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I

AUTOMATIC TECHNOLOGY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS




A Selected Annotated Bibliography

Bulletin No. 1198
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

A ugust 1956




AUTOMATIC TECHNOLOGY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS
A Selected Annotated Bibliography

Bulletin No. 1198
UNITED STA TES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
BUREAU O F LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner
A u g u s t 1956

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, W ashington 2 5, D. C.




Price 4 5 cents




CONTENTS
Section

I.
II#

III#
IV#
V#
VI#
VII#
VIII#
IX#
X#
XI#
HI#
XIII.
XIV#

Page
Introduction .............. • • • • • # . • ............11
General surveys • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
I
Automation in metalworking • • • • • • # . • • • • • • •
6
Mechanized bulk materials handling • • • • • • • • • • •
12
Automatic production of electronic goods # • # . • • • •
15
Automatic control in processing ........................... 18
Automatic control of machine tools • • • • • • • • • • •
2li
Electronic computers* Technological aspects # • • • • •
27
Electronic data processing in business offices # • • • • 30
Electronic data processing in science and engineering • • 35
Electronic data processing in industrial production • • • 38
Economic and social implications # • • • • • • • # . • •
Ul
Union attitudes and policies # • • • • • • • • • • • • •
51
Implications for business organization and management • • $6
Bibliographies and glossaries • • • • • . • • . • • • . #
£q

Appendixes
A.
B.
C.
D#

Index to authors
62
Index to subjects
...................................... 66
Names and addresses of periodicals .......................71
Names and addresses
of
publishingorganizations • • • . •
76




- i -

AUTOMATIC TECHNOLOGY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS

A SELECTED ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Introduction
The growing importance of automatic equipment and processing in American
industry and business is attracting worldwide attention* There is a general
awareness that recent technological developments are likely to have important
implications for employment, occupational requirements* training and education*
labor relations* and* in fact* the stability of the economy. Because the
ramifications of these changes may affect many of its operations* the Department
of Labor has taken an active role in research work in this field*
The U* S* Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics in presenting
this bibliography seeks to enable research workers to make use of the growing
volume of published material concerning the progress of automatic technology
and its social and economic effects* It is planned as a research tool for
economists* union and management officials* labor relations experts* journal­
ists* university teachers* and students. It was compiled as part of the
Bureau's research program on productivity trends and current technological
developments. By fostering research in this area* the Department of Labor
seeks to promote a better understanding of this increasingly important force
in the American economy.

Scope and Limitations
The bibliography lists 35>9 references. These references consist of
periodical articles* books* reports* speeches* pamphlets* conference pro­
ceedings* and other readily available materials. They present more or less
nontechnical descriptions of the operations of automated equipment in business
and industry* analyses of the conditions for their use* and discussions of the
implications for labor* management* government* and the economy.
The sources searched in compiling the bibliography included the reference
files of materials in the Bureau's Division of Productivity and Technological
Developments; the Department of Labor Library; and the Scientific Library of
the U. S. Patent Office. The industrial Arts Index and the Labor Personnel
Index were consulted for listings of periodical articles on the subjects
covered*




ii

The broad standard far selecting references was their value to persons
primarily interested in the social and economic aspects of current developments
in automation* Technical material addressed chiefly to engineers was excluded*
For the most part, the references selected were published during 1955 and the
first 5 months of 1 9 5 6 * A number of important books and articles published
earlier, however, are also included*
Special efforts have been made to cover the most significant contributions
and to limit repetition* No attempt has been made to include items from the
daily press or to cover the literature published in other countries. Materials
on general subjects related to automation, such as technological changes, and
productivity statistics, are considered outside the scope of the bibliography*
In view of the large volume of published material on the subjects covered,
it is highly probable that some important references may have been overlooked.
Every effort will be made in future revised editions to incorporate omissions
that are brought to the Bureau's attention*
Using the Bibliography
To facilitate the most effective use of the bibliography, special at­
tention is directed to certain features that were incorporated to assist
researchers*
Subject Matter Divisions: References are classified under lib broad
subdivisions of the general subject* When a reference relates to more
than one subdivision, it is listed only once, under the division to which
a major portion of the article, book, etc*, relates*
Alphabetical Arrangement of Titles: References within each subdivision
are arranged alphabetically by title* The titles of books, pamphlets,
papers, and speeches are underlined* In the citation of periodical
articles, the name of the periodical is underlined.
Brief Annotations: To give the user the gist of the subjects covered,
each reference is briefly annotated, but no evaluation of the reference
is intended*
Index to Authors: Appendix A presents an alphabetical listing of the
names of authors, with the numbers of all references cited in the bibli­
ography, Writers of articles that are included in collections are not
listed unless these articles have been shown separately*




- iii -

Index to Subjectst Appendix B presents an alphabetical listing of subjects with the numbers of all references related to them. Where a refer­
ence is related to mare than one subject, it is cited under each subject.
Lists of Periodicals and Publishers: Users of this bibliography should
write directly to the periodical or publisher concerning any item listed.
Appendixes C and D present the names and addresses of all periodicals
and publishing firms cited in the bibliography. The Bureau of Labor
Statistics cannot provide reprints of articles, etc., except those
prepared in the Bureau itself.

This bibliography was planned and prepared by Edgar Weinberg of the
Bureau's Division of Productivity and Technological Developments. Herman J.
Rothberg assisted in compiling and annotating the references.




SECTION I
G E N E R A L

S U R V E Y S

(Oils section covers references on background, development, principles,
definition, and examples of various types of .automation*)

1*

America* s Needs and Resources— A New Survey*
J* Frederick Dewhurst
and Associates*
Twentieth Century Fund,
New York, 1955*
H I 48 pp*
Chapter on Technologyt Primary Resource describes seme new
developments in automation and electronics* (pp* 868-875*)

2*

Automatic Control*
Editors of Scientific American.
Schuster,
Hew York, 1955* 158 pp*

Simon and

A collection of articles ty 13 scientists on the principles, example^
and implications of automatic controls*

3*

Ifae Automatic Factory-rA Critical Examination*
Stephen A* June and
Associates* Instrument Publishing Co*, Pittsburgh, 1955* 88 pp*
Distinction between complete automaticity and progressive mechani­
zation, obstacles to automatic factory, examples of contemporary
automaticity, case studies of costs, and briefly, social implications.

5*

The Automatic Factory— A Fortune Round Table.
Vol. 53 (pp. 168-171j 178-180).

Fortune,

October 1953,

Experts in metalworking and electronics discuss rate of progress,
jobs suitable to automate, role of electronics and computers*

5*

Automatic Machines at Work— Present and Future*
Philip R. Marvin*
Automation, August 1955, Vol* 1 (pp. 35-37)*
Definition of autoomtion, some conditions for use*

6*

Automation*
Elmer W. Engstrom*
Tech Engineering News,
February 1956, Vol* 37 (pp* 12-2271
Evolution) its new contribution to technology, and present and
future importance*




- 1 -

7.

Automation.

Time,

March 19, 1956,

Vol. 68

(pp. 98-106).

Illustrations of the latest developments in the field of automation.

8.

Automation and Industrial Development.
(Minutes of conference,
May 12, 195U, at Sijrracuse, N. T.
Sponsored by New York State
Department of Commerce.)
New Toxic Department of Commerce, Albany,
195U. 133 pp.
Papers by experts and company officials on definition, economic
aspects, and applications in office and plant.

9.

Automation and Technological Change; Hearings.
Joint Coranittee on the
Economic Report, ... Congress of the United States, 8Uth Cong., 1st
sess. ... October lU-28, 1955.
U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, 1955. 6bU pp*
Statements by 26 industrialists, labor leaders, and scientific experts
on current examples and implications for living standards, employment,
displacement, occupations, training, etc.

10.

Automation: News Behind the Noise.
Herbert Solow.
April 1956, Vol. 53 (pp. 150-155).

Fortune,

Examples of more automatic production in various industries.
problems and advantages.

11.

Automation of Industry.
Martin Packman.
Washington, January 5, 1955. 18 pp.

Some

Editorial Research Reports,

Definitions and use in various industries, evolution and potentialities
and eoonomic and social effects.

12.

Automation* Special Report.
(pp. 75-102).

Business Week,

October 1, 1955

Definitions, industries producing and using equipment, implication
for employment, consumers, prospects for automatic factory.

13.

Automation--The Advent of the Automatic Factory.
John Diebold.
D. Van Nostranid Co., tnc., New York, 1952. 18 pp.
Possibilities, limitations of automatic controlj need for redesign
of methods, products and machines.
Social Implications.




-

2

-

Hi.

Automation— The New Technology.
John Diebold.
Harvard Business Review
November-December 1953, Vol. 31 (pp. 63-71).
Meaning, need for rethinking design, applications of new equipment,
limiting factors, effect on economy.

15.

Automation— Today.
P. H. Alspach.
(Paper to American institute of
Electrical Engineers Conference on Machine Tools, October 25, 1951,
Detroit, Mich.)
General Electric Corp., Schenectady, 1955. 12 pp.
Progressive development of automatical from manual to mechanized stage
and to continuous automatic production.

16.

Challenge of Automation.
Papers Delivered at the CIO National Conference
on Automation.
P u b li c Affairs Press, Washington, 1 9 5 5 . 110 pp.
Papers on applications and uses, technological considerations,
industrial significance and labor's stake, by J. Diebold, D. P. Campbell,
W. S. Buckingham, and W. Reuther.
(Papers also reprinted in part in
Monthly Labor Review, May 1 9 5 5 ,
pp. 5 1 9 - 5 2 7 ) *

17.

Electronics and Automatic Production.
(Proceedings and Symposium, held
August 22-23, 1955, at San Francisco, Calif.)
Jointly Sponsored
by National Industrial Conference Board, New York, and Stanford
Research Institute, Menlo Park, Calif. 1955*
Papers by company officials, covering automotive, steel, chemical,
electronics industries, business data processing, and economic and social
implications.

18.

A Functional Morphology of Mechanisms.
E. W. Leaver and J. J. Brown.
Automation, July 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 37-Ul).
A conceptual system for classifying various methods of production.

19*

How Much Automation for Your Plant?
Annesta R. Gardner.
Dun's Review
and Modern industry,
February 195U.
Reprint.
7 pp7
Examples in container, chemical, copper, auto industries.




- 3 -

20.

How to Evaluate Automation.
James R. Bright.
July-August, 1955, Vol. 33 (PP* 101-111).

Harvard Business Review,

Automation as a higher level o f mechanization.
levels of mechanization.

21.

Method of charting

Keeping Pace With Automation; Practical Guides for the Company Executive.
Special Report No. ?.
American Management Association, New York,

1956.

1 3 b PP.

Various experts on basic concept and approaches, company experiences
and outlook.

22.

Looking Around: Automation for Management.
Joseph L. Massie.
Harvard
Business Review,
March-April 1956, Vol. 3U (pp. 139-152).
A review of various interpretations of the term, "automation."

23.

Orders and Degrees of Automaticity.
George Amber.
Electrical
Manufacturing,
January 1 9 5 5 , Vol. 55
( p p . 6 U -6 ^ T I
Describes different degrees of automaticity in machinery, from
replacement of manual skill to mental skills of workers; brief
bibliography.

2tw

Principles of Mass and Flow Production.
cal Library, Inc., Sew York, 1 9 5 5 .

Prank G. Foollard.
1 9 5 pp.

Philo so phi -

Historical development o f transfer machines, applicability,
illustrations, advantages, and limitations.

25.

The Push Button Factory.
Journal,

Frank K. Shallenberger.

November 1952

The Engineering

(pp. 119U-1198).

Historical development of automation, principles, and outlook.

26.

A Review of Automatic Technology.
Review,
June 1 9 5 5 , Vol. 78

Edgar Weinberg.
(pp. 6 y t - 6 b k ) .

Monthly Labor

Basic principles, some leading examples, factors in its growth and
some general implications.




- U-

27 •

Special Automation Handbook.
7 9 PP.'

American Management Association,

------- New- fi^ k ,- 1955.

Reprints of eight articles on various aspects of automatical and its
implications, from professional and management journals.

28.

Stop Coining Words I
J. J. Brown*
Vol. 2 (pp. U8-U9).

Control Engineering,

Distinctions between automation and mechanization*




5

March 1^55,

SECTION II
AUTOMATION IN METALWORKING

(This section covers references on principles of operations and examples
of automatic equipment recently introduced in machining, stamping, founding,
finishing, assembling, and other operations of metalworking plants.)

29.

The American Factory and Automation.
John I. Snyder.
Review,
January 22, 1955 (pp. 16-17).

The Saturday

Industrialist describes highly automatic Rockford, 111., ordnance plant.
Also cites automation in refineries.

30.

Automatic Engine Assembly on a Transfer Machine.
Charles Wick.
Machinery,
December 1955, Vol. 62 (pp. 166-172).
Use of automatic equipment in engine assembly plant.

31.

The Automatic Factory?
D. S. Harder and D. J. Davis. (Paper presented
at SAE National Production Meeting,
March 25, 1953, Series No. GbX
Society of Automotive Engineers, New York, 1953. 1U PP.
Automation equipment at Ford Motor Co. and its advantages for quality,
safety, cost, increased machine speed, implications for plant maintenance*
management, and labor.

32.

Automatic Presses.
December 195U,

T. W. Bannon.
Instruments and Automation,
Vol. 27 (pp. 1951-1552).

Examples of transfer feed presses.

33*

Automatic Units in an Automatic Factory.
F. R. Swanson.
Safety News,
May 1955, Vol. 71 (pp. 22-23).

National

Influence of automation on design of machine tools, with stress on
safety features for operators and maintenance




-

6

-

3ii.

Automation and Its Requirements,
G. G. Murie. (Paper presented to SAE
Annual Meeting, January l955, at Detroit Mich.)
Society of
Automotive Engineers, Inc., New York, 1955* 8 pp.
Ford Motor Co. engineer on development of automation at Ford. Covers
machine tooling, preventive maintenance, and need for indirect labor.

35.

Automation Compounds Maintenance Problems.
Walter Rudolph.
Factory,
October 1953, Vol. 53 (pp. 93-95).

Mill and

Need for skilled maintenance Markers at Cleveland Engine Plant.

36,

Automation Devices Tie in Machining Operations.
1955, Vol. 176 (pp. 75-78).

Iron Age,

August b,

Continuous production on different machine tools at gear plant.

37.

Automation Facts— Not Fancies.
H. B. Osborn, Jr.
1956, Vol. 62 (pp. Hli-167).

Machinery,

March

Results of survey of plants made by American Society of Tool Engineers
to determine potential impact of automation in metalworking industries.

38.

Automation in Foundry.

Automation,

October 1955,

Vol. 2

(pp. 71-72),

Automatic movement of a sand mold.

39.

Automation in the Foundry.
Vol. 82 (pp. 1U0-1U5).

William E. Dougherty.

Foundry,

May 195U,

Mechanization of molding, problems, and costs.

h0.

Automation— Its Development in Metalworking . Anderson Ashbuzn.
Mechanical Engineering,
November 1955, Vol. 77 (pp. 958-963).
Historical development of automatic machine tools.




-

7

-

111.

Automation— Key to the Future.
D. S. Harder.
conference on automation, Davenport, Iowa,
Ford Motor Co., Detroit, 195U. pamphlet.

(Address to Quad City
August 27, 195U.)

Originator of word reviews definition, where and when practicable,
effect on production, problems of control, and maintenance in auto
industry.

U2.

Automation of Crankshafts Speeds Plymouth V-8 Production* Charles H.
Wick.
Machinery,
January 1956,
Vol. 62 (pp. 123-133)*
Automatic loading, positioning, conveying in automobile plant.

k3»

Automation Opens New Vistas in Stamping.
December 195>li, Vol. 1 (pp. 19-26).

Francis J. Sehn.

Automation,

Automatic unloading to eliminate handling bottlenecks in large and
small plants.

UU.

Automation— the Metalworking Industry's Philosophy for Increasing

Productivity.
( p p .

Charles H. Wick.

Machinery,

March 1955,

Vol. 61

1 U 3 -1 U 7 ).

Need, advantages, and disadvantages.

U5.

Automation, What It Means to Foundries.
July 1955, Vol. 83 (pp. 115-117).

W. R. Jennings.

Foundry,

Forecasts greater use of continuous operation for closer tolerances,
complex design, and greater productivity.

1*6.

Chicago Show Issue.

American Machinist,

August 29, 1955,

Vol. 99.

Latest models of machine tools described.

1*7.

The Economics of Automation.
W. C. Newburg.
(Paper presented to SAE
Annual Meeting, January 1955, Detroit, Mich.)
Society of
Automotive Engineers, Inc., New York, 1955. 8 pp.
President, Dodge Division, Chrysler Corp., on cost, reliability, and
savings considered in adopting automation equipment in auto industry.




-

8

-

U8.

157 U Companies Report 56 Plans. Special Report No. U02.
American
Machinist,
August 29, 1955, Vol. 99 (pp« 1H5-160).
Report on plans for buying new equipment; amount, type, by industry
and by area.

U9«

Ford Expands Cleveland Operation.
1956, Vol. 62 (pp. 190-195).

Edgar Altholz.

Machinery,

April

A stamping plant and second engine plant feature latest techniques of
automation, materials handling, and quality control.

50.

GE Meets Competition With Automation.
August 8, 1955 (pp. 61-6U).

Philip J. Klass.

Aviation Week,

Mechanized assembly machines for small production runs of aviation
equipment.

51*

Latest Developments in Ford Automation Techniques.
Joseph Geschelin.
Automotive Industries,
February 1, 1956, Vol. Hi* (pp. 5U-58).
Most advanced manufacturing methods developed by Ford Motor Co.

52.

Latest Developments in Plating Automation.
'March 1, 1956, Vol. Ill; (pp. U0-U3).

Automotive Industries,

Automatic electroplating at various automobile manufacturing plants.

53.

Maintaining the Automated Plant.
Automation, November 1955,

N. K. Conrad.
Instruments aid
Vol. 28 (p. 1927

Ford Co.'s experience in decentralizing maintenance activities.
Planning of productive maintenance.

5U.

Mechanization o f Small-Batch or Step-By-Step Production.
Ray H.
Sullivan.
American Management Association. Manufacturing Series
No. 205
(pp. 16-13)“
Need for study of practices, difficulty of materials handling,
application to large and small companies.




9

55.

Method o f Automation.
C. F. Hautau.
1953, Vol. Ue> (pp. 15-20).

Cleveland Engineering,

March 5,

Automation in metalworking using specialized equipment*

56.

Modern Trends in Machine Tools.
(pp. UO-51).

Automation,

September 1955,

Vol. 2

Illustrations and descriptions of the latest types of automatic machine
tools shown at the September 1955 Machine Tool Show in Chicago, H I .

57.

New Ford Assembly Plant.
Thomas Madiew.
Automative Industries,
December 15, 1955, Vol. 113 (pp. 60-6U T
Latest materlals-handling equipment used in assembling cars and trucks

58.

Newly-Designed Transfer Machines in Ford Engine Plant.

Automotive Industries,

March 1, 1956,

Vol. 11U

Joseph Geschelin.

(pp. 28-31).

Newly desigied transfer machines in the newest of Ford Motor Co.'s
engine plants.

59.

Parts Handling-Key to Grinder Automation.

January 1956,

Vol. 3

Handling devices for feeding.
automated operation.

60.

Automation,

Small parts link standard machines for

The Plymouth Qualimatic V-8 Engine.

1955,

Rex Stevenson.

(pp. 53-57).

Tooling and production,

October

Vol. 21.

Detailed account of the conception, implementation, and successful
functioning of Plymouth’s new automatic engine assembly plant.

61.

Pushbutton Manufacturing.
Vol. 1 (pp. 18-27).

Clarence Tice.

Automation,

October 195U»

Examples of automatic handling of parts in automotive parts, from
machining to plating.




10

-

62.

Revolution in Processing.
(pp. 1, b-5).

Automobile Facts,

January 195b,

Vol. 13,

Changes in processing automotive parts, from machining to plating.

63.

Small Shops Can Use Automation, Too.
J. B. Cunningham.
American
Machinist,
April 12, 195b, Vol. 98 (pp. 177-187).
Use of special transfer units and loading devices in smaller plants.

6b.

Transfer Machines Boost Output of Ifcrdromatics.
Reuben R. Jensen.
Machinery,
April 1956,
Vol. 62
(pp. 16^-172).
Operation of transfer machines for inspecting and assembling, as well
as machining various components.

65.

Trends in Machine Tool Automation.
R. E. Cross.
Instruments and
Automation,
May 195b, Vol. 27 (pp. 768-770).
Evolution of transfer machines.

66.

True Automation: Its Competitive Advantages.
Charles F. Hautau.
Automatic Control,
July 195b> Vol. 1 (pp. 28-33).
Need for revising machine tools, production methods, and products for
automatic production of parts.

67.

Vibratory Feeding of Parts.
George H. Kendall and Jerry A. Host.
Automation,
November 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. Gj-70).
Bowl-type vibratory feeder useful in storage, orientation, and
movement of parts.

68 .

What Does Automaticity Cost?
Vol. 99 (p p . 751-753).

American Machinist,

August 29, 1955,

Survey of cost of electronic hydraulic and pnuematic elements on
machine tool models.




-

11

-

SECTION III
MECHANIZED BULK MATERIALS HANDLING

(This section covers references on principles and examples of the use of
moving conveyors, automatic weighers and meters, and related materials-handling
equipment in processing grain, flour, coal, and other bulk materials*)

69.

Automatic Barrel Cleaning Solves a Dirty Problem.
Carl J. Schroeder,
Automation,
December 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 1*5-50).
Specialized machinery used in a refinery.

70.

Automatic Materials Handling.
Leonard J. Bishop.
American Management
Association. Manufacturing Series No. 209
(pp. 29-3<?)• Sew YoricT
--------------------------------m y.------------------------------Factors in installing materials-handling equipment, some typical
operations.

71.

Automatic Weighing of Bulk Materials.
John K. Rudd.
Power,
May 1955, Vol. 68 (pp. 1*1*-U6).

Industry and

Uses of automatic weighing machines, conveyors, etc., to provide
continuous flow of bulk materials such as feed and coal.

72.

Automation in the Milling Industry.
E. D. GLadow.
The Northwestern
Miller,
September 13, 1955, Vol. 25U (pp. la, 5a-7a)7
New packing, loading, and processing equipment.

73.

Blast Furnace Automation.
W. W Robinson.
.
February 1955# Vol. 28 (pp. 266-269).

Instruments and Automation*
~

Automatic control of charging program.

71*.

Control Components Provide New Ways to Handle Materials.
Control,
May 1955, Vol 2. (pp. 27-31).

Automatic

Examples of automatically controlled handling systems in two
warehouses.




-

12

-

75.

From Egg Beaters to Automation.
Vol. 1 (pp. 8-11).

Automatic Control,

December 195U,

Integration of chemical and fabricating plant in production of foam
rubber through mechanized materials handling. Advantages and savings.

76.

Heavy Material Handling Uses Automation.
February 1955, Vol.2 (pp. 26-30).

E. H. Abbe.

Automation,

Controls used with high-speed conveyors in handling ore and coal.

77.

How Automation Applies to the Baking Industry.
Cledo Brunetti.
Baking Industry,
February 25, 1956, Vol. 105 (pp. 57-59).
Mechanization of flour and dough handling.

78.

Mechanized Bread Making.
(pp. 102-10$).

Food Engineering,

July 1951,

Vol. 23

Automatic machinery used in processing and materials handling in
modern bakeries.

79.

Metering Bulk Materials.
Vol. 2 (pp. 26-31).

I. H. Richardson.

Automation,

August 1955,

Various automatic devices for weighing and moving with higfc degree of
accuracy.

80.

Hew Automatic Plant Gives Them Quantity and Quality Plus.
A. J.
Faulhaber and M. Eisenstaedt.
Food Engineering,
July 1952,
Vol. 2 *
1
(pp. 77-85).
Advanced mate rials-handling equipment, high speed in-line production
machines at new bread baking plant.

81.

New Potentials of Materials Handling.
James R. Bright.
Harvard
Business Review, July-August'l95h, Vol. 32 (pp. 79-9TJT
Extent of handling activity in factory, objectives, important trends,
management approach.




-

13

-

82.

Retooling for Materials Handling. James R. Bright.
July 1955, Vol. 20 (pp.17-21).

Advanced Management,

Methods of analyzing the level and span of automation of plant
operations.

83.

Status of Automation in the Rubber and Plastic Industries.
G. V.
Kullgren.
Rubber World,
June 1955, Vol. 132 (pp. 3i*7-399).
Examples of automation or mechanization in various processes of
rubber and plastics industries and some future possibilities.

81*.

Trend Toward Automation in Automatic Weighing and Bulk Materials Handling.
I. H. Richardson.
Mechanical Engineering,
November 1953,
Vol. 75 (pp. 865-87<371
Examples in grain, flour, and sugar mills; types of scales, systems
in glass, foundry, feed, and rubber mill.

85.

Warehousing System Unified to Improve Handling Efficiency.
May 1956, Vol. 3 (pp. U9-51).

Automation,

System of conveyors to move cases from packaging to shipping.

86.

Weight Control of Bulk Materials.
S. E. Gluck. Automation, December
1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 26-33); January 1956, V o l . 3 (pp. U2-U7).
Various types of conveyor scales and weight control feeders for moving
material and controlling its flow to processing equipment.




- 1U -

SECTION IV
AUTOMATIC PRODUCTION O F ELECTRONIC GOODS

(This section covers references on the use of printed circuitry and
machines for assembling electronic equipment).

87.

Automatic Manufacture of Electronic Equipment.

Scientific American,

August 1955,

Vol. 192

L. P. Lessing.

(pp. 29-33)•

A description of the AEF plant in Alexandria, V a . , now producing com­
ponents on the modular principle.

88 .

Automatic Production in the Electronics Industry.

(A Status Report.)

Cledo Brunetti, T. R. James, R. F. Mauther.
General Mills, Inc.,
Mechanical Division, Engineering Research and Development Department,
Minneapolis, July 1955* 62 pp.
Descriptions of various types of automation fabrication processes,
printed circuits, and design, of electronic components. Bibliography and
illustrations 9

89.

Electronics Goes Modern.
Edmund L, Van Deusen.
Vol. 51 (PP. 132-135).

Fortune,

June 1955,

Trends in mechanization of electronic-goods assembly.

90.

IBM Tackles the Problem of Job Shop Automation.
N. E. Armstrong.
Automation,
March 1956, Vol. 3 (pp. 37-U0).
Specially built equipment developed for automatic production of parts.

91.

Is the Automatic Factory Practical for the Smaller Electronic Manufacturer?
f . f . damson" (taper presented to West <5oast Electronic Manufacturers'
e t
Association, San Francisco, May 195U.)
Stanford Research Institute,
Stanford.
October 195U. 6 pp.
A method of mechanical assembling of electronics described.




- 15 -

92.

Machine Automates Assembly of Printed Electronic Circuits.
April 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 6$-68).

Automation,

Operation of autofab machine on IEM circuits.

93.

Manufacturing Cost Determination of an Automatic Electronic Factory.
National Bureau of Standards Technical News Bulletin,
May 195 k,
^ 8 ( p p '.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Vi
o.

rr-m~

Summary of report on comparative costs of manually and mechanically
producing an item based on modular principle, compared with cost of con­
ventional equipment. Cites lower cost of modular design of electronics.

9k.

Mechanized Production of Electronic Equipment.
September 1955, Vol. 28 (pp. 137-160).

John Markus.

Electronics,
-----------

Report an etched wiring, component preparation, machine assembly, dip
soldering, automatic testing.

95.

Modern Developments in Automation for Electronics.
Automation,
May 1956, Vol. 3 (pp. 3k-k7).

Wilbur R. Ellis.

Examples of wiring board techniques, components for automatic produc­
tion, automated assembly, and automatic testing.

96.

Now, Assembly by Machine for TV Sets.
(pp. 56-00).

Business Week,

June 18, 1955

Examples of automatic assembling equipment on market.

97.

Proceedings of the Symposium on Printed Circuits.
(Held by the RadioElectronic-"Television Manufacturers of America at University of
Pennsylvania, January 1955.) Engineering Publishers, New York,
1955. 122 pp.
Papers on automatic production of electronic equipment.

98.

Producing Circuits for Mechanized Electronics Assembly. P. I. Anderson.
and J. A. Zagusta.
Automation, November 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 71-^ii
Development of printed circuit techniques.
pattern forming versus graphic arts.




-

1 6

-

Advantages of mechanical

99.

Project Tinkertoy: Modular Design of Electronics and Mechanized Production
of Electronics.
National Bureau of Standards Technical News Bulletin.
November 1953, VoI717 (pp. 16l-l7l).
Description of operations and materials.

100

.

Television Sets Cost Less Because of Automation.
C. S. Rossate.
Machinery,
December 1955, Vol. 62 (pp. 156-161).
Admiral Corp. experience with dip soldering, printed circuitry and
automatic assembly equipment, TV production; cites cost savings.




- 17 -

SECTION V
AUTOMATIC CONTROL IN PROCESSING

(This section covers references on principles and uses of feedback control
devices in chemical, petroleum refining, and other process industries.)

101.

Advancing Continuous Malting.
(pp. 66-68).

Automation,

October 1955,

Vol. 2

Operation of automatically controlled malting plant.

102.

Are the Processing Industries Going Electronic?
Joseph Yanak and Len
Axelrod.
Automatic Control,
June 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 18-23).
Growing use of electrical control instead of pnuematic devices in
refineries.

103.

An Automatic Chemical Plant.
September 1952, Vol. 187

Eugene Ayres.
(pp. 82-96).

Scientific American,

Use of control instruments in petroleum refineries, goal of end-point
control for greater automaticity, need for systems engineers.

10U.

Automatic Control Fundamentals.
1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 37-U2).

C. W. Worley.

Automation,

April

Development of theoryj basic principles of open- and closed-loop
control.

105.

Automatic Control in the Steel Industry.
R. W. Holman.
Blast Furnace
and Steel Plant.
April 195b, Vol. UU (pp. 391-397).
Status of automatic controls in gaging and processing.
used.

106.

Various types

Automatic Control— When? Chemical and Engineering News.
1956, Vol. 3i
i (pp. 286-287).

January 16.

Initial applications seen in petroleum and organic chemical
industries.




-

1 8

-

107.

Automatic Testing Devices Keep Pace With Production.
K. W. Patrick.
Automatic Control,
March 1955* Vol. 2 (pp. 16-17).
Need for automatic testing as processes become faster and more
complex.

108.

Automation.
The National Confectioners' Association Bulletin,
June 1955, Vol. 1*0 (pp. 17-18).

April-

Automation in candy making processes of cooling and cooking.

109.

Automation in Hosiery Finishing.
Vol. 36 (pp. 53 and 69).

M o d e m Textiles Magazine,

May 1955*

A new machine for automatically setting, dyeing, and chemically
finishing women's nylon hosieiy in a continuous operation.

110.

Automation in the Chemical Industry.

Management Association.

Carl F. Prutton.

American

Manufacturing Series No. 209

(pp. 25“ 29)•

New Yorkj 1953.
---------------------------------------Background, development, and outlook.

111.

Automation in the Iron and Steel Industry.
Pittsburgh, l & o .
ido pp.

Instruments Publishing Co.,

A collection of papers presented at 195U and 1955 conferences on In­
strumentation for the Iron and Steel Industry.
Covers control in blast
furnaces, rolling mills, etc.

112 , Automation— New Impact and Challenge.
October 1951i, Vo l .2 (pp. U-5).

Ted F. Silvey.

Looking Ahead,

Explanation of closed-loop control.

113*

Automation Pays Off.
J. O. Scott.
The Oil and Gas Journal,
ber 19, 1955, Vol. 5U Cp p . llU-lI5Ti
'

Septem­

Automatic equipment on oil wells and storage tanks saves men and
materials.




19

111*.

Automation's Challenge.
1956, Vol. 3U (pp.

Chemical and Engineering News,

February 20,

Process industries lag in use of up-to-date instrumentation.

11$.

A Case for Electronics in Process Control.
Robert A. Duncan.
Automation,
February 19$6, Vol. 3 (pp. 67-71).
Advantages of electronics over pneumatic control systems.

Il6.

Control Systems.
Gordon S. Brown and Donald P. Campbell.
American,
September 19$2, Vol. 187 (pp. $6-61*).

Scientific

Examples and advantages of feedback controls in various industrial
processes and military uses. Some implications for technical training
of systems engineers.

117.

Electronically Controlled Refinery.
Leon Stewart.
Instruments and
Automation,
December 1951*, Vol. 27 (pp. 19l*8-19$iji
Refinery at Indianapolis controlled by electronic instruments.

118.

Electronics in the Atlantic Refinery: An Operational Report.
Control,
July 19$$, Vol. 3 (pp. llt-19).

Automatic

Advantages, costs, and operation of electronic control of refinery.

119.

Feedback.
Arnold Tustin.
Vol. 187
(pp. 1*8-$$).

Scientific American,

September 1952,

Concept of open- and closed-loop systems in engineering and nature.

120.

Feedback Control Systems for Automatic Operation.
Paul Lindholm.
Automation,
September 19$l*, Vol. 1 (pp. $7-63).
Principles of automatic control; role of computers.

121.

Feedback Systems: A Basis for Self-Regulation.
Control,
July 19$ii, Vol. 1 (pp. 16-??).
Meaning of open- and closed-loop control.
planning and process control.




-

2 0

-

Alan Block.

Automatic

Examples of use in system

122.

Fundamentals of Instrumentation for the Industries.
Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co., Philadelphia, 1952. lib pp.
Characteristics of various types of measuring and control instruments.

123.

Gaging of Plating Thickness Points to Automatic Inspection.
June 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 57-60).

Automation,

Operation of three instruments to rapidly measure coating thickness
nondestructively.

12U.

A Glance at Tomorrow's Bulk-Oil Measurement.
November 15, 195U.
(pp. 205-211).

The Oil and Gas Journal,

Use of more automatic methods in petroleum measurement and testing
for greater accuracy and better quality.

125.

Graphic Panels Expedite Control.
1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 70-7U).

Leo Walter.

Automation,

December

Centralized control in refineries.

126.

How Instruments Help Make Steel.
(p. 56).

Iron Age,
------

June 2, 1955,

Vol. 175

Temperatures and pressures in various operations maintained automat­
ically through control instruments.

127.

industrial Instrumentation in Our EeononQr.
Raymond E. Olson.
Instruments and Automation, February 1955, Vol. 28 (p. 205).
Relation of process instrumentation to automation.

128.

Instrumenting a Nylon Intermediates Plant.
F. G. Carson.
Technology,
Winter 1955, Vol. 7 (pp. 3-7).

Taylor

A description of one of the most m o d e m Canadian, chemical plants of
Dupont Co. Example of centralized automatic control.




-

2 1

129*

Instrument Techniques and Mechanised Candy Processing.
The National Confectioners' Association Bulletin,

Lloyd E. Slater.
August 195U

Tpsan
p r ^ r ---------------

Obstacles to automatic control of processing and some possibilities
in control of flow of ingredients, size, and moisture.

130.

Mining Low-Grade Ores Is Economical With Automatic Control.
E. W.
Leaver and J. J. Brown.
Automatic Control,
January 1955, Vol. 2
(pp. 5-9).
Processing minerals from sea and air, particularly suitable for auto­
matic control. Elimination of transport means cost saving.

131.

Modern Instrumentation: Spur to Oil Industry's Growth.
Paul Barton.
Automatic Control,
February 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 11-13).
Use of automatic controls in processing industry.
automatic data loggers and scanners.

132.

Experience with

Nearest Thing Yet to a Completely Automatic Power Station.
and Power,
February 195b, Vol. 70 (pp. 35-1*0).

Industry

Steam electric station operated by five men on each shift.

133.

1955 Takes on Automatic Look.
Chemical and Engineering News,
2, 195b Vol. 3U (PP. b7-b9jl

January

A review of noteworthy 1955 developments in chemical industry,
especially the trend toward automatic data logging and control
instrumentation.

131*.

Producing Dry Ice.

Automation,

January 1956,

Vol. 3

(pp. 38-1*1).

Two operators on each shift control processing.

13$.

Push-Button Plants: When and How.
George A. Hall, Jr.
Engineering, May 1952, Vol. $9 (pp. 202-207).

Chemical

Development of automatic controls in chemical processing; types of
control systems; managerial problems.




-

2 2

-

136.

A Refinery Pioneers the Use of Electronic Controls.
Anderson.
Automatic Control,
December 19$lt>

Clarence O.
Vol. 1 (pp. U-7).

Advantages of electronic system in operation and maintenance*

137.

Rolling and Packing Automatically: The Saran Wrap Story.
Evan Herbert.
Automatic Control.
September 195$, Vol. 3 ipp. 16-18).
Automatically controlled materials-handling equipment for winding
wrapping film at hi$i speed.

138.

Special Instruments for the Steel Industry.
W. A. Block.
Instruments
and Automation,
November 1$51*, Vol. 27 (pp. 178b-179171
Examples of use of ultrasonic inspection and thickness gaging.

139.

Strip-Steel Thickness Control.
1956, Vol. 29 (p. 91).

Instruments and Automation,

January

Automatic X-ray gage system to reduce thickness variations.
lliO.

Trends in Process Automation.
Qlen G. Gallagher and Robert A. Robinscn.
Instruments and Automation,
February 1956, Vol. 29 (pp. 29l*-298).
Past developments toward automatic control and future trend t oward
automatic
data processing, product analysis, and electronic control.

11:1.

Where Is ELectronics Used in Control?
Vol. 2

195$,

(pp. la-52).

Control Engineering,

February

Uses in different industries of electronic devices in automatic
control.




- 23 -

SECTION VI
AUTOMATIC OONTHDL OF MACHINE TOOLS

(This section covers references on principles and operation of taped
programs and similar feedback devices to control the operation of machine
tools.)

1U2.

Adapting Present Machine Tools for Automatic Operation.
Julius I.
Kaplan.
Instruments and Automation,
September 1 9 5 U , Vol. 27
(pp. 1 U 7 9 - O T T :
Use of tape controls to automate machine tools for small-lot
production.

1U3.

Analysis of Developments in Automation.
C. J. Jacoby 3d.
Engineering,
October 1952, Vol. 7U (pp. 810-811).

Mechanical

Concept of programming, description of program controlled milling
machine, advantages of controls.

1UU.

An Automatic Machine Tool.
William Pease.
Scientific American,
September 1952, Vol. 187 (pp. 101-115).
Development of automatic feed mechanisms on machine tools, and the
MIT computer controlled milling machine.

1U 5.

Automatic Machining—-a View and Preview Waldo H. Kliever.
Control
Engineering,
September 1 9 5 5 , Vol. 2 (pp. 1 1 2 - 1 2 2 ) ; October T 9 5 5
(pp. 8U-b9);
November 1 9 5 5 (pp. 77-81).
Series on ways of automatically instructing machine tools; of driving,
and of measuring the position and size.

1U 6.

Controlling Machine Tools Automatically.
Mechanical Engineering,
June 1 9 5 U ,

Frederick M. Cunningham.
Vol. 7 6
(p p . U 8 7 - U 9 0 ) .

Types of mechanical and electronic devices to control machine tools
by tape or cards.




XU7*

Cutting a 30-Hour Job to 2-1/2 Hours*
(pp. U6-lt8)*

Business Week*

August 30, 1952

MIT's tape controlled milling machine*

lll8*

Double Your Machine Tools' Output With Numerical Control.
Howard S.
Gleason*
Automatic Control,
March 1955, Vol* 2 (pp* 18-19)*
Comparison of tape controlled and conventional machining*

1U9*

Electronic Controls for Machine Tools.
David A* Findlay.
Electronics,
February 1956, Vol. 29 (pp. 122-129)*
Survey of applications of various types of programmed machining,
positioning, and tracer controlled systems*

150.

Making Machines Remember*
Ira M* Sage*
1953, Vol. 2U (pp. 1U1-1U9).

product Engineering,
-------------------

April

Types of memory devices and their vise in machine-tool control*

151.

Now— a Tape Controlled Machine in the Shojk
John Rudolf.
Factory
Management and Maintenance,
April 1955, Vol.
(pp* Vo-YY).

213

Operation of precision boring machine regulated by tape actuated
signals. Used at Minneapolis-Honeywell Co.

152.

Numerical Control: What It Means to Metalworking.
William M.
Stocker, Jr. and Charles D. Emerson.
American Machinist,
October 25, 195U, Vol. 98 (pp. 133-156^
Advantages and operational control of machine tools by taped
programs*

153*

A Numerically Controlled Milling Machine* (Final Report to the United
States Air Force on Construetion and Initial Operation, Part I)
Servomechanisms Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
Cambridge, 1952.
19 pp*
Nontechnical description of automatic, tape controlled machine tool*




25

15U.

Numerical Positioning Control.
D. B. Schneider and H. V. Nielson.
Tech Engineering News,
February 195b, Vol. 37 (pp. 50-57).
Operations of General Electric Corp.'s device to direct machine tools
by means of punched cards.

155.

Tape-Controlled Machines.
Lawrence R. Peaslee.
Electrical
Manufactaring, November 1953> Vol. 52 (pp. 162-108).
The General Electric Corp.'s record playback technique of controlling
machine tools.

156.

Tape Gives Turret Lathe Short Run Flexibility.
American Machinist,
August 1955, Vol. 99

John R. Nichols.
(pp. 106-109).

Application of numerical control to machine tool.




-

2 6

-

SECTION v n
ELECTIONIC COMPUTERS: TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS

(This section covers references on the principles of operation and
characteristics of electronic analog and digital computers.)

157.

Automatic Data-Processing Equipment: A Survey.
Charles W. Adams.
American Management Association. Special Report No, 3 (pp. 125139). New York, 19#.
Types of manual, semiautomatic devices, small drum-type systems, large
general purpose computers, forms of storage.

158.

The Brain Builders.

Time,

March 28, 1955,

Vol. 65

(pp. 81-86).

International Business Machine Corp. and the development of
electronic computers.

159.

A Broad Look at Analog Computers.
William Allison.
Control
Engineering, February 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 53-57).
Various types of analog systems and their advantages.

160.

A Comparison of Large-Scale Calculators.
John W. Carr III and Alan J.
Perils.
Control Engineering,
February 1956, Vol. 3 (pp. 81**96).
Characteristics and performance of currently operating large-scale
computers.

16L.

Computer Memories.
1955, Vol. 192

Louis N. Ridenour.
(pp. 92-101).

Scientific American,

June

Various techniques for storing data.

162.

Data Processing Systems: How They Function.
Jerre D. Noe.
Engineering,
October 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 70-77).

Control

Comparison of manual and automatic data processing systems in solving
scientific problems, handling business data, and controlling processes.




27 -

163*

Data Processing Systems: How They are Used.
Eugene M. Grabbe•
Control Engineering,
December 195$, Vol. 2 (pp. U0-1^>).
Development of computers, and requirements, present studies and
future possibilities of use in science, business, and process control.

16l*.

Electronic Computers for the Businessman.
June 1955, Vol. 28 (pp. 122-131).

John M. Carroll.

Electronics.

Survey of characteristics, number sold, price of 36 modern computers*

165.

Electronic Data Processing Machines.
G. T. Hunter and G. M. Clark.
Instruments and Automation,
May 1955, Vol. 28 (pp. 782-793).
Survey of characteristics of all IBM statistical machines, including
electronic and mechanical types.

166.

The Evolutionary Trend from Manual Methods to Computers.
Thorton F.
Bradshaw and Maurice S. Newman.
American Management Association.
Special Report No. 3 (pp. 17-38)" Mew York, 1955.
Significant stages in advancement of data processing methods.

167.

Faster, Faster. Simple Description of a Giant Electronic Calculator and
the Problem It Solves^
W. J. Eckert and Rebecca Jones.
International Business Machines Corp., New York, 1955* 160 pp.
Layman's explanation of how NORC performs calculations, and its use
on some scientific problems.

168.

Giant Brains, or Machines That Think.
Edward C. Berkeley and John
Wiley ana Sons, Inc., Mew York, 19U9. 270 pp.
Explanation of theory, mathematics, and functioning of electronic
computers and early examples.

169.

An Introduction to Analog Computers.
Jerry Roedel. (Paper presented
at 8th National Instrumentation Conference, Chicago, September
1953.)
Reprinted by George A. PhilbrLck Researches, Inc., Boston,
1953.
History, classification, and precision and accuracy of computing
devices.




- 28 -

170.

A Look at Future Developments.
Bussell B. McNeil.
American Management
Association. Special Report No. 3 (pp. 231-21*0). New York, 1955.
Problem of high setup time, coming importance of transistors, faster
access, high-speed outputs, and the input problem.

171.

Minds and Machines.
223 PP.

V. Slue kin.

Penguin Books, Inc.,

Baltimore, 1551*,

Principles of electronic computers and implications for study of humcn
psychology.
172.

A New Approach to Information Storage.
Gilbert W. King.
Engineering, August 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 1*8-53).

Control

Advantages and uses of photographic techniques in electronic computers

173*

NORC: What Goes into an Automatic Product.
1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 23-26).

Automatic Control,

March

Types of components used in large-scale computer.

171*.

A Palimpsest on the Electronic Analog Art.
George A. Philbrick Researches, Inc.,

Edited by H. M. Paynter.
Boston, 1955, 270 pp.

Collection of reprints of articles on principles and applications.

175.

A Survey of Domestic Electronic Digital Computing Systems.
Weik.
Office of technical Services Report PB111996j
Department of Commerce, Washington,
December 1955*

Martin H.
U. S.
272 pp.

Engineering characteristics, operating experiences, costs, and
personnel requirements of 8 * different digital computers.
1

176.

Uni vac and Univac Scientific. W. Allen and G. E. Smith.
and Automation,
June 1955, Vol. 28 (pp. 960-969).
Characteristics of two important machines.




29

Instruments

SECTION VIII
ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING IN BUSINESS OFFICES

(This section covers references on the application of electronic computers
to data processing in banking, insurance, sales, accounting, and similar
business office operations.)
177.

Airlines Plan Expanded Uses of Reservisors.
Henry P. Steier.
Aviation,
August 1, 1955, Vol. 19 (pp. 27-28).

American

Operation of the automatic systems for handling airline reservation
data.
178.

Automation Is an Asset in Banking.
Ray P. Eppert.
November 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 57-61).

Automation,

Instances where automation data processing may be profitably applied
to banking.
179.

Automation of Bank Operating Procedures.
Bank Management Commission,
American Bankers Association, New York, 1955. 32 pp.
Need for automation in banking operations, and the requirements of
checking- and savings-account operations as they affect equipment.

180.

U5-51).

Can Computers Cut Your Costs?
Vol. 3 (PP.

Ned Chapin.

-----------

Automation,

March 1956,

Factors to be considered in determining profitability of automatic
computer for specific data processing tasks in business.
181.

Can Control Devices Solve Common problems Facing Industry and Business?
Automatic Control,
May 1955, Vol. 2
(pp. lU-17).
Need for automatic equipment in order processing, inventory control,
materials handling of mail-order division of retail chain.

182.

The Challenge of Electronic Equipment to Accountants. Everett S. Calhoun.
Stanford Research Institute, Stanford, caiil."7 1953. 13 pp.
Characteristics of machines and their use in accounting.




- 30 -

183.

The Coining Victory Over Paper,
Edmund L. Van Deusen.
October
Vol.
(pp. 130-132).

195$,

$2

Fortune,

New electronic devices for bookkeeping in banks and offices.

18U.

The Computer As an Accountant.
Dorpthy Colburn.
December
Vol. 1 (pp. 19-21).

195k,

Automatic Control,

Use of electronic machines in recording, arranging, processing, and
printing.

185*

Current Status of Magnetic Tapes As a Recording and Data Processing
Medium. (Report of the Committee on )lew Recording Means and Computing
Devices, June
Society of Actuaries, Chicago, 1955. 112 pp

1955•)

Properties of tape and its suitability in processing insurance records.

186.

Data Processing by Electronics.
----- jjj-jp---------------------------

Haskins and Sells,

New York, 1955.

Explanation of operation and use of electronic computers in records
processing, for laymen.

187.

Economics of the Digital Computer.
Richard F. Clippinger.
Harvard
Business Review,
January-February 1955, Vol. 33 (pp. 77-78).
Potential business uses, costs, and savings.
service agencies.

188.

Electronic Computer and Management Control.
Kircher.
McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc.,

Roster of computing

George Kozmetsky and Paul
New York, 1956. 296 pp.

In laymen's terms, methods of electronic data processing, applications
administrative problems in introducing systems, and executive's role in
selecting system.
189.

Electronic Computers: A Progress Report.
Peter B. Laubach and Lawrence
E. Thompson.
Harvard Business Review,
March-April
Vol. 33
(pp. 120-128).

1955,

Differences in equipment, applications, advantages, and management
approach.




- 31 -

190*

Electronic Data Processing in Industry— A Casebook of Management
'Experience!
Special Report Ho. 3, American Management Association,
New York, 1955* 257 PP*
Evolution of data processing, planning of applications, available
equipment, and some actual business uses, by various experts in accounting,
insurance, railroads, and industry*

191*

Electronics As It Applies to Bank Accounting*
Jerre D. Noe*
(Paper presented at National Association of Bank Auditors and
Comptrollers, October 195>U*)
Stanford Research Institute, Stanford,

195iu

9 PP.

Applicability of computers to sorting and routing of checks,
reconciling, and dollar-accounting problems*

192*

Electronics Down to Earth*
John A* Higgins and Joseph S* Glickauf*
Harvard Business Review, March-April 195U,
Vol. 32 (pp. 97-10U).
Operating characteristics of computers economic advantages, future
trends in business*

193*

Electronics in Financial Accounting*
Jerre D. Noe, (Paper presented
to Eastern Joint Computer Conference, Boston, November 1955)#
Stanford Research Institute, Stanford, 1955. 29 pp. Processed.
Elements of financial accounting and Erma, new electronic equipment
for processing.

194*

Electronics in the Office: Problems and prospects.
Office Management
Series No. 13l*
American Management Association, New Yoric, I9i>2.

■3Fpp!----Application in accounting and in small office.

195.

Erma-Electronic Bookkeeper.
Vol. 7 (pp. 1-12).

Research for industry,

October 1955,

Description of accounting machine to handle bookkeeping functions for
Bank of America checking accounts.




32 -

196.

GE and Univacs Harnessing the High-Speed Computer.
Roddy F. Osborn.
Harvard Business Review,
July-August 195U, Vol. 32 (pp. 99-107X
Experience of General Electric Corp., in applying univac to office
operations.

197.

How One Company Utilizes a Medium-Size Electronic Digital Computer.
Management Methods,
September 1955 (pp. IUt-U5).
Case study of use at All-State insurance Co. Economies and plans for
future use.

198.

How a Computer Takes Over.

July 2k , 195U

Business Week,

(pp. 58-62).

Savings in changeover to electronic computer in insurance company.

199.

The impact of Computers on Office Managements Experience in Computer
Application.
Office Management Series Wo. l36.
American
Management Association, New York, 195U. 60 pp.
Papers on planning and installation of computer to do clerical office
work such as payrolls and Insurance records.

200.

A Magnetic Drum Speeds Stock Transactions.
January 1955* Vol. 2 (p. 26).

Automatic Control,

Electronic quotation service at Toronto Stock Exchange.

201.

A New Approach to Office Mechanizations Integrated Data Processing
Through Common Language Machines.
American Management Association,
New York, I95U. 62 pp.
Experience of U. S. Steel Corp. in mechanizing office work.

202.

A New Recordings Means and Computing Services} Report Committee of the
Society of Actuaries.
Malvin E. Davis, Chairman. Chicago, l9i>Z.

nrrw.------------

Application in processing insurance records.

203.

Office Automation.
(pp. 55-llii).

Dun>s Review and Modern Industry,
----------------------------------

October 1955

Major problems and applications, case study of data developed in
small installation, evaluation by consumers and producers.




33

20h.

Office Automation.
---- f ew York,"1955.
l

R. Hunt Broun.
202 pp.

Automation Consultant. Inc..

Manual for laymen on coronercial aspects, hardware, vises in accounting
and science, potential applications, and social aspects.

205*

Taking the Mystery Out of Integrated Data-proceasing.
Arno A* Krause.
Office Executive,
July 1955, Vol. 30 (pp. 10-12).
Methods of integrating data processing machines b y common language
tapes.

206.

A Univac Progress Report.
Vol. 20 (pp. 334).

G. M. Sheean.

Systems,

March-April 195^

Experience of General Electric Corp. in applying computer to payroll
accounting and scheduling.

207.

Using a Computer to Run a Business.
(PP. 68-75).

Business Week,
-------------

May lU, 1955

Application in planning location of retail stores.

208.

What Computers Can Do For You.
Morley G. Meldon.
Factory Management
and Maintenance,
February 1956, Vol. H U
(pp. £8-105)•
Use of computers today; future areas of application in management.

209.

What Management Should Know About Electronics for the Office.
Management Methods,
January 1955 (pp. 10-13).
Savings, application in small companies, and advantages of faster
reporting.




- 3U -

SECTION IX
ELECTIONIC DATA PROCESSING IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

(This section covers references on the application of digital and analog
computers on mathematical and statistical problems in science and engineering,)

210.

Automatic Instruments and Industrial Research,
Orvol L. Linebrink.
Automatic Control,
April 1955 > Vol. 2 (pp. 28-30).
Use of automatic instruments to monitor, reduce, and gather data
rapidly, as research tools.

211.

Basic Applications of Analog Computers.
P. J. Hermann, K. H« Sparks,
and J. A. Rudolph.
Instruments and Automation,
March 195b,
Vol. 29 (pp. 1*6M j
69T:
Some uses in solving engineering problems.

212.

Bibliography in an Age of Science,
Louis N. Ridenour, Ralph R. Shaw,
ana Albert G. hill.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana, 1951.
90 pp.
Problems of library research and contribution of electronic data
processing devices.

213.

Cut Research and Development Costs.
Control,
October 1955* Vol. 3

Bernard S. Benson.
(pp. 22-26).

Automatic

Examples of use of automatic data reduction techniques in aircraft
research, general applicability, and possible economies.

2lU.

Digital Computers in Design.
Marshall Middleton, Jr.
February 23, 195b, Vol. 28 (pp. 88-92).

Machine Desigi,

Use o f digital computers in designing parts, equipment or complete
machines.




- 35 -

215.

Extending Engineering Skills With Large-Scale Digital Computers.
Allen Keller.
Mechanical Engineering,
November 1953* Vol. 75
(pp. 891-895).
Lists possible uses in engineering and business.
typical engineering problem.

216.

Illustrates use on

Information Processing in Social and Industrial Research.
James L.
McPherson, Samuel N. Alexander, H. Burke Horton, and Ezra Glaser.
The Scientific Monthly,
Februaiy 1953, Vol. 76 (pp. 100-108).
Use of electronic computers in interindustry economic analysis,
accounting, and management.

217.

Machine Methods in Employment Statistics.
Rudolph C. Mendelssohn.
Monthly Labor Review,
May 1955, Vol. 78 (pp. 5t>7-5t>9).
Use of small electronic computer on large-scale statistical program.

218.

Make More Effective Use of Analogue Computers.
Robert J. Bibbero.
Automatic Control,
August 1955, Vol. 3 (pp. 2U-27).
Actual and possible applications in engineering*

219.

Programming Scientific Calculators.
Joseph H. Wegstein and Samuel N.
Alexander.
Control Engineering,
May 1956, Vol. 3 (pp. 89-92).
Steps in programming problem for NORC; also automatic coding.

220.

Seasonal Computations on Itoivac.
Julius Shiskin.
The American
Statistician,
Februaiy 1955, Vol. 9 (pp 19-237^
Application to statistical analysis.

221.

Small-Scale Computers as Scientific Calculators.
John W. Carr III and
Alan J. Perils.
Control Engineering,
March 195b, Vol. 3 (pp.
99-10U).
The characteristics of the various electronic digital computers in
the medium-to-small-size class, for use as scientific calculators.




- 36 -

222 .

Solving Scientific Problems.
John W. Carr III.
January 1956, Vol. 3 (pp. 63-70).

Control Engineering,

General characteristics o f scientific computers, types of problems
solved, and desirable specifications.

223.

f

J.

Statement ~on automation
A. V. Astin.
Automation and TechnologicaT Change; Hearing.
Joint Committee on the Economic Report,
bongress of the United States, ... October 1U-28, 1955 (pp. 571-58<Jt
U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955.
Government scientific applications of computers and state of the art
of automatic data processing machines.

22U.

Statement £"on automation_7.
Robert W. Burgess.
Automation and Tech­
nological Change; Hearing.
Joint Committee on the Economic Report,
Congress of the United States, ... October 1U-28, 1955
(pp. 72-82).
U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955.
Experience of U. S. Bureau of Census with large-scale computers.
General remarks on effects of automation.

225.

Translation by Machine.
William N. Locke.
January 1956, Vol. 19ii (pp. 29-33).
Progress in translating by computers.




•37

Scientific American,

SECTION X
ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING IN INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION

(This section covers references on the uses of computers for controlling
plant operations*)

226.

Analogue or Digital Control?
John P. Bishop.
December 195U, Vol. 1 (pp. 16-18).

Automatic Control,

Uses of both in controlling plant processes.

227.

Automatic Freight Yard Shuffles Cars Quickly, Yet Gently.
Engineering,
January 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 28-37)*

Control

Use of computer controlled systems in freight classification yards.

228.

Automatic Production Inventory Control.
E. D. Lucas.
neering,
September 1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 68-73).

Control Engi­

The use of data processing equipment for inventory and accounting
control of materials and supplies of a gas utility company.

229.

A Caveat on Computers. E. W. Leaver and J. J. Brown.
February 195b, Vol. 3 (pp. 38-U2).

Automation,

Future evolution of automation seen along evolutionary lines.
Computer controlled factories far off.

230.

The Computer Age.

Business W e e k ,

April 7, 195b

(pp. $2-68).

Uses of computers in operating a refinery, office accounting, central
processing of statistical data. Growth o f service centers for small
fins.
231.

Cost Reduction Through Electronic Production Control.
.Mechanical Engineering,
November 1953, Vol. 7$

R. G. Canning.
(pp. 887-890).

Mechanization of clerical tasks in processing customers' orders and
scheduling production.




- 38 -

232.

The Future of Automatic Information Handling in Chemical Engineering.
Charles R. DeCarlo.
Chemical Engineering Progress,
November
1955, Vol. 51 (p p . U B 7 ^ T . --Use o f computers in design, prediction, and control of processes.

233.

Industrial Uses of Analog Computers.
R. L. Hovrous, C. D. Morrill,
and N. P. Tomlinson.
Instruments and Automation,
April 1955,
Vol. 28 (pp. 59U-O01).
Typical applications and some advantages in controlling production.

23U.

Industrial Uses of Special Purpose Computers.
A. H. Kuhnel.
Instruments and Automation,
July 1955, Vol. 28 (pp. 1108-1113).
Case studies of use of digital and analog computers for machine
control.

235.

Machines Without Men.
E. W. Leaver and J. J. Brown.
November 19U6, Vol. 3U (pp. 165} 192-20U).

Fortune,

Projection of automatic factory, based on electronic control devices.

236.

Refinery Uses Digital Computer.
1955, Vol. 28 (p. 109).

Instruments and Automation,

January

Use of computer to control operations at oil refinery research
laboratory.

237.

£

Production Control Through Electronic Data Processing. A Case Study.
R. G* Canning. U. 57 department o Commerce, Of rice of Technical
Services, Washington, 195U. 52 pp.
An in-plant research study, at a medium-size manufacturing plant, to
determine electronic data processing systems to meet plant production
control requirements.




- 39

238.

The Role of the Computer.
Louis N. Ridenour.
September 1952, Vol. 187
(pp. 116-130).

Scientific American,

Application to control of industrial processes.

239.

What Computers Promise •
David Rubinfein.
September 195U, Vol. 1
(pp. t>U-b7).

Control Engineering.

Limitations and advantages of computers in controlling processes.




UO -

SECTION XI
ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS

(ftiis section covers references on the implications of automation for
employment, leisure, displacement, skill, training, safely, economic
stability, and related problems.)

21*0.

Adjustments to Automation in Two Firms.
January 1956, Vol. 79 (pp. 15-19).

Monthly Labor Review,

Summary of two case studies made by Bureau of Labor Statistics.

21*1.

The Age of Automation.
Warner Bloomberg, Jr.
Democracy, Tna, Sew York, 195$. 39 pp.

League for Industrial

Implications of use of automatic controls for employment, older
workers, training, need for displacement insurance, job information,
retraining.

21*2.

The Age of the Thinking Robot, and What It Will Mean To Us.
Bendiner. The Reporter,
April 7, 195$ (pp. 12-18).

Robert

Possibilities of displacement and need for retraining, shorter hours,
and coherent planning.

21*3.

Automatic Control.
1952. Vol. 187

Ernest Nagel.
(pp. 1*1*-1*7).

Scientific American,

September

Some implications for employment, training, and large-scale
organization of automatic control technology.

2**
11.

Automatic and Economic Development.
Richard L. Meier.
Bulletin of
the Atomic Scientists,
April 1951*, Vol. 10
(pp. 129-133).
Applicability of automatic production equipment to underdeveloped
areas.




21*5•

Automation: A New Dimension to Old Problems*
George B. Baldwin and
George P. Shultz.
Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Meeting.
Industrial Relations Research Association^
Detroit, December
l95h, Publication No. 11*, (pp. lli*-i28).
Madison, 1955.
Definition, examples, and likely effects in industrial relations,
skill, job classifications, seniority and displacement. (Also published
in part, in Monthly Labor Review,
February 1955, Vol. 78, (pp. 165169).

21*6.

Automation in the American Economy.
R. L. Meier.
The Journal of
Business of the University of Chicago, January l$5b, Vol. 29

(pp. 1U-27).
Factors affecting pace, areas of application, implications for labor
force, consumption.

2l*7.

Automation.
(BNA1S Personnel Policies Forum Survey, No. 33).
of National Affairs, Inc., Washington, 1955. 10 pp.

Bureau

Survey of opinion of 67 executives on extent of automation, effects,
and methods of educating employees to accept automation.

21*8.

Automation: Creator or Destroyer of Jobs.
Tale Brozen.
Digest,
February 1956, Vol. 27 (pp. 3-7).

Iowa Business

Implications for unemployment, displacement, wage rates.

21*9.

Automation'8 Impact on Education.
Neil Hurley, S. J.
Instruments
and Automation,
January 1956, Vol. 29 (pp. 57-58).
Implications for training in humanities, methods of research, and
use of leisure.

2^0.

Automation aid Job Trends. (No. 3 of a series on Technology and
Employment.)
Council for Technological Advancement, Chicago,
1955 .

21* pp.

Some examples, reasons for automation, importance of economic growth,
direct and indirect employment effects, and relation to capital goods.




- U2 -

251.

Automation.
John B. Shallenberger.
Proceedings of National Con­
ference of Social Work,
San Francisco, Calif., 1$55 (pp. 152-159).
Columbia University Press, New York, 1955.
Implications of automation: increased leisure, upgrading of skills,
communities, and managers, dispersion of plants, higher standard of
hiring.

252.

Automation and Labor Relations*
Clyde E. Dankert.
December 1955, Vol. 3h (pp. 203-265).

Personnel Journal*

Expected pressure for higher wages, shorter hours, multiple shift
work, and union organization*

253.

Automation and Technological Change.
Report of the Subcommittee on
Economic Stabilization to the Joint Committee on the Economic Re­
port, Congress of the United States, 81*th Cong., 1st sess.,
... October 1U-28, 1955. U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, 1955. 13 PP*
Findings based on hearings on economic significance, and impli­
cations for employment, displacement, training, education.

25U.

Automation, Productivity and Industrial Relations: Discussion.
Solomon Barkin.
Proceedings of Seventh Annual Meeting of Indus­
trial Relations Research Association, Jiadison, 1955 (pp. 1U2-150).
December 195h.
Current trends in technology and their implications for employment,
displacement, education, collective bargaining, and unionism.

255.

Automation, Safety's New Ally.
John B. Stirling.
News,
February 1955, Vol. 71 (pp. 22-23).

National Safety

Mechanized handling reduces foot injuries, hernia, etc*

256.

Autonation— Some Hunan Problens.

1955,

Vol. 32

W. E. Vannah.

Personnel,

September

(pp. 100-106).

Different levels of automation, estimated application, some case
histories, effect on collective contracts, incentive systems, and need
for joint planning.




- U3 -

257.

Automation— Some Social Aspects. H. deBivort. International Labor
Review,
December 1955, Vol. 72 (pp. U67-U95) .
Various definitions, areas affected, technical problems of
management, trade union problems, employment.

258.

Calling All Jobs: An Introduction to the Automatic Machine Age.
National Association of Manufacturers, New York, 195U. 22 pp.
Pamphlet.
Advantages of technological change in past and prospective benefits
of automation to workers and consumer.

259.

A Case Study of a Company Manufacturing Electronic Equipment. (Studies
of Automatic technology, l)
Edgar Weinberg,
S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, 1955. 19 pp.
Bibliography.
processed.
Study of effect on labor of introducing printed circuitry and
automatic assembly.

260.

The Challenge of Automation.
ia
(pp. 510-512).

The Nation,

December 10, 1955.

Vol.

Implications for productivity, displacement, government policy.

261.

A Chemical Plant Program for Instrument Personnel Training.
William
D. DeCourey.
Instruments and Automation,
August 1955, Vol. 28
(pp. 1327-1329):
Training program developed to upgrade employees to skilled
instrument work of continuous process plant.

262.

The Coming Revolution in Industrial Relations, 1955-1975.
Relations News, Inc., New York, 1955.

industrial

Implications for employment, management, unions and industrial
relations, in question and answer form.




- hk -

263*

The Department of Labor and Automation Research,
K, G, Van Auken, Jr,
(Paper presented to Society oi' Applied Anthropology, Yale university,
December 28, 1955.) U, S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Washington, 15 pp. Processed,
Labor Department’s need for information, current program of case
studies and future research needs.

26U,

Electronics and Human Beings.
E« W, Leaver and J, J, Brown.
Magazine,
August 1951, Vol. 263 (pp. 88-93),

Harper’s

Implications of automatic control for upgrading skill and greater
leisure.

265*

Engineers for Automation,
(pp. 86-91, 92).

Business Week,

December 17, 1955

Need for maintenance, system builders, and designers.
university courses in this field.

266,

Inadequacy of

The Future of Automatic Machinery,
Norbert Wiener,
Mechanical
Engineering,
February 1953, Vol, 75 (pp* 130-132).
Applicability to routine workj limitations in fields of value
judgments.

267,

Geographical Features of the Automation of industry,
David G« Osborn,
(feesearch Paper No. 30, Department of Geography, university of
Chicago.) university of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1953, 106 pp.
Examples in manufacturing and nonmanufacturing and their implication
for the location of plants.

268.

A Government View-Economic Aspects of Automation.
Edgar Weinberg.
Advanced Management,
May 1956, Vol. 2i (pp. 11-15).
Relation to earlier trends and implications for occupational changes,
displacement, training, and research studies.




- U5 *•

269*

How Necessary is Automation to America.
Ewan Clague. (Paper presented
at diversity of Chicago, Chicago, November lit, 1955.)
U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington.
15 pp. Processed.
U. S. Commissioner of Labor Statistics on implications of automation
for labor farce, occupational requirements, and training.

270.

The Human use of Human Beings.
Norbert Wiener.
Books, New York, l9i>U. 265 pp.

Doubleday-Anchor

The significance of the Second industrial Revolution on skill and
employments.

271.

Improving the Work Skills of the Nation* Proceedings of a Conference
on Skilled Manpower, April zy-May l, 1955.
Columbia University
Wess,
New York,'1955. 'T O ' pj T
'
p ---- ------

Conference under auspices of the National Manpower Council on ways
educational, industrial, and government agencies could increase skilled
manpower.

272.

Industrial Significance.
Walter S. Buckingham.
Automation
(pp. 30-140. Washington, 1 955.

The Challenge of

Background, definition, applicability, and implications for location
and concentration of industry, skill, and employment.

273*

An Inquiry into the Effects of Automation.
Labor Review,
January 1956, Vol. 79

Edgar Weinberg.
(pp. 7-lU).

Monthly

Statements of witnesses at Joint Comnittee on Economic Report's
hearings organized around six topics* definition, relation to past
developments, trends in key industries, factors in outlook, implications.

27U.

The introduction of an Electronic Computer in a Large insurance Company.
(Studies of Automatic technology, 2 ) K. G. Van Auken, Jr. u. S.
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, 1955.
18 pp.
Processed.
Study of labor adjustments in adopting electronic data processirg.




- 1*6 -

275*

Labor on the Hook.
1955 (p. 20).

Nat Weinberg.

The Saturday Review,

January 22,

Research director of automobile workers' union discusses implications
of automation for annual wage policies, distribution of income, and
employment security.

276.

A Look at the White Collar.
C. Wright Hills.
American Management
Association. Office Management Series, No. Ill
(pp. 30-36).
flewTork;T9VZ.-------------------------------Implications of electronic computers for work motives, unionism,
wages of white-collar workers.

277.

Machines and Men.
Wassily Leontief.
1952 , Vol. 187 (pp. 150-160).

Scientific American,
--------------

September

Implications of automatic control for employment, costs, and effect
on underdeveloped countries.

278.

The Meaning of Automation.
Cledo Brunetti.
Minneapolis, 1955.
Pamphlet.

General Mills, Inc.,

Benefits of mechanization for employment, wages, and prospects far
improvement.

279.

Measurement of Current Trends in Output Per Man-hour. Leon Greenberg,
Jack Alterman, and Allan D. Searie. (paper presented to the Annual
Meeting of the American Statistical Association, New York,
December 1955.) U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Washington, 1956. 21 pp. Processed.
Estimates of productivity changes in manufacturing, 1953-55.

280.

The Monstrous Machine and the Worried Workers.
Warner Bloomberg, Jr.
The Reporter,
September 29, 1953 (pp. 28-31).
Adjustment of workers in steel mill to continuous processing
equipment.




- U7 -

281.

Output Per Man-Hour in Manufacturing, 1939-53.
Leon Oreenberg.
Monthly Labor Review,
January 195b, Vol. 79 (pp. 1-b).
BLS productivity indexes for postwar years, relation to earlier
periods, factors affecting productivity change.

282.

Preparing Your People for Office Mechanization.
Esther R. Becker.
Personnel Journal,
April 195b, Vol. 3U (pp. 1*00-1*09).
Special problem of nonunion!zed women workers, ways to reassure
office people, development of training, and better pay.

283.

Proceedings of the First Conference on Training Personnel for the
Computing Machine Field
(Held at Wayne University, Detroit, Mich.,
June 22-o, l$5h.) Edited by Arvid W. Jacobson.
Wayne University
Press, Detroit, 1955. 101* pp.
Papers on manpower requirements by users and producers, and educa­
tional programs of schools and companies.

281*.

The Promise of Automation.
Peter F. Drucker.
April 1955, Vol. 210 (pp. l*l-l*7).

Harper's Magazine,

Implications for management, skill, training of workers and managers,
and economic stability.

285.

A Researcher Views Human Adjustment to Automation.
Arthur N. Turner.
Advanced Management,
May 195b, Vol. 21 (pp. 21-25).
Significance for job content, motivation, supervision, group
relations.

28b.

The Role of the Technician in Our Nation's Future.
Karl 0. Werwath.
The American Engineer,
September 1955 (pp. 17-19).
Need and technical and personal qualifications of technicians.




-

1 *8

-

287.

Statement /"on automation^/.
Edwin G« Nourse.
Automation and
Technological Change; Hearing.
Joint Committee on the Economic
Report, Congress or the United States, ... October 1U**28, 1955
(pp. 618-627) • U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955#
Need for integrated government economic policy, implications for
competition, and possibility of instability.

288.

Statement /"on automation/.
James P. Mitchell.
Automation and
Technological Change; Hearing.
Joint Committee on the Economic
Report, Congress of the bnited States, ... October lli-28, 1955
(pp. 2o3-279). U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955.
Secretary of Labor on possible occupational changes.
and the Department of Labor's activities.

289.

Case studies

Statement /"on automation_7.
Vannevar Bush*
Automation and
Technological Change/"Hearing.
Joint Committee on ihe Economic
Report, Congress of the United States, ... October lU-28, 1955
(pp. 60L-616). U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington,
1955.
Implications for costs, skill, small business, education.

290.

Statement /"on a u t o m a t i o n W a l t e r S. Buckingham, Jr.
Automation
and Technological Changei Hearing.
Joint Committee on the Economic
Report, Congress o f the United States, ... October lU-28, 1955
(PP* 29-37)* U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955*
Definition, implications for investment; some short-run problems,
and need for study.

291.

Steel-Plant Instrument Personnel Training.
Gail Rose.
and Automation,
January 1955 (pp. llt>-117).

Instruments

On-the-job and in-plant classes for training workers on new
equipment and introducing new workers.

292.

Technicians in Industry: A Manpower Study of Semi-Professional
Occupations^
Howard Rosen.
thesis D., American
University.
Washington, 1955. 176 pp.
Chapter 6 on technicians and automation*
employment and training*




-

k9 -

Implications for

293*

Thinking Ahead.
James R. Bright.
Harvard Business Review,
November-December 1955, Vol. 33 {pp. 27-28).
Based on case study of automated plants; the effect on worker skilly
Maintenance costs, and small business.

29h»

Today's Industrial Revolution.
John Diebold.
July 1951*, Vol. 1 (pp. b-15).

Automatic Control,

Implications for cost reductions, new industries, products, services,
areas of application, marketing problems, and meaning for labor.

295*

Training Personnel in Electronics for Business Applications.
Arvid Jacobson.
Management Methods,
December 1955 (pp. 11-15).
Needs for computer courses at businesses and schools; for specialists
at planning stages.

296,

Trends in Productivity Since the War.
Ewan Clague,
(Paper presented
to National Industrial Conference Board Meeting,
New York,
January 20, 1956*)
U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Washington, 1956*
11 pp.
Processed.
BLS,indexes of output per man-hour in manufacturing, 19U7-53 and
estimates for 1953-55*

297*

What Automation Means to America.
Carroll W. Boyce.
Factory
Management and Maintenance, September 1955, Vol. 113 (pp. 8U-90).
Implications for employment, productivity, hours of work.

298.

Will Electronics Make People Obsolete?
J. Douglas Elliot, Jr.
the
Impact of the Computer on Office Management,
Office Management
Series No. l36 (pp. 1*7-&0).
American Management Association,
New York, 195U.
Implications of electronic data processing for skill, personnel
relations, and displacement of white-collar employees.

2 9 9 • Worker Welfare in the Era of Automation.

Richard C. Walmer, Jr.
Keeping Pace With Automation,
Special Report No. 7 (pp. 118-130).
American Management Association, New York, 1956.

Significance for Industrial safely and medicine.




- 50 -

SECTION XII
UNION ATTITUDES AND POLICIES

(This section covers references to policies and statements by union
officials on labor problems of automation.)

300.

Automatic Equipment,

The International Mailer,

February 1955 (p. 1).

Contract provisions for retraining, dismissal pay, shorter workweek.

301.

Automation. A Report to the UAW'-CIO Economic and Collective Bargaining
Conference^ Detroit, November 12-13, 195U, UAW-CIO Education
Department. Detroit, 1955. 39 pp.
Implications for displacement, job classifications, retraining,
guaranteed annual wages, wage structure, contracts.

302.

Automation and Labor.
J. 0. Cross.
Journal, April 1955 (p. 16).

Bakers and Confectioners

Possibility of hardships and need for collective bargaining
mechanisation clauses.

303.

Automation.

CIO Committee on Economic Policy,

Washington, 1955.

Si* ppT
Varieties of automation, and its implications for national
econony, workers, and their unions.

301*.

The Automation Problem.
The International Chemical Worker,
February and March 1956^ V o l . 1 6 (p. 7).
Union policy on layoff, training, and work schedules.

305*

Automation Beaches Industry.
E. W. Kenney*
Wood-Worker, February 9, 1955* Vol. 20

International
(pp. 1-13).

Need for advanced planning on wage structures, incentive systems,
training, seniority in sawmill industry.




306.

Did Reuther Speak for All Labor?
1955, Vol. 2 (pp. 25-2?).

Control Engineering,

February

The views of 10 labor leaders on implications of automation for
employment, wages, and hours.

307.

Electrical Workers Beat Automation.
February 1956 (pp. 18-19).

The Electrical Workers' Journal,

Union local training program for electrical technicians.

308.

A Few Ways Automation Threatens Jobs Now Being Performed by Our Membera.
The Railway Clerk,
April 1955 (pp. 22-23).
Need for separation allowances, more unemployment compensation.

309.

The First Automation Strike.
(PP. 57-58).

Fortune,

December 1955, Vol. 52

Production measures for indirect labor as an issue in Westinghouse
strike.

310.

Here Come the Machines: What’s UPWA Policy?
0. R. Hathaway.
The Packinghouse Worker,
January 1951* (p. 5).
Policy on displacement, new job load, aid rates of pay in
meatpacking industry.

311.

Labor Can Handle Automation.
Carl Huhndorff.
Machinists Monthly
Journal,
April 1955, Vol. 67 (pp. 118-123).
Research director on scope and examples, union acceptance.

312.

Labor's Stake.
(pp. 1*5-56).

Walter P. Reuther.
Washington, 1955.

The Challenge of Automation

Speech delivered at CIO National Conference on Automation— Impli­
cations for government economy policy, training, plant relocation,
wages, unemployment.




- 52 -

313*

Labor Views Planned Adjustment to Automation.
Advanced Management,
May 1956, Vol. 21

Nathaniel Qoldfinger.
(pp. 16-18).

Changes needed in workweek, unemployment insurance, training,
seniority.

3lU.

Man is Not Outmoded.
David J. MacDonald.
Vol. 20 (pp. li-5).

Steel Labor,

May 1955>

Steel union president stresses need for shorter hours.

315.

Preparing for Autonation.
Machinists Monthly Journal,
Vol. 67 (pp. 128-129).

May-June 1955

Editorial on need for improved training facilities.

316.

A Shop Steward Views Automation Versus Model T's.
Edward Falkowski.
Advanced Management,
May 1956, Vol. 21 (pp. 19-20).
Triplications of unemployment for the worker and his family.

317.

Statement / “on automation 7.
Howard Coughlin.
Automation and
Technological Change {“ Hearing.
Joint Committee on^the^cdnomic
Report, Congress of the (inited States, ...October lj—28, 1955
l.
(pp. 213-218). U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955.
Impact on office workers.
displacement.

318.

Union policy on seniority, retraining,

Statement / “on automation 7*
James B. Carey.
Automation and
Technological Change {“Hearing. Joint Committee on the Economic
Report, Congress of the United States, ...October lU-28, 1955
(pp. 219-21*3). U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955.
Impact on employment in electrical manufacturing industry. Radio
workers' union policies on workweek, price policies, distressed
communities, training.




- 53 -

319.

Statement /“on automation /•
Joseph A. Beirne.
Automation and
Technological Change{“ Hearing.
Joint Committee on the Economic
Report, Congress of the United states, ...October lii-28, 1955
(PP. 335-361*). U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955.
Displacement and retraining problems of workers in telephone
industry. Union recommendations.

320.

Statement /"on automation 7*
Otto Pragan.
Automation and
Technological Change {“Hearing.
Joint Conmittee on the Economic
Report, Congress of the United States, ••.October ll*-28, 1955
(pp. 151-169). U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955.
Effect on chemical workers* work schedules, skills, collective
bargaining issues, and employment.

321.

Statement /“ on automation /•
W. P. Kennedy.
Automation and
Technological Change {“Hearing.
Joint Conmittee on the Economic
Report, Congress of the united States, ... October ll*-28, 1955
(pp. l*5l*-l*7l*). U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955.
Examples of displacement in railroad industry, management policies,
union attitude. Safety aspects, union program for relocation and
retraining.

322.

Statement /"on automation /•
Walter P. Reuther,
Automation and
Technological Change {“Hearing.
Joint Conmittee on the Economic
Report^ Congress of the United States, ...October li*-28, 1955
(PP* 97-11*9). U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1955.
Union attitude on progress and problems of dislocation, consumption,
training, education, small business, productivity, and need for research.

323.

Technological Alarms.

Fortune,

May 1955,

Vol. 51

Attitudes of various unions toward automation.




- 5U .

(pp. 59-60).

32U.

Unionism— Answer to Automation.

The Carpenter,

February 1955 (pp.5-8)*

Collective bargaining to assure fair shares*

325*

What Automation Means to You— A Summary of the Effects of the Second
Industrial Revolution on the American Worker*
Abraham Weiss.
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen &
Helpers of America, AFL, Washington, 1955* 11 PP*
Examples of automation, labor problems, and contract provisions
needed, briefly cited.




-5 5 -

SECTION

mi

IMPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

(This section covers references to impact of automation on management's
functions of planning, control, etc.)
326.

Adapting Continuous Process Production Methods to the Individual Device
Manufacturing Industries.
W. H. ELoodworth.
Proceedings of
Operations Research Conference, 195U. Society for the Advancement
of Management, New York, 1951*. 13 PP»
Case history of use of operational research methods to reduce model
variety for mass production.

327.

Administering a Conversion to Electronic Equipment; A Case Study of a
Large Of lice. Harold Farlow Craig. Division of Research, Graduate
School of Business Administration, Harvard University, Boston,
1955. 235 PP.
Management policies in installing new office equipment in life in­
surance company.

328.

Automation.
David A. Wallace.
Vol. 18 (pp. 52-56).

Advanced Management,

January 1953,

President of Chrysler Corp. considers factors of quality, size of
production needed for automation, problems of personnel, training, and
management.

329.

Automation— Advances in Automatic Production.
Robert T. Collins.
Advanced Management,
May 1955 (pp. 26-30).
General Motors Corp. executive on principles, implications for
design, cost, organization, personnel requirements, and maintenance.

330.

Computer Applications to Management Problems.
Jay W. Forrester.
American Management Association. General Management Series,
No. 176 (pp. 22-31). New York, 1955.
Problems in developing company management to make effective use of
computers.




56

331*

Decision Making in the Age of Automation.
M. L. Hurni.
Harvard
Business Review,
September-Gctober 1955 , Vol. 33 (pp. U9-58).
Implications for management planning and need for operations
research.

33?.

Design for Automation.
Roger W. Bole.
Vol. 2 (pp. 3l»-U3).

Automation,

November 1955,

Cost savings possible by careful assessment of product, process
design, and the automatic system.

333.

Design for Manufacture.
Vol. 1 (pp. 16-21).

Roger W. Bole.

Automation,

November 19$h,

Some cases of redesign of parts to facilitate automation.

33U.

Developing a Maintenance Program.
Napoleon Perkowski.
February 195b,
Vol. 13 (pp. 28-33).

Automation,

Application of industrial engineering techniques for controlling
production to control of maintenance.

335.

Electronics in Management.
Edited by Lowell H. Hattery and George P.
Bush.
University Press of Washington, D. C., Washington, 1956.
207 pp.
Seventeen papers by experts, on management impact, of electronic
computers, available equipment, case examples, and suggestions for
management.

336.

Evaluation and Planning for Automation.
April 1955, Vol. 3 (PP. 22-30).

C. E. Evan son.

Automation,

Factors management should consider planning automatic production
system. Partial automation practical for any size compary today.

337.

The Factory of the Future: Will Centralized Control be Possible?
Cuthbert C. Hurd.
American Management Association. Special
Report No, 7 (pp. 97-lo l) . New York, 1$$5.
Implications of computers for programming operations.




- 57 -

338.

Future Possibilities and Limitations of Electronics in Management.
Simon Ramo.
American Management Association.
General Management
Series No. 16b (pp. 3“U ) * Mtew York, i£53.
Factors in outlook, applications in business management.

339*

The Impact of Automation on the Company Organization.
C. E. Knight
and C. H. Fawkner.
American Management Association.
General
Management Series No. it 8 (pp. 11-21V. New York, N. Y. 1955*
Implications for management functions and need for greater amount
of information.

31*0.

Increasing the Opportunities for Automaticity.
M. L. Hurni.
Mechanical Engineering, July 19
Vol, 76 (pp. 577-581).
Explains way of analyzing number of models in order to facilitate
mass production. Approach involves managerial functions of planning
and risk evaluation.

3U1.

Industrial Continuum and the Nature of Man.
Professor Erwin H. Schell.
Advanced Management, May 1956, Vol. 21 (pp. 26-28).
Implications of larger scale organizations and continuous
production for management.

31*2.

Management With Automatic Production.
Charles E. Knight.
Mechanical
Engineering.
April 195U, Vol. 76 (pp. 317-320, 355).
Effects on management structure and functions, including personnel,
communications. Operations research to be first department to be formed.

3U3*

Management Views on Application of Automation.
Carl J. Demrick.
Advanced Management,
May 1956, Vol. 21 (pp. 6-10).
Problems in planning and building new Plymouth engine plant.

3Uh.

Management's Stake in Automated Handling.
Automation. September 195U, Vol. 1

Charles E. Kraus.
(pp. 20-23).

Mechanized handling in production, testing, assembling, and
packaging. Problems in automatic handling.




- 58 -

3U5.

Must Management Change to Prepare for Automation?
M. L. Hurni.
Advanced Management,
May 195U, Vol. 19 (pp. 25-28).
Need for creative managers in design, analysis, operations,
research, and control.

3U6.

The Practice of Management.
----New YorTc,"1955. " T O PP.

Peter F. Drucker.

Harper and Bros.

Implications of automation for the skills of managers, and concepts
and organization of company management.

3U7.

Problems in the Push-Button Factory.
Matthew J. Murphy*
Management Association. Manufacturing Series No. 205
New York, 19i>3*

American
(pp. 6-10).

Problems for management in production and human relations.

3U8.

The Role of Design in Autonation.
John E. Arnold.
American Management
Association. Manufacturing Series No. 205
(pp. 13-id)• New York,

Relationship of product and machine design, designing for a specific
function, automatic multipurpose machines.

3U9.

Symposium on Managerial Aspects of Digital Computer Installations.
Navy Mathematical Computing Advisory I^anel Meeting, March 30, 1953*
U. S. Department of the Navy, Office of Naval Research, Washington,
1953. 36 pp.
Operating rates, costs, training, on various scientific projects.




-5 ? -

SECTION XIV
BIBLIOGRAPHIES AND GLOSSARIES

(This section covers references to existing bibliographies on technologi­
cal and economic aspects of automation and glossaries of terms used in the
field.)

3$0.

Articles on Automation.

Machinery,

March 1955,

Vol. 6l (pp. 203-2(3^

List of articles published in magazine, 19U5-55, on various phases
of automation equipment.

351.

Automatic Control Bibliography.
Warren P. Wade and Emony N. Kemler.
Summary Reports, Spring Park, Minneapolis, 1955. 331 PP.
Lists over 1,600 references from American and British literature
relating to automatic control since 1900.

352.

Automatic Controls, a Bibliography.
F. Stenger and R. M. Ancell. U.SL
Department o£ Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, 1951. 235 pp.
Over 1,600 references from American, French, and German literature.
Stresses electric power applications.

353.

Automation Dictionary.

Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co.,

- Philadelphia,
"
”1955•
Pocket-size glossary of terms.

35U.

Bibliography of Articles on Automation and Related Subjects.
Ted F.
Silvey. National CIO Headquarters, Washington, March 1, 1955.
Processed.
Articles on subjects listed in Readers' Guide to Periodical
Literature, 1950-5h.




60 -

355.

Bibliography on the Use of IBM Machines in Science, Statistics, and
Education, January
Compiled at the Watson Scientific Com­
puting laboratory by A. F. Beach, E. V. Hanken, and K. M. Sweeney.
International Business Machines Oorp., New York, 195U.
Bibliography of 600 technical articles that describe IBM machine
methods useful for research.

356.

Electronics in Business. A Descriptive Reference Guide.
Herbert F.
Klingman, Editor. Controller ship Foundation, Inc., New York,
1955. 176 pp.
Annotated bibliography of periodical articles, pamphlets, books,
reports, proceedings on business uses of electronic computer. Also
description of various systems, installations, centers.

357.

Mechanical Translation.
William N. Locke and Victor H. Yngve.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 195U. Ul pp.
Bibliography of annotated references on translation of languages
with the aid of machines. Published irregularly. First issued March
195U.

358.

Servomechanism Analysis.
George J. Thaler and Robert G. Brown.
McOraw-ttiii Rook (Jo., Inc., New York, 1953. UlU PP.
Engineering text with bibliography of 206 items on engineering and
scientific aspects of automatic control.

359.

Source Materials on Automation and Related Subjects.
United Automobile Workers of America, CIO, Research and Engineering Department
Library, Detroit, April 1955. 7h pp.
Bibliography of items, stressing automobile industry and collective
bargaining aspects.




- 61 -

APPENDIX A
INDEX TO AUTHORS
Reference
Number

Name

Reference
Name

B~Con.

A
Abbe, E. H ........................ 76
Adams, Charles W.
• • • . • • •
157
Alexander, Samuel N.
. • . .216,219
Allen, W.
176
Allison, William
o . . . . . . 159
Alspach, P. I .
I
• • • • • • • •
15

Alterman, Jack ................... 279
Altholz, Edgar
• • • . . . • •
19
*
Amber, George
23
American Management Association. 21,
27, 19U, 199, 201
Ancell, R. .......................352
Anderson, Clarence 0. . • . . . 136
Anderson, P. L. . . . . . . . .
96
Arnold, John E. . . . . . . . .
31*8
Armstrong, N. E.
............
90
Ashbum, Anderson • • • • • • •
IO
4
Astin, A. ................
222
Axelrod, Len
• • • • • • • • •
102
Ayres, Eugene ................... 103
B
Baldwin, George B.
. . . . . .
Bannon, T. W. • • • • • • • • •

21*5
32
Barkin, Solomon • • • • • • • •
25U
Barton, Paul . . . • • • • • • •
131
Beach, A. F.
• . . . « . . » .
355
Becker, Esther R. . . . . . . .
282
Beime, Joseph A . . . . ...........3L9
Bendiner, Robert • • • • • • • •
2l|2
Benson, Bernard S.
. . . • • • 213
Berkeley, Edmund C. • • • • • •
168
Bibbero, Robert J.
• • • • • •
218
Bishop, John F.
226
Bishop, Leonard J.
• • • • • •
70
Black, W. A.
. . . . . . . . .
138
Block, Alan .....................121
Bloodworth, W. H. • • • • • • •
326
Bloomberg, Warner, Jr.
. • 21*1, 280




Number

62

332,
. . . • • •
Boyce, Carroll W.
• • • • •
Bradshaw, Thorton F.
• • • • •
Brigit, James R. « . 20, 81, 82,
Brown, Gordon S. • • • • • •
Brown, J . J .
. . . . . . . .
28, 130, 229, 235,
Brown Robert G.
. . . . . .
Brown, R. Hunt • • • • • • •
Brozen, Yale • • • • • • • •
Brunetti, Cledo . . . . . 77,, 88,
Buckingham, Walter S. •
16, 272,
Bureau of National Affairs . • •
Burgess, Robert W.
. • • •
Bush, George P.
. . . . . .
Bush, Vannevar . . . . . . .
Bolz, Roger W.

333
297
166
293
116
18,
26U
358
20l*
21*8
278
290
21*7
221*
335
289

C
Calhoun, Everett S.
. • • •
Campbell, Donald P.
• • • •
Canning, R. G. • • • • • •
Carey, James B.
. • • • • •
Carr, John W. Ill . • 160 ,
Carroll, John M. • • • • • •
Carson, F. G.
« • • • • • •
Chapin, Ned
Clague, Ewan • • • • • • • .
Clark, G. M. • • • • . • • •
Clipplnger, Richard F. 0 . .
Colburn, Dorothy . . . • • •
Collins, Robert T. • • • • •
Conrad, N. K.
• • « • • • •
Coughlin, Howard « • • • • •
Council for Technological
Advancement * • • • • • • •
Craig, Harold Farlow . . . .
Cross, J. G. • • • • . . . .
Cross, R. E. . . . . . . . .
Cunningham, E. J.
. • • • •

182
16, 116
231, 237
318
221, 222
161*
128
180
269, 296
165
• O 187
181*
329
53
317

• •

250
327
302
65
11*6

Reference
Number

Name

F~Con.

C— Con.

Cunningham, J. B.

Reference
Number

Name

Goldfinger, Nathaniel
Grabbe, Eugene M.
Greenberg, Leon • •

• • • • • • • • 6 3

D
Dankert, Clyde E. • • • • • • •
252
Davis, D» J«
• • • • • • • • •
31
Davis, Malvin E.
• • • • • • •
202
deBlvort, H.
................ 257
DeCarlo, Charles R« • • • • • •
232
DeCourey, William D.
• • • • • 261
Demrick, Carl J*
• • • • • • •
3U3
Dewhurst, Frederick J.
• • • • •
1
Diebold, John • • • *13, 1U, 16, 29k
Dougherty, William E. • • • • • • 39
Drucker, Peter • • • • • • • 28U, 3k6
Duncan, Robert A* • • • • • • •
115

E
Eckert, W. J* • • • • • • • • •
Eisenstaedt, M* E*
• • • • • •
Elliott, J* Douglas
• • • • •
Ellis, Wilbur R,
.............
Emerson, Charles D* • • • • • •
Engstrum, Elmer W.
• • • • • •
Eppert, Ray P»
• • • • • • • •
Evanson, C. E.
• • • • • • • •

167
80
298
95
152
6
178
336

H
Hall, George A. Jr,
Hankan, E. V*
• •
Harder, D* S*
• •
Hathaway, G* R*
•
Hattery, Lowell H«
Hautau, Charles F*
Herbert, Evan • • •
Hermann, P. J. • •
Higgins, John A* •
Hill, Albert G.
Holman, R. W«
• •
Horton, H* Burke •
Host, Jerry A* • •
Hovrous, R. L« • •
Huhncbrff, Carl
•
Hunter, G. T.
• •
Hurd, Cuthbert C*
Hurley, Neil S . J*
H u m i , M. L, • • •

•
•
•
•
O
•
•
•
•
«
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

•
•
•
»
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
«
•
•
•

•
•
•
•
•
•
•
«
•
•
•
#
•
•
•
•
•
•

• • .
135
• • .
355
• • 31, lil
310
• • •
• • .
335
• • 55, 66
• • .
137
211
• • •
192
• • .
212
• • •
• • .
105
216
• • •
• • .
67
• ♦ .
233
• • .
311
# • .
165
• • .
337
• • .
2U9
3li0, 3U5
331 , :

I
Industrial Relations News, Inc*

262

F
Falkowski, Edward • • • • • •
Faulhabsr, A* J«
• • • • • •
Fawkner, C. H.
............
Findlay, David A*
• • • • • •

Forrester, Jay W.

•
316
•
80
*339
•

J
Jacobson, Arvid Jr*
• •
283* 295
Jacoby, C « J «
• • • • • • • •
XU3
James, T. R* • • • • • • • • •
88
Jennings, W. R*
.......... ..
U5
Jensen, Reuben R.
• • • • • •
6U
Joint Committee on Economic
Report • • • • • • • • • • •
9
Jones, Rebecca * • • • • • • •
167
June, Stephen A» • • • • • • •
3

lU9

330
19
Gallagher, Glenn G* • • • • • •
lUO
Gamson, E. R, • • • • • • • • •
91
Geschelin, Joseph • • • • • • $1, 56
Gladow, E. ..................
72
Glaser, Ezra
• • • • • • • • •
216
Gleason, Howard S*
• • • • • •
llt8
Glickauf, Joseph S* • • • • • •
192
Gluck, S « E »
• • • • • • • • •
86
Gardner, Annesta R.




• • • • • • •
• • • • • •

K
Kaplan, J. 1..................

63

1U2

Reference
Nuraber

Name

M — Con.

K— Con.
Keller, Allen • • • • . • • • • *
Kemler, Etooiy K.
• • • • • • • •
Kendall, George H.
• • • » • • .
Kennedy, W. P.
• • • • • • • • •
Kenney, E. W.
King, Gilbert V*
• • • • • • • *
Kircher, Paul ........... ..
Klass, Philip J.
. « • • • • • •
Kliever, Waldo H. • • • • • • . .
Klingman, Herbert F.
. « . * • •
Knight, Charles E.
• . • . 339*
Kozmetsky, George . • • • • • • .
Krause, A m o A* . . . . . . . . .
Kuhnel, A. H. • • • • • • • • • •
Kullgren, 0. W. • • • • • • • • •
Kraus, Charles S. • • • • • • • •

215
351
67

• •
• •
235,
• •
• •
• .
• •
225,
« «

Morrill, C. ............
Murie, G . G .
• • • • • • • • •
Murphy, Matthew J. • • • • • «

233
3U
3U7

321
305

172

188
50
1U5
356
3U2

188
205
23U
83
3hh

L
Laubach, Peter B. • • • • • •
Leaver, Eric W. . . . • • • •
130, 229,
Leontief, Wassily • • • • • •
Lessing, L. P.
. » • • • • •
Linebrink, Orval L.
• • • • •
Lindholm, Paul
• • • • • • •
Locke, William N. • • • • •
Lucas, E. D. Jr*
. « « « . .

Reference
Number

Name

N
Nagel, Ernest • • • • • « • • «
National Association of
Manufacturers • • • • • • • •
National Industrial Conference
Board • • • • • • • • • • • •
Newberg, W. C. • • • • • • • •
Newman, Maurice S* • • • • . .
New York State Dept, of
Commerce
Nichols, John R. . . . • • • •
Nielson, H . V .
• • • • . . . .
Noe, Jerre, D. • • • . 162, 191,
Nourse, Edwin G. • • . • • • •

2U3
258
17

hi
166
8
156
15U
193
287

189

26l
277
87

210
120

0
Olson, Raymond E.
• •
O s b o m , David G. • • •
Osborn, Roddy F. • • •
Osborne, H. E. • • • .

•
•
•
.

•
•
•
.

•
•
•
.

•
•
•
•

127
267
196
37

357

228
P

M
MacDonald, David J* . . . . . . . 3114
MacNew, Thomas • • • • • • • • • •
57
Markus, John • • • • • • • • • • •
9h
Marvin, Philip R* •
5
Massie, Joseph L. • • • • • • • •
88
Mauther, R. F*
• • • • • • • • •
Meier, Richard L* • • • • • 2UU,
Meldon, Moreley G*
• • • • • • • 208
Mendelssohn, Rudolph C* • * * * . 217
McNeill, Russel B*
• o • • • • • 170
6
Mcpherson, James L* • • • • • • •
Middleton, Marshall Jr. • • • • • 2llt
Mills, C. Wright .................
Mitchell, James P*
* • • • • * . 288




22
21(6
a

276

Packman, Martin • • • • • • • •
Patrick, K « W .
. « . • • • • •
Paynter, H. M.
...............
Pease, William • • • • • . • •
Peaslee, Lawrence R. . . . . .
Perkowski, Napoleon
• • • • •
Perlis, Alan J.
. * . •
160,
Pragan, Otto . • • • • • • • •
Prutton, Carl F. . . » • • • •

11
107
17U
II44
I.
155

33k
221
320
110

R
Ramo, Simon
338
Reuther, W. P. . . . .
36, 312, 322
Richardson, I • H.
. . . . .
79 $ 8li

Reference
Number

Name
R — Con.
Ridenour, Louis N. •
Robinson, Robert A.
Robinson, W. W. . .
Roedel, Jerzy • • •
Rose, Gail . . . . .
Rosen, Howard . . .
Rossate, C. S.
. .
Rubenfein, David
•
Rudd, John K. . . .
Rudolf, John • • • •
Rudolph, J. A.
• •
Rudolph, Walter • •

• 161,
• • • •
• • # •
• • • •
• • • •
• • • •
• • • •
• • • •
« • • •
• • • •
• • • •
• • • •

Reference
Number

Name
T

212, 238
11*0
• •
• •
73
• •
169
• • 291
• • 292
100
• •
• •
239
• •
71
• •
151
211
• •
• •
35

Thaler, George J.
• • • • • .
358
Thompson, Lawrence R.
• • • • 189
Tice, Clarence . . . • • • • •
61
Tomlinson, M. P ................ 233
Turner, Arthur N.
. • • • • •
285
Tustin, Arnold • • • • • • • •
119

V
Van Auken, K. G. Jr. • •
263, 27l*
Van Deusen, Edmund L.
•
89, 183
Vannah, W. E.
• • • • • « . .
256

S
W
Sage, Ira
150
Schell, Erwin • • • • • . . . .
3U1
Schneider, D. B.
« • ........... 15U
Schroeder, Carl J.
« • • • • •
69
Scott, J. 0 ........................113
Searle, Allan D.
• • • • • . .
279
Sehn, Francis J.
• • • • • . .
1*3
Shallehberger, Frank K. « • • •
25
Shallenberger, John 6.
• • • • 25l
Shaw, Ralph R.
• • • • • • • •
212
Sheean, G« M.
. • # • • • • •
206
Shiskin, Julius . • • • • « • •
220
Shultz, George P. • • • • . . .
21*5
Silvey, Ted F.
» • • • • • 112, 35U
Slater, Lloyd G.
• • • • • • •
129
Sluckin, W .........................171
Smith, G. E.
. . ............ . 1 7 6
Snyder, John I. • • • • • • • •
29
Solow, Herbert • • • • • • • • •
10
Sparks, K. H .......................211
Steier, Henry P.
•
177
Stenger, F. ...................... 352
Stevenson, Rex
« • • • • • • •
59
Stewart, Leon • • • • • • • • •
117
Sterling, John B. ............... 255
Stocker, William M ................ 152
Sullivan, Ray H.
• • • • • • •
5U
Swanson, F. R.
• • ...........
33
Sweeney, K. M.
. . . o . . . .
355




Wade, Warren F.
. . « • • • •
35l
Wallace, David A.
• • • • • •
328
Walmer, Richard C. • • • « • «
299
Walter, Leo
• • • • • • • • •
125
Wegstein, Joseph ............
219
Weik, Martin H.
• • • • • • •
175
Weinberg, Edgar
*26, 259, 268, 273
Weinberg, Nat • • • • • • • • •
275
Weiss, Abraham • • • • • • • •
325
Werwaft, Karl 0. ............. 286
Wick, Charles H. « • •
30, 1*2, 1 1
**
Wiener, Noibert
• « • •
266, 270
Woollard, Frank G. . . . . . .
2l*
Worley, C . W .
. . • • • • • •
101*

I
Yanak, Joseph
• • « • • • • •
102
Ihgve, Victor H ................ 357

Z
Zagusta, J. A.

«

98

APPENDIX B
INDEX TO SUBJECTS
Reference Number

Subject
A
Accounting

.............................

(see also Office Work)

182 ,

18U, 186, 190, 193, 19U, 200, 230
Analog Computers:
Technology • • •
Use in engineering
Use in production
Assembling:
Electronics
• •
Metalworking • •
Automatic Control:
Bibliography o •
Canty industry •
Chemical industry

.........15?, 169, 17U
211 , 218
.............
233, 23U

.........

89, 92, 9 h , 95, 96, 100
. . . . 30, 50, 57, 60
............................

351, 352, 358

......... ,

.......................

108 , 129
101

103, 106, 110, 111:, 128, 130, 133, 135, l t )
if
Equipment . • o •
................... 107, 115, 137, lliO, ll4l
Olossary of terms
......................................... 353
Hosiery • • • • •
......................................... 109
Machine tools . •
.............................
1U2, 156
Refineries * • • • • • • • • . .
.................... 102 ,
106,113, 117, 118, 12U, 125, 131, 136
Power station
.........................................................
132
Principles « • • • . • • • • • •
..................... ,
16, 10U, 112, 116, 119, 120, 121, 135
Steel Industry « • • • . • • • •
........... ..
* 105, 111, 126 , 138
Automatic Factory .................
.....................
3, 13, 25, 235
1-28
Automatic Technology, General Surveys
Automatic Weighing .................
........... .......... 71, 79, 8U, 86
Automation, Background
• • • • • •
........ . . . .
6, 11, 13, 22, 26
Automobile Industry:
Automation
30,
31, 3 k , 35, ill, U2, k 7 , k 9 , 51-53, 57 , 58, 61, 62, 6 *
1.
Bibliography • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . . • • • • • • • • .
359
Management problems
328, 329, 3 k 3
Union policies
........... • 301, 316

2

, ...................................

B
Baking industry ................................ ..
77, 78, 80, 302
Banking . .................................. .. . 178, 179, 183, 191, 193, 195
Bibliographies ....................... ........................... ..
350-359




- 66 -

Reference Number

Subject

B~Con.
Bureau of Labor Statistics • • • • • . . . ........ ..
Bureau of the Census

21*0, 259, 263, 27 l
*
220, 221*

C
Cancer industry • • • •
Chemical industry • o . . . . . . . . .

108, 125
17,

ioi, 103, 106, no, ni*, 128, 130, 133, 131*, 11*0, 261, 30U 320
,

Congressional hearings • • • « • • • • . • • • • • • •
Conveyors (see materials handling)

9, 253, 273, 287-290

D
Department of Labor • • • • • • • • • • • • • < > 2l*0, 259 , 263,
Design for automation ........... ..........
13, 11*, 326, 332,
Digital computers
• • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
160-168, 170-171*, 175,

27l*, 288, 296
333, 3U0, 3I
48
• • • ■ 157,
176, 211*, 215

£
Economic and Social Aspects*
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Education
•
General discussion • • •
Incentive systems
« • •
Employment trends
• • •
Engineers • • • • • • . . ,
Labor relations • • • • •
Leisure • • • • • • • • . <
Occupational changes • • ,
Personnel policies • • •
Plant location • • • • •
Productivity o • • • • •
Office workers • • • • • ,
Safety • • • • • • • • • <
Skill
.................
Small business • • • • • .
Underdeveloped areas • • ,
Wages
• • • • • • • • •
Electric power • • • • • • .
Electronic Data processings
Accounting • • • • • • •
Banking •
Bibliography • • • • • • .
Engineering • • • • • • • <




...............
21*0, 259, 263, 27U
................................. 21*9,25U
....................... .
21*0-299

.......... .......

21* ,
5

256

................................. 250,253
......................
265, 286, 292
.........
21*5, 252, 25U, 256, 257
............... . 13, 21*6, 21*9, 251
. . •
11*, 268, 269, 271, 281*, 285
.............
21*5, 21*7, 271*, 282
.........................
267
....................... 279, 281, 296
• . . 271*, 276, 282, 283, 295, 298
. ..
-2$5, m
13, 11*,261*, 266 , 270, 271, 281*, 289
.......................
13, 289, 293

.. ...............
......................................................

21*1 277
*,

................................. 21*5,275

132

...................
.

181*, 186, 190, 193, 191*,
. . 178, 179, 183, 191,

182,

200, 230
193, 195

............................... 355,356

.......................... 211, 211*, 215, 218

- 67 -

Reference Number

Subject
E— Con.
Electronic Data Processing:— Con*
Factors in use •

17,
163, 180, 187, 188, 189, 190, 192, 208
Industrial research • • ......... • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 210, 213
185, 190, 197, 198, 202, 27U
Insurance • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • •
Inventory control
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • »
. . . . . .
228
Management problems ................... .327, 330, 331, 335, 337, 338, 3U9
Office work
8,
183, 186, 188, 190, 19h, 196, 201, 203-206, 209
Production control • •
...................................... 231, 237
..........................
230, 236
Refineries « • • • • •
212 , 216, 219, 221, 222, 223, 225
.........
Scientific research • •
► ...................
216, 217, 220, 223, 22U
Statistics • • • • • •
Trade • • • • • • . • •
....................................
181, 207
Training • • • • • • •
....................................
283, 295
Transportation • • • •
................................
177, 190, 227
............................
87-100, 259, 318
Electronics goods industry
Employment trends • • • .
...............
2U 8, 250, 253, 251*, 268, 269
215
Engineering • • • • • • •

....................................

211, au,

, 218

F
Feedback (see automatic control)
Finishing work • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • . . . • • 5 2 , 62
Foundries
38, 39, U5
H
Hosiery industry

109
I

I B M .................................................................. 158, 165
Incentive systems • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 2U5, 256
Industrial research •
210, 213
Instrumentation (see also automatic control) • • • • 111*, 122, 123, 126 , 127
185, 190, 197, 198, 202, 27h
Insurance ................. ............ .
Integrated data processing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . . .
201, 205
L

Labor problems
Leisure • • •




2U6,

21*
0-325
2k9>

251

Reference Number

Subject
M
Machine Tools!
Automation • • • • • • • • • • • <
Tape controls
• • • • • • • • • <
Maintenance • • • • • • • • • • • • <
Management Problems:
Automobile Industry
• « • • • • <
Effects of automation
• • • • • <
Electronic data processing • • •
Materials handling * • • • • • • • • <
Mechanical translation • • • • • • • <
Mechanization, relation to automation
Metal forming equipment • • • • • • <
Metal-working:
Assembling • • • • • • • • • • •
Automatization • • • • • • • • • ,

. . .

33,

36,

37, I*),

68
11* , 156
2

56, 65,

.............................
.........................

35, 53, 331*

.......................
328, 329, 31*3
......... 336, 339, 3l*l, 31* , 3W*-3l*7
2
. . .327 , 330 , 331, 335, 337, 338 , 31i9
. . . .
69, 70, 72, 73, 75-78, 80-85
............................
225, 357
. . 3, 15 , 18, 20, 23, 2l , 26, 28, 82
*
..............................
32, 1 3
*
.......................

30, 50, 57, 60

*29,*37,#li/u8,*5i*,*55,#59,*63,*66-68
Bibliography •
.................................. 350
Maintenance
• • • • • • • • • • ,
................................ 35, 53
Safely • • • • • • • « • • • • • <
................... .............
33
MIT automatic milling machine • • . , ....................... 11*1*, 11*7, 153
Modular production electronics
» • , .....................
87, 88, 93, 99
N
167, 173, 219

NORC »

0
Office work

.......................................................
191*, 196, 201, 203-206, 209 , 276, 298,

186, 188, 190,

8, 183,
300, 317

P
Personnel policies • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
21*5, 2l*7, 282
Plait oontrol .......................................... ................ 226,
229, 230, 232, 233, 236, 238, 239,.267
Plant location • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • •
267
Printed circuits (see also electronic goods industry)
• • • • •
97, 98, 100
Production oontrol • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • , 2 3 1 , 237
Productivity trends ................. ............ ..
279, 281, 296

R
Railroads




308,

321

Reference Number

Subject
R — Con.

Refineries • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ...............
69,
102, 106, 113, 117, 118, 12U, 125, 131, 136, 230, 232, 236
Research on automation
263, 268, 285, 290
75, 83
Rubber industry o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. • •
S

33, 255, 2 99
. . . O
212 , 216, 219, 221-223, -225
. . .
26U, 266, 270, 271, 28i , 289
i
...............
63, 90, 91, 1U2, 151
.................
217, 220, 223, 22U
.................................. 17,
73, 105, 111, 126, 138, 280, 291, 31a

Safety
Scientific research •
S k i l l ...............
Small plants , • • • •
Statistics • • • • • •
Steel industry • • • •

T

Technicians • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • ........ . •
265, 286, 292
Tinkertoy project •
87, 88, 93, 9?
T r a d e ................................................................181, 207
T r a i n i n g ........................................
261, 283, 291, 295, 307, 315
Transfer machinery • • • • • • • . • • . • • • * . . • • •
30, UO, 58, 63, 6U
Transportation ........................... • • ................ .. 177, 190, 227

U
Underdeveloped areas •
Union policies . . • .
Automobile industry
Bibliography • • •
Bakery industry
•
Chemical industry
Electronics • • • •
Heat packing • • •
Office work • • o •
Railroads
• • • •
Steel industry o »
Telephone industry
Univac • • • .........

. . . • 2UU, 277
. . . .
300-325
. . . .
301, 316
...........
359

.........

302

.........30li, 320
. . . .
307, 318

..............

310

, . . . . 300,
. . . .
308,
...........
...........

317
321
31U
319

176, 206, 220, 22U

W
Warehousing




7k, 85

APPENDIX C
NAMES AND ADDRESSES O F PERIODICALS CITED IN
BIBLIOGRAPHY

Periodicals Concerned Principally With Automation

Automatic Control
Reinhold Publishing Corp
U30 Park Ave.
New York 22, N. Y.

Control Engineering
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co., Inc.
330 West l*2d St.
New York 18, N. Y*

Automation
Penton Publishing Co.
Pen ton Bldg.
1213 West 3d St.
Cleveland 13, Ohio

Instruments and Automation
Instruments Publishing Co., Inc.
81*5 Ridge Ave.
Pittsburgh 12, Pa.

Professional, Technical, and Other Periodicals

Advanced Management
Society for the Advancement of
Management, Inc.
7U Fifth Ave.
New York 16, N. Y.

American Machinist
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co., Inc.
330 West l*2d St.
New York 18, N . Y.

American Aviation
1025 Vermont Ave., NW.
Washington 5, D. C.

The American Statistician
American Statistical Association
1108 Sixteenth St., NW.
Washington 6, D. C.

The American Engineer
1121 Fifteenth St., NW.
Washington 5, D. C.

Automobile Facts
Automobile Manufacturers Association
320 New Center Bldg.
Detroit 2, Mich.




- 71 -

professional, Technical, and Other Periodicals— Con*

Automotive Industries
Chilton Co*
Chestnut & 56th St*
Philadelphia 39, Pa*

Chemical and Engineering News
American Chemical Society
1155 Sixteenth St., NW.
Washington 6, D. C*

Aviation Week
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co*, Inc*
330 West U2d St.
New York 18, N. Y.

Chemical Engineering Progress
American Institute of Chemical
Engineers
15 North Seventh St*
Philadelphia 6, Pa*

Bakers and Confectioners Journal
Bakery and Confectionery Workers *
International Union of America
11U5 Nineteenth St*, NW*
Washington 6, D. C*

Cleveland
Cleveland
2136 East
Cleveland

Baking Industry
Cllssold Publishing Co.
105 West Adams St*
Chicago, 111.

Dun's Review and Modern industry
Dun and Bradstreet Publications Carp*
99 Church St.
New York 8, N. Y.

Blast Furnace and Steel Plant
Steel Publications, Inc*
U Smithfield St*
Pittsburgh 30, Pa*

Electrical Manufacturing
The Gage Publishing Co.
1250 Sixth Ave*
New York 20, N. Y*

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist
53 West Jackson Blvd,
Chicago 6, 111*

The Electrical Workers' journal
International Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers
1200 Fifteenth St., NW*
Washington 5, D. C.

Business Week
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co., Inc*
330 West l*2d St.
New York 18, N. Y*
The Carpenter
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and
Joiners of America (AFL)
222 East Michigan St*
Indianapolis ! , Ind.
*




Engineering
Engineering Society
19th St*
15, Ohio

Electronics
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co., Inc.
330 West lt2d St*
New York, N. Y.
The Engineering Journal
The Engineering Institute of Canada
2050 Mansfield St*
Montreal, P. Q*, Canada

72 -

Professional, Technical, and Other Periodicals*— Con.

Factory Management and Maintenance
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co,
330 West hZd St,
New York, 18, N, Y,

International Labor Review
international Labor Office
Geneva, Switzerland

The international Mailer
International Mailers Union
3k South Bight St,
Akron 8, Ohio

Food Engineering
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co,
330 West U2d St.
New York 18, N. Y.

The International Woodworker
U30 Governor Bldg.
Portland U, Ore,

Fortune
9 Rockefeller Plaza
New York 20, N, Y,

Foundry
penton Publishing Co,
Penton Bldg,
Cleveland 13, Ohio

Iowa Business Digest
Bureau of Business and Economic
Research
State University of Iowa
Iowa City, Iowa

Harper’s Magazine
Harper & Bros,
East 33d St,
New York 16, N. Y.

Iron Age
Chilton Co,, Inc,
Chestnut & 56th St,
Philadelphia 39, Pa,

Harvard Business Review
Gallatin House
Soldiers Field
Boston 63, Mass,

The Journal of Business of the
University of Chicago Press
5750 Ellis Ave.
Chicago 37, 111,

industry and Power
The John Paul Taylor Publishing Co.
Commercial Bank Bldg,
St, Joseph, Mich,

Looking Ahead
National Planning Association
1606 New Hampshire Ave., NW,
Washington, D, C,

The International Chemical Worker
International Chemical Workers* union
1659 West Market St,
Akron 3, Ohio

Machinery
The Industrial Press
93 Worth St.
New York 13, N. Y.




73

Professional, Technical, and Other Periodicals-Con»

Machinists Monthly Journal
International Association of
Machinists
Machinist Bldg*
Washington 1, D. C*

The National Confectioners' Association
Bulletin
National Confectioners' Association
1 North La Salle St*
Chicago 2, 111*

Management Methods
Management Magazines, Inc*
lUl East Uvth St*
New York 17, N. Y.

National Safety News
National Safety Council
U25 North Michigan Ave*
Chicago 11, 111*

Machine Design
penton Publishing Co*
Penton Bldg*
Cleveland 13, Ohio

The Northwestern Miller
P* 0* Box 67
Minneapolis 1, Minn*

Mechanical Engineering
The American Society of Mechanical
Engineers
29 West 39th St*
New York 18, N. Y*

Mechanical Translation
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
77 Massachusetts Ave*
Cambridge 39, Mass*

Mill and Factory
Conover-Nast Publishing Co*, Inc*
205 East k2d St*
New York 17, N. Y.

Modern Textiles Magazine
Rayon Publishing Carp*
303 Fifth Ave.
New York 16, N. Y.
Monthly Labor Review
U* S* Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D* C*




Office Executive
National Office Management Association
132 West Chelten Ave*
Philadelphia W** Pa*

The Oil and Gas Journal
211 South Cheyenne Ave*
Tulsa, Okla*

The Packinghouse Worker
United Packinghouse Workers of America
608 South Dearborn St*
Chicago 5, 111*

Personnel
American Management Association
330 west U2d St*
New York, 18, N* Y*

Personnel Journal
Personnel Journal,Inc*
P. 0. Box 239
Swarthmore, Pa*

7U

Professional, Technical, and Other Periodicals--Con,

Product Engineering
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co,
330 West U2d St,
New York 18, N. Y,

The Scientific Monthly
American Association for the
Advancement of Science
1515 Massachusetts Ave,, NW,
Washington 5, 0, C.

The Railway Clerk
Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship
Clerks
1015 Vine St.
Cincinnati 2, Ohio

Steel Labor
United Steel Workers of America
2U57 East Washington St*
Indianapolis 7, Ind.

The Reporter
Fortnightly Publishing Co,
136 East 57th St.
New York 22, N. Y.

Research for Industry
Stanford Research Institute
Menlo Park, Calif.

Rubber World
Bill Bros, Publishing Corp,
1309 Noble St,
Philadelphia, Pa,

The Saturday Review
25 West 1)5th St.
New York 36, N. Y,

Scientific American
Scientific American, Inc,
2 West 1)5th St*
New York 36, N. Y.




Systems Magazine
315 Fourth Ave,
New York, N. Y*
Taylor Technology
Taylor Instrument Cos,
Rochester 1, N, Y.
Tech Engineering News
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Walker Memorial
Cambridge 39, Mass,

Technical News Bulletin
National Bureau of Standards
Washington, D, C,

Time
Time, Inc,
Time-Life Bldg.
New York 10, N. Y.

Tooling and Production
Louisville, Ky.

APPENDIX D
NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF PUBLISHING ORGANIZATIONS
CITED IN BIBLIOGRAPHY

American Bankers Association
Bank Management Commission
12 East 36th St*
New York 16, N. Y.

Council for Technological Advancement
120 South La Salle St*
Chicago 3, H I *

American Management Association
1515 Broadway
New York 36, N. Y.

D. Van Nostrand Co., Inc*
250 Fourth Ave.
New York, N. Y.

Automation Consultant, Inc*
1U£0 Broadway
New York 18, N. Y.

Editorial Research Reports
1205 - 19th St., NW.
Washington 6, D* C.

The Bureau of National Affairs, Inc*
1231 - 2Uth St., NW.
Washington, D* C.

Engineering Publishers
0. P. 0. Box 1151
New York 1, N. Y.

Columbia university Press
Morningside Heights
New York, N. Y.

Ford Motor Co.
Detroit, Mich.

General Electric Corp.
Schenectady, N. Y.

Congress of Industrial Organizations
CIO Committee on Economic Policy
718 Jackson Pi., NW.
Washington 6, D. C.

Controllers hip Foundation, Inc*
2 Park Ave.
New York 16, N. Y.




General Mills, Inc.
Mechanical Division
Engineering Research Dept.
2003 East Hennepin Ave.
Minneapolis 13, Minn.

76

League for industrial Democracy
112 East 19th St.
New York 3, N. Y.

Division of Research
Graduate School of Business
Administration
Harvard University
Boston, Mass.

Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co.
Brown instruments Division
Philadelphia, Pa*

Raskins and Sells
67 Broad St*
New York, N. Y.

Industrial Relations Newsletters, Inc,
230 Vest Ulst St*
New York, N. Y.

National Association of Manufacturers
2 East U8th St.
New York 17, N. Y.

National Industrial Conference Board
2h7 Park Ave*
New York 17, N. Y.

Industrial Relations Research
Association
University of Wisconsin
Madison 6, Vis*

New York State Department of
Commerce
Albany, N. Y*

Instruments Publishing Co*

8U5 Ridge Ave*
Pittsburgh 12, Pa*
International Brotherhood of Teamsters,
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen & Helpers
of America (AFL),
25 Louisiana Ave*, NV*
Washington, D* C*

Office of Technical Services
U* S. Department of Commerce
Washington, D. C.

international Business Machines
590 Madison Ave,
New York, N. Y*

public Affairs Press
2162 Florida Ave., i,V.
Washington, D. C.

Corp.

John Viley & Sons, Inc*
UUO Fourth Ave.
New York 16, N* Y.

Society of Actuaries
208 South La Salle St.
Chicago U, 111*

Joint Committee on the Economic
Report
Congress of the united States
(8Uth Cong.)
Washington, D, C.

Society of Automotive Engineers,
Inc.
29 West 39th St.
New York 18, N* Y*




77

Simon and Schuster, Inc.
Rockefeller Center
630 Fifth Ave.
New York 20, N. I.

U» S. Department of the Interior
Bureau of Reclamation
Denver Federal Center, Bldg. 53
Denver 2, Colo.

Stanford Research institute
Menlo Park, Calif.

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington 25, D. C.

Summary Reports
Spring Park, Minn.

U. S. Department of the Navy
Office of Naval Research
Washington 25, D. C.

The Twentieth Century Fuad
330 West U2d St.
New York 36, N. Y#

U. S. Government Printing Office
Supt. of Documents
Washington 25, D. C.

UAW-CIO Education Dept.
Solidarity House
Detroit ill, Mich.

The University Press of
Washington, D. C.
Washington 9, D. C.

UAW-CIO, Research and Engineering
Department Library
Solidarity House
Detroit, Mich.

Wayne University Press
Detroit, Mich




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U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1 9 5 6

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395096


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102