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Bank Suspensions in the United States, 1892 - 1931

Federal Reserve System
i»

HI

m

Committee on Branch, Group, and Chain Banking




THE
FEDERAL
RESERVE
RANK of
ST. LOUIS

Research Library




BANK SUSPENSIONS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1892-1931

M a t e r i a l p r e p a r e d for t h e i n f o r m a t i o n of t h e
F e d e r a l Reserve System \>y t h e
F e d e r a l Reserve Committee on
Branch, Group, and Chain Banldng




Members of the Committee

E. A. Goldenweiser, Director, Division of Research and Statistics,
Federal Reserve 3oard, Chairman
Ira Clerk, Deputy Governor, Federal Reserve Bajik of San Francisco
M. J. Fleming, Deputy Governor, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
L. R. Rounds, Deputy Governor, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
E. L. Smead, Chief, Division of 3ank Operations, Federal Reserve
Board

J. H* Riddle, Executive Secretary and Director of Research

The Committee was appointed February 2o, 1930> n°7 the
Federal Reserve Board
n

• . .to assemble and digest information on
branch banking as practiced in the United States,
group and chain banking systems as developed in
the United States and elsewhere, the unit banking
system of the country, and the effect of ownership
of bank stocks by investment trusts and holding
corporations,"

LETTER OE TRANSMITTAL

To the Federal Reserve Board:
The Committee on Branch, Group, and Chain Banking transmits
herewith a digest of statistical material with reference to bank
suspensions in the United States during the period 1893-1931. For
the period from 1921 to 1931, it includes a detailed analysis of
suspensions, by geographic divisions, by size of towns, and by size
of banks; it also contains general data relating to 1932,




Respectfully,

E. A. Goldenweiser
Chairman




CONTENTS
Page
The Increase in Suspensions
1
History of Suspensions 1892-1932
3
Bank Suspensions and Wholesale Prices
8
Bank Suspensions and Business Failures
11
National and State Bank Suspensions Compared
11
Member State Banks
14
The Age of Suspended Banks
1?
Procedure in the Statistical Analysis of Suspensions 13
Geographic Distribution of Bank Suspensions
llumber of Suspensions by Geographic Divisions
Ratio of Suspended to Active Banks
Increase of Suspensions in the Industrial Areas
Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during
1921-1931 " y Geographic Divisions
b
Suspensions during 1892-18S7
Suspensions of National and State Banks Compared
Member and Nonmember Banks
Member State Banks
Age of Suspended Banks by G-eographic Divisions

24
24
33
39

Size of Suspended Banks
Suspended Banks Grouped by Size of Loans and
Investments
Ratio of Suspended to Active Banks by Size Groups
Suspension Rate by Geographic Divisions
Size of Suspended Banks, 1930-1931
Suspended Banks Grouped IDJ Size of Capital Stock
Suspended Banks Grouped by Size of Community in
Which Located
Size of Suspended Member State Banks

50

Disposition of Suspended Banks and Expenses of Li qui-*
datidn
Expenses of Liquidation
Losses to Depositors of Suspended Banks
Losses in Reopened and Taken-over Banks
Losses in Completely Liquidated Banks
Losses by Size of Banks
Banks in Process of Liquidation

40
43
44
45
48
49

50
56
59
65
69
72
78
81
86
89
91
94
99
104




CONTENTS (Cont'd)
Page
Losses to Stockholders of Suspended Banks
Losses to Stockholders of National Banks
Losses to Stockholders of State Banks
Total Losses to Stockholders of Suspended Banks,
1921-1931
*

106
106
109

Suspensions of Private Banks
Suspensions from 1892 to 1931
Geographic Distribution of Private Bank Suspensions
Size of Suspending Private Banks
Size of Communities Where Suspensions Occurred

114
114
119
123
126

Summary

127

Appendix

131

112




CHAPTER I

THE INCREASE IH SUSPENSIONS

Daring the twelve years 1921-1932 over 10,000 national and
State banks with deposits of nearly $5,000,000,000 were closed because
of financial difficulties.

This is about five times the number sus-

pending during the previous twenty-nine years, prior to which the
available statistics are not sufficiently complete to permit reliable
comparisons. Bank suspensions began to increase during the latter
part of 1920 and in 1921 they averaged about nine a week.

The period

selected for an intensive study of bank closings, therefore, begins
with that date.
The suspensionsCl) during the twelve years represent about
36 per cent of the total number of active national and State banks
in the country in 1920 and about 13 per cent of their total deposits
at that time.

In no previous period of equal length since the estab-

lishment of the national banking system has so large a proportion of
the country1 s banks suspended.
Although closings continued to run at an abnormally high

For the purpose of this study a bank was considered in suspension
whenever its doors were closed to the public, either temporarily
or permanently, by supervisory authorities or by the bank!s board
of directors on account of financial difficulties. Banks which
were reopened or taken over by other institutions after closing
are included as suspensions.

- 2 ~

rate orbing the entire period since 1920, the number greatly increase i after the "beginning of the depression.

In 193^ the total was

1,292 as compared with an average of 601 during the previous nine
years, and in 1931 the total was 2,213, or 10.5 Ver cent

of all hanks

in operation in that year. That stands as the high mark, as far hack
as reliable records go, in the percentage of closings to active hanks
in a single year.

In 1932 the number suspending was l,Ul6, or ~f*8 per

cent of all hanks. The number of suspensions during each of the past
twelve years is given in Table 1.




Table 1 - National and State Bank Suspensions
1921-1932(1)
Gross dove sits(000 omitted)

Year

Number

1921
1922
1923
19 2h
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932

l*6i

636
U79
628
1,292
2,213
IMS

163,299
S9,27l+
1^,3^7
202,^23
159,90U
250,U3U
19^,992
139,^00
222,931
821,83*+
1,669,075
698,382

Total

10,332

$u, 75s,295

3*+3
623
738
579
92^

$

(1) During the same period U76 private banks and 8 mutual savings
banks suspended* Trust companies
and stock savings banks are included among the State banks*




- 3-

History of Suspensions 1892-1932

While suspensions have been unusually numerous in
recent years, the problem is not one of recent origin in
the United States. Our financial history has been characterized from its inception by heavy bank mortalities during
periods of depression.

Chart 1 gives the number of suspen-

sions of national and State banks each year from 1892 to 1932,
inclusive. The figures on which this chart is based are given
in Table 2.




- k CHART 1

NUMBER OF BANK SUSPENSIONS IN THE UNITED STATES
NUMBER

2200 |

2200

2000

2000

1600

iaoo

1600

1600

1400

fifOO

1200

1200

1000

1000

600

aoo

600

600

400

aoo

200

200

0

1 >

1892 1693

1900

t

1

L.

1 ••»

1905

1

1

1

1910

L

1

i_. , , L
,

1915

1,

1 ,, t,_

1

1920

1

1—_!

i 1 1 J L _ lU . . L . U
_.

1925

1950

i

1935

Number of national and State bank suspensions in the united
States each year from 1892 to 1932. ^ru6t companies and
stock sayings banks are included.




- 5-

Table 2 - Number of national and State Bank: Suspensions
per Hundred Active Banks, 1592-1932
r

Number o f [
Number of
active 'banks
suspensions
(June 30)

Year

1S92
1293
1894
1895
1S96
1397
1S9S
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
190U
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
191s
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
192^
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932

!

7,532
7,995
7,958
8,084
7,968
8,030
8,067
8,320
8J3S
9,814

44

30
1

17,891
20,307
21,486

!

1

0.50
1.57
1.18
2.16

1

2.63

j

2.09

S3
122
113

25,3^5
25,824

4o

1

26,309
27,103
27,425

34
37
61
143
461
3^3
623
738
579
924
636
479

28,659

1
1

!
i
1
1

57

1

29,417
29,033

1

I

18
19
24
34
35
75
45
40
70
102
45
46
63

!

28,890
28,108
27,639
26,966
25,909
25,125
24,258
23,045
21,123
18,282

I
!

62

19,620

24,308
25,016

0.58
3-71
O.78
1.05
1.25
1.15
0.37
0.22
0.22
0.24
O.32
O.3O
O.56
0.31
0.25
0.39
O.52
0.22
0.21
0.28
0.24
O.36
0.49
0.45
0.15
0.13
0.14
0.22

85
100
92

11,825
13,297
i4,6S2
16,266

1

Suspensions
per 100
active "banks

297

10,703

22,592
23,403

r

|

I 3.^3
1

2.45

!

1.91
2.59
5.61

628
1,292
2,213

10.48

l,4i5

7.75

Sources: Figures for active banks for the entire period
and for national bank suspensions from IS92 to 1920
were taken from the annual reports of the Comptroller
of the Currency. Suspensions of State banks from

- 6~

It is only for comparatively recent years that comprehensive
and dependable statistics on bank suspensions in this country are available.
Records as to national bank failures since the beginning of the national
banking system are contained in the annual reports of the Comptroller of
the Currency, but for State banks the statistics prior to 1S92 are too
fragmentary to be of much use for present purposes. Beginning in 1392,
however, it is possible to piece together from various sources a statistical series of bank suspensions covering the entire period, 1S92-1932
inclusive.

It is not possible to secure uniform accuracy and comparability

in the figures throughout that period.

For the years prior to 1921, for

example, the national bank figures represent only those closings for which
receivers were appointed and exclude those suspended banks which reopened
or were otherwise disposed of without tho appointment of a receiver.

With

respect to State banks the series is not entirely satisfactory for the
years prior to 1900: first, because no information is available as to
what was considered a bank suspension; and second, because little is known
as to the method of collecting the data and consequently as to their accuracy, completeness, and continuity.

In the case of some States this also

1892 to 1920 were taken from the Banking Inquiry of 1925 and from Bradstreet *s Commercial Agency. Suspensions from 1921 to 1930 were compiled
by the Federal Reserve Committee on Branch, Group, and Chain Banking from
data, furnished by national and State authorities and differ slightly from
those heretofore published by the Federal Reserve Board. For 1931 and 1932
the suspension figures were compiled by the Division of Bank Operations of
the Federal Reserve Board. The figures of both active banks and suspensions
include trust companies and stock savings banks, but exclude private banks,
industrial banks, and mutual savings banks. They include banks in continental United States only. See Table I in the appendix for a more detailed
statement of the composition and sources of the figures.-







-

7 -

CHART 2

SUSPENSIONS PER 100 ACTIVE BANKS
1692 - 1932

PER HUNDRED

PER HUNDRED
It

II

10

8.

1890

1895

1900

1903

1910

11
95

1920

1923

1930

Number of national and State bank suspensions per hundred
active banks on June 30 each year from 1892 to 1932.

1933

~ g -

applies to later years, i.e., to the greater part of the period 1900 to
1920.

But despite these inherent weaknesses, the record is "believed to he

sufficiently reliable to show in general perspective the periods of abnormal banking mortality.

A description of the sources used is given at the

end of Table I of the appendix*
Chart 2 gives the ratio of suspensions to active banks each year
from 1292 to 1932»

Reliable figures as to deposits, loans and investments,

total resources, or capital stock are not available for all suspended State
banks prior to 1920, and, therefore, there is no adequate measure of size
for comparison with active banks.
One of the most dramatic features of the panic of 1893 was the
great number of bank suspensions. As nearly as can be determined, approximately 297 banks, embracing nearly 4 per cent of all chartered banks in
operation, were forced to close during that year because of insolvency.

It

.will be observed that the number of suspensions was excessive throughout
the entire period 1S93-*1897 inclusive and that a secondary peak was reached
in 1S96. Thereafter the annual number of failures declined to a fraction of
1 per cent of the banks in operation and continued at this level until 1921*
In only four years during that period did the number exceed one hundred, one
of those years being 1920. The others were 1908, 19l4, and 1915, and in
each of these years the number of suspensions testifies to the financial
stress of the times.
Bank Suspensions and Wholesale Prices. - Chart 3 compares the
number of bank suspensions each year from 1892 to 1932 with the Bureau of
Labor index of wholesale prices.

During the period of gradually rising

prices from 1897 to 191o, suspensions were comparatively few, except for







- 9 -

CHART 3

BANK SUSPENSIONS AND WHOLESALE PRICES

NUMBER

INDEX
OF

SUSPENSIONS

PRICES

1

2200
2000

240

J

1600

220
200
160

1600

1 1160

K*00
1200
iOOO

#
MTOLESAU* #
#
PRICES
#

eoo

f

#
i
i
1
il
r

600

i
#i
# ii
• ••
i
i
i
i

140
120

•
•
I
i

_ A*/ \
r
KS*+
I \

f

1

/ *
\

V>—^

BO
\

, - • " '

^00

100

60

I *
BANK
/
SUSPENSIONS

200
i—1_

1690

....«_. i_ »,—

1895

—»

1900

1905

1910

1915

1920

11,

1923

t

a

40
•i

1930

*

i

»

J

20

1935

Somber of national and State bank: suspensions and the Bureau
of Labor index of wholesale prices, annual figures from 1890
to 1932. For price Index 1926 = 1 0 0 .

- 10 -

CHART A-

BANK SUSPENSIONS AND ALL BUSINESS FAILURES
PERCENT

11




1
1
1

PER CENT Of
NATIONAL AND STATE BANKS
SUSPENDING

U

Y\J
V

i l

FE R CENT Or /tLL
BU5IN1
ESS ENTERP RISES
fAILING
1
.A
I
— ' '\

KN

1

1
I
1

y
ft
V

I

i

1890

i

i

i

1

1895

1

1

1

t i l l

1<*00

1 i i i i

1905

t

1910

i

i

i

.

1

1915

I

!

1

1 1 t 1 1

1920

1, 1 1 1 .1

1925

, i i i,, i 1

1930

1935

Per cent of national and State banks and of a i l business enterprises f a i l i n g each year from 1890 to 1932. The figures for
business failures are those compiled by R. G* Dun and Co,




- 11 short periods following business disturbances, such as 1908 and
I91U-I915.

With the rapid rise in prices from 1916 to 1920 closings

\7ere at a minimum, but rose rapidly with the decline in prices in
1920-1921.

Although prices remained relatively stable for eight

or nine years after thececline of 1921, suspensions continued at a
high level tlrroughout the decade, and during the sharp drop in
prices in 1930-1932 rose to unparalleled records.
Bank Suspensions and Business Failures, - The iDercentage
of banks suspending each year is compared in Chart k with the percentage of all business enterprises failing, as estimated by H. &•
Dun and Company, (l) It is of interest to note that prior to 1920
the proportion of failures among all business enterprises was
larger than among banks for every year except 1893•

From 1920 to

1932, however, the proportion of banks suspending was higher than
for all business enterprises for every year except 1922 when the
ratios were about the same.

In fact for this period as a whole the

proportion for banks was about three times as high as for all business enterprises.
National and State Bank Siispensions Corn-oared
Table 3 shows separately for national and State banks, for
the period 1921-1932, the number of banks siispended and the deposits
of these banks. Out of 10,332 suspensions in the twelve years, l,6l2,
or 16 per cent, were national banks and 8,720, or SU per cent, were
State banks. The deposits of the suspending national banks were
$1,187,000,000 and the deposits of the suspending State banks were
$3,571,000,000.
(1) Dun's Review, January 21, 1933> P-

10

-

- 12 -

Chart 5 compares the number of national and State bank suspensions
each year from 1S92 to 1932.
Table 3 - National and State Bank Suspensions
1921-1932
ilat i.onal banlcs
Gross d e p o s i t s
ihraber (000 o m i t t e d )

Year
1921
1922
1923
192H
1925
1926
1927
1Q2S
1929
1930
1931
1932

52
49
90
122
11s
123
91

57

i
!

64
161
409

| _2I6

Total

1,612

$

20,777
20,197
34,244
0M9O

S t a t e banks
Gross d e p o s i t s
Htuuber
(000 o m i t t e d )
409
2S)4

533

616
461
601

$

142,522

69,077

112,103

137,533

43,998
45,547
35/483
41,614
170,446
439,171
214.150

422
5o4
1,131
1,204
1,140

104,330
200,436
149,445
102,917
181,317
651,388
1,229,904
484,2^2

$1,127,091

S,720

i $3,571,204

55.57^

545

A comparison of the number of suspensions per hundred active
banks has been made for national banks and for State banks. The suspensions of national banks during the twelve years 1921-1932 amounted
to 20 for every hundred in operation on June JO, 1920, while for State
banks the rate was about U2 per hundred.
If instead of tailing the 1920 figures for active banks the
average of the June 30 figures for the twelve years 1921-1932 is used,
the ratios of suspensions to active basics during that period are
slightly over 21 per cent for national banks and about US per cent for
State banks.







- 13 -

CHART 5
NUMBER OF NATIONAL AND STATE BANK SUSPENSIONS

1892-1932

NUMBER

NUMBER
Nl

1

1800

1500

|1

1600

1600

1400

1400

1200

ZOO

1
1000

1000

800

600

State Banhs

A if 1

600

1

600

AI 1/

4
»*
fI

400

!
1

400

I*

1 *
1 *

200

I

(i

[-•^

1692 1895

K^^,, L——-r *

** «— •

1900

1905

1910

1915

200

National

I

0

I

Banhs

• •IWIMI J

i

1920

i

i

i

i—i—i—»

1925

i

»

—i—i,

1930

t

t ,J

1935

Kumber of national bank and State bank suspensions each year
from 1892 to 1932# Trust companies and stock savings banks
are included in State banks.

r

lk-

The ratios of suspensions to active banks each year from 1892 to
1932 are shown for both national and State banks in Chart 6.
are given in Table I of the appendix.

The figures

The rate for State banks was higher

than for national banks during the entire period, with the exception of
two years.

It will also be noted that during periods of stress as in 1892-

1893 the rate for State banks rose much more sharply than that for nationals.
This has likewise been true during the entire period 1921-1932.
Chart 6a shows suspensions of member and normember banks per
hundred active banks each year from 1921 to 1932*
Member State Banks. - Of the Stat/e bank suspensions UlS, or less
than 5 pe r cent, v/ere members of the Federal reserve system.

If the member

State bank suspensions are added to the national bank suspensions, it will
be found that 2,030, or about 20 per cent of all suspended banks, were members of the Federal reserve system and 8,302, or SO per cent, were nonmember
State banks.




Table h - Member State Bank Suspensions
1921-1932

Year

Number

1921
1922

19
13
32
3S
28

1923 1
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
Total

Gross deposits
(000 omitted)

_55.

$ 17,363
7,H3
12,559
13,6^5
9,883
23,466
17,9^2
10,247
16,459
202,399
293,957
55.153

kis

$650,136

35
31
16
17

;

2

|

107

7




- 15 CHART 6

PER HUNDRED

SUSPENSIONS PER 100 ACTIVE BANKS
1692-m2

PER HUNDRED

13

13

12

11

10

6

1690

1595

1900

1905

1910

1915

1920

1925

1930

1935

Number of n a t i o n a l bank and State bank suspensions per hundred
active banks on June 30 each y e a r from 1892 t o 1932.

-

ID

-

CHART 6a

SUSPENSIONS OF MEMBER AND NONMEMBER BANKS
PER HUNDRED ACTIVE BANKS, 1921-1932 PER HUNDRED
HUNDRED

PER

1/+

_J>J

12

\
\

i
i

I
I
I

12

\
\

i

\

Norimemb< 1
I3anks - #/

10

\

\ 10
\

i

i

a
i
i
i
i
#
i/

i
i
i

/ \

/

2

6

1

*

Kz
i

1921




\

i
i

r
\

/

\

,

A

/

1

N

>mber
anKs_

/

-•

1922

J\

1923

192A-

1925

1926

1927

1926

1929

1930

1931

Bumber of member bank and nonmember bank suspensions per hundred a c t i v e banks on June 30 each year from 1921 to 1932.
Member banks include both national banks and State banks
which were members of the Federal reserve system.

1932

- 17 -

The number of active member State banks has fluctuated widely
during the years since 1920, rising from 1,37*4- on June 30 of that year to
l,6Ug two years later, and declining to S35 on June 30, 1932*

T&e average

of the June 30 figures for the twelve years 1921-1932 was 1,327f or only
slightly less than the number on June 30, 1920*

The suspensions of member

State banks daring the twelve year period amounted to 30 P e r hundred active
banks on June 30> 1920; and this suspension rate becomes 31 if the annual
average number of member State banks is used*

This indicates a suspension

rate for member State banks about midway between the rate for national banks
and that for all State banks.

The Age of Suspended Banks
Bank suspensions in the United States have not been limited to
institutions with a mushroom growth or overnight existence.

It is note-

worthy that for the United States as a whole the average age of suspended
banks at time of closing was nineteen years and ten months in the case of
national banks and sixteen years and two months in the case of State banks.
(See Table IX of the appendix.) These are the averages for suspensions
during ten years only, 1921-1930. The average age of banks suspending daring 1931 and 1932 has not been compiled*
The use of averages probably tends to obscure the considerable
period of time during which many suspended banks had been in operation prior
to closing.

This is best illustrated by classifying the suspended banks

into age groups as is done in Table 5»

From this table it is apparent that

while 25*1 per cent of all suspended banks for which data are available were
less than ten years old at time of closing and 63*6 per cent were less than




- IS -

twenty years old, 36.k per cent, on the other hand, had been in operation
for twenty years or more. This clearly indicates that although many of
the suspensions have occurred among recently organized hanks, long-established institutions have " y no means "been immune to the difficulties which
b
have prevailed during the past ten years.

Table 5 ~ Distribution of National and State Bank Suspensions
during 1921-1930 According to Age
11120136 r Of ' Number of

Yeaxs in operation
prior to suspension
Less
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
kO

than 5
to
9
to l4
to 19
to 2k
to 29
to 34
to 39
to 44

45 to ks
50 and over
Total

national
banks

State
banks

Number of
national and
State banks

75
133
122
155
20S
9^
36
25
37
23

660
792

735
925

1,141+
1,128
1,005

1,266
1,283
1,213

467
236
155
63
20
21

56l
272
180
100
^3
4o

5,69i(D

6,618(1)

ja
927

1

( 1 ) Exclusive of 85 hanks for which data are not available.

Procedo.ro in the Statistical Analysis of Suspensions
Available information on State banks suspending prior to 1920 is
quite fragmentary, as indicated above.

In many States the liquidation of

closed banks was conducted by receivers appointed by the courts and the
records were filed at the various county court-houses throughout the State,
It frequently happened that these receivers were disinclined to cooperate
with State banking commissioners in supplying information on the results of
liquidation. Under such conditions it is not surprising that very little




- 19 -

published data on failed "banks were presented in the periodic reports
issued " y the several State hanking departments.
b
Beginning in 1920 with the rapid increase in suspensions, considerable agitation arose on the part of many State banking commissioners
for the extension of their powers to include the liquidation of closed
banks.

Substantial progress along this line has been made during the ensu-

ing years and in the majority of States the banking commissioner is now
responsible for the liquidation of closed banks, although in some instances
his acts are subject to the approval of the court.

Improved records of bank

suspensions have thereby become available at the offices of the State banking departments, but much of this information is not published. Moreover,
considerable diversification of practice is to be found among the States
in the technique of liquidation itself, a fact which complicates the comparative study of suspension records of the various States. Notwithstanding these difficulties, the opportunities for making a comprehensive analysis of bank suspensions have been greatly enhanced by improved records during recent years.
With this in mind, the Committee drew up a schedule for reporting
unifonn information, or as nearly uniform as possible, on each bank which
suspended operations during the period 1921-1930 inclusive. A copy of
this schedule appears at the end of the appendix to this report• For
national bank suspensions the schedules were prepared in the office of the
Comptroller of the Currency, and for State bank suspensions they were prepared in the State banking departments, either by the staff of the department or by a representative of the Federal reserve bank of the district*
On the whole the results were satisfactory although no State was able to




- 20 -

supply all the information requested, and due to differences in records and
methods of accounting some of the data are not strictly comparable for the
different States*

Every effort has been made, however, to avoid errors and

to prevent inconsistencies in the use of the data secured from the various
States. This has involved the expenditure of much time in checking the
schedules and in correspondence between the Committee, the Federal reserve
agents, and officials of the State banking departments in clearing up
questionable points. The figures thus obtained regarding national and
State banks are considered sufficient to present a comprehensive picture.
The Committee! s figures differ slightly from those published for
the same period by the Federal Reserve Board due to revisions in the preliminary figures reported to the board.

Sometimes a closing may be reported

originally as a voluntary liquidation or consolidation but upon more complete information may be classed as a suspension, and vice versa.
For 1931 a n & 1932 the Committee has used information collected by
the Division of Bank Operations of the Federal Reserve Board.

Some of the

data collected on the schedules for 1921-I93O are not available for 193^~
1932 and for such data the analysis is necessarily limited to the ten year
period 1921-1930.
For the purpose of this study a bank was considered in suspension
whenever its doors were closed to the public, either temporarily or permanently, by supervisory authorities or by the bank1 s board of directors on
account of financial difficulties. (1)
(l) The term "bank suspension." as defined here and as used in the following
discussion coincides with the practice of the Federal Reserve Baord,
Division of Bank Operations, which has compiled statistics on this subject since 1921, It differs from a bank failure as defined "ay the Comptroller of the Currency. The latter considers as failures only those
closed banks for which receivers have been appointed, and excludes all
cases in which a bank suspends business temporarily but resumes operations without the intervention of a receiver*




- 21 ~

Banks which were reopened or taken over by other institutions after closing
are included as suspensions.

The figures do not include banks closed tempo-

rarily under special "moratorium" holidays declared by civil authorities,
nor banks which, without cessation of business, obtained depositors1 agreements for the waiver or deferment of deposits. There were many of such moratoria during 1932 in some parts of the country, particularly in the North
Central States, but they were not frequent j>rior to that year*
For the hjG private banks suspending daring the twelve years
1921-1932 the information secured by the Committee is less comprehensive and
less reliable than that for national and State banks, doe to the fact that
in many States private banks are not under the supervision of any public
authority and no records are available*

Therefore, the following analysis

of suspensions is based on national and State bank suspensions only, and
private banks will be the subject of a separate chapter.
clude trust companies and stock savings banks*

State banks in-

Mutual savings banks, in-

dustrial banks, and banks in the United States possessions are excluded.
In classifying bank suspensions in the following chapters by
location and by size they are compared with active banks in order to secure
a ratio of suspensions to active banks in each geographic division or State
and in each size group*

Suspensions during the eleven years 1921-1931 are

compared with active banks on June 3°> 1920*

The compilations were made

before the 1932 figures became available*
The use of active banks on June 30, 1920, as a base for these computations may be open to some criticism on the ground that certain changes
in the distribution of banks by States and 'by size groups have occurred
during the years subsequent to 1920. For example, most of the suspensions




- 22 -

during the eleven years 1921-1931 occurred among relatively small banks with
a consequent decrease in the proportion of total active hanks in the smaller
size groups. The number of banks in the larger size groups was increasing
at the same time. Hence the use of 1920 instead of a later year or a combination of later years as a base against which to compare suspensions tends
to show lower suspension rates for banks in the smaller size groups, and
higher rates in the larger size groups.
This tendency, however, may be offset in part by a contrary tendency when loans and investments are used as the measure of size. A bank
ordinarily tends to liquidate loans and investments in meeting deposit withdrawals as it approaches suspension. Hence it follows that at the time of
suspension a bank is usually smaller than it has been as an active, solvent
institution.

In the analysis which follows, therefore, this factor tends to

raise the suspension rate among small banks. This influence affects a relatively small number of cases which fall close to the border lines between
the various size groups, and exists with more or less equal force whatever
year or combination of years might be taken as the base.
Perhaps a comparison of suspensions each year with the active banks
in that year would be the more logical method.

To compile the number of

active banks by size groups for each year, however, would entail an amount
of labor on the part of overworked banking departments that would hardly be
justified by the results.

Since the year 1920 marks the beginning of the

current period of banking difficulties, and is near the peak in the number
of active banks in most States, there is a logical purpose in relating the
suspensions by States and by size groups with the active banks in 1920. On
the whole that year is considered preferable to any other as a base for
comparison.







- 23 -

In order to conform uith other studies of the Committee,
total loans and investments, and not total deposits, are used in
this study as a measure of the size of banks and as a measure of
the amounts involved in suspensions. Total loans and investments
necessarily "bear a close relation to total deposits, so that for
the purpose in hand the use of total loans and investments as a
basis of classification gives approximately the same Results as
the use of total deposits.

CHAPTER II

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF BANK SUSPENSIONS

During the greater part of the eleven year period

1921-1931 "bank

suspensions were concentrated largely in the agricultural sections of the
country.^ 1' This is illustrated in Chart 7 which shows on a map of the
United States the locations of the S,9l6 suspensions of national and State
banks during those years.
Number of Suspensions by Geograpliic Divisions
Over 3»600>

or

^1 P e r cent of the total number of national and

State bank suspensions, occurred in the seven Western Grain States of Minnesota, North and Soutn Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, and Kansas. The
Southeastern and Southwestern States, also largely agricultural, and the
semiagricultural North Central States contributed another hi per cent of the
total*

Only 18 per cent of the suspensions occurred in the Northeastern part

of the United States and in the Southern Mountain, Rocky Mountain, and Pacific
Coast sections. Table 6 gives the number and percentage of the total suspensions occurring in each geographic division.

The annual changes in the various

geographic regions are shown in Charts S and 9> the figures on which they are
based being given in Table II of the appendix. (2)

(1) The analysis of suspensions in this and the following chapter was prepared before the 1932 figures became available, and is consequently
limited to the eleven year period 1921-1931•
(2) In addition to national and State bank suspensions the following States
reported a substantial number of private bank suspensions during the
eleven years 1921-1931: Iowa, 118; Michigan, SI; Texas, 78; Georgia, 35 *
>
Indiana, 28; New York, 25; Pennsylvania, 21; and Ohio, IS. The remaining thirty-five private bank suspensions were distributed over ten States.
During the same period there was one mutual savings bank suspension in
each of the following States: Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts,
Maryland, and Wisconsin.




- 2h -




- 25 -

CHART 7

BANK SUSPENSIONS

NATIONAL BANKS
STATE BANKS AND \
TRUST COMPANIES!
TOTAL SUSPENSIONS-

W S

- 26 -

During the nine years 1921-1929 > 70 per cent of the suspensions
occurred in twelve agricultural States, including the seven Western Grain
States listed above, and Georgia, South Carolina, Montana, Oklahoma, and
Texas. During 1930 and 1931 suspensions increased in the industrial districts, "but they did not decline in the agricultural regions.

While only

kO per cent of the total during 1930 and 1931 occurred in these twelve agricultural States, the actual number of suspensions therein was greater in
1931 than during any previous year.
Table 6 - Bank Suspensions during 1921-193^ "by Geographic Divisions
Geographic
division^1)
New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North C e n t r a l
Southern lifountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast
UNITED STATES

N a t i o n a l hanks
Per c e n t
Number of t o t a l

S t a t e banks
Per cent
Number of t o t a l

10
llU

0.7
8.5

163
57
152
195
U30
159
56

12.2

32.2
11.9
k.Z

3.223

k$z

17.5
10.3
42.6
6.0

1U0

! 1.336

100.0

7,580

*.3

ll.U

lU.6

39
19U
L0U9
370
1,323
779

0.5
2.6
13.8

N a t i o n a l and
S t a t e banks
Per c e n t
Number of t o t a l

19
+
308
1,212

0.5
3.5
13.6
10.9
U1.0

1.8

U27
1,^75
31k
3.658
617
196

100.0

8,916

100.0

M

k.s

16.6
6.9

2.2

(1) New England: Maine, Hew Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Bhode
Island, Connecticut.
Middle Atlantic: New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania,
Maryland, District of Columbia,
North Central: Miciiigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio,
Southern Mountain: West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee.
Southeastern: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida,
Alabama, Mississippi.
Southwestern: Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma.
Western Grain: Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa,
Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas.
Rocky Mountain: Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico,
Arizona, Utah, Nevada.
Pacific Coast: Washington, Oregon, California.







CHARTS
BANK SUSPENSIONS BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS
Or SU8PCN5MWS
1921-1931

NUMBER OF SUSPENSION*

WO

550

500

4-50

M)0

1 WESTERN GRAIN

350

300

v

j
4
/

\

\

NJ 250
>J

/
/
/
i

1
i

\

1

/
/
/
i
F

k
\

1

SOUTH EASTERN
\

1
1
/

i

/
/
i
/

i

f

\

•

\
•!
!

\
\
\
\
\

/
/
\
1

/

200

/
/
#
fr
<

150

/

/
* — -f-*

100

> "
\

> m^

m

S'
50
SOUTHERN MOUNTAIN

F==S
1921

* ' • • %
"

1922 1923 192«*

i

5^

. J I ANTIC.

S^Sfi**

d

~A

vA

1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1 3
91

Humber of national and State ban* suspensions In specified
geographic divisions of the oountry. Annual figures from
1921 to 1931 Inclusive

- 28 CHART 9

BANK SUSPENSIONS BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS
NUMBER OT SUSPENSIONS
1921-1931
NUMBER OF SUSPENSIONS
450

450

400

400

350

550

500

300

250

250

200

|j \
/ /
/ /

150

v*°

c

\

200

N
150

/ /

>KY MOUNTAIN

/ /

100

100

ff f

k*

r^

_ ^

«•••»•

^ \

SOUTH ^N«\
WESTERN
^

*

S*

^

mmmm

wm

vV

JI

vv

/

vs ^

50

V
v

50

f

wmwmmwm*

NORTH CENTRAL

1921




1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1926

1929

1930

Somber of national and State bank suspensions in specified
geographic divisions of the country. Annual figures fro*
19B1 to 1931 inclusive

1931

- 29-

Not only did the majority of a l l suspensions occur in these twelve
a g r i c u l t u r a l S t a t e s , but the year to year fluctuations were more pronounced
in these States during 1921-1929 than in other sections of the country.

In

1926, for example, there was a sharp r i s e in the number of suspensions in
these States but l i t t l e change in other sections of the country.

In the

Southeastern States the r i s e in suspensions in 1926 was p r e c i p i t a t e d by the
F l o r i d a r e a l e s t a t e boom and the f a i l u r e of the V/itham system of banks.

In

tne rTestern Grain States crops were smaller that year than in 1925, and prices
lower*

In the Ninth Federal Reserve D i s t r i c t , for exaaiple, the cash price

for wheat, r y e , and flax a t the terminals was 25 per cent less than in 1925*
The number of suspensions in 1927 and 1928 declined s u b s t a n t i a l l y .
At the beginning of the current business depression, however, the
number of bank suspensions turned upward again in the a g r i c u l t u r a l S t a t e s ,
and there were also numerous closings in i n d u s t r i a l d i s t r i c t s , e s p e c i a l l y
around the Great Lakes and in Pennsylvania.

The New England, Middle A t l a n t i c ,

and North Central States reported more than twice as many in 1930-1931 as in
the previous nine y e a r s .

Even in the l a t t e r period, however, New England r e -

ported only about 1 per cent of the t o t a l suspensions in the country.
Middle A t l a n t i c States accounted for l e s s than 1 per cent of

Tne

the t o t a l during

1921-1929i but in 1930-1931 they reported over 7 per cent of a l l suspensions.
The proportions occurring in the North Central States were 7 per cent in 19211929 and 2k per cent in 1930-1931.

In the New England S t a t e s , in which the

number of suspensions throughout the e n t i r e period remained lower than in any
other geographic region, 39 banks closed in 1930-1931» compared with 10 during
the preceding nine y e a r s .




- 30 -

Differences in the geographic distribution of suspensions during
1921-1929 and 1930-1931 are shown in Table 7. Chart 10 gives on a map of
the United States the location of each suspension during 1921-1929, and
this may " e compared with Chart 11 which gives the distribution for 1931
b
only.

Table 7 - Suspensions of National and State Banks
by Geographic Divisions
Geographic
division

1921-1929
Per cent
Number of t o t a l

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast

186
951
614
2,567
530
130

UNITED STATES

5 Ml

0.2
0.9

10

4s

19 TC-1911
Per cent
Number of t o t a l

39

2.4

260
837
241
524
360
1,091
87
66

100.0

3.505

375

6.9
3.^

17.6

n.4
47.4
9.8

1.1
7.4
23.9

6.9
14.9
10.3
31.1
2.5
1.9
100.0

The States in which suspensions were most numerous during 193^
and 19319 in addition to the seven Western Grain States, were the mixed
agricultural and industrial States east of the Mississippi river: Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and North Carolina, and the two agricultural States of Arkansas and Mississippi*

The differences between the lo-

cations of suspensions in 1930a n & 1 3 1 an^- those prior to the general
9-business depression are most clearly shown in the following two lists,
one giving the twelve States with the largest number of suspensions during
1921-1929, and the other giving the twelve States with the largest number
of suspensions during 1930-193^







- 31 -

CHART 10
BANK SUSPENSIONS

NATIONAL BANKS....
STATE BANKS AND
L* , cr
TRUST COMPANIES
^ ^
TOTAL SU3PENSIGNS...5411




- 32 -

CHART 11

BANK SUSPENSIONS

NATIONAL BANKS
STATE BANKS ANOl
TRU5T COMPAWttSJ
TOTAL SUSPEMSIONS-—2213

- 33 -

Table 8 - States Showing the Largest iJumber of Suspensions

State

Number of
suspensions
1921-1929

Iowa
North Dakota
Minnesota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Georgia
Missouri
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Texas
Kansas
Montana

452
427
1+19

332
366
322
293
264

225
219
21S

199

State

Illinois
Iowa
Missouri
Arkansas
Indiana
North Carolina
Nebraska
Pennsylvania
Ohio
South Dakota
North Dakota
Minnesota

Number of
suspensions
19TO-19tt

254
225
190

169
156
155
143
128
128
125
123

The number of suspensions each year in each State is given in
Table III of the appendix.
Batio of Suspended to Active Banks. - A comparison of bank suspensions in different sections of the United States is perhaps best illustrated by relating the number of suspended banks to the number of active
banks in each State and geographic division of the country.

This method

has the advantage over other means of describing the distribution of suspensions in that differences in size of region and number of banks operating
in each area are eliminated through the use of percentages*

For this purpose

the number of active banks in existence on June 30, 1920, is used as the
base with which the suspensions for the entire period 1921-1931 are compared*
That year, 1920, marked approximately the beginning of the banking difficulties which have harassed the country during recent years.




* 3^-

In proportion to the number of banks in operation the Southeastern States, as a group, showed the heaviest fatalities.

Suspensions

in these States during the eleven years amounted to 55 for each hundred
banks in operation on June 30> 1920. In the Rocky fountain and the Western
Grain States there were about ko suspensions per hundred active banks, and
in the Southwestern States 30 P e ? hundred.

Only in the New England States

did suspensions during the eleven years amount to less than 10 per cent of
the banks in operation in 1920*

These suspension rates for each geographic

region are given in Table 9 and illustrated in Chart 12.'*'

Table 9 - Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 30, 1920,
by Geographic Divisions
Geographic
division
New England
Middle Atlantic
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
V/estern Grain
Rocky Mountain
Pacific Coast
UNITED STATES

National State National and
banks
banks State banks

2.k
6.8
11.9
11.0

2M
19.0
27.2
30.6
H-.7
16.7

12.2
15.7
26.2
25.5
5S.9

3^.9
| ^3.5
^3.5

6.7
10.6
22.6
21.7
5^.3
29.9

Uo.7

I1?.1?

39.2
1U.2

36.3

30.9

(1) The term "suspension rate" is used throughout this report to mean the
number of suspensions per hundred active banks. In most cases the
number of suspensions for the eleven years 1921-1931 is compared
with the active banks as of June 30, 1920 • When another period of
time, or another base, is referred to, it will be so stated*







-

35

-

CHART 12

SUSPENSIONS PER HUNDRED ACTIVE BANKS
PCRHUNMCD

BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS, 1921-1931

mHUNDRED

SOUTH ROCKY WESTERN SOUTH
NORTH SOUTHERN PACiriC MIDDLE
NEW
EASTERN MOUNTAIN 6RAIN WESTERN CENTRAL MOUNTAIN COAST ATLANTIC EN6LAND

Number of suspensions during 1921-1931 per hundred active
banks on June 30, 1920, by geographic divisions

-

3

6-

In several individual States, shown in the following list, the number
of suspensions during the eleven years 1921-193^ was more than 50 per hundred
active banks on June 30, 1920. In some States, particularly Florida, the use
of 1920 figures for active banks as a base gives a somewhat distorted picture
because of the increase in the number of banks after 1920.
Table 10 ~ States Showing a Suspension Rate of Over
50 per hundred National and State Banks

State

Suspensions during 1921-1931
per 100 active banks on
June 30, 1920

Florida
South Dakota
South Carolina
North Dakota
Arkansas
Georgia
Montana
New Mexico

9M

75.6
63-I
61.5
57-3
53.7
52.2
50.8

In six other States, Arizona, Iowa, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, and
Wyoming the rate was over Uo per hundred. Table IV of the appendix gives the
suspension rates for each State, alphabetically arranged; and Table V gives
the same rates with the States arranged in order of the size of the suspension
rate.

The suspension rates in the various States are illustrated in Chart 13.
Suspensions were most numerous, as a rule, in those States where the

number of banks increased rapidly prior to 1920 and in those States which had
a low population per bank in 1920. On the other hand, the majority of States
which had a high population per bank had suspension rates substantially below
the average for the country as a whole. Table 11 gives for each State:

(1)

the per cent change in the number of banks from 1900 to 1920, (2) the population per bank in 1920, and (3) the suspension ratio*
by size of the suspension ratio.




The States are arranged




-

37 -

CHART 13

BANK SUSPENSIONS, 1921-1931

NUMBER Of SUSPENSIONS DURING mi-1931
PER .100 ACTIVE BANKS IN EACH STATE
ON JUNE 30,1920
OtoiQOftrHundred \\25JtoS0faHundred
to2SP*rHundr*d\ \ Over 50 P*r Hinted

Numerals in each State indicate number of national and State
bank suspensions during 1921-1931. Shading indicates ntimber
of suspensions per hundred active baxlki dti June 30, 1920 according to legend*

- 32 Table 11 - Per Cent Change in the Ifumber of Banks from 1900 to 1920,
Population per Bank in 1920, and Number of Suspensions during
1921-1931 per 100 Active Banks in 1920, by States
States
(arranged by size
of the suspension
ratio)

Suspensions during
Per cent change
Population
1921-1931 per 100
in number of banks per bank
active banks on
1900~1920U)
in 1920(2)
June "50. 1920(2)
+S0.0
844
0.0
000
+79.6
2.3
517
+7.3
550
+21,2
3.8
978
+66.7
5.1
7.8
+iusi5
7.8
14 4p3
8.5
18 515
-50.7
9.1
+37.0
9 957
10.1
%S
+79.8
10.2
s 82S
12.0
+120,6
6 169
12.3
+59.5
2 333
15.2
+371.4
2 729
15.5
+180.3
4 1U9
17.1
+69.3
18.1
§21
18.2
b57
+5fco
\ 758
20.0
+18U.5
20.5
his
+3^1.b
21.1
037
+332*1
21.8
869
22.3
+233.7
31s
23.1
+137.5
297
7b4
23.2
+320.0
+190.2
4o6
23.5
+150.9
26
358
+87.1
28
379
+230.3
+150.0
29
3U1
+132 •.7
30
3U3
31 5
,2
06S
+142, ,1
31 7
702
32 3
135
,1
+b6l!•9
y .9
,0
968
.9
+179 •
231
,
$- . 5
+788,
4i2
Hi.2
U3.6
+103.k
089
i+3.7
+222.2
920
47.6
136
49.4
+178.7
059

Dist. of Col.
Vermont
Maine
New Hampshire
Delaware
New York
California
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
Maryland
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Nevada
Wisconsin
Kentucky
Ohio
Michigan
Virginia
Washington
Texas
Oregon
Kansas
Tennessee
Louisiana
Utah
Illinois
Colorado
West Virginia
Indiana
Missouri
Alabama
Oklahoma
Minnesota
Idaho
Wyoming
Iowa
Nebraska
Arizona
North Carolina
Mississippi
New Mexico
+656,
Montana
+252.
Georgia
+667.
Arkansas
+464.8
North Dakota
+1+77.5
South Carolina
+266.5
South Dakota
+40^.8
Florida
+118.3
UNITED STATES
(1) National, State, and private banks.
(2) National and State hanks only.




I

I

943

I

719
b70
924
162
3.713

50.8
52.2

53.7
57.3

bi.5
63.1
75.6

3Ll

30.9

- 39 Increase of Suspensions in the Industrial Areas, - The increase of
suspensions in the industrial and semiindustrial regions in 1930-1931 is reflected in the changes in the ratio of suspensions to active banks in the
various geographic divisions. In Table 12 the number of suspensions during the
nine years 1921-1929 per hundred active banks on June 30, 1920, is compared for
each geographic division with the number of suspensions during the two years
1930-1931 per hundred active banks on June 30, 1930. In both periods the
Southeastern States rank first in the size of the suspension rate. The Rocky
Mountain section, however, which ranked second during the former period,
dropped to sixth place during the latter period, the second rank being taken
by the Western Grain States. The New England States show the lowest suspension
rate during both periods.
Table 12 - Suspensions of National and State Banks per Hundred Active Banks,
"by Geographic Divisions
1921-1929

Geographic
division

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Bocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast
UNITED STATES

1930-1931
SuspenSuspenNumber of
Number of
Suspensions
Suspensions
a c t i v e banks
a c t i v e "banks
sions
p e r 100
sions
p e r 100
June 3 0 ,
June 3 0 ,
1921-1929 a c t i v e
1930-1931 a c t i v e
1930(1)
1920(1)
banks
banks
729
2.913
5,374
1,969
2,694
3.256
8,992
1,573
1,385

10
48
375
186
951
614
2,567
530
130

28,885

5,411

1.4
1.6
7.0
9.4

33.7
_i^

703
3,231
5,084
1,755
1,700
2,496
5,998
908
221

39
260
837
241
524
36O
1,091
87
66

JLJ.

18.7

22,866

3,505

15.3

35.3

18.9
28.5

5.5
8.0
16.5
13.7
3p.8
14.4
18.2
9.6

( 1 ) The 1920 figures for active State banks include 386 banks in Illinois which
were classed as private banks on June 30 of that year, but which had nearlyall been converted to State banks by the end of the year on account of a
law prohibiting the operation of private banks after January 1, 1921.
The figures for active State banks were compiled for the Committee in
some cases by the State banking departments themselves and in others by the
Federal reserve banks from published reports of the State banking departments. The purpose in making the new compilation was to secure a classification of banks by size in order to make the comparisons shown in Chapter
III following. The figures by size were not readily available in all States
as of June 30> a n & i*1 these cases they were taken as of other dates for the
years given. The totals, therefore, differ somewhat from those given in
Table 2, p. 5> and in Table I of the appendix, imich were taken from the
annual reports of the Comptroller of the Currency.




- Ho -

The most striking difference "between the two periods 1921-1929
and I93O-I93I is the fact that in the New England, Middle Atlantic, Southern
Mountain, and North Central States the suspension rates for the two years
1930-1931 were much higher than during the preceding nine years taken together*

In the Southeast, and west of the Mississippi, on the contrary,

the suspension rates for the two years, though higher than during the preceding nine years if computed on an annual basis, were considerably below
the rates for the years 1921-1929 taken together.

In general, while the

agricultural sections of the West and South were first to suffer from an
abnormally large number of suspensions, and while suspensions in those areas
continued at an unparalled rate during 1930-1931* the outstanding development
of the two years was the rapid increase of suspensions in the industrial areas
of the country.

Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931
by Geographic Divisions
The distribution of the loans and investments of suspended banks
among the several geographic regions differs somewhat from distribution of
the number of suspensions. This is because the average size of suspended
banks varies from region to region. The North Central States rank first with
loans and investments of suspended banks amounting to more than a billion
dollars, though this section ranks third in the number of suspensions, (See
Table 6, p. 26*) The Western Grain section, first in the number of suspensions, is second in respect to the amount of loans and investments of suspended banks, which amounted to nearly a billion dollars. The loans and
investments of banks suspending in the Middle Atlantic section were also
nearly a billion dollars, though this section is seventh in the list as to




- kl -

number of suspensions. These three regions, which include 58 per cent of
the total number of "banks suspending, account for more than 60 per cent
of the total loans and investments. The Southeastern States, which are
second in number, are fourth in respect to loans and investments. The
Pacific Coast States, second from the last in regard to number, show the
smallest total of loans and investments.

The loans and investments and the

percentage of the total in each geographic division are given in Table 13*
The loans and investments in each State by years are given in Table VI of
the appendix.

Table 13 - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931
by Geographic Divisions
National and
National banks
State tanks
State banks
Loans and
Loans and
Loans and
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
investments
investments
investments
of t o t a l (000 omitted) of t o t a l (000 omitted) of t o t a l
(000 omitted)

Geographic
division

50,136
2U.H91
17S,57^
103,175
1^5,613
116,256
203,302
g6,812
50,gUg

4.4
1S.5
15.6
9.0
12.7
10.1
17.7
7.6
4.4

$l f 1^6»207

100.0

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast
UNITED STATES

$

$

124,475
732,410
852,657
170,066
499,274
211,193
774,992
126,528
781514

$3,570,115

3.5

3.7

2.2

174,611
943,901
1,031,231
273,241
644,887
327,449
978,300
213,340
129.^62

20.0
21.9
5.8
13.7
7.0
20.7
4.5
2.7

100.0

$4,716,322

100.0

20.5
23.9
4.8
14.0
5.9
21.7

3.5

$

The banks suspending during 1930^1931 were of larger average size
than those suspending during the preceding nine years. Although the number
of suspensions during the two years was only about two-thirds as large as
during the previous nine years,
per cent greater.




the loans and investments were about 62

There is also a striking contrast in the geographic

distribution of the loans and investments of banks suspending during
the two periods. During the earlier period roughly 60 per cent of
the total loans and investments of suspending banks were in the Western Grain and Southeastern sections; while during the later period So
per cent of the total were in the Middle Atlantic and North Central
States, The figures for these and other geographic divisions a re given
in Table

lk.
Table lU ~ Loans and Investments of Suspended national
and State Banks by Geographic Divisions

Geographic
division
New England
Middle Atlantic
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
7 e stern Grain
/
Eocky Mountain
Pacific Coast
UNITED STATES

1921-1929
1930-1911
Loans and
Loans and
investments Per cent investments Per cent
(000 omitted) of total (000 omitted) of total
$

2U.20U
66,326
151.33^
56,959
372,222
181,351
678,635
lS2,ghg

_JkZ
$1,798,515

150,^07
877,575
879,897
216,282
272,665
1U6.09S
295,665
30,^92
^,725

100.0

$2,917.S06

1.3
3.7
8.U
3.2

$

20.7
10.1
37-7
10.2

5.2
30.1
30.2

7.H
9.3
5.0
10.3

1.0
l.o
100.0

The loans and investments of banks suspending during the
eleven year period per hundred dollars of loans and investments of
active banks on June ~$0% 1920, are given in Table 15 by geographic
regions.

Similar information noy States is given in Table VII of the

appendix.

These tables show that during the 11-year period ending

with 1931 it ^ a s i n general the agricultural States that suffered the
greatest proportionate declines in loans and investments as a result
of suspensions. These declines, however, were not so large as might
be expected from the relative number of suspensions, due to the fact
that the average size of suspended banks is much




- *3-

less than the average size of active banks.

(See Table 20, p* 50.) Eight

States show a suspension rate of under 10 per cent of the number of banks,
while fifteen States show a ratio of loans and investments of suspended to
active banks of less than 10 per cent. On the other hand, fourteen States
had over ho per cent of their active banks suspend, but in only five States
did the loans and investments of suspended banks exceed ho per cent of those
of active banks*
Table 15 - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931
per $100 of Loans and Investments of Active Banks
on June 30, 1920
Geographic
division
New England
Middle Atlantic
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
Pacific Coast
UNITED STATES

National State National and
banks State banks
banks

U.o

9.6

3.1
5.8

12.1
20.3

12.2
21.3
10.2
10.1
16.2

24.1

23.7

28.5

16.1
21.1
21.8

J±A

-5*1

-5*1

6.5

19.2

13.0

50.0

29.6

6.9
7.3
1U.1

17.6
38.3

Suspensions during 1892-1897
Prior to 1920 the only previous extended period of abnormal bank
fatalities for which we have a reasonably adequate record was 1892-1897*
During these six years suspensions aggregated about 9 per cent of the banks
in operation on June 30, 1892«

It is of interest that during that period

the greatest number of failures likewise occurred in the agricultural sections*

The Western Grain States, for example, accounted for k2 per cent of

all failures; the Pacific Coast States, 13 per cent; and the North Central




kk ~
States, which were then not so industrialized as at present, another
12 per cent of the total. The Southeastern and Southwestern States,
however, accounted for only small proportions of the total, around 6
per cent in each case.

In Table l6 both the distribution of failures

and the ratio of suspensions to active banks during that period are
given by geographic divisions. Table VIII of the appendix gives the
number of suspensions in each geographic division each year from IS92
to. 1931.
Table l6 ~ Suspensions of National and State Banks during 1S921S97 by Geographic Divisions
Per cent 1
Geographic
division

Number of
suspensions
1892-1897

New England '
Middle Atlantic
North Central
Southern MountaiLn
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain t
Pacific Coast
UNITED STATES;

1

Ik

2.1
5-3

36
82

of total 1 Number of
suspensions!active bancs
in the U.S. June 30,1892

1

66S
|

12.0

Suspensions
per 100
active banks

!

1,300
1,251

2.1
2.8

66
.
7H
.

Hi

6.0

3S
H2
2SH
53

5.6
62
.

316

Hi.S

2.H66

7S
.

21H
Hi 5

11.0
13.3
11.5
2H.S
21.7

7,532

9.0

__20

13.2

680

100.0

555
3^7

!

Suspensions of National and State Banks Compared
In many ;f the tables and charts in this chapter showing suspensions during I92I-I93I the figures f JT nationa"1 banks and State
banks have been given separately, both for the country as a whole and
for different sections of the country, in order to conrpare their relative suspension rates. Examination of the data for the different
States shows that during the 11-year period State bank suspensions




-U5equaled or outnumbered national ban:.: suspensions in every State and
that the number of suspensions per hundred active banks was higher,
frequently very much higher, for State banks than for national banks
in every State except California, Delaware, Idaho, Mississippi, and
Washington.

In California the suspension rate was somewhat higher

for national banks than for State banks, but in the other four States
the rate was nearly the sane for the two types of banks. (For details
by States see Table IV of the appendix.)
In the New England States, where the suspension rate among
State banks was

more than five times as great as that of national

banks, there were too few failures to make the difference of particular significance (Table 9> P» 3^)* I21 three other geographic divisions the suspension rate among State banks during the eleven years
was uore than twice as great as the rate among national banks, but
the Pacific Coast States show only a 25 per cent difference.
Member and Honmember Banks
The ratio of suspended banks to active banks was about half
as large for members of the Federal reserve system as for nonmembers, as




- U6 -

illustrated in Table 17.
Table 17 - Suspension of Member(l) and Nonmember Banks during 1921-1931
hy Geographic Divisions
Geographic
division

Number of
active hanks
June ^0. 1920
Member Nonmember

me

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast

1,878
1,737
564
530
1,233
1,770
652
588

UNITED STATES

9,398

283
1,035
3,637
1,405
2,164
2,023
7,222
921

131
19,487

Number of
Suspensions
suspensions
per 100
192: U1971
active banks
Member ! Nonmember Member Nonmember
11 I
134 ;
232
65
215
241
509
219

11
1,699

3S
174
980
362
1,260
3,1%
398
12-S

2.5
7.1
13.4
11.5
40.6
19.5
28.8
33.6
12.4

25.8
58.2
36.2
U3.6
43.2
15.4

7,217

18.1

37.0

13.4

l6.8
26.9

(1) Member banks include both national and member State banks.

Chart 13a shows that the suspension rate was higher for nonmember banks in every geographic division and in some cases more than
double the rate for member banks. This is due in part to the fact that
the great majority of the smaller banks, among which failures have been
most numerous, are nonmember banks.







- u? -

CHART 1 3 i

SUSPENSIONS OF MEMBER AND NON-MEMBER BANKS DURING mi-1931
PER HUNDRED ACTIVE BANKS ON JUNE 30,1920
PER HUNDRED

BY GEOGRAPHIC

DIVISIONS

PERHUNDRiD

SOUTH
ROCKY WESTERN SOUTH
NORTH SOUTHERN PACIFIC MIDDLE
NEW
EASTERN MOUNTAIN GRAIN WESTERN CENTRAL MOUNTAIN COAST ATLANTIC EM6LAN0

Number of suspensions during 1921-1931 per hundred active
banks on June 30, 1920, by geographic d i v i s i o n s

- Ug -

Member State Banks* - The number of member State "bank suspensions
during 1921-193^ &&& the ratios of suspensions to active banks are snown
by geographic divisions in Table IS, The number of active banks given for
each division is the average of the June 30 figures for each of the eleven
years 1921-1931*

The June JO, 1920 figure for active hanks is not used as

a basis of comparison in this case "because of the changes from nonmeniber to
member banks, and vice versa*
The Rocky Mountain, Western Grain, Southwestern, and Southeastern
States, all primarily agricultural areas, suffered the greatest mortality.
Likewise the closings in the New England and Middle Atlantic States were few
in comparison with the agricultural States.
Table 18 - Member State Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931
per Hundred Active Banks, by Geographic Divisions

Geographic
division

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast
UNITED STATES

Active member
Batio of suspended
Suspensions
State banks
to a c t i v e banks
1921-1931
(per cent)
1921-19^51 averageU)
Loans and
Loans and
Number investments Number investments Number Loans and
investments
(000 omitted)
(000 omitted)
73i»7l*o
38 $
5»66o,277
255
35U
2,997,099
189,987
47
199.427
115
257,072
176
497,094
182
109,122 ;
100
861,987
105

1
20
69
8
63
1+6
79

60

1 -^

1,372

$11,503,805

363

(1) Averages of the June 30 figures for each year*




$ 3,845
302,657
205,361
24,935
46,951
46,434
87,488
22,725
21,768

2.6
7.8
19.5
17.0
54.8
26.I
43.4
60.0
16.2

0.5
>3
6.9
13.1
23.5
18.1
17.6
20.8
_2^

$762,164

: 26.5

6.6

- k3 -

Age of Suspended Banks " y Geographic Divisions
b
Substantial variations among the several States and geographic
divisions of the country obtain with respect to the age of suspended banks,
as indicated in Table 19 of the text and Table IX of the appendix. These
figures cover ten years only, 1921-193°* Taking both national and State
bank suspensions into consideration, those in the Western Grain States had
been in existence for an average period of eighteen years and eight months,
the longest for any geographic area, whereas in the Rocky Mountain States
the average was only eleven years and eight months, the shortest for any
geographic area. The range is somewhat greater in the case of individual
States; Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida,tossachusetts,Montana,
and Wyoming are distinctly below the average for the United States as a
whole, while Delaware, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia exceed it appreciably*

Table 19 - Average Age at Time of Suspension of Banks Suspending during 1921-1930
by Geographic Divisions
1

Geographic
division

N a t i o n a l and
State. h a n k a 1;
Huniber Average age Number Avera ge age Number Average age
of hanks Years Months of banks Years Months of hanks Years Months
N a t i o n a l ha nks

k

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North C e n t r a l
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
?Jestern Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast

1U2
_3S

15

UNITED STATES

927

19

29
78
25
110
155

346

32
23
23
19
17
16
2U
12

S t a t e hanks ,1)

lU

9
9

_s

2,619
32s
10U

ik

_a

IS
72
631
275
I.23U
311
2,965
U70
1^2

10

5.691

16

2

6,618

3
7
10

7
k

10
1

k

^3
553

250
1,12b

656

13
12
15
IS
15
13
18
11

2

3
1

6

0
h

17
17
16
18
15
Ik
IS
11 1

3
5
3

2
8

2

15

_Q

16

5

V-w Exclusive of 85 banks in Montana for which there were insufficient data.




10
1

CHAPTER I I I

SIZE OF SUSPENDED BAMS

The previous chapter indicates that most of the suspensions
during the eleven years

1921-1931. occurred in the agricultural regions

of the South and Kiddle West, in areas where the typical "bank is relatively
small in size.

Table 20 gives the average size of active hanks and of

suspended hanks by geographic divisions*

Table 20 - Average Size of Active Banks and Suspended Banks,
National and State, by Geographic Divisions
A c t i v e "banks June 30, 1 9 2 0 ^ ^
Suspended hanks 1921-1931
Loans and i n v e s t m e n t s 1
Loans and investment*;
i n thousands of d o l l a r s 1
i n thousands of dollar;
Number
Average Number
Average
Aggregate
Aggregate
p e r hank
p e r hanl'

Geographic
division

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North C e n t r a l
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast
ran TED SEMES

729
2,913
5,374
1,969
2,694
3,256
8,992
1,573
1.385
28,885t1)

2,542,954
12,912,328
7,293,802
1,553,046
1,684,227
2,027,602
4,628,392
!
980,669
'• 2 . 5 2 6 . 9 1 1

3,488
4,433
1,357
789
625
623
515
623
1.824

<—:

1,252

:

49
308
i
j 1,212
427
1 1,475
974
3,558
617
196

174,611
943,901
1,031,231
273,241
i
644,887
i
327,449
1 978,300
!
213,340
!
129.362
1
8,916 ! 4 , 7 1 6 , 3 2 2

|

3,553
3,064
851
640
437
336
267
346
660
529

See footnote pu 39.




Suspended Banks Grouped by Size of Loans and Investments
Out of a total of 8,916 suspensions of national and State banks

- 50 -

- 51 -

during 1921-1931, 3,504, or 39 per cent, had loans and investments of less
than $150,000. Another 20 per cent of the total had loans and investments
of $150,000 to $250,000; and 1,391, or 21 per cent of the total, had loans
and investments of $250,000 to $500,000. That is, 80 per cent of all the
banks suspending during 1921-1931 had less than $500,000 of loans and investments.

These figures, and those for other size groups, are given

"both for national and State banks

in Table 21, The number of national and

State banks in each size group is illustrated in Chart 14. Similar figures
by geographic, divisions and by States are given in Tables X and XI of the
appendix.

Table 21 - Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931,
by Size of Loans and Investments
Size group
loans and investments (000 omitted)
Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2,000 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
50,000 and over
Total

National tanks
Per cent
Number of total

154
253
413
170
89
157
74
20
5

11.5
18.9
30.9
12.7

6.7
11.8

1

5.5
1.5
0.4
0.1

1,336

100.0

States "banks National and State tanks
Per cent
Per cent
Number
Number of total
of total
3,350
1,501
1,478

44.2
19.8
19.5

3,504
1,754
1,891

39.3
19.7
21.2

481
248
285
158
47
31

6.3
3.3
3.8
2.1
0.6
0.4

651
337
442
232
67
36

7.3
3.8
5.0
2.6
0.7
0.4

1

0.01

7,580 100.0

2
8,916

0.02
100.0

About 61 per cent of all national bank suspensions and 83 per cent
of all State bank suspensions occurred among institutions with loans and
investments of less than $500,000. These same banks, however, had but 19
per cent and 31 per cent respectively of the total loans and investments of







-

52 -

CHART 14

NUMBER OF BANK SUSPENSIONS 1921-1931
GROUPED BY SIZE OF LOANS AND INVESTMENTS
NUMBER Or SUSPENSIONS

NUMBER Or SUSPENSIONS

3500

3500

3000

2500

2000

1500

1000

500

SIZE«ROUPSUNDCR

i5p

290

500

750

T u n i K i u n c I*,
or DOUARS

250

500

750

1,000 2000 5,000 10,000 50,000 OVER

ft

,w
TO

lw
70

,TO
w

TO
*w

1000 2jD00 5,000 10 000 50,000
TO
•"

av
TO

l u
TO

TO
•"

AND
ra»»

Number of national and State bank suspensions during 19211931 grouped by size of loans and investments

- 53 -

all suspended national and State "banks. Only 1 per cent of all national and
State "banks suspending had loans and investments of $5,000,000 or more, "but
such "banks had 30 per cent of the loans and investments of all the suspended
hanks during the period. (See Table 22^) Chart 14a compares the loans and
investments of active banks with suspended banks by size groups.

Table 22 - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931
by Size of Loans and Investments
Size group
loans and investments
(000 omitted)

National and State 'banks
Hational oanks
State "banks
Loans and
Loans and
Loans and
Per cent
Per cent
Per cent
investments of total investments of total investments
of total
(000 omitted)
(000 omitted)
(000 omitted)

Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1 ,000 - 2,000
2,000 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
50,000 and over

$

Total

16,392
50,565
147,425
103,932
76,907
218,345
223,849
141,827
108,539
58T426

$1,146,207

1.4
4.4

$

12.9

9.1
6.7
19.0
19.5
12.4

I

9.5
5,1

j
i

100.0

282,388
290,925
514,567
289,551
214,978
400,136
470,047
311,995
582,125
213.403

$3,570,115
1

7.9
8.2

6.0

298,780
341,490
561,992
393,483
291,835
613,481
693,896
453,822
690,664
271.829

100.0

$4,716,322

14.4

8.1
6.0
11.2
13.2

8.7
16.3

$

6.3
7.3
14.0

8.4
6.2
13.1
14.7

9.6
14.6

5.8
100.0

The average size of suspended banks is much smaller than the
average size of active banks• Daring the eleven year period the average
amount of loans and investments in suspended national banks was $858,000 as
conrpared with an average of $2,187,000 for all active national banks on June
30, 1920#

For State banks the corresponding amounts were $471,000 and

$891,000, respectively*

Suspended and active banks are grouped into corres-

ponding classes in Table 23, thus permitting a comparison of the relative
percentages of active and suspended banks falling in the several size gro"ups*







- 5* -

CHART H+a
LOANS AND INVESTMENTS OF ACTIVE BANKS
AND SUSPENDED BANKS
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS
10,000
9,000

6,000

7,000

6000

5,000
4v000

3,000

2,000

1,000

5aE B0UPS

UNDER

150

250

500

750

THOUSANDS

150
,,w

TO

TO

TO

TO

250

500

750

^

orpoUARS

1000 2,000
TO

ipOO 2000

TO

5000 10,000 5Q000
TO

TO

AMD

5000 10000 50,000 O E
VR

Aggregate loans and investments of active national and State
banks on June 30, 1920, and of national and State banks suspending during 1921-1931, grouped by size of loans and investments.

- 55 Table 23 - Percentage Distribution of the Number of Active Banks on
June 30, 1920 and the Number of Suspensions during I92I-I931
by Size of Loans and Investments
State banks
National banks
National and State banks
Per cent of Per cent Per cent of Per cent Per cent of Per cent
Size group
total
of total
of total
total
total
of total
loans and inactive banks suspen- active banks suspen- active banks suspenvestments
June 30,1920 sions
June 30,1920 sions
(000 omitted) June 30,1920 sions
1921-1931
1921-1931
L921-1931
Under $150
150 - 250
25O - 500
500 - 750

750 -l.ooo
1,000-2,000
2,000-5,000
5,000-10,000
10,000-50,000
50,000 and over
Total

*.3
9.5

2
?'?
l6.4
10.7
17.7
10.1

3.2
2.3

11.5

is.9
30.9

44.2
19.s
19.5
6.3

12.7
11.S

5.5

o. ?

0.4
0.1

1.2
0.9
0.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

1

6.3

IS
1.8

o.4

4.6
6.3
3.6

39.3

3.3
2.1
0.6

S.9

6.7

22.7
17.7
24.1
11.0

3*3

29.7
20.9
23.7

1.3
0.2

3.8
5.0
2.6
0.7
0.4

0.01
100.0

100.0

19.7
21.2

7.3

0.02
100.0

The relative frequency of suspensions among banks of different sizes, however, canbe placed in proper perspective only by relating the niamber of suspensions among banks in various size groups to the total number of active banks in
the same size groups.

To do this the number of suspensions per hundred active

banks was computed for each size group in each State.

This comparison of sus-

pensions with active banks was made on three different bases:
ments, capital stock, and size of community.

loans and invest-

Suspensions during the eleven years

I92I-I93I were compared with active banks on June 30, 1920. (l)

Similar compu-

tations were made for the United States as a whole and for geographic regions.

(l)

See p.21 for an explanation as to the use of this date.







_5o-

Hatio of Suspended to Active Banks by Size Groups. - Chart 15
shows for the United States as a whole the number of national and State
bank suspensions from 1921 to 1931 per hundred active banks on June 3O1
1920, grouped according to the size of loans and investments.

Chart l6

shows similar data for national and State banks separately, and Table 2k
gives the figures on which the charts are based.

These charts bring out

the fact that during the 11-year period ending with 193* tiie heaviest
mortality occurred among the smallest banks and that the suspension rate
was progressively smaller in the larger size groups.
Table 2k - Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 30> 1920,
by Size of Loans and Investments
Size group
loans and investments National
banks
(000 omitted)
Under $150
W.6
150 - 25O
33.3
250 - 5OO
20.4
500 - 75O
12.9
10.3
750 -1,000
11.0
1,000- 2,000
2,000 -5,000
9.1
5,000-10,000
7.7
10,000-50,000
2.7
50,000 and over
2.7
Total

16.7

State
banks
5^.0

3^.5
29.9
25.9
25.9
21. S

20.7
19.0
lo.S

National and
State banks

53-5

3M

27.1
20.5

is.5
16.2
1^.7
13.2

2.q

9.3
2.8

36.3

30.9




- 57 CHART 15

SUSPENSIONS PER HUNDRED ACTIVE BANKS
PER HUNDRED

GROUPED BY SIZE OF LOAN5AND INVESTMENTS

PCH HUNDRED

60

60

50

40

30

20

10

SIZE CROUPS
IN
THOUSANDS
OF DOLLARS

U D R 150
NE T
150
°

250

250
TO
500

500
TO
750

750
TO

1,000 2,000
TO

TO

5,000 10,000 50,000
TO

TO

AND

1,000 2,000 5,000 10,008 50,000 O E
VR

Number of national and s t a t e bank suspensions during
1921-1931 per hundred a c t i v e banks on June 50, 1920,
grouped by s i z e of loans and investments.

- 58 CHART 16

SUSPENSIONS PER HUNDRED ACTIVE BANKS
PER HUNDRED
60

»N
UNDER
THOUSANDS , * A
OF DOLLARS T 0 U




GROUPED BY SIZE OF LOANS AND INVESTMENTS

PER HUNDRED

60

*5°
™
250

250

500

750

1,000

TO

TO

TO

TO

500

750

1,000 2,000

2,000 5,000 10,000 50,000
TO

TO

TO

AND

5,000 10,000 50,000 O E
VR

number of national bank and State bank suspensions during
1921-1931 per hundred a c t i v e banks on June 3 0 , 1920 f
grouped by s i z e of loans and investments.

- 59 In every size group the suspension rate vzas higher for State
ba::ks than for national banks, and in more than half of the ten size
groups it was tv/ice as high.
Suspension Hate by Geographic Divisions, - Turning no\7 to the
experience in specific geographic divisions of the country, considerable
variations appear, as shown in Charts 17, IS, and 19*

These three

charts give the suspension rates among banks of different sizes, grouped
according to loans and investments, the first for national and State together, and the other two for national-and for State banks separately.
The figures on which these charts are based are given for national and
State banks together in Table 25, and for national and State banks separately in Table XII of the appendix.

Similar figures for each State

are given in Table XIII of the appendix.
Table 25 - Number of National and State Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 3°> 1920, by Geographic
Divisions and by Size of Loans and Investments
Size group
New Middle North South- South- South- West- Rocky PacifUnited
ic
loans and
ern
east- west- ern MounEng- Atlan- Cenern
ern Grain tain Coast States
investments
tic
tral Mounland
tain
(000 omitted)
Under $150
150 - 250
250 - r.OQ
500 - 750
750 -1,000
1,000 -2,000
2,000 -5,000
5,000-10,000
10,000-50,000
50,000 and over
Total




11.2

36.s 30.1

6~7
2.3
*.3
2.7
7.6
9.S
15.1
6.1

l4.4

25.1 20.7
20.7 20.1
17.* 22.2
1H.3
i s . 9 12.9
17.7
19.s 19.*

6.7

10.6

11.2
l4.2
7.3
9.2
10.6
12.7
6.9
5.6

39.6
36.O
35.3

46.0
24.4
23.3
19.*
22.2
21.5
13.9
12.5

76.3
4s.s
52.0
37.5

6l,9
42.5
31.7
24.3

57.2
39.0
3^.1

29.s
21.1

16.s

1S.1

23.5

22.2

s.7

26.s 5.2
21.S 36.7 9.3
l6.g 26.5 6.5
14.1 9.9 7.7
9.3 11.8 11.4
2.6
3.1

22.6

21.7

54.S

29.9

4o,7 39.2 14.2

14.9

*U.5

53.5
3^.3
27.1
20.5

is.5
16.2
14.7
13.2
9.S
2.S
30.9

-

oo -

CHART 17

PER HUNDRED

SUSPENSIONS PER HUNDRED ACTIVE NATIONAL AND STATE BANKS
GROUPED BY SIZE Of LOANS AND INVESTMENTS

PC* HUNDRED

40

iniiiiiuiiimii 5T nirrm

SIZE
6R0UPS ^
s

w

rv Q

§ S

»o 8 g 8 S

or
» '
'
'
THOUSANDS 8ft «M P ft ^>
DOLLARS 111 ^ »<) ^* K
S i
txte
t
'
-




§

7
*<

CM*

5'SS!

Siiili
li§

S ? ««

! *8

§

a 5»

1 5 -J s . „

iill

SSSSBSSSSSSS

Number of national and State bank suspensions during 19211931 per hundred active banKs on June 30, 1920, grouped by
size of loans and investments




-61CHART 18
SUSPENSIONS PER HUNDRED ACTIVE NATIONAL BANKS
GROUPED BY SIZE OF LOAMS AND INVESTMENTS

PER HUNDRED

20

I tO

MIDDLLE ATLANTIC
STATES

NEW ENGLAND
STATES

10

10

l

JLmJI
60

I 0
(SO
SOUTHWESTERN
STATES

SOUTHERN MOUNTAIN
STATES
70

I TO

60

60

50

50

40

ko

30

50

hn
IMMMI

20

to

0
70

M

50
PACIFIC COAST
~
STATES
"~

30

20

size
GROUPS 8 4 4 i § § S « S
D SA S § 5 5 § § 1 §
OLR

illiW
.

§ | §

S*
T

!
»

! »
» t

i

5 j
• 2
4 4 §j § » .
5 ^ o S O

§ss§§l§§|i

Number of national bank Buspensions during 1921-1931 per
hundred active national banks on June 30, 1920, grouped
by size of loans and investments

10




- 62 CHART 19

SUSPENSIONS P£R HUNDRED ACTIVE STATE BANKS
GROUPED BY SIZE OF LOANS AND INVESTMENTS
PER HUNDRED

PER HUNDRED

50

50
MIDDLE ATLANTIC
STATES

40

NORTH CENTRAL
STATES

40

30

50

20

• • • - . • • I I I 1 20

illlillli,

10
0
60

Hill

70

10

60
70

SOUTH WESTERN
STATES

SOUTHERN MOUHTAIM
STATES

60

60

50

50

*0

40

30
20

10

O

in ii n

30
20

•

SIZE o
6R0UP5 V
>
tHOOSMI&SOC
or
^i

DOLLARS g

Nunfoer of State bank suspensions during 1921-1931 per hundred active State banks on June 30 1 1920 f grouped by size
of loans and investments

10

-63-

For national and State banks together the higher rate of suspensions among small banks as compared with large banks during the eleven
year period ending with 1931 is fairly well defined in all geographic divisions except the New England and Middle Atlantic States, There are considerable differences, however, in the suspension rates in the various size
groups in different sections of the country.

This may be attributed, in

part at least, to differences in the character of business financed and to
the different degrees of prosperity among the various industries and the
various regions during the past two decades.
In the New England and Middle Atlantic States, as shown by
Chart 17, there was very little difference for the period studied in the
suspension record of small banks as compared with large banks. In fact
these areas had relatively few suspensions of any size compared with the
experience in other sections of the country.

In no size group in either

of these divisions did the suspension rate exceed 15 per cent. The region
with the next most favorable experience in this period was the Pacific Coast.
In this area small banks showed a higher suspension rate than large banks,
but the banks of medium size made an exceptionally good record, there being
comparatively few suspensions among banks with more than $500,000 of loans
and investments.
In the Southeastern States, the suspension rate for the period was
exceedingly high in all the size groups, both for national and State banks,
but particularly for the latter. In the case of State banks the rate for large
institutions was almost as high as for small ones, due largely to the fact
that in Florida the mortality among the larger banks was especially great.
As previously stated the use of the 1920 figures of active banks as a base
for the comparison of suspensions presents a difficulty in the State of




- 61+ -

Florida not encountered in most of the other States*

i n unusually great

expansion in the hanking resources of Florida occurred during the years 1923
to 1925 coincident with the r e a l e s t a t e boom t h e r e .

In consequence, there

was during these years a considerable increase in the proportion of banks
in the l a r g e r size groups, and in several groups there were more f a i l u r e s
during the ten years than there were active banks in those groups in 1920.
In the three a g r i c u l t u r a l sections west of the Mississippi,
namely, the Western Grain, Southwestern, and Roclcy Mountain S t a t e s , the
l a r g e r banks showed for the period studied d i s t i n c t l y lower suspension
r a t e s than the smaller banks.

Among banks with l e s s than $150,000 of

loans and investments the suspension r a t e s ranged from M-6 to 62 per cent,
while in a l l groups with more than $2,000,000 of loans and investments
the suspension r a t e s were below 15 per cent.
The North Central S t a t e s , occupying a middle position between
the highly i n d u s t r i a l i z e d Northeast and the predominantly a g r i c u l t u r a l
regions west of the M i s s i s s i p p i , had a suspension r a t e for small banks t h a t
i s comparable with that for the a g r i c u l t u r a l s e c t i o n s .

National banks of

large and medium size had a r e l a t i v e l y favorable r a t e , one below 15 per
cent, for a l l groups with more than $500,000 of loans and investments.
Among State banks, however, the suspension r a t e s in a l l groups were above
20 per cent, except t h a t the group with more than $50,000,000 of loans and
investments had no suspensions.
The record in the remaining geographic division, the Southern Mount a i n S t a t e s , was more s p o t t y .

In general, t h i s region lacks both the ex-

tremely high suspension r a t e s c h a r a c t e r i s t i c of the smaller size groups in




- 65-

other agricultural areas and the relatively low suspension rates among the
larger size groups prevailing in some areas.
In Chart 20 the loans and investments of national and State hank
suspensions during 1921-1931 per hundred dollars of loans and investments of
active tanks on June 30, 1920, are presented for the United States as a
whole by size groups*

In appearance

this chart is very similar to Chart 15,

except that there is a slightly narrower range in the

ratio of loans and in-

vestments of suspended to active "banks than in the ratio of the number of
suspensions to active "banks. Ratios for the various geographic sections of
the country agree closely with the data presented in the immediately preceding discussion*

Pull data, however, both for geographic regions and for

States, regarding the amount of loans and investments of suspended banks in
each size group are given in Tables XIV and XV of the appendix, and regarding
the ratios of loans and investments of suspended to active banks in Tables
XVI and XVII of the appendix.
Size of Suspended Banks. 1950-1931. - In Chapter II it was noted
that there was a considerable difference between the geographic distribution
of banks suspending during the nine years 1921-1929 and that of those suspending during the years 1930-1931.
to the size of banks suspending*

There are also differences in respect

Suspensions among large banks in 1930-1931

were relatively more numerous than in the preceding nine years.

Table 26

shows that banks with loans and investments of more than $500,000 accounted
for only 15 per cent of all suspensions during 1921-1929, whereas they
comprised 27 per cent of the total during 1930-1931. Banks with over
$5,000,000 of loans and investments constituted only 0.3 per cent of all
suspensions during 1921-1929 but were 2.5 per cent of all suspensions during
1930-1931.




- 66 -

CHART 2 0
LOANS AND INVESTMENTS OF SUSPENDED BANKS
PER HUNDRED DOLLARS OF LOANS AND INVESTMENTS
OF ACTIVE BANKS, BY SIZE GROUPS
PER HUNDRED
PER HUNDRED
50
50

SHE ©ROUPS UHDER
THOUSANDS 1 5 0
CV DOLLARS




10
5

250

500

TO

TO

TO

250

500

750

750
TO

1000 2.000 5.000 10.000 50.000
TO

TO

TO

TO

AHO

1000 2.000 5.000 10.000 50.000 OVER

Loans and investments of national and S t a t e banks suspending during 1921-1931 per hundred d o l l a r s o f loans and i n vestments of a c t i v e banks on June 3 0 , 1920. Banks are
grouped by s i z e o f loans and investments.

- 6] -

Table 26 - National and State Bank Suspensions, by Size of
Loans and Investments
S i z e group
l o a n s and i n v e s t m e n t s
(000 o m i t t e d )

1921-1929
.
1930-1931
Per cent
Per cent
Number
Number
of t o t a l
of t o t a l

Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2,000 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
50,000 and over

2,313
1,123
1,151
357
175
201
74
13
4
—

Total

5,411

42.7
20.8
21.3
6.6
3.2
3.7
1.4
0.2
0.1
—
100*0

1,191
631
740
294
162
241
158
54
32
2

1

34.0
18.0
21.1
8.4
4.6
6.9
4.5
1.5
0.9
0.1

3,505

;

100.0

I

This relatively higher mortality among the larger banks during the
two years is also shown in Table 27, which gives for national and State banks
the suspensions in 1930-1931 per 100 active banks on June 30, 1930,

Table 27 - Number of Suspensions during 1930-1931 per Hundred Active Banks
on June 30, 1930, by Size of Loans and Investments
— —_
—

National
and State
banks
Suspen- ITumber of i1
Suspen- SuspenNumber of
Number of
sions
Number of i s i o n s
sions
active
active
suspensions -oer 100 p e r 100
suspensions p e r 100
banks
banks
June 30,1930 1930-1931 a c t i v e Jane 30,1930 1930-1931 a c t i v e a c t i v e
banks banks
banks
N a t i o n a l banks

Size group
l o a n s and
investments
(000 o m i t t e d )

S t a t e banks

Under $150
335
4,504
25.1
59
17.6
24.6
1,132
150 - 250
701
103
14.7
2,809
528
18.8
18.0
250 - 500
1,591
139
8.7
3,375
601
17.8
14.9
500 - 750
968
80
8.3
1,394
214
15.4
12.4
750 - 1,000
767
43
5.6
785
119
15.2
10.4
1,000 - 2,000
1,320
71
5.4
1,280
170
13.3 1 9.3
2 , 0 0 0 - 5,000
1,014
54
5.3
873
104
11.9
8.4
5,000 - 10,000
307
15
4.9
238
39
13.5 |
9.1
10,000 - 50,000
202
5
2.5
252
27
10.7 i
7.0
50,000 and over
42
1
2.4
59
1
1.7 !
2.0
1
Total
7.247
570
15.619V ) __. .2*935 _ 1 3 . 8 L.25.3
7.9
See footnote o. 39. In classifying active State banks by size groups, whenever
individual reports for June 30 were not obtainable, f igurcs for'the nearest
available date were used. For this reason the above total does not agree v/ith
the corresponding figure published by the Comotroller of the Currency, as shown
in Table I~ of the ao"oendix to this reoort.




- 68 -

Comparison of Table 27 with Table 24 shows that there is mach less spread
between the suspension rates of the various size groups during 1930-1931
than during the entire eleven year period.

The differences between the

various geographic districts are shown in Table 28•

Table 28 - Number of National and State Bank Suspensions during 1930-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 30, 1930, by Geographic
Divisions and by Site of Loans and Investments
Size group
loans and
investments
(000 omitted)
Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2,000 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
50,000 and over
Total

Sew 1Middle North 1 South-South- South- West- Rocky 'PacifUnited
Eng- Atlan- | Cen- ern
east- west- ern Mounic
Mounland tic
tral
ern Grain tain Coast States
ern
tain

9.1
2.3
3.0
1.8
5.9
7.4
10.7
1.9

19.4
17.4
9.7
11.7
7.2
7.0
6.0
8.1
4.8 |
4.2

j 5.5

6.7

13.8
11.8
6.5
1.7
6.7
1.5
4.7
9.1

24.6
18.0
14.9
12.4
10.4
9.3
8.4
9.1
7.0
2.0

9.6

6.7

15.3

33.2
30.7
38.2
29.6
21.8
25.8
15.5
23.5
11.1

19.1
13.5
11.4
14.4
'9.5
10.9
7.5
6.5
7.7

26.8
20.2
14.0
0.3
7.2
7.1
4.8
2.9
4.3

17.1
10.8
8.7
4.4
11.5
1.5

8.0 j 16.5! 13.7 1 30.8

14.4

18.2

28.5
17.0
16.1
13.8
14.3
12.6
13.8
11.1
15.1

!
i

i

16.7
13.5
15.8
13.5
10.3
7.1
14.4
6.9
12.9

1

J

The study of suspension records in relation to active banks
by size groups involves certain factors which should be taken into account
in interpreting results^

Important differences doubtless exist within a

single State, for instance, in the character of business done by a large
bank in contrast to that of a bank with loans and investments of, say,
$500,000 or less.

The larger bank is usually found in situations which

offer far greater opportunities for diversification than are open to
the typical small bank operating in a community dependent frequently upon
the success or failure of one major industry.




Moreover, the majority of the suspensions during the eleven years

- 69-

occurred in the agricultural sections of the West and South, which is in part
attributable to the fact that during this period many agricultural regions
were far less prosperous than most industrial sections.

The types of industry

which banks finance and the relative degrees of prosperity or depression
prevailing in these industries are undoubtedly of great significance in
explaining the comparative suspension records of banks of different sizes as
well as of banks in different sections of the country. Prior to the current
depression the banks in the industrial regions were not subjected to the same
severe tests as those in the agricultural regions.

Suspended Banks Grouped by Size of Capital Stock
The study of suspensions in relation to active banks grouped by
size of capital stock tends in general, as shown by Tables 29 and 30 and by
Charts 21 and 22, to support the findings previously set forth in this discussion.

Further figures for geographic regions are given in Table XVIII of

the appendix and for States in Tables XIX and XX of the appendix.
Table 29 - Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931, by Size of Capital Stock

Size group
capital stock

Under $25,000
25,000
25,000 - 50,000
50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000
100,000 - 200,000
200,000 - 500,000
500,000 - 1,000,000
1,000,000 - 5,000,000
5,000,000 and over
Total




National "banks
State ba.nks
Number
Number
of sus- Per cent of sus- Per cent
pensions of total pensions of total
32.1

3,049
1,671

429
116
338
98
169
57
98
21
10

12.7

4.3
7.3
1.6
0.7

722
934
267
425
155
262
53
41

—

—

1

1,336

100.0

7,580

8.7
25.3

7.3

40.2
22.1

National and
Statp. banks
Number
of sus- Per cent
pensions of total
3,049
2,100

34.2
23.5

9.5

838

9.4

12.3

1,272

14.3

3.5
5.6
2.1
3.5
0.7
0.5

365
594
212
360
74
51

4.1
6.7
2.4
4.0
0.8
0.6

0.01
100.0

1
8,916

0.01
100*0

- 70 -

CHART 21

SUSPENSIONS PER HUNDRED ACTIVE BANKS
PER HUNDRED

GROUPED BY SIZE OF CAPITAL STOCK

PER HUNOREO

^0

4*0

30

30

20

20

10

10

0
SIZE GROUPS
THOUSANDS
OF DOLLARS




UNDER

100

200

TO

TO

500 1000 5,000
TO

TO

AMD

200 500 1,000 5.000 O E
VR

Number of n a t i o n a l and S t a t e bank suspensions during
1921-1931 p e r hundred a c t i v e banks on June 3 0 , 1920,
grouped by s i z e o f c a p i t a l s t o c k .

-

71 -

CHART 2 2
SUSPENSIONS PER HUNDRED ACTIVE NATIONAL AND STATE BANKS
GROUPED BY SIZE OF CAPITAL STOCK
PCRHO HO«D

PER

NEW ENGLAND
STATES

MIDDLE ATLANTIC
STATES

30

20

•

• lllllll

0
70 |

SOUTH EASTERN
STATES

.SOUTHERN MOUNTAIN
STATES

60 !

..I.

nnn inn minim

10

• III

50

imnii

40

30

20

10

0
50

lllill.l.
minium milium mi

0
50

•
40

30

20

WESTERN GRAIN
WEST!
STATES

Mi
iinm

m.i

40

30

20

i.ii

10

I1I

SIZE
\
6R0UP3 Jj
THOUSANDS S
or
g
DOLLARS £




PACIFIC COAST
STATES

ROCKY MOUNTAIN
STATES

5

iY

•a

si

i

i iwimni
T

CM

5

1

» ! t
V) V> O O
M N «0 <0

4 4

si

I

<

5 o
>

©J «0 v * W)

!

<o v> 6
U N <0

I

1 ° 2
§ § %

s ?*
o Q 5 ?,
CM <*> * * < 0

Number of n a t i o n a l and S t a t e batik suspensions during 19211931 per hundred a c t i v e banks on June 3 0 t 1920, grouped by
size of c a p i t a l s t o c k .

10

- 72 ~

Table 30 - Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 30> 1920,
by Size of Capital Stock
National
banks

Under $25,000
25,000
25,000 - 50,000
50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000
100,000 - 200,000
200,000 - 500,000
500,000 - 1,000,000
1,000,000 - 5,000,000
5,000,000 and over

20.1
25. k
17.3
19.8
11.9
15.6
12.9
10.0

Total

State
banks

National and
S t a t e banks

37-0

Size group
c a p i t a l stock

36.9

39.3

32.9
35.0
28.2
29.9
21.0
2k.k
22.7
18.2
13.2
2.1

37.2

36.7
36.7
30.3

5.6

30.s
31.6
26.9
19.8

lS.7

36.3

—

30.9

Capital stock, however, does not appear t o be as trustworthy
as loans and investments as a measure of s i z e , for i t i s determined in
p a r t by requirements of law and bears a varying r e l a t i o n s h i p to the v o l ume of earning a s s e t s and deposits from one bank to another.

Its reli-

a b i l i t y as a c r i t e r i o n of size i s also impaired by the p r a c t i c e obtaining
i n many banks of building up s u b s t a n t i a l amounts of surplus and undivided
p r o f i t s r a t h e r than increasing paid-in c a p i t a l as a msans of supporting a
given volume of b u s i n e s s .
Suspended Banks Grouped by Size of Community in Which Located
When suspended banks are grouped by size of town, i t appears that
during the period 1921-1931 35 per cent of a l l suspensions occurred in towns of
l e s s than 500pcpilatian,and 75 per cent in towns ox less than 2,500 inhabitants, as shown




- 73 in Table 31. On the other hand, only 4.4 per cent occurred in tovms of
100,000 and over.
Table 31 - Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931, by Size of Torni
N a t i o n a l and
N a t i o n a l "banks
S t a t e hanks
S t a t e hanks
Number \ p e r c e n t
Number P e r c e n t
Number ] P e r c e n t
of s u s of t o t a l
of s u s - of t o t a l
of s u s of t o t a l
p e n s i o n s suspensions p e n s i o n s suspensions p e n s i o n s suspension

Population
of town

Total

171
255
408
202
118
92
36
19
35

12.8
19.1
30.6
15.1
8.8
6.9
2.7
1.4
2.6

2,982
1,476
1,348
568
309
297
I
112
130
358

39.3
19.5
17.8
7.5
4.1
3.9
1.5
1.7
4.7

1,336

Under 500
500 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,500
2,500 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 25,000
25,000 - 50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000 and over

100.0

7,580

100.0

35.4
19.4
19.7
3.6
4.8
4.4
1.6
1.7
4.4

3,153
1,731
1,756
770
427
339
148
149
593

100.0

8,916
i

1

The suspension rate is 38 per hundred in towns of less than 500
population, and 31 per hundred in towns of 1,000 to 2,500 population, as
shown in Table 32.

There is not nruch difference, however, between the towns

of various size above 5,000 population, the rate dropping to 20 per hundred
in cities of 25,000 to 50,000 population, "but rising to 24 per hundred in
cities over 100,000 population.




Table 32 - Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 30, 1920
by Size of Town
Population
bf town

National
hanks

State
hanks

National
and
S t a t e banks

Under 500
500 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,500
2,500 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 25,000
25,000 - 50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000 and over

25.6
21.9
19.1
15.1
12.7
11.5
11.7
8.3
7.7

39.3
37.1
38.0
33.6
28.5
31.9
26.0
31.4
30.3

38.1
33.6
30.9
25.4
21.2
22.4
20.0
23.1
24.0

Total

16.7

35.3

30.9

- 7*-

There is considerable difference between national "banks and State
banks in respect to the size of communities in which failures have occurred.
The suspension rates are much higher for State banks than for national banks
in all sizes

of communities, but the differences are especially marked in

the larger cities*

This may -ocrloaps be explained on the ground that there

are more small State banks than national banks in large cities, due to the
lower capitalization requirements in many States, figures for the various
sizes of towns and cities are illustrated in Charts 23 and 24 #

Corresponding

figures for each State are given in Tables XXI, XXII, and XXIII of the
appendix.
In Table 33 the loans and investments of national and State banks
suspending during the eleven years

1921-1931

per hundred dollars of loans

and investments in active national and State banks on June 30, 1920, are
grouped by population of the towns and cities in which the banks were located
Table 33 - Loans and Investments of Suspended National and State Banks
per $100 of Loans and Investments of Active Banks, by Size of Town
Loans and i n v e s t m e n t s (000 emitted)
Population
of town

Under 500
500 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,500
2,500 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 25,000
25,000 - 50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000 and over
Total

A c t i v e banks
June 30, 1920
$ 1,390,858
1,482,947
2,607,426
2,152,694
2,126,377
2,863,814
1,955,663
2,264,561
19.305.591

$

$36,149,931^

$4,716,322

( 1 ) See footnote p 39.
#




Suspended 'banks
1921-1931
396,041
374,007
590,349
407,347
350,127
494,733
262,527
344,548
1.496.638

R a t i o of l o a n s
Number of
and investments s u s p e n s i o n s
of suspended to n e r ' l O O a c a c t i v e "banks
" t i v e banks
1 . f-oer c e n t )
. . . . ,, . «....
28.5
33.1
25.2
33.6
22.6
30.9
25.4
18.9
21.2
16.5
22.4
17.3
20.0
13.4
23.1
15.2
24.0
7.8
13.0

30.9




- 75 -

CHART 23

SUSPENSIONS PER HUNDRED ACTIVE BANKS
PER HUNDRED

GROUPED BY SIZE OF TOWN

PER HUNDRED

1*0

40

UNITED STATES
30

30

20

20

10

10

LESS

POPULATION
THAN
GROUPS

500

500

IPOO

2,500

5000

TO

TO

TO

TO

1,000

2500

5000

10.000 25000 5QOO0 100.000
TO

TO

TO

AND

10.000 2^000 50,000 100,000 O E
VR

Number of n a t i o n a l and S t a t e bank suspensions during
1921-1931 per hundred a c t i v e banks on June 3 0 , 1920,
grouped by s i z e of town.

- 76
CHART 24

SUSPENSIONS PER HUNDRED ACTIVE NATIONAL AND STATE BANKS
GROUPED BY SIZE OF TOWN

PER HUNDRED

40 1

NORTH CENTRAL
STATES

MIDDLE ATLANTIC
STATES

NEW ENGLAND
STATES

PER HUNDRED

30

20
to

iiirmmiiiiiiiiii

0
70
60

SOUTHERN MOUNTAIN
STATES
50

40

30

20

10

J

SOUTH EASTERN
TH

iiiiiiiiiII




20

10

ini nil
MINIUM

MIMMMlblMIIIIMIIIIIHIII

•i
"""'J " g g § 1 §8 I

30

I I

Milium
iimnnip MIMIIMI imimi

-Mi!

40

ll
s§ I
S

«o Q

si

7 ? •

I I * V "Ill
Q

*

W

S

i

mm
I
g

8

<N|

11 S I ? 3

SJ

w

W XT

s w ss I

Ktimber of national and State bank suspensions during 19211931 per hundred active banks, on June 30, 1920f grouped by
size of town
* ^Suspensions but no aM* banks m this group in f 920

to
0
50

to




- 77 -

OThis table shows a gradual decline in the ratios from small
towns to large, thus indicating that the banks in small communities
have suffered most from suspensions*

These ratios of loans and invest-

ments of suspended to active banks become more significant when compared
with the number of suspensions per hundred active banks in the corresponding population groups.

This comparison is also shown in Table 33.

It is particularly significant that the number of suspensions per
hundred active banks exceeds the ratio of loans and investments of
suspended to active banks in every size group.

This indicates in genersuL

that the smaller banks have made a less favorable record than the larger
banks regardless of location.
In Table 34 the suspensions occurring during the nine years
1921-1929 are compared, by size of community in which banks are located,
with those during the two years 1930-1931.

Table 34 - national and State Bank Suspensions
during 1921-1929 and 1930-1931,by Size of Town
Population
of town

1921-1929
Per cent
Number
of total

Under 500
500 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,500
2,500 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 25,000
25,000 - 50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000 and over

2,108
1,089
1,080
437
224
200
57
65
151

39.0
20.1
20.0
8.1
4.1
3.7
1.0
1.2
2.8

Total

5,411

100.0

1930-1931
per cent
Number
of total
1,045
642
676
333
203
189
91
84
242

29.8
18.3
19.3
9.5
5.8
5.4
2.6
2.4
6.9

3,505 100.0

- 78 -

These figures show that during 1930-193-1-

a

smaller proportion

of the suspensions occurred in towns of l e s s than 2,500 population, and
a greater proportion in l a r g e r towns and c i t i e s than during the preceding nine y e a r s .

The actual annual r a t e of failure in the smaller towns

was not reduced, however, being nearly 1,200 per year during 1930-1931
as compared with l e s s than 500 per year during 1921-1929, in a l l towns of
l e s s than 2,500 population.

Almost half as many banks f a i l e d during the

two years of 1930 and 1931 in towns of l e s s than 500 population as f a i l e d
during the preceding nine y e a r s .

But in c i t i e s of more than 25,000 popu-

l a t i o n the number of f a i l u r e s during the two years 1930 and 1931 numbered
U17, as compared with only 273 during the preceding nine years, nearly a
sevenfold increase in the average annual number of suspensions.
Size of Suspended Member" State Banks
About 55 per cent of the t o t a l number of suspended member State
banks had loans and investments of l e s s than $500,000 oach a t time of
closing, 37 p e r cent of the t o t a l had loans and investments between $500,000
and $5,000,000 each, and 2 per cent had loans and investments of more than
$5,000,000 each.

On the other hand, the banks in the f i r s t group had only

6 per cent of the t o t a l loans and investments of member State bank suspensions, while those in the second group had 2k per cent of the t o t a l and
those in the group of l a r g e s t banks had 70 per cent.
nated size groups are given in Table 35.




Figures for 10 desig-

- 79 Table 35 - Suspensions of Member State Banks during 1921-1931
by Size of loans and Investments
Size group
loans and investments
(000 omitted)

Per cent
Num'ber of
of total
s Ltspens J. oils
number

56
5S
85
U7
29
35

Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2,000 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
50,000 and over
Total

25

Per cent of
Loans and
total loans
investments
aiiH ^n—
(000 omitted)
vestments

15.4
lo.O

11,967
29,280
28,^52
24,618

23. k
12.9

8.0

9.6
6.9
3.6
3.9

^9,515
78,699

S
1
j

0.8
1.6

$ 5,699

_0si

87,701
232,230
213.403

363

100.0

$762,164

3.9
3.7
3.2

6.5
IO.3
11.5
30.5
28.0
100.0

A similar distribution is shown when suspended member State banks
are grouped by capital stock, as in Table $6.

More than half the suspended

banks had $50,000 or less of capital stock, while only 6 per cent had
$1,000,000 or more*

But the banks with $50,000 or less accounted for only 9

per cent of the capital stock of all suspended member State banks, while those
with $1,000,000 or more had 6l per cent of the capital stock.
Table 36 - Suspensions of Member State Banks during 1921-1931
by Size of Capital Stock
Size group
capital stock
Under $25,000
25,000
25,000 - 50,000
50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000
100,000 - 200,000
200,000 - 500,000
500,000 - 1,000,000
1,000,000 - 5,000,000 ;
5,000,000 and over
Total




Number of
banks

2
SO

*3
71
2S

Per cent
of total
number

0.6
22.0
11.9
19.6

7.7

Per cent
Aggregate
capital stock
of total
(000 onitted) capital stock
$

33
2,000
1,526
3,550
2,024
5,700
2,089
9,000

0.04

2.4
1.8

M

2.5

57

15.7

15

4.1

35

9.6

11
20
1

3.0

6,575

7-9

5-5
Q-3

25,225
25.250

30.4
30.4

363

100.0

$82,972

100.0

6.9
2.5
10.9

~ so A classification of member State bank suspensions by size of town
is presented in Table 37-

About 52 per cent of the total number occurred

in towns of less than 2,500 population, whereas only 15 per cent were
located in cities of more than 25,000 population.

The latter, however,

had 78 per cent of the total loans and investments of suspended member
State banks, while the fozmer had only 2 per cent of the total.

Table 37 - Suspensions of Member State Banks during 1921-1931
by Size of Town

Populat ion
of town

Number of
tanks

Per cent
of t o t a l
number

Loans and
investments
(000 omitted)

Per cent of
t o t a l loans
and i n vestments

$ 15,93**
13,394
30,362
39.03U
20J42
47,211
36,31+l
84,204
474.942

2.1
1.8
4.0
5.1
2.7
6.2
4.S
11.0
62.3

$762,164

100.0

Under 500
500 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,500
2,500 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 25,000
25,000 - 50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000 and over

73
60
26
32
12
11
.32

17.4
lU.9
20.1
16.5
7.2
S.S
3.5
3.0
g.g

Total

363

10O.0




%

CHAPTER IV

DISPOSITION OF SUSPENDED BANKS AND EXPENSES OF LIQUIDATION

About 20 per cent of the banks suspending daring the ten years
192I-I93O were reopened or taken over by other institutions within a relatively short time after closing, and about 80 per cent were placed in
liquidation.

In Table 32 national and State bank suspensions during the

ten years are classified to show what disposition had been made of the
banks at the time the suspension schedules were made out; while Table 39
gives the percentages of the total which were reopened, taken over, or
placed in liquidation.

There is considerable year to year variation in

the percentage of banks reopened and taken overf the proportion being as
high as 35 per cent in 1921, and as low as 12 per cent in 1928* There are
also differences between the national and State banks; only 17 per cent of
the former were reopened or taken over, while 21 per cent of the latter
were thus handled*
Only 21 per cent of the suspensions occurring during the ten
years had been completely liquidated at the time the suspension schedules
were prepared late in 1930 and early in 1931* The great majority of these
were banks which suspended during the earlier years of the period.




- 81 -

- 82 Table J>Z - D i s p o s i t i o n of Suspended N a t i o n a l and S t a t e Banks "by Years
1921-1930(1)
Year

Reopened

3
Taken over
Completely! In process Disposition
by other
l i q u i d a t e d of l i q u i - \ not recorded Total
institutions
dation'-'^
National banks

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
.1927
192S
1929
1930
Total

19
17
15
l4
9
11
4
1
5
_2
97

.»
—

_a

25
23
54
67
k5
33
11
5
2
2

5
7
15
29
55
69
70
51
57
148

—

52
>9
±
90
122
118
123
91
57
64
161

57

267

506

-

927

92
86
210
290
236
3S3
331

3^
18
53
35
15

3
2
6
12
9
10
6
-

S t a t e banks
1921
1922
1923
1921+
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
Total
Total n a t i o n a l
and State

111
54
SO
gg
66
179
90
44
84
220

17
10
11
16
10
22
20
13
20
28

i
1

155
126
179
187
134
204
98
32
14
1

1,016

167

1,130

1.113

224

1.397

i
[

446
881

-

1

409
294
533
616
461
801
545
422
564
1.131

3.284

179

5,776

3.790

179

6,703

2

? 9

^

6
4

( 1 ) Disposition at the time the suspension schedules were prepared for the
Committee during the latter half of 1930 and the first half of 193**
Doubtless more of the suspended "banks have been reopened, taken over, or
completely liquidated since the schedules were prepared. Of the 193^ suspensions 12i* State banks and l6 national banks were reopened during the
year.
The number taken over by other institutions is not known. Most of
the banks suspending in that year are, of course, in process of liquidation*
( 2 ) Including in some States, especially those which had guaranty funds in
operation, some banks whose depositors had been paid in full, but which
were not reported as completely liquidated*




-83-

Table 39 - Disposition of Suspended Banks, 1921-1930, Percentages of Total'1)
National and
State banks
ReReTaken Placed i n
ReTaken Placed i n
Taken Placed i n
opened over l i a u i d a t i o n opened over l i q u i d a t i o n opened over l i a u i d a t i o n
National tanks

v*»«* **

lear

36.53^.7-

5.8.
U.l.

1921
1922
1923
1921+
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930

1.8
7.8
_i*£

JL£„

1921-1930

10.5

6.1

16.7
11.5

7.6

9.0

k.h

6.7

9.8.
7.6.
8.1
6.6
-

State banks

57.7.
61.2.
76.6.
78.7
8k, 8
82.9
89.0
98.2
92.2
93.2.
83.H

29.6
19.6
16.7.
15.1.
lU.8
22.7
16.7.
10.5.

H.5.
3.6
2.3
2.8.
2.2
2.8

lU.9

3.5.

19.5

3.7.
3.1
-2^

1 8 . 1 : 3.0.

65.9
76.8
81.0
82.1
83.0

7^.5
79.6
se.k

30. U
21.8
16.7
lU.5
13.3
20.9
14.9

k.l
3.7

6^.9
7^.5

U.o
3.*

80. 3
81.5
83.3

3.0

11

75.6

81.6
78.0

l4,2
17.2

9.5

2.7
3.2
-2*2

81.0
87.8
82.6
79.9

78.9

17.1

3.^

79.5

( 1 ) Omitting 179 State banks the disposition of which was not recorded.

In Table UQ the disposition of banks suspending during 1921-1930
is given by geographic regions. . The North Central States rank highest and
the Rocky Mountain States lowest in the proportion of banks reopened and
taken over, the percentages being yi and 13 respectively.

It is note-

worthy that the North Central States, which rank highest in the percentage
of banks reopened and taken over, are lowest in the percentage of banks
completely liquidated*

This results largely from the fact that over "naif

of the suspensions in this area occurred during 1929 and 1930 and that
sufficient time had not elapsed to complete their liquidation.

On the

other hand, the high proportion of total suspensions which had been completely liquidated in the Rocky Mountain States is explained by the fact
that nearly three-fourths of the total suspensions in that area occurred




-

gU-

e a r l y in the period under consideration, namely, from 1921 to 1924 inclusive •

rfence a mach longer period has elapsed in which to complete t h e i r

liquidation.




Table Ho - Disposition of National and State Banks Suspending
during 1921-1930,"by Geographic D i v i s i o n s ( l )
_ _ _

Geographic
division

Coffl- |In proo j DisTaken pletely| ess of position
Total
Reopened
over l'iqui- j liquinot
dated i dation 1 recorded

Number
Hew England
Middle Atlantic
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
Pacific Coast
UNITED STATES

3
12
146
2S
218
166
464
5S
IS
1,113

3j

ill

5
48
21

45

36

33

176
192
622
248

51
44
16

12
44

390 1
190 1
747
401
1,813
139

_
-

2
—

60
1
22
94

18
72
631
275
1,234
811
2,965

555
142

it
224

1.397

3.790

6,703

179

Fer cent of total
New England
Middle Atlantic
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
Pacific Coast

16.7
16.7
23.2
10.2
17.7
20.5
15.6
10.5
12.7

UNITED STATES

16.6

6.9
7,6
7,6

16.7
15.3
7.1

ip

*L2

14.2
23.7
21.0
44.7
45.1

3*3

20.8

2,7

6,3
1.5

1 2 '9

• 66.6
61.1 1
61.8 |
69.1
60.5 !
49.4
61.2
25.0 1

^s.o

56.6

~
0.3
4.9
0.1
0.7

16.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
i100.0
100.0
100.0

2.7
1

(1) Di
disposition at the time the schedules were prepared for the
Committee during the latter half of 1930 and the first half
of 1931.

- 85 -

Substantially the saine tendencies are revealed by the classification of loans and investments of suspended banks according to the disposition
of the banks, except that a larger proportion of the total occurs

in the

group: "In process of liquidation,41
Table Hi - Loans and Investments of National and State Banks Suspending
during 1921-1930 Classified According to Disposition of Banksvl)
Geographic
division

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Kocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast
UNITED STATES

Reopeneq

6,3^5
22,827
81,748
11,018

76,849
45,565
139,127
20,163

DisComIn process
position
pletely of liquinot
liquidation
recorded
dated
(in thousands of dollars)

Taken
over

.-*
9.841

32,561
8,585
18,764
22,893

7.1*1

12,762
10,652
6,425

;4ii,oS3

122,483

3.136
6,518
14,513
6,317
38,910
54,037
148,639
65,331

36,571
340,224

—

600
174,354
153,323
329,187! 13,254
131,126'
60
9,082
457,3S0
72,390' 22,391
—
in,577

38,468

1,798,192

375,869

Total

46,052

379,410
303.776
179,303
536,964
253,681
766,990
190,927
95,911

45,387

2,753.014

fe.4

0.2
—
2.5
0.02
1.2
11.7
-

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

65.3

1.7

100.0

Per cerit of t o t a l
New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Sou the rn Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast
UNITED STATES

13.8
6.0

26.9
6.2
14.3
18.0
18.1
10.6
7.8
14. S

2.6
10.7
4.8

3-5
9.0
1.7

79.4
89.7
57.4
85.5
72.5
51.7
59.6
37.9

6.8
1.7
4.8

3.5
7.2

5.6
6.7

19.4
34.2
40.1

4.1+

13.7

j

(1) Disposition at the time the schedules were prepared during the latter
half of 1930 and the first half of 1931.




- 26 The banks which have been reopened or takien ever average in size about the
same as all suspended banks.
The disposition of banks suspending in each State during 1921-1930
is given in Table XXIV of the appendix.

Expenses of Liquidation
Expenses of liquidation for the 26j completely liquidated national
banks have been compiled from the annual reports of the Comptroller of the
Currency.

In order to examine the percentage of total assets which was ab-

sorbed through expenses of receivership, the ratio of expenses to total resources(l) at time of suspension was computed for these banks. Since the
quality of assets, and consequently the collections from these assets, vary
considerably from one bank to another, the ratio of expenses to total collections for the banks was also computed,.
This information is presented by geographic divisions in Table k2.
For the United States as a whole, the average ratio of expenses of liquidartion to total resources amounts to 5.0 per cent, but considerable variations
are evident in different sections of the country*, The namber of banks shown
for the Hew England, Middle Atlantic, North Central, and Southern MountainStates is not sufficient to justify conclusions, but of the other geographic
divisions the Southwestern States are lowest with a ratio of U.l per cent
while the Pacific Coast States are highest with a ratio of 5*9 per cent.

•• Total resources as used here are the book value of assets at time of
*/
suspension, as published in the annual reports of the Comptroller of
the Currency.




- 87 -

Table 42 - Expenses of Liquidating 267 Suspended National Banks,(1)
" y Geographic Divisions
b

Geographic
division

Southeastern
Southwestern
"*7estern Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast
Other d i v i s i o n ^ 2 )
UNITED STATES

Expenses
Number
of
of
liquidation
"banks (000 omitted)
21

50

u

2

267

$ 363
1,197

Total
Total
Ratio of
Eatio of
expenses
colresources
expenses
a t time of
to t o t a l lections to t o t a l
collections
resources
suspension
(000
(000 omitted) (per cent) omitted) (per cent)

$

1,915
3U7
2Z2

7,086
29,009
3L707
36,1^6
5,S7S
9.252

$5,9^5

$119,078

5.1
U.i
5.5
5-3
5.9
k.i
:

$ 3,756
16,578
18,680
19,367
^,269
6.99U

9.7
7.2

5.0

$70,1^

8.5

9.6
8.1
5.U

W

Banks which suspended during 1921-1930 and which had been completely liquidated
at the time the suspension schedules were prepared* Expenses of liquidation and
total resources at time of suspension were compiled from the annual reports of
the Comptroller of the Currency.
(2) New England, Middle Atlantic, North Central, and Southern Mountain.

The percentages of expenses to total collections, however, are
substantially higher, averaging 8.5 for the country as a whole and ranging from 7.2 in the Southwestern States to 9«7 in the Southeastern States,
omitting from consideration those divisions with less than ten liquidated
banks.
Expenses of liquidation in proportion to total resources at
time of suspension have "been materially higher for the smaller banks
than for the larger "banks as indicated in Table U3 showing the ratio
of expenses to total resources in banks by size groups.

In only two

banks with more than $500,000 total resources did the ratio of expenses
to resources exceed 8 per cent, whereas tne expenses in 72 banks with
resources of less than $500,000 exceeded 8 per cent of the book assets




- 88 ~

at time of suspension.

Half of these cases show expenses to be more than

10 per cent of total resources.

Table U3 - Ratio of Expenses of Liquidation to Total Resources of 267 Completely
Liquidated national Banks, by Size Groups
R a t i o of
expenses of
liquidation
to t o t a l
resources
056 - 2$
2.1 - k
H.l - 6
6.1 - 8
g . l - 10
1 0 . 1 - 12
1 2 . 1 - ik
1U.1 - 16
16.1 - lg
l g . i - 20
2 0 . 1 and over
Total




Number of banks with t o t a l r e s o u r c e s
Under
$250,000 $500,000 $750,000 $1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,000,000
to
to
to
Total
to
and
to
$250,000 500,000 750000 1,000,000 .1,500,000 2,000.000
over
2
13
13
29
26
15

k
k
1
2
1
110

1
7
29
25
10
7
2

3

11
17

3
1

—
_
_
—
-

_
—
-

gi

1

35

1
1

_.

2

1
1
1
1

_
_
_
_
-

1

—
_

—
_

6
6

lU

1
7
U
_
_
_
_
—
-

13

3
5

—

mm

—

_
—
•
—

_
_
_
-

10

k

12
50
70
61
33
22

6

k
1
2
1
26-

CHAPTER V

LOSSES TO DEPOSITORS OP SUSPECTED B A M S

It is impossible to measure in a comprehensive manner the farreaching consequences which have attended the thousands of bank suspensions
during recent years. Particularly is it beyond the scope of this inquiry
to attempt an appraisal of the personal hardships, the lost opportunities,
and the impediments to trade which have been occasioned by the tie-up of
funds in closed banks.

There are, however, certain phases of this subject

dealing with realized losses of depositors and stockholders in the aggregate
upon which considerable information can be presented.

Safety of depositors1

funds is one of the primary requisites of a successful banking system.

It

is particularly pertinent, therefore, to examine the losses sustained by depositors as a result of bank suspensions*
The data in this and the following chapter cover the ten year
period 1921-193° and- do

not

include figures for 1931*

It should be noted,

furthermore, that the information contained in these chapters for the ten
years represents the situation at the time the schedules were prepared for
the Committee, i.e., during the latter half of 1930 and the first half of
1931*

The time required for preparation was several weeks or even months

in some of the States, and the date of the completion of the schedules varied
considerably from State to State,

Since that time many additional banks

which suspended during that period have been finally liquidated, and many
more have been reopened.




- g9 -

- 90 -

Many complicating factors are involved in the attempt to arrive at
comparable results representing losses to depositors in different States*
The detailed instructions prepared by the Committee when the original requests for data on suspensions were submitted to the Comptroller of the Currency and the several State banking departments called for information on
deposit claims only, divided into three classes:
unsecured.

secured, preferred, and

It was particularly stressed that any departures from this prac-

tice should be fully explained.

Notwithstanding these precautions, the re-

turns from certain States showed that the data were not always in the form
requested, either because of inadvertence, or because they were not available
in that form.

In some States, for instance, deposit claims were not segre-

gated from other types of claims. Moreover, the same types of liabilities
were classified differently on the suspension schedules from one State to
another, sometimes apparently because of a difference in statutory priority,
and sometimes simply because of a difference in the judgment of those who
prepared the schedules at source.
An effort was made through further correspondence to determine in
each State:

(l) the statutory priority of lien of the various types of

deposits; (2) the precise character of deposits reported on the suspension
schedules as (a) secured, (b) preferred, and (c) unsecured; and (3) the precise character of other claims included in the suspension schedules with
depositors1 claims. The replies to this inquiry were so diverse in character"
as to make impracticable any attempt to show comparable results for the different States with respect to the claims of preferred or secured creditors
and the payments thereon in suspended State banks.




- 91 -

With respect to national banks, the work of segregating the claims
of secured, preferred, and unsecured creditors was prohibitive; hence, for
banks completely liquidated or in process of liquidation, only the amount of
the claims of unsecured depositors and the percentage of payments thereon
were obtained, Prom the amount of the claims of unsecured depositors and the
percentage payments thereon, estimates have been made of the amounts paid to
unsecured depositors. JOT banks reopened and taken over, no losses of secured
or preferred claimants were recorded on the suspension schedules.
In the following discussion, therefore, estimates of losses to depositors are confined to the losses of unsecured depositors*

It is safe to

assume, however, that unless the percentage of dividends paid to unsecured
depositors was abnormally low, preferred and secured creditors were paid in
full.

Secured creditors receive the same dividend payments as unsecured

creditors until their claims are met in full, either from the dividends or
from the liquidation of collateral held or both.

In those cases where the

dividend payments were unusually low it is possible that the collateral held
by secured creditors may have been inadequate by more than this percentage
to liquidate the claims fully, and that the secured claimants suffered some
loss*

Losses in Reopened and Taken-over Banks
Unsecured depositors of suspended banks which have been reopened or
taken over have suffered relatively small losses, as a rule, compared with
those incurred by depositors in banks which have been liquidated.

In Table UU

the suspended national and State banks which were reopened or taken over are
classified according to the percentage of claiins realized by depositors.




-92-

Data on the percentages of claims realized by depositors in 1 national and
139 State hanks were unavailable.

Bat of the 1,197 banks included in this

table, 90U, or slightly more than 75 P e r cent, paid unsecured depositors in
full.

Only 6l banks, or roughly

5 Per

cent

of the total number, paid un-

secured depositors less than fifty cents on the dollar.

Table hh - Reopened and Takenr-over Banks Classified According to
Per Cent of Claims Bealized by Unsecured Depositors(l)

Per cent of
claims realized
(exclusive of offsets)
o# - 19$
20 - 39

Ho - 59
60 - 79
80 - 99
100
Total

National 1 State
banks
tanks

National and
S t a t e banks

9
112

6
30
S7
97
39

6
31
9U
114
Ug

78*?

_2PJi

153

l.oUH

mm

1
7
17

1

1,197

( 1 ) Banks suspending during 1921-1930. Infonnation as to
claims realized by depositors of 1 national bank and
139 State banks is not available.

There were instances, however, in which unsecured depositors received only 10 or 15 per cent of their claims.

In Florida the deposits in

most reopened banks were frozen by waiver agreements for periods ranging
from a few months to as many as four or five years. Under such circumstances
it is evident that the Florida percentages constitute nothing more than
tentative estimates which may or may not be actually realized.

Taken as a

group, the Western Grain States made the poorest showing, nearly a fourth
of all reopened and taken-over banks in that area having paid depositors
less than 60 per cent of their claims, as shown in Table * 5 presenting the
+
banks by geographic divisions of the country.




~ 93 ~

Table U5 - Per Cent of Claims Realized by Unsecured Depositors in 1,197 Reopened
and Taken-over Banks (National and State),
by Geographic Divisions(l)
Number of banks which paid depositors
Total
(exclLasive of offsets)
| 0#-19#20#-39# Ho£-5<# j6o#-79# 80^-99$ 100$

Geographic
division

1 _

New England
Middle Atlantic
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
Pacific Coast

—
—
-

;
-

2
.
1
-

_

_

_

-

1

l

5

lU

7

1
10

1
16
17

l

55
6
k

21

19U
173
257

5

*9

6U

1

16

2k

ni+

US

90U

1,197

6
-

-

JL

6

UNITED STATES

1
27

31

Sh

6
65
k

J

6
6

x

2
15

g

2
17
18U
16
+
226
203
^31

( 1 ) Banks suspending during 1921-193° • Figures for 1 national bank
and 139 State banks are not available.

The actual dollar losses to unsecured depositors in reopened and
takenr-over banks were not always reported*

They were computed in each case,

however, by multiplying total deposits by the reported percentage loss.

If

it is assumed that about the same average proportionate loss occurred among
the 1^0 banks for which no information as to losses was reported as among
other reopened and taken-over banks in the same area, the total losses
to depositors in the 1,337 reopened and taken-over banks aggregated
approximately $5^,081,000. The amounts are given by geographic divisions
in Table i+6.




-9*-

Table kS - Total Estimated Losses to Unsecured Depositors of 1,337 Suspended
Banks Which Were Reopened or Taken Over(l)
National
"ba^ks

State
"banks
(000 omitted) I (000 omitted)

Geographic
division
New England
Middle Atlantic
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocly Mountain
Pacific Coast

1

^
_

mm

% 302

215

UNITED STATES

$5,738

$

302
6,607

523

2U0
925
i,o46
1,377
1.633

«i
-

% 6,392

-

1
j
|

National and
State banks
(000 omitted)

1

523

7,300
1,507
31,063
i,iUo

7,5^0
2,432
32,109
2,517
2,051

Uig
$48,3^3

;

$54,081

(l) Banks suspending during 1921-1930 which had teen reopened or
taken over " y other institutions at the time the suspension
b
schedules were prepared for the Committee.
The deposits of these "banks aggregated $^g6,958,000(2) and,
therefore, the depositors suffered an average loss of about 11 per cent.
For the 15^ national hanks the estimated loss was about S per cent, and
for the 1,183 State hanks it was nearly 12 per cent*

Losses in Completely Liquidated Banks
Of the 927 national "banks which suspended operations during the
ten years 1921-1930, inclusive, 267 were completely liquidated at the time
these data were compiled*

Receivers for these banks allowed claims to un-

secured depositors as distinguished from clams of secured or preferred

(2) Condition figures reported on the suspension schedules for national
banks are as of the last examiner*s or last call report prior to suspension rather than at time of closing* Since deposits ordinarily
decline somewhat as suspension approaches, some overstatement results
from the computation of losses by multiplying the percentage of loss
in each bank by deposits as shown on the suspension schedules.




- 95 ~

creditors, to the amount of $6S,HS9,000(1) on which aggregate payments of
$3!+,034,000 were made. Unsecured depositors, therefore, received about
fifty cents on the dollar, exclusive of offsets. Total offsets
(2)

in the
amount of $9,227,000 were allowed,and if these are taten into account the
percentage of claims realized "by unsecured depositors is raised to 55»7 P e ^
cent.
With respect to completely liquidated State hanks the data are
much less satisfactory than in the case of national hanks. Not only are
the records more fragmentary, "but considerable difficulties were encountered,
as noted above, in securing comparable returns from the various States. Differences in the statutory priority of claims in the various States, as well
as differences in methods of liquidation, have complicated the work*

Every

effort has been made, however, to avoid unwarranted comparisons, and for this
reason reference is made only to claims of unsecured depositors as distinguished from the claims of preferred and secured creditors in the discussion
which follows.
Of the 1,130 State banks which have been finally liquidated,
relatively complete data as to claims and payments wore received on only 988,
Aggregate unsecured claims in these 988 banks amounted to $155t809,000 on
which payments of $9°*891,000 were made, depositors thus receiving an average
of 58.3 cents on the dollar exclusive of offsets. Including offsets of
$lU,963,000, the average percentage of claims realized by unsecured depositors:
is raised to 62.0 per cent.
(1) This figure includes a negligible amount of claims of secured creditors
which it has not been possible to segregate.
( 2 ) A depositor who is also a borrower usually has his deposit applied
against his indebtedness to the bank.




-96-

Table U7 ~ Claims of and Payments to Unsecured Depositors in Completely
Liquidated Banks, by Geographic DivisionsC1)

Geographic
division

N a t i o n a l banks
Claims Payments R a t i o
of p a y - N T O Num- ( e x c l u - ( e x c l u ber
s i v e of s i v e of ments t o "ber
offsets) offsets)
claims
of
of
(000
(per
banks
(000
"banks
omitted) omitted)
cent)

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North C e n t r a l
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
i
P a c i f i c Coast

1
3
S
2
21
50
S3
S6

1

UNITED STATES

67.O
79.2
59-0
90.7
54.8

45.4

187
1,885
2,757
332
366
3,288
1,802
17,167
7,787
10,321+
20,397
17,449 1
7,418
J 1 i 2,1*91 j 1.542

267

$

279
2,381
4,671

$68,1+89

$

$34,034

1

State
Claims
(exclus i v e of
offsets)
(000
omitted)

banks(2)
Payments R a t i o
of p a y (exclus i v e of ments t o
offsets)
claims
(000
(per
cent)
omitted)

30
13
139

1,612
843
5,677
1,1K>5
1^,987

$ 1,612
791
3,891
l,06l

99

9,577

100.0
93.8
68.5
75.5
43.3
49.6
55.5
58.1
73.7
58.3

4

$

6,493

50.6
42.5
6l.9

,

524
128
-30

81,120
16,914
23,674

4,752
• 45,008
9,832
17,451

^.7

988

$155,809

$90,891

( 1 ) Banks suspendiiig d u r i ng 1921-:L93O whicla h a d heei1 compl. e t e l y l i q u i d a t e d a t t h e
time the schedules were prepared for the Committee, with the exception of 1^2
State banks for which information as to claims and payments is not available.
The great majority of these liquidated banks suspended during the early part of
the period under study.
(2) Guaranty fund payments are included.

Considerable differences are shown by a study of results for individual States and geographic districts.

In Table kj the average percentages

of claims received by depositors in completely liquidated national and State
banks are shown by geographic divisions.

It is evident from this table that

depositors in the areas which have had the heaviest failures have, as a rule,
realized the smallest percentage of their claims upon liquidation. Depositors in the Southeastern, Southwestern, Western Grain, and Rocky Mountain
States have, on the whole, suffered larger losses proportionately than those
in other areas. Within each geographic division, however, there are appreciable differences among the several States, as shown in Tables XXV and




- 97 -

XXVI of the appendix, presenting data " y Statesb

Leaving out of considera-

tion those States in which the number of banks that have been completely
liquidated is inadequate to give a fair indication of what more inclusive
data might show, the proportion of claims realized by depositors of State
banksf exclusive of offsets, ranges from a low of 27.8 per cent in North
Dakota, 32,0 per cent in Arkansas, and 35»1 Pe** cent in Montana to 66.1 per
cent in Colorado, 72.9 Ver

cent

in

Washington, 82.7 VeT

cent in

Tennessee,

SU.3 per cent in Texas, and 100 per cent in Nebraska.
The Nebraska banks which were reported to the Committee as having
been completely liquidated all failed during 1921~1923f when the Depositors1
Guaranty Fund was still in operation. For a period of years the depositors
in suspended Nebraska banks were paid in fall, the difference between the
amount realized from a bankls assets and the liabilities assumed being paid
out of the Depositors1 Guaranty Fund.

In later years, however, as bank

failures increased, the Guaranty Fund was inadequate to pay all deposit
claims. By 1930 a deficit of about $20,000,000 is reported to have accumulated
and the Guaranty Fund law was repealed early in that year.

The deficit at

that time was greater than the total capital stock of all active State banks
in the State.
In seven other States the operation of State guaranty deposit funds
increased during a limited period the returns which depositors in State banks
received.

These guaranty funds were responsible in part for the fact that

depositors in the liquidated State banks received a higher percentage of
their claims than those in national banks, as shown in Table U7. The majority
of the banks included in that table suspended during the early part of the




- 98 ~

period under study, while several of the guaranty funds were still in operas
tion. After the guaranty funds "became inoperative, however, the depositors
of many hanks which had contributed heavily to the maintenance of these funds
received no benefits therefrom,
Oklahoma passed a guaranty law in 1907; Kansas, Nebraska, and
Texas in 1909; Mississippi in 191*+; South Dakota in 1915; and North Dakota
and Washington in 1917• I n B^x

of these States, all except Kansas and Wash-

ington, membership in the guaranty system was compulsory upon all State banks,
and in these six States taken together more than 5»000 banks were included in
the systems, with deposits in 1925 of $900,000,000,
In all of these States it was the intention that the guaranty funds
should be built up and maintained by initial, annual, and special assessments
on the banks»

Increasing bank failures after 1920, however, disrupted all

of the systems, leaving in all cases substantial deficiencies in the guaranty
funds. These deficiencies ranged from three or four million dollars to over
thirty million dollars, according to a statement of the Comptroller of the
Currency to the Subcommittee of the Committee on Banking and Currency of
the House of Representatives. (1)
In Washington the guaranty fund was inoperative after 1921, and ..
.
the Oklahoma law, after an experience of 15 years, was repealed in 1923•
The laws in the other six States were either repealed or became inoperative
in the period I927-I93O.
Perhaps a more important factor in the differences between national
and State bank payments, as shown in Table ^7, is that the data for completely
liquidated State banks are not strictly comparable with those for national
banks.

Claims of preferred and secured creditors and the payments thereon

(1) U. S. Congress, 72nd, 1st Session, Hearings on H. R. (102^1) H 3 6 2 .




- 99 ~

were not segregated from the claims of unsecured depositors in the case of
some State hanks•

This fact would tend to improve the showing of State

banks, since a higher percentage is paid on the claims of secured and preferred creditors*

In some States, Idaho and Oregon, for example, the deposi-

tors are preferred creditors. This increases the depositors1 share of dividends because their claims take precedence over other claims. Furthermore
the data for l*+2 completely liquidated State banks were too fragmentary to
be included in the tabulations. While there is no definite proof that depositors in these banks received a low percentage of claims, many of the 1^2
omitted cases were in States in which the payments received by depositors
were well below the average for all completely liquidated State banks*
The figures for national and State banks may be compared for each
State in Tables XXV and XXVI of the appendix.

In most of the States and in

some of the geographic divisions the number of cases of completely liquidated
banks is so small that such comparisons are practically meaningless.

In some

of the States where suspensions have been heaviest and where comparisons can
be made, the national banks show a higher percentage of claims realized than
State banks. These include Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wyoming, For
the majority of States and for the country as a whole, however, the State
banks have shown somewhat better liquidating results.
Losses by Size of Banks. - The distribution of reopened, taken-over,
and completely liquidated banks according to size, as presented in Table hS,
shows that depositors in banks with over $1,000,000 of loans and investments
realized a higher percentage of claims than depositors in smaller banks. In
banks having less than $1,000,000 of loans and investments, however, size




~ 100 ~

has little relation to the percentage of claims paid, for hanks with less
than $150,000 of loans and investments paid approximately the same percentage of claims as those with from $500,000 to $1,000,000 of loans and investments*
Table kS ~ Distribution of Reopened, Taken~over, and Completely Liquidated
National and State Banks According to Per Cent of Claims Realized by
Unsecured Depositors and by Size of Loans and Investments(l)
Size group
l o a n s and
investments
Under $150,000
150,000 - 500,000
500,000 - 1,000,000
1,000,000 and over
Total

Number of banks which p a i d d e p o s i t o r s
( e x c l u s i v e of o f f s e t s )
0 ^ - 1 9 $ 20#-39£ iJO#-59# 6052-7956 SO$~99# 100^5 T o t a l
115
115
21
8

11s
124
26

259

3^
J£

124
149
42
21

364

_£

144
171

336

75
69
11
12

167

464 1,040
484 1,112
109 243
66 12S
1,123 2,523

P e r c e n t <3f banks which pjl i d d e p o s i t o r s
1e x c l u s i v e of ofjf s e t s )
'
11.1
10.3
S.6
6.2

li.U
11.2
10.7
4.7

13.8
15.4
14.0
11.7

11.9

7.2
6.2

17.3
16.4

4.5

10.3

Under $150,000
150,000 - 500,000
500,000 - 1,000,000

10.9

14.4

13.3

6.6

1,000,000 and over
Total

44.6 1100.0
43.5 100.0
44.9 100.0
1
5 1 . 6 1100.0

44.5

100.0

(1) Banks suspending during 1921-1930 which had been reopened, takenover, or liquidated at the time the suspension schedules were prepared for the Conanittee during the last half of 1930 and the first
half of 1931> excluding 211 banks for which information is not
available as to the percentage of claims realized by depositors.

Table 1+9 gives the average percentage of claims realized by
depositors in completely liquidated banks distributed by the size of
towns in which the banks were located.




- 101 -

Table 49 - Average Per Gent of Claims Realized "by Unsecured Depositors
in 1,255 Completely Liquidated National and State Banks,
"by Size of Town(l)

Population
of town
Under 1,000
1,000 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 25,000
25,000 and over
Total

785
342
40

37
1,255

Claims
allowed
(exclusive
of offsets)
(000 omitted)

Payments
(exclusive
of offsets)
(000 omitted)

Average
per cent
of claims
realized by
depositors

$ 72,654
72,004
13,210
24,032

$ 35,609
37,450
7,083
16,270

49.0
52.0

J+2^28

Number of
banks
completely
liquidated

28,513

([LI

$224,29S

$124,925

55.7

53.6
67.7

(1) Those banks suspending during 1921-1930 which had been completely liquidated at the time the schedules of information were prepared for the
Committee during the latter half of 1930 and the first half of 1931,
with the exception of lte State banks for which infoimation as to
claims and payments is not available.
Completely liquidated banks which closed during the later part
of the period 1921~193°> paid a higher percentage of depositors1 claims
than those which closed during the early part of the period, as is shown
by Table $0.

This situation may be explained in part by the fact that

only a few of the banks which failed in recent years have been fully liq~
uidated. These presumably were the banks \#iose affairs were least involved and therefore most likely to pay a relatively high percentage of
depositors1 claims.

In the case of national banks, moreover, they were

institutions in which the expenses of liquidation were comparatively low
in proportion to total resources at the time of suspension.




(See Table 52)•

~ 102 -

Table 50 ~ Claims Realized " y Unsecured Depositors in Completely Liquidated
b
National and State Banks, by Year of Suspension(l)
State "banks
Payments
Batio
Claims
Ratio
(exclusive
of pay- Num- (exclu: of payof offsets
ment s( 2) ber sive of and payments
ments
to claims
offsets) from guar- to claims
of
(per
(000
(per
anty funds)
"banks
cent)
cent)
omitted) (000 omitted)

National "banks

Year
of
suspension

Claims
(excluNumber sive of
offsets)
of
(000
banks
omitted)

Payments
(exclusive of
offsets)
(000
omitted)

33
11
5
2
2

$9,297
6,857
11,874
20,757
10,582
6,358
1,168
492
218
886

$ 3,262
40^6
2,787
4,265 35.9
51.3
10,644
58.5
6,194
71.6
4,551
61.0
712
507 103.0
226 103.7
US 100.0

128
103
154
164
123
186
90
31
9

$ 31,687
17,497
22,025
23,304
21,794
27,128
8,348
3,^26
570

$19,107
7,536
10,869
10,557
10,985
15,958
5,677
2,176
532

60.3
43.1
^9.3
^5.3
50.4
58.8
68.0
63.5
93.3

267

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930

$68,489

$34,034

49.7

988

$155,809

$83,397

53.5

25
23
54

P
45

Total

( 1 ) Banks suspending during 1921-1930 which had "been completely liquidated at
the time the schedules of information were prepared for the Committee, with
the exception of lH2 State banks for which information as to claims and
payments is not available.
(2) Including interest.

The banks which suspended in the early twenties were apparently
heavy borrowers, as shown in Table 51, and a substantial part of their
better assets had been pledged to secured creditors.




- 103 -

Table 51 - Borrowings of Completely Liquidated Banks(l)

Year of
suspension

n a t i o n a l banks
Total
Capital
borrowSFumber
funds (2)
ings
of
(000
(000
banks
omitted)
omitted)

2
2

$ 1,730
2,036
2,918
4,785
2,760
1,682
36O
277
141
215

$ 4,384
4,140
6,144
8JS8
3,^32
1,137
360
176
57
207

267

1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930

$16,904

$28,825

25
%
67
45
33
11

5

Total

Borrow^
ings per
$100 "of
capital
funds
253.4
203.3
210.6
183.7
124.3

State banks
Total
Capital '
Number
borrowfunds(2)
of
ings
(000
banks
(000
omitted)
omitted)
128
103
154
164
123
186
90
31

Borrowings per
$100 of
capital
funds

9

$11,553
5,711
6,270
7,727
4,661
5,775
1,447
607
85

153.2
125.7
123.6
122.5
86.0
74.0
57.1
65.I
40.5

988

67.6
100.0
63.5

$ 7,5^
4,542
5,071
6,310
5,419
7,805
2,536
932
210
$40,367

$43,836

108.6

4o.4

( 1 ) Banks suspending during 1921-1931170.5 had "been completely liquidated at
which
the time the schedules of information were prepared for the Committee, with
the exception of 1^2 State "banks for which information as to claims and
payments is not available.
( 2 ) Capital stock, surplus, and undivided profits.

Table 52 shows for completely liquidated national hanks the disposition of total collections in expenses of liquidation, payments to unsecured creditors, to secured and preferred creditors, and to shareholders*
The relatively high borrowings of the banks suspending during the early
part of the period 1921-1930

were accompanied by payments of a relatively

large part of collections to secured and preferred creditors.




~ 10l+ ~

Table 52 ~ Disposition of Total Collections in 267 Completely
Liquidated National Banks, by Year of Suspension
1

Tear
of
Numsus- i ber
penof
s i o n "baiKs

Total
collections
(000
emitted)

1921
25
1922
23
1923
5>4
1924
67
1925
^5
1926 | 33
1927
11
1928
5 i
2 !
1929
1930 | 2

$ S,291
7,315
11,081
22,486
10,893

T o t a l 267

_J

Payments from c o l l e c t ions
P e r c e n t a g e payments
! To secured1 To u n from col l e c t i o n s
For exsecured
and
To
p e n s e s p r e f e r r e d d e p o s i t share- For e x - To
To u n 01
c r e d - ! creditors h o l d - p e n s e s secured s e c u r e d To
aid. p r e - d e p o s i t shareliqui- i t o r s ( l ) (excluers
of
dation
s i v e of (000
ferred
(estiliquicred- hold(000
mated)
o f f s e t s ) omit- dation creders
itors
(000
(000
ted)
omititors
ted) omitted) omitted)
$ 4,2*1-3
3,848
5,716
10,051

972

786
680
1,097
1,780
9U0
500
113
38
10
1

579
154
97
85

$ 3,262
2,787
4,265
10,644
6,194
4,551
712
507
226
886

$70,144

$5,9^5

$30,136

$34,034

6,657

l,4i6

700

333

$

3,759
l,6ok

.

_
~

$3

11
•-»
2
12
1
-

9-5
9.3
9-9
7.9
8.6
7.5
8.0
(2)
(2)

51.2
52.6
51.6

44.7
34.5

24.1
40.9
(2)
(2)

(11 ___1
$29

8.5
43.0
—_____ L _-,_._. .

39.3

38.1
38.5
^7.3
56.9
68.4
50.3
(2)
(2)
(2)

0.1
_
0.8
(2)
(2)

G_l

48.5

(1) Payments to secured and preferred creditors estimated to be the difference
between collections and other payments,
( 2 ) The percentages are omitted because the figures for these few cases which
were quickly liquidated are not representative of the collections, costs,
and payments of all banks suspending during these three years.
Banks in Process of Liquidation
The great majority of banks suspending during the period covered
by this study were still in process of liquidation when the data regarding
losses were compiled, and the final results were not known. No adequate
basis exists, therefore, for computing losses in these banks*

Whether the

losses will average higher in those banks suspending in recent years is a
matter on which the Committee has no statistical evidence.
The total deposits of the 506 national banks suspending during
1921-1930 a a l still in process of liquidation at the time the schedules
_c




~ 105 -

were prepared amounted to $37^t 639*000-

I* will he recalled that in the

case of the hanks completely liquidated the claims of unsecured depositors
amounted to about SO per cent of total deposits, and dividends averaged
about 50 per cent of these claims.
The deposits of State banks failing during 1921-1930 and still
in process of liquidation amounted to $lf297*175f000.

In the case of

completely liquidated State banks the claims of unsecured depositors
amounted to about 86 per cent of deposits, and dividend payments on these
claims averaged about 53*5 P e r cent.




CHAPTER VI
LOSSES TO STOCKHOLDERS OF SUSPENDED BAMS

I n view of the heavy l o s s e s s u s t a i n e d by d e p o s i t o r s of suspended
b a n k s , i t i s obvious t h a t s t o c k h o l d e r s l o s t the b u l k of t h e i r e q u i t i e s r e p r e s e n t e d by c a p i t a l f u n d s .

B e s i d e s , they were s u b j e c t to a s s e s s m e n t s , b o t h

p r i o r to and a f t e r the time of s u s p e n s i o n .

Payments to s t o c k h o l d e r s of com-

p l e t e l y l i q u i d a t e d n a t i o n a l banks were n e g l i g i b l e , and though f i g u r e s a r e not
a v a i l a b l e , i t i s p r o b a b l e t h a t the same was t r u e of completely l i q u i d a t e d
S t a t e b a n k s , and w i l l a l s o be t r u e of banks s t i l l i n p r o c e s s of

liquidation.

F i g u r e s a r e not a v a i l a b l e r e g a r d i n g the amount of c a p i t a l funds remaining
i n reopened and t a k e n - o v e r b a n k s .

On t h e o t h e r hand, t h e c o l l e c t i o n s from

s t o c k h o l d e r s p r i o r to s u s p e n s i o n a r e probably u n d e r s t a t e d i n many of t h e
suspension schedules.

The b e s t e s t i m a t e , t h e r e f o r e , of t o t a l l o s s e s t o s t o c k -

h o l d e r s i s t h a t o b t a i n e d by adding c o l l e c t i o n s from a s s e s s m e n t s t o r e p o r t e d
c a p i t a l funds a t the time of s u s p e n s i o n .

Losses to S t o c k h o l d e r s of N a t i o n a l Banks
The c a p i t a l s t o c k of the 927 n a t i o n a l banks suspending d u r i n g 19211930 a g g r e g a t e d $67,027f000 and the t o t a l r e p o r t e d c a p i t a l funds,

including

c a p i t a l s t o c k , s u r p l u s , and u n d i v i d e d p r o f i t s , approximated $93*^00,000.
F i g u r e s f o r each g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n are g i v e n i n Table 53 > a n ( i f or
i n Table XXIX of the a p p e n d i x .

each S t a t e

R e c e i v e r s of the 267 n a t i o n a l banks which had

b e e n completely l i q u i d a t e d a t the time the s u s p e n s i o n s c h e d u l e s were p r e p a r e d
f o r the Committee




r e t u r n e d to the s t o c k h o l d e r s only $32,000 i n cash and

- 10b -

- 107 -

about $^90,000 in uncollected assets. The stockholders therefore lost practically their entire capital funds*
Table 53 - Capital Funds and Assessments on Stockholders
Prior to Suspension of National Banks Suspending
during 1921-1930

Geographic
division

Number
of
banks

k
29
7S
25
110
155
3U6

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North C e n t r a l
S o u t h e r n Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Hocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast

-3S

UNITED STATES

927

Total
leported
Capital c a p i t a l
Assessments
assessments
stock
per $100 of
funds
"before
(000
capital
suspension
omitted) (000
stock
omitted) (000 omitted)

$

4oo

2,150
5, His
6,335
11,770
10,1+09
17,895
8,900
3.750
$67,027

Prior to suspension

$

75S
4,894
7,592
10,201
is,o4i
12,973
22,644
11,721

$

116

64o
795
2,451
5,629
3,337
6,%3
2,322

l.oto
$93,364

$22,883

29.0
29.8
1U.7
3S.7
48.3
32.1
36.3
26.I
27.7
34.1

stockholders of these banks were assessed

$22,383,000, according to information reported on the suspension schedules.
It is not known how much of these assessments were collected; but it is
probably safe to assume that most of them were collected in full*

If this

assumption is correct, the collections from stockholders prior to suspension
averaged about 3U per cent of the capital stock,'1)
With respect to assessments after suspension, a fairly dependable
indication of the percentage collected can be gained from completely liquidated banks, for both assessments and collections therefrom are known for
( i ) The history of assessments tells only a part of the story, because heavy
losses have been taken by directors buying at book value worthless or
questionable assets. Furthermore large amounts of such assets have been
transferred to affiliated companies organized or used for that purpose#




- 10S -

these banks.

Assessments a f t e r s u s p e n s i o n on s t o c k h o l d e r s of the 267 com-

p l e t e l y l i q u i d a t e d n a t i o n a l banks amounted t o $13,100,000, of which $6,056,000
was c o l l e c t e d .

The c a p i t a l s t o c k of t h e s e banks was $13>39^>000 and t h e r e -

f o r e t h e c o l l e c t i o n s from a s s e s s m e n t s amounted to about U5 p e r c e n t of the
c a p i t a l stock.

The f i g u r e s f o r g e o g r a p h i c d i v i s i o n s a r e shown i n Table 5^

and f o r S t a t e s i n Table XXXI of the a p p e n d i x .

Table 54 - Assessments on S t o c k h o l d e r s A f t e r Suspension and
C o l l e c t i o n s Therefrom i n Completely L i q u i d a t e d N a t i o n a l
Banks Which Suspended d u r i n g I92I-I93O

Geographic
division

Collections
CollecC a p i t a l Assessments
from
J P e r cent
Number
tions per
stock
after
| a s s e s s m e n t s of a s s e s s $100 of
of
.(000
suspension
after
ments c o l capital
banks
o m i t t e d ) (000 o m i t t e d )
lected
suspension
stock
(000 o m i t t e d )

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
|
Eocky Mountain
!
P a c i f i c Coast
UNITED STATES

1

$

31
8 !
2
21
50
S3
86

50
200
500

55
1,180

3,134
3,335

13

4,225
715

267

$13,394

1-

$

50
200
^75
55
1,095
3,000
3,285
4,225

D&
$13,100

$

4l
83
291
37
564

1,27^
1,627
1,721

4i8
$6,056

82.0

i

Ul.5
61.3
67.3
51.5
42.5
49.5
4o.7
58.5
46.2

82.0

41.5
58.2
67.3
47.s
4o.7
; 48.8
| 4o.7
1 58.5
45.2

I f i t i s assumed t h a t the r a t i o of c o l l e c t i o n s to c a p i t a l s t o c k
f o r a l l suspended n a t i o n a l banks was about t h e same a s f o r those t h a t had
been completely l i q u i d a t e d , i . e . , H5 p e r c e n t , the t o t a l c o l l e c t i o n s from
s t o c k h o l d e r s of a l l n a t i o n a l banks suspending during 1921-1930 would a g g r e g a t e about $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 .




- 109 -

Here again significant contrasts are found "between different sections of the country, "but on the whole it appears that the percentage of
assessments collected varies more widely from State to State than from section to section*

For those States in which five or more "banks are included,

the average percentage of assessments collected ranges from 29•5 P^r cent in
Oklahoma to 75»^ per cent in California, with the majority of States below
50 per cent.
Losses to Stockholders of State Banks
The capital stock of the 5»77S State "banks which suspended during
1921-1930 amounted to $262,3^0,000 and the total reported capital funds to
about $378,000,000. Figures for each geographic region are given in Table
55 > and for each State in Table XXX of the appendix. While a part of these
funds may not have been lost, especially in reopened and taken-over banks,
the percentage saved is probably small.
Table 55 - Capital Funds of State Banks Suspending during 1921-1930




"

•

•'•"

"

"

•

Geographic
fl"i v i Q"i ATI

Number
of
banks

l4

Capital
stock
(000 o m t t e d )

$ 2,964
4i,S96
30,964
13,464

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast

*3
553
250
1,124
656
2,619
1*13

io4

54,221
23,788
70,956
15,232
8,855

UNITED STATES

5,776

$262,340

Total
c a p i t a l funds
(000 omitted)
$

5,423

73,699
42,218
19,271
82,437
32,216
92,860
8,997 (1 >
10,485
$377,606

(1) For 85 banks in Montana only capital stock is included.

- 110 -

Data regarding, assessments on shareholders of State "banks prior
to suspension are much less satisfactory than for national "banks. In a
number of States where the assessments appear to have been reported in full
they averaged around 30 *° 35 per cent of the capital stock, or nearly the
same as in the case of national banks. On the other hand, many of the States
with the heaviest suspensions reported on the schedule practically no assessments before suspension, and several other States reported but little. It
is probable, however, that in many instances stockholders contributed
heavily in efforts to save their banks. There have doubtless been numerous,
cases where important directors or stockholders have taken doubtful assets
out of the bank!s holdings without reporting the transaction.
Data relative to assessments after suspension are much nore complete, but even here liberal allowance should be made for omissions. Total
assessments after suspension on stockholders of the State banks which reported this information amounted to $102,500,000. This, however, is a
considerable understatement as is evident from the fact that data were not
received from 1,39& > ° r one-fourth, of the banks.
With respect to the percentages of assessments collected, the
same difficulties of incomplete information are encountered.

The effort

has been made, however, to sunmarize the data by States so far as possible.
For this purpose it was necessary to include only those banks regarding
which reports were made both as to assessments after suspension and as to
the collections from those assessments. This information, which is available for completely liquidated banks only, is presented by geographic regions in Table 5& and by States in Table XXXI of the appendix.

Of the

1,130 State banks that had been completely liquidated only 529 reported




- Ill -

both the assessments after suspension and the collections therefrom. These
amounts aggregated $1^,223,000 and $6,23^,000 respectively, the collections
averaging about kh per cent of assessments or 37 per cent of capital stock.
Several States do not have the double liability provision in their banking
laws, and if allowance is made for the suspensions in these States collections would be roughly 10 per cent lower or about 33 per cent of capital
stock, or a total of roughly $85,000,000.

Table 56 - Assessments on Stockholders After Suspension and Collections
Therefrom in Completely Liquidated State Banks(l)
Which Suspended during 1921-1930

Geographic
division

Capital
Assessments
Number stock
after
of
suspension
(000
banks omitted) (000 omitted)
1

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast

_4o

100
380
105
105
4,l43
2,020
^.393
1,469
3,944

UNITED STATES

529

$16,659

4
3
5
121
S5
225
45

$

$

Collections
Collecfrom
Per cent
t i o n s per
assessments of a s s e s s after
ments c o l - $100 of
capital
suspension
lected
stock
(OOP omitted)
— X. ^ _ 1 - >

11.8

50
105
SO
3,684
1,536
4,221
1,395
3,152

$ ~H5
75
22
1,297
454
1,976
826
1,539

90.0
71.4
27.5
35.2
29.5
46.8
59.2
48.8

71.4
21.0
31.3
22.5
45.0
56.2
39.0

$14,223

$6,234

43.8

37.4

(1) Includes only those banks for which the Committee has records of both assessments after suspension and collections from those assessments. This is 601
banks fewer than the number completely liquidated.

It is not likely that assessments in the case of reopened and
taken-over banks were as high as in those that were liquidated.

On the

other hand, it is likely that a higher percentage of such assessments was
collected.

While there are no data on which to base an estimate of col-

lections from these banks, there is no reason to suppose that they would




- 112 ~

average materially lower than in the case of liquidated banks*

At l e a s t

the difference would not s u b s t a n t i a l l y affect the estimate given above, which
i s based upon a l l suspended State banks regardless of t h e i r d i s p o s i t i o n .
Total Losses to Stockholders of Suspended Banks, 19 21-19 "U
A summary of the estimated losses to stockholders from bank suspensions during the eleven year period 1921-1931 i s given in Table 57 •

For

the ten years from 1921 to 1930 the figure i s obtained by t o t a l i n g the losses
estimated in the preceding paragraphs.

These losses amounted to $1*46,300,000

in national banks, and to $Hb2,600,000^' in State banks, or a t o t a l of
about $609,000,000.
Table 57 - Summary of Estimated Losses to Stockholders As a Result of National
and State Bank Suspensions during the Eleven Years 1921-1931
National
banks
(000 omitted)

State
banks
(000 omitted)

National and
State banks
(000 omitted)

1921-19^0 suspensions
$377,600

22,900

(2)
85,000

115,000

iU6,300

H62,600

608,900

108,500

suspension

$ 93>l±00

"50,000

Capital funds of suspended banks
Collections from stockholders p r i o r
to suspension
Collections from stockholders a f t e r

281,300^2)

389,S00(2)

$471,000
22,900^2)

Total 1921-1930
197)1 suspensions
Losses computed on same b a s i s
$254,300

$7^3,900

$998,700

Total 1921-1931
(2) Tor State banks data regarding collections from stockholders prior to suspension are not available. In the case of a few States which appeared to
report this information in full the assessments prior to suspension averaged
30 or 35 per cent of capital stock. For national banks the assessments
prior to suspension averaged 3^ P e r cent of capital stock.

\1) This figure does not include assessments prior to suspension.




- 113 -

The c a p i t a l stock of national banks suspending in 193^ amounted
to $^9,300,000, and t h a t of State banks to $156,300,000,

If i t i s assumed

t h a t stockholders' losses in that year bear the same r a t i o to c a p i t a l stock
as during the preceding decade, the amount would be $102,500,000 for national
banks and $281,300,000 for State banks.
The t o t a l losses to stockholders during the eleven years, theref o r e , probably approximate $1,000,000,000, about one-fourth of t h i s occurring
in n a t i o n a l banks and about three-fourths in State banks.




CHAPTER VII

SUSPENSIONS OF PRIVATE BANKSU)

During the eleven year period 1921-1931 there were 339 recorded
suspensions of private "banks. This is about 5 P^r

cen-t

of the number of

national and State "banks which suspended during the same period.

In contrast

to these, the actual number of private hank failures during recent years has
not "been much above the level of earlier years. There has "been a great reduction in the number of private "banks during the past twenty-five years, however,
as a result of consolidations, conversions to national and State hanks, and
the passage in many States of laws regulating or prohibiting private hanks.
In about half of the States private hanks are now prohibited, and in several
others no new private banks may be organized.

Thus despite the small number

of private banks suspending each year, the proportion of those in operation
which have suspended is considerably higher than for national and State banks.
Also the geographic distribution of suspended private banks differs considerably from that of incorporated banks.

Suspensions from 1892 to 1931
Table 58 gives the estimated total number of active private banks,
the number of private banks making reports to the Comptroller of the Currency,
and the number of suspensions, each year from 1892 to 1931*

(1) The meaning of the term "private bank" varies somewhat in the different
States and the Committee has not undertaken a general definition to cover
the banks reported in this category from the various States. As a rule,
however, a private bank is an unincorporated institution which performs
much the same functions as an incorporated commercial bank. The large investment banking houses, many of which are generally understood to have
some commercial business, are not included in the Committee* s figures for
private banks. A digest of State laws relating to private banks or bankers is included in the appendix to the Committeefs report on Changes in
the Number and Size of Banks in the United States.




- llU -

- 115-

Table 58 - Suspensions of Private Banks, 1892-1931

Year

JJumber making f
Suspensions
Estimated
itfum'ber of
per 100
reports to the
number of
active
Comptroller of
susuensions (3)
active pri"banks
vate "banks(l) the Currency(2)

1892
1893
1894
1895
I896 !

1S97
I898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
190U
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919 |
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
192s
1929
1930
1931

4,004
4,031
3,844
3,924
3,810
3,806
3,853
4,168

l,l6l

990
904
!

1,070
824

5,187
5,060

759
758
756
987
916

4,976
5,4l7

1,037
1,173

5,484
5,291
4,823

I

1,028

S54
929

4,947
4,576
4,407
3,669
3,683
3,406
3,213
3,062
2,737
1,968
1,852
1,846
1,817
1,736
1,242
1,157
1,080
1,008

915
860
792
737
685
598
504

l,i4i
1,007
1,497

934
1,116
1,110
1,016
1,064
1,036
i,oi4

;

936

!
1

1,091
1,017

799
70S
673
6o4
560
523
495
467
404
391
36l
284

1
i

36
194
21
25
4i
47
33
14
16
4l
20
17
50
35
13
20
51
33
12
22
21
15
27
39
12
15
10
1
24

44
23
23
37
39
52
33
19
31
58
80

;
1

0.9
4.8
0.5
0.6
1.1
1.2
0.9
0.3
0.3
0.8
0.4
0.3
0.9
0.7
0.3
0.4
1.1
0.7
0.3
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.9
1.4
0.6
0.8
0.5
0.1
1.4
3.5
2.0
2.1
3.7
4.3
6.0
4.2
2.6
4.5
9.7

1 15.9

(l) The figures are i'or continental Un ited States only' and for most
years they are orlly approximations . Those for 1892 to 1909, inclusive, are tain:sn from the Pahlications of the Nait ional Monetary




- 116 -

The estimates of active private "banks prior to 1921 have been compiled from "bankers1 directories, and suspensions for the same period from
Bradstreet!s reports. For the years from 1921 to 1931* inclusive, these
figares for "both active private "banks and suspensions were collected " y the
b
Committee on Branch, Group, and Chain Banking with the cooperation of the
Federal reserve hanks and State banking departments.

Due to the fact that

Commission, Vol, VII, p. 250, and are based on lists in Homanst Banters*
Almanac» otherwise entitled, The Bankers Directory; Homans * and Sharp &,
Alleman!s Edition. The figares given in this directory are stated to irn
elude "bankers and brokers at Hew York City, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia
and Baltimore"; but in most years the figares given by the National Monetary Commission are smaller than those given in the directory, indicating
that an effort was made to omit those doing only a brokerage business.
Figares for the years from 1910 to 19^91 inclusive, are taken from the
Rand McUally Bankers • Directory. The sharp decrease between 1909 and 1910
is apparent rather than real, being due to the fact that after 1910 the
Rand McNally directory listed a smaller number of private banks than
Homans1. Figares for the years from 1920 to 1931> inclusive, were col**
lected by the Committee on Branch, Group, and Chain Banking with the cooperation of the Federal reserve banks and the State banking departments.
The marked decrease from 1920 to 1921 is due primarily to a law prohibiting private banks in Illinois on Janaary 1, 1921.
Figares are as of June J09 or the nearest reporting date. In the
early years, however, no uniform date can be asstimed; and for some of the
recent years have been obtained by averaging year-end figares.
(2) From the annual reports of the Comptroller of the Currency. The annual
variations are due in part to the failure of banks to report every year.
In some States private banks are included in the totals for State banks,
a practice which varies greatly from year to year. In Kansas, for example,
I63 private banks were reported in 1892, I36 in I89U, kl in 1§02, and 32
in 1903; but from 1895 *o 1901, inclusive, figares for private banks were
not given separately, but included among State banks.
(3) Figares for the years from 1892 to 1920 are taken from the annual reports
of the Comptroller of the Currency, being obtained by the comptroller's
office from Bradstreet!s. Figares for IS92 and for the years from 1900 to
1919> inclusive, are for years ending on June 30; those for the years from
189*+ to 1899 a re for years ending on August 31; and that for the year 1893
is for the lU months ending Augast 31. The 1920 figure is for 18 months
ending December 31, 1920. For the years from 1921 to 193°t t h e number of
suspensions was collected by the Committee on Branch, Group, and Chain
Banking with the cooperation of the Federal reserve banks and the State
"banking departments, and are for the calendar year. For 1931 t h e figures
were compiled by the Division of Bank Operations of the Federal Reserve
Board*







- 117 -

CHART 25
SUSPENSIONS OF PRIVATE BANKS, 1692-1931

NUMBER

NUMBER

200

zoo
NUMBER OF SUSPENSIONS

100

100

0
1890

1895

1900

1905

1910

1915

1920

1925

1930

1935

1591

PER HUNDRED

1

15

PER HUNDRED

15
SUSPElsI5I0NS I >ER 100 ACTIVE BANKS

10

10

i

1890

1895

1900

1905

1910

1915

1920

1925

i

1930

i

i

i

1935

Number of suspensions of private banks and the ratio of suspensions to active private banks each year from 1892 to 1931




- 113 -

CHART 26

PER HUNDRED

SUSPENSIONS PER 100 ACTIVE BANKS
NATIONAL,STATE, AND PRIVATE, mi-TO1

13.9/

PER HUNDRED

15

15

10

'—

••^i''

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1926

1929

1930

1931

Number of suspensions of national, state and private banks
per hundred active banks each year, 1921-1931.

10

- 119 -

in many states private "banks are not subject to any supervisory authority,
there are no official figures as to either active banks or suspensions.
There are doubtless certain errors, therefore, in any figures compiled*
The number of suspensions each year, and also the number suspending per hundred active banks, are illustrated in Chart 25*

If these

are compared with corresponding charts for national and State banks, given
in Chapter I, it will be noted that the suspension rate of private banks
follows, in general, a course similar to that of State banks. Since 1921
the rate has been somewhat higher for private than for State banks, with
the exception of one year. This is more clearly shown in Chart 26, comparing the annual suspension rates for national, State, and private banks
during the past eleven years.

Geographic Distribution of Private Bank Suspensions
The location of each private bank that suspended daring 1921-1931
is shown in Chart 27 on a map of the United States, and the number in each
State each year is given in Table 59«

More than half of the suspensions

daring the eleven years were in the North Central and Western Grain States.
The highest suspension rate among the various geographic divisions, however, using the number of active banks on June 30, 1920 as a base, is in
the Southeastern States, the Western Grain, and Southwestern States being
next in order. The figures for each geographic division are given in
Table 60 and illustrated in Chart 28.







- 12Q -

CHART 27

PRIVATE BANK SUSPENSIONS

mi-mi
• )

II

/

J

\ '

' ^^pff

y

J*

il
H

n

'

D

• w . !5ft/

\ l^^T^rI I \ /-_ /
II

\

\ J

""
*

• I

I.

^ ^ >

/ . yS

r •
—

r
J*

Vj^x

V

1

*.Y •-•-*»"•* * I

/^
\

\ •* *
*• /

•;:;. * * 3 K ^ * W *
,~'

1




- 121 -

CHART 26

SUSPENSIONS OF PRIVATE BANKS PER 100 ACTIVE BANKS
PERHUNDRED

BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS

PER HUNDRED

70

70

SOUTH WESTERN SOUTH
NEW
ROCKY SOUTHERN NORTH MIDDLE
EASTERN
GRAIN WESTERN ENGLAND MOUNTAIN MOUNTAIN CENTRAL ATLANTIC

PACIFIC
COAST

Number of suspensions of private banks during 1921-1931
per hundred active banks on June 30, 1920, by geographic
divisions.

- 122 -

Table 59 - Suspensions of Private Banks, 1921-1931. " y States and by Years
b
State

1921 !$&,

1923! 192I 19.25. 11926].19.27. 19.2S.1 1929I 1930 1931 Total
1

Arkansas
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Maryland
Michigan
Missouri
Montana
New York
Ohio
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Texas
Virginia
Wyoming

-

1
2
2

k

-

2
S
-

1
2
2

1

-

-

-

2

-

1
-

1

7

11

3
2
17

u

1

lU

g
1
12

ik
k

-.

-

-

-

1

~

-

1
2
6
2

3

2

7

3

22

2

~

-

2

—

-

-

2

2

k

-

2
1
3

4
1

k
5

-

«.

1

-

11

g

5

k

—

—

—

—

10
1

23 i 23

37

—

39

—

-

5
2M

-

-

5

2
15

2
ll*

-

-

-

3

3
-

3
2

3
10

3
-

4! 9

-

-

1

3 ! 10

1
2

!

—

1

152 1 33

-

-

^
-

2

20

l
2

9
17

-

2
2

1

-

kk

3

-

1

-

Total

n_

mm

i

1

i

—

x

9

1

1

so

New England
Middle Atlantic
North Central
Southern Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
Pacific Coast
Total

Number of
active banks
June 30, 1920

23
301, x
53l(D
7
5*
ISO
236
16

Number of
suspensions
1921-1931

9
53
127
2
36
80
126

2

6
—m

i,350(D

^39

2
7
gl
2
5
25

18
21

h

^39

I

Table 60 ~ Number of Suspensions of Private Banks during 1921-1931 Ver
Active Banks on June 30, 1920, by Geographic Divisions
Geographic,
division

118

7S
- 1 "
2
— 1 —I
"*
"
5S

31

~

2
9
1
35
2g

!

Hundred

Suspensions
per 100
active "banks
39-1
17.6
23.9
28.6
66.7

l*.U
53.^
37-5
-

32.5

(l) Excluding 386 active banks in Illinois, where private banks
were prohibited after January 1, 1921.

The States in which the largest number of suspensions occurred
were Iowa, Michigan, and Texas, suspensions in these three States constituting
63 per cent of the total. The States of Georgia, Missouri, South Dakota,




- 123 and Montana, however, had the highest suspension rates. Figures for each
State are given in Table 6l.
Table 6l - Number of Suspensions of Private Banks during 1921-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 30, 1920, by States
State
Alabama
Arkansas
Colorado
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Maryland
Michigan
Missouri
Montana
New JerseyNew Mexico
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
South Dakota
Texas
Virginia
looming
Total

Number"of
Number of
Suspensions
active hanks
suspensions i
per 100
June 30. 1920(1) 1921-1931
active hanks
S

m»

k

2

5

-

23
2
kl
Ijk
223

u

28
213

3
8
Ik
1
1U5
2

1
i

9
l

35

B5.k

28
118
2

16.1
52.9
50.0
25.0
38.0

7
81
2

66.7

62.5

5
-

25

—

,

-

im

2

~

n4

21

1,350(1)

-

39.1
50.0

IS

1
6
176
7
2

50.0

—

17.2
-

12.5
—

18.U
—

k

66.7

7S
2
1

1&.3
28.6
50,0

439

32.5

(1) Omitting Illinois where private banks were prohibited
after January 1, 1921.
Size of Suspending Private Banks
The majority of private banks in operation and also the majority
of those suspending are small banks. It is not possible, however, to compute the suspension rate for banks by size, because the figures on capital and loans and investments are available for only three-fourths of the




- 124 -

active hanks on June 30, 1920, and for only one-fourth of the private hanks
suspending during 1921-1931. Of the 116 suspending during the eleven years
for which these figures are given, nearly half had loans and investments of
less than $150,000 and ahout 90 P e r c e n ^ ^ ^ loans and investments of less
than $500,000. Nearly 80 per cent of these same hanks had a capital of not
more than $25,000, and * 5 per cent had only $10,000 or less*
+

The number and

percentage of the ll6 in the various size groups, hoth in respect to loans
and investments and in respect to oapital, are given in Table 62 and illustrated in Chart 29•
Table 62 - Suspensions of Private Banks during 1921-1931* t>7 Size of
Loans and Investments and by Size of Capital
Per cent of
total
Loans and
1
Loans
investNum- ments
Numand
ber i n v e s t ber
(000
ments
omitted)
Suspensions

Size group
loans and
investments
(000 omitted)
Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 75O
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2,000 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
50,000 and over
Total

56
$ *+,533 Us.3
22
4,206 IS.9
25 !
9,050 21.5
6
3,588 5-2
k
3,290 3.5
1
1,292 0.9
2
^,531 1.7

116

lU.9
13.8
29-7
11.7
10.8
4.2
14.9

i $30,490 100.0 I 100.0

Suspensions
Size group
capital
(000 omitted)

Under $10
10
10 - 25
25
2 5 - 50
50
50 - 100
100
100 - 200
200 - 500
500 - 1,000
1,000 - 5,000

Per cent of
total

Capital
Num- (000
Num- Capital
ber emitted) ber

7 $ 22 6.0
U50 38.8
U5
503 25.9
301
10
6
7
3
5
1
l
l

250
206
350
179
500
155
200
500

8.5!
5.2
6.0
2.6
U-3
0.9
0.9
0.9

0.7
13.6
15.2
7.5
6.2
10.5
5-U
15.1
4.7
6.0
15.1

5,000 and over
Total

116

$3,315 100.0

1

100.0

(1) Includes only 116 out of U39 private banks suspending during I92I-I93I; no information regarding capital and loans and investments is available for the
remainder*







- 125 -

CHART 29

SUSPENSIONS OF 116 PRIVATE BANKS, mi-1931
BY SIZE OF LOANS AND INVESTMENTS

NUMBER

NUMBER

60

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

LOANS ANO
INVESTMENTS
THOUSANDS

OF DOLLARS

UNDER

150

150

250

500

750

1,000

TO

TO

TO

TO

TO

TO

250

500

750

1,000

2,000

5,000

2J0OO

This olassifioation of suspended private banks by size of
loans and investments includes only 116 out of 439 suspensions during 1921-1931.

- 126 Size of Communities Whero Suspensions Occurred
More data are available regarding the size of towns and cities in
which private banks are located and in which they suspended than in regard to
the size of the banks. Table 63 gives by size of town the number of active
banks on June 30, 1920, the number of suspensions during 1921-1931* and the
number of suspensions per hundred active banks. The figures in respect to
active banks are not complete, since the size of the communities in which 10
per cent of the banks were located could not be determined.

This tends to

raise the computed suspension rates for the towns and cities of various size
by about 11 per cent above the true rates. Though there is considerable difference between the suspension rates in the various community groups, there
does not seem to be any indication that private banks have suffered to a
greater extent in small communities than in large communities.

The lowest

suspension rate, as computed, is 11.1 per cent in cities between 25,000 and
50,000, and the highest is in cities between 50>000 and 100,000 population;
while in the three size groups below 2,500 population, the suspension rate
is practically equal to that for all size groups.
Table 63 - Number of Suspensions of Private Banks during 1921-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 30, 1920, by Size of Town
Population
of town
Under 500
500 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,500
2,500 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 25,000
25,000 - 50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000 and over

Number of
active "banks
June 30, 1920(1)

50^

1W
k2

3^
15
27
23
151

Number of
Suspensions
suspensions
per 100
1921-1931 ! active "banks

180

¥

35-7
37-7
37.5

21

50.0

9
7
3

26.5

12

_59_

kS.l
11.1
52.2
33.1

Total
1,213c1)
i
^39
36.7
(l) Omitting 386 active banks in Illinois, where private banks were
prohibited after January 1, 1921, and 137 active banks on June 30*
1920, the location of which could not be determined. The latter
omission tends to raise the suspensions per hundred active banks
substantially above the true figures.




CHAPTER VIII

SUMMARY

The foregoing compilations and analyses present in detail the
available statistical data relative to bank suspensions aad to losses incurred
by bank depositors and bank proprietors. Some of the principal points
brought out by this material are as follows:
(1)

The number of bank suspensions was abnormally high during

the period 1921-1929 in spite of the industrial prosperity which prevailed
during most of that period. Daring the depression years of 1930 and 1931t
moreover, the number ro&e sharply to an annual rate nearly three times the
average of the preceding nine years. The suspensions of national and State
banks during the eleven years amounted to nearly 9>000f

or

about 3* per

cent of the number of banks operating in 1920.
(2) During the first nine years of the period, from 1921 to
1929, suspensions were concentrated in the agricultural sections of the
country, 70 VeT
States.

cent of them occurring in twelve predominantly agricultural

During 1930 a^cL 1931 suspensions increased in industrial districts,

but those in agricultural regions were not reduced, the number in the
twelve predominantly agricultural States being larger in 193^ "ft1331 * n

an

previous year. In 1930 and 1931 suspensions in the New England, Middle
Atlantic, and North Central States were more than twice as numerous as
during the previous nine years.




~ 127 -

7

- 128 -

(3) Failures were most numerous, as a rule, in those regions
where the number of banks showed the greatest increase prior to 1920 and
where the population per hank was smallest in 1920. In the Southeastern,
Southwestern, and Rocky Mountain States, for example, the number of banks
increased over 300 per cent from 1900 to 1920, and the ratios of suspensions
during 1921-1931 to active banks in 1920 were 55, 30, and 39. respectively.
In the Western Grain States where the suspension rate was Hi, the increase
in the number of banks from 1900 to 1920 was only 13S per cent, but the
population per bank in 1920 was lower there than in any other geographic
division.

In New England the number of banks actually declined from 1900

to 1920 and in the Middle Atlantic States the increase was only 7-5 P e r
cent. These regions had the highest population per bank in 1920 and the
lowest suspension rates during 1921-1931
(k)

of a

H the geographic divisions.

Nearly Uo per cent of the banks suspending during the eleven

years 1921-1931 k 8 ^ loans and investments of less than $150,000 and SO per
cent had loans and investments of less than $500,000. In the smallest size
group (loans and investments of less than $150,000) the number of suspensions during 1921-1931 w a s about 5^ P e r hundred active banks in 1920, and
was progressively smaller for banks in the larger size groups.
The higher rate of suspensions among the smaller banks was due in
part to the fact that the great majority of suspensions during the eleven
years 1921-1931 occurred in the agricultural regions where the typical bank
is relatively small in size. With the analysis limited to particular regions,
the contrast in the suspension rates between the banks in the various size
groups was not always so striking.
sections of the East.




This is especially true in the industrial

- 129 -

(5) The majority of suspensions has "been among "banks located
in small towns, 75 per cent of the banks suspending during the eleven years
"being located in towns of less than 2,500 inhabitants, and 35 per

cent

in

towns of under 500 inhabitants. In towns of less than 500 population the
suspensions during the eleven years amounted to 33 per hundred active banks
in 1920, while among towns and cities of over 2,500 the corresponding rate
was 23.
(6)

State banks had a much higher suspension rate in the eleven

years than national banks• Eighty-five per cent of the suspensions were
of State banks and 15 per cent of national banks. State bank suspensions
amounted to 36 for every hundred active State banks in 1920 while the ratio
for national banks was 17 suspensions per hundred active banks. The ratio
of suspension for member State banks was higher than for national banks but
lower than for all State banks.
(7) About 20 per cent of the banks suspending during the ten
years 1921-1930 were reopened or taken over within a relatively short time
after suspension, and a slightly higher percentage had been completely liquidated at the time the suspension schedules were prepared for the Committee
in 1930.
(S) Unsecured depositors of banks completely liquidated during
the ten year period 1921-1930 received on an average somewhat more than half
of their claims, while secured and preferred creditors, received a much higher
proportion.
(9)

Collections from assessments after suspension on stockholders

of banks completely liquidated during the 10 years 1921-1930 averaged roughly




- 130 -

^5 per cent of the assessments. On the "basis of the experience of the
"banks completely liquidated the total losses to stockholders, including
capital stock and other capital funds, as ^ell as assessments, may be
roughly estimated for the eleven years at something over one billion dollars.

This is about t r . e the par value of the capital stock of the susiic

pended banks.







est
- 38& -

APPENDIX

- 132 Table I - Number of Suspensions per Hundred Active Banks
1892-1932(1)

Year

Rational "banks
State "banks(2)
Suraber of
Suspensions
Suspensions
Number of
active tanks Number of per 100 ac- active "banks Number of per 100 acsuspensions tive "banks
suspensions tive banks
June 30
June 30

1S92

3,759

1S93
1894
1895
1896
1897
189s
1899

3,807
3,770
3,715
3,689
3,610
3,581
3,582
3,731

1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932

12

69

0.6l
%

34
28
11
10

M63

5
9

4,532
4,935
5,327
5,664
6,046
6,422
6,817
6,886

22
20
6
12
19
8

7,13s
7,270
7,366
7,467

4

13

O

7,571

5
6
13
15
20
8

7,599
7,699
7,779

2
2

7,518

7,597

8,024
8,150
8,244
8,236
8,080
8,066

7,972
7,790

5
7
52
49
90
122
118
123
91

7,685

57

7,530
7,247

64
161
409
276

6,800

6,145

O.32
1.81
0.92
O.92
O.78
O.31
0.28
0.13
0.22
0.09
0.26
0.41
0.35
0.10
0.19
0.28
0.12
0.08
0.07
0.08
0.17
0.20
0.26
0.11
0.07
0.03
0.03
0.09
0.64
0.59
1.09
1.51
1.46
1.54
1.17
0.74
0.85
2.22
6.01
4.49

32
228

3,773
4,188
4,188
4,369
4,279
4,420
4,486
4,738
5,007
5,651
6,171
6,890
7,970
9,018
10,220
11,469
12,803
13,421
14,348
15,322
16,037
16,841
17,498
17,7^8
18,253
18,710
19,404
19,646

39
51
66
64
19
8
14
15
30
22

53
25
34
58
83
37
40
58
51

75
107

93
32
29

35
59

20,635
21,267
20,789
20,654
20,028
19,573
18,994
18,119
17,440
16,728
15,798
14,323
12,137

136
409
294

i
i
j

533
616
U61
801
545
422
564

1,131
1,804
1 1,140

!

0.85
5.44
0.93
1.17
1.54
1.45
0.42
0.17
0.28
0.27
0.49
0.32
0.66
0.28
0.33
0.51
O.65
0.28
0.28
O.38
0.32
0.45
0.61
0.52
0.18
0.15
0.18
0.30
0.66
l.«*2
1.41
2.58
3-08
2.36
4.22
3-01
2.42

3.37
i 7.16
! 12.60

9-39

v 1 ) In continental United States only. See next page for sources of figures.
(2) Including trust companies and stock savings banks. Private banks and mutual
savings banks are not included.




- 133 -

Sources of Figures in Table 1 o f the Appendix
^ j
Active Banks
Figures for active banks were taken from the annual reports of
the Comptroller of the Currency. All figures are for continental United
States only.
Suspensions 1892-1920
National Banks. - For this period the figures refer to calendar
years and are taken from reports of the Comptroller of the Currency (1920,
Vol. II, pp. 92 ff., and 1921, p. 2U9). These figures refer to bank failures
rather than to bank suspensions, the fomer tenn embracing only those closed
banks for which receivers have been appointed. They are not therefore
strictly comparable with the figures of suspensions given for the years 19211931 for two reasons: first, because the latter include banks which were
closed for a time and resumed operations without the intervention of a receiver; and, second, because in some cases banks may have suspended operations during the latter part of one year while the receivers may not have
been appointed until after the beginning of the following year. During the
nine years from 1921 to 1929 the total number of suspensions exceeded the
number of failures hy 42, or 5*2 P e ^ cent.
State Bonks. - Suspensions of State banks for this period are taksn
in part from the Banking Inquiry of 1925* ch. VIII, and in part from Bradstreets compilations, as given in the annual reports of the Comptroller of
the Currency. The Banking Inquiry of 1925* a private inquiry covering several
phases of banking, was prepared under the supervision of Dr. H. Parker Willis.
The results of the inquiry, which fill several volumes of typewritten material,
have not been published, but one copy was filed with the Senate Committee on
Banking and Currency and another placed in the library of the School of Business, Columbia University. The suspension figures in this inquiry are more
comprehensive than Bradstreet!s figures, and are used as far as available.
They begin, however, at various dates, as early as 1900 in the case of about
a third of the States, but at later tames in the other States. For one State
they are lacking for the entire period. Bradstreet!s reports are thus used
for all States from 1392 to 18991 a*1*1 f o r a varying number of States from
1900 to 1920. The Banking Inquiry figures are for calendar years, while
Bradstreet!s figures from IS92 to 1899 &re for years ending August 31, and
from 1900 to 1920 for years ending June 30. For only a few of the years,
therefore, is the number given in the table precisely accurate for calendar
years.
There are differences also in the inclusiveness of the figures.
Failures of mortgage and investment companies, of mutual savings banks, and
of industrial banks have been excluded in all cases where they could be identified as such, including in Bradstreet!s reports from 1892 to 1899 all failures of savings banks in New England and Wisconsin. Failures of stock savings banks and of trust companies are included. In the Banking Inquiry a
failure is defined as follows:




- 13H -

"A bank failure . • . occurs when the bank is unable
to meet the immediate financial claims of its loan creditors
or depositors necessitating either a temporary or permanent
closing of the institution, or when the institution is closed
by the properly empowered authority in pursuance of law."
This is substantially the definition of bank suspensions used by the Committee
on Branch, Group, and Chain Banking.
Suspensions 1921-1952
Figures for the years from 1921 to 193° for both national and State
banks are for calendar years. They were collected by the Committee on Branch,
Group, and Chain Banking from schedules prepared for the purpose of providing
basic data for a detailed analysis of suspensions during that period and differ but slightly from figures compiled and published for this period by the
Federal Reserve Board. The term suspension as used by the board and by the
Committee includes all banks closed to the public either temporarily or permanently by supervisory authorities or by boards of directors on account of
financial difficulties. The figures do not include banks closed temporarily
under special "moratorium" holidays declared by civil authorities, nor banks
which, without cessation of business, obtained depositors1 agreements for the
waiver or deferment of deposits. There were many of such moratoria during
1932 in some parts of the country, particularly in the North Central States,
but they were not frequent prior to that year. For national bank suspensions
the schedules were prepared in the office of the Comptroller of the Currency,
and for State bank suspensions in the respective State banking departments,
either by the staff of the department or by a representative of the Federal
reserve bank of the district.
For I93I and 1932 the figures were compiled by the Division of
Bank Operations of the Federal Reserve Board, and are comparable with the
figures for the period from 1921 to 1930.




- 135 Table I I - Number of Bank Suspensions by Years and by Geographic D i v i s i o n s
1921-1931
Geographic
division(i)

1921 ! 1922 11923 11924! 1925 1926 1927 1922 1929^ 1930|

1931 T o t a l

N a t i o n a l banks
_
2
1
1
2

—

M

3

1

17

lb

1
«.
4
2
4
20
22
22

_5

_5

_3 _J2 __5_

_a

UNITED STATES

52

49

90

123

13

11

5

l
-

rf
7

1
2
4
2

_-

New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
S o u t h e r n Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast

5
^

46
42

122

—

6
9

10

_2

91

57

64

161

_
l

_

7

25

9

lb

1511

194

3b

140

18

lb

74
7

44
3.

112

r

b

1
_1

15
52

22

l!

0

9
7!

~
1

2
30
13
3,1
34
32
3
_ i

2
1
12

2

1
lj
101
1
12

1

6

b'
24

2

2
221

4:

22

3

25
25

I
4o
84
17
12

114

16
5?
152
195
430
159

51

4o9 1.336

S t a t e banks
New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
S o u t h e r n Mountain
Southeastern
Southwestern
Western Grain
Rocky Mountain
P a c i f i c Coast
UNITED STATES

2

7

13
11

97
73

_
—

2

1

4
23
S
bo
55

1
2b

262
110

13
9
56
57

123

409

2

346
7b

15

7£

64
12

294

533 6l6

3

2b
12
SO

«.
1

3?

24
209

b2
45
24b 44o
34

5.

461

201

1
1

67
hi
77
33 22
3^
29
25 120
36
32
63
250 219 277
15
8
9
16

10

545 422

226
76
252
163
360
22

- 9

496 1,0%
120
370
199 1,323
123 779
609 3,228
45 458

564 1,131 1,204 7,520

N a t i o n a l and S t a t e banks
«.
2
New England
Middle A t l a n t i c
North Central
! i2
12
S o u t h e r n Mountain \
9
Southeastern
! 99 59
Southwestern
71
Western Grain
13U 103
Rocky Mountain
24
65
P a c i f i c Coast
21

I
£ 27

1 4

IP

64
75
290
132

1

3
30
17
81

2
b
22
19

—
2

44
2b
21b

60 1 ?p
79
392 [292 514
112
56
30
12 _1Z
12
12

1

1

—

2 i 10
7
Sb
57 i 75
k
i 2
142
7
95
42
?
294 243 I299
IS
12
9
22 _J2
12

i

2
49
31
24 ! 23b 308
256
521 1,212
29
152
283 241 1,4/b
163 974
197
398
693 :3.c58
617
25
62
12 i
5^ i 19b

fez

U6l 1343 623 732 J579 | 924 °3 D I 479 [_62S [1,292 [2,213 8,916
(1) New England: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Ehode Island,
Connecticut.
Middle Atlantic: New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland,
District of Columbia.
North Central: Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio.
Southern Mountain: West Virginia, Virginia) Kentucky, Tennessee.
Southeastern: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama,
Mississippi.
Southwestern: Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma.
Western Grain: Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska*
Missouri, Kansas.
Eoeky Mountain: Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona,
Utah, Nevada.
Pacific Coast: Washington, Oregon, California.
UNITED STATES




/3C

Table III - Number of 3ank Suspensions by States and by Years
National Banks

[l921 11922 Il923 [l924 1925

States

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Is&J&na
Iowa
!
Kansas
Kentucky
i
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
Hew Hampshire
Ne-v Jersey
..e Mexico
><w

——
——
1
1
—
21 31
11
1

I —

11
7
1
3
—
—

-••»

. , , . . -




.

,

!

51

—

11
2

1

3

4

2
4
—

_—

1
1
1
—

11
3
1
4
1
8
1

Total

1
8
8,
7
—

13
2
1
—

1
1
—
7
1
1
4! 4
4
11 1
——
__
2
4
16
31
—. 1 1
3

2
— i
2
2
3
21
1

1
3

4
3
—
20
4
13
3
3
1

1
4
3
6
4

1

3 1
4!

4 1

37

8j
21 |

4
4 j

—

23
4
28
26
25
1
1
23
23
30
73
23
126
18
8
2

——

—
—
—
—
1
—
7
4
—
1
1
—;

3|
2
1
1
—— ]
— i

2
__.
—

4

8

15

1
17
2

—
13
8

1
9
1

9
1

1
2j
3
2
1| —
2
ll
14
z\
—:
3
81 17
21
—
—
— i
—
—
——
1!
5
2!
4
2|
_..
—

—

—

—1
-

——

49

i

3
—
1
—
1
2
90

14

1 1

1
—

10!

52|

3
5
14
13
8
12
3
8
—
1
16
1
24
14
13
19

1

_i

1)
11

.1

—
1
1
1

—

—!

.in

3

1 71

31
1

—

2\
j
!

1

—[ 1
1

i

2

'

2

—

I

—
'

2

1926 1927 1928 1929]1930 1931
——
7
8
21
2 !

1 1

hex York
> ' : r h Carolina
:•,t
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED SPATES

1
2

..„.

2
2
3

1
12
—
1
1
3

——
3
—
1
——
3

2
1
3
6
2
4

1
1
1
1
1
3

1
12
1
__
9
—
9
—
1

2
—
4
7
——
9
1
3

3
14
1
6
1

4
12
6
——

_~
11
2
8
—
1

2
4
2
8
2
6

3
5
2
2
1
_~
1

3
12
1
7

21 5
2
2

1
10
8
3
6 |
2
—
4
6
42

1
8
2
1
—_
1
4
—

~-.
1
1
5
2
2
_
—
1
3
1
1
——! ——
9
123 117! 123

!

6

——
——

4

—
—

2

1
1

4
3
3
14
1
2
1
5
1

5
13 i
4
30
1
•

—

6
6
18
7

11 1
—
1
——. ' —.
57
64 | 161 409
91
1
1

5
6
18
71
15
25
64
40
—
1
19
21
28
37
83
33
73
12
61
1
31
67

9
92
4
1
13
1
18
27
16
11
1,336

- 137 Table III - Number of Bank Suspensions by States and by Years (Continued)
State Banks

192l[ 19221 1923I 192*1 j 19251 1926I 1-3271 19281 19291 1930 1 1931 1 T o t a l

State
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D i s t . of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New J e r s e y
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
N o r t h Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Ehode I s l a n d
South C a r o l i n a
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATES




l

2

6
5

5

2

8

6
6

3
7

3
7

2
1

1
+
x

3

2
1
lk\

3
7

l
IS

2

6

l
8

2
10

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

6
18

11

1
11

d
62
15

7
*
H
6|
7!

3

11
—
2
1
18
1
+
16
15
25
j

1
2k

k
3

-

9

33|
3
5!

20
2
_
-

2
—

12
-

7

16

11 i S5
—
1
36
31
6
—
—
1
26
15

2

9
3 .1
33 I .19
71 l
1
+

5
5

n

l
-

l
2
—

1 H09

l
-

l
1+2
2
21
60
15
-

l

1

5
*
+
6

1
15
10
11
22
23
1
—

6
2
lk

35

27

5

9
3
l?
11

k\

29U

39
3
8
2
2

5

11
7

1
+

3

— 1+2
2U 105

29
IS

3

*
H
6
7
53!

3

5

28

11

N

68
13!

5!

19

6

15

k\
89
1+5

7

2
-

**!
—
-

10
—
—

1

2

1

^7
3

3?

79
6
56
6

1
+

1+1
28
13
-

20
1

11
11

8
—1
12 i

66 1
3

25

4i

3

l
23
92

5

^3
7

1
11
2

3
l

36
51

7

lk
l

23
1

3
7

2

7

10

2

533 616

k
3

1+61

22
_
_

!2
1+8
x

5
3
5

l
—
1+2
101
12
26
-

3

-

27
21

1
—

3
53
6
^5

l
22
—
-

1
1

1

A

54
x

iu

26
19
23
11
1
—

n

23
1

2

19

—j

-

1

-

12
20
10
1
—
22
25

V

25
2

*
+

^
1
+
10
lk
_3 1 1
5^5

3

10
ll+
8
-

248
30
89
13
1

lk\

227

1

365

201
S3

1+22
2l+6

ll\

580
281
92
60
1
+
19
17
101

121

1
+
1
+
1

35

28
1
105

lk\
57

1
-

33
5
3

2
l
—
^

l
l
1
2

17 !
29
8
20
1

k
~~

x
3
x

*
+

3

12

^
16
2

23

9

7

—
1
2

2

15
lk
85
88
1+8
110
8
101
2
1
22
—
28 i

k

56
97
9

1I+9

71
-

71

8

2
1
+

x

5

11 1

6
3
1

k2
2
1
+
S3

51
20
16
2

52

l

1+0
27

7

*9

3
6

21

22
—

31
l

1+22

87

M
U8

5

30

>3
*
5

1
_
- 1 —i
12
5

33

28

27

5

3

371 39
35 20
8
7
k
3!

2

801

12
11

l
-1
lk\
-

1

1+71

151
1+93

157
l+Sl

5

2
25
1+1

36

>9
*

238

53

1+69
11+6

23

86
22
10
86
29
60
27
1+6
8
31
16
?S
1+1

—

3

53.

1,80*+

p,580

9

23
52
26

17

3

1
18
2

5

1 56U 11,131

237
1+8
113
2
255

^53
117
23U
27
1
S7
62
^
131+

- 138 Table III - Number of Bank: Suspensions by States and by Years (Continued)
National and State Banks
19211 1922 1923I 19241 1925 1926J 19271 1928J 1929I 1930 1 19311 Total

State
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATES




,

2

7
5
3

2
8

6

-

-

-1

6
63

6

9
-

-

A
12

18

22

2

-

8

12
1

3
7

2
18

5
3
6

5
3
7
3
15

1

1

3
29
7

1

20
11

7 19
0
7
120
69
19 46
6
7|

45

36

2k\

31

8

7
3

2

1

k\

93
7
58

b5!

16

8
25

221

77
17 i

kk

ki
21

21

-;

1

_

-

-

2

-

5

i4

23

10

-

-

-

lg

-

9 16
3 11
1
3
2
^3 i 3
71 3

1
-

75
3
50
3

1
+
1
26

39
6

-

l
11

99
U
53
5

-

2
-

—

20

3
6

-

1
-

—

27
17
31

l

-

579 \S2k

73S
1

2
^

4
5
15

1
-

-

1
1
2

39
3^
i

125
78
70

M
3°

20
2

13
12

9
~

2

9
7

5
6

lk
11

7

l 1

U79

im

M

^95
269
706
299

1
2

6

IS
19|
99|

21
2

101

4
24
23
119
542
166

59
103
11

46
-

56
122
11
109
2
2

62

518
221
521

5

38

^

1

3

15

^

id
23a
9^

2

5

6
4

33

250
388
82

-

23
22
2

-

n

2

100

10
21
1

1
1
22

x

38
276
56
114
14

10

37

3

a
~l

110

27
7

11

5

la

21

1

38

8 j IS

53

-

5
93
59

1

636

—

1
52 152
l
1

-

2k

12
1

l

25

-

2
4
k
12
2
6
l
2
2
k
2
12 10 11 11
__9_ -33 _ 3 _ 1

J

2

45

1
4i

20

4
kS\ 31
5
8
32 23

21 1 28
5 12 j
2
7

3
5

623

~
—
-

6
46

63 113
7 x3
29 33

i

25

11 j 20
2
2

461 3^3

—
—

16 12 ik
32 1 59 37
1
7 j ik

44 112
6
3

5

—

20

50
k

16 j 11

-

3
30

1

l

5

2
18
22

55
3
4i

-

12
1

7
29
24
58

—

IS 15
5, 11

-

65

1

1
1
46!
2

1
g
13

—

35
26

_
—
—

5

134
7
k\
5
3

3

18

3 3
9

12

31

—
-

l

31
24

1
-

1

—
-

-

6
4

3

lL

14
1

1

5
-

1
27

U

1

4

2

37

-1
.

10

2
1

1

"
"
—

k\

—

7
3
14

-

2

6

-

j

16
6
4

16

11

29

16
5
l4

J

2
1

A4

3

20
2

22'

k\
1

3 105
8
k\

S 10
i
4
M 12
k\
7
6
28 72
9!

9
4

j

10

•2
6
64
275
552
179

52
63
66
105
2k
l
U

1 128

-

27
55
29
31
3

-

3^
3
31
76

7

9

2
20

37

3

22

10
2k
—

57

-

4s
3

310

60
174
3

2S6
520
126

326
31
2
100
80
101
150
64

628 p.292 2.213 8,916

- 133 Table IV - Number of Suspensions d\iring 1S21-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 30, 1920

State

Number
of
active
banks,
June

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri"
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hano shire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina 1
North Dakota i
Ohio
Oklahoma
i
Oregon
1
Pennsylvania i
Ehode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota j
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
|
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

101
20
83
303
141
66
19
15
53
93
81
480
254
358
249
134
38
S3
92
159
112
331
30
136
145
188
10
55
212
47
491
8?
181
370
348
90
851
17
32
136
98
556
28
49
165
37
122
151
47

State
National1
banks
"banks
Number] SuspenNumber Suspen-\ Number 1
of
of
of
sua- • sions active sussions
per
per
pen"banks, pensions hundred
sions hundred, June
1921- active
1921- active
"banks l&0> 1951
banks
1931

23
4
28
26
25
1
1
—

23
23
30

73 '

23
126
18
8
2

—'

5
5
18
71
15
25
64
40

22.8
20.0
33.7

8.6

17.7

1.5
5.3
—

43.4
24.7
37.0
15.2

9.1
35.2

7.2
6.0
5.3
—

5.4
3.8

16.1
21.5
50.0
18.4
44.1
21.3

-

-

1
19
21
28
37
83
33
73
12
61
1
31
67
9
92
4
1
13
18
27
16
11

1.8
9.0
44.7

5.7

42.5
45.9

8.9

21.0
13.3

7.2
5.9

37.8
49.3

9.2

15.5
14.3

2.0
7.9

20.7
22.1
10.6
23.4

246]
67
399
417
255
73
20
30
205
529
141

87|
34
248
30
89

13 |

1

—

227
365
52
1,403
422
625!
246
1,3541 580
1,094. 281
451
92
229;
60
551
4
1441
19
112
17
541 101
1,177
471
306
1,511

273

1,008

ill

157
481
5
2
25
41
36
238
46S
146
237
48
113
2
255
453

23
25
154
75
326
491
717
521
611
185
559
16
371
552
448 ! 117
992 I 234
104 ; 27
39
1
335
87
303
62
216
74
817 134
53
111

35.4
50.7
62.2

7.2

34.9
17.8

5.0
*
"

National and State
oanks
Number 1
Numberl Suspenof
of
active sussions
per
banks, penJune
sions hundred
1921- active
banks
1951

jjkofr)
347|

no]

87
482
720
396
139
39
45

38
276
56
114
14
2

258|
110.7
53.0
722
36.9
222
30.1
1,883
39.4 i
879
42.8
1,712
25.7
1,343
20.4
585
26.2
267

7.3

13.2
15.2
18.7
40.0
49.3
32.6
56.5
47.7
21.7
.3.0
16.2
54.7
11.0
48.5
65.4
23.5
38.8
25.9
20.2
12.5
68.7
82.1
26.1
23.6
26.0

2.6
26.0
20.5
34.3
15.4
47.7

113
236
271
653

1,508

336

1,647

423

1,196

33
80
365
122
817
578
898
991
959
275
1,410

33
453
688
546

1,548

132
38 1
500
390
338
968
158

— i

250
388
32
495
269
706
299
100
62
4
24
23
119
542
166
518
221
521
5
3
44 |
62
64
275
552
179
310
60
174
3
236
520
126
326
31

31.7
43.7
57.3

7.8

28.8
10.1

5.1
—

96.9
53.7
56.9
26.3
30.6
41.2
22.3
17.1
23.2

3.4

10.2

8.5

18.2
35.9
49.4
31.5
52.2
43.6
15.2

3.8
12.0
50.8

7.8

47.6
61.5
18.1
32.3
21.8
12.3

9.1

63.1
75.6
23.1
21.1
23.5

2

2.3

100
80
101
150
64

20.0
20.5
29.9
15.5
40.5

TJNITEP STAT5S 8*024
i 16^7 |2Q*S61 I7»580 1 56.3 128«885 i 8*9161 SQt9
( 1 ) The 1920 figures for active State banks include 386 banks in Illinois which
were classed as private banks on June 30 of that year, but which had nearly
all been converted to State banks by the end of the year on account of a
law prohibiting the operation of private banks after January 1, 1921.
In some of the Spates the active State banks classified as desired
for this study were not readily available as of June 30, 1920, and therefore were compiled as of different dates in that year. The figures for
these States and the totals, therefore, differ somewhat from those appearing in the comptroller's reports and other sources as of that daxe.




- ii+o Table V ~ Number of Suspensions of National and State Banks during 1921-1931
per Hundred Active Banks on June 30, 1920
States
(arranged according to size
of the suspension ratio)
District of Columbia
Vermont
Maine
New Hampshire
Delaware
New York
California
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
Maryland
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Nevada
Wisconsin
Kentucky
Ohio
Michigan
Virginia
Washington
Texas
Oregon
Kansas
Tennessee
Louisiana
Utah
Illinois
Colorado
West Virginia
Indiana
Missouri
Alabama
Oklahoma
Minnesota
Idaho
Wyoming
Iowa
Nebraska
Arizona
North Carolina
Mississippi
New Mexico
Montana
Georgia
Arkansas
North Dakota
South Carolina
South Dakota
Florida
UNITED STATES
(1) See footnote, p, 139*




Suspensions
per 100
active banks

Number of
[ Number of
active banks
suspensions
1921-19^1
June Tp.-iqaoU)

^5
ss

••
*

2
u

11s
80

56
23
3

33

14

139
3&

It

1,410

174
!
!

653

500
390
It 548

275
l,3}{|

267

132
1,883

39b
338
879

1.647

3^7
959

1,508
222
158
1.712
1,196

87
578
336
122

U23
722
US2
898

i$3
688
258
28,885^)

3.8
5.1

2
64

S17
720
271

90S
585
991

#

3

39

!

5

150
100
179
119
100

go

326
60

299
12b
62
31
495

114
101

269
51S

110
310
542
82
64
706
521
2 3S
JP166

62
221
388
276
552
286
520
250
S.916

^

1

7.8
7.8
8.5

j

9a

!

10.1
10.2
12.0
12.3
15.2
15.5
17.1
18.1
18.2
20.0
20.5
21.1
21.8
22.3
23.I
23.2
23.5
26.3
28.2
29.9
30.6
31.5
31.7
32.3
35.9

;

4o'.5
41.2
,43.6
^3-7
47.6
49. 4
50.8
52.2
53-7
57.3
61.5
63.I
75.6

3Ll
30.9

TABLE" VI -LdAttS AND IHWSTMm
National Banks
(In thousands of d o l l a r s )
States

1 1921

1922

I1923

1 —
—
Alabama
191
US2
L3H6
Arizona
Arkansas
822
—
—
285
California
1,599 I 2,119
Colorado
229
795
—
Connecticut
—
—
—
i -" —
Delaware
—
D i s t r i c t of Columbia.
—
—
—
—
Florida
1
—
Georgia
3U2
i
197
—
I daho
6,122 |
388 ! 2,738
Illinois
—
1
—
Indiana
lU8
1,713 i
I owa
202
721
1,3^5
Kansas
—
83H
Kentucky
—
67H
—
Louisiana
!
81
—
Maine
—
—
—
Maryland
952
Massachusetts
—
29H
—
Michigan
—
—
—
Minnesota
—
1.75H
—
Mississippi
76U
296
—
Missouri
201
!
—
Montana
1,932 1 3.99S 1 8,906
Nebraska
1,221|
2,590
755
Nevada
—
New Hampshire
—
—
New J e r s e y
805
—
New Mexico
522
990
1,955;
New York
Hoi
385




1

1

1

1

1 192U

799

1925
251
—
--8

1926

365

—
—
1,219 i
—
1
*+2T [ 2,78Jfo
—
1,769 | 7 , 6 i 7 1,002
1,897
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
I
629 i
^75
i,U68
—
U.16U
!
2,56U ! 2,119
101
76H
207 1,176
—
797
—
3.789 10,395 17,066
1,830
—
H61
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
U,9U7
9,^57 5,573
—
—
75
2ll!
003 1
—
6 , 7 0 6 ' 1,78^1
93 1
832! 1,150
M79
—
—
—
—
—
—
1.36H
9,55^
739

1927
——
230
1,790

1928
—
—

1929
1.H20
—
H95
801
H76

1930

1931

3,733
3.9H5
—
H70
7,319 1 3,603
H j 8 H 1 9.H01
1.33H
153

!
679
I
-.1
—
—
1,830 I
623 11,908 13,185
82H i 1,328
11,953 ;
1,112 i
1,006
—
175
682
2.92H l H . i i o
1,718
2 050
382
2,186
633
9.H1H
3,188 13,915
2,701
HHi
1,166
517
H.950
—
—
—
38,380
—
—
—
1,952
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
766
—
287
1.675
H.602
21?
2.H79
567
23H
—
':
6,669!
381!
767!
385
1.383
162
238
H9
3 , 0 7 8 | 1,2501
797! 1.383
—
—
722
—

3,219
L865
1,591
58,817
11,081|
7.37H!
1.956 1
9.2H1
—
—
H.012
HH.836
19,253
5,030
16,909
6,615

559
7,353

H36
28,851
859

H7H| 23,Hoo|

Total
IOJOH
2,298
13,688
23,987
13,375
1,897
679
31,869
22,lHl
17,916
80,398
18,990
70,110
12,155
H8.295
2,033
—
_

H.96H
H5.130
21,981
3H.622
2H.9H7
10,606
2H.H27
2H.688
—
H36
30,378
15.2HH
25.399

TABLE VI-LOANS AND IHVESMSKTS OE SUSPENDED BANKS BY STATES AND BY YBAHS (CONTINUED)
National Banks
(In thousands of dollars)
States
North Carolina,
North Dakota..
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania..
Rhode Island...
South Carolina.
South Dakota..
Tennessee
,
Texas
Utah..'.
Vermont
Virginia
Washington.
West Virginia..
Wisconsin
;7yoming

United States




1921

553
,809

1922

2,300
670
5,084

,4o6
594

573
8

1,999
988
1,828

1923

192U

1,358
1.5*6

1,517

M3U

3,198

5,003
7,865
64s

^,317
391
-&**

2,402
2,506

3.313

8,971
206
8,712
332

5,209
251
3.878

mr
4,846

35
il4
354

#3*
81,-893

1.097
523
516

1,294
9,380

31.U8U ^5.219

1926

3,242
1,736
1,295
653
1,182
i+,396
785
2,1*52

1927
,3^3
,690
,1*8

.373
.752
,130

1928
1,631*
2,608
1,19U
6U1
2,622

1929
1,927
1,287
1,020
182
1,283

375
5U8

1,535
1,781
651*

2,51*6

1,977

1,01*1*

730

2,882

1.350
1,532

27

31.898

1925

I

675
332
220

49 ^

372
178

2U3
726

4q,6ii

38,826

267
8,862
1,025

1930

n

193

13,808 14,550
1,1*50 2,521
6,186 28,633
322
2,183
1,338
i*,6i*6 129,1*96

3.3*+9

1,752

3,93^
1,008
2,914
13,681*
26,259
11,121+
173
1,138
9,062
8U6
5,7^0
5,780 16,710
7,7^
193

Total

39.^37
22,801
46,220
32,280

8,017
150,071
1,535
' 16,515
28,320

17,589
68,255
3,818
1,138
12,63s
18,844
24,653
10,985
9,73^

45,i48 185,014 523.158 1,146,207

Table VI - Loans and Investments of Suspended Banks by States and by Years (Continued)

State
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D i s t . of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York




1921
1,3^5
k,Zlk
1,299
^77
1,087
2,335
-

3,29s
il+,i+i3
6,773
6,01+3
1+18

6,173
3,256
388
2,125
-

976
11+.370
-

5,984
2,949
3,402
5,660
7,025
-

1,623
6,988

State Banks
(in thousands of dollars)
1928
1926
1927
1925

1922

1923

1921+

2,355
8U9
883
883

ll+2
1,834
2,513
I89
4,378

708 [
3S6
1,632 , 3,101+
1,335
3,378
678
257
606
1,658

-

-

1,126
4,646
1,420
1,1+12
3,980
1,627
5,969
512
1,91+9

3,627
1,851
1,797
3,350
1,627
10,208
11,280
665
697
507

1+13

3,553
1,677
5,111
1+.972
5,678
122
1+96
"
"

-

9ll+
7,936
192
6,785
13,365
3,289

—

—
-

2I+0

17,561
7,194
631 : 1,535
6,912
12,057
7,283
1,012
1,581+
l+,263

-

-

1,475

4,799

3.61+1

2,261+

—

—

**

1930

3,212 1
70 4,588 • 8,100
105 i
3,373
4,152 ! 3 , 5 1 0 : 2,063 4 i , i S 9
1,310
4,197 : 5,241
362 !
784
590
783
~
14,382
257

|

220

j

1 1 1 +

! 3,555
2,01+6
: 1,596
—

3I+5
30,653
4,263 21,671
5,155
570
697 ' 1.386
3,689 j 2,1+12
5,067
762
6l6
i }^V
33,165 24,546 36,1+00
6,666
3,577 i 2,977
972
558 1,934
1+91+
539 3,683
1+83

i 1929 .

-

24i
16,830
2,090
14,757
517
4,311
—
-

—

~

33,165
1,392
600
11,1+28

20,173
i+,i+29
156
3,924
5,615
10,556
3,317
2,116
630

10,1+1+8

12,321
5,600
1,700
1,073
728

-

-

1,053
9,1+30
2,606
6,257
107
4.051

7,288
1,685
3,853
2l+
4,521+
165

-

!

-

66
-

—
-

«

—

4 3 , 3 6 4 30,595
2,149
5,449
323
59
16,451 54,6so
7,672 36,112
4,600 ! 11,780
1,666 ! 6,371
627 32,970
«r
3,954
-

1,225

-

5,os4

! 5,3i4

1,588
2,885
7,818 ; 2,515
1,671 20,672
2,754 i 19,169
2,079
9,H6
24,155
3,133
_

-

5,74l

2,580

103

S,o4o

1931
8,10g
2,65S"
11,359
3,249
2,425
19,189
—

6,127

6,64s

921
158,272
53,587
88,076
5,361
13,140
5.53S
2,573
24,879
60,878
105,640
21,289
14,799
19,836
893
23,172
179
647
50,809

—

238,120

86,153

Total
26,879
19,389
75,202
18,527
15,152
35,906
257
—

172,473
72,066
14,702
266,788
122,206
239,452
56,540
55,582
20,682
3,808
32,164
80,562
113,457
107,39s
50,507
100,893
35,912
91,168
3,599
2,122
59,130
12,992
339,301

Table VI - Loans and Investments of Suspended Banks by States and by Years (Continued)

State.

1921

1922

North C a r o l i n a
Horth Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode I s l a n d
South C a r o l i n a
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
TTyoming

2,553
7,603
201

1,615
2,476

6,639

9,^99

2,1+27
3,006

5,^91

i

1923

,

S t a t e Banks
Ln t h o u s a n d s of d o l l a r s )
JL
1924
1926
1927
1925

1928

1 1929

1930
53,211

19,093
8,049
263,781

Total

1931

i

-

-

5,591
433
1,951
14,991
1,447

6639
2,474
34l
4,650
144

-

-

-

635

255
912

925
20,676
423
-

1.068

UNITED STATES 172,547




2,766
10,419
717
6,195
481
621

2,071
15,200
229
5,660
267
5,126
896
7,301
12,435
1,009
1,653
892

-

1,321
572
314

135.

-

4,093
33,886
2,494
2,193

97
—

328
1,444
306
752
5,012

-

1,929
1.310

3,128
2,756
3,166
6,242
166
2,309
2,208
1,464
330;
1,272
4,985
555
167
8,273 14,166
n,94l 22,706
2,227
•4,344
4,735
3,957
~
160
~

-

IP
647

-

635
2,? ' 3
"1

359

217
2,2^5
288

3,729
3,993
4,313
5,061
1,647
1,119

QOS
3,H7
4,284

~

-

-

6,571
893
3,186
4,892

2,750
1,561
2,366
536

8,039

4,4il
2,926
4,908
294

54o
513
87

676

-

-

213
4,290
2,143
2,574
183

2,4s4
755
.2,i4o
804

—

6,545
3,050
3,072
4,232
2,212
7,710

-

1,212
1,066
6,530
5,261

411

4,714
24,843
2,565
195
6?.. 458
4,b43
10,034
19,214
2,044
1,393
i,oi4
6,623
208
5,180
9,572
—

98,375

68,029
303,915
47,826
3,763
22,483
7,5SS
216,891
301,558
1,063
78,974
10,90s
10,744
111,51s
4,210
44,268
67,483
22,924
14,205
9,102
1,614
24,992
11,583
6,125 . 37,504
45,224
27,07s:
46,291
20,647
10,577
1,249

86,599 139,090 168,859 116,991 216,810 161,009 105,035 193,541 769,484 1,440,150 3,570,115
:

4="
4^

Table VI - Loans and Investments of Suspended Banks by States and by Years (Continued)
National and State banks
(in thousands of dollars)

State
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D i s t , of Col.
Plorida
Georgia
Idaho
Jilinois
.Indiana
Jlowa
Kansas
Kentucky
""Louisiana
Maine
"Maryland
Massachusetts
. Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
Hew Mexico
New York
Horth Carolina




1921
1,3^5
4,696
1,299
2,07b
1,316
2,335
-

3.289
14,755
12,S95
6,o43
55S
7.51S
3,256
3SS
2,125
-

976
i4,370
-

5,984
3.713
3,402
7.592
9,615
-

2,145

7,373
1 2,553

1922

| 1323

-

333
3,180

2,355
1,671
2'?1?
3,002
474
1,678 ; 4.37S
-

,
|

1,126
4,646
1,808
l,4l2
5,693
2,3^8
5,969
512
2,030
-

952

-

1924

1925

1926

1927

1,507
1,632
1,335
67s
2,375
1,837

637
3,104
3.378
685
9,275

585
114
4,774
4,326
2,598

3,212
105
4,332
3,100
362

—

I 3.627

3^5
! 2,048 6,623
1 4,535 3.261
i 3.350 4,453
1,627
762
!lo.Uio 36,954
12,114
5,407
972
1.339
697
494
507
-

-

_
—

294
9l4
483
9,690 22,508
3.553
192
1,973
631
6,986 12,057
5,111
8,970 22,271 13.989
4,044
5.863
6,899
_
122
4l3

-

805
1,436
401
3,915

-

6,754
-.

3,588

-

-

—

24o
16,651
1,535
7,123
2,796
5.095
-

739

2,766

—

3.628
-

4,n4

_

1930

1931

6,008

11.833
3.373
4s,508
10,025
937
14,382

12,053
3.12S
14,962
12,650
3.759
19,189

—

—

43,780
6,777
59
68,790
3S.298
25,695
11,321
71,350
5,906

3.346
8,513
2,512
217,089
64,668
95,450
7,317
22,381
5,538
2,573
28,891
105,714
124,893
26,319
31,708
26,451
1.452
30,525
179
1,083
79,660
S59
109,553
33,643

-

3,510
-

530

2,55s
4,998
1,259
-

,-

_

1,819
14,032
2,606
6,638
156
7,129

_
—
-

—
—

1929

673

241
22,403
2,165
15,420
610
5,461

3.128

70
-

-

629 31,12s 34,995
8,427 21,671
1,392
1,712
3.505
671
2,619
6,243 12,110
1,413 12,49s
1,377
3^.941 53.465 21,735
b,o4i
7,127
2,977
558
1,700
1,934
539 3,683 1.073
—
728

1,475

13.195

—

1328

66

6,072

20,736
16,382
331
5,702
6,248
13.257
4,983
2,116
630
_
-

257
—

55,272
2,973
1,329
19,375
8,054
7,788
2,183
627
-

1,225
_

1,875
9,767
8,031
1,685
1,905
4,620
3,139
24
162
5,774 24,952
165
3.133
_
-

2,542

-

-

5,084
5,31^
4,560
3,082
27,341
20,552
2,317
10,499
-

5,74l
3.302
103
8,040 238,594
8,472 67,019

Total
37,583
21,687
88,290
42,514
28,527
37,803
936
—

204,342
94,207
32,618
347,186
141,196
309,562
68,695
103,877
22,715
3,808
37,128
125,692
135,438
142,020
75,454
111,499
60,339
115,856
3,593
2,558
83,508
28,236
364,700
137,812

Table VI - Loans and Investments of Suspended Banks by States and by Years (Continued)
National and State banks
(in thousands of d o l l a r s )
State

1921

1922

N o r t h Dakota
3.146
8,156
!
201
Ohio
Oklahoma
9,^8
14.5S3
Oregon
5,491
3>S33
Pennsylvania
3,600
—
Ehode I s l a n d
South C a r o l i n a
8,63s
5.591
South Dakota
1,006
3,462
Tennessee
341
1,951
Texas
6,47S
23,732
Utah
1,447
3,457
—
—
Vermont
Virginia
1,252
635
Washington
21,111
1,381
West V i r g i n i a
1+23
572
Wisconsin
314
Wyoming
j 1,06s
735

1924

. 1923
19,234
5.232
13.525
915
5,126
S96
7,301
14,837
1,009
4,159
392
-

:

1 1925

13.617
717
10,512
4si
1,012

!

—

4,737
42,857
2,700
10,905
429
—

659
912
—

2,043
1,664

1,678
2,976
306
2,o46
14,392

1926

1927

\

4,714 9 , 4 8 4
5,683 i
166
4 , o 4 5 ! 6,761:
1 7,417
2,759 1 7,434
!
631 1,272 , 3,399
1,208 10,249
1 8,863
—
1
167
8,4i4
i i , 1 6 0 15,34s
16,7S7 27,102
4,959
2,926
2,227
5,129
7,617
6,4o9
6,885
294
160
-

~

375

1,744
1,15S
2,629
261

1,034
332
217
2,485
28S|

_

213
4,290
2,515
2,752
183

1928
5,725 1
5,47s !
1,181
3.135
87
1,535
3,352
1,547
3,186

5,936
676
-

2,484

755
2,333
1,530
~

1929

1 1930

4,337

6,164
4,092 3 L 0 2 9
4,4i4
4,748
2,212
195
s . 9 9 3 66,104
-

5,296
i,56i
2,366
1,266
—

1,479
9,928

7,555

5,261
471

—

7,992
11,042
32,898
13,168
1.393
2,152
7,136
1,054
10,960
9,765
—

1931

Total

90,830
io,570
2 9 2 , 4 l 4 i 350,135
80,106
4,085
30,500
8,936
451,629
346,387
—
2,593
12,660
95,489
14,678
139,833
7,124
61,857
135,738
49.1S3
18,023
9,275
2,152
20,645
37,630
56,348
11,865
43,733
69,877
57,276
23,391
20,311
1.249

UNITED STA'i'SS 204,445 11s,083 184,309 250,291 181,444 266,774 210,620 143,S6l 233,689i 954,498 1,963,303 4,716,322




Table VII - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931
per $100 of Loans and Investments of Active Banks on June 30, 1920
(000 omitted from dollar amounts)
1
S t a t e banks
N a t i o n a l and S t a t e banks
Hatio of
E a t i o of
Hatio of
Loans and Loans and
Loans and Loans and
Loans and Loans and
loans and ]
l o a n s and
loans and
investments
investinvestments
investinvestinvestments'
investments investments
investments
! of a c t i v e
ments of
of a c t i v e ! ments of
of a c t i v e
ments of of suspended
of suspended:
of suspended
"banks,
suspended
suspended
banks,
banks,
suspended
to a c t i v e
to a c t i v e
to a c t i v e
banks,
June 30,
banks,
June 301
banks,
June 3 0 ,
banks
banks
banks
1921-1931
1921-1931 ( p e r c e n t )
1920(1)
1920
1921-1931 ( p e r c e n t )
192011)
(per c e n t )
N a t i o n a l banks

State

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D i s t . of Col.
F l a m da
Georgia
Tdaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
KentuckyLouisiana
lifeline
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada



$

!
1
i

121,708 $
26,175
68,138
799,950
19^.777
190,176
13,673
84,851
96,362
153,26s
72,363
1,271,400
329,416
331+,661
130,366
198,626
113,773
95,933
225,357
801,201
331,6^6
508,249
44,309
533,135
88,350
220,53s
13,964

10,704
2,298
13,638
23,937
13.375
1,397
679

8.3
8.8
20.1
3.0
6.9
1.0

31,369
22,141
17,916
30,398
13,990
70,110
12,155
1*8,295

33.1
14.0
24.8
6.3
5.3
1S.2

3.6

6.7
24.3
x
-7

2,033

2.2
5.6
6.6
5.3

45,130
21,981
34,622
24,947
10,606
24,427
24,663

1

56.3

2.0
27.5
11.2

$

105,101 $
51,165
135,314
1,091,050
92,743
165,078
49 ,794
81,941
86,125
268,340
57,191
1,537,111
362,936
644,693
286,962
180,534
289,368
113,480
219,165
749,221
j
883,204 1
427,831 !
148,412
1
703,700 !
93,035
260,192
is,610

26,379
19,339
75,202
13,527
15,152
35,906
257

25.6
37.9
55.6
1.7
16.3
21.8
0.5

172.U73
72,066
14,702
266JSS
122,206
239,452
56,540
55,532
20,632
3,80S
32,164
30,562
113^57
107.39S
50,507
100,893
35,912
91,16s

200.3
26.3
25.7
17.4
33.7
37.1
19.7
30.3
7.1

3.599

1
i

|
!
!

14.7
10.8
12.8
25.1
34.0
14.3
33.6
35.0
19.3

$

226,809 *

77,3^

203,502
1,891,000
237,520
355,254
68,467
166,792
182,487
427,108
129,554
2,803,511
692,352
1,029,354
467,328
379,160
403,141
209,413
444,522
1,550,422
1,214,850
936,080
192,721
1,236,885
131,885
480,730
32,574

37,583
21,687
83,890
42,514
28,527
37,803

936
204,342
94,207
32,618
347,136
141,196
309,562
68,695
103,877
22,715
3,803
37,123
125,692
135,438
142,020
75,454
111,499
60,339
115,856

3,599

16.6
23.0
43.7
2.2

9.9
10.6
1.4
112.0
22.1
25.2
12.4
20.4
30.1
14.7
27.4

5.6

l.S
8.4
8.1
11.1
15.2
39.2
9.0
33.2
24.1
11.0

Table VII - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-I93I per $100
of Loans and Investments of Active Banks on June 30, 1920 (Continued)
(OOP omitted from dollar amounts)
N a t i o n a l "banks

State

Loans and Loans and
investments investof a c t i v e ; ments of
. suspended
"banks,
banks,
June 30>
1921-1931
1920

.New Hampshire
$
52,^50 $
IJew J e r s e y
^73.003
iffew Mexico
36,2U0
New York
H, 033,0^1
iforth C a r o l i n a
1^2,569
.North Dakota
85,628
Ohio
821,636
G&aahoma
282,01+3
Oregon
150,570
Pennsylvania
2,017,335
Rhode I s l a n d
58,630
South C a r o l i n a
121,687
South Dakota
96,865
Tennessee
182,877
Texas
667,216
Utah
i
5^i007
Vermont
1
46,676
Virginia
326,206
Washington
200,030
fest Virginia
132.509
Wisconsin
330,879
Wyoming
50,999

436
30,37S
15,244
25,399
39,^37
22,SOI
46,220
32,280
8,017
150,071
1,535
16,515
28,320
17,589
68,255
3.S18
1,138
12,63s
18,844
24,653
10,985
9,7ll+

UNITED STATES ; $17,547,061 $1,146,207
- • •

(1) See footnote, p. 139*



1

!
S t a t e banks
N a t i o n a l and S t a t e banks
Hatio of
R a t i o of
R a t i o of
.
Loans and Loans and
Loans and Loans and
loans and
l o a n s and
loans and
investments
investinvestinvestments
investments investments
investments
of a c t i v e
ments of of suspended of a c t i v e ] ments of
of suspended
of suspended
banks,
suspended
banks,
suspended
to a c t i v e
to active
to a c t i v e
June 30,
banks,
June 3 0 ,
banks,
"banks
banks
banks
I920U)
1921-1931
1920(1)
1921-1931 ( p e r c e n t )
(per cent)
(per cent)
0.8

6.U
42.1
0.6
27.7
26.6
5.6
11.4

?:2
2.6
13.6
29.2
9.6
10.2

7.1
2.4
3

*?

9.4
17.8
3.3
19.1

6.5

2,122
29,730 $
59,130
570,896
12,992
22,183
339,301
3,641,880
9S.375
234,123
68,029
132,701
997,008
303.915
i
156,51s
47,826
1
111,138
22,483
1,496,392
301,55s
1,063
179,656
78,974
!
156,723
111,51s
162,821
44,263
I
201,776
67,483
310,182
14,205
8l,54o
60,723
1,014
170,963
24,992
174,173 i
37,504
153.555
45,224
428,566
46,291
26,827
10.577
$18,602,870 $3,570,115

$

7.1
10.4
58.6
42.0
51.3
30.5
30.6
20.2
20.2

0.6
50.4
68.5
21.9
21.8

17.4
1.7
14.6
21.5
29.5
10.8

39.^
19.2

$

82,180 $

2,553
89,508
28,236
364,700
137,812
90,830
350,135
80,106
30,500
451,629
2,598

3.1
8.6
48.3
4.8
36.6
41.6
19.3
18.3
11.7
12.9

95,489
139,838
61,857
135,738
18,023
2,152
37,630
56,348
69,877
57,276

34.3
53-8
16.1
13.9
13.3
7.6
15.1
23.9
7.5

20,311

26.1

$36,149,931 $4,716,322

13.1

1,043,899
58,423
7,674,921
376,692
218,329
1,818,644
438,561
261,708
3.513.727
238,286
278,410
1
259,6s6
384,653
!
977,398
!
135,547
107,399
497,169
374,203
292,064
759,445
77,826

1.1

2.0

~ x^y -

Table VIII - Number of Bank Suspensions by Years and by
Geographic Divisions,U) 1892-1931
National and State Banks
South-j South-1
Rocky]
Pacific United
Western
Middle
North Southern
New
westeast
MounYear
England Atlantic Central Mountain!
Grain
Coast States
ern
tain
ern
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911 j
1912;
1913!
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931

1
6
1
2
—

4
1
3
2
2
3
2
4
1
1
2
3
1
1
—
-

5
-

1
—
—
—
—

5
2

3
12
6
6
5
4
3
2
2
4
7
9

j

14 1
10
5
18
16
6
5
6
6
6
5
5
4
1
1
4
-

6
46
1
4
14
11
7
3
2
2
9
5
18
11 1

l

3
7
17
8
6
10
9
5
7
8
4
7
4
3
6
14
14
27
30 '
28 j
44
86
57
75
256

5
23
7
2
2
2

2
19
7
3

—
-

-

2
-

3
1
5
1
9
1
io !

2
6 !
13 i

7
5
17
13
4
4
3
6
2
12
9
10
17

8

9
5
4
3
6
2
7
2
10
24

31

236

581

152

Total j 100

483

1,455

582

—

3
1
2
-

1
1
*
~

19

26
34
23
36
89

—

7

20
100
21
44
54
45
15
3
7
9

5
11
5
3
9
9
2

3
2
2

-

4 •

—

5 I

5
12
7
8
5
14
6
3
11
10
26
27
19
6
5
3
13
28
86
71
75
79

5 !

7
7
4
5

7 i
8
1
3
4 ,

1
2

11
9
29
40
17
7
7
4
35
99
59
64
81
98 1 60
216 i 80
95
79
42
97
142
42
197
283
241
1S3
1,729

1,229

i

2
34
4
5
3
5
-

1
-

1
1
3
2
1
6
7
4
10
7
6
12
5
11
1
3

46
10
16
13
5
2
3
1
3
2
-

3
1
1
8
17
12
5
4
1

9
8
7
16
10
5
7
8
7
20
26
13
3
3
13 1 3
723
21
43
134
84
103
65
290
138
392 118
298
56
514
30
294
18
9
243
299
12
25
398

6
3
1
4
37
3 i
1 i
61
3 j 143
21
461
17
343
12
623
17
738
12
579
12
924
22
636
5
479
12
628
12 1,292

693

62

54

2,213

4,207

782

370

10,937

-

See footnote p # 135 for list of States in each geographic division.




44
297
62
85
100
92
30
18
19
24
34
35
75
45
40
70
102
45
46
63
57
88
122
113
40
34

- 150 Table iX - Average Age at Time' of Suspension of Banks Suspending
during 1921-1930, by States

State

National and State
National
State
"banks
banks
banks
Number Average age Number Average age Number Average age
of banks Yearsi Months of banks Years[Months of banks Years

Alabama
15
18
Arizona
3
15
Arkansas
20
13
California
18
11
Colorado
18
15
Connecticut
60
1
Delaware
45
1
Dist. of Col.
20
15
Florida
19
19
Georgia
11
Idaho
26
24
Illinois
36
24
15
Indiana
29
105
Iowa
28
Kansas
14
23
Kentucky
4
Louisiana
6
2
Maine
Maryland
2
23
3
Massachusetts
1
30
4
Michigan
20
Minnesota
58
14
7
Mississippi
17
13
Missouri
10
61
Montana
21
32
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
3
11
New Jersey
20
16
New Mexico
4
13
New York
23
19
North Carolina
70
19
North Dakota
14
24
Ohio
71
14
Oklahoma
8
19
Oregon
19
26
Pennsylvania
1
63
Ehode Island
26
15
South Carolina
54
19
South Dakota
5
28
Tennessee
62
20
Texas
3
3
Utah
1
1
Vermont
12
7
Virginia
19
12
Washington
16
9
West Virginia
15
9
Wisconsin
11
13
Wyoming
19
UNITED STATSSl 927
(1) Eighty-five "banks omitted in




5
6
11
10
5
6
3
6
11
8
1
1
9
1
2
4
3
10
8
9
2
3
9

59
30
200
20
75
5
1

14
9
17
11
10
11
1

10

213
334
46
221
163
417
247
69
53
2
4
3
16
383
103
383.,

10
17
13
13
15
20
18
21
13
16
9
9
17
16
16
18
11
19
21
12
20
11
15
15
16
16
12
17
12
19
14
17
15
9
14
25
15
13
20
18

11
6
9
4
10
9
5
8
9
2
2
1
8
7
6
3
6
5

10
11
6
5
9

74
33
220
38
93
6
2

15
9
17
11
11
19
23

7
7
4
11
5
7
8

233
353
72
257
178
522
261
73
55
26
4
20
441
110

11
17
13
14
16
22
18
22
13
15
13
5
20
14
16
18
10
20
21
12
15
12
14
15
17
18
13
17
18
34
14
18
16
12
13
13
15
15
19
18

3
7
1
11
6
5

412
380
3
3
1
1
5
3
4
5
41
61
4
1
8
12
2
11
6
7
212
189
5
10
416
486
11
9
60
74
5
7
215
255
2
38
46
5
1
27
46
8
2
3
8
7
226
252
7
9
393
447
8
2
95
90
6
250
11
188
10
22
19
11
2
1
7
63
56
8
10
58
46
11
1
44
35
10
3
102
4
93
3
9
61
50,
_2
10
10
tt 15
16
10
2
5,691
6,618£>
Montana "because of insufficient data

6
2
11
5
2
9
5
3
11
5
9
10
7
11
2

4
8
10
7
4
2
6
11
_9
5

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- 4r§6' -

TAB IS X l - NUMBER OF BANK SUSPENSIONS 1921-1931,
BY STATES AND BY SIZE OF LOANS AND INVESTMENTS
N a t i o n a l Banks
S i z e g r o u p s - l o a n s a n d i n v e s t m e n t s i n t h o u s a n d s of
Under $150I$250 $500 $750 $ 1 , 0 0 0 $ 2 , 0 0 0 $ 5 , 0 0 0 $10,000 $
to ; to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$150
250j 500 750 1 , 0 0 0
2,000 5,000 10,000 50,000

States

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
I
Delaware
D i s t . of C o l .
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New H a m p s h i r e
New J e r s e y
New M e x i c o
New Y o r k
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode I s l a n d
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee .
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
Y/est V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Wyoming

1

3
•••

rr

4

2
5
**•
• # •

•••
• ••
1
4
2
4
8
1
•••
1
• ••
•••
• ••

...
6
4i
5
•••
• ••
• ••
2
6
6
14
5
33
3
...I
...

8
2
10
9
8
•••
• ••
•••
8
8
5
22
6
40
7
3
• • •

• • 9

• ••
2
1
5
33
1
9
17
15
...
1
3
4
?
9
28
8
23
5
11
...
11
29
•••
23
1
•••
6
8
11
3
3




14
1
5
12
5
...
...!
2!
4;
li
4|
371
2
15
1
7
. •.!
5»
17
2
16
1
•••
• ••
4
3
3j
3j
i

"UNITED STATES

4
1
4
25
4
...
•••
.••
•.•
1
2
12
3
17
1
2
•••
5
6
1
24
1 '
•••
1
•••
1
2
2j

253 i

413

• • • j

• .

2|
7j
2
8
...
• ••
2
1
3
4
1

3
2
2
3 ,
•••
•••
•••
2
3 !
2
...

2
• ••
1
3
3
1
• ••
•••
7
3
5
11
4
13
1
• ••
1
...
...
2
4
5
4
2
2
4
...
...
4
5
7
6
1
7
6
3
7
1
5
5
1
11
•••
1
3
1
3
1
1

170

89

157

i

. . . , . . .
3i
3

23
4
28
26
25
1
1

• ••

•••
• ••
1
1
1
•••
• ••
•••
1
1
• ••
9
2
1
1
1
• ••
•••
1
1
3
2
4
•••
2
3
...
...
4
1
2
7
•••
4
2
•••
8
•• •
•••
i
• ••
4
1
• ••
1
1
2
1
• ••
74

• o •

•«•

1
•

• o

•••
•••
• ••
2
1

i

!
.

i
|

.

!

»

23
23
30
73
23
126
18
8
2

j

2
1
1
• ••

1
* ••

•••

• Ii ?
6

.

.
.

i

i
|

18
71
15
25
64
40
• ••
1
19
21
28
37
83
33
73
12
61
1
31
67
9
92
4

i

154

4
1
2 •••
4
2
4
2
2
1
• ••
1
•# •
3
3
5
5
7
6
1
1
21
9
3 j
2
2
• ••
. ••' .. •
2i . . .

dollar?..
5 0 , 0 0 0 r ^
and
Total
over

i

9J

4

... I
3
4|
1
5\
1
6>
3
...
•••
...
4i
l
4!
3
8 1•
2
4|
5
3j
2
5
3
7
3
2 • ••
15
6

1

.

•••

'

...
.
.

j

1
!

.
.
.

!
j
|

3
• ••

3

' 1
1
1
• ••
1
20
•

5

L

1
13
18
27
16
11

1,336

-

±52 -.

Table S I - Number of Bank Suspensions .during' 1921-1931* ^7 S t a t e s and by Size
of Loans and I n v e s t m e n t s . ( C o n t i n u e d )

State

S t a t e Banks
Size groups - l o a n s and i n v e s t m e n t s i n 1thousands of d o l l a r s |
250 I 5001 7501 l.OOO] 2,0001 5,ooo| 10,000I 50,000 1
Under! 150
Total
to
to
and
to
to
to
to
to
to
250
150
500 J5PJ 1,000 2,000 5.000 10.000 50.000 over

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
I
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D i s t . of Col,
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
1
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New J e r s e y
New Mexico
1
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode I s l a n d
1
South C a r o l i n a
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
1
Virginia
Washington
West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Wyoming

^1

ke\
8
137

5
36
x
3

3
56

id
1
-1

1
31
11
71
62
156

l6o

64

M
56

38
105
1
61
2i

104
297
24
150
23

4o

108
30

5

35
7
6

"
*
117

44

l I

124
15

187

67

4o

131

39

44

21

33

96

16

1

10
18
10
16
25

18
l

4

l
—
24
15
L.

M

25
50

98J 33!

39

290
84;
271
3
-

5
5

38 x3
24 11
15
7
— 2
5 —
10 j
19

6

17
225

28
11

65
166

3
19
105

3

~

100

15

"•"

5

45
56
9

59

25

8

39
7

^

~
62
226
25
125
60
155

16]

78
21

77
-

4

15
11
6
17
l
4
7
3
l6

2
1
+
7
2
2
3
29

3
4

5
3
36
x
3

8
2
20

30
10
27
1
1

5

1
2
10

61
j

2
1
2
2
—
6
~
12
1
*19
9

UNITED STATES [3,350 | i , 5 o i

11,478

481

7

3

2Ug

" •

1
—
1
1
~
1
1
2 !
-

5
3

3
6
4
4
5

1
10
10 i
- 1

4

11

3

6

285

15s

I
—
-

-

3
5

l
2
1
10
—
—
1
~
1

i
1

3

I ~
"

1
~

1 ~

1

1

—
1
1
"*
*
1
-

U
7

31

!

I
1
1
1

j

-

3
-

u
j

-

1
9

52
422
246
580
281
92
6G

-

j

1

1
—
_
—
—
1
i
I
-

~
"
*
—
—

S7
3*
2k§
30
S3
13
1
_
227

365

-

—
1
-

-

,1

—
—
~
-

-

9
5

1

4

3

2

~
2
1
-

16

2

7

1

3
5

tm

1
""

1
1

4

—
-

10

j

2
1
l
3

^

1 j
2 I
3
1
1
1
-

9

mm

2
1
—
l |

6
3
| 3
2
59 i
5
2
59 3
x
28 19
10
11
3
2
33 10
4
3
l
2
2
3
9
18 15
8
23
25
—
1
~"
4
11
16
56
7
104 28
5
~
**
18
1
5
6
4
38
7
7
7
3
8
l
2 1
- 1 —
- 1 -1
l 1 ""
6
2
2
20
I
16
l
2
3
15 IS
5
4
5
1
2
4o 15
7
9

I




3
3

19
17
101
471
151

493
157
481

5

2
25
41

36
23s

469
146

2

S

113
2
255

^53

-

117
234
27
1
87
62

1 ~
1 ~

134

1

7,580

-

1 *"
"
1
-

j

74
52

Table-XI- Number of Bank Suspensions daring 1921-I93I, by States and by Size
of Loans and Investments (Continued)

State

National and State Banks
Size groups - loans and investments i n thousands of d o l l a r s 1
Under 150 1 250 r 5 0 0
750] l.OOOi 2,000! 5,000| 10,000) 50,000
Total
to
I to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
500 35Z. 1.000 2,000 5,000 10,000 50,000 over
150
250

ks
Alabama
Arizona
S
Arkansas
1U1
c
California
Colorado
61
Connecticut
—
Delaware
~
D i s t . of Col.
Florida
62
Georgia
227
Idaho
29
Illinois
127
64
Indiana
Iowa
163
Kansas
Kentucky
%
Louisiana
26
Maine
—
Maryland
3
Massachusetts
Michigan
17
Minnesota
229
Mississippi
57
Missouri
294
Montana
109
Nebraska
275
Nevada
3
New Hampshire
New J e r s e y
—
16
New Mexico
!
New York
l
North C a r o l i n a
106
N o r t h Dakota
309
Ohio
27
Oklahoma
167
Oregon
|
24
Pennsylvania
7
Rhode I s l a n d
—
South C a r o l i n a
122
South Dakota
193
Tennessee
6s
Texas
155
Utah
6
Vermont
Virginia
Ho
Washington
22
West V i r g i n i a
12
Wisconsin
46
Wyoming
33

1—

UNITED STATES 3.504




18

22

5

42
17
22
1
-:
—
!

49

}i

??

16
18
1
-

65

10

4
4

6
2

5

3
3

~
—
20

4
_

—
—

9
7

1
1
—
27

6fl 18|
14 5

A

4l:
26

122
71
206

85

67j

189j

62

1}\
16!

% 13;
15
1\
— 2
2
7
1
24 ^ !
131 42
34 15
87 15
32 11
92 23
1
1
8
7
13 11
10 : 11
68 20
87
6
36 24
56 17
14
3
29 30
67 18
133 35
18 i 7
61 x5
9 1
26
*
+
24
4
2b 21
4 3 19
14
1

15

a

-1
3|

19|
119|
3i|
101
50
11G

lj

-j

2
10

d

lU5
32
50
8
13
1
49
l4l
17

56
11
18
l4 |
19
28
10

i,754

4
3

3
5

24
1C

1,891 651

1

1

l

6

x

36
8 i
47 j
17 !

36

30

?

5

2

5

1
2
—

1
—
2
10
8

1

2i

20 !
8
10

3

10
12
11

3
6
3
3
4

6 '
6 ,

4

8
-

3

2
_
2S
11
8
2

8

11

x

1

8

3
9
36

9

1
11

1
-

5 1 6

1
8

4

5
10
4
14
7
2
14
l
10

6

8
10
2
—
2
2

8

9
4

;

7

17
16
9
1
14
20
4
9
6
2
30
33
l 1 k
16
l
10
1
5
18
7
l
2
1
9
2
3

1

7
2
1

337 j 442

110
38
276

2

7
3
232

— 1
*
~
1
~
2
-

3

l
8
2

2
1
1

_
1
—
—
~
_

_
—
—
—
—
—
—
-

3
~
1
—
1

i ;

-

i
2
2
1
-

J

3

6 1

3

1
1
-

4

1
2
1
13
~
1
-

3
l
2
1
1

67

!

l
10
-

4

~
2
1
"*
"
1
-

_
i
i
-

|
-

1 --

j

-

56

j
\

114
14
2
—
250
388
82
495
269
706

?99

100
62

4

24
23
119
542
166
518
221
521

5
3
44
62
64
j 275

552
179
310
60
174

3

286
520
126
326
31
2
100
80
101
150

64
36

2

8,916

- 155 -

Table XII - Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931 per Hundred Active Banks
on June JO, 1920, " y Geographic Divisions and "y
b
bSize of Loans and Investments (1)
S i z e group
l o a n s and
investments
(000 o m i t t e d )

SouthNew Middle Ho r til
South- South- West- Hocky Paern
United
Eng- A t I a n - ; Cene a s t - weste r n Moun- c i f i c
MounStates
land
tral
tic
ern
ern
Grain t a i n Coast
tain
N a t i o n a l "banks

Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2 , 0 0 0 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000

3.2

5.1
1.2
4.0
8.3

11.1
12.2
7.0
12.9
4.1
4.6
6.1
U..8
l.S

21.6
17.8
15.0

20.0
13.9
13.8
10.6

8.8
9.7
13.4
4.2
3.8

7.6
7.4
10.8
7.1
15.4

2.4
Total

6.8

.11.9

11.0

20.4
9.1
IS. 8

_r_

9.3

_5_a

50,000 and over

54.1
24.7
16.1
12.3

133.3
71.9
51.7
17.2
30.8
25.2
22. k
44.4

66.1
62.3
29.5
16.5
16.li
15.4'
10.7

— ^

34.1

9.6

19.0

49.3
40.3
34.2
23.U
24.4
25.4
9.8

4.3

13.6
20.5
21.2

9.1
27.2

33.3

20.4
6.6 12.9
11.8 10.3
7 . 0 11.0
9.1
4.4
: 7.7
12.5
2.7
| _2*I

I 11.7
16.7

S t a t e banks
Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2 , 0 0 0 - 5.000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000

i+.s

11.3
17.2
20.4
16.7
13.0
15.8
15.4
19.6
10.5

12.2

115.7

22.2
ll~4

6.7
ll.l
18.3
25.0

50,000 and over
Total

37.9
26.4
22.2
20.9
25.3
24.5
24.9
24.5
26.1

30.6

6-1.8
30.4
75.6
45.3
21.5 i 47.2
2U.3 j 4o.5
22.s
5 2 . 1 I 2 9 . 1 ! 32.3
47.4 ! 2 6 . 4 2 9 . 0
30.5
2 0 . 9 1 45.6 1 39.3 2 5 . 7
19.0 i 52.5 j 2 2 . 8
is.2
54.8 2 5 . s i 17.6
28.6
25.0
15.0
1 66.7
12.5
50.0
50.0

58.8
3S.5
34.1
30.3
52.9
28.0
10.0
16.7

32.0 1 54.0
21.3 34.5
14.7 29.9
4 . 2 25.9
7 . 0 25.9
5.9 2 1 . 3
10.2 20.7
1 0 . 5 19.0
5.0 16.8
-2*2

43.5 ; 43.5

1 15.5 36.3

| 26.2 25.5

I 58.9

1 34.9

( 1 ) Figures for national and State banks combined can be found in Table 25* p. 59 >
of the text.




Table XlXt- Number of Suspensions- 19}J!l-1931^><Per Hundred Active Banks
on June 30, 1920, by S t a t e s and by Size of Loans and I n v e s t m e n t s
N a t i o n a l Banks

States-

Size groups « l o a n s and inver tments i n t h o u s a n d s of dollarqf. ^ ^
•
»
Under IflSO $250 $500 $750 $1,000 152,000 $5,000 $10,000 | 5 0 , 0 0 0 r^——"v
f
and / T o t a l
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$150
250 500 750 1,000 2,000 5,000 10,000 50,000
over !
,

Alabama
Arizona
Arleans as
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delav/are
D i s t . of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New J e r s e y
New Mexico
New York
North C a r o l i n a
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode I s l a n d
South C a r o l i n a
South Dakota
Tennessee




75.0
—
50.0
12.5
50.0

31.3
—
40.0
12.5
27.8

32,0 21.1 > 1 6 . 7
200,0 28.6
52»6 28.6 ! 20.0
15.5 4.4 15.4
21.6 4 . 0 11.8

9.5

_».

i

.

u

.

l

••_

12.5
4.3
14.3
:
6.7

11.1
3.2
16.7
—

9.1
~_
«-

63.4
15.8
38.5
14.9
10.0
21.0
3.0
—
25.0

20.0
11.1
—
22.5
9.1
4.5
10.0
10.0
—

200.0
100.0
—.
20.0
~~
20.0
-.-.
25.0
—

—
—
33.3
12.7
75.0
14.3
12.5
15.8

—
5.1
10.8
11.9
57.1
16,7
28.6
18.2

9.1
2.7
16.7
12.5
44.4
—
14.3
42.9

—
6.7
--.(i)
—
—•
«.-

2.9
75.0
3.7
83.3
33.3
6.7
15.8
—
5.3

6.8
125.0
6.7
24.0
8.3
8.2
25.0
21.4
3.5
(1)
20.8
27.8
6.3

11.4
25.0
3.1
36.8

5.6
«...
—.

MM

""""
"*"*
-.-

-~
—
~--

25.0
—
100.0
44.4
8.3
66.7
160.0
5.9
—
25.0

40.0
100.0
85.7|
25.0
12.5
132.0
7.0
—

—
—
—.
36.4
(1)
100.0
!
59*5
200.0

— 11.1 14.3
—
6.7 —
— 4 1 . 7 15.8
51.9 26.0 1 3 . 6
(1) 25.0 —
27.8 2 3 . 7 ( 1 4 . 8
37.5 58.6J41,7
35.71 2 4 . 2 1 1 1 . 1
i

100.0
40.0
25.0
18.0
9.7
37.0
8.0
8.1

33.3
12.5
33.3
8.3
2.7
25.9
6.8
8.3

—
—

55.5
10.0
2.7
20.0
16.7
—

•

-.~~
—.
„

_
50.0
—

..-.
—
—
—
-.—
M.
—.

16.7
*—
*

—
.--

"*"*
__
_..

—
-—
--.

„

i

—
- | 6.3|
— 1.25.0; 9.7j 20.0
— 1 36.4! 4 0 . 0 | 5 7 . 1
14.3J 3 . 8 ; 6 . 7 J 1 1 . 0
200.0 133.3 7 5 , O j 2 3 . 5
120.0 8 4 . 1 J 3 5 . 4 ] 1 1 , 1
23.1 8 . 0 | l l . i : 8.9
54,8 2 5 . 4 | 1 6 . 3 J 1 4 . 3
25.0 1 4 . 3 2 1 . 7 J 1 2 . 5
11.1 16.3 64.7)12.3

250.0 250.0 6 1 . l | l l . l 7 5 . 0
60.0 141.7 ! 65.9j 30.4 8.7
3 3 . 3 140.0 i " i 11.8 16.7

9.5
11.8

—
——

..—
--.
--

8.3

-—.

in ii m*

MM
mmtm

6.5
—

7.7

5.6
--

16.7
-_

20.0
—

«...

--.
25.0

_—

22.8
20.0
33.7
8.6
17.7
1.5
5.3
43.4
24,7
37.0
15.2
9.1
35.2
7.2
6.0
5.3
5.4
3.8
16.1
21.5
50.0
18.4
44.1
21.3
1.8
9,0
44.7
5.7
42.5
45.9
8.9
21.0
13.3
7.2
5.9
37.8
49.3
9.2

/S7
-3&C -

- 1 9 3 1 ^ / P e r Hundred A c t i v e Banks
Table X l I I - Number of S u s p e n s i o n s ^ 1
on June 3 0 , 1920, by S t a t e s and by Size of Loans
and I n v e s t m e n t s ( C o n t i n u e d )
N a t i o n a l Banks

States

Size groups - loans and investments in thousands of dollarsj,
Under $150 1250 $500 $750 $1,000 : 2,^00 $5,000 $10,000 $50,000
|
to
to
to
to
to
to
and i Total
to
to
$150
250 500 750 1,000 2,000 5,000 10,000 50,000
over
r

•

II

Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
"Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

1

L

I
I

.

57.1 22,5 12,5
25.0 50.0 25,0
20.0

9.1

6.3

15.0 6,9
34.7 7,1
28,2 20.0
12.0 21.1
21,4 25.0

25.0
20,0
10.0

UNITED STATES 44.6 33.3 20.4 12.9

10.3

80.0
25.0 30.0
28.6 33.3
66.7 60,0

••I.

•

19.3

9.1
16.7

6.7
12.5
6.3
12.5
2.4
11.1

7,7
12.5
28.6
5,0

11,0

9.1

33,3

20.0
12.5

MM»

2.7

2.7

100.0

7.7

I,

(1) One suspension, but no bank of this size on June 30, 1920.




—

16.5
14.3
2.0
7.9
20.7
22.1
10.6
23.4
16.7

~ 15S Table XIII— Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931 per Hundred Active Banks
on June 30, 1920, " y States and " y Size of Loans
b
b
and Investments (Continued)

State

S i z e groups
Under! 150|
to
150
250

State Banks
- l o a n s and i n v e s t m e n t s i n t h o u s a n d s . o f d o l l a r s 1
250] 5001 750 J 1,0001 2 , 0 0 0 | 5,000| 10,000 1 50,000
and Total
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
500 75CM 1,000 2,000 5.000 lo.ood 50,000 over

M
35.4
«••• 1
4 8 . 4 20. Q 32,d 33.3 37.5 22.2 100.0
Alabama
Arizona
—
50.7
6 1 . 9 2 9 . 4 6 6 . 5 71.4 100.0 8 0 . 0 1 0 . 0
Arkansas
69.9 5 2 . 9 5 9 . 1 5 6 . 3 4 2 . 1 77.8 2 8 . 6
—
62.2
(i)
~
~
~
7.2
California
2.9
4.7
5.3
1 1 . 1 2 9 . 3 7 . 1 1.7
Colorado
4 i . a 39.9 2 3 . 3 50.0
- 22.2
~
34.9
-1
~
~
M
Connecticut
— 30.0 33.3 22.2
—
17.8
~
Jj 2 0 . q
io.d
.
~l
..
_|
—
— I 5.0
Delaware
*n 2 0 . d
*•
-*l
Dist* of Col.
—
—
_
—
I
—
~1
"*
*
~
H
""
Florida
7 8 . a 8 3 . a loo.q 2O0.q 153.8 1 8 1 . 3 6 0 0 . 0 1 0 0 . 0
(2)
110.7
Georgia
8 1 . 9 42.1J 4 7 . 1 39.5] 1 8 . 8 2 0 . 8 1 0 . 0
*
~
— 58.0
Idaho
65. a 32.4 20.5
-1
36.9
" 133.3 30.0
Illinois
3 3 . 9 26.q 2 7 . 3 2 5 . 4 4 3 . 5 4 0 . 0 3 0 . 6 2 7 . 3
7.7
30.1
~
Indiana
6 9 . a 3 8 . a 3 6 . 3 3 3 . 3 21.7 2 6 . 5 3 6 . 0 5 0 . 0
39.4
~
*"
Iowa
5 6 . a 5 2 . a 58.6 2 9 . 6 3 8 . 0 2 2 . 7 2 2 . 6 1 4 . 3 1 0 0 . 0
— 42.8
Kansas
3 7 . Q 1 9 . a 15.fl 2 6 . 5
4 . 8 15.4 50.0
—
25.7
Kentucky
24. a 1 4 . a 2 1 . 1 2 3 . 4
— 100.0
20.4
4.8 1 1 2 . 5 5 7 . 1
~
Louisiana
4 2 . 4 i 5 . a 2 5 . 9 2 5 . 9 29.4 i 7 . 1 1 4 . 3
26.2
**
*
Maine
J
— 20.0 25.0
6.3
—
— 1
7.3
—
1
Maryland
i 3 . d 20. Q 1 9 . a
— 12.5 15.0 11.1! 11.1
25.0
- ' 13.2
Massachusetts
—
.
—
—
— 10.0| 2 2 . 0 3 8 . 5
6.3
15.2
~i
Michigan
j 4 0 . a 26. q n.a 12.5l 20.4 24.2 1 13.9l 3 3 . 3
13.3
18.7
Minnesota
64.1; 3 9 . 2 28.4 2 9 . 2 1 2 . 5
9.1
7.1
40.0
Mississippi
58.9 5 8 . 8 4 6 . 5 34.1 1 50.0 3 3 . 3 2 5 . 0
~
49.3
Missouri
4 5 . 0 2 9 . 1 24.?| 1 2 . 4 2 2 . 7
8.0 1 2 . 0 2 5 . 0
32.6
82.4 45.8 39.6 37.5 37.5 44.4 14.3
56.5
Montana
Nebraska
7 8 . 8 3 6 . 1 2 7 . 1 2 8 . 8 3 5 . 7 35.7 1 0 0 . 0
—
47.7
Nevada
150.0 33.3
—
—
— 33.3
~
21.7
New Hampshire
— 25.0
- 16.7
- !
8.0
New J e r s e y
— 66.7 30.8 17.6 I 21.2
6.4 1 3 . 6 | 1 0 . 0
— ! 16.2
New Mexico
5 3 . 3 3 3 . 3 6 0 . 0 116.7 200.0 2 0 . 0
—
—
~
54.7
New York
— 11.1 6.1 8.1 ; 12.0 17.2 11.5 17.9
7.9
7.1
11.0
North C a r o l i n a
72.2 39.6 4 3 . 1 38.1 18.5 40.0 15.4
50.0
— 48.5
(1)
North Dakota
' 8 2 . 0 50.9 4 7 . 2 2 5 . 0 6 6 . 7
—
65.4
~|
*
Ohio
4 3 . 6 28.0 1 5 . 1 t 2 2 . 6 23.9 2 0 . 3 1 22.7 1 1 . 8
60.0
23.5
"*
Oklahoma
55.1 20.5 30.0 32.3 57.1 20.0 1 40.0
~
38.8
*
~
Oregon
4 6 . 0 1 7 . 1 21.4 | 3 . 8 2 2 . 2 3 3 . 3 3 3 . 3 1 0 0 . 0
~
~
25.9
Pennsylvania
1 4 . 3 21.4 2 9 . 5 27.8 1 4 . 3 1 4 . 8 2 2 . 1 2 9 . 4
15.0
20.2
~
Ehode I s l a n d
— (1)
—
—
—
~
12.5
~
~ 50.0
~
South C a r o l i n a
9 8 . 3 64.7 6 4 . 4 3 9 . 0 3 3 . 3 3 9 . 3 5 7 . 1
68.7
**
"
~
South Dakota
114.7 8 4 . 9 58.8 6 3 . 6 30.8 6 2 . 5 |
- 100.0 1
82.1
~
~
Tennessee
29.5 16.7 26.1 25.0 54.5 22.2 I 12.5
50.0
— 26.1
~
*
Texas
2 9 . 0 1 9 . 6 1 9 . 5 1 0 . 1 38.9 1 7 . 1 2 5 . 0 1
— 23.6
(1)
~
Utah
3 3 . 3 3 4 . 5 32.0 6.7 3 3 . 3
26.0
~1
" 33.3
Vermont
—
—
~
2.6
*
* 5.9 1
~
1
-1 —
1 "
*
Virginia
36.8 26.1 23.3 8.3 13.3 31.6
—
26.0
~
Washington
30.4 17.9 2 0 . 5 9 . 4
4 . 5 2 0 . 0 5 0 . 0 100.0
20.5
~
West V i r g i n i a
42.3 48.5 21.7 66.7 25.0 12.9 62.5
—
~
34.3
Wisconsin
28.0 14.0 1 7 . 1 1 2 . 6 1 1 . 9
1.9 1 4 . 3
~
16.4
*" 1
~
Wyoming
5 8 . 5 35.0 4 2 . 3
—
47.7
" 400.0
~
**
~
UNITED STATES 1 54.0134.5 129.9 25.9 1 25.9 1 21.8 | 2 0 . 7 1 19.0 1 16.8 1 2.9 136.3
(1) One suspension, but no bank of this size on June 30, 1920.
(2) Three suspensions, but no bank of this size on June 30, 1920.




*•*

!

°~

•"*

- 159 Table XIII - Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931 per Hundred Active Banks
on June 30, i920, by States and by Size of Loans
and Investments (Continued)

National and State :Banks
State

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts

<
Size groups - 1 oans_.and investments in thousands of dollars!
150 250 500] 750 1,000 2,000 5,0001 10,0001 50,000 1
Under
to to to to
to
to
to
to
and Total
150
250 500 750 1,000 2,000 5,000 10,000 50,000 over
22.8
27.8
50.6
22.4
36.1
— 16.7

32.0
76.9
57.6
10.3
22.5

—

10.0 20. q
—
-

49,5
57.1
69.1
11.6
42.1

26.5 28.6 13.3 22.2
50. q 100. Oj 40. Oj 6.7
47.8 34.5 47.1 18.8

2.8
i5.a

5.3

77.5
81.9
61.7
32.0
69.6
58.6
36.3
24.1
41.3

78.6 100.0 128.6
44.5 46.0 29.Q
41.5 21.9 21.7
26.3 24.9 18.8!
33.5 29.5 23.2J
58.7 38.3 28.4|
18.2 13.7 17.2|
13.2 17.9 18.3!
14. C 24.6 22.6
— 10.0
:
13.0 16.7 15.9 5.6

5.6

-

3.6 4.1
3.7
?.lj 16.7! 11.1
— 16.0! 16,2 14.3
—!
~ * "*
—
"
—1
—
i
—

9.4!

87.0 133.3 185.7 150.0
12.0 18.6| 10,5 20.0
75.0) 34.8j
—
27.91 28.71 27.5 25.0
13.3j 19,1 23.4 20.0
31.0 21.9 15.1 16.7
8.5 16.7
—
9.11
2.7 4.3 29.4 20.0
21.7; 11.1
7.1
2.9
—
—
11.1
6.7
7.3 10.0
7.1
— 6.8 12.8 21.4
22.4 19.4 14.8 20.0
12.7 10.7 10.0
54.5 40.0 35.3
(1)
21.6
9.7
7.9 10.0
25.0 37.5 14.3
—
24.2 25.0 50.0
.«:
~ 16.7
—

Michigan
\ 39.5 24.4 13.3 13.1
Minnesota
63.3 40.3 27.8 23.5
Mississippi
, 60.0 60.8 45.3 30.0
Missouri
45.3 29.0 24.6 12.9
75.7 43.5 46.3 39.3
Montana
79.5 36.1 26.6 20.4
Nebraska
Nevada
, 150.0 33.3
—
New Hampshire
5.0 7.1
—
5.9
New Jersey
— 20.0 18.9 24.2 7.7 12.0
New Mexico
44.4 34.5 52.0 84.6 100.0 66.7
New York
7.1 6.8 6.5 10.0
6.3 10.5
North Carolina
73.1 42.3 45.6 33.9 30.3 32.0
North Dakota
83.1 56.6 42.6 15.4 44.4
6.7
Ohio
39.7 24.2 14.0 17.1 15.4 13.4
55.1 21.7 22.3 21.3 26.9 23.1
Oklahoma
Oregon
44.4 16.7 21.5 7.1
7.7 26.1
Pennsylvania
13.2 18.3 12.6 17.0
8.3 8.5
Rhode Island
100.0
— 16.7 33.3
M
South Carolina
100.8 70.0 63.8 30.5 40.0 30.8
South Dakota
111.6 89.2 60.5 52.2 16.7 38.5
Tennessee
29.6 17.91 18.4 18.9 34.8 14.7
Texas
31.4 20.4 16.1 9.6 15.2 18.4
31.6 35.5 31.0 5.3 25.0
tltah
—
Vermont
~
—
~
— 6.3
Virginia
36.0 22.0 20.6 7.5
5.3 20.9 1
Washington
29.8 23.0 23.8 8.7 1 11.1 5.3
West Virginia
40.0 44.2 24.1 50.0 1 22.9 [ 12.7
Wisconsin
28.0 15.0i 16.613.8 | 11.4! 2.1
Wyoming
58.9 40.0 35.0 8.3 80.0
8.3
mm

UNITED STATES ; 53.5 34.3 27.1 20.5 I

UT

mm

—
-

18.5 iie^

- i

—
~
—
J.00.0

5.3 |

16.7 |

~
66.7

9.1

-

10.5

33.3

33.3

—

-

37.0

—

10.5

25.0
16.7

50.0

—
—

6.7

—

33.3

12.5
11.1

27.3
16.7

7.7
~
~

—
4.0 1

—
—

—
-

—

~
~ 1
*
16.7 1 28.6 J14.3
46.7 1 11.1
~
—
8.8 1
"
"
100.0
—

14.7

13.2

9.8

17.1
23.2

8.5

18.2
- ! 35.9
~ 49.4
- 31.5
- 52.2
- : 43.6
~ 15.2

-

16.3
5.7
18.2
16.7 100.0
13.9 17.8

i

.. | 3.4
~ ! 10.2

10.0

28.1

1

-

.
-

—
8.5 10.0
25.0
6.8 10.6

•• 31.7
~ 43.7
- 57.3
~
7.8
28.8
~ 10.1
~
5.1
- 96.9
~ 53.7
~ 36.9
~ 26.3
~ 30.6
~ 41.2
~ 22.3
-

~
~
_
—
7.1
4.8

One suspension, "but no "bank of t h i s size on June 30, 1920.




•
»
~
(1)
~

mm

3.8

~

12.0
50.8

3.7
1

-

~
1
t

1

•
*
11.1

~

~

7.8
47.6
61.5
18.1
32.3
21.8
12.3

9.1
63.1
75.6
23.1
21.1
23.5

—
~
2.3
- ; 20.0
~ 20.5
29.9
—
— 1 15.5
40.5

1 2.8

30.9

Table XIV - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931,
"by Geographic Divisions and "by Size of Loans and Investments
Size group
loans and investments

;

(in thousands of dollars )
South- Western
Middle
North
Southern SouthEocky
Hew
Pacific
1
Atlantic Central Mountain eastern western 1 G-rain Mountain
England
Coast

United
States

National tanks
Under $150
150 - 250
25O - 500
500 - -750
750 - 1,000
L,000 - 2,000
2,000 - 5,000
5,poo - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
"50,000 and over
Total

i

-

i

730

;

-

-

373
2,010
I 8,264
18,321
7,732
27,529
43,322
31,425
13,963
52,426

50,136

211,491

7.594
4,923
2,345
j 28,484

i

1,083 ! 4,776 1 4,582 |
376
4,731
1,021
7,309 22,852 I
7,234 1 16,094 ! 20,334 57,327

1,350
4,912
16,192
12,233
12,895
36,344
63,929
15,228
15,425

5,420
4,233
9,603
13,022
11,479
50,667

-

-

172,574 103,175

10,002
10,274
39,671
37,352
26,401

11,366
7,197
27,031
l6,2l4
21,429

32,521
19,610
32,071
22,097
6,122

-

-

-

145,613

116,256

203,302

3,490
5,205
13,522
11,157
9,622
22,227
15,524

357

16,392
50,565
147,425
• 103,932
76,907
212,345
223,249

5,393

1,265
7,656
2,912
5,272
10,215
6,6s6
15,225

-

—

26,212

50,24s

1,146,207

19,652
17,291
25,663
13,992
15,370
19,640
7,243
6,471

4,731
5,992
10,999
2,833
3,627
2,633
12,371
10,859
12,463

222,322
290,925
514,567
289,551
214,978
400,136
470,047
311,995
522,125
213,403

141,827
102,539
52,426

'

629

Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2,000 - 5,000
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
50,000 and over

2,269
11,294
2,452
13,127
14,152
1,253
11,190
65,514
46,342 106,275
47,920 132,322
14,370 173,425
213,403

Total

124,475 | 732,410




-

342

State
12,460 1 42,142
25,909
4o,4os
42,183
12,651
27,612
90,109
93,253
21,802
54,702
63,431
12,023
58,822
41,185
109,119 ! 23,690 j 85,118
139,846
27,224 i 67,921
25,924
11,001
239,029 32,424
55,103

- 1

-

Banks
33,247 137,612
22,362 146,815
43,061 211,976
25,161
92,045
46,920
20,966
24,344
52,888
18,152
37,947
-

23,294

17,433
31,357

1

852,657 J.70,066 J 499,274 211,193 774,992

—
—

126,522

-

72,514

3,570,115

Table XIV - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931,
" y Geographic Divisions and " y Size of Loans and Investments (Continued)
b
b

Size group
loans and investments

Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2,000 - 5,000
-53 000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
50,000 and over
Total




New

i
(

Middle
England Atlantic

-

348
730
2,452
1,353
18,784
51,325
56,265
42,854
-

1,002
4,279
19,55S
31,44S
21,890
93,103
149,597
163,807
187,3SS
271,829

(in thousands of dollars)
North
South- Western
Southern f SouthCentral Mountain j eastern western
Grain

27,259
45,320
106,307
75,664
71,717
145,463
203,835
101,212
254,454
-

174,611 943,901 1,031,231

National and Statei
12,836 ! 49,230
38,023
46,914
13,732
29,671
34,846 109,947
63,395
64,710
27,222
36,527
16,316
28,163
51,459
33,293 124,789
51,375
40,366 105,333 1 3^,972
37,402
21,429
11,479
23,894
83,151
55,103
-

273,241

-

644,887

-

327,^49

banks
142,194
169,667
269,363
124,566
66,530
90,959

.6o,o44
23,620
31,357
_

978,300

Rocky
Pacific
Mountain
Coast

23,148
23,696
39,191
25,149
25,058
4l,867
23,367
11,864
-

213,340

5,088
7,863
18,655
5,745
8,899
1S,S4S
25,057
26,744
12,463
-

129,362

United
States

298,78O
341,490
661,992
393,483
291,885
618,481
693,396
453,822
690,664
271,829
4,716,322

Table XIII - Loans and Investments of Suspended Banks 1921-1931,
by States and by Size of Loans and Investments
National Banks

! Under

States

$150

rzz

S i z e groups - Loans and i n v e s t m e n t s i n t h o u s a n d s o f d o l l a r s
i $ 2 , 0 0 0 j $ 5 , 0 0 0 j $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 1 $50,000
; $500
I 0750 | $ 1 , 0 0 0
$150
$250
|
tO
!
to
i
to
I
*0
to
!
to
1 to j 5 0t, o 0 0 1 oand | T o t a l
0
ver
|
5,000 | 10,000 |
!
75.C
j 1,000 ! 2,000
500
j 250
,
}

:

1

i

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D i s t . of C o l .
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
lorn
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New J e r s e y




304 j 1,086
;
i

j
j

i
'
|

j
376
225
449
—
—
—
—
115
444
225
501
1,024
149
—
81
—
—
—
487
75
465
2,254
476

I—

1,202
I
842
!
892
i

•

——

1
1
i

""
""

|

425 1
!

1
i
'
!
!

!

1,273
1,178
2,797
1,062
6,780
619
—.

l
|
|
!
j
'

—

|
I

""

2,864
234
956
2,321
1,042
"•"""

~
404

i

i
1
!
j
|
j
|

!
!

3,233
952
3,671
3,004
2,877
__
—
—
3,263
2,639
1,929
8,427
2,206
14,227
2,606
1,108
M M

•
1

i
;
j
i
j
1
j
i
1

2,483 !
971
_1,346 ;
2,428 1 1,815
1,172 j 3 , 6 7 1
746 1 1 , 6 5 0
i
—
679
!
-—
—
»~
1,787 i
—2,016
3,083 ; 4,637
4,199
5,308
545 |
'844
13,542 ! 7,897
1,588
1,593
1,237•
—
—
__

r
|
i
!
j
j
.!

i

;

i

|
j
I
|
i
I
j
I

1,125
M M

1,906
5,341
__
2,421
3,136
3,802
__
-_
2,469

—

2,421 I
3,497
2,455
767
908
2,628
—
—

|
!
|
j
I
j
1
—
!|
915

_,.

•

1
!
i
1

—

2,365
4,437
2,621
.—

——
•
2,639
2,677
--.
29,116
8,242
3,835
4,553
2,818

1
1

683
294
1,858
11,825
296
2,961
5,197
5,467
—
436
953 |

1

2,627
—
1,831
3,613
4,140
1,897
—
-11,321
4,673
6,645
15,098
5,590
16,623
1,047

1

»•»«

1

~~

1

M

__

—
6,170

i

j

3,156
4,983
11,107
4,524 ;
11,790
—•
i
7,200
6,805
—
—
M M

10*652

j
M M

1

j

1

«.—
~
12,434
8,748

1

15,228
—.
6,182
_-.
5,411

M M

8,345
.._
—
5,219;
•-— j
—
~
— !
MM

*

~~ 1
8,815

M -

""
""
M M

»-•»•

1,952
—
3,024
4,689
6,084
4,878
3,036
3,411
4,468

M M

M M

M

7,023

—m~

..
M

M M

M M

„

M M

37,721
«...

M M

—-

—
—
28,484
-.—

M M

~~
M

~

M

1

1
i

MM

_——
—
—

M M

M M

M

i

M

10,704
2,298
13,688
23,987
13,375
1,897
679 „
—
31,869 ,
22,141
^x
80,398
18,990
70,110
12,155
48,295
2,033

~

„

~

_

17,916 §J5

—m
M

.. -

j

4,964
45,130
21,981
34,622
24,947
10,606
24,427
24,688
—
—
436
30,378

, ~'

Table XIII - Loans and Investments of Suspended Banks 1^21-1931*
by States and by Size of Loans and Investments (Continued)
National Banks

New Mexico
New York
North C a r o l i n a
N o r t h Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode I s l a n d
South C a r o l i n a
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
\7est V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATES




Under

$150

$150

States

250

to

/
S i z e groups - l o a n s and i n v e s t m e n t s i n thousands of dol" .ars
„
i *—<*—» <—»v^
$250
$500
|750
$1,000
$2,000
$5,000 $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 $50,000
and
Total
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
2,000
5,000
10,000
50,000 over
500
750 ,i
i.ooo
1,221
2,726
2,751
9,803
2,719
7,908
1,735
3,902
—
3,912
10,498
—
8,755
332
__
2,135
2,917
3,991
988
1,020

2,221
4,847
2,508
1,646
3,132
4,126
1,072
9,201

461
612
121
2,419
67
—
145
-110
250
276

704
243
696
7,177
462
3,024
226
1,363
—
1,017
3,414
414
3,083
173
—
—
797
667
v591
557

16,392

50,565

147,425

»-«#•-

139
133
1,369
374
1,900
132
234

2,493
1,621
4,326
1,638
2,683
2,690

1,203
4,176
1,139
4,812
—

5,202
—
2,522
1,595
1,678
2,692
—

1,402
668
1,642
2,451
625

—
1,601
2,555
1,639
—

6,148
10,316
8,777
1,168
9,253
8,076
4,852
11,103
1,535
7,395
5,645
1,291
15,172
—
1,138
4,460
1,750
3,852
1,714
1,883

103,932

76,907

218,345

2,457
5,507
20,246
—
12,172
4,556
—
24,007
—
—
2,380
—
9,393
3,246
—
4,496
2,249
5,768
3,352
—

—
22,670
—
—
—
—
21,429
—
—
—
8,362
6,068
—
5,593

223,849

141,827

-mm-

—

—M-»

«— M

——15,425
-—
—
—
—
13,963 58,426
—
.—
—
—
—
—
12,946
""*
""
—
—
—
**"
""
—
__
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—

15,244
25,399
39,437
22,801
46,220
32,280
8,017
150,071
1,535
16,515
28,320
17,589
68,255
3,818
1,138
12,638
18,844
24,653
10,985
9,734

108,539 58,426 1,146, 207
1
1

Table XV - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931,
by States and by Size of Loans and Investments (Continued)
State Banks

150

State

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
S i s t . of Col.
Florida
Georgia
"Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey



150
to
250

3,531

2,609

Under

Size groups - loans and investments in thousands oi d o l l a r s
250
500
1,000
2,000
5,000
10,000
750
to
500

to
750

7,079
2J22
3,261

5,936
2,690
14,012
2,864
3,033

2,900
3,101
10,766

181
-

257
-

570
—

15,756
19,300
3,o4i
36,076
22,964
58,986
12,197
8,729
5,192

14,486
9,244

5,905
16,073
13,334
3,19s
2,218

6,156
11,009
2,ll4
13,809
11,79s
30,270
12,421
3,056
1,169

_
237
-

~
59S
-

1,911
20,551
4j4o
21,667
S,200
22,772

3,745
20,274

301
-

165
-

835

9,39^
311

3,603
-

^,900
17,903
2,187

n,UoU

5,9^6

18,989
7,095
20,085

643

2,283

-

20J80
15,497
29,722
7,661
6,881
4,027
1,235

-

1,815
-

6,920
34,l46
11,192
26,856
6,691
25,209
-

1,272

-

|
1
|
1

6,331
19,^56
8,820
6,599
1
3,9^3
| 9,686
647

2,483

50,000

to

to

to

to

to

and

1,000

2,000

5,000

10,000

50,000

Total

over

2,570
2,624
6,569
1,844
-

17,577
2,654
3,537
26,194
8,75s
23,064
920
893

4,482
957

1,892
-

S,397
5,005
7,674
8,289
2,742
4,181
-

2,822

2,0SQ
6,745
9,160
2,953
2,972
3,75s
—

38,267
7,966
3,823
50,321
18,854
25,069
5,^77
2,760
1,150
1,616 i
4,342
3,327
20,917
3,151
7,751
5,926 !
5,031 i
6,174 1

-

_
-

18,807

12,590

7,244
2,500
4,439
7,190
—

35,347
3,990
-

61,768
26,062
18,337
4,530
10,748
2,444
—

2J56
27,535
16,024
4,815
4,384
7,204
2,210

-

5,005

13,783
—

'34,979

-

-

35,525
12,368
6,574

10,9H
-

31,357

-

19,317

5,084
35,330
21,389

15,440
14,370
27,823

«
-

_
-

11,899

5,363

-

3,133

1,475
9,619

-

-

S,467

22,56s

3,o6i

-

—

_
—
~
_
_
_
-

26,879
19,329
75,202
18,527
15,152
35,906
257
—

172,473
72,066
14,702
266,788
122,206
239,452
56,540
55,582
20,682
3,808
32,164
80,562
113,457
107,39s
50,507
100,893
35,912
91,168
3,599
2,122
59,130

Table XV - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931,
by States and by Size of Loans and Investments (Continued)

Q+Q+p'

Under

i^ vet w c

150
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Veimont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATES




.1,679
-

S,Ul2
25,500
2,710
11,936
2,085

392
-

8,656
17,715

^,737
9,699
5^5

150
to
250
l,l4l
10
*1
7,831
19,989
6,088

6,584
1,319
1,270
167
8,632
24,787
3,oio

7,530
1,876

~

-

3,346
2,335

3,443
1,957
3,l42
4,968
IT 3 ^

1,179

3,979
2.308

State Banks
Size groups - loans and investments in thousands of dollars
5,000
250
500
2,000
1,000
10,000 50,000
750

to
500

to
750

3,497
9.66

3,955

6,984

1,864
9,856
1,757
11,319
6,116
522
8JS0

—

-

21,608
18,884
9,622
11,148

2,923

20,061
9,402
17,164
35,698
6,019
2,897
12,709 | 4,252 i
3,016
710 1
—

—

1,138
7,305
5,212 1 1,668 1

5,559

10,886

14,527
9,504
~
1
3i695 !

to

to

to

to

to

and

1,000

2,000

5,000

10,000

50,000

over

1,069
16,217
14,123

15/364
5,966

38,234

5,996

20,124

-

-

-

-

17,635
3,951
4,179

30,120
4,492

16,702

4,653

35,336

79,688

5,019
66,436

-

—

6,251
3,562
5,193
6,316
1,5*7

14,922
7,091
6,514
10,083

11,050

—
—

-

5,501

—
-

2,731
6,783

-.
-

13,167
10,111

6,471

—

i,oi4
8,006
1,501
6,4io
1,392

Total

1,651
2,583

4,459
1,899
9,424

3,599
1,783
6,855

896

1,754
—'
4,243
6,049
3,229

-

. 50,269 213,U03
200,295
-

95,217

~
-

—
—

—
—
—

6,528
13,805
5,872

5,S!+0

12,463

_.
—

—
—
~

—

222,338 290,925 514,567 289,551 214,978 400,136 470,047 311,995

582,125

*
~
—
-.
—
—
~
—
—.
—
~
—,
—
—
—

12,992
339,301
98,375
68,029
303,915
47,826
22,483

301,558
1,063
78,974
111,51s

44,26s
67,483
14,205
1,014
24,992
37,504
45,224
46,291
10,577

213,403 3,570,115

Table XV - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending daring 1921-1931,
by States and by Size of Loans and Investments (Continued)

State

Under

'

150
.Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
IBisU of Col.
Tlorida
Georgia
Jflaho
XL l i n o i s
.Indiana
"Iowa
"Kansas
Kentucky
'Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Hebraska
Nevada
Hew Hampshire
Hew J e r s e y



3,235
835
9,770
53b

4,052
4,900
18,018
2 , 631
11,629

6,4o6
17,097
13,^23
3,19S
2,299
:
237
i

1,9H
21,038

Ml5

I 22,132
I 10,^5^
1 23,248
301
-

150
to
250

3,b95
894
8,281

3,564
M53

181
6,581
12,282
3,292
16,606
12,860

37,050
13,O4O

3,056
1,169
-

59s

3,745
23,138
6,180

19,945
9,4i6

21,127
165
-

4o4

National and State Banks
Size groups - ].oans and i n v e s t m e n t s i n thousands of d o l l a r s
250
1,000 ! 2,000
500
! 750
5,000
10,000
50,000
to
to
!
to
to
to
to
to
and
10,000
1,000
over
2,000
500
50,000
5,000
750
9,169
5,383
3,642
4,447
17,683
13,194
5,868
1,815
3,029
5,910
570
257
679
—
..
19,019
16,273
11,260
21,939
4,970
3,083
44,503
24,979
16,042
25,170
43,264
73,213
14,803
9,254
9,837 ! 8,118
5,192 ! 4,027
! 1,235
2,498
1,125
294
8,778
8,237
45,971
24,797
11,488
8,820
29,817
9,020
11,888
7,079
13,488
30,676
436
647
2,225 1 ^,952

7,244
4,716
3,541
2,624
2,500
6,745
8,384
10,991
6,so4
11,627
6,566
5,515
2,621
1,650
7,H2
~
18,807
5,655
~
—
—
49,588
37,986
17,577
2,654
6,667
12,639
8,174
.
—
io,46s
90,884
31,502
65,419
24,444 1 34,304
9,602
30,961
41,692 i 22,172
2,508 ! 6,524 1 9,083
2,760
13,566
893
4,482
3,102
2,444
1,616
957
"4,342
1,892
5,912
32,518
6,351
10,818
25,606
27,131
8,502
9,339
9,235
10,129
12,629
16,174
8,962
7,204
9,056
8,442
9,410
3,650
6,809
10,642
9,866
—
3,133
1,475
3,737 1 15,789 1 19,H9

7,023
12,590
~
_

! 17,439
i 8,748
I

~

50,753
12,368
12,756
5,^11
5,084
43,675
21,389
5,219
5,363
—
~
"*
"
131,323

-.
13,783
_
~
—
3^,979
_
10,911
31,357
57,038
15,440
42,854
27,823
—
—
—
_
11,899

-

37,523
21,687
88,890
42,514
28,527
37,803
936
—
204,342
94,207
32,618
347,186
141,196
309,562
68,695
103,877
22,715
3,808
37,128
125,692
135,438
142,020
75,454
111,499
60,339
115,856
3,599

-

2,55s
89,508

«.
—
_
~
—
—
—
~
—
—
—
I

Total

Table XV - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931,
by States and by Size of Loans and Investments (Continued)

State

_____
Under

150

150
to
250

1,81+5
2Jew Mexico
1,679
New York
!
139
North C a r o l i n a
8,545
8,527
North Dakota
26,869 1 27,166
Ohio
3,084 ; 6,550
Oklahoma
13,836
9,608
Oregon
2,217
1,545
Pennsylvania
626
2,633
Rhode I s l a n d
167
South C a r o l i n a
9,649
9,117
South Dakota
28,201
is,327
Tennessee
3,424
4,858
Texas
12,118
10,613
Utah
612
2,049
Vermont
|
Virginia
3,44 3
3,^91
Washington
2,335
2,75^
West V i r g i n i a
1,289
3,809
Wisconsin
4,229
5,559
Wyoming
2,584
1.882

em

UNITED STATES




1

298,780

National and State Banks
Size j•croups - loans anc . i n v e s t m e n t s i n thousands of d o l l a r s
500
1,000
2,000
250
750
5,ooo 10,000 50,000
to
to
to
to
I
to
|
and
to
to
over
2,000
1,000
10,000
750
500
5,000
50,000

4,718 \ 6,176 ! .4,144
4,204
3,692
6,711
12,364
24,359
8,785
28,687 ! 3,403
3,537
12,341
14,451
12,107
19,056
10,242
6,289
1,594 ; 1,783
4,658
10,886
17,981
12,057
896
10,610
23,973
8,773
46,196
21,340
5,157
4,036
6,019
6,871
21,464
9,064
9,008
3,348
710
1,587
w*

-

—

—

9,44o
8,129
9,550
15,515
^,715

2,540
2,336
12,528
U,955
62£

1,754
1,601
6,798
7,688
3,229

31+1,490 661,992

393,483

291,885

2,457
7,217
20,871 j 38,234
50,269 213,403
26,533
22,900
26,212 j 5,996 1 20,124
—
—
1,168
—
26,S8S
42,292
16,702 i 215,720
—
12,027 ! 9,048
9,031 ! ^,653 ; 5,019
~
!
89,106 1 109,780
58,426 !
46,439 103,695
—
1,535
—
11,050
22,317
—
—
2,380
5,501
12,736
7,805
26,113
2,731
—
16,676
21,429
10,111
25,255
3,246
6,471
—
—
—
2,152
-.
—
—
12,466
4,496
1UJ02
12,463
3,251
8,777
10,262
6,068
19,573
«.
3,106
9,224
—
—
—
i t 883
5,393
618,481

693,896

453,822

690,664

271,829

Total

28,236
364,700
137,812
90,830
350,135
80,106
30,500
451,629
2,598
95,489
139,838
6l,S57
135,738
18,023
2,152
37,630
56,3^8
69,877
57,276
20,3U
4,716,322

- i6s Table XVI - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931
per $100 of Loans and Investments of Active Banks on June 30» 1920,
" y Geographic Divisions and " y Size of Loans and Investments
b
b
South-1
Size group
!
Hew Middle N o r t h
South- South- We s t - Rocky Pal o a n s and
era
United
Eng- A t l a n - Cene a s t - weste r n 1 Moun- c i f i c S t a t e s
investments
Mountral
tic
ern
ern
land
Grain t a i n Coast 1
(000 o m i t t e d )
tain 1
N a t i o n a l banks
Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2 , 0 0 0 - 5i00C
5,000 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000
50,000 and over

3.0
5^6
1.9

23.8
12.2
1 1 . s ! 17.7
6.5
15.3
9.2
12.6
8.8
4.o

i4.o

Total

9.4
l4.5

3-1

k.e\

5.0
5.8
5.5
1.2
1.8

5.8

4.61
3-2

29.7
14.6
13.5
10.4
7.4
7.4
11.8
6.7
19.4

19. u
11.1
7.0
10.8
17.9
24.1
3-5

5 0 , 0 0 0 and over
Total

Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2 , 0 0 0 - 5,000
5 , 0 0 0 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000

9.6

4o.o

9.7
17.6
20,0
16.0
13.2
17.1
15.1
19.0
11.1
8.7

25.9
22.2
21.2
25.4
24.7
25.6
25.0
27.5

12.1

20.3

12.2

4.2
2.9
7.8
9.9
lU.9
6.9




6.9

48.0
38.2
30.8
23.8
25.3
25.4
10.7
7.4

19.7
21.5
19.9
6.3
12.0
7-7
5.0
13.9

47.3
32.4
19.6
12.9
10.3
11.1
9.1
8.0
3.0
ia

10.1

21.3

4.4

16.2

1

28.6
21.7
22.7
30.8
21.2
20.5
24.8

44a

68.5
46.9
52.3
47.3
46.6
51.4
54.2
20.2
50.0

37.9
23.8
28. S
26.4
39.9
23.3
19.8
23.4

6.5

l4.3
10.6
13.8

1 7.3
10.0
10.3
12.9
6.8

38.7
24.7
20.8
17.5
13.9
17.6
20.6
14.9
IS.8

1 7-3

55.9
36.8
34.5
30.5
54.0
29.4
8.6

28.6
21.7
14.0
3.9
7.4
6.2
9.9
8.4

49.8
34.0
29.5
25.7
26.1
22.2
20.3
18.3
15.6

12.4

57.0
4o.i
31.8
28.5
25.7
18.7
18.4
14.2
18.0

29.6
| 23.7
N a t i o n a l and S t a t e banks

1 24.1

2.9

_5^£

50.0

28.7
20.9
19.9
22.2
14.3
13.5
18.3
5.0

39.4
69.1
23.s
48.5
23.2
52.1
37.4
19.3
22.3
42.1
3 9 . 5 1 21.9
35.5
11.0
35.4
13.0
5.4

24.8

10.5
5.8
2.2

84.5
59.7
28.5
16.8
16.0
13.9
10.0
4.0

S t a t e "banks
10.2

50,000 and over
Total

53.4
23.8
16.3
12.0
9.8
20.8
7.4

19.3

4.o
Under $150
150 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 750
750 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,000
2 , 0 0 0 - 5,000
5 , 0 0 0 - 10,000
10,000 - 50,000

103.2
70.8
51.0
17.4
30.2
26.4
21.8
51.5

57.6
42.0
31.0
24.1
21.8
16.3
14.1
8.5
4.8

19.2
5.7
28.5
54.6
37.1
33.1
27.1
37.5
27.1
9.9
9.5

18.9

27.7
21.7
16.0
4.9
9.6
6.9
7.9
11.0

1 17.6

|38.3

33.8
26.5
20.4
18.6
16.4
14.5
13.1
9.4

1 1 -5 L i O
1 16.1 1 21.1J 2 1 . 8

14.1

U9.7

!

5.1

J13.0

Table XIV - Loans and Investments of Suspended Banks, 1921-1931 f Per $100 of Loans
and Investments of Active Banlcs on June 30, 1920, by States and
by Size of Loans and Investments
National Banks

States

S i z e groups - l o a n s and i n v e s t m e n t s i n t h o u s a n d s of d o l l a r s
itnder $150! $250 $500 #750 $1,000 $2,000! $5,000 •110,0001 $50,000
to
to
to
t o j to
to
to
and
Total
to
$150
250 500 750 1,000 2,000 5,000 10,000 50,000
over

Alabama
6 6 . 5 3 3 . 3 3 5 . 3 21.5 1 8 . 6
Arizona
-...
— 305.1 32.8
Arkans as
4 7 . 2 3 8 . 1 54.0 28.2 21.4
California
15.9 1 3 . 5 13.8 4 . 2 1 6 . 3
Colorado
5 0 . 2 24.8 19.9 4 . 9 1 1 . 5
Connecticut
Delaware
27.5
D i s t . of Col #
Florida
_-.;.; •44.. 4 .114.4 3 1 . 3
~
Georgia
81.6; 9 0 , 7 3 9 . 1 1 4 . 0
—
Idaho
. EI*& 77*6 25.1 34.8 58.7
Illinois
, 8.*4« 24,. 0 .18.9 8 . 2 1 0 . 2
Indiana
. :M„9 13*4 1 0 . 2 2 . 3
2.7
Iowa
22a. 6 129.5 3 4 . 5 28.4 2 0 . 5
Kansas
:8*8 7 . 1 8 . 5 6 . 0 1 5 . 2
Kentucky
—
8.1 8.3
—
Louisiana
.15.9! - —
—
—
Maine
Maryland
—
—
9 . 9 12.7
Massachusetts
— j
4.6 j —
Michigan
: ~ i ~ 42.2J16.7 3 0 . 1
Minnesota
5 5 . 9 | 4 8 . 7 24.6*13.5 1 3 . 4
Mississippi
69.9
(1) 1(1) 17.7J —
Missouri
118.0 24.8j 21.4114.8 1 2 . 9
Montana
j 54.7!36.8J50.6 42.6 13.8
Nebraska
1 8 2 . 4 | 3 5 . 5 23.2 1 1 . 3 1 6 . 0
1
Nevada
1
New Hampshire
•
New J e r s e y
2.9
- - J25.4 8 . 0 20.4
New Mexico
-32.2 3 1 . 2 J 4 8 . 4 7 1 . 1
New York
1 7 . 8 4 . 4 6.6 110.6 . 3 . 4
North C a r o l i n a 1134.3 9 6 . 5 6 6 . 5 * 2 3 . 6 8 2 . 7
North Dakota J116.8J77.7 3 7 . 0 | 1 0 . 3 32.6
Ohio
24.6 9 . 0 ' 1 0 . 4 8.9
6.9
Oklahoma
54.9 24.6 1 6 . 0 1 3 . 6 13.8
Oregon
5 2 . 2 1 4 . 5 21.8 1 1 . 3
—
Pennsylvania
5.3
1 1 . 1 15.6 6 . 0 112.1
Rhode I s l a n d
1
South C a r o l i n a 1174.6 287.3 5 6 . 1 1 1 . 2 7 3 . 4
South Dakota | 1 0 3 , 9 140.3 6 2 . 3 J 3 0 . 1 i 8.0
10.8 1 6 . 0
Tennessee
35.1 40.6
~




— ; • • • '

8.9

__

m* mm

— ••
--

19.1
4.0
13.9
9.1

7.7
4.9
15.9

—
8.8
--

—
—

71.9
17.4
39.5
13.9
10.4
20.1
2.4
—
33.8

14.8
11.6
__
24.7
11.4
6.0
15.3
9.6
—

184.7
136.1
—
23.5
__
22.2
—
24.7

-.-

—
5.6
9.4
10.2
54.5
17.0
30.0
15.8

10.3
4.2
17.7
9.0
45.4
—
19.4
3 2 . '2

—
7.8
—
—
(1)

7.1
107.2
7.0
25.5 !
6.7
8.2
24.3
26.6 1
4.0
(1) !
21.5
22.8 !
5.9 1

9.7
25.9
2.7
34.9

!

9.9
9.2
6.5
""
18.3

—
—

—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—

—
-M
60.6
—
-23.1
-—
—
—
—
mmmm

mmmm

'mmmm

6.8
_—

-—
-.--.

«...
••«•>

;

«...
-8.3
—*
__

—.
3.4

|

2.2
5.6
6.6
5.8
56.3
2.0
27.5
11.2

•"—

!
'
i

——
_--

7.1 1
mmmm

i

33.1
14.0
24.8
6.3
5.8
18.2
6.7
24.3
1.7

—
-_-.
-—
-—-

„

—.

--17.0

8.8
8.8
20.1
! 3.0
6.9
1.0
3.6

1

~~

—
13.6
—.
~~

[

0.8
6.4
i 42.1
! 0.6
27.7
26.6
5.6
11.4
5.3
7.4
2.6
13.6
29.2
9.6

Table XIV - Loans and Investments of Suspended Banks, 1921-1931,, Per $100 of Loans
and Investments of Active Banks on June 30, 1920, by States and
by Size of Loans and Investments (Continued)
National Banks
"
l

States

Size groups - loans and investments in thousands of dollars
Under $150 §2501^500 §750 01,000 12,000:$5,000 §10,000 #50,000
Total
to
to
to
to
to
to j to
to
and
250 500j 750 1,000 2,000 5,000 110,000 50,000
$150
over
9,1

6.6

18.7

7.8
15.1

14.5 8.0
33.8 7.7
27.5 17.9
10,6 20.4
19.3 23.9

23.9
19.6
9,5

12.7
7.4
11.9
2,8
15.9

11,3
8.9
28,6
5.0

UNITED STATES 47.3 32,4 19,6 12.9

10.3

11.1

9,1

Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
Y f s Virginia
iet
Wisconsin
Wyoming

57,9 21.7 13.1
19,6 40.5 23.0
36.6
90.8
50,7 32.3
34.9 30.2
77,1 55.4

•

i.

i

•

•!•

.

37.7

25.4
12.9
73.7
8.0

il

(1) One suspension, but no bank of this size on June 30, 1920«




10.2
7.1
2.4
3.9
9,4
17.8
3.3
19,1

3.0

1.1

6.5

- 171 Table XVII - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931
per $100 of Loans and Investments of Active Banks on June 30, 1920,
by States and by Size of Loans and Investments (Continued) ;

State

S i z e groups
Under 1501
to
150
250

Siate__Ban}£S
- l o a n s and i n v e s t m e n t s i n thousands of d o l l a r s !
2501 500! 750 1 1,0001 2,0001 5,0001 10,0001 50,0001,
rotal
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
500j 750 1,000 2,ood 5,000 10,000 50,000 over 1

•• I
4 1 . 4 2 1 . 5 3 4 . 4 3 0 . 5 3 5 . 8 1 7 . 3 100.2
*• 12 5 . 6
Alabama
— 37.9
Arizona
6 3 . 7 26.8 6 1 . 2 75.9 1 1 3 . 1 1 0 0 . 1
8.6
~
_
-. 55.6
6 1 . 3 5 2 . 9 6 0 . 5 5 5 . 8 4 0 . 5 7 9 . 0 20.9
Arkansas
(I)
California
5.7
3.0
5.4
1.7
1 1 . 2 3 0 . 1 8 . 1 1.7
•>• 1
— 16.3
Colorado
32,3 37.4 23.4 47.1
""
i
— 24.8
1
~
— 21.8
Connecticut
1
1
— 9 . 2 11 3 . 3| 9 . 1 1 — 2 5 . 7| 3 4 . 3 2 0 . 4
1 — _
Delaware
—
i
—
—
1
0.5
~*
—
~
-1
—
—
—
—
D i s t . of Col,
~
~
— -I
1
-1
- EOO.3
(2)
Florida
6 7 . 7 8 7 . 4 97.fl 195.0 154.6 1 7 3 . 0 5 2 1 . a 6 2 . 5
Georgia
7 3 . 9 4 0 . 1 4 6 . 3 4 1 . 0 1 9 . 3 23.9 1 4 . 4
26.8
— I
_i
— 25.7
Idaho
55.3 31.0 20.3
~
—1 4 4 . 1 2 9 . 6
1
-1
— 17.4
3.8
Illinois
3 6 . 9 2 6 . 3 27. q 2 5 . 5 4 3 . 7 4 0 . 7 31.7 2 5 . 4
~
— 33.7
Indiana
6 1 . 8 3 6 . 5 3 7 . d 34.9 2 2 . 2 2 8 . 4 3 7 . 0 4 4 . 4
Iowa
6 0 . 4 5 1 . 9 3 8 . 9 29.2 .'38.:2 2 4 . 9 2 1 . 3 1 6 . 0 ' 1 7 . 5
37.1
— 19.7
Kansas
33.5 19.5 14.9 26.4
5 . 1 1 4 . 7 63.8
~
~*
~
Kentucky
2 5 . 0 14.8; 2 1 . 4 2 4 . 3
5.1 12.7 56.8
133.2
30.8
~
—
Louisiana
3 9 . 4 1 5 . 4 2 5 . 1 24.8! 2 9 . 2
6.6 12.6
7.1
~
~
— i
—
—
— 19.7| 2 6 . 7
—
~
Maine
7 . 2!
3.4
~l 8 . 5 2 4 . 2
—! 14.7
13.5* 16.8 1 0 . 0
Maryland
10.2 19.9 19. d
—
_
— 11.4
— 10.8
Massachusetts
20.1 37.7
4.2
~
Michigan
4 8 . 3 2 5 . 6 i i . i! 1 3 . 0 2 0 . 1 2 3 . 0 15.5 1 35.4
10.6
12.8
—
—
— 25.1
Minnesota
6 1 . 4 3 8 . 7 2 7 . 9 28.6 1 2 . 1
7.3 13.3
-. 3 4 . 0
Mississippi
5 9 . 3 5 9 . 9 4 3 . 6 3 3 . 2 5 0 . 8 3 0 . 2 19.4
~
Missouri
38.7 29.5 24.5 12.1 21.9
8.5 10.0 18.1
14.3
_
~
—
Montana
82.7 44.6 37.2 41.8 39.2 40.7 10.8
38.6
~
~
—
Nebraska
6 7 . 6 34.8 25.8 2 6 . 5 3 5 . 5 3 7 . 2 1 5 0 . 0
35.0
—
—
—
—[ 34.7
—
—
Nevada
212.0 2 6 . 8
19.3
—
—I — j
— 27.0
— 17.7
-New Hampshire
7.1
—
—[50.9 30.8
- 110.4
New J e r s e y
18.8 20.2
5.7 1 1 4 . 7 1 6 . 1
—
New Mexico
5 6 . 8 3 2 . 6 6 7 . 0 312.3 1185.7 | 1 7 . 5
58.6
~
— 10.8
New York
5 . 2 i 8.2 i 1 2 . 0 20.4
9.6 1 8 . 1
5.5
9.6
9.3
— 42.0
North C a r o l i n a
6 6 . 3 4 0 . 1 4 4 . 1 i 3 9 . 5 1 9 . 3 4 1 . 6 15.4
62.4
(1)
—
North Dakota
69.6 49.1 46.0 j 24.1 74.7
51.3
~
— 30.5
Ohio
! 4 5 . 0 28.6 1 4 . 2 21.7 ! 2 3 . 5 1 9 . 5 2 2 . 2 1 5 . 6
78.2
Oklahoma
I 4 3 . 7 1 9 . 7 29.9 33.4 I 57.8 2 0 . 8 30.0
30.6
~
Oregon
4 1 . 7 1 6 . 8 2 0 . 4 3.4 21.9 3 3 . 2 2 4 . 5 7 8 . 3
20.2
Pennsylvania
1 3 . 3 22.8 3 1 . 3 2 6 . 2 1 4 . 1 1 5 . 9 2 3 . 0 27.4
27.9
20.2
— (1)
—1
—
Rhode I s l a n d
0.6
~
** 58.8
**
~
—
South C a r o l i n a
9 0 . 5 6 2 . 2 6 7 . 2 3 8 . 3 3 5 . 1 38.8 4 8 . 9
50.4
~
~
~
— 87.0
South Dakota
116.8 87.1 56.9 67.3 32.3 65.5
68.5
Tennessee
2 4 . 3 1 6 . 9 2 4 . 4 23.6 5 3 . 8 2 6 . 6 1 0 . 1
27.4
21.9
~
Texas
2 4 . 6 1 9 . 1 1 8 . 6 1 0 . 2 1 42.7 1 7 . 8 18.9 1
21.8
(1)
~
—1
Utah
3 4 . 6 3 2 . 6 3 5 . 5 7.7 3 1 . 4
— 23.6
17.4
~
~
—
—
—
—
—
Vermont
—
4.1
1.7
~1
~
~
—
— 14.6
Virginia
39.8 2 6 . 1 2 3 . 9 7.8 1 3 . 6 3 0 . 2
~
""
~
Washington
2 6 . 6 1 8 . 3 1 8 . 0 8.8
5.2 18.8 38.1
65.4
21.5
"*
—
West V i r g i n i a
4 1 . 7 4 7 . 6 2 1 . 6 68.8 2 5 . 0 1 5 . 0 5 8 . 6
29.5
— 10.8
Wisconsin
27.9 14.1 17.5 13.2 12.0
2 . 0 -13.7
~
~
Wyoming
56.1 34.0 42.3
396.7
139,4
UNITED STATES 1 49.8i.34.0 129.5 125.7 1 26.11 22.2 1 20.3 1 18.3 1 1 5 . 6 1 5.4 j l 9 . 2
(1) One suspension, hut no "bank of this size on June 30, 1920.
(2) Three suspensions, hut no hank of this size on June 30, 1920.




mm

I

" l
"

- 172 Table XVII - Loans and Investments of Banks Suspending during 1921-1931
per $100 of Loans and Investments of Active Banks on June 30, 1920,
by States and by Size of Loans and Investments (Continued)

State

Size groups
1501
Unden
to '
150
250

National and State Banks
- l o a n s and i n v e s t m e n t s i n thousands of d o l l a r s 1
250] 500! 750 1 1,0001 2,0001 5,000] 10,0001 50,000 1
Total
to
to
to
to
to
to.
to
and
500 750 1,000 2,000 5,000 10,000 50,000 over

4 2 . ? 2 4 . 0 34.71 2 5 . 6 28.51 llT3| 27M
•*• 1 1 6 . 6
** 1 •"• 1
*
Alabama
5.7
28.0
Arizona
59.11 2 5 . 2j 77.4 5 4 . 3 1 1 3 . 1 5 1 . 3
~
~
"*
Arkansas
60. Q 5 0 . 1 5 9 . 0 4 7 . 3 | 33.9 52.0 1 3 . 1
43.7
(1)
~
California
12.8 23.3 10.3 2.8 10.1
3.5
5.2
3.8
—
2.2
Colorado
33.9 33.8 21.6 15.1
7.0 1 7 . 0 1 0 . 1
9.9
*~
~
*
Connecticut
J 15.7
— 14 . 8
-1 1 6 . 0 15.9 1 2 . 6
—
10.6
~
Delaware
J
— 6.8 22.6
—
—
1.4
~
~
~
"1
D i s t . of Col.
•J
—
—
—
—
1
—
~
~
~
~
"1
"
Florida
6 6 . a 8 2 . 2 100.2 323.9 8 6 . 1 130.9 1 5 4 . 0 1 1 8 . 3
93.7
112.0
~
Georgia
73.9 42.6 45.3 30.5 12.4 21.0 13.1 26.5
22.1
~
~
5 4 . 6 3 9 . 5 2 1 . 9 22.7 7 9 . 0 3 5 . 2
—
—
25.2
Idaho
~
Illinois
3 4 . 0 2 5 . 9 25.4 1 8 . 8 2 8 . 2 2 8 . 2 2 9 . 1 24.8
2.6
12.4
~
Indiana
62. a 32.0 30.0 23.5 13.5 20.3 24.0 18.3
20.4
""
6 3 . a 5 8 . 3 37.9 2 8 . 9 3 1 . 3 22.7 1 4 . 8 1 8 . 5
33.1
30.1
Iowa
~
Kansas
32.9 18.0 13.1 16.7
8.8
8.1 24.6
—
—
14.7
~
Kentucky
24.4 13.7| 18.0 18.8
2.8
4 . 4 28.1] 1 9 . 9
74.3
27.4
Louisiana
3 7 . 4 1 3 . 6 23.8 2 1 . 8 2 2 . 1 1 3 . 4
—
5.6
6.2J
Maine
—
- 10.1 12.0
3.4
1.8
**!
-1
Maryland
1 0 . 3 1 6 . 2 1 5 . 2 5.0
7.3
8.2 10.2!
5.7 ! 9 . 0
- ! 8.4
Massachusetts
—
— 3.9
1
—
9.2
~
8.1
-1 7.6 1 2 . 8 | 21.8
Michigan
4 6 . 8 23.81 1 3 . 2 1 3 . 7 21.7 1 8 . 2 1 6 . 3 2 1 . 1
8.5
11.1
9.0 10.8
~
15.2
Minnesota
6 1 . 2 39.7| 27.01 2 3 . 1 1 2 . 6
Mississippi
~
39.2
6 0 . 2 6 2 . 3 42.0i 2 8 . 6 54.4 3 6 . 5 3 3 . 3
(1)
Missouri
3 9 . 2 29.2: 2 4 . 2 1 2 . 7 20.71 10.2'
6.6
7.0
—
~
9.0
Montana
7 4 . 5 4 2 . 4 4 2 . 1 4 2 . 2 26.9 3 5 . 5 1 6 . 3
~
33.2
Nebraska
6 8 . 5 34.8 2 5 . 3 1 9 . 2 2 4 . 1 23.7 4 2 . 6
—
—
24.1
Nevada
, 212.0 26.8
—
- 17.0
—
—
~
11.0
New Hampshire
— 5.4 7 . 5
-'
6.3
—
~
3.1
New J e r s e y
20.3 15.5 24.5
8.1 11.8
7.4 1 1 . 1
4.2
8.6
~
New Mexico
4 7 . 3 3 2 . 5 5 1 . 7 7 6 . 1 1 9 4 . 3 61.0 25.9
•* 1
48.3
New York
10.0 7 . 0 6 . 2 9 . 8
6.1 11.7
5.8 1 1 . 6
3.4
4.2 |
4.8
North C a r o l i n a
66.8 4 2 . 1 4 5 . 9 34.8 3 1 . 0 3 3 . 5 2 7 . 1 | 3 7 . 3 4 4 . 3
**
*
36.6
North Dakota
71.0 D T : . *j 4 2 . 5 1 4 . 6 4 6 . 8
5.4
—
—
—
41.6
~
Ohio
4 0 . 9 2 4 . 8 1 3 . 1 1 6 . 6 1 5 . 4 1 3 . 2 15.4
7.1
45.5
19.3
~
Oklahoma
4 5 . C 2 1 . 0 2 2 . 0 2 1 . 0 24.4 23.0 1 4 . 1
—
—
18.3
~
Oregon
4 2 . 2 1 6 . 4 20.9 5.4
7.9 2 9 . 3 1 2 . 6 7 8 . 3
—
11.7
~
Pennsylvania
1 2 . 4 1 8 . 4 112.4 1 6 . 4
8.2
9.3 14.5 17.3
14.5
8.9
12.9
Rhode I s l a n d
1C0.0
—
— 17.6 35.2
1.1
""
~
South C a r o l i n a
9 2 . 8 6 7 . 8 5 5 . 1 3 0 . 0 4 1 . 3 30.6 2 2 . 4
—
54.3
—
~
South Dakota
1 1 6 . 3 9 1 . 2 158.0 5 4 . 2 16.7 35.8 1 1 5 . 2 4 6 . 7
—
—
53.8
Tennessee
2 4 . 5 1 8 . 2 | 1 7 . 1 1 7 . 7 34.1 16.8
5.6
21.0
«16.1
Texas
2 7 . 8 1 9 . 8 1 5 . 9 9.6 1 6 . 3 1 8 . 3 1 0 . 3 3 0 . 1
4.5
13.9
~
~
9.5 13.1
13.3
Utah
3 1 . 9 j 3 3 . 2 3 3 . 7 6 . 1 23.6 i
~
"*
Vermont
—
—
—
—
~
2.0
** 4 . 7
~
~
Virginia
3 9 . 6 21.6 20.9 8 . 0
5.3 ! 2 0 . 2
5.6
7.6
Washington
2 6 . 2 23.8 2 1 . 7 8 . 5 10.4
6.2 1 4 . 7 2 9 . 3
11.3
15.1
~
West V i r g i n i a
42.4 4 4 . 0 2 3 . 7 5 0 . 1 2 2 . 7 1 3 . 7 4 4 . 8 1 1 . 0
23.9
~
Wisconsin
2 8 . 3 1 4 . 9 1 6 . 8 1 4 . 2 11.4
2.4
8.4
7.5
~
Wyoming
57.8 3 8 . 2 3 3 . 6 8 . 1 77.2 1 1 . 8
26.1
' — 73.7
-

•

" •

UNITED STATES J 49.7 3 3 . 8 [26.5 20.4

18.6
1 ,-

1.

1 16.4 1 14.51 13.1 1 9.4 1 3.0 1 13.0

'*' One suspension, but no "bank of this size on June 30, 1920.




- 173 -

Table XVIII - Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931* " y Geographic Divisions
b
and " y Size of Capital Stock
b

Size group
c a p i t a l stock

National and State Banks
w xJSouth-i SouthSouth- West- Eocky PaNew Middle Nortq
eastEng- Atlanwestern Moun- c i f i c
land t i c
ern
ern
Grain t a i n Coast
Itam 1

tral r H

Unitet
Stater

Number of suspensions
Under $25,000
25,000
2 5 , 0 0 0 - 50,000
50,000
50,000 - 100,000
100,000
100,000 - 200,000
!
2 0 0 , 0 0 0 - 500,000
500,000 - 1,000,000
1,000,000 - 5,000,000
5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 and over
Total

6
4s

2

8

46

9
3

71
17
4
2

49

is
47
47 1

)+9
20
IS
1
308

l4o
78
52
54
53 25

122
388
1201
2l6

483
280
134
225

4o
39 9 1

112i

20

"%
15

7

!

2

77

150
49
63
10
4:

162
196
72
87
22

357 1,739
201
i4*+
51
70
23
30 !
2

853
350
447
105
109
221
28

49
9
19
1 !

3

2

4o
54
9
44
11
10

9

3.o4
2,10(
83:
1,27?.
36:
59]
21c

3b(
71
5;

11 !
. 3 !
5

3
1,212 427

617

3.658

1,475

196

8,911

974
Suspensions per hundred a c t i v e banks on June 30, 1920
i
Under $25,000
25,000
2 5 , 0 0 0 - 50,000
50,000
50,000 - loo.ooo
100,000
100,000 - 200,000
200,000 - 500,000
500,000 - 1,000,000
1,000,000 - 5,000,000
5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 and over
Total




54.6
14.6 2 2 . 3
10.9
2 1 . 8 i 55.9
3.8
8.8
25.7
; 8.7
22.1 23.1
6a | 7 . 6 I 2 3 . 1 20.9 57.5
58.6
8.6 1 5 . 3
21.0 22.9 1 45.3
9.4
17.2 22.7 1 51.4
7 . 4 14.2
2 6 . 5 15.8
73.1
10. 4 12.2
3 6 . 1 22.0
51.2
10.3 18.9
30.8 16.3
4i.7
2 3 . 1 8.7
6 . 3 12.9
25.0
4.2
6.7

10.6

2 2 . 6 21.7

33-6 4 1 . 2 4 l . 8
29.2
30.1
28.2
31.1
25.7
41.8
22.6
5.1

21.7
16.2
12.7
16.5
13.9
5.2
15.3
9.6
8.8
10.6

1 36.9
32.9
35.0
28.2
29.9
21.0
24.4
22.7
18.2
13.2
2.1

39.2

14.2

30.9

5.4
13.0

4o.7

54.8
i

43.7
47.3
39.1
^4.3
26.0
39.3
17.6
10.0

44.1
41.6
34.4
37.9
33.1
30.O
31.1
7.7

29.9

(7**

Table XVI - Number of Bank S u s p e n s i o n s , 1921-1931, by S t a t e s and
by Size of C a p i t a l Stock
N a t i o n a l Banks

States

Under
§25

»
I
i
t
i
t
i
1

6
1
10
7
9

2
2
1
5

4
1
7
9
5

8
2
4
5
2

3
1

i
1

2

1

1
1
2

\
3

1

1

1

i
l

23
4
28
26
25
1
1

i
l
i
t
i
I
i
|
i
|
i
|
i
|
i
|
i
|

2
9
17
9
31
2
1

2
2
2
4
2
16

i
|

6
10
7
19
3
40
9
3
1

1
4
5
2
13
3

8
2
6
9
2
13
3
1

2
1
1

J

4

i
|

2

i
|
i
|
i
|
i
|
i
|
i
|
i
i

4
8
7

1
1
6
15
1
.
8
9
14

1
3
4
1

6
5
6
9

—*

4
38
2
6
37
8

7

1

4
1
12
4
rr

2
1

4

o

1
1

1

1

——

1
7
1
1
4

3

1
1
1

i
|

1
2

I
I

2
1
2

2
3
1

2

1
A

1

4

23
23
30
73
23
126
18
8
2
5
6
18
71
15
25
64
40

i
|
i
|
t
|
i
|
i
|
i
|
t

i

x

i

i
1
i
1
i
1
i
i
I I I
i
i
1




»
»

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delav/are
Dist. of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
Hew Hampshire
Hew Jersey
New idexico
Hew York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee

Size groups - capital stock in thousands of dollars
025
! $50
§100!£200 £500 $1,000' §5,000
$25 to C-50 to §100
to 1 to
to
to
and Total
200j 500 1,000 5,000] over
50
! 100

1
2
3
11
4
60
6
35
3
13
5
35
2

o

2

1

5

1

o

17
-

1
7
8

l

10
1
7
4
1

8
2
1

7
2
2
5
1

12
17
1

o

2
7
1
2

1

4

2
4

14
5
13

1

"I

r,

o

2
5
5
6
1
2

2
1
4

2
1

1

2

1
19
21
28
37
83
33
75
12
61
1
31
67
9

t7^

Table XVI - Number of Bank S u s p e n s i o n s ^ 1 9 2 1 - 1 9 3 1 , by S t a t e s and
l>y S i z e of C a p i t a l Stock (Continued)
N a t i o n a l Banks

States

Under
§25

Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATES




Size groups - capital stock in thousands of dollars
! $100 $200 $500 $1,000 $5,000
$25
§50
$25 to $50 to $100
to
to
to
and
50
100
200 500 1,000 5,000 over

i *°

23
2

zz.

10

21
1

1
2
9
8
3

2
1
4

4
8
6
5
3

3

8

2
2
1

13
1
3
2
3
1
1

429 116 338 . 98 169

5

9
1

i

2
1
1

1
1

2

1

1
1
1

—

1
57

IIIH

98
-

-

•

10

21
,

.

1.

1
,

•

1

.

I
l
l

Total
92
4
1
13
18
27
16
11
1,336

- 176Table XIX - Number of Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931, "by States
and hy Size of Capital Stock (Continued)
State Banks
Size groups •- capital stock in thousands of dollars 1
(100(2001 500 J l.oooT5,000
Under
50
25

State
V
V
K*

%***

\>

25
27
7

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Col.
Florida
Georgia

125
—

*9
—
_

57
132
13

Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
KentuckyLouisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATSS




10
+
2
150
170

*3
20
_
!

6
~

SI
68
3lU
60
220
1
—
—
—
—

114

365
145
15
—

S5
246
60

67
3
1

i

37

25

Total

to 50 to jioo to to to
to and
100
200 500 1,000 5,000 over
_59_

25

20 10 13 10
+ +
a 1 1 2

2

1
2

6

3
l

33 13 29 16 18 61 5
+
q 3 6 1 — 5 1!
+
1
1
iQ
6 12 1 1
2 1 k
li 3
-i
-i

-

-

— 1

^i

101!

26

1+61

_
—

_
—

14
4
23
72
52

10
~

32
IS
16
*3 16
15 k
9 1
~

—

2
—

7
15

+
35 29 1 0
107 1 2 16
+ +
lb 12 6
isi n 3^
+
9! 6 6
—

1
8

18 10
19 — 9
21 ! 12 16

55

38

22.

8

1

—
-

1 1 10 is!
+
22 5 6

1
1

—

5 —
1
*5 1 +
23 6
31 1
+
10 3
3 3
6 ~

—

—

— 1

68

3
2
2

3

1
1

l

-

-

3

1

1

l

—
.
_
—

—
*
~

2

—

~
-

—

—

—

~
—

•

12

7
—

pi

15
_1

2

2

5

1

—
—
~
—

—

l

—

—

^
,

—»

2

2

2

*"*j

«.

—

6
5
9

2
1

0

_

5

5

2

6
2

—1
1
1

l
11

2
1

_

— i

3

3

5

52
1+22

2H6

580

231

92
60

1
+

19
17

j

1

10 6
1 1
;
2 s 12
1 1
+ 1 2
_
1 1 1
+
1 30 31
+
7
2 _
21 30
8 7
+
5 1 1 2
5 13 M k
13 17 10 5
2 ~
l
~

365

—
—

2

O

227

101

^71
151
1+93

157
481
5

.,

2!
^

—

—
—
—
—
—
*
-

•

~
—
—
—

«
•

M

30
39
13
1

—
~

2
—

9

_
—

3^
21+s

—
.

1

l

37

"
"
~
—
~
—
~
~
—
—
—
—
~
~
**
"

—i

9

2
1
1 11
29

12
3k
25

" 1
"
1
—
—
—

l l 2
~
_
—
l 3 11
13 14 6 10
S
1 2 37 12 1 ~ —
+
+
1 + 20 6 7 5 5
1
27 53 17 18 5 8
J5 13 l 6 3

56
124 6S *7
—
3

-

2

-

+
3 IS 1 0 9
121 22 1 1 15
+
21 6 1 3
+
124! ^3 63 14
111 26 50 13
168 9 7 92 22
55 ik 23 10 11 10 7
7 6 13 7
~
3 1
1 7

•• 1
"

—

1

1

, J

1

I

—

M

2

i
1

1 »•

ill

1

M

—

1 1 • 1 —
*
•
11
5 I M
1 •
—
m^
mm

1

1

I •
—
I «-»

5

2

2

-

••
•

1
—

48
113
2

1 »•

255

}

-—

1

^
_

~

^53
117
23U

~

27

1

1— 1 —
1 " 1 "
"
"
2 1—
~
~

l

87
62

~
—

^

13^
51

1

3,014-9 1,671 ^22 93^ 267 1+25 155 262

«•

«
»

9

1
+

—
~
—
—
~

4l
36
23s

.
.

^

2
25

53

1+1

1

7,530

J

- 177 Table XIX - Number of Batik Suspensions daring 1921-1931, by States
and by Size of Capital Stock (Continued)
National and State Banks
Size groups - capital stock in thousands of dollars 1
50,
100]~200[ 500 1
1,0001 5,ooo 1 Total
Under]
25 i
to
and
25 to 50 to 100 to to to
100
200 500 1.000 5,000 over
, 25
_50J

State

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Col,
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana

j

Nebraska

-.

H

*
d
H
~

57
132
*3

m
2

x

150

4

2d

—1

6
—]

4
68

3lH
60

Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vennont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATES




27
7
125

220
1
1

:

iiS

365
11+5

15

2 1 12
6
+
9 1
15
15
25 11

H

H

—
-

1
—

-

3
2
— 1
20

9
-

23
139

4

}i

i

l
2

17
15

1

i

21

2

6
10

1

7
6

6
3

2

4

2
1
-J 12

2
-

i
i
i

1 !
1 1
- 2
7 12

52 19,
7
52! 31 66 18
93 23 22 5
132 75 61 13
1 3: 28

1+1

2

u

+
31 20 1 6 %
123 24 51 16!
8 n
71 11
141
82 19 51*
W
120 28 53 1%
138 i o
+
199
57 %
37 3!
11 H
7;
7 6
7 6
~
H

3

? 10 10
5 2 8
36 19 22
15
5
15 2 6
2 — 3
x

6

T

21
6 10
1 1

x

?
7

3

2
—
12
2
2
2
—

N
2

16
^ 10
3 2

—

—1

a
3

2

x

3

2 11
1 1

7

9

0

8

- - 20
1 11
+
l 12

-

1 7
+
2 5
-

1
+

6

1

\l)

~

9

u

u

21

2

2
-

5
3
6
2

!

3
i

— — —I 2 1 —
10
+
22
I ?5- 1^2
52 10 37 10
8 2
2H6
1 63
!
60
18 ^3 7 7 11+ ~
71 1 9! 55 21 30 15
+
1 6?
11 6 I 7 - 2
—
3
- —! l 1 mm
37
19 12 12 5 8 2
2
25 i 21 1 ^
5
16 22 0
1
+
*
"
2
$
55
3 20 7 6 23.
u _ 2 10 2 —

l
2
-

2

3

g 2 1 15 13 ll+
12 1 8
IS 1 12 2 2 l 5
22 ! 3 28 ! lU l + 38! 33
l

~

3

~
•— 1 —
1
~
2 1 2
1
5
l i
l
—
—
l
2
3

3

8
38 13 19 11 10
2 2
~ —

32 33
132 21
5S 19
78
39 1

~
1
2
—
—
—
2
-

3

sq

n
2<
3
7
13

«• 1
"

1
2
2
—

i

3

l

82

^5
269
706
299
100
62

U

2^

23
119
5^2
166
51s
221
521

5

4
62

61+
275
552

179
310
60

~
~
~
~
"
"
-

7

2
—
-

3gg

~

—
10
— 1 1
-

2

Ik
2
250

1
~
—

i+

~
*
—
—
2
~
-

3S
276
56
11U

—

8

—
—
-

110

1

~
~
~
~
—
~
~
~
~

2

15

*•
•

171+

3

286
520
126

1 ~

326
31

~
—
*
~
~
~
~

3
~
-

2
100
80
101

150

0±

• 1

3.0i+9 2,10'0 838 1.2* 365 59^ 212 360

7^
j

1

51
j

8,916
1

/7?

Table XVII - Number of S u s p e n s i o n s , 1921-1951* Par Hundred A c t i v e Banks on
June 3 0 , 1920, by S t a t e s and by S i z e of C a p i t a l Stock
N a t i o n a l Banks

States

Under

i

$25
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Col.
Florida
1
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
Hew Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
j
Hew York
North Carolina;
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania j
Rhode Island j
South Carolina!
South Dakota
Tennessee
1




Size groups - capital stock in thousands of doi:Lars
I $50
$100 !$200 $500
$5,000
[5251
to |$100
to ! to
$25 1 to #50
to
and Total
to
50
ilOO
200: 500 1,000 5,000 over

WJooo

o6»o 25.0 21-.1 — — 33.3
50.0 — ; 14.3
43.5 50.0i 28.037.5 36.4
7.5
9.3 125.0 11.5 —
18.8 | 33, 3 9.4 16.7 8.3

*mmm

22.2

8.3

50.0 12.5
6.3 6.9
50.0 37.5
16.7

—
—

8.3
~m.

-«

20.0
—
40.0
37.5
14.7
13.2
34.4
2.3
3.0

—
—

_~
~
--

"" :
—

i

—

j

—
—

;
!

-——

66.7 66.7 60.0
9.1 28.6
13.3
37.5 100.0 25.0
11.4 12.5 41.4
8.3 16.0
3,3
27.7 57.1 12.5
8.8 • — 10.0
3.3
10.0
""
. 16.7
—
l
"
*
"""
8.3 - i 4.3 12.5
33.3 —
-.
—
2.2
— ! 4.8
4.5
33.3 — ; 21.4 20.0 6.1 40.0 17.6
22.1j21.2j 24.6 41.2 8.7 (1)
9.1
200.0 — i 20.050.0 30.8 100.0 57.1
19.4 57.ll 26.7! 10.0 17.2 100.0 __
47.4 61.5J 50.0 44.4 11.1 25.0 28.6
17.8 35.0J 18.7 36.4 21.1 50.0 16.7
—
i
16.7
4.0 10.0 12.5 —
5.7 16.7 17.4
-~ 75.0
21.4 75.0 41.7 100.0 55.5
8.9 28.6 5.2 —
4.2
3.3 3.6
50.0 3O0.0 50.0 25.0 30.0 166.7 33.3
47.6 50.0 56.2 25.0 10.0
7.8 21.4 9.7 10.7 8.0
5.3!11.4
17.6 35.0 18.9 37.5 27.6
— {31.6
15.0 —
—
16.7 50.0 6.o
14.3
6.6 9.5 5.4 14.6 7.1 13,1 2.0
16.7
50.0 66.7 60.0 20.0 38.9 28.6 16,7
57.4 35.7 43.6 ioao 30.8 50.0 -9.1, 16.7 5.3 15.4 7.1
9.1
VM«M

—.

—

50.0 40.0 —
22.2 43.5 9.1
22.2 33.3 66.7
12.1 14.1 11.1
11.8 6.5 14.3
55.2, 31.0 64,3
— i 11.518.8
— 1 12,0 —
— j 9.1

:

-.-

~_
—
«50.0

—
-~_
~~~
_-.

20.0

50.0

—.

—.
28.6
.«
~—
--.

—

50.0
50.0
—
40.0
mmmm

—
„

—.
~(i)
..
..
—.

«...
—.

mmwtk

-~
—
—
-~

—.

—.

••
••

—

--.

-.«-

—~
_—
—«...

——

7.1

M—

18.2

-_
10.5

20,0
._
.
__
.
66.7

-—
—20,0

——

——

-_
—-

-«.
~_
»«IH

•i*l

m

22.8
20.0
33.7
8.6
17.7
1.5
5.3
43.4
24.7
37.0
15.2
9.1
35.2
7.2
6.0
5.3
__
5.4
3.8
16.1
21.5
50.0
18.4
44.1
21.3
1.8
9.0
44.7
5.7
42.5
45.9
8.9
21.0
13.3
7.2
5.9
37.8
49.3
9.2

/7?

Table XVII - Number of Suspensions^ 1921-19U1, Per Hundred A c t i v e Banks on
June 3 0 , 1920, by S t a t e s and by Size of C a p i t a l Stock (Continued)
N a t i o n a l Banks

Under
States
025
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
liTyoming
UNITED STATES

mmam

S i z e groups - c a p i t a l s t o c k i n t h o u s a n d s of d o l l a r s
#25
§50
§100»§200 $500 1$1,000}$5,000 r
§25
t o §50
t o $100
to ! to
to
to
and T o t a l
50
100
200 500 1,000 5,000 over
21.1 1 8 . 5 1 5 . 3 1 5 . 4 11.8
—
33.3
16.7
6.3
3 . 1 1 4 . 3 10.8 — 1 2 . 0
8.5 50.0 3 6 . 4 ! 6 6 . 7 1 1 . 1
29.0 25.0 22.2 20.0 1 3 . 6
22.9 — 1 6 . 7 7 . 1 3.2
2 7 . 3 50.0J 25.0 —
9.1
1
1'
20.1 25.4j 1 7 . 3 19.8 1 1 . 9
in i •

—
—
—
—
—

27.8 1 8 . 8
—
25.0

11.1

10.0

—

16.7

—

20.0
16.7

—
—

50.0

—

12.5 12.5
(1) 1 2 . 5
25.0 16.7
—
—

15.6!12.9

i

L

(1) One suspension, but no bank of this size in 1920.




10.0

••• i '

~-

16.5
14.3
2.0
7.9
20.7
22.1
10.6
23.4

5.6

~

16.7

-—
*mm*

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- 1S1 Table XX - Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931 P e r Hundred Active Banks
on June 30t 1920, by States and by Size of Capital Stock (Continued)

State

National and State Banks
I
Size grou pa - c a p i t a l s t o c k i n thousands of d o l l a r s
100 200) 500 1 1,0001 5,000 I
Under!
50 I
25 I
Total
100
to
to
to
to
to
to
and
50
25
100
200 500 1,000 5.000 over
25
_5°J

••• 1 3 1 . 7
Alabama
32. J 3 6 . I 3 M 3 3 . 3 4 5 . 4 2 3 . a 1 8 . 8 2 0 . 0 3 3 . 3
Arizona
7 0 . d hi.H 33.3 26.3 l o o . q 4 2 . 1 100.0 33-3
43-7
"*
Arkansas
(1)
57-3
65.4 51.7 53-6] 44.4J 59.4 64.7 100.0 33-3
— s
California
7.8
13-S 1 0 . 1
5.9
""
7.q to i11.3 3 . 8 7.7
28.8
Colorado
34.8
29-7l 2 5 . 4 2 0 . 0 1 7 . | 28.6 33-3
— 8 . 6 20.0 10.3
—
Connecticut
-1 2 8 . 4
11.8
22.2
10.1
—
—
—
Delaware
-1
40.0
-1
5-1
D i s t . of Col.
—
Florida
(2)
96.9
6 7 . 1 6 6 . q so.q 104.5 128.6 158.1 240.0 233-3 6 0 . 0
Georgia
6 2 . 0 6 8 . q 40.d 49.O 3 8 . 1 40.01 3 5 . 3 31-3 4 0 . 0
53-7
—
Idaho
—1
36.9
2 8 . 3 U2.3 32.q 28.9 7 7 . 8 4 5 . 8 3 3 . 3 16.7
Illinois
1 8 . 8 24.7 25.3 2 2 . 4 20.9J 23.7 3^.7 6 2 . 5 4 6 . 2 2 1 . 4
26.3
~
—
Indiana
50.0
30.6
26.7 3 6 . 6 3 0 . 6 2 0 . 0 2 8 . 0 3 4 . 8 16.7 16.7
—
41.2
Iowa
34.0
55-1 3 7 . 1 5 2 . 6 3 8 . 3 3 6 . 4 2 0 . 4 5 0 . 0 50-0
&
Kansas
2 4 . 4 2 1 . a 16.7 2 2 . 0 1 0 . 0 19.1 3 3 . 3 1 0 . 5
22.3
—
Kentucky
17.1
16.5 25.9 8.0 14.3 22.2 22.2 66.7
19.1 12. a
—
—
—
Louisiana
25.6 20. q 20.0 3 1 . 1 3 6 . 8 2 5 . 0
23.2
14.3!
—
—
—
—
— !
—1
Maine
J 6.0 12.5
~l
3.^
—
— j 10.2
H
Maryland
28.6 1 3 . 3
8.3
1^.3 14. l
5.6
7-7
!
Massachusetts
J
3.6
2 . 8 10.7 1 4 . 0 , 9 - 5 ' 1 0 . 5 1
S.5
—
Michigan
18.2
6.7!
1 5 . 3 17.8^ 17.2 21.71 33.3 1U.3 9.5 2 7 . 5 to.7
—
Minnesota
38.9 3 4 . 2 to.9 ?^*7 5to3 1 2 . 5 5 0 . 0 3 . 8 1 0 . 0
7 7 . 8 56.3 100.0
60.2| 51-91 36.8
[Mississippi
26.9 33.3!
—
'Missouri
3 3 . 1 2 7 . 4 27.0 4 3 . 4 3 4 . 0 20.41 4 2 . 9 1 6 . 3
31.5
—
—
—
52.2
^Montana
53.61 6 1 . 6 57.5
33-3 26.9 5 7 . 1 3 1 . 8
—
43.6
Nebraska
41.6! 49.11 5to3 3 5 . 7 4 8 . 1 3 4 . 2 33.3I 5 0 . 0
-.
_
-;
Nevada
50.0
50.0
! 15.2
33.3
—:
—
— i
- 11.1
- 11.1
—
—
New Hampshire
3.8
- ,15.2 20.0 1 0 . 0
—
New Jersey
10.0 10.2
21.4 ; i s - 2 .
12.0
- 3 5 . 4 5 0 . 0 58.3 I 3 3 . 3
—; 5 0 . 0
— !
—
New Mexico
50.8
—
New York
j
— 8 . 0 1 1 . 1 1 §-3 v5-6
7.0 7.6
6.1 13.s
5-0
7.8
North Carolina
to-9 . t a . 8 89*2 66.7 1 40.6. 2 S . 4 157.1 to.7 6 0 . 0 5 0 , 0
to.6
—
~
—
North Dakota
1 6 3 . 8 6 1 . 1 7 7 . 8 53.6 4 0 . 0 1 1 . 1
61.5
- 2 0 . 0 25.7 2 1 . 5
~
Ohio
18.1
9 . 1 1 0 . 1 3 1 . 0 15.6 1 9 . 0 3 8 . 5
—
Oklahoma
35.7 2 8 . 4 3 5 . 4 3 3 . 6 2 1 . 1 30.8 2 5 . 0 2 9 . 6
*~
32.3
—
—
Oregon
2 0 . 8 32.7 1 8 . 2 1 9 . ^ 2 5 . 0 6.3 2 5 . 0 35.7 5 0 . 0
21.8
Pennsylvania
9 . 4 8 . 8 8 . 4 19.7 8 . 1 1 5 . 1 15.7 35-7 14.9
12.3
~
—
—
—
- 100.0 1 1 . 1
~
~
—
Rhode I s l a n d
~
9-1
6 3 . 4 53.7 62.7 IZ6--9 4 0 . 9
South Carolina
7 2 . 6 |54.1 8 1 . 6
63.I
~
~*
~
~
South Dakota
7 2 . 6 7 7 . 2 8 7 . 0 8 4 . 0 9 0 . 9 4 2 . 1 66.7 \xxxo
~
1 •^ 7 5 .. 6
* 23 1
— 21.7
Tennessee
25.0 1 9 . 1 27.7
24.1 43. 8
20.0
~
Texas
21.1
1 7 . 4 2 4 . 3 2 6 . 3 2 0 . 4 2 2 . 3 17.1 P*2.9 18.9
9-1 1 3 . 3
~
- 18.2
Utah
2 0 . 0 3 6 . 7 33.3 2 2 . 6
22.2
23.5
~
— 5-0
— 1
—
Vermont
I
2.3
2.9
~
~*
~
Virginia
22.8 2 6 . 4 118.8 2 1 . 1 16.7 1 8 . 2 1 3 . 3 1 9 . 2
20.0
~
""
~
Washington
2 2 . 5 1 9 . 1 5.0 2 9 . 8 35-7 7 . 5 m o 1 4 . 3
20.5
33-3
~
- 2 9 . 4 3 1 . ^ 33-8
—
West V i r g i n i a
2 6 . 1 2 8 . 0 ho.s 2 5 . 0 4 2 . 9
29.9
—
— 5.4
Wisconsin
1 3 . 6 2 9 . 1 12.6 ito 3 1 9 . 4 9 . 0
14.3
""
15.5
Wyoming
36.7 5 0 . 0 to.7 2 0 . 0 26.7
40.5
~ 50.0
|21.0 |2to4 [22.7 j 1 8 . 2 |l3^t 12T1 [ 3 0 . 9
UNITED STATES 1 36.9
(32.9 [35.0 (28.2 [29.9
( 1 ) One suspensi*on, bu.1; no 1bank of thi s siz«i in '.L920.
(2) Two suspensionsf hut no "bank of this size in 1920,




4

i.i

v-i

iA

•m

• —

Hi

• *

* 182 -

Table XXI - Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931* "by Geographic Divisions
and by Size of Town

Population
of town

National L and S t a t e Banks
South-1
New Middle North
South- South- West- Rocky- Paern
United
e a s t - westEng- A t l a n - Cene r n Moun- c i f i c !
MounStates
tral
tic
ern
Grain t a i n Coast;
land
ern
tain
Number of £suspensions

Under 500
500 - 1,000
1,000 - 2,500
2 , 5 0 0 - 5,ooo
5 , 0 0 0 - 10,000
10,000 - 25,000
2 5 , 0 0 0 - 50,000
5 0 , 0 0 0 - 100,000
100,000 and o v e r
Total

_
1
+

b
1
+
7
6
7

_I5
1+9

i+i
23
39
5
21
.12

270
2ll+
230
123
72
72
58'
37
136

308

1,212

25

31

11+6

81
75
37
27
13
13

9
_2i
1+27

372
280
377
166
S3
91
29
37

l+o

1.H75

1,805

253
199
224
135
66
65
12

7791

23I+
10l+
11+1+

1+8 3,153
37 1,731
52 ! 1,756
770
17
10
1+27
11
3S9
2
ll+8

605
198
102
72
ll+
26
•?7

-16

_i&

393

97i+ 3.65S

617

196

8,916

5
-15

^7 1

1+0
19
9
1
+

ll+9

3

•

Suspenj sions 13er huncIred act;ive "banks on June J>0, 1920
Under 500
15.2 : 22.9 21+.1
500 - 1,000
12.2
20.8 23.5
3.6
2 2 . 2 19.6
1,000 - 2,500
8.9
2 , 5 0 0 - 5,000
6.7 - 9 . 0 i 2 2 . 5 1 5 . 5
7 a
5,000 - 10,000
16.0 ; 2 1 . 6
3.6 \
10,000 - 25,000
18.8 16.5
5.0 | 1 1 . 3
2 5 , 0 0 0 - 50,000
8.6
3.7
23.3 26.0
50,000 - 100,000 12.7 13-5
3 1 . 1 1 lU.g
100,000 and over 21*5. 1 2 i l
30.6
3^3.
Total

6.7

10.6

22.6

21.7

68.1+
52.7
51.6
^7.3
39.2
51.1
1+9.2

| 32.1
1 26.8
1 27.5
33.2
1 32.1+
1+2.8
26.7
13.2
51+.!+
190.5 1 2 3 . 1
54.8

29.9

1+2.9
1+5.1
1+1.8

1+2.8
1+1+.3
1+1.1+

1 3^.7

27.2
37-0
22.1
28.1
(1)

29.U
26.3
23.3
23.6
22.9

J 3LJ+

20.8
17.3
17.2
1 8.6
7.6
11.6
5.3
'7.9
11.6

1
1to.7 39.21 1I+.2 1 30.9
1

(1) Tour suspensions, but no bank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.




38.1
33.6
30.9
25.1+
21.2
22.1+
20.0
23.1
24.0

/£3

Table XIX - Number of Banlc Suspensions^ 1921-1931, by S t a t e s and
by Size of Tovm
N a t i o n a l Banks
'• '" '"' ' • " •

•

"' "1

Si ze groups - population
States

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist« of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New .Jersey
Hew Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee




Less
than

500
to

3
—
—
4
3

2
—
5
2
3

l,000i 2,500 5,000|10,000j 25,0001 50,000jlooToool
to ! to
to
to
to
and | Total
to
500 1,000 2,500 5,000 10,000; 25,000 50,000 100,000 over 1

3
—

15 J
6
9

•

1
1
2
3
4

5
1
3
7
5

!
|
!
;
|

«_ 1
.

i

9 !
l !

j

—

3

mmmm

|

2

•M —

mm mm

—

1
—
—

«.
..

—

1

-- j

—

j

l
3

1

!

1
9
6
11

—.

—
5
2
14
5
36
3
2
1

—

1

2

~~
—

5
4
2
17
—

17 i

9
36
91

1

4
5
4
10
3
20
4
1

—
12
—
3
22
5

1
19
—
4
13
10

4
25
5
6
23
12

1
1
5
10
—
5
-6

—

—
3
4
4
1
32
4
7
4
10

1
3
5
7
9
20
8
26
6
16

4
6
3
8
3
7
11
—
15

2
2
7
—
25
2
13
—
4
—
15
™

7
13 !
2

9
28

2

8
7
2

4
3
6
8
—
10
—
1

1

3
5

2
3
1
1
3

—

8

—
2
5 i 1
8
7
1
1
1
9
4
—
2

1

13
—

2
—
3
1
2
1
—
—

1

—
1
—
4
1
2
-—
1

i

2

—
—.
2
—
1
I

mmmm

1

-.-

1

1
-_
1
__

1
1
1

j

1

|
i

--

9
—
-—.
1
-.
..

—
--.
1.
—*
—__
—--

1
—
2
1
1
-_

—
1
j

|
!

1

3

1
2
4
6

2
—

2

l
3

i
i
j

1

3
1

—

!
3 !

5
4
4

—

2

—
-

2
—

3
3
2
4
2
3

—
4
«.
..
„
**«M

„

-—~

i

1

"
|

2
..
..
MM

3
•—
.
—
5
__

i ~~
__
—

i

23
4
28
26
25
1
1
23
23
30
73
23
126
18
8
2
5
6
18
71
15
25
64
40
1
19
21
28
37
83
33
73
12
61
1
31
67
9

Table XIX - Number of Bank Suspensions^ 1921-1931, by S t a t e s and
by Size of Towi (Continued)
N a t i o n a l Banks

States

Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UOTZTED STATES




Si ae grotips - p o p u l a t i o n
Less 1 500 1,000 | 2,800 5,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 100,000
to
t h a n I t o 1 to 1 t o ! t o
to
to ;
and T o t a l
500 !1,000 2,50Q 5,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 100,000 '
over
9
1
2
—
6
1
2

17
—
—
1
4
4
5
5

171

255

21
—
1
5
8
10
6
2
408 |
______

-

4
1

1
~
1
1
—

—
—
—
—
—

-.-.
—
—
—
—

36

19

35

17
2

9

11

4

4
2
2
2
—

—
2
2
1
—

—
2
2
-2

202

118

92

92
4
1
13
18
27
16

n
1,336

- 185 Table XXII - Number of Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931, " y States
b
and " y Size of Town (Continued)
b
State Banks
State
VJ

" Lr** VI \w/ '

fUiider. 1 500
I

to

500
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vexmont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATES
-




Population of town
55,0001
10,000 j;
I1,000]2^001 5,000 1

z

ia

to

l.ooq
2d

1

kl\

—
-

1

1
44
84
68
48

20

127
19
121

42
264
139

l4l

19
10
-

5
27

-

-

23
238
!5
+
230

15
97
4l
95

18

91

28
101 i

2
1

-

—

12

11

2

~

-

5
35
65
27
53

3
4
64
19

Z

86
24
4

10
8

—

-

75

41
ill

%

27

49

53
9
—

1
—

16

'

-'

1

x

3
9
7

12

9
3

*

1

15

28
18

20

7

7
6

23
72
27
5
9

2

6
1

30
10
11

14
14
3

16
3

l
2

~
—

l
—

2

1

3

—

~
—
—

3

9

~
*
^
~

""
~
2

~
—

\

'
—

3
6

15

—

—

—

12 1
3 I
1
1

~
—
~
~
11

19

]

_

~

~
~

3
3

4
5

x

2

~
~
••
*

2
—

3

1

1

5
6

297

h

^71
151

493
.

157

4£i

5
2
25
4i

36

2

469
146
237

*
+
45

113
2

l

I

_

12
9
2

3

5
5

5

1 •-»

-•

101

238

11
1

1

19
17

15

10

16

92
60
4

5
19

6

2

l

281

-

1

-

246
580

7 1

5
5

2

422

2

41

16
5
9
16

^

—
—

-

1
1
8
2

227
365

8

—
-

2 !

1

—

11

1

309

56s

— 1
- j

-

3
1
— 1
2 j

4

5
3

9
15
9
6

1

1

l

\

-

19
19
l
~ 1 ~
~
l
2
1
*
10
4

6
3
6
16

3.
2,982 M76 1,348
1

9

29

^

27

11
8
2

—

10

14
27

,15

48

J

7
3

10

12
47
9

—
-

1
3 1

5
16
23
2

46
5
9
69
76

—
-

248
30
89
13

10

5
4

5

&

1
2

7
9

21

~ 1
-

23

2 I
10

S7

5

3
3
1

10
8
12
11

18 1
6 1

—

12

12

42
19

71

14
25

11

—

2

over

2
1
2

-

21
20
1
84 : 23
2

!

79
372

8
1
1

-

66
26

21

i

s

7

10
1

14

1

—

11

*7

20

—

V
16

23
41

95
36

9
1
4
3

III
7

22

51

2

- 1

30

A

, - j

-

*
*
-

65
87

3
—

12
1

H
3

17

7

248

LOO,000
50,000 1
:
Total
to
and

to

*

6
38

55

-|

"*
*

to

1

^

Ol

52
15
12
-]
5j

ll\

to

2.50Q 5,000 10.000 25.000 50.000 100.000

7
51
5
^
11
I

sa

to

1

255
^53
117
234
27
1

87
62
7^
134
53

1 .... my,y.

130
\

358

7,580
-

- ISo Table XXII - lumber of Bank Suspensions during 1921-1931, "by States and
"by Size of Town (Continued)

State

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist. of Col*
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
JMississipm
Missouri"
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
JTew Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

National and State Banks
Po]
mlation of town
_J
500 1,000 2,500 5,000 10,000, 25,000 50,000!100,000 1
Under
to ;
to
to
to
to
to
to
and Total
500
over |
1,000 2,500 5,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 100,000

28
7
70
16
26
—
—
74
93
16
81
60
131
45
21,
14!

44
19
21
49

22
7
56
7
14
—
1
_
44
89
17
82
53
177
55
17
13
—
6
16
116
41
99
41
111
_
3
6
9
36
97
31
60
14
18
—
48
124
29
70
9
—
17
16
18
32

29

10

20

26
6
82
5
44
—
—
—
20
127
24
125
44
281
139
33
14
—
7
23
250
45
233
113
253
2
3
14
7
79
397
29
99
24
8
—
75
252
48
58
2

—

2

3
:
22
91
31
99
47
96
2
1
6
17
11
73
39
33
72
11
25
78
104
14
68
9
1
15
25
25
34 1

UNITED STATES 3,153 1,731 1,756




18
7
41
10
7
3
1

2
5
14
4
4
1.

,-

6
12
3
4 |

3
-

~
—
23
17
13
25
16
21
5
5
8
1
1
10
21
11
28
11
13
~
1
4
5
8
13
5
16
16
3
10
1
17
9
9
28
1
—
1
3
12
5

1
1
11
2
1
24
5
10
23
2
25
—
14
6
2
30
—
—
2
6
6
3

1

3

770 i 427

389

—'

26!
35
9
37
26
61
21
8
10
1
1
1
19
35
21
25
1
29
_
—
6
16
8
29
8
23
34
2
25
—
37
19
11
50
6
1
10
5
8
18
1

23
9
3
34
12

3
2
1 |
21

—
—
!
1
!
!
!

14 !
18

3
— |
—!
2i
31
13 !
10 1
15 !
12 j
61
7 !

9 !

—

17 i

15
5
1
4
1
2
3
5
—
2
1
2
—
2
2
.
12
1
14
4
1
1
5
6
~
7
1
_
3
—
6
7
—
148

i

3
3
1
3
1
2
—
7
7
13
16
11
6
—
2
—
—
5
6
—
—
6
—
3
—
—
6
—
3
8
~
1
_
12
—
12
.
1
2
—
—
3
—
5
1
—
149

5

-

~

6
13
3
—

24
11
81
27
5
9
9
—
—
2
11
5
19
15
—
9
_
3
—
17
~
—
22
2
4
i

50

1
_
—
12
13
3
—
5
6
1
I
—
393

110
38
1 276
i
56
i
114
14
2
!
250
388
82
495
269
706
299
100
62
4
24
23
119
542
166
518
221
521
5
3
44
62
64
275
552
179
310
J 60
174
3
286
520
126
326
31
2
100
80
101
150
64
8,916

/Z7

Table XX - Number of Suspensions j 1921-1931, Per Hundred A c t i v e Banks on
June 30, 1920, by S t a t e s and by S i z e of Tovm
N a t i o n a l Banks

States

Sizo groups; - population
~r
"
Less 500 11,000 2,500i 5,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 100,000
to
to
Total
than to
to
to
to
to
and
500 j1,000 2,500 5_,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 100,000 over
,

50.0
Alabama
—
Arizona
—
Arleans as
California
21.1
Colorado
13.6
Connecticut
Delaware
Bist. of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
71.4
Illinois
10.5
9.1
Indiana
Iowa
44.7
—
Kansas
Kentucky
—
Louisiana
llaine
—
Maryland
iiassachusetts
—
Michigan
Minnesota
28.6
—
Mississippi
Missouri
60.0
Montana
38.6
Nebraska
23.8
Nevada
New Hampshire : —
New Jersey
: 40.0
' 18.2
New Hexico
Nev/ York
22.6
North Carolina —
42.4
North Dakota
9.1
Ohio
Oklahoma
\ 36.1
Oregon
i
Pennsylvania | 5.7
Rhode Island
South Carolina; —
South Dakota
60.0
Tennessee




""

20.0
—

35.7
5.6
12.0

25.0 27.8
25.0 16.7
57.7 13.6
7.7 12.1
26.5 12.0
50.0

—
60.0
83.3 20.0
22.2 57.9
19.4 13.1
14.7 14.8
42.9 37.5
6.4 12.0
2.4
18.2
20.0

10.0
25.0
18.2
7.7
33.3
12.5
—

35.3 40.0
25.0 21.4
28.6 42.9
13.3 13.3
—
7.5
33.9 27.0
~8.9
2.8
5.0

•

""*—-——

n

••

-r

- —

-

• - —

21.4
—

53.3

75.0
7.7
—
-—

100.0
25.0
25.0
9,8
6.7
14.3
6.7

—
—
-—
—.

-——.

-

7.1

5.0
37.5
—

--

66.7

(1)

—
—

25.0
mmmm

12.0
8.3
16.7

25.0
7.1
25.0

—

39.1
—.
—-

-

33.3

25.0

wmm»

„

(1)

22.8
20.0
33.7
8.6
17.7
1.5
5.3
43.4
24.7
37.0
15.2
9.1
35.2
7.2
6.0
5.3

-

6.7

8.7

33.3 15.4
24.4 23.1
83.3
25.0 14.0
52.0 76.7
27.0 17.1
17.6
100.0
6.3
50.0
57.1
8.2
11.7
26.7
8.8

7.1
7.5
35.7
6.2
56.3
45.5
10.0
22.0
20.7
8.7

70.0
38.2
18.2

47.4
65.6
11.8

6.7
6.7
""
""
29.4 11.5
22.7 12.0
—
100.0
31.3 35.7
—
33.3
31.6 18.2

__

2.5
20.0
11.8
21.4
8.3
7.7
50.0

20.0

—"
—.

—

7.7

20.0

9.7
53.3
53.8
6.5

—

—
—.
—
~--

2.8
66.7
11.8
42.9
28.6
7.8
23.6
8.3
1.0
25.0
18.2

12.5
mm

—

1.8
40.0
—

2.0
29.2
16.7
8.7
11.1
100.0

9.1

9.1

1.8
9.0
44.7
5.7
42.5
45.9
3.9

—.

\ 21.0

3.1

7.8

-_
~~

(2)
——

42.9
(1)
10.5
25.0

3.2
---

(2)

...

—

5.3

5.4
3.8
16,1
21.5
50.0
18.4
44.1
21.3

—
—

--

16.7
20.0
33.3

~~

2.2

—

——
—.
-—~

--.

(2)
25.0
50.0

—

8.0
54.5
3.5
30.8
42.9
16.7
17.2

12.1

—

20.0

.—
i

i

——

12.5

;
1

13.3
7.2
| 5.9
37.8
49.3
9.2

/82

Table XX - Number of Suspensions^ 1921-1931^ Per Hundred Active Banks on
June 30, 1920, by S t a t e s and by Size" of Town (Continued)
N a t i o n a l Banks

States

Size groups - population
Less 500 1,000 2,500 5,OOOj10,000 25,000 50,000 100,000
to i to
to
and
Total
than to
to
to
to
500 1,000 2,500 5,000 10,000j25,000 50,000 100,000 over

Texas
36.0 16.2 10.5
Utah
100.0
Vermont
5.6
11.8
4.2 11.1
Virginia
40.0 29.6
Washington
West Virginia 46.2 30.8 24.4
25.0 25.0 19.4
Wisconsin
66.7 250.0
Wyoming
9„5
UNITED STATES 25.6

21.9

19.1

20.0
23.6
13.8
11.8
8.3
6.5

17.3

25.0

40.0
25.0
4.2

25.0
15.4

16.7
16.7

23.5

20.0

16.5
14.3
2.0
7.9
20.7
22.1
10.6
23.4

7.7

16.7

—

16.7
7.7

22.2
15.1

12.7

11.5

11.7

8.3

v-^/One s u s p e n s i o n , b u t no bank on June 30, 1920 i n a c i t y of t h i s s i z e ,
(2)
Two suspensions, but no bank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.




- tfg Table XXIII - Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931 per Hundred Active Banks on
June SO, 1920, by States and by Size of Town (Continued)

State

Under

506

State Banks
Population of town
| 500 11,000 2,500 5,000 10,000! 25,000| 50,0001 100,000

to

to

to

to

to

to

to

[1,000 2,500 5.000 10.000 25,000 50,000 100,000

1
Alabama
39.7
Arizona
100.0
Arkansas
59.0
California
3.7
Colorado
30.6
Connecticut
,
Delaware
~
Dist. of Col.
Florida
60.6
Georgia
118.7
Idaho
34.5
Illinois
26.9
Indiana
35.0
Iowa
44.7
Kansas
23.9
Kentucky
17.1
Louisiana
24.1
—
Maine
Maryland
26.9
~
Massachusetts
Michigan
20.7
Minnesota
36.6
Mis sis sip-pi
59.2
Missouri
32.7
Montana
56.9j
Nebraska
44.0
Nevada
100. Q
—
New Haxnpshire
New Jersey
(1)
New Mexico
46.2
—!
New York
North Carolina, 52.3i
North Dakota
65. d
Ohio
25.3
23.9
Oklahoma
Oregon
35.3
Pennsylvania
36.4
~
Ehode Island
South Carolina 69.4
South Dakota
70.7
Tennessee
27.7!
19.4!
Texas
Utah
20.0
!
Vermont
—]
Virginia
25.6J
Washington
18.3
West Virginia
38.5
Wisconsin
15.&
Wyoming
46.6;

27.8 30.6
43.8 46.2
55.4 66.3
8.8 11.2
36.7 45.9
—

25.0

_

—

52.0
37.5
77.6

10.0
40.0
63.2

112.5

-

4.1

2.0

2.9

11.8
14.3
25.0

26.7
37.5
—
—

—
—
—
—

77.2
57.5
39.5
23.7
38.4
46.7
25.7
16.7
22.6

no.i 115.8 105.6
46.5 36.1
31.1
25.0 38.5
63.6
28.1 26.0
23.3
42.1 34.3
33.3
' 46.6 41.4
23.4
28.3 25.8
20.0
28.6 18.9
14.8
34.1 24.4
57.1
— 11.8
9.1'
9.1
16.7
16.7
4.5
—

—

—

12.7 14.3
52.7 47.1
55.4 31.3
33.0 39.4
63.6 63.2
51.0 54.5
_ 20.0

—

27.5
53.2
65.6
20.4
11.1
59.0

15.9
42.9
33.3
47.9
63.6
32.1

—

50.0

14.3
66.7
6.3 10.9
54.2 42.9
47.5 41.7
23.1 30.8
43.0 45.1
20.8 11.8
20.0 16.7

8.8

—
—

—

60.0
75.0

—

33.3
—

66.7
17.6
—
—:

mm

50.0

—
—

i63 100.0
—
28.6
«.
25.0
48.4
31.1
16.4) 56.0
22.9
13.0
1
35.6
28.6
27.3
«•' 33.3

l^

—

-

40.0!
11.1
37.0
28.6
52.2
35.5
38.5
44.4
25.0
25.0
36.4
100.0

11.1
17.6
14.3
~
~
—

h\
—
—

63.6
27.3

—

5

~
—

ni l

91.7
—
64.3
51.4
42.9
117.4
40.9 ! 27.8
20.0 j 52.9
— | 72.7

(1)

—
-

.
-

7.1

38.5 !
55.6 ;
~
-

46.2

35.4
50.7
162.2

—
10.0 j 7.2
50.0
34.9
13.0
17.8

—

14.6
18.5
25.0
—

19.0

33.3

—

—

—
—
_

42.9

90.0

—
_.

—
—

13.3

15.4

5.3

—
—
50.0
—
—
20.0
16.7
22.6
55.2
55.6
(4)
38.5
60.0
~
23.4
18.4
38.7
~
76.2 150.0
25.8
.
18.2
14.3
11.4
16.2
3.8 18.3
—
—
- 100.0
—
—
~
74.5 69.7 .61.7
61.9
56.5 133.3
73.3
—
93.3 111.8 171.4
56.3 100.0 125.0
—
—
25.7 17.1 21.4
38.9
40.0
17.8 19.9 38.8
45.2
54.3
27.3
66.7
—
~
20.0
33.3
56.3 21.4 21.1
—
— 12.5
~
—
~
32.7 19.2 46.2
10.0
33.3
16.7
37.5
— j
21.1 30.9 17.6
30.8
— |
6.7
34.1 32.5 23.1
71.4 ' 20.0 35.7
31.3 1
13.6 22.2 23.5
13.8
i 1 , 5 15.8 25.0
—
52.5 58.1 20.0
16.7 i 53.3

20.0
16.1
36.8
78.3
22.0
45.7
25.6
30.8

over

75.0 1 166.7
(5)
12.5
10.5

Total

and

—

15.6
—
-

19*6

(2)
21.1
29.4
14.3
—
—

50.0
30.0
20.0
~

18.5
17.6

.

5.0
-

5.0
—

110.7
58.0
36.9
30.1
39.4
42.8
25.7
20.4
26.2

7.3
13.2
15.2
18.7
40.0
49.3
32.6
56.5
47.7
21.7

8.0

16.2
54.7
11.0
48.5
65.4
23.5
38.8
25.9
20.2
12.5
68.7
1 82.1
26.1
1
23.6
26.0
! 2.6
1 26.0
20.5
j 34.3
16.4
47.7

UNITED STATES 39.3; , 37.1 38.0 33.6
31.4 S 30.3
28.5
31.9
26.0
36.3
(1) One suspension, hut no "bank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.
(2) Two suspensions, "but no bank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.
(3) Three suspensions, "but no hank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.
(4)
Six suspensions, but no bank on Jane 30, 1920 in a city of this size.
(5) Twenty-four suspensions, but no bank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.
(6) Twenty suspensions but only one bank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.




- 190 Table XXTII - Number of Suspensions during 1921-1931 per Hundred Active Banks on
June 30, 1920, by States and by Size of Town (Continued)
National and State Banks
|
___^
Ppjyulation of town
500 1,0001 2,5001 5,000 10,000! 25,0001 50,0001 100,000 Total
State
Under
to
to
to
to
to
and
to ! to
500
wuv
over
1.000 2.500 5.000 lQ.ood 25.000 50.000 loo.ood
40.6
Alabama
Arizona
100.0
Arkansas
58.6
California
10.9
Colorado
28.2
Connecticut
_
Delaware
—
Dist. of Col*
—
Florida
60.6
G-eorgia
118.7
Idaho
38.7
25.6
Illinois
Indiana
31.0
Iowa
44.7
Kansas
22.9
Kentucky
16.7
Louisiana
24.1
Maine
—
Maryland
20.0
Massachusetts
—
Michigan
20.5
Minnesota
35,1
59.2
Mississippi
Missouri"
32.9
Montana
52.1
Nebraska
43.3
100.0
Nevada
New Hampshire !
New Jersey
60.0
New Mexico
37.8
New York
19.4
North Carolina j51.6
North Dakota
63.7
Ohio
22.6
Oklahoma
31.7
Oregon
31.6
Pennsylvania
9.9
Ehode Island
~
South Carolina 67.6
South Dakota
70.0
Tennessee
26.7
Texas
20.9
Utah
33.3
Vermont
—
Virginia
25.1
Washington
17.4
West Virginia
40.4
Wisconsin
15.8
Wyoming
47.5

•— 60.0
*
26.8 28.6 41.9 10.0 1 26.1
43.8 41.2 31.8 35.7
(3)
~
~ 42.9
52.8 64.2 57.7 46.7 100.0
—
10.0
7.5
9.6
7.6
4.5
4.9
6.7
25.5 36.6 17.5 22.2
26.7
7.7
U)
—
5.9
10.0
22.2
— 15.0
11.1
12.5
- 14.3
—
—
—
—
—1
_
_
_
"
*
*
72.1 100.0 83.9 82.1 575.0
90.0
41.2
58.6 42.91 34.0 28.8
27.3
_
26.9
36.2 32.7i 33.3 52.0
25.0
—
22.8 22.6 20.7 18.8
33.0
24.3
43.3
13.2
40.5
32.7
33.3 33.0 24.3 19.3
20.3
36.7
45.9 43.7 38.6 25.0
x
15.8
22.1 22.3 18.9 11.9
24.0
16.8 13.9 11.0 10.6
15.8
30.8
22.4 31.1 19.6 38.1
14.3
(2)
—
6.1
4.8
3.8
—
—
13.3
6.7
3.0
7.7
.22.2 14.3
~
—
6.3
— j 5.2
9.7
17,9
13.2 14.5 27.9 14.3 i 31.0
12.2
42,9
44.3 36.7 38.5 31.3 i 22.2
—
55.4 34.8 56.8 47.8
40.5
(2)
~
32.6 35.5 21.9 45.2
27.9
5.6
35.3
59.4 69.1
6.7 4.7.8 1 23.1
40.0
—
47.2 42.9 50.0 26.0 i 46.7
—
27.3
— 13.3
— ! 16.7 !
—
—
*
*
4.5
- 10.0
5.0
~
17.6 13.3
9.4i 5.7
23.9
17.1
42.9 56.7 61.51 55.6
33.3
—
(2)
9.6
6.3
5.9! 13.8
10.7
1.1
37.1 54.5 38.71 28.9
49.0
52.0
(4)
69.8 46.4 42.1! 41.7
23.8
18.0 17.6 24.5i 14.4
10.1
5.3
2 $
34.1 32.0 29.6 27.1
51.1
66.7
—
25.9 20.8
6.3 13.0
15.4
12.9 10.9 11.7
5.5
12.3
1.9
13.0
'—
—
— 100.0
—
11.1
—
73.8 66.1 59.7 45.9
43.8
62.5 , 60.0
81.0 92.9 1 95.0 30.0 100.0
85.7
—
25.0 16.1 i 15.1 31.0
20.0
5.3
17.4 15.6 29.4 29.8
38.0
25.0
28.6
45.0 19.6 23.1 14.3
—
14.3
—
3.1
7.1
—
- 1
23.3 15.5 23.8
3.7
11.8
17.6
21.4
23.9 30.5 14.7 15.0
28.6
—
~
33.3 28.7 16.0 54.5
18.2
30.0
25.0
14.6 21.6 18.2
9.4
6.4
13.7
14.3
100.0 38.5
9.1
8.3
25.0
-

100.0 j
~
~
8*6
46o4
8.6
—
(5)
68.8
49.7

?4

—

i

tif

1

74

1

31.7
43.7
57.3
7.8
28.8
10.1
5.1
—
96.9
53.7
36.9
26.3
93.1 1 30.6
23.8 i 41.2
47.4
22.3
60.0
17.1
23.2
3.4
4.8
10.2
13.6
8.5
15.2
18.2
21.3
35.9
49.4
14.9
31.5
—
52.2
47.4
43.6
—
15.2
3.8
5.3
12.0
— i 50.8
10.8 j 7.8
— ! 47.6
— 1 51.5
16.9
18.1
32.3
(2)
16.7
21.8
23.0
12.3
7.1
9.1
—
63;1
—
75.6
37.5
23.1
24.1
21.1
18.8
23.5
2.3
13.2
20.0
13.6
20.5
—
29.9
4.2
15.5
40.5

1
1
UNITED STATES 38.1 33.6 ! 30.91 25.4 21.2 1 22.4 20.0 23.1 1 24.0 1 30.9
1
(l) One suspension, hut no "bank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.
(2) Two suspensions, "but no hank on June SO, 1920 in a city of this size.
(3) Three suspensions, hut no "bank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.
(4) Eight suspensions, hut no hank on June 30, 1920-in a city of this size.
(5) Twenty-f6u£ suspensions, "but no hank on June 30, 1920 in a city of this size.




Table XXIV - D i s p o s i t i o n of Banks Suspending d u r i n g 1921-1930, "by S t a t e s

State

ITational Banks
In process j Disposition
Total
Taken jCompletely
Reopened
of
number
not reover liquidated liquidation
corded
suspended

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
I
Connecticut
1
Delaware
Dist. of Col*
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
KentuckyLouisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
[
Ohio
1
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATES




2
2

11

3

3
5

15
8

—
—

~
—

s

9

~
-

—

P.
"

1
1

l
l
2
1

15

7

i
i
-

-

~
*
—
—

1
1
2
2

i
-

1
—
!
!

i

i
2

k

~

1
l

19

n

17

k
31

2
1

12

lU
k

10

-

3

-

1

—

-

-

1

1
1

~
-

—
~
~
—
~
—
~
~
_

1
1
-

69

~
^

-

1
1
1

13

8
2

-

2

38
13

15
15

-

-

-

—
-

k

12

2
2

~
i
i

3
1
10
1
15
l
2

3
5
~

-

1

^3
3

2
2

10

]

l
2

-

1

k

25

17
38
7
26

k

3

21

3
2

15

-

l
16

3

1
1

-

~

7

12

l
-

-

l

2

1

•z
j

3

_

k

-

5
7

2

0

g

2

267

5o6

-

1

97

1
1

2
1

57

g
16
l
21
1

%

4

22
1
1

-

ymm

»

• •

4

•• -

•

•

'

«

15
3

-

~
~
-

f

_

20
19
26

36
15
105
ik
!

k
2
~

2
1

k
5S
7
13

6i
32
-

3
20

;

k

j

23

70
ik

71

s
19
l
26

5k
5

62

3
1

i

1

20
IS
IS
1
1

_

7
12

9
9

n

927

-

192

Table XXIV - Dispos i t i o n of Banks Suspending d u r i ng 1921-IS 30,
by S t a t e s (Continued)

State

S t a t e Banks
~ ~ _ . . j In p r o c e s s j D i s p o s i t i o n ! T o t a l
Taken Completely)
~
not r e 1Eeopened
number
over l i q u i d a t e d ! l i q u i d a t i o n
suspended
corded

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D i s t . of Col. i
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
j
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New J e r s e y
New Mexico
New York
North C a r o l i n a !
N o r t h Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode I s l a n d
South C a r o l i n a
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Wyoming

9
1 '
+

55

I1
_
—
61

7^
6
55
Uo
76
35
S
12
1
1

6
86
lU
57
n
55

2
1
11
2
_
_
—

k

2
1
16
92
10
32
1
8

|

1H2
130
11
131
109
130
8U
kl
19
1
1
2
8
2U5
83
200
2S
308
1
2
19

2

6
—
2

U
17

5

—

6
9
l
2
-

5

l
30
8

7
7
l
3
U
3
2

UNITED STATES 1 1,016

167




5

i

|

3

37

11
9
3
1
-

_

9
6

182
125
18
16
1
2
2
50
2
109
27
15
_
IS
1
2
35
•"
614
Ik

i

5

i

1

3,2^

j
1

—

1

|
j

2
22
.—
78
—
60
—
—
—
—
-

3

—
12

Ho
13

[

75
5

j

-

1
1+1
8
30

|
1

30
200
20

_

6

k
33

1,130

-

u

87
3U9
1+2
105
19
IS
1
189
278
bl
118

—
16
23
12
25
8
20
15.

1
1
—
—

96

6

1

32
12

j

120
28

6
7
3

59

j

20

k

37

k

-

39

10
1
26

2
1
_
2

2
1

9
k
37 1
k
62 1
I ;

j

179

1
—
213

3?
46
221
I63
417
2l+7

j
|
|

69
53
2
%

3

16
383
103
383
1U9
380

"3

1
3
Ul
8
189

Ul6

j

1

1
j

|

60
215
38
27
2
226
393
90
188

^
l

56
kS
35

93
50

5,776

Table XXIV - D i s p o s i t i o n of.kariks Suspending d u r i n g 1921-1930,
by S t b t e s (Continued)

State
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist, of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
KentuckyLouisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Ehode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STATES




N a t i o n a l and S t a t e Banks
In process Disposition
Total
Taken Completely
not reReopened
of
number
over liquidated liquidation
corded
suspended

10

3

11

l
11

6

4o

20
111

1
1

9
70

1
9
18

74
33
220
38
93

50

5
57
5
5

—
-

1
«
.

62
76
10
56
1+1
91
35

5
—
—

4
11
2
28

1

4

—
_

2
—

161
l4i
15
162
121

6
125
45
11

8
12

7
14
3
3
7

7
196
129

—

-

1

1
1

1

3

-

l
2

199
94
44
19

18

17

l
1
2
12
288

6
87
15
57
19
57

3
5

63
4

18

ill

210

5
4

65
28

^3
323

2

1

-

-

-

1

4

30

21

2

1

4

6
56
3
89

5
io4
387
49

3
6
1
+

11

l

86

3

13
52

9
14

5
4

1
2

18

131
22

7

33

1

—

—

17
95

6

10

7
19

2
205
312

2

1

24
39
13
46
9

-

—

-

2

9

5

8
1

-

5
37

44
13

-

•8

45

1

30

6
4

2.

2

22
23

1,113

224

1,397

65
i4o
7

j '

23.

3,790

6
2
-

233
353
72
257
178
522
261
73
55

2
22
—
-

2

6
4
20

44l
110

396

78

210

—

412
3
1

6
61

60

1

—

i

—
—

12
212

4s6
74
286

46
46
3

— 1

252

-

447
95
250

3

22
2

-

63
58
44

~

102

12

61

179

'

6,703

- 19U ~

Table XXV - Claims of and Payments to Unsecured Depositors in
267 Completely Liquidated National Banks^ " y States
b
and Geographic Divisions(l)

S t a t e s and
geographic
divisions

Hew England
Maine
Hew Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode I s l a n d
Connecticut
Middle A t l a n t i c
Hew York
Hew J e r s e y
Delaware
Pennsylvania
Maryland
Horth C e n t r a l
Michigan
Wisconsin
Illinois
Indiana
Ohio
Southern Mountain
West V i r g i n i a
Virginia
Kentucky
Tennessee
|
Southeastern
Horth C a r o l i n a
South C a r o l i n a
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi




Ratio
of p a y ments t o
claims
including
offsets
(per c e n t )

Ratio
of p a y Claims Payments
Itoiher Claims Payments ments O f f s e t s including inclidin g
of
(000
(000
to
(000
offsets offsets
"banks emitted) e m i t t e d ) claims (Kitted) I (000 j (000
(per
omitted)! omitted)!
cent)

1 J!__2ZSU
" 1 *
-

$

1

279

-

lj

1S7

-

1

-

2.381]
~

—

_
-

-

—

~

67.0

187

~

_i

$

-1

~

- 1
67.O
-

200|

68.5

-j

~

~

200

-

172

—
—

2921 $
-j
292

13!

1.885' • 7 9 , 2
~
—

13J

-

2,555
^^7

~
—

1

6S.5
—

80,6

2.057

—
~

—
—

~
—

2
1

2,129
252

1,11k
111

so. 5
S7.9

IS5
7

2,294
259

1,879
178

2.757

59.0

522

5.193 j

3,279

g

4.671

~

_

2
2
3

664
166
946
2,895

2

566

1

—

l
-

1
21

T~
s
5

1

-

-

153 23.O
121 ! 7 2 . 9 i
709 7 4 . 9
1,774 6 1 . 3
332
156

88.6

-

-

-

190

176

92.6

3.288
720 ]
1,992
329

-

-

2
2

l46
101 1

68

l f 8 0 2 54.8
1+90 I 6 8 . 1
935 46.9
1U2 4 3 . 2
—

1*7
gg

33
—
16

381

1

J
|

—

221
1U2
790
2,126

209 !
206

i

1

"*

189

30.2
75.9
76.9
65.5
91.8
1

1 90.4
I

192

*~*

~
93.2

1

1

297 1
ST1
150 1
50 !
~

~

100.7
87.1

732
187
1,027
3,247 1
415. |

21

31 1
352
—

176

63.1
i

k±

90.7

81.9
68.7

1

6
6

3.585 1
805 I
2,lU2 1
379 i

1

192
~*

—

152
107

58.5
2.099
575 1 ll.k
1,085
50.7

1

153

50.7
~
~

100.7

9^ 1 87.9

- 195 -

Table XXV ~ Claims of and Payments to Unsecured Depositors in
267 Completely Liquidated National Banks, by States
and Geographic Divisions(l) (Continued)
——
——

Ratio J
S t a t e s and
geographic
divisions

Southwestern
Louis i a n a
Texas
Arkansas
Oklahoma

50
1
21
3
25

Western Grain
Minnesota
North Dakota
South Dakota
Iowa
Nebraska
Missouri
Kansas

SL

Rocky Mountain
Montana
Idaho
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
Arizona
Utah
Nevada

(

ofpayClaims
Ifcnriber Claims Payments ments O f f s e t s including
(000
(000
to
(000
offsets
of
(000
hanks omitted) o m i t t e d ) claims emitted)
(per
omitted)|
cent)

13
21
16

i4
13
2
4

ss
38
17
8
8
12
2
1
-

' a c i f i c Coast
Washington
Oregon
California

13

UITED STAT3S

267

Tp
4
5

45.4
37 8
W] 4 8 .. 5
5,130
626 1 8 5 . 4
2,:017 j 3 4 . 6

$17,167 $ 7,787
10,579
733
5,822
20,397
3,^87)
3,901
3,505
3,360
4,352
489
1,303

10.324
1,914
1,584

17,449
4,080
3,774
2,606
1,932
4,397
625
35

7,4i8
1,135

-

l,64o
2,198
1,676
313
999

$20,540 $11.160
52
751
7,504
12,949
806
699
6,710
2,905

$3.373
38
2,374
73
888
1.728
268i
280
260

50.6

54.9 !
4o.6
1*6.8
65.4
38.5
64.0
76.7

22,125
3,755
4,181
3,765
3,692
4,771
521

332
419
32
137

42.5
27.8
37.1

i,44o

j 2,674

4oiT'
738 i

1,401
1,709
1,045
1,846
277
5

i 65.6

4l4

54.1
42.0
144.3
14.3

269
772
69
7

-

"

2.491
l . 5 t e 161.9
555
455^ |82.0
34.1
215
631 i
872
66.8
1,305

$6s,4S9 $34,034

J49.7

|

-

12,052
2,182
1,8641
1,900!
2,530
2,095
345
1,136

10,092 I
i^5w~ |
4,512
2,139
3,020 j
2,123
2,201
1,314
2,618
5,169
694
346
42
12

20 123
V+85

-

399
53 |
69
277 1
$9,227

Ratio
Payments of p a y iociiding ments t o
offsets
claims
(000
including
omitted) offsets
(per- c e n t )

2,890 1
b0T1
700
1,582

54.3
69^
58.0
86.7
43.3
54.5
58.1
44.6
50.5
68.5
43.9
66.2
78.9
50.2
34.3
47.4
70.3
59.7
50.6
49.9
28.6

~

-

i,94l
508
284
1,149

67.2
83.6

4o.6
72.6

$77,716 1$43,261
55-7
J
(l)Banks suspending during I92I-I93O which had been completely liquidated at the
time the schedules of information were prepared for the Committee*




J

196 -

Table XXVI - Claims of and Payments to Unsecured Depositors in S$S Completely
Liquidated State Banks, by States and Geographic Divisions ( i )

S t a t e s and
geographic
divisions

„
. I R a t i o of
Claims Payments
E a t i o of
tg
Number Claims Payments payments O f f s e t s including
" L ^ H to claims
(000
(000
o f f s e t s of± s e t s . , ,. „
of
to
(000
mcludm
(000
s
banks omitted) o m i t t e d ) c l a i m s omitted)
(000
•?. , J offsets
£per cent)
omitted) omitted) L e r c e n ^
1

$ l,6l2

1

liddle A t l a n t i c
New York
New J e r s e y
Delaware
Pennsylvania
Maryland

2 !
2

$ 1,612

100.0

1,612

8l+3

iew England
Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Ehode I s l a n d
Connecticut

653 $

2,265 $

2 , 2 6 5 | 100.0

100.0

653

2,265

2,265

100.0

791

91.8

326

1,169

1,117

95.6

U55:
388

U03 !
388'

88.6

50
276

5,677
673
2,903
835
1,266

•=5.291
399
1.S5U
522
1,116

1,612

100.0
orth Central
Michigan
Wisconsin
Illinois
Indiana
Ohio

10
2
20
2

$

!

1+63

68.5
59.3
63.9
62.5
88.2

313
150

1+53
661+

89.7
100.0

3.053
835
1,266 !

1+.351+
712
2,00l+
522
1,116

70.9
72.2
65.6
62.5
88.2

505
661+!
6,11+0
986

6

lout h e r n Mountain
West V i r g i n i a
Virginia
Kentucky
Tennessee

1,1+05 1

1,061 t

75.5

.51

1,1+56

1,112

76.1+

1*5
3

362

198

51+.7

23

385

221

57 .U

10

1,0^3

S63

82.7

28

1,071

891

83.2

outheastem
119
North Carolina
1
South C a r o l i n a
12
111
Georgia
Florida
!
*
Alabama
I
9
Mississippi
2

11+.987
lU
1,951
10,366
1,5^9
79S
309

outhwestem
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Oklahoma




I

99
16
23
lU
U6

9,577
1,911
2,266
2,1+21
2,979

6,1+9"?
1+3.3
lU 1 100.0
1,21+3
63.7
37.7
3,913
5S5
37.8
1+29
53.s
100.0
309
U9.6
1+.752
777 1 ^ 0 . 7
1,910
SI+.3
775
32.0
1,290
^3.3

1,1+93 1 16,1+80
ll+
1U0
2,091
1,221
11,587
21
1,570
111
909
309

1

US5
11+
7^
168
229

10,062
1,925 1
2,3^0 i
2,589 1
3,20s

7,986
1+8.5
11+ 1 100.0
66.1
1,333
1+1+.3
5,13^
38.6
606
5^0
59. U
309 100.0
5,237

791
1,98^

9^3
1,519

52.0
Ul.l
S4.S
36.4
^7.1+

- 197 -

Table XXVI - Claims of and Payments to Unsecured Depositors in 988 Completely
Liquidated State Banks, by States and Geographic DivisionsU) (Continued)
t'

11111 •

in

'

'

•

R a t i o of
Claims Payments payments
R a t i o of
Number i Claims 'layaaents payments O f f s e t s including including to claims
o f f s e t s o f f s e t s including
(000
(000
to
of
(000
(000
(000
banks o m i t t e d ) omitted) c l a i m s omitted)
offsets
(per ceni^
o m i t t e d ) o m i t t e d ) (per cent)
i

!

S t a t e s and
geograpnic
divisions

/ e s t e r n Grain
Minnesota
North Dakota
South Dakota
Iowa
Nebraska
Missouri
Kansas

i

524

i

hs
35

$ 81,120 $45,008
2,112
4,691+
2,769
771
3.023
1,856
3 7 , 6 5 5 19,082
2,946
2,946
11,668
5,707
18,365 12,53^

23
176
15
10U
122

iocky MountainMontana
Idaho
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
Arizona
Utah
Nevada

l6,9lU
1,975
3,37^
1,066
8,989
1,388
122

128
22
28
9
62
k

9,812
693
l,6o4
559
5,94i
924
ill

55.5
45.0
27.8
61.4
50.7
100.0
48.9
68.2

$ 4,072 $ 85,192 $ 49,080
4,984
2,402
290
2,769
771
206
3,229
2,062
2,3^2
39,997
21,424
44
2,990
2,990
912
12,580
6,619
278

58.1
35.1
47.5
52.4
66.1
66.6
91.0

18,643

12,812

1,569
692
121
28
571
155
2

18,481
2,667
3,^95
1,094
9,56o
1,543

11,401
1,385
1,725
587
6,512
1,079
113 .

3

' a c i f i c Coast
Washington
Oregon
California

lU
50 1
^ j
988
—

61.7
51.9
49.4
53-7
68.1
69.9
91a

124

32 J

NITED STATES

57.6
48.2
27.8
63.9
53.6
100.0
52.6
68.7

!
J

23,674
17,727
3,737
2,210

17,451
12,915
2,4o6
2,130

73.7
72.9
64.4
96.4

$155,809 $90,891

58-3

5,851
5,607!
137!
107

23.33^
3,874
29,525
2,317

23,302
78.9
18,522
79.4
2,543 • 6 5 . 6
2,237
96.5

$i4,963 l $170,772 $105,854

62.0

!

' Banks suspending during 1921-1930 which had been completely liquidated at the
time the schedules of information were prepared for the Committee, with the exception of 1^2 banks for which information as to claims and payments is not
available.




- 198 -

Table XXVII - Average Time Elapsed Between the Dates of Closing and the Dates
on Which Suspended Banks Were Completely Liquidatedvl)

States and
geographic
divisions

National a n d
State "banks
1 Number! Average time 1
Number) Average timel Humbert Avei-age time
\
of
elapsed 1 of
elapsed
1 of
elapsed
banks Yearsl Months banks Years! Months 1 banks Y e a r s ! Months
National banks

New England
Maine
N e w Hampshire 1
Vermont
|
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut

~
1
-

k

5
~
-

5

4

~

-

|

7 j

i
s

5

4

1

-

L_
3

u

9

9

3

1

6|
3'

3
3

11
-

35.

^

8

Ui

3

-

g
3
6
5

6
3

3

3
3
7
3

2
20
8

2
22
10

6
3

2
—

9

U

s

-

' —
1 11

1
2

1 11

8 i •s
_

2
1
1

Southeastern
N o r t h Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi

21

Southwestern
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Oklahoma

10
50
1
1 1?
] 2
21
i.
j
2
5s
3
25
3

8

3
5 j 3

10

9:
2
1

3
1

1

TJ

2
10

5

U

4

-

-

7

i

21

3

1

1 k

9

"
"

~

i

ki 3
1
7
6

3
3

3
1 [7
8
3

1-57

113
8

2
3

2

b

5
2
2

8~
-

5 [

2

k

ET

id

-

—

6

3

1
1

k

—

—

—

2
2
1

3.
if
-j

8
-

3
2
_

Southern Mountain
West Virginia
Virginia
Kentucky
Tennessee




~
1

k

2
2
2

2
1

j

3
5

l

_
-

~

I

a
n

-

l J __5_j

Middle Atlantic
N e w York
N e w Jersey
! Delaware
Pennsylvania
Maryland
N o r t h Central
Michigan
Wisconsin
Illinois
Indiana
Ohio

1J

State banks

llU u
i4p i
19 3
37 2 5

Sh

6
3
|

—
11

4
11

29_1

g
9
3
3
9

2

10

3

5

^

6_

-

i

_

l

5
x
?
7

4
3
3

4
6

158

1

9
1
11

^

8

-

5| 3
16 3
118
3
5 4
10
3
U 3

2

18U

3~
9

ij
Ho
Ho
S9

S

3
3

10

1 1°

10

j

4
U
3
2

4

9~~
10

s
3
3
6
l
~
11
10
8

- 199 -

Table XXVII - Average Time Elapsed Eetween the Dates of Closing and the Dates
on Which Suspended Banks Were Completely Liquid&tedX 1 ) (Continued)
National and
State banks
Number Average time Number Average time Number] Average time
elai3sed
elapsed
of
elapsed
of
of
banks Years Months banks Years Months banks Years 1Months
National banks

States and
geographic
divisions

Western Grain
Minnesota
North Dakota
South Dakota
Iowa
Nebraska
Missouri
Kansas

S3L

13
21

16
ik

4
4
4
4

State banks

0O8I

2
1

525

—

35

8
S

22

5
6
5
3
6
7

2

3 1

28
111
121

5
3
3

7
7

235J
6j
451

2

5 i
5 :

193

3
7
7
4

_

4_J

6l|
56
3s

1
+

48

4
4
4
4

9
6
3

179
15
109
117

6
6

1U9
23

2
10

28
10

4
3

4
6
4

5
5

60
17

2

11
-

10

3

D

g

8

5
3
5

5

5
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

Pacific Coast
Washington
Oregon
California

13

u

10

4
3
3

1

5

5P_
32
i4
4

3

5
4

8
2
11

UNITED STATES

267

4

1,066

3

11

Eocky Mountain
Montana
Idaho
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
Arizona
Utah
Nevada

13
2
i
*
!
!

I
3
3

86
38
17

4
4
4
4
4
4
4

8
8
12
2
1

k
k

4

-

2
;

J

3

T
T^

4
10

18

68
29

8

n

1

3~
5

2

4
l

5
4
-

l

9
2

'

7

-

-

-

61
36
9

8

4
5

4
4
4
3

i»333

4

18

mm

l~
2

9
-

I
(1) Banks which closed during 1921-1930 and which had been completely l i q u i dated a t the time the suspension schedules were prepared. Only those banics
are included for which the two dates are recorded. In the case of State
banks t h i s i s 6U l e s s than the number a c t u a l l y l i q u i d a t e d . In the case of
a few banks only the years were given for closing and f i n a l l i q u i d a t i o n
d a t e s , and therefore the average figures for time elapsed are not absolutely accurate.




-

200 -

Table XXVIII - Average Time Elapsed Between the Dates of Closing and the Dates
on Which Suspended Banks ffere Either Eeopened or Taken Over(l)
National banks 1
State
Average 1
Number
Number
time
of
of
elapsed
banks (months) banks

States and
geographic
divisions

il

New England
Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut

—
-

g

2

-

-

—

—

1
1
1

1

3
3

1
1
1

9J

6

17

3|

1
2

3|

3_J

2
—

~
-

~
-

Middle Atlantic
New York
New JerseyDelaware
Pennsylvania
Maryland
North Central
Michigan
Wisconsin
Illinois
Indiana
Ohio

National and
banks 1
State banks
Average T
Average
Number
time
time
of
elapsed
elapsed
(months) banks (months)

7 1

I

-

1

3
3
5

6]

5
3

2

3

l

2

~
"

-

-

—

6

—
r
0

2
1

3
1

-

U\

8

2

1

3

2

3

10

2

182

—

3
2

192

-

3
2
9
2
2

i
j

Southern Mountain
West Virginia
Virginia
Kentucky
Tennessee

3

!

9

3 i

6~

2
1
1

2

k

32
81

6

11

5

U5

2
2

18

7

^1
22

3

U7_
6
lU 1

2

^

6

Ul

3

2

J
+
11
10
16

2
2
2

2
3
1

3
l
3
3

11
16

-

-

Southeastern
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi

12
2
2

5
8

225

3
3
3

18
82

°3

7

64

l

11
12

2
2

13

Sou thwe stern
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Oklahoma

k2
1
19
2
20




3
1
2
2

x

39

5
2

169
17 ]
kl
65

_

2
—

2

|

46 1

2V

1
2
2

3
U
3
2
2

lU
211

1

1

2

"
^

2

20
85

2

u

1
3
3

5i

k

1

3

1

IsH|
6o
67

66

2
1

3

1

21

- 201 -

Table XXVIII - Average Time Elapsed Between the Dates of Closing, and the Dates
on Which Suspended Banks Were Either Reopened or Taken O v e r W (Continued)

National banks
States and
geographic
divisions

Number ;

of
banks

Western Grain
Minnesota
North Dakota
South Dakota
Iowa
Nebraska
Missouri
Kansas
Kocky Mountain
Montana
Idaho
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
Arizona
Utah
Nevada
Pacific Coast
Washington
Oregon
California
UNITED STATES

Average |
Dumber
time
of
elapsed . "banks
(months)

hk

k

2
11

~

National and
State "banks
Average 1
Average
Number
time
time
of
elapsed
elapsed
"banks '
(months)
(months)

State "banks

4581

u

S8

-J

S0_

5

6
3

16
6

l
1

2
1

10

6

5
3
6

90
^3
95

k

1
21
g

2
2

k

4
4

4

2k

b

11
11

5

3

2

71

3

2

4

6o
75
38

i

10

101

4
6
3
3
5

k

22

9
5

k
7

502

10

-

!

7

32
91
79
56
74
3S

1

3
3
4
3
3

l

3
15

-

3

2

15_

i

l

2
2
1

1

6

5

3

3

!

10

15U

3

7

3

6
3
3

2
1
l

3

10

^
s
2

3

| 1,30b

1
l
-

i_
3

5
5
51
1,152

12
2

2k 1
g 1
!

2
2

l

3
3

!
i
i
1
^ ) Banks which closed during 1921-1930 and which had been reopened or
taken over by other institutions at the time the suspensions schedules were prepared. Only those banks are included for which the
two dates are recorded. In the case of State banks tnis is 31 banks
less than the number actually reopened and taken over.




fable XXVII - Capital Funds and Assessments on Stockholders
Prior to Suspension, Banks Suspending
during 1921-1930
National Banks
i

!Number i

States

Capital
Total
stock
capital funds
o f
!
| banks «(000 omitted) (000 omitted)
i

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Dist, of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee




-

!

!

15
3 j
20
18
18
1
1

o
20
19
26
36
15
105
14
4
2
0
2
1
4
58
7
13
61
32

$ 1,210
225
1,090
1,575
1,485
150
80

5

0 1,556
257
1,587
1,790
1,883
301
121

$

211
17
140
614
317
0

17.4
7.6
12.8
39.0
21.3
0.0
0.0

o

-

__

2,710
2,240
1,590
2,515
868
7,345
1,015
4,125
250

4,755
3,226
2,155
3,381
1,173
9,103
1,586
6,491
288

3,903
724
546
358
102
3,092
629
1,000
23

75
50
150
2,485
1,110
645
5,040
1,730

127
65
218
3,060
1,637
812
3,776
2,404

0
13
20
849
113
31
739
336

0.0
26.0
13.3
34.2
10.2
4.8
24.3
19.4

*"
~~

_—
--

-

144.0
32.3
34.3
14.2
11.8
42.1
62.0
25.7
9.2
—

—
—

o
o
3
20
4
23
70
14
71
8
19
1
26
54

-

Repor.ted
assessments
Assessments
before
per $100 of
capital stock
suspension
(000 omitted)

275
1,625
130
2,555
2,345
1,585
3,970
585
1,590
100
1,945
" 2,330
990

370
2,194
255
4,198
2,784
2,462
4,491
762
4,021
181
2,669
2,895
1,947

83
616
9
671
755
244
1,954
231
548
0
G7
801
973

1
1

i

30.2
37.9
6.9
26.3
32.2
15.4
49.2
39.5
34,5
0.0
3.4
34.4
98.3

Table XXVII - Capital Funds and Assessments on Stoclcholders
Prior to Suspension, Banks Suspending
during 1921-1930 (Continued)
Kational Banks
i

-

!

j

States

Number 1
Capital
Total
1 of [
stoclc
c a p i t a l fuel's
i banks (000 omitted) (000 omitted)
i

Texas
Utah
1
Vermont
1
Virginia
Washington
West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Wyoming
UNITED STiffiES




Reported
assessments
Assessments
before
per $100 of
suspension
c a p i t a l stock
(000 omitted)

62
3
1
7
12
9
9
11

$ 5,099
300
100
410
1,590
810
300
635

$ 6,607
349
211
545
1,988
1,218
358
1,107

$ 1,220
7
103
64
195
354
71
80

23.9
2.3
103.0
15.6
12.3
43.7
23.7
12.6

927

$67,027

|93,364

$22,883

34.1




- 204 Table XXX - Capital Funds of Banks Suspending
during 192I-I93O (Continued)

State
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D i s t . of Col.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New J e r s e y
i
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
N o r t h Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode I s l a n d
South C a r o l i n a
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
J
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Wyoming

State Banks(l)
Capital
Number 1
stock
of
(000 o m i t t e d )
banks
$

59
30
200
20 i

75
5

1
—
.
213

75

—
15,995
12,179
l,b25
15,030
8,716
16,731
6,109
4,7g
2,066
110
455
1,2%
900
9,122
4,146
11,581
5,370

4

221
163
417
247

69
53

2
4
3
16
3S3
103

3?3

149
3S0

10,43D

3

l

, 3

41
8
189
416
60
215
38
27
2
226
393
90
188

j
!

19
1

56

46

35
93
50

2,862
1,538
8,461
3,448
2,142
1,340

|

600
50
1,200
1,830
30,260
8,U63
7,116
3,968
5,220
1.908
9,906
165
10,576
9,861
4,210
8,041
768
50
1,969
3,%9
2,540
2,350
1,309

Total
capital funds'2)
(000 omitted)
$

4,027
2,425
11,936
3.34S
2,685
2,881
113
28,178
15,009
2,039
20,224
12,057
23,H6
8,989
7,645
2,917
129
908
1,970
1,261
11,571
5,788
15,903,,.
5,913^)
5,928
738
110
1,848
2,413
55,396
13,336
11,848
5,466
7.0U1
2,550
15.434
r 213
16,099
15,505
5,492
10.322
1,087
120
2,728
4,587
3,40b
3,210
LL69J

$377.606
UNITED STATES 5.776
$262,340
( 1 ) For 85 banks i n Montana o n l y c a ? j i t a l s t o c k i s
included,
( 2 ) P a i d - i n c a p i t a l , s u r p l u s , and u n d i v i d e d p r o f i t s ,

Table XXVIII - Assessments on and Collections from Stockholders
After Suspension in Completely Liquidated Banks *
National Banks ( i )

States
1

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
De lav/are
D i s t . of C o l .
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New J e r s e y
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
N o r t h Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Ehode I s l a n d
South C a r o l i n a




! Assessments C o l l e c t i o n s P e r c e n t j C o l l e c t i o n s
Capital i
Number
after
; from assess-j of a s s e s s - p e r $100 of
• —
i ments
stock
|
after!
of
| capital
banks (000 omitted)] suspension:
suspens ion i ments
stock
(000 omitted); (000 omitted) j c o l l e c t e d j
1
1

o

0
0
5
17
2
1
14
4
0
1
1
1
0
13
2
2
38
13
0
0
0
12
0
4
21
!
3
25
4
1
2
0
8

.

$

2
2
3
5
8
0

o

1

. .

i

-

125
200
135
325
445
—
"
~

i

>

$
j

i
\
i

1

j
i

i
.!
!
!

1
i
j

—

250
965
75
125
600
330

i
!

$

250
75
125
600
330
—
50
—
50
50

|
1

'

1,025

150
625
225
1,215
200
150
—
545

1

150

j
j
|
j
j

575
200
1,215
200
150

i

!
|
i
|
1
j
!
f

I

j
!

1

j
!

—

545

-

|
1

43.2
49.0
49.6
75.4

j
j
1
j

46.7

1
!

—

•

14
—
22
41

425
25
145
1,205
675

1,025

—
—
109
353
45
37
394
228

965 1

i
!
i
|
'
j
i

-

i

i

i
;

54
98
67
245
208

1

„

50
—
50
50
__
425
110
145
1,205
675

125
200
135
325
445

196
14
95
400
266
—
-—
494
—
78
220
198
359
90
61
—
309

i

-43.6
36.6
60.0
29.6
65.7
69.1
—
28.0
—44.0
82.0
—
46.1
56.0
65.5
33.2
39.4
—
' 48.2
!
: 52.0
j 38.3
• 99.0
I 29.5
i 45.0
! 40.7
!
56.7

I

43.2
49.0
49.6
75.4
46.7
—
—
—
—
43.6
36.6
60.0
29.6
65.7
69.1
—
28.0
—
44.0
82.0
—
46.1
12.7
65.5
33.2
39.4
—
—
—
48.2
—
52.0
35.2
88.0
29.5
45.0
40.7
—
56.7

Table XXVIII - Assessments on and Collections from Stockholders
After Suspension in Completely Liquidated Banks (Continued)
National Banks U )
Assessments
Kumber, Capital
after
of !
stock
suspension
banks j (000 omitted) |
(000 omitted)

States

i

South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Wyoming

i
•
I
|
j
j
j
'

16
1
21
1
0
1
4
0
2
8

535
30
1,734
25

UNITED STATES! 267

$13,394

!

|

I

535
30
1,600
25

Collections
Per cent Collections
from a s s e s s jof a s s o s s - p e r $100 of
ments a f t e r
I ments
capital
suspension
[collected
stock
(000 omitted) j
$

228
20
834
13

42.6
66.7
52.1
52.0

42.6
66.7
48.1
52.0

25
190

25
190

17
83

68.0
43.7

68.0
43.7

75
360

75
360

11
155

14.7
43.1

14.7
45.1

$13,100

$6,056

46.2

45.2

j

I

'•'•'Banks suspending d u r i n g 1921-1930 which had been c o m p l e t e l y l i q u i d a t e d a t t h e
time t h e s c h e d u l e s of i n f o r . r a t i o n were p r e p a r e d f o r t h e Committee.




-• 20? -

Table XXXI- Assessments on and Collections from Stockholders
After Suspension in Completely Liquidated Banks (Continued)

State

State Banks ( i )
Assessments Collections 1 Per cent Collections
Number Capi tal
from assess- of assess- per $100 of
after
stock
of
(000
mentssuspension ments after
capi tal
"banks omitted) (000 omitted) suspension collected
stock
(000*pad tted)
«
_
^
.
•
* 1
*" 1
"
7 $
196 1
55
$
55
$
17
30*9
30*9
3
4
60
60
17
28.3
28.3
4
837
75
43
57*3
5.1
30
879
964
500
51.9
56.9
—
—
1
100
~

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
—
—
—
Delaware
"
~
~
*
~
—
—
~
Dist. of Col.
— 1
~
~
"
Florida
55.0
44.0
75
60
33
4
Georgia
110
3,872
3,624 !
1,264
34.9
32.6
—
—
—
Idaho
~
~
—
—
—
—
Illinois
- 1
—
—
—
—
—
Indiana
70
70
30
Ioira
42.9
42.9
2
Kansas
120
2,671
2,624
1,254
48.2
j
47.3
Kentucky
30
25
22
84.6
j
73.3
2
—
—
—
Louisiana
13
477
—
—
—
Maine
*
~
!
- i
—
Maryland
2
205
—
—
—
—
—
—
Massachusetts
Michigan
90 1
90
64
71.1
71.1
2
Minnesota
50
792 j
792
322
40.7
40.7
- |
—
—
~
Mississippi
_
~
Missouri""
4
110 ;
Montana
j
1
20
20
1
5.0
5.0
—
~
—
~
" !
"
Nebraska
—
—
—
—
!
~
~
Nevada
—
—
—
New Hampshire
—
- !
—
—
—
New Jersey
—
4 i
New Mexico
255
193
176
91.2
69.0
_
—
—
—
—
New York
"*
*
~
~
—
—
North Carolina
~
*
*
*
North Dakota
28
380
380
234
61.6
61.6
~
—
—
—
—
Ohio
~
"
Oklahoma
50
S75
975
252
25.9
25.9
Oregon
5
375
315
121
38.4
32.3
Pennsylvania
2
175
50
45
90.0
25.7
—
—
—
—
Ehode Island
—
—
—
—
South Carolina
South Dakota
21
370
355
126
35.5
34.1
—
—
—
—
Tennessee
Texas
18
508
501
175
34.9
34.4
75
Utah
2
75 1
53
90.7
90.7
—
—
_
_
—
Vermont
~
Virginia
3
75
54
~
~
Washington
31
2,732 1
2,762
1,375
49.8
50.3
—
—
~
~
—
West Virginia
~
Wisconsin
1
15
15
11
73.3
73.3
Wyoming
j
5
185
88
64
72.7
34.6
$6,234
1 37.4
UNITED STATES ! 529 [$16.659 1 $14,223 1
1 43.8
( 1 ) Banks suspending during 1921-1930 which had "been ^completely liquidated at the
time the schedules of information were pre-oared for the Committee. Only those
"banks are included which have records "both*" for assessments after suspension
and for connections from those assessments. This is 501 tanks fewer" than the
number completely liquidated.







- 208 -

3XFrPI3?
Bank Suspensions Since January it 1921
If this report is printed, it is the intention to
include at this point in the appendix a reproduction of
the analysis "blank upon which information was collected
with respect to each separate hank suspension*


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102