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AREA WAGE SURVEY
Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minnesota
Metropolitan Area, January 1975

Wisconsin,

Bulletin 1850-20




document collection

APR 9 1976
Dayton & Montgomery

C
o.

public Library

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
_ _ Bureau of Labor Statistics




ANNOUNCEMENT
A re a Wage Survey bu lletin s w ill be is s u e d on ce e v e r y 3 y e a r s .
T h e s e bulletins w ill contain in form a tion on esta b lish m e n t p r a c t ic e s and
su p plem en tary b en efits as w e ll as e a rn in g s . In the in te r im y e a r s ,
supplem ents containing data on ea rn in g s only w ill b e is s u e d at no
add ition a l cost to h o ld e rs o f the A r e a W age b u lle tin . If you w ish to
r e c e iv e th ese su pplem ents, p le a s e co m p le te the cou pon s lis te d on
page 47 o f this bulletin and m a il to any o f the BLS re g io n a l a d d r e s s e s
lis te d on the back c o v e r . No fu rth er action on y o u r p a rt is n e c e s s a r y .
E a ch y e a r , you w ill r e c e iv e the supplem ent when it is pu blished .

Preface
T h is b ulletin p rov id es resu lts of a January 1975 s u rv e y o f o ccu p a tio n a l e a rn in gs and
sup plem entary w age benefits in the M in n ea p olis—
St. P a u l, M in nesota— is c o n s in , Standard
W
M etrop olita n S ta tistica l A rea (Anoka, C a r v e r , C h is a g o , D akota, H ennepin, R a m s e y , S co tt,
W ashington, and W right C ou nties, M inn.; and St. C r o ix C ou nty, WLs.). The s u rv e y w as m ade
as p a rt of the B ureau of L a b or S ta tis tic s ' annual a re a w age su rv e y p r o g r a m . The p r o g r a m
is d esign ed to y ie ld data fo r individual m etrop olita n a r e a s , as w e ll as n ation a l and re g io n a l
e stim a tes fo r all Standard M etropolitan S ta tis tica l A re a s in the United S ta tes, exclu din g
A la sk a and H aw aii.
A m a jo r con sid era tion in the a rea w age su rv e y p r o g r a m is the n e e d to d e s c r ib e the
le v e l and m ovem en t of w ages in a v a rie ty of la b o r m a r k e ts , th rou gh the a n a ly sis o f (1) the
le v e l and d istrib u tion o f w ages by occu p a tion , and (2) the m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s by o ccu p a tio n a l
ca te g o r y and s k ill le v e l. The p r o g ra m d ev e lo p s in fo rm a tio n that m ay be u sed fo r m any
p u r p o s e s , in cluding wage and sa la ry a d m in istra tion , c o lle c t iv e b a rg a in in g , and a s s is ta n ce in
determ in in g plant loca tion . Survey resu lts a ls o a re u sed by the U.S. D epartm en t o f L a b o r to
m ake w age d eterm in a tion s under the S e rv ice C on tra ct A ct o f 1965,
C u rre n tly , 82 areas are in clu d ed in the p r o g r a m . (See lis t o f a re a s on in sid e b a ck
c o v e r .) In ea ch a rea , occu pa tion a l earn ings data a re c o lle c t e d annually. In form a tion on
esta b lish m en t p r a c tic e s and supplem entary w age b e n e fits is obtain ed e v e r y th ir d y e a r .
R esu lts of the next tw o annual s u rv e y s , p rov id in g e a rn in gs data o n ly , w ill be is s u e d as fr e e
supplem ents to th is bulletin. The supplem ents m a y be obtain ed f r o m the B u re a u 's re g io n a l
o f fic e s .
(See b a ck c o v e r fo r a d d r e s s e s .)
E ach y e a r a fter all individual a rea w age s u rv e y s have b een co m p le te d , tw o su m m a ry
bu lletin s are is s u e d . The fir s t b rin gs tog eth er data f o r ea ch m e tro p o lita n a re a su rv e y e d .
The seco n d su m m a ry bulletin p resen ts n ational and r e g io n a l e s tim a te s , p r o je c t e d fr o m
in dividual m etrop olita n area data.
The M in n eap olis—
St, Paul su rv ey was con d u cte d by the B u re a u 's re g io n a l o ffic e in
C h ica g o , under the gen era l d irection o f L ois L . O r r , A s s o c ia te A ssista n t R e g io n a l D ir e c t o r
fo r O p era tion s. The su rvey cou ld not have been a c c o m p lis h e d without the co o p e ra tio n o f the
m any fir m s w h ose w age and sa la ry data p r o v id e d the b a s is fo r the s ta tis tica l in fo rm a tio n in
this b u lletin . The B ureau w ish es to e x p re s s s in c e r e a p p re cia tio n fo r the co o p e ra tio n r e c e iv e d .

Note:
R e p o rts on occu pational earnings a n d s u p p lem en ta ry w age p r o v is io n s in the
M in n eap olis—
St. P au l area are a lso available f o r the e le c t r ic a l a pp liance r e p a ir (S eptem b er
1972) , m a ch in ery (F eb ru a ry 1973), n ursin g h om es (M ay 1973), h o te ls and m o te ls (June 1973),
auto d e a le r r e p a ir shops (June 1973), departm ent s to r e s (S eptem b er 1973), banking (O cto b e r
1973) , laundry (January 1975), m oving and stora g e (January 1975), and m e ta lw o rk in g (January
1975) in d u strie s. A ls o available a re listin g s o f union w age ra te s fo r b uildin g t r a d e s , prin tin g
tr a d e s , lo c a l-t r a n s it operating e m p lo y e e s , lo c a l t r u c k d r iv e r s and h e lp e r s , and g r o c e r y s to re
e m p lo y e e s .
F r e e co p ie s of th ese are a vailable fr o m the B u re a u 's re g io n a l o f fic e s .
(See
b ack c o v e r fo r a d d r e s s e s .)

AR EA W AGE SURVEY

Bulletin 1850-20

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R , John T . Dunlop, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S , Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

June 1975

Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minnesota—Wisconsin, Metropolitan Area, January 1975
CONTENTS

Page

Introduction--------------------

2

Tables:
A.

B.

Earnings:
A - 1.
Weekly earnings of office workers___------------------------------ . ----------- . ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ A -l a . Weekly earnings of office workers—
large establishments------------------------------------------------------------------------------ . ---------- Weekly earnings of professional and technical w orkers_____________________________________________________________ __
A - 2.
A - 2a. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers—
large establishm ents...----------- . . ------------------------- ---- ------- __
A - 3.
Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by se x ___________________________ _____ ---A -3 a . Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex—
large establishments——________
A -4 .
Hourly earnings of maintenance and power pi ant w o rk ers.___________________________________________ _______________ ---A - 4 a. Hourly earnings of maintenance and power pi ant workers—
large establishments------------------------------------------------------ ---A - 5.
Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement w orkers____________________ ____________________ ________ _____ ----A - 5a. Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement workers—
large establishments____________________ __ ___ ___ __
A - 6.
Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement workers, by sex — __
A -6 a . Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement workers, j
by sex—
large establishments_________________________ — _____ ________________________________________________________ ___
A - 7.
Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected occupational groups, adjusted for
employment shifts_________________,________________________ „__________________________________________________________ ___

3
7
10
11

13
15
17
18
19
21
22

24
25

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
B -1 .
Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and cle r k s________________________________________ ________ —___
B -2 .
Late shift pay provisions for full-tim e manufacturing plant w o r k e r s ™ __________—____ —-------------------- — ___________
B -3 .
Scheduled weekly hours and days of full-tim e first-shift workers______________ ___ ______________ _________ ______ ___ —B -4 .
Annual paid holidays for full-time w orkers___________ _________ _______________________ ________ ____ ____ ____ _______ _____
B -4 a . Identification of major paid holidays for full-tim e w orkers__ _______________ ___ ____ —____________________ _______ ____ B -5 .
Paid vacation provisions for full-tim e workers__ ______ ___ ___________________________ _— ------------------------------- ------ ------B -6 .
Health, insurance, and pension plans for full-tim e workers_________________________________________ __________________

26
27
28
29
30
31
34

Appendix A. Scope and method of survey---------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------——_____ — ________________ _____—______

37




For sale by the Superintendent o f D ocum ents, U. S. Government Printing O ffice , Washington, D. C. 20402, GPO Bookstores, or
BLS Regional O ffices listed on back cover. Price $ 1 .0 5 . Make checks payable to Superintendent o f Documents.

Introduction
This area is 1 of 82 in which the U.S. Department of Labor's
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings and
related benefits on an areawide basis. In this area, data were obtained
by personal visits of Bureau field economists to representative estab­
lishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transpor­
tation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major industry
groups excluded from these studies are government operations and the
construction and extractive industries. Establishments having fewer than
a prescribed number of workers are omitted because of insufficient
employment in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are provided
for each of the broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.
A -series tables
Tables A - l through A -6 provide estimates of straight-time
hourly or weekly earnings for workers in occupations common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupations
were selected from the following categories: (a) Office clerical, (b) pro­
fessional and technical, (c) maintenance and powerplant, and (d) custodial
and material movement. In the 31 largest survey areas, tables A - l a
through A -6 a provide similar data for establishments employing 500
workers or more.
Following the occupational wage tables is table A - 7 which
provides percent changes in average earnings of office clerical work­
ers, electronic data processing workers, industrial nurses, skilled




maintenance workers, and unskilled plant workers. This measure of
wage trends eliminates changes in average earnings caused by employ­
ment shifts among establishments as well as turnover of establishments
included in survey samples. Where possible, data are presented for all
industries, manufacturing, and nonmanufacturing. Appendix A discusses
this wage trend measure.
B -se r ie s tables
The B -se rie s tables present information on minimum entrance
salaries for office workers; late-sh ift pay provisions and practices for
plant workers in manufacturing; and data separately for plant and office
workers on scheduled weekly hours and days of first-sh ift workers; paid
holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans.
Appendixes
This bulletin has two appendixes. Appendix A describes the
methods and concepts used in the area wage survey program. It provides
information on the scope of the area survey and information on the area's
industrial composition in manufacturing. It also provides information
on labor-management agreement coverage. Appendix B provides job
descriptions used by Bureau field economists to classify workers in
occupations for which straight-tim e earnings information is presented.

N um ber o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earn in gs <
Number

S

S

S

$

S

workers

weekly
hours1
(standard)

$

S

$

S

S

$

$

S

S

S

S

S

S

$

S

S

80

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

80

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv isio n

90

100

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180 __190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

320

3
3

16
10

14
14

-

33
21

*

—

18
7

14
3

34

-

12
12

77

-

23
20

18
15

1
-

32
30

8
6

31
21

21
21

1
—

—

-

3
3

1
1

53
16
37

39
39

19
5
14

46
25
21

8
6
2

1

6

1

1

6

1

-

-

IS
9
6
6
<
*

7
7
_
_

•
•
_

-

.

•
•

75
Mean i

Median *

Middle ranged

and
under

ALL WORKERS
BILLERS* MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) ------------------------ ---------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------

221
70

$
$
$
$
40 * 0 1 7 4 .5 0 2 0 0 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 * 2 0 2 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 3 3 .0 0 1 2 6 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0

BILLERS* MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) ---------------------- -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

136
114

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 2 8 .0 0
1 2 8 .0 0

1 2 6 .5 0 1 0 9 .5 0 * 1 5 0 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0 1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0

-

-

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS A ------------------------------— — —
MANUFACTURING ----------------------—
NONMANUFACTURING ----------— ------

177
52
125

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 4 0 .5 0 1 3 2 .5 0 1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 5 2 .0 0
1 4 4 .5 0 1 5 2 .5 0 1 2 3 .0 0 - 1 5 5 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0 1 3 2 .5 0 1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0

-

-

-

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS B ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------WHOLESALE TRAOE ------------------

283
240
100

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 1 8 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 8 .5 0 1 0 9 .5 0

1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 2 1 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0 - 1 2 6 .5 0

-

-

4
2
-

93
75
55

98
95
1

46
36
26

11
7
-

19
19
12

6
6
6

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS A —
MANUFACTURING----- — -------------- -NONMANUFACTURING ------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S — — -------WHOLESALE TRAOE -----------------RETAIL TRAOE — — -------------FIN AN CE-------------— — — --------SERVICES ---------------------------------

2 *49 1
637
1 *85 4
847
473
115
311
108

3 9 .5 1 6 6 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 5 6 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 6 9 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 9 7 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 4 8 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 3 6 .0 0
3 8 .0 1 4 8 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 4 7 .0 0

1 5 7 .5 0
1 5 0 .5 0
1 6 5 .SO
2 0 9 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 2 9 .0 0
1 4 7 .5 0
1 4 1 .5 0

1 3 5 .5 0 - 1 9 5 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0 - 1 6 3 .0 0
1 3 4 .5 0 - 2 0 9 .5 0
1 8 7 .0 0 - 2 2 0 .0 0
1 2 2 .5 0 - 1 7 1 .5 0
1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0 - 1 6 9 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0 - 1 6 1 .0 0

_
—
-

.
•
-

5
5
3
2

54
•
54
47
•
3
4

119
12
107
39
22
40
6

265
56
209
48
60
40
50
11

332
109
223
63
90
6
35
29

307
137
170
23
53
29
44
21

211
141
70
7
24
5
31
3

191
60
131
46
32
8
33
12

103
21
82
16
36
2
27
1

228
60
168
90
24
3
35
16

77
10
67
23
33

123
1
122
110
11

186
1
185
177
4

171

8
3

1

4

«.

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS b —
MANUFACTURING-------------------------NONMANUFACTURING — ------ — —
PUBLIC U TILITIE S ---------------WHOLESALE TRAOE -----------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------FINANCE.------------------ ---------------S E R V IC E S------------------ --------------

2*932
762
2*1 7 0
537
686
359
44 7
141

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
4 0 .0

1 2 7 .5 0
1 2 0 .5 0
1 3 0 .0 0
1 5 7 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 2 1 .5 0
1 2 5 .5 0
1 2 6 .5 0

1 2 1 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0 1 1 0 .5 0 - 1 2 7 .5 0
1 2 4 .5 0 1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 4 4 .5 0
1 5 7 .5 0 1 2 6 .0 0 - 1 7 9 .5 0
1 1 5 .0 0 1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 2 6 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0 1 0 3 .5 0 - 1 4 0 .0 0
1 2 4 .0 0 1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 3 7 .0 0
1 2 6 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 3 9 .5 0

4
•»
*
4
—
4
-

78
78
44
13
21
-

147
33
114
11
42
41
11
9

504
139
365
12
174
73
92
14

625
234
391
67
165
45
88
26

501
178
323
47
118
53
75
30

348
122
226
62
44
38
54
28

219
16
203
36
42
56
39
30

123
11
112
41
19
22
30
-

102
16
86
33
31
5
17
-

132
5
127
100
7
4
12
4

50
4
46
35

48
4
44
42

5
6

2

CLERKS* FILE* CLASS A ---------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------FINANCE -----------------------------------

215
174
45
88

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 4 1 .0 0 1 2 8 .5 0
1 4 2 .5 0 1 2 7 .5 0
1 9 4 .5 0 2 1 0 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0 1 2 3 .0 0

1 2 0 .0 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0
1 1 6 .5 0 - 1 5 1 .5 0
1 6 0 .0 0 - 2 1 7 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .5 0

•
•
-

3
3
3

13
12
5

35
33
1
26

61
51
2
37

25
16
2
2

21
7
4

20
15
4
10

6
6
6
-

1
1
1
-

4
4
3
1

2
2
2

-

-

CLERKS* F IL E , CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U TILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE FINANCE ------------------

554
145
409
82
68
206

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 1 3 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0
1 4 3 .5 0
1 0 1 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0

9 8 * 0 0 -1 2 0 .0 0
1 0 6 .5 0
9 9 .0 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0
1 1 3 .5 0
9 5 .5 0 - 1 1 9 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0
1 2 5 .0 0 1 0 6 .5 0 - 1 7 4 .0 0
9 2 .5 0 - 1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0
9 2 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0

2
2
-

34
34
1
26

138
41
97
4
32
44

123
19
104
24
19
55

93
17
76
1
14
56

76
42
34
13
2
11

43
26
17
3

6

2

13

12

6

2

6
-

2
-

13
13

12
12

6
6

2
2

7

5

2

CLERKS* FILE* CLASS C
MANUFACTURING ------—
NONMANUFACTURING —
WHOLESALE TRAOE FINANCE ------------------

856
131
725
86
469

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

9 9 .5 0 1 0 0 .0 0
9 5 .0 0
9 4 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 1 .0 0
9 1 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
9 9 .5 0 1 0 0 .0 0

9 2 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
8 9 .0 0 - 1 0 2 .0 0
9 3 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
8 5 . 0 0 - 9 5 .0 0
9 4 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0

1
1
-

145
42
103
45
50

288
52
236
25
178

372
17
355
16
230

40
20
20
9

2

•

.

.

2
2

-

-

•




j

—

_

/

_

•

•

2

1
1

4

8
_

8

171
156
15

31

9
9
9

11
11

5
5
5

11
11
11

3
3
3

-

1
1

41
13
28
26
2

-

_

11

31
31

56
56
56

_
_

.

„

.
.

.

2
2
2

3
3
3

.
_

•
•

1

1

_

2

l
1

2
2

-

.

_

«»

_

•
»
_

_

.
_

_

W eekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of
workers

Number o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e w eek ly ea rn in gs o f—
S

$

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

S

$

S

S

$

$

S

$

$

S

S

S

S

$

S

S

s

S

i

M ean ^

M edian l

M iddle ranged

80

90

100

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

80

O c c u p a t io n a n d in d u s t r y d iv is i o n

90

100

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

320

1

24

78
13
65
56

55
4
51
12
30

183
31
152
126
3

76
24
52
44
8

94
41
53
31
4

56
15
41
32
9

86
45
41
13
1

50
17
33
24

33
2
31
31

30
12
18
18

29
17
12
12

26
14
12
12

12
12
12

167
1
166
166

10
10
10

4*
44
44

-

-

-

38
3
35
•
19
10

63
27
36
1
14
2

69
32
37
3
18
14

70
42
28
1
6
17

96
38
58
16
7
17

47
11
36
15
9
1

62
44
18
14
1

41
9
32
13
12

20
6
14
14

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11
11
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329
161
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121
123
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and
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A L L W O RK ERS—
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26
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42
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290
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16
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73
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56
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9

W eekly earnings 1
(standard)

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

A verage
weekly
hours1
(standard)

N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eekly ea rn in gs o f —
S

S

75
Mean *

Median ^

Middle range *

$

S

S

S

$

S

S

S

S

S

$

S
S
S
S
S
S
$
$
260
240
220
280
200
230
210

80

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

90

100

UP

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

-

-

“
-

39
•
39
3
—
36
-

13
13
2
1
1
8
1

51
23
28
12
2
13
1

93
26
67
30
17
15
5

165
74
91
34
16
32
9

307
129
178
2
24
26
98
28

246
145
101
3
19
7
65
7

229
168
61
3
8
1
48
1

105
85
20
2
4
13
1

42
21
21
5
6
1
9
-

20
2
18
4
13
1

36
13
23
4

•
—
-

—
—
•
-

34
21
13
9
4
-

132
72
60
25
3
26
6

331
176
155
3
15
11
92
34

541
350
191
10
7
42
93
39

619
479
140
7
7
25
59
42

422
336
86
12
7
13
46
8

180
107
73
32
14
11
13
3

66
35
31
4
8
5
14

41
13
28
8
7
2
11

30
2
28
9
9
6
4

21
1
20
10
8
2

—

1
1
1
—
-

•
-

1
1
1
-

14
2
12
1
3
8
-

53
12
41
2
3
23
9
4

211
85
126
16
21
13
40
36

385
167
218
8
10
17
43
140

252
169
83
2
13
10
38
20

217
85
132
6
18
23
51
34

148
52
96
24
15
11
42
4

88
28
60
7
1
25
26
1

26
26
6
6
11
3
-

20
6
14
14

7
2
5
4

20
20

-

1

-

-

-

-

23
3
20
13
1
6

142
44
98
18
16
30
34

192
95
97
6
42
16
31

158
77
81
6
32
19
16

68
23
45
4
16
7
9

75
11
64
17
18
5
22

23
3
20
7
12
1

6
•
6
5
1
-

20
1
19
19
-

44
44
40
4
_

20
3
17
17
.

79
6
73
73
_

7

6

6

7
6

6
6

6
6

10
10

2
2

30
3
27
1
7
19

140
57
83
•
17
50
16

297
199
98
6
21
31
20

543
389
154
4
25
44
60

318
221
97
•
38
42
1

155
97
58
10
as
12
7

85
31
54
13
11
7
23

25
3
22
7
9

20
12
8
3
4

40
4
36
29
7

9
5
4
3
.

35

19

15

19
7
12

15

10
4
6

_

15

45
3
42
3
39

10

35
26
9

5

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

172
18
154

66
21
45

78
39
39

37
19
18

19
11
8

17
10
7
1

16
4
12
10

4
2
2

8

12

4
2
2
1

_

3

5
1

1

and
under
___ 8ft.

260

280

22

23

22
19
3

23
18
5

25
1
24
22
2

240

300

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
SECRETARIES— CONTINUEO
SECRETARIES* CLASS B ------------------- -- ----------MANUFACTURING ---------- ------ ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------- -------— —
PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------------------FINANCE .----------------------------------— —
SERVICES -----------------------------------------------------------

1*422
667
735
90
160
76
341
66

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
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$
1 7 4 .5 0
1 7 4 .5 0
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2 3 8 .0 0
1 6 8 .5 0
1 6 0 .5 0
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$
$
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1 5 4 .5 0 - 1 8 4 ,5 0
2 2 6 .5 0 - 2 6 2 .5 0
1 4 9 .5 0 - 1 7 6 .5 0
1 4 9 .5 0 - 1 6 5 .0 0
1 5 3 .5 0 - 1 7 8 .5 0
1 6 2 .0 0 - 1 8 0 .0 0

SECRETARIES* CLASS C ------------------- -- ----------MANUFACTURING-------- -- ---------------------------- ----------NONMANUFACTURING---------------------------- -- ----------PUBLIC U TILITIES — ------------------------------WHOLESALE TRAD E ------------------------- -------- —
RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------------------FINANCE • « —
SERVICES ------------------------------------------------------------

2*472
1 *59 9
873
113
143
123
362
132

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0

i5 5 .0 0
1 5 2 .5 0
1 5 9 .0 0
1 8 6 .0 0
1 7 7 .0 0
1 5 6 .5 0
1 4 9 .0 0
1 4 6 .5 0

1 5 2 .0 0
1 5 2 .0 0
1 5 1 .5 0
1 7 4 .5 0
1 7 0 .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0
1 4 5 .0 0
1 4 9 .5 0

1 4 2 .5 0 - 1 6 2 .0 0
1 4 5 .0 0 - 1 6 0 .0 0
1 3 9 ,0 0 - 1 7 0 .0 0
1 6 9 .5 0 - 2 0 9 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0 - 2 0 7 . O0
1 4 4 .5 0 - 1 6 7 .0 0
1 3 4 .5 0 - 1 6 0 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 - 1 5 5 .5 0

SECRETARIES* CLASS D ---------------------- ----------MANUFACTURING---------------------- ---------------- — —
NONMANUFACTURING ------------ ------------- -------- —
PUBLIC U TILITIES ---------- ------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE — — -------- — -- ----------RETAIL TRAD E --------------------------------------- -------FIN AN CE --------•*>-------- -- ----------- — — — -------SERVICES ------------------------------------------------------------

1 *44 2
608
834
109
88
137
260
240

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0

1 4 5 .5 0
1 4 3 .5 0
1 4 7 .0 0
1 7 2 .0 0
1 4 4 .5 0
1 4 6 .5 0
1 4 6 .5 0
1 3 8 .0 0

1 4 0 .5 0
1 4 0 .5 0
1 4 1 .0 0
1 6 9 .0 0
1 4 3 .5 0
1 5 1 .5 0
1 4 8 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0

1 3 1 .0 0 - 1 5 6 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0 - 1 5 3 .0 0
1 3 1 .0 0 - 1 6 1 .5 0
1 4 1 .0 0 - 1 9 8 .0 0
1 2 5 .0 0 - 1 5 9 .0 0
1 2 4 .0 0 - 1 7 2 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 - 1 6 1 .5 0
1 3 1 .0 0 - 1 4 0 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS* GENERAL ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------— ------------ -------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------------- — — -------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------- -- ----------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------- ----------------RETAIL TRAD E ---------------------- ------------------------FIN AN CE ------------------- ------------------------- — — -

881
266
615
242
154
79
119

3 9 .5 1 3 9 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 2 2 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 4 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 8 3 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 5 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 1 8 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 1 9 .5 0

1 2 4 .0 0
1 1 9 .9 0
1 3 1 .5 0
1 9 0 .0 0
1 2 2 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0

1 1 4 .0 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0 - 1 2 5 .5 0
1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 8 7 .0 0
1 6 4 .0 0 - 2 0 6 ,5 0
1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 3 8 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 2 5 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 3 1 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS* SENIOR -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING---------- ----------- ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES ------------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE — — ---------- ----------------FINANCE
SERVICES ------------------------------------------------------------

1*7 8 8
1*024
764
115
239
193
154

3 9 .5 1 4 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 3 7 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 5 5 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 9 0 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 7 6 .0 0
3 8 .5 1 3 1 .5 0
3 8 .0 1 3 6 .0 0

1 3 7 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0
1 4 2 .5 0
1 9 4 .0 0
1 5 7 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0
1 3 8 .0 0

1 2 9 .0 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0
1 2 9 .0 0 - 1 4 4 .0 0
1 2 7 .5 0 - 1 6 9 .5 0
1 6 3 .0 0 - 2 1 3 .5 0
1 3 8 .0 0 - 2 3 0 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 4 3 .0 0
1 2 3 .5 0 - 1 3 8 .0 0

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------- ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------- ------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------- -------RETAIL TRAOE — --------- -- ---------------------- —
FINANCE — —
—
—
—
SE R V IC E S ---------------------- --------------------------- --------

453
128
325
32
60
59
134

3 9 .5 1 2 3 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 2 9 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 0 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 8 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 0 7 .0 0
3 8 .5 1 2 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 0 5 .0 0

1 1 7 .0 0
1 2 5 .5 0
1 0 8 .0 0
1 8 9 .0 0
1 0 5 .0 0
1 2 2 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0

1 0 3 .0 0 - 1 3 1 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0 - 1 3 7 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0 1 2 4 .5 0
1 6 2 .0 0 1 9 4 .0 0
1 0 1 .0 0 - 1 1 2 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 3 2 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0

_

2

-

-

-

2




.
-

—
-

•
-

_
•
-

•
-

•
-

—

2

-

-

2
-•
2
—
—
2
15
2
13
10
3

31
6
114

7
12
16

6
17
1

2
12
1

2
1
1

—

2

.

8
8

-

20

_
4
15

_

6
6
6

_

-

-

-

10

7

10
8

7
7

23
4
19
1
18

..

2

_

1“
3
11
2
9

-

-

-

10

2

_
_

_

-

_

_

_
_

_

1

12
12

•

_

_

3

_

..

320

W eekly earnings
(standard)
Number
of
workers

O ccupation and in du stry d iv isio n

1
S

Average
w eekly
(standard

Mean i

M edian

*

M iddle range *

80

90

100

Number o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g straigh t -tim e w eek ly ea rn in g s o f—
S
S
s
$
*
%
S
$
S
$
s
S
S
S
S
5
260
280
300
230
240
200
220
120
130
140
190
210
no
160
150
170 180

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

119
4
115
9

130

182
86
96
4

153
59
94
11

107
48
59

4
4

22
1
21
?1

3
3

-

-

-

-

At
HI

36
8
28
12
1

25
7
16
9

Pa
CU
1A
10
o
o

13
4
9
4
J

11

-

_

_

1

-

S

75
and
under
80

S

$

$

240

2 «0

300

320

_

230

_

_

-

-

-

_

•

_

-

-

-

-

-

26C

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ---------- — ----------------- -----NONMANUFACTURING --------------------- ----------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE----------— ----------------—
FINANCE -------------------------------------------SERVICES -----------------------------------------TRANSCRIBING-MACHINL OPERATORS*
RFkiPuai _ _ ______ _________ _____ ____
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------- --— —
FINANCE -----------------------------------------------TYPISTS* CLASS A ------ --------------------------------MANUFACTURING —
— — —
—
MDMMAMIiFAfTlIDTKIR _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
WHOLESALE TRADE--------------------— —
RETAIL TRADE — — — — —
—
TvflTCTc. n a c c a
MANUFACTURING

____

—
KiO KlM AM I IF" A P T l ID T k lft

____ _____ ______

_

—
—
_______________

PUBLIC UTILITIES — -------------- -----------wholesale TRADE —
— ------------ —
RETAIL TRADE -------- ---------- ----------------FINANCE ----------------- --------------- --------------SERVICES -------------------------------------— —

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




805
224
581
89
150
181
80
81

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 7 .5
3 9 .5

$
$
$
$
_
1 2 1 .5 0 1 1 6 .0 0 1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 3 0 .0 0
1 2 6 .5 0 1 2 3 .0 0 1 1 3 . 5 0 1 3 6 .0 0 1 1 9 .5 0 1 1 3 .0 0 1 0 3 . 5 0 1 3 0 .0 0
1 4 9 .9 0 1 5 5 .0 0 1 2 2 . 5 0 1 8 0 .0 0 1 1 4 .0 0 1 1 2 .0 0 1 0 3 . 5 0 1 2 0 .0 0
1 1 6 .5 0 1 1 6 .0 0 1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 3 C .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0 1 0 3 .5 0
9 9 .0 0 1 0 8 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0
9 4 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0

-

J ib

J o .6
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0

1 2 6 .5 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 2 8 .5 0
1 2 4 .5 0

-

-

-

71
245
181

1 2 2 .5 0
1 1 8 .0 0
1 2 4 .0 0
1 2 3 .5 0

1*170
468
702
113
62
386

3 9 .5 1 2 4 .5 0 1 1 8 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 4 .0 0 1 1 7 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 2 4 .5 0 1 1 9 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 1 8 .5 0 1 1 8 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 6 .0 0 1 1 9 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 1 6 .5 0 1 1 3 .5 0

486
1*205
111
156
87
757
92

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5

_
1*691

1 1 1 .0 0
1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 1 .5 0
1 6 4 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0

1 1 3 .5 0 - 1 3 7 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 2 3 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0 - 1 3 7 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0 - 1 3 6 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0 1 3 0 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0 - 1 2 9 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0 1 3 3 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 3 0 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 1 3 3 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0 1 2 4 .5 0

Q
7

-

11
11

A
7

25

1A
1U

-

7
3
4
1

29
17
12
6

98
20
78
70

77
20
57
47

60
8
52
45

-

23

309
1 4^
1 1A
195
34
11
1I
134

295
U Cl
146
22
CC

219
91
128
30
A
7

96

19

7

1
6

1

68

126
54
72
26
6
38

53
5
48

-

19
1

581
131
450
6
51
54

395
161
234
2

98
54
44
12

89
39
50
15

7

2

PA

A
«9

1Q
47

7
1
6

1
JUI

1 7A
1 9O
PI
cl

46
12
36
21
it
2

CC

18

-

1 0 7 .5 0 1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 1 6 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 1 8 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0
9 8 .0 0 -1 1 6 .0 0
1 4 5 .0 0 1 3 6 .5 0 - 1 9 5 .S 0
1 1 0 .0 0 1 0 1 .0 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0
9 8 .0 0 1 0 4 .5 0 1 0 3 .0 0
9 8 . 0 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0 1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0

AC

wO
P
1A
IP

-

-

130
8
55

_

21
9
12

398
80
318

-

3
g

22
23

JC 7
cd r
1A
ID

38

1

tA
17
e

c

o
c
15

i

4
12

17
17
10

12
3
9
36
2
34

Ic

1

1

_

1

1

_

51
49
2

1

-

-

7

4

18

6

16

2
2

7
7

4

18
18

6

4

6

16
16

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

11

3
2

11

23

33
•
33

23

1

1

1

N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earn in gs of—
Number
of
workers

s

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

$

$

s

$

$

S

%

S

%

S

$

s

$

%

s

9

$

%

%

i

80

90

100

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

18U

190

200

210

220

230

24(<

260

280

3u0

90

100

no

120

130

140

ISO

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

2b0

300

3<c0

AO
ov
1D
Xc
57

1A7
lO r

1 CD
IDc
il7
Of

do
oo
CC
DO

32

40
10
30
23

171

130

45

1
H8

1

41
13
26
26

9

■7
9
1

77
J r

103
4
99
85

89

47

219
07
79
\ oD
le t
52
40
17

Q
|.
7U

c1
Dl

1 C C * 'J U

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv isio n

3

3

1C7
lO f

116

1 1 5 .0 0

DQA
CdH
99

75
Mean

1

Median 2

Middle ranged

and
under
80

ALL WORKERS
$

$

$

$

Cl
DX

19 1 JO

”

CA
DO

111
1 X1

c
* 372
PUBLIC U TILITIES
r lliH V N v u

— *—

— **

C one

C T l C . Pi ACC K
r 1 L l >9 v k A ^ b A ■ "
m
MAlwJIJ ANUr A w I 1 J TMfH
&
N UN W AMI i f A r T1 U K 1 NO • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

n c a ifc * c t iLc . /■ Abb O
‘i
l-Lt K b r 1 t * CL acc u
l\
M K IF APTI IPTKift
A il
“ MiNUr M v 1UnXINvJ • • • • • • • * *
•*• •• ••

••••••••

4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 5 6 .5 0 1 6 2 .0 0 1 3 2 .5 0 1 2 0 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 0 2 .5 0 1 3 7 .5 0 1 3 7 .0 0 1 1 8 .5 0 -

1 cr
J9 7
fiA
oo

70

1 5 0 .5 0 1 3 5 .0 0

39* 0

1D 7 o D O
I C f CA

1C T oD V
I DO C fl

00 a
JT # C

lit :

1 1 1 AA
U lo U O

Q l C A a IcU *00
C
7T.9U l 9 n A A
qo .*un r — 1 9fi.Ari
7 7 i r. 1 CU . u u
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1U0.0U— c r . 9 0
i

99
ppc
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n LunTVg f r t iL P a V L M O q
W p d k c a p 1 L 9 n aq J
M A M IIFAW T IU n liN U
"HMlNUr A T I I P T M f;

r
v

• • • • * • «• • • • • •
..
.

^ * 9
39 aC

A JT
t 7J

'J U # d
J O ^C
o o . D
J O •c
I f .0
J Ol • t

RETAIL TRADE — --------------- -------------r i LC O IK b* r AT H U L 1
W fc K fC f O A V DAI L
Mak|| Av 1 1 ID TN O
| C
M flN U r A /*T U K i M/«

**
. . . —

NONMANUFACTUk IMG -----------------------------n Un
IIT X 1 1 1 £D
K n o iL lW U 1 T IL T T T C C • • • • • • • • • • • • •
DP TATI TO AOP

g a • DU
TO Ac / i
J 9 .A A
7 t| U U

X X U • DU

98#5o

lv « J | U V

790
CCT

7Q c
J 9 aD

1 2 0 .5 0

1 1 4 .0 0

OU C r , . l l l AA
7 O | j| i* lJ C l0 U

190
118

3 9 .5 1 1 4 .0 0 108.5C
3 9 .5 1 0 6 .0 0 9 9 .0 0

9 8 . 5 0 - 1 2 8 .0 0
9 5 .0 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0

cM
7B
186

IQ C
J79 J
AA A
H U #U

3 9 .5
AA A
H U *U

g C Ac . t
7 p • DU
1 U J AA
AA 1 f V V

52

3 9 .0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS « — — —
MA Ml 1C AWT IUK T m /1 • • • • • • • • • _ _ _ _ _• _* _ _• _"
MAIMUr A P 1 IO UNO _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ • • •
•
iiA M ki A Nil iP A f*Tl I b liN U
_
NUNM AN lJr AW 1U K tK U . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
n # ia i i r
e
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o C, t a t in
TUADF
nc 1 A 1
1 ™ 1/ C.
M
r liM A N W t • • »• -• • • • • • • ■ •••••••■

801
a 7a
H cU
7a \
JO 1

3 9 .5

1 3 4 .5 0

77 C
JQfD
70 J
J7 t C

1 J 4 CA
X1 H # D0
114 ca
1 JO «D U
1QO . D 0
19 A ua

n O P n P T H O Q « CL H C3 n
U r t D A 1U R 3 f v 1 a 9 h u
AW 1 U “ il'K ? "•• • •• • ••

551
189
362
AO
ou
153
OC
“j

W P V r'U l'IL H
l\L T D IIM rU

_______
*

nMIrUr
NONPANUFACTURIMG -----------— -------------DlU d L iW li T T lL T T T C s • • • • • • • • • • • •
K iqi Tf* U l X
1 1i t C
RETAIL TRADE -------------------------- -------r i iN A U WF • • • • • • • • • • • • **• • • • *• •
M AN ^ c
r




1 PC
IC O

93
104

D
C

7

D
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1
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13*1.90
140 ca
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I OO A A
40*0 locoO O
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147
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S

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S
$
$
$
S
S
S
$
S
$
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$
$
$
140
160
240
150
260
130
170
280
180
190
220
120
200
230
210

workers

90

100

110

80

Occupation and industry d iv isio n

80

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

12

35
13
22
7

180
58
122
1
94

82
48
34
1
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20
12
8
-

17
10
7
2

6
3
3
2

2

5

5

2
2

5
5

5
5

11
2
9
1
4
4
-

54
22
32
4
23
1
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212
127
85
3
16
17
21
28

468
311
157
5
40
30
49
33

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477
182
12
32
43
74
21

791
584
207
11
35
66
78
17

75
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300

and
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190

200

19

3

8

-

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-

-

-

-

-

-

19
19

3
3

6
8

-

-

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-

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669
467
202
23
22
51
87
19

460
282
178
28
17
46
82
5

291
202
89
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7
19
46
1

174
119
55
16
6
10
21
2

113
56
57
21
11
9
15
1

83
40
43
36
2
4
1
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34
13
21
15
2
4
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23
19
3
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4
36
30
3
1

53
5
48
43
5
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15
15
15
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9
9
9
-

10
3
7
2

30
20
10
3

27
15
18
7

35
21
14
4

43
31
12
5

45
37
8
6

17
10
7
3

18
10
9
4

18
1
11
10

23
23
20

9
9
9

9
9
9

7
3
4

8

23
-

8

23

-

-

-

-

-

-

85
1
24
-

6

-

10

7

L
3

210

220

230

240

26 u

2rt0

300

320

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
$

$

$

$

MESSENGERS ---------------------MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES FINANCE ------------------

394
144
250
48
123

SECRETARIES -------------------MANUFACTURING ----- —
NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES WHOLESALE TRADE RETAIL TRADE -------FINANCE -----------------SERVICES ----------------

4 ,1 7 0
2 ,7 2 1
1 ,4 4 9
302
203
326
486
132

SECRETARIES* CLASS A
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES •

284
152
132
82

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
40 .G

2 1 3 .0 0
2 3 0 .0 0
2 2 8 .0 0
2 4 5 .5 0

2 0 5 .0 0 1 9 0 .0 0 - 2 2 8 .5 0
2 0 2 .0 0 1 8 8 .5 0 - 2 1 8 .0 0
2 2 1 .5 0 1 9 0 .0 J - 2 6 8 .5 0
2 5 6 .5 0 2 1 0 .0 0 - 2 7 6 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS 8
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURIn G —
RETAIL TRADE -------FINANCE ------------------

964
598
366
76
150

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 7 9 .0 0
1 7 5 .5 0
1 8 5 .5 0
1 6 0 .5 0
1 7 5 .0 0

1 7 5 .0 0
1 7 5 .0 0
1 7 2 .5 0
1 6 0 .0 0
1 7 5 .0 0

1 6 2 . 00-18& .O 0
1 6 5 .0 0 - 1 8 5 .0 0
1 6 1 .0 0 - 1 9 6 .0 0
1 4 9 .5 0 - 1 6 5 .0 0
1 6 4 .5 0 - 1 8 4 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C
MANUFACTURING ----- — «
NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES ■
FINANCE ------------------

1 ,9 2 8
1 ,4 9 1
437
90
171

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 5 5 .0 0
1 5 3 .0 0
lb l.5 0
1 8 5 .5 0
1 5 4 .5 0

1 5 3 .0 0
153 .C 0
1 5 4 .0 0
1 7 2 .0 0
1 5 1 .0 0

1 4 4 .0 0 - 1 6 1 .0 0
1 4 5 .0 0 - 1 6 0 .0 0
1 4 2 .0 0 - 1 7 3 .0 0
1 6 9 .5 0 - 2 1 3 .0 0
1 4 2 .0 0 - 1 6 2 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING — «
PUBLIC UTILITIES RETAIL TRADE -------FINANCE ------------------

926
480
446
55
137
153

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 4 7 .5 0
1 4 3 .5 0
1 5 1 .0 0
1 8 5 .0 0
1 4 6 .5 0
1 5 2 .5 0

1 4 4 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0
1 5 0 .5 0
1 9 3 .5 0
1 5 1 .5 0
1 5 S .0 0

1 3 2 .5 0 - 1 6 1 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 - 1 5 3 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0 - 1 6 7 .5 0
1 6 2 .5 0 - 2 1 5 .0 0
1 2 4 .0 0 - 1 7 2 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0 - 1 6 6 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING — <
PUBLIC U TluITIES .
RETAIL TRADE -------FINANCE ------------------

685
251
484
213
76
90

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 4 3 .0 0
1 2 2 .0 0
1 5 5 .0 0
1 9 2 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0

1 2 4 .5 0
1 1 9 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0
1 9 9 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 2 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES •
FINANCE ------------------

1*196
903
293
60
133

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
39. D

1 3 8 .5 0 1 3 5 .0 0
1 3 5 .5 0 1 3 5 .0 0
1 4 8 .5 0 1 3 8 .0 0
1 9 6 .0 0 2 1 0 .5 0
1 3 5 .5 0 1 3 7 .0 0




9 8 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0
9 7 .0 0
1 7 9 .0 0
9 4 .5 0

9 2 .0 0 - 1 0 7 .0 0
9 6 . 5 0 - 1 0 6 .0 0
9 2 .0 0 - 1 0 9 . 5 0
1 5 6 .0 0 - 1 7 9 .0 0
9 2 . 0 0 - 9 7 .0 0

3 9 .5 1 6 2 .5 0 1 5 7 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 5 9 .0 0 1 5 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 7 0 .0 0 1 6 1 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 1 6 .0 0 2 1 5 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 5 9 .0 0 1 5 2 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 5 6 .0 0 1 5 5 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 6 2 .0 0 1 6 1 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 4 5 .0 0 1 4 0 .5 0

1 4 5 .0 0 - 1 7 S .0 0
1 4 5 .0 0 - 1 7 0 .0 0
1 4 4 .0 0 - 1 8 2 .5 0
1 7 5 .5 v - 2 5 7 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0 - 1 7 0 .5 0
1 4 0 .5 0 - 1 7 2 .5 0
1 4 7 .5 0 - 1 7 5 .0 0
1 3 1 .0 0 - 1 5 6 .0 0

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 1 .5 0
1 1 0 .5 0
1 6 9 .0 0
9 3 .0 0

-

12
12
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1
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4
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13
8
5
2
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57
26
31
17
7

106
60
46
16
12

185
107
78
26
33

203
139
64
7
47

186
152
34
!
2c

99
79
20
4
13

36
21
15
l
9

8
2
6
1
-

419
328
91
10
47

541
465
76
7
34

356
308
48
12
20

137
97
40
19
9

58
35
23
2
14

29
13
16
6
7

26
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4

10
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6
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20

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222
158
64
3
30

1
1
1
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10
2
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38
7
31
23
1

121
65
56
3
13
15

215
14S
70
2
17
18

167
123
44
2
10
20

129
55
74
4
23
32

109
49
60
9
11
34

82
26
56
3
25
26

18
16
4
11
3

10
6
4
4

2

•

4
4

20
20

10
3
7
1
6

111
44
67

123
74
49
6
19
12

52
23
29
4
4
5

31
7
24
6
5
5

11
3
8
7
1

6
6
5
-

20
1
19
19
-

40
40
40

20
3
17
17

79
6
73
73

30
34

151
87
64
6
16
27

-

-

2

77
54
23

-

-

36
9
27
9
7

3
2
1
-

5
1
4
3

14

267
217
50
37

9
3
6
2

7

415
357
58
4
30

84
67
17

-

243
187
56
6
26

3

2

15
3
12

-

-

1 1 4 .5 0 - 1 7 8 .5 0
1 1 2 .5 0 - 1 2 5 .5 0
1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 9 6 .5 0
1 8 2 .0 0 - 2 0 8 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 2 4 .5 0
1 0 5 .0 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0

.

.

-

-

1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 4 4 .0 0
1 2 7 .5 0 - 1 4 u .b o
1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 6 0 .0 0
1 6 3 .0 0 - 2 1 5 .5 0
1 2 6 .5 0 - 1 4 5 .0 0

.

.

-

-

-

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-

-

1

-

3
4

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16
15
1

84
62
22

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-

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12

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3
2

7
•

7
6
1
24
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24
24

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6
6
6
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-

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6
6

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_

6

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-

i

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3
3

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-

-

-

-

2
2
2
•

•

_

4
4
4

-

_

-

-

-

_
-

-

W eekly earnings1
(standard)

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

Average
w eekly
hours1
(standard)

N um ber o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earnings of—
S

75
Mean *

M edian*

M iddle range*

$

$

S

S

S

S

$

S

S

S

$

%

$

%

S

S

%

S

i

S

80

90

100

n o

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

m

190

200

210

2ZQ.

230

240

26.)

280

300

320

9
2
7

33
5
28

31
14
17

53
39
14

29
19
10

14
9
5

17
10
7

8
4
4

4
2
2

b

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

4
2
2

-

b

-

-

6

4

20

8

15

7

2

7

2

1

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i

-

-

-

_

1

-

l

-

1

and
under
80

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS-------------------------MANUFACTURING------------------ -----------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

22 4
106
118

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

$
$
$
$
1 3 3 .0 0 1 2 5 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 4 5 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0 1 2 7 .5 0 1 2 2 .0 0 - 1 4 0 .0 0
1 3 4 .0 0 1 2 2 .0 0 1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 5 4 .5 0

-

-

2
2

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

75

3 9 .5

1 3 1 .0 0 1 2 5 .5 0

1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 4 1 .0 0

-

-

1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 3 4 .0 0

-

-

7

19

21

19

19

3

3

3

-

-

1

-

53
25
28
6
18

33
1
32
12
3

8
2
6

51
49
2

-

137
91
46
9
20

1

-

219
128
91
10
68

33

-

173
114
59
11
43

19

-

23
4
19

300
101
199
6
54
117

137
85
52
2
1
28

71
43
28
12

50
27
23
15
4

26
12
14
11
2

18

4

_

18
18

4
4

.
_

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
GENERAL --------------------- ------------------------------

96

3 9 .0

1 2 2 .5 0

1 2 0 .5 0

TYPISTS* CLASS A ---------------------------- -------MANUFACTURING---------------------------- -------NONMANUFACTURING ----- -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------FIN AN CE---------------------------------------------

751
414
337
50
175

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 2 6 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0
1 2 8 .5 0
1 2 7 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0

1 1 7 .5 0 1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 3 1 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0 1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 2 6 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0 1 1 0 .5 0 - 1 4 8 .0 0
1 2 1 .0 0 1 1 1 .0 0 - 1 4 8 .0 0
1 1 3 .5 0 1 0 7 .5 0 - 1 2 1 .0 0

TYPISTS* CLASS 8 ---------------- -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------FINANCE ---------------------------------------------

783
357
42 6
83
87
192

3 9 .0 1 1 3 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 0 9 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 1 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 5 6 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 0 4 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 0 6 .0 0

See foo tn o te s at end o f ta b le s .




1 0 6 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0
1 4 2 .5 0
1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 4 .5 0

1 0 0 .5 0 - 1 1 8 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 1 8 .5 0
1 0 3 .5 0 - 1 1 7 .5 0
1 3 1 .0 0 - 1 9 5 .5 0
9 8 .0 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 1 .0 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0

-

-

-

-

18

•
-

17
9
8

145
80
65

-

•

•

-

3
5

23
31

-

-

11

-

19
1
2

33
1

1

2

7

4

1
1

2
2

7
7

4
4

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3

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1
1

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.

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-

-

-

.

_

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•

.

Occupation and industry d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

Median X

M iddle ranged

120

130

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

12

26

89
7
82

88

60

9

3

4

p
c
7
9
7
D

4

£

1 ----------

100
Mean 1

no

N um ber o f w o rk e rs re ce iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly ea rn in gs o f—
s
3 --------- $
S
S
s
S
s
S
S
S
170
240
160
180 200 220
150
260
280
320
140
300

3

S

Average
w eekly
hours1
(standard

s

S

$

$

$

$

$

$

340

360

380

400

420

and
under

110

320

340

360

380

400

420

440

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

75

4p
“C

53

1P
1c

10

8
1P
1c

AC
p
*T
9
7n
D
U

-

-

-

-

3
3

2
1
1

ALL WORKERS
$

$

1 8 8 .5 0

$

325

1 7 0 .5 0 - 2 0 5 .0 0

$

1
p
c

1
l?
1C

25

188

39 *5 1 7 3 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 6 7 .0 0

110

1 6 5 .0 0
1 6 6 .0 0

1 5 5 .5 0 1 5 5 .5 0 -

1 8 2 .0 0
1 7 5 .0 0

COMPUTER OPtRATORSt CLASS L —— — —

-

1

3 9 .5

1 6 4 .^ 0

1 4 0 .5 0

1 4 0 .0 0 1 3 3 .0 0 - 1 4 9 .5 0
iJ J .U U " l3 J .3 U

*«

i pa
IcO
D
U
76
cp
DC

139*00
COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS.
O 1 Th l CC - n ACC a ••••••••••••••••
l C tC
duo IN j j 9 ULAoo A
u A IPaTTI IDTM/I _________ — __________
kl!
NuNMANUr AL 1UKiNU — — — — — —
PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------.rum c cai c to ansr ••••• •••*••••
^InULLoALu 1HAUc
r IN ANUr — — —
—
—
—
—

CAk
duo
I /ki
1 U1
/AC
HUD
43
7Q
97
1hQ
107

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS.
iiilCTAiCCC. CL Abb n
3
eiUbiNfcSb. n ACC |
“
y A il IPAU1U TK if-___ _____________________
K
MANUr A/*Tl O 1N «•••••••••••••••••
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NUNMANUr AU 1UK INvi — — —
— ——
PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------p c ai c 1KAl/u
WnULbv AL«k tcjanc
IT A a k i r r __ __ _____ ___ _
Ti

cpi;
OCD
1 tU
1 7A
ooO
92
7O
9c.
fU
1tJo

70 A
J7#D
J 7 *D ? 4 4 * n i
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PI f •U
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pep
coc
64
168
70
f7

COMPUTER PPOGRAMMERSt
qi ic tkircc * ULAbb r _
a acc l — —
_ _________________
pUb1N cbbt
— — — —
y A IP ATTl | T fl ••••••••••*•••••••
kil
D
MANUrflt1UKlNo
MfUty AKIlCArTlUKINo _ _ ____ —
* AU1 IDf kill
__________
NUNMANUr
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS.
___________
di ic Trip c c
'I
bUSINtSS. /■ ASS A ___ _____ —
LL ACC A
y A ip At 1U XNO • — ______ —•_________
kil
.
MANUr ATTl ID f k t _ • __ • • • • •_ *• • • **•
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|k
iiv\iy 11. | ArTlUKINo ••••••*••••••••
ip A t 1 IDTK ill_______ —
NUNMANUr

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS.
BUSINESS. CLASS B -------------------------- --—
y A I lC A/'Tl IDTkifl ______ ___ —
M *
__________
ki/lklki AM 1TAf*Tl IDTK
lS
i/1
NUNMANUrAt 1UK1No •••••••••••••••
DIIQI Tr IITTI TTTPC “ ” —“
-UrJLlL Ul 1L 11 1ES
*
“*
*
FINANCE ---------------------------------------- —
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS.
BUSINESS. CLASS C:
NONMANUFACTURING ----- ------------------------




68

41
3
io
DO
Id
g

1 6 2 .0 0 1 6 2 .0 0
1 7 4 .0 0

, _^

-

55
13

1
8

71
Dl

1 A7
10 9
48
59
PQ
C7

0

87
44
*tD

158
61
97

CD

2

^p
Jl
23
1A
10

283 *00
OkQ* b 0
c o y CA
321 *00
282 *00
p c c CA
ADD# D
U
PCC^CA
COO * D
U

67
34
JJ

11
11

44
23

7
9
1P
1C

23
1A
XO
c
D

i

PA1 * uu CDw•Uv DlD * U
c o i An OC') Ai*t«71S-nA
U
0/.0 CamPOP-AA
c*»c.D 0 -c.C .U U
320*50 2 9 5 .5 0 -3 5 U .0 0
O/l1 DU— PA — U
7
A
310 *00 £H1 * ctA• DCv * UA
253*50 OAA _ Qi)v p7fi •D
C“ U•Dw"C f v - SA
U
pAA^aa 2 4 2 .5 0 - 2 8 7 .5 0
c o o •u u

P71 uU
CD1 * nn
P47 <40
CH 9 * D
U
ppp * < f
%t
CCC DU
263*50
215 *50
210 *50

P 1A C1* p C7 * AA
\
C1v •DU^ CDw — U
U
P 7 A— A p A 1 — ft
A
H
cJy*V u ■ Cvl*w v
PA7 *U*»mc “l c-AA
^
cw f AA PZ ^#VVI
2 4 1 .5 0 -2 8 9 * 0 0
PA 7 - AA«»P7A . AA
CvD.Uv b J v * Uv
p A7 •AA• P7 f{ *UU
A
cU f vU*CDl{ — A

70 c:
70 c;
0700
7Q ^
0 7 t3
3 8 .5

1 AO ca 185*50
107*DU
1 “ ctUU
l Op AA
1 UU#AA 185*00
188*00
182*50 184* 50

39#5
7Q s
7 “ c:
J QtD
3 9 .0

330•00
7 J f - Qn
J 7 7 •D
O
7P1 AA
D e l*U
U
71 A CA
C
D1U*DQ

771 k A
DD1*DU
77A AA
DDo*UU
IpC ,*,A
DCO* U
»#
7PP AA
Dcc*UU

3 9 .5
70 e
D“ *D
J7#D
AA A
*K I#w
3 9 .0

283 *50
284*50
OOl _ Ca
cOl*DU
7AA AA
DUO•OU
2 76 *00

285 *00
286 *00
PAP Qa
cOc*Dy
7AP Ca
DUc*DU
280*50

.2 6 7 .5 0 - 3 0 0 .5 0
pCQ *UU*JU1*UU
c Ot AA*7Al-AA
P 7 CA *7 AA —4
^U
COD* DUa DUU•DA
07A A /i.'l'lfi. Aft
erO.UU—
OO^.UU
2 4 9 .0 0 - 2 9 4 .5 0

4 0 .0

237 *00 228 *00 2 0 9 .5 0 - 2 7 9 .5 0

60

9
1

13

6

AA
O
U
Cl
Dl
£
O
P
c

2

26

2o

11
11

161

71

6

1

1f
X7
c.
s

61
1P
1C
40
*t7
16
29

i
i

12
4,

15

47

15

35

1VO
1AA
31
7C
fD

Xx
19

133
19
114.
x x*»
9
27
70

CO
71
D1

69

34

11

11

32
14
1A
1O

71 A
D1U *D\>—
DDD*UU
71A CA«.7C^-Sn
Jlu#JU "JjO |JU
PQQ Uf** J3C . Ua
Al* 7 ®P AU
>
9AA C ij-tA .Uu
cOU.SU— n .n n
J**u

647
dqa
J<
rO
pcl
coi

18

30

9

1 7 2 .5 0 -2 1 0 « S 0
177 AA~PPAad A
X * J.UU CCv. 3U
1 7 1 .0 0 - 2 0 2 .5 0
1 7 fl *DA*17i*UAA
P
1 fO C U 1 Q1 —U

CAP
DHc
OUQ
coy
pc )
PoO
117
1 ID

63
30
77
dd
3

39

g
5
i
i
-

-

1

7

1«
17

1

-

-

7

19
17

12

-

1 c:
ID
1A
10

c
D

19

2

17
*

45
14
31
26

58
36

23

4

4

12

1

3
3
•
jj

3

2

-

_

-

-

-

8

20

O
c
-

**

i

2

7
9
5
p
c

OCC AA 0 4 1 Ar«*PQK-*%ft
39 #5 272 *50 c o o * uu CHD.IJi.- C7 j * 5 v

7Q a
iQ C
D“ *D
4 0 .0
40 •0
IQ C
jOa D
40 •0

22

in
JU

1

8
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

27

31
4
P7
Cf
1D
I 7
Q
O

p
c

1 9 7 .5 0

A
O

11
11

Q
7

8

p
C

12 b
1 11
1

Pa
au

91

73
S

S5

117
1i 9
3

93

1 11
1
7/1
fu
1O
17

8
40
*+£
10

1 aL
10 °

~

7
9

11
11

99
CC

g
c
D

58
pc
CD
DD

■A
J

10
lo

21
1P
1A
7

21

19

9

1
1

1A
P
1
11
11

97
C7
Df
4a

140
AP
CC
l

1A

36
43
PD
co

-

-

-

CO
3t
23

^3
■1
X1

1
1

trt
i”

6

1

1A
10

6

3
2
1
1

£

56
CP
DC

PP
cA
j
1Q
1t
F
1s
1D

*J

14

93
C7
DD
40

151
Q"
1
ca
31

20 2
IDO
1 Do
D

46

117
70
17
7Q
Do
7
23

16

2

-

-

2

8

10

26

13
33

6

_

9

20

2

2

14

4/,

g

20
10

.

1 1 /.
11H
62
52
16

11
1
10
7
3

11

“

-

-

_

.

“

"

~
~

~

-

-

-

.

-

—

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of
workers

Average
w eekly
hours1
(standard)

N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earn in gs of—
120

130

140

150

160

170

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

420

110

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv isio n

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

420

440

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

10
7
3

67
45
22

164
134
30

219
163
56
13

136
101
35
19

56
44
12
2

41
33
8
4

9
6
3
2

2
•
2
2

-

-

-

-

56
29
27
6

11

8

3

_

_

_

_

_

11

8
3

3
3

_

_

•
_

•

.

1

52
24
28
10

91
1
90
78

6

_

100
Mean 2

Median 2

M iddle range2

and
tinder

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
DRAFTERS* CLASS A --------------------------MANUFACTURING---------------—
NONMANUFACTURING------------------ ----PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------

712
541
171
42

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

$
2 5 1 .0 0
2 5 0 .5 0
2 5 1 .5 0
2 7 5 .0 0

DRAFTERS* CLASS B — --------—
MANUFACTURING---------------------------—
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S ----- ------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------

688
482
206
51
66

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 0 6 .0 0 2 0 4 .0 0 1 8 4 .0 0 - 2 2 3 .0 0
1 9 9 .0 0 1 9 6 .0 0 1 8 2 .5 0 - 2 1 3 .0 0
2 2 2 .0 0 2 2 3 .0 0 2 0 1 .5 0 - 2 3 8 .0 0
2 3 6 .0 0 2 3 0 .0 0 2 1 6 .5 G -2 5 0 .5 0
1 9 7 .0 0 1 9 8 .0 0 1 7 9 .5 0 - 2 2 5 .0 0

-

_
-

-

-

•
-

.

-

DRAFTERS* CLASS C ------------------------ -«
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTUPING -----------------------

563
365
198

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 7 0 .5 0 1 6 9 .0 0
1 6 1 .0 0 1 6 1 .0 0
1 8 8 .0 0 1 8 0 .0 0

1 5 7 .0 0 -1 8 U .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0 - 1 7 0 .5 0
1 7 0 .5 0 - 2 0 7 .5 0

.
-

1
1
-

11
11
-

34
33
1

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS ------------ ~
MANUFACTURING---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------- ~
PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------------

1 .7 9 8
19 021
777
339

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 3 5 .5 0
2 1 7 .5 0
2 5 8 .5 0
2 7 7 .0 0

2 3 4 .0 0 1 9 4 .0 0 - 2 7 4 .0 0
2 1 2 .0 0 1 8 5 .0 0 - 2 4 6 .0 0
2 6 5 .0 0 2 3 2 .0 0 - 2 9 8 .0 0
2 8 4 .0 0 2 4 1 .0 0 - 3 1 3 .5 0

-

-

-

-

NURSES* INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
MANUFACTURING ----------— -------------

139
103

$
2 4 7 .5 0
2 4 8 .0 0
2 4 7 .5 0
2 6 4 .5 0

3 9 .5 2 0 8 .0 0 2 0 8 .0 0
3 9 .5 2 0 9 .0 0 2 0 9 .5 0

$
$
2 3 2 .0 C -2 6 6 .5 0
2 3 2 .0 0 - 2 6 9 .0 0
2 3 6 .0 0 - 2 6 5 .0 0
2 5 4 .5 0 - 2 7 8 ,0 0

—

•

1 9 1 .0 0 - 2 2 1 .0 0
1 9 5 .0 0 - 2 2 0 .0 0

-

—
-

2
1
1
1
-

25
25
-

88
65
23
2
19

185
160
25
1
22

185
134
51
11
7

125
68
57
19
18

50
46
4

80
79
1

123
88
35

105
70
35

94
37
57

49

10

5

49

10

5

1

1
1
-

16
16
-

105
81
24

109
8S
24

305
223
82
34

190
158
32
2

254
161
93
39

211

239
113
126
42

219
53
186
100

48
38

38
35

34
26

3

1
1

2

—
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
-

-

8
3

105

106
34

5

6
-

-

_

_

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

_

_

_

S ee footn otes at end o f ta b le s .

Table A-2a. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers—large establishments
in Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.—Wis., January 1975
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)______

O ccupation and in du stry d iv isio n

N um ber o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earnings <
s

A verage
w eekly
hours1
(standard)

s

100

s

110

and
under

120

s

s

s

s

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

200

220

240

2b0

280

300

320

340

360

3du

400

420

130

140

150

160

170

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

4?0

44Q

7
1

28
7

21

67
49
18
1

48
30
18

10

10

28
4
24
13
5

9
2
7
3
4

3
1
2
2
-

4

6

9

16
5

34
31

9
1

3
1
2

2

47
24
23
3

13

10

6

2

"

110

M iddle range2

s

ALL WORKERS
$

$

$

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS A
MANUFACTURING-------------------NONMANUFACTUPING --------— ■
PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------FIN AN CE-----------------------------

205
95

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS 8
MANUFACTURING ---------— -----NONMANUFACTURING — - — — *
PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------FIN AN CE-------------------------- -«

323
145
178
54




110
25
54

66

$

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

2 0 0 .0 0
1 9 7 .5 0
2 0 2 .5 0
2 2 5 .5 0
2 0 0 .0 0

1 9 7 .0 0 1 8 4 .0 0 1 9 5 .0 0 1 8 8 .5 0 1 9 9 .5 0 1 7 7 .5 0 2 2 2 .0 0 2 1 2 .5 0 1 8 8 .5 0 1 7 3 .0 0 -

2 1 2 .5 0
2 0 3 .0 0
2 2 4 .5 0
2 3 8 .0 0
2 1 3 .5 0

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

1 7 9 .5 0
1 6 7 .5 0
1 8 9 .0 0
2 1 3 .0 0
1 8 6 .5 0

1 7 0 .0 0 1 6 0 .0 0 1 6 5 .0 0 1 5 7 .0 0 1 7 9 .5 0 1 6 0 .5 0 2 3 0 .0 0 1 8 2 .5 0 1 7 5 .0 0 1 5 6 .5 0 -

1 9 0 .5 0
1 7 5 .5 0
2 2 7 .0 0
2 3 0 .0 0
2 1 1 .0 0

32
13
19
1
15

49
28

21

72
44
28

6
17

1

4
<
*
-

W eekly earnings
(standard)
Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

1

Num ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e w eek ly earn in gs o f—
s

s

S

S

$

S

S

S

S

S

s

S

S

$

S

S

*

Mean i

Median

*

M iddle range *

$

S

S

110
100
and
under

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

110

O ccupation and industry d iv isio n

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

340 . 36fl_

6
6
-

12
2
10

25
14
11

61
45
16

57
48
9

35
24
11

16
12
4

7
5
2

_
-

•

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

22
6
16

32
6
26

9

15

42
11
31
5
16

29
17
12
5
7

25
7
18
8
8

20
11
9
9
-

12
6
6
6
-

10
4

1

59
8
51
3
30

72
31
41
12
19

85
56
29
21

54
25
29
21

34
14
20
19

4

17
8
9
9

1
1
1

6
1
1

42
18
24
9

67
57
10
2

S

360

380

400

420

380

400

420

»*0

6
-

3
2
1
1
—

_
-

_
-

•
-

-

-

_
•
-

-

103
82
21
13

78
62
16
8

59
36
23
11

26
23
3
-

3
3
-

2
1
1
-

43
20
8
10

8
7
7
-

•
-

-

-

3
-

2
-

340

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS Q -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------- --------

219
156
63

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

$
1 4 0 .5 0
1 4 2 .0 0
1 3 7 .5 0

$
1 4 1 .0 0
1 4 2 .5 0
1 3 5 .5 0

$
$
1 3 1 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0
1 3 3 .5 0 - 1 5 0 .0 0
1 2 8 .5 0 -1 5 0 * 0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS A -------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------- -------NONMANUFACTURING ----- -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------------

257
79
178
43
86

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

2 7 4 .0 0
2 8 9 .0 0
2 6 7 .5 0
3 2 1 .0 0
2 5 4 .5 0

2 6 5 .5 0
2 8 7 .5 0
2 5 9 .0 0
3 2 0 .5 0
2 5 3 .0 0

2 4 4 .0 0 - 3 0 3 .5 0
2 5 5 .5 0 - 3 2 3 .0 0
2 4 1 .5 0 - 2 9 5 .0 0
2 9 5 .5 0 -3 5 0 * 0 0
2 3 8 .0 0 - 2 6 8 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS B -------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------------

363
164
199
92
57

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

2 4 2 .0 0
2 4 5 .5 0
2 3 9 .5 0
2 6 3 .0 0
2 2 4 .0 0

2 4 0 .5 0
2 4 8 .5 0
2 3 4 .5 0
2 6 3 .5 0
2 2 4 .5 0

2 1 8 .5 0 - 2 6 4 .5 0
2 3 0 .0 0 - 2 6 4 .0 0
2 0 8 .0 0 - 2 6 4 .5 0
2 4 1 .5 0 - 2 8 9 .0 0
2 0 7 .0 0 - 2 3 6 .0 0

-

_
-

-

-

—
-

-

6
5
1

1
1

27
10
17

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

5

66
15
51
9
23

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS C -------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------- —
NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

134
52
82

3 9 .5 2 0 7 .0 0 2 0 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 2 0 2 .5 0 2 0 0 .5 0
3 9 .5 2 0 9 .5 0 2 1 0 .5 0

1 9 0 .0 0 - 2 2 3 .0 0
1 7 9 .5 0 - 2 2 2 .0 0
1 9 1 .0 0 - 2 2 3 .0 0

-

_
-

1
1

1
1

-

-

2
2
-

35
11
24

33
11
22

32
14
18

12
1
11

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS* CLASS A -------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------- -------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------—
FINANCE --------------------------------------------

411
283
128
67

3 9 .5 3 3 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 3 3 9 .5 0
3 9 .5 3 1 4 .0 0
3 9 .0 3 0 3 .0 0

3 3 6 .0 0
3 3 8 .0 0
3 1 9 .0 0
3 1 3 .0 0

3 1 0 .5 0 - 3 5 6 .5 0
3 1 7 .5 0 - 3 5 6 .5 0
2 8 1 .0 0 - 3 5 6 .0 0
2 5 0 * 0 0 - 3 5 1 .0 0

3

3

19

6

-

3
3

3
3

19
15

1
5
3

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS* CLASS 8 — ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------- —
PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------------------—
FINANCE --------- ----------------------------------

480
128
29
65

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
40*0
3 9 .5

2 8 8 .0 0
2 8 6 .0 0
3 2 5 .5 0
2 6 9 .0 0

2 6 7 * 0 0 -3 0 3 .5 0
2 5 3 * 0 0 -3 1 5 .0 0
3 0 2 .5 0 - 3 3 9 .0 0
2 2 5 .0 0 - 3 1 2 .0 0

2
2

8
8

20
11

102
21
3
8

135
17
3

6

102
25
7
11

ORAFTERS* CLASS A — ------------------------- —
MANUFACTURING----- — — — — — — —

437
382

3 9 .5 2 5 4 .5 0 2 5 2 .0 0 2 3 4 .0 0 - 2 7 2 .5 0
3 9 .5 250 *50 2 4 9 .0 0 2 3 0 * 0 0 -2 6 9 .0 0

_

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

53
41

29
21

ORAFTERS* CLASS B — — — — ----------— —
MANUFACTURING--------------------------------—
NONMANUFACTURING —
—
-------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

378
306
72
43

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0

2 0 8 .5 0
200 *50
242 *50
239 *00

2 0 5 .0 0
2 0 0 .0 0
2 40 *00
2 37 *00

1 8 7 .5 0 - 2 2 4 .5 0
1 8 5 .0 0 - 2 1 2 .5 0
2 2 2 .0 0 - 2 6 9 .5 0
2 1 8 .0 0 - 2 6 0 .5 0

•
-

_
-

.
-

-

•
-

ORAFTERS* CLASS C --------— —
—
MANUFACTURING----- --------------------------—

243
187

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

173*50 1 7 0 .0 0
1 6 4 .5 0 1 6 5 .0 0

1 5 7 .5 0 - 1 8 4 .0 0
1 5 4 .0 0 - 1 7 3 .5 0

_
-

1
1

1
1

7
7

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS ---------------------MANUFACTURING ----------—
— ------—

1*092
1*021

3 9 .5 221*00 2 1 6 .5 0
3 9 .5 2 1 7 .5 0 2 1 2 .0 0

1 8 6 .0 0 - 2 5 2 .0 0
1 8 5 .0 0 - 2 4 6 .0 0

.
-

-

-

-

-

NURSES* INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ----MANUFACTURING ----- -------------------- ----------

125
95

3 9 .5 207 *00 2 0 8 .0 0
3 9 .5 208 *00 2 0 8 .0 0

1 9 0 * 0 0 -2 2 0 .0 0
1 9 3 .0 0 - 2 1 9 .5 0

_

.

-

-




2 8 5 .5 0
2 8 3 .0 0
3 1 6 .5 0
2 6 8 .0 0

-

-

-

-

_
—

-

-

-

17
12
5

—

6

2

-

.

8

10

60
17
1
10

-

•
-

8
6

1
1

32
32

89
89

142
129

78
61

2
1
1
1

21
21
-

27
24
3
2

105
102
3
1

111
101
10
7

66
46
20
15

24
11
13

11

8

3

11

6

5

8
3

3
3

-

•
-

-

30
29

39
38

40
39

47
40

45
32

17

10

5

1

.

1
1

16
16

81
81

85
85

223
223

158
158

177
161

130
113

76
53

34
24

1
1

-

-

5

8
3

42
35

38
35

26
21

1
1

2

-

-

-

no
105
3

—
-

-

-

-

_

•
-

-

_

«.

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

Table A-3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex.
in Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.—Wis., January 1975
Sex, occupation* and in d u stry d iv isio n

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

Number
of
woiken

Weekly
Weekly
hours) earnings1
[standard) (standard)

HEN

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING# CLASS A — — —

552

4 0 .0

$
1 8 9 .0 0
186«50

124

4 0 .0

CLERKS# ACCOUNTING# CLASS B ----------—
N0NNANUFACTURIN6 — — —
——
WHOLESALE TRAOE ----------------------------

110
107

3 9 .5 1 2 6 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 6 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 3 .5 0

MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------- — -------WHOLESALE TRAOE ----------------------------

70
325
325

4 0 .0 1 7 5 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 1 2 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 1 2 .0 0

MESSENGERS------------------ ------------------------------MANUFACTURING------— ------------ -----------NUNMANUr
1UKINU • • • * • • "* * * • * * * •

135
51
Q4

3 9 .5 1 2 3 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 0 7 .0 0
1 3 3 .5 0

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

1 4 6 .0 0

W EN
OM

BILLERS# MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE)t
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

Or

3 9 .5 1 3 5 .0 0

135
117
1 14

BILLERS# MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINEI
NUNMANUr At 1UK INP

3 9 .0 1 2 7 .5 0
IQ n 1 9 1 A
J7.U 1 C 1 . 9C 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS#
MANUFACTURING
—
NONMANUFACTURING — —

177
eo
oc
—

— —
—

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS#
CLASS 8 — — — — —
—
——
—
NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------UUAI CC HIP 1KAUC
WliULtdALt T O A n r •■•*••■•••••••

125
283
100

CLERKS# ACCOUNTING# CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------------- -------PUBLIC U TILITIE S -------------------------WHOLESALE TRAOE — —
— — —
RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------rIN A N tt ••••••••••••••••••••••
5ERVICES

1*939
537
1*402
559
349
108

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING# CLASS B —
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NUNMANUrAt1UKINU
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------- ---------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------RETAIL TR AO E---------------------------- ------

2*82 2
759
2#063

SERVICES ------------------------------------------See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




CTJ

7J

CC Q
J 9V
A ll

Average
(mean2)

Average
(mean2)

Ol w
356
422
141

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
AA A
w U . il
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
9A A
JO . V
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
40 .0
3 9 .5
.a
a
d O .Q

4 0 .0

1 4 0 .5 0
1 4 4 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 1 8 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0
11 a cn
1ID.SfJ
1 6 0 .0 0
1 5 0 .5 0
1 6 3 .5 0
1 8 9 .5 0
1 4 8 .0 0
1 3 5 .5 0
1 AO _A A
IHO.00
1 4 4 .5 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 2 0 .5 0
1 3 0 .5 0
1 5 7 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0
19 C CA
I c S .S v
1 2 6 .5 0

Sex, o ccu p ation , and in du stry d iv isio n

Number
of
woikes

Weekly
Weekly
hours1 earnings1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS W
OMEN— CONTINUED
—
—

203

CLERKS* FILE# CLASS B -------------------------MANUFACTURING — — --------------— — -----NONMANUFACTURING —
—
— ——
PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

544
145
OBfi
J77
79
A9
Oc
206

CLERKS# FILE# CLASS A — —
—
FINANCE —

—

——

—

—
—

FINANCE — — -----------------------------------CLERKS* FILE* CLASS C -------------------------MANUFACTURING — — —
—— —
NONMANUFACTURING — —
—
—
WHOLESALE TRADE — -----------------------ORDER j l ^ m j■
m
MANUFACTURING----- -------------------- — -----NONMANUFACTURING — — — — — —
WHOLESALE TRADE — — —
———
RETAIL TRADE — — — ----------------------

1 AC
IO O
OO
OA

85A
131
723
85
AAA
HOO
659
166
493
262
118

CLERKS* PAYROLL — — —
——— —
MANUrAC TUR 1No — — —
—
——
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES — — — — —
w h olesale TRADE — —
— ——
RETAIL TRADE — — — —
—— —

584
pf\C
cUO
379
129
92
70

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS# CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING — — ----- ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING —
—
—
—
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------------WHOLtaALt IK*Ut — — — — —
—
RETAIL TRADE —
——
----- —
T I NANCE — —
—
— ——
—

1*394
512
882
232

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS# CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES — —
——
WHOLESALE TRADE
RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------

1*209
307
902
95
214
153
384
56

SERVICES -----------------------------------------MESSENGERS — —
—
——
———
MANUFACTURING ----- -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------— — — -------PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE — — —
— —

CH4

93
187

436
126
310
26
62
17S

Sex, occu pation , and in du stry d iv isio n

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS W
OMEN— CONTINUED
$
— ““““““
39*0 1 3 9 .0 0 SECRETARIES — — ——
9 0 A 139#50
MANUr AtIUKllMo
IQ C 1 c H*!>U
M A k i ii Ak ll |C AL 1UKiNv>
NUNMANUr A f 'T I ID T k l/I
J O .3
1O A C A
nnfli T c i TILITIES
PUBLIC iUT f l T T T C C
UUAI C C A l C T D 1 r \C
WHOLESALE TKAUE
112o50
3 9 .0 1 l o c t
RETAIL TKAUE
3 9 .5 1 1 3 .0 0
7 i7c0o d y
CA
rIN A N tt
3 9 .0 l
SERVICES -----------------------------------------3 9 .5 1 4 0 .0 0
AA A
HU«U I U C . 9 U
SECRETARIES# CLASS A -----------------------3 8 .5 1 0 6 .0 0
u at i l 1C A A T I ID T h l f l _____________________________
M A M k i A All I P A ^ T I ID 1 NO •••••••••••••••
NUNMANUrAt1UKTkl/1
9 9 .5 0
3 9 .0
D IIO I Tr IITTI ITT r.o ••••
rU“ L i t UVlU l l 1 PC
9 5 .0 0
3 8 .5
yufilL pealL u TPAITP
H n U C o R P I r v A l/ C
■ « ■
3 9 .0 1 0 0 .0 0
4 0 .0
9 1 .5 0
QQ~Cn
77#D v
3 8 .5
crro rT A D T C C _
SECKETAKIES# a i a c c D “ “ “
CLASS q
“
““
n A N U r M w 1 v»> I N v
4 0 .0 1 2 4 .5 0
i l A k i y A M l | At 1UKINu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CA rTI ID Tkl/1
NUNMANUr
3 9 .5 1 3 3 .5 0
piioiuTP IITTI i i i l 3
^ u n iv % i i b TTTPC
j
4 0 .0 1 2 2 .0 0
yumL C , 3 n L p TOADP
w n v pcA| L
1n A U u
4 0 .0 1 2 8 .5 0
RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------3 9 .5 1 0 6 .0 0
FINANCE------------------------------------ -------C P p W IL uo
OunV T P P C
- --. .
4 0 .0 1 5 2 .0 0
AA A
HU#U
c r c t K T 1AD i c c *t m a c c r * * * « » * » » ^ - * «
r o c t A K lto
D
tLAoD t
3 9 .5 1 5 5 .0 0
u AM I I t ATtT l I D T k lf l •••••••••••*••••••
MANUr A 1UK1Nu
4 0 .0 1 9 0 .0 0
klOM n Akll IF A U 1 U n l N U • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
A
N U NMA N U r ACTI ID TW
4 0 .0 1 3 5 .0 0
PIIAI iTP Ul XL1 1 ICO ■■■■
IITTI TTTPC
rU c U w
3 9 .5 1 3 1 .0 0
y u A i CCAl F TOADP ••••• ••••••••
VfnULtdALu 1KAUC.
O CT A T I
Ktv AIL T O A A C ••••••••••••••••*
IKAUfc
3 9 .5 1 4 1 .5 0
PTAiAKlPP
3 9 .5 1 3 4 .0 0
CPOUTPPC
D u N V 1v u D
•
3 9 .5 1 4 6 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 7 6 .0 0
AA A
SECRETARIES* CLASS D -----------------------IvOoDU
MANUFACTURING----- — — — ---------- — —
3 9 .5 1 3 4 .5 0
IAklM IFAPTI IDTklft
Akll
K
NUNMANUr At 1UK1NU ••••*•*••••••••
3 8 .5 1 3 6 .0 0
PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------------------U U A I t t A t t TDAAC
WnU FCAI C 1KAUt *
*
3 9 .5 1 2 1 .5 0
RETAIL TRADE ----- ---------------------------4 0 .0 1 1 7 .5 0
r iNANUt
3 9 .5 1 2 3 .0 0
DtnV l t t 5 ^
* ■ **• • **
4 0 .0 1 4 6 .5 0
4 0 .0 7 9O o v v
K 0 AA
VTPMn^OAPMFDC. ULNuNAL
uNUvnAr n tnD f AFfclFDAl
3 9 .5 1 1 4 .5 0 jDV
u A I iPATTl iDTKId
M
MANUr A t 1UNxNU ••••••••••••*•••••
3 8 .5 1 1 9 .0 0
t lA K ly A t i l I f AAtT I ID T k lf l •••••••••••••••
NUNMANUr A 1UKINb
4 0 .0 1 1 7 .0 0
PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------------------KnULUwAWb 1nAUU wwm m ™ — *
m
--- —
3 9 .0 1 0 0 .5 0
D C T A1U. T D A A C •••••••••••••••••
m
Kt 1 A T l 1KAUt
3 9 .0
9 8 .0 0
PTMAKirP ••••••••••••••••••••••
r lNANUt.
3 9 .0 1 0 1 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 3 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 0 4 .0 0
3 8 .5
9 4 .0 0

Number
of
workers

Average
(mean2)
Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5

$
1 6 1 .0 0
1 5 8 .5 0
1 6 4 .0 0
2 0 5 .5 0
1 6 7 .5 0
1 5 4 .5 0
1 5 5 .5 0
1 4 8 .0 0

573
9 l
C1l 7
JjO
104
130
AC
OS

4 0 .0
AA A
HUoO
AA A
H •1
U 1
AA^A
HV •If
40 #0
-*Q A
J7# □

1QA A A
17D#UU
ptc^AA
l J j •U U
180*50
1 UC AA
lOD#UU

i *vC0
687
f JJ
90
158
76
341
68

to c
JToD
39#5
oq r
%
J7| u
40 a O
AA.A
t v •U
39*5
3 9 .0
39*0

17A c a
1 rH#ou
174*50
174*00
238*00
167#50
1 6 0 .5 0
163#50
1 7 5 .5 0

5.A71
C9** 1 1

IQ C 1 C C 0 A
W7#3 1 D D # a U
c 7C 9 A
J7tO I D c . DCU
7Qa a 1 C O Auu
4 7 # U 107# A
A A 1/ 1 ftCT^cA
t V # A X0 3 t 9 V
1 Q C 1 7 7 ^ AA
J T oaD
i f f #uu
A A V lD A
A
H U # A 7 C O . DCQ
O « D X A O# U U
Q L 1H7 AA
JO
J7« s) i t O . O V

5 *97 3
3*111
2*86 2
414
587
365
1*028
468

1 . CQQ
1 * 377
872
112
143
iC J

7A2
J O c.
132

1 9 4 .5 0
1 QC * D U
17O C A

1*441
608

3 9 .5
3 9 ,0

O J3

OQ C
J7 # 3

108
Q
O
Oo
137
P / lA
cOU
t'Mi

4 0 .0

o c
O?O
p^c
cDD

3 9 #5 Xw O o ~ v
t o c 1c c . o C a
i OO O
lO C 7 A A AA
ItboOU
40*0 1 8 3 .5 0
A v t . A X C s .A n
t f • u 1? j i U U
*70 U 1 X O A A
4 7 # A 116 * U U
*70 A 1 t
CA
4 7 # Q 1 l 7D* O 0

A I A
OtU

237
154
70
17
I IQ
1A 7

AA A
HU*0

3 9 .0

145*50
1 4 3 .5 0
1 H 7 •A A
1 A f UU
171*50
1AA CA
lHH#OU
146*50

1l
AA
AA * U 1 4u # U 0
HU A
o

Table A-3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex.
in Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.—Wis., January 1975— Continued
Sex, occu p a tion , and in du stry d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

Average
(mean2)
Weekly
Weekly
hours* earnings*
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS W EN— CONTINUED
OM
STENOGRAPHERS* SENIOR
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------

<
t

Sex, occu p ation , and in du stry d iv isio n

751

1 5 4 .0 0
40 *0 1 7 1 .5 0

WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS -------------------- -----NONMANUFACTURING-------------------- ------—

127
324
32

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

n^T AIL 1HAUL
59
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ---------------------------- -------NUNrmNvr hv* vvr%inw
AliQI f r IITTI TTTTC — — — —
PUBLIC U TILITIES
—
uuai r e si cr TRAUt _ ____ ____________
WHOLtoALc. td *r\c ••••••••••••••
OPT ATI TO AOP
RETAIL TRADE

805
224
581
QQ
W7
1 CA
i3U
1o i
AI
i

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
OQ C
AA A
HVoO

1 2 9 .5 0
1 2 0 .5 0
1 8 1 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0
1 2 6 .5 0
1 1 9 .5 0

81

316
71
CHD
181

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
-to cr
3 8 .0

TYPISTS* CLASS A ----- ------------------------— M
ANUr AC 1UR I N b ”*
**
NONMANUFACTURING----------------------— —
WMOLCj ALl 1 KAUC •••••
~
n t I AIL IKAUC
fINANvC ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ " ■

1*16 5
A LQ
A
t QO
697
113
62
386

3 9 .5
OQ.C

3 9 .0 124^00
4 0 .0 1 1 8 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 6 .0 0
3 8 .5 1 1 6 .5 0

TVDTCTCta PI A o j Q ••••••••• — —
1T r lo lb
L L ACC d
MANUFACTURING------—
— -------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------------------WnULtdALu 1KAUC
• ••
KC vAX * 1mAUw
L
PTMAKirr
r inArivc
SERVICES -----------------------------------------

1*681
486
1*195
102
158
87
756
92

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5

r

llMANLL

1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 1 .0 0
1 6 1 .5 0
1 1 5 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS* CLASS A -------------------------------MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING
p T kl AMAC
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS*_CLASS 8 -------------------------------MANUFACTURING —
—
———
NONMANUFACTURING —
————
PUBLIC U TILITIES — — — — —
FINANCE — — —
—————
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BUSINESS* CLASS C:
NONMANUFACTURING — —
———

PROFESSIONAL ANO TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN
COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS A — —
NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

uuai c c ai c TNAUt
WHOLEoALC td an r
r r i n k t A r _______________ _. _____ __ __
_
rlNANVfc.

i
114*00
1 1A U
C
ilO iOC A COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
1 0 6 .0 0
BUSINESS* CLASS B — — — — — — — —
—
1 1 7 .5 0
NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----- -------------------UUAI PC A1 P TD AnC
WHOLESALE TRAUE
1 2 6 .5 0
FINANCE —
—
—
————
1 1 7 .5 0
COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
124*50
BUSINESS* CLASS C
MANUFACTURING
klAM AA ICAATI 1Di No
U ll
I/1
1 2 4 .0 0
NUNMANUr AV 1UKTK

^0 •0
3 7 .5
3 9 .5

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
VbNCKAL
MANUFACTURING-----------------------------------klAilll A A 1CA ATI IBT ilA
ll
____ —
__________
NONMANUrACTURING

^ v n r u 1 ck

SERVICES -------------------------------------------

80
O tH VltLo

FINANCE --------------------------------------------

273
208
82

357
121
cJO
68
59
73

39*5
-IQ^c
OQ C
J 7 »0
AA •U
■fV A

JUu
152
154
103

■1Q.C
07 •O
40^0

426
81
345
39
79
1 CA
JlO
O
51

oq n
J7#U

4 0 .0
tO c
Jo .3
4 0 .0

390
287
69
A7
vf
101

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

232*50
2 2 9 .0 0
2 6 3 .5 0
2 1 6 .0 0
2 1 9 .5 0

4 0 .0
3 8 .0

3 9 .0
3 8 .0

J " *u
* q ac
>
J7 * ?
AU^U
HA•A

167
50
117
Air

3 9 .5 1 9 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 9 3 .5 0
IQ
J v . DC 1 9 0 .5 0

487
258
229
1 n?
XUc

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
-»Q A
0“ . V

3 3 0 .5 0
3 3 8 .5 0
3 2 2 .0 0
‘IIC.CA

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

2 8 5 .0 0
2 8 5 .5 0
2 8 4 .5 0
3 0 0 .5 0
2 8 0 .0 0

554
343

211
39
1 JO

CA
D4

4 0 .0 2 2 8 .5 0

Number
of
workers

Average
(mean2)
Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

$

71x
fi 1
CAA
DHU
171
Jf1
L
AO
HC

IQ O
JT •C
70 c
70 C
j7 o d
Art rt
HU•U

put Crt
c d l* D 0
275* 00

ooi
477
OAA
cO*f
49
66

70 •c
O
7Q ac
OTod
39*5
4 0 .0
AA * A
H U
U

206 *0 0
1QQ.nn
ITT* uu
2 2 2 *0 0
077 Ca
c J ( *b0
1 7 /* AA
1 Q7 0 0

CAO
OHC

344

p m .n n
CO 1•uu

p e t AAH
c j 1•U
U

3 9 * 5 171 AA
xfl*U U

3 9 .5 1O I * AA
I AI uu

198

3 9 .0

188 *00

1 01
1 .*7100
1*0 0 8
77c
( rD
777
337

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 3 6 *0 0
2 1 8 *0 0
2 5 9 *0 0
2 7 7 *5 0

191
138
57

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1A l . U U
t v I.AA
1 6 1 .0 0
1 5 9 .0 0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS • W EN
OM
.rnMDIITPO U «unAIU ndl vLAOd R
LU nrv 1 CK OPPOATnPQ. n ACC w
”
Vfl VV AV IP A ATI IDT kID
I I i II
_______ ___
NUNMANUr ALIUK1NL _______ —
WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------AAiim ivrn Afirn ATAnr n * r r A
COMPUTfcR UPtKATUKb* CL Abb V -» • —
M M Akit IP APTI XNU
O M
NUNMANUr AL V IP TMft
UK

91
52

J 7 .U

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS A ---------------- ---------- -----V V A I IP AATI IDT V _ ______ _ __________
IA IM M
IA
NUNMANUrAVTUKING

67
An
OO

3 9 .0 2 6 1 .5 0
OQ A 9LO Crt
J t *U cd T o d o

AAiiQi ITPD DDAP.D AVXM C PD
CuMKUIcK KKUUKAMMcKbf
BUSINESS* CLASS B:
M ktV kll IPAL1UK1NU • •• ••••*•*•••••
A JA
AATI IDTK
IC
NUNMANUr

69

OQ^C ppO^Crt
JToD Cu t * DU

83
71
f 1

7Q ac 1AC_Cn
W7|D X O D * D U
70 C 1 o H * AA
jT # d
x QA Q U

^ A iio iiT r n c v c T r r iic
a k ia I v c t c
COMPUTLR ST5TC.MS ANAVTblb*
BUSINESS* CLASS C ---------------------------------

55

4 0 .0

NURSES* INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) -----M K IPAATI IDTKIA
A II
MANUrAL1UK i Nw ••••••••• **• • • • •

137
101

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
QilCTKIPCCm AI ACC P — "■
n U dllrtddf LLAdd L
M Vi A kll IP AC TURING —
AM
NUNMANUr A ATI IDT kl/1 ______ _ _ __ _____ _

7Q C 1 "lA cn
ld o*d O
3 9 . 5 142 *00

2 4 3 .5 0

3 9 . 5 2 0 7 .5 0
7 7 . D
J 0 *b 2 0 8 .0 0

3 9 .5 1 9 2 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 9 1 .0 0
3 8 .5 2 0 2 .5 0

NOTE: E arn ings data in table A -3 rela te only to w o rk e rs w hose se x id en tification w as p ro vid e d by the establishm ent.
to all w o rk e rs in an occu p ation . (See appendix A fo r publication c r it e r ia .)




Sex, o ccu p a tion , and in du stry d iv isio n

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
$
1 7 9 .5 0 nDATTPOC. UCADD A ■
L/K8» 1CiKvt pi ACC A "
*
m
"■**
i a a .aV
M K U APTI IDTKiA
HAINIPAL 1UK1NU
M II r
IvO .<; a
K IM Akli IPAL 1UK TNo •••••••••••••••
lflklM ANU A/'Tl IDi K
I/1
103.3U
NU M
r
DllQI TP U 1 lu x 1 l t d *• *• "•• • • • • •
2 1 7 .0 0
rU oL lL IITTI TTTFC
1 6 5 .0 0
nOAFTFDC. PI ACC Q
1 7 9 .0 0 UKAr1tKd| LLAdd u _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
"J
M K IPAv l UKxNU ••••••••• *• • • *• *•
A It
1
"AiNU“ APTI IPT K A
hiAkiu *h ic aati in t lie
ia
NUNMANUrALTUKINv •••••••••••••••
1 4 1 .0 0
mint r f* iitti t T rt d •••••••••••••
rU oL lL U1xL1 I i r e
1 4 4 .5 0
UUAI PC A P TD An r • • • • •• • •• *•« «
I
1 3 8 .0 0
WPIULudALt 1KAUC
*•*
1 3 7 .0 0
HDAPTPDC. vLAdd P
PI ACC v
UKArVwKdt
M K IPAL 1UK xNO ••••••••• *• • *• *• •
IA
“ A II APTI IDTK
AlrUr
klD Akll IP AATI IDT klA
klVi
2 7 2 .0 0
NUNMANUr AV1UKINb _ _______ __________
2 7 5 .0 0
2 7 1 .5 0 Pi PATDAkITAC TPAUkiTAT AkIC__ _ — ______
C.LE.V 1KUNI Vb TEVrlNIVlANS
UAkli IPAL1UK1NU ••••••••••••••••••
kISl
MANUr AATI IDT
3 2 1 .0 0
k k AA I IP AATI IDTklA ______ ___________
lD lV M
2 8 2 .0 0
NUNMANUr AVTUKlNG —
____ ______
DllQI TA IITTI illC b
2 5 6 .5 0
PUBLIC U T I LT T T P C __ __ ^
2 6 8 .0 0

PROFESSIONAL ANO TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS B --------—

227

Average
(mean2)
Number
of
Weekly
Weekly
workers hours* earnings*
(standard) (standard)

Earnings data in ta b les A - l and A - 2 ,

on the oth er hand,

rela te

Sex,

o c c u p a t io n *

O F F IC E

a n d in d u s t r y d iv is io n

O C C U P A T IO N S

-

.

W e e k ly
hours*
(standard)

W e e k ly
earnings*
(standard)

M EN

M A N U F A C T U R IN G
N tb S L N v tK b
O F F IC E

------- ------- --------------------

* * ^ * » —^

~56

-

o c c u p a t io n ,

_

1 2 8 .5 0

320

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

— — — — —

N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G

1*370

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

.

4 0 .0
3 9 .0

_

200

tL u n IN O f r I L t f tL A ^ O
D • • • * * • • • •
U A K II Iff A P T l ID T k l A _______________ _ _______
_______
• • • • • • • • • * • • • • •

P L C K ^ C * r r1iL C . I V i L a c c p
p _ p, A3o t
Li PD k j * r
L i a i .Ii i r * r T l i D T K j r _ ____________ _______
n H i i u r m v #v u n i n u
—
i l f U l U A All Iff A P T I IO T K lP _________________________ _
r ii N W n v t .
PI p Q tfC .

• • • • • • • • • • • • • * • • * •

D D HPO

_ __ _ _____________

HIOM M AKII I r A P lT l n Dl T M f j
iN U N P lA r iu F A t U I i N v t
D P T A 71
TDAHF
K t *A lt
1K A U t

*

CLERKS*
P A Y R O L L -------------------------------------- —
n A I N U r M U 1 v n l lT V ? • • • • • • • • • » • • • * .
KlO KIM AKIIU F M P T1IUID 7 INVJ • • • • • • * • • • • ■
l> lv ~ n A lN I r A U
K 1 Mf%
D U oI L Tl P I I T T IU 1 T T lCQ • • • • • • • • • ■
r IIQ
t U 11 T 1JF D
D P T A 71
K t 1A lt

TDAHP
1K A U t

*

*k®

i/ r w n i iiiM u A O r o A T A n r .
* r» r a
H tT rU N L n U r tK A I U K o i C L A S S A
M A M I IrP A T T IUID lT KK j • • • • • • • • •_ •_ •_•_•_•_,
n A N U M U 1 n P IA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
M ftkflM A iNIU r M U T lUID 7 M P • • • • • • • • • • • ■
I N U in AM I P A P 1 K 1IMU
Dua
I 1X T1 l C • • • • • • • • »
_
r U o lL ITf* UI T T I L 1 T T tCo
U
D P T A 71
TKAUr
K tf A lt
1D A n t
F IN A N C E

*

*

—
KEYPU NCH O PERATO RS* C LA SS B —
•
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------K IAA1U AM IU| r A U T !UID T L ift
NU NM AN p AP 1 K 1NU
Ol tS l f
I 1 7 T 1 l C _ * • •_ _ • • •_■ _
r U IDI t 7U
UI T X lL 1 T 7 tPd
• __ ••_ _
o r t i T 1 T D A n r _____________ _______
h l i M ik
i nm vt
P T k lA H ir 'P _ _ ___ _ ___ _________
_




—

—

—

—

—

1 6 9 .0 0
190*00
1 5 7 .5 0

3 9 .0

1 21
131

3 9 .0

80

3 9 .0

- io n
J c J
99
224
114

1 3 2 .5 0
1 5 6 .5 0
1 3 6 .5 0
1 4 7 .5 0
1 5 3 .5 0

3 9 .0

116*50

3 9 .0

404
99

4 7 #0

204
119
1 14

39# 0
90 U
47# A
97 3
4Q a e
QQ C
47# 3
90 - 3
4 7 #C
AA A
*MJ # 0
AA *A
H U #U
9Q * 3
47 e

1 ft c
4 t #!>
IQ C
47*3
*3ft c
4 t *3

249

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
SO C
J T .3

98*50
92*00
100*50
101*50
118*00
113*50
106*00
152*00
145*00

D C V ilT C 1 H r v x c .3 *

V iL M O o

iv u iv n « i v u r « u i u r v iiv o

M

-------------- — —

— — — -------

U T IL IT IE S

----------------- —

D C U K C 1A n 1 C 3 f U tM O a D
y a ait if f A P T l ID T K IP
M A N U r A L 1U K 1 N u “
hi ft KIM AKII Ir A P T lUIK T A iH • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
N U N M A N U P A t 1 D 1 INI)
DPT A IL TDAAC
K L T A TI
fKAU t
r 1TVM W VU

3 C V K C 1 A f t lV O t UU M O O U —
————
---U AKIIUI r A U T U ID I N IP • • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • •
M A N P A P I l K TK O
NUNM ANUr ACT UK I No
P U B L IC U T IL IT IE S

--------------------------------

R E T A I L ^ T R A D E ------------------------------------------r iu a u v u
—
———
— ————

1 5 4 .5 0
3 1 u K U U K M r n t K O f u c .u c .r t
U k KN lU P A P T l IK T N O « • •
M A I I r A U 1U D I M ft
k lA N ll i A k iiUI r A v T UID ITN O i
N U k M A N P A P T l K k l/

1 3 3 .0 0

800
A fI lD
• y
Oo l
4 Q1

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 4 1 .5 0
1 3 4 .5 0

Dfl IDI L T P
rU B
It
D t T A lI
K P T A Tu

3 9 .5

1 4 9 .5 0

r in A n v c

125

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 8 2 .0 0
1 3 4 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

— — — — — ——

r if iM n U u

1 9 3 .5 0

3 9 .5

—

d tU K C 1A K 1 C 3 * V V A 3 3 U ——
———— —---U A N IP A t 1 K 1 N O
M A Ail U r A P T lUID T R IP • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
k lA N li i A k ilUI r A v T UID I N W l • • • • • • —________ —_ _
N U k M A N P A P T l K T k O _ _____— • • • • • • • • •
D llD ft T P ft IT T ft T X T P C
_ - - _ .___________
_
r U B L I V U 1 X L 11 I t s

3 9 .0

3 9 .0

1 1 9 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0

Mu — —
—
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
_ _________
• • • • • • • •_• _____—_____
• ••• •• »
I T
UI T v Il LT TlT P C • • • • * _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
l R d _____ • • • • • • • •
T D A D P ■u t 1 *
TKAUt
1
— —-------------------------— -

3 1 c iN U o r v « r n c . r o *
a c i v x v m — — — — — ——
H M liy r M V 1U K A U U —
—
———k lA k ikMA All I PrA P TTI U K T N o _.________ ___
ID I ki/1 — —
NUN l ANU AC
—
P U B L IC U T IL IT IE S
— ------- — —
rIN A N v t • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

120*00

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

114*50

3 9 .5

115*50

149*00

39 «0

$
1 A n •D U
1UU CA
Qo # 3 U
7 QaC a
101# 50
09
7 4 # |A U
|A
1 AP~C%A
IO C • 3v
1 CaQ ^ A r
1 D 7 # U Ut
215# 00
1 C k fi^9 U
& 9 0 # CA
1 6 2 #0 0
1 H 3 #A A
1A C . UU

142
1

4 0 .0

Ao
on
1C l
104
D3
7C

CTO
OA 1
20 1
9?M
4CO
Af A
T Ot O

90 J
47# n

OQ A
COU
1 ^C
1D9

AA • A
HU 0
AU A
HA • v

1 PA
1to
78

40*0
4 0 .0

o c c u p a t io n ,

a n d in d u s t r y d iv is io n

962
CQO
D70

- o c
J jV . D
-JQ A
J r . U

1 77 # Q U
1 f 0 AA
1 73 # 3 U
1 f C AC n
1 f C . UU
X 0t3 # A A

3 i f x i w i o u R n u u r c n n i v n a ——
————— ——
U A A ll Iff A P T l ID T A l P ________ ___________ _______
M A N U r A C T U R IN G
AlAAIki A All I P A P T I ID T k lA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
N U N M A N U rA v T U K IN O • • • • • • • • * • • • • • •

CU T 1t U O A D H
3 W 1 T P n o U AAK U

Num ber
of
workers

W e e k ly
hours *
(standard)

W eek ly
earnings 1
(standard)

97# 3
40- C

£
$
1 9 1 .A A
1 4 1 #UU

-

D D F K A T A O a O rtrtFt D T1 T rtK! T 3 TC« »
U K tD A IU K ^ K
K
1 U N 1 Q 1 3**

T O A k I C n n T O T ki/a _ k i A r»LJ T K lff A n C L l k T A D C
>
T R A N 5 C R I n I N G * * M A C H l N R O P t K A 1U N 3 f
U tN tK A L • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
•1 T D iT Qf T o $ P Iu A 3 3 A
TV r o
C- V ACC A
y A KJt UPr A P T lUID 1 N U • • • * • * • * •
M A N I A v 1 K TMA
•
M A N M A N I r A t 1 K TKIft • • • • • *
•■
•• • •
N U K iM A k llU P A P T lUID 1 N U • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • «
D tT A IL TK A U t M
K PI A T I
1D A n r
• • • • • • • •

75

196
7 ltt o
r A
414

3 9# 0l 1 2 2 .5 0
97 C
4 Q# 3
90 3
4 7 #C

1C O - n n
I PA •u u
1C K #C A
l P 4 . 3U
r
1C O #u u
I P A - AA

332
Cn
DU

9Q-3
J T #C

175

39 • 0

1P f 0 u
1 C 7 . AuA
1 1 C .A A
1 1 3 • UU

777
r f r
9C f
437

39 0
90 U
47# A
90 C
47# 3
A U#u
HA n

1 1 P - 3U
11C#C n
109*50
1 1 3 # 311
11C CA
133# CA
1CC 30

1 O1
17 l

90 3
47# C
90 A
47# 0

1 A 2L # A A
106*00

pi * rc
a
VLAbo A • • • • • • •
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1M
l o il
04
TO

9Q a
47# 0
90 A
47# u

A A y n t iT r n A n r n k T n n .r
Pi *r r
L
t
U U M r U lt K U K t K A lU K b t V U A 3 3 » • • • • • • •
w AKIIUIP A P T lUID t K if l • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
M AN r A t 1 K 1N o
KIOKILI A N U P A
IU K N 1
N U N M A KII I r A PtT 11 D TIM /o * • * • * • • * * • • • • *
Dl n it U
r U IDI t T P I I T lTl IL T l l T P C
lT r b

39C
c43
96
147
190

97# 3
40 C
90 A
47# U
9 0 #C
47 3

43

4 0 #0

192 50
9 1D CA
217*30

^ A im iiT r n A n r o i T A n r
pi i r r
r
V U M r U lt K U r t K A I U K b f V u A b b v —
M A N r A V 1 K T Ki/1
M AKIIUIP A P T lUID 1 N o • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 AU
lO n
1pa
1CU

90 C
47# 3

1 Zl I * 0 0
1H4 a A

40# 0

144*50

CO M PUTER PROG RAM M ERS*
D SIK S C
o lU1C T N ItP CS *. P IL A S S A ———————
G ACC A

3nc
CU3

90 a
47# 0
90 A
47# U
40 • 0
90 c
4o# 3

Q r1 AA
2 74#0U
P ru CA
27n«3u

O A
t 3CH
137
1C f

39# 5
90 C
47# 3

OAl
A
c H 1* 0AU

69

4 0 »0

239*50
9 A 4 # CA
2O 9 30

87

90 c
47# 3

911 AA
2 11 * 0 0

3 9 #5
3 9 #5

444*00

T V O T C T C . PI A C C Q
y A M lUIP A P T l ID TKI/1 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
M A N r A V 1U K 1 N o
K1 AM U A N r A t 1 K 1 N o
N U N M AM IUIP A P T lUID T Ki/1 • • • • « • • • • • • • • • •
D l n 1 P I I T T IL T T T tP3
r U IDIL T t
U 11 1 1l C
*
** ***
D tl Al I
TOAHF • • * • • • * • * • • • • • •
K P TA TU
1K A U t
P T K IA M P P

39# 5

2 4 3 .5 0

9A&
JW * t
7A
«D
1o u
i QA

j 7 19
4g . c
90 A
47# D

1 •927
1 a Z tQ I

90 A
47# 3
90# C
47^ 3
90 3
4 7 #t
AA 0
HU • A

1 1 1 .0 0

O O
c il o
1A f
lO T
e
il ii o

549
AT
l1o r
O0 c
4 AO

*

1 2 0 .0 0

1 1 4 .5 0
110*50

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
IQ C
40*3

93
1AH
i OA

•■ ■ ■ ■

1 2 8 .5 0
1 1 8 .5 0

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

A ll
*141
111
AAA
320
ODD
272

oo
1 T
l oA o
AO
Co
32

In A U t

Sex,

O F F IC E O C C U P A T IO N S
W OMEN— C O N T IN U E D

Ct fC l

P U B L IC
p L tp o N fS t r rI i L c t. p iL f l c c A “ “ “ ”*
a
t i n l t c. r
t
C a oj
“ ****“ “ “ **
U A i l U * L li 1C 1 r T l IQ I k l / i ________________________
IT U IT H W lT U r M w 1 VFT l »VV7

H IA Nlk i A KH I P A r>T 1 lO T M d
N U k M A N U r A t 1 U K llMt>
r ilN M IN V C .

— —

W e e k ly
earnings*
(standard)

-

1 6 2 .0 0
1 4 3 .5 0

Ku T A IL

««

W e e k ly
hours*
[standard)
1

W OMEN
1*174

r T M A k ir r

a n d in d u s t r y d iv is io n

N u m be r
of
workers

A . 1C ?
*M I O C

n c .D 3 c .JV V 3 C .ro
-H«

^

O C C U P A T IO N S

Sex.

O F F IC E O C C U P A T IO N S
W OMEN— C O N T IN U E D

$

A v erag e
(m ean 2 )

A v e ra g e
(m ean 2 )

A v e ra g e
(m ea n 2 )
N u m be r
of
woriceis

h o o

Q7
0Q
1 r
1 7 11
QOC
7 fc O
480
54

3 9 .0

P # AA
c lIcP U u
2 o o #00

1 6 0 #50
1 73 # U U
1 fC^AA
133# a A
1 CCC U U
1
1D4# AA
UU
1 A l1 3 U
1 0 # CA

90 0
47# A

185# 50
i c a f v
1 9;H # D a

90 A
4 7 #U
9 Q# A
47 U
90 C
47# 3

1A f
I H 7 #A 0
0A
1A9 cn
X“ 4# 3 U
13 l a A
1 C 1 • UU

4 0 .0
3 9 .0
39# 0

1 4 6 .5 0
13 9 . 3U
1 F C #Q A

A f7
O7 Q
OCA
230
A 9Q
^C7
DA A
200

90 3
4 7 #c
90 3
4 7 #A
90 A
47# 3

1 A C #C3A
1H9 . 0
1 P C • AU
I C P^ UA
1 C A #C U
1 3 h 3A

4 0 #0
90 A
47# 0
90 A
4 7 #0

17C# 3U
1O P CA
1 1 7 #C U
1 1 9 3A
1 1H #P 0
1 1A 9 a

r n u m iT r n n n r o a t a o c
v U M K U ftK U rtK A I U K b f
l l A k l M A AllUI r A P TIIUID T N o
NUN y AN P A t
K I KI/1

T F C M KN lT A lIL
1 u V n i lI V f
• n tU
m pn

on i c a
c U l # 30
204# 50
_
1 A ft

CA

1 8 4 .5 0

137
i m4
13

P n vArP P Cg lT HI N A I t MIMU
AW H
r D uQ C w N M
n r t ra i th N q
U V n Ui p A t 1 U k i 3

420
7A
rO
A f
o7

7O
fA
Qn
70
1 .1 QC
1 1 IV b
Qa O
7U J
ODD
272
59
1J1 J
i 1
PP9
c c c
1A t
1Q3
117
1 1 *

1 90 CA
5 14o# 30
1C 1 1 C c A*
3 143# 3U
C 1AO A A
3 l* t O # U U
4 0 #0 1 9 5 . 0 0
9 0 (1 1 1 # C A
4 7 # A 1 4 3C - 3 U

—— ——

N U N M A N U r A t 1U K I N o • • • • • • * • • • • • • • •
DU IDIu T v
I
r l o
i P UI T lTlIL T T lTt PbC • • • • • • • • • • • • •
ll

P A U DrIU T t K
I 1 P D r K U o K A M iL iC U C t
DD AAD Ak M tK h .
vU M
Q IC 1 N t 3 3 - V A 3 3 Q
D lU 3 T K I P C C 9 P IU A C C n • • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • •
K U k M K II P A t 1 K T k o
N IA N lliAA N UI r A P T lUID I N lA • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Dl o l t U
_____
r U IDI tT P I I T lTl IL T T lTt PbC _ _ _ _ _ _•_•_•_ • • • • •
ll
• • • • *

39#
90
47#
90
47#

P A IMD IUI T t K
V U I K I P D O K U A D AM MtW >> f
K D A o K A U lit D C _
Q< IC l K
C. V ACC v - _ _
_ • • - _* • * -• •
D U b T N ItPoCb t P IL A b b P _ * — _ _ * _ _ _ * _ _ _ _ _ _

90 3
4 7 #c
9 0 #A
47 0
9 0 c;
47# 3

P A U OK UTIP K C T C l ' tfM C
AN A TbV b .
L U M I I t D b V b T U o A K IA lL V C T C t
P IL A b b A _____ _ • • • • • • •
1 D lU b TN ItP Cb T
U IC l K b C
V ACC A • • • • •
U AKIIUIP A Pt T lUI D T KIP • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
A 1 K 1N o
MAN r
K UNM AN r A
I K T K I _______________
N lA k lk i A KilUIP A PtT1UID 1 N o P • • • • • • • * • • •
PI N A K IP P • • • • • • • _ • • • • • • • _ • •
r TMA N v t
• _______• __

144# Q U
1 9 9 AA
19P* 3 0
1 4 c CA
1 4M # AU
19A 0A

• • • •
• • • •
• • • •
_• • _
• __•

143
39
AC
03

90A
4AA
9C c
cO3
119
112
CA
30

92 1 AA
4P1# 00
255*50

3 4 0 .0 0

SI
A
39 #5 J 1 O . 9CQ
V
39#0 3 1 1 .0 0

Sex, occu p a tion , and in du stry d iv isio n

of
w o rk e rs

W e e k ly
h ou rs *

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s 1
(sta n d a rd )

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*

nn arT C n r
/'i * r r
a
UKAr I t Kb * UL A b b
A
MAKIIU r A t# T lUID I N lft
M A N I P A C 1 K TN O

N um ber

Sex, o ccu p ation , and in du stry d iv isio n

of
w o ik e is

W e e k ly
h ou rs1
(sta n d a rd )

W e e k ly

Sex, o ccu p ation , and in d u stry d iv isio n

e a r n in g s 1
(sta n d a rd )

$

417
108
25
54

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

436

3 9 .5 2 5 4 .5 0
3 9 .5 2 5 0 .5 0

o o l

2 8 6 .0 0
2 8 7 .5 0
3 1 9 .5 0
2 7 4 .0 0

U K A r1t K b * tL A b b
o
u « uni i r * r T 1iUf\ J.INU • • • • • • • • * • • • • • • • •
i d TKi n
FIM iU r A L
KJOKJM AMI P A t 1 ID l N v )
N U l i r l A N UI r A T T IU K IK U a • • • • • * * * * • • • • • •
D il ^
r U T lTl IL Tl T T t d
II
r U D I L Tl t
t i CC
• • • • • • • • • • • • •
rxn A P T P n n
U K A r |fc K b *

ni Ann
L L A bb

.

371
1
J v i
7n
ru

41

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0

$
2 0 8 .5 0
2 0 0 .5 0
2 4 3 .5 0
2 4 1 .0 0

T r A U M T A T Akin

IC.CHN1CIANS

MA N Ui r A ^ T lUIDTMvA
r l AMI r A t 1 K IfM J

_________ ______ _

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

r i P t nP U T U t n o t.
V r F A I r PA

p /iL
I

>< ;<
A 0 3;

h
B

——

iP w M r U IiT P r '
V O n PI C .O

n
U Pr P n A T U n v t.
t PA I H PQ

PI
t L AA CO
O C

P
V

_ _ _ ■■■■
■ ■ ■ _ _ _ _

222

3 9 .0
IQ

1*079
1*008

—

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s 1
(s ta n d a rd )

74

3 9 .0

$
1 7 0 .5 0

55

3 9 .0

1 34 *00

An - n
u• u

C tJ o d U

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
Q

1 7 5 .0 0
1 6 4 .5 0

u U w lr lb d d f

3 9 .5 2 2 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 2 1 8 .0 0

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




h o u rs 1

55

I r n M P Ui t 1 * '
V ,U n r i 1 f r

v t A vw

t

x

NURSES* INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
C l C ^ T O A A IT P C
L L C L 1K O N IU b

W e e k ly

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - W EN
OM

166

n
(,

M A M II P A C T lI P T M A

of
w o rk e rs

(s ta n d a rd )

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

PROFESSIONAL ANO TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
o i ic tm cc c .
acc
o
_
M
O v s lN ta s f
tL A s s
O
k t A iiii s i l l i r a
in t
N U N M A N U r A U T U K iN U • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
m i n i t n i i t t i ? t » i- p
r U o L lw
U l XL 1 1 lr .b

(m e a n 2 )

(m e a n 2 )
N um ber

(s ta n d a rd )

A vera ge

A v era g e

A vera ge
(m e a n 2 )
N um ber

E arn ings .data in table A -3 a rela te only to w o rk e rs w hose se x
ide n tifica tio n w as p ro v id e d by the establish m en t. E arn ings data in
tables A - l a and A - 2 a , on the other hand, re la te to a ll w o rk e rs in an
o ccu p a tio n . (See appendix A f o r pu b lication c r it e r ia .)

M A N U r A t 1 U K 1 IMu

---------

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

123
93

3 9 .5 2 0 6 *5 0

O A 7 CA
C U f * DU

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3*60 3 .8 0 4 .0 0

■
P
.
O'
e

M ean2

©

w o rk e rs

S'
.
S'

O ccupation and industry d iv isio n

N um ber o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g straight$
$
1
1
1
S
S
T
1
*
S
3 .5 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4.*20 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 . 8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0
and
under
-p

N um ber

IV

H o u rly e a r n in g s 3

4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0

s

I

s

s

$

s

S

T"

5 .8 0

ALL WORKERS
BOILER TENDERS----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

106
83

$
5 .9 0
6 .0 5

$
5 .9 4
6 .0 7

$
$
5 . 3 7 - 6 .5 1
5 . 7 1 - 6 .5 1

CARPENTERS* MAINTENANCE ----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S ------------— —

237
109
128
28

6 .2 7
5 .7 8
6 .6 9
5 .4 7

6 .0 6
5 .8 1
6 .4 4
5 .1 5

5 .4 0 5 .3 7 5 .8 0 5 .1 1 -

ELECTRICIANS* MAINTENANCE -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------ ------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

449
323
126

7 .1 2
6 .7 9
7 .9 8

6 .9 0
6 .9 0
8 .5 6

ENGINEERS* STATIONARY --------------------MANUFACTURING------------<
NONMANUFACTURING --------—
PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------- —
RETAIL TRADE — ----------------------SE R V IC E S---------------------- ---------------

651
253
398
36
87
106

6 .5 2
6 .3 1
6 .6 6
6 .3 2
6 .8 1
6 .5 3

HELPERS* MAINTENANCE TRADES
MANUFACTURING -----—
n o n m a n u f a c tu r in g :
PUBLIC U TILITIES ---------------------

205
161

6 .4 4
6 .1 3
7 .8 1
5 .2 6

•

—

-

-

6 . 4 2 - 8 .4 5
6 . 0 9 - 7 .2 6
7 . 2 5 - 8 .5 7

.

6 .2 2 5 .9 5 6 .4 6 —
5 .3 9 6 .9 0 6 .4 6 -

.

-

4 .9 2
4 .8 4

5 .0 0
5 .0 0

44

5 .2 2

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS* TOOLROOM
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

74
74

MACHINISTS. MAINTENANCE ---------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

5
-

7
5

3
3

12
12

11
11

21

2
2

2
2

20
2
18
18

34
27
7
6

7
5
2

12
7
5

40

23
23

-

-

-

-

3
3

.

6 .6 2
6 .3 0
6 .6 2
6 .2 7
6 .9 0
6 .6 9

9
-

_

.

-

4
4

6 ,7 5
6 .6 5
6 .9 0
7 .0 5
6 .9 3
6 .6 9

—

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

1
1

_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

•

•

18
18

8

2
6
_
2

12
5
7
7
•

4
3
1
1

-

-

•

_

-

-

-

-

•

4 . 7 6 - 5 .2 0
4 . 7 6 - 5 .2 0

20
20

.
-

•
-

-

1
1

2
2

55
40

15
15

75
57

26
26

5 .1 3

4 . 7 9 - 5 .3 5

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

-

18

-

5 .4 7
5 .4 7

5 .5 2
5 .5 2

5 . 0 9 - 5 .9 7
5 . 0 9 - 5 .9 7

•

•
-

_

5
5

9
9

8

-

5
5

610
602

6 .3 6
6 .3 4

6 .5 2
6 .5 2

6 . 0 5 - 6 .5 2
6 . 0 5 - 6 .5 2

MECHANICS* AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) — --------------------------—
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------- --------------PUBLIC U TILITIES ---------------------

1*148
163
985
895

6 .6 3
6 .0 6
6 .7 2
6 .7 7

7 .0 4
6 .3 9
7 .0 4
7 .0 4

6 . 4 0 - 7 .0 4
5 .3 4 - 6 . 8 6
6 . 5 2 - 7 .0 4
6 . 9 8 - 7 ,0 4

MECHANICS* MAINTENANCE ------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------ -----------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------- -------PUBLIC U TILITIES ----------------—

1 *00 9
900
109
50

5 .7 1
5 .6 2
6 .5 0
6 .9 3

5 .5 2
5 .3 7
6 .6 5
7 .0 4

5 .1 0 5 .0 9 5 .9 3 6 .5 4 -

MILLWRIGHTS ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

220
214

6 .2 5
6 .2 4

6 .3 9
6 .3 9

5 . 8 1 - 6 .4 7
5 . 8 1 - 6 .4 3

PIPEFITTERS♦ MAINTENANCE --------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------




6 .5 6
6 .0 2
6 .8 2

6 .4 4
6 .0 4
6 .4 4

6 . 0 4 - 6 ,8 0
5 . 7 8 - 6 .4 2
6 . 4 4 - 7 .7 9

8 8

71

7 .0 1
6 .8 4

7 .2 1
6 .8 5

6 . 7 3 - 7 .2 1
6 . 3 9 - 7 .2 1

1 *03 6
1*03 5

6 .3 1
6 .3 1

6 .5 0
6 .5 0

6 . 0 0 - 6 .5 1
6 . 0 0 - 6 .5 1

10
8

2

3
5
16
2
14
3
11

10
10

40

1

4
3

20

12

39

1

20

12

6
6

1
3
2

49
48

1

1

m

•
-

181
59
122

8

5
2

-

PAINTERS. MAINTENANCE --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

22
20
2

11

-

5

-

6 .4 5
6 .2 1
6 ,8 4
7 .4 5

-

29

17
16

15

13
89

11

12
1

10
10

79
59
20
261
64
197
5
76

83
81
2

44
38
6

94
3
91
7
70

12

11

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

32
32
32

—
-

•
-

-

•
—
-

.
-

•
-

•
-

25
25
—
-

47
47
•

11
10
1

-

-

-

-

8

-

30
30

47
47

33
33

69
69

295
295

43
43

33
33

16
•
16

35

94

29
26

16
10

94
93

6

140
35
105
52

655
10
645
637

73
31
42
42

60
47
13
3

36
30

62
58
4

50
47
3

163
124
39

9
7
2
-

10
10
-

27
26
1
-

132
131
1

49
46
3

219
218
1
3
3

-

-

-

2
2

_

_

.

-

20
20

-

29
29

-

25
25

-

-

11

13

6

6

1

13
13

97
72
25
25

21

19
19

54
54

20
20

75
69

-

72
17
55

8

27

3
5

27

•
-

•
-

-

-

-

-

_

12
12

-

2
4

12

-

3
2
1

15

-

4
2
2

6

-

4
3
1

10

-

4

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
1

1

•

4
4

50
50

30
30

e»

25
25

6

13

26
26

16
16
46 9
46 9

37
35

41
41

41
40

4

2

1

2

-

18

-

6
1

20
19

86

-

35
26
7

103
17

-

-

18

N um ber o r w o rk e rs r e ce iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f —

H o u rly e a r n in g s 3

S
1
3
1
S
T
*
T
T
T
1
S
4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5.•00 5 .2 0 5,►40 5,•60 5 •80 6 •00 6 •20 6 .4 0 6 .6 0

Occupation and industry div isio n
w ork ers

M ean2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

$
6 .8 0

S
S
S
7 •00 7 •20 7 .4 0

$
S
S
$
$
S
7,.60 7 .8 0 8 . 0 0 8,•20 8 .6 0 9 .0 0

7 .0 0

7 •2Q 7 .4 0

7 t9 Q

7 ,>90 JLdUL 9a2,Q, JB.a60_ 9 .0 0

2
2

and
tinder
4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4« 80

o
o
in

9
-

3
3

5
-

5
5

3
3

12
12

11
11

21
15

2
2

”

2
2
-

2
2
-

20
2
18
18

34
27
7
6

7
5
2
-

9
4
5
-

31
29
2
“

2
2
“

10
8
2
“

2
1
1
1

1
1

«.

.

-

-

-

22
20

8
3

3
2

49
48

10
10

46
46

1
1

12
5
7
7

4
3
1
1

10
2
8
3

9
5
4

13
12
1

14
5
9

34
22
12

-

-

”

5 •20 5 .4 0 5<•60 5,.8 0 6 •00 6 •20 6 .4 0 6 .6 0 6 .8 0

9_*4Q

ALL WORKERS
BOILER TENDERS ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------ --

84
63

$
5 .8 6
6 .0 3

1 .9 3
5 .9 4

$
$
5 . 2 9 - 6 .1 8
5 . 6 9 - 6 .1 8

CARPENTERS* MAINTENANCE --------------—
MANUFACTURING --------— -------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES ----------------------

151
85
66
28

6*11
5 .6 9
6 .6 4
5 .4 7

5 .8 1
5 .8 1
5 .8 3
5 .1 5

5 .3 7 5 .3 7 5 .1 5 5 .1 1 -

ELECTRICIANS* MAINTENANCE -------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

349
264

7 .1 7
6 .8 3

6 .9 0
6 .9 0

6 . 3 6 - 8 .5 5
6 . 0 9 - 7 .3 7

ENGINEERS. STATIONARY — --------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING — ---------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------

248
117
131
25
67

6 .5 8
6 .5 7
6 .6 0
6 .4 6
6 .7 3

6 .7 4
6 .6 9
6 .9 0
7 .0 5
6 .9 0

6 .2 5 6 .2 5 6 .4 1 5 .2 9 6 .9 0 -

HELPERS* MAINTENANCE TRADES ------—
MANUFACTURING---------— — — — -------

92
77

5 .0 1
5 .0 6

5 .1 6
5 .2 0

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS* TOOLROOM
MANUFACTURING ----- ------------------

64
64

5 .6 1
5 .6 1

MACHINISTS* MAINTENANCE — --------— ■
MANUFACTURING -------—

482
474

MECHANICS* AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE)
NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES ----------------------

6 .3 9
5 .8 1
8 .2 1
5 .2 6

-

•
.

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

”

“

-

-

2

4 . 8 1 - 5 .2 0
5 . 0 0 - 5 .2 0

1
1

2
2

15
“

15
15

5 .5 3
5 .5 3

5 .3 7 - 5 .9 7
5 .3 7 - 5 .9 7

-

.

•

_

“

“

-

6 .3 9
6 .3 6

6 .5 2
6 .5 2

6 .0 9 - 6 .5 2
6 . 0 9 - 6 .5 2

”

*

212
182
145

6 .8 4
6 .9 1
7 .0 7

6 .9 1
7 .0 9
7 .0 9

6 . 4 8 - 7 .4 3
6 . 4 8 - 7 .4 7
6 . 5 2 - 7 .4 8

-

-

-

MECHANICS. MAINTENANCE — -------------MANUFACTURING--------------— -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------— ---------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----- :----------------

481
398
83
50

6 .2 4
6 .1 7
6 .5 7
6 .9 3

6 .4 5
6 .2 3
6 .6 5
7 .0 4

5 .5 3 5 .5 3 6 .0 7 6 .5 4 -

MILLWRIGHTS — ----------- --------— -------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------

210
204

6 .2 7
6 .2 6

6 .3 9
6 .3 9

5 .8 1 - 6 .4 7
5 .8 1 - 6 .4 7

PAINTERS* MAINTENANCE ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------ --------

94
53

6 .4 5
6 .1 1

6 .2 5
6 .0 4

5 .8 1 - 7 .0 3
5 .8 1 - 6 .4 2

PIPEFITTERS* MAINTENANCE ---------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------

88
71

7 .0 1
6 .8 4

7 .2 1
6 .8 5

6 . 7 3 - 7 .2 1
6 . 3 9 - 7 .2 1

•
-

533
532

6 .5 7
6 .5 7

6 .5 1
6 .5 1

6 .5 1 - 6 .5 6
6 .5 1 - 6 .5 6

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ----MANUFACTURING --------

See footnotes at end of tables.




6 .9 2
6 .9 9
6 .9 2
7 .4 0
6 .9 2

6 .5 2
6 .5 2
7 .3 4
7 .4 5

“

-

”

57
57
9
9

8
8

25
25

-

•

“

*

4
4

30
30

37
37

_
•

3
2

-

•

—

•

-

-

-

-

.

.

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
9
1

1

3

77
76
1

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

•

•

-

•

2
2

3
3

_

-

•

2

“

-

-

2
1

.

•

-

**

•

-

10
10

-

“

“

“

•

*
*

”

2
2

_

1

2

-

.

17

8

-

-

-

2
2

-

17
•

8
*

-

-

1
1

-

-

56
54

6
6

37
36

4
2

1
1

6
6

66
9

30
19

3
“

50
30
20

55
3
52

7
-

-

-

-

29
28
1
1

9

5

-

50

1
1

295
295

8

77
77
48

•
-

2
1
1
-

7
7
“

“

15
15

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
5
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

•

•

•

2
2

3

_

“

•

-

-

19
19

44
42
42

6
-

2
2

-

1
-

13
13

9
9

2
2

69
69

-

—

6
6

-

“

-

“

•

“

38
31
7
3

26
24
2

30
26
4

13
6
7

“

-

32
29
3
1

_
-

9
9

54
54

20
20

-

4
2

3
2

8
4

15
12

12
12

1
1

2
1

1

-

-

4
4

_

-

6

1

10
10

.

13
13

“

5

_

-

-

-

-

136
124
12
11

15

21
21
6

-

“

1
1

-

15
10

-

-

-

-

75
69

_

_

.

17
17

1

-

“

“

-

“

-

3
3

14
14

•

.
-

16
16

-

•

51
51

346
346

45
45

29
29

8
8

-

7
“

80
72
8
8

42
42
42

35
35
3
3

•
“

—

-

2

•

-

-

•

-

“

_

•

_

17
-

-

-

-

-

-

17
17

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

_

_

-

-

•

-

“

-

•

-

-

6

1

b

3

-

1

2

4

-

9

.

”

-

26
26
3

13
13
13

5

1

28
27

-

_

-

•

.

•

”

.

N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g straight -tim e h ou rly ea rn in gs o f—
*
3
1
S
1
I
*
$
1
1
$
s
S
$
5
$
2 .0 0 2 .2 0 2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 •60 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0

H o u rly e a r n in g s 3

S

O ccupation and in du stry d iv isio n

of
w ork ers

M ean2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

$
5 .4 0

S
$
S
S
S
5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 .0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0

5 .6 0

5 f 8Q 6 .0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0

and
under
?*2ft 2.4Q 2 .6 0 2 .8 0

3 .0 0 3 .2 0

3 .4 0 3 .6 p 3 .8 0 4 .0 0

•
p
ru
o

N um ber

61
20
41

106
99
7

4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 *8Q 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0

7 .2 0

ALL WORKERS
GUARDS AMD WATCHMEN — — — ------— — —
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — —
n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ---------------------- -------PUBLIC U TILITIE S -------------------------FIN AN CE----------------------------------------—
SE R V IC E S---------------------------------- -------GUARDS*
MANUFACTURING--------------------------------—

2*308
509
1*79 9
39
229
1*450

3 .0 1
4 .3 1
2 .6 5
5*32
4 .2 7
2 .2 4

1 .3 5
4 .3 2
2 .2 5
5 .4 6
4 .2 1
2 .2 0

1 .1 5 4 .0 0 2 .1 0 5 .1 8 3 .6 C 2 .1 0 -

1 .9 5
4 .8 8
2 .5 6
5 .6 9
4 .8 8
2 .3 0

708
708

468

4 .3 4

4 .3 2

4 . 0 6 - 4 .9 3

-

708

520
520
—
520
-

144
2
142

69
5
64

142

61

2

5

27
15
12

102
26
76

103
77
26

39
32
7

•
3

11
4

15

60

19

5

11

7

7

2

44

4

26

20

99

65

22

16

7* 5 8 2
1*94 4
5*638
346
137
393
1*82 6
2*936

3 .5 0
4 .1 2
3 .2 8
4 .6 9
4 .3 5
3 .3 7
3 .2 7
3 .0 6

3 .5 5
4 .0 0
3 .1 0
4 .7 3
4 .6 4
3 .2 8
3 .3 5
3 .0 1

2 .9 2 3 .8 0 2 .7 5 4 .6 1 3 .5 0 2 .7 1 3 .0 6 2 .6 7 -

3 .8 8
4 .4 4
3 .7 8
5 .1 3
4 .9 6
3 .8 0
3 .7 8
3 .6 2

35
35
35

LABORERS* MATERIAL HANDLING -------------MANUFACTURING--------------— ------------ -----NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------- —
PUBLIC U TILITIE S -------------------------WHOLESALE TRAD E------------------------ —
RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------

5*994
2*002
3*992
1 *51 6
1*71 7
648

5 .3 6
4 .5 9
5 .7 5
6 .5 7
5 .4 3
5 .1 2

5 .5 5
4 .6 0
6 .0 4
6 .7 0
5 .7 9
5 .6 0

4 .5 8 4 .0 8 5 .5 3 6 .7 0 5 .4 5 4 .6 5 -

6 .5 2
4 .6 7
6 .7 0
6 .7 0
6 .0 4
5 .8 3

.
-

30
30

26
26

30
30

40
40

•

30

13
13

-

40

ORDER FILLERS ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------ -----WHOLESALE TR AO E-------------------- -------RETAIL TRAD E---------------------------------

4*577
412
4*165
3*177
643

5 .5 0
4 .5 8
5 .5 9
5 .6 8
4 .7 9

5 .8 0
4 .5 3
5 .8 0
5 .8 0
4 .4 9

4 .9 9 4 .0 3 5 .5 3 5 .5 3 3 .7 5 -

6 .2 1
5 .0 5
6 .2 7
6 .0 8
6 .0 0

•

51
51
51

9
9
9

40
1
39
39
“

PACKERS* SHIPPING — ------— -------- — -----MANUFACTURING------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE — -------------------- —
RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------------

1*917
1*131
786
672
114

4 .4 6
4 .1 9
4 .8 6
5 .0 8
3 .5 7

4 .4 7
4 .3 0
5 .7 0
5 .7 0
3 .4 2

3 .5 3 3 .6 2 3 .4 2 4 .0 2 2 .1 0 -

5 .7 0
4 .5 5
5 .7 0
5 .7 0
3 .7 5

31
31
31

9
9
6
3

16
16
13
3

RECEIVING CLERKS---------------- ---------------- —
MANUFACTURING---------------- -------- -----------NONMANUFACTURING — ------------------ -------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------ ---------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------------

508
195
313
111
186

5 .2 4
5 .3 3
5 .1 9
5 .7 2
5 .0 2

5 .0 9
5 .0 9
4 .9 2
5 .7 5
4 .9 2

4 ,7 5 4 .9 5 4 .5 7 5 .7 2 4 .6 1 -

6 .0 1
5 .9 4
6 .1 2
6 .6 3
6 .1 2

.
-

—
•

SHIPPING CLERKS ----------------- — ---------------MANUFACTURING - — —
—
----NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------- —
WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------RETAIL TRAD E---------------------- ------------

461
246
215
119
89

5 .3 8
4 .9 1
5 .9 3
5 .9 7
5 .9 7

5 .7 2
4 .7 7
6 .1 2
5 .7 6
6 .1 2

4 .7 6 4 .5 1 5 .7 2 5 .7 2 6 .1 0 -

6 .1 2
5 .1 2
6 .2 4
6 .1 2
6 .7 0

.
-

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS —
m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------ — — —
NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------- — --------

451
218
233
181

5 .2 1
4 .7 8
5 .6 2
5 .8 3

5 .0 8
4 .5 7
5 .7 0
6 .0 0

4 .4 4 4 .4 2 5 .0 8 5 .0 8 -

6 .0 0
5 .0 5
6 .0 0
6 .6 3




31
4
27

—
12

JANITORS* PORTERS* AND CLEANERS ----MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING — ---------------------- —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------- -----WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------FIN AN CE---------------------------------------- —
SERVICES -------------------------------------------

399
25
374
4
81
36
253

69
49
20

65
16
49
9
40

441
441
2
439

635
5
630
24
3
50
342
211

9
6
3

407 1104 1041
495
241
56
546
351
863
29
2
18
3
25
19
71
38
126 46 5
40
403
361
160

560 1005
28
25
535
977
4
1
14
13
36 46 9
491
484

368
64
304
5
45
219
35

235
235

38
12
26

38
20
18

201
16

16
16
16

21
1
20
13
7

4
4
-

—

*
-

26

31
17
14
1
13

70
42
28
6
22

18
8
10
10
•

86

15

42

8

112
86
26

5

-

-

_

141
82
59
47
12

77
41
36
36

27
7
20
20

37
24
13
1
12

_
.
.

i 08
6
! 27
5
81
2
60
19

142
54
88
1C
3
75

315
206
109
6
90
13

153
36
117
117

270
102
168
9
159
-

430
6
424

279
27
252

282
142

167
85

51

200
50
150
150

14
14

39

819

618
618

556
4
552
551

978

•
-

402
95
307
307

618

39
39
-

978
515
120

819
675
144

10
10

45
44
1
1

369

104

36

369
369

104
104

36
12
24

46
9
37
36
1

21
10
11
4

52
21
31
.
31

66
6
60
60

23
21
2
2

103
21
62
44
38

53
13
40

39
6
33
13

22
21
1
1

64

48

64
61

48
48

13
13

9

13
8

11

2

25
8

10
8

209
8
201
182
19

47
4
43
13
30

76
20
56
36
20

55
•
55
54

30
—
30
—
30

153
128
25
13
12

81
31
50
39
11

133
57
76
76

51
51

4
4
4

14
16
16
-

56
30
26
19
7

345
252
93
88
5

52
22
30
30

177
174
3
3

70
52
18
18

84
84
-

316
310
6
6

64
62
2
2

74
72
2
2

18
18

.
•

3
3
3

10
—
10
10

10
10
—
8

7
6
1
—
1

26
2
24
15

7
7
-

19
6
13
10
3

8
5
3
3

30
17
13
1
12

88
17
71

41
40
1

71

10
10

•
—

.
-

_
-

2
2
—

3
3
—

3
2
1

23
22
1

25
25
-

23
23
—

56
56
-

37
31
6

30
30

“

“

10

•

*

"

•

-

.

•

-

1

1

-

-

-

—

1

1

_

-

.
-

—
-

-

166
79
87
43
24
20

392
374
18

-

•
•

199
65
134
103
18
13

107
74
33

1

.

•

232
213
19
16
3

126
124
2

-

-

-

.

11
5
6
•
-

•

410
378
32
4
6
20
2

388
323
65

6
4
2

13
13

277
116
161
2
4
91
64

74
53
21

13
1
12
12
-

13

_

”

”

-

-

32
31
1

90
77
13
13

25
25
-

4
4
-

«

_

4
1
3
3

32
32
•
-

4
4

-

_

•

2
.
2

6

-

28
7
21

-

_

1

77
39
38
37

6

6

6
6
6

15
15
15

656 1617
43
21
613 1596
9 1363
568
113
36
120

_

„
_

•
_
.
•

.
_
*
_
•
_

_
_

-

-

66

•

21
21

66
45
21

-

53

-

6
4
2
2

Hourly earnings3

O ccupation and industry d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

S

S

2 .0 0 2 .2 0
Mean 2

M edian2

M iddle range 2

and
under

-

Num ber o f w o rk e rs r e ce iv in g stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs o f—
1
S
1
1
1
S
S
S
S
$
$
S
$
S
2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0
-

-

“

-

-

-

o
o
.
4-

2 .2 0 2 .4 ft 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 ft 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0

-

-

-

-

-

4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 * 9 0 5 .0 0

5 .2 0

S
S
5 .4 0 5 .6 0
-

$
5 .8 0

S

6 .0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0
“

-

-

5*40 5*60 5 .8 0

-

6 .0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 f 2ft

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
TRUCKDRIVERS ------------------------------------ -------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------- --------PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------

5*569
856
4 .7 1 3
3*0 8 6
808

1*2 3
5 .5 8
6 .3 5
6 .5 7
6 .0 9

1 .7 0
5 .3 5
6 .7 0
6 .7 0

6 .0 0

1 .8 3 4 .8 6 5 .9 4 6 .7 0 5 .7 2 -

1 .7 0
6 .7 2
6 .7 0
6 .7 0
6 .7 0

_
-

-

.
-

_
-

-

-

-

•

“

-

-

“

33

20

3

13

3

3
1A
10

20
Pa
C0

_
•

TRUCKDRIVERS* LIGHT (UNDER

18
18
“

1o
lA
5*30
5 .4 7

5 .9 4

4 .7 2 — 5 .9 4

2*608
375

6 .1 8
5 .1 8

6 .7 0
5 .5 1
6 .7 0
6 .7 0

121

6 .5 4
5 .9 1

6 .2 2

5 .8 3 4 .8 4 5 .8 3 —
6 .7 0 6 . 00 -

—

1*670

6 .7 0
5 .0 0
A. 7 a
o ro
6 .7 0

6 .2 2

”

TRUCKDRIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
TO ATI CD TVDC \ ___ ____
UaM IPAATI ID1No
l
/1
HANUr AC 1UK TM —
——
— — —
klAAliiAM (P ADTl |Df U •••••••••••••••
I
__________
NUNMANUrAC1UK1M _ _ ____ —
PUBLIC U TILITIES ---------------------- —

Afil
ooi
OA J
cUc
A.7Q
Hit
273

A AO
O* VO
c Ol
3AC1
A AA
©•HH
6 .4 8

A. o i
o A*
a, OL
A. i7 a
o O
6 .7 0

C.J33 7C_
4 .9 4 —
E. 0 J 3 ft 7_
6 .6 1 -

354
OAO
cOC

A PI
OoCl
c DO
0970

A» 3 y
o QO
C. 7 J
3 07

5 . 8 3 - 6 .7 2
c a o _ OtOO
OoOJ* r ac

1*63 8
Q1 “»
725
416

5 .4 0
A0 3
. . _ DC

5 .5 6
A
^
‘♦t 7 C
9

6 .1 0

6 .2 2
6 .2 2
5 .8 3

4 .6 8 A .C.JC
H
5 .8 3 5 .9 3 5 .8 3 -

29
4
25

12

23
p
c

DA
CO

PA
CH
PP
CC

DA
CO

2

2&

5

18
13
C
L
D
5
"

174
174

8
1

-

7
“

DA
cH
5
13

92
07

*
*

60
60

D
y
9

6
6
11
11

1P
1C
1P
1C
1P
1C

A 7q
O .rO
5 35
A 7ft
O .(O
6 .7 8

TRUCKORIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
n 1rlfc.K 1 n im 1o i 1 LC.K 1 TKt I
Ur u r a t u AN t KATi cd t v d f / _ _ _ _ _ _ _
klAilii A A iPiTTlUR TAID ____ _____ —______________ •
ll
NONMANUr ACT IDINu

1A
10
13
1A
10

5 .6 2

12 2

36
23
13

22
10
12

1o
lA

13

10

20

o c 1 ati 1r»ni/t
nCT All* t pa o p
TRUCKDRIVERS* MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) ----------- -------MANUFACTURING ----- -----------------------------NUNMANUr Av 1UKINu ^
PUBLIC U TILITIES — — --------— -----WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------

TRUCKERS. POWER (FORKLIFT) ---------------u Akli IPAC 1 UKTA — — — — — —
ID
MANUr APTl ID1 No
NONMANUFACTURING------------------— — —
WHOLESALE TRADE -------------------------- -RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------

280

6 .1 9
5 .9 4

6 .1 9
CL
3 .9 0
6 .7 0
6 .6 3
6 .2 2

10
-

“
-

“

-

“

20
Pa
cU

13

15

10

3

-

-

2
11
1W

i
J

3

23

20

•
7
o

-

-

10
10
-

PA
CO

2
3

67
32
35
5

2

D1
J1

16
p
c

18
1A
in
-

-

-

-

•

-

46

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

3
3

79

275
272
3
3

86

1

1

8
16
7
9

100
70
30
5
19
”

1
1
”

34

10

85

-

-

-

2

1

1

59
CQ
9*
-

211

12 1

37

190

21
8
11

107
14
13

35
33
-

-

14
14

77
2

329
64
265
252
13

1J
tJ
iD
13

138
18

120
-

120

6
6
6

62*
624

6
-

6 18
82
82

6 u 0 2 99 3
61
214
619 2 77 9
281 2530
335
166
83
31
Cl

168
50
118
-

100
18

122
2
2

“

123 1485

22

22
39
1 0 1 1446
6 1443

22

82

3
3
72
71

24

31
oe
£9

1
X11

11

4

32
Jc

9
9
•

51
32
19
18

2

262
64
1 DU
I 70
198
-

8
e
_
-

388
388

6

-

_
4

95

36
”
36
-

18
1D
1c

251

42
-

6
6

243
213

118
118

ii

139

“

CA
Ca
PH
54

-

8

100

186
59
127
94
33

178

103

178
90
64

103
103

-

277
49
228
76
152

29
29

36
16

-

-

-

_
_

52

10

*
*

122
12 2
-

47
47

_
-

”

8

96
*
96
so
”

TRUCKERS* POWER (OTHER THAN

222
W
MRUr Mv 1 wn X w
IN
W
AREHOUSEMEN----------— -----------------------------MANUFACTURING —
—
— —
—
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE — ------------------------

5 .3 6
5 .3 3

5 .5 9
5 .5 9

4 .9 3 - 5 .6 4
4 . 9 0 - 5 .5 9

811
446
365

4 .7 8
3 .9 9
5 .7 4
6 .1 3

4 .3 8
3 .7 0
5 .9 8

3 .5 1 3 .5 1 5 .4 1 5 .9 1 -

196

222

6 .1 2

5 .9 4
4 .3 8
6 .1 2
6 .7 5

.
-

.
—

-

-

—

-

34
34

204

200
4

48
48
-

9
9
-

60
60

•

53
53
-

12
7
5
4

6
4

2

65

2

54

4

84

61

20

34

4
_

120

2

8<
+

120

61
61

•

43
'

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




96

‘

N um ber o f w o r k e r s re c e iv in g str a ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs o f—

H ou rly e a r n in g s 3

S

$

2 .1 0 2 .2 0

O ccu p ation and industry d iv is io n
M ean2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

s
S
1
S
S
1
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
$
S
S
S
2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 .6 0 4 . 8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 .0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0
S

and
under

2 .2 0 2 . 4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3*2p 3 •40 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5*2 0 5 .4 0 5*6 0 5 *8 0 6*00 6 .4 0 6*80 7 .2 0
ALL WORKERS
GUARDS AND WATCHMEN — <
MANUFACTURING -----------NONMANUFACTURINGI
PUBLIC U TILITIES
FINANCE -------------------------------------GUARDSt
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------JANITORS* PORTERS* AND CLEANERS
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES ------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------

1» 4 l0
491

$
3e43
4e35

$
3 .4 0
4 .3 2

$
$
2 .2 5 - 4 .3 6
4 . 0 7 - 4 .9 0

39
190

5*32
4#4 0

5 .4 6
4 .6 6

5 . 1 8 - 5 .6 9
3 .8 0 - 4 .9 8

464

4 .3 5

4 .3 2

4 .0 7 - 4 .9 3

-

-

2

2*535

3 .8 7
4 .1 8
3 .6 0
4 .8 8
3 .6 8

3 .8 6
4 .0 0
3 .2 1
4 .7 0
3 .8 0

3 .1 0 3 .6 6 2 .9 2 4 .6 1 3 .3 0 -

4 .3 8
4 .3 9
4 .0 4
5 .1 5
3 .8 3

•
-

2

4

2

1*180
1* 3 5 5
267
215

289
-

243

•

.

7
7

2
2

58
45

31
4

63
26

58

106
99

103
77

39
32

65

20

..

19

.
5

.

11

•
15

.

•
•

.
-

11

.
7

9
40

26

5

7

2

40

326

3
■
—
••

48
5
43
•5

—
—

3
—
3
3

“

40
40
40

217
—
217

16
16
16

91

8

2

5

.

-

•

-

—

2

1

4

20

19

11

81
79

82
74

11

2

8

26
5

221

8

45
27
18

42

3

173
162

16

13
13
—
13

10
8

19

175
175
19

30
—
30
30

28

22

6 .0 0
6 .0 0

9
—
9
9

•
•
—
-

PACKERS* SHIPPING ------------ --------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------

681
518
163

4 .3 5
4 .4 4
4 .0 8

4 .4 7
4 .4 7
3 .7 5

3 .8 6 - 4 .5 5
4 . 0 7 - 4 .5 5
2 . 7 1 - 5 .8 5

31
31

6

3
3

4
4

4
—
4

3
3

7
•
7

RECEIVING CLERKS ----------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------

239
82
157
154

5 .1 7
5 .1 4
5 .1 9
5 .1 9

4 .9 2
5 .0 9
4 .9 2
4 .9 2

4 .8 6 4 .9 5 4 .8 6 4 .8 6 -

6 .0 1
6 .1 2
6 .1 2

.
-

.
-

•
—

.
•
—
•
—
•

3
—
3
3

.
—
-

5
—
5
5

SHIPPING CLERKS ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------

100

5 .7 1
6 .2 7

6 .1 2

-

-

“

.
-

•
-

-

6 .7 0

4 . 8 2 - 6 .7 0
6 . 1 2 - 6 .7 0

...
-

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

81

4 .9 2
4 .6 2

4 .6 9
4 .6 1

4 . 3 8 - 5 .1 5
4 . 3 8 - 4 .9 3

•

-

.

-

-

.

1

•

-

“

•

*

-

-

TRUCKDRIVERS ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------

980
282
696

6 .3 5
6 .3 0
6 .3 8

6 .7 0
6 .7 2
6 .7 0

5 . 9 8 - 6 .7 2
6 . 0 1 - 6 .7 2
5 . 9 5 - 6 .7 0

-

-

-

-

-

.

—

—

—
*

•

“

—
•
*

—

6 .1 1

5 .9 4
5 .9 4

5 .9 4 4 . 7 2 - 5 .9 4




6 . 6 1 - 6 .7 8
6 . 7 0 - 6 .7 8

20 1

-

10
9
9

-

—

—

22

-

8

11

2

8

35
—
35
34

30
30
30

140
128

42
31

12
12

30
30

97
94
3

7

7

—
-

6
1
1

2

2

•

-

1

1

2

.

•

•
•

3
—
3

.
—

8
20
20
14

8
1
1

21
21

11
11

51
51
51

47
47
-

-

44
44
-

18
18
“

274
274
-

6

20

5

5
5

3
3
-

3

r

2

4

.»

_

•
—

•
—

•
—

—

-

-

-

-

-

.

5

•

-

•
•
V

15

_

15
15

18

-

2

11
11

282

95
5

199
29
170
134
36

99

2
2

184

144

184

144
144

-

-

127
27

100

12 0

-

-

45
44

-

9

26

21
261
61

120

-

24

2

-

-

1

9

26

24

-

76
5
71
71

31
30

1
1

8
8

1

8

43

1
1

8
7

21
22
22

21

3
3

16
3
13

21
21

l

•
•

3
-

5
“

-

2
2

20
20

40
40

-

13
7

17
17

1

1

12

2

2

.

6

-

12

17
17

16

3
3

-

-

4
7

1
1

•

3
“

-

-

3

-

1

8

>

2
2

2

-

36

-

—

-

-

-

•

4

31
28

.

-

—•

—

—

-

-

-

-

-

49
44
5

35

—

-

_
-

41

-

-

14
14

9
4
5

—

1

6

—

.
•-

-

13

3
—
3
3

3

—

s
5

2

*

—

•
-

8
8

2

-

6
6

14
14

6

*

m

41
25
25

-

13

8

99

•
15

206
15
13

21

2

3
—
3

2
38
38

95
39
56
56

5 . 4 0 - 6 .7 2

6 .7 0
6 .7 0
6 .7 0

4

-

51
—
51
51

6 .5 1
6 .6 9
6 .7 0

52
52

40

2

106
75
31
31

-

TRUCKDRIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS
TRAILER TYPE) ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES -------------------------

1
1

170
65
105
92
13

6 .0 0

6 .5 8

25
24

20
20

15

3 .5 5 4 .0 3 3 .1 5 3 .6 9 -

6 .2 2

27
7

86

4 .4 9
4 .3 8
4 .7 5
4 .6 5

54

66

16

63
44
19
16
3

4 .6 7
4 .4 0
4 .7 6
4 .8 4

TRUCKDRIVERS* MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS)*
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

.

22

1*201

m

8

65
294
272

ORDER FILLERS ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------

5 .6 2

42

99
154
78
76

6 .0 4
5 .0 8
6 .5 2
6 .0 4
6 .6 0

TRUCKDRIVERS* LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) --------NONMANUFACTURING

10

13

6
22

20

3 .9 3 4 .0 8 3 .1 5 3 .1 5 3 .6 1 -

70

1

515
407
108
25
71

5 .0 8
4 .6 7
5 .8 5
5 .8 5
5 .1 5

5 .9 0

18

26

4 .9 5
4 .7 3
5 .1 2
4 .9 0
5 .1 2

6

70
42

209
92
117
19

1*643
724
919
501
328

—

29
15

4

LABORERS* MATERIAL HANDLING — •
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------- --—

4 .9 1

112
86

108
58
46
14
62
44
—
•
2
25
36

305
5
2
324
300
—
•
4
13

”

278
923

21

16

8
8

1

11

-

-

120

23

120

17

706
206
500

-

82
82

-

12 2
2

-

-

-

-

39

-

.
-

-

6
6
6

243
243
213

•

-

-

6

Table A-5a. Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement workers—large establishments
in Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.—Wis., January 1975— Continued
H o u rly e a r n in g s 3

w ork ers

M ean2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

o
.
4*

2 .10

of

o

O ccupation and industry d iv isio n

N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs o f—
1
1
S
1
1
^
n
*
S
S
5------- i
S
S
$
S
4 . 8 0 5 .0 0 5 . 2 0
2 .2 0 2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0
*
.

S

N um ber

*

S

S

5 .4 0 5 .6 0

s
5 .8 0

5 .6 0 5 . 8 0

6 .0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0

S

S

6 .0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0

and
under
o
<
M
.
*

2 .2 0 2 . 4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3*20 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0

4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0 5 .4 0

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
TRUCKERS* POWER (FORKLIFT) ---------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------TRUCKERS* POWER (OTHER THAN
F O R K L IF T )---------------------- ---------------------- —
nAWUr Av I UKXW ?
V
WAREHOUSEMEN-------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING------— — — — — — —
NONMANUFACTURING — — — — —

804
564
240
135
160

ic a

302
125
177

$
5 .3 5
4 .9 8
6 .2 3
6 .0 6

$
4 .9 9
4 .9 1
6 .7 0

6 .2 2

$
4 .6 8 4 .5 0 5 .9 4 5 .9 4 -

$
5 .9 3
5 .5 6
6 .7 0
6 .7 0

5 .3 8
5 .4 0

5 .5 9
C CQ

4 .8 9 - 5 .6 4
V QQ- C AA
.

5 .3 4
4 .5 1
5 .9 2

5 .4 1
4 .3 8
5 .9 4

4 .3 8 - 5 .9 6
4 .3 8 - 5 .0 4
5 .4 6 - 6 .7 5

•

-

.

•

•

-

•
.
-

•
-

”
.
-

“
—

—

-

•
•

3

4
—

4

-

—

4

32
31

81
80

2
2

1
1

1
1

—

-

2

3
3

•

—

•

8
8

4

-

20
20

53
53

-

9
9

33
32

2
2

*
*

1

2
-

2

34

•

-

•

Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement
workers, by sex, in Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.—Wis., January 1975
N um ber
of
w orkers

A vera ge
(m e a n * )
h o u r ly

N um ber

Sex* occu p a tion , and industry d iv isio n

e a r n in g s 3

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN
106
83

CARPENTERS* MAINTENANCE ---------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES --------------------------

237
109
128
28

A vera ge
(m e a n 2 )
h o u rly

Sex, occu pation , and in du stry d iv isio n

5 .9 0 ELECTRICIANS* MAINTENANCE — -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------6 .0 5
NONMANUFACTURING----- --------— -----------6 .2 7
—
—
5 . 7 8 ENGINEERS* STATIONARY —
MANUFACTURING —
—
—
—
6 .6 9
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------5 .4 7
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------------RETAIL TRADE — -----------------------------SE R V IC E S------------------------------------------

N um ber

of
w o rk e rs

e a rn in g s3

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

BOILER TEN0ERS ----------—
------------ -----MANUFACTURING -------------------------------- ~




of
w orkers

A v era g e
(m e a n 2 )
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s 3

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
449
323
126
651
253
398
36
87
106

7 .1 2 HELPERS. MAINTENANCE TRADES -------------6 .7 9
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — — —
7 .9 8
NONMANUFACTURING:
PUBLIC U TILITIE S -------------------------6 .5 2
6 .3 1 MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS* TOOLROOM —
6 .6 6
MANUFACTURING ------—
———
6 .3 2
6 .8 1 MACHINISTS* MAINTENANCE ---------------------6 .5 3
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

20
7

62
-

62

34

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .

Sex* occu pation , and industry d iv isio n

42
9
33
33

88

16
ID

4

31
25

2

29
C7

11
11

4
A
H

2
-

65
AC
DO

-

14
13

8

-

-

100
86

21
11

3
5

69
49

91
91

135
114

4

47
47
-

2
2

S3
53
•
-

205
161

$
4 .9 2
4 .8 4

<t4

5 .2 2

74
74

5 .4 7
5 .4 7

610
602

6 .3 6
6 .3 4

—

88
64

55
—
55
•

2

—

2

61
—
61

-

—

N um ber

Sex* occupation* and in du stry div isio n

of
w ork ers

A venge
(m e a n 2 )
h o u rly

N um ber

Sex* occu p a tion , and in du stry d iv isio n

of
w o rk e rs

ea rn in g * 2

MECHANICS* AUTOMOTIVE

$

LABORERS* MATERIAL HANDLING --------------

o*oo
1UKINO ••••••
895
RETAIL TRADE —
1*009

NONMANUF ACTURING — — — — —
PUBLIC U TILITIES --------------------------

6 .5 0
6 .9 3

MANUFACTURING------------------------------------

214

6 .2 5
6 .2 4

PAINTERS* MAINTENANCE-------------------------MANUr Aw1UKlNO
K lU Il iPArTI IPTMA
inK AK
iMvIinAINyr AW1UK i lw

59

6 .5 6
O.UC
6 .8 2

122

1*036
1 .A tC

6 .3 1
O .J i

mcTAHT ai Akin u atcdt ai MWVtMtNl
UUblUUXAw AMU MA9EKXAL ynucurkiT
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN

—

—

——

——

A.A7
HO l
6* 0 3 3
1*817
4*216
309
128
QA?
VOc
2*534

1*27 9
658
ADI
OCX

NONMANUFACTURING —

3 .6 2
4 .1 4
3 .4 0
4 .8 4
4 .4 5
CA
3 .1 1

TRUCKDRIVERS* LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) -------------NONMANUFACTURING —
uum FCAI F TDAHF .<
OCT AV T O i n C ___ ______ _ _________ _
I

UST0DIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
$
5 .3 7 {TRUCKDRIVERS - CONTINUED
4 .5 9
TOi i^i/f\D t ucdc MEDIUM lx***^2 t a
_
5 .7 5
TKUvKDKIVEK5♦ u r n fiu i t % 1 i o TO
Akin X N v L U U X N u 4 TA N 5 I% ••••••••••
ViiAl linti.r* /. I Ukl!*>
AMU
6 .5 7
..........
k AA IP AATI mVklP
J ll
C A.7
D.HJ
5 .1 2
NONMANUFACTURIMG-------------------------- —
PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------ere* a 1 rr .A t Ar
.
C
W HUwEDAwE TK AU E
m
3 .0 1
4 .7 3
5*6 8
C oA1
P ol
A 70
4* fy
4*86
4*43
c 77




A v era g e
(m e a n 2 )
h o u rly
e a rn in g s2

2 *6 0 8
375
2 *2 3 3
1*670

121

$
6 .1 8
5 .1 8
6 .3 4
6 .5 4
5 .9 1

TRUCKDRIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
taa vi err* v u n n ••••••••••••••••••
IKAXLEK iTKt#
kiAilllPAATilATilA
.

681

NONMANUFACTURING---------------------- -------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------------

479
273

6 .0 8
5 .2 1
6 .4 4
6 .4 8

20 2

1 C*
J3H
262

A .C l
D 91
5 .9 8
5 .4 0
4 .8 5

ARC
4DD
240
0 1c
c lD
IIO
1 XV
89

1 *63 6
911
725
416

437
204
233
1 AT
xox

J
C DC • AKtnUUDtMtN ••••••••••••••••••••••
v
D#CD L Apruni ICFMFkl mmmmmmmmmmmmmm>....mmrn
4*82
MANUFACTURING----- — — ------— —
kiAkiii Akii ar Aati ic fkir _
__ _ _
5 .6 2
NUNMANUr a v TUk ING
ijuai r r ai p
c 07
NrlULtbALt TiMPSP — —
1NAUt
— —

731
366
365

C CXQ
m
DtDpy
856
A.^1 7
4 f f 1J
7mAftX
J9UOO
AAA
ovo
7Q7
fit

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
6 .2 3
OCCUPATIONS - W EN
OM
5*58
6 .3 5 JANITORS* PORTERS* AND CLEANERS —
L Akii ir A rn lOTkin
i
«
A C7
O*D f
klftkJMA II 1CAf'Tt IDT I/1 _
K
K
__
A ld !
O AO
C ol
PIIAI 1C UiXwXIXfLD ••••*•••••••*
P « Al
ruoiaXV IITTI TTTPC
RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------FINANCE --------------------------------------------5*73
SERVICES ------------------------------------------5 .3 0
_
4*9 1 rtonco r n t r o c _
c A7
D*H f
DAPKFDC. CMTDDTkIC_____ _____ _ _
MAhiilCArTl IDTK in ___ _ ______ _
NONMANUFACTURING — — —
— —

346
175
53

122

N O T E : E a rn in gs data in table A -6 rela te only to w o rk e rs w hose s e x id e n tifica tio n w as p ro v id e d b y the esta b lish m en t.
the oth er hand, re la te to a ll w o rk e rs in an occu pation . (See appendix A f o r p u b lication c r it e r ia .)
See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le s .

of
w orkers

TDI I^DOTWCDC. UCH/V IUVEK 4 TAMC
1KUv I UK XVEKbt HEAVY i f\WtU a TONbf
n
otmpd thakj TDATI PP TVPF) ••*••••
V 1nC“ InMI* IKMXVC.K 1 Tr C,» ••mmm««
5*28
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------5*35
5 * 2 3 TRUCKERS. POWER (FORKLIFT) ---------------L Akll lir A/“ lOtkif*
I
*Tl
•
C fC
MANUrAV1UKXnv ••••••••••••••••••
D* 70
NONMANUFACTURING ----- — -------------------5*02
LiLiAi PC- ai p v n in r —
NrlULtbALt IKAUc.
— —. —
oct 14 Xla 1 D Ut
__________
Kt TATI Tr 4i n P __________ —
\
5*40
4 .9 2
TOI IPI/rOP QAuCD lATLiro TU A
M
5 * 9 3 lKUvi\ER5* HOk EK lOTHER THAN
FADk’l TFT \ ____________________—
__________
5*97
5 .9 7
m a n u f a c t u r in g ----- -------------------- ------—

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING PI PDlCC •••••
VVCnrvD • • • • "
MANUFACTURING ---------klHkliiAkli iCkrTl lOTklft __
3 .0 2
yuni FC ai e T» AltF
A *1
fVnWwwMW V Uw
KM
H. J1
2 .6 5
TDlirwriDfUCDC
.
5 .3 2
MANUFACTURING — — —
4 .2 7
K U I lFAr*TI IDXNU
irtM AM Av I UK (KIA
INMNnANUr
2 .2 4
PUBLIC UTILITIES
UHm F^Al F TRAPIF —
RnvLuMMLu |" Ml/u - ,
A OC
RETAIL TRADE --------

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS----------------------— —
UAL IF A v 1UKINu
ift
MANUr A/*Tfl IDTKl/l ••••••••••••••••••

JANITORS* PORTERS* AND CLEANERS
MANUFACTURING---------------------- -------------NONMANUFACTURING -------— -----------------PUBLIC U U U I l t a
WHOLESALE TRADE — —
—
orT A ti r o A n r ••*••••• ••••••••
K t 9A1V IKAUL
r INANCt.
———
——
SE R V IC E S---------------------- --------------------

PACKERS* SHIPPING — — —

A 717
m
Joo
7t.QQA
j yyy
7 .A 1 1
J9U11
AA7
o4j

CMTODiuA WC.KV\D ____ _
D n lr r ilMv ri r o v e ••••••(
m a nu fac tur ing — — —
kiAklUAkll ICA/^TI lOTLIA __
NVnnRNVf M « vis HIM
V
uum crcai r to a n r ______ ___ _______
RETAIL TRADE --------

VI
fl

7 .0 1
A flA
O.OH

GUARDS:
MAkll IPATTI iDTklA
MANUr AC 1UK 1 NU —

M i U K X N u *•••••••••••••••••
V

501
192
7AA
ouy
1 1 11
1i
186

88

2 *29 4
CAfi
DUO
1*786
jy
229
1*438

r iM N u r

5*978
1 a QQ1
1 f 77J
. VOD
3t ADC
1 tDXO
X*C 1 A
1 . 7f 1l 1
19 l
647

RECEIVING CLERKS ----- — —
u * u u r * r r iio T u f t ___ __
M M A I IPACTI IDinvj •••••••••••••••
O MM
IA
nviWHkriur mv i uk TK •••••••••••••••
uum r c ai r t d a a c _____ _______ _____
RETAIL TRADE --------

PIPEFITTERS* MAINTENANCE ------------------MANUr AC«UK 1 No

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN — — — — — —
M
Akll ICAPTI IDTkin
MANUrAv1UK1NO • ••••••••*••••*••*
NONMANUFACTURING------------------— — —
nitm
IITTI I I l c .9
rUBLIC U l l L tT tr C ■ *■.■ "**■ • ..... • •
••
FINANCE -------------------------------------------SERVICES

—

5 .7 1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

MECHANICS* MAINTENANCE ------------------------

i!

NUNMANUi A v

N um ber

Sex* o ccu p ation , and industry d iv ision

e a r n in g s 2

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN— CONTINUED

A vera ge
(m e a n 2 )
h o u rly

280
222
196

6 .1 0
6 .1 9
5 .9 4
5 .3 6
5 .3 3

222

4 .8 8
4 .0 2
5 .7 4
6 .1 3

1 *54 9
127
1*42 2
37
50
924
402

2 .9 9
3 .8 0
2 .9 2
3 .4 3
2 .9 3
2 .9 8
2 .7 3

240

3 .5 8

638
473
165

3 .6 6
3 .8 5
3 .1 0

E arn ings data in tables A - 4 and A - 5 ,

on

Table A-6a. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement
workers, by sex—large establishments in Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.—Wis., January 1975
A vera ge

N um ber

S e x,

o c c u p a tio n ,

a n d in d u s t r y d iv is io n

(m e a n * )

of
w orkers

h o u r ly

o c c u p a tio n ,

a n d in d u s t r y d iv is io n

M A IN T E N A N C E A N D P O W E R P L A N T
O C C U P A T IO N S M E N — C O N T IN U E D

—

P U B L IC

U T IL IT IE S

E L E C T R IC IA N S * M A IN T E N A N C E
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------- --- -------------------------------—
E N G IN E E R S
M AN U FA
NUN M AN
P U B L
R E T A

._ S T A T IO N A R Y
C T U R IN G
U rA C U K IN w •
IC U T I L I T I E S
IL
TRAD E

1

H E L P E R S * M A IN T E N A N C E
M A N U F A C T U R IN G

2 5.47
8
264 6.83

-----------------------------------------

TRAD ES

—

M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A T O R S . T O O L R O O M
M A N U F A C T U R IN G —
—
—
— — —
M A C H IN IS T S * M A IN T E N A N C E
M A N U F A C T U R IN G

—

—

—

—

—

M E C H A N IC S * A U T O M O T IV E
( M A I N T E N A N C E ) --------------------------------------------------------- —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G —
—
—
• —
P U B L IC U T I L I T I E S
—
—
— —
M E C H A N I C S * M A I N T E N A N C E ---------------— ----------------------M A N U r A v UKI N G • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • *
n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------ -------------------------------—
AI m< V
l IT T l f T T T C
P U B L IC U T I L I T I E S
— —
— —
—

1
f
*

i

DC
CD
C
Q7
r

9
2
77
6
4
0
4
482
474

O o OU
o * o
AL
Do ro

G U A RD S AND W ATCH M EN — — — —
M A N U F A C T U R IN G — — — —
—
N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G J

DO

—

—

1 408 J7^4cq9
f
* f
4 0 4• oD D
9
9 c ip
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1Q 0 D * J C
4.40
I 7

—

a

—

^

W ^ nU D

—

—

—

—

a

—

t

U
41 M A N U r A L 1 R I N G
7
AK 1D
O
D
J IA N IIT T U K C . r vHKO T F O C a A N D v L t F A^ MC P' ^ D
1 .K D A M D H ^ D C
C
M
lI
MN
5
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M
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s *6
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D UI I Q I L Ti v UI T I TI L ITI T C F DQ • •• •• •• *• • • •• •• •• •• •• • •
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r
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• •
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L A tRJ Dy D Ft K C f. n A TI C S Tj AA L M A M DJI L iTl N lG
r
6*39 WlA^ KI NIIrUitA KWlI vi pl UAnPl PT li vIDJ T M f t
K
6*36 N U Nn M A N rUer A» L cI U TK 1Ni rGt r
i
n
W H O LESALE
IK A U c
R E T A IL
1K A U E
6*84
6* U K U E K r II TL L L K DlD T i v l /
91
7.07 M i Af MN Uu ri i kA iLn r UA Ke I rI Nn Gn1 i i r
k
N U N M A N U r A L I U R ITN G • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
6*24
A 1
0*17 o r i f ' C O C A C U T D O T k (2
r
6*57 rALKEKS* IDTMA/
A * U j1
M K iPArTl
A II
07
NUNMANUr A L 1U K I N G
AL P 7

| u f t t r U T C ______ ______ ________________
y aN U r A /% T lUIDTNk Gl / I ••••••••••••••••••
__________________ —________________
M A as* if» a T K I
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P A IN T E R S * M A IN T E N A N C E
M A N U F A C T U R IN G — —

p
c iiU a

204

• »• — — — •—
—— —
——

QA
Cl
DJ

—— — —
— —— —

88

P IP E F I T T E R S * M A IN T E N A N C E
M A N U F A C T U R IN G — — —

71

1 if K

1

~

TI K IU P LI TM D JD KT IW F n D f. M F U ITUI I M
D I
M
n I .* W f>c
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A N iU ITNk iL L U I U T k l G A TU K i C I •
IHN o J f
M AN r AL
M A k llUI P A P T lU ID TNk G t • • • • • • • • • * •
K I lf

1 1 /1 4
1

5*19
c o/> JANi 1U J>| PftDTFOC. ANU PI PAMPD4 •••
K
D*CU lAklTTftDC. KUKlCKof AklH LLt.WwC.Ko
rlM U M lurriNG
IN r L
"
5*19
M U A.il IFAL 1 UK TKlfZ — — —
IM U
4 * 19
NUNMftr'IUr APTl ID INw —
— —— — —
—— — —
D IQ

CUTDDTklft LucKfVD
w
7*01 D n ir r ING PI CD^C
K
IAklUA I |p *PTI IDTklft
M
NUNMANUr AL 1 UKING •••*••*••••••••
6« 8 4

1U
I AA
U
7a
fU

— ——
4 71 DAPk’FQC.9 C M iT KK T M r , — — — —
D* # I KALISCKo OH D D ING
MA I IF APTl IDTKin — — — — — — — —
M
——* w —
—
MANUrAL1UKJNG — —
6*27

——

—

——

—— —

P

a

jai

i

y A kll

TO

a

DC*

A / 'T l
1

DPTATI

A

_________ ____.___________ ________
- —• —— — —
—
—

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

TDAHF

O P IlK r lN U

o *c f

1

1
104
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2
44
18
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__________________ — _________________

D P T A T1

4 * IC
4 * 1c
9
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f

A kll IP

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
• • • • *• • • •
* • • • • • • •
. . • . M • •
• • A • • • A M •M •. •a• • •
• . . a ea
T T tre

rT l

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a

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• • • • • • • • *

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W AnunU U DunC N "■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■
m a k ii i r * r T i id i u k
—• — • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
— — ——— ———— ———
1
•
•
IF P T l
— — ———— — — — —

A

h o u r ly
e a r n in g s 3

7 5.03
1 $
6*35
p up
cO C
6* 3
0
698 6*38

Q 0 (A
7 Q1

246 6*11
1r
I1* 4 5*62
l

1

9 Ik
LUU
70
f7
1 47
ID r
1 4M
I Da

——

———————

IB

———

A vera ge
(m e a n 2 )

of

t a
U

• • • • • •

K CvtlV I N G LLC.K D
FN
D*cD DPPP TUTkJft ri POkC •••••••••«••••••••
aj A IPAL 1UK 1Nl’
kll
MANUr APTl IDTkl/1
A * hd
AC
M P M U A I ir A L 1 U idtiuG ••••*• — — —• • •
M ApTI K AN R — — — — — —
—
— ****• —
NUNMANUr
o
K t . A XL I K A I J L •••••••••••••••••
6 .1 1

t
—————

a

4
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See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le s.




• • • • • •

6
03
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1c“ tJ
A
9A4

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M OKiUAKII |p A P T l IDTKiVe

yT |

• * • • • •

T R U C K D R IV E R S . L IG H T
(U N D E R
“
I v iV o l
M U IN M ll I r A L
IN O M MH A kf V U P M P T lUID ITN G " • • • • •
K K l^

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A
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• • • • • • • • • • • • •
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4.98 ▼T Rn Un Cm K/ rE nRIeSf *A nK Uni WDj rEnTK k i (»AO rRu K/ i L tI FmT #
F
3.75 M OA MN UU Ar M IC I F1 K/ ' TI lNID r — — — — — — — —
M
A
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N U N M A N U r A L 1U R I N G • • • • • • • • * • • • • •
4*94
R E T A IL
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4.54 M lAA KNIkUi rAfc.llL UA K I N IGD T K i n
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4.99 KNUNMANUr A L 1 K I N G • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
4.84
4* O c
4* 5u C U S T O D I A L 1A NADT Mt kAt CT E fta I A|«i Lf t M M iOu V E M E N T
R
C t
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r

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

O C T A tl

212
12
8
15
4
4Q Q
81
-a
8
3
CA

f r k s

d

N U N M A N U r A L I U K IN G

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
O C C U P A T IO N S - M E N

F IN A N C E
id

o

l in

-----------------------------------—
• ■ • • • • • • • • • • • •

d iv is io n

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
O C C U P A T IO N S - M E N — C O N T IN U E D
a n d

e J oc
D i

1 1 6.11
5

--------------------------------------------------

a n d in d u s t r y

5 3 $6.57 cD ur TUOr Dr l lTTMWf t M i l l / pr \ Cr r Vr T( .Ul VT iKl l i vn rv i L t n i> D
3 z CT
*
r
T RU
UR 1cK o • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
V
y AN
A T lU K I l
M A k llUi rr A L T1ID T Nk Gf l
M r tM M A k ll I F A P T I IO T
———— —— —— —— —— — ——

—

C A R P E N T E R S * M A IN T E N A N C E
M A N U F A C T U R IN G

o c c u p a tio n ,

w o rk e rs

!

$
—

S e x,

e a rn in g s3

M A IN T E N A N C E A N D P O W E R P L A N T
O C C U P A T IO N S - M E N
TEN D ER S

N um ber

(m e a n 2 )
h o u rly

of
w orkers

e a rn in g * 3

B O IL E R

A vera ge

N u m ber

S e x,

E arn ings data in table A - 6a rela te only to w o rk e rs w hose sex
id e n tifica tio n w as p ro v id e d by the establishm ent. Earnings data in
ta b le s A -4 a and A - 5 a , on the other hand, rela te to a ll w ork ers in an
occu p a tio n . (See appendix A fo r p ub lication c r it e r ia .)

T

311

__
3*3 7
9*00
7 IO
3* 19

944
c.D9
1 7fl
1 fO

4

A? I
*fcl

110

1 o1
3*^1
•3 2




Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for
selected occupational groups, adjusted for employment shifts,
in Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.—Wis., for selected periods
Industry and o ccu p ation al
group

January 1972
to
January 1973

January 1973
to
Jan uary 1974

5.1
*
5.9

6.2

8.6

6 .1

8.4
7.8
9.2
9.3

A ll in d u stries:
O ffic e c le r ic a l (m en and w o m e n )----------------------------E le c tr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w o m e n ) ------Industrial n u rses (men and w o m e n )-----------------------Skilled m aintenance tra d e s (m e n )---------------------------U nskilled plant w o rk e rs (m e n )---------------------------------

6.8
6.8

M anufacturing:
O ffic e c le r ic a l (m en and w o m e n )___________________
E le c tr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w o m e n ) ------Industrial n u rses (m en and w o m e n )-----------------------Skilled m aintenance trad es (m e n )---------------------------U nskilled plant w o rk e rs (m e n )---------------------------------

4.2
*
5.4
6.4
6.3

6 .1
6.6

N onm anuf actu rin g:
O ffic e c le r ic a l (m en and w o m e n )----------------------------E le c tr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g (m en and w o m e n ) ------Industrial n urses (men and w o m e n )-----------------------Skilled m aintenance tra d e s (m e n )--------------------------U nskilled plant w o rk e rs (m e n )_____________________

5.5
*
**
**
7.1

6.7
*
**
**
5.8

★
5.6
6.4

5.4
*
6.4

January 1974
to
January 1975

7.7
6.9
6.5
9.0
9.3
9.0

10 .2
*#
**

9.2

*
Data not available.
* * Data do not m eet pub lication c r it e r ia .

NOTE: The p e rce n t in c r e a s e s p re s e n te d in this table are b a s e d on changes in average
h ou rly earnings fo r e stablish m en ts rep ortin g the tre n d jo b s in both the cu rre n t and p re v io u s
y e a r (m atched establish m en ts). Th ey are not a ffe cte d by changes in average earnings
resulting fro m em ploym ent shifts am ong e stablish m en ts o r tu rn o v e r o f e stablish m en ts
included in survey s a m p le s . The p e rce n t in c r e a s e s , h o w e v e r, are s t ill a ffe c te d by fa c to r s
other than w age in c r e a s e s . H irin gs, la y o ffs , and tu rn o v e r m ay a ffe ct an establish m en t
average fo r an occupation when w o rk e rs are paid under plans p rovidin g a range o f w age rates
f o r individual jo b s . In p e r io d s o f in c r e a s e d h irin g , f o r e x a m p le , new e m p lo y e e s en ter at the
bottom of the-range, d e p re ssin g the a verage without a change in wage ra te s .
T h ese wage tre n d s are not link ed to the w age in d e x e s p r e v io u s ly p u b lish ed fo r this
a rea becau se the w age indexes m e a s u re d changes in a re a a v e ra g e s w h erea s th e s e w age tre n d s
m easu re changes in m atched establish m en t a v e ra g e s . O ther c h a r a c t e r is t ic s o f th ese w age
trends w hich d iffer fr o m the discontinu ed indexes includ e ( 1 ) earn in gs data o f o ffic e c l e r i c a l
w o rk e rs and in du stria l n u rs e s are co n v e r te d to an h o u rly b a s is , ( 2 ) tre n d e stim a te s are
provid ed fo r nonm anufacturing establish m en ts w h ere p o s s ib le , and (3) tr e n d e stim a te s are
provid ed f o r e le ctr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g jo b s .
F o r a m o r e detailed d e s crip tio n o f the m ethod used to com pute th e s e w age tr e n d s , see
"Im p roving A re a Wage Survey I n d e x e s ," M onthly L a b o r R e v ie w , January 1973, pp. 5 2 -5 7 .

B. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
Table B-1. Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and clerks in Minneapolis—St. Paul
Minn.—Wis., January 1975
Other in e x p e rie n ce d c le r ic a l w o rk e rs 5

Inexperien ced typists

M inim um w eekly stra ig h t-tim e s a la r y 4

B ased on standard w eekly h o u r s 6 o f—

A ll
indu stries

A ll
schedules

M anufacturing

N onm anufacturing

M anufacturing

A ll
schedules

40

A ll
sch ed u les

40

N onm anufacturing

B a sed on standard w eek ly h o u r s 6 o f—

A ll
industries

A ll
sch edu les

40

40

290

95

XXX

195

XXX

290

95

XXX

195

XXX

___ ______

114

39

33

75

55

127

47

41

80

61

$77.50 and under $80.00 _______ ________ ________________ _
__ __
$80.00 and under $82.50
$82.50 and under $85.00
___________ _________ __ __
$85.00 and under $87.50 ___
$87.50 and under $90.00 _
____
____ _____
$90.00 and under $92.50 __
$92.50 and under $95.00 _______
$95.00 and under $97.50 __________________________________
$97.50 and under $100.00
_
_ __
$100.00 and under $102.50
__
_ __ __
$102.50 and under $ 1 0 5 .0 0 _______________________________
$105.00 and under $ 1 0 7 .5 0 _______________________________
$107.50 and under $ 1 1 0 .0 0 ________ ________
_
_
$110.00 and under $112.50 ___________
$112.50 and under $115.00
____ ____ ______________
$115.00 and under $ 1 1 7 .5 0 _______________________________
$117.50 and under $120.00 _______
________

4
3
3
4
14
3
8
10
18
17
4
1
2
3
2
4

2
4
2
3
2
9
6
1
1
2
1
1
2

1
3
2
2
2
9
3
1
1
2
1
1
2

4
3
3
2
10
1
5
8
9
11
3
-

3
2
2
6
1
5
5
9
5
1
-

1
4
8
4
7
23
4
6
10
22
10
1
2
4
3
3
3

1
2
9
2
3
1
12
6
2
3
1
1
2

2
7
2
2
1
12
4
2
3
1
1
2

1
4
8
3
5
14
2
3
9
10
4
1
1
2
2
1

1
7
2
3
10
1
3
6
10
2
1
1
2
1
1

-

-

1

2
1
3

2
1
3

E stablishm ents studied
Establishm ents having a s p e c ifie d m in im um „

$120.00
$125.00
$130.00
$135.00
$140.00
$145.00
$150.00
$155.00

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
over

_

2
1
3

-

-

-

3
1
2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
2
3

1

1

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

2
2

-

1

2
2

1
2
3

1

1

2
2

2
2

XXX

31

XXX

69

31

XXX

38

XXX

XXX

89

XXX

94

17

XXX

77

XXX

50

19

126

37




3
1
2
1

1
-

E stablishm ents having no s p e c ifie d m in im u m __ ___________

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s.

-

2
1
2

3
2
2
1

$ 1 2 5 .0 0 ..................
.......................
$ 1 3 0 .0 0 _______________________________
$135.00 _______________________________
$ 1 4 0 .0 0 _______________________________
................................................
$145.00 __
$ 1 5 0 .0 0 _______________________________
$155.00 _ ___ _______
____
__
_
__ __ __

E stablishm ents w hich did not em p loy w o rk e rs
in this c a te g o r y
_
_
__ _ _ _ _
_

-

2
1
2

_

-

-

-

-

-

-




^All^full^timejrainufacturinyfi^
A ll w o r k e r s 7

W o r k e r s on la te s h ifts

S e co n d sh ift

T h ir d s h ift

In e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith la te s h ift p r o v is io n s ___

92.4

7 6.8

W ith no pay d iffe r e n tia l f o r la te sh ift w o r k ____
W ith p a y d iffe r e n tia l f o r la te sh ift w o r k _______
U n ifo r m c e n t s -p e r - h o u r d iffe r e n t ia l------ -----U n ifo r m p e r c e n t d iffe r e n tia l _ ______
O th e r d iffe r e n t ia l___
__
_ __
__ ______

1 .2

S e co n d sh ift

T h ir d s h ift

P ercen t o f w ork ers

91.2
84.6

6 .1
.5

-

19.7

.1

7 6.8
7 1 .9
4 .4
.5

19.6
18.5

2 1 .5

16.3
7.8

1 .1

5.7
-

5.7
5.5

.2
-

-

A v e r a g e pay d iffe r e n tia l
U n ifo r m c e n t s -p e r - h o u r d i f f e r e n t i a l ___________
U n ifo r m p e r c e n t d iffe r e n tia l ____________________

15.9
6.7

8.6

2 2 .4

8 .1

P e r c e n t o f w o r k e r s b y type and
am ount o f pay d iffe r e n tia l
U n ifo r m c e n t s -p e r - h o u r :
5 o r 6 ce n ts __
__
___
7 o r 8 cen ts
10 ce n ts
_
_
. __ _
1 1 c e n ts __________ __ ________ ______.....
. ..
12 ce n ts
_ _____
12 Vj. cen ts
13 ce n ts
_
__ _____ _
14 ce n ts
15 ce n ts
„
_________________
15 V? cents
16 ce n ts
_ _ _ _ _
17 ce n ts
18 ce n ts
__
_
_ .
19 c e n t s ________________________________________
2 0 ce n ts

20 4 ce n ts _ __
/5
2 2 c e n ts _________

__ __
_
__ __

__
__

__

___

__ _

23 ce n ts

25
26
28
30
31
34
50

c e n t s ___ ______ _________________________ _____
ce n ts
c e n ts _ _
_____ __
------ ...
ce n ts
_ _
__ __ ___
V2 o r 33 V3 c e n t s _______________________ ___
c e n t s _____ __ __ __ __
___ _____ __ _
ce n ts and o v e r ____ __ _

2 .4
1.5
14.9
3 .4
4 .0
-

4.2
1.3
2 2 .5

.4
-

6.6

.7

.1

(8 )
-

1.4

.6

1 .2

-

4.3
1.3
7.5

1 .2
.2

.2
.1
.1

-

1 .6

-

5.2
.3

7.7
3.1
1.3
5 .0

4.1

-

.9

-

.8

i ~

-

17.5

.4
1.3
-

.9

3.1
1.5
3 .0
1.3

.2

-

2 .4
.9
-

.8

U n ifo r m p e r c e n t:
5 percen t
6 p e r c e n t ___ __ ___ ___ _
_ __ ____
7 p e r c e n t ___ _____________
__ _ _
9 p e r c e n t __
__________________ ___ _____
10 P e r c e n t ---------------------------------------------------------

3.1
.9
.7
1.4

O th e r d i f f e r e n t i a l ______ - _______ _______ ___ ______

.5

.6

.5

.2
1.6

6.8

(8 )

-

-

-

3.2
.9

6 .1
5.7

-

1 .2
-

1 1 .8
(8 )

.8

-

.2
.3
-

.2
2 .1
2.6

.7
.4
.3

.5
-

1.5

.3

-

-

1 .6

.2

.1
.1

.4

(8 )

1.4
.5

.1

"

.2
.2

Minn.—Wis., January 1975
O ffic e w o rk e rs

P lant w o rk e rs
Item

A ll
in d u strie s

Manu­
fa ctu rin g

100

100

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W h olesale
trade

R etail
trade

S e rv ice s

A ll
in du stries

Manu­
factu ring

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W h olesa le
trade

R etail
trade

F in an ce

S e r v ic e s

100

P e r c e n t o f w o rk e rs by scheduled
w eek ly h ou rs and days
A ll fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s ____________________________________
20
32
35
36

hours—
h ours—
h ours—
hou rs
4 days

5 days______________________________________________
5 days______________________________________________
5 days
—
_
_

_

___

36*A hours— 5 d a y s.
.
_ _
36l/2 hours— 5 days
________
37 h ours— 5 days
37Va hou rs— 5 days
37l/2 hours— 5 days
__
____
_____
38 hours— 5 days
_____
38*A hours— 5 d ays________________________ __________________
38 V2 hours— 5 d ays____________________________________________
383 hours— 5 d ays____________________________________________
A
39 h ours— 5 days
39 V4 hours— 5 days .
39 V2 h ours— 5 days
______________ __
40 h ours— 5 days
42 h ours— 5 days
43 hours— 5 days_____________________________________ _ _ _
44 h ours— 5 days
45 h o u r s ________________________________________________________
5 d a y s _______________________________________________________
51 d a y s .
/*
48 hours— 6 days______________________________________________
50 hours— 5 days______________________________________________

1
(9 )
4
1
1
_
_
_
_
5
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
83
(9 )
1
(9 )
2
1
1
1
2

100

100

_
5
2
2

_
_
_
-

-

_
_
_
_
5
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
79

I
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
99
_

(9 )
(9 )

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
96
4
_
_
_
_

-

40.0

_

_
1
4
3
1
1
3

_
_

_
_
_

100

100

_
4
_
-

9
1
_
1
1

(9 )
(9 )

_
_
_
_
16
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
68
_
_
_
_
_

-

1
-

5
-

40.1

39.7

38.0

_
_

_
_
_
_
5
7
_
_
_
_
_
_
80
_
3
_

_

100

100

100

100

100

100

_

_
_
2
2

_
_
_

_
_
1

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

1

-

-

:

2
7
4
_
17
(9 )
6
4
28
8

(9 )
1
1
/9 \
(9 )

2
1

(9 )

9
(9 )

I
(9 )
_
9

I
_

_

_
1
_
_

_
_
2
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

5
1

70
_
_
_

_
_
_

(9 )

_
_
4
_
5
_
79
_
_
_

5
_
_
_
94
_
_
_

_
_
97
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

1
1
10
2
2
1

-

-

-

39.6

39.9

39.9

39.7

38.5

_
_
(9 )
15
_

_

-

_
_
_
_

_

_

_

_
(9 )
2
2
“

_

10

_
_
_
84

5
18

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
82

_
_
_
_
_

(9 )

A v e ra g e scheduled w e e k ly h ou rs
A ll w eek ly w ork s c h e d u le s ____________________________________

See footnote at end o f ta b le s .




39.9

40.2

39.4

39.5

P lant w o rk e rs
Item

A ll
in du stries

Manu­
factu ring

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W h olesale
trade

O ffic e w ork ers
R etail
trade

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in d u strie s

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u tilities

W h olesale
trade

R etail
trade

100

100

100

Finance

S e r v ic e s

P ercen t o f w ork ers
A ll fu ll-t im e w o r k e r s ___________

________

_ _ _

In e sta b lish m en ts not p rovid in g
p a id 'h o lid a y s — _ _ _ _ _
In e sta b lish m en ts p rov id in g
paid h olid ays ________________________________________________ _

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
_

100

100

2

(9)

_

_

2

15

(9)

_

_

98

99

100

100

98

85

99

100

100

100

99

100

98

8.6

9.2

9.2

8.8

7.2

6.9

8.9

9.4

8.7

8.4

7.7

9.2

8.6

.

_

1

( 9)

!
40

46

4

2

5

3
.

3

1

_

10

1

3
9
5

19

1
6
1
1
1

_
_
3
4

20

20

8

11

7
3

4

2

3

2

( 9)
H
7
4

2

3
9

10

23

21

13

7

_
34

11

(9)

22
8

13

2

(9)

A v e ra g e num ber o f paid h olid ays
F o r w o rk e rs in e sta b lish m en ts
provid in g h olid a ys

___

___

P e r c e n t o f w o rk e rs by num ber
o f paid h olid a y s p ro v id e d 1
W
L e s s than 6 h olid ays
_ .
.
6 h olid a ys
_ _ _
_
. . . .
6 h olid a ys plus 1 h alf d a y ______________________________ ______
6 h olid a ys plus 2 o r 3 h a lf d a y s ______ ___ __________________
7
7
7
7

h o lid a y s _____
_ ___..... .
h olid ays plus 1 h a lf day
h olid a y s plus 2 h a lf d a y s ________ ___________________________
h olid ays plus 3 h a lf d a y s _____
_ _ _ ....
8 h o lid a y s — _____
_
_
.... „
8 h olid a ys plus 1 h alf day
_
r m ._
.
.„
8 h olid ays plus 2 h alf d a y s ___ __ _______
_ _
9 h olid a y s
_ __
_
„.
T , rT
9 h olid ays plus 1 h alf day _ _____
_
. .
9 h olid a ys plus 2 h alf days__
_
,. ...
..^ ........
10 h olid a ys
_
_
r
- .. . T
„
10 h olid a ys p lu s 1 o r 4 h a lf d a y s _____
1 1 h olid a ys
_ _
_
_...
,. T . . ..
.
...
„ ... .
12 h olid a y s _ __ _____ _ _ __ - - ,
13 h olid a ys plus 1 h alf d a y ____
^
^
14 h olid a y s
___ ___________
________
____
___
15 h olid a ys
_
_ __ _
. ...
.......... .

(9)

11

(9)

1
8
1
2

(’ )
17

1
1

_

13

1

24

33

26
.

39
_

2

1
1

1

1

_
31
_
18

1

1

2

_
36
_
9
_
_
_

-

-

-

98
97
97
87

100
100
100

77
76
57
56
30
30
4
4

99
99
99
98
98
92
91
77
76
43
42
3
3

1
1
1

2
2
2

“

“

(9)

_

_

_
16

2
6
25
_
19
_

2

_
_
3
-

_
9
5

2

_
_

21
2
1

9

_

17
_
_

(9)
_
_

( 9)

(9)

_
_
_
_

8
_
( 9)

-

(9)

12

7
4
25
3
( 9)
25

2
2
( 9)

2

( 9)

1

1

24

14

2
(9)
52
5
(9)

2
21

(9)

1

(’ )

33

31

7
5
3
5
24
4

8

5

6
1

16
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3

15

10

11

2

_

_

_

( 9)

-

4

-

-

100
100
100

100
100
100

101
100
100

98
98
94
92
85
82
58
58

95
95
74
74
63
63
28
26

99
99
99
81
81
57
55
33
33

100
100
100
100
100

98
98
98
91

6
1
1

11

99
98
85
63
24
15
9

78
54
44
44
31
26

1

1
7
7

P e r c e n t o f w o r k e r s by to ta l paid
h olid a y tim e p ro v id e d “
4 days o r m o r e ----------------------------__ . .....
5 days o r m o r e —__ __ ________ ________ _____
— _____ _
6 days o r m o r e __________________ _____
__
,.
6 V2 days o r m o r e ________ _________________ _____
___
7 days o r m o r e
— __
_ ______
„
.
,__ ^
l x days o r m o r e
h
. . .. ..
...
8 days o r m o r e __ ____
^
8V2 days o r m o r e
_r
9 days o r m o r e __ ________ —__ _ ______ — — —
9V* days o r m o r e ___ ____
T .
_
10 days o r m o r e ------------- -------------------- ------------------- n.__
10 l/2 days o r m o r e _ ___ __ .
r
...
......
. _ ...
1 1 days o r m o r e
,.T
..................... .
12 days o r m o r e _
______
. . . _ ___
_ __
13V2 days o r m o r e
...
.......
14 days o r m o r e _ __
. .TT .
15 davs _
____ _
_
__
... _
...
... ...




86

99
99
97
97
64
64
47
45
9
9
.
-

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100
100
100
100
97
83
83
57
55
24
24
5
5
3
3
3

98
97
97
57
57
48
43

85
85
85
39
39
17
17

20

8
8
8
8
8
8

19
(’ )
(’ )
_
_
.
_
-

( 9)

(9
(9

99
99
99
96
95

86
83
70
63
34
31
7
5
3
3

1

(9)

_
_

(9
( 9)

-

97

88
75
72
40
40
15
15
5
5
4
4
4
4

86

8
8

10
10
7

7

7
7
i

-

-

O ffic e w o rk e rs

P lan t w o rk e rs
I t e m 10

W h olesale
trade

R etail
trade

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in du stries

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
8

85

99
25
30
5
99
7
99

100

100

9
41
5

35
43
-

100
8

100
20

100

100

99

100

100

1

1
100

P u b lic
u tilitie s

A ll
in d u strie s

Manu­
fa ctu rin g

100

100

98
9
35

99

6

30
35
-

Manu­
factu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W h olesa le
trad e

R eta il
trad e

F in an ce

S e r v ic e s

100

100

100

99

100

1
1

64
16
7

98
24

P e r c e n t o f w o rk e rs
A ll fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s --------

-----—

—

------ —

New Y e a r 's Day------------------------------ —------- --------------------- ---- —_
W ashington's B irth d a y— ----------------- ----------------------------- —
G ood F rid a y
—— ------- ----------------- ----------------------------------G ood F rid a y , h alf day------------------- --------------------------- ----M em oria l D ay---------------------------------------------------------------------------T h ird of .Tuly
__________ _
____________________-___
F ourth of J u ly —----------------------------------- ---------------------------- —
F ifth o f J u ly - .............................................................................................
L a b or D a y________________________________________________ _____
C,olumbus D a y-------------------- --------------------- -------------------- ----V eterans D ay—----------------------------- ------------------------------------------F lection Day — — ___ _____ ________ __________________ _____
Thanksgiving Day______________________________________________
Day after T h anksgiving--------------------- ---------------------------------Day after T hanksgiving, h alf d a y __ —----------------------------— -----C h ristm as Eve — —____ ——_____________________—
___ — _—
C h ristm as E ve, h a lf day ------- ------------- --- -------------------- --------- -------------------C h ristm as D ay---------------- ----------------------E x tra day at C h ristm a s---- —---------------- —------- -----------------------New Y e a r 's Eve---------------------- — — -----—------------ --------------New Y e a r 's E ve, h alf day----------- —------- --- -------------------------------F loating holiday, 1 d a y 1 3 --------------------------------------------------------F loating holiday, 2 days 13 ----- ------------------- ----------------------- _
Floating holiday, 3 days 13 ---------- —— -----------------------------------F loating h olid ay, 4 days 13 ______ __________________________
E m p loy ee's birthday — — ------- -----------------------------------------E m p lo y e e 's birth day, 2 d a y s. _____ _ --------------------------------E m p lo y e e 's a n n iversary-------------------- ----------------------------- -----

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




1
98
98
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98
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9

52

2
99
98
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99
(9 )
5

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98
36

99
60

100
-

-

100

99
39

-

-

100
22

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-

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79
3
99

38
3
99
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6

1

5

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1

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19
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9
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100

100

52
5
98
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19
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29

30
3
41
4

38
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16
25
52

1
7

100
4
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100
18
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21
100

23
17
29

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43
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98
3
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98
98
97
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85
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99

10
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42

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5
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7
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7

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15
7
14
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9
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(9 )

100

65
72

2
100

16

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54

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19
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36
4
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21

2

7

9

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14
27

1

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10

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38
5
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100
-

99
99
99
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7

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100
20
7
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24

100
-

16
21
19
9

1
18
-

99
3
7

2
99
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1
5
17
17
31
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100
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100
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100
34
34
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45
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98
42
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39
98
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19
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P lant w o rk e rs
Item

O ffic e w ork ers

A ll
in du stries

Manu­
factu ring

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

100

100

100

100

99
96
3

100

100
100

20

18
15

2

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in d u strie s

Manu­
fa ctu rin g

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100

100
100

89
89

100

100

100
100

100
100

100
100

13
14

40

20

10

4
4

13
(9 )

51

4
23

23

6

10

19

P u b lic
u tilities

W h olesale
trade

R etail
trade

Finance

S e r v ic e s

P ercen t o f w ork ers

_________

A ll fu ll-t im e w o r k e r s _

In esta b lish m en ts not p rov id in g
p a id v a c a t io n s ............. ..................... ............ , —
In esta b lish m en ts p rov id in g
paid va ca tion s
_
, .
L e n g th -o f-tim e paym ent
__ __ ______ ---------------------------_
P e r c e n ta g e paym ent

1

11
93
7

100
-

99
(9 )

99

1

100
-

100

100

4
7
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34

Am ount o f paid v acation a ft e r : 14

6 m onths o f s e r v ic e :
U nder 1 w eek
—
1 w eek
___
O v er 1 and under 2 w eek s . ......................
2 w eeks.

14

2
1

1

25
5

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37

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1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e :
U nder 1 w eek ___
1 w eek
O v er 1 and under 2
2 w eeks
O ver 2 and under 3
3 w eeks
O ver 3 and under 4
O ver 4 and under 5

......
w eek s

(9 )
75
3

w eek s

20
1
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w eek s
w eek s ....

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2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
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1 w eek
_
O v er 1 and under 2
2 w eek s
O v er 2 and under 3
3 w e e k s __
_____
O v er 3 and u nd er 4
O v er 4 and under 5
3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek
__ __
O v er 1 and under
2 w eeks
O v er 2 and under
3 w eek s
_
O ver 3 and under
O ver 4 and under
4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek .
O v e r 1 and under
2 w eek s _
O v e r 2 and undeV
3 w e e k s .,___ _ . _
O v e r 3 and under
4 w eeks
O ve r 4 and under

_
w eek s
. .....
w eeks

21

5
71

1

......

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(9 )
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w eeks

__
2 w eek s
_
...
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.
3 w eeks
. . . . . . .
4 w e e k s . ...
5 w e e k s ___________ —

.

_____

5 w eek s




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84

1

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88

73

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4 w eek s

2

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O ffic e w o rk e rs

P lant w o rk e rs
Item

A ll
in d u s trie s

Manu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

S e rv ice s

A ll
in du stries

Manu­
factu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W h olesa le
trade

R eta il
trade

F in an ce

S e r v ic e s

Am ount o f paid vacation a ft e r 14— Continued
5 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e :
O ver 1 and under
2 w eeks
-------O ver 2 and under
3 w e e k s ___
O ver 3 and under
4 w eeks _ _
O ver 4 and under

2 w eeks
_ ... .......
_
__
3 w e e k s _____ ___ ________________ ____
_
4 w eek s,,_ ,___ _______________^r
_
5 w e e k s .... .... ^_______________ ________

10 y ea rs o f s e r v ic e :
2 w e e k s __ ____________________ ______ ________ ____________
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks _______ ______ _______________
3 w eeks ________ ___ __ _______ _____ _________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks
4 w eeks
O ver 4 and under 5 w eeks _ _ _
_______
_ _
5 w eeks

12 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
2 w eeks
_ ..............

.......
,
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks __________ ____ _____________ __
3 w eeks
_
_ _
T ,.
O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks _
_
_ _
4 w eeks
T_
___
O ver 4 and under 5 w eeks
5 w eeks.
_
,.

15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
2 w eeks
O ver 2 and under
3 w eeks
_ . ..
O ver 3 and under
4 w eeks
O ver 4 and under
5 w eeks
O ver 5 and under
6 w e e k s ----_

(9 )
76
7
15
(9 )
(?)
(9 )

9

1
83
3
3

1

4 w e e k s __ _____ ____________
_

_ _____
_

20 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e :
2 w eeks

_ ----------- __
_______

^
_
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ________________________ _____
3 w e e k s __________________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w eeks ______________________________
4 w eeks _ __
_________
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s . _____ __ __
5 w eeks
.
O ver 5 and under 6 w e e k s ______________________________
6 w e e k s __ ____ ___ __ ___________ ___ ______ __________ _
O ver 6 w eeks
__ _




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82
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P lant wo r k e r s
Item

A ll
in d u stries

Manufactu ring

P u b lic
u tilitie s

O ffic e w o rk e rs

W h olesale
trade

R etail
trade

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in d u strie s

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W h olesale
trade

R etail
trade

Finance

S e r v ic e s

A m ount o f paid v a ca tion a f t e r 14— Continued
25 y.ears o f s e r v ic e :
2 w e e k s _________________ _____________ _____ ______ ______
O v er 2 and under 3 w e e k s _________________ _ . ,, „ __
3 w eeks
O v er 3 and under 4 w eek s . . . , ........ .
4 w eek s
........
O v er 4 and under 5 w eek s „
____
_ _
5 w e e k s .._______
O ver 5 and under 6 w eek s
.......
6 w eek s ...
O v er 6 w eek s
30 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
2 w eeks
O v er 2 and under 3
3 w eeks
O v er 3 and under 4
4 w eeks
O v er 4 and under 5
5 w eeks ............ _
O v er 5 and under 6
.
6 w eeks . ___
O ver 6 w eek s

15

1
1
12

45

48

1

1

32

33

1
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1

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1

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43
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w eek s

,

M axim um v a ca tion available:
2 w eeks
O v er 2 and under 3 w eeks
3 w eeks
O v er 3 and under 4 w eek s
4 w e e k s . ___ .
O v er 4 and under 5 w eeks
5 w eek s
,
O v er 5 and under 6 w eek s
6 w eek s __
„
O v er 6 w eek s

2
2

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1

3

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15

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1
12

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36

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43

47

5

41

57

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33

15

2

2

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




___

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3
39

7

1

1

C
C
7

1
(’ )

(9 )

(9 )

....

20

g

4

.

.

9

(’ )

2

w e e k s __ ___ _______ ________

(9 )

22

1

32

w eek s _

3

7

15
(9 )
41

43

1

6

g

(9 )

(’ )

1
1
12

3

_
_

1

15

w eek s ______________________________

(9 )

“

"

"

“

7

2

57
3
34
■

5
-

O ffic e w o rk e rs

P lant w o rk e rs
Item

A ll
in d u strie s

Manu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W h olesale
trade

R etail
trade

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in du stries

Manu­
factu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s

W h olesa le
trade

R eta il
trade

F in an ce

S e r v ic e s

P e r c e n t o f w o rk e rs

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

94

78

99

100

100

100

97

100

98

96
87

88

97
72

98
78

100

65

71
71

78

98
77

93
64

96
63

98
55

81
72

74
54

48
48

71
45

73
43

62
53

81
57

88
60

58
30

87
44

A ll fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s _____________________________________

100

100

100

100

In establishm ents provid in g at le a s t one o f the
benefits shown b e lo w 15_______________________________________

97

100

100

L ife in s u r a n c e ----------------------------------------------------------------------------N oncontributory p la n s ______________________________________

93
80

98
87

98
84

A ccid en ta l death and d ism em b erm e n t in su ra n ce-------------------N oncontributory p la n s ______________________________________

72
62

75
65

75
73

S ick n ess and a ccid en t in su ra n ce o r s ick leave
o r b o th 16______________________________________________________

89

92

95

95

81

74

92

97

100

85

89

82

94

75
65

80
71
23
7

63
62
32
5

75
67
45

72
53

70
70

50
36
69

24

(9 )

78
67
54
4

49
47
59
3

85
59

1
1

55
44
58

13
9
71
9

51
19
85
4

18
13

19
14

20
20

34
27

10

8
6

52
28

50
18

23

20

58
54

27

77
44

54
32

H ospitalization in su ra n ce---------------------------------------------------------N on contributory p la n s ______________________________________

96
82

99
89

99
99

100

94
61

66

99
64

99
84

96
92

99
79

95
40

100

98
37

S u rgica l in su ran ce---------------------------------------------------------------------N oncontributory p la n s ______________________________________

96
82

99
89

99
99

100

94
61

66

98
64

99
83

96
92

99
81

95
40

100

M ed ica l in s u r a n c e ______________________________________________
N on contributory p la n s ______________________________________

95
82

99
89

99
99

100

91
58

66

98
64

99
83

96
92

99
81

94
39

100

62

M ajor m e d ica l in s u r a n c e ----------------------------------------------------------N oncontributory p la n s ______________________________________

83
62

86

100

78
44

46
42

98
60

98
76

91

97
75

94
33

100

97

68

100

62

Dental in s u r a n c e ------------------------------------------------------------------------N oncontributory p la n s ----------------------------------------------------------

22

21
20

68

28
28

1
1

(9)
(9 )

24
13

32

1
2

35
35

20
20

3
-

18

67

R etirem en t p e n s io n ____________________________________________
N oncontributory p la n s ----------------------------------------------------------

87
82

93
91

83
80

88
88

81
67

57
49

85
75

90
85

77
74

80
73

84
51

Sickness and accid en t in s u r a n c e ----------------------------------------N oncontributory p la n s ___________________________________
Sick leave (full pay and no w aiting p e r io d )________________
S ick leave (p artial pay o r w aiting p e r io d )--------------------------

22
10

L o n g -te r m d isa b ility in su ra n ce-----------------------------------------------N oncontributory p la n s ______________________________________

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s.




23

81
84
84
84

6

3

9

6

62
62

8

1

8

37

6

26
26
26
26

6

95

86

98
37
98
37
97
36
23
7
37

21

Footnotes
A ll of these standard footnotes may not apply to this bulletin.

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which em ployees receive their regular straight-tim e salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime
at regular a n d /o r prem ium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all workers and dividing by the number of w orkers. The median
designates position— half of the employees surveyed receive m ore and half receive le ss than the rate shown. The middle range is defined
by two rates of pay; a fourth of the workers earn less than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn m ore than the higher rate.
3
Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
4 These sa la ries relate to formally established minimum starting (hiring) regular straight-tim e salaries that are paid for standard
workweeks.
5 Excludes w orkers in subclerical jobs such as m essenger.
6 Data are presented for all standard workweeks combined, and for the m ost common standard workweeks reported.
7 Includes a ll plant w orkers in establishments currently operating late sh ifts, and establishments whose form al provisions cover late
sh ifts, even though the establishments were not currently operating late shifts.
8 L e ss than 0.05 percent.
9 L e ss than 0.5 percent.
10 For purposes of this study, pay for a Sunday in D ecem ber, negotiated in the automobile industry, is not treated as a paid holiday.
1 A ll combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for exam ple, the proportion of workers receiving
1
a total of 9 days includes those with 9 full days and no half days, 8 full days and 2 half days, 7 full days and 4 half days, and so on.
Proportions then w ere cumulated.
12 A C hristm as—
New Year holiday period is an unbroken series of holidays which includes Christm as Eve, Christm as Day, New Y ea r's
E ve, and New Y e a r 's Day.
Such a holiday period is common in the automobile, aerospace, and farm implement industries.
13 "F lo a tin g " holidays vary from year to year according to em ployer or employee choice.
14 Includes payments other than "length of t i m e ," such as percentage of annual earnings or fla t-su m payments, converted to an
equivalent tim e b a s is ; for exam ple, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 w eek's pay. Periods of service are chosen arbitrarily
and do not n ecessa rily reflect individual provisions for progression; for exam ple, changes in proportions at 10 yearr include changes between
5 and 10 y e a r s. E stim ates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 w eeks' pay after 10 year
Includes those eligible for
at least 3 w eeks' pay after fewer years of service.
15 E stim ates listed after type of benefit are for all plans for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the em ployer. "Noncontributory
p la n s" include only those financed entirely by the em ployer. Excluded are legally required plans, such as workm en's compensation, social
security, and railroad retirem ent.
l °
Unduplicated total of workers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below. Sick leave plans are
lim ited to those which definitely establish at least the minimum number of days' pay that each employee can expect. Informal sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.







Appendix A
A r e a w age and r e la te d b e n e fits data are obtained by p e rs o n a l v is its o f B u rea u fie ld re p re se n t*
atives at 3 -y e a r i n t e r v a ls .1 In e a c h o f the intervenin g y e a r s , inform ation on em ploym ent and
2
occu p a tion a l ea rn in gs i s c o lle c t e d b y a com bin ation o f p e rs o n a l v is it and m a il q u e stion n aire fr o m
e sta b lish m en ts p a rticip a tin g in the p r e v io u s su rvey.
In e a ch o f the 8 2 2 a r e a s c u r r e n tly su rv e y e d , data are obtained fr o m r e p re se n ta tiv e e sta b ­
lish m en ts w ithin s ix b r o a d in d u stry d iv isio n s : M anufacturing; tran sportation , com m u n ica tio n , and other
p u b lic u tilitie s ; w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e ta il tr a d e ; fin a n ce , in su ran ce, and r e a l estate; and s e r v ic e s . M a jo r
in d u stry grou p s ex clu d ed f r o m th e s e studies are governm ent operations and the co n stru ctio n and
e x tr a c tiv e in d u s tr ie s . E sta b lish m e n ts having fe w e r than a p r e s c r ib e d num ber o f w o rk e rs are om itted
b e c a u s e o f in s u fficie n t em p loym en t in the occu p a tion s studied. Separate tabulations are p ro v id e d f o r
ea ch o f the b r o a d in du stry d iv isio n s w hich m e e t publication c r it e r ia .
T h e se s u rv e y s are co n d u cte d on a sam p le b a s is . The sam pling p ro c e d u r e s in vo lve detailed
s tra tifica tio n o f a ll e sta b lish m e n ts w ithin the s c o p e o f an individual a re a survey by in du stry and num ber
o f e m p lo y e e s . F r o m th is s tr a tifie d u n iv e rs e a pro b a b ility sam ple is se le cte d , w ith e a ch establish m en t
having a p r e d e te r m in e d ch an ce o f s e le ctio n . T o obtain optim um a c c u r a c y at m in im u m c o s t , a g r e a te r
p r o p o r tio n o f la r g e than s m a ll e sta b lish m e n ts is s e le cte d . When data are com bin ed, e a ch establish m en t
i s w eigh ted a c c o r d in g t o its p r o b a b ility o f s e le ctio n , so that unbiased estim ates are g en erated . F o r
e x a m p le, i f one out o f fo u r e sta b lish m e n ts i s s e le cte d , it is given a w eight o f fo u r to re p r e s e n t its e lf
p lu s th r e e o th e r s . An altern ate o f the sam e o rig in a l p robab ility is chosen in the sam e in d u s tr y -s iz e
c la s s ific a t io n i f data a re not available f o r the o rig in a l sam ple m e m b e r. If n o suitable substitute is
a v a ila b le, add itional w eight i s a s s ig n e d to a sam ple m e m b e r that is sim ila r to the m is s in g unit.
O ccu p ation s and E arn ings
O ccu p ation s s e le cte d f o r study are co m m o n to a va rie ty o f m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s , and a re o f the fo llo w in g ty p e s : (1) O ffice c le r ic a l; (2) p r o fe s sio n a l and te c h n ica l; (3)
m aintenance and pow erpla n t; and (4) c u s to d ia l and m a te r ia l m ovem ent. O ccupational c la s s ific a t io n is
b a s e d on a unifo r m set o f jo b d e s c r ip tio n s d esign ed to take account o f in terestab lish m en t v ariation
in duties w ithin the sam e jo b . O ccu p ation s s e le cte d fo r study are lis te d and d e s c r ib e d in appendix B.
U n less oth e r w is e in d ica ted , the e a rn in gs data follow in g the jo b title s are fo r all in d u strie s com bin ed .
E a rn in g s data f o r som e of the o ccu p a tio n s lis t e d and d e s c r ib e d , o r f o r som e industry d iv isio n s within
o ccu p a tio n s , a re not p r e s e n te d in the A - s e r ie s ta b le s , b e cau se eith er (1) em ploym ent in the occupation
i s t o o s m a ll t o p rov id e enough data to m e r it presen tation , o r (2) th ere i s p o s s ib ility o f d is c lo s u r e o f
in divid u al esta b lish m en t data. Sepa ra te m e n 's and w o m e n 's earnings data are not p re s e n te d when the
nu m ber o f w o r k e r s not id en tifie d b y s e x is 20 p e rce n t o r m o r e o f the m en o r w om en id e n tifie d in an
occu p ation . E a rn in g s data not shown s e p a ra te ly fo r industry d ivision s are in clu d ed in all in d u strie s
c om b in ed data, w h ere shown. L ik e w is e , data are included in the o v e r a ll c la s s ific a tio n when a sub­
c la s s ific a t io n o f e le c t r o n ic s te c h n icia n s , s e c r e t a r ie s , o r tr u c k d r iv e rs is not shown o r in form ation to
s u b c la s s ify i s not a vailable.
O ccu p ation a l em ploym en t and e a rn in gs data are shown fo r fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s , i .e . , th o se h ir e d
t o w ork a re g u la r w eek ly sch e d u le . E a rn in gs data exclude prem iu m pay fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on
w eek en d s, h o lid a y s , and late s h ifts. N onproduction bon u ses are exclu ded, but c o s t -o f -liv in g allow an ces
and in cen tive b on u ses are in clu d e d . W eek ly h o u rs fo r o ffic e c le r i c a l and p r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ica l
occu p a tion s r e fe r t o the standard w ork w eek (rounded to the n e a re st h a lf hour) fo r w hich e m p lo y e e s
r e c e iv e re g u la r s tr a ig h t-tim e s a la r ie s (e x c lu s iv e o f pay f o r ove rtim e at regular a n d /o r p re m iu m ra te s).
A v e ra g e w eek ly ea rn in gs f o r th e se o ccu p a tio n s are rounded to the n ea rest h alf d o lla r.
T h e se su r v e y s m e a s u r e the le v e l o f occupational earnings in an a rea at a p a r ticu la r tim e .
C o m p a ris o n s o f individ ual occu p a tio n a l a v e ra g e s o v e r tim e m ay not re fle c t e x p e cte d w age changes.
T h e a v e r a g e s f o r individ ual jo b s are a ffe c te d by changes in w ages and em ploym ent p a tte rn s. F o r
ex a m p le , p r o p o r tio n s o f w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d b y h ig h - o r low -w a ge fir m s m ay change, o r high -w age
1
2

P e s o n a l v is it s w e r e o n a 2 - y e a r c y c l e b e f o r e J u ly 1 9 7 2 .
I n c lu d e d in t h e 8 2 a r e a s a r e 9 stu d ies c o n d u c t e d b y th e B u rea u u n d e r c o n t r a c t .

L a u d e r d a le —H o l l y w o o d

a n d W e s t P a lm

B each —B oca

R a t o n , F l a . ; L e x in g to n —F a y e t t e ,

T h e s e a rea s a r e A u s tin , T e x . ; B in g h a m to n , N . Y . —P a . ; F o rt
K y .;

M e lb o u r n e — T it u s v ille — C o c o a ,

F l a . ; N o r fo lk — V ir g in ia

B e a c h — P o r ts m o u th a n d N e w p o r t N e w s —H a m p t o n , V a . — N . C . ; P o u g h k e e p s ie —K in g s to n — N ew b u rg h , N . Y . ; R a le ig h —D u r h a m , N . C . ; a n d S y r a c u s e , N . Y .
I n a d d i t io n , th e B u rea u c o n d u c t s m o r e l i m i t e d a r e a s tu d ie s in a p p r o x im a t e ly 7 0 a rea s a t th e re q u e st o f t h e E m p lo y m e n t S ta n d a rd s A d m in is t r a t io n o f
4 h e -U ~ S . D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r .




w o r k e r s m ay advance t o b e tte r jo b s and b e r e p la c e d by new w o rk e rs at lo w e r rates. Such shifts in
em ploym en t cou ld d e c r e a s e an occu p ation al a v era g e even though m o s t establishm ents in an area
in c r e a s e w ages during the y e a r . T re n d s in earn in gs o f occu p a tion a l g rou p s, shown in table A - 7,
are b e tte r in d ica to rs o f w age tre n d s than individ ual jo b s within the grou p s.
A v era ge ea rn in g s r e fle c t c o m p o s it e , areaw id e e s tim a te s . In du stries and establish m en ts d iffe r
in pay le v e l and jo b staffin g, and thus con tribu te d iffe re n tly to the estim a tes fo r each jo b .
Pay
a v e ra g e s m ay fa il t o r e fle c t a ccu ra te ly the w age d iffe re n tia l am ong jo b s in individual establish m en ts.
A v era ge pay le v e ls fo r m en and w om en in s e le c t e d occu p ation s should not be assu m ed to
r e fle c t d iffe r e n c e s in pay o f the . s e x e s w ithin individual esta b lish m en ts. F a c to r s w hich m ay contribu te
t o d iffe r e n c e s includ e p r o g r e s s io n within e s ta b lis h ed rate ra n g e s , sin ce only the rates paid incum bents
are c o lle c t e d , and p e r fo rm a n ce o f s p e c ific duties w ithin the g e n e ra l su rvey jo b d es crip tion s . Job
d e s c r ip tio n s used to c la s s if y e m p lo y e e s in th ese su rv ey s u su ally are m o r e g en era lized than those used
in individ ual esta b lish m e n ts and allow f o r m in or d iffe r e n c e s am ong establishm ents in s p e c ific
duties p e r fo rm e d .
O ccup ational em ploym en t e s tim a te s r ep res en t the to ta l in all establish m en ts within the scop e
o f the study and not the nu m ber actu ally su rveyed . B eca u se occu p ation al stru ctu res among e s ta b lis h ­
m ents d iffe r , e s tim a te s o f o ccu p a tio n a l em ploym ent obtained fr o m the sam ple o f establishm ents studied
s e r v e only to in dica te the re la tiv e im p o rta n ce o f the jo b s studied. T h ese d iffe re n ce s in occupational
stru ctu re do not a ffe ct m a te r ia lly the a c c u r a c y o f the ea rn in gs data.
W age tre n d s f o r s e le c t e d occu p a tion a l gro u p s
The
Annual ra te s
span betw een
in c r e a s e d at

p e r c e n ts o f change in ta b le A -7 rela te to w age changes betw een the in dica ted dates.
o f in c r e a s e , w h ere show n, r e fle c t the amount o f in c r e a s e f o r 12 m onths when the tim e
su rve ys w as oth er than 12 m onths. Annual ra te s are b a s e d on the assum ption that w ages
a constant rate betw een s u rv e y s .

O ccup ations u se d to com pute w age tre n d s a re :
O ffice c l e r i c a l (m en and w o m e n ):
B ook k e e p in g-m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s B
C le r k s , accou n tin g, c la s s e s A and B
C le r k s , f il e , c la s s e s A , B , and C
C le r k s , o r d e r
C le r k s , p a y r o ll
K eypunch o p e r a t o r s , c la s s e s A and B
M essengers
S e c r e ta r ie s
S te n o gra p h e rs, g e n e ra l
S te n o gra p h e rs, se n io r
Sw itchboard o p e r a to r s
T a b u latin g-m ach in e o p e r a to r s ,
c la s s B
T y p is ts , c la s s e s A and B
E le c tr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g
(m en and w o m e n ):
C om pu ter o p e r a t o r s , c la s s e s A , B , and
C om pu ter p r o g r a m m e r s , c la s s e s A , B
and C

E le c t r o n ic data p r o c e s s in g (men
and w om en )— Continued
C om pu ter sy s te m s analysts, c la s s e s A,
B , and C
In du strial n u rs es (m en and w om en ):
N u r s e s, in d u stria l (re g is te r e d )
S k illed m aintenance (m en ):
C a rp en ters
E le c tr ic ia n s
M ach in ists
M ech a n ics
M ech a n ics (autom otive)
P a in ters
P ip e fitte r s
T o o l and die m a k ers
U n sk illed plant (m en ):
J a n ito r s , p o r t e r s , and clea n ers
L a b o r e r s , m a te r ia l handling

P e r c e n t changes fo r individ ual are a s in the p r o g r a m are com pu ted as fo llo w s :
1. E ach occu pation is a ssign e d a w eight b a s e d on its prop ortion a te em ploym ent in the s e le cte d
grou p o f o ccu pation s in the ba se y e a r .
2. T h e se w eigh ts are u sed to com pute group a v e r a g e s . E a ch occu p a tion 's average (m ean)
earn in gs i s m u ltip lie d b y its w eight. The p ro d u cts are to ta le d to obtain a group average.
3. The ra tio o f grou p a v e ra g e s f o r 2 c o n s e c u tiv e y e a r s is com puted by dividing the average
f o r the cu rre n t y e a r by the a verage f o r the e a r lie r y e a r . T he r esu lts— e x p r e s s e d as a percen t— le s s 100
is the p e r c e n t change.

E stablishm ent p r a c t ic e s and supplem entary w age p r o v is io n s
The B - s e r ie s ta b les p r o v id e in fo rm a tio n on establish m en t p r a c t ic e s and su pplem entary w age
p r o v is io n s fo r fu ll-tim e plant and o ffic e w o r k e r s .
"P lan t w o r k e r s " includ e w ork in g fo re m e n and all
non s u p erv isory w o rk e rs (including leadm en and tr a in e e s ) engaged in n o n o ffice fu n ction s. C a fe te ria
w ork ers and routem en are ex clu d e d fr o m m an u factu rin g, but in clu d ed in nonm anufacturing in d u strie s.
"O ffic e w o r k e r s " includ e w ork in g s u p e r v is o r s and n o n s u p e rv is o r y w o rk e rs p e r fo rm in g c le r i c a l o r
r ela ted functions. A d m in istra tiv e , e x e c u tiv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and p a r t-tim e e m p lo y e e s are e xclu ded.
P a rt-tim e e m p loy ees are th ose h ir e d to w ork a schedule callin g r e g u la r ly fo r fe w e r w eekly h ou rs than
the esta b lish m en t's sch edu le f o r fu ll-tim e e m p lo y e e s in the sam e g e n e ra l type o f w ork . The
determ ination is b a s ed on the e m p lo y e r 's distin ction betw een the tw o grou ps w hich m ay take into
account not only d iffe r e n c e s in w ork sch ed u les but d iffe r e n c e s in pay and b e n e fits.
M inim um en tran ce s a la r ie s fo r o ffic e w o rk e rs rela te only to the e stablish m en ts v is ite d . (See
table B - l . ) B eca u se o f the optim u m sam plin g techniques u sed and the p ro b a b ility that la r g e
establishm ents are m o r e lik e ly than sm a ll establish m en ts to have fo r m a l entran ce rates above the
s u b c le r ic a l le v e l, the table is m o r e rep re se n ta tiv e o f p o lic ie s in m ediu m and la r g e establish m en ts.
Shift d ifferen tia l data are lim ite d to fu ll-tim e plant w o rk e rs in m anufacturing in d u s trie s . (See
table B - 2 .) T h is in form a tion is p re se n te d in t e r m s o f (1) establish m en t p o l ic y 3 f o r to ta l plant w o rk e r
em ploym ent, and (2) e ffe c tiv e p r a c t ic e fo r w o rk e rs e m p loyed on the s p e c ifie d shift at the tim e o f the
su rvey. In establish m en ts having v a r ie d d iffe r e n tia ls , the amount applying to a m a jo rity is used. In
establishm ents having som e la te -s h ift hours paid at n o rm a l r a te s , a d iffe re n tia l is r e c o r d e d only i f it
applies to a m a jo rity o f the shift h ou rs. A s e co n d (evening) shift ends w ork at o r n e a r m idnight. A
th ird (night) shift starts w ork at o r n ea r m idnight.
The sch ed u led w eek ly h ours and days o f a m a jo rity o f the f ir s t -s h ift w o rk e rs in an e s ta b lis h ­
m ent are tabulated as applying to all fu ll-t im e plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs o f that e stablish m en t. (See
table B -3 .) Schedu led w eek ly h ou rs and days are th ose w hich a m a jo rity o f fu ll-t im e em p lo y e e s are
expected to w ork fo r s tr a ig h t-tim e o r o v e r tim e ra te s.
Paid h olid a y s; paid v a ca tio n s ; and health, in su ra n ce , and pen sion plans are tre a te d s ta tis tica lly
as applying to all fu ll-tim e plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs i f a m a jo rity o f such w o rk e rs are e lig ib le o r m ay
eventually qualify fo r the p r a c t ic e s lis te d . (See ta b le s B -4 through B - 6 .) Sums o f individual item s in
tables B -2 through B -5 m ay not equal totals b e ca u s e o f rounding.

The sum m ary o f vacation plans is a s ta tis tic a l m e a s u r e o f va ca tion p r o v is io n s ra th er than a
m e a s u r e o f the p ro p o rtio n of fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s a ctu ally r e c e iv in g s p e c ific b e n e fits . (See ta b le B - 5 .)
P r o v is io n s apply to all plant o r o ffic e w o r k e r s in an esta b lish m en t r e g a r d le s s o f length o f s e r v ic e .
P aym en ts on oth er than a tim e b a s is a re c o n v e r te d to a tim e p e r io d ; f o r e x a m p le, 2 p e r c e n t o f
annual earnings are c o n s id e r e d equivalent to 1 w e e k 's pay. Only b a s ic plans a re in clu d ed. E stim a tes
e xclu d e vacation b o n u se s, v a ca tio n -sa v in g s pla n s, and "e x te n d e d " o r "s a b b a t ic a l" b en efits b eyon d b a s ic
p lan s. Such p r o v is io n s are ty p ica l in the s t e e l, alum inum , and can in d u stries.
Health, in su ra n ce , and pension plans f o r w h ich the e m p lo y e r pays at le a s t a part o f the c o s t
in clu d e th ose (1) underw ritten by a c o m m e r c ia l in su ran ce, com pan y o r n on p rofit o rg a n iz a tio n , (2)
p r o v id e d through a union fund, o r (3) paid d ir e c t ly by the e m p lo y e r out o f c u rren t op era tin g funds o r
fr o m a fund set aside fo r th is p u rp o se .
(See table B - 6 .) An esta b lish m en t is c o n s id e r e d t o have
such a plan if the m a jo rity o f e m p lo y e e s are c o v e r e d even though le s s than a m a jo rity p a rticip a te
under the plan be ca u se em p lo ye e s are r e q u ir e d to con tribu te tow a rd the c o s t.
E x clu d ed are
le g a lly req u ired plan s, such as w o rk m e n 's c om p en s a tion , s o c ia l s e c u r ity , and r a ilr o a d r etirem en t.
Sickness and accident in su ran ce is lim ite d to that type o f in su ra n ce under w hich p r e d e te r m in e d
c a s h paym ents are m ade d ir e ctly to the in s u r e d during te m p o r a r y illn e s s o r a ccid en t d isa b ility .
In form ation is p resen ted fo r all such plans to w h ich the e m p lo y e r con trib u tes.
H ow ev er, in New
Y o r k and New J e r s e y , w hich have en acted te m p o r a r y d is a b ility in su ra n ce law s req u irin g e m p lo y e r
c o n tr ib u tio n s ,4 plans are included only if the e m p lo y e r (1) con trib u tes m o r e than is le g a lly req u ir e d ,
o r (2) p ro vid e s the em ployee with ben e fits w hich e x c e e d the r eq u irem en ts o f the law. T a bu lation s o f
paid s ick leave plans are lim ite d to fo r m a l p la n s 5 w h ich p r ov id e fu ll pay o r a p r o p o r tio n o f the
w o r k e r 's pay during absence fr o m w ork b e c a u s e o f illn e s s . S eparate tabulations are p r e s e n te d
a c c o r d in g to (1) plans w hich p rovid e fu ll pay and no w aiting p e r io d , and (2) plans w hich p ro v id e eith er
p a r tia l pay or a waiting p e rio d . In addition to the p resen ta tion o f p r o p o r tio n s o f w o r k e r s p rov id ed
s ick n e s s and accident in surance o r paid s ick le a v e , an unduplicated tota l is shown o f w o r k e r s who
r e c e iv e eith er o r both types of b e n e fits.
Long te r m d isability in su ran ce plans p ro v id e paym ents to to ta lly d isa b led e m p lo y e e s upon the
e xp ira tio n o f th eir paid sick leave a n d /o r s ick n e s s and accid en t in s u r a n c e , o r after a p r e d e te r m in e d
p e r io d o f disability (ty pically 6 m onths). P a ym en ts a re m ade until the end o f the d is a b ility , a
m axim u m age, o r e lig ib ility fo r re tire m e n t b e n e fits . F u ll o r p a r tia l paym ents are a lm ost always
re d u ce d by s o cia l se c u r ity , w o rk m e n 's co m p en sa tion , and p riv a te p e n s io n s b en efits payable to the
d isa b le d em ployee.

Data on paid h olid ays are lim ite d to h olid a ys granted annually on a fo r m a l b a s is , w hich (1)
are provid ed f o r in w ritten fo r m , o r (2) are e sta b lish e d by cu sto m . (See table B - 4 .) H olidays
ord in arily granted are in clu d ed even though they m ay fa ll on a nonw orkday and the W orker is not
granted another day off. The fir s t part o f the p aid holid ays table p re se n ts the n um ber o f w hole and
half holidays actually granted. The se co n d part co m b in e s w hole and h alf holid ays to show to ta l holiday
t im e . T able B -4 a r e p o r ts the in cid e n ce o f the m o s t com m on paid h olid ays.

M a jo r m e d ica l insu ran ce plans p r o te c t e m p lo y e e s fr o m s ick n e s s and in ju ry ex p e n s e s beyond
the c o v e r a g e o f b a s ic h ospitalization , m e d ic a l, and s u r g ic a l plains. T y p ic a l fea tu res o f m a jo r m e d ica l
plans are (1) a "d e d u ctib le " (e .g ., $ 5 0 ) paid by the in s u r e d b e fo r e b e n e fits b egin ; (2) a c o in s u ra n ce
featu re requiring the in su red to pay a p o rtion ( e .g ., 20 p e r c e n t) o f c e r ta in ex p e n s e s ; and (3) stated
d o lla r m axim um b en efits (e .g ., $ 10,000 a y e a r ). M e d ica l in su ra n ce p r o v id e s co m p le te o r p a rtia l
paym ent o f d o c to r s ' fe e s . Dental in su ra n ce usually c o v e r s fillin g s , e x t r a c t io n s , and X - r a y s . E xclu ded
are plans w hich c o v e r only o r a l su r g e r y o r a ccid en t dam age.
R etirem en t p en sion plans p rov id e
paym ents fo r the rem ain der of the w o r k e r 's life .

3 A n establishment was considered as having a p o lic y if it m et either o f Ihe follow in g conditions: (1 ) Operated late shifts at the tim e o f the
survey, or (2 ) had form al provisions coverin g late shifts. A n establishm ent was considered as having form al provisions if it (1 ) had operated late
shifts during the 12 months before the survey, or (2 ) had provisions in written form to operate late shifts.

4 Th e temporary disability laws in C alifornia and Rhode Island do not require em ployer contributions.
5 A n establishment is considered as having a form al plan if it established at least d ie m inim um number o f days sick lea v e ava ila ble to each
em p loy ee.
Such a plan need not be written; but informal sick lea ve allow ances, determ ined on an individual basis, are exclu ded .




N um ber o f establish m en ts

Industry d i v i s i o n 2

M inim um
em ploym ent
in e s ta b lis h ­
m ents in sco p e
o f study

W ork ers in establishm ents
W ithin sco p e o f study

Within s c o p e
of stu d y 3

Studied

T o t a l4

Studied
N um ber

P e rce n t

F u ll-t im e
plant w o rk e rs

F u ll-t im e
o ffic e w o rk e rs

T o ta l4

A ll esta b lis h m e n ts

1,912

290

4 3 6 ,1 9 7

100

2 0 6 .8 4 8

83,531

218, 780

-

648
1,264

95
195

192 ,504
2 4 3 ,6 9 3

44
56

106,377
100,471

3 0 ,6 6 4
52 ,8 6 7

104,450
114,330

50
50
50
50
50

122

29
37
49
33
47

4 9 ,1 3 7
3 6 ,9 3 4
86,572
34 ,9 7 5
3 6 ,0 7 5

1
1

230
477
172
263

20
8
8

24, 388
18, 130
4 0 ,9 5 3
7 2 ,3 0 4
14,696

10,151
10,099
8,081
19,416
5, 120

35,303
12,300
39, 135
16,097
11,495

A ll d iv is io n s ____________________ ____________

-

130

86

2 1 7 ,6 0 9

100

86,601

4 8 ,1 5 4

183,235

M a n u fa c tu r in g ____ ________ _______ ___________ ____
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g ______________________ _______
T ra n sp orta tion , com m u n ica tio n , and
oth er public u tilitie s 5 ______________________
_________________________
W h olesale t r a d e .
R e ta il t r a d e ___________________________________
F in a n ce, in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e 6 ____ _
S e r v i c e s 8 ----------------------------------------------------------

500

58
72

34
52

112,292
105,317

52
48

4 9 ,9 6 5
36,636

2 2,041
2 6 ,1 1 3

92,755
90,480

1
2

1
2

9
26
17

7
15

3 2 ,2 4 8
7 ,9 3 9
4 3 ,0 1 9
16,863
5 ,2 4 8

20
8
2

15
3

15,562
3 ,2 1 5
15,336

6 ,241
2 ,3 3 4
5 ,531
1 0 ,658
1 ,349

32,248
6, 819
34,304
12,401
4 ,7 0 8

A ll d i v i s i o n s -------------------------------------------------M anufacturing
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g________________________________
T ra n sp orta tion , c o m m u n ica tio n , and
oth er public u tilitie s 5 _ ________________
W h olesale t r a d e _______________________________
R eta il tra d e __________________________________
F in a n ce, in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e 6 ____ _
S e r v ic e s 8 ------------------------------------------------------ —

-

50

9

L a rg e esta b lish m e n ts

-

500
500
500
500
500

8

1
1
7

_

2 ,5 2 3

1 T h e M in n eapolis—St. P aul Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea, as defin ed by the O ffice o f M anagem ent and Budget through F e b ru a ry 1974, c o n s is t s o f An oka, C a r v e r , C h isago, Dakota,
Hennepin, R a m s ey , Scott, W ashington, and W right Cou nties, M inn.; and St. C r o ix County, W is. The "w o r k e r s within scope o f study" e stim a te s shown in this table p ro v id e a reasonably accurate
d e s c r ip tio n o f the s iz e and co m p o s itio n o f the labor f o r c e included in the su rv e y . E stim ates are not intended, h o w e v e r, fo r c o m p a r is o n with oth er em ploym en t in d exes to m easu re em ploym ent
tr e n d s o r le v e ls sin ce (1) planning o f w age surveys r e q u ire s establishm ent data co m p ile d co n s id e r a b ly in advance o f the p a y r o ll p e r io d studied, and (2) sm a ll esta b lish m en ts are excluded from
the s co p e o f the su r v e y .
2 The 1967 ed ition o f the Standard Industrial C la s s ifica tio n Manual w as used to c la s s ify e stablish m en ts by in du stry d iv isio n .
3 In clu des a ll e sta b lish m e n ts w ith to ta l em ploym ent at o r above the m in im um lim itation . A ll outlets (within the area) o f co m p a n ie s in in d u stries such as tra d e, fin a n ce, auto rep a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion p ictu re th e a te rs a re c o n s id e r e d as 1 establishm ent.
4 In clu d es e x e c u tiv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, p a rt-tim e , and other w ork ers exclu d ed fro m the separate plant and o ffic e c a t e g o r ie s .
5 A b b re v ia te d to "pu blic u t ilit ie s " in the A - and B - s e r ie s tables. T a x ica b s and s e r v ic e s in ciden ta l to w ater tran sportation w e re exclu ded.
6 A b b rev ia ted to " fin a n ce " in the A - and B - s e r ie s tables.
7 E stim ate r e la te s to r e a l e state establishm ents only. W orkers fro m the en tire industry d iv isio n are re p re s e n te d in the A - s e r ie s ta b le s , but fro m the r e a l estate p ortion only in "a ll in du stry"
es tim a te s in the B - s e r i e s t a b le s .
8 H otels and m o t e ls ; lau n d ries and oth er p e rso n a l s e r v ic e s ; business s e r v ic e s ; au tom obile r e p a ir , ren tal, and parking; m otion p ic tu re s ; n onp rofit m em b e rs h ip org a n iz a tion s (excluding religiou s
and ch a rita b le org a n iz a tio n s ); and en gin eerin g and a rch ite ctu ra l s e r v ic e s .
N OTE: S ince the la s t s u rv e y in the M inneapolis—
St. Paul a r e a , the Standard M etrop olitan S tatistical A re a (SMSA) has been expanded to in clu d e C a r v e r , C h isago, Scott, and
W right C ou n ties, M in n.; and St. C r o ix County, W is. The additional geograph y accounts fo r 3 p e rce n t o f the w o rk e rs within sco p e o f the study. T h re e -fo u r th s o f the additional w ork ers
w e re in m anufacturin g e sta b lis h m e n ts .
O ccu p ation a l e a rn in gs in fo rm a tio n in T a bles A - l through A -6 r e la te s to the expanded SMSA but w age tren d in form ation in T able A -7 r e la te s to the g e o g ra p h ica l scope used in the
January 1974 su rv e y .
Next y e a r all data w ill rela te to the enlarged SMSA.
_________________________________________________ _
L a bor-m an a gem en t a g reem en t c o v e r a g e
In du strial c o m p o sitio n in m anufacturing
O ver t w o -fifth s o f the w o r k e r s within scop e o f the survey in the M in neapolis—
St. Paul
a rea w ere em p loy ed in m anufacturin g fir m s . The follow in g presen ts the m a jo r industry
grou p s and s p e c ific in d u s tr ie s as a p e r c e n t o f all m anufacturing:
Industry gro u p s
M a ch in ery, e x ce p t e l e c t r ic a l __ 26
E le c t r ic a l equipm ent and
2
s u p p l i e s _______________________ 1
2
P aper and a llie d p r o d u c t s _____ 1
1
F ood and k in dred p ro d u cts ____ 1
Printin g and p u b lis h in g ________ 8
F a b r ic a te d m eta l p r o d u c t s _____ 7
Instrum ents and re la te d
p r o d u c t s _______________________
7

S p ecific in du stries
O ffice and computing
m a c h in e s ---------------------------- _ 13
_
M iscella n eou s con verted
1
0
paper products ------------------

T h is in form a tion is b a s e d on e stim a te s o f total em ploym ent d e riv e d fro m u n iverse
m a te r ia ls c o m p ile d b e fo r e actu al su r v e y . P ro p o rtio n s in various industry d iv isio n s m ay
d iffe r fro m p r o p o r tio n s b a se d on the re s u lts o f the survey as shown in the appendix ta b le .




The follow in g tabulation show s the p ercen t o f fu ll-tim e plant and o ffic e w ork ers
e m p loyed in e stablish m en ts in which a union con tra ct o r co n tr a c ts c o v e r e d a m a jority o f the
w o rk e rs in the r e s p e c t iv e c a t e g o r ie s , M in neapolis—
St. Paul, M inn.— is., January 1975:
W
Plant w o rk e rs
A ll in d u s t r ie s ____ ________
M a n u fa ctu rin g ____ ________
Pu blic u t i li t ie s ___ ...............
W holesale trade —
_
R e ta il t r a d e ______
F in a n ce —.................
S e r v ic e s __________ ________

71
72
97
87

O ffice w ork ers

1
1
1

51

2

41

28

79

16

-

An establishm ent is co n s id e r e d to have a con tra ct co v e r in g all plant
w o rk e rs i f a m a jo rity o f such w o rk e rs are c o v e r e d by a labor-m an agem en t agreem ent.
T h e r e fo r e , all other plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs are em ployed in establish m en ts that either do
not have la b o r-m a n a g e m e n t co n tr a c ts in e ffe c t , o r have co n tr a c ts that apply to few er than
half o f th eir plant o r o ffic e w o rk e rs . E stim ates are not n e c e s s a r ily represen tative of the
extent to w hich all w o rk e rs in the area m ay be c o v e r e d by the p r o v is io n s o f labor-m an agem ent
a g re e m e n ts , b e cau se sm all establish m en ts are excluded and the industrial scop e of the
su rve y is lim ite d .




Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions

The p r im a ry purpose o f p reparin g jo b d e s c r ip tio n s fo r the B u re a u 's w age su rve ys is to a s s is t its fie ld s ta ff in cla s s ify in g into app ropriate
occu p a tio n s w o r k e r s who are e m ployed under a v a r ie ty o f p a y r o ll title s and d ifferen t w ork arran gem en ts fr o m establish m en t t o establish m en t and
f r o m a re a t o are a . T h is p e rm its the grouping o f occu p a tion a l w age rates rep resen tin g co m p a ra b le jo b content. B e ca u se o f this em ph asis on
in te re sta b lish m e n t and in te ra re a com p a ra b ility of occu p a tion a l content, the B u re a u 's jo b d e s c r ip tio n s m ay d iffe r sig n ifica n tly fr o m th ose in use in
in divid u al esta b lish m en ts o r th ose p re p a re d fo r other p u r p o s e s . In applying th e se jo b d e s c r ip tio n s , the B u re a u 's fie ld e c o n o m is ts are in stru cted
t o e x clu d e w ork in g s u p e r v is o r s ; a p p ren tices; le a r n e r s ; b e g in n e rs ; tr a in e e s ; and handicapped, p a r t -tim e , te m p o r a r y , and p rob a tion a ry w o rk e rs .

OFFICE
B IL L E R , M ACHINE

CL E R K S, ACCOUNTING

P r e p a r e s sta tem en ts, b i l l s , and in v o ic e s on a m achine other than an ord in a ry o r e le c tr o m a tic
ty p e w rite r . M ay a ls o k eep r e c o r d s as to b illin g s o r shipping ch a rges o r p e r fo rm other c le r i c a l w ork
in cid en ta l to b illin g op e r a tio n s . F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , b ille r s , m ach in e, are c la s s ifie d by type o f
m a ch in e, as fo llo w s :

P e r fo r m s one o r m o r e accounting c le r i c a l task s such as p osting to re g is te r s and le d g e r s ;
re c o n c ilin g bank a ccou n ts; v e rify in g the in tern al c o n s is te n c y , co m p le te n e s s , and m athem atical a ccu ra cy
o f accounting d ocu m en ts; assigning p r e s c r ib e d accounting d istribu tion c o d e s ; exam ining and verify in g
fo r c le r i c a l a c c u r a c y v a r io u s types o f r e p o r t s , lis t s , ca lcu la tio n s , p ostin g , e t c .; or preparing sim p le or
a ssistin g in p rep arin g m o r e co m p lic a te d jo u rn a l v o u c h e r s . M ay w ork in eith er a manual or autom ated
accounting system .

B i l le r , m ach in e (billin g m a ch in e ). U ses a s p e cia l billin g m achine (com bination typing and
adding m a ch in e) to p r e p a r e b ills and in v o ic e s f r o m c u s to m e r s ' purch ase o r d e r s , intern ally p re p a re d
o r d e r s , shipping m em ora n d u m s, e tc . U sually in vo lve s application o f p red eterm in ed discounts and
shipping c h a r g e s and en try o f n e c e s s a r y e x te n s io n s , w hich m ay o r m ay not be com puted on the b illin g
m a ch in e, and to ta ls w h ich are a u tom atica lly accum ulated by m achine. The operation usually in volves a
la r g e nu m ber o f ca rb on c o p ie s o f the b i ll being p re p a re d and is often done on a fan fold m achine.
B i l le r , m achine (bookkeeping m a ch in e ). U ses a bookkeeping m achine (with o r without a
ty p e w rite r k e y b o a rd ) t o p r e p a r e c u s t o m e r s ' b ills as part o f the accounts re c e iv a b le operation.
G en era lly in v o lv e s the sim u ltaneou s en try o f fig u re s on c u s t o m e r s ' ledger r e c o r d . The m achine
a u tom atica lly accu m u lates fig u r e s on a n u m ber o f v e r tic a l colu m n s and com putes and usually prints
a u tom atica lly the debit o r c r e d it b a la n c e s . D oes not involve a know ledge o f bookkeeping. W orks fro m
u n iform and standard ty p es o f s a le s and c r e d it s lip s .

The w ork r e q u ir e s a know ledge o f c le r i c a l m ethods and o ffic e p r a c t ic e s and p ro ce d u re s w hich
r e la te s to the c l e r i c a l p r o c e s s in g and r e c o rd in g of tra n sa ction s and accounting inform ation. With
e x p e r ie n c e , the w o rk e r ty p ica lly b e c o m e s fa m ilia r w ith the bookkeepin g and accounting te r m s and
p r o c e d u r e s used in the assign ed w o rk , but is not re q u ire d to have a know ledge of the fo rm a l p r in cip le s
o f bookkeepin g and accounting.
P o s itio n s are c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the b a s is o f the follow in g defin itions.
G lass A. U nder g e n e ra l s u p e r v is io n , p e r fo r m s accounting c l e r i c a l operations w hich requ ire
the application o f e x p e rie n ce and judgm ent, f o r e x a m p le, c le r ic a lly p r o c e s s in g com p lica ted o r
n on repetitive accounting tr a n s a c tio n s, se le ctin g am ong a substantial v a r ie ty of p r e s c r ib e d accounting
c o d e s and c la s s ific a t io n s , o r tr a c in g tra n sa ction s though p rev iou s accounting actions to determ ine
s o u r c e o f d is c r e p a n c ie s . M ay be a s s is te d b y one o r m o r e c la s s B accounting c le r k s .

BO O K K EE PIN G -M A CH IN E O P E R A T O R
O p erates a book k eepin g m ach in e (with o r without a typ e w rite r keyboard) t o k eep a r e c o r d of
b u s in e s s tr a n s a c tio n s.
C la ss A . K eeps a set o f r e c o r d s re q u irin g a know ledge o f a n d 'e x p e rie n ce in b a s ic bookkeeping
p r in c ip le s , and fa m ilia r ity w ith the stru ctu re o f the p a rticu la r accounting system used. D eterm in es
p r o p e r r e c o r d s and distrib u tion o f debit and c r e d it item s to be used in each phase o f the w o rk . M ay
p r e p a r e c o n s o lid a te d r e p o r t s , ba la n ce sh e e ts , and other r e c o r d s by hand.
C la s s B . K eep s a r e c o r d o f one o r m o r e phases o r s e c tio n s o f a set o f r e c o r d s usually
req u irin g little know ledge o f b a s ic bookk eepin g. P h a se s o r se ctio n s include accounts p aya ble, p a y r o ll,
c u s t o m e r s ' accou n ts (not in clu d in g a s im p le type o f b illin g d e s c r ib e d under b i ll e r , m a ch in e ), c o s t
d istrib u tion , exp en se d istrib u tion , in ve n to ry c o n t r o l, etc. M ay ch eck o r assist in p rep a ra tion o f t r ia l
b a la n ce s and p r e p a r e c o n t r o l sh eets f o r the accounting departm ent.

R e v is e d occu p a tion a l d e s c r ip tio n s f o r sw itchboard o p e ra to r; sw itchboard o p e r a t o r -r e ­
ce p tio n is t; m a c h in e -t o o l o p e r a t o r , t o o lr o o m ; and t o o l and die m aker are being in tro d u ce d this y e a r .
T h ey are the resu lt o f the B u re a u 's p o lic y o f p e r io d ic a lly review ing a re a wage su rv e y occu pation al
d e s c r ip tio n s in o r d e r t o take in to account te c h n o lo g ic a l developm ents and to c la r ify d e s c r ip tio n s so
that they are m o r e r e a d ily u n d e rsto o d and u n iform ly in terp reted . Even though the r e v is e d
4e s c r ip t io n s r e fle c t b a s ic a lly the sam e o ccu p ation s as p re v io u s ly defined, so m e re p ortin g changes
m ay o c c u r b e c a u s e o f the r e v is io n s .
The new sin gle le v e l d e s c r ip tio n fo r sw itchboard op e ra to r is not the equivalent o f the tw o
l e v e ls p r e v io u s ly defin ed.




C la ss B . U nder c lo s e s u p e rv isio n , follow in g d etailed in stru ction s and standardized p r o c e d u r e s ,
p e r fo r m s one o r m o r e routine accounting c le r ic a l o p e r a tio n s , such as posting to le d g e r s , c a r d s , or
w o rk sh e e ts w here iden tification o f ite m s and lo ca tio n s of postin gs are c le a r ly indicated; checking
a c c u r a c y and co m p le te n e s s o f stan dardized and rep etitiv e r e c o r d s or accounting docum ents; and coding
docum ents using a few p r e s c r ib e d accounting c o d e s .
C L E R K , F IL E
F ile s , c la s s i f ie s , and r e tr ie v e s m a te r ia l in an e sta b lish ed filin g system . May p e r fo rm
c le r i c a l and m anual task s re q u ire d t o m aintain f ile s . P o s itio n s are c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the b a sis
o f the follow in g d efin ition s.
C la ss A . C la s s ifie s and in d exes file m a te r ia l such as c o r re s p o n d e n c e , r e p o r ts , tech n ica l
d ocu m en ts, e t c ., in an e sta b lish e d filin g s y stem containing a n um ber o f v a r ie d subject m atter file s .
M ay a ls o file this m a te r ia l. M ay k eep r e c o r d s of v a rio u s typ es in conjunction with the file s . May
le a d a s m a ll group o f lo w e r le v e l file c le r k s .

L is te d b e lo w are
ste re o ty p e s in the title s :

r e v is e d

o ccu p ation al

title s

in trod u ced

this

y ea r

to

elim inate

R e v is e d title

F o r m e r title

D ra fter
D r a ft e r -t r a c e r
B o ile r ten der

D raftsm an
D ra fts m a n -tra ce r
F irem a n , stationary b o ile r

sex

SE C R E TA R Y — Continued
C la ss B . S o r ts , c o d e s , and f ile s u n c la s s ifie d m a te r ia l b y sim p le (su b je ct m a tte r) headings
o r partly c la s s ifie d m a te r ia l b y fin e r subheadings. P r e p a r e s sim p le .related index and c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e
aids. As req u ested , lo c a te s c le a r ly id e n tifie d m a te r ia l in file s and fo rw a r d s m a te r ia l. M ay p e r fo r m
rela ted c le r i c a l task s r e q u ir e d t o m aintain and s e r v ic e file s .
C lass C . P e r fo r m s routine filin g o f m a te r ia l that has a lrea d y been c la s s ifie d o r w hich is
e a s ily c la s s ifie d in a sim p le s e r ia l c la s s ific a tio n sy ste m ( e .g ., alph ab etical, c h r o n o lo g ic a l, o r
n u m erica l). As req u ested , lo c a te s r e a d ily available m a te r ia l in file s and fo rw a r d s m a te r ia l; and m ay
f il l out w ithdraw al ch a rg e. M ay p e r fo r m sim p le c le r i c a l and m anual ta sk s re q u ir e d t o m aintain and
s e r v ic e file s .
C L E R K , ORDER
R e c e iv e s c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s f o r m a te r ia l o r m e rch a n d ise b y m a il, phone, o r p e rs o n a lly .
Duties involve any com bin ation o f the fo llo w in g ; Q uoting p r ic e s t o c u s t o m e r s ; m aking out an o r d e r
sheet listing the item s to m ake up the o r d e r ; ch eck in g p r ic e s and quantities o f item s on o r d e r sheet;
and distributing o r d e r sh eets t o r e s p e c tiv e departm ents to be fille d . M ay ch e ck with c r e d it departm ent
to determ ine c r e d it rating o f c u s to m e r , acknow ledge re c e ip t o f o r d e r s fr o m c u s t o m e r s , fo llo w up
o r d e r s to see that they have be e n fille d , k eep file o f o r d e r s r e c e iv e d , and ch e ck shipping in v o ice s
w ith orig in a l o r d e r s .
CLERK, PAYROLL
Com putes w ages o f com pan y em p lo y e e s and e n ters the n e c e s s a r y data on the p a y r o ll sh eets.
D uties in volve: C a lculating w o r k e r s ' earn in gs b a s e d on tim e o r produ ction r e c o r d s ; and posting
calcu lated data on p a y r o ll sh e e t, show ing in form ation such as w o r k e r 's nam e, w ork ing d ays, t im e ,
ra te , deductions f o r in s u ra n ce , and to ta l w ages due. M ay m ake out p a ych e ck s and a s s is t p aym aster
in m aking up and distributing pay e n v e lo p e s. M ay u se a calcu latin g m achine.
KEYPUNCH O P E R A T O R
O perates a keypunch m achine to r e c o r d o r v e r ify alphabetic a n d /o r n u m e r ic data on tabulating
c a rd s o r on tape.
P o s itio n s a re c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the b a s is o f the fo llo w in g d efin ition s.
C la ss A . W ork r e q u ir e s the app lication o f e x p e rie n ce and judgm ent in se le ctin g p r o c e d u r e s
to be follow ed and in sea rch in g f o r , in te rp re tin g , s e le ctin g , o r codin g ite m s t o be keypunched fr o m a
v a r ie ty o f s o u r c e d ocum ents. On o c c a s io n m ay a ls o p e r fo r m som e routin e keypunch w o rk . M ay train
in ex p erien ced keypunch o p e r a to r s .
C la s s B . W ork is routin e and re p e titiv e . U nder c lo s e su p e rv isio n o r fo llo w in g s p e c ific
p ro c e d u r e s o r in s tru ctio n s , w o rk s fr o m v a rio u s stan dardized s o u r c e docum ents w hich have been co d e d ,
and follow s s p e c ifie d p r o c e d u r e s w hich have been p r e s c r ib e d in detail and r e q u ire little o r n o s e le ctin g ,
cod in g, o r in terp retin g o f data t o be r e c o rd e d . R e fe r s to s u p e r v is o r p r o b le m s a risin g fr o m e r r o n e o u s
item s o r c o d e s o r .m issin g in fo rm a tio n .
MESSENGER

E x clu s io n s
Not all po sitio n s that are titled " s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s the above c h a r a c t e r is t ic s .
p o s itio n s w hich are exclu d ed fr o m the d efin ition are as fo llo w s :

E x a m p les of

a.

P osition s w hich do not m eet the " p e r s o n a l" s e c r e t a r y con cep t d e s c r ib e d above;

b.

Stenographers not fully tra in e d in s e c r e t a r ia l type du ties;

c . Stenographers
m a n a g e ria l pe rso n s;

servin g

as

o ffic e

a s sista n ts

to

a grou p

o f p r o fe s s io n a l, te c h n ic a l,

d. S e cre ta ry p o sitio n s in w hich the duties a re eith e r su bstan tially m o r e
stantially m o re co m p le x and re sp o n sib le than th ose c h a r a c t e r iz e d in the d efin ition ;

or

routin e o r sub­

e . Assistant type p o sitio n s w h ich in volve m o r e d ifficu lt o r m o r e re s p o n s ib le t e c h n ic a l,
a d m in istrative, su p e r v is o r y , o r s p e c ia liz e d c le r i c a l duties w hich are not t y p ic a l o f s e c r e t a r ia l
w o rk .
N OTE: The t e r m " c o rp o ra te o f f i c e r , " u sed in the le v e l d efin ition s fo llo w in g , r e fe r s to th ose
o ffic ia ls w ho have a significant c o r p o r a t e -w id e p olicy m a k in g r o le w ith r e g a r d t o m a jo r com p an y
a c tiv itie s . The title " v ic e p r e s id e n t ," though n o r m a lly in d ica tiv e o f th is r o le , d oes not in a ll c a s e s
id en tify such position s. V ic e p resid en ts w h ose p r im a r y r e s p o n s ib ility is to act p e r s o n a lly on in divid u al
c a s e s o r tran saction s (e .g ., approve o r deny individ ual loan o r c r e d it a c tio n s ; a d m in ister individual
tru st accou n ts; d ir e ctly su p e rv ise a c le r i c a l sta ff) are not c o n s id e r e d to be " c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r s " fo r
p u r p o s e s o f applying the follow ing le v e l d e fin itio n s .
C la ss A
1. S ecre ta ry to the chairm an o f the b o a r d o r p r e s id e n t o f a com p an y that e m p lo y s , in a ll,
o v e r 100 but few er than 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; o r
2. S ecre ta ry to a c o r p o r a te o f fi c e r (oth er than the ch airm a n o f the b o a r d o r p r e s id e n t) o f a
com pany that e m p loys, in a ll, o v e r 5, 000 but fe w e r than 25, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
3. S ecre ta ry to the head, im m e d ia te ly b e lo w the c o r p o r a t e o f fic e r le v e l, o f a m a jo r segm ent
o r su b sid ia ry o f a com pany that e m p lo y s, in a ll, o v e r 2 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .
C la ss B
1. S ecre ta ry to the chairm an o f the b o a r d o r p r e s id e n t o f a com p an y that e m p lo y s , in all,
fe w e r than 100 p e r s o n s ; o r
2. S e cre ta ry to a c o r p o r a te o f fi c e r (oth er than the ch airm a n of the b o a r d o r p r e s id e n t) o f a
com pan y that e m p loys, in all, o v e r 100 but fe w e r than 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; or
3. S ecre ta ry to the head, im m e d ia te ly b elow the o f f i c e r le v e l, o v e r eith e r a m a jo r c o r p o r a t e w ide functional a ctivity (e .g ., m arketin g, r e s e a r c h , o p e r a tio n s , in d u stria l r e la tio n s , e t c .) o r a m a jo r
g e o g ra p h ic o r organ ization al segm ent ( e .g ., a r e g io n a l h e a d q u a rters; a m a jo r d iv isio n ) o f a com pany
that e m p lo y s , in all, o v e r 5 ,0 0 0 but fe w e r than 2 5 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s ; o r

P e r fo r m s v a rio u s routine duties such as running e r r a n d s , operatin g m in o r o ffic e m achines
such as s e a le r s o r m a ile r s , opening and distributing m a il, and oth er m in o r c le r i c a l w ork . E xclude
p osition s that re q u ire operation o f a m o to r v e h ic le as a sign ifican t duty.

4. S e cre ta ry to the head o f an individual plant, f a c to r y , e tc . (o r oth er equivalent le v e l o f
o ffic ia l) that e m p loys, in a ll, o v e r 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r

SE CRETARY

5. S ecre ta ry to the head o f a la r g e and im p ortan t org a n iz a tion a l segm ent ( e .g ., a m id d le
m anagem ent s u p e rv iso r o f an o rgan ization al segm ent often in volvin g as m any as s e v e r a l hundred
p e r s o n s ) o r a com pany that e m p lo y s , in a ll, o v e r 2 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .

A ssign ed as p e r s o n a l s e c r e t a r y , n o rm a lly to one individual. M aintains a c lo s e and highly
resp on siv e rela tion sh ip t o the d a y -to -d a y w o rk o f the s u p e r v is o r . W ork s fa ir ly independently
re ce iv in g a m in im um o f d eta ile d s u p e rv isio n and guidance. P e r fo r m s v a r ie d c le r i c a l and s e c r e ta r ia l
duties, usually including m o s t o f the fo llo w in g :
a. R e c e iv e s telep hone c a l ls , p e r s o n a l c a l le r s , and in com in g m a il, answ ers routine in q u ire s ,
and routes tech n ica l in q u iries t o the p r o p e r p e r s o n s ;
b.

E s ta b lis h e s , m ain tain s, and r e v is e s the s u p e r v is o r 's f ile s ;

c.

M aintains the s u p e r v is o r 's ca le n d a r and m akes appointm ents as in stru cte d ;

d.

R ela ys m e s s a g e s fr o m s u p e r v is o r t o su bordin ates;

e. R ev iew s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , m em ora n d u m s, and re p o r ts p r e p a r e d by o th ers f o r the s u p e r ­
v i s o r 's signature t o a s s u re p r o c e d u r a l and typ o gra p h ic a ccu ra cy ;
f.

P e r fo r m s sten ograp h ic and typing w ork .

M ay a ls o p e r fo r m oth e r c le r i c a l and s e c r e ta r ia l tasks o f co m p a ra b le nature and d ifficu lty.
The w ork ty p ic a lly re q u ir e s know ledge o f o ffic e routin e and understanding o f the org a n iz a tio n , p r o g r a m s ,
and p ro c e d u r e s rela ted t o the w o rk o f the s u p e r v is o r .




C la ss C
1. S ecre ta ry to an execu tive o r m a n a g e ria l p e r s o n w h ose r e s p o n s ib ility is not equ ivalen t to
one o f the s p e c ific le v e l situations in the defin ition f o r c la s s B , but w h ose o rg a n iz a tio n a l unit
n o r m a lly num bers at le a st s e v e r a l dozen e m p lo y e e s and is u su ally d ivided into o rg a n iz a tion a l segm en ts
w hich are often, in turn, fu rth er subdivided. In s om e c o m p a n ie s , this le v e l in clu d es a w ide range of
o rgan ization al e ch e lo n s; in o th e rs , only one o r tw o; o r

2. S e cre ta ry to the head o f an in d ivid u al plant, f a c to r y , e tc . (o r oth er equivalent le v e l of
o ffic ia l) that e m p loys, in a ll, fe w e r than 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .
C lass D
1. S ecre ta ry to the s u p e r v is o r
about 25 o r 30 p e r s o n s ); o r

o r h ead o f a s m a ll org a n iz a tion a l unit ( e .g .,

fe w e r than

2. S e cre ta ry to a n o n s u p e rv is o ry sta ff s p e c ia lis t , p r o fe s s io n a l e m p lo y e e , a d m in istra tive
o f fi c e r , o r assistant, sk ille d technician o r e x p e r t.
(NO TE: M any com p a n ies a ssig n s te n o g r a p h e r s ,
ra th e r than s e c r e ta rie s as d e s c r ib e d a b o v e , t o th is le v e l o f s u p e r v is o r y o r n o n s u p e rv is o r y w o r k e r .)

STEN OG RA PH ER

TA BU LA TIN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R ( E le c tr ic A ccounting M achine O p era tor)

P r im a r y duty is t o take d icta tion using shorthand, and to tr a n s c r ib e the d icta tion . M ay a ls o
type f r o m w ritten c o p y . M ay o p e ra te f r o m a sten ograph ic p o o l. M ay o c c a s io n a lly t r a n s c r ib e fr o m
v o ic e r e c o rd in g s (if p r im a r y duty is t r a n s c r ib in g fr o m r e c o rd in g s , see T ran s c r ib in g -M a c h in e
O p e r a to r, G en era l).

O perates one o r a v a r ie ty o f m ach in es such as the ta b u la tor, c a lcu la to r , c o lla t o r , in te rp re te r ,
s o r t e r , re p ro d u cin g punch, e tc . E x clu d ed fr o m th is defin ition are w ork in g s u p e r v is o r s . A ls o exclu ded
are o p e r a to r s o f e le c t r o n ic digita l c o m p u te r s , even though th ey m ay a ls o operate EAM equipm ent.

N O T E : T h is jo b i s d istin gu ish ed f r o m that o f a s e c r e ta r y in that a s e c r e ta r y n o r m a lly w o rk s
in a c on fid en tia l rela tion sh ip w ith only one m a n a ge r o r execu tive and p e r fo rm s m o r e r e s p o n s ib le and
d is c r e t io n a r y ta sk s as d e s c r ib e d in the s e c r e ta r y jo b defin ition.

C la ss A. P e r fo r m s c o m p le te re p o rtin g and tabulating a ssign m en ts including devisin g difficu lt
c o n tr o l pan el w irin g under g e n e r a l s u p e rv ision . A ssign m en ts ty p ic a lly in volve a v a r ie ty of long and
c o m p le x r e p o r ts w hich often a re ir r e g u la r o r n o n r e c u r r in g , req u irin g som e planning o f the nature and
sequencing o f o p e r a tio n s , and the use o f a v a r ie ty o f m a ch in es. Is ty p ic a lly in volved in training new
o p e r a to r s in m achine ope ra tio n s o r train ing lo w e r le v e l o p e r a to r s in w irin g fr o m d iagram s and in
the operatin g se q u e n ce s o f lon g and c o m p le x reports* D oes not includ e p osition s in w hich w iring
re s p o n s ib ility is lim ite d t o s e le ctio n and in s e r tio n o f p r e w ir e d b o a r d s .

S ten ograp h er. G e n e ra l
D ictation in v o lv e s a n o r m a l routin e v o ca b u la ry .
o r p e r fo r m oth er r e la tiv e ly rou tin e c l e r i c a l ta s k s .

M ay m aintain file s , k eep s im p le r e c o r d s ,

S ten ogra p h er. S en ior
D ictation in v o lv e s a v a r ie d te c h n ica l o r sp e c ia liz e d voca b u la ry such as in le g a l b r ie fs o r
r e p o r ts on s c ie n tific r e s e a r c h . M ay a ls o se t up and m aintain f ile s , k eep r e c o r d s , e tc.
OR
P e r f o r m s s ten og ra p h ic duties re q u irin g sig n ifican tly g r e a te r independence and r e s p o n s ib ility
than s ten og ra p h er, g e n e r a l, as e v id e n c e d b y the follow in g: W ork re q u ire s a high d e g re e o f sten ograph ic
s p eed and a c c u r a c y ; a th orou gh w ork in g know ledge o f g e n e ra l bu sin e ss and o ffic e p r o c e d u r e ; and o f
the s p e c ific b u s in e s s o p e r a tio n s , o rg a n is a tio n , p e d ic le s , p r o c e d u r e s , file s , w o rk flo w , e tc . U ses this
k now ledge in p e r fo rm in g sten og ra p h ic duties and r e s p o n s ib le c le r i c a l ta sk s such as m aintaining follow u p
f il e s ; a ssem b lin g m a te r ia l f o r r e p o r t s , m e m o ra n d q m s , and le tte r s ; com posin g sim p le le tte r s fr o m
g e n e r a l in s tru ctio n s ; readin g and routin g in co m in g m a il; and answ ering routine q u e stio n s, e tc .
SW ITCHBOARD' O P E R A T O R
O p erates a telep h on e s w itch b o a rd o r co n s o le u sed w ith a p rivate b ra n ch exchange (P B X )
s y s te m t o r e la y in c o m in g , ou tgoin g, and in t r a -s y s t e m c a lls . M ay provide in form a tion t o c a l le r s ,
r e c o r d and tra n s m it m e s s a g e s , k e e p r e c o r d o f c a lls p la ce d and t o ll ch a rg e s. B e s id e s operatin g a
telep h on e sw itch b oa rd o r c o n s o le , m a y a ls o type o r p e r fo r m routine c le r ic a l w o rk (typing o r routine
c l e r i c a l w o rk m ay o ccu p y the m a jo r p o rtio n o f the w o r k e r 's tim e , and is usually p e r fo r m e d w hile at
the sw itch b oa rd o r c o n s o le ). C h ie f o r le a d o p e r a to r s in establishm ents em ployin g m o r e than one
o p e r a to r a re exclu d ed . F o r an o p e r a to r w ho a ls o acts as a r e ce p tio n is t, see S w itchboard O p e r a to rR e ce p tio n is t.
SW ITCH BOARD O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
At a s in g le -p o s it io n telep h on e sw itch b o a rd o r c o n s o le , acts both as an o p e ra to r— se e Sw itch­
b o a r d O p era tor— and as a r e c e p tio n is t. R e c e p tio n is t's w ork in volves such duties as g reetin g v is it o r s ;
d eterm in in g nature o f v i s i t o r 's b u s in e s s and provid in g app ropriate in form ation ; r e fe r r in g v is it o r to
A p propriate p e r s o n in the org a n iz a tio n , o r con tacting that p e rs o n by telephone and arranging an
appointm ent; keeping a log o f v i s it o r s .

P o s itio n s a re c la s s if ie d into le v e ls on the b a s is of the follow in g defin itions.

C la ss B . P e r fo r m s w o rk a cco rd in g t o e s ta b lis h e d p r o c e d u r e s and under s p e c ific in stru ction s.
A ssign m en ts ty p ic a lly in volve c o m p le te but routine and r e c u r rin g re p o r ts o r parts o f la r g e r and m o re
c o m p le x r e p o r t s . O perates m o r e d ifficu lt tabulating o r e le c t r ic a l accounting m ach in es such as the
tabulator and c a lc u la t o r , in addition t o the s im p le r m ach in es used by c la s s C o p e r a to r s . M ay be
r e q u ir e d t o do so m e w irin g f r o m d ia gra m s. M ay tra in new e m p lo y e e s in b a s ic m achine operation s.
C la s s C . U nder s p e c ific in s tru ctio n s , op e ra te s sim p le tabulating o r e le c t r ic a l accounting
m ach in es such as the s o r t e r , in te rp re te r , rep rod u cin g punch, c o lla t o r , e tc . A ssignm ents ty p ica lly
in volve p o rtio n s o f a w ork unit, f o r e x a m p le, individual sortin g o r collating runs, o r repetitive
o p e ra tio n s . M ay p e r fo r m sim p le w irin g fr o m d ia g ra m s , and do s om e filin g w ork.
TRANSCRIBINGrM ACHINE O P E R A T O R , G EN ER AL
P r im a r y duty is to t r a n s c r ib e d ictation in volvin g a n o r m a l routin e voca b u la ry fro m tra n s c r ib in g -m a c h in e r e c o r d s . M ay a ls o type f r o m w ritten cop y and do sim p le c le r ic a l w ork. W ork ers
t r a n s c r ib in g d ictation in volvin g a v a r ie d te c h n ica l o r s p e c ia liz e d v o ca b u la ry such as le g a l b r ie fs o r
re p o r ts on s c ie n tific r e s e a r c h are not in clu d ed. A w o rk e r w ho takes dictation in shorthand o r by
Stenotype o r s im ila r m achine is c la s s ifie d as a sten ograph er.
TY PIST
U ses a ty p e w rite r to inake c o p ie s o f v a r io u s m a te r ia ls o r to m ake out b ills after calcu lation s
have been m ade by another p e r s o n . M ay in clu d e typing o f s t e n c ils , m a ts , or s im ila r m a teria ls fo r
use in duplicating p r o c e s s e s . M ay do c le r i c a l w ork in volvin g little s p e c ia l train in g, such as keeping
sim p le r e c o r d s , filin g r e c o r d s and r e p o r t s , o r sortin g and d istributing incom ing m ail.
C la s s A . P e r fo r m s one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g : T yping m a te r ia l in fin a l fo rm when it
in vo lve s com bin in g m a te r ia l fr o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s ; o r re s p o n s ib ility f o r c o r r e c t sp ellin g, sylla b ica tion ,
punctuation, e t c ., o f te c h n ica l o r unusual w ord s o r fo re ig n language m a te r ia l; o r planning layout and
typing o f c o m p lic a te d sta tis tic a l ta b le s t o m aintain u n iform ity and ba la n ce in spacing. May type routine
fo r m le t t e r s , v aryin g d etails t o suit c ir c u m s ta n c e s .
C la s s B . P e r fo r m s one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g : C opy typing fr o m rough o r c le a r drafts;
o r routine typing o f f o r m s , in su ran ce p o l ic i e s , e tc ; o r setting up sim p le standard tabulations; or
copyin g m o r e co m p le x ta b le s a lrea d y set up and s p a ce d p r o p e r ly .

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COM PU TER O PERATOR

C O M PU TE R O PER ATO R— Continued

M on itors and o p e r a te s the c o n t r o l c o n s o le o f a d igita l com pu ter t o p r o c e s s data c c c o r d in g to
op eratin g in s tru ctio n s , u su ally p r e p a r e d b y a p r o g r a m m e r . W ork includes m o s t o f the fo llo w in g :
Studies in s tru ctio n s t o d eterm in e equipm ent setup and op era tion s; loads equipm ent with r e q u ire d
ite m s (tape r e e ls , c a r d s , e t c .) ; sw itch e s n e c e s s a r y au xilia ry equipm ent into c ir c u it , and starts and
o p e r a te s c om p u ter; m a k es adjustm ents t o c o m p u te r to c o r r e c t operating p ro b le m s and m e e t s p e c ia l
c o n d itio n s ; re v ie w s e r r o r s m ade during o p eration and d eterm in es cause o r r e fe r s p r o b le m to
s u p e r v is o r o r p r o g r a m m e r ; and m aintain s operating r e c o r d s . M ay te st and a s s is t in c o r r e c t in g
p rogram .

C la s s B . O perates independently, o r under only g e n e r a l d ir e ctio n , a com pu ter running
p r o g r a m s w ith m o s t o f the fo llo w in g c h a r a c t e r is t ic s : M ost o f the p r o g r a m s are esta b lish ed production
ru n s, ty p ic a lly run on a r e g u la r ly r e c u r rin g b a s is ; th ere is little o r no testing o f new p rog ra m s
re q u ir e d ; altern ate p r o g r a m s a re p ro v id e d in c a s e orig in a l p r o g r a m n eed s m a jo r change o r cannot be
c o r r e c t e d w ithin a rea so n a b ly t im e . In co m m on e r r o r situ ation s, dia gn oses cau se and takes c o r r e c t iv e
action . T h is usually in v o lv e s applying p r e v io u s ly p r o g r a m m e d c o r r e c t iv e step s, o r using standard
c o r r e c t io n te ch n iqu es.
OR

F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , c o m p u te r o p e r a to r s are c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s :
C la s s A . O p erates independ ently, o r under only gen era l d ire ctio n , a com p u ter running
p r o g r a m s w ith m o s t o f the fo llo w in g c h a r a c t e r is t ic s : New p ro g ra m s are freq u en tly te s te d and
in trod u ced ; sch edu lin g r eq u irem e n ts a re o f c r it i c a l im p ortan ce t o m in im ize dow ntim e; the p r o g r a m s
a r e o f c o m p le x design s o that id e n tifica tio n o f e r r o r s o u r c e often re q u ire s a w ork in g know ledge o f the
to ta l p r o g r a m , and: a ltern ate p r o g r a m s m a y not be available. M ay give d ire ctio n and guidance to
lo w e r l e v e l o p e r a to r s .




O perates under d ir e c t s u p e rv isio n a com p u ter running p r o g r a m s o r segm ents of p rog ra m s
w ith the c h a r a c t e r is t ic s d e s c r ib e d fo r c la s s A. May a s s is t a h igh er le v e l op era tor b y independently
p e r fo rm in g le s s d ifficu lt ta sk s a ssig n e d , and p e r fo rm in g d ifficu lt task s follow in g detailed in stru ction s
and w ith freq u en t re v ie w o f ope ra tio n s p e r fo rm e d .
C la s s ic . W ork s on routin e p r o g r a m s under c lo s e s u p e rv is io n . Is exp ected t o develop w orking
know ledge o f the co m p u te r equipm ent u sed and ability t o d etect p r o b le m s in volved in running routine
p r o g r a m s . U sually has r e c e iv e d so m e fo r m a l train in g in com p u ter op eration . M ay a s s is t h igh er le v e l
o p e r a to r on co m p le x p r o g r a m s .

C on verts statem ents o f b u sin e ss p r o b le m s , ty p ic a lly p r e p a r e d b y a sy s te m s analyst, into a
sequence o f d etailed in stru ctio n s w hich are re q u ir e d to s o lv e the p r o b le m s by autom atic data p r o c e s s in g
equipm ent. W orking fr o m ch arts o r d ia g r a m s , the p r o g r a m m e r de v e lo p s the p r e c is e in stru ctio n s w hich,
when en tered into the com p u te r sy s te m in c o d e d language, cau se the m anipulation o f data t o ach ieve
d e s ir e d re s u lts . W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g ; A p p lies know ledge o f co m p u te r ca p a b ilitie s ,
m a th em a tics, lo g ic em p loy e d b y c o m p u te r s , and p a r ticu la r su b je ct m a tter in vo lve d t o analyze ch arts
and diagram s o f the p r o b le m to be p r o g ra m m e d ; develops sequ en ce o f p r o g r a m ste p s; w rite s d etailed
flo w charts t o show o r d e r in w hich data w ill be p r o c e s s e d ; co n v e rts th e s e ch a rts to c o d e d in stru ction s
f o r m achine to fo llo w ; te s ts and c o r r e c t s p r o g r a m s ; p r e p a r e s in stru ctio n s f o r operating p e rs o n n e l
during produ ction run; a n a ly z e s, r e v ie w s , and alte rs p r o g r a m s t o in c re a s e operating e ffic ie n c y o r
adapt to new r eq u irem en ts; m aintains r e c o r d s o f p r o g r a m developm ent and r e v is io n s . (NOTE: W o r k e r s
p e rform in g both sy s te m s an a lysis and p rog ra m m in g should be c la s s ifie d as sy s te m s analysts i f th is is
the s k ill used t o d eterm in e th e ir p a y .)
D oes not in clu d e em p lo y e e s p r im a r ily re s p o n s ib le fo r the m anagem ent o r su p e rv isio n o f other
e le c t r o n ic data p r o c e s s in g e m p lo y e e s , o r p r o g r a m m e r s p r im a rily c o n c e r n e d w ith s c ie n tific a n d /o r
engineering p r o b le m s .
F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , p r o g r a m m e r s are c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s :
C la ss A . W ork s independently o r under only g e n e ra l d ir e ctio n on c o m p le x p r o b le m s w hich
req u ire com p eten ce in all ph a ses o f p rog ra m m in g co n ce p ts and p r a c t ic e s . W orking fr o m diagram s
and ch arts w hich iden tify the nature o f d e s ir e d r e s u lts , m a jo r p r o c e s s in g steps t o be a cco m p lis h e d ,
and the rela tion sh ip s betw een v a rio u s steps o f the p r o b le m solvin g routin e; plains the fu ll range
o f p rogra m m in g a ction s n e e d e d t o e ffic ie n tly u tilize the co m p u te r s y s te m in , achieving d e s ir e d
end p rod u cts.
At this le v e l, p rogra m m in g is d ifficu lt b e ca u s e com pu ter equipm ent m ust b e o rg a n iz e d to
p rod u ce s e v e r a l in te rr e la te d but d iv e r s e p ro d u cts fr o m n um erous and d iv e r s e data e le m e n ts. A w ide
v a r ie ty and exten sive num ber o f in te rn a l p r o c e s s in g action s m ust o c c u r . T h is re q u ir e s such a ction s as
developm ent o f com m on ope ra tio n s w hich can b e re u s e d , establish m en t o f linkage points betw een
op era tion s, adjustm ents t o data when p r o g r a m re q u ire m e n ts e x c e e d co m p u te r s to ra g e c a p a city , and
substantial m anipulation and re se q u e n cin g o f data e lem en ts to fo r m a highly in tegrated p r o g r a m .
M ay p rov id e

fu n ction a l d ir e ctio n t o lo w e r le v e l p r o g r a m m e r s who are

C lass A . W orks independently o r under on ly g e n e r a l d ir e ctio n on co m p le x p r o b le m s in volvin g
all ph a ses o f sy ste m a n a lysis. P r o b le m s a re c o m p le x b e c a u s e o f d iv e r s e s o u r c e s o f input data and
m u ltip le -u s e requ irem en ts o f output data. (F o r .exam ple, d ev elop s an in tegrated p rod u ction sch ed u lin g,
in ven tory co n tr o l, c o s t a n a ly sis, and s a le s an a lysis r e c o r d in w hich e v e r y ite m o f e a ch type is
autom atically p r o c e s s e d through the fu ll s y s te m o f r e c o r d s and ap p rop ria te follow u p a ction s a re in itiated
by the co m p u te r.) C on fers with p e r s o n s c o n c e r n e d t o d eterm in e the data p r o c e s s in g p r o b le m s and
ad vise s su b je ct-m a tte r p e rso n n e l on the im p lica tio n s o f new o r r e v is e d s y s te m s o f data p r o c e s s in g
o p e ra tio n s. M akes reco m m e n d a tio n s, if n e ed ed , fo r a p p rova l o f m a jo r s y s te m s in sta lla tion s o r changes
and fo r obtaining equipm ent.
May p ro v id e functional d ire ctio n t o lo w e r le v e l s y s te m s analysts w ho are a s s ig n e d t o a s s is t.
C lass B . W orks independently o r under only g e n e r a l d ir e ctio n on p r o b le m s that are re la tiv e ly
uncom plicated t o analyze, plan, p r o g r a m , and o p e ra te . P r o b le m s are o f lim ite d co m p le x ity b e c a u s e
s o u r c e s o f input data are hom ogeneous and the output data are c lo s e l y r ela ted . (F o r e x a m p le, d ev elop s
sy s te m s for m aintaining d e p o s ito r accou n ts in a bank, m aintaining a ccou n ts r e c e iv a b le in a r e ta il
establish m en t, o r m aintaining in ven tory accou n ts in a m anufacturin g o r w h o le s a le e s ta b lis h m e n t.)
C o n fe rs with p e rs o n s co n c e r n e d to d eterm in e the data p r o c e s s in g p r o b le m s and a d v ises s u b je c tm atter p erson n el on the im p lication s o f the data p r o c e s s in g s y s te m s t o be applied.
OR
W orks on a segm ent o f a co m p le x data p r o c e s s in g sch e m e o r s y s te m , as d e s c r ib e d f o r c la s s A.
W orks independently on routine assign m en ts and r e c e iv e s in stru ction and guidance on c o m p le x
assignm ents. W ork is rev ie w e d fo r a c c u r a c y o f ju dgm en t, c o m p lia n c e w ith in s tru ctio n s , and t o in su re
p r o p e r alignm ent with the o v e r a ll sy ste m .
C lass C . W orks under im m ed iate s u p e r v is io n , c a r r y in g out an a lyses as a s s ig n e d , usually
o f a sin gle activity. A ssignm ents are d esig n ed t o d ev elop and expand p r a c t ic a l e x p e r ie n c e in the
application of p ro ce d u re s and s k ills r e q u ir e d f o r s y s te m s an a ly sis w ork . F o r e x a m p le, m ay a s s is t a
h igh er le v e l system s analyst b y p re p a rin g the d eta iled s p e c ific a tio n s r e q u ir e d by p r o g r a m m e r s fr o m
inform ation developed by the higher le v e l analyst.

a ssign e d t o a s s is t.

C la ss B . W ork s independently o r under only g e n e ra l d ir e ctio n on re la tiv e ly Sim ple p r o g r a m s ,
o r on sim p le segm en ts o f c o m p le x p r o g r a m s . P r o g r a m s (o r se g m e n ts) usually p r o c e s s in form a tion to
p rod u ce data in tw o o r th re e v a r ie d s e q u e n ce s o r fo rm a ts . R e p o rts and lis tin g s are p r o d u ce d by
refin in g, adapting, a rra y in g , o r m aking m in o r additions to o r d e letion s fr o m input data w hich are
r ea d ily available. W hile nu m erou s r e c o r d s m ay be p r o c e s s e d , the data have been r e fin e d in p r io r
a ction s s o that the a c c u r a c y and sequencing o f data can be te s te d by using a few routine ch e c k s .
T y p ic a lly , the p r o g r a m deals w ith routine r e c o rd -k e e p in g type op era tio n s.
OR
W orks on c o m p le x p r o g r a m s (as d e s c r ib e d f o r c la s s A ) under c lo s e d ir e ctio n o f a h igh er
le v e l p r o g r a m m e r o r s u p e r v is o r . M ay a s s is t h igh er le v e l p r o g r a m m e r b y independently p e r fo rm in g
le s s d ifficu lt task s a ssig n e d , and p e r fo rm in g m o r e d ifficu lt ta sk s under fa ir ly c lo s e d ir e ctio n .
M ay guide o r in stru ct lo w e r le v e l p r o g r a m m e r s .
C la ss C . M akes p r a c t ic a l app lication s o f p ro g ra m m in g p r a c t ic e s and co n ce p ts usually le a rn e d
in fo rm a l train in g c o u r s e s . A ssign m en ts are design ed t o de ve lo p co m p e te n ce in the app lication o f
standard p r o c e d u r e s t o routine p r o b le m s . R e c e iv e s c lo s e su p e rv isio n on new a sp e cts o f assign m en ts;
and w ork i s r ev iew ed to v e r ify its a c c u r a c y and c o n fo rm a n ce w ith re q u ire d p r o c e d u r e s .
CO M PU TE R SYSTEM S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS
A n alyzes b u s in e s s p r o b le m s to fo rm u la te p r o c e d u r e s f o r solvin g th em by use o f e le c t r o n ic
data p r o c e s s in g equipm ent. D evelops a c o m p le te d e s crip tio n o f a ll s p e c ific a tio n s n eed ed t o enable
p r o g r a m m e r s to p r e p a r e re q u ir e d d igita l co m p u te r p r o g r a m s . W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g :
A n alyzes s u b je c t-m a tte r ope ra tio n s to b e autom ated and id e n tifie s con d ition s and c r it e r ia re q u ir e d to
a ch ieve s a tis fa c to r y re s u lts ; s p e c ifie s n u m ber and types o f r e c o r d s , f il e s , and docum ents t o b e used;
outlines action s t o b e p e r fo r m e d by p e r s o n n e l and co m p u te rs in su fficien t de ta il f o r p resen tation to
m anagem ent and f o r p rog ra m m in g (ty p ica lly this in v o lv e s p rep aration o f w o rk and data flo w ch a r ts );
coord in a tes the developm ent o f te s t p r o b le m s and p a rticip a te s in t r ia l runs o f new and r e v is e d s y s te m s;
and recom m en d s equipm ent changes t o obtain m o r e e ffe c tiv e o v e r a ll o p e ra tio n s. (NOTE: W o r k e r s
p e rform in g both sy s te m s an a lysis and p ro g ra m m in g should be c la s s ifie d as s y s te m s analysts if this is
the s k ill used t o d eterm in e th e ir p a y .)
D oes not includ e em p lo y e e s p r im a r ily re s p o n s ib le f o r the m anagem ent o r s u p e rv isio n o f oth er
e le c tr o n ic data p r o c e s s in g e m p lo y e e s , o r s y s te m s analysts p r im a rily c o n c e r n e d w ith s c ie n tific o r
en gineering p r o b le m s .




F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , sy s te m s analysts a re c la s s if ie d as fo llo w s :

D RAFTER
C lass A. P lans the graph ic pre sen ta tion o f co m p le x ite m s having d is tin ctiv e design fea tu res
that d iffe r significantly fr o m e sta b lish e d drafting p r e c e d e n ts . W ork s in c lo s e su pport w ith the design
o r ig in a to r , and m ay re co m m e n d m in or design ch an ges. A n a ly zes the e ffe c t o f ea ch change on the
details o f fo r m , function, and p o s itio n a l rela tion s h ip s o f com p on en ts and p a r ts . W ork s w ith a
m in im u m of su p e r v is o r y a ssista n ce . C om p leted w ork is r e v ie w e d by d esign o r ig in a to r f o r co n s is te n c y
w ith p r io r engineering d eterm in a tion s. M ay e ith er p r e p a r e d ra w in gs, o r d ir e ct th e ir p rep a ra tion by
lo w e r le v e l d r a fte rs .
C lass B . P e r fo r m s nonroutine and c o m p le x drafting assign m en ts that re q u ir e the app lication
o f m o s t o f the standardized drawing tech n iq u es r e g u la r ly used. D uties t y p ic a lly in volve such w ork as:
P r e p a r e s w orking draw ings o f su b a s s e m b lies w ith ir r e g u la r s h a p e s , m u ltiple fu n ction s, and p r e c is e
p o s itio n a l rela tionships betw een com p on en ts; p r e p a r e s a r c h ite c tu r a l draw in gs f o r c o n s tru ctio n o f a
building including detail draw ings o f fou n dation s, w a ll s e c t io n s , f lo o r p la n s , and r o o f. U ses a cce p te d
fo rm u la s and m anuals in m aking n e c e s s a r y com pu tation s to d eterm in e quantities of m a te r ia ls t o be
used, lo a d ca p a c itie s , stren gth s, s t r e s s e s , e tc . R e c e iv e s in itia l in s tru ctio n s , r e q u ir e m e n ts , and
advice fr o m su p e r v is o r . C om pleted w o rk is c h e ck e d fo r t e c h n ica l adequacy.
C lass C . P r e p a re s detail draw in gs o f sin g le units o r p a rts f o r en g in eerin g , c o n s tr u c tio n ,
m anufacturin g, o r re p a ir p u rp o s e s . T y p es o f draw in gs p r e p a r e d in clu d e i s o m e t r ic p r o je c t io n s
(depicting th ree dim en sion s in accu rate s c a le ) and s e c tio n a l v ie w s to c la r i f y position in g o f com pon en ts
and con vey needed in form ation . C o n so lid a tes d etails fr o m a n u m ber o f s o u r c e s and adjusts o r
t r a n s p o s e s s c a le as re q u ire d . Suggested m eth ods o f a p p roa ch , ap p lica b le p r e c e d e n ts , and a d vice on
s o u r c e m a te ria ls are given w ith in itia l a ssig n m en ts. In stru ction s a re le s s c o m p le te when a ssign m en ts
r e c u r . W ork m ay be s p o t-ch e ck e d during p r o g r e s s .
D R A F T E R -T R A C E R
C op ies plans and draw ings p r e p a r e d b y oth ers by p la cin g tr a c in g c lo th o r p a p er o v e r draw in gs
and tra cin g with pen o r p e n c il. (D oes not in clu d e tr a c in g lim ite d to plans p r im a r ily co n s istin g o f
straight lin es and a la r g e s ca le not re q u irin g c lo s e d elin ea tion .)
A N D /O R
P r e p a re s sim p le o r rep etitive draw in gs o f e a s ily v is u a liz e d ite m s .
during p r o g r e s s .

W ork is c lo s e l y s u p e r v is e d

W ork s on v a r io u s ty p es o f e le c t r o n ic equipm ent and rela ted d evices b y p e r fo rm in g one o r a
com bin ation o f the fo llo w in g : In sta llin g , m aintain ing, rep a irin g , overhauling, trou b lesh ootin g, m o d ify in g ,
con s tr u c tin g , and testin g . W ork r e q u ir e s p r a c t ic a l application o f tech n ica l know ledge o f e le c t r o n ic s
p r in c ip le s , ability to d eterm in e m a lfu n ctio n s , and s k ill to put equipm ent in requ ired operating condition.

C la s s B . A p p lies co m p re h e n siv e te ch n ica l know ledge to s olv e c o m p le x p rob lem s ( i.e ., those
t h a t . ty p ic a lly can be s o lv e d s o le ly by p r o p e r ly in terp retin g m a n u fa c tu r e r s ' m anuals or sim ila r
d ocu m en ts) in w ork in g on e le c t r o n ic equipm ent. W ork in v o lv e s : A fa m ilia r ity with the in te rre la tio n ­
ships o f c ir c u it s ; and judgm ent in determ ining w ork sequ en ce and in selectin g t o o ls and testing
in stru m e n ts, usually l e s s co m p le x than th ose used by the c la s s A tech n icia n .

T h e equipm ent— c o n s istin g o f e ith e r m any differen t kinds o f c ir c u its o r m u ltiple repetition o f
the sam e kind o f c ir c u it — in c lu d e s , but is not lim ite d to , the follow in g: (a) E le c t r o n ic tran sm ittin g
and r e c e iv in g equipm ent ( e .g ., r a d a r , r a d io , te le v is io n , telep h on e, sonar, n avigational a id s ), (b)
d igita l and analog c o m p u t e r s , and ( c ) in d u s tria l and m e d ica l m easu rin g and co n tro llin g equipm ent.

R e c e iv e s t e c h n ica l gu idan ce, as re q u ir e d , fr o m s u p e r v is o r o r h igh er le v e l tech n ician , and
w o rk is re v ie w e d f o r s p e c ific co m p lia n ce w ith accep ted p r a c t ic e s and w ork assignm ents. May p rovide
te c h n ica l guidance t o lo w e r le v e l te ch n icia n s.

T h is c la s s ific a t io n e x c lu d e s r e p a irm e n o f such standard e le ctr o n ic equipm ent as co m m o n o ffic e
m ach in es and h ou seh old r a d io and te le v is io n s e ts ; production a s s e m b le rs and t e s t e r s ; w o rk e rs w hose
p r im a r y duty is s e r v ic in g e le c t r o n ic te st in stru m en ts; tech n ician s who have adm in istrative o r
s u p e r v is o r y r e s p o n s ib ility ; and d r a ft e r s , d e s ig n e r s , and p r o fe s sio n a l en gin eers.

G la ss C . A p p lie s w ork ing te c h n ica l know ledge to p e r fo r m sim p le o r routine tasks in w orking
on e le c t r o n ic equipm ent, follow in g detailed in stru ction s w hich c o v e r v irtu a lly all p r o c e d u r e s . W ork
ty p ic a lly in vo lve s such ta sk s as: A s s is tin g h igh er le v e l tech n icia n s by p erform in g such activ ities as
re p la cin g com p on en ts, w irin g c ir c u it s , and taking test read in gs; rep a irin g sim p le e le ctr o n ic equipm ent;
and using to o ls and co m m o n te s t instru m en ts (e .g ., m u ltim e te r s, audio signal g e n e r a to r s , tube t e s t e r s ,
o s c illo s c o p e s ) . Is not r e q u ir e d to b e fa m ilia r w ith the in terrela tion sh ip s o f c ir c u its . T h is know ledge,
h o w e v e r, m ay be a cq u ire d through assignm ents design ed to in c r e a s e com p eten ce (including c la s s r o o m
tra in in g ) so that w o rk e r can advance to higher le v e l tech n ician .

P o s itio n s a re c la s s if ie d in to le v e ls on the b a s is o f the follow in g defin itions.
C la s s A . A p p lies advanced te c h n ica l know ledge to solve unusually co m p le x p r o b le m s ( i.e .,
th ose that t y p ic a lly cannot be s o lv e d s o le ly b y re fe r e n c e to m a n u fa ctu rers' m anuals o r s im ila r
d ocu m en ts) in w ork ing on e le c t r o n ic equipm ent. E xam ples o f such p roblem s includ e lo ca tio n and
d ensity o f c ir c u it r y , e le c t r o -m a g n e t ic radiation , isolatin g m alfu n ction s, and frequent en gineering
ch an ges. W ork in v o lv e s : A d e ta ile d understanding o f the in terrelation sh ips o f c ir c u it s ; e x e r c is in g
independent judgm ent in p e r fo rm in g such ta sk s as m aking cir c u it a n a lyses, calcu latin g w ave fo r m s ,
tr a c in g rela tion sh ip s in sign al flo w ; and re g u la r ly using co m p le x te st instrum ents' (e .g ., dual tr a c e
o s c il l o s c o p e s , Q -m e t e r s , d eviation m e t e r s , p u lse g e n e ra to rs).
W ork m ay b e re v ie w e d b y s u p e r v is o r (frequently an en gin eer or d e s ig n e r ) fo r g e n e ra l
co m p lia n c e w ith a c c e p te d p r a c t ic e s . M ay p ro v id e tech n ica l guidance to lo w e r le v e l te ch n icia n s.

R e c e iv e s te c h n ica l guidance, as r e q u ire d , fr o m s u p e r v is o r or h igh er le v e l technician. W ork
is t y p ic a lly spot ch e ck e d , but is given detailed review when new o r advanced assignm ents are involved.
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (R e g is te re d )
A r e g is t e r e d n u rse who g iv e s nursing s e r v ic e under g e n e ra l m e d ica l d irection to ill or in ju red
e m p lo y e e s o r oth er p e r s o n s who b e c o m e i ll o r s u ffe r an accid ent on the p re m is e s of a fa c to r y or
o th er e stablish m en t. D uties in volve a com bin ation o f the fo llo w in g : G iving fir s t aid to the i ll or
in ju red ; attending to subsequent d re s s in g o f e m p lo y e e s ' in ju rie s ; keeping r e c o r d s of patients treated;
p re p a rin g accidexit re p o r ts fo r com pen sation o r other p u r p o s e s ; a s sistin g in p h ysica l exam inations and
health evaluations o f applicants and e m p lo y e e s ; and planning and ca r r y in g out p rog ra m s involving health
edu cation , accid en t p re ve n tio n , evaluation o f plant en viron m en t, o r oth er a ctiv ities affecting the health,
w e lfa r e , and safety o f all p e rso n n e l. N ursing s u p e r v is o r s o r head n u rs e s in establishm ents em ployin g
m o r e than one n u rse are exclu ded.

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
B O ILE R T E N D E R

H E L P E R , M AINTENANCE TRADES

F i r e s s ta tion a ry b o ile r s t o fu rn ish the establishm ent in w hich em ployed w ith heat, p o w e r ,
o r steam . F e e d s fu els t o f ir e by hand o r o p e ra te s a m ech a n ica l sto k e r, g a s , o r o il b u rn e r; and
c h e c k s w a ter and sa fety v a lv e s . M ay c le a n , o il, o r a ssist in repairing b o ile r r o o m equipm ent.

A s s is ts one o r m o r e w o rk e rs in the sk illed m aintenance t r a d e s , by p erform in g s p e c ific or
g e n e ra l duties o f l e s s e r sk ill, such as keeping a w o rk e r supplied w ith m a te ria ls and t o o ls ; cleaning
w ork ing are a , m a ch in e , and equipm ent; a ssistin g jou rn eym an by holding m a te ria ls o r t o o ls ; and
p e r fo rm in g other un sk illed task s as d ir e cte d by jou rn eym an . The kind o f w ork the h elp er is perm itted
to p e r fo r m v a r ie s fr o m trad e to tr a d e : In so m e tr a d e s the h elp er is con fin ed to supplying, liftin g,
and holding m a te r ia ls and t o o ls , and cleanin g w orking a r e a s ; and in oth ers he is p erm itted to p e r fo rm
s p e c ia liz e d m achine o p e ra tio n s , o r p arts o f a trad e that are a ls o p e r fo rm e d by w o rk e rs on a
fu ll-t im e b a s is .

C A R P E N T E R , M AIN TENANCE
P e r fo r m s the ca r p e n tr y duties n e c e s s a r y to con stru ct and maintain in g o o d r e p a ir building
w ood w ork and equipm ent su ch as b in s , c r ib s , co u n te rs, ben ch es, p artition s, d o o r s , f lo o r s , s ta ir s ,
c a s in g s , and t r im m ade o f w oo d in an esta b lish m en t. W ork in volves m ost of the fo llo w in g : Planning
and laying out o f w ork fr o m b lu e p r in ts , d ra w in gs, m o d e ls , o r v e r b a l in stru ction s; using a v a r ie ty o f
c a r p e n t e r 's h an d tools, p orta b le p o w e r t o o ls , and standard m easu rin g instru m en ts; m aking standard
Shop com pu tation s rela tin g t o dim e n sio n s o f w o rk ; and se le ctin g m a te ria ls n e c e s s a r y f o r the w ork . In
g e n e r a l, the w ork o f the m aintenance ca r p e n te r re q u ire s rounded training and e x p e r ie n c e usually
a cq u ire d th rou gh a fo r m a l a p p re n tice sh ip o r equivalent train ing and e xp e rie n ce .
E L E C T R IC IA N , M AIN TENANCE
P e r fo r m s a v a r ie ty o f e l e c t r ic a l tra d e functions such as the in stallation , m aintenance, o r
r e p a ir o f equipm ent f o r the ge n e ra tio n , d istrib u tio n , o r utilization o f e le c t r ic en ergy in an e stablish m en t.
W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : Installing o r rep airin g any o f a variety o f e le c t r ic a l equipm ent
such as g e n e r a to r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , s w itch b o a rd s , c o n t r o lle r s , c ir c u it b r e a k e r s , m o t o r s , heating units,
conduit s y s t e m s , o r oth er tr a n s m is s io n equipm ent; w orking fr o m blu eprin ts, d raw in gs, layou ts, o r
o th er s p e c ific a t io n s ; loca tin g and diagn osin g tr o u b le in the e le c t r ic a l system o r equipm ent; w orking
standard com putation s rela tin g to lo a d re q u ire m e n ts o f w iring o r e le c t r ic a l equipm ent; and using a
v a r ie ty o f e le c t r ic ia n 's h an dtools and m e a su rin g and testing in stru m en ts. In g e n e r a l, the w ork o f the
m aintenance e le c t r ic ia n r e q u ir e s rounded tra in in g and e x p e rie n ce usually acqu ired through a fo r m a l
a p p ren ticesh ip o r equivalent tra in in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
EN G IN EER, STATIO N A RY
O perates and m ain tain s and m ay a ls o su p e rvise the operation of station ary engines and
equipm ent (m ech a n ica l o r e l e c t r i c a l) to supply the establishm ent in w hich em p loyed w ith p o w e r , heat,
r e fr ig e r a t io n , o r a ir -c o n d itio n in g . W o rk in v o lv e s : O perating and maintaining equipm ent such as
stea m en g in e s , a ir c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s , m o t o r s , tu rb in e s, ventilating and r e fr ig e r a tin g equipm ent,
stea m b o i le r s and b o i le r - f e d w a te r pum ps; m aking equipm ent r e p a ir s ; and keeping a r e c o r d o f operation
o f m a c h in e r y , te m p e r a tu r e , and fu e l con su m ption . M ay a lso su p e rvise these o p e ra tio n s. H ead o r
c h ie f e n g in e e rs in e sta b lish m en ts e m ployin g m o r e than one engineer are excluded.




M A C H IN E -TO O L O P E R A T O R , TOOLROOM
S p e c ia liz e s in operating one o r m o r e than one type of m achine to o l (e .g ., jig b o r e r , grinding
m a ch in e , engine lathe, m illin g m ach in e) to m achine m eta l f o r use in m aking o r m aintaining jig s ,
fix tu r e s , cutting t o o ls , ga u g es, o r m e ta l dies o r m old s u sed in shaping o r form in g m etal or n onm etallic
m a te r ia l (e .g ., p la s t ic , p la s t e r , ru b b e r, g la s s ). W ork t y p ic a lly in v o lv e s : Planning and p erform in g
d ifficu lt m achinin g ope ra tio n s w hich re q u ire com p lic a te d setups o r a high d eg ree of a ccu ra cy ; setting
up m ach in e t o o l o r to o ls (e .g ., in s ta ll cutting to o ls and adjust g u id es, s to p s , w orking ta b le s , and other
c o n tr o ls to handle the s iz e o f sto ck to be m ach in ed; determ in e p r o p e r fe e d s , sp eed s, toolin g, and
operation sequ en ce o r s e le c t th o se p r e s c r ib e d in d raw in gs, b lu ep rin ts, o r layou ts); using a va riety of
p r e c is io n m easu rin g in stru m en ts; m aking n e c e s s a r y adjustm ents during m achining operation to achieve
re q u isite d im en sion s to v e r y c lo s e to le r a n c e s . M ay be req u ired to s e le c t p r o p e r coola n ts and cutting
and lu bricatin g o i ls , t o r e c o g n iz e when t o o ls n eed d r e s s in g , and to d r e s s to o ls . In gen era l, the w ork
o f a m a c h in e -to o l o p e r a to r , t o o lr o o m , at the s k ill le v e l c a lle d f o r in th is c la s sific a tio n req u ires
e xte n sive know ledge o f m a c h in e -s h o p and t o o lr o o m p r a c tic e usually acq u ired through c o n sid era b le
o n -t h e -jo b train in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s -in d u s t r y w age study p u r p o s e s , this c la s s ific a t io n does not include m a ch in e -to o l
o p e r a t o r s , t o o lr o o m , e m p lo y e d in t o o l-a n d -d ie jobbin g shops.
M ACHINIST, M AINTENANCE
P r o d u ce s re p la ce m e n t p a rts and new parts in m aking r e p a ir s o f m etal parts o f m ech a n ica l
equipm ent o p e ra te d in an establish m en t. W ork in volves m ost o f the fo llo w in g : in terp reting w ritten
in stru ctio n s and s p e c ific a tio n s ; planning and laying out o f w ork ; using a v a r ie ty of m a ch in ist's handtools
and p r e c is io n m ea su rin g in stru m en ts; setting up and operating standard m ach in e t o o ls ; shaping of m etal

parts to c lo s e t o le r a n c e s ; m aking standard shop com putation s rela tin g t o dim en sion s o f w o rk , to o lin g ,
fe e d s , and speeds o f m achinin g; know ledge o f the w ork ing p r o p e r tie s o f the co m m o n m e ta ls ; se le ctin g
standard m a te r ia ls , p a r ts , and equipm ent re q u ire d fo r th is w o rk ; and fitting and a sse m b lin g p a rts into
m ech a n ica l equipm ent. In g e n e r a l, the m a c h in is t's w ork n o r m a lly re q u ire s a rounded train ing in
m a ch in e-sh op p r a c t ic e usually acq u ire d through a fo r m a l ap p ren ticesh ip o r equivalent train ing
and ex p erien ce.

Paints and re d e c o r a te s w a lls , w o o d w ork , and fix tu r e s o f an establish m en t. W ork in v o lv e s the
fo llo w in g : K nowledge o f su rface p e c u lia ritie s and ty p es o f paint req u ir e d fo r d ifferen t a p p lica tion s;
p rep arin g su rface fo r painting by re m ovin g old fin ish o r by p la cin g putty o r f il l e r in n ail h oles and
in t e r s t ic e s ; and applying paint with sp ra y gun o r bru sh . M ay m ix c o lo r s , o i ls , w hite le a d , and other
paint ingredients to obtain p r o p e r c o lo r o r c o n s is te n c y . In g e n e r a l, the w ork o f the m aintenance
p ainter requ ires rounded training and e x p e r ie n c e usually a cq u ire d through a fo r m a l a p p ren ticesh ip o r
equivalent training and e x p e rie n ce .

MECHANIC, AU TO M OTIVE (M aintenance)
P IP E F IT T E R , M AINTENANCE
R ep a irs a u tom ob iles, b u s e s , m o to rtr u c k s , and t r a c to r s o f an establish m en t. W ork in v o lv e s
m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : Exam ining autom otive equipm ent to diagnose s o u r c e o f tr o u b le ; d isa sse m b lin g
equipm ent and p e rfo rm in g r e p a ir s that in volve the use o f such handtools as w re n ch e s , gau g es, d r ills ,
o r s p e c ia liz e d equipm ent in d is a s s e m b lin g o r fitting p a rts; re p la cin g brok en o r d e fe ctiv e parts fr o m
s tock ; grinding and adjusting v a lv e s ; re a s s e m b lin g and in stallin g the v a r io u s a s s e m b lie s in the v e h ic le
and m aking n e c e s s a r y adjustm ents; and aligning w h e e ls , adjusting b ra k e s and lig h ts , o r tightening body
b o lts . In g en era l, the w ork o f the autom otive m e ch a n ic re q u ire s rounded train in g and e x p e r ie n c e usually
acq u ired through a fo rm a l app ren ticesh ip o r equivalent train ing and e x p e r ie n c e .
This c la s s ific a tio n d o e s not include m e ch a n ics who re p a ir c u s t o m e r s ' v e h ic le s in autom obile
r e p a ir shops.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R ep airs m a ch in ery o r m e ch a n ica l equipm ent o f an establish m en t. W ork in vo lve s m o s t o f the
follow in g : E xam ining m ach in es and m e ch a n ica l equipm ent to diagn ose s o u r c e o f tro u b le ; dism antling
o r partly dism antling m ach in es and p e r fo rm in g re p a ir s that m ain ly in volve the use o f han dtools in
scrapin g and fitting p a rts; rep la cin g b rok en o r d e fe ctiv e parts w ith item s obtained fr o m sto ck ; ord e rin g
the production of a rep la cem en t part by a m achine shop o r sending o f the m achine to a m achine shop
fo r m a jo r r e p a ir s ; p rep a rin g w ritten s p e c ific a tio n s fo r m a jo r r e p a ir s o r fo r the produ ction o f parts
o r d e r e d fr o m m achine shops; re a s s e m b lin g m a ch in es; and m aking all n e c e s s a r y adjustm ents fo r
operation. In g e n e ra l, the w ork o f a m aintenance m ech an ic re q u ir e s rounded train in g and e x p e rie n ce
usually a cqu ired through a fo r m a l ap p ren ticesh ip o r equivalent train in g and e x p e r ie n c e . E xclu ded fro m
th is c la s sific a tio n are w o rk e rs w h ose p r im a ry duties in volve setting up o r adjusting m a ch in es.
MILLW RIGHT
Installs new m ach in es o r heavy equipm ent, and dism an tles and in sta lls m ach in es o r heavy
equipm ent when changes in the plant layout are re q u ire d . W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f the fo llo w in g :
Planning and laying out o f the w o rk ; in terp retin g blu eprin ts o r oth er s p e c ific a tio n s ; using a v a r ie ty of
handtools and rig gin g ; m aking standard shop com putation s relating to s t r e s s e s , strength o f m a te r ia ls ,
and cen ters o f g ra vity; aligning and balancing o f equipm ent; se le ctin g .stan dard t o o ls , equipm ent, and
parts to be used; and in stallin g and m aintaining in g o o d o r d e r po w e r tr a n s m is s io n equipm ent such as
d riv e s and speed r e d u c e r s . In g e n e ra l, the m illw r ig h t's w ork n o r m a lly re q u ir e s a rounded train ing and
e x p e rie n ce in the tra d e acq u ired through a fo r m a l app ren ticesh ip o r equivalent train ing and e x p e r ie n c e .

Installs o r r e p a irs w a te r, steam , g a s , o r oth er ty p es o f pipe and p ip efittin gs in an e s ta b lis h ­
m ent. W ork in volves m ost o f the fo llo w in g : L aying out o f w ork and m ea su rin g to lo ca te p osition o f
pipe fr o m drawings o r other w ritten s p e c ific a t io n s ; cutting v a rio u s s iz e s o f pipe to c o r r e c t lengths
with c h is e l and h am m er o r oxyacetylene t o r c h o r p ip e-cu ttin g m a ch in e s ; threading pipe with s tock s and
d ie s; bending pipe by han d-d riven o r p o w e r -d r iv e n m a ch in e s ; a ssem b lin g pipe w ith cou p lin gs and
fastenin g pipe to h an gers; making standard shop com pu tation s rela tin g to p r e s s u r e s , flo w , and s iz e of
pipe requ ired ; and m aking standard te s ts to determ in e w hether fin ish ed p ipes m eet s p e c ific a tio n s . In
g e n e ra l, the w ork o f the m aintenance p ip e fitte r re q u ir e s rounded train in g and e x p e r ie n c e usually
a cq u ire d through a fo rm a l app ren ticeship o r equivalent train in g and e x p e r ie n c e . W o r k e r s p r im a r ily
engaged in installing and repairin g building sanitation o r heating s y s te m s are ex c lu d e d .
S H E E T -M E T A L W ORKER, M AINTENANCE
F a b r ic a te s , in s ta lls , and m aintains in g ood rep a ir the s h e e t-m e ta l equipm ent and fix tu res (such
as m achine guards, g re a se pans, s h e lv e s , lo c k e r s , tanks, v e n tila to r s , ch u tes, du cts, m eta l ro o fin g )
o f an establishm ent. W ork in volves m o s t o f the fo llo w in g : Planning and laying out all types o f s h eetm e ta l m aintenance w ork fr o m blu e p rin ts, m o d e ls , o r oth er s p e c ific a t io n s ; setting up and operatin g all
available types o f s h e e t-m e ta l w orking m a ch in es ; using a v a r ie ty o f han dtools in cutting, bending,
fo rm in g , shaping, fitting, and assem b lin g ; and in sta llin g s h e e t-m e ta l a r t ic le s as r e q u ired . In g e n e r a l,
the w ork o f the m aintenance s h e e t-m e ta l w o rk e r r e q u ir e s rounded train in g and e x p e r ie n c e usually
acq u ired through a fo rm a l app ren ticesh ip o r equivalent train in g and e x p e r ie n c e .
T O O L AND DIE M AKER
Con structs and re p a irs j ig s , fix t u r e s , cutting t o o ls , ga u g es, or m eta l dies o r m old s u sed in
shaping o r form ing m etal o r
n o n -m e ta llic m a te r ia l ( e .g .,
p la s t ic , p la s t e r , ru b b e r , g la s s ). W ork
ty p ica lly in v o lv e s: Planning and laying out w ork a c c o r d in g to m o d e ls , b lu e p r in ts , d ra w in gs, o r other
w ritten o r oral sp e c ific a tio n s ; understanding the w ork in g p r o p e r tie s o f com m on m eta ls and a llo y s;
se le ctin g appropriate m a te r ia ls , t o o ls , and p r o c e s s e s r e q u ir e d to co m p le te task; m aking n e c e s s a r y
shop com putation; setting up and operating v a r io u s m achine t o o ls and r ela ted equipm ent; using v a rio u s
t o o l and die m a k e r's handtools and p r e c is io n m ea su rin g in stru m en ts; w ork in g to v e r y c lo s e to le r a n c e s ;
h ea t-trea tin g m etal parts and fin ish e d t o o ls and dies to ach iev e r e q u ir e d q u a litie s ; fitting and
asse m b lin g parts to p r e s c r ib e d t o le r a n c e s and a llow a n ces . In g e n e r a l, t o o l and die m a k e r 's w ork
r e q u ir e s rounded train ing in m a ch in e -s h o p and t o o lr o o m p r a c t ic e usually acq u ired through fo r m a l
app ren ticeship o r equivalent train ing and e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s -in d u s t r y wage study p u r p o s e s , this c la s s ific a t io n d oes not in clu d e t o o l and die
m a k e rs who (1) are e m ployed in t o o l and die job b in g shops o r (2) p rod u ce forg in g d ies (die sin k e rs ).

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND W ATCH M EN

LA B O R E R , M ATER IA L HANDLING

G uard. P e r fo r m s routine p o lic e duties, eith e r at fix e d p ost o r on to u r , m aintaining o r d e r ,
using arm s o r f o r c e w h ere n e c e s s a r y . Inclu des gatem en who are stationed at gate and ch eck on
identity of e m p loy ees and other p e r s o n s en te rin g .

A w ork er e m ployed in a w are h o u se , m anufacturin g plant, s t o r e , or other establish m en t w hose
duties involve one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g : Loadin g and unloading v a riou s m a te r ia ls and m erch a n d ise
on o r fr o m freigh t c a r s , tr u c k s , o r oth er tra n sp ortin g d e v ic e s ; unpacking, sh elvin g, o r placin g
m a te r ia ls o r m erch an dise in p r o p e r sto ra g e lo ca tio n ; and tra n sp ortin g m a te r ia ls o r m erch a n d is e by
handtruck, c a r , o r w h eelb arrow . L o n g sh o re m en , who lo a d and unload ships a r c exclu d ed .

W atchm an.
and ille g a l entry.

M akes rounds o f p r e m is e s p e r io d ic a lly in p ro te ctin g p r o p e r ty against f ir e , th eft,

JANITOR, P O R T E R , OR CL E A N E R
Cleans and keeps in an o r d e r ly condition fa c to r y w ork ing are a s and w a s h r o o m s , o r p r e m is e s
o f an o ffic e , apartm ent h ou se, o r c o m m e r c ia l o r other establish m en t. Duties in volve a com bin ation of
the follow in g: Sw eeping, m opping o r scru b b in g, and polish in g f lo o r s ; rem ovin g c h ip s , tr a s h , and other
refu se; dusting equipm ent, fu rn itu re , o r fix tu r e s ; polish in g m e ta l fix tu r e s 01 trim m in g s ; p rovidin g
supplies and m in or m aintenance s e r v ic e s ; and cleanin g la v a to r ie s , sh o w e rs , and r e s t r o o m s . W o rk e rs
who sp e c ia liz e in window w ashing are ex clu d e d .




ORDER FIL L E R
F ills shipping o r tr a n s fe r o r d e r s f o r fin ish ed g ood s fro m s tored m e rch a n d is e in a c c o r d a n c e
w ith sp e cifica tio n s on sales s lip s , c u s t o m e r s ' o r d e r s , o r other in s tru ctio n s .
M ay, in addition to
fillin g o r d e r s and indicating ite m s fille d o r om itted , k e e p r e c o r d s of outgoing o r d e r s , req u isition
additional stock o r re p o rt short supplies to s u p e r v is o r , and p e r fo r m oth er rela ted duties.
PA C K E R , SHIPPING
P re p a re s fin ish ed produ cts f o r shipm ent o r sto ra g e by placin g them in shipping co n ta in e r s ,
the s p e c ific operations p e r fo rm e d being dependent upon the ty p e, s iz e , and n u m ber of units to be
pack ed , the type o f con tain er em ployed, and m eth od o f shipm ent. W ork r e q u ir e s the placin g of item s
in shipping containers and m ay involve one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g : K now ledge o f v a r io u s item s of

s to ck in o r d e r t o v e r ify content; s e le c tio n o f appropriate type and size o f co n ta in e r; in se rtin g
e n c lo s u r e s in con ta in er; using e x c e l s i o r o r o th e r m a te ria l to prevent breakage o r dam age; c lo s in g and
sea lin g c o n ta in er; and applying la b e ls o r e n terin g identifying data on container. P a ck e rs w ho a ls o m ake
w ooden b o x e s o r c r a t e s a re e x c lu d e d .

fo llo w s :

T R U C K E R , PO W ER
goods

O perates a m anually c o n tr o lle d g a s o lin e - o r e le c t r ic -p o w e r e d tru ck o r tr a c to r to tran sp ort
and m a te r ia ls o f all kinds about a w a reh ou se, m anufacturin g plant, or other establishm ent.
F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , w o rk e rs are c la s s ifie d b y type o f tru ck ,

as fo llo w s :

T r u c k e r , p o w e r (fo r k lift)
T r u c k e r , p o w e r (oth er than fo r k lift)

F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s a re c la s s ifie d as fo llo w s :

WAREHOUSEMAN

R e ce iv in g c le r k
Shipping c le r k
Shipping and r e c e iv in g c le r k
TR U C K D RIV ER
D riv e s a tr u c k w ithin a c ity o r in d u stria l a rea to tra n sp o rt m a te r ia ls , m e r ch a n d is e , equipm ent,
o r m en betw een v a r io u s ty p e s o f esta b lish m e n ts such as: M anufacturing plan ts, freigh t dep ots,
w a r e h o u s e s , w h oles a le and r e ta il e s ta b lis h m e n ts , o r betw een re ta il establishm ents and c u s t o m e r s '
h o u s e s o r p la c e s o f b u s in e s s . M ay a ls o lo a d o r unload tru ck with o r without h e lp e r s , m ake m in o r
m e c h a n ic a l r e p a ir s , and k eep tru ck in g o o d w orking o r d e r . D r iv e r -sa le s m e n and o v e r -t h e -r o a d
d r iv e r s are ex clu d ed .

A s d ir e c te d , p e r fo r m s a v a r ie ty o f w arehousing duties w hich req u ire an understanding of
the e s ta b lis h m e n t's sto ra g e plan. W ork in v olv es m ost o f the fo llo w in g : V erifyin g m a teria ls (o r
m e r ch a n d is e ) against re c e iv in g d ocu m en ts, noting and rep ortin g d is c re p a n c ie s and obvious dam ages;
routing m a te r ia ls t o p r e s c r ib e d s to ra g e lo ca tio n s ; s to r in g , sta ck in g, o r palletizing m a teria ls in
a cc o r d a n c e w ith p r e s c r ib e d sto ra g e m eth ods; rea rra n gin g and taking in ventory o f sto r e d m a te r ia ls ;
exam ining s to r e d m a te r ia ls and re p o rtin g d e teriora tion and dam age; rem ovin g m a te ria l fro m stora g e
and p re p a rin g it f o r shipm ent. M ay o p erate hand o r p ow er tru ck s in p e rform in g w arehousing duties.
E xclu de w o rk e rs w hose p r im a ry duties in volve shipping and re c e iv in g w ork (see shipping and
r e c e iv in g c le r k and p a c k e r , shipping), o r d e r fillin g (s e e o r d e r f il l e r ) , o r operating pow er tru ck s (s e e
tr u c k e r , p o w e r).

Area Wage Survey bulletins will be issued once every 3 years. These bulletins will contain information on establishment practices and supplementary benefits as well as earnings. In the interim years, supplements containing data on
earnings only will be issued at no additional cost to holders o f the Area Wage bulletin. I f you wish to receive these supplements, please complete the coupons below and mail to any o f the B L S regional addresses listed on the back
cover o f this publication. N o further action on your part is necessary. Each year, you will receive the supplement when it is published.

.
Please send a copy .o f Supplem ent I to B L S Bulletin
Name

...

Please send a copy o f Supplem ent II to B L S Bulletin
Name

Address

City and State




as

T r u c k d r iv e r (com bin ation o f s iz e s lis t e d s e p a ra te ly )
T r u c k d r iv e r , ligh t (under lVz to n s)
T y u ck d r iv e r , m ed iu m (IV 2 to and including 4 to n s )
T r u c k d r iv e r , heavy (o v e r 4 to n s , t r a ile r typ e)
T r u c k d r iv e r , heavy (o v e r 4 to n s , o th er than t r a il e r ty p e)

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING C L E R K
P r e p a r e s m e r ch a n d is e f o r sh ipm en t, o r r e c e iv e s and is resp on sible fo r in com in g (shipm ents
o f m e r ch a n d is e o r oth er m a t e r ia ls . Shipping w ork in v o lv e s : A knowledge o f shipping p r o c e d u r e s ,
p r a c t ic e s , r o u te s , a vailable m ean s o f tra n sp o rta tio n , and ra te s; and p reparing r e c o r d s o f the good s
sh ip p ed , m aking up b ills o f la d in g , p ostin g w eight and shipping c h a r g e s , and keeping a file o f shipping
r e c o r d s . M ay d ir e c t o r a s s is t in p r e p a rin g the m e rch a n d ise fo r shipm ent. R e ce ivin g w o rk in v o lv e s :
V e r ify in g o r d ire ctin g o th e r s in v e r ify in g the c o r r e c t n e s s o f shipm ents against b ills o f lading, in v o ic e s ,
o r oth er r e c o r d s ; ch eck in g f o r s h o rta g e s and re je ctin g dam aged g o o d s ; routing m e rch a n d ise o r
m a te r ia ls t o p r o p e r dep a rtm en ts; and m aintaining n e c e s s a r y r e c o rd s and file s .

F o r w age study p u r p o s e s , tr u c k d r iv e r s a re c la s s ifie d by s iz e and type o f equipm ent,
( T r a c t o r - t r a ile r should be rated on the b a s is o f t r a ile r c a p a c ity .)

!
j

1

Address

Zip Code

City and State
-

1

Zip Code
-

1
1
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I
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Available On Request
The follow in g area s are s u rv e y e d p e r io d ic a lly fo r use in a dm in isterin g the S e r v ic e C on tract A ct o f 1965.
the BLS reg ion a l o ffic e s shown on the back c o v e r .
A la m o g o rd o — as C r u c e s , N. M ex.
L
A laska
A lbany, Ga.
A lbuquerque, N. M ex.
A lexa n d ria , La.
Alpena, Standish and Taw as C ity, M ich.
Ann A r b o r , M ich.
A tlantic C ity, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.—
S.C .
B a k e r s fie ld , C a lif.
Baton R ou ge, La.
Battle C r e e k , M ich.
Beaum ont— o r t Arthur^-Orange, T e x .
P
B iloxi—G ulfport and
P a sca g o u la , M is s ,
B o is e C ity, Idaho
B r e m e r to n , W ash.
B r id g e p o r t, N orw alk and S tam ford, Conn.
B ru n sw ick , Ga.
B u rlington, V t.— .Y.
N
Cape C od , M a ss.
C ed ar R a pid s, Iowa
Cham paign—
Urban a, 111.
C h a rle sto n , S.C.
Ch arlotte— aston ia, N.C.
G
C heyenne, W yo.
C la r k s v ille -H o p k in s v ille , Tenn.—Ky.
C o lo r a d o S p rin gs, C o lo .
C olu m bia, S.C.
C olu m bu s, Ga.—
Ala.
C olu m bu s, M is s .
C ra n e , Inch
D eca tu r, 111.
Des M o in e s, Iow a
Dothan, A la.
D u lu th -S u perior, Minn.— is.
W
E l P a so, T ex.
Eugene— p rin gfie ld , O reg.
S
F a y e tte v ille , N .C .
F itchburg— e o m in s te r , M a ss.
L
F o r t Sm ith, A rk .—
Okla.
F r e d e r ic k — agerstow n, M d.— h a m b ersb u rg,
H
C
Pa.— artin sb u rg, W. V a.
M
G adsden— nniston, A la.
A
G o ld s b o r o , N .C.
G rand Island— astings, N ebr.
H
G reat F a lls , M ont.
Guam
H a rrisb u rg — ebanon, Pa.
L
Huntington— shland, W. Va.—
A
Ky.—
Ohio
K n o x v ille , Tenn.
L a re d o , T e x .
L as V e g a s , Nev.
L im a, Ohio

C op ies o f pub lic r e le a s e s are o r w ill be a v ailable at no c o s t w hile su p p lies la st fr o m any of
Little Rock—N orth Little R ock , A r k .
Logansport— e r u , Ind.
P
L orain— ly r ia , Ohio
E
L ow er E astern S h ore, M d.— a.—D el.
V
Lyn ch burg, Va.
M acon, Ga.
M adison, W is.
M ansfield, Ohio
M arquette, E scan aba, Sault Ste. M a r ie , M ich.
M cA llen— h arr—
P
Edinburg and B ro w n s v ille —
H arlingen—
San B en ito, T ex .
M edford— lam ath F a lls— rants P a s s , O reg.
K
G
M eridian, M iss.
M id d lesex, M onm outh, and O cean C o s ., N.J.
M o b ile , Ala. and P e n sa co la , F la .
M ontgom ery, Ala.
N ashville— avidson, Tenn.
D
New Bern— a ck so n v ille , N .C.
J
North Dakota
N orw ich— roton—
G
New London, Conn.
O rlando, F la.
QxnarcHSimi V alley— en tu ra, C a lif.
V
Panam a City, F la.
P e o r ia , 111.
Ph oenix, A r iz .
Pine B lu ff, Ark.
P ortsm outh, N.H.—
Maine— a ss.
M
P u eblo, C olo.
P u erto R ico
R eno, Nev.
Richland—
Kennewick— alla W alla—
W
Pendleton, W ash.— reg.
O
R iv e rsid e —
San B ern a rd in o— n tario, C a lif.
O
Salina, Kans.
Sandusky, Ohio
Santa Barbara^Santa M aria—L o m p o c , C a lif,
Savannah, Ga.
Selm a, A la,
Sherm an^D enison, Tex,
Shrevep ort, La,
Sioux F a lls , S, Dak,
Spokane, W ash,
Springfield, 111.
S p rin g fie ld -C h ico p e e — olyoke, M a s s .—Conn,
H
Stam ford, Conn,
Stockton, C a lif.
T a co m a , W ash.
Tampa—
St. P e te rs b u rg , F la .
T opeka, Kans.
T u cson , A r iz .
V a lle jo -F a ir fie ld —
Napa, C a lif.
W aco and K illeen— e m p le , T ex .
T
W aterloo—
Cedar F a lls , Iowa
W est T exa s Plains

R ep orts fo r the follow in g su rv e y s con du cted in the p r io r y e a r but s in ce discon tin u ed are a lso available:
Grand F o r k s , N. Dak.
Sacram en to, C a lif*
San A n gelo, T ex **
W ilm ington, D el.—
N.J.— d.*
M

A b ile n e , T e x .* *
B illin g s , M ont.*
C orpu s C h ris ti, T e x *
F r e s n o , C a lif.*
*
Expanded to an a re a w age su rvey in fis c a l y e a r 1975.
** Included in W est T e xa s P lain s.

See in sid e back c o v e r .

The fourteenth annual re p o rt on s a la r ie s fo r accountants, a u d ito rs, c h ie f accountants, a ttorn eys, jo b an a lysts, d ir e cto r s o f p e rso n n e l, bu y e rs, ch e m is ts , e n g in e e r s , en gin eerin g tech n icia n s, d r a ft e r s , and
c le r ic a l e m p loy ees is available. O rd e r as BLS B u lletin 1837, N ational Survey o f P r o fe s s io n a l, A d m in istra tive , T e ch n ica l, and C le r ic a l P ay, M a rch 1974, $1.40 a co p y , f r o m any o f the BLS re g io n a l s a le s
office's shown on the b a ck c o v e r , o r fr o m the Superintendent o f D ocu m en ts, U S. G overn m en t P rintin g O ffic e , W ashington, D.C. 20402.




Area W age Surveys
A l i s t o f th e la t e s t a v a il a b l e b u ll e t in s o r b u lle t in s u p p le m e n t s i s p r e s e n t e d b e lo w .
A d i r e c t o r y o f a r e a w a g e s t u d ie s in c lu d in g m o r e li m it e d s t u d ie s c o n d u c t e d at th e r e q u e s t o f the E m p lo y m e n t
S t a n d a r d s A d m in i s t r a t io n o f th e D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r is a v a ila b le on r e q u e s t .
B u lle t in s m a y b e p u r c h a s e d f r o m a n y o f th e B L S r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s sh ow n on th e b a c k c o v e r .
B u lle tin s u p p le m e n ts m a y be
o b t a in e d w ith o u t c o s t , w h e r e in d ic a t e d , f r o m B L S r e g io n a l o f f i c e s .

A rea

B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r i c e *

A k r o n , O h io , D e c . 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
A l b a n y -S c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N. Y . , S e p t. 1974 _____________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
A l b u q u e r q u e , N . M e x . , M a r . 1974 2 _________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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A l le n t o w n -B e t h le h e m —E a s t o n , P a — N .J ., M a y 1974 2_____________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
A n a h e im —
Santa Ana—G a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , O c t . 1 9 7 4 * __________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 9 , 85 c e n t s
A t la n t a , G a ., M a y 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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A u s t in , T e x . . D e c . 1 97 4 _______________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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B a l t i m o r e , M d ., A u g . 1 9 7 4 ___________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
B e a u m o n t—P o r t A r t h u r —O r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1974 2— ____________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
B i l l i n g 8 , M o n t ., J u ly 1974 1 __________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 6 , 75 c e n t s
F ree
B in g h a m t o n , N .Y .—P a . , J u ly 1974 __________________________________-a----------------------------------- S u p p l.
B i r m in g h a m , A l a . , M a r . 1 97 4 ________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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B o i s e C i t y , I d a h o , N o v . 1973 2...................................................................................................................... S u p p l.
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B o s t o n , M a s s . , A u g . 1 97 4 _____________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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B u f fa lo , N . Y ., O c t . 1 9 7 4 _______________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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F ree
B u r lin g t o n , V t . , D e c . 1973 2________________________________ ______________ ___________________ S u p p l.
C a n t o n , O h io , M a y 1974 1 _____________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 - 2 3 , 80 c e n t s
C h a r l e s t o n , W . V a ., M a r . 1974 2_____________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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C h a r l o t t e , N . C ., J an . 1974 2_____________________________________________________________ 1------ S u p p l.
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C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n — G a . , S e p t. 1 97 4 _________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
C h i c a g o , H I ., M a y 1974 1______________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 -2 7 , $ 1 .1 0
C in c in n a t i, O h io —K y.—I n d ., F e b . 1 97 5 _______________________________________________________ S u pp l.
F ree
C l e v e l a n d , O h io , S e p t. 1 97 4 1 ........................................................................................................................ 1 8 5 0 -1 7 , $ 1 .0 0
F ree
C o lu m b u s , O h io , O c t . 1 97 4 ___________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
C o r p u s C h r i s t i , T e x . , J u ly 1 9 7 4 * ____ _________________________ _____________________________ 1 8 5 0 -3 , 75 c e n t s
D a l la s , T e x . , O c t . 1973 2............................ ..................................................................................................... S u p p l.
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D a l l a s - F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , O c t . 1 9 7 4 ________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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R
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D a v e n p o r t — o c k I s l a n d - M o l i n e , Iow a —111., F e b . 1 97 5 ------------------------------------------------------ S u p p l.
D a y t o n , O h i o , D e c . 1974 1_____________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 4 , 80 c e n t s
D a y to n a B e a c h , F l a . , A u g , 1 9 7 4 1____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 - 1 , 75 c e n t s
D e n v e r , C o l o ., D e c . 1973 2 ____________________________________________________ _______________ S u p p l.
F ree
D e n v e r —B o u l d e r , C o l o ., D e c . 1974 1 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 8 5 0 - 1 5 , 85 c e n t s
D e s M o i n e s , I o w a , M a y 1974 2________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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D e t r o i t , M i c h . , M a r . 1 9 7 4 ____________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
D u r h a m , N . C ., D e c . 1973 2 ___________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 - 9 , 65 c e n t s
F o r t L a u d e r d a le —H o lly w o o d a n d W e s t P a l m B e a c h , F la .,
A p r . 1974 _______________________________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , O c t . 1973 2 ________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
F r e s n o , C a li f. 1 3 _______________________________________________________________________________
G a i n e s v i l l e , F l a . , S e p t. 1 9 7 4 * ________________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -1 1 , 75 c e n t s
G r e e n B a y , W i s . , J u ly 1 9 7 4 __________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
G r e e n s b o r o — i n s t o n -S a le m — ig h P o in t , N .C ., A u g . 1974 1 ------------------------------------------- 1 8 5 0 - 2 , 80 c e n t s
W
H
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M a y 1974 ------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------- S u p p l.
F ree
H a r t f o r d , C o n n . 1 3 ______________________________________________________________________________
H o u s t o n , T e x . , A p r . 1974 1 ___________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 -2 2 , 85 c e n t s
H u n t s v i ll e , A l a . , F e b . 1974 *_________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 - 1 3 , 65 c e n t s
I n d ia n a p o lis , I n d ., O c t . 1 97 4 ---------------------------------------------------------------- -------------- ------------------ S u p p l.
F ree
J a c k s o n , M i s s . , J an. 1974 1 __________________________________________________________________ 1 7 9 5 -1 2 , 65 c e n t s
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , D e c . 1 97 4 ______________________________ ____________ _____________________ S u p p l.
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K a n s a s C i t y , M o .— a n s . , S e p t. 1 97 4 ________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
K
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H
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L a w r e n c e — a v e r h i ll , M a s s .—N .H ., J une 1974 2 ----------------------- ------------------------------------------ S u p p l.
L e x in g t o n — a y e t t e , K y ., N o v . 1974 _________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F
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L it t l e R o c k - N o r t h L it t le R o c k , A r k . , J u ly 1973 2 ------------------------------------------------------------- S u p p l.
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L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h . C a l i f . , O c t . 1 9 7 4 _______________________________________________S u p p l.
F ree
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h a n d A n a h e im — anta A n a —G a r d e n
S
G r o v e , C a l i f . , O c t . 1973 2___________________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
F ree
L o u i s v i l l e , K y .— n d ., N o v . 1974 1 ____________________________________________________________ 1 8 5 0 -1 2 , 80 c e n t s
I
L u b b o c k , T e x . , M a r . 1974 2 . ......................................................................................................................... S u p p l.
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M a n c h e s t e r , N .H ., J u ly 1973 2_______________________________________________________________ S u p p l.
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*
1
2
3

Prices are determined by the Government Printing O ffice and are subject to change.
Data on establishment practices and supplementary w age provisions are also presented.
No longer surveyed.
T o be surveyed.




A rea

B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r i c e *

M elbourne— itu sv ille — o c o a , F la ., Aug. 1974 1 _________________________________ ____ 18 50-5, 75 cents
T
C
M em ph is, Tenn.— rk .— is s ., Nov. 1974 _____________________________________________ Suppl.
A
M
F ree
M ia m i, F la ., O ct. 1974_________ _____ ______________________________________ _______ ___ Suppl.
F ree
M idland and O d e ssa , T e x ., Jan. 1974 2________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
F ree
M ilw aukee, W is ., M ay 197 4______________________________________________ ______ ______ Suppl.
M in neapolis—
St. Paul, Minn.— is., Jan. 1975 1 _______________________________________ 1850-20, $1.05
W
M uskegon— uskegon H eigh ts, M ich ., June 1974*—___ ______________________________ Suppl.
M
F ree
Suffolk, N .Y . 1 3 ------------ --------------------- ------- ---------------- —..........- .......... —.........- .......
Nassau—
N ewark, N .J., Jan. 1974 1______________________________________________________________ 1850-18, $1 .0 0
N ewark and J e r s e y C ity, N .J ., Jan. 1974 2------------------------------------------------------ ------------ Suppl.
F ree
New H aven, Conn., Jan. 1974 2 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
F re e
New O rle a n s, L a ., Jan. 1974 1----------------- -------------------------------------------- ------- —.......... ....... 1795-15, 70 cents
New Y o rk , N .Y .-N .J . 1 3 .....................................................................................................................
New Y ork and Nassau—
Suffolk, N .Y ., A p r. 1974 2 —........................................... ...................Suppl.
F ree
N orfolk— irgin ia B eachr-Portsm outh, Va.— .C . 3 ------------ ---------------------- ----------------V
N
N orfolk— irgin ia B each— ortsm outh and N ewport News—
V
P
H am pton, V a ., Jan. 197 4___________________________________________ _________________ Suppl.
F ree
N ortheast Pen nsylvania, Aug. 1974 1____________________________________ _______ ______ 1850-8, 80 cents
Oklahom a C ity, O k la ., Aug. 1974 1________________ _______________________________ ____ 1850-7, 80 cents
Omaha, N ebr.—
Iow a, O ct. 1974 1-------- ---------------- --- -------------------------------------------------------- 1850-10, 80 cents
P a terson — lifton— a s s a ic , N .J ., June 1974 _____________________________ ______ ____Suppl.
C
P
F ree
N
F re e
Ph iladelphia, Pa.— .J ., N ov. 1974_____________________________________ ________ _______ Suppl.
P h oenix, A r i z . , June 1974 2 _______ _________________ _____ ___________ _____ ___________ Suppl.
F ree
P ittsburgh, P a ., Jan. 1975____________ ____ ___ _____ ________________ __________ _______ Suppl.
F ree
P ortland, M aine, Nov. 1974________ ______________________________________ _________ ___Suppl.
F re e
W
P ortlan d, Or eg.— a sh ., M ay 1974 1_____ _________________________ ___________________ 1795-26, 85 cents
P ou gh keepsie, N .Y . 1 3 ------------ ----------------------------------------------------- -------- —.......... ................
Pou ghkeepsie—
Kingston— ewburgh, N .Y ., June 1974_________________________________ Suppl.
N
F ree
P ro v id e n ce — arw ick— aw tucket, R .I.— a s s ., M ay 1974 1_________ _____ ___________ 1795-24, 80 cents
W
P
M
R a leigh , N .C ., D ec. 1973 1 2............................................................................................................. 1795-7, 65 cents
R aleigh— urham , N .C ., F eb . 1975______________________________________ __________ ___ Suppl.
D
F re e
R ich m on d, V a ., M ar. 1974 1_______________________________________________________ ____ 1795-25, 80 cents
San B ernard ino— n tario, C a lif., D ec. 1973 2______________________________Suppl.
O
F ree
R iv e r s id e —
R o c k fo r d , 111., June 1974 2_______________ . _______ _______________________________ ___ Suppl.
F ree
St. L o u is , M o.—
111., M ar. 1974 ________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Sacram en to, C a lif., D e c. 1974 1 __________________ _____ _______________________ ____ _ 1850-19, 80 cents
Saginaw, M ich ., Nov. 1974 1-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1850-16, 75 cents
Salt Lake C ity, Utah, Nov. 1974 ______________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
San An ton io, T e x ., M ay 1974 1_____________ ____________ _______________________________ 1795-21, 65 cents
____________________ _____ ______________________ ________ 1850-13, 80 cents
San D ie go , C a lif., N ov. 1974 1
San F r a n c is c o —
Oakland, C a lif., M ar. 1974 ____________________________________ ______ Suppl.
F ree
San J o s e , C a lif., M ar. 1974____________________________________________________________Suppl.
F ree
Savannah, G a., M ay 1974 2--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------ Suppl.
F ree
Scranton, P a ., July 1973 1 2 __________________________ - ________________________________ 1795-3, 55 cents
Seattle—E v erett, W ash., Jan. 1974 ............................ .............. .................. .......... .................... 1795-17, 65 cents
Sioux F a lls , S. D ak., D e c. 1973 2 _________________ ______ ___________________ __________ Suppl.
F ree
South Bend, Ind., M ar. 1974 1---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ 1795-18, 65 cents
Spokane, W ash., June 1974 2___________________________________________________________Suppl.
F ree
S y ra cu s e , N .Y ., July 1974 1--------------------------------------- -------------------------------- ------------------ 1850-4, 80 cents
Tam pa—
St. P e te rs b u rg , F la ., Aug. 1973 2 ___________________________________ ________ _ Suppl.
F ree
T o le d o , Ohio— ic h ., A p r. 1974 -______ ______ _______ . _______ _________ ________ ________Suppl.
M
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T ren ton , N .J ., Sept. 1974----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Suppl.
F ree
W ashington, D .C .— d.— a ., M a r. 1974 ___________ ___________________________________ Suppl.
M
V
F ree
W aterbury, Con n., M ar. 1974 2_____________ _______________________________ ______ ____Suppl.
F ree
W a te rlo o , Iowa, N ov. 1973 1 2______________________________________________ _________ 1795-5,
60 cents
W ichita, K ans., A p r. 1974 1 _________________ ___________________________________ ____1795-20,
65 cents
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s ., M ay 1974----------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------- Suppl.
F ree
Y o rk , P a ., F eb . 1974 ___ _______________________________________________ _____ ___ ____Suppl.
F ree
Youngstown— arren , O hio, Nov. 1973 2_______________________________________________ Suppl.
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T H IR D C L A S S M A IL
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20212

P O S T A G E A N D F E E S P A ID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE $300
LA B -4 4 1

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T I S T I C S R E G IO N A L O FFIC ES
Region I
1603 J F K Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 2 23-6 761 (Area Code 61 7)
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

Region V
9 th Floor, 230 S. Dearborn St.
Chicago, 11 606 04
1.
Phone: 3 53-1880 (Area Code 312)
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin




Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 9 71-5405 (Area Code 212)
New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Region VI
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Arkansas
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Region III
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 21 5)
Delaware
District o f Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
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Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut S t , 15 th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
VII
Iowa
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Missouri
Nebraska

VIII
Colorado
Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Utah
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Region IV
Suite 54 0
1371 Peachtree St. M E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30 309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee
Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone:556-4678 (Area Code 415)
IX
Arizona
California
Hawaii
Nevada

X
Alaska
Idaho
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Washington


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102