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75-37

Area Wage Survey

The San F ran cisco —O akland, C alifornia,
M etropolitan A rea
Ja n u a r y 1 9 6 8

Dayton & Montgomery Co
Public Lib rary
MAY 2 3 1968

CONTRA COSTA

S a n Francisco

DOCUMENT COLLECTION

Oakland

SAN FRANCISCO

Bulletin No. 1 5 7 5 - 3 7




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES

New England
John F . Kennedy F e d e ra l Building
G overnm ent C enter
Room 1603-B
B oston , M a s s. 02203
T e l .: 223-6762




M id-Atlantic
34 1 Ninth A ve.
New Y ork, N. Y. 10001
T e l .: 971-5405

Southern
1371 P e ac h tre e S t . , N E.
A tlan ta, G a . 30309
T e l .: 526-5418

North Central
219 South D earborn St.
C h icago , 111. 60604
T e l . : 353-7230

P a c ific
4f>0 Golden G ate A ve.
Box 36017
San F r a n c isc o , C a lif. 94102
T e l .: 556-4678

Mountain-P lain s
F e d e r a l O ffice Buildin g
T h ird F lo o r
911 Walnut St.
K a n sa s C ity , M o. 64106
T e l . : 374-2481

Area Wage Survey
T he San F ran cisc o —O akland, C aliforn ia,
M etropolitan Area
Jan u ary 1 9 6 8

B ulletin No. 1575-37
April 1968

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sole by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price>25 cents







Preface

Contents
Page

T h e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s p r o g r a m of a n n u a l
o c c u p a tio n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m e tr o p o lit a n a r e a s i s d e ­
s i g n e d to p r o v i d e d a t a o n o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s , a n d e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s a n d s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s . It
y ie ld s d e ta ile d d a ta by s e l e c t e d in d u stry d iv isio n for each
o f t h e a r e a s s t u d i e d , f o r g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n s , a n d f o r the
U n ited S t a t e s .
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in t h e p r o g r a m i s
t h e n e e d f o r g r e a t e r i n s i g h t i n t o ( l ) the m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s
b y o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e g o r y a n d s k i l l l e v e l , a n d (2) the s t r u c ­
tu r e an d le v e l of w a g e s a m o n g a r e a s and in d u stry d iv isio n s.

I n t r o d u c t i o n ______________________________________________________________ ___
W a g e t r e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s ___________________________
T ab les:
1.
2.

At the end o f e a c h s u r v e y , an in d ivid u al a r e a b u l­
le tin p r e s e n t s s u r v e y r e s u l t s f o r e a c h a r e a stu d ie d . A fte r
c o m p le tio n of a ll o f the in d iv id u al a r e a bu lletin s fo r a
roun d of s u r v e y s , a t w o - p a r t s u m m a r y b ulletin i s i s s u e d .
T h e f i r s t p a r t b r i n g s d a t a f o r e a c h o f the m e t r o p o l i t a n
a r e a s s t u d i e d i n to o n e b u l l e t i n . T h e s e c o n d p a r t p r e s e n t s
in fo r m a t io n w hich h a s b e en p r o je c t e d fr o m individual m e t ­
r o p o l i t a n a r e a d a t a to r e l a t e t o g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n s a n d the
U n ited S t a t e s .

A.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f s u r v e y
a n d n u m b e r s t u d i e d _______________________________________________
In d e x e s of sta n d a r d w eek ly s a l a r i e s and s t r a ig h t - t im e
h ou rly e a r n in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p s , and
p e r c e n t s o f i n c r e a s e f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s _____________________
O ccu p atio n a l e a r n in g s: *
A - 1. O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — e n a n d w o m e n _______________________
m
A - 2 . P r o f e s s i o n a l and tech n ica l o ccu p a tio n s— en and w o m e n ...
m
A - 3. O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s
m e n a n d w o m e n c o m b i n e d ________________________________
A - 4. M a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s __________________
A - 5. C u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s ___________

A p pendix.

O c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s _________________________________

E i g h t y - s i x a r e a s c u r r e n t l y a r e i n c l u d e d i n the
program .
In e a c h a r e a , i n f o r m a t i o n on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n ­
i n g s i s c o l l e c t e d a n n u a l l y a n d on e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s
and s u p p le m e n ta r y w a g e p r o v i s io n s b ien n ially .
areas.

T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s r e s u l t s of the s u r v e y in
S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k l a n d , C a l i f . , in J a n u a r y 1968.
O
The
S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f i n e d b y the
B u r e a u o f th e B u d g e t t h r o u g h A p r i l 1967, c o n s i s t s o f
A l a m e d a , C o n t r a C o s t a , M a r i n , S a n F r a n c i s c o , an d S a n
M ateo C o u n ties.
T h i s s t u d y w a s c o n d u c t e d in the B u ­
r e a u ' s r e g i o n a l o f f i c e in S a n F r a n c i s c o , C a l i f . , C h a r l e s A .
R o u m a sse t, D ire c to r.
T h e s t u d y w a s u n d e r the g e n e r a l
d ir e c t io n of A d olph O. B e r g e r , A s s i s t a n t R egion al D i­
re c to r of O p eratio n s.




i
3

* NOTE:
S im ila r tab u latio n s a r e a v a ila b le fo r other
(See in sid e b a c k c o v e r .)

A c u r r e n t r e p o r t on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s a n d s u p p l e ­
m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s in the S a n F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d a r e a
i s a l s o a v a i l a b l e f o r h o s p i t a l s ( J u l y 1966), a n d on e a r n i n g s
o n ly f o r s e l e c t e d f o o d s e r v i c e a n d l a u n d r y a n d d r y c l e a n ­
i n g o c c u p a t i o n s ( S e p t e m b e r 1 9 6 7 ). U n io n s c a l e s , i n d i c a t i v e
of p r e v a ilin g pay l e v e l s , a r e a v a ila b le f o r b uilding con ­
s t r u c t i o n ; p r i n t i n g ; l o c a l - t r a n s i t o p e r a t i n g e m p l o y e e s ; an d
m o to rtru c k d r iv e r s , h e lp e r s , and a llie d o c c u p a tio n s.

iii

2
3
5
10

\j
13

\4
17




Area Wage Survey
The San Francisco—Oakland, Calif., Metropolitan Area
Introduction
T h i s a r e a i s 1 o f 86 in w h i c h the U .S . D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s c o n d u c t s s u r v e y s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s
a n d r e l a t e d b e n e f i t s on a n a r e a w i d e b a s i s .

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t a n d e a r n i n g s d a t a a r e sh o w n f o r
f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s , i . e . , t h o s e h i r e d to w o r k a r e g u l a r w e e k l y s c h e d u l e
in the g iv e n o c c u p a tio n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
E a r n i n g s d a ta exclude p r e ­
m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , a n d l a t e
s h if ts . N o n p ro d u c tio n b o n u s e s a r e e x c lu d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a llo w ­
a n c e s and in c en tiv e e a r n in g s a r e in clu d ed . W here w e e k ly h o u rs a r e
r e p o r t e d , a s f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e i s to the s t a n d ­
a r d w o r k w e e k ( r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r ) f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s
r e c e i v e th e ir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c lu s iv e of p ay fo r
o v e rtim e at r e g u la r a n d /o r p r e m iu m r a t e s ) . A v e ra g e w eek ly e arn in g s
f o r t h e s e o c c u p a t i o n s h a v e b e e n r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .

T h is b u lle tin p r e s e n t s c u r r e n t o c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t and
e a r n i n g s i n f o r m a t i o n o b t a i n e d l a r g e l y b y m a i l f r o m the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
v i s i t e d b y B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s in the l a s t p r e v i o u s s u r v e y f o r
o c c u p a t i o n s r e p o r t e d in t h a t e a r l i e r s t u d y . P e r s o n a l v i s i t s w e r e m a d e
to n o n r e s p o n d e n t s a n d to t h o s e r e s p o n d e n t s r e p o r t i n g u n u s u a l c h a n g e s
s i n c e the p r e v i o u s s u r v e y .
In e a c h a r e a , d a t a a r e o b t a i n e d f r o m r e p r e s e n t a t i v e e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t s w ith in s i x b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s : M a n u fa c tu rin g ; t r a n s ­
p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and other public u tilitie s; w h o le sa le tr a d e ;
r e t a i l t r a d e ; fin a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s . M a j o r
in d u stry g r o u p s e x c lu d e d fr o m th ese stu d ie s a r e go v ern m en t o p e r a ­
t i o n s a n d the c o n s t r u c t i o n a n d e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s . E s t a b l i s h m e n t s
h a v i n g f e w e r t h a n a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r of w o r k e r s a r e o m i t t e d b e c a u s e
t h e y t e n d t o f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d
to w a r r a n t i n c l u s i o n . S e p a r a t e t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h o f the
b r o a d in d u str y d iv is io n s w hich m e e t p u b licatio n c r i t e r i a .

The a v e r a g e s p r e se n te d re fle c t c o m p o site , areaw id e e s t i ­
m ates.
I n d u s t r i e s a n d e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l an d j o b
s t a f f i n g a n d , t h u s , c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to the e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h j o b .
T h e p a y r e l a t i o n s h i p o b t a i n a b l e f r o m the a v e r a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t
a c c u r a t e l y the w a g e s p r e a d o r d i f f e r e n t i a l m a i n t a i n e d a m o n g j o b s in
i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . S i m i l a r l y , d i f f e r e n c e s in a v e r a g e p a y l e v e l s
f o r m e n a n d w o m e n in a n y o f the s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s h o u l d not b e
a s s u m e d to r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y t r e a t m e n t of the s e x e s w it h in
in d iv id u al e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . O th er p o s s i b l e f a c t o r s w hich m a y c o n tr ib ­
u te to d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y f o r m e n a n d w o m e n i n c l u d e : D i f f e r e n c e s in
p r o g r e s s i o n w i t h i n e s t a b l i s h e d r a t e r a n g e s , s i n c e o n l y the a c t u a l r a t e s
p a i d i n c u m b e n t s a r e c o l l e c t e d ; a n d d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c d u t i e s p e r ­
f o r m e d , a l t h o u g h the w o r k e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d a p p r o p r i a t e l y w ith in the
s a m e s u r v e y j o b d e s c r i p t i o n . J o b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g e m ­
p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d t h a n t h o s e u s e d
in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d a l l o w f o r m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s a m o n g
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the s p e c i f i c d u t i e s p e r f o r m e d .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e c o n d u c t e d on a s a m p l e b a s i s b e c a u s e of
the u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t i n v o l v e d in s u r v e y i n g a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
To
o b t a i n o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y a t m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n of
l a r g e t h a n of s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i s s t u d i e d . In c o m b i n i n g the d a t a ,
h o w e v e r , a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s a r e given their a p p r o p r ia te w eight. E s ­
t i m a t e s b a s e d on the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
a s r e l a t i n g to a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the i n d u s t r y g r o u p i n g a n d a r e a ,
e x c e p t f o r t h o s e b e l o w the m i n i m u m s i z e s t u d i e d .

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the t o t a l in a l l
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h in the s c o p e o f the s t u d y a n d not the n u m b e r a c ­
tually su rv ey e d .
B e c a u s e of d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , the e s t i m a t e s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b ­
t a i n e d f r o m the s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d s e r v e o n l y to i n d i c a t e
the r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e o f t h e j o b s s t u d i e d . T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u ­
p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e d o not a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y the a c c u r a c y of the e a r n ­
in gs data.

O c c u p atio n s and E a r n i n g s
T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r s t u d y a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y of
m a n u f a c t u r i n g a n d n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , an d a r e o f the f o l l o w ­
in g t y p e s : (1) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l ; (3) m a i n ­
t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t ; a n d (4) c u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t . O c ­
c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n i s b a s e d on a u n i f o r m s e t o f j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s
d e s i g n e d t o t a k e a c c o u n t o f i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n in d u t i e s w it h in
the s a m e j o b . T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r s t u d y a r e l i s t e d a n d d e ­
s c r i b e d in t h e a p p e n d i x . T h e e a r n i n g s d a t a f o l l o w i n g the j o b t i t l e s a r e
f o r a l l i n d u s t r i e s c o m b i n e d . E a r n i n g s d a t a f o r s o m e of the o c c u p a t i o n s
l i s t e d a n d d e s c r i b e d , o r f o r s o m e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w it h in o c c u p a t i o n s ,
a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d in t h e A - s e r i e s t a b l e s b e c a u s e e i t h e r (1) e m p l o y ­
m e n t in the o c c u p a t i o n i s t o o s m a l l t o p r o v i d e e n o u g h d a t a to m e r i t
p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e of i n d i v i d u a l e s ­
ta b lish m e n t data.




E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s and S u p p le m e n ta r y W age P r o v i s i o n s
T a b u l a t i o n s on s e l e c t e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s a n d s u p p l e ­
m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s ( B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) a r e not p r e s e n t e d in t h i s
bulletin .
In fo rm a tio n fo r th e s e t a b u la tio n s is c o lle c te d b ien n ially .
T h e s e t a b u l a t i o n s on m i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r i n e x p e r i e n c e d
w o m e n o ffice w o r k e r s ; sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a ls ; sc h e d u le d w ee k ly h o u rs; p aid
h o lid a y s; p a id v a c a tio n s ; and h ealth , in s u r a n c e , and p e n sio n p lan s a r e
p r e s e n t e d (in the B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) in p r e v i o u s b u l l e t i n s f o r t h i s a r e a .

1

2




T a b le 1.

E s t a b lis h m e n t s an d W o rk e rs Within S co p e o f S u rv e y and N u m b er Stu d ied in S an F r a n c is c o — ak lan d , C a lif. , 1
O
by M a jo r In d u stry D iv isio n , 2 Ja n u a r y 1968

M inim um
em ploy m en t
in e s t a b lis h ­
m e n ts in sc o p e
o f study

In d u stry d iv isio n

N u m b er o f e sta b lis h m e n ts

W o rk e rs in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
Within sc o p e o f st u d y 4

Within sc o p e
o f stu d y *

Studied
N u m b er

P ercen t

Stu d ied

A ll d i v i s i o n s _____________________________

-

1,2 5 1

272

402, 200

100

231, 170

M a n u fa c t u r in g ___________________ _____ _________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ______________________________
T r a n s p o r t a tio n , co m m u n ic a tio n , and
o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s 5
W h olesale t r a d e ...
R e ta il t r a d e _________________________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e
S e r v ic e s 6 7 . _ ............ .

100
-

353
898

79
193

1 3 0 ,2 0 0
2 7 2 ,0 0 0

32
68

1 7 0 ,1 5 0

100
50
100
50
50

82
255
102
204
255

32
38
45
43
35

8 9 ,5 0 0
33, 500
5 2 ,2 0 0
5 5 ,6 0 0
4 1 ,2 0 0

23
8
13
14
10

7 4 ,0 3 0
9, 700
3 9 ,2 0 0
32, 420
14, 800

j

61,020

1 The S an F r a n c is c o — ak lan d S ta n d a r d M e tro p o lita n S t a t is t ic a l A r e a , a s defin ed by the B u r e a u o f the B u d g e t th ro u gh A p r il 1967, c o n s i s t s o f
O
A la m e d a , C o n tra C o s ta , M a r in , S an F r a n c is c o , an d San M ateo C o u n tie s. The "w o r k e r s w ithin sc o p e o f stu d y " e s t i m a t e s show n in th is ta b le p r o v id e a
r e a so n a b ly a c c u r a t e d e s c r ip tio n o f the s iz e an d c o m p o sitio n o f the la b o r f o r c e in clu d ed in the s u r v e y . The e s t im a t e s a r e not in ten d ed , h o w e v e r, to s e r v e
a s a b a s i s o f c o m p a r is o n w ith o th e r em p lo y m en t in d e x e s fo r the a r e a to m e a s u r e em ploy m en t tr e n d s o r le v e ls s in c e ( l ) p lan n in g o f w ag e s u r v e y s r e q u ir e s
the u s e o f e sta b lis h m e n t d a ta c o m p ile d c o n s id e r a b ly in a d v a n c e o f the p a y r o ll p e r io d stu d ied , and (2) s m a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s a r e e x c lu d e d fr o m the sc o p e
o f the su r v e y .
2 The 1967 e d itio n o f the S ta n d a r d In d u s tr ia l C la s s if ic a t io n M an u al w a s u se d in c la s s ify in g e s t a b lis h m e n t s by in d u str y d iv isio n .
3 In c lu d e s a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith t o ta l em p lo y m en t a t o r ab o v e the m in im u m lim ita tio n . A ll o u tle ts (w ithin the a r e a ) o f c o m p a n ie s in su c h in d u s ­
t r i e s a s t r a d e , fin a n c e , au to r e p a ir s e r v i c e , an d m o tio n p ic tu r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n sid e r e d a s 1 e sta b lis h m e n t.
4 In c lu d e s a ll w o r k e r s in a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith to ta l em p lo y m en t (w ithin the a r e a ) at o r ab o v e the m in im u m lim ita tio n .
5 T a x ic a b s an d s e r v i c e s in c id e n ta l to w a te r tr a n s p o r t a t io n w e r e e x c lu d e d . The lo c a l- t r a n s i t s y s t e m s in the S an F r a n c i s c o — ak lan d a r e a a r e m u n ic ­
O
ip a lly o p e r a te d an d a r e e x c lu d e d by d efin itio n fr o m the sc o p e o f the stu d y .
6 T h is in d u stry d iv isio n i s r e p r e s e n te d in e s t im a t e s fo r " a l l in d u s t r i e s " and "n o n m an u fac tu rin g " in the S e r i e s A t a b l e s . S e p a r a t e p r e s e n ta t io n of
d a ta fo r th is d iv isio n i s not m a d e fo r one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g r e a s o n s : ( l ) E m ploy m en t in the d iv isio n i s too s m a ll to p r o v id e enough d a ta to
m e r it s e p a r a t e stu d y , (2) the sa m p le w a s not d e sig n e d in itia lly to p e r m it s e p a r a t e p r e se n ta tio n , (3) r e sp o n se w a s in s u ffic ie n t o r in a d e q u a te to p e r m it
s e p a r a t e p r e s e n ta t io n , an d (4) t h e r e i s p o s s ib ili t y o f d i s c lo s u r e o f in d iv id u al e sta b lish m e n t d a ta .
1 H o te ls an d m o t e ls ; la u n d r ie s an d o th e r p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v i c e s ; au to m o b ile r e p a ir , r e n ta l, an d p a r k in g ; m o tio n p i c t u r e s ; n o n p ro fit
m e m b e r sh ip o rg a n iz a t io n s (e x c lu d in g r e lig io u s an d c h a r ita b le o r g a n iz a t io n s ); an d en gin eerin g and a r c h it e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .

A bout o n e -th ir d o f the w o r k e r s w ithin sc o p e o f the su r v e y in the San F r a n c i s c o —
O ak lan d a r e a w e r e e m p lo y e d in m a n u fa c tu r in g f i r m s . The follow in g ta b le p r e s e n t s the m a jo r
in d u str y g r o u p s an d s p e c if ic in d u s t r ie s a s a p e r c e n t o f a ll m a n u factu rin g :
S p e c ific in d u s t r ie s

In d u str y g r o u p s
F o o d an d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ________
E le c t r i c a l eq u ip m en t and
s u p p l i e s __________________________
F a b r i c a t e d m e ta l p r o d u c t s ________
P r in tin g an d p u b lis h in g ___________
T r a n s p o r t a tio n eq u ip m en t ________
P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s t r ie s ________
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ____
P e tr o le u m an d c o a l p r o d u c ts ____
C h e m ic a ls an d a ll ie d p r o d u c ts ___
P a p e r an d a ll ie d p r o d u c ts ________

18
10
10
10
9
8
7
7
6
5

P e tr o le u m r e f in i n g _____________
M otor v e h ic le s an d e q u ip m e n t__
B l a s t fu r n a c e s an d b a s ic
st e e l p r o d u c t s _________________
C an n ed, c u r e d , and fr o z e n
f o o d s ________
N e w sp a p e r s ____

7
5
5
5
5

T h is in fo r m a tio n i s b a s e d on e s t im a t e s o f to tal em ploy m en t d e r iv e d fr o m u n iv e r s e
m a t e r i a l s c o m p ile d p r io r to a c tu a l s u r v e y .
P r o p o r tio n s in v a r io u s in d u str y d iv is io n s m a y
d iffe r fr o m p r o p o r tio n s b a s e d on the r e s u lt s o f the su r v e y a s shown in t a b le 1 a b o v e .

3

Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
P r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 2 a r e i n d e x e s a n d p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e
in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s of o f f ic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s ,
a n d in a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s . T h e i n d e x e s
a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a giv en tim e , e x p r e s s e d a s a p e r c e n t of
w a g e s d u r i n g th e b a s e p e r i o d ( d a t e o f t h e a r e a s u r v e y c o n d u c t e d
b e t w e e n J u l y I 9 6 0 a n d J u n e 1 961).
S u b t r a c t i n g 100 f r o m t h e i n d e x
y i e l d s the p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e i n w a g e s f r o m the b a s e p e r i o d to the
d a te o f the in d e x .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e o r i n c r e a s e r e l a t e to
w a g e c h a n g e s b etw een the in d ica te d d a te s .
These e stim a te s a re
m e a s u r e s o f c h a n g e in a v e r a g e s f o r the a r e a ; they a r e not i n t e n d e d
to m e a s u r e a v e r a g e p a y c h a n g e s in the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i n t h e a r e a .
M ethod of C om p utin g

in t h e o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p . T h e s e c o n s t a n t w e i g h t s r e f l e c t b a s e y e a r
em ploy m en ts w h e rev er p o ssib le .
The a v e r a g e (m ean ) e a r n in g s fo r
e a c h o c c u p a t i o n w e r e m u l t i p l i e d b y the o c c u p a t i o n a l w e i g h t , a n d the
p r o d u c t s f o r a l l o c c u p a t i o n s in t h e g r o u p w e r e t o t a l e d . T h e a g g r e g a t e s
f o r 2 c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s w e r e r e l a t e d b y d i v i d i n g the a g g r e g a t e f o r
th e l a t e r y e a r b y the a g g r e g a t e f o r t h e e a r l i e r y e a r .
The resultan t
r e l a t i v e , l e s s 100 p e r c e n t , s h o w s th e p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e . T h e i n d e x
i s the p r o d u c t o f m u l t i p l y i n g the b a s e y e a r r e l a t i v e ( 1 0 0 ) b y t h e r e l a t i v e
f o r the n e x t s u c c e e d i n g y e a r a n d c o n t i n u i n g to m u l t i p l y ( c o m p o u n d )
e a c h y e a r ' s r e l a t i v e b y th e p r e v i o u s y e a r ' s i n d e x .
A v e ra g e earn in g s
f o r t h e f o l l o w i n g o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e u s e d in c o m p u t i n g t h e w a g e t r e n d s :

E a c h o f th e s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t i o n s w ith in a n o c c u p a t i o n a l
g r o u p w a s a s s i g n e d a w e i g h t b a s e d on i t s p r o p o r t i o n a t e e m p l o y m e n t
O ffice c le r ic a l (m er and women)>
Bookkeepin g-m achin e operators,
class B
C lerk s, accoun tin g, classes
A and B
C lerks, file , classes
A, B, and C
C lerk s, order
C lerk s, payroll
C om p tom eter operators
Keypunch operators, classes
A and B
O ffice boys and girls

T a b le 2.

O ffice cle r ic a l (m en and women)—
Continued
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Sw itchboard operators, classes
A and B
T abu la tin g-m ach in e operators,
class B
Typists, classes A and B

S k illed m aintenance (m en):
Carpenters
E lectrician s
M achinists
M echanics
M echanics (autom otive)
Pa.nters
Pipefitters
T o o l and die makers
Unskilled plant (m en):
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Laborers, m aterial handling

Industrial nurses (m en and women):
Nurses, industrial (registered)

Indexes o f Standard W eekly Salaries and Straigh t-T im e Hourly Earnings for S e le c te d O ccupation al Groups in San Francisco-O akland, C alif. ,
January 1968 and January 1967, and Percents o f Increase for S elec ted Periods
Indexes
( January 1961=100)

Industry and o ccu p atio n al group

Percents o f increase

January 1967 January 1966 January 1965 January 1964 January 1963 January 1962 January 1961 January 1960
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
January 1968 January 1967
January 1968 January 1967 January 1966 January 1965 January 1964 January 1963 January 1962 January 1961

A ll industries:
O ffice cle ric a l (m en and w o m e n )------Industrial nurses (m en and w om en )----S k ille d m ain ten ance ( m e n ) -------------U n skilled plant (m e n )----------------------

127.3
1 3 3 .0
1 2 7 .7
129.3

1 2 0 .9
120. 1
1 2 1 .5
121. 7

5 .4
1 0 .8
5. 1
6 .2

3 .6
4 .6
3 .5
3. 2

2 .9
3 .0
4 .9
2 .6

3 .4
2 .2
1 .3
3 .2

3. 1
2. 7
3 .6
3 .5

3. 2
3. 7
3 .2
4. 5

3 .0
2 .4
3 .2
3 .0

4. 1
8 .3
3 .2
4. 8

M anufacturing:
O ffice c le ric a l (m en and w o m e n )------Industrial nurses (m en and w o m e n )----S k ille d m ain ten ance ( m e n ) -------------U nskilled plant (m e n )----------------------

124. 5
134.2
125. 7
1 2 7 .5

1 1 7 .7
1 1 9 .9
1 1 9 .9
1 2 0 .4

5 .8
1 1 .9
4 .8
5 .9

3 .0
4. 1
2 .8
3 .7

1 .6
2 .5
4 .7
1. 8

3 .4
2 .2
1 .2
2 .6

3 .5
3. 1
4 .1
4 .3

2 .4
4. 2
2 .9
3. 7

2 .6
2 .4
2 .9
2 .7

4 .2
8 .2
5 .1
4 .5




4
F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s a n d i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , the w a g e
t r e n d s r e l a t e to r e g u l a r w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r the n o r m a l w o r k w e e k ,
e x c l u s i v e of e a r n i n g s f o r o v e r t i m e .
F o r p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s , th e y
m e a s u r e c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c l u d i n g
p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , an d
l a t e s h i f t s . T h e p e r c e n t a g e s a r e b a s e d on d a t a f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u ­
p a t i o n s an d i n c lu d e m o s t of the n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t j o b s w ith in
each group.
L im itatio n s

C h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in the
o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s w ith o u t a c t u a l w a g e c h a n g e s . It i s c o n c e i v a b l e
th a t e v e n though a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in a n a r e a g a v e w a g e i n c r e a s e s ,
a v e r a g e w a g e s m a y have d eclin ed b e c a u s e lo w e r - p a y in g e s t a b lis h m e n t s
e n t e r e d the a r e a o r e x p a n d e d t h e i r w o r k f o r c e s .
S im ilarly , w ages
m a y h a v e r e m a i n e d r e l a t i v e l y c o n s t a n t , y e t the a v e r a g e s f o r a n a r e a
m a y have r is e n c o n sid e ra b ly b e c a u s e h ig h e r-p a y in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s
e n t e r e d the a r e a .

of D a t a

T h e i n d e x e s an d p e r c e n t a g e s of c h a n g e , a s m e a s u r e s of
c h a n g e in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e i n f l u e n c e d b y :
(1) g e n e r a l s a l a r y an d
w a g e c h a n g e s , (2) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y i n d i ­
v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h i l e in the s a m e j o b , a n d (3) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e
w a g e s due to c h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e r e s u l t i n g f r o m l a b o r t u r n ­
o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , a n d c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r ­
t i o n s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h d i f f e r e n t p a y l e v e l s .




T h e u s e of c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s the e f f e c t
of c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r t i o n of w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h j o b i n ­
c l u d e d in the d a t a .
The p e r c e n t a g e s of ch an ge r e f l e c t on ly c h a n g e s
in a v e r a g e p a y f o r s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r s .
T h e y a r e not i n f l u e n c e d b y
c h a n g e s in s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , a s s u c h , o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
f o r o v e r t i m e . W h e r e n e c e s s a r y , d a t a w e r e a d j u s t e d to r e m o v e f r o m
the i n d e x e s an d p e r c e n t a g e s of c h a n g e a n y s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d
b y c h a n g e s in the s c o p e of the s u r v e y .




5
A. O ccupational E arnin gs
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
by i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , J a n u a r y 1 968)
O
Weekly earnings1
(standard)
\verage
weekly
hours1

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
$

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

$

50
and
under

S

$
55

60

$
65

$

$
70

75

$
80

*

S
85

90

*
95

$
100

*
105

$
110

$
120

$
130

«
140

%
15C

$

$
160

170

%
180

190
and

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

120

130

140

150

16C

170

180

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10
10

40
40
40

67
67
67

10
10
10

-

-

-

-

-

18
18
2
5

16
2
14
1
11

18
1
17
3
14

85
19
66
3
25
38

ICC
48
52
7
17
28

158
75
83
14
22
14

78
41
37
26
11

36
30
5
2
2

29
17
12
3
6
-

7
7
-

4
4
-

1
1
-

28
19
9

9
9
5

57
29
28
6

31
8
23
1

34
4
30
30

36
36
35

4
4
-

_
-

_

_

-

-

_
-

2
2
2

36
32
4
4

30
12
18
18

92
47
45
45

68
4
64
64

75
27
48
48

2b
26
2
2

17
1
16
4

_

“

_
-

-

-

127
127
127

40.0
40.0
40.0

$
130.50
130.50
130.50

$
136.00
136.00
136.00

$
$
123.50-138.50
123.50-138.50
123.50-138.50

552
246
306
61
82

131.50
13 9.CO
125.50
136.50
128.50
117.00

131.50
136.50
125.00
141.00
125.00
115.00

120.00-143.50
128.50-149.50
113.50-134.50
129.00-147.50
118.50-134.50
109.50-124.50

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

3
2
1

-

112

39.0
39.5
38.0
39.5
38.5
37.5

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
“

-

232
75
157
77

39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0

119.00
112.50
122.00
136.00

119.00
116.00
122.50
137.50

104.50-133.00
102.00-119.50
109.50-138.00
131.50-147.00

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

5
5

8
8
-

9
9

11
3

372
173
199
187

39.5
3 9 .C
40.0
40.0

130.50
125.50
135.00
133.00

130.50
126.50
135.00
134.00

120.00-144.00
10 8.00-145.50
126.00-143.00
125.50-141.50

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
-

13
13
-

~

9
9
-

8

-

190 over

_

69

40.0

137.50 139.50 125.50-149.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

1

-

1

1

1

14

14

19

5

9

-

-

26

39.5

145.50 147.00 13 9.00-151.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

7

12

2

4

-

-

-

6 56
144
512
50
74
321

38.0
38.5
38.0
39.5
37.5
38.0

72 .0 0- 86.50
77 .5 0- 90.00
71 .5 0- 85.00
84.00-107.50
7 2 .5 0- 83.00
70.50- 82.50

_
-

18
18
18

20
20
20

52
13
39
13
26

172
14
158
10
12
119

68
18
50
2
13
34

145
41
104
28
45

70
22
48
10
l
26

42
21
21
4
5
9

17
6
11
1
2
5

22
3
19
1

28
4
24
22

2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

18

1

127
100

38.0
38.0

139.00 140.50 126.50-153.00
139.50 142.00 130.00-155.00

3
3

10
8

26
14

23
20

31
28

22
17

11
10

.

_

~

-

1
~

288
74
214
52

39.0
38.5
39.0
40.0

124.50
127.00
123.50
136.50

24
6
18

82
17
65

26
4
22
20

1
1
~

.

-

“

81
30
51
17

2

“

59
14
45
15

_
~

“

70

39.5
39.5

108.50 107.00 101.50-117.00
109.00 107.50 102.00-117.50

_

.

_

.

39.5
39.5
39.0

96.50
99.50
87.00
88.50
106.50 105.00

~

“

68

80.50
84.00
79.50
93.50
78.50
77.00

80.00
83.50
77.00
94.50
80.00
74.00

123.00
129.00
122.00
135.50

116.00-134.00
118.00-136.50
115.00-133.00
124.50-146.50

86 .50-107.50
83.00- 89.50
91 .00-111.50

-

_

-

“

-

_

_

-

-

~

_
-

_

_

-

-

”

“

"

1
1

_

_

3
3

3
2

7
6

13
13

21
21

1C
10

9
9

3
3

5
5

5
5

18
15
3

62
35
27

6
1
5

8
4
4

29
6
23

29
3
26

17

1

16

17

1

16

_

-

_

—

_
“

_

-

~

-

—

“

2
2

2
1
1
~

9
1
8

—

~

-

2
~

~

_

6
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s t u d ie d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , S a n F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , J a n u a r y 1968)
Weekly e am ings 1
(stanclard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
fstandard)

%

$
50

M ean2

Median

2

Middle range 2

55

$

$

$

$

$

S

%

$

i

*

$

$

$

$

%

$

$

$

$

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

over

and under

and

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

-

“

”

-

1
1
1

-

6
6
6

8
8
8

63
63
50

3
3
1

6
6

.

.

.

-

-

-

13
9
4
*

7
6
1
1

9
8
1
~

31
5
26
26

42
10
32
28

53
6
47
7
7

55
42
13

50
21
29
9
11

71
9
62
41
14

37
7
30
20
7

23

5
2
3

67

79
23
56
3
2
24
24

90
7
83
6

-

101
16
85
2
13
8
51

WOMEN - CO NT IN UE D
BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) --- ------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------RETAIL TRADE ------------BOOKKEEP IN G- MA CH IN E OPERATORS,
CLASS A ------------------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONMANUF AC TU RI NG ----------------WH OL ES AL E TRACE ----------------

112
112
77

$
40.0 100.50
40.0 100.50
96.00
40.0

183
61
122
70

39.C
39.0
38.5
39.0

115.50
112.00
117.50
114.50

$
93.50
93.50
92.50

$
$
91 .0 0-103.00
91 .00-103.00
90.50- 94.50

116.50
114.00
117.00
113.50

106.50-125.00
10 0.50-122.00
108.00-128.00
108.00-119.50

BOOKKEEP IN G- MA CH IN E OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NQNM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRACE --------------------

353
110
243
112
52

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------MA NU FACTURING --------------------NONMANUF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UT I L I T I E S 3 --------------WH OLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------FI NA NC E4 --------------------------

1, 288
493
795
128
80
108
364

38.5
38.5
38.5
39.5
38.5
39.5
38.0

120.50
127.50
116.50
133.50
115.50
118.00
111.50

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S3 --------------WH OLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E 4--------------------------

2,407
636
1,771
447
328
329
518

38.5
39.0
38.5
40.0
38.5
39.0
37.5

100.50
89.00-111.00
99.00
104.50 105.00
93 .00-115.50
99.00
88.00-109.00
97.00
89.00-109.50
103.50
95.50
108.50 110.00 10 3.50-116.00
100.00
89 .5 0-108.00
99.00
89.50
88.00
81.50- 97.00

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A --------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------F I N A N C E 4--------------------------

262
69
193
118

38.5
95.50
95.50
39.0 102.00 102.50
93.50
92.00
38.0
92.50
93.50
38.0

85.00-104.00
96 .00-111.50
84.00-101.50
84.00-101.50

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B --------------MA NUFACTURING --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3--------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E 4--------------------------

1,067
78
989
62
66
82
711

79.50
76.00
38.5
88.00
87.00
39.0
75.50
38.5
79.00
38.5 110.50 116.00
83.00
81.00
38.5
83.00
82.50
39.5
74.50
72.00
38.0

68.00- 87.50
73.50- 99.50
67.00- 86.50
96 .0 0-127.00
74.00- 91.00
81.00- 84.50
64.00- 81.00

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C --------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------F I N A N C E 4--------------------------

653
613
437

38.5
38.5
38.0

74.00
72.50
68.50

CLERKS, ORDER ------------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------

362
83
279
215
64

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0

108.00
107.00
108.00
111.50
97.50

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




90.00-105.00
38.5
98.50
98.00
38.5
93.50
94.50
90.00- 98.50
38.5 100.00 101.50
89.50-107.50
39 . C 105.50 104.50 101.00-111.00
95.50-107.00
39.0 102.00 101.00
119.50
125.50
116.00
136.00
117.00
118.50
111.00

109.00-132.50
118.00-138.00
10 4.00-126.50
12 1. 00 -1 46 .0 0
112.00-121.50
103.00-131.50
99.00-121.00

"

.

-

.

.

8

-

-

-

-

~

-

~
26
20
6
4

~

“

"

8
~

10
10
~

48
20
28
14

21
3
18
1

4

_

-

-

4

-

_
-

2

_

_

_

-

23
17
2

25
5
20
14
6

-

-

-

-

“

“

~

“

267
134
133
22
16
15
70

201
110
91
32
2
29
18

83
45
38
21
4
13

50
41
9
3
2
4
“

31
11
20
20

-

-

-

-

5
50

314
104
210
19
40
19
87

-

~

~

80
31
49
41
6
-

36
5
31
31
”

4
4
“

~

”

~

4
4
2

7
7
7

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

"

*

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

~

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

'
_

-

.
-

_

_

4

7

-

-

-

-

-

4

7

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

~

2
1

1
2
50

89
89
10
4
71

135
18
117
5
3
33
72

379
67
312
130
50
122

300
69
231
86
31
41
57

2 77
69
208
46
12
44
66

224
62
162
22
37
54
28

273
57
216
50
73
35
46

394
176
218
16
121
47
18

136
46
90
20
41
15

16

30
3
27
16

36
9
27
20

42
19
23
16

16
6
10
9

24
14
10
8

16
5
11
~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

~

-

-

-

42
6
36
-

30
10
20
10

27
27
27
-

2
2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

36

14
2
12
1
2
3
6

10

-

”

~

“

2
2

37
5

4
4

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

60
3
57
57

91
91
91

44
12
32
26
6

36
19
17
9
8

14
10
4
4

16
16
16

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

“
_

_
-

-

-

2
2
-

20
4
16
6

58
26
32
32

-

-

5
-

67

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

7
6

7
1

16
10

36
13
23
17

32

-

-

161
161
-

79
>
77
-

219
27
192
1
20

-

-

-

167

109
6
103
7
2
11
53

-

76

118
B
110
2
15
54
37

56
11
45
2
17

161

113
113
2
10
12
64

40
6
34
8

-

57
57
57

2
22

63.00- 82.00
62.50- 79.50
59.00- 73.50

36
36
36

88
88
88

64
64
52

98
98
70

151
147
126

36
32
14

48
48
24

33
33
17

51
51
10

_

106.00 96.50- 11 5. 00
92 .0 0- 12 5. 00
105.00
106.00 10 0.50-110.00
107.00 10 3.50-111.00
91.00- 98.00
93.00

_
-

_
-

-

2
2
-

4
4
-

5
4
1
1

3
2
1
1

10
4
6
6

63
12
51
12
39

14
11
3
3

"

'

71.50
70.50
68.00

1
1
1

3
3
1

-

-

-

-

7

7

-

32
15

22

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

2

-

“
-

_

7
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d ie d on a n a r e a b a s i s
by i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , J a n u a r y 1 968)
O

W
eekly amings1
(standard)
Number Average
weekly
of
hours1
workers ( standard)

s

s

S

S

S

$

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e iv i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w ee kl y e a r n i n g s of—
$
t
S
%
$
t
t
t
$
$
$
$
$
$
85
95
80
90
100 105
110
120
170 180 190
130
140
150
160

$

60

65

70

75

55

Sex, occupation, and in du stry division

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

2
2
-

2
2
-

4
4
-

14
12
2
_
_
2
-

22
5
17
_
_
14
1

54
6
48
_
17
26
3

82
34
48
1

140
76
64
6
16
12
12

112
35
77
36
9
18
14

106
40
66
39
12
1
13

17
11
6
5

29
6
23
22

_
_
_
_
_

25
13

47
21
26
5
5
13
3

20
14
6
2
1
2

-

4
2
2
_
2
-

50
Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

and
under

and
190 o v er

WOMEN - CO N T I N U E D
CL ERKS, PAYROLL ----------------------M A NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------WH OL ES AL E TR AC E ---------------RE TA IL TRACE -------------------FI NA NC E4 --------------------------

655
270
385
116
60
115
59

39.0
39.0
38.5
38.5
37.5
39.5
37.5

$
118.50
118.00
118.50
135.00
117.00
105.50
117.00

$
118.00
117.50
118.50
133.00
117.50
103.00
119.00

$
$
10 4.00-131.00
105.00 -1 31 .5 0
10 3.00-131.00
122.50-144.00
99 .5 0-129.00
97 .0 0- 11 7. 00
104.00-129.00

~

_

-

C O MP TO ME TE R OP E R A T O R S --------------M A N U F A CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------W H O L ES AL E TRACE ---------------RE TA IL TRAC E --------------------

687
204
483
203
114
158

39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0

111.50
112.50
111.00
126.50
102.50
98.50

110.00 98 .0 0- 12 4. 00
110.50 10 5.00-123.50
110.00 95.00- 12 4. 50
125.50 12 1.50-133.50
103.50 94.50- 10 8. 50
94.50 90.50- 10 4. 50

_
“

_
-

_
“

_
-

2
2
-

2
2
2

19
19
3
15

39
10
29
9
19

75
3
72
2
19
49

55
16
39
1
8
26

59
21
38
3
26
9

94
50
44
3
31
10

76
28
48
25
16
7

173
72
101
78
2
21

63
63
63
”

K E Y P UN CH OP ERATORS, CLASS A -------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S --------------WH OL ES AL E TRACE -------------- —
F I N A N C E --------------------------

1,370
388
982
151
169
487

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
38.5

111.00
110.00
111.50
130.00
110.00
108.00

109.50
107.50
111.00
139.00
109.00
110.50

100.50-119.00
100.50-116.50
101.00-119.50
11 2.00-147.00
104.00-118.00
99.00- 11 8. 50

_
-

-

-

-

-

10
10
10

26
4
22
22

30
16
14
13

39
16
23
2
20

208
56
152
8
19
70

205
60
145
12
28
72

191
84
107
14
46
30

359
78
281
17
50
164

182
47
135
12
21
86

KE YP UN CH OP ER AT OR S, CLASS B -------MA NU F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PUBLIC UT I L I T I E S 3 --------------WH O L E S A L E TRAD E ---------------RE TAIL TRACE -------------------F I NA NC E --------------------------

1,698
315
1,383
445
324
196
409

39.0
38.5
39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
38.5

100.50
98.50
98.50
97.00
100.50 98.50
112.50 121.00
98.50
98.00
100.00 100.00
89.50
90.50

90 .0 0-111.00
89 .50-108.50
90.50- 11 2. 00
96.00- 12 4. 50
93.5 0- 10 3. 00
93.0 0- 10 5. 00
81.50- 99.50

_
-

12
12
12

12
12
12

12
12
12

20
10
10
6

47
7
40
40

116
27
89
2
17
7
61

192
40
152
44
36
2
70

278
60
218
55
39
70
54

245
40
205
43
98
17
44

229
34
195
13
89
54
39

87
27
60
24
17
8
11

158
43
115
15
27
35
38

OFFICE GIRL S -------------------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------NO N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------F I N A N C E --------------------------

340
142
198
87

38.5
38.5
38.5
38.5

84.00
84.50
83.50
77.50

82.00
83.00
79.50
74.50

74.5080.0073.5072 .0 0-

89.00
89.00
89.00
82.00

_
-

1
1
1

3
3
3

19
8
11
5

69
20
49
37

45
6
39
16

84
61
23
9

45
16
29
10

10
9
1
~

8
4
4
"

11
5
6
6

35
5
30

9
7
2

S E C R E T A R I E S 5--------------------------M A NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G - ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3--------------WH OL ES AL E TRADE ---------------RE TA IL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E --------------------------

6,262
1.761
4,521
565
934
335
1,62 2

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.5
39.5
38.5

122.00
125.50
121.00
131.50
124.50
118.50
117.00

120.00
125.50
118.50
129.00
122.00
117.00
116.50

107.50-134.00
112.50-137.00
106.00-132.50
116.00-145.50
113.50-134.00
107.50-129.50
10 4.50-127.50

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
16
16

44
13
31
5
5
21

194
41
153
7
25
12
67

371
62
309
9
4
25
110

632
110
522
41
77
20
220

SE CR ET AR IE S, CLAS S A -------------M A NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NO N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------FI N A N C E 4 ------------- -------------

295
60
235
36
50

38.5
39.0
38.5
38.5
38.5

145.00
150.50
143.50
167.00
145.50

141.50
146.00
139.50
172.00
144.00

132.50-160.50
134.50-162.50
131.00-159.50
146.00-184.50
132.50-157.00

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

13

8

22

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
-

8
-

22
-

SECRET AR IE S, CLASS B -------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3--------------WH OL ES AL E TRACE ---------------FI NA NC E4 --------------------------

1,172
278
894
122
148
476

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
39.0
38.5

132.50
138.00
130.50
147.50
137.00
124.50

132.50
135.00
131.50
143.00
134.50
124.50

118.00-146.00
122.50-152.50
117.00-144.00
133.50-167.00
128.50-152.50
112.50-137.00

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

19
4
15

32
32

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

15

85
8
77
2
19
55

43
12
31
2
21

152
37
115
6
4
93

S e e fo o tn o te s a t en d o f t a b le ,




-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

30
2
28
28
-

_
-

_
~

-

"

“

27
5
22
17
3
”

93
22
71
71
-

~

"

“

-

-

206
14
192
180
1
3
8

77
6
71
69
2

7
7
~

-

-

~

-

"
“
~

1
1
-

-

-

~
-

“

“
“

“

-

-

599 1327 1154
147
350 394
977 760
452
57
65
111
279
193
56
47
44
103
390 277
180

909
254
655
105
166
41
201

535
221
314
43
42
25
72

202
58
144
35
57
7
39

156
60
96
41
19
4
23

115
46
69
34
15
2
1

17
4
13
5
3

11
1
10
7
1
2

15
3
12
7

81
14
67
7
13

58
21
37
8
10

23
4
19
2
10

21
7
14
~
6

32
7
25
7
1

15
4
11
5
3

7
~
7
7

181
42
139
9
17
82

276
61
215
38
40
110

182
41
141
18
22
53

64
15
49
7
28
13

68
22
46
15
14
17

64
35
29
27
1

2
~
2
~

4
1
3

—

“

-

~
~

~

"

1
2

8
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif., January 1968)
Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
[standard)

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight -time weekly earnings of-%

$

%

$

$

$

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

$

;
t

$

$

85

90

95

100

80

85

90

95

100

60

65

70

75

60

65

70

75

50
and
under

$
80

55

55

Sex, occupation, and industry division

l
s

$

l

*

%
i
*
$
1
t
190
180
170
150
160

105

110

120

130

140

105

110

12C

130

140

150

160

170

180

and
190 over

WOMEN - CONTINUED
S E CR ET AR IE S5 - CO NTINUED
SECRETARIES, CLASS C -------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------WH OLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRACE -------------------F I N A N C E 4--------------------------

1,938
603
1,335
183
34 7
112
442

39 .C
38.5
39.0
39.5
38.5
39.5
39.0

$
125.50
128.50
124.50
134.00
124.50
116.50
118.50

$
125.50
127.00
124.50
131.00
126.00
116.50
119.00

$
$
115.50-136.50
117.50-141.00
114.00-135.50
123.50-154.00
116.00-134.00
108.00-126.00
108.50-127.50

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

17
11
6
4
2

24
24
14
2
8

68
4
64
1
4
8
18

1C7
33
74
4
16
5
49

126
29
97
19
11
16
49

374
120
254
13
83
43
113

5C8
161
347
49
1C1
11
128

342
84
258
39
87
12
50

221
1C5
116
8
17
10
9

79
21
58
24
12
1
16

66
31
35
25
1
-

6
4
2
1
-

-

-

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S3 --------------WHOL ES AL E TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E 4--------------------------

2, 78C
749
2,031
210
404
119
654

38.5
39.C
38.5
39 . C
38.0
39.5
38.5

113.00
116.50
111.50
115.00
120.00
110.00
108.50

111.50
115.00
109.50
115.50
117.00
111.50
107.50

102.50-120.50
106.00-128.00
102.00-119.00
104.50-126.50
111.50-123.50
101.00-118.50
100.50-117.00

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

16
16
16

27
2
25
5
1
19

151
37
114
7
11
10
44

271
58
213
8
16
77

42 7
69
358
35
29
15
116

421
106
315
45
43
14
110

764
189
575
30
192
42
184

408
150
258
51
73
18
60

190
78
112
21
25
3
28

61
46
15
6
3
-

32
14
18
2
16
-

_
_
_

12
12
12
_

_
_
-

_
~

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------NONMANUF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3--------------WH OL ES AL E TRACE ---------------FINANCE 4--------------------------

1,794
443
1,351
256
96
795

95.50
39.0 97.50
39.5 102.50 102.00
96.00
94.00
39.0
98.50
39.0 104.00
38.5
94.50
98.50
38.5
92.00
92.00

89.00-104.50
94.00-111.00
88.00-102.00
89.00-122.50
91.50-104.50
86.00- 98.00

-

-

-

1
1
1

14
14
13

54
1
53
12
41

155
20
135
13
12
108

286
54
232
51
174

348
47
301
36
41
161

299
76
223
23
8
161

217
60
157
14
13
87

152
66
86
16
4
36

156
88
68
14
16
13

76
20
56
54
2
-

32
11
21
19
-

_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_
-

-

4
4
4
_
-

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR --------------MA NUFACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3--------------WH OLESALE TRACE ---------------F I N A N C E 4--------------------------

1,797
501
1,296
262
169
549

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0

111.00
114.00
110.00
118.50
115.00
103.50

100.00-120.50
104.00-123.50
98.50-119.50
101.00-133.00
107.50-120.00
96.50-109.00

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

*

21
2
19
9

77
12
65
26
22

143
31
112
23
65

211
28
183
12
19
131

252
63
189
20
18
132

255
110
145
23
11
70

376
101
275
29
79
88

225
64
161
49
23
11

143
78
65
37
14
1

58
10
48
23
5
20

21
2
19
5
-

13
_
13
13
-

"

2
_
2
2
-

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A ---MA NU FACTURING --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3— ------------FINANCE 4--------------------------

421
107
314
78
116

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.5
38.0

89.00-115.00
103.50 101.50
113.00 110.50 105.00-123.00
88.00-111.50
97.50
100.50
120.00 118.50 102.00-138.50
98.50
92 .00-106.00
97.50

_
-

_
-

_
—
-

6
6
6

_
-

10
10
10

20
5
15
4

90
6
84
4

22
4
18
1
12

54
1
53
17
31

35
10
25
4
18

46
26
20
2
16

62
18
44
22
13

32
19
13
9
2

17
9
8
6

25
7
18
17
-

2
2
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_

_

_

SW ITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B ---NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3--------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E 4--------------------------

486
448
27
90
118

91.50
86.50-100.00
39. C 93.00
91.00
86.00- 98.00
39.0 91.50
39.5 109.00 109.00 100.00-120.00
40.0
94.50
90 .5 0- 10 0. 50
94.50
38.5
88.00
82.00- 95.50
89.00

_
-

_
—
-

_
-

1
V
-

35
35
3

19
19
18

29
28
8
20

126
126
l
10
29

108
103
5
32
17

44
44
1
16
23

64
64
22
3

30
14
9
1
3

20
7
5
2

9
6
5
1
-

1
1
1
-

"

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

-

-

SWITCH BO AR D O P ER AT GR -R EC EP TI ON IS TS MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3--------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------FI NANCE 4----------------------- -

752
220
532
44
250
106

39.0
39.5
38.5
39.0
39.0
38.0

90 .5 0- 10 9. 00
95 .50-111.00
89.50-107.00
92 .0 0- 13 3. 50
92.C0-lil.50
85.00-100.50

_
-

_

_

13
13
13

-

118
13
105
6
16
29

137
24
113
12
67
18

86
36
50

49
22
27

32
7
25
17
-

51
15
36
26
10
-

_

_

1
2

93
38
55
43
6

-

_
_
-

44
5

129
51
78
35
20

_

-

44
14
30
17
13

TABULA TI NG -M AC HI NE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------NO NM AN UFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3— -------------

265
251
120

39.5 118.00 114.00 105.00-137.00
39.5 117.50 113.50 105.00-137.50
40.0 108.00 110.50 99 .0 0- 11 3. 50

-

~

~

“

~

5
3
3

15
15
14

25
25
17

21
21
9

18
18
11

73
73
53

34
25
9

17
17
-

54
54
4

83

39.5 118.50 126.00 111.00-128.50

14

4

1

1

5

53

5

~

~

TABU LA TI NG -M AC HI NE OPERATORS,
class C
S e e fo o tn o te s a t en d o f ta b le ,




109.00
111.00
108.00
119.50
115.50
102.00

99.00
100.50
103.00 102.50
95.50
99.00
115.50 131.00
101.00 98.00
90.00
89.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_
_
_
-

-

_
_
_
_
-

_

_

_

_
_
_
-

_

_
_

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

"

_
-

2
_

1

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
_
-

“

9
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued
(A verage straigh t-tim e weekly hours and earn in gs fo r sele cted occupations studied on an a r e a b a s is
by in dustry division , San F r a n c isc o —
Oakland, C a lif., Jan u ary 1968)
Num ber of w ork ers receivin g straigh t-tim e weekly earn in gs of—
Number
of
workers

Average
weekly

t

$

$

$

$

$

S

*

t

%

(standard)

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

55

S e x , o c c u p a ti o n , an d in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

-

-

-

13
13
12

13
13
9

24
2
22
16

41
8
33
18

75
6
69
11
44

6
6
6

10
10
10

29
29
29

58
58
56

282
15
267
18
87
157

93
93

376
47
329
-

310
65
245
7
2

470
66
4 04
45
48
13
281

50
and
u nde r

s

S

>

%

S

$

6

$

S

1

%

10 0,

105

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

100

105

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190 o v er

60
8
52
1
39

1 04
7
97
49
44

37
4
33
12
13

29
4
25
3
13

42
20
22
7
15

13
1
12
7
4

3
_
3
_
3

1
1
_
1

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

336
25
311
41
63
20 2

208
13
195
21
62
85

2 22
11
211
17
26
140

128
20
108
8
35
56

86
37
49
4
32

125
48
77
3
40
10

17
13
4
1

8
2
6
4
2

16
2
14
14
_

_

_

_

353
55
29 8
33
30
29
191

238
57
181
5
22
15
121

118
43
75
1

71
32
39
5

35
14
21
16

21
2
19
10

11
2
9
9

13
13

10
26

16
12

5

9

190
and

WOMEN - C O NT IN UE D

T R A N S C R I B I N G - M A C H I N E OPERATORS.
G E NE RA L ---------------------------------------------M A NU FA CT UR IN G ------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------W H OL ES AL E TRACE -----------------------F I N A N C E 4--------------------------------- -—

4 55
60
3 95
90
231

38.0
38.5
38.0
38.5
37.5

$
95.00
99.50
94.00
100.50
92.50

$
95.00
99.50
94.50
98.50
92.00

$
$
8 6 .5 0 -1 0 1 .5 0
8 9 .50-112.00
8 6 .50-100.00
96 .0 0 -1 0 3 .0 0
8 5 .5 0 - 99.00

TY PI ST S. CLASS A ------------------------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------NO N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------P U BL IC U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------W H OL ES AL E TRACE -----------------------F I N A N C E 4---------------------------------------

1.531
186
1.345
130
3 16
783

38.5
39.0
38.0
39.5
36.5
38.5

91.00
93.50
104.00 106.50
90.00
92.00
91.50
99.00
90.50
93.50
88.50
89.00

85.00-100.00
92 .5 0 -1 1 2 .5 0
8 4 .5 0 - 98.00
8 7 .00-101.00
8 4 .5 0 -1 0 0 .0 0
8 3 .0 0 - 96.50

TYPISTS. CLAS S B ------------------------------MA NU F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 ---------------

2.129
383
1.746
144
113
98
1.276

38.5
39.5
38.5
39.0
38.0
39.5
38.0

83.00
86.50
82.50
8 8 .0 0
85.00
92.00
80.00

7 5 .5 0 - 89.50
7 9 .0 0 - 95.00
7 5 .0 0 - 88.50
8 3 .0 0-109.00
8 2 .0 0 - 89.50
8 7 .0 0 -1 0 2 .0 0
7 3 .5 0 - 86.00

ULlHI L£t j A L C TO A U l
N n U 2 C A 1 C 1 K A PC

—— —

R E TA IL T R AD E -------------------F I N A N C E 4-------------------------------------------------------------

84.00
87.00
83.00
96.00
85.00
93.50
80.00

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

~

-

-

6
6

14
14

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

14

-

91

9
1
30 5

-

229

13
_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

—

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

_

c

1 S tan d ard hours re fle c t the w orkw eek for which em ployees receive their regu la r straigh t-tim e s a la r ie s (ex clu siv e of pay fo r overtim e at regu la r an d /o r prem ium r a te s), and the earnings c o r r e ­
spond to th ese w eekly h o u rs.
2 The m ean is com puted for each job by totaling the earn in gs of all w o rk ers and dividing by the number of w o rk e rs. The m edian d esign ate s position— half of the em ploy ees su rveyed receive m ore
than the rate shown; h alf rec eiv e l e s s than the rate shown. The middle range is defined by 2 r a te s of pay; a fourth of the w o rk ers earn l e s s than the low er of these r a te s and a fourth earn m ore than
the higher ra te .
3 T ran sp o rtatio n , com m unication, and other public u tilitie s.
4 Fin an ce, in su ran c e, and re a l e sta te .
5 M ay include w o rk ers other than those p resen ted sep arately .




10
Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations—Men and Women
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif, , January 1968)
W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1
(sta n d a rd )
N um ber

Sex, occupation, and industry division

w ork ers

i

A verage
w e e k ly

$
80

M ean 1
2

(sta n d a rd )

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

$

$

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight -time weekly earnings of—
i
$
$
%
*
$
t
$
S
S
$
1C5 110
115
120
125
130 135
140
145
150
155

$

85

90

95

100

90

95

100

105

$

$

t

$

%

85

200

160

170

180

190

200 over

and
under

and
110

115

120

125

130

135

140

145

150

155

160

170

180

190

12

17

12

32

18

59

108
53
55

69
27
42

22
21
1

4
2
2

9
8
1

MEN
$

DRAFTSMEN* CLASS A

$

$

$

-----------------------------------------

476
264
212

4 0 . C 175.50 177.50 164.50-185.00
39.5 172.50 174.00 15 5.00-186.00
40.0 179.00 179.00 172.50-184.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B -------------------------------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G ------------------------------------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3 -----------------------------------

556
326
23C
79

40.C
39.5
40. C
40.C

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C -------------------------------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G ------------------------------------------------N O N M AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------------------------------

40 3
170
233

40.0 128.50 129.00 113.50-144.50
40. C 117.00 116.00 10 3.50-131.00
40.0 137.00 141.00 123.50-154.50

-------------------------------------------Mf A M I I P f\ vT T I I R I N v jC _______ __________________________ __
n l i u r A i u “ l in

N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG

r tK tA frT b Uf f c k l — T fK A T tC f lbf
U f l Ir t C N . f t A l K
— — —————————— —————
Ai m i A 1 U K I A b
r Aa N i U er A rb T i m i N ir —— — —
—
——— ———— —

68
65

150.50
139.00
154.00
153.50

133.00-163.00
126.00-163.50
146.50-162.50
147.00-160.00

86 .5 0— 109.00
40*0

9 7*5^

98*5°

q 2
c n _ i t\~f c n
O oi Du
l l ) f • !)(J

-

"

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

3
3

7
6
1

'

149.00
145.00
154.00
153.50

-

-

“

-

-

1

4

5

27

127
51
76

38
17
21
11

64
11
53
18

52
17
35
15

83
35
48
11

55
44
11
8

16
8
8

~

38
15
23
12

“

“

”

23
18
5

42
4
38

8
5
3

28

58
2
56

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

1

'

_
13
13

-

-

-

-

41
33
“

29
26
3
1

42
30
12
1

39
36
3

-

44
42
2
2

39
18
21

22
16
6

42
8
34

31
17
14

36
17
19

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29
29

15
7
8

20
20
~

-

_
-

B

-

-

28

'

13
13

10
10

10
10

7

10

7

8

.

1

2
1

2
2

1

8
2

8
3

11
7

1

ViOMEN
NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ------MA NU FA CT UR IN G -------------------------------------------------

122
89

39.5 139.00 138.00 130.50-149.00
39.5 141.50 139.50 133.00-151.00

_

_

_

.

_

22
18

19
17

10
5

16
14

11
9

1 Standard hours reflect the w o r k w e e k for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or p r e m i u m
spond to these weekly hours.
2 For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A-l.
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , and oth er pu b li c u t i l i t i e s .




8
8

8
6

rates), and the earnings corre­

11
Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d ie d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , J a n u a r y 1968)
O
Average

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

Average

Occupation and industry division

OFFICE OC CUPATIONS

OFFICE O C CU PA TI ON S

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours 1
standard)
(

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

323
74
249
145

39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0

CLERKS, ORDE R ------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NMANUFACTURING ----------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------

734
256
478
402
76

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0

11,. so
119.50
119.50
121.50
108.50

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKK EE PI NG
MACHINE) -----------------------------NO N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------

121
121
81

40.0 100.00
40.0 100.00
40.0
96.00

BO OK KE E P I N G - M A C H I N E OPERATORS,
C L AS S A ------------------------------M A N U F A CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------WHOL ES AL E TRAC E ----------------

183
61
122
70

39.0
39.0
38.5
39.0

CLERKS, PAYROLL ---------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

724
306
418
142
64
117
59

39.0
39.5
38.5
38.5
37.5
39.5
37.5

120.00
120.50
120.00
136.50
115.50
105.50
117.00

BO OK KE E P I N G - M A C H I N E OPERATORS,
C L A S S B ----------------- •
------------M A N U F A CT UR IN G --------------------NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------W H OL ES AL E TRADE ---------------R E TA IL TRAD E --------------------

372
110
262
112
52

38.5
99.00
38.5
94.50
38.0 101.00
39.0 105.50
39.0 102.00

COMPTOMETER OP ERATORS --------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------

691
204
487
207
114
158

39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0

111.50
112.50
111.50
126.50
102.50
98.50

CL ERKS, ACCO UN TI NG , CLASS A -------MA NU F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WH O L E S A L E TRAD E ---------------R E TA IL TRAC E -------------------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

1,840
739
1,101
189
162
113
476

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.5
38.5
39.5
38.0

124.00
131.50
119.00
134.50
122.00
118.50
113.00

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRAD E ---------------FINANCE3 --------------------------

1,370
388
982
151
169
487

39.0
39.0
39 .C
39.5
39.5
38.5

110.00
111.50
130.00
110.00
108.00

CL ERKS, AC COUNTING, CLASS B -------M A NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------W H OL ES AL E TRAC E ---------------RE TAIL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E 3 --------------------------

2,639
711
1,928
524
36 7
330
552

39.0
39.0
38.5
40.0
38.5
39.0
37.5

102.50
105.50
101.00
108.00
109.50
99.50
90.00

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2— -----------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E 3------------ -------------

1,704
315
1,389
450
324
197
409

39.0
38.5
39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
38.5

100.50
98. 50
100.50
112.50
98.00
100.00
90.50

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A --------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------NO NM AN U F A C T U R I N G -----------------FINANCE 3--------------------------

269
70
199
120

38.5 96.00
39.0 102.00
38.0
94.00
38.0
92.50

OFFICE BOYS AND G I RL S--- ------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

996
286
710
106
408

38.5
38.5
38.0
38.0
38.0

81.50
84.50
80.50
78.50
77.00

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B --------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------NO NM AN U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WH OL ES AL E TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRACE -------------------F I N A N C E 3 --------------------------

1,116
78
1,038
80
74
82
734

38.5 to. 50
39.0
88.00
38.5
79.50
38.5 111.50
38.5
66.00
39.5
83.00
75.00
38.0

SECRETARIES4 — ----------- ------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRACE -------------------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

6,323
1,774
4,549
588
937
335
1,624

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.5
39.5
38.5

122.50
125.50
121.00
132.50
124.50
118.50
117.00

CLERKS* FILE, CLAS S C --------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E 3--------------- ----------

670
630
53
*45

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------FI N A N C E 3--------------------------

299
60
239
40
50

38.5
39.0
38.5
38.5
38.5

145.50
150.50
144.00
168.00
14 5 . 50J

38.5
38.5
39.5
38,0

115.50
112.00
117.50
114.50

75.00
73.00
91.00
68.50 1

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE OC CU PA TI ON S - CONTINUED

- CONT IN UE D

$
112.00
88.50
119.00
131.00

BILLERS, MA CH IN E (BILLING
MACHINE) -----------------------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------NO NM AN U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------

Average

Occupation and industry division

1 1 1 .0 0

SE CR ET AR IE S4 - CCNTINUED
SECRETARIES, CLASS B -------------MANU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

1, 182
278
904
131
149
476

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
39.0
38.5

$
132.50
138.00
131.00
148.00
137.50
124.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -------------MA NU FACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2 --------------WH OL ES AL E TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I NA NC E3 --------------------------

1,952
606
1,346
190
349
112
444

39.0
38.5
39.0
39.5
38.5
39.5
39.0

125.50
128.50
124.50
134.00
12 4.50|
116.50
118.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -------------MA NUFACTURING --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WH OLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I N A N C E 3 --------------------------

2,791
758
2,033
212
404
119
654

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.0
39.5
38.5

113.00
116.50
111.50
115.50
120.00
110.00
108.50

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -------------MA NUFACTURING --------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WH OL ES AL E TRADE ---------------FINANCE 3--------------------------

1,806
443
1,363
267
96
796

39.0
97.50
39.5 102.50
39.0
96.00
39.0 104.50
38.5
98.50
38.5
92.00

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR --------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------F I N A N C E 3 ----------------- --------

1,810
502
1,308
273
170
549

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0

111.50
114.00
110.00
119.00
115.00
103.50

SW ITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------- -----------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------F I N A N C E --------------------------

421
107
314
78
116

38.5
39.0
38.5
39.5
38.0

103.50
113.00
100.50
120.00
97.50

SW IT CH BO AR D OPERATORS, CLASS B ---NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------RETAIL TRADE ---------- --------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

489
451
29
90
118

93.00
39.0
39.0
91.50
39.5 110.50
94.50
40.0
38.5
89.00

SW ITCHBOARD OPERAT CR -R EC EP TI ON IS TS MA NUFACTURING --------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WH OL ES AL E TRADE ---------------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

756
224
532
44
250
106

39.0
39.5
38.5
39.0
39.0
3B.0
I

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




100.50
103.50
99.00
115.50
101.00
. SJL^QO

12
Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined— Continued
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif. , January 1968)
Average

Occupation and industry division

OFFICE OC CU PA TI ON S

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

Average

Occupation and industry division

OFFICE OC CU PA TI ON S

- CO NT IN UE D

TABU LA TI NG -M AC HI NE OPERATORS,
CLASS A ------------------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------F I N A N C E --------------------------

156
123
53

$
38-5 137.50
38.5 138.00
39.5 134.00

TABULA TI NG -M AC HI NE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------MANU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WH OLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRACE -------------------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

553
88
465
172
128
56
70

39.5
39.C
39.5
40 .C
38.5
40.0
39.5

TABU LA TI NG -M AC HI NE OPERATORS,
CLASS C ------------------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WHOLESALE T R A C E -----------------

153
141
78

39.5 114.00
39.5 114.00
39.5 120.50

121.50
127.00
120.50
116.50
132.00
112.50
114.50

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

- CO NTINUED

Average

Occupation and industry division

Number
of

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

PR OFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
O C C U PA TI ON S

TR AN 5 C R I 8 1 NG-yACHIf\E OPERATORS,
GE NERAL ------------------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------FINANCE --------------------------

464
60
404
90
240

$
38.C 55.00
38.5 99.50
38.0 94.00
38.5 100.50
37.5 93.00

TYPISTS, CLASS A --------------------MA NUFACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UTIL IT IE S 1
2--------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------FI N A N C E 3 ----------- -------------4

1,541
188
1,353
137
316
784

38.5 93.50
39.0 103.50
38.0
92.00
39.5 99.50
36.5 93.50
38.5
89.00

TYPISTS, CLASS 8 --------------------MA NU FACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRACE -------------------F I N A N C E 3 --------------------------

2,141
384
1,757
155
113
98
1, 276

38.5
39.5
38.5
39.0
38.0
39.5
38.0

84.00
87.50
83.00
95.50
85.00
93.50
80.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A ------------------MA NUFACTURING --------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------

491
272
219

$
4 0 . C 175.00
35.5 17 2.CO
4 0 . C 179.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS 8 ------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------------

570
334
236
84

40.0
39.5
4C.C
40.C

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C --------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NO NM AN UFACTURING -------------------------------

431
193
238

40.0 128.50
4C.0 118.CO
4C.C 137.00

DR AFTSMEN-TRACERS -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

1C6
66

4C.C
40.C

96.50
97.50

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) --MANUFACTURING ---------------------

122
89

39.5
39.5

13 9.GO
141.50

148.50
145.00
154.00
153.00

1 Standard hours reflect the w o r k w e e k for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or p r e m i u m rates), and the earn­
ings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
3 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
4 M a y include workers other than those presented separately.




13
Table A-4. Maintenance arid Powerplant Occupations
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , J a n u a r y 1 9 6 8 )
O

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings1

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Mean13 Median 2
24

Middle range 2

t
i
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
t
i
*
».10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40
.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.0C *
■

Under and

2.801 under
.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.1C 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.60 4.80 •
>.00 5.20 5.40 o v e r

CARPEN TE RS , MA IN T E N A N C E ----------MANU FA CT UR IN G ------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ---------------

267
153
114

$
4.00
3.97
4.05

$
3.97
3.98
3.91

$
3.723.782.97-

$
4. 08
4.06
5.22

EL EC TR IC IA NS , M A IN TE NA NC E -------M A N U FA CT UR IN G ------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG --------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3-------------

734
546
188
147

4.15
4.16
4.14
4.18

4.01
3.97
4.41
4.43

3.793.793.933.92-

4.45
4.45
4. 45
4.46

ENGINEERS, ST AT I O N A R Y — ---------- *
M A NU FA CT UR IN G ------------------NO NM AN U F A C T U R I N G ---------------

436
206
230

4.15
4.18
4.13

4.12
4.23
4.06

3.81- 4.42
3.85- 4.51
3.78- 4.27

HELP ER S, M A IN TE NA NC E TRADES -----M A NU FA CT UR IN G ------------------NO N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3-------------

284
117
167
145

3.17
3.31
3.08
3.07

3.22
3.29
3.09
3.08

2.993.232.952.94-

97
91

3.88
3.87

3.94
3.93

3.75- 4.05
3.75- 4. 05

MACH IN IS TS , M A IN TE NA NC E ----------M A N U FA CT UR IN G -------------------

1,158
1,053

4.15
4.14

4.07
4.07

3.96- 4 . 34
3.94- 4 . 29

MECHANICS, A U TO MO TI VE
(M A I N T E N A N C E ) --------------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G ------------------NO NM AN U F A C T U R I N G --------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3-------------

1,276
224
1,052
947

4.45
4.29
4.49
4.50

4.41
4.42
4.40
4.38

4.243.834.254.25-

MECHANICS, M A IN TE NA NC E ----------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ---------------

1,040
976
64

3.86
3.86
3.90

3.85
3.83
3.87

3.56- 3.98
3.56- 3.98
3.80- 3.99

_

OILERS ------------------------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G -------------------

141
107

3.25
3.20

3.29
3.22

3.13- 3.40
3.09- 3.34

3
3

PAINTERS, M A IN TE NA NC E — ----------M A NU FA CT UR IN G ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------- -

236
121
115

4.21
4.16
4.27

3.98
4.01
3.97

3.78- 4.39
3.76- 4.38
3.80- 5.21

PI PE FI TT ER S, M A IN TE NA NC E --------M A NU FA CT UR IN G -------------------

442
412

4.04
4.04

4.04
4.04

3.99- 4. 09
3.99- 4.09

SH EE T- ME TA L WORKERS, M A IN TE NA NC E
M A NU FA CT UR IN G -------------------

81
57

4.19
4.32

3.95
3.95

3.76- 4.07
3.76- 4.09

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS --------------M A NU FA CT UR IN G -------------------

313
313

4.47
4.47

4.48
4.48

4.43- 4.65
4.43- 4.65

MA CH IN E- TO OL OPERATORS, TOOL RO OM
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---•
--- — ---------

1
2
3
4

3.29
3.47
3.24
3.24

4 . 80
4.71
4.82
4.83

16
16

_

1

-

-

-

1
~

-

-

4

28

-

“

4

23

219
120
99
98

4
4
-

-

-

-

-

1

62
44
18

4

29
25
4

-

-

16

“

34
6
28
28

30
1
29
28

19
19
12

98
42
56
48

6
6
5

1
_

2

1
-

2
2

11
11

_

_

24
24

_

-

-

-

-

*
“

3
3

1
1

“

8
8

2
2

16
16

20
20

44
41
3
-

126
107
19
13

99
73
26
2

16
15
1
-

90
32
58

25
25

32

13

95
45
50

1

~

52
15
37

42
42

-

1*8
1*8

_

11

_

138
135
3

10

-

10

_

_

_

2

“
16

-

-

13

12
6

38
38

1
1

.

2
2

.

_

.

.

_

-

-

“

-

*

-

“

30
30

186
184

284
247

54
54

134
134

68
68

162
96

34
34

_

36
36

18
18

-

~

c2
50
2
2

1

51
15
36
14

6
6

1
1

34
10
24
24

337
16
321
313

116
116
116

156
57
99
28

158
56
102
100

329
5
324
324

-

8
8

105
105

40
40

_

_

-

-

-

16
16

5
5
“

-

-

48
19
29

_

26
26

4
4

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

12
4 12

8

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

262
262

J7
J7

100
H3
17

50
2«
22

29 2
281
11

30
17
13

17
16
1

L2
L2
“

37
11
26

3
-

3

62
24
38

24
20
4

10
10

28
28

3
3

32
80

234
209

2

1
-

24
24

_

22
10

16
11

5
5

_

_

4
4

12
1
-

33
33

-

4

-

3
3
-

_
-

-

"
-

35
20

1

:

-

10

19

15

71

~

10

5

13

_

24
24

71

-

10
10

1
1

_

3

“

45

45

-

1

4
4

23
5
18
16

62
57
5

9

Excludes p r e m i u m pay for overtime and for w o r k on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A-l.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
All wo rk er s w e r e at $6 to $6.20.




5
4
1

49
38
11

-

1

9

16
5
11
8

1

4
4
-

3
2

10

10
6
4
3

18
18

5

3

37
27

5

4
4

59
58

_

-

_

_

2

_

12
12

_

13
13

165
165

102
102

_

2
2

-

8

-

1
1
-

14
Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d ie d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , J a n u a r y 1968)
O

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e iv i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o ur ly e a r n i n g s of—

Hourly earnings

Number
O c c u p a t i o n 1 and i n d u s tr y d iv i si o n

workers

Mean3

Median3

$
$
S
2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0
,
Middle range3 Under and
c
2 . 0 0 u nd er
2 .1 0 2 .2 0

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN ----------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------

1,303
2 67

$
2.41
3.05

$
2.61
2.99

$
$
2 . 01- 2 .6 8
2 .8 3 - 3.28

GUARDS:
MANUFACTURING ---------------------

146

3.05

2.93

2.83-

2.30

$
2.30

$
$
$
$
$
2.4 0 2 .50 2 .6 0 2.70 2 .8 0

s
$
$
2.90 3.00 3 .10

$
3.20

$
$
$
3.30 3.40 3.60

2.40

2.50 2 .60 2 .7 0 2.80 2.9 0

3.00 3.10

3.20

3.30

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.0 0

240
~

44
~

18
“

23
4

~

-

3.37

67
3

58
11

605
29

37
6

52
44

63
40

18
14

28
22

36
36

13
10

83
48

-

418

$
*
$
$
3.80 4.00 4.20 4 .4 0

11

13

1

40

30

6

2

-

10

4.20 4.40

$
$
4.6 0 4 .8 0

4.60 4.80

“

—

-

"

5.00
~

33

WATCHMEN:
MANUFACTURING ---------------------

121

3.05

3.16

2 .8 6 - 3.26

-

-

-

-

4

3

-

16

5

4

10

8

20

36

-

15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS --MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NM ANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC UTIL IT IE S 5--------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I NA NC E6 --------------------------

4,835
1,384
3,451
337
95
368
307

2.72
2.91
2.64
2.63
2.84
2.69
2.76

2.76
2.89
2.71
2.63
2.79
2.70
2.76

2.572.802.462.4 8 2.742.512.72-

2.93
3.15
2.84
2.79
2.86
2.86
2.79

138
10
128
23
3

106
106
36
2
~

445
20
425
23
1
1

69
29
40
9
2
"

132
22
110
12
9
9

128
36
92
6
54
10

2 59
84
175
64
15
5

585
35
550
57
5
80
~

948
115
833
54
49
28
216

696
361
335
1
32
109
57

4 58
170
288
1
1
6

321
67
2 54
62
1
6

1 90
176
14
4
6

205
174
31
5
3
10

88
72
16
16

67
13
54
8
6

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
(WOMEN) -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5---------------

568
76
49 2
40

2.57
2.36
2.60
2.46

2.72
2.42
2.73
2.55

2.432.C 72 .5 8 2.17-

2.77
2.50
2.77
2.75

24
24
-

34
26
8
3

57
4
53
11

8
1
7
4

10
3
7
-

30
24
6

25
2
23
5

45
5
40
-

283
5
278
17

32
2
30

20
4
16

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING -------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5--------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRACE --------------------

4,278
2,057
2 ,2 2 1
1, 174
697
348

3.4C
3.23
3.56
3.71
3.42
3.34

3.33
3.24
3.69
3.84
3.34
3.36

3 .193.033.323 .8 1 3.303.3 1 -

3.81
3.35
3.85
3.87
3.38
3.61

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1
1

83
80
3
2

58
40
18
17

218
201
17
17

61
45
16
16

281
121
160
155
5

120
106
14
12
2

288
226
62
60
2

73 7
56 3
174
56
107
11

89 2
300
592
414
178

11 3
105
8
2
6

2 13
94
119
28
91

995
38
9 57
957
-

1 44
138
6
6
-

74
74
74
-

~

_
-

-

ORDER FILLERS ----------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRACE --------------------

1,685
182
1, 503
1 ,0 1 2
484

3.47
3.30
3.49
3.4C
3.69

3.36
3.30
3.37
3.34
3.74

3.2 8 3.193.293.283.61-

3.73
3.36
3.74
3.39
3.79

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1
-

1
1
-

6
6
4

19
19
16

7
7
7

12
12

10
10
-

43
43
15
28

436
1
4 35
170
2 65

11

18
18
18

70

_
~

-

10

600
81
51 9
506
13

70
70

12

380
42
33 8
308
30

19
8
11

-

63
50
13
13

_
*

PACKERS, SHIPPING -------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WHOLESALE TRACE ----------------

720
358
362
332

3.24
3.27
3.21
3.25

3.24
3.26
3.24
3.24

3 .1 7 - 3.29
3 .0 1 - 3.50
3 .2 1 - 3.27
3 .2 1 - 3.27

_
-

3
3

-

_
-

1
1
-

15
2
13
-

3
3
-

34
34
-

3
2
1
-

47
47
-

12
12
-

37 2
80
29 2
2 80

56
56
-

56
56
-

_
-

_
-

34
34
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

PACKERS, SHIPPING

(WOMEN) ----------

102

2.85

2.98

2 .7 5 - 3.06

2

1

3

6

4

4

5

-

-

2

31

30

-

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RECEIVING CLERKS --------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------RETAIL TRACE --------------------

571
245
326
154
143

3.53
3.48
3.56
3.64
3.56

3.53
3.36
3.57
3.56
3.62

3.313.263.453.493.51-

3.72
3.72
3.72
3.77
3.6 9

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1
1

1

5

10
4
6
4

12
8
4
3

37
14
23
10

60
58
2
2

74
58
16
13

142
21
121
87
34

1 40
52
88
20
63

19
19
19

57
24
33
32
1

1
1
1

4
4

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
~

~

-

-

SHIPPING CLERKS ---------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUF AC TU RI NG ----------------WH OLESALE TRACE ----------------

309
203
106
83

3.48
3.44
3.56
3.65

3.41
3.36
3.55
3.56

3.313.293.493.51-

3.64
3.63
3.71
3.69

_

13
13
-

33
32
1
1

87
87
-

72
8
64
61

36
29
7
6

16
12
4
”

29
14
15
15

_

_

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

_

-

SHIPPING AND RE CEIVING CLERKS ----MA NUFACTURING --------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WH OLESALE TRACE --- ------------RETAIL TRACE --------------------

4 36
183
253
165
80

3.46
3.35
3.54
3.51
3.60

3.47
3.40
3.49
3.46
3.57

3.393.153.443.423.52-

3.57
3.53
3.63
3.55
3.67

17

45
43
2

23 7
77
160
107
49

69
11
58
41
16

9
4
5
5

9
9

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le ,




-

-

_
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

~

~

-

_

-

1
-

5
4

4
4

4
3
1
-

6
6
"

2
2
-

3
3
-

_

3
2
1

16
16

26
26

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

_

-

_

-

8
2
6
3

-

•

_

2
2

84
32
52
52

-

17
17

~

-

-

9
-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

_

-

-

15

Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations—Continued
(A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u rly e a r n in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d on a n a r e a b a s i s
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , J a n u a r y 1 968)
O

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings1
2

O ccu pation 1 and in du stry d ivision

Number
of
woAers

Mean34

Median3

Middle range3

$
$
$
$
$
t
t
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
t
$
$
$
S
2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2. A0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3 . 10 3.20 3.30 3.A0 3.60 3.80 A . 00 A . 20 A.A0 A . 60 A . 80
Under and
2.00 iunder
2.10 2.20 2.30 2. A0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3 . 20 3.30 3.A0 3.60 3.80 A.00 A . 20 A.A0 A.60 A . 80 5.00

6,329
1, 16A
5,165
3,379
1.2A3
308

$
3-89
3.96
3.87
3.83
3.91
A.28

$
3.86
A.0A
3.85
3.8A
3.88
A . 31

$
3.783.793.773.783.78A . 09-

TRUC KO RI VE RS . LIGHT (UNDER
1-1/2 TONS I -----------------------NO N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5---------------

A21
170
59

3.70
3.56
3.29

3.78
3.68
3.A8

TRUCKD RI VE RS . M E DI UM (1-1/2 TO
AND IN CL UD IN G A TONS) -----------MA NU F A C T U R I N G --------------------NO N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5--------------W H O L ES AL E TRACE ---------------RE TA IL T R A D E ------ ---------- ---

2,505
116
2,389
1,766
3A1
50

3.77
3.7A
3.78
3.78
3.78
A. 02

TRUC KD RI VE RS . HE AV Y (OVER A TONS,
TRAILER T Y P E ) ----------------- ---MA N U F A C T U R I N G — ------------------NO N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S 5---------------

1.931
A67
1, A6A
930

TRUCKD RI VE RS , HEAV Y (OVER A TONS,
OTHER TH A N T R A I L E R TYPE) — ----NO NM AN U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5-----------W H OL ES AL E T R AD E ----------------

TR UC KO RI VE RS 7 --------MA N U F A C T U R I N G -----NO NM A N U F A C T U R I N G —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 56
W H O L ES AL E TRADE RE TA IL TR A D E ----

$
A . 01
A . 20
3.9A
3.89
3.97
A . 53

1

2

5

-

1
1
-

2
1
-

5
5
-

20
16
A
A
-

6
6
A
-

10
10
10
-

AA
15
29
28
-

18
8
10
1
—
6

26
23
3
2
~

52
5
A7
A5
~

~

1
1
1

1
1
1

3
3
3

19
3
3

3
3
3

7
7
7

20
5
5

7
7
1

8
"
*

3
3
1

7
7
6

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1

_
-

_
-

2
2

_
-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

~

2A
2A
23
~

3
3
i

11
10
1
”

AA
AA
AA
~

15A
2A
130
120
10

-

-

-

-

-

~

~

~

_
-

_
-

_
“

_
~

8
6
2
2

367
106
261
22A

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

5

_

8

59
1

-

-

“

-

~

_

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

—

—

—

~

-

—
~

—
-

72
71
1
1
-

32
32
-

-

—
-

28
28
—
-

210
20A
6
5
1

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.65- A . 03
3.60- 3.7A
2.96- 3.65

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

3.81
3.82
3.81
3.82
3.77
3.98

3.7A3.A83.7A3.753.733.92-

3.86
3.86
3.86
3.86
3.83
A . 06

_
-

_
-

_
-

«

—

A.02
A . 01
A.02
3.93

A.0A
A . 07
A.03
A . 01

3.833.813.833.80-

A . 17
A . 17
A . 17
A . 06

~

—

1,308
1,019
555
A57

3.99
3.9A
3.90
3.98

3.92
3.90
3.86
3.95

3.853.853.833.92-

A . 00
3.96
3.90
3.99

_

_

TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT) --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------— --------- -—
NO NM AN U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S 5--------------W H O L ES AL E T R A C E ----------- ----RE TA IL TRADE ---------------- -—

1,678
1,087
591
105
336
1A8

3.38
3.25
3.61
3.83
3.A8
3.7A

3.38
3.29
3.A9
3.85
3.A3
3.81

3.223.073.A03.823.373.61-

3.A8
3.A2
3.8A
3.87
3.A9
3.86

-

TRUCKERS, POWER (OTHER TH AN
FORKLIFT) --------------- ---------- -

306

3.A1

3.52

3.35- 3.56

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

—

“

—

-

—

Data lim ited to men w ork ers except where otherw ise indicated.
E x clu d es p rem iu m pay fo r overtim e and for work on weekends, holiday s, and late sh ifts.
F o r definition of te r m s , se e footnote 2, table A - l.
W orkers w ere d istrib u ted a s follow s: 207 at $1. 60 to $1. 70; 86 at $ 1 .7 0 to $ 1 .8 0 ; 110 at $ 1 .8 0 to $ 1 .9 0 ; and 15 at $ 1 .9 0 to $ 2 .
T ran sp o rtation , com m unication, and other public u tilitie s.
Fin an ce, in su ran c e, and r e a l e sta te .
In cludes a ll d r iv e rs , a s defined, re g a r d le ss of siz e and type of truck operated .




2
2
2

—

-

13

188 1523 2779 1C05
A6
198
173 388
1A2 1325 2606
617
131
761 188A
502
90
10
363
6A8
25
50
l

528
26A
26A
132
132

53
53
53

66
28
38
38

3
3
3

30
~

157
~

_
~

_
“

_
-

_
~

923 1321
9
70
91A 1251
A90 1089
108
223
30
1

12
12
12

3
3
~

7
7
7

_
-

_
”

393
53
3A0
200

7A6
231
515
502

335
71
26A

A6
A6

31
31

3
3
”

90
90
90

190
-

_
_

35
7
-

_
-

19
*6
13
—
13

_
—
-

_
-

-

—

—

“

”

-

-

-

-

155
130
28

~

~

~

1

921
921
555
366

A3 188
A J 177
11
2
—
-1
11
2
*

351
225
126
—
110
1A

A26
261
165
—
1A6
19

73
15
58
2
21
35

218
9
209
97
A8
6A

18
18
-

6

A2

210

-

-

-

-

30

—

-




Appendix. Occupational Descriptions
The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field
staff in classifying into appropriate occupations woikers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles
and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This permits
the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on
interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions may
differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In
applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed to exclude working supervisors;
apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.
OFFICE
BILLER, MACHINE

BILLER, MACHINE—Continued

Prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other than
an ordinary or electromatic typewriter. May also keep records as to
billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work incidental to
billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, machine, are clas­
sified by type of machine, as follows:

columns and computes, and usually prints automatically the debit or
credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping.
Works from uniform and standard types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher,
Sundstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register, with or without a type­
writer keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions.

Biller, machine (billing machine). Uses a special billing ma­
chine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott Fisher, Burroughs, etc. , which are
combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and
invoices from customers' purchase orders, internally prepared orders,
shipping memorandums, etc. Usually involves application of pre­
determined discounts and shipping charges, and entry of necessary
extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing ma­
chine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by machine.
The operation usually involves a large number of carbon copies of the
bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.

Class A . Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles, and familiarity with the
structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines proper
records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each
phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets,
and other records by hand.
Class B. Keeps a record of one or more phases or sections of
a set of records usually requiring little knowledge of basic book­
keeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll, cus­
tomers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described
under biller, machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc. May check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine). Uses a bookkeeping
machine (Sundstrand, Elliott Fisher, Remington Rand, e t c ., which
may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare customers' bills
as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the
simultaneous entry of figures on customers' ledger record. The ma­
chine automatically accumulates figures on a number of vertical




Note: Since the last survey in this area, the Bureau has discontinued collecting data for duplicatingmachine operators and elevator operators.

17

18

CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A . Under general direction of a bookkeeper or accountant,
has responsibility for keeping one or more sections of a complete set
of books or records relating to one phase of an establishment's busi­
ness transactions. Work involves posting and balancing subsidiary
ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable;
examining and coding invoices or vouchers with proper accounting
distribution; and requires judgment and experience in making proper
assignations and allocations. May assist in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal entries; and may direct class B accounting clerks.
Class B. Under supervision, performs one or more routine ac­
counting operations such as posting simple journal vouchers or accounts
payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher registers; reconciling
bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by general
ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data. This job does not
require a knowledge of accounting and bookkeeping principles but
is found in offices in which the more routine accounting work is
subdivided on a functional basis among several woikers.
CLERK, FILE
Class A. In an established filing system containing a number
of varied subject matter files, classifies and indexes file material
such as correspondence, reports, technical documents, etc. May
also file this material. May keep records of various types in con­
junction with the files. May lead a small group of lower level file
cleiks.
Class B. Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple
(subject matter) headings or partly classified material by finer sub­
headings. Prepares simple related index and cross-reference aids.
As requested, locates clearly identified material in files and forwards
material. May perform related clerical tadks required to maintain
and service files.
Class C. Performs routine filing of material that has already
been classified or which is easily classified in a simple serial classi­
fication system (e. g . , alphabetical, chronological, or numerical).
As requested, locates readily available material in files and forwards
material; and may fill out withdrawal charge. Performs simple
clerical and manual tasks required to maintain and service files.




CLERK, ORDER
Receives customers' orders for material or merchandise by mail,
phone, or personally. Duties involve any combination of the following:
Quoting prices to customers; making out an order sheet listing the items
to make up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be filled.
May check with credit department to determine credit rating of customer,
acknowledge receipt of orders from customers, follow up orders to see
that they have been filled, keep file of orders received, and check shipping
invoices with original orders.
CLERK, PAYROLL
Computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary
data on the payroll sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers' earnings
based on time or production records; and posting calculated data on payroll
sheet, showing information such as worker's name, working days, time,
rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and assist paymaster in making up and distributing pay envelopes.
May use a calculating machine.

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
Primary duty is to operate a Comptometer to perform mathe­
matical computations. This job is not to be confused with that of statis­
tical or other type of clerk, which may involve frequent use of a Comp­
tometer but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to performance
of other duties.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Class A. Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combina­
tion keypunch machine to transcribe data from various source docu­
ments to keypunch tabulating cards. Performs same tasks as lower
level keypunch operator but, in addition, work requires application

19

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR— Continued
of coding skills and the making of some determinations, for example,
locates on the source document the items to be punched; extracts
information from several documents; and searches for and interprets
information on the document to determine information to be punched.
May train inexperienced operators.
Class B. Under close supervision or following specific procedures
or instructions, transcribes data from source documents to punched
cards.
Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combination
keypunch machine to keypunch tabulating cards. May verify cards.
Working from various standardized source documents, follows specified
sequences which have been coded or prescribed in detail and require
little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be punched.
Problems arising from erroneous items or codes, missing information,
etc. , are referred to supervisor.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
Performs various routine duties such as running errands, operating
minor office machines such as sealers or mailers, opening and distributing
mail, and other minor clerical work.
SECRETARY
Assigned as personal secretary, normally to one individual. Main­
tains a close and highly responsive relationship to the day-to-day work
activities of the supervisor. Works fairly independently receiving a mini­
mum of detailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied clerical and
secretarial duties, usually including most of the following: (a) Receives
telephone calls, personal callers, and incoming mail, answers routine
inquiries, and routes the technical inquiries to the proper persons; (b)
establishes, maintains, and revises the supervisor’s files; (c) maintains the
supervisor’s calendar and makes appointments as instructed; (d) relays
messages from supervisor to subordinates; (e) reviews correspondence, mem­
oranda, and reports prepared by others for the supervisor's signature to
assure procedural and typographic accuracy; and (f) performs stenographic
and typing work.
May also perform other clerical and secretarial tasks of com­
parable nature and difficulty. The work typically requires knowledge of
office routine and understanding of the organization, programs, and pro­
cedures related to the work of the supervisor.




SECRETARY—Continued
Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled "secretary” possess the above
characteristics. Examples of positions which are excluded from the def­
inition are as follows: (a) Positions which do not meet the "personal”
secretary concept described above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in
secretarial type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a
group of professional, technical, or managerial persons; (d) secretary posi­
tions in which the duties are either substantially more routine or substan­
tially more complex and responsible than those characterized in the def­
inition; and (e) assistant type positions which involve more difficult or more
responsible technical, administrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical
duties which are not typical of secretarial work.
NOTE: The term "corporate officer," used in the level definitions
following, refers to those officials who have a significant corporate-wide
policymaking role with regard to major company activities. The title
"vice president," though normally indicative of this role, does notin all
cases identify such positions. Vice presidents whose primary responsibility
is to act personally on individual cases or transactions (e. g. , approve or
deny individual loan or credit actions; administer individual trust accounts;
directly supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be "corporate
officers" for purposes of applying the following level definitions.
Class A
a. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a
company that employs, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5, 000 persons; or
b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman of
the board or president) of a company that employs, in all, over 5,000 but
fewer than 25,000 persons; or
c. Secretary to the head (immediately below the corporate
officer level) of a major segment or subsidiary of a company that employs,
in all, over 25,000 persons.
Class B
a. Secretary to the chairman of the board or president of a
company that employs, in all, fewer than 100 persons; or
b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than chairman of the
board or president) of a company that employs, in all, over 100 but fewer
than 5,000 persons; or

20

SECRETARY—Continued

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL— Continued

c. Secretary to the head (immediately below the officer level)
over either a major corporate - wide functional activity (e .g . , marketing,
research, operations, industrial relations, e tc .) or a major geographic or
organizational segment (e. g. , a regional headquarters; a major division)
of a company that employs, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
employees; or

May maintain files, keep simple records, or perform other relatively rou­
tine clerical tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool. Does not
include transcribing-machine work. (See transcribing-machine operator. )

d. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc.
(or other equivalent level of official) that employs, in all, over 5,000
persons; or

STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
Primary duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical or
specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific re­
search from one or more persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or
similar machine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from written
copy. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.

OR
e.
Secretary to the head of a large and important organizational
Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly greater inde­
segment (e. g . , a middle management supervisor of an organizational seg­
pendence and responsibility than stenographers, general as evidenced
ment often involving as many as several hundred persons) of a company
by the following: Woik requires high degree of stenographic speed and
that employs, in all, over 25,000 persons.
accuracy; and a thorough working knowledge of general business and
Class C
office procedures and of the specific business operations, organization,
policies, procedures, files, workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in per­
a. Secretary to an executive or managerial person whose respon­
forming stenographic duties and responsible clerical tasks such as, main­
sibility is not equivalent to one of the specific level situations in the def­
taining followup files; assembling material for reports, memorandums,
inition for class B, but whose subordinate staff normally numbers at least
letters, e tc .; composing simple letters from general instructions; reading
several dozen employees and is usually divided into organizational segments
and routing incoming mail; and answering routine questions, etc. Does
which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In some companies, this level
not include transcribing-machine work.
includes a wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or
two; or
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
Class A. Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone
b. Secretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc.
switchboard handling incoming, outgoing, intraplant or office calls. Per­
(or other equivalent level of official) that employs, in all, fewer than
forms full telephone information service or handles complex calls, such as
5,000 persons.
conference, collect, overseas, or similar calls, either in addition to doing
Class D
routine woik as described for switchboard operator, class B, or as a full­
time assignment. ("Full" telephone information service occurs when the
a. Secretary to the supervisor or head of a small organizational
establishment has varied functions that are not readily understandable for
unit (e .g . , fewer than about 25 or 30 persons); or
telephone information purposes, e.g., because of overlapping or interrelated
functions, and consequently present frequent problems as to which exten­
b. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional
sions are appropriate for calls.)
employee, administrative officer, or assistant, skilled technician or expert.
Class B. Operates a singler or multiple-position telephone
(NOTE: Many companies assign stenographers, rather than secretaries as
switchboard handling incoming, outgoing, intraplant or office calls. May
described above, to this level of supervisory or nonsupervisory worker.)
handle routine long distance calls and record tolls. May perform limited
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
telephone information service. (’’Limited" telephone information service
occurs if the functions of the establishment serviced are readily understand­
Primary duty is to take dictation involving a normal routine vo­
able for telephone information purposes, or if the requests are routine,
cabulary from one or more persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or
e. g-, giving extension numbers when specific names are furnished, or if
similar machine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from writ­
complex calls are referred to another operator.)
ten copy.




21

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
In addition to performing duties of operator on a single-position
or monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and may also type or
perform routine clerical work as part of regular duties. This typing or
clerical work may take the major part of this worker* s time while at
switchboard.

TABULATING-MA CHINE OPERATOR—Continued
some filing work. The work typically involves portions of a woik
unit, for example, individual sorting or collating runs or repetitive
operations.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Class A. Operates a variety O f tabulating or electrical account­
ing machines, typically including such machines as the tabulator,
calculator, interpreter, collator, and others. Performs complete
reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs difficult
wiring as required. The complete reporting and tabulating assign­
ments typically involve a variety of long and complex reports which
often are of irregular or nonrecurring type requiring some planning and
sequencing of steps to be taken. As a more experienced operator,
is typically involved in training new operators in machine operations,
or partially trained operators in wiring from diagrams and operating
sequences of long and complex reports. Does not include working
supervisors performing tabulating-machine operations and day-to-day
supervision of the work and production of a group of tabulatingmachine operators.
Class B. Operates more difficult tabulating or electrical account­
ing machines such as the tabulator and calculator, in addition to the
sorter, reproducer, and collator. This work is performed under specific
instructions and may include the performance of some wiring from
diagrams. The work typically involves, for example, tabulations
involving a repetitive accounting exercise, a complete but small
tabulating study, or parts of a longer and more complex report. Such
reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where the pro­
cedures are well established. May also include the training of new
employees in the basic operation of the machine.
Class C. Operates simple tabulating or electrical accounting
machines such as the sorter, reproducing punch, collator, etc. , with
specific instructions. May include simple wiring from diagrams and




Primary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal routine
vocabulary from transcribing-machine records. May also type from written
copy and do simple clerical woik. Workers transcribing dictation involving
a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal briefs or reports
on scientific research are not included. A worker who takes dictation in
shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine is classified as a stenog­
rapher, general.

TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies of various material or to make
out bills after calculations have been made by another person. May in­
clude typing of stencils, mats, or similar materials for use in duplicating
processes. May do clerical work involving little special training, such
as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and dis­
tributing incoming mail.
Class A . Performs one or more of the following: Typing ma­
terial in final form when it involves combining material from several
sources or responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication, punctu­
ation, etc. , of technical or unusual words or foreign language ma­
terial; and planning layout and typing of complicated statistical tables
to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing. May type routine
form letters varying details to suit circumstances.
Class B. Performs one or more of the following: Copy typing
from rough or clear drafts; routine typing of forms, insurance policies,
e tc .; and setting up simple standard tabulations, or copying more
complex tables already setup and spaced properly.

22

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
DRAFTSMAN—Continue d

DRAFTSMAN
Class A. Plans the graphic presentation of complex items having
distinctive design features that differ significantly from established
drafting precedents. Works in close support with the design originator,
and may recommend minor design changes. Analyzes the effect of
each change on the details of form, function, and positional relation­
ships of components and parts. Works with a minimum of supervisory
assistance. Completed work is reviewed by design originator for con­
sistency with prior engineering determinations. May either prepare
drawings, or direct their preparation by lower level draftsmen.
Class B. Performs nonroutine and complex drafting assignments
that require the application of most of the standardized drawing tech­
niques regularly used. Duties typically involve such work as: Prepares
working drawings of subassemblies with irregular shapes, multiple
functions, and precise positional relationships between components;
prepares architectural drawings for construction of a building including
detail drawings of foundations, wall sections, floor plans, and roof.
Uses accepted formulas and manuals in making necessary computations
to determine quantities of materials to be used, load capacities,
strengths, stresses, etc. Receives initial instructions, requirements,
and advice from supervisor. Completed work is checked for technical
adequacy.
Class C. Prepares detail drawings of single units or parts for
engineering, construction, manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types
of drawings prepared include isometric projections (depicting three
dimensions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning
of components and convey needed information. Consolidates details
from a number of sources and adjusts or transposes scale as required.

Suggested methods of approach, applicable precedents, and advice on
source materials are given with initial assignments. Instructions are
less complete when assignments recur. Woik may be spot-checked
during progress.
DRAFTSMAN-TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing
cloth or paper over drawings and tracing with pen or pencil. (Does not
include tracing limited to plans primarily consisting of straight lines and
a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
and/or
Prepares simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized items.
is closely supervised during progress.

Woik

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general medi­
cal direction to ill or injured employees or other persons who become ill or
suffer an accident on the premises of a factory or other establishment.
Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid to the ill
or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of employees' injuries; keeping
records of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation
or other purposes; assisting in physical examinations and health evaluations
of applicants and employees; and planning and carrying out programs
involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant en­
vironment, or other activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety
of all personnel.

M A I N T E N A N C E AND POWERPLANT
CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain
in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs,
counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim made
of wood in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Plan­
ning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal
instructions using a variety of carpenter's handtools, portable power tools,

and standard measuring instruments; making standard shop computations
relating to dimensions of work; and selecting materials necessary for the
work. In general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal ap­
prenticeship or equivalent training and experience.




23

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE

HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES— Continued

Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the in­
stallation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generation, dis­
tribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment. Work
involves most of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of
electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, con­
trollers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems, or other
transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or
other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical
system or equipment; working standard computations relating to load
requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of
electrician’s handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In general,
the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

a worker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning working area, ma­
chine, and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding materials or tools;
and performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind
of work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding ma­
terials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted
to perform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are
also performed by workers on a full-time basis.

ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of
stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the
establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrigeration, or
air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment
such as steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors, turbines,
ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and boiler-fed
water pumps; making equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation
of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May also supervise
these operations. Head or chief engineers in establishments employing
more than one engineer are excluded.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which
employed with heat, power, or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a mechanical stoker, or gas or oil burner; and checks water
and safety valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom
equipment.
HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES
Assists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades,
by performing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping




MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or more types of machine
tools, such as jig borers, cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or milling machines, in the construction of machine-shop tools, gages,
jigs, fixtures, or dies. Work involves most of the following: Planning
and performing difficult machining operations; processing items requiring
complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision measuring instruments; selecting feeds, speeds, tooling, and oper­
ation sequence; and making necessary adjustments during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions. May be required to recognize
when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to select proper coolants
and cutting and lubricating oils. For cross-industry wage study purposes,
machine-tool operators, toolroom, in tool and die jobbing shops are ex­
cluded from this classification.
MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of
metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work
involves most of the following: Interpreting written instructions and speci­
fications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist’s
handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating
standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making
standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds,
and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties of the
con* non metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and equipment re­
quired for his work; and fitting and assembling parts into mechanical
equipment. In general, the machinist’s work normally requires a rounded
training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal ap­
prenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

24

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)

OILER

Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an es­
tablishment. Work involves most of the following: Examining automotive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling equipment and
performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches,
gages, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassembling and installing the various assemblies in the vehicle
and making necessary adjustments; and alining wheels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the auto­
motive mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Lubricates, with oil or grease, the moving parts or wearing sur­
faces of mechanical equipment of an establishment.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Examining machines and mechanical
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling
machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of handtools
in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items
obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a
machine shop or sending of the machine to a machine shop for major
repairs; preparing written specifications for major repairs or for the pro­
duction of parts ordered from machine shop; reassembling machines; and
making all necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the work of
a maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience. Excluded from this classification are workers whose primary
duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dismantles and
installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout
are required. Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying
out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a
variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations re­
lating to stresses, strength of materials, and centers of gravity; alining
and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment, and
parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order power
transmission equipment such as drives and speed reducers. In general,
the millwrights work normally requires a rounded training and experience
in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent train­
ing and experience.




PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an es­
tablishment. Work involves the following: Knowledge of surface peculi­
arities and types of paint required for different applications; preparing
surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler
in nail holes and interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush.
May mix colors, oils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain
proper color or consistency. In general, the work of the maintenance
painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves most of the following:
Laying out of work and measuring to locate position of pipe from drawings
or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct
lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting
machine; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven
or power-driven machines; assembling pipe with couplings and fastening
pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to pressures,
flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard tests to determine
whether finished pipes meet specifications. In general, the work of the
maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience. Workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building
sanitation or heating systems are excluded.
PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
Keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installation of vents
and traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and fixtures;
and opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber's snake. In general,
the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded training and ex­
perience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

25

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE

TOOL AND DIE MAKER—Continued

Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-metal
equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans, shelves,
lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an establish­
ment. Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying out all
types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints, models, or other
specifications; setting up and operating all available types of sheet-metal­
working machines; using a variety of handtools in cutting, bending, form­
ing, shaping, fitting, and assembling; and installing sheet-metal articles
as required. In general, the work of the maintenance sheet-metal worker
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
TOOL AND DIE MAKER

volves most of the following; Planning and laying out of work from
models, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifications;
using a variety of tool and die maker's handtools and precision measuring
instruments; understanding of the working properties of common metals
and alloys; setting up and operating of machine tools and related equip­
ment; making necessary shop computations relating to dimensions of work,
speeds, feeds, and tooling of machines; heattreating of metal parts during
fabrication as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve required qual­
ities; working to close tolerances; fitting and assembling of parts to pre­
scribed tolerances and allowances; and selecting appropriate materials,
tools, and processes. In general, the tool and die maker's work requires
a rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

(Die maker; jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker; gage maker)
Constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gages, jigs, fixtures
or dies for forgings, punching, and other metal-forming work. Work in-

For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die makers in
tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classification.

C U S T O D I A L AND M A T E R I A L MOVEMENT
GUARD AND WATCHMAN

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER— Continued

Guard. Performs routine police duties, either at fixed post or
on tour, maintaining order, using arms or force where necessary. Includes
gatemen who are stationed at gate and check on identity of employees
and other persons entering.

trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing
metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor maintenance
services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers who
specialize in window washing are excluded.

Watchman. Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting
property against fire, theft, and illegal entry.

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman
or stock helper, warehouseman or warehouse helper)

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
(Sweeper; charwoman; janitress)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas
and washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commerical
or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following:
Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips,




A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store,
or other establishment whose duties involve one or more of the following:
Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or from
freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage location; and trans­
porting materials or merchandise by handtruck, car, or wheelbarrow.
Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are excluded.

26

ORDER, FILLER

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK— Continued
For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:

(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips, customers1
orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to filling orders and in­
dicating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requi­
sition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform
other related duties.
PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them
in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being dependent
upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the type of con­
tainer employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the placing of
items in shipping containers and may involve one or more of the following:
Knowledge of various items of stock in order to verify content; selection
of appropriate type and size of container; inserting enclosures in container;
using excelsior or other material to prevent breakage or damage; closing
and sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying data on
container. Packers who also make wooden boxes or crates are excluded.
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is responsible
for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials. Shipping work
involves; A knowledge of shipping procedures, practices, routes, available
means of transportation, and rates; and preparing records of the goods
shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges,
and keeping a file of shipping records. May direct or assist in preparing
the merchandise for shipment. Receiving work involves: Verifying or
directing others in verifying the correctness of shipments against bills of
lading, invoices, or other records; checking for shortages and rejecting
damaged goods; routing merchandise or materials to proper departments;
and maintaining necessary records and files.




Receiving clerk
Shipping cleric
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCKD RIVER
Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport ma­
terials, merchandise, equipment, or men between various types of es­
tablishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses,
wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail establishments and
customers' houses or places of business. May also load or unload truck
with or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep truck
in good working order. Driver-salesmen and over-the-road drivers are
excluded.
For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and
type of equipment, as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on the
basis of trailer capacity.)
Truckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under 1V2 tons)
Truckdriver, medium ( 1V2 to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)
TRUCKER, POWER
Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered
truck or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a
warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of truck,
as follows:
Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)




A v a i l a b l e O n R e q u e s t -----The eighth an n u al r e p o r t on s a l a r i e s fo r a c c o u n ta n t s , a u d i t o r s ,
a t t o r n e y s , c h e m i s t s , e n g i n e e r s , e n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s , d r a f t s m e n ,
t r a c e r s , job a n a l y s t s , d i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l , m a n a g e r s of o ffic e
s e r v i c e s , b u y e r s , and c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s .
O r d e r a s B L S B u lle t in 1585, N a tio n a l S u r v e y o f P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d ­
m i n i s t r a t i v e , T e c h n ic a l, and C l e r i c a l P a y , Ju n e 1967^ F if t y c e n ts
a co p y .




Area Wage Surveys
A l i s t o f the l a t e s t a v a i l a b l e b u l l e t i n s i s p r e s e n t e d b e lo w . A d i r e c t o r y in d i c a ti n g d a t e s of e a r l i e r s t u d i e s , and the p r i c e s of the b u lle tin s i s
a v a i l a b l e on r e q u e s t . B u l l e t i n s m a y be p u r c h a s e d f r o m the S u p e r i n t e n d e n t of D o c u m e n t s , U .S . G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W a sh in gto n , D . C . , 20402,
o r f r o m any of the B L S r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s shown on the i n s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .
A rea

B u l l e t in n u m b e r
and p r i c e

A k r o n , O h i o , J u l y 1 9 6 7 1-------------------------------------------A l b a n y — c h e n e c t a d y ^ T r o y , N . Y . , A p r . 196 7 -------------S
A l b u q u e r q u e , N . M e x . , A p r . 1 9 6 7 ______________________
A l l e n t o w n —B e t h l e h e m —E a s t o n , P a . — J . ,
N.
F e b . 19 67 __________________________________________________
A t l a n t a , G a . , M a y 196 7 ___________________________________
B a l t i m o r e , M d . , O c t . 1 9 6 7 _______________________________
B e a u m o n t —P o r t A r t h u r — r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1967 _____
O
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , A p r . 1 9 6 7 1 __________________________
B o i s e C i t y , I d a h o , J u l y 1 9 6 7 --------------------------------------B o s t o n , M a s s . , S e p t . 1 9 6 7 1----------------------------------------

1530-86,
1530-62,
1530-60,

25 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
20 c e n t s

1530-53,
1 5 3 0 - 7 1,
1575-18,
1530-74,
1530-63,
1575-3,
1575-13,

25 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
30 c e n t s

B u f f a l o , N . Y . , D e c . 1 9 6 6 1_________________________________
B u r l i n g t o n , V t . , M a r . 1 9 6 7 1 -------------------------------------C a n t o n , O h i o , A p r . 1 967 _________________________________
C h a r l e s t o n , W. V a . , A p r . 1 9 6 7 __________________________
C h a r l o t t e , N . C . , A p r . 1 9 6 7 _______________________________
C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n . - G a . , A u g . 1 9 6 7 ---------------------------C h i c a g o , 111., A p r . 1 9 6 7 1 ________________________________
I
C i n c i n n a t i , O h i o —K y . — n d . , M a r . 1967 ----------- -----------C l e v e l a n d , O h i o , S e p t . 1 9 6 7 --------------------------------------C o l u m b u s , O h i o , O c t . 1 9 6 7 _______________________________
D a l l a s , T e x . , N o v . 1 9 6 7 __________________________________

1530-38,
1530-52,
1530-58,
1530-61,
1530-64,
15 7 5 -7 ,
1530-73,
1530-56,
1575-14,
1575-23,
1575-20,

30
25
20
20
20
25
30
25
25
25
25

D a v e n p o r t — o c k I s l a n d —M o l i n e , I o w a —
R
111.,
O c t . 1 9 6 7 ___________________________________________________
D a y t o n , O h i o , J a n . 196 7 __________________________________
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1 9 6 7 1_______________________________
D e s M o i n e s , I o w a , F e b . 1 9 6 7 -----------------------------------—
D e t r o i t , M i c h . , J a n . 1 9 6 7 1 _______________________________
F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , N o v . 1 967__------------------------------------G r e e n B a y , W i s ., J u l y 1 9 6 7 ______________________________
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M a y 196 7 ---------------------------------------H o u s t o n , T e x . , J u n e 1 9 6 7 ------------------------------------------I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d . , D e c . 1 9 6 7 1___________________________

1 5 7 5 - 1 2,
1530-45,
1575-38,
1530-44,
1530-48,
15 7 5 -2 2 ,
1575-5,
1530-66,
1530-85,
1575-36,

J a c k s o n , M i s s . , F e b . 1 9 6 7 _______________________________
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , J a n . 1 9 6 8 — .--------------------------------K a n s a s C i t y , M o . — a n s . , N o v . 1 9 6 7 1------------------------K
L a w r e n c e — a v e r h i l l , M a s s . —N . H . , J u n e 1967 -----------H
L i t t l e R o c k — o r t h L i t t l e R o c k , A r k . , J u l y 1 9 6 7 --------N
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h a n d A n a h e i m — a n t a A n a S
G a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , M a r . 196 7 1 -------------------------I
L o u i s v i l l e , K y . — n d . , F e b . 1 9 6 7 1 ------------------------------L u b b o c k , T e x . , J u n e 1 9 6 7 -----------------------------------------M a n c h e s t e r , N . H . , J u l y 1 9 6 7 -------------------------------------M e m p h i s , T e n n . - A r k . , J a n . 1 9 6 8 1-----------------------------M i a m i , F l a . , D e c . 1 9 6 7 1_________________________________
M i d l a n d a n d O d e s s a , T e x . , J u n e 1967 ------------------------

Bu lletin num ber
and p r i c e

M i l w a u k e e , W i s . , A p r . 1967 1_________ .----------------------M in n eap olis—
St. P a u l , M in n ., J a n . 1967 1______________
M u s k e g o n — u s k e g o n H e i g h t s , M i c h ., M a y 1967 _________
M
N e w a r k and J e r s e y C i t y , N . J . , F e b . 1967 ______________
New H a v e n , C o n n ., J a n . 1 968 1__________________________
New O r l e a n s , L a . , F e b . 1967 1 _________________________
New Y o r k , N .Y ., A p r . 1967 1____________________________
N o r f o l k — o r t s m o u t h and N e w p o r t N e w s —
P
H a m p to n , V a . , Ju n e 1967 1_____________________________
O k l a h o m a C i t y , O k l a . , J u l y 19 6 7 _______________________

1530-76,
1530-42,
1530-72,
1530-55,
1575-34,
1530-51,
1530-83,

30 c e n t s
30c e n ts
20 c e n t s
25c e n ts
25c e n t s
30 c e n t s
40 c e n ts

1530-82,
157 5-4,

25 c e n ts
20 c e n ts

cents
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cents
cents
cen ts

O m a h a , N e b r . - I o w a , O ct. 1 9 6 7 1________________________
P a t e r son — l i ft o n — a s s a i c , N. J . , M ay 1967 ____________
C
P
P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . — . J . , Nov. 1966 1____________________
N
P h o e n i x , A r i z . , M a r . 1 9 6 7 ______________________________
P i t t s b u r g h , P a . , J a n . 1967 1 _____________________________
P o r t l a n d , M a in e , Nov. 1967 1------------------------------------P o r t l a n d , O r e g . — a s h . , M a y 1967 _____________________
W
P ro v id e n c e — aw tucket— arw ick, R .I.— a s s . ,
P
W
M
M ay 1967 1 ______________________________________________
R a l e i g h , N . C . , A u g . 1967 1---------------------------------------R i c h m o n d , V a . , Nov. 1967 1_____________________________
R o c k f o r d , 111., M ay 1967 ________________________________

1575-21,
1530-67,
1530-35,
1530-59,
1530-46,
1575-16,
1530-79,

25 c e n ts
25c e n ts
35c e n t s
20 c e n ts
30 c e n t s
25c e n t s
25c e n ts

1530-70,
1575-6,
1575-27,
1530-68,

30c e n ts
25c e n ts
25 c e n ts
20c e n t s

25
25
25
25
30
25
20
25
25
30

cents
cen ts
cen ts
cents
cents
cents
cen ts
cen ts
cents
cents

St. L o u i s , M o.—
111., Oct. 1966 1_________________________
S a l t L a k e C i t y , U tah, D e c . 1967 _______________________
S a n An ton io, T e x . , J u n e 1967 1 _________________________
San B ern a rd in o — iv e r side— ntario , C a lif.,
R
O
A u g . 1967 1______________________________________________
S a n D i e g o , C a l i f . , Nov. 1967____________________________
S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , J a n . 1968 _____________
O
S a n J o s e , C a l i f . , Se p t . 1 967 1 -----------------------------------S a v a n n a h , G a . , M a y 1967 _______________________________
S c r a n t o n , P a . , J u l y 1967 1----------------------------------------S e a t t l e — v e r e t t , W a s h ., N ov. 1 967 1____________________
E

1530-27,
1575-35,
1530-84,

30 c e n ts
20c e n ts
25c e n ts

1575-10,
1575-19*
157 5 - 3 7 ,
1575-15,
1530-69,
1575-9,
1575-29,

30c e n ts
20c e n ts
25c e n ts
25c e n ts
20c e n t s
25c e n ts
25 c e n ts

1530-43,
1575-33,
1575-30,
1530-77,
157 5 - 2 ,

20
20
25
20
25

cents
cents
cents
cen ts
cents

1530-65,
1530-49,
1530-75,
1575-1,
1575-32,
1575-28,
1530-78,

30
30
20
20
25
25
20

cents
cen ts
cen ts
cents
cents
cen ts
cen ts

S i o u x F a l l s , S . D a k . , Oct. 1 967 1________________________
South B e n d , In d., M a r . 1967 ____________________________
S p o k a n e , W a s h ., Ju n e 1967 1 ____________________________
Tam pa—
St. P e t e r s b u r g , F l a . , A u g . 1967 ______________
M
T o l e d o , Ohio— i c h ., F e b . 1967 1________________________
T r e n t o n , N . J . , N ov. 1967_______________________________
W a sh in gton , D . C . — d.— a . , S e p t . 1 967---------------------M
V
W a te r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r . 1967 ----------------------------------W a t e r l o o , Iow a, Nov. 1967_______________________________
W ic h ita, K a n s . , D e c . 1967----------------------------------------W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , Ju n e 1 9 6 7 __________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1967 --------------- -------------------------------Y ou n g stow n — a r r e n , O h io, N ov. 1967 1________________
W

1575-17,
1530-57,
1530-80,
157 5 - 8 ,
1530-50,
1575-24,
1575-1 1,
1530-54,
1575-26,
1575-31,
1530-81,
153 0 - 4 7 ,
1575-25,

25c e n ts
20c e n t s
25c e n ts
25c e n ts
30c e n t s
20c e n ts
25c e n ts
20 c e n t s
20c e n ts
20c e n ts
25c e n t s
25c e n t s
25c e n ts

1 D a ta on esta b lish m e n t p r a c tic e s and su pp lem en tary w age provisions are also presented.




A rea


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102