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UL

TABLE O F ' C O N T E N T S .
'

Report by; Mr. Dallas on tlie Finances Eeport by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr! Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr.'Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
.Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr-Crawford on the Finances ,
lieport by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Rush on the Finances Report by Mr. Rush^ on the Finances Report by Mr. Rush on the Finances . Report by Mr. Rush on the Finances Eeport by Mr. Crawford on the state of the




•

Page.

December, 1815
5
D.ecember, 1816
73
-^
,r
December, :i817
88
•
November, . 1818
lo
i
- ..
. December, 1819, 144
December, 1820
167
,. - .
December,, 1821
198
.December,. 1822 .217
; December,^ 1823
247
•December, 1824276
-^
313
December, 1825
December, • 1826 ^ 353
- ,
-~
:
December, 1827
. .-< . .
388
December, 1828
->
- . 439
Currency of the United States, in 18*20
481 .

' ^ '^^ w'

8 31

-1828.].

.
.' ' .

• ^ SECRETARY OF T H E TREASUR.Y.

'

".KEPORT ON THE FINANCES.
' DECEMBER, 1B28.•• •

^

439

" ',..."
'

. •

In layiiig'before Congress the annual report from the Treasury for "thi^
present year, the occasion is deemed a fit one for presenting, In.connexioh
with it. a brief retrospect.of the principal financial operations and results of
the th'ree years preceding,
'.
'"^'
•.
V
.As preliminary, it may be proper to remark, that the"receipts,for the
present year are likely to reach, a sum greater ^han that at \yhich they
were estimated when Congress assembled last year: whilst the expenditures,
always confined within Umits prescribed bythe law, .have not gone beyond'
those limits. The only exception' to this previous'limitation upon expenditure apphes to the pubhc debt, for the reduction of which larger sums may '
be paid than are regularly set apart for the; service of the' year,* provided
there be surplus funds in the Treasury to admit of it. This 'has proved to
be the case daring the present year.
' .\ • ^'
in.the summary retrospect which it is proposed tOvgive, the stat^ of the
public debt will claim the first atten'tioii. Such is tJie. interest which the
nation is known to take in its extingaishment, that what is done at. theTreasury, from Year to year,, under the injunctions of the.'1-aws, towards this
end, cannot be too distinctly set forth.' Amongst the highest duties of a
nation, is fiithfiilly to keep to its pecu.niary engagements; andlthere need
be no better demonstration of its pecuniary ability, thaii when it is seen to
pay off with promptitude and punctuality its fundqd debt. ~
'.
There was ptiid in 182.5,,on account of .the debt, the sum of twelve million
ninety-nine thousand .and forty-foiir dolkrs and seventy-eightcents. This
sam was not till derived, as will be seen liereafter, from- sifrplus revenue.
In 1826, there werepaid $11,039,444 60, all from surplus revenue ; ui 1827,
$10,001,585 98, from surplus revenue"; and in.'1828, there vvill have been
paid, by the close of the year, also from surplus reYenue, fl2,163,566 90;
making for the four years,-fort,y-fi.ve million three hundred and three thou- .
sand six hundred and forty-two dollars twenty-six cents. Of this suni
1^0,373,188 01.were,applied to theprincipal, and $14,930,454 25 to the
interest of'the debt; the whole of the foriiier having gone towards the ^reduction of that part of it which bears ah' interest of six per cent.
The act of Congress of the 3d'of M'arch.J.81.7', commonly called the
sinking fund act, appropriates the annual sum often millions ofdollars for
the purpose^ofgraduMly sinking or paying off the public debt of the-nation.
This sum includes all payments on accourit of interest, v/hich areinvariably
made from quarter to quarter, leaving^tho remainder tobe applied, as far as
it will go,'to the 'redaction of the principal: Up to the.year 1825, the ex, pectations of this act had not, in one sense, -been always fully met. The
\ annual interest was ever scrupulously paid as the;qiiarter came round; but
there hadnot been during every year a sufficient.residue to be applied to the
' principal, to make up the entire sum of ten rnilUons of dollars. Sometimes,
too, there wasjiat a suflicient amount of-debt redeemable under the laws, in



440'.

.

•••

REPORTS O F - T H E

.^.

^

[.1828>

the course of a year, to allow ofthe full payment.of ten millions, even, if the
surplus funds, of the-Treasury had been equal to the operation. The inability ofthe Tre.asury, where.it may have existed, to reduce the principal of the.
debt, every 3^ear, by the precise amourit contemplated' in the sinking fund
act, neither-broke faith, ndr caused complaint with'the public creditor-; for ^
whatever the considerations of pubhc policy that have made the rapid extinguishment of the debt a favorite object with, the nation, it is known that the
public 'Creditor regards it, individually, as a hardship to be paid off. His reliance upon the faith and resources of the nation is. so unbounded, that he
prefers to let his capital stock remain in .its hands, subject only to his calls
for the niterest;. .But since the close of 1825, such has been the state of .the
Treasury,'from the increasing solidity ofthe national resources, that, not only
has the annual .i;equisition'of the sinking fund act been complied with, but
stil] more has been done.. .At the beginning,of that year, "the whole sum paid
under the act, during theseven years of its operation in reduction of the principal of the debt, (the .operation of the act not having regularly conirnenced
until 1818,) fell short, bya'sUm exceeding three milliohs of dohars, ofthe
amount: that it would have reached,.had the full ten millions beeh paid in principal and interest, during each of the seven years in question. Since the
close of 1.825, (or, more porrectly, since the commencement of 1826,) tliis
deficiency has-been coantervailed, by such,an excess of annual jDayrneiits
towards the princip.al of the debt,.as to leave, in the language of the Treasury, no arrear^ now due to the sinking fund, or none of importance.". In
other words, locTkihg back upon the whole time that has elapsed since the
sinking;.fand act,went into operation, it can now.be stated, that,, taking
one year with another, there have been m.ade (.with the exception of a sraall
Tractioiial sum) the full average payments of ten millions of dollars annually,
in principal and interest, on account of the public debt. This result has
been,,,in a great degree, produced by the payments which will have been made
during the .present year in.'reduction of the principal. Five million foUr
hundred.and sixty-three dollars and twelve cents v/ere paid on the 1st of
July, arid' it is inten'ded to pay $4,050,780 77 on the 1st of January;
making for the."whole year, including a small balance of Treasury notes to ,
bei paid, otf, and a minute "fraction of the old ^registered debt, nine .million
sixty-one thousand four hundred and ninety-vsix dollars nineteen cents. The
Cornmittee on Finance of the Senate,.in their valuable report to that body
in April last, on the state of the public debt, referring to the foregoing payment which it was then in contemplation to make on^ the 1st of \luly,. expressed their.hope that a Considerable redaction of the aTrears due,.tq Vhe
sinking fand would pr.obably be effected in the course o'f this year. The
hope-is amply realized.. The large amount of the "payment to be made .on
the 1st'of January was justified, in the opinion of the commissioners; of ^
the sinking fund, by the receipts intothe Treasury, since the payment in
July was resolved upon, which were greater than had been anticipated, aiiaby those th cit were reasonably anticipated, for the fourth quar te-r of the, year;
The totalsum that will have been paid on account of the ^debt, from the
1st of January. 1817, the year in which the sinking fund act passed, to
the 1st 'of January hext, will be one hundred- and forty-six milhon six
hundred and sixty-nine thousand seven hundred and sevenjy-three dollars
forty eight cents. Of this sum, -$88,834;ip8 66 were pai.d on, account of
principal, and $57,835,664 82 on "account of interest. The extra payments
on account ofthe prindpar, (more than could Have t.ee:i.:covered by the_an-


1828.]

SECRETARY, OF T H E TREASURY.

44i-

nual.appropriation of ten millions,) comprehend sums obtained on loan at a
lower interest than six per cent., to replace stock paid off at that interest,
and sums that had accumulated in the Treasury in 1817, partly uncier the
effect ofthe double duty system, before the prospective operation of the act
began. The national debt has been .positively lessened in ainount by.the
sum of sixty-five million one hundred arid twenty-nine thpusand eight
himdred and twenty-nine dollars-and thirty-eight cents, since the'1st of
January, 1817, by. surplus funds. The whole of this last nientioned sum,
so paid off, was borrowed at six per cent., ;0'r more than six, .with the exception ofa small amount of Treasury, notes, and some Mississippi stock.
It is facts hke these that tittestthe truecharacter and value of a-sinking-fund.
None can be effectively such, but where income exceeds expenditure; and
where a clear surplus from the former is steadily applied to the diminution
of the debt.' Sach is, the sinking fund act of the United States^ and such^
have been the results of its operation; results, which it cannot be otherwise,
than acceptable to the nation to learn'. The whol6 remaining debt thatthe
nation will owe on the 1st of .January ensuing, will 'be, in its nominal
amount, fiftyreight million three hundred and sixty-two thousand one hundred and thirty-five dollars seventy-eight cents. Bnt from .^this-amount
.should be taken seven millioris of dohars,- being so itiuch of apparent debt
only, in the .shape of sabscription to the stock of the Bank.of the United
States, the nation owning a hke sum in the stock of. the bank, upon which
dividends, are punctually paid. Of the sum that wicll remain, namely,
$51,362,135 78, the old revolutionary three per cerits constitute more than ,
thirteeii millions of dollars. By this exhibitionof the state of the debt, it
will be seen to how small an amoant it has fallen,-under a faithfuLenforcement of the sinking fand act, in the space of eleven years! In tlie past "effects of this act we have the pledge of its future efiicacy.^ As each successive
year increases the proportion ofprincipal that is paid oft', diminishing that
of interest, it is easy to anticipate in how short a time the nation, under the
continued action ofthe fund, will be released from all charges whatever, on
account of the debt, by its 'final extinguishment. Assuming its stated appropriation often millions to be forerun in the same proportion in future
years as it has been this year, the debt will, in effect, be totally paid off in
little more than four years.
,. '
, •'
An evidence ofthe stable resources ofa country, actual and prospective,
is to be found in the prices which its fu'nded debt bearsiri the money market.
A finaricial ex]Dp'sition. and review, like the present, naturally embraces,
some general allusion to this point The stocks^.of the United States keep
at an eleveition a:bove par, indicativ.e ofthe high credit of fhe-Government;
the more remarkable, from the'consideration that they are redeemable at
• short periods, and quickly redeemed, in fact, as. the periods arrive. The
three per cents, being those whichat is presumed will be redeemed last, a
circumstance known'always ta enhance the value of stock, where public
confidence attaches^ to it, stand, accordingly, at the highest rate; being a
favorite stock abroad as well as at home^ .For the last four years, this portion of the public stock has been at, a price ranging, in the main,- from 80 to
85; nor has it been always obtainable, such is the demand for it, even at that
rate. The.heavy fall of stocks in England, towards the close of 1825, affected those of this country less than might have been anticipated, from the
connexions of business betv/een. the two countries; and serves, to show the
value of those of this Government, even under untoward occurrences, in
that o^reat centre of the commercial world.



442.

^

- '•

• REPO-RTS OF. THE^

••••

^[1828.

/ The precise amount ahd kinds, of stock of which, the public debt will
eonsistorl the 1st of January next, with the, periods of redemption, will be
seen in detail in the document No. 1, annexed to this report. It is not
deemed necessary to say any thing more u.nder this head, except' barely ,to
add, that the |5,000,463 12, t hat "were pai (^ oft' onthe 1st of .Iuly4ast, consisted of $2,744,423' 91 of the six per cent stock created by the act of Coiigress of th(5 8th of Febraary 1813, being all that was left of that stock;
, and' of. $2,256,039 21 of the six per cent\ stock created by the. act of the
24th;of March, 1814. •.The $4,050,780 77 intended to be paid.at the close
' ofthe present year, consist ofthe six per cent, stock, also.created by thelast ~
mentioned act, buTdisnominated-theloan of the 22d of August, l-814';,being,
, in like manner, all that remains unpaid of that particular loan.
/
- T h e general state of the .foreign commerce ofthe country win nex-^
giv.en.. ^This wih best make known the surplus productions of its soil, and,;
those other sources of its industry which constitute the,basis.of its foreign,
cornmerce.\- The-irii portations into the United States, daring the last four,
yearsy amount in value to three hundred and fifty million twohuhdred and^
two thousand four hundred and sixty-nine dollars". Those for a portion of
the-present year are hfere given by probable estimate, rather than certain
knowledge. . The^exportations for thesame four years, calculated in the
same way, amount to three hundred and thirty-seven million two,hundred
and two thousand four hundred and twenty-six dollars; of the latter,
$233,069,Q35 were of domestic produce'and manufacture, and $104,133,391
were re-exportations of foreign;Gommodities: The importations for the fouryears, preceding, or from 1821 tp 1824, (both inclusive,) amounted to three
hundred and thre.e million nine hundred and fifty-five thousand five hun- •
dred^ and thirty-nine dollars; and the exportations to two hundred and
eighty-seven miUion eight hundred and t.wenty thpusand.three hundred
.and fifty dollars. Of the latter; $191,350,881 were of domestic produce and.
manufacture, and $96,469,469,re-exportations of foreign articles.
,: The receipts irito the Treasury .during the last fou.r years, (these being always; chiefiy depeiidant upon the importations;) amount to ninety-seven million nine, hi,indred and fifty-seven thousand'five hundred arid fixfty-nine
dollars and eighty-six cents. .' Those for the present year ai^e here:also given,
in part, by estimate.- The estimates rriay deviate from accuracy, but not to
ari^extentto thwart the general conclusions that are'in view.', The expenditures for.the same time, calculated in.the'same' way, riiay be state'd at
ninety-five million five.hundred and eighty-five.thousand fivehundred and
eighteen dollars and eighty-five cents. Of this sum,, besides what was applied to ;the public.debt, about fourteen millions .will have been expended on
internal works designed to improve the^condition of tlie country, or otherwise on objects not belonging to the mere annual support of Government,
in its^civil, "military,' and naval establishmehts. T h e receipts for the four'
years that -p.receded were eighty-four million seven hundred and twentyeight thousand and ten dollars and seveiity-one cents; and the expenditures
eighty-three million nine'hundred and ,•seventy-nine, thousand eight hundred and seventy-four'doll ars and seventy-nine cents. ' Ten millions of dol^
• lars obtained by loans, are included in the receipts ofthe four years last mentioned; and G.ve millions, so obtairi,ed, cahie intb the Treasury duringthe
first year of the other series, viz: iri 1825. This loan of five millions was procured under an act of Congress of May, 1824, at four and a half per cent., not
from,any deficiency of reveiiue, but for thep.urpose pfpayingan equal arnount



i m ] • :;. -: •SECRETARY Of •THE-TREASURY,;' . ,,

44S^

ofthe •public debt at six per cerit. :It explains what wa^-said of thepayment
thatSvas made on account of the debt'in ^825 not havirig all bee^n from surplus revenue. The loans, amounting to^ ten millipns, embraced^in the first;
series of foXir years, were obtained with a:vidw.(ex;clusive of the suni applied
.to the purchase of Florida) to siriiilaT changes in the, debt. It hasibeen the' '
/policy of the Treasury Departmeht "to^^feeommerid,/from tim to time, these
^ changes of stock,,;from:;a: high, to ;stock bearing :a;loXv<ermte of interest^
^
'appearingto be unjust to the nation, that, underan ehtii^e alteratiph of cir.curiistances sirice thetime when itmay haye^Wrrowed^nioney,:^
tinue to .pay more:in .the shape of interest: than iiidiyiduais^ pay; the credit ,
of'the nation transcending that of in divi duals as.ninch a:s'dd4ts resoiirees. ^ •
/Thi« remark necessarily implies the'right,^£)n the/part'of i;he Governinent,'
so to change its stock, from .the time of redemption'having arrived, to that
which bears a h,igh interest; and which may, therefore, withbut objectibn,
be paid off by anew loan.obtain^^^
.
: ,
,-";,
. .Dedticting the ampunt of receipts from these:beneficial loaris during the
. two periods; reviewed,, the absolute An crease ^ of r,eyenue, .during the second
period, is found to exceed eighteen miliions of dollars. The whole, of this-in-.
crease:has been in the customs. It amounts, in each yeai', toari a;verage of
more .than twenty-four per ceiit. Whilst th^^
in receipts ha^heeh
atthis rate,.the increased experidituie, aside frorii;What, has tieen paid towards the reduction -bf the / debt, lias been less than ten'per cent., and; the
latter .has been chiefly caused by >iiiternai' improvements; J The increase in.
/receipts may be aecount^^
.part obut inot at;^all tb:;thi^vextent^by the^
increas^ duties under; the tariff .of 1824. T t e inipprtsy-du riri g the four years /
endirig with 18^8,''exceed^th0se~.of the^receding^ur:years by -ari- average:.^
Of riiore than -fifteen per-cientOT;each year.\ 'The^ expidrts 6f .dpiriestic'pro-. /
f
diice, for the four years )ending^wiUi.'1828,. excee^^^ those of the fo.iir years
.ending with 1:824 % an average.of riiore than ^twerity-bne per:cent. in. each .
-year; The-increase in the consu mption of foreigri arti cles,-.duririg .the sanie.
ti mO, has been, on an. average, upwards.of eighteeii per cent, iri^each year.
;.' It. is believed, that the shipping of the UnitedStates will be found to have
increased, during the last four years, in a fair mtio with their conimeTce and.
%eYenue. The rettirns urider'this head.! are not sufiiciently complete, at Jthe .
preserit moment, to :speakvwith precision. It'is ,certa;in that the^whole mer- Gantile shipping- of the Uri ion ^ in eluding that-employed in thp coastingtrade,
aswell a's.all that is embarkedan foreigri corhmerceand the fisheries, .exceeds
at'this .time fifteen hundred thousand tons. . That of no oth'er nation is protoably .as large, 'England .excepted.' , In 1818, .the tonn age Of the; Union was <
1 :hutJi(;de more thein twelve: hundred thousand./VJts'^greaiestiri'Ctease-since that year, was in ohe of the yiears undei^exariiiiiationyviz: in .1826.A:The
profits of freight upon thi^ large amourit of tbniia'gey;the-.ships of the U
S.tatesibeing almost exclusively the cari^iers^^^^^^^
centre at horiie, knd make a lai-ge addition to thb.stock .of.capital^^
•
The foregoing .statements ih&ate a'Stead.yv^^^
perity. The .reality, of this advance is oiily to be measured by aggregate re' sulfs, aseertaiifed at proper ip tery ais of time. •-it is. useful to present such re- ,
•' .stilts, 'they show the general C
O
country, v-iewfed, notin parts,
but:'under one midivided whole. • They attest-thei.^positive . gfowth^ o.f its
riches, M the rapidity of the growth by comparison.^ They afford resting
poiritsfor .doubtful.opinions, when all desire to airrive at thos^e that may ap-;
-peai best supported by results. No singlp e;y'e''can take them all in, unassist


444 • ^

.:- • ^

-'.REPORTS dF'^.THE. . . / A ,-:•.... ^

•.•/•••[1828/

ed by the authentic returns, which'it: is the province of the Goyernment, and
chiefly of the department of the, Treasury,, to watch over and promulgate,
endeavoring also to trace them to their causes., Astate whose/riatural resources and territory are abundant, whose institutions are free, and whose
interests are diversified, niay \vitriess occasional and teriiporary pressure upoa
some'of thos;e interests,. wMlst all the great branches of its industry are in
courser of'surej/develpphient./ But transient inconvenience is lost im the
aggregate prospenty, and niust, jn the end, participate in that .prosperity. Ai .
is.thus, that great states;, urider successful systems of legislation, go onward .
in their career of rijches arid power; . Not only has there been a iliarked increase: of importatioris arid revenue in the United States, during the last four
years, and of exportation of domestic commodities, but a like dirriinutiori in
re-exportations. The latter is^veiystiildng;,and justifies the inference, not
irierely of an increased-desii^e to. import foi the purpose of meeting, the contingencies of trade or speculatipn, but of an inc^^^^
b purchas^o and^iise foreign fabrics. The increased consumption of the:lafter, and the iricrease in revenue, have expeeded the ratioof the increase of .
duties uiidervthe tariff:of 1824, and the presumed iricrease of population also.
The,exports of doitrestic products have aiw^
than theincreaseLof population, as,given by the cerisus. at periods the most
fixyprable. . T h e s e facts cannot mislead.:.; They point to ah' unequiYOCal increase, sofar, m the pirosperity ©f the nation. Statistical testimonials for a
;single year, or for n^ore than oney may rise or fall in amount, from causes
that postpone alL'perriianeht conclusions ;, but where they are seen to go ori
in ail iriereasing train,, thrdughout a succession of years, it is rational to ascribe them.to.causey beginning to assume a fixed character. If w^e review the
last foil i;;fy ears as a period of time in commercial history, ive find little inthe
.circurnstaiices of the world, either from general war, or otherwise, to affect
foreigri'Markets beyond'the ordinary Huctuations incident to trade at all
tinies. The e^traOrdiriary operatioris in the^cptton market,;that fell upon
the first of these years, viz: 1825,; are not conceived to impair the apphcability pfthe remark, because-there has been tinie enough for diminished exportations, as a cohseqiience of the large e.xportatioris of thatyear. No'term,
indeed, of,eight years, since the establishment of the Govern merit, has been
so exempt frorii the influence of external events that disturb the regular opera^tions of natidnal iridustry arid comniercb,- as the last eight; None,, there- ^
fore,, could be so faiiiy.taken for the comparative stateriientsthett have been
made.' It do:es not escape recoUectiOn, that from 1791 to 1815, there were
: epochs vi^heathe foreign commerce of the country adyanced with even iiipre
rapidity than is here stated—when it was greater,, absolutely, and therefore'greater in proportion to the population .of the country. But.-during that
long interval, there prevailed in Europe, with scarcely a percpptible interruption, .desolating wars, which created an unparalleled /demand ,for,our
staple productionSjarid brought them up to extravagant prices. This, with
our neutral attitude, vyhich gave to our carryirig trade a "scope almost un-r
•bounded, raised exportations and importations; to ;an artificial pitch,that caii
never be recurred to as ^a standard of comparison fbr commerce, iindef circumstances more ordinary and regular. It is known that, during portions
of that ihterval, pur trade in fofejgnprpduce far exceeded that in domestic.
It is .wholly'^otherwise now. The mere profits oh our/tbhnage at ^ that
earlier day of the republic, by the capital which it introduced/gave, ofitself,
the capacity for an enlarged corisumption of foreign^articles, on ;a compara^
tively smaller basis of population..
'
'.



A

182.g.] '

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

'445.

The increased consumption'of foreign articles in the United States, daring the last four years, as compared with the four that preceded, riiay, it is
believed, be ascribed, in no inconsiderable degree, to the advances which
home labor has been making in various ways, in the country, since 1824.'
'The creation and sub-division, of home' labor must bring new wealth to
this, country, as they-ever have to other countries ; arid with it an increased
ability to,buy articles of all kinds. T h e reports, from this.department,
within these four years, have respectfully,- but earnestly,' urged upon Coiir
gress the'expediency of fostering'manufacturingiabor; u.nder the conviction,:
. deeply entertained, that in its success is largely to befound the true groundwork of financial power. It will ultimately unfold the means of prrividing
revenue for the public wants, when war or other.external .events, notto b^
controlled, may abridge foreign • commerce. Hpw difficult it has been,heretofore, to obtain any efficient supplies of revenue from soursces of internal industry and wealth, when such vicissitudes have happened, the finan;
cial history of the country in times past sufficiently makes khowii, irriparting admonition for the future. The department has no, jess strenuously'*
inculcated the pojicy of important amendments in,our commercial.code, by '
lowering the dutie^ upon foreign articles that were indicated, especially
teas; by removing the shackles w;hich bind down the^merchant in'his trade
. of re-exportation; and by a liberal extension of the •warehousing system,v/hich, with the abolition, of aU transit duties, might more and more tend
to bring.the productions of all parts ofthe world into deposite at our.pprts,
thence to. be distributed, and principally by our - own ships, whPrever markets might invite them.. It. was beheved that,, with the- establish men t, of
manufactures at home, foreign commerce would ultimately'expand ; t)ut it
continues to be believed that the latter will' never^get to\its full height in
the Unite.d States, until aided by the lawsin the ways recommended. .'The ,
merchant, like the^manufacturer, requires, at proper, junctures, the helping:
hand, of Congress, and may suffer without it. Herice it has beenihe ob-'
ject, as it was the duty, of the department, to invoke legislative favor fox
both these great interests, under the b'elief that they flpurish' most when:
they flourish together ; that, iri proportion as both flourish, in conjunction
with agriculture, the invariable feeder of both, is the public Treasury most
likely to be kept full;, and that all plans of finance that do not take'the cooperating prosperity of these three primary interests of the state as their
foundation, must prove fallacious or 'short-lived. Such were the counsels
of a departed statesman, whose name peculiarly lives in the records of this,
department; whoVas.first placed at its head, directing its pperations Avith,
a forecast sb luminous as still to throw a guiding light pver the/path of his
successors. His comprehensive genius, looking into futurity, and,embracing in its survey all the interests that go to niake up the full strength and
riches of a great empire, saw"the truth, now in cours,e of corroboration by
our own experience, that the protection and increase of riianufacturing
labor, far,from stopping the springs' of'our corifimercial. power, would but >
multiply and diffuse them.
'
Enough of time has not elapsed to warrant any decided judgment upon
the practical operation of the tariff of 1828., There seems no present reason for supposing that it, will lessen exportations. If not, no scale of duties
which it has created will diminish the foreign trade, or the revenue of the
nation. Tt is mariifestly what we send abroad that rriust, in the end, give
the true riieasure of what we are to receive from abroad.



,,446

•

•

. ^REPORTS OF TBE,

|182&

' The moneys received into the Treasury during the last four years amoimt,
as has been already estimated, to mpre than'ninety-seven miliions, of dollars^
It belongs to this retrospect to state, that in the applicatioh of' the \yhole of
this s.um to'the various objects of expenditure designated by the laws, no
embarrcissmerits or delays, injurious to the public-service, have happened.
All money^haye.been paidat the time,'and at the placp, where they were
• required to be paid, and to thepersoiis erititled to receive them. This capa-,
.city in the-Treasury to apply the-pubUc funds at theproper moment, iri. every
part of a cPuntry of such' wide extent, has been^essentially augriiented by
the .Bank of the United States.' The department feels an obligation of duty
to bear its testimony, founded on constant experience during the terni in
question, to the iiselhl instrunieritahty of this institution in all the most im-.
portarit-fiscal .operations of the nation. In faithful obedience to the conditiojis of i t s charter, and aided by its branches, it has afforded, the necessary
^ facilities for' transferring the- public rnoneys from place to place, concentrating them at the point required. :- In this, manner" all payments on account of
,the public debt, whether for interest or principal; all on account of pensions ;
all for the civil list, for the army, .for the navy, ,or, for whatever bther .purpose wanted in-any part of the Union, ha've: been punctually niet. The
bank is also the depository, with its branches, for the public mone.ys, from '
whatever sources of revenue received; aiding, too, in their collectipn : thereby giving safety to the keepirig, as well as promptitude and certainty to the
disbursement, of thepublic treasure.. It receives the paper ofthe State banks
paid on.public accpunt in the interior, as, well as elsewhere, andj by placing
it to the credit ofthe United States as cash, renders it available wherever the
public service may require. By this course—a course not enjoined by its
charter—it widens the field 'of business and usefulness to the State banks.
Such, also', is the confidence reposed in the stock ofthe Bank of the United
States, that it 'serves as a medium of remittance abroad; in satisfaction of
debts due from" our citizens | to those' of other countries, vvhich o.therwi'se
would make a- calhupon the; specie of the country for their discharge. Nor
are these all'the uses of this:institution, in which the Goverriment participates. It is the preservatioii of-a good currency that can alone impart stability toproperty, and prevent thosO fliictucition'sin ils value, hurtful alike to
indiyidual and to. national wealth. This advantage the bank has secured
to the/community, by confining within 'prudent limits its issues >of paper,
whereby a restraint has been imposed upon excessive importations,which-,
are.thus kept more within the true'wants and capacity ofthe couiitry. Sometimes (judicipu sly varying itscburse)it enlarges its issues,, to relieve .sGarcit.3^,
as under the disastrous speculations of 1825. The State banks, following,/
or controlled by, its general example; have shaped their policy towards the
same salutary,ends: adding fresh demonstrations tothe truth, that under the
mixed jurisdiction and powers-of the State and national systems of govern-ment,. a.national bankis the instrument alone by which Congress can effectively regulate the^purrency of the nation: When the Congress of the revolution, under the severest pressure of financial difficulty, estabhshed, in 1781.
the Bank of Noi-th .America-; whieri the superintendent of finance: of that period predicted that it \vou\d<^'beeorne as usefiulto'cd7nm.&ce^^
crgrieiilture^
in peace, as to the Governnient during war;'' when the same public officer, speaking from an arduous arid enlightened experierice, subsequently
said thatiwithbut that barik, imperfect as wasits organization, ^ the business
^
ofi the Department'ofi Finarice could not have been perfiormed;'it affords



t838..]- •

'^ '•••SECRETARY O F ' T H E TREAStJRY..,;- . "• ^ . 447

a.testimPriy, the inemory of which is con ceived: to bemot \yhbll.y;iireleyant
to, that which is here intended to be borne, to the kindred but better institution of our day.' The policy of Congress having establisiieda^finaricial connexion betweenthe Bank of the United States^andthp Go'vernriientbf ,the
.Union,itis conceived-to devolve upon the otficer! of,theiatter, whose.post
.charges him with a close'observance of thatcorinexionj to report to Congress
its.pfactical;effects. , The benefits of ^a remedy .becoiiie'often most apparent
' By a recolleGtion of the evils which ealled fors it. . Ai paper •currency too rediutdant, because without any basis of eoinj.'or other effecUve. check,- and of
; no value as a medium of reniittance or ex%ange, beyond; the jurisdicti
the State whence it had been issued ; a durrency that not unfrequently imposed upon the Treasury the necessity of meeting, by extmvagant premiums, '
. the mere act of transferring the revenue coljected at'one .point, to defray unavoidable experiditures at another: this is the state of things wliich the Bank
of the United States has superseded. In the firiancial operations of the na-'
tion, as in'the pecuniary transactions betweeh man and^nian, cohidence'has
succeeded to distrust, steadiness to fluctuation, and reasonable certainty to
general confusion and risk. The very million of dollars of funds not effecrtive, of which theTreasury for, m'any years- has been obliged tp :speak,is but.
a reriinarit.of the losses-arising from the.shattered currency, which the' bank,,
by !a wise management of its a-ffairs, has curedO In conclusion, the.mode of
* its ageiicy, in large payments-of the priricipal of the debt.is'not to be overlopked. ,B.y ,itf arrangerneiits for: them, it avoids^ the inconvenience of too,
great ari accumulation of money: in,Nt he-vaults ofrfepositeused by the Go verriw-:
ment, arid of the^^vacuum that v;^ould succeed its toO sudden distribution. It
do.es.this by anticipating, a^ ths ,p,eripds^^^^^^^
ment of a^cprisiderable portion of the stocky inf the form of discounts iix favor
of those who are: to be paid'off; thereby ena blan g. them/otherwise to emplby •
theiivca;pital,,as .pppoiHuhities^
i n this manner Heavy'
paynients. of thedebtare,i:riyeffeGt, made.gradually,' instead of the whole-mass
beirig thrown "at: once upon the money market,^ which'niight produce injurious, shocks, 'So prudently inthis, and other respec;ts,. does the bank aid the
operatioh.of paying off the debt, thatthe comniunity hardly has- a conscious-/
ries^ihatitis^goingon.
.'; ^.; - . , • , " . , , / -. • > • -•/•-. .=;./.,-:. • • , ••/•••
•
. An..'act of'Congress waslpassed on the 24th'of last May,, directing the Secretary o.f the Treasury to subscribe, in the nanie .ari§ fqr lhe use.of the
United States,forteri thousand shares'of capital'^
Ohio G'aritalCompany-—atfehtferpj-ise desi^
to open thp shortest outlet between the waters of therdhio and the Atlantic ocean. ' .This duty has.been
perform_ed ;'aliditis/satisfaetory to be able to-state, thatthe natipnal work
which itis designed toadvance-^aworkdi'stinguishedf^^^^^
t K which Cohgress has heretofore lent itSr powerful aid jbyitsi^
C
\yith the natiohaLiTietrppolis—has b^eri cohimenced. A considerable ^portion ,
of the;lirie,of the canal is in progress of^x^avation, and under circimistanees
tlia,t prpmise well towards the successful prosecutioii/of the whple work.
M i t s cOmpletio^n, a large and enriching increase; of home tradein this part
ofthe Union, diffusing its commercial and fiscal Benefits tpi other parts, and
much> of it conoentratirig in a-district underthe^peciTh
of Cohgress, canriot but be witnessed.
- ' - ,
\/~ ,
The retrospect interided is here closed. -It looked to But two things: 1st, ,.
a condensed statement; of the leadirig.facts belonging to the history of the:
depar|rnent; at the terniinatioh of one of those periods of time into whiefe


^^448 _ . •/:;'\;,v:;,;>:-/;--REPORTS,0

•.•'[1828.

the constrtritibS:ha&4iyided the movements of theGbye^nment^ arid, secondly, to a genefali^:^i|liee to theprinciples of public policyY^ich have guided
trie presentinc^mbehtirit
So-deeply
do the-firiahcea.0f ;a,state alj^^
the esthriate pf its i3rOsperity—
often of its very^:exist^^^^
he has at rio time felt himself at liberty to,
take^a restiicted-™w; of the law com nian ding himto raakean annual report
to.^Cprigress ^on the^subjectvofjfinance ;" but,.puts liimsplf upon .the ihdulgerice of that bo^dy for having;coupled with this-anhual performancexpf
his^ duty; principles and recomniendations which he believes eventually (^1^
culated,/iri thp, language of that Jaw, toiriiprove and increase the finances '
^of • the^Uriiom • .:• .•• • "[ ;,•/• ' ••- ••'/ ^: • - .'•;, >.:•:• ;- • .....: f-fi-- • . - 'r .
•
The report wilfnow proceed-tP'state the receipts arid expeiiditures of the
^as^ and present y^ars,^as feras kscertained,;and;an estimate of those for the^
•;year-ensuirig.v; ;.'/•-•,-''••; ^.••.::?:' • /.;..••••, ;••.;•
./-; •' ••'''. /.•-'•:/ ,.,•
The actuW receiptafrom^a
during the year 1827,^ amounted, as
-will bpiseen • in;d.ocument No. 2, to twenty-two mihion nine hundred arid
' sixty-six thousand three hundred and ^ ^ ^
^^^
,
whidh, w ^ the ^balance in the Treasury on the 1 st>of January >of that year|^
^^
cof sixniillion three hundred:^and fifty-eight thoiisalid six ii u n dr ed and eigh ty,, six'dollars. arid'' eighte^eh cents,, gives an aggregate of twenty-nine' rriilhoh
three/huridreaahdjwenty-fiYethousand and fifty dpllars and
. Ofthe s;im received as abpve, during 1827, the-customs yielded upwards of
nineteen .millions and, a half ahd the sales of the publiciands neariy one
, m i l l i p n ' W a y half. T h e expenditures of the United States, fc)r the sam^e
year, amounted to twenty-tw^o million six hundred and flfty-six-thousand
seyen.liundred^and sixty^four dollars and'fpur cents. Thesaiiiedocument
willsupp!y-aspeciflcationofthe.particulars,'andshow.abalai^^^^
sury.on tlie 1st of January^ 1828, :of six milhon six hundred and sixty-eiMit
thPusarid two hundred.and,,eighty-six doHars arid ten/berits. ' > " • • v. • • ••'
^
^ .^The^.actual receipts (iuririg the :first th'rOe quartersvof I82@f|Jdbcii^
No.
.3,) aie supposed to have amounted to eighteenri:iihibri'six. hund red/and thirsty-three thousancl five hundred and eighty dollai^-^hd^t^Phty-se^^
arid thosepf the fourth quarterritis supposed, will airipilht t^jfefe^^
hundred and sixty-one thoiisand two^himdred and e i p t y ^ h r e e ^
= .forty ;cents;,niaking the total receipts for 1828: t v ^ n l y ^ ^
ninety-four thousand eight huridred and sixty-tyte:^'dblai^ -^arid % ^
.werieents^; which, added^ to the.balarice-in the TreS&%' oythl^lstipf ;|anuaiy:,vas above ^stated,' gives xin .aggregate of thirty .million^seven ^hun>dred and sixty 4h ree, thou sandv one" hundred and forty-riine dollars arid
seventy^eveii cents, The expenditures t)f the'first three quarters: of :the'
year, (same document,) are Supposed to have amounted „to eighteeri million two hundred and forty-four thousand nine' liundred and seven dollarsl^ and' ^
ninety-:Oiie cerits-and those for the fourth quai^ter,:it is supposed, whi amotint
to ;seyeri niillioh three hundred and ninety-two thpusand six hundred and
three dollars and seventy-two cents; making, for the whole year, twenty-five
million sixhundredand thhty-sevpn thousand five huridred and elbvferi dollars^ and sixty-three .cents;/ This experidituTeincludes, as the items in the
documen'twill show, upwards of twelve millions on account of the debt; arid
will leave iri the, Treasury,^pn^he Istof Jariuar;^, li829, ah estimated balance
of five milliompnp huridred and twerity^five thousand six Hundred and thirtyeight dollars arid fburteeri; cents;/ • Thishalarice wilt be subject to the appropriations of hK)neysipr.^heseryice.xrf
as yet Beeri^^called



fifm

1828.]

SECRETARY -OF'THE TREASURY.

-449

•fpr,'a sum e^stimated at three million five hundred thousand dollars; and
-includes the one mihion ofdollars in funds not now effective, as heretofore
explained.
'. / ^
ESTIMilLTE ;0P' REVENUE AN.D EXPENDITUR-E .FOR 1829.

The gross amount of duties secured by custom-house borids, during the
first three quarters of the preserit year, is estimated at tw'enty-two million
nine hundred and ninety-seven thousand dollars ; arid the.amount that will
be secured, during the fourth quarter, at five mihions ; making an aggregate, for the-whole year, of twe nty-seven million nine hundred and ninetyseven thousand dollars. -The debentures for drawback of duty, issued
during the first three quarters, amounted to $2,962,584 55, and the amount
outstanding on the last day of the third quarter was $2,261,798 05, of
which $1,045,144 46 are chargeable upon the revenue of 1829. The amourit
ofbonds in suit at the close of the third quarter-was $4,624,278 76 ; which '
exceeds, by $487,466^° 11, the timount that was in suit'on the corresponding
day of 1827. "'^ '. ••
' '
. - : / , •/,,
•' ' -. fi /
Making the propei deductions on the foregoirig and other accounts froni
the gross amount of duties secured in 1828, the revenue to be received from
the customs in ,1829 maybe estimated at twenty-one million five hundred
thousand dollars; that from the sales ofthe public lands may be put down at
one million ; that from bank dividends at four hundred ahd ninety thousand dollars ; andthat from incidental sources at about'one'hundred and
fifty thousand dollars; makingatotal of twenty-three million one hundred .
and forty thousand dohars. The expenditures are estimated thus : For the
whole civil list, includhig miscellaneous objects, andthe ten miUions for the
debt, twelve miUion one hundred and sixty thousand dollars ; for the military establishments, and objects in connexion with them, five milliori and
sixty thousand ; and for the naval, four iniUion four hundred and twenty
thousand; making, in the whole, twenty-one million six hundred and
forty thousand dollars;- and giving an excess ofreceipts for the year 1829,
over its expenditure, of orie milhon five hundred thousand dollars.
The receipts for 1828 were estimated at twenty-two mihion three hun- ,
dred'thousand dollars ; but are hkely to amount, in point of fact, tp above
twenty-four milhons ofdollars. , The receipts for 1829 are esrimated, as is
seen above, at twenty-three milhon one hundred and forty thousand dollars. It has not been considered safe to place them, by any decided anhcipation, at a higher sum; yt^t there are appearances in the commercial and
political worid, which; in theii further development, may carry the actual
receipts of 1829 at least as far.above their estiniated amount as is likely to
be the case with those of 1828. If, for example, without alluding to other
contingencies, any continued or further activity in the demand for grain and
flour shoidd lead to heavier exportations of our produce than usual, within
a few inonths to come, there would of course be a reflow of heavier iniportations. The revehue of 1829 v/ould feel the effect of these, in increased
receipts; because, even urider the long credits allowed on duty bonds, a
porhon of the duties that accrue within the year are receivable within the
year. But such events as these, although fit, perhaps, to be incidentally
hinted at, are to be viewed with caution as the groundwork of any positive
financial calculations, and accordingly have not been adopted in that sens3
upon the present occasion.
.
VOL. II.—29



45.0

. REPORTS OF T H E

'

>
,

[1828.

Upon, the whole, in bringirig this report to a close, there is room for mirighng a feeling of congratulation to the national legislature, with the statements which it has exhibited. The receipts of the existing year, greater by
nearly two millions of dollars than had been foreseen, with a prospect of
income for the next scarcely less abundant; the receipts of /the last four
years .presenting a Jarge and gratifying excess over those df the four years
preceding; the foreign commerce of the country in a state of solid prpsperity, from the iniproving'condition of its leading departments of industry
;at honie, and, consequent increa:se in the exportation of its products; the
inci'ease.'of its-tonnage, that foundation of naval strength as wellas commercial riches, keeping pace with ;the inprease pf comnierce ;-the public
debt aiinually and'rapidly decreasing, under the application of surplus
furids annually and rapidly increasing ; the public revenue preserved atan
equal value in every part of the Urifon? thrpugh the power of transfers
•promptly made by the Bank of the United., States, without expense or risk
to the nation, and the'currency mairitained in a healthful state^by the sariie
institution :—such is. the great outline p f t h e financial;: and comriierci.al
conditioii ofthe country; a condition the result of good lawfe faithfulily
administered, iand of the aggregate industry of an.enterprising arid /ree
people./ V . ,
'
.
/^.
V
.
; All which is, respectfuily submitted.
v
• --,,. ^,':. \
;:
, ,.. • / , .
• ,V-RICHARD. RU^H. ;
' •;.' .,

. ,'

Becember 6, 1828. ^




; . '

.''.••

CO
QO

S T A T E M E N T exhibiting the amounl ofi duties whick'accrued on merchandise, tonnage, passports, arid clearances;
' ofi debentiires issued on fioreign Tnerchdndise exported ; ofi draiobacJc' on domestic distilled spirits and domestic refined
sugar, exported; ofi botinty on salted fish, exported; ofi alloivances io vessels emjiloyed in tke fis ker ies ; arid ofi expenses ofi collection, during.tke year ending, on.the 3\st day ofi December, 1827.
-~
Ul
Duties on
Year.

Merchandise.

Tonnage
and. light
money.

1827 S27,943,999 33 ^145,701 76




Passports and
clearances.,

Debentures
issued.

.Drawback on domestic .
refined sugar ^ Bounties and
allowances;
and domestic
distilled spirits.

Cl
Gross revenue.

Expenses of
coUection.

_, Net.t revenue.

^.
^

S13,114 00

i4,531,242 59

S17,;002 64

^215,064 75

^23,339,505 11 ^867,438 08- "^22,472,067 03

•

O
^

•

>
Ul
d
Kl

452

[1828.

REPORTS OF TFIE

A S T A T E M E N T exhibiting the values and quantities, respectively, ofi
merchandise on lokick duties aciually accrued during the year 1827,
{consisting ofi the diff^erence belween^ articles paying duty, imported,
and tkose entitled to draivback, re-exported fi) and, also, ofi ttie nett
revenue wkick accrued tkat year, firom duties on merckandise, tonnage,
passports, and clearances.
MERCHANDISE PAYING DUTIES AD VALOREM.

1,853 dollars, at 12 per cent,
2,023,963 dollars, at 12§ per cent,
3,700,544 dollars, at 15 per/cent,
7j242,123 dollars', at 20 per cent,
25,-139,978 dollars, at 25 per cent,
1,989,754 dollars, at 30 per cent,
6,-929,166 dollars, at 33^ per cent,
4,396^ dollars, at 35 per cent,
78,639 dollars, at 40 per cent,
442,387 dollars, at 50 per cent.

S222 36
- 252,995.38
- 555,08160.
^ 1,448,424 60
- 6,284,994 50
- 596,926 20
r 2,309,722.00
1,538 60
31,455 60
- 221,193 50

47,552,803 dollars

S.tl,702,554 34 , Sil,702,554 34'
DUTIES ON SPECIFIC ARTICLES.

i. Wines,
2,989,760
2; Spirits,
3,465,302
Molasses, 13,127,933
3. Teas,
5,372,956
Coffee,
31,895,217
4. Sugar,
55,123,515
5. .Salt,
3,431,163
6. All other articles -

gallons, average 23.68 ctS;
gallons, average 44.66 cts.
gallons, at
5'• cts.
pounds, average 33.52 cts.
pounds, at
5 cts.
pounds, average 3.05 cts.
bushels,at
20 cts.
-

- S707,994 95- 1,547,769 34
656,396 65
- 1,800,849 19
- 1,594,760 85
- .1., 681,850 47
686,232 60
- 2,674,494 36
11,350,348 41

Deduct duties refunded, after deducting therefrom duties on merchandise,
the'particulars of which could not be ascertained, and difference in cal,. cuiation
- / • _
Add' 2 | per cent, retained on drawback
""- ,
10 per cent extra duty on foreign vessels
Discriminating duty on French vessels J
Interest on custom-house bonds
Storage receiyed
.
.,
-

23,052,902 75
20,559 02
23,032,343 73

$123,106 79
28,461 07
591 54
10,904 28
'2,284 58
165,348 26

Duties on merchandise
Duties on tonnage - Light money -

23,197,691 d^^
S129,488 37
. 16,213 39
145,701 76
13J14 GO

Passports and clearances^
Deduct drawback on domestic refined sugar
drawback on doniestic distilled'spirits

Sll,168 28
5,834 36

23,356,507 75
17,002 64

Gross revenue
Expenses of fcollecticn




Nett revenue, (A)

23,339,505 11
867,438 08
P2,472,C67 03

453

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

1828.]

Explanatory Statements and Notes..
1. Wines—Madeira
Burgundy and Champagne
Sherry and St. Lucar Lisbon, Oporto, &c. -•
Teneriffe, Fayal,-&c.
Claret, &c.-bottled
All other

-

•

-

'

2,989,760
2. Spirits—Grain

, - 1st proof
2d do.
3d do.
4th do.
5lh do.
Other materials, 1st and 2d do.
'3d do.
4th do. '
5th do.
Above 5th. do.

^

•

-

-,
-

fi

3. Teas—Bohea \- '
. Souchong
Hyson skin, &c. Hyson and young hysoii
Imperial '
- .

S116,584 00
26,011 00
8,912 40
99,489 50
75,284'80
29,890 50
351,822 75

116,584 gallons, at 100 cents
26,011 do.
100 do.
. 14,854 • do.
60 do.
198,979 do.
• 50 do.
188,212 do. 40' do.
99,635 do.
30 do.
•2,345,485 do.

582,342
6,254
59,022
4,506
36,032
-398,288
768;076
1,600,429
10,122
231

'244,583 64
2,8r4 30
28,330 56
2,343 12
21,619 20
15-1,349.44
322,591 92
768,205 92
5,769 54
> 161 70

42 do.
45 do.
,48 do'
52 do.
60 do.
. 38 do.
' 42. do.
48 do.
, 57 -do.
70 do.

do.
do.
do.
do.
do:
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.

707,994 95

3,465,302

,-

1,547,769 34

18,682 1pounds, at 12 cents
1,562,349 do.
25 do.
1,107,975 do.
28 do.
2,452,241 do.
40 do. 231,709 do.
50 do.

2,241
390,587
, 310,233
980,896
115,584

8^
25
00
40
50

<5,372,956'
Add extra duty on teas impor ed
from other places than Chi aa

1,036 20

/
4. Sugar—Brown
White

,- '

52,309,013.
2,814,502

1,800,849 19
3 do.
4 do.

do.
do.




1,569,270-39
112,580 08
1,681,850 47

55,123,515
5. Salt—Imported
- ,
Exported,
bushels 71, 791
Bounties and allowances
reduced into bushels, at
20 cents
1,075,324

\

4,578,278 bushels. at 20 cents'

915,655 60

1,147,115

2^9,423 00

3,431,163

do.

'

20 do.

686,232 60

454

REPORTS OF THE .:

[1828.

Explanatory Statements and Notes—Continued.

6. All other articles.

Gtuantity.

\ - yards
Carpeting, Brussels,-Wilton, &c.
,- , ^ ' '' Venetian
-' .
do.
all other
da
Cotton bagging , - .
do.
Vinegar . .
- gallons
Beer, ale, and porter, in bottles ', do.
• do.
[ • V in casks "-• ^ do.
Oil—spermaceti • ^
-' ^
whale
-.
do.
olive.
- -^ , 'do.
.ca,stor' ,. - /
-. „
- ' do.
Irnseed
- \
- •
do.
• • hempseed - , - .
do.
Cocoa
- '
•
- pounds
Chocolate
.: .
do.
Sugar—candy
do.
... 'loaY
- _ - .
- ",
do.
other refilled
.. do.
Fruits—almonds
/, - . • . '
do.
currants
- /
-.
' •do.
prunes and plums • - .
do.
- .
figs"
-, •'• - .' ' do.
raisins, jar
-'
-'
.
:• .^
do.
other
- / ' ,do.
Candles—tallow - . , do.
wax -"
.- ' ,
.
do.
• ^/
spermaceti
- . do.'
Cheese - " do.
Soap
do.
Tallow - '
- • .- '
do.
Lard
" - ., . - ' ,
do.
Beef and pork
-"
'
•-•
do.,'
Hams, and other bacon -.
. do. ^
Biitter
- ' .:
• ...
do.
Refined saltpetre ' .
- . 'i
do.
Vitriol/blue or Roman , - - ^ do.
bil of
v-^
- ' do.
-Camphor, crude - ' do.
refined .
,- '
do.
Salts, Epsona
do.
Glauber
..
do. ,
Spices—Cayenne pepper
' .do.
., ginger * • • do.
nutmegs
— do.
cloves 'do.
pepper. • - ' do. 1
' pimento - ; do.
Snuff
.
.
.
.
.
. do.
Indigo • . do.
Cotton
do.
Gunpowder
-.
. do.'
Bristles - •,
do.
Glue
do.
Paints—ochre, dry
do.
in oil
- .do.
white and red lead
do..
whiting , _
do.
Lead—pig, bar, and sheet
, do.
Cables, tarred
, do.

77,082
• • 676,088
9,922
4,376,701
' 33,403
90,296
7,465
1
' '' • 157
85,0,24
100
- 37,816
43
326,735
2,581
272
w 347
61
457,147
97,362
249,908
1,136,728
2,659,731
2,663,619
44,431
415
301
77,176
•216,108
1,042,643
30
208,168
4,454
2,882
27
56
900
"• 30,446
1
1,610.
. 78
514
304,670
" 21,788.
38,020
389 ,'718
614,676
503
450,791
"42,292
59,351
275,557
1,583,
1,052,558
13,490
1,807,179
657,218
4,403,014,
- 24,142




Rate
of
duty.
Cents.
50
25
20
3|
< 8
.20
15
25
15
25 '
,- 40
25
25
2
4"
12
12
10
3
3
3
•4
3
5
' 6
•8
9
4
1
3
2
3
5
3
4
3
8'
12
4
. 215
2
6025
8
^ 6
12
15
3
8
3
5
.1
U
4
1
2
4'

1828;]

.SECRETARY'OF THE TREASURY.. .

Am-

"^^PlmmoryMatemerUsandNxrtes-Gon^

.

' <>V^age—tarred
'-, ..-,r..
• - .:
untarred '
- - , --' .,
Twine—untarred, varn' > ' ' • C o r k s . .. • ^--f-^- . . : J y fi- •
Copper—rods and bolts. .- " .nails and spike? ,. .Fire-arms—rifies
-• ,
- '
iron and steel wire, not above No. 18
• ^
above No. 18
'taeks, not above 16 oz. per M.
above 16 oz. per M. nails .
- " •- . ^ -' •
.
spikes
-.V chain cables • .
,' mill saws - •
'an<ihors
- •
-"anvils
,• - .-.
• • hammers and sledges
'. -castings, vessels of - " , -other
. - ..
rp.und OP brazier's rods,, ' nail and spike rods •
. -,
sheet and hoop . - ' ; ^
slit and„ rolled
• • pig - "- "-, .- • bar, rolled -.",.hammered - ^ '^
,.«teel
-•
Hemp
^'Alum
•-". .. Copperas . . .
Wheat flour , €oal

-

'

-

-

•--'•••

• •

Wheat
- '
Oats
- ,
- .
- • ..
Potatoes .
- •
Paper—folio and 4to post
printing
Books printed".previous to 1775, - .- , ' , _
in. other languages
Latin or Greek,, bound • .' not.bound
all other, bound - , . , . '
;. not bound '^ '^
Glass^-cut, and-not specified \ - :
/
^ ,ail other articles of
. apothecaries' vials, "not above 4 oz.
bottleSj not above! quart
/. 1 gallon
.demijohns
" , .- .
, '
window, not above 8 by 10
10 bv 12
above 10 by 12
• '
/•
' uncut, in plates ,
Eish—dried or smoked'•'-,
, pickled, salmon -'
mackerel
, all other -- : -




^^oz.

Ce7its.\
- pounds
do.
.' - . do.
do.
do.
do.
- No.
- pounds
do.

-/ 4o.

do.
do.
do.
- . do.
No.'
' - pounds
do.
- . - do. - . : do.
: - •

do.

- '. do.
do:
, do.
do.
- / cwt-;
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
-do.
- bushels
-:
do. ^
- • do.
do: '
-'pounds
do.
do.
• -do.
-

• do".
•

392,911
74,618
334,177
173,682
5,616
2,392
.11
613,635
' 2.58,426
24,133
, 4,271
600,151
57,384
435,505
1,464
.35',722 I
1,178,686
.56;757
627,847
. 489,381
. 680,366
11,555
5,049,059
201,334
26,086
170,146
536,936
25,503
119,354

2,929
32
1,077,.536
1,180
... :773
38,102
a2,994
• 852
938
90,899
2 ,,455

-

do.

• - • 3.,1§2

T

., d o .

12,982
59,304
•- 28 ,.832
1,344,263
, 7,164
1,074
.29,759^
/ / 36
52,534
964
456
4,114
633
583
924
39
174

- -do.
do:.
- , do.
- gro'ss
- - do.
do.
- .. , do.
db.
100 sq. ft.,
do.'
do.
- quintals
- barrels
do;
do.

„. s$15,716.44.
.
3^730 90
" 16,708-.85
• "20,841 84. /
224.64
• 95 68
27 50
'
30,681 7 5 .
23,258 34
1,206 65
213 55
30,007 55.
2,295 36
^ 13,065 15
1,464 00
. 714 44
23,573 72
1,418 92
9,417 71
4,893 81
.20,410 98'
346 65
151,471 77
6,040 02
13,043 00
255,219 00
483,242 40
25,503 00
208,869 50
210 00
5,858 G
O
16 00
64,652 16
295 00
77.30
'3,810 20
•' 2,598 80
. 85 20.'
37 52
3,635 96
368-25
413 66
^ 3,894 60
15,419 04
864 96
26,885 26 .
7,164 00
1,342 50
'59,518 00
108 00
13,133 50
• 2,892 00
1,596.00
16,456 00
• 2,532 00
583 00
1,848 00
58 50
174 00

, ,

45.6,

[1828,

'REPORTS O F THE,, • ,•,:

Explanatory Statements and Notes—Continuei.
• "•

-

/

•

".

' •

V '

^ ,

••'

•

•

•

Rate•-(Quantity. rs of /
duty.

^

• .6.. All other'articles—coniinued. •
,

. . ^

'

•

,

:

•

.

•

•

,

.

.

.

.

-

. •

•

.

•

"

-

.

J

.

Duties.

.,

•

: "

<-.

••

•

Cents.Shofesah.d: slippers-—silk",/ •- • ' - '
':- ^"pairs. ^ ••..-l.,..367-. 30
/,• •' . . '- . pruiielle, ;
^
- ,.
- ' •. do. ., / . 1,447 • 25.^
/V "/•• . - '
leather'' . - .do. .
3.123 •••25
; ^^ ^ '•
.:/-^!-children's
' - - ^ - . , r ' do,:i,22o- 15
Boots a;nd bootees- , - . - / . - '
- ^
^
-,
-do.. -.•••- 2 7 4 - 150. .Segars- .[ ' : -. /,;-• ;:.;^^.-', /',. - - . - '
M : , ' • .•13-,960. 250-,
' / : • :

• ' ; , ; - •

• ; • / -

"

: ;

•

•

-

,

.

,

'

'

,

.

"

•

^;
• . ' . /Deduct excess of exportation over importatieir:
Mace'-;- " ' - • - - • „ • 718 pouncls, at 100 cents
Cinnamon
'. -'
— ,' 11,676 pounds, at 25 cents
Cassid",.''" - , ' .-- 126,248 pounds, a t , 6 cents .
Tobaccb; manufactiired
- - : ,13,372-pounds, at, 10. cents
Shor:•' - - V ; - .: \ -'
5,957 pounds, at 31 cents
.Muskets'- r . - / - , '.„ - .8,602-each' ^
150 cents
Paper—foolscap
'-•/'43,890 pounds, at 17 cents "
. • ~ . sheathing
- . . ' - ' 1,662 pounds^; at ,3, cents,
-other -.
- - , 6,953'pounds, at ISiCents' "
BottieSj^noc over^quarts- •
7 gross, ' at 250^cents
Playing cards
• .-;
4,389 packs, at 30 cents
-

•

•

•

-,^ ,;

.

•••

'

,

'^' \

•

-,

: • , . :

•

'

•

-

•

..••

•_

'

-••

•

;

•

•

•

.

c

.

-

^

-

'

- ,

; . • • • •

'

•

"

-

'

-

2,710,043 25

/

'
•.-: .- $718>00. y 2,919 00
- -, -7,574 88
- '-^ 1,337-20
, -;•
208 50
- 12,903 00
- 7,461-30
49 86
- 1,042 95
17 50
- 1,316 70

.'./ -^—.

.

Carried to statement B

. ^

'

• • pio.'-ro
• -361 75— 780'75'
.
168. 00
• . /411..0O
• 34,900,, O
O

• ' 1

/

•

.•

•

'

/

'

•35,548-89'

.^_
'

•

/ '

2,674,494 36

'

•

:

.

/

,

S T A T E M E N . T exMbiting the amount bfi Amei'ican and foreign tori• riage emptoyed in the fioreign trade ofi. tke United States during the
' year ending ori the 31st day ofi Dece'mbe7\ 1827.
<
- • Tons 900,198
- • .,.,-- 151,875.;

jimeriean tonnage in for.eign trade ,
Foreign tonnage in foreign trade ;

Tofel tonna^*e employed in the foreign trade of the United" ;
':States\--\ . ; - - / . .;• -•" -, • -.
- • • .•^.^'//.•.-••. • .1,052,074
Froportion of fbreign tonnage to the whole amount of tonnage employed in the foreign trade of the United States
TREASURY'DEF.X'VRTM'ENT,

•".

14.4 to 100
;.-.

.

-

'

'

Register's Office, December 8, 1828.,
".
.
'
;"•:..."
' . •• JOSEPH.NOURSE, :i?^i5^€?v




D.

oo

S T A T E M E N T ofi the sales ofi 2niblic lands, and ofi tke receipts into ike land ofiices, arid payments into the Treasury
on accourit thereofi; showing., also, ihe .expenses incidental to the .same, during theyear ending the 31st day ofi
D.ecember, 1827.
.
" >
.
Nett amount of Purchase money. Amount received . Aggregate reunder the credit
ceipts.
lands sold.
system.

Incidental
ex- Payments, by repenses, salaries, ceivers into the
commissions.
.Treasury.

.Land offices.

-'
Marietta '
Zanesville
*
Steubenville . . '
Chillicothe
Cincinnati
- .
Wooster
Piqua Tiffin Jeffersonville Vincennes
Crawfordsville
Indianapolis Fort Wayne Shawneeto\vn Kaskaskia '- Edwardsville -. ,,
Vandalia
Palestine
- .
Springfield
St. Louis : •
Franklin . - , •Jackson
Palmyra
. Lexington
St. Stephen's .

'

-

-

-

-

.- .
-- .
.
.
.
,. . .
- .
- •
-.
. -.
. . .
- .
-- - /
-"
_
.^ . _
.
.
-




Acres.

7,524.51
29,810.69
25,003.98
10,285.96
24,389.00
- 17,030.89
2,45,1.54
34,506.74
14,095.16
' 14,017.71
113,341.85
•66,024.24
2,212.25
3,,340.57
2,2.56.54
8,398.-66
1,743:64
9,466.69
33,398.97
27,040.41
62,798.02
3,724.67
26,127.07
35,380.36
6,257.28

Dolls. Cts.

Dolls. Cts.

.Dolls. Cts.

9,405-^61
5,614 39
39,937 15
28,209 69
. 31,254 96
19,762 80
12,8.57 41
15,572 44
30,486 2551,233 64
21,307 81
. 22,058 79
" 3,064 44 43,808 65
_
17,618 89
26,895 76
17,522 18"
23,194 07
141,917 79
_
83,141 45 '
_2,765 31
3,779 56 ^
. 2,08560
2,88115
975 60
10,498 33
359 19
2,179 54
_.
12,096 57
.. , 1
41,759 49.
_
33,801 26
10,434 Ib^ 82,981 20
i s , 754 21
„
.•
4,655 82 '
33,216 74
^
44,459 06
_
>
7,839 66
1,584 00

'

.

15,020 00
68,146 84
51,017 76
28,459 85
81,719 89
43,366 60
3,064 44 ^
43,808 65
44,514 65
40,716 25
141,917 79
83,141 45
2,765-31
5,865.16
3,856 75
10,857 52 '
2,179 54
^ 12,096 5741,759 49
-44,235 36
96,735 41
• 4,6.55 82- 33,216 74
44,459 06
9,423 66

Ul

a
'^

Kl

Dolls. Cts.
2,515
3,277
3,995
2,994
5,512
3,563
1,047
2,436
- "5.,245
2,200
4,265
3,870
1,170
2,734
~3,-724
.1,924
r,296
1,434
2,572
3.743
•5',493
1,334
1,785
1,596
4,334

GO

37
68
01
31
65
95
49
81
08
45
38
46
94
46
15
78
13
68
43
14
93
62
64
12.
07

Dolls. Cts.
12,570 80
61,864 91
42,539 01
29,000 80
76,283 97
39,658 15
3,487 39
40,700 31
39,360 92
37,860 53
152,158 .34
113,067 29
1,440 00
• 3,986 07
76- 56
^ - 7,633 47
^ I 505 00
8,415 21
30,101 21
28,654 60
107,137 91
3,250 00
16,65500
32,644 01
8,336 44

o
-3
W

Ul

ox

S t A ' T E M E N T 0--CQntinu-ed:
00.
'

:

•

.

•

•

.

"

'

-

•

.

•

•'

,

,

.

•

/

.

,

.

.

^

.

•

:

-

•

-

,"•- /

•:, / \ f i - i

'

.

•

_

•

•

.

Nett amount of- -Purchase-money. •Amount received ' A g g r e g a t e relands sold. •
u n d e r the.credit
ceipts: ^
system. • ' ".-

.

.•~i

.

•;• '

':

LittleRock

-

.Batesville.
Tallahassee

- - .
^
- .^ /
fifi

•

•

-

-.
•
•

.

•, _ -

.

.

- •
-

• - " • •

'.

'^ '.

- ..
- -

^

•

'

.

•

_

.

.

-

'

^

-

-

. '

• A'cres'.-^ - •.
-

•

Totals

.

.

•

.

,

:I)olls.:Cts,

48,l4d-.-38
60,170 44
4,797.04
, 5,996 28
15,189.71
. 1 8 , 9 8 7 56
23,694.53
30,563 37
^ .
7,326.83
',•9; 158 52
-'
53,022.83
67,509 87
399.85
"• . 499 82^
• - . . T o w n lots.
/> 134,451 00
1,971.23
-2,464 03
- :;
- 4,504.22
5;630 26
.- . 34,8,05.4543,542 11
7,604.60
9,573 36
-/ ^
• - . .
-•
.
.1-i 8 9 0 . 1 7 . -' •• ^-2,362 72
-^
-.%165.81
2;7.07-26
- .
. 140,587.. 71 • ^ ^ 1 8 9 , 1 8 2 48
~ _-

.

,

" " • '

Landbffices..,

.Cahaba^ " -: - , Huiits v i l l e '
^
Tuscalo'osa' ^ " • SjDarta ,-'
' .
Washington . M o u n t Sal us. - • - - '
AiigLista
-_.
.N e w O r l e a n s -.
- •,.
Opelousas:.
Ouachita -.
.Detroit-^-'
.- "
Monroe '
'- ,

fi

•

936,727.76

1,318,006 36

•

,

29,478.0015,324 48

._-',.
. • ' - _ '

'

•

/

.

_ - •
_

. -

•4,177 38•

"

,

.

4 , 1 2 2 94

_'
- .
_ ^
' ^ -—,
*
.

- : • : .

..

•

313,132 3 7

,- '
^'

^ ' 0:otts: Cts.-\ / - " B oils:'Cts.'

.:
/-•

Dolls. Cts.'.

89,648 44^
21,320; 7 6 /
•-18,987-56 •
50,563 37
•47; 453 8 1 '
,67,509.87
^ „'499 82
. 134,451 00
^
6,641 41
^5,630 26.
'
47,635 05
-9,573 36
\ . ' • -:2,"362^72, 2,707--2.6
189,182 48 f

fi^lO-55
•-:
• 8^', 654-92
23,^650 00
4,679 86 . ;
11,691 00
1,960 07
r , 354 0 2 ,
•
- .
43,600 00
4,B"5 15
45,395 16
3 , 3 3 2 61
• •"476-49-- ,
' 4 , 3 1 6 93
115,538,91
1,350 4 3
5,004.17
1,633 02
.46,313 70
3,341 41 .
• 12,887 09'
1,796 09
-25 00
^
1,463 28 ^ -. "
5,201 00
1,695 51 •
205,596 50
7,936 30

.1,631,138 7 3 .

• -121,281,; 45 ; • ' 1-, 495,845.26

.

38,295 2 9
X

'

, .

Dolls." Cts.-

• -

:, • -

-

Mncideiital „ex-- PaymentSvby r e , penses, salaries, ; cei vers into the
commissibris.^
', Treasury./^:

m
•

^

d
Ul-

6
S"

Note.—The " incidental expeiises'' in the foregoing statement are greatly increased, ini^consequence of the operation of the-act pf ^May.-22, 4826, providing
for the allowance, to registers and receivers, of the ainoTint of clerk hire ihcurred in the execution, of the la-vvs for the relief of p.urehasers of public .lands,
passed in the years 1821, 1822, and 1823; and allowing the one-half of one per^cent. on the payments made-by relinquishments and discounts,, allowed under
those .laws; and, also, in consequence of alTowances made to receivers for depositing public-moneys, smce 2lp'i^'26,-1818, in pursuance of the provisions of
an act. to that-effect, passed May 22, 1826,
.
..
•
'
TREASURY.DEMRTMENTJ




GenerafiLand Office, .November^22, A828.
^ G^^OUGE; '(mmMlfieommiissiomr.

CO
CD

182-8.]

459

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

S T A T E M E N T of the sales of public lands, and of the receipts, into
\he land offces on account thereof and .of the expenses incidental to
the same, from, the \st of January, 1828, to the 20th of June folloiving.
^
^

Nett amount
of lands sold.

Land offices.

^
' •

Marietta
,Zanesville Steubenville •Chillicothe .- ,^
•Cincinnati Wooster
Piqua
Tiffin
Jeffersonville
Vincennes Crawfordsville
Indian apblis ,
Fort Wayne Shawneetown
Kaskaskia Ed,wa-rdsville -.
Vandalia
Palestine
Springfield St. Louis
-'
Franklin
.'Jackson
Palmyra
Lexington l '
St. Stephen's Cahaba
Huntsville Tuscaloosa Washington Mount Salus
Augusta
New Orleans
Opelou.sas Ouachita
•Detroit
Monroe
Little Rock Batesville Tallahasse -

,

'

-•
.
- ^
-

-

-•
-,
- '
- ,
•

Purchase • Amount Aggregate
money.
"received ' receipts.
underlhe
cre.dit system. /

Incidental
expenses,
salaries.
and commissions.

Acres.
3,445.66 $4,307 07 ^149 15
16,255.62
20,169 42
955 01
12,520.02
15,650 01
6,685.91'
8,357 38'
'183 92
10,616.36
13,270 45
-. ' - 5,867.64
7,334,54
373.36
466 70
15,600.87
19,501 08
5,059.52
6,324 40 • 44 12
^8,786.74
10,983 45.
200 00^
•52,851.77
66,054 74
23,935.33
29,919 09
_/
80.00
100 00
1,734.05
2,18.5 45 r
1,356.17
1,695 23
184 93
7,133.23
8,916 5'5
1,108.04
1,385 05
6,188.94 , 7,736 17
12,502.41 . 15,628 01
^_
,11,972.71
14,9.65 94
16,693.57
20,867 01 ,121^25
..
1,803.58
2,354 44
11,474.85
14,343 60
10,052.99 12,566 28
5,248.72
6,560 99
27 76
29,710.01
37,137 81
44 95
801.76
1,002 20
3,472.90
4,341 69
.1,357.22
1,696 50 • 808 60
20,795.8.2
25,994 .58
._
55,3.40
69174
_

/S4,456 2.2- • . $588 -51
21,124.43
1,160 84
15,650 01
981 48
' 8,541 3b • .776 58'
13,270.45
2.; 275 95
/ 7,334. 54
751 71
466 70
509 76
19,50r08
952 ^86
- 6,368 52
• 802 71
,11,18,3 45
6,677 23
6'6,054 74
2,411 07
29,919 09
1,019 53
^ 100 00
506 05
2,185 45
1,756 74
1,880 16,
858 86
8,916 55
663 12
1,385 05604 81
- 7,736 17
. -725 33
15,628 01
.814 21
14,965 94
^ 761 97
20,988 26;
-919 60
. 2,354 44
, 603 73
14,343 .60
767 19
12;566 28
1,335 24
. 6,588 75 ' 1,191 25
37,182 76
1,466 91
1,002 20
3,674 75
4,341 69
695 2L
'2,505 10- V 596,71
•25,994 58,
927 19
i591. 74
• 541-68
2,344 43
_- ,
^Ol. 85
1,.598 64
557 55
•2,239 01
731 69
_
13,723 42' 2,690 09
._
976 10
_ - • 3,923 04
417 50
539 06
_
312 26
470 78
_
22 ,'493 57
1,123 66
'"

_

.

.

•

•

- - -

- .

_

1,195.04^
1,791.21
10,978.70
3,138.44
334.00
249.81
• 17,873.38

'

341,599.75

,1,493
2,239
13,723
3,923
417
312
22,493

79
01
42
04
50
26
57

427,110 16

47,752 14

429,934 70

2,824 54

NOTE.—The causes of the aniount of incidental expenses being sq .large will be found fully,
explained in the note appended to the statemeni for the year 1827. • "
,
^
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

'

.

General Land Ofiice, Nov. 22,1828.' \ ^ '
, ^/,
' •
, '.GiEO. GRAHAM, . .
. Commissioner ofi the General Land Offiice. -




46ft':

' REPORTS- O E T H E • ;, :•;••. •
- ; ' •

; • -

.

. . .

' : ,

E

.

•

.

' "

.

/ .

• • . \ .

"

[1828,
,

' , ' • • • : • • • : /

. . .

S T A T E J M E N T .ofi moneys received into the Treasiiry, firoin all sources
other than customs and public lands, during tke year 1827.
Dividends on stock in |he Bank ofthe UnitedStates . - .14^0,000 GOr
From arrears of direct tax.- ) ",$2,626 90
.
new internal revenue - ./ ,-.: , I9j885 68 - ^
fees on letters patent,10,560 00
' / > ^
cents coined at,the mint
-< . 22,030, 32
, postage of letters
. 1
- ;
10100 .
,-' •
.fines; penalties and forfeitures
157 45
. .
surplus.emoluments of ofiicers of the
•
:: • ^
^--'V \ Q u s t o m s ^ l . , ' / , ; > , / •• - .;• • '-"';-•^8,132 83^-, • ^^ ''•-':fi^f .•'
^
'
' intereston balances due by,banks to
/ :
/
.
'
VtheUnited States -^^^'>^^
6,000 00:
--,'[."
".' ; nett proceeds of vessels condemned
/
/
.,.
,:^ under the slave-trade acts - '
- ' 10,841 79
.
.a person unknown, stated;to be oil : , '
;
:
- \ ',? , account of imports and tonhage - ^'
. 6 00
v/ '
. / moneys previously advanced, on ac- , '
.'
:
Godiit pf treaty with Spain^
, 8 5 00
100,429'97
Balances of advances made in the War Department, repdid under.the 3d section of the act of 1st May, 1820 - " 32,845 44
Moneys received froni Great Britain, under the convention^
of 13th November, 1826, for slaves and other property ^ y
taken during the late war
-;
- '1,204,960 00
$1,758,235 41
•TREASURY'D,EPARTME-NT,'.. • ' ' ,. /

"'\ :

' ' Register's Office, Decemher 4t, 1828. fi ' '
,• /•
•; .V, ^;. :• / • , . • ; : ;
• ^-^ J O S . E T H . N O U R S E , .ge^/ii^^r.

•••;

,:,';•

'•'.;•;;:

V

' . ' '

•'•

,

• • • : - : ' •

F .

.

'^

'

fi

•

•

•.

•

;

- . . ,

STA T E M E N T of tke expenditrires ofi tke United States, fior the year
fi
,

:.

'

...

/ i

. . '•• ^ ; i 8 2 7 .

,....•.••

-'••

•

CIVIL, MISCELLANEOUS, AND DIRLOMATIC, V I Z ;

.•••.•'••
:

-Legislature' , -',- ' •'./-;-^ .-• •-- -.; , -':.|42i,965'35 •• : „;• ^ -/^
"
Executive departments
,- 501,793 05
Officers of the mint ^
,
/ ;j,600>G0 \
,. :
Surveying department
-\
fi
-.: 25,176 93
Commissioner of the Fublic Buildings
- , 1,695 06
:
Governments in the Territories oC the United
' -States: - - • • ' - . - •
• . •;•, > ' \ •;..••-,- 42,462^27 '
\.
•Judiciary - " "v^-. , , ^ . ^ • ..' - /225,448 4 8 . ' ^ ;^ . '
^
. ' • , -^ • .
•—^.
. ^ ^ $1,228,141 04

m^

1823.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

461

Annuities and grants
$2,000'00. •
x^lint establishment ..
40,588 86.
Unclaimed merchandise , - ,
247 64
Light-house establishment -•
- .324^859 78
Surveys of public lands.
- .53,718 15 /
Registers and receivers of land offices
,3,25!5, 14
Preservation of the public archives in Florida
1,62'5 00 - .
Land claims in Florida Territory
- ';\ 2,971.24
Land claims in St. Helena land district . 1,502 78
Roads within the State of Ohio
'7,390 '91
Roads within the State of Indiana ^7,352 54 ' ' -..
Roads, canals, &c. within the State of Alabama
6^540 36
Roads, canals, &c. within the State of Missouri
1,981'45
Roads, canals, (fcc. within the State of Mississippi
4,717 11
Repairing the post road between Chatahoochie
and Line creek, Alabama 6,000 00,
Marine hospital establishment
89,137 42
" Public buildings in Washington
- '
. - 175,727 35 . '•
Payment of balances to collectors of new in- , .
, ' ;.,
ternal revenue
••
. - .
- / 2,637 13
Appropriation of prize mpney
2,202 50- \ . ,
Stock in the Louisville and Portland Canal
.
• ,
Company30,000 00 ,
Payment of claims for property lost, &c.
608 75
' • •
Paymentof claims for buildings destroyed • 8,134 7 4 /
Miscellaneousexpenses.
- '
'"52,923 82
3,123 67
Diplomatic department
- ' 117,126 55
Mission to the Congress of Panama - .
17,953 /52
Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse - • 36.''248 63
Reliefand protection of American seamen 30,617 68.
Prize causes
•
-/ ^ 4,000 00
Treaties with Mediterranean powers
26,505 54
Treaty of Ghent (6th and 7th artiqles)
- . 1 1 , 7 6 5 06
Treaty of Ghent (1st article)
^ :
13,706 44
Payment of claims under the 9th article of the
-treaty with Spain - ^
824/00
Claims on Spain , 1,817.72
Awards under the first article of the treaty of
^
Ghent
.- 398,646 73
659,211 87
2,713,476 58
MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT.

Pay of the army
Subsistence , - '
.
Forage
.
.
Quartermaster's department Arrearages of the army
Bounties and premiums
Purchasing department
Purchase of wo^ollens for 1828



.
.
. ,-

- , 990,004 21
. 226,556 41
.
44,519 26
- 32.6,889 48
12,387 24
14,092 16
- 228,967 08
20,000 00

462

REPORTS ; 0 F T H E

$11,600 54
Expenses of recruiting , - > - . .
Ordnance V ' - 24,733 52
Arming and equipping the militia ^ 199,397 59
Armories
" - '^
• -, • , - 366',047- 27
32,564 96
Arseiials
-.' • .
,. Arsenal at Vergennes - -:; , 8,600 00
Arsenal at Augusta, Maine
- . -'•:^- • -' -,
4,581 60
Arsenal at Augusta, Georgia - '
- 32,S86 69
Arsenal at St. Louis .,^ - 15,000 00
28,023 84
Hospital department - - .,
Contingencies of thei army
8,223 66
Repairs andcontingeiricies of .fortifications
22,906 23
Fort Monroe ' - - . 87,396.97
Fort Calhoun -.
- . - / . 56,817.24
106,801 47
Fort Adams - •
-. '
- .
Fort Hamilton
,' -,
- '66,784 09
90,144 7SFort Jackson .-. '
Fort at Cape Fear, North Carolina
' - 29,930 0 0
49,464 42
"Fort Macon, at Beaufort, North Carohna
40,000 '00
F,6rt at Bienvenue
- .
Fort at Mobile Point" - ^' / - 72,951 46
33,670 71
Fort at Rigolets
~
. 63,413 09
Armament of new fortifications
48,242.44
Surveys, &c. of roads and canals . Continuation of the Curnberlaiid road -^
- 163,720 OO
Preservation and repairs of the Cumberland
25,51:0 00
road -'.. : . 2,065 00
Road from Memphis to Little Rock -2,000,00
Road froni Little Rock to Cantonment Gibson
Road from Fort Smith l o Fort Towspn' ' 2,000 00
5,916 00
Road from Colerain to Tampa bay.
Old King's road from the Georgia line ^(by St.
Augustine) to New Smyrna
5,000 00
Road from Detroit lo Ghicago
20,000 00
26.716 0 0
Improving the Ohio arid Mississippi rivers
9,000 00
Improving the na;vigation of the Ohio river Improving Hyannis harbor, Massachusetts
1.000 00
Improving Cleavelaiid harbor, Ohio 4;500, 00
Improving Pascagoula harbor, Mississippi river
8,000 00
Deepening the harbor df Presque Isle
5,484' 81
Deepening the harbor'at Sackett's Harbor
3,000 00
.Preservation of islands in Boston harbor
9,115 27
Repairs'df Plymouth beach . 2,184 90
Removing obstructions in Huron creek, Ohio 3,500 00
Removing obstructions in Cunningham creek 0 .
1,000 00
Removing obstructions in Ashtabula creek, O. - 10,915 18
4,620 00
Removing obstriictidiis in Grand river, Ohio Removing obstructionb in-Mobile harbor, Alai.
,5,605 78
Removing obstructions in Saugatuck river, Me.
1,5.00 06
Building piers on ;Steel's Ledge, Belfast, Maine
.4.0{) OO:
Building piers at New Castle,. Delaware
2,0:00 dt)
Building piers^at Buifalo cree.k. New York .5,060 00:



[1828.

1828.] '

SECRETARY ^ OF T H E TREASURY.

Piers, beacons, (fee. in the harbor of Saco, Maine $4,450 00,
Piers at the mouth of Oswego harbor. New York - '6,010 39 Piers atthe mouth of Dunkirk^iarbor, New York
3,000 Q
O
Piers at Laplaisance bay, Michigan
1,000 00.
Examinins: piers^ at Porf Penn, Marcus Hook, and
.FortMiffiin
: - ' '---fi
- . .IGOOO'
Survey of a canal from the Atlantic to the Gulf
of Mexico
'. -. ^ 2,755 00 ^
Connecting the Detroit and the river Raisin, with
- ..
the Miami and Sandusky, roads
- '12,000:00 '
Surveying the harbor of Church's Cove, Rhode
Island.
. - /
.
200. 00
Surveying the harbor of Stonington, Connecticut ~ 200 00
Surveying the roads from Detroit to Saginaw,
Fort Gratoit, and Lake Huron
, - /
1,500 00
Erection of a wharf at Fprt'Wolcott, Rhode Island
500 00
Purchase of a house and lot of land at Eastport,.
Maine
: 1,800 00
Purchase of lots at St. Augustine, Florida . • 600 00
Barracks at Savannah, Georgia 11,414 40
Barracks at Fort St. Philip
- .
- 12,000 00
Barracks at Fort Michilimackinac
6,000 00
Military cantonment near St. Louis
> - . 16,591 54
.
Settlement of the Georgia niilitia,claims, - 100,600 00
v
System of cavalry, artillery, and infantry exercise
1,675 24
Military Academy, West Point - ' - 41,143 95
Maps, plans, and books for the War Department415 13
Relief of officers, (fee. engaged in the Seminole
campaign
- .
881 53
Relief of Capt. Bigger's company of rangers
4,635 91
Relief of sundry individuals
.
V •• 10,553 80
Interest due to the State of Pennsylvania
17,577 60
Payment of clainis for property lost
^ ''
220 00
Revolutionary pensions
. - 796,012 52
Invahd and hall-pay pensions - 170,567 56
Pensions to widows and orphans
9^558 7&
Boundary lines'between Georgia and Florida
3,745 80.
Suppression of Indian aggressions on the frontiers
of Georgia and Florida
13,096 71
Carrying into effect certain Indian treaties (aet 2d
March, 1827) -^
, -.
.
- .
. 159,847 37
Rations to Florida/Indians
30,015 96
Relief of Florida Indiians
-:
- 12,750 25
Running the hne df land assigned to Florida In330 56
dians - ^ - .
..
14,9'40 45
Presents to Indians
Contingencies of Indian department
- 95i787 3295^787 32Creek treaty, per act of 22d May, 1826 - 101(383 84
Treaty with the Choctaw and Chicikasaw Indians^'
2,445 m
Effectino: certain Indian treaties (act of 20th May,.
5j750 0©:'
1826)^.; • -• . .Emigration of the Creeks beyond the Mississippi •29i08O;82



463

-

S ^

464

REPORTS OF T H E

$10,296^ 84
Civilization of the Indians
-Payof Indian agents - , - 32,356 65
17;007 02
Pay of sub-agents
•- '
209,529.29
Indian annuities
Choctaw schools,'(treaty of ISth Octobe^r, 1820) - ' 10,270 90
2,000 00
Provisions to Gluapaw Indians . • 5,677,349 85
Fro;m which deduct the following repayments: •
Fortifications -•
~
- $ 5 3 19,
Repairs of Fort Constitution , - .
- 72 14
Sarvey of Marblehead and Holnies's Hole, 95 82
Survey of Laplaisance bay • - 89 11"
Survey of Sandusky bay
- 41 .70
Road from Ohio to Detroit
-70000
Road, from Pensacola to St. Aitgastine ,'- 546' 00'
".Effecting Creek trccity, per act of 3d, ^ '^
'. March, 1825- ,\ ' "- 8 00
Holding treaties with the Indians" ctaim- (
ing lands in Indiana- - 2 27
1,608 23
-5,675,741-62
NAVAL E S T A B L I S H M E N T . .

Pay of the navy afloat
. - - ' -fi Pay of the navy shore stations
Provisions . - -.
' - ;
Medicines and hospital stores Repairs of vessels. >
Nayy yards,,docks, (fee.
,- .
Navy yard, Pensacola' ' ^ Ordnance and ordnance stores'
Building ten sloops of war ,, Repairs of sloops of war
. Gradual increase.of the navy Gradual improvement of the navy
Prohibition of the slave trade - . , Suppression, of piracy - . . ..Superintendents, artificers, (fee.
Survey of the harbors of Brunswick,
nah, (fee.
\- .
- •
Arrearages prior fo 1827
- .
Surveys and .estimates,for dry docks Contingent, prior to 1824
Contingent,,not enumerated, 1826
-.
Contingent, for 1827 -,
--'
Contingent, not enumerated, 1827
Pay of the marine corps
Clothing for the marine corps Fuel for the marine corps
*
Medicines for the marine corps
Barracks forthe marine cQrps
Military stores for the marine^ corps 


- 1,172,618,19
- 166.063 39^
,- 575,769 23
34,314 52
- 41'7,365 66
- 196,916 01
.^' - , 57,499 63:
36,407 34
. ,- - 184,804 24
20,181 38
- 735,587 68
- 100,104 45
29,603" 8.9
-, ' 1,162 65
-,70,720 20
Savan' 4,078 43
- ' 14,769 66.^
- , 2,707 27
-r
10,114 68
3,267 06
- 218,340 81
1,219 12
,
- 161,531 30
.26,040 70
"
5,649 60
-'
1 J 1 7 55
.3,146.66
402 00

.1828.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

Contingent for the marine corps
Contingent arrearages forthe marinecorps
Contingent, additional, 1826, for the marine corps
. . .
-

fi

465

$13,112 42
2,228 70

'

308 05
4„267,752-25

From which deduct the following .repayments:
Contingent for 1824 . ^ - . $677 44
'
Contingent for 1825 491 62
Contingent, not enumerated,
" 1825
-.'108 88
Gontingent for 1826 - 1,878 00.
.Building barges
67 16
Building five schooners
58 33
Swords and medals • -.
- 579 62
Navy yard, Philadelphia . . 13 75
.•.3,874-' 80
1,263,877 45
PUBLIC DEBT.

Interest on the funded debt
•.
- 3,482,509 21
Redemption of the six per cent, stock of
1813, (loan of $16,000,000) \ 6,507,466 85
interest on the. Loiiisiana stock 3,56.2 30
Reimbursement of the Mississippi stock 1,642 48
Paying certain parts of the domestic debt
21 12
Paying the principal and interest of Treasury notes
- ..
_ ' '.'8,466 44
10,003,66,8 40
Frorri which deduct the following re-"
payment:
Redemption of six per cent, stock of 1813,
($7,500,000) -

01— - 1 0 , 0 0 3 , 6 6 8 3?

•^—:

.$22,656,764:04
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register'is Office, December A, 1B28.
JOSEVB: m m m ,

I .

,

:'

•

Register.

•

;

•'

• . ,

^

•

S T A T E M E N T ofi the expenditures ofi tke Uriked States, firorn thelst
, of Jdimctry to tke 30th September^ 1828.
CIVIL, M I S C E L L A N E O U S , AND DIPLOMATIC, VIZ t

Legislature. - .
Executive department
Officers of the mint
Surveying departnient
: '" • '

^YoL.

n.--3()^




-

«.
-

-$520,557 52
- > 392,5.77.05
7,200 00
- /15,613;26
•

"

;,
• '."'

•• •

.'

^ 46.6

'

[1828.

• • ' - , REPORTS OF T H E

v..

,

*
>

•

•

;

.

Commissioner of the Public Buildings
-•• $1,500 00
V
Governments in the Territories of the United:
. 35,147 •59.-^
States
Judiciary
- ,. - -'
.: -> 192,92^8 62
il,l'65,524 04
1,698 91
Annuities and grants
. 26,388 ,95.
Mint establishment , , 316 84
Unclaimed merchandise
Light-house establishment -.
- 172,648 00
37„647'97' . ' /
Surveys of public lands
- " ' l-,250^00
Registers and receivers of lahd offices
Preservation of the publip archives in Florida
750 00
"Territory
- ,.
'
'2,554 75
Land claims in Florida Territory
2,819 67
Land claims in Alabama' -. • ' ^ . '
Land claims in Michigan 297 13
.'• 4,215" 41
Roads within the State ,of Ohio
'-,
11,346 25
Roads within the State of Indiana - ,
4,632 69
RoadSjCanals, (fee. within the State of Alabama.
6,332 m
Roads, canals,' (fee. within the State of Missouri
49,159 70
Marine hospital establishment
' 86,006 2S
Public buildings in Washington
Payment of balances to collectprs of new in\ -.192 46
ternal revenue
-.
Stock in the Louisville and Poftland Canal
30,000 00'
. Company
- .
,'.
Stock in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
Company- - / -^ 10;000 00
c
75 50'
Payment of claims for property lost, &c:
46,217 14
^ Appropriation for navy hospital fund
indemnifying the owners of the British ship
^ Union
".'-. •
".- 23,474 00
Repayment for lands erroneously sold by the
327 00
United States
' - . . Reyohitionary claims ^
- . , - . ,
310,254 77
6l,^76 13
Miscellaneous expenses
885,781 17
'
Diplomatic department
' - .
- 102,779 98
15,756 69
Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse 11,747 30
Relief and protection of American seamen. Prize causes - ' . . ^ 8,000 00
33.730 00
Treaties with Mediterranean powers
2,700 34
Treaty tof Ghent, (6th and 7th articles)
9,804 45
Treaty of Ghent, (1st article)
Awards under the 1st article of the treaty of
Ghent
- " - 763,688 26
948,207 02
;

•

•

•

.

'••-'

•:,

\

• -

••

; •

V

• " • • " • ' • • ' -

1

'

'

.

'

.

.

,

'

•

'

,

•

,

•

2,999,512 23
MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT.

\

Fay of the army
Subsistence „.. -




\- .

-

807,15.5 66 .
177,965 9 8 .

J

1828.]

S'ECRETARY OF T H E TREAS'URY.

$35,821 02
Forage
'- '
380,484 90
duartevmaster's department
- •
13,955 37
Arrearacres of the array. •
14,017 16
Bounties and premiums:
11,252 74
Expenses of recruiting
152,879 70
Purchasing department
- , 10,000 00
Purchase of woollens for 1829 .65,609 22
Ordnance
165,382 90
Arming and equipping the militia
295,414 40
Armories
60,292 08
Arsenals.
:
24,000 00
Arsenal at Augusta, Maine
16,778. 81
Arsenal at Au2:usta, Georma 14,151 99
Hospital department . ^
;10.353 92
Contingencies of the army
-.^ - .,^-.
1,500 00
Expenses of the board of visiters to West Point
14,232 24
Repairs and contingencies of fortifications
Fort Monroe - '
-.
- 76.354 55
63,135 41
Fort Calhoun
^• -.^ ' Fort Adams
- .
-'
- :" .- .66,504 32
60,359 03
Fort Hamilton • -.
47,744 00
Fort Jackson -'
" Fort Macon, at Beaufort
- .. - ' ' ' - 55,361 98
34,729 30
Fort at Gape Fear
. 80,000 00
Fort at Mobile Point 4,000 00
Fort at Pensacola . ' Fort Delaware
- ' ,1 28
Armament of new fortifications
- 114,660 64
Surveys, (fee, roads and canals
^ - 28,963 66
Continuation ofthe Cumberland road 128.508 36
Repairs of the Cumberland road
. 5,000 00
Road from Memphis to Little Rock
- -. 9,470 18
Road from l^ittle Rock to Cantonment Gibson 5,300 00
Road from Port Smith to Fort Towson
, r
8,884 00
Road from Pensacola to St. Augustine
2,000 00
Road from Detroit to Saginaw, (fee.
230 14
Old King's road from the Georgia line, by St.
Augustine, to New Smyrna
.' - 3,000 00
1,000 00
Military road in the S.tate of Maine •-.
31,605 31
Improving the Ohio and Mississippi rivers
6,000 00
Improving the navigation of the Ohio river
8,000 00
Improving Hyannis harbor, Massachusetts
5,500 00
Improving Cleaveland harbor, Ohio. 6,223.18 •
Deepening the harbor of Presque Isle 500 00
Deepening the harbor of Sackett's Harbor
2,000 CO
Preservation of islands in Boston harbor ,
Removing obstructions in Huron creek, Ohio- - 4,413 35
1,517 76
Removing obstructions in Cunningham creek, O.
2,000 OORemoving obstructions in Ashtabula creek, Ohio
3.200^ OO
Removing obstructions in Grand river, Ohio
Removing obstructions in Mobile harbor, Ala. '553 00
Removing obstructions in Appalachicola river, Fl. 1,500 00



467

468 .

.

REPORTS O F T H E

Removing obstructions in Piscataqua river
- $2,500 00
Removing obstructions in Black river, Ohio
1,000 00
Building piers on Steel's ledge, Belfast, Maine 33 76
Building piers at Newcastle,"Delaware
- 5,000 00 .
Building piers at the rhouth of Dunkirk harbor, '
'
• r
NewYork . - .
.
3,000 00'
Building piers at the mouth of Oswego harbor.
New York - . - -,
. 13,281 27
Bailding piers at Laplaisance bay, Michigan 2,977 81
Piers, beacons, (fee, within the harbor of Saco,
Maine
/ - 2,550 00
Pier adjacent to the pier at Buffalo, New York -. 20,000 00
Repairing public piers at. Port Penn, Marcus
Ho.dk, and Fort Mifflin
^
4;413 00
Survey ofa canal from the, Atlantic to the Gulf
of Mexico - .
,
• .^ -,
308 62
Surveying the Colbert shoals, in, Tennessee river
200 00
. 300 00
Survey ofthe harbor of Nantucket, Mass.
Barracks at Savannah,. Georgia .
3,038 11
Military cantonment near St. Louis, Missouri 996 93
Balances due to certain Stcttes oil account of
militia
-.
- ,
- \
7,591 20
Settlement of the Georgiatmilitia claims
315 56
Military Academy at West Point fi- .
25,701 36
Relief of officers, &c., engaged in th6 Seminole
campaign
, 698 94
Rehef of Captain Bigger's company of rangers 135 50
Relief of sundry individuals . ' 29,852 33
Ransom of American captives - , r, 242 25
Revolutionary pensions ..
^- 670,627 65
^
Invalid and halfj-pay pensions - .
- 106,592 93
Pensions to widows and orphans
4,412.37
Suppression,of Indian aggressions on the frontiers of Georgja and Florida
3,576 ,15
Pay, (fee, of Illihois and Michigan militia, for the
suppression of Indian disturbances^ 39,889 5 3
.
Presents to Indians
- .
14,931 82
Contingencies of the Indian departiuent
- 90,449 12
Creek treaty, per act of 22d May, 1826
56,604,76,
'' Emigration of the Creaks-beyond the Mississippi 31il34 25
Civilization of Indians
, -,
5,833 00
Pay of Indian agen tjs - 21,650 00
Pay of sub-agents9„691 13
Indian annuities:
.' -. '189,839, 61,
' Choctaw schools; (treaty of 18th Octpbe,r, 1820)
8,980.. .42; •
Treaty with the Choctaws
- 4,07,7. 5:7,
House for sub-agents, interpreters, (fee.
14,324 Q O
Extiriguishnieht of the claims of Cherokee IUT ,
dians to lands in Georgia . . -•
50000
Extinguishment of the claims of Cherokee Indians to lands;in North Carolifta
^
- 20,613. 88




[1828.

^

1828.]

SECRETARY .OF T H E TREASURY.

•469

Carrying into eflfect certain Indian treaties,
(act 24th May, 1828)
:
- ' ^^ $,111,791. :00
Holding treaties with the Chippewas, cfec.
(acf24th May, 1828)
15,000 00
Exploring of the country west of the Mississippi, by a delegation of Indians
6,200 00
4,690J223 3G
From which deduct the follov/ing'repay-- ^
ments:
"
'
^'
Arsenal at Vergennes $68 8 1 '
Wall around the arsenal on the
Schuylkill -.
• '70 53
Survey of the harbor of Church's
• "4 81
cove . Survey of Saugatuck river and
30 03
harbor
9 54
Survey of Piscataqua river
Survey of Hyannis harbor
27 00Repairs of Fort Constitution
1 50
Erecting piers at Marc^us Hook,
36 11
Port Penn, (fee. ^
5 32
House and lot at Eastport, Me. Repairs ot wharf at Fdrt Wolcott' • 37 83
Brigade of mihtia
\ 1,000 00
Treaty with the Cherokees, (act
2,265 07
of 20th April,-,1818 Provisions for ftuapaw Indians - 2,000 00
5,556 55
$4,684,666 81-•
NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT.

Pay of the navy afloat
- ' .^ 918,912 72
116,197 72
Pay of the navy shore stations
Pay of naval constructors, superin ten d'ts., (fee. 63,600 62
Provisions
- 414,193 33
Medicines and hospital stores
. - .•48,954 86
Kepairs of vessels ^- .
" 468,476 65
141,037 80
Navy yards .
- V
13 75
Navy yard at Philadelphia
. -.
•22 17
Navy yard at Washington
. 34,417 43
Ordnance and ordnance stores
194,690 29
Building ten sloops of war .59,128 04
Gradual increase of the navy
. 288,461 19Gradual improvement of the navy
Prohibition of the slave.trade
- • •28,274 17Survey of the harbors of Savannah, Bruns1,154 87
wick, (fee.
4,697 16
Arrearages prior to 1827 9,838 69
Arrearages prior to 1828 25,000 00
Outfits \ 19 96
Prize money due to Thomas Douty
19 96
Captors of Algerine vessels
.-" •
13,360 68
Relief of sundry individuals .
863 .68
Contingent, prior to 1824




•4:70

.

R E P O R T S . OF T H E

•

,/

[1828.

. . $2,398 82
Contingent for 1824
. 125 .00
Contingent, not enumerated,^ for 1824
108 88
Contingent, not enumerated, for 1825
. Contingent for 1826 '. - . -.
• - - 2,822-98
169 70
Contingent, not enumerated, for 1826
-.
1,218 34
Contingent for r827 . ' - '
Contingent, not enumerated, for 1827 "-' .-. . 3,293 45
Contingent for 1828 ' 201,009 '73
500 00
Contingent, not enumerated, for 1828
Breakwater near the mouth of Delaware bay :
5,000 00
Pay and subsistence of the iriarine corp:3
95,679 37
' 29,259 11
Clothing for marine corps - :
6,098 17
Fuel for marine corps
••2,726 34
Medicines for marine corps
21,827 03
- -Barracks for marine corps 1,276 67
Military stcr?>s for marine corps . 10,452 '91
Contingent fjr marine corps
-

•

^
'
:
3,205,302 24
•
., •
From which deduct the following repay'
ments:
"
^
^
..
Rewarding the officers and cre\ys
. of the Wasp and Constitution $3,418 50
Contingents for 1825 r
- 553 06 "
^
...
^Houses for ships in ordinary
190 00 >
- "• ^
^
' 4,161 56 •-' •
• ^.
— ^^—'$3,201,140 68
*

.

PUBLIC DEBT.

-

Interest ,on the funded debt
. - 2,3p7,556
Redemption ofthe 6,per cent, stock of 1813,
(loan of sixteen milliohs) • • '- 2,744,423
Redemption of the 6 per cent, stock of 1813,
(loan of seven and a half millions)
- 2,256,039
Reimbursement of Mississippi.stock
900
Paying the principal and interest of Treasury notes
'- •
- ' - 668'
• • " - ! " ..
• —•
'-

'.•
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

~

67
91
21
00
40 ^
. 7,3.59,588.19
^$18,244,907 91

^ .

• '

• Register's Office, Deicember A, 1828. •
• ^ , ' ,
• JOSEPH NOURSE, .Register.




1828.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
No. 1.

.

•471

•

S T A T E M E N T ofi the fiunded debt ofi ihe tfnited States, as it will
exist on ike 1st ofi January, 1829 ; exhibiting, also, the dates ofi the
acts under lokich tke several stocks, were constituted, and tke periods at
rvkick tkey are, or were, redeemahle.
•
Date of a<^ts constituting tlie several stocks.

Sto.cks.

Three per cent, stock,
(revoiutionary debt)

Aug. ^^^r^oo -

^ •.-1 March 24, 1814
Six per cent, "
stock '
Six per cent, .stock

-

MarchS, 1815.-

Amount at- six. per '
cent.
Five per cent, stock,
subscription 0 the
• BanlioftheU.S. - April 10, 181G.

Period.s.when re-'
deemable.

•

'

.,

Amounts.
4

At the ple,asure of,.
S13,296,249 45
Government
In 1827 •- - ^6,789,722-92. 9,490,099 10
In 1828 •

16,279,822 02

. -

-

At the pleasure of
Governrnent
7,000,000 00
•999,999 13
Five.per cent, stock - • May 15, 1820 - In 1832 4,735,296 30
Five per cent, stock - MarchS, 1821- In 1835 Exchanged five per
'
,''
cent, stock "'
- ^April 20, 1822 -' One-third in 1830;
one-third in 1831;
one-third in 1832- 1 , 56,704-77Amount ai five per
cent.
. 12,792,000 20
_
_
Four and a half per
5,000,000 00
cent, stock May 24, 1824 - In 1832' i?our and a half per
5,000,000 00
, cent, stock May 26, 1824 - In 1832 . Exchanged four and a
. 1824 - One-half in 1833;
half per cent, stock May 26,
4,454,727 95
one-half in 1834 Exchanged four and a
half per cent, stock, March 3,1825: One-half in 1829;
one-half in 1830 1,539,336 16
Araount at four and a
15,994,064 11
half per cent.
"
•.

.

^

-

"~\

"

"

•

j S58,362,-135 78

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Registers Office, December 4, 1828'.
JOSEPH NOURSE, Register.




472

REPORTS-OF T H E
••

,No..2..- • •

^' ^
'; •

•

: •

The actual receipts into the Treasury from all sources, .,
during the year 1827, amounted to . - $22,966,363 9S
•

Yiz.

•

'

•

•

,

/

:

•

-^

•

V -

Customs
-. . - . • . •.- ..$19,712,283 '29.
Lands, (statement D) - ,
-, ^ 1,495,845 26
Dividends on stock in the Bank of the
,
United States, (statement E) .420,000 00: ^
Arrears of internal duties, direct tax, and
other incidental receipts, (statement E) . 100,429 ^7
Repayments ofadvances made in the War
• Departnient for services and supplies
prior to 1st July, 1815, (statement E)
32,845 44
Moneys received from the^British Government, under the convention of the
'
13th November, 1826., (statement E) 1,204,960 00.
Making; with the balance in the Treasury
on the 1st January, 1827, of -

,-

-

\ ' , ' '
- , 6,358,686 18

Ah aggregate of -.
. - \ 29,325,050' 14
The actual ex!penditures of the United Slates, on all ac'
'
counts, during the year 1827, amounted (statement F) to 22,656,764 04
'
Yiz. .'
- .
,
^
•"..,•
Civil, diplomatic, and miscehaneous
- $2,314,829 85
' Military establishment, including fortifi'
cations, ordnance, Indian department,
revolutionary and military pensions,
arming militia,, and arrearages prior to.
1st January, 1817
-•
5,675,741 62
Naval service, including the gradual im,i
provement of the navy .
^4,263,877 45
Publicdebt
-,
- 10,003,668 39.
Payments of awards to owners of slaves
and other property, under the convention with the British Government of
the, 13th November, 1826
398,646 73
Leaving a balance in the Treasury, on the 1st ofJanuary,
182,8, of , - •
^ ' ~ '
-.
TREASURY DEPARTBIENT, , •

$6,668,286 10.

'' •

Register's Office, December 4, 1828.
" / \ ^
• JOSEPH NOURSE, i^^^^5^e^.




1828.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

473

No. 3.
The actual,receipts into the .Treasury,,during the first three quarters of the
year 1828, are estimated to have amounted.to
- - . ' - '
- $18.6.33,58027
Viz.

'

'

,

•

^

•

, •

,

'

.

Customs
-.
- ,
- ^17,309,169 73
Lands
r
- ^
. 564,507 33
Dividends on stock in'the Bank ofthe United'States .
455,000 00
Arrears of internal duties, direct tax, and incidental receipts 289,152 72
Repayment ofadvances raade in the War Department,
prior 10 the 1st July, 1815
- , ' - .
15,750 49
And the actual receipts into the Treasury, during the fourth quarter of the,
year, are estimated at
^' -. . Making the total receipts into the Treasury, during-the year 1828 -.
And with the balance in the Treasury on the 31st December, 1827, of

. -

5,461,283 40
24,094,863 67
6,668,286 10

An aggregate, estimated at
-'
- " - 30,763,149 77
The expenditures, during the first three quarters of 1828,
have amounted to (statement 1) '•' - ^18,244,90^ 91 .

V i z .

.

'

•

.

'

Civil, diploniatic, ahd miscellaneous
-$2,235,823 97-'
Military establishment, including fortifica^
.
tions, ordnance, Indian department, revo.• lutionaryandmilitary pensions, and arming the militia
- • . - 4,684,666 81
Naval service, including; the gradual im- >
'
provement of the navy ' -'3,201,140 68
Public debt^
.
,
Principal - 85,002,031 52 .
Interest
-. 2,357,556 67
'
• / . — fi • •. ^. 7,359,588.19Payment of awards to owners of slaves, and
,-:
other property, under the convention with
.
the British Government, of the 13th November, 1826
763,688.26

,-^

•

•

•

•
-

'

'

..

,.

• . >-

:

,

•
'

' ' .

And the expenditures of the fourth quarter are estimated at ' 7,392,603 72
Viz.
. '
'
.
'.
Civil, diplomatic, and miscellaneous - $546;000 00 :
Militarv establishnient
- '
- 1,100,000,00
'
Naval service
.
.
900,000 00
. '
Public debt— *
.^
^
Principal - #4,059,464 67
' •'
'
Interest
744,514 d4
.- '4,803,978-71
.'
Balance of awards to owners of slaves and
.
.
v
other property
42^^,625 01
: "
^
. '
Making the total estiraated .expenditure of the year 1828

-

-

-

25,637,511 63

And leaving in the Treasury, fon the 1st January, 1829, an estimated balanceof
-•
- . .
.'-

$5,125,638 14

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, Decemher 4, 1828.
' '
.^
: •. JOSEPH • NOURSE, i^eg-i^^er.




474

"

• REPORTS-OF. T H E ' '
• No.-4.'.

_

[1828,

'

. E S T I M A T E D A M O U N T ofi. Treasury notes ouistanding on tke Isi
....
. October^ 1828:
Total amourit issued, as exhibited in statement No. 2, which accompanied
the Secretary's report of the 8th December, 1827
- $36,680,794
Cancehed and reported on by the First Aild itor
- ''
36,670,419
Outstanding

,•r

'

.
•

^ .

-

$10,375

-

I -

Consisting of smah Treasury notes
notes bearing interest

-

- $2,135
- 8,240-

,fl0,375

.,..•..
'•
s.
Register's.Office, December A, 1828. ^
. • JOSEPH NOURSE, i?e^i^^er.-.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

No. 5.
S T A T E M E N T ofi tke stock issued under tke act ofi Congress entitled
" An act supplementarrj to ike act for tke indemnification ofi certain
^ claimants ofi public lands in tke Mississippi. Territory," passed on
tke3d Marck, 1815.. :
. ^
Amount of clainis awarded, per statement No. 3 ofthe last
• report' ' -.•; r -

$4,282,151 12

Whereof there was, paid in for lands, per statement
- 2,447,539 39
Payments from theTreasury, to the 30th September, 1827, per said statement '
, - $1,827,958 04
'
Paid from 1st October, 1827, to 1st October, 1828 .
- •
-^
1,800 00
.
r
1,829,758 04
Balance oufstanding 1st October, 1828, consisting of—
Certificates outstanding . -• '
''$4,809.09 ,.
Awards not applied for, - .' .
44 60
'
•' • •
-. ^
-•
• —
4,853 69
$4,282,151 12
TREASURY,DEPARTMENT,/

'/

,

•

Regis.ter's Office. December A, 1828., • \ ^ ' ,
JOSEPH NOURSE, i?^^2-5^er.




[The following are the statements referred lo at page 353.]

A.

'

S T A T E M E N T exkibiiing tke duties wkick accrued on merckandise, tonnage, passports, and clearances ; ofi debentures
issued on tke exportation ofi fioreign merckandise; ofi payments fior drawback on domestic distilled sjnrits, arid domestic refined svigar, exported ; ofi bounties on salted fish exported ; ofi allowances to vessels emptoyed in tke fisheries ;
ofi expenses ofi collection; and ofi payments made'into the Treasury during tke year ending- on tke 3ist day of
December, 1825.
\ :
' ;
.
,'Duties on
Ysar.

Merchandise;

Tonnage
and light
,, money.

Drawback on
foreign merPassports and chandise . exported.
clearances.

Drawback
on domestic Bounties and Gross revenue.
Expenses of Nett revenue. Payments made
distilled spi-. allowances.
collection.
into the Trearits and dosury.
mestic refined sugar exported.

CO
OK

Ul

o

•

•
1825 $31,707,794 32 .^138,847 83 ^12,638 00




$6,391,783 57

$3,565 00 $209,285 57 ^25,254,646 01 J^843,903 16 $24,410,742 85 $20,098,713 45

Ul

ox

[1825

EEPOHTS OF T H E

476

E.
A S T A T E M E N T exkibiiing the value and quantities,.respectively, oj
merchandise on whick duties actually accrued dimng tke year 1825:
[consisting of tke difference between articles paying duty, imported,
and tkose entiiled to drawback, rerexported ;) and, also, ofi ihe nett revenue whick accrued tkat year from duties on^Qnerckandise, tonnage,
passports, and clearances.
MERGIIANDISE' PAYING DUTIES AD VALOREM.,

$7,285
1,569,003
2,982,362
8,619,757
30,804,852
5,865,022
'5,155,710
15,033,
126,4.39
560,349

at 12 per cent. • . a t l 2 i do.^
,- at 15" do. at 20 'do.
.
at 25 do.
•. at 30 .do. .' ,-'
at33^ do.
- ' at 35 do.
- • - , at 40 do.
.
.
at 50 do.

-

•. ,- -

$55,705,812 - • • .
.. • '
:" ,22,216 exported,'at 7rper cent. -

$874
196,125
447,354
1,723,951
7,701,213
1,759,506
1,718,570
^ 5,261
50,575
280,174

20
36
30
40
00
60
00
55
60
50

13,883,606 5 1 '
1,666 20^
13,881,940 31

55,683,596',

$13,881,940 31

DUTIES ON SPECIFIC ARTICLES,

1. Wines, ' 2,688',640
2. Spirits,
4,114,046
Molasses, 12,4.30,622
3. Teas,
6,557',629
Coffee,
22,357,721
4.,Sugar,
47,504,033
,5: Salt, .
3,537,378
6. 'All other articles

gallons, average 25.37 cents
do.
.do. 43.82 do.
do. , , do.
5.00 do.
pounds, do!' 33.53 do\
do..
do. ' 5.00 do.
do.
do.
3.06 do.
bushels do. .20!00 do.
- ^ '-

•7
-.
-

682,111 15
1,802,766'52
- 621,531 10
2,198,787 46
1,117,886 05
1,457,769 52
707,475 60
^ 2,386,698. 20
10,975,025 60
24,856,965 91

Add duties which accrued on merchandise, the particulars of .which were not rendered by the collectors, after
•deducting therefrom duties refanded and difference in
calculation • - .
-.

26,037 69
24,883,003 60

Add 2 | per cent, retained on drawback 10 per cent, extra duty on forisigh vessels
discriminating duty on French vessels
interest on custom-house bonds
storage received ' - _. Duties on merchandise' - Add duties on tonnage.
- , light money -

-

Add passports and clearances

-

-

- '

:
-

-

175,923
19,916
2,558
. 22,664
2,658

21
91
19
49
78
;

- -

-

fi'

25,106,725 18

I20T647 73
18,200 10

-,

..,'"'

990 '-'91 CO

138,847 83
12,638 00

'

25,258,211 01
Deduct drawback on domestic spirits ' - .
drawback on domestic refined sugar

-'

1,952 32
1,612 68
3,565 00

.
Gross revenue
Deduct expenses on collection
Nett revenue

-




-

-

-"

•

-

•

25,254,646 01
843,903 16
24,410,742 85

1825.1

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

477

Explanatory Statem'ents and Notes.
L WinesMadeira ' , ,'Burgundy and Champagte,
Sherry and St. Lucar • Lisbon, Oporto, &c.
. Teneriffe, Fayal, &c.
Claret, &c., bottled
Another - , -

161,396 gallons, atlOO cents
•13,332 do. at 100 do.
8,264 do.
60 do.
245,662 do.'
'm do.,
126,333 do.
do.
40 do.
60,084 do.
-30 do.
2,073,569 do.
15
' 2,688,640 do.
'-

2. Spirits—
From grain,

$161,396
13,332
4,958
122,831
, 50,533
18,825
311,035

00
00
40
00
20
20
35

682,111 15
420,648 48
23,681-82
62,954 40
4,011 80
2,032 80
256,152 30
330,175 02
681,095 04
21,402 36 •
.-610 50

1st proof2d do. 3d do. ' 4th do. 5th do. Other materials, 2d do. : 3d do. 4ih do. •5th do. Above 5th . do. ^'

1,001,544
52,657
131,155
7,715
3,388
674,085
786,131
1,-418,948
37,548'
"875

do. at 42 do.
do. rit 45 do.
do. at 48 do.
do. at .52 do.
do. at 60 do.
do. at 38, d6.
do. - a t 42 do.
do. at 48 do.
do. at 57 do.
do. at 70 do.

' ,<

4,414,046

dp.

1,-8.02,766 52

. 91,755 pound. , at 12 do.
1,032,516 do. at 25 do.
2,197,041 do. at 28' do.
3,039,148 do. at 40 do.
197,169 do. at 50 do.

11,010 60
25S,i29 00
,615,171 48
1,215,659^0
•98,-584 50

3. Teas—^
Bohea
^ .. Soiichong Hyson skin, &c. > Hyson and young hyson Imperial Extra duty on teas imported from
other places than China

- _ 6,557,629

4. S u g a r Brown
White, clayed, &c.

44,239,180
3,264,853

2,198,787^46

do. at 3 do.
do.. at . 4 do.

1,327,175 40
.130,594 12

do.

47,504,033 ^ do.
5. S a l t Imported,
bushels,
Exported,
do. -'
Bounties and allowances reduced into bushels, at 20 cents -




; 232-68

- •
-

1,457,769 52

4,639,160 at 20 cents

927,832 00

,101,782 at 20 do.

220,356 40

55,354
1,046^ 428
3,537,378 bushels

707,475 60

478

• • • • • REPORTS OF T H B :
• Explanatory Statements and Notes—Continued.
'
6. All other articles.
'{

Gtuantity.

^

'Carpeting, Brussels, Wilton, &c. , . - yards
Venetian and ingrain »
- :'
~do.
all other, &c.
•' do.
Cotton bagging
'
- '
- .
, . . »do.
Vinegar - . '
.
' _
• -,e:allons
Beer, ale, and porter, in bottles
- .
do:
in casks
^ .
-do.
Oil, spermaceti
" - - do..
whale, and other iish
••
do.
olive, in casks ^ ' - ' .'
-do.
.castor ^ •
.
:-: - . do. •
linseed
. .
'
.
do. .
hejnpseed'
- '
.
do.
rapeseed ^ - ,
'
. - , do.
Cocoa
'
, - .
- pounds
Chocolate
" ,- • •
do.
Sugar, candy
do:
: .loaf- •
- • do.
6ther^ refined
',,-..
do.
Fruits—almonds
- , • '. - "
dc.
currants - -•
, do.
prunes and plrims -.
•
- .do.-.
figs
' ^ do.
Taisins, jar, and Muscatel
-' >.
- : do: •
other
-'
' - ^
, - . do.
Candles, tallow
do.
wax
.
do.
Cheese .
do.
Soap- • , ' . •1
do.'
"Tallow - "
- '
. ' - . do.
L a r d . ' ', • - • . - .
• do.
Beef and pork '- 7,
- •
.
do.
Ham.s and other bacon
•
do.
Butter
. ' ,
"
do.
Vitriol, blue or Roman
.x-,
do.
" oil of
do. ,
Camphor,.crude
. ,
do.
refined do.
Salts, Epsom
•- ^
do.
Glauber
' do.
Spices—Cayenne pepper
do.
ginger
do.
mace
•do.
nutmegs " do.
cinnamon '
do.
^ cloves'
.do.
pepper, black
"
-,
do.
pimento
,,
do.
cassia
'
_
do.
Tobacco, manufactured, &c. do.
Indigo
T
do.
Gunpowder.
•' ^
'
do. •
Bristles v -, .
. .
do.
Glue
do.'
Paints—ochi e, dry . -- ' do.
.
~
in oil
.
dx
white and red lead ; do.
whiting
. •' - • do..
Lead, pig, bar, and sheet
^7
dr.
•shot
- •/
do




Rate
of
duty.

Duties.

Cerits.
^ $29,594 00
-79,188
50
519,392
25
129,848 00
1,024 80
.20
5,124
152,734 13
31
4,072,910
20,082 • 8'
1,606 56
.11,523 00
57,615
20
]5
1,057 65
7,051
1 25
5
25
52 65
:351
15
72,021
25
18,005 25.
i.,017
40
406 80
25
16,78125
67;12^
6,498 50
25,994 • 25
. 19
25
4 75
146 ,'463
2,929 26
2
- - 78 68
•^1,967.
4
86 16
12
718
12
57 24
477
14 00
140'
10
943,441
^ 28,303 23
3
3 ' , 2,854 05
95,135
- 5,552 04
138,801
4
3
784,994.
23,549 82
1,766,797
4
70,671 88
48,602 82
i;619,.094
3
38,006
1,900 30
5
2,081
•124 86
6
33,571
9
3,021 39
220,909
4
8,836 36
134,076
1,340 76
1
• 8
3
'
24188,711
2
3,774 '22
17,701
3
531 03
1,832
5
91 60
9,179
4
367 16
> 30,816
3
924 48
57,703
8
4,616 24
226
12
27.12
108,191
4
. 4 , 3 2 7 64
2
286
. 5 -72
189
15
28 35
- 926
2
18 "52
17,479
100
17,479 00
60
90., 107
50,064 20
20,470
25
5,117 50
25
27,219
6,804 75
1,465,762
8
117,260 97
235;044
6
14,102 64
6
. 105,647
6,338 82
10
397
39 70
414,756
15
62,213 40
8
43,905
3,512 40
3
172,688
5,180 64
50,363
5
2,518 15
403,003
1
4,030 03
4,323
^U
.64 84
1,768,164
4
70,726 56
246,960
1
2,469 60
1,934', 340
2
78,686-81
60,206
2,107 21
3^

1.825.] .

,

SECRETARY OF, THE TREASURY.

47.9:-

Explanatory Statements and Notes—Continued.

' Gtuantity.

6. A n o t h e r articles.

" Rate
of'
duty.

Duties.

Ce7Us.
114,033 . 4
$4,561 32
- pounds
Cal)les, tarred
-' 235,212>
•4
9,408 48
- - do. Cordage, tarred -,
176,0.57 ' 5
8,802 85
do.
.untarred
.
313,748
15,687 40
: . do.
5
T w i n e , untarred, 3^arn,'&c.
109,158
13,098 96
12 •
'
- - do. ^
Corks
. 111,531 ^ 4 ^
4,461 24
- • . do.
Copper, rods and bolts ,
'
- ".'
do:
2,573
4
102 92
nails and spikes
^
. 13,069 150.
19,603 50
No.
Fire-arms,'maskets
'
do.
12 25030 00
xifles
- . ,
29,013 50
580-, 270
- pounds
5
Iron and steel wire, not above No. 18
do.
205,699 ^ 9
' 18,512 91
above Nb. 18
. 32,532
. ' 1,626 60
5
M.
racks, brads, and sprigs, not above 16 oz.
6,602
330 10
5 .
- pounds
• , above 16 oz.
378,103
V 18^905 15
-,
do.
5
. , nails- ' • ' - ! ' .
d'o. •
27,815
4
1,112 60
spikes
.' •
416,267
3
12,488 01
-•
do.
, chain cables, &c.
' . 'r' \
186
4
7 44
do.
-millcranks -'
1,496 IOO'
'
1,49.6 00
No. . ' .
^ ^millsaws
' - '
50,836
2
1,016 72
-, pounds
anchors ^ 587,663
.2
11,753 26
-.;
do.
.'.anvils .
/ . - • . ,
. 66,262.
1,656 55
-•
do.
m
• h a m m e r s and sledges - ^
770,637
11,559 55
do.
. castings, vessels of
- , • ' -,
U
436,362
4,363 62
do.
1
.. other • • • ...
do.
- 58,127'
3
1,743 81
round and brazier's rods
14,078
3
422 34
do. •
. nail and spike rods
.-,
do.
'2,081,-367
3
. 62,441 01
sheet and hoop
.-;
do.
70
3
2 10
slit and rolled
"
17,273. ,• 50
8,636 25
- , cwt.
• pig
•
- .
• 119,017 50
79,345 150
- - do.
bar, rolled -•
- • ,
484,786
90'
436,307 40
CM.
hammered .
;
34,146 100
34,146 00
do.
Steel
' - •
159,432 00
91,104 175
do. Hemp
, Alum
..
- • do.
3 250
"- ,
7 50
3,712' 2 0 0 .
^
"7,444 00
- . . do.
Copperas
.
- do.
^ 88
50 .
44 00
Wheat
floui- -.
6
48,984 84
- bushels • ^ 816,414
Coal "
3,448 . 25
• 862 00
do:
Wheat
10
958
95 80
do.
Oats
. •. 10
36,911
3,691 10
do.
Potatoes
.
12,753 . 20
2,550 61)
- pounds
.Paper, folio and 4to post
foolscap
do.
540,332
17
91,856 44
printing
do.
2,660
10
266 00
sheathing 91,676 . 3
2,750 28
do.
27,569
15
4,135 35
do.
all other -.
1,237
4
49 48
do.
Books, printed previous to 1775
111,683
4
4,457 32
do. ^
printed in other languages, &c.
5,882
15
882 30
do.
Latin and Greek, bound
;
- do.
7,003 . 13
910 39
in boards
-•
13,013 • 30
5,703 90
- ' do.
all other, bound
26
. 21 496 02
82,677
do.
in boards - .
33,225
3
1,146 75
do.
Glass, cut. and not specified 2
19,257 94
932,897
-do..
all other, &c.
.
3,2.58 100
3,258 00
- • gross
apothecaries' vials, not above 4 oz.
- d o .
367' 125
458-75
not above 8 oz.
27,394 00
do.
13,697 200 •
bottles, not above 1 quart
2 quarts - do.
22 250
' , 55 00
^ 4 300
12 00
- . do.
4 do.
'686 SOO
-lOOsq.ft.
2,058 00
window, not above 8 by 10 inches >
10 by 12 do.
do.
•730- 350 ' , • 2,555 00




•k^B

480

.

REPORTS. OF T H E . •

•[1825.

Explanatory Statements and Notes.—Contiaued.

^ 6 . All Otheir articles.
•

i

• Gtuantity.

;

'

• ,

'

.

Glass, window, above 10 by 12 inches -'.
uncut, in plates
demijohns
-^
- - - - Fish, dried or smoked
.- .
salmon, pickled
- .
- '
mackerel, pickled
V •- _
all other, pickled.
- ,'.
Shoes and slippers, silk. • • - • • prunelle '
- - .--,'•"
leather, men's, &c. - " .- ' '
•
children's
- \
Boots and bootees • . - . .
Segars • ' - " . , ' .•- • '
Playing cards
- - •
-

Rate,
of
duty.

3,719
77
32,301
1,556
1,540
• 257
648
1,245
1,747
^ 1,481
1,105
218
21,377
8,894

Cents.
400
400
25
100
200
150
100
30
25
25
15
1.50
250
30

'

•

••.

Duties.

- 100 sq. feet
- >
.
do. No.
quintals
barrels
•do.
- '
do.
pairs .
- /
• do. .'
do.
-.
do. 'do.
M.
packs

$14,876 00
308 00
8,075 26
1,556 00
3,080'00
385 50
• ', 648 00
373 50
436 75
^ 370 25
165 75
' ' 327 00
53,442 50
2;668 20
2,395,343 53

Deduct excess of exportation over importation
Saltpetre, refined
.1,495 p.ounds', at 3 cents '• . - $44 85
11 64
Snuff . . ^-'
'
97 pounds, at 12 cents
- 4,083 72
Cotton
- 1-36,124 pounds, at ' 3 cents^
4,140 21
• -.
Exports at former duties:
Duck, Russia
100 pieces,, at 200 cents
. Ravens. . - " , 1 8 0 pieces, at 125 cents
Sheeting, brown
410 pieces, .at 160 cents
Raisins, other than jar, &c.. .3,000 pounds; at 2 cents
Candles, tallow
2,326 pounds, at 3 cents
S o a p . - ' ' -' 4,256 pcvands, at 3 cents
White and red lead - '
765 pounds, at Scents:
Cordage, tarred
.- •
- 10,378 pounds, at Scents
,Ir6n, nails - .
- . 6,903 pounds, at 4 cents
sheet and,hoop
- 662 cwt,,,, at 250 cents
hammered
1,155 cwt., at 75 cents
Glass, window, not above 8,
bylOinches
- ^ 14100 sq. f. at 250 cents

- - 200 00- ,225 00
- 656 00
60 00
-,
69 78
- 127.68
22 95
- 311 34
- 276 12
- 1,655 00
- 866 25

V

35 00
8,645 33

-

•

' •

"

.

Carried to statement B

-.

c.

.

•

.

2,386,698 20

.

A .STA T E M E N T exhihiting the amount ofi American and fioreign
tonnage employed in the fioreign trade ofi the United States, during
theyfiar ending on,the 31st day ofi Decerriber, 1825.
Americantonnageinforeigntra.de
Fo.reigntpnnage in fgreign t r a d e -

;-

-

,

.

.

.

-

- Tons, 886,511
94,836

Total Jt.onnage employeddn the foreign trade of the United -States
PiTopprtion of foreignitonnage. to the whole amount of tonnage, employed in the
• fprieign trade of the United States'

981,347
10.6 to 100

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office..



JOSEPH NOURSE, Register.




IND..E:.X..A.
Agriculture, promoted by domestic manufactures, 321; 405, 445^
how affected by the fall in price of domestic articles i n foreign
markets in 1818, 486.
Appropriations for 1814, gross amount of, 29.
Army expenses from 1st January, 1812, to 30th: September, 1815, 15, 29,
in 1816, 74.
1817, 89, 111.
,
1818, 111, 198;
181% 145; . 198.'
1820,; 168, 198.
1821;. 200, .217; 234.;
1822, 218, 239. 264.
1823; .248, 269, 276,. 294
1824;-, 277, 301, 313, 332,
1825, 314, 339, 354, 372T
1826, 355, 379, 393, 418
1827, 394, 426, 461, 472•
1828, 466, 473.
B.
y
Bdlanc e in the Treasury,, 1st January, 1815, 30.
.1816, 74...
1817, 88.:
1818, U L
1819, ,114..
1820, 169,
1821, 199.
1822, 217.
• 1823, 247.
1824; 276.:
1825,' 313.
1826, 354;^
,
1827,. 393, 472*.
1828, ,448, 472.
1829, estimated. ,448.Battk capital anthorized by law, in- 181445-16.17, 481, 483^-53fc
of sixteen banksvin.1813-15-19 ,;523;
Bank credits, advantages5 and,
disadvantages iof,' considerediji 491,. 492.
Bank, nationaliestablishmentrof:a, jecommpndedyr4^^
Bank of England, suspended -specie .paymentsjiremarks; on,i49!l^
excessive issues; of, reduced, the ratevof;interesitj 503.
Ba¥ik^of,..the Unitedi States,. subsGriptioa, to thestocknof !theji;90.5.
a modifications of r theii char terao%.recommend-^
ed^..l77.,
•, "
its beneficial effeets on the: fiscalj operations of
Governmenty; 446..
CQndition|of:the,'iQn^ the :30th frSteplember, 1819.
• • .' 481, 514;
• .



tf^ • '

528

INDEX.

'

Bank dividends, in 1817, 117:'
, •
1818, 110, 155, 198.
1819, .184, 198. .
1821, 199, 232.
.i
^ 1822, 237, 260.
' 1823,^292.
1824, 330.
1825, 337, 370.
1826, 416. ,
1827, 424, 460, 472.
,
; 1828, 473.
. . , >••,.
Bank notes, duty on, cease in 1816, 9.
/
'
in circulation in 1819, 482, 483, 518, 523.
Banks benefit the community, under certain restrictions, 487.
Banks increased since the termination of the war in 1.815, 493.
should be restrained from excessive issues, and from issuing small
notes, 494.
\
Banks in the several Slates and Territories, condition.of the, in 1819, 521.
., . specie possessed by the, 522.
Bounties and allowances.—See Imports.
,
C.

'^^•-'

-

^

^

Ghesapeake and Ohio Canal Company, United States subscribe to thestock
of the, 447.
Circulating medium, plan for improving the, 40.
Cocoa, a reduction of the duty on^ recommended, 325.
Coffee, a reduction of the duty on, recommended, 325.
Coinage of the United States compared with that of other nations, 494.
an. increase and alterations of the. recommended, 495.'
Colonial trade, remarks on the, 410.
Commerce, how affected by the tariff of 1824, 280, 319, 397.
state of the foreign, in 1828, 442.
how affected by substituting a paper for a metallic currency, 509.
Cotton, exported in 1825-26, 361.
Cotton fabrics^ further protection necessary for the manufacturers of, 149,
325, 400.
Crawford, Mr., report of, on currency, 481.
•
Currency, report of Mr. Crawford on, 481.
bf what it consists, and its condition, 482.
causes of depreciation in the paper, 484.
of metal and paper in circulation in 1813-15-19, 485.
when purely metallic, its effects, 488, 493.'
how affected by bank issues, 489.
^
Treasury notes became a component part of the, in the eastern
States, in 1815-16, 491.
paper circulation may be beneficially connected with metallic^
.491, 493.
metallic, value of, compared with that of other nations, 494.'
v'".
, the issue of Treasury notes for the improvement of the, considered, 496.



INDEX.

-52,9

Currency, the practicability of adopting a paper for a metallic, considered,
497,511. .
• .:
constitutionalityof adopting a paper for a raetallic, considered, 504.
estimated amount required for Europe, of metallic, 501.
D.
' '
Debentures issued in 1813-14,
65.
1815,
82, 95, 150.'
1816,
95, 150.
1817,
116,150.
1818-19-20, 179, 205. •
1821,
225.
1822,
253.
1823,
285.
1824,
327. ' :
1825,
367.
1826,
413.
1827,
• 451.
*
•'
Debt—See Public Debt.
Direct taxes increased in 1815, 12.
a reduction of the, reconimended, 36.—See. Revenue.
Discriminating duties cease in 1816, 7.
Drawbacks—See Debentures issued.
'
Duties on domestic manufactures, a repeal of the, proposed, 36.
table of existing, 46.
additional, on imports and tonnage, cease iii 1816, 7.
a continuance of the, recommended, 38.
on stamps and refined sugar, cease in 1816, 35.
on other articles, a repeal or reduction of, recommended, 36.
on imports, an increase of the, proposed for the proteetibn of certaia
articles of domestic manufacture, 149,204,223,252,400:
on fine cotton fabrics imported, an increase ofthe, proposed, 325.
on teas, cofi-ee, and cocoa, a diminution ofthe, proposed, 325.
on imports, remarks on the credit system, in the collection of the,
492.—See Imports; also, Merehandise.
B .

.

,

•,

Estiraate of receipts and expenditures for 1815-16, 24, 29, 33, 35, 73, 78.
1817,
78, 80, 88.
1818,
93, 110.
1819, 113, 145.
1820, 148, 167.
1821, 170, 199.
1822, 202,218.
1823, 220,247.
•1824, 250,277.
1825, 281,314.
1826, 318,354.
1827, 360, 393.
1828, S96,412.
...•.., I
'
1829, -449. '
Exchange, (foreigii and inland,) rate of, in 1813-14-15-16, 484,-524.,
Exchange, (foreign) how' affected by the depreciation of paper currency, 484.
by substituting a paper for a metallic curreney, 509.
,VoL.
 II.—34


5'30

. .

INDEX.

Expenditures^—See Receij>ts and expenditures.
Exports for the year ending SOth September, 1822, .220. 222.
' . " , ' "
1823,250.
1824, 280.
1826, 318;
1826, 360.
for the years 1822 to 1827, 397.
1821 to 1828, 442.
'
,
•

F. -

.

Finances, a review ofthe. in reference to the late state of war, 5.
state of the, in 1815, 24.
,
1816, 73. .
1817, 88'.
1818, 110.
1819, 144.
1820, 167.
1821, 198.1822, 217.
1823, 247. •
1824, 276.
1825, 312.
1826, 353.
1827,. SSS.
1828, 439. •
Flour exported in 1825-6, 361.
Foreign debt' extir iguishedin 1810, 20;
H.
Hamilton's reports on finances referred ta, 445.
Hemp,- ao increase ofthe duty on, recomniended, 400.
^

'

' -

•

•

'

'

I

. Importations into several ports, a comparative statement of the value of, 305,
gross amount of, in 1821 to 1828, 442.
in 1816, increased the rate of exchange, 484.
Imports, statement of the amount of duties accrued on, in 1813-14. 65.
••
^
1815, 82/150'

'
•
.

'

'•

• • •

•.

•••/'•. ^ . •
. :

•

^

-r ^
.Indemnify W Cf reat I^iiWn for slates, &^^
:
distribution ofthe, 394, 418,425.
internal duties increased in 1815; 12.




1815-16, 95, 150.
1817, 116, 150.
1815-16-17-18,150.
1817-18-19, 179.
1818-19-20^205.
1821, 225.
, 1822, 253.
1823, 285. •
1824, 327, •
1825, 367.
1826, 413.
1827, 451.^See
Merchandise im>ported.

INDEX.

531

Internalj duties, repeal of some, and reductionof other parts of the, proposed, 35. ^
repealed 31st December, 1817, 148.—See Revenue. ,
Internal improvements, surplus revenues may be applied to, 81.
Iron, an increase of the duty on, recommended, 400.
, •, . .- L.
. . .
,; .
Land claimants (Yazoo) in Mississippi, statements of the awards to, 126,
166, 190, 216, 246, 275, 311, 345, 387, 431, 474,
Lands—See Puhlic lands.
Laws creating and increasing the revenue, reviewed, 8, 34.
repeal or modification of certain, proposed, 38.
a revision of the, recommended, 445.
Loans, additional, recommended, 75,' 149, 178, .204, 282, 317, 359.
receipts from, in 1812-'13-'14, 15.
in 1815, 26,. 30.
terms on whieh obtained, 26, 53 to 64. 283, 306, 307.
receipts from, in 1816, 74.
1820, 178.
.^ 1821,199, 204, 217.
1822, 223.
1823, 283.
1824, 312.
1825, 334, 370—See Revenue.
^ ,

, M:
Manufactures, a repeal of the laws injuriously affecting domesti'c, proposed, 36. table of the existing duties on domestic, 46.
.'
a modification of the tariff, proposed for the better protection
of, 149, 204, 223, 252, 325, 397, 400.
promote the interests of agriculture and comnierce, 324, 445.
domestic, exported in lS24-'25, 319.
1826, 363.
1827, 397. '
182,1 to,1828. 442.
how affected by the fall in price of domestic articles iu
foreign ports in 1818, 486.
Mediterranean fund, discontinued in March, 1815, 6.
Merchandise imported, (the quantity re-exported deducted) in 1814, 66.
'
1815,82,95.
1816,95.
1817,116.
1818, 151.
1819,180.
1820,206.
1821, 226.
1822,2,54.
•
1823,286.
1824,347.
1825,476.
- 1826, 433.
• 1827,452.



5.32:

, INDEX:
N.

'.

National bank, establishihent. of a, recommended, 44.
subscription to the stock of the, 76.
National circulating medium, plan for improving the, 40.
Navy expenses, from 1st January, 1812, to 30th September, 1815, 15, 29.
for 1816, 74.
18L7, 89, 111.
1818, 111, 198.
,
1819, 145, 198.
. 1820, 168, 198. •
.1821, 200, 217, 234. '
1822,218,241,264.
1823,248, 270,276, 295.
1824,277,302,313,333.
1825, 314, 340, 354. 374.
1826,354,381,393,420.
1827, 394, 428,'464, 472.
1828,469,473.
O.
Officersand soldiers—^ee Revolutionary claims. ,
•

P . '

.-

•

'•

Passports and clearances—See Merchandise iniported; also, Imjiorts.
Postage on letters, increased in 1815, 12.—See Revenue.
Public credit, during the late war, state ofthe-, reviewed, 6.
plan for improving the, 38.'
, state of, in 1828, 44L
Public debt, amount paid from 1st Jan., 1812, to 30th Sept., 1815,15,16, 30.
amount unpaid on 30th September, 1815,19.
amount paid to 1st January, 1815, 22.
statement ofthe, from 1st January, 1791, to 1815. 47.
state ofthe. in 1816, 76, 82, 85, 90, 100.
1817, 90, 100 to 103, 111, 119, 135.
additions made to the, by funding Treasury notes, 104,146,160.
. amount of the, on 1st January and 1st October, 1818,112, 120^
146, 160, 164.
in 1819, 147, 161 to 166, 185.
'
1820, 169, 186, 188, 200, 212.
1821, 201, 213 to 216, 219, 235, 243.
1822, 219, 244, 249, 265, 272.
1823, 249, 271, 273, 278, -296, 308.
1824, 278, 303, 309, 334, 342.>
when it may be redeemed, 283.
amount paid from 1st January, 1817, to 1st January, 1825,284,
343\




INDEX.

533

Public debt, amount of the, on 1st October, 1825, 315, 341, 344, 375, 384.
1826,356,381,385 to 387,421.
1827, 390,429 to 431,465,472.
. .
; .1828, 470, 473.
amount paid from 1st Jan., 1817, to 1st Jan.j 1829, 440, 472.
amount unpaid on 1st January, 1829, 471.
Public lands sold prior to ihe estabhshment of land offices, 51.
frora the opening of the land offices to 1814, 51.
from 1st October, 1814, to SOth Sept., 1815, 68 to 72,88.
receipts from, in 1816, 73, 88. 110.
- sold from 1st Oct., 1816, to 1st Oct.,. 1817, 97 to, 99, 110.
soldinl817-18,110, 118, 135to 143. ,
1818-19, 145, 156 to 159, 191.
1819-20, 167, 191 to 198.
\
relief to purchasers of, recommended, 175.
sold ia 1820-21, 199,.. 211, 230.
effects of the relief laws on the sale of, 202.
sold in 1822, 236, 247, 258.
1823,248,266,276,290.
1824,277,^297,312,328.
1825, 313, 335, 368.
1826,376,392,414.
1827,393,422,457.
remarks on the credit systera in the sale of, 492.
.;R.
Receipts and expenditures, frora 1st Jan., 1812, to 30th Sept., 1815,16, 29.
from 1791 to 1814, 45, 73.
in 1815-16, 73, 88, llO; •.
1816-17,88,110.
1817-18, 111, 144.
1818-19, 145, 167.
1819_20, 167, 198.
1820-21,198,217,233.
1821-22, 217,233, 238 to 244,247,261.
1822-23, 247, 261,268, 293. .
18^3-24, 276, 293, 30,0, 330^1.
• from 1st Jan., 1817, to 1st Jan., 1825, 284.
in 1824-25, 312, 330 to 352, 354,371,476.
1825-26, 353, 371 to 382.
1826-27, 392, 413 to 438, 451, 457, 460,
472.
froml821tol828,442, 448, 451,465, 473. '
Revenue, state ofthe, during the, late war, reviewed, 5.
laws passed in 1815 for increasing the, 12.
from wliat sources derived, and the amount in 1815,12, 2,3, 30.
received from all sources, from 1st Jan., 1812, to 30th Sept., 1815,
16, 30.
laws relating to thp several branches of, revie\yed, 8, 34.
laws, modifications of, proposed, 36, 38, 445.
plan for improving the, 38.



534 • -

INDEX. .- •

Revenue, amount of. in 1814-15-16, 73, 88, 96, 110, 144.
1817, 89, 96, 110, 117, 144, 167.
1818,111,144,150,167,198.
1819, 145, 155, 167, 184, 198.
an augmentation" of the, recommended, 149, 204, 223. .
amount of^ in 1820, 167, 184, 198, 210. V
'
1821, 199,217,226,232.
'
1822,218,237,254,260.
1823,' 247, 266, 276, 286 to 292.
from 1st Jan. 1817, to 1st Jan. 1825, 284.
in 1824, 276, 299, 312, 328, 330.
1825, 313, 335 to 337, 354, 368 to 370, 476.
1826, 377, 392, 413 to 416, 432 to 438.
1827, 393, 422 to 424. 448, 451, 457 to 460.
from 1821 to 1828, 442, 448.
how affected by the issue of Treasury notes, 496.—See Merckandise.
Kevolutionary claims paid under act of .15th May, 1828, 466.
Rice, amount of, exported in 1825-6. 361.
S.
Salt duty, ceases in 1816, 9, 34.
a continuation of the, recommended, 36.
Silk, observations on the culture and manufacture of^ 364.
Sinking fund, operations ofthe, to 30th September, 1815, 20.
rise and progress ofthe, 21, 39.
further powers neeessary to the, 40, 77.0
statement of the, in 1816, 83.
stock purchased by the, in 1817, 106 to 109,
' •
1818, 124. • '
1819, 164.
1826,358,382.
7 per cent, stock, to be purchased by the. 252.
operations of the, from January, 1818, to January, 1829, 440.
Slaves, (fcc, amount received from Great Britain for. 393, 460.
amount'paid, 461, 466, 472,473.
Specie, effects ofthe suspension of the payment of, by banks, on the fiscal
.operations of Goverriment, 12, 24, 40, 114.
paymentof, resumed by banks, 114, 490.
amount possessed by banks, and in circulation in 1819, 482.
causes ofthe suspension ofthe payment of, by banks, 484, 490.
an article of commerce, 494.
Spirits distilled in the United States, dutieson, to be modified, 36, 178.
importation of, to be prohibited, 178.
quantity imported.—See Merckandise.
Stamp duties, cease in 1816, 35.
a continuation of the, recommended, 36.
Subscription to the Bank of the United States, 90.
Sugarj quantity imported.—See Merckandise.
refined, duties on, cease in 1816, 35.
a continuation of the duties on, recommended, 36.



INDEX.

-636

Surplus fund, unexpended balances carried to the, in 1815, 29.
amount applied to the payment of the public debt since
January, 1817, 441.
Surplus revenues may be applied to internal improvements, 81, 252.
T .

•

•

,

Tariff of duties on imports, a modification of the, proposed for the better
protection of domesiic liianufactures, 149.,
a revision of the, recommended, 204, 223, 252.
325, 397.
present compared with former, 304,
- V
of 1828, effect ofy on the revenue,. 445.
Taxes, a view of the several descriptions of, in 1815.12.—See Direct taxes:
also, Internal duties.
Teas imported, a reduction of the duties on, recommended, 325, 409. 445.
—See Merckandise. ,
%
.
.
Tobacco exported in 1824-5-6, 361.
.
Tonnage, amount of American and foreign, in 1814, 65.
1815,-82,95,150.
1816,95,150.
1817, 116, 150, 179.
1818, 150, 179. 205.
1819, 179, 205.'
1820, 205. •
1821, 225.
Ft--1822, 253. 1823, 285.
1824, 352.
1825, 367.
1826, 438.
1827, 456.
1828, 443.
Treasury notes authorized tobe issued in 1815, 13.
amount received from, in 1812-13-14, 15.
issued prior to February, 1815, and outstanding, LS.
may be funded, 19.
for what purposes issued in 18L5, 26.
amount received from, in 1815, 31.
re-issued prior to October, 1815, 52.
estimated amount of, unpaid in 1816, 64.
issued, 92.
funded and outstanding in 1817, 104.
1818, 112, 125.
stock issued on, to 31st December, 1817, 12L
outstanding in December, 1819, 165, 187.
October, 1820, 189.
November, 1821, 215.
October, 1822, 246.
1823, 275.
1824, 310, 345.



536

INDEX.

Treasury notes outstanding in October, 1825, 316.
• '
'• 1826, 387.
° 1827, 431.
: 1828, 474..
constituted an essential part of the circulating medium in
the Eastern States in 1815^16, 490.
expediency of issuing^ as a relief from the generaL pecuniary distress (in 1820) considered, 496.
"
w :

.

^ ^ •

'

Wines, a reduction ofthe duties on, recommended, 409.^—See Merckandise.
Woollen fabrics, further protection necessary for manufacturers of, 149,400.'

Yazoo claimants, statement of awards'in favor of the, 126, 166, 190, ,216,
246, 275, 311, 345, 387, 431, 474.




t.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102