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_ _ JRNMI
FISCAL YEAR 1 9 7 7

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THE BUDGET DOCUMENTS

Data and analyses relating to the budget for 1977 are published in
four documents:
The Budget of the United States Government, 1977 contains the
information that most users of the budget would normally need,
including the Budget Message of the President. The Budget presents
an overview of the President's budget proposals and includes
explanations of spending programs and estimated receipts. This
document also contains a description of the budget system and various
summary tables on the budget as a whole. (Price $3.45.)
The Budget of the United States Government, 1977—Appendix contains
detailed information on the various appropriations and funds which
comprise the budget.
The Appendix contains more detailed information than any of the
other budget documents. It includes for each agency: the proposed text
of appropriation language, budget schedules for each account, explanations of the work to be performed and the funds needed, proposed
general provisions applicable to the appropriations of entire agencies
or groups of agencies, and schedules of permanent positions. Supplementals, budget amendments, and rescissions for the current year, and
new legislative proposals, are presented separately. Information is also
provided on certain activities whose outlays are not part of the
budget totals. (Price $19.20.)
Special Analyses, Budget of the United States Government, 1977 contains 17 special analyses that are designed to highlight specified program areas or provide other significant presentations of Federal budget
data.
This document includes analytical information about: Government
finances and operations as a whole and how they affect the economy;
Government-wide program and financial information for Federal
education, training and employment, health, income security, civil
rights, and crime reduction programs; trends and developments in
the areas of Federal aid to State and local governments, research and
development, and environmental protection. (Price $2.70.)
The United States Budget in Brief, 1977 provides a more concise,
less technical overview of the 1977 budget than the above volumes.
Summary and historical tables on the Federal budget and debt are
also provided, together with graphic displays. (Price $1.15.)
GENERAL NOTES
1. All years referred to are fiscal years, unless otherwise
noted.
2. Detail in the tables, text, and charts of this volume may
not add to the totals because of rounding.




TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

PART 1. THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT
PART 2. PERSPECTIVES ON THE BUDGET.._„

Ml
1

Budget authority
Reconciliation of actual and estimated outlays that are relatively uncontrollable under
existing law
Off-budget and other fiscal activities
PART 3. ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS A N D LONG-RANGE BUDGET PROJECTIONS..
Economic assumptions
Long-range budget projections
PART 4. BUDGET RECEIPTS
Summary
Enacted and proposed tax changes
Changes in budget receipts
Receipts by source
Analysis of 1975 receipts

PART 5. THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

55
56
56
60
61
72
80
84
94
98
108
116
126
134
146
152
156
159
162
164
166

PART 6. THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS




6
10
23
24
27
39
40
41
47
48
50

. . 53
.

Functional changes in the 1977 budget
Budget trends
Tax expenditures
Other Federal fiscal activities
National defense
International affairs
General science, space, and technology
Natural resources, environment, and energy
Agriculture
Commerce and transportation
Community and regional development
Education, training, employment, and social services
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Law enforcement and justice
General government
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance
Interest
Allowances
Undistributed offsetting receipts
The budget process
Coverage of the budget totals
Budget authority and related transactions
Receipts
Other transactions
Basis for budget

3

167
168
173
174
177
179
180

figures

III

IV

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

PART 7 THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

183

Legislative branch
_____
185
The Judiciary
.
190
Executive Office of the President
193
Funds appropriated to the President
195
Department of Agriculture
200
Department of Commerce
212
Department of Defense—Military
- 217
Department of Defense—Civil
224
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
228
Department of Housing and Urban Development
237
Department of the Interior
241
Department of Justice
251
Department of Labor
253
Department of State.
_
256
Department of Transportation
260
Department of the Treasury
265
Energy Research and Development Administration
270
Environmental Protection Agency
271
General Services Administration
272
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
276
Veterans Administration
277
Other independent agencies
280
Allowances.
306
Budget totals
306
PART 8. SUMMARY TABLES
309
Explanatory note relating to the summary tables
310
Table 1. Budget summary
311
Table 2. Budget receipts, outlays, and budget authority
312
Table 3. Budget authority by agency
313
Table 4. Outlays by agency
314
Table 5. Obligations incurred, net
315
Table 6. Budget authority available through current action by Congress
316
Table 7. Outlays from budget authority available through current action by Congress
317
Table 8. Relation of budget authority to outlays
318
Table 9. Balances of budget authority
320
Table 10. Full-time permanent civilian employment in the executive branch
322
Table 11. Budget financing and outstanding debt
323
Table 12. Budget receipts by source
324
Table 13. Offsetting receipts by type
__
327
Table 14. Budget authority by function and agency
330
Table 15. Outlays by function and agency
342
Table 16. Controllability of budget outlays, 1967-77
354
Table 17. Legislative proposals for major new and expanded programs in the 1977 budget. _
356
Table 18. Budget receipts by source, 1967-77
358
Table 19. Budget outlays by function, 1967-77
360
Table 20. Federal transactions in the national income accounts, 1966-77
__
366
Table 21. Federal finances and the gross national product, 1954-77
367
Table 22. Budget receipts and outlays, 1789-1977
368
INDEX
369




PART 1

THE BUDGET MESSAGE
OF THE
PRESIDENT




Ml

BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT
To the Congress of the United States:

The Budget of the United States is a good roadmap of where we
have been, where we are now, and where we should be going as a
people. The budget reflects the President's sense of priorities. It
reflects his best judgment of how we must choose among competing
interests. And it reveals his philosophy of how the public and private
spheres should be related.
Accordingly, I have devoted a major portion of my own time
over the last several months to shaping the budget for fiscal year
1977 and laying the groundwork for the years that follow.
As I see it, the budget has three important dimensions. One is
the budget as an element of our economic policy. The total size of
the budget and the deficit or surplus that results can substantially
affect the general health of our economy—in a good way or in a
bad way. If we try to stimulate the economy beyond its capacity to
respond, it will lead only to a future whirlwind of inflation and
unemployment.
The budget I am proposing for fiscal year 1977 and the direction
I seek for the future meet the test of responsible fiscal policy. The
combination of tax and spending changes I propose will set us on a
course that not only leads to a balanced budget within three years,
but also improves the prospects for the economy to stay on a growth
path that we can sustain. This is not a policy of the quick fix; it does not
hold out the hollow promise that we can wipe out inflation and
unemployment overnight. Instead, it is an honest, realistic policy—
a policy that says we can steadily reduce inflation and unemployment
if we maintain a prudent, balanced approach. This policy has begun
to prove itself in recent months as we have made substantial headway
in pulling out of the recession and reducing the rate of inflation; it
will prove itself decisively if we stick to it.
A second important dimension of the budget is that it helps to
define the boundaries between responsibilities that we assign to
governments and those that remain in the hands of private institutions and individual citizens.
Over the years, the growth of government has been gradual and
uneven, but the trend is unmistakable. Although the predominant
growth has been at the State and local level, the Federal Government has contributed to the trend too. We must not continue driftM3




M4

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

ing in the direction of bigger and bigger government. The driving
force of our 200-year history has been our private sector. If we rely
on it and nurture it, the economy will continue to grow, providing
new and better choices for our people and the resources necessary
to meet our shared needs. If, instead, we continue to increase government's share of our economy, we will have no choice but to raise
taxes and will, in the process, dampen further the forces of competition, risk, and reward that have served us so well. With stagnation
of these forces, the issues of the future would surely be focused on
who gets what from an economy of little or no growth rather than,
as it should be, on the use to be made of expanding incomes and
resources.
As an improtant step toward reversing the long-term trend, my
budget for 1977 proposes to cut the rate of Federal spending growth,
year to year, to 5.5%—less than half the average growth rate we
have experienced in the last 10 years. At the same time, I am proposing further, permanent income tax reductions so that individuals
and businesses can spend and invest these dollars instead of having
the Federal Government collect and spend them.
A third important dimension of the budget is the way it sorts out
priorities. In formulating this budget, I have tried to achieve
fairness and balance:
—between the taxpayer and those who will benefit by Federal
spending;
—between national security and other pressing needs;
—between our own generation and the world we want to leave
to our children;
—between those in some need and those most in need;
—between the programs we already have and those we would
like to have;
—between aid to individuals and aid to State and local governments ;
—between immediate implementation of a good idea and the
need to allow time for transition;
—between the desire to solve our problems quickly and the
realization that for some problems, good solutions will take
more time; and
—between Federal control and direction to assure achievement of
common goals and the recognition that State and local governments and individuals may do as well or better without
restraints.
Clearly, one of the highest priorities for our Government is always
to secure the defense of our country. There is no alternative. If we




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M5

in the Federal Government fail in this responsibility, our other
objectives are meaningless.
Accordingly, I am recommending a significant increase in defense
spending for 1977. If in good conscience I could propose less, I
would. Great good could be accomplished with other uses of these
dollars. My request is based on a careful assessment of the international situation and the contingencies we must be prepared to
meet. The amounts I seek will provide the national defense it now
appears we need. We dare not do less. And if our efforts to secure
international arms limitations falter, we will need to do more.
Assuring our Nation's needs for energy must also be among our
highest priorities. My budget gives that priority.
While providing fully for our defense and energy needs, I have
imposed upon these budgets the same discipline that I have applied
in reviewing other programs. Savings have been achieved in a
number of areas. We cannot tolerate waste in any program.
In our domestic programs, my objective has been to achieve a
balance between all the things we would like to do and those things
we can realistically afford to do. The hundreds of pages that spell
out the details of my program proposals tell the story, but some
examples illustrate the point.
I am proposing that we take steps to address the haunting fear of
our elderly that a prolonged, serious illness could cost them and
their children everything they have. My medicare reform proposal
would provide protection against such catastrophic health costs.
No elderly person would have to pay over $500 per year for covered
hospital or nursing home care, and no more than $250 per year for
covered physician services. To offset the costs of this additional
protection and to slow down the runaway increases in federally
funded medical expenses, I am recommending adjustments to the
medicare program so that within the new maximums beneficiaries
contribute more to the costs of their care than they do now.
My budget provides a full cost-of-living increase for those receiving social security or other Federal retirement benefits. We must
recognize, however, that the social security trust fund is becoming
depleted. To restore its integrity, I am asking the Congress to raise
social security taxes, effective January 1, 1977, and to adopt certain
other reforms of the system. Higher social security taxes and the
other reforms I am proposing may be controversial, but they are
the right thing to do. The American people understand that we
must pay for the things we want. I know that those who are working now want to be sure that the money will be there to pay their
benefits when their working days are over.




M6

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

My budget also proposes that we replace 59 grant programs with
broad block grants in four important areas:
—A health block grant that will consolidate medicaid and 15
other health programs. States will be able to make their own
priority choices for use of these Federal funds to help lowincome people with their health needs.
—An education block grant that will consolidate 27 grant programs for education into a single flexible Federal grant to
States, primarily for use in helping disadvantaged and handicapped children.
—A block grant for feeding needy children that will consolidate
15 complex and overlapping programs. Under existing programs, 700,000 needy children receive no benefits. Under my
program, all needy children can be fed, but subsidies for the
nonpoor will be eliminated.
—A block grant that will support a community's social service
programs for the needy. This would be accomplished by
removing current requirements unnecessarily restricting the
flexibility of States in providing such services.
These initiatives will result in more equitable distribution of
Federal dollars, and provide greater State discretion and responsibility. All requirements that States match Federal funds will be
eliminated. Such reforms are urgently needed, but my proposals
recognize that they will, in some cases, require a period of transition.
These are only examples. My budget sets forth many other recommendations. Some involve new initiatives. Others seek restraint.
The American people know that promises that the Federal Government will do more for them every year have not been kept. I make no
such promises. I offer no such illusion: This budget does not shrink
from hard choices where necessary. Notwithstanding those hard
choices, I believe this budget reflects a forward-looking spirit that
is in keeping with our heritage as we begin our Nation's third
century.
GERALD R. FORD.
JANUARY 21,




1976.




PART 2

PERSPECTIVES
ON THE BUDGET

PERSPECTIVES ON THE BUDGET
This part presents the budget totals and explains briefly several
topics that help to place the budget in perspective.
THE BUDGET TOTALS
[In billions of dollars]
Description

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Budget receipts

281.0

297.5

81.9

351.3

Budget outlays

324.6

373.5

98.0

394.2

-43.6

-76.0

-16.1

-43.0

412.1

408.4

88.1

433.4

Deficit ( - )
Budget authority

One of the sections that follows compares the original estimates
of certain 1975 outlays with the actual results for that year. This
comparison demonstrates several key points:
—Budget outlays and receipts for the current and future years are
estimates.
—The President's budget is his principal statement of priorities for
the Federal Government and is predicated on acceptance of his
proposals for appropriations, for legislative change, and for
deferrals and rescissions
—For a variety of reasons, the estimates now presented will undergo
change as we move closer to 1977 and then into that year.
Notwithstanding every effort to refine and apply the best estimating
techniques available, the estimates set forth in the budget will turn
out to be different from the actual figures recorded at the end of 1977—
a year and 8 months away. There will be many reasons for the differences. Economic assumptions, covered in Part 3, rarely are precisely
accurate. Differences between actual economic conditions and those
assumed can materially affect both outlays and receipts. Furthermore,
in many programs benefits are paid automatically to those who meet
specified criteria. Thus, the rate at which individuals or States and
localities apply for benefits can have a major effect on the level of
Federal spending. Particularly in the case of new programs, or programs that have recently undergone substantial change, the number
of eligible applicants is difficult to predict accurately. Finally, congressional action on or affecting the budget, subsequent Presidential
decisions, and other factors can also cause substantial changes to the
budget estimates.
This part also discusses certain concepts not directly reflected in
total budget outlays but very closely related, such as the off-budget
Federal agencies and the privately owned Government-sponsored
2




PERSPECTIVES

3

enterprises. Finally, it covers the concepts of Federal funds and trust
funds, and Federal debt. These discussions demonstrate strongly that
budget outlays and budget authority give only a part, albeit a fundamental part, of the picture with respect to the financial position
and plans of the Federal Government.
Differing perspectives on both the totals and the details are also
presented in this part and throughout the budget documents by use of
different classifications. While the details of the budget are shown by
agency and by budget account, the major classification of the budget
totals is in terms of functions or purposes being served. As is noted in
the introduction to Part 5 of this document, the functional classification has taken on a major new role now that the Congress is using it as
a basis for budget review.
One additional perspective is crucial. Where we are headed in the
next few years—particularly as to the growth in Federal spending—
is determined in large measure by substantive laws and appropriations already enacted and programmatic actions already taken. For
example, many billions of outlays represent payment of obligations
that must be met. These include interest on the public debt and payments coming due on a wide variety of contracts already signed. The
Federal Government is committed to future payments for bridges,
dams, water reclamation projects, waterways, military equipment,
sewage treatment plants, research and development, subsidies for
lower income housing, community development projects, and much
more. About one-quarter of 1977 outlays are so committed. Moreover,
major Federal responsibilities often cannot be altered rapidly. It is
possible to increase or decrease outlays for our national parks, the
Forest Service, or the Department of the Treasury, but sharply curtailing or eliminating such activities in a short period of time is not
practical.
It is for this reason that the budget document has increasingly
emphasized projections for the years beyond the budget year. Part 3
of this document contains estimates through 1981, as now required by
the Congressional Budget Act. Even greater emphasis has been placed
on future budget trends by including in the discussion of the budget
by function, in Part 5, specific references to 1978 outlays where the
outyear impact is particularly important.
The sections in this part of the volume are also complemented by
Part 6, which summarizes the budget process and defines the most
significant terms used in the budget documents.
BUDGET AUTHORITY
The Congress must provide budget authority, generally in the form
of appropriations, before Federal agencies can obligate the Government to make outlays. For 1977, a total of $433.4 billion of new budget
authority is recommended.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977
BUDGET AUTHORITY
[In billions of dollars]
Description

1975
actual

1976
TQ
estimate estimate

1977
estimate

Available through current action by the Congress:

Enacted and pending:
Appropriations
Supplemental requests pending
Rescissions pending
Proposed in this budget:
1977 appropriation requests
Amendments to 1976 and TQ appropriations
Supplemental requests
To be requested separately:
Under existing legislation
Upon enactment of proposed legislation
Allowances:
Civilian agencies1
Department of Defense—Military 2

__

Subtotal, available through current action by
the Congress
Available

without

current action

(permanent authorizations):3
Trust funds (existing law)
Interest on the public debt
Other
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total, budget authority.

by

the

271.1

248.4
*

49.8 _
*

-2.3

-.3

2.4
7.5

.4
2.1

1.4

1.2
.9

.1
-.1

.6
2.1

.2
.1

.2
*

2.6
1.6

271.1

258.3

52.2

268.3

128.7
32.7
19.8
-40.2
-40.2

143.3
37.7
23.3
-54.3

33.6
10.4
2.5
-10.7

164.1
45.0
18.3
-62.4

412.1

408.4

88.1

433.4

260.0

Congress

"'Less than $50 million.
Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.
Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Allowances for relatively uncontrollable programs with permanent authorizations are estimated
at zero.
1
2
3

Congressional action on $ 268.3 billion of the new budget authorityproposed for 1977 is required for it to become available. The remaining
$165.1 billion will be available under existing laws. Such latter authority consists mainly of trust fund receipts, which in most programs
are automatically appropriated by existing law, and interest on the
public debt, for which budget authority is automatically provided
under a permanent appropriation enacted in 1847.
Not all of the new budget authority for 1977 will be obligated or
spent in that year.
• Budget authority for most trust funds authorizes the expenditure
of the funds' receipts from special taxes and contributions and
from Federal fund payments to the trust funds, to be used as




PERSPECTIVES

needed over a period of years for benefit payments and other
purposes specified by law.
• Budget authority for many construction and procurement
programs covers the estimated full cost of projects at the time
they are started, although the outlays will occur over a number
of years as work on the projects progresses.
• Budget authority for the subsidized housing programs is equal to
the maximum Federal payment expected under new authority to
make contracts, which extend over long periods of up to 40 years.
• Budget authority for many direct loan programs provides financing for a period of years; budget authority for many insurance
and guaranteed loan programs consists of amounts to be used only
in the event of defaults or other claims on the programs.
As a result of these factors, a substantial amount of budget authority
carries over from one year to the next. Most of this is earmarked for
specific uses and is not available for new program proposals.
Relation of Budget Authority to Outlays —1977 Budget
Figures in brackets represent Federal funds only
$ Billions

New Authority ^
Recommended '
for 1977
r—
433.4

W Unspent Authority
Enacted in
Prior Years
510.5
[344.9]

To be spent in 1977

281.3
[231.8]

[286.2]

T o be spent
in Future Y e a r s

402.7
[295.6]

NOTE; The rfiffftr^e befwwuhe fotd bad** %«»* w dfecfattifond*dwwn in brocks amsisfe a* *m*tendsam* i«




Outlays
in 1977
394.2

Unspent Authority^
for Outlays in
Future Years

554.8
[375.7]

6

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

As shown in the preceding chart, $112.9 billion of outlays in 1977,
29% of the total, will be made under budget authority enacted in
previous years. Conversely, $152.1 billion of the new budget authority
proposed for 1977, which is 35% of the total amount proposed, will
not result in outlays until future years. Some budget authority will be
written off and expire without being spent.
Once budget authority is provided, the Congressional Budget and
Impoundment Control Act requires that any amounts withheld from
use must be reported to the Congress in rescission or deferral messages.
The Congress may require release of funds by overturning the proposed
deferral or by not taking action on the proposed rescission of budget
authority.
RECONCILIATION OF ACTUAL AND ESTIMATED OUTLAYS
THAT ARE RELATIVELY UNCONTROLLABLE UNDER
EXISTING LAW
This section of the budget explains the differences between the
actual 1975 outlays for major programs that have relatively uncontrollable outlays and the amounts estimated in the 1975 budget, which
was transmitted to the Congress in February 1974.
Outlays are defined as relatively uncontrollable in any one year
when the President's decisions in that year can neither increase nor
decrease them without a change in substantive law. That is, under
existing law these outlays depend generally upon factors that are
beyond administrative control, such as benefit payments that beneficiaries are entitled to by law or contractual agreements or other
legally binding commitments that have already been made.
The amounts estimated in the budget for relatively uncontrollable
outlays may differ from the actual outlays for a number of reasons.
For example, legislation may change benefit rates or coverage; the
number of beneficiaries under a program may differ from the number
estimated; or economic conditions (such as the interest rates required
for Federal borrowing) may differ from what was assumed.
The following table shows the differences between actual outlays
for relatively uncontrollable programs in 1975 and the estimated
amounts shown in the 1975 budget. The list of such programs in this
table is the same as in table 16 (Controllability of Budget Outlays) in
Part 8 of this year's budget.
The February 1974 estimate of uncontrollable outlays did not
include the outlay effect of legislation then being proposed. This is
standard practice consistent with the definition of uncontrollable
outlays stated above. Where legislation was enacted that significantly
affected relatively uncontrollable outlays in 1975, it is identified in the
discussion below.




PERSPECTIVES

As the table shows, actual outlays for relatively uncontrollable
programs were $12.1 billion higher than originally estimated. T h e two
components of this total, open-ended programs and fixed costs and
outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations, accounted for
$13.7 billion and —$1.6 billion of this difference, respectively. The
former programs are composed mainly of benefit programs, grants, and
subsidies for which eligibility is automatic or fixed b y law; interest
payments; and payments for the legislative and judicial branches,
which the President must—by law—include in the budget without
change.
RELATIVELY UNCONTROLLABLE OUTLAYS FOR 1975
[In billions of dollars]
February
1974
estimate

Description

Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals:
Social security and railroad retirement
Federal employees' retirement and insurance
(Military retired pay)
(Other)
Unemployment assistance
Veterans benefits: Pensions, compensation, education, and
insurance
Medicare and medicaid
Housing payments
Public assistance and related programs
Subtotal, payments for individuals
Net interest
General revenue sharing
Farm price supports (CCC)
Other open-ended programs and fixed costs

^

Total, open-ended programs and fixed costs

Change
from
1974
estimate

67.2
13.3
2 (6.0)
3(7.3)
7.5

168.4
13.3
(6.2)
(7.1)
14.0

1.2
*
(.2)
(-.2)
6.5

9. 6
20. 8
2. 3
4
15.4

12.4
21.6
2.1
16.9

2.9
.9
-.2
1.5

2 4

135.9
22.0
6.2
.9
8.1

148.7
23.3
6.1
.6
8.0

12.9
1.3
-.1
4
-.1

2 4

173. 1

186.8

13. 7

23.7
28.6

23.6
27.1

-.1
—1.5

52. 3

50. 7

—1.6

Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations:5
National defense
Civilian programs
Total, outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations
Total, relatively uncontrollable outlays

Actual

2 4

225.4

237.5

12.1

*Less than $50 million.
Includes $1.7 billion of special benefits resulting from the Tax Reduction Act of 1975.
Based on controllability classification used in the 1977 budget. Additional outlays of $0.3
billion, which had been projected in February 1974 to result from automatic cost-of-living increases under existing law, are now included as uncontrollable outlays.
3
Incorrectly shown as $7.1 billion in the 1975 budget.
4
Based on controllability classification used in the 1977 budget. Additional outlays of $1.3 billion,
which was the 1974 outlay projection for the child nutrition programs, are now included as relatively uncontrollable outlays.
6
Excludes prior-year contracts and obligations for activities show above as "open-ended programs and fixed costs."
1
2

210-000 O - 76 - 2




8

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Most of the $12.9 billion underestimate in payments for individuals
can be explained by differences between assumed and actual economic
conditions and the effects of new legislation. Over a third of this
amount can be explained by the effect on outlays of a higher than assumed rate of unemployment. This higher rate is responsible for most
of the outlay increase in unemployment assistance and part of the
increase in both public assistance and veterans readjustment outlays.
Changes in law subsequent to the budget submission also account
for over a third of the underestimate in payments for individuals.
Social security and railroad retirement outlays were $1.2 billion
greater than originally estimated. The Tax Reduction Act of 1975
(Public Law 94-12) increased social security and railroad retirement
outlays $1.7 billion by providing a $50 payment to beneficiaries of
these and certain other programs. Railroad retirement outlays were
higher by an additional $0.3 billion due to benefit increases enacted
by the Railroad Retirement Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-58). Partially
offsetting these increases was a $0.8 billion reduction in social
security benefits due to a smaller number of beneficiaries than
originally estimated.
Outlays for Federal employees' retirement and insurance were
almost the same as estimated in the 1975 budget. There were, however, offsetting changes in the component programs, consisting of
a $0.2 billion overestimate for the civilian retirement programs and
a $0.2 billion underestimate for military retired pay. The lower outlays for civilian retirement resulted from overestimates of the number
of annuitants ( — $0.3 billion) and of the amount of refunds to workers
leaving Federal employment ( — $0.1 billion), partially offset by a $0.2
billion increase due to higher than expected inflation. Military retired
pay was underestimated by $0.2 billion due to the higher rate of inflation.
The largest revision in uncontrollable outlays was the $6.5 billion
increase in unemployment assistance. The original estimate assumed
an unemployment rate of 5.7% for 1975, as compared to the actual
rate of 7.3%. This higher rate increased unemployment assistance
outlays by about $4 billion, given the benefit coverage assumed in
the original estimate, and an underestimate in the benefits and coverage under then existing law contributed about $1 billion. In addition,
the higher unemployment prompted legislation that extended the
length of entitlement to benefit payments beyond the time workers
would normally be eligible and provided benefits to workers not previously covered (Public Laws 93-567 and 93-572). The legislation
added $1.5 billion to the original estimate.
Outlays for veterans benefits were $2.9 billion above the original
estimate. The Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974 (Public




PERSPECTIVES

9

Law 93-508) extended the coverage and amount of education benefits
above what was estimated in the 1975 budget. The 22.7% increase in
monthly payments and the extension of some entitlements for an additional 9 months are the major components of the act that added
nearly $1.0 billion to the 1975 outlay estimate. Passage of the Veterans
and Survivors Pension Adjustment Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-527),
which increased income limitations and liberalized provisions relating
to payment of pensions and survivors' compensation, added $0.2
billion to 1975 outlays. In addition, outlays were increased $1.7 billion
due to an unanticipated increase in beneficiary caseloads in the
readjustment, compensation, and pension programs and higher than
expected average benefit levels in the latter two programs.
Outlays for medicare were $0.6 billion higher than estimated and
those for medicaid were $0.3 billion higher. The increased outlays for
medicare resulted largely from greater than anticipated increases in
enrollee utilization rates (for example, number of hospital days or
physician visits per enrollee) under the hospital insurance (HI) and
supplemental medical insurance (SMI) programs. The HI utilization
rate for 1975 was estimated to increase by 0.7%, as compared to an
actual increase of 5.0%. For SMI, the estimated utilization rate increase was 1.7%, as compared to an actual increase of 7.2%. A higher
than expected rise in medical costs also contributed to the underestimate of medicare outlays in 1975 and was the primary factor that
resulted in underestimating medicaid outlays.
Housing payments were $0.2 billion less than anticipated in the
1975 budget because the number of previously approved subsidized
housing units that actually became available for occupancy in 1975
was smaller than expected.
Public assistance outlays in 1975, which include public assistance
cash payments, food stamps, and child nutrition programs, were $1.5
billion higher than estimated. Increased caseloads and higher average
benefit levels in the public assistance cash payments program accounted
for $0.6 billion of the increase, while higher than expected participation
in the food stamp program increased outlays by $0.7 billion. Increases
beyond what had been assumed for the rate of inflation and for the
program participation rate in the child nutrition programs account for
the remaining $0.2 billion of the underestimate.
Net interest in 1975 was $1.3 billion above the original estimate.
This is almost entirely due to more debt being held by the public
than originally estimated. At the beginning of 1975, some 5 months
after the budget submission, debt held by the public was $346 billion,
very near the original estimate. However, by the end of the fiscal
year, debt held by the public was $397 billion, $38 billion more than
the original estimate of $359 billion.




10

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

As a result of lower than anticipated agricultural output, especially
grains, commodity prices were higher than expected. This reduced
outlays for price support loans by $0.6 billion and export credits by
$0.1 billion. However, another result of the smaller crop was to
increase outlays for direct payments by $0.4 billion above the budget
estimate. The net effect was a $350 million lower outlay total for farm
price supports than had been estimated in the 1975 budget.
Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations were $1.6 billion
lower than originally estimated in the 1975 budget. The major underestimate was for the Department of Housing and Urban Development ($1.8 billion) and the larger overestimates were for the Environmental Protection Agency (—$1.7 billion), the Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare (—$1.0 billion), and the Department of
Transportation (—$1.0 billion).
OFF-BUDGET AND OTHER FISCAL ACTIVITIES
The budget does not include a number of fiscal activities of the
Federal Government that result in spending similar to budget outlays.
Two major exclusions—the off-budget activities of Federal agencies
and the activities of privately owned Government-sponsored enterprises 1—-are discussed in some detail below. 2 Federal and federally
assisted credit activities, only part of which (direct loans) is on budget,
also have significant effects on the economy. The Federal debt has
become, of course, a major force in the financial markets. These
topics, too, are discussed below.
OFF-BUDGET AND OTHER FISCAL ACTIVITIES
[In billions of dollars]

Description
Outlays:
Off-budget Federal agencies._
Government-sponsored enterprises
Outstanding Federal and federally assisted
credit, end of fiscal period: 1
Direct loans-on budget
Direct loans—off budget
Guaranteed and insured loans 2
Government-sponsored enterprise loans..
Outstanding debt, end of fiscal period:
Gross Federal debt
Debt held by the public
1
2

1974
actual

1975
actual

1976
est.

TQ
est.

2.7
14.5

1977
est.

9.5
7.0

9.3
8.1

4.0
4.3

11.1
14.6

46.0
15.4
153.0
71.1

49.8
24.4
158.7
79.6

54.1
32.3
171.8
88.6

55.2
35.6
172.2
92.9

68.8
34.4
174.6
109.6

486.2
346.1

544.1
396.9

633.9
484.4

652.8
504.4

719.5
558. 2

See Special Analysis E, Federal Credit Programs, published in a separate volume.
Excludes loans held by Government accounts and Government-sponsored enterprises.

1 Detailed financial statements for these organizations are contained in Annexed Budgets,
Part IV of the Appendix, Budget of the United States Government. Fiscal Year 1977.
2
The Exchange Stabilization Fund and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
(but not the Federal Reserve banks) are Federal entities. They are excluded from the budget and
from this discussion.




PERSPECTIVES

11

Outlays of off-budget Federal agencies and
Governmentsponsored enterprises.—Of-budget Federal agencies are federally
owned and controlled, but their transactions have been excluded from
the budget totals under provisions of law. Therefore, their fiscal activities are not reflected in either budget outlays or the budget surplus or
deficit, and appropriation requests for their activities are not included
in the totals of budget authority. The debt of these agencies is part of
the gross Federal debt but is not subject to the statutory debt limit.
As shown in the table on page 16, the outlays of the off-budget Federal
agencies are added to the unified budget deficit to comprise the total
Government deficit that has to be financed by borrowing from the
public or by other means.
The first off-budget agency excluded from the unified budget was
the Export-Import Bank (excluded by statute as of August 17, 1971).
This removal was the first departure from the concept of the unified
budget, which had been adopted for 1969 and which combined the
administrative budget with the substantial trust fund activity of the
Federal Government. Since 1972 further departures from a unified
budget have occurred. The Postal Service fund, the Rural Telephone
Bank, the lending activities that became the Rural Electrification and
Telephone revolving fund, and the Housing for the Elderly or Handicapped fund were removed from the budget. The Environmental
Financing Authority fund,3 the Federal Financing Bank, the United
States Railway Association, and the Pension Benefit Guaranty
Corporation were established off-budget.
Under legislation proposed last fall, the Energy Independence
Authority would be established as a Government corporation to assist
the development of domestic sources of energy. While transactions of
the corporation will be off-budget, the net gains or losses of the Authority will be recorded in the budget.
According to current law the Export-Import Bank will be returned
to the budget as of October 1, 1976, the beginning of fiscal year 1977.
Legislation has been proposed to make a similar, though partial, shift
for the United States Railway Association. Its lending program for
ConRail, which will comprise almost all of its outlays, will be onbudget starting later in 1976. The budget totals currently include the
administrative expenses of the Rural Electrification Administration
lending programs and of the United States Railway Association, and
they also include the subsidies paid to the Postal Service.
3
The Environmental Financing Authority expired on June 30, 1975, without having conducted
any operations.




12

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

While the budget authority and outlays of off-budget activities are
excluded from the budget totals, not all of these activities are excluded
from Presidential and congressional review. For example, limits to the
amount of new lending by the Rural Electrification and Telephone revolving fund are set annually by law, and the outstanding debt and
annual borrowing of the Postal Service are limited by statute.
In many cases there is little or no justification for off-budget
treatment. The Congressional Budget Act of 1974 calls for the Committees on the Budget of the House of Representatives and the
Senate to study on a continuing basis those provisions of law that
exclude any outlays of Federal agencies from the budget and to report
to their respective Houses their recommendations for terminating or
modifying such provisions.
Government-sponsored enterprises were established and chartered by
the Federal Government to perform specialized functions. The earlier
enterprises were all created with partial or full Government ownership
and direct Government control, but, in time, they were converted to
private ownership and some new enterprises were created as privately
owned institutions. The current rule governing the budget treatment
of these enterprises was established in 1967 in accordance with a
recommendation by the President's Commission on Budget Concepts.
The Commission, whose report led to the adoption of the unified
budget, recommended that the budget exclude those Governmentsponsored enterprises that are entirely privately owned.
The Federal Land Banks and Federal Home Loan Banks had both
become entirely privately owned a number of years before the unified
budget was adopted and therefore have always been excluded. The
Federal National Mortgage Association, the Banks for Cooperatives,
and the Federal Intermediate Credit Banks became wholly privately
owned by repaying their Federal equity capital during 1969 and were
accordingly removed from the budget. The Federal Home Loan
Mortgage Corporation and the Student Loan Marketing Association
were subsequently established with full private ownership.
Except for the Postal Service and the Pension Benefit Guaranty
Corporation, the excluded outlays of both the off-budget Federal
agencies and the Government-sponsored enterprises are incurred for
carrying out loan programs. These programs are similar to the direct
loan programs in the unified budget. The outlays of most of these
programs are roughly equal to the difference between new loans
disbursed and repayments of principal. For example, during 1975
new loans disbursed by the excluded programs were $47.7 billion
and repayments were $29.5 billion, for an increase in loans outstanding of $18.2 billion. In comparison, the outlays of these excluded
loan programs were $16.5 billion.




PERSPECTIVES

13

COMPARISON OF OUTLAYS FOR THE UNIFIED BUDGET, OFF-BUDGET FEDERAL
AGENCIES, AND GOVERNMENT-SPONSORED ENTERPRISES
[In billions of dollars]
Outlays i
Fiscal year

Unified
budget

Off-budget
Federal

Governmentsponsored

1954
1955

70.9
68.5

-0.3
.2

1956
1957
1958
1959
1960

70.5
76.7
82.6
92.1
92.2

.4
.1

-.5

1961
1962
1963
1964
1965

97.8
106.8
111.3
118.6
118.4

-.3
1.1
.5
1.8
1.2

1966
1967
1968
1969
1970

134.7
158.3
178.8
184.5
196.6

1.9
-2.9
1.7
4.3
9.6

1971
1972
1973
1974
1975

211.4
231.9
246.5
268.4
324.6

0.1
.6
2.7
9.5

4.4
11.4
14.5
7.0

1976 estimate
TQ estimate
1977 estimate

373.5
98,0
394.2

9.3
4.0
11.1

8.1
4.3
14.6

1.1
.4

*

*Less than $50 million.
1
To prevent double-counting, outlays of off-budget Federal agencies exclude loans to other offbudget Federal agencies and to other Federal agencies; and outlays of Government-sponsored
enterprises exclude loans to other Government-sponsored enterprises and loans to or from Federal
agencies.
2
The 1972—74 data have been revised for the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to reflect
the reclassification of sales of participation certificates as borrowing rather than as asset sales.

Like direct loans in the budget, the loans of the excluded programs
are designed to allocate economic resources toward particular uses.
Under certain circumstances they also provide some stimulus to
aggregate economic activity, although this is offset to a degree because
their net lending has to be financed largely by borrowing from the
financial markets just as does a deficit in the budget. The off-budget
Federal agencies support a variety of program functions both through




14

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

their direct operations and, in the case of the Federal Financing Bank,
through the purchase of debt securities issued by several agencies
and the purchase of obligations guaranteed under a number of Government programs. Part 5 of the budget, "The Federal Program
by Function," shows the outlays of most of the off-budget Federal
agencies by function and discusses some of their more significant
activities. The Government-sponsored enterprises primarily support
housing but also support agriculture and higher education.
In the preceding table, the excluded outlays of the off-budget
Federal agencies and the privately owned Government-sponsored
enterprises are compared with the unified budget outlays.4 The outlays
of the off-budget agencies began at a negligible amount in 1972 but
have grown rapidly since then, in large part because more off-budget
agencies have been created. The following table shows the extent
to which the off-budget outlays in 1974-77 are due to one agency,
the Federal Financing Bank (in billions of dollars):
1974
actual

Federal Financing Bank
Other off-budget Federal agencies
Total

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

6.4
3.2

5.6
3.8

2.8

2.6

1.3

8.2
2.9

2.7

9.5

9.3

4.0

11.1

0.1

The outlays of the Federal Financing Bank reflect only its purchases
of Government-guaranteed obligations, not its purchases of agency
debt, in order to prevent double counting. For 1977 the Federal
Financing Bank outlays are estimated to be three-fourths of the total
outlays of the off-budget Federal agencies. Federal Financing Bank
outlays make up almost two-thirds of the total during the rest of
the 1975-77 period. The next largest sources of off-budget outlays are
the Postal Service, the Export-Import Bank until its return to the
budget in 1977, and the Energy Independence Authority in 1977.
Altogether, the outlays of off-budget Federal agencies equaled 2.9%
of budget outlays in 1975 and are estimated to equal 2.5% in 1976 and
2.8% in 1977.
The outlays of the privately owned Government-sponsored enterprises have likewise grown—from relatively small amounts in the
early 1960's to an average of $7.5 billion, or 2.9% of budget outlays,
during 1971-75, when more Government sponsored enterprises were
outside the budget. In 1976 and 1977 these enterprises are expected
to spend $8.1 billion and $14.6 billion, respectively, equal to 3.1% of
budget outlays over the period.
4
The historical data for unified budget outlays include off-budget Federal agencies for any years
when they were in the budget and include Government-sponsored enterprises for periods when
they had any Government ownership.




PERSPECTIVES

15

Guaranteed and insured loans.—Federal and federally assisted
credit has a significant influence on resource allocation. Direct loans
by on-budget agencies are part of total outlays. Direct loans by offbudget agencies (discussed above) and federally guaranteed loans
are not measured in the budget totals. Credit guarantees allocate
economic resources toward particular uses, especially housing, and
under certain circumstances provide some stimulus to total spending
in the economy. The impact of guaranteed loans on the economy is
difficult to assess, since some portion of the private loans that are
guaranteed would be made anyway and since those private loans that
would not otherwise have been made tend to divert credit away from
other economic activities.
The outstanding guaranteed loans held by the public are large and
have grown substantially each year. At the end of 1975 they were
$158.7 billion. They are expected to grow $13.1 billion in 1976, $0.4
billion in the transition quarter, and $2.4 billion in 1977, reaching
the sum of $174.6 billion by the end of 1977. These figures include
the full amount of all loans guaranteed in whole or in part with respect
to payment of the principal or the interest. In addition to the $16.0
billion increase in guaranteed loans that will be held by the public
during 1976-77, the total held by the Federal Financing Bank, other
Federal agencies, and Government-sponsored enterprises is estimated
to increase by $18.9 billion. The latter amount is reflected in the outlays of the Federal agencies and Government-sponsored enterprises that
buy these loans. Many loan guarantee programs are discussed by
function in Part 5 of the budget; and loan guarantees generally are
analyzed further in Special Analysis E, "Federal Credit Programs." 5
Taxation.—Several other fiscal activities not measured in the
budget also have economic impacts. Taxation affects the economy
not only by providing the Government with receipts, which the
budget does measure, but also by changing the, allocation of resources
among private uses and the distribution of income among individuals.
The private economy may be significantly affected both by the
relative importance of the various taxes and also by the structure of
each of the different taxes that are levied. Some aspects of the structures of the individual and corporation income taxes—exclusions,
exemptions, deductions, credits, preferential rates, and deferrals—are
discussed as "tax expenditures" at several places in Part 5 of the
budget, including the introduction, and in Special Analysis F, "Tax
Expenditures." 6
«See Special Analyses. Budget of the United States Government. Fiscal Year 1977.
•Ibid.




16

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Budget funds and the Federal debt.—The budget is divided between two major groups of funds: Federal funds and trust funds.
The Federal funds are derived mainly from taxes and borrowing.
Most of these funds are not restricted by law to any specific Government purpose. The trust funds, on the other hand, collect certain
taxes and other receipts for specified purposes, such as the payment
of social security and unemployment insurance benefits. 7
BUDGET FINANCING AND CHANGE IN DEBT OUTSTANDING
[In billions of dolhirs]
Description

1975

1976

TQ

Budget surplus or deficit (—) _
Surplus or deficit (—) of off-budget Federal agencies. _ _

-43.6
-9.5

-76.0
-9.3

-16.1
-4.0

-43.0
-11.1

-53.1

-85.3

-20.1

-54.0

-.3

-1.4

1.4
.6
.6

.2
-1.6
.7

.1
-.2
.2

.4
-.6
.7

2.3

-2.2

.1

.5

-50.9

-87.5

-20.0

-53.5

Total, surplus or deficit (—)_

1977

Means of financing other than borrowing from the
public:

Decrease or increase (—) in cash and monetary assets
Increase or decrease (—) in liabilities for:
Checks outstanding, etc _
_
Deposit fund balances
_
_
Seigniorage on coins
Total, means of financing other than borrowing
from the public _ _
Total, requirements for borrowing from the
public
Reclassification of securities 1

Change in Federal agency investments in Federal
debt:
Federal funds
Trust funds
Off-budget Federal agencies.
Total, change in Federal agency investments in
Federal debt _
___

87.5

20.0

53.8

.9

.9

7.1

.2
-1.2

-1.0

2.0
-.6

-.1

.5
12.4
*

7.0

2.3

-1.1

12.9

57.9

89.8

18.9

66.7

50.9

Change in debt held by the public _

Change in gross Federal debt__

-.3

_

*Less than $50 million.
1
On October 1, 1976. Federal debt held by the public is estimated to increase by $0.3 billion due to
a reclassification of Export-Import Bank certihcates of benehcial interest from asset sales to debt.
7
Data for Federal funds and trust funds are presented in Special Analysis B, "Funds in the
Budget," in Special Analyses, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 1977.




PERSPECTIVES

17

The budget combines the receipts and outlays of the Federal funds
and trust funds and deducts the various transactions that occur
between them. It therefore generally displays the net transactions of
the Federal Government with the public. Thus, as is shown in the
previous table, the unified budget surplus or deficit is the principal
determinant of the change in Federal debt held by the public.8 Since
1974, however, the deficits of the Federal Financing Bank and the
other off-budget Federal agencies have also become an important
determinant of the change in Federal debt held by the public. The
transactions of the off-budget Federal agencies have been excluded
from the budget under provisions of law and are not part of either
the Federal funds or the trust funds grouping.
The deficit expected for 1977 and the other factors noted in the
preceding table will increase the Federal debt held by the public from
$504.4 billion at the end of the transition quarter to $558.2 billion at
the end of 1977.
Gross Federal debt is the sum of the debt held by the public and
the debt held by the Government itself, such as the investments in
Treasury debt by the social security trust funds. The Federal funds
deficit is the principal determinant of changes in gross Federal debt,
but the off-budget Federal agencies also have an important effect.
Gross Federal debt is estimated to rise from $652.8 billion on
September 30, 1976, to $719.5 billion on September 30, 1977. As the
lower section of the preceding table indicates, $12.9 billion of thii
increase will be in debt held by trust funds and other Federal agencies,
reflecting mainly the investment of trust fund surpluses in Treasury
debt.
The gross Federal debt consists almost entirely of securities issued
by the Treasury Department. However, a few Government agencies
are authorized to issue their own debt instruments to the public or
to other Government agencies and funds. This borrowing is part of
the gross Federal debt. At the end of 1975 the outstanding debt of
such agencies that was held by the public was $9.0 billion. This debt
is expected to fall by small amounts in 1976 and 1977 due to the operations of the Federal Financing Bank, which buys most new issues of
agency debt and finances its purchases through Treasury borrowing.
8

Federal debt held by the public includes debt held by the Federal Reserve System.




18

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

To prevent double counting, these holdings are not included in gross
Federal debt. Consequently, the change in agency debt is largely
determined by the repayment of securities that have matured.
Almost all Treasury debt issues are covered by a statutory debt
limit, but most borrowing by Federal agencies other than the Treasury
is excluded from this limit. The ceiling on the debt subject to limit is
temporarily $595 billion but under existing law is scheduled to return
to the permanent limit of $400 billion on March 16, 1976. To permit
the Federal Government to meet its obligations, this ceiling will have
to be raised. Under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Congress is to include in its concurrent resolutions on the budget the
appropriate level of debt and the amount by which the debt subject
to limit ought to be changed.
The debt subject to statutory limit includes not only most of the
Federal debt held by the public but also most of the Federal debt held
internally by the Government itself. Therefore, the concept of Federal
borrowing subject to statutory limit is roughly similar to the concept of
the Federal funds part of the unified budget. Trust fund surpluses
invested in Federal debt do not hold down the growth in the debt
subject to limit as they do the growth in the debt held by the public.
Consequently, debt subject to limit usually grows more than debt
held by the public; and whereas borrowing from the public is roughly
related to the unified budget surplus or deficit, borrowing subject to
limit is roughly related to the Federal funds surplus or deficit.9
The Federal funds deficit in 1977 is estimated to be $55.5 billion,
and the off-budget Federal agencies are estimated to require an additional $11.1 billion of borrowing subject to limit. As shown in the
following table, these two factors will account for most of the
increase in the debt subject to limit.
9
Federal debt is discussed further in Special Analysis C, "Borrowing, Debt, and Investment,"
in Special Analyses, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 1977.




PERSPECTIVES

19

FEDERAL FUNDS FINANCING AND CHANGE IN DEBT SUBJECT TO LIMIT
[In billions of dollars]
Description

1975

Federal funds surplus or deficit ( - )
Effect of outlays of off-budget Federal agencies on debt
subject to limit
Total, amount to be

financed

1976

TQ

1977

-51.0

-78.5

-15.0

-55.5

-9.0

-8.8

-3.9

-11.1

-60.0

-87.4

-18.9

-66.6

Means of financing other than borrowing:

Decrease or increase (—) in cash and monetary assetsIncrease or decrease (—) in liabilities for:
Checks outstanding, etc
Deposit fund balances
Seigniorage on coins

3

-1.4

1.7
.7
.6

.7
-1.6
.7

.2
2
.2

.6
-.6
.7

Total, means offinancingother than borrowing.

2.7

-1.6

.2

.7

-.9

-.9

-.2

-.5

-.8
.8

-.2

_*

-.6

Decrease or increase (—) in Federal funds investments in Federal debt
Increase or decrease (—) in Federal funds debt not
subject to limit
Redemption of special notes to IMF 1
Reclassification of securities 2
Total, requirements for borrowing subject to
debt limit
Change in debt subject to limit

-.3

-58.2
58.2

-90.0
90.0

-18.9
18.9

-67.3
67.3

*Less than $50 million.
1 On March 14, 1975, $825 million of non-interest-bearing notes issued to the International Monetary Fund were redeemed and replaced by a letter of credit of equal value. These notes were included
in the debt subject to limit but not in the gross Federal debt. Since the letter of credit is not counted
as 2debt, this transaction reduced debt subject to limit by $825 million.
On October 1, 1976, Federal debt held by the public is estimated to increase by $0.3 billion due to a
reclassification of Export-Import Bank certificates of beneficial interest from asset sales to debt.




20

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

FEDERAL FUNDS RECEIPTS AND OUTLAYS
[In billions of dollars]
Description

Outlays (by agency):
Department of Defense military functions and military assistance *
Department of the Treasury;
Interest on the public debt
Other
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Veterans Administration
Department of Agriculture
Department of Housing and Urban Development
All other agencies
Allowances2

1975
actual

1976
TQ
estimate estimate

1977
estimate

86.9

91.8

24.7

100.3

32.7
8.7
37.3
16.3
9.7
7.5
39.4

37.7
7.8
41.7
18.8
14.2
7.2
57.5
.2

10.4
1.9
10.1
4.4
3.3
1.9
13.0
.2

45.0
6.5
44. 3
17.0
10.8
7.2
53.0
2.3

Total
Receipts

238.5
187.5

276.9
198.4

69.8
54.8

286.2
230.8

Deficit ( - )

-51.0

-78.5

-15.0

-55.5

1
2

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.

A substantial part of the Federal funds deficit—and, therefore, a
substantial part of the growth in debt subject to limit—is associated
with transactions between Federal funds and trust funds. These
transactions consist primarily of Federal funds payments to trust
funds: interest paid on Treasury debt held by trust funds, the
employer share of employee retirement, the Federal payment to
finance the unfunded liability of the civil service retirement fund, and
other payments mainly to social insurance trust funds (such as the
Federal Government's contribution for supplementary medical
insurance). The trust fund payments to Federal funds are very
small.10
From 1966 through 1975, the cumulative Federal funds deficit was
$219.6 billion, of which $100.4 billion was attributable to transactions
with trust funds and the remaining $119.1 billion was attributable to
transactions with the public.11 A significant Federal funds deficit can
occur, as one did in 1969, when there are surpluses in the unified budget
and in the transactions of the Federal funds with the public. The
relevant figures for 1975 through 1977 are shown in the following
table.
10
These transactions are shown in detail in Part 8, table 13. Seethe section of the table on interfund transactions.
11
See the footnote to the table. Budget Surplus or Deficit by Fund Group, on the next page.




PERSPECTIVES

21

BUDGET SURPLUS OR DEFICIT ( - ) BY FUND GROUP*
(In billions of dollar*]
Description

Federal funds:
Transactions with the public
Transactions with trust funds
Total
Trust funds:
Transactions with the public
Transactions with Federal funds
Total
Budget total:
Federal funds
Trustfunds
Total

1975
actual

1976
TQ
estimate estimate

1977
estimate

-32.4
-18.6

-49.6
-28.9

-10.1
-4.9

-25.1
-30.3

-51.0

-78.5

-15.0

-55.5

—11.2
18.6

—26.4
28.9

—6.0
4.9

—17.8
30.3

7.4

2.5

-1.1

12.5

-51.0
7.4

-78.5
2.5

-15.0
-1.1

-55.5
12.5

-43.6

-76.0

-16.1

-43.0

1
For purposes of this analysis, payments from Federal funds to the general revenue sharing trust
fund are treated as transactions with the public instead of transactions with a trust fund; and the
corresponding payments from the general revenue sharing trust fund to the public are accordingly
omitted. This is because the general revenue sharing trust fund has no independent source of funding
but serves only as a channel through which a Federal funds payment is made to the public.




PART 3

ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS AND
LONG-RANGE BUDGET
PROJECTIONS

23

210-000

0 - 7 6 - 3




ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS AND LONG-RANGE BUDGET
PROJECTIONS
This part of the budget discusses the long-range budget outlook
and the economic assumptions underlying that outlook. The first
section presents economic assumptions for calendar years 1976 through
1981 and explains the nature of these assumptions. The second section
examines the budget outlook for the fiscal years 1977 through 1981,
presenting projections of receipts by major source and budget authority and outlays by function and agency.
ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS
There is a two-way relationship between the economy and the
budget. Economic conditions significantly affect the budget, and the
budget, in turn, significantly influences economic conditions. Both the
tax structure and budget outlays can have a substantial effect on
national output, employment, and inflation.
At the same time, outlays for many Federal programs are directly
linked to developments in the economy, and this linkage has become
increasingly strong in recent years. For example, most retirement
and other social insurance benefit payments are now tied by law to
cost-of-living indexes. Medicare outlays are affected directly by the
price of medical services. Interest on the debt is linked to general
market interest rates and the size of the budget surplus or deficit, which
in turn are influenced by economic conditions. Of course, to the extent
that outlays rise automatically in response to inflation the budget is
less effective in counteracting inflationary pressures than it would be
if these linkages did not exist.
Another type of linkage to economic events is outlays for unemployment benefits, and certain other benefits, which rise and fall with
the unemployment rate. In addition, budget receipts vary in accordance with individual and corporate incomes, which respond to both
real economic growth and inflation. Thus, receipts and some benefit
payments serve as "automatic stabilizers" for the economy by both
restraining inflation and cushioning economic downturns.
The following tables present the underlying economic assumptions
that have been used for purposes of developing budget estimates.
These assumptions are presented on a calendar year basis, whereas
the budget estimates are presented on a fiscal year basis. These
assumptions are being presented in order to provide the Congress and
the public with information that may be helpful in understanding
and assessing the budget estimates and long-range projections.
24



PROJECTIONS

25

SHORT-RANGE ECONOMIC FORECAST
[Calendar years; dollar amounts in billions]

Item

Gross national product:
Current dollars:
Amount
Percent change
Constant (1972) dollars:
Amount
Percent change
Incomes (current dollars):
Personal income
Wages and salaries
Corporate profits
Price level (percent change) :
GNP deflator:
Year over year
Fourth quarter over fourth quarter
Consumer price index:
Year over year
December over December
Unemployment rates (percent):
Total
Insured 1
Average Federal pay raise, October (percent)
Interest rate, 91 -day Treasury bills (percent) 2

Actual
1974

Forecast
1975

1976

1977

$1,407
7.7

$1,499
65
.

$1,684
12.4

$1,890
12.2

$1,211
—1.8

$1,187
-2.0

$1,260
62
.

$1,332
5.7

$1,155
763
132

$1,246
802
18
1

$1,386
892
16
5

$1,538
1,001
11
8

9. 7
11.4

87
.
63
.

59
.
59
.

62
.
63
.

11.0
12.2

91
.
69
.

63
.
59
.

60
.
59
.

5.6
3.8
5.5
7.9

85
.
72
.
50
.
58
.

7.7
63
.
47
.
55
.

69
.
5.4
86
.
55
.

1
2

Insured unemployment as a percentage of covered employment.
Average rate on new issues within period; the rate shown for 1976 was the current market rate
at the time the estimates were made.

The short-term economic assumptions presented in this section have
been developed in quite different ways from the longer run assumptions. The assumptions for calendar years 1975 (for which only three
quarters of actual data were available at the time the forecast was
made), 1976, and 1977 are forecasts of probable economic conditions
during these years.
The longer range assumptions for the period 1978 to 1981 are not forecasts of probable economic conditions, but rather assumptions consistent
with moving gradually toward a relatively stable price level and a
higher level of employment. Any economic forecast is subject to substantial error. Even the 1976 forecast involves considerable uncertainty, but the uncertainty rises rapidly as we attempt to foresee
economic activity in 1977. Beyond 1977, it is virtually impossible to
make a forecast with any degree of reliability. It is for this reason the
data in the following table are mechanical projections.




26

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977
LONG-RANGE ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS
[Calendar years; dollar amounts in billions]
Assumptions
Item

Gross national product:
Current dollars:
Amount
Percent change
Constant (1972) dollars:
Amount
Percent change
Incomes (current dollars):
Personal income
Wages and salaries
Corporate profits
Price level (percent change):
GNP deflator:
Yearoveryear
Fourth quarter over fourth quarter
Consumer Price Index:
Yearoveryear
December over December
Unemployment rates (percent):
Total
Insured1
Federal pay raise, October (percent)
Interest rate, 91-day Treasury bills (percent)
1
2

1978

1979

1980

1981

$2,124
12.4

$2,636
10.9

$2,877
9.1

$1,411
5.9

$1,503
6.5

$1,600
6.5

$1,679
4.9

$1,727
$1,126
201

$1,930
$1,259
223

$2,138
$1,397
247

$2,331
$1,525
271

6.1
5.7

5.0
4.7

4.2
4.0

4.0
4.0

5.9
5.6

2

$2,376
11.9

5.0
4.6

4.2
4.0

4.0
4.0

6.4
4.9
7.0
5.5

5.8
4.2
6.5
5.5

5.2
3.6
5.75
5.0

4.9
3.3
5.5
5.0

Insured unemployment as a percentage of covered employment.
Average rate on new issues within period.

It is assumed that real GNP grows at a 6.5% rate from the first
quarter of 1978 through the end of 1980. At that time, with the
unemployment rate less than 5%, a slower rate of growth is assumed.
It is further assumed that this growth pattern is consistent with a
continuous deceleration in the rate of inflation. The current dollar
value of GNP is derived from the assumed inflation and real growth
rates, while personal income, wages and salaries, and corporate profits
are computed assuming a continuation of the historical trends that
relate these data to current dollar GNP. The unemployment rate is
projected by using the historical relationship between unemployment
and the gap between actual and potential GNP.
There is no intent to imply that the economy will follow the exact
path derived from these assumptions. It may grow more rapidly in
some periods and less rapidly in others. Nor do the assumptions represent a blueprint for economic policy. Such plans can only be set as we
gain more information regarding the evolving relationship between




PROJECTIONS

27

inflation and unemployment during this recovery. The purpose of
presenting these assumptions is solely to provide a consistent base for
projecting the budget estimates.
LONG-RANGE BUDGET PROJECTIONS
The effects of current decisions extend beyond the budget year.
They establish program trends that have important influences on the
size and composition of budgets for years into the future. Just as the
composition and level of the 1977 budget have been largely determined
by past decisions, the decisions and proposals it embodies will strongly
affect subsequent budgets. Thus, major program decisions on the 1977
budget significantly affect the swing from a projected $43 billion
deficit in 1977 to almost a $10 billion surplus in 1979.
The budgets for the last 6 years have emphasized the longer range
implications of current decisions by presenting 5-year projections of
Federal outlays and receipts. In the 1973 budget, detailed 5-year
projections of the costs of legislative proposals for major new and
expanded programs were added. In accordance with the Congressional
Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974, this budget presents
projections by agency, major program, and function for each of the
years 1978 through 1981.
Basic assumptions.—The receipts projections presented below are
consistent with the foregoing economic assumptions, and with continuation of current tax laws as modified by the proposals contained
in this budget. The outlay and budget authority estimates indicate
the degree to which resources would be committed by the continuation
of existing and currently proposed programs at the program levels
recommended for 1977. These projections are not forecasts of future
receipts, outlays, or budget authority, because no attempt is made to
predict future decisions or their effects. Nor are the projections
recommendations, except to the extent that they are consistent with the
objective of restraining the growth in Federal spending, and to the
extent that they lead to a balanced budget in 1979.
In general, the outlay projections assume that program levels
remain level in current dollars except where there is an explicit
budget recommendation to increase or decrease program levels over
time. Allowances are also made for future cost-of-living adjustments
to benefit levels, Federal pay raises, and other cost increases. These
allowances are consistent with the economic assumptions outlined
above.




28

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

The Fiscal Outlook to 1981

The fiscal outlook.—Under
the assumptions used here, receipts are
projected to increase b y an average of 13.6% per year from 1977
to 1981, rising from $351 billion to $585 billion. Over the same
period, outlays for current programs and those proposed in this
budget are projected to rise by an average of 6.6% a year, from $394
billion to $510 billion. Thus, the budget is projected to move into
surplus in 1979 with increasingly large surpluses in subsequent years.
THE FISCAL OUTLOOK, 1975-81
[In billions of dollars]
1975

1976

TQ

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

Outlays under current programs.... 324.6 373.7 98.2 391.9 420.4 441.8 465.0 489.2
Outlays under proposed programs...
- . 2 - . 2 2.3 9.1 13.9 17.5 20.7
Total projected outlays
Receipts under current law
Effects of proposed tax changes

324.6 373.5 98.0 394.2 429.5 455.7 482.5 509.9
281.0 297.3 87.3 374.1 430.1 491.7 555.1 623.9
. 2 -5.5-22.8-23.4-26.4-32.0-38.4

Total projected receipts
Budget margin or deficit ( - )

281.0 297.5 81.9 351.3 406.7 465.3 523.1 585.4
- 4 3 . 6 - 7 6 . 0 - 1 6 . 1 - 4 3 . 0 - 2 2 . 8 9.6 40.6 75.5




PROJECTIONS

29

Receipts are projected to increase by 6 7 % from 1977 to 1981
due to growth in tax bases and an increase in the average effective
tax rate on personal income as rising real incomes and inflation move
people into higher tax brackets. This increase in effective tax rates,
which is implicit in a progressive income tax system, accounts for
about $50 billion of the total increase in individual income tax
receipts between 1977 and 1981. Over the past two decades, legislated
tax cuts have offset implicit increases of this nature. Without these
reductions, total Federal receipts would have risen to a much larger
percentage of G N P than they now claim.
PROJECTED RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
[In billions of dollars]
Source

1975

1976

TQ

1977

1978

1979

1980 1981

Individual income taxes
122.4 130.8 40.0 153.6 184.0 218.4 252.8 287.3
Corporation income axes
40.6 40.1 8.4 49.5 54.5 59.8 65.9 71.7
Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust funds)
86.4 92.6 25.2 113.1 130.8 147.2 162.1 181.6
Excise taxes...
16.6 16.9 4.4 17.8 18.4 18.8 19.2 19.6
Estate and gift taxes
4.6 5.1
1.4 5.8 6.4 7.2 8.0 8.9
Customs duties
3.7 3.8 1.0 4.3 4.8 5.4 6.0 6.6
Miscellaneous receipts
6.7 8.3 1.5 7.2 7.8 8.5 9.2 9.8
Total budget receipts

281.0 297.5

81.9 351.3 406.7 465.3 523.1 585.4

MEMORANDUM
Effect of proposed legislation included above:
Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contions
Excise taxes and other

- * - 4 , 6 -22.2 -24.7 -26.7 -30.7 -35.6
- * - . 8 -6.2-10.8-13.8-16.3-19.2

.2

-*

5.4
.1

8.1
4.0

9.7
4.5

10.4 11.5
4.7 4.9

Total effect of proposed legis-

lation

.2 -5.5-22.8-23.4-26.4-32.0-38.4

*Less than $50 million.

Tax proposals included in this budget reduce individual and corporation income taxes by $28 billion in 1977 and $55 billion by 1981.
The largest reductions result from:
—tax reductions to take effect July 1, 1976, when temporary
tax cuts expire; these changes reduce income taxes by $28 billion
in 1977, and $39 billion by 1981; and




30

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 77

—integration of individual and corporation income taxation; this
proposal does not affect receipts in 1977, but reduces receipts
by $13 billion by 1981.
For a more detailed discussion of these and other tax proposals, see
Part 4.
Social insurance taxes and contributions, which have increased from
only 12% of receipts in 1955 to almost 31% two decades later, are
projected to increase by 61% between 1977 and 1981. Under current
law, the social security tax rate is scheduled to increase from the
current rate of 11.7% to 12.1% on January 1, 1978, and to 12.6% on
January 1, 1981. As part of the program to restore the fiscal integrity
of the Social Security trust fund, the President is proposing an additional 0.6 percentage points, effective January 1, 1977, to place the
social security system on a sounder financial basis. In addition to these
rate increases, the taxable earnings base is projected to increase,
automatically under current law, from its current level of $15,300
to $23,400 by January 1981. Legislation is also proposed to increase
the rate and base on which unemployment insurance taxes are collected. The combined effect of these proposed rate and base increases is
to raise receipts by over $5 billion in 1977 and by $11 billion by 1981.
Estate and gift taxes, customs, excise taxes, and miscellaneous
receipts are projected at $45 billion in 1981, an increase of $10 billion
from 1977. These estimates assume continuation of the 4^ per gallon
Federal excise tax on gasoline and other highway trust fund taxes, all
of which are scheduled to decline or expire on September 30, 1977.
Full-employment receipts is an analytical concept based on the
amount of income that would be generated if the economy were continually operating at full capacity (conventionally defined as a 4.0%
unemployment rate for the civilian labor force). Similarly, fullemployment outlays include only that portion of the outlays for benefits
under the regular unemployment insurance program that would be
paid if the economy were continuously operating at full capacity.
They thus eliminate the fluctuations in actual outlays for these
benefits due to year-to-year changes in the unemployment rate. The
differences between these adjusted receipts and outlay estimates are
called full-employment budget margins. Changes in these margins
from one year to the next provide a rough measure of the impact of
discretionary fiscal policy (i.e., excluding automatic stabilizers) on the
economy.




31

PROJECTIONS

FULL EMPLOYMENT RECEIPTS AND OUTLAYS
[In billions of dollars]
1976

Full-employment receipts
Full-employment outlays
Full-employment budget margin

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

347
363

389
386

445
422

498
451

550
480

607
508

— 16

3

23

47

70

99

Full-employment outlays are estimated at $386 billion in 1977,
rising to $508 billion in 1981. Full-employment receipts are
projected to increase from $389 billion in 1977 to $607 billion in
1981. The full-employment margin gradually increases from $3
billion in 1977 to $99 billion in 1981.
While the full employment concept is traditionally defined in
terms of a hypothetical 4.0% unemployment rate, any other rate
would serve essentially the same analytic purpose, provided it remained fixed from year to year.
Budget trends.—The major trend in the composition of the budget
outlays over the last 20 years has been the rapid growth of domestic
assistance programs and the corresponding relative decline in spending
for direct Federal operations, particularly defense. Over the past two
decades, outlays for domestic assistance have been growing much
more rapidly than national output, and more rapidly than total
Federal outlays.
Direct Federal operations include Federal purchases of goods and
services for use in Government programs such as defense and space
exploration, compensation of Federal employees, payment of interest
on the public debt, and energy research and development. Domestic
assistance programs, in contrast, include payments to retired, disabled,
or unemployed workers, to lower-income families and individuals, and
aid to State and local governments.




T H E BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

32

BUDGET COMPOSITION

Actual

Description

Projected

1956

Domestic assistance
Payments for individuals:
Direct 1
Indirect (grants-in-aid)
All other grants-in-aid i
Direct Federal operations
National defense
Netinterest
Other
Total outlays
1

1960

1964

1968

1972

1977

1981

22.3

29.4

30.6

32.5

45.7

55.4

53.9

(17.0) (21.8) (22.1) (22.1) (30.2) (40.0) (40.6)
(2.5) (2.7) (3.0) (3.4) (6.3) (5.3) (5.7)
(2.8) (4.9) (5.5) (7.0) (9.2) (10.1) (7.6)
77.7 70.5 69.4 67.5 54.4 44.7 46.1
(56.4) (49.0) (44.5) (44.4) (33.4) (25.7) (28.0)
(7.2) (7.5) (6.9) (6.2) (6.7) (8.4) (7.2)
(14.1) (14.0) (18.0) (16.9) (14.3) (10.6) (10.9)
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Excludes military retired pay and grants classified in the national defense function.

The detailed composition of the 5-year projections of outlays and
budget authority is shown on pages 35-37 by major function and
agency. While total outlays increase by 29% from 1977 to 1981, outlays
for health, income security, natural resources, environment and
energy, and national defense increase faster than total outlays.
The five-year Defense projection is calculated on the basis of a
continuation of existing force and readiness levels. The Administration
will continue to review the adequacy of our force posture, including
surface naval capabilities in the year ahead. Projected outlays for
other functions, such as interest and general government decline
in relative terms but not absolutely. Outlays for education, training,
and social services are projected to decline, both in absolute and
relative terms in large part due to the anticipated fall in unemployment, and hence, to decreases in various employment and training
assistance programs. However, these trends are influenced by the
guidelines used in developing long-range projections. For example,
functions such as income security that consist largely of programs
indexed to the cost of living reflect assumptions about anticipated
inflation. Functions that consist largely of programs without such
mandatory adjustments appear to grow more slowly. Moreover,
the national defense function includes allowances for pay increases
and for increases in the prices of purchases of goods and services.
For the other functions these allowances are not shown on a functionby-function basis, but rather as a single entry. Thus, while the
functional trends may in some cases reflect the future implications of
current law and budget proposals, they are not predictions of the
likely eventual outcome.




PROJECTIONS

33

The recent large increases and additions to domestic assistance
programs have, to some extent been offset by real reductions in
direct Federal operations, particularly defense. Thus, the rise in
outlays for health and for income security—to 45% of total outlays
by 1981, compared to 33% in 1971—indicates an increased response
to human needs, but also a long-range budgetary problem of fundamental importance if these programs were to grow in the future at
the same rate as they have in the past. The budget cannot accommodate the same rates of growth in the future, and maintain or
increase defense and other direct Federal activities unless the Federal
Government assumes an ever-increasing portion of GNP through
increased taxes.
Controllability.—Outlays in any one year are considered to be
relatively uncontrollable by the President when his decisions can
neither increase nor decrease them without changes in existing statutes.
Relatively uncontrollable outlays consist of two major categories:
open-ended programs and fixed costs, and payments out of prior-year
contracts and obligations. The percentage of open-ended programs
and fixed costs under current law is projected to reach 62% by 1981.
As recently as 1971 open-ended programs and fixed costs amounted
to less than 47% of the budget. The substantial growth since then
has been due primarily to the rapid increase in benefit payments
for individuals.




34

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 77
CONTROLLABILITY OF BUDGET OUTLAYS
[In billions of dollars]
Category

Relatively uncontrollable under present law:
Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals:
Social security and railroad retirement
Medicare and medicaid
All other payments for individuals
Subtotal, payments for individuals
Netinterest
.
General revenue sharing
Other open-ended programs and fixed costs
Total, open-ended programs and fixed costs,
currentlaw
Proposed open-ended programs and fixed costs x
Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations
Relatively controllable outlays
Undistributed employer share, employee retirement
Total budget outlays
1

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

87.2
31.2
73.2

96.5
36.0
75.9

106.5
41.1
77.9

116.5
46.9
80.7

126.4
53.3
84.3

191.6
32.9
6.5
9.6

208.3
35.9
6.7
11.1

225.5
37.1
6.8
10.9

244.1
37.1
7.0
11.1

263.9
36.6
7.1
10.7

240.7
—5.5
63.21
100.3f
—4. 5

262.0
280.3
299.2 318.3
—7.8 —10.8 —14.2 —17.6
,fin ,
,Q1 1
on? ft I\A ft
I W
191 2
2U2 8
M
'\
'
'
'*
—4.8
—5.0
—5.3
—5. 6

394.2

429.5

455.7

482.5

509.9

Includes as "relatively controllable outlays" in table 16 of Part 8.

In addition to open-ended programs and fixed costs, outlays for
"prior-year contracts and obligations" amount to an additional 15% to
20% of the budget and should be considered relatively uncontrollable
in the short run. Though these outlays cannot be projected beyond
the budget year, they suggest that the relatively uncontrollable
portion of the budget amounts to 75% to 80% of the total in the
short-run.
The degree of uncontrollability in the budget has obvious fiscal
policy implications. Without changes in legislation, attempts to control
total budget outlays fall on an increasingly smaller proportion of the
budget. The President has proposed legislation to change some of the
relatively uncontrollable programs. The effect of these proposals is
reflected in the line "relatively controllable outlays" in the above
table.




PROJECTIONS

35

PROJECTED BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
[In billions of dollars]
1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

Budget authority:

National defense
114.9 122.4 131.9 141.6 151.5
International affairs
9.7
7.7
7.6
8.0
8.9
General science, space, and technology
4.6
4.6
4.4
4.3
4.0
Natural resources, environment, and energy
9. 7
13. 3
14.1
13. 8
13. 6
Agriculture
2.3
1.9
2.5
2.3
2.4
Commerce and transportation
17.9
18.3
18.4
18.8
18.6
Community and regional development
5.8
5.9
5.8
5.8
5.8
Education, training, employment, and social services.
15.9
15.4
15.4
15.5
15.3
Health
38.0
43.5
48.9
53.8
63.5
Income security
157.7 180.3 196.7 212.9 228.8
Veterans benefits and services
17.7
17.3
16.8
16.3
15.9
Law enforcement and justice
3.3
3.3
3.3
3.4
3.4
General government
3.5
3.9
3.6
3.5
3.5
Revenue sharing and general purposefiscalassistance.
7.3
7.7
7.9
8.1
8.3
Interest
41.3
44.8
46.5
46.9
46.9
Allowances
2.6
5.6
8.1
10.5
12.8
Undistributed offsetting receipts
- 1 8 . 9 - 2 0 . 7 -21.4 -22.1 - 2 2 . 9
Total budget authority

433.4

475.4

510.6

543.3

580.2

Outlays:

National defense
101.1 112.9 121.5 132.4
International affairs
6.8
7.8
7.8
8.1
General science, space, and technology
4.5
4.6
4.5
4.4
Natural resources, environment, and energy
13.8
14.4
15.1
14.9
Agriculture
1.7
2.6
2.6
2.8
Commerce and transportation
16.5
19.4
19.1
18.7
Community and regional development
5.5
6.0
6.2
6.0
Education, training, employment, and social services.
16.6
15. 3
15. 3
15. 3
Health
34.4
37.7
40.3
43.4
Income security
137.1
147.1 158.3 170.1
Veterans benefits and services
17.2
17.2
16.7
16.3
Law enforcement and justice
3.4
3.3
3.3
3.3
General government
3.4
3.9
3.6
3.6
Revenue sharing and general purposefiscalassistance.
7.4
7. 7
7.9
8.0
Interest
41.3
44.8
46.5
46.9
Allowances
2.3
5.6
8.1
10.5
Undistributed offsetting receipts
-18.8 -20.7 -21.4 -22.1
Total outlays




394.2

429.5

455.7

482.5

142.8
8.0
4.1
14.5
2.8
18.7
6.1
15. 3
47.0
182.9
15.7
3.3
3.7
8.2
46.9
12.8
-22.9
509.9

36

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 77
PROJECTED BUDGET AUTHORITY BY AGENCY
[In billions of dollars]
Department or other unit

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

Outlays:

Legislative and judicial branches
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture:
Food stamps and other nutrition programs
Other Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military:
Military and civilian pay
Retired military pay
Purchases
Pay and price increases
Defense—Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare:
Social security
Medicare
Other Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor:
Unemployment trust fund
Other Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury:
Interest on the public debt
General revenue sharing
Other Treasury
Offsetting receipts
Civil Service Commission
Export-Import Bank
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Other agencies
Allowances
Undistributed offsetting receipts
Total budget authority




1.3
.1
6.4

1.5
.1
5.2

1.4
.1
6.1

1.4
.1
6.1

1.4
.1
6.1

6. 8
5.0
1.7

7.1
4.5
2.0

7.4
5.2
2.0

7.7
5.2
2.2

8.0
5.3
2.0

37. 3
8.4
59.6
5.8
2.2

36.7
9.8
60.5
12.3
2.3

36.5
10.6
62.9
18.6
2.3

36.5
11.5
65.5
25.0
2.3

36.4
12.2
68.2
31.7
2.3

80.6
17.2
48. 3
21.8
2.8
2.1

89.5
23.7
50.3
33.1
2.9
2.1

100.0
25.4
56.7
35.9
2.9
2.1

110.7
29.7
59.2
38.9
2.9
2.1

121.2
37.7
63.0
42.2
2.9
2.1

16.9
3.6
1.1
11.7

16.6
4.0
1.3
12.9

15.4
4.0
1.3
12.8

13.8
4.0
1.5
13.0

12.4
4.0
2.4
13.0

50.6
50.6
50.2
48.5
45.0
7.1
7.0
6.8
6.7
6.5
3.6
3.6
3.6
3.7
4. 2
-4.3
-4.3
-4.3
—4. 4 - 4 . 4
20.3
18.0
19.4
16.7
16. 4
1.8
1.7
1.8
1.9
3. 3
3.1
3.4
3.5
3.7
3. 7
15.9
16.3
16.8
17.3
17.7
17.5
17.7
17.7
18.1
16. 6
12.8
10.5
8.1
5.6
2.3
—18.8 -20.7 -21.4 -22.1 -22.9
433.4

475.4

510.6

543.3

580.2

PROJECTIONS

37

PROJECTED BUDGET OUTLAYS BY AGENCY
[In billions of dollars]
Department or other unit

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

1.3
.1
3.9

1.5
.1
3.9

1.4
.1
4.9

1.4
.1
5.3

1.5
.1
5.0

7. 1
3.6
2.1

7. 1
5.4
2.0

7.4
5.5
2.0

7.7
5.7
2.2

8. 0
5.8
2.0

37.3
8.4
48.4
5.4
2.2

36.7
9.8
51.2
12.1
2.3

36.5
10.6
53.9
18.3
2.3

36.5
11.5
57.5
24.8
2.3

36.4
12.2
60.8
31.5
2.3

83.6
16.6
39.7
7.2
2.6
2.2

92.6
22.1
37.7
8.8
2.8
2.2

100.3
24.4
41.0
9.8
2.8
2.2

112.4
27.1
39. 6
10.5
2.8
2.1

116.2
30.1
46. 3
12.3
2.8
2.1

16.5
5.5
1.0
12.8

16.3
4.1
1.3
14.1

14.0
4.0
1.3
14.3

12.7
4.0
1.5
14.0

12.2
3.6
1.6
14.4

45.0
6.5
4.2
-4.4
10.1
1.3
3. 7
17.2
18.4
2.3
-18.8

48.5
6.7
3.6
-4.4
11.9
1.8
3. 7
17.2
20.6
5.6
-20.7

50.2
6.8
3.7
-4.3
13.0
1.9
3. 6
16.7
20.2
8.1
-21.4

50.6
7.0
3.6
-4.3
14.3
1.8
3.5
16.3
19.7
10.5
-22.1

50.6
7.1
3.6
-4.3
15.6
1.9
3.2
15.7
19.0
12.8
-22.9

394.2

429.5

455.7

482.5

509.9

Outlays:

Legislative and judicial branches
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture:
Food stamps and other nutrition programs
Other Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military:
Military and civilian pay
Retired military pay
Purchases
Pay and price increases
Defense—Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare:
Social security
Medicare
Other Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor:
Unemployment trust fund
OtherLabor
State
Transportation
Treasury:
Interest on the public debt
General revenue sharing
Other Treasury
Offsetting receipts
Civil Service Commission
Export-Import Bank
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Other agencies
Allowances
Undistributed offsetting receipts
Total outlays




PART 4

BUDGET RECEIPTS

39

210-000

0 - 7 6 - 4




40

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET RECEIPTS
This section of the budget describes the major sources of budget
receipts and discusses the legislative proposals affecting them. In
addition, an analysis is provided of the difference between receipts for
1975, the last completed fiscal year, and the budget estimates for 1975
published 2 years ago. The detail of budget receipts by source is
shown in table 12 in Part 8, and the economic assumptions underlying
these estimates are presented in Part 3.
SUMMARY
Total budget receipts in 1977 are estimated at $351 billion, an increase of $54 billion from the $298 billion estimated for 1976. These
estimates reflect the effect of:
• The recently enacted Revenue Adjustment Act of 1975, which
reduced corporation and individual income tax liabilities for
calendar year 1976 and extended for the first half of that year the
withholding rates that were in effect during the last 8 months of
calendar year 1975.
• Proposed permanent reductions in individual and corporation
income taxes—larger than the temporary reductions now in
force—effective July 1, 1976.
• A proposed increase in the combined employer-employee social
security tax rate, effective January 1, 1977.
• A proposed increase in the unemployment insurance tax rate and
wage base as of January 1, 1977.
• Elimination of the import fees on crude oil and petroleum products
imposed in 1975.

Composition of budget receipts.—The Federal tax system relies
predominantly on income and payroll taxes. In 1977:
• Income taxes paid by individuals and corporations are estimated
at $154 billion and $49 billion, respectively. Combined, these
sources account for 58% of estimated total budget receipts.
• Social insurance taxes and contributions—composed largely of
payroll taxes levied on wages and salaries, most of which are paid
equally by employers and employees—will produce an estimated
$113 billion, 32% of the estimated total.
• Excise taxes imposed on selected commodities, services, and
activities are expected to provide $18 billion, 5% of the total.
• Other taxes and miscellaneous receipts will amount to an estimated $17 billion, the remaining 5% of the total.




BUDGET RECEIPTS

41

BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
[In billions of dollars]
Source

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions
Excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts
Total budget receipts

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

122.4
40.6
86.4
16.6
4.6
3.7
6.7

130.8
40.1
92.6
16.9
5.1
3.8
8.3

40.0
8.4
25.2
4.4
1.4
1.0
1.5

153.6
49.5
113.1
17.8
5.8
4.3
7.2

281.0

297.5

81.9

351.3

Receipts under the full-employment concept.—While actual
receipts are affected by the level of economic activity, receipts calculated under the full-employment concept are based on estimates of
the amounts of personal and corporate income that would be generated
if the economy were continuously operating at full employment
(traditionally defined as unemployment equal to 4% of the civilian
labor force). Receipts that would be produced by existing and proposed
tax laws using this concept are estimated at $323 billion for 1975,
$347 billion for 1976, and $389 billion for 1977.

ENACTED AND PROPOSED TAX CHANGES
In the last year, two temporary tax reductions have been enacted,
the first generally applying to income received in calendar yeairs 1974
and 1975 and the second applying to income received in calendar year
1976. The President is proposing that permanent income tax reductions—larger than the temporary reductions now in effect—become
effective July 1, 1976, and that certain other tax changes be made.
This section discusses the tax reductions enacted in calendar year 1975
and the tax changes proposed by the President. The accompanying
table shows the dollar amounts of the changes by fiscal period.
The Tax Reduction Act of 1975 (Public Law 94-12) was enacted on
March 29, 1975. This act provided a partial rebate of calendar year
1974 individual income tax liabilities, a number of temporary reductions in individual and corporation income tax liabilities, and a few
permanent changes in the tax structure. The act also provided a
one-time $50 bonus to recipients of social security and certain other
social insurance programs and extended the maximum duration of
unemployment benefits from 52 weeks to 65 weeks through June 30,
1975.




42

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

The tax rebate was equal to 10% of calendar year 1974 tax liabilities, subject to minimum and maximum rebates. The minimum
rebate equaled the lesser of actual tax liability or $100, and the maximum rebate equaled $200. The maximum rebate phased down to
$100 between adjusted gross incomes (AGI) of $20,000 and $30,000.
The rebate totalled $8.1 billion, almost all of which was paid in
May and June of 1975.
The major temporary provisions of the Tax Reduction Act affecting
individual income tax liabilities—generally for calendar year 1975—
were:
—A $30 tax credit per personal exemption (except the special
exemptions for the blind and aged).
—An increase in the low income allowance (minimum standard
deduction) from $1,300 per return to $1,900 for a joint return or
$1,600 for a single person.
—An increase in the percentage standard deduction from 15% of
AGI with a maximum of $2,000 to 16% of AGI with a maximum
of $2,600 for a joint return or $2,300 for a single person.
—An earned income credit for families with dependent children
equal to 10% of earned income subject to a maximum of $400.
The maximum credit is phased down to zero between AGI or
earned income, whichever is greater, of $4,000 and $8,000. For
budget purposes, payments to recipients of such credit in excess
of tax liabilities otherwise owed are counted as outlays rather
than as reductions in receipts.
—A 5% credit, with a maximum of $2,000, on the price of a new
home acquired after March 12, 1975, and before January 1, 1976,
provided that construction began prior to March 26, 1975.
Most of the tax reductions applied to all of calendar year 1975.
However, since the act did not become law until the end of March, the
change in withholding schedules to reflect the reduction did not begin
until May 1, 1975. Withholding rates were then reduced to reflect
the full year's tax reduction; these withholding rate reductions were
greater than would have been necessary if such reductions had begun
on January 1, 1975.
The major temporary provisions affecting corporation income tax
liabilities were:
—An increase in the investment credit—applicable to equipment
acquired and put in service in calendar years 1975 and 1976—
from 7% (4% for public utilities) to 10%.1
1
This provision also applies to unincorporated businesses and therefore also directly affects
individual income taxes.




BUDGET RECEIPTS

43

—Corporate tax rate reductions for calendar year 1975, from 22%
to 20% on the first $25,000 of income and from 48% to 22% on
the second $25,000. The balance of income continued to be
taxed at 48%.
In addition to the temporary features discussed above, a few permanent tax changes were enacted. The most notable were limits on
percentage depletion and revisions in the tax treatment of certain
foreign income. Subject to exceptions, percentage depletion was eliminated for major producers of petroleum products. For small producers,
the percentage depletion rate remains at 22% through 1980 and then
phases down to a permanent rate of 15% in 1985.
As indicated above, most of the changes in the Tax Reduction Act
were only for calendar year 1975. On December 23, 1975, the Revenue
Adjustment Act oj 1975 (Public Law 94-164) was enacted, which effectively provided tax reductions for the first 6 months of calendar year
1976. For corporations, the act extended the rate reductions that were
enacted in the Tax Reduction Act of 1975. For individuals, however,
larger tax reductions (at an annual rate) were enacted in order to
maintain the withholding rates that applied during the last 8 months
of calendar year 1975.
To facilitate a comparison with the provisions of the Tax Reduction Act of 1975 listed above, the provisions described below—which
are applicable for only a half year—show the amounts that would
apply if the tax reductions for the first 6 months were in effect for a
full year. The major provisions of the Revenue Adjustment Act
affecting individuals are:
—A $35 tax credit per exemption (except the special exemptions
for the blind and aged) or an optional taxable income credit
equal to 2% of the taxpayer's taxable income up to $9,000,
whichever is larger.
—An increase in the low income allowance from $1,300 per return
to $2,100 for a joint return and $1,700 for a single person.
—An increase in the percentage standard deduction from 15% of
AGI with a maximum of $2,000 to 16% of AGI with a maximum
of $2,800 for a joint return or $2,400 for a single person.
—Extension of the earned income ciedit that was in effect for
calendar year 1975.
Since these provisions effectively apply to only half of calendar year
1976, the changes will be one-half of the amounts shown if further
legislative action is not taken. For example, the tax credit per exemption will be $17.50 instead of $35.




44

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977
ENACTED AND PROPOSED TAX CHANGES *
[In billions of dollars]
1975
estimate

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Tax Reduction Act of 1975:

Individual:
10% rebate of calendar year 1974 tax liability
Tax credit per exemption
Increase in low income allowance and percentage
standard deduction
Earned income credit ^
Home purchase credit
Other .

_*

-.5

-7.8

_*

-.6

-2.8
-1.1
\J
.2

-0.5

-1.8

.3
*

2.2
.6

-2.0

-.1

1.0

-10.2

-9.8

-.2

.4

-2.3
-1.1

-.2
-.1

-.6
-.3

-2.0

__ 2

-.5
-.1

-5.4

Total, Tax Reduction Act of 1975

_*

-2.0
-.3
-.6
-.4

-.8

Subtotal, corporation

-.5

-.8
-.4
.5
*

Corporation:
Investment credit increase ^
Rate reductions.. _
Limit on percentage depletion3
Other...

-0.1
-4.3

-9.4

Subtotal individual

-7.9
-1.0

-.5

-1.5

-.6

—*

-.4

-0.1

Revenue Adjustment Act of 1975:

Individual:
Tax credit per exemption. _
Optional taxable income credit
__
Increase in low income allowance and percentage
standard deduction _
Earned income credit2
Subtotal, individual4
Corporation: Rate reductions

_

Total, Revenue Adjustment Act of 1975

-6.0

-.5

-1.9

-2.4
-.7
-1.6

-10.8
-3.9
-7.0
-.1

-4.6

-21.9

Proposed tax reductions (beginning July 1,1976):

Individual:
Increase in personal exemption.
Increase in standard deduction.
Rate reductions
Other
Subtotal, individual.
See footnotes at end of table.




BUDGET RECEIPTS

45

ENACTED AND PROPOSED TAX CHANGES-Continued
[In billions of dollars]
1975

1976

Proposed tax reductions (beginning July 1,1976)—Con.
Corporation:
Rate reductions
Permanent extension of investment credit increases3
Electric utilities tax relief3

TQ

1977

—.6

-.2

Other income tax proposals:
Financial Institutions Act 5
Stock ownership incentives
Accelerated depreciation on investment in high unemployment areas 5

—5.7

-5.4

Total, proposed tax reductions (July 1,1976).._

—1.2
-.8

—.8

Subtotal, corporation

—3.7

-27.5

—.3
—.3
—*

Other tax proposals:
Social security tax rate increase
Unemployment tax rate and wage base increase
Other*

—. 3

—*

Total, other income tax proposals

—*
—*

—.8

0.2

-*

3.3
2.1
.1

.2

-*

5.6

-9.4
—.8

-13.2
—2.6

-.5
—.2

-2.1
.7

-10.2

-15.8

-.7

-1.5

-*
—*

-4.6
—.8

.2

-*

-22.2
—6.2
5.4
.1

.2

-5.5

-22.8

Total, other tax proposals
MEMORANDUM
Tax changes enacted in calendar year 1975:
Individual
Corporation
Total enacted changes
Proposed tax changes:
Individual
Corporation
Social insurance taxes and contributions
Other
Total proposed tax changes

*$50 million or less.
1
This table shows the effect of enacted and proposed tax changes on budget receipts (i.e. cash collections) for the fiscal period shown.
2
Payments to recipients of such credit in excess of tax liabilities otherwise owed are counted as
outlays and are not included in this table.
3
This provision also has a direct effect on individual income taxes. This effect is included under
"other" individual income tax changes.
4
Although the reduction in individual income tax liabilities resulting from this act apply to all of
calendar year 1976, the bulk of the receipts loss occurs in the first half of that year when reduced withholding rates are in effect.
8
This provision has a direct effect on both individual and corporation income taxes.
6
Consists of proposed changes in miscellaneous receipts, airport and airway trust fund receipts,
and estate and gift taxes.




46

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

The President is proposing income tax reductions—linked to
reductions in spending as proposed in this budget—to become effective
July 1, 1976. These proposed reductions will be permanent and will
be about $10 billion larger at an annual rate than the reductions in
the Revenue Adjustment Act of 1975 would be if they were extended
to a full year. The proposed further reductions will reduce 1977
receipts by about $28 billion. The major provisions affecting individual
income taxes—shown here as they will exist in their first full year of
effect—are: *
—An increase in the personal exemption from $750 to $1,000.
—Substitution of a flat standard deduction—$2,500 for joint
returns and $1,800 for single persons—for the low income allowance and percentage standard deduction.
—A reduction in tax rates.
For corporations, the President is proposing that the rate reductions and the increase in the investment credit enacted in the two
previous tax acts be made permanent. In addition, it is proposed that
the maximum corporation income tax rate be reduced from 48% to
46% and that legislation be enacted to provide tax relief to electric
utilities.
In addition to these changes, several tax incentives being proposed
by the President to encourage specific economic activity will reduce
individual and corporation income taxes. In order to encourage financial institutions to hold residential mortgages, a new tax credit is
proposed as part of the Financial Institutions Act to become effective
January 1, 1977. The credit will be a percentage of interest income
received on residential mortgages and will range from 1.5% to 3.8%
depending on the fraction of the institution's assets held in the form
of residential mortgages. Individuals holding residential mortgages
will be eligible for the credit at the 1.5% rate. Also, the current tax
provision that permits financial institutions to maintain excess bad
debt reserves would be phased out. These proposals, combined, reduce
receipts by $0.3 billion in 1977.
To stimulate employment in areas of particularly high unemployment (7% or greater), a tax incentive is proposed to encourage construction of new facilities, or expansion of old facilities, in such areas.
1
Combining the effect of the Revenue Adjustment Act and the President's tax reduction proposals
the spei :ific provisions that will apply to individual incomes received in calendar year 1976 are:
personal exemption of $875;
tax credit per exemption of $17.50 or a credit equal to 1 % of the taxpayer's income (up to
$9,000). whichever is larger;
low income allowance of $2,300 for a joint return and $1,750 for singles;
percentage standard deduction of 16% of AGI with a maximum of $2,650 for a joint return
and $2,100 for singles;
—an earned income credit equal to 5% of earned income with a maximum of $200; and
—an average of the rate structures in effect under the Revenue Adjustment Act and the President's tax reduction proposals.




BUDGET RECEIPTS

47

This will be accomplished by allowing, in addition to the full investment tax credit, very rapid amortization (one-half the useful life on
buildings; 5 years on all capital equipment) when a project in one of
these areas is begun between January 20, 1976, and a year later, and
completed within 36 months.
Tax incentives are also proposed to induce broader ownership of
common stock. This plan will provide a tax deferral for funds invested
in stock purchase plans established by employers or directly by
individuals. There will be a limit imposed on the maximum annual
contribution, and this maximum will be phased out at higher income
levels. Funds must remain invested for at least 7 years, and are
subject to tax at the time of withdrawal. This proposal will become
effective July 1, 1976, and the full deduction will be allowed for
calendar year 1976.
Integration of individual and corporation income taxation as outlined in Administration testimony last July is also proposed effective
January 1, 1978. The effect on receipts is reflected in the long-range
receipts estimates in Part 3.
Legislation will also be proposed to ease the burden of estate and
gift taxes on farms and other small businesses. This legislation will
not result in a significant loss in receipts.
The other major tax proposals in this budget are to increase social
security and unemployment trust fund taxes to place these funds on a
sounder financial basis. The combined employer-employee social
security tax rate will increase from 11.7% to 12.3% effective January
1, 1977. This rate change will increase receipts by $3.3 billion in
1977. Also proposed is an increase in the Federal unemployment
insurance tax rate (from 0.5% to 0.65%) and wage base (from $4,200
to $6,000) effective January 1, 1977. These changes will increase
1977 receipts by $2.1 billion.
CHANGES IN BUDGET RECEIPTS
Budget receipts are estimated to rise by $16.5 billion in 1976 and
$53.7 billion in 1977. The year-to-year changes can be divided between
those due to growth in the tax base and those due to revisions in the
tax structure. Under the tax rates and structure in effect on January 1,
1974, receipts would have risen by $19.4 billion in 1976 (from $290.8
billion to $310.2 billion) and by $61.1 billion in 1977 (from $310.2
billion to $371.3 billion). Thus, enacted and proposed tax law changes,
which are shown in the accompanying table, reduce the growth in
receipts by $2.9 billion in 1976 and by $7.4 billion in 1977.




48

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977
CHANGES IN BUDGET RECEIPTS
[In billions of dolars]
1975
estimate

Receipts under tax rates and structure in effect Jan. 1,
1974
Increase in import fee on petroleum products by administrative action. __
Enacted legislative changes:

Social security taxable earnings base increases:
$13,200 to$14,100 effective Jan. 1,1975
$14,100 to $15,300 effective Jan. 1,1976
$15,300to$16,500effectivejan.1,19771
Tax Reduction Act of 1975
Revenue Adjustment Act of 1975
Liberalized deduction for individual contributions to
pension plans
Reduction in telephone excise tax
Increase in SMI (medicare) premium
Total, receipts under existing legislation

1976
estimate

290.8

310.2

+.4

-10.2

1977
estimate

+1.7

+.1

TQ
estimate

—.2
—.1
+.1
281.0

87.2

371.3

+1.6
+.2

+.4
+.6

-9.8
-6.0

-.2
-.5

+2.1
+2.4
+.8
+.4
—1.9

—.1
—.1
+.1

—.5
—.9
+.3

—.3
—.4
+.1
297.3

87.4

374.1

-5.4

-27.5
—.3
—.3

—*

—.3

Changes due to tax proposals:

Individual and corporation income tax reductions
effectivejulyi.1976
Financial Institutions Act
Stock ownership incentives
Accelerated depreciation on investment in high unemployment areas
Social security tax rate increase from 1 ].7% to 12.3%
effective Jan. 1.19771
Unemployment tax rate and base increase Jan. 1,

—*

_..

1977
Other

+.2

Total, receipts under existing and proposed legislation

281.0

297.5

+3.3

-*

+2.1
+.1

81.9

351.3

"Less than $50 million.
1
The effect of the taxable earnings base increase is calculated using a tax rate of 11.7 %. The effect
of the tax rate increase is calculated using a taxable earnings base of $ 16,500.

RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
Individual income taxes.—Individual income tax receipts are
estimated at $130.8 billion in 1976 and $153.6 billion in 1977. As
discussed earlier, enacted and proposed tax reductions reduce receipts
from this source by $13.2 billion in 1976 and $24.4 billion in 1977.
In the absence of these tax law changes, individual income taxes would
increase by $34.0 billion in 1977 rather than by $22.8 billion as
projected here.




49

BUDGET RECEIPTS

Corporation income taxes.—Corporation income tax receipts are
estimated at $40.1 billion in 1976 and $49.5 billion in 1977. Enacted
and proposed tax law changes reduce these receipts by $2.7 billion in
1976 and $5.5 billion in 1977. In the absence of these changes, profits
taxes would increase by $12.2 billion in 1977, reflecting the large
increase in profits that is expected to accompany the economic
recovery.
Budget Receipts: 1967-1977
S Billion

SSilliom

400

m
Told

300-

-300

-200

-H00

mt

im

wo mt

mt

m$ wu ms

tm

*x Ptopotak in i9U md 1977.

Social insurance taxes and contributions.—Included
in this
category are social security and railroad retirement taxes, unemployment insurance taxes and deposits, Federal employee retirement
contributions, and premium payments for supplementary medical
insurance.
Receipts from this source are expected to total $113.1 billion in
1977, up by $20.5 billion from 1976. Proposed legislation, as described
earlier, accounts for $5.4 billion of this increase in 1977 receipts. These
receipt figures also reflect a statutory increase in the taxable earnings
base under social security from $14,100 to $15,300 effective January 1,




50

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

1976, and an anticipated increase from $15,300 to $16,500 effective
January 1, 1977, due to the operation of the automatic adjustment
mechanism provided in current law. The increase in January 1977
will be determined by the increase in the average taxable wage from
the first quarter of calendar year 1975 to the first quarter of calendar
year 1976, with the amount of the increase rounded to the nearest
multiple of $300.
Excise taxes.—Excise taxes are levied on a variety of products,
services, and activities. Receipts from these taxes in 1977 are estimated at $17.8 billion, which is $0.9 billion more than in 1976. Excise
tax receipts in both 1976 and 1977 reflect the continued phasing
out of the telephone excise tax. This tax rate was reduced from 7%
to 6% on January 1, 1976, and will be reduced to 5% on January 1,
1977.
Other receipts.—Estate and gift taxes, customs, and miscellaneous
receipts are estimated to total $17.3 billion in 1977, an increase of
$0.1 billion from 1976. The miscellaneous receipts estimate reflects
elimination of the import fees on crude oil and petroleum products
that were imposed by administrative action in 1975. Because of
recent court action challenging the legality of the imposition of these
import fees, all such fees collected after August 11, 1975, are being
held in a deposit fund. The budget estimates assume that this litigation is resolved in the Government's favor and include the fees in
1976 receipts.
In addition to budget receipts, the Government receives significant proprietary income from the public. This income is derived
from various market-oriented activities—such as rents, royalties, and
the sale of Government products and property (such as timber and
veterans life insurance). Since this income arises from business-type
transactions rather than from taxation, it is treated as an offset to
related outlays and budget authority rather than as budget receipts.
The detail of proprietary receipts from the public is shown in table
13 of Part 8.
ANALYSIS OF 1975 RECEIPTS
This section explains the differences between actual receipts by
major source for the last completed fiscal year and the original budget
estimates for that year. The Congressional Budget Act of 1974 requires
that this information be included in each budget beginning with the one
for 1978. This kind of information was presented last year for 1974,
and is presented again this year for 1975, to facilitate the transition to
the new congressional budget process.




BUDGET RECEIPTS

51

As shown by the table below, receipts for 1975 were $14.0 billion
lowei than originally estimated in the budget for that year (submitted
in February 1974), largely because legislated tax changes were different from those assumed in the budget for individual and corporation income taxes.
COMPARISON OF 1975 BUDGET RECEIPTS
[In billions of dollars]
February
1974
estimate

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions
Excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs
Miscellaneous receipts
Total

Actual

Change,
actual
less
estimate

129.0

122.4

—6.6

48.0
85.6
17.4
6.0
3.8
5.2

40.6
86.4
16.6
4.6
3.7
6.7

-7.4
0.8
-0.9
-1.4
-0.1
1.6

295.0

281.0

-14.0

Individual income taxes in 1975 were $6.6 billion lower than
originally estimated. The major cause was the Tax Reduction Act of
1975, which reduced individual income tax receipts in 1975 by $9.4
billion. Partially offsetting this legislated reduction were increases
amounting to about $3.0 billion. About $1.0 billion of this increase
resulted from congressional inaction on tax reform and simplification
proposals in the 1975 budget. Personal income in calendar year 1974
was about $20 billion higher than originally projected, accounting for
the remaining $2.0 billion increase.
Corporation income taxes were $7.4 billion below the original budget
estimate. About $3.8 billion of this reduction reflects differences in tax
law from what was proposed in the 1975 budget. The Tax Eeduction
Act of 1975 lowered corporation income tax receipts by $0.8 billion,
and inaction on a proposed windfall profits tax on the sale of domestic
crude oil lowered receipts by $3.0 billion. The remaining reduction of
$3.6 billion is composed of a $2.0 billion increase in refunds and a $1.6
billion decrease in tax payments. This net $3.6 billion reduction was
caused primarily by a lower effective tax rate than was originally
assumed and was not affected greatly by changes in corporate profits.
Corporate profits for calendar years 1973, 1974, and 1975 all affect
fiscal year 1975 collections. Profits for 1973 and 1975 were below the
original assumption while those for 1974 were above the original
estimate; the effects of these differences were largely offsetting.




52

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Social insurance taxes and contributions were $0.8 billion higher
than originally estimated, with almost all of the increase in higher
unemployment tax receipts. These were largely due to increased State
taxes deposited in the Treasury to finance unemployment benefits.
Social security taxes and other contributions for social insurance were
each within $0.1 billion of the original estimates.
Excise taxes, estate and gift taxes, and customs duties were below
the original estimates by $0.9 billion, $1.4 billion, and $0.1 billion,
respectively. Miscellaneous receipts were $1.6 billion above the
original estimate, largely because of higher deposits of earnings by
the Federal Reserve System ($1.1 billion) and the increased import
fees on petroleum and petroleum products in calendar year 1975
($0.4 billion).




PART 5

THE FEDERAL
PROGRAM BY FUNCTION




53

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
This section discusses budget outlays in terms of the major functions
or purposes being served. The functional structure groups the budget
authority, outlays, and tax expenditures of budget and off-budget
Federal agencies into relatively homogeneous categories to facilitate
understanding and analysis of the budget. To the extent feasible
these groupings transcend agency or organization lines.
Federal activities are classified in one, and only one, function.
Because most activities serve more than one purpose, it is necessary, in
deciding how they will be classified, to make judgments as to their
single most important purpose. Consequently, the total in a function
is not a complete measure of all Federal activity serving that purpose. For example, payments to retired military personnel are classified
in the national defense function, even though one of their major
purposes is the same as that of retirement payments to former civilian
employees of the Federal Government, which are classified in the
income security function. Thus, spending for income security is underestimated as a result of this classification of military retirement
benefits.
Some important Federal activities are not explicitly identified in the
functional classification structure. Housing is not. While all housing
programs have a common purpose—better housing—this purpose is
subordinated in the present functional classification to such other
purposes as community and regional development, income support,
aid to business, national defense, and veterans benefits and services.
With all its limitations, however, the functional classification has
proven to be a useful structure for the presentation of the Federal
program for nearly three decades.
Functional data appear in several other places in this and other
budget documents. The budget accounts listing (BAL) in Part 7
presents budget authority and outlays by agency and appropriation
account and includes an identification number indicating the functional classification of all accounts. Tables 14 and 15 in Part 8 show
budget authority and outlays by function, subfunction, and agency.
This information permits the functional and subfunctional totals
discussed in this section and in other parts of the budget to be crossreferenced to agency and account data in the BAL and the budget
appendix. Table 19 provides data on budget outlays by function and
subfunction for the years 1967 through 1977. Historical data on budget
outlays by function for the years 1940 through 1977 and by sub54




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

55

function for the years 1962 through 1977 are available upon request
from OMB. In addition, Special Analysis F of the budget shows tax
expenditure data by function. Part 6 of this budget document discusses
the criteria for the functional classification.
While budget outlays have been presented on a functional basis
since 1948, this classification has taken on new importance with
enactment of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93344). Under terms of this act, Congress is now required to adopt at
least two concurrent resolutions on the budget each year. The first
resolution is to provide targets for budget authority and outlays
by major function; the process of authorizations and appropriations is to work in tandem with the first concurrent resolution to
ensure that congressional action on specific appropriations and authorizations is consistent with the overall targets. The second concurrent resolution adjusts the overall targets and converts them
into firm ceilings, including any directions to congressional committees
necessary to meet these ceilings. As a result, the functional structure
is now being used as a basis for budget review as well as a means of
displaying budget information.
FUNCTIONAL CHANGES IN THE 1977 BUDGET
The functional classification structure used in the 1977 budget is
very close to that used in the 1976 budget. The principal changes from
the 1976 budget are as follows:
• The word "manpower" has been replaced by "training and employment" in function 500 and subfunction 504, and by the word
"labor" in subfunction 505. This word change has no effect on
the composition of the function.
• A new subfunction 155, "International financial programs," has
been established to show the Export-Import Bank separately from
subfunction 151 (foreign economic and financial assistance).
• A new subfunction 555, "General health financing assistance,"
has been added to accommodate a proposed block grant, "Financial Assistance for Health Care."
• Subfunction 252 (earth sciences) has been abolished; virtually
all of its outlays are now included in subfunction 306 (other
natural resources).
• To accommodate the broadening of the functional classification
to include off-budget Federal agencies, the title of subfunction
402 was changed from "Payment to the Postal Service" to
"Postal Service."
• In addition, a new subfunction 807 was established for the
Federal Financing Bank (FFB). Because, under law, the FFB is
not included in the budget (it is an "off-budget" Federal agency),
this does not affect the functional tables for the budget.

210-000

0 - 7 6 - 5




56

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL TEAR 1977

Federal Outlays—Constant (977 Dollars
$ Billion,

400

300-

200-

tm

100 ~

mo

1960

1965

W70

1915

'11

BUDGET TRENDS
The table on page 57 presents budget outlays by function for the
years 1969-77. Outlays for human resources increase $141.7 billion or
223% during this period, while spending for defense rises $20.9 billion
or 26% and outlays for all other categories expand by $46.9 billion or
115%. Among the other categories, the most rapid growth has been in
areas of new, but sustained, national interest—natural resources, environment, and energy; law enforcement and justice; and general
purpose fiscal assistance to State and local governments.
The "real" level of program change over this period is partially
masked since it reflects current dollar spending for a period marked by
high rates of inflation. Total budget outlays in 1977 constant prices
are estimated to be 16% higher in 1977 than in 1969; national defense
spending in constant prices will be 33% less in 1977 than in 1969,
while nondefense spending will be up 55%, as reflected in the chart
showing Federal outlays in constant 1977 dollars.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

57

BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1969-77 *
(In billions of dollars]
1969

National defense
Human resources

1970

1971

1972

1973

_

Other nondefense
(Physical resources)
Natural resources, environment,
and energy
Agriculture
Commerce and transportation..
Community and regional development
(Net interest)
Interest
Interest received by trust funds.
(Allother)
International affairs
General science, space, and
technology
Law enforcement and justice...
General government
Revenue sharing and general
purpose fiscal assistance
Allowances
Undistributed offsetting receipts
(except interest)
.

1976
est.

1977
est.

78.6 86.6 92.8 101.1

63.6 72.7 89.0 103.8 115.7

131.5 168.1198.5 205.3

11.9
18.8
73.0
12.0

40.8 44.6 45.7 50.7 55.8

11.6
22.1
84.4
13.4

15.2 18.9 16.6
27.6 32.1 34.4
108.6 128.5 137.1
16.6 19.0 17.2

58.3 69.8 82.2 87.7

(19.0) (21.5) (23.3) (25.6) (26.3) (26.8) (31.5) (38.3) (37.5)
3.9
5.8
7.1

4.0
5.2
9.1

4.9 5.5
4.3 5.3
10.4 10.6

5.9
4.9
9.9

6.6
2.2
13.1

9.5
1.7
16.0

11.8
2.9
17.8

13.8
1.7
16.5

2.2 3.2 3.6 4.2 5.5
4.9 4.4 5.8 5.5
(12.7) (14.4) (14.8) (15.5) (17.4) (21.5) (23.3) (26.8) (32.9)
15.8 18.3 19.6 20.6 22.8 28.1 31.0 34.8 41.3
-3.1 -3.9 -4.8 -5.1 -5.4 -6.6 -7.7 -8.0 -8.4
(9.1) (8.8) (7.6) (9.5) (12.1) (10.0) (15.0) (17.1) (17.3)
3.8 3.6 3.1 3.7 3.0
3.6 4.4 5.7
6.8
5.0
.8
1.6

4.5
1.0
1.9

4.2
1.3
2.2

4.2
1.6
2.5

4.0
2.1
2.7

4.0
2.5
3.3

4.0
2.9
3.1

4.3
3.4
3.5

4.5
3.4
3.4

4

.5

.5

.5

7.2
___

6.7

7.0
__

7.2
.2

7.4
2.3

___

- 2 . 4 - 2 . 6 - 3 . 7 - 3 . 0 - 6 . 9 -10.1 - 6 . 4 - 7 . 2 - 1 0 . 5

Total budget outlays...... 184.5 196.6 211.4 231.9 246.5
Excluding outlays for the transition quarter.




1975

80.2 79.3 76.8 77.4 75.1

Education, training, employment,
and social services
6.9 7.9 9.0 11.7
Health
11.8 13.1 14.7 17.5
Income security
37.3 43.1 55.4 63.9
Veterans benefits and services.... 7.6 8.7 9.8 10.7

1

1974

268.4 324.6 373.5 394.2

58

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

TAX EXPENDITURES
While budget outlays are the most obvious method by which the
Federal Government allocates resources, other fiscal activities of the
Government also have large effects on resource allocation. Tax expenditures are a major example of such activity.
Tax expenditures are the revenue losses attributable to provisions of
the Federal income tax laws that allow a special exclusion, exemption,
or deduction from income or provide a special credit, a preferential
rate of tax, or a deferral of tax liability.
Ambiguities sometimes arise in determining whether a particular
section of the tax law represents a special provision leading to a tax
expenditure or whether it represents a part of the "normal tax
structure" which is not intended to convey a special advantage to
particular forms of economic activity or to individuals in special
circumstances. The tax expenditure concept is relatively new and it
will take time to resolve these ambiguities. As a result, this concept
can be expected to evolve through time. Special Analysis F, "Tax
Expenditures/ 7 in the Special Analyses volume of the budget, discusses
in detail conceptual and measurement issues involved in tax expenditures, and delineates the boundaries of the tax expenditure concept
that are used in the budget. It also presents an extended listing of tax
expenditures, including some that have not previously been identified.
Almost all tax expenditures serve either to encourage particular
economic activities or to reduce the taxes of persons considered to be
in adverse circumstances. Among the economic activities encouraged
are private investment, spending by State and local governments, and
support of charities. Among the persons whose tax burdens are
lightened are the aged, those with large medical expenses, and recipients of social insurance payments.
Tax expenditures are instruments of public policy and generally
can be viewed as alternatives to other Government fiscal action such
as direot outlays and credit programs. Consequently, the Congressional
Budget Act of 1974 requires that they now be included in the
budget—the central document dealing with Government resource
allocation. Most tax expenditures are readily classified into the same
functional categories as are spending programs. The more important of
these are discussed in the functional sections that follow in order to
compare them with outlay programs that serve the same broad functional purpose. However, some of the largest tax expenditures have
been classified into three functions that have no comparable outlays:
business investment, personal investment, and other tax expenditures.
The tax credit for investment in business equipment is the largest
item in the business investment category. The reduction in receipts
due to this credit is expected to be $9.3 billion in 1977 under the




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

59

Administration's proposal to make permanent an increase in the
credit that the Tax Reduction Act of 1975 temporarily provided.
Personal investment tax expenditures encourage investments by
individuals/The taxation of most realized capital gains at rates lower
than those which apply to ordinary income is estimated to reduce tax
receipts from individuals by over $6 billion in 1977. The deductibility
of mortgage interest and property taxes on owner-occupied homes
encourages investment in home ownership; the tax loss is estimated at
$7.7 billion. The exclusion from income of interest on life insurance
savings provides a $1.9 billion dollar tax expenditure that fosters
investment through life insurance.
The deductibility of charitable contributions is the largest among
"other tax expenditures." It is estimated to reduce 1977 receipts by
$4.5 billion.
Estimates of the magnitude of tax expenditures are based upon a
concept analogous to the outlays concept in spending programs. That
is, the current flow of assistance—rather than commitments that result
in future assistance—is estimated. A few cautions with respect
to the estimates should be noted. First, they do not always indicate
the increase in receipts that would initially appear if a given tax
expenditure were eliminated. In some cases, transitional effects would
limit increases for many years. Moreover, in the case of those tax
expenditures that encourage particular economic activities, eliminating
the tax expenditure might lead to a decline in the activity and hence
to a smaller increase in receipts than the estimate suggests, or even
to a decline in receipts. Similarly, on the outlay side, eliminating a
given income security program might lead to greater outlays under
other programs and hence to a smaller saving than the outlays of the
eliminated program.
Second, the estimated revenue increase that would result from
eliminating some combination pf tax expenditures is not, in general,
equal to the sum of each tax expenditure estimated separately. The
overall revenue gain may be greater if, for example, the elimination
of multiple exclusions moves taxpayers into higher tax brackets.
Alternatively, it may be smaller if the elimination of multiple deductions caused taxpayers to switch from itemizing deductions to using
the standard deduction. Thus, tax expenditures should not be simply
added together. In a few cases, totals that take account of interactions
have been computed and are presented.
Third, because tax expenditures are measured as departures from
the structure established by the rest of the income tax system, changes
in that structure affect the magnitude of tax expenditures. For
example, the Tax Reduction Act of 1975 and the Revenue Adjustment
Act of 1975 made major increases in the standard deduction, with the
result that many tax expenditures are smaller in 1976 than in 1975.




60

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Moreover, if changes in tax expenditures brought about major shifts in
the size or distribution of the tax burden, accompanying adjustments
in the rest of the tax system—for example, changes in the tax rate
tables—might be expected to alter or offset their effect.
Finally, in the case of items for which information is not reported
on tax returns—for instance, social security benefits or tax exempt
interest income from State and local debt—estimates may involve
sizable uncertainty even for prior years.
OTHER FEDERAL FISCAL ACTIVITIES
The Federal Government allocates resources by means other than
those reflected in budget outlays and tax expenditures. Activities most
similar in nature to budget outlays are the outlays of the off-budget
Federal agencies, which are federally owned and controlled but
excluded from the budget under provisions of laws, and the outlays
of the Government-sponsored enterprises, which are privately owned
but were established by the Federal Government to perform specialized
functions. Also, Federal credit guarantees and the regulation of
economic activity have major impacts on the economy in many
sectors. Finally, taxation affects the allocation of resources among
private uses and the distribution of income among individuals in
many important ways not covered by tax expenditures. Federal
taxes other than income taxes affect the economy, as also do tax
rates, personal exemptions, and other features of the income taxes
that are not treated as tax expenditures.
In order to set many of these activities in perspective with budget
outlays and tax expenditures, the description of Federal programs
by function includes discussion of off-budget Federal agencies,
Government-sponsored enterprises, credit guarantees, and major
initiatives or changes in economic regulation. Further discussion of
off-budget Federal agencies and Government-sponsored enterprises
is contained in Part 2. A more thorough analysis of Federal credit
programs generally is presented in Special Analysis E, "Federal
Credit Programs/ 1 in the Special Analyses volume of this budget.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

61

NATIONAL DEFENSE
The national defense function includes the funds to develop, maintain, and equip the military forces of the United States and to provide
military assistance to foreign governments.
Program

Highlights

• Continue the increase begun in 1976 that reversed the
7-year decline in real defense resources.
• Further modernize strategic and general purpose forces
to deter nuclear and conventional attacks.
• Improve the readiness, combat effectiveness, and structure of general purpose forces within current personnel
levels.
• Reduce programs that do not contribute directly to
combat effectiveness, and lower civilian personnel levels
accordingly.

The fundamental goal of the defense establishment is to ensure the
freedom and security of the United States and to protect the vital
interests of the United States throughout the world.
To ensure that American defense forces remain adequate to meet
these goals, an increase in funding—beyond what is necessary to
offset inflation—is essential. This increase will permit the development
and procurement of up-to-date military equipment needed to improve
the effectiveness of our combat forces. Proposed outlays for national
defense programs rise from $92.8 billion in 1976 to $101.1 billion in
1977, and to $112.9 billion in 1978.
To achieve the improvements needed, while staying within the
proposed budget, requires further increases in the efficiency of the
defense establishment. Toward this objective reductions are proposed
in personnel levels, benefits, and support activities that make only
marginal contributions to combat effectiveness. Many of these reductions will require legislation. Without such legislation additional funds
would be required.
Department of Defense.—The national security goals of the
Department of Defense are to:
• maintain a worldwide military balance, in conjunction with our
allies, and thus reduce the threat of war;




62

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

• deter any attack against the United States, its allies, and other
nations vital to United States security; and, if deterrence fails,
ensure an outcome favorable to the United States; and
• assure the flow of ocean-going trade and supplies b y protecting
the sea lanes that are vital to the national security and economic
well-being of the United States, its allies, and its trading partners.
NATIONAL DEFENSE
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

Department of Defense—Military:
Military personnel
Proposed legislation
Retired military personnel
Proposed legislation
Operation and maintenance
Proposed legislation
Procurement
Research, development, test and evaluation.
Military construction
Family housing
Revolving and management funds and other.
Allowances for:
Civilian and military pay raises:
Existing legislation
Proposed legislation
...Other legislation

Recommended
budget
1976
TQ
1977
authority
estimate estimate estimate for 1977 1
Outlays

1975
actual

24,968

25,495

6,693

7,636
—5
4,975
2,471
483
324
—112

25,251
—62
8,500
—112
30, 805
—135
20,354
10,435
1,825
1,372
—225

25,498
—62
8,494
—112
32,149
—221
29,310
10, 854
2,277
1,190
277

6,242

7,325

1,977

26,330

28,254

16,042
8,866
1,462
1,124
—14

16,486
9,107
1,840
1,297
—92

51

29

1,399
—9
163

1,441
—9
164

..-

Subtotal, military
Military assistance....

85,020
999

89.763
1,437

24,471
129

99,561
539

111,250
2,516

Subtotal, military and military assistance
Atomic energy defense activities
Defense-related activities
Deductions for offsetting receipts.

86,019
1,506
-936
—4

91,200
1.621
-59
—3

24,600 100.100
443
1,833
-14
-801
—1
—3

113,766
1,943
-802
—3

86,585

92,759

25,028

114,905

Total, national defense

101,129

1
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table 14
of Part 8.

United States forces as proposed in this budget, together with
allied forces, are sufficient to meet these goals. Despite an increase in
Soviet defense spending, military personnel levels, and equipment
modernization, an acceptable military balance exists in the world
today, primarily due to four factors:
• An effective strategic deterrent has been maintained through
selected force improvements.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

63

• United States and allied forces have been strengthened by the
introduction of modern tactical aircraft, the continuing modernization of the surface fleet, and increased purchases of tanks,
antitank weapons, and other ground force equipment and
munitions.
• The fighting capability of the defense establishment has been
improved—without an increase in overall personnel levels—by
the conversion of support resources into combat resources. The
number of Army divisions has been expanded from 13 in 1974 to
16 in 1976, while the total number of military personnel has
remained at 2.1 million. The combat effectiveness of the tactical
air forces and naval forces has also been improved.
• Much of the Soviet military increase has been directed toward
the Chinese bolder.
The United States seeks to reduce military expenditures and international tensions through negotiations. These include the strategic
arms limitation talks with the Soviet Union and discussions on mutual
and balanced force reductions in central Europe between NATO
and Warsaw Pact members. Effective agreements can be reached,
however, only if United States and allied forces remain at least as
strong as those of potential adversaries.
To maintain the military balance in the interim, the 1977 budget
contains proposals to carry forward the increase in Army divisions,
continue the modernization of ground, sea, and tactical air equipment,
and improve the readiness of the combat forces. These measures
will require continuing budget increases, over and above amounts
needed to offset inflation.
To moderate the increases in resources that are required to maintain
U.S. military strength, the 1977 budget contains the following
proposals to increase the efficiency of the defense establishment:
• restrain the growth in compensation levels;
• reduce civilian personnel positions by consolidating headquarters and other base facilities;
• phase out subsidies for the operating costs of military commissaries over a 3-year period;
• eliminate dual compensation of Federal employees on active duty
for training with the National Guard or Reserve;
• reduce temporary duty and permanent change-of-station travel;
• reduce petroleum consumption for proficiency flying programs
through greater use of smaller aircraft and ground training aids;
• reduce the scope of the civil defense program, while continuing to
support nuclear attack preparedness activities at the State and
local level;
• hold new construction below 1976 levels; and
• reduce the paid drill strength of the Naval Reserve by 40,000.




64

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

19 77

Most of these actions require the approval of Congress. If these
actions are not approved, additional defense appropriations of up to
$2.8 billion would be required in 1977. These amounts cannot be offset
by reductions in resources needed for basic defense preparedness.
Military and Military Assistance Programs, 1950-1977

-150

-100

Current Dollars

-50

1 1 1 1I I I I 111 1I 1 1I I I 11I I I I 1 1
1950

1955

FiteafYtat*
1
Totoi Obt.sotfoiw! Authority,

1960

1965

1970

1975

*77

Estimate

As shown in the accompanying chart, increases in the total current
dollar military budget were insufficient to offset inflation during the
1968-75 period. This resulted in a 7-year decline in Department of
Defense military functions and military assistance budget resources
when measured in dollars of constant 1977 purchasing power. This
decline was reversed in 1976, and further increases proposed for 1977
would continue to improve purchasing power. This chart is in terms
of total obligational authority—current budget authority enacted
each year by Congress, plus previously enacted authority that is
transferred to subsequent years.
The following table summarizes the total obligational authority for
Department of Defense military functions and military assistance on
the basis of major missions.




T H E FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

65

SUMMARY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BUDGET PROGRAM i
[In billions of dollars]
Major mil itary programs

Total obligational authority
1975
actual

1976

TQ

1977

Strategic forces
General purpose forces
Intelligence and communications
Airlift and sealift
Guard and Reserve
Research and development2
Central supply and maintenance
Training, medical, and other general personnel activities
Administration and associated activities
Support of other nations1

7.2
28.1
6.3
.9
4.8
7.7
9.1

7.3
33.4
6.7
1.3
5.4
8.7
9.7

1.8
7.1
1.6
.3
1.5
2.2
2.6

9.4
40.2
7.7
1.6
5.9
10.5
10.9

20.0
2.0
1.8

21.8
2.2
1.8

5.4
.5
.1

23.0
2.1
1.4

Total obligational authority,...
Prior-year funds and other financial adjustments

87.9
3. 6

98.3
2.4

23.1
—.1

112.7
1.1

91.5

100.7

23.0

113,8

Total budget authority
1
2

Includes grant military assistance program and foreign military sales programs.
Excludes R. & D. in other program areas on systems approved for production.

Strategic forces.—The principal objective of strategic forces is to
deter nuclear attack, or the threat of attack, against the United States
or its allies by maintaining:
• overall balance with Soviet strategic forces;
© no perceived advantage to the Soviet Union of a first use of
strategic weapons; and
© the ability to counter rapidly any adverse change in the strategic
balance.
Arms control negotiations are being pursued to stabilize the strategic
balance and eventually to reduce the level of forces. Both as an aid
to these negotiations and as a safeguard if they are not successful,
research and development efforts will continue to improve weapon
systems.
The 1977 strategic program of $9.4 billion in total obligational
authority continues the planned modernization of strategic forces and
provides options for more extensive future modernization. Major
efforts, including those funded under research and development, are:
• development of the B-l bomber to strengthen and update
strategic bomber forces, and initial procurement of the B-l if
test results are favorable;
• continued development and procurement of the Trident missile
and submarine to give the seagoing strategic forces greater range
and less vulnerability;
• further development of a new intercontinental ballistic missile
for deployment in the mid-1980's;




66

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

• full-scale development of long-range strategic cruise missiles for
aircraft, submarine, or surface ship deployment;
• increases in the accuracy of ballistic missile warheads;
• improvement of technology for ballistic missile defense systems;
and
• further improvements in systems for early warning of attack and
for command, control and communications.
General purpose forces.—Land, sea, and air forces in this category
are intended to deter or counter threats short of strategic nuclear conflict. These threats range from isolated incidents to major sustained
conventional warfare and tactical nuclear conflict. The objective of
general purpose forces is to deter such conflicts wherever possible and,
where deterrence is not possible, to ensure an outcome favorable to
the United States. Recommended total obligational authority for
general purpose forces is $40.2 billion in 1977.
For the last 2 years a major effort has been underway to increase
combat readiness and effectiveness so that U.S. forces are better
prepared for short, intense conflicts. New combat units have been
established by making offsetting reductions in headquarters and
general support activities. A major initiative in the 1976 budget was to
increase the number of active Army divisions from 13 to 16. All 16
divisions have now been established and further actions in 1977 will
bring the new divisions up to combat strength. The Administration's
efforts in this direction will continue in 1977 with a program that adds
the equivalent of four wings to the Air Force with no overall increase
in total military personnel.
Both qualitative and quantitative improvements in land forces
are provided for in the 1977 budget. The production of helicopters and
antitank guided missiles will continue, and tank production will be
increased in order to permit the eventual conversion of two light infantry divisions into mechanized divisions and to rebuild inventory
levels by replacing tanks provided to Israel. Major new systems under
development for support of land forces include the advanced XM-1
tank, a mechanized infantry combat vehicle, and an attack helicopter.
The combat effectiveness of the tactical air forces will be increased as
more F-14 and F-15 fighters are purchased. Air Force air-to-ground
capabilities will be improved with the introduction of the A-10 aircraft, specifically developed to support ground combat units. Air combat fighters are under development for both the Air Force and Navy,
with initial production of the Air Force F-16 air combat fighter scheduled in 1977. This aircraft will meet the varied defense requirements
of the United States and a number of NATO nations. Significant




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

67

savings will be realized through shared production and a high rate of
procurement. Inventory requirements for the Navy A-6 attack aircraft have been met and production of this aircraft will be discontinued.
Procurement of 15 new ships in 1977 will support continued efforts
to modernize general purpose naval forces and rebuild the size and capability of the fleet. In 1965 the United States had 936 warships with an
average age of 16 years. In 1976 the fleet will have 480 active warships
with an average age of 14 years. Fleet readiness will be improved
through increasing overhauls and intermediate maintenance. Three
nuclear-powered attack submarines, designed to hunt down and
destroy enemy submarines, will be procured in 1977. Procurement of
eight guided-missile frigates will provide increased protection of
amphibious force ships, replenishment ships, and merchant convoys
from air, surface, and subsurface attacks.
The 1977 shipbuilding program includes a nonnuclear destroyer and
long-lead funding for a nuclear-powered strike cruiser. Both ships will
carry the Aegis weapon system that will increase the ability of the
fleet to counter the air and cruise missile threat in the 1980's and
beyond. Maintenance capability will be increased through the purchase of several fleet support vessels. These vessels will replace aging
units and provide the additional facilities needed to repair, maintain,
and supply the new combat ships now entering the fleet.
Airlift and sealijt forces,—Effective transportation ie required to
enable U.S. forces to respond on short notice to threats against U.S.
interests throughout the world, to assist nations whose security is
important to the welfare of the United States, and to sustain American forces abroad. Strategic transport capabilities will be increased to
enable adequate U.S. forces to be deployed and sustained in the
critical early days of an intense conflict overseas. To achieve these
objectives, total obligational authority of $1.6 billion is being requested for 1977.
Proposed modifications will improve and extend the service life of
the C-5 and C-141 aircraft. In addition, there will be an evaluation in
1977 among existing large transport aircraft to select a new tanker/
cargo aircraft to be procured in 1978. Portions of the Civil Reserve
Air Fleet will be modified to permit the air transport of oversized
cargo. This will enable commercial aircraft to support active forces
more effectively in either a mobilization or a combat situation.
The sealift program provides transportation for heavy armored
equipment and munitions, as well as petroleum products and dry
cargo. Special ships are also necessary for oceanography, cable maintenance, and the tracking of missiles and space vehicles.




68

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

Guard and Reserve forces.—The effectiveness of Reserve forces will
be increased by modernizing equipment and associating designated
National Guard and Reserve units more closely with specific active
force units. Emphasis will be placed on better management of Reserve
personnel. Naval Reserve paid drill strength will be reduced by 40,000
through the transfer of these positions to the Individual Ready
Reserve in those cases where readiness still can be maintained through
summer training.
Research and development.—Technological superiority of U.S. forces
depends upon adequate investment in research and development. To
maintain this superiority, recommended total obligational authority
will increase to $10.5 billion in 1977, $1.8 billion above the 1976 level.
Strategic weapon systems development will continue on the B—1
aircraft, the Trident submarine and missile system, a new intercontinental ballistic missile system, strategic cruise missiles and warhead
improvements, as will research on ballistic missile defense technology.
Research and development activities will also continue the major
modernization of general purpose forces started in previous years. The
Army development program includes a new tank, infantry combat
vehicle, attack and transport helicopters, and air defense system. The
Navy will develop the F-18 air combat fighter to complement the
sophisticated F—14 fleet defense aircraft. The Navy will also continue
development of improved fleet air defense and antisubmarine systems.
Full-scale development of a tactical cruise missile will lead to a more
effective attack capability for ships.
The Air Force will continue development of the F-46 air combat
fighter. In addition, work will proceed on systems capable of neutralizing enemy air defenses and on exploration of the combat potential of
high-energy lasers and vehicles piloted by remote control. Funding
for a major new aeropropulsion systems test facility will be provided
in 1977. This facility will be required for the development and testing
of advanced military aircraft engines and will result in substantial
future savings in the development costs of such engines.
Training, medical, and other general personnel support activities.—The
increased wages and other pay and benefit improvements associated
with pay comparability and the decision to shift to an all-volunteer
military force have significantly raised the cost of personnel. As
shown in the accompanying table, total personnel-related costs increased from 43% of the Department of Defense budget in 1964 to
over 54% beginning in 1974.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

69

PERSONNEL OUTLAYS AS A SHARE OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BUDGET *
[In billions of dollars]
1964
actual

1968
actual

1974
actual

1975
actual

10.6
2.4
7.3
.5
1.2

15.3
4.6
10.3
.4
2.1

21.0
2.7
13.4
.7
5.1

21.6
3.4
14.6
.9
6.2

22.0
3.6
15.5
1.1
7.3

22.6
3.7
16.0
1.1
8.4

Total personnel outlays

22.0

32.6

43.0

46.7

49.4

51.8

Total outlays

50.8

78.0

78.4

86.0

91.2

100.1

Personnel outlays:
Militarypay
Other military personnel outlays
Civilianpay
Family housing
Military retired pay

1976
est.

1977
est.

Personnel outlays as a percent of total. 43.3% 41.8% 54.8% 54.3% 54.2% 51.7%
1

Department of Defense military functions and military assistance.

Several actions are proposed to moderate the increase in pay-related
costs.
• Civilian personnel employment levels will be reduced.
• The housing system of the Department of Defense will be reformed gradually to eliminate inequities between the value of
housing directly received and the allowances provided in lieu of
housing. As a first step, future military pay raises will be allocated differently among the various pay components.
• Enlistment bonuses are being reduced, and the need to extend
legislation authorizing annual bonuses for physicians as a recruitment and retention device will be reexamined.
• Legislation to replace the basic pay of future cadets at the Service
academies with a method of compensation more appropriate for
students—the payment of expenses plus a monthly allowance—
will be requested.
• Congress will be requested to enact the Defense Officer Personnel
Management Act. This act is designed to match better the
military work force with job requirements, in terms of rank and
length of service.
• New personnel policies will reduce both the costs of military travel
and the adverse effects of frequent transfers on the morale of
military personnel and their dependents.
• Training times will be reduced, personnel will be assigned to
permanent duty stations as soon as possible after training, and
training sites will be consolidated where feasible.
• Legislation has been proposed to reform gradually the career
incentives in the military retirement system. Legislation is also
proposed to revise the formula for the cost-of-living adjustment




70

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

for civilian and military retired pay. This will eliminate provisions
that increase annuities by one percentage point more than the
Consumer Price Index increase.
• Legislation will be proposed to reform aspects of the law governing
wage-board pay rates that result in Government civilian bluecollar workers earning more than their non-Government counterparts. The budgetary effect of this legislation on outlays of the
Department of Defense is included in the defense function.
Further savings will result as the recommendations of a recently
completed comprehensive review of the military health care system
are implemented. Developed by the Department of Defense, the
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and the Office of
Management and Budget, these recommendations would result in
more efficient operations and reduced outlays for the military health
care system in the future.
Military assistance.—Military assistance grants, credit sales,
and training of foreign military personnel furnish other countries the
support necessary to strengthen their own defense efforts. These
programs are discussed in the section on international affairs.
Atomic energy defense activities.—Nuclear weapons research,
development, underground testing, and production activities are expected to remain at about 1976 levels. Additional funds are requested
for safety, environmental, and waste storage improvements as well as
cost increases. The physical security of nuclear weapons and nuclear
materials at Government sites will continue to be improved.
Defense-related activities.—To end the annual registration for
the draft during peacetime, the Selective Service System will be reformed. This reform will yield an annual outlay savings of $33 million
beginning in 1977.
Realization of an estimated $870 million in stockpile receipts is
dependent upon market conditions and the passage by Congress of
$746 million in disposal authority for certain commodities that are in
excess of current needs. Receipts from the sale of excess strategic
stockpile commodities under existing disposal authority are estimated
at $124 million in 1976.




71

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
SUMMARY OF ACTIVE MILITARY PERSONNEL AND FORCES
Description

June 30,
1975
actual

June 30.
1976
estimate

September 30.
1977
estimate

Military personnel (in thousands):

End strength:
Army
Navy...
Marine Corps
Air Force

_

70
9
54
4
16
9
571

74
8
54
3
16
9
63
1

72
8
55
2
16
9
54
8

Total, Department of Defense..
Average strength:
Army
Navy
_
Marine Corps
Air Force

2,127

2,087

Total, Department of Defense...

2.145

2.101

2.096

1.000
54
66
5
44
9

1.000
54
66
5
49
1

1.000
54
66
5
49
1

1
4
3

1
6
3

1
6
3

26
1
4
3

26
1
3
3

2
6
1
3
3

1
5
6
4
16
8
64

1
3
6
5
10
8
62

1
3
7
0
18
8
64

4
1
3
5
1

4
1
3
48

4
1
3
47

778
55
4
13
9
69
2

74
7
59
2
16
9
62
0

2.101
75
8
56
3
16
9
59
7

Strategic forces:

Intercontinental ballistic missiles:
Minuteman
Titan II
Polaris-Poseidon
Strategic bombers..
General purpose forces:

Land forces:
Army divisions
Marine Corps divisions
Tactical air forces:
Air Force wings
Navy attack wings
_
Marine Corps wings
Naval Forces:
Attack and antisubmarine carriers.
Nuclear attack submarines
Other warships
Amphibious assault ships
Airlift and sealift forces:

C-5A airlift squadrons
Other strategic airlift squadrons
Troopships, cargo ships, and tankers.

210-000 O - 76 - 6




72

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
The international affairs function includes programs to achieve a
range of United States economic and security objectives. It is composed of foreign economic and financial assistance, the conduct
of foreign affairs, foreign information and exchange activities, and
international financial programs.

Program

Highlights

• Contribute to a lasting peace in the Middle East.
• Participate in efforts to strengthen the international
trade and monetary system.
• Pursue U.S. initiatives toward creating more cooperative
relationships between the developed and developing
countries.
• Focus development assistance on the needs of the poorest
group of nations.
The achievement of peace throughout the world is this Nation's
foremost international goal. The most immediate threat to that peace
has been in the Middle East, an area of great importance to the
United States. This country has made a major effort to bring peace
to the region, and the recent agreement between Israel and Egypt
is an encouraging sign of progress. The United States, in concert with
the nations of the area, will continue its efforts to promote a durable
settlement.
America's prosperity and the health of the world economy are
closely linked. The United States must, therefore, promote a world
economic system that ensures stability and progress for both developed
and developing nations alike. The United States is committed to work
with the other industrial nations to assure the rapid recovery of their
economies, to accelerate completion of trade negotiations, to achieve
monetary reform, and to foster economic growth in the developing
nations. Outlays for international affairs are expected to total $6.8
billion in 1977 and $7.8 billion in 1978.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

73

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
[In millions of dollars]

1975
actual

Foreign economic and financial assistance 3___
Conduct of foreign affairs:
Administration of foreign affairs
International organizations and conferences.
Other

Total, international affairs 4

4,953

964

4,736

5,461

412
223
23

487
301
26

127
205
7

560
322
28

617
339
29

658

814

339

910

985

290
58

335
63

88
19

324
61

317
69

348

398

108

385

386

(1,504)
-50

(1,358)
-50

1,306
-50

3,348
-50

-50
-449

-77

1,256
-464

3,298
-464

4,358

Subtotal, foreign information and exchange activities
International financial programs:
Export-Import Bank *
Offsetting receipts

3,665

-50
-263

Subtotal, conduct of foreign affairs
Foreign information and exchange activities:
Foreign information activities
Educational exchange activities

Subtotal, international financial
grams
Deductions for offsetting receipts.

Rccommended
budget
19761
TQi
1977
authority
estimate estimate estimate for 1977 2
Outlays

Program or agency

5,665

1,334

6,824

9,666

(370)

pro-

1
Congressional appropriations action has not yet been completed on this function for 1976 and
the transition quarter.
2
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table 14
of 3Part 8.
Detail shown in foreign aid table on p. 75.
4
By law, the Export-Import Bank is excluded from the budget totals from August 17, 1971
through September 30, 1976. Total outlays for the international affairs function including the ExportImport Bank would have been $5,862 million in 1975; $7,023 million in 1976; and $1,704 million in
the transition quarter.

FOREIGN AID

The United States undertakes a variety of programs designed to
further U.S. objectives by directly assisting developing countries.
Foreign aid programs consist of two major components: military
assistance (included in the national defense function) and foreign
economic and financial assistance.
Military assistance.—Defense materiel and services are provided by
the United States to selected countries for their internal security and
self-defense, and to permit the recipient country to participate in
regional or collective security arrangements. Military assistance, administered by the Department of Defense and included in the national




74

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

defense function, is an integral part of the overall American foreign
aid effort.
Budget authority of $840 million is requested to support a military
credit sales program of $2.1 billion, a substantial portion of which will
be for Israel. About $704 million will be in direct credits requiring
budget authority of the same amount. The remainder of the program
will be guaranteed loans for which the funds will be provided by the
Federal Financing Bank. These loans require a guaranty reserve of
10% and thus budget authority of $136 million.
The Administration's budget proposals are based upon a continued
transition from an emphasis on grant military assistance to an emphasis
on foreign military sales credits. In 1977, budget authority for grant
military assistance will decline from the 1976 level of $394 million to
$279 million, and the number of recipient countries will also be
reduced. Total outlays for military assistance are estimated to be
$739 million in 1977. This estimate is $200 million higher than that
shown in the section on national defense because of the exclusion here
of net trust fund outlays related to military cash sales.
Foreign economic and financial assistance.—Provided bilaterally and multilaterally, this assistance is designed to: contribute to
U.S. security objectives; facilitate the economic growth of the developing countries; and respond to the needs of the poorest people of
the world for food, shelter and other necessities of life.
Security supporting assistance provides economic assistance to
selected countries and encourages progress toward a lasting negotiated
settlement in the Middle East. Budget authority of $1.8 billion is
being requested in 1977, primarily for aid to the Middle East.
A Middle East special requirements fund of $35 million is also being
requested to defray the costs of the Sinai Support Mission and to
allow an additional measure of flexibility in responding to unforeseen
events.
Multilateral development assistance.—This assistance is provided
through contributions to the international financial institutions (the
World Bank Group and the regional development banks) and for development programs of international organizations (principally within
the United Nations system). It has become an increasingly important
component of foreign economic development assistance. Multilateral
assistance encourages increased contributions from other donors and
mobilizes private resources for the development effort. For 1977,
$1.2 billion in budget authority is requested for this assistance, with
estimated outlays of $1.1 billion.




75

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
FOREIGN AID
[In millions of dollars]
Budget authority
1975
1976 1
1977
actual
estimate estimate

Assistance programs

1975
actual

Outlays
1976 1
1977
estimate estimate

NATIONAL DEFENSE FUNCTION
Military assistance: 2

Subtotal, military assistance

394
30

279
31

1,065

840

402
247
930

545

-171

-259

-365

-256

-306

-376

1,379

Grant military assistance
Foreign military training *
Military assistance, South Vietnam
Foreign military credit sales
Emergency security assistance for
Israel
Offsetting receipts and other

1,230

785

1,877

2,037

739

1,053

1,389

108

37

496

86

6

569
115

966
217

902
177

550
700
300

556

776
15
198
809

368
28
695
24

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
FUNCTION
Foreign economic and financial assistance:

Security supporting assistance
Middle East special requirements
fund.__
Indochina postwar reconstruction
assistance
Multilateral development assistance:
International financial institutions.
International organizations
International Fund for Agricultural
Development

660

1,873

1,802

100

50

35

619
139

1,076

Subtotal, multilateral
Bilateral development assistance:
Agency for International Development
Overseas Private Investment Corporation
Inter-American Foundation

758

1,505

1,205

685

1,183

1,109

691

1,030

1,127

940

1,135

1,082

12
8

-25
8

-36
8

Subtotal, bilateral
Food for Peace
Migration and refugee assistance
International narcotics control
Peace Corps
Contingency fund
International highway assistance

791
778
68
18
78
2
15

960
936
76
15
86
4
10

1,118
1,209

1,054

Subtotal, foreign economic and
financ al assistance
Deductions for offsetting receipts 4
Total, foreign aid

__

435
230

1,027

178

396

200

30

100
1,030
1,090

1,127
1.169

62
42
81
10

10
34
67
10
2

59
48
78
7
3

996
23
38
65
9
11

3,704
-104

5,744
-412

5,461
-446

3,665
-104

4,953
-412

4,736
-446

4,979

6,563

5,800

5,438

6,578

5,029

1
Congressional appropriations action has not yet been completed on foreign aid for 1976 and the
transition quarter.
2
Excludes trust funds; net of offsetting receipts.
3
Included in grant military assistance in years prior to 1976.
.
_
4
Composed of loan repayments, which are proprietary receipts that are deposited in the Treasury.




76

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

The international financial institutions extend long-term loans to
developing countries to finance development projects. It is proposed
that in 1977 the United States contribute $375 million to the International Development Association, $171 million to the Asian Development Bank, and $440 million toward a new capital replenishment of the Inter-American Development Bank. In addition, a United
States contribution of up to $42 million is proposed for the International Finance Corporation to stimulate private sector activities in
the developing nations.
Voluntary contributions of $178 million are proposed for 10 international organizations and programs primarily oriented toward
economic assistance and humanitarian relief. The largest of these is
the United Nations Development Program.
Authorization has been granted to allow the United States to
contribute one-fifth, but no more than $200 million, of the total
amount mobilized in a new International Fund for Agricultural Development to help finance agricultural production projects in developing countries. Contributions from all sources are expected to
total $1 billion.
Two other major initiatives to hasten the economic growth of the
developing nations are being pursued through the International
Monetary Fund (IMF). Neither of these affects the budget totals.
The United States has proposed a special trust fund within the IMF
to extend concessional aid to the poorer developing nations, financed
in part with funds received by the sale of gold now held by the IMF.
The United States also supports changes in the operations of the IMF's
compensatory financing facility that will make increased IMF resources available to developing nations that suffer sudden shortfalls
in their export earnings.
Bilateral development assistance, provided primarily by the Agency
for International Development (AID), concentrates aid on the
neediest people in the poorer countries. This program emphasizes
expanding agricultural development, checking rapid population
growth, and improving basic health and education services.
Because the economies of some developing countries have progressed, they no longer need highly concessional assistance from AID.
This, combined with the availability to many developing nations of
other public and private sector sources of capital and technical
assistance, has permitted the Administration tb reduce its budget
request somewhat below the amount originally sought in authorizing
legislation for 1977.




77

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Outlays for International Affairs
$ Billion.

6-

Foreign Economic and Financial Assistance

1967

1968 1969 1970 mi

f972

1973 1974 *975

fiscal Years
1

1976

1977

Estimate

Export-lmport & * & w«* « « d * M horn tU Bwlgef from 8/1/72 tkoagJi 9/30/76.

Food for Peace helps alleviate hunger and malnutrition in developing
countries by providing concessional loans and grants to finance
agricultural imports from the United States. Most of the food goes to
the poorer countries, with grants focused on the poorest-fed groups in
in those countries.
Migration and refugee assistance is conducted through American
voluntary agencies, the United Nations, and the Intergovernmental
Committee on European Migration. A 1976 appropriation of $25
million is requested to establish a new emergency refugee and migration assistance fund. No additional budget authority is requested
for the fund in 1977.
International narcotics control assistance is provided to foreign governments and international organizations to control the production,
processing, and illegal trafficking in dangerous drugs in an effort to
curtail their flow into the United States.
The Peace Corps, which will have approximately 5,700 volunteers in
67 countries during 1977, will concentrate its efforts on agriculture,
health and nutrition, education, and conservation.




78

THE BTJDGET FOR FISCAL TEAR 1977
OTHER INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES

Conduct of foreign affairs.—Outlays for the administration of
worldwide U.S. diplomatic and consular responsibilities will increase
by $73 million in 1977. About $45 million of this increase results
from the State Department financing certain administrative services
provided to, and previously funded by, other agencies. It does not
represent a net increase in budget totals. Most of the remaining
increase is due to sharply rising wages and prices abroad. Budget
authority is also requested to begin construction of a new embassy
complex in Moscow.
Outlays for international organizations and conferences increase by
$21 million, primarily reflecting increased assessments for membership
in international organizations. Outlays for the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and the International Trade Commission increase
slightly in 1977, while those for the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission decrease due to the completion of two claims programs.

Foreign information and exchange activities.—Proposed outlays will decrease $13 million in 1977. The decrease in foreign information activities largely reflects savings to the Board for International
Broadcasting resulting from the consolidation of the management
and operation of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty. The activities
of the U.S. Information Agency and the educational exchanges of
the Department of State will also decline in 1977.

International financial programs.—The Export-Import Bank
promotes United States exports by extending direct loans to overseas
buyers, discount loans and guarantees to American banks, and insurance to American exporters. Direct loans in 1977 are estimated to
increase from $3.0 billion to $4.0 billion; discount loans will be
reduced to $1.0 billion as a step toward eventual termination of the
program; and insurance and guarantees are projected at $8.8 billion.
The Bank's budget authority and outlays, excluded by law from the
budget totals since 1971, is included again beginning in 1977. Outlays to finance these activities are estimated at $1.3 billion in 1977.
Pending legislation would enable the United States to provide loan
guarantees to the Financial Support Fund for the industrial countries.
The fund will be available to member countries with major balance
of payments difficulties. No budget authority is required in 1977.
Tax expenditures.—The international affairs function contains a
number of tax expenditures that promote international trade and




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

79

investment. T h e largest—the deferral of taxes on profits of domestic
international sales corporations—is expected to reduce U.S. Treasury
receipts b y $1.6 billion in 1977.
Credit programs.—The international affairs loan and loan guarantee programs are summarized in the table below.
INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
CREDIT PROGRAMS
[In millions of dollars]
1975
actual

19761
estimate

TQi
estimate

1977
estimate

Foreign military credit sales:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period

29
0
-235
95
7
2,100

9
2
-87
90
8
2,300

15
9
-350
85
2
2,600

378
—134
1,386

60
2
-95
1,911

14
1
-49
1,976

72
4
-98
2,621

529
—152
10,813
416

52
7
-205
11,180
55
1

15
3
-53
11,261
50
4

43
6
-231
11,493
71
3

1
—2
17
169

9
-1
2
5
15
8

2
2
8
14
8

8
-2
3
4
18
9

747
—242
3,954

__

247
—90
1,001
1,047

96
5
-88
4,821

18
1
-6
4,934

88
3
-97
5,675

—6
59

-6
5
4

-5
50

-5
4
5

2,817
—1,315
9,415
4,464

2,772
-1,314
10,873
6,749

International security assistance: 2

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
International development assistance:

3

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
L
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period
Overseas Private Investment Corporation:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period
Food for Peace:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Department of State:

Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period

__

Export-Import Bank:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period

2,800
66
4
-272 -1,378
11,247 12,921
8,395
7,160

1
Congressional appropriations action has not yet been completed on this function for 1976 and the
transition quarter.
3
Excludes foreign military credit sales.
1
Excludes the Overseas Private Investment Corporation.




80

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
The general science, space, and technology function includes the
space research and technology programs of the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration (NASA), the physical science programs of
the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and
all activities of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Outlays for
general science, space, and technology are estimated at $4.5 billion in
1977, an increase of $196 million over 1976, and $4.6 billion in 1978.

Program Highlights
• Continue development and testing of the space shuttle,
but defer procurement of a third space shuttle vehicle in
recognition of the need for fiscal restraint.
• Improve technologies for surveying natural resources and
weather forecasting from space.
• Strengthen the Federal Government's overall support for
basic science through programs of the National Science
Foundation and the Energy Research and Development
Administration.
• Provide for construction of a positron-electron colliding
beam facility in high energy physics to develop and test
new theories on the ultimate nature of matter.

GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE, A N D TECHNOLOGY
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays
Program or agency
1975
actual

Space research and technology:
Manned space
flight
Space science, applications, and technology..
Supporting space activities
Subtotal
General science and basic research:
National Science Foundation
Energy Research and Development Administration
Smithsonian Institution
Subtotal, general science and basic
research
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total
1

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977 *

1,535
1,084
334

1,735
1,118
337

469
281
80

1,865
1,125
349

1,891
1,087
355

2,953

3,190

830

3,339

662

721

221

734

805

374
2

400
2

107
1

434
2

481
2

1,038
—2

1,124
—3

328
—1

1,170
—2

1,288
—2

3,989

4,311

1,157

4,507

4,618

3,333

Information on budget authority for 1975. 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table
14 of Part 8.




81

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Outlays (or General Science and Space
$ Billions

SBillioru

8

—1
Space Science and Other Space Activities

m?

m»

wn

Activities in this function are only a small part of the Federal
Government's support of scientific research and development. Most
of this support appears in other functions to which the research and
development is related, such as the functions that cover energy,
health, and defense. In addition, a tax provision, which permits private
industry to treat research and development expenses as current costs,
rather than as capital investments to be depreciated over a period of
years, will provide an estimated $0.7 billion in tax expenditures that
support research and development in 1977. Special Analysis P,
"Federa Research and Development Programs," in the Special
Analyses volume of the Budget, discusses the full range of such
Federal activities.
Space research and technology.—This category consists entirely
of NASA funds for manned space flight; space science, applications,
and technology; and supporting space activities.
Outlays for space research and technology in 1977 are proposed to
be $3.3 billion, $149 million greater than in 1976. The increase in 1977
is primarily for the continued development of the space shuttle.




82

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Manned space flight.—Manned space flight activities will be concentrated on development of the space shuttle. The shuttle is a reusable space vehicle which will be the key element of a transportation
system that will provide a major advance in U.S. space capabilities
beginning in the early 1980's. Outlays for manned space flight will be
$1.9 billion in 1977, $130 million higher than in 1976.
During 1976 and 1977 NASA will reach major milestones in the
shuttle development program, including the roll-out of the first completed shuttle orbiter in September 1976 and the performance of a
series of approach and landing tests beginning in 1977. The first
manned orbital flight of the shuttle orbiter is scheduled for 1979.
One of the first payloads to be carried into orbit by the space shuttle
will be a space laboratory, which is being developed cooperatively with
the European Space Agency.
In keeping with the Administration's efforts to restrain Federal
spending, procurement of a third shuttle orbiter is being deferred for
consideration in 1978. Certain shuttle-related payload and support
activities will also be reduced or delayed in order to restrain outlays
in the 1977 budget.
Space science, applications, and technology.—The 1977 budget
provides funds to continue exploration of the solar system and the
universe using automated spacecraft. Outlays for space science, applications, and technology will be $1.1 billion in 1977.
The Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft launched in 1972 and 1973 sent
back pictures of Jupiter in 1974 and are continuing their exploration of
the outer planets. Pioneer 10 is leaving the solar system and Pioneer
11 will fly past Saturn in 1979. Two unmanned Viking spacecraft
launched in the late summer of 1975 are en route to Mars and will
begin to search for life on the surface of that planet in July 1976. Work
is going forward on spacecraft that will explore the atmosphere of
Venus in 1978 and fly past Jupiter and Saturn by 1979.
In addition to projects to explore the planets, satellites are being
developed to conduct astronomy from Earth orbit. Development will
continue in 1977 of high energy and ultraviolet astronomy observatories that will orbit Earth to study the composition of the galaxy and
distant parts of the universe. Development of a satellite to be launched
in 1979 to study the next peak of solar flare activity will be initiated
in 1977.
In the applications program, a third Earth resources technology
satellite (LANDSAT) is being developed to gather information from
space for agricultural forecasting, geological surveys, and other applications. Also the first of a series of new satellites to provide major
improvements in weather forecasting will be launched in 1978. Work




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

83

is continuing on a satellite to be launched in 1978 to locate and map
potential geothermal sources of energy. A satellite to monitor the
Earth's pollution is being prepared for a 1978 launch, and another will
monitor ocean conditions and provide improvements in weather prediction and oceanography. In 1977 development will start on a new
satellite to be launched in 1980 that will improve mapping of the
Earth's magnetic field.
As part of efforts to restrain Federal spending, several new satellites
previously planned to be initiated in 1977 will be postponed for
consideration in 1978.
Supporting space activities.—Funds are included under this heading
to provide tracking and data support to the existing fright programs
and to encourage broader utilization of space technology for commercial uses. Outlays for supporting space activities will be $349
million in 1977.
General science and basic research.—The 1977 budget includes
funds to assist in providing balanced Federal support of basic research in all scientific disciplines. Outlays for general science and
basic research will be $1.2 billion in 1977.
National Science Foundation.—Proposed budget authority for the
iVational Science Foundation will increase by $87 million to $805
million from 1976 to 1977. There will be an increase of almost 20%
in obligations for the conduct of basic research, from $523 million to
$625 million. This increase will apply to all fields of basic research,
but particularly to the physical and life sciences. Growth will continue
in international scientific programs such as the international decade
of ocean exploration and in national programs such as the climate
dynamics program. Funds for the U.S. Antarctic research program
will also increase due primarily to additional costs of logistic support.
The program of research applied to national needs (RANN) will continue with a focus on environment, productivity, and natural resources.
Energy Research and Development Administration.—Funds for high
energy physics research will increase to provide for the construction of
a large positron-electron colliding beam facility at the Stanford
Linear Accelerator Center. The use of this facility can lead to a new
depth of understanding of elementary particles and the fundamental
laws of physics. The 1977 budget also provides for the continued
utilization of four existing national accelerator facilities. These highenergy facilities assist scientists in advancing knowledge of the basic
nature of matter. In addition, increases are included for a balanced
program in basic energy sciences to support the future development
of both nuclear and non-nuclear energy technologies.




84

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT, AND ENERGY
Natural resources, environment, and energy programs are concerned
with both present and future needs. They promote the management
of the Nation's natural resources, recognizing development, conservation, and environmental objectives that sometimes conflict. Outlays
for this function are estimated to be $13.8 billion in 1977 and $14.4
billion in 1978.
Program Highlights
• Establish Energy Independence Authority to provide
loans, loan guarantees, and other assistance to selected
high priority private sector energy projects.
• Begin initial development of a strategic petrole um storage
program to minimize the impact of disruptions in foreign
oil supplies.
• Increase outlays for existing and new energy research
and development initiatives by 30% in 1977.
• Accelerate the development of technology for the safe
long-term management of radioactive wastes from
commercial nuclear facilities.
• Increase energy production and encourage energy conservation by the gradual decontrol of oil prices and the
immediate decontrol of new domestic natural gas prices.
• Provide $3.8 billion in outlays for the construction of
sewage facilities in 1977, a 60% increase over 1976 and
a 95% increase over 1975.
• Recommend amendments to the Federal Water Pollution
Control Act to focus Federal financial assistance on
meeting the needs of existing population and to provide
additional incentives for meeting water quality standards
in the most efficient manner.
• Prepare for oil and gas leasing planned in frontier areas
of the Outer Continental Shelf and promote increased
energy development on Federal lands consistent with acceptable environmental standards.
• Provide $300 million for recreation land purchases and
development.
• Add 400 personnel to National Park Service staff in
1976 to meet bicentennial needs.




85

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT, AND ENERGY
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays

Program or agency

Energy:
General operating programs
Regulation
Research and development
Energy Independence Authority

7ZZZ

7Zz:

1975
actual

1976
estimate

369

12
7

1.441

2,051

4
1
44
54
4

-

Subtotal, energy
Pollution control and abatement:
Sewage plant construction grants. .
Other
Subtotal, pollution control and
abatement
Water resources and power
Conservation and land management:
Forest Service
Bureau of Land Management
Agriculture conservation programs..
Other, including offsetting receipts.
Subtotal, conservation and land
management
Recreational resources:
Purchase of new recreational areas..
Operation of recreational resources.
Subtotal, recreational resources
Other natural resources
Deduction for offsetting receipts
Total

Trzz—
1977
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977 1

48
7
18
7

689

2,677

3,078

42

66

14
0
3

—
TQ
estimate

42

11
7

1.611

2,592

629

3.375

3,981

1,938

2,350

60
0

55
8

77
3

216

3.770
618

(2)
61
3

2,522
3,274

3,087
3,827

816
1.151

4.388
3.908

2,986

80
7
27
0
47
4

352
63

15
0

84
2
26
5
33
8

85
3
28
5
32
2

-224

950
269
473
-359

26

-437

-431

1,300

1,333

546

1.027

995

24
8

30
0

30
3

600

63
15
8

39
2

51
4

630

589

825
762
-756

900
81
7
-814

248
232
-333

959
934
-819

919
1.010
-819

9,537

11,796

3,289

13,772

9,702

650

83,000

547

1,000

61
3

ADDENDUM
Off-budget Federal activities:
Energy Independence Authority 3 _
Rural electrification and telephone
revolving fund

477

482

125

1
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table
142 of Part 8.
Because $6 billion of budget authority will remain unobligated, no new budget authority is
requested for 1977.
3
Under proposed legislation, net gains or losses of the Energy Independence Authority will be
included within the budget. Gross transactions of this corporation appear off-budget in the annexed
budgets section of the budget appendix.




86

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Outlays (or Energy
$ Billions

Energy.—Last year the Administration proposed a comprehensive
national energy policy designed to lessen the Nation's dependence on
foreign imports, increase the production of domestic energy supplies,
and encourage energy conservation. Recently the President signed the
Energy Policy and Conservation Act, which is a first step toward a
comprehensive national energy policy. While the bill is by no means
perfect, it will permit a gradual phaseout of controls on domestic
petroleum. It provides emergency authorities for use in case of an oil
embargo. It also provides needed authorities to implement a strategic
petroleum storage system, convert utility and industrial plants from
oil and gas to coal, and enter into international agreements with other
petroleum-consuming nations.
Much remains to be done. In this regard, the Administration
requests expeditious enactment of legislation proposed previously,
including measures to:
• establish the Energy Independence Authority to provide loans,
loan guarantees, and other assistance to selected high priority
private sector energy projects;
• deregulate the wellhead price of new domestic natural gas in
order to encourage greater production and minimize shortages;
• authorize production from the naval petroleum reserves;




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

87

• create, under the Nuclear Fuel Assurance Act, a new private
industry to develop the additional uranium enrichment capacityneeded to provide fuel, in the future, for nuclear reactors rather
than require the taxpayer to finance these additions;
• increase the price charged for uranium enrichment services
provided by current Government-owned facilities in order to
secure a fair return on the Government's investment;
• streamline the procedures for licensing nuclear power plants to
reduce the amount of time required to process applications while
maintaining safety and environmental standards;
• provide tax aids to electric utilities with special benefits for
facilities not fueled by petroleum products;
• modify regulatory practices to assure that utilities can continue
to attract sufficient capital;
• establish thermal efficiency standards for new residential and
commercial buildings;
• provide assistance to help low-income and elderly consumers
insulate their homes to save energy; and
• amend the Clean Air Act to provide a needed balance between
environmental and energy goals.
Greater development of our domestic energy resources is essential
to assure that needed supplies are available in the long run. To encourage such development, the President has proposed the establishment
of an Energy Independence Authority (ElA). The EIA will provide
loans, loan guarantees, and other assistance to domestic energy projects of critical importance for developing domestic sources of energy.
The Authority will supplement and encourage private capital investment across a broad spectrum of energy supply, conservation, and
energy-related environmental projects. The EIA will also work to
shorten the time required for energy projects to obtain clearances and
permits from Federal regulatory agencies. Financial resources of EIA
will be $100 billion, and it is anticipated that up to $10 billion will be
used in 1977. Because EIA is to be self-liquidating, its outlays will not
be included in the budget except for operating gains or losses.
Pending enactment of the EIA, the Administration strongly supports the immediate authorization of a synthetic fuels commercialization program administered by the Energy Research and Development Administration. This program is critical to assisting industry
in the early demonstration of current technologies that can increase
our national capability for energy independence. The budget includes
$503 million in budget authority in 1976 to cover $2 billion in loan
guarantees as a first step in implementing this program. The budget
assumes that with the creation of the EIA, by 1977 the synthetic
fuels program would be transferred to the Authority and would grow
to a level of $6 billion in loan guarantees.
210-000

0 - 7 6 - 7




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Tax expenditures also encourage the development and production of
energy and mineral resources. Exploration and development expenses
(mostly for oil and gas) may be treated as current costs rather than
as capital investments, which are depreciated over a number of years.
This provision is expected to provide a $1 billion incentive to develop
energy resources in 1977. Another tax provision allows the use of
percentage depletion rather than actual cost depletion. Although
sharply curtailed for oil and gas in 1975 legislation, it is still expected
to offer a $1.6 billion tax incentive for mineral production in 1977,
with most of that amount for fossil fuel production. The Administration has proposed a package of tax aids for electric utilities that will
especially help generating facilities not using oil or gas as fuels. It is
estimated to provide $0.8 billion of tax relief in 1977.
Operating programs promote the development of domestic energy
resources and encourage energy conservation. Outlays for these programs will total $478 million in 1977. However, this estimate does
not include the full effect of the recently signed Energy Policy and
Conservation Act. The allowance for contingencies for fiscal years
1976 and 1977 covers amounts that may be necessary for programs
authorized by this Act.
The budget assumes that Congress will approve the proposed
Nuclear Fuel Assurance Act, under which ERDA will assist private
industry to finance, construct, and operate all future uranium enrichment facilities to meet projected fuel requirements for civilian nuclear
power plants.
A strategic petroleum reserve will be developed in order to minimize
the impact of disruptions in foreign oil supplies. Energy conservation
programs are intended to increase the energy efficiency of new automobiles and many new appliances and to set goals for saving energy
in the leading energy-consuming industries.
The budget continues the acceleration of energy research and development Outlays for this purpose, under this subfunction, are expected
to total about $2.7 billion in 1977, a 30% increase over 1976 and
an 85% increase over 1975.
Nuclear research and development outlays in 1977 will total about
$1.4 billion. Increases are provided for the construction of an experimental fusion test reactor and a demonstration power plant using
liquid metal fast breeder reactor technology. In addition, the budget
provides for greatly increased research on the safe management of
radioactive wastes and the safeguarding of nuclear materials from
theft, which are important to assuring that nuclear power remains a
safe, reliable, and environmentally acceptable form of energy.
Nonnuclear energy research and development will total about $900
million. Major increases are provided for demonstration of advanced




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

89

technologies to produce synthetic fuel from coal, the development of
advanced technologies for coal combustion, research on improving
gas turbines in order to burn fuel gas produced from coal, and oil
shale research. Outlays will increase significantly for solar and geothermal research and development and for development of advanced
technologies for energy conservation in buildings, industry, and
transportation.
In addition to research and development directly related to the
development of specific nuclear and nonnuclear technologies, the 1977
budget includes about $450 million for supporting research. Such
research in environmental effects and basic energy sciences is applicable to many different technological objectives. It will involve
studies on the effects and control of various pollutants and investigations of the fundamental properties of materials applicable to advanced
energy technologies.
Federal energy regulation includes controls over the use of nuclear
materials and the construction and operation of nuclear reactors and
related facilities, the regulation of interstate natural gas and electric power, and the allocation and pricing of petroleum. Outlays for
energy regulation programs will total $178 million in 1977, not including the full impact of the recently signed Energy Policy and
Conservation Act. Again, amounts that may be necessary to implement
the regulatory requirements of the Act—principally personnel—are
covered by the allowance for contingencies. The budget provides for
a large increase in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's programs for
nuclear materials safeguards, reactor inspection, and reactor safety
research. The Federal Power Commission advises that it will intensify
its efforts to deal effectively with shortages of natural gas by distributing available gas in a manner that avoids disruption to the Nation's
economy. Under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, the Federal
Energy Administration will remove price and allocation controls on
those parts of the petroleum industry, primarily wholesalers and
retailers of petroleum products, that are "downstream" from
refineries.

Pollution control and abatement.—The Federal Government
has primary responsibility for environmental research and development as to national environmental standards. However, direct
operations, including enforcing standards, are primarily the responsibility of State and local governments. Therefore, the 1977 budget
will continue to emphasize assisting State and local governments in
their programs. Special attention will be given to assisting States to
develop programs for the enforcement of national drinking water
standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act enacted in 1974.




90

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Outlays (or Environment and Natural Resources

As part of the overall objective of establishing financially sound
policies for long-term financial assistance to State and local governments, amendments to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act are
being proposed. The purpose of these amendments is to formulate
a multi-year program which will serve as a basis for determining
appropriation requests commencing in 1978. Enactment of the proposed amendments will provide emphasis on serving the sewage treatment needs of existing population, meeting water quality standards
in the most effective manner, and striking the appropriate balance
between Federal and State responsibilities. Approximately $10 billion
of the $18 billion allotted to the States for the construction of wastewater treatment plants currently remains unobligated and $6 billion
will be unobligated at the beginning of 1977. Consequently, no new
budget authority is requested for 1977.
The tax-exempt status of pollution control industrial revenue bonds
results in a tax expenditure estimated to provide about $250 million
in support of pollution control in 1977.
Water resources and power.—Outlays for water resources and
power programs in 1977 will be approximately $3.9 billion, an
increase of $81 million over 1976, and are estimated to grow to $4




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

91

billion in 1978. Growth in outlays will be restrained by stretching out
some work, and there will be no new construction starts for water
projects in 1977. Receipts in power programs, which are counted as
an offset to outlays, are estimated to increase.
Water development.—Federal water resource development programs encompass projects that generate and transmit electricity,
improve water supplies, help control floods and erosion, enhance
navigability, provide irrigation, and develop water-related recreation
opportunities. Outlays for these programs will be $2.9 billion in 1977,
compared with 2.8 billion in 1976.
Budgetary restraints have made it necessary to slow work on a
number of ongoing projects, but planned power delivery dates on
hydroelectric projects will be met. Restraints have also precluded
new construction starts in 1977. Projects underway in 1977 will cost
an additional $18.5 billion in future years to complete, including $725
million for new construction starts added by the Congress in 1976.
The study of major water resource policies mandated by the Water
Resources Development Act of 1974 is being completed by the Water
Resources Council. It addresses, among other things, the need for a
broader look at project benefits, the application of user charges, cost
sharing and reimbursement, and the selection of appropriate discount
rates for project evaluation and reimbursement. Its report will be
transmitted to Congress in calendar year 1976 together with recommendations for program reform.
Power programs.—Outlays for power programs will be $1,046
million compared with $1,055 million in 1976. The Tennessee Valley
Authority (TVA) will be engaged in the planning and construction
of eight nuclear power plants in 1977. The Department of the Interior's
power programs support the marketing and transmission of electric
power from Federal hydroelectric dams.

Conservation and land management.—The public lands are
administered both to develop and to conserve natural resources, to
provide recreation opportunities, and to manage and protect wildlife
habitat, environmental quality, watersheds, and areas of scenic
beauty. In 1977, outlays for conservation and land-management
programs will total $1,027 million. Major reasons for the apparent
decrease from 1976 are: (1) estimates included in 1976 for fighting
forest fires are not included in 1977 but are covered separately by the
allowance for contingencies; (2) reform of the agriculture conservation
program is proposed; and (3) an increase in estimated offsetting
receipts in 1977 reduces net outlays.




92

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Outlays for agricultural conservation programs will decline by $90
million in 1977 largely because of the proposed termination of unnecessary Federal cost-sharing for private conservation and forestry
practices. Legislation will be proposed to limit cost-sharing to practices
providing long-term, enduring benefits.
The Forest Service administers the National Forest System, conducts a comprehensive forest and range research program, and carries
out cooperative forestry programs with States and private landowners. During the past year, a comprehensive planning process has
been underway as required by the Forest and Range Renewable
Resources Planning Act of 1974. Although this process is incomplete
due to severe time constraints, information it produced was used
in formulating the 1977 budget.
Although increases of $30 million are proposed for recreation,
wildlife, rangeland management, and other programs, Forest Service
outlays are expected to decline from $950 million in 1976 to $824
million in 1977. The increases are more than offset by decrease in timber sale preparation and associated direct Federal road construction—made possible by ending 1976 with an inventory of prepared
but unsold timber, a planned phaseout of grants to States for fire
control, and reduced construction of administration and recreation
facilities. The 1977 amount excludes outlays for fighting forest fires,
which are not funded in advance but are covered by the allowance
for contingencies. Outlays for road construction by timber purchasers
have been included in the budget totals for the first time in 1977.
Timber operations are also aided by a tax expenditure of over $200
million that arises from treating income from certain timber operations
as capital gains rather than as ordinary income for Federal tax
purposes.
The 1977 outlays of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) (again
excluding outlays for fire fighting) will increase by $10 million.
Increases will be used primarily to support energy and mineral development. BLM and Geological Survey support for Outer Continental Shelf
oil and gas leasing will increase by $13 million to $111 million; support
for onshore leasing of energy minerals will increase by $10 million to
$74 million. For range management, outlays of $27 million will be
available. Emphasis will be placed on making range investments
where clear economic benefits can be demonstrated.
Recreational resources.—Federal programs for recreation include
the purchase, development, and operation of parks, wilderness areas,
historic sites, wildlife refuges, wild and scenic rivers, trails, recreation
areas and seashores, fish hatcheries, and recreation sites at water




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

93

development projects. Total outlays for these programs will increase
from $900 million in 1976 to $959 million in 1977.
Outlays of $390 million will enable the National Park Service to be
host to an estimated 253 million visitors to the 286 units of the
National Park System in 1977. Funds have been provided to improve
the maintenance of park facilities, and outlays of $75 million will be
available for construction of requisite sewage treatment facilities,
development at new park areas, and other construction.
The acquisition and development of recreation land will be supported by fully funding the Land and Water Conservation Fund with
$300 million. The fund provides both grants to States and local governments and funds for direct Federal use.
The Fish and Wildlife Service manages wildlife refuges, conducts
research on fish and wildlife, and protects endangered species. In
addition, it will initiate a national inventory of wetlands and continue
to furnish ecological data to resource development agencies to minimize adverse effects on fish and wildlife. Grants to States for wildlife and fisheries management will total $79 million of total Fish and
Wildlife Service outlays of $233 million.
Other natural resources.—The activities of the Geological Survey
and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
fall within this subfunction. The programs of the Geological Survey
include topographic surveys and mapping, geological and mineral
resource surveys, and water resources investigations. These activities
contribute to the development of energy resources. Geological Survey
resources are being concentrated to support highest priority programs
for leasing of energy minerals both on the Outer Continental Shelf
and onshore. Some other Geological Survey programs are being
reduced below their 1976 levels to provide resources for energy leasing.
NOAA will continue its programs in marine conservation, environmental and weather monitoring and prediction, and preservation and
development of the Nation's coastal zone. The higher costs of providing public weather services are expected to be partially offset
through the continued application of automation and improved
productivity. Total outlays for the other natural resources subfunction
are estimated at $934 million in 1977.




94

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

AGRICULTURE
Agricultural programs provide income protection for farmers;
research and technical, economic and market information services to
farmers, processors, distributors, and consumers; and inspection
services to assure the quality of farm products. Outlays for these
programs are estimated at $1.7 billion for 1977, and are projected at
$2.6 billion in 1978.
Program Highlights
• Continue successful market-oriented commodity programs
with their reduced reliance on Federal controls.
• Strengthen grain inspection services.
• Increase crop and livestock production efficiency through
expanded production research efforts.
• Begin trial boll weevil eradication program.
• Propose tax relief for heirs of small farm owners.

Outlays for Agriculture




Total

-4

-3

*•:•$:$:$ Research and Services *

vm wt\ wn mt

wu ms

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

95

AGRICULTURE
[In millions of dollars]

Outlays

Program or agency

1975
actual

1976
TQ
1977
estimate estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977 l

Farm income stabilization:

Price support and related programs
Long-term land retirement programs
National Wool Act.
SugarAct
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
Agriculture credit insurance fund
Other
Subtotal, farm income stabilization

575
41
19
77
30
—133
176

1,441
42
<4
12
8
192
157

446
0
I
0
5
2
38

829
21
36
0
16
—344
159

899
0
45
0
12
141
162

785

___

1,896

492

717

1,259

329
219

382
227

100
58

407
221

396
219

240
85
50
—46

267
97
56
-48

66
24
14
-12

276
104
57
-5\

280
102
59
-51

250

1,014

1,005

—2

—2

1,729

2,262

Agriculture research and services:

Research programs
Extension programs
Consumer protection, marketing, and regulatory programs.
Economic intelligence
Other..
Offsetting receipts
.
Subtotal, agricultural
services
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total agriculture

research

and
877

,.__

981

—2

—2

1,660

2,875

742

1
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in Table
14 of Part 8.

Farm income stabilization.—The Administration's policy is to
avoid Government restrictions on crop production, permit market
forces to work, but provide producers protection against severe price
declines. Problems continue to exist where this policy is not followed.
For example, rice, peanuts, and tobacco are controlled through
cumbersome mandatory programs that often result in a buildup of
surpluses and higher prices at considerable cost to the Federal Government and consumers.
Outlay estimates for stabilization programs are based on the following assumptions: (1) normal weather during the 1976 growing season;
(2) continued economic recovery; (3) continued strong overseas demand for U.S. farm products; (4) reduced acreage allotments for rice
and tobacco to bring supplies into better balance with demand; (5)
acreage allotment for peanuts at the legal minimum; and (6) short-




96

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

term export credit of $450 million. The 1977 outlay estimates resulting
from these actions and assumptions are $717 million for farm income
stabilization.
Further major reductions in farm income stabilization from the
amounts in this budget are contingent on substituting an expanded
crop insurance program for disaster payments—such a proposal has
been sent to the Congress—and on changing the price support program for peanuts. Absent such reforms, outlays for disaster payments
and peanut price supports (included in price support and related
programs) are projected at over $500 million in 1977.
Actual outlays for this subfunction are subject to wide swings
because weather and foreign demand are difficult to predict.
COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION OUTLAYS
tin millions of dollars]
1976

TQ

1977

mate

1975

mate

mate

Agriculture:

Price support operations:
Disaster payments
Commodity loans
Commodity purchases
Short-term export credit sales
Other price support operation
Receipts and adjustments
Subtotal price support operations
Other activities
Subtotal

556
270
829
1,304
720
510
249
900
481
388
- 2 , 2 6 0 -1,931

47
378
340
1,209
125
579
125
450
157
317
-347 -2,104

575
10

1,441
70

446
-24

829
36

585

1,511

422

865

1,228
—294

1,480
—269

225
—62

1,286
—290

International affairs:

Food for Peace:
Gross outlays
Receipts and reimbursements
Subtotal
Total CCC outlays

934

1,211

163

996

1,519

2,723

586

1,861

Federal tax expenditures for agriculture arise principally from two
provisions in the income tax law that enable farmers, including corporate farms, to treat certain capital outlays as current expenses and
certain types of farm income as capital gains. Reductions in farmers'
taxes attributable to these provisions will total an estimated $1
billion in 1977.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

97

The Administration will ask Congress for legislation permitting
heirs of owners of small farms to defer the first payment of estate
taxes for five years and amortize the balance over 20 years at 4 percent
simple interest.
Agricultural research and services.—Overall outlays for research,
extension, consumer protection, marketing, regulatory, and economic
information programs are being held near to 1976 levels, $1 billion.
However, within such totals, funds for research to increase production
efficiency will be $21 million higher and outlays for animal disease
eradication will be increased by $11.5 million. The only new program
for 1977 will be a feasibility trial of a program for eradication of the
boll weevil. Outlays in 1977 for this program are estimated at about
$4 million. This will be a cooperative trial with Virginia, North
Carolina, and South Carolina. Depending on results achieved, the trial
may lead to nationwide improvements in pest control as well as the
eradication of the boll weevil through further cost-sharing programs.
The Administration has also proposed legislation to strengthen the
national grain inspection system. The proposal provides for additional
Federal authority over inspection activities to deal with conflicts of
interest, provide protection against abuses and increase penalties
for violation.
I t is estimated that the Farmers Home Administration will provide
new loan commitments of about $1.4 billion in guaranteed and direct
agricultural loans to family farmers in 1977, down from $2.3 billion
in 1976, due largely to expiration of the emergency livestock credit
program. About one-third of the loans are subsidized; the balance are
at market rates.
CREDIT PROGRAMS-AGRICULTURE
[In millions of dollars]
Program or agency

1975
actual

1976
estimate

1,101
—1,546
1,262

2,264
-1,656
1,870

1,995
—394
750
4,597

1,454
-557
85
2
5,761

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Farm income stabilization:

Commodity Credit Corporation:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
.
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Agricultural and emergency credit programs:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period




4 0 1,719
8
-245 -1,638
2,104 2,033
42
3
-139
76
8
6,079

1,343
-656
43
6
6,832

98

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION
Programs for commerce and transportation include aids to business,
development and support of several modes of transportation, supProgram Highlights
• Implement the major air, motor carrier, and rail regulatory reform legislation proposed by the Administration.
• Implement Administration-proposed highway legislation
to provide responsible funding levels, consolidate noninterstate assistance programs, and give priority to completion of key links in the Interstate System.
• Increase mass transit formula grant funding by 30%
while limiting the percentage available for operating
expenses in order to encourage capital investment.
• Restructure bankrupt Northeast-Midwest rail freight
system with $2.1 billion of new capital over the next 5
years, and provide financial assistance for upgrading rail
freight facilities in the rest of the country.
• Restrain growth of subsidies for intercity rail passenger
service by eliminating least efficient service.
• Implement airport and airways development legislation
proposed by the Administration to provide responsible
funding levels, enhance the State role in the airport
grant program, and require users to pay part of the
operating costs currently financed by general taxpayers.
• Refocus aeronautical research to emphasize development
of technologies to reduce aircraft energy requirements.
• Help small businesses obtain necessary financing by
increasing loan guarantees by 33%.
• Enable financial institutions to compete more effectively
for funds and encourage investment in residential mortgages under the Financial Institutions Act proposed by
the Administration.
• Make commitments to purchase $3 billion in mortgages
on new apartment projects under the Emergency Housing
Act of 1975.
• Reduce defaults on federally insured mortgages by providing additional subsidies under the section 8 rental
housing program to financially troubled housing projects
serving lower income families.
• Stimulate business through proposed tax changes.
• Continue effort to have charges for mail service reflect
the costs of services.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

99

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays

Program or agency

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977 l

Ground transportation:

Highway improvement and construction. __
Traffic and highway safety
..._
Mass transit
Railroads
Regulation

6,600
165
1,524
1,179
52

1,915
42
410
357
13

6,990
170
1,770
1,156
60

6,552
177
771
2,171
55

6,501

9,519

2,737

10,146

9,725

2,029
64
316

2,293
72
330

595
18
80

2,368
73
339

2,394
80
364

2~408

2,695

694

2,781

2,838

537
922

Subtotal, ground transportation

4,821
150
929
555
46

637
1,067

162
286

712
1.156

415
1,202

1,459
74

1,703
77

448
19

1,868
71

1,616
80

10,442

13,994

14,865

14,259

Air transportation:

Airways and airports
Air carrier subsidies
Aeronautical research and technology

__
_

Subtotal, air transportation.
Water transportation:

Shipping
Coast Guard
Subtotal, water transportation
Other transportation
Subtotal, transportation..

3,898

Mortgage credit and thrift insurance:

Department of Housing and Urban Development—mortgage insurance and related
programs
Department of Agriculture—rural housing
programs
Other

3,199

1.630

-892
503

278
-630

2,810
1.877

1,278
1.690

303
431

-647
1,459

1,160
1,459

Technology utilization
Economic and demographic statistics
Small business assistance
_.__
Other

145
77
44\
276

156
95
3U
333

40
24
78
67

171
103
315
321

167
109
541
319

Subtotal, other advancement and regulation of commerce
Deductions for offsetting receipts....

939
-60

895
-55

209
-22

910
-89

1,136
-89

Subtotal, mortgage credit and thrift
insurance....
_
Postal Service—payment to Postal Service..

389

982

984

90
-462
-\77 -1,167

177

Other advancement and regulation of commerce:

Total

16,010

17,801 ~ M 1 9

16,498

17,925

ADDENDUM
Off-budget Federal activities:

U.S. Railway Association
Postal Service fund
Housing for the elderly or handicapped
fund
_
1

34
1,112

-1
1,843

-1
730

-2
1,421

-13

-13

-4

111

356

Information on budget authority for 1975. 1976. and the transition quarter is shown in table M
of Part 8.




100

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

port of the mortgage market, the subsidy to the Postal Service, and
related regulatory activities. Outlays for commerce and transportation
programs are estimated to be $16.5 billion in 1977 and $19.4 billion
in 1978.
Ground transportation.—Total outlays for ground transportation
are estimated at $10.1 billion in 1977.
Highways.—Proposed 1977 and 1978 outlays, the highest in history,
will increase by about $300 to $400 million annually. Obligations of
$6.7 billion are proposed for the Federal-Aid Highways program in
1977, an increase of over $1 billion from the Administration's earlier
legislative proposal but about $1 billion below the unusually high
1975-76 levels. This level will be achieved by restraining authorizations to amounts necessary to control the growth of Federal spending in 1977 and beyond. This legislation, proposed last year, would
consolidate the large number of non-Interstate programs into three
broad programs and would thus increase local flexibility in the use of
funds. Priority will be placed on completion of key interconnecting
segments of the Interstate System. The Administration is withdrawing
proposals to permit State takeover of $1 billion of Federal motor fuel
taxes in 1977.
A related tax expenditure estimated at $0.6 billion in 1977 indirectly
subsidizes highway travel by permitting an itemized deduction for
State and local gasoline taxes.
Mass transit.—Proposed outlays for mass transit in 1977 total $1.8
billion, a 16% increase over 1976. The increase is attributable to (1)
past local actions to apply almost all transit formula grant funds to
operating subsidies and (2) the accelerated use of Interstate Highway funds transferred to transit projects—principally the Washington,
D.C., Metro. The budget proposes limiting to 50% the portion of
transit formula grants that may be used for operating subsidies in 1977
and future years. This will foster use of formula grant funds for capital
investment and replacement and will encourage local governments to
restrain operating costs and to seek greater productivity. The budget
proposes limits on Federal funds for Metro, which is due to begin
service in 1976, and targets funds to make partially built segments
operable earlier than now planned. Applications for other major
transit projects will continue to be reviewed to assure that alternatives
have been carefully analyzed and that equally effective, low-cost
approaches are being considered.
Railroads.—Proposed comprehensive rail legislation provides the
basis for Federal support of the Nation's rail freight system. Over the
next 5 years, the United States Railway Association will provide a
$2.1 billion Federal investment in ConRail, the successor corporation




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

101

Outlays for Transportation

that will take over the assets of seven bankrupt railroads in the Northeast and Midwest in March 1976. Federal financial assistance in the
form of loan guarantees will be provided in the rest of the country
primarily to improve track and other fixed facilities. In addition, the
Administration supports measures aimed at improving the rail freight
system nationwide through mergers and consolidations.
Proposed outlays for Amti ak, which operates the Nation's intercity
rail passenger service, will rise by $122 million to $462 million in 1977.
The growth of operating subsidies accounts for $49 million of this
increase. However, service reductions are proposed on the least efficient
routes, since operating losses would increase by $100 million if the
current route structure were retained. Amtrak's losses frequently
exceed the full ticket price of parallel, unsubsidized transportation
modes. The Administration recently proposed a $1.2 billion 6-year
program for upgrading Boston-New York-Washington rail passenger
service. This proposal will improve reliability, energy efficiency, and
ride comfort along this heavily used, relatively less subsidized route.
Air transportation.—Total outlays for air transportation are estimated at $2.8 billion in 1977 and $2.9 billion in 1978. The Administration proposes legislation to continue the airport and airway programs




102

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

at only slightly above the previous levels. The critical congestion
problems experienced during 1969-70 when these programs were
greatly increased have now subsided. The Administration's proposal
would also restructure user fees to make them more equitable and
would relieve the general taxpayer from part of the burden of paying
for all Federal aviation operation and maintenance expenses by requiring about 25% of these expenses, which total over $1.6 billion annually,
to be financed by the air trust fund.
The Federal Aviation Administration's budget includes funds for
additional air controllers and to begin a major program to automate
flight service stations. Flight service stations provide pilots with
weather forecasts, information on the status of navigational aids and
airports, and other services.
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration will spend $339
million in 1977 on its program of research and development to advance
aeronautical technology. The 1977 program will address specific
national concerns: improving performance, reliability, and safety;
reducing aircraft energy requirements; and diminishing noise and
exhaust pollution. Emphasis will be placed on development of technologies leading to aircraft that consume less fuel.
Water transportation.—Total outlays for water transportation
are expected to be $1.9 billion in 1977 and $1.9 billion in 1978. Federal
ocean shipping program expenditures will reach $712 million in 1977,
up from $637 million in 1976. Ship construction subsidies help improve
the international competitive position of U.S. shipbuilders while ship
operating subsidies support greater U.S. flag participation in U.S.
foreign trade.
Coast Guard outlays of $1,156 million are concentrated upon
replacement and renovation of capital equipment and facilities required to maintain current levels of service to the public. Major tasks
include search and rescue, marine pollution control and abatement,
provision of marine navigation facilities, and enforcement of U.S. laws
and treaties.
The Administration will propose legislation to require waterway
users to pay a share of the Federal cost of providing waterway facilities.
Receipts resulting from this legislation are estimated at $80 million
in 1977.
Reform of transportation
regulation.—Federal Government
regulation of transportation has not adequately responded to changes
in the industry and the general economy. Regulation has resulted in
rigidity and in overprotection of the industry's interests, rather than in
the protection of the public for which it was intended. The Administration's legislative proposals are designed to bring about far-reaching
reform of economic regulation of airlines, railroads, and trucking. In




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

103

addition, transportation regulatory agencies have advised that they
will pursue overall modernization of their procedures, increase consumer representation, improve analysis of costs and benefits, and
speed their decisions.
Mortgage credit and thrift insurance.—Credit is particularly
important to potential homebuyers since relatively few of them are
able to pay the price of a home out of their own pockets at the time of
purchase. Consequently, a smoothly functioning mortgage market is
essential to the production of housing in sufficient quantities to meet
the Nation's needs.
In recent years, mortgage markets have been severely disrupted
by the high interest rates that high rates of inflation have produced.
Clearly, the most important thing that Government can do for
housing production is to control inflation through sound fiscal and
monetary policies. This, in turn, requires spending restraint and
smaller Federal deficits. A smaller deficit will not only curb inflationary pressures,, but will also draw less of the Nation's limited
supply of credit away from mortgage markets.
While laying the basis for a return to stable prices, the Administration has acted to alleviate housing credit problems caused by
tight money. During calendar 1975, the Government National Mortgage
Association (GNMA) made commitments to buy $5 billion in mortgages bearing inteiest rates below prevailing market levels. This is
aiding the purchase of 150,000 housing units. Mortgages purchased
under the program are being resold to yield prevailing market returns, with GNMA absorbing the loss. In addition, the Administration recently announced that $3 billion in mortgage purchase assistance will be made available to support new multifamily projects.
The losses absorbed by GNMA in connection with mortgage purchase
activities are estimated to be $371 million in 1976, $103 million in the
transition quarter, and $80 million in 1977. The budget assumes that
there will no longer be a need for these temporary programs in 1977
as conditions in the mortgage market return to normal.
A succession of short-run measures designed to combat temporary
dislocations in financial markets cannot assure the availability of
adequate housing credit in the future. In addition to sound fiscal and
monetary policies, a basic reform of the financial system is essential if the Nation's housing objectives are to be met. To this end, the
Administration has urged passage of another major regulatory
reform measure, the Financial Institutions Act. This legislation would
enable financial institutions to compete more effectively by removing restrictions on the interest rates the;y may pay depositors
and on the types of investments they may make. It would encourage
investment in residential mortgages through a new tax expenditure,
210-000

0 - 7 6 - 8




104

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

a tax credit on mortgage investment income. The current tax provision
that permits financial institutions to maintain excess bad debt
reserves would be phased out. The net additional tax expenditure from
these changes is estimated at $0.3 billion in 1977.
The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) provides mortgage
insurance for those families who should be able to fulfill the obligations
accompanying a mortgage loan, but who are not adequately served by
the private mortgage market. Heavy default rates experienced under
some mortgage insurance programs—particularly those serving lower
income families—contributed to the FHA's net outlays of $1,088
million in 1975.
To reduce defaults and the dislocations that often accompany them,
the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) will
provide additional subsidies to federally insured low- and moderateincome rental projects that are experiencing severe financial problems.
Subsidies will also be provided to properties that HUD has already
acquired through defaults, making it easier to return these properties
to private ownership. This assistance will be provided from within the
current funding level for the section 8 lower-income housing assistance
program, and will not increase outlays under the program. However,
by lowering defaults on FHA-insured mortgages, this extra assistance
is expected to save $1.9 billion in 1976, the transition quarter, and
1977, combined. FHA's net outlays for these periods are estimated at
$1,161 million, $205 million, and $830 million, respectively.
Most of the Federal Government's support for housing does not
appear in the budget. Government-sponsored enterprises, such as the
Federal National Mortgage Association and the Federal Home Loan
Banks, are excluded from the budget because they are privately
owned. These enterprises supplied $4.8 billion for housing in 1975—
nearly 13% of the net increase in residential mortgage credit. Federal
loan guarantees support housing on a large scale ($8.8 billion in 1975),
but they do not generate budget outlays unless defaults occur. Loans
to finance housing projects serving elderly or handicapped persons
have been excluded from the budget by law, although they are financed
in the same way as other Federal loan programs. The 1977 budget
provides for $375 million in new loan commitments for such projects.
Tax expenditures also are an important form of Federal support.
The deductions for interest on home mortgages and for local real
estate taxes are estimated to cost the Treasury $4.7 billion and $3.8
billion, respectively, in 1977. The 1975 Tax Reduction Act included a
temporary credit for purchase of new homes. Although the cost of
this provision is substantial—approximately $0.6 billion in 1976—
its effect on sales does not appear to be great.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

105

The Farmers Home Administration provides direct and guaranteed
housing loans in rural areas. It emphasizes assistance to lower income
families through low-interest rehabilitation loans and assistance in the
purchase of existing housing. In 1977, almost one-half of rural home
ownership assistance funds will be used to aid the purchase of existing
housing units, rather than for higher-cost new construction. In addition to direct Federal mortgage loans, an experimental program of
loan guarantees is being undertaken to determine whether private
capital can be effectively attracted to the rural housing market.
Direct Federal mortgage loans will also be available through the
Farmers Home Administration. A total of $2.7 billion in direct and
guaranteed loans will aid in the construction, acquisition, and improvement of 126 thousand rural housing units in 1977. The budget
proposes termination of several relatively small and ineffective rural
housing programs.
Postal service.—The Postal Reorganization Act of 1970 established
the U.S. Postal Service as an independent agency. The general operations of the Postal Service are excluded from the Federal budget
except for the Federal subsidy payment. This payment covers liabilities of the former Post Office Department for benefits for retired and
disabled employees, public service costs, and carrying certain classes
of mail at free or reduced rates. The recommended subsidy for 1977
follows the schedule that was established in the 1970 Act for transition
to full-cost rates for certain second, third, and fourth class mail.
It does not include additional subsidies to extend that schedule further.1 Outlays for the payment to the Postal Service are expected to
decline from $1,690 million in 1976 to $1,459 million in 1977, largely
because of the phased transition to full-cost rates and the decision not
to request funding for the extension of the phased transition. The
Postal Service continues to face serious difficulties in achieving a
balance between its costs and revenues. It will continue to explore ways
to control its costs through such steps as closing marginal post offices,
reducing overtime, and transferring employees from overstaffed
operations to fill vacancies elsewhere.

Other advancement and regulation of commerce.—The primary effects of Federal actions on private business are through monetary and fiscal policy, tax policy, credit programs, and regulation.
1
Section 3 of Public Law 93-328 provides that the budget shall also include separate statements
of the amounts which the Postal Service requests to be appropriated for public service costs and
carrying certain classes of mail at free and reduced rates. The Postal Service's request would extend
the subsidy schedule at an added cost of $19 million in 1976 and $307 million in 1977. These
amounts are shown in greater detail on pages 763 and 764 of the Budget Appendix. The President's
budget does not recommend funding for this extension.




106

THE BUDGET FOB FISCAL YEAB 1977

In some specific areas, however, Federal agencies do provide direct
services to the private sector. Budget recommendations for
these areas in 1977 reflect the President's desire to foster increased
reliance on the efficient functioning of private markets and to moderate
spending growth. Outlays for advancement and regulation of commerce
are expected to total $910 million in 1977, 2% more than in 1976.
In 1977, the Small Business Administration (SBA) will provide $315
million of direct loans, a 10% reduction from 1976, and loan guarantees
of $2.3 billion, an increase of 28% over 1976. This SBA aid is expected
to help 34,000 small businesses in 1977, compared to 28,060 in 1976.
The SBA will'provide more management assistance to firms participating in its programs and expand its efforts to better manage
problem loans already in its portfolio. The Department of Commerce
and SBA will continue their programs to assist minority enterprises.
The Federal Government also aids businesses through several large
tax expenditures. Existing provisions were expanded temporarily to
reduce rates of tax on the first $50,000 of corporate profits in calendar
1975 to less than one-half of the rate that applies to profits in general.
Although these lower rates aid all businesses, they especially help small
businesses because the first $50,000 of profits is of relatively greater
importance to them. The Administration proposes that these lower
rates be made permanent. The total tax expenditure resulting from
favorable tax rates on the first $50,000 of profits would then be about
$6.2 billion in 1977. Small businesses will also be aided by an Administration proposal to permit deferral of estate taxes in order to ease
the dislocations these taxes can cause to small businesses and farms.
Some tax expenditures assist businesses primarily by providing
incentives to investment. The credit for investments in business
equipment was temporarily increased in 1975 for calendar years 1975
and 1976, and the Administration proposes that this increase be
permanent. The resulting reduction in the 1977 tax: payments of
those firms and individuals who make these investments would be
$9.3 billion. Favorable tax treatment of most capital gains encourages
investment generally and the retention of earnings by corporations
in particular. The associated tax expenditures are estimated to total
over $7 billion in 1977.
The Administration is proposing other tax law changes to aid
businesses. These include a plan to broaden stock ownership, a reduction in the rate of tax on most corporate profits from 48% to 46%,
and measures to stimulate capital formation. Part 4 of the budget
provides more information about these proposals.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

107

MAJOR CREDIT PROGRAMS-COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION
[In million, of dollars]
Program

Department of Housing and Urban Development—
mortgage insurance:
Direct loan disbursements
_
Direct loan repayments l
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period...
Department of Agriculture—rural housing:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments 1
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period...
Maritime Programs:
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period
Small Business Administration:
Direct loan disbursements
_
Direct loan repayments *
__
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period.__
1

Includes sales of loans.




1975

1976

TQ

1977

671
—29
2,328
85,424

45
8
-31
2,782
83,443

16
1
-9
2,890
82,566

37
8
-38
3,239
78,675

3,076
—4,020
842
8,642

3,124
-2,991
94
7
10,437

89
7
-721
1,131
10,854

4,088
-4,869
30
5
13,743

2,366

2,950

3,100

3,550

348
—161
1,718
4,104

42
6
-329
1,851
5,220

16
0
-44
1,913
5,492

46
5
-334
2,036
7,162

108

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
The Federal Government promotes the preservation and revitalization of communities and regions through numerous programs.
These programs provide assistance to State and local governments
for the construction of public facilities, the provision of public services,
and economic development generally. Assistance for communities and individuals suffering the effects of floods and other natural
disasters is also included.

Program

Highlights

• Increase community development block grants by $446
million to $3.2 billion, in support of local community
planning and development activities.
• Improve Indian tribal government planning and management in support of the Indian Self-Determination Act.
• Increase the number of areas in which federally subsidized flood insurance is available from 9,500 to 17,000
by the end of 1977.
• Discontinue funding of Department of Commerce countercyclical activities and reduce funding for new development assistance programs for which effectiveness has not
been demonstrated.
• Begin implementation of the National Capital Pennsylvania Avenue development plan.
The Federal Government's impact on community and regional
development is not limited to activities discussed in this function.
Many programs administered by other Federal agencies help promote
the social and economic development of the Nation's States and
localities. These programs include, among others: highways, mass
transit, and airports; flood protection, reclamation, agricultural land
drainage, navigation, and hydropower projects; housing credit assistance; aid for local health, education, crime prevention, and recreation
activities; defense contracting; operation and management of forests,
parks, and the public domain; and assistance for water quality enhancement.
Outlays for community and regional development programs covered
in this function alone will be $5.5 billion in 1977 and approximately
$6.0 billion in 1978.
Community development.—Community
development programs
are designed to provide Federal resources to States and localities




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

109

COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
(In millions of dollar*]
Outl

Program or agency

Community development:
Department of Housing and Urban Development:
Community development block grants....
Categorical programs replaced by community development block grants
Research and planning...
Departmental management and other
Department of Agriculture: Water and
sewer grants
District of Columbia
ACTION....
Community Services Administration
Pennsylvania Avenue development
Other
Subtotal, community development.....

1975
actual

»y»

1976
TQ
1977
estimate estimate estimate

Recommended
-S?d2tw
for "977 I

38

750

400

1.600

3.248

1.994
149
104

1.910
167
147

318
44
41

995
142
160

18
96
155

35
193
92
530
1
13

62
202
112
508
1
33

16
42
26
128
*
6

84
186
93
365
25
17

0
115
94
334
38
12

Subtotal, area and regional development
Disaster Relief and Insurance:
Funds appropriated to the President: Disaster relief
Department of Housing and Urban Development: Flood insurance and other
Small Business Administration disaster loans.
Department of Agriculture
_
Subtotal, disaster relief and insurance..
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total

3.892

1.021

3.667

4.110

-31
301
517
316
1
-192

208
388
738
344
1
-311

69
99
205
97
*
-85

218
333
737
332
*
-285

348
316
685
369
1
-285

912

1.368

385

1,335

1,432

206

250

55

250

100

7
177
8

117
190
15

39
30
4

208
89
15

108
91
10

398
-27

572
-30

127
-4

562
-32

309
-32

4,431

Area and regional development:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Indian programs
Appalachian programs
Other
Offsetting receipts

3.149

5,802

1,529

5,532

5,819

ADDENDUM

Off-budget Federal agency:
Rural Telephone Bank

110

137

38

148

1.065

*Less than $500,000.
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table 14
of Part 8.
1




110

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL TEAR 1977

Outlays (or Community and Resional Development

for carrying out locally determined planning and development programs. Outlays for community development will be $3.7 billion in 1977.
Under the community

development block grant program,

which

replaced seven categorical grant and loan programs in 1975, localities
are eligible to receive grants in support of locally designed planning
and development activities. Funds are allocated by a formula based
on objective measures of need, including population, degree of poverty,
and housing overcrowding. Activities funded under the antecedent
categorical programs are eligible for funding under the community
development grant program. These include acquisition of real property, construction of public facilities, rehabilitation of structures,
provision of social services, planning, and payment of the non-Federal
share required by other Federal grant programs.
New commitments under the block grant program will total $3.2
billion in 1977, an increase of $446 million over the 1976 level and
$900 million above the 1973 level. This represents an unprecedented
level of support for community development activities. Outlays reflect
the rate at which State and local governments carry out projects and
are expected to total $1.6 billion in 1977 and $2.4 billion in 1978.




T&E FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

HI

Categorical programs replaced by block grants will continue to have
outlays in connection with uncompleted projects, although these
outlays are decreasing as more projects are completed.
Planning and management assistance will be provided through the
c6mprehensive planning program in 1977. This assistance supports
State and local planning and management programs concerned with
urban and rural development. Planning and management activities can
also be funded under the community development block grant
program, reducing the amount of categorical support required for
planning. Outlays for the comprehensive planning program will total
$75 million in 1977.
The research program of the Department of Housing and Urban
Development supports the search for solutions to community development and housing problems. The 1977 research program provides for
analysis of such topics as neighborhood preservation and local government management. Outlays for these and other research projects
will total $67 million in 1977.
In 1977, there will be no new budget authority for the Department
of Agriculture's water and sewer grants due to the substantial funding
provided in 1976, an amount sufficient to finance the program for 2
years. Outlays, however, will increase by $22 million from 1976 to
$84 million in 1977 due to spending from prior year commitments.
The Federal Government will lend funds directly to the District of
Columbia for approved capital projects not otherwise financed by the
municipal borrowing authority provided by the Home Rule Act. In
1977, outlays will be $186 million for such projects.
A start will be made in the revitalization of downtown Washington,
D.C., through private and public activities envisioned in the 14-year
Pennsylvania Avenue development plan. Development will take
place under the direction of the Pennsylvania Avenue Development
Corporation and will extend north of Pennsylvania Avenue between
the Capitol and the White House. Outlays for land acquisition and
development activities in 1977 are estimated to be $25 million.
ACTION'S domestic volunteer programs include Volunteers in
Service to America (VISTA), University Year for ACTION (UYA),
older Americans volunteer programs, and a broad range of special
volunteer programs. Most of the volunteers work on projects designed
to meet the needs of the disadvantaged. Where possible, local financial
support is sought. In 1977, there will be approximately 23,500 fulltime and 203,000 part-time volunteers participating in ACTION
programs. These projects will emphasize local design and operation,
attempt to increase the number of volunteers participating in community activities, and give special priority to encouraging older




112

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL TEAR 1977

citizens to volunteer. Federal outlays for ACTION'S domestic programs are estimated to be $93 million in 1977.
The Head Start, Economic Opportunity and Community Partnership Act of 1974 established the Community Services Administration
(CSA) to succeed the Office of Economic Opportunity. CSA will
administer community action and community economic development
programs designed to meet the needs of the economically disadvantaged. The act provides for greater non-Federal financial support,
permitting funding for 1977 to be maintained at the 1975 level.
Additional non-Federal resources, based on State and local determinations of program effectiveness, may raise program levels. Federal
outlays for CSA will be $365 million in 1977, $143 million lower than
1976 due to the requirement for an increased non-Federal share and
the proposed elimination of duplicative categorical programs.
Area and regional development.—Programs in this category
provide support primarily for rural development, American Indian
Tribal governments and Appalachian development. Outlays for area
and regional development are estimated to be $1.3 billion in 1977.
Department of Agriculture.—Farmers Home Administration (FmHA)
programs provide loans for business and industrial development
in communities of less than 50,000 population, and loans and grants
for water, sewer, and other community facilities in communities
of less than 10,000 population. Many of these communities also
receive Federal assistance under the community development grant
program, as well as under other programs aimed at rural development.
New loan commitments will exceed $1 billion, although the outlay
effect of those loans is reduced substantially by their sale to the
Federal Financing Bank, which is estimated to be $703 million in
1977. Total outlays for FmHA rural development programs will be
$218 million in 1977.
New loan commitments from the Rural Telephone Bank, which by
law is excluded from the budget, willr total $180 million in 1977.
Outlays, also off-budget, will be $148 million in 1977.
Department of Commerce.—The Economic Development Administration (EDA) and the Regional Action Planning Commissions
provide assistance to economically depressed areas and assist States
and communities in meeting regional economic adjustment problems.
Obligations for new EDA programs will be limited in 1977 until
activities initiated in 1975 and heavily funded in 1975 and 1976 can
be evaluated. Traditional EDA programs, such as public works,
business development, technical assistance, and research will continue
in 1977 but at lower funding levels. No funding is requested in 1977
for the countercyclical job opportunities program. Outlays for the




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

113

development assistance programs will be $333 million. In addition,
$222 million in Department of Commerce outlays will result from prior
year commitments for the job opportunities program.
Indian programs.—The major objectives of Federal Indian policy
are to strengthen Indian autonomy, preserve community rights and
relationships, and increase self-determination for American Indian
Tribal governments. Toward these ends, the Indian Financing Act of
1974 provides for business development assistance, direct Federal
loans, guaranteed loans, and interest subsidies to Indians. The Indian
Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975 will further
these objectives by enabling Indian communities to administer Federal programs serving them, pursuant to contracts with the Bureau of
Indian Affairs (BIA). A newly authorized program of grants, training,
and technical assistance will be instituted to strengthen tribal management and planning abilities. Outlays for this new program will total
$21 million in 1977, and additional funds are set aside to pay the overhead costs for tribes electing to take over the operation of BIA
programs. In 1977, no new appropriations will be sought for BIA
construction grants to local public schools attended by Indian children,
and deferral through 1977 of existing appropriations will be proposed.
This is being done because this program in part duplicates existing
programs administered by the Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare which assist public schools in reservation-impacted areas,
and in part to slow the growth in Federal outlays. Outlays for Indian
programs in this subfunction will be $737 million in 1977.
The Appalachian Regional Development Commission provides a
framework in which 13 Appalachian States, from Mississippi to New
York, and the Federal Government work together to promote the
economic development of the region. In 1977, major emphasis will
be placed on construction of the Appalachian development highway system, which involves corridor highways as well as access roads.
For nonhighway programs, the States will continue to have the flexibility to emphasize those particular activities that are most important
to their citizens. These include activities for health, education, and
community facilities. In 1977, outlays for Appalachian development
will be $332 million.
Disaster relief and insurance.—Although State and local governments and the private insurance industry are primarily responsible for
financing recovery from such natural disasters as floods, hurricanes,
and tornados, Federal insurance and relief are available to supplement
these resources when they are insufficient. Outlays for disaster relief
and insurance are estimated to be $562 million in 1977.




114

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

The National flood insurance program is designed to reduce the
economic hardship resulting from floods. It is available for communities
with flood hazard areas that are willing to take flood protection actions.
Under the program, flood insurance on structures in participating
localities is provided at rates that are subsidized by the Federal
Government. Communities adopt flood plain management plans in
order for their citizens to qualify for the insurance premium subsidies.
This program was expanded in 1973, and there are currently more than
9,500 participating communities. By the end of 1977, it is estimated
that there will be 17,000 communities participating. Most of the
estimated $208 million in outlays in 1977 under this program will be
for actual claims and the insurance premium subsidies.
The Disaster Relief Act of 1974 broadened the relief that the Federal
Government may provide to include grants to persons unable to meet
serious needs arising from disasters and block grants for restoration of
public facilities. Outlays depend upon the incidence and severity of
uninsured losses from natural disasters and are estimated to be $250
million in 1977. The Small Business Administration and the Department of Agriculture also provide loans for disaster relief, and outlays
for these programs are estimated to be $104 million in 1977.
Tax expenditures.—The Administration is proposing a temporary
tax incentive to encourage investment in construction of new facilities
and expansion of older facilities in areas of the highest unemployment. Both business equipment and nonresidential structures would be
eligible for the incentive, which is estimated to result in $0.3 billion
of reduced tax revenues in 1977.
The tax exempt status of interest on industrial revenue bonds will
allow communities to attract industry through favorable borrowing
terms. The estimated 1977 cost of this tax expenditure is $0.3 billion.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

115

MAJOR CREDIT PROGRAMS-COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
[In millions of dollars]

Major credit program

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Community development:

Department of Housing and Urban Development:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period

626
—606
305
3, 787

70
3
-623
43
1
3,512

12
5
-154
15
1
3,334

70
0
-725
8
9
2,656

510
—693
230
1, 629

79
3
-762
27
0
2,594

24
5
-265
17
9
2,913

68
7
-744
11
3
3,712

17
—19
474
123

3
1
-23
42
8
16
2

8
-6
44
8
16
2

3
2
-24
43
9
19
2

9
—1
36
0

3
4
-2
6
8
12
0

3
-1
7
0
9
9

1
3
-4
8
0
14
3

158
—140
1, 357
8

20
3
-143
1,444
9

6
5
-36
1,473
9

14
1
-148
1,439
1
0

Area and regional development:

Farmers Home Administration:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period
Economic Development Administration:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period
Indian Financing Act:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period
Disaster relief and insurance:

Small Business Administration:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period




116

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT, AND SOCIAL
SERVICES
This function includes those Federal programs that promote the
general extension of knowledge and skills and assist individuals in
becoming productive members of society. Most programs in this
function are designed to help States and localities provide services to
individuals. A small portion of these outlays are for direct cash benefits
or physical facilities. Outlays for these programs are expected to
be $18.9 billion in 1976, $16.6 billion in 1977, and $15.3 billion in 1978.
Program Highlights
• Consolidate, under a new Financial Assistance for
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, 27 separate
grants for education into a single flexible grant to States,
without matching requirements, primarily for use in
helping disadvantaged and handicapped children.
• Convert the social services program into a block grant
under a proposed Financial Assistance for Community
Services Act that would remove matching requirements
and allow States more flexibility in providing sei vices to
the needy.
• Provide $1.1 billion to give 1.3 million needy students
basic opportunity grants of up to $1,400 each so they can
go to the college of their choice.
• Provide 515,000 training and employment opportunities
in 1977 under the regular State and local programs of the
Comprehensive Employment and Training Act.
• Continue the temporary employment assistance program
through calendar year 1976, and then, as the economy
continues to improve, phase it out by September 30,
1977.
• Provide $250 million in grants and technical assistance
to improve education in school districts that are in the
process of eliminating discrimination.
• Reform the education impact aid program to assure that
Federal funds are directed only toward those school
districts burdened by Federal activities.
EDUCATION

States and localities have the principal responsibility for public
education. The Federal Government, however, helps to assure that all
Americans have equal access to educational facilities and provides
funds for special educational services for the disadvantaged and the




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

117

handicapped. Outlays for Federal education programs are estimated
to be $8.1 billion in 1976, $7.6 billion in 1977, and $7.5 billion in 1978.
Reduced outlays result from actions proposed in 1976 to limit Federal
programs to their proper role and from selected reductions in nonpriority areas in 1977. Substantial sums are provided for education or
educationally related activities in programs classified under other
functions, including $4.2 billion for veterans educational benefits and
$2 billion for school lunches. Special Analysis I, Federal Education
Programs, discusses all these activities.
EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT, AND SOCIAL SERVICES
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays
Program or agency

Education:
Elementary, secondary, and vocational education:
Financial Assistance for Elementary and
Secondary Education Act (proposed legislation)
Aid to education agencies
Proposed legislation2
Child development..Subtotal, elementary, secondary, and
vocational education
Higher education:
Student aid and institutional support
Special institutions
Subtotal, higher education
Research and general education aids:
Proposed legislation2
Other
Subtotal, research and general aids
Subtotal, education
Training, employment, and labor services:
Training and employment:
Temporary employment assistance
Training and employment program activities
Work incentive program
Proposed legislation
Job opportunities program
Federal-State employment service
Subtotal, training and employment
Other labor services
Subtotal, training, employment, and
labor services




1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

4,193

4,158

866

441

478

130

294
3,903
-241
472

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977 1

3,300
3,918
-2,361
478

4,634

4,636

996

4,428

5,335

1,928
122

2,537
144

378
33

2,173
125

2,010
135

2,050

2,681

411

2,298

2,145

947

824

233

-26
873

-137
973

947

824

233

847

786

7,631

8,141

1,640

319

2,331

485

1,065

2,926
314

3,469
350

1,021
80

2,864
315
—55

22
482

175
550

80
138

2,868
315
—55
222
569

4,063
259

6,874
326

1,804
81

4,984
362

3,693
366

4,321

7,200

1,885

5,346

4,060

7,573

8,266

569

118

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT, AND SOCIAL SERVICES-Continued
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays
Program or agency

Social services:
Financial Assistance for Community Services Act (proposed legislation)
Grants to States for social services
Proposed legislation3
Rehabilitation services
Services for the elderly and other special
groups__
Proposed legislation (Financial Assistance
for Health Care Act)
Allied services (proposed legislation)
Subtotal, social services
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total

1975
actual

Recom-

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

2,048

2,375

609

817

730

2,500
2,514
-2,460
147
775

435

491

123

budget
authority
for 1977 x

2,500
2,515
-2,460
777

426

328

-25
5

-25
20

3,301
-5

3,596
-38

880
-1

3,735
-38

3,655
-38

15,248

18,900

4,403

16,615

15,943

1

Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table 14
of 2Part 8.
Financial Assistance for Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
3
Financial Assistance for Community Services Act.

Elementary, secondary, and vocational education.—These
programs provide assistance to State and local educational agencies,
either through formula grants or specific, discretionary project
grants. The greatest share of this assistance helps to educate the
disadvantaged and the handicapped.
Aid to education agencies.—The 1977 budget includes a proposed
Financial Assistance for Elementary and Secondary Education Act
to consolidate most formula and some project grants so that decisions
on the use of Federal funds for education can be better integrated
with State and local priorities and funding. As shown by the chart on
page 119, the new program would consolidate 27 grant programs in
the following major areas: elementary and secondary education, education for the handicapped, vocational and adult education, and
library resources. Funds would not have to be matched by the States
and would be distributed equitably by formula. Each State would be
required to develop a plan showing how the Federal funds will be
used, and to report on the actual use of funds and accomplishments.
Most of the funds would have to be used to educate the disadvantaged
and the handicapped. So that States have time to plan the use of
these funds, they would be provided in the fiscal year prior to the
school year in which these funds will be used. Additional funds provided for this initiative would increase 1978 outlays by $100 million.




119

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Flow of Federal Education Dollars
Before Consolidation
($3.0 Billion in Budget Authority in 1976)
Department of
Health, Education
and Welfare

Education
Programs

Intermediaries

Recipients and
Beneficiary Groups

ELEMENTARY AND
SECONDARY
OISAOVANTAGED
(8 SUBPROGRAMS)
SUPPORT AND
INNOVATION
HANDICAPPED
STATE GRANTS
EARLY CHILDHOOD
SEVERELY HANDICAPPED
SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES
REGIONAL AND
ADULT CENTERS
RESEARCH
MEDIA CENTERS
RECRUITMENT AND
INFORMATION
SPECIAL EDUCATION MANPOWER
REGIONAL AND
ADULT PROGRAMS

OFFICE OF
EDUCATION

u

OCCUPATIONAL,
VOCATIONAL, ADULT
BASIC STATE
PROGRAM
SPECIAL NEEDS

RECIPIENTS
LOCAL EDUCATION AGENCIES
STATE EDUCATION AGENCIES
NON-PUBLIC SCHOOLS
PRIVATE AND NON-PROFIT
ORGANIZATIONS
OTHER FEDERAL AGENCIES
STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
INDIVIDUALS
POST SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
STATE EDUCATIONAL
AGENCIES
LOCAL EDUCATIONAL
AGENCIES

PfllUCIIIUIPD AMn
uUIMoUIVitn MDJU

i

HOMEMAKING
WORK-STUDY
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
STATE ADVISORY
COUNCILS
CURRICULUM
DEVELOPMENT
VOCATIONAL
INNOVATION
RESEARCH
ADULT EDUCATION

BENEFICIARY GROUPS
DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS.
- ECONOMICALLY/
EDUCATIONALLY
- NEGLECTED AND DELINQUENT
- MIGRANT
- HANDICAPPED
SEVERELY HANDICAPPED CHILDREN
AND ADULTS
CHILDREN WITH LEARNING
DISABILITIES
ADULTS
STUDENTS, INDIVIDUALS
ADVISORY GROUPS

LIBRARY RESOURCES
LIBRARIES
CONSOLIDATION
PUBLIC LIBRARIES
(3 SUB-PROGRAMS)
COLLEGE LIBRARIES
UNDERGRADUATE
INSTRUCTIONAL
EQUIPMENT
TRAINING
DEMONSTRATIONS

After Consolidation
($3.3 Billion in Budget Authority in 1977)

ASSISTANT SECRETARY
FOR EDUCATION

210-000

0 - 7 6 - 9




w

FINANCIAL
ASSISTANCE FOR
ELEMENTARY AND
SECONDARY
EDUCATION

STATE
GOVERNMENT

BENEFICIARIES DESIGNATED
BY THE STATE

120

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Outlays for Education
S Billions

SBillion,

Elementary, Secondary,
and
Vocational Education

(967

1968

1970

If71

1974

197$

1976

1977

Estimote

The Administration is again proposing to reform the impact aid
program. Recognizing that Federal activities provide an economic
benefit to host communities, the reform would limit Federal aid to
those school districts where free education is provided for children
whose parents both live and work on Federal property. Since Federal
property is exempt from local taxes, these families do not contribute
to the cost of education, as other families do, and Federal contributions
are fully justified. These proposals would save an estimated $285
million in 1977 and approximately $330 million in 1978.
Budget authority of $250 million is requested to provide assistance
to those school districts that are in the process of eliminating discrimination. This assistance is aimed at improving the achievement of
students, while providing for equality of educational opportunity.
Child development—Federal funds foster research, demonstration,
and service programs that aid the development of preschool children.
In 1977, the head start preschool program will continue to serve
about 349,000 children. Programs to curb child abuse will also be tested
in 1977.
Higher education.—The Administration's higher education programs will concentrate on providing assistance directly to students,




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

121

rather than to educational institutions. Total outlays will be $364
million lower in 1977 than in 1976, primarily because no further capital
contributions for direct loans are proposed as greater reliance is placed
on student grants and guaranteed loans.
The 1977 budget includes $1.1 billion in budget authority for basic
educational opportunity grants of up to $1,400 each for 1.3 million
undergraduate students in the 1977-78 school year. This compares to
$1.0 billion requested in 1976 to support 1.1 million students. In
addition, budget authority of $44 million in 1977 is requested for the
State student incentive grant program that would provide assistance to
176,000 needy students. Budget authority of $250 million for workstudy would help 652,000 students obtain part-time employment.
Legislation is proposed to increase the share of the employment cost
borne by the participating institutions from 20% to 50%, over a
3-year period. This would permit Federal funds to serve 14% more
students;* ;
Budget authority of $400 million in 1977 for the guaranteed student
loan program would help to provide an estimated $1.3 billion in loans
to aid about 1 million students in the 1976-77 school year. To assure
an adequate supply of private capital for student loans, legislation is
proposed to increase the maximum interest rate chargeable by banks
from 10% to 11%. Because of the availability of the guaranteed
student loans and $225 million available in 1977 from prior funds,
no further capital contribution is requested for the national direct
student loan program.
Tax expenditures totaling over $1.5 billion in 1977 also support
higher education. The two largest of these are the deductibility of
contributions to educational institutions and the personal exemption
allowed parents with full-time student dependents over 18 years of age.
Special institutions.—Federal support is requested for construction
of the Kendall School for Deaf Children to be located in the District
of Columbia. Basic support for the National Technical Institute for
the Deaf, Gallaudet College, and Howard University will be continued.

Research and general education aids.—Funds in this category
provide support for educational research and development, cultural
activities, special projects that focus on national needs in education,
and program administration. Outlays of the National Institute of
Education are estimated at $88 million in 1977, up $18 million from
1976. These funds would support studies on basic skill development;
education and work; finance, productivity and management; and
educational equity. They also support the dissemination of research
results and other information. The National Foundation on the Arts




122

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

and the Humanities will spend approximately $191 million in support
of cultural activities in 1977. Outlays of $114 million would support the
activities of the Smithsonian Institution. Under the newly enacted
Public Broadcasting Financing Act of 1975, two dollars of Federal
funds will match every five dollars of private contributions to the
public broadcasting system up to specified limits. In 1977, outlays
are estimated at $70 million and in 1978, $80 million.
TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT, AND LABOR SERVICES

The Federal Government finances programs that help individuals
to obtain jobs via training and employment services or through the
provision of temporary public service jobs. It also sets and enforces
minimum wage and other standards regulating employment and labormanagement relations practices. Unemployment compensation programs are included and discussed in the income security function.
Training and employment.—Federal
funds are provided to
States and localities for programs to train the unemployed and the
disadvantaged, to help those seeking jobs find work, and to finance
public service jobs. Outlays for these programs in 1977 are expected
to be $5.0 billion, $1.9 billion less than in 1976, because of the phaseOutlays for Training, Employment, and Social Services
$ Billion.

-to

Training and Other Labor Services

Fiscal Ye




im

mo mt

mt m% WIA vm

mi
Estimate

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

123

down of public service jobs as regular employment continues to
increase.
Temporary employment assistance.—In response to the President's
request, the Congress, in December 1974, authorized a temporary
public service jobs program as one part of a series of efforts to bring
additional aid to the unemployed. Appropriations through June 30,
1975, made $2.5 billion available for about 260,000 jobs. Another
50,000 jobs are funded from other training and employment programs.
The budget provides for additional budget authority of $1.7 billion
for temporary employment assistance in 1976. This authority will
permit the continued operation of the program until January 1977,
with a gradual phaseout through September 1977, as the economy
continues to improve. In order to focus this additional aid where the
need is greatest, funds will be distributed in areas with rates of unemployment over 6.5%, and the Federal contribution to annual wages
will be limited to $7,000.
Training and employment program activities.—In 1977, $2 billion will
be spent by States and localities on regular programs under the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of 1973 (CETA). These
funds will provide about 515,000 years of training and work experience
through institutional training, remedial education, on-the-job training,
job development, job matching, vocational counseling, and supporting
services. In 1976, outlays for these programs are expected to be $495
million higher due to the effect of startup delays on 1975 spending.
As State and local agencies sponsoring CETA programs gain experience
in planning and managing these programs, they are able to focus
more attention on tailoring activity to the needs of the local labor
market and on improving the quality of program operations.
About $400 million of the total outlays expected in 1977 will be
for national training and employment programs. These include programs for migrant workers and Indians, as well as research and
evaluation projects, and the Job Corps.
A special summer youth employment program will be funded in
both 1976 and 1977. Preliminary outlay estimates for the summer of
1976 are $440 million to support 740,000 jobs, and for 1977, $400
million to support 670,000 jobs.
Work incentive program (WIN).—This program provides help in
obtaining jobs to those receiving aid to families with dependent children (AFDC). In 1975, jobs were found by 171,000 WIN program
participants. Every employable AFDC recipient must register for the




124

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

WIN program. Child care and other supportive services help enable
recipients to seek or accept jobs. Welfare recipients are counseled on
effective methods for obtaining jobs. Proposed legislation would insure that each employable AFDC recipient is engaged in an active job
search. Under the proposed legislation, the WIN program would no
longer fund work and training services. Registrants would still be
eligible to receive such services under CETA. Supportive services for
WIN recipients funded separately through this program would be
limited to those required for the job search and the first 30 days of
employment. As a result of these legislative changes, outlays for the
program are expected to be reduced by $55 million in 1977, and by a
similar amount in 1978.
Job opportunities program.—This program was enacted in December
1974 as one of the temporary programs to help the unemployed
get jobs. Federal agencies submitted proposals to the Department of
Commerce for accelerated or expanded projects to provide added
employment. The Department transferred funds to agencies that had
proposals that appeared to have the best prospects of meeting the goal
of rapidly creating additional employment. About 100,000 employment
opportunities were initially estimated to result from the $500 million appropriated in 1975 and 1976.The projects selected are scheduled
to be completed by the end of 1977 in order to provide jobs while they
are most needed. However, past experience with similar projects would
indicate that a large number of the projects may continue into 1978 or
later.
Federal-State employment services.—The total cost for State offices
providing job-matching services to workers and employers is paid
by the national government. In 1975, the Employment Service placed
people in 4.2 million jobs and in 1977 expects to achieve 4.4 million
placements. Outlays in 1977 are estimated at $569 million, $20 million
more than in 1976. A major study will analyze what the future direction of the Employment Service should be. This study is expected
to be completed by 1979.
Other labor services.—The Federal Government establishes and
enforces basic standards affecting the relationship between employee
and employer, such as minimum wages, overtime payments, equal
pay for equal work, and welfare and pension plan operation. It also
administers laws designed to assure fair practices in labor management
relations, and gathers and disseminates statistics on employment,
unemployment, and prices. Outlays for these services are estimated at
$362 million in 1977, $36 million more than in 1976.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

125

SOCIAL SERVICES

Social services.—Grants to States for social services, authorized
under Title XX of the Social Security Act, provide support for services
to poor individuals to enhance their self-sufficiency. Federal assistance
is provided to States and localities, which have the primary responsibility for administering this program within the framework of Federal
regulations. In order to allow greater flexibility and to strengthen the
initiative of the States, a Financial Assistance for Community Services Act is proposed to convert both the social services and training
grants under public assistance into a single $2.5 billion block grant.
Funds would be distributed among States under the current formula.
The present 25% State matching requirement and all unnecessary
restrictions on State governments would be eliminated. States could
thus operate their social service programs in the ways they find best
serve the needy. Services provided would continue to include family
planning, preparation and delivery of meals, transportation, counseling, child care, and services to meet the special needs of the aged,
handicapped, mentally retarded, alcoholics, and drug addicts.
Rehabilitation services.—Outlays for vocational rehabilitation services to the physically and mentally handicapped are estimated to
increase $45 million over 1976 to $775 million in 1977. The President
has called a White House Conference on Handicapped Individuals
to be convened in December 1976 in order to stimulate a national
assessment of problems of the handicapped and to develop recommendations for improvement.
Services for the elderly and other special groups.—Outlays for these
programs in 1977 are estimated at $401 million. Special programs for
the aging are estimated to provide more than 290,000 meals daily,
an increase of 90,000 over 1976. These programs also provide services
necessary to help older people secure and maintain independence in a
home environment and prevent or delay institutionaliaation. Funds
are also included to continue demonstrating new approaches to the
provision of services that meet the needs of special groups such as
runaway youths, Indians, and Alaskan and Hawaiian natives.
The Allied Services Act has been proposed to encourage coordination of all human service delivery programs at the State and local
level. Under this act, States could receive grants for projects to demonstrate how the delivery of health, rehabilitation, and other human
service programs could be brought together to improve service to
State or local residents. They would also be able to transfer limited
amounts of Federal funds among specified programs to facilitate
integrated service demonstration.




126

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

HEALTH
The health function includes programs that finance and provide
health services (primarily for the aged and poor), support health
research, pay for the training of health care personnel, and support
the prevention and control of health problems. Outlays for Federal
health programs are estimated at $34. 4 billion in 1977, an increase
of $2. 3 billion or 7% over 1976. Outlays in 1978 are expected to
reach $37. 7 billion, primarily reflecting increases in the medicare
program and an additional $500 million for the proposed new Financial
Assistance for Health Care Act.

Program Highlights
• Initiate a $10 billion program consolidating 16 health
grant programs, including medicaid, through the Financial Assistance for Health Care Act, so that States will
have greater flexibility in meeting the health care needs
of the low-income population.
• Provide catastrophic protection for the elderly and disabled through medicare by limiting an individual's
payments to $500 per year for hospital and nursing home
care and $250 annually for doctors' fees.
• Slow health cost inflation by limiting medicare reimbursements for health care services and requiring States to
undertake health planning and cost control activities
under the Financial Assistance for Health Care Act.
• Reform medicare cost sharing to provide needed program
funding and to help assure that hospitalization and
medical services are medically necessary.

The 1977 budget for health is based on a policy of providing and
improving access to health services for aged and disabled individuals
through medicare and for the low-income population under the proposed Financial Assistance for Health Care Act.
General health financing assistance.—The new Financial
Assistance for Health Care program will have budget authority of $10
billion in 1977. Estimated outlays in 1977 are $9 billion. No State or
local matching will be required. The 16 health programs to be consolidated are shown in the chart on page 128. Funds will be allocated
to the States under a formula that will assure a more equitable distri-




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

127

HEALTH
[In million* of dollars]

1976
TQ
1977
estimate estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977 1

9,001

10,002

Outlays

Program or agency

1975
actual

General healthfinancingassistance:
Financial Assistance for Health Care Act
(proposed legislation)
Health care services:
Financing health services:
Medicare
14,781
Medicare improvements of 1976 (proposed legislation)
__
Medicaid
6,840
Proposed legislation2_____
Other
financing
1,371
Proposed legislation 2
Providing health services directly

17,748
-315
8,184
1,550

4,963

2\,877

-401 -2,231
2,220
9,292
-9.292
341
1,338
_.
-234

23,038
-10
9,292
-9,292
1,425
-703

412

470

145

502

504

_.

23,405

27,637

7,268

21,252

24,255

Health research and education:
Health research
.
Health education and training
Subtotal, health research and education.

1,835
842

2,091
907

507
145

2,203
594

2,189
523

2,677

2,998

652

2,798

2,712

435
196
252

493
246
245

133
68
59

497
259
203
-23

496
265
207
-58

883

983

260

936

911

130

119

37

557

440

75

134
-55
360

130
-96
92

8

75

Subtotal, health care services

Prevention and control of health problems:
Consumer safety
—Occupational safety and health
Preventing and controlling diseases
Proposed legislation2
Subtotal, prevention and control of
health problems
Health planning and construction:
Health planning
Proposed legislation2
Health construction,...
St. Elizabeths Hospital construction and
renovation (proposed legislation)
Subtotal, health planning and construction
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total.
1

687

559

113

448

201

-5

-39

-1

-41

-41

27,647

32,137

8,291

34,393

38,038

Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table 14
of 2Part 8.
Financial Assistance for Health Care Act.




128

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Flow of Federal Health Services Dollars
Before Consolidation
($9.2 Billion in Budget Authority in 1976)
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare

6 Agencies
ALCOHOL, DRUG
ABUSE, AND
MENTAL HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION

Intermediaries

16 Programs
COMMUNITY MENTAL
HEALTH CENTERS
ALCOHOL PROJECT
AND STATE
FORMULA GRANTS

ALCOHOL ABUSERS

VENEREAL DISEASE
IMMUNIZATION
CENTER FOR
DISEASE CONTROL

Beneficiary Groups

f

CHILDREN

RAT CONTROL
LEAD PAINT
POISONING
PREVENTION
STATE AGENCIES FOR WELFARE.
ALCOHOL ABUSE MENTAL
HEALTH. CRIPPLED CHILDREN
DEVELOPMENTAL
DISABILITIES

SOCIAL AND
REHABILITATION
SERVICE

MEDICAID

HEALTH PLANNING
MEDICAL FACILITIES
CONSTRUCTION

HEALTH SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION

MENTALLY ILL ADULTS AND

- >

"•

STATE HEALTH COORDINATING
COUNCILS
HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANIES
LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENTS
PUBLIC, PRIVATE AND NONPROFIT HEALTH CARE
FACILITIES AND PROVIDERS
CENTERS FOR A COHOL ABUSE,
MATERNAL A ND CHILD
HEALTH, MENTAL HEALTH,
COMPREHENS VE AND
COMMUNITY iEALTH
SERVICES, FA MILY PLANNING,
MIGRANT HE/kLTH.AND
EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SERVICES
HEALTH SYSTEMS AGENCIES

-+
i

i

SPECIAL "HIGH RISK" MINORITY
GROUPS
MOTHERS
CHILDREN AND YOUTH
CRIPPLED CHILDREN
INDIVIDUALSSEEKING FAMILY
PLANNING SERVICES
MIGRANTS AND SEASONAL
RESIDENTS OF SERVICE AREAS
RESIDENTS OF RAT INFESTED
AREAS OF SELECTED CITIES
CHILDREN IN PRE-1950 HOUSING
IN SELECTED CITIES
PRESCHOOL AND PRIMARY
CHILDREN NEEDING
IMMUNIZATIONS
PERSONS WITH VENEREAL
DISEASE
RECIPIENTS OF AFDC ASSISTANCE
CERTAIN RECIPIENTS OF CHILD
CARE SERVICES
CERTAIN PERSONS ELIGIBLE FOR
BUT NOT RECEIVING AFDC
OR SSI
LOW INCOME PERSONS UNDER 21
CERTAIN CARETAKERS OF LOW
INCOME CHILDREN
CERTAIN FORMER MEDICAID
RECIPIENTS
SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY
INCOME (SSI) RECIPIENTS
MEDICALLY INDIGENT

COMMUNITY HEALTH
CENTERS
STATE HEALTH GRANTS
MATERNAL AND CHILD
HEALTH
FAMILY PLANNING
MIGRANT HEALTH
EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SERVICES

After Consolidation
($10 Billion in Budget Authority in 1977)

ASSISTANT
SECRETARY
FOR HEALTH




FINANCIAL
ASSISTANCE FOR
HEALTH CARE

STATE GOVERNMENT

LOW INCOME
INDIVIDUALS

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

129

Health Outlays

bution of Federal health services spending. The new legislation will
provide for a gradual shift from the current distribution to a more
equitable allocation. No State will receive less in 1977 than it did in
1976. Funds must be used primarily to meet the health needs of
low-income persons, but may also be used for other health purposes.
Existing programs provide an inequitable and inefficient basis for
assisting States and localities in dealing with the health problems and
needs of the low-income population. Under current programs, estimated Federal health funding per capita for the population below the
poverty line—the group least able to cope with the rising costs of
health care—varies by State from over $800 to under $200, depending
on the matching resources the particular State provides. Furthermore,
current narrow categorical programs inequitably single out for special
Federal assistance certain segments of the population or certain
communities from many others with equal or greater need for assistance. In addition, the costs of health services in some federally supported health centers appear to be substantially above those of the
private sector.
Under the Financial Assistance for Health Care Act, States will have
broad flexibility to meet health needs. They will be able to develop a
comprehensive strategy for meeting health needs on the basis of




130

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

planned priorities. In order to hold down rising health costs, the Act
will require States to undertake health planning and cost control
activities. The $10 billion ceiling on Federal payments in 1977 will
further encourage States to take necessary actions to control health
care costs. The funding levels requested for the new program for
1977 will be $783 million more than requested for 1976, but $227
million less than would otherwise be requested for 1977 without
restraints.
Health care services.—The largest Federal involvement in the
health sector is through the financing and provision of health care
services. Total outlays are estimated at $21.3 billion in 1977, and
$23.4 billion in 1978.
Medicare.—Within proposed outlays of $19.6 billion in 1977, medicare benefits will be improved to provide protection for the first time
against catastrophic medical costs for 25 million aged and disabled
Americans. The costs of a prolonged and expensive illness can devastate those on fixed incomes. In order to protect the elderly and the
disabled from catastrophic health expenses, the medicare improvements of 1976 will limit cost-sharing for covered services to $500 per
year for hospital and nursing home care and to $250 annually for
physicians' services.
The inflation of health costs has been particularly rapid since the
end of the economic stabilization program controls in April 1974. During the past year alone, hospitals have increased their charges by 13%,
and physicians have raised their charges by 11%. Federal programs,
through reimbursement policies and additional spending, have contributed to this inflation. The medicare improvements of 1976 will
limit increases in medicare payment rates to assure that the Federal
Government helps slow down health cost inflation. The legislation
would limit increases in payments to 7% per day for hospitals and to
4% for physicians' services. Cost sharing reforms are also proposed to
provide financial incentives against overutilization. Under these
reforms, beneficiaries would continue to pay a deductible representing
a day's hospital costs, but would also pay 10% of the remainder of
hospital charges up to the proposed maximum. For physicians' services, beneficiaries would continue to pay an annual deductible (proposed to rise as social security benefits increase) and the current 20%
of additional charges, up to the proposed maximum.
In addition to supporting greater economy in health care costs and
utilization, these measures will hold medicare expenditures in 1977 to
$2.2 billion less than the anticipated level without restraining measures. Even with these restraints, medicare spending will increase
$2.5 billion to over $22 billion in 1978.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

131

Other financing.—Outlays for the health maintenance organization
(HMO) program in 1977 will total $20 million. This demonstration
program supports HMOs, which are based upon the concept of delivering health care on a prepaid basis with emphasis on preventive
services. New HMO funding commitments under this 5-year Federal
demonstration effort will be completed by 1977.
Federally funded facilities for treating civilian drug abusers will
expand their capacity from 95,000 persons in treatment at any one
time in 1976 to 102,000 in 1977. Priority will be given to treating those
forms of drug abuse that are most costly to society. Research will focus
upon evaluating the effectiveness of different methods of treatment.
In 1977, direct obligations of $52 million are recommended for the
Professional Standards Review Organization (PSRO) program which
attempts to improve the quality and appropriateness of medical care
through review by physician-sponsored organizations. Under recent
legislation, most PSRO review costs will be indirectly funded through
the medicare program. A high priority will be given to evaluation of
PSROs so that the further development of the PSRO system can be
guided by experience.
Tax expenditures.—Federal tax laws help individuals to obtain
health insurance by excluding from employees' taxable income the
health insurance premiums paid by their employers. They also reduce
health care costs to individuals by permitting itemized deductions for
certain expenses for health care and health insurance premiums. In
1977, the revenue loss from these tax expenditures is estimated at $4.2
billion for employer contributions and $2.1 billion for itemized medical
deductions.
Providing health services directly.—In addition to financing medical
services, the Federal Government provides some medical care directly.
An estimated $349 million will be spent in 1977 on the provision of
medical services to over one-half million American Indians and Alaska
Natives; this does not include funds in other Federal health programs
that are spent for the care of Indians and Alaska Natives. Funding
for Indian health services has increased 226% in the last 8 years,
from $107 million in 1969 to $349 million in 1977. While many serious
health-related problems generally associated with reservation conditions remain, significant advances in overall health status have
occurred in this 8-year period. For instance, there has been a 30%
decline in infant death rates and a 32% decline in tuberculosis cases.
Legislation will be submitted to transfer to community use or close
the eight Public Health Service hospitals. Care to Federal beneficiaries will be provided more efficiently on a contract basis. In addi-




132

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

tion, responsibility for the health care of Coast Guard personnel will
be transferred to the Department of Transportation, and the Department of Justice will begin a gradual assumption of responsibility for
providing health care to Federal prisoners.
Legislation is being proposed to transfer St. Elizabeths Hospital
from the Federal Government to the District of Columbia in a few
years. The legislation will authorize funds in 1977 for renovation and
new construction at the hospital in order to obtain accreditation before
the transfer occurs. The Federal Government will continue for several
years to subsidize the operating costs of the hospital and will reimburse the District fully for the treatment of Federal beneficiaries.
Over 85% of the inpatient population at the hospital is composed of
District residents, and virtually all of its outpatient activity is devoted
to District residents.
Outlays for the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) will total
$17 million. The NHSC program demonstrates ways in which physicians and other health professionals can be attracted and retained
in critical health manpower shortage areas. The number of NHSC
health professionals will increase from 551 in 1976 to 676 in 1977.
Health research and education.—Programs for health research
and education include support for research, as well as training and
education of health care personnel.
Health research.—Outlays for research will be $2.2 billion in 1977.
Current levels of effort will be maintained in major research areas
such as cancer and heart disease. Support for emerging research
fields—such as immunology, aging, and the effects of the environment
upon health—will grow.
Health education and training.—In 1977, total outlays for training
health professionals will be $594 million. This decline from 1975 and
1976 levels reflects the reduced need for Federal subsidies for such
training. Major increases in the number of graduates of U.S. health
professions schools to meet future needs are already assured. For example, between 1969 and 1976, medical school enrollments have grown
from 35,833 to an estimated 56,200, and the annual numbei of graduates has increased from 8,059 to an estimated 13,500—increases of
57% and 68% respectively.
Proposed legislation for health professions training will provide
grants to schools of $1,500 per medical, dental, and osteopathy




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

133

student in return for the schools' commitment to meet conditions
designed to improve geographic and specialty distribution of health
personnel. Future direct Federal assistance to new students will be
limited to scholarships that require a public service commitment.
Health professions schools may retain repayments of previous Federal
contributions to student loan funds in order to form a pool of funds
for loans to students not wishing to make service commitments. The
legislation also provides support for special training projects in areas
of concern such as family medicine. Existing law requires an evaluation
of the need for additional Federal subsidies for training researchers.
Pending this analysis, new funds for training researchers will be
limited to individual postdoctoral fellowship awards.

Prevention and control of health problems.—Outlays for prevention and control of health problems will be $936 million in 1977.
Outlays of $497 million are being requested for consumer safety.
Priority will be placed on the safety of drugs, medical devices, foods,
and consumer products.
Outlays of $180 million are proposed for preventive health services,
the control of communicable diseases, and the improvement of clinical
laboratories. Grant programs for control of disease, such as venereal
disease and rat control, will be consolidated under the new Financial
Assistance for Health Care Act.
Federal support for occupational safety and health programs will
increase $13 million to a total of $259 million in 1977. The Department
of Labor will increase emphasis on health hazards without diminishing
attention to safety. It will provide a better balance of regulation and
enforcement with consultation, education, and voluntary compliance.
Emphasis on helping employers provide a safe workplace and on
improving the quality of inspections will also be increased.

Health planning and construction,—Grants for health planning and medical facilities construction are among those to be included
in the new Financial Assistance for Health Care Act. This will encourage States to evaluate these activities against competing priorities
for health spending and to link them to the objective of providing
health services for the low-income population.
Special Analysis K, "Federal Health Programs," in the Special
Analyses volume of the budget discusses all Federal activities related
to health, including those outside this function such as health programs
for military personnel and veterans.




134

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

INCOME SECURITY
This function includes income support payments to families and
individuals that do not in return require the performance of services
by recipients. It includes retirement, disability, and unemployment insurance programs as well as cash benefits, housing assistance,
and food assistance programs for lower income families and individuals.
Program Highlights
• Propose the Income Assistance Simplification Act to
permit income assistance programs to be changed to
promote equity, effectiveness, and consistency, and to
remove work disincentives.
• Take effective measures to assure correct payments to
beneficiaries and eliminate fraud and abuse in the AFDC,
SSI, and food stamp programs.
• Target food stamp benefits on the poor.
• Consolidate 15 child nutrition programs and focus
benefits on the poor through the Child Nutrition Eeform
Act.
• Propose social security tax and benefit legislation to
assure the future financial integrity of the trust fund.
• Extend unemployment insurance coverage to 6 million
additional workers, raise maximum benefit levels, and
strengthen financing of the trust fund.
• Create a National Commission on Unemployment Insurance to study the need for reform.
• Increase the number of housing units approved for subsidies by up to 506,000.
• Eliminate excessive increases in Federal employee retirement pay by deleting the extra 1 percent now required
to be added to each automatic CPI adjustment.

Federal income security payments sustain or augment family income
and purchasing power in order to help support adequate living
standards. There are four general types of income security programs,
although these are not necessarily distinct or mutually exclusive:
—Social security and other retirement programs support retired or
disabled citizens.
—Payments are made to maintain basic family income during
periods of temporary unemployment.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

135

INCOME SECURITY
[In million* of dollars]
Outlays
Program or agency

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 19771

General retirement and disability insurance:

Old-age, survivors, and disability insurance:
Present programs
Proposed legislation
Railroad retirement...
Special benefits for disabled coal miners
$50 bonus for beneficiaries of certain social
insurance programs
Other
_.__
Subtotal, general retirement and disability

63,649
3,077
976

72,684
__
3,474
1,008

19,934
-10
902
235

83,558
-826
3,678
943

1,678
3

72
3

1

69,383

77,241

21,061

87,357

88,247

6,980

8,336

2,309

10,059
—70

16,217

6,980

8,336

2,309

9,988

16,217

13,459

19,378

3,980

16,572
300

15,672
900

13,459

19,378

3,980

16,872

16,572

4,779

5,237

1,407

5,910

5,910

5,898
_
2,503
5,625

1,576

6,215
—256
3,080
4,708

6,215
—256
17,092
4,743

2,563

459

188

1,200
563

78

3,107
-740
600
307

3,139
-1,058
600
291

18,783

23,588

-1

-35

108,605

128,509

3

80,048
3,517
3,736
943

3

Federal employee retirement and disability:

Present programs
Proposed legislation
Subtotal, Federal employees retirement
and disability
Unemployment insurance:

Present programs
Proposed legislation
Subtotal, unemployment insurance
Public assistance and other income supplements:

Supplemental security income
Grants to States for maintenance payments:
Present programs
Proposed legislation
Housing assistance
Foodstamps
School lunch and other nutrition programs:
Present programs
Proposed legislation
Earned income credit payments
Other
Subtotal, public assistance and other
income supplements
_
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total

5,121
_
2,052
4,599
2,044
_.

703
1,169

5,392

36,676

-35
32,742

22,931

-35

137,115

157,678

1
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table 14
of Part 8.

210-000 O - 76 - 10




136

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

—Assistance is given to those in financial need who are not covered
by other programs or their own resources.
—Finally, certain services that are close substitutes for cash payments to individuals are provided through Federal income security
programs, notably for food and shelter.
Other services that are similar to cash payments and closely related
to income security, particularly for the aged, the young, the poor, the
disadvantaged, the disabled, and the unemployed, are described in
other functions: health; education, training, employment and social
services; and veterans benefits and services.
Income Security Outlays

More than $137 billion or 35% of the 1977 budget is for income
security assistance of the kinds served by this function. Retirement
and disability outlays make up 71% of income security outlays.
Most such payments are linked by law to increases in the Consumer
Price Index (CPI) to maintain purchasing power. Income securityrelated tax expenditures will result in benefits of at least $20 billion
in foregone tax receipts in 1977.
Income security payments are projected to rise from $128.5 billion
in 1976 to $137.1 billion in 1977. This increase of 6.7% year-to-year




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

137

is less than half the average over the past decade. Income security
outlays for 1978 will rise to $147.2 billion. This represents 34.2% of
the budget in 1978 compared to 34.8% of the 1977 budget.

General retirement

and disability insurance.—The social

security cash benefit program—the world's largest system of retirement, survivors, and disability insurance—will pay benefits in 1977 to
an estimated 32.6 million beneficiaries including dependents and survivors. Outlays will total $82.7 billion, over $10 billion more than in
1976. Of the total increase, $6.5 billion will result from automatic CPI
increases in benefit payments. The remaining increase, $3.5 billion
results from both a net increase in the number of retired people and an
increase in the benefit base (usually, average earnings) of the most
recent retirees. Average benefits for retired workers will be $249 per
month, an increase of 9.7% over the $227 monthly level of 1976.
The total social security payroll tax rate, including the health
insurance tax, is now 11.7% (one-half paid by the employer and onehalf paid by the employee). Under an automatic adjustment mechanism, in current law, the amount of an employee's annual earnings
subject to payroll tax rose from $14,100 to $15,300, effective January 1,
1976, and is expected to reach $16,500 on January 1, 1977.
Under current law, payments from the social security funds have
been, and will continue to be greater than the contributions collected
from employers and employees. As a result the cash surpluses accumulated in the trust fund in earlier years are shrinking.
The Administration is proposing a series of legislative changes to
restore the integrity of the social security fund—changes that maintain the contributory nature of the social security system. A major
element in these proposals is an increase of 0.6 percentage point in
the social security payroll tax, effective January 1, 1977, raising the
total payroll tax to 12.3% from the present 11.7%. Legislation is
also proposed to eliminate the provision that allows some new retirees
to receive an initial lump-sum payment in exchange for permanently
reduced future monthly benefits. It will also convert the retirement test
to an annual instead of a monthly test and phase out students benefits, over a 4-year period. The Administration is also proposing legislation to delete the inadvertent feature of the 1972 social security amendments which not only assures new retirees of future benefit increases as
the CPI rises, but also—under present projections—raises the initial
benefit levels more rapidly than wages increase. Under this proposal,
future initial benefit levels will continue to reflect the general rise in
covered wages in the economy, and maintain the same proportion of a
retiree's prior earnings as at present. Benefits after retirement will
continue to be adjusted as the CPI increases. Benefits of those currently retired will not be affected.




138

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

About 500,000 railroad workers receive retirement and disability
benefits from a separate contributory retirement system. Railroad
retirement outlays are projected to be $3.7 billion in 1977, an increase
of $0.2 billion over 1976. Average benefits will increase from $350
per month in 1976 to $375 per month in 1977. Social security taxes
paid by railroad employees and employers will also increase under
the Administration's proposal.
Under various provisions of the Federal tax law there are tax
expenditures relating to income of the aged. Major provisions include exclusion of all social security and railroad retirement benefits
from tax liability (not just the portion representing a return of the
taxpayer's original contribution) without regard to an individual's
income from other sources; the extra exemptions available to persons
65 or over; and the retirement income credit. The combined benefits
to the retired and elderly from these tax expenditures is estimated at
$5.8 billion in 1977.
Other tax provisions assist the economic security of aged persons
by promoting private pension programs. The largest benefits result
from excluding employer contributions to and current earnings of
qualified pension funds from taxation. Taking into account deferred
taxes collected from present retirees, the net loss in receipts is estimated
to be $6.5 billion in 1977. The Employees Retirement Income Security
Act of 1974 increased the similar benefit for the self-employed and
allowed tax benefits for the first time for employees not covered by
employer pension plans. These provisions will result in an estimated
tax expenditure of $1.0 billion in 1977.
Disabled persons benefit from the exemption from taxation of
disability insurance benefits under social security, of worker's compensation benefits, and of sick pay. In 1977, these estimated
receipt losses provide benefits of $0.4 billion, $0.6 billion and $0.4
billion, respectively.

Federal employee retirement

and disability.—Government

retirement programs provide benefits for 1.5 million retired and
disabled Federal civilian employees. Outlays for civil service retirees
will reach $7.0 billion in 1976, $10.0 billion by 1977, and $15.9
billion by 1980. The increases result primarily from the large growth
in the retirement rolls, rising average salaries on which annuities are
based, and CPI adjustments. Legislation is proposed to correct the
CPI adjustment formula for both civilian and military retired pay.
This will eliminate provisions that increase annuities by 1 percentage
point more than the CPI increase. The 1 percentage point provision
was originally enacted to compensate annuitants for the lag between
increases in the cost of living and increases in annuities. However, in




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

139

practice this feature will, over the long run, overcompensate
annuitants.
The Civil Service Commission has undertaken a comprehensive
evaluation of the financing mechanisms for civil service retirement and
disability. This study is expected to be completed in the spring of 1976
and further reforms may be proposed as a result.
Unemployment
insurance.—The unemployment benefit programs continue to play an important role as the economy recovers.
As the unemployment rate declines it is estimated that approximately
11.5 million workers will receive unemployment assistance in 1976,
and 9.6 million in 1977. Average benefits are estimated to increase
from $69 per week in 1976 to $75 per week in 1977. Under Administration legislation proposed last year, unemployment insurance coverage will be expanded to include about two-thirds of all farmworkers,
about 400,000 domestic-service workers, and all workers in public
elementary and secondary schools and public hospitals. In total, about
6 million additional workers will be brought into the unemployment
insurance system. In addition, proposed legislation will require that
individuals be paid weekly benefits equal to at least one-half their
weekly wage with upper limits on benefits no lower than two-thirds
of the State's average covered wage. Benefits will thus rise with
average wages. To maintain the insurance nature of the program,
the proposal increases the amount of wages on which employers pay
the Federal unemployment tax from $4,200 to $6,000. It also temporarily increases the tax rate to speed repayment of general fund
loans used to finance benefits paid beyond the normal 26 weeks during
the recession. This temporary tax increase will expire when these loans
have been repaid. The proposed National Commission on Unemployment Insurance will study the unemployment insurance system, its
relation to other income security programs, and will develop alternative recommendations.
In addition to the permanent unemployment insurance program,
which provides compensation for up to a total of 39 weeks if unemployment is high, the Administration supported enactment, in December 1974, of two temporary unemployment assistance programs.
Under the Federal supplemental benefits program, covered workers
who have received their full benefits (up to 39 weeks) may be eligible
for up to 26 additional weeks of benefits, when the national and State
insured unemployment rates are high. This temporary program will
pay benefits through March 31, 1977. Outlays are estimated to drop
from $1.9 billion in 1976 to $1.1 billion in 1977.
The temporary special unemployment assistance program pays
up to 39 weeks of benefits to those who are ineligible for regular unem-




140

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

ployment benefits because of work history or the absence of coverage.
Benefits will be paid through March 31, 1977, for workers who apply
for compensation before January 1, 1977. Outlays are estimated to
drop from $800 million in 1976 to $300 million in 1977.
Under Federal tax law unemployment benefits are excluded from
taxable income. This tax expenditure is estimated at $2.9 billion in
1977.

Public assistance and other income security supplements.—
The supplemental security income (SSI) program, which replaced federally aided State assistance programs for the aged, blind and disabled
will pay an estimated $5.9 billion in Federal benefits to 5.1 million
recipients in 1977. An average benefit of $73 per month is estimated
for 1976 and 1977. The number of beneficiaries is estimated to increase
from 4.6 million in 1976 to 5.1 million in 1977. Because of late amendments complicating the program and the rapid conversion of 3 million
State and local cases to the Federal rolls, a substantial number of
payment errors have occurred in the program. In addition, some
States have more than a dozen different variations in their supplementation payments; this complexity is one source of erroneous
payment under the program. The Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare is taking extensive steps to reduce the number of errors in
payments in this program.
The State and local programs of aid to families with dependent children (AFDC) are assisted through grants to States for maintenance
payments. Federal outlays for the AFDC program are expected to
increase from $5.9 billion with 11.5 million recipients in 1976, to $6.0
billion with 11.3 million recipients in 1977. The Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare is working closely with the States through its
quality control effort to reduce errors and abuses in the administration
of benefits. Recent data indicate that 7.5 % of recipients were ineligible,
17.5% were overpaid, and 7.3% were underpaid. Legislation has been
proposed to simplify the AFDC matching formula, to include stepparents' income in determining eligibility, and to revise and simplify
work-related income disregards to focus resources on the most needy.
Income assistance simplification,—Certain of the specific reforms
recommended for programs that provide benefits to individuals, are
steps toward a more rational system of income support for the poor
and the needy. In the longer run, a more comprehensive approach is
needed that will avoid problems of inequity, different and unjustified
eligibility requirements, and gaps in and overlapping of benefits. The
average beneficiary of income assistance payments is participating in
three major federally assisted benefit programs. There is evidence that




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

141

the cumulative benefits are very unevenly distributed among persons
in need, with substantial sums going to persons not in need. Methods
will be developed for gathering national information on the actual
distribution and amounts of benefits of these programs, and on the
characteristics and resources of persons eligible for and benefiting
from these programs. As a step toward a more rational system, legislative authority is requested to simplify the administration of national
income assistance programs. These modifications would be within
carefully prescribed limits to achieve defined objectives, and would
be subject to congressional disapproval. The total income assistance
resources devoted to the needy would not decrease through the use of
this authority. Changes in one program would be accompanied by
other changes to the extent necessary to assure that the overall income assistance effort is maintained. This proposed authority would
permit the Administration to achieve greater consistency in eligibility requirements, benefit levels and related organization structures,
and thus improve the delivery of benefits. It would simplify and
reduce the costs of administration, assure more equitable treatment for all individuals and families in similar situations, and promote
work incentives for those who are employable. These reforms would
make it possible to avoid the haphazard course of the past, where
treating a problem in one area has generated imbalances or inequities
in the overall income support system and often created work
disincentives.
Housing assistance.—The Department of Housing and Urban
Development's (HUD) subsidized housing programs seek to bring
decent housing within the reach of families who otherwise could not
afford it. The most important of these, the lower income housing
assistance program, provides rental subsidies on behalf of eligible
families, with the amount equal to the difference between fair market
rent and a percentage of family income. Participating families may
select housing that meets their specific needs from the stock of existing
units. This program also encourages the construction and rehabilitation
of units in housing markets where the existing stock cannot meet the
needs of eligible families. The homeownership assistance program
(section 235) helps families become homeowners by subsidizing mortgage interest rates down to 5%.
The 1977 budget requests authority to contract for annual payments
of up to $850 million under the lower income housing assistance program. When added to the $359 million in authority expected to be unused at the end of the transition quarter, the new authority should allow
an additional 400,000 units to be approved for rental subsidies in 1977.




142

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

The Federal commitment to subsidize occupants of these units will
range from 15 years to 40 years. Accordingly, use of the requested authority will obligate HUD to make subsidy payments of nearly $23
billion. Assuming that tenant income and market rents rise at an annual rate of 5% during the term of the subsidy contract, outlays per
unit are estimated as follows:
• $397,000 over 40 years, for publicly financed new construction;
• $109,000 over 20 years, for privately owned new construction; and
• $47,000 over 15 years, for existing housing.
In 1976 HUD obligated $264.1 million in homeownership assistance
contract authority, and approvals against this authority are expected
for 100,000 units in 1977. Contractual obligations on behalf of these
units are estimated at $2.4 billion. In addition, HUD will continue to
provide housing assistance for reservation Indians under the conventional public housing program. The 6,000 units proposed for
approval in 1977 are expected to involve a Federal contractual obligation to make subsidy payments of $680 million, with outlays spread
over the 40 years following completion.
The authority proposed for use in 1977 under HUD's three housing
subsidy programs is expected to finance up to 506,000 units.
Subsidy payments on behalf of some 2.7 million housing units are
expected to reach $3.0 billion in 1977, an increase of $557 million over
1976. Of this amount, $462 million would be provided as operating
subsidies for public housing projects, using the performance funding
system. This system bases operating subsidies on the amount that would
be required by a well-run project with the same characteristics. In
calculating subsidy requirements, tenants will be expected to devote
between 15% and 25% of their income to housing. Legislation will be
proposed to allow a single measure of income to be used under the
lower income housing assistance and public housing programs, which
serve the same income groups. These changes will permit a savings of
approximately $112 million in operating subsidy requirements during
1977, and greater amounts in subsequent years. Additional assistance
for existing public housing will be provided under the modernization
program, with capital improvements estimated at $215 million in 1977.
The jood stamp program seeks to assure the needy an opportunity
to purchase an adequate diet. Presently this program is plagued
with a number of problems. These include a complicated system of
deductions from income, accepting applicants' estimates of future
income rather than using previous actual income, and loose assets
tests. Such eligibility requirements allow individuals to participate
who are capable of providing for themselves. Federal food stamp
outlays have increased from $30 million in 1964 to $4.6 billion in
1975. Outlays for 1976 are projected at $5.6 billion with 15 million
participants.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

143

The Administration has proposed reforms of the current program
to simplify and improve the program administration and assure that
benefits go only to the needy. These reforms will reduce program
costs by approximately $1.2 billion in 1977 and increase benefits for
those truly in need. Under these reforms, more than 13 million beneficiaries are estimated to participate in this program in 1977 with
outlays at $4.7 billion. Average individual benefits are projected to
increase from $23 per month in 1976 to $28 per month in 1977.
School lunch and other nutrition programs.—The existing feeding
programs are complex and overlapping. In the early 1940's the school
lunch program was designed to make good use of commodities acquired by the Federal Government under agricultural price support
and surplus removal programs. In recent years the commodities
acquired by these agricultural programs have diminished dramatically.
However, child feeding programs have continued to expand and were
made more complex and costly by the passage of six major laws in as
many years. In 1976, outlays for school lunch and child nutrition programs will be over $2.6 billion. Substantial portions of these outlays
will go to the non-needy; over $600 million will subsidize meals for
children with family income nearly twice the poverty level (above
$10,000 for a family of four).
The feeding programs currently provide benefits in the form
of cash and food to: (1) subsidize lunches and breakfasts served
in schools to all school children regardless of income, (2) provide
support for meals served in summer camps and summer feeding projects, (3) help pay for meals served in residential child care institutions,
day care projects and juvenile detention institutions, and (4) supplement the diets of pregnant women, infants, and young children.
Programs that provide subsidies for meals served to nonpoor children
have grown rapidly and been a factor in the acceleration of Federal
outlays. Benefits under these feeding programs are in addition to
benefits available under the food stamp program.
The proposed Child Nutrition Reform Act is a consolidated block
grant program to help States feed needy children. It will replace 15
existing fragmented, overlapping, and administratively complex programs. The new block grant program shown on the chart will provide
greater funds to feed needy children than now available under existing
law, while permitting substantial Federal savings by the elimination of
the subsidies for the nonpoor. States would have greater flexibility and
discretion to tailor feeding programs to local conditions and preferences. The excessive and unproductive administrative complexities
generated by the present array of categorical programs with different
requirements, standards, and regulations would end.




144

THE BUDGET FOB FISCAL YEAR 1977

Flow of Child Nutrition Dollars
Before — Categorical Programs
($2.7 Billion in Budget Authority in 1976)
Department of
Agriculture

Programs

Beneficiaries

Intermediaries

BASIC SCHOOL LUNCH

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE
(FREE AND REDUCED
PRICE LUNCH)

k.

NON-FOOD ASSISTANCE
(EQUIPMENT)
;
SCHOOL BREAKFAST
(BASIC, REDUCED
AND FREE)

SPECIAL MILK
(BASIC AND FREE)

FOOD AND
NUTRITION
SERVICE

- •

-

r

y

f

STATE EDUCATIONAL
AGENCY
STATE HEALTH AGENCY
STATE DISTRIBUTING
AGENCY
LOCAL EDUCATIONAL
AGENCY
LOCAL HEALTH AGENCY
LOCAL WELFARE AGENCY
PUBLIC, PRIVATE AND
NON-PROFIT
RESIDENTIAL CHILD
CARE INSTITUTIONS
PUBLIC, PRIVATE AND
NON-PROFIT SCHOOLS
(ELEMENTARY AND
HIGH SCHOOLS)
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE
NONPROFIT CHILD
CARE PROGRAMS
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE
NON-PROFIT SUMMER
FEEDING PROGRAMS

SUMMER FOOD

CHILD CARE FOOD
(BASIC, REDUCED
AND FREE)

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL
FOOD FOR WOMEN,
INFANTS AND CHILDREN

t '

SUPPLEMENTAL FEEDING
FOR WOMEN, INFANTS
AND CHILDREN

i

i

CHILDREN IN
SCHOOLS AND
INSTITUTIONS

i

COMMODITY
DISTRIBUTION

STATE ADMINISTRATIVE
EXPENSES
(BASIC AND SUMMER)

After—Consolidated Block Grant
($2 Billion in Budget Authority in 1977)

FOOD AND
NUTRITION
SERVICE




—•

CHILD NUTRITION
REFORM PROGRAM

— *

STATE AGENCY
AND DESIGNATED
PROVIDERS

—•

LOW INCOME
CHILDREN

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

145

The Administration's grant program for all needy children would
be available to the nearly 700,000 children who now do not receive
program benefits. The proposal would enable States to provide onethird of a needy child's daily nutritional requirement.
Earned income credit.—The Tax Reduction Act of 1975 provided
low-income families with children a credit equal to 10% of earned
income with a maximum credit of $400; where the credit exceeds any
taxes owed, the Government pays the difference to the family in
cash. This credit was applicable to incomes earned in calendar year
1975, with payments being made the following spring. Recent tax
legislation extended this credit into calendar year 1976 at half the
previous rate. Federal payments in excess of the tax liability otherwise
owed—counted as outlays—are estimated at $1.2 billion in 1976 and
$0.6 billion in 1977.
The reduction in taxes owed resulting from this credit—counted
as a tax expenditure—is estimated at $0.3 billion in 1976 and $0.1
billion in 1977.




146

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES
This function consists of those Federal programs specifically designed for veterans, their dependents, and survivors.
Program Highlights
• Increase VA medical care staffing by 1,757 full-time
employees, completing personnel improvements recommended in the 1974 "Quality of Care" study.
• Provide compensation and pension benefits to 4.8 million
veterans and their survivors.
• Enact pending legislation to eliminate VA GI bill education benefits for future members of the peacetime
All-Volunteer Force.
• Change current law to limit education program eligibility
for active duty personnel now in service to a readjustment period of 8 years following separation.
• Revise existing legislation to require health insurers to
reimburse the VA for care of insured patients with nonservice connected disabilities.
• Establish, through legislation, a new grant program for
construction and operation of State veterans cemeteries.
• Propose legislation to eliminate veterans burial payments
to the extent that they duplicate other federally funded
benefits.
This budget provides a high level of benefits and services to veterans
and their families. It provides recipients of compensation and education benefits with higher average benefits in 1977 than in 1976.
It also includes funds for additional medical personnel to complete
staffing improvements recommended in the 1974 "Quality of Care"
survey and for high priority construction projects that will improve
VA health care delivery. Legislation reflected in the budget will align
education benefits to the concepts of an All-Volunteer Armed Force
and an 8-year readjustment period; require health insurers to reimburse the VA for medical care provided to covered beneficiaries with
non-service-connected disabilities; and eliminate VA burial benefits
which duplicate other federally funded benefits.
Proposed spending for benefits and services to veterans and their
families totals $17.2 billion in 1977 and in 1978. Expected decreases
in pension and education caseloads, reflecting respectively improve-




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

147

VETERANS BENEFITS A N D SERVICES
[In millions of dollars]

Program

Outlays
1975
actual

Income security for veterans:
Compensation and pensions:
Service-connected compensation
Non-service-connected pensions
Other veterans benefits and services
Proposed legislation
Insurance programs:
National service life insurance trust fund.
U.S. Government life insurance trust fund.
NSLI and USGLI receipts
All other insurance programs
Subtotal, income security for veterans..
Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation:
Readjustment benefits and other
Proposed legislation
Subtotal, education, training, and rehabilitation
Veterans housing:
Loan guaranty revolving fund
Direct loan revolving fund
Other ( H U D participation sales trust fund).
Subtotal, veterans housing
Hospital and medical care for veterans:
Medical care and hospital services
Proposed legislation
Construction of hospital and extended care
facilities
Medical administration, research, and other.

1976
TQ
1977
estimate estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for
1977 i

4,680
2,739
162

5.114
2.914
13
7

1.306
73
8
5
6
-21

5.220
2.771
12
8
-85

5.200
2.772
12
8
-85

731
86
-472
—65

65
5
7
4
-477
-69

15
1
1
4
-124
-19

62
8
6
8
-508
-71

94
3
3
7
-508
5

7,860

8,383

2,111

8,258

8,536

4,593

6.023

1,144
-68

4,957
-713

4,873
-713

4,593

6.023

1,075

4,245

4,160

72
-41
—6

5
-101
—7

50
-19
—2

—161
-210
—9

24

-103

2
9

-380

3,405

3,769

96
3
-30

4,162
-130

4,172
-130

19
1
11
4

16
8
18
8

7
3
4
7

33
0
17
8

21
1
14
8

Subtotal, hospital and medical c a r e . . . .
Other veterans benefits and services:
VA administrative expenses and other
Proposed cemetery legislation
Non-VA veterans support programs _

3,665

4,142

1,026

4,521

4,437

430
__
28

565

115

26

6

525
4
27

517
5
27

Subtotal, other benefits and services... _

458

591

121

555

550

—2

—2

—1

—2

—2

16,597

19,035

4,362

17,196

17,681

Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total

1
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table 14
of Part 8.




148

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Outlays for Veterans Benefits and Services
SBilli

20-

$ Billion*

20

16 H

1977

ments in other Federal income security programs and declining
active duty force levels, combined with the legislative proposals
reflected in the budget, result in 1977 and 1978 spending which is
lower than that for 1976. In addition, tax expenditures flowing from
the tax-exempt status of compensation and pension payments and of
readjustment benefits are estimated at $0.6 billion and $0.3 billion
respectively in 1977.
Income security for veterans.—In addition to other Federal
income security programs, such as social security and unemployment
assistance, veterans and their families are eligible for special VA
programs which help maintain their income when the veteran is
disabled, aged, or deceased. Outlays for these programs will total an
estimated $8.3 billion in 1977.
Service-connected compensation.—Monthly compensation payments
are provided to veterans who are disabled as a result of military
service. The amount of the benefit is related to the loss of earning
capacity resulting from the disability. Disability and indemnity compensation payments are made to survivors of veterans who die from
service-connected injuries. Recently enacted legislation provided
benefit increases ranging from 10% to 12%for veterans and survivors.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

149

During 1977, an estimated 2.6 million veterans and their survivors
will receive $5.2 billion in compensation benefits.
Non-service-connected pensions.—Pensions are provided to needy
wartime-service veterans who are aged or have become disabled subsequent to their military service. Survivors of wartime-service veterans
also may qualify for pension benefits based on demonstrated financial
need. An estimated 2.2 million veterans and their survivors will
receive $2.8 billion in pension benefits during 1977.
Life insurance.—Insurance programs for veterans and their survivors will provide $34 billion of coverage to 5 million families in
1977. The Servicemen's Group Life Insurance program for military
personnel will provide $65 billion of coverage to 3.3 million families.
Cemetery and burial benefits.—To help the families of deceased
veterans defray the cost of burial in private cemeteries, the budget
provides $46 million in burial plot allowances. Families of deceased
veterans also receive funds to help pay veterans funeral costs. Proposed legislation will eliminate these latter payments in instances
where similar benefits are provided b}^ other federally financed
programs.
Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation.—The education benefits of the GI bill range from college courses to vocational
and on-the-job training. These benefits are designed primarily to assist
veterans make the transition from military to civilian life by helping
them get the education they otherwise might have gotten had they
not served their country in a time of national emergency. Active duty
servicemen and widows and children of veterans who have died or been
totally disabled in military service also are eligible. Service-disabled
veterans with significant disabilities can choose between regular GI
bill benefits or vocational rehabilitation training.
With no change in existing legislation, an estimated 563,000 fewer
beneficiaries would be trained in 1977 than in 1976, reflecting the
decline in active duty force levels with the end of the Vietnam conflict. However, legislation reflected in the budget will reduce training
loads by an additional 540,000. This legislation will eliminate new
enrollments in marginally effective flight and correspondence school
programs and return the education program to an 8-year eligibility
period—sufficient time for a veteran to make the transition from
military to civilian life. In addition, in keeping with similar actions
ending GI bill education programs for post-World War II and Korean
conflict veterans, pending legislation will terminate education benefits for future members of the peacetime All-Volunteer Force. Enactment of these legislative proposals will result in savings of $713 million
in 1977 and $825 million in 1978.




150

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

CREDIT PROGRAMS-VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES
[In millions of dollars]

Program

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimat

152
-112
1,130

153
-120
1,162

39
-31
1,170

2
—1
2

4
—1
5

6

4
—1
8

331
-311
1, 789

398
-514
1,674

104
-77
1, 701

419
-839
1,281

8,254
-3,166
57,983

10,444
-5,792
62, 636

2,708
-1,508
63,836

10,882
-5,887
68,831

Income Security:

Insurance policy loans:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period

156
-130
1,195

Education:

Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period

1

Housing:

Direct housing loans:
Direct loan disbursements
Direct loan repayments
Direct loans outstanding, end of period
Housing loan guaranty and other:
Guaranteed loan disbursements
Guaranteed loan repayments
Guaranteed loans outstanding, end of period

Notwithstanding these projected decreases in the number of people
training under the GI bill, 2.3 million beneficiaries are expected to
be trained in 1977 at an average cost of $1,804, up from $1,727 in
1976. By the end of 1977, 8.3 million people will have received tiaining
under the Vietnam-era GI bill.
Hospital and medical care for veterans.—The Veterans Administration operates a nationwide civilian medical care system that
includes 172 hospitals, 229 outpatient clinics, 89 nursing homes and 18
domiciliaries. Outlays for medical programs will reach an estimated
$4.5 billion in 1977, $379 million more than in 1976.
Medical care and hospital services.—Medical care is available to all
veterans with service-connected disabilities. To the extent that
available facilities and staff are not fully utilized by these veterans,
services also are provided to veterans unable to pay the cost of care.
Many patients who receive treatment in VA facilities for non-serviceconnected ailments have health insurance coverage. Pending legislation
will require health insurers to reimburse the VA medical system for
care provided in such cases. These reimbursements are expected to
total $130 million a year in 1977 and 1978.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

151

In 1977, veterans medical care services will be improved through
strengthened regional management of VA operations and more sharply
focused medical support programs.
I t is estimated that over 1.2 million veterans will be treated in VA
hospitals in 1977 with another 30,500 treated through contracts with
other hospitals at VA expense. In addition, an estimated 15.7 million
outpatient visits will be handled in 1977.
MEDICAL CARE FOR VETERANS
Program indicator

Number receiving hospital care (thousands)
Staff-to-patient ratio for VA hospitals
Number receiving contract hospital care at VA expense (thousands)
Number receiving extended care (thousands)
Outpatient visits (millions)

1975
actual

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

1,114
1.65

,202
1.72

1,246
1.74

28.6
70.7
14.8

20.9
76.2
15.3

30.5
82.5
15.7

The 1977 budget provides funds for an increase of 1,757 medical
personnel to complete the staffing improvements recommended in the
1974 "Quality of Care" survey, as well as for new research studies
on spinal cord regeneration and health problems of aged veterans.
Construction of hospital and extended care facilities.—Budget authority of $211 million will finance construction for high-priority
new projects including a number to modernize and correct safety
hazards as recommended in the 1974 survey of the quality of care in
VA hospitals.
Veterans housing.—In 1977, the VA will help 364,000 veterans
purchase homes through its mortgage loan guarantee and direct loan
programs.
Other veterans benefits and services.—In 1975, 593,000 veterans were placed in jobs through Jobs for Veterans and the National Alliance of Businessmen. Government agencies and private
industry will continue cooperative efforts to open new job opportunities for veterans in 1977.
The Veterans Administration administers 103 national cemeteries
to provide for the interment of eligible deceased servicemen and
veterans. Proposed legislation will provide grants to States for the
establishment and operation of veterans cemeteries, expanding the
number and geographic distribution of veteran burial sites.

210-000 O - 76 - 11




152

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND JUSTICE
This function includes those Federal programs that provide judicial
services; police protection; and the apprehension, prosecution, detention and rehabilitation of criminals, along with financial and technical
assistance to States and localities for their own criminal justice
systems.
Program

Highlights

• Intensify efforts to curtail illegal commerce in firearms and
seek stronger legislation related to handguns.
• Strengthen programs to reduce illegal traffic in narcotics
and dangerous drugs.
• Increase resources devoted to litigation and court support.
• Activate three new correctional institutions and begin
construction of four facilities.
• Adopt a more cautious approach to new State and local
law enforcement grants.
• Expand resources for increased enforcement of the antitrust laws.
• Emphasize apprehension and deportation of illegal aliens.
State and local governments have the primary responsibility for law
enforcement and the administration of justice; they will spend an
estimated $15 billion for these purposes in 1977. Proposed Federal
outlays for law enforcement and justice, which include $834 million of
assistance to State and local governments, are estimated to be $3.4
billion in 1977—nearly the same as in 1976. In 1978, outlays for these
programs are projected to be $3.3 billion. Further discussion of
Federal activities in the law enforcement area is contained in Special
Analysis N, "Federal Programs for the Reduction of Crime."

Federal law enforcement and prosecution.—Outlays for Federal
law enforcement and prosecution will increase slightly in 1977 to an
estimated $1,933 million.
During the past year, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
(ATF) began an intensified effort to curtail illegal commerce in firearms. This action is designed to assist local police in disrupting
distribution channels and prosecuting those who engage in this trade.
Vigorous enforcement of present firearms laws will complement the
Administration's legislative proposals, which include mandatory
sentences for felons convicted of using such weapons, prohibitions on
the manufacture and sale of "Saturday night specials," and a man-




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

153

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND JUSTICE
[In millions of dollars]

Outlays
Program or agency
1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977 *

Federal law enforcement and prosecution:

Drug Enforcement Administration
Federal Bureau of Investigation
Immigration and Naturalization Service
Justice Department legal activities
Legal Services Corporation
Secret Service
Customs Service
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
Other
Subtotal, Federal law enforcement and
prosecution
Federal judicial activities
Federal correctional and rehabilitative activities
Law enforcement assistance
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total

62
24
3
1
80
26
49

19
5
460
223
273
83
112
323
13
2
18
7

19
5
467
222
270
80
114
324
15
2
172

1,885
338

496
9
1

1,933
378

1,933
380

267
919
-7

75
255
-3

279
844
-7

299
713
-7

43
16
2

86
299
95
18
3

15
5
468
212
245
85
10
1
338
18
0
14
6

1,593
279
226
853
-9

132
439
19
7
226

2,942

3,402

5
4

914

3,426

3,318

1
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table
14 of Part 8.

datory waiting period between purchase and receipt of handguns. In
1977, outlay increases for ATF programs to reduce violent crime will
be partially offset by reductions in activities related to illegal liquor
production, which has declined sharply in recent years.
The Customs Service will reduce staff in 1977 to reflect the impact
of an unanticipated decline in the number of travelers who arrived
from foreign countries and formal import entries recorded in 1975.
Within the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), staff will
be redeployed to emphasize apprehension, detention, and ultimate
deportation of illegal aliens. Border patrol operations will continue at
1976 levels. Expected productivity gains will allow modest staff reductions for port-of-entry inspections and background investigations of
immigrants seeking U.S. citizenship.
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) coordinates Federal
activities to control illegal production and sale of narcotics and
dangerous drugs, provides technical assistance and training to support
State and local police, and assists foreign governments in curbing




154

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Outlays for Law Enforcement and Justice

Federal Enforcement and Prosecutio

smuggling. DEA will emphasize control of hard drugs and concentrate
its resources on high level offenders in order to disrupt distribution
channels and organizations.
Outlays for the Federal Bureau of Investigation will decline slightly
due to expected productivity increases, improved management practices, and deferred acquisition of selected equipment. The intensive
effort to combat white collar and organized crime will not be
diminished.
The Justice Department conducts most Federal litigation in both
civil and criminal matters. Most Washington-based legal divisions will
be held to 1976 staff levels. However, additional resources are requested for the Antitrust Division in order to carry out the Administration's program for increased enforcement of the antitrust laws.
Staff in the U.S. attorneys' field offices will expand by 9% to handle
burgeoning civil and criminal caseloads of increasing complexity.
The Legal Services Corporation provides aid in non-criminal cases
for clients who are unable to afford legal services; outlays are estimated
to be $83 million in 1977.
Constitutional guarantees of equality are enforced through civil
rights programs of the Department of Justice and other Federal
agencies. These programs are discussed in detail in Special Analysis
M, "Federal civil rights activities."




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

155

Federal judicial activities.—By law, the President's budget forwards estimates for the Judiciary without change. In 1977, the budgets
of the Supreme Court, the appellate and district courts, other activities of the judicial branch in this subfunction, and certain other
judicial activities amount to $378 million, an increase of 12% from
1976 level of $338 million.
Federal correctional and rehabilitative activities.—Three new
correctional institutions will be activated and construction will begin
on four additional facilities—metropolitan detention centers in Detroit
and Phoenix, a youth correction center in Alabama, and an adult
correction center in New York. These facilities are needed to alleviate
overcrowding problems in existing penal institutions.
Law enforcement assistance.—The Law Enforcement Assistance
Administration (LEAA) is responsible for providing Federal assistance
to State and local criminal justice systems; legislation to extend the
LEAA program for 5 years has been submitted to the Congress. In
1977, proposed outlays for LEAA grant programs will decline by 8%,
reflecting a more cautious approach in this area. Improved selectivity
in grant activities, coupled with a greater distribution of resources for
evaluation and research, will enable LEAA to determine and pursue
those programs which promise the most impact on reducing crime in
the United States. Such evaluation will improve decisions on the
level and direction of LEAA assistance.
In 1977, State and local governments will be asked to pay one-half
the costs of law enforcement training programs conducted for their
officials by the FBI. Other Federal agencies will continue to provide
technical assistance upon request.




156

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

GENERAL GOVERNMENT
General government programs encompass many fundamental
Federal activities including the legislative branch, the Executive Office
of the President, collection of revenues and Government-wide operations affecting property, supplies, and personnel. Outlays for general
government programs will decrease by $114 million in 1977 to an estimated $3.4 billion. In 1978, outlays for these programs are estimated
to be $3.9 billion.
Program Highlights
• Plan for an Office of Science and Technology Policy to
give scientific and technological advice and assistance to
the President.
• Accomplish Internal Revenue Service functions with
reduced staff through anticipated productivity increases
and other management improvements.
• Plan for proposed new territory, the Commonwealth of
the Northern Mariana Islands.
• Convene a National Women's Conference.
Legislative functions.—By law, the President's budget contains
estimates for the legislative branch as they are submitted by that
branch. The legislative branch proposes to spend $789 million in
1977 for the Congress, the General Accounting Office, the Congressional Budget Office, and other activities in this subfunction.
Executive direction and management.—Outlays for the White
House, the Executive Office of the President, and related activities
are expected to be $75 million.
The Office of Science and Technology Policy is planned to begin
operations in 1976, subject to the enactment of authorizing legislation
now before the Congress. The Office will advise the President on
scientific and technological aspects of national policies, programs, and
issues, and on the use of new discoveries in science and technology in
addressing national problems.
Central fiscal operations.—Computer verification of tax returns
by the Internal Revenue Service will be expanded in 1977 to process
the increasing number of tax returns. The one-time surge of pension
plans and amendments filed under provisions of the Employee




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

157

GENERAL GOVERNMENT
{In millions of dollars]
Outlays

Program or agency

1975
actual

Legislative functions
Executive direction and management.
Central fiscal operations
General property and records management
Central personnel management
Other general government:
Territories
Treasury claims
...
Other

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority 1
for 1977

Total

767
72
1,863

190
19
472

789
75
1,856

747
75
1,865

418
88

328
104

78
25

284
104

313
104

90
179
203

126
274
241

36
73
108

112
249
159

104
249
197

472
-292

640
-228

217
-39

520
-195

551
-195

3,089

Subtotal, other general government
Deductions for offsetting receipts

588
63
1,752

3,547

961

3,433

3,460

6,355

5,552

2,762

8,191

ADDENDUM
Off-budget Federal agency:
Federal Financing Bank

._.

1
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table
14 of Part 8.

Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 will be handled by temporarily assigning personnel engaged in other areas to the review of
these materials. Expected productivity and management improvements and a slight reduction of compliance coverage will permit lower
staff levels in other tax administration programs.
General property and records management.—The
General
Services Administration proposes $28 million for new and augmented
construction projects. The repair and alterations program of $61
million represents an approximate reduction of 40% from the 1976
program level. GSA will also undertake efforts to make its operations
and maintenance activities more cost competitive with the private
sector. More equitable and realistic standard level user charges
will be developed for incorporation in 1978. These are rates that GSA
charges its tenant agencies for space and related services, pursuant to
the Public Buildings Amendments of 1972.
Central personnel management.—During the past year, the
President's Panel on Federal Compensation made an extensive and




158

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

comprehensive review of the appropriate levels of compensation
for Federal civilian employees under the principle of comparability
with the private sector work force. Major refinements in the current
system of comparability were suggested. Some changes could be
adopted by administrative action while others would require legislative action by the Congress. With respect to the development of
career executives, Federal agencies are being directed to strengthen
their internal programs of executive selection and training.
The Commission on Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries
will conduct a quadrennial review of appropriate pay levels for upper
level positions in the three branches of the Federal Government. The
President will request that the Commission complete its report in
time for preparing recommendations to the Congress in January 1977,
as contemplated by law.
Other general government.—Outlays for programs in this subfunction are estimated to decline by nearly $120 million in 1977 to a
level of $520 million. Contributing to the decline in outlays are the
phaseout of the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration
activities, the completion of funding of the 1976 Presidential election
campaign and reduced amounts for the Trust Territory of the Pacific
Islands, Guam, and American Samoa.
Appropriations will be requested to convene a National Women's
Conference under recently enacted legislation. The major objectives
of the conference will be to assess progress toward insuring equality
for all women and to set goals for eliminating barriers toward their
full and equal participation in American life.
Federal Financing Bank.—By law, the Federal Financing Bank
(FFB) budget is excluded from budget totals. However, mention of
the magnitude of its operations is required to present a more complete
description of the Federal Government's impact on the economy.
Since its creation on December 29, 1973, the FFB has become a
major coordinating instrument of Federal agency and federally assisted
borrowing from the public. Most Federal agencies are using the Bank
to finance those programs that depend upon the sale of credit market
instruments, including agency securities, guaranteed obligations,
participation agreements, and loan assets. In 1975 the Bank had 150
loans and advances outstanding totaling $13.3 billion. In 1977, these
outstanding balances are estimated to total $39 billion. Further discussion of the FFB and its activities is contained in Part 2 of this
document and Special Analyses C and E in the Special Analyses
volume.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

159

REVENUE SHARING AND GENERAL PURPOSE FISCAL
ASSISTANCE
This function includes Federal aid to State, local, and territorial
governments that is available for general fiscal support and may be
used at the State or local governments7 discretion for a range of
functional purposes. Outlays in 1977 are estimated to be $7.4 billion,
rising further in 1978 to $7.7 billion.

Program Highlights
• Renew general revenue sharing through 1982 with annual
increases.
• Provide a Federal payment of $280 million to the District
of Columbia in 1977.
• Provide temporary emergency assistance for New York
City.

General revenue sharing.—General revenue sharing has become
a significant element in the fiscal relationship between the Federal
Government and State and local governments. Outlays in 1977 will
be $6.6 billion, with one-third going to State governments and twothirds to local governments. The Administration has recommended
that general revenue sharing, which terminates December 31, 1976,
be extended through September 30, 1982. The proposed legislation
will continue the authorization and appropriation of specific annual
amounts, increasing by $150 million annually to $7.2 billion for 1982.
Over the 5-year authorized life of the current program, $30.2 billion
of Federal funds will have been distributed. These payments are
made to States and localities with minimal Federal restrictions and
controls, thus allowing regional and local decisionmaking to address
regional and local needs. The principal Federal requirements of the
program address such concerns as assuring nondiscrimination and
public participation in spending decisions.
The Office of Revenue Sharing (ORS) supplements its own efforts
to assure compliance with program requirements by relying on other
Federal and State agencies. In addition, agreements have been
signed with a number of State audit and human rights agencies to
provide investigative assistance.




160

T H E BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

REVENUE SHARING AND GENERAL PURPOSE FISCAL ASSISTANCE
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

General revenue sharing
Other general purpose fiscal assistance:

Agriculture Department: Forest Service
Interior Department:
Payments from Federal land management
activities
Other
Treasury Department:
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands: Collection of duties, taxes and fees... _
Internal revenue collections in Puerto

Rico

Outlays
1975
actual

1976
TQ
1977
estimate estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977 i

6,130

6,275

1,627

6,552

6,546

121

91

118

37

37

178
24

179
40

145
7

127
27

127
26

180

225

56

230

230

122

114

24

114

114

1

*

1

1
283
-21
4

New York City Seasonal Financing Fund,
administrative expenses
District of Columbia:
Federal payment and utility charges
Other transactions
Other agencies and programs

232
15
4

260
-20
4

65
4

283
-21
1

Subtotal, other general purpose fiscal
assistance.

875

894

419

799

801

7,005

7,169

2,046

7,351

7,347

Total

*Less than $500 thousand.
1
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, and the transition quarter is shown in table 14
of Part 8.

Other general purpose fiscal assistance.—The Federal Government returns all or part of certain taxes and other revenues to specific
jurisdictions. For example, the Department of Agriculture pays 25%
of most national forest receipts to States for roads and schools in
counties where the receipts are generated. The Department of the
Interior returns to States and counties part of its receipts for activities
such as timber sales, mineral leasing, and grazing permits on Federal
lands. In addition, the Department of the Treasury returns to Puerto
Rico and the Virgin Islands most Federal taxes and other revenues
collected there.
Most of these payments to States and counties will be low in 1977
because such payments usually are paid in the quarter immediately
following the end of the fiscal year in which the receipts were generated.
The payments based on 1976 receipts will be paid in the transition




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

161

quarter, while payments made in 1977 will be based mainly on receipts
generated in the transition quarter.
The District of Columbia's operating budget is financed by local
taxes and by an annual payment to compensate for burdens placed on
the District as the Nation's Capital. A Federal payment of $280
million is requested for 1977.
Public Law 94-143 established the New York City Seasonal Financing Fund, which authorizes short-term loans by the Federal Government to the city through June 30, 1978. The amount of loans outstanding may not exceed $2.3 billion in any year. New York City will
be required to repay these loans by the end of the city's fiscal year.
The Federal Financing Bank is authorized to purchase the loans from
the Treasury. As a result, there will be no net effect on budget outlays
for any fiscal year. New York City will pay interest at the rate of 1%
above Treasury borrowing rates into the general fund of the Treasury.
Most Federal grants to State and local governments are classified in
other functions of the budget since they are intended to meet particular
program objectives rather than provide general financial support.
Functions that include substantial funds for grants to State and local
governments are: Commerce and transportation; Community and
regional development; Education, training, employment, and social
services; Health; and Income security. The Administration is proposing a number of reforms in grant programs to consolidate narrow
categorical grants into broad-based block grants. A detailed discussion
of Federal assistance to State and local governments is contained in
Special Analysis O, "Federal aid to State and local governments,"
in the Special Analyses volume.
Two major tax expenditures also provide fiscal assistance to States
and localities. The exclusion from reportable income of interest on
State and local obligations allows these governments to borrow at
lower interest rates. The revenue thus foregone by the Treasury is
estimated to be $4.5 billion in 1977. In addition, the deductibility of
State and local taxes from gross income allows individuals who itemize
deductions to partially offset their State and local tax liabilities
through reduced Federal taxes; the revenue loss is estimated to be
$6.7 billion in 1977.




162

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

INTEREST
Interest is the cost of borrowing or lending money. This function
includes both interest paid and received by the Federal Government.
Budget outlays for the interest function are estimated to rise by
$3.9 billion in 1976, and by another $6.5 billion in 1977, reaching
$41.3 billion. These increases result largely from the financing of
budget deficits of $76 billion in 1976 and $43 billion in 1977. By 1978,
interest costs are estimated to grow to $44.8 billion.
INTEREST i
{In millions of dollars]
Outlays
1975
actual

Interest on the public debt ^
Other interest
Total

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977

32,665
-1,691

37,700
-2,865

10,400
-631

45,000
-3,703

45,000
-3,704

30,974

34,835

9,769

41,297

41,296

1
Excludes interest on debt issued by various agencies, which is included in the outlays of the function served. Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976, andthe transition quarter is shown in
table 14 of Part 8.
3
Includes interest paid on the public debt held by Government investment accounts.

A substantial portion of the outlays in the interest function is paid
to trust funds on Government securities held by them. These payments
(which are shown as undistributed offsetting receipts) will amount
to $8.4 billion in 1977. They are deducted from both outlays and
budget authority in arriving at budget totals, since they are intragovernmental transactions. As shown in the table below, net interest
outlays are projected to be $32.9 billion in 1977.
[In millions of dollars]
1975
actual

Outlays for the interest function
Interest received by trust funds
Net interest outlays
Deduct: Deposit of earnings by Federal Reserve
System 1
Netimpact2
1
2

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

30,974
-7,667

34,835
-8,015

9,769
-2,110

41,297
-8,373

23,307

26,820

7,660

32,924

5,777

5,550

1,350

6,200

17,530

21,270

6,310

26,724

Shown as budget receipts.
Net amount of interest to be paid from receipts or other means of financing.




1977
estimate

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

163

In addition, $6.2 billion of the interest paid on securities held by
the Federal Reserve banks will be returned to the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts. Hence, the net impact on the 1977 budget of interest
paid will be $26.7 billion.
A significant tax expenditure arises from the optional deferral of
tax on the interest income of U.S. savings bonds. Normally the interest
would be taxed each year as it is credited, but the holder may defer
paying the tax until the bond is redeemed. The associated revenue
loss is about $0.7 billion in 1977.




164

THE BUDGET FOE FISCAL YEAR 1977

ALLOWANCES
Recommended

Outlays
1975
actual

Civilian agency pay raises
Contingencies for:
Relatively uncontrollable programs _
Other requirements
Total

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

authority
for 19771

760

790

200

0
175

0
1,500

0
1,800

200

175

2,260

2,590

1
Information on budget authority for 1975, 1976. and the transition quarter is shown in table 14
of Part 8.

Allowances are included in the 1977 budget to cover civilian agency
pay raises and contingencies. The outlay allowance for civilian agency
pay raises, which covers pay raises due to take effect in October 1976,
is $760 million for 1977. Outlays for the allowance for contingencies are
$200 million in 1976 and $1.5 billion in 1977. The contingency allowance for relatively uncontrollable programs is zero because the probability of net decreases or net increases for such programs is believed to
be equal.
The Federal Pay Comparability Act of 1970 provides an annual
system for adjusting Federal pay on the basis of comparability with
the private sector. During the past year, the President's Panel on
Federal Compensation made an extensive and comprehensive review
of the appropriate levels of Federal civilian employees' pay under
the principle of comparability. Major improvements in the current
system of comparability were recommended, some of which can be
implemented by administrative action and some of which require
legislation.
For purposes of making budget estimates, it has been assumed that
the Panel's recommended administrative changes will be reflected in
the October 1976 pay raise. The major administrative changes recommended are to include data on secretaries and computer operators in
the comparability survey, and to weight appropriately the survey data.
It is anticipated that these changes in the survey will reduce the average comparability increase in October 1976 from the earlier estimate of
11.5%, although the exact amount cannot as yet be determined. These
changes may affect the increase for lower grades more than for higher
grades because the newly included data relate more to the lower
grades.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

165

Legislation will be proposed to initiate other reforms recommended
by the President's pay panel. These include splitting the piesent
general schedule into two schedules, and setting salaries in the new
clerical and technical schedule on a locality basis. The Panel also
recommended furthei study to determine the feasibility of expanding
the comparability principle to include fringe benefits as well as pay.
In addition to these changes, and consistent with the President's
comprehensive program of fiscal restraint, it presently appears necessary to limit the increase in Federal salaries. The budget assumes that
October 1976 pay increases for white-collar employees will be limited
to 5%. Smaller increases may be received by some employees—
consistent with changes in the comparability process—but for budget
purposes, it is assumed that all employees will receive at least a 3%
increase. The estimated average increase is 4.7%. A full return to
comparability is assumed for 1978. In accordance with a change in the
law made in 1975, an allowance for equivalent pay raises for executive,
legislative, and judicial salaries is included.
A final decision on the need for pay restraint, and on its nature, will
be made by the President in late summer after a review of the economic
and fiscal situation at that time and after a review of the recommendations of his pay agent, the Federal Employees Pay Council, and the
Advisory Committee on Federal Pay.
The President also will submit legislation to implement the Pay
Panel's recommendations for reform of certain aspects of the law
governing wage board pay rates which result in blue-collar workers
earning more than their private sector counterparts. The 1977
allowance includes the effect of this proposed legislation. Other
reforms and changes proposed by the Panel are not expected to affect
total pay levels significantly in 1977.




166

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

UNDISTRIBUTED OFFSETTING RECEIPTS
Offsetting receipts are generally netted against budget authority
and outlays at the function or subfunction and agency levels. (See
part 6 for a detailed explanation.) However, there are three instances
where the offsetting receipts are sufficiently different that they are
deducted from the budget as a whole, rather than being offset at
the agency and functional level.

Outlays
1975
actual

1976
TQ
1977
estimate estimate estimate

Employer share, employee retirement
—3,980 -4,193
Interest received by trust funds
—7,667 -8,015
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental
Shelf
-2,428 -3,000
Total....
1

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1977 l

-979
-2,110

-4,468
-8,373

-4,468
-8,373

-500

-6,000

-6,000

—14,075 —15,208 -3,589 -18,840

-18,840

For these programs, budget authority equals outlays.

Employer share, employee retirement is composed of payments by
Federal agencies to retirement funds of its employees. About twothirds of these payments are to the Civil Service retirement fund
with the remainder paid mostly to the Social Security trust funds.
Most trust fund balances are—by law—invested in interest-bearing
Federal debt securities. The interest received by trust nonrevolving
funds is included as an undistributed deduction rather than being
offset against the interest function. These payments are estimated to
be $8.4 billion in 1977.
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf are not directly
related to a specific program in the budget. The Government plans
to lease more lands off the west and gulf coasts in fiscal year 1976,
along with, for the first time, lands in the Gulf of Alaska. In the
transition quarter, the mid-Atlantic tracts off the east coast are
scheduled to be opened to exploration. In 1977, additional sales are
planned in all these areas. Receipts from these leased tracts are
estimated to be $6.0 billion in 1977.




PART 6

THE BUDGET SYSTEM
AND CONCEPTS

167

210-000 0 - 7 6 - 1 2




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS
The budget system of the U.S. Government is based upon a structure
for financial administration that has as objectives the efficient management of programs in relation to the requirements of the Nation and
effective financial control.
This year the budget process continues to undergo changes due to
the enactment of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control
Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344). The act established new congressional budget procedures and a new fiscal year period (October 1
through September 30) effective with fiscal year 1977. There will be a
3-month transition quarter between fiscal year 1976, which ends
June 30, 1976, and fiscal year 1977, which begins October 1, 1976.
THE BUDGET PROCESS
The budget process has four main phases: (1) executive formulation
and transmittal; (2) congressional action; (3) budget execution and
control; and (4) review and audit. Each of these phases interrelates
with and overlaps the others.

Executive formulation and transmittal.—The budget sets forth
the President's financial plan of operation and thus indicates his
priorities for the Nation for the coming year. The President's transmittal of his budget to the Congress early in each calendar year is the
climax of many months of planning and analysis throughout the executive branch. Formulation of the 1977 budget began in the spring of
1975, although tentative goals for some programs were set earlier—
when the 1976 budget was transmitted to the Congress in February
of 1975.
During the period when a budget is being formulated in the executive branch, there is a continuous exchange of information, proposals,
evaluations, and policy determinations among the President, the
Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and the various Government agencies.
In the spring, agency programs are evaluated, policy issues are
identified, and budgetary projections are made, giving attention both
to important modifications and innovations in programs and to
alternative long-range program plans. Preliminary plans are then
presented to the President for his consideration. At about the same
time, the President receives projections of the economic outlook that
are prepared jointly by the Council of Economic Advisers, the Treas168




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

169

ury Department, and OMB and reviewed by the Economic Policy
Board. The President also receives projections of estimated receipts
prepared by the Treasury Department.
Following a review of both sets of projections, the President establishes general budget and fiscal policy guidelines for the fiscal year
that will begin about 15 months later. Tentative policy determinations
and planning ceilings are then given to the agencies to govern the
preparation of their budgets.
Throughout the fall and early winter the executive branch is involved in two related budgetary processes. One is the preparation of
the current services estimates, required by the Congressional Budget
Act to be transmitted to the Congress by November 10 of each year.
These estimates are projections of budget authority and outlays
required to continue ongoing Federal programs and activities in the
upcoming fiscal year without policy changes from the fiscal year in
progress at the time the estimates are submitted.
The second process is the preparation of the President's budget
for transmittal to the Congress. This process involves a detailed
review of agency budget requests by OMB. These requests and OMB's
recommendations on them are presented to the President for decision.
Overall fiscal policy issues—relating to total budget outlays and receipts—are again examined. Moreover, the effects of budget decisions
on outlays in the years that follow are also considered and are explicitly
taken into account.
The actual budget data from the most recently completed fiscal
year and updated estimates for the current fiscal year provide an
essential reference base in this review and decision process. Thus, the
budget process involves the simultaneous consideration of the resource
needs of individual programs and the total outlays and receipts that
are appropriate in relation to the outlook for the national economy.
The budget reflects the results of both of these considerations.
Congressional action.—The Congress can act as it wishes on the
President's budget proposals. It can change programs, eliminate them,
or add programs not requested by the President. It can increase or
decrease the amounts recommended by the President to finance
existing and proposed new programs. It may also act upon legislation
determining taxes and other means of raising receipts.
In making appropriations the Congress does not normally vote on
outlays directly, but rather on budget authority. The Congress
first enacts legislation that authorizes an agency to carry out a particular program and, in some cases, sets a limit on the amount that
subsequently can be considered for appropriation for the program.
Many programs are authorized for a specified number of years, or
even indefinitely; other programs, such as nuclear energy, space




170

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

exploration, defense procurement, foreign affairs, and some construction programs, require annual authorizing legislation.
The granting of budget authority is usually a separate, subsequent
action. As a normal rule, budget authority becomes available each
year only as voted by the Congress. However, in a significant number
of cases, the Congress has voted permanent budget authority, under
which funds become available annually without further congressional
action. Most trust fund appropriations are permanent, as are many
Federal fund appropriations, such as the appropriation to pay interest
on the public debt.
Congressional review begins when the President transmits his current services estimates to the Congress some 2 months before the
President's budget is transmitted. While these current services estimates are neither recommended amounts nor estimates as to what the
figures for the budget year will actually turn out to be, the Congress
may use these estimates as a base upon which to examine the budget
transmitted in January.
Upon receipt of the President's budget, the Congress will follow
new procedures required by the Congressional Budget Act in addition
to its established pattern of considering requests for appropriations
and changes in revenue laws.
Under the new procedures the Congress will consider budget totals
prior to completing action on individual appropriations. The act requires that by March 15, the new House and Senate Budget Committees receive reports on budget estimates from all other congressional
committees, as well as a fiscal policy report from the new Congressional
Budget Office, by April 1. This is followed by the adoption of the first
concurrent budget resolution, no later than May 15, containing
Government-wide budget targets of receipts, budget authority, and
outlays to guide Congress in its subsequent consideration of appropriations and revenue measures.
Congressional consideration of requests for appropriations and for
changes in revenue laws will continue to follow an established pattern.
These requests are considered first in the House of Representatives.
The appropriations committee, through its subcommittees, studies the
proposals for appropriations and examines in detail each agency's
performance. The Ways and Means Committee reviews proposed
revenue measures. Each committee then recommends the action to be
taken by the House of Representatives.
As appropriations and tax bills are approved by the House, they
are forwarded to the Senate, where a similar review process is followed.
In case of disagreement between the two Houses of Congress, a conference committee (consisting of Members of both bodies) meets to
resolve the issues. The report of the conference committee is returned
to both Houses for approval, and when agreed to, the measures are




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

171

then ready to be transmitted to the President in the form of an
enrolled bill, for his approval or veto.
After action has been completed on all money bills, the Congress
will, by September 15, adopt a second concurrent resolution. The
resolution adopted by the Congress will contain budget ceilings
classified by function for budget authority and outlays and a floor for
revenue measures. This resolution may retain or revise the appropriate
levels set earlier in the year, and can include directives to the appropriations committees and to other committees with jurisdiction over
budget authority or entitlements to recommend changes in new or
carryover authority or entitlements. Similarly, the second resolution
may direct the appropriate committees to recommend changes in
Federal revenues or in the public debt. Changes recommended by
various committees pursuant to the second budget resolution are to be
reported in a reconciliation bill (or resolution, in some cases) whose
enactment is scheduled by September 25, a few days before the new
fiscal year commences on October 1.
With enactment of the reconciliation bill, the congressional budget
process will be completed. At this point, Congress may not consider
any spending or revenue legislation that would breach any of the
levels specified in the second resolution. In other words, Congress
would not be able to pass a supplemental appropriation if it would
cause spending to rise above the levels of the second budget resolution,
nor could it cut revenues below the second resolution's totals. However, Congress may adopt a new budget resolution any time during
the fiscal year.
If action on appropriations is not completed by the beginning of
the fiscal year, the Congress may enact a "continuing resolution" to
provide authority for the affected agencies to continue operations until
their regular appropriations are enacted.
Budget execution and control.—Once approved, the budget
becomes the financial basis for the operations of each agency during the
fiscal year.
Under the law, most budget authority and other budgetary resources are made available to the agencies of the executive branch
through an apportionment system. Under authority delegated by the
President, the Director of OMB apportions (distributes) appropriations and other budgetary resources to each agency by time periods
(usually quarters) or by activities. Obligations may not be incurred in
excess of the amount apportioned. The objective of the apportionment
system is to ensure the effective and orderly use of available authority
and to reduce the need for requesting additional or supplemental
authority.




172

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Changes in laws or other factors may indicate the need for more
authority during the year, and supplemental requests may have to
be transmitted to the Congress. On the other hand, reserves may be
established under the Antideficiency Act (31 U.S.C. 665) to provide
for contingencies or to effect savings made possible by or through
changes in requirements or greater efficiency of operations. Amounts
may also be withheld for policy or other reasons, pursuant to the
Impoundment Control Act.
Whenever the President determines that all or part of any budget
authority provided by the Congress will not be required to carry out
the full objectives or scope of a program for which it was provided, or
that such budget authority should be rescinded for fiscal policy or
other reasons, a special message is transmitted by the President to the
Congress requesting a rescission of the budget authority. The budget
authority proposed by the President for rescission must be made
available for obligation unless both the House and Senate pass a
rescission bill within 45 days of continuous session after receiving
the President's message.
Whenever all or part of any budget authority provided by the
Congress is deferred (i.e., temporarily withheld from obligation) the
President transmits a special message to the Congress on such deferrals. Either House may pass a resolution disapproving this deferral
of budget authority, thus requiring that the funds be made available
for obligation. When no congressional action is taken, deferrals may
remain in effect until, but not beyond, the end of the fiscal year.
Review and audit.—This is the final step in the budget process.
The individual agencies are responsible for assuring—through their
own review and control systems—that the obligations they incur and
the resulting outlays follow the provisions of the authorizing and
appropriating legislation, as well as other laws and regulations relating
to the obligation and expenditure of funds. OMB reviews program
and financial reports and keeps abreast of agency programs and the
effort to attain program objectives.
In addition, the Comptroller General, as agent of the Congress,
regularly audits, examines, and evaluates Government programs.
His findings and recommendations for corrective action are made to
the Congress, to OMB, and to the agencies concerned. The Comptroller General also monitors the executive branch's reporting of
special messages on proposed rescissions and deferrals. He reports
any items not reported by the executive branch and any differences
that he may have with the classification (as a rescission or deferral)
of withholdings included in special messages submitted by the President. The Comptroller General may bring civil actions to obtain
compliance should the President fail to make budget authority available in accordance with the Impoundment Control Act.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

173

COVERAGE OF THE BUDGET TOTALS
Agencies and programs.—The budget totals cover agencies and
programs (including Government corporations) administered by the
Federal Government, no matter how funded, except for the following:
Exchange stabilization fund,
Rural electrification and telephone revolving fund,
Rural Telephone Bank,
Environmental Financing Authority,1
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System,
Housing for the elderly or handicapped fund,
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation,
Postal Service fund,
United States Railway Association,
Federal Financing Bank,
Energy Independence Authority (proposed).2
In addition to these exceptions, the totals exclude privately owned,
Government-sponsored enterprises, such as the Federal land banks
and Federal home loan banks. Information on the excluded Government agencies and on the Government-sponsored enterprises is discussed in Part 2 of the Budget and presented in the form of "annexed
budgets" in Part IV of the Budget Appendix.3
Functional classification.*—The functional classification arrays
budgetary data according to the major purpose served by the unit
being classified (usually, a budget account). In accordance with the
Congressional Budget Act, the Congress will pass resolutions establishing budget targets and ceilings by functional categories.
The following criteria are used in establishing and in assigning
activities to functional categories:
• A function must have a common end or ultimate purpose addressed
to an important national need. (The emphasis is on what the
Federal Government seeks to accomplish rather than the means
of accomplishment, what is purchased, or the clientele or geographic area served.)
• A function must be of continuing national, importance and be
significant in size, i.e., normally account for at least 2% of total
budget outlays over a number of years.
• The basic unit of classification generally is the appropriation or
fund account. Occasionally, an appropriation account serves more
than one major purpose. Accordingly, an account may be divided
1
2

The authorization for the Environmental Financing Authority expired on June 30. 1975.
The budget totals include an amount equal to the estimated net earnings or losses of this proposed
Authority.
'Beginning Oct. 1, 1976, the Export-Import Bank, previously excluded from the budget totals
is 4
included in the budget totals.
A further discussion of this subject is found in Part 5 of this Volume.




174

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

into two or more subfunctions. Any such division requires a
compelling reason, and must involve relatively large amounts
for each subfunction.
• Each unit is classified into the single best or predominant purpose
served. Thus, a unit is assigned to only one function.
• Activities and programs are normally classified by common
purpose (or function) regardless of which agencies conduct the
activities.
Types of funds.—Agency activities are financed through Federal
funds and through trust funds, both of which are included in the
budget.
Federal funds are of four types. The general fund is credited with
receipts not earmarked by law for a specific purpose, and is charged
with payments from such receipts and from general borrowing. Special
funds contain Federal receipts earmarked for specific purposes, other
than for carrying out a cycle of operations. Public enterprise (revolving) funds finance a cycle of business-type operations in which
outlays generate collections, primarily from the public. Intragovernmental revolving and management funds facilitate financing operations
within and between Government agencies.
Trust funds are established to account for receipt and expenditure of
moneys by the Government for use in carrying out specific purposes
and programs in accordance with the terms of a trust agreement or
statute. These moneys are not available for the general purposes of
the Government. Within the category of trust funds there is a special
subcategory of trust revolving funds that carry on a C3^cle of businesstype operations.
Current expense and capital outlay.—The budget includes
spending for both current operating expenses and capital outlays such
as the purchase of lands, structures, and equipment. It also includes
capital outlays in the form of lending and the purchase of investments.
These categorizations of outlays are discussed in Special Analysis D.
However, it excludes from obligations and outlays the acquisition of
Federal debt securities issued by the Government itself (either by the
Treasury Department or b}^ other Federal agencies).
BUDGET AUTHORITY AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS
Budget authority.—Government agencies are permitted to enter
into obligations requiring either immediate or future payment of
money only when they have been granted authority to do so by law.
The amounts thus authorized b}^ the Congress are called budget
authority.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

175

Budget authority permits obligations to be incurred, and for most
accounts the amount of the authority is related to the obligations
expected to be incurred during the year. In some cases—especially
construction (other than water resources projects), research, and procurement—budget authority is requested and provided to finance the
full cost of each project at the time it is started, regardless of when
obligations are expected to be incurred and the expected time of
completion. In other cases, certain insurance or other programs are
provided with standby budget authority that may never be used fully
but is available if certain contingencies should arise.
Budget authority usually takes the form of appropriations, which
permit obligations to be incurred and payments to be made. Some
budget authority is in the form of contract authority, which permits
obligations in advance of appropriations and therefore requires a subsequent appropriation or receipts to "liquidate" (pay) these obligations.
There is also authority to spend debt receipts (i.e., borrowing authority))

such budget authority permits the use of borrowed money to incur
obligations and make payments. Where such authority pertains to the
borrowing from the Treasury, it is authority to spend public debt
receipts. Authority for a Government agency to borrow directly from
the public or from a Government-administered fund available for
investment is authority to spend agency debt receipts.
Starting in January 1976, it is not in order for either House of the
Congress to consider any bill, with certain exceptions, that provides
new borrowing or contract authority unless that bill also provides
that such new spending authority will be effective only to the extent
and in such amounts as are provided in appropriations acts.
Most appropriations for current operations are made available for
obligation only during a specified fiscal year (1-year appropriations).
Some are for a specified longer period (multiple-year appropriations).
Others, including most of those for construction, some for research,
and many trust fund appropriations, are made available for obligation until the objectives have been attained (no-year appropriations).
When budget authority is made available by the Congress for a
specific period of time, any part that is not used for obligations during
that period lapses and cannot be used later. Reappropriations—
congressional actions to continue availability of unused balances
that have lapsed—are counted as budget authority in the year of the
congressional action.
A rescission is a legislative action that cancels budget authority prior
to the time the authority would otherwise have lapsed. Rescissions
are offset against new budget authority in arriving at the total of
budget authority for each year. A deferral is an executive branch
action or inaction—including the establishment of reserves under the
Antideficiency Act—that effectively delays the obligation or expendi-




176

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

ture of budget authority. Deferrals may not extend beyond the end
of the fiscal year and may be overturned at any time by either House
of Congress.
Most authority to obligate funds is granted year by year {current
authority). Under certain laws, some budget authority in Federal funds
and most budget authority in the trust funds become available from
time to time without further action by the Congress {permanent
authority).
The amount of budget authority is usually stated specifically in the
legislation that makes it available {definite authority). In a few cases
the amount is left indefinite, to be determined by subsequent circumstances {indefinite authority). Examples of the latter type are the
appropriation for interest on the public debt, and the trust fund
appropriation equal to receipts under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (social security).
Obligations incurred.—Following the enactment of budget
authority, obligations are incurred by Government agencies. Such
obligations include the currently accruing liabilities for salaries and
wages, certain contractual services, and interest; entering into contracts for the purchase of supplies and equipment, construction and
the acquisition of land; entering into contracts to make loans; and
other contractual arrangements requiring the payment of money.
Outlays.—Obligations generally are liquidated by the issuance of
checks or the disbursement of cash; such payments are called outlays.
In lieu of issuing checks, obligations may also be liquidated (and outlays occur) by the maturing of interest coupons in the case of some
bonds, or by the issuance of bonds or notes (or increases in the redemption value of bonds outstanding). Outlays during any fiscal year may
be payments of obligations incurred in prior years or in the same year.
Such outlays, therefore, flow in part from unexpended balances of
prior year budget authority and in part from budget authority provided for the year in which the money is spent. Total budget outlays
include deductions for offsetting collections (see Receipts, below).5
Balances of authority.—Not all budget authority enacted for a
fiscal year is obligated and paid out in the same year. The obligated
balance is that portion of the budget authority that has been obligated
but not yet paid. For example, in the case of salaries and wages, one to
three weeks elapse between the time of obligation and the time of
payment. In the case of major procurement and construction, up to
several years may elapse. Obligated balances of budget authority are
carried forward until the obligations are subsequently paid. In addi* This process is depicted on a chart "Relation of Budget Authority to Outlays —1977 Budget"
in Part 2 of this volume.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

177

tion, in multiple-year or no-year accounts, budget authority that is
still available for obligation may be carried forward for obligation in
the following year. These are unobligated balances.
Therefore, a change in the amount of budget authority for a given
year does not necessarily result in a similar change in either the obligations incurred or the budget outlays of that same year. A change in
budget authority in any one year may have an effect on obligations for
2 or more years, and may affect budget outlays for an even longer
period. In the case of standby budget authority, obligations and
outlays may never materialize.
Allocations between agencies.—In some cases, one or more
agencies may share in the administration of a program for which
appropriations are made to another agency or to the President. This
is made possible, in the accounts, by the establishment of allocations
from the "parent" account (the account to which the appropriation
was made). Obligations incurred through such allocations are included
with the parent account in the Budget (without separate identification)
and in the Budget Appendix (where the total obligations of each
participating agency are identified separately).
RECEIPTS
In general.—Receipts represent amounts collected during the year
and are classified into two major categories:
• Budget receipts, which are compared with total outlays in calculating the budget surplus or deficit.
• Offsetting collections, which are deducted from disbursements in
calculating total outlays. Corresponding offsets are made in
arriving at total budget authority and net obligations incurred.
Budget receipts.—Budget receipts are collections from the public
that result from the exercise of the Government's sovereign or governmental powers and from contributions paid by participants in
certain voluntary Federal social insurance programs. They consist
primarily of tax receipts and social insurance premiums, but also
include receipts from court fines, certain licenses, and war reparations
(in applicable years). Gifts and contributions (as distinguished from
payments for services or cost-sharing deposits by State and local
governments) are also counted as budget receipts.
Offsetting collections.—These are classified into two types: collections credited to appropriation or fund accounts and offsetting receipts
(that is, amounts deposited in receipt accounts). Generally, collections
credited to appropriation or fund accounts can be used without




178

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

appropriation action by the Congress, whereas funds in receipt accounts
cannot be used without being appropriated.
Collections credited to appropriation or fund accounts occur in two
circumstances:
• Reimbursements.—When authorized by law, some incidental
sums collected are treated as reimbursements to appropriations;
these are netted in determining outlays from such appropriations.
• Revolving funds.—In the three types of revolving funds—
public enterprise, intragovernmental, and trust revolving—
collections are regularly netted against spending.
Offsetting receipts generally are deducted from budget authority
and outlays by function and subfunction and by agency. Offsetting
receipts are subdivided into two major categories, as follows:
• Proprietary receipts from the public.—These are collections from
the public—deposited in receipt accounts of the general fund,
special funds, or trust funds—that arise out of the business-type
or market-oriented activities of the Government (for example,
loan repayments, interest, sale of property and products, charges
for nonregulatory services, and rents and royalties). Such collections are not counted as budget receipts, and with one
exception, are offset against total budget authority and outlays
by agency and by function.6
• Intragovernmental transactions.—These are payments into receipt
accounts from other federally owned or administered accounts.
They are treated as an offset to budget authority and outlays,
rather than as a budget receipt. Intragovernmental transactions
may either be intrabudgetary (where the payment and receipt both
occur within the budgetary universe) or result from receipts from
of-budget Federal agencies in those cases where the payment comes
from a Federal agency whose funds are excluded from the budget
totals. Normally intragovernmental transactions are deducted
from both the outlays and the budget authority for. the agency
receiving the payment.7
Intrabudgetary transactions are further subdivided into three
groups: (1) interfund transactions, where the payment is from one
fund group (either Federal funds or trust funds) to the other fund
group; (2) Federal intrafund transactions, in those cases where the
payment and receipt both occur within the Federal fund group; and
(3) trust intrafund transactions, in those cases where the payment
and receipt both occur within the trust fund group.
• Receipts from rents and royalties from the Outer Continental Shelf lands are deducted from
tctal budget authority and outlays for the Government as a whole rather than any single agency
or function.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

179

OTHER TRANSACTIONS
Borrowing and repayments.—Borrowing and debt repayment are
not treated as receipts or outlays, since if they were the budget could
be balanced simply by borrowing. This applies both to borrowing in
the form of public debt securities and to specialized forms of borrowing—such as the sale of agency securities, military family housing
mortgages, and certificates representing participation in a pool of
loans.
Exercise of the monetary power.—Seigniorage is the profit from
coining money; it is the difference between the value of coins as money
and their cost, including the cost of manufacturing. Seigniorage on
coins arises from the exercise of the Government's monetary powers
and differs from receipts coming from the public, since there is no
corresponding payment on the part of another party. Therefore,
seigniorage is excluded from receipts and treated as a means of financing a budget deficit, or as a supplementary amount to be applied
to reduce debt or to increase the cash in Treasury in the years of a
budget surplus. The increment (profit) resulting from the revaluation
of gold as a monetary asset is treated like seigniorage, but the profit
from sale of gold as a commodity is treated as a proprietary receipt.
Liabilities in deposit fund accounts.—Accounts outside the
budget, known as deposit funds, are established to record certain
amounts held in suspense temporarily, or held by the Government as
agent for others (for example, savings accounts for military personnel, State and local income taxes withheld from Federal employees' salaries, and payroll deductions for the purchase of savings bonds by
civilian employees of the Government). Such transactions affect Treasury's cash balances even though they are not a part of the budget.
Exchange of cash.—The Government's deposits with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) are considered similar to cash assets.
Therefore, the movement of money between the IMF and the Treasury
Department is not in itself considered a receipt or an outlay, borrowing
or lending.

Obligations to international lending organizations.—Debt
instruments issued (in lieu of checks) in payment of subscriptions to
international lending organizations are not considered borrowing or
outlays, but remain a part of the obligated balances until they are
cashed, at which time they become outlays. These differ only in form,
and not in substance, from ordinary balances for unpaid obligations.




180

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BASIS FOR BUDGET FIGURES
In general.—Receipts and repayments reflect collections. Outlays
are stated in terms of checks issued, including cash paid in lieu of
checks. The accrual basis is generally used for interest on the public
debt. In the case of bonds and notes, where the interest expense of the
Government is reflected in periodic changes in redemption value, the
interest outlay is counted when the redemption value changes.
Data for 1975.—The 1975 column of this budget generally presents
the actual transactions and balances for that year, as recorded in
agency accounts and as summarized in the central financial reports
prepared by the Treasury Department.
Data for 1976 and the transition quarter, July 1,1976, through
September 30, 1976.—By now (January 1976) all regular appropriations acts for 1976 and the transition quarter have become law except
Foreign Assistance; Defense; Labor-Health, Education, and Welfare;
and the District of Columbia, for which continuing appropriations
have been provided. The amounts in the Budget for 1976 and the
transition quarter include budget authority actually made available
by the Congress in the case of enacted appropriations, the amounts
in the conference report on the unenacted Defense bill, and the amounts
in the President's 1976 budget, as amended, for projects and activities
to be funded in the Labor-Health, Education, and Welfare; Foreign
Assistance; and District of Columbia appropriation bills that are not
yet law. This budget proposes some amendments to these appropriations still pending before the Congress. Also some rescissions are
now pending before the Congress, and additional supplemental
appropriations will be required in certain cases. These supplemental
represent the amounts required for various pay raises including those
of October 1975 and the additional amounts requested to meet
previously unforeseen program costs.
Where the word "enacted" is used with reference to 1976 and the
transition quarter, as in tables 1 and 8 of Part 8 of the Budget, the
amount represents budget authority already voted by the Congress.
In the case of indefinite appropriations, the enacted sums include the
amounts likely to be required. Actions "pending" before the Congress
include unenacted appropriations and proposed rescissions, whether
included in regular or supplemental appropriation bills or awaiting
Congressional consideration for inclusion in a rescission bill. Where
the word "estimate" is used, the amounts may include pending appropriations, needed supplemental, and enacted budget authority.
Certain standard footnotes are used in Part 7 of the Budget (and are
explained at the end of that table) to specify the status of these
additional items for 1976 and the transition quarter.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

181

Data for 1977.—This budget is complete as to the estimates for
1977. Part I of the Budget Appendix generally includes the proposed
appropriation language for the various items identified in the budget.
However, in some instances, estimates are included in the budget
schedules without appropriation language for 1976 and 1977. For these,
the requested amounts may already be pending, proposed legislation
may be required and/or the estimated amounts will be requested later
when the requirements are known. In certain tables of the budget these
items for later transmittal and the related outlays are separately
identified. Estimates of the total requirements for 1976, the transition
quarter, and 1977 include both the amounts formally proposed and the
amounts planned for later transmittal.
Allowances.—Lump-sum allowances are included in the tables to
cover possible additional changes. The allowance for contingencies
is shown in two categories, as required by the Congressional Budget
Act. The estimates in the first category, " Relatively uncontrollable
programs," are zero because the probability of net decreases or net
increases for such programs is believed to be equal. The second category, "Other requirements," contains estimates for requirements now
not foreseen for existing programs and for the possible enactment of
legislation not specifically provided for in the budget. The allowance
for civilian agency pay raises includes an estimate of the additional
amounts that will be required for pay raises anticipated in October
1976 for employees of civilian Government agencies. A separate
allowance for pay raises is shown for the military and civilian employees
of the Department of Defense and is included in its figures. These
increases could not be reflected in the various program appropriation
requests since the applicable detailed amounts have not yet been determined.




PART 7

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM
BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

183

210-000 O - 76 - 13




EXPLANATORY NOTE
This tabulation contains information on budget authority
(BA) and outlays (O) for each appropriation and fund account. The budget authority in this tabulation takes account
of certain transfers between appropriations. All budget authority items are current and definite appropriations except
where otherwise indicated.
Functional code numbers are shown for each account as
a cross reference to tables 14 and 15 (pp. 330-353), where the
figures are summarized by functional classification. Types of
funds in the budget and the deduct entries at the end of each
chapter of this tabulation are explained in Part 6 (pp. 174-178).
Congressional action in the appropriation process occasionally takes the form of a limitation on the use of a trust
fund or other fund, or of an appropriation to liquidate contract
authority. Amounts for such items, which do not affect budget
authority, are included here in parentheses and identified in
the stub column, but are not included in the totals.
184




185

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
SENATE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

122,684
D
4.676
127,360

31.456
°1.559
33,015

125.068

185,546

222,499
"4,053

54,714
"439

237,525

178,988

226,552

55,153

237,525

B
A

45,770

71,261

13,576

55,328

0

.801

44,989

71,419

13,629

55,328

B
A

4,041

6,050

1,512

8,500

"31

655

°93

435

2,723

6,244

1,912

8,305

4,736
°132
3,968

1,184

10,159

1,817

10,159

1,578
"51
1,640

425

1,784

435

1,770

120
100
298

30

120

30
1,391

120
5,778

1,739

5,530

BA

108,734

0

102,237

BA

0

Senate

125,068

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

House of Representatives

801

JOINT ITEMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Joint Items

801

OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

801

B
A
0

Reappropriation

CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

801

BA ...
0

...

"33

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries

801

Contingent expenses
Reappropriation

801

Capitol buildings

801

BA

1,424

0

1,408

BA
BA

0

440

89
4.962

BA
0

Reappropriation

BA

1,127
7,951

4,209
'157
759
6,851

12

32
1,785
<59

405

3,202

1,922

443

2,490

Extension of the Capitol

801

0

Capitol grounds

801

BA

1,437

BA
0

250
1,561

Reappropriation

See footnotes at end of table.




186

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Master plan for future development
of the Capitol grounds and
related areas
801

BA .
0

Acquisition of property as an
addition to the Capitol grounds

0

350
275

25

50

8,696
<294
"28
225
9,455

2,079

10,136

2,332

9,680

2,663
13
0

1,793

15,266

42

801

1

Additional parking facilities
congressional employees

for
801

0

Senate office buildings

801

BA

7,076

BA
0
BA
0
0

7,221
16 322
1,209
7
1

BA
0

866
3 954

Reappropriation
Construction of an extension to the
New Senate Office Building
801
Extension of additional Senate Office
Building site
801
Acquisition of property as a site for
parking facilities for the United
States Senate
801
Plans for garage and related
facilities for the United States
801

.

o

49
34

140

117
24,294

127
c
l
136
9,815
C
438

35
2,596

138
14,263

10
10,101

15,325

3,738

19,553

2,442

11,172

2,542

11,002

6,859

695

6,090

2 700 .
1600

200

900

45
8

2,863

57
7

2,597

Senate garage

801

BA

120

House office buildings

801

0
BA
BA
0

Reappropriation
Acquisition of property, construction,
and equipment, additional House
Office Building
801
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

(145) ..
..
77
8,688

0
0

6,654
5
9

0

1,365

o
Capitol Power Plant

801

Expansion of facilities, Capitol Power
Plant
801
Modifications and enlargement,
Capitol Power Plant
801
Alterations and improvements,
buildings and grounds, to provide
facilities for the physically
handicapped
801
Structural and mechanical care,
Library buildings and grounds.801
Reappropriation
See footnotes at end of table.




774 .

BA

o
BA

1,741

BA
0

1,823

19
4
9,063
C
25
10,549
402 ..
.

2,034
<69
70 ..
..
2,302

187

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

9,940

900

16,410

6A
0

68,757
50,894

42,759
71,366

9,887
15,484

49,458
91,596

BA

1,018

1,205
'48
1,235

297

1,165

332

1,190

57,598
C
153
°1,424
59,257

14,931

68,380

°545
15,254

67,766

BA

5,992

6,753

1,768

7,851

0

Total Federal funds Architect of
the Capitol.

7,221

48,798

Library of Congress, James Madison
Memorial Building
801

6,109

°223
6,835

1,811

7,807
*564

20,329

0

BOTANIC GARDEN
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

801

998
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Copyright Office:
expenses

503

Salaries

and
403

BA

49,825

National Commission on New
Technological Usage of
Copyrighted Works: Salaries and
expenses
403

BA

337

0

314

114
D
A
106

Congressional Research
Salaries and expenses

Service:
801

BA
0

13,382

16,606
D
574
16,944

4,433
"220
4,510

20,157

Distribution of catalog
Salaries and expenses

cards:
503

BA

10,780

11,285

2,971

12,263

13,722

C

'O ft

555

4i

11,309

°216
300
11,529

2,919

12,265

1,458
1,409

1,695
1,752

456
443

1,760
1,766

BA
0

229
197

251
270

75
59

286
291

BA

11,417

3,742

22,637

0

11,908

15,872
<8
"55
12,447

"21
4,287

18,096

Collection and distribution of library
materials (special foreign currency
program)
503

BA
0

2,014
2,333

2,014
2,166

498
506

2,910
2,681

Indexing and microfilming the
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic
Church records in Alaska
503

0

Furniture and furnishings
Reappropriation

BA
BA
0

4,078
20
2,121

145

3,108

1.148

5.366

Reappropriation

BA
0

Books for the general collections.503

BA
0

Books for the law library

503

Books for the blind and physically
handicapped: Salaries and
expenses
503

See footnotes at end of table.




503

1

3,319

111

188

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

34
33

0

34
35
16

8A
0

3
20

44
60

5
10

23
40

BA
0

41
98,793
96,285

-26
119,581
113,702

1
6
30,209
31,078

-5
140,147
136,821

BA
0

4,473
4,510

4,704
4,669

1,116
1,125

4,466
4,300

BA
0
BA

80,000
71,564
36,765
35,171

27,324
32,045
9,391
°298
9,939

95,639
93,000
44,776

0
BA .
0 .
BA
0 .
.

109,294
108,594
37,566
"799
39,365

-9,703
147,869
138,766

-5,308
37,013
36,676

-20,631
155,915
138,245

130,204
"1,696
"3,682
134,395
'1,696

33,737
'425
"1,215
32,452
'425

147,437

1,635
1,650

410
400

1,700
1,546

Revision of Annotated Constitution:
Salaries and expenses
503

BA
0

Revision of Hinds' and Cannon's
Precedents: Salaries and expenses
503
Oliver Wendell Holmes devise fund
(special fund): Permanent
503

36
36

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

503

Total Federal funds Library of
Congress.
Trust

0

Funds

Gift and trust fund accounts,
non-revolving: Permanent
503
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Printing and binding

801

Office of Superintendent of
Documents: Salaries and expenses
806
Acquisition of site and general plans
and designs of buildings
806
Project planning

806

300

45,776
15,500
20,100

210
510 .
.

Intragovernmental funds:

Government Printing Office revolving
fund
806
Total Federal funds Government
Printing Office.

BA
0
BA
0

12,000
14,701
129,065
121,436

BA

124,989

GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

801

125,941

150,138

COST-ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
See footnotes at end of table




801

BA
0

1,628
1,392

189

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

LEGISLATIVE B R A N C H — C o n t i n u e d
UNITED STATES TAX COURT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

BA

6,600
"115
6,682

6,285

1,650
"19
1,675

7,322

Construction
Total Federal funds
States Tax Court.

Trust Funds
Tax Court judges survivors annuity
fund: Permanent, indefinite
602

2 000
3,709

3,000

BA
0

8,285
11,005

6,715
9,682

1,669
1,869

7,322
7,277

BA
0

90
23

90
34

28
8

96
34

BA
0

500
140

5,000
4,322

1,250
1,755

6,950
6,983

BA
0

752
United

7,296

0

752

0
RA

Salaries and expenses

777,781
737,028

897,171
912,357

220,669
225,997

946,674
970,181

-307

-305

-77

-305

7,277

194 .

FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

806

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
803

BAl

0 I
902

-5

-23

the
503

BAl
O I

-7,128

-7,262

-1,802

-7,262

BAl
0 J

-105

BAl
0 J

-5,225

-4,908

-1,338

-4,856

902

from

-44

801

receipts

-4

752

Proprietary
public

BAl
0 J

BAl
0 J

-3

Total Federal funds

...

...

BA
0

765,009
724,256

884,652
899,838

217,447
222,775

934,228
957,735

BA
0

4,563
4,533

4,794
4,703

1,144
1,133

4,562
4,334

BAl
0 J

-2,598

-2,898

-677

-2,714

Total trust funds

BA
0

1,965
1,935

1,896
1,805

467
456

1,848
1,620

Total Legislative Branch

BA
0

766,974
726,191

886,548
901,643

217,914
223,231

936,076
959,355

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
503

See footnotes at end of table.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

190

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

T
Q

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

estimate

THE JUDICIARY
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

752

Care of the buildings and grounds
Reappropriation
Total Federal funds Supreme
Court of the United States.

6,581

5,892

1,513

"93

B
A

7,571

"63

0
B
A

5,591

6,442

1,901

7,142

1,004

1,429
roc

196

800

B
A
0
B
A
0

372
1,284
7,268
6,875

.
1,337

398

1,295

8,128
7,779

1,772
2,299

8,371
8,437

853
30
878

213
"11
220

898

645
"33
663

2,705

2,536

COURT OF CUSTOMS AND PATENT APPEALS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

752

B
A

782

0

Salaries and expenses

744

D

915

CUSTOMS COURT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

2,479
2,431

2,587
"93
2,669

B
A

2,341

2,429

0

2,267

2,488

597
"26
597

BA

27,975
27,089

28,750
"1,074
29,740

7,230
"358
7,588

30,182

0

752

BA
0

Salaries and expenses

117,075
"4,385
120,160

29,700
"1,498
28,298

138,145

4,723
"52
4,695

20,686

2,730

COURT OF CLAIMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

752

"78

2,570

COURTS OF APPEALS, DISTRICT COURTS, AND
OTHER JUDICIAL SERVICES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries of judges

752

Salaries of supporting personnel..752

BA

103,804

30,171

142,345

0

99,456

Representation by court-appointed
counsel and operation of defender
organizations
751

BA

15,826

0

18,280

18,890
"156
17,096

Fees of jurors

752

BA
0

17,450
17,555

18,000
17,978

4,500
4,500

19,350
19,295

Travel and miscellaneous expenses
752

BA
0

15,100
15,184

20,040
19,491

4,883
4,883

26,550
25,826

Salaries and expenses of United
States magistrates
752

BA

8,764
8,348

2,745
"112
2,830

11,862

0

10,914
"336
11,097

See footnotes at end of table.




20,299

11,857

191

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

THE JUDICIARY—Continued
COURTS OF APPEALS, DISTRICT COURTS, AND
OTHER JUDICIAL SERVICES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Salaries and expenses of referees
(special fund) ..
752

BA

21,140

0

22,513

BA
0 ...

2,500

Pre-trial services agencies

752

BA
0 ...

31,218

500

500

3,375

752

6,519
"275
6,794

1,500

Speedy trial planning

24,962
"796
25,563

31,445

1,125

5,000

10,000

.

Commission on Revision of the
Federal Court Appellate System of
the United States
752

BA
0

351
276

175

Total Federal funds Courts of
Appeals, District Courts, and
other Judicial Services.

BA
0

222,910
208,701

245,378
246,175

62,595
61,213

278,220
286,511

BA

5,822
5,412

1,973
"82
2,040

9,617

0

7,833
"246
7,824

..

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF THE UNITED
STATES COURTS
Federal Funds
GiiGrcil oncl SDGCIQI funds?

Salaries and expenses

752

9,458

Intragovernmental funds:

752

Total Federal funds
Administrative office of the
United States Courts.

-33

9

BA
0

5,822
5,379

8,079
7,833

2,055
2,040

9,617
9,458

BA

3,450
2,374

6,565
"55
5,102

1,721
"18
2,250

7,720

0

Consolidated working fund

6,689

BA
0

62,500
52,469

64,000
63,429

16,000
20,726

75,969
70,064

3,875
1,485

4,570
4,083

425
3,132

5,675
2,299

0

FEDERAL JUDICIAL CENTER
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

752

SPACE AND FACILITIES, THE JUDICIARY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Space and facilities

...752

EXPENSES, UNITED STATES COURT FACILITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Furniture and furnishings..
See footnotes at end of table.




....752

BA
0

THE

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

THE JUDICIARY—Continued
COMMISSION ON BANKRUPTCY LAWS OF THE
UNITED STATES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses (special fund)
752

0

1

BICENTENNIAL EXPENSES, THE JUDICIARY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Bicentennial activities

806

BA
0

2,000
800

500

500

JUDICIARY TRUST FUNDS
Trust Funds

Judicial survivors' annuity fund:
Permanent
602
Operation of the Public Defender
Service for the District of Columbia:
Permanent
751
Total trust funds
Trust Funds.

Judiciary

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0
BA
0

2,114
1,286
1,921
1,817

2,620
1,385
1,882
1,881

684
234
470
485

2,775
1,546
2,070
1,976

BA
0

4^035
3,103

4^502
3,266

U54
719

4J45
3,522

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
750

902
Total Federal funds

311,427
282,726

344,845
341,236

86,111
93,640

391,711
390,173

BA1
0J

-146

-142

-35

-142

BA1
0 I

-12

-15

-4

-15

BA

311,269

344,688

86,072

391,554

0

282,568

341,079

93,601

390,016

Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
751
Total trust funds

BA1
0 J

4,035
3,103
-1,921

4,502
3,266

1,154
719

4,845
3,522

-1,882

-470

-2,070

BA

Total The Judiciary

2,114

2,620 "

684

2,775

0

1,182

1,384

249

1,452

BA

313,383

347,308

86,756

394,329

0

283,750

342,463

93,850

391,468

62
62

250
250

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Compensation of the President




802

BA
0

250
250

250
250

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

T
Q

1977
estimate

estimate

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT—Continued
THE WHITE HOUSE OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

B
A
0

802

B
A

1 744

0

1,710

16,367
15,293

4,191
4,191

16,530
16,530

1 826
'50
D
25
1,893

457
C
18

2 095

489

2,103

274
400

26
56

61
135

978
23

244
D
8
252

1,246

16,763
16,763

EXECUTIVE RESIDENCE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

OFFICIAL RESIDENCE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

802

B
A
0

315
70

B
A

910

0

841

1,077

BA

1,600

1,718

0

1,600
°20
1,603

400

1,465

422

1,669

1,600
1,468

1,620
1,603

400
422

1,718
1,669

BA
0

2,500
2,424

3,236
3,236

822
1,022

3,415
3,415

0
B'A
0

311
2,500
2,735

529
3,236
3,765

822
1,022

3,415
3,415

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE TO THE PRESIDENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Special assistance to the President

802

D

1,246

COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

ntragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Total Council
Advisers.

of

802
Economic

0
BA
0

3

COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND
OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Council on Environmental Quality
and Office of Environmental
Quality
802
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

802

Total Council on Environmental
Quality and Office of
Environmental Quality.
See footnotes at end of table.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

194

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT—Continued
COUNCIL ON INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC
POLICY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

BA

1.600

1.650

0

1,379

1,724

BA

1.000

1,550

412
520

1.466

1,248

COUNCIL ON WAGE AND PRICE STABILITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

494

°9
3
1,628

^403
"5
1
72
M03

1,607
1,494

DOMESTIC COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

BA

1.250

1.610
"36

402

1.700

0

1,209

1,616

427

1,705

BA

2.900

2.980

3.210

0

2,621

3,137

650
D
24
790

802

BA
0

Office of the Federal Procurement
Policy: Salaries and expenses ..802

BA

21.250
21,522
660

6.058
6,058
182
D
9
175

25.800
25,800
1.627

157

24.250
23,725
730
D
24
758

5
6
21.910
21,735

14
25.004
24,497

6.249
6,233

27,427
27,338

"1.400
'400

"500
"700

"1.600

Salaries and expenses

802

NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

3,300

OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

0

1,538

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

802

Total Office of Management
and Budget.

0
BA
0

OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
POLICY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

BA
0

"2,100

OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE
FOR TRADE NEGOTIATIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

See footnotes at end of table.




802

BA

1,850

0

Salaries and expenses

1,469

1,980
"40
2,009

495
"14
560

2,370
2,271

195

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT—Continued
OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE
FOR TRADE NEGOTIATIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

802

Total Office of the Special
Representative for Trade
Negotiations.

0
BA
0

1 ....
1,850
1,470

2,020
2,009

509
560

2,370
2,271

8,450
7,754

8,500
9,350

2,100
2,478

8,206
8,106

OFFICE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

802

BA
0

SPECIAL ACTION OFFICE FOR DRUG ABUSE
PREVENTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

553

BA
0

4,240
14,937

Special fund for drug abuse

553

BA
0

8,760
18,857

Total Special Action Office for
Drug Abuse Prevention.

BA
0

13,000
33,794

19,084

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
Total Executive Office of the
President.

BA
0

75,646
92,823

69,906

17,512

72,901

89,196

18,677

72,910

126,000

12,500

113,500

185 000
(162,200)
336,000

(37,500)
95,000

250 000
(185,000)
325,000

9,200
.
9,884

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
APPALACHIAN REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Appalachian regional development
programs
452
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

B
A

133,500

0

-40,000 ..
185 000
(160,000)
310,417

0
B
A
0

957

2,000

500

1,500

278,500
311,374

311,000
338,000

12,500
95,500

363,500
326,500

B
A
0

200,000
205,858

150,000
250,000

37,500
55,000

100,000
250,000

B
A
B
A

Public enterprise funds:

Appalachian housing fund

452

Total Appalachian Regional
Development Programs.
DISASTER RELIEF
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Disaster relief




.

453

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

196

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
iestimate

1977
estimate

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
ECONOMIC STABILIZATION ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

802

0

802

Salaries and expenses

BA
0

1,702

138

500
325

1,000
1,000

18

3

BA
0

500
343

B
A
0

-85 092
831

UNANTICIPATED NEEDS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Emergency fund for the President
802
Total Unanticipated Needs

250
250

1,000
1,000

1,000
1,003

250
250

1,000
1,000

136

625

25

B
A
B
A

475 000
75 000

394 500

27,200

279,000

0

Unanticipated needs

555,663

(323 913)
776,000

80,000

368,000

30,000
15,000

7,000
4,000

30,900
28,000

0

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund, Defense Production
Act:
054
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.

EXPENSES OF MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Expenses of management
improvement

0

..

802

FOREIGN ASSISTANCE
International Security Assistance
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military assistance
052
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority
Foreign military training

052

BA ...
0 ...

B
A
0

700 000
402 411

197 589

B
A
0
B
A
0
0

300,000
246,586

1,065,000
809,000

30,000
192,000

840,000
695,000

660,000
395,769

1,873,300
1,052,789

30,200
130,552

1,801,500
1,388,521

930,239

545,000

60,000

24,483

052

0

-1901

1901

Liquidation of foreign military sales
fund
052

0

-84,285

-47,990

-14,662

-11,900

Military assistance
Vietnamese Forces

South
052

Foreign military credit sales

052

Security supporting assistance

151

Emergency security
Israel

assistance for
052

Military credit sales to Israel
Public enterprise funds:




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

197

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
FOREIGN ASSISTANCE—Continued
International Security Assistance—Continued
Trust

Funds

Advances, foreign military sales:
052
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

0

8,692,886
(4,415,270)
3,536,939

9,772,205
(6,500,000)
5,900,000

1,669,805
(1,664,000)
1,564,000

8,930,375
(7,200,000)
7,000,000

BA
0

2,210,000
2,444,482

3,362,800
3,349,289

94,400
451,890

2,951,400
2,492,104

-171,279

-259,500

-92,338

-364,583

BA
0

2,038,721
2,273,203

3,103,300
3,089,789

2,062
359,552

2,586,817
2,127,521

BA
0

8,692,886
3,536,939

9,772,205
5,900,000

1,669,805
1,564,000

8,930,375
7,000,000

-4,415,270

-6,500,000

-1,664,000

-7,200,000

4,277,616
-878,331
6,316,337
1,394,872

3,272,205
-600,000
6,375,505
2,489,789

5,805
-100,000
7,867
259,552

1,730,375
-200,000
4,317,192
1,927,521

435,000
496,437

86,408

10,000

5,978

275,900
'1,000

495,635
'531,667
879,900
'22,000
'30,000
*177,650
176,954
1,204,952
1,108,854

BA

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
052
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
052
Total trust funds..

BA1
0 I
BA
0

Total International
Assistance.
Indochina

BA1
0 J

Security

BA
0

Postwar
Reconstruction
Assistance
Federal Funds

General and special funds:

Indochina postwar
assistance

reconstruction
151

BA
0

International Development Assistance
MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

financial

institutions
151

BA

619,127

0

International

569,239

820,635
'255,000
958,600
'7,000
'200,000

139,200
115,460
758,327
684,699

229,500
217,047
1,505,135
1,182,647

23,700
29,931
23,700
306,831

569,000
401,201
15,600
16,090

1,000,200
996,285
16,680
16,680

286,300
252,282

Payment to the International Fund
for Agricultural Development....151

BA
0

International
programs

BA
0

organizations

and
151

Total Federal funds,
Multilateral Assistance.

BA
0

BILATERAL ASSISTANCE

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Functional development
program

assistance
151

BA
0

Payment to Foreign Service
retirement and disability fund .152

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




*1,094,200
1,005,651
16,680
16,680

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

198

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
FOREIGN ASSISTANCE—Continued
International Development Assistance—Con.
BILATERAL ASSISTANCE—Continued

Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

American
abroad

schools

and

International disaster assistance.151
Other assistance programs

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

151

10,000
15,080
20,000
20,252

2,500
3,833
10,000
7,642

7,500
10,773
25,000
24,024

105.843

20.376

41.271

-24,790
7,967

-2,817
1,606

-35,690
8,144

6,540
806,900

1,046,880

298,800

1,143,380

974,793

1,134,970

282,922

1,070,853

BA
0

8,795

9,894

6,000
6,000

BA
0

hospitals
151

1,565,227

2,552,015

322,500

2,348,332

1,659,492

2,317,617

589,753

2,179,707

-49,205

-233,430

-51,400

-255,158

-54,768

-178,268

-38,600

-190,965

BA
0

1,461,254

2,140,317

1,905,919

232,500
499,753

1,902,209

1,555,519

BA
0

8,795

6,000
6,000

17,500
20,547
35,000
19,057
69,800
232190

Public enterprise funds:

Development loans—revolving fund
151

257,910

Development loan fund (liquidation
account)
151

846

Housing and other credit guaranty
programs
151

1,204

Overseas Private
Corporation

Investment

Inter-American Foundation

151

BA
0

151

0

Intragovernmental funds:

Advance acquisition of
property—revolving fund

151

0

Office of the Inspector General of
Foreign Assistance
151
Consolidated working fund

Trust Funds
Trust funds: Permanent, indefinite ...151
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public...
..150

902

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)..




100,000

12,307
7,732
-755
-76

151

Total Federal funds, Bilateral
Assistance.

Total Federal funds....

-2,347

BA
0

BA 1

0

BA1
0 I

9,894

6,000
6,000

1,733,584
6,000
6,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

199

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1.976
esi imate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued1
FOREIGN ASSISTANCE—Continued
International Development Assistance—Con.
Summary— Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
BA1
public...
151
0 J

-8,788

-6,000

-6,000

Total trust funds

BA
0

7
1,106

Total International Development
Assistance.

BA
0

1,461,261
1,556,625

2,140,317
1,905,919

232,500
499,753

1,902,209
1,733,584

17,500
15,250

42,500
48,000

13,000
10,000

"34,000
38,000

International Narcotics Control Assistance
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

International narcotics control

151

BA
0

.

Contingencies
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

President's foreign
contingency fund
Middle East
fund

special

151

BA
0

1,800
4,316

10,000
7,122

5,000
2,781

M 0,000
8,651

requirements
151

BA
0

100,000

50,000
107,658

10,000
23,870

35,000
36,780

BA
0

101,800
4,316

60,000
114,780

15,000
26,651

45,000
45,431

BA
0

4,054,275
4,344,725

5,346,117
5,244,896

262,562
905,956

4,568,026
3,950,514

BA
0

4,277,623
-877,225

3,272,205
-600,000

5,805
-100,000

1,730,375
-200,000

BA
0

'56,600
'11,100

"58,900
'29,200

"367,700
'304,200

BA
0

56,600
11,100

58,900
29,200

367,700
304,200

-106,900

-163,400

-683,800

-50,300
-95,800

-104,500
-134,200

-316,100
-379,600

assistance

Total Contingencies
Total Federal
Assistance.

funds

Total trust funds
Assistance.

Foreign
Foreign

NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVE/STRATEGIC
PETROLEUM STORAGE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Naval petroleum reserve/strategic
petroleum storage
305
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
305
Total Naval Petroleum
Reserve/Strategic Petroleum
Storage.
See footnotes at end of table.

210-000 0 - 7 6 - 1 4




BA)
0 I
BA
0

THE

200

BUDGET

FOR

FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976

TO.

estimate

1977

estimate

estimate

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
EMERGENCY MIGRATION AND REFUGEE
ASSISTANCE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Emergency migration and refugee
assistance fund
151
PUBLIC WORKS ACCELERATION
Federal Funds

BA
0

"25,000
"3,000

"2,600

"9,600

585

145

440

4,723,435
5,140,221

6,560,915
6,520,545

554,050
1,271,014

6,210,932
5,652,960

BA1
0 J

-171,279

-259,500

-92,338

-364,583

150

BA1
0 J

-49,205

-233,430

-51,400

-255,158

305

BA1

-106,900

-163,400

-683,800

-54,768

-178,268

-38,600

-190,965

General and special funds:

Public works acceleration

452

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
052

0 I
902
Total Federal funds

BA1
0 J
BA

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
052
151
Total trust funds

5,782,817

208,312

4,716,426

4,864,969

5,742,447

925,276

4,158,454

6A
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

4,448,183

0

8,701,681
3,546,833

9,778,205
5,906,000

1,669,805
1,564,000

8,936,375
7,006,000

BA 1
0 J

-4,415,270

-6,500,000

-1,664,000

-7,200,000

BA1
0 J

-8,788

-6,000

-6,000

BA

Total Funds Appropriated to the
President.

4,277,623

3,272,205

0

-877,225

-600,000

"

-100,000

5,805

1,730,375

-200,000

BA
0

8,725,806
3,987,744

9,055,022
5,142,447

214,117
825,276

6,446,801
3,958,454

15,981
"421

4,004
"147

14,324

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Departmental Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Departmental administration

352

BA

0

See footnotes at end of table.




.....352

16,119

4,080

14,178

BA

17,020

2,237
"41
"48

538
"10
"16

2,328

0

Office of the Secretary

18,727

2,193
"41

531
"10

2,233

201

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT—Continued
Departmental Administration—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

352

21,466

22,585
"1,009
"460

5,648
"252
"162

26,568

21,343

22,820
"977

5,769
"243

26,052
"41

BA
BA

8,110
8,167

8,247
"270
8,344

2,062
"94
2,112

8,730

0

Office of the General Counsel

352

B
A

0

Office of the Inspector General

- 2 890

8,551

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

352

0

Consolidated working fund

352

0

Total Federal funds
Departmental Administration.

177

....

BA
0

46,596
45,524

51,468
50,494

12,992
12,745

51,950
51,055

B
A

208,323

255,675
"8,350
c
1,058
"5,571
"-225

62,006

263,202

487
"1,924

1,000
259,511
"1,400
"-225

67,015
"2,231

271,193
"1,400

7,500
8,515

1,850
2,242

10,000
9,492

SCIENCE AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Agricultural Research Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Agricultural Research Service

352

Permanent
Reappropriation

BA
BA

0
Scientific activities overseas (special
foreign currency program)
352

BA
0

15,000
1,000
224,876
5,000
7,275

C

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund, Agricultural
Research Center
352

0

59

Trust

BA
0

229,323
232,210

278,929
269,201

66,267
71,488

273,202
282,085

BA
0

668
630

722
697

180
174

725
804

BA

217,713
143,740

146,273
"3,152
164,343

38,392
"1,107
39,448

167,384

0

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Research Service.
Funds

Miscellaneous contributed
Permanent, indefinite

funds:
352

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Ser vice
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service:
(Agricultural research and
services)
352
See footnotes at end of table.




163,037

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

202

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
SCIENCE AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS-Con.
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service:—Continued
(Prevention and control of health
problems)
553

Animal quarantine station (special
fund)-. Permanent, indefinite ....352
Total Federal funds Animal and
Plant Health Inspection
Service.
Trust

201,359

0
Total, Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service.

BA

199,683

BA
0
BA

419,072
343,423

n
BA
0

419,072
343,423

214,802
* 7,644
"5,858
219,397
'7,644
377,729
391,384
100
50 ..
.
377,829
391,434

60,998
"2,161
"2,057
62,962
'2,161
104,715
104,571

232,498
231,329

104,715
104,571

399,882
394,366
327
471
400,209
394,837

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
352

BA
0

1,620
1,853

2,621
2,214

572
572

2,632
2,265

BA
0

101,749
95,826

114,460
112,158

28,615
28,662

122,508
123,756

BA
0

7
6

5
5

BA
0

215,523
219,012

228,935
227,605

57,453
57,200

218,790
221,111

0
BA
0

190
215,523
219,202

-400
228,935
227,205

500
57,453
57,700

218,790
221,111

BA

4,916

5,421
"118
5,582

1,356
W
41
1,405

Cooperative State Research Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Cooperative State Research Service
352
Trust

Miscellaneous
Permanent

Funds

contributed

funds:
352

5
5

Extension Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Extension Service

352

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

352

Total Federal funds Extension
Service.
national Agricultural Library
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Agricultural Library

352

4,839
See footnotes at end of table.




6,034
6,082

203

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
SCIENCE ANQ EDUCATION PROGRAMS-Con.
national Agricultural Library—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Library facilities

352

0

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

Total Federal funds National
Agricultural Library.
Total Federal funds Science
and Education Programs.
Total trust funds Science and
Education Programs.

33

42

4,916
4,872
970,583
895,533
2,295
2,489

5,539
5,624
1,005,692
1,005,622
3,348
2,916

1,397
1,405
258,447
263,826
752
746

6,034
6,082
1,020,743
1,027,871
3,362
3,074

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
Economic Management Support Center
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

352

BA
0

2,805
2,658

Statistical Reporting Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Trust

352

B
A

27,070

0

Statistical Reporting Service

27,929

30,096
"532
"787
30,604
"527

7,523
"133
"280
7,717
"138

33,712

22
22

1
7
1
7

2
2
22

6,262
°255
6,494

26,116

6,517
6,494

26,116
26,112

405
405
14,453
14,349
422
422

2,411
2,411
62,633
62,237
2,433
2,433

33,467

Funds

Miscellaneous contributed
Permanent, indefinite

funds:
352

BA
0

20
18

Economic Research Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

352

BA

22,394

0

Economic Research Service

23,303

25,037
"745
25,750

0

1,933
22,394
25,236

-1,949 ..
..
25,782
23,801

403
465
49,464
53,165
423
483

1,611
1,611
57,197
54,932
1,633
1,633

26,112

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

151

Total Federal funds Economic
Research Service.
Trust

BA
0

Funds

Miscellaneous contributed
Permanent, indefinite

funds-.
352

BA
0

Total federal funds Agricultural
Economics.

BA
0

Total trust funds Agricultural
Economics.

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

204

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

T
Q

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-Continued
MARKETING SERVICES
Commodity Exchange Authority
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Commodity Exchange Authority

352

BA
0

2.598
2,894

.
.

on
Packers and Stockyards Administrate
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

B
A

Packers and Stockyards
Administration

4.899

0

4,575

5.028
"143
5,025

B
A

2.428

2.482

352

1,271

5.234

"50
1,286

5,087

Farmer Cooperative Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

352

0
Trust

2,594

A> 2 7

2,531

2,548

639

2,580

43
38

50
72

13
12

50
48

9.925
10,000

7,730
7,573

1,968
1,925

7,828
7,667

43
38

50
72

13
12

50
48

37,071

9,283

37,119

Funds

Miscellaneous contributed
Permanent, indefinite

funds:
352

Total Federal funds Marketing
Services.
Total trust
Services.

D

620

77

Farmer Cooperative Service

funds

Marketing

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
Foreign Agricultural Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

352

Total Federal funds Foreign
Agricultural Service.

O

Salaries and expenses (special
foreign currency program)
352

CD CO O

Foreign Agricultural Service..
Permanent, indefinite...

BA
0

30,559
2,117
32,630

..
37,571

9,283

38,407

303

500

125

500

32,676
32,933

37,071
38,071

9,283
9,408

37,119
38,907

778,473
933,899

1,089,917

146,220

1,169,255

1,211,138

163,293

995,910

-155,426

-121,221

-17,073

173,345

Foreign Assistance Programs and Special
Export Programs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Expenses, Public Law 480, foreign
assistance programs, Agriculture
151

BA
0

Increase (-) or decrease in amount
owed by general fund to
Commodity Credit Corporation..351

0

Total Federal funds Foreign
Assistance Programs and
Special Export Programs.

BA
0

778,473
778,473

1,089,917
1,089,917

146,220
146,220

1,169,255
1,169,255

Total Federal funds
International Programs.

BA
0

811,149
811,406

1,126,988
1,127,988

155,503
155,628

1,206,374
1,208,162

See footnotes at end of table.




205

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION AND
CONSERVATION
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

351

Sugar Act program

351

Agricultural

conservation

BA
0
BA
0

program
302

BA

151,054
147,804

37,762
37,032

0

157,891
154,401

12,300
J

90,000

BA

Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

160,691
158,069
85,700
77,084
190,000
(285,500)

175,000
(190,000)

244,786

170,000

(90,000)
'(85,000)
29,500
'30,000

57,500
• 4 51,500

'22,500
302

BA

2,144

0

Water Bank Act program

1,906
43,801
41,223
-146
10,000
8,153
1,850
2,696
118
15,000

Cropland adjustment program

351

BA
0

Conservation reserve program

351

0

Emergency
Dairy

conservation

and

beekeeper

measures
453
indemnity

program

351

BA
0
BA
0

Cropland conversion program

351

0

Forestry incentives program

302

BA

244

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

10,000
"-10,000
4,093
"-321
42,000
42,000

2,500
"-2,500
230
"-10
21,000

10,000
15,000
6,650
6,674
118
15,000
"-15,000
20,300
"-9,400

2,500
3,500
1,000
1,000

10,000
15,000
4,050
4,050

3,750
"-3,750
4,195
"-2,845

6,270
"-5,255

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Stabilization and
Conservation Service.

62,262
102,602

261,941
330,022

2,985
D
125
3,110

12,000

BA
0

509,186
-114
534,019

114
384,704
408,682

BA

302

12,000

11,940

0

4,691
"-1,635
21,000

CORPORATIONS
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administrative
expenses

and

operating
351

0
See footnotes at end of table.




11,939

°0
6

12,000

12,000

206

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
CORPORATIONS—Continued
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
fund
351
Limitation on administrative and
operating expenses.
Total Federal funds Federal
Crop Insurance Corporation.

18 331

-3,776

1,724

4,401

(6,117)

0

(6,764)
^(275)
"(395)
12,000
8,224

(1,691)
'(69)
__ o j33)

(8,006)

3,110
4,834

12,000

BA
0

12,000
30,270

BA
0

4,069,412
574,878

16,401

Commodity Credit Corporation
SUPPORT AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Price support and related programs:
Reimbursement for net realized
losses
351
Limitation on administrative
expenses.

2,750,000
1,440,999

(38,000)

(39,400)

64,418
18,888

27,250
44,396

446,428
(9,850)

898,652
829,271
(40,700)

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Wool Act (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
351

BA
0

815

45,211
36,290

Intragovernmental funds:

(Game bird protection)

351

0

4

(Conservation loans)

302

0

-25,000

(Purchase of commodities for
donations)
351
Increase or decrease (-) in amount
owed to the Corporation by Public
Law 480 general fund for foreign
assistance programs
351

0

16,558

0

funds, Special

Total Federal funds Commodity
Credit Corporation.
Total Federal funds
Corporations.

-25,000

155,426

121,221

17,073

64,418
165,876
4,133,830
740,754
4,145,830
771,024

27,250
191,594
2,777,250
1,632,593
2,789,250
1,640,817

439,316

BA

990

0

Total Federal
Activities.

25,000
977

825

1,305
"36
1,272

354
W
12
366

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

-7,112

444^150

-173,345

45,211
-137,055
943,863
692,216
955,863
708,617

RURAL DEVELOPMENT
Rural Development Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Rural Development Service

See footnotes at end of table.




452

1,434
1,358

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

207

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
RURAL DEVELOPMENT—Continued
Rural Electrification Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

305

BA

19,675
18,891

20,112
"601
20,670

5,220
D
212
5,241

250,000
"-125,000
71,750
"-9,750
11,875
"-9,375
10,244
"-844
7,500
"-7,500
5,950
"-450
9,000
"-9,000
6,000
"-1,000
155,102
154,441
3,500
"-3,500
4,724
"-2,800

37,500
"-25,000
18,500
"-2,300
2,969
"-2,969
2,749
"-863
1,875
"-1,875
1,700
"-100
2,250
"-2,250
1,950
"-200
40,791
40,343
875
"-875
700
"-700
200
"-200

600
"-600
175,429
1,170
-453,222
"-14,400
141,189
-344,426
47,484

21,409
21,260

Farmers Home Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

452

Rural housing for domestic farm
labor
401

Mutual and self-help housing

Salaries and expenses
Rural

community

fire

401

BA

13,750
4,219

BA

5,000
3,024

BA

5,000

0

Rural development grants

35,118

0

disposal
451

30,000

0

and waste

BA
0

Rural water
grants

3,158

452

BA
0

protection

BA

grants

452

132,025
134,298
3,500

0

1,561

Self-help housing land development
fund
401

0

301

Rural housing insurance
Indefinite
Permanent, indefinite

BA

124,592

772
"-633
122,000

BA
0

1,011
-898,378

1,450
267,466

300
86,774

Agricultural credit insurance fund:
Indefinite
351

BA
0
BA

169,214
192,098
25,214

2,136

Rural development insurance fund:
Indefinite
452
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.

485,262
-132,768
17,446
88,759
-168,443
-2,965
906,345
-1,020,875
927,010
-1,001,159

119,293
42,390
-1,500
719,773
738,858
741,827
760,800

26,330
-300
53,591
176,719
59,389
182,326

115,354
"-31,354
10,964
"-3,448
5,400
"-2,000
6,000
"-4,000
162,156
161,422
875
"-875

Public enterprise funds:

Community Services loan fund

fund:
401

452

Total Federal funds Farmers
Home Administration.
Total Federal funds
Development.
See footnotes at end of table.




Rural

BA
0
0
BA
0
BA
• 0

136,551
47,806
-100
663,979
-506,004
686,822
-483,386

208

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS
So/7 Conservation Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Conservation operations
River basin surveys
investigations

302
and
301

Watershed planning ..

301

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

198,007
187,197

206,057
211,204

51,521
56,806

215,329
208,503

14,531
13 934

14,745
16 242

3,687
3 819

14,266
14 418

11 099
10,838

11 196
12,633

2 799
3,158

10,012
10,976

124,527
144 142

199,418
169 775

38,408
60 717

135,263
161,238

20,196
15,004

20,379
19,515

5,951
5,801

5,178
16,949

20,320
22,930

29,972
32,409

7,493
6,596

21,488
21,641

388,680
394,045

481,767
461,778

109,859
136,897

401,536
433,725

B
A
0
B
A
0

662
582

138
146

1,178
1,131

181
122

553
581
247
336

62
84

322
309

Total, Miscellaneous
contributed funds.

B
A
0

843
704

800
917

200
230

1,500
1,440

Total trust funds Soil
Conservation Service.

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

843
704

800
917

200
230

1,500
1,440

388,680
394,045

481,767
461,778

109,859
136,897

401,536
433,725

843
704

800
917

200
230

1,500
1,440

40,755
40,171
1,600

47,111
46,898
1,600
"-1,600
1,600
"-1,600
238,155
305,690

12,913
12,913
400
"-400
400
"-400

57,087
56,869

62,376

-4,308

Watershed and
operations

flood

prevention
301

Great plains conservation program

302
Resource conservation
development

and
302

Total Federal funds Soil
Conservation Service.
Trust

Funds

Miscellaneous contributed funds:
(Water resources and power):
Permanent, indefinite
301
(Conservation and land
management): Permanent,
indefinite

302

Total Federal funds
Environmental Programs.
Total trust funds Environmental
Programs.
CONSUMER PROGRAMS
Agricultural Marketing Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

352

BA
0

Payments to States and possessions
352

BA

Marketing services

0
Funds for strengthening markets,
income, and supply (section 32)
(special fund): Permanent,
indefinite
604
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

310
288,414
469,014

209

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
CONSUMER PROGRAMS-Continued
Agricultural Marketing Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Perishable Agricultural Commodities
Act fund (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
352

BA
0

1,717
1,492

1,630
1,802

416
465

1,590
1,820

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Marketing Service.

BA
0

332,486
510,987

286,896
354,390

13,329
75,754

58,677
54,381

Trust Funds
Agricultural Marketing Service trust
funds: Permanent, indefinite
352

BA
0

42,125
43,693

10,874
11,029

43,498
44,119

0

42,033
41,842
-1,699

BA
0

42,033
40,143

42,125
43,693

10,874
11,029

43,498
44,119

Milk market orders assessment fund
351
Total trust funds Agricultural
Marketing Service.
Food and nutrition Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Institutional nutrition support

604

Permanent

Special nutrition supplements

BA
BA
0

604

BA
0

Food programs administration

604

BA
0

Food stamp program

604

BA

4,869,355

0
Special milk program

604

BA

4,598,956
125,000
122,858

Child nutrition programs
Permanent

Food donations program
See footnotes at end of table.




604

BA

829,885

BA
0

604

705,926
1,452,267

BA
0

5,196,534
>-169
5,624,794
144,000
"-40,000
144,000
"-15,265
1,024,921
"223,351
881,111
2,074,505
"35,914
17,839
17,839

1,037,500
F
-59
1,169,441

1,689,307
'-2,778,307
1,111,000
2,491,431
'-2,469,431
277,677
'-272,050
268,677
'-263,050
60,889
'-7,250
59,643
'-7,250
4,743,268
4,708,268

24,735
"-24,735
"430,150
65,850
"326,100
4,460
4,460

"291,487

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

210

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
CONSUMER PROGRAMS-Continued
Food 3nd Hutrition Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

604

BA
0

Total Federal funds Food and
Nutrition Service.

BA
0

6,530,166
6,174,081

7,447,587
7,881,787

1,472,051
1,565,851

6,824,534
7,079,775

Total Federal funds Consumer
Programs.

BA
0

6,862,652
6,685,068

7,734,483
8,236,177

1,485,380
1,641,605

6,883,211
7,134,156

Total trust funds
Programs.

BA
0

42,033
40,143

42,125
43,693

10,874
11,029

43,498
44,119

B
A

531,758

479,170
"115,000
500,127
"100,000
18,134
34,300
35,000
15,500

148,539
"40,000
182,956
"50,000
11,074
21,933

498,112

11,000

16,000
200,000

Child nutrition reform

Consumer

'2,000,000
'2,000,000

FOREST PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT
Forest Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Forest protection and utilization...302

526,832
Construction and land acquisition
302

BA
0

Youth Conservation Corps

302

BA
0

Forest roads and trails
302
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA
BA
0

Acquisition of lands for national
forests, special acts (special
fund)
302

BA
0

Acquisition of lands to complete
land exchanges (special fund).302

BA
0

Cooperative range
(special fund)

BA
0

Assistance to
planting

improvements
302

States

for

tree
302

BA
0

Construction and operation of
recreation facilities: Indefinite .303

BA
0

Other general funds: Indefinite

302

BA
0

Forest Service permanent
appropriations (special funds):
Permanent, indefinite
302

BA
0

Forest Service permanent
appropriations (special funds):
Permanent, indefinite
852

BA
0

31,337
38,515
10,392
9,859
-61,611
140,000
(124,578)
114,545
161
155
39
40
700
679
1,355
1,288
1,260
1,851
49,000
49,008
71,447
73,895
120,763
120,763

(112,859)
138,450
161
161
35
90
700
721
1,359
1,400
3,674
2,785
284
69,209
67,324
90,981
90,981

466,865
"5,000
14,414
14,559

68

(170,104)
208,704
160
110

829
1,055
2,212
2,930

54
54
700
700
1,373
1,216
2,475
2,500

55,978
60,412
117,609
117,609

47,580
41,478
36,640
36,640

2,962

-1,500

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund
See footnotes at end of table.




302

0

8,297

-9,939

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

2i\\

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
FOREST PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT
—Continued
Forest Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:—Continued
Consolidated working fund
302
Total

Federal

funds

Service.
Trust Funds
Cooperative work: Permanent, indefinite

0

-13,789

15,862

1,525

BA

896,601

813,423

376,241

801,508

0

Forest

931,938

958,046

452,450

792,326

BA

58,953

72,900

16,000

72,900

0

60,234

86,000

20,000

71,300

Total Federal funds Forest
Protection and Management.

BA
0

896,601
931,938

813,423
958,046

376,241
452,450

801,508
792,326

Total trust funds Forest
Protection and Management.

BA
0

58,953
60,234

72,900
86,000

16,000
20,000

72,900
71,300

BA
0

15,617,676
10,130,563

15,194,529
14,712,909

2,539,604
3,408,503

12,340,409
11,272,452

BA)
0 J

-199,811

-167,922

-178,675

-94,653

BA1

-205,805

-343,595

27,534

-421,115

-1,627

-1,644

-386

-1,872

302

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300

302

0I
350

BA1

0I
450

BA1
0 I

-25

-23

-6

-23

600

BA1
0 J

-665

-666

-167

-666

902

BA1
0 J

-244

-184

-46

-184

Total Federal funds

BA

15,209,499

14,680,495

2,387,858

11,821,896

9,722,386

14,198,875

3,256,757

10,753,939

BA
0

104,590
104,091

120,856
135,231

28,261
32,439

123,743
122,414

BA1
0 J

-58,953

-72,900

-16,000

-72,900

BA1

-45,614

-47,956

-12,261

0
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
302

352

0 J
Total trust funds

BA

0
Total Department of Agriculture




BA

0

-50,843
•

23

-476

14,375

4,178

-1,329

15,209,522

14,680,495

2,387,858

~Ti.821.896

9,721,910

14,213,250

3,260,935

10,752,610

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

212

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

T
O

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

estimate

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

Special foreign currency program.403
Participation in
expositions

United

Miscellaneous Federal funds

States
403
403

B
A

0
0
B
A
0
0

12,804
°394
13,047

10,725

771
- 5 000
1790

3,212
°138
3,299

14,412

828
530
877

11,355

85

1,126

14,274

288

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

403

Consolidated working fund

403

-490

.

162

...

Trust

6,355
13,246

13,728
14,752

3,350
3,384

14,412
15,400

B
A
0

569
492

505
503

158
120

500
500

2,044

511

2,162

1,965

Total Federal funds General
Administration.

0
0
B
A
0

496

2,030

40,474
"1,065
41,191

10,519
°392
10,898

44,278

31,873
"1,120
"713
36,302
"1,020

8,180
"1,107
°242
8,010
"1,100

"47,429

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
403
OFFICE OF ENERGY PROGRAMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

305

B
A

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

38,845

403

BA
0

38,897

Periodic censuses and programs..403

BA
BA

22,850

0

24,526

0

-1,591

BA
0

61,695
61,832

75,245
78,513

20,440
20,008

91,707
85,745

BA
0

4,731
4,970

5,097
4,937

1,157
1,148

4,967
4,567

BA

9,959

11,459
"317
11,665

2,974
"115
3,100

12,491

Salaries and expenses

43,383

42,362

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

403

Total Federal funds Bureau of
the Census.
Trust

...

Funds

Special studies, services, and projects:
Permanent, indefinite
403
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

9,976
See footnotes at end of table.




12,367

213

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

estimate

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

-50

B
A
0

9,959
9,926

11,776
11,665

3,089
3,100

12,491
12,367

B
A
0

80
92

64
63

15
14

64
63

B
A

246,950
235,132

89,625
" - 1 000
58,649
"-1,000

"223,438

0

360,000
" - 3 000
269,578
"-1,000

Administration of economic
development assistance programs
452

B
A
0

22,900
22,065

25,378
25,548

6,375
6,800

25,426
25,117

Financial and technical assistance

B
A
0
R
A
0

-12 000
5,488

4,821

1,205

3,638

125 000
21,871

374 000
175,000

80,000

222,129

0

-20,480

-20,809

11,984

-25,000

0

70

382,850
264,146

756,378
453,138

95,000
157,638

248,864
490,177

B
A
0

38,517
42,199

64,068
52,139

15,760
15,195

42,200
39,271

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

29,917
22,037

59,529
62,124

10,247
7,144

25,254
29,309

421,367
306,345

820,446
505,277

110,760
172,833

291,064
529,448

29,917
22,037

59,529
62,124

10,247
7,144

25,254
29,309

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Economic Analysis.
Trust

Funds

Special studies, services, and projects:
Permanent, indefinite
403
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

Economic Development Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Economic development
programs

assistance
452

403
Job opportunities program

504

266,293
"-2,000

Public enterprise funds:

Economic
fund

development

revolving
452

Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working
fund
integrated grant administration

fund

452

Total Federal funds Economic
Development Administration.

B
A
0

Regional Action Planning Commissions
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Regional development programs...452
Trust

Funds

Regional action planning commissions-.
Permanent, indefinite
452
Total Federal funds Economic
Development Assistance.
Total trust funds Economic
Development Assistance.
See footnotes at end of table.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

214

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

T
Q
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
PROMOTION OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
Domestic and International Business
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Trust

403

B
A

60,313

0

Operations and administration

14,743
"546
15,275

*62,902

57,218

59,177
"1,556
61,496

B
A
0

4,034
3,474

4,872
4,587

1,272
1,272

4,857
5,181

B
A

52,000

49,850

*50,013

60,414

12,463
"93
12,389

59,110

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
403
Minority Business Enterprise
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Minority business development

403

DOCC

0

50,240

0
B
A
0

52,000
50,305

50,115
60,414

12,556
12,389

50,013
54,949

403

BA
0

11,237
11,658

12,799
12,162

3,200
2,918

12,220
11,618

403

0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

9 ...
11,237
11,667

12,799
12,162

3,200
2,918

12,220
11,618

123,550
119,190

123,647
134,072

31,045
30,582

125,135
125,677

4,034
3,474

4,872
4,587

1,272
1,272

4,857
5,181

B
A

451,805

136,000
'643
"2,926
'75

"540,881

BA
0

495,135
'1,832
"8,417
'238
1,027
468,081
18,000
"32
17,026
7,944
8,403

54,949

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

403

Total Federal funds Minority
Business Enterprise.

65

...

United States Travel Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

Total Federal funds United
States Travel Service.
Total Federal funds Promotion
of Industry and Commerce.
Total trust funds Promotion of
Industry and Commerce.
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
national Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operations, research, and facilities
306

302

BA

780
427,272
15,019

Promote and develop fishery
products and research pertaining
to American fisheries (special
fund): Permanent, indefinite ....403

BA
0

6,657
7,751
8,603

Appropriation, Current, indefinite...
Coastal zone management

See footnotes at end of table




126,726
4,500
"11
4,825
1,857
1,820

1,027
510,335
23,408
17,395
7,944
8,944

215

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY-Contmued
national Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

-319

Fisheries loan fund

403

0

-306

-546

-160

Offshore shrimp fisheries fund

403

H
A

Fishermen's guaranty fund

403

0

230
588
1,971
202
-234

29
9
61
1,769
-242

15
15
-106

61
180
17
8

0
BA
0

-7,038 ..
.
477,556
435,744

532,686
494,790

146,027
133,120

573,321
536,722

0
CO CD

Federal ship financing fund, fishing
vessels
403
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

306

Total Federal funds National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration.
Trust

Funds

BA
0

5,467
7,571

6,750
4,400

1,650
945

6,000
4,600

BA

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
306

6.000

8.618

2,235

"10,178

national Fire Prevention and Control
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operations, research,
administration

and
451

Dine

3,234

7,039

1,642

8,067

77.566

20,840
<24
"680
21,103

86,406

71,119

83,300
<5
6
°2,046
84,043

B
A

62,449

60,919

15,785

66,700

0

70,794

"1,472
61,727

°528
16,357

71,893

BA
0
0
BA
0

1,585
-1,639
-2,592 ..
.
64,034
66,563

2,085

343

2,085
1,500

64,739
61,727

16,753
16,357

68,785
73,393

Patent and Trademark Office
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

BA

86,209

Science and Technical Research
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Scientific and technical research and
services
403

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

403

Consolidated working fund

403

Total Federal funds Science
and Technical Research.
See footnotes at end of table.

210-000

0 - 7 6 - 1 5




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

216

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY—Continued
Science and Technical Research—Continued
Trust

Funds

Information products and
Permanent, indefinite

services:
403

Total Federal funds
and Technology.

Science

Total trust funds Science and
Technology.

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

7,571
7,562

10,500
10,645

2,625
2,625

11,700
11,700

625,156
576,660

691,559
647,599

186,603
172,222

738,690
704,391

13,038
15,133

17,250
15,045

4,275
3,570

17,700
16,300

B
A
0

275,000
240,828

195 000
242,000

18,000
59,000

B
A

235,188

322,397

97,287

"338,300

(315,936)
(30,235)
315,954
B
ll,821

(70,582)

(403,721)

70,582
"18,414

403,721

OCEAN SHIPPING
Maritime Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Ship construction

406

Operating-differential subsidies: 406
Contract authority, Permanent,
indefinite.
Liquidation of contract authority....

(242,800)

.
258,000

B

0
Research and development

406

Operations and training

406

B
A
0
B
A

243,152
25,900
26,109

12,000
27,000

4,000
5,700

M 9,500
17,163

41,183

11,280

*48,525

271
11,671

49,062

0
Public enterprise funds:
Federal ship financing fund

406

Vessel operations revolving fund..406
War risk

insurance

revolving

fund

39,627

45,000
r
228
°851
45,583

0
0
0

-14,212

-15,165

-4,409

-19,675

-347

-100

-340

-551

-50
-50

-388

130,943
160,858

406,325
707,848

c

105

D

-35

406
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

406

Total Federal funds Maritime
Administration.
Trust

Total trust
Shipping.

funds
funds

Ocean
Ocean

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary
receipts from the
300
public
See footnotes at end of table




-91

619

577,271
534,726

575,476
627,161

...

Funds

Special studies, services and projects:
Permanent, indefinite
406
Total Federal
Shipping.

0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

42
19
577,271
534,726

575,476
627,161

42
19

36

B
A
0

1,825,353
1,621,925

2,313,967
2,021,004

36
36

36

BA 1

0

-1,272

36

36

...
130,943
160,858

36
36

...

-1,379

406,325
707,848

486,757
563,483

1,681,986
2,182,906

-87

-4,450

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

217

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Federal funds: — Continued

400

BA1
0 I

450

BA1
0 J

902

BA)
0 J

-2,000

-500

-2,000

-1,298

-1,752

-384

-1,520

1792^009

2,281,974

480,009

1,658,294

1,588,581

1,989,011

556,735

2,159,214

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
306

-15,722

0
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

-5,777

BA

Total Federal funds

52,411
46,217

87,353
87,295

17,124
13,268

53,378
55,956

BA1
0 J

-5,467

-6,750

-1,650

-6,000

-5,077

-21,627

403

BA1
0J

406

452
Total trust funds

-30,774

-26,862

-16,444

-20,563

BA1
0 I

-42

-36

BA1
0 I

-966

-36

-1,404

-360

BA "
452

Total Department of Commerce.

58,600 "

23,298

58,542

-28,951

-58,125

BA

1,792,550

0

Interfund transactions

29,492

0

1,582,928

BA1~
0 J

10,037

6,181
~

-1,528
24,187

26,765

-9,887

-23,726

2,282,449

480,159

1,658,755

1,989,428

553,029

2,162,253

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY

MILITARY PERSONNEL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military personnel, Army

051

BA

8,082,121

8,180,347
"17,700
'263,400

2,064,635
"4,600
'87,700

8,642,866

0

8,150,006

8,442,500
"17,500

2,221,300
"4,700

8,534,566
"100
J
-666

BA

5,839,760

5,722,300
"17,400
M 83,500

1,451,668
"4,300
'61,000

6,055,667

0

5,865,481

5,907,800
"17,200

1,455,600
"4,400

J
-667
6,086,567
"100
J
-667

BA

1,760,456

1,806,377
"4,100
'59,100

460,117

1,883,900

0

1,741,271

1,851,000
"4,000

476,900
"100

-666

Military personnel, Navy

051

Military personnel, Marine Corps..051

See footnotes at end of table




'19,900

1,870,000

218

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
MILITARY PERSONNEL—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

051

B
A

7,496,531

7,251,524
'6,800
fc
234,227

1,776,677
4
1,700
'76,095

0

Military personnel, Air Force

7,478,087

7,402,400
4
6,600

1,865,200
* 1,800

7,169,567
'-667
7,060,567

M00
'-667
447,690

Total Federal
Personnel.

funds

Military

B
A

215,400

200,035
'6,491

59,525
'2,522

209,236

209,000

80,000

B
A

65,200

70,652
'1,700

28,082
'800

66,610

72,000

30,000

B
A

147,865

157,500
'4,397

48,260
'2,079

138,604

162,000

50,000

B
A

660,800

696,900
'19,900

209,050
'9,250

655,157

711,000

234,000

B
A

205,227

212,318
'7,154

60,924
'2,727

196,992

216,000

72,000

'-13,070
210,070
'-13,070

24,963,260
24,967,612

25,604,322
25,495,000

6,603,111
6,693,000

25,436,200
25,189,000

B
A

6,250,900

6,885,200
M40.400

1,775,100
"187,600

8,493,400

0

National Guard personnel, Air Force
051

197,000

0

National Guard personnel, Army...051

476,000

0

051

466,168

0

Reserve personnel, Air Force

165,299
'6,201

0

Reserve personnel, Marine Corps..051

468,879
M l ,621

0

051

489,900

0

Reserve personnel, Navy

051

B
A
0

Reserve personnel, Army

6,241,772

6,887,000
'438,000

1,788,000
^189,000

'-111,700
8,498,700
•M.000
'-111,700

B
A

'-10,090
420,090
'-10,090
153,415
'-3,115
144,115
'-3,115
77,130
'-1,030
76,030
'-1,030
157,037
'-3,737
157,737
'-3,737
699,565
'-28,665
690,665
'-28,665
211,070

RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Retired pay, Defense

See footnotes at end of table




051

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

219

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

T
Q

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation and maintenance, Army

B
A

6,461,188

0

6,637,863

B
A

7,297,225

0

7,317,197

7,052,000
"6,000
"154,100
"90,200
7,111,000
"5,000

1,779,000
"3,000
"59,500
"29,900
1,771,500
"3,500

8,060,400

8,069,400
"3,800
"160,000
"66,600
7,984,000
"3,000

2,133,557
"1,900
"50,500
"21,600
2,416,700
"2,300

9,660,800

497,110
"500
"17,900
"4,800
509,500
"500

125,506
"200
"3,800
"1,500
154,800
"200

580,400

7,498,679
"4,800
"105,100
"60,900
7,539,700
"4,300

1,897,495
"2 400
"38,600
"18,800
1,949,300
"2,700

8,224,700

2,475,431
"3,000
"8,700
"63,800
2,629,300
"2,700

627,725
"1,500
"5,300
"15,800
651,300
"1,700

2,765,300

310,710
"600
"3,500
"4,900
303,400
"600

91,100
"300
"2,000
"1,700
98,700
"300

375,100

284,425
"100
"2,100
"1,100
275,900
"100

73,250
"100
"700
"300
88,900
"100

294,600

12,000

3,400

14,800

"'5

"1

12,038

13,000

"8
5,000

B
A

296,250

0

296,216

322,430
"500
"5,400
"3,300
329,500
"500

81,190
"200
"2,700
"1,100
79,800
"200

051

Operation and Maintenance, Navy

051

B
A

460,984

0

Operation and maintenance, Marine
Corps
051

485,418

maintenance,

Air
051

Operation and maintenance, Defense
agencies
051

7,273,030

7,445,455

B
A

2,454,647

0

and

B
A

0

Operation
Force

2,259,948

Operation and maintenance, Marine
Corps Reserve
051

283,993

297,973

B
A

246,738

0

Operation and maintenance, Navy
Reserve
051

B
A

0

Operation and maintenance, Army
Reserve
051

228,857

B
A
0

Operation and
Force Reserve

maintenance,

See footnotes at end of table.




Air
051

11,728

7,887,500
"500

8,870,600
"400

540,000

7,995,800
"200

2,723,900
"100

369,000

279,000

13,000
358,600

362,000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

220

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

1976
estimate

TO.
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

607,528

173,285
"600
'5,900
"2,900
187,300
"700
181,200
"600
4,800
"2,200
180,300
"700
93

719,200

National Board for the Promotion of
Rifle Practice, Army
051

BA

Naval petroleum reserve

BA

197
69,400

649,930
4
1,200
'10,700
"8,900
662,900
"1,100
697,100
"1,100
c
8,700
"6,600
712,000
'1,000
233
D
6
260
117,700

0

33,097

89,000

BA
BA
0

54,600

71,600

100
47,500
'-47,500
21,000
'-5,000
15,500

63,416
2,500
3,653
1,065
921
119
26,176,359
26,329,634

73,000
2,500
1,530
1,134
D
33
1,210

17,000
725
1,640
285
D
11
260

28,871,352
28,254,000

7,463,733
7,631,000

31,927,500
30,670,000

231,160
124,796

333,500
162,000

59,400
58,000

"555,500
140,000

366,800
656,519

422,600
501,000

42,600
153,000

"552,400
494,000

312,500
204,805

881,400
445,000

255,000
128,000

"1,147,900
714,000

692,749
800,662

637,200
660,000

252,800
261,000

"910,800
823,000

657,000
626,779

912,300
629,000

197,700
127,000

1,417,900
844,000

2,766,400
1,944,496

2,958,500
2,598,000

605,500
563,000

"3,032,500
3,003,000

725,300
492,209

1,172,600
731,000

321,700
220,000

"2,239,700
1,199,000

3,059,000
2,626,530

3,853,000
2,721,000

471,200
824,000

"6,289,500
3,572,000

Operation and maintenance, Army
National Guard
051

BA

608,578
BA

655,300

0

Operation and maintenance, Air
National Guard
051

638,688

0

Claims, Defense
Current, indefinite
Contingencies, Defense

051

051

051

BA
0

Court of Military Appeals, Defense
051

BA

Miscellaneous expired accounts....051

0

0
Total Federal funds Operation
and Maintenance.

BA
0

183

n2

710,000
784,600

787,000
261
260
221,300
J
-221,300
181,000
M35.000
82^500
81,000
5,000
2,510
1,239
1,230

PROCUREMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Aircraft procurement, Army

051

Missile procurement, Army

051

B
A
0
B
A

0
Procurement of weapons and tracked
051
combat vehicles, Army
Procurement of ammunition,, Army
Other procurement, Army

051
051

Aircraft procurement, Navy.....

051

Weapons procurement, Navy...

051

Shipbuilding and conversion , Navy

051
See footnotes at end of table.




B
A
O
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
O
B
A
0

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

221

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
PROCUREMENT—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

051

Procurement, Marine Corps

051

Aircraft procurement, Air Force

051

Missile procurement, Air Force

051

Other procurement, Air Force

051

Procurement, Defense agencies....051
Procurement of aircraft and missiles,
Navy
051
Procurement of
missiles, Army

equipment

and
051

Total Federal funds
Procurement.

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
0

1.545.400
1,465,960
202.600
110,830
2.880.872
2,210,861
1.533.700
1,602,190
1,626.278
1,576,624
98.416
80,830
1,416,805

1.829.700
1,499,000
281.000
168,000
3,933,700
2,637,000
1,710,200
1,604,000
2.074.400
1,677,000
205.600
121,000
273,000

464,500
663,000
40,400
72,000
818,400
972,000
233.000
348,000
353,000
444,000
39,600
24,000
108,000

0

100,946

60,000

10,000

BA
0

Other procurement, Navy

16.698,175
16,041,842

21.205.700
16,486,000

4,154.800
4,975,000

29.310.400
20,354,000

BA

1,741,416
1,964,406
3,023,914

0
BA

3,020,979
3,290,853

0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

3,307,947
490,657
546,346
25.000
26,821
8.571.840
8,866,499

504.452
L
1,333
D
5,079
493,000
818,722
1,800
"5,600
588,000
901.014
c
1,502
D
4,351
1,270,000
146,550
115,000
5,000
5,000
2,395,403
2,471,000

"2,376,300

0
BA

1,948,823
c
2,705
"15,666
1,948,000
3.238,390
c
4,300
D
\ 7,500
3,145,000
3,591.266
C
2,934
°12,356
3,417,000
604,400
572,000
25.000
25,000
9.463,340
9,107,000

BA
0
BA
0

656.825
547,351
606,376
500,389

790,025
686,000
770,018
607,000

37,100
193,000
17,200
139,000

"649,500
636,000
"595,200
589,000

2.192.800
1,698,000
"337,700
191,000
"6,344.800
3,913,000
"1.599.400
1,498,000
"2,424.900
2,017,000
264,600
193,000
55,000

RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND
EVALUATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research, development,
evaluation, Army

test, and
051

Research, development,
evaluation, Navy

test, and
051

Research, development,
evaluation, Air Force

test, and
051

Research, development, test, and
evaluation, Defense agencies...051
Director of test
Defense

and evaluation,
051

Total Federal funds Research,
Development, Test, and
Evaluation.

2,287,000
"3,855,200
4,007,000
"3,916,600
3,434,000
"676,300
681,000
"30,000
26,000
10,854,400
10,435,000

MILITARY CONSTRUCTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military construction, Army

051

Military construction, Navy

051

See footnotes at end of table.




222

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Military construction, Air Force

051

Military construction,
agencies

051

BA
0

Military construction, Army National
Guard
051

BA
0

Military construction, Air National
Guard
051

BA
0

Military construction, Army Reserve
051

BA
0

Military construction, Naval Reserve
051

BA
0

Military construction,
Reserve

Defense

BA
0

Air

Force
051

BA
0

Total Federal funds
Construction.

Military

BA
0

051

BA
0

456,439
274,295
31,260
17,623
59,000
35,706
35,500
19,055
43,700
41,190
22,135
16,129
16,000
10,030
1,927,235
1,461,768

550,644
351,000
19,300
21,000
62,700
53,000
63,000
34,000
50,300
48,000
36,400
25,000
18,000
15,000
2,360,387
1,840,000

14,000
101,000
1,000
5,000
1,500
11,000
1,000
12,000
2,500
10,000
400
8,000
1,000
4,000
75,700
483,000

"802,300
390,000
"81,100
29,000
"47,200
52,000
"27,600
47,000
"47,000
42,000
"16,800
26,000
"10,000
14,000
2,276,700
1,825,000

1,224,627
1,290,600

283,400
323,600

"1,190,300
1,367,000

6,400
1,224,627
1,297,000

400
283,400
324,000

5,000
1,190,300
1,372,000

85,000

"71,000

578
87,978
"22

19,300
'
9
"191
17,991
'
9

2,668
4,000

37
1,000

"3,665
4,000

-69

383

201

FAMILY HOUSING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Family housing, Defense

Family

BA
0

1,151,809
1,121,738
5,000
2,559
1,156,809
1,124,297

Operation and maintenance, Defense
Civil Preparedness Agency
051

BA

82,000

Public enterprise funds:

Homeowners
Defense

assistance

fund,
051

Total Federal
Housing.

funds

BA
0

CIVIL DEFENSE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
A22

W

0

86,404

BA
0

4,382

0
0
0

1,677
9
35,021

70,000

SPECIAL FOREIGN CURRENCY PROGRAM
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Special foreign currency program.051

1,945

REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Defense production guarantees ....051
Laundry service, Naval Academy ..051
Naval working fund
See footnotes at end of table.




051

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

223

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS-Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Army stock fund

051

Navy stock fund

051

Marine Corps stock fund
051
Air Force stock fund
051
Contract authority, Permanent,
indefinite.
Defense stock fund
051

BA
0
BA ..
0
BA
0
BA .
BA
0
BA
0

20,408

20,000
-42,700

42,400

100,000
-8,600

-39,541

10,000
143,800

4^800

32,000
-30,100

-2700

8,600
6 400

2,000

- 2 046

76,700

15,000
125,779
-109,658

306,500

16,900

-84,700

32,400
192,512

88,000
-259,400

-162,000

140,600
-21,800

Army industrial fund
Navy industrial fund
Marine Corps industrial fund

051
051
051

0
0
0

22,949

183

-2,337

-11,390

-69,489

-52,540

-5,864

17,486

241

-637

-169

552

Air Force industrial fund

051

0

38,995

-153,282

-13,650

-3,370

Defense industrial fund
Army management fund

051
051

0
0

-4,067

6,351

1,500

-7,656

- 4 776

121

Navy management fund
Air Force management fund

051
051

0

-12 558

-7 500

0
BA
0

-4,006

-1,622

158,179
65,671

135,000
-60,795

Total Federal funds Revolving
and Management Funds.

-197

-1,039

-120,934

357,900
-144,016

"52,400
"51,000
52,400
51,000

"28,400
"29,000
28,400
29,000

'1,441,500
"-8,700
'1,399,100
"-9,100
"163,500
"163,000
1,596,300
1,553,000

ALLOWANCES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Civilian and military pay raises...051

Other legislation

051

Total Federal funds Allowances.
TRUST FUNDS
Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
051
Miscellaneous (trust revolving funds)
051
Total trust funds
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end ot table




BA
BA
0
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
0

7,645
7,634
3,876

7,390
6,820
6,075

1,750
1,600
-2,666

9,040
7,270
3,146

BA
0

7,645
11,510

7,390
12,895

1,750
-1,066

9,040
10,416

BA
0

85,986,702
85,189,881

96,330,996
89,886,205

22,986,784
24,481,066

111,406,065
99,715,984

THE

224

BUDGET

FOR

FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
051

Interfund transactions
Total Department of
Defense-Military.

-7,500

-158,800

85,811,352
85,014,531

96,201,096
89,756,305

22,979,284
24,473,566

111,247,265
99,557,184

7,645
11,510

7,390
12,895

1,750
-1,066

9,040
10,416

BA1
0 I

-6,523

-6,200

-1,500

-6,600

BA " 85,812,474
0
85,019,518

051

-129,900

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

-175,350

BA
0

Total Federal funds

BA 1
0 I

96,202,286
89,763,000

" 22,979,534
24,471,000

TTi,249,705
99,561,000

966
44

6,161

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL
CEMETERIAL EXPENSES, ARMY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

705

BA

0

258

5,615
r
133

C

7,751

>3
5,600

'1
1,200

5,500

CORPS OF ENGINEERS—CIVIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General investigations

301

BA
0

65,284
69,824

66,836
67,400

17,110
18,100

64,255
65,000

Construction, general

301

BA

966,338

1,227,151
»_2,500
1,203,781
"-200

408,741
"-1,100
436,304
"-200

1,266,332

0

1,134,693

1,260,900
"-3,200

Operation and maintenance, general
301

BA
0

494,577
522,109

582,073
580,000

153,116
155,000

583,900
586,000

Flood control
emergencies

301

BA
0

65,400
73,138

25,000
31,000

3,750
5,100

18,140
17,970

301

BA

40,100

10,650
°412
'18
12,050

47,400

and

General expenses

coastal

41,606

42,500
D
1,241
'59
43,800

Flood control Mississippi River and
tributaries
301

BA
0

120,051
211,715

180,147
187,000

60,300
65,600

"191,220
193,700

Special recreation use fees (special
fund): Indefinite
303
Permanent appropriations (special
funds):
(Water resources and power):
Permanent, indefinite
301

BA
0

700
819

1,200
1,000

294

3,100
2,500

BA
0

456
2,713

800
456

125
150

548
775

0

See footnotes at end of table.




46,400

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

225

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued
CORPS OF ENGINEERS—CIVIL—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Permanent appropriations (special
funds).—Continued
(Other general purpose fiscal
assistance): Permanent,
indefinite
852

BA
0

3,971
3,717

3,700
3,971

1,100
3,700

4,000
1,100

BA
0

4,427
6,430

4,500
4,427

1,225
3,850

4,548
1,875

301

BA
0

-14,841

700
8,281

950
5,602

-2,645

301

0

151

111

BA
0

37,712
28,761

22,000
27,000

5,500
10,000

28,000
24,200

BA
0

1,756,877
2,045,644

2,128,907
2,126,600

655,172
701,700

2,178,895
2,168,500

BA)
0 i

-11,044

-12,151

-3,486

-12,339

BA1
0 J

-11

-9

-3

-10

BA)

-904

-1,040

1,744,918
2,033,685

2,115,707
2,113,400

37,712
28,761
-37,712

Total, Permanent appropriations
(special funds).
Intragovernmental funds:

Revolving fund, Corps
Engineers-Civil

of

Consolidated working fund
Trust

Funds

Corps of Engineers—Civil, trust funds:
Permanent
301
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300
301
902

-HI

-1,651

0 I
Total Federal funds

BA~
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
301

BA1
0 i

Total trust funds

0

Total Corps of Engineers-Civil

BA
0

"

651,572
698,100

2,164,895
2,154,500

22,000
27,000

5,500
10,000

28,000
24,200

-22,000

-5,500

-28,000

^957

5^000

4~500

-3,800

U44TiiB
2,024,734

2,115,707
2,118,400

651,572
702,600

2,164,895
2,150,700

RYUKYU ISLANDS, ARMY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administration

806

0

2

5

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800

0

2

5

BA)
0 )

-410

-439

-90

-410

BA
0

-410
-408

-439
-434

-90
-90

^410
-410

Total Ryukyu Islands, Army




THE

226

BUDGET

FOR

FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued
SOLDIERS' AND AIRMEN'S HOME
Trust Funds
Operation and maintenance
705
705

Payment of claims: Permanent,
indefinite
705
Soldiers' and Airmen's Home revolving
fund (trust revolving fund)
705

15,391

15,665

3,905

15,373

0
Capital outlay

BA

14,698

15,099

3,812

15,325

0

1,046

100
5
5

1
1

5
5

Total Soldiers' and Airmen's
Home.

15,391
15,756

15,670
15,204

3,906
3,813

15,378
15,330

-167

-150

-37

-150

BA
0

15,224
15,589

15,520
15,054

3,869
3,776

15,228
15,180

BA

63,641

15,900
D
357
16,257

66,047

0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
705

12

BA
0

Summary
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0
0

BA1
0 J

THE PANAMA CANAL
CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses..

806

64,106

59,800
D
492
60,292

Capital outlay

806

BA
0

5,790
3,822

2,240
7,510

560
1,154

3,647
4,540

Canal

BA
0

69,431
67,928

62,532
67,802

16,iB17
17,411

69,694
70,587

BA
0

30,000
-3,023
(25,477)

2,554
(24,371)

-20
(6,540)
D
(124)

-2,812
(26,585)

BA
0

99,431
64,905

62,532
70,356

16,817
17,391

69,694
67,775

BA 1
0 I

-20,945

-21,849

-7,546

-25,421

the
800

BA]
0 J

-40,585

-36,442

-7,182

-38,686

902

BA1
0 J

-62

-65

-15

-68

37,839
3,313

4,176
12,000

2,074
2,648

5,519
3,600

Total Federal funds,
Zone Government.

66,047

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY

Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Corporation: Panama Canal Company
fund:
406
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.
Limitation on general and
administrative expenses.
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
..806
Proprietary
public

receipts

from

Total The Panama Canal

See footnotes at end of table




BA
0

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

227

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued
MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Wildlife conservation, etc., military
reservations: Permanent, indefinite
303

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300
Total Miscellaneous Accounts....
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

680
868

860
860

201
251

806
806

BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

680
868

860
860

201
251

806
806

-680

-860

-201

-806

BA1
0 J
0

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Interfund transactions
806

BA1

188

50

1,857,246
2,119,170

2,198,084
2,203,421

673,212
720,542

2,255,556
2,242,581

-20,945

-21,849

-7,546

-25,421

0J
Proprietary
public

receipts

from

the
300

BA 1
0 I

-11,724

-13,011

-3,687

-13,145

301

BA]
0 J

-11

-9

-3

-10

800

BA1
0 I

-40,995

-36,881

-7,272

-39,096

BA1

-966

-1,105

-126

-1,719

BA

1,782,605

2,125,229

654,578

2,176,165

0

2,044,529

2,130,566

701,908

2,163,190

53,103
44,517

37,670
42,204

9,406
13,813

43,378
39,530

BA1
0 J

-37,712

-22,000

-5,500

-28,000

BA1
0 I

-167

-150

-37

-150

3,869

15,228

902
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0I

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
301
705
Total trust funds

BA

T5^224

15,520

__J1638

20,054

8,276

11,380

BA

1,797,829

2,140,749

658,447

2,191,393

0

2,051,167

2,150,620

710,184

2,174,570

0
Total

Department

Defense-Civil.




of

"

228

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds'
Generaj and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

553

BA

199,897

0
Buildings and facilities

553

BA
0

199,658
1,000
1,265

201,805
<142
"5,609
'249
218,895
1,000
2,876

50,126
C
47
°1,771
'82
56,076
750
720

223,105

223,133
3,125
3,950

Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for certification and
other services
553

0

-226 .

BA
0

200,897
200,697

208,805
221,771

52,776
56,796

226,230
227,083

BA

919,997

877,595
"-103,159

226,318
"-24,645

*697,187

0

785,037

865,823
"-18,900

232,295
"-23,580

BA

235,672

0

Total Federal funds Food and
Drug Administration.

236,495

HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Health services

Indian health services

Indian health facilities
Emergency health

551

551

554

BA
0

57,431
46,301
50
2

274,835
'•'1,050
"3,786
'928
"-5,294
271,679
"-4,334
55,366
71,168
28
0

73,780
C
263
"1,269
'309
84,233
"-330
11,084
14,574

'-510,225
776,254
"-79,732
'-210,444
314,594

302,067
"-630
40,345
46,817

....054

0

Health maintenance organization
loan and loan guarantee fund.551

0

-33,000

31,092

BA
0

1,213,100
1,035,353

1,105,107
1,216,736

288,378
307,192

541,901
831,632

BA

152,345

141,001
"-7,690

33,328

"143,293

154,491

158,000
"-1,000

48,000
"-1,000

Public enterprise funds:

Total Federal funds Health
Services Administration.

-2,700

CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Preventive health services

553

'-33,710

See footnotes at end of table.




147,000
"-5,000
'-15,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

229

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Biomedical research:
Health research and Education

BA

2,051,278

1,955,000

552

D

2,129,308

°150
>3
467,285

2,149,868

1,806,409

448
'10
2,051,291

BA
0

38,619
76,639

22,000
35,639

4,000
4,922

10,339
25,560

BA
0

2,089,897
1,883,048

1,977,474
2,086,930

430,513
472,207

2,139,647
2,175,428

BA
0

3,000
4,967

3,000
11,371

0
Health planning and
construct[q^. J ..._ : .__._ 1 L ....554

Total, Biomedical research
Buildings and facilities

426,345

552

750
2,629

25,400
12,187

Intragovernmental funds:

General research support grants..552

0

7,905

National Institutes
Management fund

Health
552

0

-1,956

of

-3,000

Grants management fund

554

0

-231

Consolidated working fund

552

0

-3,619

-54

1,211

Service and supply fund

552

0

-770

227

121

95

2J092J97
1,889,344

1,980,474
2,095,474

431,263
476,168

2,165,047
2,188,000

417,119

436,486
"-53,500

47,190

Total Federal funds National
Institutes of Health.

BA
0

290

ALCOHOL, DRUG ABUSE, AND MENTAL HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Alcohol, drug abuse, and
health:
(Health care services)

mental
551

BA

"355.265
J

519,423

433,029
"-2,675

87,302
"-9,665

-192,459
383,265
"-30,788
-'-23,261

BA

254,398

37,125

"163,000

0

263,584

182,056
"-3,000
259,102
"-325

46,923
"-535

188,596
"-1,712

BA

111,388

105,089

13,217

0

96,263

104,693

23,759

"105,066
J
-23,872
100,002
'-7,571

554

BA
0

14,250
25,830

Total, Alcohol, drug abuse, and
mental health.

BA
0

797,155
905,100

Construction and renovation St.
Elizabeths Hospital
554

BA
0

(Health research and education)
552

(Prevention and control of health
problems)
553

(Health planning
construction)

See footnotes at end of table.




and

.
30,325

4,127

13,206

667,131
824,149

97,532
151,911

407,000
621,737
75,000
J
8.250

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

230

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
ALCOHOL. DRUG ABUSE, AND MENTAL HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

49.673
45,163

<484
"1.507
>9
53.375
55,698

15.875
17,764

57.964
57,405

0

1
0

-6

-6

-7

BA
0

846,828
950,273

722.506
879,841

113.407
169,669

539.964
687,385

BA

569,606
595,470

BA

240.340

113,360
"-2,000
142,239
"-10,498
23,930

388,433

0

487.651
"-67,000
688,325
"-24,300
85,985

0

503,787

373,177

76,186

809,946
1,099,257

506,636
1,037,202

135,290
207,927

10,000
22,398
2,284
2,284
1,716
1,716
520^030
1,063,600

7,000
6,373

BA
BA
BA
BA
0

Working capital fund, Lexington
Addiction Research Center
551
Total Federal funds Alcohol,
Drug Abuse, and Mental
Health Administration.

Saint Elizabeths Hospital:

551

Appropriation, Current, indefinite...
Intragovernmental funds:

HEALTH RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Health resources:
(Health research and education)
552

(Health planning
construction)

and
554

Total, Health resources

BA
0

458,955
"-26,101
117,867
'-96,300
359,927
'-55,000
410,000
737,781

Public enterprise funds:

Medical facilities guarantee and loan
fund
554

BA
0

Health education loans

552

BA
0

Nurse training fund

552

BA
0

Total Federal funds Health
Resources Administration.

BA
0

11,693
2,268
-215
1,732
-360
813,946
1,110,375

554

BA

30,992

Retirement pay and medical benefits
for commissioned officers:
Indefinite
551

BA
0

22,317
39,499
36,024

Financial assistance for health care
555

BA
0

Scientific activities overseas (special
foreign currency program)
552

BA
0

142,290
214,300

31,000
25,119
2,727
2,727
1,273
1,273
445,000
766,900

OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR
HEALTH
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Assistant Secretary for Health

See footnotes at end of table




5,865

20,842
"614
'52
25,618
45,013
44,447

11,331

5,210
"230

22,216

6,272
13,552
13,104

23,283
52,352
51,130

2,387

10,001.500
•'9,001,200
1,500
11,924

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

231

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR
HEALTH-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Service and supply fund

551

0

-705

Consolidated working funds

552

0

-239

Total Federal funds Office of
Assistant Secretary for
Health.
Trust

Public Health Service
Permanent, indefinite

BA
0

70,491
63,262

66,521
81,396

19,009
21,763

10,077,568
9,087,537

BA
0

1,840
2,243

1,527
1,711

381
425

1,600
1,794

Funds

trust

funds:
554

EDUCATION DIVISION
Office of Education
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Financial assistance for elementary
and secondary education
501

BA
0

Elementary and secondary education
501

BA

'3,300,000
-'294,000
2,262,175

191,270
"-48,770

2,234,522
"-161,634

"2,211,888
'-2,072,888

Permanent

BA

0

2,210,218

School assistance
affected areas

501

federally
501

534,188
"-13,596

2,233,983
"-109,500
'-197,000

BA

42,034

57,055
"-15,000

516

M2.055

40,036

42,101
"-600

12,132
"-2,877

44,572
"-10,598

501

BA

656,016

680,000
"-243,773

70,000

325,000

0
Emergency school aid

in

2,288,732
"-5,300

0

Indian education

2,277,069

618,711

657,536
"-172,451

57,498
"-10,887

438,463
"-43,306
*249,700

Education for the handicapped ....501

BA

215,000

241,700

325

0

215,943

234,663

58,816

220,778

BA

199,859

126,375
"-1,375

120,500
"-35,000

236,375
'-220,375

Permanent

BA

100,000

0
Occupational, vocational, and adult
education
501
Permanent

151,244

198,508

55,962
"-4,449

229,369
"-18,949
'-34,546

BA

681,677

598,150
"-10,241

222,500
"-4,000

599,688

BA

7,161

74,661

1,790

652,751

673,633

111,279
"-3,050

0
See footnotes at end of table.

210-000 O - 76 - 16




'-67,500
7,161

681,166
"-9,610
'-9,450

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

232

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
EDUCATION DIVISION—Continued
Office of Education—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Higher education
Permanent

BA

2,206,171

BA

502

2,700
1,838,066

2,559,109
"-768.140
'335,000
2.700
2,450,700
"-18,700

124,000

*1,994,251

383,000
"-21,000

2,393,886
"-645,800
'301,500
137,330

503

BA

167,474

70,724
"-18,975

147,330
"-10,000

0

Library resources

225,810

140,920
"-2,000

49,079
"-7,000

174,504

31,260
36,893
5,533
2,000
1,989

1,103
4,704
200
426

'-137,330
134,223
"-10,200
•'-26,100
3,531
67,350
38,977
2,000
1,928

24,643

115,434

95,816

105,224
"2,083
109,023

32,830

112,537

BA

197,600
111,087
2,701

201,787
107,163
2,192

30,000
28,500
58
4

91075
2,119

BA
0

1,235
16,292

1,220
10,596

287
-4,408

1,282
12,633

BA
0

210
6.759,548
6,419,420

6,492,087
6,753,306

2.766,527
1,262,250

6.793,540
6,117,562

BA
0

70,357
82,770

70,000
70,000

20,000
13,400

"90,000
88,000

BA
0

11,500

11,500

10,113

10,677

Educational development

503

0

Special projects and training

503

BA
0

Educational activities overseas
(special foreign currency program)
503

BA
0

1,000
1,881

Salaries and expenses

BA

116,745

0
502

BA
0

Higher education facilities loan and
insurance fund
502
Permanent, indefinite

503

Public enterprise funds:

Student loan insurance fund

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

503

Total Federal funds Office of
Education.

0

national Institute of Education
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Institute of Education

503

Office of the Assistant Secretary for
Education
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses:
(Higher education)
See footnotes at end of table.




502

11,500

307

10,170

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

233

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
EDUCATION DIVISION—Continued
Office of the Assistant Secretary for
Education—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Salaries and expenses:—Continued
(Research and general education

aids)

503

Total, Salaries and expenses

BA

2,363

21,000

5,599

21,446

0

2,443

12,915

3,961

22,227

5,599

32,946

Total Federal funds Office of
the Assistant Secretary for
Education.
Trust

8A

13,863

32,500

0

12,556

23,592

"

4,268

32,397

BA
0

13,863
12,556

32,500
23,592

5^599
4,268

32,946
32,397

BA
0

21

60
44

20
27

100
51

Funds

Special statistical compilations
surveys: Permanent, indefinite

and
503

Total Federal funds Education

2,792,126

6,916,486

1,279,918

6,237,959

BA
0

21

60
44

20
27

100
51

BA

2,013,177

2,819,070

608,500

2,515,200
'40,000

2,048,425

2,375,299

608,700

2,514,000
'40,000

BA

6,966,375

8,261,993

2,220,000

9,292,000
'-9,292,000

6,840,395

8,183,715

2,220,000

9,292,000
'-9,292,000

BA

4,861,927

5,897,904

1,576,000

0

5,120,881

5,897,904

1,576,000

6,215,000
'-256,000

BA

13,841,479

16,978,967

4,404,500

8,514,200

0

14,009,701

16,456,918

4,404,700

8,513,000

BA

210,000

400,000

80,000

315,000
'-55,000

0

313,837

350,000

80,000

315,000
'-55,000

BA

65,822

55,255

14,950

63,095
'-24,250

0

64,439

57,715

20,229

59,019
'-22,000

BA
0

100,000
11

66,700

16,200

50,000
71,500

BA

90,000

85,000

19,000

82,000

0

Education

6,594,587

6,846,898

0

funds

6,843,768

6,514,746

0

Total trust
Division.

BA

0

Division.

88,125

86,000

19,000

82,000

SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Public assistance:
(Social services)

(Health care services)

(Public assistance and
income supplements)

506

551

other
604

Total, Public assistance
Work incentives

Program administration

504

506

Special assistance to refugees from
Cambodia and Vietnam in the
United States
604
Cuban refugee assistance
See footnotes at end of table.




604

6,215,000
—256,000

7

THE

234

BUDGET

FOR

FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account

and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERYICE-Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

506

Total Federal funds Social and
Rehabilitation Service.

0

BA
0

3,344

14^307^30?
JWM57

mizz:

^^57^222
_J]J)}UM

4jii,450 ~~T945j45
4,540,129

8,963,5_19

SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payments to social security trust
funds:
(Health care services)
551

miners

Supplemental
program

2,846,000

3,597,430

878,000

5,997,000
'-143,000

0

(General retirement and disability
insurance)
601
(Public assistance and other
income supplements)
604
Total, Payments to social
security trust funds.
Special benefits for disabled coal

BA

2,859,995

3,597,608

878,000

5,997,000
'-143,000

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA

499,323
499,323

3^45^323
3,359,318
957,740

515,317
515,317
10,616
2,127
4J23L363
4,115,052
999,778

716,902
716,902
2,940
537
880,1)40
878,537
234,600

6,570,902
6,570.902
913,897

601

0

967,782

986,271

229,614

913,897

604

security

BA
0

4,857,102
4,779,258

5,518,523
5,235,372

1,503,541
1,406,510

5,910,122
5,909,544

601
Social

0
BA

757
.:11:::::
UMU65 ""TojSuiM

income

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Total Federal funds

Security Administration.

0

_JU0M15

10,336,695

2,619,081 "17,394,921
2,514,661

13,394,343

Trust Funds

Federal old-age and survivors insurance
trust fund-. Indefinite
Permanent, indefinite

BA

'2,031,000

601
BA
0

Limitation on salaries and expenses..

(2,125,987)

Limitation on construction
Federal disability insurance trust fund:
Indefinite
601
Permanent, indefinite

58,756,400
56,676,171

(8,232)

62,383,422
64,232,954

(2,373,134)
"(22,597)
(6,300)

16,640,030
17,284,167

71,812,031
73,595,306

'-10,000
(629,900)
"(15.300)
(3,633)

'-790,000
(2,561,773)

BA

(14,400)
'1,451,000

Federal hospital insurance trust fund:
Indefinite
551
Permanent, indefinite

BA

7,919,753

8,398,725

2,224,000

9,525,000

0

7 982,231

9,534,117

2,650,264
'-2,000

11,252,292
'-36,000

'3,000

'8,000

'-10,000

BA

See footnotes at end of table.




12,567,872

13,609,540

3,626,202

15,726,008

0

Federal supplementary medical
insurance trust fund: Permanent,
indefinite
551
Total trust funds Social
Security Administration.

BA

10,611,532

12,510,908
'-315,000

3,416,384
'-365,000

15,410,819
'-2,130,000

BA
0

4,336,015
4,169,855

4,945,975
5,237,365

BA
0

83,580,040
79,439,789

89,340,662
91,200,344

1,425,000
1,547,043
_ 7 - 3 M°i
23,923,232
24,484,858

7,312,000
6,466,434
•'-101.000
107,847,039
103,667,851

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

235

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
SPECIAL INSTITUTIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

American

Printing

House for the

BA

1,967

2,408

602

2,762

0

1,994

2,408

602

2,762

National Technical Institute for the
Deaf
502

BA
0

9,819
9,887

9,836
11,679

2,932
2,932

12,675
12,675

Gallaudet College

BA

35,595

22,435
'531

5,606

40,840

0

27,397

38,406
'518

8,045
'13

33,112

BA

81,700

84,158
'3,300

18,728

81,909

0

84,574

89,688
'3,265

22,311
'35

79,230

BA
0

129,081
123,852

122,668
145,964

27,868
33,938

138,186
127,779

and
501

BA
0

483,000
441,208

481,178
477,583

117,338
129,927

477,683
471,789

506

BA

1,117,965

1,064,945
"-2,000

266,161

"1,095,006

0

1,180,024

1,154,792
"-2,000

250,142

J
-55,225
1,157,761

BA

1,600,965

1,544,123

383,499

1,517,464

0

1,621,232

1,630,375

380,069

1,604,823

0

2,499

3,268

BA
0

1,600,965
1,623,731

1,544,123
1,633,643

383,499
380,069

1,517,464
1,608,018

BA

22,207

24,686

6,379

29,685

19,616

»653
25,624

°228
6,500

28,945

1,488
»46
1,537

372
"16
372

1,581

22,251

3,508

6,773

Blind

501
502

Howard University

Total Federal
Institutions.

502

funds

Special

ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Human development:
(Elementary, secondary,
vocational education)
(Social services)

Total, Human development
Research and training activities
overseas (special foreign curency
program)
506
Total Federal funds Assistant
Secretary for Human
Development.

•'-24,727
"

3,195

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General'and special funds:

Office for Civil Rights

751

0
Office of Consumer Affairs

506

1,465

0
General Departmental management:
(Community development)
451

BA

1,573

BA

0
See footnotes at end of table.




1,579

26,329

8,706

236

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

T
Q
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds: — Continued
General Departmental management:
— Continued.
(Public
assistance and other
income supplements)
604
Total, General
management.

Departmental

Policy research

604

Allied services

..506

Intragovernmental funds:
Working capital fund

B
A
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

506

Consolidated working fund
Total Federal
Departmental

506 0
BA
funds
Management.
0

93,661

96,528
101,773
105,234

85,662
"2,610
90,862
88,272
113,113
24,950
10,230

22,366
"953
19,177
23,319
22,685
6,575
7,848

1,912
-2,143
125,445
126,192

3,000
2,000
140,095
155,504

13
4
36,889
37,548

169,877
156,976

37,557,229
37,378,888

41,299,719
41,851,855

11,458,364
10,079,151

45,187,272
44,404,131

75,444

90,811
93,661
97,584
24,950
22,868
20,000
'5,000
1,000

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
902
Proprietary

receipts

from

public

the
500
550
600
902

Total Federal funds

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)...

902
receipts

from

the
503
554
601

See footnotes at end of table




-24,519
0J
BA1
-3,933
0I
BA}
-4,508
0J
BA
\
BA1
-3,056
0I
BA 37,521,213
0
37,342,872
83,581,901
79,442,032

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
601

Proprietary
public

BA}

-30,625

-24,500
-37,067
-39,333

-1,004
-802

-37,247
-41,352
-34,000

-34,000
-745

-2,842

41,161,987
41,714,123

11,455,813
10,076,600

45,041,206
44,258,065

89,342,249
91,202,099

23,923,633
24,485,310

107,848,739
103,669,696

-2,832

BA1 -1,010,299 -1,083,000
0I
BA1
-2,908
-9,874
0I
-21
BA1
-60
0J
-1,485
BA1
-1,290
0I
-114
BA1
-114
0I

-1,289,000
-5,700
-20

-100

-322

-1,290

-30

-114

237

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Trust funds:—Continued

902
Total trust funds

BA1
0 J

-1,052
82,566.022
78,426,153

88,247,911
90,107,761

23,917,561
24,479,238

106,558,235
102,379,192

551

BA1

-2,858,943

-3,597,430

-878,000

-5,854,000

601

Interfund transactions

BA
0

BA1

-499,323

-515,317

116,728,969
112,410,759

125,297,151
127,709,137

Total Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare.

0I
0I
BA
0

-716,902
34,495,374
33,677,838

145,028,539
140,066,355

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
HOUSING PROGRAMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Annual contributions for assisted
housing:
604
Contract authority
Permanent
Housing payments
604
Liquidation of contract authority....

44,046,961
338,944

17,000,000
1.033,511

21,900

0
Payments for operation of low
income housing projects:
604
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA

(2,196,926)
2,087,106

(2,245,000)
2,313,000

(600,000)
565,000

(3,070,000)
2,570,000

535,000
(535,000)
162,000

80,000
(80,000)
130,000

"463,600
"(463,600)
462,000
1,000

BA
0

Mobile home standards program..403

BA

"16,572,900
5,500

'1,000
0

800
'300

Rent supplement program
604
State housing finance and
development agencies:
451
Contract authority

B
A

800,000

B
A

600,000
''-600,000
(15,000)
"(-15,000)

Liquidation of contract authority....
Homeownership (Section 235) and
rental housing (Section 236)
assistance:
604
Contract authority, Permanent
Counseling services...
See footnotes at end of table.




....506

B
A

0

2
3
33
3

22
7

6
8

238

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1977
estimate

TO
estimate

1976
estimate

1975
actual

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
HOUSING PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Federal Housing Administration fund
401
Current, indefinite
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Current, indefinite.
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.
Limitation on administrative
expenses.
Limitation on nonadministrative
expenses.

BA

^5,000

BA

142,500
^-5,000

BA
0

1,294,150
1,088,449
(14,230)

"825,698

1,129,408
1,161,156

239,073
204,747

149,761
830,305

(190,500)

College housing—loans and other
expenses
502
Appropriation, Permanent,
indefinite.
Contract authority

BA

14,758

14,137

3,607

BA

385

363

93

BA
0

-696,720
-55,418

-30,000

-15,000

Low-rent public housing—loans and
other expenses
604

0

-53,839

Emergency homeowners' relief fund
401

BA

Nonprofit sponsor assistance

35,000

604

0

-331

2,030

1,015

2,360

Community disposal operations fund
451

0

-865

-600

-150

-600

Rental housing assistance fund...604

0

-15,202

-8,400

-932

-3,728

Revolving fund
programs)
Appropriation,
indefinite.

BA

528

2,053

518

16,665

BA
0

188
58,193

1,003
220,000

482
20,000

1,335
19,500

(liquidating
451
Permanent,

Housing for the elderly
handicapped fund

or
401

-1,784

Intragovernmental funds:

Disaster assistance fund
Total Federal funds
Programs.

-11,147

453
Housing

BA
0

-37,554
44,999,194
3,069,088

20,693,998
3,808,747

345,945
904,980

18,036,527
3,880,637

GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

sales
401

B
A

Special assistance functions fund
401
Appropriation, Permanent,
indefinite.
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent.

B
A

4,698

4,745

1,166

4,600

B
A

3,379

3,482

88
7

3,500

BA
0

6,000,000
2.180.268

4,750,000
511.500

191.924

186,349

Payment of participation
insufficiencies
Public enterprise funds:

See footnotes at end ot table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

239

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:—Continued

Management and liquidating
functions fund
401
Limitation on administrative
expenses, Government National
Mortgage Association.
Guarantees of mortgage-backed
securities...
401
Participation sales fund:
(Mortgage credit and thrift
insurance)
401
(Other advancement and
regulation of commerce) 403
(Community development)
451

0

-61,648
(8,113)

-30,273
(1,240)
"(33)

-7,500

-21,400

(350)

D

(U)

0

-9,723

-11,598

-3,390

-16,806

0

3,807

-1,080

3,606

3,321

0

-1,437

-2,278

1,530

-2,788

0

-374

4,272

1,378

2,040

(Higher education)
502
(Health research and education)
552

0
0

-740
-131

7,016
-237

6,299
-3

7,392

(Veterans housing)
704
Total, Participation sales fund..

0
0

-5,801
-4,676

-7,161
532
4,758,227
470,161

-2,391
10,419

-9,220
275

2,044
191,453

8,100
148,418

400,000

100,000
3,148,000
(3,148,000)
1,600,000
"25,000
75,000

Total Federal funds Government
National Mortgage
Association.

BA
0

6,009,539
2,104,221

-470

COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Community development grants ...451
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....
Comprehensive planning grants...451
Miscellaneous expired accounts....451

BA
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

50,000
2,382,189
(2,382,189)
38,081
100,000
96,883
70,175
536 006

50,000
1,788,000
(1,788,000)
750,000
75,000
110,000

25,000

206 906

Public enterprise funds:

Rehabilitation loan fund

451

B
A
0

29,440

BA

47,637
(47,637) .

50 000
"-50.000
76,000
"-18,382

23,000
"-25,000

(300,000)
300,000

Urban renewal fund-capital grants:
AC]

Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....
Liquidation of contract authority....

0
Urban renewal fund-loans and
Dlannincf advances
451
See footnotes at end of table.




1,376,465

(702,493)
1,375,000

0

-29,032

50,000

(1,000,000)
1,000,000
-25,000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

240

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
197 b

Account and functional code

TQ

1976
estimate

actual

1977
estimate

estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:—Continued

451

BA
BA
0

1,437
726
23,386

Total Federal funds Community
Planning and Development.

BA
0

2,652,164
2,071,229

1,913,000
2,549,524

723,000

3,273,000
2,650,000

2,906

3,000

1,500

5,000

6,566

11,352
15,818

5,830
5,584

25,452
25,446

9,472

11,352
18,818

5,830
7,084

25,452
30,446

-2,350

-2,534

-613

-1,758

Public facility loans
Appropriation, Permanent,
indefinite.

.

NEW COMMUNITIES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

New community

assistance

grants
451

Public enterprise funds:

New communities fund:
Authority to spend public
receipts.

451
debt

BA

Total Federal funds New
Communities Administration.

0
B
A
0

.

FEDERAL INSURANCE ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

National insurance development fund
403
453

BA
0

50,000
44,208

75,000
127,823

18,750
38,750

100,000
200,866

Total Federal funds Federal
Insurance Administration.

BA
0

50,000
41,858

75,000
125,289

18,750
38,137

100,000
199,108

BA
0

415
1,831

400
450

100
100

450
450

BA
0

65,000
52,332

53,000
57,000

15,500
19,000

71,000
67,100

2,726

736
"23
759

2,848

National flood insurance fund

OFFICE OF INTERSTATE LAND SALES
REGISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Interstate land sales (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
403

POLICY DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research and technology

451

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses, Department
of Housing and Urban
Development:
(Other advancement and
regulation of commerce)
403

BA

"71
0

See footnotes at end of table




2.797

2.848

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

241

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Salaries and expenses, Department
of Housing and Urban
Development:—Continued
(Community development)
451

relief

and

insurance)
453

114,761

119,161
"3,859

0
(Disaster

BA

93,988

123,020

BA
0

Total, Salaries and expenses,
Department of Housing and
Urban Development.

34,027
"118

34,424

34,145

BA

11,417

11,844
"372

12,216

160,602

172,178

139,829

172,178

313
-20
369
156

BA
0

404

0
0

Intragovernmental funds:
Working capital fund

451

0

451

Consolidated working fund

0

Total Federal funds
Departmental Management.

129,415

1,956
1,312

BA
0

demonstration
451

Urban transportation
Low income-housing
programs

34,424

BA
0

and
751

BA

11,417

(Federal law enforcement
prosecution)

other
604

129,415

7,575
7,575

0

(Public
assistance and
income supplements)

31,067
"965
32,032

7,238
"417
7,655

49,668

2,891
"134
3,025

11,936

43,471
43,471

201,442
201,442

813
206

207

-824

160,602

172,178

140,647

176,465

43,471
43,678

201,442
200,618

53,936,914

27,677,155
7,206,454

431,640

21,715,971

1,927,432

7,176,777

-2,383

-592

-2,383

49,668

11,936

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
450
Total Department of Housing
and Urban Development.

BA1
0 J
BA
0

7,490,678
-2,468
53,934,446

27,674,772
7,204,071

431,048

21,713,588

1,926,840

7,174,394

189,582
"22,000
"3,023
191,078
"21,340

58,192

208,740

"1,066
47,714
"660

204,805

8,911

2,238

9,884

98

7,488,210

"39

9,429

2,052

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
LAND AND WATER RESOURCES
Bureau of Land Management

Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Management of lands and resources

B
A

175,746

0

159,861

302

Construction and maintenance

302

B
A
0

See footnotes at end of table




6,725
7,931

D

8,180

T H E BUDC3ET FOR K1SCAL Y E A R

242

1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account

and f u n c t i o n a l

197 f j
actual

code

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
LAND AND WATER RESOURCES—Continued
Bureau of Land Management—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Public lands development roads and
trails:
302
Contract authority

BA

-4,891

BA

10,000 .
(4,070)
3,545
27,402
29,573
4,187
3,929
242
145

-8,800
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

0

(3,183)
4,300
28,000
34,064
5,435
5,200
300
260

(1,121)
1,511
8,700
9,010
600
1,100
100
70

(5,000)
5,000
30,000
30,232
7,235
5,812
300
240

Oregon and California grant lands
(special fund)-. Indefinite
302

BA
0

Range improvements (special fund).
Indefinite
302

BA
0

Recreation development and
operation of recreation facilities
(special fund)
302
Permanent appropriations (special
funds):
(Conservation and land
management): Permanent,
indefinite
302

BA
0

BA
0

1,312
1,266

1,501
2,611

377
377

1,500
1,500

(Other general purpose fiscal
assistance): Permanent,
indefinite
852

BA
0

178,483
178,064

179,399
179,399

145,023
145,023

126,800
126,800

Total, Permanent appropriations
(special funds).

BA
0

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Land Management.

BA
0

179,795
179,330
399,206
384,314

180,900
182,010
429,449
447,681

145,400
145,400
216,335
207,517

128,300
128,300
384,459
382,569

BA
0

725
574

700
740

200
150

700
628

19,427
18,710
13,825
13,801
1,654
1,061

20,892
22,699
22,665
21,680
2,992
2,720

6,794
6,540
9,205
16,430
837
1,250

21,030
21,060
10,773
13,510
4,131
1,410

27,650
5,774
600
448
244,123
261,781
100,800
102,178

19,670
40,000
1,000
1,000
327,308
293,004
132,162
127,412

7,130
7,000
200
200
98,834
89,274
34,017
32,952

43,120
40,000
1,000
1,000
347,017
352,801
143,000
142,850

Trust

Funds

Bureau of Land Management
funds: Permanent, indefinite

trust
302

Bureau of Reclamation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General investigations

301

BA
0

Loan program

301

BA
0

Recreational and fish and wildlife
facilities, Upper Colorado River
storage project
303

BA
0

Colorado River Basin Salinity control
projects
301

BA
0

Emergency fund (special fund)

301

BA
0

rehabilitation
301

BA
0

Operation and maintenance (special
fund)
301

BA
0

Construction and
(special fund)

See footnotes at end of table




243

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1977
estimate

1976
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
LAND AND WATER RESOURCES—Continued
Bureau of Reclamation—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

General administrative
(special fund)

expenses
301

20,920

0
Other miscellaneous appropriations
(special funds): Permanent
852
Permanent indefinite

B
A

5,600
D
200
5,574

22,600

20,622

21,290
"600
21,955

B
A

600

600

600

600

B
A
0

2104
2,754

2 400
3,000

600
1,200

2,400
3,000

B
A
B
A

23,000
12 500
(32,800)

29,205
19 500
(17,440)
"(5,000)
52,000
"5,000

8,810

73,420

(1,500)

(20,600)

8,000

80,000

38,160
44,830

15,562
12,980

61,900
48,375

22,804

Public enterprise funds:

Colorado River Basin project
301
Contract authority Permanent ..
Liquidation of contract authority....

0
Upper Colorado River storage project

301
Continuing fund for emergency
expenses, Fort Peck project
301

44,483

B
A
0
0

22,967
9,271
- 2 095

0
B
A
0

490,170
478,604

638,444
635,300

188,389
181,400

730,991
726,810

B
A
0

2,922
3,251

12,285
12,400

4,380
4,000

29,000
24,600

18,180
19,000

4,411
4,423

*22,273
18,200

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

301

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Reclamation.
Trust

-184

..

Funds

Reclamation trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
301

Office of Water Research and Technology
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

301

B
A
0

19,792
23,015

306

0
B
A
0

42

23

19,792
23,057

18,180
19,023

4,411
4,423

22,273
18,200

B
A

-7

909,168
885,975

1,086,073
1,102,004

409,135
393,340

1,137,723
1,127,579

3,640
4,020

12,985
13,140

4,580
4,150

29,700
25,228

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

Total Federal funds Office of
Water Research and
Technology.
Trust

Funds

Cooperation with foreign agenciesPermanent
.
.
301
Liquidation of contract authority

0
Total Federal funds Land and
Water Resources.
Total trust funds Land and
Water Resources.
See footnotes at end of table.




...

BA

0
B
A
0

(7) ..
195 ..

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

244

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1971.
ictual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
FISH AND WILDLIFE AND PARKS
Bureau of Outdoor Recreation
Federal Funds
G
I d
' 1 f d
Salaries and expenses
303

Land and water conservation
(special fund). Indefinite
303
Contract authority, Permanent

B
A

1,444

6,187

0
B
A

5,251

5,737
"160
5,892

1,492

6,188

307,492

308,086

75,988

300,000

B
A
0

30,000
283,617

30,000
300,000

63,000

30,000
329,000

0
B
A
0

342,872
288,870

343,983
305.892

77,487
64,492

336,187
335,188

28,639
<120
°768
30,174

122,821

1,060
7,000

6,727
12,800

800

5,380

"55

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

303

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Outdoor Recreation.

2

United States Fish and Wildlife Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

.303

B
A

103,798
99,211

Construction and anadromous fish

303

0
B
A
0

117,746
r
480
"2,402
112,431

14,397
8,790

17,706
15,400

Migratory bird conservation account

B
A

1,000

7 500

B
A
0

7,512
16,464

12,000
14,000

6,390

12,000
14,750

B
A
0
B
A
0

75,046
68,022

84,986
76,600

18,700
19,223

89,986
78,900

3,986
4,078

4,200
4,400

1,380
1,137

4,300
4,400

B
A
0

79,032
72,100

89,186
81,000

20,080
20,360

94,286
83,300

0
B
A
0

-2,881

700

160

700

205,739
193,684

247,020
223,531

51,467
64,084

235,834
230,955

B
A
0

1,262
1,357

2,063
1,800

620
925

2,063
2,000

B
A

220,138
224,209

75,772
'2,359
"1,695
76,355

272,864

0

243,588
r
4,219
"3,929
240,843

Resource management

(special fund)
Permanent, indefinite

119,405

.303

Miscellaneous appropriations (special
tunds):
(Recreational
resources):
Permanent, indefinite

.303

(Other general
purpose fiscal
assistance):
Permanent,
indefinite
852

Total, Miscellaneous
appropriations (special
funds).
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

.303

Total Federal funds United
States Fish and Wildlife
Service.
Trust Funds

Contributed funds:
indefinite

Permanent,
.303

national Park Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation
system

of

the

See footnotes at end of table




national

park
.303

273,495

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

245

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

T
Q
estimate

1977
estimate

D E P A R T M E N T O F THE I N T E R I O R — C o n t i n u e d
FISH A O WILDLIFE AND PARKS—Continued
N

national Park Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Planning and construction

303

60,412
56,092

BA

Road construction:
Contract authority

BA
0

27,215
54,819

7,100
13,663

33,200
54,546

-10,461

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

105,000
(26,026)
24,560
24,476
13,847
11,739
18,284

BA

2,500

0
BA
0

2,605
277
243

0
BA
0

-77
414,081
339,763

262,086
364,817

98,762
115,209

337,956
388,778

BA
0
BA
0

1,705
2,035
962,692
822,317

3,000
3,000
853,089 ~
894,240

750
750
227,716
243,785

3,000
1,600
909,977
954,921

BA

2^967

5JI63

U70

M63

0

3,392

4,800

1,675

3,600

303
"-58,500

Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....
Preservation of historic properties
303
Planning, development, and
operation of recreation facilities:
Indefinite
303
John F. Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts
303

Miscellaneous permanent
appropriations (special
Permanent, indefinite

funds):
303

(40,115)
39,522
24,666
17,066
14,000
9,659

(9,900)
11,175
6,040
6,045
5,000
7,200

(18,000)
22,925
"14,500
21,000
14,000
13,500

2,575
C
65
"9
2,588
320
320

741

3,072

716
55
55

2,992
320
320

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
303
Total Federal funds National
Park Service.
Trust

Funds

National Park Service trust funds:
Permanent
303
Total Federal funds Fish and
Wildlife and Parks.
Total

trust

funds

Fish

and

Wildlife and Parks.
ENERGY AND MINERALS

Geological Survey
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Surveys, investigations and research
306

BA

254,146

0
Payment from proceeds, sale of BA
water, Mineral Leasing Act of
1930: Permanent, indefinite 301

226,868
1

267,247
(
183
°5,069
269,860

67,400
<72
1,770
71,495

284,308

69,242
71,495

284,308
284,345

284,345

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
306
Total Federal funds Geological
Survey.
See footnotes at end of table




0
BA
0

-1,958
254,147
224,910

272,499
269,860

246

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

TO.
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE I N T E R I O R — C o n t i n u e d
ENERGY AND MINERALS—Continued
Mining Enforcement and Safety
Administration

Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund

553

B
A

67,913

0

553

68,260

20,205

90,148

"768
22,834

88,554

20,973
22,834

90,148
88,554

61,633
"204
52,474

15 371

65,606

17,849

63,342

23,634
"460
24,079

88,764

72,726

95,754
"1,303
90,540

148,820
115,563

158,894
143,014

39,537
41,928

154,370
156,724

64

200

50

200

79,473
^2,143
"2,003
81,241
4
2,143

-15

15

B
A
0

67,913
68,245

83,619
83,399

554

R
A
0

185
150

35

305

R
A

67 113

Total Federal funds Mining
Enforcement
and Safety
Administration.

0

.

Trust Funds
Contributed
indefinite

funds:

Permanent

.

Bureau of Mines

Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Mines and minerals:
(Energy)

0
(Other natural resources)

306

42,837

B
A

81,707

0
B
A
0

Total, Mines and minerals
Miscellaneous appropriations
Public enterprise funds:
Helium fund:
Contract authority
Permanent
Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund

306

0

"72

93,382

306

R
A
R
A
0

- 4 7 500
47,500

43

47,500

.

268

312

-2,929

594

35

1,688

B
A
0

196,320
112,242

158,894
143,851

39,537
42,281

201,870
158,924

B
A
0

610
468

485
485

120
120

600
600

301

BA
0

301

BA
0

540
611
760
728

652
705
838
840

198
246
209
244

763
763
1,164
1,164

306

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Mines.

0

47,500
-456

Trust Funds
Contributed
indefinite

funds:

Permanent,
306

Alaska Power Administration

Federal Funds
General and special funds:
General investigations
Operation and maintenance
See footnotes at end of table.




247

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
ENERGY AND MINERALS—Continued
Alaska Power
Administration—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

301

Total Federal funds Alaska
Power Administration.

0
BA
0

-35
1,300
1,304

35
1,490 ~
1,580

407
490

1,927
1,927

Bonneville Power Administration
Federal
Funds
General and special funds:

0

66,679
40,711
11,243
11,909
500

BA

94,078

Authority to spend public debt
receipts.

BA
0

Total Federal funds Bonneville
Power Administration.

BA
0

1,250,000
100,997
1,422,000
154,117

Construction

301

BA
0

Operation and maintenance

301

BA
0

Continuing fund (special fund) ....301
Public enterprise funds:

Bonneville Power Administration fund

301

Trust

-66,000

-1,460

-15,130

-66,000

-M60

-15,130

Funds

BA
0

7,149
10,261 ...

BA

0

Bonneville Power Administration
fund: Permanent, indefinite

946
953

BA
0

108
108

BA
0

301
....301

trust
301

Southeastern Power Administration
Federal
Funds
General and special funds:

Continuing fund (special
Permanent, indefinite

301
fund):
....301

Total Federal funds
Southeastern Power
Administration.

1,000
995

257
245

1,054
1,061

1,000
995

257
245

1,106
1,104

BA
0

620
375

680
680

125
153

960
959

BA

5,795
3,620

6,000
"81
6,079

1,850
"24
1,995

7,821

0

Operation and maintenance

1,106
1,104

....

Southwestern Power Admim\stration
Federal Funds
neral and special funds:

Construction
Operation and maintenance

See footnotes at end of table

210-000 0 - 7 6 - 1 7




7,816

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

248

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
ENERGY AND MINERALS—Continued
Southwestern Power Administration—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

BA
0

65
65

Total Federal funds
Southwestern Power
Administration.

BA
0

6,480
4,060

6,761
6,759

1,999
2,148

8,781
8,775

Total Federal funds Energy and
Minerals.

BA
0

1,949,214
565,939

524,263
440,444

132,415
138,033

588,140
528,499

Total trust funds Energy and
Minerals.

BA
0

7,944
10,879

485
520

120
120

600
600

BA

31,652

30,427
"5,000
"599
30,631
"4,800
237,585
"5,500
239,659
274,906
"11,307
"4,375
275,990
"10,707
569,699
561,787
73,922 ~
"5,250
73,250
"4,000

Continuing fund
Permanent

(special

fund):
301

..

INDIAN AFFAIRS
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation of Indian programs:
(Conservation and land
management)

302

0

30,559

and
501

BA

226,495

(Area and regional development)
452

B
A

(Elementary, secondary,
vocational education)

0

218,561
227,785
220,034

Total, Operation
programs.

of

Construction

Indian
452

BA
0
BA
0

Road construction
452
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA
BA

61,268

183
7,361
77,700
"1,680
70,041
88,317
°1,337
79,044

177,367
156,446
13,550

34,154
34,200
"200
243,807
244,141
311,549
311,970
"600
589,510
591,111
46,263

15,000

72,737
"1,250
27,205

25,000
75,000
(59,500)
66,082

(66,705)
66,757

(28,000)
27,000

(46,795)
68,000

BA
0

13,618
12,680
70,000
3,102
72,245
86,720
84,925

12,666
12,800
70,000
2,200
72,200
84,866
85,000

2,800
2,800
40,000
1,200
41,200
44,000
44,000

12,666
12,800
30,000
2,200
32,200
44,866
45,000

BA
0

38,000
7,126

3,000
30,000

2,078

4,536

0
Miscellaneous appropriations:
(Area and regional development)-.
Permanent, indefinite
452
(Other general government)
Permanent, indefinite

485,932
469,154
64,804

8,150
D

806

Total, Miscellaneous
appropriations.

BA
0
BA
BA
0

Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for loans
See footnotes at end of table.




452

249

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
INDIAN AFFAIRS—Continued
Bureau of Indian Affairs—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:—Continued

Indian loan guaranty and insurance
fund
452

BA
0

Liquidation of Hoonah
Project revolving fund

Housing
452

0

452

20,000
96

10,000
4,267
13

1,473
2

20,000
6,573
13

234,917
245,999

727,844
789,220

750
10,000
76,155
77,954

3,000
35,387
228,702
258,667

86,905
77,954
86,905
77,954
234,917
245,999
86,905
77,954

267,089
258,667
267,089
258,667
727,844
789,220
267,089
258,667

3,800
"5
5,019
"3,519
15,100
"40
«2,160
17,309
"1,433
8,600
8,139

21,862

185
200

0

4

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Indian Affairs.
Trust

BA
0

795,456 ..
1,818 .
690,473

746,737
825,074

BA
BA
BA
0

2,169
32,380
150,341
148,066

3,000
31,200
227,158
259,848
10,000 ..
.
12,161
271,358
272,009
271,358
272,009
746,737
825,074
271,358
272,009

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds:
(Area and regional development)..452
Current, indefinite
Permanent, indefinite
(Other general government):
Permanent, indefinite
806

BA
0

Total trust funds Bureau of
Indian Affairs.

BA
0

Total Federal
Affairs.

Indian

BA
0

Total trust funds Indian Affairs.

BA
0

845
184,890
148,911
184,890
148,911
795,456
690,473
184,890
148,911

BA

15,350

Total, Miscellaneous
funds.

funds

trust

BA
0

TERRITORIAL AFFAIRS
Office of Territorial Affairs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Micronesian claims fund, Trust
Territory of the Pacific Islands:
Indefinite
806

BA
0

1,400
-177

22,000
"14
"4,740
23,868
"1,221
80,196
"114
B
10,148
84,448
B
5,644
10,000
10,000

Office of the Comptroller for Guam
(special fund): Permanent,
indefinite
806

BA
0

625
314

600
680

Administration of territories

806

19,244
Trust territory of the Pacific Islands
806

BA

69,750
70,404

See footnotes at end of table




27,622
*82,321
80,817
3"033
256
655

THE BUD

250

G E T FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE I N T E R I O R — C o n t i n u e d
TERRITORIAL AFFAIRS—Continued
Office of Territorial Affairs—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Internal revenue collections for the
Virgin Islands (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
852

6A
0

17,676
17,240

19,500
32,360

4,875
4,885

19,000
19,505

Total Federal funds Office of
Territorial Affairs.

BA
0

104,801
107,025

147,312
158,221

34,765
40,504

123,439
131,632

BA

11,082

11,263
"353

2,665
124

12,658

SECRETARIAL OFFICES
Office of the Solicitor and Office of the
Secretary
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Office of the Solicitor, salaries and
expenses
306

D

0
Office of the Secretary, salaries and
expenses
306

10,773

11,607

2,673

12,657

BA

19,839

18,734
D
550

D

4,203
183

21,097

0
Departmental operations

306

19,964

18,963

4,675

20,496

BA

10,758

12,153

2,480

12,695

95
2,641

11,521

D

9,929

°225
11,918

Salaries and expenses (special
foreign currency program)
306

BA
0

192
136

1,494
1,180

75
65

907
800

Litter prevention and
Permanent, indefinite

BA
0

15
8

25
25

5
5

25
25

0

cleanup-.
304

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

306

0

3,495

Consolidated working fund, Office of

0

653

the Secretary

306

Total Federal funds Office of
the Solicitor and Office of
the Secretary.

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the

public

41,886
44,958

44,797
43,693

9,830
10,059

47,382
45,499

BA
0

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

4,763,217
3,116,687

3,402,271
3,463,676

1,048,778
1,071,720

3,534,505
3,577,350

-56

-75

-543,504

-631,402

-150,782

-707,091

-385,040

-236,681

-61,893

-247,097

-14,287

-13,261

-2,949

-13,261

BAI

250 0 J
300 BAI
0J
301 BAI
0J
450 BAI
0J
500 BAI
0I
800 BAI

0 I

See footnotes at end of table




-79

-70

-18

-70

-650

-750

-200

-900

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

251

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued

Federal funds:—Continued

806

BAl
0 J

-2,779

-2,000

-1,000

-2,000

902

BA1
0 J

-3,995

-4,007

-644

-4,101

BA
0

3,812,827
2,166,297

2,514,025
2,575,430

831,292
854,234

2,559,985
2,602,830

BA
0

199,441
167,202

289,891
290,469

92,975
83,899

302,452
288,095

BAl
0 J

-10,071

-12,285

-4,380

-29,000

302

BAl
0 J

-725

-700

-200

-700

303

BAl
0 J

-1,262

-2,063

-620

-2,063

306

BAl

-610

-485

-120

-600

-111,232

-108,382

-27,521

-111,636

Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

. ..

Deductions for offsetting receipts
Proprietary receipts from the
public
301

452

0 1
BAl

0 J

554

BAl
0 J

-185

806

BAl
0 I

-333

902

BAl

-22,852

-11,209

-12,526

-7,955

52,171

154,767

155,345

47,608
38,532

150,498

19,932
-47,473

-139,158

-46,205

-144,889

2,565,594
2,594,082

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

BA
0

452
806

Total Department of the Interior

BAl'

0I
BAl.
0 J
BA "
0

136,141

-10,000
3,817,525

2,519,634

832,695

2,138,756

2,581,617

846,561

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

751

BA

21,048
r
35
°556
21,298

5,223
H3
°191
5,370

20,287

20,896

Salaries and expenses

120
22,451
21,016

21,639
21,298

5,427
5,370

20,287
20,742

22,451

20,742

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

751

Total Federal funds General
Administration.
See footnotes at end of table.




0
BA
0

252

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

T
Q

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

estimate

DEPARTMENT ( 3F JUSTICE—Continued
LEGAL ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses, General Legal
Activities
751
Salaries and expenses,
Division

Antitrust
751

Salaries and expenses,
Attorneys and Marshals

U. S.
751

Fees and expenses of witnesses...751

B
A

60,989

0
B
A

59,978

0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A

63,565

60,420
"1 689
60,775

14,900
"583
15,268

21,595
"604
21,601

5,600
"214
5,693

23,426

36,100
"1,298
36,760

160,076

133,100

142,300
"3,668
142,771

14,200
11,962

16,480
15,650

4,000
3,798

19,177
19,453

3,750

3,940

4,131

18,253
17,781
131,158

64,729

23,380

160,968

Total Federal
Activities.

funds

Legal

0
B
A
0

3,569

3,842

985
"35
978

228,350
226,390

250,795
244,639

63,715
62,497

270,375
272,687

B
A

449,546
438,501

468,700
'206
"12,886
468,497

124 000
C
76
"4,665
125,794

466,777

0

Salaries and expenses, Community
Relations Service
751

208,000
"5,609
212,192

52,700
"1,990
54,305

221,581

48,000
r
538
"1,361

208.160

"99

4,157

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

460,055

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

751

181,320
178,765

B
A

167,750

186,200
'2,056
"4,085

>97

.

B
A
0

Salaries and expenses

>29

0
B
A
0

167,960

189,339

51,016

B
A
0
B
A
0

25,940
31,312

12,560
45,390

4,395
14,564

59,095
39,545

28,600
26,335

31,875
32,353

8,466
9,155

31,875
32,353

222,642

FEDERAL PRISON SYSTEM
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses, Bureau of
Prisons
753

National Institute of Corrections...754
Buildings and facilities

753

Support of United States prisoners

753
See footnotes at end of table




206,779
4,997
3,800

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

253

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE—Continued
FEDERAL PRISON SYSTEM-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Federal Prison Industries, Inc.:
Federal Prison industries fund .753
Limitation oti administrative
expenses.
Limitation on vocational expenses.
Total Federal funds
Prison System.
Trust

0

1,039
(1,559)
(4,415)

Federal

BA
0

prisons
753

0

222,290
226,646

(1,906)

(289)

(5,120)

(1,618)

(1,236)

(4,829)

236,873
267,082

62,789
74,735

304,127
282,477

Funds

Commissary funds, Federal
(trust revolving fund)

-233

LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

754

BA

887,171

809,672
"1,005

204,960
D
322

707,944

0

852,863

919,445

254,750

839,702

BA

135,723

149,859
D
3,142

41,758
°1,230

159,287

0

132,230

154,808

43,270

158,964

2,126,851
2,076,411

2,168,386
2,287,961

563,632
620,721

2,150,378
2,257,269

BA1
0 J

-9,013

-7,066

-2,792

-7,228

BA1
0 I

-258

-250

-62

-250

BA

2,117,580

2,161,070

560,778

2,142,900

0

2,067,140

2,280,645

617,867

2,249,791

DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
750
902
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

Total Department of Justice

~

-233

BA

2,117,580

2,161,070

560,778

2,142,900

0

2,066,907

2,280,645

617,867

2,249,791

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Program administration




BA

67,009

67,128
"1,629

16,670
"543

69,380

0
See footnotes at end of table.

504

69,462

72,976

17,213

73,481

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

254

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1975
actual

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—Continued
EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION
—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

6A

2,852,450

0

Employment and training assistance

2,803,020

504

638,000
'365.300

2,394,330
'400,000
2,394,330
'400,000

'485,000

'1,065,000

599,000

2,394,400
'440,300
3,273,050
'75,000

Community service employment for
older Americans
504

R
A
0

12,000
8 607

30,000
43 393

....

Temporary

R
A

875 000

..

0

319 209

1 625 000
M,700,000
2 180 791
"150,000

0

53 437

4 495

8A
0
B
A
0

2,365,000
748 648

410,000
1 333 308

95,000
400 000

860,000
860 000

64,400
-18,666

76,800
94,247

18,500
18,500

81,500
81,500

B
A

5 750 000

5 000 000

785,000

8,512,231

1,100,000

employment

assistance

504

Emergency employment

assistance
504

Federal unemployment benefits and
allowances
603
Grants to States for unemployment
insurance and employment
services
504
Advances to the unemployment trust
fund and other funds: Indefinite

5,000,000
"-1,200,000
5,700,000
M.200,000

603

0

504

0
B
A
0

11,985,859
4,759,980

11,745,257
15,739,491

729,713
3,024,013

7,605,210
9,374,311

B
A
0

-62

125
125

31
31

125
125

B
A
0
B
A

439,036
500,850

472,419
455,272

110,234
119,734

487,749
487,749

B
A
0

7,675,927
12,710,273

16,228,047
18,044,728

3,289,766
3,580,266

15,512,251
15,712,251
•'300,000

B
A
0
B
A
0

8,114,963
13,211,123

16,700,466
18,500,000

3,400,000
3,700,000

16,900,000
16,500,000

8,114,963
13,211,061

16,700,591
18,500,125

3,400,031
3,700,031

16,900,125
16,500,125

B
A

36,845

11,124

48,619

0

27,388

45,910
"1,043
44,838

11,961

46,742

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

Total Federal funds
Employment and Training
Administration.
Trust Funds
Gifts and bequests, National
Commission for Manpower Policy:
Permanent, indefinite
504
Unemployment trust fund:
(Training and employment):
Permanent, indefinite
504
(Unemployment insurance): Indefinite

-8,737

"900,000

CflO

Permanent, indefinite

Total, Unemployment trust fund
Total trust funds Employment
and Training Administration.
LABOR-MANAGEMENT SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

See footnotes at end of table.




505

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

255

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TO.
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—Continued
EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

505

BA

76,116

21,478
"740
22,218

92,445

71,991

85,500
"2,310
87,810

0

9,946
8,111

22,141
22,141

5,566
5,566

29,542
29,542

75,234
75,234

288,276
288,276

Special benefits:
(General retirement and disability
insurance)
601

BA
0

(Federal employee retirement and
disability)
602

BA
0

155,054
184,223

275,959
246,785

Total, Special benefits

BA

Trust

165,000

298,100

80,800

317,818

0

192,334

268,926

80,800

317,818

BA
0

Total Federal funds
Employment Standards
Administration.

"

92,445

241,116
264,325

385,910
356,736

103,018
103,018

410,263
410,263

BA
0

6,010
2,723

2,751
2,601

690
650

3,414
3,037

BA

102,006

116,025
"1,560

29,000
"534

127,970

91,086

119,330

31,352

124,940

Funds

Special workers' compensation
expenses: Permanent

601

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

553

0
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

553

-971

971

BA
0

102,006
90,115

117,585
120,301

29,534
31,352

127,970
124,940

BA

54,422

64,846
"1,256

16,100
"455

73,688

0

52,936

64,780

16,121

72,351

54,422
52,033

66,102
64,780

16,555
16,121

73,688
72,351

H8

45

BA

30,339

33,684
"879

8,524
"220

49,176

0

Total Federal funds
Occupational Safety and
Health Administration.

0

8,800

49,000

97

100

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

505

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

505

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
Trust

0
BA
0

-903

Funds

Special statistical work

505

0

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

505

See footnotes at end of table.




27,459

34,600

BA

200

70

0

Special foreign currency program.505

118

162

70

25g

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF L A B O R — C o n t i n u e d
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

505

0

-239

Consolidated working funds

505

0

-177

Total Federal funds
Departmental Management.

-44

-232

-212

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500

600
603
902
Total Federal funds

30,539
27,161

34,633
34,718

8J44
8,665

49,246
48,888

BA
0

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

12,450,787
5,221,002

12,396,440
16,360,864

899,027
3,195,130

8,314,996
10,077,495

BAl
0 J

-578

-492

-120

-492

BAl
0J
BAl
0J
BAl
0 J

-156

-135

-30

-135

-425

-107

-430

BA

0

-59
-393
12,449,601

12,395,388

898,770

8,313,939

5,219,816

16,359,812

3,194,873

10,076,438

8,120,973

16,703,342

3,400,721

16,903,539

13,213,902

18,502,771

3,700,681

16,503,162

-1,100,000

-4,500,000

3,199,491

20,717,478

5,795,554

22,079,600

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA

0
Interfund transactions

601

BAl
0 I

-148

603

BAl
0 I

-785,000

-8,512,231

BA " 19,785,426

20,586,499

0

26,350,352

Total Department of Labor

17,648,570

"

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

152

Representation allowances

152

BA

365,377

425,400
r
134
"7,412

119,100
{
49
"2,609

"539,800

0

152

425,789

120,792

505,300

1,350

1,700

525

"2,000

0
Acquisition, operation, and
maintenance of buildings abroad

378,865

BA

1,289

1,650

270

1,920

BA

22,914

29,840
"102

8,450
"36

"67,200

0

22,443

42,501

3,595

41,755

Acquisition, operation, and
maintenance of buildings abroad
(special foreign currency program)
152

BA
0

4,870
7,773

16,785
15,349

800
1,646

5,535
8,889

Emergencies in the diplomatic and
consular service
152

BA
0

2,100
2,055

2,100
2,000

600
580

"2,100
2,100

See footnotes at end of table.




257

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF STATE—Continued
ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Payment to Foreign Service
retirement and disability fund.152
Permanent, indefinite

BA

6,355

BA
0

22,700
29,055

6,355
'1,700
30,900
37,255
'1,700

1,590

"8,055

9,900
11,490

39,800
47,855

-100

1

-32

522,428
526,144

143,659
138,374

664,490
607,787

106,249
80,863
M,219
647
576
106,896
80,220

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

152

0

Consolidated working fund

152

0

Total Federal funds
Administration of Foreign
Affairs.
Trust

BA
0

-225
-243 ..
.
425,666
441,012

Funds

Foreign Service retirement
disability fund
Permanent, indefinite

and
602

'2,300

BA
BA
0

Total trust funds
Administration of
Affairs.

Foreign

23,738
18,759

BA
0
BA
0

637
675
105,726
55,997

647
576
96,903
66,463

158
163
23,896
18,755

BA

152

93,956
65,887

203,903

217,853

0

Miscellaneous appropriations:
Permanent, indefinite

105,089
55,322

203,677

217,878

189,764
'29,090
170,968
'29,090

BA

n
BA

34,495
5 658
7,008

0
BA
0
BA

6,372
7,400
6,028
1,900

0
BA
0

936
254,706
222,671

BA
0

45
62

M67

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND
CONFERENCES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Contributions to
organizations

international
152

Contributions for international
peacekeeping activities
152
Missions to international
organizations

152

International conferences and
contingencies
152
International trade negotiations ...152

Total Federal funds
International Organizations
and Conferences.
Trust




2,673
"50
2,620
1,775
1,500
739
"14
711
224,105
204,889

258,650
"45,000
45 000
"9,300
9,288
"7,035
5,970
"3,540
3,309
338,875
322,217

Funds

Gifts and bequests, National
Commission on Educational,
Scientific, and Cultural Cooperation:
Permanent, indefinite
152
See footnotes at end of table.

35,000
63 837 ..
.
9,000
"139
8,749
5,840
7,230
2,856
"39
2,779
270,727
300,473

"274,000

50
45

10
8

50
50

THE

258

B U D G E T FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF STATE—Continued
INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

International Boundary and Water
Commission, United States and
Mexico:
Salaries and expenses
301

BA

4,952

5,300
C

1,371
C

U
"35
1,529

"5,810

5,810
"3,919

0
Construction

301

4,924

125
'MOO
5,513

BA

6,231

8,365

830

13,575

1,630

6,486

450
"14

"1,840

0
American sections, international
commissions
301

BA

12,338
1,379

1,576
W
33

0

1,144

1,694

BA

4,060

4,730

0

International fisheries
commissions

3,881

4,760

302
"30

Total Federal funds
International Commissions.

BA
0

16,622
22,287

20,259
25,542

BA

53,300

0
International educational exchange
activities (special foreign currency
program)
153

0

Center for Cultural and Technical
Interchange Between East and
West
153

BA
0

Preservation of ancient Nubian
monuments (special foreign
currency program)
153
Educational exchange fund,
payments by Finland, World War I
debt: Permanent, indefinite 153

0

425

1,824

1,560
^442
"17

"5,500

1,577
*442

5,500

4J53
5,603

17,069
19,620

60,000
"385
"-5,000

13,000
"97
"-3,000

"58,500

50,300

56,348
"-2,650

19,113
"-2,500

52,621
"-2,400

47

50

6

20

7,400
7,363

9,000
9,000

2,350
2,350

"10,000
10,000

3

15

EDUCATIONAL EXCHANGE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Mutual educational and cultural
exchange activities
153

Total Federal funds Educational
Exchange.
Trust Funds
Educational exchange trust
Permanent, indefinite

funds:
153

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

13

15

352
410

352
375

61,052
58,133
196
198

64,737
63,138
325
276

352
375
12,447
18,972

68,852
60,631

90
91

225
251

800

"10,000

OTHER
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Migration and refugee assistance
See footnotes at end of table.




BA

28,443

0

151

31,660

16,900

"23
19,069

"8
3,528

10,693

259

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF STATE—Continued
OTHER—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Assistance to refugees from the BA
Soviet Union
151 0

40,000
44,540

20,000
37,350

Special assistance to refugees from BA
Cambodia and Vietnam
604 0

305,000
3,349

271,400

5,251

BA
0

141

1,896
654

550

Payment to the Republic of Panama: BA
Permanent
152 0

2,328
2,328

2,328
2,328

BA
0

375,771
82,018

41,147
330,801

808
9,329

15,108
17,741

BA
0

1,133,817
826,121

919,298
1,246,098

385,772
377,167

1,104,394
1,027,996

BAl
0 J

-518

-519

-130

-519

from the
150

BAl
0 J

-4,128

-6,028

-1,838

-5,921

300

BAl
0 I

-52

-55

-12

-55

301

BAl
0 J

-403

-400

-100

-400

400

0I

-1688

-1,750

-450

-1,750

-857

-864

-191

-855

1,126,171
818,475

909,682
1,236,482

383,051
374,446

1,094,894
1,018,496

105,967
56,257

97,278
66,784

23,996
18,854

107,171
80,521

BAl
0 i

-433

-300

-75

-300

BAl
0 J

-121

-250

-75

-150

BA
0

105,413
55,703

96,728
66,234

23,846
18,704

106,721
80,071

BAl
0J

-45,135

-55,635

-11,490

-64,535

1,186,449
829,043

950,775
1,247,081

395,407
381,660

1,137,080
1,034,032

International Center, Washington,
D.C. (special fund): Permanent,
indefinite
152

Total Federal funds Other....

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)..
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
152
Proprietary
public

receipts

902
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)..

from the
153

Interfund transactions
Total Department of State




BAl
0 J
BA "
0

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
intrafund transactions
602
Proprietary receipts
public
Total trust funds

BAl

152

BA
0

2,416

2,780
2,304
2,328
2,328

2gQ

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

.

T
Q
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

407

30,315

0
6A
0
BA
0
BA
0

40,079
33,420
34,264
1,158
1,167

0
0

-2,181
-8,218

-432
-4,713

-1,713

-5,170

BA
0

64~893
65,329

63,050
64,585

15,930
15,989

67,750
59,000

BA

660,085

718,154
c
3,354
"1,986
'14,660

205,612
c
1,339
"670
'4,991

"817,703

0

652,273

734,900

209,300

BA
0
BA
0

108,376
106,110
6,562
4,813

156,100
145,004
6,500
6,619

16,160
21,838
1,625
1,625

BA

105,000

115,650
"8,330

30,050
"3,345

0

104,875

115,650
"8,330

30,050
"3,345

28,912

31,200

10,175

0

Transportation planning, research,
and development
407
Grants-in-aid for natural gas pipeline
safety
407
Transportation research activities
overseas (special foreign currency
program)
407

BA

28,207

"51
'861
32,112

"19
'381
10,575

BA
0
BA
0
BA
BA
0

16,888
16,078
5,790
4,944

218

32,550
"600
33,880
28,000
33,800
1,650
1,750
250
300

8,930

"35,350

8,440
7,000
8,500

33,520
29,800
29,000
"2,500
1,600
100
50

600
162

Intragovernmentol funds:

Working capital fund
407
Consolidated working fund,
transportation systems center..407
Total Federal funds Office of
the Secretary.
COAST GUARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

Acquisition, construction,
improvements
Alteration of bridges
Retired pay

406

and
406
406
406

J

-1,000
811,900
-'-1,000
"171,100
129,100
8,600
8,600
147,103
M.322

147,103
M.322

Reserve training

406

Research, development, test, and
evaluation
406
State boating safety assistance...406
Pollution fund (special fund)
Permanent, indefinite

304

BA

1,832
6,742

18,600
18,515
5,790
6,290
10,000
2,000
8,000

4,650
4,534
1,450
2,262
1,250
1,000

"34,800

34,800
"19,000
18,500
5,790
5,790
5,000
5,000
8,000

Intragovernmental funds:

Coast Guard supply fund
See footnotes at end of table.




406

BA
0

-1,590

2,000
2,700

300

700

261

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
COAST GUARD—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:—Continued

Coast Guard yard fund
Total Federal
Guard.

6,592

-3,572

2,400

1,700

Coast

BA
0

933,445
929,044

1,095,236
1,074,548

281,717
287,229

1,211,774
1,163,871

fund:
406

BA
0

5
6

30
30

8
8
-5

30
30
41

406
funds

Trust Funds
Coast Guard general gift
Permanent, indefinite

Miscellaneous trust revolving funds .406
Total trust funds Coast Guard...

0

-246

30

BA
0

5
-240

30
60

BA

1,419,500

1,525,000
"43,700
•/-148.614
1,553,485
M48.614

396,000
15,100
M l 7,511
418,050
M17.511

M78.732
1,650,330
•'-478,732

30
71

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operations

405

1,394,715
Facilities, engineering
development

and

D

1,677,519

Operation and maintenance,
Metropolitan Washington Airports
405

Construction, Metropolitan
Washington Airports

405

Civil supersonic aircraft development
termination
405
Safety regulation
United States International
Aeronautical Exposition

405

BA
0

11,821
8,648

12,250
16,200

2,925
4,400

14,602
14,500

B
A

16,310

17,757

17,527
'700
"600
18,150
'700

4,450
'175
"240
4,386
'175

20,700

0

405

BA
0

5,500
2,776

11,625
9,200

2,500

0

13,363

2,442

0

1,174

1,535

-10

232

-5,928

37

-1

1

1,453,131
1,432,494

20,000
8,100
9,800

225

0
405

Public enterprise funds:

Aviation war risk insurance revolving
fund
405

0
9

37

1,462,788
1,453,368

301,379
312,234

1,242,189
1,215,935

350,000

87,500

0

(280,000)
291,870

(370,000)
375,000

(92,500)
95,000

350,000
(355,000)
355,000

BA
0

227,278
223,351

245,537
226,000

51,269

226,595
226,418

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated
integrated
program

working fund,
grant administration
405

Total Federal funds Federal
Aviation Administration.
Trust Funds
Grants-in-aid for airports (Airport and
airway trust fund):
405
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority
Facilities and equipment (Airport and
airway trust fund)
405
See footnotes at end of table.




0

BA
0

BA
BA

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

262

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Trust Funds—Continued
Research, engineering and development
BA
(Airport and airway trust fund) ....405
0
Operations (Airport and airway trust
fund)
405

67,500
70,450
7
148,614
-137
'148,614
811,651
819,927

17,900
14,000
'117,511

76,700
73,000
'476,422

222,911
277,780

'47M22
1,129,717
1,130,840

6,500
D
167
6,942
1,000

1,625
D
59
1,679
20
5

(25,000)
29,657

(30,000)
46,800

(7,500)
11,055

32,000
(40,000)
40,000

(4,500)
5,666
13,510
9,451

(3,300)
2,600
4,900
14,000

650

17,000
(6,500)
7,100

0
BA
0

10,009
(4,000)
2,625
360
670

8,000
(4,000)
4,600
467
1,230

BA

10,000

57,900
63,612

BA
0

225

BA
0

285,178
579,058

404

B
A

6,087

Highway beautification
404
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA
BA

Total trust funds Federal
Aviation Administration.
FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Motor carrier safety

Highway-related safety grants: 404
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

Darien Gap Highway

0
BA
0

4,703
999
75.000 .

151

Territorial highways:
404
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....
Railroad-highway crossings
demonstration projects
404
National scenic and recreational
highway-.
404
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....
Alaska Highway

404

Off-systems roads:
404
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....
Access highways to public recreation
areas on certain lakes
404
Miscellaneous accounts
404
Liquidation of contract authority....
Total Federal funds Federal
Highway Administration.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA

BA
0 .
BA

0
BA
0

6,750

1500

7,000

(1,000)
1,150
320

(3,400)
4,500
3,333
1,067

1,000

1,500

(8,200)
8,200
15,000
3,900

(10,000)
10,000
10,000
750

(2,500)
2,500

(92,000)
92,000

4,825
200,000

0 .
BA ..
.
0 .
.
BA

6,949

3,860
(18,490)
40,187
324,650
92,959

900

1,900

1,060
1,934
24,314

10,100
74,282
182,517

11,000
15,544
42,034
103,466

263

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Trust

Funds

Federal-aid highways (trust fund): 404
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

-390,000
3,475,000
(5,733,800)
'(1,350,000)
5,070,928
4,692,405
'1,350,000
(128,170)
(142,480)
D
(3,044)

146,095
6,282,500
(4,685,840)

BA
BA

0
Limitation on general operating
expenses.
Right-of-way revolving fund (trust
revolving fund)
404
Liquidation of contract authority
Baltimore-Washington Parkway (trust
fund)
404
Highland scenic highway (liquidation of
contract aut horization) (trust fund):
404
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority
Trust fund share of other highway
programs
404
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority
Highway safety
development

research

and

Overseas highway

404
404

Other Federal Highway Administration
trust funds: Permanent
151
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

(20,000)
37,006
1,544
148

BA
0

BA
0
BA

8,685

BA

59,491
(7,500)
8,162
8,685

BA
0
BA
0

50
0
2,637

BA

BA

42,764

0

Total trust funds Federal
Highway Administration.

0
BA
0

4,254
(4,467)
5,770
6,514,391
4,743,491

39,106

BA

(20,000)
36,900
1,000

(1,348,950)

-245,000
6,700,000
(6,550,000)

1,881,726

6,720,000

(35,916)
(l,081)

(152,300)

(5,000)
5,000

(46,600)
46,600
6,900
2,000

D

600

15,000
(15,000)
15,000
10,933
(11,700)
18,660
9,000
17,685
500
200
31,300
(7,079)
25,500
3,151,733
6,535,873

6,667
(3,000)
4,700
2,250
2,250

(33,620)
36,033
9,000
9,000

50
8,100

750
31,000

1,100
10,350
1,902,426

33,100
6,508,567
6,847,483

11,850
D
130
11,960

73,980

NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Traffic and highway safety

404

State and community highway
safety:
404
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....
Total Federal funds National
Highway Traffic Safety
Administration.
See footnotes at end of table.

210-000 O - 76 - 18




BA
BA
BA
BA
0
BA
0

38,896
°374
46,970

57,070
103,000

..
.
2,250 ..
..
(10,860)
5,168
45,014
44,274

(2,000)
3,000
39,270
49,970

(500)
500
11,980
12,460

(12,000)
13,000
176,980
70,070

264

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY
ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Trust

Funds

Trust fund share of highway safety
programs
404
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

BA

28,110

BA

BA
0

195,750
(85,140)
105,368
-10
223,860
105,358

0
Gifts and donations
Total trust funds
Highway Traffic
Administration.

404
National
Safety

0

28,904
"280
56,500
(69,000)
115,030
11 ..
.
85,684
115,041

6,300
D
100
(19,500)
29,540

(80,000)
100,230

6,400
29,540

100,230

FEOERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Office of the administrator

404

BA

3,782

Railroad transportation employment
and improvement
404

BA

5,000

5,900
"175
6,168
16,200
D
383
16,367
61,150
54,800
1,500
180
85,000
"236,000
97,108
"236,000
90,000

0
Railroad safety

404

BA

3,289
11,794

Railroad research and development
404

BA
0

Grants-in-aid for railroad safety ...404

BA
0

Rail service assistance

BA

9,439
47,550
51,078
965
53
135,200

0

169,004

Grants to National Railroad
Passenger Corporation
404

BA
0

Emergency rail facilities restoration
404

0

276,500
299,000
2,046

440,000
340,000
1,432

BA
0

6,031

9,000

-1,609

7,764

BA
0

486,822

945,308

185,952

767,530

532,300

759,819

154,888

612,677

BA
BA

51.010
8,766,166
(450,000)

64,300
615,700
(1,190,300)
"(100,000)
1,240,000
"100,000

14,400
-14,400
(325,000)

88,600
566,400
(1,510,000)

370,000

1,585,000

0

404

1,400
"56
1,459
4,050
D
121
6,179
13,650
13,200
375
375
8,600
"15,000
9,575
"5,000
18,000
124,700
118,000

5,800
5,793
"18,500
17,133
53,000
40,424
"2,000
1,731
"198,530
71,505
"10,000
483,700
462,000

Public enterprise funds:

Alaska Railroad revolving fund

404

Total Federal funds Federal
Railroad Administration.

6,000

1,100
"

4,091

URBAN MASS TRANSPORTATION
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Urban mass transportation fund..404
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

753,246
See footnotes at end of table.




265

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT
CORPORATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Saint Lawrence Seaway Development
Corporation fund
406
Limitation on administrative
expenses.
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

902

-976

-968

-797

(923)

(982!

(250)

°(24)

(886)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400

°(8)

12,125,131
3,848,146

798,892
1,176,317

4,195,505
4,888,102

-24,135

BA}
0 J

4,327,686
4,844,780
-26,267

-15,721

-71,100

-96

BA1
0 J

-51

-96

-104

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
151

902
Total trust funds

12,100,900
3,823,915

4,301,323
4,818,417

783,120
1,160,545

4,124,301
4,816,898

BA
0

Total Federal funds

Total Department
Transportation.

-1,500

0

7,023,434
5,427,667

4,049,098
7,470,901

239,669
2,209,749

7,638,314
8,078,624

-5,005

-36,249

-7,300

-28,900

4,012,849
7,434,652

232,369
2,202,449

7,609,414
8,049,724

BA1
0 J

-16

BA1
0 J
BA
0
BA

of

7,018,413
5,422,646
19,119.313

8,314,172

1,015,489

11,733,715

9,246,561

12,253,069

3,362,994

12,866,622

6,760

26,972

0

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses, Office of the
Secretary
803

Office of Revenue Sharing

851

26,145

B
A

27,042

D

22,684

"572
30,117

201
7,600

25,973

2 948

0
R
A

738

3 810

2,908

759

3,738

Salaries and expenses, Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center....751

BA
0

3,115
2,803

12,000
11,000

3,500
3,400

8,450
8,250

Construction, Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center....751

BA
0

18,915
293

4,053

5,252

9,078

Expenses for economic stabilization
(liquidating functions)
802

BA
0

Presidential election campaign fund:
Permanent, indefinite
806

BA

0

See footnotes at end of table.




n

....

2,000
1 561
61,675

305
40,000
31,000

35,000
40,000

....

266

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY—Continued
Federal
Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Miscellaneous permanent
appropriations (special
Permanent, indefinite

funds):
803

6A
0

23
23

0

28

0

-3,124

0

18
18

16
20

62

Public enterprise funds:

Liquidation of Federal Farm
Mortgage Corporation
803
Liquidation of Reconstruction
Finance Corporation
803
Liquidation of Home Owners' Loan
Corporation
803

-446

-424

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund
803 0
Total Federal funds Office of BA
the Secretary.
0
Pershing Hall
Permanent

Trust Funds
memorial fund:

BA
705 0

55
111,873
24,385
7
7

-83
82,768
78,874

-25
11,276
56,991

-80
74,250
46,553
7
7

7
7 ..
..

BUREAU OF GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL
OPERATIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

803 BA

127,369

126,785
Special payment to recipients of
certain retirement and survivor
benefits
601
New York City seasonal financing
fund, administrative expenses .852
Claims, judgments, and relief acts
806
Permanent, indefinite

BA
0

1,750,000
1 678 074

BA
0
BA

163,653

BA
0

20,485
179,332

Interest on uninvested funds:
BA
Permanent, indefinite
902 0
Payment of Government losses in BA
shipment: Indefinite
803 0
Eisenhower College grants
502 BA
0
Grants to Hoover Institution on War, BA
Revolution, and Peace
503 0

8,279
8,031
600
210
9,000
8 333 .

120,000
"10,573
C
68
"1,084
123,961
"10,573

30,000
"4,944
V
2
"404
30,725
"4,944

147,229

315
315

1,250
1250

'67,205
6,000
6,000
'67,205

'225,889
23,000
23,000
'225,889
8,025
8,025
500
497

149,255

71926
1,000
1000
43,472
'201,954
23,000
71,679
'201.954
8,076
8,076
700
754
1,000

1,983
1,983
175
175

1,667
7,000
2,000

50
0

3,000

Public enterprise funds:

Check forgery insurance fund
803 0
New York City seasonal financing BA
fund
852
See footnotes at end of table.




1

3 ..
.
2.300.000

3

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

267

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
BUREAU OF GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL
OPERATIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Fishermen's protective fund

403

BA

0
Total Federal funds Bureau of
Government Financial
Operations.

3,000

1,696

2,104

2,082,386
2,002,462

2,717,927
494,030

BA
0

18
18

BA

0

Trust

BA
0

741
"

111,028
111,847

405,893
413,327

18
18

4
4

18
18

94,400

106,839
"2,858

26,709
"991

125,315

94,828

108,313

25,883

123,396

292,400

310,000
"9,077

77,500
"3,388

324,059

Funds

Bureau of Government Financial
Operations trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
806
BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND
FIREARMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

CUSTOMS SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

BA

0

298,539

337,691

79,655

322,539

Miscellaneous permanent accounts
(special funds): Permanent,
indefinite
852

BA
0

169,404
179,889

225,000
225,000

56,250
56,250

230,000
230,000

Total Federal funds Customs

BA

461,804

544,077

137,138

554,059

0

478,428

562,691

135,905

552,539

3,784
3,440

3,000
3,000

800
800

3,500
3,500

Service.
Trust

Funds

Refunds, transfers and expenses,
unclaimed, abandoned and seized
goods: Permanent, indefinite
803

BA
0

BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Air-conditioning of the Bureau of
Engraving and Printing buildings
803

0

16

Bureau of Engraving and Printing
fund
803

0

-4,373

2,454

133

-218

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Engraving and Printing.

0

-4,357

2,454

133

-218

34,600
33,259

41,230
39,589

10,308
9,898

43,215
42,500

Intragovernmental funds:

BUREAU OF THE MINT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
See footnotes at end of table.




803 BA
0

268

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TO.
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
BUREAU OF THE MINT—Continued

Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Construction of mint facilities i 8 803
C t t i
f it f i l i t
0 3

BA
0

780

3,312

Coinage profit fund (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
803

BA
0

2,178
2,162

2,818
3,369

800
876

3,500
3,500

Total Federal funds Bureau of
the Mint.

BA
0

36,778
35,421

47,398
46,008

11,108
11,554

46,715
49,312

B
A

97,117

98,000
'6,493

24,500
'2,078

114,497

"1,108

3,350
3,050

..

BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administering the public debt

803

100,222

99,402
'5,857

"376
25,462
'2,078

41,970

44,500
"1,325
45,649

11,125
"460
11,513

46,700

771,500
D
20,240
789,819

192,875
"6,815
198,840

789,900

830,000
"23,955
852,126

207,500
"8,340
214,885

834,900

113,977
'636

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

803

BA
0

Accounts, collection
service

and taxpayer
803

BA

42,825
733,600

0
803

Payment where credit exceeds
liability for tax: Permanent... .604

731,096

BA

811,000

0

Compliance

827,859

BA ...

784,055

828,883
600,000
600,000

1,200,000
1.200,000

n

46,350

Refunding internal revenue
collections, interest: Permanent
902

BA
0

235,628
235,628

334,000
334,000

61,500
61,500

396,000
396,000

Internal revenue collections for
Puerto Rico (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
852

BA
0

111,758
121,519

114,000
114,000

23,500
23,500

114,000
114,000

fund:
803

BA
0

500
114

-80

Internal

BA
0

1,934,456
1,959,041

3,339,520
3,335,514

512,115
510,238

2,781,500
2,769,288

751

B
A

82,800
82.108

30,860
"800
30.980

110,250

0

105,750
"2,200
107.020

Public enterprise funds:

Federal tax lien
Indefinite

revolving

Total Federal funds
Revenue Service.
SECRET SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

See footnotes at end of table




108.250

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

269

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
SECRET SERVICE—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

85,733
85,775

2,600
2,550
110,550
109,570

500
500
32,160
31,480

4,000
4,000
114,250
112,250

7,804

16,715

-10,620

3,874

BA
0

32,665,008
32,665,008

37,700,000
37,700,000

10,400,000
10,400,000

45,000,000
45,000,000

BA
0

6,204,780
6,204,780

6,354,780
6,354,780

1,626,195
1,626,195

"6,542,280
6,542,280

BA
0

6,204,780
6,137,917

6,354,780
6,272,430

1,626,195
1,626,589

"6,542,280
6,548,504

BA
0

Contribution for annuity benefits:
Permanent, indefinite
751
Total Federal funds Secret
Service.

43,774,335
43,645,993

51,112,341
48,897,493

12,895,688
12,937,766

55,758,759
55,723,340

BA
0
BA
0

2,933
3,667

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE
CURRENCY
Trust

Funds

Assessment funds (trust revolving fund)
403

0

INTEREST ON THE PUBLIC DEBT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Interest on the public
Permanent, indefinite

debt:
901

GENERAL REVENUE SHARING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payments to State and local
government fiscal assistance trust
fund: Permanent
851
Trust Funds
State and local government fiscal
assistance trust fund: Permanent

851
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
155
803
902
Receipts from off-budget Federal
agencies
155

902
Proprietary
public

receipts

from

the
050

150
800
See footnotes at end of table.




BA1..
0J
-573
BA1
0J
BA1 -1,206,021
0J
BA1
-50,000
0J
BA1
-454,727
0J
-3,879
BA1
0I
-208,927
BA1
0J
-191,968
BAl
0J

-50,000
-640

-160

-650

-261,396

-1,394,836

-1,253,809

-360,000

-2,252,497

-2,540

-640

-2,500

-209,320

-23,800

-202,234

-141,061

-19,985

-101,991

-1,538,201
-50,000

THE

270

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Federal funds:—Continued

902

BA1

-158,807

-186,654

-19,590

-218,458

47,730,116 " 12,210,117
45,515,268
12,252,195

51,535,593
51,500,174

0 I
Total Federal funds

BA
0

41,499,433
41,371,091

BA
0

6,208,589
6,149,186

6,357,805
6,292,170

1,626,999
1,616,773

6,545,805
6,555,903

BA1

-130,109

-145,000

-36,250

-145,000

-6,354,780

-1,626,195

-6,542,280

47,588,141
45,307,658

12,174,671
12,206,523

51,394,118
51,368,797

Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Interfund transactions

803

851
Total Department
Treasury.

of the

0 J
BA! -6,213,019
0 J
BA 41,364,894
0
41,177,149

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses:
(Atomic energy defense activities)
053

BA

1,229,542

0

1,218,554

(General science and basic
BA
research)
251 0
(Energy)

305

BA
0

Total, Operating expenses

1,359,478
"30,000
D
550
1,303,522
"22,500

368,422
"23,000
D
195
348,075
"17,500

"1,558,140

318,953
309,766

358,300
343,500

93,530
90,300

"381,300
366,900

1,162,832

1,839,481
"6,326
'-21,700
1,581,797
'-21,700
3,572,435
3,229,619
6,650
3,150

588,386
"2,232
'-4,000
485,496
'-4,000
1,071,765
937,371

"2,682,186

500

2,000

266,996
"4,000
291,109
"4,000

60,070

"385,151

77,803

311,218

66,100
56,497
595,571
"6,000
486,993
"4,000

11,375
16,890
122,571
"35,000
153,199
'5,000

"99,700
67,200
"981,643

938,667
842,599

229,016
252,892

1,466,494
1,123,615
"50,000
4,400

930,128

(General science
research)
(Energy)

and basic
251
305

Total, Plant and capital
equipment.
Geothermal resources development
fund
305
See footnotes at end of table.




BA

254,818
287,352

BA
0
BA

62,115
64,558
483,820

0

Plant and capital equipment:
(Atomic energy defense activities)
053

2,711,327
2,458,448

0

Special foreign currency program.305

BA
0
BA
0

354,621

BA
0
BA
0

800,753
706,531

1,508,610
"13,000

'-90,800
2,383,007
•'-90,800
4,530,826
4,180,717

713,197
'32,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

271

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Synthetic Fuels Commercial
Demonstration Fund
305
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.
Total Federal funds Energy
Research and Development
Administration.

BA

3,000

BA
0

'500,000
'3,000

305

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

5,020,752
4,078,368

BA
0

13,389
13,370

BA

Trust Funds
cooperative work:

3,512,080
3,164,979

0

Advances for
Permanent

BA
0

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
305

BA1
0 I

Total trust funds

0

Total Energy Research and
Development Administration.

BA
0

'1,000
'1,000
1,301,781
1,191,763

6,047,320
5,310,732

10,275
10,339

2,570
2,570

10,275
10,275

3,512,080

5,020,752

1,301,781

6,047,320

3,164,979

4,078,368

1,191,763

5,310,732

13,389
13,370

10,275
10,339

2,570
2,570

10,275
10,275

-13,389

-10,275

-2,570

-10,275

1,301,781
1,191,763

6,047,320
5,310,732

^19
3,512,080
3,164,960

"

64 "
5,020,752
4,078,432

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Agency and regional management

304
Energy research and development

BA

60,364

70,758

18,423

0

53,868

68,000

15,000

67,538

66,000

BA

134,000

100,550

21,140

"96,973

305
Research and development

0

23,204

120,000

24,000

120,000

304

BA

166,532

166,466

41,823

"159,476

0

Buildings and facilities

304
304

Construction grants:
304
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

177,000

56,000

160,000

286,815
150,000
(26,000)

374,925

92,299

"329,544

(65,000)

(19,000)

(49,182)

265,349

392,000

124,000

305,000

BA

51,096

52,721

13,731

"56,561

0

Enforcement

166,608

BA
BA

0

Abatement and control
304
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

51,637

53,000

15,000

56,000

BA
0

1,529
3

2,100
612

500
1,000

2,100
2,000

BA

7,666,230
(1,400,000)

(500,000)

(600,000)

(4,100,000)

1,937,575

2,350,000

600,000

3,770,000

3,512

4,000
5,000

670
1,000

6,000
5,000

28,691

27,000

2,000

16,000

0
Scientific activities overseas (Special
foreign currency program)
304

BA
0

Operations, research, and facilities
304

0

See footnotes at end of table.




272

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for certification and
other services
304

0

-246

-10

-50

188,586
837,990

-39

718,192
4,499,950

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

304

Total Federal funds
Environmental Protection
Agency.
Trust

0

487

337 .

BA
0

8,516,566
2,530,688

B
A
0

28
6

BA
0

8,516,566
2,530,688

771,520
3,192,910

188,586
837,990

718,192
4,499,950

-206

-310

-76

-310

BA
0

8,516,360
2,530,482

771,210
3,192,600

188,510
837,914

717,882
4,499,640

BA
0

28
6

BAl

-26

188,510
837,914

717,882
4,499,640

771,520
3,192,910

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds-. Permanent
indefinite
304

9
90 .

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from
the
public
304

Total Federal funds

BAl
0 J

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
304

Total Environmental
Agency.

Protection

-9

.

0 I
BA
0

Total trust funds

9 .
90

2
-20

BA
0

8,516,362
2,530,462

81 .
771,210
3,192,681

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
REAL PROPERTY ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Real property miscellaneous
accounts:
(Federal judicial activities)
752

0

2,008

3,100

156

0

9,128

10,000

210

Total, Real property
miscellaneous accounts.

0

11,136

13,100

366

Disposal of surplus real and related
personal property, operating
expenses
.
.
804

BA

7,156
5,712

1,450
"60
1,510

6,205

0

6,000
"180
6,180

Expenses, disposal of surplus real
and related personal property
(special fund): Permanent,
indefinite
804

BA
0

915
824

1,500
1,100

375
600

1,000
1,000

125,697

35,717

2,032

-10,324

(General property
management)

and records
804

6,205

Intragovernmental funds:

Federal buildings fund
See footnotes at end of table.




804

0

273

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Continued
REAL PROPERTY ACTIVITIES-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:—Continued

Construction services fund

804

Consolidated working
property activities

real
804

fund,

0
0

2,355

-17,293 ...
-1,213

-303

-109

Real

BA
0

8,071
145,724

7,680
37,591

1,885
4,205

7,205
-3,228

BA

166,074

154,815

151,552

164,866
"667
158,694

41,601

0

Total Federal funds
Property Activities.

BA .
0
0
BA
0

8,311
-199
166,074
159,664

40,000
10,014
-95
205,533
168,613

B
A

51,294

60,200

0
B
A

52,625

57,837

1,305

1,350

PERSONAL PROPERTY ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Federal Supply Service, operating
expenses
804

°196

39,520

154,729

-8
41,797
39,512

-19,997
145
154,815
134,877

Intragovernmental funds:

General supply fund

804

Working capital fund

804

Total Federal funds Personal
Property Activities.
RECOROS ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Archives and Records
Service, operating expenses 804
Records declassification

804

Trust

0
B
A
0

64,439

1,410

64,513

1,276

1,394

337
"15
352

52,599
53,901

61,594
59,231

15,776
15,702

65,849
65,923

-249

-464

-75

-400

D

44

Total Federal funds Records
Activities.

15,050
D
374
15,350

1,410

Funds

National archives trust fund (revolving)
804

0

National archives gift fund

B
A
0

528
737

65
225

21
21

35
41

B
A
0

528
488

65
-239

21
-54

-359

1,812

7,651

n
1,879

7,447

-526

-1,961

Total trust
Activities.

funds

804
Records

35

AUTOMATED DATA AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS
ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Automated Data and
Telecommunications Service,
operating expenses
804

B
A

7,121

0

7,020

7,250
D
210
8,051

0

-3,165

-5,744

n

Intragovernmental funds:

Federal telecommunications fund.804
See footnotes at end of table.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

274

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Continued
AUTOMATED DATA AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS
ACTIVITIES—Continued

Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:—Continued

-3,117

-6,000

-834

4,500

B
A
0

7,121

1,885

738

7,460
-3,693

519

7,651
9,986

0

4,494

2,162

175

1,025

0

-548

-500

-125

-500

0

196

122

0

4,142

1,784

50

525

Federal Preparedness Agency,
salaries and expenses
054

6A

7,650

15,500
'150
"360

16,380

6,212

15,763

3,875
c
'46
D
124
3,966

Defense mobilization
Federal agencies

of
054

BA
0

1,500
2,052

393

Expenses, Defense Production Act
054

BA
0

State and local preparedness

054

0

loan
054

0

-29

-27

-7

-27

William Langer Jewel bearing plant
revolving fund
054

0

-320

93

-27

-32

Total Federal funds
Preparedness Activities.

BA
0

9,150

16,010

7,915

16,437

4,045
3,932

26,920
26,319

and agency
804

BA

10,807

12,000
"183

3,000
"114

12,636

0

9,545

11,635

2,959

12,636

Federal management policy, salaries
and expenses
804

BA
0

1,748

1,100

275

1,575

1,145

Automatic data processing fund ..804
Total Federal funds Automated
Data and
Telecommunications
Activities.

0

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL
ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Property Management and Disposal
Service, Operating expenses
(special fund):
(General property and records
management)
804
Strategic and critical materials....054
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund,
Emergency health activities

054

Total Federal funds Property
Management and Disposal
activities.
PREPAREDNESS ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

functions

15,838

10,540

10,540
215

Public enterprise funds:

Defense Production Act,
guarantee activities

6ENERAL ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General management
operations

See footnotes at end of table.




275

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ

estimate

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Continued
GENERAL ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Indian trust accounting

806 BA

2,549

2,600
W
75
2,673
275
275

Administrative and staff support
services, salaries and expenses
804
Consumer information center 403

BA
0
BA
0
BA

2,417
160
150
100
91
47,989

0
BA

43,917
996

Refunds under Renegotiation Act:
Indefinite
902

BA ..
0

Office of Administrator, salaries and
expenses
804

0

10
157

968
1,000
531
36

Reconstruction Finance Corporation
liquidation fund
804

0

-174

0

-891

-884

831.
64,349
58,442

185
70,256 ~
68,125

650
25
672
68
68

2,702

17

Virgin Islands Corporation liquidation
fund
804

D

Allowances and office staff for
former Presidents
802
Expenses, presidential transition..802

814

9
50,572
D
1,397
51,535
1,054

2,686
280
280
900
900
65,170

12,662
D
473
12,980
264
D
5
246

63,828
1,073

125

390

-211

-807

984

Public enterprise funds:

Intragovernmental funds:

Administrative operations fund 804 0
Total Federal funds General BA
activities.
0
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for .offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
054

BA 1

0J
902 BA1
0 J
Proprietary
public

receipts

from

the BA)
054 0 I

800

BA I
0J
902 BA1

0I

Total Federal funds

BA
0

Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Total General Services
Administration.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0
BA
0

17,536
16,839

82,761
80,897

368,533
348,088

82,924
80,759

345,201
315,299

-990,852

-124,000

-26,000

-870,000

-52,130

-37,995

-9,647

-50,115

206,538
186,093
65
-239
206,603 "
185,854

47,277
45,112
21
-54
47,298
45,058

-574,914
-604,816
35
-359
-574,879
-605,175

307,364
430,526
-8,630
-3,241

-214
-747,703
-624,541
528
488
-747,175
-624,053

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research and development:
(Manned space flight)

253

technology)

(Supporting space activities) ...255
(Air transportation)

405

Total, Research
development.

and

Construction of facilities:
(Manned space flight)

253

1,415,400

374,600

"1,515,425

1,184,345

1,341,600

349,300

1,469,200

8A

787,563

838,330

216,800

"788,500

0

806,972

825,800

200,000

828,100

BA
0

253,500
257,010

248,300
260,000

65,400
62,700

"265,900
262,000

BA

166,400

175,350

43,800

"189,100

172,060

180,300

43,900

177,000

BA
0

:....254

1,116,100

0

(Space science, applications, and

BA

0

2,323,563
2,420,387

2,677,380
2,607,700

700,600
655,900

2,758,925
2,736,300

(Space science, applications, and

technology)

254

BA

77,185

47,220

0

34,976

65,600

BA

19,430

8,549

10,400

BA

36,295

30,275

10,750

0

34,968

32,400

4,500

(Air transportation)

BA

9,745

4,635

0
Total, Construction of facilities.

BA

59,900
"9,400

(Supporting space activities) ...255
405

0

"39,825

25,500

6,814

500

7,600
"45,845

42,200
"28,950

6,400

700

16,000

142,655

82,130

10,750

124,020

85,307

114,800

31,200

125,700

317,050

319,600

90,550

"335,725

0

315,350

8,240
327,515

"3,015
93,730

BA

270,073

274,600
"7,075

77,300
"2,575

0

268,640

281,400

80,010

289,000

40,054

41,712
"1,075

11,233
"375

"43,100

0
Research and program management-.
(Manned space flight)
253

(Space science, applications, and
technology)
254
(Supporting space activities) ...255

BA

BA

0
(Air transportation)

405

BA

D

39,840

42,730

11,645

43,100

137,698

139,600
"3,596

34,595
"1,152

"146,200

0

136,967

143,055

Total, Research and program
management.

BA
0

764,875
760,797

795,498
794,700

Total Federal funds National
Aeronautics and Space
Administration.

BA
0

3,231,093
3,266,491

3,555,008
3,517,200

Trust

335,700
"289,030

35,815
~

146,200

220,795
221,200

814,055
814,000

932,145
908,300

3,697,000
3,676,000

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds-. Permanent,

indefinite
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

255

BA

1,723

0

3,931

735

2,900

100

800

2,100




3,231,093

3,555,008

932,145

3,697,000

0
See footnotes at end of table.

BA

3,266,491

3,517,200

908,300

3,676,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

277

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
250
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA1
0 i
BA "
0

-1,991

-2,165

3,229,102
3,264,500

3,552,843
3,515,035

1,723

735
2,900
-735

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
255

3,931

BA

-1,723

Total trust funds

0

Total National Aeronautics and
Space Administration.

BA
0

-400

-2,000

931,745

3,695,000

907,900

3,674,000

800

2,100

100

-100

2,208

2,165

800

2,000

3,229,102

3,552,843

931,745

3,695,000

3,266,708

3,517,200

908,700

3,676,000

1,175,928
"123,566
1,163,369
"143,085
734,840
'48,534
726,996
"56,200
55,632
'U00
'-21,000
55,035
"1,215
'-21,000
1,966,400
"173,300
'-21,000
1,945,400
"200,500
'-21,000
1,039,472
"120,000
'-68,300
1,022,472
"120,000
'-68,300
2,450
2,400

5,199,951

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Compensation and pensions:
(Veterans service-connected
compensation)
701

4,654,449

0

4,679,956

B
A

2,724,136

0

(Veterans non-service-connected
pension)
701

B
A

2,739,065

4,703,978
'450,932
4,707,582
"406,190
2,824,404
'97,168
2,826,568
'87,525
171,318
'1,400

..702

Veterans insurance and indemnities
701
See footnotes at end of table.




161,686

171,454
"1,285

BA

7,539,400

7,699,700
"549,500

7,580,708

7,705,604
"495,000

BA

4,476,229

5,414,475
"800,000

0

Readjustment benefits..

and
701

160,815

0

Total, Compensation
pensions

B
A

0

(Other veterans income security
programs)
701

4,591,079

5,275,375
"745,000

8,750
9,055

6,600
6,100

BA
0

"25,223
2,771,691
2,*768t847
"1,977
181,758
181,540
"100
'-85,000
8,153,400
'-85,000
8,145,100
"27,300
'-85,000
4,873,000
'-712,500
4,900,000
"55,000
'-712,500
7,000
7,800

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

278

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
703

B
A

3,317,520

3,666,711
"108,390
'18,000
°71,355

0

Medical care

3,405,059

3,728,030
"41,001

91,377

4,172,232

0
Medical administration and
miscellaneous operating expenses

703

93,196

B
A

37,508

0

36,187

95,000

24,714

97,433

"17

"2,309
97,211

°813
25,453

"46

8A

"-130,000
4,158,533
"3,174
'-130,000

"47

Medical and prosthetic research ..703

949,413
"31,235
9,069
"25,353
"-30,000
906,109
"29,750
'-30,000

"18

38,528
"381
"670
39,670
"365

10,230
"134
°240
10,330
"122

39,941

462,450
"12,600
'400
D
12,150
472,083
"12,000

112,164
"4,800
c
200
"4,066
108,860
"4,636

512,883

97,433

39,913

705

"28

Construction of hospital
domiciliary facilities

and
703

Construction, major projects

703

Construction, minor projects

703

B
A

432,028

0

General operating expenses

444,566

0

12,728

7,803

1203

251,127
67,913

297,464
99,498

15,860
46,034

117,531
197,000

51,894

106,426

16,490

93,061

B
A
0
B
A

DACQ

0

38,251
9,700
3,441

Grants for construction and
operation of State cemeteries ..705

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

Assistance for health
training institutions

B
A
0

10,000
5,937
1 828
71,555

Grants for construction
extended care facilities

of State
703

Grants to the Republic
Philippines

of the
703

manpower
703

2,050
1,975

78,388
10,000 .
5,638
2,100
2,150

#17ft
1 /U

511,683
"764

25,754

105,592

1,400

10,000
5,217

525
525

2,100
2,100
'5,000
'4,000

30,000
42,476

8,332
9,084

35,000
42,000

Public enterprise funds:

Loan guaranty revolving fund

704

B
A
0

5,000

50,000

-161,000

Direct loan revolving fund

704

0
0

-41,447

-101,000

-19,000

-210,000

-304

-1,350

-200

-1,650

Service-disabled veterans insurance
fund
701

0

-1,161

1,600

200

-100

Veterans reopened insurance fund
701

0

-32,387

-32,400

-8,400

-32,000

Education loan fund

B
A
0

74 509
1,402

2,729

1,164

2,110

Canteen service revolving fund ....705

See footnotes at end of table




702

279

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TO
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION —Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:—Continued

Vocational
fund

rehabilitation

revolving
702

BA

97

"100
86

M00
Servicemen's group life insurance
fund
701
Intragovernmental funds:
Supply fund: Indefinite
705
Contract authority, Permanent,
indefinite.

0

BA
BA
0

Consolidated working fund

705

Total Federal funds Veterans
Administration.

National service life insurance fund:
Permanent
701
life
701

Veterans special life insurance fund
701
Total trust funds
Administration.

"39,001
20,000
-17,929

"(80,999)
12,921
"65,700

60
0

9,400

-573

Veterans

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

16,324,017
16,271,961

19,444,826
18,806,738

4,396,147
4,365,114

17,191,081
16,981,897

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
0

4,001
3,873
835,070
730,760
37,679
85,695
-41,257

4,250
4,100
865,700
654,700
37,900
73,500
-42,200

1,037
1,150
231,700
115,000
9,600
14,000
-12,500

4,500
4,350
933,700
682,300
36,600
68,100
-45,200

BA
0

876,750
779,071

907,850
690,100

242,337
117,650

974,800
709,550

BA
0,

Trust Funds
General post fund, National Homes:
Permanent, indefinite
705

United States Government
insurance fund: Permanent

2,624

16,324,017
16,271,961

19,444,826
18,806,738

4,396,147
4,365,114

17,191,081
16,981,897

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
700

BA1

-2,106

-2,106

-527

-2,106

902

BA1
0 J

-39

-39

-10

-39

BA " 16,321,872
0
16,269,816

19,442,681
18,804,593

4,395,610
4,364,577

17,188,936
16,979,752

BA1

876,750
779,071
-471,778

907,850
690,100
-476,795

242,337
117,650
-123,700

974,800
709,550
-508,25)

BA
0
BAl

404,972
307,293
-2,101

431,055
213,305
-2,025

118,637
-6,050
-506

466,543
201,293
-1,905

16,724,743
16,575,008

19,871,711
19,015,873

4,513,741
4,358,021

17,653,574
17,179,140

Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)...

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
701
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

701

Total Veterans Administration....

See footnotes at end of table.

210-000 0 - 7 6 - 1 9




0 I

0 I
0I
BA
0

THE

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES
ACTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses, international
programs (Peace Corps)
151

8A

0
Operating expenses,
programs

80,826
D
447

25,729
°194

"67,155

86,272

77,854

23,771

65,315

100,000

101,089
"329

20,925
D
152

93,902

91,776

112,247

26,196

92,697

BA
0

203
348

245
245

61
61

245
245

BA
0

domestic

177,687
178,048

182,691
190,101

47,000
49,967

161,057
158,012

BA1
0 J

-27

-26

-7

-26

BA1

-2

BA
451

0
Trust

77,687

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
151
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150
902

0 I
Total Federal funds

BA "

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

177,659

182,665

46,993

161,031

0

178,020

190,075

49,960

157,986

203
348

245
245

61
61

245
245

-119

-125

-31

-125

84

120

30

120

229

120

30

120

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
151
Total trust funds

BA1
0 J
BA

0
Total Action

"

BA

177,743

182,785

47,023

161,151

0

178,249

190,195

49,990

158,106

750
752

785
765

196
286

880
800

880
800

ADMINISTRATIVE CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED
STATES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

BA
0

751

0

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

Total Administrative Conference
of the United States.

19

BA
0

750
771

785
765

196
286

BA

130

135

34

215

83

106

46

198

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON FEDERAL PAY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

805

0
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

281

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES-Continued
AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Trust Funds
Permanent, indefinite
705

BA

4,779

5,012
'362

1,450

5,824

0
Contributions:

705

4,731

5,254

1,400

5,783

BA
0

12
21

34
34

7
7

34
34

BA
0

4,779
4,731

5,374
5,254

1,450
1,400

5,824
5,783

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
700

-3

BA

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

-3
4,778

5,371

1,450

5,821

0

Total Federal funds

BA1
0 J

-3

4,728

5,251

1,400

5,780

BA

Total American Battle
Monuments Commission.

12

34

7

34

0

21

34

7

34

BA
0

4,788
4,749

5,405
5,285

1,457
1,407

5,855
5,814

BA

9,410

10,500
D
230

2,700
D
80

11,800

0

9,726

10,430

2,880

11,200

BA

49,800

64,500

17,968

"53,385

0

49,858

63,018

18,468

54,383

ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Arms control
activities

and

disarmament
152

BOARD FOR INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Grants and expenses

153

CABINET COMMITTEE ON OPPORTUNITIES FOR
SPANISH-SPEAKING PEOPLE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

506

BA

500

0

499

17

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payment to the Central Intelligence
Agency retirement and disability
fund: Indefinite
054
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

J
J

28,300
28,300

282

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
CIVIL AERONAUTICS BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

4,750
"200
4,934
15,150
18,141

21,654

17,437
67,728
63,581

19,295
"588
19,800
60,695
71,883

85,338
81,018

80,578
91,683

20,100
23,075

101,661
94,621

-126

-131

Salaries and expenses

405

BA

17,610

Payments to air carriers

405

0
BA
0

BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
902

BAl
0 I
BAl

0I

-8

-8

21,654
80,007
72,967

-136

-33
-1

-3

BA
0

85,204
80,884

80,439
91,544

20,066
23,041

101,522
94,482

BA

92,850
86,869
(18,781)

BA

264,817

0

251,000

95,200
"2,333
101,899
(20,843)
"(545)
338,650
"9,319
338,650
"9,319
1,280,970
"236,895

23,775
"930
24,590
(5,248)
"(180)
94,437
"4,407
94,437
"4,407
245

102,328

0

Total Civil Aeronautics Board....

2,874,955

3,203,397
4,484,367
"236,895

245

7
-2,954
4,279,672
7,154,627

1,255
"43
1,286
15,000
16,000

317
"13
327
4,000
4,000

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Limitation
funds.

805

payable

under

trust

Government payment for annuitants,
employees health benefits
551

Permanent, indefinite

BA

1,326,933

BA
0

Payment to civil service retirement
and disability fund
805

2,465,349
3,792,282

Intergovernmental
assistance

Council:
805

personnel

BA

1,007

0

Federal Labor Relations
Salaries and expenses

1,008
15,000
14,731

806

BA
0

805

0

102,281
(24,365)
451,844
451,844

7

-2,954
1,565
1,547
10,000
10,000

Intragovernmental funds:

Revolving fund
Trust

Civil service retirement and disability
fund
602
Permanent, indefinite

BA
BA
BA
0

Employees health benefits fund (trust
revolving fund)
551

0

See footnotes at end of table.




63

-56

Funds

"236,895
11,360,556
7,071,144

12,695,774
8,439,169

2,099,362
2,311,825

-63,079

-9,350

-16,074

'-313
15,826,091
10,092,896
7
-69,271
-75,502

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

283

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION—Continued
Trust Funds—Continued

Employees life insurance fund (trust
revolving fund)
602
Retired employees health benefits fund
(trust revolving fund)
551

0

-303,660

0

5,793

-411,545

-93,143

5,192

1,746

-398,725
7,048

Summary
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800

BA1
0J

-82

BA1

-4

902

4,165,956
4,145,834

5,183,062
5,189,304

128,124
128,069

7,717,410
7,717,345

-190

-48

-190

-10

-2

-10

0 I
Total Federal funds

BA

4,165,870

5,182,862 "

128,074

7,717,210

0

4,145,748

5,189,104

128,019

7,717,145

11,360,556
6,710,198

12,932,669
8,023,466

2,099,362
2,204,354

15,825,778
9,556,446

BA 1
-27,427
0 J
BA 11,333,129

-5,337

-3,250

-5,694
15,820,084

Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

DeductionsJojoffsetting receipts:
intrafund transactions";.
602
Total trust funds

12,927,332

2,096,112

6,682,771

8,018,129

2,201,104

BA1 -3,792,282
0 J

-4,721,262

BA

11,706,717

13,388,932

2,223,941

16,385,621

7,036,237

8,485,971

2,328,878

10,116,224

0
Interfund transactions

805

Total Civil Service Commission..

0

"

-245

9,550,752
-7,151,673

COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

451

BA

176

198

45

215

0

175

195

45

218

BA

7,000
6,920

1,925
"178
w
68
2,265
"181

9,540

0

7,700
"276
»m
7,920
"264

64

316

68

302

COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

751

9,444
"9

COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE OF PRODUCTS
ANO SERVICES OF THE BLIND AND OTHER
SEVERELY HANDICAPPED
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses




BA

252

0
See footnotes at end of table.

505

237

255
"6
257

THE

284

BUDGET

FOR

FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TO.
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

BA

4,168

11,193
"290

2,798
"104

11,615

0

1,102

12,179

2,823

11,749

COMMUNITY SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Community services program:
(Community development)

504

426,450
"-2,500

93,250

334,000

529,935

509,250
"-1,000

129,750
"-1,500

365,000

16,612

0

7

501

(Training and employment)

579,200

0

secondary.and

vocational education)

BA

0
(Elementary,

451

Total, Community services
program.
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
450

902
Total Community
Administration.

Services

BA
0

579,200
546,554

423,950
508,250

9?,250
128,250

334,000
365,000

BA
0

579,200
546,554

423,950
508,250

93,250
128,250

334,000
365,000

BA1
0 J

-57

-30

-5

-30

BA1
0 J

-181

-150

-30

-150

BA
0

578,962
546,316

423,770
508,070

93,^15
128,215

333,820
364,820

BA

36,954

41,820
"-5,225

10,355
"-1,206

*37,000

0

34,213

48,109
"-4,000

12,653
"-1.153

39,802
"-1,278

BA
0

36,954
34,213

36,595
44,109

9,149
11,500

37,000
38,524

-2

-1

1^52
3^211

36,594
44,108

9J49
11,500

BA

62,000

70,000

17,500

0

62,000

70,000

17,500

CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

553

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
550
Total Consumer Product Safety
Commission.

BA1
0 J
BA
0

-1
3U99
38,523

_

CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC BROADCASTING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Public broadcasting fund
See footnotes at end of table.




503

70,000

_

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

285

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Cont inued
1976
estimate

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate .

OTHER INDEPENDENT A G E N C I E S — C o n t i n u e d
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Federal payment
Columbia

to

District of
.. 852

B
A
0
B
A
0

231,800

B
A
0
B
A
0

64,922
64 922

282,707
282 707

41579

114,187
185 136

152,600
192 106

248,153
201 336

...

832
832

832

...

40,000
40,000

40,000
40,000

40,000
40,000

40,000
40,000

425,232
464,738

548,673
501,856

104,922
146,501

437,726
508,675

BA1

-10,425

-12,286

BA1

-25,000

-60,000

-40,000

-60,750

0 I
B
A
0

Repayable advances to the District
of Columbia general fund:
Permanent, indefinite
852

259,688
259 688

B
A
0

Loans to District of Columbia for
capital outlay ...
451
Advances to stadium sinking fund,
armory board:
451
Authority to spend public debt
receipts Permanent indefinite

231 800

389,807
429,313

476,387
429,570

64,922
106,501

362,254
433,203

-7,144

-6,399

-1,201

-4,507

832
832

832

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
450

852
Total District of Columbia

..

-14,722

0 i

EMERGENCY LOAN GUARANTEE BOARD
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Emergency loan guarantee fund...403

0

ENERGY INDEPENDENCE AUTHORITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Adjustment for net earnings or
losses, Energy Independence
Authority
305

B
A
0

"42,000
•/42,000

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

751

B
A

55,082

0

Salaries and expenses

B
A
0

56,131

63,040
"1,619
62,988

18,290
"619
17,869

68,035

55,082
56,131

64,659
62,988

18,909
17,869

70,100
68,035

-10

-10

55,072
56,121

64,649
62,978

70,100

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
750
Total Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA1
0J
B
A
0

-10

...
18,909
17,869

70,090
68,025

286

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Export-Import Bank of the United
States fund:
155
Authority to spend agency debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.
Limitation on administrative
expenses.
Limitation on program activity

3,348,300

BA
0

1,305,947
(12,081)
(6,334,443)

FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for administrative
expenses
..
351
Limitation on administrative
expenses.

0

-210
(6,352)

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
350

0

122
(7,089)
^(410)
"(172)

-202
(1841)
D

(64)

122

-202

_2

-2

-2

BA
0

-2
-212

-2

-2

120

-204

BA

46,900
47,964

12,436
"200
12,731

51,448

0

49,813
"900
50,780

BA
0

46,900
47,964

50,713
50,780

12,636
12,731

51,448
52,327

-25

-18

-5

-n

46,875
47,939

50,695
50,762

12,631
12,726

51,430
52,309

-407,682

-607,858

-73,686

-767,281

BA

130,035

25,283

0

120,697

142,992
"54,900
147,500
'49,900

101,397
53,456
126,000
•'58,642

BAl

0 I

Total Farm Credit
Administration.

CM CSJ

-210

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds

Salaries and expenses

403

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Federal Communications
Commission.

BAl
0 J
BA
0

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
Trust Funds
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
0
fund (trust revolving fund)
401

52,327

FEDERAL ENERGY ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

See footnotes at end of table




305

MOO
14,775
•MOO

287

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
FEDERAL ENERGY ADMINISTRATION—Con
Summary
Federal funds:
BA
(As shown in detail above)
BA
0
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
BAl
public.
300
0 J
Total Federal Energy
Administration.

197,892
197,400

25,183
14,675

154,853
184,642

130,009
120,671

197,892
197,400

25,183
14,675

154,853
184,642

2,478

BA
0

130,035
120,697

2,541

784

1,222

-15,245
(3,650)
'(200)
"(123)
(4,900)
"(183)

-51,600
(17,100)

-26

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Interest adjustment payments

401

Public enterprise funds:

Federal Home Loan Bank Board
revolving fund:
401
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Current, indefinite.
Limitation on administrative
expenses.

BA
0

Limitation on nonadministrative
expenses.
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance
Corporation fund
401

2,000,000
1,237,352
(10,677)

(20,936)
-315,630

BA
0

2,000,000
924,200

B
A

7,400

0

B
A
0

Total Federal Home Loan Bank
Board.

0

303,077
(14,665)
'(879)
"(385)
(19,585)
"(596)

(23,620)

-312,275
'879

-84,306
'220

-328,000

-5,778

-98,547

-378,378

1,960
"79
2,015

8,309

7,250

7,840
"226
8,068

7,400
7,250

8,066
8,068

2,039
2,015

8,309
8,250

-22

-21

-6

-21

FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

406

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

8,250

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400

BA1
0 J

Total Federal Maritime
Commission.

B
A
0

7,378
7,228

8,045
8,047

2,033
2,009

8,288
8,229

BA

16,245

18,250
"428
17,754

4,800
"150
5,059

20,328

FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION
SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

505

15,498
See footnotes at end of table.




20,328

288

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION
SERVICE—Continued
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
BA
0
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
BA1
public
500
0 J

18,678
17,754

-1

-1

BA
0

16,244
15,497

18,677
17,753

BA
0

60
46

2

BA

33,097

0

Total Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service.

16,245
15,498

4,950
5,059

20,328
20,328
-1

4^950
5,059

20,327
20,327

35,610
<32
°952

8,558
C
U
"321

41,582

FEDERAL METAL AND NONMETALLIC MINE
SAFETY BOARD OF REVIEW
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

553

FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

305

Total Federal Power
Commission.

8,329

41,455

85
84

85

85
85

33,181
34,424

36,679
37,587

8,891
8,414

41,667
41,540

-17

. -15

-4

-13

33,164
34,407

36,664
37,572

8,887
8,410

41,654
41,527

BA

38,983

45,927
"1,164

12,000
°421

*52,833

0

Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
300

37,503

84
80

BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

34,344

BA
0

BA
0

Payments to States under Federal
Power Act (special fund)-.
Permanent, indefinite
852

38,732

46,889

12,682

52,591

BA
0

38,983
38,732

47,091
46,889

12,421
12,682

52,833
52,591

-29

-29

-7

-29

38,954
38,703

47,062
46,860

12,414
12,675

52,804
52,562

BA 1
0 I

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Federal Trade Commission

See footnotes at end of table.




BA1
0 J
BA "
0

289

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

152

Payment of Vietnam prisoner of war
claims
152
Total Foreign Claims Settlement
Commission.

BA
0
0

1,260
1,090
181

1,400
1,343
330

375
605
25

800
744
150

BA
0

1,260
1,271

1,400
1,673

375
630

800
894

40

42

HISTORICAL AND MEMORIAL COMMISSIONS
Harry S Truman Scholarship Foundation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payment to the Harry S Truman
memorial scholarship trust fund
Trust

10,000
10,000

BA ..
0

Funds

Harry S Truman memorial scholarship
trust fund
502
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

-10,282

B
A
0

....

-10,282

40

42

BA .
0 ....

Total Harry S Truman
Scholarship Foundation.

10,000
10,000

0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

....

10,000
-282

40

42

sion
Japan United States Friendship Commis
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Japan-United States friendship trust
fund
153

BA

18,000

American Revolution Bicentennial
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Commemorative activities
fund): Permanent
Trust

BA
0

9,686
11,939

9,462
21,179

1,743
3,543

1,965
2,165

(special
806

BA
0

6,178
5,811

11,400
11,000

2,020
1,854

3,200
3,700

5

7
12

15,864
17,750

20,862
32,179

3,763
5,397

5,165
5,865

Funds

Gifts and donations: Permanent
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)




806

806

BA
0 ....

BA
0

290

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

T
Q
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
HISTORICAL AND MEMORIAL COMMISSIONS
—Continued
American Revolution Bicentennial
Administration—Continued
Summary—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

-6,183

-11,400

-2,020

-3,200

BA
0

Total Federal funds

BA1
0 I

9,681
11,567

9,462
20,779

1,743
3,377

1,965
2,665

1,743
3,377

1,965
2,665

11,567

7
12
9,469
20,791

14
25

24
14

3
9

38

BA
0

Total American Revolution
Bicentennial Administration.

BA
0

9,686

Other Historical and Memorial Agencies
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial
Commission
806

BA
0

Miscellaneous appropriations

806

0

Trust Funds
Civil War Centennial Commission:
Donations
806

0

29
36

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)..

BA
0

29
36

Trust funds:

1

(As shown in detail above)....
Total Other Historical
Memorial Agencies.

and

BA
0

Total Federal funds Historical
and Memorial Commissions.

BA
0

Total trust funds Historical and
Memorial Commissions.

BA
0

3
9
9,681
11,606
5

3
9
37,462
30,817
7
-10,269

29
36
1,994

1,749
3,383

2,701

40

42

32
5
"5
1
37
6

*1,530

INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

See footnotes at end of table.




..752

BA

1,324

1,411

0

Salaries and expenses

1,243

1,411

1.530

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

291

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES

Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental
Relations
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

806 BA
0

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

806

0

1,184

1,200

1,060

1,387

300
"6
306

1,402
1,402

402 .

-391

Trust Funds

Contributions:

Permanent,

BA
0

2
-9

6
31

2
2

10
10

BA
0

1,184
669

1,200
1,789

306
306

1,402
1,402

BA
0

indefinite
806

2
-9
1,186
660

6
31
1,206
1,820

2
2
308
308

10
10
1,412
1,412

1,747

480
D
16
496

1,897

3,370
3,440

891
891

3,421
3,465

Summary
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)

Total Advisory Commission on BA
Intergovernmental Relations.
0
Appalachian Regional Commission
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

0

Salaries and expenses

1,545

1,830
"44
1,874

0

-220

674

452 BA

1,897

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

452

Trust Funds

Miscellaneous trust fund
Permanent, indefinite

accounts: BA
452 0

3,151
2,961

BA
0

1,747
1,325

1,874
2,548

496
496

1,897
1,897

BA
0

3,151
2,961

3,370
3,440

891
891

3,421
3,465

-1,450

-1,560

-414

-1,573

ijcT

UM0

477

1,848

1,511

1,880

477

1,892

^477

-1,848

496
496

1,897
1,941

•

Summary
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
452
Total trust funds

BA1
0 J
BA

0
Interfund transactions

452

BA 1

-1,700

-1,810

0I
Total Appalachian
Commission.
See footnotes at end of table.




Regional

BA
0

1,748
1,136

1,874
2,618

THE

292

BUDGET

FOR

FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES—Continued
Delaware River Basin Commission
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

301

Contribution

301

Total Delaware
Commission.

77

79

19

83

0
BA
0
BA
0

76
238
209
3ii
285

82
215
177
296
259

20
53
53
73
73

84
198
198
21M
282

52
52

52
52

13
13

BA

77

0
BA
0
BA
0

75
150
150
227
225

79
l
84
150
150
231
234

BA
BA
0

36,529
90,360
175,306

48,845
50,879
181,600

26,700
39,600

26,174
90,059
184,574

BA
0

River Basin

BA

130,414
177,862

103,377
186,482

27,646
40,545

120,046
188,388

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Contribution

304

BA
0
Susquehanna River Basin Commission
Federal Funds

General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

301

Contribution

301

Total Susquehanna River Basin
Commission.

D

19
\
19
38
38
58
57

D

83
83
150
150
233
233

Washington Metropolitan Area Transit
Authority
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Federal contribution
Permanent

404

Summary
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
452
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions
Total Intergovernmental
Agencies.
See footnotes at end of table.




452

BAl
0 J
BA "
0
BAl
0 I
BA ~
0

3,153
2,952

3,376
3,471

893
893

3,431
3,475

-1,450

-1,560

-414

-1,573

1,703
1,502
-1,700

1,816 "
1,911
-1,810

479
479
-477

1,858
1,902
-1,848

130,417
177,664

103,383
186,583

27,648
40,547

120,056
188,442

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

293

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

152

BA

10,400

2,675

*11,539

8,296

10,413

"111
2,799

11,494

BA

44,970

49,330
°1,500

12,290
°500

54,676

0

46,148

50,676

12,790

54,676

300

5,500

0

8,900

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

404

Payments for directed rail service

404

BA

15,000

0

1,000

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Interstate
Commission.

Commerce

44,970
46,148

65,830
51,676

12,790
13,090

54,676
60,176

BA1
0 J

-2,186

-176

-36

-176

BA
0

42,784
43,962

65,654
51,500

12,754
13,054

54,500
60,000

88,000
85,000

24,630
24,066

80,000
82,757

LE6AL SERVICES CORPORATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payment to the
Corporation

Legal

Services
751

BA
0

MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

302

BA

750

900

225

1,000

0

528

919

275

919

BA

1,777

1,871

419

1,904

0

1,742

1,871

4B

1,904

BA

2,000

2,000

500

5,000

0

1,371

2,079

590

4,660

NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

451

NATIONAL CENTER FOR PRODUCTIVITY AND
QUALITY OF WORKING LIFE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND
INFORMATION SCIENCE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses




BA

409

468

117

517

0
See footnotes at end of table

503

449

41_9

114

499

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

294

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

TQ
iestimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND
INFORMATION SCIENCE-Continued
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Trust funds:
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
503

409
449

BAl
0 J
BA
0
BA
0

410
450

517
499

468
419

117
114

517
499

1
1

Total National Commission on
Libraries and Information
Science.

117
114

1

Total trust funds

468
419

NATIONAL COUNCIL ON INDIAN OPPORTUNITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

452

0

23

NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Operating fund

401

Total National Credit
Administration.

-141

-147

-48

-16,227

-4,483

-21,131

-13,537

Union

-14
-13,523

0

Credit union share insurance fund
401

-16,368

-4,630

-21,179

145,283
14,000
118,687

157,410
15,000
162,317

56,914
1,000
56,000

170,000
15,000
176,028

NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE
HUMANITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

503

Salaries and expenses
Current, indefinite

BA
BA
0

503

0

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Trust

Gifts and donations:
indefinite

51 ....

Funds

Permanent,
503

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public...
..902
Total Federal funds....




35

BA
0

9,361
9,361

20,660
20,660

1,000
1,000

15,000
15,000

BA
BA
0

159,283
118,722

172,410
162,368

57,914
56,000

185,000
176,028

172,410
162,368

57,914
56,000

185,000
176,028

BAl

-2

0 I
BA
0

159,281
118,720

295

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE
HUMANITIES—Continued
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
BA
0

20,660
20,660

1,000
1,000

15,000
15,000

BA
0

168,642
128,081

193,070
183,028

58,914
57,000

200,000
191,028

B
A

62,669

61,100

68,499
<18
D
1,813
72,449

17,127
L
l
°645
16,406

78,204

0

BA
0

62,669
61,100

70,330
72,449

17,779
16,406

78,204
77,249

-211

-222

-55

-235

BA
0

62,458
60,889

70,108
72,227

17,723
16,350

77,969
77,014

BA

3,236
3,119

3,405
D
91
3,485

850
°33
883

3,606

0

BA
0

Total National Foundation on
the Arts and the Humanities.

9,361
9,361

3,236
3,119

3,496
3,485

883
883

3,606
3,596

-12

-18

-5

-21

BA
0

3,224
3,107

3,478
3,467

878
878

3,586
3,576

BA

711,570

167,134

796,000

"389
'78
217,816

728,000

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses: Indefinite.505

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total National Labor Relations
Board.

BA 1
0 J

77,249

NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

505

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total National Mediation Board.

BA1
0 J

3,596

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

251

657,885

710,000
v
\\
"1,159
'230
716,071

BA
0

4,850
2,775

4,000
5,000

500
600

6,000
6,000

0

-211

-700

1,900

-700

0
Scientific activities (special foreign
currency program)
251
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
See footnotes at end of table.

210-000 O - 76 - 20




251

296

™

E

BUDGET

FOR

FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION—Continued
Trust Funds

Donations: Permanent, indefinite

251

Total National
Foundation.

Science

716,420
660,449

715,400
720,371

168,105
220,316

802,000
733,300

BA1
0 J

-193

-278

-107

-278

BA1
0 I

-14

-22

-9

-22

716,213
660,242

715,100
720,071

167,989
220,200

801,700
733,000

3,193
1,922

3,000
1,000

300

3,000
1,000

719,406
662,164

718,100
721,071

167,989
220,500

804,700
734,000

BA
0

9,640
8,628

11,260
12,000

3,095
3,040

12,000
11,900

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

3,000
1,000

BA
0

Total Federal funds

300

BA
0

902

3,000
1,000

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
250

3,193
1,922

BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

9,640
8,628

11,260
12,000

3,095
3,040

12,000
11,900

-13

-13

-3

-13

BA
0

9,627
8,615

11,247
11,987

3,092
3,037

11,987
11,887

BA

135,165

51,425
"750
51,790

*249,430

86,017

215,423
°2,167
200,264

135,165
86,017

217,590
200,264

52,175
51,790

249,430
236,430

52,175
51,790

249,430
236,430

"

~

NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

407

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total National Transportation
Safety Board.

BA1
0 J

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

305

0

236,430

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the

public
Total Nuclear
Commission.
See footnotes at end of table




300
Regulatory

BA)

-2

0 J
BA ~
0

135,163
86,015

217,590
200,264

~

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

297

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

T
Q

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW
COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

553

B
A

0

5,512

6,280

1,418

5,292

5,675
"131
5,862

1,550

6,249

824

1,256

314

841

1,214

484

*1,425
25,000
21,196

W

46

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT
CORPORATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
Authority to spend public
receipts.
Public enterprise funds:
Pennsylvania Avenue
Fund

451
debt

B
A
R
A
0

J

Total Pennsylvania
Avenue
Development Corporation.

B
A
0
B
A
0

824
841

1,256
1,214

314
484

37,875
24,835

B
A

1,874,741
1,877,112

1,587,185
'102,642
1,587,185
'102,642

416,481
'14,649
416,481
'14,649

1,458,804

0

Development
451

\ 1,450
'3,639

POSTAL SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Payment to the Postal Service fund

402

1,458,804

RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Payments to
Regional rail transportation
protective account

601

604

Trust Funds
Railroad retirement account: Indefinite
601
Permanent, indefinite

BA
0

3,516
3,516

250,000
250,000
37,600
37,600

BA
0

...

250,000
250,000
10,030
10,030

"35,000

BA
BA
0

Limitation on salaries and expenses..

40,000
40,000

2,775,956
3,077,289
(25,758)

3,274,330
3,474,007
(28,703)
"(789)

494,400
902,335
(7,176)
D
(280)

3,735,600
3,678,238
(33,723)

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

3,516
3,516

287,600
287,600

10,030
10,030

290,000
290,000

BA
0

2,775,956
3,077,289

3,274,330
3,474,007

494,400
902,335

3,770,600
3,678,238

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




THE

298

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD—Continued
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafimd transactions
902
BA1

0 I

Total trust funds

5,748

6,818

5,700

BA

Interfund transactions

601

2,781,704

3,281,148

500,100

3,770,600

0

3,083,037

3,480,825

908,035

3,678,238

-3,516

-250,000

BA1

-250,000

0 J
Total

Railroad

Retirement

BA

2,781,704

3,318,748

510,130

3,810,600

0

3,083,037

3,518,425

918,065

3,718,238

BA

5,298

5,400
*115
"178

1,335
'162
D
61

6,370

0

5,406

5,525
'113

1,386
'147

6,308

BA
0

Board.

~

5,298
5,406

5,693
5,638

1,558
1,533

6,370
6,308

RENEGOTIATION BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

054

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050
Total Renegotiation Board

BA1
0 J

-2

BA

5,296

5,693

1,558

6,370

0

5,404

5,638

1,533

6,308

BA

44,427

47,885
"1,406

12,675
D
502

52,198

0

44,419

51,570

12,240

51,925

BA
0

44,427
44,419

49,291
51,570

13,177
12,240

52,198
51,925

-23

-25

-6

-25

BA
0

44,404
44,396

49,266
51,545

13,171
12,234

52,173
51,900

BA

45,000

37,500

8,300
"-1,775

6,800

0

48,465

41,403

7,875
"-1,775

8,303

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Securities and Exchange
Commission.

BA1
0 I

"

SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

See footnotes at end of table.




054

299

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM-Continued
Summary
Federal funds:

BA
0

6,525
6,100

6,800
8,303

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050
Total Selective Service System...

BA}
0
BA
0

45,000
48,465

37,500
41,403

-3

-3

44,997
48,462

37,497
41,400

6,525
6,100

6,797
8,300

26,500

28,835
"650
28,650

6,993
°225
6,725

35,400

21,493

(As shown in detail above)

307,500
404,145
90,000
1,762
176,912

278,750
267,745
100,000
1,212
190,000

197
29,500

2,307
20,000
13,554

1,005
10,000
13,600

240
2,500
5,700

466,600
258,470
90,000
1,189
89,000
3,000
2,030
36,000
20,000

445,762
618,411
-518

419,447
501,000

9,915
107,060

632,189
404,400

445,244
617,893

419,447
501,000

9,915
107,060

632,189
404,400

70,706

77,832
'1,000
c
790
"1,816
80,321
'1,000
50
0
2,600

21,740

85,100

1,875
"9
6
2,236
8,390
9,075

50
0
"3
2
56
2
1,440
3,025

-3

SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403 BA

34,900

Public enterprise funds:

Business loan and investment fund BA
403 0
Disaster loan fund
453 BA
Permanent, indefinite
BA
0
Lease guarantees revolving fund..403
BA
0
Surety bond guarantees revolving
BA
fund
403
0

64,895

Summary
Federal funds:

{As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Small Business
Administration.

BA1
0J
BA
0

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

503

B
A
0

68,877

B
A

Museum programs and related
research (special foreign currency
program)
503

0

2,000
4,203

Science information exchange

B
A

1,805

0

1,603
9,420
3,844

251

Construction and improvements,
National Zoological Park
503
See footnotes at end of table.




B
A
0

c

302
"626
28,487

83,806

50
0

4,481
2,781
1,900
1,902
6,800
10,113

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

300

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES-Continued
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Miscellaneous appropriations
Salaries and expenses,
Gallery of Art

BA
0

1,192
4,309

(7,000)
12,919

(2 500)
8,775

61

15

BA

7,015

7,113

400
600

R
A

0
0

3,300
3,325

500
2,000

7,564
<71
"170
8,048

1,937
C
26
D
63
2,013

12,309

238
°5
243

1,120

1,006

962
"14
1,056

BA
0

53
45

55
62

15
15

55
63

93,390
103,088

102,245
117,435

27,300
36,894

115,510
116,226

-29

-27

-6

-2)

BA
0

93,361
103,059

102,218
117,408

27,294
36,888

115,483
116,199

BA
0

National
503

1,500

BA
0

503

Salaries and expenses, Woodrow
Wilson International Center for
Scholars
503
Trust

1,490
3,462

0

Restoration and renovation of
buildings
503
Construction
503
Liquidation of contract authority....

53
45

55
62

15
15

55
63

BA
0

93,414

102,273

117,470

27,309
36,903

115,538

103,104

B
A
0

693
277

764

120

1,167

120

60
110

B
A
0

588
588

711
711

104

B
A
0

693
277

764

120

1,167

120

B
A
0

588
588

BA
0

954

11,179

1,120

Funds

Smithsonian Institution
Permanent, indefinite

trust

funds:
251

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total Federal funds

BAl

0 1

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)..

Total Smithsonian Institution

116,262

TEMPORARY STUDY COMMISSIONS
Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning
Commission for Alaska
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Trust

Cooperative funds:
indefinite

Funds

Permanent,

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




452

452

711
711

104

104

104

60
60

60
110
60
60

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

301

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)— Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
TEMPORARY STUDY COMMISSIONS—Con.
Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning
Commission for Alaska—Continued
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
BA1
public
.452
0 J
Total Joint Federal-State Land
Use Planning Commission
for Alaska.

BA
0

-588

-711

-104

-60

693
277

764
1,167

120
120

60
110

Other Temporary Commissions
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Commission on American
Shipbuilding: Salaries and
expenses
406

0

Commission on Executive,
Legislative, and Judicial Salaries:
Salaries and expenses
805

BA
0

Commission on Federal Paperwork:
Salaries and Expenses
804

BA
0

Commission on
Beautificatiori:
expenses

Highway
Salaries and
404

0

55

Commission on Population Growth
and the American Future: Salaries
and expenses
806

0

17

Commission on the Organization of
the Government for the Conduct
of Foreign Policy: Salaries and
expenses
152

BA
0

1 594
1460

441

Commission on the Review of the
National Policy toward Gambling:
Salaries and expenses
751

BA
0

1,000
586

745
770

Defense Manpower Commission:
Salaries and expenses
054
Reappropriation

BA

800

1 300

BA
0

355
747

1,455

100

Lowell Historic Canal District
Commission: Salaries and
expenses
303

BA
0

120
82

30
68

National Commission for the Review
of Federal and State Laws
751

BA
0

332
520

400
498

10

National Commission on Consumer
Finance: Salaries and expenses
403

0

2

49

National Commission on Electronic
Fund Transfers: Salaries and
expenses
403

BA
0

National Commission on Fire
Prevention and Control: Salaries
and expenses
.'451

0




100
95

2
4,100
3 900

2 000
2 000

200

186
242

265
284

19

500

260
31

145

95

302

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
TEMPORARY STUDY COMMISSIONS—Con.
Other Temporary Commissions—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

National Commission on Marihuana
and Drug Abuse: Salaries and
expenses
552

0

1
0

National Commission on Materials
Policy: Salaries and Expenses..403

0

3

National Commission on the
Observance of International
Women's Year: Salaries and
expenses
806

BA
0

National Commission on Supplies
and Shortages: Salaries and
expenses
403

BA
0

National Commission on the
Financing of Postsecondary
Education: Salaries and expenses
502

0

National Commission on Water
Quality: Salaries and expenses
304

BA
0

National Study Commission
Records and Documents
Federal Officials

BA
0

on
of
804

35
'5,000
"260

"440

"2,900

287

623
910

295
295

360
360

213

1
3

6,800
8 336

6 618

680 .
.

"350
"340

"10

5

National Tourism Resources Review
Commission: Salaries and
expenses
403

0

National Water Commission-. Salaries
and expenses
301

0

Navajo and Hopi Relocation
Commission: Salaries and
expenses
806

BA
0

12,700
2 500

100
100

500
7 500

Privacy Protection Study Commission:
Salaries and expenses
806

BA

548
°2
453
25,888
18,669
26,652
19,836

200

750

237
2,811
4,327
2,931
4,447

765
1,975
12,199
2,035
12,309

35 .
.

0
Total Other Temporary
Commissions.

BA
0

Total Federal funds Temporary
Study Commissions.

BA
0

11,668
11,960
12,361
12,237

TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Tennessee Valley Authority fund...301
Authority to spend agency debt
receipts.

BA
BA
0

BA
0

30,550

121,185

767,255

100,025
10,000,000
1,112,225

249,550

1,049,450

77,400
767,255

10,100,025
1,112,225

30,550
249,550

121,185
1,049,450

77,400

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




303

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1975
actual

Account and functional code

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY—Continued
Summary—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public.
300

BA1
0 J

-30

-24

-6

-24

BA
0

77,370
767,225

10,100,001
1,112,201

30,544
249,544

121,161
1,049,426

153

BA

223,791

BA
0

Special international exhibitions...153

BA
0

Special international exhibitions
(special foreign currency program)
153

0

221,859
8,377
9,571
6,790
7,074
22

67,500
"950
63,980
3,225
3,071
2,004
1,431

"248,325

Salaries and expenses (special
foreign currency program)
153

246,200
D
3,100
246,064
10,708
9,953
6,187
10,958
14
6

Acquisition and construction of radio
facilities
153

BA
0

4,400
1,667

10,135
4,446

260
1,602

"2,142
2,202

Trust Funds
United States Information Agency trust
funds: Permanent, indefinite
153

BA
0

226
76

226
406

40
40

226
226

BA
0

243,358
240,193

276,330
271,585

73,939
70,084

-541

-541

-118

263,908
269,697
-541

BA
0

242,817
239,652

275,789
271,044

73,821
69,966

263,367
269,156

BA
0

226
76

226
406

40
40

226
226

-195

-195

-32

-195

31
-119
242,848
239,533

31
211
275,820
271,255

Total Tennessee Valley Authority

UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY
Federal

Funds

General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

250,646
"8,600
9,736
"4,841
7,113

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150
Total Federal funds

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
153

BA)
0 J

BA 1
0 J

Total trust funds

BA
0

Total United States Information
Agency.

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




8
8
73,829
69,974

31
31
263,398
269,187

THE

304

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
UNITED STATES RAILWAY ASSOCIATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administrative expenses

404

BA

0
Payment for the purchase of Conrail
securities
404
Total United States
Association.

Railway

12,000

22,700

BA
0

10,000
"4,100

"2,000

"3,000

15,627
"3,900

400
"2,100

2,900
"100

"400,000
"400,000

"300,000
"200,000

"1,400,000
"540,000

BA
0

12,000
22,700

414,100
419,527

302,000
202,500

1,403,000
543,000

BA

9,775

10,722

2,350

*9,465

0

9,463

11,673

4,817

301

0

63

301

BA

3,807

4,552

1,099

6,692

0

3,695

5,249

1,287

6,702

BA

9,775

10,7?2

2,350

9,465

0

9,526

11,673

4,817

9,465

BA
0

3,807
3,695

4,552
5,249

1,099
1,287

6,692
6,702

-1,213

-1,136

-278

-1,318

WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Water resources planning

301

9,465

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Trust

Funds

River Basin Commissions
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
301
Total trust funds

BA1
0 J

301

2,594

3,416

821

5,374

0
Interfund transactions

BA

2,482

4,113

1,009

5,384

-821

-5,374

BA1

-2,593

-3,416

BA

9,776

10,722

2,350

9,465

0

9,415

12,370

5,005

9,475

21,992,466
13,180,245

1,819,444
2,077,341

18,788,847
16,294,755

0 J
Total Water Resources Council..

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050

150

12,104,663
11,763,776

"

BA1
0J

-5

-3

-3

BA1

-568

-567

-125

-567

-193

-278

-107

-278

-75

-39

-10

-37

0I
250
300
See footnotes at end of table.




BAl
0 J
BAl
0J

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

305

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of d o l l a r s ) — C o n t i n u e d
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

1976
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Federal funds:—Continued

350

BAl

-2

-2

-2

-2

0 I
400

BAl
0 J

-2,942

-413

-96

-418

450

BAl
0 1

-10,482

-12,316

-5

-14,752

500

BAl
0 1

-253

-268

-67

-283

550

BAl
0 J

-2

-1

700

BAl
0 J

-3

-3

BAl

-10

-10

750

0I

-1
-3

..

-10

800

BAl
0 1

-6,265

-11,590

-2,068

-3,390

852

BAl
0 1

-25,000

-60,000

-40,000

-60,750

902

BAl
0 J

-210

-190

-42

-185

BA
0

12.058.653
11,717,766

21,906.786
13,094,565

1,776,922
2,034,819

18.708.168
16,214,076

BA
0

14.157.113
9,398,813

16.239.865
10,911,184

2,596,981
3,036,750

19,625,121
12,494,250

-27,427

-5,337

-3,250

-5,694

Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Intrafund transactions
.602

BAl
0 I

BAl

5 748

6 818

the
1 SI

BAl
0 1

-119

-125

-31

-125

153

BAl

-195

-195

-32

-195

-1,213

-1,136

-278

-1,318

-2,038

-2,271

-518

-1,633

14.131,870
9,373,570

16.237.619
10,908,938

2,598,572
3,038,341

19,616,156
12,485,285

90?
Proprietary
public

receipts

from

o\

5 700

n f
301

BAl

or
452

BA]
0 1

503

BAl
0 J

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions




BA
0

1

301

BA 1
0 J

- 2 593

- 3 416

-821

- 5 374

452

BAl
0 1

-1,700

-1.810

-477

-1,848

601

BAl
0 I

-3,516

-250,000

-250,000

306

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1976
estimate

1975
actual

1977
estimate

TQ
estimate

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Trust funds:—Continued

805
Total Other
Agencies.

-3,792,282

-4,721,262

-245

-7,151,673

22,390,432

33,167,917

4,373,951

30,915,429

0

Independent

BAl
0 J
BA

17,291,245

19,027,015

5,071,617

21,290,466

ALLOWANCES
Allowances for:

'755,000
J
35,000
'726,000
'34,000

BA
BA
0
0

Civilian agency pay raises

Contingencies for:
Relatively uncontrollable programs

0
0

BA
0

0
0

BA
0

150,000

1,800,000

175,000

1,500,000

225,000
200,000

150,000

175,000

2,590,000
2,260,000

323,039,330
246,346,684

318,591,814
286,169,603

64,917,519
71,804,593

326,645,655
300,971,240

BAl -1,264,758
0J
BAl
-504,727
0 J
1 . -3,621,738

-1,586,058

-269,314

-1,502,379

-1,303,809

-360,000

-2,252,497

-3,356,917

-911,299

-4,973,252

-3,000,000

-500,000

-6,000,000

-7,819,188

-9,246,784

-2,040,613

-14,728,128

BA

315,220,142

309,345,030

0

238,527,496

276,922,819

62,876,906
69,763,980

311,917,527
286,243,112

BA
0

Total Allowances..

225,000
200,000

BA
0

Other requirements

129,217,864
118,412,496

144,039,232
141,631,162

33,878,546
36,897,288

169,131,672
155,633,989

BAl -1,035,319
0J
BAl -5,239,506
0 J

-1,091,693

-3,325

-1,294,994

-7,347,167

-1,886,275

-8,096,279

BUDGET TOTALS
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)..
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
(As shown in detail above):
Intrafund transactions

Receipts from off-budget Federal
agencies.
Proprietary receipts from the
public.
(Undistributed by agency and
function)-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public:
Rents and royalties on the
Outer Continental Shelf ...953

Total deductions

.

BAl
0J

Federal fund totals..
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)..
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
(As shown in detail above):
Intrafund transactions
Proprietary
public.

receipts

See footnotes at end of table.




from

BA
0

the

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

BUDGET TOTALS—Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
(Undistributed by agency and
function):
Receipts from off-budget Federal
agencies.Employer share, employee
retirement
951

-966,591

-987,718

-153,099

-1,072,109

BA1

Total deductions

BAI
0 I

-7,241,416

-9,426,578

" -2,042,699

-10,463,382

121,976,448

134,612,654

"31,835,847

158,668,290

HI,171,080

132,204,584

34,854,583

145,170,607

-3,013,614

-3,205,136

-826,160

-3,395,551

-7,667,186

-8,015,254

-2,109,501

-8,372,525

BAI -14,416,816

-24,372,389

-3,711,576

-25,408,732

BAI -25,097,616

-35,592,779

-6,647,237

-37,176,808

0 I
BA 412,098,974
0 324,600,960

408,364,905
373,534,624

88,065,516
97,971,332

433,409,009
394,236,911

0I
Trust fund totals

BA

0

Interfund transactions (-):
Employer share, employee retirement
stire

951
Interest received by trust funds...952

BAI

0
BAI

0J
Applied by agency above

0I
Total interfund transactions

Budget totals A
__




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

308

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

BUDGET TOTALS—Continued
ABudget totals are distributed as follows:
1976
BA
Federal funds:
Enacted, pending, and initial requests:
Appropriations
Supplemental requests pending.
Needing authorizing legislation (B)
Rescissions pending (»)
Proposed in this budget:
Amendments to 1976 and TQ appns
Supplemental requests.
Program:
Under existing legislation (A)
Needing authorizing legislation (»)
Pay:
Wage-board pay raises ( c )
Civilian pay raises (»)
Military pay raises (>•)
To be proposed separately:
Under existing legislation (')
Under proposed legislation (•*)
Allowances
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
Enacted, pending, and initial requests:
Appropriations
Proposed in this budget:
Amendments to 1976 and TQ app'ns
Supplemental requests:
Program:
Under existing legislation (A)
Pay:
Civilian pay raises (")
To be proposed separately.
Under proposed legislation ( J )...
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Outlays

309.034,800

278,603,691

62.594,610

68.350.147

34.000
-2.304.642

26.500
-322,105

23.000
-284.979

17.500
-173.948

13.000
-1,064,371

2.370,392

2,147,810

417.441

598.823

70,931

4.776.448
414.248

2,932.119
421.365

1.087.606
304.160

1.537.501
221.947

523,670
772.772
808,886

441,712
707.592
777,879

194.609
254.220
274,258

245.212
282.740
297,177

1,177,254
706.586
277.400
-9.246,784

276,954
-94.914
251.000
-9.246.784

67,205
-193.011
178,400
-2.040.613

432.505
-209,011
204.000
-2.040,613

625.889
-2.767,083
4,186.300
-14,728,128

957.389
-4,253,714
3.813,000
-14,728,128

309,345,030

276.922.819

62.876,906

69.763,980

311,917,527

286,243,112

143,648,143

140.431.148

33,752,935

37.192.599

164,248,563

157,985,057

4.883,109
-10.463,382

-2,351,068
-10.463,382

16,120
239,195
280
151.614
-9.426,578

Outlays

Outlays

323,200.549

1.400.000

299.290,186

1,528.389
540.100
31.355
36,887
8,088

245

1,350.000
280

100

100

-166.386
-9.426.578

125.511
-2,042.699

-295.656
-2.042.699

Total trust funds

134,612,654

132.204.584

31.835,847

34\854.589

158,668.290

145.170,607

Interfund transactions (-)

-35,592,779

-35.592,779

-6,647,237

-6.647,237

-37.176,808

-37,176,808

Budget totals

408,364,905

373.534.624

88,065,516

97,971,332

433.409,009

394,236,911

"Supplemental under existing legislation.
"Supplemental. Additional authorizing legislation required
'Supplemental now requested, wage-board pay raises.
"Supplemental now requested, civilian pay raises.
'Supplemental now requested, military pay raises.
'Proposed transfer to other accounts for pay raises (-).
''Proposed transfer from other accounts for pay raises.
"Rescission pending.
'Proposed for later transmittal under existing legislation.
-'Proposed for later transmittal under proposed legislation
"Additional authorizing legislation required.







PART 8

SUMMARY TABLES

309

EXPLANATORY NOTE RELATING TO THE
SUMMARY TABLES
Types of tables.—This part of the budget consists of tables
as follows:
• Tables 1 through 11 are short summary tables of the
budget, often only one page each.
• Tables 12 through 15 provide greater detail in support
of data in the first four tables.
• Table 17 presents 5-year projections of the estimated
costs of proposed legislation pursuant to section 221 (a)
of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970.
• Table 16 and tables 18 through 22 are historical in
nature, giving data, for earlier years, comparable to
that data in the preceding tables, and also giving information on the national income accounts and the
gross national product over a longer period.
Periods covered.—Due to the change in fiscal year required by
the Congressional Budget Control Act, the following periods
are covered by the various columns:
• July 1 through June 30, for the 1975 and 1976 columns.
• July 1 through September 30, 1976, for the TQ column.
• October 1 through September 30, for the 1977 and subsequent columns.
Concepts followed.—The concepts used in the current and
historical tables are discussed in Part 6 of this volume.
Other sources of data.—The Special Analyses volume, part
1, presents a series of data covering Government finances
and operations as a whole. These include, for example:
• Special Analysis A—which compares budget totals with
the Federal sector of the national income accounts.
• Special Analysis B—which provides a breakdown of
selected data between Federal funds and trust funds.
• Special Analysis C—which gives the detail of the agency
debt and the holdings of U.S. securities which are summarized here in table 11.
• Special Analysis D—which focuses on the distinction
between outlays that are of an investment or "capital"
nature and outlays for operating or "current" purposes.
• Special Analysis H—which presents information on
civilian employment in the executive branch.
310




311

SUMMARY TABLEiS
Table 1. BUDGET SUMMARY (in millions of dollars)
Description

1975

1976

TQ

1977
estimate

Budget authority (largely appropriations):

Available through current action by Congress:
Enacted and pending
Proposed in this budget
To be requested separately
Available without current action by Congress. _
Deductions for offsetting receipts 1

49,516
2,532

181,134
-40,158

246,123
9,906
2,313
204,290
-54,266

46,570
-10,731

261,422
6,928
227,427
-62,368

412,099

408,365

88,066

433,409

187,505
118,590
-25,098

198,373

54,758
33,783

230,755

134,754
-35,593

-6,647

157,684
-37,177

280,997

297,534

81,894

351,262

238,527
111,171
-25,098

276,923

69,764
34,855

286,243

132,205

-35,593

-6,647

145,171
-37, Ml

324,601

373,535

97,971

394,237

-51,023
7,419

-78,550
2,549

-15,006
-1,072

-55,488
12,513

-43,604

-76,001

-16,077

-42,975

486,247

544,131

633,931

652,799

719,511

140,194
346,053

147,225
396,906

149,525
484,406

148,393
504,406

161,265
558,246

80,649
265,404

84.993
311,913

46,045
15,352
152,998

49,777
24,364
158,663

54,079
32,272
171,809

55,207
35,640
172,250

68,798
34,367
174,647

71,060

79,566

88, 600

92,897

109.571

Total budget authority

271,123

178

Receipts and outlays:

Receipts:
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions
Total budget receipts
Outlays:
Federal funds
Trustfunds
Interfund transactions
Total budget outlays
Surplus or deficit (—):
Federal funds
Trustfunds
Total budget
1974

actual
Outstanding debt, end of year:

Gross Federal debt.
Held by:
Government agencies.
The public
__

_ _

Federal Reserve System __
Others
MEMORANDUM
Outstanding loans, end of year:

Direct loans—on-budget accounts..
Direct loans—off-budget accounts.
Guaranteed and insured loans2
Government-sponsored agencies
loans3 . _ _
_
_
1
2
3

These consist of intragovernmental transactions and proprietary receipts from the public.
Excludes loans held by Government accounts and sponsored credit agencies.
Net of interagency lending; excludes Federal Reserve banks.

210-000 O - 76 - 21




312

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Table 2. BUDGET RECEIPTS, OUTLAYS, AND BUDGET AUTHORITY
(In millions of dollars)
Description

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

122,386
40,621

130,822
40,056

40,003
8,416

153,641
49,461

75,204
6,771
4,466
16,551
4,611
3,676
6,711

80,164
7,723
4,684
16,901
5,100
3,800
8,284

21,729
% 214
1,231
4,371
1,400
1,000
1,530

96,018
12,064
4,970
17,806
5,800
4,300
7,202

280,997

297,534

81,894

351,262

Outlays by function:
National defense *
86,585
92,759
International affairs
4,358
5,665
General science, space, and technology
3,989
4,311
Natural resources, environment, and energy
9,537
11,796
Agriculture
1,660
2,875
Commerce and transportation
16,010
17,801
Community and regional development
4,431
5,802
Education training, employment, and social services.
15,248
18,900
Health
27,647
32,137
Income security
108,605 128,509
Veterans benefits and services
16,597
19,035
Law enforcement and justice
2,942
3,402
General government
3,089
3,547
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance.
7,005
7,169
Interest
30,974
34,835
2
Allowances
200
Undistributed offsetting receipts
-14,075 -15,208

25,028
1,334
1,157
3,289
742
4,819
1,529
4,403
8,291
32,742
4, 362
914
961
2,046
9,769
175
-3,589

101,129
6,824
4,507
13,772
1,729
16,498
5,532
16,615
34,393
137,115
17,196
3,426
3,433
7,351
41,297
2,260
-18,840

Receipts by source:
Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes...
Social insurance taxes and contributions:
Employment taxes and contributions
Unemployment insurance
Contributions for other insurance and retirement
Excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts
Total receipts._

Total outlays
Budget surplus or deficit ( - )

1975
actual

324,601

373,535

97,971

394,237

-43,604

-76,001

-16,077

-42,975

Budget authority by function:
National defense >
91,925
International affairs
4,420
General science,* space, and technology
4,018
Natural resources, environment, and energy
16,484
Agriculture
5,873
Commerce and transportation
32,431
Community and regional development
5, 391
Education, training, employment, and social services.
15,526
Health
29,935
Income security
159,294
Veterans benefits and services
16, 745
Law enforcement and justice
3,031
General government
3,075
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance... _
7,052
Interest
30,974
2
Allowances
Undistributed offsetting receipts
-14,075
Total budget authority
1
2

412,099

102,299
6,450
4, 374
19,189
4,135
18,605
4, 794
19, 738
32,339
140,342
19, 898
3,264
3,546

23,394
944
1,126
2,380
308
2,410
523
4,942
8,584
28,803
4,520
849
909

9,538
34,836
225
-15,208

2,043
7,347
9,769
41,296
2,590
150
-3,589 -18,840

408,365

88,066

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.




1977
estimate

114,905
9,666
4,618
9,702
2,262
17,925
5,819
15,943
38,038
157,678
17,681
3,318
3,460

433,409

SUMMARY TABLES

313

Table 3. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY AGENCY (in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
____
The judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture
Commerce
.
Defense—Military (including pay raises)
Defense—Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies
Allowances 1
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee retirement
Interest received by trust funds
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf.
Total budget authority

Budget authority
1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

767
313
76
8,726
15,210
1,793
85,812
1,798
116,729
53,934
3,818
2,118
19,785
1,186
19,119
41,365
3,512
8,516
—747
3,229
16,725
22,390

887
347
70
9,055
14,680
2,282
96,202
2,141
125,297
27,675
2,520
2,161
20,586
951
8,314
47,588
5,021
771
207
3, 553
19,872
33,168
225

218
87
18
214
2,388
480
22,980
658
34,495
431
833
561
3,199
395
1,015
12,175
1,302
189
47
932
4,514
4,374
150

936
394
73
6,447
11,822
1,659
111,250
2,191
145,029
21,714
2,566
2,143
20,717
1,137
11,734
51,394
6,047
718
—575
3,695
17,654
30.915
2,590

-3,980
-7,667
-2,428

- 4 , 193
-8,015
-3,000

-979
-2,110
-500

-4,468
-8,373
-6,000

412,099

408,365

88,066

433,409

271, 123
181,134

258, 341
204,290

52, 226
46,570

268, 350
227,427

-28,869
-11,289

-40,562
-13,704

-7,433
-3,298

-43,299
-19,070

412,099

408,365

88,066

433,409

MEMORANDUM

Portion available through current action by Congress 2_
Portion available without current action by Congress.Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total budget authority
1
2

Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.
Budget authority excludes appropriations to liquidate contract authority.




314

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977
Table 4. OUTLAYS BY AGENCY (in millions of dollars)
Outlays

Department or other unit
1975
actual
Legislative branch._
The judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture
.__
Commerce
Defense—Military (including pay raises)
___
Defense—Civil.
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
....
Transportation
Treasury
Energy Research and Development Administration. _ _
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration _
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies
Allowances *
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee retirement
Interest received by trust funds
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf.. _
Total budget outlays

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

726
284
93
3,988
9,722
1,583
85,020
2,051
112,411
7,488
2,139
2,067
17,649
829
9,247
41,177
3,165
2,530
— 624
3,267
16,575
17,291

902
342
89
5,142
14,213
1,989
89,763
2,151
127,709
7,204
2,582
2,281
26,350
1,247
12,253
45,308
4,078
3, 193
186
3,517
19,016
19,027
200

— 3,980
—7,667
-2,428

—4,193
—8,015
-3,000

-979
-2,110
-500

-4,468
-8,373
-6,000

324,601

373,535

97,971

394,237

145,674
92,908
56,580
69,598

163,016
119,617
63,982
81,186

29,208
20,226
29,627
29,640

173,550
144,939
79,467
58,649

-28,869
-11,289

-40,562
-13,704

-7,433
-3,298

-43,299
-19,070

324,601

373,535

97,971

394,237

99
5
23
2
31
9
9
4
1
9
7
3
85
2
3,958
10,753
3,261
2,162
53
5
24,471 99,561
2,175
70
1
33,678 140,066
1,927
7,174
87
4
2,594
2,250
68
1
5,796 22,080
1,034
32
8
3,363 12,867
12,207 51,369
5,311
1,192
4,500
88
3
-605
4
5
3,676
99
0
4,358 17,179
5,072 21.290
2,260
15
7

MEMORANDUM
Portion available through current action by Congress..
Portion available without current action by Congress..
Outlays from obligated balances
Outlays from unobligated balances.
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total budget outlays
1

Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.
Note.—Outlays from appropriations to liquidate contract authority are included as outlays from
balances.




SUMMARY TABLES

315

Table 5. OBLIGATIONS INCURRED, NET (in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President:
International security assistance
International development assistance
Other
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military *
Defense—Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Civil Service Commission
Export-Import Bank
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Federal Home Loan Bank Board
Postal Service
Railroad Retirement Board
Other independent agencies
Allowances2
Undistributed offsetting receipts
Total
MEMORANDUM
Federalfunds
Trustfunds
Interfund transactions
Total
1
2

1975
actual

690
291
73

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

918
350
70

216
89
18

1,008
399
73

4,724
5,817
1,733
2,231
435
584
9,597
14,153
1,475
2,396
83,795 100,253
1,836
2,225
113,695 128,530
27,988
38,246
2,228
2,829
2,090
2,277
18,571
26,983
975
1,118
13,036
15,011
41,285
45,220
3,514
4,933
4,928
5, 350
—801
195
3,246
3,970
16,514
19,490
7,516
9,033

897
235
11
3,474
454
23,970
671
35,932
3,799
868
565
4,904
393
3,339
12,229
1, 302
1,244
61
931
4,472
2,418

4,670
1,590
242
10,894
1,865
107,295
2,226
142,380
27,755
2,523
2,142
21,017
1,100
13,925
51,394
6,047
6,783
—585
3,694
17,162
10,670
3,348
-757
-384
1,459
3,724
5,967
2,590
-18,840

-450
915
1,875
3,117
4,471
-14,075
355,287

-483
-193
-9
-87
1,690
431
3,522
923
6,089
2,328
225
150
-15,208
-3,589
428,007

102,453

433,377

261,020 325,075
119,364 138,525
-25,098 -35,593

73,180
35,920
-6,647

321,783
148,771
-37,177

102,453

433,377

355,287

428,007

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.




1977
estimate

316

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

Table 6. BUDGET AUTHORITY AVAILABLE THROUGH CURRENT ACTION
BY CONGRESS (in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military1
Defense-Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury Department
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration..
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies
Allowances2
Total budget authority available through
current action by Congress

1975
actual

1976
estimate

778
311
76
4,538
14.118
1,582
85,861
1,868
37,546
46,299
4.213
2,127
12,451
1,108
12,580
4,292

897
345
70
6,376
13,765
1,984
96,331
2,208
38,914
20, 759
3,019
2,168
12,396
886
4,804
5,108

3,512
8,517
307
3,231
16,304
9,504

5,021
772
367
3,555
19,445
18,926
225

271,123

258,341

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

21
2
8
6
1
8
54
5

97
4
32
9
7
3

79
1

5,961
10,960
1,336
111,406
2,266
48,651
21,555
3,223
2,150
9,215
1,059
4,699
2,803

1,302

6,047

19
8
8
3
92
3

78
1
344

2,365
38
8
22,987
66
7
11,464
19
6
83
8
54
6
89
9
36
7
1,029

4,396
1,778

10
5
52,226

3,697
17,191
11,067
2,590
268,350

MEMORANDUM
Appropriations to liquidate contract authority: 3

Legislative branch
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture
Commerce
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Transportation
Environmental Protection Agency
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies
Total appropriations to liquidate contract
authority

*
160
410
243
4, 627
122
5,591
1,426

3
8
8
5
7
1
60
8
4
1
1,805
69
1

15
8
260
404
6,682
90
8,737
4,149

7

486
303
346
4,568
132
8,909
565
81
2

12,587

15,393

3,338

20,507

*Less than $500 thousand.
Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.
Excluded from budget authority above.

1
2
2




SUMMARY TABLES

317

Table 7. OUTLAYS FROM BUDGET AUTHORITY AVAILABLE THROUGH
CURRENT ACTION BY CONGRESS (in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military i
Defense-Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury Department
Energy Research and Development Administration
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. _
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies
Allowances2
Total outlays from budget authority available through current action by Congress..

1975

1976

TQ

653
266
59
1,723
11,848
732
62,221
1,326
25, 759
240
1,969
1,254
3,293
707
2,682
3,981
1,612
346
273
2, 225
14,986
7,517

814
308
64
2,421
12,139
860
67,639
1,657
27,518
538
2,205
1,355
7,904
813
3,335
2.610
2,161
433
303
2,461
17,700
7,577
200

14
8
6
5
1
4
11
7
1,672
11
8
15,076
17
7
3,342
58
33
8
253
456
37
2
71
6
532
59
9
13
2
46
32
2
3,084
1,232
10
5

145,674

163,016

29,208

1977

874
33
5
68
2,382
9,828
86
0
74,616
1,717
30,569
1,278
2,374
1,377
7,611
86
9
3,300
2,589
2,837
408
36
0
2.496
15,815
8,788
2.260
173,550

MEMORANDUM
From appropriations to liquidate contract authority: 3

Legislative branch
Fund s appropr iated to the Presidnet
Agriculture
Commerce
Housing and Urban Developm ent
Interior
Transportation
Environmental Protection Agency
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies
Total outlays from appropriations to liquidate contract authority

*
4.575
12
9
243
2.235
99
5,467
41
4
7
13,259

6,984
18
9
38
2
3,109
92
8,187
55
6
66
2 _
19,532

1.699
30
7
1
900
29
1,621
59
0

4,859

*Less than $500 thousand.
1 Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
2 Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.
3
Excluded from outlays above.




7,385
222
404
4,215
72
8,703
4,049

25,049

318

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977
Table 8. RELATION OF BUDGET AUTHORITY TO OUTLAYS
(in millions of dollars)
Description

Budget authority available through current action by
Congress:
Enacted or recommended herein:
Appropriations 1
Contract authority..
Authority to spend debt receipts
Reappropriations and reauthorizations
To be requested separately:
Appropriations 1
..
Authority to spend debt receipts
Total budget authority available through
current action by Congress (table 6)

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

226,045
19,974
10,006
3

51,889
153
6

240,763
20,609
50
_
__

1,813
500

178

6,928

271,123

258,341

52,226

268,350

204,968
62,957
3, 195
4

1976
estimate

Budget authority available without current action by
Congress (permanent authorizations):
Appropriations 1
Contract authority
Authority to spend debt receipts
Deductions for offsetting receipts (table 13):
Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the public

157,168
16,582
7, 384

183,340
14,950
6,000

44,542
1,789
239

207,091
16,701
3, 635

-28,869
-11,289

-40,562
-13,704

-7,433
-3,298

-43,299
-19,070

Total budget authority for the year (table 3 ) .

412,099

408,365

88,066

433,409

288,270
-20,975
-247,651

247,651
-515
-232,858

232,858
-4.487
-228.901

-4,396

-4,391

-4,501

4,391

4.501

5,003

355,287

428,007

102,453

433,377

188,312
—414
44
-218,629

218,629
111

273,212
—6

277,688
9,063

-273,212

-277.688

-325,890

324,601

373,535

97,971

394,237

Unobligated balances and adjustments:
Unobligated balances:
Brought forward at start of year (table 9)_ _.
235,637
Written off (rescinded, lapsed, etc.) 2 3
-5.261
Carried forward at end of year (table 9 ) . . . _ _ - 2 8 8 , 2 7 0
Application of new authority to prior obligations:
Budget authority of year, obligated previously
-3,314
Budget authority of subsequent year, obligated
currently
.
4,396
Obligations incurred, net (table 5)
Obligated balances:
Brought forward at start of year, funded (table
9)
Adjustments in expired accounts 4
Deficiency appropriations
Carried forward at end of year (table 9)
Outlays (table 4)




SUMMARY TABLES

319

Table 8. RELATION OF BUDGET AUTHORITY TO OUTLAYS—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Description

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

MEMORANDUM
Federal funds included above:
Budget authority available through current
action by Congress
Budget authority 5
Obligations incurred, net 5
Outlays s
1

270,590
315,220
261,020
238,527

257,558
309,345
325,075
276,923

Excludes appropriations to liquidate contract authority:
1975
ctual

1976
estimate

For later transmittaL
All othe




51,971
62,877
73,180
69,764

TQ
estimate

263,326
311,918
321,783
286,243

1977
estimate

00

Table 9. BALANCES OF BUDGET AUTHORITY (in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President:
International security assistance
International development assistance
Other
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense-Military i
Defense—Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury




Unobligated

Obligated

E n d 1976

E n d 1975

Start 1975

Unobligated

Obligated

Unobligated

Obligated

E n d 1977

End TQ

Unobligated

Obligated

Unobligated

Obligated

44
21
47

211
9
*

7
29
26

264
23
1

23
37
7

221
20

16
31
6

217
18

64
39
6

125
13

9,814
4,512
1,893
4,472
],782
28,608

5,557
10,648

13,116
4,689
1,292
4,335
1,684
27,266

7,020
10,373

16,343
5,014
1,129
4,275
2,090
37,756

7,509
10,280

16,975
4,749
1,074
4,488
1,991
37,255

6,603
10,277

19,687
4,606
1,018
4,630
1,694
44,989

6,239
10,589

259
7,086

321
15,122

811

220

19,030
84,508
1,290

51,781
36,791

],2\7

1,640

975
155
13,224

596

20,207
105,014
1,372
1,235
2,495

461

12,642

638

16,731

179

55,653
59,279
2,483

173
14,445

92

178

228

389

10,967
1,883

15,780

14,751
1,985

21,583

91

163

670

21,228
136,056
1,619
1,231
3,119

99

17,509
1,897

337

12,525

524

12,308

95

52,208
31,704
1,969

57

8,020

196

14,840
2,530

631

23,482
137,928
1,641
1,178
2,228

111

17,485
1,920

294

11,409

551

11,167

82

50,777
28,553
1,900

53

5,998

199

12,515
2,476

682

25,795
158,509
1,570
1,070
1,165

176

18,543
1,945

275

12,299

344

14,830

48

53,921
18,967
1,730

54

5,698

236

10,180
2,476

o

Total

1,441
5,516
382

354
8,136
13

1,791
7,909
207

412
11,719
50

2,646
10,066
216

500
7,140
27

2,756
10,472
232

500
6,085
1

918
1,769
1,980

485
9,592
34,076

897
1,700
2,459

468
9,696
38,253

1,349
2,174
3,006

51
9,973
42,609

1,372
2,288
3,096

52
9,990
42,414

229
*
232
3,215

8,638
8,196
4,326
3,412

187
-10
266
2,897

9,088
9,271
3,990
2,824

312
-13
270
3,057
25

9,571
7,280
3,787
11,371

192
-2
275
3,819

9,764
7,367
3,374
10,221

188,312

Energy Research and Development Agency. _
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Civil Service Commission
Export-Import Bank
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Federal Home Loan Bank Board
Railroad Retirement Board
Other independent agencies
Allowances 2

235,637

218,629

288,270

273,212

247,651

277,688

232,858

325,890

228,901

163,335
24,977

104,848
130,789

185,459
33,169

155,141
133,129

233,722
39,490

118,480
129,171

237,132
40,555

107,772
125,086

281,735
44,156

93,943
134,958

188,312

235,637

218,629

288,270

273,212

247,651

277,688

232,858

325,890

228,901

3,492
12,755
252
1,390
2,272
3,650
}\,\35
202
-8
281
3,950
330

500
20
10
52
10,388
48,130
" 10,521
7,751
3,460
10,044

MEMORANDUM
Federal funds.
Trust funds. _.
Total

"Less than $500 thousand.
Includes balances of allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Includes balances of allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.

1
2




i

CO

to

322

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 197 7

Table 10. FULL-TIME PERMANENT CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT IN THE
EXECUTIVE BRANCH *
As of June 30
Agency

Agriculture
Commerce
_...
Defense—military functions
Defense-civil functions
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development..
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
.-. — Energy Research and Development Administration _
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration.
Other:
Agency for International Development
Civil Service Commission
Federal Energy Administration
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Panama Canal
Selective Service System
Small Business Administration
Tennessee Valley Authority
United States Information Agency
Miscellaneous

1975
actual

.

1976
estimate

79,133
28,711
954,721
29,069
129,285
15,142
58,088
49,032
13,427
22,324
70,345
108,138
7,457
9,160
36,400
24, 333
184,502

80,400
28,900
930,700
29,100
135,000
15,000
59,200
51,600
14,600
22,900
72,400
113,500
8, 300
9,600
36,800
24,300
196,600

6,185
6,670
2,978
2,006
13,768
2,121
4,127
14,084
8,662
37,484

6,200
6,800
3,200
2,300
13,800
200
4,300
15,100
8,800
40,200

As of
Sept. 30.
1977,
estimate

80,400
28,700
924,000
29,100
128,900
15,700
59,300
51,700
14,900
22,900
72,600
110,000
8,400
9,600
36,000
23,800
198,100
6,200
6,900
2 1,800
2,500
13,800
100
4,400
15,500
8,800
40,200

Subtotal
Contingencies3

1,917,352 1,929,800 1,914,300
2,000
5,000

Subtotal...
Postal Service

1,917,352 1,931,800 1,919,300
558,311
542,600
543,600

Total

2,475,663 2,474,400

2,462,900

1
Excludes developmental positions under the worker-trainee opportunity program and certain
disadvantaged youth programs.
2
Excludes the impact of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975. Allowance for any necessary additional staff is included in contingencies.
3
Subject to later distribution.




323

SUMMARY TABLES
Table 11. BUDGET FINANCING AND OUTSTANDING DEBT
(in millions of dollars)
BUDGET FINANCING
1975
actual
Budget surplus or deficit ( - ) . _
Surplus or deficit ( - ) of off-budget Federal agencies...

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

-43.604
-9,544

-76,001
-9,342

-16,077
-4,040

-42,975
-11,060

Total surplus or deficit
-53,149 -85,343 -20,117
Means of financing other than borrowing from the public:
Decrease or increase (—) in cash and monetary assets.
— 273
—1,411
Increase or decrease (—) in liabilities for:
1
1,362
167
Checks outstanding, etc.
131
579
-1,585
-182
Deposit fund balances
Seigniorage on coins
626
672
168

Total, means of financing other than borrowing
from the public
Total requirements for borrowing from the public...
Reclassification of securities 2 ...
Change in debt held by the public

2,295

- 5 0 , 853 -87,500
50,853

Nonbank investors
Commercial banks
Federal Reserve System

-2,157

87,500

117

-54,035

422
-591

704

535

-20,000

-53,500
—340

20,000

53,840

30,923
15,585
4,345
OUTSTANDING DEBT, END OF YEAR
1974
actual

Gross Federal debt:
Debt issued by Treasury
Debt issued by other agencies
Total gross Federal debt

474.235 3533, 188
12,012
10,943

623,188
10,743

642,100
10.699

709,701
9.810

486,247

544,131

633.931

652,799

719,511

140,194
346,053

147,225
396,906

149.525
484.406

148,393
504,406

161,265
558,246

80,649
265,404

84,993
311,913

Held by:

Government agencies
The public
Federal Reserve System
Others

DEBT SUBJECT TO STATUTORY LIMITATION, END OF YEAR
Debt issued by Treasury
474,235 3533,188
3
Treasury debt not subject to limitation
-617
—624
Agency debt subject to limitation
1,543
1,622
Notes not part of Federal debt but included
indebtlimit*
845
20

623,188
-614
1,629

642,100
-614
1,613

709,701
-614
1,286

20

20

20

Total debt subject to statutory limitation s._

624,223

643,119

710,393

476,006

534,207

1
Includes military payment certificates, accrued interest (less unamortized discount) on Treasury
debt, and as offset certain collections in transit.
2
On Oct. 1. 1976. Federal debt held by the public is estimated to increase by $340 million due
to 3 a reclassification of Export-Import Bank certificates of beneficial interest from asset sales to debt.
4 Includes $9 million of Federal Financing Bank debt in 1975.
Non-interest-bearing notes issued to the International Monetary Fund plus District of Columbia
stadium bonds. See Special Analysis C for further explanation.
5
The statutory debt limit is permanently established at $400 billion. Public Law 94—132 temporarily increased the statutory debt limit to $595 billion through Mar. 15, 1976. Legislation is
needed to change the limitation.




324

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977
Table 12.—BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE (in millions of dollars)
Source

1975

122,103

Withheld

Other
Proposed legislation
Gross individual income taxes

123,131

37,221

168,482

34,296

Individual income taxes:

1976

TQ

1977

37,520
-2

8,294
-4,630

42,112
-22,225

156,399

Corporation income taxes

40,885

188,369

-29,827

-882

-34,728

122,386

Net individual income taxes

160,649

-34,013

Refunds

130,822

40,003

153,641

45,747

10,366

61,440

-30
-5,900

-823
-1,127

-6,170
-5,809

40,621

40,056

8,416

49,461

55,207

Net corporation income taxes.

45,986

._
-5,125

Proposed legislation
Refunds

15,835

7,250

58,741
_
7,724

11,258
1,489

12,060
1,639

3,382
430

67,977
1,921
8,935
1,392
13,816
1,942
35

75,204

80,164

21,729

96,018

5,299

6,163

1,795

1,355

1,436

374

117

125

45

8,197
1,100
1,584
1,000
183

6,771

7,723

2,214

12,064

Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust funds):

Employment taxes and contributions:
Old-age and survivors insurance
Proposed legislation
Disability insurance
Proposed legislation
Hospital insurance
Railroad retirement
Proposed legislation

__ .

Total employment taxes and contributions
Unemployment insurance:
State taxes deposited in Treasury J
Proposed legislation
Federal unemployment tax receipts l
Proposed legislation
Railroad unemployment tax receipts *
Total unemployment insurance

2,082

Contributions for other insurance and retirement:
Supplementary medical insurance
Federal employees' retirement—employee contributions
Other retirement contributions2

1,901

1,921

528

2,162

2,513
52

2,712
52

690
13

2,756
52

Total contributions for other insurance and retirement

4,466

4,684

1,231

4,970

Total social insurance taxes and contributions..

86,441

92,571

25,174

113,052

Excise taxes:

Federal funds:
Alcohol taxes:
Distilled spirits
Beer
Rectification tax
Wines
Special taxes in connection with liquor occupations
Refunds
Total alcohol taxes
See footnotes at end of table.




3,830
1,305
22
172

3,913
1,351
24
163

890
378
5
34

4,120
1,439
23
167

22
-113

23
-112

9
-27

24
-116

5,238

5,362

1,289

5,657

325

SUMMARY TABLES

Table 12—BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Source

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

2,261
51
1
1
-3

2,381
50
2
1
-4

577

2,486
49
2

2,312

2,430

587

2.533

29
51
22
11
4
-12

31
59
22
11

8
17
7
3

33
71
27
13

-9

105

114

31

134

2,024
6
104
7
2
65
19
1
-23

1,900
7
28
7
*
61
21
1
-17

503
1

1.828
7

6

7

2
5
*
-4

63
24
1
-16

2,204

2.008

513

1 914
,

-460

300

-40

1
2

9.400

10.214

2,380

1 ,250
0

Trust funds:
Highway:
Gasoline
Trucks, buses, and trailers.
Tires, innertubes, and tread rubber
Diesel fuel used on highways.
Use-tax on certain vehicles
Truck parts and accessories
Lubricating oils
Refunds

4,069
602
797
402
221
143
100
-146

4.123
375
566
370
208
130
94
-155

1,118
19
2
19
9
17
1
18
1
4
1
25
-1

4,313
578
830
440
226
13
6
12
1
-160

Total highway trust fund

6,188

5,711

1,746

6,502

Airport and airway:
Transportation of persons
Waybill tax
Tax on fuels
International departure tax
Aircraft registration fees
Tires and innertubes
Proposed legislation.

779
54
54
55
20
1

787
48
59
51
25
1
7

209
1
3
1
4
1
3
6
*
-9

81
5
55
6
1
54
26
1
8

Excise taxes—Continued

Federal funds—Continued
Tobacco taxes:
Cigarettes
Cigars
Cigarette papers and tubes
Other
Refunds
Total tobacco taxes
Manufacturers' excise taxes:
Gasoline
Firearms, shells, and cartridges
Fishing rods, creels, etc
Pistols and revolvers
Other
Refunds
Total manufacturers' excise taxes
Miscellaneous excise taxes:
General and toll telephone and teletype service.
Wagering taxes, including occupational taxes.__
Sugar tax
.
Coin-operated gaming devices
Interest equalization tax
Tax on foundations
Foreign insurance policies...
Other
Refunds
Total miscellaneous excise taxes
Undistributed Federal tax deposits and un
applied collections
Total Federal fund excise taxes

See footnotes at end of table.




11
*

1
-5

-4

-10

326

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

Table 12—BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Source

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Excise taxes—Continued
Trust funds—Continued

-1

245

1,054

6,687

1,991

7,556

16,901

4,371

17,806

5,180
-80

1,421
-1
-20

5,883
-3
-80

5,100

1,400

5,800

3,676

Customs duties

976

4,611

Total estate and gift taxes.

962

-11

Total excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes. _
Proposed legislation _
Refunds

-2

4,688

Total trust fund excise taxes.

-1

16,551

Total airport and airway trust fund

-2

7,151

Refunds

3,800

1,000

4,300

181

237

59
1,350

242
80
6,200

3

Miscellaneous receipts:
Miscellaneous taxes
Proposed legislation
Deposit of earnings, Federal Reserve System.
Fees for permits and regulatory and judicial services:
Immigration, passport, and consular fees
Patent and copyright fees
Registration and filing fees
Import fees on crude oil and petroleum products-Miscellaneous fees for permits, licenses, etc
Miscellaneous fees for regulatory and judicial services
Proposed legislation
Fees for legal and judicial services
Total fees for permits and regulatory and judicial
services
Fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Proposed legislation
War reparations and recoveries under military occupation
L
Gifts and contributions---.
Undistributed collections

5,777

5,550

50
30
56
443
26

53
32
137
1,789
31

13
8
19
33
8

53
32
90
255
34

19

49

13

*

*

*

25
62
*

624

2,090

93

550

Total budget receipts

86
228

22

96

59
22
—41

58
35

1
4

3
30

6,711

Total miscellaneous receipts

90

8,284

1,530

7,202

280,997

297,534

81,894

351,262

187,505
118,590
-25,098

198,373
134,754
-35,593

54,758
33,783
-6,647

230,755
157,684
-37,177

MEMORANDUM

Federal funds...
_
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

_

*Lcss than $500 thousand.
1
Deposits by States are State payroll taxes that cover the benefit part of the program. Federal
unemployment tax receipts cover administrative costs at both the Federal and State level. Railroad unemployment tax receipts cover both the benefits and administrative costs of the program
for2 the railroads.
Represents employer and employee contributions to the civil service retirement and disability
fund for covered employees of Government-sponsored, privately owned enterprises and the District of Columbia municipal government.
3
Includes both Federal and trust funds. Trust fund amounts in miscellaneous receipts are: 1975,
$40 million; 1976, $47 million; TQ. $7 million; and 1977, $44 million.
Note.— Estimates for 1976. TQ and 1977 include effects of proposed legislation.




SUMMARY TABLES

327

Table 13. OFFSETTING RECEIPTS BY TYPE (in millions of dollars)
Type

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

INTRAGOVERNMENTAL TRANSACTIONS
Intrabudgetary transactions:
Federal intrafund transactions:

Interest on Government capital in enterprises __
Other

1.234
31

1,563
23

261
8

1 425
.
77

1,265

1,586

269

1 502
,

1,010
25

1,083
9

3

1 789
,
6

Total trust intrafunds

1.035

1,092

3

1 295
,

Total intrafund transactions.

2.300

2,678

273

2 797
,

307
244
2,330
481
3,837
785
1

268
295
2,939
610
250
4,777
8,512
2

12
1.100
1

236
622
5,047
666
250
7,216
4,500
2

6,205
87

6,355
219

1,626
59

6,542
182

14,278

24,227

3,675

25,264

130
9

15
4

36

15
4

19
3

15
4

36

15
4

14,417

24,372

3,712

25,409

1,918

2,052

521

2,085

1,082
13

1,138
15

301
4

1,295
15

3,014

3,205

826

3,396

7,667

8,015

2,110

8,373

Total interfunds undistributed by agency and
function

10,681

11,220

2,936

11,768

Total interfund transactions

25,098

35,593

6,647

37,177

Total intrabudgetary transactions

27,398

38,271

6,920

39,974

Total Federal intrafunds.
Trust intrafund transactions:

1

Railroad retirement/social security.
Other

Interhind transactions:
Distributed by agency and function:

Federal fund payments to trust funds:
Contributions to insurance programs:
Old-age and survivors insurance
Military service credits, various programs..
Supplementary medical insurance
Hospital insurance
Railroad dual benefits
Supplementary retirement contributions. _.
Unemployment insurance
Other
Miscellaneous contributions:
State and local governmentfiscalassistance .
Other
Subtotal
Trust fund payments to Federal funds:
Charges for services to trust funds
Other
Subtotal.
Total interfunds distributed by agency
and function

878

Undistributed by agency and function:

Employer share, employee retirement:
Civil service retirement and disability insurance
Old-age, survivors, disability, and hospital
insurance (contribution as employer)2
Other Federal employees retirement
Total employer share, employee retirement.
Interest received by trust funds

See footnotes at end of table.
210-000 0 - 7 6 - 2 2




328

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Table 13. OFFSETTING RECEIPTS BY TYPE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Type

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

Receipts from off-budget Federal agencies:
Distributed by agency and function:

Interest on loans to Government-owned enterprises
.
Dividends and other earnings
„
Total distributed by agency and function

455
50

1,254
50

360

2,252

505

1,304

360

2,252

967

988

153

1,072

1,471

2,292

513

3,325

28,869

40,562

7,433

43,299

Undistributed by agency and function:

Employer share, employee retirement
Total receipts from off-budget Federal agencies..
Total intragovernmental transactions

PROPRIETARY RECEIPTS FROM THE PUBLIC
Distributed by agency and function:
Interest:

Interest on loans, Foreign Assistance Act
Interest on foreign military credit sales
Interest on loans to United Kingdom
Interest on rural electrification loans
Other interest on foreign loans and deferred foreign
collections
Other interest (domestic—civil)3
Other interest (domestic—national defense)
Total interest...

._

Dividends and other earnings

Rents:
Rent and bonuses from land leases for resource exploration and extraction
Rent of land and other real property 3
Rent of equipment and other personal property

89
62
60

209
70
59
9

47
18

222
75
58
44

14
86
16

11
99
17

4
22
2

12
94
]7

93

521

328
2

475
2

*

2

15
62
38

18
61
21

4
5
5

22
74
21

116

100

14

117

Royalties 3

367

392

87

443

Sale of products:
Sale of timber and other natural land p r o d u c t s 3 . . .
Sale of power and other utilities
Sale of other products
Recovery of mint m anuf acturing expense

541
435
27
37

673
397
55
44

214
239
13
11

677
986
41
51

1,041

1,170

477

1,755

Totalrents.

Total sale of products
Fees and other charges for services and special
benefits:

Veterans life insurance (trust funds)
Other 3
Total fees and other charges
See footnotes at end of table.




472
396

477
413

124
101

508
484

868

890

224

992

SUMMARY TABLES

329

Table 13. OFFSETTING RECEIPTS BY TYPE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Type

1975
actual

Sale of Government property:
Sale of land and other real property 3
Sale of equipment and other personal property:
Sale from the stockpile of strategic and critical
m aterials
Military assistance program sales (trust fund)
Other
Profit on the sale of gold
Sale of scrap and salvage material3

40
991
4,415
52
93
20

1976
estimate

48

TQ
estimate

11

1977
estimate

62

124

26

870

6,500

1,664

7,200

29
61
4

7

42

*

1

5,611

6,766

1,708

8,176

105
94
70
™
197

187
94
71
'
408

74
24

105

288
85
73
"
435

466

760

202

881

65

157

14

158

-3

-7

-23

25

Total proprietary receipts from the public distributed by agency and function

8,861

10,704

2,798

13,070

Undistributed by agency and function:
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf:
Rents and bonuses
Royalties

1,936
492

2,400
600

350
150

5,300
700

Total proprietary receipts from the public undistributed by agency and function

2,428

3,000

500

6,000

11,289

13,704

3,298

19,070

40,158

54,266

10,731

62,368

Total sale of property
Realization upon loans and investments:
Foreign military credit sales
Dollar conversion of foreign currency
Repayment of loans to United Kingdom
Other
Total realization upon loans and investments
Recoveries and refunds

3

Deposits in clearing accounts

Total proprietary receipts from the public
Total offsetting receipts

4

•Less than $500 thousand.
1
Interchange receipts between the social security and railroad retirement funds place the social
security funds in the same position they would have been if there were no separate railroad retirement
system. Interchange receipts between Federal retirement funds occur when an employee transfers
from coverage by one system to coverage by another system.
2
Includes provision for covered Federal civilian employees and military personnel.
3
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
* Consists of:
TQ
1977
1975
1976
estimate
1, 4 1 1
6,357
10,973
Federal funds
6,050
1, 8 8 6
7,347
8,096
Trust funds
5,240




330

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION A N D AGENCY
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

050

1976
estimate

1975
actual

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

NATIONAL DEFENSE

051 Department of Defense—Military:
Military personnel
Retired military personnel
Operation and maintenance
Procurement
Research, development, test, and evaluation.
Military construction
_
Other 1
Allowances
_
Deductions for offsetting receipts

24,963
6,251
26.176
16.698
8,572
1,927
1.407
-182

053 Atomic energy defense activities:
Energy Research and Development Administration
054 Defense-related activities:
Funds appropriated to the President
General Services Administration
Other independent agencies:
Central Intelligence Agency
Renegotiation Board
Selective Service System
Other temporary commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total 054.
Deductions for offsetting receipts 2 .
Total national defense

96,202

22,980

111.250

11.262
-6,760

1,734
-1,756

10.080
-7,565

5.656

Total 052.

25.436
8.382
31.928
29,310
10,854
2,277
1,632
1,596
-165

10.243
-4.587

052 Military assistance:
Funds appropriated to the President 1 .
Deductions for offsetting receipts

6.603
1.963
7.464
4.155
2.395
7
6
35
0
2
8
-9

85.812

Total 051.

25.604
7.326
28.871
21.206
9.463
2.360
1.455
52
-136

4,502

-22

2,516

1,484

1,661

452

1,943

9

16

4

27

5
45
1

6
38
1

2
7

28
6
7

-999
-1,024

-124
-63

-26
-14

-870
-802

-4

-3

-1

-3

91.925

102,299

23,394

114,905

-85

__.

150 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
151 Foreign economic and financial assistance:
Funds appropriated to the President l
Department of Agriculture
Department of State
Department of Transportation l
Other independent agencies: ACTION 1
Deductions for offsetting receipts
_

Total 151.
152 Conduct of foreign affairs:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of State 1
Other independent agencies:
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
Foreign Claims Settlement Commission/.
Sec footnotes at end of table.




2,773
78
7
6
8
2
0
7
8
-14

4,542
1,090
3
7
3
6
8
2
-42

31
8
16
4
1
8
2
6
-7

3,704

5.744

54
5

4,218
1,169
1
0
3
1
6
7
-35
5,461

17

16
683

1
7
798

38
6

1,009

9
1

1
1
1

3
*

1
2
1

SUMMARY TABLES

331

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit
150 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS—Continued
152 Conduct of foreign affairs—Continued
Other independent agencies—Continued
International Trade Commission
Other temporary commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

153 Foreign information and exchange activities:
Department of State l
Other independent agencies:
Board for International Broadcasting. _
Japan-United States Friendship Commission.. _
United States Information Agency l
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 153

1
0
-56

3
-12

1
2
-65

64
7

Total 152.

9
2
-46

71
8

32
6

95
8

61

6
5
64
18
277

1
3
1
8

6
9
53

74
_*

24
6

104

386

50
244
—*
354

424

-50

-50

3,348
-50

^50

-50

3.298

-263

-449

-77

-464

4,420

6,450

944

9,666

381

424

105

481

720
2

718
2

805
2

1 13
,0

1 15
.4

168
1
274

1
.288

253 Manned space flight:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration __

15 0
,1

17 0
.9

48
6

1
,891

254 Space science, applications, and technology:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. -

1,077

1,120

297

1,087

255 Supporting space activities:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration 1.
Deductions for offsetting receipts

332
—2

155 Internationalfinancialprograms:
Other independent agencies:
Export-Import Bank of the United States
Deductions for off setting receipts
Total 155
Deductions for off setting receipts

2

Total international affairs... 250 GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
251 General science and basic research:
Energy Research and Development Administration
_
Other independent agencies:
l
National Science Foundation
Smithsonian Institution l
Total 251.

Total 255

-

Deductions for offsetting receipts 2
Total general science, space, and technology...
See footnotes at end of table.




4,018

35
5

88

35
5

-3

330

88

-1

-2

4,374

1.126

4,618

322
-1 .
.
31
2

332

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

300 NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT,
AND ENERGY
301

Water resources and power:

Department of Agriculture l
Department of Defense—Civil i
Department of the Interior 1 ...
_
Department of State
Other independent agencies:
Delaware River Basin Commission
Susquehanna River Basin Commission
Tennessee Valley Authority
Water Resources Council!
Deductions for offsetting receipts

.._.

Total 301
302 Conservation and land management:
Department of Agriculture!
Department of Commerce
Department of the Interior 1
Department of State
Other independent agencies: Marine Mammal
Commission
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 302
303

151
1,790
1,947
13

226
2,146
672
15

45
660
198
3

161
2,200
787
12

*
*
77
14
-437

*
*
10,100
15
-276

*
*
31
3
-73

*
*
121
16
-311

3,554

12,899

866

2,986

1,223
18
287
5

337
5
80
2

1,168
23
293
6

1,279
15
253
4
1

1

*

1

-265

-417

11

-495

1,287

1.117

435

995

2
*
229

2
4
915

Recreational resources:

Department of Agriculture
Department of Defense—Civil
Department of the Interior 1
Other independent agencies: Other temporary
commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 303
304 Pollution control and abatement:
Department of the Interior
Department of Transportation
Environmental Protection Agency l
Other independent agencies:
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin
Other temporary commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts....
Total 304
305 Energy:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of the Interior
Energy Research and Development Administration i
Environmental Protection Agency
See footnotes at end of table.




1

4
1

2

963

557
*

*

—1

—2

—1

—2

965

861

230

919

*
2
8,383

*
12
671

*
1
167

*
10
621

*
7
-*

*

*

-*

-*

—*

683

169

631

67

57
21
2
62

59
5
1
15

368
21
2
66

1,660
134

2,946
101

748
21

3,633
97

8,391

20

333

SUMMARY TABLES

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT,
AND ENERGY—Continued
305 Energy—Continued
Other independent agencies:
Energy Independence Authority
Federal Energy Administration
Federal Power Commission
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Deductions for offsetting receipts

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

300

350

769

3,981

513
415
-7

141
103
-2

548
469
-7

921

243

1,010

-756

-814

-333

-819

16,484

19,189

2,380

9,702

4,923

3,158

63

1,259

997
-46

1,027
-48

257
-12

1,056
-51

979

245

1,005

-2

-2

_*

-2

5,873

4,135

308

2,262

136
7,304

123
6,065

*
241

177
984

9,439

Total natural resources, environment, and energy.

3,522

91
5

Deductions for offsetting receipts

2

42
155
42
249
-694

878

Total 306

25
9
52
-166

458
426
-6

306 Other natural resources:
Department of Commerce 1
Department of the Interior *
Deductions for offsetting receipts

198
37
218
-117

2,166

Total 305

130
33
135
-13

6,189

241

1,160

1,875

1,690

431

1,459

6
358
*
3
1

7
404
4

2
103
1

429
4

AGRICULTURE

351 Farm income stabilization:
Department of Agriculture 1
i
352 Agricultural research and services:
Department of Agriculture l
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 352
Deductions for offsetting receipts

2

Total agriculture
400

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION

401 Mortgage credit and thrift insurance:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Other independent agencies:
Federal Home Loan Bank Board
Total 401
402 Postal Service:
Other independent agencies: Postal Service.
Other advancement and regulation of commerce:
Legislative branch
Department of Commerce l
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Department of the Treasury l
General Services Administration

2,000

403




end of table.

1

334

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

400

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION—
Continued
403 Other advancement and regulation of Commerce—Continued

Other independent agencies:
Commodity Futures Trading Commission
Federal Communications Commission
Federal Trade Commission
National Center for Productivity and Quality of
Working Life...
.
Securities and Exchange Commission
Small Business Administration
Other temporary commissions
Total 403___
404

_

3
13
12

49
318
1
-21

-5

875

153

1,136

16,392

4,908

209

8,151

2

12
51
53
*

13
10
*

5
52
541
*
-22

Ground transportation:

Department of Transportation 1
_
Other independent agencies:
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
...
Interstate Commerce Commission
United States Railway Association
Total 404

406 Water transportation:
Department of Commerce *
_
Department of Defense—Civil
J
Department of Transportation
Other independent agencies:
Federal Maritime Commission

_

27
13
302

116
55
1,403

5,487

550

9,725

1,738
314

2,274
323

524
80

2,372
364

85

81

20

102

2,678

624

2,838

131

406
--1,202

577
30
932

576
-_
1,083

280

7

_

8

2

8

—*

---

—*

1,667

413

1,616

65

63

16

68

10

11

3

12

75

74

19

80

-60

_

—*
1,546

Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total406_._

100
66
414

2,137

Total 405

127
45
12
16,575

_

405 Air transportation:
Department of Transportation *
National Aeronautics and Space Administration..
Other independent agencies: Civil Aeronautics
Board
._

407

2
44
354
1
843

_

11
51
47

-16

Deductions for offsetting receipts

4
47
39

—55

-22

-89

2,410

17,925

Other transportation:

Department of Transportation-.._
Other independent agencies: National Transportation Safety Board....
_
Total 407...
Deductions for offsetting receipts

2

Total commerce and transportation
See footnotes at end of table.




-

32,431

18,605

SUMMARY TABLES

335

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

125
9

1977
estimate

12
2

450 COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
451 Community development:
Department of Agriculture
_
Department of Commerce
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare..
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Other independent agencies:
ACTION
.
Commission of Fine Arts
Community Services Administration
District of Columbia
_
National Capital Planning Commission
___
Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation

10
_

Total452
453 Disaster relief and insurance:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Other independent agencies: Small Business Administration
Total 453
2

Total community and regional development

54

3,517

100
*
579
153
2

101
*
424
249

21
*
93

94
*
334
115
2

1

1

*

38

3,015

184

4,110

278
256
338
649

311
303
506
657

12
41
121
193

364
348
316
685

5

5

1

5

1
-192

1
-311

*
-85

*
-285

1,336

452 Area and regional development:
Funds appropriated to the President. _ _
Department of Agriculture....
Department of Commerce l
_
Department of the Interior l
Other independent agencies:
Appalachian Regional Commission *
Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning Commission for Alaska J
Deductions for offsetting receipts

2,103

3,730

TotaI451

Deductions for offsetting receipts

30
6
26
2,833

1,473

284

1,432

200
10
50

150
10
75

38
2
19

100
10
108

92

101

*

91

32
5
-27

36
3
-30

5
9
-4

39
0
-32

5,391

4,794

53
2

5,819

4,549
226

4,444
243

2,567
79

5,092
244

4,775

4,687

2,647

5,335

2,549
-682
9

2,466
14
1 .

182
4

2,145

2

*

500 EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT,
AND SOCIAL SERVICES
501 Elementary, secondary, and vocational education:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. __
Department of the Interior
Total 501
502 Higher education:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. _
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Department of the Treasury
._.
See footnotes at end of table.




336

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

550 EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT,
AND SOCIAL SERVICES—Continued
502—Higher education—Continued
Other independent agencies:
Harry S Truman Scholarship Foundation 1
Total 502

1,876

503 Research and general education aids:
Legislative branch i
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare * _
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies:
Corporation for Public Broadcasting
National Commission on Libraries and Information Science
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities l
Smithsonian Institution
Deductions for offsetting receipts

2.491

186

2,145

and employment:
of Commerce
of Health, Education, and Welfare. _ _ _
of L a b o r 1 . . . .

116
296

62

70

18

70

*

*

*

1

169
92
-10

193
100
-10

59
27
-2

200
114
-10

749

313

786

506 Social services:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare....
Other independent agencies: Cabinet Committee on
Opportunities for Spanish-Speaking People
Total 506
2

Total education, training, employment, and
social services

125
210
4,310

374
400
6,808

80
745

260
3,433

7,582

825

3,693

198

235

59

264

*
16
63
3

*
19
70
3

*
5
18
1

*
20
78
4

328

83

366

3,198

3,939

890

3,655

3,199

Total 505




25
188

280

505 Other labor services:
Department of Labor L .
Other independent agencies:
Committee for Purchase of Products and Services
of the blind and other Severely Handicapped..
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
National Labor Relations Board
National Mediation Board

See footnotes at end of table.

100
289
7

4,645

Total 504

Deductions for offsetting receipts

84
358

754

Total503
504 Training
Department
Department
Department

10

3,939

890

3,655

-5

-38

-1

-38

15,526

19,738

4,942

15,943

*

SUMMARY TABLES

337

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

550 HEALTH
551 Health care services:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare K _
Other independent agencies: Civil Service Commission i
Deductions for offsetting receipts

28,378

31,951

8,511

29,657

265
-2,859

348
-3,597

99
-878

452
-5,854

552 Health research and education:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare..

2,882

2,562

576

2, 712

553 Prevention and control of health problems:
Executive Office of the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare _.
Department of the Interior
Department of Labor.__.
Other independent agencies:
Consumer Product Safety Commission
Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety
Board of Review
.
Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission

13
201
465
68
102

228
447
84
118

65
99
21
30

232
417
90
128

37

37

9

37

*

Total 554

919

226

911

383
*
—2

196

52

202

—1

—*

—1

382

554 Health planning and construction:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare K
Department of the Interior (trust fund)
Deductions for offsetting receipts

6

891

Total 553

6

1

6

195

52

201

555 General health financing assistance:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. __
Deductions for offsetting receipts

2

Total health

_

_..

602 Federal employee retirement and disability:
Legislative branch (trust fund)
The judiciary (trust fund)
See footnotes at end of table.




—5

—39

—1

—41

29,935

600 INCOME SECURITY
601 General retirement and disability insurance:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 1 .
Department of Labor l
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies: Railroad Retirement
Board*...
„.
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 601

10,002

32,339

8.584

38,038

68,133
16
1,750

72,297
25

19,099
6

86,450
33

2,779
-1,513

3,524
-1,848

494
-*

4,021
-2,256

71,165

73,998

19,599

88,247

*
2

*
3

*
1

*
3

338

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL TEAR 1977

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

1976

1975

1977

TQ

600 INCOME SECURITY—Continued
602

Federal employee retirement and disabilityContinued
Department of Labor..
Department of State (trust fund)
Other independent agencies: Civil Service Commission (trust fund)
_
_
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total 603
Public assistance and other income supplements:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Department of Housing and Urban Development _
Department of State
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies: Railroad Retirement

288
106

11,361
-28

12,933
-6

2.099
-3

15,826
-6

13,302

2,196

16,217

15,791
-785

603 Unemployment insurance:
Department of Labor x_ _
Deductions for offsetting receipts.

75
24

11,595

_

276
96

21,638
-8,512

3,385
-1,100

21,072
-4,500

15,006

Total 602

155
105

13.126

2,285

16,572

6,819
9.984
44,420
305

7,686
11,625
19,403

1,472
3,131
110

6,825
12,120
17,092

604

Board

_

38

2

40

39,951

4,723

36,676

-1

_

10

61,528

Total 604
Deductions for offsetting receipts

600

1.200

-35

-35

159.294

140.342

28,803

157,678

8.421
-474

9,159
-479

2,362
-124

9,046
-510

7.947

8,681

2,238

8,536

702 Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation:
Veterans Administration
__

4.551

6,215

1.091

4,160

703 Hospital and medical care for veterans:
Veterans Administration

3.771

4,448

1,063

4,437

16
*

21
*

5

22
*

456

51
3

12
2

522

19
2

6
_*
50
5

Total income security
700

_

VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES

701 Income security for veterans:
Veterans Administration 1
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 701.

704 Veterans housing:
Veterans Administration.
705 Other veterans benefits and services:
Department of Defense—Civil 1
Department of the Treasury (trust fund).
Veterans Administration l
Other independent agencies: American
Monuments Commission 1.
__
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total 705
See footnotes at end of table.




2 .

_
Battle

5
46
7

58
5

SUMMARY TABLES

339

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

700 VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES—
Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts 2

—2

—1

—2

16, 745

Total veterans benefits and services

—2
19,898

4,520

17,681

18
22
1,017
495
11

21
25
1,121
551
12

5
7
296
144
3

23
30
1,138
572
12

750 LAW ENFORCEMENT AND JUSTICE

751 Federal law enforcement and prosecution:
The judiciary l
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.
Department of Justice
Department of the Treasury
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Other independent agencies:
Administrative Conference of the United States.
Commission on Civil Rights
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission..
Legal Services Corporation
Other temporary commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts

752 Federal judicial activities:
Legislative branch
The judiciary
Other independent agencies: Indian Claims Commission
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 752

1
—2

8
65
88
1
—2

2
19
25
*
—*

1
10
70
80
*
—2

1,626

Total 751

1

1,892

500

1,933

8
296

7
324

2
81

7
371

7
55

1

1

*

1

—*

*

2

_

305

83

380

222

237

63

299

887

811

205

713

-9

-7

-3

-7

3,031

753 Federal correctional and rehabilitative activities:
Department of Justice!

332

3,264

849

3,318

635
—5

744
—5

183
—1

752
—5

630

740

181

747

63
*
2

70
1

18
*

73
1

754 Law enforcement assistance:
Department of Justice
Deductions for offsetting receipts

2

____

Total law enforcement and justice
800 GENERAL GOVERNMENT
801 Legislative functions:
Legislative branch
Deductions for offsetting receipts.
Total801
802 Executive direction and management:
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of the Treasury
See footnotes at end of table.




_

340

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY—Continued
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit
800 GENERAL GOVERNMENT—Continued
802 Executive direction and management—Continued
General Services Administration
__

1976

TQ

1977

804 General property and records management:
General Services Administration *
_
Other independent agencies: Other temporary
commissions __
__

*

1

7
1

1
8

7
5

2,008
-146

509
-36

2,011
-146

1,748

Total 803

*

1,879
-131

803 Central fiscal operations:
Department of the Treasury 1__
Deductions for offsetting receipts.

*

6
5

Total 802.

1,862

472

1,865

25
9

348

78

33
1

4
25
9

Total 804_
805 Central personnel management:
Other independent agencies:
Advisory Committee on Federal Pay
Civil Service Commission
Other temporary commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts

2 .
33
1

8
0

32
5

806 Other general government:
Legislative branch
The judiciary
Department of Defense—Civil
Department of the Interior!
Department of the Treasury \
General Services Administration
Other independent agencies:
Civil Service Commission
American Revolution Bicentennial Administration 1
Other historical and memorial agencies1
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental
Relations 1
.
Other temporary commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 806

._
2

Total general government

*
3,886

*
4,820

*
25

-3,792

-4,721

-*

*
7,256
*
-7,152

94

!__

Total 805

Deductions for offsetting receipts

1975

99

25

104

50

11

67

69
160
246
3

44
2
63
210
308
3

17
71
73
1

70
137
284
3

15

15

4

10

16

21

4
*

5
*

1
-24

18
-34

1
*
-9

*

1
I
-27

536

651

173

551

-292

-228

-39

-195

3,075

3,546

909

3,460

12,410
-6,213

12,713
-6,355

3,253
-1,626

13,088
-6,542

6,197

6,358

1,627

6,546

850 REVENUE SHARING AND GENERAL
PURPOSE FISCAL ASSISTANCE
851 General revenue sharing:
Department of the Treasury 1
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 851
See footnotes at end of table.




SUMMARY TABLES

341

Table 14. BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND A G E N C Y — C o n t i n u e d
(in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit
850 REVENUE SHARING AND GENERAL
PURPOSE FISCAL ASSISTANCE—
Continued
852 Other general purpose fiscal assistance:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Defense—Civil
Department of the Interior
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies:
District of Columbia
Federal Power Commission
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 852
Total revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal
assistance
.

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

11
2
4
23
0
21
8

9
1
4
26
0
2,640

18
1
1
12
5
80

22
7
*
-25

30
0
*
-60

15
0

1977
estimate

-40

37
4
13
5
35
4
33
2
*
-61

856

3,181

416

801

7,052

9,538

2,043

7,347

32,665

37,700

10,400

45,000

244

63

404

-1,935

342
1
-3,208

-695

-4,108

-1,691

-2,864

-631

-3,704

30,974

34,836

9,769

41,296

900 INTEREST
901 Interest on the public debt:
Department of the Treasury
902 Other interest:
Department of the Treasury
General Services Administration
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total902
Total interest
Allowances for:
Civilian agency pay raises
Contingencies for:
Relatively uncontrollable programs
Other requirements
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee retirement:
Interfund transactions
Receipts from off-budget Federal agencies
Interest received by trust funds
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf.
Total budget authority
MEMORANDUM
Federal funds
Trustfunds.
Interfund transactions

790
0
225

0
150

0
1,800

-3,014
-967
-7,667
-2,428

-3,205
-988
-8,015
-3,000

-826
-153
-2,110
-500

-3,396
-1,072
-8,373
-6,000

412,099

408,365

88,066

433,409

315,220 309,345
121,976 134,613
-25,098 -35,593

62,877
31,836
-6,647

311,918
158,668
-37,177

*Less than $500 thousand.
Includes both Federal and trust funds.
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been distributed by subfunction above.

1
2




342

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Table 15. OUTLAYS B Y FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

050 NATIONAL DEFENSE
051 Department of Defense—Military:
Military personnel
Retired military personnel
Operation and maintenance
Procurement
Research, development, test, and evaluation.
Military construction
Other i
Allowances
Deductions for offsetting receipts

052 Military assistance:
Funds appropriated to the President *_
Deductions for offsetting receipts

25,495
7,325
28,254

6,693
1,977

16,486

4.975

25,189
8,388
30,670
20,354

8,866

9,107

1,462
1,292

2,471
483
221

10,435
1,825
1,312

-182

1,840
1,341
51
-136

29
-9

1,553
-165

85,020

Total 051.

24,968
6,242
26.330
16,042

89,763

24,471

99,561

5,586
-4.587

8,196
-6.760

1,885
-1.756

8,104
-7,565

7,631

999

Total 052_
053 Atomic energy defense activities:
Energy Research and Development Administration,
054 Defense-related activities:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare _ _
General Services Administration
Other independent agencies:
Central Intelligence Agency
Renegotiation Board
Selective Service System
Other temporary commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts

1,437

129

539

1.506

1,621

443

1,833

*
16

26
28
6

Deductions for offsetting receipts _
Total national defense

-26

-870

-59

-14

-801

-4

-3

86,585

92,759

25,028

101,129

2.565
936
76
1
5
87
-14

3,612
1,209
56
40
78
-42

770
13
6
4
1
2
24
-7

3,657
996
1
3
40
66
-35

3,665

2

6
41
1
-124

-936

Total 054_

5
48
1
-999

4,953

964

4,736

1
6
667

1
7
830

344

1
7
935

10
1
8
1

10
2
10
*

3
1
3

1
1
1
1
1

2
6
*

-3

150 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
151 Foreign economic and financial assistance:
Funds appropriated to the President1
Department of Agriculture
Department of State
Department of Transportationx
Other independent agencies: ACTION *
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 151 _
152

Conduct of foreign affairs:

Funds appropriated to the President
Department of State l
Other independent agencies:
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
Foreign Claims Settlement Commission. _
I nternational Trade Commission
Other temporary commissions
See foo




end of table.

SUMMARY TABLES

343

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Con.
Function and department or other unit
150

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

—46

—56

— 12

—65

658

814

339

910

58

63

1
9

6
1

50
240
—*

63
272
—*

1
8
7
0
_*

54
20
7
_*

348

398

108

385

-50

-50

1,306
-50

-50

-50 .

1,256

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS—Continued

152

Conduct of foreign affairs—Continued

Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 152
153

1975
actual

Foreign information and exchange activities:

Department of State 1
Other independent agencies:
Board for International Broadcasting
United States Information Agency J
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 153

155 International financial programs:
Other independent agencies: Export-Import Bank
of the United States
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 155
2

-263

-449

-77

-464

4,358

5,665

1,334

6,824

374

400

107

434

62
6
2

71
2
2

74
3
2

1,038

1,124

21
2
1
38
2

1,170

253 Manned space flight:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration

1,535

1,735

49
6

1,865

254 Space science, applications, and technology:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration

1,084

1,118

21
8

1,125

36
3
-2

38
3

80

34
3

37
3

8
0

39
4
_*
39
4

—z

-3

-1

-2

3,989

4,311

1,157

4,507

68
78
0
19
8
4

2,189

Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total international affairs

250 GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
251 General science and basic research:
Energy Research and Development Administration,
Other independent agencies:
National Science Foundation 1
Smithsonian Institution l
Total 251

255 Supporting space activities:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration !__

Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 255
Deductions for offsetting receipts

2

Total general science, space, and technology

- 1 _.

300 NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT,
AND ENERGY
301 Water resources and power:
Department of Agriculture1
Department of Defense—Civil1
Department of the Interior 2
Department of State
See footnotes at end of table.
210-000 0 - 7 8 - 2 3



19
6

19
9

2,070

2,149

62
7
1
8

64
0
2
1

18
8
72
6
1
4

344

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Con.
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

300 NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT,
AND ENERGY—Continued
301

Water resources and power—Continued

Other independent agencies:
Delaware River Basin Commission
Susquehanna River Basin Commission
Other temporary commissions
Tennessee Valley Authority
Water Resources Council 1
.
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 301
302

Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total 302

Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total 303

250
6
-73

1,049
16
-311

3,274

3,827

1,151

3,908

1,317
7
237
4

1,424
17
304
5

457
5
70
2

1,207
17
291
6

1
-265

1
-417

11

-495

1,300

1,333

546

1,027

2
2
823

3
2
897

3
1

2
3
956

*

*

-1

-2

-1

-2

825

900

248

959

*

*

Pollution control and abatement:

Department of the Interior
Department of Transportation
Environmental Protection Agency 1
Other independent agencies:
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin
Other temporary, commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total 304
305

*
*

*

Recreational resources:

Department of Agriculture
Department of Defense—Civil
Department of the Interior *
Other independent agencies: Other temporary
commissions

304

*
*

767
13
-437

*
*
*
1,112
17
-276

Conservation and land management:

Department of Agriculture l
Department of Commerce
Department of the Interior *
Department of State
Other independent agencies: Marine Mammal
Commission

303

*
*

246

7
2,507

8
3,073

*
1
814

8
4,380

*

*
7
_*

*
1
_*

_*

3,087

816

4,388

43

1
1
2
1
2
5
2

2
9
5
*
1
8

34
0
2
1
2
6
3

1,298
23

2,068
10
2

64
4
2
4

3,054
10
2

121
34
86

17
9
3
8
20
0

1
5
8
5
2

4
2
15
8
4
1
26
3

8

2,522

Energy:

Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of the Interior
Energy Research and Development Administration i
Environmental Protection Agency
Other independent agencies:
Energy Independence Authority
Federal Energy Administration
Federal Power Commission
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
See footnotes at end of table.




19

SUMMARY TABLES

345

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)-Con.
Function and department or other unit

300

1975

TQ

1977

NATURAL RESOURCES. ENVIRONMENT.
AND ENERGY—Continued

Deductions for off setting receipts

-13

2

Deductions for offsetting receipts _.
Total natural
energy
350

resources,

environment,

3,375

428
340
-6

472
405
-7

128
106
-2

515
426
-7

81
7

22
3

94
3

-814

-333

-819

9,537

Total 306

69
2

-756

__

2,592

72
6

306 Other natural resources:
Department of Commerce *
Department of the Interior *
Deductions for offsetting receipts

-117

1,611

Total 305

-166

-694

11,796

3,289

13,772

785

1,896

492

77
1

and

AGRICULTURE

351 Farm income stabilization:
Department of Agriculture * _ _
Other independent agencies: Farm Credit Administration
___

_

1,029
-48

263
-12

1,065
-51

91
8

20
5

1,014

-2

1,660

Deductions for offsetting receipts ___

77
1

-2

2

42
9

87
7

Total 352

1,896

922
-46

352 Agricultural research and services:
Department of Agriculture * _ _ _
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total agriculture

_*

_*
75
8

Total 351

400

1976

2,875

72
4

1,729

-892
3.199

278
1,630

90
389

-462
982

-408
924
-14

-608
-6
-16

-74
-99
-5

-767
-378
-21

2,810

1,278

33
0

-647

1,877

1,690

41
3

1,459

6
373
—2
10
1

7
40
2
-1
1
9
1

2
12
0
2
-11
*

8
43
3
_*
_
5
1

-2

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION

401 Mortgage credit and thrift insurance:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Housing and Urban DevelopmentOther independent agencies:
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (trust
fund)
Federal Home Loan Bank Board
___
National Credit Union Administration
Total 401

._

_

402 Postal Service:
Other independent agencies: Postal Service
403

Other advancement and regulation of commerce:
Legislative branch.
Department of Commerce 1
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Department of the Treasury *
General Services Administration
.

See footnotes at end of table.




346

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Con.
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

12
—6
51
47

3
—1
13
13

12
—5
52
53

52
311
1

12
78
*

400 COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION—
Continued
403

Other advancement and regulation of
commerce—Continued

Other independent agencies:
Commodity Futures Trading Commission
Emergency Loan Guarantee Board
Federal Communications Commission
Federal Trade Commission..
.....
National Center for Productivity and Quality of
Working life
Securities and Exchange Commission
Small Business Administration
Other temporary commissions..

1
—7
48
39
1
44
441
*

Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total 403..

-16

_

1

-21

5
52
315
*

-5

-22

939

Total 405
406 Water transportation:
Department of Commerce1
Department of Defense—Civil..
Department of Transportation1
Other independent agencies:
Federal Maritime Commission
Other temporary commissions

910

*
6,256

2
8,865

2,482

9,358

175
46
*
23

182
52
*
420

40
13

185
60

202

543

9,519

2,737

10,146

2,012
316

2,273
330

590
80

2,347
339

81

92

23

95

2,695

694

2,781

535
-3
921

405 Air transportation:
Department of Transportation i
National Aeronautics and Space Administration..
Other independent agencies: Civil Aeronautics
Board

209

2,408

Total 404

895

6,501

404 Ground transportation:
Department of Housing and Urban Development _
Department of Transportation!__
Other independent agencies:
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
.
Interstate Commerce Commission
Other temporary commissions
United States Railway Association. _
_.

627
3
1,066

161
-*
285

708
-3
1,155

8

2

7
* "
_

Deductions for offsetting receipts

-

-*

-*

1,459

Total 406
407

2

1,703

8
-*

448

1,868

Other transportation:

Department of Transportation
Other independent agencies: National Transportation Safety Board
Total 407.'

_
2

Deductions for offsetting receipts ....
Total commerce and transportLtion
See footnotes at end of table.




_

65

65

16

59

9

12

3

12

74

77

19

71

-60

-55

-22

-89

16,010

17,801

4,819

16,498

SUMMARY TABLES

347

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Con.
Function and department or other unit

450

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

451

Community development:

Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare-..
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Other independent agencies:
ACTION
Commission of Fine Arts
Community Services Administration
District of Columbia
National Capital Planning Commission. _ _
Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation
Other temporary commissions
Total 451

__._

452 Area and regional development:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce1
Department of the Interior 1
Other independent agencies:
Appalachian Regional Commission *_
.
National Council on Indian Opportunity
Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning Commission for Alaska1
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total452
453 Disaster relief and insurance:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Other independent agencies: Small Business
Administration
Total 453
Deductions for offsetting receipts 2
Total community and regional development

35
3
9
2,284

62
7
22
2,974

16
2
4
803

84
8
7
2,897

92
*
530
193
2

112
*
508
202
2

26
*
128
42
*

93
*
365
186
2

1

1
*

*

3,149

3,892

1,021

3,667

311
-31
301
517

339
208
388
738

96
69
99
205

327
218
333
737

4
*

6

1

5

1
-192

2
-311

*
-85

*
-285

912

1,368

385

1,335

206
8
7

250
15
117

55
4
39

250
15
208

25
__

177

190

30

89

398

572

127

562

-27

-30

-4

-32

4,431

5,802

1,529

5,532

4,399
219

4,397
240

926
70

4,184
244

500 EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT,
AND SOCIAL SERVICES
501 Elementary, secondary, and vocational
education:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare..
Department of the Interior
Other independent agencies: Community Services
Administration
Total 501
See footnotes at end of table.




17
4,634

—
4,636

996

4,428

348

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Con.
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

500 EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT,
AND SOCIAL SERVICES—Continued
502

Higher education:

Department of Health, Education, and Welfare__.
Department of Housing and Urban Development,
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies:
Harry S Truman Scholarship Foundation l
Other temporary commissions
Total 502
503 Research and general education aids:
Legislative branch 1
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare L_
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies:
Corporation for Public Broadcasting
National Commission on Libraries and Information Science
National Foundation on the Arts and the
Humanities 1
Smithsonian Institution
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 503
504

2, 704
—23

420
—9

2,288
7
2

—*
*

*

*

*
2,050

2,681

411

2,298

81
583

94
370
2

26
99
*

113
365
3

62

70

18

70

*

*

*

*

128
101
-10

183
115
-10

57
36
-2

191
114
-10

947

824

233

847

22
314
3,727

175
350
6.349

80
80
1,644

222
260
4,502

4,063

6,874

1,804

4,984

179

232

59

260

*
15
61
3

*
18
72
3

*
5
16
1

*
20
77
4

259

326

81

362

3,300
*

3,596
*

880

3,735

*

*

3,301

3,596

880

3,735

- 5

- 38

-1

- 38

15,248

18,900

Training and employment:

Department of Commerce
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. _
Department of L a b o r 1 . . .
...
Other independent agencies: Community Services
Administration

Total 504
505

2,097
—56
8

*

Other labor services:

Department of Labor i
Other independent agencies:
Committee for Purchase of Products and Services of the Blind and Other Severely Handicapped
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
National Labor Relations Board
National Mediation Board

Total 505
506 Social services:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare...
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Other independent agencies: Cabinet Committee
on Opportunities for Spanish-Speaking People__
Total 506
Deductions for offsetting receipts 2
Total education, training, employment, and

social services
See footnotes at end of table.




4,403

16,615

SUMMARY TABLES

349

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Con.
Function and department or other unit

550

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

26,070

30,890

8,062

26,723

194
-2,859

344
-3,597

85
-878

383
-5,854

23,405

27,637

7,268

21,252

2,677

2,998
_*

652
_*

2,798

2,677

2,998

652

2,798

34
200
451
68
90

19
111
483
83
120

65
128
23
31

231
447
89
125

34

44

12

39

*

*

5

6

2

6

83
8

93
8

20
6

96
3

689
*
—2

560
*
—1

113

449

—*

—1

687

559

113

448

—5

—39

—1

9,001
—41

HEALTH

551 Health care services:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare *_
Other independent agencies: Civil Service Commission *
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 551.
552

Health research and education:

Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. _
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Other independent agencies: Other temporary commissions
Total 552
553

*

Prevention and control of health problems:

Executive Office of the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Health, Education and Welfare. _ _
Department of the Interior
Department of Labor
Other independent agencies:
Consumer Product Safety Commission
Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety
Board of Review
Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission
Total 553
554 Health planning and construction:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare»..
Department of t h e Interior (trust fund)
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total554
555 General health financing assistance:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.. _
Deductions for offsetting receipts 2
Total health
600

1975
actual

27,647

32,137

8,291

34,393

6 ,1 6
6 2
1
1
16 8
,7

7 ,2 9
5 6
2
5
7
2

20,1 2
5
6

85,6 2
5
3
3

902
-*

3,928
-2,256

INCOME SECURITY

601 General retirement and disability insurance:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare ! _
Department of Labor l
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies: Railroad Retirement
Board i
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 601
See footnotes at end of table.




3,081
-1,513

3,724
-1,848

69,383

77,241

21,061

87,357

350

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Con.
Function and department or other unit

600

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

INCOME SECURITY—Continued

602

Federal employee retirement and disability:

Legislative branch (trust fund)
The judiciary (trust fund)
Department of Labor
Department of State (trust fund)
Other independent agencies: Civil Service Commission (trust fund)

603

*
2
288
80

8,028
-6

2,219
-3

9,625
-6

8,336

2,309

9,988

27,890
-8,512

5,080
-1,100

21,372
-4,500

13,459

19,378

3,980

16,872

6,643
10,085
2,052
3

8,187
11,389
2,503
271
1,200

1,628
3,045
703
5

7,075
12,136
3,080

38

10

40

23,588

5,392

22,931

-35

-*

-35

Unemployment insurance:

Department of Labor i
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total603
604

Public assistance and other income supplements:

Department of Agriculture
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.. _
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Department of State
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies: Railroad Retirement
Board
Total604
Deductions for off setting receipts

18,783
2

Total income security
700

*
*
75
19

14,244
-785

Total602

*
1
247
66

6,980

Deductions for offsetting receipts

*
1
184
55
6,767
-28

-1

600

108,605

128,509

32,742

137,115

8,334
-474

8,862
-479

2,236
-124

8,768
-510

7,860

8,383

2,111

8,258

4,593

6,023

1,075

4,245

3,665

4,142

1,026

4,521

-6
30

-7
-96

-2
31

-9
-371

2
4

-103

2
9

-380

VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES

701

Income security for veterans:

Veterans Administration 1
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 7 0 1 .
702

Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation:

Veterans Administration
703 Hospital and medical care for veterans:
Veterans Administration.
704 Veterans housing:
Department of Housing and Urban Development _ _
Veterans Administration
Total 704
See footnotes at end of table.




SUMMARY TABLES

351

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Con.
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

5

700 VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES—
Continued
705 Other veterans benefits and services:
Department of Defense-Civil 1
Department of the Treasury (trust fund)
Veterans Administration *
Other independent agencies: American Battle Monuments Commission1
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total veterans benefits and services

115

21
*
529

5
—*

5
—*

1
—*

6
—*

591

121

555

-2

-2

-1

-2

16,597

19,035

4, 362

17, 196

20
20
997
482
11

19
26
1,101
571
12

5
6
291
146
3

22
29
1,135
576
12

1
-2

8
63
85
1
-2

*
2
18
24
*
-*

1
9
68
83
*
-2

1,593

Deductions for offsetting receipts 2

21
*
565

458

Total 705

24
*
430

1,885

496

1,933

11
264
2

10
323
3

2
88
*

7
369

*

I

750 LAW ENFORCEMENT AND JUSTICE
751 Federal law enforcement and prosecution:
The judiciary i
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. _
Department of Justice
Department of the Treasury
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Other independent agencies:
Administrative Conference of the United States.
Commission on Civil Rights
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. _
Legal Services Corporation
Other temporary commissions
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 751
752 Federal judicial activities:
Legislative branch
The judiciary
General Services Administration
Other independent agencies: Indian Claims Commission

I

Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 752

1
7
56

,

753 Federal correctional and rehabilitative activities:
Department of Justice !

1

I

—*
279

338

91

378

226

267

75

279

853

919

255

844

-9

-7

-3

-7

2,942

3,402

754 Law enforcement assistance:
Department of Justice
Deductions for offsetting receipts2
Total law enforcement and justice
See footnotes at end of table.




914

3,426

352

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1977

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)-<:on.
Function and department or other unit

1975

1976

TQ

1977

800 GENERAL GOVERNMENT
801 Legislative functions:
Legislative branch
Deductions for offsetting receipts

593
—5

771
—5

191
—1

794
—5

588

767

190

789

59
2
2
*

70
2
*
*

19
*

73
1

*

1

63

72

19

75

803 Central fiscal operations:
Department of the Treasury l

1,883

2,009

509

2,002

Deductions for offsetting receipts

-131

-146

-36

-146

1,752

1,863

472

1,856

324

76

284

4

2

*

418

328

78

284

*
3,880
*

*
4,825

*
25

*
7,256
*

-3,792

-4,721

-*

-7,152

Total801
802

Executive direction and management:

Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of the Treasury
General Services Administration
Total 802

Total803
804

_

General property and records management:

General Services Administration* _
_
Other independent agencies: Other temporary
commissions
Total 804
805 Central personnel management:
Other independent agencies:
Advisory Committee on Federal Pay
Civil Service Commission.
Other temporary commissions

__

Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total 805

88

806 Other general government:
Legislative branch
The judiciary
Department of Defense—Civil
Department of the Interior!
Department of the Treasury *
General Services Administration
Other independent agencies:
Civil Service Commission
American Revolution Bicentennial Administration *
Other historical and memorial agencies *
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental
Relations 1
Other temporary commissions

See footnotes at end of table.




25

104

50
68
163
179
2

34
1
68
210
305
3

6
*
17
77
113
1

52
*
71
144
249
3

15

16

4

10

18
*

32
*

5
*

6
*

1

2

*

2

1

1
11

*

3
-34

-9

-27

472

Total 806

Total general government

104

-24

Deductions for offsetting receipts

Deductions for offsetting receipts

418

640

217

520

-292

-228

-39

-195

3,089

3,547

961

3,433

SUMMARY TABLES

353

Table 15. OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Con.
Function and department or other unit

1975
actual

1976
estimate

TQ
estimate

1977
estimate

12,343
-6,213

12,630
-6,355

3,254
-1,626

13,095
-6,542

6,130

6,275

1,627

6,552

121
4
202
301

91
4
219
340

118
4
152
80

37
1
154
345

272
*
-25

300
*
-60

105
*
-40

323
*
-61

875

894

419

799

7,005

7,169

2,046

7,351

901 Interest on the public debt:
Department of the Treasury

32,665

37,700

10,400

45,000

902 Other interest:
Department of the Treasury
General Services Administration
Deductions for offsetting receipts

244
*
-1,935

342
1
-3,208

63
*
-695

404
*
-4,108

-1,691

-2,865

-631

-3,703

30,974

34,835

9,769

41,297

850 REVENUE SHARING AND GENERAL
PURPOSE FISCAL ASSISTANCE
851 General revenue sharing:
Department of the Treasury!
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 851
852 Other general purpose fiscal assistance:
Department of Agriculture
Department of Defense—Civil
Department of the Interior
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies:
District of Columbia
Federal Power Commission
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total 852
Total revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal
assistance
900 INTEREST

Total 902
Total interest.
Allowances for:
Civilian agency pay raises
Contingencies for:
Relatively uncontrollable programs
Other requirements
Undistributed offsetting receipts:
Employer share, employee retirement:
Interfund transactions
Receipts from off-budget Federal agencies
Interest received by trust funds
Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf..

.

0
200

0
175

0
1,500

-3,014
-967
-7,667
-2,428

-3,205
-988
-8,015
-3,000

-826
-153
-2,110
-500

-3,396
-1,072
-8,373
-6,000

324,601

Total outlays
MEMORANDUM
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

760

373,535

97,971

394,237

238,527 276,923
111,171
132,205
-25,098 -35,593

69,764
34,855
-6,647

286,243
145,171
-37,177

•Less than $500 thousand.
Includes both Federal and trust funds.
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been distributed by subfunction above.

1
2




00

Table 16. CONTROLLABILITY OF BUDGET OUTLAYS, 1967-1977 (dollars in billions)
Actual
1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

Estimate
1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

TQ

1977

Relatively uncontrollable under present law:

Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals:
Social security and railroad retirement. _
Federal employees' retirement and insurance
(Military retired pay).
(Other)
Unemployment assistance.__
.._.
Veterans' benefits: Pensions, compensation, education and insurance.Medicare and Medicaid
Housing payments
Public assistance and related programs.

22.5

24.8

28.3

31.3

37.2

41.5

50.7

57.6

68.4

76.2

20.8

3.8
(1.8)
(2.0)
2.6

4.3
(2.1)
(2.2)
2.9

4.8
(2.4)
(2.4)
2.9

5.6
(2.8)
(2.7)
3.7

6.6
(3.4)
(3.2)
6.6

7.7
(3.9)
(3.8)
7.5

9.0
(4.4)
(4.6)
5.7

10.8
(5.1)
(5.7)
6.5

13.3
(6.2)
(7.1)
14.0

15.8
(7.3)
(8.5)
19.8

4.3 18.6
(2.0) (8.5)
(2.3) (10.1)
4.1 17.1

5.0
4.6
.3
2.8

5.0
7.2
.3
3.4

5.7
8.9
.3
3.9

6.6
9.9
.5
4.7

7.6
11.2
.7
7.4

8.3
13.4
1.1
8.9

9.3
14.1
1.6
9.1

10.0
17.2
1.8
11.5

12.4
21.6
2.1
16.9

14.4
25.9
2.5
21.1

41.6
10.3

47.7
11.1

54.9
12.7

62.2
14.4

77.3
14.8

88.4
15.5

1.7
3.0

3.2
3.0

4.1
2.8

3.8
3.8

2.8
5.2

4.0
6.4

99.6
17.4
6.6
3.6
6.3

115.4
21.5
6.1
1.0
6.8

148.7
23.3
6.1
.6
8.0

175.7
26.8
6.3
1.4
9.2

45.2 191.6
7.7 32.9
6.5
1.6
.4
.8
2.7
8.8

Total, open-ended programs and fixed
costs
(National defense)
(Civilian programs)

56.5
(1.9)
(54.7)

64.9
(2.2)
(62.8)

74.5
(2.6)
(71.9)

84.2
(3.0)
(81.2)

100.1
(3.4)
(96.7)

114.3
(4.0)
(110.3)

133.4
(4.1)
(129.3)

150.8
(4.7)
(146.1)

186.8
(5.4)
(181.4)

219.5
(6.8)
(212.7)

57.6 240.7
(1.9) (8.4)
(55.7) (232.3)

Outlays from prior-year contracts and
obligations: 1
National defense
Civilian programs

21.2
15.8

24.6
17.8

25.0
16.9

24.5
17.0

21.6
18.6

19.9
19.4

18.3
21.3

20.9
22.9

23.6
27.1

22.2
30.9

Subtotal, payments for individuals...
Net interest
General revenue sharing
Farm price supports (CCC)
Other open-ended programs and fixed costs,




3.3
7.2
.7
4.8

9.8
11.9

87.2

13.3
31.2
3.0
21.2

25.9
37.3

td

d
a
a

03

Total, outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations

37.0

42.3

41.9

41.5

40.2

39.2

39.6

43.8

Total, relatively uncontrollable outlays

93.5

107.3

116.4

125.7

140.4

153.5

173.0

194.5

46.1
20.3

52.7
20.7

52.6
17.6

51.8
21.4

51.8
21.9

53.5
27.7

52.6
23.8

53.0
24.2

57.6
33.5

63.8
41.4

13.3 66.8
6.3 28.0

Total, relatively controllable outlays.-.-

66.4

73.4

70.1

73.3

73.7

81.1

76.4

77.2

91.1

105.2

19.6 94.9

Undistributed employer share, employee retirement

-1.7

-1.8

-2.0

-2.4

-2.6

-2.8

-2.9

-3.3

-4.0

-4.2

-1.0 -4.5

158.3

178.8

184.5

196.6

211.4

231.9

246.5

268.4

324.6

373.5

98.0 394.2

Relatively controllable outlays:
National defense
Civilian programs

Total budget outlays

50.7
237.5

53.0
272.5

21.7 63.2
79.3 303.8

MEMORANDUM
Percent of total outlays:
Relatively uncontrollable under present law:
Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals
Other

26.3% 26.7% 29.7% 31.7% 36.6% 38.1% 40.4% 43.0% 45.8% 47.0% 46.1% 48.6%
9.4
9.6
10.6
11.3
10.8
11.1
13.7
13.2
11.7
11.7
12.7 12.4

Total open-ended programs and fixed
costs

Outlays from
obligations

35.7

prior-year

Total relatively uncontrollable outlays. Relatively controllable outlays
Undistributed employer share, employee retirement
Total budget outlays

36.3

40.4

42.9

47.4

49.3

54.1

56.2

57.6

58.8

58.8 61.1

23.4

23.7

22.7

21.1

19.0

16.9

16.1

16.3

15.6

14.2

22.2 16.0

59.1
42.0

60.0
41.0

63.1
38.0

64.0
37.2

66.4
34.8

66.2
35.0

70.2
31.0

72.5
28.8

73.2
28.1

73.0
28.2

81.0 77.1
20.0 24.1

-1.0

-1.0

-1.1

-1.2

-1.2

-1.2

-1.2

-1.2

-1.2

-1.1

-1.0 -1.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

contracts and

100.0
00

1

Excluding prior year contracts and obligations for activities shown as "open-ended programs and fixed costs."




^

Table 17. LEGISLATIVE PROPOSALS FOR MAJOR NEW AND EXPANDED PROGRAMS IN THE 1977 BUDGET
PROJECTION OF COSTS 1 (in millions of dollars)
Estimates
Agency

1976

Funds appropriated to the
President:
Naval petroleum reserves, BA
strategic p e t r o l e u m 0
storage.
Offsetting receipts
BA
0

TQ

57
11

59
29

-107

-163

Explanation

1979

1980

1,745
1,598

1,667
1,725

1,633
1,642

-684 -1,030 -1,006

-991

-886

1978

1977

368
304

512
352

1981

Increase production from Elk Hills, Calif., to finance further
exploration, development, and production of Naval
petroleum reserves, and to establish a national strategic
petroleum reserve, subject to the control of the President.
Appropriate adjustments will be made to reflect requirements of recently signed Energy Policy and Conservation
Act.
First replenishment of the equity capital of the Corporation,
established within the World Bank group in 1956, to enable
it to expand investments in private enterprises in developing countries.

International Finance BA
Corporation
0

4
2
0

4
2
2
2

4
2
2
2

0
2
2

0
22

Agriculture:
Child Nutrition Reform BA
Act
0

2,000
2,000

2,000
2,000

2,000
2,000

2,000
2,000

2,000
2,000

Provide a block grant to States to ensure that every needy
child has access to nutritious meals. This will result in a net
savings of $740 million in 1977 by eliminating the existing
complex and overlapping categorical programs which
subsidize children regardless of income or need.

Defense—Military:
Uniformed services retire- BA
ment modernization
0

4
0
4
0

14
5
14
5

11
3
11
3

19
1
19
1

9
3
9
3

124
124

124
124

125
125

125
125

125
125

Modify retention incentives inherent in current military
retirement system, correct existing program inequities and
restrain growth in annuity costs.
Provides for adjustments to military per diem rates, movement allowances and nuclear qualified officer pay.

2,500
2,500

2,500
2,500

2,500
2,500

2,500
2,500

2,500
2,500

Other legislation

BA

0
Healthy Education, and
Welfare:
Financial assistance for BA
community services
0




52
51

28
29

Provides a block grant to States for social services and
related State and local training activities under public
assistance.

td

O
Sd

i

Financial assistance for BA
healthcare 2
0

10,001
9,001

10,501
10,451

11,001
10,951

11,501
11,451

Financial assistance for BA
Elementary and Sec- O
ondary Education Act.

3,300
294

3,300
2,308

3,300
3,000

3,300
3,300

900
300

2,100
1,800

2,900
1,500

4,100
1,300

55
60

55
55

42
42

55
55

12,001 Provide a block grant to States to support health services,
11,951
especially to the low-income population, and undertake
health planning and cost control activities.
3, 300 Provide for a consolidation of 27 existing education authori3,300
ties into a block grant designed to give greater flexibility
to local and State education agencies, primarily in serving
the disabled and handicapped.

Labor:

Unemployment trust fund.

BA
O

4,500 Increase coverage, benefits and taxes in the Federal State
1, 300
Unemployment Insurance System.

Federal Energy Administration:

Low-income
residential
winterization
Energy Independence
Authority:
Adjustment for net earnings or losses.

BA
O
BA
O

United States Railway As- BA
sociation
0
Allowances:
Relatively small and un- BA
forseen items
O




55
50

400
400

300
200

1,400
540

200
150

60
50

250
200

0
428
300
250

0 Provide grants to States to winterize dwellings of low0
income persons, particularly the elderly.
98
98

133 Estimates are based on one possible investment strategy. It
133
is practically impossible to accurately project investment

0
370

0
165

decisions that would be made by the El A Board of Directors.
Most EIA investments would be in long leadtime projects,
some of which may have early-year losses before becoming
profitable ventures, once construction is complete.
0 Supplemental appropriation as authorized in omnibus rail
0
legislation.

350
300

400
350

75
75

450
400

2
GO

CO

00

Table 18. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE, 1967-1977 (in millions of dollars)
Actual
Source

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes

1967

61,526
33,971

1968

1969

1970

68,726
28,665

87,249
36,678

1971

90,412
32,829

86,230
26,785

Estimate
1972

1973

94,737
32,166

1974

103,246
36,153

1975

118,952
38,620

1976

122,386
40,621

TQ

130,822
40,056

1977

40,003 153,641
8,416 49,461

Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust
funds):
Employment taxes and contributions:
Old-age and survivors insurance
Disability insurance
Hospital insurance
Railroad retirement

22,197
2,204
2,645
776

22,265
2,651
3,493
814

25,484
3,469
4,398
885

29,396
4,063
4,755
919

31,354
4,490
4,874
980

35,132
4,775
5,205
1,008

40,703
5,381
7,603
1,189

47,778
6,147
10,556
1,411

55,207
7,250
11.258
1,489

58,741
7,724
12.060
1,639

15,835
2,082
3.382
430

Total employment taxes and contributions

27,823

29,224

34,236

39,133

41,699

46,120

54,876

65,892

75,204

80,164

21,729

3,659

3,346

3,328

3,464

3,674

4,357

6,051

6,837

6,771

7,723

2,214

Unemployment insurance

§
69,898
10,327
13,816
1,977

Contributions for other insurance and retirement:
Supplementary medical insurance
._
Employees' retirement—employee contributions
Other retirement contributions

647

698

903

936

1,253

1,340

1,427

1,704

1.901

1,921

528

2,162

1,201
19

1,334
20

1,426
24

1,735
29

1,916
37

2,058
39

2,146
41

2,302
45

2,513
52

2,712
52

690
13

2,756
52

Total contributions for other insurance
and retirement

1,867

2,052

2,353

2,701

3,205

3,437

3,614

4,051

4,466

4,684

1,231

4,970

Total social insurance taxes and contributions
__

33,349

34,622

39,918

45,298

48,578

53,914

64,542

76,780

86,441

92.571




_=S

25,174 113,052

Excise taxes:
Federal funds:
Alcohol..._
Tobacco
Other

—.
-—
—.

Total trust excise taxes.

_.-_._

Total excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts:
Deposit of earnings by Federal Reserve
System
Other miscellaneous receipts
Total miscellaneous receiptsi_

4,482
2,136
3,967

4,610
2,093
3,649

4,696
2,205
3,609

5,004
2,205
2,297

5,040
2,274
2,522

5,248
2,435
2,060

5,238
2,312
1,850

5,362
2,430
2,422

1,289
587
504

5,657
2,533
2,060

9,700

10,585

10,352

10,510

9,506

9,836

9,743

9,400

10,214

2,380

10,250

4,441

Trust funds:
Highway
Airport and airway

4,189
2,121
3,390

9,278

Total Federal excise taxes.._

3,980
2,077
3,221

4,379

4,637

5,354

5,542
563

5,322
649

5,665
758

6,260
840

6,188
962

5,711
976

1,746
245

6,502
1,054

4,441

4,379

4.637

5,354

6,104

5,971

6,424

7,100

7,151

6,687

1,991

7,556

13,719

14,079

15,222

15,705

16,614

15,477

16,260

16,844

16,551

16,901

4,371

17,806

2,978
1,901

3,051
2,038

3,491
2,319

3,644
2,430

3,735
2,591

5,436
3,287

4,917
3,188

5,035
3,334

4,611
3,676

5,100
3,800

1,400
1,000

5,800
4,300
3

1,805
303

2,091
400

2,662
247

3,266
158

3,533
325

3,252
381

3.495
426

4,845
524

5,777
934

5,550
2,734

1,350
180

6,200
1,002

2,108

2,491

2,908

3,424

3,858

3,633

3,921

5,369

6,711

8,284

1,530

7,202

Total budget receipts

149,552 153,671 187,784 193,743 188,392 208,649 232,225 264,932 280,997 297,534

81,894 351,262

MEMORANDUM
Federalfunds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

111,835 114,726 143,321 143,158 133,785 148,846 161,357 181,219 187,505 198,373
42,935 44,716 52,009 59,362 66,193 72,959 92,193 104,846 118,590 134,754
-5,218 -5,771 -7,547 - 8 , 7 7 8 - 1 1 , 5 8 6 - 1 3 , 1 5 6 - 2 1 , 3 2 5 - 2 1 , 1 3 3 - 2 5 . 0 9 8 - 3 5 , 5 9 3

*
jg

54,758 230,755
33,783 157,684
-6,647-37,177

1

Includes both Federal and trust funds.




oo
CO

Table 19. BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1967-1977 (in millions of dollars)
Actual
Function

1967

050 National defense:
051 Department of Defense—Military:
Military personnel
Retired military personnel.
Operation and maintenance
Procurement.
Research and development
Military construction and other!_.__
Deductions for offsetting receipts.—
Subtotal. 051
052 Military assistance
053 Atomic energy defense activities
054 Defense-related activities....
Deductions for offsetting receipts

150 International affairs:
151 Foreign economic and financial assistance
152 Conduct of foreign affairs...
153 Foreign information and exchange
activities
155 International financial programs
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total international affairs
250 General science, space, and technology:
251 General science and basic research
253 Manned space
flight




1969

1970

1971

Estimate
1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

17,956 19,859 21,374 23,031 22,633 23,036 23,246 23,728 24,968 25,495
1,830 2,095
2,444
2,849
3,386
3,885
4,390
5,128 6,242
7,325
19,000 20,578 22,227 21,609 20,941 2),675 21,069 22,478 26,330 28,254
19,012 23,283 23.988 21,584 18,858 17,131 15,654 15,241 16,042 16,486
7,160 7,747
7,457
7,166 7,303
7,881 8,157 8,582
8,866
9,107
2,636
3,975
525 1,059
],552
1,655
895 2,627
2,754
3,232
- 1 3 8 -164
- 1 4 3 -148 -126
-113 -113
-159
-182 -136

67,457
858
1,277
__
-491
_

Total national defense

1968

TQ

1977

6,693
1,977
7,631
4,975
2,471
733
-9

25,189
8,388
30,670
20,354
10,435
4,690
-165

77,373
654
1,336
51
-4

77,872 77,]50
789
731
1,389 1,415
162
-8
-5
-3

74,546 75,151
999
806
1,385
1,373
-120
29
-3
-2

73,297 77,625 85,020 89,763
531
819
999 1,437
1,409
1,486 1,506 1,621
- 1 6 2 -1,349
-936
-59
-4
-13
-4
-3

24,471 99,561
129
539
443 1,833
- 1 4 -801
-I
-3

69,101

79,409

80,207

79,284

76,807

77,356

75,072

78,569

86,585

92,759

25,028 101,129

4,062
368

3,459
353

3,142
370

2,935
398

2,902
405

3,235
451

2,870
475

2,884
606

3,665
658

4,953
814

964
339

4,736
910

245
436
-416

253
790
-243

237
246
-211

235
219
-223

24}
-184
-271

274
39
-277

295
-50
-634

320
-50
-167

348
-50
-263

398
-50
-449

108
-77

385
1,256
-464

4,695

4,612

3,784

3,564

3,093

3,723

2,956

3,593

4,358

5,665

1,334

6,824

897
3,649

930
3,096

938
2.781

947
2,209

1,009
1,885

978
1,740

961
1,537

1,018
1,473

1,038
1.535

1,124
1,735

328
469

1,170
1,865

W

a

s

3
3

I
i

254 Space science, applications, and technology
255 Supporting space activities
Deductions for offsetting receipts
_

1,236
451
-2

1,110
388
-2

913
387
-4

984
370
-3

933
355
-2

1,118
338
-2

1,230
304
-1

1,168
322
-3

1,084
334
-2

1,118
337
—3

281
80
-1

1,125
349
-2

Total general science, space, and technology

6,231

5,522

5,016

4,508

4,198

4,174

4,030

3,977

3,989

4,311

1,157

4,507

300 Natural resources, environment, and
energy:
301 Water resources and power
302 Conservation and land management...
303 Recreational resources
304 Pollution control and abatement
305 Energy
306 Other natural resources
Deductions for offsetting receipts

1,778
698
280
190
774
358
-379

1,802
691
333
249
980
372
-417

1,728
567
380
303
952
370
-400

1,674
717
372
384
931
432
-467

2,053
855
476
702
831
498
-475

2,315
784
521
764
1,028
571
-463

2,493
725
566
1,122
1,015
570
-544

2,540
740
665
2,035
623
673
-705

3,274
1,300
825
2,522
1,611
762
-756

3,827
1,333
90
0
3,087
2,592
5/1
81
7
-814
-814

1,151
56
4
28
4
86
1
69
2
L5L
22
3
-333
-333

3,908
1,027
99
5
4,388
3,375
M
94
3
-819
-819

Total natural resources, environment,
and energy

3,697

4,010

3,901

4,043

4,941

5,521

5,947

6,571

9,537

11,796

3,289

13,772

2,515
476
-8

4,032
514
-5

5,304
520
-46

4,589
579
-5

3,651
639
-2

4,553
728
-2

4,099
758
-3

1,458
775
-3

785
877
-2

1,896
981
-2

492
250
-*

717
1,014
-2

2,982

4,541

5,779

5,164

4,288

5,279

4,855

2,230

1,660

2,875

742

1,729

1,750
1,141

2,807
1,080

-624
920

104
1,510

-251
2,183

-42-1,192
1,772
1,567

1,519
1,698

2,810
1,877

1,278
1,690

33
0
41
3

390
4,140
1,046
774
6
-42

457
4,378
1,088
856
13
-41

247
4,443
1,220
874
21
-36

477
4,678
1,422
913
26
-40

474
5,180
1,824
1,053
37
-103

488
5,353
1,925
1,111
36
-43

552
5,640
2,177
1,231
56
-101

714
5,583
2,236
1,354
57
-64

99
3
6,501
2,408
1,459
7
4
-60

85
9
9,519
2,695
1,703
77
-55

29
0
2,737
64
9
48
4
1
9
-22

-647
1,459
90
1
10,146
2,781
1,868
7
1
-89

9,205

10,637

7,065

9,090

10,396

10,601

9,930

13,096

16,010

17,801

4,819

16,498

350 Agriculture:
351 Farm income stabilization
352 Agricultural research and services
Deductions for offsetting receipts..
Total agriculture
400 Commerce and transportation:
401 Mortgage credit and thrift insurance..
402 Postal Service
403 Other advancement and regulation of
commerce
404 Ground transportation
405 Air transportation
406 Water transportation
407 Other transportation
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total commerce and transportation
1

Includes allowances for civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.




w
g

td
g

00

to
Table 19. BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1967-1977 (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Actual
1967

11968

1,039
308
75
-11

1,335
447
120
-10

Total community and regional development

1,412

500 Education, training, employment, and
social services:
501 Elementary, secondary, and vocational
education..
502 Higher education
503 Research and general education aids...
504 Training and employment
505 Other labor services
506 Social services
Deductions for offsetting receipts

450 Community and regional development:
451 Community development
452 Area and regional development
453 Disaster relief and insurance___._
Deductions for offsetting receipts

Total education, training, employment,
and social services
550 Health:
551 Health care services
552 Health research and education
553 Prevention and control of health problems
554 Health planning and construction
555 General health financing assistance




m9

Estimate

T970

V)T\

1972

1973

1^74

1975

1976

TQ

1977

1,631
566
40
-12

2,328
593
257
-13

2,613
680
353
-14

3,110
836
396
-16

3,088
879
1,580
-19

3.045
1.111
782
-27

3,149
912
398
-27

3,892
1,368
572
-30

1,021
385
127
-4

3,667
1,335
562
-32

1,891

2,224

3,166

3,632

4,325

5,529

4,911

4,431

5,802

1,529

5,532

2,639
1,160
265
1,239
107
623
-10

2,815
1,393
329
1,590
112
778
-14

2,728
1,232
330
1,560
122
908
-10

3,107
1,385
521
1,602
135
1,148
-10

3,544
1,433
520
1,952
157
1,449
-10

3,962
1,447
523
2,894
184
2,694
-11

3,745
1,532
668
3,283
202
2,455
-10

3,771
1,349
867
2,910
219
2,496
-13

4,634
2,050
947
4,063
259
3,301
-5

4,636
2,681
824
6,874
326
3,596
-38

996
411
233
1,804
81
880
-1

4,428
2,298
847
4,984
362
3,735
-38

6,023

7,004

6,871

7,888

9,045

11,694

11,874

11,598

15,248

18,900

4,403

16,615

4,909
1,229

7,593
1,405

9,537
1,459

10,648
1,577

12,107
1,687

14,538
1,952

15,476
2,272

18,502
2,334

23,405
2,677

27,637
2,998

7,268
652

21,252
2,798

313
311

318
393

348
415

362
469

459
465

541
443

638
449

750
494

883
687

983
559

260
113

936
448
9,001

3

1
a

i
3

Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total health

-2

-2

-2

-6

-2

-3

-3

-6

-5

-39

-1

-41

6,759

9,708

11,758

13,051

14,716

17,471

18,832

22,074

27,647

32,137

8,291

34,393

22,773

24,552

28,288

31,303

37,485

41,966

51,684

58,613

69,383

77,241

21,061

87,357

2,076
2,507

2,660
2,412

1,732
2,583

2,688
3,364

3,191
6,169

3,789
7,076

4,500
5,356

5,645
6,065

6,980
13,459

8,336
19,378

2,309
3,980

9,988
16,872

3,465
-1

4,059
-2

4,679
-1

5,712
-2

8,580
-2

11,081
-2

11,419
-2

14,108
—*

18,783
-1

23,588
-35

5,392
-*

22,931
-35

30,821

33,680

37,281

43,066

55,423

63,911

72,958

84,431

108,605 128,509

32,742

137,115

4,704

4,506

5,036

5,546

5,966

6,344

6,533

6,789

7,860

8,383

2,111

8,258

305
1,391
304
197
-2

478
1,469
210
220
-2

701
1,564
102
239
-2

1,015
1,800
54
263
-2

1,659
2,036
-179
296
-2

1,960
2,425
-317
320
-2

2,801
2,711
-381
350
-2

3,249
3,006
-15
359
-2

4,593
3,665
24
458
-2

6,023
4,142
-103
591
-2

1,075
1,026
29
121
-1

4,245
4,521
-380
555
-2

6,899

6,882

7,640

8,677

9,776

10,730

12,013

13,386

16,597

19,035

4,362

17,196

456
91

483
98

553
112

672
134

821
146

971
172

1,168
188

1,291
204

1,593
279

1,885
338

496
91

1,933
378

64
6
—7

69
8
—8

71
29
—3

88
65
—6

104
233
—6

128
380
—2

158
624
—7

202
770
—5

226
853
—9

267
919
—7

75
255
—3

279
844
—7

610

650

761

952

1,299

1,650

2,131

2,462

2,942

3,402

914

3,426

600 Income security:

601 General retirement and disability insurance
.
602 Federal employee retirement and disability
603 Unemployment insurance
604 Public assistance and other income supplements
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total income security
700 Veterans benefits and services:
701 Income security for veterans
702 Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation
703 Hospital and medical care for veterans704 Veterans housing
705 Other veterans benefits and services...Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total veterans benefits and services
750 Law enforcement and justice:
751 Federal law enforcement and prosecution
752 Federal judicial activities
...
753 Federal correctional and rehabilitative
activities
754 Law enforcement assistance-Deductions for offsetting receipts._
__
Total law enforcement and justice




w

t1

00
00

00

Table 19. BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1967-1977 (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Actual

?967
800 General government:
801 Legislative functions
802 Executive direction and management...
803 Central fiscal operations....
804 General property and records management
805 Central personnel management
806 Other general government
Deductions for offsetting receipts

196i

^969

1970

\rf\

Estimate

?972

197i

1974

1975

1976

TQ

1977

218
19
728

237
21
762

254
25
808

303
30
934

342
38
1,013

404
59
1,183

438
72
1.209

521
117
1,329

588
63
1,752

767
72
1,863

190
19
472

789
75
1,856

655
19
163
-233

586
37
201
-159

587
38
88
-151

616
44
158
-145

637
51
218
-141

719
58
189
-146

910
67
221
-235

1,030
74
419
-164

418
88
472
-292

328
104
640
-228

78
25
217
-39

284
104
520
-195

1,569

1,684

1,649

1,940

2,159

2,466

2,682

3,327

3,089

3,547

961

3,433

850 Revenue sharing and general purpose
fiscal assistance:
851 General revenue sharing....
852 Other general purposefiscalassistance..

_
288

311

365

451

488

531

6,636
586

6,106
640

6,130
875

6,275
894

1,627
419

6,552
799

Total revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal assistance.

288

311

365

451

488

531

7,222

6,746

7,005

7,169

2,046

7,351

13,391
-858

14,573
-822

16,588
-796

19,304 20,959 21,849 24,167 29,319 32,665 37,700
-992 -1,350 -1,267 -1,355 -1,247 -1,691 -2,865

12,533

13,751

15,793

18,312

§
§

Total general government

900 Interest:
901 Interest on the public debt
902 Other interest.
_
Total interest




_

_

19,609

20,582

22,813

28,072

30,974

34,835

10,400 45,000
-631 -3,703
9,769

41,297

*j
Q

g

Allowances:
Civilian agency pay raises
Contingencies for:
Relatively uncontrollable programs
Other requirements

_
_______

___

0
200

0
175

0
1,500

__

200

175

2,260

_______

Total allowances.___
950 Undistributed offsetting receipts:
951 Employer share, employee retirement._
952 Interest received by trust funds
953 Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf
...

760

_

_._

_.__

-1,661
-2,275

-1,825
-2,674

-2,018
-3,099

-2,444
-3,936

-2,611
-4,765

-2,768
-5,089

-2,927
-5,436

-3,319
-6,583

-3,980
-7,667

-4,193
-8,015

-979
-2,110

-4,468
-8,373

-637

-961

-428

-187

-1,051

-279

-3,956

-6,748

-2,428

-3,000

-500

-6,000

Total undistributed offsetting receipts... -4,573 -5,460 -5,545 -6,567 -8,427 -8,137-12,318-16,651-14,075-15,208

-3,589-18,840

Total budget outlays

158,254 178,833 184,548 196,588 211,425 231,876 246,526 268,392 324,601 373,535

97,971 394,237

126,779 143,105 148,811 156,301 163,651 177,959 186,403 198,692 238,527 276,923
36,693 41,499 43,284 49,065 59,361 67,073 81,447 90,833 111,171 132,205
-5,218 -5,771 -7,547 -8,778-11,586-13,156-21,325-21,133-25,098-35,593

69,764 286,243
34,855 145,171
-6,647-37,177

MEMORANDUM

Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions
* Less than $500 thousand.




3
W
f
H
(72

Table 20. FEDERAL TRANSACTIONS IN THE NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS, 1966-1977 (in billions of dollars)
Actual

§?

Estimate

Description
RECEIPTS, NATIONAL INCOME BASIS
Personal taxes and nontaxes
Corporate profits tax accruals
Indirect business tax and nontax accruals....
Contributions for social insurance.

57.5
30.8
15.5
28.9

64.4
30.3
15.8
35.5

71.4
33.2
17.1
38.4

90.0
37.0
18.6
44.5

93.6
33.0
19.2
49.2

87.5
32.0
20.0
52.9

100.3
34.2
19.9
59.1

107.3
40.5
20.7
71.5

122.9
43.6
21.4
83.7

126.4
40.6
22.4
92.0

136.4
47.5
24.0
99.5

160.4
58.2
24.3
121.8

Total receipts, national income basis...

132.7

146.0

160.0

190.1

194.9

192.5

213.5

240.0

271.6

281.5

307.4

364.7

72.4
(54.1)
(18.3)
34.1
(31.8)
(2.3)
12.7
8.7

86.0
(67.0)
(19.0)
39.3
(37.2)
(2.2)
14.8
9.6

95.0
(74.9)
(20.1)
44.8
(42.7)
(2.1)
17.8
10.5

98.0
(76.1)
(21.9)
50.9
(48.7)
(2.2)
19.2
12.1

97.0
(75.3)
(21.7)
57.0
(55.0)
(2.0)
22.6
13.6

94.8
(72.1)
(22.7)
70.1
(67.7)
(2.3)
26.8
14.2

100.9
(72.5)
(28.4)
78.9
(76.1)
(2.8)
32.6
14.1

101.5
(73.2)
(28.4)
89.7
(87.1)
(2.7)
40.4
15.9

104.5
(74.0)
(30.5)
104.7
(101.7)
(3.0)
41.6
19.8

117.6
(80.3)
(37.3)
134.8
(131.7)
(3.1)
48.3
22.0

130.0
(86.7)
(43.3)
158.7
(155.1)
(3.6)
57.8
26.0

139.4
(92.8)
(46.6)
168.2
(164.4)
(3.8)
59.3
32.0

4.8

5.2

4.1
_

4.6

5.4
—.1

6.8
.1

6.4
__

9.1
—.5

7.9
.1

5.7
.4

6.2

5.6

EXPENDITURES, NATIONAL INCOME
BASIS
Purchases of goods and services
Defense
Nondefense
Transfer payments
Domestic ("topersons")
Foreign
Grants-in-aid to State and local governments.
Net interest paid
Subsidies less current surplus of Government
enterprises
Wage disbursements less accruals
Total expenditures, national income
basis
Excess of receipts ( + ) or expenditures (—),
national income basis
*$50 million or less.




_
132.7

154.9

172.2

184.7

195.6

212.7

232.9

256.1

278.7

328.7

378.7

404.5

+*

-8.9

-12.2

+5.4

-.6

-20.2

-19.5

-16.1

-7.1

-47.2

-71.3

-39.8

O

Table 21. FEDERAL FINANCES AND THE GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT, 1954-1977 (dollar amounts in billions)

Fiscal year

Gross
national
product

Budget receipts
:
Amount

Budget outlays

Percent Amount
of GNP

Percent
of GNP

Federal debt, end of year
Held by the public

Total
Amount

Percent
of GNP

Amount

Percent
of GNP

1954..
1955.

363.5
381.0

69.7
65.5

19.2
17.2

70.9
68.5

19.5
18.0

270.8
274.4

74.5
72.0

224.5
226.6

61.8
59.5

1956__
1957..
1958..
1959..
I960..

410.9
433.3
441.7
471.3
498.3

74.5
80.0
79.6
79.2
92.5

18.1
18.5
18.0
16.8
18.6

70.5
76.7
82.6
92.1
92.2

17.1
17.7
18.7
19.5
18.5

272.8
272.4
279.7
287.8
290.9

66.4
62.9
63.3
61.1
58.4

222.2
219.4
226.4
235.0
237.2

54.1
50.6
51.2
49.9
47.6

1961.
1962.
1963..
1964.
1965.

509.0
545.8
577.1
616.4
658.0

94.4
99.7
106.6
112.7
116.8

18.5
18.3
18.5
18.3
17.8

97.8
106.8
111.3
118.6
118.4

19.2
19.6
19.3
19.2
18.0

292.9
303.3
310.8
316.8
323.2

57.5
55.6
53.9
51.4
49.1

238.6
248.4
254.5
257.6
261.6

46.9
45.5
44.1
41.8
39.8

1966.
1967.
1968.
1969.
1970.

722.4
773.5
830.3
904.2
960.2

130.9
149.6
153.7
187.8
193.7

18.1
19.3
18.5
20.8
20.2

134.7
158.3
178.8
184.5
196.6

18.6
20.5
21.5
20.4
20.5

329.5
341.3
369.8
367.1
382.6

45.6
44.1
44.5
40.6
39.8

264.7
267.5
290.6
279.5
284.9

36.6
34.6
35.0
30.9
29.7

1971.
1972.
1973.
1974.
1975.

.019.8
.111.8
.238.4
.358.6
.440.0

188.4
208.6
232.2
264.9
281.0

18.5
18.8
18.8
19.5
19.5

211.4
231.9
246.5
268.4
324.6

20.7
20.9
19.9
19.8
22.5

409.5
437.3
468.4
486.2
544.1

40.2
39.3
37.8
35.8
37.8

304.3
323.8
343.0
346.1
396.9

29.8
29.1
27.7
25.5
27.6

1976 estimate.
1977 estimate.

,593.0
.837.0

297.5
351.3

18.7
19.1

373.5
394.2

23.4
21.5

633.9
719.5

39.8
39.2

484.4
558.2

30.4
30.4




C
O

i

s
CD

00

5

368

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1977

Table 22. BUDGET RECEIPTS AND OUTLAYS, 1789-1977
(in millions of dollars)

Fiscal year

Receipts Outlays

1789-1849
1850-1900

1,160
14,462

1,090
15,453

Surplus
or
deficit ( - )

Fiscal year

Outlays

4,979
6,361

+70 1939
-991 1940

Receipts

8,841
9,456

Surplus
or
deficit ( - )

-3,862
-3,095

562
562
541

525
485
517
584

+63
+77
+45
-43

544

567

-23

1941
1942
1943
1944
1945

1906
1907
1908
1909
1910

595

570

666

579

602
604
676

659
694
694

+25
+87
-57
-89
-18

1946
1947
1948
1949
1950

1911
1912
1913
1914
1915

702

691

+11 1951 ._

693
714

690
715

725
683

726
746

761
1,101
3,645
5,130
6,649

713
1,954
12,677
18,493
6,358

5,571
4,026
3,853
3,871
3,641

5,062
3,289
3,140
2,908
2,924

+509
+736
+713
+963
+717

1926
1927
1928
1929
1930

3,795
4,013
3,900
3,862
4,058

2,930
2,857
2,961
3,127
3,320

+865
+ 1,155
+939
+734
+738

1966 „_ _
1967
1968
1969
1970

130,856
149,552
153,671
187,784
193,743

134,652
158,254
178,833
184,548
196,588

-3,796
-8,702
-25,161
+3,236
-2,845

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935

3,116
1,924
1,997
3,015
3,706

3,577
4,659
4,598
6,645
6,497

-462
-2,735
-2,602
-3,630
-2,791

1971
1972 - - _
1973
1974
1975

188,392 211,425
208,649 231,876
232,225 246,526
264,932 268,392
280,997 324,601

-23,033
-23,227
-14,301
-3,460
-43,604

3,997
4,956
5,588

8,422
7,733
6,765

-4,425 1976est
-2,777 TQ est
-1,177 1977 est

297,534
81,894
351,262

-76,001
-16,077
-42,975

1901
1902
1903
1904
1905

1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925

588
_ _

.

.
.

.

1936._.
1937
1938

.

+3
_*

-63

8,621
14,350
23,649
44,276
45,216

13,634
35,114
78,533
91,280
92,690

-5,013
-20,764
-54,884
-47,004
-47,474

39,327
38,394
41,774
39,437
39,485

55,183
34,532
29,773
38,834
42,597

-15,856
+3,862
+12,001
+603
-3,112

51,646
66,204
69,574
69,719
65,469

45,546
67,721
76,107
70,890
68,509

+6,100
-1,517
-6,533
-1,170
-3,041

74,547
79,990
79,636
79,249
92,492

70,460
76,741
82,575
92,104
92,223

+4,087
+3,249
-2,939
-12,855
+269

1961
1962
1963 .
1964
1965 ,

94,389
99,676
106,560
112,662
116,833

97,795
106,813
111.311
118,584
118,430

-3,406

.

.

1952
1953
1954
1955

+48 1956
-853 1957
-9,032
-13,363

1958 . .
1959 . .
+291 1960

373,535
97,971
394,237

-7,137
-4,751
-5,922
-1,596

* Less than $500 thousand.
Notes.—Certain intcrfund transactions are excluded from receipts and outlays starting in 1932.
For years prior to 1932 the amounts of such transactions are not significant.
Refunds of receipts are excluded from receipts and outlays starting in 1913; comparable data are
not available for prior years.
Data for 1789—1939 are for the administrative budget; 1940-1977 are for the unified budget.
Starting in calendar year 1976 the Federal fiscal year will convert from a July 1-June 30 basis to
an Oct. 1-Sept. 30 basis. The TQ refers to the transition quarter from July 1 to Sept. 30, 1976.




INDEX
ACTION, 111,280
Adjusted gross income (AGI) provisions, 42
Administrative Conference of the United States,
280
Administrative Office of the U.S. courts, 191
Adult education, 117
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental
Relations, 291
Aeronautical research program, 98
Aeronautical technology, 102
Aeronautics Board, Civil, 282
Aeronautics and Space Administration, National 80, 102, 276-277
Aged:
Assistance, 138,234
Community service employment, 254
Economic security, 138
Hospital care, M5
Housing, 238
Income security, 136
Insurance, 234
Personal income exemption, 138
Agency for International Development, 76
Agricultural commodities, price support, 206
Agricultural commodity programs, market
oriented, 94
Agricultural conservation program, 91
Agricultural economics, 203
Agricultural Library, National, 202-203
Agricultural Marketing Service, 208-209
Agricultural price support and surplus removal
programs, 143
Agricultural Research Service, 201
Agricultural research and services, 97
Agricultural Service, Foreign, 204
Agricultural stabilization and conservation, 205
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service, 205
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance
Act (Public Law 83-480) programs, 204
Agriculture:
Credit programs, by program or agency, 96
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, total, 95
Program analysis, by function, 94-97
Tax expenditures, 96-97
Agriculture, Department of, 20, 111, 112, 114,

160,200-211
Aid foreign, see Foreign assistance
Aid to families with dependent children
(AFDC), 124, 134, 140
Air Forces, tactical, 66
Air transportation, 101-102
Aircraft, noise, 102
Aircraft energy requirements, reduction of, 102




Airlift forces, 67-68
Airmen's Home, U.S. Soldiers' and, 226
Airport and airway programs, 98, 101-102
Airport and airway trust fund, 261-262
Airports, Metropolitan Washington, 261
Alaska, Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning
Commission for, 300-301
Alaska Highway, 262
Alaska Power Administration, 246-247
Alaska Railroad, 264
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, 229-230
Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Bureau of, 152,
267
Aliens, deportation of illegal, 152, 153
Allied services, 236
Allied Services Act, 125
Allocations between agencies, explanation, 177
All-volunteer Armed Force, 68, 146
American Battle Monuments Commission, 281
American Future, Commission on Population
Growth and the, 301
American Indian tribal governments, 112
American Printing House for the Blind, 235
American Revolution Bicentennial Administration, 158, 289-290
American Samoa, 158
American Shipbuilding, Commission on, 301
Amtrak program, 101
Animal disease eradication, 97
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service,
201-202
Animal Quarantine Station, 202
Antarctic research program 83
Antitrust activities expansion, 152
Antitrust enforcement activities, 154
Appalachian Regional Commission, 113, 291
Appalachian regional development programs,
112,195
Appeals, Court of Military, 220
Appeals courts, 190-191
Appellate Court System of the United States,
Commission on Revision of the Federal, 191
Appellate and district courts, 155
Apportionment system, 171
Appropriations, 3, 175
Architect of the Capitol, 185-187
Archives and Records Service, National, 273
Area and regional development, 112
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 78,
281
Army:
Cemeterial expenses, 224
Civil functions, 224-227
Corps of Engineers, 224-225
Art, National Gallery of, 300
Arts, Commission of Fine, 283
369

370

T H E BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

Arts and the Humanities, National Foundation
on the, 122, 294-295
Asian Development Bank, 74-76
Assessment, Office of Technology, 185
Atmospheric Administration, National Oceanic
and, 93, 214-215
Atomic energy defense activities, 70
Automatic data processing activities, General
Services Administration, 273-274
Aviation Administration, Federal, 102, 261-262
Aviation safety, 261-262
B
Balance of payments, 78
Balanced budget, M3
Balances, budget authority, explanation, 176Balances, budget authority, totals, table, 197577, 320-321
Balances, unobligated, 177
Baltimore-Washington Parkway, 263
Bankruptcy Laws of the United States, Commission on, 192
Banks:
For cooperatives, 12
Federal financing, 14
Federal home loan, 12, 104, 173
Federal intermediate credit, 12
Federal land, 12, 173
Federal Reserve, 162-163
Basic educational opportunity grants, college,
116, 121
Basis for budget figures, 180-181
Beautification, Commission on Highway, 301
Beautification, highway, 301
Bicentennial Administration, American Revolution, 158, 289-290
Bicentennial expenses. The Judiciary, 192
Bilateral development assistance, 76, 197-198
Biomedical research, 229
Blind, American Printing House for the, 235
Blind and Other Severely Handicapped, Committee for Purchase from the, 283
Block grants, M6
Boll weevil eradication program, 94, 97
Bonneville Power Administration, 247
Border patrol operations, 153
Borrowing and debt repayments, definition, 179
Boston-New York-Washington rail passenger
service, 101
Botanic Garden, United States, 187
Bridges, alteration of, 260
Broadcasting, Board for International, 78
Broadcasting, Corporation for Public, 284
Budget:
Accounts listing, 185-308
Allowances, 181,306
Allowances, outlays, table, 57
Allowances, outlays and recommended budget
authority, total, 165
Balanced, M3
By agency, for each account and functional
code, 185-308
Ceilings, 171, 173
Changes, functional, 55
Congressional action, 169-171




19 77

Budget—Continued
Congressional process, 50
Controllability, outlays, 33-34, 354-355
Coverage, 173-174
Current services estimates, 169
Data for 1975, 1976, and 1977, 180-181
Data for transition quarter, 180
Deficit or surplus, M3, 162
Discussion, 10-15
Execution and control, 171-172
Executive formulation and transmittal,
168-169
Federal funds, totals, table, 1975-77, 21
Federal program by function, discussion,
54-55
Figures, basis for, 180-181
Financing, table, 1975-77, 323
Financing and change in debt limit, 19
Financing and change in outstanding debt, 16
Firm ceilings, 55
Functional classification:
Changes, 55
Discussion, 54-55
Funds, discussion 16-21
Interest, net impact, 162
Legislative proposals for major new and
expanded programs, 1977, projection of
costs, 1976-81, 356-357
Message of the President, M1-M6
Outlays, controllability, totals, table, 1967—
77, 354-355
Outlays, total, 56-57
Outlays, totals, table, 1975-77, 312
Outlook, long-range, 27-37
Perspectives on, 1-21
Priorities, M4
Procedures, new congressional, 168
Process, discussion, 168-172
Receipts, definition, 171
Receipts, discussion, 40-43
Receipts, totals, table, 1975-77, 312
Receipts and outlays, totals, table, 17891977,368
Reductions, 61
Reform, M5
Restraint, M5, M6
Review and audit, 172
Summary, totals, table, 1975-77, 311
Surplus or deficit, totals, table, 1789-1977,
368
Surplus or deficit by fund group, totals, table,
1975-77,21
System and concepts, explanation of, 168-181
Targets, 170,173
Totals, 162
Totals, exceptions, 173
Transition quarter, 168
Trends, 56
Trends, discussion, 31-33
Trust funds, totals, table, 1975-77, 21
Budget, Office of Management and, 168,194
Budget authority:
Available through current action by Congress, totals, table, 1975-77,4,316
Available without current action by Congress,
table, 4

371

INDEX
Budget authority—Continued
Balances, by agency, totals, table, 1975-77,
320-321
Balances, explanation, 176-177
By agency, totals, table, 1977-81,36
By function, totals, table, 1977-81, 35
By function and agency, totals, table, 197577, 330-341
Construction and procurement programs, 5
Defense, national, 61
Deferrals, 172
Direct loans, 5
Discussion, 3-6
Explanation, 174-177
Foreign assistance, total, 75
Foreign information and exchange activities,
78
Granting of, 170
Guaranteed loan programs, 5
Housing programs, subsidized, 5
International affairs, total, 73
Military credit sales to Israel, 74
Multilateral assistance, 74
Permanent, 170
Relation to outlays, chart, 5
Relation to outlays, totals, table, 1975-77,
318-319
Rescission, 172
Reserves, 172
Student loan program, guaranteed, 121
Summary:
By agency, totals, table, 1975-77, 313
By function, totals, table, 1975-77, 312
Table, 4
Totals, table, 1975-77,4,311
Target ceilings by major function, 55
Transition quarter, 168
Trust funds, 4-5
Budget Committees, 12, 170
Budget Concepts, President's Commission on, 12
Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974,
Congressional, 12, 27, 168
Budget Office, Congressional, 156, 185
Budget outlays, see Outlays
Buildings, construction of, see Construction
Buildings, Federal, 272
Business Administration, Domestic and International, 214
Business and industrial development loans, 112

Cabinet Committee on Opportunities for Spanish-Speaking People, 281
Canal Zone Government, 226
Capitol, Architect of the, 185-187
Cemeterial expenses, Army, 224
Census, Bureau of the, 212
Censuses, periodic, 212
Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange
between East and West, 258
Center for Disease Control, 133, 228
Central Intelligence Agency, 281
Child Nutrition Reform Act, 134, 145

210-000

0 - 7 6 - 2 5




Children:
Dependent, aid to families with, 124, 134, 140
Education block grant, M6
Needy, block grants for feeding, M6,145
Nutrition programs, 134, 145, 209-210
Civil Aeronautics Board, 282
Civil defense program, 66
Civil rights:
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 285
Programs, 154
Civil Rights, Commission on, 283
Civil Rights, Office for, 235
Civil Service Commission, 139, 282-283
Claims:
Defense, Department of, 220
Indian, 290
Prisoners of war, 289
Vietnam, 289
Claims, Court of, 190
Claims Commission, Indian, 290
Claims Settlement Commission, Foreign, 289
Climate dynamics program, 83
Coal miners, disabled, 234
Coast Guard, 102,260-261
College housing, 238
Combat forces, 61
Commerce, advancement and regulation of,
105-106
Commerce, Department of, 106, 108, 112, 124,

212-217
Commerce, promotion of, 214
Commerce Commission, Interstate, 293
Commerce and transportation:
Major credit programs, 107
Outlays, 100
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, total, 99
Program analysis, by function, 98-107
Commissions and committees, see under more
specific titles
Committees on the Budget, Senate and House
of Representatives, 12, 170, 171
Commodity Credit Corporation, 206
Commodity Credit Corporation, outlays, by
program or agency, total, 97
Commodity Exchange Authority, 204
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, 284
Communications Commission, Federal, 286
Community action programs, 112
Community development:
Block grant program, 108, 110
Planning and management, 111, 239-240
Programs, analysis, 108-112
Community economic development program,
112
Community and regional development:
Major credit programs, 115
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, total, 109
Program analysis, by function, 108-115
Tax expenditures, 114

372

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Community Relations Service, 252
Community Services Administration, 111, 284
Comprehensive Employment and Training Act,

116,123
Comptroller of the Currency, Office of the, 269
Comptroller General, 172
Conciliation Service, Federal Mediation and,
287-288
Congress, Library of, 187-188
Congress of the United States, 156, 185-189
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, 18, 50, 55,
169, 173
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974, 12,27,168
Congressional Budget Office, 156, 170, 185
Congressional budget process, 50
Congressional Research Service, 187
ConRail, 100-101
Conservation:
Agriculture, 205
Energy, 84, 86, 88
Fish and wildlife, 227
Soil, 208
Conservation Corps, Youth, 210
Conservation and land management, 91-92
Consolidated Rail Corporation, 100-101
Construction grants, Bureau of Indian Affairs,

113
Construction grants, hospitals and health facilities, 278
Construction programs:
Defense—Military, 221-222
General Services Administration, 157
Justice, Department of, 152, 154
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 276
Public facilities, 108
Sewage treatment facilities, 84, 89-90, 92
Ships, 102
Tennessee Valley Authority, 91
Veterans Administration, 151, 278
Water and sewage system, 111, 112
Construction projects:
Energy Research and Development Administration, 80, 83
Nuclear reactor, 88
Saint Elizabeths Hospital, 132
State, Department of, 78
Veterans Administration, 146
Consumer Affairs, Office of, 235
Consumer Finance, National Commission on,

301
Consumer Information Center, 275
Consumer Price Index, 25, 26, 136, 139
Consumer Product Safety Commission, 284
Consumer protection, 208-210
Consumer safety, 133
Contingencies, 165, 172
Contract authority, 175
Cooperative State Research Service, 202
Copyright Office, 187
Copyrighted Works, National Commission on
New Technological Uses of, 187
Corporation taxes, 42, 43
Corporations, Government-owned, see under
particular name
Corps of Engineers—Civil, 224-225.




FISCAL YEAR

1977

Correctional and rehabilitation activities, 153
Corrections, National Institute of, 252
Cost-Accounting Standards Board, 188
Cost of living increases, M5
Council of Economic Advisers, 193
Council on Environmental Quality, 193
Council on International Economic Policy, 194
Courts, see under particular kind
Credit Administration, Farm, 286
Credit guarantees, 15, 60
Credit programs, Federal:
Agriculture, by program or agency, 96
Commerce and transportation, 107
Community and regional development, 115
International affairs, 79
Veterans, 150
Credit Union Administration, National, 294
Crimes, reduction of violent, 152
Crop Insurance Corporation, Federal, 205-206
Crop production, 94
Cultural Cooperation, National Commission
on, 257
Cultural exchange activities, 258
Current budget authority, definition, 176
Current expense and capital outlay, explanation, 174
Customs Court, 190
Customs duties, 29, 41, 50
Customs and Patent Appeals, Court of, 190
Customs Service, U.S., 153, 267

D
Darien Gap Highway, 262
Deaf, National Technical Institute for the, 235
Debt, public, see Public debt
Defense, Department of—Civil, 224-227
Defense, Department of—Military: 61-71,

217-224
Construction, 221-222
Operation and maintenance, 219-220
Procurement, 220-221
Program analysis, 61-71
Receipts and outlays, Federal funds, 20
Research and development, 65-66, 68, 221
Research and development, total obligational
authority, 68
Revolving and management funds, 222-223
Summary, total obligational authority, table,

65
Defense, national:
Increase in funding, 61
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and budget authority, by program or
agency, totals, 62
Procurement, 61
Program analysis, by function, 61-71
Defense Civil Preparedness Agency, 222
Defense Manpower Commission, 301
Defense outlays, 57
Defense prepardness, 64
Defense production, expansion of, 196
Defense programs, M5, 61-71
Defense spending, M5, 56
Deferral, definition, 175-176
Deficit or surplus, M3, 16, 177

INDEX
Deficit or surplus, totals, table, 1789-1977, 368
Definite budget authority, definition, 176
Definition of terms, 173-179
Delaware River Basin Commission, 292
Depletion, limits, 43, 44
Development, rural, 112, 206-207
Development assistance, economic, 213
Development assistance, international, 72, 1 7
9—
199
Development Service, Rural, 206
Disability insurance, Federal, 139, 234
Disadvantaged benefits, 123
Disarmament, see Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
Disaster assistance, international, 198
Disaster relief, 108, 113, 195
Discrimination, see Civil rights
Disease Control, Center for, 228
Diseases, prevention and control, 228
District of Columbia, 132, 285
District of Columbia, Federal payment to, 159,
161
District of Columbia, Home Rule Act, 111
District of Columbia, loans to, 111
District of Columbia, Metro, 100
District Courts. 190-191
Domestic assistance, 31, 32
Domestic Council, 194
Domestic and International Business Administration, 214
Domestic programs, M5
Drinking water standards, enforcement of,
89-90
Drug Abuse, Mental Health, and Alcohol
Administration, 229-230
Drug Abuse, National Commission on Marihuana and, 302
Drug Abuse Prevention, Special Action Office
for, 195
Drug abuse treatment, 131
Drug Enforcement Administration, 153,253
Drugs, control of dangerous, 153

Earned income credit, 42,44
Earth
Resources Technology
Satellite,
(LANDSAT), 82
Economic Advisers, Council of, 193
Economic Analysis, Bureau of, 212-213
Economic assistance, foreign, see Foreign
assistance
Economic assumptions, discussion, 24-27
Economic Development Administration, 112,
213
Economic development assistance, 213
Economic growth, M3, M4
Economic Management Support Center, Agriculture Department, 203
Economic Opportunity, Office of, 112
Economic policy, M3
Economic Policy, Council on International, 194
Economic projections, 25-26
Economic Research Service, Agriculture Department, 203
Economic stabilization activities, 196




373

Education:
Aid to agencies, 117-120
Aid to school districts, 231
Block grants, M6
Child development, 116, 120
Disadvantaged, 116
Elementary and secondary, 116, 117-120, 231
Federally impacted areas, 116, 120
Grants to States, 116
Handicapped, 116,231
Health, 132-133
Higher, 121,232
Indians, 231
International exchange activities, 258
Occupational, 231
Programs, 231-233
Research and development, 121-122
Science, 201-203
Veterans, 121, 146, 149-150
Vocational and adult, 117, 231
Work-study, 121
Education, National Commission on the Financing of Postsecondary, 302
Education, National Institute of, 121, 232
Education, Office of, 231-232
Education, Office of the Assistant Secretary for,
232-233
Education, training, employment, and social
services:
Outlays, 116
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, total, 117-118
Program analysis, by function, 116-125
Education, and Welfare, Department of Health,
20, 140, 228-237
Educational Cooperation, National Commission
on, 257
Educational development, 232
Eisenhower College grants, 266
Elderly, see Aged
Election campaign fund, Presidential, 265
Election Commission, Federal, 189
Election Fund Transfers, National Commission
on, 301
Electric utilities, tax aids, 87
Electronic Surveillance, National Commission
for the Review of Federal and State Laws
Relating to Wiretapping and, 301
Embargoes, 86
Emergency employment assistance, 254
Emergency funds, Presidential, 196
Emergency homeowner's relief fund, 238
Emergency Housing Act, 98
Emergency Loan Guarantee Board, 285
Emergency preparedness, see Defense Civil
Preparedness Agency
Emergency rail facilities restoration, 264
Emergency school aid, 231
Emergency school assistance, 231
Employees Retirement and Income Security
Act, 138, 156-157
Employees, Federal, see Federal employees
Employment, Federal civilian, summary by
agency, table, 322
Employment, full, 30-31, 41
Employment, full-time permanent civilian, by
agency, totals, table, 322

374

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Employment assistance, temporary, 123, 254
Employment Opportunity Commission, Equal,
285
Employment services, Federal-State, 124
Employment Standards Administration, 255
Employment and Training Administration,
253-254
Endangered species, 93
Energy:
Conservation 84, 86, 88
Development, M4
Domestic resource development, 86
Geothermal, 83
Loans, 84
Policy, 86-89
Regulation programs, 89
Research, 89
Research and development, 84, 88, 271
Energy Administration, Federal, 89, 286-287
Energy Independence Authority, 11, 84, 87,

173.285
Energy and minerals, 88, 245-248
Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, 86
Energy Programs, Office of, 212
Energy Research and Development Administration, 80, 83, 270-271
Engineers, Corps of, see Corps of Engineers
Engraving and Printing, Bureau of, 267
Environmental Financing Authority, 11, 173
Environmental protection, M4
Environmental Protection Agency, 271-272
Environmental Quality, Office of and Council
on, 193
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission,
285
Estate and gift taxes, 29, 41
European Space Agency, 82
Exchange of cash, 179
Exchange Commission, Securities and, 298
Exchange stabilization fund, 173
Excise tax, 2 9 , 4 0 , 4 1 , 5 0
Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries,
Commission on, 158,301
Executive Office of the President, 156,192-195
Executive Residence, 193
Expenditures, national income accounts, totals,
table, 1966-77,366
Export-Import Bank, 11,78.286
Export programs, Agriculture Department, 204
Export promotion program, 78
Extension Service, Agriculture Department, 202

Facilities, construction of, see Construction
Fair labor management practices, 124-125
Family housing, Defense Department, 222
Farm Credit Administration, 286
Farm income stabilization, 95-97
Farmer Cooperative Service, 204
Farmers Home Administration, 97,105,112,207
Farms, price support, 7,10
Federal Aviation Administration, 102,261-262
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 154,252
Federal Communications Commission, 286
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, 205-206
Federal debt. 16-21,311.323.367




FISCAL

YEAR

1977

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 286
Federal Election Commission, 189
Federal employees:
Management. 158
Pay increase, 27, 165
Pay systems, revision of, 156
Retirement and disability fund, 139
Retirement program, 7, 8, 134
Salary comparability, 158
Federal Energy Administration, 89, 286-287
Federal finances and gross national product.
1954-77,367
Federal Financing Bank, 11, 14,17, 74,112, 158,

173
Federal funds, explanation, 16, 174
Federal government and the economy, M4
Federal government responsibilities, M3
Federal Highway Administration, 100, 262-263
Federal Home Loan Bank Board, 287
Federal home loan banks, 104
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, 12
Federal Housing Administration, 104, 238
Federal hydroelectiic dams, 91
Federal Insurance Administration, 240
Fedeial intrafund transactions, definition, 178
Federal Judicial Center, 191
Federal Labor Relations Council, 282
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, 265
Federal Maritime Commission, 287
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service,
287-288
Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety
Board of Review, 288
Federal National Mortgage association, 12, 104
Federal Paperwork, Commission on, 301
Federal Pay, Advisory Commission on, 280
Federal Power Commission, 89, 288
Federal Preparedness Agency, 274
Federal Prison System, 252-253
Federal Procurement Policy, Office of, 194
Federal program, analysis by function, 54-166
Federal program by agency and account, 185308
Federal Railroad Administration, 264
Federal Reserve System, 162, 173
Federal spending, M3, M4
Federal Supply Service, 273
Federal Trade Commission, 288
Financial Assistance for Community Services
Act. 116, 125
Financial Assistance for Elementary and Secondary Education Act, 117
Financial Assistance for Health Care Act, 126,

133
Financial institutions, 46, 98
Financial Institutions Act, 98, 103
Financial Operations, Bureau of Government,

266-267
Financing, budget, means of, table, 1975-77,323
Fire Prevention and Control Administration,
National, 215, 301
Firearms, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and, 152,
267
Firearms, illegal commerce in, 152

375

INDEX
Fiscal outlook:
Discussion, 28
Table, 1975-81, 28
Fiscal policy, discussion, M3
Fiscal year, new, 168
Fish and Wildlife Service, 93, 244
Fisheries, International commissions, 258
Five year projections, Federal outlays and receipts, 27
Flood insurance, 108, 114,240
Food block grants, M6
Food and Drug Administration, 228
Food and Nutrition Service, 209-210
Food for Peace, 76
Food stamp program, 9, 134, 143, 209
Forces, combat, 61
Forces, general purpose, defense, 61, 66-67
Forces, strategic, 61
Foreign affairs, conduct of, 72, 77-78, 256-257
Foreign agricultural assistance, 204
Foreign Agricultural Service, 204
Foreign assistance, 196-199
Foreign assistance, by outlays and budget
authority, total, 75
Foreign Claims Settlement Commission, 78, 289
Foreign economic and financial assistance, 72,
74-77
Foreign information and exchange activities, 72,
78
Foreign military sales, 74
Foreign Policy, Commission on the Organization of the Government for the Conduct of,
301
Forest and Range Renewal Resources Planning
Act, 92
Forest Service, 91-92, 210-211
Forests, protection and management, 210-211
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission, 290
Fuel, synthetic, 271
Fuel facilities, synthetic, 88, 89
Full employment, 30-31,41
Functional classification, 54-55, 173-174
Funds, types of, explanation, 174
Funds appropriated to the President, 195-200

Gallaudet College, 121,235
Gambling, Commission on the Review of the
National Policy Toward, 301
Gas and oil leasing, 84, 92
Gasoline taxes, State and local, 100
General Accounting Office, 156, 188
General fund, explanation, 174
General government:
Outlays, 156
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by functio or agency, total, 157
Program analysis, by function, 156-158
General purposes forces, defense, 61, 66-67
General revenue sharing, 7, 269
General science, space, and technology:
Outlays, 80
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program, or agency, total, 80




General science, space, and technology—Con.
Program analysis, by function, 80-83
General Services Administration, 157, 272-275
Geological Survey, 92, 93, 245
Geothermal resources, 270
GI bill, education benefits, 146
Government National Mortgage Association,
103, 238-239
Government Printing Office, 188
Government-sponsored enterprises, 12-14, 60,
104, 173
Grain inspection, 94, 97
Grants, see under particular purpose
Grazing permits, 160
Grazing program improvements, 92
Gross national product:
Increase, 25, 26
Public debt as a percent of, table, 1954-77,
367
Gross National Product (GNP), M4, 137
Ground transportation, 100-101
Guam, 158
Guard forces, 68

H
Handicapped:
Education of, 116,231
Housing for, 238
Handicapped, Committee for the Purchase from
the Blind and Other Severely, 283
Harry S Truman Scholarship Foundation, 289
Head Start, 111, 120
Health:
Block grants to States, M6
Coast Guard, 132
Education and training, 132-133
Facilities, see Hospital and health facilities
Federal prisoners, 132
Grants to States, 126-129
Indians, 131,228
Insurance, 234
Manpower, 132
Medical facilities construction, grants for, 133
Occupational, 133
Outlays, 126
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, total, 127
Program analysis, by function, 126-133
Research, 126, 132-133
Tax expenditures, 131
Health, Education, and Welfare, Department
of, 20, 140,228-237
Health, National Institutes of, 229
Health, Office of the Assistant Secretary for,
230-231
Health Administration, Occupational Safety
and,255
Health care services, 130-132
Health Maintenance Organization, 131
Health problems, prevention and control, 133
Health Resources Administration, 230
Health Review Commission, Occupational
Safety and, 297
Health Services Administration, 228
Higher education, 121, 232
Highway Administration, Federal, 100, 262-263

376

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Highway Beautification, Commission on, 301
Highway Traffic Safety Administration, National, 263-264
Highways:
Alaska, 262
Appalachian, 113
Baltimore-Washington Parkway, 263
Darien Gap, 262
Interstate, 100
Safety, 262-264
Scenic and recreational, 262
Historical agencies, 289-290
Home Loan Bank Board, Federal, 287
Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Federal, 12
Home purchase credit, 42,44
Homeownership and rental assistance program,
142,237
Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and
Peace, 266
Hospital care, M5
Hospital insurance, Federal, 234
Hospital insurance program, 126
Hospitals and health facilities, veterans, 278
House of Representatives, 185
Housing:
Assistance, 141-143
College, 238
Construction, 105, 142
Counseling services, 237
Credit programs, 103
Elderly, 238
Guarantees of mortgage-backed securities,
239
Handicapped, 238
Homeownership and rental assistance, 237
Indians, 142
Insulation assistance, 87
Loans in rural areas, 105
Low-income housing demonstration program,
241
Low-income projects, 237, 238
Low and moderate income, 98, 104
Lower income assistance program, 142
Mortgage credit, 103
Ownership assistance, 105
Payments, 7, 9, 237
Production, 103
Programs, 237-238
Public 142,238
Rental subsidies, 98, 134, 237, 238
Subsidized program, 5
Veterans, 151
Housing Administration, Federal 104, 238
Housing for the Elderly or Handicapped Fund,
11,173
Housing and Urban Development, Department
of, 20, 104, 111, 141,237-241
Howard University, 121, 235
Human Development, Assistant Secretary for,
235
Human resources, outlays, table, 57
Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts
and the, 122,294-295
Hydroelectric dams, Federal, 91




FISCAL YEAR

1977

I
Immigration and Naturalization Service, 153,
252
Import fees, 50
Impoundment Control Act, 172
Income Assistance Simplification Act, 134
Income security:
Assistance, 134
Outlays, 137
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, total, 135
Program analysis, by function, 134-145
Tax expenditures, 136
Income tax, 29, 40-41, 48-49
Income tax credit, earned, 145
Income tax reductions, individual and corporate, 41
Indefinite budget authority, definition, 176
Indian Affairs, Bureau of, 113, 248-249
Indian Claims Commission, 290
Indian Opportunity, National Council on, 294
Indian Self-Determination and Education
Assistance Act, of 1975, 108
Indians:
Claims, 290
Education and welfare, 231
Health services and facilities, 131, 228
Housing, 142
Programs, 113
Social services, 125
Training, 123
Individual aid, M4
Indochina postwar reconstruction assistance, 197
Industry and commerce, promotion of, 214
Inflation, M3
Information Agency, United States, 78, 303
Information Science, National Commission on
Libraries and, 293-294
Insurance:
Aged, 234
Disability, Federal, 139, 234
Disaster relief, 113
Flood, 108, 114, 240
Health, 234
Hospital and medical, 9, 126, 234
Life, 149
Mortgage credit and thrift, 103-105
Old age and survivors, Federal, 234
Retirement and disability, 137-138
Social, 29
Unemployment, 134, 139-140
Veterans, 149, 277, 278
Insurance Administration, Federal, 240
Insurance Corporation, Federal Deposit, 286
Inter-American Development Bank, 76
Inter-American Foundation, 198
Interest:
Function, 162-163
Outlays, 162
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
total, 162
Public debt, 4, 162,269
Trust funds, 164
Interfund transactions, definition, 178
Intergovernmental agencies, 291-292

377

INDEX
Intergovernmental Relations, Advisory Commission on, 291
Intergovernmental revolving funds, explanation, 174
Interior, Department of the, 91, 160, 241-251
Internal Revenue Service, 156, 268
International affairs:
Credit programs, table, 1975-77, 79
Foreign assistance, by outlays and budget
authority, total, 75
Loan an loan guarantee programs, 79
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays, total, 72
International affairs and finance:
Outlays and recommended budget authority
by function or agency, 73
Program analysis, by function, 72-79
International arms limitations, M5
International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico, 258
International Broadcasting, Board for, 78, 281
International Business Administration, Domestic and, 214
International Center, Washington, D . C , 259
International commissions, 258
International Decade of Ocean Exploration, 83
International Development, Agency for, 76
International development assistance, 197-199
International Development Association, 74
International disaster assistance, 198
International Economic Policy, Council on, 194
International educational exchange activities,
258
International Finance Corporation, 76
International financial institutions, 74-76
International financial programs, 72, 78
International fisheries commissions, 258
International fund for agricultural development,
76
International lending organizations, obligations
to, 179
International Monetary Fund, 76, 179
International monetary system, 72
International narcotics contiol assistance, 77,
199
International organizations and conferences, 78,
257
International organizations and programs, 76
International peacekeeping activities, 257
International programs, agricultural, 204
International scientific programs, 83
International security assistance, 196-197
International trade, 72
International Trade Commission, 78, 293
International trade negotiations, 257
International Women's Year, National Commission on, 302
Interstate Commerce Commission, 293
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin, 292
Interstate Highway System, 98, 100
Interstate Land Sales Registration, Office of, 240
Intrabudgetary transactions, definition, 178
Intragovernmental transactions, 162




j
Japan-United States Friendship Commission,
289
Job Corps programs, 123
Job opportunities program, 112, 124
Jobs for Veterans, 151
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing
Arts, 245
Judicial Center, Federal, 191
Judicial Salaries, Commission on Executive,
Legislative, and, 158,301
Judiciary, The, 155, 190-192
Justice, Department of, 154, 251-253

Kendall School for Deaf Children, 121
L
Labor, Department of, 133, 253-256
Labor-Management Services Administration,
254
Labor Relations Board, National, 295
Labor Relations Council, Federal, 282
Labor services, 122-124
Labor standards, 124-125
Labor Statistics, Bureau of, 255
Land forces, defense, 66
Land Management, Bureau of, 92, 241-242
Land sales, interstate, 240
Land Use Planning Commission for Alaska,
Joint Federal-State, 300-301
Land and water resources, 241-243
Law enforcement assistance, State and local
governments, 152
Law Enforcement Assistance Administration,

152-153,253
Law enforcement and justice:
Outlays, 152
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, total, 153
Program analysis, by function, 152-155
Law enforcement and prosecution, 152-154
Law Enforcement Training Center, Federal, 265
Legal activities, Justice Department, 252
Legal Services Corporation, 293
Legislative, and Judicial Salaries, Commission
on Executive, 158,301
Legislative branch, 156, 185-189
Legislative proposals for major new and expanded programs, in the 1977 budget, projection of costs, 1976-81, 356-357
Lexington Addiction Research Center, 230
Liabilities in deposit fund accounts, 179
Libraries and Information Science, National
Commission on, 293-294
Library, National Agricultural, 202-203
Library of Congress, 187-188
Library resources, 232
Life insurance, see Insurance
Liquor trade, illegal, 153
Livestock production, 94
Loan Guarantee Board, Emergency, 285
Loan guarantees, Veterans Administration, 278

378

T H E BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

Loans, see particular kind
Long-range budget outlook, 27-37
Long-range budget projections, discussion, 27
Longer-range assumptions, 25-26
Longer-range economic assumptions, table,
1978-81,26
Lowell Historic Canal District Commission, 301
Low income allowances, 42, 43, 44
Low-income housing demonstration programs,
241
Low-rent public housing, 238

M
Mail service, cost of, 98
Mammal Commission, Marine, 293
Management and Budget, Office of, 168, 194
Management improvement, Federal Government, 196
Manned space flight, 82
Marihuana and Drug Abuse, National Commission on, 302
Marine Mammal Commission, 293
Maritime Administration, 216
Maritime Commission, Federal, 287
Marketing services, agricultural, 204, 208-209
Mass transit, 98, 100
Materials Policy, National Commission on, 302
Mediation Board, National, 295
Mediation and Conciliation Service, Federal,
287-288
Medicaid,M6,7,9,126,130
Medical cai e, veterans, 278
Medical expenses, M5
Medical insurance, Federal supplemental, 9, 234
Medical research, Veterans Administration, 278
Medicare, M6,7.9.126.130
Medicare reform, M5
Memorial agencies, 289-290
Mental Health Administration, Alcohol, Drug
Abuse and,229-230
Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Board of
Review, Federal, 288
Metropolitan Washington airports, 261
Metro, Washington, D.C., 100
Mexico, International Boundary and Water
Commission, United States and, 258
Middle-East, peace in, 72
Middle-East special requirements fund, 74,199
Migrant and refugee assistance, 77, 200, 258-259
Military Appeals, Court of, 220
Military assistance, 73-74
Military assistance program, 61, 70
Military balance, 61, 63
Military construction, see Construction programs, Defense—Military
Military health care system, review of, 70
Military personnel:
Active forces, 71, 217-218
Control of costs, 68
Outlays, totals, table, 1964-77, 69
Retired forces, 218
Summary, table, 71
Total ceiling, 69
Military retired pay, outlays, 7, 8
Military sales, foreign, 74
Milk program, special, 209




19 77

Mine Safety Board of Review, Federal Metal
and Nonmetallic, 288
Mineral leasing programs, 160
Mines, Bureau of, 246
Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration, 246
Minority Business Enterprise, Office of, 214
Minority enterprises, 106
Mint, Bureau of the, 267-268
Mobile home construction and safety standards
program, 237
Monetary power, exercise of the, 179
Mortgage Association, Federal National, 104,
238-239
Mortgage Association, Government National,
103
Mortgage credit and thrift insurance, p 103-105
Mortgage insurance, 104
Mortgage market, 100
Mortgage purchase assistance, 103
Mortgages on new apartment projects, 98
Motor fuel taxes, Federal, 100
Multilateral assistance, 197
Multilateral development assistance, 74-76

N
Narcotics control, international, 199
Narcotics and dangerous drugs, curtailment of
trafficking in, 152
National advisory commissions, see under more
specific titles
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 80, 102, 276-277
National Agricultural Library, 202-203
National Alliance of Businessmen, 151
National Archives and Records Service, 273
National Board for Promotion of Rifle Practice,
220
National Capital Planning Commission, 293
National Center for Productivity and Quality
of Working Life, 293
National commissions, committees and councils,
see under more specific titles
National Credit Union Administration, 294
National defense, M5
National Fire Prevention and Control Administration, 215
National flood insurance program, 114
National forest system, 91—92
National Foundation on the Arts and the
Humanities, 122, 294-295
National Gallery of Art, 300
National Guard, 68
National Health Service Corps, 132
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 263-264
National income accounts, transactions in,
totals, table, 1966-77. 366
National Institute of Corrections, 252
National Institute of Education, 121, 232
National Institutes of Health, 229
National Labor Relations Board, 295
National Mediation Board, 295
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 93, 214-215
National Park Service, 84, 92, 244-245

INDEX
National park system, 92
National Railroad Passenger Corporation
(Amtrak), 264
National Science Foundation, 80, 83, 295-296
National security, M4
National Security Council, 194
National Service Life Insurance, 279
National Technical Institute for the Deaf, 121,
235
National Transportation Safety Boaid, 296
National Women's Conference, 156, 158
National Zoological Park, 299
Native American program, 125, 131
NATO, 63
Natural gas, decontrol of prices, 84
Natural gas, shortage of, 89
Natural resources, environment, and energy:
Outlays, table, 57, 84
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, total, 85
Program analysis, 84
Natural resources, space surveys, 80
Naturalization Service, Immigration and, 153
Navajo-Hopi Relocation Commission, 302
Naval forces, 67
Naval Petroleum Reserve, 86, 199, 220
Needy and non-needy, assistance to, 134
New Communities Administration, 240
New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works,
National Commission on, 187
New York City seasonal financing fund, 159,
161,266
Non-nuclear research and development, 88-89
Noith Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO),
63
Northeast-Midwest rail freight system, 98, 101
Northern Mariana Islands, 156
Nuclear deterrent forces, 61, 65
Nuclear Fuel Assurance Act, 87, 88
Nuclear materials safety, 88
Nuclear power plants, 87, 91
Nuclear reactors research, 89
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 89, 296
Nuclear research and development, 88
Nuclear weapons, 70
Nutrition, 134, 145
Nutrition Service, Food and, 209-210

O
Obligations, explanation, 175-176
Obligations incurred, explanation, 176
Obligations incurred, net, by agency, totals,
table, 1975-77, 315
Occupational education, 231
Occupational health and safety programs, 133
Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 255
Occupational safety and health programs, 133
Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, 297
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
National, 93, 214-215
Off-budget agencies, 11-12, 17,60, 178
Off-budget and other fiscal activities, 10-15
Off-budget and other fiscal activities, table,
1974-77, 10
'




379

Offsetting collections, definition, 177-178
Offsetting receipts, by type, 327-329
Offsetting receipts, undistributed:
Analysis, 164
Explanation, 164
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
total, 164
Oil, crude, 40
Oil, decontrol of prices, 84, 86
Oil, import fees on, 40, 50
Oil, embargo, emergency authorities, 86
Oil and gasleasing, 84, 92
Oil and gas leasing, Outer Continental Shelf, 164
Oil shale research, 89
Old-age and survivors insurance, Federal, 234
Older Americans programs, 125
Older Americans volunteer program, 111
Onshore leasing, 92
Open-end programs and fixed costs, 33
Orbiter, shuttle, 82
Organization of the Government for the Conduct of Foreign Policy, Commission on the,
301
Outdoor Recreation, Bureau of, 244
Outer Continental Shelf, 84, 92
Outer Continental Shelf, rents and royalties, 164
Outlays:
Agricultural, 10
Agricultural research and services, 97
Air transportation, 101
Amtrak, 101
Area and regional development, 112
As a percent of gross national product, chart,
56
As a percent of gross national product, table,
1954-77. 367
By agency, for each account and functional
code, 185-308
By agency, totals, table, 1977-81, 37
By function, totals, table, 1967-1977, 360-365
By function, totals, table, 1969-77, 57
By function, totals, table, 1977-81, 35
By function and agency, totals, table, 197577, 342-353
Coast Guard, 102
Commerce, advancement and regulation of,
105-106
Commodity Credit Corporation, 97
Community and regional development, 108
Community Services Administration, 112
Conservation and land management, 91-92
Controllability, discussion, 33-34
Controllability, table, 1967-77, 354-355
Controllability, table, 1977-81, 34
Defense, national, table, 57
Defense programs, 61-71
Disaster relief and insurance, 113
Discussion, 54-55
Education programs, 116
Energy regulation programs, 89
Energy research and development, 88
Explanation, 176
Export promotion, 78
Farm income stabilization, 95
Farm price support, 7, 10
Federal employees retirement and insurance
programs, 7, 8
Federal Financing Bank, total, 1974-77, 14

380

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Outlays—Continued
Federal funds, table, 1975-77, 20
Firm ceilings, 55
Fiscal outlook, table, 1975-81, 28
Fish and Wildlife Service, 93
Five-year projections, 27
Food stamp program, 9
Foreign affairs, conduct of, 77-78
Foreign assistance, total, 75
Foreign information and exchange and activities, 78
Forest Service, 92
From budget authority available through current action by Congress, totals, table, 197577, 317
Full-employment, 31
Full-employment, table, 1975-81, 31
General Government, by program or agency,
156
General revenue sharing, 7
General science, space and technology, 80
General science and basic research, 83
Ground transportation, 101
Health block grants, M6
Health programs, 126
Housing payments, 7, 9
Income security, 137
Indian programs, 113
Interest, net, 162
International affairs, 72
International affairs, total, 73
Land Management, Bureau of, 92
Law enforcement and justice, 152
Loan program, 12
Medicaid, 7, 9
Medicare and Medicaid, 7, 9
Military assistance, total, 74
Military retired pay, 7, 8
National defense, 57
National Park Service, 92
Natural resources, 93
Natural resources, environment and energy,
84
Net interest, 7, 9, 57
Off-budget agencies and Government-sponsored enterprises, 10-14
Off-budget agencies and Government-sponsored enterprises, table, 1954-77, 13
Physical resources, 57
Postal Service, 105
Projected, 32
Public assistance, 7, 9
Railroad retirement, 7, 8
Range management, 92
Recreational resources, 92
Relation to budget authority, chart, 5
Relation to budget authority, totals, table,
1975-77, 318-319
Rural Telephone Bank, 112
Social security, 7, 8
Solar and geothermal research, 89
Space activities, supporting, 83
Space research and technology, 81
Space science, applications and technology, 82




FISCAL

YEAR

1977

Outlays—Continued
Summary:
By agency, totals, table, 1975-77, 314
By function, totals, table, 1975-77, 312
Totals, table, 1975-77,311
Target ceilings by major function, 55
Total, 56-57
Total by function, table, 360-365
Total projected, 28
Total, table, 1789-77, 368
Uncontrollable, 6-10, 33-34
Uncontrollable, total, table, 1975, 7
Under proposed programs, 28
Unemployment assistance, 7, 8
Unified budget, table, 1954-77, 13
Veterans benefits, 7, 8-9
Veterans benefits and services, 147
Water power programs, 91
Water resource development programs, 91
Water resources and power programs, 90-91
Overseas Private Investment Corporation, 198

Pacific Islands, 158
Packers and Stockyards Administration, 204
Panama, Republic of, payment to, 259
Panama Canal, 226
Panama Canal Company, 226
Paperwork, Commission on Federal, 301
Park Service, National, 92, 244-245
Participation sales and authorizations, Government National Mortgage Association, 238
Patent Appeals and Customs, Court of, 190
Patent and Trademark Office, 215
Pay, Advisory Committee on Federal, 280
Payroll tax, 40
Peace Corps, 77, 280
Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation, 297
Pennsylvania Avenue development plan, 108,
111
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, 11, 12,
173
Pension programs, private, 138
Pensions, veterans, 277-278
Permanent budget authority, definition, 176
Personal property activities, General Services
Administration, 273
Pest control, 97
Petroleum, import fees on, 40
Petroleum industry, removal of price and allocation controls, 89
Petroleum Reserve, Naval, 86, 199, 220
Petroleum reserve, strategic, 88
Petroleum storage program, strategic, 84, 199
Philippines, Veterans Administration grants,
278
Planning Commission, National Capital, 293
Plant Health Inspection Service, Animal and,
201-202
Policy development and research, 240
Pollution:
Abatement and control, 89-90, 271
Exhaust, aircraft, 102
Fund, Coast Guard, 260
Marine, 102

381

INDEX
Population growth, 76
Population Growth and the American Future,
Commission on, 301
Postal Service, 12, 100, 105,297
Postal Service fund, 11, 12, 173
Potomac River Basin, Interstate Commission
on the, 292
Poverty research, 236
Power Commission, Federal, 89, 288
Power programs, 91
Preparedness activities, General Services Administration, 274
Preparedness Agency, Federal, 274
President, The:
Budget message of, M1-M6
Compensation, 192
Emergency fund, 196
Funds appropriated to, 195-200
Special assistance, 193
Unanticipated needs, 196
President, Executive Office of the, 156
Presidential election campaign fund, 265
President's foreign assistance contingency fund,
199
President's Panel on Federal Compensation,
156, 157, 165
Price Index, Consumer, 136, 139
Price Stability, Council on Wage and, 194
Price support programs, 206
Printing and Engraving, Bureau of, 267
Prison System, Federal, 252-253
Prisons, Bureau of, 252
Privacy Protection Study Commission, 302
Private and individual responsibilities, M3
Procurement, defense, 61, 67, 220-221
Procurement Policy, Office of Federal, 194
Product Safety Commission, Consumer, 284
Productivity and Quality of Working Life,
National Center for. 293
Professional Standards Review Organizations,
131
Property:
Management, 157, 274
Personal, 273
Real. 272-273
Proprietary receipts from the public, definition, 178
Prosthetic research, Veterans Administration,
278
Public assistance. 7, 9, 140-145, 233
Public debt:
As a percent of gross national product, table,
1954-77. 367
Increase in, 20
Interest on, 4, 162, 170,269
Limit, table, 1975-77, 19
Limit, totals, table, 1974-77, 323
Outstanding, 311, 323
Outstanding, table, 1975-77, 16
Public debt, 9
Public Debt, Bureau of the, 268
Public enterprise revolving funds, explanation,
174

Public facility loans, 240
Public Health Service. 131-132. 231
Public housing, low-rent, 238




Public housing programs, 142
Public Law 83-480, see Agricultural Trade
Development and Assistance Act
Public works, acceleration, 200
Puerto Rico, 160
Q
Quality of care survey, veterans, 146
R
Radio Free Europe, 78
Radio Liberty, 78
Radioactive waste disposal, 84, 88
Rail crossings, 262
Rail freight facilities, 98
Rail freight system, 100-101
Rail passenger service, intercity, 98, 101
Rail service assistance, 264
Railroad Administration, Federal, 264
Railroad Passenger Corporation, National,
(Amtrak), 264
Railroad research, 264
Railroad Retirement Act of 1974 (Public Law
93-58), 8

Railroad Retirement Board, 297-298
Railroad retirement outlays, 7, 8, 138
Railroad retirement, and disability benefits, 138
Railroad safety, 264
Railroads, 100-101
Railway Association, United States, 11,
100-101,173,304
Range management, 92
Readjustment benefits, veterans, 277
Real property activities, General Services Administration, 272-273
Receipts:
Analysis, 50-52
Authority to spend debt, 175
Budget, definition, 177
By source, discussion, 48- 50
By source, projected, table, 1975-81, 29
By source, totals, table, 1967-77, 358-359
By source, totals, table, 1975-77, 324-326
Changes in, total, table, 1975-77, 48
Comparison of 1975, total, table, 51
Discussion, 177-178

Federal funds, table, 1975-77, 20
Fiscal outlook, table, 1975-81, 28
Five-year projections, 27
Full employment, 30-31. 41
Full employment, table. 1975-81. 31
Increase, 40
Leased land, 164
National income accounts, table 1966-77, 366
Offsetting, 178
Offsetting, by type, totals, table, 1975-77,
327-329
Offsetting, undistributed, 164
Offsetting, undistributed, outlays, table, 57
Offsetting collections, definition, 177-178
Projected, discussion, 29
Relation to gross national product, table.
1954-77. 367
Strategic stockpile commodities, 70
Summary, 40—41
Summary, by source, totals, table, 1975-77,
41,312

382

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Receipts—Continued
Summary, totals, table, 1975-77, 311
Total, 40
Total projected, 29
Totals, table, 1789-1977, 368
Trust fund, 4
Reclamation, Bureau of, 242-243
Records activities, General Services Administration, 273
Records management, 157
Recreation, Bureau of Outdoor, 244
Recreation land purchases, 84
Recreational resources, 92
Refugees, assistance to, 200, 233, 258-259
Regional Action Planning Commissions, 112,

213
Regulatory reform, 98, 102-103
Rehabilitation:
Services, 125
Vocational, 125
Rehabilitation loan fund, 239
Reimbursements, definition, 178
Renegotiation Board, 298
Rent supplement program, 237
Rescission, definition, 175
Research:
Agricultural, 97, 201
Applied to national needs (RANN), 83
Biomedical, 229
Economic, Agricultural Department, 203
Energy, 89, 270
Health, 126, 132-133
Housing and Urban Development, Department of, 111, 240
Medical and prosthetic, Veterans Administration, 278
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 276
Nuclear reactor, 89
Poverty, 236
Railroad, 264
Space, 80
Water resources, 243
Research applied to national needs (RANN)
program, 83
Research and development:
Coast Guard, 260
Defense-Military, 65-66, 68, 221
Education, 121-122
Energy, 84, 88, 271
Environment, 89-90
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 102. 276
Non-nuclear. 88-89
Nuclear, 88
Scientific, 81
Solar and geothermal, 89
Research Service, Congressional, 187
Reserve forces, 68
Reserve personnel, see Military personnel.
Reserves, 172
Residential mortgage credit, 46
Resources Council, Water, 91, 304
Restoration of public facilities, block grants for,
114
Retirement, employer share, 164




FISCAL YEAR

1977

Retirement benefits, Federal, M5
Retirement and disability insurance, 137-138
Retirement fund, Civil Service, 164
Revenue Adjustment Act of 1975, 40, 43, 44
Revenue sharing, general, 159-160, 269
Revenue Sharing, Office of, 159, 265
Revenue sharing and general purpose fiscal
assistance:
Outlays, table, 57
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, total, 160
Program analvsis, by function, 159-161
Revolving funds, definition, 178
River basin commissions, 304
Rural development, 112, 206-207
Rural Development Service, 206-207
Rural Electrification Administration, 11, 207
Rural electrification and telephone revolving
fund, 11,12, 173
Rural housing programs, 105
Rural Telephone Bank, 11, 112, 173
Ryukyu Islands, Army, 225

Safety:
Aviation, 102,261-262
Boating, 260
Consumer, 133
Food, drug, and devices, 133
Highway and motor carrier, 262-263, 263264
Nuclear materials, 88
Nuclear weapons, 70
Occupational health and, 133
Safety Administration, Mining Enforcement
and,246
Safety Board, National Transportation, 296
Safety Board of Review, Federal Metal and
Nonmetallic Mine, 288
Safety Commission, Consumer Product, 284
Safety and Health Administration, Occupational, 255
Safety and Health Review Commission, Occupational, 297
Saint Elizabeths Hospital, 132, 229-230
Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation, 265
Salaries, Commission on Executive, Legislative, and Judicial, 301
School assistance in federally affected areas, 231
School breakfast and lunch program, 143
School desegregation assistance, 116
Science, National Commission on Libraries and
Information, 293-294
Science education, 201-203
Science Foundation, National, 80, 83, 295-296
Science and technical research, 215-216
Science and Technology Policy, Office of, 156,
194
Science and technology programs, Commerce
Department, 214-216
Scientific Cooperation, National Commission
on, 257
Sea lanes, protection of, 62
Sealift forces, 67-68
Search and rescue, Coast Guard, 102
Secret Service, U.S., 268-269

INDEX
Securities and Exchange Commission, 298
Security assistance, international, 196-197
Security Council, National, 194
Security income program, supplemental (SSI),
134, 140,234
Security supporting assistance, international, 74
Seigniorage, 179
Selective Service System, 70, 298-299
Senate, U.S., 185
Servicemen's Group Life Insurance Fund, 279
Sewage treatment facilities, 84, 89-90
Sewer grants, water and, 111
Shipbuilding, Commission on American, 301
Shipping, ocean, 216
Ships, construction, 102
Shortrange economic forecast, table, 1974-77,
25
Sinai support mission, 74
Small Business Administration, 106, 114, 229
Small business loan guarantees, 98
Smithsonian Institution, 122, 299-300
Smuggling, control of, 154
Social and economic development, 108
Social insurance, 29, 41
Social insurance bonus, 41
Social insurance taxes, 40, 49-50
Social and Rehabilitation Service, 233-234
Social security, M5, 49
Social Security Administration, 234
Social security fund, M5
Social security outlays, 7, 8, 137
Social security payroll tax, 137
Social security system, 134
Social security tax rate, 40
Social security trust funds, M5, 164
Social services block grant, M6, 125
Social services block grant program, 116
Social services programs, 125
Soil Conservation Service, 208
Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, 226
Southeastern Power Administration, 247
Southwestern Power Administration, 247-248
Soviet defense spending, 62
Space activities, supporting, outlays, 83
Space Administration, National Aeronautics
and, 80, 102
Space and facilities, The judiciary, 191
Space laboratory, 82
Space programs, 80
Space research and technology programs, 80
Space science, applications and technology,
82-83
Space shuttle, 80, 81,82
Spanish-Speaking People, Cabinet Committee
on Opportunities for, 281
Special Action Office for Drug Abuse Prevention,
195
Special funds, explanation, 174
Special Representative for Trade Negotiations,
194-195
Spending changes, M3
Standard deduction, increase in percentage, 42.
43,44
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 83
State, Department of, 78, 256-259
State and local assistance, M4
State and local governments, block grants, M6




383

State and local governments, responsibilities,
M3
States:
Allied services, 125
Block grants for needy children, 145
Boating safety assistance, 260
Community development block grant program, 110
Federal grants-in-aid, 159
Health assistance, 126-129
Health grant programs, 126
Highway safety programs, 262-264
Human rights agencies, 159
Law enforcement assistance, 152, 153
Medical facilities construction, grants for, 133
Revenue sharing, general, 159-160
Roads, 160
Schools, 160
Social services, grants, 125
Student incentive grant program, 121
Statistical activities:
Agriculture, Department of, 203
Labor, Department of, 255
Statistical Reporting Service, 203
Statistics, Bureau of Labor, 255
Stockyards, 204
Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) 63
Strategic forces, defense, 61, 65
Strategic petroleum reserve, 88
Strategic petroleum storage program, 84, 199
Strategic stockpile commodities, 70
Strategic weapons systems, 68
Student assistance, 121
Student Loan Insurance Fund, 232
Student Loan Marketing Association, 12
Student loan program, guaranteed, 121
Summary tables, explanation of, 310
Supplemental authority 171
Supplemental security income program (SSI)
134,140.234
Supplies and Shortages, National Commission
on, 302
Supply Service, Federal, 273
Supreme Court of the United States, 155, 190
Surplus or deficit, M3, 16 177
Surplus or deficit, totals, table, 1789-1977, 368
Susquehanna River Basin Commission, 292
Synthetic fuel facilities, 88, 89
Synthetic fuels commercialization program 271

Tax administration, see Internal Revenue.
Tax changes, M3
Tax changes, enacted and proposed, total,
table. 1975-77, 44-45
Tax Court, United States, 189
Tax credits, 42, 43, 44
Tax expenditures:
Agricultural, 96-97
Assistance to States and local governments. 161
Community and regional development, 114
Deferral of interest income, Savings Bonds,
163
Discussion, 15, 56-59
Energy and mineral resources, 88

384

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Tax expenditures—Continued
General science and basic research, 81
Health, 131
Higher education, 121
Income security, 136
International affairs, 78
Mortgage credit and thrift insurance, 104-105
Pollution control and abatement, 89-90
Small businesses, 106
Timber operations, 92
Veterans benefits and services, 148
Tax incentives, 46-47
Tax liability, changes in, 42
Tax rates, 29-30
Tax rebates, 41, 42
Tax Reduction Act of 1975 (PL 94-12), 8, 41.
58, 104, 145
Tax reductions, M4, 41
Tax reductions, income, individual, and corporation, 41
Tax structure, 27
Taxation, M4, 15
Taxes:
Earned income, credit, 145
Estate and gift, 29, 41,50
Excise, 29, 40, 41, 50
Gasoline, State and local, 100
Income, 29, 40. 41,48-49
Motor fuel, Federal, 100
Payroll, 40
Personal income exemption for the aged, 138
Relief for heirs of small farmers, 94
Social insurance, 29, 40, 41, 49-50
Social security, M5, 29, 40, 137
Unemployment insurance, 40
Technology Assessment, Office of, 185
Technology Policy, Office of Science and, 156,
194
Telecommunications Policy, Office of, 195
Telecommunications service, General Services
Administration, 273-274
Temporary employment assistance program,
116
Tennessee Valley Authority, 91,302-303
Territorial Affairs, Office of, 249-250
Thermal efficiency standards, 87
Timber sales, 160
Tobacco and Firearms, Bureau of Alcohol, 152,
267
Tourism Resources Review Commission, National, 302
Trade, ocean-going, 62
Trade Commission, Federal, 288
Trade Commission, International, 78, 293
Trade negotiations, international, 72, 257
Trade Negotiations, Special Representative for,
194-195
Trademark Office, Patent and, 215
Training:
Health manpower, 132-133
Indians, 123
Law enforcement, 153
Migrant workers, 123
On-the-job, 123
Training Administration, Employment and,
253-254
Training and employment programs, 122-124




FISCAL YEAR

1977

Transit Authority, Washington Metropolitan
Area. 292
Transition, fiscal year, 168
Transition quarter, explanation of, 168
Transportation:
Air, 101-102
Ground,100-101
Reform of, 102-103
Urban, 241
Water. 102
Transportation, Department of 260-265
Transportation Safety Board, National, 296
Travel Service, United States, 214
Treasury, Department of the, 20, 160, 265-270
Trust funds, explanation, 16,174
Trust intrafund transactions, definition, 178

U
Unanticipated needs, President, 196
Unemployment, M3
Unemployment assistance, 7, 8, 123
Unemployment assistance program, temporary,
140
Unemployment benefits, 41
Unemployment, insurance, 134, 139-140
Unemployment Insurance, National Commission on, 134
Unemployment insurance tax, 40
Unemployment rates, 31
Unified budget, 11,17, 18
United Nations Development Program, 76
United States Courts, expenses of facilities, 191
United States Friendship Commission, Japan-,
289
United States Government Life Insurance, 279
United States Information Agency, 78, 303
United States Railway Association, 11, 100-101,
173.304
United States Tax Court. 189
United States Travel Service, 214
University Year for ACTION (UYA), 111
Uranium enrichment facilities, 87, 88
Urban Development, Department of Housing
and, 104, 111,141,237-241
Urban Mass Transportation Administration,
264
Urban renewal program, 110, 239
Urban transportation, 241
User charges, standard level, 157

Veterans:
Cemetery and burial benefits, 146, 149, 151
Compensation and pensions, 146, 277-278
Education and training, 117, 121, 146, 149150
Hospital services, 150
Hospitals and extended care facilities, 150,
278
Housing, 151
Income security, 148
Insurance, 277, 278
Job opportunities, 151
Life insurance, 149
Loans, 151,278
Medical care, 150-151,278

INDEX
Vete rans—Cr ntinued
Medical care personnel, 146
Non-service-connected pensions, 149
Pensions, non-service-connected, 149
Readjustment benefits, 7, 8-9, 277
Service-connected compensaiion, 148-149
Vocational rehabilitation, 149
Veterans Administration, 20, 277-279
Veterans benefits and services:
Credit programs, 150
Outlays, 57, 147
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program, total, 147
Program analysis, by function, 146-151
Tax expenditures, 148
Veterans and Survivors Pension Adjustment
Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-527), 9
Vice President, The, official residence of, 193
Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974
(Public Law 93-508), 8
Virgin Islands. 160, 250
Virgin Islands Corporation, liquidation, 275
Vocational education, 231
Vocational rehabilitation, 125
Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA), 111

Water resources development programs, 91
Water resources and power programs, 90-91
Water resources programs, 241-243
Water and sewer grants, 111-112
Water transportation, 102
Weapon systems, strategic, 68
Weapons, modernization, 63
Weapons, nuclear, 70
Weather programs, 80, 82
Welfare, Department of Health, Education,
and, 20. 140, 228-237
White House Conference on Handicapped
Individuals, 125
White House Office, 156, 193
Wildlife conservation, 227
Wildlife refuge system, 93
Wildlife Service, Fish, and, 93, 244
Wiretapping and Electronic Surveillance, National Commission for the Review of Federal
and State Laws Relating to, 301
Women's Conference, National, 156, 158
Women's Year, National Commission on the
Observance of International, 302
Woodrow Wilson International Center for
Scholars, 300
Work incentive program (WIN), 124
Work incentives, 233
Working Life, National Center for Productivity
and Quality of, 293

W
Wage and Price Stability, Council on, 194
Warsaw Pact, 63
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, 292
Waste disposal, radioactive, 84. 88
Water Commission, National, 302
Water Pollution Control Act, 84
Water Quality, National Commission on, 302
Water quality standards, 84
Water Research and Technology. Office of, 243
Water Resources Council, 91. 304




385

Youth Conservation Corps, 210
Youth employment program, summer, 123
Youths, runaway, 125

Zoological Park, National, 299

O


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