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ANNUAL REPORT

STATE OF THE FINAICES

FORTY-THmD CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION,

D E C E M B E E , 1, 18,73,

WILLIAM A. RICHARDSON,
S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E T R E A S U R Y . .

WASHINGTON:
GOVERNMENT




PRINTING

1873.

OFFICJs.




TABLE OF CONTENTS.

[Index by subjects will be found on page 701.1
Page.
iii

I. REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY

Tables accompanying the report
Liabilities to Indian tribes
II. REPORTS OF TREASURY OFFICERS :

3
543
•

Architect, SuxDcrvising
Auditor, First
Auditor, Second
. Auditor, Third
Auditor, Fourth
Auditor, Fifth
Auditor, Sixth
'.....
Coast Survey
Bureau of Statistics
Commissioner of Customs
Commissioner of Internal Revenue
Comptroller of the Currency
Comptroller, First
Comptroller, Second
Director of the Mint
Light-House Board
Register
.:
----Solicitor
I
Treasurer




,

^

^.
-

675
175
181
201
219
227
271
579
487
171 ,
51
67
161
165
461
585
359
559
291




'\ ^0
iAy

REPORT
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Washington,, B . C, Becember 1, 1873.
S I R : In compliance with the provisions of law, I have the honor to
submit to Congress the following report:
RECEIPTS, &C., FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 3 0 , 1 8 7 3 .

The moneys received and covered.into the Treasury during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1873, were—
From customs. $188, 089,'522 70
From internal revenue
- . . 113, 729, 314 14
From sales of x>ublic lands
2, 882, 312 38
From tax on circulation and deposits of national
banks
6, 830, 037 67
From repayment of interest by Pacific Eailway Companies
:...,
514, 206 04
From customs'fines, penalties, &c.j labor, drayage,
storage, &c
1, 966, 469 36
From sales of Indian trust lands
:- 818, 246 58
From fees, (consular,) letters patent, homestead, &c.
lj.877, 221 67'
From XDroceeds of sales of Government property
1, 637, 283 15
Froni marine-hospital tax
,
333, 003 03
From steamboat fees
259, 092 56
From direct tax
315, 254 51
From x)rofits on coinage
489,134 62
From tax on seal-skins
-252,181 12
From miscellaneous sources
2,184, 394 25
Total ordinary receipts
Premium on sales of coin

-'

- 322,177, 673 78
11, 560, 530 89

Total net receipts
333, 738,204 67
Balance in Treasury June 30,1872, including $3,047 80
received from ^'unavailable".
106, 567, 404 74
Total available cash




440, 305, 609 41

IV

REPORT OP T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

The net expenditures by warrants during the same period were—,
For civirexpenses.
$19,348, 521 01
For foreign intercourse
1, 571, 362 85
For Indians-. - -.
7, 951, 704 88
For pensions
.-..-..
,. - - 29,359, 426 86
For military establishment, including fortifications,
river and harbor improvements, and arsenals
46, 323,138 31
For naval establishment, including vessels and machinery, and improvements at navy yards
23, 526,256 79
For miscellaneous, civil, including public buildings,
light-houses, and collecting; the revenue 52, 408, 226 20
For interest on the public debt,-.'.-.
104, 750, 688 44
For premium on bonds purchased
5,105,919 99
Total, exclusive of the public debt
290, 345,245 33
Redemption of the x')rincix3al of the debt, exclusive of
the certificates of deposit issued under act of June
8, 1872, for the redemption of which a like amount
of United States notes was set ax^art and held as a ^
special deposit
$50, 498, 335 58
Outstanding certificates of dex^osit
mentioned above, added to the principal of the debt and to the cash
balance in the Treasury
31, 730, 000 00
Leaving net disbursements on account of loans

18, 768, 335 58
309,113, 580 91

Balance in theTreasury June 30,1873. $99, 462, 028 50
To which add special deposit of legaltender notes for redemption of certificates of deposit, added above. -. 31, 730, 000 00
Total cash balance July 1,1873
Total

-... -

131, 192, 028 50
-----.

440,305, 609 41

By the foregoing statement it will be seen that the
net revenues for the fiscal year were
$333, 738,204 67
.And the ordinary expenses
290, 345,245 33
Leaving a surplus revenue of




43, 392, 959 34

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

V

Which has been apxDlied to the reduction o f t h e
debt, as follows:
Eeduction of principal account, exclusive of certificates of deposit-'- $50, 498, 335 5S
Decrease of cash in the Treasury, exclusive of sxiecial
dex30sit of United States notes for redemx^tion of
certificates of dex30sit, as compared with June 30,
1872
.'
7,105, 376 24
Reduction in debt

43, 392, 959 34

This statement treats solely of the principal of the debt. By the
monthly debt statement of the public debt, into which enter the
accrued interest, interest due and unpaid, and the cash in the Treasury, as ascertained on the day of publication, as well as the principal
of the debt, the reduction of the debt during the past year amounted to
$43,667,630 05; and the total reduction from March 1, 1869, to ISTovember 1, 1873, has been $383,629,783 39, the annual saving of interest
resulting therefrom being $27,432,932 04.
RECEIPTS, &C., FOR FIRST QUARTER OF FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 3 0 ,

1874.
The receipts during the first quarter of the current fiscal year were—
From
Fcom
From
From
From
From
From
From
From

customs
$49,195, 403 68
sales of public lands
°
573, 768 07^
internal reveuue
25, 640, 454 41.
tax on circulation, <Sbc., of national banks
3, 490, 743 66
repayment of interest by Pacific Railways .. - .
198, 970 56
customs' fines, &c
438, 514 21
consular, patent, and other fees
503, 941 12
proceeds of Grovernment proxierty
303, 765 32
miscellaneous sources
1, 507, 931 21

F e t ordinary receipts
-From premium on sales of coin
From Government of Great Britain—payment of the
award of the tribunal of arbitration at Geneva
Total receipts
Balance in Treasury J u n e 30, 1873
Total available




:

• ...

81, 853, 492 24
2, 350, 818 34
15^ 500, 000 00
99, 704,310 58
131^ 192, 028 50
230, 896, 339 08

VI

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

The expenditures during the same period were as follows :
For civil and miscellaneous expenses, including public
buildings, light-houses, and collecting the revenues $17, 372,293 60
For Indians
'. 2,008, 715 19
For pensions
: - - -.
8, 698,156 58
For military establishment, including fortifications,
river aiid harbor improvements, and arsenals
13, 795, 053 48
For naval establishment, including vessels and machinery and iinprovements at navy yards
9, 792, 451 57
For interest on the public debt, including Pacific
Railway bonds
- . . ^ 37, 051, 907 79
Total, exclusive of the principal and premium
on public debt.
Premium on purchased bonds
$1, 301, 946 78
Award by Geneva tribunal, investment account
15, 500, 000 00
Ket redemption of the public d e b t . . . . 32, 986, 828 91
Total net expenditures
Balance in Treasury September 30, 1873
Total

88, 718, 578 21

49, 788, 775 69

\. 138,507, 353 90
92,388,985 18
230, 896, 339 08

Owing to the large proportion of the interest on the public debt
maturing July 1, the amount paid out on that account during the first
quarter of the year is more than half as much as will be required for the
next nine months, and although it enters into the expenses pf this
quarter, it is properly chargeable to a longer period of time. Many
other expenditures are greater also during the first than any subsequent quarter, by reason of the necessity of supplying disbursing officers with money under new appropriations which became available on
the first of July.
For the remaining three-quarters of the current fiscal year it is
estimated that the receipts will be—
From
From
From
From
From
From

customs
sales of public lands
internal revenue
tax on national banks
Pacific railways
customs' fines, & c - . . :




$111, 000, 000
1, 500, 000
66, 000,000
\ ..
3, 200, 000
300, 000
800, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

From consular, patent, and other fees
From sales of public property
.'
From miscellaneous sources

— ^
.

Total

VII

$1,300, 000 00
1, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
187,100, 000 00

For the same period it is estimated that the expenditures will be—
For civil expenses
....."....:
For foreign intercourse
For Indians
For pensions
For military establishment
For naval establishment
For.miscellaneous, civil, including public buildings..
For interest on the public debt.
Total-

'

$15, 250, 000
1,100, 000
6, 500, 000
21, 780, 000
34, 000, 000
18, 000, 000
34, 000, 000
70, 000, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

200, 630, 000 00

This will leave a deficiency in the revenues of $13,530,000.
ESTIMATES FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 3 0 , 1 8 7 5 .

It is estimated that the receipts for the fiscal 3^ear ending June 30,
1875, win be—
From customs
$180, 000, 000 00
From sales of public lands
2,500, O O 00
Q
From internal revenue
108, 000, 000 00
From tax on national banks
6,200, 000 00
'From Pacific railways
'.,. •
500, 000 00
From customs' fines, &c
1, 500, 000 00
From consular, patent, and other fees...,
-.
1, 500, 000 00
From sales of public property
. 1, 500, 000 00
From miscellaneous sources
4, 000, 000 00
Total. -

305, 700, 000 00
_

It is estimated that the expenditures for the same period will be—
For civil expenses.. - '.
^
-.
Forforeign intercourse
-!
For Indians
For pensions
For military establishment, including fortifications,
river and harbor improvements, and arsenals




$19, 500, 000 00
3, 350, 000 00
7, 000, 000 00
30, 480, 000 00
/
50, 000, 000 00

VIII

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

For naval establishment, including vessels and machinery and improvements at nav^^ yards
$23, 000, 000 00
For miscellaneous, civil, including public buildings,
light-houses, and collecting the revenues
54, 067,144 00
For interest on the public debt.
98, 000, 000 00
For interest on Pacific Railway bonds
3, 875, 000,00
For sinking fund.. -:
29, 918, 856 00
Total.. -

319,191, 000 00

The estimates received from, the several Executive Departments are
as follows:
•
Legislative
Executive
Judicial
Foreign intercourse
.. Military
IsTaval
Indians
Pensions
Public works
Postal service
•
Miscellaneous
Permanent
Interest on public debt
Interest on Pacific Railway bonds
Sinking fund.
.•

- -.
:...

^^.. -.
\...
:
»
.
-.

Total

$3,961, 405 62
17, 895, 674 90
3,409, 750 00
3,347, 304 00
34, 881, 618 10
19, 251, 935 86
6, 765, 779 61
*30, 480, 000 00
33,168,287 10
6, 811,363 00
10, 704, 381 42
16, 926, 890 49
97, 798, 080 00
3, 877, 410 72
29, 918, 856 00.
319,198, 736 82

The book of estimates, now ready to be laid before Congress, thoroughly prepared under the immediate supervision of Mr. C. F. Conant,
chief of the warrant division of the Secretary's ofiice, whose watchful
care, industry, and judgment have made it a work of great accuracy,
will prove to be of the utmost convenience to committees and members.
The several tables which^ form part of this report furnish details of
the accounts of the Department.
THE REVENUES AND ESTIMATES.

On account of the alterations in the tariff laws, effected by the acts of
May 1 and June 6,1872, adding tea and coffee and other articles to the
free list, and the reduction of duties on other merchandise, as well as




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREAST.^RY.

, IX

by the removal of a considerable amount of internal revenue taxation,
the receipts have fallen off for the year ending June 30, 1873, much
below those of x:)revious years, as was anticix)ated.
Since the close of that year the recent severe financial and commercial crisis has caused an additional and unexpected diminution in the
revenues during part of September and the whole of October and
ISTovember.
But it is gratifying to find that, in this x^eriod of the greatest commercial embarrassment, the receipts in coin from customs have been
greater than the proportionate amount required for the same period to
meet the interest on the xiublic debt and all other expenditures which
are payable in coin.
For the remainder of the year the currency payments will be much
larger than the ordinary currency receipts without the sale of gold.
The revenues have already fallen off sufficiently to make it important
and necessary to exercise the greatest economy in appropriations and
expenditures for the future. And should there not be a revival of
business at an early day, and an increase in the receipts over those of
the x^ast two and a half months, additional means will be required to
meet exxienses. Should such be the case, I recommend additional
taxation, judiciously laid, so as to be the least burdensome ux^on the
people and the business of the country, rather than a resort to borrowing money and increasing the public debt.
In the estimates for the next nine months, as well as for the next
fiscal year, the x)robable effect of the financial and business derangement has been somewhat taken into account; but, as it is yet too early
to determine its full effect upon the future revenues, or to estimate
when and to what extent they will be restored to their former amounts,
these estimates are subject to future contingencies, which*, during the
next few months. Congress will be better able to take into account and
to judge of than it is possible to do at this time. ,
In any event, I earnestly commend ever}^ reduction in the approxiriations which may be found xiossible, to the end that the economy
which the x^eox^le, suffering under the xiresent embarrassment in business, are everywhere disposed to make, may be shared and encouraged
by the Government through their public servants.
REFUNDING THE PUBLIC DEBT.

Under arrangements made by my immediate predecessor in January
last, the refunding of the public debt has been successfully continued,
and is still x3rogressing in x)recisely the same manner as previous




X

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

negotiations were conducted. Subscriptions have been made to the
new five per cent, funded loan to the extent of eighty-four and a half
million dollars, and the proceeds are applied, as fast as subscriptions
mature, to the. redemx^tion of an equal aimount of five-twenty bonds
bearing six per cent, interest.
In addition to that amount, the fifteen and a half million (-ollars
received from Great Britain in payment of the Geneva award, under the
first article of the Treaty of Washington, have been used to redeem so
far the outstanding public debt bearing six per cent, interest, and an
amount equal to the debt so redeemed has been invested in five per
cent, bond's of the funded loan, and a registered bond therefor has
been issued to the Secretary of State, in trust, to be held subject to the
future disposition of Congress, according to the provisions of the act
of March 3, 1873.
When the subscriptions above mentioned shall have matured there
will have been thus effected since January last a conversion of the
debt bearing six per cent, interest into the new five per cent, loan., one
hundred million dollars, making an annual saving of interest to the
amount of one million dollars. And the whole amount converted into
this loan since the passage of the refunding ac.t will be three hundred
million dollars, reducing the annual interest charge three million
dollars.
The credit of the United States has not stood higher since the close
of the rebellion than it does at the present time, and it is believed
that the refuriding of the six per cent, debt at a lower rate of interest
can be still further continued.
LOAN OF 1 8 5 8 .

Under the provisions of the act of June 14, 1858, as amended by the
act of March 3, 1859, (chap. 82, sec. 6,) the then Secretary o f t h e
Treasur}^ contracted a loan of twentj^ million dollars, for part of which
registered bonds were issued '^ redeemable atthe pleasure of the United
States at any time after the expiration of fifteen years after the 1st of
January, 1859;" and for the balance, and much larger xoart, coupon
bonds Avere issued '-payable at any time after the 1st day of January,
1874, on presentation and surrender of the certificate at the Treasury
of the United States."
I t will be perceived that the two classes of bonds differ materially
in phraseology as to the option of payment after January 1,1874, but I
am unable to discover, either from the act itself or from the records of
the Department, that any difference in the contracts was intended, and




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XI

it is presumed that the variation in language of the two classes of
bonds Svas wholly accidental. Since the passage of the act of June 30,
1864, authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to issue registered
bonds of any loan in exchange/or coux^on bonds of the same loan, the
coupon bonds of this loan to the amount of about four million dollars
haye been exchanged into the registered bonds, and the amount of
each class now outstanding is $6,255,000 registered, and $13,745,000
coupon.
It is understood that some holders of the coupon bonds have regarded them as payable on the first of January next or at any time
after that date, at their option. Applications have been made to the
Department for the privilege of exchainging coupon bonds for five per
cent, bonds of the funded loan, which exchange the Secretary of the
Treasury has now no authority to x^ermit.
1^0 apxiroxiriation has been made, either in the act authorizing the
loan or in any subsequent act, for the payment of the principal, and no
provision of law exists for determining the pleasure of the United
States as to the time of payment of either class of bonds.
The attention of Congress is thus called to this loan with the recommendation that such action in relation thereto may be taken, before the
1st day of January next, as Congress may deem, wise and just.
THE BANKS, THE FINANCIAL CRISIS, AND THE CURRENCY.

The prevailing xiractice, not only of national banks, but of State
banks and x^i'ivate bankers, of paying interest on deposits attracts
currency from all parts of the country to the large cities, and especially
to Kew York, the great financial centre. At seasons of the year when
there is comxiaratively little use for currency elsewhere, immense
balances accumulate in ISTew York, where, not being required by the
demands of legitimate ahd ordinary business, they are loaned on call
at a higher rate of interest than that paid to depositors and are used
in speculation.
Every year, at the season when the demand sets in from the West
and South for currency to be used in payment for and transportation
of, their agricultural products, there occurs a stringency in the money
market arising from the calling in of such loans to meet this demand.
Until this year, though annually creating some embarrassment, this
demand has been met without serious difficult}^
During the past summer, anticipating the usual autumn stringency,
the Treasury Department sold gold while the inarket price was high,
currency abundant, and bonds for sale in the market were scarce,




XII

REPORT

OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

and vi^hile there was a surplus of gold in the Treasury, and thereby
accumulated about fourteen million dollars of currency with the view
of using the same or such part thereof as might be necessary in the
XDurchase of bonds 'for the sinking fund at times during the autumn
and winter when they could be bought at a price not above par in
gold, or in meeting demands upon the Treasury^ as circumstances
should require.
This year there was a great demand for currency to pay for the
heavy crops of a bountiful harvest, for which the European countries
offered a ready market. The suspension of certain large banking
houses, the first of which occurred on the 18th day of Seiitember,
alarmed the people as to the safet}^ of banks aud banking institutions
in general. Suddenly there began a raxiid calling in of demand loans
and a very general run on the banks for the withdrawal of dexiosits.
Entire confidence was manifested in United States notes and even in
national-bank notes, and they were drawn wherever they could be
obtained and were largely hoarded with as much avidity as coin was
ever hoarded in times, of financial distress when that was the circulating medium of the country. The banks found themselves unable to
meet the demands ux')on them, currencj^ in circulation became exceedingly scarce, and the business of the'COUDtry became greatly embarrassed.
In this condition of things, great pressure was brought to bear upon
the Treasury Department to afford relief by the issue of United States
notes. The first application came from a number of gentlemen in I^ew
York, suggesting that no measure of relief would be adequate that did
not place at the service of the banks of that city twenty millions of
dollars in United States notes, and asking that the assistant treasurer
at New York should be authorized to issue to those banks that amount
of notes as a loan upon a pledge of clearing-house certificates secured
by ample collaterals, and for which certificates all the banks were to
be jointly and severally responsible. This proposition was declined,
it being clearly not Avithin the duty or the authority of the Treasury
Department, under any iirovisions of law, thus to employ the public
money.
Exchange on Europe having fallen to unusually low rates, and indeed having become almost unsaleable in the market, to the embarrassment of our foreign and domestic'trade, applications were made to the
Secretary of the Treasury to use the money in the Treasury in the purchase of exchange. The Treasury Department having no occasion to
do this for its own use, and no necessity for transferring funds to
Europe, was compelled to decline this proposition, which, if accepted.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XIII

would have x^ut the Dexiartment in the xiosition of becoming a dealer
in exchange, a position clearly inconsistent with its duties.
Subsequently the J^ew York Produce Exchange made a proposition
to accomx^lish the same result in a different form, and also requested,
as others had before, that.tlie Secretary should pay at once the twentymillion loan of 1858, to which the following reply was made:
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 30, 1873.
S I R : Your letter of the 29th inst., covering two resolutions of.the
IsTew York Produce Exchange, has been received and the subject-matter
fully considered.
^
The resolutions are as^ follows:
' ^ W H E R E A S the critical condition of the commercial interests of the
country requires,immediate relief by the removal-of the block in negotiating foreign exchange; therefore be it
^'Besolved, That we respectfully suggest to the Secretary of the Treasury the following x)lans for relief in this extraordinary emergency:
''First. That currency be immediately issued to banks or bankers,
upon satisfactory evidence that gold has been placed upon special
deposit in the Bank of-England, by their correspondents in London,
to the credit of the United States, to be used solely in xiurchasing commercial bills of exchange.
''Second. That the President of the United States and the Secretary
of the Treasury are respectfully requested to order the immediate preX^ayment of the outstanding loan of the United States due January 1,
1874." .
.
. •
While the Government is desirous of doing all in its power to relieve
the present unsettled condition of business ailairs—as has alreadj^ been
announced by the President—it is constrained, in all its acts, to keep
within the letter and spirit qf the laws, which the officers of the Government are sworn to suxDx^ort, and theycannot go beyond the authority
which Congress has conferred upon them. Your first resolution presents
difficulties which cannot be overcome. It is not suxiposed that you
desire to exchange coin in England for United States notes in New
York at x)ar. If your proposition is for the Government to xiurchase
gold iu England, to be paid for in United States notes at the current
market rate in IsTew York, it would involve the Government in the
business qf importing and speculating in gold, since the Treasury
has no use for coin beyond its ordinary receipts, and would be obliged
to sell the coin so X3urchased at a price greater or less than was x)aid
for it. If your object is to induce the Treasury Department to loan
United States notes to banks in New York ux^on the x^ledge and deposit
in London of gold, it is asking the Secretary of the Treasury to loan
the money of the United States upon collateral security for which there
is no authority in law. If the Secretary of the Treasury can loan notes
upon a pledge of coin he can loan them upon a pledge of other property in his discretion, as he has recently been requested to do, which
would be an extraordinary power as well as a most dangerous business
to engage in, and which my judgment would deter me from undertaking,
as the Secretary of the Treasury, even if by any stretch of construction
I might not find it absolutely prohibited by law. The objections already




XIV

R E P O R T OF T H E SECRETARY OF. T H E TREASURY.

mentioned to your first resolution axe so insuperable and conclusive
that it is unnecessary for me to refer to the many practical difficulties
which would arise if an attempt should be made to comply with your
request. Your second resolution calls for the' payment at once of the
loan of 1858, or the bonds commonly called ''Fives of 1874." Upon a
thorough investigation I am of opinion that Congress has not conferred
upon the Secretary of the Treasury power to comply with your request
in that particular, and in this opinion the law officers of the Government concur. Under these circumstances you will perceive that, while
I have great resxiect for the gentlemen comprising the New York
Produce Exchange, I am. compelled, b}^ my views of the law and of my
duty, to respectfully decline to adopt the measure which your resolutions
propose.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully,
W M . A . RICHARDSON,

•

Secretary of the Treasury.

TheChainber of Commerce of Charleston, South Carolina, xietitioned
for the transfer of currency to that city, and the X3urchase with it, at
that xioint, of exchange on New York, to aid those engaged in forwarding the cotton crop to the market. The folloAA^ing letter was sent in
answer to this petition:
\
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

Octoher 3, 1873.
SAMUEL Y . TuppER,'Esq.,

President Chamber of Commerce, Charleston, S. C.:
I have the honor to acknowledge the receix^t of the memorial of the
Charleston, South Carolina, Chamber of Commerce, addressed to the
President ofthe United States, and referred to this Department, which,
. after reciting the present stringency in the -money market and the
difficulty of obtaining currency, requests ' ' t h a t the sum of five hundred thousand dollars be xilaced and maintained on deposit Avith the
assistant treasurer at Charleston, to be used by him in the purchase
of New York exchange from the banks."
To comply with the request it w^ould be necessary for the Treasury
DexDartment to send currency by exx^ress to Charleston from time to
time, and to buy with it exchange on New York in competition with
private bankers.
Should this request be granted a hundred other xilaces in the country might, with equal propriety, ask for the same relief, and if all such
requests were impartially granted, the Dexiartment w^ould find itself
engaged in an extensive exchange business, fixing and regulating the
rate of exchange between different places in the country, and the
public money, raised by taxation only for the purpose of carrying on
the Government, would be employed to a very large amount in a business which Congress has not given the Secretary of the Treasury any
authority to engage in.
With a due regard to the proxier management of the Treasury Department, within the provisious of law, I have felt it to be my duty to
decline all similar x)ropositions from other places, and your request
must, therefore, receive the same response.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, yours,




W M . A . RICHARDSON,

Secretary of the Treasury.

Rfi:P0RT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XV

The Executive Dexiartment of the Government was anxious to do
everything in its power, under the law, and with due regard to the
XDrotection of the Treasury and the maintenance 6f public credit, to allay
the panic and to prevent disaster to the legitimate commercial and industrial interests of the countiy; but it. was found impossible to afford
the relief in au}^ of the ma^ny forms in which that relief was asked. It
was decided, therefore, to adopt the only practicable course which
seemed to be open to it, the purchase of bonds for the sinking fund to
such, an extent as the condition ofthe Treasury would allow, and thus
release a considerable amount of currency from its vaults. Purchases
of bonds were commenced on the morning of the 20th of September,
and Avere continued until the 24th, when it became eyident that the
amount off'ering for purchase was increasing to an extent beyond the
power of the Treasury to accept, and the purchasing was closed after
bonds to the amount of about thirteen million dollars had beenjDought,
and without the use of any part of the fortj^-four millions of United
States notes, generally known as the reserve.
It should be stated that in the excitement there were man3^ persons
in the city of New York who insisted with great earnestness that it
was . the duty of the Executive to disregard any and all laws vvhich
stood in the way of affording the relief suggested by them—a x^roposition
which indicates the state of feeling and the excitement under which
applications were made to the Secretary, of the Treasury to use the
X)ublic money, and which, it is scarcely necessary to add, could not
be entertained by the officers of the Government to whpm it was
addressed.
These facts are recited in order to lay before Congress, and place on
record in a concise form, exactly what the Treasury Department was
asked to do, and what it did. in the late financial crisis.
The currency x^aid out of the Treasury for bonds did much to
strengthen mau}^ savings bank.s, and to prevent a panic among their,
numerous depositors, who began to be alarmed, and had there
developed an extended run ux3on those useful institutions, it would
inevitably have caused widespread disaster and distress. It also fortified other banks, and checked the general alarm to some extent. But the
loss of confidence in the value of a great amount of corporate property
which immediately followed the failure of banking houses connected
with largely-indebted corporations, the distrust of the solvency of
many other institutions, the doubt as to the credit of firms and individuals whose business was supposed to be greatly extended, and the
legitimate effect thereof in disturbing the business of the country,




XVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

could not be avoided by any amount of currenc^^ which might be
added to the circulation alread}^ existing.
Confidence was to be entirely restored only b}^ the slow and cautious
process of gaining a better knowledge of true values and making investments accordingly, and by conducting business on a firmer basis,
with less inflation and more regard to real soundness and intrinsic
values.
There can be no doubt that the practice by banks of allowing interest on deposits payable on demand is xDernicious, and fraught with
danger and embarrassment to borrower and lender, as well as to the
general business interests.
Deposits x^a^"^"^^le on demand should be limited to that surplus
which individuals require over and above their investments, and no
Xoart of that from Avhich they exxiect an income. Such deposits are
comparatively stable in average amount, and constitute a healthy
basis for banking purposes within xiroper limits, which prudent bankers
know h A ^ to determine.
oA
But if dexDOsit accounts are employed as temx)orary iuA^estments,
the interest attracts a large amount of money to those cities AA^here
such interest is paid, and Avhere speculation is most active, at
seasons Avhen as much x^i^ofit thereon cannot be secured elsewhere.
With the first return of activit^Mn legitimate business these temporary iuA'^estments are called in, and jeopardize in their sudden
Avithdrawal the whole business of the banks, both affecting the
legitimate dex^ositors on the one hand by excitement and distrust, and
on the other creating a condition of things in Avhich the borroAvers on
call are also unable to respond. The banks have borroAved their money
of depositors on call. They have loaned it on call to speculators,
Avho by its use have contributed to inflate the x^rices .of the stocks or
merchandise Avhich have been the subject of their speculations. The
-speculator Avants it to carry the stocks till he can dispose of them
without a loss. This he is unable to do in a stringent money market.
The banks, their depositors, and the borroAvers, all Avant it at the
same time, and of course a stringency is dcA^eloped AA^hich sx^reads
distress throughout the country. .
The system creates immense amount of debts payable on demand,
all of which thus suddenly and unexpectedl}^ mature at the first shock
of financial or commercial embarrassment in the countiy^, and at the
very time when most needed by debtors and when they are least able
to respond.,
There is no safety for corporations or individuals whose capital employed is wholly or mostly borrowed on call. Many savings banks




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,

XA^II

were protected from ruin in the reeent financial excitement by availing
themseh^es of proAnsions in their rules requiring sixty days or other
X^eriods of notice before xiaying depositors, thus making all their deposits payable on time. Every cautious and Avell-managed, savings institution has such a rule among its^ by-laAvs.
Without attributing- the stringency in the money market, which is .,
experienced ever^^^- autumn and occasionally at other seasons of the
year, solely to this X3ractice of paying interest upon deposits in the
large cities, it is evident that, when money is less needed in legitimate
business, the xiractice encourages OA^ertrading and speculation, ahvays
detrimental to the best interests of the country, and the bad effects of
Avhich upon those interests become more apparent, and the disaster
more widespread, w4ien the necessary contraction begins to be felt.
I recommend that national banks be prevented from paying interest
on deposits, or that they be restricted and limited therein, either by
.direct prohibition, by discriminating taxation, or otherAvise.
While legislation, by Cougress cannot prevent State banks and private bankers from continuing the xiractice, it can prevent national
banks from becoming involved in, and instrunrental in producing, the
embarrassments and difficulties to which it necessarily leads.
The national banks, organized by law of Congress and having relations A\ith the Government in. the issue of circulating notes, ought to
be the most cautious and safe banking institutions ofthe country, and •
should be kept aloof from all hazardous business which it is not
Xiossible to prevent sanguine, venturesome, and speculative indiA^iduals
from engaging in, at the risk of their cax3ital and their credit.
With a fixed amount of circulation of bank notes and of United States
legal-tender notes not redeemable in coin, and with gold above par in
currency, thiere must be each year times of redundancy and times of
scarcity of currency, depending wholly on the demand, no method ex- >
isting for increasing the sux3X3ly.
\
With a circulating medium redeemable in coin, a redundancy is
corrected by the export, and a scarcity by the import of specie from
other countries.
There is a prevailing sentiment that more elasticity should bd given
to the volume of the currency, so that the aniount in circulation might
increase and diminish according to the necessities of the business of
the country. But the difference of ox3inion on this subject is so great,
and the real difficulties attending its solution are so numerous, that,
without discussing any of the multitude of plans which have been presented to the public through the X)r6ss and otherwise, I earnestly com' 2 SR




XVIII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

mend to the wisdom of Congress a.careful and thorough consideration
of this important subject, rendered more obAdously important by the
present embarrassed condition of large business interests which have
suffered by the i'ecent financial crisis; and that, in such inquiry^
avoiding further inflation of the issue of irredeemable legal-tender
notes, the most desirable of all financial results to be attained, namely,
a X3ermanent return to the sound basis of specie payments, and a gold
standard to which all our X3ax3er issues shall be made of equal A^alue,
shall be the aim.
To allow national banks to use part of their reserves at seasons of
the greatest pressure, under proper restrictions and regulations, would
afford some flexibility.
Rigid statute laws applied to all banks, at all seasons, and in all
places alike, often x3rove an embarrassment and injury when they conflict AA^ith economic principles and the laws of trade and business,
which are stronger than legislative enactments, and cannot be OA^erthroAvn thereby. Associated banks at the several redemption cities
named in the banking law, Avhich are the great controlling centres of
business, might do inueh to give steadiness and safety, if they were
authorized, through properly constituted boards or committees of their
own officers, to exercise a large discretion in the use of their reserves,
in the rate of interest to be charged at different seasons and under
. different circumstances, and in other matters, within liinits prescribed
by law.
•
Should it be deemed necessary or expedient to temporarily enlarge
the x3aper-money circulation in cases of great emergency, xDi'Ovision
inay be made to permit the national banks, under certain circumstances
and to a limited extent, to increase their note circulation by a pledge
of United States bonds, bearing no interest while so pledged, or subjecting the banks to special taxation upon the circulating ndtes obtained
thereon, or upon such other terms that it Avould be for their interest to
recall the notes and redeem the bonds at the earliest x3ossible day after
the pressure and their necessities should haA^e ceased.
But any large augmentation of the issue of United States legaltender notes in time of X3eace would not only be a departure from that
"declaration of public policy and X3ledge of the X3ublic faith to the
national creditors," made in the act of June 30, 1864, that the total
amount of such notes shall never exceed four hundred million dollars,
as well as from that more solemn x^ledge contained in the first act of
the Forty-first Congress, "to make provision at the earliest xiracticable
X3eriod for the redemx3tion of United States notes in coin," but would




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XIX

postpone the day of specie payments and render it more difficult to
attain in the distant future, unsettle confidence in our national finances,
and be a serious detriment to public credit at home and abroad. .
There can be no doubt that during the eight years since the rebellion
there has been a growing desire among the people to restore the paper
circulation to a specie standard, and that any stex3S taken tp accomXilish that object wiU be received with general favor.
It is not possible to resume and maintain sx3ecie payments with so •
large an amount of notes in circulation, and so small an amount of
gold in the country. The volume of currency must be reduced or that
of coin greatly increased. Should the national banks be prohibited
from selling the coin received by them as interest upon bonds pledged
to secure circulation, retaining the same in Avhole or in part in
reserve, or loaning it in the discount of bills and notes payable in
coin, as Congress might prescribe, there would be a gradual accumulation of gold in the banks, which would do something towards preparing for resumptiouo This, with a constant increase of coin in the
Treasury, undertaken, with the approval of Congress, Avould ere:, long
lead to the desired result, when other conditions required for the maintenance of specie payments should become favorable.
The acts of Congress of February 25, 1862, July 11, 1862, and March
3, 1863, together authorize the issue of four hundred million dollars of
United States notes, in addition to fifty million dollars of such notes
reserved for the purpose of securing x^rompt xiayment of temporaryloan deposits, and the act of June 30, 1864, contains these, words:
"nor shall the total amount of United States notes issued, or to be
issued, evei? exceed four hundred millions of dollars, and such additional sum not exceeding fifty millions of dollars, as may be temporarily required for the redemption of temporary loan."
The temporary loans referred to in the foregoing acts having been
redeem.ed, the maximum amount of United States notes which, under
existing laws, can now or hereafter be issued, is four hundred million
dollars.
Between the 31st of August, 1865, when the amount of United States
notes outstanding was at its highest point, and the 4th of February,
1868, there was a gradual contraction of the amount in. actual circulation, limited by' the act of February 12,1866, to not more than ten million dollars within the then next six months, and thereafter not more
than four million dollars in any one month. On the 4th of February,
1868, Congress passed an iact suspending further reduction of the currency, when the amount outstanding was three hundred and fifty-six




XX

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

million dollars, and that sum is HOAV the minimum limit df issue. But
the law authorizing the issue of the maximum of four hundred million
dollars has never been repealed, and has uniformly been held by the
Treasury Department and the laAv officers thereof to be in full force.
In view of the uncertainty which exists in public sentiment as to the
right of the Secretary of the Treasury to issue United States notes in
excess of the minimum,- and the conflict of ox3inion as to the policy of
doing so, conceding that he has that right under the law, I resxiectfully recommend that Congress shall set these questions at rest by a
distinct enactment.
Until that is done, whenever there is a stringency in the money
market there will continue to be.a pressure upon the Treasury Department, by those who favor a X3olicy of exx3ansion, to increase the issue
of notes to the maximum, by the purchase of bonds or otherwise;
while, on the other hand, those who conceive that the public interests
will be better served thereby will bring equal pressure to keep the
issue down to the minimum.
Assuming that it is the settled policy of Congress, as declared in
the act of June 30, 1864, above cited, that the tot.al amount of
United States notes, issued and to be issued, shall never exceed four
hundred million dollars, I am of oxiinion that it would be uuAvise to
require the amount in actual circulation to be kept up to the maximum or to any amount above the present minimum. The Treasury",
dex3ending princix3ally upon the receix3ts from customs and internal
taxation, without the power of borrowing or otherwise increasing its
resources, with liabilities created by congressional ax3X3ropriations
which must be met in currency to the extent of nearly two hundred
million dollars a year, ought always to have a large reserve upon
Avhich it can draw to meet the ordinary demands upon it in case of
emergencies, when the .revenues suddenly, and unexpectedly diminish
by reason of a national calamity or financial derangement, which from
time to time are liable to occur in all nations.
Such a reserve is also rendered necessary by the fact that the fractional currency authorized to be issued to the amount of fifty million
dollars, UOAV in actual circulation to the extent of more than forty
million dollars, is redeemable ih United States notes at the option of.
the holders.
.
In order that there may be no ^misunderstanding as to the circumstances under which the amount between the minimum and the maximum may be issued, and, that it may not be issued for the purx30se of
inflating the x^^P^i' currency of the country, I recommend that it be




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY Oh' T H E TREASURY.

XXI

declared a reserve to be issued temporarily when the ordinary demands
upon the Treasury shall require it, and in payment of such demands
and for the redemption of fractional .currency, the amount so issued to
be returned to the reserve as soon as the cdndition of the Treasury
shall warrant it, and that the purchase of bonds shall be forbidden so
long as the outstanding United States notes shall exceed the minimum
fixed by the act of February 4, 1868.
I believe that such a reserve, so restricted, would be a xii'oper and
reasonable x3rotectioh against any contingencies whereby the revenues
of the country might temporarily be diminished, and. Avould give no
reasonable cause to fear permanent inflation. As it ought not to
be the business of the Treasury Department to increase and diminish
the amount of legal-tender notes from time to time, according to the
condition of the money market, and for the sole purpose of affecting
that market, I think it Avould be unwise to authorize the reserve to be
issued excex3t for the purposes and in the manner which I have suggested.
NATIONAL BANK NOTES.

In the general appropriation act for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1874, the following special appropriation is made, in addition to the
usual annual appropriation for making and issuing the national currency :
" F o r replacing the worn and mutilated circulating notes of national
banking associations, and for engraAdng and preparing, in such manner and on such paper and of such form and design as the Secretary
of the Treasury may prescribe, new circulating notes for such associations to rejilace notes of a design and denomination now successfully
counterfeited, six hundred thousand dollars: Provided, That each of
said national banking associations shall reimburse the Treasury the
costs of the circulating notes furnished under this iirovision."
The operation of this clause must be very limited without further
legislation. The making of new plates and replacing notes seem to be
restricted to those of denominations which have been successfully counterfeited, and it is found that the only one that can be thus considered
is the ten-dollar note, although the tAvo and the twenty-dollar notes
have been counterfeited to some extent. A plate has been made for
the ten-dollar note, but as the proviso in this clause requires banking
associations to reimbiHse the Treasury for the cost thereof, fA ^ banks
eA
are inclined to order them while they can continue to haA^e notes of
other denominations printed from.the old plates without cost to themselA^es, under the provisions ofthe general banking law.




XXII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

I recommend that the x3roA^iso in the clause aboA^e cited be repealed,
or that banks be required to pay for all new notes furnished them,
whether printed from new or old plates.
The soiled and mutilated condition of the circulating notes of national
banks now in use makes it a matter of necessity that something should
be done^to redeem the same and to supply their places Avith new currency, to the end that all the notes, which the peox3le are obliged to«
take ahd use as money may be clean and whole. Several methods to
accomplish this result haA^^e been carefuUy considered, but no X3lan
seems to be feasible without the active co-ox3eration of the banks
themselves, assisted by such congressional enactments, as may be
required for that purpose, which are earnestly recommended.
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS.
During the fiscal year ending June 30) 1873, the value of merchandise imported into the United States was $642,029,539, as against
$626,595,077 for the previous year.
An analysis shows an increase in' the imports of merchandise
admitted duty free, in raw materials and in some articles of necessity,
while in some articles of luxury there, was a reduction.
The increase in the imxiortation of coffee was $6,164,339, and in
tea, $1,522,519, in addition to the amounts in. bond July i, 1872, and
Avhich were withdraA\^n therefrom during the year. Coffee was so Avithdrawn for consumx3tion to the A^alue of $16,901,126, and tea to the
value of $18,024,2lt. There was an increase, also, in the importation
of copper and copper manufactures of $1,818,488; soda and salts,
$1,719,408; tin in plates, $2,681,222; hides and skins, $1,427,784; furskins, $188,170; melado, $2,656,138; wood and manufactures thereof,
$2,141,766; eartheuAvare, $745,140; manufactures of cotton, $9,893,870.
There was a decrease in silk, goods, $5,723,582; x^recious stones,
$.182,905; fruits, $713,203; fancy goods, $278,577; fine linen, laces,
and other manufactures of flax, $1,054,115; as Avell as in some articles
of a different class, such as barley, $440,626; ox3ium and extracts
thereof, $128,839; leather • and leather goods, $1,829,917; wool,
$8,105,114.
The gold value of the exports of merchandise from the United States
was,$522,478,892, as against $444,177,586 for the prcAdous year.
There was an increase in certain articles exported as follows, the
,A^alue being stated in currency:
Cotton, $47,201,672; "wheat, $12,537,194; wheat, flour, $1,425,980;
bacon and hams, $13,895,545; pork, $884,727; lard, $1,068,196; cheese.




R E P O R T OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XXIII

$2,745,092; oils, $7,256,514; wood and manufactures thereoi, $3,878,930;
manufactures of iron, $2,372,725; coal, $952,449; drugs and chemicals,.
$575,050; hides and skins, $2,159,845; furs and fur-skins, $382,545;
leather and leather goods, $1,621,465; in liA^e animals, $259,731.
The export of gold and silver in excess of the imports was.
$63,127,637, as against $66,133,845 for the previous year.
The balance of trade in merchandise has been largely against the
United States for many years, and the country has exx3orted during the
twenty years ending Avith the last fiscal year gold a;nd silver to the.
'extent of inore than a thousand million dollars OA^er and above the
;amount imx3orted.
. For some months x^ast, and esx3ecially in the months of October and.
November, the export trade in merchandise has greatly increased, and,
owing to the disturbance of financial affairs and other causes, the importation of goods has largely diminished, so that the balance of trade
a t present is in favor of the United States; and gold and silver have
flowed into the country during thex^ast two months at a rate more
rapid than ever before, except in the year 1861, when, for the whole year,
the excess of imx3orts over exx3orts was $16,548,531; and for the past
twenty years there has been no other single year in which there has.
been an excess of imx3orts of gold and silver over the exports.
The condition of the carrying trade with foreign countries, though
exhibiting a large adverse balance, shows. some slight gains, AAith
X3rospects of still further improvement. Of the exx3orts and imports
during the x^^st year, twenty-seven per cent. were» carried in United
States vessels—a gain of three per cent, over the previous year.
The increase in shix3-building in the country is decided. Official
numbers were awarded by the Bureau of Statistics to 1,699 A^essels of
the aggregate tonnage of 313,743 tons, while, during the year preceding, the addition to our mercantile marine was only 38,621 tons..
iSince the close of the fiscal year still greater activit}^ has prcA^ailed in
the ship-yards on the Atlantic seaboard. From the 1st of July to
the 1st of November documents have been issued to 1,288 completed
vessels of 181,000 tons in all, while such returns as have been received,
incomplete as they are, indicate that there were building in October
last 386 vessels of the tonnage of 177,529 tons; including 69 steamers
with a tonnage of 67,007 tons, of which 18 iron steamers with an
;aggreci^ate of 38,492 tons are in course of construction on the DelaAvare. •
In view, of the high price of iron and coal and the recent advance in.
the cost of labor in Europe, together with the superior tensile strength .
of American shix3-plates, as proved by actual exxieriments, there is




XXIV

R E P O R T OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

reasonable encouragement to expect that this branch of industry will
make rapid strides of progress, to the great adA^antage of the commerce, trade, and financial strength of the country.
The following table shows the amount of merchandise imported or
taken out of .bond a t t h e xilaces therein named since the xiassage of
the act of June 6, 1872, authorizing the imxiortation free of duty of
certain articles actually used for ship-building:
Value.

Duties
remitted.

Duties
estimated.

Duties to be collected.

Sl73,626 00
139,•246 00

$36,992 00
37,546 86

$10,347 06

Philadelphia........
2, 768 00
, 15,403 00
Portland..
"Bath
56, 666 00

894 48
4,687 67
4,743 92

,
$1, 306 13
Duties remitted, but vessel engaged in coasting
trade more than three
months in one year,
hence duties accrued.

387,709 00
Total
Duties estimated..

84, 864 93
10,347 06

Port.
New Yoi'k
Boston

10,347 06

1,306 13

Vessels .Vessels
built. repaired.
2
4

•47

17

1
2

28

50

95,211 99

Nothing, except a sound financial system, is more important to the*
welfare of the country than that of turning and retaining the balance
of trade in favor of the United States, by a healthy stimulation of the
agricultural and manufacturing industry of the country, the reduction;
in the cost of production at home, and of the transportation of merchandise from the interior to the seaboard, and the building of ships and
vessels to do the carrying trade, now mostly in the hands of the people
of other countries; and no legislation should be neglected which may
assist the industrious people of our country in attaining those most
desirable results.
With the balance of trade in favor of the United States a return tospecie payments may be easily reached, and, Avhen reached, may be
maintained if such wise financial measures are adox3ted as will prcA^ent
overtrading, extraA^agance, and speculation, and encourage economyy,
industry, thrift, and only well-directed and prudent enterprises—conditions as essential to the prosperity of nations as td individuals.

The attention of'Congress is iuAdted to the necessity of a revision
and codification of existing tariff laws. Duties on imports are UOAV imI)Osed under fourteen principal statutes relating to classification and
rates, besides twenty other acts or resolutions modifying or affecting^
tariff' acts, all passed betw^een March 1, 1861, and March. 4, 1873, to
which must be added the A^ery numerous customs rcA^enue laws enacted
prior to March, 1861, and remaining either wholly or partially in force»




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XXV

Under these various enactments, questions relating to the x3roper
assessment of duties cdnstantly arise. There is often a direct conflict
between different statutes, and occasionally between two or more x3rovisions of the same statute, while single provisions are frequently held
to embrace different meanings. These differences can be settled only
by arbitrary interpretations or by adjudications in court. As a necessary consequence, x3rotests against the paj^ment of duties exacted by
collectors of customs and appeals to this Department, based on such
protests, are of daily occurrence, while suits brought by the Government to collect unpaid duties, or by individuals to recoA^er back duties
paid, croAvd the calendars of our courts.
The number of statutory appeals to the Secretary of the Treasury
on tariff questions during the last fiscal year was four thousand seven
hundred and thirty-one, exclusiA'C of miscellaneous cases or applica-,
tions for relief, numbering five thousand and sixty-five.
The onerous duties imposed upon the Department, the A^exatious
delays to individuals, and the expense of litigation to all concerned,
resulting from this state of affairs, are obvious. The following remedies are suggested for adoption, in a general revision of the tariff laws:
First. The abandonment of distinctions based upon commercial usage.
In other words, the material of which an article is composed instead of its
commercial designation, where a particular material forms the sole or
chief element of value, should control its classification, and the I'ate
of duty consequently imposed, whether ad valorem or specific.
Second. The abandonment of "charges and commissions" as^ an
element of dutiable value. The revenue from this source' while uncertain and comparatively trifling in amount, is a -fruitful source of
embarrassment and complaint in the liquidation of duties. Its continued exaction is therefore not desirable.
Third. The repeal of all x^rovisions of law for what are commonly
known as "damage allow^ances," or .proportionate abatements of
duties on merchandise injured during the voyage of importation.
These vary at different ports, exceeding at some by ten or fifteen x^er
cent, those made at others in like cases. In many instances the
extent of damage can be only approximately determined, while in
others there is room to suspect fraudulent X3ractices, and, in all, the
operation df the system is unfavorable to the honest importer as well as
to the Government. I therefore recommend its entire abolition—a
measure which would X3lace all importers on an equality in this respect,.
Avhile there would result to them only the extra expense of insurance
on the duties, in addition to that upon the foreign cost of the goods.




XXVI

R E P O R T OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

Many articles upon which duties are now levied, and which do not
come in comx3etition with those of the manufacture or production of
this country, are imported in such small quantities that the duties
collected thereon are insignificant and do not compensate for the cost
of collection. . I suggest that all such articles be added to the free list.
The fees prescribed by law for services ux3on the northern frontier
connected with the execution of the laws relating to naAagation and
the collection of the revenue from customs are different from those
ux3on the coast, and it is questionable whether such difference does
not constitute a Aaolation of the constitutional provision prohibiting
the giving of a preference by any regulation of commerce or revenue
to the x^orts of oue State over those of another; and a revision and
equalization of such fees are recommended.
A tonnage'tax is nowlcA^ed on all American sailing vessels engaged
in the foreign trade, and on all sailing vessels of other nationalities.
I t is not imposed upon American vessels engaged in the coasting
trade. Steamships of foreign nationality, in some cases, are subject to
the tonnage t a x ; in others, they are exempt by old treaty stipulations
only recently carried into effect. But all American steam-vessels
arriving Irom foreign countries are subject to the tax. In consideration
of the fact that this tax was entirely abolished on all vessels for more
than thirty years and only resorted to as a war measure in 1862, and
that those engaged in the coasting trade Avere again relieved from this
burden by recent enactments, I recommend that this tax be wholly
abolished.
The Dep'artment has found difficulty in the administration of the act
of February 18, 1793, relating^to the enrolment and license of vessels,
with reference to its application to.canal-boats and similar craft designed to be chiefly emx3loyed on the internal waters of States. From
a period immediately subsequent to the passage of the act down to a
comparatively recent date, the Department uniformly held that such
boats, exceedingfiA^etons burden, were liable to be enrolled and licensed.
During the term of my immediate x^r^decessor the question was thoroughly considered, and the liability to enrolment and license was held
to attach to this class of vessels only when they emerged from the internal Avaters of a State into the navigable waters of the United States.
But even this modified vicAV of their liability has been contested on the
ground that such boats are not included in the proAasionS of the enrolment act. The growth of inland commerce and the necessities of trade
have, of late years, led not only to a large increase in the number of canalboats, but also to their more frequent egress into naAdgable waters.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XXVII

Hence it becomes more and more for the interest of the numerous OA^mers
of this species of prox3erty to claim entire exemption from the burdens
imposed by the coasting laws, or incidental to an enforcement thereof
Avhile the Department has no ox3tion but to administer the law. I t is,
therefore, important that the status of this class of vessels should be
definitely fixed by such legislation as the case requires.
Rivers and harbors which have been dredged by the Government at
great exx3ense are often made the receptacle of ballast thrown from
vessels, by which the channels become filled and navigation imx3eded.
There is much necessity for a law to prevent this practice, making
it a X3enal offence to deposit, in such channels or harbors, ballast or
other matter by Avhich their value as such is lessened.
The general regulations of this Department, issued in 1857, and
partially revised in 1868-'69, having become to some extent obsolete,
and in many respects deficient, have been comx3letely revised and
adapted to existing laws, speciahpains being taken to make the arrangement of topics convenient, and the text of the regulations simple, comprehensive, and concise. It is believed that this revision, an edition
of which will be issued at an early date, will materially aid customs
and other officers in the performance of their duties.
v
REORG-ANIZATION OF CUSTOMS DISTRICTS.
I invite the attention of Congress to the proprietj^ of reorganizing
the customs collection districts on the Atlantic coast, seventy-nine in
number.
The establishment of many of these districts dates back to a x3eriod
when the conditions determining their importance, relative to the commerce of the country, were entirely different from those existing at
thexiresent time. In some, the expenses of collecting the revenue
exceed the amount collected, and the consolidation of such districts
Avith others may be advisable. At the same time, it must be remembered, that the effective administration of the revenue system often
requires the services of customs officers at points where few or no
duties are collected. The judicious disposition of a force for the X3reA^ention of smuggling is indispensable to the collection of the revenue
from imx3drts, esx3ecially where the extent of coast affords ox3X)ortunities for the clandestine introduction of dutiable merchandise. I would
therefore suggest such action as may lead to a reduction of the number of districts, and a consequent reduction of exx3enses, without
affecting the convenience of importers or the safety of the reA"^enue.




XXVIII

REPORT

OF T H E

SECRETARY

INTERNAL

OF T H E

TREASURY.

REVENUE.

The following statement shows the increase and decrease from each
general source df internal revenue for the fiscal years ended June 30,
1872, and June 30,1873, as appears from the report of the Commissioner of Internal Reyenue:
' Sources.
Spirits
Tobacco
Fermented liquors
'
Penalties
Banks and bankers
Adhesive stamps
Articles'a'nd occupations .formerly taxed but now exempt..
Total..

Increase.
S2,623, 855 42
650,132 57
1,066,439 38
19,447 94

% 359,875 31

Decrease.

$857,197 68
8,474,943 75
12,723,224 53
22, 055, 365 96

It Avill be seen that there has been an increase in the receipts for
taxes on spirits, tobacco, fermented liquors, and from penalties.
The decrease in the receipts from banks and bankers is due principally to that provision in the act of June 6, 1872, Avhich raises the
exemption of all sums deposited in saAangs banks, &c., in the name of
one person, from $500 to $2,000.
The repeal of all stamx3 taxes imposed under Schedule B, act of June
30, 1864, except that of two cents on bank checks, drafts, or orders,
took effect October 1, 1872, and has caused a falling off from that
source.
The class of articles and occupations formerly taxed but now entirely
exempt includes incomes, gas, and other sources of taxation on lists
repealed prior to the act of June 6, 1872, and the receipts from these
sources constantly and rapidly diminish.
In accordance with the provisions of the act of December 24, 1872,
the offices of assessors and assistant assessors of internal revenue have
. been abolished, and all their final accounts approved by the Commissioner of Internal RcA^enue and referred to the accounting officers.
The number of these officers varied according to the exigencies of the
service, being greatest in 1868, when, there Avere three thousand and
forty-three, of which two hundred and forty-one were assessors; since
Avhicli time the number had, up to the taking effect of the act above
referred to, been reduced about one-half.
The system of collecting taxes by stamps, and without assessments,
has been found to giA'e general satisfaction. Since its axiplication to
special taxes they have been collected more promptly and thoroughly,
and a more gratifying and healthy increase in the receipts therefrom
is apparent.




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XXIX

The old assessment lists have been disposed of in a large number of
the collection^istricts, and the aggregate amount held as collectible
thereon does not exceed. $450,000.
REATENUE MARINE AND LIFE-SAVIN.G- SERVICE.

A marked imx3rovement has been made during the past year in the
Revenue Marine Service. The number of vessels boarded and examined, and the number of those reported for violation of revenue laws,
and of those assisted in distress, as well as the number of lives saA^ed
through the agency of the revenue cutters, is largely in excess of like
service performed during any previous year. The character of the
serAdce has been elevated by rigid professional examinations. Ten old
vessels have been thoroughly rex3aired and three ncAv ones have been
built. There are now employed twenty-eight steamers and six sailing
vessels, and these are better adapted to the service required of. them
than were the A^essels formerly in use. Three new steam-A^essels are
constructing and will go into commissidn next sx3ring. With the
addition of a new steamer for the Columbia riA^er and vicinity, i t i s
believed that this branch of the service will be in a condition to
answer the demands upon it, economically and efficiently, for many
years to come.
1 desire to renew the recommendations heretofore submitted to Congress that the navy-x3ension laws be made applicable to the officers and
seamen of the Revenue Marine, and that x3rovision be made for a
retired list of officers. These measures are demanded to aid in promoting efficiency, and in justice to meritorious officers and seamen
whose livfes are spent in the performance of hazardous public service.
From the approx3riation of $100,000 "for the establishment of new^
life-saving stations on the coast of the United States," tAventy-one new
stations are in process of erection upon the coasts of Maine, New
Hampshire, Massachusetts, Yirginia; and North Carolina'. Of these,
ten will be ready for occupancy by the first of February next, and the
others at a later period in the season. Arrangements are also being
made for the establishment of tAvo other stations. No provision of
law exists for the two additional superintendents which 'these new
stations render necessary, nor for keepers and crews for the same. It
is recommended that early authority be giA^en for the employment ot
such persons.
Although during the past year marine disasters haA^e been unusually
numerous, it is gratifying to be able to state, that upon the coasts




xxx

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

X3rovided A^dth life-saving stations, which are the most dangerous upon
the seaboard, the loss of life and xiroperty has been exceedingly slight.
The Avreck reports from the various stations show that since the last
annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury, thirty-two vessels
haA^e been driven ashore ux3on these coasts by stress of Aveather, A^alued, Avith their cargoes, at $832,230, on which the loss was only about
$220,000. •
• The number of lives imperilled was two hundred and thirty-five, of
which number, but a single life was lost.
"
^
In accordance Avith the directions of the act of March 3, 1873, measures have been taken to ascertain " a t what points on the sea and lakecoasts of the United States the establishment of life-saving stations
Avould best subserve the interests of commerce and humanity," and a
report on the subject Avill be transmitted to Congress during the
session.
For the X3itrpdse of recognizing and encouraging the services of the
keepers and crews of the stations, in the x^erformance of the x^erilous
duties they are frequently called upon to undertake in rescuing the
shix3wrecked, it is recommended that a system of rcAvards be adopted in
the shax3e of medals of honor, to be distributed to such of them as may
particulaiiiy distinguish themselves by special or notable acts of gallantry or daring, resulting in the rescue of persons from imminent
danger. Such rewards might be properly extended C ^ e beyo
A ^n
life-saving service, and bestowed ux3on any others who may have made
extraordinary exertions, at their OAVU peril, in saAang life in marine
disasters. Similar rewards are bestoAved in foreign countries, where
life-saAdng institutions exist, and are considered xirizes worth the. most
'adventurous efforts.
.. _
THE COAST 'SURVEY.
The important service of the Coast Survey under this Department
has been prosecuted with vigor and usefulness. The changeable character of many of our harbors and most frequented coastwise passages
calls for constant watchfulness, to maintain the charts and aids to navigation as correct indicators of the actual channels. Work has been prosecuted on portions of the coast heretofore surveyed, and examinations
and resurveys have also been made at Boston, New York, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, San Francisco, and many other harbors, as well as in the
great thoroughfare between Nantucket and Monomoj^ Twenty-fivenew charts are reported as published during the yeai-r. The publication
of a "Coast Pilot," or X3rinted sailing directions for harbors and coastAvise navigation, has been commenced, which, with the annual predictions of tides, Avill complete and digest for ready use the information




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

.XXXI

laid down on the charts. Much interest has been manifested in the
extension of the great triangulation lines across the continent; and
the sj^stem, steadily pursued-, will in time, at a small annual expense,
supx3ly the frame-work for an accurate map of the whole country.
LiaHT-HOUSES.

I have frequently attended the meetings of the Light-House Board,
and have been much impressed with the importance of the work under
its control, and the efficiency Avith which it has been conducted.
Our Light-House Establishment is now larger than that of any other
country in the world, extending with its lights and beacons over more
than ten thousand miles of coast and shore, maintaining, at the close
of the last fiscal year, five hundred and twenty-due light-houses, thirtyfiA^e powerful signals operated by engines driA^en by steam or hot air,
twenty-one light-ships, three hundred and sixty-four day or unlighted
beacons, and twenty-eight hundred and thirty-eight budys.
During the past summer the Board, with my ax3proval, directed its
Engineer Secretary, Major Elliot, of the Corps of Engineers of the
Army, to make an inspection of the light-house systems of Europe, with
a view df improAdng our own by the introduction of such modifications as haA^e been found useful there. His report has been made, and
the practices in other countries Avhich differ from our own will be'
duly considered by the Board, with a view to the adoption of such as
will render still more efficient the light-house system under its control.
At some of>the most important points on the.French and English
coasts,.electric and gas light-houses have been placed, and I recommend that the Treasury Department be authorized to make experiments in the same direction, by axiplying to IAVO of our most important stations, on towers already constructed, one electric and one gas
light, of most powerful character.
MINTS.

The Mint Bureau, established by the act of February 12, 1873, was
organized on the 1st of Ax3ril, when the coinage act becaine operatiA^e.
Doctor H. R. Linderman A ^s appointed director; and, under his able
Aa
and energetic management, the operations of the mints and assay offices
have been efficiently conducted, and a more speedy and systematic
rendition of the bullion accounts effected. At the request of the DeX3artment, he has obtained A-aluable information on various technical
ahd scientific points connected with the coinage, by which the transaction of business has been greatly facilitated.




XXXII

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

The coinage during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1873, Avas as folloAvs:
Gold coinage.. /
'.....
$35, 249,.337 50
SilA^er coinage
."
2, 945, 795 50
Minor coinage.
494, 050 00
TotaL

.- • 38, 6'89,183 00.

During the same period, the value of bars manufactured was as follows:
Fine gold
$7, 439, 843 78
Unparted gold.
' 8, 485, 602 35
Total gold.,

15, 925, 446 13

Fine silver
Unparted silver
Total silver.
Total gold and sih'er bars.

$3,149,372 64
,

8, 442, 711 84
11, 592, 084 48
$27, 517, 530 61

The reduction of the coinage charge from one-half to one-fifth of one
per cent, has been followed by an increased coinage, and prevented,
to a considerable extent, the export of gold bullion—its value for coinage in this country having thereby been brought nearly to its mint
value in London, where it is coined without charge. Sonie further advantages would no doubt follow the adoption by this country of the
free-coinage system as to gold. I recommend the rex3eal of the charge
for coining gold, and also the charge imposed for copper used fbr alloy,
as being an incouA-^enient item in estimating the coinage value of gold.
With the view to prevent the export of gold coins, authority should
be given for keex3in.g in the Treasury, when its condition will admit of
the same, a supply of fine gold bars bearing the mint stamp of fineness,
weight, and value, and for exchanging such bars for coin. They
would alAvays be preferred to coin for exx3ort, and gold coins of full
weight would be retained in the country, instead of being selected for
export.
The repeal or modification of that, part o f t h e coinage act which
requires gold coins to be excluded from the benefit of the half per
cent, abrasion limit, unless they have been in circulation for certain
X3rescribed x3eriods, is recommended, on the ground that in the daily
transactions of the custom-houses it cannot be carried into effect.
The subsidiary silver coins being manufactured by the Government
on its own account, and the seigniorage or difference between the bullion




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XXXIII

and nominal value of such coin realized by it, provision should be
made for redeeming in kind such pieces as have become unduly worn
from long circulation. Thisls done in other countries which, like ours,
have adopted the gold standard and demonetized silver.
The recent fall in the price of gold, together Avith the depreciation
in the market value of silver, as compared with gold, which has been
going on for some time, has enabled the Director to coin sih^er, to be
paid out instead of United States notes to advantage. Availing himself of this opportunity, the Director caused to be X3urchased as much
silver bullion as could be conveniently used in giving employment to
the mints, when'not engaged in the more important business of coining gold, and the same was so coined and paid out.
During the last fcAv years, our subsidiary silver coins have been
sent in considerable amounts to Central and South America, where it
is understood they circulate as full-valued coins. It would be better
for us to manufacture coin according to standards and values legally
prescribed by those countries, than to encourage the export of our ^nhsidiary coin, which is intended for home circulation.
In connection Avith this subject, it should be stated, that applications
haA^e been received from some of the South Anlerican goAT^ernments to
supply them with coins of their own standards. These applications
. could not be granted for want of lawful authority. As an act of
comity to friendly States who have no facilities for coinage, and for
commercial reasons, it is recommended that authority be granted for
the execution of coinage of other countries, when it can be done at
our mints without interfering Avith home demands for coin.
No coinage has been executed at the New Orleans Mint since the
year 1861, but the machinery, AvLth inconsiderable exceptions, is still
there, and reported to be in good condition. As that section of the
• country Avill, at no distant period, require a large supxily of coin, estimates for the amount required, to place the mint in condition for coining operations, and for its sux3port during the next fiscal year, haA^e
been submitted, and, it is hoped, will receive the favorable consideration of Congress.
Under the x^i*ovisions of the coinage act, depositors receive in
stamped bars from assay offices, where refining is not done, the identical bullion deposited by them, and are subjected to heavy discounts
in converting the bars into coin or currency. These interior assay?
offices would become much more useful to the mining interests, if
authority Avere given to the Secretary o f t h e Treasury to issue coin
certificates fbr the net A^alue of such bars,
3 s R
^




XXXIV

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
MARINE HOSPITALS.

The relief operations of the Marine Hospital Service embraced at the
close of the last fiscal year ninety-one customs* districts, and shoAved
an increase of twelve ^ev cent., as comx3ared with the year preceding,
and nearly thirty-seven per cent, since the xiassage of the act of June
30, 1870, under which the service is now administered. Medical and
surgical attendance was furnished to thirteen thousandfiA^ehundred and
twenty-nine seamen. The hospital at Chicago has been comx3leted, and
a site has been selected for the pavilion hospital authorized at the last
session of Congress to be erected at San Francisco. The recommendations contained in the last annual report of my predecessor as to hospitals at New York and Pittsburg are renewed, and Oyster Island is
suggested as an eligible site for that at New York.
Instead of costly alterations and repairs to the hospitals at Detroit,
Cleveland, Louisville, and Portland, the Supervising Surgeon proposes,
for sanitary and other reasons, that comparatively inexpensive wooden
pavilion wards be built on the grounds adjoining, and.only such expenditures be made upon the present buildings as may be necessary to fit
them for administrative purposes.
The recommendation is "also renewed as to the use for hospital purposes of wooden pavilion structures, of simple design and comparatively small cost, which may be destroyed and renewed when their
continued occux3ancy renders them unhealthy. In these vicAvs I fully
concur.
PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

In the annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury for 1872, the
attention of Congress was called to the fact that very large sums of
money would be needed for the completion of buildings begun or
authorized, and it was recommended that, with the exception of
pavilion hospitals and a building for the accommodation of the Bureau
of Engraving and Printing and the surx3lus files of the Treasury DeX3artment, no new work should be authorized. Contrary to this recommendation. Congress, while making no apx3ropriation for the building
last named, authorized the commencement of seventeen new buildings
and the piurchase of sites for several others. This legislation, together
with the work preAdously commenced, has imposed an unprecedented
and extraordinary ainount of labor upon the Supervising Architect's
office, and has rendered it necessary to submit estimates in an aggregate sum much larger than I think should be expended in any one year.
It is highly important to limit the erection of public'buildings to




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE. TREASURY.

XXXV

such as are imperatively demanded by the necessities of the X3ublic
service, and where suitable temporary accommodations cannot be proAdded at a reasonable, cost. While it is no doubt true that all buildings authorized to be erected are needed and their early completion
would be desirable, those in the larger cities where permanent buildings are imperatively demanded for the proper transaction of business
should have the preference.- With the present organization of the
SuperAasing Architect's office, it does not seem practicable in a single
year to commence or x^i'0X3erly supervise the construction of all the
buildings authorized by Congress.
In this connection I desire to refer to the labor performed by that
office, and the magnitude of the business committed to its charge.
There are one hundred and fifteen buildings finished and occux3ied
for federal puiposes, which are by law placed under the charge of
the Treasury Department, consisting of Treasury buildings, customhouses, court-houses, post offices, appraisers' stores, warehouses, marine
hospitals, mints, and assay offices. The Sux3erAdsing Architect's office
has, by direction of. the Secretary of the Treasury, the sux3ervisi6n of
the repair and supx3ly of these buildings with furniture, heating apparatus, safes, vaults, fuel, lights, water, &c. Most of these buildings
require more or less rexiairs every year, and thirty of them are now
undergoing extensive repairs and.remodelling, several to an extent
iuA^olving as much time and attention as the erection of UCAV buildings.
The office is also charged with the construction of all new buildings
erected under the Treasury Department, and is now engaged in the
construction of seventeen such new buildings, and also the new State,
War, and Navy Department in this city, and the new jail for the District of Columbia.
.
The expenditures during the past 3^ear were $9,039,698 76, and the
balances of approx3riations standing to the credit of that office on July
1, 1873, amounted to $14,774,573 00.
Congress has provided for the erection of twenty UCAV buildings not
yet commenced, plans for six of which are UOAV being prex3ared; sites
have been secured for eleven, and negotiations are in progress for the
purchase of the renjaining nine.
The Supervising Architect's office has also the renting of^ buildings
and office-rooms for the use of the various officers of the Treasury
Department throughout the country at places where there are no
public buildings, or Avhere such buildings are insufficient. The number
now occupied is two hundred and tAventy-six, which are located in
every State in tlie Union, excex3t Kansas and Arkansas, and in five of
the Territories, at a total annual rental of $190,488 25,




XXXVI

REPORT OF THE. SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Great credit is due to the SuperAdsing Architect and his subordinates
for the able, faithful, and economical manner in which they have conducted the vast business submitted to their immediate sux3ervision.
NEAV YORK CUSTOM-HOtJSE.
The great.extent and rapid increase of the commerce of the port of
New York, Avhere are collected about sixty-seven per cent.. of all the
duties levied on imported goods, has already rendered the custom-,
house accommodations there quite insufficient. With the certain increase of business which this port must attain in the future, and with
the prospect of its becoming more and more an exchange centre for
other countries, it is a matter of the first importance to select, at an
early day, a site for a new custom-house on a larger scale, together
with the buildings needed in connection therewith, where the situation,
convenience, and accommodations will be adequate to the requirements and Avorthy of the position of this great mart. The expense of
erecting the building may well be extended over a series of years.
The present custom-house lot may be sold to advantage, when no longer
required, in part reimbursement of the expense. I earnestly commend
this subject to the consideration of Congress.
THE SEAL ISLANDS.
Valuable rei3orts have recently been made by Captain Charles Bryant,
agent, and Mr. Henry W. Elliott, assistant agent of the Treasury
' Department, at the seal islands of Alaska, in respect to the geography
df the islands, the condition of the inhabitants, and the habits of the
'seals. They concur in the opinion that the laAv of July 1,1870, pro Adding that of the one hundred thousand seals to be taken annually, the
proportion of one-quarter from St. George Island is altogether too
large for the nuinber of seals now frequenting that island, making it
necessary, in order to obtain the full comx3lement, to kill seals too small
to afford first-class skins. They think the x3roportion between the two
islands should be eighty-five thousand from St. Paul, and fifteen thousand from St. George. I am of opinion that the law of July 1, 1870,
aboA^e referred to, should be so altered that the proportion to be taken
from the separate islands may be fixed by the Treasury Department,
and changed from time to time as the course of the seals may render
it necessary.
LOUISVILLE AND PORTLAND CANAL.
In the " act making appropriations for the repair, preservation, and
comx3letion of certain public works on rivers and harbors, and for



REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XXXVII o

other purposes," approved March 3, 1873, the following appropriations
and provisions are made:
" F o r completing the Louisville and Portland^canal, one hundred
thousand dollars; and the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized,and
directed to assume, on behalf of the United States, the control and
management of the said canal, in. conformity with the terms of the
joint resolution ofthe Legislaiture of the State of Kentucky, approved
March 28, 1872, at such time and in-such manner as in his judgment
the interests of the United States, and the commerce thereof, may
require; and the sum of money necessary to enable the Secretary of
the Treasury to carry this provision into effect is hereby appropriated:
Provided, Th'dt after the.United States shall assume control of said
canal, the tolls thereon on vessels propelled by steain shall be reduced
to twenty-five cents per ton, and on all other vessels in proportion."
The resolution of the State of Kentucl^ recites the facts that all
the stock of the canal company belongs to the United States except
five shares owned by the directors, that the property of the company
is subject to a mortgage to secure bonds therein mentioned, and that
the comx3any may owe other debts, and directs the LouisA'ille and Portland Canal Company to surrender the canal and all the property connected therewith to the government of the United States upon the
terms and conditions therein specified, the sixth and last of which is
"that the government of the United States shall before such surrender
discharge said mortgage and pay all debts due by said canal company,
and purchase the stock of said directors."
The United States, by repeated acts, have manifested the intention of
taking possession of this canal ahd maintaining it for the benefit and
imx3rovement of the navigation of the Ohio river, and the importance
of consummating that intention at as early a day as possible is apparent. As long ago as 1855 the United States had become the
owners of all the shares in the company except the five shares held
at the request of the then Secretary of the Treasury by the directors, to
enable them to retain their offices and keep up the corporate organization and the management of the business of the company. Since that
time Congress has at different times made ax3propriations ahd exx3eiiditures for enlarging and improving the canal to the amount of mdre
than a million dollars, for which the Treasury has never been reimbursed.
,
*
Recognizing the great benefit which Avould accrue to the commerce
of the country bordering on the Ohio riA^er, by the United States
taking possession of the canal and reducing the tolls thereon, steps
were taken to ascertain the debts of the company, and to dcAdse a
plan for carrying into effect the provisions of the appropriation act
aboA^e cited.




c XXXVIII

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

It is found that the unsecured floating debt of the company, after
deducting cash on hand, is not large, and may be easily ascertained
and paid, and that the five shares of stock may be obtained of the
directors by paying therefor one hundred dollars per share, with
interest from February 9, 1864.
In addition to these debts, there are outstanding eleven hundred
and seventy-tAvo bonds of the comx3any, of $1,000 each, with coupons
attached, bearing six per cent, interest, X3ayable semi-annually. Of
these, bonds, $373,000 wiU mature January 1, 1876; $399,000 Avill
mature January 1, 1881; and $400,000 will mature January 1, 1886.
While the resolutions of the State of Kentucky require that these
bouds shall all be paid, and the mortgage discharged before the surrender of the canal to the-United States, and the bonds do not all
mature until the je^v 1886, and are supposed to be distributed among
a great number of unknoAvn holders, the difficulty of carrying into
effect the provision of Congress may be readily seen.
If Congress would authorize the Secretary of the Treasury, with the
consent of the State of Kentucky, to take possession of the canal
upon paying the floating debts of the company, purchasing the five
shares of stock, and assuming the payihent of the bonds secured by
the mortgage Avhen matured, with authority to purchase them at any
time x3reviousl3', as circumstances would warrant, one great obstacle in
the way of accomplishing this most desirable result would be removed,
and the cost thereof might be distributed over a period of several
years.
While this subject Avas under consideration a communication was
received from the president of the comx3any, under date of July 9,
1873, informing the Department that " t h e Louisville and Portland
Canal Compiany has been sued in the Louisville Chancery Court, by
the devisees of Colonel John Campbell, for nearly all the land owned
by the company."
This suit, which is now pending, and is understood to involve the
title to all or nearly all the land through which the canal runs, has so
changed the aspect of affairs, that I deemed it the part of prudence,
within the discretion intrusted to my judgment, to exx3end no money
towards X3aying the debts of the company until these facts should
be laid before Congress for its consideration and action thereon.
REPORTS OF BUREAU OFFICERS.

The several reports of the different bureau officers to accompany
this report, to wit: those of the.First and Second Comptrollers, Commissioner of Customs; the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, and




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY^

XXXIX

Sixth Auditors; Treasurer, Register, Director of the Mint, Chief of the
Bureau of Statistics, Solicitor ofHhe Treasury, Superintendent of the
Coast Survey, the Light-house Boai'd, Supervising Architect, and ,
Commissioner of Internal Revenue, Avith that of the Comptroller of
the Currency, are respectfully commended to the consideration of Congress, as showing the extent and condition of the business of the
Department in all its numerous branches, and the faithfulness, industry, and integrity with Avhich the same has been conducted during the
past year by all persons emplo^^ed in the service.
WILLIAM A. RICHARDSON,
Secretary of the Treasury.
Hon.

S P E A K E R OF THE H O U S E OF REPRESENTATIVES.







TABLES ACCOMPANYING THE EEPORT.







REPORT.OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

"TABLE A.—Statement of tlie net receipts (hy ivarrants) during the fiscal year ended June 30,
1873.
CUSTOMS.

•Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended September 30, 1872
ended December 31, 1872.:...:
ended March 31,1873.:
euded June 30, 1873

Quarter
^Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

'...

$57, 729, 540 27
39, 591, 519 96
49, 902, 018 67
40,866,443 T"
• f 188, 089, 522

:..

SALES OF PUBLIC LANDS.

September 30,1872
December 31, 1872
March 31.1873
June 30, 1873

797,324 57
670, 821 88
641,558 38
772,607 55

.

2, 882, 312 38
INTERNAL REVENUID.

Quarter
Quarter
'Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

September 30,1872
December 31, 1872
March 31,1873
June 30, 1873

34,169, 047 22
26, 066, 701 30
24,262,778.30
29, 230, 787 32
113,729,314 14
DIRECT TAX.

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Qiiarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

September 30, 1872
December 31, 1872
March 31, 1873.
June 30, 1873

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended vSeptember30,;1872..^
ended December 31, 1872
ended March 31,1873
ended June 30, 1873

272, 687 02
42, 567 49

TAX ON CIRCULATION, DEPOSITS, ETC., OF NATIONAL BANKS.

:

3, 307,238"69
72,150 01
3, 427, 084 71
23, 564 26

'.

6, 830, 037 67
REPAYMENT OF INTEREST BY PACIFIC RAILW.4Y COMPANIES.

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended September 30, 1872
ended December 31, 1872
ended March 31,1873
ended June 30, 1873

119, 093 73
177, 973 84
179, 405 33
37, 733 14

'.

514, 206 04
CUSTOMS, FINES, PENALITIES, AND F O R F E I T U R E S .

'Quarterended Septeniber 30,1872
'Quarter ended December 31, 1872
Qaarter ended March 31,1873
'Quarter ended June 30, 1873

.
:

103,787 30
45, 294 59
613, 928 45 ^
406, 505 04
1,169,515 38

^

FEES.

Consular, letters-patent, steamboat,' and land:
'Quarter ended September 30, 1872
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
'Quarter ended March 31, 1873
•Quarter ended June 30, 1873
.•

•
'..
.-

479, 306 03
373,161 48
484, 668 88
540, 085 28

PROCEEDS OF SALES OF GOVERNfflUNT P R O P E R T Y .

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Qaarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

SB])tember 30,1872
December 31, 1872
March 31, 1873
June 30, 1873

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
^Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

September 30, 1872
December 31, 1872'
March 31, 1873
June 30, 1873
,

'.

336, 801 88
584, 442 58
138, 685 10
577,353 59

1,,637, 283 15

MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES. •

°.
•

To.tal.ireceipts, .exclusive of loans and premium on coin




1, 346, 257 47
1, 093, 825 43
939, 256 97
1, 753, 666 27
5,133,006 14
,' 322,177, 673 78

4

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY..

Premium on
Quarter ended
Quarter ended
Quarter ended
Quarter euded

sales of coin :•
September 30, 1872 ...'
Deceraber 31, 1872
Marcli 31, 1873
June 30, 1873.

.'

|2, 426, 736
2, 587,127
2, 946, 726
3, 599, 939

:..

.
.
91
59
72 .
67- '
m , 560, 530 89'

Total net receipts
'
:
Balance iu Treasury Juue 30,1872, (including $3,047.80 received from "unavailable")
Total
:
:

333, 738, 204 67
106, 567, 404 74
440,305,609 41

TABLE B.—Statement of the net disbursements (7;?/ warrants) during the fiscal year ended'
June 30, 1873.
CWIL.

Congress
'
Executive
Judiciary
Government of Territories
Sub-treasuries
Public land-oflices
Inspection of steam-A'^essels
Mints and assay-offices
Total ciA-il list

'.

•

R 251, 8:32 46
6, 896, .567 13
3, 820,131 77
27.1,, 985 36
340,'530 92
414,135 19
221,917 50
125, 420 68

-

,

:

§19,348,521 01

FOREIGN I N T E R C O U R S E .

Diplomatic salaries
Consular salaries
.•.. .•
Contingencies of consulates
l..^..
Relief and x)rotection of American seamen
^.
American and Mexican claims commission
.'
American aud Spanish claims commission
1
American and British claims commission
I'ribunal of arbitration at Geneva
Exxienses of the Japanese embassy
Capitalization of Scheldt dues
'
. Eeturn of consular receipts
?
•
AVar expenses in Madrid, Paris, Berlin, and London
International Exposition at A'^ienna
Survey of boundary between the United States and British possessions.
Contingent and miscellaneous
.,
'..
Total foreign intercourse

376; 862 69
416, 973 86
93, 063 75
5, 235 04
20, 212 20
14, 030 70
184, 679 81
62, 210. 22
750 00
66,584 00
3, 040 54 •
2, 303 63 •
Ill, 146 26
75,000 00
.139, 270 15

MISCELLANEOUS.

Mint establishment
699, 483 65
Branch-mint buildings
:
•
382, 857 43
CoastSurvey
852,828 75
: Light-House Establishment
1,20.5,570 86
Building and repairs of light-houses
1, 700, 718 61
Refunding excess of deposits for unascertained duties
3,120,192 90
Refunding duties on tea and -coifee
257, 231 82
Drawbacks on certain articles imported into district of Chicago
192,155 95
P a j ^ e n t s for coins, nickels, Sec, destroyed at Chicago
370, 813 24
Revenue-cutter service
995, 308 88
Building revenue-cutters
138, 592 49
Life-saAdug seivice.
.
212, 383 08
Custom-houses, court-houses, iDOst-offices, SLG
6,241, 032 97
•'I'Xirniture, fuel, &c., for public buildings under,Treasury Department..
409,362 45
Repairs and preservation of public bnUctings under Treasury Department
414, 822 16
Collecting customs revenue
7, 079, 743 42
Debenture and drawbacks nnder customs laws
1, 211, 710 99
Refunding duties erroneously or illegally coUected..'.
134, 552 06
Marine hospital establishment
398,220 08
Marine hospital, Chicago, Illinois
^
62, 482 94
Distributive shares of fines, penalties, and forfeitui'es
626,156 74
Assessing and collecting internal revenue
•
5, 337,124 23
Punishing violation s of internal-revenue laws
35, 648 40
Internal-revenue stami:)s
'.
..--,.
329, 727 70'
Refunding' duties erroneously or illegally collected
630, 708 28
Internal-revenue allowances and drawbacks
134, 293 84'
Redemption of internal-revenue stamps
215, 414 03
Mail-steamship service....'
'.
725, 000 00
Deficiencies in revenue of Post-office Department.'.
•.
4, 765, 475 00
Refunding proceeds of captiu-ed and abandoned property
1, 960, 679 26
•Collection of captured and abandoned property
"
84, 459 50;




1, 571, 362 85
'

•

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
Expenses national loan
Expenses refunding national debt
Expenses national currency
'
'.
Suppressing counterfeiting and frauds
Contingent expenses independent treasury
Public Duildings and gTOunds in Washington
Re-imbursement District of Columbia for repairs on avenues. Sec
Capitol extension, dome repairs,
fcc
•.
Extension of Capitol grounds
'..
State, AVar, and ISTavy Department buildings
Columbian Institute tor Deaf and Dumb
Government Hospital for the Insane
:
Charitable institutions in Washiugton
Meti'opolitan police
Support of sixty transient paupers
Surveys of public lands
:
Repayment for lands eixoneously sold
Proceeds of swamp-lands to States
Five per cent, fund, &c., to States
Expenses of eighth and ninth censuses
Penitentiaries in the Territories
Payments under relief acts
ITnenumerated items
'.

5

$2, 806, 863 94
54, 736 83
181, 654 84
125, 608 73
96, 377 15
1, 929,197 26
1, 294, 535 75
87, 222 04
731,199 15
1, 609, 233 28
124, 000 00
206, 800 00
188, 013 32
.
205,175 78
12, 000 00
1,128, 060 13
'
32, 486 27
3, 799 96
237,624 91
103,262 44
37, 345 20
265, 851 61
22, 435 90

Total miscellaneous

'.

;

|52, 408, 226 20

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT.

Indians
Pensions

;

1
^

7, 951, 704 88
29, 359, '426 86

:

Total Interior Department.....

. .•

37, 311,131 74

MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT.

Pay Department
'Coinmissary Department
Quarterma^ster's Department
'
Ordnance Department
Medical Department
Military Academy
.'
Exijenses of recruiting
•Contingencies
Signal service
Refugees, freedmen, and abandoned lands
Bounties to soldiers
Re-imbursing States for raising volunteers
,
Military organizations in Kansas
'.
Claims of loyal citizens for supplies
Payments under relief acts
.;
Forts and fortifications
Improvements of rivers and harbors
Re-imbursing Kentucky for militia during the rebellion
Suppressing Indian hostilities in Montana Territory
Allowance for reduction of Avages under eight-hour law
. Total military, establishment

,
:
•
;....

3, 513, 840 88
2, 521, 837 81
14, 513, 010 39
2, 091, 063 22
346, 214 53
66, 505 77
107, 564 00
396, 813 04
350,500 00
178, 796 74
10, 445, 014 77
758,110 31
324, 439 37
927, 910 19
353,155 96
1, 997, 589 56
6, 321, 880 49
525, 258 72
• 425, 000 00
158, 632 56

•

•

46, 323,138 31

NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT.

Pay and contingent of the]^avy
MarineCorps...
iN^arigation
;
Ordnance
1
Provisions and clothing
il
Medicine and surgery
Equipment and recruiting.Construction and repairs
Steam-engineering
Y a r d s a n i docks
Payments under relief acta
Surveying Isthmus of Darien for ship-canal
SurvcAaiig Isthmus of Tehuantepec and Nicaragua
Miscellaneous
'.

!
*.....
:..:..

'.

.

• 6,587,607 24
:
1,171,872 59
339,511 65
"..
1,158, 923 19
2, 767, 721 33
-254, 811.46
1, 837,156 42
4, 546, 057 54
1,682 099 00
---2,463,022 59
341,195 34
5, 000 00
13, 074 39
. 358,204 05

Total naA-al establishment
23,526,256 79
Interest on the public debt
^
•- 104,750,688 44
Total net disbursements exclusiA'-e of premium and principal of public debt
285,239,325 34
Premium on bonds purchased
5,105, 919 99
Redeinption of the pubUc debt
,
18,768,335 58
•
23, 874, 255 57
Tot.^1 net disbursements
Balance in Treasury, Jnne 30, 1873
Total.....

..--.-

309,113,580 91
131,192,028 50
440,305,609 41.

4




TABLE C—Statement of the redemption and issue oj loans and Treasury notes (hy warrants) for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
Character of loans.
Coin certificates, act of March 3, 1863, section 5
T h r e e per-cent. certificates, acts of March 2,1867, and J u l y 25, 1868
Seven-thirties of 1861, act of J u l y 17, 1861 . . .
=
Old demand notes, acts of J u l y 17, 1861, August 5, 1861, and F e b r u a r y 12, 1862
,
Legal-tender notes, acts of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, J u l y 11, 1862, J a n u a r y 17, 1863, and March 3, 1863.,
Fractional currency, acts of J u l y 17, 1862, March 3, 1863, and J u n e 30,1864
One-year notes of 1863, act of March 3, 1863
-... T w o - y e a r notes of 1863, a c t o f March 3, 1863
Compound-interest notes, acts of March 3,1863, and J u n e .30, 1864
Seven-thirties of 1864 and 1865, acts'of J u n e 30, i864,and March 3, 1865
Bounty-land scrip, act of F e b r u a r y 11, 1847
t
..:
L o a n o f 1848, a c t o f March 31, 1848
i
Loan of J n l y and August, 1861, acts of J u l y 17, 1861, and A u g u s t 5, 1861
Five-twenties of 1862, a c t o f F e b r u a r y 2.5, 1862
:
Five-twenties'of March,. 1864, act of March 3, 1864
:
,
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864, act of Junew.30, 1864 ...~
;
Five-twenties of 1865, a c t o f March 3, 1865
Consols of 1865, a c t o f March 3, 1865
,
Consols of 1867, a c t o f March 3, 1865
:
;
Consols of 1868, act of March" 3, 1865
Certificates of deposit, act of J u n e 8, 1872
•
Total..

Excess of re-,
demption.

Redemptions.
$55, 570, 500 00
5, 000 00

196,800
195, 000
650
8, 328
019, 067
731, 269
17,162
8, 255
114,120
58, 050
300
5, 500

00
00
00
75
00
83
00
00
00
00
00
00

873,150
57,800
326, 650
032, 200
415,800
286, 300
922, 950
430, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

'57,'i6o,'c)66"66'

233,699,352 58

dt)
Excessof
issues.

$7,373 700 00
2
•
hj-

214, 931, 017 00

63,519,067 00
38, 674, 800 00

$12,190, 000 00
650 00
8. 328 75
1, 500; 000 00
17, 162 00
8,255 00
114,120. 00
58, 050 00
300 00
5, 500 00

150 00

1,500 00

15, 873,150 00
57, 800 00
6, 326, 650 00
4, 032, 200 00
15, 415, 800 00
5, 284, 800 00
922, 950 00

Excess of redemptions Excess of issues

61,815,715 75
43, 047, 380 17

Net excess of redemptions charged in receipts and expenditures.

•••

o

:::::::::::::

^

.3,943,'536"i7

;;;;;;;;;;;

^

H

:::::::::::::
150 56

w
^
CQ

t=^

o
"•-V

-------

••

31, 730, 000 00
43, 047, 380 17

18, 768, 335 58

NOTE.—It will be seen that the reduction of the principal of the public debt, as shown b y this statement, appears to be $18,768,335.58. Congress, .by act of J u n e 8, 1872, (17 Statutes, 336,) provided that national banking associations might deposit United States legal-tender notes in the T r e a s u r y of the United States and receive therefur certificates of deposit
bearing no interest, and that the notes so deposited should be set a p a r t and held as a special deposit for the redemption of said certificates. T h e certificates outstanding on the 1st day.
of J u l y , and includedin the outstanding principal of the debt, amounted to $31,730,000, and the notes held as a special deposit for their redemption w a s included in the cash.balance in
the T r e a s u r y on that day. I t will be seen, therefore, t h a t while these certificates, as a matter of accounts, are treated as a p a r t of the public debt, they do not in reality forra a n y portion of it, in the usual sense of the word, for the reason t h a t no revenue is required to be provided for their p a y m e n t , the notes Avhich they represent always being in the Trea.sury
as a special deposit for their redemption, and those notes being included iu the outstanding legahtender notes. Omitting these certificates of deposits as offset b y the notes held Qu deposit
for'their redemp-tion, and the actual reduction of the principal of the debt w a s $50,498,335.58,
. ' • ' '
• .




^

O

w

fei-

H
>

O
pj
H

Ul

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

^

7

. D.—Statement of the net receipts (hy warrants) for the quarter ended Ser>t'emher 30, 1873.
RECEIPTS.

Customs
Sales of i)nblic lands ,
'
Internal revenne
Tax on circulation, deposits, &c., of national banks
Repayment of interest by Paciiic railway companies . .
Customs fines, penalties, and fees
Consular, letters-patent, homestead, and land fees."
Proceeds of sales of Government iDroperty
Miscellaneons...
:
Premium on sales of coin
—:

o

$49,195,403
573,768
25,640,454
3,490,743
198,970
438,514
. 503,941
303,765
1,507,931
2,350,818

'
•

Total ordinary receipts, exclusive of loans
Payment hy the British .government of the award of the tribunal of
arbitration at Geneva..
Total net receipts
Balance in Treasury June 30, 1873

68
07
41
66
56
21
12
32
21
34

84,204,310 58
15,500,000 00
99,704,310 58
131,192,.028 50

Total

230,896,339 OS'-

E.—Statement of ilie net dishursements (hy ivarrants) for the quarter ended Septemher 30,1873,
civil and miscellaneous.
Customs
Internal revenue
Diplomatic service
.ludiciary..
Interior, (civil)
Treasury i)roi)er
Quarterly salaries

-.
'.
,

Total civil and miscelli^neous
Indians
Pensions
Mihtary establishment
Naval establishment
,
'.
Interest on public debt
,
. •
Total net ordinary expenditures
Premiums on i)ui"chase of bonds
Award of Geneva Tribunal, investment account
Excess of neb redemptions of loans over receipts
Total net expenditures
Balance in Treasury September 30,1873
Total




$5,558,157
1,249,656
399,592
821,297
1,209,538
8,030,614
103,437
:
$2,008,715
8,698,156
."... 13,795, 053
9,792,451
37,051,907

45
67
17
12
30
16
73

17,372,293.60
19
^8
48
57.
79

•
'

. 71,346,284 6 1 '
. 88,718,578 21
1, 301,946 ,78
15,500,000 00
32,986,828 91
:
.....'

49,788,775 6d
138,507,353 90
92, 388,985 18 ,
230,896,339 08

8

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE F.—Statement of outstanding principal qf the puhlic deht of the TJnited States on the
1st of Jaiiuary of each year from 1791 to 1843, inclusive, and on ihe 1st of July of each
year from 1844 to 1873, inclusive.




R E P O R T OF vTHE SECRETARY OF T H E . T R E A S U R Y .

9

TABLE F.—Statement of outstanding principal of the puhlic deht, ^x.—Continued.
Year.
1867
1868
1869
1870
387L
1872
1S73

Amoimt.

:

;

.•
..
:

.

.•

. .

$2,678,126,103 87
2,61L687,851 19
2, 588, 452, 213 94
2, 480, 672, 427 81
2, 353, 211, 332 32
. . . 2, 253, 251, 328- 78
*2, 234, 482, 993 20

* I n the amount here stated as the outstanding principal of the public debt, is included.the certificates of
deposit outstanding on the 30th J u n e , issued under act of J u n e 8,' 1872, amounting to $31,730,000, for which
a like araount in United States notes was on special deposit in the T r e a s u r y for their redemption, aud added
to the cash balance in the T r e a s u r y . These certificates, as a matter of accounts, are treated as a part of the .
public debt, but beiug offset by notes held on deposit for their redemption, should properly be deducted frora
the principal of the p.ublic debt in making comparison with former years. (See note at foot of Table C,
p a g e 6.)




10

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

TABLE G.—Statement ofthe receiptts of the United States from March 4, 1789, to June
Balance in the
Treasury at
u

>
<

commencemehtofyear.

1791
1792 "*'$973^905"75'
783,444 51
,1793
753, 661 69
1794
1,151,924 17
1795
1796
516,442 61
1797
888, 995 42
1,021,899 04
1798
• 617,451 43
1799
2,161,867 77
1800
2, 623, 311 99
1801
3, 295, 391 00
1802
5, 020, 697 64
]803
1804
4,825,811 60
4, 037, 005 26
1805
3, 999, 388 99
1806
4, 538,123 80
1807
9, 643, 850 07
1808
9,941,809 96
1809
3, 848, 056 78
1810
2, 672, 276 57
1811
3, 502, 305 80
1812
3,862,217 411813
5,196, 542 00
1814
1, 727, 848 63
1815
13,106,592 88
1816
22,033,519 19
1817.
14,989,465 48
1818
1,478,526.74
1819
2,079,992 38
1820
1,198,461 21
1821
1,681,592 24
1822
4, 237,427 55
1823
9,463,922 81
1824
1,946,597 13
1825
1826
5, 201, 650 43
1827
6, 358, 686 18
6, 668,286 10
1828
5,972,435 81
1829
1830
5, 755, 704 79
1831
6, 014, 539 75
4,502,914 45
1832
2,011,777 55
1833
11,702,905 31
1834
1835
8, 892, 858 42
1836
26, 749, 803 96
1837
46, 708, 436 00
37,327,252 69
1838
36,891,196 94
1839
33,157,503 68
1840
1841
29, 963,163 46
1842
28,685,111 08
184.3* 30,521,979 44
1844.
39„186, 2S4 74
1845
36,742,829 62
1846
36, 194, 274 81
1847
38,261,959 65
1848
33,079, 276 43
1849
29 416 612 45
1850
32,' 827,' 08*2 69
1851
35,871,753 31
1852
40, I58i 3.53 25
1853
43! 338^ 860 02
1854
50,261,901 09
1855
48, 591, 073 41
1856
47^7771672 13
1857
49,108,229 80
1858
46,-802, 855 00
1859
35, 113,334 22
1860
'.33,193, 248 60
186L
32, 979, 530 78
1862
30, 963, 857 83
1863
46, 965, 304 87
1864
36, 523, 046 13
1865 134, 433, 738 44




• Customs.

Internal revenue.

Direct tax.

Public lauds.

Miscellaneous.

'

t

$4, 399, 473 09
$10, 478 10
3,443, 070 85 •
$208," 942 81
9,918 65
4,255,306 56
337, 705 70
51, 410 88
4,801(065 28
274,089 62
53, 277 97
5,588,461 26
337, 755 36
28 317 97
6, 567, 987 94
475,289 60
1,169,415 98
7, 549, 649 65
575,491 45
399,1.39 29
83, 540 60
7,106,061 93
644, 357 95
11, 963 11
58,192'81
6,610,449 31
779,136 44
86,187 56
9, 080, 932 "73
809, 396 55 "$734," 223*97*
152, 712 10
443'75"
10, 750, 778 93
1, 048, 033 43 • .534, 343 38
167,726 06
345, 649 15
12,438,235 74
621,898 89 . 206, 565 ,44
188,628 02
1, 500, 505 86
10,479,417 61
.215,179 69
71,879 20
165,675 69131,945 44
11, 098, 565 33
50, 941 29
50,198 44
487, 526 79
139,075 53
12, 9.36, 487 04
21,747 15
40, 332 30
21,882 91
.540,193 80
14,667,698 17
20,101 45
55. 763 86
51,121 86
, 765, 245 73
35,84.5,521 61
13, 051 40
3 4 7 3 2 56
466,163 27
38, 550 42
16, 363, 550 58 '
8,190 23
19,159 21
647, 939 06
21, 822 85
7. 257, 506 62
4, 034 29
7, 517 31
442, 252 33
62,162 57
8,583,309 31
7, 430 63
12, 448 68
696, 548 82
84, 470 84
13,313,222 73
2, 295 95
7, 666 66
59,211 22
1, 040, 237 53
8,-9.58,777 53
4, 903 06
859 22
710,427 78
126,165 17
13,224,623 2 5 '
4,755 04
271,571 00
3,805 52. 835, 655 14
5, 998, 772 08
1,662,984 82 2, 219, 497 36
1,135,971 09
164, 399 81
7, 282, 942 22
4, 678, 059 07 2,162,673 41
285, 282 84
1,287,959 28
36, 306. 874 88
.5, 124, 708 31 4, 253, 635 09
1,717,965 03
273, 782 35
26, 283, 348 49
2, 678,100 77 1, 834,187 04 .L 991, 226 06
109, 761 08
17, 176, 385 00
955, 270 20
'21606,564 77
57,617 71
264,333 36
20, 283, 608 76
229, 593 63
83, 650 78
3,274,422 78
57,098 42
15,005,612 15
106, 260 53
31, 586 82
1,635,871 61
61,338 44
13,004,447 15
69, 027 63
152, 589 43
29, 349 05
1,212,966 46
17, 589, 761 94- *
67, 665 71
20, 961 56
452, 957 19
1, 803, 581 54
19, 088, 433 44
34, 242 17 •
10, 337 71
141,129 84
916, 523 10
17, 878, 325 71
34, 663 37
6,201 96
984,418 15
127, 603 60
20,098,713 45
25, 771 35
2, 330 85
1,216,090 56
130,451 81
23,341,331 77
21,-589 93
6, 638 76
94, 588 66
1, 393, 785 09
19, 712, 283 29 •
19, 885 68
2, 626 90
1, 495, 845 26
1,315,722 83
23, 205, 523 64
17,45154
1,018,308 75
2,218 81
65,126 49
22,681,965 91
14,502 74
1, 517,175 13 .
112, 648 55
11,335 05.
21, 922, 391 39
12, 160 62
16„980 59
2,329,356 14
73, 227 77
24,224,441 77
6,933 5L
10, 506 01
3,210,815 48
584,124 05
28, 465,237 24
11, 630 65
6,791 13 • 2, 623, 381 03
270,410 61
29,032,508 91
2, 759 00
394.12
3, 967, 682 55
470, 096 67
16,214,957 15
4,196 09
19 80
4,857,600 69
480, 812 32
19,391,310 59
10, 459 48
4,263 33 14, 757, 600 75
759. 972 13
23, 409. 940 53
370 00
728 79 24,877,179 86
2,.245, 902 23
. 11,169, 290 39
5, 493 84
1,687 70
6, 776, 236 52 7, 001, 444 59'
16,158, 800 36
2,467 27
3, 730, 945 66
6, 410, 348 45
23,137,924 81
2,553 32
7,361,576 40
979, 939 86
755'22*
13, 499, 502 17
1, 682 25 '
3,411,818 63
2, 567.112 28
14,487,216 74
3,261 36
1, 365, 627 42 1 004, 054 75
18,187,908 76
495 00
'451'995 97
1, 335, 797 52
7, 046, 843 91
103 25
898,158 18
285, 895 92
'26,183,570 94
1,777 34
2, 059, 939 80
1,075,419 70
27, 528,112 70
3, 517 12
2, 077, 022 30
361, 453 68
26, 712, 667 87
2, 897 26
2', 694' 452 48
-289,' 950 13
23,747,864 66
.375 00
2, 498, 355 20
220, 808 30
31, 757, 070 96
375 00
3, 328, 642 56 • 612 610 69
28, 346, 738 82
1, 688, 959 55
685', 379 13
39, 668, 686 42
1, 859, 894 25 2, 064, 308 21
49,017,567 922, 352, 305 30 • 1,185, 166 11
47, 339,326 62
464 249 40
2, 043, 239 58
58, 931, 865 .52
988 081 17
1, 667, 084 99
64,224, 190 27
8,470,798 39
1,105, 352 74
53,025,794 21
11, 497, 049 07
827, 731 40
64, 022, 863 50
8,917,644 93
1,116,190 81
63, 875, 905 05
3, 829, 486 64
1 259 920 88
41,789,620 96
3,513,715 87
1, 352^ 029 13
49, 565, 824 38
], 756, 687 30
1, 454, 596 24
53,187,511 87
1,778,557 71
1, 688, 530 25
39, 582,125 64
870, 658 54
1; 023, 515 31
49, 056, 397 62
152, 20.3'77
915,327 97
'i,'795,'.33i'73"
69, 059, 642 40 ""37,640,"787'95' 1, 48.5,103 61 • 167,617 17
3, 741. 794 38
102,316,152 99
109,741,134 10
47,5, 648 96
588, 333 29 30,291,701 86
84, 923, 260 60
209, 464, 215 25 1, 200, 573 03
996, 553 31 25,441,556 00

.

* For the half year from Jnn

REPORT

OF

THE

SECRETARY

OF

THE

TREASURY.

11

30, 1873, hy calendar years to 1843, and hy fiscal years {ending Jime 30) from that time.

Dividends.

Net ordinary
receipts.

Interest.

Preraiums.

Receipts from
loans aud Trea- Gross, receipts.
sury notes. .

$361, 391 34
409,9.51 19
•5,102, 498 45
669, 960 31
$8, 028 00
1,797, 272 01
652.923 14
38, 500 00
4. 0.07,950 78
303, 472 00
431 904 87
3, 396, 424 00
160, 000 00
6,114 534 59 $4. 800 00
160,000 00 8,377 529 65 42, 800 00
320, 000 00
780 99
70, 000 00
80. 960 00
495 80 78, 675 00
200, 000 00
79, 920 00
7,
813 31
71, 040 00
5, 000, 000 00
7,
749 10
71,040 00 10,
1, 565, 229 24
88, 800 00 12, 935 330 95 "i6,'i25'o6
39, 960 00 14; 995, 793 95
:
11, 064 097 611, 826 307 38
560 693 20
13,
15, 559; 931 07
16, 393; 019 20
661 93
17, 060 473 12
7, 773, 214-'28
384
2, 750, 000 00
9,
14, 422, 634 09
12, 837, 900 00
9, 801 132 76
26,184, 135 00
300 00
14, 340, 409 95
23, 377, 826 00
85 79
11, 181, 625 1(}
$32,107 64 35, 220, 671 40
15, 696 916 82 11,541 74
9, 425, 084 91
686 09
47, 676, 985 66 68,665 16
466, 723 45
202, 426 30 33, 099; 049 74 267, 819 14
353 00
525, 000 00 21. 585, 171 04
412 62
291 00
675, 000 00 24, 603 374 37
1, 000, 000 00 17, 840 669 55
3, 000, 824 13
40, 000 00
105, 000 00 14, 573 379 72
5, 000, 324 00
297, 500 00 20, 232 427 94
350, 000 00 20, 540; 666 26
350, 000 00 19, 361 212 79
5, 000, 000 00
367, 500 00 21, 840 858 02
5, 000, 000 00
402, 500 00 25. 260 434 21
420, 000 00 22, 966 363 96
455, 000 00 24, 763; 629 23
490, 000 00 24, 827 627 38
490, 000 00 24. 844 116 51
490,.000 00 28, 526: 820 82
490, 000 00 31, 867, 450 66
474, 985 00 33, 948 426
234, 349 50 21, 791 935 55
506, 480 82 35, 430; 067 10
292, 674 67 50, 826, 796 08
24, 954 153 04
2, 992. 989 15
26, 302, 561 74
12, 716, 820 86
31, 482, 749 61
• 3, 857, 276 21
19, 480, 115 33
5, 589, 547 51
16, 860 160 27
13, 659, 317 38
19, 976 197 25
14, 808, 735 64
231 001 26
71, 700 83 12, 479, 708 36
8, 320; 707 78
1; 877,181 35
666 60
29, 970, 105 80
29.
967 74
29,
403 16
28, 365 91 ,28, 872, 399 45
26,
699 21
37, 080 00 21., 256, 700 00
35,
077 50
487, 065 48 28, 588, 750 00
30,
10, 550 00
4, 045, 950 00
43,
4,264 92
203, 400 00
039 33
52,
46, 300 00
815 60
49,
16, 350 00
61,
031 68
22 50
001 67
73,
341 40
800 00
65
.,
574 68
200 00
74,
699 24
•68,
312 57
3, 900 00
46,
365 96
23, 717, 300 00
,52,
107 92
709, 357 72 28, 287, 500 00
56,
599 83
10, 008 00 20, 776, 800 60
41,
299 49
33, 630 90 41,861, 709 74
51,
261 09
68, 400 00 529, 692, 460 .50
112,
945 51
602, 345 44 776, 682, 361 57
243,
971 20
21,174,101 01 1,128,873,945 .36
740 85
322;
158 19
11,683,446 891,472,224,
'1, 1843. to J u n e 30, 1843.




771,342
772, 458
450,195
439, 855
515, 758
740, 329
758, 780
179,170
.12, 546, 813
12, 413, 978
12, 945, 455
14, 995, 793
11. 064, 097
11, 826, 307
13, 560, 693
15, 559, 931
16, 398,019
17, 060, 661
7, 773, 473
12, 134,214
14, 422, 634
22, 639, 032
40, 524, 844
34, 559, 536
50, 961. 237
57, 171,421
33, 833, 592
593, 936
24, 605, 665
20, 881,493
19, 573, 703
20, 232, 427
20, 540, 666
24, 381,212
26, 840, 858
25, 260, 434
22, 966, 363
24, 763, 639
24, 827, 627
24, 844,116
28, 526,820
31, 867,450
33, 948, 426
21, 791, 935
35, 430, 087
50, 826, 796
27, 947,142
39, 019,382
35, 340, 025
25, 069, 662
30. 519, 477
,34,784, 932
20, 782,410
31, 198,555
29, 970,105
29, 699, 967
55, 368,168
56,'992. 479
59, 796, 892
47, 649, 388
52, 762, 704
49, 893,115
61,•603, 404
73, 802, 343
65, .351, 374
74, 056, 899
68, 969,212
70, 372, 665
81, 77.3 965
76, 84i;407
83, .371, 640
581, 680,121
889, 379, 652
,393, 461,017
805, 939,345

Unavailable.

$1,889 50

63, 288 35
, 458, 782 93
37, 469 25
11,188 00
28,251 90

103, 301 37

11,110 81
6,001 01
9,210 40
6, 095 11

12

R E P O R T OF T H E

SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

TABLE G.—Statement of tlie receipts of the United States

u
ci

Balance in the
Treasury at
commencement of year.

1866
1867

$33. 933, 657 89
160, 817, 099 73

1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
.1873

198,076, 537
158,936,082
183, 781, 985
177,604,116
133,019,122
134, 666, 001

09
87
76
51
15
85




Internalrevenue.

Customs.

$179, 046. 6ol ,53
176, 417,-810 88
164, 464,
180, 048,
194, 538,
206, 270,
216, 370,
188, 089,

.599
426
374
408
286
522

56
63
44
05
77
70

3, 385, 720, 600 18

Direct t a x .

$309, 226, 813 42 $1,974,7.54 12
266,027, 537 43 4, 200, 233 70
191,087,589
158,356,460
184,899,7.56
143,098,153
130, 642,177
113,729,314

41
86
49
63
72
14

1, 788,145
765, 685
229,102
580, 355

35
61
88
37

315, 254 51

Public lauds.

Miscellaneous.

$665, 031 03 $29,036,314 23
1,163, 575 76 15, 037, 522 15
1,348,715
4, 020, 344
3,350,481
2, 388, 646
2, ,575, 714
2,882,312

4\^
34
76
6S
19
38

17,745,403.59
13, 997, 338 65
12, 942, 118 30
22, 093, 541 21
15,106, 051 23
L7.161, 270 05

1, 876,191, 953 19 27, 554, 926 93 197,171, 498 65 252, 734, 361 07

* Amounts heretofore credited to the Treasurer as una

R E P O R T OF T H E SECRETARY OF THE

TREASURY.

13-

from March 4, 1789, to June 30, 1873, tj^'C—Continued.

1866
1867

N e t ordinary
receipts.

Receipts from
loans and Trea- Gross receipts.
sury notes.

$519, 949,1564 38
462,846,679 92

Dividends.

$1,270,834,173 11 $172,094 29 >
$712, 851, 553 05
$38, 083, 055 68
27, 787, 330 35640, 426, 910 291,131,060,920 .56 721,327 93-

Unavail-',
able.

2, 675, 913 191868
1869
1870
1871
1672
1873

370, 434,;4.53
357,138,1256
395, 959,1833
374,431„104
364, 694,1229
322,'177,1673

82
09
87
94
91
78

29, 203. 629
13.755,491
15, 295, 643
8, 892, 839
9,412,637
11, 560, 530

50
12
76
95
65
89

625,111,433
238,678,081
285, 474, 496
268, 763,-523
305, 047, 054
214,931,017

20 1,030,749,516 52
609,621,828 27
06
696,729,973 63
00
47
652,092,468 36
00
679,153,921 56
00
548,669,221 67

*2, 070 73
*3,396 18-*18, 223 35
*3, 047 80

19, 720,136 29 5,749,093i476 31 $485,224 45 188. 984, 953 33 7,614,519,112 33 13,553,032,771 97 2, 649,175 13^
vailable, and since recovered! and charged to his account.




14

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE H.—Statement of the expenditures of the United States from March 4, 1789, to Jun^

•
Year.

1791
1792
1793
1794
1795'
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1310
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1321
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1327
1828
1829
1830
1331
16.32
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1833
1839
1340
1841
1342
1843*
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851 1
18.52
1853 1
1854 '
1855
18,56
1857
3858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864 1

War.

liTavy.

Indians.

Pensions.

-Miscellaneous.

$632,804 03
$27,000 00
$175, 813 83
$1,083,971 61
1,100, 702 09
13, 648 85
109, 243 15
4, 672, 664 38
1,1.30,249 08
27,282 83
eo'087 81
511,451 01
2, 639, 097 59
$6i-i"468'97
81, 399 24
750, 350 74
13, 042 46
2.430.910 13
68, 673 22
. 1, 378, 920 66
23,475 68
410, 562 03
1,260,263 34
274, 784 04
il3,563 98
100, 843 71
801.847 58
1, 039, 402 46
1, 259, 422 62 1
62, 396 58
382, 631 89
92, 256 97
2, 009, 522 30
1, ,381, 347 76
16,470 09
104, 845 33
1,1.39, 524 94 1
2, 466, 946 98
20, 302 19
2. 858, 081 84
95, 444 03
1, 039, 391 68
2, 560, 878 77
31 22
1, 337, 613 22
3.448,716 03
64,130 73
1, 672, 944 08
9, 000 00
• 1,114, 768 45
2,111,424 00
73,533 37
1,179, 148 25
915, 561 87
94, 000 00
'
85, 440 39
1. 462, 929 40
0 822, 055 85
1, 842, 635 76
60, 000 00
62, 902 10
1, 215, 230 53
875, 423 93
116, 500 00
1,189, 832 75
80, 092 80
2,191,009 43
712, 781 28
196, 500 00
1, 597, 500 00
81,854 59
3, 768, 598 75
1, 224, 355 38
1, 649, 641 44
234, 200 00
81, 875 53
2,890,137.01
L 288, 685 .91 c>
. 1,697,897 5L
1,722,064 47
205. 425 00
70, 500 00
2, 900, 834 40
1, 884, 067 80
213,575 00
1, 423, 285 61
82, 576 04
3, 345, 772 17
2, 427, 758 80
337, 503 84
1, 215, 803 79
87, 833 54
2, 294, 323 94
177, 625 00
1,101,144 98
1, 654, 244 20
83, 744 16
2, 032, 828 19
• 1, 965, 566 39
151,875 00
1,367,291 40
75, 043 88
1.1,817,798 24
277, $45 00
91,402 10
3. 959, 365 15
1,68.3,083 21
19. 652, 013 02
167, 358 28
6,446, 600 10
86, 989 91
1. 729, 435 61
20, 350, 806 86
167; 394 86
2, 208, 029 70
90,164 36
7,311,290 60
14, 794, 294 22
530, 750 00
2, 898, 870 47.
8, 660, 000 25
m . 656 06
16, 012, 096 80
274, 512 16
2,989.741 17
3, 908, 278 30
168, 804 15
8, 004, 236 53 3, 518, 936 76.
3, 314, 598 49
319,463 71
297, 374 43
5,622,715 10
505, 704 27
3, 835,839 51
2, 953, 695 00
890, 719 90
/
6, 506, 300 37
3, 847, 640 42
463,181 39
3,067,211 41
« 2, 415, 939 85
2, 630, 392 31 . 4, 387, 990 00
3, 203, 376 31
2, 592, 021 94
315,750 01
4,461,291 78477, 005 44
242, 817 25
2, 223,121 54
3,319,243 06
3,111,98148
2, 224, 458 98
1, 967, 996 24
575, 007 41
1,948,199 40
3. 096, 924 43
2, 503, 765 83
380, 731 82
2, 022, 093 99
1, 780, 588 52
3. 340, 939 85
, 2. 904, 531 56
429, 987 90
1, 499, 326 59
7,155,308 81
3, 659, 914 18
724.106 44
1,303,810 57
2, 748, 544 89
3. 049, 083 86
3, 943,194 37
2, 600,177 79
4, 218, 902 45
743, 447 83
1, 5.56, 593 83
3, 948, 977 88
4, 263, 877 45
750, 624 83
2, 713, 476 53
976,138 86
, 4,145, 544 56
705, 084 24
850, 573 57
3, 676, 052 64
3,918,786 44
4,724,291 07
3, 308, 745 47
576, 344 74
949, 594 47
3, 082, 234 65
4, 767,128 88
622,262 47
1,363,297 31
3, 239, 428 63
3; 237, 416 04
4, 841, 835 -55
3,856.183 07
930. 738 04
1,170, 665 14
3, 064, 646 10
5, 446, 034 38
3, 956, 370 29
1, 352, 419 75
1,184, 422 40
4, ,577,141 45
6, 704, 019 10
3, 901, 356 75
1, 802, 980 93
4, 589,152 40
5,716,245 93
5, 696,189 38
3, 956, 260 42
1, 003, 953 20 . 3, 364, 285 30
4, 404, 728 95
5, 759,156 89
3.8u4,939 06
1, 706, 444 48
1, 954, 711 32
4, 229, 698 53
• 11, 747, 345 25
5, 807. 718 23
5, 037, 022 88
2,882, 797 96
. 5, 393, 279 72
13, 682, 730 80
6,646,914:53
4, ,348, 036 19
2, 672,162 45
9, 893, 370 27
12,897,224 16
5, 504,191 34
2,156, 057 29
7,160, 664 76
6,131,530 53
8, 916, 995 80
6,182, 294 25
2, 528, 917 28
3,142, 750 51
5, 725, 990 89
7, 095, 267 23
6,113,896 89
2, 603, 562 17
2, 331. 794 86
5, 99.5, 398 96
8,801,610 24
6,001,076 97
2, 514, 8.37 12
2, 388, 434 51
• 6,490,831 45
6, 610. 438 02
8, 397, 242 95
1,199, 099 68
L 378, 931 33
6, 775, 624 ,61
• 2, 908. 671 95
3,727,711 53'
839, 041 12
578, 371 00
3, 202, 713 .00
5, 218,183 66
6, 498,199 11
1, 256, 532 39
2, 032, 008 99
5,645,183 86
5, 746, 291 28
6, 297,177 89
1, 539, 351 35
, 2,400,788 11
5. 911, 760 98
10,413,370 58
6, 455, 013 92
1, 027, 693 64 ,
1,811,097 56
6, 711, 283 89
35, 840. 030 33
7, 900, 635 76
1,430,411 30
1, 744, 883 63
6, 885, 608 35
27, 638, 334 21
9, 408, 476 02
1,252, 296 81
1,227,496 48
5; 650,-851 25
14, 558, 473 26
9, 786, 705 92
1, 374,161 55
1, 328. 867 64
12, 885, 334 24
9, 687, 024 58
1,866,886 02
7, 904, 724 '66
1, 663, 591 47
16, 043, 763 36
12.161,965 11
8, 380, 581 38
2,829,801 77
2, 293, 377 22
17, 888, 992 18
8, 521, 506 19
8 918,842 10
3. 043, 576 04
•2,401,853 78
17,504,171 45
9,910,498 49
3, 880, 494 12
11,067,789 53
1, 756, 306 20
17,463,068 01
11,722,282 87
• 10. 790, 096 32
1, 550, 339 55
1,232,665 00
26, 672,144 68
14, 648, 074 07
13, 327, 095 11
2,772,990 78
1,477.612 33
24,090,425 43
16, 963,160 51
14,074, 834 64
2, 644, 263 97
1, 296, 229 65
31, 794, 038 87
19,159,150 87• 12. 651, 694 61
4,354, 418 87
1, 310, 380 58
28, 565,498 77
2.5,679,121 63
14, 0.53, 264 64
' 4,973,266 18
1, 219, 763 30 • 26, 400, 016 42
23,154, 720 53
14, 690, 927 90
3, 490, 534 53
1.222, 222 71
23. 797, 544 40
16, 472, 202 72
11.514,649 83
2,991,121 54
1,100,802 32
27, 977, 978 30
• 23,001,530 67
12, 387,156 52
1, 034, 599 73
2, 865, 431 17
. 23, 327, 287 69
389.173, 562 29
42, 640, 353 09 2, 327, 948 37
852,170 47
21,38.5,862 59
60.3;314,4ll 82
L 078,513 36
23,198, 382 37
63,261,235 31
3,152, 032 70
690, 391, 048 66
85, 704. 963 74
4,985,473 90
27,572,216 87
%, 629, 975 .97




^ For the half year from Janu

(

15

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

•30, 1873, hy calendar years, ^a^l843, and hy fiscal years {ending June 30) from that time.

Net
ordinary
expenditures.

919, 589
896,258
749, 070
545, 299
362,541
551,303
636,110
651,710
480,166
39
7, 411, . 6
4. 981,669
3, 737, 079
4, 002, 824
4, 452, 858
6. 357, 234
6, 080, 209
4, 984, 572
6, 504,338
7, 414,672
311.062
5,
592, 604
5,
829,498
17,
082, 396
28,
127, 686
30,
953, 571
26,
373, 432
23,
4.54, 609
15,
808, 673
1.3,
300, 273
16.
134, 530
13,
723,479
10,
827, 643
9, 784,154
9, 330,144
L5, 490, 459
11, 062,316
13, 653, 095
12, 296,041
13, 641,210
12, 229, 533
13, 864, 067
13, 516,368
16, 713, 755
22, 425, 417>
18, 514, 950
17, 863,164
' 30,243, 214
37, 849,718
33, 496, 948
26, '139, 920
24; 196,840
26, 361, .336
24, v256, 508
11, 650,106
20, 695, 369
21, 418,459
26, 801,569
53, 227, 454
'45, 933, 542
39, 165, 990
37, 054, 717
44, 389, 954
40, 078,156
44, 967, 528
51, 316,197
56, 772, 527
66, 041,143
6D, 330, 437
72, 355, 950
66, 056, 754
60, 616,055
62, 379, 896
456, 004, ,575
694, 283, 679
811,

Gross expenditures.

Public de^t.

$1,177, 863 03
2, 373. 611 28
2, 097, 859 17
2, 752, 523 04
2, 947, 059 06
3, 239, 347
3,172, 516 73
2, 955, 875 90
2,815, 651 41
3, 402, 60 L 04
4,411, 630 06
4, 239, 172 16
• 3,949,462 ,36
4,185, 048 74
2, 657, 114 22
3, 368. 968 26
3, 369, 578 48
2, 557, 074 23
2, 866, 074 90
3,163, 671 09
2, 585,435 57
' 2,451,272 57
3, 599. 455 22
4, 593,239 04
5, 990.090 24
7, 822.923 34
4, 536,262 55
6, 209, 954 03
5,211, 730 56
5,151, 004 32
5,126, 073 79
5,172, 786 79
4, 922, 475 40
4, 943, 557 93
4, 366, 757 4!
3, 975, 542 95
3, 486, 071 51
3, 098, 800 60
2, 542, 843 23
1.912. 574 93
1, 373, 748 74
561 50
772,
796 87
303,
152 98
202,
863 06
57,

$18, 23; 43

82,865 81
69,713 19
170, 063 42
420,498 64
2, 877, 818 69
8t2, 047 39
385, 372 90
363,572 39
5';!4,443 08

ary 1, 1843, to J u n e 30, 1843.-




14, 996
399, 633
174, 598
284, 977
773, 549
523, 583
1,833, 452
1, 040, 458
642, 723
1.119, 214
2, 390, 765
• 3,565,535
3, 782, 393
.3, 696, 760
4, 000, 297
3, 665,832
• 3,070,926
2,314, 464
1, 953,822
1, 593,265
1, 652, 055
2, 637, 649
3,144, 120
4, 034, 157
13,190, 344
24, 729, 700
53, 685, 421

48
89
08
55
85
91
13
18
27
72
88
78
03
75
80
74
69
99
37
23
67
70
94
30
84
62
69

984
693, 050
2, 633, 048
2, 74-3,771
2,841, 639
2, 577, 126
2, 617, 250
976, 032
1, 706, 578

23
25
07
13
37
01
12
09
64

1,1.33, 563 11
2, 879, 876 98
5, 294, 235 24
3, 306,697 07
3, 977, 206 07
4, 583, 960 63
5, 572, 018 64
2, 938, 141
7, 701, 288
3, ,586,479
4, 835, 241
5, 414, 564
1,998, 349
7, 508, 668
3, 307, 304
6,638, 832
17, 048, 139
20, 686, 753
15, 086, 247
2, 492, 195
3, 477, 489
3, 241, 019
2, 676, 160
607, 541
11, 624, 835
7, 723, 587
7, 065, 539
6, 517. 596
9. 064, 637
9, 360, 304
9, 443, 173
14, 800, 629
17, 067, 747
1, 239, 746
5, 974, 412
328
21. 822
• 5, 590, 723
10, 718, 153
3,912, 015
5, 315, 712
7, 801, 990
338, 012
11,158, 450
7, 536, 349
371, 100
5, 600, 067
13, 036, 922
12, 804, 478
.335
• 3, 656,
654, 912
2,152, 293
6,412, .574
17, 556, 896
6, 662,065
3,614, 618
. 3,276,606
7, 505,250
14. 685,^043
250
13, 854,
100
18,737„
322
96, 097,
635
181, 081,
014
430, 572,

62
96
26
12

43
86
22
90
11
59
57
59
73
96
83
33
01
63
38
24
88
47
77
29
48
79
51
21
20
91
79
53
62
1
09
64
71
49
04
65
54
54
14
71
05
01
95
66
66
05
82
15
00
00
09
07
03

11,
11,
12,
13i
11,
12,
13,
15,
11,
16,
13,
13,
13,
22,
39,
38,
39,
48,
40,
35,
24,
•21,
.19,
17,
15,
31,
23,
24,
22,
25]
25,
24,
30,
34,
24,
24,
17,
30,
37,
39,
37,
28,
31,
32,
12,
33,
30,
27,
60,

60,
56,
44,
43,
46,
• 54,
75,
66,
72,
71,
82,
8.3,
77,
85,
565,
899,
,295,

436
920
977
593
240
776
877
618
396
534
376
467
983
113
309
196
292
702
226
994
604
121
520
230
493
495
646
875
199
024
572
'592
171
538
604
398
764
479
356

78
Of)
97
17
15
84
37
41
97
12
94
31
67
72
47
26
99
04
30
49
86
15
36
32
35
51
04
40
73
85
69
63
00
47
72
46
04
52
40

281 ,55
446 12
698 06
298 49
982 44
141 56
164 04
0.37 15
438 35
936 15
533 6
530 03
'876 53
105 15
010 85
408 71
282
851
143
422
716
l'04
603
061
170
775
341
587
186
642
125
313
563
911.

90
74
19
74
26
31
83
74
75
96
57
37
74
92
65
08
74
25

114 66

Balance • in
T r e a s u r y at
the end of
the y e a r .

$973, 905
783, 444
753, 661
1,151 924
516, 442

75
51
69
17
61
42
04
43
77
99
00
64
60
26
99
80
07
96
78
57
80
41
00
63
88
19
48
74
38
21
24
55
81
13
43
18
10

995
1, 021, 899
617, 451
2,161, 867
2, 623, 311
3, 295, 391
^,020, 697
,825, 811
005
, 037,
388
i, 999,
123
, 538,
850
' 643,
,
,941, 809
056
: 848,
,
276
• 672,
,
, 502, 305
, 862, 217
' 196, 542
,
, 727, 848
1,106. 592
I 033,519
.
„ 989, 465
,478, 526
I 079,992
,
,196, 461
,681, 592
, 237, 427
922
' 463,
,
,946, 597
1,201 650
686
: 356,
.
', 668, 286
' 972, 435 81
,
' 755, 704 79
,
',014, 539 75
,502, 914 45
1,011, 777 .55
,702, 905 31
I 892, 8.58 42
,
: 749,803 96
,
' 708,
,
436 00
' 327,
,
252 69
; 891 196 94
,
: 157, 503 68
,
163 46
' 963,
,
111 08
: 685,
,
\ 521 979 44
284 74
. 186,
: 742,829 62
,
274 81'
; 194,
,
i,261 959 65
:,079 276 43
, 416;612 45 •
: 827,082 69
,
,871 753 31
' 158; 353 25
,
,'338, 860 02
1,261 901 09
, 591 073 41
, 777, 672 13
1,108, 229 60
• 802,855 00
,
' 113,334 22
,
1,193, 248 60
: 979, 530 78
,
i, 963, 8.57 83
1, 96.5,304 87
046 13
• 523,
,
, 433,738 44

16

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE.TREASURY.
TABLE li.—Statement of the exptenditures of the United

Year.

War.

Indiaus.

Navy.

Miscellaneous.

Pensions.

1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1672
1873

$1, 0.30, 690, 400 06
283,1.54, 676 06

$122, 617, 434 07
43,285, 662 00

$5, 059, 360, 71
3, 295, 729 32

$16,347,621 34
15, 605, 549 88

$42,989,383 10
40, 613,114 17

3, 568, 633, 312 26
*3, 621, 780 07

1865
1666

717,551,816 .39
*77,992 17

• 103,369,211 42
*53, 286 61

119,607,6.56 OL
*9,737 87

643, 604, .554 33
*718, 769 52

3, 572, 260, 092
95, 224, 415
• 123, 246, 646
78,501,990
57,65.5,675
3.5, 799, 991
35,372,157
46, 323,136

717, 629, 806
31,034,011
25, 775, 502
20, 000, 757
2^1, 780. 229
19,431,027
21, 249, 809
23, 526,256

35
63
62
61
40
82
20
31

4, 044, 384,109" 94

56
04
72
97
87
21
99
79

103,422,498 03
4. 642, 531 77
4, 100, 682 32
7, 042, 923 06
3, 407, 938 15
7. 426, 997 44
7,061,728.82
7,951,704 88

880,427, 404 15

145, 057, 004 47

119,617,393
20,936,551
• 23,782, 386
28,476,621
28, 340, 202
34, 443; 894
26, 533, 402
29,359,426

88
71
78
78
17
68
76
66

313, 489, 880 82

644, 323, 323
51,110, 223
. 53.009,867
56,474, 061
53,237,461
60,481,916
60, 984, 757
73, 328,110

85
72
67
53
56
23
42
06

1,052,949,722 04
* Outstanding-

N O T E . — T h i s statement is made from w a r r a n t s paid b y the T r e a s u r e r u p to J u n e 30,1866.
Theb a a n c e in the T r e a s u r y J u n e 30, 1873, b y this statement, is $159,293,673.41, from which should beoO, 1873, $131,192,028.50.
•
•




R E P O R T OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

17

States from March 4, 1789, to'June 30, 1873—Continued.

Year.

Net
ordinary
expenditures.

Premiums.

Interest.

Public debt.

Gross expenditures.

Balance
in
Treasury at
the end of
the y e a r .

1865 $1, 217. 704,199 26 .$li!717.900 11
i 58, 476 51
1866
385, 954, 731 43

$77, 395, 090 30 $609,616,141 68 $1, 906, 433, 331 37 $3.3; 933, 657 89
133, 067, 624 91 620, 263, 249 10 1,139, 344, 081 95 165, 301, 654 76

7,1611,003 56
1
1

602, 689, 519 27 2,374, 677,103 12 8, 037, 749,176 38
*100 31
*2, 888 48
*4, 484, 555 03 *4, 484, .555 03

5,157, 253.116 67 7,,611. 003 56
202, 947, 733 87 10,1313, 349 38
229,915,088 11 7,001,151 04
19.0, 496, 354 95 1,1674,680 05
164, 421, 507 15 15, 996, 555 60
]57,583,827''58 9, 016, 794 74
153, 201, 856 19 6, 956. 266 76
180,468,636,90 5,105,919 99

502, 692 407 75 2, 374, 677, 203 43 8, 042, 2.33, 731 41160, 817, 099 73
143,781,591 91 735, 536, 980 11 1, 093, 079, 655 27 198, 076, 537 09
140, 424, 045 71 692, 549, 685 88 1,009,889,970 74 156,936,062 87
130, 694, 242 80 261,912,718 31
584,777,996 11 18.3,781,985 76
129, 235. 498 00 393,254,282 13
702, 907, 642 88 177, 604,116 51
125, 576, 565 93 399, 503, 670 65
691, 680, 858 90 138,019,122 15
117,357,8.39 72 405, 007, 307 54
682, 525, 270 21 134, 666, 001 85
104, 750, 688 44 233, 699, 352 58
524, 044, 597 91 159,293,673 41

5,152, 771, 550 43
*4, 481, 566 24
1867
1868
1669
1870
1871
1872
1873

6, 436, 308,121 42 64, 177, 721 12 1, 394, 512, 880 265,496,141,200 63 13,391,139,923 43

outstanding warrants are th^n added, and the statement is by warrants issued from that date.. The
deducted the amount deposited with the States, $28,101,644.91, leaving the net available balance, June
2 F




•

•

18

REPORT OF TtlE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE I.—Statement of the differences hetween the several accounts shoiving the outstanding
principal of the puhlic deht, with an explanation thereof, so f a r as the examination of the
accounts has progressed.
The statementof receipts (Table G-) .shows the amount which has been covered into
tbe Treasury, as derived from loans and Treasury notes, fi-om the organization ofthe
Government to and includiug June 30, 1873, to have beeu
S7, 614, 519,112 38
The statement of expenditures (Table H) shows the payments fi'om. the Treasury for
the redemption and pui'chase of loahs and Treasury notes for the same period to
have been
5,496,141,200 63
Showing the principal outstanding by these tables, June 30, 1873
2,118, 377, 911 75
The actual outstanding piincipal. at that date, as shown by Tables F and 0, and by
the debt statemeut of July 1, 1873, was
'.
.*. 2,234, 482, 993 20
Showing

-.

-. -:

H6,105, 081 45

more outstanding and unpaid principal by the, debt statement, and by Tables F and 0, than by the
receipts and expenditures, Tables G and 11.
'

•,

This difference of ^116,105,081.45 is thus explained: The folloM^ng stocks were issued in payinent of
various debts and claims, but in the transaction no money ever came into the Treasury. When the ;
stock matured it was paid out of the general funds then iu the Tieasm.\y. This showed an expenditure
where there had been no corresponding receipt, and, of course, a statement of the debt made from the
receipts and expenditures on account of loans and Treasra'y notes would not be correct unless these
items were added to the receipt side of the account. This caunot be done until legislation has been,
had authorizing i t : .
French farmers-general lean
Prench loan of eighteen million livres
Spanish loan of 1781
....'.
Prench loan of ten million l i v r e s . . . . . '
French loan of .six million livres
Balance of supplies due France
Dutch loan of 1782....:
'.
Dut'ch loan of 1764
Debt due foreign officers
Dutch loan of 1787
Dutch loan of 1788
Interest due on the foreign debt
Domestic debt of the Revolution, estimated

.,

:
.-

•

$153, 688 89
3,267, 000 00
174, 017 13
1, 815, 000 00
^ 1; 089, 000 00
, 24, 332 86
% 000, 000 00
800, 000 00
186, 988 78
1....
400,000 00
400, 000 00
1, 771, 496 90
•.. 63, 918, 475 44

The above are the details (so far as the progress of the examination has developed them)
of the item iu the finance report of 1871, (page 20,) " Eevolutionary debt, estimated,
176,000,000."
Mississippi-purchase stock.
Louisiana-purchase stock.
:
Washiuf^ton and Georgetown debt assumed by the United States
United States Bank subscription stock
'.
Six per cent. Navy stock
'.
Texas-purchase stock
Mexican indemnity stock
]3ountv-land scrip'
Tompkins fi-aud in loan of 1798
^...

4, 282,151 12
11, 250, 000 00
1, 500, 000 00
7, 000, 000 00
711, 700 00
5, 000, 000 00
303, 573 92
233, 075 00
1, 000 00

The following amounts represent the discounts suffered in i)lacing the loans named;
only the money actually received was covered into the Treasury. The difference between this and the face value of the stock issued was thfe discount. To make the
receipts and expenditures on the loan"accounts correct, these disconnts should be
credited to the loans as receipts and charged to a discount account. This also requires
legislation to enable it to be done:
• '
Loanof 1796
.'
Loan of February, 1813
.''
Loan of August, 1813
Ten-million loan of 1814
'.
Six-million loan of 1814
Undesignated stock of 1814
Loan of March, 1815
.'
Loan of Februai-y, 1861
The foregoing are the details of the difference of $116,105,081.45, so far as the examina- tion of the public-debt a'ccouuts has progressed. There still remains to be ex• plained
Which is the resultant error arising out of differences yet to be discovered and reconciled. The full details of this item can only be given after the accounts have all been
examined and corrected, and the amount of it may be increased or diminished when
the examination of the domestic debt of the Revolution shall have shown what its
true amount is. This examination is still being continued, for the purpose of perfecting the records.
Total




•

' 10,000 00
2,109, 377 43
998, 581 95
1, 983, 895 25
1, 076, 626 97
91^, 868 95
588, 820 93
2, 019, 776 10
942,433 83

116,105, 081 45

TABLE K,—Statement shoiving the condition of the sinhing-fund,'from its institution in May, 1869, to dnd including June 3d, l 8 7 l
.

T H E S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E T R E A S U R Y IN ACCOUNT W I T H SINKING-FUND.

T o i of 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt,
being for the three months from April 1 to J u n e 30,
1863
J u n e 30, 1869, T o interest on f8,691,000, being amount of principal of
public debt purchased during fiscal y e a r 1869 on this
account
i
Balance to n e w account
•.

J u n e 30, 1869

J u l y . l , 1868

$6,529,219 63

B y amount of principal purchased, $8,691,000, including
$1,000 donation, estimated in gold
B y accrued interest on the amount of purchases in 1869..

$7, 261, 437 30
136, 392 56

25, 884, 522 14
521, 460 00

"^
^

O
W
H

196,590 00
672, 020 23
7, 397, 829 86

J u l y 1, 1869.. T o 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt on
J u n e 30, 1869, §2,588,452,213.94 '.
J u n e 30, 1870. T o interest on 18,691,000, araount of redemption in 1869 ..
T o interest-on $28,151,900, araount of priucipal of public debt purchased during fiscal y e a r 1870 on this account

• CR.

7, 397, 829 86
J u l y 1,1669.
J u n e 30, 1870

1, 254, 897 00

B y balance
B y amount
in gold
B y accrued
By balance

from last year
!
,
of principal purchased, $26,151,900, estimated
interest on account of purchases in 1870
to n e w account
:

27, 660, 879 14

O

672, 020 23
25, 893,143 57
351,003 54
744,711 80
27, 660, 879 14

H
CZ2

w
o
W
W

Hj

'.....
J u l y 1, 1870.. T o balance from Lastyear
T o 1 per cent, ou t h e principal of the public debt on
J u n e 30, 1870, $2,480,672,427.81
J u n e 30, 1871. T o interest on redemption of 1869. $8,691,000
To interest on redemption of 1670, $28,151,900
T o interest on $29,936,250, amount of principal of public debt purchased during fiscal year 1871 on this account
:
•

744, 711 80
24, 805; 724 28,
521, 460 00
1,689,114 00

J u n e 30, 1871

B y a m o u n t o f principal purchased, $29,936,250, estimated
in gold
By accrued interest on accountof purchases in 1871 . . . . . .
By balance to new account

1, 557, 264 50
29,319,274 58

'
J u l y 1,.1871.. T o balance from last year ..'.
T o 1 p e r cent, on the principal of the public debt o.n J u n e
30, 1871, $2,353,211,3.32.32
J u n e 30, 1872. T o interest on redemption of 1669, $8,691,000
To interest on redemption of 1870, $28,151,900
To interest on redemption of 1871, $29.936,2.50...
T o interest of redemption of $32,618,450, amount of principal of public debt purchased duriug fiscal j^'ear 1672
on this account
T o balance to n e w a c c o u n t . . .
..,..i..




28, 694, 017 73
367, 782 53
257, 474 32

257, 474 32
23,532,113
521,460
L 689,114
1, 796,175

32
00
00
00

29,319,274 58
J u n e 30, 1872. B y amount of principal purchased, |32,61S,450, estimated
in gold
B y accrued interest on account of purchases in 1872

32, 248, 645 22 '
430, 906 38

H'
ill
M
H
t^
P>

CO

W
K

2, 059, 325 50
2,.823, 891 46
32, 679, 553 60

>
W
^
o
^

32, 579, 553 60

BR.

TABLE K.—Statement showing the condition ofthe sinking'fund, t^-c.—Continued.

J u l y 1, 1872.. T o 1 p e r cent, on the principal of the public debt on J u n e
30, 1872, $2,253,251,328.78
•.
J u n e 30, 1873. T o interest on redemption of 1869, $8,691.000
To interest on redemption of 1870, $28.151,900
T o interest on redem ption of 1871, $29,936,250
T o interest on redemption of 1872, $32,618,450
T o interest on redemption of $28,678,000, amount of principal of public debt purchased during fiscal year 1873
on this account
,...:
To. balance to n e w account




J u l y 1, 1872.. B y balance from last year
532, 513 29 J u n e 30, 1873: B y amouut of principal purchased, $28,678,000, estimated
in gold
521, 460 00
689,114 00
By accrued interest on account of piirchasesin 1873
796.175.00
957, 107 00

CR.

to
o

$2, 823, 891 46
28, 4.57. 562 83
392,-385 45

O

725, 881 50
451,588 95
673,839 74

31, 673, 839 74

o
H.

Kj

TABLE L.—Statement shoiving the purchases of' honds on account of the sinMng-fund during each fiscalyear from its institution in May, 1869, to and including
JuneZ0,l&73.
•
•

Principal redeemed.

Y e a r ended^

P r e m i u m paid. Net cost iu currency.

N e t cost estim a t e d in go d.

Interest due a t
close of fiscal
year.

Accrued iuterest paid in coin.

Balance of i u '
terest due at
close of fiscal
year.

O
JUNE 30, 1869.
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols,. 186'8

of 1862
of INIarch, 1864
of J u n e , 1864
of 1665

$1,621,000 00
70, 000 00
1,051,000 00
465. 000 00
461,000 00
4,718,000 00
305, 000 00

'
.-. .•

Total

8,691,000 00
X

$1,874,822
81, 725
1,212,946
539, 969
534,736
5, 467, 208
354, 442

84
00
45
00
80
08
50

$1,349,970
57, 552
87.3,205
- 387, 566
387. 903
3,948,586
256, 653

02
82
61
28
26
11
20

$16,210
700
10,510
^ 4,650
13,8:30
141,540
9,150

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$7, 384
218
1,470
2,683
429
116, 032
• 8,173

60
63
42
54
04
35
98

$8, 825
481
9, 039
1, 966
13, 400
25, 507
976

40
37
58
46
96
65
02

196,590 00

136, 392 56

. 60,197 44

3,263,099 51
75, 6 5 54.8
3, 647, 628 29
2, 606, 636 20
10,681,7.36 97
5, . 0 810 90
39
308,573 16

160.919 .50
5, 350 00
16.5, 834 00
105,257 5049.5, 421 .50
302, 734 50
19, 380 00

45,994 49
1,080 99
49, 946 00
37,113 .53
14.5,518 29
66,111-51
5, 238 73

114,925
4,269
115,888
68,143
349, 903
236, 622
14,141

31, 898, 953 68

25, 893,143 57.

1,254,897 00

351,003 54

3, 020,557 56
227, 607 56
31,777 20
2, 277 20
4, 307, 879 63
340, 529 63
7, 343, .523 00
574,923 00
850, 949 79 11,073,149 79
541,559 41
6,644,609 4L
4,764 61
57,384 61.

2, 680, 209 05
• 2&, 590 88
.3,847,182 42
6, .525. 231 42
9, 762, 387 78
5,800,618 87
•49,797 81

H
O

903, 893 46

1,374,850 67

10. 065, 850 67

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

493, 479 42
15,742 87
506,189 91
361,735 43
1, '154, 778 37
861,763 73
-53, .363 95

4., 035, 529 42
100, 742 87
4,477,589 91
3,151,985 43
12, 986, 928 37
6,744,313-73
401, 863 95

, 151, 900 00

,
..'..-,

J U N E 30,

Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

84
00
45
00
80
08
50

3, 747, 053 68

7,261,437 30

o

JtJNE30, 1870.

Five"-twenties of 1662
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864
F i v e twenties of 1865
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867 ...".
"
Consols, 1868
'
Total

$253, 822
11, 725
161,946
74, 969
73, 736
749.208
49, 442

Total




01
01
00
97
21
99
27

O
H

1671.

of 1862
of M aixh, 1864
of J u n e , 1664 .1
of 1865
.,..•

3. 542, 050
85, 000
3, 971, 400
2, 790, 250
11,.532,150
5, 882, 550
348, 500

..

2, 792, 950
29, 500
3, 967, 350
6, 768, 600
10,222,200
6, 103, 050
52, 600

CO
00
00
00
00
00
00

29, 936, 2.50 00

2, 542, 631 20

32, 478, 881 20

28,694, 017 73

145, 975 00
1,240 00
201,375 00
331, 933 "50
522, 117 00
351, .528 00
3, 096 00
1,,557, 264 50

36, 657
3SS
51,703
92v259
'109,455
76, 745
572

SO
35
46
58
28
93
13

367, 782 53

109,317 20
85 L 65
149,671 . 4
5
239, 673 92
412,661 72
274, 782 07
2, 523 87

d

1,189,481 97

to

to
to

TABLE h.—Statement shoiving the purchases of honds on accountof the sinUng-fund during eachfiscalyear from its institution, tf-c.—Continued.
Principal redeemed.

Y e a r ended—

J U N E 30,

P r e m i u m paid. Net cost in currency.

Net cost estimated in gold.

Interest due at
close of fiscal
year.

Accrued interest paid in coin.

Balance of interest due at
close of fiscal
year.

o

1872.

Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of Marchj 1864
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864
.Five-twenties of 1865
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1 8 6 7 . . .
. Consols, 1863

$6, 417, 850
127,100
3, 604, 650
3. 035, 200
11. 788; 900
6,9.58,900
85, 850

Total

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

32. 618, 450 00

$764,055
14,9.59
438,656
436, 838
1, 436, 989
83.3,600
9, 951
•

21
03
16
70
46
15
63

3, 935, 050 34

$7,181,905
142. 059
4. 04.3, 306
4; 072, 038
13, 225, 889
'7,792,-500
95,801

21
03
16
70
46
15
63

36. 553, 500 34

$6, 345, 391
1.26,123
3, 573, 223
3, 594, 747
11, 660, 785
6, 863, 777
84, 595

98
46'
63
85
89
39
02

32, 248, 645 ^-22

$427, 849
8,894
246, 001
246, 562
707, 334
417, 534
5,151

00
00
-50
00
00
00
00

2, 059, 325 50

• $75,179
l,-338
57, 449
37,817
149,248
108,487
1, 386

43
70
80
.37
21
92
95

430, 908 38

$352, 669
7, 555
188.551
208,744
558, 065
309, 046
3,*764

57
30
70
63
79
08
05

o

1,628,417 12

O
J U N E 30, 1873.-

Fivetwenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

of
of
of
of

1862
'.
March, 1864
J u n e , 1864
1865

7,137,100
50, 000
3,741,150
1, 959, 850
10, 768, 250
4,402,100
619, 550

'.,
'

Total
G r a n d total




00
00
00
00
00
00
00

925, 783
7; 372
480, 684
250, 635
1,371,187
• 5.53,610
81,983

87
50
37
93
17
89
44

8, 062, 883 87
57, 372 50
4,221,834 37
2, 21.0, 48.5- 93
12,1.39, 437 17
4,95.5,710 89
701,533 44

7, 089 542 58
49,780 91
.3,715,211.22
1, 943, 488 93
10,668,617 09
4,373,781 76
617,140 34

431,450 50
. , 500 00
3
223, 270 50
120, 266 50
646,095 00
264,126 00
37, 173 00

26, 678, 000 00
,

3,671,258 17

32,349,258 17

28, 457, 562 83

1, 725, 881 50

128, 075, 600 G
O

15, 270, 844 06

143, 346, 444 06

122, 554, 806 65

6, 793, 958 50

101, 960
813
42,216
23,744
145, 069
69, 632
8, 948

57
70
46
47
3451
40

392, 385 45
1, 678, 472 '

329, 489 93
2, 686 -30
181,054 04
96, 522 03
501,025 66
194, 493 49
28,224 60

H

O'

1, 333, 496 05
5, 115, 486 04

H
td

TABLE M.—Statenient showing the purchases of honds in excess of the amount reqiiired for the sinhing-fund during each fiscal year from the commencement of
the purchases in May, ISQ^, to and including June 30, 1B73.
.

Y e a r ended— < .
>

Principal redeemed.

Preraiura paid.

Net cost in currency.

Net cost estimated in gold.

Interest due a t
close of fiscal
year.

Accrued interest paid in
coin.

Balance of interest due. a t
close of fiscal
year.

o
JUNE

30,1870.

F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862
Five-twenties of March, 1864.«
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1664
Five-twenties, 1865
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1863

H
,

$1, 438, 465 74 $11,413,715 74
116,951 00
714,351 00
1, 767, 653 37
13,510,353 .37
1,102, 967 36
6,723,317 30
5, 242, 087 61 41, 360, 287 61
21.349,245 22
2, 922, 445 22
2,470.379 14
364,879 14

$9, 026, 361 36
532,076 2L
10, 680. 518 21
7,051,018 61
32, 775, 094 65
16,374,2.50 02
1, 869,116 40

$502, 456 55
40, 948 00
589, 697 55
" 328, 437 85
1,861,918 50
1, 037, 727 00
123, 495 00

$110, 968 99
9,621 13
146,031 16
94,005 47
483, 633 72
206, 748 21
23,141 27

86, 586, 200 00

Total

,

$9, 975, 250 00
597, 400 00
11, 742, 700 00
7, 620, 350 00
36,"118, 200 00
18, 426, 800 00
2,105. 500 00

12, 9.55, 449 44

99,541,649 44

78, 308, 437 46

4, 434, 680 45

1, 074,149 95

$391,487 56
31,326 87 ,
443, 666 39
234, 432 38
1, 378, 284 -78
630, 978 79
100, 353 73
3,410,530 50

O

CO
Q

J U N E 30, 1871.

Total

7, 695, 250 00
100, 500 0(f
7,145, 950 00
9,117,750 00
24, 476, 800 00
10, 741. 550 00
163,600 00

8, 420, 693 91
7g.5, 443 91
111.362 25
10,862 25
7, 803, 620 36
657, 670 36
* 877, 4.59 15 . 9, 995, 209 15
2, 348, 715 .50
26,825.515 50
11. 753, 035 32
1,011,485 32
• 180, 402 01 •
16,802 01

59, 441, 400 ,00

Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of June,-1864
Five-twenties, 1865
Consols, 1665
Consols, 1867
Cou.sols, 1868

5, 648, 438 50

12, 364, 000 00
54, O O 00
O
4*299. 550 00
1, 868. 400 00
7, 909, 700 00
705, 750 00
8, 950 00
27, 210, 350 00

7,517,031 86
100,135 51
6. 968, 994 28
8, 875, 458 67
23, 917, 450 48
10, 430, 837 44
159,625 18

315, 865 00
1,- 335 00
280, 772 50
362,211 00
988, 482 00
478, G47 00
6,813 00

68,115 14
196 94
68, 675 02
90,1.47 01.
355, 28a 04
153,991 14
2, 780 76

65, 089, 838 50

57, 969, 533 42

', 433, 525 50

779,166 05

1, 359, 618. 69
6, 549 90
495,186 15
209, 232 93
999, 620 72
95, 071 84
1,170 36

13,72.3,618 69
60, 549 90
4, 79 i, 736 15
2, 077, 632 93
8, 909, 320 .72
800,821 84
10, 120 36

12,317,868 .38
53,884 81
4, 279, 233 48
1,858,868 91
7, 875, 863 64
703, 446 24
8,918 01

354, 487 00
1,020 00
104,153 50
49, 536 00
237,501 00
21,285 00
283 50

132, 389 84
389 92
46, 626 09
16, 649 96
155, 887 37
13, 956 70
186 94

222,097 16
630 08
57, .527 41
32, 886 04
81,613 63
7, 328 30
96 56

3, 166, 450 59

30, 376, 800 59

27, 098, 083 47

'768, 266 00

366, 086 82

402, 179 1 8 .

227, 749 86
1,138 06
192, 097 48
272 063 99
633,201 96
324, 055 86
4,032 24 .
1,654 339 45

o
H

J U N E 30, 187.2.

Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864
Five-twenties, 1665
Consols, 3865
Consols, 1667
Co.nsols, 1868
Total




>

cn

d
K!

to
oo

TABLE M.^Statement showing the purchases of honds in excess of the amount required for the sinhing-fund during each fiscal year, ^-c.—Continued.

Principal r e deemed.

Year e n d e d -

P r e m i u m paid.

Net cost in currency.

N e t cost estimated in gold.

Interest due a t
close of fiscal
year.

Accrued iuterest paid in
coin.

IN3

Balance of iu- .
terest due a t
close of fiscal
year.

JUNE 30. 1873.
Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864
Five-twenties, 1865
Consols, 1865
' Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868
T o t a l . . .•
Grand t o t a l . . . . .

- -.

-..

$3, 092, 200
6, 300
1, 915, 450
550, 700
2, 279, .700
857, 250
302, 200

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$435, 582
956
272, 520
78, 272
325, 646
131,063
47, 386

12
16
18
53
23
53
90

$3, 527, 782
7, 256
2,187, 970
628, 972
2, 605, 346
986,313
349, 586

12
16
18
53
23
53
90

$3, 052, 928
6,162
1, 895, 085
543, 974
2, 254, 176
848, 313
297, 854

79
53
70
45
05
40
93

$113,440
198
65, 666
16, .590
68,391
2.5, 717
9, 066

00
00
50
00
00
50
00

$56, 369 39
4 14
28, 376 89
8, 259 4325, 908 86
6,233 17
5, 970 88

61
86
61
57
14
33
12

9, 003, 600 00

1,291,427 65

10, 295, 227 65

6, 896, 495 90

301,069 00

w

162,241,750 00

23, 061, 766 IS

205,303,516 18

172, 274, 550 25

~7, 987, 540 95

Q

N O T E . — T h i s and the preceding t a b l e show the entire araount of bonds purchased frora the commencement of the purchases'to and including J u n e 30, 1873.
tention is invited to the note at the end of T a b l e N.
"
..




$57,070
193
37. 269
10, 330
' 42, 482
• 19,484
3, 095

O
H
O

I n this connection at-

H
K!.

O

a

!2

P,n3

D a t e of purchase.

p,

a,

. 3
P.

o

"fl

1

a
<

o

.s ^

•T3

"5
g .

i
-t-i

fl

li.a g
© fl 03-

.1

^a|
•

> P.PH

<

(U o .fl
p. b o o

<

Average rate of
premium on total purchases to
date.

0)

Currency value of
interest accrued
on bonds bought
"flat."

TABLE 1^.—Statement showing the purchases of honds from May, 1869, to Septeinher 30, 1873.
fl .^

"^ s .

m
III

o

1869.
May

June

July

AuD'ust

12
19
19
27
3 .
10
16
]7
23
26 1
3
9
14
15...
2L
28
29
4"*
11..
12
18
25..-Ofi

September

October

1.38=V

"

'

.
.

'

. . . .

.

l...
8
9 '
15
22
23
25
29
6..

...

.

:.

•.

7
7
13
20




'

'

......

142
142
139^
138i
1381
138
]38i
137i
137i
I37b^
137
136
137f
137
135i
1364135|
136
135*
135i
133
133i
I33i
13.3^
.136
135J
136i
137f
I41i
133f
133i
130
13li
13H
130i
130

$1,155,070 00
$1,000,000 00
• 81, 718 00
70, 000 00
L 168, 5.12 10
1, 000, 000 00
1,153, 581 50
1,000,000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1.164, 056 90
1, 000, 000 00
1,161,967 00
1, 000 00
1,155 00
1,000,000 00
1,152, 950 00
1, 620, 000 00
1, 670, 402 50
1, 000, 000 00
1,158, 228 25
1,158, 098 75
1, 00.0, 000 00
3,496,474 00
• ,3, 000, 000 00
3, 518, 044 00
3, 000, 000 00
3, 607, 622 90
3, oot), 000 .00
1,000,000 00
1, 201, 850 00
3, 000, 000 00
3, 600, 028 80
3, 000, 000* OiJ^ •
3, 604,859 00
1,000,000 00
1,201,570 55
2. 000, 000 00
2,431,136 80
2, 000, O O 00
O
2, 422, 038 27
1,000,000 00
1,198, 931 70
2, 000, 000 00
• 2, 378, 781 81
2, 000, 000 00
2, 389, 539 01
1,000,000 00
1,196, 247 80
2,000,000 00
2, 401, 991 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 356, 000 00
1,183, 972 53
1, 000, 000 00
2; 369, 639 55
2, 000, 000 00
• 2, 000, 000 00
2, 337, 657 62
1,000,000 00
1.165, 543 50
3, 000, 000 00
3, 537,158 16
3, 000, 000 00
3, 473, 533 12
2, 000, 000 00
2, 319,139 18
1,000,000 00
• 1,159, 945 10
*153, 500 00
178,187 69
2, OOQ, 000 00
2,318,863 53
2, 000, 000 00
2, 314, 079 00

$2, 504 36

711 78

'

$ 1,152,-565 64
61. 718 00
1,168,512 1.0
1,153, 581 50
1.164, 770 68
1,161,967 00
1,155 00
1,152,950 00
1, 870, 402 50
1,158, 223 25
1,158, 098 75
3,496,474 00
3,518.044 00
3, 607, 622 90
1,201,850 00
3, 600, 028 60
3, 604, 859 00
1,201.570 55
2, 431,136 80
2, 422, 038 27
1,198,931 70
2,378,781 81
2, 389, 539 01
• L 196, 247 60
2, 401, 991 00
2, 356, 000 00
1,183, 972 53
2, 369, 639 55
2, 337, 657 62
1.165, 548 50
3, 537,158 16
3, 473, 533 12
2, 319,139 IS
. 1,159, 945 10
178.187 69
2, 318; 883 53
2, 314, 079 00

- $832,177 36
57, 548 45
822, 895 85
826, 940 14
842,510 43
838, 208 84
835 44
833,960 21
1, 364, 012 76
842,347 82.
842,253 63
2, 552, Jr70 80
2,^586, 797 06
2,626,113 12
877, 262 77
2,664,221 12
2, 640, 922 34
865,134 84
1, 787, 600 59
1, 787, 482 12
887, 276 00
1, 788, .557 75
1, 793, 275 07
893, 555 78
1, 800, 930 46
1, 732, 352 94
671,368-92
1, 740, 782 04
1, 697, 029 12
822, 982 17
2, 647, 078 14
2, 599, 463 51
1, 783, 953 22
884,610 18
135,891 47
1,782,043 06
1, 780, 060 77

15.26
83.22
16. 74
82.21
16.85
82.29
15. 36
82.69
16. 48
84.25
16. 20
83. 82
15. 5083. 54
15.30
83.40
15.46
84.20
15. 82
84.23
15.81
84.22
16.54
85. 07
17. 27
86. 23
20.25
87.54
20.18
87.73
20.00
88.61
20.16
88.03
20.16
88.51
21.56
89. 38
21.10 . . 89:37
19.89
88. 73
18.94
89. 43
19. 48
89.66
19. 63
89.36
20.10
90.05
• 17.80
86.62
18.40
87.14
18.48
87.04
16.88
84.85
16.55
82. 30
17.91
88.24
15. 78
86. 65
15.96
89.20
15.99
88.46
-16. 08
88.53
15.94
89.10
15.-70
89.00

O

<
hrj

H
, 15. 64

82.72
Ul

o
15. 82

83 55

17. 85

85 93

16.48

80 87

O

Ul

cl
18.33

86 91

to

TABLE ^.—Statement showing the purchases of honds from May, 1869, to Septemher 30, 1873—Continued.

to

fl /,
•" fl
' o o
D a t e of p u r c h a s e .

ai o

p.t3

S P
o = "^
^
•T)

3 t- fl
> P^p<

S .2 0-:

< p .a
D

O
H

.O

1669.
October

21
27...
,
3
,
4
4.-.
5
5
,
10
17
,
17
24
,
December
1
2
8.'.'.'."'.'."
15
,
16
November

2\).'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.
30

130i
130i
127f
1261
126f
1264126i
1261
127i
127i
1261
122i
122i
1231
121f
121t
120i
1191
119f

$1,000, 000 00
2,000, 000 00
2, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
*201, 300 00
*433, 000 00
2, 000,000 00
2, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
3. 000,OUO 00
000 00
• 2; 000,
1, 000,-000 00
2, 000,000 00
2, 000.000 00
1,000 000 00
2, 000,doo 00
2, 000,000 00
1, 000,
000 00

$1,152, 000
2 - 292,600
,
2, 257,255
1,126, 843
1,129, 090
227, 580
492, 158
2, 259,000
2, 256.513
1,129, 039
3, 382,483
2,206, 992
1,102, 659
2, 248,236
2, 239,710
1, 118,412
2, 215,985
2, 220,427
1,110, 507

00
00
21
74
29
43
94
00
69
02
67
21
61
56
90
34
83
12
80

2,'246, 595
517, 400
1, 539,826
010
1, 141,
2, 281,555
1,142, 872
1,126, 500
. 56,325
1,115, 764
1,117, 486
377
1, 107,
1,067. 347
1, 067,480
1, 060,440
1,069, 985
1, 070,574
1, 073,953

03
49
93
09
49
27
00
00
80
85
50
35
27
34
26
91
37

$167 43
2,917 87

$1,1.52, 000
2, 292,600
2, 257,255
1,126, 843
1,129, 090
' 227.413
489, 241
2, 259,000
2, 256,513
1.129, 039
3, 382,483
2, 206,992
1, 102,659
236
" 2, 248,
2, 239,710
1,118, 412
2, 215,985
2, 220,427
1,110, 507

00
00
21
74
29
00
07
00
69
02
67
21
61
56
90
34
83
12
80

2, 246,595
517, 400
1, 539,794
1,141, 010
2, 281,555
1, 142,
872
1, 126,
500
56, 325
1,115. 764
1,117, 488
377
1, 107,
347
1, 067,,
1, 067,480
1, 060,440
-1. 069,985
1,070, 574
1, 07.3,953

03
4935
09
49
27
00
00
80
85
50
35
27
34
26
91
37

302 59
1,761, 644 36
1, 768.662 26
869, 906 21
891, 680 39
179, 773 12
751
, 386, 63
1, 780,492 61
1, 775,035 35
888, 1.32 95
.2, 671,260 54
1, 807,1*58 41
901, 971 06
1,818, 593 73
1, 839,598 27
919, 557 94
1, 844,733 26
.285 40
1, 852,
926, 388 15

15.20
14.63
12. 86
12.63
12.91
12.97
12.99
12. 95
12.83
12.90
12. 75
10.35
10.27
12.41
11.98
11.84
10.60
11.02
11.05

17.80

87.20

GO

w
87.48

.16.13

88.20

February
•
.

March

April

5
11
11
13
19
27
10
11
24
24
2
10
17
24
"30
7
13

,
....,
,

:.,

,
,

,



119f
122^
1224121f
12U
122
120^
120i
cll7-f
117-1
1161
111
112
112^
Illi
112
112i

2, 000,000
*45L, 700
*1, 342,550
1, 000,000
2, 000,000
1, 000,000
1,000, 000
50, 000
1, 000,000
1, 000.000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000.000
1, 000,000
1. 000.000
1, 000,000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

32 58

1, 876,071
• 422,367
1,256, 974
938, 137
1, 877,823
936, 780
932, 919
46, 888
948, 577
950, 043
951, 559
961, 574
953, 107
942, 613
^ 956,411
955, 870
954, 625

01
75
98
79
45
55
25
66
94
66
61
19
39
63
41
46
22

12. 33
14.54
14.69
14.10
14. 08
14.29
12.65
12.05
11.57
11.75
10.74
6.73
6.75
6.04
7.00
7.06
7.39

O
W

O
hj

td-

1870.
January

hj

H

H
i^
88.55

w
15.79.

21
27
30
30
5
12
12
19
26
2...:
9
16
o;j

20'.'.'.'.'."'.'.'.

May

June

113f
113i
1141
114i
114i
115t
1151
1141114i
114^
113i'
113i
lllf

IIH

7
11
11
1.4..-•
21
28
August
4
11
IS
25
September 1
8
15
22
29
October
6
13
20
27
November 3
3
3
10
17
25
December 1 —
8
15
22
29

,

•.
.,
,

July

,

1121
12li
12H
121^

im
116f

im
"...

,

•
.
,

,
. 1671,

4
11
18
25
. February
1

im
im
im

January

,




116f
114
114f
113 J
113i
113

im

1121
112
llUf
llOi
llOf
110§
113
112
11 Of
llOf
IIU

not

1,000, 000
1, 000,000
^345, 400
*758. 800
2, 000,000
*l 850
1, 000,000
2, 000,000
1, 000,000
2, 000,000
1,000, 000
2, 000,000
1, 000,000
2, 000,000
L O O O , 000
*690, 400
*1, 683, 150
2, 000.000
1, 000,000
2, 000,000
1,000, 000
2, 000,000
1, 000,000
2, 000,000
1,000, 000
3, 000,000
2, 000,000
3, 000,000
2, 000,000
2, 000,000
2. 000,000
2, 000,000
2, 000,OUO
1, 000.OUO
*245; 850
*.542, 250
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

1, 078,778
1,100, 490
. 390,
847
859 029
2, 215,447
2, 074
1,118, 370
2, 230,611
1.108, 910
2, 223,766
1.109, 976
2, 217,755
1,104, 612
2, 218,005
1,107, 000
758, 749
1,'848, 423
2.182, 332
1, 070,136
2,162, 085
1, 085,712
2,191,414
1, 097,329
2,181, 093
1, 091.038
3, 272,957
2.183, 503
3, 281,789
2, 177,057
2,174, 300
2,170, 465
2; 170, 236
2,165, 529
1, 077,696
265, 173
584, 808
1, 072,263
• 1,064,972
1, 065,650
1,064, 917
1, 063,854
1,065, 972
1, 064,459
1, 064,473

18
79
25
25
70
31

86
87
71
41
64
94
10
71
00
60
96
89
00
83
21
93
29
02
65
77
11
74
86
26
37
48
30
19
81
61
90
36
15
08
32
75
26
95

7, 826 65
18,099 70
3 85

1,078,778 18
1,100, 490 79
38.3, 020 40
840, 929 55
2, 215, 447 70
2, 070 46
1,118,370 86
2, 230, 611 67
1,108,910 71
2, 223, 786 41
1,109,976 64
2,217,755 94
1,104,612 10
2, 218, 005 71
1,107. 000 00
758. 749 60
1, 648, 423 96
2,182,332 89
1, 070,136 00
2,162, 085 63
1,085,712 21
2, 191,414 93
1. 097, 329 29
2,181, 093 02
1, 091, 038 65
3, 272, 957 77
2,183, 503 11
3, 281, 789 74
2,177, 057 86
2,174, 300 26
2,170,465 37
2,170, 236 48
2, 165, 529 30
1, 077, 698 19
265,173 81
584,800 . 5
5
1, 072, 263 90
1, 064, 972 36
1, 065, 650 15
1, 064, 917 08
1, 063, 854 32
1, 065, 972 75
1, 064, 459 26
1, 064, 473 95

7.88
951,513 28
966,402 45
10.05
333, 423 63
10.89
732, 038 78
10.82
1, 932, 778 80
10.77
1, 794 55
11.92
•969,335 52
11.84
1, 943, 888 34
11.53
970, 600 16
10.89
1, 942,171 53
11.19
977, 952 99
11.00
1, 960, 447 24
10.89
989,574 11
• 1.0.46
1,987,015 19
10. 90
987, 290 97
10. 70
659, 065 88
9.90
1,605.580 00
9.82
9.12
1, 933, 406 77
878, 981 81
7.01
1, 777, 665 64
8.10
891,755 41
8.57
1, 885, 088 11
9.57
939,696 61
9.73
1, 850, 344 02
.9.05
937, 519 78
9.10
2,871,015 58
9.10
1, 909, 073 76
9.18
2, 881, 922 93
9.39
1.9U.796 14
8.85
1, 924,1.59 52
8.72
1,906,006 91
6.52
1, 922, 690 12
8.51
1, 933, 508 30
8.28
973, 090 92
7.77
239, 434 59
7.86
528.036 61
7.85
971,473 52
7.23
942, 453 42
6.50
951, 473 35
6.56
962,636 91
6.49
961, 676 22
6.38
958,177 75
6.60
962,223 06
6.45
961,150 29
6.45

95.15
96 64
96. 53
96.47
96.64
97. 00
96.93
97.19
97.06
97.11
97.79
98.02
98.95
99.35
98. 73
9.5. 46
95.39
96.67
87. 90
68.88
89.17
94. 25
93. 99
92.52
93,75
95. 70
95. 45
96.06
95.59
96.21
95. 30
96.13
96.68
97. 31
97.39
97.39
97.15
94.25
95.15
96. 26
96. 17
95.82
96.22
96.11

2,147, 345 03
1, 074, 257 50
2,144, 457 32
1,074,651 96
2,173, 985 90
2,175, 643 46

L 938, 91199
967, 799 55
1, 938, 492 49
971, 436 80
1, 943, 227 62
1, 946, 884 53

96.96
96.78
96.92
•97.14
97.16
97.34

15.10

69.36

14.90 •

89.76

o
14.65

90. 31

14.29

90.52

14.07

90.62

13. 71

90.98

O
H
t?j

m

o

X

o
13.44

91.24

13.25

91.39

13.05

91.53

12.65

91.72

H
Ul

im

11 O-I
111
llOf

not
nil
llH

2,
1,
2,
1,
2,
2,

000, 000
000, 000
000, 000
000, 000
000, 000
000, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00

2,147, 345 03
1, 074, 257 50
2,144, 457 32
1, 074, 651 96
2,173, 985 90
2,175, 643 46

7.37
7.43
7.22
7.46
8.70
8.78

to
--5

TABLE IST.—Statement showing- the p)urchases' of honds from May, 1869, to Septemher 30, 1873—Continued.

to
QO

fl 5 o
og ^ c3
!> *

D a t e of purchase.

OJ

•0 ^ -fl

"^ S o
tic ®

^

^^"

^^"S fl^

>. p, a

<

3 ._ C -

O

H
O

1871,
February

15
21
1
8
15
22
29
3
5
12
19
26
• 3
10
17
24
31
7

March

April

May

June

•

July

:.

not
llOi
lilt
1101
Illi
Illi

"...

nil

•14
2L
28

'5
12
19
26
• August
2
9...
16
23
30
September 6
13
20
25
27
October
4
11

IIU
IIU
1101
IIU
lllf
1101
llOi
llOi

.

•..
,
,




lilt
nil
112i
112-1
ll2f
1131
113^
112f
112^
112i
1121
112
112i
112i
11.3i
1131
11.31
1141
115
1141
114
1141

$2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 CO'
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, OUO 00
2, 000 J O O 00
2, 000, 000 00
216, 000 00
3, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
3, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
1. 000, 000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1,000, ooo 00
1,000,000 00
1,000,000 00
1, 000, 000 00
365, 600 00
1, 000, 000 00
162,750 00
20, 100 00
1, 000, 000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1,000,000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1,000,000 00
3, 000, 000 00
3, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
4, 000, 000 00.

$2,184, 170 19
2,191. 633 24
.2,199, 585 00
2, 199,570 48
2,191,702 96
2,188,826 83
2,183,254 76
235. 807 20
3,295,500 00
2,197,018 24
3,317,193 60
2, 215,181 72
2, 221,571 71
2, 223,162 54
2, 228,989 07
2, 224,133 69
2, 225,697 79
1,115, 811 40
1,114, 175 30
1, 116,587 05
1,118, 691 60
1, 132,364 49
' 1, 122,
692 96
433, 278 38
1,122, 086 99
182, 407 63
22, 509 99
1,122, 127 56
1,121, Oil 54
1,125, 650 82
1,128, 864 31
1,125, 600 00
3, 375,1.35 99
3, 397,636 15
2, 262,400 68
2, 258,747 45
4,470, 310 00

$2,184, 170 19
2.191,633 24
2,199,585 00
- 2,199, 570 48
2,191, 702 96'
2,188, 826 83
2,133, 254 76
235, 807 20
3, 295,500 00
2,197, 018 24
3, 317,193 60
2, 215, 181 72
2.221, 571 71
2. 223. 162 54
2. 228,989 07
2, 224,133 69
2, 225,697 79
1, 115,811 40
1,114, 175 30
1,116, 587 05
1,118, 691 60
1,132, 384 49
1,122, 692 96
433, 278 38
1,122, 066 99
182, 407 63
22, 509 99
1,122, 127 56
1,121, Oil 54
1,125, 650 82
1, 128,864 31
1,125, 800 00
3, 375,135 99
3,397, 636 15
2, 262,400 68
2, 258,747 45
4, 470,310 00

$1, 963,299 05
1,970, 007 41
1,983, 842 16
1, 977.142 00
1.967, 859 00
1.974, 139 19
i; 980,276 42
213, 884 08
2, 985,730 46
1, 995,022 24
2, 971,7.30 17
1, 997,909 10
1. 999.164 64
1, 998,348 35
1,992, 392 46
1,992, 504 98
1, 989,450 54
994, 041 33
991, 479 69
S93, 625 65
988, 898 65
997, 695 59
999, 059 35
385, 136 33
999, 632 06
162, 682 39
20, 098 20
999, 668 21
996, 673 98
99.3, 952 16
991, 318 82
•988, 627 68
2, 9.57,402 84
2, 954,640 13
1, 975,895 78
1,981, 357 41
3,917, 029 57

9.21
9.58
9.98
9.98
9.58
9.94
9. 16
9.17
9. 85
9.85
10.57
10.76
11.08
11. 16
11.45
11.21
1L28
11.58
11.42
11..66
11.87
13.24
12.27
12.36
12.21
12. 08
11.99
12.21
12.10
12.56
12. 89
12.58
12.50
13. 26
13.12
12.94
11.76

t^
hj
O

98.16
98.50
99.19
98.85
98.39
98.71
99.01
99. 02
99.52
99.75
99.06
99.90
99.96
99.92
99.62
99.63
99.47
99.40
99. 15
99. 36
98.89
99.77
99.91
99. 88
99. 96
99.96
99.99
99.97
99. 67
99.39
99. 13
96.86
98.58
98.49
96.79
99.07
97. 93

12.68

91.99

92.34

m

o
92.71

93.04

H

.'O

w
H
93.26
CQ

d '
12. 34

12.36

93.35

18
18
25
1
8
15
21
6
13
20
27

i

112f
iiif
112 •

..
'

nil
UH
llOf
1C91
1091108S
. 108i

4, 000,000
50, 000
2, 000,000
1,000. 000
1,000, 000
21, 100
1. 000.000
517, 450
43, 700
61, 000
240, 550

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

566, 200
699, 750
000
1, 000,
000
1, 000,
1,000, 000
000
1, 000,
000
1, 000,
1,000, 000
1, 000,000
2, (JOO,000
263, 850
691, 650
5, 000
4, 000,000
3, 000,000
2, 000,000
2, 000,000
825, 950
47, 850
921. 900
400
1, 084,
300, 850
511, 750
000
1, 000,
47. 200
1, 000,000
2, UOO,000
7, 000
I, 000,000
34-. 300
000
5,
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
3, 000,000
1. UOO,000
3, 000,000
000
5, 000,
94, 100

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

4, 414,343
55, 160
2, 217,901
1,11.3,421
1,114, 150
23, 452
1,107, 389
568, 325
47, 734
86, 083
260, 908

08
00
5L
29
87
74
47
56
84
15
91

:

4,414,343 08
55,160 002,217,901 51
1,113,421 29
1,114.150 87
23. 452 74
1, 107,369 47
568, 325 56
47, 734 84
88, 083 15
260, 908 91

3, 915,160 16
46, 922 39
1, 986, 921 84
994.126 15
- 998,119 48
21,081 11
999, 900 20
517, 247 38
43, 693 21
80, 996 00
240, 469 04

10.36
10.32
10.89
11.34
11.41
11.11 »
10.74
9.83
9.24
8.74
8.46

97. 88
97. 84
99. 35
99. 41
99. 81
99. 88
99. 99
99. M6
99. 99
99. 99
99. 97

12.31

93. 82

12.30

93.90

0

hj

•

12.28

93.91

12.27

93 95

O
H
O

. 12.23

94.02

• H

12.21

94.05

1872.
January
February

Ma ' h
April

May

July

August

4
18
1
15
29
14
28
3
10
17
24
1
8
8
35
22
29
]2
19
26
2
10
17
24
31
7
7
14
2L
22
9R

. 1091
109
109f
llOi
1101
1101
110-1
1091

..

noi
1101

.. •
.
:

.

11
18...... „
25
2
.
7..
16

. . • .

.

:




nil
112i
1131
1.1
13
114
113f
113f
1141
114
1.1
13
131
1113f
.13
1.1
114^
1141
1151
115i
115i
114f
114i
1141
113
1.1
13
113
1141
• 1131
1141
113
1121

617, 775 00
978, 713 38
091, 919 01
092, .584 13
091, 388 34
092, 821 91
095, 961 25
097, 435 25
100, 721 08
213, 295 42
294, 794 93
776, 203 34
5, 640 00
519, 795 84
395, 626 68
267, 116 41
274, 174 67
945, 245 28
54, 486 79
047. 373 04
227, 634 17
342, 155 19
581, 975 72
144, 063 85
53, 956 89
146, 489 17
296, 663 19
8, 036 80
145, 208 63
38, 996 39
5, 683 00
123. 616 18
123. 204 81
112. 251 60
,343. 130 94
120, 993 75
369, 121 78
641, 797 44
106, 178 24

617,775 00
976, 713 38
L 091, 919 01
1,092,584 13
1, 091, 388 34
1, 092, 821 91
1, 09.5, 961 25
1, 097, 435 25
1,100,721 08
2,213,295 42
294, 794' 93
776, 203 34
5. 640 00
4,519,795 84
3, 395, 826 68
2,267,116 41
2, 274,174 67
945, 245 28
54, 468 79
1, 047, 373 04
1, 227, 634 17
342,155 19
531,975 72
1,144,063 85
53, 956 89
1, 146, 489 17
2,296,663 19
8,038 80
1,145, 208 63
38. 996 39
.5. 683 00
1.123,616 18
1,123,204 81 ,
1,112,251 6 0 ^
3, 343,130 94
1,120, 993 75
3,369,121 78
5, 641, 797 44.
106,176 24

566,116 84
897, 902 16
994,914 61
991, 006 01
984, 341 23
992, 346 80
992, 943 37
996, 803 41
998, 366 46
1, 996, 207 82
263, 503 85
691,495 16
4, 963 70
3, 977, 818 12
. 2, 978, 795 34
• 1,993,069 37
.1,997,079 84
824, 641 46
47, 795 42
919,756 79
1, 082, 808 53
300,795 77
511,627 01
.999,162 40
47,123 92
995, 864 64
1, 992, 766 31
6, 975 10
998, 003 16
34,132 50
4, 974 16
994, 350 60
992, 888 23
984, 293 45
2, 926,1.54 00
986, 573 14
2,94.5,660-25
4,992,741 10
94, 067 11

9.11
8.78
9.19
9.26
9.14
9.28
9.60
9.74
10.07
10.66
11.73
12. 22
12.80
12.99
13.19
13.36
13. 71
14.44
13.87
13.61
13.22.
13. 73
13.72
14.41
14.32
14.65
14.83
14.84
14.52
1.3. 69
13.66
12. 36
12. 32
11.23
11. 44
12.10
12. 30
12.84
12.84

99. 99
99. 80
99. 49
99. 10
98. 43
99.
. 99.
29
99..88
99. 84
99. 81
99. 87
99. 98
99. 97
4
99. • 4
99. 29
99. 65
99. 65
99. 84
99. 88
77
. 99.99. 85
99. 98
99. 98
99. 90
99. 84
99. 59
99. 64
99. 64
80
. 99.
99. 51
99. 48
99. 44
99. 09
98. 43
97. 54
66
• 93.
98. 19
99. 85
99. 97

K
CO

12.13

94.15

o

H
12.22

94. 38

Pi
K!

O

12.24

94.44

12.26

.94. 49

H
Pd
P>
Ul

12.29

94.57

12. 27

a
w

94.64

to

00

o
o
,o
p.^

• '6
p<

D a t e of purchase.

1

"fl

p<
"o

§

.3

a

P4

C
1872.
October
November

^

23
30
6 -.
13
20
26

1131
1121
112i
1131
1131
112f
112f
lllf

. .

1

•

«a

|.s
0

22
29

12 .
19
26

April
May

July

18 .
16

...
'.

. . .
.
...

20
20
20
24 -.•
Total




"as
CflC
S
rt r; r;

Sgfl

.<

$1, 000, 000 00
359, 250 00
428,400 00

lllf
112
11.3f
114
113f
1141
114f
114f
115
1151
1151
1151
116
118
1171

20, 850 00
197, 600 00
516,400 00
169,350 00
518, 250 00
1, 000. 000 00
1,000,000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1, 000, 000 00
500, 000 00'
1, 000, 000 00
3, 800 00
500, 000 00
500, 000 00
500, 000 00
.500, 000 00
500, 000.00
500, 000 00
500, 000 00
207, 850 00
15,500 00
55, 850 do
11,708,100 00
47, 000 00
741,150 00
161,000 00

1, 000, OOi) 0 0

2, 000, 000
489,150
560, 600
417,950

00
00
00
00

12.66
$1,126,635 51 ^ ' $995, 920 89
12.36
403, 657 22
359, 205 54
478, 902 16
426, 638 90 ; n . 7 9
12.60
992, 078 62
1,126.009 23
12.54
1,969,711 90
2, 250, 861 .59
12. 69
488, 883 42
, 551,216 06
12.73
560, 485 84
631,947 79
11.73
417,877 48 .
466, 976 03

$1,126, 635 51
403, 657 22
478, 902 16
• 1,126,009 23
2, 250, 861 59
551,21.6 06
631, 947 79
466, 978 06

1873.

^«;;;;;;;;;;;;;";";;-;;;;;;;

12
19
20
26
9
23
7
2L...

. ft
"Sc rfl

a .

^'^ <^
>fcD0

<

2 ' ^ rt
> ta 0

O

<

H

.,

^26

januaiy

o

o-S -

Average rate of
premium on total purchases to
date.

•

Currency value of
iaterest accrued
on bonds bought
"flat."

TABLE 'N.—Statement showing the purchases of honds from May, 1869, to Septemher 30, 1873—Contiuued.

•

.

im
1171
118
11.51
116
115t
Illi

nii
Illi
llU
Illi

323, 253, 800 00

23, 297 79
221,278 24
584, 824 36
192,613 81
587, 510 76
• 1,138,246 72
1,137, 351 75
1, 137, 509 59
1, 135, 731 04
567,161 07
1,133,941 25
4, 332 00
572, 335 00
574, 095 97
575, 915 67
576, 944 55
579,840 14
581,790 70
576, 032 20
240, 737 77
17, 643 60
61,944 08
12, 963, 682 93
'
52, 038 40
817,011 04
178, 265 73

•

23, 297 79
221,278 24
584, 824 36
192, 613 81
.587, 510 76
1,138,246 72
1,137,351 75
1,137,509 59
1,135,731 04
567,161 07
L 13.3, 941 25
4, 332 00
572, 335 00
574, 095 97
575,915 67
578,944 55
579, 840 14
581,790 70
578, 032 20
240, 737 77
17, 843 60
61, 944 08
12, 963, 682 93
52, 038 40
817,011 04
178, 265 73
363, 012, 332 71

$30, 848 92

20, 848 14
197, 569 86
514,696 91
168,959 48
516,492 98
997, 366 43
992, 237 07
991, 293 76
967,592 2L
492, 848 05
983, 896 96"
3, 750 49
493, 392 25
. 486, 522 01
491, 186 07
493, 243 49
493, 460 97
493, 042 97
496,841 17
207, 532 56
15,462 51
55, 680 07
11,652,748 70
46, 776 09
734,341 95
160,238 86

362, 981, 483 79

307, 702, 207 64

99. 59
99.99 ' " " i 2 . ' 2 9 '
99.59
99.21
99.48
99.95
12.29
99; 98
99.96
12. 29

1L74
99.99
11. 96
99.98
13. 25
99.67
13. 74
99. 77
13. 36
99.66
. 13.62
99.74
13.74
99. 22
13.75
99.13
13.57
•98. 76
13.43
• 98.53
13. 39
98. 39
14.00
98.70
14.47
98.68
14.82
97. 30
15. 18
98. 24
15.79
98. 65
15. 97
98.70
16. 36
98.61
15. 61
99.77
15. 83
99.65
1.5. 12
99. 89
10.91
99.69
10.72
. 99. 53
^ 10.72
99. 52
10.24
99. 09
10.72
99. 53

O
94. 79

H
94.65

tJ

94. 86

Ul

o
td
12.29

.94. 89

12.31

94.94

Pi

6

12. 32

94. 97

t?j

12.32.

94. 98

12.34

95.00

H•
Pd
td

12. 35
12. 36
12.36

95.01
95. 01
95.01

>

Ul

a
Pd

•^

12.^27

95. 19

R E C A P I T U L A T I O N BY LOANS.
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of
Five-twenties of
Five-tweuties of
Five-twenties of
.Consols, 1865
Consols 1867
Consols 1866 .

1862
March, 1864
J u u e 1864
1865

Total

.

$56,1.59,350
L 119, 600
43.459,750
35, 923, 350
116, 965, 550
62, 631, 950
4, 794, 050

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

323, 253, 800 00

$62, 9.55, 548
1, 307, 208
48, 803, 264
40, 01.5, 286
.. 133, 457, 305
70, 963, 372
5, 510, 347

50
39
34
19
57
67
05

363, 012, 332 71

$938
12
4,024
53
24, 983
744
91

14
48
32
43
68
92
90

$62, 954, 610 36
1,307,195-91
48, 799, 240 02
40, 015, 232 71
133, 4.32, 321 89
70, 962, 627 75
5,510,255 15

30, 846 92

362,981,483 79

$54,156, 833
1, 029, 967
41, 492, 330
34,529,031
113,374,317
58, 668, 585
•
4,451,142

67
67
61
06
08
27
06.

307, 702, 207 64

12
16
12
11
12
12
14

10
74
30
39
18
94
94

12 27

96
91
95
96
95
93
92

4.3'
98
47
12
30
42
85

95 19

N O T E . — T h e bouded debt of the Uuited States has been reduced by the amount of these bouds, which h a v e ceased to bear iaterest and h a v e been canceled- aud destroyed. This statem e n t does not include the six per cent, bonds converted into fives, nor the rederaptioo of past-due and called securities, which have also ceased to bear interest aud have been canceled and
destroyed. Those items m a r k e d (*) are the bonds bought with the proceeds of the interest collected on the bonds previously purchased. These "interest-purchases " w e r e discontinued
after the passage of the act of J u l y 14,1870, (16 Statutes, 272,) authorizing the refunding of the natioiial deb.t^ and "directing the cancellation and destruction of the bonds purchased. All
bonds, w h e t h e r purchased, redeemed, or received in exchange for other bonds bearing a lower rate of interest, either before or since the date of that act, h a v e ceased to b e a r iuterest; and
the a n n u a l interest-charge has been reduced b y the a m o u u t of interest that would h a v e beeu payable on the first two Classes, and the difference in rate on the last class, b u t for such redemption, purchase, or exchange.




Pi

o

Pd
H

O

Ul

td

.
o
po
td
H
f>
fd

O
15
-

t
d
H'
Ul

a
pi

oo

TABLE O.—Statement of the outstanding principal of the puhlic deht of the United States, June 30, 1873.
L e n g t h of
. loan.
OLD

Rates of interest.

Price
at which
sold.

Araount author- A m o u n t is.sued.
ized.

A m d u n t outstanding.

pi
td

DEBT.

^

Unclaimed dividends upon debt created prior to 1800, and the principal
and interest, of the outstanding debt created during the w a r of 1812,
and-up to 1837. ,
TREASURY

W h e n redeem-able.

CO

On d e r a a n d 7 . . . 5 and 6 per
cent.

$57,665 00-

NOTES P R I O R TO 1 8 4 6 .

T h e acts of October 12,1837, (5 Statutes, 201;) Mav 21, 1833, (5 Statutes,
- 228;) March 31, 1840, (5 Statutes, 370 ;) F e b r u a r y 15, 1841,. (5 Statutes,
411;) J a n u a r y 31, 1842, (5 Statutes, 469 ;) August 31, 1842, (5 Statutes,
581;) and March 3.1843, (5 Statutes, 614 ;) authorized the Issue of Treasu r y notes in various amounts, and with interest a t rates named therein
from 1 mill to 6 per centum per annum.
TREASURY

O
1 aud 2 years

1 and 2 years
•frora date.

1 raill to 6
per cent.

Par

.

82, 575- 35

.td
Ul.

td

NOTES OF 1 8 4 6 .

•The act of J u l y 22, 1846, (9 Statutes, 3 9 , ) > u t h o r i z e d | t h e issue"of Treasu r y notes in such sums as the exigencies of the Government might require ; the amount outstanding at a n y oue time not to exceed $10,000,000,
. to bear interest at not exceeding 6 per centum per annura, redeemable
one year from date. These notes were receivable in p a y m e n t of all debts
due the United States, including customs duties.
MEXICAN

O
Pi

o
1 year

L

r

frora

6 per c e n t . . . P a r

6 000 00

$10,000,000 00

td
H
f>
?d
Hi

INDEMNITY.

A proviso in the civil and diplomatic appropriation act of August 10.1846,
(9 Statutes, 94,) authorized the p a y m e n t of the• principal and interest of
the fourth and fifth installraents of the Mexican inderanities due April and
J u l y , 1844, by the issue of stock, with interest at 5 per centum, payable
in five years.

.5 y e a r s

April and J u l y , 5 per c e n t . . . P a r
1849.

350, 000 00

$303, 573 92

1,104 91

td

H
td

TREASURY

NOTES O F . 1 8 4 7 .
Ul

T h e act of J a n u a r y 28,1847, (9 Statutes. 118.) authorized the issue of
^23,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, "with interest at not exceeding 6 per centum
per annum, or the issue of stock for a n y portion of the amount, with interest at 6 per centum per a n n u m . T h e T r e a s u r y notes under this act were
redeemable at the expiration of one or t w o years ; and the interest w a s
to cease at the expiration of sixty days' notice. These notes were receivable in payraent of all debts due the United States, including customs
d.uties.




1 and 2 years After 60 d a y s '
notice.

6 per c e n t . . .

Par

23, 000, 000 00

950 00

PiK!

•

LOAN OF 1847.
T h e act of - J a n u a r y 28, 1847, (9 Statutes, 118,) authorized the issue of
$23,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at not exceeding 6 per centum
C^ per a n n u m , or the issue of stock for any portion of the amount, with
hj
interest at 6 per centum per annum, re-imbursable after December 31,
1867. Section 14 authorized the conversion of T r e a s u r y notes u n d e r
this or any preceding act into like stock, which accounts for the a p p a r e n t
oVeriiesue.

20 y e a r s .

J a n u a r y 1,1868. 6 per cent .

Par .

23, 000, 000 00

28, 207, 000 00

1, 650 00

Pi

O

BOUNTY-LAND S C R I P .

T h e 9t.h section of F e b r u a r y 11, 1847, (9 S t a t u t e s , 125,) authorized the
issue of l a n d - w a r r a n t s to soldiers of the Mexican w a r , or scrip, at the
option of t h e soldiers, to bear 6 per centum intei'est per annum, redeemable at the pleasure of the Governraent, b y notice from the T r e a s u r y
D e p a r t m e n t . Interest ceases J u l y 1, 1849.

H
Indefinite .

J u l y 1, 1849 . . .

6 per cent . .

3, 600 00

Indefinite .

O

td
TEXAN I N D E M N I T Y

STOCK.

T h e act of September 9, 1850, (9 Statutes, 447,) authorized the issue of
$: 0,000,000 stock, with interest at 5 per centum per annum, to the State
of T e x a s , in satisfaction of all claims against the United States arising
out of the annexation of the said State. This stock w a s to be redeemable at the end of fourteen years.

Ul

14 y e a r s .

10, boo, 000 00

J a n u a r y 1,1865. 5 per-ceut . .

5, 000, 000 00

174, 000 00

td

o

td
H

>

Pi
T R E A S U R Y NOTES OF 1 8 5 7 .

T h e act of December 23, 18.57, (11 Statutes, 2.57,) authorized the issue of
$20,000,000 in T r e a s u r y notes, $6^000,000 with interest at not exceeding
6 per centum per annura, and the remainder with iuterest at the lowest
rates offered by bidders, b u t not exceeding 6 per centum per annum.
Those notes w e r e redeemable at the expiration of one year, and interefet
w a s to cease at the expiration of sixty days' notice after maturity. Thej'w e r e receivable iu p a y m e n t of all debts due the United States, including
customs duties.

1 year.

60 da3's' uotice

20, 000, 000 00

5 and 51 per
cent.

lO, 000, 000 00

2, 000 00 -

td

>

LOAN OF 1858.
T h e a c t of J u n e 14,18.56, (11 Statutes, 365,) authorized a l o a n of $20,000,000,
vv'itli interest at not exceeding 5 per centum per annum, and redeeraable
any time after J a n u a i y 1, 1874.

O

15 y e a r s .

Jan.

1, 1874

5 per cent -.

10 years-

Jan.

1, 1671

5 per cent .

Par .

20, 000, 000 00

20, 000, 000 00

20, 000, 000 00

21, 000, 000 00

7, 022, 000 00

Ul

10, 000 G
O

LOAN OF 1860.
T h e act of J u n e 22, 1860, (12 Statutes, 79,) authorized a loan of $21,000,000,
(to be used in redemption of T r e a s u r y notes,) with interest at not exceeding 6'per centum per annum, redeemable in not less than ten nor
more than t w e n t y years.




OO

oo

TABLE O.—Statement of the outstanding principal of the puhlic dehtj ||-c,—Contin tied.
Length of
loan.

W h e n redeemable.

Kate of interest..

OO

Price
A m o u n t author- A m o u n t issued;
at which
ized.
sold.

A m o u n t outstanding.

LOAN 6 F FEBRUARY, 1861, (1681 S.)
T h e act of F e b r u a r y 8, 1861, (12 Statutes, 129,) authorized a loan of
$25,000,000, vvith iuterest at not exceeding 6 per centum per annum, reimbursable in not less than ten nor more t h a n t w e n t y y e a r s frpm the date
of the act.
.
'

10 or 20 y r s . . J a n .

1, 1881

6 per cent .

$25, 000, 000 00

$18,415,000 00

$18, 415, 000 00

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TREASURY NOTES OF 1861.

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T h e act of March 2,1861, (12 Statutes, 178,) authorized a loan of $10,000,000,
with iuterest at not exceeding 6 per centum p e r annum, redeemable on
three months' notice after J u l y 1,1871, and payable J u l y 1,1881. If proposals for the loan were not satisfactory, a u t h o r i t y w a s given to issue the
whole a m o u u t iu T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at not exceeding 6 per
contura per annnra. T h e same act gave authority to substitute T r e a s u r y
notes for the whole or a n y p a r t of loans authorized at the time of the
passage of this act. These notes were to be received in p a y m e n t of all
debts due the United States, including customs duties, and were redeemable at any time within t w o years from the date of the act.

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2 years.
60 d a y s .

2 years aftor]
date.
I
60 days after f

date.

C 22, 468,100 00
\ 12,896, 350 00

0 per c e n t .

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135, 364, 450 00

3,150 00

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OREGON WAR DEBT.
T h e a c t o f March 2, 1661, (12 Statutes, 198,) appropriated $2,800,000 for the
p a y m e n t of expenses incurred by the Territories of Washiugton and
Oregon iu the suppression of Indian hostilities in the years 1855 and 1856.
Section 4 of the act authorized the p a y m e n t of these claims in bondtj redeemable in t w e n t y years, w i t h interest at 6 per centum per annum.

20 y e a r s .

July

1, 1881

2, 800, 000 00

6 per c e n t . . .

1,090,850 00

945, 000 00 -

20 years.

July

. 1, 1881

6 per c e n t .

Par .

250, 000 000 00

• 50,000,000 00
350 00
139,321,200 00 1189, 321,




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OLD DEMAND NOTES.
T h e act of J u l y 17, 1861, (12 Statutes, 259,) authorized the issue of
$50,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, not bearing interest, of a less denomination

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• LOAN OF JULY AND AUGUST, 1861, (1881S.)
T h e act of J u l y 17, 1861, (12 Statutes, 259,) authorized the issue of
$250,000,000 bonds, with interest at not exceeding 7 per centum per annum, redeeraable after t w e n t y years. T h e act of A u g u s t 5, 1861, (12
Statutes, 313,) authorized the issue of bonds, with interest at 6 per centum
jjer annum, payable after t w e n t y years from date, in exchange for 7-30
notes issued under the act of J u l y 17, 1861. None of such bonds w e r e to
be issued for a sum less than $500, and the whole.araouut of thera w a s not
to exceed the-whole a m o u n t of 7-30 notes issued under the above act of
J u l y 17. T h e a m o u n t issued iu exchange for 7-30s was $139,321,200.

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On d e m a n d . : . .

60, 000, 000 00 .. 60, 000, 000 00

79, 967 50

than fifty dollars and not less than ten dollars, and p a y a b l e on demand
b y t h e assistant treasurers at Philadelphia, N e w York, or Boston. T h e
act of A u g u s t 5, 1861, (12 Statutes, 313,) authorized the issue of these
notes in denominations of five dollars; it also added the assistant treasu r e r at Saint Louis and the designated depositary at Cincinnati fo- the
places w h e r e these notes were.made payable: T h e act of F e b r u a r y 12,
1862, (12 Statutes, 338,) increased the a m o u n t of demand notes authorized $10,000,000.

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SEVEN-THIRTIES OF 1861.
T h e actof J u l y 17,1861, (12 Statutes, 259,) authorized a loanof $250,000,000,
p a r t of which was to be in T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at 7 3-10 per
centum per annum, p a y a b l e £hree years after date.

3 years.

August 19 a n d
October" 1,
1864.

7 3-10 per ct.

140. 094, 750 00

140, 094, 750 00

19,350 00

515, 000, 000 00

514, 771, 600 00

^63, 625, 600 00

FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1862.
T h e act of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 Statutes, 345,) authorized a loan of
$500,000,000 for the purpose of funding the T r e a s u r y notes and floating
debt of the United States, and the issue of bonds therefor, with interest
at.6 per centum per a n n u m . T h e s e . b o n d s were redeemable after five
and payable t w e n t y years from date. T h e act of March.3, 1864, (13
Statutes, 13,) authorized an additional issue of $11,000,000 of bonds to
persons w h o subscribed for the loan ou oi- before J a n u a r y 21,1864." T h e
act of J a n u a r y 28, 1865, (13 Statutes, 425,) authorized an additional issue
of $4,000,000 of these bonds and their sale in the United States or E u r o p e .

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5 or 20 y e a r s . May 1,1867..-

6 percent..-.

Par.

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LEGAL-TENDER NOTES.
T h e act of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 Statutes", 345,) authorized the issue of
$150,000,000 United States notes, not bearing interest, payable to bearer
at the T r e a s u r y of the United States, and of such denominations, not less
than five dollars, as the Secretary of t h e T r e a s u r y might deem expedi.ent,
$50,000,000 to be in iTeu of demand notes authorized b y the act of J u l y 17,
1861; these notes to be a legal tender. T h e act of J u l y 11, 1862, (12 Statutes, 532,) authorized an additional issue of $150,000,000 United States
T r e a s u r y notes, of such denominations as the Secretary of the T r e a s u r y
might deem expedient, b u t no such note should be for a fractional p a r t of a
dollar, a n d not more t h a n $35,000,000 of a lower denoraination than five
dollars ;.these notes to be a legal tender. T h e act of March 3,1863, (12 Statutes, 710,) authorized an additional issue of $150,000,000 United States
notes, p a y a b l e to bearer, of such denominations, not less than oue dollar,
as the Secretary of the T r e a s u r y might prescribe; which notes w e r e made
a legal tender. T h e same act limited the time at which T r e a s u r y notes
might be exchanged for United States bonds to J u l y 1, 1863. T h e amount
of notes authorized b y this act w e r e to be in lieu of $100,000,000 authorized b y the resolutionof J a n u a r y 17, 1863, (12 Statutes, 8.22.)




On demand

None .

450, 000, 000 00

915, 420, 031 00

356, 000, 000 00

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TABLE 0.—Siaiement df ine oilkimiMng principal of the puhlic deht, cfc.—Continned.
L e n g t h of
loan.

W h e n redeemable.

Rate of interest.

Notless than
30 days.

After 10 days'
notice.

Price
at which
sold.

4, 5, aud 6
per cent.

a:)

Araount author Amount issued.
ized.

Araount outstanding.

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TEMPORARY LOAN.
T h e act of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 Statutes, 346,) feuthori'zed temporary
loan deposits of $25,000,000, for not less than thirty days, with iuterest
at 5 per centum per annum, payable after teii days' notice. T h e act of
March 17, 1862, (12 Statutes, 370,) authorized the increase of temporary
loan deposits to $50,000,000. T h e act of J u l y 11, 1862, (12 Statutes, 532,)
authorized a further increase'of temporary loan deposits to $100,000,000.
T h e act of J u n e 30, 1864, (13 Statutes, 218,) authorized a f u r t h e r increase
.of t e m p o r a r y loan'deposits to not exceeding $150,000,000, and an increase
of the rate of iuteresj; to not exceeding 6 per centum per annum, or a decrease of the rate of interest on ten days' notice, as the public interest
Alight require*

$78, 560 00

$150,000,000 00

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CERtlFiCATES OF INDEBTEDNESS.
T h e act of March 1, 1862, (12 Statutes, 352,) authorized the issue of certificates of indebtedness to public creditors who might elect to receive them,
to bear interest at the rate of 6 per centum per annum, and payable one
year from date, or earlier, a t the option of the Government. T h e act of
M a y 17, 1862, (12 Statutes, 370,) authorized the issue of these certificates
in p a y m e n t of disbursing ofiicers' checks. T h e act of March 3,. 1863,
(12-Statutes, 710,) made the interest payable in lawful money.

1 year.

1

j^ear
date.

$561,753,241 65

6 per ceut

5, 000 00

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FRACTIONAL CURRENCY.
Ou presentation.

1?he act of J u l y 17, 1862, (12 Statutes, 592,) authorized the use of postal and
other stamps as currency, and made thera receivable, in p a y m e n t of all
dues to the United States less than five dollars. T h e fourth section of the
act of March 3. 1863, (12 Statutes, 711,) authorized the issue of fractional
Uotes in lieu of postal and other stamps and postal currency; made them
exchangeable in sums not less t h a n three dollars for United States notes,
and receivable for postage and revenue stamps, and in p a y m e n t of dues
to the United States, except duties on imports, less than five dollars;
and liraited the araount to .$50,000,000. T h e fifth section of the actof J u n e
30, 1864, (13 Statutes, 220.) authorized au issue of $50,000,000 iu fractional
currency, and provided that the whole araount of these notes, outstanding a t a n y one time, should not exceed this sum.
LOAN OF 1863.
l^he act of March 3,1863, (12 Statutes, 709,) authorized a l o a n of $900,000,000,
and the issue of bonds, with interest at not exceeding six per centum per
a n n u m , and redeemable I n not less t h a n ten nor more t h a n forty years,
principal aud interest payable in coiu. T h e act of J u n e 30, 1864, (13




50, 000, 000 00

None.

223, 625; 663 45

44, 799, 365 44

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a
17 y e a r s .

J u l y l , 1881 . . . 6 per c e n t .

Average
preraiura of
4.13,

. 75, 000, 000 00

75, 000, 000 00

75, 000, 000 00

Statutes, 219,) repeals so much of the precediug act as limits the authority
t h e r e u n d e r to the current fiscal y e a r , and also repeals the authority
altogether except as relates to $75,000,000 of bonds already advertised for.
ONE-YEAR NOTES OF 1863.
T h e act of March 3, 1663, (12 Statutes, 710,) authorized the issue of
$400,000,000 T r e a s u r y n o t e s , with interest a t not exceeding six per centum
per a n n u m , redeemable iu not more t h a n three years, principal and interest p a y a b l e in lawful money, to be a legal tender for their face value.

1 year.

1 year a f t e
"date.

5 p.er c e n t .

400, 000, 000 00

44, 520, 000 00

84,655-00

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TWO-YEAR NOTES OF 1863.
T h e act of March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 710.) authorized the issue of
$400,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, w i t h ' ' i n t e r e s t at not exceeding six per
c e n t u m per a n n u m , redeemable in not more than three years; principal
a n d interest p a y a b l e in lawful money, to be a legal tender for their face
value.

O
2 years.

2 years
date.

after

400, 000, 000 00

5 per c e n t . . .

166,180, COO 00

57, 450 00

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COIN-CERTIFICATES.

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T h e fifth section o f t h e act of March 3, 1803, (12 S t a t u t e s 711,) authorized
the deposit of gold coin ahd bullion with the Treasuror or any assistant
treasurer, in suras not less thau .$20, and the issue of certificates therefor
in denoraiuations'the sarae as Uuited States n o t e s ; also authorized the
issue of these certificates in p a y r a e n t of interest on the public debt.
I t limits the araount of thera to not more thau 20 per centum of the amount
of coin and bullion in the T r e a s u r y , and directs their receipt in p a y m e n t
. for duties on imports.

On demand

Indefiuite .

562, 776, 400 00

39, 460, 000 00

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COMPOUND-INTEREST NOTES.

T h e act of March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 709,) authorized the issue of
$400,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at not exceedingsix per centum
per annura, in lawful raoney, p a y a b l e not more than three years from date,
and to be a legal tender for their face value. T h e act of J u n e 30,1864, (13
Statutes, 216.) authorized the issue of $200,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, of a n y
denoraination not less than $10, p a y a b l e nbt raore t h a n three years frora
date, or .redeemable at a n y time after three years, with interest at not
exceeding seven and three-tenths per centum, p a y a b l e in lawful money
at maturity, and raade thera a legal tender for their face to the same extent as Uuited States n o t e s ; $177,045,770 of the amount issued w a s in
redemption of 5 p e r cent, notes.

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3 years.

J u n e 10,1667, &
May 15,1668.

6 per cent.,
compound.

400, 000, 000 00 266, 595, 440 00

479, 400 00

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TEN-FORTIES OF 1864.
T h e act-of March 3 , 1864, (13 Statutes, 13,) authorized the issue of
$200,000,000 bonds, at not exceeding six per centum per a u n u m , redeemable after five and p a y a b l e not more t h a u forty y e a r s from date, in coin.




10 or 40 years. March 1, 1874.

5 per cent .

P a r to 7
per c't.
prera.

200, 000, 000 00 190,117,300 00

194, 567 300 CO

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T^\:BLE O.—Statement of the outstanding principtal of thepul)lio deht, <f'C.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

W h e n redeemable.

R a t e of interest.

. Price
at which
sold.

Amount
authorized.'

00
Amount issued.

A m o u n t out-,
standing.

FIVE-TWENTIES OF MARCH, 1864.
T h e act of March 3, 1864, (13 Statutes, 13,) authorized the issue of
$200,000,000 bonds, a t not exceeding six p e r Centura p e r annum, redeemable after five and payable not more than forty years from date, in coin.

$3, 882, 500 00

5 or 20 y e a r s . Nov. 1 , 1 8 6 9 . . . 6 p e r cent - . . P a r . . o - .

. $2, 291, 700 00

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FIVE-TWENTIES OF JUNE, 1864.
T h e act of J u n e 30,1664, (13 Statutes, 218,) authorized a l o a n of $400,000,000,
and the issue therefor of bonds redeemable not less t h a n five nor more
than thirty (or forty, if deemed expedient) years from date, with interest
a t not exceeding Oper centum per annum, p a y a b l e semi-annually in coin.

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5 or 20 years- Nov. 1, 1369 . . . 6 p e r cent . . . P a r . . . . . $400, 000, OCO 00

125, 561, 300 00

66, 519, 500 00

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SEVEN-THIRTIES OF 1864 AND 1865.
T h e act of J u n e 30, 1864, (13 Statutes, 218,) authorized the issue of
$200,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes.'of not less than $10 each, p a y a b l e at not
more t h a n three years from date, or redeemable a t a n y tirae after three
years, w i t h interest a t not exceeding 7 3-10 p e r centum per a n n u m . T h e
"act of March 3, 1865, (13 Statutes, 468,) authorized a loan of $600,000,000,
a n d the issue therefor of bonds or T r e a s u r y notes. T h e notes to be of
denominations notless than.$50, with interest in lawful money a t not more
t h a n 7 3-10 per centum per annum.

3. years

<

Aug. 15,1867. )
J u n e 15,1868. S 7 3-10 per ct . P a r . . . . .
J u l y 15,1868. )

800, 000, 000 00

629, 992 500 00

274,100 00

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NAVY PENSION FUND.
T h e act of J u l y 1, 1864, (13 Statutes, 414,) authorized the Secretary of the
N a v y to invest in registered securities of the United States so much of
the N a v y pension fund in the T r e a s u r y J a n u a r y 1 and J u l y 1 in each
y e a r as would not be requii-ed f o r t h e p a y m e n t of n a v a l pensions. Section 2 of the act of J u l y 23, 1868, (15 Statutes, 170,) makes the interest
on this fund 3 per centum p e r a n n u m in lawful money, a n d confines its
use to the p a y m e n t of naval pensions exclusively.

Indefinite....

3 per c e n t . . . P a r

Indefinite

14, 000, 000 00

14. 000, 000 00




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FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1865.
T h e act of March 3. 1865, (13 Statutes, 468,) authorized the issue of
$600,000,000 of bonds or T r e a s u r y notes in addition to amounts previously authorized; the bonds to be for n o t less t h a n $50, payable not
more than forty years from date of issue, or after a n y period not less
t h a n five years ; interest payable semi-annually at n o t exceeding 6 p e r
eentum per annura w h e n in coin, or 7 3-10 per Centura per annura w h e n
in currency. I n addition to the araount of bonds authorized b y this act,
authority w a s also given to convert T r e a s u r y notes or other interest-

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5 or 20 y e a r s . Nov. 1, 1670.-.. 6 p e r cent . . . P a r

203,327,250 00 ' 203, 327,250 00

155, 467, 450 00

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b e a r i n g obligations into bonds authorized b y it. T h e a c t o f April 12,
1866, (14 Statutes, 31,) construed the above act to authorize the Secret a r y of the T r e a s u r y to receive a n y obligations of the United States,
'whether beariug interest or not, in exchange for a n y bonds authorized
b y it, or to sell any of such bonds, provided the public debt is not increased t h e r e b y .
Pi
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CONSOLS OF 1865.
T h e act of March 3, 1865, (13 Statutes, 468,). authorized the issue of
$600,000,000 of bonds or T r e a s u r y uotes in addition to amounts previously a u t h o r i z e d ; the bonds to be for not less t h a n $50, p a y a b l e not
more t h a n forty y e a r s frorn date of issue, or after a n y period not less
than five years, interest p a y a b l e semi-annually, at not exceeding 6 per
c e n t u m p e r a n n u m w h e n in coin, or 7 3-10 per centum per a n n u m w h e n
in currency. - I n addition to the amount of bonds authorized b y this act,
a u t h o r i t y w a s also given to convert T r e a s u r y notes or other interestbearing obligations into bonds authorized b y it. T h e act of April 12,
1866, (14 Statutes, 31,) construed the above act to authorize the Secret a r y of the T r e a s u r y to receive a n y obligations of t h e United States,
w h e t h e r bearing interest or not, in exchange for a n y bonds authorized
b y it, or to sell a n y of such bonds, provided the public debt is not increased thereby.

20
5 o r : y e a r s . J u l y 1, 1870.

6 per c e n t . . . P a r .

332, 998, 950 00

332, 998, 950 00

206, 661, 500 00

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CONSOLS OF 1867.
T h e act of March 3, 186.5, (13 Statutes, 466,) authorized the issue of
$600,000,000 of bonds or T r e a s u r y notes in addition to amounts previously a u t h o r i z e d ; the bonds to be for~ not less t h a n $50, p a y a b l e
not more thau forty years frora date of issue, or after a n y period not
less t h a n five y e a r s ; iuterest p a y a b l e semi-annually, at not exceeding 6 per centum p e r a n n u m w h e n in coin, or 7 3-10 per centum
per annura w h e n in currency. I n addition to the a m o u u t of bonds
authorized b y this act, authority w a s also given to convert T r e a s u r y
notes or other interest-bearing obligations into bonds authorized b y it.
T h e act of April 12, 1866, (14 Statutes, 31,) construed t h e above act to
authorize t h e S e c r e t a r y of the T r e a s u r y to receive a n y obligation of the
United States, w h e t h e r bearing interest or not, in exchange for a n y
bonds authorized b y it, or to sell a n y of such bonds, provided the public
debt is not increased t h e r e b y .

5 or 20 years - J u l y 1, 1 8 7 2 . . . 6 per c e n t . . .

Par .

379, 602, 350 00

379, 616, 050 00

315, 014, 550 00




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CONSOLS OF 1868.
T h e act of March 3, 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468,) authorized the issue of
. $tjOO,000,000 of bonds or T r e a s u r y notes in addition to amounts previo u s l y authorized; t h e bonds to be for not less t h a n $50, payable not more
t h a n forty y e a r s from the date of issue, or after a n y period not less t h a n
- five y e a r s ; interest p a y a b l e semi-annually, at not exceeding 6 per centum,
p e r a n n u m , -whfen in coin or 7 3-10 per-centum per annura w h e n in currency. I n addition to t h e a m o u n t of bonds authorized b y this act,
authority w a s also given to convert T r e a s u r y notes or other interestb e a r i n g obligations into bonds authorized b y it. T h e act of April 12,

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5 or 20 y e a r s . J u l y l , 1873 . . .

6 per c e n t . .

Par .

42, 539, 350 00

42, 539, 350 00

38, 335,500 00

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TABLE 0.—Statement of the outstandingprincipcil of thepiiUic deht, ^-c.—Continued.
L e n g t h of
loan.

W h e n redeemable.

R a t e of iuterest.

O

Price
A m o u n t authorA m o u n t issued.
at which
ized.
sold.

A m o u n t outstanding.

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1866, (14 s t a t u t e s , 31,) construed the above act to authorize the Secret a r y of the T r e a s u r y to receive a n y obligation of the United States,
w h e t h e r bearing interest or not, in exchange for a n y bonds authorized
b y it, or to sell a n y of such bonds, provided the public, debt is not increased thereby,

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THREE PER CENT. CERTIFICATES.
T h e act of March .3, 1867. (14 Statutes, 558.) authorized the issue of
$50,000, 000 in t e m p o r a r y loan certificates of deposit, with interest at 3
p e r ceutum per a n n u m , payable in lawful money on demand, to be used
in redemption of compound-interest notes. T h e act of J u l y 25, 1868, (15
Statutes, 183,) authorized $25,000,000 additional of these certificates for
the sole purpose of redeeming compound-interest notes.

h^
Indefiuite .

On d e m a n d .

3 per c e n t .

$75, 000, 000 00

85,150, 000 00

$30, 000 00

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CERTIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS OF 1670.
T h e a c t o f J u l y 8, 1870, (16 Statutes. 197,) authorized the issue of certificates of indebtedness, payable five years after date, with intei-est at 4
per centum per annum, payable semi-annually, principal and iuterest, in
lawful money, to be hereafter appropriated and provided for by Congress. These certificates w e r e issued, one-third to the State of Maine,
and two-thirds to the State of Massachusetts, both for the use and benefit
of the E u r o p e a n and North American Railway Company, and were in
full adjustment and p a y r a e n t of a n y and all claims of said States or railw a y company for moneys expended (or interest thereon) by the State of
Massachusetts on account of the w a r of 1812-'15.

5 years.

Sept. 1, 1375 . . 4 per cent . . .

678, 362 41

678, 362 41

678, 000 00

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FUNDED LOAN OF 1831.
T h e act of J u l y 14, 1870, (16 Statutes, 272,) . authorizes the issue of
$200,000,000 at 5 per centum^ $300,000,000 at 4h per centum, and
$1,000,000,000 a t 4 per centum, principal and interest payable in coin of the
present standard value, at the pleasure of the United States Government
after ten years, for the 5 per c e n t s ; after .fifteen years, for the 4k per
cents ; and after thirty years, for the 4 per cents ; these bonds to be exempt
from the p a y m e n t of all taxes or duties of the United States, as well as
from taxation in a n y form b y or under State, municipal, or local authority. Bonds and coupons p a y a b l e at the T r e a s u r y of the United States.
T h i s act not to authorize a n increase of the bonded debt of the United
States. Bonds to be sold at not less than p a r in coin, and the proceeds to
be applied t o t h e redemption of outstanding 5-20s, or to be exchanged for
said 5-.20S, par for par. P a y n i e n t of these bondS; w h e n due, to be made




10 y e a r s .

May 1 , 1 8 8 1 . . . . 5 xjer c e u t . . .

500, 000, 000 00

200, 000, OGO 00

200, 000, 000 00

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4n order of dates and numbers, beginning with each class last dated and
n u m b e r e d . Interest to cease at the end of three m o n t h s from notice of
intention to redeem. T h e act of J a n u a r y 20, 1871, (16 Statutes, 399,) increases t h e a m o u n t of 5 per cents to $500,000,000, provided the total
a m o u n t of bonds issued shall not exceed the a m o u n t originally authorized, and authorizes the interest on a n y of these bonds to be paid quarterly.

td

CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT.
T h e act of J u n e 6, 1872, (17 Statutes, 336,) authorizes the deposit of United , ludcfinito . . .
S t a t e s notes-without interest b y b a n k i n g associations in sums not less
t h a n $10,000, and the issue of certificates therefor in denominations of not
less t h a n $5,000; which certificates shall be p a y a b l e on deraand in
United States notes, at the place w h e r e the deposits w e r e made. I t provides that the notes so deposited in the T r e a s u r y shall not be counted as a
p a r t of the legal reserve, b u t t h a t the certificates issiied therefor m a y be
held and counted b y the national b a n k s as p a r t of t h e k legal reserve,
and m a y be accepted in the settlement of clearing-house balances at the
places where the deposits therefor w e r e made, and that the United States
notes for which such certificates w e r e issued, or other United States notes
of like amount, shall be held as special deposits in the T r e a s u r y , and
used only for the redemption of such certificates.




hj
On d e m a n d . .

No limit.

57,160, 000 00

31, 730, 000 00

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2, 234, 482, 993 20

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On J u l y 1, 1865:
Central Pacific
K a n s a s Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City a n d Pacific . . .

$1, 258, 000 00

.

Total amount of interest due the United States from
Pacific
Railway
companies.

• i l l
$37,740 00

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37, 740 00
55,056 83
6, 417 53

~

37, 740 00

37,740.00

92, 796 83
6,417 53

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„....

2, 362, 000 00
640, 000 00

$37, 740 00

92, 796 83
6,417 53

. "^

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37, 740 00

61,474 36

99, 214 36

3, 002. G O 00
O
1, 360, 000 00
1, 630, 000 00

92, 796 83
6,417 53

83,169 02
33, 026 56
19, 917 09

175, 965 86
39, 444 09
19,917 09

175, 965 86
39 444 09
19 917 09

6, 042, 000 00

On J u l y l , 18({6i
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union P a c i f i c . . . .
W e s t e r n Pacific.
Sioux City a n d Pacific




PO
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$37,740 00

3, 002, 000 00

On J a n u a r y 1, 1867 :
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific

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$37, 740 00

.•

1,258,000 00
On J a n u a r y 1, 1866:
Central Pacific
K a n s a s Pacific
Union-Pacific
-.
Central B r a n c h Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific
..

*^a

-J"

<D

Balance of accrued
interest due the
United States on
interest account.

1
i§
a
<

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Balance due t h e
Unite.d States on
. interest
account,
deducting repayments.

R a i l w a y companies.

If

Repayment of interest by transportation of mails,
troops,. &c.

a
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^ ba
a

Amount of interest
accrued and paid
; to date, as per preceding statement.

T A B L E P.—Statement of 30-year Qper'cent. honds {interestpayahle January and July) issued to the several Pacific Eailway companies, under ihe acts of July
.
1, lb62, (12 Statutes, 492;) and July 2,1864, (13 Statutes, 359.)

99, 214 36

136,112 68

235, 327 04

235,327 04

3, 962, GOO 00
2, 030, 000 00
4, 320, 000 00
640, 000 00

175, 965 86
39, 444 09
19, 917 09

111, 837 51
55,186 84
97, 755 65
10, 099.74

287,
94,
117,
10,

. 99, 214 36

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a
803
630
672
099

37
93
74
74

- •

287, 803 37
94, 630 93"
117,672 74
10, 099 74

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W e s t e r n Pacific
:...
Sioux City and P a c i f i c ,
11, 002, 000 00

Ou J u l y 1,1867:
Central Pacific
K a n s a s Pacific
Union Pacific
Central B r a n c h Union Pacific .
W e s t e r n Pacific
"
Sioux City aud P a c i f i c . . . . . . . . .

4, 602, 000 00
3, 360, 000 00
5, 520, 000 00
960, 000 00
320, 000 00

235, 327 04

274, 879 74

510, 206 78

267,
94.
117,
10,

136,534 50
78,654 29
147, 826 87
22, 408 75
8, 206 03

424, 337 87
173, 285 22
265,499-61
32, 506 49
8, 206 03

$22, 349 07
27,414 40

393,630 44

903, 837 22

50, 293 47

803
630
672
099

37
93
74
74

510,206 73

td
145, 640
265, 499
32, 508
8, 206

82
61
49
03

40L 488 80
145, 840 82
265,499 61
32, 508 49
8,206 03

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14,762, 000 00

510, 206 76

853, 543 75

W
On J a n u a r y 1, 1868 :
Central Pacific
K a n s a s Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific .
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

td
6, 074, 000 00
4, 680, 000 00
8,160, 000 00
1,280,000 00
320, 000 00

424, 337 87
173, 285 22
265, 499 61
32, 508 49
8, 206 03

569, 951 70
295,865 48
476, 061 89
62, 833 99
17, 806 03

518, 681 87

20, 714, 000 00

145,613 83
122, 580 26
210, 562 28
30. 325 50
9, 600 00

1, 422, 519 09

29, 899 07
146, 935 26
249,191 98

428,026 31

540, 052 63
146, 930 22
226, 669 91
62, 633 99
17, 806 03

540, 052 63
146,-930 22
226, 869 91
62, 833 99
17, 806 03

994. 492 78

994, 492 78

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On J u l y 1, 1863 :
Central Pacific
'
K a n s a s Pacific
Union Pacific
Central B r a n c h Union Pacific .
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City a n d Pacific

O




569, 951 70
295, 865 46
476, 061 69
62, 833 99
17, 806 03

165, 641 16
165, 258 16
288, 593 86
46, 974 27
9, 600 00
19, 603 76

29, 089, 000 00

On J a n u a r y 1,1869:
Central Pacific
K a n s a s Pacifi'c
Union Pacific
Central .Branch Union Pacific.
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific . . . . . . .

7, 020, 000 00
6. 080, 000 00
12,957,000 00
1, 600, 000 00
320, 000 00
J, 112, 000 00

1,422, 519 09

715, 671 21

2,138,190 30

823,169 81

1, 314, 020 49

1, 314, 020 49

16, 664, 000 00
6, 30.3, 000 00
24, 078, 000 00
1,600,000 00
320, 000 00
1,112, 000 00

755, 592 86
461,123 64
764, 655 75
109, 808 26
27, 406 03
19, 603 76

347,193 73
164, 599 45
549,109 77
46, 000 00
9,600 00
33, 360 00

1,102,766 59
645, 723 09
1, 313, 765 52
157, 808 26
37, 006 03
52, 963 76

46,158 10
368, 406 97
719, 214 87

1, 056, 628 49
277, 316 12
594, 550 65
157, 808 26
37, 006 03
52, 947 49

1, 056, 628 49
277. 316 12
594, 550 65
157, 808 26
37, 006 03
52, 947 49

1,171, 862 95

3, 310, 053 25

1,133,796 21

755, 592. 80
461,123 64
764, 655 75
109, 808 26
27,406 03:
19, 603 76'

36, 949 07
266, 367 71
• 524, 853 03

718,
194,
243,
109,
27,
19,

643
755
802
808
406
603

79
93
72
26
03
76

718,643 79
194,755 93
243, 802 72 • H
109, 808 26
td
27, 406 03
19, 603 76

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50, 097, 000 00

2,138,190 30

2,176, 257 04

Ul

2,176, 257 04

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On J u l y 1, 1869 :
C e u t r a l Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific .
W e s t e r n Pacific
*
Sioux City and Pacific . .

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a

.58, 638, 320 00

25, 881, 000 00
6, 303, COO 00
27, 075, 000 00
1, 600, 000 00
. 1, 648, 000 00
1,628,320 00

•

^^

lis

• $1,102,786
645, 723
1,313,765
157, 808
37, 006
52, 963

59
09
52
26
03
76

3, 310, 053 25

1, 719, 216
834, 613
2, 061, 669
205, 806
46, 606
~ , 96, 508

18
09
89
26
03
69

64,135, 320 00

4, 964, 622 14

25, 861, 000
6, 303, 000
27, 075, 000
1, 600, 000
1, 970, 000
1, 628, 320

On J u l y 1,1870 :•
Central PacificK a n s a s Pacific
Union Pacific
C e n t r a l B r a n c h Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

.*.p

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^.£202

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$22, 789, 000 .00
6, 303, 000 00
25, 998, 000 00
1, 600, 000 00
320, 000 00
1, 628, 320 00

On J a n u a r y 1,1870:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific..
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

CO >->

a^^i

Total amount of interest due the United States from
Pacific
Railway
companies.

o a

R a i h v a y companies.

t'bO

Balance of accrued
interest due the
United States on
iuterest account.

.a

Balance due . the
United States on
interest account,
deducting repayments.

a
o

Repayment of interest by transportation of mails,
troops, &c.

Amount of interest
accrued and paid
to date as per preceding statemient.-

TABLE F.—Statement of 30-year ^2^^^^ c^^^^* honds {interest payahle January and July) issued to^the several Facific Eailway companies, ^-c.—Continued.

2, 491, 744
1, 023, 903
2, 891, 729
253, 808
73, 288
145,356

0000
00
00
00
00

26
09
85
26
76
29

$616, 429
189,090
768,104
48, 000
• 9, 600
43, 514

59
00
37
00
00
93

1, 674, 768 69

772, 528
189,090
609, 659
48, 000
26,682
48, 649

08
00
96
00
73
60

1, 895, 010 37

770, 023
189, 090
821,641
48, 000
. 57, 908
48,849

$1,719,216
834, 813
2, 081, 669
205, 806
46, 606
96, 506

18
09
69
26
03
69

4, 984, 822 14

. 2, 491. 744
1, 023, 903
2, 891, 729
253, 808
73, 268
145, 358

26
09
65
26
76
29

$72. 666
546,569
906, 446
3, 490

99
10
11
79

16 27

$1,646,549
288, 243
1, 175, 423
202, 317
46, 606
96, 492

$1, 646, 549
288, 243
1,175,-423
202, 317
46, 606
96, 492

19
99
78
47
03
42

1, 529,169 26

2, 374, 978
392, 676
1, 784, 302
248, 506
73, 288
144, 988

3, 455, 632 88

3, 455, 632 63

116, 765
631,224
1,107,427
5, 301

86
99
54
92

369 40

2, 374, 978
392, 676
L 764, .302
248, 506
73, 288
144 988

40
10
31
34
76
89

6, 879, 832 51

L 861, 069 71

3,261,767.84
1,212,993 09
3, 713, 371 05
301, 808 26
131,197 36
194, 207 89

164,'054
684,359
1, 269, 576
7,401

396 08

3, 097, 71^3 67
528, 633 97
2, 423, 794 18
294, 406 34
131,197-36
191}, 811 81

17
12
87
92

40
10
31
34
76
69

5, 018, 742 80

5. 018, 742 80

58
00
20'
00
60
60

19
99
76
47
03
42

$155, 730
28,717
67, 767
17, 857
4, 274
5,154

40
58
69
43
71
20

3, 253, 444
557, .351
2,491,561
3] 2, 263
13.5, 472
198, 966

07
55
87
77
07
01

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64, 457, .320 00
On J a n u a r y 1,1871:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific.
Union Pacific . . . . .
.
Central Bi'ancli Union Pacific




..

6, 679, 832 51

1, 935, 512. 96

8, 815, 345 49

2,145, 786 16

6, 669, 557 33

25, 881, 000
6, 303, 000
27,236,512
1,600,000

3, 261, 767
1,212,993
3, 713, 37L
301,808

776, 430
169,090
817, 095
" 48, 000

4, 038,197
1, 402, 063
4,530,466
349, 808

241, 638
768,146
1, 434, 952
7, 401

3, 796, 559 14
633, 934 43
3,095,514 08
342, 406- 34

326, 995
56, 879
194, 389
3.5, 410

6, 949, 059 34

279, 502 01

00
00
00
00

64
09
05
26

00
00
36
00

84
09
41
26

70
66
33
92

81
25
56
83

4,123, 554 95
690, 613 68
3, 289, 903 '64
, 377, 817 17

• -

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0 U.July 1,1871:
Central Pacific
K a n s a s Pacific.

>

Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

.

._^.

1, 970, 000 00
1, 628, 320 00

131.197 36
194, 207 89

59,100 00
48, 849 60

190, 297 36
243, 057 49

8,281 25
396 08

1S2, 016 11
242,661 41

10, 598 09
15, 762 43

192,614 20
258, 423 84

64,618,832 00

^.... . 1

Vi'^estern Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

8, 815, 345 49

1, 938, 564 96

10, 753, 910 45

2, 460, 818 94

8,293,091 51

640, 035 97

8, 93.3,127 46

.4,814,627
1, 591,173
5,347,561
397, 808
249, 397
^91, 907

34.3,266
857, 330
1, 755, 303
9, 276
8,281
401

4,471,360
733, 842
3, 592,258
388, 531
241,116
291,505

449,
76,
269,
46,
16,
23,

4,921,114
810,774
3, 682,132
435, 2.56
257, 492
315,020

2.5,861,000
6, 303, 000
27,236,512
1, 600. 000
• 1, 970, 000
1, 628, 320

00
00
00
00
00
00

4, 038,197
1, 402, 083
4,530,466
349, 808
190, 297
243, 057

Central Branch Union Pacific
^'^estern Pacific -.
.....

25, 881, 000
6, 303, 000
27, 236, 512
1,600,000
1, 970, 000
1, 628, 320

00
00
00
00
00
00

4, 614, 627
L 591,173
5,347,561
397, 808
249, 397
291, 907

On J u l y 1, 1872 :
Central Pacific
K a n s a s Pacific

776, 430
189, 090
817,095
48, 000
59, 100
46, 849

84
09
77
26
36
09

00
00
36
00
00
60

84
09
77
26
36
09

•12,692,475 41.

5,591,0.57
1, 780, 263
6,164,657
445, 808
. 306, 497
310, 756

84
09
13
26
36
69

1,938,564 96

12,692.475 41

64,618,832 00

00
00
36
00
00
60.

1, 938, 564 96

10,753,910 45

64, 618, 832 00

On J a n u a r y 1, 1872 :
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific

776, 430
189, 090
817,095
48, 000
59, 100
48, 849

84
09
41
26
36
49

14, 631, 040 37

777, 318
189, 090
817,095
48, 000
59,181
46, 849

6, 368, 376 07
1, 969, 353 09
6, 981, 752 49
493. 808 26
367. 679 34
389,-60'6 29

90
93
15
92
25
83

94
16
'62
34
11
21

753
932
874
725
376
515

57,
82
27
32
52
13

2, 973, 861 03

9, 716, 614 38

903,177 '63

422, 556
927, 829
1, 964, 850
9, 276
9. 350
401

5,168,501
652, 433
4,199, 807
436, 531
299, 147
340,354

595,
100,
402,
59,
24,
32,

33
30
08
92
25
33

3, 334, 264 76

51
79
05
34
11
81

11,296,775 61

968
272
429
783
076
965

12
17
22
02
92
74

1, 215, 497 .19

51
98
89
66
63
34

10, 621, 792 01

5, 764, 469
9.52, 705
4, 602.236
496.314
. 323, 226
373, 320

63
96
27
36
03
55

12, 512, 272 80

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.

Central B r a n c h Union-'Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City a n d Pacific

25, 685,120
6, 303, 000
, 27, 236, 512
1, 600, 000
1,970,560
1, 628, 320

.5, 591, 057
1, 730, 263
6,164, 657
445, 808
306, 497
340, 756

00
00
00
00
00
00

84
09
13
26
36
69

14,631,040 37

64, 623, 512 00

•

23
00
36
00
98:
60

1, 939, 535 17

16, .570, 575 54

527, 025
973, 904
2,181,989
15,839
9, 350
825

39
69.
4342
25
60

3, 708, 9.34 78

5,841,350
99.5, 448
4,799,763
477, 968
358, 329
386, 780

68
40
06
84
09
69

12, 861, 640 76

766, 898
126, 262
537,973
74, 538
33,775
44,165

68
25
22
53
70
12

1,58.5,613 50

6, 605, 249
1,123, 710
5, 337, 736
552, 507
392,104
432, 945

36
65
28
37
79
81

14, 447, 254 26

Kj

O

td
H

On J a n u a r y 1, 1873 :
Central Pacific
^
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central B r a n c h Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City aud Pacific




25, 865,120
6, 303, 000
27,236,512
1,-600, 000
1, 970, 560
1, 628, 320

00
00
00
00
00
00

64, 623, 512 00

.

6, 368, 376
1, 969, 353
6, 9S1, 752
493, 806
367, 679
389, 606

07
09
49
26
34
29

16, 570, 575 54

776, 553
189, 090
817,095
48, 000
59,116
46, 849

60
00
36
00
80
60

• 1, 938. 705 36

7,144, 929
2,1.58,443
7, 798, 847
541, 606
426, 796
438 455

67
09
85
26
14
89

18, 509, 280 90

614,057
1, 067,179
2, 296, 875
17,714
9,350
825

06
03
90
42
25
69

6, 530, 672 61
1,091,264 06
5, 501, 971 95
524,093-64
417,445 89
437,630 20

4, 006, 002 35

14, 503, 278 55

963, 723
160,631
696, 737
91.093
4.5, ,538
57,153

26
78
82
42
64
49

2,014,878 61

,7,494,595
1,251, 895
6,196, 709
615,187
462, 984
494, 783

87
64
77
26
73
69

td
Ul

a

16,518,157 16

•
Or

On J u l y 1, 1873 :
Central Pacific
Kausas Pacific
. .

-.

Central Branch Union Pacific .
W^estern P a c i f i c . . .




...

1

© 0)

a5 ^

all
a^^

1

%x>ai

Total amount of interest' due the United States from
Pacific
Railway
Companies.

a
<

a).a

Balance of accrued
iuterest due the
United States on
interest account.

a i2

ft-a
^p

Balance due the
United States on
interest
account,
deductiug repayments.

:l

R a i l w a y companies. '

11
.a i^

Repayments of interest by transportation of mails,
troops, «fec.

ao
a

Amount of interest
accrued and paid
to date, as per preceding statemeut.

TABLE P.—Statemeni of 30-yedr Q per cent, honds {interest payahle January and July) issued to the several Pacific Eailway Companies, cfc.—Continued.

a)
:

td
hj

O

Pi

O

$25,865,120 00
6, 303, 000 00
27, 236, 512 00
1, 600, 000 00
1,970,560 00
1, 626, 320 00

$7,144, 929 67
2,158. 443 09
7, 796, 847 65
541, 808 26
426,796 14
438, 455 89

$776, 553 60
189, 090 00
817.095 36
- 48, 000 00
59,116 80
46, 849 60

$7, 921, 483 27
2, 347, 533 09
8,615,943 21
589,808 26
135,912 94
487. 305 49

$725, 037 15
1,082,195 36
2,383,019 67
18, 651 92
9, 367 00
4, 869 72

$7,196, 446 12
1. 265. 337 73
6, 232. 923 54
571,156 34
476, 545 94
482, 435 77

%\, 186,1.38 37
197,874 38
881, 263 1&
109,529 94
59, 423 02
. 71,947 61

$8, 382, 584 49
. 1,463,212 11
7,114,191 70
680. 666 28
535.973 96
554. 383 38

64,623,512 00

18,509,280 90

1,938,705 36

20, 447, 986 26

4,223,140 82

16, 224, 845 44

'. 2, 506,186 48

18, 731, 031 92

w
td
Ul

td

o

PO
td
H

>

Kj

O

w
td
H
W
td

>

Ul

w
K
l

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

47

TABLE Q.—Eeturns; hy award of the United States Court of Claims, of proceeds of proxierty
seized as captured or ahandoned nnder the act of March 12, 1863, jpaicZ from July 1, 1872,
to June 30, 1873.
.
T o whom paid.
1872.
July 2
3

20
22
23
24
26
27
Aug. 1

13
14
17
1873.
F e b . 17
19
April 26
May 14
15
21
24
29
June 2

Dominick 0 . Grady's executors, John Quinlan et al
Asher Ayres
William W. Worthington
Daniel L. Ferguson
.-.'
'
Melvin B. W i l b u r
.•
.;
Eide F . T o r e k
;
.•
AVilliam and Robert M c l n t y r e
Simon Queyrouze's administrator
,
William H. G-reene
J a m e s Cantwell
George W . Anderson
Alexander Abrams
Daniel H. Baldwiu •.
William H u n t e r
Theodore B. Marshall and George S. Marshall
Levi De W i t t and Richard Morgan
James K. Reilly
J a m e s J. W a r i n g
William Lightfoot and David Flanders
H e n r y C. Freeman's administrator
Esadore Cohn
J a m e s W . and H a r v e y W . L a t h r o p
Samuel F . O'Neil
J o h n Stevenson
E . E . Simpson et aZ.,administrators of-John A. Simpson . .
Ezekiel E. Simpson...^
Erastus H e n r y
'
J o h n C. Schreiner <fe Sons
Herman P a r k e r ' s administratrix
Elie Cote, for use of J. C. Martin et al
Desir6 Godet
L a w r e n c e de Give
Andrew L o w
J
H e n r y A. Richmond's administratrix and Samuel Wilmot
E d w a r d Padelford's executors
Chandler H . Smith
i
Albert Johnson's executrix,'for use of Martin Tally
Adolph B. Weslow •
:
Anthony F e r n a n d e z
E d w i n Parsons and George Parsons
E d w a r d Padelford's executors et al
Michel Castille
'.
Julius Witkowski
E d w i n M. Price
William B. Adams
A b r a h a m Backer
L u k e Christie.
'...'
J o h n R. Wilder
Lovell & Lattimore
William Lattimore
' E d w a r d Lovell
Aaron Wilbur's executor
Alfred Austell
Alexander O l d h a m . . .•
Herman Bulwinkle
'.
H e n r y and Isaac Meinhard....°
Simon Witkowski
W i l h a m Lindou
:
Ralph Meldrim.
.•
J o h u S. Daniel's administratrix...'.
Hibernia Armstrong
H u g h Carlisle aud George S. Henderson
J a m e s C. Terry, survivor of T e r r y & Carnes
H e n r y Cobia's executors
Octavus Cohen
Samuel Meinhard, Isaac M. F r a n k , and A b r a h a m Epstein.
A k e Hem-y
'
William Markhara
:
Isaac Rosenheim
Antoine Caire, for use of Thoraas C.'Payan
•.'..
Virginia Sheftall
J o h n S. Rogers
:
John A. Douglass
1
John M. Cooper
".
William H. H u n t e r aud John Gammel
William W., and Nelly K. Gordon
J o h n and Margaret R i c h a r d s . . .
:




$03, 268 60
34, 604 08
42, 904 83
15, 343 88
1, 093 63
1, 273 91
4,830 15
14, 592 00
10, 549 15
10,131 67
5, 863 78
1,490 13
12, 252 i&
3, 311 40
13, 907 88.
11, 358 9.3.
9, 934 20
. 2, 483 55.
13,411 17
55,134 61
• 5, 775 00
8. 795 67
2. 980 2(>
L 821 27
12, 630 42
28,380 13- •
5, 504 02
7,119 51
• 5, 276 80^
9, 871 91
5, 760 00>
2,255 30
450, 580 19
13, 493 46
12,323 7 3
:25,166 64
421 96
5, 463 31
19, 537 26
17,219 2825, 585 £5
18,240 00
92, 547 00
68,712 93
21, 396 02.
42, 652 37
" 4, 470 39 .
15, 227 CO5, 296 42
662 23
6, 439 29
16, 888 14
12, 385 88
7, 000 00
8, 218 03^
10,148 85.
19, 537 261, 729 97 '
2, 566 33.
67, 258 23:
16,730 00
43, 232 00
32, 460 39 >
107,126'63..
10, 784 75•24.180 47
12, 345 755, 891 99
14.201 73.
36, 096 00
4.172 22 .
7, 889 85
6,136 55.-.
6, 570 3&
•3, 506 60
. 3,013-27;.'
1, 970 2L

48

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE Q,.—Eeturns, hy award of the United States Court of Claims, <^^c.—Continued.
To whom paid.

Date.
1,873.
June 6

28

Henry D. Headman
William H. Starke
Jacob Stern
•
Karl M. Oppenheimer
Stern »e Oppenheiraer — :
f
Edwin Bates
Horatio N. Spencer
Robert Hunter.
J
Rufus C. Barkley
Charles Deignan
Stephen S. Boone
Aaron Champion
George H. Linstedt
".
Lowell T.'Whitcomb
James Reed, for use of Benoni G. Carpenter
John J. Gardner
Zenon J. Broussard
,
Jules Perrodin
i
David W.Davis
^......,
Augustus W. Eckel
George J. Huthmacher
Cornelius Donate
James Snipes
Thaddeus Kelley's administrator
Total




,

$695 37
44, 938 7 7
.
1.390 74
3, 782 95
4,909 24
10, 687 06
4, 545 81
1,824 62
5, 327 03
912 31
1,928 63
7, 013 20
2, 085 28
2, 549 69
8,415 84
9, 408 00
15,744 00
64, 512 00
651 65
781 98
1, 433 63
960 00
65 16
4,170 56
1, 960,180 94

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

49

TABLE R.—Awards of the Uniied States Court of Claims of proceeds of property seized as
captured or ahandoned under the act of March 12, 1863, decreed hut not paid during the«
fiscal year ended June 30,1873.
Name of claimant.

D a t e of decree.
5 e b . 10, 1873
March 3, 1873
March 31, 1673

April
April

14, 1673
21, 1673

May
May

5, 1673
19, 1873

May'

26, 1673

June

2, 1673

June

4, 1873

J o h n M. Powell
Michael Slattery
...'.
Thomas W . Keya'^ administrators
A b r a h a m B. Matthews
'.
Samuel G. Cabell
Mary Hunter, executrix of J a m e s H u n t e r
J o h n L. Hardee, executor of Noble A. Hardee
Thomas and Catharine McDermott
E m m a P. Sykes
1
J e a n M. L a p e y r e
Charles Wilson e t a l
H e n r y D. Weed aud George Corn well
William M. Wilson
Alfred L. T y l e r
Dwight L a t h r o p
Carl William Heinsuis
E d w a r d W . Mar.shall, J o h n N. Beach, and Sidney Root
A n d r e w J. Miller...'
William J. Poitevent
William Battersby
- -.
William Battersby and Thomas S. Metcalf's executor . .
William Battersby and Octavus Cohen
William Battersby ahd Andrew Low
Charles Green
William W. Cones
A b r a h a m A. Solomons
William J . Jenkins, executor of Eliza Hans Chaplin ..'.
William J. Hill
Oakley H. By num
J o h n McMahon, administrator of J a m e s Cody
H e n r y Skipwith, executor of Eliza Hai'desty
Samixel Houston
:..
Gazaway B.Laraar
L u c y C. Murphy '.
Freeman B u r r . . . l
T h e Home insurance Company
T h e Southern Insurance and T r u s t Company
John F . Pargoud
Martin Tally
.'.
Frederick A. Kinch, admiuistrator of J o h n Scudder . . .
Daniel O'Connor, for the use of Joseph B. S t e w a r t
John L. Villalonga
H e n r y Brigham et al
Samuel C. McPherson's executrix
Leon Lippraan, survivor of M. and L. Lippman
Matilda Johnson
,
J a m e s Sheppard
.
"
Howell W . Wright
E d w a r d P. Scott, executor of Isaac Scott
E d w a r d P . Scott, executor of Isaac Scott
E d w a r d P. Scott, executor of Istiac Scott
J a m e s N. Cartwright
.'.
J. Wesley Vick.,
Clarissa .Ashford, executrix of J a m e s P . Ashford.
Charles Hill
'.
W a r r e n R. Dent
•
Augustus P. Wetter, trustee of Margaret Telfair
.Matthew Malsch
."...
Brittain M. Odora
:...,
John E. Moncure. •J. A. Martin, administrator of J a m e s B. Johnson
R. A. Rutherford and N. S. Rector
>
.^
A. B. Christian, administrator of J. B. Christian
.Total

4 F




,

Amount
awarded.
$1,994 77
320 55
1,172 97
16, 130 34
20,513 61
4, .375 00
103, 856 86
525 99
3,3.52 36
9, 955 66'
4,032 59
249, 437 18
9, 625 00
86,892 31
5, 610 56
40, 747 83
31, 033 41
29, 553 42
1,631 27
87, 013 67
487, 242 07
• J , 880 86
3, 940 43
155, 554 89
92, 596 40
4, 733 97
9, 432 12
18, 769 50
4, 405 87
4, .558 58
27, 339 56
2,22547
579,343 51
6, 523 00
6, 336 00
35, 529 53
27,176 15
15,266 81
678 72
9, 503 39
2,317 90"'
90, 389 89
876 65
7, 680 00
4, 025 00
15, 195 52
42, 908 32
1,820 10
9, 029 49
• 18,234 32
62,242 15
14,193 00
1, 356 10
23, 589 43
37, 695 95
17, 923 90
8,941 83
8,218 60
6, 392 40
6, 636 11
34,813 70
4,109 40
7, 685 75
2, 635. 096 94




REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REYENUE.







R.E P O R T
OF

THE CO.llISSIONER OE INTERNAL REVENUE.,

•

.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, '
O F F I C E OF INTERNAL E E V E N U E ,

WasMngtorij N'ovemher 7, 1873.
S I R : I have the honor to transmit herewith the tabular statements
made up from the accounts of this Office, which the Secretary of the
Treasury-is required to lay before Congress, as follows:
Table A, showing the receipts from each specific source of revenue,
and the amounts refunded in each collection district, State, and Territory of the United States, forthe fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
Table B, showing the number and value of internal revenue stamps
ordered monthly by the Commissioner, the receipts froni the sale of
stamps, and.the commissions allowed on the same; also the number
and value of stamps for special taxes, tobacco, cigars, snuff, distilled
spirits, and fermented liquors, issued monthly to collectors during the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
Table C, showing the territorial distribution of internal revenue from
various sources in the United States for the fiscal years ended June 30,.
1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, and 1873.
Ta;ble-^D, showing the aggregate receipts from each collection district,
State, and Territorv, for the fiscal years ended June 30,1863,1864,1865,
1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871,' 1872, and 1873.
Table E, showing the total collections from each specific source of
revenue for the fiscal years ended June 30, 1863, 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867^.
1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, and 1873.
Table F, showing the ratio of receipts from specific sources to the aggregate of all collections for the fiscal years ended June 30, 1864,1865,.
•1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, and 1873.
Table G, an abstract of reports of district attorneys concerning suits.
and prosecutions under the internal revenue laws, during the fiscalyear
ended June 30, 1873.
Table H, an abstract of seizures of property for violation of internal
revenue laws during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
The aggregate receipts from all sources, exclusive of the direct
tax upon lands and the duty upon the capital, circulation, and deposits of national banks, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, were
$114,07^,456.08. This amount includes sums refunded and allowed
on. drawbacks.
The amount of drawback allowed during the last fiscal year was as«
follows :
On spirits
On tobacco
On general merchandise
Total..



_
..i

.'
„

,... $33,.7G0 20
1,959 30
16,,686 81
, 52,,346 31

54

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

The amount of tax abated on spirits destroyed under act of May 27,
1872, was $27,855.
There were refunded during the last fiscal yearfor taxes illegally assessed and collected $618,667.77.
SPIRITS.

The following statement shows the receipts from the several sources
relating to distilled spirits for the fiscal years ended June 30, 1872 and
1873, together with the increase and decrease from each source :
Sources.

R e c e i p t s for
R e c e i p t s foi?
fiscal y e a r 1872. fiscal y e a r 1873.

S p i r i t s distilled from apples, p e a c h e s ,
01.- g r a p e s
S544, 846
S p i r i t s distilled from m a t e r i a l s o t h e r
t h a n ajDples, p e a c h e s , or f ' r a p e s . . - • . - . . 32, 572, 940
W i n e m a d e i u i m i t a t i o n of c h a m p a g n e .
20
*319, 504
Rectifiers
,:.
4, 028, 604
Dealers, retail liquor
.,
I>ealers, ^vholesaTe l i q u o r
,
*727, 651
M a n u f a c t u r e r s of stills
1, 391
StiUs or w o r m s m a n u f a c t u r e d
4, 260
s t a m p s for distilled s p i r i t s i n t e n d e d for
export
290,264
s t a m p s , distillery w a r e h o u s e
• S t a m p s , rectifier's',^
'.
!
367, 424
S t a m p s , w h o l e s a l e liquor d e a l e r s '
139, 602
4,118
E x c e s s of g a n g e r s ' fees
,
-Articles a n d occupations r e l a t i n g to spiri t s f o r m e r l y t a x e d h u t u o w e x e m p t .. *10, 474, 684
Total.-

63'

^2,014,045 60

16
00
20
93
92
66
00

41,116, 419
3,531
371, 4.56
5,016,904
781, 663
1, 393
3, 280

18
90
72
10
82
26
00

00
00
75
95

7, 031
148, 418
186,100
73, 767
520

Increase.

50
80
60
00
85

96

52, 099, 371 78

%\, 469, 796 77
8, 543, 479
3,511
51, 952
988,299
54, Oil
1

02
90
52
17.
90
60
$980 .00

7, 081 50
141, 845
181, 323
65,835
3, 598

2, 374,186 45

49, 475, 516 36

Decrease.

20
40
75
10

, 100, 696 51
11,118,134 38

;, 494, 278 96

A g g r e g a t e i n c r e a s e , ^1^2,623,655.42.
* T h i s . a m o u n t , $10,474,884.96, i n c l u d e s |636,200.71 t a x on rectifiers p r o d u c i n g in excess of 200 h a r r e l s
p e r y e a r ; !$1,337,911.71 on sales of l i q u o r s iu excess of $25,000 (including o t h e r m e r c h a n d i s e ) p e r a n n u m ;
$2,010,986.53, p e r d i e m t a x on distilleries, a n d $6,489,786.01 distillers' special a n d ha.rrel t a x , all of w h i c h
t a x e s w e r e i u c l u d e d in t h e r e p o r t for l a s t y e a r on p a g e V I I u n d e r t h e i r a p p r o p r i a t e h e a d i n g s , h u t w h i c h
t a x e s w e r e r e p e a l e d h y a c t of J u n e 6, 1672", a n d a r e n o w t h e r e f o r e p r e s e n t e d iu one a m o u n t .

The increase in the. receipts fromthe gallon tax on distilled spirits
was $10,013,276 ; and from the special tax of rectifiers and dealers in ^
liquor, $1,094,264 5 making a total increase from these sources of over
,$11,000,000.. The tax on distilled spirits was raised from 50 to 70 ceuts
per.gallon August-1, 1872. To this fact,is due the large increase in the
receipts from this source. The large increase.in the receipts from special
taxes is doubtless owing in great part to the earlier and more thorough
collection of special taxes since the introduction of the present system
of paying them by stamps. A part of this $11,000,000 increase was,
however, offset by the loss of nearly $400,000 during the last year by
the reduction of the value of stamps for spirits, other than tax-paid
stamps, from 25 cents to 10 cents each, under act of June 6, 1872; and
by the further loss of a little over $8,000,000 by the repeal, under the
same act, of certain taxes relating to spirits, leaving a balance of alittle
more than two and a half millions as the increase in the receipts from all
sources relating to spirits.
^
. .
;
PRODUCTION OF SPIRITS DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED* J U N E 3 0 , 1 8 7 3 .
,Taxahle gallons.

Total i^roduction from materials other than fruit
Total i^rocluction from fruit
Total



:

L

(j8,23'6, 5(-)7
2, 914, 800
71,151,367

COMMISSIONER

OF INTERNAL

55

REVENUE.

The following tabular statement shows the distribution of distilleries
in the various States and Territories:
Statement sliowing the numher of distilleries registered and operated during the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1873.
Grain.

Molasses.

Pruit.
o

1
1
6

states and Territories.

6

1

O

i'
3

6
5

1
3
2
43
28
4

1
3
2
43
28
4
2
163
4

Illiuois
Indiana

.

.

...

Kansas
Kentuckv

. . .

Marvland
jMassachusetts
Minnesota .
Mississippi
Missouri

.

178
4
8
2
2

646

South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Utah . . . . .
Vermont
Virginia

118
54

95
32

7
205

7
185

2
200
5
121
1,699
70
3
129

2
189
5
116
1,696
69
3
115

142
666
25

138
657
21

10
1, 424
1
284
1

20
1
1
2

14
39
61

i

-

--

•.

S

•
. . . . . . . ..

...

.

1

1

13
33
51

1

1

37

78

2
1

10
1,401
1
162
1

7,325

6,948

1

48
2

40

21
2
1
10

•.

West Virginia
Wisconsin
Total

24
1
1

7

706
1

1

7

80
148
14

714
16

i

629

84
157
14

.

, 57
12
194
125
77

77
21
239
130
77
1
649
2
127
185
18
7
892,
- 20
1
126
63
2

58
12
^0
130
77
1
632
2
123
176
18
, 2
869
•5
1
103
41
2

7
229
1
1

7
205
1
1

•

Nehraaka
NeA'ada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Yf)rk .'.
North Carolina
Ohio
Oregon
Penusyivania

8
2
• 2

2

-

"o

74
21
231
125
77

Arkansas

Florida

i
d

1

8
5

1
^

r6

20
1
• 9

611

543

13

13

3
3
191
202
5
5
' 130
136
1, 729
1,738
131
120
3
3
195
• 218
1
1
• 138
142 '
697
714
21
27

io
1, 445
3
285
11
7,949

10
1, 421
1
163
10^
7,504

From the above table it appears that during theJast fiscal year 7,325
fruit distilleries were registered, and 6,948 operated; and'that of the
distilleries other than fruit, 624 were registered, and 556 operated.
The following stateraent shows the number of grain and molasses distilleries in operation at the beginning of each month duriug th^ fiscal
year ended June 30, 1873 : ,




56

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.
N u m h e r of dis- > Capacity of grain distilleries.
tilleries.

Months.
Grain.

Molasses.

Bushels.

Gallons.

Capacity of molasses
distilleries.
Total spiritproducing
capacity.
•Spirits.
Gallons.
_L_

July
August...
September
Octoher—
No.vemher
December
January..
Pebruary.
March
Auril
May
,
June

158
144
159
196
227
260
301
352
378402
309
301

8

^

'

)
^

10
10
9
9
10
10
9
9
10
10

.58, 813
41,037
49, 988
61, 928
71, 922
73, 234
77, 465
78, 503
74, .535
71, 514
53, 652
58, 607

209, 596
.136,921
174, 536
214, 960
249, 481
229, 832
263,197
271, 624
255, 645
241, 604
181, 860
203,110

11, 209
11, 323
1.5, 613
15, 896
15,132
11, 608
12,261
14, 390
13, 631
9,877
10, 959
11, 304

9,567
9, 624
13, 270
13, 510
12, 862
9,866
10, 422
12, 291
11, 585
8,395
9, 324
9,109
Gallons.

Quantity of distilled spirits in bond July 1, 1872, at 50 cents
Quantity of distilled spirits produced d u r i n g t h e year ended
June '30, 1873, at 50 cents.
:
Qnantity of distilled sy.nrits.produced duriug tbe year ended
Jurie 30, 1873, at 70 cents
.'

219,163
146, 545
187? 806
• 228, 470
262, 343
239, 693
278, 619
284,115
267, 230
249, 999
191,184
212, 219
Gallons.

10,103, 392
5, 359,013
62,877,554

68,236,567
Quantitj^ of distilled spirits withdrawn on payment of tax, at
50 c e n t s . . . . 14,885,340
Quantity of distilled spirits withdrawn on payment of tax, at
70 cents
'
48,086, 073
^62,971,413
.Quantity of distilled spirits exported, at 70 cents
625,944
Quantity allowed, by special credits, at 50 ceuts
*
'
45, 664
Quantity of distilled spirits withdrawn for scientific purposes, a.t 70 cents.
2, 865
Quantity on which the tax has been abated under the act of May 27,1872,
at 50 cents
43,925
Quantity remaining in bond July 1, 1873, at 50 ceuts . . .•
487, 476
Quantity remaining in bond July 1, 1873, at 70 cents
14,162, 672
'
.
.
,
•
14,650,148
1,732,686 gallons of the quantity reported as remaining in bond have been
rernoved on export bonds and proofs of lauding, not yet presented, so
tliat the quantity actually in warehouse is
12,917,462
Quantity removed for export during the year, includiug the quantity ac' counted for.
'..
.'
2, 358,630

The,tax collected, on spirits withdrawn from warehouse during the
fiscalyear 1872 was $32,457,235.50. Tlie tax collected on spirits withdrawn frora warehouse during the fiscal year 1873 was $41,102,921.10.
The tax on spirits Avithdrawn for export during the fiscal year 1873 was
$1,651,041. If the tax had been collected on spirits withdrawn for export
during the fiscal year 1873, as was the case during the fiscal year 1872,
the receipts for the fiscal year 1873 w'ould have been increased $1,651,041;
thus swelling the receipts irom spirits withdrawn from bond for the
fiscal year 1873 to t42,753,962.10.
A comparative statement, therefore, of the receipts on account of all
spirits withdrawn from bond for the two years, under like circumstances,
AYOuld show an increase of $10,296,7.26.60, or over 31 per cent.,-ih the
receipts of the fiscal year 1873 over those for the preceding fiscal year.
The act of June 6, 1872, authorizing t|je withdrawal of spirits from,
distillery warehouse for export, without payment of the tax, has been in
operation since the 1st of August, 1872, under the regulations of this Office
approved by the Secretary of the Treasury:
Number of rectifiers in business July 1, 1873 ..'.
Number of distillery w^arehouses in existence July 1, 1872
Number of distillery warehouses in existence July 1, 1873
Number of distillery store keepers in assignment July 1,1873
Nnmber of distillery store keepers in .commission July 1,1873



1, 347
385
531
624
1; 105

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

57

IMITATION WINES.,

The tax received on imitation wines during the year ended June 30,
. 1873, was $3,531.90.
FERMENTED LIQUORS.

The tax received on fermented liquors, at $1 per barrel, for the years
1872 and 1873 was $8,009,969.72 and $8,910,823.83 respectively.
The number of brewers engaged in the manufacture of fermented
liquors during the fiscal year ended June 30,1873, was 3,554, distributed '
as*follows: Alabaina, 5 ; Arizona, 15; Arkansas, 1; California, 201;
Colorado, 44; Connecticut, 3 1 ; District of Columbia, 18 ; Delaw^are, 3 ;
Dakota, 5 ; Florida, 3 ; Georgia, 7; Idaho, 15; Illinois, 210; Indiana,
158; Iowa, 174; Kansas, 55-, Kentucky, 53; Louisiana, 17; Maine, 8 ;
Mary Land, 74; Massachusetts, 49 ; Michigan, 202 ; Minnesota, 132; Mississippi, 3 ; Missouri, 130; Montana, 31; Nebraska, 23 ; INTevada, 41; IsTew
'Hampshire', 5; i^ew Jersey, 8 1 ; iSTew Mexico,.8; 'Eew York, 481; North
Carolina, 2; Ohio, 296; Oregon, 34 ; Pennsylvania, 500; Ehode Island,
6 ^ South Carolina, 4 ; Tennessee, 7 ; Texas, 50 ; Utah, 29 ; Yermoiit 2;
Virginia, 10 ; Washington Territory, 15; West Virginia, 2 1 ; Wisconsin,
280 ; Wyoming, 15.
The number of breweries reported for 1872 was 3,421.
The increavse in the receipts of the last over the preceding year will
be seen to be, in number of breweries 133, in aggregate of tax paid
$900,854.11, and average per brewery of $165.86.
But'this comparison does not afford a full and fair exhibit of the increased productiveness of the country in this branch of our manufactures, oroi:' the increased efficiency of the improved means employed
by this Office for securing the tax iraposed thereon.
The number of breweries given for the year ended June 30, 1873,
comprise all the tax-paying breweries, which had been in operation for
any portion of that year. This is true, also, of the number given for the
year 1872. But within the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, in portions
of the country the sale of iermented liquors was' prohibited by State
enactments, and numbers of breweries w-ere thus cut short, by other
than business causes, of the time within the year duriug which they
would otherwise have continued to operate, and the production of those
continuing to manufacture in the States referred to has been materially
lessened. •
TOBACCO.

The total receipts from tobacco for the fiscal year ended June 30,
1873, were $34,386,303.09. Compared with the total receipts for th'e .
fiscal year ended June 30, 1872, the following results are sho\yn :
Year ended June.30, 1873, tobacco manufactured, of
call descriptions, taxed at 20 cents per pound
^'|22,217,127 93
Snuff, taxed at 32 cents per pound
1, 082,048 60
Tobacco, &c., taxed at 32 cents ])er ijound, old collectious
94,270 22
Tobacco, &c., taxed at 16 cents x>er pound, old collections......
4,411 47.
__
• $23,397,858 22Year ended June 30,1872, tobacco manufactured, snuff, ."
&c., taxed at 32 cents per pound
18, 674, 569 26
TobaccO; smoking, &G., taxed at 16 cents per p o u n d . . . 5,896,206 33
.
^
,_« 2i, 570,775 s a "
Sbowing a decrease of collections on manufactured to-.
.bacco of all descriptions of
-




1,172,917 37

58

•

REFORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Year ended June 30,1873, cigars, clieroots, a.ud cigarettes

•

|8,\^940, 391 48

Year ended June 30, 1872, cigars, cheroots, and cigarettes

"

Sbowing an increase on cigars, &c., of

X, 566,156 86
. 1, 374,234 62

Year ended June 30, 1873, received from sale of export
stamps, at 25 ceuts
'
|175 00
Export stanips, at 10 cents
:
5, 419 60
$5,594 60
53,576 25
47, 981 65

Year ended June 30, 1872, received from sale of export stamps
Decrease from sale-of export stamps
Year ended June 30, 1873, received from, dealers in leaf tobacco
Year euded Juue 30, 1872, received from dealers in leaf tobacco

..

Decreased collections from dealers in leaf tobacco

141,969 88

Year ended June 30, 1873, received from dealers in manufactured tobacco, &c
•-Year ended June 30, 1872, received from dealers in manufactured tobacco, &c
Increased collections from dealers in manufactured tobacco, &c

$118, 517 74
260, 487 62

..

Year ended June 30, 1873, received from special taxes.of tobaccb and
' cigar man ufacturers
•
,
Year ended June 30, 1872, received from special taxes of tobacco and
cigar manufacturers

$1,663,552 02
1,102, 357 89.
561,194 13
$165, 091 • 27
182, 816 31

Decreased collections from special taxes of tobacco and cigar manufacturers
...-•.
.'

17,725 04

Year ended June 30-, 1873,^ collected from special taxes of peddlers of
tobacco, under the actof June 6, 1872

"
$50, 694 96

Year ended Juue 30, 1873, collected from sales of cigars, leaf and
manufactured tobacco, and upon the ]3enal sum of bonds of tobacco
manufacturers, taxes w^hicli had accrued prior to June 30, 1872

$44,602 80

Giving a grand total as above of $34,386,303.09, and showing an increase in the total receipts from the manufacture and sale of tobacco,
snuff, and cigars, in all their forms, over the receipts from the same
sources for the preceding fiscal year, of $650,132.57.
PRODUCTION OF MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.-

The quantity of tobacco represented by the collection of taxes, as
above, during the year ended June 30, 1873, is as follows :
Pounds.

Tobacco of all descriptions, taxed at 20 cents per pound
Snuff, taxed at 32 cents per pound
Tobacco, taxed at 32 cents per pound
Tobacco, taxed at 16 cents per 'pound
Tobacco, &c., exported directly from manufactories

I l l , 085, 640
3, 381," 402
294,594
27, ^572
8,177,107^

Total in pounds
122, 966, 315
Deductiug the quantity stored in bojided warehouses June 30,187.2, and
• withdrawn during the year on paymentof tax, together with the quantity on which taxes vvere collected whicli had accrued prior to July 1,
1872, to the amount of..:
•
6,525,381
. And we have a balance of

116", 440,934

pounds as the actual product of the year, so far as such products have
been reported to this Office,' and showing" an increase over the annual
production reported for the preceding fiscal year of 9,180,079 pounds.



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

59

The number of cigars, cheroots, &c., on which taxes were collected
during the fiscal year ended Jane 30, 1873, was 1,807,034,646, showing
an excess over the number reported for the preceding fiscal year of '
279,328,674.
°
'
The act of June 6, 1872, established a uniform rate of tax on all descriptions of chewing and smoking tobacco of 20 cents per pound, in-,
stead of the previous rates of 16 and 32 cents per pound, leaving the
rate of tax on snuff at 32 cents per pound, as provided by the act of
July -20, 1868. This was an average reduction of 22j- per cent, upon the
rates at which the taxes for the previous fiscal year had been collected.
But,'notwithstanding this large reduction in the average rate of tax, .
' the decrease of collections under the new_ ate of 20 cents per pound on
all descriptions of tobacco, both chewing and smoking, is only a small
fraction over 4 per cent., or, more exactly, 4j'^ per cent. Daring the
fiscal year ended June 30,1873, the unprecedented quantity of 114,789,208
pounds of tobacco in its various manufactured forms reached taxation,
being a quantity in excess of the preceding fiscal year of 19,579,889
pounds.
,
A part of this increase is owing to increased consumption, which undoubtedly keeps pace with the annual increase of population. A part
may be due to the fact that after the closing out of the bonded warehouses a portion of the surplus stock which previously had been stored
in them, awaiting a demand for consumption before the tax was paid, '
was during the last year placed upon the market, tax paid in anticipation of its demand., But by far the greater portion of this increase, in
my opinion, to an amount not less than 15,000,000 pounds, is directly
due to the fact that the act of June 6, 1872, which went into operation
at the beginning of the last fiscal year, imposed a heavier tax on the
sale of leaf tobacco, where such sales were made to persons who purchased leaf tobacco for direct consumption in an unmanufactured state
thus requiring the consumer to pay about the same amount of tax to
the Government on the tobacco he consumed, whether in the manufactured or unmanufactured form. As between the two classes of tobacco,
the tax being equal, or nearly so, the consumer does not hesitate to
give the preference, in almost every case, to the manufactured article.
As shown by the figares given, the rcvsult of this legislation has been
to increase largely the returns of manufactured tobacco, thus, showing
that the business of the manufacturers has been also largely increased.
It 'has at the same time freed them from an unjust and an unequal
competition with dealers in unmanufactured tobacco. It has enabled
the Government to make a large reduction in the rate of tax, (22J per
cent.,) thereby cheapening the article to general consumers, while at the
same time no material reduction has been made in the revenue derived
directly from chewing and smoking tobacco.
Equally favorable have been the results upon the legitimate cigar trade
o f t h e additional provisions relating to leaf tobacco. They have been
alike protective to the interests both of the Government and the honest
cigar manufacturers. Under the present law none but legally authorized
cigar manufacturers can purchase leaf tobacco to be made into cigars.
The leaf dealer who shall sell leaf tobacco to an unauthorized manufacturer or maker of cigars, to be illicitly worked ui3 without the payraent of
the Government tax, which w^as largely practiced prior to the present strin gent enactments on that subject, renders himself liable to a special
tax of $500, in addition to penalties. It is estimated that not less
• than $500,000 of the increased collections upon cigars duriug the last




60

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

fiscal year are due directly to the practical operation of th'ese provisions
on that branch of the tobacco business, and to that extent has the legitimate cigar trade, as well as the Government, been benefited.
EXPORTATION OF MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.

Apprehensions were entertained by parties favoring the continuance
of tire former system of export bonded warehouses, that there would
be a large falling off in the qaahtity of manufactured tobacco shipped
to foreign coantries under the present systein. These predictions, however, have not been verified'by the actual results, which show, that
notwithstanding sorae considerable time was required fally to inaugurate
the change, and to farailiarize shippers with all the details of the law
and regulations under which such shipments are now made, instead of
there being any falling off, there was an acfcaal increase of some 544,064
pounds of exported tobacco during the last fiscal year.
The reports made to this.Office of such shipments show the following
results:
Year ended June 30, 1873, exported of tobacco in warehouses, June 30,
1872
Exported directly from manufactories
Total exports for the year
Year ended June 30, 1872

Pounds.

1,932,937.75
8,177,107.75
10,110,045.50
9,565,981.00

Showing an increase of

,

544,064. 50.

It has been the aim of this Office to render every facility in its power,
to the exporters of manufactured tobacco, and to that end it has
endeavored to make the rules and regulations governing such exporta-*
tions no more exacting than the safety of the revenue'should require,
and to reduce the expenses of exporters on account of export stamps,
inspection fees, &c., to the miniraam sum that the efficiency of the service would allow, in order to promote as much as possible this branch
of our foreign trade.
.UNIFORM TAX.

The consolidation of the different rates of tax on different classes of
chewing tobacco has seemed to realize in practice all that the friends of
this measure predicted of good results. No branch of the business
seems to have experienced any inconvenience, or suffered any diminution in the amount of business formerly done under a graded tax, in
consequence of such uniform tax. Not only has there been a large increase generally in the production and sale of manufactured tobacco,
but it.is believed that this increased business has been done with a reasonable amount of profit to the manufacturer.' The law in its present
operation is thought to act equally and impartially. Its requirements
have become better understood. There has been a more general
acquiescence in these requirements during the last fiscal year than ever
before. There have been fewer violations of law and regulations,
fewer seizures, and fewer prosecutions reported.
Abstract of cases compromised.
The whole number of cases compromised, as provided under section.
102, act of July 20, 1868, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873,
was 492,



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE,

61 .

Amount of tax accepted
:,..-•
1
:
Assessed penalty fixed by law
Specific penalty in lieu of fines, penalties, and forfeitures

$182,376 10
,1,872 56
77,921 33 >

Total araount received by compromises

262,169 99

Abstracts of reports of disti'ict attorneys for tlie fiscal year 1873.
SUITS COMMENCED.

Number of criminal actions
Nuraber of civil actions in personam
Number of actions in rem

•.

2,3i5
631
....
271

......'

Whole number commenced

•.

: 3,217

SUITS D E C I D E D I N FAVOR O F U N I T E D STATES.

Number of criminal actions
Number of civil actions in personam
Number of actions in rem

.'

950
378
316

j.

Total number of suits decided in favor of United States

• 1, 644

SUITS D E C I D E D AGAINST T H E U N I T E D STATES.

Number of criminal actions
Number of civil actions in personam
Number of actions in r e m . . .
'.

'411
34
50

Total number of suits decided against the United States

495

S U I T S S E T T L E D OR DISMISSED.

Number of criminal actions
Nuinber of civil actions in pei^sonam
Number of actions in rem

1,315
• 125
..
116

Total number of suits settled or dismissed

1,556

SUITS P E N D I N G J U L Y 1, 1 8 7 3 .

Number of criminal actions
Nuraber of civil actions in personam
Number of actions m rem

'

3, 930
1, 221
474

:

Total number of suits pending July 1, 1873

i

.5,625

Amount of judgments recovered by United States in suits in criminal
actions
:
;
$154,296
Amount of judgmeuts recovered by United States in suits in civil actions
in personam
.,i
1, 476, 346
Amount collected on judgments and paid into court in suits in criminal
actions
38, 493
Amount collected on judgments and paid into court in suits in civil
actions in personam
291,514
Amount collected on judgments and paid into court in actions in rem or
proceeds of forfeiture
73,953

20
23
H
97
81
45

^ Abstract of ^seizures.
Seizures of property for violation of internal revenue law during the .
fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, were as follows:
45,531 gallons of distilled spirits, valued at
702 barrels of fermented liquors, valued at
210 pounds of snuff, valued at
41,885 pounds of tobacco, valued at
796,069 cigars, valued at
Miscellaneous property, valued at
Total value of seizures

:
,
,..
•

:

$58,231. 95
3, 486 87
16 50
18, 853 95
15, 029 55
193,587 50
289,206 32

The following table shows the receipts from all sources other than



62

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

spirits and tobacco for the last two fiscal years, with the increase and
decrease from each source:
E e c e i p t s fiscal EeceiiDts fiscal
y e a r 1872.
y e a r 1873.

Sources.

lucrease.

Decrease.

FERMENTED LIQUOKS.
.PeiMTierited liquors, t a x of $1 p e r b a r r e l OD
13r e w e r s ' special t a x
Dealers iu malt liquors

Total

^8, 009, 969 72
248, 528 74

$8, 910, 823 83 ' ^900, 854 11
56,121 17
304, 650 21
109, 463 80
109, 463. 80

8, 253, 498 46

9, 324, 937 84

1, 066, 439 38

3. 643, 272 19
• 976, 092 13
8, 864 82

3, 009, 302 79
736, 950 05
24,778 62

15, 913 80

4, 628, 229 14

3, 771, 031 .46

15, 913 80

16,177, 320 60
442,205 12

7, 702, 376 85^
' 461, 653 06

19, 447 94

19, 053, 006 53

6, 329, 782 00

BANKS AND BANKERS.
IBanlv deT)0sits
B a n k capital
Bank ciiculatiou
Total

.

.

.

.

Adhesive staraps
Peualties
.•.
•
Articles aud occupatious formerly t a x e d
b u t u o w e x e m p t '.

1633, 969 40
239,142 08
873, 111 48
8, 474, 943 75
12, 723, 224 53

The decrease in receipts from banks and bankers and adhesive,
stamps is due to legislation approved June 6, 1872. The class entitled
^'Articles and occupations tbrmerly taxed but now ex'empt," includes
certain taxes on old lists repealed prior to June 6, 1872, with the tax
on income and gas. The aggregate receipts for the last fiscal year
exceeded my estimate by $4,075,45i3.08.
I t is estimated that the total receipts for the current fiscal year wall
be $100,000,000. This estimate will of course be aifected somewhat by
the continuance, or otherwise, of the present financial embarrassmeni.
It is not thought that any material loss will ensue from the amounts of
taxes received from the personal consumption of spirits or tobacco
should the financial trouble continue; but a loss would undoubtedl}^
be felt in the amount of spirits used chemically and in the mechanic
arts.
SCHEDULE C.

The correspondence of this Office during.the past year developed the
factthat a contrariety.of opinion and practice existed among the officers
and tax-payers in relation to taxable articles under Schedule 0. To
secure uniformity of practice and, as far as possible, the proper collections from that source of revenue, a pamphlet containing the various
rulings of this Office from 1863 to 1873 in regard to" stamp duties on
medicines and cosmetics was issued to the local officers, with instructions
to place a copy in the hands of every dealer and druggist. The awakened attention thus secured already gives evidence of a healthy effect,
and cannot fail to materially increase the revenue from that source
should it remain unrepealed.
THE NEW SYSTEM.

The act of December 24,1872, provided for the abolition of the offices
of assessor and assistant assessor on or before the 30th day of June,
1873. Immediately upon the passage ofthe act, preparations were begun in the Office for this radical change. Regulations had to be revised and reprinted and general instructions prepared as to the method
to be pursued in closing up the assessing offices and turning over
their effects either to the Commissioner or the collectors. To avoid
embarrassment from failures to transfer the offices, w^hich would



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

63

probably occur in some instances if the change was delayed until the
last day (July 1) under the act, it was determined to make it, as far
as practicable, on the 20th day of May. On that date a large proper
tion of the assessing offices were finally closed, and their papers and
property turned over, a part to this Office and a part to the collectors.
The assessment'lists, by virtue of which, since^the organization of the
internal revenue system in 1862, the vast sums collected were authorized, and by which all refunding claims, either by Congress or the Commissioner, are tested, were shippedby express to this Office, and required
over one thousand large boxes to contain them. The lists have been
carefully sorted and filed for the future daily use which is demanded of
them. .Under the full and explicit instructions prepared and distributed by this Office the change was quietly and systematically made. The
outgoing officers, with scarcely an exception, laid oft their official garments gracefully, commendingpthe simplicity and'economy of the incoming system. The few districts that were not ready at that date,
through accident OJ otherwise, w^ere prepared for the change by the 30th
of June, 1873, and the first day ofthe current.fiscal year fecund the old
system gone and the new in operation. Two hundred and twenty-eight
assessors, 240 clerks, and 1,040 assistant assessors were thus finally discharged from the service at alarge annual saving to the national Treasury, as shown below.
The law which abolished the office of assessor, authorized and required the Commissioner to make the various inquiries, determinations,
and assessments of taxes which had been made by these officers; accordingly such monthly assessment lists are now so made up, and transmitted to the collectors of the various districts. It was soon found that
the receipts of collectors, for their lists, reached this Office earlier than
when prepared by the local assessing officers. This is doubtless largely
due to the fact that all these assessments are prepared at one point,
•and by the same hands, thus avoiding the delays and controversies referred to in the report of last year, incident to. the varied '^ interpretations of two or three hundred unassociated minds.'' The receipts of
special taxes (licenses) show particularly the beneficial effects of the.
changes wrought by the new law.
The collections from spirits and tobacco have been hereinbefore
treated at large under their respective heads.
In the report of this Office made last year, in which the new system
was proposed, it was asserted that a large saving per annum, in ex-'
penses, might be expected if the system was adopted. The following
figures will show its annual saving in comparison with the old system
which it supplanted, and the plan (act of June 6, 1872) of reducing to
eighty, districts, which was repealed-before it ha4 been inaugurated:
Tbe .appropriations for assessing' and collectino- tbe internal revenue for tbe
- fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, were, (including $1,500,000 for salaries
and expenses of gaugers aud store keepers)
$6,200, 000
Appropriations for tbe fiscal year 1874, (including $1,500,000 for salaries "
and expenses of gaugers and stoi'e keepers)
4,600, 000
Difference

,

• 1,600,000

The estimate for the fiscalyear 1874, based on the reduction to eighty
districts, was $5,662,827, or $537,173 less than tlie appropriation for the
fiscal year 1873.
The plan adopted in lieu of the eighty-district plan, to wit, abolishing the offices of assessors and asvsistantass.essors, reduced the expenses
$1,062,827 lower than the estirnated^reduction under the eighty-district
plan, and $1,600,000 lower than the appropriation for 1873, under the
old system.



64

" '

REPORT ON THE FINANCES:

The estimates for the fiscal year 1875 show a further reduction of
$9,458, or $1,609,458 less than the appropriation for the fiscal year 1873,
and $1,072,285 less than the estimate for 1874, based on the eighty-district plan.
It was thought at first that an additional'clerical force would be
needed in this Office in view of the increased labor under the act of
December 24,1872, but'diligence and an enthusiastic application to
their new duties on the part of the existing clerical forces have obviated
such supposed necessity. For a considerable part of the past summer
a number of the clerks were employed several hours each day after the
regular business hours in executing and adjusting the new system.
This gratuitous labor was cheerfully performed, and is descrying bf
special commendation.
.
;
SALARIES.

The I change under the .law dispensing with assessors and assistant
assessors made a re-organization of the collecting forces necessary, and ,
required a small average increase of allowance for collecting expenses.
The assessing had cost more than the collecting in about the proportion
.of three to two. To make the saving anticipated under the new system,
and at the same time to insure a sufficient force to superintend and collect the revenue of the country, it was concluded to regulate the expenses, as a general thing, by the following rule: aggregate the entire
expense of assessing arid collecting in the. respective districts for the
past year under the old plan, divide that by two, and allow the result
respectively to each district. This gives a slight average increase to
the collectors for expenses to compensate them for the additional
labor and responsibility, and yet makes sure the large saving heretofore noticed. It is very desirable that Congress should fix definitely
the pay of the leading local officers—collectors. Under the present
system, special and controlling allowances have to be made in all cases,the districts arranging themselves into two classes, each of which requires
allowance, but for contrary reasons: First, w^hen the collections are
small and the salary and commissions are not large enough to personally
compensate the collector, and at the same time afford him sufficient means
to employ a proper subordinate force. Second, when the collections are
so large th'at, with the maximum salary ($4,500) allowed the collector,,
there would be more realized, in addition' to his personal salary, than
would be proper to be expended on subordinates. In the first class we
.give additional aid to secure the due enforcement of the law. In the
second we withhold certain amounts to prevent the lavish and unnecessary expenditure of money.
It will at once be seen that this is a most delicate responsibility. It
involves the measuring of men's services, which is always embarrassing,
and urges, a conflict between this department and its chief subordinates
on the most tender point, next to character—that of moneyed interest.
On the one hand, the subordinate officer is apt to think that he has been
unfairly dealt with, while, on the other, the controlling officer is fearful'
that he may have been too free with that portion of the public purse
intrusted to him.
•
.
It is urgently desired that Congress should fix'by law the exact
compensation of collector^, and the following schedule, based upon
'collections, is respectfully submitted as one that would fairly compensate them:
.
/
Collectors collecting not over $50,000'i)er aunum, salary
•
Collectors collecting over $50,000 and not exceeding $250,000, salary
Collectors collecting over $250,000 and not exceeding '$500,000, salary



$2, 500'
3,000
3,500

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.
Collectors collecting over $500,00.0 and not exceeding $750,000, salary
Collectors collecting over $750,000 and not exceeding $1,000,000, salary
Collectors collecting over $1,000,000, salary
.'

65
$4, 000
4,500
5,000

Starting with a sum ($2,500) none too large, it' .would seem., for one
who gives a bond ranging from $50,000 to $100,000, and who is responsible in the matter of due diligence for all the taxes of his district, as
well as the honesty of his subordinates, and concluding with an amount.
($5,000) strikingly small for the annual care, as is the case in a.number .
of instances, of six or seven millions of the public money, i t i s hoped
that this recommendatio7i will receive congressional favor and ea;iiy
pass into the law;
The act of J u n e 6, 1872, • reduced the number of supervisors from
twenty-five to ten, thus more than doubling the area of their districts
but leaving their compensation $3,000 per annum, the same as before.
Under these circumstances I recommend that the salary of supervisors
be fixed at $4,000 per annum. ' The duties of these officers are of great
importance to .the service and involve constantly pressing and grave responsibilities. In some of their districts the performance of duty is frequently attended with personal danger, and in all it demands constant
travel and exposure. Their individual districts average in square miles
a territory one-fifth larger than Austria, or nearly as large as the whole
of Great Britain and France together.
With the general service so much reduced in its numbers, of employ6s
and yearly expenses, with the responsibility of the remaining officers so
largely increased, it is respectfully suggested that the above slight increase Of expenxliture can be well afforded.
REVISION.AND COMPILATION OF THE LAWS.

During the year a revision of the internal revenue laws in force, as
provided for in section 45, act of June 6, 1872, has been prepared and
published, a,nd generally distributed to Congress and the revenue service. This work has been conveniently arranged for reference by plac- .
ing, as far as possiblCj all the law on each subject of taxation under its
appropriate title j all obsolete or repealed law is eliminated, amendments are incorporated in their proper places, and a full and proper index accompanies the ^vhole. It meets a want^ long felt, substantially
aids the efforts of those charged with the execution ofthe laws, and will
materially simplify the labor of Congress when considering amendments.
thereto. The two gentlemen in this Office, appointed by you to pef' form this work have accomplished it in addition to their regular duties,
the larger pbrtiou of i^ after office hours, and, in accordance with prece
dent, I would recommend that they be suitably compensated.
ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS.

Section 44 of the act of June 6,1872, provided, in effect, that all claims
for .the refunding of taxes alleged to have been erroneously assessed or
collected must be presented to the Commissioner, and all snits or proceedings to recover such taxes must be brought '; within two years next
after the cause of action accrued and not after.^' It provided, however,:
as to claims which had accrued prior to the passage of the act, (June 6,
1872,) that the presentation thereof to the Commissioner, or the bringiug
• of action thereon in the courts, must be done w^ithiii one year from the
last mentioned date. .
As must always occur on the taking effect of any statute of limitation,
some meritorious claims have doubtless been barred by the act above
mentioned which might have been presented, but through neglect, in. 5 F .



66

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

difference, or otherwise, w^ere not. It would seem reasonable, however,
to assume that few, if ahy, cases of actual hardship to ta.x-payers failed
of presentation within the year given for that purpose.
On the other hand, it is quite probable that the statute has barred
very many claims which, with 2 prima facie appearance of legality, were
>
i
in ffict without merit, either in law or equity, but which it would have
been difficult for the Government to disprove, owing to the recent change
of system, under which many of our oldest officers have necessarily left
the service.
I would repeat the suggestion contained in ray report of November
21, 1871, that ^ section 44 of the act of July'20, 1868, should be
^
amended by making the minimum peiialty smaller, such penalty being
now a fine of not less than $1,000, with not less than six months'
imprisonment. The undue severity of this punishment would, seem to
be obvious as applied to the offenses of carrying on the business of
a retail or wholesale liquor-dealer, rectifier, or manufacturer of stills,
' without having paid the special tax' in cases wherein' no intent tp defraud exists; the omission arising from ignorance of the law, or other
circumstances not fraudulent, yet constituting no legal excuse under
the terms of the section. The practical effect of providing so disproportionate a punishment for these offenses is to discourage complaints,
defeat convictions, and induce suspensions of sentence, ih many cases
in which some moderate punishment should be enforced, as well to vindicate the law as to secure future compliance with its requirements."
The repeal of all documentavry stamp duties under Schedule^B, except
that of two cents on bank checks, drafts, or orders, by*l'.he act of June
6, 1872, left many stamps in the hands of dealers and others throughout
the coLtntry, for which they had no use; and such as have been presented to this office have been redeemed or exchanged, under the provisions of section 161 of the act of June 30, 1864, as amended by section
41 of the act of June 6, 1872.
The amount so redeemed and exchanged from October 1, 1872, to
October 1, 1873, was $473,844.44.
As it is believed that the public have now had a sufficient notification
of the willingness of the. Government to redeem or excha.nge such stamps
as might be presented, accompanied by satisfactory evidence that they
had not been used, I would recommend such legislation by Gongress
as will limit the time to July 1, 1874, within w^hich documentary
stainps issued under Schedule B of a greater denomination than two
cents may be presented for redemption, under section 161 of the act of
June 30,1864, as amended by section 41 of the act of June*6, 1872.
The suggestions made in my last annual report that the amendments
of June 6, 1872, to section 59 of the act of July 20, .1868, relating to the
special taxes of dealers in liquors, should be made more explicit, were
fully met by the carefully drawn House bill No. 4069, entitled ^ An act
^
to correct an error in section 13 of the act of June 6,1872, and to amend
certain sections of other acts relating to internal revenue." That bill
passed the House of Eepresentatives on the 3d day of March last, but
unfortunately'ffiiled of being acted on by the Senate, solely, it is understood, for want of time in which to consider it. It is very important
that the same or a similar bill should be enacted as soon as practicable.
Eespectfully,
J. W. .DOUGLASS,
Commissioner.
Hon. W I L L I A M A.




EICHARDSON,

Secretary of the Treasury.

REPORT OF COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.







EEPORT

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY

TREASURY- D E P A R T M E N T ,
O F F I C E OF T H E COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY,

Washington, November 2SJ 187S,
SIR : I have the honor to submit for the consideration of Congress,
in compliance with section sixty-one of the national currency act, the
following report:
The first national bank, under the act of February 25, 1863, was organized in Philadelphia June 20, 1863,* and the first circulating notes
were issued December 21 of the same year. Since that time 2,129 national banks have been organized, 32 of which have failed, and 117 gone
into voluntary liquidation by a vote of two-thirds of the shareholders,
under section 42 of theact. During the lastyear 68 banks have been organized, 11 have failed, and 21 have gone into voluntary liquidation,
leaving 1,980 in existence on November 1, 1873.
* The first proceedings in the Congress of the United States in reference to the estahlishment,of a bank were June 21,1780, at which time a committee of three was appointed
to confer with the inspectors and directors of the proposed bank, which committee, on
J u n e 22, 1780, reported as follow^s :
Whereas a number of patriotic citizens of PennsyWania have communicated to Congress a liberal
offer, on their own credit, and by their own exertious, to supply and transport 3,000,000 rations, and 300
hogsheads o.f ram, for the .use of the Army, and have established a bank for the sole purpose of obtain
ing and transporting the said supplies with the "greater facility and dispatch; and whereas on the one
hand the associators, animated to this laudable exertion by a desire to relieve the public necessities,
mean not to derive trom it the least pecuniary advantage ; so, on the other, it is just and reasonable
"
that they should be fully re-imbursed and indemnified : Therefore,
Eesfilved, unanimously. That Congress entertain a high sense of the liberal offer of the said associators to raise and transport the beforem en tioned supplies for the Army, and do accept the same as a distinguished proof of their patriotism;
Resolved, That the faith of the United States be, and the same hereby is, pledged to the subscribers
to the said bank, for their effectual re-imbursement in the premises.
"
*
* The proposed bank of 1780 was completed by the act of incorporation of 1781 of tjhe
.Bank of North America. This bank was converted from a State bank to a national
bank December 8, 1864.




70

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The following table exhibits the* resources and liabilities of the
national banks at the close of business September 12, the date of their
last regular report—the returns from New York City, from other redemption cities, and from the remaining banks being given separately:
New York city. Other redemp- Country banks.
tion cities.*
1,747 banks.
48 banks.
181 banks.

Aggregate.
1,976 banks.

Resources.

Loans an(l discounts
1^199,160,887 79 $262, 523, 070 82 $478, 549, 345 61
594, 439 05
3, 209, 914 03
182, 459 04
Overdrafts
!9, 591, 050 00 264, 869, 250 00
IJ. S. bonds to secure circulation... 33, 870,100 00
650, 000 00
3, 026, 000 00 11,129, 000 00
U. S. bonds to secure deposits
3,785,050 00
332, 400' 00
1, 707, 400 00
U. S. bonds and securities on hand.
Other stocks, bond, sand mortgages.
552, 797 40
4, 736, 037 68 14, 420,199 45
Due from redeeming and reserve
32,279, 436 .51 63, 854, 684 15
agents
Due from other national b a n k s . . . . .
740, 765 99 10, 976,896 48 14, 696, 017 59
6, 609, 859 07
Due from other banks and bankers.
3, 335,728 30
077, 286 04
Eeal estate, furniture, and fixtures.
8, 601,528 75 17, 590, 310 13
469, 984 33
3, 699, 404 08
905, 622 11
2, 380,410 80
Current expenses
5, 356, 773 62
1, 629,890 56
Premiums
766,179 69
1, 908,842 89
7, 466, 300 80
Checks and other cash items —
058, 769 .53
Exchanges for cleaiing-house ...
897, 740 69 21, 028,262 84
8, 502, 644 00
Bills of "other national banks
4, 955,579 00
618, 583 00
11, 211 00 , -15,826 00
Bills of State banks
535, 538 90
1, 428, 841 04
Practional currency
338,394 32
585,810 55 3, 210,970 07 • 2, 071, 688 83
Specie
'.
468, 530 00 28, 599, 405 00 42, 279, 728 00
Legal-tender notes
810, 000 00
7, 550,000 00
•2, 250, 000 00
' TJ. S. certificates of deposit
175, 000.00
Clearing-house certificates......
Totals .

389, 486, 310 48

489, 356, 698 65 •951, 784, 836 40

$940, 233, 304
3, 986, 812
'388, 330, 400
14, 805, 000
8, 824, 850
23, 709, 034
96,134, 120
41, 413, 680
12, 022, 873
34, 661, 823
6, 985, 436
7, 752, 843
11, 433, 913
88, 926, 003
16, 076, 806
• 27, 037
2, 302, 774
19, 868, 469
92, 347, 663
20, 610, 000
175, 000

22
12
00
00
00
53
66
06
41
21
99
87
22
53
00
00
26
45
00
00
00

1, 830, 627, 845 53

Liabilities.
Capital stock —
Surplus fund
TJndiTided profits
•.
National bank notes outstanding .
State bank notes outstanding
DiAddends nnpaid
Individual deposits
U. S. deposits
Deposits of U. S. disbursing officers
Due to national banks
Due to other banks and bankers..
Notes and bills rediscounted
Bills payable
Totals

70,235, 000 00 127,164,985 00 293, 672,631 00
21, 923,211 45 32, 470, 516 75 65, 920,771 00
472
11, 210, 470 03 • 12. 764, 21 30, 540, 189 52
27, 482,342 00 77, 800, 560 00 233, 798,897 00
. 146,525 00
207, 127 00
835, 201 00
205, 979 60
3,20,700 03
875, 868 26
167, 512,662 74 172, 065, 102 29 283,107, 798 26
296, 877 39
1, 496.332 71
6, 036,117 63
40, 297 13
6, 731,509 49
1, 326,753 51
72, 257, 769 25 43, 649, 018 01 17, 765, 945 68
050 50 15, 469,278 28
18,113,
5, 715,819 36
4,638, 458 78
1, 349,053 58
799 28
62,125 39
2,145, 629 42
^, 272,

491, 072,616
120, 314, 499
54, 515, 131
339, 081,799
1,'188, 853
1, 402,547
622, 685,563
7, 829,327
8, 098,560
133, 672,732
39, 298,148
5, 987,512
5,-480, 554

389, 486, 310 48 489, 356, 698 65 951,784,836 40

1, 830, 627, 845 53

00
20
76
00
00
89
29 •
73
13
94
14
36
09

* The redeinption cities, in addition to New York, are : Boston, Albany, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh,
Baltimore, Washington, New Orleans, Louisville, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee,
Saint Louis, and San Francisco.

DISTRIBUTION OF THE CURRENCY.

The act of February 25, 1863, and the subsequent acts of June 3,
1864, and March 3, 1865, authorize the issue of three hundred aiillions
of circulating notes to national banks to be organized under the provisions of those acts, one hundred and fifty millions of which were required
to be '' apportioned to associations in the States, in the District of Columbia and the Territories, according to representative population, and
the remainder among associations formed in the several States, the District of Columbia and the Territories, having due regard to the existing
capitajl, the resource and business of each State, District, and Terri
tory.''*
• '
The whole amount of currency authorized by these acts was issued to
national banks during the four years following.



71

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The following table exhibits the apportionment of the whole amount
of circulation authorized by law ($354,000,000) to the different States
and Territories, upon the basis of population 'and wealth as given in the
census returns of 1870, together with the amount outstanding and
authorized, and tlie excess and deficiency:
,. ,
s t a t e s and Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire
V e r n i ont
Massachusetts
Khode Island . . . J
Connecticut

Apportio n - Apportio n .
ment
on
ment
on
population.
wealth.

$2, 877, 818
1, 461,138
1, 517, 376
6, 689, 889
997, 747
2, 467, 152

Total Eastern
States

• 12,053,200
1, 480, 800
1, 380, 600
12, 549, 300
1, 752, 300
4, 566, 600

Aggregate
apportionment.

$4,
2,
2,
19,
2,
7,

931, 018
947, 938
897, 976
239,'189
750, 047
033, 752

16, Oil, 120

23, 788, 800

39, 799, 920

20,118, 813
4,1.59, 382
16.167, 317
573, 873
3, 584, 651

38, 267, 400
5,540,100
22,425,900
. 566,400
3, 787, 800

58,386,213
9, 699, 482
38, 593, 217
1,140, 273
7,372,451

Total Middle
States

44, 604, 036

70, 587, 600

115,191, 636

D i s t r i c t of C o l n m b i a
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georcfia.
Plorida
'.
Alabama
Mississipi)i
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
M i s s o u r i .•

604, 560
5, 624, 042
- 2, 029, 041
4, 918, 022
3, 239, 045
5, 435, 587
861, 846
4, 576, 646
3, 800, 529
3, 336, 863
3, 757, 640
2, 223, 936
6, 064, 027
5, 777,118
7, 901, 509

743, 400
2, 407, 200
1,115,100
1, 539, 900
1,221,300
1, 575, 300
265, 500
1,185, 900
1, 239, 000
1, 893, 900
938,100
920, 400
3, 557, 700
2, 938, 200
7, 557, 900

1, 347, 960
8, 031. 242
3,144,141
6, 457, 922
4, 460, 345
7, 010, 887
1,127, 346
5, 762, 546
.5, 039, .529
5, 230, 763
4, 695, 740
3,144, 336
9, 621, 727
8, 715, 318
15, 459, 409

New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland

...

Total Southern
and
Southw e s t e r n States.

Outstanding
and authorized circulation.
$S,
4,
6,
59,
13,
17,

029,
024,
932,
523.
385,
994,

Excess.

Deficiency.

252 $3. 098, 234
.525 ' i; 676, 587
030
4, 034, 054
671 -40,284,482
840 10, 635, 793
648 10, 960, 896

110,' 489, 966

70, 690, 046

60, 976, 006 • 2, .589, 793
1, .327, 408
31,020,890
3, 462, .564
42, 05.5, 781
1.296,615
156, 342
9, 252, 847
1, 880, 396
124, 608,139
1; 530, 091
3, 902, 342
2,360.307
1, 819, 300
2, 319, 500
2, 365, 605
90, 000
1,541,133
5,876
3, 646. 870 •
930, 960
192, 495
7, 637, 900
3, 341, 736 •
6, 476,193

9, 416, 503
182,131
|4,128, 900
783, 834
4, 638, 622
2,140, 845
4, 645, 282
1, 037, 346
4, 221, 413
5, 033, 653
1, 583, 893
3, 764, 780
2, 951, 841
1, 983, 827
5; 373, 582
8,. 983, 216

51,271,034

60,150,411

29, 098, 800

.89,249,211

38,160, 308

12, 234, 726
7, 714, 871
11,659,230
5, 435, 357
4, 841, 403
5,481,081
2, 018, 445
1,672,754
564, 592

13,151,100
7, 469, 400
12, 496, 200
4, 230, 300
4,141, 800
4, 230, 300
1, 345, 200
1,115,100
407,100

25, 385, 826
15,184, 271
24,155, 430
9, 665, 657
8, 983, 203
9, 711, 381
3, 363, 645
2, 787, 854
971,692

23, 876, 370
14, 706, 415
17, 824, 209
7, 485, 043
3, 253, 316
5, 674, 385
3, 3130, 414
• 1, 825, 496
.809, 500

$1, .509, 456
477, 856
6, 331, 221
2.180, 614
5, 729, 887
4, 036, 996
33, 231
962, 358
162,192'

51,'622, 459

48, 586, 500

100,208,959*

78, 785,148

21, 423, 811

195, 052
417, 377
2, 571, 783
182, 993
398, 386
68, 852
94, 540
41, 855
421, 742
44, 334
65, 096
109, 964

177, 000
300, 900
3, 752, 400
123, 900
88, 500
35, 400
88, 500
35, 400
194, 700
17,700
35, 400
88, 500

372, 052
718, 2.'~7
6, 324,183
• 306,893
486,886
104, 252
183, 040
77, 255
616, 442
62, 034
100, 496
198, 464

11, 864
225, 000

360,188
493, 277
6 324,183

T o t a l Pacific
states and
Territories..

4, 611, 974

4, 938, 300

9,^550,274

1, 924, 688

301, 062

7, 926, 648

G r a n d t o t a l of
States
and
Territories....

177, 000, 000

177, 000, 000

354, 000, 000

353, 968, 249

80, 589, 742

80, 621, 493

Oliio
India.na
Illinois
Michigan 1
AA^iscousin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas
Nebraska
Total W e s t e r n
States
Nevada
Oregon
California
Coloiado
TJtali
Idaho
Montana
Wyoming
N e w Mexico
Arizona
Dakota
Washington

.•
:..




538,
419,
90,
252,
72,
270,

995
829
000
000
000
000

182, 131

232,102
67, 057
14, 252
68, 960
• 5, 255
•346,442
62.034
55, 496
198, 464

45, 000

72

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The following table exhibits the number of banks organized, the
nuniber closed and closing, and the number in operation, with their
capital, amountof bonds on deposit, and circulation issued, redeemed,
and outstanding, in each Stateand Territory, on the 1st day of November,
1873:
•
Capital
paid in.

States aud Territories.

Bonds on Circula- Girculat'n Uirculat'u
deposit. tion issued, redeoned. outs land-.
ing.

3g,
Maine .'
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Bhode Island
Counecticut

'-

65
43
44
220
62
8.3

63
42
4!
217
62

321
63
213
11
34

276 110,654,691 69, 025, 450 98, 508, 160 37, .532, 154 60, 976, 006
62 13, 958, 350 12, 389, 650 14, 598, 87," 3, 571, 985 11,026,890
202 53, 510, 240 47, 446, 500 57,510,090 1,5, 454, 909 42, 055, 781
11 1, 523,185 1, 453, 200 1, 756, 515 4.59, 900 1, 296, 615
33 13, 640, 203 10, 391, 250 12, 828, 540 3, 575, 693 9, 252, 847

Total Eastern States..
New York
New Jersey.
Pennsylvania
Delawai'o
Maryland

i.
•. -. -

506 160, 291, 432124, 415, 000151, 861, 751 41, 371, 785110, 489, 966

Total Middle States.

193, 280, 669140, 706, 050185, 202, 780 60, 594, 641 124, 608,139

District of Columbia.,
Anrginiar
:'
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
'.
Alabama
'...
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkau.'ias
Kentucky — ' .
Tennessee
Missouri.. 1
Total Southern and
Southwestern States.
Ohio
.Indiana
Illiuois
Michigan ..
AVisconsin .
lovFa
Minnesota .
Kansas
Nebraska ..
Total AVestern States
Nevada
Oregon
Colorado
Utah
Idaho
Montana
AA'^'yoming
New Mexico .
Dakota
Washington .
Total Pacific Statc^
and Teri^tories
Grand total of States
and Territories

|9, 540, 000 $8, 880,'750110, 392,106 $2, 362, 854 18, 029j 252
5,185, 000 5, 163, 000 5, 967, 755 1, 343, 230 4, 624, .525
8, 335, 012 7, 736, 000 a, 909, 990 1,977,960 6, 932, 030
91, 342, 000 67, 346, 750 83, 956,110 24, 432, 439 59, 523. 671
20, 504, 800 14, 981, 700 18, 084, 800 4, 698, 961: 13,385,840
25, 384, 620 20, 306, 800 24, 550, 990 6, 556, 342 17, 994, 648

1, 652, 000
4,185, 000
2, .590, 000
2,100, 000
3, 170, 000
2, 78.5, 000
1, 569, 300
5, 2.50, 000
995, 000
205, 000
8, 263, 700
3, 520, 481
9, 545, 300
23fl

180
97
144
80
52
84
34

30

1, 670, 000
3, 926, 000
2, 571, 600
1, 820,100
2, 425, 000
2, .526, 400
1, 430, 000
4, 000, 000
840, 000
205, 000
7, 709, 850
3, 249, 750
6, 868, 350

764, 009
2, 294,100
807, 458
4, 329, 800
3,169, 200
808, 893
147, 300
1, 836,160
53, 080
2, 229, 580
373, 685
2, 649, 290
187, 767
1, 477, 800
60,124
66, 000
4, 345, 340 . 729, 470
251, .540
1, 007, 000
SO, 205
272, 700
8,178, 645 1,1.56, 745
573,504
3, 66.5, 510
8,126, 055 1, 908, 622

45, 836, 781 39, 242, 050 43, 647,180
163 29, 093, 000 26,127, 750 31,.572, 610
• 92 n,.611, 800 16, 277, 300 18, 949, 620
137 20, 843, 000 18,010,600 20, 849, 4.50
77 9, 763, 500 7, 963, 050 8, 892, 570
45 3, 680, 000 3, 434, 550 4, 305, 700
75 6,017.000 5, 909, 000 7,115, 695
32 4,173, 700 3, 509,250 3, 851, 290
26 1, 975, 000 1, 765. 000 1,740,19;"
10
905, 000
940; 000
886, 200

1, 530, 091
3, 522, 342
2, 360, 307
1, 688, 800
2,176, 500
2, 275, 605
1, 290, 033
5,876
3, 615, 870
755, 460 .
192, 495
7,-021,900
3, 092, 006
6, 217, 433

7, 902, 462 35, 744, 718
7, 948, 240 23, 624, 370
4, 413, 605 14, 536. 015
4,523,391 16, 326,'0.59
1, 675,187 7,217,383
1, 242, 881 3,122, 8*16
1, 751, 810 5, 363, 885
706, 376 3,144, 914
202, 699 1, 537, 496
94, 700
791; 500

662 94, 062, 000 S3, 936, 500 98, 223, 330 22, 558, 89-2 75, 664, 438
250, 000
625, 000
450, 000
100, 000
350, 000
125, 000
.300, 000
50, 000

.2, 250, 000

250, 000
560, 000
450, 000
• 100, 000
245, 000
60, 000
300, 000
.50, 000

131,700
2.50, 500
562,'720
554, 500
110, 600
262, 300
54, 00©
289, 800
45, 000

2, 261,120

• 119, 836
25, 500
^ 86,725
134, 671
20, 600
. 10,300
19, SOC

417, 432

22.5, OUO
475, 995
419, 829
90, 000
. 252, 000
54, GOO
270, 000
45, 000

1, 843, 688

495, 720, 882
390, 314, 600481,196,161 132, 845, 212
348, 350, 949

GOLD B/VJS^KS.

Massachusetts.
Califoruia
Total .




120, 000
2, 537, 5.00 2, 074, 600

120, 000
44, 600

2, 030', 000

3, 200, 000 2, 537, 500 2,194, 600

164, 600

2, 030, 000.

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

.

73

The act of July 12, 1870, authorized an additional issue of fifty-four
millions of dollars, and provided that such notes should be issued to
banking associations organized or to be organized in those States and
Territories having less than their proportion under the apportionment
contemplated by the act of March 3,1865, and that the bonds deposited
with the Treasurer of the* United States to secure the additional circulation should be of any description of United States bouds bearing interest in coin. It also provided that a new apportionment of the increased
circulation should be made as soon as practicable, based upon tbe census
of 1870, and for the cancellation monthly of three per cent, certificates*'
equal in amount to the national bank notes issued—-the last of these
certificates haAdng been finally redeemed during the present year. Of
this additional circulation, authorized by the act of Julj' 12,1870, there
was issued to November 1,1871, $24,773,260; in the year ending jSTovember 1,1872, $16,220,210; in theyear ending November 1,1873, $7,357,479;
leaving,' at the date of this report, still to be issued to banks already
organized, and in process of organization, $5,649,051.
The act of July 12, 1870, farther provides that when the fifty-four millions of additional circulation '^shall have been ;taken up," ^^the Comptroller ofthe Currency shall, as additional circulation may be required by the
banks having less than their proportion, make a requisition for such an
amount, commencing with the. banks having a circulation exceeding one
million of dollars in States having an excessof circulation, and withdrawing their circulation in excess of one million of dollars, and then pivGeeding 2jro rata with other banks having a circulation exceeding three
hundred thousand dollars in States having the largest excess of circulation, and reducing the circulation of such banks in States having the
greatest proportion in excess, leaving undisturbed any States having
a smaller proportion until those in greater excess shall have been
reduced to the same grade, and continuing thus to make the reduction
providedfor b}^ this act until the full amount of twenty-five millions
provided for shall be withdraAvn ; and the circulation so withdrawn shall
be distributed among the States and Territories ha\ing less than their
proportion, so as to equalize the same."
In accordance with the provisions of this section, it will be the duty of
the Comptroller, as soon, as the necessary bonds shall haA^ebeen deposited
to secure the small amount of additional circulation not already issued
or '^ taken up," to prpceed to make requisitions upon banks organized
in the States which have an excess. It will probably be the duty of the
Comptroller during the next three months to make requisitioi:is as provided for by this act upo'n banks already organized ih States which are in
excess, for an amount equal to the aggregate amount of circulation called
for by the applications on file from the States which are deficient.
These requisitions will be made upon the banks located in the following
States and cities:
Foar in the city of New York
Thirty-seven in the city of Boston
Twenty-one in the State of Massachusetts
Seventeen in the city of Providence
Fifteen in the State of Counecticut

."
•
-.

•.
.'

15,018*,000
13, 320, 000
'.. 2,659, 000
2, 818, 000
1,185, 000

• This will reduce to $1,000,000 the circulation, of all banks in the city of
New York having an excess over thatamount, and the circulation of
all banks in Massachusetts and Ehode Island to $300,000. If these
banks >do' not return the amount of circulation within one year after the
*The amount of three per cent, certificates outstanding on July 1, 1S70, was
145,545,000.




74

^ REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

requisition is made upon them, it is made the d'uty of the Comptroller of.
the Currency to sell at public auction, upon twenty days' notice, the
bonds deposited by such associations as security for said circulation
equal in amount to the circulation tobe withdrawn, and not returned in
compliance with the requisition. With the proceeds of the bonds tbe
Comptroller is required to redeem the notes of these banking associations as they come into tbe Treasury. The notes of these banks are so
scattered through the whole country that it will be impracticable for
them to return their circulation withont an'expense not contemplated by
the act; and It will, therefore, be for the interest .of the banks• to provide the-Comptroller of the Currency with the requisite amount of
legal-tender notes with which to redeem their circulation as it comes
into the Treasury. To this extent < the act may be executed; but
the notes to be redeemed will not come to the Treasury for redemption to any considerable amount, and therefore but a small proportion
of the twenty-five millions will be placed at the disposal of the Comptroller for redistribution to the banks of the South and West. The result will, therefore, be great embarrassment to the banks to whom the
currency has already been issued, without providing any relief for organizations elsewhere, as contemplated by the act. The Comptroller,
therefore, reiieats the recommendation contained in his previous report,
that section six of the actof July 12,1870, be repealed, and that twentyfive millions additiona.! circulation be authorized to be issued and distributed among the States, as heretofore provided.
The Comptroller also renews his recommendation that the law be so
amended that national banks maybe organized without circuhition,
upon the deposit of $10,000 of United States bonds with the Treasurer,
instead of the deposit of one-third of the paid-up capital, as now required.
He also recommends that banks already organized witliout circuiatiou
may be authorized to withdraw the bonds now on deposit in excess of .
$10,000, and that banks desiring to reduce their circulation may deposit
legal-tender notes for that purpose and withdraw a proportionate amount
of bonds.
The following comparative table exhibits the amount of circulation
issued under State laws previous to the establishment of the national
banking system, and the amount authorized by Congress; the ratio of
bank, circulation in each State in 1862, and' the amount now issued, in
proportion to capital and wealth, and the per capita of circnlation in
1862, and the per capita of circulation authorized by Congress:




75

COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

Comparative tahle, exhihiting hy States the banlc circulation,*' the amount per capita, and tlie
ratio of circulation to wealth and to capital, previous to the organization of the national
hanking system and in 1873.

B a n k circulation.

Circulation per
capita.

S t a t e s ancl T e r r i t o r i e s .
1862.

%6, 488,
4,192,
.5, 621,
28, 957,
6, 413,
13, 842,

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
E h o d e Ishxud
Connecticut

1873. t

478
034
851
630
404
758

18,
4,
6,
59,
13,
17,

029,
624,
932,
523,
385,
994,

252 $10 33
525
12 86
030
17 84
671 • 23 52
840
36 73
648
30 08

T o t a l E a s t e r n S t a t e s . . . 65, 516,1.55 110, 489, 966
N e w Yorlv
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland

39,182, 819
8,172, 398
27, 689, 504
678, 340
6,649,030

60, 976, 006
11, 026, 890
42,055,781
1, 296, 615
9, 252, 847

T o t a l M i d d l e S t a t e s . . - . 82, 372, 091 124, 608,139
jDistrict of C o l u m h i a
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
. .
North Carolina
S o u t h Carolina
:

19, 817,148
5, 218, 598
6, 089, 036
8, 311, 728
116, 250
5, 055, 222

Florida
Alabama
Mississippi

8, 876, 519
Texas
.
Arkansas.
Iventucky
Tennessee
Missouri

.

....
•
9, 035, 724
4, 540, 906
4,037,277

Total Southern and
S o u t h w e s t e r n S t a t e s . 71, 098, 408
Ohio
Indiana
Illiuois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansais
Nebraska

...:.

:.

Nevada
'.
Oregon . .
California
Colorado
Utah
Idaho
Montana
W^yomino* . . . .
N e w Mexico
• Arizona
=
Dakota .
•
T o t a l Pacific S t a t e s a n d
Territories

20-90
10
12
9
6
9

9 97

530, 091
12 4 1 '
902, 342
360, 307
819, 300 " ' 5 ' 2 6 '
8 65
319, 500
7 86
365, 605
83
90, 000
5 24
1, 541,133
5.876
3, 646, 870 " 1 2 54
930, 960
192, 495
• 7, 637, 900 '""7"82"
4 09
3, 341, 736
3 42
6, 476,193
38,160, 308

78,785,148

1873.

6 17

1862.

1873.

81
53
97
84
.59
48

Per ct
3.4
2.6
4.6
3.5
4.7
3.1

F e r ct.
2.3
1.8
. 2.9
•2.8
4.5
2.3,

P e r ct.
. 81. 3
85.3
143. 7
42.8
30.7
63.5

31 68

3.5

2.7

51.7

68.9

2.1
1.7
1.9
1.5
1.8.

0.9
1.1
1.1
1.3
1.4

36.0
99.8
106.-8
176. 2
54.9

54.*4
79.0
78.6
85.1
< 67.8

2.0

1:0

.53.1

64.0

$12
14
20
40
61
33

12 82
11
3
5
1
3
2
1
5
1
5
2
3

62
18 • " " 2 . " 5 "
34
i.4'
70
1.1
29
1.3
00
0.1
48
• 1.0
55
01
02 ' " " i . ' s
14
40
78 ""V.'z
66
0.9
76
0.8

2 91

3 87
8 96
5 02 • 8 75
36
7 02
17
6 32
2 ]2
3 08 '
1 85
•4 75
1 15
7 57
03
5 01
6 58
2 49

H a t i o of circu-.
l a t i o n t o capital.

1862.

10
13 91
12 17
16
11 94
53
. 10 37
04
11 85
68

1,
3,
2,
1,
2,
2,

9, 057, 837 23, 876, 370
6, 782, 890 14, 706, 415
619, 286 17, 824, 209
7; 485, 043
.
131,087
3, 253, 316
1, 643, 200
1, 249, 000 . 5,674,385
3, 330, 414
198, 494
1, 825, 496
2, 770
809,500

T o t a l W e s t e r n S t a t e s . . 19, 684, 564

1862.

R a t i o of circulation to
wealth.

7 09

1.1
0.7
1.3
0.1
0.0
0.6.
0.5
0.4
0.0
• 0.6

1873.+
F e r ct.
84.1
89 0
83.0
6,5.2
65.0
70.9

1.2
"120.'2'
1.0
1.3
0.7 '"•66." 3"
40.7
1.1
50.2
0.9
27.3
0.2
101.5
0.8
0.0
"si.'o
1.1
0.6
0.1 ........
1.3 '"'6.5.'5'
127.4
0.7
35.9
0.5

88 6
83.1
90.]
80.4
68.7
81.5
0.0
82.2
0.0
68 8
75.1
90.0
84.4
86.9
64.9

• 66. 3

77.5

159. 6
1.1
150. 9
1.2
31.4
. 0.9
1.0
0.5 " ' 5 3 . ' 8 '
156. 5
0.8
62.4
1.5
5.3
1.0
1.2

80.4
81 9
77. 4
73. 8
83.7
88.3
75. 0
77.8
87.5

125.4

79.7

0.8

1.0
0.4

0.0
90.0

52
84
50
24
90
94

2.6
2.6
1.4
1.7
1.0
0.9

76.2
90.0
90.0
63.0
43.2
90.0

45, 000

3 17

O.T

90.0

• 1,924,688

1 82

0.2

79.3

11, 864
'225, 000

28
2 47

538,995
419, 829
90, 000
2.52,000
72, 000
270, 000

G r a n d t o t a l of S t a t e s
and Territories
238, 671, 210 353, 968, 249

13
4
6
12
7
2

7 59

9 18

1.5

1.2

58.9

69.9

* The circulation of the State banks in the year 1862 has been obtained from page 210 ofthe reportof
tlie Secretary of the Treasury on the condition of the banks at the comraencem^ent of the year 1863.
The returns from Delaware, Maryland, Louisiana, Tennessee, and Kentucky Avere not complete. The
aggregate amount of State bank circulati6n reported at that time Avas much greater than at any xirevious
period.
t Outstanding and authorized circulation.
J Outstanding circulation.




76

REPORT ON THE, FINANCES. .
FREE BANKING.

,

The restraining law of the State of ISTew York (act of April 21, 1818)
provided that '^ it shall not be lawful for any person, association of persons, or body-corporate, from and after the 1st day of August next, to
keep any office of deposit for the purpose of discounting promissory
notes, or for carrying on any kind of banking, business or operations
which incorporated banks are authorized by law to carry on, or issue
any bills or promissory notes, as private bankers, unless thereunto specially authorized by law."
;
Jlhis law placed the whole banking interests of the country in the hands
of a few chartered institutions, and was, in its effects, a grievous monopoly. Most of the States of the Union organize, by special act of legislature, trust companies, savings-banks, and other corporations. The
Bank of England, and the private and joint-stock banks of England, organized prior to 1844, possess the right to issue circulation,
and no such right has been granted to other organizations since that
year. All such favored institutions are monopolies. But it cannot be
said that the national banks of the United States are monopolies, in the
same sense of the word. The organization of national banks has, from the
beginning, been open to all, and until the amount of circulation authorizede>
by Congress was exhausted, all applications for the organization of
such institutions with circulation, accompanied by proper indorsements
certifying to the means and character of the applicants, were considered
and granted, and the aggregate of circulation for which applications are
no^w on file in this Office, the consideration of which has been postponed,
does not exceed ten millions of dollars. That the banks which were first
organized were profitable to their shareholders is conceded; and it is a
cause of congratulation that the surplus earnings of those years are
husbanded in a surplus fund of more than one hundred and twenty millions of dollars, as a protection to depositors and creditors, in anticipa-*
tion of times of panic and disaster. The statistics we present show that
the earnings of the banks, of late years, have not been excessive, and in
many cases much less than the earnings and dividends which the shareholders of manufacturing, "railroad, and other corporations realize from
capital invested. If the national banking system, under which one or
more national banks have been organized in .almost every city ahd
thriving village in the Union, and where the earnings of business men
and the savings of the people can.be deposited with a greater degree of
safety than under any previous system, is iu any sense a monop)oly,.it is
not the fault of the system, but an evil which arises from the existing
state ofthe currency; and it is believed that the national banking system is in every sense less a monopoly than any national system of
banking ever before devised.
The system is considered a monoijoly because it is supposed that
large profits are derived from the privilege of issuing circulating notes
which are limited in amount. The act of March 12, 1870, authorized a n '
additional issue of fifty-four millions of dollars of national banknotes,
but the whole amount has not yet been issued, chiefly for the reason
that in the'States to .which the amount was assigned there is but little
profit in the issue of such notes, as will be seen hereafter. But to
the erroneous belief that a large profit accrues, from circulation to
organizations, of this kind, the deinand for what is termed free banking
may, to a large extent, be attributed. The restraining act of the State
of ISTew York, as has been seen, prohibited individuals and associations
from carrying on the business Qf banking wiA®ut first obtaining special



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

77

charters from the legislature. This law was repealed about thirty years
after its passage, not without encountering bitter opposition. In the
year following the repeal, the general banking system of the State of
ISTew York was authorized—a system based on the deposit of securities,
with redemption at a fixed rate of discount, and it is probable that the
term '*^free banking" originated chiefly from the fact that it superseded
the monopoly which preceded it. The signification of the phrase " free
banking," however, as.now used, is not clearly defined,for there is'nothing in =this country to-day more free than banking. Every individual or
association of individuals throughout the country has the right to
negotiate promissory notes, drafts, and bills of exchange, to receive deposits, to loan money upon personal or real estate security, and to transact almost every kind of business pertaining to legitimate banking.
There is little doubt that the term " free banking" is, by many persons,
understood to mean the unrestricted issue of bank-notes to any association of persons organizing a national bank and depositing the required amount of United States bonds as security; but there are
few persons who have given any considerable attention to this subject
who would be willing to advocate the unrestricted issue of national
bank notes to an amount equal tb the public debt.
It is probable that a more satisfactory definition of free banking
would be, an issue of paper money which shall be promptly redeemed at
the commercial center of the country. Such a currency may be divided
into three classes—(1) an unsecured circulation, redeemable at par by
the bank, or its agent in some designated city; (2) a secured circulation,
redeemable at its own i30unter at par,, and at the commercial center at a
fixed rate of discount; and (3) a circulation exchangeable at par for lawful money at its own counter, and by its agent appointed for that purpose.
The currency of the ISTew England States previous to the war is a fair
example of the first class. That system was generally known as the
^'Suffolk system," because the Suffolk Bank, at Boston, compelled the
redemption of the notes of the New England Banks at its own counter
at par. The'system, however, was not free, but a monopoly, as banks
could, only be organized under special charters obtained from the legislatures of the six IsTew England States. This circulation was not
'required to be secured by any deposit pledged for that purpose, and the
failure of banks in some of the isTew England States, which not infrequently happened, almost always resulted in great loss, not only to the
creditor,l3ut to the bill-holder. The Suffolk Bank, at Boston, forced
the redemption of the notes at par at its own counter, by a system of
assorting and returning the notes to the place of issue, but the same notes
were invariably at a discount of one-eighth per cent, in Kew York. The
notes of these banks were therefore neither safe nor exchangeable at par
in coin at the chief commercial center.
The ISTew York State system of free banking is an example of the
second class of currency, and the only system of free banking which has
ever been successfully maintained ; and it is. probable that the more
thoughtful advocates of what is termed free banking propose that circulation shalhbe issued and redeemed under the national-currency act
upon a.similar plan.
Taking for granted that the advocates of free banking base their
arguments upon the success ofthe system, authorized in that State by
the act of April 18, 1838, it may be well to.contrast the.condition of the
currency and ofthe public debt at the time of the inauguration of that
system, at the commencement of the war, and at the present time.



78

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The currency of the State of New York first issued was secured by
stocks of the different States, and by bonds and mortgages deposited by
corporations; with the comptroller of the State. Subsequently, by various amendments, the law was so changed as to provide for the issue of
circulation based entirely upon the bonds of the United States and of
the State of New York, and that was the basis at the time of the breaking out of the war. The debt of the State of New York at the time of
the inauguration of the system was $11,256,152, and the debt of the
United States was $10,434,221, and all these bonds were above par in
the market. In 1860, the funded debt of the State of New York was
$34,140,238 and the funded debt of the. United States $44,794,092.^^
The laws authorizing the issue of circulating notes were more numerous
than the States and- Territories of the Union, and the rates of discount
in the New York market upon the bank-notes issued ahd in general circulation varied from one-eighth of one per cent, to one and one-half per
cent, discount, while many bank-notes that had a local circulation were
quoted at from 5 to 10 per cent, discount. The notes of the New
York and New England banks, only,.circulated throughout the whole
Union, like the national bank currency of to-day.
. .
The funded debt of the United States is to-day more than eighty times
as great as were the combined debts of the United States and of the
State of New York in 1838, and it is about twenty-one times greater
than was. -their combined debt in 1860; The United States then issued
coin, only, as currency. Now the national bank notes and the legaltender notes are about twenty times the amount of the circulation of the
State of Nevy York at that time, and more than three and one-half times
the amount of the circulation authoriized at that time by all of the
States of the Union.t
The amounts of the funded debt and of the currency are therefore entirely changed, and it is by no means evident that what was a good
thing for theState of New York in 1860 is, in 1873, a good thing for the
whole United States*.
The New York State law authorized the issue of bank-notes to all
associations organized under its provisions, at the face value of United
States and New York State six per cent, bonds deposited, and to this
feature of the law the Bank of England and the national-currency act
are indebted for those excellent provisions which insure absolute security
to the bill-holder.
But this law did not authorize an unrestricted issue of bank-notes. I t
required that the bank-notes issued to an association should be i^edeemed
at its own counter, and by its agent in New York, Albany, or Troy, at a
discount. Practically the notes were redeemed at the agency, and not at
the counters of the bank. Eedemption was the cardinal principle of the
law, and it was expected that this principle of redemption would prevent
an issue of circulation which should exceed the requirements of business.
EedemiDtion in the New York law meant discount. It was to be a redemption in specie, and was founded upon the avowed principle that specie was
worth more, and was more desirable to hold,than the circulating notes authorized. But in order that there should be no mistake, the law itself provided that the discount upon the circulat-ing notes at the redemption
agencies, should be one-fourth of one per cent. If a law had been passed
by Congress at that time for the redemption of the gold coin in silver
coin, or for the redemption of the silver coin in copper coin, such a taw
* In addition to the funded debt proper tliere were |19,795,611 of Treasury notes outstanding,
t Circulation in 1860 was $207,102,000.



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

79

would have been a dead letter, (for the reason that gold coin is known
to be of greater intrinsic value in the market than silver coin, and the
silver of greater intrinsic'value than copper,) though each of these
coins is a legal tender to an amount fixed by law. In order to have a
proper system of redemption,it isnecessary that the thing to be redeemed
shall be known to be worth less than the thing in which it is to be redeemed ; and this principle was legalized by the New York State legishiture, when it provided that the bank-note should be worth, in the
city of New York, one-quarter of one per cent, less than the gold coinage of the United States. Tf forty millions of dollars, therefore, were
issued,* its value at the moment of issue was $100,000 less than '
$40,000,000. If the circulation were redeemed three times a year, the^re
would be $300,000 of loss on" one side, and $300,000 of g'ain on the
other side. The gain was, as a general rule, divided between the banks
which issued the money and the banks which redeemed the same, while
the country merchant, the manufacturer and the jobber in the great
cities, experienced the loss. But the circulation of the State of New
York was known to be so much safer, and the discount so much .^
less, than the circulation of any other State of the Union, that the discpunt was hardly noticed, while the loss upou the notes of most of the
other States of the Union was from four to six times as great. The
result was, as might have been expected, that the notes were not fulfilling their function of a circulating medium, but were being sent forward,
not for the purpose of obtaining specie, but to be exchanged one
for the other at the clearing-house, in order to provide a fund in
New York for the redemption of other notes, and also to provide exchange at a profit of fromi one-quarter to one and a quarter per cent.
The amount of exchange thus gained by the bankers and brokers, and
the amount of exchange lost by the people in these transactions, cannot
be computed, but there is no doubt that it amounted, annuall3^, to millions of dollars. .
'
The average amount of specie held by the New York State b^nks for
ten years previous to the year 1860, was $17,565,006.10.t
1851
1852 ::
1853
1854
18'55
1856
1857

..•
..

'
:

$8,978,918
:... 13,304,356
13,384,410
10,792,429
15,921,467
18,510,835
14,370,434

1858
1859
1860

•

.....433,597,211
22,207,782
24,582,219
175,650,061

Yearly average . . . - - • . . . . :

17,565,006

Of this amount about one-eighth, say $2,200,000, was held by the country banksin their vaults, and the balance, seven-eighths, say $15,300,000,
was held in New York City. If from this amount should be deducted
the coin belonging to banks and persons residing outside of the State of
New York, and the amount represented by checks payable in coin, it
would be found that the amount of circulating notes issued in the State
of New York was, on an average, for ten years at least, five times the
amount of specie on deposit for the purpose of redeeming their notes.
The amount of national bank notes now authorized to be issued is
1354,000,000, and of legal-tender notes, $356,000,000; so that the amount
of legal-tender money, in which the national bank notes are now.redeem^>ble, is nearly identical with that of such notes, though slightly in excess.
If the national banking law were.so amended as to require the redemp* The circulation of New York State was ||39,182;819.
iSpjecie held hy the New Yorlc State hanlcs from 1851 to 1860. (Re^Dort of Superintendent of Banking Department of the State of New York, January 1, 1861, page 79.)




80

.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

tion of the national bank notes in the legal-tender notes at one-fourth
of one per cent, discount, as in the New York State law, instead of at
par, as provided in the national-currency act, and the national banks of
the whole country would agree to such a provision of the law, the
prompt redemption of the national bank notes would be insured ; but
the redemption of this vast amount of circulating, notes, if redeemed .
but once a year, would result in a loss to thepeopleof the United States
of $900,000; if the notes were to be redeemed four times annually,
$3,600,000; and if redeemed six times annually, $5,400,000. A system
of redemption of this kind would also at once increase the rate of
exchange from tho rate of one-tenth of one percent, now existing at
most perio(Js of the year between the different cities of the Union, f o iTom
one-half per cent, to one per cent., thus restoring, to a considerable degree,
the condition of thee'xchangeat the time of the inaugaration of the national banking system, and causing an annual loss to the people of
millions of dollars. Such a system would, however, undoubtedly result
in the return of the notes of the national banks, at certain seasons of
the year when they were not needed, to the vaults of the country banks,
to be paid out when the demand for currency increased. .Such a system would also give, what is exceedingly desirable at the present time,
elasticity to the currency.
'
The profit upon the circulation of national banks organized in the
Southern and Western States during the past year, did not much ex-'
ceed one per cent, for the country banks, and was less than one^half
per cent, in the redemption cities, as will be shown more fuly hereafter.
Under such a condition of things, with so small a margin of profit to be
derived from the issue of circulating notes, there would be little demand for circulation, and consequently but little danger in throwing
the doors wide open-for the issue of circulating notes to any association
properly organized that might desire such circulation; but with the
reduction of the value of the bonds, and the approximation of the value
of the bank-note to the value of specie, the profit would increase, and
with the increase of profit the demand for the issue of additional banknotes would also increase; so that under sudh a system the issue of banknotes would have a continual tendency to lessen the value of the paper
dollar, and prevent its approximation to the value of the gold dollar,
and all ideas of specie payment might forever be abandoned.
Ill order tb insure the prompt redemption of the national bank notes,
the amount ..issued, must be so much increased that the notes will be,
say, at one-eighth of one per cent, discount, and this would probably not
be accomplished until an addition should b,e made to the present circulation, of one hundred millions of dollars. The same result would follow from
the reduction of the volume of legal-tender notes simultaneously with
the increase of the issues of the bank-notes; but Congress has so frequently refused to diminish the amount of legal-tender notes, that, in
the opinion of the Comptroller, any general system of free banking,
accompanied with redemption, must be postponed until the resumption
of specie payment.
'
The Comptroller, in order to avoid any misapprehension of his views
upon this subject, desires to state that he is not an advocate of any permanent system of currency usually known as an irredeemable currenc^^
He belives, however, that the people of this country y^ill not, and
ought not to, submit to the higher rates of exchange prevailing previous
to the war, and that any amendment to the national-currency act which
shall result in restoring such high rates of exchange will also result in
the downfall of a systeni of banking which, it is believed, will yet be
come the most satisfactory and complete of any ever established.



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

81

During the past year, so far as his observation has extended, the national bank note has been rarely at any perceptible discount for legal- tender notes in the city of New York; and during the late panic no
distinction was made by the people between legal-tender notes of
the United States and national bank notes. Both were alike hoarded
as being the most desirable of all things to hold, and it is probable that when specie payments shall be resumed,;the faith of the
people will be. so well established in ^the safety of the currency of the
banks that no such general sj^stem of redemption will be required as
was necessary for the unsafe currency issued by the different States previous to the war.
If the circulation should beconie redundant, as is sometimes the case
.with the silver coinage, and the national bank notes be at a discount
for legal-tender notes, it will be bnly necessary; fbr the surplus to be
presented to the agencies in the City of New York, Vhei^e more than
two-thirds of the circulation is now redeemable, in order to restore the
equilibrium.; for it is to be hoped that previous to the return to specie
payments some system will be adopted which will give abundant elasticity to tiie eurrency without increasing the expense and burden pf general reciempUbn, and without the loss resulting from the high rates of
excbange wliip^ ^^Y^ .^Iways prevailed under previods systems.
RESERYE,

The advocates of a free-banking law are also advocates of the repeal
of the chief restrictions of the national curreiic^^ act, and particularly of
the provision which require^ the keeping of a certain amount of money
as reserve against liabilities. They claim that the directors and managers of the banks, and not the legislature which enacts the law or the
officer who executes it, are the best judges of the amount of money to be
loaned, and the amount to be held on hand fbr the protection of their
creditors; that the Government should be careful to protect the
bill-holder from loss, but the depositor or other creditor may safe^ly
be allowed to protect himself. They further maintain that such laws
prevent the banks frpni extending accommodations to legitimate busi-^
ness interests, which, consequently, suffer on account of the lack of
such accominodations. in some instances this may be true, but such
laws are passed not so muiih for the benefi!t of those persons who conduct, their business on sound principles as for that.class or association
of. persons which has but little experience in the method pf transacting
a legitimate business. If the law be correct in principle, it will be
found not to interfere with the rights of those persons who understand
the true theory of business, but its tendency will be to prevent abuses
on the part of those who would otherwise take risks which a prudent
and careful mail would avoid.
Any association of persons may organize a ba^nk under.the provisions
of the national, currency act. .If private citizens wish to transact business in accordance with their own judgment, they can avail themselves
,of, the privilege by conducting a private business. If other citizens
prefer to organize corporations under an act of Congress which imposes
restrictions designed for.the public good, who.shall objectl The privilege is open to both, and each can decide without prejudice or bindraiice. A private banker solicits and obtains business on the strength
of his. gopd name, and. it is well understood that the funds placed in his
hands are to be used at his discretion, the depositors relying upon his
, business sagacity arid judgment; butaf corporations desire to organize
;Upder, the.abuthority and seal of a great nation, care, should be exercised
t h a t t h e authoiity obtained shaH
—
:
6F
" •
'
'•'



82

. REPORT ON . THE FINANCES.

During the past few years great corporations have been organized by
authority of law, with the advantages of immense subsidies, but almost
wholly without restrictions, the law-making power having been led to
believe that the corporations authorized would contribute as much to
the public good as to their o.wn profit. But it has been found that overgrown corporations are conducted in defiance ofthe rights, of the shareholders, and with little regard to the comfort, wants, and profit of the
people, but chiefly for the benefit of the few officers and directors; and
the whole countrj^is now arOused to the mistaken legislation which has
placed the highways of the nation under the control of a few men, with^
out reserving such salutary restrictions as should compel the common
carrier to deliver the products of the land to the market for a fair remuneration; and it is the great economical problem of the day how to
correct a monstrous evil, which would have been under complete control
if the proper restrictions had at first been provided and enforced.
The officers and directors of stock companies w^hich have a good'
reputation are too apt to forget that they are but the servants of the
shareholders, and that the poorest shareholder is entitled to information
in reference to its affairs. The Bank of Amsterdam is said to have
been bankrupt for fifty years prior to the announcement of its failure,
yet it continued business for a half century upon the strength of the
name and character it had built u p ; and many individuals and corporations are to-day supposed to be possessed of large wealth, whose affairs,
if carefully scrutinized, would be found to exhibit the reverse. If
banks are to be organized under the authoritj' of law, and intrusted
W'ith the earnings of the people, it is right that legislators shall require
them to loan the savings of the people upon real estate security of twice
the value of the loan ; and if the'banks are organized for commercial
purposes, it is right that they should be prohibited from loaning money
upon real estate5'and be required to loan money chiefly to business men
upon commercial paper ; and depositors have a right to expect that the
contractAvhich the law provides between them and the bank shallbe
enforced. If the law provides for a proper security Ibr circulation, and
at the same time defines the kind of security in which deposits shall be
invested, it is as important to know that the contract with the depositor
will be fulfilled, as well as the contract with the bill-holder. It is the business of such corporations to receive the money of the people, and first of all
to fulfill their legal obligations with their creditors, rather than to attempt
to follow the vagaries and manipulations of the stock-board, or. assume
to regulate the rate of interest on the street. While the law permits
banking corporations to use a certain portion of the deposits of each
creditor, and realize a profit therefrom, it provides also that they shall
keep a certain other portion of such deposits on hand for the prompt
payment of the creditor whenever it shall be demanded. The correctness of this principle of law is evident, but the difficulty is to ascertain
the exact amount necessary to keep on hand. The reckless banker or
director would loan it all, and frequently not to his neighbors for the
.purpose of facilitating legitimate transactions, but to himself, for use in
some enterprise which promises well, but results in ruin. The prudent
banker invests carefully the savings of his neighbors, and studies their
wants, holding an ample fund at his command for all emergencies. The
law properly provides that all the assets of a bank, even including the
furniture, shall first be applied to the payment of the creditors, the
shareholflers having a right only to the balance which may remain
after the payment of every cent of indebtedness. If the law is so careful to protect the interests of the depositors, it is also just that it should
provide restrictions to that end, and devise methods of ascertaining



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

8d

frequently whether these restrictions are strictly observed. The amount
of the capital of the shareholder may be sraall, and the amount of the
capital furnished-by the depositor may be many times as great, so that
the risk of the shareholder is by no means as great as that of the depositor. . .
The capital and surplus of the London and Westminster Bank of
England belonging to the shareholders is fifteen millions of dollars,
while the average .capital, in the shape bf deposits contributed by its
creditors, is one hundred and twenty millions of dollars. Three national
banks in the city of New York, with a capital and surplus belonging to
the shareholders of ten millions of dollars, had, previous to the late
crisis, deposits contributed by their creditors equal to fifty millions of
dollars; and a late report from a savings bank in this country, on file
in this Office, exhibits a capital belonging, to shareholders of but $25,000,
while the capital contributed by the depositors was $1,000,000. The
capital contributed by the depositors in the first instance, that of the
English bank, was eight times that contributed by the shareholders;
in the second instance, that of the three New York banks, five times,
and in the case of the savings bank forty times. The necessity of
restrictions to govern corporations holding such large proportionabte
amounts of credits could not be better illustrated.
The banks of England, of Scotland, and of other countries of Europe,
are managed by men who have had long experience in that branch of
business, and their experience is handed down from generation to
generation to their successors, and the organization of a corporation to
conduct the business of banking by men untried in that particular profession or calling would be looked upon with disfavor, and meet with no
success. But in this country, under the provisions of the act, any
association of persons may organize a bank; and it is no uncommon
occurrence for api)lications to be received for that purpose from persons
who have had little or no experience in banking, but who desire to
organize under the national currency, act, because it is believed that
an organization under that act will give to the shareholders a character
and credit which they could not obtain if they should attempt to conduct
a private banking business.
It is said that the .restriction in reference to reserve should be removed
from circulation, for the reason that the circulation is already safe beyond
a peradventure. This is undoubtedly true, for the security of the circulation rests not alone upon the bonds which are deposited, but also upon
the total assets of the bank, the personal liability of the shareholders,
and, finally, upon the guarantee of the G-overnment that in any event
the face value of the note shall be paid. The absolute certainty of the
'full payment of the notes is therefore assured. But the question is not
whether a reserve shall be held which shall insure the payment., merely,
ofthe note, for that is unnecessary, but what, amount of reserve shall"
be held by the banks to insure tho, prompt payment of all their liabilities'? The percentage of reserve could be fixed relatively to the capital if
the amount of the liabilities were in all cases proportionate to the amount
of capital, which, as is well known, is not the case. The question is not
what percentage should be held upon capital, upon deposits, or upon
circulation, but what amount of reserve should bC'held to protect the
demand:liabilities of the bank; and the experience of years can alone
determine that proportion.
A recent writer* on .English banking, who has been extensively
quoted in this country, has stated that the provision of the national cur^''Lombard Street," by Walter Bagehot.



.

~~

°.

84

REPORT ON T H E FiNA:tTCES.

rency act requiring a fixed proportion of reserve to liabilities is not the
proper standard for a bank reserve, for the reason, that a fixed proportion ^'wdll sometimes err by excess, and sometimes by defect," ahd that
^' the near approach to the legal limit of. reserve would be a sure incentive to panic," He says that " t h e very essence and principle in the
American system is faulty;" but in the final summing up of his argument in reference to the reserve whi.ch the Bank of England should hold,
he gives it as his opinion that the bank " ought never to keep less than
£11,000,000, or £11,500,000, of reserve on hand, and that in order not
to be below £11,500,000, the bank must begin to take precautions when
the reserve is between £14,000,000 and £15,000,000, fbr experience
shows that between £2,000,000 and £3,000,000 may probably enough be
withdrawn from the bank's store before the right rate of interest is
found which will attract money from abroad, and before that rate has
had time to attract it." Again he says, '' I should say that at the present
time the mind ofthe monetary world would become feverish and fearful
if the reserve of the banking department of England went below
£10,000,000." This proportion is equal to more than one-third of the
average liabilities of the Bank of England, and is more than eight per
cent, in excess of the amount required by the national currency act.
' When this distinguished economist asserts that the Bank of Englahd
"ought never to keep less than £11,000,000 " on hand, and that " t h e
monetary w^orld would become feverish and fearful if the reserve in the
bank department of the Bank of England went below £10,000,000,"
and at the same time that the rule of reserve required by the national
currency act " will sometimes err by excess and sometimes by defect,"
the mind of the searcher after the truth in reference to the principles
w^hich should govern legislation upon'this subject is bewildered, and will
look in vairi for light to the abstruse legislation and management of the
Bank of England, and to the dark statistics which emanate semi-annually from the parlors of the London joint-stock banks.
The requirement that the reserve shall be proportional to the liabilities is based on the conviction that the amount of the reserve should
be dependent on, or have some definite> relation to, the varying amount
of the liabilities; and the opposite view, tb wit, that the reserve shou'ld
have no such relation, but should be a fixed quantity, entirely independent of and' undisturbed by changes in the amount of liabilities,
appears to be in conflict with sound principles, and is at variance with
the practice, when un trammeled, of the leabding and safer banking institutions both of this coiintry and of Europe.*
* Banlc of England depdsits and reserve, compiled from the London Economist.
Date.

. J u l y 30
• August 6
.August 13....
A u g u s t 20
•.Augusts?....
September 3 .
S e p t e m b e r 10
• Sexitember 17
S e p t e m b e r 24
October 1
October 8 . .•..
October 15 . . .
October 22 . . .
- O c t o b e r 29'-.•.
November 6..




Deposits.

£
403,
675,
989,
622,
691,
591,
030,
416,
456,
040,
•584,
747,
981,
•530,
357,

Banking
reserve.

B a t e of P e r c e n t , of
discount.
reserve.

P e r cent.
£
12, 423, 352
'3k
11, 996, 907
12, 713, 623
13, 287; 645
13,318,865
12, 760, 233
13,177,780
13,346,843
13, 2'38, 507
9,954,181
9,115,152
7,861,036'
8,109,-529
8,4.55, 447
'8,071,288

:50.9
:50.6
.52.9
.53.9
. 51. 8
.46.2
. 46. 9
.45.3
.44.9
.34.2
.33.0
.31.7
. 35. 2
.37.5
.36.1

85

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

But it is claimed that the Bank of England is required to hold this
large amount of reserve because it holds in its vaults the reserve, not only
for its own dealers, but also of the joint-stock banks of England, whose
combined deposits are three times as great as all the deposits of the
Bank of England; and that, therefore, the Bank of England must at all
times be ready, not only to pay the demands of its creditors, but also to
extend loans to the other institutions in times of panic. The jointstock banks of England are not, however, entirely deficient in reserve,
for it is found upon reference to the statistics of the London and Westminster Bank for 1867, published by the same author, that this bank,
with a capital of £2,000,000 and a surplus of £1,000,000, had at that
time deposits of £13,889,021; cash on hand, £2,226,441, and government securities amounting to £3,572,797. This bank, which is the largest joint-stockbank in England, and second only to the Bank/of England itself, held therefore at that time six per cent, of its liabilities in
cash, a.nd more than 25 per cent, in addition in available resources, while
many other of the leading joint-stock banks of England continually
hold in available resources a still greater amount, as may be seen from
the following table:
Tahle of reserve, cfc, of th'e ten principal joint-stoclc hanlcs of London, on June 30, 1873,
•
compiled from- the London Economist of OctoherA8,lS73, {supplement.)
P r o p o r t i o n of r e s e r v e .
to liabilities.

Reserve.

fe

Capital
and
surplus..

Banks.

C a s h deposits..
•

{25

Cash.

Stock, investments..

Total.

\

P e r ct._

1 London and
W e s t m i n s t e r £ 3 , 000; 000 £28, 383, 425 a£3,796,639 6 £ 3 , 298,.851 £7,095,490
2 London J o i n t
1,673,849 *17, 404, 319' a2,218, 816 cl, 080, 000 3, 298, 816
Stock
3 TJnion
1, 500, 000 13, 371; 046 d5,135, 994 ' 62,278,825 7,414,819
4 City
750, 000
/ 621, 462
951, 989
cr330, 527
3. 050, 486
740,000
5 Ipap erial
560,695
. / 4 7 1 , 949
/i88, 746
2,235, 587
940, 000 . i, 821, 583
6. Alliance..
723,184
/ 665, 028
158,156
876,125
7 Consolidated .
/ 8 5 4 , 029
2, 988, 705
j 208, 402 1, 062, 431
109, 000
159,165
669, 018
/159,165
ent
e C o u droanl a n d
9 L
172,680
. SoutbLweet'rn
729, 479
A; 179, 219
A;179,219
10 L o n d o n a n d
1, 800, 000 17, 821, 279 25,195,143 m l , 647, 498 6, 842, 641
County
Total.......

J u n e 30, Deo. 31, J u r i e 30,
1873.
1872.
1872.

11, 561, 654

88, 474, 927 :. 19,297,444 :

a
6
c
d

8,991,005 28, 288, 449

Perot.

24". 99 n26. 48

P e r ct.^
n25.31

18.95
55.'45
31.54
25.- 08
39.70
35.54
23. 79

18.'22
50. 93
30.
24.68
36.24
32.20
42.77

15.45
54.02
31 96
25.06
33.43
34.50
38. 30

24. 57

23.75

22 12

38.96

37. 80

4L36

31.97 .

32.55

3L40

Casb in hand and at the Bank of England.
Government stock and exchequer bills.
Consols, new 3 per cents., and reduced at 90.
Embraces £1,173, 516 cash in the. hank, £.971, 292 cash in Bank of England, aud £2, 991,185 cash
lent at call.
.
e • Government stock, exchequer hills, debentures, &c.
f Cash in hand at Bank of England, and at call.
.
„
g Exchequer bills. East India debentures, and government securities.
h Consols, Iridia debentures, and city bonds.
i Investtnents in consols, &c.
7-New. 3 per cents., and other government stocks.
A Cash in hand and at call.
;
>
^
I Cash on hand at head office and branches, and with Bank of England; cash at^call and at notice,
covered hy securities,
m Government and gaaranteed stocks.
From the London Economist of March 15,1873, page 83.




86

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

I t is well known that the funds of the English government are the
most readily convertible of any in the markets of the world, and that
. while English consols* can at all times be purchased at a moderate discount, (92,) they can also at all times be converted into a coin at a
^mailer loss than any other securities upon the market. The jointstock banks of England, therefore, have a final resource in which.their
reserves can be invested with the certainty of conversion at any moment. The Bank of England thus holds continually a reserve of about
one-third of the amount of its average liabilities, while the joint-stock
banks of England continually hold in available reserve, a still greater
proportionate amount in cash and government securities; and it is no
answer to the proposition under discussion to say that the conversion
of the consols held by the English joint-stock banks into coin would
have the effect at once to reduce the reserves of the Bank of England,
•for the money-market of London is, as we have been taught to believe,
the money-market of the world, to which is attracted the capital of all.
nations by the simple process of raising the rate of interest.
The national currency act requires that the country banks shall hold
6 per cent., the redemption cities 12J per cent., and the New York City •
banks 25 per cent, of their liabilities in cash, making an aggregate of.
cash reserve of from 13 to 15 per cent. The remainder of the reserve
required to be held by the cpuntry banks may be on deposit with the
banks in the redemption cities, while that of the redemption cities may
be on deposit in the city of New York.
These large accumulations in the redemption.cities, and in the banks
of the city of .New York, are to a large extent invested in call loans,
^le banks in the redemption cities and in the city of New York having
no resource like the joint-stock banks of England in which to place.
their surplus of reserves, which can be readily converted in the markets
of the world into coin, if occasion shall require; and it can hardly be
doubted that if the surplus means of the country banks, which were
invested in call-loans by their city correspondents, had been invested in
funds convertible into cash upon demand, the disastrous results of the
late panic would have been largely avoided.
The crisis was caused in a great degree by the desire of the country
banks to withdraw their balances from the city banks; first, because in
the month of September the amount on deposit with the city banks was
needed for the legitiniate purposes of trade; and secondly, because the
country banks, foreseeing and fearing the return of the experience of previous years, thought it s a f e to withdraw their balances at once. When
the reserves of the New York City banks, becaine alarmingly reduced
by the drafts of their country correspondents, the only resource left to the
city banks was to convert their call-loans, amounting to some $60,000,000;
but these, if paid at all, were paid in checks upon the associated banks,
and the latter found, the next morning, at the clearing-house, that,
altjiough a portion of their liabilities had been reduced by the payment,
of calMoans, they were in the aggregate no richer in currency than on
the previous day. Suspension followed; but if the surplus o f t h e
country banks had been to a considerable extent invested in Grovernment certificates, the drafts upon the city banks would have been proportionately less; and if the surplus fund of the city banks had likewise
been held in such certificates, the avails of such certificates would have
* Since the year 1850 the Enghsh consols (three per ceuts,; have ranged in price from
99-|- (in 1851) to 87<i (in 1866.) The average price has, however, cluring that period
been above 92; a rate which indicates the borrowing x>ower of the goverument to be
about 3J per cent, per annum,



OOMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

87

been quietly withdrawn from the Treasury, and the banks would have
found themselves possessed of ready means with which to supply the
demands of their dealers.
I t is said that the issue of such certificates would facilitate the withdrawal of legal-tender notes for speculative purposes, but the assistant
treasurer in New York could hardly fail to be advised of the deposit of
large amounts of money with himself for illegitimate purposes, and a
provision of law similar to the one already in force, forfeiting the aniount
of money on deposit, and directing the prosecution of such offenders,
would effectually prevent such transactions.
,
The issue of a Government certificate for the use of all the banks of
the country, to be counted as a certain portion of their reserve, was recommended as follows in my last annual report:
The reserves of the nineteen hundred national banks located elsewhere than in the
city of New York are held to a great extent in that city. For most of the time during .
the i)ast year an amount equal to more than one-fifth of the capit^al of all these
national banks has been held on deposit by the national banks of the city of New York
to the credit of their correspondents. I n many cases thiese credits amount to twice
lhe capital of the bank with wliich they are deposited ; in other cases the amount of
deposits is three, four, and- even five times the capital, which amount has been attracted thither largely by the payment of interest on deposits. The failure of one of
these New York City banks in a time of monetary stringency would embarrass, if not
ruin, many banks in the redemption cities, and, in turn, the country correspondents of
these banks would suffer from the imprudence of the New York bank, which would be
responsible for wide-spread disaster.
*
• *
^
*
In times of excessive stringency loans are not made by such associations to business
men upon commercial paper, but to dealers in speculative securities, upon short time,
at high rates of interest; and an increase of call-loans beyond, the proper limit is more
likely to afford facilities for unwarrantable stock speculations than relief to legitimate
business transactions.
*
*
•
*
^
f
*
The variations in t h e liabilities requiring reserve in the banks of the city of New
York are very great. The banks outside of New York, during the dull season, send
their surplus means to that city for deposit upon interest, to await the revival of busi-"
ness. The banks in the city of New York, at such periods of the year, have no legitimate outlet for these funds, and are, therefore, threatened with loss. The stock board
takes advantage of this condition of affairs, speculation is stimulated by the cheapness of money, and a market is found for the idle funds upon doubtful collaterals, and
the result is seen in the increased transactions at the clearing-house, which, duriug
t h e past year, exceeded thirty-two thousand millions of dollars, or an average of
more than one hundred millions of dollars daily—not one-half of which was the result
of legitimate business; tbe total amount of transactions being greater than that of
the bankers' clearing-house of the city of Loudon. The evil arises largely from the
psiyment by the banks of interest on deposits, an old-established custom which cannot
easily be changed by direct legislation. A considerable portion of these deposits
would remain at home if they-could be used at a low rate of interest, and made available at any time upon the return of the season of active business. No sure investment of this kind is, however, open to. the country banks, and the universal custom is
to send forward the useless dollars, from vaults comparatively insecure, to their correspondents in the city, where they are suj^.posed to be safer, and at the same time
earning dividends for shareholders. A Government issue, hearing a low rate of interest, to he
counted as a certain proportion of the reserve, and an increase of .the amount ivhich the 'country^
hanlcs are required to keep) on hand, is thepropei' remedy for such a state of things. Snch aninvestmentneed not result in inflation, for the currency invested would he in the possession ofthe Gov&t^nment. If the currency is held, the ohjection is the loss of interest to the Government; hut this loss
ivould he no more than a just rehate up)on the six millions of dollars of taxation annuaUy paid
hy the hanlcs to the Government, at a time when almost every Icind of internal taxation has heen'
discontinued. Such a reduction of taxation should not be grudgingly made, if the result shall be to give elasticity to the currency, to strengthen and steady the money
market, to give additional security to seven hundred millions of dollars belonging to
depositors by retaining in the vaults of the banks a large amount- of funds for legitimate business purposes, which w^ould otherwise be thrown upon the stock board to
ensettle values throughout the country, and alternately increase and depress the price
of every commodity.

The recommendation for the issue of these certificates, to be counted
as a certain portion of the reserve, is renewed.




88

REPORT

ON

THE

FINANCES.

The same certificates could also be issued to alarge extieiit as a safe
investment for laboring men and others desiring such an investment
for earnings. If such certificates were issued in amounts of $50 they
would at once be recognized as the safest possible temporary investment, and the Government would soon ascertain by experience what
proportions of such certificates could be safely invested in the 6 per
cent, bonds of the United States, thus saving the interest upon the
funds in which the earnings of the laboring man were invested, and conferring a permanent benefit upon its humblest citizens.
The returns made to the clearing-house association of the weekly
average of reserve of the national banks for each week since the first,
of January last, show that the provision referred to has been generally
observed, and the exceptions to the rule have not been among banks of
old established reputation, whose experience is entitled to great weight,
but among banks more recently organized, which have been ambitious
to obtain business and are willing to assume risks for that purpose.'*
The rule requiring a reserve was adopted by the voluntary action of
the clearing-house association of the city of New York,.previous to the
passage of the national currency act. At a meeting of bank officers,
representing forty-two of the forty-six banks of the city of New York,
held at the rooms of the clearing-house association in March, 1858, it
was agreed ' ^ o keep on hand at all times an amount of coin equivalent to
notlessthan 20 per cent, of our net deposits of every kind, which shall
be made to include certified checks and other liabilities, except circulating notes, deducting the daily exchanges received from the clearinghouse.'^ This resolution was adopted five years previous to the passage of
tiie national currency act, and its phraseology is not unlike the provisions
of that act in reference to reserves to be held by the national banks of
New York City. The resolution did not provide for a reserve on circulation, for the reason that the circulation of the city banks was at that
time redeemable at par in coin; so that no action was necessary in
* Statement of the weeldy avei^age percentage of reserve held hy the New' York City hanks, as
reported to the clearing-house.

Week
e n ding—

1873.
Jan. 4
11
18
25
Peh. 1
8
15
21
Mar. 1
8
15
22
29
Apr. 5
12
19
26
May 3
".10

A v e r a g e per- A v e r a g e perA v e r a g e perr
c e n t a g e of
c e n t a g e ol
n a t i o n a l centage oi
State banks.
all.
hanks.

26. 32
27.25
27. 60
27.46
26.56
26. 35
24.93
24.78
• 25.57
25. 56
'25. 53
25.50
25.34
23. 83
24. 42
25. 02
25.17
26.51
27.32

18.21
19. 98
19.31
19. 00
17. 59
16.99
17. 90
16.88
16.97
17. 61
16.63
17.26
16. 95
15. 97
17.38
17. 69
18.93
19.03
19.54

Week
ending—

1873.
25. 61
•May 17
26.61
24
26.85
• 31
26. 71
June 7
25.77
14
25. 54
21
24. 32
.28
24.10 ' • J u l y 5
24.84
12
24.89
19
. 24.78
26
24.80
Aug. 2
24. 62
•
9
23.16
16
23. 82
23
24.39
30
24. 65
Sept. 6
25.87
•13
26. 67
20

A v e r a g e per- A v e r a g e perA v e r a g e perc e n t a g e of
c e n t a g e of
c e n t a g e of
national
aU. ^
State banks.
banks.

27. 53
27.03
27.61
29.70
30.28
30.34
30. 97
31.78
31.42
30.87
30. 95
30.59
30.18
30.39
28. 28
27.94
25.67
24. 44.
23.55

19.57
20.00
18.50
21.34
-20.87
20:80
21. 25
19.09
20. 91
• 21.10
21. 54
19. 83
21.42
20.24
18.52
18.84
17.62
18,35
17.95

^

26.85
26. 43
26. 82
29. 00
29.50
29. 51
30.14
. 30.72
30.58
30. 04
30.12
29. 67
29. 42
29. 48
27. 43
27.15
.24. 95
23.89
23. 03

From the weekly average percentage of the State banks is excluded the weekly average percentage
of the Bank of Ainierica and the Manhattan ComiDany, the former of which was invariably and the
latter usually in excess of 25 per cent.




COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

89'

respect to the reserve to be held upon circulating notes. From
that time to the passage of the national currency act the resolution was generally observed, and since the passage of the act neither;
the New York clearing-house association nor the clearing-house association of any city has requested the repeal of such restrictions. Oil
the contrary, the New York association has repeatedly refused to modify
the rule by agreeing that national bank notes, which by the law can be
used in payment^ of debts to each other, may be so employed.
. The national currency act requires that the national banks " shall at
all times have on hand'' the reserve required in lawful money, and the
advocates of a repeal of the reserve laws insist that, under this provision, the national banks are absolutely prohibited from using these
reserves a t any time. The provision requiring that a reserve shall be
kept on hand at all times, was intended to protect the depossitor, and to
keep the bank in funds for the purpose of responding at all times to the
demands of its creditors. This is evident from the fact that the bank
is required, when its reserves become deficient, to cease discounting and
making dividends until the amount of the reserve shall be restored.
The word ^'reserve" is used, as havS been suggested, in the same sense
as it is used in an army, and " t h e fact that a military commander cannot be definitely instructed when he may eniploy his reserve force, is not
regarded as a reason why that important portion of the army organization should, be abandoned, or be reduced in number or efficiency.'' To
claim that a bank cannot redeem its own notes upon presentation, and
cannot pay the checks of its depositors on demand if the payment of
such debts shall intrench upon its reserves, is equivalent to declaring
that the national currency act was intended to provide for the destruction of the very institutions it had created. . From the first organization
of the system to the present time, the uniform decisions have been that
the object of the reserve is to enable the bank at all times to pay its
debts. In times of panic the depositors of a bank, and.not its officers
and directors, are its masters; and it is absurd to maintain that a bank,
liable at such times to be called upon to pay its debts, would, if there
were no reserve laws, loan upon commercial paper, at the risk of almost
certain failure and disgrace, the money which belongs to its creditors.
While the Comptroller concedes that experience may hereafter justify
a modification of the provisions of the act in this respect, he is clearly
of the opinion, in view of the lessons to be derived from the late suspension of currency payment in New York, that he would not be warranted in recommending any change at present, except the offer of
inducements, as already stated, to the banks of the country to hold a
larger proportion of their reserve in their own vaults, in certificates
which can b'e readily converted into cash when the funds bf the
depositor are demanded.
If the certificates should, however, be issued as proposed, the reserve
of the country banks and the reserve of banks in the redemption cities
(other than New York) may with propriety be reduced, the amount
required to be kept on hand being largely increased; while the banks
in the city of New York should still be required to keep on hand 25,per
cent., (one-half in certificates, if desired,) subject to a reduction at any
time by the Comptroller, with the concurrence of the Secretary, upon
the recommendation of the clearing-house. Uppn the return to specie
payments and the funding of theUnited States debt into bonds bearing
a l o ^ rate of interest, the reserve now required may be very much
reduced and perhaps altogether dispensed with.
A table in the appendix, which has been compiled from the regular



90

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

reports to this office, exhibits the percentage of reserve held.by the national banks of the country for the past five years, and shows that in
every State, and in the principal cities of the Union, they have been
found, in almost every instance, to hold in the aggregate an' amount
of reserve considerably beyond the requirements of the law.
THE PANIC OF 1 8 7 3 .

The monetary crisis of 1873 may be said to have had its beginning
in New York City on September 8, by the failure of the Warehouse
Security Company, and of two houses which had left their regular business to embark in enterprises foreign thereto, which were followed on
the 13th by the failure of a large firm of stock-brokers. On the 18th and
19th two of the largest banking-houses in the city, well known throughout the country, and which were interested in the negotiations of large
amounts of railroad securities, also failed; and on the 20th of the same
month the failures of the tJnion Trust Company, the National Trust
Company, the National Eank of the Commonwealth, and. three other
well-known banking-houses were announced. On the same day the
New York Stock Exchange, for the first time in its existence, closed
its doors, and they were not again opened for a period of ten days,
during which period legal-tender notes commanded a premium over
certified checks of from one-fourth of one per cent, to three per cent.
An active demand for deposits commenced on the 18th, and increased
rapidly during the 19th and 20th, chiefly from the country correspondents of the banks; and their drafts continued to such an extent, "calling
back their deposits in a medium never before received," that the reserves
of the banks were alarmingly reduced.
The " call loans," amounting to more than sixty millions of dollars,
upon which the banks relied to place themselves in funds in such an
emergency, were entirely unavailable, because the means of the borrowers, upon the realization of which they depended to repay their loans
were, to a great extent, pledged with the banks. These collaterals could
in ordinary times have been sold, but at that moment no market could
be found except at ruinous sacrifices'. Had there been a market, the
payments would have been made in checks upon the associated banks,
which would not have added to the general supply of cash. A meeting
of the clearing-house association was called, and on Saturday evening,
September 20, the following plan for facilitating the settlement of
balances at the clearing-house was unanimously adopted :
In order to enable the banks of this association to-afford such additional assistance
to the business community, and also for the purpese of facilitating the settlement of
the exchanges bel^ween the banks, it is proposed that any bank in the clearing-house
association, maj^, at its option, deposit with a committee of five persons, to be appointed for that purpose, an amount of its bills receivable, or other securities to be
approved by said committee, who shall be authorized to issue therefor to said depositing bank certificates of deposit, bearing interest at seven per cent, per annuni, in de-^
nominations of five and ten thousand dollars, such as may be desired, to an amou.nt
not in excess of seventy-five por cent, of the securities or bills receivable so deposited.
Exeept when the securities deposited shall consist of either United States stocks or gold
certificates, the certificates of deposit may be issued upon the i)ar value of such securities.
These certificates may be used in settlement of balances at the clearing-house for a
period not to extend beyond the first of November proximo, and they shall be received
by creditor banks during that period daily, in the same proportion as they bear to the
aggregate amount of the debtor balances paid at the clearing-house.
^
The interest Avhich may accrue upon these certificates shall, on the 1st day of No-"




COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

91

. vember next, or sooner, should the certificates all be redeemed, be apportioned among
the banks which shall have held them during that time.
The securities deposited with the committee, as above named, shall be held by them
as, a special deposit, pledged for the redemption of the certificates issued thereon.
The committee shall be authorized to exchange any portion of said securities for an
equal amouut of others, to be approved by them, at the request of the depositing bank,
and shall have power to demand additional security, either by an exchange or an increased amount, at their discretion.
The ainount of certificates which this committee may issue as above shall not exceed ten million dollars.
'
,.
This arrangement shall be binding upon the clearing-house association when assented to by three-fourths of its members.
The banks shall report to the manager of the clearing-house every morning at 10 .
o'clock the amount of such certificates held by them.
That, ;u order to accomplish the purposes set forth in this arrangement, the legal
tenders belonging to the associated banks shall be considered and treated as a common
fund, held for mutual aid and protection, and the committee appointed shaU have
power to equalize the same by assessment, or otherwise, at their discretion.
For this purpose a statement shall be made to the committee of the condition of each
bank on the morning of. every day, before the commencement of business, which shall
be sent with- the exchanges to the manager of the clearing-house, specifying the foi- •
lowing items:
1st. Amount of loans and discounts.
, ' '
2d. Amount of loan certificates.
3d. Amount of United States certificates of deposit and legal-tender nptes.
4th. Amount of deposits, deducting therefrom the amouut of special gold deposits.

The suspension of currency payments followed and was at first confined
to the banks ot New York City, but afterward extended to other large
cities because the New York banks could not respond to the demands
of their correspondents in those cities, and these, in turn, could not respond to the demands of their correspondents. Exchange on New York,.
which would otherwise have commanded a slight premium, was at a discount, and to a considerable extent unavailable. The suspension of the
banks in other leading cities, almost without exception, therefore followed, and their partial or entire suspension continued for forty days,
until confidence was in a measure restored by the resumption of the
New York City banks on the first day of November.
. Although predictions had been made of the approach of a financial
crisis, there were no apprehensions of its immediate occurrence. On
the contrary there were in almost every direction evidences of prosperity. The harvest was nearly or quite completed, and the bins and granaries were full to overflowing. The manufacturing and mining interests
had also been prosperous during the year, and there was good promise that
the fall trade, which had opened, would be as large as during previous
years. The value of the cereals, potatoes, tobacco, and hay for 1872, is
estimated by the Department of Agriculture at $1,324,385,000. It is
supposed that the value of these products for the present year, a large
portion of which was at this time ready for sale and awaiting shipment
to "market, will not vary materially from the above-mentioned estimate
of last year. An estimate based upon the census returns of 1869 gives
the probable aggregate value of the marketable products of industry
for that year as $4,030,000,000, and a similar estimate upon the same
basis, and upon returns to the Agricultural Department, gives an increase
of $1,788,000,000 for 1873 over the amount for 1868.
It is not the province of the Comptroller to explain the causes which
led to this suspension. In order to enter upon such an explanation it
would be necessary to obtain comparative data for a series of years in
reference to the imports ahd exports, the products of industry, the issue
of currency and other evidences* of debt, and, in fact, a general
discussion of the political economy of the country. The immediate




92

;

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

cause of the crisis is, however, more apparent. The money market had
become overloaded with debt, the cost of railroad construction for five .
years past being estimated to have been $1,700,000,000, or about
$340,000,000 annually; while debt based upon almost every species of
property—State, city, town, manufacturing corporations, and mining
companies—had been sold i n t h e market. Such bonds and stocks
had been disposed of to a considerable extent in foreign markets, and
so long as thjs continued the sale of similar securities was stimulated,.
and additional amounts offered. When the sale of such securities
could no longer be effected abroad, the bonds of railroads and other enterprises of like nature which were in process of construction were thus
forced upon the home market, until their negotiation became almost
impossible. The bankers of the city of New Yorkj who were burdened
with the load, could not respond to the demands of their creditors, the
numerous holders of similar securities became alarmed, and the panic
soon extended throughout the country.
• The present financial crisis may, in a great degree, be attributed to the
intimate relations of the banks of the city of New York with the transactions of the stock-board, more than one-fourth, and in many instances
nearly one-third, of the bills-receivable of the banks, since the late civil
war, having^consisted of demand loans.to brokers and members^of the
stock-board, which transactions have a tendency to impede and unsettle,
instead of facilitating, the legitimate business, interests of the whole
country. Previous to the war the stock-board is said to have consisted
of only onehundred and fifty members, and its organic principle was a
strictly commission business, under a stringent and conservative constitution and by-laws. The close of the war found the membership of the
Stock-board increased to eleven hundred, and composed of men from all
parts of the country, many of whom had congregated in Wall street,
adopting for their rule of business the apt motto of Horace, "Make
money; make it honestly if you can; at all events make money."* The
law of the State of New York, restricting, the operations of the stockboard, which had been retained on the statute-book since 1813,t had, unfortunately, been repealed in 1858, so that its members and manipulators
were enabled to increase their operations to. a gigantic scale.
* Rem facias; rem,
Sipossi8,recte; sinon, quociinque modoretn.
t ''All contracts, written or verbal, for the sale or transfer of any certificate orother
evidence of debt, due by or from tlie United States, or any separate State, or of any
share or interest in the stock of any bank, or of any company incorporated under any
law of the United Stiates, or of any individual State, shall be absolutely void, unless
the party contracting to sell of transfer the same shall, at the time of making such
contract, be in the actual possession of the certificate or other evidence of such debt,
shiare or interest, or be otherwise- entitled in his own ri^ht, or be duly authorized by
sonie person so entitled, to seU or transfer the said certificate of debt, share, or interest ^
so contracted for.
(
,
^'All wagers concerning the price or prices, present or future, of any part of any debt
due by or from the United States, or any sei^arate State, or of any share or interestin
the stock bf any bank or other company incorporated under the lia ws of the United
States, or any individual State, or of any certifica,te or other evidence of any such debti
or part of such debt, or of any such share or interest, shall be void.
"Every person who shall pay or deliver any money, goods or thing in action, by way
of premium or difference, in pursuance of any contract or wager in the two last sections declared void, and his personal representatives may recover such money, goods,
or pther thing in action, of and from the party receiving the same and his personal
representatives."
' Passed February 25, 1813. '(Page 706., revised statutes of New York, vol. 1, second
edition.) Repealed laws of New York, page 251, eighty-first session, 1858.




93

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The quotations of the stock-board are known to be too frequently
fictions of speculation, and yet these fictions control the commerce and
business of a great country,; and their influence is not confined to this
country, but extends to other countries, and seriously impairs our credit
with foreign nations. The fictitious debts of railroads and other corporations which they have bolstered up, and which; have obtained quotations in London and other markets of the world, have now been reduced
to a more proper valuation, or stricken from the list.
Whether the Congress of the United States or the legislature of the
State of New York may nj)t re-enact a law reviving-similar restrictions
with great benefit to the true.business-interests of all parties is respectfully submitted.
Many measures of reform are proposed in order that the lessons pf
the crisis may not be lost, and others be led hereafter to repeat similar
errors. Unity of action among the leading banks.of the great cities
will do.more to reform abuses than any congressional enactment; for,
.unless such corporations shall unite and insist upon legitimate methods
of conducting business, the laws of Congress in reference thereto will
be,likely soon to become inoperative—such enactments being observed
; in their true spirit by the few, while the many evade them and thusinvite a repetition of similar disasters.
If, however, the banks are disinclined to unite for such a purpose, the
legislation required of Congress will be such as will induce associations
outside of the city of New York to retain in their vaults such funds as
are not needed at the commercial center for purposes of legitimatcbusiness.
, The following^ table, exhibiting the condition of the banks in New
York City in the month of October for fbur years past, has been
prepared for purposes of comparison with the statement, of September
12, of the present year, which is also given :
O C T O B E R 9,

OCTOBER £

O C T O B E R 2,

1869.

1870.

1871.

54 b a n k s .

•

. 54 h a n k s .

54'hanks.

O C T O B E R 3,

,1872.

S E P T E M B E R 12,

•1873.

Eesourc.es.
50 h a n h s .

: 48.hanks.

96410
498 50 $3,-180,738 35
938, 875. 98
L o a n s on U . S. h o n d s on clemaindj ^9, 414,:
602 90 70,
53,
331 18 53^409,624.68
916,130 34
O t h e r s t ' k s , b'ds, &c., on d e m ' d 48, 650, i
3,411,738 28
381, 571 00
L o a n s p a y a b l e i n gold
590 54 122, 806,969 10 123,183,624 55
924, 310 47
100, 237,
L o a n s , all o t h e r
182, 459 04
928 401
225,675,50
215, 166 19
241,
Overdrafts
100 00
870,100-00
550 00
600 00 34, 312,
337,
41, 762,
B o n d s for circulation
750 OOI
650,000 00
000 00
569, 000 00 1, 066,
B o n d s for d e p o s i t s .
, . . . . 1, 474,
i332; 400 00
050 OOl 4,310,700 00!
750 00
5, Oil,
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
552, 797 40
250 03 ' 4,400,397 21
261 -39
6, 514,
Other.stocks aud bonds.
611 01
740,-765 99
721' 82 13i 225,
724. 05
13, 952,
D u e from n a t i o n a l b a n k s " .
•077,.286 04
841 40 ' 3^232,205 4S|
529 36
1, 806,
D u e from S t a t e b a n k s
352. 99
469, 984 33
205 88 8, 061,
189 04
. Ileal estate,'furniture, & fixtures] 7, 422,
•905, 622 11
116 17 ' lill7,471 34
525-00
1,103,
Current expenses
,..
339.19|
766,179 69
601 10 ' . ^ 804,
•615-25
805,
P r e m i u m s paid
-.
4.
058,.769 53
929 97 . 3, 649,7 4 86
751 92
3, 487,
Cash items
391 35
897, 740 69
034 12 89, 971,
335 53
- C l e a r i n g - h o u s e exchanges...... L-7.8;.55.5,
618, 583 00
474 00 2,724, 791 00
519 00
1,755,
National bank notes
,....,
901:62
338, 394 32
857 09 . 293i
076 761
611,
Fractional currency
,
063, 200 55
'869 40
742 91
920, 767 37
1, 792,
Coin
.
•.580'00
522, 610 -00
260 00 5, 454,
900'OOl
16, 897,
Gold- T r e a s u r y notes
,
468,530 00
183 00 27, 004,485-00
577 00
21^, 070,
• Legal-tender notes
000 00
000 00
575,
.000 00
12, 05.0,
T h r e e .per cent, certificates.
•5,855,•000.00 10, 810, 000 00
TJ. S. certificates of d e p o s i t .
.000 00
15,945,000 00 17,015,000 Op 17,895, 000.00 5, 585,
Clearing-house.certificates..




390,563,093-35 375,152, 133 15 422, 345,.958„ 95 395,976,:719-78 389, .486, 310 48

94

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
OCTOBER 9,

OCTOBER ?

OCTOBER 2,

1869.

1870.

1871.

54 banks,

OCTOBER 3,

SEPTEMBER 12,

1872.

1873..

54 banks.

50 banks.

48 banks.

Capital stock
$73, 218,100 00 !|73, 435,000 00
235, 000
Surplus fund
17, 768, 667 71 18,835, 099 19
468, 615
Undivided profits
10, 964, 277 76| 10, 039,181 42
388, 683
National bank circulation
34, 683, 075 00 32, 945,080 00
632, 976
State bank circulation
243, 974 00
235, 959 00
226, 479
Dividends, unpaid
236, 860 65|
26.5, 569
Individual deposits—currency 136.660 848 70 527,991, 339 01
091, 424
gold
Certified checks
52, 580, 265 47 37, 689,570 531 4^,679, 638
1, 282, 332 36 1, 329,457 01
891, 358
Cashiers' checks
241, 961 991
073, 218
TJnited States deposits
253, 692 98
Deposits of TJ. S. disb'g ofiicers
Due to other nationarbanks.. 50,005,913 23 55, 947;455 65
701, 443
Due to State bank.s and bankers| 12, 901, 946 14 16, 225,168 70
630, 052
Notes and bills rediscounted
61, 500
Bills payable

285, 000
878, 877
049,162
070, 951
189, 575
261, 830
749,902
170, 566
827, 794
778, 729
238, 092
3,213
550, 921
852, 279

Liabilities.
54 hanks.

Total

39, 825 14

235, 000 00
923,211 45
210, 470 03
482, 342 00
146,525 00
205, 979 60
463, 264 04
101,731 10
695,185 810
252,481.79.
296, 877 39
40,297 13
257, 769 25
113,'050 50
62,125 39

390, 563, 093 35 375,152,133 15 422, 345, 958 95 395, 976, 719 78 389, 486, 310 48
1
1
I
I
- I
^

B e s e r v e , 24. 4 p e r c e n t .

The following totals exhibit similar data, compiled from the returns of the country banks of New England, the Middle, and'the Western and Northwestern States.
states.

Items.

September
12, 1873.

October 13,
. 1873.

November
1, 1873.

NEW ENGLAND STATES.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Bhode Island
Connecticut

^
'

Loans
•.
Circulation
Deposits..
Balance due to banks
Due from redeeming agentsLegal-tenders. -:
Specie

^154, 407,121 ^150,841, 262
82, 746, 627
83,154, 774
61, 912, 935
55, 830, 627
3, 230, 941
2, 224, 089
18, 969, 598
13,411,621
10, 956, 979
11, 517, 756
360, 786
304,187

|148, 291, 782
83, 288, 566
52, 725, 593
552,117
12, 425,176
11,431,217
339, 634

MIDDLE STATES. ,

•New Tork
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
• Maryland

•
<

Loans
Circulation
Deposits
,
Balance due to banks
Due from redeeming agents.
Legal tenders
Specie
:
..,

150,157, 681
65, 416, 519
102, 671,101
1, 226, 981
21, 428, 875
13, 541; 549
430, 944

142, 085, 003
65, 871, 069
89, 036, 682
1, 869, 819
14,015,227
14, 782, 708
301, 939

138,273.174
65, 976, 343
85, 907, 955

Loans
Circulation
,
Deposits
Balance due to banks
Due from redeeming agents.
Legal tenders
Specie
,

123, 854, 884
59, 659, 474
92, 856, 762

116, 833, 970
60, 253, 336
75,541,162

111, 549, 204
60, 475, 650
70, 772, 060

17, 993. 614
14, 085, Oil
246, 003

8, 029, 701
16, 341, 748
217, 680

7, 981, 507
16,199, 236
275, 521

12, 024, 641
14, 949, 860
357,335

WESTERN STATES.

Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas
Nebraska

:
:- - -

The Comptroller, in order to obtain statistics of the condition of the
banks during the late panic, as well as just previous to its commencement, issued a circular calling upon all the national banks for reports
on October 13, the day on which the banks of the city of New York
held the smallest amount of legal-tender notes duringthe late crisis,
and on November 1, the day on which the banks resumed currency payments. The aggregates of these statements for each State and the redemption cities will be found in full in the appendix to this report, as
will also a statement exhibiting in detail the average amount of loans,
circulation, deposits, specie, and legal-tender notes of each of the asso


95

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

ciated banks of New York City for the week ending September 20,1873,
and the aggregates as reported to the clearing-house fbr the week ending November 22. . From all.these returns the following comparative
statement of the banks in New York City at different dates has been
prepared:
>
"
.
September 12, September 20, October 13,
1873.
1873.*
1873.
Loans
Circulation
Deposits
Balance due to banks.
Legal tenders
Specie'.

$199,160, 888
27, 482, 342
99, 952, 097
72, 552, 768
32, 278, 530
14, 585, 811

November 1, November^
1873.
22,1873.*

$179,135, 030 $169,164, 559
27, 851, 206
27, 835,- 612 $27, 267, 700
89, 664, 948
92, 563, 997 138, 625, 300
38, 790,118
36, 911, 563
6, 517, 250
15, 668, 452 25, 330, 600
29, 607, 200
10, 031, 470
11, 499, 457 14, 759, 300
16, 119, 400

s^27,151, 600
167,184, 600

* Averages as reported to clearing-house, for week ending at .the date mentioned.

Some of the special reports were not received until during the present week, and the abstracts were therefore so lately completed that the
Comptroller can only refer the inquirer to these curious and interesting
.statistics ofthe condition ofthe banks ofthe country during the month
of the panic, without any extended comments.*
INTEREST ON DEPOSITS.

In my last annual report I referred briefly to the evils resulting from
the payment of interest upon deposits, and my predecessors have frequently referred more at length to the same subject. The difficulty has
been that the proposed legislation by Congress upon the subject would
apply only to the national banks. The effect of such legislation would
be to bring State banks and savings banks, organized by authority of
the different States, in direct competition with the national banks in
securing the accounts of correspondents and dealers; the national banks
would be desirous of retaining their business, and the more unscrupulous would not hesitate to evade the law by offering to make collections
throughout the country free of charge, to buy and sell stocks without
commission, and to rediscount paper at low rates. The proposed action
of the clearing-ho^use in the city of New York, jf adopted by the clearinghouses of the principal cities of the Union, would do more to prevent
the payment of interest on deposits than any congressional enactment.'
But the evils resulting from the payment of interest upon deposits are
by no means confined to.the city banks. It may be safely said that
this custom, which prevails in almost fevery city and village of the Union,
has done more than any other to demoralize the business of banking.
State banks, i)i'iYate bankers, and associations under the guise of savings banks, everywhere, offer rates of interest upon deposits which can* Since writing the above the following statement has. been prepared, showing the
whole amount of national-bank cnrrency, legal-ten der notes, and fractional cnrrency
issued np to October 12 and November 1, 1873 :
October 13.

National-bank currency
Legal-tender notes
Fractional currency

'

-

Totals
Deduct amounts held by the Treasury and by the banks
)

November 1.

|350,049,056
359,566,888
46,699,191

$350,332,884
360,952,206
47,876,149

756,315,135
116,496, 997

759,161,239
128,140,727
•

•

—

Which win leave .unaccounted for
639,818,138
' 631, 020,512
After making due allowance for the currency held by State and savings-banks, trust
companies, and private bankers, these are larger amounts than can be supposed to
have been in the pockets of men or the tills of small dealers. But it may be left to
the ingenious in such matters to divine what portion thereof was hoarded by the
timid, the ignorant^ or the covetous.



96

, .

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

not safely be paid by those engaged in legitimate business.. National
.^banks, desirous of retaining the business of their dealers, also make similar offers, and the result is,, not only the incirease of the rates of inter-.
est paid to business men, but, as a consequence, investments in unsecured
loans, bringing ultimate loss both upon the shareholders of the bank and
-the depositors. The kind of legislation needed is that which shall apply
to all banks and bankers alike, whether organized under the national currency actor otherwise. Alaw prohibiting the payment of interest on. deposits by the national banks will have little effect, unless followed by similar, legislation under authority of the different States, and there is lit tie
hope that such legislation can be obtained. The national currency act,*
.which was passed during the war, provided for a tax of one-half of one per
•cent, upon all deposits, and,, subsequently, internal revenue legislation
extended this tax to all deposits made with State banks and individual
.bankers. If legislation prohibiting the payment of iriterest on deposits
shall be proposed, I recommend that this Jaw be so amended as to repeal
this tax, so far as it applies to dena^and; deposits, and that an increased
rate of taxation be imposed uniformly upon all deposits which, eithier
directly or indirectly, are placed with banks and bankers wuth the offer
or expectation of receiving interest. Such legislation, if rigidly enforced,
would have the effect, not only of reducing the rate of interest throughout the country, but at the. same,time preventing the illegitimate organization ,of savingS:banks---.which organizations should be allowed only
upon the condition that the savings of the people shall be carefully and
prudently invested, and the interest arising therefrom, after deducting
reasonable ex:penses, distributed from time, to time to the depositors, and
to no other,persons whatsoever.
'

CERTIFICATION OF CHECKS.

The act of March 3, 1869, authorizes the appointment of a receiver
^'if any officer, clerk, or agent of any national bank shall certify any
check drawn upon said bank, unless the person pr company drawing the
said check shall have on deposit in said bank>at the time said check is
certified an jampunt of,mpney equal to the amount.specified in such
check."
Eeceivers have been appointed during the past year, for the National
Bank of the Commonwealth of New York and the New Orleans National
Banking Association, for violations of this act; and it is the intention
of the Comptroller'to hereafter rigidly enforce this act whenever he is
satisfied of such violation.
' '
P R O F I T ON CIRCULATION; TAXATION, EARNINGS, AND DIVIDENDS.. ^

It is.asserted that the national banks should be subject to greater
taxation than^other capital because they derive, large profits from the
issue of their circulating notes. In geueral terms it is stated that the
profit^; derived-by. the national banks from such circulation is between
five and six per. cent, in gold interest upon the .amount of the bonds
on deposit with the Treasurer, bearing that rate,of. interest payable in
coin. Nothing could be more erroneous. The banks hold an average
reserve of more than one hundred millions of legal-tender notes, which
is equivalent to a loan fo the Government without interest. T^hey also
hold of United States bonds, purchased at a premium, $42,471,000 in^
excess of the circulation issued,-which they are required to keep on
deposit with the Treasurer of. the United States as security for circulation, and ifrpm which they derive no profit except the annual interest
paid to all holders, of, such bonds.^^^L^
^nitpd States



COMPTROLLER OF THE.CURRENCY.

97

six per cent, bonds held by the banks have also from time to time been
voluntarily surrendered by them to the Government and five per cent,
bonds taken in exchange.
.
'
The* only national banks authorized to be organized under the act of
July 12, 1870, were banks to be located in States which had received
less than their proportion of circulation, as provided by the act. During
a large portion of the past year, five per cent, bonds issued by the Government have been at a premium in the market of fifteen percent.
A national bank organized in the city of Chicago deposits with the
Treasurer $100,000 of five per cent, bonds, costing $115,000 in curvrency. Upon these bonds the bank receives from the Government
$5,000 interest in gold, which, with the premium thereon, would
amouut to $5,750. I t also receives in circulation $90,000, and isrequired to keep twenty-five per cent, of that amount on hand as reserve, leaving $67,500, from which it would derive an income, at ten
per cent., of $6,750; and from this must be deducted a tax of one
per cent. ($900) upon the amount of circulation issued, leaving an
income of $5,850, which, if added to the interest received from the
bonds, would amount to $11,600. If the $115,000 had been invested in
bonds and mortgages bearing ten percent, interest, it would net annually $11,500, leaving a profit of $100 to the bank for circulation during
the year, and a loss of $15,000 premium upon the bonds at the date of
their maturity. The profits of a country bank located in the West or
South, with interest at ten per cent., adopting the same calculation^,
would be a little more than one per cent., and of a bank located in the
city of New York, with interest at seven per cent., about 1^ per cent.;;
and of a country bank located in the East, with interest at seven per
cent., less than 2J per cent. The earnings, upon capital invested in
United States bonds upbn whfch circulation is issued, would not, in
the city of New York, exceed the profits of an investment returning an
income of 8J per cent., and in a country bank in the East they would
be but little more than on an investment earning nine per cent.
The national banks, prior to May 1,1871, paid to the Commissioner of
Internal Kevenue a license or special tax of $2 on each $1,000 of capital^,
and an income tax on net earnings to December 31, 1871. The special
or license tax from May 1,1864, to May 1,1871, amounted to $5,322,688.43;.
the income tax from March 1, 1869, to September 1, 1871, amounted to
$5,539,289.17. The national banks also pay the following taxes to theTreasurer of the United States: one per cent, annually on circulation out-standing; one-half of one per cent, annually upon deposits; and one-half
of one per cent, annually upon capital not invested in United States bonds..
These taxes are payable semi-annually.
The following table exhibits the amount of taxes collected by theTreasurer, annually, from the organization of the system to January 1,.
1873:
Year.
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868...
1869
1870
1871
1872

-'...

Totals . . .

7F



Circulation.
740 45
1,371, 170.52
2, 638,396 35
2, 934,685 63
2, 955,394 60
2, 956,168 02
2, 941,381 51
3, 092,797 56
3, 282,597 46

Deposits.

^412, 953 99
2,106, 480 74
2, 668,674 72
2, 518,780 65
2, 657,235 91
2, 525,571 87
2, 694,480 26
3, 027,767 58
3,144, 839 45

22, 460, 332 00 •21, 756, 785 17

Capital.

Aggregate.

^55, 631. 63.
316, 829 01
350, ,545 29
314, 899 42
299, 126 21
349, 147 97
381, 598 67
385, 24? 07
418, 883 75

S756, 326 07
3, 794,480 27
5, 657,616 36
. 5, 768, 70.
365
5,911, 756 72:
5, 830,887 86
6, 017,460 34i
6, 505,
812 2 1
6, 846,320 66

2, 871, 909 02

47, 089, 026 19

98

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The national banks are required by ;the act of March 3,1869, to make
sehii-annual returns to this office of their dividends and earnings.
Erom these returns the following table has been compiled, exhibiting
the aggregate capital and surplus, total dividends, and total earnings
of the natioual banks, with the ratio of dividends tb capital, dividends
to capital and surplus, and earnings to capital ahd surplus for each half
year, commencing March 1,1869, and ending September 1, 1873.
KATIOS.

P e r i o d of six
No. ol
m o n t h s end- b ' n k s .
ing-

Sept.
Mar.
.Sept.
Mar.
•Sept.
Mar.
,^Sept..
Mar.
iSept.

1,1869- 1,481
1,1870. 1, 571
1,1870. 1, 601
1,1871 1, 605
1,1871. 1,693
1,1872. 1,750
1,1872.: 1,8.52
1,1873. 1,912
1,1873. 1,955

Capital.

$401,650,802
416, 366, 991
425, 317,104
428, 699,165
445, 999, 264
450, 693, 706
465, 676, 023
475, 918, 683
488,100, 951

Surplus.

T o t a l dividends.

Total net
earniugs.

$82,105, 848 121, 767, 831 $29,221,184
86,118, 210 21, 479, 095 28, 996, 934
91, 630, 620 21,080,343 26; 813, 885
94, 672, 401 22, 205,150 27, 243,162
98,'286, 591 22,125, 279 27, 315, 311
99, 431, 243 22, 859, 826 27, 502, 539
105,181, 942 23, 827, 289 30, 572, 891
114, 257, 288 24,826,061. 31, 926, 478
118,113, 848 24, 823, 029 33,122, 000

Earnings
Divi- D i v i d ' n d s
dends to to c a p i t a l to capit'al
a n d sur- a n d 8ur-.
capital.
plus.
plus.
Fer ct
5.42
p. 16
4.96
5.18
4.96
5.07
5.12
5.22
5.09

F e r ct.
4.50
4.27
4.08
4.24
4.07
4.16
4.17
4.21
4.09

Fer.ct 6.04
5.77
5.19
5.21
5. 02
5.00
5.36
5.41
5.46

This table shows that the dividends of the national banks upon
an average for a series of years, have been about ten per centum per
annum, while the dividends upon capital and surplus, which is the true
ratio, have been less than nine per cent.* As the law now stands, the
* The following stateinent of the ten principal joint-stock hanks of London, including
thei.r^ hranches, exhibiting the capital, reserve, deposits, net proiits, and dividends of
each for the half year previous to July 1,1873, has been conapiled from balance-sheets
of the banks published in the London Economist of October 18, 1873 :
P r o p o r t i o n of d i v i d e n d
t o capital. ,

1l

No.

Capital and
. surplus.

Banks.

T o t a l deNet
posits and
profits.
acceptances.

rt

Amount
of dividends for
half y e a r .

CO
CO

®

»-3

1
2
3
4

5
fi
7
8
q
10

h
©r-l

1

CO

Is
o
fi

,pr ct.
p r ct. p r ct. p r ct. p r c t
fi
•pr a n .
yr an. pr an. p r an. p r an.
London and Westminster
1 -. £3,000,000 £29, 548, 770 £241, 098 24.10 £200, 000
*20
20
*20 *18
L o n d o n J o i n t Stock
1, 673, 849
139, 867 23. 31 120, 000
17, 404, 319
2o
20
20 25 5-6
London and County
1, 800, 000
169, 384 28. 23 100, 000
20, 936, 233
20
20
20 19
TJnion
1, 500, 000
137, 910 22.98 127, 500
20
18, 028, 531
20
20 20
9
City
•30, 000
750, 000
49, 509 16.50
10
6,154, 383
10
10
6
Imperial
740, 000
46, 634 13.82
27, 000
8
2, 919, 237
8
8
L o n d o n a n d South5
western
172, 680
758, 314
7,101 8.54
4, 985
6
6
5
Consolidated
876,125
3, 258, 035
69, 895 16.47
36, 000
9
9
8
Q
309,000
'669,018
8,004 16.00
4,000
Central
8
8
8
5
940, 000
Alliance
2, 336, 440
34, 520 8.63
28, 000
7
7
6
Total

11, .561, 654

B a n k of E n g l a n d ,
A i i g u s t 31,1873..

102, 013, 280

903, 922 20.68

17, 580, 000

t29, 080, 534

785, 221 10.80 '764, 032

677, 485

15^
10

.10

* From the London Economist of March 15, 1873, page 84.
t Public and other deposits September 11,1873.

The statistics of the Bank of England and its dividends were obtained from the
report of the Bank of England published in the Economist for Septeniber 13. 1873.
Tbe usual dividends of this bank are 10 per cent, per aunum, but the amount has
varied for some years i^ast from 8 to 13 per cent.




99

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

national banks are subject to a tax of one per cent, per annuni upon
circulation, of one-half of one per cent, upon the average, amount'of deposits, and one-half of one per cent, upon the average amount of capital
stock beyond the amount invested in United States bonds. The tax-,
ation on deposits was essentially a " war-tax," such a duty never having
been, as is believed, before imposed upon the banks of any country.
While almost every other species of property and investment escapes
taxation upon its full valuation, the data for the taxation of the national
banks can always be obtained from their reports; so that a tax is derived from this species of investnient at a much, greater ratio than that
derived from capital otherwise invested. The result of such excessive
taxation is to increase the rate of interest which is paid by the borrower,
for the same reason that ah internal-revenue tax upon the products of
the manufacturer is paid, not by the manufacturer, but by the consumer.
The Gomptroller is of opinion that justice to all parties requires the
repeal of the provision imposing a tafx upon deposits, unless, in the
judgment of Congress, interest-bearing certificates shall be issued as
recommended, which may be counted as a certain portion of the reserve
tp be kept on hand; in which event it is believed that the taxation derived from deposits will much more than liquidate the interest derived
from such certificates.
An additional table in the appendix exhibits in a concise form the
ratio of dividends to capital, dividends to capital and surplus, and earnings to capital and surplus, of the national banks in every State of the
Union and in the redemption cities, semi-annually, from March 1, 1869,
to September 1, 1873.
. INSOLVENT BANKS.

Since the last annual report, receivers have been appointed for eleven
national banks, (seven of which failed during the late financial crisis,) as
follows:
Di^T.- Cash
dends. on hand.

Name and location.

Appointment
of receiver.

Capital
stock.

Scandinavian National Bank, Chicago, Bl
Walikill National Bank, Middletown, N. Y
Crescent City National Bank, ISow Orleans, L a . . .
Atlantic National Bauk, New York, N. Y
First National Bank of Washington, D. C
National Bauk of the Commonwealth, New York.
Merchants' National Bank, Petersburgh, Va
First National Bauk of Petersburgh,Va
First National Bank of Mansfield, Ohio
New Orleans National Banking Association, L a . . .
First National Bank of Carlisle, Pa

Dec. 12,1872
Dec. 31,1872
Mar. 18,1873
Apr. 28,1873
Sept. 19,1873
Sept. 22,1873
Sept. 25,1873
Sept.25,1873
Oct. 18,1873
Oct. 23,1873
Oct. 24,1873

Per ct.
$250, 000 $240, 810
25
175, 000 . 1.52,588
75
500, 000 *666, 751
300, 000
521, 526 " " . 5 5 '
30
500, 000 *1, 655, 795
750, 000 *791, 036
400, 000 *1, 002, 346
200, O O *178, 618
C
100, 000 *177, 207
600, 000 *642,182
50, 000
*68,960.

Total

Claims
proved.

$16, 300
15, 302
131, 945
109, 030
153, 300
12, 787
8, 922
9,355
7, 972
1 814

3, 825, 000 6, 097, 819
* Estimated amount of claims.

The failure of all of these banks may be attributed to the criminal
mismanagement of their officers, or to the neglect or violation of the
act on the part of their directors. The officers of two of these banks
have been arrested ; one has been convicted, and the other is undergoing trial; while the president of the first bank which failed during the
year left the country on. the pretext of visiting some of the foreign
shareholders of the bank for the purpose of inducing them to subscribe
for additional stock, but did not, of course, return upon the announceiiicnt of the failure of the bank.




100

'

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Dividends have been declared in favor of the creditors of these banks
as follows:
. '
Scandinavian Nation'al Bank, Chicago
Walikill National Bank, Middletown, N. Y
• Atlantic National Bank, New York City
First National Bank, Wasbington, D . C / . - . .

.'
:.
:

25 per cent,
75 per cent.
55 per cent.
^ 30 per cent.

During the year dividends have been declared as follows upon banks
which had previously failed:
First National Bank, Selma, Ala
National Unadilla Bank, Unadilla, N. Y
First NationalBank, Bethel, Conn
National Bank oi' Vicksburg, Miss
First National Bank, Rockford, 111
First National Bauk of Nevada, Austin, Nev
Eighth National Bank, New York
First National B'ank, Fort Smith, Ark.. .^
^

,

°^

•

35 per
32 per
28 per
35 per
25 per
15 per
10 per
100 per

cent. •
cent.
cent.
cent.
cent.
cent.
cent.
Cent,

Assessments will soon be made upon the shareholders for deficiency,
and, if not. paid, suits will be brought to collect such.deficiency from
the shareholders of The Farmers and Citizens' JSTational Bank of Brooklyn and The Eighth National Bank of New York. Similar suits will be
promptly brought against the shareholders of the other banks as soon
as the deficiency shall be ascertained. The receivers of The Ocean National Bank of New York, The Walikill National Bank of Middletown, .N. Y., The Atlantic National Bank of New York, The First National Bank of Washington, D. 0., The National Bank of the Commonwealth, New York, The First National Bank of Mansfield, Ohio, and
The First National Bank of Carlisle, Pa., encourage me to believe that
the creditors will be paid in full in the course of the next year. No
efibrt will be spared on the part'of the Comptroller to collect promptly
the assets of ^these insolvent banks, and return, if possible, the fhll
amount tp the creditors. In many cases creditors grow impatient, ahd
attribute great neglect to the Comptroller and the receiver, when the
delay in the payment of dividends has been caused by protracted litigation which could not be avoided, and which has been continued for the
benefit of the creditors. It is believed, however, that no other system
of banking previous to the organization of the national banking system
has been so successful in converting assets and making prompt dividends to creditors.
Attorney-General Akerman gave an opinion, Septeinber 9, 1871, that
the United States was not entitled to precedence for moneys deposited
in national banks beyond the amount of security on deposit with the
Treasurer. This decision has recently been confirmed by the present
Attorney-Gen eral, and approved by the Secretary of the Treasury, and
under that decision dividends have been declared during the past.year
in favor of the creditors of The First National Bank of Selma, Ala., and
The National Bank of Yicksburg, Miss. A dividend in favor of the
creditors of The First National of New Orleans is still delayed, on
account of a claim of the Government consisting of a balance of $221,769
unpaid upon a check of a former assistant treasurer of the United States
upon the bank; but there is some encouragement to believe that the
claim may be settled without further litigation, and a dividend of 25
per cent, be soon declared.
At the time of the failure of The First National Bank of New Orleans,
bills of exchange were outstanding, drawn upon the Bank of Liverpool,
amounting tb about $280,000. Proceedings in chancery were commenced
in England by the holders of these bills to recover, upon the theory
that there had been a specific appropriation of funds to pay the several



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
'

'

•

f

'

101

•

bills as they were issued. The decision of the vice-chancellor was in favor
of the holders of the drafts. The receiver appealed to the Lord High
Chancellor, and three judges with him sitting pronounced elaborate
opinions, reversing the vice-chancellor's decision and decreeing the payment of the money to the receiver. Two of the claimants.appealed to
the House of Lords, and this appeal has recently been dismissed with
costs, after six years' litigation from the lowest to the highest chancery
tribunal in England.
The Comptroller desires to call the attention of Congress to the necessity for some legislation authorizing him to appoint receivers of national
banks, for insolvency, when such insolvency shall become evident from
the protest of the drafts of such associations, or otherwise, if, after due
examination shall have been made, the assets of the association are
found not sufficient to liquidate its debts. The Comptroller also desires
to call the attention of Congress to the fact that where suits are brought
. for 'the forfeiture of the charter of a bank, as provided in section 53 of
the act, no provision exists for the appointment of a receiver when the
charter is determined and adjudged forfeited bythe United States court
before whom the suit is required to be brought by the Comptroller. It is
desirable that prompt me^fsures should be taken for forcing weak banks
into liquidation, under section 42 of the act, when it is believed that the
officers and directors will honestly wind up the affairs of such banks,
and that full authority should be given to appoint a receiver in all cases
where the forfeiture of the charter is adjudged. Provision should also
be made, after full payment of air the debts of the association, for
placing the remaining a.ssets in the hands of an agent appointed by the
shareholders of the bank,''and discharging the Comptroller and the receiver, by virtue of such legislation, from all further responsibility.
Provision should also be made for the investment of the funds on deposit
with the Treasurer in interest-bearing securities, when dividends are
delayed by reason of protracted litigation.
Criminal prosecutions will be brought against officers and directors of
national banks for violations of the law, whenever such prosecutions
can, in the opinion of the Solicitor, be maintained;
The Comptroller ha;s bed'h subjected to some criticism during the late
crisis because the indebtedness of private bankers to national banks has
been found in some instances to exceed one-tenth of the capital of the
bank. Section 29 of the act as it now stands does not prohibit deposits
payable on demand from being made with private bankers or State
banks. An amendment to this section of the act was prepared by the
Comptroller, and was introduced,and referred to the proper committee
during the last session of Congress, which provided ' ' t h a t the total liabilities to any association, of any person, or of any company, corporation, or firm, (not including the liability of one national bank to another
national bank,) including in the liabilities of a company or firm the liabilities of the several members thereof, shall at no time exceed one-tenth
part of the aggregate-amount of the capital stock of such association actually paid in, and its surplus fund." The Comptroller urgently recommends the passage of this amendment.
Tables giving statistics in reference to insolvent national banks will
be found in the appendix.
•
SAYINGrS-BANKS, TRUST AND LOAN COMPANIES, AND
ORGANIZED UNDER STATE LAWS.

STATE

BANKS

The act of Congress approved 19th February, 1873, requires the Comptroller of the Currency '' to report annually to Congress, under appro


102

^ REPORT ^ON THE FINANCES..

priate heads, the resources and liabilities, exhibiting the condition of
banks, banking companies, and savings-banks, organized under the laws
of the several States and Territories ; such information to be obtained
by the Comptroller from the reports made by such banks, banking
companies, and. savings-banks to the legislatures or officers of the States
and Territories. And where such reports cannot be obtained the deficiency shall be supplied from such other authentic sources as may be
available.''
Savings institutions.
In obedience to this command the Comptroller reports that he has encountered a full measure of the difficulties and disappointments in his
way which are intimated in the last clause of his instructions. The
deficiency of official reports is shown by the fact that he has been able
to obtain, in form for use, the condition of these institutions in only eight
of the thirty-seven States in the Union and the District of Columbia,
and none at all from the nine Territories. The inaccuracy and incompleteness of many of these official returns will show how unavailing
have been his efforts to comply with the requisitions of the act. Only
about twenty-eight of the States have made any reply to his appliciations
for the required information, and ten of this number answer that they
have none to give ; ten of them make such returns, but in such form
that they cannot be put into satisfactory statements. They afford no
clear exhibit of either the whole number of these State institutions, or
any means of balancing their resources and liabilities. To do something like justice to the reports received from the several States they
may be divided into four classes.
' First. The official returns which this office has been able to put into a
regular form.
Second. Those of the States which do not afford either comprehensive
or satisfactory exhibits of the number and condition of their State
banks, savings-banks, and trust and loan companies, distinctively.
Third. Those which answer through their executive authorities that
they can make no reports whatever.
Fourth. Those from which no answers of any kind have been received.
The first class consists of the six New England States, New York,
New Jersey, and the District of Columbia. The reports of these have
been found capable of general tabulation, and fairly obtained balances
of resources and liabilities. The statement in detail will be found in
the appendix.
;

/Savings institutions of the first class.

The following noteworthy particulars pertain to the savings-banks of
these States, exclusive of the District of Columbia.*
1st. They are old Eastern States, geographically contiguous, and in
general have ^their business and banking institutions tolerably well or* The District of Columbia is not embraced in the following comparative statements
for the reason that thirty-four branches of the Freedmen's Savings and Trust ComiDany, distributed throughout sixteen States, are reported from the central office as of
the District of Columbia; and it may be noted here tbat thirty-two of these branches
are located in the old slave States, and their aggregate deposits in June, 187.3,
w^ere
$3; 522,742
While those of the two old free States were
-505,927
Total



:.

4,028,669

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

103

ganizedj and they observe more respect to the just claim of the community for publicity of their affairs than do the monetary institutions of
other divisions of the Union.
2d. The magnitude of their deposits, as they are given at the close of
the year 1872—aggregating, for the eight States, $663,244,179, while the
deposits of the national banks of the same States at about the same
date stood at $360,399,206—the deposits of these savings-banks bearing the proportion to those of the national banks nearly as 65 to 35/
The deposits df the savings-banks of the six New England States,
taken alone, at the close of 1872, amounted to $349,395,377, while those
of the national banks of the same States, at the same time, were but
$100,498,415; or they stood as 77.66 to 22.34, respectively, Avhich is
nearly 3^ to 1.
Again, the relative numbers were then 406 savings-banks, and of the
national banks 449. The aggregate population of New England in the
autumn of 1872 may be stated at 3,628,835. The number of open depositor accounts is given at 1,109,995, which is equal to 30J per cent, of
the entire population. Connecticut reports, for January 1,1873,.the number of depositors in her savings-banks at 39 per cent, of the population.
The whole amount of the deposits at this date averaged to each person
in the State $127.50, and to each depositor $340. The average amount
to the credit of each depositor in the" six New England States w^as
$315.73.
The interest and dividend paying investments of the savings-banks of
these six States amounted to $340,556,997, which is equal to 97.16 per
cent, of the aggregate de|)osits, and their cash on hand was $5,913,127,*
or 1.69 per cent, of their liabilities to the depositors. The character
of these investments will be seen in the appendix. The rates of interest
or dividends paid to the depositors Avill appear, so far as they could
be obtained, in the same tabular statement.
The average rate of
interest, for some of these States, is not given in their summary statementSi and it^ was found impossible to calculate it from reports of
the individual banks. It should be understood, also, that the stated
* To explain an apparent discrepancy between the aggregate amount of '^ cash On
h a n d " in the savings-l3anks of the six New England States and that found in the tabular
statement of the appendix, it must be observed that the summaries or aggregates of
the resources and liabilities of these banks, made by the bank superintendents of the
several States, are adopted in all the cases in which such summaries are made. But
the summaries in all the New England States, except Massachusetts, treat " deposits
in b a n k s " as ''cash on hand." The propriety of such aggregations is doubtful, or is
matterof construction, and, deferring so far to the judgment ofthe State superintendents
their figures have been accepted in the foregoing calculations. But if " cash on h a n d "
were separated from ''deposits in banks," the proportion to the amount of dex30sits
would stand t h u s :
Cash on hand in the six New England States, $3,286,719: equal to 0.94 per ceut. of
their aggregate deposits, or liability to their depositors; while, if their "deposits in
banks " are'included, the total would be $5,913,127 : equal to 1.69 per cent.
So, with the corresponding account of the single State of Connecticut, hereafter given
at $1,567,334, "cash on hand" would be reduced to $827,258, excluding the amount of
the " dej)osits .in banks," or to 1.20 per cent, instead of 2.28 per cent, of the liabilities to
the depositors. It may be added that the " cash on h a n d " in the New York savingsbanks stands at $3,796,396—equal to 1.33 per cent, of the deposits; but if their "deposits in b a n k s " are added, the " cash" will be $16,328,893, or 5.72 per cent, of their
liabilities to their depositors.
Again, it is to be noted that in a. number of instances, greatly affecting the accuracy
of tlie division in tbe tabular statement of the cash-account in all the States of our
first class, except New York and Massachusetts, no separation of these two classes of
funds is made in the summaries of the State reports, and this office has been obliged to
accept an undistinguishing aggregate; all of which suggests the necessity of a uniform
formula of reports.




104^,

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

amount of '^deposits," ih some cases, means the amount "due depositors," including accrued interest.
An approximate idea of the business done by these New England
savings-banks may be derived from the report of those of Connecticut
for January 1,1873.
Their deposits at that date amounted to

$68, 523,397

Their real estate securities were
Personal tind collateral
,
Bonds and stocks ,
Total investments

:

- — •--, $^3? l'^'^? ^ 1 ^
9, 495, 819
16,423, 662

: . -^

69, 093,496

Total assets
Cash on hand $1,567,334=2.28% of deposits.

71^ 271,395

The rate of increase in the business of the New England savingsbanks is also indicated by an increase of the deposits'of Connecticut
on January 1, 1873, over those of January 1, 1872, amounting to
$5,805,583 upon $62,717,814, or 9^ per cent, for the year.
At the end of the year 1872 the loans and discounts of the New England savings-banks, amounting to $251,668,764, exceeded those of the
national banks of the same States, at the same time, by the sum bf
$21,608,411, or 9^ per cent.
The States of New England, with New York and New Jersey, are here
selected as the best representatives ofthe savings-bank system, as it existed
and is reported at the latest dates; and the deposits, loans, and discounts '
of the national banks are taken, for the purpose of comparison, at the
nearest corresponding date, (3d of October, 1872.) Nearly all of these
State institutions make their returns to the State authorities but once a
year, and that so late in the year that those for the present year cannot'
be received in time to be embodied in this report. For the purpose of
exhibiting the relative amount of the deposits in the savings-banks of
the States ofthe first class, and affording some measure of their magnitude and business importance, those of the national banks in. the same
States have been given. A comparison of the condition of similar institutions in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland may help
in forming a judgment of their value and force in the business of the
communfty.
.
"
^
,
In the old savings-banks of the United Kingdom there were, on November 30, 1872, open depositors' accounts, 1,425,147. In the postoffice savings-banks on December 31, 1872, 1,442,448.
The amount due to depositorsjn the former
The amouut due to depositors in the latter
Total

£39, 680, 652
19,318,339
.

58, 998, 991

An average to each depositor of £20 125. Thus we have for the number
of the depositors of New England, New York, and New Jersey 2,044,640.
-Total deposits, $663,244,179, and an average of $324.45 to each depositor; while in the United Kingdom the'number of depositors was
2,867,595; total deposits, $286,145,107, and an average of $99,91 to each
depositor.
In view of the enormous disparity in the total and average amounts
of deposits here exhibited, the question arises whether all the deposits



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

105:

in the New England savings-banks, or what portion of them, are
savings^ and what amount are merely mercantile accounts—a question
for the solution of which the reports afford no safe data. It has, however, been estimated that not more than 30 per cent, are actual savings.
Savings-banlcs of the second class of State reports.
Many of these returns, under the name of "savings-banks," shotv capi- .
tul paid in and dividends paid to stoclcholders. These, in constitution and
operation, seem to differ in nothing from ordinary banks of discount and
deposit. A distinctive description of savings institutions is given in
section 110 of the internal-revenue act, as amended by the act of July
13, 1866, in these words:
.
Associations or companies known as provident institutions, savings-banks, savingfunds, or savings institutions, having no capital stock, and doing no otlier business than
receiving deposits, to be loaned or invested for the sole benefit of the parties making
sueh deposits, without profit or compensation t o the association or company.
^.

Justice Field, of the Supreme Court of the United States, gave full
effect to this distinctive definition, in the case of The-German Savings
and Loan Society versus George Oulton. in April, 1871, at a circuit
court held for the district of California. Governed by this legislative
and judicial definition, the Comptroller, in this report, excludes from the
class of savings-banks, without regard for the names assumed, all banks
which report capital stock or dividends to stockholders.
General deficiency of savlngs-banlcs^ reports in States of our second class.
Some of these States require by their laws and charters annual,or
semi-annual reports to be made to the State authorities, which the authorities do not publish in any of their statistical ^reports. In other.States
such reports of the individual banks are allowed to be made to their
county or supreme courts, and are inaccessible to the Comptroller. Some
of these banks report only to their depositors, in accordance with their
own by-laws. For an instance of the impossibility of obtaining full and
satisfactory statements, the reply to the Comptroller's inquiries of the
president of one of the largest, most legitimate, and soundest of the
savings-banks of Philadelphia, may. be properly quoted, so far as this
point is concerned. He says, ^'We have no printed reports." The imxiortance of this bank is shown in his answer, by letter, that "^ it now
^
has near 45,000 depositors and about twelve million dollars." It is
probable that many of the savings-banks individually publish their
annual statements in the newspapers of their respective towns and cities,
but it is certain that they cannot be found registered officially with the
financial officers of their respective States.
Savings-banlcs ofthe District of Columbia.
On the 26th page of the Comptroller's Annual Report for 1872 will
be found his recommendation to Congress forthe repeal, so far as it
applies to the organization of savings-banks, of the fourth section of
the act of 1st June, 1870, which provides ''for the creation of corpora-,
tions in the District of Columbia by general law." He repeats his recommendation for the repeal, for the reasons given in his last report, and
for the enactment in its stead of a general law with judicious provisions and restrictions.




106

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

,'
TJiird class of States
From whose executive officers answers t o t h e Comptroller's letters of
inquiry have been received. Extracts from a, few of such replies will
suffice to explain the large deficiency of the summaries of this report:
The governor of Yirginia says:. ''Banks (except of circulation) are
authorized to be organized under our general laws, and they are not
required by law to make any reports whatever, except such as may be
required by the financial officers of the Government for the purposes of
taxation."
The governor of West Yirginia replies: " There are banks of discount
and deposit in the State organized and chartered under a general law.
*
'*
*
* There is no provision in our statutes requiring such
banks to make reports to any officer of the State, consequently none
are made."
The governor of Arkansas answers: " There is no law requiring State
banks and savings-banks to make a report of their condition to the
State authorities, and, therefore, I am unable to furnish you with the
information desired."
•
The secretary of state of Missouri says: "Banks and savings associations may be organized under a general statute, and, are required to publish semi-annual statements," but adds, " that no report on their condition is made by any State authority."
The governor of California answers: " Associations may be formed,
• nnder general laws, for the deposit of gold and silver, but no reports
are made either to the legislature or to, any State officers."
The secretary of state of Alabama says: " There are savings-banks
incorporated by special acts of the general assembly, but I am not prepared now to name them, or to direct your attention to the particular
statutes creating them," and adds, " There is no provision made that I
am apprised of requiring savings-banks to make any report to the
State authorities." And an officer of one of the national banks of that
State, to whom application was made for the required stal^istics, says":
"With respect to two ofthe State banks in one of the cities, even the
stockholders and a majority of the directors can get no information as
to the stock and business generally. With regard to the others, the
information can only be obtained by a deinand made by one having the
legal authority to make it."
The governor of Mississippi answers: " While the laws of the State
authorize the establishment of banks and savings institutions, they do
hot require them to make reports to the State authorities."
The governor of Kansas says: " Savings institutions are authorized,
and required, to publish statements of their condition in their county
papers, and to deposit copies in the state department," but adds, " There
are no published State reports upon the subject."
Altogether, ten of the States whose officers have made replies to the
applications of the Comptroller are of a like tenor and import with
those above cited. In all of the States of this class there is common newspaper evidence of the existence of State banks, savingsbanks, and trust iind loan companies, but no such comprehensive or
specific statements of their conditioh and business as would serve any
of the purposes of this report.
States and Territories of the fourth class.
From these, embracing twelve States and nine Territories, ho reports
or answers to his inquiries have been received.



COMPTROLLER OF TPIE CURRENCY.

107

Trust and loan companies.
These companies are usually organized, by special State statutes, in
the large cities. Their, capitals, deposits, and business are quite large
in amount. Generally, if not always, they are not required to report to
the State authorities, but under the orders of one or .other of the courts.
Some of these occur at long intervals, and are probably published in the
newspapers;. but even when so published they are by no means full,
and furnish but little available information. For instance, one of the
largest of these institutions has published but one report in the year,
and that report contains only a statement of its assets, without any
mention of the amount due to its depositors, or of any of its liabilities;
The bank superintendent of New York, in reply to an inquiry in reference to these institutions, says, (under .date bf 31st July, 1873:)"The
trust companies of New York are peculiarly situated. Some are under
the supervisioii of the bankMiepartment; some are under the control of
the comptroller of the State; but the great majority of them are under
no sort of supervision.
*
*
*
This class of corporations
(meaning the last described) has multiplied rapidly during the last few
years.
*
*
* . I am not able to furnish a copy of the charter
of any of these companies." Some reports of such companies have been
received, but the number is obviously so few in proportion to the whole
that any attempted report of them for the whole country would be not
only.useless but possibly delusive, and for this reason they are now
wholly omitted.
.
State banlcs.
In the appendix will be found a statement of the condition of such
State banks as have furnished reports which could be cast into regular form. The deficiencies in the number and the details of the reports
received are so obvious that the Comptroller deems it unavailing to
attempt any generalization of their contents, other than is given in the
tabular statement referred to. "
In accordance with the legislative and judicial definition of savingsbanks proper, all those State institutions entitling themselves "savings-banks," but reported as having capital stock, are, for the purposes
of classification, treated in the tabular statement as banks of discount
and deposit.
i t deserves to be noted here that the returns of the State banks of
New York are at once full, and properly distinguished from the savings
institutions. They exhibit the condition Of the State^ banks upon the
12th of September, 1873, the same day as the date of the last regular
returns of the national banks.
,
^
The Comptroller has great pleasure in acknowledging the courtesy
and promptitude of the executive and financial officers of the majority
of the States, in making such replies fo his inquiries as were within
their power. In view of the paucity df the information furnished, it
should be remembered that this is the first call made upon them by any
officer of the Federal Government. They were thns, in many instances,
unprepared to furnish such statements of their monetary institutions as were required of them; and it may be added that they were
not long enough apprised of the requisition made upon them, or sufficiently assured of the generality of the investigation, to put the financial machinery of their respective States in operation for the purpose.
But now, fully acquainted with the nature and importance of the investigation, it may be expected.that in the coming year a greatly better and
more serviceable collection of statistics will be supplied.



108

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Upon reflection, it will be clearly understood that the proposed collection of infoiination concerning the money institutions of the several
States, like the inquiries ofthe Census Department of the General Government, seeks only to inform the people of the condition of their organized
agencies of commercial and business exchanges. It is also respectfully
submitted that the members of Congress, and of the State*legislatures,
and the officers of the States, may exert their influence to obtain the
passage of such laws as will give us, in the next year, a full and thoroughly usefal presentment of the vast money agencies not within the
legal control of this office.
SPECIE AND SURPLUS.

The following table will exhibit the amount of specie held by the
national banjis at the dates mentioned—the coin, coin-certificates, and
checks payable in coin, held by the national banks of the city of New York,
being stated separately for a period of six years. The old reports of the
State banks included in the item of " specie," checks payable in coin, and
it is known that such checks composed a considerable proportion of the
amount reported as specie, and it is believed that no true exhibit of the
actual amountof coin held by the banks of the city of New York has
been presented previous to the preparation of this table:
Held by national banks in New York C'ity.
Date.
Coin.
Oct.' 5,1868.- ppl, 698,623 24
Jan. 4,1869.. 1, 902,769 48
April 17,1869.- 1, 652,575 21
June 12,1869.- 2, 542,533 96
Oct. 9,1869.- 1, 792,740 73
Jan. 22,1870.. 6,196, 036 29
Mar. 24,1870.. 2, 647,908 39
June 9,1870.. 2, 942,400 24
Oct. 8,1870.. 1, 607,742 91
Dec. 28,1870-- 2, 268,581 96
Mar. 18,1871.. 2, 982,155 61
April 29,1871.- 2, 047,930 71
Jiiue 10,1871.. 2, 249,408 06
Oct: 2,1871.. 1,121, 869 40
Dec. 16,187 L.- J,4.H 930 73
Peb. 27,1872.. 1, 490,417 70
April 19, 1672-. 1, 828,659 74
June 10,1872.. 3, 782,909 64
Oct. 3,1872.. . 920, 37
767
Dec. 27,1872.- 1, 306,091 05
Feb. 28,1873.. 1, 958,759 86
April 25,1873.. 1, 344,940 93
June 13,1873.. 1, 442,087 71
Sept. 12,1873-. 1, 063,200 55

TJ. S. coin Checks paycertificates. able in coin.
$6, 390,140- $1, 536, 353
18, 038, 520 2, 348,140
3, 720, 040 1,469, 826
11,953,680
975, 015
16, 897, 900 1, 013,948
28, 501, 460 2,190, 644
21, 872, 480 1, 069,094
18, 660, 920 1,163, 905
7, 533, 900 3, 994,006
14, 063, 540 3, 748,126
13, 099, 720 3, 829,881
9, 845, 080 •4, 382,107
9,161,160 3, 680,854
7. 590, 260 1, 163,628
17, 354, 740 4, 255,631
12, 341, 060 3,117,100
10,102, 400 4, 718,364
11, 412,160 4, 219,419
5, 454, 580
12, 471, 940
11, 539, 790
11, 743, 310
22,139, 090
13, 522, 610

66
49
64
82
72
74
30
88
42
87
64
24
92
44
39
90
25
52

Total.

Held by other
national
banks.

$9, 62.5,116 90 ^3, 378, 596
7, 337,320
22, 289, 429 97
3,102, 090
6, 842,441 85
15, 471,229 78
2, 983,860
19, 704,589 45
3, 297,816
36, 888,141 03 11, 457,242
25, 589,482 69 11, 507,060
22, 767,226 12
8, 332,211
13,135, 649 33
5, 324,362
6, 227,002
20, 080,248 83
19, 911,757 25 5, 857,409
6, 456,909
16, 275,117 95
4, 833,532
15, 091,422 98
3, 377,240
9, 875,757 84
997
6, .529,
23, 065,302 12
8, 559,246
16, 948,578 60
475
7,787,
16, 646,423 99
4, 842,154
id, 414,489 16
3, 854,409
6, 375,347 37
031 05
5,269, 305
13, 778,
13, 498,549 86
4, 279,123
2.50 93 3, 780,o57
13, 088,
23, 581,177 71
4, 368,909
14, 585,810 55
5, 282,658

Aggregate.

49 $13, 003,713 39
29 29, 626,750 26
30
9, 944,532,15
70
18, 455,090 48
38
23, 002, 405 83
69 48, 345,383 72
75
37, 096,543 44
66
31, 099,437 78
14
18, 460,Oil 47
76
26, 307,251 59
39 • 25, 769, 64
166
07
22, 732, 027 02
18
19, 924,955 16
33
13, 252,998 17
44
29, 595,299 56
72
25, 507,825 32
47
24, 433,899 46
98
24, 256,.644 14
42
10, 229,756 79
40
19, 047,.336 45
67
17, 777,673 53
8L
16, 868,808 74
01
27, 950,086 72
90 19, 868,469 45

The surplus of the national banks no w amounts in the aggregate to more
than^|120,000,000, which is a perpetual and ihcr'easingfund, to which
losses^and bad debts may be charged. The act limits the liabilities of
any association, person, company, or firm, for money borrowed, to onetenth of the capital paid in. It is recommended that this limit be extended tp fifteen per cent, of capital and surplus, for banks located inthe
redemption cities, and one-tenth of capital and surplus for the other
banks.
SHINPLASTERS.

In my last report I called the attention of Congress to the issue of
bills of credit by the State of Alabama, which issues are prohibited by



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

109

section 10, article 1, of the Constitution of the United States; and also to
the issue of unauthorized currency by various corporations in the South,
and the necessity of legislation to prevent this abuse. The issue of
such unauthorized currency is increasing in various directions. Railroad
corporations jn the Southern States have been issuing, for some years
past, notes for circulation, of different denominations, many of which
are similar to the following:
$10.

CENTRAL RAILROAD BANK.

SAVANNAH, GA. : FARE-TICKET.

X.

Good for the fare of two passengers one hunclred and twenty-five miles.
The Central Railroad and Banking Company of Georgia. Savannah, Dec. 1, 1871.
,
Superintendent.

President. •

I am informed that these issues are redeemed bythe railroad company, and that quite extensive arrangements are being made by manufacturing companies and corporations to issue similar devices. Such
circulation is also being issued by the mining corporations of Lake Superior, and by " Zioii's Commercial Co-operative Institution" in Salt Lake
City. Similar issues are also made for circulation in the State of Maine,
which purport to be drawn on (or by) parties residing at Saint Stephen, New Brunswick. Issues of this character will be likely to increase in the present anomalous condition of the currency, unless Congress shall legislate them out of existence by inflicting such penalties,
or assessing such taxes, as will deter the corporations in question from
engaging in such illegitimate practices. A carefully prepared bill to
remedy this evil was submitted to Congress during its last session, and
its passage is urgently recommended.
SPECIAL DEPOSITS.

The abuses arising from the receiving by the national banks of what
are termed "special deposits," are growing more and more numerous.
The common law classifies the duties of bailee as follows : He is bound
to extraordinary diligence in those contracts for bailments where he
alone receives benefit, as in the case bf loans 5 he must observe ordinary diligence in tliose bailments which are beneficial to both parties,
and is responsible for gross negligence in those bailments which are
only for the benefit of the bailor. Special deposits which are received
on deposit from the dealer of a bank are almost entirely of the latter
class. Such deposits consist chiefly of bonds in packages or in tin
trunks, which are deposited in the vaults of the bank for safe-keeping,
by those persons who are accustomed to make deposits and transact
other business with the bank. The bank would prefer to decline such
deposits, but the custom having been long established, they dislike
to refuse. In the case of the Ocean National Bank, seven different,
suits have arisen, each of which presents different questions, and
all of which it is thought will be carried to the highest court, thus
inflicting protracted litigation at the expense of the creditors or
the shareholders of the bank, which could easily.have been avoided
had the national currency act contained a specific provision in reference to such deposits. The robbery of the Ocean National Bank took
place previous to its suspension, and by that robbery its own bonds, as
well as those of its correspondents, were stolen, and the bank therefore
exercised the same prudence.in caring for the deposits of its dealers
as fbr its own. But if it can be shown that the bank did not exercise the greatest degree of diligence in the protection of its own property, a jucy will in most cases find a verdict involving, not only
the loss of the assets of the corporation, but also the property of its



110

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

dealers, which has been left entirely for the convenience of the depositor, and not for the profit or benefit of the bank. Similar litigation
is likely to arise in the settlement of the affairs of all insolvent national
banks. In the large cities there is no necessity, since the establishment
of safe-deposit companies, fbr the deposit of such packages with the
banks; and it would relieve the banks of the cities from a burden were
a law passed prohibiting the receipt by them of such deposits. Country banks cannot, however, witliout some provision of law, relieve
themselves from the duty of receiving such deposits, and I recommend,
therefore, the passage of an act, which shall provide that " n o national
bank shall be liable to make good any deficiency which may hereafter
arise in any special deposit made with any national bank, unless a receipt shall be produced by the owner of such deposit, in which the liability of the bank shall be distinctly stated.^' Such an act can work no
injustice, for the depositor will take good care, at the time of leaving
the deposit, to obtain a receipt from the bank which shall explicitly
state the liability; and if he choose to make a special deposit Avithout
such acknowledgment, he will do so, understanding at the time that
the deposit is placed in the bank solely at his own option, for his own
convenience, and at his own risk.
MUTILATED CURRENCY.

The following table exhibits the number and amount of national bank
notes, of each denomination, which have been issued and redeemed
since the organization of the system, and the number and amount outstanding November 1,1873:
Number.

Amount.

Denomination.
Issued.
1
2
5
10
20
50
100
500
1,000

15, 524 189
5,195, 111
34, 894 456
12, 560 399
3, 608 219
559 722
416 590
16 496
5,148

Redeemed.
9,891,606
3,120 723
. 9,141 963
2, 573 070
653 671
168 976
144 057
9 658
4, 530

Outstanding.
• 5, 632
2, 074
25, 752
9, 987
2, 955
390
272
6

Issued.

583 $15, 524,189 00
388
10, 390, 222 00
493 174, 472, 280 00
329 12.5, 603, 990 00
72,164, .380 00
148
746 27, 986,100 00
41, 659, 000 00
533
8, 248, 000 00
838
5,148, 000 00
618

25, 707, 654
47, 072, 676
72,780, 330
D e d u c t fc r f r a g m e n t s oi n o t e s l o s t o r (l e s t r o y e d
A d d for t r a g m e n t s of nc t e s lost or des1broyed

481,196,161 00

Eedeemed.

Outstanding.

| 9 , 891, 606 00
6,241,446 00
45, 709, 815 00
25; 730, 700 00
13, 061, 420 00
8, 448, 800 00
14, 405, 700 00
4, 829, 000 00
4, 530, 000 00

$5, 632, .583 00
4,148, 776 00
123, 762, 465 00
99, 873, 290 00
59,102, 960 00
19, 537, 300 00
27, 253, 300 00
3,419,000 00
618, 000 00

132, 848, 487 00
3, 275 30.

348, 347, 674 00
3, 275 30

132, 845,211 70

348, 350, 949 30

NOTE.—Amount of gold notes outstanding not included in the above, $2,030,000.

From the organization of the system, in 1863, to November 1, 1873,
$132,845,211, or more than one-third of the whole amount outstanding,
has been returned to the Treasury for destruction, as follows :
Previous to Novemher 1,1865-.'.
$1^5,490
During the year euding Octoher 31,1866
1,050,382
During the year ending Octoher 31, 1867
3,401,423
During the year endiiig October 31, 1868
4,60.2,825
During the year ending October 31,1869
8,603,729
During the year ending October 31,1870
14,305,689
During the year euding October 31,1871
24,344,047
During the yearending October 31,1872
30,211,720
During the year ending October 31,1873
36, 433,171
Additional amount of notes of hanks in liquidation destroyed by the Treasurer of the United S t a t e s . . . .
i
.9,716,735
Total amount destroyed



-

132,845,211

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

Ill

During the past year $36,433,171 of national bank notes have been
returned to the Treasury for destruction, which is more than one-tenth of
the whole amount of circulation.
The amount of legal-tender notes and the amount of national bank
notes in circulation are about equal. The whole issue of the national
bank notes is, however, continually in circulation, while more than onethird of the legal-tender notes is held permanently by the national
banks as reserve. The national bank notes are redeemable only by the
banks issuing them, or at their redeeming agencies, while the legaltender notes are all redeemable at the Treasury of the United States.
If the national banks are not in as good condition as the legal-tender
notes, the reason is evident. But if the bank notes should be carefally
assorted by the different treasurers, assistant treasurers, and depositories of the United States,.and transmitted to the redeeming agencies
in the city of New York, where more than two-thirds of the national
bank notes are redeemable, the worn and mutilated notes would soon be
replaced by new notes issued from this office. Section-39 of the act
provides that no association shall "pay or put in circulation the notes
of any bank or banking association which shall not at any such time be
receivable at par on deposit and in payment of debts by the association so paying out or circulating such notes; nor shall it knowingly pay
out or put in circulation any notes issued by any bank or banking,association which at the time of such paying out or putting in circulation
is not redeeming its circulating notes in lawful money of the United
States." I recommend that the return of* such notes to the Treasury
for redemption be authorized at the expense of the United States, the
amount necessary for this purpose to be appropriated from the tax on
circulation already paid by the banks* The effect of such an authorization will be to return to the Treasury the outstanding notes of all
banks which have fhiled and are in liquidation, amounting to $5,246,938,
.which maybe issued thereafter to the States which have less than
their proportion.
The Comptroller has received many letters from officers of national
banks, suggesting that a division be organized in his office for the assorting and redemption of the mutilated currency of the national banks,
the expense to be borne pro rata., by the banks whose notes are transmitted to this office for that purpose. The Comptroller will willingly
undertake the work of purifying the bank currency now in circulation,
if the proper force shall be placed at his command, and will endeavor
to re-imburse to the Treasury the expense thereof by assessment upon
such national banks as shall avail themselves of the privilege.
The present arrangement for burning notes to ashes, as required by
section 24 of the act, is very unsatisfactory, the law having evidently
contemplated that the burning should take place in the Treasury building.
I recommend that an appropriation be made to test by experts the practicability of, and to authorize the purchase of suitable machinery fbr,
grinding to pieces mutilated notes, thus utilizing the paper material
now lost, amounting in value to thousands of dollars annually. ^
NEW NATIONAL BANK NOTES.

The " act making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1874," contained the following provision:
•
For replacing the worn and mutilated circulating notes of national banking associations, and for engraving and preparing, in such manner aud on such paper and of such




112

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

form and design as the Secretary pf the Treasury raay prescrihe, new circulating notes
for such associations to rephice notes of a design and denomination now successfully
counterfeited, six hundred thousand dollars: 'Frovided, That each of said national banking associations shall re-imburse the Treasury the costs of the circulating notes furnished under this provision.

Section 41 of the currency act provided that the plates and special
dies to be prepared by the Comptroller of the Currency for the printing of such circulating notes, shall be under his control and direction,
" and the expenses necessarily incurred in executing the provision of this
act respecting the procuring of such notes, and all other expenses of
the Bureau, shall be paid out of the proceeds of the taxes or duties now
pr hereafter to be assessed on the circulation, and collected from associations organized under this act." The tax to which reference is made is
a semi-annual tax of one-half of one per cent., required to be paid to the
Treasurer ofthe United States, semi-annually, in the months of January
and July 5 and, under this provision, $22,460,332 have been collected and
paid into the Treasury since the organization ofthe system,.avS provided
by law. The section of the appropriation bill referred to was passed
without report from any committee, and no recommendation was ever
made by the Treasury Department tor the authorization of a new issue
of national bank notes at the expense of the national banks. The en• graving of the new notes will involve an expense of more than $1,000,000;
and if new notes are to be issued in place of those already issued, the
expense will amount probably to notless than $2,000,000. The national
banks maintain that the expense of the new issue should be paid out of
the taxes already exacted; ahd they insist that there is no necessity for
the issue of a new set of notes at the present time; and that if the
G-overnment shall decide upon such an issue, the expense should be defrayed, not by themselves, but from the tax already collected, as provided by section 41 of the act.
An additional reason Avhy the expense of printing new notes for the
banks should be borne by the Government is that the Government receives the benefit of all* lost and worn-out notes not finally returned for
redemption, and the amount to be finally realized from this source alone
is estimated to be much greater than the amount required to be expended'in the replacing of worn-out notes.
The following extract from a letter of a well-known Boston, cashier,
who has had great experience as secretary of the association of banks
for the suppression of counterfeiting, expresses the sentiments of the
national banks in reference to the proposed issue of new notes :
There has heen no counterfeit on any of the notes of this hank to my knowledge;
and the amount of counterfeit uotes of other banks presented to this bank for redemption or exauiination, say for the past year, has been very small. I should no't estimate
it at more than $250. In fact the amount reported from all sections .of the country
would not seem to warrant, in any degree, the legislation hy Cougress—act of March
3, 1873—authorizing new plates for national hank circulation at the expense of said
institutions. So far as my knovrledge extends, there is a universal feeling against a
new issue of national hank circulation. My opinion is that it is a mistaken policy to
engrave a new set of plates for hank notes. TJie present issue has been so little tampered with that only two or three plates of individual banks have been at all successfully counterfeited, and those plates are well known, and have already done, all the
harm they can do, as the public has hecome well educated as to the genuineness of the
present national hank circulation.
Now, if a new issue is made, the i)iihlic have got to be educated as to the genuineness of the new issue, Avhich will take a long time, and then keep posted on two sets
of plates instead of one ; and my, belief still further is that the new plates will be the
first t o b e counterfeited,-hecause the least known, and then the policy about t o b e
adopted would require you to immediately'issue a third set of plates, and so on. As
secretary of the " Association of Bauks for the Suppression of Counterfeiting," my experience of tw^euty years, iu causing the detection and conviction of parties for the




COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

113

crime ot counterfeiting bank uotes, Avould lead me to say, without auy hesitation, that
the best policy for the Governmeut to pursue would be to protect the present issue to
the hest of its ability, in preference to making any new one.
I hope, therefore, that Congress will repeal the act of March last.

I recommend that the section in the appropriation bill referred to be
repealed, or so amended as to provide that the expense of such notes
shall be paid by the Government. The appropriation for the issue of
new notes would not result, as is supposed, in the issue of new notes in
place of the worn-out and mutilated notes now in circulation, for the
reason that such notes must be returned to the Treasury by the banks
themselves for destruction, and the notes would not be likely to be so
returned if the expense for engraving and printing were to be borne by
the banks, instead of being paid out of the taxes already collected and
appropriated for that purpose.
Previous to the organization of*the national banking system, counterfeit bank notes of more than three thousand different designs were in
circulation. These notes were retired and the national bank notes issued
in their place, and during the last ten years the notes of but thirty-seven
banks, located in but nine States ofthe Union, have been counterfeited,
and only forty-three X)l{ites, ofthe whole six thousand plates which have
been engraved, have been counterfeited. The correct policy is undoubtedly to prevent the counterfeiting of the notes now iu circulation, instead of introducing new notes upon which the counterfeiter may practice his a r t ; and correspondence with all the banks whose notes have
been counterfeited shows that, so far from counterfeiting being on' the
increase during the last two or three years, the number of notes counterfeited has sensibly diminished.
A method, both simple and practicable, exists, by which the issue of ^
such counterfeit notes can be readily prevented, and that is by the
withdrawal from circulation of such denominations of the genuine notes
of national banks as have been , counterfeited. Counterfeit two-dollar
notes have appeared upon only ten banks, aijd the whole amount of
genuine notes issued to these banks is but $60,000. Counterfeit twentydollar notes upon only eleven different national banks have appeared;
and the whole amountof genuine twenty-dollar, notes issued to these
banks is, say, $800,000. It is plain that, if an appropriation be made,'
to be paid from the tax on circulation already collected from the banks,
sufficient to offer a premumof one-half of one percent, upon these notes
when presented to the Treasury for redemption,, most o f t h e genuine
notes would soon be retired, afterwhich all genuine notes (except when
presented to the Treasury or to the bank issuing them for redemption)
would be refused along with the counterfeits. No additional notes of
these denominations would thereafter be issued to the banks upon which
counterfeits are known to exist. The Comptroller is confident that an
appropriation of, say, $10,000 would withdraw from circulation all the genuine issues which have beeq coun terfcited, an dth at an annual appropriation of $1,000 thereafter would be sufficient to prevent the abuse.
EXAMINATIONS.

'

During the recent panic the Comptroller has endeavored to obtain, as
far as possible, examinations of all national banks which have been considered in a weak or insolvent condition, °and he. desires to return his
thanks to the efficient corps of examiners who have made prompt ex-'
aminations and returns to him of the condition of such banks in all
parts of the»country. It is not to be supposed that the short time
usually spent in the examination of a national bank will be sufficient,
8F



114

REPORT'ON THE FINANCES.

in all cases, to detect bad management or defalcations. If the directors
of national banks, to w^hom are confided the interests of shareholders,neglect their duties, it is not to be expected that an examiner shall, in a
single day, detect and correct the abuses of a year. A number of days
is required for the thorough examination of a national bank of any considerable business, and if it is expected that the reports to this office
shall .detect and expose defalcations, and other violations of law, the
means should be provided for defraying the expenses of more frequent
and thorough examinations. The necessary expense can be levied and
collected from the .banks, if they shall be found delinquent; but if, upon
examination, it shall be found that the investigation was unnecessary,
then the expense should be paid out of a lund to be placed at the disposal of the Comptroller for that j)urpose.
AMENDMENTS.

Carefully-prepared bills were in possession of the proper committees
during the last session of Congress,, providing, (1) forthe consolidation
of national banks; (2) defining the duties of receivers; (3) providing
fpr the organization of national banks without circulation, upon the" deposit of ten thousand dollars of bonds with the Treasurer of the United
States, instead of the deposit of oiie-thirdof the capital, as now required;
(4) for the repeal of section 4 of the act of June 17, 1870, providing for "
the organization of savings-banks in the District of Columbia; (5) for
the prevention of the issue of unauthorized currency; (6) prohibiting
the deposit of more than ten per cent, of the capital Avith any private
banker, or any person or association other than a national banking association ; (7) requiiing the word "counterfeit,'^ or "altered," or "illegal," to be stamped on all counterfeit or unauthorized issues. A recommendation was also made for the issue-of Government securities, bearing a low rate of interest, to be held by the national banks as part of
their reserve, and for a provision of law requiring a larger proportion of
cash to be kept on hand; and the attention of Congress is specially
called to the necessity of prompt legislation upon these several subjects,
for the proper consideration of which it is to be regretted that the
brevity of the session did not afford sufficient time.
THE OFFICE.

The recent panic has required from the Comptroller unusual and exhausting duties, and if he has been in any measure successful in fulfilling these duties, he is in a large measure indebted to the employ6s of
the office for a faithful performance of duty. In other offices in the
Treasury Department, compensation in addition to the salaries provided
by law is given. This adclitional compensation is, to a great extent,
merited, and the busiuess of the Department, could not be properly and
efficient!}^'conducted without it. Many of the employes of this office,
however, perform far greater labor and have much greater responsibility
in the examination of reports, the preparation of letters, and the counting.and return of large amounts of money, than others who receive additional compensation ; and the Comptroller therefore recommends that
additional compensation be appropriated, for distribution to those employes who render the most efficient and responsible service. Such an
appropriation will have the effect to promote and encourage industry
and efficiency in the public service, and will be in consonance with the.
spirit of the civil service recommended by the President.



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY,

115

. The library of the Comptroller is very deficient in works on political
economy and banking, and he recommends that an annual appropria-.
tion be provided, out of which books on finance and^ of reference upon
financial subjects may be purchased.
THE APPENDIX.

'

Special attention is called to the carefully-prepared tables contained
in the appendix, exhibiting the aggregate resources and liabilities'of
all the national banks, yearly, for the last eleven years; showing their
condition duringthe present year, for five different periods, arranged by
States and redemption cities, and separate statements of every bank of
the Union upon the twelfth day of September ultimo;^ also exhibiting
the different kinds of funds held as reserve; also showing for twentyseven different dates, during the years 1868-'73, the percentage of reserve to circulation and deposits of the national banks in each of the
redemption cities; the dividends and earnings of the national banks, by
States and cities, semi-annually, from March 1,1869, to September 1,1873 ;
also exhibiting, by States and redemption cities, the ratios, of dividends
to capital, dividends to capital and surplus, and earnings to capital and
surplus of the national banks,' semi-annually, from March 1, 1869, to
September 1, 1873; together with lists of insolvent banks, and banks
which have gone into voluntary liquidation, and the amounts and different kinds of United States bonds deposited with the Treasurer as security for circulating notes. The appendix also contains tables arranged
by States and redemption cities, together wdth the aggregates, compiled .
from special reports of the national banks' on October 13, the day on
which the banks of the city of New York held the smallest amount of
legal-tender notes during the late crisis, and on November 1, the day
on which these banks resumed currency payments; also a statement
exhibiting in detail the average amount of loans, circulation, deposits,
specie, ^and legal-tender notes of each of the associated banks of New
York City for the week ending September 20, and the aggregates tor the
week ending November 22; also statementof the condition of the State
banks'and savings-banks, organized under the laws of the diff'erent •
States of the Union, so far as they could be obtained from official sources.
A table of contents will be found on the succeeding page.
JOHN JAY KNOX,
Gomptroller of the Currency,
Hon. JAMES G . BLAINE,

"

Spealcer of the House of Bepresentatives,,




.

.

.




APPENDICES,
Page.

I. Dividends and earuings of the national hanks (s'emi-aDuual) for the
year .ending September 1, 1873, arranged by States and redemx3tion
cities
-.. II. Exhihit, by vStates and redemption cities, of the ratios of dividends to
capital, dividends to ca,pital and surplus, aud earnings to capital
and surplus of the national banks, semi-annually, from March 1,1869,
• to Septemher 1, 1873 ..
III. Reserves of the national barfks, at five different dates, since Octoher
3,1872, arranged hy States and redemption cities
^
.
IV. Circulation, deposits, and reserve of the national hanks, for 1868-^73,
at twenty-seven different dates
V. Exhibit of the percentage, of reserve to circulation and deposits of the
national'hanks, for twenty-seven different dates, during the years
1868 to 1873, inclusive, in each ofthe States and redemption cities..
VI. Ahstract of special reports of the national hanks on October 13, and
November 1,.1873, arranged hy States and redemption cities
.....
VII. Statistics of savings-hanks derived fi'om official sources
VIII. Statistics of State banks derived from official sources
IX. Amount and kinds of United States bonds held by the Treasurer as
security for the redemption of circulating notes
X. .Clearing-House retui-ns of the banks of New York City for the weeks
ending September 20 and November 22,1873
XI. Aggregate number of notes issued, redeemed and outstanding, yearly,
to November 1,1873
i^
'
XII. National hanks, in the hands of receivers, with their capital, outstanding circulation, &c
...•
'.
XIII. Insolvent banks, with date of appointment of receiver, amount of claims
proved, and dividends paid, &c
.'.
XIV. National banksin voluntary liquidation, with their capital, circulation,
&c
XV. National hanks involuntary liquidauon for the purpose of consolidating with other hanks
,
XVL Names and compensation of officer.s and clerks
,
XVII. Expenditures of the office for the fiscal year ending .June 30,1873




118

120
122
132
134
136
147
148
149
150
152
153
154
' .
155
157
158
159

118

REPORT .ON THE- FINANCES.

-Tahle of the dividends and earnings of thenatlonal hanlcs, with their raiio^ to capital, and
'} capital and surplus-fund, for the sijc months from Septemher 1, 1872, to March 1, 1873.
Patios.
Statc^s, Terr.i.toric,s, a n d
cities. '

Capital
stock.

Surplus.

Dividends.

N e t earnings.
fe •£. ^'

s
Maii.u-i
NCAV I-Iaiiipsbire

A"'^ermoi»t
Massaclmsetts
Boston
irtiode I s l a n d
'Oonnecticufc
N e w Yorlc
N e w York City.
Albany
.'..
NCAV J e r s e y

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Delaware
Maryland
.Baltimore
D i s t r i c t of C o l n m b i a
AVashington . . ^ .
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
N o r t l i Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
NcAS' O r l e a n s
Texas
A r k a n s a s .•
Kentucky
Lonis\ill'e
Tennessee
Ohio
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
Detroit
Wisconsin
Milwaukee
Towa
•
Minnesota
Missouii
Saint Louis
K a n sas
Nebraska
Oregon . .•
C alii "ornia
San P r a n c i s c o . . .
Colorado
Utah
N e w Mexico
AVyoming
Idabo
Montana
Total




61
4'i
41
162
47
62
80
227
50
7
60
157
29
16
11
19
14
1
3
24
17

10
9
11
7
8
5
2
28
21
148
5
6
85
113
19
69
3
'38
4
69
29
28
8
24
9
1
1

%S), 125, 000
5, 035, 000
7, 712, 71.2
39, 872, 000
48, 300, 000
20, 464, 800
25,149, 720
35, 989, 691
71,285,-000
2, 650, 000
13, 440, 350
27,195, 240
16, 735, 000
9, 000, 000
1, 528,185
2, 398, 218
11,241.985
252i 000
1, 200, 000
3, 835, 000
2, 596, 000
1, 975, 000
3, 000, 000
2, 625, 000
1,362,515
4, :-!50, 000
725, 000
205, 000
5, 726, 000
1, 879, 556
3,049,-716
19,148, 830
4, 000, 00.0
3, 700, 000
16,177, 800
10, 948, 000
8, 750, 000
7, 275, 000
1, 750, 000
2, 555, 000
750, 000
5, 992, 000
3, 300, 000
2, 585, 000
6, 860, 300
1, 643, 065
750, 000
250, 000
300, 000
2, 500, 000
.575, 000
250, 000
150, 000
75, 000
100, 000
300, 000

%i, 829, 023
907, 787
1, 345, 672
11, 764, 647
11,412,845
3,196, 715
6,401,631
7, 840, 725
21,182, 849
1,.250, 000
3, 443, 742
6, 670, 671
6, 916,170
2, 595, 433
403,127
477, 430
2,170,352
26, 000
327, 000
518, 095
338,131
122, 956
307, 084
390, 429
93, 458
265,112
119, 408
20, 000
.503, 869
148, 716
• 380, 524
3, 962, 297
820, 000
519, 826
4, 039, 460
2, 555, 585
2, 355, 000
1, 530, 321
625, OOD
580, 672
235, 983
1,134, 436
.500, 884
394, 470
937,142
. 179,595
125,100
50, 000
8,000
100, 000
91, 500
84, 596
8, 506
13, 300
30, 000

480,518,683 114,257,283
' Loss.

S500, 755
238, 092
304, 636
2,183, 000
2, 336, 000
910, 622
1, 355, 237
1, 830, 703
3, 397, 260
143, 000
718, 002
1, 360, 783
975, 930
498, 000
78, 084
125, 319
568, 925
10, 080
60, 000
184, 375
137, 920
104, 750
126,939
139, .500
,58, 111
229, 500
81, 500
281, 425
96, 273
172, 386
1, 094, 245
198, 000
182, 000
1, 049, 592
614, 984
360„000
451. 597
102; 500
140, 390
44, .500
316,117
153,900
154,118
246, 361
110, 971
.51, 399
15, 000
1.5, 000
14.5, 000
26, 000
10, 500
1.5, 000
11,778

65

F e r ct P e r ct.
$633, 499 5. 49 4.57
31.9,477 4.73 4.01
.526,110 4.73 4.03
2, 963, 256 5.48 4.23
2, 923, 847 4.94 4.00
1, 278, 563 4.45 3.85
1, 679, ,590 5. 39 4.30
2, 250, 707 5.09 4.18
3, 944, 983 4.77 3.67
222, 297 5.40 3.67
912, 915 5. 34 4.25
1, 781,134 5.02 4.03
1, 095, 087 5. 83 4.13
512, 236 5. 53 4.30
94, 740 .5.11 4.04
141, 888 5.23 4.36
576,536 .5. 06 4.24
16,145 4. 00 3. 63 .
94, 0.50 5.00 3. 93
300, 638 4. 80 4. 24
159, 476 5.31 4. 70
137, 076 .5.30 4.99
201, 093 4.23 3.84200, 329 .5. 31 4. 63
76, 088 4. 26 3.99
291, 499 5.26 4.97
90, 761 11. 24 9.65
9, 775
362, 296 4.91 4. 52
118, 505 5.12 4.75
222, 644 .5. 65 5.03
1, 371, 670 5.71 4.73
279, 743 4.95 4.11
280, 588 4.92 4.31
943, 268 6.49 5.19
909, 744 5.62 4. 55
926, 714 4.11 3.24
586. 373 6.21 5.13
148, 448 5.86 4.32
214, IIP 5.49 4.48
62, 334 .5.93 4.51
457, 950 .5. 28 4.44
291, 411 4.66 4.05
256, 581 5.96 5.17
301, 791 3.59 3.10
154, 753 6.75 6.09
93, 372 6.85 5.87
52, 336 6.00 .5.00
23, 869 5.00 4.87
• 2.57,795 5.80 5.58
96, 468 4.52 3.90
7,245
13, 751 7.00 6.62
*4, 717
19, 048 15. 00 13.24
44, 587 3. 93 3. .57

24, 826, 061 31,926,478

COMPTKOLLER OF T H E

119

CURRENX'Y.

I.—Table of the dividends and earnings of thenatlonal hanlcs, with their ratios to capital, and
to capital and surplus-fund, for the six months from M'arch 1,1873, to Septemher 1, 1873.
Eatios.
Capital
stock.

t a l e s , TerritoriCvS, and
cities.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
'...
Massachusetts
Bostou
Rhode Island
Connecticut
NewYork
,..
N e w Y o r k City ..
Albany
New Jersey
Pennsylvania .
..
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Delaware
Maryland
Baltimore
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Washington
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina...
South C a r o l i u a . . . . . . .
Georgia
Alabama
Ne^v Orleans
Texas
Arkansas ..:
Kentucky
Louisville
Tennessee
Obio
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Micbigan
Detroit
Wisconsin
Milwaukee
Iowa
Minnesota
Mis.souri
Saint Louis
Kansas"
Nebraska
Oregon
California
San P r a n c i s c o
Colorado
Utah
:
N e w Mexico
Wyoming
Idaho
Dakota
Montana
;..
.Tctal-s .

61
42
40
163
48
62
80
222
49
7
61
158
29
16
11
19
14
1
4
24
17
10
12
13
9
9
•6
2
30
6
23
154
5
6
90
114
20
73
3
. 39
4
75
31
29

S arp] U.S.

$9,12.5, 000 $1,878,819
135, 000
913, 404
762, 712 1, 460, .569
262, 000 11,978,230
900, 000 11,787,314
504, 800
3, 535, 399
325, 320
6, 750,1.50
499, 691
7, 925,445
985, 000 20, 027, 372
650, 000
1, 285, 000
683, 350
3, 516, 696
660, 580
7, 019, 439
93.5, 000 7, 064, 979
000, 000
2, 9.50, 741
.528,185
422, 374
398, 218
499, 877
241, 985
2,327,168
252, 000
28, 000
400, 000
364, 000
035, 000
• 573, 258
566, 000
357, 014
148, 933
975, 000
338; 547
146, 000
777,730
• 41.9, 478
529, 300
115, 655
850, 000
297,199
775, 000
184, 531
205, 000
21, 375
976, 000
581, 782
187, 700
106, 204
236, 800
396, 631
911,000
4, 2.30, 521
000, 000
875, 000
000, 000
509, 717
247, 000
4,187, 512
218, 000
2, 698, 492
950, 000
2, 807, .500
874, 280
1, 653, 680
900, 000
670, 000
690,000
059, 500
750, 000
267, 261
9.52, 000 1, 228, 528
8.50, 000
614, 006
635, 000
4.59, 841
860, 300
963, .536
755, 000
255, 511
850, 000
159. 700
250, 000
50; 000
600, 000
11, 000
.500, 000'
135, 000
575, 000
155, 500
500, 000
4.5, 998
300, 000
13, 376
75, 000
100, 000
14, 500
50, iiOO
1,000
20, 000
46,586

,;i,955 488,100,951 !ll6,113,




' Loss.

Dividends.

N e t earnings.

Perct.
|501, 5.55
$625, 589 5. 50
222, 900
164, 322 4.34
408,136
490,166 5. 26
2,168, 800 2, 924, 066 5.39
2, 387, 500 '2,9.36,811 4.88
922,322
1, 277, 475 4.50
1, 330, 475 1, 685, 307 5. 25
1, 646, 694 2,182, 476 4.64
3, 354, 800 4, 637, 057 4.73
131, 000
184, 989 4.94
735, 367
870, 582 5.37
1, 384, 980 1, 841, 315 5.19
983, 250
1,127, 495 5.81
503, 000
658, 449 .5. 59
78, 059
91, 402 5.11
120, .369
163, 773 .5.02
562, 593
679, 048 5.00
10, 080
16, 570 4.00
65, 000
112,175 4. 65
163, 875
295, 242 4.06
138,210
150, 7.39 .5.39
108, 000
142,160 .5.47
151, 500
19.5, 832 4.81
143, 500
251, 806 5.17
7.5, 965
,141,695 4.97
162, 750
218, 285 3:36
30, 000
107,106 3.87
0, 875
6, 553 3.35
281, 375
376, 525 4.71
. 97, .500
12.5, 654 4.46
184, 496 • 234,428 .5.70
1,115, .353 1, 371, 007 5. 60
222, 000
293, 209 .5.55
189, 500
252, 457 4.74
897, 563
1, 259, 586 5.20
092, 379
927, 089 6.17
455, 000
935, 832 .5.08
431, .300
641, 608 5.48
10.5, 000
175, 028 .5. 53
141, 583
226, 347 5.26
44, 500
75, 619 5. 93
330, 800
444, 207 5. 56
250,100
275, 205 6.50
154, 750
277, 040 .5.87
271, 861
354, 212 3. 96
86, 832
161,119 4. 95
83, 082
8.5, 512 9.77
15, 000
40,158 6.00
18, 000
29. 447 3.00
135, 000
177i "'^9 5.04
16, 000
81, 401 2.78
75, 000
58, 505 15.00
50
19, 500
24, 370
*798
12, 000
. 10,917 12.00
1,028
28, 954
24, 823, 029' 33,122, 000 5.09

Ferct.
4.563.69
4. 43
4.15
3. ,93
3.84
4.15
3. 79
3.69
3. 33
4. 28
^4.11
4.09
4.21
4.00
4.15
4.15
3.60
.3.68
3.56
4.73
.5.08
4. 35
4.49
4.62
3.16
3.13
3.04
4.29
4.14
5.08
4.62
4. 55
4.15
4.19
4.98
3.87
4.53
4.09
4.23
4. .37
4. 61
.5. 60
.5.00
3.47
4. 32
8. 23
5.00
2.95
.5.12
2.19
13. 74
6.22

Perct.
5.69
2.72
5.31
5.60
4.84
5.31
5. 25
5.03
5. 09
4. 70
5.06
"5.47
4.70
5.51
4.70
5.65
.5. 00
5.92
6.36
6. 41
.5.16
6. 69
5.62
7.88
8.61
4.24
11.10
2. 8!)
5.74
5. 34
6. 45
.5. 68
6.01
,5. 52
,5.88
6.66
7.96
6.73
6.81
6.76
. 7. 43
6.19
6.16
8. 95
4. 52
8.01
8.47
13. 39
4.82
6.75.
11.14
10.72
7.78

10. 48

9. 53
2.02
11. 74

120

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES,

IL—Tahle exhihiting, hy States and redemption cities, the ratios of dividends to capital, and the

P a t i o s of d i v i d e n d s to capital, for six m o n t h s ending

S t at es, T eri -i tories,
an.d cities.

1S69

1870

1S72

lS7i

1873

I P a t i o s of d i v i d e n d s

ilS69

1S7®

i Sept. M a r . Sept. M a r . Sept. M a r . Sept. M a r . Sept. I Sept. M a r . Sept.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1. i 1.
i.

Maine
New Hampshire
3 Vermont,...'.
4 Massachusetts ...^...
Boston
5
6 P h o d e Island
7 Connecticut
8 New York
9
New York City..
10
Albany
11 N e w J e r s e y
12 P e n n s y l v a n i a
13
Philadelphia... .
14
Pittsburgh
15 D e l a w a r e
1( M a r y l a n d
1"
Bfiltimore
18 D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
ic
Wasliington . . . .
20 V i r g i n i a
21 W e s t " V i r g i n i a . . . ' . . .
2« N o r t h Carolina
'
23 S o u t h Carolina
24 G e o r g i a
25 A l a b a m a
26
NewOrleans... .
27 T e x a s
.
28 Arkansa.s
> 2^ K e n t u c k y
' 30
Louisville
31 T e n n e s s e e .
32 Ohio
33
Cincinnati
34
Cleveland
3"
3f I n d i a n a
Illinois
37
Chicago
38
39 M i c h i g a n
Detroit
1.. .
-40
41 W i s c o n s i n
Milwaukee
.
42
43 I o w a
44 M i n n e s o t a . . .
".
45-1 M i s s o u r i '
Saint Louis
46 "
Kansas
.'
47
Leavenwortli .. .
48
49 N e b r a s k a
50 Oregon
51 California
Sau P r a n c i s c o . . .
52.
53 N e w M e x i c o
•
54 Colorado
55 U t a h
56 W y o m i n g
57 I d a h o
58 M o n t a n a
.".
59 N e v a d a
Dakota
Averages .




\Ferct.
5.19
4.88
4.87
5.41
5.49
4. 4'1
4.99
4.90
5.16
5.32
5.70
5.55
6. 09
.5.51
5.70
5.61
5.40

F e r ct.
5.14
4.96
4.99
5.30
4.95
4.51
5.33
4.36
4.90
5.13
5.84
5.57
5.98
5.14
5.38
5.75
5.49

5.
5.
5.11 5. 50
5.20 5.04
7. 31 5. 65
5.81 13. .59
6.40 5.73
6.67

P e r ct. \Fer ci.
5.23 ,5.18
4.82 4.82
5.28 4.66
4.99 5.42
4.92 4.94
4.45 4.43
5.16 5.30
4.44 4.84
4. .59 4.71
5.32 .5.32
5. 39 5.62
5.58 5.35
5.79 4.90
5.16 5.15
.5.53 5.13
5.23 5.57
4.98 4.79
5.
4.90
5.05
4.15
5.53
5. 63

6.15 6.15
4.33 13.81

5.
4.75
5.29
4.27
6.
9.34
4.75
6.15
L90

P e r ct.
5.13
4.68
4. 76
5.29
4.81
4.31
5.20
4.44
4.66
4.94
.5.12
5.23
5.70
5. 36
5.12
5.20
4.70

P e r ct
,5.07
4.80
4.84
5. 45
4.73
4.39
,5.25
4.70
4.89
4.15
.5.74
5. 36
5.74
5.41
5.12
,5.16
5.09

5.
4.34
4.18
4.44
5.43
5.33
5.60
,5.21
5.92

2.62
4. 61
5. 44
6.
5.40
4.88
3.41
5.64
4.38

5.24 5.16 4.99 5.03 4.63 4.19
5.32 5.60 5.32 .5.05 11.
5.37
7.86 10. 32 5.92 8.65 5.62 ,5.82
5.83 5.13 4.79 5.75 5.63 5.82
6.41 5.69 5.71 4.86 5.43 4.95
5.72 5.65 3.82 2.97 3.88 4.19
5. .58 5.41 5.21 6.06 5.58 5.37
6.96 6.26 6.59 6. 29 6.07 5. 71
6.33 3.21 2.75 4.80 .5.05
7.40 6.10 5.68 6.13 .5.08 '6.'47'
5.
5.
4.57 5.
5.
5.29
6. 50 6.19 .5.94 9. 83 4.12 4. 94
5.09 4.35 4.60 5. 31 4.60 4.87
7.96 6.43 5.38 5.80 5.12 4.76
6.89 7.02 5.49 8.11 6. 91 5.25
6.22 5. 25 6.28 17.27 5:33 5.24
5.11 4. 27 3.71 3.14 3. 29 3.20
5.41 6. 45 7.59 6.16 .5.63 4.65
|22. 40 8.
10.
5.
10.
6.25 6.25 7.08
7.14 4.
15.
4;
6.

i.57

0.83.
7.
2.50
50.

F e r ct P e r c t P e r ct'\ Fer ct
5. 23 5.49 5.50 4.53
4.64 4. 73 4.34 4.36
4.39
4. 7 3 • 5.26
5.48 5.39 4.43
4.94 4.88 4.53
4.45 4.50 4.12
5.29 5; 39 5.25 4.21
4.37 5.09 4.64 g 4.17
4.67 4.77 4. 73 I 4.14
5.74 5.40 4.94 ^ 3.89
5.40 5.34 5.37 4.69
5.21 .5.02 5.19 4.60
5.76 5.83 5. 81 4.40
5.32 5.53 5.59 4.44
5.06 5.11 5.11 4.66
5.28 5.23 .5.02 4.81
4.67
5.27 5.06 5.
4.
4.
4.
4. 6,^ 4.08
4.58 5.
4.66 4.80 4. Of 4.68
5.31 5.31 5.39 4.65
6.85
.5. 05 5.30 5.4'
5.10 4.23 4.81 5. 39
,5. 34 5. 31 5.17 5.76
6.44 4.26 4.97
4.72
5. 53 5.28 3.3f
7. 68 11.24 3.87 5.90
3. 3.'4.91 4.71 4.83
5.12 4.46 4. 69
5. 65 5.70 6. 97
6.
5. 99 5.71 5.60 4.94
4.95 5. 5.' 5.17
,5. 45
5.09 4.92 4.74 4. .56
5.88 6.49 .5.20 4.62
5.49 5.62 6.17 5. 52
5. 35
6. 21 4.11
6.12 6.21 .5. 48 5.97
5. • 5. 86 5.53 3.85
4.92 .5.49 5.26 ,5.18
5.93 5.93 4.46
lii.
14.13 5. 28 5.56 6.42
5.90 4.66 6.50 6.13
4.73 5.96 5.87 5.17
3.19 3. 59 3. 96 4.64
5.49 6.75 4.95 5.13
8.27
6., 61 6.85 9.77 i 6. 71
14.42
6.
6.
6.
3.
5.04
6. 50 „
7.
7.
3.26 4.52 2. 78 I
1.5.
15.
12.
3.93

P e r ct.
4.45
4.40
4. 42
4.30
4.09
4.17
4.50^
3.77
3.92
3.75
4.08
4.61
4.34
4.12
4.37
4.99
4.74

Perct
4.49
4.23
4.63
4.03
4.08
4. 06
4.31
3.77
3.65
3.87
4.42
4. .55
4.14
4.13
4. .56
4. .51
4.26

4.07
5.09
4.44
5.32
12.47
5.09

4.05
4.51
4.42
3.85
.5.07
5.02

5.84 .5.78
3.80 12. 62
4. 67
4.46
8.81
4.33
4. 83
4.71
4. 43.5.01
'% 20
4.83
4.32
5. 01
3. ,59
5.19
6.05
4.34
3.91
0.10
6.67
6.19
14. 29

4.43
4.62
.5.24
3.97
4.93
3.45
4.21
5.14
2.06
4.46
•4.10
4.76
3.76
4.32
4. 70
4.89
3.35
7.01
17. 22
3.58

4.67

2.37

14.68
2.92

1 5. 42

5.18

4.96

N O T E . — I n t h e a b o v e t a b l e t h e r e d e m p t i o n cities a r e n o t

COMPTR0L.LE.R OF T.HE CURRENCY.

121

ratios of dividends and of earnings to capital and surp)lits, March 1,1869, to Septemher 1, 1873.
to. c a p i t a l a n d sui l^lus, for s i x n i o n t h s end- K a t i o s of e a r n i n g s to cap ital an d surplus, foi six m onth.s
ing—
ending—
)

1S71 •
Mar.
1.
Per ct
4 43
4 19
4 09
4.33
•4.07
4. 03
4.38
-1.09
3.75
3. 37
4.58
4 34
4.20
4.10
4 21
4 75
4 08

3 872
Mar. Sept.
1.
1.

Sept.
1.

F e r ct Per ct
4 37 4. 28
4 03 4.14
4 17 4.21
4.19 4.30
3. 94 3. 86
3. 89 3.92
4.27 4.29
3.72 3. 92
3.70 3. 86
3.60 3. 02
4.16 4.63
4.24 4 33
4.06 4 09
4.22 4 24
4.16 4 12
4.40 4 36
3.99 4 34
• - • - - • •

'"'4
4
4
3
5
8
4
5
1

04'
31
70 •
94
40
2258
69
75

3 98
3.72
4.19
5.03
4.78
5. 24
5.

•

5.44

'2"12"
4 22
4 87
5 66
5 05
4 36
3 28
5 40
4 01

11873

1869 •

1870

M a r . Sept.' Sept. M a r .
1.
1.
1.
1.

Sept. M a r .
1.
1.

P e r c t Per ct F e r c t F e r c t F e r c t F e r c t
4.40 4 57 4.56 \ 6.08 6.
5.80
3.97 4.01 3 69 6.06 6.16 5.73
4.02 4.03 4.43 6.03 6 06 5. 60
4.24 4 23 4 15 6. 35 6.36 5.34
3.72 4
3 93 5. 73 5 13 5.16
3.86 3 85 1 3. 84 5.62 5 71 5 03
4.27 4 30 4 15 5. 53 5 84 5 25
3.64 4.18 3 79 5.83 5. 43 5.04
3. 67 3.67 3 69 5. 44 4.81 4. 23
3.92 3.67 3 33 • 6. 08 5.74 4.13
4.34 4.25 4 28 6. 30 6.13 5.88
4.17 4. 03 4 11 S 6.07 6.27 .5. 35
4.09 4.13 4 09 5. 29 5.10 4 67^
4.14 4 30 4 21 j 5. 80 5.17 5 13
4.06 4. 04 4
1 .5. 40 4.78 5 30
4.46 4. 36 4 15' 1 0 43 6 46 5 87
4.46 4 24 4 15 1 5 92 '6 41 5 80
3.71 3 63 •3 60 I
3. 70 3 93 .3 68 i 4 78 '.5"i8" 4'35
4.24 4 24 3 56 1 6 45 6 82 6 39
4. 76 4. 70' 4 73 1 6. 47 5.86 5.66
4.83 4. 99 •- 5 03 |lO. 04 8.93 .5.46
4.1& 3.84 4 35 1 7. 76 9.82 8.75
4.74 4.63 4 49 1 7. 59 7.91 8.20
1. 69
6.18 3. 99 4 62 1
.5.34 4.97 3 16 7. 14 7.05 sh'i
6 87 16.49
6.99 9.65 3 13
3 04
'4.'49" ' 4 . 5 2 ' 4 29. 6 58 6'86 '6'93"
4.62 4 75 4 14 5.27 6 56 4 38
5 46 5 03 5 08 8 17 9 50 7 15
4 92 4 73 4 62 6 78 6 43 5 46
4 61 4 U 4 55 7 91 6 30 4 80
4.52 4.31 4 15 5.
6.85 3.88
4. 79 5.19 4 19 6.50 6.42 5.94
4.54 4. 55 4 98 7.98 7.90 6.70
5.
' 3 . 2 4 3 87 8. 25 .5.64 5.33
5 06 5.13 4 53 S.
7. 88 6.89
3 80 4.32 4 09 6. 27 6 80 5. 85
4 09 4.48 4 23 7.75 8.13 6.91
15 22 4 51 4 37 7.81 3 97 5 39
9 63 4.44 4 61 j 8. 96 7 80 .5.66
5 09 4 05 5 60 7. 68 8 •
6 15
4 18 5 17 5
8.58 9 73 9 39
2 84 3 16 3 47 1 5. 43 4 71 3 36
4 99 6 09 4 32 7. 82 9 08 8 08
[11.57 8.00 18. 50
.5" 93' '5.'87' 8 23 i l l . 47 7.79 5.89
5
14.42 9.80 13.90
5 83 5.
4.87 2 9 5 1
'4*95' 5. .58 5 12
6 87 6.62 6 22
o2 78. 3.90 2 19
a 36' i.'47
13 74
L42

1872

• 1871

Sept. M a r .
1.
1.

F e r c t P e r c t P e r ct
5. 72 6.03 5.24
5. 33 4 59 4.77
.5.30 4 79 4.94
.5.48 5 21 5. 02
4.90 4.63 4.64*
4.82 4 71 4.62
5.30 5 20 5.11
5.05 4 47 4. .54
4.41 4.48 4.03
3.67 3 61 5. 62
5. 83 5 88 5.64
4.78 5 17 5 24
4. 39 4 41 4 59
4.97 4 84 4 86
4.50 4 63 4 40
5.30 4 83 4 54
5. 27 4 90 5.40
'5.'22'
6.81
5. 33
.5.91
7. 47
6.70
11. 35
7.43
6.81

"7.'64'
6 62
3.52
6.17
5.93
5.83
5 70
3 27
6 42

'3.'64'
5 30
5.76
7.27
6.72
,5.95
4 34
6 31
9 11

' • ' : . .

'"'o'oi'
4 38
7 70
•4 72
4 18
2. 67
4.82
4 97
3 59
4 68
4 10
S 07
4 16
4 78
6 92
14 19
2 87
5 63
6 17
5 41

"'4.'32' '391
9.86 4 87
. .5.16 5 33
4. 58 4 74
4.56 4 23
3.46 3 71
4. 52 4.37
4 . JV2
4.68
3.81
4.12 '5'28"
4.10 4 32
3.45 4 20
3.74 3 76
4.24 4 01
5. 95 4 56
4. 75 4 71
2.97 2 .86.
5. 34 4 40
3. 75 7 29
5..3a 6 36
3. 92 5 86

'"'7.'i6'
"14.95

*.
"ii'.m

4.24

4.07

' a 26'
2.12
21.8512*74'
10.91

ii 71

4.16

4 17

'.5'4i' ' 4 ' 8 0 '
4. .53 5 09 5 52
8. 34 7 14 7 79
6. 03 5.87 6.12
6.67 4 39 4 84
5.70
3.08 4.
6.30 5.43 .5.40
6.77 6.65 6.07
7. 46 6 90
7.06 6 26 '6.'.57'
6.09 6 53 6.90
9.01 5 27 6 67
6.65 6. 28 4 89
6 31 5 53 5 90
8 53 7 15 7 08
8 62 6 96 7 98
2 87 4 38 4 08
10 85 10 18 9 03
7.44 6.76 6.74
12.74 3.64 6.43.
7.67 n . 93 15.19

'2.'ii'
'6.'69'
1.44

'5.'67
4.99 7.73
2.80 6 39
5 55 47.82

i,3'24' 16 48 jli.'54' 16.'63' 13 92 16'4.5' 13*9i" i.5*2i'
3 57
2 78 18 92 16 74
3 47
4.17'

4 09

6.04

5.77

5.19

iucluded with the States in which such cities are located.




e.'ii'

5.21

5.02

5.

1S73

Sept. M a r .
1.
1.

Sept.
1.

Ferct Ferct Perct
5 61 5.73 5 69 1
4.86 5.38 2 72 2
5 33 5.81 5 31 3
5.48 5.74 5.60
4
4. 53 4.90 4.84
5
5.28 5.40 5.31
6
,5.46 5.32 5 25 7
5.14 5.14 5 03 8
4.84 4.27 5 09 9
5. 22 5.70 4 70 10
5. 41 5.41 5 06 11
.5 05 5. 27 5 47 1 2
4 59 4. 63 4 70 13
4 99 4.42 5 51 14
4 86 4.91 4 70 15
5 50 4. 93 5 65 16
5 56 4.30 5
17
4 85 5.81 5 92 18
5.26 6.16 6.36 19
5 97 6.91 6 41 20
,5.91 5. ^4 5 16 21
3.72 6.53 6 69 22
6.46 6.08 5 62 23
6.70 6.64 7 8.8 24
9 39 5. 23 8 61 25
6 93 6.32 4 24 26
12 11 10.75 11 16 | 2 7
0 27 4.34 2 89 b p ,
5 67 5.82 5 74 29
5 22 5.84 5 34 30
5 79 6.49 6.45 31
6.
5.94 5 68 32
5 35 5. 80 6.01 33
5 27 •6.65 5 52 34
.5. 25 4.67 5 88 35
6. ,50 6.74 •6 66 | 3 6
6.79 8.35 7.96 37
7.15 6.65 6.73 38
6.66 6. 25 6 81 ! 39
.5.49 6.83 6 76 40
13 04 6. 32 7 43 41
11 80 6.43 6 19 42
7 28 7.67 6 16 43
10 16 8 61 8 95 4:$
4 03 3 87 4 52 45
6 86 8 49 8 01 146
47
'7.'54' 16'67' •8*47' 48
20.91 17 45 13 .39 49
7 75 4 82 50
'5.'56' 9 92 6 75 51
9. 55 8 63 7 78 52
4 66 14 47 11 14 53
L 5 4 2 17 10 72 54'
55
23*62' ui'si" '9" .53' 56
7 56 13 51 11 74 57
58
2*02 59
5.36

.5.37

5 48

122

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

III.—Tahle ofthe state ofthe lawful money reserve of the nalional hanks of the Uniied States, as

Maine
New Hainpshire
Vermont
]\iassachusetts
Phode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
. -*
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Virginia
West Virginia
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
Keutncky
Teniiessee .>.
Ohio
-'
ludiana
Illinois
^.
Michigan
W i s c o n s i n .•
Iowa
Minnesota
'
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
California
N e w Mexico
Colorado
Utah
Wyoming
Idaho
Montana

Number
of
banks.

L i a b i l i t i e s to P e s e r v e required,
\15
be x^rotected
p e r c e n t , of
by reserve.
liabilities.

61
42
41
160
62
80
227
00
157
11
39
1
24
17
10
10
12
8
5

817, 4.55
m, 240, 067

K), 177, 692
56, 024, 970
20, 907, 303
32, 048, 877
78, 163,138
27, 735, 518
51. 21.5, 616
766, 669
326, 225
678, 757
359, 085
149,194
393, 032
6.50, 697
080, 356
283, 344
038, 044
344, 308
753, 230
395, 502
618,345
569,135
950, 239
368, 424
978, 581
619, 377
563,019
343, 759
143, 528
131, 0.32
008, 884
704,191
336, 467
448,154
177, 385
107,108
167,401
814, 397

22
1.54
88
114
70
• 38
74
29
29
24
9
.1
1
2
6
3
1
1
4

"|2, 072, 618
1, 086, 010
1,526,6.53
8, 403, 746
3, 145, 095
4, 807, 332
11, 724, 471
4,160, 323
7, 682, 342
41.5, 000
648, 934
101, 814
1, 553, 863
• 772, .379
658, 955
547, 604
762, 053
342, 502
' 305,707
51, 646
1,162, 935
1,109, 325
,5,042,751
3, !)85, 370
3, 292, 536
2, 005, 264
1,046,737
1, 892, 907
1,134, 453
951, 504
/
622,279
469, 655
160, 333
*137,.599
,50, 470
367, 223
176, 608
16, 066
25,110
122,160

Total .

P e s e r v e held.

P e r cent,
of r e s e r v e
to liabilities.

§2, 757, 511
1, 557, 467
1, 800, 553
11, 451, 967
3, 813, 427
7.911,549
15; 772, 506
6, 032, 655
9, .582, 262
504, 863
1, 012, 683
190, 394
1, 837, 7.52
987, 438
942, 606
698, 047
1, 587, 548
64.5,419
707, 332
59, 593
1, .511, 821
1, 433, 429
7.185, 701
4, 970, 421
4, 448, 544
2. 060, 385
1. 537, 415
2, 517, 336
1,479,8.58
1, 222, 964
783, 007
012,017
347, 440
230, 471
54, 862
713, 020
204,160
33, 327
31,157
203, 023

20.0
21.5
17.7
20.4
13.2
24.7
20.2
21.8
18.7
13.2
23. 4
23.1
17.7
19.2
21.5
19.1
31.3
28. 3
34.7
17. 3
19.5
19.4
19.1
13.7
20.3
19. 9
22,0
19.9
19. 6
19. 3
18. 9
19.5
32.5
32.7
16.3
29.1
17.3
31.1
18. 6
24.9

102, 033, 935

States a n d T e r r i t o r i e s .

20.4

* P e s e r v e r e q u i r e d i n Califoruia gold b a n k s , o u t s i d e of S a n

Tahle of the state of the lawful money reserve—Continued.

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .
3

1 Boston. Albany
3
4 Pittsburgh
5 Baltimore
(1 W a s h i u g t o n
7 N e w Orleans
R Louisville
9 Cincijiu.ati
10 Cleveland
11 C h i c a s o
12 D e t r o i t
13 M i l w a u k e e
14 S a i n t L o u i s

Number,
of b a n k s .

•

6

20
3
4
8

^
:

15 N e w Y o r k C i t y
16

$85, 778, 361
11,751,306 .
48,195, 235
36,394,107
21, 145,106
2, 905, 844
10, 265, 311
2, 419, 0.53
10, 999, 095
6, 659, 332
26, 341,147
4, 478, 714
3, 298, 049
9, 385,193 .

51
7
29
16
14
4
9
5
• 5

0

Tot.al

L i a b i l i t i e s to
b e i>rotected
by reserve.

San Fra,ncisco




Peserve r e quired, 25 p e r
cent, of liabilities.

P e s e r v e held.

P e r cent,
ofreserve
t o liahilities.

$21, 444, 590
2, 937, 827
12, •048, 309
4, 098, 527
5, 286, 276
726, 461.
2, 566, 328
604, 514
2, 749, 774
1, 664, 833
6, 535, 287
3,119,678
824, 512
2, 346, 298

$22, 200, 691.
4, 217, 247
V.i, 137, 272
4,147, 733
5, 823, 833
495, 363
2, 543, 620
582, 757
3, 365, 685
1, 817, 328
8,151, 312
1, ,344, 369
966,196
2, 653, 336

25.9
35. 9
27.4
25. 3
27. 5
17.0
24.8
24.1
30.6
27. 3
30.9
30.0
29. 3
28.3

181

260, 014, 858

65, 003, 714

71,.496, 742.

27. 5

50

198,661,426

49, 665, 356

,50, 969, 991

25.7

670,154

21.1

0

.

3,1/79, 008

794,7.52 •

COMPTROLLER OF T H E

CURRENCY.

123

shoivn hy the reports of tlieir condition at the close of husiness on Friday, .DeoGmher 27, 18v2.
P u n d s a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

T h r e e p e r U . S. cerClearingL e g a l t e n d e r s . h o u s e cer- cent, certifi- ti.ficates of
tificates.
cates.
deposit.

$49, 932
4, 427
29, 561
129, 883
47, 859
130, 501
154 794"
96, 728
95, 3 50
2, 953
27, 350
3 916
69, 479
11 438
25 744
8 505
61, 019
30 449
' 213 699
277
• 10, 752
40,136
51 257
39 894
94,331
52 031
27, 535
39 641
36, 256
22, 296
6,866
6,773
69, 724
199, 806
309
64, 332
7, 345
195
9,634
5,603

$1,108, 319
518, 547
740. 983
4,.391, 733
3,484,318
2. 457,154
5, 578, 250
2, 205, 253
4, 623, 883
240, 338
427, 315
143, 000
928, 649
451, 205
343, 571
268, 827
448, 813
310, 647
247, 797
28, 365
655, 725
841,247
3, 641, 654
2, 777, 499
2,113, 537
1 346 873
721,217
1, 436, 873
682, 018
611,286
392, 852
287, 352
70, 587
30, 665
43, 007
343, 266
138, 092
20, 997
21, 523
105. 600

1, 978, 383

43, 228, 892

D u e from
redeeming
agents.
| 1 , 599, 260.
1,029,493 .
1, 000, 014
6, 80.5, .301
2, 281, 250
5, 308, 894
9, 814, 462
3, 720, 674
4, 823, 229
231, 574
558, 018
43, 478
839, 624
514,795
573, 291
420, 715
1, 027, 716
304, 323
24.5, 836
.30, 951
845, 344
552. 046
3, 492, 790
2,1.53, 023
2. 240, 676
1. 261, 481
• 788, 663
1,040,817
761, .584
589, 382
383, 289
317, 892
. 207,129

$5, 000
30, 000
115, 000

m, UO
O
3 5,000
3.5, 000
30,000
3.5. 000
30, 000

190, 000

10, 000
50, 000

11,546
305, 422
58, 723
12,135

\

91, 815

1

Maine
New Hampshire ..
Vermont
Massachusetts
Phode Island
Connecticut
...
N e w York-.
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
^Delaware
"Maryland,
Dist C o l u m b i a —
Virgin! a
W e s t Virginia . . .
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Carolina
Georgia
Alabama .
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio .
Indiana .
Illinois
Michigan
'..
W i s c o n s i n . .^
Iowa
" .
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska.
Oregon
California
N e w Mexico
Colorado
Utah
W vomin er
Idaho
Montana

1
•9.

3
4
5
6
,Q
Q

10
ri
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
'^O
'>1
oo
9---i

24
25
Of;

27
0,^
9L)

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40

56, 291, 660

350, 000

135, 000

S t a t e s and T e r r i j2
tories.

Prancisco, 25 per cent, on circulation and L5 per ceut. on deposits.

'CITIES, as shoivn hy the reports of Decemher 27, 1872.
P i i n d s a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .
CleariugThree per
. house
cent, cercertificates. tificates.

Specie.

Legal tenders.

U , 535, 751
7, 693
309,184
45,316
175, 355
11 044
355* 517
• 2, 271
13 737
19,601
134 724
226
4^247
48, 093

$10,361,142
933, 774
.5,513,772
2,118, 905
2, 273, 013
293, 065
1,156,670
333, 900
1, 326, 000
940, 000
5, 287, 340
606, .530
531, 636
1,183, 980

|445, 000
.50, 000
1, 745, 000
95, 000

2, 662, 559

. 32, 864, 727

2,335, 000

13, 778, 031

24, 451, 960

688, 364

U. S. certificates of
deposit.

D u e from
redeeming
agents.

$150, 000
10, 000
250, 000

$470, 000
565, 000
1, 330, 000

30, 000

230, 000

$9, 233, 798
2, 650, 780
4, 039, ,316
1, 983, 712
3, 020, 465
386,254
. 1,031,433
246, 586
1, ,575, 948
807, 727
2, 704, 248
737, 613
430,313
1, 421, 263

450, 000
50, 000
25, 000

41, 790

. 3, 22.5, 000




46.5, 000

3, 095, 000

310,000

9, 205, 000

Cities of r e d e m p •*
tion.

Boston.
Albany .
•
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Washington
N e w Ori eau s
.Louisville
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Louis

..

1
9
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
10

13
14

30, 074, .456
N e w Y o r k C i t y . . . 15
San P r a n c i s c o

16

124

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

'

III.—Tahle of the state of the lawful money reserve—Continued.
Number
of
banks.

States aud Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont..
Massachusetts
Phode Islaud
Connecticut
NewYork

•61
42
40
163
62
SO
226
60
157
11
,19
1

NCAV- J e r s e y

PennsyNauia
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a
Virginia
W e s t V^irginia
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Caroliua
,.
Greorgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
•.
Ohio
Indiana.-.
Illinois
Michigan
Wisooosin
.'...
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri...'Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
:
California
N e w Mexico
Colorado
Ut.ah
Wyoming
Idaho
.'.
Dakota
Montana

24
17
10
11
13
9
29
22
1.55
89
114
70
39
74
30
29
24
9
1
1
2
6
3
1
i
1
4

L i a b i l i t i e s to
b e pT'otected
by reserve.

$13, 828,196
7, 277, 786
10, 376, 030
57, 425, 622
20,926,113
32, 250, 968
80, 770, 548
27, 995, 831
52,372,045
2, 904, 259
4, 310, 053
680, 845
10, 676, 798
5,113, 046
4, 657, 453
• 4, 448, 923
5,107, 851
2, 271, 154
1,935,360
369, 365
8.159, 297
• 8,034,017
39, 277, 394
28,136, 561
24, 846, 812
13,
6,
14,
7,
6,

880, 9 5 0
92.5, 879
066, 4 9 8
751,199
3.52, 9 3 3

4.160, 610
3,179, 781
1,195, 572
755, 608
377,271
2, 394, 382
1, 057, 671
121, 435
178, 259 •
.51, 618
740, 699
517, 207, 245

Total

P e s e r v e required,15 p e r
c e n t , of liabilities.

$2, 074, 229
1,091,668
1, 556, 405
8, 613, 843
3,138, 917
4, 837. 645
12,115, 582
4,199, 375
7, 855, 882
435, 639
646, 508
102,127
1, 601, 520
• 766,957
698, 617
667, 338
766,178
340, 673
290, 304
5.5, 404
1, 223, 895
1, 20.5,103
5,891,609
4, 220, 484
3, 727, 022
2, 082,143
1, 038, 882
2,109, 975
1,162, 680
9.52, 948
624, 092
476, 967
• 167,936
*134, 895
.56,591
3.59,1.57
158, 651
18, 215
26, 738
7,742
111, 104
77, 611, 640

P e s e r v e held.

$3, 207, 726

P e r cent,
of r e s e r v e
t o liabilities. •

2, 844, 585
1, 323, 220
1, 281, 992
806,153
810, 427
328, 068
220, 508
82, 047
594, 018
133,149
27, 021
31,125
33,302
165, 776

23.20
21.27
19.36
21.19
17.60
22.49
20. 92
22. 40
19.40
17.85
23. 45
32. 42
16. 37
19.18
19. 73
21.94
22. 32
25.33
31. 60
13. 51
20.. 34
20. ,78
20. 82
19.36
23.24
19.94
20.80
20.22
17.14
20.18
19. 38
22.34
29. 39
28. 43
21.75
24.81
12. 59
22. 25
17.46
25, 77
23. 38

107, 595, 294

20.80

1, 549, 0 6 6
2, 0 0 9 , 1 7 3
12, 170, 7 0 2

3, 682, 375
7,244, 596
16, 89.5, 447
6, 270, 489
10,162, 751
518, 551
1, 010, 738
227, 517
1, 747, 563
980, 875
921,100
976,010
, 1,139,276
.575,177
611, 652
49, 918
1, 700, 391
1, 669, 327
8,177, 7,52
5, 447, 809
5, 775, 034
2,767,541
1, 440, 3 4 7

'''Peserve required in California gold banks, outside of Sau

111.—Tahle ofthe state ofthe lawful money i^serve—Continned.
Number
of
banks.

C i t i e s of r e d e m p t i o n .

1 Boston
o Albany
3 Philadelphia
4 Pittsburgh
Baltimore
6 W^ashiup"toii
7 N e w Orieaus
Louisville
9 Ci ticiunati
30 C l e v e l a n d
11 C h i c a g o
12 D e t r o i t
13 MilAvaaikee
14 S a i n t L o n i s

>
)

•
.

...

. 48
7
29
16
14
4
8
6
5
6
20
3
48

Liabilities to
bo p r o t e c t e d
by reserve.

$87, 811, 451
11, 418. 7.39
50, 837, 556
17, 030, 260
21,203,893
2, 846. 546
9, 828,154
•

2,
11,
6.
28,
4,

707,
966,
969,
946,
558,

829
338
432
290
433

3, 329, 401
9, .521, 888

Peserve
req u i r e d , 25 p e r
cent, of liabilities.

s^^21, 952, 863
2, 854, 685
12, 721, 889
4, 257, 5 6 5
5, 300, 9 7 3
71.1,637
2, 457, 0 3 8
676, 9 5 7
2, 9 9 1 , 5 8 5
1, 742, 3 5 8
7, 236, 5 7 2
1,139, 608
832, 3 5 0 .

2, 380, 472

P e s e r v e held.

$21, 533, 770
3,
13,
4,
4,

588,
232,
289,
604,
456,
2, 336,
740,
3,/140,
2,183,
9, 097,

223
148
521
846,
547
928
814
439
663
433

1, 310, 279
. 850,213
2, 468, 710

P e r cent,
of r e s e r v e
to liabilities."

24. 5
31.4 i
26.1

{

25.2 j
21.7
10.0
23.8
• 2^. 4
26.2 •
31. 4
31.4 •
28.7
25.5
25. 9

Total

178

269, 026, 210

• 67,256,552

69, 883, 535

26.0

51

N e w Y o r k City

50

213 109, 9.59

50, 777, -489

.50, 461, 0.50

24. 8

16

San Prancisco

2

3, 339, 801

834, 950

70.5, 365




21.1 .

125

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
STATES, as shown hy the reports of Fehruary 23,187.3.
F u n d s a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

ClearingThree per
U. S. cerL e g a l t e n d e r s . h o u s e cer- ceut. certifi- tificates of
tificates.
cates.
deposit.

$994, 519
$25 945
2,917
486,462
61 844
61-2,361
117 104
3, 806, 357
32, 771
1, 501, 428
2,361,071
• 77,717
132, 731
5,129, 601
89, 241
2,150, 990
89,197
4, 301, 762
•3, 424
276, 078
19, 391
475, 360
3,827
133, 000
59, 040
837, 787
10, 548
426, 435
34, 217
. 335,017
13, 450
668,136
52,313
729, 356
34 468
326, 547
205, 458
301,752
2, 422
28,150'
8,764
612,063
38, 180
944, 275
* 28 789
3, 729, 719
2,.685, 402
38, 694
« 73, 474
2,164, .590
36, 055 . 1, 227, 530
17, 359
645, 767
34, 981
1,401,355
14,213
617,343
20 825
• 526,931
4 146
319, 704
7, 297
200, 651
66,'491 "
73, 886
219, 431
1,077
460
46, 020
' 73,245
270, 248
4,405
106,666
1 363
14, 201
5^ 000
26,125
7,192
14, 249
95, 885
1, 779, 651

\

$10,000
20, 000
100, 000
555, 000
10, 000
10, 000
635, 000
20. 000
. 45,000
10, 000

$10, 000
10, 000
10, 01,0
10, 000

10, 000
r
50, 000

.
40, 000
10, 000
10, 000

D u e from
redeeming
ageuts.

States and Territories.

$2,^77, 262
1,039,687
1, 234, 968
7, 682, 241
2,138,176
4,78.5,808
10, 988,115
4, 000, 2.58
/ 5,726,792
229, 04!
515,987
90, 690
850,736
. 533,892
553,866
294,424
307, 607
210,162
104, 442
19, 346
1, 039, 564
686, 872
4, 419, 044
2, 713, 713
3, 536, 970
1, 493, 956
777,221
1,408,249
696, 664
734, 236
482, 303
602, 479

Main e
New Hampshire...
V e r Jll o u t
Massachusetts
Khodelsland
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvauia
Delaware
Maryland
Dist. of Columbia . .
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
N o r t h Carolina
South C a r o l i n a
Georgia
:
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas.
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois ..".
Michio'an
Wisconsin
Iowa
.*.
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebi'aska
187,691 J Oreo'on
3.5, 567 N e w Mexico
250, 525 Colorado
22, 078 U t a h
11,452 ! W^voming . . .
Idaho
6,110
Dakota..
55, 642 M o n t a n a

41, 598, 799

1,485, 000"

90, 000

i^

i
1
9.
3
4
5
6
7
ft
q
10
11
,12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
90

''I
09,

93
94
95
9fi
07
9R

oq
30
31
39
33
34
35
36
37
3R
3q
40
41

62, 641, 844

Francisco, 25 per cent, on circulation and 15 per ceut. ou deposits.

CITIES, as shoivn hy ihe reports of Fehruary 28, 1873.
F u n d s available for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

ClearingThree per
U. S. cerL e g a l t e n d e r s . h o u s e cer- cent, certifi- tificates of
deposit.
cates.
tificates.

D u e from
redeeming
agents.

$430, ooo'
72.5, 000
3, 825, 000

$9, 467, 996
2, 058, 689
4, .572, 725
2,191, 420
1, 989,160
125,528
1, 029, 884
406, 851
1, 694, 656
1,149, 749
3, 762, 498
' • 681,613
336, 005
1,298,931

$1, 010,534
7,619
266, 837
32, 543
104, 052
22,181
208, 211
239
41, 783
7,614
123 306
441
6 598
50, 862

$10, 300, 240
796, 915
4,147, 586
2, 065, 558
1, 856, 634
258, 838
1, 098, 833
333, 724
979, 000
976, 300
• 5,186, 629
628, 225
507, 610
1,118, 918

1, 882, 820

. 30,2.5.5,010

720, 000

13, 498, 550

24, 532, 500

1, 395, 000

616, 652

$320, 000

$5, 000

325,000

145, 000

580, 000
"50,000

75, 000

425, 000
50,00
25, 000

• 175, 000

6, 035, 000

145,000




Boston
.
Albany
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Washington
N e w Orleans . .
Louisville
Ciucinnati
Cleveland
Chieao'o . . .
Detroit
Milwaukee
S a i n t Louis-

1

«
3
..

4
5
6
7
ft
q
10
11

n

13
14

N e w Y o r k City
60,113

•

•t25

30, 765, 705

10, 890, 000

23,600^

Cities of redemp-.
tion.

15

San F r a n c i s c o

16

126

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

III.—Tahle of the state of the lawful money ?'eserve—Continued.
Number
of
banks-

States and Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont, r
Massflchusetts...
P h o d e Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey... ?
,
Pennsylvania
,
Delaware
Maryland
.,
.District of Columbia
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
North Carolina
S o u t h Carolina
Georgia'
Alabama
T.e.xas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
HUnois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
,
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon . . ,•
Califotnia
N e w Mexico
Colorado . . .•
Utah
'Wycrning
:
Idaho
Dakota
Montana

, 63
42
. 40
363
62
80
223
62 158
11
19
1
24
17
I'O
11
13
9.
'6
2
30
23
1.56
90
114
72
40
75
31
29
26 •
9
1
2
3
6
3
3
1
1
3

Total

Liabilities to
be protected
by reserve.

Peserveh^equired,
15
p e r cent, of
liabilities.

.$13, 744, 572
,5, 205, 637
10, 324, 271
58, 020, 699
21,223,311
30, 955, 934
77, 233, 656
29, 715, 983
55, 039, 558
2,918,615
4, 407, 897
3,104,594
10, 348,176
5, 302, 646
4, 503, 473
2,104, 243
4, 446, 672
2, 292, 934
2, 009, 350
385, 700
7,861, .529,
7, 977, 739'
38,751,158
29, 792, 715
25, 298,155
13, 607, 033
6, 58.5, 054
14, 274, 043
7,941,785
6, 70.3, 417
4, 482, 234
3, 413, 391
1, 001, 059
772, 857
391,818
2,401,509
1, 059, 818
• 117, .328
167, 602
69.145
762, 638

$2, 061, 686
. 780, 845
1, 548, 642
8, 703,105
3,183, 496
4, 643, 390
11, 585, 043
4, 457, 397
8, 255, 934
4.37,792
661, 185
165, 689
1, 5.52, 226
795, 397
676, 272
315,636
667, 001
343, 948
301, 403
57, 855
1,179, 229
1,196, 661
5, 812, 674
4, 468, 907
3, 794, 723
2, 041, 055
1, 028, 708
2,141,106
1,191,268
1, 005, 513
672, 335
512, 003
150,159
*147, 374
58, 773
360, 226
153, 973
17, 599
25,140
10, 372
314,396

514, 998, 003

77, 281,146

P e s e r v e held.

$2, 687, 467
1, 428, 599
1, 874, 273
11, 632, 679
3, 865, 222
7,624,916
15, 243, 698
6, 404, 715
11, 209, 326
502, 880
1, 042, 858
251, 761
1, 699, 408
970, 105
774, 802
616, 996
780, 561
544, 800
679, 289
50, 948
1,410,837
1,671,079
7,619, 151
6,395,460
5, 815, 755
2, .531,036'
1, 3.52, 660
2, 954, 211
1, 345, 482
1, 459, 675
996, 778
650, 496 •
308, 108
176, 411
77, 868
650, 347
178, 7.50
30, 205
22, 538'
14, 192
139,980
105, 686, 322

P e r cent,
of r e s e r v e
to liabilities.

19.5
27.4
18.1
20.1
18.2
24.6
19.7
2L5
20.4
17.2
23.'6
22.8
16.4
18.3
17.2
29.317.5.
23.8
33.8
13.2
17.9
21.-0
19.7
21„5
23 0
38.6
19.7
20.7
16.9
21.8
22.2
19.0
30.8
22.8
19.9
27.1
16.9
25.7
13.4
20.5
18.3
20.5

* P e s e r v e r e q u i r e d i n California gold b a n k s , o u t s i d e of S a u

Tahle of tlie state ofthe laivful money reserve—Continned.
N u m b e r L i a b i l i t i e s to
be protected
of b a n k s .
by reserve.

C i t i e s of r e d e m p t i o n .

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
ft
q
10
11
12
13
14

Boston
Albany
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Washiugton
N e w Orleans
Loiiis\'^ille
Cinci n u a t i
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Louis
Total

.. J

,

San F r a n c i s c o




R e s e r v e held.

$20,
3,
14,
4,
5,
1,
2,

922, 725
738, 0^65
280, 805
613, 9.58
695, 700
026.179
800, 334
837, 335
3,187, 372
1. 611, 285
8, 46.5, 289
1, 299,193
754, 879
2, 548, 392

P e r cent,
of r e s e r v e
to liabilities.

25.6 .
32.0
27.0
26.0
26.2
30.1
25. 3
28.8
27.0
25.8
27.1
27.6 "
25.1
26.2

1

48
7
29
16
14
4
9
6
5
6
• 20
3
4
8

$81, 669, 840
11, 699, 848
52, 964, 960
17, 729,' 640
21, 772, 984
3, 412, 596
11, 051, 692
3,076,416
11, 816, 783
6, 238, 064
31, 192, 876
4, 700, 404
• 3, Oil, 588
9, 745, 316

179

i..

15 N e w Y o r k C i t y . . . . . . . . . . . .
16

R e s e r v e required,
25
p e r cent, of
liabilities.

• '270,083,012

67, 520, 753

71, 831, 516

49

191, 560,156

4r, 890, 039

47, 286, 772

24.7

2

3, 086, 782

.771, 695

558, 042

18.0

•

$20, 417, 460 .
2,924.962
13,241,240
4, 434, 410
5, 443, 246
853, 149
2, 762, 923
769,104
2, 954,197
1, ,559, 516
7, 798, 219
1,17.5,101
752, 897
2, 436, 329

26.5

127

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
STATES, as shoivn hy the repjorts of April 25, 1873.
F u n d s available for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

$24, 596
2,653
30,171
133, 932
28, 539
60 474
119, 624
132, 6.52
56, 150
3,617
16, 8413,903
30,518
9,888
38, 683
9,090
43, 219
41 427
184 415
1,909
9,771
. 33,294
23, 466
26 563
43' 806
28, 506
10,061
26 840
. • 11 990
13, 959
2,990
4 246
' 66 311
163,12883
88, 614
5 020
1 545
10 795 "
23 810
1, 567,149

Legal tenders

ClearingThree per
U. S. cerh o u s e cer- ceut. certifi- tificates of
cates.
tificates.
deposit.
\$20,
3.5,
150,
665,

$1,005,373481,771
571,339
3, 671, 865
1,472,419
2, 335, 356
4, 992, 269
2,189, 842
5, 068, 883
265, 999
454,114
135, 000
'
957,561
450, 674
396,312
426, 484
504, 305
333, 259
. 361,107
26, 700
610, 450
947, 530
4,167,159
2, 985, 250
2,25.5,402^
1, 313, 733
663, 267
1, 539, 241
690, 902
.597, 400
416,819
284, 276
,5.5,118
13, 283
,57,816
' 286,519
93, 756
23, 660
11,743
12, ,596
71, 300

35,
755,
40,
55,

/

000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000

$10, 000

10, 000

60, 000
20, 000
40, 000
10, 000

_

D u e from
redeeming
. agents.
$1, 637, 498
909,175
1,122, 763
7, 161, 832
2, 364, 264
5,194, 086
9, 376, 805
4, 042, 221
6, 029, 293
223, 264
571, 903
112, 858
711,329
•499, 543
339, 8U7
181, 422
233, 037
170,114
133, 767
22, 339
730,616
690, 255
3, 403, ,526
3, 343, 647
'3,516,547
1,178, 797
6?9, 332
1, 388,130
642, 590
848, 316
576, 969
361, 974
186, 679
19, 969
27.5, 214
79,974
1,596
44, 870

43, 202, 352 "

10, 000

1, 895, 000

States and
Territories.

n
1
9.
3
4
5
6
7
ft
q
10
11
19
13
14
15
16
17
1ft
iq
,. 90
91

Maine
New Hampshire ..
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
JSew V o i k
New Jersey
Pennsylvauia
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t . of C o l u m b i a
Virginia
AVest Virginia. . . .
N o i r h Carolina
South Carolina
GeoriiifiJ
Alabama
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
ludiana
Micliig,an
Wisconsin
Iowa
.Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregoji
California...'.
N e w Mexico
Colorado
Utah
Wyoming
Idaho
Dakota
Montana

00

93
94
95
96
97
98
. . . . 90
30
31
39
' 33
34
'. 35
36
37
3ft
39
40
41

59, Oil, 321

Francisco, 25 per cent, on circulation and 15 per cent on deposits.

CITIES, as sho.ivn hy the reports of April 25, 1873.
F u n d s , a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .
ClearingT h r e e per U. S. certiSpecie. - L e g a l t e n d e r s . h o u s e cer- cent, certifi ficates of
tificates.
cates.
deposit.
$1,106, 560
7, 410
102, 903
•30 262
107, 686
• 30, 934
266, 365
249
44,530
6,748
35, 239
638
8,334
14, 612

$7, 672, 050
782, 240
6, 444, 743
2, 666, 528
1, 812, 397
.326, 330
1, 908, 600
552,832
1,221,017
927, 892
5, 665, 366
742, 552
401,830
1, 503, 087

$580,00.0 '

1, 762, 475

•32,627,464

670, 000

7, 000, 000

13, 088. 251

24,023,521

700, 000

•9,475,000'.

450, 933

81, 450

D u e from
redeeming
agents.




90, 000

$770, 000
775, 000
3, 920, 000
100, 000
795, 000
90, 000
.500, 000
50, 000

^
.

$10, 794,115
2,173, 415
3,723,154
1,817,168
2, 980, 617
578, 915
. 62.5,369
334, 254
1, 421, 825
626, 645
2, 764, 684
550, 008
- 344,715
, 1,030,693

• Cities of
redemption.

Alba,ny .,
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Washington
N e w Orfeans
Louisville
Cincinuati
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Louis

^

a
1
9
3
4
5
6
,. 7
ft
q
10
11
19
13
14

29, 771, 577
N e w Y o r k C i t y . . . 15
. 25, 659

San F r a n c i s c o . . . . . 16

1-28

E E P O E T ON T H E

FINANCES.

III.—Tahle of tlie state of the lawful money reserve—Continued.

S t a t e s and T e r r i t o r i e s .

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
"...
Rhodelsland
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Virginia
AVest V i r g i n i a
North Caroliua
S o u t h Carolina
Georgia....
Alabama
•-.'
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
ludiana
Illinois
-..
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
l..
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
"California
N e w M.exico
Colorado
Utah
Wyoming...:...
Idaho.
•Dakota
Montana
Total.

Nuniber
of
banks.

.63
,4240
163
• 62
80
222
62
1.58
11
19
1
24
17
' 10
12
13
9
6
2
30
23
158
91
115
74
40
75
31
29
26
9 ,
1
2
2
6
3
1
1
1
3
1,737

Liabilities to
be protected
by reserve.

R e s e r v e required,
15
p e r cent, of
liabilities.

R e s e r v e held.

P e r cent,
of r e s e r v e
to liabilities.

$14,167, 974
7, 482, 344
10, 708,140
58, 649, 979
21,319,070
33, 047, 632
75, 76,5, Of'3
29, 027, 249
.54, 303, 072
2, 860, 555
4, 400, 912
720, 062
10,594,824
5; 288, 212
• 4, .521' 605
4, 062, 749
4, 372, 760
2, 305, 963
2, 203, 964
420, 146
7, 845, 281
8,071,979
39, 818, 983
29, 835, 560
2.5, 51.5, 864
13,924,320
6, 9:. 1,422
15,108,361
8, 769, 388
6, 582. 525
4, 787, 761
' 3, 638, 633
1, 042, 724
1,048,691
416,773
2, 684, 640
1,194, 038
128, 267
163,694
68,113
7.52, 360

$2 12.5,196
1,122, 352
\1, 606, 221
8, 797, 497
3,197, 861
4,957,145
11,364,763
4, 354, 087
8,145, 461
429, 083
660,137 •
108, 009
1, 589, 224
. 793, 232
678, 241
609, 412
65.5,914
345, 895
330, 595
63, 022
1,176, 790
1,210,797
,5, 972, 847
4, 47.5, 334
3, 827, 380
2,088,616
1, 036, 713
2, 266, 254
1,31,5,408
987, 378
718,164
545, 795"
156, 409
*200, 488
62,516
402, 696
.
179,106
, 19,240
24, 554
10,217
112, 854

$2, 834, 983
1, .587,156
1, 988, 618
11, 829, 718
4,000,160
7, 813, 869
14, 396, 835
6, 273, 363
10, 465, 440
520, 523
993,241
221, 427
" 1,942,242
974, 073
1, 004, 781
695, 627
871, 093
568, 248
903, 227
115,133
1, 45.5, 533
3,868,377
7, 905, 398
5. 954, 492
6,109, 370
2, 550, 908
1, 339, 599
3,711,0.32
1, 865, 292
1,329,861
1, 056, 023
1,101,839
411,587
239, 734
94,419
841, 674
237, 587
34, 685
31, 769
11, 4'. 9
147, 777

20.1
21.2
18.6
20.2
18.8
23.6
19.0
21.6
19.3
18.2
22.6
30.7
18.3
18.4"
22:2
17.1
19.9
24.6
41.0
27.4
38.5
23.1
19.8
20.0
23.9
18.3
20.1
24.6
21. 3 .
20.2
22.1
30.3
39.^5
22.8
22.6
31.4
19.9
27.0
19.4
16.9
19.6

524, 531, 472

78, 722, 905

•108,348,213

20.7

* R e s e r v e r e q u i r e d i n California gold b a n k s , o u t s i d e of S a n

Tahle of the state of the lawful money reserve—Continned;

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

1 Boston
o Al ban y
...
Philadelphia
4 Pittsburfijli
5 Bal t i m o r e
fi W a s h i n g t o n
7 N e w Orieaus
ft
q Cincinnati
10 Clevelfind
11 Chicago
19 D e t r o i t
.
13 M i l w a u k e e
14 St. L o u i s

180

"

Reserve req u i r e d : 25
p e r cent, on
liabilities.

$21, 283, 317
3, 303, 738
14,514,040
4, 602, 207
5, 563, 578
962,124
2, 849, 577
739,376 .
3, 027, 270
1, 705, 111
5, 604, 829
1,186, 790
903, 278
2, 617, 447

R e s e r v e held.

P e r cent,
of r e s e r v e
t o liabilities.

$22, 362, 334
4,931,916
15, 044, 756
5,179, 476
5, 612, 367
,725, 306
2, 996, 603
708, 977
3, .595, 613
3,715,250
10, 257, 361
3,406,748
1, 276, 756
2, 637, 242

26.3
37.3
25.9
• -28.1
, 2.5.2
18.8
26.3
24.0
29.7
' 25.2
45.8
29.6
35.3
25.2

..

275, 450, 728

68, 862, 682

78,450,705

28.1 ,

49

Total




. $85,133, 268
• 33,214,954
58,0.56,3 60
18, 408, 830
22,254,313
3, 848, 493
11, 393, 307
2, 957, 505
12,109, 080
6, 820, 444
22,419,314
4, 747,159
3,613. 114
10, 469; 787

•7

15 N e w Y o r k C i t y •.
San F r a n c i s c o

Liabilities' to
be protected
by reserve.

29
16
14
4
9
' 6
5
6
20
3
4
8

49

^

16

Number
of
banks.

214,255,949 .

53, 563, 989

64, 435, 053

25.2

2

3, 010, 453

752, 613

944, 527

31.4

129

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
STATES, as shown hy the r eports of June 13, 1873.
F u n d s a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .

*

ClearingT h r e e p e r U. S. cerL e g a l t e n d e r s . h o u s e cer- cent, certifi- tificates of
tificates.
cates.
deposit.

Specie.

$24,157
$1, 111, 478
516, 429
31 798
669, 524
38, 876
3, 634, 791
111 521
1,503, 850
22 191
2, 458,113
58, 779
4, 860, 965
16ft, 260
2,168, 513
85, 913
4, 847,102
48, 222
274, 007
2, 726
462, 048
. 17,011
• 137,000
3,930
982, 042
24,591
447, 683
9,781
430, 454
•36 517
323, 243
8,097
546, 051
• 42 997
370, 688
36, 326
276, 790
262 319
67, 712
* 2, 655
,598, 342
8 342
945, 952
'41,301 .
3, 998, 020
25, 755
2, 612, 737
36 316
72 400 • 2, 257, 631
45 457
1, 278,107
642, 019
14 359
1, 652, 367
34,178
^ 33,238
745, 340
567,113
13,647
•
443,791
3, 437
•5 148
291, 969
' 70, 8.53
82, 601
180, 953 •
11,126
257
54, 601
329, 393
84, 335
9 343
77, 427
1 777
> 25,168
- 19,287
12, 482
10, 686
5, 399
.
68,300

$10, 000
5,000
120, 000
785, 000
35, 000
860, 000
. 50,000
55, 000
$10,000

10, 000

60, 000
20, 000
105, 000
10, 000

$1, 689, 348
1, 0.53, 929
1,160, 217
.7, 298, 407
2, 474,119
5, 261, 977
8, 507, 660^
3, 968, 937
5, 515,116
233, 790
514,182
80, 447
935, 609
506, 609
537, 810
364, 287
282, 045
161, 234
364,118
44, 766
788, 349
881,124
3,861,623
3, 200, 639
3, 779, 339
1, 217, 344
733. 221
2, 024. 487
1, 086, 714
749, 101
608, 800
804, 722
258,133
47, 6.55
39, 561
427, 946
151,017
7,740
793
74, 078

10, 000

42,800,960

1, .715, 293

D u e from
redeeming
agents.

States and Territories.

1
!zi-

1
New Hampshir e..
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
NewYork
New Jersey
...
Pennsylvania.
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t r i c t Columbia.
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
N o r t h C'Brolina . . .
S o u t h Carolina
Georcia
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois

•
^
r\

5
fi
7
ft
q

in
11
1'^
13
I'I
15
16
17
1ft

19
20
91
oo
93
o,|

^5
96

Wiscoiisin

27
oq

Minnesota
Missouri

9q

30
31
3'>
33
Oregon
34
California
N e w Mexico . . . . . . 35
36
?7
Utah
3ft
3q
40
41

2,125,000 ' • 61,696,995

Francisco, 25 per cent, on circulation and 15 per cent, on deposits.

CITIES, as shoi'vn hy the reports of June 13, 1873.
F u n d s available for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

ClearingT h r e e per U . S. cerL e g a l t e n d e r s . house'cer- ceut. certifi- tificates of
cates.
tificates.
deposit.

$1, 015, 428
7 416
167, 431
28,102
65, 030
36 646
229, 585
468
59, 673
1, 473
125, 453
360
8,150
22, 275

$9, 423, 666
816, 663
4, 782, 737
2, 673, 463
1, 991,160
300, 035
1, 657, 330
398, 443
965, 000
94.5, 000
6, 240, 279
796,888
418, 363
1, 674, 224

$285, 000
90, 000

$1, 225, 000
825, 000
5, 685, 000
100, (IOO
1,170, 000
, 90,000
580, 000
50, 000
20, 000

1, 767, 490

33, 083, 256

375, 000

9, 745, 000

2.3, 581,173

30, 063, 875

295, 000

10,495,000

886,127

. 58,400

9 F




»

D u e from
redeeming
agents.
$10,
3,
4,
2,
2,

413, 240
282, 337
319, 588
377, 911
386,177
298. 625
1,109, 688
310, 061
1, 990, 940
718,777
3, 891, 629
609, 500
830, 243
940, 743

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n

Boston
Albanv
PhilacielphiJi. . . . . .
.Pittsburgh
Wasliington
New Orleans. •
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Chicago

D'etroft
Milwaukee
St. L o u i s

0

1
2
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

33, 479, 959
N e w Y o r k C i t y . . . 15
San F r a n c i s c o

16

130

REPORT

ON T H E FINANCES.

^

III.—Tahle of the state of the latuful money j-eseiTCT-Continned.

States and Territories.

Maine
N e w Hamiishire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
,
Delaware
Maryland
' D i s t r i c t of Columbia
Virginia
West Virginia...'...
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
,
Arka,nsas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
:..
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
Californinj.......''
N e w Mexico
Colorado
Utah

Wyoming
Idaho
Dakota
Montana
Total

Nuniber
of
banks.

63
42
42
166
62
80
221
62
157
11
19
1
22
17
10
12
13
9
7
2
30
23
157
92
116
74
41
75
32
29'
26
10
1
3
2
6
3
2
1
1
. 5
•^,747

Liabilities to
be protected
by reserve.

P e r cent,
R e s e r v e , req u i r e d , 15 R e s e r v e held. of r e s e r v e
to liabilipes.- cent, of
ties.
liabilities.

$14, 837, 824
7, 639, 990
11, 390, 494
59, 468, 793
21, 394, 023
32, 609, 037
77, 949, 443
29, 254, 903
55, 852, 972
3, 026, 796
4, 485, 834
706, Oil
9, 498, 411
.5, 347, 270
4, 369, 553
3, 717, 923
4, 229, 430
2,117, 225
2, 096, 878
362, 902
8, 038, 222
7, 316, 286
41, 639, 247
29, 083, 432
25, 734, 087
14, 619, 293
7, 531, 065
14, 852, 950
10, 473, 293
6, 759, 806
4, 642, 594
3, 573, 959
1, 038. 290
1, 316, 441
429, 478
2, 931, 978
1,120, 979
.213, 537
166, 194
329, 783
964, 286

$2, 225, 674
1,145, 998
1, 708, .574
8, 920. 319
3, 209,103
4, 891, 355
11, 692, 416
4, 388, 235
8, 377, 946
454, 019
672, 875
105. 901
1, 424i 761
"802, 090
655,4.33557, 638
634, 414
317, .590
314, 531
54, 435
1, 205, 733
1, 097, 443
6, 245, 887
4, 362, 515
3, 800,113
2,192, 894
1,137,160
2, 227, 942
1, .570, 994
1, 012, 621
696, 389
536, 094
155, 744
*2.52, 344
()4, 422
439, 796
• 168,147
32, 031.
24, 929
19, 467
144, 643

532, 971, 917

80, 000, 665

$3, 215, 585
1, 5.51, 214
2,133, 513
11, 913, 703
3,965,799
7, 338, 845
15, 839, 348
6, 348, 281
11, 364,162
614, 221
.1,102,582
268, 339
1, 623, 055
950, 477
719, 586
456, 696
614, 985
408,133
• 741,805
62, 598
1, 691, 017
1, 3.53, 001
8, 524, 776
5, 299, 349
6,185, 002
2, 641, 470 •
1. 763, 488
3, 295, 941
2, 716, 452
1, 289, 092
971, 737
912, 701
316, 803
301,103
484,181
596,118
150, 987
38, 062
. 25,800
32, 800
287, 648
110,110, 455

21.6
20.3'
18.7
20.0
18.5
22. 5
20.3
21.7
20.3
20.3
24.6
38.0
17.1
17.8
16.5
12.3
14.6
19. .3
•35.4
17.2
21.0
18.5
20.5
18.2
24.0
18.1
23.3
22.1
26.9
19.1
21.0
25. 5
30.5
22.9
1L3
20.3
13.5
17.7
1.5.5
25.3
29.8
20.7

* R e s e r v e r e q u i r e d i n California gold b a n k s , o u t s i d e of San

Tahle of the state of the lawful money reser-ve—Continued.

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

Boston
Albany
Philadelphia...
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Washington . . .
NewOrleans...
Louisville
Ciucinnati
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee . . . .
Saint Louis

Number
of
banks.

51
7
29
16
14
3
9
6
5
6
18
3
4

San F r a n c i s c o .




R e s e r v e reP e r cent,
q u i r e d , 25
of r e s e r v e
p e r x e n t . of R e s e c v e held, to liabililiabilities.
ties.

•48

$81, 571,340
32,721, 460
52, 887,628
17, 958,572
19, 990,820
2, 209,032
10, 231,772
3, 224,355
12, 278,228
7, 064,795
.30, 031,08®'
4, 702,924
3, 995,
10, 246,

$20, 392, 835
3,180, 365
13, 221, 907
4, 489, 643
4, 997, 705
552, 258
2, 557, 943
806, 089
3, 069, 557
1,766,198
7, 505, 272
1,190, 731
998, 052
2, 561, 720

$18. 478, 773
4. 405, 391
13, 572, 9.55
4, 913, 393
3, 942, 923
387, 519
2, 335, 440
843, 588
3, 594, 965
1, 592, 797
8, 814, 904
1, 303, 897
1, 307, 401
2, 601, 652

22.6
34.6
25.6
27.4
19.7
17.5
22.8
26.2
29.3
•22.5
29.4
27.4
32.7
25.4

269,164. 700

Total
N e w Y o r k City

Liabilities to
be protected
by reserves.

67, 291,175

68, 0a§, 598

25.3

201, 074, 964

50, 263, 741

46, 864, 341

23.3

4, 481, 396

1,120, 349

1, 514, 742

131

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
STATES, as shown hy the reports of Septemher 12, 1873.
F u n d s a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

Legaltenders.

$22, 835
'4, 260
39, 706
196, 469
' , 35,118
62, 399
238, 327
111,015
61, 874
2, 746
. 16 981
2 215
17. 252
13, 223
31, 89119, 831
43, 956
34, 916
257, 589
1,014
9, 345
50, 596
29,115 '
23, 864
72, 698
37,186
12, 938
31, 085
30, 232
17 309
4, 224
4,665
56 009
245, 540
109, 073
2,938
286
2, 633
11, 429
222
108, 632

$1,111,466
507, 8.55
. 605,199
,3, 615, .406
1, 551, 035
2,421,018
4, 927, 757
2, 204, 318
4, 815, 315
277, 221
421,938
145, 000
841,214
451, 607
• 416,097 .
283, 976
495,154
258, 498
315, 754
45, 603
543, 634
713, 722
4, 076, 111
2, 374, 909
2,273,451
1, 362, 349
704, 097
3,417,937
1, 068, 798
559, 242
398,172
269,187
62,210
45, 167
344, 509
107, 008
51, 386
26, 9.59
14,-371
26, 888
123,190

2, 071, 686

Clearing-house
certificates.

U . • S. certific a t e s of deposit.

42, 279, 728

$20, 000
35, 000
150, 000
880, 000
25,000 35, 000
835, 000
50, 000
10, 000

10, 000

60, 000
20, 000
105, 000
15, 000

•

D u e from
redeeming
agents.
$2, 061, 284
1, 004, 099
1, 338, 608
7, 221, 828
2,3,54,646
4, 820, 428
9, 838, 264
4; 032, 948
6, 436, 973
324, 254
663,663
121, 124
764, 589
^475, 647
''2?1, 598
152, 889
75, 875
114, 719
368,462
15, 981
1, 078, 038
•538, 683
4, 399, 5.50
2, 795, 576
• 3, 838, 853
1, 226, 935
• 1,046,453
1, 846, 919
1. 617, 422
712, 541
569, 341
638, 849
198, 584
10,396
30, 599
486,172
99, 315
8,470
5,690
52, 776

2, 250, 000

States and Territories.

0

1

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont .
. . .
Massachusetts
Rhode I s l a u d . . .
".
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of Colombia.
Virgiuia
West Virginia
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkan.sas
Iventucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
AVisconsin.. -.
Iowa
Minnesota
....
Missouri
,
Kansas
Nebraska
Ore«"on
California
N e w Mexico
Colorado
Utah
W.yoming
Idaho
Dakota
Montana

93
94
95
96
97
op
oq
30
31
39
33
34
35
36
37
3f^
39
40
41

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

^

3
4
5
fi
H
q
10

n9
1'
13
14
15
16
17
1ft
19
90
91
00

63,509,041

N

Francisco, 25 per cent, on circulation aud 15 per cent, on deposits.

CITIES, as shown hy the reports of Septemher 12, 1873.
F u n d s available for reserve.

Specie.

L e g a l tenders.

.$1,412, .396
7. 335
264, 430
36 320
30!» 923
5,931
236, 360
517
37,016
3,750
103, 404
226
5,774
19, 545

Clearing-house
certificates.

. $7,767,508
750, 645
4, 056. 243
. 2,511,746
•' 1,444,434
220,266 ,
1, 341, 329
513, 616
1,263,816
926, 000
5,132, 878
677, 699
' 570, 428
1, 289, 377

2, 242, 927

28, 465, 985

U , '585, 811

133, 420

$930, 000
935, 000
3, 720, 000
100,000
1, 090, 000

$175,000"

625, 000
50, 000
100, 000

7, 550, 000

21, 468, 5^0

968, 043

U . S. certificates of deposit.




17.5, 000

Due frora
redeeming
agents.
$8, 368, 869
2,712,411
5, 357, 282
2, 265, 327
1, 298, 566
161, 322
757, 751
329, 455
1, 669,133
613, 047
3, 578, 622
525, 972
731,199
1, 292, 730

p

Boston
Albany
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
W a s h i n gton
N e w Orleans
Louisville
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
1
Milwaukee
Saint Louis

•.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
ft
q
10
11
12
13
14

29, 661, 686
N e w York City

10, 810, 000
413, 279

1

£

^

15

San F r a n c i s c o

16.

132

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

IV.—Tal)le of tlie state of the lawful money reserve of the national hanks ofthe United States at.
condition made to the
STATES

No. of

Dates.

Jan.
6,1368
A p r i l 6 , 1 3 6 3 . . .•
J u l y 6, 1868 . . . . ' . . Oct.
5,1868
J a n . 4,1869
Aprill7,1869
J u n e 12,1869
Oct.
9,1869
J a n . 22,1870
M a r . 24,1,870
J u n e 9,:L870..
Oct.
8,1870
Dec. 28,1870
M a r . 18,1871
April29,1871
J u n e 10,1871
Oct.
2,1871
Dec. 16,1873
F e b . 27,3872
."
A p r i l 19,1872
J u n e 10,3 872
Oct.
3,1872
Dec. 27,1872.:
F e b . 28,1873
.'
A p r i l 25,1873
J u n e 13,1873
Sept. 12,1873

banks.

'..
.<5

:

Circulation
and deposits.

1, 418 $405, 322, 366
412, 251, 301
1, 418
419, 737, 829
1,414
414, 776, 428
1, 422
406, 128, 844
1,408
394,61.5,851
1. IOO
395, 378, 414
1, 100
394, 376,119
1. 398
1, 396 , 399,041,343403, 873, 222
3, 397
406,140, 873
1,396
1, 400 1 404, 337, 512
406, 311, 675
1, 430
423, 793, 830
1, 465
436, 412, 072
1,484
443,15.5,383
1, 497
467, 619, 031
1,536
460, 710, 213
1,564
481, 506, 93(5
1, 586
484, 854,125
1, 616
490,608,432
1,626
•1,689 . 506,713,150
500, 723, 505
1, 707
517, 267, 245
1, 717
514, 998, 003
1,732
.5':^4, 531, 472
1, 737
532,971,917
1,747

Reserve required.

$60, 798, 353
61, 837, 703
62, 968, 1.77
62, 216, 475
60,919,326
59,192, 376
59, 306, 761
59,156,419
59, 856, 202
60, 580, 977
60,921-, 131
60, 650, 626
60, 946, 7.50
63, .569, 073
0.5,461.811
66, 473, 276
70,142, 854
69,106, .532
72, 226, 040
72, 728,118
73, 591, 264
76, 006, 972
75.103, 526
77, 611, 640
77,281,146
78, 722, 905,80, 000, 665

R e s e r v e held,

$96, 873, 050
94,143, 672
100, 782, 520
95, 2.52, 448
92, 999, 217
82, 523, 406
85, 673, 334
80, 965, 643
93, 426, 468
92, 383, 755
92,037,33284, 777, 956
85, 723, 389
95, 615, 960
98, 693, 874
101, 706, 605
98, 946,184
91, 728, 626
102, 275, 001
98,012,845
101, 821, 660
97, 765, 876
102, 033, 935
107.595,294
105, 686, 322
108, 348, 248
110,110, 455

AND

R a t i o ol|
reserve
itoliabiities.

Fh~ ct.
23.9
23.8
24
22.9
22.9
20.9
21. 6
20.5
23.4
22.9
22.7
20.9
21
22.6
22.6
22.9
21.2
19.9
21.3
20.2
20.8
19.3
20.4
20.8
20. 5
20.7
20.7

N O T E . — T h e r e s e r v e w h i c h t h e b a n k s in t h e S t a t e s a n d T e r r i t o r i e s a r e r e q u i r e d t o
REDEMPTION

R a t i o of
Dates.

Jan.
6,1868
A p r i l 6,1868
July
6,1368
Oct.
5,1868,
Jan.
4,1869
A p r i l 17,1869
J u u e 12,1869
Oct.
9,1860,
J a n . 22,1870.
M a r . 24,1870.
J u n e 9,1870
Oct.
8,1870
Dec. 28,1870.
M a r . 18,1871,
A p r i l 29,1871.
J u n e 10,1871
Oct. ' 2,1871,
D e c . 16,1871,
F e b . 27,1872
A p r i l 19,1872
J u n e 10,1872
Oct.
3,1872
Dec. 27,1872.
F e b . 28,1873
A p r i l 25,1873
J u n e 13,1873
Sept. 12,1873

No. of
bauks.

Circulation
aiid d e p o s i t s .

P e s e r v e required.

Reserve held. r e s e r v e

224 $439, 653, 338 $109, 913, 335 $146, 041, 738
225
429, 084, 929 107,271,231
130,148, 347
225
493, 814, 023 123, 453, 505 160, 352. 080
223
440,170, 650
110,042,664
139, 227, 396
220
428, 310, 661
107,077,665
140, 320, 761
220
400, 006,-281
100, 001, 571
115, .570, 842
219
425, 263, 320 106,315,832
125, 468, 496
219
403, 632, 332 100, 908, 081
127, 256, 666
218
447, 831, 836 111, 957, 959
155, 894, 990
218
445,'759, 265 111, 439, 813 143,139, 798
216
460,166, 341
115, 041, .582 150, 572, 350
' 215 409, 060, 815 102, 265, 204 118, 633, 295
218
420, 796, 417 105, 199,105
123,816,297
223
466, 973, 869 116, 743, 467 138. 772, 908
225
476.104, 067
119,026,015
144,809,917
22()
510,018,734
127,504,683
159, 693, 896
230
484, 634,132
121,158,533
134, 463, 827
226
456,721,899
114,180, 474
126, 916, 204
223
470,889,271
117, 722, 318 126, 440, 065
227
460, 754, 376 115,188,594
124, 949, 109
227
499, 398, 300 124, 849, 574 144, 672, 283
230
443, 349, 305 110, 837, 326 112,152,0.56
233
461,855,292
.115, 463, 822 123,136, 887
230
475, 475, 970 118, 868, 991
121, 049, 950
230
464, 729, 950 116,182, 487
119. 676, 330
231
492, 717,130
123,179, 234
143, 830, 285
229
474,721,060
118, 675, 265 116, 474, 681

to liabilities.

Pei c t
33.2
30.3
32.5
31.6
32.7
28.9
29.5
31.5
34.8
32.1
32.7
29
29.4
2^.7
30.4
3L3
27.7
27.8
26.9
27.1
29
25.3
26.7
25.525.8
29.2
24.5

N O T E . — T h e reserve which the b a n k s iu t h e redemption cities above are required to




133

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
various dates, f r o m J a n u a r y 6,1868, to Septemher 12, 1873, a s
Comptroller of the Currency.
,
-

hy the reports of their

TERRITORIES.
Funds available for reserve.

Specie.

$2, 565, 221
1, 804, 017
2, 058, yS9
1, 781, 317
2 819, 665
1, 705, 877
1, 597, .541
1, 573, 300
3,146,141
3, 329, 055
2, 912, 275
2, 357, 856
2, 359,126
2, 420, 987
2, 504, 655
2, 032, 371
f, 814, 927
2, 043, 411
•2, 816, 771
2,600,614
1, 890 232
1, 950,142
-1,978, .383
io5'79, 651
17567,149
1,735,293
'• 2, 073, 686

Legal-tenders.

$36,'l38, 801
34, 735, 700
38, 247.168
39, 034, 570
40, 724, 681
37, 213, 372
36, 232, 475
36, 215, 334
36, 855, 868
35, 659, 362
36, 992, 740
3.5, 46.5,-915
36, 842, 257
3.5, .589, 817
38, 506, 524
38, 481, 5.50
40,139, 433
39, 380, 993
39,792,119
42, 485, 632
41,495,581
42, 717, 294
43, 228, 892
41, 598, 799
43, 202, 852
42, 800, 960
42, 279, 728

Compoundinterest
notes.

Clearinghouse
certificates.

$12, 933, 550
11, 806, 040.
6, 478, 600
2,131, 020

"
*

Three p e r
cent, certificates.

D u e f r o m red e e ni-i n g
agents.

$1, 440, 000
2, 905, 000
4, 265, 000
5, 245, 000
4, 81.5, 000
4, 595, 000
4, 235, 000
^ 3,795,000
3,370, 000
'3, 265, 000
3, 115, 000
2, 890, 000
2, 545, 000
2, 245, 000
2, 040, 000
1, 885, 000
1, 355, 000
1, 060, 000
810, 000
690, 000
605, 000
335, 000
18.5,000
90, 000
10, 000
10, 000

$43, 795, 478
42, 892, 915.
51, 732, 763
47, 060, 541
44, 639, 871
39, 009,1"57
43,608,318
39, 382, 014
.50, 054, 459
50, 130, 338
49,017,317
44,064,185
43, 977, 006
55, 360,156
55, 647, 695
,59, 307, 684
55, 636, 824
49, 244, 222
58,856,111
52, 236, 599
57, 830, 847
52, 543, 440
56, 291, 660
62, 641, 844
59, Oil, 321
61, 696, 995
63, 509, 041

United States
certificates of
deposit.

$220 000
350 000
1, 485, 000
1,895,000
2,125, 000
2, 250; 000

keep, is 15 per centum of the aggregate amount of their circnlation and deposits.
CITIES.

.o^
Funds available for reserve.

Specie.

$15, 538, 758
13 575 641
18, 696, 932
9, 686, 044
24, 458, 946
6 768 826
15,882,535
20, 415,157
43, 005, 329
32 703 399
27, 023, 254
12,108,149
19, 949, 751
19 516 341
15 788 996
14,171,225
10,226, 739
23 273 114
19, 504, 567
17,142, 870
18,040,028
8, 279, 613
17, 068, 954
15, 998, 022
15 301 659
26, 234, 795
17, 796, 781

Legal-tenders.

$78,167, 690
49, 654, 519
6,3, 918, 932
53, 418, 905
47,514,619
43, 661, 789
44, 701, 644
47, 503, 961
49, 256, 634
44, 720, 616
53, 718, Oil
4i; 737, 662
41,680,48853, 253, 532
65, 006, 031
81, 923,110
66, 848,-2.'^3
52, 633, 689
55,118, 281
60, 822, 823
78, 001, 259
59, 356, 810
57, 358, 477
54, 816,110
56, 732, 435
63, 20,5, 531
50, 067, 935

Compoundinterest
notes.

Clearinghouse
certificates.

$27, 063. 480
27,111,450
12, 994, 620
2, 382, 710

$17, 956, 000
19, 881, 000
21, 403. 000
19,136, 000
20, 498, 000
20, 599, 000
21, 581, 572
19, 248, 000
20, 322, 070
16, 633, 026
16,195, 000
13, 909, 000
12, 092, 577
8, 632, 000
5, 560, 000.
2,115, 000
1, 370, 000
670, 000
175, 000

Three p e r
cent, certificates.

D u e from redeeming
agents.

$6, 805, 000
$18,466,810
21, 3.50, 000
18, 456, 737
24,101, .596
40, 640, 000
19, 904, 737
53, 835, 000
21, 087,196
47, 260, 000
18, 545, 227
46, 595, 000
19, 304, 317.
45, 580, 000
42, 050, 000 • 17,287,543
21, 587, 027
24, 090, 000 .
23, 304, 783
22, 530, 000
25,618,085
22, 810, 000
22, 211, 484
23, 440, 000
20, 828, 058
20, 860, 000
28, 449, 035
16., 955, 000
29, 413, 318
13, 020, 000
33, 061, 561
11, 290, 000
31 241 785
5, 825, 000
28, 741, 375
5, 635, 000
30, 692, 217
4, 930, 000
29, 883,-416
3,190, 000
33, 733, 421
2, 805, 000
28,173,633 1
1, 220, 000
30, 074, 456
775, 000
30,825,818
320, 000
29, 797, 236
33, 479, 959
30, 074, 965

keep, is 25 per centum of the aggregate amount of their circulation and deposits'.




United States
cerfeificEites of
deposit.

$6, 490, 000
12, 300, 000
1'6, 975, 000
16, 475, 000
20, 240, 000'
18 360 000

134

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

. V.—Tahle showing for twenty-seven different dates during the years 1868 to 1873. inclusive, the
redemption cities

1

1868.
States and Territories.
1 Jan. A p r i l July

I 6.
IPerct
23.6
11 Maine
28.8
21 New Hampshire
i 20. 9
31 Yermont
24. 5
4 j Massachusetts
21.5
51 Phode Island
22. 9
61 Connecticut
23.
7J NewYork
:....
26.8
81 New Jersey
22.8
91 Pennsylvania
23. 3
101 Delaware
25.3
11 Maryland..-

6.

6.

1869.

1870.
1

Oct. 1 Jan. April June Oct. Ljan.
5.

17.

^'

12.

9.

22.

Mar. IJune i Oct.
24.

9.

8.

iPerct IPerct [Perct IPerct IPerct IPerct iPerct \Perct IPerct IPerct Perct
22.6 21.5 22.7 I 20.7 18.3 21.
19.1 22.7 22.7 22.
20. 7
24.1 23.6 25. 6 1 23. 9 21.4 23.7 22.
23.6 2 L 5 22.3 22.1

21.
21.4
22. 8 24.5
19.
22.
20.8 22.8
22.3 22.7
24. 3 24.9
23.7 22. 9
22.8 24.3
23. 2 23.4
fj-p
12 Jl^ii'sf.Tir-'.t, V/X \Plnli-iTiiliiC Io. 19.1 :14:.8 il7 2
. ' A O t i l XVj U
. . / U l LLLLIIL/I J
19!2 18. 9 20.8
Virginia
We-stATireinia....-.". 21.6 19. 3 20.1
14 North Carolina
151
". 27.7 2.5.1 24.2
64.
64.8 61.
161 South Carolina
37.9 34.9 36.4
171 Georgia
36.2 36.5 41.6
18i Alabama
19 1 Miee-iscjin-ni
24. 8 31 5 45 4
47!
54^6 .5L2
20 Texas
21.3
9 . 3 19.2
21 Arkansas
22.
25.2 24.9
22 Teunessee
•.
24.6 23.5 22. 8
23 Kentucky
22.9 21.1 21.9
24 Ohio...v.
25 I n d i a n a
-... 22.2 22.3 21.2
261 .Ulinois
1 24. 9 23. 9 26.1
I 25.4 24.3 21.5
27 M i c h i g a n
28.
24.2 27.5
28 W i s c o n s i n
21.9 19.6 22.
29 M i n n e s o t a
26.3 24.2 32.4
30 I o w a
311 M i s s o u r i
24.2 24.6 28.3
321 K a n s a s
15.5 32.7 39.
331 N e b r a s k a
17.3 20.4 49.8
34 i N e v a d a
24.
26.5 28.
351 Oregon
38.2 37.3 40.5
36 California
37 f M o n t a n a
42.4 '41.'9'
1 2 . 3 19.8 44.8
38 I d a h o
30.1 18.
23.9
391 Colorado
17.1 12.-f]> 18.4
40 f Utah

ill

21.1
23. 2
20.9
21.4
22.5
24.5
22.3
23.6
24.2
20 8
19.3
19.9
23.3
31.6
38.1
34.7
44. 7
39! 8
16.8
2L4
23.2
2L1
20.7
24.6
24.9
23.1
23.5
21.9
25.4
28.5
50.5
.31. 9
,30.1

2 L 7 13.9 21. 8
23.3 21.1 20.7
19.6 18.1 •17. 5
20.9 19. 6 23.122.1 20.3 19.6
23. 3 24.2 23.6
22.2 21.
21.8
2.5.1 23.5 22. 3
22. 9 2 L 7 24.
37. 9
19.1 1 2 . 7 "15." .3"
20.5 16.9 16.2
23.1 2.5.6 25.4
46.4 43.9 .53. 9
38.4 31,2 41.7
34.1 28.8 ,35.7

fso.'i'
12.9
27.1

1 24.9
! 22.1
121.2
•.24.7! 24. 2
27. 4
20. 5
23. 7
25.9
2.5.3
42.6
29.
38.1

42.'7"
2L9
22.8
28.6
19.
19.2
21.8
23.2
23.2
17.1
21.3
24.7
26.8
32. 9
49.3
28.4

41." i '4.5.'9' 1 5 . "
21.7
30.8 31.
33.9 2.5.5 24.5
18.9
16.7

411 Wyoming

.52." 7'
22.3
24.3
22.3
19.5
19.3
24.8
2L4
25.1
21.1
24.7
23.5
22.7
32.8
42.4
25.5

19.3
20.6
19.
23.4
19.9
21.4
20.6
25; 7
26.3

21.7
24. 9'
20. 9
26.1
23.7
25. 2
22.4
25.1
27. 5

19.5
22.5
18.6
24.3
23.1
23.7
24.
24.6
28.2

20. 7
21.8
18.6
24.8
2L9
24.4
22.5
19.5
30. 6

19.7
20. 8
19.9
22.1
20.3
22.4
20.1
23.
27.3

12.
1.5.7
19.7
27.7
30.9
36.6

16." 2'
20. 4
25.3
26. 6
30.1
30.9

ie.'g"

20.
17.4
24.8 18.9 22.8
21.5
21.5 -23.9 ^21.1
30.8 28.1 29.6
17.5 1 0 . 7 1^7. 9

iai'

'is." 5'

'46." 7" 1 46."2' 49." e' 45." 7' '.39." 9'
8 . ^ 8 . 6 22.9 19.6 1 0 . 5
20.4 27.
21.8 27.2
19.6 2 L 2
19.7 18.4
22.3 22. 3
21.8 23. 5
20.4 24.4
18.1 16.8
20.3 22.9
20.2 ,24.3
20.5 2 L 9
18.8 30. 4

24.7
27.5
2L3
19.3
24.7
21.
23.2
20.1
24.6
26.9
18.9
30.

24.1
24.2
20.8
20.9
26.2
22„ 5
24.2
24.9
24.4
28.3
23.8.
33.3

22.3
20. 9
19.9
19.'7
^0.3
19.6
21.8
23.4
21.5
21. 9
20.6
28.

'd'o'.i '29.-2" '22."" "32.'i" '24." i '

34." 7' 22." 2" "l.5."i'
25.8 25.1 1 3 . 6
31.1 34.9 27.9 15.3
32.3
6.4

iae"

'is.'"

42." 2'
17.8 27.9
40.7 44.1
3.5 13.5

22.9

22.7

42 N e w M e x i c o

I
i

Averages

1 NewYork..
2H Boston ..'
31 Philadelphia

41 A l b a n y
5i P i t t s b u r g h . . . :
6 Ba,ltimore
Washington
8. N e w Orleans
9 J Louisville
10 C i n c i n n a t i
11S C l e v e l a n d

12| Chicajro
13j Detroit
^.
14J Mil w.auke6
15 p S a i n t L o u i s
16 L e a v e n w o r t h
171 San F r a n c i s c o
Averages
J

23.9. 22.8

24.

22. 9

22. 9

20.9

21. 6

20.5

23.4

20 9

Redemption cities.

:

33.8
32.1
36.9
36.2
| 29 2
'.. 1 32 4
26.8
36. 3.
I 29.8
j 23.4
29.2
\ 32. 6
| 4L7
| 33.
{ 26.5
23.

,31.9 31.9
26.3 34.8
32.3 .36.8
34.3 .31.1
30 6 27.9
27 8 31.2
•24 2 27.5
42.5 34.8
-36.
31.
2 4 . 3 26.6
26.4 Z 1 . 5 \
30.6 34.2
35.
29.9
30. 6 32.2
26.8 28.9
16.5 1 9 . 3

32. 6 1 33. 2 28.8

30.1
32. 1 28.4 2 7 . 3 '
,32. 9 30.2. 30.4
42. 1 • 41.5 37. 9
29.3 25. 1 2 4 . 9
30. 9 28.4 25.5
2,8. 6 27.8 27.5
31.4 36.5 44.3
30.1 29.7 26.8
28.4 2 3 . 8 2 4 . 3
30. 6 25.
25.9
35.1 30.2 33.4
32.1 27.6 31.7
34. 7 28.7 30.7
.24.9 9R ^ 2 2 . 8 27.4
23.6 p i . S 24.(5 2 0 . 8
30. 3
31. 9
35. 9
2( 4
28 2
26 1
38. 9
29.4
25.1
27.7
35.3
36.7
33.4

j 33.2 30.3 32.5 31. 6 1 32 7 1
28.9 29. 5
»
.I
I
I • r.
I
I - l

1

34.7 37.7 32.8
27.1 31.8 30.
29. 9 32.3 33.5
30.5 41.6 43.6
27.3 1 27.7 27.4
2 4 . 9 3 L 3 31.1
26. 4 i 26.6 27.5
31.4 43.2 1 28. 8
28. 2 28. 4 1
.31.4
28., 5 28.4 29.1
29.7 28.9
29.3
30. 5 30. 4 30.-6
32. 7 29.9 28.3
28.
.32.1 • 31.5
25.2 31.5 31.6
32 2 34.7 35 7
1

33.7 28.5
29. 5 29. 6
35.
28. 9
44.9 39.
28. 6 29 2
31. 5 26 1
27. 4 27 3
28.8 2 2 . 9
27.6 32
28 9 27.9
27 5 26.3
29.4 30.7
33.3 32 2
37.4 32.9
32 5 27.1
38 4 3 3 . 8

31 5 j 34.8 32 1 32 7
i
I
!

29.
I . I

NOTE.—The reserve which the banks in the States and Territories are required to keep is 15 per
redemptiou cities" are required to keep is 25 per centum ofthe aggregate amount of their circulation
printed in bold-face type,
rintn.fl
hnlrl-fi-ir'A f.vnA




135

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.

pei'centage of reserve to circulation and deposits, in each\ of the States, Territories, and
of the " " •

1872.

.

Apr. Jnne
19.
10-

Oct
3.

1871.
Dec.
28.

Mar.
18.

April
29.

June
10.

Oct.
2.

Ferctl F e r c t F e r c t P e r c t P e r c t \
22. D
22.1
22.4 22.7 21.7
21.2
25.
22.7 25.5 23.7
20.6
20.6
20.7 2 L 3 20. 8
20.3
22.6
23.
22. 2 20. 7
18."
18.6
19.5 21.
18. 9
22. 8
24.4
26.
2.5.2 20.1
19.6
• 24.2
22.5 22. 3 20.
22. 3
23.9
23.1 24.5 22.5
20.5
21.9
22.2 2 L 9 19. 4
•19. 5
20.8
20.9 20.6 22. 7
27. 0
26.
24.1 26.4 29. 6
"l8."2' " ' l 7 . " 9 ' '""l6.'9 "i7."9' 'i7."2"
17.1
16.2
16.9 17.4 20.3
18.6
22.2
20.7 21.9 18.
21.6
26.6
31.9 23.1 20.1
28.
25.7
30.7"
28.5 19.9
6L5
42.4
3 L 8 34.7 15.8
"34.'5 '""41.'4
13.8
14.4
25.4
22.1
22. 4
20.
20.9
21.1
20.
18.8
23.3
22.2
22. r
24.6
23.2
22.8
19'. 2 j
17.1
22.9 1 21.9
23. 5
•20.1
19.6
2L8
24.1
25.1

"so.'i

'40." '
9 . 7 10.5
21.
23.2
19.4 20.3
21.4 22.4
22.3 23.9
21. 4 24.8
24.6 24.1
22.7 24.5
19.6 21.6
22.6 24.7
20.8 20.9
22.4 15.8
28.8 28.1

Dec
16.

Feb.
27.

Perctl F e r c t F e r c t :
18. 3 22.
18.6
21.2 22.3 20.3
18.4 1 18.7 XI.
18.'
20.6 19.5
17.
18.2 17. 2
22.5 24.3 20.9
18.4 21.1 20.
2 L 4 22.5 22.4
18.4 21.5 21.3
18.5 21.8^
17.
24.5 24.6 21.7
30.8
'i9."l'' "is."?' 18.6
20.2 19.8 16.3
21.4 22'.
21.
18.7 23.2 20.4
19.4 26.2 24.7
28.9 28.9 29.5

38."
'si.'i 35." 7 '39." 7"
20.6 11.4 29.4 1 1 . 6
19.5 22.
21.4 21.6
22.8 18.8 18.6 18.4
21.6 21.
20.8 19.4
23.
19.7 19.
20.6
22.5 22.3 .22.8 20.6
24.4 22.4 21.2 f 9 . 5
22.3 23.
22. 4 20.1
25.4 19. 4 17.1 16.5
24.1 2 L 6 22.
22.6
19.5 20.
19.9 19.6
22.
20.4 3 3.
22.
24.9 24.
16.9 21.

'24.'3' " * 3 4 . ' l ' """35."" '33.'i' '36." .3" '23.'3" '25.'3" '23.'7'
"26.3' " 3 0 . " " '
29.4
15.8
,36.4
27.7
25.2
10.4

21.

22.6

13.2 '22." 2"
17.2 17.9
23.4 27.1
15.9 1.5.
27.3 39.5
18.6
9.9
22.6

22.9

is." 5"
20.3
28.2
12.6
20.
28.4

is." 2'
16.
23.5
16.3
35.7
13.2

21.2

19.9

li! 14'.2
1 3 . 6 21.1
21. 6 24.6
11.6 9 . 3
25.3 1 4 . 9
21.5
7.8
21! 3

20.2

20.8

29.4

30.4

27.7

27.8

26.9

27.1

Apr.
25.

J u n e Sept.
13.
12.

ii\7

29.
30.9 26.7 27.6 25.7 26.* 7 29.1
31.
29. 9 27.1 26. 6 2 6 . 1 26.2 27.4
31.5 30.6 27.4 26.9 27.1 27.7 31.4
42.5 49.
36.1 34.
32.3 31.4 35.2
27.2 27.6 28.3 24.3 28.
23.5 25. 9
29.
30.1 26.
27.2 25.8 26.8 27.1
39.2 34. 5 27.5 2 4 . 1 3.5.
34.4 34. 9
35.2 33.2 2 2 . 6 .14.9 3 L 6 1.28.9 27.2
30.
27.8 30.
25.8 25. 6 i 2 4 . 2 25. 9
32.7 34.1 35. 8 27.5 26.
25.1 28.1
30.3 29.3 29.
28.7 27.8 39. 9 24.3
32.
31.7 38.5 30.5 29.2 29.4
35.
,35.3 36.2 33. 6 29.5 28.2 2.5,
27.3
34.6 41.
31.
2.5.3 20. 9 23.3 26. 7
28.8 32.3 30.8 26.4 31.4 24.8 30.8
26.8 19.2 18.7 22.6 2 0 . 3
74.1 18.4 ,57.5 49.7 '37." 7" '42." 8'
31.3

Dec.
Feb.
• 27.
23.

F'erct\ P e r c t \ P e r c t ] P e r c t l Perctl Perct.l P e r c t \
19.6 19.5 20.
23.2 19.5 20.1 21.6
1
20. 3 '21. 6 21. 5 2 L 3 27.4 21.2 20. 3
2
17.9 17.7 17.7 19.4 18.1 18.6 1 \ ^
3
20.
20.2 20.4 21. 2 20.1 20.2 20*
4
18.
18.
38.2 17.6 18.2 18.8 18.5
5
22.9 20. 6 24.7 22.5 24.6 23.6 22..
6
19.5 18.6 20.2 20.9 19.7 19.
20.3
7
23.
20. 9 21.8 22.4 21.5 21.6 21.
8
39.4 19.
18.7 19.4 20.4 19. 3 20.,
9
20.2 20. 5 18. 2 17.8 17.2 18. 2 20.
10
23.8 2I.2 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.6 ! 24.,
ll
38.5 32.7 28.1 32.4 22.8 30.7 1 38.^
12
13
18. 6 1 4 . 4 17.7 16. 4 16.4 18.3 17.
16.5 17.
19.2 19. 2 18.3 18.4 17. 8 14
19.5 1 18.7 2 L 5 19.8 17.2 22.2 16.5 15
22. 5 17.8 19.1 21. 9 29.3 17.1 1 2 . 3 ] 16
21.5 21.5 31. 3 1 22. 3 1 17.5 19. a 1 4 . 6 i 17
29.4 '16.5 28. 3 1 25. 3 23.8 24. 6' 19.3 1 18
19
'.35.'4' 20
'33.'3' "26." e' "34.7 1 3 L 6 33." 8 "4i."
19.6 14.6 17.3 13.5 1 3 o 2 27.4 17.2 21
21.9 16.6 19.4 -.20. 8 21.
23.1 .18.
22
38.
18.1 19.5 "20. 8 •17.9 18.5 21.
23
20.5 18.1 19.1 20.8 19.7 19.8 20.5 24
22.2 19.4 18.7 19.4 21.5 20.
18.2 25
24.
t U 4 20.3 23.2 23.
23.9 24.
26
19.2 19.
19.9 19. 9 18.6 18.3 18.1 27
2L
22.1 22. , 20.8 19.7 20.1 23.3 28
21.7 19.8 19.6 : 17.1 16.9 21.3 25.9 29
22.1 18.6 19.9 i 20.2 20.7 24.6 22.1 30
22.9 .17.6 19.3 : 20. 2 21.8 20.2^
19.1 31
23.7 22.3 18. 9 ! 19.4 22. 2 22.1 21.
32
27.
22.5 19.5 1 22.3 19.
30.3 25.5 i 33
1 34
'2s." 4' '27." 6" '32." 5' '29.'4' '36." s" '39." 5" '36.'5' 35
20.5 32.7 28.4 22. 8 22.8 22.9 1 36
16.
24.9 1 23. 4 18.3 19.6 29.8 1 37
48.1 3.6.6 18.6 17.5 13.4 19.4 15.5 i 33
24.7 26.1 29.1 1 24.8 27.1 31. 4 20.3 1 39
6 . 9 17.3 1.2.6 16.9 \ 9 . 9 13.5 40
7.4
17.7 i 41
1 0 . 7 16.9 31.1 i 22.2 25.7 97.
1 2 . 1 17.2 16.3 1 21.7 1.9.9 22.6 11.3 1 42

29.4
28.4
32.7
23. J
29.9
30.1
41.6
40.
27.2
27.3
29. 2
28.1
26.2
30.3
3.5.9
35.6
28.2
27.
28.9
30.8
26.5
3.L3
29.4
30.1
30.4
36.7
26.8 " 2 3 . 3
27.7 1 25.
25.5
22.2
29.7

1873.

29.

19.3

24.4
24.6
26.8
24.8
24.8
26.6
22.5
22.4
25.1
23.9
27.8
27.2
27.
29.6
23.5

20.4 i 20.8

20.7

20.7

1
24.8 2 4 . 7 25.2 2 3 3
2
!24.5 25.6 26.3 22.6
26.1 27..
25. 9 25.6
3
31.4 32.
37.3 34.6
4
25.2 26.
28.1 27.4
5
'21.7 26.2 25.2 1 9 . 7 \ 6
,30.1 1 8 . 8 1 1 7 . 5
7
116. •
8
23.8 25.3 26.3 2 2 . 8
j-27.4 28.8 2 4 .
26.2
9
26. S 27.
29.7 29.3 10
3 L 4 26.1 25. 2 22.8 11
3 L 4 27.1 j 45.8 29.4 12
28. 7 27.6 29.6 27.4 13
25.5 2.5.1 35. 3 32, 7 14
25.9 27.4 25.9 25.4 15
. . . . - . . § 16
ii' 2"i".i 18^"" 13ir4' 33.8

25.7
25.9
27.4
,35.9
25. 3
27.5
17.
24.8
24.1
30.6
1 27. 3
30.9
30.
29.3
28.3

m . i 21
25.3

20.5

1 26. 7 24.9

25.8

29.2 2 4 . 5

1^
"
^

ceutum of the aggregate amount of their circulation and-deposits. The reserve which the banks iji t h e
and deposits. When the amount of reserve is less than the proportion ^required by law, the ratios are




ABSTRACTS
OF

S P E C I A L

R E P O B T S
OF

THE NATIONAL BANKS
»

ON ^

OCTOBER 13 AND NOVEMEBER 1,

1873.

Arranged hy States and redemption cities.

• NOTE.—-These reports show the priucipal items ouly of resources and liabilities, and consequently
are not intended to balance.
«
j

\

MAINE.
OCTOBKK 13.

VERMONT.

N0VEMJ3EK' 1.

63 banks.
63 banks.
Resources.
$13, 337, 067 85 $13, 264, 605 22
D o a n s a n d discounts
i ) e m a n d loans
'
127, 650 00
129, 000 00
D . S. b o n d s on h a n d
532, 537 23''
524, 645 62
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
1, 228, 433 69
1, 393, 219 96
D u e ^rom aiip'd r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
109, 436 82
l ) u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
127, 866 56E x c h a n g e s for clearing-liouse
382, 488 00
312, 505 00
National bank notes
30, 067 23
. 30, 098 46
Fractional currency
13, 239 81
18, 867 15
Specie—coin
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
1,144, 404 00
1,115, 650'00
Legal-tender notes
XJ o certificates of deposit

O C T O B E R 13.

N O V E M B E R 1.

. 42 banks.
$9, 767,198 08

42 banks.
. $9, 620, 391 91

218, 900 00
395,100 00
866, 462 74
85, 234 68

. 210,450 00
384, 400 00
750, 783 48
64, 084 -66

173,
16,
25,
10,
737,
105,

667
370
945
000
505
000

00
,52
19
00
00
00

16.3, 315 00
17 899 97
30, 6.53 20
11, 660 00
744, 575 00
100, 000 00

16, 916, 457 97

12, 401, 383 21

12, 098, 213 22

9, 440, 000 00
7, 875, 706 00
5, 887, 787 20
230, 950 14

7, 850, 282 50
6, 810,180 00
4,059,725 44
36, 373 25

7, 8.58, 052 50
6, 840, 224 00
3, 748, 493 10
58, 807 86

23, 434, 443 34

18, 756, 561 19

18, 505, 577 46

.
16, 910, 324 63

Totals .
Liabilities.

9, 440, 000 00
7, 853, 294 00
5, 889, 356 49 •
359, 994 02

Capital stock
'
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
. .
....
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s

Totals

....

23, 542, 644 51
NEW

42 banks.
$6, 411, 861 99

Resources.
Doans a n d d i s c o u n t s
D e m a n d loans
U . S. b o n d s ou h a n d .
O t h e r s t o c k s , bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from all o t h e r l i a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for c l e a r i n f . h o u s e
National bank notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coin
•
o'old T r e a s u r y n o t e s
L e g a l - t e n d e r notes
U . S. certificates of deposit
Clearin<^-house loan certificates
Totals

.

.

32, 500
179;289
638, 332
12, 839

RHODE ISLAND.

HAMPSHIRE.
42 b a i m .
$6, 300, 686' 81
32,
178,
570,
7,

00
99
22
88

258, 974 00
16,119 16
2, 380 15
573, 4.50 00

.

.500 00
989 99
247 84
801 28

262, 574 00
17, 516 77
3, 782 05
546, 273 00

• 62 banks.
,$26,406,674 97

•

62 banks.
$25, 985, 822 50

84, 350 00
252,315 .59
1, 784, 621 03
587, 921 93

84, 350 00
314,765 59
• 1, 655, 399 32
, 721, 874 92

222, 065 00
58, 594 04
.32,361 70
10,100 00 .
1, 432, 634 00
5, 000 00

180 290 00
57,^419 85
46, 425 97
1,040 00
• 1, 419, ,592 00
5, 000 00

8,125, 797 39

...,.-

7,020,371 74

30,.87g, 638 26

30,471,980 15

5,135, 000 00
4, 568, 855 00
2, 646, 348 98
18, 759 17

5,135, 000
4, 571, 870
2, 405,110
25, 587

20,
13,
6,
1,

20,504,800 00
13, .321, 791 00
6,177, 298 84
1, 255, 788 32

Liabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals




•

12, 368, 963 15

00
00
37
13

12,137, 567 50

504, 800 00
325, 033 00
890, 802 15
468, 241 83

42,188, 876 98

41,259,673 16

137

COMFTKOLLER OF THE CUEEENCY.
Ahstracts of special reports, Octoher 13 and Novemher 1, 187.3—Continued.
MASSACHUSETTS.
O C T O B E R 13.

N E W YORK.

N O V E M B E R 1.

O C T O B E R 13.

Resources.
166 banks.
$60, 516, 459 66
L o a n s and discounts
D e m a n d loans
772, 600 00
D S b o n d s on h a n d
.
. .
O t h e r stocks, bonds, and m o r t g a g e s . .
1, 052, 397 93
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
5, 838,183 19
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
640, 987 35
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
N a t i o n a l b<ank notCvS
1,113, 857 00
224, 340 05
Fractional currency
.. •
Specie—coiu
89, 695 51
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
71, 3.50 00
3, 960. 871 00
Legal-tender notes
XJ. S. certificates of deposit
815, 000 00
Clearing-house loan certificates

166 banks.
$59, 477, 950 33

221 banks.
$67,140, 319 90

221 banks.
$65,356, 319 51

778, 200
1, 027, 225
5, 4^2, 266
714, 432

00
32
07
85

773, 250
3, 032, 559
6,719,921
2,298,422

00
30
55
31

794,100
2, 920, 201
5,949,829
2, 356, 177

00
95
26
75

1, 048, 333
226, 326
109,718
54, 000
4, 004, 312
815, 000

00
13
61
00
00
00

917,076
169, 298
137, 715
39, 040
5, 530,196
425, 000

00
29
73
00
00
00

750, 045
16*1 249
137,' 639
46, 390
5, 277, 962
430, 000

00
88
20
00
00
00

75, 095, 741 69

73, 727, 764 31

87,182, 798 88

-..

40,
32,
24,
1,

40; 762, 000
32, 741.185
23, 441, 946
950, 070

35,
28,
41,
3,

'..

99, 418, 721 28

Totals

'.

NOVE-MBER 1.

84,187 934 55

Tjiabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
Circulating notes outstanding
Dexiosits of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s .
Totals

'

759,
657,
760,
241,

600
423
202
496

00
00
16
12

00
00
85
04

97, 895, 201 89

BOSTON..
51 banks. •
Resources.
$84,231,661 91
Loans and discounts
7, 310, 761 89
D e m a n d loans
•.
D . S. b o n d s on h a n d
288, 550 00
341, 975 45
Other s t o c k s , bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
5, 200, 356 13
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
2, 937, 025 45
D ae from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s . '
6, 259, 827 84
E x c h a n g e s fbr clearing-house
1, 095, 077 00
National bauk notes
Fractional currency
176,112 18
Specie—coin
299, 310 23
.1, 473, 240 00
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
6, 731, 650 00
Legal-tender notes
XJ. S. certificates of deposit .
950,000 00
3, 781, 000 00
C l e a r i n g - h o u s e loan-certificates
Totals

121, 076, 548 08

Liabilities.
Capital stock
Circulating notes o u t s t a n d i n g . . . . . . .
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s • '.
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s

50, 078, 780
26, 424, 402
41, 920, 410
16, 552,181

00
00
10
29

134, 975, 773 39

Totals

51 banks.
$83, 934, 476
7, 557, 845
284, 550
345, 975
4, 538, 220
4, 297, 692
8, 201, 255
1,331,019
128, 693
360, 473
1, 774,100
7, 920, 944
1,100, 000
'4, 965, 000

83
55
00
45
68
08
96
00
22
34
00
00
00
00

00
00
08
76

140,331, 527 84

CONNECTICUT.
•

671
364
335
039

00
00
82
81

109, 504, 410 63

35, 567. 671
28, 437, 688
. 40, .390,-667
2, 766, 783

00
00
66
94

107,162, 810 60

NEW. YORK CITY.

126, 740, 246 11
50, 095, 480
26, 496, 311
45, 569, 954
18,169, 782

567,
399,
854,
683,

48 banks.
$122, 957, 564
56,377,465
3, 359, 750
5, 045, 638

.48 banks.
35 $117, 554, 502
51, 610, 957
56
00 .
3,388,900
4, 717, 651
46

16, 640, 556 90
41, 36.5, 234 55
4, 080, 372 00
266, 952 37
1, 287, 410 33
8, 744, 060 00
6, 347, 250 00
170, 000 00
16, 220, 000 00
282, 662, 254 52
70, 235, 000
27, 851. 206
131,030,382
55, 430, 674

17, 265, 913
56, 735, 347
5,460,589
296, 835
1, 353, 6.57
10,145, 800
14, 628, 452
1, 040, 000
15, 860, 000

34
14
00
37
65
10
00
21
00
00
00
00
00

300,058,604,81

70,235, 000 00
00
00 , 27, 835, 612 00
149,299,344 14
54
55
54,177, 476 26

284, 547, 063 09

^301, 547, 432 40

ALBANY.

•

80 banks. .
Resources.
$34, 401, 999 90
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans
241, 5.50 00
TJ. S. b o n d s on h a n d
.
...
946, 551.75
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
3, 055, .538 09
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s .
1, 743, 926 75
E x c h a n g e s for c l e a r i n g - h o u s e . .
566, 843 00
National bank notes
.,
78, 054 23
Fractional currency
39, 095 17
Specie—coin
5, 020 00
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
2, 718, 892 00
Legal-tender notes
25, 000 00
TJ. S. certificates of deposit
Clearino-house loan certificates

80 banks.
$33, 642, 325 18

43, 822, 470 89

Totals

•

-..-•-

lAabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
.
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals




25, 324, 620
17, 939, 989
11, 584,192
2, 279, 572

244,150
922, 901
2, 583, 259
2, 065, 891

00
75
89
64

473, 849
71, 968
49,117
14, 370
2, 655, 815
25, 000

00
39
47
00
00
00

7 banks.
$6, 0.52, 516 37
2, 052, 992 07
69, 500 00
505, 837 25
1, 423, 712 68
832, 990 07
327,164 16
132, 796 00
27, 286 24
6, 778 12
93. 000 00
596, 687 00
350, 000. 00

42, 748, 648 32

©
12, 476, 259 96

00
25, 324, 620 00
00
17, 937, 790 00
17
11, 064, 9.57 01
32 • 1, 732, 865 37

2, 6.50, 000 00
2, 035, 600 00
6, 690, 937 27
. 1, 959, 215 26

57,128, 373 49

56, 060, 232 38

13, 335, 752 53

7 banks.
$5, 890, 891
1, 735, 228
69, 500
633, 887
1, 558, 665
983, 629
391, 784
110, 235
33,120
6, 747

84
30
00
25
84
72
59
00
68
76

507, 727 00
400, 000 00
12, 321, 417 98
2, 650, 000
2rm9, 351
6,282, 336
2, 069, 017

00
00
20
69

13, 040, 704 89

138

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Ahstracts of speciai reports, Octoher 13 and Novemher 1, 1873—Continued.
PENNSYLVANIA.
OCTOBER

13.

1

NOVEMBER

N E W JERSEY.

1.

OCTOBER

13.

NOVEMBER

1.

Resources.
157 banks.
Loans and discounts
$45, 530, 224 18
D e m a n d loans
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d .
573, 050 00
2,149, 042 38
O t h e r stocks, bonds, and m o r t g a g e s . .
3, 540, 688 74
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
2, 446, 015 34
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
National bank notes
• 736, 987 00
156, 715 38
Fractional currency .
Specie—coin .
'
59, 476 03
2, 000 00
gold T r e a s u r y - n o t e s
5, 403, 776 00
Legal-tender notes
U . S. certificates of deposit
145, 000 00
Clearing-house loan certificates

157 banks.
$44; 358, 522 58-

60,742,975 05

59, 804,162 44

31, 772, 020 00

30 594 544 12

26, 738, 340
23,193, 678
27; 971, 206
2, 433,172

26, 825, 240
23, 247, 307
27, 416, 3.55
1, 759,108

13, 858, 350
11, 036, 590
15, 379, 709
1, 736, 038

13 858, 350
11, 041, 232
14,604,991
1,477,691

Totals

62 banks.
$23, 757, 029 50 \

62i, ioo hh

100, 300
406, 531
3, 222, 834
1, 211,104

00
81.
00
00
00
0.0

00
19
32
66

106 400
481, 111
2, 576,104
1, 454, 725

00
23
14
05

486,370
93, 634
37, 654
5, 800
2, 450, 761

2,124, 058 10
3, 003, 904 29
2, 626, 726 66
797, 263
157, 430
84, 623
2, 750
5, 882, 784
145, 000

62 banlcs.
$23, 099,131 20

00.
82
51
00
00

338, 974
97,108
43,259
18, 670
2 379 060

00
82
63
00
00

Liabilities.
Capital stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals

00
00
63
20

80, 386, 396 83

00
00
87
35

79, 248, Oil 22 1 42, 010, 688 20

1 .

PHILADELPHIA.
29 banks. •
29 banks.
Resources.
Loans and discounts
$43, 8.54,100 22 $42, 814, 330 01
3, 663, 872 08
D e m a n d loans
'
3, 287, 013 38
506, 200 00
507, 850 00
U." S. b o n d s on h a n d
1, 463, 934 44
1, 456,177 46
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
3,119, 764 04
4, 268, 0,53 22
D u e from a,pp'd r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
3, 593, 499 .88
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s and b a n k e r s
3, 678, 386 59
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
6, 046, 760 23 . 6, 204, 970 00
770, 499 00
964,291 00
136, 344 76
174, 053 88
Fractional currency
'
648, 385 04
Specie—coin .
'
253, 396 66
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
6, 766, 349 00
8, 053, 903 00
Legal-tender notes
720, 000 00
1, 085, 000 00
U. S. certificates of deposit
3, 901, 000 00
4, 668, 000 00
Clearing-house loan certificates

00
00
43
69

40, 982, 265 12

MARYLAND.

19 banks.
$3, 293, 840 15

173, 450 66
367, 082 31
372, 275 21
213, 890 57

i36,i46 66

19 hanks.
$3, 245, 745 73
172, 950
367,157
292,138
145, 796

00
31
15
66

19, 093 72
17, 473 32

114 578 00
20,179 49
21,223 41

sis, 2i6 66 •

528,283 00

74, 923,166 14

Totals
Liabilities.
Capital stock
..
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals..:

77, 637, 817 75

5,105, 461 28

4,908,0.51 75

16,
11,
40,
9,

16,
11,
39,
12,

2, 398, 217 50
1, 953, 320 00
2, 402, 588 57
119, 497 78

2, 398, 217 .50
1,960,751 00
2 103 637 95
100,327.18

6, 873, 623 85

6,562,913 63

935, 000
937, 338
401, 852
374, 471

00
00
63
68

78, 648, 662 31

93.5, 000
941, 843
802, 928
465, 754

16 banks.
Resources.
$15, 745, 232 27
L o a n s and d i s c o u n t s
Demand notes
63, ,501 92
169, 9.50 00
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d .
32, 523 10
O t h e r stocks, bouds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
642, 485 49
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
839, 786 41
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n l i e r s
391,114 00
E x c h a n g e s ' for clearing-house
223, 918 00
National b a n k notes
30, 044 53
Fractional currency
Specie—coin
32, 266 96
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
1, 792, 3.58 00
Legal-tender notes
.
100, 000 00
U . S. certificates of d e p o s i t
Clearing-house loan.)certificates
Totals

20, 063,180 68

00
00
18
17

81,145, 525 35 1

PITTSBURGH.

,

00
00
96
24

1

.•

16 banks.
$15,136, 097
47, 362
169, 950
.
32, 523
545, 380
740, 795
532, 830
352, 868
28,133
36,994

00
66
00
10
63
97
43
00
75
01

2, 386, 338 00
100, 000 00

BALTIMORE.
14 banks.
$19, 043, 633 83
879, 060 19
225, 000 00
673, 058 96
1, 327, 004 76
685, 994 35
1, 219, 837 28
321,918 00
19,93183
80, 2.59^40

14 banks.
$18, 9,58, 836
719, 970
228 000
673,058
1, 055, 379
636,171
1, 691, 666
226, 214
16 694
159, 337

27
31
00
96
09
21
33
00
87
62

i, 539, i95 66
405, 000 00
765,000.00

1, 759, 970 00
460 000 00
1,0.52,000 00

20,109, 278 .55 1 27,184, 873 60

27, 637, 298 66

Liabilities.

Capital stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s —
—
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s . . . . . . .
Totals




9, 000, 000
6, 616, 373
8, 336,129
1, 315,179

00
00
58
41

25,267,681 99

9, 000, 000
6, 609, 412
8, 359, 940
1, 292,157

00
00
23
99

25,263,510 22

11, 24i, 985
7,338„032
11,149,152
3, 071,128

00
00
35
48

32, 800, 297 83

31,241,985
7, 333, 774
11,704,739
2, 806, 670

00
00
62
46

33, 087,169 08

139

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
A.hstracts of special reports, Octoher 13 and Novemher 1, 1873—Continued.
1

. DELAWARE.
OCTOBER

Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a u d loans
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from app'd r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from alf otber b a u k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
National bank notes
Fractional curreucy
Specie.—coiu
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
L e g a l - t e n d e r uotes
U . S. certificates of deposit

NOVEMBER 1.

13.

11 banks.
$2, 363, 589 00
1, 050
177, 917
159, 507
245,204

VIRGINIA.

00
61
73
78

68, 496 00
10,795 80
' 2, 778 96

O C T O B E R 13.

11 banks.
$2, 213, 455 38

22 banks.
$7,101, 416 99

1,
179,
202,
258,

050
9.57
665
663

00
61
96
52

NOVEMBER

1.

22 banks.
$6,611,548 15

i96,'98i"87'
370, 756 25
249, 919 21

56,93 8 00
12, 232 72 1
2,779 39

189, 232 60
444, 929 34
312, 790 96

i35, 265 66
23, 529 24
15,126 72

92, 148 00
25, 064 24
17, 912 33

748, 6.57 66

723, 970 O
G

3, 234, 493 58

8, 835, 652 28

8, 417 595 61

00
00
63
36

1, 523, i 8 5 00
1, 289, 365 00
1, 392, 322 37
23.5,191 17

3, 600,100
2', 930, 052
5, 267, 727
564, 546

00
00
92
81

3, .599, 400 00
2, 929, 042 00
5, 076, 441 00
434, 757 97

4, 552, 850 99

Totals

296, 771 00
10, 000 00

3, 339, 098 88

Totals
Liabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
Circulating notes outstanding
• D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s

299, 759 00
10, 000 00

4,420,063 54

12, 362, 426 73

12, 039, 640 97

1, 523,185
1,288,117
1, 428, 840
. 312, 708

WEST

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
. Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e n i a n d loans
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t b e r stocks, b o n d s , a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e ao;'ts
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a u d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for clearin"•-house
N a t i o u a l b a u k notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coin .
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
Le^'al-teiider notesU . S cei^tificates of d e p o s i t
Clearing-house loan certificates

1 bank.
$301, 398 28

'

1 bank.
$263, 810 74

VIRGINIA.

17 banks.
$4,172, 715 71

• 17 bank's.
$4, 077, 513 77

Totals

7, 200 00
37,095 10
181, 462 21
• 182, 887 26

9, 042 m
821 00
2, 986 19

43, 603 00
17, 574 98
9,129,15

60, 378 00
19, 765 38
10, 356 66

163, 000 00

i6.5, 666 00

443, 773 00
10, 000 00

470, 713 00
10, 000 00

628, 556 48

Totals
Liabilities.
Capital stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s

00
00
45
59

609, 475 35

5,140, 052 88

5, 057, 371 38

252,
219,
339,
14,

252, 000
219, 915
370, 375
5,570

2,596,000
2, 296, 325
2, 514, 056
249, 496

00
00
07
26

2, 596, 000 00
2, 308, 768 00
2, 413, 432 96
214, 375 07

7, 655, 877 33

7, 532, 576 03

127, 522 50
7, 295 41
14, 387 10
10, 484 00
1,479 00
2, 990 19

7,
32,
180.
223,

i27, 522 56
28, 338 58
11, 954 34

000
915
326
637

00
00
18
18

875, 878 36

00
00
26
79

847, 861 05

.
.

050
212
670
324

NORTH CAROLINA.

WASHINGTON.

10 banks.
$3, 089, 248 07

Totals

59
64
00
55
86
99
58
00
09
61

• 3 banks.
$1,146, 602 26
58, 820 76
55, 750 00
42, 825 05
4, 805 95
44, 436 43
5, 352 19
35, 246 00
2, 254 28
7,140 81

10 banks.
$3, 243, 325 67

43, 464 00
9, 886 22
25, 419 26

78, 667 00
8, 083 93
30, 983 90

172,165 00

i89,226 66

328, 984 00

374, 730 00

28, 077 27

27, 366 59

1, 734, 836 18

Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans
. . .
U . S. bonds on h a n d
O t h e r stocks, bonds, and m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from app'd r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from all o t b e r b a n k s a n d b a u k e i s
Exehau<^es for clearino"-house
Natioual bank notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coin
2'old T r e a s u r v n o t e s
Lesal-tender notes
U . S. certificates of deposit
Clearing-house loan certificates

1, 6i9, 820 32

4, 236,199 48

4,162, 399 20

2,100, 000
1, 688, 230
2, 468,182
105, 656

2,100, 000
1, 686, 220
2, 426, 434
101, 537

.3 banks.
$1, 244, 094
72, 473
55, 500
55, 512
• 5,161
49,187
5, 339
39,-779
1, 288
6, 306

30,000
270,340
193, 716
91,063

00
92
11
30

50,
273,
122.
134,

000
340
483
861

00
92
87
51

lAabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals




968, 800
779, 340
840, 656
140, 474

00
00
55
62

2, 729, 271 17

968,
778,
805,
86,

800
550
832
407

00
00
05
04

2, 639, 589 09

00
00
67
49

6, 362, 069 16

00
00
96
89

6,334,192 85

140

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Ahstracts of special reports, Octoher 13 and Novemher 1,1873—Continued!
SOUTH CAROLINA.
O C T O B E R 13.

1
1

12 banks.
$3, 821, 933 33

Resources.
L o a n s and discounts
D e m a n d loans
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s
D u e fT;om all o t h e r b a n k s and b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
.. .
National bank notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coiu
gold T r e a s u r y notes
Le<^iil-tender notes

4i6, 884 86
201, 463 00
114,159 38

41,291 00
7, 959 08
14, 336 29

i26,269 66

361,232 00

8 banks. '
$6, .540, 890 81
813,279 42

12 banks.
$3, 807, 358 80,

417, 338 05
64, 405 65
122, 220 37

456,676 66

619, 662
347, 553
545, 307
737, 003
41, 046
15, 977
93,151

4, 850, 715 77
3,170, 000
2,181,5.55
1, 307, 801
146, 242

3,170; 000
2,181, 305
1, .561. 129
185,165

00
00
63
99

6, 805, 599 62

:

. .
• Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t h e r stocks, bouds, a u d m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s and b a n k e r s
National b a n k notes
>
Fractional currency
Specie—coiu
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
Les^al-tender n o t e s
U . S. certificates of deposit
Clearing-house loan certificates

902, 047 00

00 1
00
16
60

687, 000 00
11, 594, 746 24

4,150,
2. 973,
5; 566,
1, 792,

000
706
999
737

00
00
82
25

4,150,000
2, 973, 306
6, 034, 802
1, 773, 408

00
00
46
18

-14, 483, 443 07 • 14, 931, 516 64

7, 097, 599 76

TEXAS.
7 banks.
$1, 096, 657 62

7 banks.
$1,148,351 12

13 banks.
$3, 468, 043 89

13 banks.
$3,264,684 52

500 00
237, 062 37
144, 962 18
106, 804 01

237, 062 37
371, 826 42
268, 825 36

50, 000
15,149
121, 290
101, 285

120, 665 00
12, 822 96
40, 844 55

146, .5.58 00
26,115 79
38, 534 30

82, 732 hh
12, 334 20
204, 322 58

90, 204 00
11,417 15
188; 445 57

414,188 00

493, 798 00

333, 928 66

247, 363 00

.566 hh

00
99
71
74

•

50, 000
12, 609
81, 934
107, 575

00
99
22
57

1

T o t a l s .'.

4, 846, 904 76 |-

2, 017, 700 84

1,937,900 62

2, 798,190
2, 271, 310
1, 605, 379
161,104

2, 840,190
2, 263, 045
1, 938, 729
186, 624

925, 000
677, 229
1,194,960
70, 965

925, 000
715,113
1, 072, 050
65, 608

00
00
61
01

6, 835, 983 62

•

00 1
00 j
28
62 1

7, 228, 588 90

. ALABAMA.

Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from all o t h e r b a u k s a u d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s fbr c l e a r i n g - h o u s e
N a t i o n a l b a n k n o t e s . .^
Fractional currency
Specie—coin
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s . .
Legal-ten der n o t e s
U . S. certificates of d e p o s i t
C l e a r i n g - h o u s e loan certificates

00'
00
18
13

2, 868,154 31

00
00
64
40

2, 777, 777 04

ARKANSAS.

'

9 ba.nks.
$1, 699, 778 09

9 banks.
$1, 582, 083 59

2 banks.
$224, 905 60

2 banks.
$203, 375 30

,54, 618 89
95, 013 13
92, 496 29

54,618 89
219, 981 t 3
1*40, 448 31

5i,66i 56

31; 233 11
5, 240 73
47,146 72

37, 443 00
6, 545 43
17, 754 77

28, 649 00
6, 722 65
20, 827 19

4, i52 66
804 40
354 66

6, 313 00
2, 040 95
357 25

221, 931 00

250, 540 00

is, 3i7 hh

34, 217 00

2, 225, 580 60

Totals




619, 583 88
600, 460 08
507, 397 97
869, 902. 76
45, 813 00
16, 494 27
114, 835 89

4, 545, 892 96

•.

Liabilities.
Capital stock,
Circulating uotes outstanding.
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s '.

Totals

88
27
49
90
00
66
48

10. 863, 371 91

5,130, 577 10

GEORGIA.

Liabilities.
C a p i t a l s t o c k -.
Circulating notes outstanding
Deposits of all k i n d s
D n e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s

8 banks.
$6, 512, 262 64
718,898 75

678, 000 00

Totals

Totals

N O V E M B E R 1.

431, 499 00

6, 293 62
14,132 44

Clearing-house loan certificates

Jjiabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
...
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
i
Totals

N E W ORLEANS.
O C T O B E R 13.

N O V E M B E R .1.

2, 303, 871 36 \

322, 501 89

329 924 06

1, 625, 900
1, 230, 645
782, 854
81, 329

1, 625, 900 00
1, 279, 337 00
• 816, 655 43
132, 237 81

205, 000
184, 396
130.000
33; 357

205,
184,
139,
34,

3, 854,130 24 1

557, 754 18

00
00
80
04

3, 770, 728 84

.5, 873 22
17, 093 51

00
00
46
72

000
396
749
446

00
00
93
94

563, 592 87

141

COMPTEOLLER OF THE CUEEENCY.
Ahstracts of special reports, Octoher 13 and Novemher 1,1873—Continued.
OHIO.

KENTUCKY.
O C T O B E R 13.

N O V E M B E R 1.

30 banks.
$6, 562, 540 84

30 banks. '
$6, 401, 949 34

61,182 20
536, 302 07
233,420 18

61,182 20
516, 327 24
299,817 63

151, 639 00
9, 363 14
9, 544 18

155,1,54 00
11,175 69
14,216 64

728, 822 00

754, 434 00

8, 293, 313 61

Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loaiis
U . S. b o n d s ou h a n d
O t h e r stocks, bonds, and m o r t g a g e s .
D u e f r o m app'd red'g & reserve ag'ts.
D u e f r o m all o t h e r b a u k s a n d b a n k e r s

N O V E M B E R 1.

157 banks.
$33, 744, 560 23

157 banks.
$32, 459, 297 76

413, 600
961, .551
1, 947,182
1, 094, 003

00
33
64
30

420,900
931, 736
1, 869, 865
1,102,730

00
06
90
04

688, 827 00
95, 447 86
38, 499 16

825, 951 00
93,351 13
• 32,504,53
1,440 00
4, .526, 378 00
10, C O 00
O

4,577,195 00
10, 000 00

8r 214, 256 74

43, 650, 522 21

42, 224, 498 78

6, 076, 000 00
5, 219, 4.32 00
2, 401, 874 25
217, 575 72

6, 076, 000 00
5, 247, 395 00
2, 366, 726 14
180, 672 90

20, 346, 000 00
20,318,000 00
17, 589, 897 00
17, 510, 362 00
19, 362, 955®5 • 19, 022, 070 37
• 668", 662 66
803, 333 40

13, .914, 881.97

13, 870, 794 04

N a t i o n a l b a n k notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coin
Legal-tender notes .
U . S. certificates of d e p o s i t
Clearing-house loan certificates

-

h'otals
Liabilities.
Capital stock:
C i r c u l a t i n g notes o u t s t a n d i n g
D e p o s i t s ot' all k i n d s
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals

O C T O B E R 13.

.

#

57, 994, 650 75

LOUISVILLE.

Resources.
Loa.ns ,aud discounts
D e m a u d loans
U . S. bouds on h a n d
O t h e r s t o c k s , bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e f r o m all o t h e r b a u k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
N a t i o n a l b a n k notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coiu
"..
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
Legal-tender notes
U. S. certificates of d e p o s i t
C l e a r i n g - h o u s e loan certificates

6 banks.
$2, 617, 284
14, 030
1, 000
10, 313
87, 405
130, 876

82
85
00
75
92
83

6 banks.
$2, 476, 547
13, 570
1,000
7, 400
71, 237
• 120, 793

57 626 630 03

CINCINNATI.
46
02
00
00
29
94

5 banks.
$6, 614, 843
1, 448, 382
39, 450
107, 987
• 747 900
340, 245
80, 291
170, .573
7, 028
7, 825

74
26
00
90
73
77
04
00
53
63

5 banks.
$5, 888, 311
1 146 541
40, 000
107, 987
494,196
459, 040
45 807
241,643
5, 967
22,170

18
83
00
90
54
'64
09
00
97
14

20, 856 00
4,521 16
1, 746 00
391, 595 00

473, 764 00

1,156, .500 00
575, 000 00
75, 900 00

1 120, 769 00
' 87.5,000 00
16, 775 00

i, 279, 630 33

Totals

22, hsl hh

3,198, 874 27

11, 401, 928 60

10, 464, 210 29

4, 398 66
3,131 90

Liabilities.
Capital stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to a l l l i a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals -

t2; 187, 700
1, 694, 277
835, 202
262, 904
•

00
00
54
48

4, 980, 084 02

2,187, 700
1, 694, 484
755, 937
'
271, 797

00
00
45
36

4, 909, 968 81

• TENNESSEE.
Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t h e r stocks, bonds, and m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from app'd r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s and b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
National banks
Fra.ctional c u r r e n c y
Specie—coin
1
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
Legal-tender notes
..
.
U . S. certificates of d e p o s i t
Cleariui;;-house loan certificates
• Totals . . . . .

24 banks.
$4,678,638 8/
1,
179,
309,
372,

600
610
324
921

00
23
85
90

268, 540 00
19,954 35
38, 374 51

4,
3,
4,
2,

000,
183,
775,
111,

000
045
404
641

14, 070,;091 01

4, 000, 000
• 3,185. 930
4,180, 216
1, 793,132

00
00
93
12

13,159,279^05

CLEVELAND.

6 banks.
• $7, 415, 656
67, 000
20, 000
30, 624
189, 160 38
132, 178
309, 443 65
562, 222
372, 242 22
186, 002
94, 259
323, 569 00
21, 732
19, .527 08
750
40, 495 39

24 banks.
$4,412,512 40

00
00
35
66

96
00
00
18
60
79
06
00
97
00

6 banks.
16. 898, 839 73
71,900-00
22,000 00
32, 424 18
262, 596 71
590, 898 91
166, 362 77
120, 267 00
20,904 40
6, 600 00

858, 041 00

. 842,251 00

826, 000 00

911,000 00

6, 727, 005 71

6, 509, 206 12

9,356,426 .56

9, 103, 793 70

3, 295, 465 75
2, 73.5, 436 00
3, 962,174 90
210, 626 60

3, 297,165 75
2, 824, 266 00
3, 771, 384 10
159, 945 30

4, 550, 000 00
2, 311, 970 00
3, 379, 305 ,57
370, 700 28

4, 5.50, 000
2, 306, 970
3,32.5,069
340,802

10, 203, 703 25

10,052,761 15

10, 611, 975 85

Jjiabilities.
Capital stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
....^
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
/

Totals




00
00
83
11

10, 522, 841 94

142

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

\

Ahstracts of special reports, Octpher 13 and Novemher 1, 1873—Continued.
INDIANA.

MICHIGAN.

O C T O B E R 13.

Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans

N O V E M B E R 1.

O C T O B E R 13.

91 banks.
$25, 475, 584 99

/

91 banks.
$24,395,114 17

74 banks.
$12, 834,129 01

26,656 hh

O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from apii'd r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e f r o m all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s

673, 373 33
1, 285, 567 60
726, 545 53

594, 696 66

19, 300
693, 720
1, 247,171
778, 498

09
21
00
00
00

17, 586,170 '62
14,413,984 00
11, 989, 097 19
j
598. 830 38
'44,588,082 19

. .

Totals
Liab-MUes.
C a p i t a l atock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e t o all b a n k s amd b a n k e r s
Totals.

43, 612, 475 84

499
325
300
447
000

116 banks.
$18,255,285 35

.Other stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from a.ll o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s

78,
484,
1, 829,
813,

500
381
209
215

00
19
88 .
38

00
43
51
24

262, 9i7 66
35, 687 35
41, 572 91

212,118 00
41 550 28
45, 617 01

30, 954,.036 21

15, 961, 409'69

1.5, 323, 417 97

17, 597, 800 00
14, 420, 010 00
10, 998, 043 98
596, 621 86

7, 866, 250 00
5, 762, 748 00
7, 203, 013 47
221, 370 85
21,053,382 32

1

112, 550
506, 247
1,765,266
865, 083

3 banks.
$3, 703, 699 69
155, 000 00

00
76
65
50

^ 25,051,980 99

.

00
00
83
20

20, 403, 061 03

3 banks.
$3, 669, 972 64
95, 000 00

26,666 66
355, 382
280, 736
163, 540
63,129
24, 819
5, 209

569, 372 00
.58,364.32
53, 432 6^
;0
2, 754, 868 00

7, 902; 200
5, 793, 675
6,5.51,254
155, 931

DETROIT.

*

. I l l baulks.
$17, 376, 368 37

2, 789, 786 00

Totals

350
487
404
996

1, 522, 679 00

690,137 00
63, 405 82
48, 060 37

N a t i o u a l b a n k n o t e s . .•
Fractional currency
gold T r e a s u r y notes
Leeral-teudtr notes
. .
U S certificates of deposits . . . .

.

20,
165,
742,
448,

i, 545, 543 66

ILLINOIS.
'
Resources.
Loans and discounts
Demand notes

201, 280 90
683, 416 35.
351, 513 17

501,389 00
69, 898 88
67, 257 72
3, 050- 00
3,113; 637 00
65, 000 00

74,
37,
2,
3, 021,
55,

74 banks.
$12,124,*215 50

5,356 66-

00
29
06
09

31, 966, 382 75

National bank notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coin
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
Legal-tender notes
U S certificates of deposit

N o VEMBER 1.

25, 000
350, 468
408, 455
138,771
109, 406
23,316
1,101

63
90
41
00
39
96

00
5.5
60
01
00
24
31

765, i63 hh
50, 000 00

794, 852 00

24, 061, 553 20

5, 586, 680 93

5, 616, 343 35

11,,528, 000
9, 770, 815
12, 598, 420
237, 561

1, 900,
1, 335,
2, 984,
427,

1,
1,
2,
^

Liabilities.
Capital stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals

11,476,910
9, 705, 761
33,687,909
243, 259

.
.

00
00
50
23

3.5,113, 839 73

00
00
14
42

34,134, 796 56

000
539
980
641

00
00
31
25

6, 648,160 56

900, 000
34.5, 542
959, 655
428,365

00"
00
90
78

6,633,363 68

IOWA.

< CHICAGO.
18 banks.
$14,418,261 96
4, 595, 785 53
314,800 00
158, 809 45
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
1, 625, 945 26
D u e from app'd r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
1,172, 435 14
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
3,150, 431 29
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
995, 477 00
National b a n k notes
44, 218 86
Fractional currency
124, 370 78
Specie—coin
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
..
5, 276, 397 00
Legal-tender notes
U b certiiicates of deposit
Clf ai'iiu''-house loan certificates

18 banks.
$14, 604, 358 70
4, 470, 609 28
336,1.50 00
168, 809 45
1, 300,174 00
1, 151, 347 25
1,94.5,722 41
776,331 00
37, 969 87
,
109, 312 99

75 banks.
$9, 845, 964 86

398, 833 00
50, 571 80
26, 371 51

331 670 00
45,661 18
25,704 55

5, i77, i69 hh

1, 565, 068 00

1, .532. 338 00

29, 876, 932 27

30, 077 693 95

13, 700, 426 54

13, 037, 446 44

8,
5,
13,
5,

8,
5,
13,
5,

Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans

Totals

59,
251,
863,
638,

500
841
576
699

00
42
18
77

75 banks.
$9, 340, 768 06
62,600
241, 666
880, 617
576, 419

00
76
90
99

Liabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of a l l . k i n d s
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals




900,
7.55,
455,
840,

000
675
.551
325

00
00
67
83

33, 951, 552 50

900,
753,
743,
903,

000
830
377
609

00
00
13
34

.34, 300, 816 47

00
00
35
49

5, 817, 000 00
5, 084, 223 00
7, 418, 263 11
246,363 67

19, 221, 877 84

18, 565, 849 78

5, 313,
5, 075,
8,087,
245,

650
024
929
274

143

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
A.hstracts of special repfoi'ts, Octohh 13 and November 1, 1873—Continued.
WISCONSIN.
O C T O B E R 13.

Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a u d loans

41 banks.
$5,182, 812 02

O t h e r stocks, bonds, and m o r t g a i g e s . .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house

58,
107,
515,
455,

100
788
524
957

00
56
79
10

MISSOURI.

NOVEMBER

1.

42 banks.
$4, 933,1.57 38

29 banks.
$4, 904, 931 72

69, 000
119,215
557, 318
,511, 288

3, 750
685,121
236, 604'
136, 341

•

00
50
14
14

NOVEXA'IBER 1.

29 banks.
$4, 458, 900 73

00
27
28
19

3,
681,
231,
200,

300
876
674
900

00
69
42
71

Liabilities.
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
...
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals

148, 545 00
9,122 70
14, 566 98

" 889, 244 00

517, 4.54 00

600, 614 00

7, 302, 001 81

6, 719, 667 24

6, 349, 501 23

2, 930, 800 00
2, 386, 452 00
4, 255, 997 54
37, 494 06

2, 685,
2, 357,
3, 569,
264,

00
00
.53
93

2, 685, 000 00
2, 372, 622 00
3, 233, .522 27
176, 779 42

9, 589, 763 60

Totals

161, 245 00
8, 500 88
15, 718 90

• 2,£15, 000 00
2,^67,571 00'
4, 367, 083 83
40,108 77

Legal-tender uotes
U S certificates of deposit
Cle4irino"-house loan oertificates

186, 288 00
23, 721 23
12, 769 42

859, 714 00

.......

206, 091 00
26, 030 79
8, 678 94

7, 420, 697 20

Fractional currencv
Suecie coin

9, 610, 743 60

8, 876, 549 46

8, 467, 923 69

M i l AVAUKEE.
Resources.
TJ. S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s fbr clearing-house
National b a n k notes
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
L e g a l - t e n d e r iiotes
U . S. certificates of d e p o s i t
Clearing-house loan certificates
Totals

O C T O B E R 13.

4 banks.
$1, 727, 381 68
186, 203 .16
350 00
30, 400 00
348, 899 92
94, 863 07
198, 398 39
25, 447 00
1.5, 640 97
19, 398 32
663, 348 00

000
686
227
635

S A I N T LOUIS.

4 banks.
$1, 577, 392
188, 553
850
30, 400
225, 539
110,163
238, 609
32, 842
17, 711
27, 545

7 banks.
95
$7, 475, 551 91
2, l05,i)12 91.
23
00
5, 350 00
904, 024 35
00
51.5, .578 67
24 .
09
237, 072 86
06
190, 031 96
00
197, 207 00
43
22,153 49
75
13,737 81

792, 662 00

1, 096,159 00

7 banks.
$7, 074, 111
• 1, 990, 003
10,600
911,131
383, 633
179, 335
286, 811
201,191
14, 385
23, 865

29
57
00
85
86
25
84
00
16
03

1,114, 218 00

318, .500- 00
3, 315, .335 51

3, 242, 268 75

•7,50,000
659, 500
2,104, 922
632, 234

:

750,
659,
1, 955,
733,

13, 081, 279 96

12,189, 236 85

LiaUlities.
C a n i t a l stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a u d b a n k e r s

00
00
40
01

4,146, 706 41

Totals

000
500
931
920

00
00
44
26

4, 099, 351 70

MINNESOTA.
Resources.
Loans and discounts
...
D e m a n d loans .
U. S. b o n d s on h a n d
:
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from a n p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e ao;'ts.
D n e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Exchano'es for clearing-house
Nation al b a n k n o t e s
Fractional currency
•
Specie—coin
.
.
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
Legal-tender notes
l.
U. S. certificates of deposit
Clearing-house loan c e r t i i i c a t e s

Totals




300
537
645
466

00
00
74
95

14, 851, 949 69

6,
3,
•2,
1,

360,
670,
833,
531,

3b0
680
753
343

00
00
36
07

14, 446, 076 43^

KANSAS.

.-

32 banks.
$7,018,735 22

32 banks.
$6, 709, 430 41

26 banks.
$2,709,389 49

26 banks.
$2, 546,175 45

8, 800
272,791
672, 469
361, 450

7, 500
282, 382
573, 876
393.132

00
31
26
80

600
189,341
184, 032
385,490

00 •
17
19
65

500
184,184
234, 009
209, 379

304, 777 00
30, 062 42
19, 426 90

208, 607 00
24, 023 74
29,191 18

1,131, 338 00

958, 985 00

128,121
29, 614
6, 541
600
467, 846

00
57
71
00
00

107, 714 00
20, 996 33
6 127 36
600 00
412, 226 00

9, 819, 851 64

Totals
Liabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
C i r c u l a t i n g notes o u t s t a n d i n g
Depo.sits of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s .S

6, 360,
3, 607,
3, 044,
. 1, 839,

9,187,178 70

3, 901, 376 78

3, 721, 912 44

4,1.50, 000
3,302,889
6,170, 519
• 199, 840

00
00
34
76

4, 175, 000 00
3, 111, 287 00
5, 461, 416 34
271, 071 77

1, 991,100 00
1, 530, 927 00
2, 614, 089 .50
82, 220 69

1 975 000 00
1,530,672 00
2, 457, .535 50
77, 647 01

. 13, 623, 249 10

13, 018, 775 11

6, 218, 337 19

6,040,854 51

00
83
83
39

00
71
37
22

144

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
A.hstracts of sxiecial reports, Octoher 13 and Novemher 1, .1873—Continued.
NEBRASKA.
O C T O B E R 13

10 banks.
$1, 767, 709 04.

Resources.
L o a n s and discounts

OREGON.

,566 66-

189,-469 47
68,722 04
161,-968 12

2,706 hh

00
64
43
40

7.5, 97.5 66

9,246 hh

32,865 56
5,805 60

1, 660 58
41,087 31

840 00
683 05
80, .545 68

363, 064 66

i68,716 06

113.. 590 00

2, 562,-929 88

1,166,770 34

1,196, 8.50 47

925, 000
784, 070
2, 053, 564
146,132

^ 2 5 , 000
788,619
2, 009, 058
136,129

250, 000
.222, 365
827, 837
3,585

2.50, 000
225, 000
803, 905
44, 919

,

00
00
65 .
81

00
00
81 I
20

3 banks.
$805, 929 88

Resources.
L o a n s a n d (\iscounts
D e m a n d loans
•
U . S. b o n d s ou h a n d
O t h e r stocks, bonds, and m o r t g a g e s . .
D u e from app'd r e d ' g &,reser^^e^ a g ' t s .
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for cleariuij-house
N a t i o n a l b a n k notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coiu
ijold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
. .
L e g a l - t e n d e r notes
U. S. certificates of deposit ..Clearing-house loan certificates

4,150
45, 000
7, 380
31, 239

00
00
19
85

l,-323, 825 04

MONTANA.

3 banks.
$331, 541 25 1

00
00
58
25

00
00
32
95

1, 303, 788 27

3, 858, 807 01

3, 913, 767 46

CALIFORNIA.

4,150
45, 000
3, 210
35, 969

00
00
22
43

4 banks.'^$577, 834 S9

4 banks.*.
.$569, 962 57

36, 903 hh
60, 852 58
74, 435 70

31, 923 74
45, 6.56 31
97, 231 42

.

1, 976 00
144 29
257, 697 25

18, 9.55 00
12, 877 60
1115,749 07

36, 137 hh
12, 947 25
t85r4.59 99

16, 934 00

1, 600 00

67, 640 06

86, 053 00

1, 315, 913 27

1,181, 288 44

958, 647 84

94.5,371 28

300,
191,
675,
28,

300, 000
193, 262
680,093
8, 248

4,602 00'
85 16
400, 592 40

Totals

700,000
568, 905
659,100
•151, 687

.

Totals

•

00
00
25
98

2, 079, 693 23

7*00, 000
587, 605
574, 363
79, 367

00
00
62
74

1

2 banks.
$1, 636, 893 70
1,753,977 52
234, 351
191,416
110,647
7, 322
226
770, 188

D u e from a,pp'd r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-nouse
N a t i m i a l ba<nk-notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coin
'.
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
Legal-tender notes
U. S. cei'tificates of deposit
Clearing-house loan certificates
L.

2 banks.
$1, 691, 618 84
1, 881, 0-38 88
125, 695
197,176
78,193
7, 315
126
747, 059

97
25
15
00
34
72

000 00
767'00
256 99
416 99

1,195, 440 98

1, 941, 336 .36

S A N FRANCISCO.
Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans
i
TJ. S. b o n d s on h a n d

00
00
92
94

1,181, 604 86

DAKOTA.
1 bank.
$37, 005 90

1 bank.
$34, 900 03

767 4i

19 90
1, 363 66

97
.59
93
00
.50
12

i, 354 hh
1, 009 26
227 25

1 994 00
1 119 55
380 50

58, 900 00

25, 669 60

22, 984 00

4, 737, 124 15

4, 787,129 83

66, 032^ 82

62,76L 64

2, 500, 000
1, 437, 725
2, 595, 823
327, 398

2,500,000
1, 430, 815
2, 482, 989
220, .579

50, 000
44, 794
62,117
705

00
00
06
16

50, 000 00
44, 794 00
56, 387 29
111 20

157,636 22

151 292 49

32,36o6cf

•

Liabilities.
Capital stock
Circulating notes outstanding
Deposi ts of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a u k s a u d b a n k e r s
[

00
00
51
04

6, 860, 946 55

00
00
82
37

6, 634, 384 19

^ Report Irom one other bank in Montana not received.
'




900
517
743
363

369, 628 00

Totals...

Totals

2,
71,
183,
37,

2, 698, 913 34

Liabilities.
Capital s t o c k
C i r c u l a t i u g notes o u t s t a n d i n g
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s

Totals

i bank.
$705; 667 27

70, 364 54
64,132 30
152, 700 89

189,300 00
110, 977 42
119, 905 39

i l 2 . 632 06 ^-23; 821 69
4, 462 98

Totals

lAabilities.
Capital stock....•
CircuLating uotes o u t s t a n d i n g
Dei)0sits of all k i n d s
'
D u e to all b a u k s a n d b a n k e r s

1 N O V E M B E R 1.

1 bank.
$716,174 52

10 banks.
$1, 664, 676 91

566 hh

U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t h e r stocks, bonds, and m o r t g a g e s . . .
D u e from a,pp'd r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s .
D u e from all other b a u k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h i i n g e s for c l e a r i n g h o u s e
.Nationaibank notes
F r a c t i o n a l cui'rency
Specie—coin
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
Legal-tender n o t e s . . . '
,....
IJ. S certificates of deposit
Clearino'-house loan certificates

O C T O B E R 13

NOVEMBER 1

t "Coin" includes byillion and gold dust.

145

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
Abstracts of special reports,'Octoher 13 and Novemher 1, 1873—Continued.
IDAHO.
O C T O B E R 13.

^
Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d ;^oans
U . S. b o n d s oii h a n d .'
O t h e r s t o c k s , bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g ' t s
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d bankeri
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house..
National bank notes
Fractional currency
Specie—coin
gold T r e a s u r y notes..
Legal-tender notes
U . S. c e r t i f i c a t e s of d e p o s i t
C l e a r i n g - h o u s e loan certificates

COLORADO.

N O V E M B E R 1.

O C T O B E R 13."

1 bank.
$79, 661 56

6 banks.
$1, 509, 661 85

1 bank.
$77, 981 97

44, 588 99
508 65

'i29,"663'83

2, 320 00
11 00
8, 437 00

3, 475 00
49 40
11, 566 00

116,

134, 500
33,107
151, 239
142, 609

N O V E M B E R 1.

6 banks.
$1, 428, 813 47

00
61
61
57

28, 5,59 76
215, 461 76
135, 902 89

89, 467 00
8, 924 29
85, 747 46

40, 024 00
8,"'648 20
83, 315 40

325,

493 00

365,145 Op

231, 030

Totals.

10

308,

663.

78

2, 480,

755

39

2, 305,

870 48

100, 000
89, 200
90,174
92, 020

00
00
85
96

100,
88,
79,
120,

000
950
518
914

00
00
60
46

57.5,
477,
1, 797,
99,

000 00
000 00
338 08
640 07

575,
477,
1, 621,
98,

000
000
779
080

395,

383 06

2, 948,

978 15

2, 771, 859 43

Liabilities.
Capital stock
Circulating notes outstanding .
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s . .

371, 395 81

Totals.

WYOMING.
Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t h e r s t o c k s , bonds, a n d mortgages.''.
D u e from a p p ' d . r e d ' g & r e s e r v e a g t ' s .
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d bankers
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
National bank notes
Fractional currency . . . i
Specie—coin '.
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
L e g a l - t e n d e r notes..."
U . S. certificates of deposit
C l e a r i n g - h o u s e loan certificates

2 banks.
$149,447 69
5, 673 93
7, 704 28
400 86
3, 541 00
1,151 41
1,529 06
230 00
33, 714 00

00
00
12
31

N E W MEXICO.

2 banks.
$132, 067 I
5, 273

93

'33,'665'33"
5, 600
525
1,602
130
32,629

00
79
96
00
00

2 banks.
$304, 445 99
13, 450 43
37, 752 98
13,169 74
614 00
230 59
570 80
43, 799

00

2 banks.
$325, 436 16
13, 4.50 43
37,215 00
10, 498 36

:

1,114 00
206 73
-685 30

46, 046 00

203,

392 23

210, 894

89

414,033 53

440,751.9

125,
51,
105,
14,

000
470
942
070

125, 000
,51, 915
129,191
2, 641

00
00
65
84

300,
269,
148,
15,

00
00
40
91

300,
269,
175,
14,

000
535
534
343

296,

Totals.

482 91

308,

49

733, 061 31

759,

412 64

Jjiabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
Circulating notes outstan'ding.
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s . .
Totals.

00
00
25
66

743

UTAH.
Resources.
Loans and discounts
D e m a n d loans
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t h e r s t o c k s , bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s .
Duefrom app'd red'g & reserve ag'ts.
D u e from all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
N a t i o n a l b a n k notes
Fractional currency
Specif—coin
"
.
•..:......
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s
L e g a l - t e n d e r n o t e s ..*...
U . S. certificates of deposit
C l e a r i n g - h o u s e loan c e r t i f i c a t e s . - .

3 banks.
$542, 758 87

3 banks.
$505, 493 78

30, 033 ,55
73, 305 89
98, 450 05

31, 533 55
36, 279 78
61, 266 27

" 558 00
6, 229 41
3, 583 25

22,651 00'
5, 235 "90
6, 660 05
154,

555 00

• 839,174 02

Totals.

84, 255 00

823,

675 33

Liabilities.
C a p i t a l stock
Circulating notes outstanding
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
.
D u e t o all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s .

Totals.

10 F



450,000 00
404, 910 00
539, 718 .83
36, 491 00
1, 431,119 83

450,000 00
404, 885 00
492, 448 86
46, 092 01
1, 393,

425 87

000
535
308
217

00
00
6:i
01

146

-

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Summary of speeial reports for Octoher 13 and Novemher 1, 1873.
NATIONAL BANKS IN N E W YORK
CITY.

O c t o b e r 13.

N o v e m b e r 1.

NATIONAL BANKS, N O T I N
D E Mi'Ti ON C ITIES .

October 13.

RE-

N o v e m b e r 1.

48 banks.
48 banks.
1,746 banks.
. Resources.
1,748 banks.
Loans and discounts
.' |$122, 957, 564 35 $117, .5.54,502 34 i$45.5, 7.57, 763 "56 i?442, 049, 040 86
51,610,957 14
56,177, 465 56
. D e m a n d loans
3, 359, 750 00
3,388,900 00
3, 977, 900 00
4,105, 500 00
. U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
4, 717, 651 37
5, 045, 638 46
15, 3.52, 822 94
1.5, 419, 961 86
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s .
35, 668, 022 38
38,14.5,132 .59
D u e from app'd r e d ' g &reserA^e a g ' t s
18. 291, 459 52
17, 265, 913 65
16, 825, 387 79
D u e from all other b a n k s and b a n k e r s ] 16, 640, 556 90
56, 735, 347 10
41, 36.5, 234 55
. E x c h a n g e s for c l e a r i u g - h o u s e . . .
5, 460, 589 00
4, 080, 372 00
8, 733, 851 00
9, 812,-286 00
N a t i o n a l b a n k notes.
296, 835 21
1,'459, 671 01
266,952 37
1, 463, 561 08
Fractional currency
'.
—
1, 754, 321 69
1, 739, 200 50
1,353, 6.57 00
1,237,410 33
Specie—coin
152, 660 00
147, 880 00
10,145, 800 00
8, 744, 060 00
gold T r e a s u r y n o t e s . . .
47,250,340 00
46, 920, 787 O
O
14, 628, 452 00
6, 347, 250 00
Legal-ten der n o t e s ..".
1, 615, 000 00 .
1, 605, 000 00
1, 040, 000 00
.170, 000 00
U. S. certificates of deposit
16, 220, 000 00
15, 860, 000 CO
Clearing-house loan certificates

Totals.

300, 058, 604 81

70, 235, 000
27, 851, 206
131, 030,182
. 55, 430, 674

70, 235, 000 00 294, 270, 802 37
27,835,612 00 235, 641, 336 00
149,299,344 14 250, 907, 831 41
54,177, 476 26
18, 836, 275 04

294,
236,
239,
15,

301, 547, 432 40

785, 415, 085 14

00
00
54
55

284, 547, 063 09

Totals

NATIONAL BANKS IN OTHER
DEMPTION CITIES.

October 13.

RE^

N o v e m b e r 1.

591, 814, 860 33

576, 432, 689 •

282, 662, 254 52

Liabilities.
Capital stock.
Circulating notes outstanding.
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e t o alb b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s .

799, 656, 244 82

615, 591
294, .934
205, 463
299, 096

75
00
28
11

NATIONAL BANKS O F T H E UNITED
.STATES.

O c t o b e r 13.

N o v e m b e r 1,

Resources.
179 hanks.
179 banks.
1,973 banks.
1,975 banks.
Loans and discounts
.'
1$222, 351, 704 47 $218,274,649 64 $801, 067, 032 38 $777, 878,192 84
23, 982, 356 52
D e m a n d loans
25,182,238 44
81, 3.59, 704 00
75, .593, 313 66
1,726, 200 00
U. S. bonds on h a n d
1, 695, 650 00
9, 033, 300 00
9, 220, 600 00
4, 959, 714 26
5, 087, 284 53
25, 425, 314 58
O t h e r stocks, bonds, a n d m o r t g a g e s . .
25,157, 758 84
54, 263. 814 .52
D u e from a p p ' d r e d ' g & r e s e r v e .ag'ts. 16,118, 631 93 »1.5, 784, 507 65
51, 452, 530 03
46, 044; 292 65
D u e f r o m all o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s | 12, 578, 347 96
14, 020, 834 53
49, 578, 207 70
58, 431, 623 84
20, 798, 045 37
77,533,392 47
17, 066, 389 29
E x c h a n g e s for clearing-house
18,091,961 00
18, 770, 952 00
4, 576, 512 00
National bank notes
4,199, 303 00
• 2, 315, 530 06
Fractional currency
.,
.
486, 521 06
58.5, 016 61
2, 243, 027 28
Specie—coin.
'...
2, 274, 750 71
1, 714, 696 68
4, 741, 307 51
5, 382, 729 40
1, 566, 240 00
1, 774,100 00
10, 458,180 00
. gold T r e a s n r y n o t e s
12, 072, 560 00
81, 510, 202 CO
Legal-tender notes...'.
28,242,165 00
32,168, 429 00
94, 047, 221 00
4, 925, 000 00
3,150, 000 00
4,020,000 00
U . S. certificates of deposit
6, 675, 000 00
25, 767, 477 27
9, 547, 477 27
27, 276,135 59
Clearing-house loan c e r t i f i c a t e s . . . . . .
11, 416, 135 59
Totals

:.....

348, 957, 624 91

356,390,326 60

126,172, 565
78, 090, 059
343,031,974
46,017,750

126,189, 265
78, 220, 298
150, 797, 514
49, 936, 547

1,223,434,739 81 1, 232, 881, 620 81

Liabilities.
Capital stock
CirculatiujCf n o t e s o u t s t a n d i n g
D e p o s i t s of all k i n d s
D u e to all b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
Totals......




00
00
39
49

398, 362, 343 88

00
00
68
70

405,143, 025 38

490, 678, 367 37
341,.582, 601 00
530,019,988 34
120, 284, 700 08

491,
342,
539,
119,

039, 856 75
350, 844 00
302, 322 10
413,120 07

1,482,565,656 79 1, 492,106,142 92

COMPTROLLER

OF T H E CURRENCY.

147

VII.—Statement of resources and liahilities of savings-hanks organized under State laws.
Maine,
November,
1872.

Resources and liabilities.

New Hampshire, F e b r u a r y , 1872.

"Vermont, J u l y , 1872.

Massachu- Rhode Island,
c h u s e t t s , Oc- D e c e m b e r ,
ber, 1872.
1872.

RESOURCES.

$6, 246, 324

$4, 915, 363

$1,481,026

$89, 684, 246

$20, 697, 032

5, 518, 315
1, 268, 701

' 7,464,257
2,887,390-

1, 799, 812
264, 097

49, .541, 025
13, 769, 449

11, 651, 530
1, 708, 700

0, 591, 877
4, 940, 627
574, 461
229, 450
115, 443
5,491

5, 090,125
3, 455, 779
992, 362
171, 806

8, 229, 048
4, 602, 567
16, 972, 805
1, 968, 436
469, 682
1, 729, 487
875, 816

5, 513, 221
1, 707, 959
2, 405, 214
20.5,875
27 443
9,630
153, 617
131; 155

L o a n s on p e r s o n a l a n d collatUnited States bonds
State, municipal, and other
bonds and stocks
Railroad stocks and bonds
B a n k stock
1
Real estate
Other investments
.
Expenses
D u e f r o m other banks
Cash

663, 644

599, 963

26,154, 333

25, 578, 541

3, 945, 869

137, 842, 561

44, 211, 376

25,174, 930
2.55,991
723,412.

24, 540, 693
1,037,848

3, 744, 324
108, 585
92, 960

184, 797, 314
3, 045, 247

42,614,718
1, 559, 279

26,154, 333

•

Total

88, 823
43, 400
39, 833
21, 505
13,135
2,127
3, 232
188, 879

2.5, 578, 541

' 3, 945, 869

387,842,563

1,496

LIABILITIES.

Deposits
S u r p l u s fund
U n d i v i d e d profits
O t h e r liabilities

.'
. . "

'

Total

• ; "

•

37,379
44, 211, 376

Resources and liahilities of savings-hanks—Continued.

Resources and liabilities.

Connecticut,
JTanuary,
1873."

N e w York,
January,
1873.'

$43,174,015

$104, 639, 854

$13, 786, 752

$2, 733, 086

$287, 357, 698

9, 495, 819
4, 771, 970

17,720,173
50, 978, 625

3, 358, 924
3, 964, 963

841,602
962,193

107, 391, 457
80, 576, 088

6, 897, 298
.1,378,416
3, 375, 973
423, 342
156, 630
30, 593
740, 076
827, 258

102, ,574,131
557, 903

8,155,280
10, 320

403, 684
06, 417

6, 469, 430
6, 081, 322
12, ,532, 497
3, 796, 396

372, 914
138, 078
5,898
157,593
078, 820

437, 958
7,308
109, 575
148, 972
474, 649

143, 543, 487
16, 793, 388
24, 360, 653
10, 350, 716
. 6, 519, 359
634, 492
15,465,474
8, 236, 580

71, 271, 395

305, 330, 331

30,629,542

6, 265, 444

701,229,392

74,
669, 329,
10, 468,
. 20, 879,
476,

N e w J e r s e y , District^Col u m b i a , j uly,
January,
1873."

Aggregate.

RESOURCES.

L o a n s on r e a l e s t a t e
L o a n s on p e r s o n a l a n d collateral s e c u r i t i e s
,
United States bonds
S t a t e , mu-nicipal, a n d o t h e r
bonds and stocks
R a i l r o a d s t o c k s a n d bonds
B a n k stock
,
:
Real estate
Other investments.
Expenses
":
D u e from o t h e r b a n k s
Cash
Total.
LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
Deposits
S u r p l u s fund
U n d i v i d e d profits .
O t h e r liabilities . . ,
Total.

161, 047.

19, 776, 864
266, 846

206,1

74, 975
6, 035, 733
14, 379
79, 313
11, 039

71, 271, 395

305, 330, 331

30, 629, 542

6, 26.5, 444

28, 562,181
1, 860, 485

68, 523, 398
2,586,950

975
917
764 •
425
311

T h e a b o v e s t a t e m e n t i n c l u d e s all r e p o r t s of s a v i n g s b a n k s in t h e different S t a t e s of t h e Union w h i c h
c o u l d b e o b t a i n e d from official sources. T h e s t a t e m e n t for t h e D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a i n c l u d e s th©
s e v e r a l b r a n c h e s of t h e F r e e d m e n ' s S a v i n g s a n d T r u s t C o m p a n y in s i x t e e n S t a t e s .




148

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

VIII.—Statement of resources and liahilities of State hanks, including savings-hanks having
capital stoclc.
New York
N e w ' York,
New Hamp- Rhodelsland,
C o n n e c t i c u t , City, Septem- S e p t e m b e r
shire, F e b r u - D e c e m b e r ,
A p r i l , 1873.
b e r 12,1873.
12,1873.
ary, 1872.
1872.

R e s o u r c e s a n d liabilities.

RESOURCES.

$29, 216, 378
123, 795

203
1, 854

1, 686, 485
3, 872, 399
1, 550, 463
84, 403
271, 789
17,149, 962
2, 883, 846

1,634,348
3, 003, 873
493, 578
68, 006
228, 253
. 639,237
31, 971

45,000

$2, 571, 001
3, 0.52
35, 790

108,376
126, 455
43, 632

•

4, 000

O t h e r invecitmenta
Expenses.:
Cash items
...
Specie
Cash — legal tenders, . b a u k
n o t e s &c
.

$48,178, 538
20,191

5,102
72, 099
11,131.

$4,155, 211

• $72,984
U n i t e d Staites b o n d s
O t h e r b o n d s , stocks, m o r t g a g e s &c
D u e from o t h e r b a n k s

482,128
92, 400

3,839

6,567

233, 861

67, 450

' 4,377,947

911, 034

85', 608

4, 716, 374

3, 340,153

80, 076, 028

36, 350, 473

50, 000
1,554

'

Total

3,149, 950
24, 594

1,450,000
29, 918
212,768
118,152
4, 294
1, 214, 780
310, 241

17,.285, 200.
38,142"

LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
Circulation
S u r p l u s fund '.
U n d i v i d e d profits

,
27, 053
290
6, 711

Total

232, 044
21, 079
1, 060, 379
176, 909
51, 419

85, 608

Deposits
D u e to other banks
Other liabilities

4, 716, 374

'

3, 340,153

0

9, 653,-690
63,687

6,120, 322

3,133, 095

51, 514, 763
4, 564, 976
552, 625

20, 935,117
1, 697, 526
867-, 358

80, 076, 028

36,350,473

Eesources and liahilities of State hanlcs, including savings-hanks—Continued.
N e w Jersey, Pennsylvania,
Noveraber,
January,
1872.
1873.

R e s o u r c e s a n d liabilities.

RESOURCES. .

Wisconsin,
J u l y , 1873.

Minnesota,
J u l y , 1873.

)

O t h e r bonds, s t o c k s , m o r t g a ges. &c
D u e irom other b a n k s . . ^
Real estate
Other investments
Expenses
Cash items
•.
Specie
C a s h — legal t e n d e r s , b a n k
n o t e s , &.C

$3,302,178

$20,331,359

40, 600

..

Loans and discounts
Overdrafts

Total

Michigan,'
January,
1873.

184, 478
918, 632
121, 854
541
15, 084

4, 308, 266
1, 911, 373
798, 092
783, 962
232,189
• '43,795
66, 393

$5, 063, 837
14, 570

$740, 405

992,130'
1, 434, 687
101, 362
1,409
1,175
173, 568
26, 798

24, 598
71, 539

50
•

678,986
783,811
65, 993
70, 208
898, 663

376, 728

1, 734, 892

4, 960, 095

. .

$5, 700, 450
75, 496

*1, 418, 856

31,679,3 77

7, 576, 073

7,187, 300

1, 447, 444

1, 402, 307

146, 944
165„275

20, 761, 456
1, 973, 907
354, 207

5, 816, 410

31, 679,177

7, 576, 073

5, 753
8, 709

669, 598

69, 699

9,176, 673

920, 753

LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
Circulation
Surplus fund
U n d i v i d e d profits
Dividends unpaid
Deposits
D u e to o t h e r b.anks
O t h e r liabilities
Total

...

...

1, 482, 7.50
15,415
288, 559
189, 407
'
7,829
2, 857, 635
113, 410
. 5,090
4,960,095

;

715,
1,
54,
16,

000
404
654
688

284, 500

6, 200, 547
2,188, 380

386, 236
1,386
218, 499

9,176, 673

920, 753

4,500
25,632

/• This amount includes other bonds than those of the United States, the form of report not permitting
them to be distinguished.




149

COMPTEOLLEIi OF THE CUEEENCY.

Aggregate resources and liahilities of State -hanks, including savings-hanks having capital
stock.

Resources.

Aggregate
resources.

Aggregate
liabilities.

Liabilities.

$42, 705, 834
174, 714
2,109, 732
10, 027, 668
33, 492
110, 7.54, 034
8, 838, 355
4, 237, 578

$119, 332,341 Capital stock
Loans and discounts
,
• 2.37,104 Circulation
Overdrafts
.^
'.
1, 544, 296 Surplus fund
United States bonds".
9, 617, 667 Undivided.profits...
Other bonds, stocks, mortgages, &c.
12, 60.5,100 JDividends unpaid,..
Due from other banks
3, 269, 233 Deposits . . . . . o
Real estate
944, 079 Due to other banks .
Other investments
886, 343 Other liabilities
Expenses
18, 977, 324
Cash items
3, 020,139
Specie
8, 447, 776
Cash—legal tenders, bank notes, <fec

Total

178, 881, 407

178, 881, 407

Total .

IX.—Statement showing the amount and kind of United States registered honds held hy the
Ti-easurer of the United States on the 1st day of Novemher, 1873, to secure the redemption
of the Girciilating notes of national hanks.

Title of loan.
Loan of 18,58
Loan of Februaxy 8,1861, (81s)
Loan of July and August, 1861, (81s) . . .
Five-twenties of 1862
Loan of 1883 (81s)
Ten-forties, 1864
:
Five-twenties of March 3,1864
:..
Five-twenties of June, 1864
Five-twenties of 1865
-Consols of 1865
•
Consols of 1867
Consols of 1868
Funded loan of 1881
United States bonds issued to -Pacific
Railway companies.
Total




Authorizing.aet.
June 14,1858
February 8 1861
July 17, and August 5, 1861.
February 25,1862
March 3 1863 . .
March 3, 1864
March 3, 1864
June 30, 1864
March 3 1865
March 3,1865
'.
March 3,"1865
March 3, 3 865
:
July'14, 1870, and January 20,1871.
July 1, 1862, and July 2, 1864

Rate of
interest.

Amount.

5 per cent...
6 per cent...
6 per cent...
6 per cent...
6 per cent.:.
5 per cent-..
6 per cent...
6 per cent...
6 per cent...
6 per cent..."
6 per cent...
6 per cent...
5 percent...

$620, 000
4,162, 000
59, 344, 7.50
1, 355, 20p
32 080 150
107, 225, 050
706, 000
10, 446, 050
10, 247, 400
7, 611, 050
14,162. 350
3, 632, 000
127,172,100
6 p e r c e n t . . . 14, 088, 000
392, 852,100

150

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

X.—Statement of the average amount of loans, and of liahilities and reserve, of the hanks in
Liabilities.
National banks.

Loans.
Circulation.

F i r s t N a t i o n a l .Bank
Second Nation.al B a n k
•
Third National Bank
t
Fourth National Bank
Ninth National Bauk
Tenth National Bank
:
New York National Exchang e
Ceutral
:
National Broadway
„
N a t i o n a l of C o m m e r c e
National P a r k
Tradesmen's
:
:...,.
N a t i o n a l Shoe a n d L e a t h e r
M a r k e t .1
Saint Nicholas
Seventh W a r d
...1
N a t i o n a l of Reiiublic
'
Mercantile
J
National Mechanics' Bankiug Association
Merchants' Exchange
'.
East River,
New York County
Metropolitan
Leather Manufacturers'.
Marine
Importers ahd Traders'
Mechanics'
National Butchers and Drovers'
Union
N a t i o n a l Citizens'
Bowery
G allatiu
Hanover
Irving
•
Merchants'
Phoenix
,
Chatham
Continental ....'
"
B a n k of N e w Y o r k a n d N a t i o n a l .Banking A s s o c i a t i o n
American Exchange
.National City
N a t i o n a l B a n k of S t a t e of N e w Y o r k
,
Fulton
Chemical
Mechanics and Traders'
T o t a l s for w e e k e n d i n g S e p t e m b e r 20 ...'
T o t a l s for w e e k e n d i u g N o v e m b e r 22

,.,.
:...

628, 800
521, 000
454, 900
604, 400
070, 900
799, 300
264, 000
201, 000
932, 800
672, 300
324, 600
058, 000.
604, 500
876, 800
272, 900
203, 400
951,400
080, 000
395, 700
238,100
074, 200
144, 300'
771, 200
955, 200
147, 700
753, 000
653; 700
5,58,100
821, 800
438,. 600
242, 000
71 IS, 700
151, 700
362, 000
091, 800
870, 500
182, 900
583, 200
737, 600
259, 800
654, 300
960, 700
857, 600
701,200
860,-800

$317, 000
260,000
782, 200
2, 930, 300
610, 000
893, 500
266, 800
1, 440, 000
900, 000
3,140, 400
890, 000
752,400
775, 900
344, 400
735, 900
169, 400
858, 800
. 478,400
306, 500
447, 500
223, 500
180, 000
1,116, 800
262, 400
36P,000
488, 600
528,100
250, 000
486, 600
132, 400
225, 000
, 483,600
, 294,000
•174,400
857, 400
507, 600
/ 128,300
584, 600
833, 800
938, 200

237, 700, 400
211,441,500

27,151,600
27, 267, 700

079, 300
697, 500
041, 400
004, 300
592, 700
,578, 400
013,100
794, 800
412, 000
763, 000
055; 500
030, 500
489. 300
250,000

9,700
1, 200
2,700

38, 801, 800
36, 625, 800

32, 200

541,200

S T A T E BAJ<KS.

Manhattan Company . . :
B a n k of A m e r i c a
G-reenwich B a n k
Pacific B a n k
People's Bank
J
.'
B a n k of N o r t h A m e r i c a
Nassau Bank
Corn E x c h a n g e B a n k
•
Oriental B a n k
G r o c e r s ' Banlc
North River Bauk
Manufacturers and M e r c h a n t s '
German American
D r y Goods
:
T o t a f s for w e e k e u d i n g S e p t e m b e r 20
T o t a l s for w e e k e n d i n g N o v e m b e r 22
Aggreg.atos for w e e k e n d i n g S e p t e n i b e r 20
A g g r e g a t e s for Aveek e n d i u g N o v e m b e r 22

,

5,600
3,900
5,000
4,100

:..
.•.

276,502,200
248, 067, 300

32, ioo
27,183, 800
27, 299, 800

* L e a v i n g o u t t h e a v e r a g e r e s e r v e of t h e M a n h a t t a n C o m p a n y , w h i c h Avas 27.88 p e r cent'., a n d t h a t of
C i t y for t h e w e e k e u d i n g S e p t e m b e r 20, 1873, w a s 17.P5 p e r cent., a n d for t h e w e e k e n d i n g N o v e m b e r
of A m e r i c a 35.64 p e r cent., t h e a v e r a g e r e s e r v e of t h o S t a t e b a n k s i n N e w Y o r k C i t y w a s 24.17 p e r




'COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

151

Neiv York City, during tlie week ending Septemher 20, 1873, as reported to the clearing-house.
Liabilities.

Reserve.
Ratio of reserve.
Total.

N e t deposits.

Specie.

Legal-tenders.

Total.

Percent.
$784, 500

$471, 600
357, 000
1, 303, 900
2, 049, 400
907, 600
175, 700
297, 000
2,170, 000
1,002,800
1, 542, 000
. 2, 373, 700
• 542, 700
356, 700
. 328,000
330,400
207,700
100, 000
677,100
192, 500
409, 800
188,100
285,100
599,100
510, 200
. 368,300
2, 647, 800
566, 800
441,500
642,400
300, 200
315, 000
355,100
378, 300
506, 000
• 750,900
184, 300
305, 000
293, 000
1,189, 800
965, 000
173, 000
558, 500
313,300
.584,900
390, 000

$1, 2.56,100
357, 000
1, 427, 900
3, 635, 400
1, 340, 900
256,600
305,200
2, 260, 000
1, 052, 200
2, 365, 600
3, 469, 000
655, 400
628, 800
516, 200
393, 200
289,100
9-53, 600
820, 000
268, 200
°473, 300
201, 800
285, 100
1,640,100
815, 800
546,900
3,149, 000
924, 900
474, 400
1, 005, 200
329, 400
321,000
813, 900
593, 300
550, 000
1, 559, 400
628, 300
531,800
342, 900
- 2, 948, 800
1, 646, 400
867, 000
914,100
507, 500
997,400
408, 500

36,119,400
14,759,300

29, 607, 200
25, 330, 600

480, 900
1,320,100
6, 500
200, 400
42, 800
79, 500
6, 000
4, 200
24, 600
2, 000
439, 800
- 37,500

621, 900
936, .300
238, 500
• 237,500
137, 500
. 181,700
127, 000
291, 000
193, 4u0
158, 500
175, 800
16.5, 400
486, 400
286, 200
4, 242,100
5, 669, 200

6,951,500
8, 478, 600

33, 849, 300
30,999,800 I

.52, 678,. 100
48,568,500

24.11
24. 47
21.85
18.14
19. 79
18.40
" 26. 90
25. 39
27.35
• 24. 45
18.25
27.54
22. 26
24. 69
24. 36
27. 02
26.63
20.78
19.28
17.15
23.55
25. 98
24. 54
30. 0625. 89
25. 80
25. 07
23. 49
29.23
23. 54
25.66
34. 23
23.25
23. 21
25.29
21.60
24. 48
20.52
25. 80
27.50
30. 33
26. 00
35. 02
23.31
27.60

""""'i,"o4i,"oo6"

167,184, 600
138, 625, 300

'

$5, 210, 000
3,459,000
6, 536. 2(J0
20, 037, 400
6, 774, 400
1, 394, 200
1,134,500
8, 900, 000
3, 876,100
9, 674, 700
19, 006,100
2, 380,200
2, 824, 900
2, 090. 300
1, 613, 800
1, 069, 700
3, 580, 900
3, 945, 900
1, .391,100
2, 759, 000
857, 000
1, 097, 400
6, 68^2, 200
2,713,600
2,112, 300
12, 206, 800
3, 689, 200
2, 019, 900
3, 433, 600
1, 399,100
1, 251, 000
2, 377, 600
. 2,5.51,900
2, 369, 400
6,16.5,900
2, 909, 400
2,172, 500
1,670,800
. 11, 429, 800
5, 987, 000
2, 858, 200
3, 515, 700
1,449,000
4, 278, 500
1, 480, 000
194, 336, 200
165, 893, 000

23.53
24.17

3, 95.5, 400
5, 232, 500
1, 088, 300
3, 550, 800
1,321,600
• 2,958,700
1, 940; 800
1, 438, 300
1, 006, 700
656, 300
901,500
806, 300
4, 535, 300
1,802,700

27.88
43.12
21.92
16.29
10.90
12.91
8.75
25.76
20.40
24. 79
22.23
20.76
21. 55
17.96.

•

3, 945. 700
5, 231, 300
1, 085, 600
1, 550, 800
' 1,316,000
,
•
> 2, 958. 700
\ 1, 936; 900
, 1,43.3, ,300
\ 1,002,600
' 656,300
,
901, 500
\ 806,300
\4, ,535, 300
1, 802, 700
2\ 163, 000 ^
29341, 900
196, \47,
167, ^7,

600
200

i24,"666
•

1, 586, 000
433, 300
80, 900
8,200
90, 000
49, 400
823, 600
1, 095, 300
112, 700
272,100
183, 200
.62, 800
81, 400
853, 600
142, 900
75, 700
63, 500
13,700
305, 600
178, 600
501,200
. 358,100
32, 900
362, 800
29, 200
6,000
458, 800
21.5,000
44, 000
808, 500
444, 000
226, 800
49,900.
1, 759, 000
681, 400
694, 000
35.5, 600
194, 200
412, 500
18, 500

i5,"ic)o"

29,195, 200
• 29,374,000
.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
36
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

4-). 726, 600
. 40,089,900

'$4,893,000
1,199, 000
5, 754, 000
17,107,100
6,164, 400
500, 700
• 867,700
7, 460, 000
2, 976,100
6, 534, 300
18,116,100
1,627,800
2, 049, 000
1,74.5,900
877, 900
900, 300
2, 722,100
3, 467, 500
1. 084, 600
2,311,500
• 633,500
917, 400.
5, 505. 400
2, 451, 200
1, 7.52, 300
11,718,200
3,161,100
1, 769, 900
2, 947, 000
1, 266, 700
1, 026, 000
1, 894, 000
2, 257, 900
•2,195,000
5, 303, 500
• 2, 401, 800
2, 044, 200
1,086,200
10,596,000
5, 048, 800
2, 858, 200
2, 974, 500
1, 449, 000
4, 278, 500
1,234,300

*23. 81
28. 86

2, 709, 400
2, 809, 400

223, .531, 400
195, 267, 000

23. 57
24. 87

18, 828, 800
17, 563, 700

•

•

\ 32
i 33
1 34

35
i 36

37

1 38

30

j 40

41
42
43
44
1 45

1,302,800 i 1
2, 256, 400 i 2
233, 500
3
4
252, 600
144, 000
5
382,100 ; 6
169, 800 : 7
370, 500 ' 8
204, 400
9
162, 700 lo200, 400 ll
167, 400 12
976, 200 a3
323, 700 14

the Bank oi America, which was 43.12 per cent., the average reserve ot the State banks in New York
22, 1873, whti the average reserve of the Manhattan Company was 38.63 per Cent., and that of the Bank
cent.




•

.

••

-

•

XI.—statement showing the aggregate nuniber of notes issued, redeemed, and outstanding, on Novemher 1, 1868-73, inclusive.
Or
Twos.

Ones.

Fives.

Tens.

Twenties.

Fifties.

.

One-hun• dreds.

to
Five-hundreds.

One-thousands.

•

1868.
Issued
Redeemed

^ 8, 896; 576
254,. 754

23,106, 728
482,132

7, 915, 914
142, 359

2, 219, 322
36, 355

355,181
17, 256

267, 350
15, 583

13, 486
1,759

8, 641, 822

2,904,984

22, 624, 596

7, 773, 555

,2,182, 967

337, 925

251, 767

11, 727

2 900

9, 589,160
904, 013

3, 209, 388
232, 224

23, 670, 760
985, 940

8, 094, 645
272, 495

2, •269,'764
71, 655

363, 523
22, 859

274, 799
25, 968

13, 668
• 2, 585

4,769
2, 415

o

8, 685,147

2, 977,164

22, 690, 820

7, 821,150

2,198,109

334, 664

248, 831

11, 083.

2,354

H
O

10, 729, 327
2, 568, 703

3,590,157
• 667, 733

. 24,636,720
1, 737, 983

8, 413, 244
484,135

2, 370, 056
129,185

378, 482
47, 845

284, 460
43,599

13, 926
3,952

4 779
3, 263

8,160, 624

2, 922, 424

22, 898, 737

7, 929,109

2, 240, 871

330, 637

240,861

9,974

1 516

12, 537, 657
5, 276, 057

4,195,791
1, 493, 326

28,174, 940
3, 276, 374

9, 728, 375
933, 445 •

2,779,392
245, 361

433, 426
82, 972

321,163
76, 287

14, 642
6,017

4, 843
4,005

7, 261, 600

2, 702, 465

24,898,566

8, 794, 930

2, 534, 031-

350, 454

244, 876

• 8, 625

838

4,782,628
2, 408, 389

31, 933, 348
5, 960, 667

11, 253, 452
1, 699, 702

- 3, 225, 688
438, 852

497,199
126,180

367, 797
110, 989

15, 621
7, 867

4 933
4,315

6, 377, 971

Outstanding

2, 978,160
73,176

2, 374, 239

25,972,681

9,553,750.

2, 786, 836

371,019

256, 808

7, 754

638

15, 524,189
9, 891, 606

5,195, 111
3,120, 723

34, 894, 456
9,141, 963

12, 560, 399
2, 573, 070

3, 60S, 219
6.53, 071

559, 722
168, 976

416, 590
. 144, 0.57

16, 496
9,658

5,148
4, 530

5, 632, 583

2, 074, 388

25,752,493

9, 987, 329

2, 955,148

390, 746

272, 533

6, 838

618

'

4 746
1 846

1869.
Issued
Redeemed

•

Outstanding

.1870.

Issiied
..'.
Redeemed.

•
•

Outstanding

.

.

1871. •
Issued
Redeemed

• •

.

Outstanding

'

'

1872.
Issued
Redeemed.:

14,297,360'
7, 919, 389

Outstanding

"

1873.
Redeem.ed'.'.'.
Outstanding




'

.

C

153

COMPTEOLLER OF THE CUERENCi'.

XII.—Statement sliowing the national hanks that have heen placed in the hands of receivers,
their capital, lawful money dexiosited to redeem circulation, circulation issued, circulation
redeemed by the Treaswer of- the United States, and the outstanding circulation, Novemher
1, 1873.
t > i O .'

CD t ^ ' - '

o
o
cc Pl

N a m e a n d location of b a n k .
^

$50, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of A t t i c a , N . Y *
V e n a n g o N a t i o n a l B a n k of F r a n k l i n , P a
300, 000
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t ' l B a n k of W a s h i n g t o n , D . C. 200, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of M e d i n a , N . Y * .
50, 000
T e n n e s s e e N a t i o n a l B a n k of Memphis.Tenn'^'. 100, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Selma, A l a
• 100, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Orleans, L a . . . . . 500, 000
N a t i o n a l U n a d i l l a Bajik, U n a d i l l a , N . Y
120, 000
F a r m e r s a n d C i t i z e n s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of
B r o o k l y n , N . Y . . . ' '.
300, 000
C r o t o n N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y * . . 200, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Bethel, Conn*
60, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l .Bank of K e o k u k , I o w a *
100, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Y i c k s b u r g h , M i s s . . .
50, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Rockford, III
50. 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Nevada-, A u s t i n , N e v . 250; 000
Ocean N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y
, 000, 000
U n i o n S q u a r e N a t ' l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y . 200,000E i g h t h N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y . . . . 250, 000
F o u r t h N a t i o n a l B a n k of P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . . . 200, 000
"Waverly N a t i o n a l B a n k , W a v e r l y , N . Y
106,100
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of F o r t Smith, A r k
50, 000
S c a n d i n a v i a n N a t i o n a l B a u k of Chicago, I I I . . 250, 000
W a l i k i l l N a t i o h a l B a n k of M i d d l e t o w n , N . Y . 175, 000
C r e s c e n t C i t y N a t ' l B a n k , of N e w O r l e a n s , L a 500, 000
A t l a n t i c N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y . . 300, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of W a s h i n g t o n , D . C
500, 000
N a t i o n a l B a n k of t h e C o m m o n w e a l t h , N e w
750, 000
York, N . Y
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of P e t e r s b u r g h , Y a 400, 000
200, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of P e t e r s b u r g h , V a
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Mansfield, Ohio
100, 000
N e w Orleans N a t ' l B a n k i n g Association, L a . 600, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Carlisle, P a
50, 000
Total.

-

c^ a c3
3 C ,
D

O OJ -3

ci
O

O

-gi

o

$44, 000
8.5,000
180, JOO
40, 000
90, 000
85, 000
180, 000
100, 000

$44, 000
8,5,000
180, 000
40, 000
90, 000
85, 000
180, OOO
100, 000

$42, 906 50
83,128 50
174, 904* 00
38, 806 75
87,878 .75
82, 816 75
175,175 50
97, 514 50

253, 900
.180,000
26, 300
90, 000
25, 500
45, 000
129, 700
800, 000
50, 000
243,393
179, 000
71,000
4.5, 000
135, 000
118, 900
270, 000
66, 700
(t)

253, 900
180, 000
26, 300
90, 000
25, .500
45, 000
329,700
800, 000
50, 000
243, 393
179, 000
71, 000
45, 000
135, 000
118, 900
450, 000
100, 000
450, 000

246, 550 25
7, 349.75
176, 390 75
3, 609 25
25, 339 50
960 50
88,149 00
1, 851 00
24,108 75
1,391 25
42, 983 00
2, 017 00
117, 836 50
11,863 50
705, 035 00
94, 965 00
43, 447 00
6, 553 00
208,199 00
3.5,194 00
156, 005 00
22, 995 00
'57, 865 00 • 13,135 00
37, 005 00
7, 995 00
89, 300 00
45,700 00
75, 800 00
43,100 00
238, 000 00 212, 000 00
47, 200 00
52, 800 00
450, 000 do

(t)
^t)
(t)
(t)
(t)
(t)

234,000
360, 000
179, 200
90, 000
360 000
•45.000

8,061,100 3,533,393 .5,464,893

$1, 093 50
1, 871 50
5, 096 00
1,193 25 .
2,121 25
2,183 25
4, 824 50
2, 485 50

234,
360,
179,
90,
360,
45,

000,00
000 00
200 00
000 00
000 00
000 00

3,162, 345 00 ,2, 302, 548 00

^ F i n a l l y closed.
t U n i t e d S t a t e s b o n d s on deposit to s e c u r e circulation, n o t y e t sold.




•

154

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

XIII.—Statement showing tlie insolvent hanks, with date of appointment of receivers, caxntal
. stock, aniount of claims proved, and dividends paid.
DiviAmount
of claims d e n d s
paid.
proved.

N a m e a n d location of b a n k .

Appointment
of receiver.

Capital
stock.

F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of A t t i c a , N . Y .
V e n a n g o N a t i o n a l B a u k of F r a n k lin, P a
'.:..
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l Baiik of W a s h i n g t o n , D. C
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k bf M e d i n a . N . Y .
T e n n e s s e e N a t i o n a l B a n k of Memphis, Tenn
• F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Selma A l a . .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of NCAV Orleans, L a
N a t i o n a l U n a d i l l a B a n k of U n a d i l la, N . Y
:
F a r m e r s and Citizens' National
B a n k of B r o o k l y n , N . Y
C r o t o n N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k ,
N.Y
F i r s t N a t i o n a l Baink of B e t h e l , Conn.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of K e o k u k ,
Iowa.'
N a t i o n a l B a n k of V i c k s b u r g i i , M i s s .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Rockford,III.
F i r s t N a t i o u a l B a u k of N e v a d a ,
Austin, Nev

A p r . 14,1865

$50, 000

$122, 089.

May

1,1866

300, 000

"39,5,734

M a y 8,1866
M a r . 13,1867

200, 000
50, 000

M a r . 21,1867
A p r . 30,1867

100,000
100, 000

376, 932
238, 932

35

xMay 20,1867

SOCi, 000

11,116,631-

35

A u g . 29,1867

120, 000

127, 266

32
92

F i n a l l y closed.
C a s h on h a n d $100,347.

38i

" Cash on h a n d $40,603.
F i n a l l y closed.
Do.

6,1867

300, 000

1,189, O O
C

Oct. 1,1867
F e b . 28,1868

200, 000
.60, 000

170,752
68,986

884-

M a r . .3,* 1868
A p r . 24,1868
M a r . 15,1869

100, 000
50, 000
50, 000

205, 256
31,212
63, 248

68:}
35
25

Oct. 14,1869

250, O0(j

169, 812

Sept.

Ocean N a t i o n a l B a n k of Nev/^ Y o r k ,
N.Y.
Dec. 13,1871 1, 000, 000
U n i o n S q u a r e N a t i o n a l B a n k of
200, 000
New York, N. Y
D e c . 15,1871
E i g h t h N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w
250, 000
Dec. 15,1871
York, N . Y
F o u r t h N a t i o n a l B a n k of P h i l a d e l phia, P a
W a v e r l y N a t i o n a l B a n k , AVaverly, N . Y . . .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of F o r t S m i t h ,
Ark
:
S c a n d i n a v i a n N a t i o n a l B a n k of Chicago, III
W a l i k i l l N a t i o n a l B a n k of Middletown, N. Y
C r e s c e n t C i t y N a t i o n a l B a n k of
N e w Orleans, L a
A t l a n t i c N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w
Yort,N.Y
:........:.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of W a s h i n g ton, D. C
,..:..
N a t i o n a l B a n k of t h e Commonwealth, N e w York, N. Y
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of P e tersburgh, Va
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of P e t e r s burgh, V a
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Mansfield,
Ohio
N e w Orleans National
Banking
Association, L a
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Carlisle, P a .

Perct
58

Remarks.

Since l a s t r e p o r t .
C a s h on h a n d $263,514.
'Since l a s t r e p o r t .
C a s h on h a n d $55,287.
Finally'closed.
28 p e r cent, since l a s t
r e p o r t ; finally closed.
F i n a l l y closed.
Since l a s t r e p o r t .
Do.
15 p e r cent, since l a s t
r e p o r t . C a s h on h a n d
$33,516.

3,280,328

70

157,120

100

376, 695

60

10 p e r cent, since l a s t
r e p o r t . Cash on h a n d
$30,631.

D e c . 20,1871

200, 000

' 645, 558

100

A p r , 23, 1872

106,100

83, 351

100

2,1872

50, 000

8,683

100

Dec. 12,1872

250, 000

240, 810

D e c . 31,1872

175, 000

152,588

M a r . ISi 1873

500, 000

+666,751

A p r . 28,1873

300, 000

521,-526

Sept. 19,1873

500, 000

+1, 655, 795

Sept. 22,1873

750, 000

tT91, 036

C a s h on h a n d $153,300.

Sept. 25,1873

400, 000

Jl, 002, 346

C a s h on h a n d $12, 787.

Sept. 25,1873

200, 000

1178, 618

C a s h on h a n d $8,922.

Oct. 18,1873

100, 000

+177, 207

C a s h on h a n d $8,358.

Oct. 23,1873
Oct. 24,1873

600, 000
50, 000

+642,182
J68, 960

C a s h on h a n d $7,972.
C a s h on h a n d $1,814.

May

Since l a s t r e p o r t .
Do.
Do.
C a s h ou h a n d $131,945.
Since l a s t r e p o r t .

I
* Also, $50,000 U n i t e d S t a t e s 6 p e r cent, b o n d s on d e p o s i t w i t h t h e T r e a s u r e r .
t I n a d d i t i o n to t h o above, t h e G o v e r n n i e n t holds, a claim of $221,769, w h i c h i s i n d i s p u t e .
J E s t i m a t e d a m o u n t of claims.




COMPTROLLER

165-

OF THE- CURRENCY.

XIY.—Statement showing the national hanks in voluntary liquidation that have deposited lawful.money with the Treasurer of the United States to redeem their circulation, ivithdrawn theirbonds, and voluntarily closed business under the p)rovisions of section 42 of the act; their
caxntal,-.circuiation issued, circulation surrendered, circulation redeemed, hy the Treasurer
of the United States, amd circulation outstanding on the 1st day of Noveniber, 1873.

N a m e a n d location of b a n k .

Capital.

$100, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Columbia, M o .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a u k of Carondelet, M o
30, 000
F o u r t h N a t i o n a l B a n k of I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d .
100, 000
N a t i o n a l U n i o n B a n k of R o c h e s t e r , N . Y , . . .
400, 000
F a r m e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of.Richmond, V a . . * 100,000
F a r m e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of W a u k e s h a , W i s
100; 000
N a t i o n a l B a n k of t h e Metropolis, W a s h i n g 200, 000
ton, D . C .
N a t i o u a l S t a t e B a n k of D u b u q u e , I 8 w a . . . .
150, 000
Ohio N a t i o n a l B a n k of Cincinnati, Ohio
500, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w U l m , M i n n
60, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Blufi'ton, I n d
50, 000
N a t i o n a l E x c h a n g e B a n k of R i c h m o n d , V a .
200, G O
O
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of J a c k s o n , M i s s
300,000
1.50, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of S k a n e a t e l e s , N . Y . .
A p p l e t o n N a t i o n a l B a n k of A p p l e t o n , W i s
50, 000
120, 000
N a t i o n a l B a n k of W h i t e s t o w n , N . Y
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of C u y a h o g a F a l l s , Ohio
50, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of C e d a r b u r g h , W i s . .
100, 000
C o m m e r c i a l N a t i o n a l B a n k of C i n c i n n a t i ,
500, 000
Ohio.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of S o u t h W o r c e s t e i ,
175, 500
N.Y.
N a t i o n a l M e c h a n i c s a n d F a r m e r s ' B a n k of
350,000
Albany, N. Y.
Second N a t i o n a l B a n k of D e s Moines, I o w a
50, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of D a n v i l l e , V a
50, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Oskaloosa, I o w a
75, 000
Merchants and Mechanics' National Bank
300, 000
of T r o y , N . Y .
N a t i o n a l S a v i n g s B a n k of W h e e l i n g , W . V a .
100, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of M a r i o n , Ohio
125, 000
N a t i o n a l I n s u r a n c e B a n k of D e t r o i t , M i c h .
200, 010
N a t i o u a l B a n k of L a n s i n g b u r g h , N . Y
150, 000
N a t i o n a l B a u k of N o r t h A m e r i c a , N e w
1, 000, 000
York, N. Y.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Hallowell, M e
60, 000
Pacific N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y . .
422, 700
G r o c e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y.
390, 000
Savannah National Bank, Savannah, G a . . .
100, O O
U
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of F r o s t b u r g , M d
50, 000 •
50, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of La* Salle, I I I
N a t i o n a l B a n k of C o m m e r c e , G e o r g e t o w n ,
100, 000
D . C.
.
M i n e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of Salt L a k e City,
150, 000
Utah.
.50, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of V i n t o n , I o w a
F i r s t N a t i o n a l Balnk of D e c a t u r , III
100,000
N a t i o n a l U n i o n B a n k of Owego, N . Y
100, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of B e r l i n , W i s
5O,O(?0
C e n t r a l N a t i o n a l B a n k of C i n c i n n a t i , Ohio.
500, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a u k of D a y t o n ; Ohio
150, 000
100, 000
N a t i o n a l B a n k of C h e m u n g , E l m i r a , N . Y .
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of M i l w a u k e e ,
100,000
Wis.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of S a i n t Louis, M o . . .
200, 000
C h e m i n g C a n a l N a t i o n a l B a n k of E l m i r a ,
100, 000
N. Y.
'
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Clarksville, V a . . . .
50, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of L e b a n o n , O h i o . . : . . .
300,000
N a t i o n a l E x c h a n g e B a n k of L a n s i n g b u r g h ,
-100,000
M u s k i n g u m N a t i o n a l B a n k of Zanesville,
Ohio.
U n i t e d N a t i o u a l B a n k of W i n o n a , M i n n . . .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of D e s Moines, I o w a .
S a r a t o g a C o u n t y N a t i o n a l B a n k of W a t e r ford N . Y .
1
Stiite N a t i o n a l . B a n k of S a i n t J o s e p h , M o .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of T r e n t o n , M i c h . . .
F i r s t N a t i o u a l B a n k of W e l l s b u r g , W . V a .
C l a r k e N a t i o n a l B a u k of R o c h e s t e r , N . Y . .




Circulation
Circulation Circula- r e d e e m e d C i r c u l a t i o n ,
t i o n suroutstandissued.
r e n d e r e d . : ^.y u- s. 1 ing.
Treasurer.

$90, 000
$78, 010 $11, 425 00
2.5,500
24, 848 75
85, 700 '•'"io.'ioo' . 63, 800 00
192, 500
2, 550 373,108 25
85, 000
8,500
63, 583 25
90, 000
87, 320 25 1
180, 000 "'63,'ioo" 70, 700 00
127, 500
14, 900
450, 000
45,100
54, 000
11,800
45, 000
3,770
180, 000
7,880
40, 500
135, 000 " " 6 , ' 5 8 5 '
45, 000
44, 500
4.5, 000 ' " ' i 2 , ' 6 0 0 '
90, 000
18, 000
345, 950
157, 400

97,943
351. 240
34, 210
37, 446
151, 205
36, 015
118, 672
41, 783
40, 513
28, 304
64, 997
321, 955

75
00
00
25
00
00
20
85
25
75
00
00

$565 00^
651 25
11, 800 0016, 841 75
12, 916 75
2, 679 75
46, 200 0014, 656 25-'
53, 660 00
7, 990 003, 783 75
20, 915 00
4, 435 009, 742 80
• 3,216 15
3,986 7.54,095 25^
7, 003 00
23, 995. 00

4,500

141, 841 25

11, 058 75

314,950

48, 410

242, 300 25

24, 239 75

42, 500
4.5, 000
67, .500
184, 750

2,200
10, 000
3,755
13, 900

36, 647 00
25, 500 00
59,127.85
159, 641 20

3,-653
9,500
4, 617
11,208

0000
15
80^

90,
109,
85,
135,
333,

22,
4,
9,
12,
65,

59, 000
96, 418
•70,013
112, 891
238, 060

8, 700
9,414
5, 486
10,108
29,139

00 •
65
251535

000
8.50
000000
000

.

300
017
500
000
800

00
35
75.
85
65

.53, 350
46,143 75
2,500
134, 990
4,715 118,862 25
85, 250
33, 576 00
45, 810
85, 000
73, 255 25
4.5, 000 '*""4,'256' 36, 822 75
45, 000
11, 800
27, 500 00
90, 000
52, 505 00
21, 600
135, 000
42,
85,
88,
44,
445,
135,
90,
90,

4.5,^000

73,832.00

500
885
38, 523 75
250
79, 674 30
250 '""5,"406' 30, 006 50
000
3, 923
36, 785 80
000
105,130 271, 615 00
000
2,900 121,081 05
000
85, 098 25
000
75, 502 50

•

179, 990
161,989 05
90, 000 """3;^ 560" 80,139 00
27, 000
85, 000
90, 000 " " ' 4 , ' 3 0 3 '

21,155 0 0 .
77, 023 75
77, 557 80

4, 706
• 11, 412
5, 864
6, 744
3, 927
5, 700
15, 895

25-75
00
75'
25
00
00

16,163 00^
3, 091
5, 575
52, 843
,3,291
6S, 255
11,018
4, 901
14^ 497

25.
70
50'
20'
00
95
75 50'

13, 000 956, 361 00
5, 845 00'
7'976 2.58,134 20

100, 000

90, 000

3,800

73, 500 00

12, 700 00

•'50,000
100, 000
150,000

45, 000
90, 000
135, 000

875
700
8,000

38, 375 00
80,553 75
114,175 05

5,750 oa
8, 746 25
12, 824 95

78, 865
45, 023
77, 768
12-2, 810

•7,321
3, 976
11,732
31; 090

• 100, 000
100,000
100, 000
200,000

90,
49,
90,
180,

000
3,813
000
000 ' ' " " . 5 0 0 "
000
20,100

70
25
00
00

30
75
00
00

156

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

,

XIV.—Statement shoiving the national banksin voluntary liquidation, cj-c.—Ccntinued.

N a m e a n d location of b a n k .

Commercial N a t i o u a l B a n k of Oshkosh, W i s .
F o r t Madison National Bank, F o r t Madison, I o w a .
N a t i o n a l B a n k of M a y s v i l l e K y .
F o u r t h N a t i o n a l B a n k of Syracuse, N . Y ..
A m e r i c a n N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k . N . Y.
A t l a n t i c N a t i o n a l B a n k of Brooklyn, N . Y .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Rochester,' N . Y . . .
M e r c h a n t s a n d F a r m e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of
Quincy, III.
Lawrenceburgh National Bank, Lawrence-'
burgh, Ind.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of K n o x v i l l e , T e n n . . .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Goshen, I n d
Second N a t i o n a l B a n k of Zanesville Ohio
Second N a t i o n a l B a n k of Svracuse, N . Y . . .
M e c h a n i c s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k "of S y r a c u 8 e , N . Y .
F a r m e r s a u d M e c h a n i c s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of
Rochester, N . Y.
.
M o i i t a u a N a t i o n a l B a n k of H e l e n a , M o n t
N a t i o n a l B a n k of Cazenovia ' N . Y .
. ..
Second N a t i o n a l B a n k of Chicago, III
M a n u f a c t u r e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of ChiGao"o
DI.
Beloit N a t i o n a l B a n k of IBeloit, W i s
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o u a l B a n k of M e m p h i s ,
Tenn.
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of D u b u q u e ,
Iowa.
U n i o n N a t i o n a l B a n k of S a i n t L o u i s M o
P i t t s t o n N a t i o n a l B a n k of P i t t s t o n P a
B e r k s h i r e N a t i o n a l B a n k of A d a m s M a s s
K i t t a n i n g N a t i o n a l B a n k of K i t t a n i n g , P a .
C i t y N a t i o n a l B a u k of S a v a n n a h , G a
C e n t r a l N a t i o n a l B a n k of Omaha, N e b r
N a t i o n a l B a n k of CraAVford C o u n t y , Meadville, P a .
K i d d e r N a t i o n al Gold B a n k of B o s t o n , M a s s .
'

Total




'

Capital.

$100,000
• 75, 000
300, 000
105, 500
500,000
200, 000
400, 000
150, 000
200, 000

Circulation
issued.

270, 000
91, 700
450, 000 -*$72,200
• 165, 000
11,000
206,100
135, 000
180,000
80, 910.
103, 500
- 138,140
90,000
93, 800
83, 250

100,000
150,000
100, 000
500, 000

31,500
116,770
97, 500
450, 000

50, 000
250, 000
200, 000
•500,000
200, 000
100, 000
200, 000
100, 000
100, 000
300, 000
300, 000
15, 448, 410

$77, 015 00
$12 985 00
54, 000 00 • 13, 500 00

$90, 000
67, 500

000
000
700
000
000
000

100,
115,
154,
100,
140,
100,

Circulation
Circularedeemed Circnlation
tion suroutstandb y U . S.
rendered.
ingTreasurer.

500

' 12, 225
900
*I1, 250

'
45^ 000
225, 000
180, 000
150, 300

(t)
(t) .
(t)
(t)
(ty
.(t)
120, 000

224, 800 00
77, 235 00
103, 505 00
163, 802 50
101, 500 00
125,100 00
49,
61,
86,
51,
48,
7,

900
600
000
500
000
800

00
00
00
00
00
00

7, 400 00

45, 200
14 465
377, 800
50, 495
42,297
33, 500

00
00
00
00
50
00

54, 400 00
31,010
41- 900
.52,140
38, 500
45,800
63,225
31
108
97,
438,

500
470
500
750

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

45 000 00
225,000 00
{*)

180, 000 00

(*)

•

150, 300 00

120, 000

10, 511, 650 1, 012, 861 6,554,390 70 2, 944, 393 30

* Lawfal money not yet deiiosited.
t No circulation.

157

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

XY.—Statement showing the national banks in liquidation for the purpose of consolidating
with other hanks, their capital, bonds on dex^osit io secure circulation, circulation issued,
circulation surrendered and destroyed, and circiilation outstanding November 1,1873.

Name and location of. bank.
First National Bank of LeonardsviUe,
N.Y
First National Bank of Providence, P a
First National Bank of Newton, Newtonville, Mass
First National Bank.of Kingston, N. Y.
First National Bank of Downingtown,.
Pa:
First National Bank of Titusville, P a .
First National Bank of New Brunswick, N. J
.•
Second National Bank of Watertown,
NY
First National Bank of Steubenville, O
First National Bank of Plumer, Pa . . .
First National Bank of Dorchester,
First National Bank of Clyde, N. Y . . .
National Exchange Bank "of Philadelphia. Pa
1
First National Bank of Burlington, Vt
• Carroll County National Bank of Sandwich, N. H
,..
Second National Bank of Portland, Me.
Jewett City National Bank, Jewett
City, Conn
Orange County National Bank of Chelsea, Vt
:
Richmond National Bank, Richmond,
Ind*
First National Bank of Adams, N. Y .
First National Bank of Havana, N. Y .
Merchants and Farmers' National
Bank of Ithaca, N: Y.

Capital
stock.

U. S. bonds Circulation Circulation Circulation
on deposit.
issued.
surrendered. outstanding.

$50, 000
100, 000

$23, 500
80,000

$45, 000
90, 000

$19, 685
21, 750

$25, 315
68, 250

1.50, 000
200, 000

79, 000
125, 000

130, 000
180, 000

58, 900
67, 500

71,100
112, 500

100, 000
100, O G
O

65, 000
62, 200

89, 500
• 86,750

36, 000
. 34,900

53, 500
51, 850

100, 000

80, 000

90, 000

25, 700

64, 300

100, 000
150, 000
100, 000

84, 000
150, 000
76, 000

90, 000
135, 000
87, 500

14, 400

75, 600
135, 000
67, 200

1.50, 000
50, 000

96, 000
39,000

132, 500
44, 000

48, 300
9,000

84, 200
35, 000

300, 000
300, 000

130, 000
224, 000

• 175,750
270, 000

67, 200
69, 500

108, 550
200, 500

50, 000
100, 000

45,000
90, 000

45, 000
81, 000

5, 000

40, 000
• 81,000'

60, 000

45, 000

48, 750

8, 900

39, 850

200, 000

.189, 000

180,^000

13, 600

166, 400

230, 000
75, 000
50,000

230, 000
66, 000
48, 000

207, 000
66, 900
45, 000

16, 400
8,100
• 900

190, 600
' 58,800
44,100

45, 000

45, 000

.4,'0OO

41, 000

2, 076, 700

2, 364, 650

50, 000

' New bank organized with same title.




158'

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

.;XVI.—Names and compensation of officers and'clerks in the office of the Comptroller of tlie
Currency.
'
Names.

Class.

COMFTKOLLILK.

• •Jno. Jay Knox .
D E P U T Y . COMPTKOLLER.

. John S. LangAvorthy.

• J. Franklin Bates
Edward AVolcott
^ John D. Patten, jr
,
'••George. W. Martin . .
John W. Magruder...
. J o h n W . Griffin
Edward S. Peck
-'George H. Wood
William Elder
-Charles H. Norton . . .
F. A. Simkins
• Charles A. Jewett
Watson W. Eldridge.

Fourtli class clerk .
do
......do
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do.
.do .
.do .
-do .
.do .

Edward Myers
Fernando C. C a k e . . . . . .
Williani .H. Milstead . . .
Frank A. MiUer
John A. Kayser
C. Burr Vickery
'Charles H. Cherry
Theodore 0. Ebaugh . . .
William Sinclair
William B. Greene
AVilliam D. S^wan
Nathaniel 0. Chapman.
William H. Glascott... :

Third class clerk,
do
.do .
.do .
.do.
.do .
.do.
.do
.do .
.do .
.do.
.do.
.do.

William A. Page
•Charles Scott
"AVilliam Cruikshank
Richard T. J. Falconer...
Miss Francis R. Sprague.
. Alanson T. Kinney
Walter Taylor
,...
John J. Saiiborn
,
AVashington K. McCoy . .
David B. Ventres'
"....
.- James C. Brown
E. M. Sunderland

Second class clerk..
do
..:...,
do.^.....'
,
do
do
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
-do.

• John J. Patton
Philip T. Snowden ..
Isaac C. Miller
Edward. W. Moore..
AValter S. Johnston .
-Charles E. Brayton..
Johu A. Hebrew
True S. Norris'

•First class clerk .
,
do
do
do
do
do
do
.....do

Mrs. Mary S. McCormick ..
Mrs. Sarah F. Fitzgerald...
Mrs. Etha E." Poole
Mrs. Sophy C. Harrison
':Mrs. Fayette C. Snead
Mrs. Marie L. Sturgus
Mrs. Maggie B. Miller
Mrs. Carrie F. B. Stevens ..
Mrs. Julia R. Donoho
Mrs. E.H. Reed
vMrs. H.C. Carr.....
Miss Celia N. French
Miss Louisa W. Knowlton .
Miss Annie W. Story
Miss Maggie L. Simpson . . .
Miss Eliza R. Hyde
Miss Clara J. Fenn<;>
Miss Eliza M. Barker
Miss Amelia P. Stockdale..
IMiss Harriet M. Black

,
do .......
......do
do
do
do .......
do
do
,
do
do
do
do.......
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do




Female clerk .

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY..

159

XVI.—Nwmes and compensation of officers and cZer/cs, ^-c—Continued.
Names.

Class.

Salary.

CLERKS—Continued.
Miss Margaret E. Gooding.
Miss Julia Greer
Miss Lizzie Henry
Miss Margaret L.' Browne..
Miss Alice M. Kennedy
Miss Nellie W. Fletcher . . .
Miss Gertrude A. Massey . .
Miss Flora M. Fleming
Miss Martha M. Smith
Miss Maria Richardson
Miss Annie E. AVheat
Miss Annie E. Ober
Miss Margaret Downing . . .

Female clerk.
do
do
do
do......
do . . . . . .
do
do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do .

Edmund E. Schreiner.
Harry K. Hughes . : . . .
-J. Eddie DeSaules
Miss M. L. Conrad
AVilliam H. AValton . . .

Messenger.
do°....
. ...do....
do . . . .
do....

Charles B. Hinckley .

Assistant messenger.

Philo Burr
AVilliain H. Romaine
Henry Sanders
'Charles McTaylor ,'.Robert Le Roy Livingston ,
Henry Mathews
James D. Burke
,

Watchman.
,
do:...

720
720

Laborer.
do .
......do .
do.
do .

720
720
720
720
720

900
900
900
900
900
900.
900
900
900
- 900
900
900
840
840
840
840
840

.XYII.—jEx2)enses of the office of the Gomptroller of the Gurremy for the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
For special dies, plates, paper, printing, &c
For salaries

,

$99, 459 53
112,800 00

Total
.,
.,..212,259 53
In addition to the aboA^e amount there was paid for expenses of the
office for^special dies, plates, paper, printing, &C.5 for work done in 1872,
and previous years, $82,198.31.
The contingent expenses of the office were paid out of the general
appropriation for contingent expenses of the Treasury Department, and
as separate accounts are not kept for the different Bureaus, the amount
can not be stated.







REPORT OF THE .FIRST COilPTROLLER:

11 P







REPORT
OF THE

?FIRST COMPTROLLER' OF THE TREASURY;
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, F I R S T COMPTROLLER'S O F F I C E ,

' •
November^ 1873.
S I R : The following report, which embraces the operations of this
office during the fiscal year ending June 30,1873, is respectfully submitted. •
'
^
•
.
The number of warrants examined, countersigned, entered upon blotters, and posted into ledgers Avas as follows, viz :
Treasury i3rop8r
Public debt
Quarterly salaries
Diplomatic and consular
,
Customs
Internal revenue
^
Judiciary
War civil
AVar pay
War repay
Navy p a y . . .
Navy repay
Interior civil
Interior pay
Interior repay
Appropriation
Customs, (covering)
Land, (covering)
Internal revenue, (covering)
Miscellaneous, (covering)
Miscellaueoiis repay, (covering)

,. -

-.:

.•

'.

:. -

...-.:

'.
»».-.
,
1
...^

2, 054
223
1,704
2,189
•
4,777
7, 036
2,010
....
4
. 5,706
833
1,445
164
2^289
1,995
'
205
155
1,392
928
2,902
6,841
1, 527

•'The following accounts were received from the First and Fifth Auditors of the Treasury, and the Commissioner of the General Land-Office,
and revised and certified^ viz:
Judiciary, embraciog the accounts of United States marshals for their fees
and for the expeuses of the United States courts, of the United States district attorneys, and of the commissioners : and clerks of the United States
• courts
Diplomatic and consular, embracing the accounts arising from our intercourse
with foreign nations, expenses of consuls for sick and disabled seamen, and
of our commercial agents in foreign countries
....'...
i..
Fublic lands, embracing the accounts of the registers and receivers of land
offices, and surveyors-general and their deputies, and of lands erroiieously
sold..
*.
•
Steamboats, embraciDg accounts for the expenses of the inspection of steam• vessels, and salaries of inspectors
Mint and its branches, embracing the accounts of gold, silver, and cent coinage, of bullion, of salaries of the ofiicers, and general expenses
Public debt, embracing the account ofthe Treasurer of the United States, and
the accounts of Assistant T.reasu.rers for the redemption o£ United States
stocks and notes, aud for the payment of the interest on the public d e b t . . . .




2,201 '
1;868
2,710
329
124
713

164

REPORT ON T H E EINANCES.

Jhihlic xyrinting, embracing accounts for printing, for paper, and for binding..
84
Territorial, embracing accounts for the legislative expe,nses of the several Territories, and all the expenses incident to their government
373
Congressional, embracing accounts for salaries, for contingent expenses, and for
other expenses of the United States Senate and House of Representatives..
Ill
Internal revenue collectors' accounts of the rev^enue collected, the expenses of
collecting the same, their own compensation, and the expenses of their offices...
3, OIL
Internal revenue assessors' accounts for the expenses of levying the taxes, and
for their o^Yn compensation
•. 1, 066
Internal revenue stamp-agents' accounts for the sale of stamps
133
Internal revenue miscellaneous accounts for salaries and incidental expenses of
supervisors, surveyors, detectives, &c
3,254'
Miscellaneous, embracing acco.unts for the contingent expenses of .all the Executive Departments at Washington, the salaries of judges, district attorneys,
marshals, territorial officers, &c
1, 919
Number of letters written from this office on official -business
11, 505
Number of receipts given by collectors for tax-lists examiued, registered, and
-filed
•-..,...
2,912
Number of requisitions examined, entered, and reported, viz :
. Diplomatic and consular
;..
698^
Collectors ol internal revenue
.2,688
United States marshals
289
United States dexiositaries
'.
153

. The above details furnish but a portion of the duties appertaining to
this office. In addition thereto must be added the examination, registering, and filing of official bondsj the examination, filing, and registering of all powers of attorney for the collection of interest, and the collection of money due to public creditors from' the Department; the ex-^
amination and decision of applications, for the re-issue of securities in,
place of those lost or destroyed, and a variety of miscellaneous business
occurring daily, Avhich it is impossible to enumerate.
The'busiuess of the office continues steadily to increase, as the aggregate of the items stated in the table above is 7,642 grea,ter than in the
year immediately preceding, but the AVork has been carried on promptly
and efficiently.
I commend the persons employed in the office for their faithfulness
and efficiencyo Many of them merit a higher rate of compensation
than they now receive, not only because of their attention to business,
but because, also, of the important and responsible duties devolved
upon them, AA^hich they discharge to my satisfaction.
. .
Kespectfully submitted.
E. W. TAYLBR,
•
. •
Gomptrollero
Hon. W I L L I A M A. RICHARDSON,




Secretary of the Treasury.

REPORT OF.THE SECOND COMPTROLLER,







EEP0 RT

THE SECOND COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASUEY.
•

TREASURY. DEPARTMENT,

Second Gomptrollefs OffioCj October 31, 1873.
Sir': I have the honor to subaiit the.following detailed, statement of
the business operations of this Office for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1873.
The aggregate number of ac\30unts of disbursing officers and agents
which have been received, as well as those which have been finally
-adjusted, is as follows.
From—
Second Auditor
Third Auditor . .
•i'^om'th Auditor

Received.

-.

Total-

3,742
4,241
58.5

3,779
2,594
,561

$63, 616, 040 87
170 251 7.59 54
23, 228, 978 14

8,568

. . . .

Revised.

Amount.

6,934

257, 096, 661 64

The above accounts have been duly entered, rcAnsed, and the balances
Jbund thereon certified to the Secretary rff the Department in whicli
the expenditure has been incurred, viz, those from the Second and Third
.Auditors 'to the Secretary of War, (excepting the accounts of Indian,
agents, Avhich are certified to the Secretary of the Interior,) and those
from the Fourth Auditor to the Secretary of the NaA^y.
Character of accounts..

Received.

Revised.

Amount.

FROM T H E SECOND A U D I T O R .

s
E m b r a c i n g accounts of disbursing officers of the AVar D e p a r t m e n t
for collecting, organizing, aud drilling volunteers.
Paymasters' accounts for the pay of officers and the p a y and rations
of soldiers of the Army.
.Special and referred accounts
Accounts of A r m y recruiting-officers for clothiug, equipments, and
bounty to recruits, &c.
vOrduance, embracing the accounts of di.sbursing officers of the Ordnance Department, for arsenals, armories, armaments for fortifications, arming militia, &c.
Indian D e p a r t m e n t : Accounts of Indian agents, including the pay of
Indian annuities, presents to Indians, expenses of holding treaties,
p a y of interpreters, p a y of Indian agents, &e.,.ancl the settlement
of personal claim's for miscellaneous services of agents and others in
connection Avith Indian aifairs.
.Bledical and hospital accounts, including the purchase of medicines,
drugs, surgical instruments, hospital-stores, the claims of private
physicians for services, and surgeons eraployed under contract.
-Contingent e.xpenses of the AVar Department, including expenses for
military convicts, secret service, &c.
Preedmen's Bureau • P a y and bounty
.•Soldiers' Home '.
National Volunteer Asylum
.•
-.
Total

....:




29

33

$3,052,517 58

1.113

1,164

38, 809, 612 57

699
137

1,176, 998 80
^1, 431, 380 93

177

177

2,196, 089 99

1,127

1,110

. 15,587,4.59 32

333

333

225, 703 82

77

77

79, 088 14

13
24
12

13
24
12

1, 273, 074 00
391, .534 60
392, 581 12

699
138

3,742

-- "

'
.

.

3,779

::^^-.::

63, 616, 040 87

= = = =:

168

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.;
Character of accounts.

Received.

Revised.

2,815

1,177

$45, 307, 879 00

1,131

],136

5, 936, 243 78

210

199

27,476,730 61'

71

65

13

r

1
16

134, 742 05603,160 U
O

4,241

2,594

170, 251, 759 54

G

5

528, 691 92-

412

' 407

26

25

5, 389, 838 75

106

96

8,785,615 8 J

32

21

539, 780 24

Amount.

FROM T H E T H I R D A U D I T O R .

Quartermasters'- accounts for transportation of the Army, and the
transportation of all descriptions of Arm.y supplies and ordnauce,
and for the settlement of personal claims for services ift the Quartermasters' D(3partment.
Commissaries' accounts for rations or subsistencie of the Army, and
for the settlement of personal claims for services in the Comniissary
Department.
Accounts of pension-agents for the p a y m e n t of military pensions.
including the entries of the monthly reports of new pensioners
added to the rolls, aud the statements frora the Commissioner of
Pensions respecting the changes arising from deaths, transfers, etc.,
and for pension claims presented for adjustment.
Accounts of the Engineer D e p a r t m e n t for military surveys, the con.struction of fortifications, for river and harbor surveys aud im, provements.
Signal service
:
.Accounts for the relief of freedmen and refugees
Total

:

:

•

9,793,004 10

. FRO.M T H E F O U R T H A U D I T O R .

Marine Corps accounts: 1st, quartermasters of the Marine Corps,
embracing accounts for the expenses of officers' quarters, fuel.
forage for horses, attendance on courts-martial and courts of inquiry, transportation of officers and marines, supplies of provisions,
clothing, medical stores and military stores for barracks, and all
incidental supplies for marines on shore ; 2d, accounts of paymasters of the Marine Corps for p a y of the officers and the p a y
and rations of the marines.
Payraasters of the N a v y : Accounts for the p a y and rations of officers and crew of the ship, supplies of provisious, of clothing, a n d
repairs of vessels on foreign stations.
P a y m a s t e r s at navy-yards : Accounts for the p a y of officers on d u t y
a t navy-j'^ards, or on leave ot absence, and the pay of mechanics
and laborers on the various w o r k s .
P a y m a s t e r s acting as n a v y agents : Accounts for their advances to
paymasters, purchases of timber., provisions, clothing, and naval
stores.
N a v y pension agents' accounts for the p a y m e n t of pensions of officers and seamen, &.C., of the N a v y , and officers and privates o f t h e
Marine Corps.
•Financial agent of the N a v v D e p a r t m e n t
..

^

4, 480, 382 70

3

.4

3, 504, 668 70

585

Total

561

23,228; 978 14

6

5

13,628
I,'561
495
4,869

13, 622
1,627
'495
4, 869

• 503

503

450, 317 53-

12

12

1, 582, 685 72

0.

J!Saval prize-lists

,

•

CLAIMS R E V I S E D D U R I N G T H E YEAR.

Soldiers' p a y and b o u n t y
Sailors' p a y and bounty
."
Prize-money.
.....
.
Quartermasters' stores under the act of J u l y 4, 1864 ; property lost, or
destroyed, or captured, &c., under the act of March 3, 1849; rent
of buildings and land for the use of the Army, and for other mis-.
cellaneous military claims against the AVar D e p a r t m e n t .
Oregon and Washington T e i ritory w a r <5laims, including Montana
Indian w a r claims of 1867.
Claims of States for enrolling, subsisting, clothing, supplying, arm.. ing, equipping, paying, aud transporting their troops in defense of
the United States.
Subsistence
Total
lieferred cases.

......

•

.

Settlements for the fiscal y e a r ending .June 30, 1873
*
Accounts on h.and at the commencement of the fiscal year, J u l y 1, 1872.
Accounts on hand at the close of the fiscal year, J u n e 30, 1873
L e t t e r s written on official business




16
09
12
62.

'

234

234

21, 302

:

1, 525, 052
427,144
398,813
2, 035,246

21,362

3,172

76, 292 27

3,172

6,495,551 5 1 .

6,934
1, 952
,3, 586
1,07a

SECOND

169>

COMPTROLLER.

Numher of requisitions recorded durjing the year.

Accountable . .
Refunding
Settlement
Transfer

Interior.

AVar.
.

..

- - -.:

....
».

--

.-

Total

Number of contracts, classified as follows :
Quartermaster's Department.. ^
Eo^'ineer Department
•
Indian Department . . .•
Ordnance
".
Navy Departraent
Adjutant-General.Leases
Commi-ssary of Subsistence
'.
Official bonds filed

1,218
1.36
208
49

85-5
219
1,102
46

6, 485

.
'.

Navy.

1,665
784
3,880
156

Requisitions.

1,611

0 90r>

.
,

^

'.
."
:
,
"

..:

723
202
147
6
139.
115
6"
269
183

BIENNIAL EXAMINATION OF PENSIONERS.

There is one large item of expenditure occurrifig. in the accounts
subject 'to the rcAision of this Office to which I respectfully call 3'our
special attention, AA^ith a view to suggest legislation on the subject. It is
the expense of the medical and surgical examinations of iuA^alid pensioners required by the second section of the law of March 3,1859, (11 Stat.,
439.) to be made biennially. Not less than $200,000 are expended biennially in fees to examining-surgeons, beside many incidental charges, and
the reductions of pensions from previous rates Avill not exceed an average of $10,000. If the laAV requiring biennial examinations should be
repealed, some of the invalids on the roll would undoubtedly receive
more than their disability would warrant; but it is bad economy to
spend nearly a quarter of a million of dollars to guard against a possible loss of $10,000. In addition to the direct pecuniary saving which
would be effected by the repeal of the law, the adjustment of the accounts of the disbursing peuvSion-agents Avould thereby be facilitated,
much time and labor being noA^' spent in A^erifying reductions made
during a period for which the accounts have been settled and subsequently called up on appeal.
^
'
'
The aggregate annual sum paid to pension-agents for compensation
alone amounts to more than half a million of dollars, to say nothing of
contingent expenditures, the keeping of accounts between the Assistant
Treasurer and nearly sixty agencies, the transmission, monthly, to the
Treasury, b}^ express, of unwieldy packages, and other similar items.
Since the law of July 8, 1870, (sec. 2, 16 Stat., 194,) pensioners have
all been paid directly by check, payment to attorneys being prohibited
except in cases of pensioners residing in foreign countries.
I t is not seen y^\xjone general agency at the seat of GoA^ernment, near
the Pension-Office, AA-here errors could readily be corrected, and a more
thorough supervision exercised, might not be as effective and convenient as the numerous agencies now existing, at less than a tenth of their
present cost. A check mailed from Washington would reach most of the
pensioners nearly as soon as one sent from either of the agencies. No
additional expenditure would be required for separate rolls, as duplicate rolls, the property of the Government, and containing the post-office




170

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

address of every pensioner in the Unitecl States, are now at the agencies. The process of issuing duplicate checks, also, under the law of
April 19,* 1871, (17 Stat., 4,) to replace those lost or stolen, Avould be
much, simplified if all pensions Avere pa^'able from one disbursing office,and that at the seat of Government.
Eespectfully submitted.
.
.
,
., •
. J.. M. BRODHEAD,
-"
.,
Gomptroller. •
Hon.

W M . A. EICHARDSON,

Secretary of the Treasury.




. ',

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS.







REPORT

T H E C O M M I S S I O N E R OF CUSTOMS-.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

••

Office of Gommissioner of Gustoms, Septemher 22, 1873.
SIR : I submit herewith, for your information, a statement of the work
performed in this Office during the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1873.
The nnmber of acconnts on hand Jul}^ 1, 1872, Avas
The number of acconnts received from the First Auditor dnring the year

^ -.

238
6,443

;•
\6,681
Nnmber of acconnts adjusted duriug the year
6,283 '
Number of accounts adjusted, returned to the First Auditor, dnring the
year
'.
•
30
-6,318
Number of accounts on hand June 30,1873

363

The amounts paid into the Treasury of the United States from-sources
the accounts of which are settled in this Office, are as follows:
Ou account of customs
On account of fines, penalties, and forfeitures
On account of steamboat inspections
On account of labor, drayage, and storage
On account of Marine-Hospital tax
The amount of fees earned by collectors

$188,089,522
1,1.69, 515
'. 259, 092
475,741
333,003
611, 525

-

70
38
56
37
03
44

. • 190,938,400 48

And there was paid out of the Treasury—
On account, of expenses of collecting the rcA^enue from cnstoms
$7, 079,743 42
Ou account of refunding excess of deposits
3,70S, 067 97
On account of debentures
1,176,055 18
On account of public buildings
3,748,780 28
On account of construction and maintenance of ligh ts
2, 910,857 64
On account of construction and maintenance of revenue-cutters
1,133, 901 37
On account of distributive shares of fines, penalties, and forfeitures..
626,156 74
On account of marine-hospital service
398,778 69
On account of life-saving stations
212,383 08
On account of miscellaneous accounts
^
117, 468 80
21,109,193 17
The
The
The
The
The
The
The

number of estimates received
number of requisitions issued
amount involved in said requisitions
number of letters received
number of letters written
number of letters recorded
nuinber of returns received and examined




.

2, 669
2,572
$12,785,721 15
9, 305
10, 368
-.
9,946 .
-~
*
5,983

174
The
The
The
The

•

•

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

number of oaths examined and registered
number of appointments registered
average number of clerks employed
amount involved in this statement

.•
-

4,786
3, 629
26
$224,833,314 80

The statement of transactions under the bonded-warehouse regulations for the year will be prepared and transmitted as soon as all the
necessary returns shall have been received.
Yery respectfully,
'
W. T. HAINES,
Gommissioner of Gustoms>
. Hon.

W. A. EICHARDSON,

Secretary of the Treasiiry.




HondfiT I'^nii IE I 10 .III Oda a






REPOET
OF

THE FIRST AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

.

First Auditor^ Office^ Septemher 18, 1873.
SIR : In obedience to your request of the 7th ultimo, I have the honor
to sulftmit the following statement of the business transactions.of this
Office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1873 :,
Accounts adjusted.

RECEIPTS.

Collectors qf customs
Collectors under steamboat act
Mints and assay-offices
\...'.
,...
Fines, penalties, and forfeitures
.;
W a g e s of seamen forfeited
Marine-hospital money coll^'cted
Official emoluments of collectors, n a v a l officers, and survej'ors received .
Moneys received from captured and abandoned property . . . . ;
Ti'easurer of the United States for moneys received
Records of sales of public property
..•
Moueys received on account of deceased passengers
#.
Misqellaneous receipts

$222, 430, 552
246,419
59. 321 905
1, 052, 094
.980
354,518
• 976,136
54, 622
918, 382, 516
46, 500
3,010
112

13
27
91
80
84'
49
81
88
25
00
00
80

5,522 1,202,869 370 18
DISBURSEMENTS.

E x p e n s e s of collecting the revenue frora cnstoms
Official emoluments of collectors, naval officers, and surveyors
Excess of deposits for unascertained duties
Debentures, dra\ybacks; bounties, and allowances
'
Light-house establishment
Marine hospital service
.•
.'
Revenue-cutter disbursements
-•
Additional compensation to collectors, naval officers, and surveyors
Distribution of fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Accounts for duties illegally exacted, fines remitted, judgments satisfied, and
net proceeds of unclaimed merchandise paid
,
Judiciary expenses, embracing accouuJs of United States marshals, district
attorneys, commissionei's, and clerks, rent of court houses, support of prisoners, &c
Mints and assay-offices
Territorial accounts, embracing salaries of officers and legislative expenses
Salaries of the civil list paid directly from the T r e a s u r y
Disbursements on account of captured and abandoned property
Defense of suits in relation to captured and abandoned property
Treasurer of the United States for general expenditures
Salaries and mileage of members of the Senate and House of Representatives.
Salaries of officers ofthe Senate
.Contingent expenses ofthe Senate
Salaries of officers of the House of Representatives
Contingent expenses of the House of Representatives
Survey of the coast of the United States
Redemption of the public debt, including principal, premium, and interest
P a y r a e n t of interest on the public debt
Certificates of deposit in currency redeemed
:
'..
Re-imbursement of the Treasurer o f t h e United States for United States demand notes, legal-tender notes, fractional currency, aud gold certificates
destroyed by burning
.c-.
'
*
Construction of the State, War, and N a v y Department
Construction of court-houses and post-offices
Construction of custom-houses

12 F



1, 297
1, 096
135
96
335
785
468
2
247

6, 586, 438 01
1, 613, 6.37 90
2, 587, 593 51
993, 822 48
643, 641 20
381,369 12
817, 948 92
320 21
212, 829 73

1,434

1,143, 318 50

41
5
4
4
38
9
40
22
117
262
4

4. 389, 203
57; 301, 401
146, 538
594, 809
38. 270
47, 420
938, 009, 191
449, 520
122, 288
. 381', 897
248, 407
218, 355
601, 101
86, 277, 496
109,829, 556
23, 645, 000

75
56
89
15
07
17
78
80
85
95
80
44
32
94
71
00

44
4
.78
164

141, 300, 678
1,514,290
2,991,778
1, 8U5, 295

33
57
96
38

2,439
111
75
1, 207
9

178

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Accounts adjusted.

Number of
accounts.

DISBURSEMENTS—Continued-

86
330
6
38
108
15
9

Construction of marine hospitals
j
Construction and repair of light-houses '.
Construction of heating-apparatus for public buildings
F u e l , lights, and water for public buildings
Repairs and preservation of public buildings
F u r n i t u r e and repairs of same
Government Hospital for the Insane
Providence Hospital, for care, support, and medical t r e a t m e n t of tran.sient
paupers.
Maryland-Institution for the Blind
National Association for Colored W o m e n
H u m a n e Society of Massachusetts
Columbia Hospital for W o m e n and Lying-in Asylum, and other charities
Public printing aud binding
..^
Supervising and local inspectors of steam-vessels, for traveling a n d incidental
• expenses
"
Salaries of same
•
Disbursing clerks, for salaries of the several Departments of the Government
at Washingtou
Contingent expenses of said Departments
Salaries of United States assistant treasurers, United States depositaries, and
the employ6s i n t h e i r respective offices...:
^
E x p e n s e s of national loan
Commissioner of Public Buildings and Grounds
Washiugton aqueduct
Expeuses of D e p a r t m e n t of Agrixiulture
W a r e h o u s e and bond accounts
Preserving life and property from shipwreck
P a y m e u t s to District of Colurabia for improvements around-bitildings and
reservations belonging, to the United States
^
New jail, District of Columbia
_
Expenses of board of health
'
•
Geological survey of Territories and mining statistics
Bringiiig the electoral vote from the several States and Territories
Extension of Government grounds
Building and' ground for reform-school
United States Capitol extension
.•
H e a l i n g Hall, of House of Representatives
,
Construction of pneumatic tube
Salaries of custodians and janitors of public buildings
Expenses,' <fec., for detection of persons engaged in counterfeiting the coin and
currency of the United States
Contingent expenses Independent T r e a s u r y
•..
Outstanding liabilities paid
'
J u d g m e n t s of the Court of Claims paid
Purchase of rebel records
Salaries of civil-service commission
Miscellaneous accounts

12
4
2
4
4
75

^86,212 34
1,969,941 70
6 5 635 11
.,
170, 900 41
274. 822 54
146, 655 57
1.59, 608 10
12, 000 00
1, 703 17
5, 935 20
8,41.2 20
43, 958 40
1,754,216 40

332
3

44, 938 46
122, 376 82

275
339

5, dfe, 845 77
1,149, 018 20

54
30
42
10
54
748
54

319,059 12
1, 799, 123 36
405, 428 66
128, 480 92
213,498 63

5
3
1
13
3
1
6
1
2
5

2, 607, 565 56
• 50, 784 57
. 39,300 00
103, 028 07
• 18,103 25
• 681,878 65
30, 000 00
67., 777 69
12, 724 95
10,350 00
54,806 58

6
35
94
173
5
2
911

137, 093 79
30, 477 49
26, 499 84
2,493,112 02
79, 957 50
1, 208 96
10, 683, 963 10

o

Total.

225,178 32

14, 474 1, 416,193, 007 42

Reports aud certificates r e c o r d e d . . . .
12,433
Letters written
2,339
Letters recorded
:
2,339
Acknowledgments of accouuts written
10,571
Powers of attorney for coUecting interest on the public debt registered and
filed
5,138
Requisitions answered
695
474
Judiciary emolument accounts registered
Total

:

33,989

It may be proper to state, so as to prevent misconception, that this
report does not exhibit the amounts of receipts from the sources named,
or expenditures on account of the subjects specified, actually accruing
within the fiscal year, but simply these amounts as shown by the accounts examined and adjusted during the year.
The business of the Office has been kept up, as far as practicable, with
the means within its control, and is now in a satisfactory condition.
Embarrassment and delays, however, l\ave arisen from tardiness in filling vacancies which have occurrM under the present system of making
appointments.



EIRST AUDITOR. '

179

In this connection it is respectfully suggested, with the view to avoid
such hindera,nces m the future, that whenever examinations are hereafter made by the board of civil-service examiners for original appointments, the number examined may be increased, so as to have a reserve
force from which vacancies can be filled during the intervals of the
xamin ations.
I take pleasure in commending the clerks and other employes now in
the Office generally for the fidelity and alacrity with which they have
discharged their assigned duties.
Very respectfully,
• •.
D, W, MAHO]^,
V
Auditor.
Hon,

W M . A. EICHARBSON,

«

Secretary of the Treasury,







REPORT OF THE SECOND AUDITOR.







REPORT
THE SECOND. AUDITOR OF, THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second Auditor^s Office^ N'ovemher 1, 1873.
SIR : I have the honor to transmit herewith the annual report of this
Office for the fiscal year ending Jime 30,1873, showing in detail the condition of business in each division at the commencement of the year, its
progress during the year, and its condition, at the end thereof.
BOOK-KEEPER'S DIVISION.

The following statement exhibits the amount and nature of the work
performed by this division during the year:
Eequisitionsregistered, journalized, and xjosted.
No.

On w h a t account drawn.

Amount.

DEBIT REQUISITIONS.

Payments
Payments
Payments
Payments
Payments
Payments
Payments
Payments
Payments
Payments
Payments
Payments

263
223
230
3
64
81
2
12
'25
5
21
1,364

on account of the P a y Department
on accouut of the Oi'dnance D e p a r t m e n t
.•
on accouut of the l^Iedical D e p a r t m e n t
ou accouut of the Quartermaster's Department
from appropriations under control ofthe Adjutant General's Department
from appropriations under control of the Secretary of W a r
from the appropriation under control of the General of the A r m y
to the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers
'
to the Soldiers' Home
.'
to the Treasurer United-States on account of Internal Revenue fund
under special acts of relief b y Congress.
•1
'
on account of the Indian D e p a r t m e n t

Totakpayments

=

2, 293

,

$13, 647, 435
2, 277, 706
440,179
41,964
194,137
347, 423
5, 000
402, 581
423, 462
113,7.36
26,562
7, 920, 652

73
65
00
33
16
56
00
12
56
21
86
77

26, 040, 841 95

TRANSFER.

Requisitions issued for the purpose of adjusting appropriations :
Transferring amounts from appropriations found to be chargeable to such as are|
entitled to credit on the books of the Second Auditor's Office
Transferring amounts as above to the books of the Third Auditor's.Office
Transferring amounts as above to the books of the First Auditor's Office
Trausferriug amounts as above to the books of the Register's Office

28, 256,538
483, 874
453
11,409

Total transfer

06
63
33
64

128

Aggregate debits

..'

28,752,275 66

2,421

•...

54,793,117 61

CREDIT REQUISITIONS.

Deposit.
In favor of P a y D e p a r t m e n t
In favor of Ordnance Department
I n favor of Medical Department
1
In favor of Adjutant-General's D e p a r t m e n t
I n favor of Quartermaster's Department
T o the credit of appropriations under control of the Secretary of W a r
T o the credit of the appropriktion under control of the General of the A r m y
I n favor of Indian Departraent
.*
T o t a l deposit




-.--

r 1, 368,787
22, 810
}

196

,
22
---.

6, 568
6,323
299
27, 916
186
127, 813

04
98
09
11
45
92
11
27

1, 560, 704 97

184

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Bequisitions registered, journalized, and posied-^ContmiiQd.
On w h a t account d r a w n .

Amount.

No.

Counter.
Requisitions issued for the purpose of adjusting appropriations:
Transferring amounts to appropriations entitled to credit from appropriations found
to be chargeable on the books of the Second Auditor's Office
Transferring amounts as above from appropriations on t h e books of t h e ' T h i r d
Auditor's Office to the books of the Second Auditor's Office . . . ;
..

18

$28, 256, 538 06

..

.......

4, 763 99
28,261,302 05
29, 822, 007 02

2,679

.......

40
258

Total counter

22

84,61.5,124 63

.•

Aggregate debits and credits.
Deducting the credits from the debits shows the n e t amouut d r a w n out to be

....

.

24,971,110 59

APPROPRIATION W A R R A N T S !

Credits.
Tn favor of appropriations of P a y Department
In favor of appropriations of Ordnance D e p a r t m e n t
.
.
Tn favor of appropriations of Medical Department
I n favor of appropriations of Adjutant-General's D e p a r t m e n t
I n favor of appropriations tinder control of Secret.^iry of W a r
In favor of appropriation under control of the General of the A r m y
Tn favor of the appropriations of the Indian D e p a r t m e n t . . .
Under special acts of relief b y Cougress

. .
...
'

f 24,191,515 52
2-269 781 96
,
663, 000 00
i
125,580 00
567, 200 00
[
5, 000. 00
5,742,671-65
49
27,641 48
5

...

;-•

63
Debits. .

33, 592, 390 61

2

Total credits

' 1,175, 583 94

•

Surplus fund w a r r a n t s
Total debits

2

1

Aggregate debits and credits
Excess of credits over debits

^

1
.'

65

.•

1,175, 583 94
34, 767, 974 55
32, 416, 806 67

CONDENSED BALANCE-SHEET OF APPROPRIATIONS
W a r Department.
o

Indian Departm.ent.

Credit.

Balance to credit of all appropriations on the books of this office J u n e
30, 1872
$26, 500, 606 16
A m o u n t credited b y appropriation w a r r a n t s during fiscal year euding
27, 844, 698 61
J u n e 30, 1873
A m o u n t credited b y deposit and transfer requisitions during same period.. 29, 550, 605 45
Araount credited through Third Auditor's Office to appropriations used in
common b y both offices
', T otal

$9, 924, 765 05
5, 747, 692 00
271, 401 57

84, 885, 470 02

15, 943, 858 62

1,001,315*54
46, 562, 822 82

174, 268 40
8, 230, 294 79

Dehit.
A m o u n t debited to appropriations b y Surplus F u n d warrants during fiscal
year ending J u n e 30, 1873
A m o u n t d r a w n from appropriations b y requisitions during same p e r i o d . . .
A m o n n t d r a w n through Third Auditor's Office frora appropriations used
in coraraon b y both offices during same period
Balance remaining to the credit of all appropriations on books of this office
J u n e 30, 1873
,
Total..:




1, 428,154 80
35, 893,176 86

7, 539, 295 43

84, 885, 470 02

15, 943, 858 62

SECOND

185

AUDITOR.

SETTLEMENTS MADE.

The following settlemeuts incidental to the work of this division were
made during the year:
On w h a t account.
Transfer settlements for the adjustment of appropriations
Miscellaneous settlements.
.
....
Total

No.

Amount.

5
5

,.

:

$68, 887; 427 66
24, 247 44

10

.

68, 911, 675 10

SETTLEMENTS ENTERED.
Paymasters'
'.
Recruiting .. 1
'...'..
'
i
Ordnance'
T
'
•Medical
!
Contingencies of the Array, and of the Adjatant-General's Department
Soldiers' Home
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers
Charges and credits to officers for overpayments, refundments, & c . . .
•
."
Charges to disbursing officers for canceled checks
Arrears of pay
Proceeds of Governraent property
Special acts of relief by Congress
Transfers to the credit of disbursiug oificers on books of the First and Third
Auditors' Offices
Transfer settlements for adjustment of appropriations on books of Second Auditor's Office
•....:..
Indian ...'.
,
Miscellaneous
Claims, war
Claims, Indian
:
Total

.-

:

•.

:

260
145
34
6
15
22
12
530
49
12
89
20
54
146
'42
336
9012,679

Twenty-five transcripts of accounts were prepared for suit; 872 certificates as to the indebtedness or non-indebtedness of officers having
claims against the United States were given to the Second and Third
Auditors' officers; and 823 letters were written during the year.
PAYMASTERS' DIVISION.

The number of accounts examined and settlements made in this division was 2,021, as follows:
Paymasters' accounts audited and reported to the Second Comptroller
1,033 •
Old settlements of paymasters' accounts revised
201
Charges raised against officers ou account of overpayments
. 242
Charges raised against officers on account of double payments:
150
Credits to officers for overpayments refunded
]28
Credits to officers for double payments refunded
^
28
Lost checks paicj. under act of February 2, 1872 .'
^^:......
31
Transfers to books ofTreasurer's office on account of '' outstanding liabilities,"
(actMay 2,"'186())----"
:
'-.:
" 23
Paymasters' accounts balanced and closed
L.
43
Paymasters' accounts finally adjusted on which balances remain due the United
States
35
Transfers to books of Third Auditor
,
17
Miscellaneous
90
Total




2,021

186

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The amounts involved in the above are as follows :
Paymasters' accounts

$27,116,621 39

Amount of fines by sentence of courts-martial, forfeitures by desertion,
arrears of pay, and bounties disallowed, found to have accrued to the
benefit hf the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers under
existing laws, and paid to the president of said home by requisition on
the Treasury, as follows :
1872.
August 2
Septembers...
October 3
November 1
Decembers..

•.

1873.
Januarys
February 4
March 6 . .
Aprils
May 3
June 3
June 30

...'.
:

$2,013
30,762
14,964
53,521
36,545

69
69
73 •
04
31

33,097 24
38,639 50
66,482^44
36,942 42
24,929 94
26,756 29
34, 896 28
399,551 57

•Amount of fineSi forfeitures, &c., for the support of the Soldiers' Home,
found to be due in the^examination of paymasters' accounts, and paid
to said Soldiers' Home in accordance with the act of Congress of March
3, 1859, as foUows :
1872.
August 2 . . . .
$18,095 05
Septembers
32,335 16
Octobers...
30,156 73
November 1 . . . . .
17, 337 26
December 3 . . . . :
31,113 12
1873.
*
.
.
^
Januarv 3
28,625 83
February 4
21,779 SO
March 6
:
15,775 73
AIMUS....

Mays
June 3
June S O . . . . :

26,726 33

-

39,843 17
29,621 71
22,477 73
313,887 12

Amount credited to the Treasurer of the United States ou account of tax
on salaries
Amcfunt transferred from the appropriation for " pay of the Army" to
that for " ordnance, ordnance stores and supplies," ou account of deductions from the pay of officers and soldiers for orduance aud ordnance stores, in accordance with paragraph 1380, revised Army Regulations of 1863
Amount trausferred from the appropriation for '' Pay of the Army" to
that of the Subsistence Department on the books of the Third Auditor's Office, on account of deductions frora the pay of soldiers for to-.
bacco, pursuant to Geueral Orders No. 63, War De]Dartment, AdjutantGeneral?s Office, June 11, 1867
Amount transferred to the books pf the Third Auditor's Office, on accouut of stoppages against officers for subsistence stores, quartermaster's stores, transportation, &c
'..
Amount charged to officers on account of overpayments :
:.'.
"
Ainount charged to officers on account of double payments
Amount credited to officers on account of overpayments refunded
Amount credited to officers on account of double payments refunded...
Amount deposited by paymasters to close their accounts, being balances
. due IJnited States on iinal settlement
'.
Ainount of balances found due paymasters and paid them to close
accounts
Amount paid to civilians under the " reconstruction acts "




102,912 97

' 17,147 53

191,497 76
1,343
19,158
38,093
3,907
.4,318

96
24
28
15 »
17

15,905 75
.2,922 33
269 56

SECOND AUDITOR.
.

187

Amount of ^' lost checks" paid in accordance with the act of February
2,1872..
Amount transferred to the books of the Treasurer's Office, on account of
" outstanding IiabiUties," (act May 2, 1866)
.T
Miscellaneous credits
.'
Total

1, 811 23
11,744 82
28,245,609 63

Accounts of paymasters on hand June SO, 1872
Draft rendezvous accounts on hand June SO, 1872
Accounts of paymasters received during the year
Total......

$4,516 80

'.

" . . . . . . ' . . . . 1, 111
16
556

„
.,..

1,683

Accounts of paymasters audited and reported to the Second ComptroUer during
theyear
1,033
Accounts of paymasters on hand*Linexamined June 30, 1873
Draft rendezvous accounts under examination June 30, 1873

*—..

634
16

..

650

«

Totalnumber of accounts on hand June SO, 1873

.

Since thelast report the accoiints,of forty-three paymasters have been
closed and certificates of non-indebtedness issued. The accounts of
thirty-five paymasters have been finally revised on which there.is due
the IJnited States $76,541, and the accounts of twelve paymasters have
been prepared for suit, the balances due tke United States aggregating
$541,447.87.
Number of letters written, 36,889.
MISCELLAN1E0US DIVISION.

The following statement shows the number of money aeeonnts on
hand in this division at the commencement of the fiscal year, the number received and settled during the year, and the number remaining
unsettled at the closeof theyear, together with tke expenditure embraced
in the settlements.
Number of accounts pn hand June 30, 1872 . :
Number of accounts received during the year
Total
•
Number of accounts settled d-uring the year
Number remaining unsettled June 30,1873

^..
...-.-.
^

1,828,
2,197
:.-. 4,0252,567

--

1, .458

The amounts involved in the above settlements are as follows s
Ordnance, medical, and miscellaneous:
Ordnance Department....
-..-^
$1, 378,992 01
Medical Department
175,622 48
Expended by disbursing officers, out of Quartermaster's
fund, not chargeable to said fund, but to certain appropriations on the books of this Office
...
32,320 95
Purchase of property of the <5freen .Bay and Mississippi
Canal Company
,
145,000 00
Expenses of arbitration between the United States and
the Green Bay and Mississippi Canal Company
- ^ IS, 512 32
Bronze equestrian statue of "Lieut. Gen. Winfield S c o t t . . .
19,750 00
•Expenses of military convicts
.
56,003 84.
. Contingencies of the Army
32,688 22
Proceeds of sale of real and personal property of J. Ledyard Hodge
.
11,041 36




•

188

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Medical and surgical history and statistics
Freedmen's Hospital and Asylum
Medical Museum and Library
• Trusses for disabled soldiers
Contingen cies'of the Adjutant-General's Department
Expenses of the Commanding General's Office
Expeuses of recruiting
Appliances for disabled soldiers
Pay of the Arniy
Providing for ithe comfort of sick and discharged soldiefs.
Medals of honor
Collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers
Eelief of Joseph Harmon, act April 28, 1870
Relief of heirs of Capt. B. R. PerLdns, act May 29, 1872 .
Relief of Mary M. Clark, act June 8, 1872
:
Relief of legal representatives of the late George T. Wiggins, act June 8, 1872
Relief of Andrew J. Jamison, act June 8, 1872
Relief of heirs of Lieut. Col. H. M. Woody ard, act June
• 10,1872
•
:
Relief of Samuel Hitchcock, act December 20, 1872 1
*
Relief of Cai^t. Lyman J. Hissong, act January 23, 1873.
Act authorizing tlie Secretary of the Treasury to settle
and pay the accounts of Col. J. F. Jaques, aet February
12, 1873
Relief of R. H. Pratt, act February 17, 1873
Relief of Charles Trichler, act February 19, 1873
Relief of Ilenry E. Janes, act February 27, 1873
Relief of E t h a u A. Sawyer, act March 3, 1873..'.-..
Relief of Thomas E. Tutt & Co., act March 3, 1873
Relief of William Baynej trustee, act March 3, 1873
Relief of Dr. W. J. C. Duhamel, act March 3, 1873
Relief of Aaron B. Fryrear, act March 3, 1873
Relief of Peter J. BurcheU, act March 3, 1873
Relief of B. H. Randall, act March 3, 187 3
Relief of Julia P. Lynde, act March 3, 1873
_
Relief of Eli H. Janett, act March 3, 1873
Regular recruiting:
Exjpenses of recruiting
Bounty to volunteers and regulars
i.
Contingent expenses of the Adjutant-General's Department .
Pay of the Army
^
Subsistence of officers
Medical aud hospital department
Pay in lieu of clothing for officers' servants
.
-...

$8,195
43,165
7,360
6,939
4,668
2,237
1, 017
938
932
947
15
3
359
' 1,738
1,202

57
75
66
78
09
82
95
.50
50
75
00
23
58
00
00

,000 00
190 00
,099 07
861 56
375 50
6,719
200
300
296
5,000
2,795
2,550
600
500
318
300
274
150

00
00
00
00
00
78
00
00
00
05
00
40
29

231,002 73
25 00
1 50
210 93
171 00
124 25
9 42
f^*^! t^AA Q*?.

- Volunteer recruiting:
Collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers
Bounty to volunteers and regulars
• Draft and substitute fund
•.
Pay of the Army
Subsistence of officers
Medical and .hospital department
Pay in lieu of clothing for officers' servants

.

142,197 38
2, 488 08
• 28, 574 65
130 90
112 2a
6 90
5 50

Local bounty:
Fay of two and three- year volunteers.

1,423 45

Freedmen's Bureau accounts:
Number received during the year
Number settled during the year

146
64

Numb'er on hand June 30, 1873.
82
Amount involved in settlement of Freedmen's Bureau a c c o u n t s . . . . . . . . 8,541,725 08
Total




„.._........

„. ie,91^;391 98

SECOND AUDITORo

•189«

Six hundred paymasters' accounts were examined for the requisite
data as to. double payments to officers, and two hundred and nine double
payments were discovered and reported to the paymasters' division, in
which charges are raised against officers on this account. Several of
the clerks ordinarily engaged on this work are now auditing the accounts
of General Oliver O. Howard, late Commissioner of the Freedmen's
Bureau.
Number of letters written, 1,838.
INDIAN DIVISION.

General report of the Indian division for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1873:
Money accounts of agents on hand June 30, 1872
Property accounts of agents on hand.June .30, 1872
Claims on hand June 30, 1872
Money accounts of agents received during the year
Property accounts received during the year
Claims received during the year
^

,-

To4;al......

,.....
«

,

780
729
60
825
544
925

. . . . . ^ . „ 3,863

Money accounts of agents audited during the year
Property accounts examined during the year
Claims settled during the year
Total

„

887
• 400
• 984
2,271

Money accounts of agent>s on hand J u n e 30, 1873
Property accounts of argents on hand June 30, 1873...-....,
Claims on hand June 30, 1873
Total number of accounts, &c., on hand June 30, 1873
Aniount involved iu mon ey accounts audited
Amount involved in claims settled

^

Total.....

718
873
1
1 1,592
$3,598,438 87
4,730., 749 34
8,3.29,188 21

The copying incident to the business of this division, including a
report to Congress of the receipts and expenditures of the Indian Department during the fiscal year, extended to 1,630 pages of folio-post
and 463 pages of foolscap.
'
Number of letters written, 1,665.
PAY AND BOUNTY DIVISION.

The following tabular statements exhibit in detail the operation of
the two branches of this division during, the year, together with the
condition of the business both at the commencement and close of the
year.
• EXAMINING BRANCHlo

. The work performed by the examining branch of this division is exemplified by the Ave following tables:




Claims in cases of white soldiers.

o.
A r r e a r s of p a y and original b o u n t y

Additional bounty, act J u l y 28, 1866, and amendments.
Original claims,

.2

-6
4)

Date, .

1

1
53
fl

b
.£1

1
8

ft
•3

.2|

a

^u
<
&

^

•*-"vi
u, 0
<o eS
.c

1
u
•1
S

x
>

a

a

H^
2
o43

'- g

<V)

ll
it

V.

"a.
.

^

Suspended claiuis.

«

XJ

g

tl

a

s
a

•

.2
o

;25

8>
S^
•^ 5

1
^

i

-gi

fl'

,

Original clainis.

"ft
ft

a

fl ^

U.S.2

-o^fi
12;

1

"3

u

s
c
fl

a

<
D
Xi

a

1
o

o
O)

p

a

Total

Jl

a
fl
s
o

fl

«2

^
a

gJ fl
t 2 TS
"^
t . fl
< (S
U
XJ

u
u

a .^

fl

s

a

a

fl

a fl

^s
s

a

^«
a;--3

l|

o

a

'1 1
•I'

. o

fl ®

<a

J3

X

'6

il .1

i

fl

a

i-d f-9 •

•o'

1872.
July
August
September
October
November
December
1873,
January
February
March
,
April
_.
May
, ....
June
,

i,
cS

re

OS

•

Suspended claims.

u

• - • - ' %

•^•Bm

s ce sS

i.,

-

,p

a
g
fl

1

o

o
<
D
X2

a
fl

563
826
513
295
380
487

93
346
61
40
55
31.

315
291
345
.186
172
291

81
99
46
8
100
121

74
90
61
61
53
.44

366
752
665
951
699
920

100
207
202
316
216
240

208
516
404
570
401
548

58
29
59
65
82
132

929
1,578
1,178
1,246
1,079
1,407

1,252
2,531
1 759
1,990
1 722
2 246

359
•396
692
614
784
495

21
23
137
37
20
22

140
190
372
456
526
263

11
32
46
8
141
112

187
151
137
J13
•97
98

1,056 . 142
229
1,-618
173
1 408
195
1 189
1 201
173
1 427
209

848
1 257
1 126
904
891
1 106

66
132
109
90
137
112

1,415
2,014
2,100
1,803
1,985
1,922

1,397
2,826
2. 1492,163
2, 81.0
2,589

700
700
686
588
221
410

46
21
16
16
5
51

317
377
382
320
116
211

139
166
161
208
67
95

198
136
127
44.
33
53

1,422
1,081
1,321
1,048
1,300
1,576

293
275
296
216
175
231

1, 009
707
905
675
899
1,208

120
99
120
157
226
137

2,122
1,781
2,007
1 6.36
1 521
1 986

843
3,251
2,989 1,235
644
2,895
2,723
717
546
2 617
759
3 504

15
18
26
12
26
111

•427
869
.327
382
359
398

134
172
147
188.
24
139

267
176
144
135
137
111

2 150 -129
1,397
158
2 176
224
2 549
256
230
1 906
302
2 055

1,759
1,175
1,810
2,113
1,572
1 647

262
64
142
180
104
106

2, 993
2, 632
2 820
3,266
2 452
2, 814

4,006
3,701
4, 123
4, .551
3,787
3,903

• 781 3,323 1,291

974

8,050 1,284

18,470

29, 479 8,084

468 4,709 I 154 1,753

20,132 2,420

6,396




12,101 2 767

16 208 1,504

28, 216 37, 465

.o
o
W
t=3

Q
02

SECOND

191

AUDITOR.

Bounty claims under the act of April 22, 1872.
Original claims.

i
Date.

k •

o

cS
X
<D
CD

ft

o
o

a

H
.al

fl

a
fl

X3

&

fl

-c a
^.2

;H

© n
XI rt

rQ

o

.^
fl.
ft-^
fl OT

'd
S
o

© .s

X2

'^'S.

il

©

fl

.1

fl
© ^ ©

-c;g >

143
48

78
135
55
56
25
52

91
40
34
27
11
24

41
36
. 35
24
11
13

4,299

797

593

517
11
79
1
50
13

3,054
297
300
6
186
55

252
77
50

20
25
24
13
8
9

6,459

770

,

fl
IZ

©

"5?
© +3

a

a 03
a-l's^ •^soa
a ^ ©
03 O

3,906
4,818
3,503
2,871
1,475
1,484

a

^

ole

fl

1

•a
;- ^
©"^

© fl
ft ©

143
108
64
39
44
35

fl
IZ

230
236
148
120
55
98

Total

IS

a
X

^
^

fl
15

3,966
493
493
46
423
151

1872.
July
August
September
October
November
December
1873.
January
February
March
April
Mav
Juue

.J.
£ •

a^

a

a
^

•fl

^

13
©
C

a

-2

fl

1
1

Suspended claims.

3

a
fl

o

©
'rO

x>

^
o

a

fl

a
fl
^

15
2

607
1,359
1,149
• 840
402
417

3 006
" 3, 039
2,063
1 982
622
826

293
420
291
49451
241

7,872
5, 3 U
3,996
2,917
1,898
1,635

4,095
8,789
5, 883
3,402
3,437
2,954

1,120
1,209
1,045
65S
732
445

240
274
246
162
194
100

630
737
613
363
406
. 257

250
198
186
128
132
88

1,350
1, 445
1,193
773
787
543

2,132
2,101
1,825
1,186
1,028
775

23, 261

5,990

14, 544

2,727

29, 720

37, 607

.

IZ

'

tz

EH

1

Claims in cases of colored soldiers, including both arrears of pay and bounties.
Original claims.
©

1
o
o

ce
X

Date.

©

©
XJ

a
p
fl

o

^
.1872.
July
August. '
September
October
November
December

•..

ft
ca

©

a

•

M

^2

a

^1

OTn-J

g©

fl <»

o

w^

© fl

a
fl
^

fl

93
270
43
82
45
102

4
1

148
94
94
.126
. 59
34

© .s
-^"Q.

a^
fl

IZ

84
105
35
66
41
90

5
164
8
13
4
10

1

121
78

24
16

„

85
120

9
5

46
28

13
2

899

273

3
2

a
fl

©
Xi

a
^

a
^
".
fl

fl

Ul

X3 ce

X
>

©

ce
X

fl

t-.S-d
.^^5 >

© -.^ ©

o

^

al'55
j3 ce ©

IZ

1 .

a

^
^

'o

©

=3 OT

0-.3

u
©

II

fd

-g-s

©

1-^

fl
c2

a

Suspended claims.

H i3 .
^.2

TJ*
©

a

t5
©

a
fl

• XJ

n 'O o
flrt©

^

cA

a
. ^
fl

o

.^

'o
©
X3

a

|2;-

949
1,043
833
745
736
724

124
144
121
103
59
65

749
836
647
608
654
649

76
63
65
34
23
10

1 042
1^313
876
827
781
826

1 075
1,386
883
836
836
660

2

848
738
875
947
841
656

79
36
93
• 117
131
74

724
677
703
774
637
494

45
25
79
56
73
88

996
832
969
1 073
900
690

1 099
871
995
1 840
2,010
3,013

2

9,935

8,152

637

11,. 125

15, 504

•1873.

Jauuary
F e b r u a r y •.
March
April
May
June.
. Total

1,190

4 °
16




1,146

192

REPOET ON THE FINANCES.
Bounty claims in cases of colored soldier s, midJer tZie aci of March 3, 1873.
T3

Suspended clairas.

Original claims.

a •
c:

-d

©
fl

1
o

a
.rt •

Date.

•Si
UTK

a

©
XJ

o

© a
.o ce
fl
.IZ

a

a
fl

IZ

^

ri
©

u
©
XJ

a
fl

Iz

•Is

''a

^ri
rt a
.2 fl
ftS

X
ce
©

1

fl OT
' C fl

a
fl
fl

- Q ^

a
fl

IZ

•

^

ftS

•d

ft"^

a^
fl .
tH . S ' A

•-2^ >
8x3"©
art©
IZ .

.2 ®
bi)rtQ
J
rt g "S

_©

<D - ^

Cu

'OTH

a

u
©
XJ

a-s o

fl

IZ

a

tz

H

I
1

_©

?

1

O

fl

©

.2
fl
'A

c3
O

a.

H

.

April
May

195
118
150
Total

ai

fl
fl
•2

a
fl

1873.

. %-6

©

u

fl

•ft

463

•.

10

94
68
12?

7
1
0

,

94
49
26

268
630
1,078

14
28
1.52

150
390
689

104
212
237

463
748
1,228

284

169

1,976

194

1, 229

553

2,439

973
1, 939
.1,645
1,454
850
931

4, 811
5,648
4,240
4,064
2, 568
3,129

493
644
524
238
693
495

11,258
10.216
•8,150
6, 793
5, 743
5,790

741
743
859
765
758
859

4,122
3, '^96
4,031.
4,075
3, 904
4,295

677
386
527
6-25
747
656

SUMMARY.
1872.
July
August
September .
October —
November.,
December .
1873
Jauuary—
Februarj'- . .
March
,
April . .
May
,
June ...
Total

635
381
277
81
125
82
64
66
49
40
177
22, 565

3,593
883
1, 052
714
925
699
943
1,' 459
849
972
614
811

349
372
150
29

394
351
522
164
286

404
'349
262
213194
177

6,277
8.231
6,409
5,756
4, ill
4,555

508
348
.306
203
181
177.

5,540
4,425
5,417
5,465
5,409
5,810

67, 405 12,517

,045

48,183

,705

7,819
14, 992
10, 674
8,391
8,805
8, 449

7,461 ' 10, 488
6,. 690
9,662
6,989
9,838
7,211
10, 300
6,408
9, 442
7,261
11,195
19, 970 120, 055

SETTLING; BRANCH.
The work performed by the settling branch during the year is shown
by the annexed tables:
..
Claims in cases of white soldiers.
Additional bounty, act of J u l y 28, 1866,
Number of claims.

i

Arrears of pay, &c., act of J u l y 22,1861
Number of claims.

.Amount
involved.

Araount
involved.

1872.
July
August .....
September.
October
November .
iDecember .
1$73.
.January . . .
February ..
March
April
May
June

425
346
331
243
239
281

125
106
167
164
187
165

28
150
65
2
210
100

153
256
232
166
397
265

746
744
607
572
445
549

223
126
178
217
145
192

40
225
50
1
75
75

263 $33, 518 10
351 16, 897 86
228 29,012 65
218 29,413 33
220 30, 468 87
267 37, 268 60

1,395
1,356
664
229
223
219

273
464
351.
358
262
346

50
29
lUO
3(10
220
113

323
493
45.L
658
482
459

1,183
'925
660
567
569
475

230
232
2S8
390
336
385

20
20
32
102
200
102

250
2.52
320
492
536
487

Total

5,951

8,042

2,942




1,367

29. 804 86
26, 943 73
39, 715 03
73, .581 .39
42, 057 40
52,129 02
[440, 810 84

193

SECOND AUDITOR.
Bounty claims under the act of April 22, 1872.
N u m b e r of claims.

Amount
involved.

Date.

1872.
July
August
September
October
November
December

722
474
1,452
243
220
163

;

656
914
604
. 437
1,186
^ 793

40
250
120
3
205
175

696
1,164
724
440
1,391

$60, 638 10
97,040 0060,700 00
43, 700 00
110, 785 62
73,667 01

522
421
461
327
332
133

40
70
150
100
334
200

562
491
Oil
427
666
333

.56,010 12
50,868 63
46, 821 31
41,462 39
35,196 09
13,300 06'

1873.
January
February
March.
April...'
May
J u n e . .•

222
230
140
117
68
64

.'
Total

8,473

4,115

690,189 33

Claims in cases of colored soldiers, including hoth arrears of pay and bounties.
Nuraber of claims.

c
>

li,
•ll

Date.
rd

ri

-d.
©

.1

©

Amouut
involved. .

<

1872.
99
253
32
96
96
102

•
.

.

133
83
15
.55
' 84
149

49
96
62
4
97
41

182
179
' 77
59
181
188

$21,132
14, 371
3,170
7,'943
15, 672
22, 573

66
51
49
68
32
74

120
.95
1,651
2,692
1,835

July
August
A
September
October
November
December

143
1.38
139
137
137
147

23
27
50
113
• 47
30

166
• 165
189
250
204
177

21,928
. 22, 792
26, 886
23, 322
28,881
24,538

17
25
59
64
61
02

7,071

1,378

. 639

2,017

233,213 68

1873.
January...
February
March."
April
May
June

...

Total

13 P




.

......

....*....

.

194

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

SUMMARY.
Nuinber of claims.

A m o u u t involved.

Date.

1872.
July..-.....:
August
September
October
November
December

1, 992
1,81.7
2,422
1; 154
1,000
1,095

,

157
721.
297
10
587
391

1,294
1,950
1,261
883
2,189
1,688

2,920
2,511
1, 5.59
2, 564
3, 552
2, 593

:

1,137
1,229
964
873
1,602
1,297
1,168
1,2.55
1, 239
1,212
1,087
1,011

.133
146
332
615
801
445

1,301
1,401
1,571
1,827
1,888
1,456

14, 074

4,635

18, 709

$129,
136,
110,
100,
175,
150,

388
592
333
733
826
659

86 11,123
1,305
37
1,853
14
94 • 1,267
1, 922
81
1,634
35

1873.
January
February
March
April
May
June

:

Total.........

25,179

135, 583 15
141, 065 52
1-49, 963 60
176, 014 95
133,244 85
125, 579 10

1, 831
1,981
1, 508
2,058
2,056
1,151

1, 664, 985 64 29, 689

Consolidated statement sho-wing the operations of the entire division for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1^13.
N u m b e r of claims.

Date.'

fl ^

Amount involved.

1872.

January..,
. February.
March
April
May.
•June .

1,992
1, 817
2,422
1,1.54
1,000
1,095

1,137
1,229
' 964
873
1,602
1,297

1, 402
2, 096
1,239
484
1,862
1,354

2,539
3,325
2,203
1,357
3,464
2,651

2,920
2,511
1,559
2,564
3,552
2,593

l;168
1,255
1,239
1,212
1,087
1,011

1,704
1,274
1, 516
1,960
1,893
1,562

2,872
2,529
2,755
3,172
2,980
2,573

25,179

July
;
August
September .
October —
November.,
December.

14, 074

18, 346

32, 420

$129,388
136, 592
110, 333
100, 733
175, 826
150, 659

86
37
14
94
81
35

18, 942
16, 297
12, 527
9,658
10, 727
10, 083

1,000
8.54
1,127
903
1,595
909

135, 583 15
141, 065 52
149, 963 60
176, 014 95
133,244 85
125, 579 10

12, 319
11, 643
11,346
12, 358
11,498
12, 346

1,589
.1,153
1,468
1,400
1,232
1,032

1, 664, 985 64

149, 744

14, 262

In addition to the foregoing there were^ made in this division twelve
settlements on account of fines, forfeitures, stoppages, &c., against soldiers of the Eegular Army, upon which the sum. of .$22^ 845.89 was paid
to the treasurer of the Soldiers' Home, in accordance with the acts of
Congress of March 3,1851, and March 3,1859, making the total number
of settlements 14,086, and-the total disbursements $1,687,831.53.
Number of claims under act of July 28,1866, (white,) on hand June 30,3872,... 7, 321
Number of claims for arrears of pay and original bounty (white) on hand June
30, 1872
19,337
Number of colored claims on hand June 30,1872.
,
4,171
Number of bounty claims under act of Ainil 22, 1872, ou hand June 30, 1872... 11,183
Total number pf claims on hand June 30,1872




42, 012

• .
Number
Number
Number
Number

of
of
of
of

SECOND AUDITOR.

19.5

clairas under act of July 28, 1866, (white,) on hand June .30, 1873... 5, 589
claims for arrears of pay and original bounty on hand June 30,1873. 16,543
colored claims on hand June 30, 1873
10,934
bounty claims under act of April 22,1872, on hand June 30,1873
1,705

Total number of claims on hand June 30, 1873

34,771

The condition ofthe claims on hand is .shown by the following statement:
Number of claims suspended awaiting evidence to be filed by claimants or their
attorneys
:
'
28,308
Number of claims ready for settlement
2, 891
^Number of claims unexamined June 30, 1873
•
3, 572
Total

;

...^

34,771

PROPERTY DIVISION.

The subjoined statement shows the progress and condition of business
in this division:
Number of property returns of officers on hand June 30,1872
Returns of ordnance, ordnance stores, &c., received during the year.
Returns of clothing, camp, and garrison equipage received during the year
Total
Number
Number
Number
Amount
Number
Number
Number

16, 855
29
3, 095
19,979

of returns settled during the year
:
of returns on hand June 30, 1873
of certificates of non-indebtedness issued to officers'
charged to officers for property not accounted for
of returns registered
of letters written
*
of letters recorded

10 578
, . ' ' 9 , 401
431
$18,115 64
3,124
3,778
2,489

Thirty-one thousand one hundred and ninety-seven property returns
rendered by volunteer officers in previous years, but not heretofore
reported, have been settled under the provisions of the act of June 23,
1870.
DIVISION OF INQUIRIES AND REPLIE.S.

The work performed in this division during the year is as follows:
Number of inquiries on hand unanswered June 30,1872
Number received during the year, as'per detailed statement below

20,162
39,979

Total .'..
-..:
Number of .inquiries answered during the year

60,141
42, 309

Number of inquiries on hand unanswered June 30, 1873

17,832

Officers m a k i n g iuquiry.

Adjutant-General
Paymaster-General
Quartermaster-General
Commissai'y-General of Subsistence
° Commissioner of Pensions
T h i r d Auditor
F o u r t h Auditor
P a y m a s t e r s ' division, local b o u n t y ca.ses
P a y m a s t e r s ' division, deserter's cases . . .
Miscellaneous
Total

:




Number
Number
received. answered.

1,382
88
13, .349
14, .393
1,809

8,108
768
9'4
. 105
700
1,103
66
16, 792 .
10, 779
3,794

39, 979

42, 309

7,276
769
106
107
•: 700

196

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

Rolls and.vouchers copied for the Adjutant-General and Paymaster-General..
Rolls and vouchers copied for preservation in this office
Rolls and vouchers partially copied and traced for preservation in this office..
Signatures verified
,
Letters written

1,113
219
2,259
2,610
22,737

A large amountof miscellaneous business devolved upon this division,
such as the copying of affidavits, final statements of enlisted men, letters^ and other documents, in which 2,244 pages of foolscap were used.
DIVISION FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF FRAUD.

During the year 5,276 cases have been under investigation and prosecution by this division. -A.bstracts of facts have been prepared in 240
cases 5 527 have been finally disposed of, and 83 prepared ibr suit and
13rosecution through the various UnitedBtates district courts.
The amounts recovered by suit and otherwise are as follows :
Amount recovered by draft, certificate of deposit, and current funds, in
cases of white soldiers, and turned into the Treasury to be credited to
the proper appropriations
Amount recovered iu cases of .colored soldiers, principally through the
agency of the Freedmen^s branch of the Adjutant-General's Office, and
turned into the Treasury for appropriate credit
Amount wrongfully withheld by claim agents, and secured to the rightful
owners by the interposition of this office
Amount of disbursing-officers' checks recovered and cancelled
•Amount of judgments recovered, but not yet satisfied
Amount secured by stoppages and offset
Amount of checks secured, from the Indian Ofiice, being on account of
bounty to Indian Home Guards, and properly cancelled
Amount recovered and turned over to Army paymasters
.,
.

Total.......

'

'.

,

| 9 , 070 09
41, 644 68
7,297
1, 000
10, 277
560

42^
00
17
35

1,660 40
115 07'
71,625 18.

To which should be added—
Amount of fines imposed by United States courts in criminal cases
Bond of indemnity on hand
.^

750 00
1,700 00

•

74,075 18

There are now under examinatipn and investigation 4,749 cases, involving forgery, fraud, unlawful withholding of money, overpayments,
&c., as follows:
Fraudulent and contested claims in cases of white soldiers, in which settlements
had been made prior to notice of fraud or contest
Fraudulent and contested unsettled claims in cases of white soldiers
Alleged fraudulent claims awaiting the decision of United States courts
Cases involving overpayments to ex-officers of the Army and volunteers
Fraudulent and contested claim's in cases of colored soldiers in which settlements had been made prior to notice of fraud or contest
Unsettled claims in cases of colored soldiers involving fraud in the marriage
evidence
Unsettled contested claims in cases of colored soldiers
-.
Unsettled claims in cases of colored soldiers in which evidence of heirship is
believed to have been manufactured by claim agents and their abettors
Claims in cases of Indian Home Guards in which fraud is alleged.
Miscellaneous cases
'
.Total ..J
Nuraber of claims on hand June 30, 1872
Number of claims received during the year.
Total
'
Nuniber of claims finally disposed of during the year




:

1,187
626
80
207
1,153
146
294 •
974
25
57
4,749
4, 381
895
5,276
527

SECOND AUDITOR.
Number of claims on hand June 30, 1873
Number of letters written

,

197
4,749
4, 814

'

In addition to the foregoing cases there is a large number of letters
and informal complaints relating to fraudulent transactions, which are
held as caveats against the persons complained of until cases of a similar
nature, now pending in the courts, shall have been finally determined.
I t will be observed by the exhibit of this division that there is a further increase of labor, although the result of the past year's operatfons
is highly satisfactory, especially in the prosecution of suits and recovery
of money. Since the transfer of the Freedmen's Bureau to the AdjutantGeneral's Department, many irregularities and dishonest practices of
some of the officers lately employed by that Bureau have been discoA^ered,
necessitating much labor and care in the examination of certain claims,
vouchers^ and accounts. Much credit is due to the officers of the War
Department who now have the management of the Freedmen's Bureau
affairs,, the Solicitor of the Treasury, aod the United States district offi.cers for thei;r earnest co-operation with this office in the discovery and
punishment of wrongs, and in protecting the Government and its wards.
With the continued aid of these officers it is anticipated that the fraudulent practices in the bounty-claim business will soon be suppressed, and
the ends of justice rapidly answered.
ARCHIVES DIVISION.

The following are the details of the work performed by this division:
Number of accounts received from the Paym aster ^General
Number of accounts on file awaiting settlement .'.
.-.
Number of confirmed settlements received from the Second Comptroller verified, briefed, and transferred to permanent files—
Paymasters'
1
' 261
Indian
:
1,047
Miscellaneous
1, 371
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number

556
6.34

2,679
531
2,602
58, 872
225
16,085
19, 919
789

of paymasters' settlements re-examined
of settlements withdrawn and returned to
files
of vouchers withdrawn and returned to accounts
of abstracts of accounts bound in covers
of dui)licate bounty vouchers examined for certificates of pa,yment...
of mutilated muster and pay-rolls repaired
of letters written
REGISTRY AND CORRESPONDENCE DIVISION.

The record of the work pertaining to this division is as follows:
Number of letters received
•
Number of letters written
Number of letters recorded
'.
Number of letters referred to other bureaus
Number of dead letters received and registered
'..
Number of miscellaneous vouchers received, stamped, and distributed
Number of letters, with additional evidence in the case of suspended claims,
received, briefed, and registered... ^
Number of pay and bounty certificates examined, registered, and sent to the
Paymaster-Gen eral, in accordance with joint resolution April 10, 1869
Number of claims received, briefed, and registered
Number of pay and bounty certificates examined, registered, and mailed
Number of reports calling for requisitions sent to the War Department

30, 365
42,467
2,355
1,983
3,275
103,748
25,902
12,855
31,284
14,262
440

For convenience of reference, and for^the purpose of showing at a
glance the various classes of accounts settled in the Office, and the num-




198

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

ber of each class received, disposed of, and remaining on hand, I annex
the following
Consolidated statement.

Description of accouuts.

r e CO

O o
1,127
Payraasters
780
ludian agents
729
Indian agents
60
Indian claims
42, 012
. Bounty, arrears of pay, &c
Ordnance, medical, and miscellaneous..
Regular recruiting
Volunteer recruitiug
} 1,828
Claims for r e t u r n of local b o u n t y
F r e e d m e n ' s B u r e a u accouuts
. .i..
Ordnance and Quartermaster's Depart16, 855
ment (property)...Soldiers'liome
National Home'.

1

J

Total.,

63, 391

•556
825
.4
54
925
25,179

1,033
887
400
984
32, 420

2, 197

2,567

146
3,124
,24
12
33, 532

10, 578
24
12

650 $27, 532,170" 94 36, 889
3, 598, 438 87
718
873
i 1,665
4, 730, 749 34
1
1, 664, 985 64 149, 744
34, 771
1, 968,183 01 1
231, 544 83 I
1,458
173, 515 61 ^ 1,838
, 1, 423 45
,
82 t 8,'541,725 08
9,401

3, 778
336, 733 01
399, 551 57
49,179,021 35

193, 914

Besides the number of letters stated in the above table, there have
been written 71,630 relating to the miscellaneous business of the Office,
making a total of 265,544, or 62,886 in excess of the correspondence of
last year.
,
The average number of clerks employed during the year was 272.
The following statements and reports were prepared and transmitted
during the year:
Annualreport to the Secretary,of the Treasury of the transactions
of the Office during the fiscal year.
Annual statement of the recruiting fund, prepared for the AdjutantGeneral of the Army.
.
Annual statement of tlie contingencies of the Army, prepared for the
Secretary of War.
Annual statement of the clerks and other persons employed in this
Office during the year 1872, or any part thereof, showing the amount
paid to each on account of salary, with place of residence, &c., in pur>
suance of the eleventh section of the act of August 12, 1842, and resolution of the .House of Eepresentatives of January 13, 1846, transmitted
to the Secretary of the Treasury.
Monthly tabular statement showing the business transacted in the
Office during the month, and the number of accounts remaining unsettled at the close of the month, transmitted to the Secretary of the
Treasury.
Monthly report of absence from duty of employes of this Office, with
reasons therefor, transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury.
Pay-rolls, upon which payment was made to the employes of this Office^
prepared semi-monthly.
It affords me great pleasure to say that the results accomplished during the year have been satisfactory.
/
The showing in the number of settlements made, especially of claims
for pay and bounty, has not been as large as in preceding years, for the
reason that more than half of the unsettled claims upon the registers of
the Office, at the commencement of the year, have been accumulating



SECOND AUDITOR.

^

199

during the last ten years, have beep, suspended from time to time for
cause, and, owing to peculiarities in their character, require great care in
their treatment, and involve a large amount of investigation and correspondence. A special effbrt is being made to dispose of them in such
a manner as to secure the rights of the Government and of honest
claimants. .
•
Claims under recent laws are promptly settled, and if there should be
no large class of claims created by new "legislation it is believed that
during tho current year the clerical force upon this-branch of work can
be materially reduced.
While there has been no lack of official courtesy toward this office,,
one of the principal obstacles to the prompt dispatch of business has
been the difficulty of obtaining necessary information from other offices^,
in consequence of their inability to furnish it. On the 3d of July last
a letter was addressed to this office from the Adjutant-General, acknowledging the fact that there was then in that office over six thousand unanswered requests from this, for statements of service in the cases of
enlisted men of the volunteer army^ arid stating that " This delay arises
from the fact that the clerical force is not sufficient to keep up the current work, and at the same time keep in a proper state of preservation
the muster-rolls from which the inform ation called for is obtained." Its
effect upon the business of this office is a Cause of regret, which it is
hoped will be promptly removed by Congress.
The conduct of the clerical force of this office is entitled to high commendation. Their ability and faithful discharge of their duties have
been marked and constant, and leave nothing to be desired.
I am,- sir, very respectfully,
E. B. FEEiS^OH,
Auditor,
Hon.

W M . A. EICHARDSON,

Secretary of the Treasury,







REPORT

OF




THE

THIRD

A U D.I T O R .




EEPORT
OP

THE THIRD.AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY,

...

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Thi'kl Auditor'^s Office^ Septemher 16, 1873.
SIR : In compliance with instructions from your office and the requirements of law, I have the honor to transmit herewith the following report of business operations of .this office for the fiscal year ending June
30,1873.
BOOK-KEEPER'S DIVISION.

The duties devolving upon this division are, in general, to keep the
appropriation and money accounts of the office.
The annexed statement of the financial operations of the office during
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1873, exhibits the amounts drawn on
specific appropriations, except those under direction of the Chief of Engineers of the Army, which are aggregated and entered under the general heading, " Engineer Department." I t also shows the repayments
into the Treasury for the same period.
The average number of clerks engaged in this division during the
period embraced in this report h*as been nine, and that number now con, stitutes the active force of the division.
The number of requisitions drawn on the Secretary of the Treasury .
by the Secretaries of War and of the Interior for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1873, was 4,654, amounting to $61,693,170.22, as follows, viz:




Eequisitions drawn by the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Interior.

>4^

Advances to
officers and
agents duriug the fiscal year. •

Appropriations.

$4,
1,
1,
4,

TRANSFERS:

Second
Auditor's.

Cavalry and artillery horses
Clothing of the A r m y
Preservation of clothing and equipage
2sational cemeteries
Construction and repair of hospitals . . . . . . . .

.

....

Exnenses of sales of stores and niaterials
Commutation of rations to prisoners of w a r
Extension of military reservation C a m p JVIohave
Purchase construction and maintenance of steam-rams-

546, 543
380, 568
486, 063
330, 754

34
3018
94

294,
10,
870,
150,

Barracks and quarters

54
00
84
00
75
31
51
55
43
00
00
00

273
000
975
000
777
. 358, 707
84, 526
!29, 674
842
1,000
2, 000
14, 219

o

$647, 430
49, 889
220, 626
926, 652
1,586
87, 030
281
10, 545

66
28
52
95
07
95
93
28

$441
173
]36
1,748

52
40
70
58

Third
Auditor's.
$2, 787
762
• 32
10, 502

.

-

Interior
Department.

44
72
40
87

$255 50

225, 000 00

208 00

138, 917 85

120 66

.

Fourth •
Auditor's.

/

17, 220 36
14, 423 27
945 38257,486 11

10 00

P a y m e n t of members of certain military organizations, Kansas City
Defraying expenses of minute-men, &c., in Pennsylvania, Maryland,
28, 762 32
758,110 31
525, 258 72
3.36, 817 37
425, 000 00
43, 408 28

• .•

Claims of loyal citizens for supplies &c southern claims

Horses &c

lost act of March 3 1849

Signal-service

 ordinary expenses
C u r r e n t and


Military Academy

8, 260, 478
, 12, 500
338, 000
63, 045

35
00
00
00

6, 81*8
927,910
61,821
17,131
9,591
2,051
99, 975
5,159

82
19
13
66
41
00
85
75

Total.

.^5,197, 202 96
1 431 393 70
1,706,858 80
5, 269, 914 84
1, 586 07
381, 304 49
10, 281 93
1,106,521 12
150, 000 00
777 75
. 497, 833 16
84, 526 .51
29, 674 55
842 43
1,000 00
2, 000 00
14, 219 00
17, 220 36
14, 548 93
945 38
257,496 11

O
Pi
H
O

• '958 50

958 50

Gun-boats on w e s t e r n rivers.

Special relief acts.

2, 038 21

,

28, 762
758,110
525, 258
336,817
425, 000
43, 408
6,818
927,910
61,821
17,131
9,591
2, 051
99, 975
8,267,676
12, 500
338, 000
63, 045

32
31
72
37
00
28
82
19
13
66
41
00
85
31
00
00
00

•

Q

Ul

15, 800 00
17, 500 00

Miscellaneous items and incidental expenses. Military A c a d e m y
S u n n o r t of Bnrpftu of "Rpfuffpes F r e e d m e n &C

.

............
2, 880, 971 50
30, 200,115 33

Pensions to widows-aud others
Art
Act
Art
Act
Act
Act
Act
Act
Act

for
for
for
for
for
for
for
for
for

fhe
the
the
the
the
the
the
the
the

relief
relief
relief
relief
relief
relief
relief
relief
relief

of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of

.......

12, 971
80,-748
102
1, 268
12, 222
101

95
1300
57
26
03

1,686 85

50,179 68
664 43
1, 284 88

117 32

T h o m a s D W^est . .
......
J o h n W . Phelps
S J3 Mitchell and others .
Harriet Spring
Albert G r a n t
T h o m a s B S t e w a r t aud Alexander McConn . .
Omaha National B a n k
1
T h o m a s F . Spencer
Charles H . Thompson

A f t for the relief of H a r r i e t W P o n d . . '
A c t for the relief of Beverly B. Botts and others
A c t for the relief of Minerva Lewis, administratrix
A c t for the relief of William W e b s t e r of Maine
A c t for the relief of Orville J. J e n n i n g s
A ct for-the relief of William Spence
A ct for the relief of Mary L o v e . .
....
A c t for t h e relief of Horace T y l e r
A c t for the relief of Georsre R e b e r . . . . . i . . . . .
A c t for the relief of W a r r e n & Moore
A c t for the relief of Jesse E. P e y t o n
A c t for the relief of Heirs of T h o m a s L a w s o n . . . .
..
A c t for the relief of Milo P r a t t
Act for the relief of Charles H. Mallory & Co., N e w York
A c t for the relief of Levi J. Powell
A c t for the relief of Margaret Merklein
Total




15, 800
17, 500
46, 971
'2, 977, 644
30, 200, 217
51 448
12, 886
1,503

34, 000 00
14,237 63.

'

.,;

•

..... .
.'.

•
55, 774, 336 87

4, 803, 400 95

4,187 05

842, 658 83

117 .32

255 50

910
555
2, 592
8.510
40, 906
1, 443
1, 503
100
3.100
•112,740
1, 000
1,990
5, 000
4,208
8,132
24, 290
2, 000
34, 988
797
293
1, 684
4, 600
2,000
4,160
104
600

00
00
95
11
33
25
69
23

00
00
87
67
63
36
96
00
00
76
00
16
00
33
95
80
00
53
15
58
45
00
00
00
50
00

268,213 70

268,213 70

61 693 170 22

'

a
I—(

O

* Nineteen thousand dollars advanced out of the appropriation for exploring expedition, 40th parallel.

to
.O
Or

^206'

REPORT ON T H E • FINANCES.

The number of credit and counter requisitions drawn by the Secretaries of War and of the Interior on sundry persons in favor of the
Treasurer of the United States is 697, on which repayments into the
Treasury during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1873, were made
through the Third Auditor's Office, as follows, viz :
. Deposits......
Canceled requivsitions
•Second Anditof's transfers
Third Auditor's transfers
.Fourth Auditor's transfers
Interior Department transfers
War Department transfers

•

..--

$2,145,112
110
480,711
856,450
4,133
....
991
80
--

i

12
00 >
12
05
73
58
12

Total.:
•
3,487,588.72
NOTE.—The aggregate amount of $5,626,733.26 standing to the credit of twentynine ''specific appropriations" respectively, has been carried to the surplus fund hy
•warrant No. 151, dated June 30, 1873.

The following statement shows, in a tabular form,.the principal items
•of business transacted in this Office duringthe fiscal year ending June
30, 1873, and the number and amount of uusettled accounts and claims
'On hand:

ill
^ fl
O 03 •

Description of accounts. •

tOoMei .
• lis

lis

oca %
'^ r.

^

Number of accounts settled in fiscalyear ending
J u n e 30, 1873.

o.« g
P2;

Monthly Blonthly Monthly
aud.
• and
and
quarterly. quarterly. quarterly.
Quartermasters' money
-Quartermasters' p r o p e r t y
Commissaries'money..
Refugees,
Freedmen,
aud
Abandoned L a n d s
Tension agents' money
Signal-officers' money . . . ;
'Signal-officers' property
Total

*.

3,467
7,255
1,145

4
711
203
26
102

14
795
216
97
102

Amount
involved.

Monthly
and
quarterly.

$3,458, 919 06

14
19
56
52

561
62
9

16, 150, 003 20
4, 595, 787 47
• 192, 650 21

76, 606, 833 54

• 2, 390

25,071,839 20

4, 372,779 33
118,198
33,926,556
8, 826, 443
297,229

•-

9, 555 .

5,159
69
842
6,786
6

136
258
3
129
6,016
6

136
413
4
146
4,750
8

409, 785
73, 033
37,183
17, 503
4, 419, 908
1,701,418

52
93
00
05
00
28

5,004
68
825
. 8. 052
4

' 12, 862

6, 548

5,457

6, 658, 831 78

13, 953

13, 091

Amount
involved.

1,148
279
331

$29, 065, 626 80

5, 926

.'

•Claims for horses lost . . .
steamboats destroyed
Oregon w a r
miscellaneous
...
Total

3,'783
3,667
1,059

832
3,867
417
10
645
75
80

Number of, accounts un. settled J u n e 30, .1873.

674, 479 26

919, 037
556, 493
69, 664
4, 658, 284
280,160

58
70
61
32
68

6, 483, 640 89

•QUARTERMASTERS' DIVISION.

The accounts of quartermasters cover a varied range of money disbursements and property accountability, embracing disbursements for
barracks, quarters, hospitals, store-houses, offices, stables, forage, and
transportation of all Army supplies. Army clothing, camp and garrison
•equipage; the purchase of cavalry and artillery horses, fuel, forage,
straw, material for bedding, stationery; hired men; per diem to extraduty men; of the pursuit and apprehension of deserters; of the burial



207

THIRD AUDITOR,

of officers and soldiers; of hired escorts; of expresses, interpreters,
spies and guides; of veterinary surgeons, and medicines for horses; of
supplying posts with water, and generally the proper and authorized
expenses for the movements ancl operations of an army, not expressly
assigned to any other department. The " returns '^ are an account of
the disposition made of all property paid for by the Quartermaster's
Department, (except clothing, camp and garrison equipage, which are
accounted for to the Second Auditor.)
The tabular statement herewith exhibits in a condensed form the
results of the labors of the force employed in this division:
Money accounts.

Supplemental settlements.
Propertyreturns.

Property.

A m o u n t involved.

No.

On hand per last r e p o r t . .
Received during the fiscal y e a r

. .

Total
Reported during the fiscal year
Remaining unsettled
Total

A m o u n t involved.

832
3,783

$17, 863,150 52
14, 661, 395 34

3,867
3,667

2,492

2 , 3 7 9 . $10,152, 684 70

4,615

32, 524, 545 86

7,534

2,492

2,379

10,152,684 70

3,467
1,148

29, 065, 626 80
3, 458, 919 06

7,255
279

2, 492

2,379

10,152, 684 70

4,615

32, 524,-545 86

7,534

2,492

2,379

io, 152, 684 70

Money.

Signal-accounts.
A m o u n t involved.

Total.

Property.
•Onhand per last report
.
..
..
Received during the fiscal y e a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total
Reported during the fiscal y e a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remaining unsettled . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
...........
T o t a l '.

Money.

102

80
26

$207,102 88
282, 776 85

106

489,879 73

17,228

43,167,110 29

97
9

297, 229 52
192, 650 21

15, 792
1, 436

39, 515 541 02
3, 651, 569 27

3 06

489, 879 73

17, 228

43,167,110 29

102
102
102

.

No.

Amount involved.

4,779 $18, 070,'253 40
12, 449 25, 096, 856 89

Kumber of letters written, 8,292; average number of clerks employed, 69|.
;
JSTumber of vouchers examined, 533,192, and pages of manuscript
written, 13,874.
The above table exhibits in a concise form the principal items of labor
performed;,by the clerical force employed in this division, and shows
also the number of accounts remaining unsettled at the end of the fiscal
year, and the amount involved in such unsettled accounts.
I t will be seen that832 quartermaster accounts, in volving $17,863,150.52,
and 80 signal-officers'accounts, involving $207,102.88, total,$18,070,253.40,
remained on hand June 30,1872 ; that 3,783 quartermaster accounts, involving $14,661,395.34, and 26 accounts of signal-officers, involving
$282,776.85, total, $14,944,172.19, were received from the proper military'
bureaus; that3,467 quartermaster accounts, involving $29,065,626.80, and
97 accounts of signal-officers, involving $297,229.52, total, $29,362,856.32,
were settled during the fiscal year, leaving 1,148 quartermaster accounts °
and 9 accounts of signal-officers, involving $3,651,569.27, remaining on
hand unadjusted. There were also 2,379 supplemental money-statements
made, involving $10,152,684.70, making a grand total of $39,515,541.02




208

^

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

adjusted by this division during the year. A reference to prior reports
will show that the unsettled accounts remaining on hand ($3,651,569.27)
is a smaller amount than remained on^hand at the close of any fiscal
year subsequent to the year ending June 30, 1860. Of these accounts
a large portion have been examined and are ready to be reported to the
Second Comptroller, as soon as settlements of the same disbursing officers'accounts, now in that office, shall be returned to this office. A
careful examination shows that 2,206 settlements, made in this office, of
the money accounts of disbursing pfficers of the Quartermaster's Department, are now in the Second Comptroller's Office awaiting the official
action of that office.
The number of letters sent from this division was 8,292, against 17,444
sent during 1872. Letters on official business ate prepared at considerable cost to the Government, and, while care has been taken to answer
promptly all communications requiring rex^lies, it is deemed important
that only those should be written which are absolutely required for the
proper discharge of the administrative duties of the office.
The best results obtained in the year just closed will be found in the
'^ supplemental money-settlements.'^ These settlements are based generally on explanations, or corrected vouchers, furnished by disbursing
officers in answer to objections raised against their accounts. The amount
involved in these settlements, it will be seen, was $10,152,684.70 during
the year just closed.
Of the vast number of ^' Eeturns of quartermaster stores," rendered
duringthe rebellion, only about forty remain unadjusted, and of that number the larger portion were'rendered by officers who were subsequently
dismissed the service for fraudulent transactions in connection with their
accountability to the Government, and who have not consequently been
permitted to receive the benefit of the liberality displayed by Congress;
to faithful officers in the passage of the acts of June 23,1870, and June
7, 1872, authorizing allowances for losses of funds, &c.
SUBSISTENCE DIVISION.

This division audits the accounts of all commissaries and acting commissaries of subsistence in the Army, whose duties are to purchase the
provisions and stores necessary for the feeding of the Army, and see to
their proper distribution. These commissaries render monthly moneyaccounts, with proper vouchers, for disbursements of the funds intrusted
to them, together with a provision-return, and vouchers showing the
disposition of provisions and stores purchased and received during
each month. These accounts are received monthly through the office
of the Commissary General of Subsistence, and are every six months
(or oftener if \ h e officer ceases to disburse) examined and audited in
this division, and the money accounts and vouchers, together with a
certified statement of their condition, referred to the Second Comptroller
of the Treasury for his decision thereon. Upon their receipt back from
the Comptroller with the statement approved, the officers are then officially notified of the result of said examinations and are called upon by
this office to adjust or explain any omissions or errors that may have
been discovered. The money and provision accounts, together with
vouchers and papers belonging thereto, are, after examination, placed
°in the settled files of this division for future reference, and remain permanently in the custody of this office*
- .




THIED

209

AUDITOE.

Annual report ofthe Subsistence Division for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1873.
Refugees, Freedmen, and
Abandoned Land accounts.

Subsistence accounts.
fl .

Money accounts.

Money accounts.

O 00

•g g
No.

*
..

Remaining on hand J u n e 30 1873

No.

417
1,059

$501, 941 83
4, 545, 316 76

405
1,043

...

1,476
1,145

5, 047, 258 59
4, 372, 779 33

1,448
1,120

14
14

.. .

331

674, 479 26

328

A m o u n t involved.

10
4

. On hand per last report, vTune 30,1872
Received duriug fiscal year
Total
Audited during fiscal year

A m o u n t involved.

'> ^

.

$49, 802 02
68, 396 12
118 198 14
118,198 14

_

IsTumber of vouchers examined, 57,252; difierence-sheets written,
738; letters written, 1,090; queries answered, 1,105; average number
of clerks, 7.
ENGINEER DIVISION.

This division is employed in the examination of the accounts of the
officers and agents of the Engineer Department, who, under direction of the Chief of Engineers of the Army, (except the superintendent
of the Military Academy at West Point, whose ciisbursemeuts are directed by the Inspector-General,) disburse moneys out of various appro;
priations—now 248 in number—made from time to time by Congress
for works of a public nature, which may be classed under the following
general heads, viz :
•
The purchase of sites and materials for, and construction and repairs
of, the various fortifications throughout the United States;
Construction and repairs of roads, bridges, bridge-trains, &c., for
armies in the
field;
.
•
Surveys on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts ;
Examination and surveys of the northern and western lakes and
rivers ;
Construction and repairs of breakwaters ;
Eepairs and improvement of harbors, both on sea and lake coasts;
Improvement of rivers and purchase of snag and dredge boats forthe
same; and
The expenses of the Military Academy at West Point.
The average number of clerks employed in the division for the year
ending June 30, 1873, was 4.25, and the transactions of the division for
the same period are shown by the following statement, viz:
Accounts.
Number of
quarters.

Amount involved.

75
203

$4,918,071 84
8,504,149 19

:....

278

,13,422,221 03
8, 826, 443 56
4, 59.5, 777 47

3a

...........

216
62
278

13, 422, 221 03

36

On hand per last report, J u n e 30,1872
Received during the year
Total
Reported during the year
Remaining on hand
...

•
........

..

...

Total

Iiumber of letters written, 612.
•
14 F



-^ fl 2

210

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

The business of thig division is well up, as will be seen by the following : Of the accounts on hand four are for disbursements made in 1871,
thirty-four in 1872, and the remainder in 1873.
STATE WAR-CLAIMS DIVISION.

The duties of this division embrace the settlement, under the various
.acts and resolutions of Congress relating thereto, of all claims of the
several States and Territories for the costs, charges, and expenses properly incurred by them for .enrolling, subsisting, clothing, supplying,
arming, equipping, paying, and transporting their troops employed by
the United States in aiding to suppress the recebt insurrection against
the United States. Also, Indian and other border invasions.
Original accounts.

No.

Amount.

Suspended accounts.
No.

Montana w a r
claims.

Amount.

No.

Araount,

76 $4,178, 936 51

On hand J u n e 30 1872
Received during the fiscal y e a r ending J u n e 30,
1873
,
-.

•6

$661,457 81

6

1, 320,121 15

3

6.57,921 80

136

$409, 785 52

Total
.'
Reported during the fiscal y e a r ending J u n e 30,
1873
:

12

1,981,578 96

79

4, 836, 858 31

136

409, 785 52

8

1, 701 418 28

22

84, 984 40

136

409, 785 52

4

280,160 68

57

4,751,873 91

' Number of ofiicial letters written during the year, 89.
]^[umber of clerks employed during the year,. 3.
CLAIMS DIVISION.

The duties of this division embrace the settlement of claims of a miscellaneous character arising in the various branches of service in the
War Department, growing out ofthe purchase or appropriation of supplies and stores for the Army; the purchase, hire, or appropriation of
water-craft, railroad stock, horses, wagons, and other means of transportation; the transportation contracts ofthe Army; the occupation of
real estate for camps, barracks, hospitals, fortifications, &c.; the hire of
employ6s, mileage, court-martial fees, traveling expenses, commutations, &c.; claims for compensation for vessels, railroad-cars, and engines, &c., lost in the military service; claims growing out of the Oregon
and Washington war of 1855 and 1856, and other Indian war claims ;
claims of various descriptions uuder special acts of Congress, and claims .
not otherwise assigned.
The following statements show the business transacted in this division
during the fiscal year ending Jiine 30, 1873, and the condition of the
business at the commencement and at the end thereof: .
Miscellaneous claims.
No.O n h a n d JunG30, 1872 1
Received during the year
Total
Disposed of
T o t a l on hand J u n e 30, 1873

Amount
claimed.

6786
6016

*$4, 190, 774 57
14,887,418 61

^2802
4750

9, 078,193 18
+4,419,908 86

8052

§4, 658, 284 32

* This is the amount claimed in 5,462 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (1,324) not beiug stated.
t T h i s is the amount claimed in 5,766 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (250) not being stated,
X This is the amount claimed in 4,667 cases, the amounts claimed iu the others (83) not beiug stated.
§ This is the a m o u n t claimed in. 6,561 cases, the amouuts claimed in the others (1,491) not being stated.




THIRD

211

AUDITOR.

]N'umber of letters written during the year in all the branches, 2,672.
Washington and Oregon Indian war claims 1855 and 1856.
Amouut
claimed.

No.
On hand J u n e 30, 1872
Received during the y e a r

842
129

. *$65,797 51
17, 658 10

Total
Disposed of '.-

971
146

73, 4.55 61
+3, 791 00

On hand J u n e 30, 1873

825

§69, 664 61

* This
tThis
J This
§This

is the
is the
is the
is the

amount
amouut
amouut
amount

claimed
claimed
claimed
claimed

in
in
in
in

405 case's, the amounts claimed in the others (437) not being stated.
49 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (80) not beiug stated.
29 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (117) not being stated.
425 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (400) not being stated.

Lost vessels, 4'G, Act March 3, 1849!
Number.
On hand J u u e 30, 1872
Received during the y e a r
• • Total
Disposed of

-'

Amount claimed.

693

593,676 70
37,183 00

68

On hand J u n e 30, 1873. . . . : .

$560, 873 07
32, 803 63

72
4

.•

A m o u n t allowed.

556, 493 70

$22, 636 00

HORSE-CLAIMS DIVISION,

This division is engaged in settling claims for compensation for the
loss of horses and equipage sustained by officers or enlisted men while
in the military service of the United States, and for the loss of horses,
mules, oxen, wagons, sleighs, and harness while in. said service by impressment or contract.
The number of clainus received and docketed during the year is 251,
in which the aggregate amount claimed is $60,501.63. The number
settled and finally disposed of during the same period (including those
received prior as well as during the year) is 413, in which the aggregate
amount claimed is $73,033.93, and on which the aggregate amount
allowed is $58,437.69.
There have been during the year 389 briefs made; 2,669 claims examined and suspended; 1,703 letters received and docketed, and 4,907
letters written.
The following table presents the condition of the business of this
division at the commencement aud close of the fiscal year, as well as its
progress through the year :
Number.
Claims on hand J u n e 30, 1872
«.
Claims received during the year
Claims reconsidered durinig the year

....

369
.
44




$930, 435 05
60, .50! 63
1 134 83
992, 071'51

$58, 437 69"
8,445 88
66, 883 57
6, 150 36
413

D e d u c t as finally disposed of during the year
Claims on hand J u n e 30, 1873

Amount,

5,417

....

..
,

Number.
5, 159
251
7

,
,

Total
Claims allowed during the yeai'
. • .. .
. .
. . . .
Rejected on same
..
.....1..............
A m o u n t claimed
.
Claims disallowed duriug the y e a r

Amount.

-

73, 033 93

*5,004

919,037 58

f

212

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The adjustment of this class of claims grows more difficult every year
as the lapse of time- between the accruing and settlement of them increases', and it necessarily requires more work and longer time to complete the evidence, and, therefore, the same number of clerks settle a
less number of claims each succeeding 5^ear.
I have again to invite your attention to the fact that quite a considerable number of very meritorious claims are on file in this division for
the allowance of which no statute provision is made. These claims are
as equitable as any of those specified in the act of March 3, 1849, and
it is recommended that the first section of that act be amended so as to
provide.payment for all losses of horses and equipage that are incident
to the service, as suggested in my report for the year 1870.
PENSION DIVISION.

The. duties of this diyision embrace the settlement of all accounts
which pertain to the jpay ment of Army pensioners throughout the United
States.
The name of each pensioner, his rank, rate, date of commencement,
increase, reduction, transfer, remarriage, death, and expiration, whether
* by limitation under existing laws or on account of the disability having
ceased, is recorded in a roll-book for each agency prepared for such purpose. An account is kept with each pension agent, charging him, under
the proper appropriation bond, and fiscal year, with all moneys advanced
for the payment of pensioners. Each agent pays the amount of pension
due on vouchers properly executed, with duplicate receipts attached,
signed by the person entitled thereto; and in the margin of the receipt
is the number and date of the check issued. At the end of each month
the agent forwards his account direct to this office, with abstract and
vouchers of payments made, and, upon receipt thereof, the account is
primarily examined, compared, acknowledged, and placed in the unsettled files for audit.
Bach voucher is afterward carefully examined, and the payment
made is entered on the roll-book opposite the pensioner's name.
The account, when audited, is reported to the Second Comptroller for
Ms revision, and approval, which, when completed, is returned to this
office. The agent is then duly notified of any and all errors, and the
account,placed in the settled files, where it permanently remains.
In case of any defalcation, this office prefjares the papers necessary
for suit, and transmits the same to the Second Comptroller, "who
directs the prosecution.''
Under act July 8,1870, pensioners are paid quarterly, instead of semiannually, as theretofore, which more than doubles thelabor'in the exami^ nation aud auditing of the accounts.
Act July 12, 1870, requires all accounts to be audited by fiscal j'iears,
and the balance unexpended to be covered into the Treasury. So tar as
ifc relates to these accounts I think it one of the best laws enacted.
Act February 14, 1871, granted pensions to the survivors of the war
of 1812 who served sixty days, and to the widows who married prior to
the treaty of peace. The number added to the roll under this act is
23,319.
Act June 8, 1872, amended the act June 6, 1866, which granted disabled soldiers fifteen, twenty, and twenty-five dollars per month, so
that now they are entitled to receive eighteen, twenty-four, and thirtyone and twenty-five hundredths dollars per month. The number receiving the above increase is 15,505.
Act March 3, 1873, to revise, amend, and consolidate the pension
laws, necessitates the change and increase of a great many pensioners.



THIRD

213

AUDITOR.

Number of pensioners on the rolls at present t
Revolutionary, half-pay, act 1848, &c
Invalid act July 14, 1862, &c
Widows aud others, not includiug children
War of 1812, act February 14, 1871...
Total

1,557
.99,804
112, 088
23,319

..:

„

.:

236.768

Pensioners who have received artificial limbs
1, 407
Pensioners who have received commutation in lieu, thereof
.9, 497
Amount appropriated to pay Army pensions for the fiscal yearending
June 30,1873
..,..
$30,000,000 00
Amount drawn from the Treasury to pay penfiions during the year
29,995, 445 69
Balance iu the Treasury
4,554 31
Amount paid to pensioners duriug the fiscal yea.r ending June 30, 1873,
as appears from the accounts rendered, and more fully from the tabular statement herewith
;
28,958,852 95
The unexpended balance will be refunded and covered into the Treasury
•
1,036,592 74

' The following tabular statement shows the amount of business disposed of during the fiscal year ending June 30,1873 :
Amount involved.

Number.
Accounts on hand J u n e 30, 1872
Accounts received during the y e a r .

645
711

Accounts reported during the y e a r .
Accouuts remaining unsettled

$21,319,8.56 47
28, 756, 702 92

795
561

50, 076, 559 39
33, 926, 5.56 19
16, 150, 003 20
50, 076, 5.59 39

The accounts on file unsettled, although many are already in hand,
are divided as follows, viz:
^
Accounts of 1872
Accounts of 1873
Total.

—

_
-

6
555
561

Pensioners recorded, increased, restored, and re-issued
38,076
Pensioners transferred
,.
3,963
Pension-vouchers examined
957,749
Payments entered
875, 012
Pages of abstract added
36,274
Pages of difference and miscellaneous copied
3,591
Copies of surgeon's certificates of examination furnished Gommissioner of Pensions in increase-cases
1,449

Seventy-two special settlements were made, (the number not being included in the tabular statement above,) mostly old accounts, finally
closed, some of which had remained unsettled many years.
The force in this division during the year numbered 47 clerks and 3
copyists.
..
It is my desire that the work of this division shall be brought up to
current work. The changes that constantly occur at the agencies, and
the errors made, should be discovered as soon as possible, so that steps
can be taken to have the accounts adjusted and closed at once.
By a constant, careful, and sometimes personal examination of the
accounts of agents who have been out of office some time, I have succeeded in collecting many thousands of dollars which were heretofore
considered as total lossThe followingtabular statement exhibits the amount paid at the-several agencies during the year ending June 30, 1873:



state.
Arkansas
Do
Connecticut
California
District of Columbia
Delaware
Indiana
Do
Do
Do
Ulinois
,
Do
Do...„
Do
Do
Do
Do
Iowa
Do
,
Do
Do
Kansas
f...
Kentucky
Do
Do
Louisiana
Maine
Do
:..
.
Do
,
Massachusetts
Maryland
Michigan
Do
o...
Do
Missouri
,
Do
Do
Minnesota
Mississippi
• N e w Hampshire
Do
New York
Do...
Do
Do
Do
New Jersey




Agency.
Little Rock
....do
Hartford
San Prancisco
Washington City .
Wilmington
Fort Wayne
Indianapolis
.-..do
,.,
Madison
Chicago
Quincy
Springfield
....do
....do
Salem
•
....do
Des Moines
....do
Fairfield
Marion '.
Topeka
Lexington
Louisville
....do
New Orleans
Augusta
Bangor
Portland... i
Boston
Baltimore
Detroit.'
....do
•G r a n d Rapids : . . .
Macon C i t y . ; . ' . . . .
Saint Louis
.--.do
Saint P a u l
Vicksburgh
Concord
Portsmouth
Alb'any
Canandaigua.'.
Brooklyn
New York C i t y . . .
.--.do
Treuton

Agent.
J a m e s Coates
A. D . T b o m a s
D.C.Rodman
H. C. Bennett
David C. C o x . . . . :
E.D.Porter
H i r a m Iddings
C. W . Brouse
W.H.H..Terrill...
Mark Tilton-.
Daniel Blakely
B. M. Prentiss
William J a y n e
S. H. J o n e s . . .
J. H. Moore
J a m e s S. M a r t i n . . .
W . E. McMackin . ,
S. Goodrell
B. F. Gue
D.B.Wilson
J. B. Y o u n g
Charles B . Lines . ,
A. H. Adams
W . D. Gallagher . .
R . M . Kelley
R . H . Isabelle
F . M. D r e w
S. B. Morison..
George L. Beal . . .
Charles A. Phelps .
Harrison Adreon . .
Arnold K i n c h e n . . .
Samuel Post
Thoraas Foote
William C. E b e r t .
J a m e s Lindsay
A. R. Easton
,
E. McMurtrie
J o h n T. R a n k i n . . .
Alvah Smith
,
D. J . V a u g h a n
S. H . H . P a r s o n s . . .
L. M. D r u r y
J o h n Hall
L. L . Doty
S. B.;Dutcher
,
J a m e s F . Rusiing.,

Artificial
limbs.
I 00
736 90
OOL 89
794 75
125 00
709 05
854 45
550 00
893 40
959 30
500.00
709 30
450 00
337 00
503 55
200 00
775 00
518 50
452 47
317 45
400 95
275 00
150 00
600 00
550 00
506 00
413 25
278 50
112 20
095 88
400 00
977 20
125 00
005 60
150 00
.551 71
162 .53
357 80
341 20
599 38
278 36
656 00
466 73
039-00
928 00

Invalids.
$17, 483 38
2,819 10
131,283 71
34, 989 84
257, 7.59 61
27, 483 83
187, 497 52
349, 305 79
106, 168 34
1.37,900 20
381,752.90
185, 232 49
4,427 31
169, 990 67
60,881 03
131,644 48
120,414 05
. 33,091 59
83, 779 98
137,333 61
144,315 49
135,019 60
66, 610 40
65, 909 03
68, 105 33
30, 599 03
158,998 72
138,417 05
175,164 43
527, 046 81
126, 647 93
290, LOO 01
102,274 76
97,770 Ll
131,878 28
132,471 84
35, 490 73
117,983 07
6, 3.59 10
176,798 71
41, 017-94
555, 777 29
558, 177 64
89, 863 68
114,766 18
307,551 9L
233, 061 76

A c t of Februa r y L4,137L.
•

Widows and
others.

$21, 289 09
3, 569 32
34,606 15
9,170 41
209, 493 56
3,134 39
20, 250 82
59,34L 02
15, 262 .37
28,246 51
34,744 88
. . 26, 885 18
],343 97
21, 807 08
7, 989 29
18,701 18
.
15, 626 07
6,131 13
12, 058 62
20, 195 87
17, 484 58
9, 448 20
61, 929 24
41,626 09
37, 432 27
40, 319 78
35, 834 34
14.538 35
38, 760 86
55, 567 87
55, 826 67
55, 838 32
17, 674 02
12, 446 07
46, 663 95
52,321 42
9. .540 77
9, 552 76
32, 409 03
32, 820 90
9, 568 93
165,149 91
146,423 .30
48, 748-.38
32,182 84
67, 127 2<r
52, 998 66 1

$74, 804 61
10,011 01
268,794 11
2L, 189 09
271,656 43
41. 897 79
244, 643 38
532, 975 3L
152, OLl 49
250, LOL 4835.1, 287 65
224, 740 99
9,922 12
216, 083 27
79,900 18
265, 233 85
243, IL2 55
50, 189 18
122, ^03 70
193, 353 15
208,118 21
122, 378 05
25U, 684 79
181,560 49
164,588 54
48, 129 07
220, 889 75
205,601 44
233,966 71.
-799,298 69
192, 384 44
408, 866 88
138, 490 38
123, L61 26
228,860 71
299, 729 3 L
64,419 80
148, 069 45
46, L37 58
221,388 97
70,751 16
77L, 487 19
669, 753 42
146, 155 20
167,625 8^
383, 675 69
303, 038 55

Total.
. $113, 627 08
16, 399 43
435, 420 87 .
66, 351 23
741,704 35
72,59101
453, LOO 77
943, 476 57
273, 992 20
4L7, 141 59
769,744 73
437, 358 66
15, 693 40
408, 590 32
149,220 50
415,916 5L
379,656 22
89,611 90
219,017 30.
351,401 13
370, .370 75
268. 163 30
379, 63 L 38
289,370 61
270,276 L4
119,647 88
417,272 8L
359, (J6ia 84
448,305 25
1,384, L9L 87
375, 97 L 24
7.55, 901 09
258, B39 16
234, 3.54 64
408, 527 94
485, 528 17
109, 601 30
276, 755 99
85, 068 24
•431,366 38
121,679 23
1,499,013 77
1, 377, 633 72
,285, 423 26
3L6, 64L 64
- 760, 393 84
• 590, 026 97

tn
H
^

o
w
H
o
t?1
H

w
H
•^

)—(

^
f>
^

Q
02

North Carolina. .
Nebraska
' N e w Mexico . . . .
Ohio
Do
Do
Oregon
Pennsylvania . . .
Do
Do
Rhode Island
Tennessee
Do
Do
Vermont
Do
Virginia
W e s t Virginia . . .
Wiscousiu
Do
Do
Washington. Ter.
Total .




Raleigh
Omaha
Santa F 6 . . . .
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbus
Oregon C i t y .
Philadelphia.
.-..do
Pittsburgh...
Providence...
Knoxville
Nashville./...
.-.do
Burlington;...
Montpelier"..,
Richmond
Wheeling
L a Crosse
Milwaukee...
Madison
Vancouver . . .

Ch.i.rles H. Belvin . .
S. S. Caldwell
E : W . Little
Charles E. Brown . . .
S e t h M . Barber
J o h u A. Non-is
Henry Warren
H . G . Sickel
D. R. B. Novin
J a m e s McGregor —
Charles R. B r a y t o n .
D. T. Boynton
William J. Stokes . . .
W.Y.Elliott
J. L. B a r s t o w
Stephen T h o m a s
Andrew W a s h b u r n .,
T. M. Harris
J o h n A. Kellogg
E d w a r d Ferguson . . ,
Thomas Reynolds . . .
S. W . Brown
,

183
50
300
919
549

85
00
80
70
82

11,060 82
494 85
300 00
80 40
184 02
695
106
100
757
505
363
535

40
70
00
23
16
28
00

.15, 392 52
30, 447 82
3,851 40
475, 768 89
317, 373 25
298, 991 85
5,162 30
952, 059 10
364, 980 85
47,622 10
91,377 71
26,011 62
5, 676 99
93, 034 34
JL4,-692 64
. 28, 463 19
154, 267 32
63,616 OL
176, 543 59
121,.357 76
3,898 11
10, 579, 954 62

• 45, 539 87
2, 814 66
144 00
87, 261 24
64, 250 27
76, 536 '68
3,753 31
98, 748 45
50, .244 71
61, 659 76
8, 184 48
62, 003 60
83,742 41
19,779 11
18,613 47
26,716 23
186, 029 34
75, 560 64
8, 479 14
15 370 86
16, 102 57
759 99
2, 782, 976 45

73, 283 71
19, 699 31
2, 953 73
667, 750 68
376, 202 82
454, 171 12
4,484 42
16,691 28
1, 287, 799 97
471,022 63
97, 328 66
301, 550 57
123, 651 02
31, 238 45
123,016 86
141, 683 69
52, 505 90
279,789 31
94, 674 62
260, 175 13
196, 872 79
1,195 92
15,521,865 55

1.34,216 10
5 3 150 64
.,
6,999 13
1,235 081 61
759, 746 04
831,249 47
13, 400 03
1, 078, 559 65
1,338,044 68
• 900,158 09
154,435 24
455,012 28
233, 589 07
56, 694 55
235, 360 07
284,199 26'
267, 098 43
511,.374 50
167,274 93
453, 452 86
3.34,868 12
5,854 02
26, 958, 852 95

O

IN::)

216

REPOirr

ON THE

FINANCES.

COLLEGTION DIVISION.

The following statement shows the work of this division during the
months named:
,
^

.

Special cases.

i

•
Month.

03
• ti

o

s

•

c
a
P3

•

1872.
.•

July
'Vugust .October

.

• ^330
470
„ 226

ua

li
a 0
3

1

p

Cl

o
o.
<3

o

>

1

]23
89
140
194
207
153

162
.. 162
100

672
627
328

294
291
137

80
226

554
1 792

200
444

102
194
65
52
78
124

31

164
256
146
188
141
131

263
335
117
379
250
307

3 666
6, 883
2, 148
7, 193
7.126
7,542

433
479
317
449
476
308

253
222
222
169
149
2L7

1, 306

1, 932

2 381

38, 53 L

3,828

1 847

.
76
80

December

1'

'bD

a

^

1873.
0auuary
March
A pril
May
June.

..
...
.

93

......

........

'Total

....

..
.

.

....

.

Number of cases reported for suit, 2.
BOUNTY-LAND AND PENSION. DIVISION, WAH OF 1 8 1 2 .

During the fiscal year ending 30th of June, 1873, 11,201 pension
claims, act of February 14, 1871, have been examined and returned to
theCommissioner of Pensions for his action.
Seven hundred and fifty-one bounty-land claims have been examined
and reported-to the Gommissioner of Pensions.
Four hundred and thirty-nine letters have been written on subjects
connected with the war of the Eevolution and the war of 1812,
The work of the division is up to date, so that the mails of the day
may be answered on the succeeding day.
^There are ten lady copyists assigned to this office, and this number
seems to be sufficient for the discharge of the duties required of them.
The number of pages of difierence-sheets copied was 4,585.; compared,
4,675. The number of pages of miscellaneous papers copied was 6,226 ;
compared, 9,813; letters copied, 4,062; compared, 6,879; total pages
copied, 14,873 ; compared, 21,367; names indexed, 27,514; money difference-sheets registered and copied, 698; property difierence-sheets
registered and copied, 349; engineer difierence-sheets registered and
copied, 44; miscellaneous papers copied, 1,039.
The number of settlements added to the files during the fiscal year is
10,226, viz: settlements certified by^ Second Comptroller—accounts of
disbursing quartermasters, 1,276 ; of commissaries, 1,238 ; of agents for
paying pensions, 183 ; of engineer officers, 57 ; of officers of Freedmen^s
Bureau, 13; miscellaneous claims, 2,661; and returnsof quartermasters'
property, 4,798; total, 10,226. The quantity of matter now on the.files
is enormous, being estimated at 125 tons in weight. Another room, containing 3,300 feet of shelving, has been assigned to this office, and it is
probable that this is all that will be required this year. The pension



THIRD AUDITOR.

.

217

accounts will, for the next ten years, probably require more room than
.all others. The larg<e file-room has been furnished with extinguisliers,
and great care is taken to guard agaiust fire. The tiles are in good condition, and, I am glad to say, the men incharge of them are careful and
attentive to the trust committed to them.
The act of Gongress approved June 23, 1870, to authorize the settlement of the accounts of officers of the Army and Navy for losses of
funds, vouchers, and property during the war of the rebellion, and extended for two years by the act of June 7, 1872, will expire by limitation June 23, 1874. It is believed that within the period covered by
the extension all the urgent cases requiring-relief under said acts will be
adjudicated.
Nearly one year remains during which said acts'will be available,
though it is impossible to say whether these acts will afibrd sufficient
time to enable all worthy claimants under them to take advantage of
the relief they afibrd.
It is suggested that a general law might with propriety be recom-.
mended for the favorable action of Gongress, giving the accounting
officers, ih conjunction with the proper military bureaus having administrative action on the accounts and returns, equity jurisdiction for a
limited amount, to enable them to close accounts without recourse to
Gongress for a special act of relief in each particular case. In this connection it may not be improper to ask attention to the report from this
office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1868, showing statement of
balances standing to the debit of officers arising ont of advances made
between May, 1792, and July 1, 1815, (Finance Eeport, 1868, pages
75-127 inclusive.) These balances are generally for small amounts,
and the accounts have stood open on the books since 1815—nearly sixty
years. As there does not appear to be au}^ probability that any portion
of the inoney thus charged vfill ever be recovered, I respectfully renew
the recommendation made in that report, and refer to it liow as an additional reason for granting the equity jurisdiction above suggested.
Claims for services rendered in the Quartermaster's Department, and
filed under the law known as the eightrhour law% act of May 18, 1872,
and the President's proclamation of May. 19,^ 1869, have been received.
Much difficulty has been experienced in fixing upon a proper basis on
which settlements can be made. It seemed necessary that all claims
accruing under the act should be received before action should be taken
on au}^ of them. This course appeared to be necessary for the reason
that owing to the fact that Army officers frequently changed their stations, and the name of a claimant was liable to appear on the rolls of
two *or more officers for the same service. In this way unintentional
errors were liable to be made. To avoid confusion and liability to errors of this sort, it was deemed best to have each chief quartermaster
forward the rolls of claimants for reduced pay, and also request them
to notify this office in cases where no just Claims under said act exist.
All the rolls have not yet reached this office, but as soon as they shall
be received, settlements will be made promptly, and little if any delay
is anticipated in their final adjustment.
During the year nearly all of the claims made by employes of the
Engineer Corps, under the actof May 18, 1872, known as the ^'Eighthour law," and numbering several thousand, have been adjusted, and
disbursing officers are now^ engaged in paying the men entitled to extra
coinpensation under that law. The number of claimants and the total
amount paid canuot yet be ascertained, owing to the fact that the approved rolls' are in x3ossession of the difierent disbursing officers and will
not be forwarded to this office until the men are paid.



218

.\

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The experience of each new year demonstrates more clearly the necessity of a limitation upon the time wTithin which claims may be presented
to the Executive Departments. Gongress has deemed it wise to make
a limitation in respect to claims presented to the Commissioners
of Claims and the Court of Claims; and there is, I believe, no State
in the Union which has not made such provision in respect to suits between individuals. The Government needs such protection much more
than an individual, for the latter generally has such personal knowledge
of his business as will put him upon his guard when fraud is attempted
against him, while the Government transacts its immense business
entirely through agents or officers, w^hose stations are often changed.
Frequently its agents or officers, .after quitting its service, are not disposed to neglect their private pursuits to bestow time and labor gratuitously in protecting the Government from imposition ; and often, when
they have the disposition, lapse.of time will so impair their recollections
that they can give no information of value. Every day-s experience
shows how difficult it frequently is to procure on behalf of the Government definite and reliable evidence in respect to ancient transactions on
which stale claims are founded.
Under such circumstauces it is comparatively easy for claimants, by
exparte evidence secured at their own leisure, and with no check of
cross-examination, to bolster up deniands which are either wholly unfounded or grossly exaggerated.
.
A proper limitation would seem to be three years from the time w^hen
the claim accrued, with one year after the i:)assage of the act in case of
claims which accrued mpre than two years previous to the passage of
the act. If it be thought that this is allowing but a short period for the
adjustment of such claims, it should be considered that the creditor of
the Government always knows where to find his debtor, and that the
debtor is alw^ays willing and able to pay just demands.
I invite your attention particularly to claims uuder the act of March
2, 1861, which provided for ]3ayment of expenses incurred in the Indian
hostilities in Oregon and Washington Territories in the years 1855-'56.
Seventeen years have passed since the close of the war, and during more
than twelve years the law has been in force authorizing the adjustment
ofthe claims. Very few claims are now being presented, and it seems
advisable that only a short period—say one year—should be longer allowed for presentation cf claims under this act.
I take great pleasure in bearing testimony to the'general faithfulness, industry, and fidelity displayed by the clerks employed in this'
office during the past year, and trust the day is not far distant when
the labors they have performed for the Government will be properly
appreciated by Congress, and a fair increase of the inadequate compensation allowed in soine cases wdll be granted.
. It is not creditable to the Government that faithful and useful clerks
in the Auditors' offices who perform identical duties of equal responsibility w^ith others, should be more meagerly paid than the clerks in
oifices which have been recently re-organized. It is true that the salaries of the fbrmer were long since fixed, and have not been changed,
but justice and fair dealing alike require that this inequality should be
promptly corrected, and I trust this matter Avill receive early attention.
Eespectfully submitted.
ALLAN EUTHEEFOED,
Auditor.
Hon.

W I L L I A M A.

EICHARDSON,

Secretary of the Treasury.



EEPORT

OF T H E FOU R T H A U D I T O R .







EIilPORT

HE FOURTH AUDITOR.OF THE TREASURY,

TREASURY- DEPARTMENT,

Fourth Auditor^s Office, August 29, 1873,
SIR : In accordance with your request of the 7th instant, that I should
forward to you the annual report of the operations of this office for the
'fiscal year ending June 30,1873, I have the honor to transmit the following tabular statements, in which is embraced the information desired,
I.—PAYMASTERS' DIVISION—GEORGE L. CLARK, CHIEF.
Statement of accounts, including Marine, received and settled in the Paymasters^ Division front.
July 1, 1872, to June 30, 1873, with the aniount of cash dishursed in those settled,_and the
numher of letters received and written in relation to the same.
P.VYMASl'EKS' i\ND MAKINE ACCOUNTS,

A.ccounts Accounts
received.
settled.

Date.

Letters
received.

Letters
written.

27
36
27
23
27
28

96
119
69
92
81
• 85

113
16L
115

51
25
28
43
36
19

38
31
40
33
32
39

383

381

Cash disbursements.

•

1872.
July
August . . .
October
November

.....

.
/.

...SL..

42
33
21
40
28
17

-

101
101

$732, 264
^ l , 241, 789
809, 642
346, 394
883, 316
1, 203, 244

52
25
90
36
48
22

126
97
72
102
137
73

178
118
82
156
135
1.34

],.575,956
1,866,836
2,075,044
1,481,611
4r8, 649
2, 156, 439

44
17
12
74
40
8»

1,149

1,491

1873.
Jauuijiry

..

...........

March
April
Mav
Total

14, 797, L89 49

Nuraber of unsettled accounts on h a n d J u l y 1, 1872, 9 ; n u m b e r of unsettled accouuts on hand J u n e 30
1873, 1 1 ; average nuraber of clerks employed in the division, 12.







JO t o ^

'IS. CO t o

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—
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C > JO c>; Ol /— CO
3
rfi. CO CO CO » 00
—

^

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J3550j*»I-' 00 tn —' oo ^

v—
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• • /— CO O CO c

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l " o V j o 00 to
^ ^ to Ol CO 00
H- CO fO O OT *.

_pt jc>. J-" _tn _to p T

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tn CO COrfi.F— CO
00 <} ^ 00 o tn

to >
-

CO to

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^ CO t n I— t o CO
I " Vl - ^ 0> O r-'

t o ^ t o t o t o Jx
05 o t *. .-3 C3> CO
fo n o^ o cn
to

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o 05OTCO o ^^
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(-" CO t n i-* ^ ^ ^o
Ol ..^ «D CD »N3 Oi
t o > - i-- >- c o c »

B b C =
D

C O n tt CJ C
D

indexed.

re-

Letters
vvriften
. b y record division.

Dead-letters
gistered.

Names indexed
and double indexed.

Letters

Letters referred
to other bu• reaus.

Letters filed.

L e t t e r s recorded.

Letters w r i t t e n ;
keyed out.

Letters received;
• k e y e d in.

o

1

o
o

a •

Ul

^

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^
^ §
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§

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—
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o?? 5 ^ §

' S ' o 5 < O' 2.CP5 C £ S L
& ' p ' p o'-®
c ? ^3
T

-- CJJ CO *» CO O I-

tntOOOCnOOCOtOOOhl^COcO C» >-' ^ - ' ^ - ' ' - ' C O C O t O — < !
<lCOCO^--?4i.OOltOCOOlfOCnCOOOI—'to<?cocoto
O 0 0 0 l C ; i O 0 5 < J C T 3 H i . O O 4 i > O < J to C 0 0 5 0 0 ^ r f i . O

co^tococotocooitncototOr

^co_to _w^v-'_io_v-'_copo_coj-'_toj-' .^-'_^o>JJJ
o c o C c o t n ^ j M to J i ' C r i t o o t n a o t o c x j i - ' ' - ' 0o ^
O
0 0 0 0 > * ' ' v l 0 0 — — C^'OiO^COOtOCOtnOOJOl C» hP.
r
o o c o c o o « * > - c o i - j o o o o o to j^OiOTJi'to aj--.i

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)-'i-'tOtOtO<}COCO<?
ooooJi-oo5CiCotoi-'CotooototOrfi.too5>tiC:;co6a

^^'^^^

cr; -.

Total disbursements.

Amount disbursed
to widows.

Amount disbursed
to inavlids.

Nuraber of N a v y
widow pensioners.

N u m b e r of N a v y
Invalid pension-,
ers.

H

^,

o
o
o
d

>

o

!^
CD
M

O

Co

1-3

tS 8.

If

• s^§

: CO
1-* ?i ?i
CCS ^

i2j

H

O

w

to

•W
I—*

o

o
o
o
b

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2 • w

I

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u

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LsS*
IN:;

FOURTH

223

AUDITOR.

-^ly.-PRIZE-MONEY AND MISCELLANEOUS DIVISION—BENJ. P. DAVIS, CHIEF.
Statement of the work xierformed hy the Frize-money and Miscellaneous Division during the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1873.
Prize-lists.

Letters.

to

Amount paid.

1

t
uri

2^-

Date.

Claims.

o
O 2
D

A m o u n t appropriated.

5l

It II

.§1
ol

if

. o

W O

Prize-money.

•S ^

.a
a
<D

59
24
205
26
33
20

30
2"8
172
21
35
22

$15,071
5, 849
142, 225
2, 674
6,679
5, 034

P
33
•13
79
12
88
18
13
36
13
99..
• 10
89

258 • 28
218
35
299
30
• 622
101
361
62
314
32

25
27
26
31
23
10

4, 544
173, 069
26, 347
6,130
3, 979
1, 557

50
76
39
30
33
81

1872.
1

2 $210, 644 69

1
1

1
1

1

1

.2, 371 67

4

July
August

5

438, 787 78

255
336
435
255
274
231

266
247
268
203
153
177

October
November
December
•1873.
Jauuary
March
April
May
Juiie

. . . .

247
248
233
539
328
261

198, 251 42
27, 500 00

^
'.
Total

3,170 • 3,858

655 . 450

17 •
15
21
15
23
20

393,165 33

190

179

In addition to the above this division is charged with the duties of
preparing tabular statements and reports called for by Congress and
the Secretary ofthe Treasury ; keeping a record of appointments, resignations, removals, and absences; receiving and distributing the stationery used by the office, and the payment of salaries to employes.
Average nnmber of clerks employed, 2.

v.—GENERAL CLAIM DIVISION—A. C. ADAMSON, CHIEF.

>

I

Date.

a
"cS

O
1872. .
On hand .Tune *'^n
July
August
.. . . . .
...
September , . . . . . . October
November
...
.
......
December
--

1

1

a

.2

S

I

o

o

a

5.2 a

• 1

92
112
127
153
200
187
227

103
128
149
165
177
137

164
95
223
-• 180
177
166

.

1.1

ri

ri

201
119
167
230
158
173

III

•s|f
!H

CO O

2

$20, 439 58
30, 431 67
17, 628 97
13.851 .52
15, 988 74
20, 907 29

502
462
463
511
435
574

3.5
24
15
15
26
" 23

11
2
2
1
]
1

567
280
729
565
654
'507

40
• • 10
14
16'
22
56

1
1
1
2
2

Namber of reports
on applicatious
for admission to
Naval Asylum.

Statement of the loorlc p)&^formed by the General Claim Division for the year ending June 30,
1873. .

1
1

187.3.
February
March
April
May
June

....

.;

:
--

-

Total .




2,103 • 1,907

.

19,221
5, 637
10.861
36,617
14,469
11,455

96
32
.56
86
23
82

217, 511 72

•

6,249

Average number of clerks employed, 6.

296

25

2
2
6

224

REPORT ON T H E

^

FINANCES.

VL—NAVY AGENTS' DIVISION—VVILLIAM F. STIDBLAM, CHIEF.

Statenient of the worh performed hy the Navij Agents' Division for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1873.

A m o u n t involved.

•^ ^
July
•
August
September
October
November
December

1872.
---

-

$363, 946
2,829,215
46, 638
234, 404
235,087
73,121

15
45
40
38
14
08

148
170
111
150
149
129

130
125
132
128
145
131

1, 084,137
723, 547
270, 692
2, 743, 645
271,658
499,751

.-.

15
09
29
79
65
60

122
117
138
177
172
146

153
97
141
178
365
140

1873.
.January . . . t
February
March
April...
May
June
Total

9, 375, 845 17

1,729

ALLOTMENT ACCOUNTS.

a^
S^

^V. '
fl s
^ a
S'-S

Date.

s^ "S§
~ o
< z <-'2 \\
J u l y , 1872
August, 1 8 7 2 . . .
September, 1872
October, 1872...
November, 1872
December, 1872.

• 24

Total . . . .

405

30
68
50
107
126

76
74
81
80
88

J a u u a r y , 1873.
F e b r u a r y , 1873
March, 1 8 7 3 . . .
April, 1873
May, 1873
,
1 J u n e , 1873

42
441 1
1

Total....

Statement of the amounts paid hy Navy agents for allotments during the year 1872.
NewYork....
Boston
PLiladelpliia
Washiugton
Portsmouth ...'
Baltimore
San Francisco
Total.

-.

$75,063
50,887
44,857
25,582
: . -• " 5, 632
10,851
7. 516

:..'....

00
00
50
00
00
00
50

220,389 00

Accounts remaining on hand June 30, 1873, 8 ; average number of clerks employed,
6^ ; number ot* vouchers examined, 24,090.




•

FOURTH AUDITOR.

225

VIL—BOOK-KEEPERS'. DIVISION—PARIS H. FOLSOM, CHIEF.
Statement ofthe worlc performed in the Booh-lceepers^ Division for the fiscal'year ending June
30, 1873.
rn

• ^

c

fH

CS

ii

si

S

^^

X3

Total

cc d
r3

>
1

sg ,
Si

.1

ac3

,0

a
^

^*

Q

^

1873.
January
February
March
April
May
J u n e J.

•r.'^

J3

a'
S3
1872. .
July
August
September
Octobei'
November
December

13 r s
<> 0
r
N 0

0

>
^

<i>

Date.

§

©

a
o

13

M

Xi

0

•

^q

S
,K]

^V
s£
>iS

<) 0

bD

a
1
^

>

1
a

1
d

d

M

w

0

.<

<

121
122
149
109
144
138
:...

$3, 096, 300
1,814,968
3 100 720
2 240' 590
2, 15.=), 920
2, 135, 858

97
01
87
33
21
44

13
14
• 9
14
23
9

$66, 478
69, 692
326 085
63 993
89! 377
66, 024

16
46.
22
62
64
08

164
138
134
135
124
129

218
173
261
148
173
177

46
94
113
6L
32
43

16

16

10
25
269
474

3
5

3

108
103
99
149
125
163

1,34.5,676
1,681, 187
2, .561, 747
3, 159, 001
1,997, 1.38
2,306,624

81
51
80
97
25
18

9
10
3
25
26
3

109, 748
232, 084
4.59,381
1,139, 620
.
576, 331
.568,915

25
34
79
50
50
38

148
113
1,36
166
130
150

220
184
1.91
196
183
179

77
55
92
261
55
100

129
58
41
103
36
22

• 99

3
3
1
4
6

99
3
3
1
4
6

27, 6.55, 735 35

178

3, 767, 732 94 1,667 2, 303 1,591

778

140

140

1, 530

Average number of clerks employed, 6i.

173

1

The system and order in the arrangement of files and papers which
prevail in the office, the modes of transacting bnsiness, the keeping of
the books, the promptitude with wliich claims and acconnts have been
settled, and the amount of work accomplished, may be mentioned with
satisfaction. 1 am pleased again to acknowledge the co-operation I have
receivedfrom Mr: Moore, my chiet clerk, aud from other able and faithful clerks.
. I have the honor to be, sir, with esteem and respect, very respectfully^,
your obedient servant,
«
STEPHEN eT. W. TABOE, .
'. AitdUor.
Hon. W I L L I A M A, RICHARDSON,

Secretary of Treasury.
15 P







REPORT

OF




THE

FIFTHAUDITOR.




EEPOET
OF

THE FIFTH AUDITOR OF-THE

TREASURY.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, F I F T H AUDITOR'S O F F I C E ,

Washington, November 15, 1873.
S I R : Herewith are submitted the tabular statements of the operations of this Office for the fiscal year ended June 30,1873. There have
been thirteen thousand and fifty-three (13,053) letters written, two hundred and thirty-one thousand two hundred and eighty-nine (231,289)
vouchers examined, and fifteen thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine
. (15,799) accounts adjusted, involving $829,742,602.42.
In view of anticipated reduction in the amount of work for the future,
no first-class vacancies have been filled, except by the transfer of temporary clerks to the permanent roll. The nine temporary clerks heretofore provided for this Office will be no longer required. The increased
number of accounts adjusted, with a reduced number of clerks, and the
increased amounts involved, show the efficienc}^ of the clerical force has
not been diminished.
Very respectfully,
J. H. ELA,
Auditor.
Hou.

W I L L I A M A.

EICHARDSON,

Secretary of the Treasury.

A.—Statement of the expenses of all missions abroad, for salaries, contingencies, and loss hy
exchange, from July 1, 1872, to June 30,1873, as shown hy accounts adjusted in thi s^
No.

Mission.

1
9.

J u l i u s White, minister
D. E . Clapp, charg6 d'affaires

Salary.

Contingen- Loss b y excies.
change.

Total.

ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.

,

$1, 875 00
1, 500 00

• $30 98
574 20

3,375 00

605 18

12, 000 00
1,800 00

1,135 25

13, 800 00

•

1,135 25

14,935 25

7, 500, CO

657 35

8,157 35

12,000 00'
1, 800 00

413 19

13,800 00

413 19

$3,980 18

AUSTRIA.

3
4

J o h n J a y , minister
J. F . Delaplaine, secretary of legation

....;.

BELGIUM.

5

J. R. Jones, minister

.
BRAZIL.

6
• 7

J. R. Partridge, minister
R. C. Shannon, secretary of legation




14,213 19

230

REPORT ON T H E
'

FINANCES.

L.^-Statement of the exxienses of all missions abroad, cfc.—Coutinued.
Missiou.

No.

Salary.

Contingencies.

Lo.ss b y exchange-

Total.

BOLIVIA.

R
q

^531 99

$4,100 27
3, 805 64

$307 79
65 02

7, 905 91

372 81

53 L 99

$8, 810 71

10, 000 00

346 70

895 47

11,242 17

12, 000 00
5, 000 00

500 00

2, .573 41
870 30

CHILI.

10
CHINA.

11
19

•

•

17, 000 00

500 00

.3, 443 71

20,943 71

7, 500 00

•258 73

107 06

7, 865 79

7, 500 00

279 64

186 91

7, 966 55

7,500 00

504 84

741 60

8, 746 44

COSTA R I C A .

13
DENMARK.

14
ECUADOR.

15

E. R. Wiug, minister
FRANCE.

16
H

17, 500
2, 625
2, 308
2, 000
1,500

18
'19

00 •
00
96
00
00

25, 933 96

4,055 38

4, 055 38

29, 989 34

.'..-

GERMAN E M P I R E .

20
21

17,500
2, 625
1, 4.38
2, 000
275

4,604 08

•• 7,500 00

1

4, 604 08

23, 838 89

29

00
00
75
00
14

247 35

440 18

6 31
253 66

28,696 63

GREECE.

93

7,940 18

GREAT BRITAIN.

94
95

R. C. Schenck, mini-ster

9fi

W . H . Cheesebrough, assistant secretary

8, 750
2, 625
1, 450
2, 000

00
00
40
00

16, 453 94
2, 680 63

14,825 40

19,134 ,57

3,790 11

683 20

7, 500 00

142 44

7, 500 00

192 60

7, 500 00

481 17

33, 959 97

GUATEMALA.

97

380 00

4 853 31

H A W A I I A N ISLANDS.

98

H. A. Peirce, m i n i s t e r . . !

j

7,642 44

IHAYTL

oq

E . D . Bassett, minister

•.

63 21

• 7, 755 81

HONDURAS.

30

H . D . Baxter, minister




,

7 981 17

FIFTH

231

AUDITOR.

A.—Statement of the expenses of all missions abroad, ^"C..—Continued.
Mission.

No.

Salary.

Contingencies.

Loss by exchange.

Total.

'

ITALY.

31
32

$6, 000 00
1, 800 00

$6, 281 89

9, 800 00

6, 281 89

12, 000 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00

966 77

1,034 90
204 59
204 86

17, 000 00

966 77

1,444 35

18, 311 12

3, 507 00

298 24

40 40

3,845 64

12, 000 00
1,800 00

1,286 82

13, 800 00

1,286 82

15, 086 82

7, 500 00

438 24

7, 938 24

11,250 00

122 46

6,758 24

G. W^ W^urts secretary of legation
^

236 02

$16,081 89

.JAPAN.

33 C. E. DeLong minister
34 . E DeLoner Tiprrv secretarv of legation
...
35 N E . R i c e internreter
'
......

..

LIBERIA.

36

M. J. T u r n e r minister

.

MEXICO. .

37

T. H. Nelson, minister

NETHERLANDS. .

39
PARAGUAY AND URUGUAY.

40

11, 682 96

310* 50

NICARAGUA.

41

C N Riotte minister

6, 994 26

^

RUSSIA.
40

3, 356 16
6, 495 92

880 87

10,7.32 95

7, 500 00

190 42

7, 690 42

12, 000 00
1, 800 00

^6, 596 65

306 32

13,800 00

6, 596 65

306 32

20, 702 97

7, 500 00

804 75

370 71

8, 675 46

7, 500 00

304 46

7, 500 00

4, 214 -79

1,875 00

84 10

2, 439 56

43

880 87

9, 852 08

J. L. Orr, late ministeJr

66 20

.. SALVADOR.

44
SPAIN.

45
46

D. E. Sickles, minister

SWEDEN.

47
SWITZERLAND.

48

7, 804 46

TURKEY.

49

11, 870 37

155 .58

VENEZUELA.

50

'

1,959 10

CENTRAL AMERICAN STATES.

51

2, 505 76

U N I T E D STATES OF COLOMBIA.

52




1,944 80

1,944 80

=

232

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

A.—Statement of the expeuses of all missions abroad, ^"C.—Continned.
Salary.

Mission.

No.

Contingencies.

Loss by exchange.

Total.

U N I T E D STATES D I S P A T C H A G E N T .

53

$2, 000 00

57. 579 99

$22, 032 50

$20, 032 50

32.5, 795 95

B. F . Stevens

$9,231 47

392,607 41

1,112 39

Total

• 355, 334 50

U N I T E D STATES BANKERS, LONDON.

54

Clews, Habicht & C o

REMARKS.
" 9. Inclusive of salary while receiving instructions and for transit.
17. Salary wbile actiug as charg6.
24. Private amanuensis aud cable dispatches includedin contingencies ; accounts for first and second quarter- of 187,3 not received.
31. Accounts for first aud second quarter of 1873 not received—$6, OOO-^for moving legation from Florence
to Rome, included in contingent expenses.
50. No accounts received for three quarters.
53. Amount of coutingeucies not included in total of the other accounts, as they already contain the same,

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries aud emoluments to ofiicers, and loss by exchange for the fiscal year ended Jane 30, 1873.
Cousulat.es, consular
agencies, &c.

Salary and
emoluments.

Fees.

Loss.

$2, 000 00

$1,132 27

1, 875 00

'"2,'i87'50'

Alexandria. .
Algiers
Alicante

4, 290 76
1, 500 00
175 27

437 07
52 50
175 27

Amoor River
A m o y . -•..•
...
Amsterdam
Nieuwediep .
Ancona
Antigua
.....
Antwerp....
Apia
Archangel.Aspinwall
Augsburg

2.50*00
3, 000 00
1, 000 00
135 23
68 26

10
2,584
1,182
135
68

2,500 qp
1, 000 00

2, 816 18
141 05

2, 760 83
13 L 25

3, 920 29
131 25

Remarks.

Acapulco
Aguas Calientes .
Aix-la-Chapelle..

491 50

Cologne .

A u x Cayes .
Bahia
Bangkok
B irbadoes
Barcelona
Tari-agona ,
Barmen
Crefeld
Dusseldorf..
Basle
Olten . . .•
Batavia
Bathurst
B a y of I s l a n d s . . .
Christchurch
Beirut
Belfast,
,
Baliymeua . . .
Belize
Bergen
.Berlin




$80 62
119 39

No returns.
Accounts for second quarter 1873 not received.
Inclusive°only of first quarter,-1873. .Returns
incomplete.
Inclusive of salary of consular clerk.
Inclusive ouly of third quarter 1872 and
. secoud quarter 1873. No returns for other _
quarters.
/
Noreturnsreceivedsince September 30,1872. •

30
14
71
23
26

No returns.

500 00
750 00

No returns.
Inclusive of transit salary.
Returns for first and second quarters 1873,
not received.
Reports from agencies not received;
Accounts for second quarter 1873 not received.

678 11
705 44

3, 000
1,587
1,500
301
2, 000

00
28
00
20
00

144
1, 587
288
301
6, 734

75
28
76
20
00

1, 902
1,142
2, 000
2, 010
1, 000
77
1,000
SO
2, 000
. 2, 164
329
'530
116
4, 006

59
00
00
68
00
18
00
41
00
84
00
18
50
40

3, 185
1, 142
. 3, 309
2,840
923
77
620
80
143
10, 713
329
530
116
9, 295

50
00
'50
00
29
18
94
41
02
73
00
18
50
50

713 81
No returns received from agencies.
'".57" 78'
""98'63'

Inclusive of additional compensation allowed when fees reach $3,000.

36-99

17 21
'113'79

Report from agency not received.
Return for second quarter 1873 notreceived.
Returns from agencies incomplete.
Inclusive of instructiou. salary.
No returus from agencies.

FIFTHAUDITOR.

'

233

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, cfc.—Continued.
Consulates, consular
agencies, &c.
Bilbao
Birmingham
Leicester
Kidderminster . . .
Redditch
Wolverhampton.
Bogota
Bombay....
Bordeaux
Pan
Bayonne
i.
Bradford

Salary and
emoluments.

Remarks.

N o returns.
$2, 500 00 $11,480 02
1,802 25
1,768 50
1,222 00
1,222 00
1, 009 50
1, 009 50
925 00
925 00
43 50
43 50
218 00
218 00
6, 561 44
2, 000 00
118 00
118 00
22 00
22 00
3, 015 47 14, 951 00

Bremen
Geestemunde.
Brindisi
Bristol
Gloucester . . .
Worcester
Brunswick
Brussels
Bucharest
Buenaventura
Buenos Ayres
Cadiz
Cairo

3, 000 00
2, 000 00
1, 500 00
1, 200 26
383 08

3, 400 50
2. 389 68
21 25
1,200 26
383 08

2, 424 50
3, 701 14

4,267 20
1,542 67
. 89 00-

Calcutta.

6, 845 75

5, 553 72

Callao
Camargo
Canea
Canton
Cape Haytien
Cape T o w n
• P o r t Elizabeth
Carditf
•.
Llanelly
,
Milford Haven
Newport
Swansea
Carlsruhe
• Mannheim
Kehl
Carrara
Carthagena, U n i t e d
Stat^js of C o l o m b i a . . .
Carthagena, Spain
Ceylon
.Chee-Foo
Chemnitz

3, 500 00
195 28
1,000 00
4, 000 00
1, 000 00
1, 000 00
542 36
2, 852 02
37 50
10 1 5
>
459 92
195 92
2, 259 75
759 50
322 50
590 00

Accounts for second quarter 1873 not received.

2, 424 50
4, 182 50

2,122 25
1,500 00
89 00

$29 18

3, 592 42
195 2 8
,

Do.

1, 353 37
624 94
485 17
542 36
2, 852 02
37 50
10 15
459 92
195 92
2, 259 75
- 759 50
322 50
590 00

500 00

R e t u r n for second quarter 1873 not' received.
Returns from agencies incomplete. Inclusive of transit salary.
100 00
414 63 N o reports received from the agencies.
Returns from agencies incomplete.

632 96
858 31
4,154 50

Accounts for first lind second quarters 1873
uot i-eceived.
Inclusive of first and second quarters 1873
only. T h e returns for third a n d fourth
quarters 1872 not received.

168 00
3,147 15
224 00
230 50

Clifton

2,000 00

5, 063 00

• St. Catharines..
Coaticook
Lineboro
,
Hereford
Potton
^ Stanstead
Georgeville
Cobija
Colonia

278 50
2, 000 00
1, 721 00
270 00
147 50
347 50
98 00

278 50
6,381 75
1,721 00
270 00
.147 50
347 50
98 00

Constantinople .
Copenhagen . . .
Coquimbo..'
Caldera
Cork
Waterford..

lyo.
11 58

400 84-

1,000 00
858 31
1,164 84

3, 000 00
• 224 00
230 50

Comayagua and Tegucigalpa
Amapala

No report from agency.
N o returns.

Chihuahua .
Chiu-Kiang
Christiania
Ciudad Bolivar .

75 51

131 76
R e t u r n s for first and second quarters 1873
not received.
Inclusive of additional compensation allowed w h e n fees reach $3,000.
Do.

11 42

11 42

No returns.
No returns from agency. Account second
q u a r t e r 1873 not received.

163 28

163 28

No returns.
Returns for third and fourth quarters 1872
not received.

3; 000 00
332 00

. 3 75
39
332 00
No returns.

Do.

2, 000 00
47 57




1,158 86
47 57

234.

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, c^-c.—Continued
Consulates, consular
agencies, «&c.

Salary and
emoluments.

Remarks.

Corunna
CunKjoa . . . .
Bonaire .
Cyprus...,-.

$75
2,249
104
500

88
47
76
00

Demerara . : . . .
Deuia
Dresden
Dublin
,
Dundee
Aberdeen .
Elsinore . . . : . . .

2,000 00

2,513 09

4,238 65
2, 257 62
2, 000 00
1, 030 75
375 00

5, 245 73
2, 257 62
7, 572 28
1,030 75
3 00

442 07

442 07

750 00'
98 7!
6 00
23 95
94 74
22 88
2, 252 50
3, 500 00
1,500 00
562 50

461 . 4
5
98 71
6 00
23 95
94 - 4
7
22 88
2,252 50
1,330 71
2, 382 50
562 50

317 00
3, 000 00
1, 500 00

No returns from agencies.

$75 86
2,249 47
104 76

317 00
3, 980 50
154 68
3 00

Falmouth
Scilly Islands
Fayal
Flores
Graciosa
St, Jorge
St. Michael
,
Terceira
Florence
Foo-Chow
F o r t Erie
•^ Port Rov/an
P o r t Stanley and St.
- Thomas
;
Frankfort-on-the-Main .,
Funchal
Gaboon
Galatza
Gaspe Basin
Geneva
Genoa
• Milan
Ghent
•..
Gibraltar
Glasgow
Goderich
Stratford
Gottenburg
Grand- Bassa
Guadeloupe
Guatemala
Guayaquil
,
Guaymas
Guerrero
Hakodadi
Halifax
•
Hamburg
Harburg
Lubec
'
Kiel
Cuxhaven
^^..,
Hamilton, Bermuda..*...
St. George's
Hamilton, Canada
.?aris
Hankow
Kiu-Kiang
Havana
San J u a n de los Re• medios
Havre
Dunkirk
Brest
Rouen
Dieppe . . . . . :
Cherbourg
Honfleur
Helsingfors

$32 50

No returns.

1, noo 00

18 60

Inclusive ouly of the third quarter 1872;
vice-consul in charge not a citizen of
UnitedStates.

No returns from agency.
Partial returus.

No returns.
No fees. .
1 . 4 90
,51
1,500 00
1,564 91
1,500 00
339 25
. 339 25
262 50
262 50
1,500 00
831 06
3, 000 00 11, 803 39
• 761 77
1, 408 33
2,012 50
2, 012 50
26 83
857 82
703 00
562 50
1, OUO 00
160 00
2, 500 00
2, 000 00
2, 000 00
1,844 25
55 78
41 50

26 83
857 82
703 00
415 90
833 26
160 00
436 06
3,803 01
9,998 35
1,844 25
55 78
41 50

2, 462 82
359 53
2,844 70
932 50
3, 000 00
721 24
8, 000 00
893 15
6, 000 00
283 82
225 00
201 97
85 63
20 00

893 15
5, 839 39
283 82
225 00
201 97
85 63
20 00

3 92
4 82

No returns.
R e t u r n for fourth quarter 1872 not received.No return from agency. •
Returus from agencies not received.
Accouut for fourth q u a r t e r 1872 iiot received.

2, 462 82
359 53
4,366 GO
932 50
1,348 56721 24
23,815 97

229 .22
•~~5 06
132 97

Returns from agencies not received.

No fees.

15 49

R e t u r n for fourth quarter 1872 notreceived.

Inclusive of salary of t w o consular clerks.
19 39

Inclusive oulj'- of third and fourth quarters
1872; the other quarters' returns no
received.
No returns.
Accounts foi>Becond q u a r t e r 1873 not r e ceived.

15 49

Hobart Town .
Hong-Kong . . .

2, 625 00

9,195 14

Jerusalem
Kanagawa
Kingston, J a m a i c a . .
Black River

1,500
3, 000
2, 000
103

44 00
5, 684 59
1, 927 77
103 45




Return for fir.qt quarter 1873 not received.
Accounts for first and second quarters 1873
not received.

00
00
00
45

153 57
305 22
7 83

FIFTH AUDITOR.

•

235

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, cfc.—Continued.
Consulates, consular
agencies, «fec.
Falmouth
Montego Bay
Port, Antonia
Grand Caymans .
Old Harbor
San-la-Mar
Kingston, Canada
Bell ville
Napanee
Pictou
Ganauoque
Laguayra
Laguna
Lambayeque .
Lanthala
L a Paz, Bolivia.
L a Paz, Mexico.
Sau J o s 6 . . .
La Rochelle....
Cognac
Limoges
Rochefort . .
L a Union
Leeds

Salary and
emoluments,
$86
145
83
35
11
48
1, 500
1,938
843
329
00
1,125

52
12
31
25
38
14
00
50
50
50
25
00

%i6
145
83
35
11
48
1, 227
1, 938
843
329
60
441

52
12
31
25
.3,^
14
00
50
5050
25
75

85 18
750 00
10
50
59
,50
50
50
84
00

677 . 0
1
61. 50
349 50
1, 689 00
1,383 50
107 50
508 84
1,162 49

1,000 00

3, 160 50

Hull .
Leghorn .
Leipsic...

246 16
1,500 00
3, 000 00

246 16
1,922 94
7. 777 75

Leith
Dunfermline .
cLiege
Lisbon
Liverpool
Saint Helens .
London
Ramsgate
Dover
Londonderry
Ludwigshafen
Lyons

3,137 49
1, 955 00
1,468-50
1, .500^ 00
9, 270 37
2, 043 38
7, 500 00
29 00
2 00
495 50
1,751 00
2, 221 32

3, . 0 63
52
1, 955 00
1, 468 50
540 93
34,210 57
3, 946 00
51,444 03
29 00
2 00
495 50
1,751 00
9, 730 53

2, 056. 30
1, 500 00
225 00
1,5U0 00
• 3, 000 00
1, 350 18
555 91
1,192 96
1,000 00
2, 933 99
1,201 21
35 35
2, 000 00
2, 002 50
2,500 00
-1, 600 00
1,500 00
-2,812 00
1, 276 93

3,143 00
1, 860 . 9
5
225 00
138 88
29, 206 52
1 3 5 18
,,0
555 91
1, 192 96
173 46
3, 802 33
1,201 21
35 35
826 00
2, 430 00
4,991 ^6
4,121 70
2,430 91
° 3,351 50
1,276 93

Huddersfield.

SaintEtienne...:..
Malaga
1
,
Almeria Malaga . . ,
Malta
Manchester
Manila
-.
Manzanillo, Mexico . . . '
Maracaibo
:..,
Maranham
Marseilles
Cette
Toulon
Matamoras
S a n t a Cruz Point.
Matanzas
Cardenas
Sagua la Grande .
Mayence
Mazatlan
Medellin
Melbourne
P o r t Adelaide
Merida
Progreso .
Messina
Catania . .
Syracuse,.
Gioja
Mexico
Mier
Minatitlan

677
61
1,656
1,616
1, 383
107
508
1, 000

$108 38

Accounts for second quarter 1873 not received.
No returns.
Return for second quarter 1873 uot'received.
Accounts for secoud quarter 1873 uot received.
Nd returns.
Inclusive of instruction and transit salaries.

06 Accounts for first and second quarters 1873
not received.
R e t u r n s f o r first and second quarters 1873
not received.
Do.
Inclusive of consular clerks' sa;lary and additional compensation when fees reach
$3,000.

Returns from agencies not I'eceived.
Inclusive of instruction and transit salaries
Returus imperfect.
Do.
Inclusive of consular clerk's salary from
April 1, 1873, to J u u e 30, 1873.
13 07
No fees received at the other agencies.
"7l'43
No returns from agencies.
5 20
9 15

Inclusive of instruction and transit salaries.

Accounts for expenses incomplete.
No returns.

4, 000 00
81 L5
110 50

2,414 77
81- 15
110 50

131 93
1,500 00
' 70 22
11 . 7
3

131 93
2, 556 01
. 70 22
11 . 7
3

1, 000 00
149 50
829 94

320 50
149 . 0
5
829 94




Inclusive only from April 14, 1873, to J u n e
30, 1873.
Do.

R e t u r n for fourth quarter 1872 not received.
No returns from agency.

236

REPORT OH T H E

FINANCES.

B.—Statement of consular fees, cons ula/ salaries and emoluments to officers, ^fc.—Continued.
Consulates, consular
''agencies, &c.
Monterey.
, Montevideo..'......
Montreal
Laciiine...'
. Hemmingford .
T h r e e Rivers . .
Sorel.........
Moscow
Mozambiqtie
Munich
Nagasaki
,
Nantes
L'Orient
Saint Nazaire
Naples
Castelamare •
Nassau
H a r b o r Island
Governor's H a r b o r .
•Green T u r t l e B a y .
San Salvador
Inagua
Newcastle-upon-Tyne .
Carlisle
Hartlepool
Sunderland
New-Chwang
Nice .'
Mentone.
Ningpo
Nuevo Laredo
Nuremberg
Bamberg
Oaxaca

Salary and
emoluments,
$34 00
1,911
4, 000
1,139
469
367
226
13

00
00
50
50
00
00
00

1, 500 00
3, 000 00
1, 500 00
77'50
98 96
1,500 00
288 50.
2, 000 00
287 17
294 90
49 79
84 20
40 66
1, .500 00
•' 795 00
587 92
582 27
160 68
1, 500 00
120 00
. 773 61
728 50
4, 007 97
1, 099 50
4.00

Fees.

Loss.

$34 00
884 44
5, 901 87
1,139 ,.50
469 50
367 00
226 00
13 00

$13 62

1, 277
731
•323
77
98
1, 458
288
1, 292
287
294
49
84
40
1,721
795
587
582
160
482
120
773
728
6, 452
1, 099
.4

- • Remarks.

R e t u r n s for fourth quarter 1872 and first
q u a r t e r 1873 not received ; no returns
from agencies.
Inclusive of instruction and transit salaries.

27 92
350 69
31 75

50
51
82
50
96
31
50
23
17
90
79
20
66
00
00
92
27
68
00
00
61
50
22
50
00

Returns for first and second quarters 1873
not received.
No.returns.

44 18

Returns for first and second quarters 1873not received.

Odessa
Taganrog
Rostoff
Omoa and Truxillo .
Oporto

2, 000 00
1.34 50
21 50

78 00
134 50
21 50

1,761 07

193 00

99 60

Osaka and Hiogo .
Ostend
Padang
Palermo
Marsala
Licati
Girgenti
Trapani
Panama
Para

3, 692 95

2,398 84

105 63

1,6U
51
52
98
147
3,500
896

26
05
21
24
40
00
73

1, 753 20
51 05
52-21
98 24
147 40
3, 105 59
1,810 56

Paramaribo
Paris;
Calais
,
Lille
:.,
Paso del Norte ..
Payta...
,
Pernambuco
Pictou
Piedras Niegras •

1, 774
8,000
213
88
585
500
2,000
375
277

03
00
00
00
15
00
00
00
00

1,774
52, 416
213
88
78
314
1,458
427
277

03
00
00
00
50
52
2L
78
00

980
17
171
99
4
22
54
2,051
1, 039
2, 000
1, 500
1,415
500

50
72
85
20
00
00
00
10
78
00
00
75
00

12
17
171
99
4
22
54
360
3
29
1, 468
1,41.5
, 96

00
72
85
20
00
00
00
58
50
50
00
75
55

Piraeus
Syra
0 Plymouth
Brixham
Dartmouth
Guernsey
Jersey
P o r t Louis, M a u r i t i u s .
P o r t Mahon
P o r t Said
P o r t Sarnia
London
^
P o r t Stanley
~




Returns incomplete.
Inclusive of iustruction and tran.><it salaries.
No fees received at the agencies.
Inclusive of transit salary.
No returns.
No returns.
Inclusive of instruction salary.

Accounts for second quarter 1873 not re*
ceived. Inclusive of instruction and >
transit salaries.
Inclusive of salary of three consular clerks.
Returus incomplete.
Do.
Inclusive of iustruction and transit salaries.
Returns from agencies incomplete.
Returns incomplete.
R e t u r n s for first and second quarters 1873
not received.

106 96
44 94
103 52

Inclusive of instruction salary.
Returus incomplete.
No returns received from agencies.
Accouuts for first and second quarters 1873
not received.

FIFTH AUDITOR.

237

B.—Statemeni of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, ^-c.—Continued.
Consulates, consular
agencies, &c.
Prague.

Salary a n d
emoluments.
$1,250 00

Loss.

Fees.

12, 083 00

Remarks.

Accouuts for expenses not received ; no
returns of fees for first and second"quarters 1873-.

Prescott
,
Ottawa
Brockville
..,
Morrisburg
...
Cornwall
...,
Prince Edward Island.
Georgetown
Cascumpec
Summerside
P u e r t o Cabello

1; 500
1,786
1, 343
756
492
1, 500
42
60
94
1,184

Quebec .

1, 500 00

Rheims
Riga
...;...
Rio Grande do S u l .

1, 695 00

1,695 00

'""833'33'

"""367'32'

9,046 13

6, 750 80

1 12

1,890
461
2, 000
1,979
2

21
40
00
50
00

375 50
461 40
1, 860 42
1, 979 50
2 00

'2282

122 45

122 45

RioHacha......
Bio de Janeiro.,
Rio Negro
,
Rome
,
Rosario
Rotterdam
Scheidam
Flushing
,
Sabanilla
San Andres
San Dimas
San Jos6
P o r t Limon
P i t n t a Arenas . .
S a n J u a n del Norte.
(San J u a n del Sur —
San Juan, P . R
Ponce
Mayaguez
(3-uayama
Arecibo
Fajardo
,
Aquadilla
,
Naguabo
San Luis Potosi

3, 035 00
2, 000 00
2, 000 00
1,464 62
1,401 73
497 90
372 03
225 28
64 85
196 92

San Salvador.,

1,313
2, 319
1,343
756
492
717
42
00
94
1,184

00
00
00
50
00
57
74
00
00
33

413
377
706
1,464
1,401.
497
372
225
04
196

7 00

43 29

Returns for third quarter 1872 not received.
Returns for fourth quarter 1872 and first
quarter 1873 not received.
'J No fees for third quarter 1872; no other
returns received.
R e t u r n s for first and second quarters 1873
not received.
Do.

42 50
191 58

1,500 00
589 81
44 00
8 12
562 50
2. qOO 00
'971 71
375 91
373 31
2 90
175 25
757 39
1, 500 00
5,127 70
4, 354 46
2,118 26
151 08
2, 500 00
144 80
2, 000 00
3,854 47
299 54
2.000 00
36 00
19 .50
56 00
1, 500 00

113 90
589 87
44 00
8 12
131 92
863 25
971 71
375 91
373 31
.
2 90
175 25
757 39
143 93
1^, 807 35
9, 462 75
•7,943 50
151 08
1, 201 22
144 86
1, 444 55
6, 404 75
299 54
489 50
36 00
19 .50
56 00
5 00

"i," 560" 66' ""ibi'es

No returns.
'
Accouuts .for secoud quarter 1873 n o t received.
No fees.
Inclusive of allowance, b y act of Congress
approved December 17, 1872, to Vice-'
Consul Cordeiro.
No returns.
Returns incomplete.
,

No returns.
Return for first quarter 1873 not received.
No returns.
'
Do.
Do.
Do.
Inclusive of instruction and transit salaries.

30
66
31
62
73
90
03
28
85
92

42 50




•$1 86

1,027 34

191 58

La Lihertad.
i3anta Cruz
S a n t a Martha
Santander
Gijon
Santiago, Cape Verde .
Santiago de Cuba
' Baracoa
Guantailamo
• Manzanillo
Santa Cruz
Santos
Seville
Seychelles.:
Shanghai
Sheffield
Nottingham
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Penang
Smyrna
Sonneberg.
Sonsonate
Southamp ton
Portsmouth
,..
Weymouth
Cowes
Spezia
St. Bartholomew
St. Catharine's

00
54
00
50
00
00
74
00
00
33

Returns from agency incomplete. .

47 84

R e t u r n for first quarter 1873 not received.
Do.
Accounts for second quarter 1873 n o t received.

67 68
Inclusive of salary of consular clerk.

162 51

R e t u r n for second quarter 1873 n o t received, y

'"6i"77'
Returns for third quarter 1872 n o t r e c e i v e d .

238

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES,,

-

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, t^-c—Continued.
Consulates, consular
. agencies, &c..
St,
St.
St.
St.

Christopher
Doming-o
Helena
John's, Cauiida
Stanbridge
Freligsburg
Suttou
St. John's,
Newfoundlaud
St. John, New Bruns
wick
.-:
St. Stephen's
St. Andrew's . . . . . .
St. George
St. M c A d a m .
,
St. Meriraichi
Frederickton
St. M a r c St. Martin
,
St. Eustatius
St. P a u h d e Loando
St. Pierre, Martinique.
Fort de France
St. Pierre, Miquelon . .
St. P e t e r s b u r g
St. T h o m a s . . '
Stettin
Konigsburg...
Danzig
Memel
Swinemunde .
Stockholm
Stuttgart
Swatow
Sydney
Newcastle
Tabasco
Tahiti...
Talcahuano
Tamatave
,
Tampico
Tuxpan
Tangier
Taranto
Teneriife
Las Palm as . .
Tien-TSin
Toronto
P o r t Hope
Coburg
Guelph
• Whitley
Trieste
Fiume
Trinidad de C u b a .
Cienfuegos . . .
Trinidad, (island).
Tripoli
Tumbez
Tunis
Tunstall
T u r k ' s Islands
Cockburn H a r b o r . .
Salt Cay
Valencia
Valparaiso
Venice
Vera Cruz
victoria .'.
Vienna
Brunn
Pesth
Windsor, Nova Scotia .
Windsor. Canada
Chatham
.'
Wallaceburg
...
•Winnepeg




Salary aud
emoluments.

Fees.

$59
1,5!J0
1,500
500
072
314
209

$59
554
728
2,841
1,072
314
209

56
00
00
00
50
00
50

Remarks.

No returns for first quarter 187;

No returus from agencies.

445 46
3, 706 93
1,172 72
347 92
384 82
297 53
65 60
388 00
444 .32
457 69
11 76
1,000 00
97 87

1,ono 00

5, 956 46
1, I7i> 72
347 92
384 82
297 53
65 60
388 00
444 .32
457 69
11 76

"3694

No returns for first aud second quarters
1873. .
No. returns.
Do.
Inclusive only of third and fourth quarters
1872. Other quarters not received.
Accounts for first aud second quarters 1873
not received.
Inclusive of instruction and transit salaries.-

20 43
470 67

No returus from agencies.
Inclusive of additional compensation allowed when fees reach $3,000.

97 87

4, O'OO 00
1,224 78
195 25
30 75
15 50
5 00
592 08
2, 000 00
3, 500 00
1,249 96
759 29
602 86
1,000 00
1,000 00
2, 000 00
1,919 83
141 53
3, 000 00

460
2,36^
304
195
30
15
5
592
3.012
667
1,249
759
129
653
366
32
578
141
20

50
59
44
25
75
50
00
08
75
50
96
29
56
10
66
86
6V
.53
00

288 54
128 25
3, 500 00
2, 000 00

288
128
776
4,210

54
25
13
00

2, 042 76
1,01.4 00
. 783 50
112 50
2. 000 00
19 48
2,671 70
2, 230 47
453 36
3, 000 00
500 00
3, 000 00
2, 000 00

2,237
1,014
783
112
1,416
19
579
2,596
• 453
1
145
17
7,610

00
00
5(1
50
37
48
23
71
36
00
13
00
02

70 13

Inclusive of instructiou aud transit salaries.
213 65

No fees.

2, 000 00
185 81
273 52
634 61
3,000 00
750 00
3, 500 00
2. 725 00
1,500 00
325 50
. 249 50
1,000 00
1,500 00
1, 024 50
879 00
1, 500 00

487 11
185 81
273 52
2 00
2, 483 40
425 34
1,712-67
2, 867 36
5, ,304 50
325 50"
249 50
573 76
2,617 25
1,024 50
879 00
534 10

Inclusive of additional compensation allowed when fees reach $3,000.

From May 8 to J u n e 30, 1873.
Inclusive of instruction salary.

,

191 52
9 68
Inclusive of additional compensation
lowed when fees reach $3,000.

12 40

Returns incomplete 1

'36'ii
Adjustment of salai-y not y e t effected..

al-

FIFTH

239

AUDITOR.

B.—Si itement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, cf-c—Continued.
Consulates, consular
agencies, &c.
Zacatecas .

Salary and
emoluments'

...

16 .50
30 00

16 .50
30 00

140 00

140 00

1,390 81
2, 000 00

St. Gall
Total......

Inclusive only of first and second quarters 1873 ; third and fourth of 1872 not
received.

$6 00

207 14
3,352 50

Patras

Remarks.

Loss.

$6 00.

Zante .
..
. .
Cephalonia . .

Zanzibar
Zurich

Fees.

2, 000 G
O

2,917 25

539,441 32

14% 594 89

$198 20

Rettirns for first and second quarters 1873
uot received.
<
R e t u r n for second quarter 1873, n o t ' received.
Inclusive of transit salary.
Inclusive of additional compensation allowed when fees reach $3,000.

9,1.56 24

RECAPITULATION.
T o t a l fees received
Salaries. &c., to officers..'
Loss by exchange

.$539,441 .32
9,156 24

.-

$746, 594 89
548, 597 56
197, 997 33,

Excess of fees over salaries and loss b y e x c h a n g e .

B 1.—Expenditures on account of sundry appropriations from July 1, 1872, to June 30,1873,
. as slwwn hy adjustments in this Office.
For interpreters to the consulates iu China, Japan, and Siam
$8,502 52 .
•For salaries of the marshals of the cousulcir courts in Japan, including
3,890 88
that at Nagasaki, and in China, Siam, and Turkey
For rent of prisons for American convicts in Japan, Cliina, Siam, and Turkey. 11,751,13
For expenses of the consulates in the Turkish dominions, viz : Interpreters,
guards, and other expenses ofthe consulates at Constantinople, Smyrna,
Candia, Alexandria, Jerusaleu), and Beirut
4, 261 50
C.—Statement showing the amount exxiended by ilie consular officers of the United States for
' the relief of American seamen, the money received hy said officers for extra wages, cfc, and
the loss by exchange incurred hy thein during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, as. shown
hy the accounts settled in this Office.
Consulate.

Acapulco
Amoy
Amsterdam
Antigua
,
Antwerp
Apia
' Aspinwall
A u x Cayes, H a y t i
Bangkok
Barbadoes
Barcelona
•
Batavia
B a y of Islands, New Zealand.
Belize, Honduras
Bermuda
Bombay
Bremen
Bristol
,
Buenos Ayres
Cadiz
Calcutta
Callao
."
Cardiff....
Constantinople
Cape T o w n
Comayagua
• Cork
Corunna
Demerara
I
Dundee, Scotland
Elsinore.
Fayal.
Falmouth, E n g l a n d .
F o r t Erie, Caufida..
Genoa




Loss b y exchange-

Expended.

$2,138 !
Ill ;

$22 85
33 37
126 00

225
111
.289
138
50L

777 18
165 00
143 20

47
•'309
12

$8 29
13 52

103 55

2, 825
888
21
367
50
403
110
784
620

85
4, 038
137
31
13
60
65
38
35
5.57
86
3, 326
304
.
62
7

175 45
614 42
283
71
551
153
. 573
121
655
3, 590
81

00
92
48
66
26
79
31
03
80

592 38
'16044
1,188 62

31 68

222 90
-17 42

240

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

C.—Statement showing the amount expended by the consular officer's, ^o.—Continued.
Consulato.

Gibraltar..,
Glasgow . .
Gu'ayaquil.
Guaymas..
Hakodadi ..
Halifax . . .
Hamburg..
• Havana . . .
Havre
,
Hong-Kong
Honolula
Kanagawa
Kingston, J a m a i c a .
Laguayra
Leghorn.
Leith, Scotlaud .
Liverpool
London
Londonderry . . .
Malaga
Madagascar
Manila .
Manchester...-......,
Manzanillo, Mexico.
Marseilles J
Matanzas
Matamoras
Mauritius.
Melbourne..
Montevideo.
Nagasaki
Nassau, Bahamas .
Nap
aplei
Newcastle, England.,
Ob-aca and Hiogo
Panama
Paramaribo
Paris
Payta .
Pernambuco, (steamship Erie burned at s e a ) .
Plymouth, England
Quebec.
Rio de Janeiro
Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil . . , . .
Santiago, Cape Verde Islands .
Santiago de C u b a
Seychelles
Saint Catharine's, Brazil
Saint Helena
Seville .
Singapore
Swatow
Shanghai
'
Sydney, Australia
Saint John, New B r u n s w i c k . .
Saint Pierre, Miquelon
...
Saint>Thomas, West I n d i e s . . .
Tahiti
Talcahuano
• Tampico ,
Teneriffe
Tien-Tsin, China
Toronto
'.
Trie-stH.
Trinidad de Cuba
Trinidad Island
Valparaiso
Vera Cruz
Victoria, Vancouver's Island ,
Zanzibar ;
...
-.
Total.
RECAPITULATION.
. A m o u n t expended b y consuls for relief of seamen
'.
t ^ m o u n t expended b y consuls for loss in exchange
,
Amount paid for the passage of destitute seamen, (see Schedule D ) .
Total a m o u n t o f expenditures
A m o u n t of extra wages, &c., received b y consuls
Excess of expenditures over receipts.




Expended.

$284 61
1, 219 34
42
76
26
362
638
819
729
108
305
16

50
35
70
75
20
06
75
00
29
74

LOBS b y e x -

Received.

$43
50
120
13
263

-cbange.

35
00
00
20
50

818 95
2, 025 60
110 75.
574 20
891 25
348 11
229 20

80 00
656 63
750 86 34, 428 70
1,280 50
,133 53
8 51
34 00
. 805 13
,
20 00
30 94
. 134 25
,
335 83
' 20 09
.125 00
75 00
386 15
278 75
97 00
78 00
1 2 00
-0
659 62
755 84
621 50
369 41
92 64
146 85
175 05
1,701 16
81 00
36 05
715 00
140 55

lio 00
,829 35
668 40
15 44
[ 040 48
,
i 170 18
,
240 02
8 50
531
733
209
525
72
139

39
45
50
00
56
26

742 55
66 50
50 82
486 26
35 .50
93 70
423 57
835 98
347 64
31 92
581 95
10 00
14 78
32 60
I U .54'
1 3 70
.8
199 13
43 50
12 00
59, 950 46

1,339 70
840 00
. 45 00
827 14
•110 00
143 25
92 17
20 00
577 38
33 34
1, 687 78
193 17
301 '72
1,449 62
174 75
150 00

'44566
128 93
40 00
36 . 3
5
386 64
03 80
120 00
64,312 13

;

$59, 950 46
1, 314 05
11, 019 9L

-

.
v

72, 284 42
64,.312 13
7, 972 29

241

FIFTH AUDITOE.

D.—Statement showing the numher of destitute American seamen sent to the United States from
the following consulates and the amount paid for their passage during the -fiscal year ended
June 30, 1873. " •
• ,
.

Consulate.

Acapulco
Antigua
- Aspinwall
.A u x Cayes
Barbadoes
,
Baracoa
B a y of Islands, New Z e a l a n d . .
Belize, Honduras
Bermuda
Bristol
Bombay....:
Buenos A y r e s
Cadiz
Callao
Calcutta
Cape T o w n
Cardiff
r.
,
Cow Bay, Nova Scotia
Fayal
Gibraltar
Guadeloupe
Halifax
Havana
,
Hong-Kong
:
Honolulu
Kanagawa
,
Kingston, Jamaica..-.
,
Liverpool
London
Malaga
Manila
Martinique
Matamoras
;
Matan zas
Messina
Melbourne
Montevideo
Nassau, B a h a m a s
North Sydney, Cape Breton Island
Padang

Amount.

15
9
162
11
16
3
6
5
*41
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
43
3
5
8
26
22
82
19
9
18
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
*86
*26
1

$1,50 00
90 00
1, 620 00
170 00
185 00
30 00
60 00
100 00
410 00
20 00
10 00
* 20 00
10 00
20 00
20 00
30 00
10 00
20 00
886 00
• 30 00
50 00
56 00
260 00
220 00
820 00
190 00
100 00
180 00
30,00
10 00
10 00
20 00
20 00
•10 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
1,108 00
340 00
10 00

* F r o m w r e c k e d vessels.

Consulate.

Panama
Payta
Pernambuco
P o r t au Prince
P o r t Hastings, Nova Scotia
P o r t Limon
Porto Rico
P o r t Louis, Mauritius
Progreso
Rio de J a n e i r o
Rio Grande do Sul
Sagua la Grande
Santiago, Cape Verde Islands
Santiago de Cuba
.;..:.
Singapore
SierraLeone
St. Croix, W e s t Indies
Santo Domingo
St. Helena
"..
San Jos6 del Cabo
St. Thomas, W e s t Indies
,
Seychelles
St. Christopher, W e s t Indies . . .
Tahiti
Talcahuano
Tampico
Teneriffe
Trinidad Island
,
Vera Cruz
Victoria,, Vancouver's Island
Wellington, New Zealand
Zanzibar
,
Picked up at sea and brought to
the United States
Relief afforded b y naval pay-,
masters to destitute .American
merchant seamen brought to
the United States
Total

,

44
1
t75
• 1

4
11
2
4
4
10
2
15
7
1
1
1
1

$440 00
10 00
750 00
10 00
40 00
110 00
20 00
40 00
40 00
100 00
30 00
150 00
70 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
60 00
170 00
• 90 00
390 00
20 00
20 00
20 00
30 00
10 00
310 00
40 00
90 00
45 50
10 00
20 00
160 00

27

329 41

983

11, 019 91

I Steamship Erie, burned a t sea.

D 1.—Statement showing the amount exxoende^l in bringing to the Uniied States American seamen charged with crime during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.

Consulate.

B a y of Islands, New Zealand
F a y a l , Azore Islands
Hong-Kong
St. Helena

$250
260
300
96

00
00
00
80

906 80

Total

IQ F




242 .

.

REPORT

ON T H E FINANCES.

,>

E.—Statement sho-wing the amount refunded to citizens, seamen, or their representatives,
directly from the United .States Treasury, the several, sums having been previously paid
• therein by consular ofiicers, during thefisoal year ended June 30, 1873.
n . Abraham, seamaii, estafce of
^
Charles Brown, citizen, estate of
John F. Bryant, seaman, wages refunded
John Church, citizen, estate of
Jacob Jonsen, seaman, estate of
John C. Mendell, citizen, estate of
Andrew Olsen, seaman, wages refunded
Total

$45
187
93
2,066
49
87
90

'

:.....

,

46
34
08
35
53
00,
12

2,618 88

F.—Department accounts received and settled for the fiscal year ended June 30, .1873..
STATE D E P A R T M E N T .

Publishing laws in pamphlet form,
"
Proof-reading and packing .. ..Copper-plate printing, books, maps, &c
Rescue of American citizens from shipwreck
'.
Expenses nnder the neutrality act
Stationery, furniture, &c
.--...
Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse and missions
- abroad
$25,318 44
The same settled, on Department of State approval
4,158 08
—.
_^
Contingent expenses of consuls
35,554 79
The same settle(?, on Department of State approval
59, 380 67
•
Salary and expenses of United States and British claim commission
Salary and expenses of United States and Spanish claim commission...
Salary and expenses of United States and Mexican claim commission . .
Salary and expenses of United States commissioners to Texas
Salary and expenses of United States commissioner to penitentiary congress at London
Salary and expenses of tribunal of arbitration
:
Salary and exxienses of northern boundary survey
Entertainment of Japanese embassy
Statistical congress at St. Petersburg

$84,516.96
2,944 96
2,278 66
4 328 65
5,332 73
5,449 14

29,476 52
94,935 46
55,954 98
11, 611 *02
25,205 28
7,939 32
6, 362
94,-607
30,030
25,750
300

57
80
77
00
00

487,-024 82
INTERIOR DEPARTMENT.
f

Expenses of taking ninth census
Expenses of taking eighth census
Miscella-neous and contingent expenses of Patent-Office
Publishing Patent-Office Official Gazette
:
Plates for Patent-Office Official Gazette
Expenses for copies of drawings in the Patent-Office
Expenses of packing and distributing congressional documents
Expenses of bnilding hall in Smithsonian Institution
•
Preservation of collections of Uuited States exploring expeditions
Maps to illustrate quarto volumes of ninth census
Photo-lithographing
Heating-apparatus, Library of Congress

$1,208, 849
49, 678
99,157
5, 425
27,712
66, 857
7,492
9,594
.11,112
21,271
26,375
1, 436

25
93
85
00
99
07
46
62
20
02
13
56

1,634,963 08
P O S T - O F F I C E DEPARTMENT^

Contingent expenses of Post-Office Department



,

$52, 996 64 '

G.- -Statement showing the expeiises of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, including the salaries, commissions, and allowances
ofthe assessors, their contingent exptenses, and the compensation of assistant assessors and store-heepers, from July 1, 1872, to June 30, 1873.
o

1

o

•

1

1

•

District.

t

• -a

5

. 1r

a
o

1

>
u

a

§

o

C O
S

ALABAMA.

--

Total

$6 00
6 00

3, 462 80

238 86

12 00

$118 45^

$6, 846 64
10, 515 04
1, 972 64

1,108 00

$9, 648 58
14, 337 26
6, 560 20

233 04

389 66

118 45

19, 334 -32

1, 378 00

30, 546 04

300 00

52 25

60 00
91 69
133 3 3 .

75 70

285 02

4 50

$103 94
82 69
52 23

$283 33
106 33

23 45

$900 00
. 1,593 96
968 84

142 00
175 69
15 35

9 00

$1, 480 00
1,680 55
2, 218 36
5,378 91

F i r s t districtt* . . .
Second district*
T h i r d district*
--

1, 759 72

$270 OQ

ARIZONA.

10 oo'

2, 218 40

720 00

3, 257 40

>

2, 582 92
1,614 33
4, 571 97

4, 657 86
4 216 35
7, 457 15

H
O

8,769 22

16, 331 36

ARKANSAS.
First districtt
T h i r d district*. .

1, 534 73
1,593 36
2, 335 16

375 00
764 51
374 99

30 21
121 46
18 25

Total

5, 463 25

1,514 50

169 92

•

22 75
31 00
53 75

T h i r d district*

Total

12
42
61
60
70

1, 4.37 50
- 1, 769 22
1, 264 00

137 54
39 00
48 07

9 00

12, 028 45

---

Fifth district*

M

•

CALIFORNIA.
First district

.

4, 636
149
2, 3.38
2, 532
2, 371

4, 441 32

8, 912 04

450 51

^ 2, 300 82

1, 261 29

72 80

225 90

19, 579 65

6, 715 00

99 99
96 00
15 00

330 00
389 23
265 31

94 50
7 50

4, 674 30
7, 339- 44
3, 829 50

840 00

9 00

215 49

2, 744 26

102 00

35, 422 89

7, 555 00

20 83

31 50

450 33.

37, 362
149
9,961
12 165
7,801

21
42
44
49
08

67,439 64

COLORADO.
Colorado

' -Including items belonging to previous fiscal years not before adjusted.




3, 012 25

7,149 82

t June quarter accounts not adjusted and included in this report for want of certificate.

to

G.—Statement showing the exx)enses of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, t^'G.-—Continued.
2
o

rs

1

ll

Dist.rict,
fl

S
o

•'3

o

S « o

II

o

o

>

fl

c
•

II

li
••m fl

o

.S 53

.

fl

w

• .

CONNECTICUT.

F i r s t district
Third district
F o u r t h district

$3, 420
1,782
766
1,515

.- -

Total

83
31
57
14

7, 484 85

87
29
00
42

2, 966 58

$99
36
1
35

1380
30
53

172 76

05
19
89
35

$201 25
88 61
• 150 00
66 67

$5 10
14 70.

$6, 371
4,374
1, 459
5, 640

17 50

144 48

506 53

19 80

17, 845 16

1 50

$796
1, 061
400
708

5 00

$36
60
17
30

$17 50

22
14
32
48

$6, 828 00 •

$17, 758 "45
7, 418 04
2,812 58
7,996 59

6, 828 00

35, 985 66

DAKOTA.

o

Dakota*!

2, 407 24

1, 750 82

- 4 , 1 6 4 56

DELAWARE.

2, 573 74

1,325 60

61 03

37 42

37 50

5, 013 66

9 048 95

1, 541 74

1, 532 42

61 90

9 00

373 00

4, 489 45

1,000 00

86 91

2,
2.
2,
2,

1,050
1, 258
1,432
1,595

D I S FRICT OF C0LU.A1BIA.
la*

l-H

.

FLORIDA.

Florida

151 62

9 00

442
266
133
281

• 7,127 55

300 00

Cl
10, 756 08

GEORGIA.

-

Total

410
254
407
475

65
24
51
89

9, 548 29

00
36
42 1
00

5, 335 78

78
67
127
. 65




31
67
35
90

30 40

361 04

1,124 23

24 00

300 00

20
19
20
09

19 .50
4 00

48
50
171
90

.3.37-68

23 50

00
89
75
40

• 14,926
12, 820
14, 080
13, 082

27
82
49
52

28 25

10, 847
8,919
9, 838
7, 533

21
47
26
99

1, 01-2 00

58 65

37, 138 93

1, 012 00

54, 940 10

• 4,231 52

2, 322 00

8, 936 30'

•

IDAHO.

Idaho*

w

8,007 51

2, 081 00

Delaware . . . . . . . .

F i r s t district*
Second district*
T h i r d district*
Fourtli district*

o

1, 875 00 1 '

1.32 00

51 78

Ul

,

—

ILLINOIS.

First dist.rict*.
Secoud district*
Third district*Fourth district* '.
Fifth district*
Sixth district*!
Seventh district*
'...
Eighth district*.........
,
Ninth district*
-Tenth district* . : . . . i
Eleventh district... ^ . . . . . i
Twelfth district*
Thirteenth district*!
Total

13,130 73
1, 838 53
4, 215 87
5, 639 33
16, 453 49
1, 840 67
2,09.3 38
8,.200 64
1,941 56
1, 384 .75
:i,248 63
2, 940.36'
1,314 53
62,242 47

3, 696 06
637 58
930 65
1,062 96
1,420 00
538 00
796 98
1, 309 99
.45 00
.265 39
250 00:
811.49
200 00
11,964 10

117 63
30 00

63 31
42 00

5 30

24 25
18 60

28 70
65 34
45 00
36 52
.32 35
60 21
29 50
29 44
• 23 05
34 40
9 42

25 42
25 81
59 94
87 03
20 03
.67 22
21,25
.55 69
28 41
581 28;

5,30

499 24

•

123
159
68
265
100
53

85
43
75
83•
00
33

.88 88
176 92

11 50

6 30

4 60

66 00
159 18 """44"65"
7 00
9 00
1,271 17

74 05

13, 675 24
2, 068 76
4, 343 66
3, .529 36
6, 903 89
5, 057- 54
4, 065 23
4, 790 80
1,652 21
.3, .300 81
1,9.32 67
3, 650 23
.3, 942 41

20, 575 00
2, 654 00
4, 048 00
•16. 040 00
2, 432 00
3,170 00
8, 346 00
992 00
304 00
"'i,'21* 2'60"
59, 783 00

58,912 81

51 257-97
4 757 52
12, 366 56
14 432 34
41, 153 63
10, 036 84
10,271 21
22, 794 67
4, 773 78
5, 528 53
3,541 60
8, 908 00
5 510 77
195, 333 42

INDIANA.

. First district*
Second^ district
Thirddistrict*
Fourth district*
Fifth district
Sixth dist.rict*
Seventh district...,
Eighth district*
Ninth district
Tenth district^...
•Eleventh, district

4,753 32
1,429 31
4, 700 i r
8, 560 17
1,331 05
.3. 809. 20
3, 423 81'
3,160-99
.1, 647 47
1,3.36.17
1,356 08

.Total.......

•

.

35, .507 .68

1, 036 25
,455 30
6,57 2 2
774 16
200 00.
655.25
.'500" 00
v885.76
28 00

1.00 60
75 86
5103
27 98
15 00
1 68,90
- 24 60
51 56
20:09
• 8 .008,00

•5, 1,91,94;

451 -62

12 00
•
4*50"
2 00
6 50

2 00
2 00

-29 00

57^.30
16 88
23 64
• 30 18
15 00
. 6 32
10'-50
1 25
5 40
1 98
.45 00.
213 45

141 97
88 71.
91 66
106 .33"
132 91

178 70
73-25
32 10
12 85

'"".-66-'67*
111 12
37 62
,53 00
. 88 87
918 86

296 90

4, 540 42
3, .527 70
2, 256 98
2, 946 34
1, 679 93
-2,190 11
'2,446.31
1,087.91
•2,812-19
1, 935 93
1, 483.46

5, 452 00
1,284 00
2, 238 00
10, 536 00
671 00
• 2, 620 50
• 3, 142 00

ms .00

.sqo 00"""S'24'GO*

26,907 "28

16, 272 50
6,951 01
10, 0.55 24
22, 994' 01
4, 046 89
9, 356 78
9,613 89
6, 286 59
5 452 77
3, 337 08
3, 005 41

27; .855 50'

-l-H

H
O

.5, 897 67
6, 693 63
10, 274 94
•3 672 4 5
.
. 3, 491 86
4, 482 01

4, .374 00

u

97,-,372 23

272 00'
1, 252 00
2,850-00

!>

d

34, 512 56

IOWA.

First district*
Second district*
Third district^
Fourth district
Fifth districtt
Sixth district*

,.....
,

Total

'..,

1, 759
2, 254
3, 795
1,326
1,458
1, 329

02
00
25
90
95
53;

11, 923- 65

611 15
406 94
761 , 7
5
.412 07
404 63
354 44

52 8042 44-:

4 .50
7 50

51
37
3
21

2 40
4 50

55
68
00
01

2, 950 80

•208 48

1,061 29

123 94

23
24
48
60

41
50
96
46

"""ig'oo' "'"•"" 81 "24"
37 90

97 78
70 77

14 95
8 85.

106 67
120 00
127 60

3, 062
2, 626
2, 765
1.724
1, 505

06
63
21
17
28

2, 549 19

, 238 57

522 82

23 80

14,232 54 1

179 71

332 00

130 95

6, 866 80

KANSAS.

Kansas . - .*.

1,709 82

* Including items.belpnging,to;previous,fiscal years not.before, adjusted.




517 00

10, 921- 51

t. June quarter accoimts not adjusted and included in this report for want of certificate.

Or

to

G.—Statement showing the expenses of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, ^•o.-—Continued,

c3

District.

fl
o

fl

s
o

... .*...

$1,828
2,471
2,030
3, 609
3,229
6,299
5, 753
1,681
3,058

.....

Thirrl diR+rift*
F o u r t h district*
Fifth dist.rict*
Sixth district*
Seventh district*

...

Ninth district* Total

3

il

fl %
.2 2

"li

c5
o

fl

li

3

S.I

o

o

o

KENTUCKY.
First district .

1
m

O

xn

Postage and express.

a

o

7..

or
58
04
06
15
51
17
64
11

29, 960 35

$727
884
798
1, 548
2,163
1, 591
2,042
709
663

42
37
63
74
85
93
31
86
84

11,130 95

$103
57
32
100
127
47
101
130
65

$15
36
.35
34
31
61
83
23
89

82
55
25
40
41
90
07
13
28

74
89
15
35
00
93
20
70
80

$138
132
128
177

.......

221
320
100
177

^28 10
69 80
594 65

33
66
35
75
i

43 70
1 90

15
00
50
39

204 08

1, 396 13

942 23

765 81

411 76

320 00
265 00
585 00

$4, 864
, 4,926
4,202
5, 905
8, 268
• 6,441
9, 270
5, 645
4, 362

84
59
77
70
85
93
30
46
40

$1, 768
10, 745
48
31, 023
19, 074
25, 844
59,-100
9, 504
2,004

00
00
00
00
50
00
00
00
00

$9, 474
19, .324
7, 869
42, 399
32, 894
40, 552
76,671
17, 795
10, 624

34
44
84
00
76
05
95
29
90

159,110 50

• 257, 606 57

10, 283 30

69 50

12, 047 97 .
7, 330 77
6, 489 54

30,771 5311,146 16
9, 693 09

69 50

25, 868 28

10,283 30

53, 883 84

5,110 10
2,081 00
2, 210 44

Total

3,189 15
. 1, 329 15
594 19

137 18
63 36
58 42

3 83
21 88
6 00

9,401 54

Tliird district

5,112 49

2.58 96

31 71

Fifth district

94
04
68
90
17

690
40
110
160

83
00
00
00

15
13
16
7
41

00
00
50
50
24

| 7 25

7
46
7
18
16

04
74
42
75
32

88
39
64
88

88
00
00
55

-

2, 046
2,598
1, 485
1,406
1,709

94
95
05
53
08

- 1,124 00

5, 439
4,125
2, 989
2, 983
2, 734

75
86
65
68
36-

1,000 83

93 24

7 25

96 27

280 43

9, 246 .55

1,124 00

18,273 30

4,497 77
352 70
4,340 39

1,061 54

110 00

21 75

7 37

622 22

10, 235 44

2, 927 00

2, 658 33

ioi 70

i 75

25 00

17, 485 40

4, 280 00

19, 483 09
3.52 70
28,892 57

MARYLAND.
F i r s t district
Thirddistrict




Cl

w

6,424 73

Total

•

Ul
1, 5,55
1,331
1,331
1,326
879

Thirfl distripl

^

HH

, ^—

51, 610 78

MAINE.
Pirt^t distrirt

H
O
i^
H

w

LOUISIANA..
F i r s t district*

O

7 32
9 00

1,486 38
2, 332 00

46 03
19 10

4, 902 43

276 83

1,611 22
1, 373 03
5. 288 93
3, 667 55
2, 838 16
3, 776 79
750 00
1, 333 21
1, 383 10
2, 998 37

540 00
320 00
2,744 67
1, 765 43
1,066 00
1, 242 26
1,061 29
1,066 67
637 58
1,063 00

31
50
302
119
96
83
46
67
81
57

25, 020 36L

11,506 90

937 69

7 25

1,326 91
1,562 56

350 00
698 20

9 00
35 08

2, 889 47

1, 048 20

3, 491 15
1,327 05
1,348 19
1, 394 29
951 91
1, 331 04

1, 519
475
534
5U6
304
439

.9,843 63

Total

475 00
707 56

13, 009 24

Fifth district*

23 50

44 34
39 81

42 45
5 05

4, 004 88
5,820 96

2, 312 00
4, 283 16

8,418 40
13,221 64

48 69

706 37

47 50

* 37, 546 68

13, 807 16

70, 368 40

17 42"
15 24
11 60
31 06'
12 41
58 78
11 45
-9.45
51 46
11 75

176
176
886
486
58
266
221
277
176
320

MASSACHUSETTS.

Third district
Fifth district
S5ixth district
Eighth district

•
•

Total

^.

92
92
10
54
33
21
15
47
92
84

14 75

3,548 98
2, 669 29
13, 589 27
9, 323 02
5,803 82
3, 472 93
3,'784 97
2, 958 15
5,461 27
5, 934 76

230 62

3, 047 40

18 00

56, 546 46

11 75

47 05
97 10

88 63
340 77

3, 629 37
5,661 16

5, 450 96
8, 406 62

44 08

11 75

144 15

429 40

9,290 53

U , 857 58

70
22
66
15
96
11

00
10
79
75
65
15

19 00

444
176
132
114
132
46

6,052
2, 026
3, 962
2, 969
2,791
4, 482

3,778 71

282 44

19 00

181, 91

1,047 31

2, 213" 74
2, 615 79
2, 215 06

1,321 65
1, 010 53
636 80

30 47
101 00
86 92

9 00
7 50

18 60
60 35
143 45

7,044 59 •

Eirst district

2, 968 99

218 39

16 50

222 40

71
23
40
52
99
89
75
00
80
40

7 25

3 25

6, 525 00
4,166 00
2, 316 00
4,254 00

2, 504 00
19,765 00

5, 926
4, 604
29,347
19,559
12,191
13,154
5, 875
5, 722
7,792
12, 904

25
71
97
12
71
86
6L
45
13
87

117, 079 68

MINNESOTA.

Total
MICHIGAN.

Tl-iirrl fli<trirtt

Total

00
00
80
32
51
08

2
27
18
87
46

25
72
13
24
57

15
68
87
83
00
06

1, 040 00

5 00

22, 284 59

1, 872 00

266 00
265 34
177 78

64 80

7, 759 12
5,'664 99
5, 917 02

64 80

19,341 13

d
b

11,609 59
9, 727 00
9, 249 33

709 12

w
>-

30, 585 92

45
92
70
58
66 "•"""s'oo'
00

. 832 00

12, 635 75
4,030 00
6, 073 07
5, 018 90
5, 200 97
6, 355 90

O'

39, 314 59

MISSISSIPPI.
FirKt district
Third district'

.

.'.

Total
MISSOURI.

3, 320 67
F i r s t districtt
5, 031 97
794 44
Second districtt
....,
,
1, 323 81
860 87
Thirddistrict*
-.
'
1. 500 54
'' Including items belonging to previous fiscal years not before adjusted.




10 007.50 001.56 90.
207 26
51-8 15
160 00
32 95
54 71
, 24 no
53 59
83 90
30 75
t June quarter accounts not adjusted and inciiid-jd in this

9, 245 00
27, 494 38
8, 979 84
1, 336 00
9, 233 50
4,806 18
1, 252 00
3, 208 96
7, 019 61
report for want of certificate.

INS

G.—Statement showing the expenses of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in ihe several collection-districts, ^-c.—Continued.

i_

fl*

District.

.2

0 .2

2

fl
o

PA

6

Q

.9 33

1

fl

1^

1 •
1

'CS

CO

o
"fl

1

Compensation of
.assistant assessors.
>

OC

!k

''3
o <v

fl

w

• ll
is

tl

MISSOURI—Continued.

3
o

F o u r t h district*
Fifth district*..
Sixth district*

$1, 903 65
1,981 97
3,831 81

$98 61.
1,115 33
1, 422 19

$53 24
82 82
138 64

$6 00
6 15

$6 49
237 55
•282 63

$84 75
218 73
385 00

$378 74
11 75

$3, 317 68
6, 975 88
7, 494 29

$13 .33
4,788 00

$5, 464 42
11,010 35
18, 360 46

Total . . .

15, 573 75

7,612 11

517 06

45 10

797 52

1, 687 38

932 64

34, 782 83

16, 634 33

78, 582 72

1,875 00

750 00

89 12

17 00

442 30

5, 204 39

145 00

8, 522 81

2,125 68

825-00

84 81

35 22

68 22

5, 610 35

1,402 32

10,151 60

1,774 51

862 00

30 00

27 00

179 17

2, 347 45

1,605 23
1,331 05
1,458 76

400 00
640 00
275 00

19 47
29 20
23 15

53 33
133 11
71 10

2, 724 06
1,727 73
1, 433 85

1,044 00

3 00

21 00
9 75
45 36

5, 867 09
3, 870 84
3, 310 22

4, 395 04

1,315 00

71 82 . .,

3 00

76 11

257 54

5, 885 64

1,044 00

13, 048 15

2, 907
2, 399
3, 536
2, 700
3, 450

1,360
1, 062
1,061
864
2,387

3 00

55
12
24
28

MONTANA. -

Montana* . . . . .

NEVADA.

Nevada*
NEW

Total . . ,
NEVV

First d i s t r i c t . .
Second district
Third district
F o u r t h district
Fifth district*
Total . . .

h-i

5, 220 13

a

HAMPSHIRE.

First district
Second district
T h i r d district.

^




H
O

w

NEBRASKA.

Nebraska*

o

JERSEY.

64
92
30
65
89

14,995.40

00
64
29
39
90

6, 736 22

97
76
118
' 38
95

12
38
05
25
77

24 00

425 57

27 00

70
73
00
71

121 14

283
176
176
178

33
89
89
57

. 40 45

815 68

40 45

»

89
72
82
88
89

1,164 00

19, 648
8, 772
14,821
11,546
16,024

46, 363 20

1,288 00

70, 812 66

14,876
5, 000
8, 748
7, 699
10, 036

124 00

98
25
08
19
16

Ul

-

N E W MEXICO.

2, 328 34

New^ Mexico*
NEW

394 99

5 50

38 25

189 83

4,651 63

7, 608 54

YORK.

F i r s t district*
Second district*.t^.
Third district*
Eighth district
Ninth-district*
T e n t h district*
E l e v e n t h district*
Twelfth district*.
T h i r t e e n t h district
F o u r t e e n t h district
Fifteenth district

1

Seventeenth district*
Eighteenth district*
Nineteenth district
T w e n t i e t h district.. . . .
Twenty-first district*
Twenty-second district
T w e n t y - t h i r d district* . . . . . . . ,
T w e n t y - f o u r t h district*
Twenty-fifth district .
.
T w e n ty- sixth district*
T w e n t y - s e v e n t h district* t
T w e n t y - e i g h t h district*
T w e n t y - n i n t h district
Thirtieth district
.

...

.

.
'.

..

...

3, 391
3, 538
3, 000
3, 338
3,232
3,312
1,573
2,294
1,331
3, 035
1,844
1,326
1,331
1,836
1,248
1,324
2,226
1, 775
3, 053
3, 653
1, 326
1,635
1, 508
2, 960
1,331
6, 086
3, 662

45
46
00
81
10
90
19
05
05
44
76
93
05
37
60
33
15
56
57
46
93'
99
25
66
02
78
69

66,180 55

Total

4, 426
5, 307
3, 675
2, 950
2, 6.1.7
1, 332
604
1,061
640
1.276
1, 326
230
150
480
300
466
940
1,061
1, .330
1, 062
636
135
776
885
465
2, 354
4, 863

94
69
00
80
19
42
01
29
00
00
63
9o
00
00
00
50
00
29
64
64
77
30
57
52
35
40
36

41, 357 29

225
195
175
246
77
88
83
29
30
110
75
20
25
64
50
30
82
68
68
39
35
48
46
69
30
189
285

33
00
77
25
75
77
86
10
60
24
72
21
88
64
05
90
71
62
49
12
26
38
31
64
00
79
52

11 25

2, 493 91

47 50

8 25

.^. -.
3 00

1 25
3 00
3 00
2 50
1 50
13 75

35 25
48 55
11 00
6 91
435 00
.. 12 06
32-21

884
1,404
1,500
1, 100
280
241,
137
154
137
442
281

62
16
00
00
00
67
50
94
50
30
33

88
148
141
90
177

73
84
56
uO
47

443
88
15
111
21
444
106
575

67
46
26
50
00
44
67
87

47, 299 50
21,669 03
19, 853 27
10, 172 41
14, 127 62
5, 289 56
5, 872 90
5, 994 09
2, .336 82
6, 183 79
5,318 03
I,464 03
1.638 58
3, 765 89
1,483 84
1,535 45
4,733 60
3, 669 27'
4,893 04
4, 16L 28
2, 550 88
3, 007 76
. 6, 350 80
5,891 00
3, 854 87
11,244 99
24, 596 17

8,270 00

86 29

228, 959 47

27, 490 00

00
00
10
66
32
50
44

44 00

8, 007
5, 055
6, 098
13, 607
8, 983
8, 990
7, Oil

281 07

1,014 02

44 00

57, 753 90

13, 005 84

96,911 44

2 60
35 10
14 85

1, 326 92
95 54
133 33

8 70

15,338 89
5,889 39
1,603 47

20,180 00
12, 286 00
5, 586 00

52,780 75
26,118 99
13, 667 88

9 00
38 30
19 76
26 19
11 22
9 00
27 28
12 00
102 CO
5 29
29 98
19 70
19 15
37 75
49 95
8 24
9 00
51 35
30 00
1,095 14

9,143 49

75
10
30
34
53
76

150
120
86
166
265
137
88

44 41
20 17
2L 71

135 00
990 00

932 00

216
1,724
1, 948
828

00
00
00
00.

1, 812 00
7, 275 00
3, 360 00

64 541 34
32 162 89
28,215 04
17,815 18
20,904 66
11 311 79
8.303 67
9, .553 64
4 509 68
11 086 '07
§,•866 23
3 245
1, 247
3,251
3, 460
8,261
6 799
11 543
10, 975
5 472
5 045
8,7.54
12 071
5,796
27 791
36, 797

46
99
33
43
93
03
39
66
25
18
38
50
91
93
74

376,853 64

NORTH CAROLINA-

First district*
Second district
T h i r d district * t
F o u r t h district''
Fifth district*
Sixth district
Seventh district*.

2,106
2, 000
1, 800
2,805
3, 449
2, 488
2, 245

'.
...'.
.

39
00
34
93
77
94
47

16, 896 84

Total

450
866
247
1, 475
2,711
1, 375
361

00
67
90
00
30
00
12

7, 486 99

52
42
45
53
77
136
5

37
41
59
40
34
42
00

412 53

„

12, 227 02
6,136 48
5, 387 18

3, 562 08
1,591 94
914 15

Including items belonging to previous fiscal years not before adjusted.




16 25

65
89
45
01
57
50

58
84
32
14
06
76
20

2, 065
4, 453
6, 472
15

00
00
00
84

10,841
8,112
8, 308
20,251
19.993
19,677
9, 727

99
06
70
14
36
12
07

<
:

OHIO.

F i r s t district
T h i r d district
F o u r t h district

16 25

143 24
75 84
28 90

t June quarter accounts not adjusted and included in this report for want of certificate.

^

H-i

f G.—Statement showing the exxienses of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in the sevei^al collection-districts, ^-c.-—Continued.

-to

o
•

O

SH

OJ

fl
-.2

1

-2

a

District.

X

.-^

fl
o

Ifl

o
Q

<n

1

" u
• 3

"o
fl

•If

02

II

p . cn

Ocao

SH

fl
02

PH

II

§-|.

>

O

-ii

•si
i|

'^ .
SH

CO

1
o

O 33

o

OHIO—Continued.
$1, 682
5, 414
3,471
1,456
4, 544
4,578
4, 863
3, 299
1, 489
1, 710
1, 332
1, 400
2, .391
3, 454
1, 351

Fifth dist.rict*
Sixth district*
Ninth district*
T e n t h district*
Twelfth dist.rict*
F o u r t e e n t h district * t
Fifteenth district
Sixteenth district*
Eighteenth district

04
39
35
34
98
63
97
28
79
03
62
06
92
53
50

$532 97
666 65
1, 324 05
742 90
1,196 01
2, 669
265
211
490
519
236
1, 833
22

64
66
00
00
33
80
34
00

$22
34
113
33
96
25
68
18
71
44
25
69
45
90
23

72
32
42
00
72
50
50
0091
40
96
21
48
96
60

66,192 11

16, 778 52

1,031 68

2,312 28

Total

48 00

4, 572 66
3, 630 68

119 63
126 34

1, .591
884
400
1, 123
1, 065
862
600
798
790
750

42
77
79
57
143
42
29
59
21
27

26
13
74
01
,37
49
52
21
55
36
73
27
37
70
06

$1,252 00
3, 704 00
•3,756 00

4 00
10 50
30 90

67 47

87 70

67, 023 52

66, 438- 00'

50 50

4,247 01

$55
66
132
88
88

00
45
64
88
61

155
53
111
75
88
44
132
692
88

55
15
11
00
87
78
67
32
73

23 80

453 08

3, 429'55

47 44

5 07

•63 .34

3, 790 .36
3, 600 85
86 46
2, 456 54
2, 265 04
1, 364 00
2,109 50
2,219 25
1,712 40
1,577 70
1,761 02
2,124 04
1, 425 55

$6 00
11 00

297 00

31 05
14 16

480 .00

$22 32
22 88
7 43
30
58
10
12
68
18
34
51
31
8
23

23
20
00
61
52
69
82
41
47
73
22

$6 50

8 io
28 10
12 50

$1, 870
1,288
3, 817
2,065
3, 475
4, 055
3,117
2,834
2,754
2,756
1,468
3,172
2, 429
• 7, 575
1,511

6,102
3, 248
1,2.52
2,^212

00
00
00
00

2, 948 00
1,516
836
1, 400
160

00
00
00
00

$5,443
11, 207
12, 622
.3, 643
15, 092
•^13,161
9,491
11,102
4, 761
7,771
3, 479
6,816
6,103
15, 055
3,180

31
82
63
23
38
83
34
89
54
58
60
46
71
58
11

o
7, 065 57.

PENNSYLVANIA.

Ninth district*
T e n t h district
E l e v e n t h district
Twelfth district
T h i r t e e n t h district
Fourteenth district.:




• H

221, 501 63

OREGON.

Fifth d i s t r i c t . . .

fed

O
H
O
izl

.•

:
,

93
37
00
08
93
17
00
00
00
00

00^
93
67
87
42
58
57
85
20
50

,16 20

6 25

31 00

20
16
P
7
8
20
40
48
49
5

00
49
76
85
03
76
66
89
88
00

• 442 31
176 82
198 94
177 -78
222 23
177 77
97 10
228 63
255 86
137 50

7 93
32 35
4
11
20
9
22

09
30
30
30
40

22, 520 22
24, 775 24
173 52
6, 903 82
6,978 26
2, 222 70
4, 498 88
6,591 90
4, 266 75
4, 120 40
3,927 77
5, 075 77
4, 851 24

2, 735 00
5, 582 50

3, 311 48
1,540 00
1,156 00
1. 860 00
2,504 00
1, 91.6 00

.3.3,785
38, 209
• 259
11,464
10, 431
4,281
11, 286
11, 794
8, 249
6, 485
8, 693
10,874
9,112

12
77
98
53
26
32
44
85
73
73
46
12
79

Ul

78
6
55
31
31
21
16
56
4
51

70
25
88
21
00
11
10
00
50
06

E i g h t e e n t h district* .

.... ..

T w e n t i e t h district
Twenty-first district

.

.

..

.

Twenty-fourth district

I

25, 576 39

1,179 37

1,265 93
318 46

3, 582 56

.".

1,326 93
707 90
240 00
348 88
185 00
361 60
1, 062 64
2, 732 84
831 34
710 44

2, 251 54
1,331 02

"

2, 327 61
1,867 82
1, 331 05
1,329 05
1, 649 40
1, 400 80
4,515 53
2,267 33
2, 468 27
1,628 59
47, 278 16

Sixteenth district*

19 00

12 00
5 00
15 69

7
1
7
41
1
36
42
Ol
275
57

04
25
54
43
95
25
OO15
00
23

176
88
66
88
106
94
82
800
13
117

92
50
67
89
35
26
00
00
78
33

803 37

4, 229 61

40 90
20 65

7 50
10 08

1, 584 39

61 55

17 58

323 84

20 00
39 32
59 33

6, 090 56

323 84

75 40
315 66

145, 955 76

57 -14

177 47

- 2, 081 00
2,211 53
1,798 03

Total

8, 094 93
4, 595 15
2,716 95
^3, 785 52
4, 890 05
3, 746 94
4, 500 93
7, 783 85
4, 322 20
4, 612 77

33 41
12 70
29 34

5,168
8, 896
652
2, 340

00
00
60
00

1,752
11,148
3,112
6, 896
9, 356

00
00
00
00
00

17,180 13
16,215 28
5, 082 79
7, 994 32
6, 863 75
7, 424 96
21, 429 34
16,813 17
14, 826 78
16, 608 82

69, 924 98.

295, 368 44

7, 576 61
2, 743 94

. 971 25

12 113 73
4, 601 62

177 47

10, 320 55

971 25

16, 715 35

39 06

88 46

51 35

213 33

4, 513 13
2, 985 57
3, 845 61

6,741 65
5, 236 42
6,291 49

118 65

90 41

301 79

11, 344 31

18, 269 56

1,134 30
460 00
796 51
530 75
1,595 00
746 .56
796 98
1, 593 96

30 73
9 00
34 53
54 38
49 16
14 45
21.82
103 66

42
206
159
128
360
53
85
533

50
18
40
35

1, 950 38
1, 662 91
3, 942 71
3, 525 86
8, 428 34
1, 943 49
3i 061 97
4,271 72

9, 952 00
10, 558 00
92 00

3 00

18
24
62
17
21
2
4
48

5, 008 26
5 118 19
6, 798 23
16,241 34
24, 251 26
3,964 36
- 5, 323 45
8,356 58

7, 654 06

817 73

3 00

198 68

320 43

28, 787 38

21,542 00-

75, 061 67

1,265
1, 062
1,100
1, 062

104
23
128
100

91
19
39
19

4 00

98
64
113
75

356 68

10 00

105 14

R H O D E ISLAND.
"

Total '

•

S O U T H CAROLINA.

F i r s t district*

.

...:

Third district
Total
TENNESSEE.

P^'irst district*"
Second district*
Third district
F o u r t h district t
Fifth district
Sixth district* |Seventh district
E i g h t h district

.
;...

.

14, 669 37

24
00
40
39
80
00
85
00

66
95
67
00
00
35
06
33

1,569 02

33
225
43
18

940 00

TEXAS.

1,588
2,211
2, 293
2, 218

F i r s t district*!
Third district
Total

:

91
53
96
40

8, 312 80

42
64
00
64

4,490 70

* Including items belonging to previous fiscal years not before adjusted,




H

w
>
d
o
t-H

1,831 95
1,815 33
1, 768 91
1,807 78
3,195 56
1,094 16
1,352 77
1, 802 .91 .

:

Total

)-H
.hrj

6 00

91
68
87
72

353 18

400
319
371
425

00
00
10
33

1,515 43 ^

68 75
68 75

9,866 03
6, 6.34 41
8, 222 97
9, 770 29
34,493 70

' 13 328
10 315
12, 305
13, 652

18
45
04
57

49, 601° 24

t June quarter accounts not adjusted and included in this report for want of certificate.

H
O

(a.^-Statement showing the exxienses of

the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, cfc.—Continued.
to

fl*
o

"

6

District.

1

oi

-

si

§1

1
.2

fl

o -o

m

s..
fl
OQ

P^

§1

•.a ci

>

o
fl

bOPi

"o ^

fl.2

22

"o

O Oi

o

UTAH.

Utahf

•...

-.

$20 00

$94 67

$450 00

$3, 598 34

18 00
40 10
41 82

13 50

28 50
65 91
70 84

132 58
65 46
184 50

567 29
890 68
1, 482 12

o 083 52
2, 574 00
3, 297 39

99 92

13 50

165 25

382 54

2, 940 09

7, 954 91

$1,250 00

$300 00

$9.49

1, 326 90
1,346 85
1, 384 61

10 25
165 00
120 00

4, 058 36

295 25

15, 722 5

VERMONT.
First district
Secoud district.
T h i r d district*

'

Total

.

• H
O
H
O

VIRGINIA.

F i r s t district
Second district*
Thirddistrict.
F o u r t h district*
Fifth district
Sixth district t
Seventli district*
Eighth district*

-...
".

Total

1,205 92
3, 981 82
3, 577 46
1,577 13
3, 590 60
1, 470 39
1, 458 39
1,393-76

135
1,421
1,722
733
1,593
1,326
793
320

00
21
95
23
96
61
65
00

21
143
275
45
67
66
55
33

09
93
53
70
79
58
51
39

12 50
3 00

4
178
39
175
65
136
15
118

37
56
21
81
22
35
00
77

64 00

16
07
66
54
75
90
03
09

$1,152 00
312 00

6, 899
16,886
12 654
10,947
13, 096
20 170
9 451
5,707

54
.59
31
51
27
15
68
08

o

95,813 13

Ul

00
12
75
10
22

$65 10
135 83
103 57

733 29

853 19

328 35

40 98

265 00

109 11

1, 824 17

20 85

3, 489 46
4, 629 00
3, 149 07

1,252 00

6, 783 21
7,920 97
5,531 07

11,267 53

1, 252 00

20, 235 25

•

220
120
93
133
222

5, 469
10, 009
6, 714
8,127
7,523
6, 992
3, 804
2, 586

18, 255 47

8, 046 61

709 52

2, 210 97

530 63

13 60

2,173 74
1,400 51
1,834 65

1,063 00
532 97
352 00

4 20
45 74
91 87

6 00

31 96
16 30
44 15

44 45
53 33

5, 408 90

1, 947 97

141 81

6 00

92 41

97 78

24 85

15 50

^

51,227 20

9, 980 00
3,192 00
1,008 00
15,644 00

WASHINGTON.

Washington

4, £94 46

WEST VIRGINIA.

First district*
Second disti'ict
Third district *
Total...:




„

„
•

20 85

'

• WISCONSIN.

F i r s t district
Second district
Third district
Sixth district

\. . .

Total

4, 786
1,375
1,775
1,326

04
85
54
93

9,264 36

2,214
886
690
318

47
10
00
39

4,108 96

153
84
65
57

93
58
09
42

361 02

4 00

79
118
104
133

82
91
41
18

4 00

436 32

8, 536 00
1,952 00

24,498 16

128 00
178 33
•

02
99
94
21

10. 488 00

6,640
6, 286
7,200
4,370

458 33

764 66

22, 868
10,704
9, 967
6, 384

61
43
98
46

49, 925 48

WYOMING.

Wyoming

2, 293 93

57 32

• 266 48

0

3, 079 82

462 09

RECAPITULATION.

Alabama
Arizoua
Arkansas
'..
California
Colorado
Counecticut
.
Dakota
Delaware
District of Columbia.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
,.—
Maine
Maryland
•.
Massachusetts ..Minnesota
Michigan
Missi.iSippi
Missour^i
'
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
.
New Jersey
N e w Mexico
New York

378 91
218 40
463 25
028 45
300 82
484 85
407 24
573 74
541 74
081 00
548 29
875 00
242 47
507 68
923 65
709 82
960^5
401 54
424 73
009 24
020 36
889 47
843 63
044 59
573 75
875 00
125 68
774 51
395 04
995 40
328 34
180 55

$3, 462 {
50
04
29
58

10
169
4.50
72
172

1,.325
1,532
1,000
5, 335
132
11,964
5, 191
2, 950
1, 061
11, 130
5,112
1,000
4, 902
11,506
1, 048
3,778
2, 968
7,612
750
825
862
1,315
6, 736
394
41,357

60
42
00
78
00
10
94
80
29
95
49
83
43
90
20
71
99
11
00
00
00
00
22
99
29

61
61
86
337
51
581
451
208
123
765
258
93
276
937
44
282
218
517
89
84
30
71
425
•5
.2, 493

* Including items belonging to previous fiscal y e a r s not before adjusted.




$12 00

1.514
8;912
1,261
2, 966

53
9
20
17
1

75
00
83
50
50

9 00
23 50
5 30
29 00
37 90

7
23
7
11
19
16
45

25
50
25
75
00
50
10

3 00
27 00
47 50

$233 049 00
75 70
215 49
31 50
144 48
5 00
37 42
9 00
1.51 62
361 04
24 00
499 24
213 45
238 57
179 71
411 76
31 71
96 27
48 69
230 62
144 15
181 91
222 40
797 52
17 00
35 22
27 00
76 11
121 14
38 25
1, 095 14

$389
300
285
2,744
450
506

66
00
02
26
33
53

37
373
300
1,124
300
1,271
918
522
332
1,396
585
280
706
3, 047
429
1,047
709
1,687
442
65
179
257
815
,
189
9; 143

50
00
00
23
00
17
86
82
00
13
00
43
37
40
40
31
12
38
30
22
17
54
68
83
49

$118 45
102 00

"ig'so'

58 65
74
296
23
.1.30
942
69

05
90
80
95
23
50

47 50
18 00
5 00
64 80
932 64

40 45
'86*29'

$19, 334
720
8. 769
35, 422
3,012
. 17, 845
1,750
5, 013
4, 489
7,127
37,138
4,231
58,912
26, 907
14, 232
6, 866
53,888
25, 868
9, 246
37, 546
56, 546
9. 290
22, 284
19,341
34, 782
5, 204
.5,610
2, 347
5, 885
46, 363
4,651
228, 959

32
00
22
89
25
16
82
66
45
55
93
52
81
28
54
80
84
28
55
68
46
"53
59
13
83
39
35
45
64
20
63
47

$1, 378 00
7, 555 00

'6,'828'66'

1,012
2, 322
59, 783
27, 855
4, 374
517
159,110
10, 283
1,124
13,807
19, 765

00
00
00
50
00
00
50
30
00
16
00

1,872 00
16, 634 33
145 00
1, 402 32
1, 044 00
1, 288 00
27, 490 00

^30, 546
3, 257
16, 331"
67, 439
7,149
35,985
4,164
9, 048
8,007
10, 756
54, 940
8, 936
195, 333
97,372
34,512
10,921
257, 606
51,610
' 18, 273
70, 368
117,079
13. 857
39,314
30, 585
78, 582
8,522
10,151
5, 220
13, 048
70. 812
7, 608
376,853

t J u n e quarter accounts not adjusted and included in this report for w a n t of certificate.

04
40
36
64
82
66
56
95
51
08
10
30
42
23
56
5L
57
78
30
40
68
58
59
92
72
81
60
13
15
66
54
64

d
>—(
H
O

bO
Ol
CO

G.—Statement showing the expenses of assessing the internal-i'evenue taxes in the sev&i-al collection-districts, ^c—Continued.

to

RECAPITULATION—Continued.

§•9

District.

o <« o
:
O

^
North Carolina
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania .
Rhode Island . .
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas.:
Utah
Vermont
Virginia . :
Washington . . .
W e s t Virginia .
Wisconsin
Wyoming . . . . .
Total . . .




$16, 896
66,192
2, 312
47,278
3, 582
6, 090
14,669
8, 312
" 1,250
4,058
18, 255
2,210
.5, 408
9, 264
2, 293

84
il
28
16
56
56
37
80
00
36
47
97
90
36
93

$7, 486 99
16, 778 52
48 00
25, 576 39
1,584 39
323 84
7, 654 06
4, 490 70
300 00
295 25
8, 046 61
530 63
1, 947 97
4,108 96

$412 53
1,031 68
63 34
1,179 .37
61 55
118 65
317 73
356 68
9 49
99 92
709.52
13 60
141 81
361 02
57 32

$16 25
67 47

587,204 16

229, 085 56

14, 608 91

687 99

105 14
3
10
20
13
15

00
00
00
50
50

6 00
4 00

$281
453
47
803
17
90
198
353
94
165
733
40
92
436

07
08
44
37
58
41
68
18
67
25
29
98
41
32

.$1, 014 02
3, 429 55
297 00
4, 229 61
177 47
301 79
1,569 02
1,515 43
450 .00
382 54
853 19
265 00
97 78
764 66
266 48
46, 453 I

$44 00
87 70
50-50
315 66
320 43
68 75
328 35
109 11
20 85

4, 376 36

$57, 753 90 $13,005 84
66,438 00
67, 023 52
4,247 01
69, 924 98
145,955 76
971 25
• 10, 320 55
11,344 31
28, 787 38
21, 542 00
34, 493 70
3, 598 34
2, 940 09
15, 644 GO
51, 227 20
1. 824 17
11, 267 53
1,252 00
10, 488 00
24, 498 16
462 09
1, 275, 336 93

564, 856 -18

$96,911 44
221, 501 63
7, 065 57
295, 368 44
16,715 35
18, 269 56
75,061 67
49, 601 24
5, 722 50
7, 954 91
95,813 13
4, 994 46
20, 235 25
49, 925 48
3, 079 82

o.
H
O

W

2, 732, 420 66

o

t.- Stat&ment showing

the expenses of collectingJ the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, including the commissions, salaries, and extra
allowances ofthe collectors; tKe office expenses ivhich are paid out of the commissions and extra allowances of the collectors ; and the assessments and collections from July 1, 1872,./o June 30, 1873. ^ ^
^,
Stationery
Compensa- and blanktion.
1 books.

District.

Postage.

j Total ex- Expenses of
E x p r e s s anc Advertis- pense of col- administering.
dep. money.
lecting.
ing ofiice.

Assessments.!,

Collections.

ALABAMA.

Total

. ....

:....-;..

$3 00
5 30

$94 50
68 25
106 75

$10,166 87
9,598 17
9, 310 92

$7,180 33
6, 348 50
6,881 25

$169, .586 42
81,232 66
100,136 70

§80, 568 92
35, GOl 09
186, 254 74

28, 251 72

280 35

266 09

8 30

269 50

29,075 96

20, 410 08

350,955 78

302 424 75

2 50

.53 99

117 50

5, 672 20

1,905 38

19, 635 16

14, 238 87

14 22
75 06
4 00

86 30
63 33
95 51

32 50
40 00

112 50

3, 993 07
5,199 44
5,145 81

1,404 50
2, 997 55
1, 893 92

63,156 43
90.494 59
54,614 81

25, 258 60
37, 483 07
31, 522 18

13, 814 90

. •.

$.59 40
112 69
94 00

3,860 05
5, 061 05
4, 893 80

..-.-..

$9,873 49 . $139 48
65 73
9, 348 50
75 14
9, 029 73

5,498 21

F i r s t districtt
...
Second district
T h i r d district*

93 28

245 14

40 00

145 00

14, 338 32

6, 295 97

208, 265 83

94. 263 85

163 46
253 00
265 9 0 .

38, 673
7, 423
10,341
11, 507

ARIZONA.

^

f ARKANSAS.
F i r s t district^^
Second d i s t r i c * t t - . - . T h i r d district*
...

.'

Total
CALIFORNIA.
F i r s t district*
T h i r d districtt
F o u r t h disirict
Fifth d i s t r i c t * . . . . - . . . . !

<
."..

....
.........

Total...............!.......,

37, 879
7,218
9,378
8, 323

34
45
83
02

62,799 64

149
62
• 224
55

97
68
94
03

492 62

_

248
98
351
173

80.
99
45 1
00

231
43
133
2, 690

67
73
43
94

24
85
65
89

23,144
5, 038
7,783
5, 965

87
98
57
36

2,451,223
345, 929
246,852
164, 413

35
78
26
61

1, 999, 273
112,908
174,218
89, 643

H
O

12
91
99
86

872 24

3, 099 77

682 36

67, 946 63

41, 932 78

3, 208, 419 00

2, 376, 044 88

99 30

19 60

131 00

8,486 15

5, 674 93

74, 069 02

76, 274 56

12 58
6 20

63 75
27 00

-8,
5,
2,
5,

4,444
3,143
700
1,591

COLORADO.
Colorado-

.........:

.;...... ^........:.

_'
.
CONNECTICUT.
F i r s t district ^ . . . . . . . . . .
....—.. =
Second district
Thirddistrict
........
........
F o u r t h district
Total




8,174 93
.
...:......

........
'.
'

. . . . . .

8, 244
. 5,501
2,279
. 4, 885

12
26
61
89

20, 910 88

.

61 32 '
64
. 3
12
46

23
00
66
33

126 22

. 223-00
59 98
55 00
84 41

, 422 39 1

,
-

19 44

18 50

38 22

109 25

607
597
347
054

6S
44
27
57

21, 606 96

70
91
00
75

9. 880 "36

617,347
210, 470
54,016
153,501

27
90
13
48

498. 758 67
194, 806 04
51 390 01
129,030-25

1, 034,335 78

873,984 97

IN:)

ox

H.—Statement showing the expenses of collecting4he iniei'nal-revmiue taxes in the several collection-districts, including ihe eommissions, salaries, and extra
allowances of the collectors ; the office expenses ivhich are paid out of the commissions and extra allowances of the collectors ; and the assessments and collections from July 1,1872,.to June 30,1873.
'^
.
,
District.

.

Stationery
Compensa- and blanktion.
books.

'
.

Postage.

Total ex- -Expenses of
Express and Advertispense of col administerdep. money.
ing.
ing office!
lecting.

Assessments.t

$94 50 $10,166 87
$7,180 33
68 25
9,598 17 1 6, 348 50
106 75 - 9, 310 92
6,88125

$169, 586 42
81, 232 66
100,136 70

$80, 568 92
35,^601 09
186,254-74

20, 410 08

350, 955 78

302, 424 75

5, 672 20 .

1, 905 38

19,635.16

14,2B8 87-

Collections.

•

ALABAMA.

-

—

•

-

.

.

.

.

-

Total.

- -

280 35

266 09

8 30

2 50

.53 99

3, 860 05
5,06105
4,893 80

—

$3 00
5 30

,14 22
75 06
4 00

86 30
63 33
95 51

40 00

112 50.

3„993 07
5,199 44
5,145 81

1, 404 50
2, 997 55
1, 893 92

63,156 43
90, 494 59
54,614 81

25,258 60
"37,483 07
31,-522 18

13,814 90

-

. $.59 40
112 69
94 00

5,498 21

-

$9, 873 49 - $139 48
65 73
9, 348 50
9, 029 73
75 14
28, 251 72

First districtt. . . .
Second district
Thirddistrict*

93 28

245 14

40 00

145 00

14, 338 32

6, 295 97

208, 265 83

94, 263 85

163 46
253 00
265 9 0 .

38, 673
7, 423
-10,341
11„507

269 50

29,075 96

ARIZONA.

Arizona .

117 50

[ARKANSAS.

First district^^
Second distric*tt Third district*

!

i

Total

32 50,

CALIFORNIA.

First district* . . . . . . .
Third districtt
F o u r t h disirict
Fifth district* . . . . - . . . - !

----

37, 879
7,218
9, 378
8,323

---

Total

34
45
83
02

149
62
• 224
55

97
68
94
03

248
98
351
173

80
99
.45
00 '

231
43
133
2; 690

67
73
43 1
94

24
85
6589

23,144
5, 038
7, 783
5, 965

87
98
57
36

2,451,223
345,929
246, 852
164,413

35
78
26
61

1, 999, 273'
112,908
174,218
89, 643

t—l

H
O

12
91
99
86

62, 799 64

492 62

872 24

3, 099 77

682 36

67, 946 63

41, 932 78

-3,208,419 00

2, .376, 044 88

8,174 93

61 32

99 30

19 60

' 131 00

8, 486 15

5, 674 93

74,069 02

76,274 56

12 58
6 20

63 75
27 00

'8, 607
5, 597
2, 347
5,054

4, 444
3,143
700
1,591

COLORADO.

Colorado
CONNECTICUT.

F i r s t district ^
Second district
Thirddistrict
F o u r t h district
Total




.
..

. . .

8,244
_ 5,501
2,279
4,885

12
26
61
89

20, 910 88

64
. 3
12
46

23
00
66
33

126 22

.

223 00
59 98
55-00
-84 41

- '.' 422,39 1

,
^

19 4 4 !
38 22

18 50
109 25

68
44 27
57

21, 606 96

70
91
00
75:

9,880 36^

617,347
210, 470
54,016
153, 501

27 •
90
13
48 •

1,034,335 78

498,758 67
194,806 04
51 390 01
129,030-25
873,984 97,

CTT

cn

Twelfth district...
Thirteenth district,

26 70

138 79
103 00

1 55

22 50
154 00

8,252 77
5, 812 84

95, 757 77 1,335 21

1,661 32

192 61

795 63

99, 742 54

79 75
232 50
166 35

8, 288 53
4, 997 32
8, 675 21
10, 740 88
2, 807 43
7.122 19
6,811 32
6,904 10.
5, 098 99
3, 649 74
4, 742 11

3, 316 67
1,576 21
4,630 23
5, 522 50
1,175 00
2,150 00
2, 120 12
1, 569 47
1, 537 45
1,811 55
2,193 23

69, 837 82

27, 602 43

8, 063 23
5, 555 84

Total

3, 862 40
1, 950 91
45,4.34 87

738, 765 45
89, 972 90

442,069 11
44,010 68

19,175, 492 14 16, 607, 333 48

INDIANA.

> First district
^

7, 935 70
4, 502 29
8, 302 40
10, 335 45
2, 625 90
6, 884 88
6,619 53
6, 750 93
4, 970 96
3, 504 66
4,563 93

•.

Total

98 08
91 53
86 79
91 68
30 03
23 52
19 23
1 85
8 80
37 59

175 00
171 00
111 82
287 16
115 25
135 94
75 56
45 00
49 48
24 00
139 53

66, 996 63

Second district—
Third district*
Fourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district*
Seventh district —
Eighth district*
Ninth district
Tenth district
Eleventh district*

489 10

1, 329 74

7 85
26 59
7 25

6 86
48 55

29
77
97
106
69
76
38

00
85
00
32
75
63
65

• 973 80

1,112,279 96
141, 537 85
864, 558 19
3,026,813 89
48,144 67
610,712 19
919, 629 62
436,384 64
156,180 91
76, 856 64
36,279 59

952, 941 78
97 651 70
581,046 62
2,438,180 15
36, 512 98
467, 826 35
570, 333 43
351 201 60
137, 350 55
66, 820 97
42, 443 58

7,429,378 15

5, 742,309 71
I—(

IOWA.

First districtt
Second district
Thirddistrict
Fourth district
Fifth district
Sixth districtt

00
77
55
33
50
53

10 34
28 66
3 45

55
105
56
217
24

469 24

1,238 68

58 57

458 43

5,178 10

99 25

187 50

6,256 13
2,902 62
4,933 26
7, 488 70
10;i07 13
11, 085 87
12, 346 90
5,815 84
6, 450 38

177 53
88 39

179 50
37 98
105 61
322 72
65 00
85 98
215 00
339 96
134- 06

3, 815 89
6,464 11
7, 568 96
3,161 13
4, 029 49
2, 555 70

Total

• 89 20

27, 595 28

".

78 78
54 99

114 01
86 59
45 67

62
189
.449
237
205
94

2 30
13.82

30
05
50
58
00

3, 95S 97
6, 777 99
8, 237 57
3,551 89
4, 526 90
2, 766 88

1,102 14
2, 182 76
2, 973 00
1,121 77
2, 029 49
1, 332 80

29, 820 20 - 10,741 96

188,120 63
323,164 06
459, 622 75
64,081 11
70,155 85
31,543 37
1,136,687 77

118,233 85
268,518 55
412,006 68
55, 371 18
55, 465 34
36, 001 57
945,597-17

O

KANSAS.

Kansast* . . ^

5, 464 85

2, 955 52

121, 531 96

104 789 67

KENTUCKY.

First district*
Second districtt
Third district*
Fourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district*
Seventh district
Eighth district.'
Ninth district*
Total




,

67, 386 83

73
86
226
99
79
52

48
92
04
29
29
23

' 883 17

1,485 81

.3 50
615 80
1 55
4 00
15 90
640 75

52 50
9
114
16
101
23
20

00
00
00
50
25
75

337 00

6, 669 16
3, 028 99
5, 038 87
8, 509 70
10,374 60
11,413 89
12,766 69
6, 274 24
6, 657 42 ^
70, 733 56

1, 447 94
1, 636 00
340 00
2, 565 18
5, 185 04
6, 207 79
4, 737 49
1,410 78
3, 264 94
26, 795 16

351, 467 04
193, 329 99
125, 562 59
97, 907 58
157, 703 16
118,655 87
484, 145 99
345, 055 47
2, 296, 527 14 1, 832,197 40
2,374,241 35
1,61.5,776 55
1,083,889 94
924,529 12
171, 937 . 2
3
139, 020 61
101 753 6Q
186, 498 48
7,231,973 OL

5, 368, 226 28

to
cn

to

H.—Statement showing tlie expenses of coltecting the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts,, ^c.—Continued.

Cr<

00

Compensa- Stationery
and blanktion.
books.

District.

Postage.

T o t a l exE x p r e s s and Advertis- pense of col- Expenses of
administerdep. money.
ing.
lecting.
ing office.

Assessments. |

Collections.

LOUISIANA.
First district
Second districtt
Third district!.

$15,897 61
6, 723 41
4, 972 95

:
-...;

.. . .

Total

.

$100 60
20 56
42 19

$20 00
23 23
19 35

$3 84
103 00

$22 50
5 00
10 00

$16,044 55
6, 875 20
5, 044 49

$11,398 17
3, 736 07
2, 722 95

$1, 525, 691 20
14, 944 74
14, 489 63

$1,261,368 61
26,145 44
30,146 50

27, 593 97

163 35

62 58

106 84

37 50

27, 964 24

17,857 19'

1,.555,125 57

1,317,660 55

598
838
396
214
681

161,636
33, 238
24,818
32, 990
24,071

124,363
27,868
19,110
25,864
17, 087

MAINE.
F i r s t district
Second district*
T h i r d district .
F o u r t h district
Fiftbdistrict

!

-.

4, 787
2, 428
2, 073
2,275
2, 012

-

01
98
25
88
62

14
50
13
• 24
35

08
78
72
50
56

76
. 98
94
46
60

2 24
7 39

00
50
20
72
88

15
37
26
38
16

00
00
48
83
25

4,894
2,622
2,207
2, 385
2,125

33
65
65
93
31

98
53
00
23
10

39
24
04
72
11

19
.53
03
49
25

O

6

•

Total..

13, 577 74

4

138 64

376 30

8, 448
10, 699
4, 407
6,467

118
118
45
24

205
79
48
120

9.63

133 56

14, 235 87

2, 728 84

8, 846
10, 951
4, 561
6, 712

3,792
7,165
1, 881
3, 424

-276, 754 50

214 293 49

MARYLAND.
First district* . . . . . . ^
Thirddistrict
F o u r t h district
Fiftbdistrict*
Total

.

55
87
42
81

30, 023 65

i.i

64
41
57
91

307 53

9 50

59
50
95
00

12 70
39 20

454 04

61 40

Total




. . . . . . .
.

>

25
52
14
50

225 41

53
30
78
42

31, 072 03

63
13
98
03

16,263 77

862, 901
1, 797, 829
161, 677
322, 623

51
75
05
07

3,145,031 38

752, 086
,1,570,063
95,173
252,160

03
45
95
39

2, 669, 483 82

•

MASSACHUSETTS.
First district
Second district . .
.
•.
T h i r d district
F o u r t h district
..
.
Fifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eighth district
Ninth district
T e n t h district

64
53
47
60

.

4, 693 26
3, 049 14
9, 821 78
8,817.97
6, 5d6' 63,
9,039 18
4,143 64
3,130 50
3, 420 07
7,479 69
60,101 86

96
395
76
98
23
19
50
33
67

32
74
46
11
65
42
24
26
33

860 53

74 18
91 64
• 62 46
93 00
69 00
96 00
51 70
44 86
183 00
131 75
897 59

18 92
4 02
2 78
.4 75
.

16 70
17 80
64 97

58
55
41
48
,12
28
30
• 23
36
26

H
W

!zj
O
W.
Ul

4,825 69
25
3, 292 34
24
25 . 10,340 15
9, 036 18
75
00
6, 689 76
25 • 9, 189 86
15
4,249 66
00
3,248 60
50
3, 689 53
25
7, 722 82

359 64

62,284 59-

2, 009
1, 955
5, 060
5, 030
2, 006
5,469
2. 0.54
1, 033
1,866
3, 008

00
01
23
99
63
16
44
06
44
82

29, 493 78

92, 399
59, 769
1, 456, 835
858, 626
358, 396
718,354
101,135
85, 034
97,901
420, 866

57
95
07
56
88
45
26
78
51
70

4, 249, 320 73

132,328
51,637
1, 488, 093
552,823
319, 630
646, 000
- 88,121
55.301
62. 214
377,065

98
65
26
85
49
60
30
01
98
10

3,773,217 22

MICHIGAN.

First districtt
Second districtt
Third district* t
Fourth district
Fifth district*t
Sixth district*

•

7, 670 56
2, 436 58
3, 636 73
4, 337 08
4, 130 12
6, .658 80

.'

Total

94 31
20 06
29 14
46 30
37 96
35 96

67
51
186
123
30
131

55 83

7, 831 94
2, 507 64
3, 852 43
4,573 11
4,198 74
6,896 90

3, 668 96
963 00
158 80
1,536 84
138 89
1, 846 36

1,736,543 86
19,084 24
84, 763 82
114,765 02
34, 654 44
219, 933 19

1,510,023 12
47, 084 56
74, 995 06
94,569 34
34,111 89
224, 336 50

2, 209, 744 57

1,985,120 47

07
00
56
00
66
36

5 58

61 15

14 95

28, 869 87

263 73

589 65

20 53

116 98

29, 860 76

8, 312 85

4,711 03
8,173 08

56 64
94 74

261 40
263 24

27 55

145 00
277 17

5,201 62
8, 808 23

2,211 03
3, 918 49

90, 671 65
170,119 78

66, 475 47
161,248 90

12, 884 11

151 38

524 64

27 55

422 T:-

6,129 52

260, 791 43

227, 724 37

3, 276 89
8, 693 52
9,053 77

50 03
61 28
128 42

44 97
170 93
275 92

31 85
7 60

36 75
15 00
286 50

1, 555 19
6,193 59
5, 236 73

41, 948 45
116,463 63
119,577 .32

43, 648 73

21, 024 18

239 73

491 82

39 45

338 25

12, 985 51

277, 989 40

L28, 794 29

MINNESOTA.

First district
Second district*
Total
D

14,009 85

MISSISSIPPI.
•

First district
Second district
Third district*

.

Total

3, 440 49
8, 940 73
9, 752 21
22,133 43

31,304 45

53, 84M1

w
>a
o
I—i

MISSOURI.

First district* t
Second district*t
Third district
Fourth district
Fifth district*

,

Sixth district

12, 097 50
306 87
6,724 07
48 08
4, 699 38 . 64 08
94 31
5, 585 53
110 92
5, 002 65
10, 507 09
162 01

,

786 27

6,941 16

Total

44, 616 22

13 60

26 00
143 11
162 80
145 18
475 73
308 40

5 00
49 09

1, 261 22

161 08

15 10
8 19
67 40
16 30

63
57
175
240
201

00
00
50
40
57

12, 435 37
7, 027 35
. 4, 998 36
6, 008 71
5,897 10
11,195 .37

9,911 04
4, 087 25
1,472 00
1, 080 16
2, 795 01
7, 602 05

737 47

47, 562 26

26, 947 51

71 50

7, 065 26

5, 599 00

3, 080, 240 72 2, 499, 577 61
71, 861 39
133, 441 75
119,562 51
180. 286 29
212, 400 45
352, 880 08
128, 197 46
197, 060 20
376, 207 02
700, 007 08
4,643,916 12

H
O

3, 407, 806 44

MONTANA.

Montana *1

39 00

79, 702 31

36,173 15

.. .
.
NEBRASKA.

Nebraska

...,

12,180 87

141 68

209 92

13 56

305 25

12, 851 28

9, 510 12

35 31

121 98

24 65

274 31

9, 771 25

7, 737 11

552,091 52

305, 273 35

NETADA.

Nevada




9, 315 00

84, 062 01

83,237 18

Cn
CO

to
at)

H.—Statement showing the expenses of collecting the internal-revenue taxes in the sevei^al collection-districts, ^c.—Continued.

o

Compensa
tion.

District.

NEW

F i r s t district
Second district
T h i r d district

Stationery
and blankbooks.

Postage.

Total ex- Expenses of
Express and Advertis- penses of col- administer
dep. money.
ing.
lecting.
iug office.

Assessments. J

Collections.

HAMPSHIRE.

$149 00
68 30
103 63

$7 99
3 76

$27 00
18 00
29 13

$5, 747 92
4,680 22
2, 270 71

$1,162 68
1, 385 70
413 60

$241,845 87
94,167 90
28, 324 09

$197, 440 96
105, 509 70
18, 349 48

Total

150 65 1

320 93

11 75

74 13

12,698 85

2, 961 98

364,337 86

321, 300 14

6
83
84
12
199

51
94
2.35
133
72

5 00
38 86

34 00^

2, 299
1,638
3,932
1, 930
7,615

$40 27
30 83 i
79 55

5, 005
5, 808
8, 500
6, 438
10,874

......... .

$5, 531 65
4,555 10
2, 054 64
12,141 39

1

NEW JERSEY.

F i r s t district*
Secoud district
Third di.strict*
F o u r t h district
Fiftbdistrict*

.

.

.

...
.

.

18
93 !
19
36
17

30
73
15
41
75

00
55
25
00
00

136 80

36 00
35 05
100 30

5,101
6, 0-26
8, 855
6, 755
11,246

48
07
59
62
22

81
49
81
97
72

160, 424
441,661
719,475
400,195
1,193,585

83
97
05
73
50

159, 219
273, 948
518,047
388, 786
1, 286, 048

76
36
90
32
74

;

36, 626 83

386 34

585 80

180 66

205 35

37, 984 98

17, 417 80

2, 915, 343 08

2.626,051 08

6, 253 43

Total

83 95

61 84

28 52

80 00

6, 507 74

3,969 12

38,153 87

O
H
O

42,821 45

W

N E W MEXICO.

N e w Mexico*
NEW YORK.
First district
'Second district *
Third district*
Eighth district
Ninth di.strict i
T e n t h district
E l e v e n t h district*
Twelfth district*
'
T h i r t e e n t h district
F o u r t e e n t h district*
Fifteenth district
Sixteenth district.
. . . .. .
Seventeenth district
Eighteenth district
Nineteenth district '.
T w e n t i e t h district
T w e n t y -first district *
.•
Twenty-second district
T w e n t y tbird district*




.

......

.
".
.
^
. ..

.....

.....

21, 482 43
16,396 15
13, 080 77
12,881 67
11,921 35
8.251 89
5,144 11
6, 222 36
'....
4, 8.55 84
8,190 61
5, 770 08
2, 406 72
2, 394 31
4,735 85
2,827 34
3, 137 71
6,215 73
4,671 35
1 7, 613 85

234
233
120
79
66
75
81
89
15
131
41
13
5
85

42
31
39
41
50
75
38
58
76
17
55
25
50
59
80
25 47

'""ri'hV
25 25

151
128
10
59
60
155
127
164
56
85
102
101
101
228
76
122
70
281
77

50
70
00
91
00
50
60
90
00
50
70
14
00
10
94
18
00
77
00

.

27 52

87 30

63 20

57 60
58 80

3
5
11
19
3
2
18
13
10
30

94
30
61
50
42
29
18
26
23
30
29
29
18
17

62
36
74
90
67
05
00
50
40
66

5 80
12 27
1

88
15
19
50
00
00
50
25
50
25
75
50
75
00

21, 983
16, 7.58
13, 331
13, 079
12, 047
8, 581
5, 388
6, 549
4,998
8, 452
5, 945
2, 5.57
2, 540
.5, 083
2, 965
3,315
6,321
5,031
7, 733

17
16
96
82
85
64
60
77
00
95
.38
61
56
44
99
11
03
75
10

16,985 53
11,126 94
8,541 08 '
8, 225 47
7,505 14
4,357 66
2,0,37 91
2, 207 21
644 46
3, 807 55
2,141 67
605 96
1, 495 20
1, 805 36
1,478 57
600 00
1,416 66
1. 7.30 91
3,185 75

4. 420, 670 81
2, 440, 500 92
2, 071, 014 90
866,610 78
1, 025, 853 00
691,961 42
250,910 56
262, 368 30
135,410 41
696. .339 70
229, 782 48
34,299 78
40;171 42
142,964 07
58,106 23
70, 648 46
334, 610 55
115,0.34 29
411,934 98

4, 065, 010
2, 445, 279
1,961,195
802,156
1, 008, 092
534,691
147, 964
260, 290
132, 978
1, 242, 673
226, 780
30, 224
29, 810
119,447
44, 244
54, 590
294, 675
.103,207
412,925

61
48
36
96
39
70
11
25
36
17
20
20
35
73
36
22
66
28
26

Q
Ul

T w e n t y fourth district..
Tweuty-fitth district
Twent3'-Kixth d i s t r i c t . . .
T w e u t y - s e v e n t h di.-^.trict
Twenty-eighth district*.
T w e n t y - n i n t h district*..
Thirtieth district*
Thirty-second district*..

.351 58
783 73
264 73
552 67
966 63
616 52
956 23
329 83-

Total

214,022 04
NORTH

First district
Second district
Third district * t
F o u r t h district*
Fifth district
Sixth district
S e v e n t h district*

„ '.

Total

42 17
9 94
39 25
31 05
52 96
12 17
217 90
184 21

• 361 66
89 02
56 69
246 75
17 82
71 00
115 56
137 30

11 36
16 31
4 98
5 50

29 00
46 87
38 00
52 86
39 90
59 50
61 00
29 40

270 29

1, 962 34

7, 795 77
4, 929 56
5, 398 67
6, 899 64
8, 082 29
3,764 69
10,3.50 69
20, 685 19

2, 851 36
l,2(;-0 17
1,807 82
3, 560 91
3, 436 20
1,223 98
5, 315 67
14, 295 16

220, 572 39 113,590 30

654,214 47
483,665 08
199, 828 43
116, 968 30
298, 905 84
174,192 45
183,434 14
157, 384 42
661,255 14
580, 277 98
111,842 93
80, 669 73
1. 680, 582 61 1, .546, 709 64
2,511,268 36
2,230,525 18
20, 600, 524 98 19, 286, 630 43

CAROLINA.

4,211 42
5,621 33
5, 246 50
9, 513 46
9, 832 83
8, 744 23
5, 818 08
48, 987 85

57 42
13
.7
206
204
41

65
40
85
31

127
124
45
113
186
150
42

48
40
80
16
59
70
00

647 63

66 00
179 56
55 52
99 24
44 71
75 42
44 10
174 33
71 75
71 65
76 98
21 76
69 00
83 83
178 79
98 30
140 00
112 63

24 49
28-55

790 13

270
126
36
38
96
156

37 75
36 25
70
62 00

34
53
95
51

25
50'
25
00

308 00

4, 376 65
5, 839 40
5, 293 00
9, 860 52
10, 279 32
9,219 52
5, 980 94
50, 849 35

1,932 .57
2,891 33
2, 996 50
6, 965 47
6, 843 33
8, 302 00
3, .37 7 95
33,309 15

59, 450 04
-73,744 10
93, 040 92
535, 902 45
613,481 07
310, 120 19
76,291 09

38, 929 32
56, 409 77
46, 034 78
474. 647 05
541,332 63
252,126 40
43,681 79

1,762,029 86

1,453,161 74

8, 565,419 91
2, 005,509 10
832, 166 74
127, 1.56 83
726. 846 03
722, 182 25
45! 641 00
943, 446 07
1,253, 670 02
668, 059 34
657, 104 89
39, 147 14
88, 883 07
133. 060 79
1.52;456 16
274, 141 51
743, 217 26
106, 441 41

7,161,277 23
1, 495,458 80
699, 070 56
70, 012 77
468, 953 45
495, 343 53
38, 400 17
739, 219 79
1, 091,836 75
575, 446 63
584, 395 47
42, 723 79
58, 070 97
95, 313 47
73, 119 43
198, 479 48
720, 189 71
63, 949 93

18,085,140 52

14,671,261 93

f-i

Eirst'district
T h i r d district
F o u r t h district
Fifth district
Sixth district*!
Seventh district
Eighth district*
Niuth district*
T e n t h district
,
E l e v e n t h district
Twelfth district*
Thirteenth districtt...
Fourteenth district..
Fifteenth district* . . .
Sixteenth d i s t r i c t * . . .
Sevent,eenth district.
E i g h t e e n t h district* .
Nineteenth district . .
Total

Oregont .




672 39
285 51
854 93
629 19
098 88
000 46
833 75
422 92
530 99
548 78
162 85
406 71
282 35
t 4 3 42
712 51
753 80
342 21
431 02
117,512 67

5, 768 90

05
69
51
43
15
06
75
59 78
85 45
61 44
38 98
22 15
21 77
42 44
118 25
13 81
155 76
13 12

1,663 57

83 00

10
74
5
2
46
8
5
6
1

13
66
28
92
64
01
37
87
97

74
2 62
5 20

72
21
31
51

50
00
00
50

38 25
31 75
SO 25
35 75
98 12
54 50

4 94
2 87
13 20

39 25
.68 25
45 00
42 50
74 50
48 53

191 42

832,65

18, 091 07 13,107 86
11, 687 42
6,624 18
6, 983 24
2, 243 01
3, 821 28
1, 348 .33
6, 286 .38
2, 632 22
8, 278 20
3,316 92
2,915 72
1, 192 53
7,744 15
2, 605 38
8, 725 91
3, 982 41
6, 779 99
1,998 79
6, 334 05
1, 486 26
2, 450 62
1, 256 70
3,414 99
1,214 44
4, 743 14
2, 573 42
4, 0.54 55
1.312 34
5, 913 35
i;516 35
9,715 34
4, 9.50 00
3, 618 50
1, 422 60
121, 557 90

,917 3!

54,783 74

2, 970 97

106, 747 36

70, 087 91

3
I—<

O

a)
:

H.—Statement showing the expenses of collect-in(j the internal-revenue taxes'in'Jlie several collection-districts, fc.—Continned.
Stationery!
Compensa- and blankPostage.
tion.
books.

District.

Express and Advertisdep. money,
ing.

rs:)
a:)

Total ex- Expenses of
penses of administercollectyig. ing office.

Assessments^

^8, 797 23
11,887 38
6, 259 47
5, 842 53
3, 238 37
5,516 16
6, 465 33
7,233 56
5,198 51
5, 785 54
2.810 59
4,845 58
6.811 14
5, 337 48
3 814 06
6, 372 34
5, 983 79
4, 639 77
9, 393 23
9, 329 96
8, 308 11
5, 135 14

$1, 228, 949 92 $1, 085,956 71
2,102, 967 89
1,747, 700 21
273, 475 92
324, 722 49
416.197 04
362, 640 12
62, 603 50
53, 028 11
332, 582 10
253, 967 27
308, 279 78
284, 512 19
195, 567 77
170, 260 22
148,180 36
147, 540 79
283.198 59
200, 123 70
66,071 15
36, 163 51
154, 970 36
107, 916 44
347, 797 17
290, 961 51
188,441 59
119, 920 31
92, 808 23
52, 098 90
78, 793 17
89, 088 99
131,891 51
114, 402 75
124, 527 05
96, 495 33
707, 588 10
549, 463 76
1,098,519 18
860, 651 81
539,812 72
469, 996 94
169,200 60
128, 015 22

Collections.

PENNSYLVANIA.

First districtt
S econd district*
Fifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district
Eighth district
Ninth district*
Tenth district*
Eleventh district*
Twelfth district...-.
Thirteenth district
Fourteenth district
Fifteeenth district
Sixteenth district*
Seventeenth district *
Eighteenth district*
. Nineteenth district
Twentieth district. '.
Twenty-first district*.;
Twenty-second district
Twenty-third district
Twenty-fourth district*

!

Total

:

693 29
503 90
975 26
760 07
090 84
419 69
380 30
067 69
981 27
531 40
603 69
624 48
586 65
062 90
664 85
188 26
796 64
431 29
177 32
190 88
123 97
895 97

,

113 83
70 08
2 71
18 85
42 37
26 23
61 62
15 24
54 30
31 65
42 10
80 17
59 82
25 21
33 28
6 63
37 92
76 97
49 05
66 64
21 30
1,001 83

$4 75
72 00
152 00
59 25
101 00
44 50
38 80
66 65
.158 00
174 70
108 35
119 50
117 46
146 42
83 65
73 39
76 39
130 00
123 44
57 78
75 00
189 07
2, 172 10

$1 33
61 45

1 60
5 14
19 90
2
3
7
17
40
5

56
39
60
66
13
81

179 20

$32 00
136 20
62'13
20 50
17 55
9 60
20 00
36 00
44 00
20 00
47 00
59 50
24 30
64 95
32 75
. 9 75
^
64 UO
34 75
15 50
32 25
42 50
26 30
901 53

139, 005 27

$6, 225 98
9,108 74
1,953 17
1, 868 40
945 10
892 39
1, 949 67
1,595 27
768 34
2,898 29
1,256 34
1, 457 54
3, 329 48
1,55L 36
1, 355 81
1,824 35
3,296 64
1,816 90
4, 594 32
4, 593 05
3, 610 93
2, 566 24
59, 458 31

9, 050, 423 70

7, 545, 627 28

O
O

a
•Ul

RHODE ISLAND.

First district

..

•

Total

.;
SOUTH

First district
Second district
Third district"
Total




6, 473 35
2, 621 77

2 49
36 49

9, 095 12

Second district

38 98

5, 619 90
6, 144 23
5,444 09

114 36
23 75
70 28

58 00
14 00

4 40
2 00

39 25
27 00

6, 577 49
2,70L 26

2,551 10
521 95

347, 345 07
40, 944 32

3, 073 05

388, 289 39

287,159 81
37, 392 36

CAROLINA.

,

17, 208 22

173 26
115 61
133 48

19 86
2 85
4 10

277 00
146 60
33 75

6,204 38
6, 433 04
5, 685 70
18,323 12

2, 970 95
3, 773 00
2, 944 09

55, .567 38
73,066 11
98,618 16
227,251 65

33, 607 38
63, 547 36
72, 345 64

TENNESSEE.

First district*
Second district*
Third district
Fourth districtt
Fifth district
Sixth district*t
Seventh districtt
Eighth district*

4, 660 28
7, 705 40
5, 730 UO
4, 121 39
8,528 66
3, 454 55
1, 604 70
8,191 26

~

!

Total

30
23
64
74
68
102
28
204

64
22
36.
49
83
19
72
14

43 21
41 00
64 35
20 00
86 00
35 43
55 00
• 176 77

3 05

-22 10
7 00
113 00
47 50

4, 745 78
7, 779 62
5, 858 71
4, 222 .58
8, 708 39
3, 603 27
1,801 42
8, 622 72

2,149 02
3, 913 27
3, 730 00
2, 621 39
5, 442 63
2. 454 57
781 65
3, 988 40

20 80

207 10

45, 342 49

25, 080 93

182
172
80
77

8, 475 79
10, 996 02
6, 477 22
12, 282 58

5, 793 56
4, 523 58
3, 480 90
1, 056 73

150,457 96
59, 725 88
106, 771 25
141,101 84

99,262 28
47, 885 03
73,105 76
116, 446 84

20, 854 77

458, 056 93

336,699 91

2, 665 50

56,141 33

51,591 95

17, 718 89
63. 492 60
26,179 62

18, 978 84
36,611 31
22,411 64

4 15
6 70
2 80
4 10

7 50
10 00

54,051 14
95, 000 19
132, 234 83
135, 768 92
303, 877 49
42,073 91
64, 908 72
316, 377 34

29, 795 89
51,937 43
54, 263 28
60,234 15
259,234 25
19, 633 83
25, 442 28
196, 766 08

43, 996 24

596 59

521 76

8, 012 41
9, 153 38
6,238-74
11,626 72

152 80
120 72
30 12

108
156
124
191

35, 031 25

303 64

580 47

1,803 10

5, 098 83

57 68

223 89

64 48

2,069 36
2, 608 30
2,172 35

. 9 32
34 25

36 79
63 00
196 99

7 67
3 70

4 50
43 63
26 00

2,119 97
2, 756 85
2, 399 04

125 00
254 89
506 99

6, 850 01

43 57

296 78

11 37

74 13

7, 275 86

886 88

3, 624 74
8,480 52
13, 295 84
6,118 46
12,107 69
8, 405 45
3,434 07
2,871 85

21 00
57 36.
117 81
102 53
250 37
106 27
99 31

^ 6 00
119 10.
192 37
171 58
136 43
235 38
125 53
124 86

16 00
8 30

2, 221 75
3, 340 47
8, 773 51
3,383 69
7, 998 16
5, 405 45
1,489 53
. 410 36

15, 868 73
4^, 799 59
992,334 13
1,111,184 64
4, 284, 695 63 3, 706, 240 58
48, 875 27
104,619 83.
2, 735, 434 97- 2, 246, 289 28
172, 258 99
230, 236 13
93,867 72
113, 620 30
42, 280 86
74, 062 36

58,338 62

754 65

8, 703, 653 45 7, 318, 015 56

5, 887 27

19 06

1,144,292 54

697, 307 19

TEXAS.

First districtt
Second district*
Third districtt
Fourth district
Total

23
82
01
41

19
1,392
4
386

60
20
35
95

75
90
00
50

513 15

38,231 61

UTAH.

Utah

5, 444 88

VERMONT.

First district
Second district
Third district-^

107,391 11

o

78, OOL 79

Total
VIRGINIA.

:

First district
Second district... -.
•Third district
Fourth district*
Fifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district
Eighth district*

1, 111 25

85
20
21
37
25

30 00

3, 667 74
8,704 14
13, 687 52
6, 395 42
12,611 81
8, 821 56
3, 756 28
3, 038 96

172 18

306 73

60, 683 43

33, 022 92

.91 53

25 00

6,108 86

3,241 85

2
21
14
97
12

38 86
81 50
96 12
60 25

Total
WASHINGTON.

Washington*




86 00

62, 797 14

14,792 21

to

H.—Statement showing the exp)enses of collecting the internal-revenue taxes in the seve^'al collection-districts,
Compensa- Stationery
and blanktion.
books.

District.

Express and Advertisdep. money.
ing.

Postage.

fc.—Continued.'

Total ex-' Expenses of
penses of administercollecting. ing office.

Assessments.!

Collections,
•

WEST

First di.><trict.
Second district
Third district*

-

VIRGINIA.

....

..

....

$6, 456 92
4, 9.54 81
3, 612 65

Total.

$156 95
45 67

$90 80
104 61
144 14

$0 80

$41 50
105 00
110 50

$6, 589 22
5, 322 17
3, 912 96

$2,190 45
1, 267 90
431 67

$381, 517 75
221,037 92
48, 093 70

$294, 343 01
127, 273 01
3.3,986 16

15, 024 38

.

202 62

339 55

80

257 00

15, 824 35

3, 890 02

650, 649 37

455, 602 18

00
95
30
90

49 10

WISCONSIN.

First district
Second district* . . .
Third di-strict
Sixth district

•
..

.'.

.

Total

8,510
.5, 279
5, 255
4,703

66
28
73
22

29
62
75
39

07
24
08
75

51
169
201
92

,50
60
67
00

1
1
8
4

8, 641
5,513
5, 589
4, 908

48 25
68 15

33
07
03
02

3, 878
1,100
4, 234
2, 362

64
84
85
23

23, 748 89

206 14

514 77

16 15

165 50

24, 651 45

11,576 56

2, 570 38

28 25

50 60

27 24

39 00

2, 715 47

1, 775, 029
230,716
210, 558
77, 716

1,035 84

23
65
34
80

2, 294, 021 02

80
24
87
80

O

1, 886, 688 71

i4

1, 476, 800
16.5,516
173, 186
71,184

o

WYOMING.

Wyoming...... ........

..

... ..... .

. ......

.

1.3, 785 13

11 112 99
l-H

* Including items which belong to previous fiscal years not before adjusted.
t Accounts for J u n e quarter not received u p to November 15, 1873.
I This item includes the various kinds of stamps, other than adhesive, furnished to collectors, in addition to the assessment lists.

a

RECAPITULATION!

District.

California
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota.;




Compensation.

^28,251
.5,498
13,814
62, 799
8,174
20,9i0
2,179

72
21
90
64
93
88
47

Station e r y
and blankbooks.
$280
2
93
492
61
126

35
50
28
62
.32
22

Postage.

$266
53
245
872
99
422
33

09
99
14
24
30
39
00

Express and
dep. money.

$8 30
40
3, 099
19
38
10

00
77
60
22
65

Ul

Advertising.

$269 50
117.50
145 00
682 36
131 00
109 25
97 12

Total expenses
of collecting.

$29, 075
5, 672
14,338
67, 946
8,486
21, 606
2, 320

96
20
32
63
15
96
24

Expenses of
administer ing office.
$20, 410
1, 90.5
6, 295
41, 932
5, 674
9, 880
673

08
38
97
78
93
36
85

Assessments.

$350, 955
19, 635
208, 265
3,208,419
74, 069
1,034,335
11,123

78
16
83
00
02
78
28

Collections.

$302,424
14,238
94, 263
2,376,044
76,274
873,984
7,154

75
87
85
88
56
97
90

Delaware

.

.......

Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois

Maine - .
Maryland
Massi^ chusetts
Michigan

New
New
New
New

•

..

-.

Hampshire
.Torsey
Mexico
York

Ohio
Bhode Island
Tennci-see
Texas
"Utah
Vermont
Virgitda
Washington W^est Virginia

.

Wvomiutf..




-.

6.814 48
4,834 25
6, 599 98
27,989 12
3,874 13
95, 757 77
66, 996 63
27, 595 28
5, 178 10
67. 386 83
27, 593 97
13, 577 74
30, 023 65
60,101 86
28, 869 87
12,884 11
21,024 18
44,616 22
6,941 16
12, 180 87
9,315 00
12,141 39
36, 626 83
6, 253 43
214,022 04
48, 987 85
117,512 67
5, 768 90
134.750 61
9,095 12
17, 208 22
43,996 24
35,031 25
5, 098 83
6, 850 01
58, 338 62
5,887 27
15. 024 38
23, 748 89
2, 570 38

51 22
51 82
71 80
325 62
11 90
1,335 21
489 10
469 24
99 25
883 17
163 35
138 64
307 53
860 53
263 73
151 38
239 73
786 27
13 60
141 h8
35 31
150 65
386 34
83 95
'
1,962 34
647 63
1, 357 59
55 66
1,001 83
38 98
208 39
596 59
303 64
57 68
43 57
•
754 65
19 06
202 62
206 14
28 25

141 60
71 00
176 .57
• 525 30
39 90
1,661 .32
1. ,329 74
1,238 68
187 50
1, 485 81
62 58
376 30
454 04
897 59
589 65
524 64
491 82
1,261 22
39 00
209 92
121 98
320 93
585 80
61 84
3, 256 27
790 13
l,66-< .57
83 00
2,172 10
72 00
422 35
521 76
580 47
223 89
296 78
1, 111 25
86 00
339 55
514 77
50 60

179 20
6 40
26 81
20 80
1,803 10
64 48
11 37
172.18
91 53
80
16-15
27 24

1, 520, 697 88

16, 051 93

27, 031 37

8,195 53

330
271
161
795
973
45S

00
75
50
63
80
43

337
37
133
225
359
116
422
338
737
71
305
274
74
205
80
1,061
308
832
9
901
66
457
207
513

00
50
56
41
64
98
17
25
47
.50
25
31
13
35
00
45
00
65
75
53
25
35
10
15

74
306
25
257
165
39

13
73
00
00
50
00

7, 020 92
5,014 87
7, 178 35
29,142 10
4,289 73
99, 742 54
69, 837 82
29,820 20
5, 464 85
70, 733 56
27, 964 24
14,235 87
31, 072 03
62,284 59
29, 860 76
14, 009 85
22, 1.33 43
47, 562 26
7, 065 26
12. 851 28
9, 771 25
12, 698 85
37, 984 98
6, 507 74
220, 572 39
50, 849 35
121, .557 90
5,917 31
139, 005 27
9, 278 75
18,323 12
45,342 49
38,231 61
5,444 88
7, 275 86
60, 683 43
6,108 8615, 824 35
24, 651 45
2, 715 47

13,499 57

1, 58.5, 476 28

13 62
57 80
30
202
192
48
58

31
30
61
.55
57

640
1U6
9
61
64
20
27
39
161

75
84
63
40
97
53
55
45
08

13
24
11
180
28
270
115
191

56
65
75
66
52
29
74
42

2, 289
1,893
4, 076
23, 552
1,382
4.5,434
27, 602
10,741
2, 955
26,795
17,857
2,728
16,263
29, 493
8,312
6,129
12, 985
26,947
5, 599
9,510
7,7.37
2,961
17,417
.3,969
113, 590
33,309
54, 783
2, 970
59, 458
3,073
9. 688
25, 080
20, 854
2, 665
886
33, 022
.3,241
3, 890
11,576
1,035

33
459, 162 37
55
156, 962 52
58
198,874 18
63
692, 058 43
18
73,476 26
87
19,175,492 14
43 ' 7, 429, 378 15
96
1,136,667 77
52
121, 531 96
16
7,231,973 01
19
1, 555,125 .57
84,
276, 754 50
77
3,145,031. 38
78
4, 249, 320 73
85
2, 209, 744 57
52
260,791 43
51
277, 989 40
51
4,643,916 12
00
79,702 31
12
552,091 52
11
84,062 01
98
364, 337 86
80
2,915,343 08
12
.38,1.53 87
30
20, 600, 524 98
15
1, 762, 029 86
74
18, 085, 140 52
97
106,747 36
31
9, 0.50, 423 70
05
388, 289 39
04
227,251 65
93
1,144, 292 54
77
458, 056 93
50
56, 141 33
88
107,391 11
92
8, 703, 653 45
85
62,797 14
02
650, 649 37
56
2, 294, 021 02
84
13, 785 13

730, 540 49

125, 945, 960 47

429, 403 34
. 133.424 58
143,568-30
491, 151 31
18,698 50
16, 607, 333 48
5,742,309 71
945, 597 17
104,789 67
5, 368, 226 28
1,317,660 55
214,293 49
2, 669, 483 82
3, 773,217 22
1,1?85,120 47
227,724 37
128, 794 29
3, 407, 806 44
36,173 15
305, 273 35
83, 237 18
321. 300 14
2, 626, 051 08
42,821 45
19, 286, 630 43
1. 453, 161 74
14,671,261 93
70,087 91
7, 545, 627 28
324, .552 17
169, 500 38
697, 307 19
336, 699 91
51 .591 95
78,001 79
7,318,015 56
14,792 21
4.5.5,602 18
1, 886, 688 71
11, 112 99

O

105, 238, 480 45

C»
7

266

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

.

I.—Statement of accounts ofthe Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internal revenue stamps
{adhesive) for ihe fiscal year, ended June 30, 1873.
Dr.
To amount of stanips iu liands of Commissioner June 30, 1872
To amount of stainps ordered from i^rinter
To amount of stamps returned by a,<j;ents
To amouut of stamps received for redemption
To amouut of discount withheld in exchange

$1,875
7,287,523
864,874
213, 423
489

54
63
26
90
05

8,368,186 38
By
By
By
By
By
By
By

'.
,
Cr.
amount of cash deposited with Uuited States Treasurer
$1, 875,753 02
amouut allowed as commissions
:
126, 585 25
amount of stamps seut to agents
5, 027,117 93
amouut of stamps destroyed
1, 312, 214 76
auiouut allowed ou certificate of Commissiouer
4,105 04
amount of stamps caucelod aud returned
17, 271 13
amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissioner June 30, 1873
5,134 25
8,368,186 38

Number of stamp-a.gents' acc^ouuts adjusted during the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1873
112
Amount involved
:
| 1 , 424, 895 47

K.—Siaiement of amounts paid for engraving and printing stamps, and for stamp paper
f c , for the office of internal revenne for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
To the Continental Bank Note Company
To the National Bauk Note Company
To the American Phototype Company
To Joseph R. Carpenter
To Henry Skidmore
To the Bureau of Engraviug and Priutiug
To James M. Willcox & Co., ( p a p e r ) . . .

:

,

$68, 301 01
32,139 23
4,135 28
92,144 19
:..
6,265 33
348, 337 53
92,915'58
644,238 15

Statement of amounts paid f o r the redemption of internal-revenue stamps dui'ing the fiscal
year .ended June 30,1873.
For stamps returned
For stamps destroyed
For stamps unnecessarily used

$202,956 66
6, 588 92
11, 087 39
220,632 97

L.—Statement of accounts of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internalrevenue
beer stamps for the fiscal year elided June 30, .1873.
Dr.
To amount of stamps in hands of Commissioner June 30, 1872, as per
last report
'...-. $1,697,562 50
To amount of stamps received from printer
13,253, 695 83^
To amount of stamps returned by collectors
10, 974 25
To amount of stamps received fbr redemption
254 37-^




14,962, 486 95^

F I F T H AUDITOR.

267

Cr.
By amonnt of stamps sent to collectors
$9,833,905 00
By amount of stamps destroyed
10,678 68f
By amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissioner June 30,
-1873
5,117,903 29J
14,962,486 95f

M.—Statement of accounts of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internal revenue
stamps for distilled spirits for ihe fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
,
Dr.
To amonnt of stamps in hands of Commissioner June 30, 1872, as per
last report .,
$14,706,175. 00
To amount of stamps received from printers
88,293,458 00
To amount of stamps returned by collectors
5,005,840 00
108,005,473 00
Cr.
By amount of stamps sent to collectors
$73,563, 647 00
By amount of stamps destroyed
23,125 00
By amount of stamps remaining iu hands of Commissioner June 30,
1873
34,418,701 00
108,005,473 00

N.—Statement of accounts of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internai revenue
tobacco, snuff, and cigar stamps for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
Dr.
To aniount of staraps in hands of Commissioner June 30, 1872, as per
last report
,
'.-.
$2,868,202 72
To amount of stamps received from priu ters
39, 654, 277 59
To amount of stamps returned by collectors
3,260,971 61
To amount of stamps returned for exchange
,
10,713 84
To amount of stamps received for redemption
128 11
•45,794,293 87
Cr.
By amount of stamps sent to collectors
i
$36,601,245 60
By amount of stamps destroyed
1, 049, 864 14
By amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissioner June 30,
1873
8,143,184 13
45,794,293 87

O.—Statement of accounts of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internal revenue
special tax stamp>s from March 12,1873, to June 30,1873.
Dr.
To amonnt of stamps received from printer
To amount of stamps returned by collectors




$9, 809,940 00
16, 800 00
9,826,740 00

268

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Cr.
By amouut of staraps sent to collectors
$9,166. 030 00
By araount of stamps remaining iu hands of Commissioner June 30,
1873
660,710 00
9,826,740 00

F.—Statement of accounts of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internal revenue
stamped foil wrappers for tobacco for the fiscal year ended June 30,1873.
Dr.
To amount stamped foil wrai>pers received from printer.

:

$543, 426 65

Cr.
By amount stamped foil wrappers sent to collectors
By amouut stamped foil wrappers destroyed

$543, 393 1
33 55
543, 423

Q.—Statement showing the amounts paid for salaries in ihe office of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue, also salaries g.nd expenses of super visors, agents, and surveyors of distilleries,
lees and expenses of gaugers, miscellaneoux expenses, counsel fees, f c , drawbacks on rum
and alcohol, and taxes erroneously asscbsed and collected, refunded during the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1873.
Supervisors.
J a m e s R. Boyley*
E. W. Barber*
. S. J. Conklin*
K. R. Cobb
R. G. Corwin*
S. B. Dutcher*
G. W . Bmery*
Speed S. F r y *
AlexaiKler F u l t o n * . . .
L M. Foulke
Wolcott Hani lin*
J . M. Hedrick
Lucian Hawley*
D a n a E. King*
George M a r s t o n * . . . . .
John McDonald'^.....
D. W . Munn.
J o h n O'Donnell *
Otis F . Presbrey*
P. W. Perry
Simon T. Powell
W . A. Simmons.
J . B. Sweitzer*
Alexander P. T u t t o n .
Total.

Salary.
^252 70
252 70
2-52 70
000 00
252 70
247 28
627 72
252 70
252 70
0' 0 00
2)0 60
000 (lO
614 13
252 70
499 95
625 00
C O 00
O
252 70
252 70
999 95
000 00
000 00
252 72
000 00
33, 351 65

Expeuses.

Clerk-hire.

^57
100
89
2,691
60
728
777
35
8
1,798
45
1,890
1,531
464

00
05
25
93
75
29
60
35
15
.58
20
56
57
47

S84 24
15 L 63
2, 838 50
126 35
2,311 41
376 63
126 36
126 36
2,010 00
67 39
2,105 42
4, 012 26
101 09

1,662
1,103
55
116
3, 200
1,418
1,746
35
1,041

80
54
08
84
80
32
21
6238

2,712 32
2, 274 59
262 93
273 21
3, 043 27
1, 632 81
2, 932 21
126 36
2, 800 72

20, 659 34

30, 496 06

Furniture.

$9 00

Rent.
$20
8
60
370
30

00
33
00
00
00

75 00
12 50
1, 000 96
14 00
100 03
556 53
18 . 5
7
397 02

'630"bb

70 00

16 84
50 00
466 70
300 00
999 96

'ise'.57"

1,334 63

4,173 07

Add to this amount for stationery furnished supervisors and allowed iu T r e a s u r y D e p a r t m e n t
accounts




$329
445
553
8, 909
469
4, 402
1,8-56
426
387
7, 809
337
7, 096
7.714
837
499
8, 027
6,378
587
692
9, 780
6,351
8, 864
414
6, 842

70
32
58
43
80
49
95
91
21
54
19
01
49
01
95
14
13
55
75
72
13
95
70
10

90, 014 75

827 01
90, 841 76

* I n office a fraction of the j^ear.

FIFTH

269

AUDITOR.

R.—Internal-revenue agents.
Salary.
George C. Alden
J . N. Beach
B. P. Brasher
J a m e s J, Brooks
A. E. Burpee
H . Brownlee
J o h n B. B r o w n l o w . . .
Matthew Berry
Charles P. Brown
E . T . Bridges
J o h n C. Bow^'or
D e W i t t C. Brown . . .
T e m p l e Clark
George L. D o u g l a s s . .
Charles L. F l a n a g a n .
William A. G a v e t t . . .
A r t h u r Gunther
Lucian H a w l e y . .
C M . Horton
'
J o h n T. Hogue
John A.Joyce
D . H. L y m a n
E . S. Lenferty
:..
J . H. Manley
J o h n M itchell
H e n r y W. Purvis
Zenas Rogers
A . M . C.Smith, j r . . . .
J. E. Simp.<on
J . E d w a r d Stacey
Isaac S. S t e w a r t
John H.Smyth
S. A. Sixbury
J.W.Wood
H. T. Y a r y a n

$2,257 00
2, 784 00
2,149 00
2, 440 00
1,814 00
595 00
530 00
1,956 00
1, 388 00
2,191 00
2,112 00
240 00
1,490 00
• 876 00
2, 236 00
1,866 00
1,144 00
1, 692 00
1,074 00
1, 970 00
2, 252 00
65 00
,2,236 00
908 00
744 00
1, 613 00
1,274 00
1, 812 00
576 00
672 00
768 00
710 00
2, 450 00
48,884 00

Total .

Expenses.
$1,199 99
-912 41
2, 2-27 83
449 80
826 71
6L6 20
230 12
1,947 16
1,337 63
1,156 28
797 10
367 32
105 40
136 05
.547 19
1, 589 96
1,881 50
536 31
967 64
541 53
1,421 25
• 2, 034 70
42 70
1, 265 42
286 22
273 60
1, 035 70
199 58
1,277 70
7 50
570 04
330 43
566 54
504 70
1,901 73

$3, 456 9 9
,
3, 696 41
4, 376 83
2, 889 80
-2,640 71
1, 211 20
760 12
.3, 903 16
2,725 63
3, 347 28
2,909 10
367 32
345 40
,626 05
1,423 19
3, 825 96
,747 50
,680 31
,659 64
,615 53
3,391 25
4, 286 70
107 70
3,501 42
1,194 22
1,017 60
2, 648 70
1,473 58
3, 089 70
7 50
1,146 04
1, 002 43
1, 334 54
1,214 70
4, 351 73

30, 091 94

78, 975

Surveyors of distilleries.
Salaries
Expenses

$23,589 26
17,318 00

Total

30,907 26
Fees and expenses of gaugers.

Fees
Traveling expenses
„
Total
(Disbursements to January 31, 1873.)

347,422 20
21,237 57
368,659 77

S.—Salai-y of Office of Commissioner of Internal Eevenue.
Salary
Miscellaneous expenses:
Salary
Traveling expenses
Expenses
Telegrams
Rent
Stationery
Expressage




,

.^

.$17,631
12,739
36,490
3,297
.6 500
19, 623
91,077

$359,588 72
63
66
70
70
00
80
17
187 360 66

270

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Counsel fees and expenses, moieties, and rewards :
Fees and expenses
Moieties
•Rewards

.' $23, 096 94
1,125 00
.15,150 00
$39,371 94

Drawbacks on rum and alcohol
Taxes erroneously assessed and collected, refunded
Taxes paid on distilled spirits destroyed by fire, refunded

586,321 32
116,117 40
433, 430 43
925 50
•
550,473 33

Statement of fines, penalties, and forfeitures :
Balance on deposit to credit of the Secretary of the Treasury July 1,1872.
Amouut deposited

223,942 57
69,254 03

293,196 60
: . . 133, 410 91

Amonnt disbursed

Balance on deposit to credit of the Secretary of the Treasury July 1,1873 . . 159,785 69

T.—Statement of disbursements for salaries of United States direct-tax commissioners in insurrectionary districts during the Jiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
Salary.

State.

$540 55

South Caroliua.

Moneys refunded on lands sold for taxes and redeemed.
State.
Arkansas
Teune.ssee
Virgiuia

Amount.

..

.
--

--

--

- - -

Total

-

...
-

'
- -

$800 00
1, 025 00
10 622 31
12, 447 31

Moneijs illegally collected in insurrectionary districts refunded during ilie fiscal year ended
June 30, 1873.
Aniount refunded

$1,507 87

Statement of certificates issned and allowed for drawbaclcs on merchandise exported for the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
Nun\ber of certificates received aud allowed.
Amount allowed




260
$18,743 17

REPORT

OF T H E




SIXTH

AUDITOR.




REPORT
THE SIXTH AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
O F F I C E OF THE A U D I T O R OF THE TREASURY
FOR THE P O S T - O F F I C E D E P A R T M E N T ,

. ' October 18, 1873.
SIR : I have the hoDor to submit the following report of the business
operations of this office for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873. ,My
annual report to the Postmaster-General, now in course of preparation,
will exhibit in detail the financial transactions of the Post-Office Department for the past fiscal year.
A comparison of the tables and statements of the present report with
those contained ih my report for the fi.scal year ended June 30, 1872,
shows a large increase of business in each division of this Bureau, especially in that of the money-order division.
EXAMININGr D I V I S I O N — B E N J A M I N LIPPINCOTT, PRINCIPAL EXAMINER.

This division receives and audits the quarterly accounts-current of all
post-offices in the United States. It is divided into four subdivisions,
viz, the opening-room, the stamp-rooms, the examining corps proper,
and the error-rooms.
1. The o]^ening-room.—All returns, as soon as received, are opened,
and if found in order, according to' regulations are entered on the register, carefully folded and tied, and then forwarded to the stamp-rooms.
The number of quarterly accounts-current received during each quarter of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, was as follows:
Third quarter, 1872:..:
. Fourth quarter, 1872
First quarter, 1 8 7 3 . . . . i
Second quarter, 1873...
Total

'.

30,816
31,659
31,962
32,170
120,607

2. TJie stamp-rooms.—The quarterly returns received from the openingroom are divided alphabetically among eight stamp-clerks, whose duties
consist in comparing the stamp-statements of the postmasters in the
accounts-current with their own books and the returns made to them
from the stamp-division of the finance office, whence stamp-orders are
issued and receipts for the same received and forwarded to the ^tanipclerks. The returns thus approved or corrected are passed to^the examiners. All accounts from offices of the first and second classes, are passed
through the various subdivisionsof the office in advance of other returns,
so that they may reach the chief examiner and his assistants with as
little delay as possible.
18 F



274

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The number of accounts examined and settled by the stamp-clerks for
each quarter of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, was as follows :
Third quarter, 1872
Fourth quarter, 1872..
First qnarter, 1873
Second qnarter, 1873

:.'.-"

30,743
31,358
31,464
31,574

Total

:

.*..........

125,139

3. The examining corps proper is composed of seventeen clerks, among
whom the returns received from the stamp-rooms are divided by sections,
each comprising several States or parts of States.
The average number ,to each section is about 1,700. After the examination of the accounts-current and the stamp-account, reviewing and
refooting the transcript of mails*received, and examining all vouchers
belonging to that portion of the work, the balance is drawn on all
accounts of the third, fourth, and fifth classes. The returns thus examined and completed are forwarded to the registering division to be
entered upon its books.
The number of accounts examined and sent to the registering division
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, was as follows :
Third quarter, 1872
Fourth quarter, 1872
First quarter, 1873
Second qnarter, 1873

30,743
31,358
31, 464
31,574

Total

125 139

The error-rooms contain five clerks, who review and re-examine the
error-accounts received from the registering division, and forward to
each postmaster a copy of his account, as stated by him, and as audited
and corrected by this office.
The number of accounts so corrected, and copied for the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1873, was as follows:
Third quarter, 1872 •
Fourth quarter, 1872.:.
First quarter, 1873
Second qnarter, 1873
TotaJ

'

I....:

8,503
5,809
5,870
5,511

:

25,693

'
'.

Each subdivision reports weekly to the chief examiner, and monthly
through that officer to the chief clerk, the progress of the work, so that
the exact amount of labor done by each clerk is clearly ascertained.
All vouchers relative to allowances made by the Post-Office Depart-'
ment for clerk-hire,, lights, fuel, rent, stationery, &c., at post-offices of
the first and second classes, are forwarded at the beginning of each
quarter to the chief examiner and his assistant for examination. A
statement is then prepared, showing ttie vouchers received, the amount
allowed and the amount suspended, when found to be in excess of the
allowance.
On rec^eipt of the returns from the examiners these accounts are received, and the amount allowable added, and the balance drawn by the
chief examiner.
The number of post-offices of the first and second classes which have
received allowances for clerk-hire, rent, &c., was 350.



.SIXTH AUDITOR.

27&

The namber of offices of the second class having: an a-llowance for
clerk-hire only-, wa;s 180.
The number of offices having an allowance .for clerk-hire to aid in
separating the mails, (independent of the number above stated,) was
445.
Total number of offices of all classes receiving allowances, and approved by the chi^f examiner, was 975.
The expense-accounts of the offices of the first and second classes were
regularly entered by the chief examiner and his assistant on the expenseregister, and show!qaarterly the amount of vouchers received, amount
allowed, and amount suspended, copies of which were forwarded to each
postmaster.
Attached to thei examining division i s a corresponding clerk, whose
duty consists in corresponding with, postmasters relative to errors in
their accoants-currtent and in making day-book entries, &c.
The amount involved in the settlement of the quao^terly accounts-current of postmasters daring the fiscal year was as follows : .
Third quarter, 1872--..
Fonrth quarter, 1872. J
First quarter, 1873...J
Second quarter, 1873
Total

-.
^
•

..."

: . . . . $5,413,821
5,663,617
5,913,128
5, 891, 087

-

91
80
68
33

22,881,655 72

The labors of the examining division for the fiscal year ended June
30, 1873, have .been fully completed. All accounts received in proper
form have been examined and passed to. the registering division. At
no period has the work been more "perfect in all its details, ^ o t only
has there been a decided improvement in the preparation of returns by
postmasters, particularly those of first and second class offices, but, by
judicious changes in the office, the efficiency of the examining corps
has been greatly increased.
R E a i S T E R I N a DIVISION—F. I. SEYBOLT, PRINCIPAL REGISTER.

This division receives from the examining division the quarterly accounts-current of postmasters, and re-examines aud registers them, placing each item of revenue ajid expenditure under its appropriate head;;
noting also, in books prepared for the purpose, corresponding with each
register, the amount of letter-postage and stamps reported as remaining
on hand in each account. The same books also show the proper amount
of newspaper-postage and box-rents chargeable to, and compensation
allowed, each office contained therein, and afibrd a complete check in the
settlement of each account
•
^ JJ]3on this divisijon thirteen clerks are employed, and during the fiscal
year the number df accounts registered, and amounts involved therein,
were as follow^s : I
.
Third quarter, 1872.. J
Fourth quarter, 1872 !.
First quarter, 1873.
Secoud quarter, 1873.1
Total...!

i

'

1.

..:.-.,....

31,012 | 5 , 439, 393 94
31,548
5,691,418 .39
31, 818 . 5, 936, 597 81
31,754
.5,910,1517 46
126,132

22,977,927 60

The number of! changes of postmasters, establishment, re-establishment, discontinuance, and change of name of post-offices reported from
the appointment office during the fiscal year, and noted by the registers,
was as follows:



276

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

Third quarter, 18.72...^
Fourth quarter, 1872
^First quarter, 1873
".
Second quarter, 1873
Total

2,104
2,359
2,888
3,621

...-

.-

....10,972

.The work of this division is fully up' to the requirements of the office,
the quarterly accounts current received from every office having been
registered to the 30th of June, 1873, the footings and recapitulations
made, and the books prepared for the registration of the accounts for
the quarter ending September 30, 1873.
B O O K - K E E P E R ' S DIVISION—F. B . LILLEY, PRINCIPAL CLERK.

To this division is assigned the duty of keeping the ledger-accounts
of theDepartment, embracing postmasters, late postmasters, contractors,
late contractors, and accounts of a general, special,.and miscellaneous
nature.
"
This work requires the services of fifteen clerks, who are employed
as follows, viz: One principal book-keeper, in charge of the division
and ledger of general accounts; one assistant principal, in charge of cashbook, deposit-book, stamp-journal, ledger of warrants and deposits, and
day-book entries on reports approved by the Auditor; one clerk, in
charge of the transfer-journal and miscellaneous duties; nine book-^
keepers of postmasters' accounts, and three of contractors' accounts.
The auxiliary books prepared in this and other divisions, and from
which the postings are made quarterly, are as follows: 13 registers of
postmasters' quarterly returns, 35 pay-books, 9 journals, 1 register of
warrants, 3 registers of Postmaster-General's drafts, 1 stamp-journal,
1 cash-book, 1 deposit-book, 1 Auditor's draft-book, 1 transfer-journal,
1 money-order transfer-book, 12 registers of mail-messenger and specialmail service, 1 route-agent's book, 1 letter-carrier's book, .1 special
agent's fare-book 5 total, -82 books.
The system of transferring debit and credit balances of payments to
contractors, of Auditor's drafts counter-credited, &c., embodied one
year ago in the transfer-journal, has worked well in practice, enabling
the book-keepers to get the items on their ledgers from thirty to sixty
days sooner than by the old method of day-book and journal.
Accounts of the first, second, and third classes, and all contractors'
accounts, are balanced quarterly; all others at the end ot the fiscal year.
For a detailed statement, showing thenumber of accounts by sections,
and to a limited extent the labor performed in the preparation of auxiliary books, 1 respectfully refer to the following tables.
The work of the division is in a most satisfactory condition, and fully^
up to the requirements of the office.
Ledgers of postmasters^ accounts.
Number of Current accounts.
ledgers.

• Sections.

Number 2
Number 4 . . . ,
Number
Number
Number
Kumber

6
.7
'8
9 .

.

.

Total




Late accounts.

4
4
4
5
5
4
4
6
5

3,447
3,400
4,008
3,870
4,004
3,753
3,581
3,609
3,841

569
515
654
411
849
708
743
749
331

41

33, 513

5,529

SIXTH

277

AUDITOR.

Ledgers of mail-contractors^ accounts.

Sections.

N u m b e r of
ledgers.

Current accounts.

Day-book entries journalized.

Accounts ,iourualized from
transportation
sheets.

Number 1..
Number 2 . .
Number 3 . .

1,830
2,005
1,827

1,557
1,325
1,460

9,180
10, .386
9,149

Total

5,662

4,342

28, 715

Number
Number
Nuruber
Nutuber
Number

of entries in stamp-journal . . . . —
of day-book entries
of entries in Ideposit-book
of entries in cash-book
of entries in transfer-journal

Total-..-..

•.
<'
:.'.........
j.

6, 254
1, 407
9,192
3,566
3,210
23,629

STATING DIVISION—:WILLIAM H. aUNNISON, PRINCIPAL CLERK.

The general postal accounts of present and late postmasters are in
charge of this division. The number of clerks employed is fifteen.
During each quarter the accounts of present postmasters at offices bf
the first,.second, and third classes, and those of the fourth and fifth
classes showing debit balances of $10 or more, have been stated for the
preceding quarter from the earliest records made in the office in time
to send special instructions for rendering accounts, and for paying the
amounts due the IJnited States at the close of the current quarter. The
items of the remaining accounts have been stated as soon as they could
be obtained from the ledgers. Statements of. such of them as showed
debit balances of $1 or more, when stated and balanced with the ledgers
(as usual) to the close of the last fiscal year, were sent to postmasters,
with special instructions, before December 31, 1872.
The accounts of late postmasters have been revised monthly to secure
the earliest possible adjustment, and all such accounts have been fully
stated to the latest dates, in advance of the time usually allowed, that
the results may be used in the annual report of the office to the Postmaster-General. I
Special attention has been given to cases showing neglect or failure
to comply with the instructions, especially those relating to indebtedness.
The addition of piie clerk, and the reduction of the work on several
of the sections, ha§ partially removed the inequality formerly existing,
and has promoted the general efficiency of the division.
Eeference to the,foilOAving statements will show the increase in the
number of the accounts during the year, and also in the miscellaneous
work of the division. It is only just to s^y that the accounts were
never in so good a condition as at the present time.




278

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Statement of the number of the general accounts of present p)ostmasters, the increase in the
numher, and the classification of the offices, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
.2

p

Draft- Deposit- Collection- Special
offices.
offices. bffices.
offices.

o

^ .

States aud Territories.

S

X

o

5

II • 1 1

§1
fl 5

1.1
xi M

al

.0 ^

5

;=i
0

Total
N e w York, A to S
Total

.a
a

I-l

.a

<x>
.0

g

3
5
7 "4'
10 ' 1
12

8 120 11
680
8
8 52
337
2 76 • 7 • 365
39 11.9 41
504
57 367

67 L; 886

•31

34 403

71 1,628

227

34 403

71 1,628

Pennsylvauia, A to R . . .

864
424
480
736 2,'504'

•\X7'/ii;f Viro-inin

TJhofle Tnland

86

2,246

64

104

2,256

86
925
394
54
618
713 2,"650' 35 175

'57

2; 593

36

70 1,170
659
14
2
102.
26
429 2,360

....

8
2
4
14

81
25
10
32

Total

6

...

1
2

8
6

79
54
3

1

3

9
7
1
1

A viy.nrifl,
r^nlrot.fl

Idaho
ATpvifO

Utah
2

:....

:::!::

f

•

7

7
18
9'

843
359
513
•618

25
31
8

112

63 1,946
•

22
7
41
16

41 2, 333

86

23
10

697
631

70
58

2
5
2
2
4
2
3
2

31
122
80
53
79
46
143
114
4

4

19 182

55 2,000

10 182
6
1 10

76
5
7

11

11 198

88 1,967

26 455
17 87

88 1,187
467
23

Nevada.
Total...

8
3
17

=

973
612
, 80
28t
18

11

Ohio

2,346

13

Alabama

7

158

55

]3

41 2, 097

51
16
4 42
2 65
4
10 174

. .'.

36

2,332

41 2, 097

2
1
2
I

Total .

•7
29

2,258

36 135

North Carolina

^pw

0

136

36 135

28 198

'f)

i

a

21

1

13

!»lf>nth P.fli'nlinfl

1°

2, ,394

1

Total
t)

o§.a

03

'

9

2
1
2
8

4

.a

fl ' 0
0 -3 fl

227

8

37
12
16
20

•

9

3

-si

.0 g

85

31

•

0
'0

.a

, §1•

34

Maine
New Hampshire
ATpy^fl phnfip.tts

2

xi

.a

.2

1

].74
197
49

=
. . . 0 . . - .

6
2
10
12'
10
6

*

878
89
761
39
3
*l
33
4
150
16
95
11
58
14
94
2
48
2
166
10
129
13
29 2,'444' 3 208' " ' • " 7 8 ' '

'

2,-366

184
19
89 2,089
230
14
22
77 2,'396' 5
10

38

110

•2,286

121

_^
^

6
2
Total

8

q

43 542- 111 1, 654

27 1,789
36
619 2," 408' 24
23

17
492
40 1,188

627
31
35
141 1,443 2,'676" *38

8 153

Total

.
_

60

162

2. 246

*3

65

2,005

50

82
71

57 1,680

172

5
3

Missouri




• • • •

SIXTH

279

AUDITOE.

Statement ofthe numher of the general accounts of present postmasters, fc.—Continued.
•fl*
0 -

,Draft- Deposit- Collection Special
offices. offices..
offices.
offices.
xi

-73

s

=fl

Cfl

States and Territories.

il

1
a

' ^

fl 03

fl ®

fl
o

2

Kentucky

3

Total

5

75
93
107

1
15

•

17
4
19

it

.fl

III
^§.a

03 ' S

03

i n

B

.a , 1

'1

40 1^872

lS l 0 •

Igfl

'o fl S

a £i3 •
fl^o

- 61

2,225

68

79
34
66
43

19 1,113
509
6
13
267
7
328

88
40 1,274
568
6
13
378
.7
25
433 2; 653." 60 161 54

222

45 2,237

= =:=
1

1

New York, T to Z . . . . . .
1
5

Total

.

==

.12

1
;

•

10
Indiana
Pennsylvania, S to Z . . . 4

....

.2

Michigan . . . . . .

2, 591

88

2,169

• 1
)

47

'' 15

20 145

53 1,94'0

84

16
. . . . 11

9 136
7 101

38 1,108
47
912

82.
50 1,360
34 1,113 2,'473" 6 •88

16 237

85 2,020

84

109
19
9
18

12
739
3 • 520
1
160
276
5

. 92
37
7- • 18

6' 155

21 1,695

154

Total
13

62

.

101
1
.7
-87
5
*2
3
3
81 36 1, 238 , " " • • 7 1 " 1,445
706 2,'257' 39
55, .15
12
612
9

^1
2
.9
8

''

132
•

i*>

. . . .

::::

27

>2

3
2
1

14
Florida
•Total

t

fl
758
79
9
511
45
6
53 1^007 2," 276' 17- 141

6.54'
-.393
825

^1

"§••

16 275

2

Total

1

-fl

g
fe

• o | |

.2

•

n
^

fl

s • o •

•i

fl'

n^

.al
i§

g C3
+='.'fl

Texa

03 '--.

. -b so

-OS

fl

10

it,

n3

•1

•
*

6

?:--•

•

.

• ..128

2,345

33

2,004

957
25
581
9
181
31
318 2," 637' 33 1 9 8 .

* Decrease.

Number of general postal accounts first, second, and tliird classes
Number of general postal accounts fourth and fifth classes

1,328
31,926

Whole number of general postal accounts for ^fiscal year
33,254
Whole number of geueral postal accounts for fiscal year ended June 30, 1872. 32, 065
Increase during fiscal y e a r . . . . : . . . . . . . . . . .
. Increase during fiscal year .ended J u n e 30,1872

.
......-

---

---•
-•

^' ^^^
1)741

flco

pCJ -

Changes reported to this office w e e k l y b y t h e Ifirst Assistant
• Postmaster-General, recorded for t h e fiscal year.'

t—1

fl .fl 03

fe
Established
...
Re-established
....'......
Discontinued
'.
N e w bonds
Miscellar^,eous, removals, resignations &c
Total...




.,

......
.. ,
:...;.
.

^

•

1""

Totalnumber,
during the
- year.

Statement showing the numher of changes, and the cdndition of general postal accounts of late
postmasters for and during the fiscal year ended June 30, Vil3.. y

454
130
269
79
1,319

370
132
266
• 176
1, 567

493
157
219
248
2,179

591
140
306
• 383
1,865

1,908
559
1, 060
8.86
6,930

2,251

' 2,511

3, 296

3,285

11, 343

280

1
2
3..
4
5
6.
7

200
390
181
394
623
777
432

'236
279
400
320
476
558
363

N u m b e r of section.

8
9
10
11
12
13
14

;
...

•

•

Number of accounts of late
• postmasters unadjusted oneach
section;

Number of ac' counts of . late
postmasters adjusted on each
section.

Number of accounts of late
postmastei'S unadj usted on each
section.

N u m b e r of section.

Number of accounts^ of late
postma'sters adjusted on each
section.

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

546
223
515
614
452
568
608

458
452
468
452
420
. 535
577

6,523
4

Number of late accounts adjusted for the fiscal y e a r . . .
Number of late accounts unadjusted for the fiscal year .

12,517

Total
Number of late accdunts adjusted for t h e fiscal year 1872 . . .
Number of late accounts unadjusted for the fiscal year 1872.

3,262
4,776
8,038

Increase ..".

ce
floi •

Miscellaneous statements.

ce

•

&^

ceco
xi'"'

?

fe
Letters received
Letters •vyritten, correspondence in special cases
General accounts, circulars, &c., i'eceived
Circulars sent in answer to letters received, and iu special c a s e s . .
Reports made to Post-Office Department—delinquencies

S

IS

xi ""^

4,479

1•

fe

123

482
202

889
•90

442
43

558 ^ 511
166
118
1,500
1,250
.715
606
157
243

1 551
609
1,750
2,652
533

COLLECTING DIVISION—-B. J . EVANS. PRINCIPAL CLERK.

The duties of this division are to collect balances due from late and
present postmasters throughout the "United States, and to attend to tke
final settlement ofthe same.
The number of clerks employed is twenty, apportioned as follows :
On Correspondence^ 4. Their duties are to correspond in relation to
postmasters^ late postmasters', and contractors' accounts, wdth a view
to the collection of balances due to the Bepartment, and to submit, for
suit, accounts of defaulting late postmasters and contractors.
On Drafts^ .1. His duties are to locate and issue drafts for the collection of balances due by postmasters and contractors; record the same
in the draft-register, and to report to the Post-Office Department for
payment all balances due to late postmasters, and record the same in
a book kept for that purpose.
On Changes, 1. His duties are to record all changes of postmasters
reported to this office from the Post-Office Department; to enter and
file drafts paid; to record all accounts of late postmasters in the book
of balances ; and to state the final action thereon.
On Letter-hoolcs.^ 2. Their duties are to record all letters written, and
address and transmit the same, together with all circulars received by
them from.the corresponding clerks.
On Miscellaneous., 1.. His duties are to examine and compare with



SIXTH

281

AUDITOR

the ledgers all accbunts of late postmasters, and close the same as ^' uncollectible" or by ^'suspense," and to assist in the preparation of the
annual report to the Postmaster-General.
On Copying., 14., Their duties are to copy ;all accounts of postmasters
and others, and transmit the same in their respective circulars; to copy
changes of postmasters; to prepare salary-books of the various postoffices in the country; to assist in the adjustment of salaries, and to
furnish a portion of the materialfor the Uni'ted States Official Register.
The regulation of the Department requiring current business to be
dispatched on the day received is observed by the division generally,
but particularly by the gentlemen on correspondence.
I beg leave to refer to the annexed table as exhibiting the labor performed by this division.
Statemient of business transacted by the collecting division.
Accounts of postmasters and contractors.

No.

Accounts of postmasters becoming late during the period from J u l y 1,1870, to J u n e 30,
1872, in charge of the division
15,5 87
Accounts of postmasters becoming late during the fiscal year, viz :
.Quarter ended September 30,1872
2,021
2,140.
Quarter ended December 31,1872
2,372
Quarter ended March 31,|1873
2, 397
Q u a r t e r ended J u n e 30,1873
24, 517

Total .
Accounts of contractors received from the pay-division for collection upon which drafts
w e r e issued:
Quarter ended* September 30,1872
Quarter ended December 31,1872
,
Quarter ended March 31,11873
.Quarter ended J u n e 30,1873
.

$1, 387
1, 403
985
^ 230

Total.
Drafts issued on
Quarter ended
Quarter 6iided
Quarter ended
Quarter ended

89
57
87
26

10, 007 49
present and late postraasters during the fiscal year
September 30,1872
,
December 31,1872
March 31,|1873
J u n e 30,1873

T o t a l .Accounts of postmasters becoming late during the fiscal year, showing balance in their
favor and closed b y " s,uspense :''
Quarter ended September 30,1872
Quarter ended Decemberi31,1872
.1.
Quarter ended March 31, jl873
•
Quarter ended J u n e 30,1873
TotaP.

793
781
710
846

397, 882 37

843
720
9
80

1, 317 90
8, 486 07
195 09
569 80

1,652

10, 568 86

23
3 16
9 09
12 35
43

Accounts of postmasters becoming late during the fiscal year, showing balances due
the United States and uncolle.ctible :
Quarter ended September 30,1872
Quarter ended December 31,1872
Quarter ended March 31,1873
Quarter ended J u n e 30,1873
^

Total.




24 83

1,664
17,044
3, 936
1, 521

35'
01
92
62

24,166 90

Total.
Accounts showing balances due late and present postmasters, and reported to the PostOffice D e p a r t m e n t for p a y m e n t :
Quarter ended September 30,1872
Quarter encled December 31,1872
Quarter ended March 31, 1873
,
Quarter ended J u n e 30,1873
1

47
68
35
87

3,130

Accounts of postmasters becoming late during the fiscal year, showing balances due
the United States, and closed b y " suspense :"
Quarter ended September 30,1872
Quarter euded December 31, 1872
Quarter ended March 31,1873
Quarter ended J u n e 30,1873
Total.

95, 743
56, 206
101, 980
143, 951

353
461
563
452
1, 829

17. 073
24, 583
20,928
17,974

62
16
73
94

80, 560 45

282

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Statement of husiness transacted by the collecting division—Continued.
Accounts of postmasters and contractors.
Accounts of late postma.ster8 and coiitractors submitted for suit:
Quarter ended September 30,1872
t
Quarter ended December 31,1872
Quarter ended March 31,1873
Quarterended June 30,1873.....
Total.....

.--.

-.

I

35 I $19, 545 32
20
10, 806 62
• 26
15,412 25
30
9,950 37

:.

Ill

Letters received during the fiscal year :
Quarter ended September 30, 1872
Quarter euded Decenjber 31,1872
Quarter ended March 31, 1873
Quarter ended June 30, 1873

69,449
69,187
78,278
^. 75, 401

•

Total...

55,714 56

l...

Letters sent during the fiscal year:
Qnarter ended September 30, 1872
Quarter euded December 31, 1872
Quarter euded March 31, 1873
Quarter ended June 30, 1 8 7 3 . . . .

292,315

_
". . . . .

^ Total

39,132
43,576
47,303
35,942

•

Total

165,953

'.....I

Letters recorded during the fiscal year:
Quarter euded September 30, 1872
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
Quarter ended March 31, 1873
Quarter ended June 30, 1873

2,444
2,836
2,970
2,346

'..:

:

10,596

Letters written to postmasters and others during the fiscal year:
Quai'ter ended September 30, 1872
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
:..
Quarter ended March 31, 1873
Quarter ended June 30, 1873
.1
Total

.

'
. 3,112
2,550
2,234
954

„

* 8,850

Accounts copied during the fiscal year and sent in their appropriate circulars :
Quarter ended September 30, 1872
5,375
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
...-....,
10,040*
Quarterended March 31, 1873
7,569
Quarter ended June 30, 1873
,.
5,022
Total

28,006

Pages of post-office changes reported by the Post-Office Department during
the fiscal year recorded in the change-books :
Quarter ended September 30, 1872
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
Quarter ended March 31, 1873
'
.'
^.
Quarter ended June 30, 1873
'
•. T o t a l .
Pages
Quar.ter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
.

of draft-register recorded:
ended September 30, 1872
ended December 31, 1872
ended March 31,. 1873...
ended June 30, 1873

Total




2,484
.2,730
3,118
2,943
11,275

•

:.."
'.
'.....:..*..

:

.:..

42
42
38
44
166

SIXTH
Pages
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

283

AUDITOR,

of book of balances rec'orded:
ended September 30, 1872
,
ended December 31, 1872
ended March 31, 1873
ended June 30, 1873

213
249
246
274
1,000

Total.
Pages
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

of letter-booki recorded :
euded September 30, 1872.
euded December 31,1872..
ended March ^1, 1873
euded June 30, 1873

1,220
1,409
1,485
1,053
5,167

Total.
LAW^ DIVISION—J. BOZMAN K E R R , PRINCIPAL CLERK.

To this divisionjis assigned the duty of preparing for suit, and transmitting to the Department of Justice, accounts of late postcaasters and
contractors who fa^ilto pay their indebtedness to the United States upon
the drafts of the department.
The number of! accounts and accompanying papers certified for suit
during the fiscal year was as follows :
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

September 30, 1872..
Decem^ber 31, 1872.
March |31, 1873
June 30, 1873
..

35
20
26
30

$19,545 32
10,806 62
15,.412 25
9,950 37

111

55,714 56

Amount of collections on judgments, includiug interest..

$25, 338 34

Total.

All accounts received from the collecting division have been prepared
for suit and sent to the Department of Justice.
FOREiaN-MAlL DIVISION—ISAAC W.

CLERK.

This division has charge of all postal accounts between the United
States and foreign governments, and making up'the accounts of steamship companies for ocean transportation of mails when not paid by
subsidy.
Number of accounts settled during thefisoal year, with amounts involved.

Name of country.

Number of
quarterly
accounts.

United Kingdom of G-reat Britain and Ireland .
German Union
J
Belgium
:.
Netherlands
:
,
Swi-tzerland
1
J
Italy.
Deumark, for extranational postages .
Total

:

'.




Amount involved.

$1, 084, 853
677, 569
•
33.904
25, 426
40, 818
44, 643
2,129
33

97
97
54
75
31
38
96

1,909,346 86

284

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Numher of duplicates registered for the fiscal year.

.Received from—

cr'C*
. a 00

Sent to—

264
195
40
96
45
82
45
52

144
54

United Kingdom.
German Union
France
Belgium
Netherlands
Switzerland
Italy
,
Denmark
Spain
Norway
,
Sweden
;..
W e s t Indies, & c . .
Nova Scotia, &c .

1
1
137
49

141
37

1,107 1,043 1,050 1,111

Total sent..

1,007

897

354
192
63
106
40
75
40
58

Total received.

.319
182
56
100
38
75
37
54

330
178
73
100
35
76
37
' 56

331
197
61
110
39
78
40
53

117
.58

United Kingdom .
G e r m a n Union
France
Belgium
Netherlands . . , . .
Switzerland
Italy .-..'I
Denmark
Spain
,
Norway
Sweden
.'
W e s t Indies, & c .
Nova Scotia, &c .

O'CO .
"^00

131
50

133
32

246
170
39
78
39
66
39
40
• 2

240
178
40
86
38
65
38
41
2
1
1
155
31

265
a 196
41
88
39
• 65
. 40
421
3
146
71

Total n u m b e r registered, 8,127. •

Amounts reported for payment of balances due foreign governments on settlement ofthe accounts
for the quarters named, together with the cost in currency.
Quarter
ended.

To-

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

June
Sept.
Dec.
Mar.
June
Sept.

Total

93, 370 67
Sept.
Dec.
Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec.
Mar.

)

30,1871
31,1871
31., 1872
30, 1872
30,1872
31,1872
31,1873

:

Costing, in currency

,

:

^

:

30,1871
30,1871
31,1871
31,1872
30,1872
30,1872
31,1872

$1, 553
1, 580
1, 815
2, 038
1,917
1,974
1, 937

24
66
78
96
38
55
35

12, 817 92
14 508 69

Costing, in currency
D e n m a r k , for e x t r a n a t i o n a l postage

.

>

Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec.

.
Total




47
67
23
66
33
62
24

238,869 29
June
Sep.
Dec.
Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec.

Total . . . \

Total amount reported
Costing, in currency

34,189
27, 205
33, 374
27,684
25, 268
27,283
33, 056

208, 062 22
\

Belgiumi

Costing, iu currency

13
26
14
71
12
05

88, 389 41

:

German- Union

Total

30,1871 114, 982
30,1871
15, 589
31,1871
13, 242
31,1872
16, 559
30,1872
14, 232
30,1872 ^ 13,782

...

Costing, in currency

Amount in
gold.

31,1872 ? . . . . 4 1 2 05
30,1872
30,1872
"'"767"96
31,1872
787 69
1,907 64

f

2, 388 98

..

..

311 175 19
349,137 63

SIXTH

285

AUDITOR]

I

The following amounts have been paid, inj gold, by the governments
named:
^
Quarter
ended.

By-

Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec'

Switzerland.

31,1872
20,1872
30,1872
31,1872

$1, 958
1,94L
.3,4'01
2, 084

65
44
64
94

9, 385 67

Total.
Netherlands.,

Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec.

31,1872
30,1872
30,1872
31,1872

359 60
678 04
587 10
1, 032 31
2, 657 05

Italy.

Dec.
Mar.
June
Sept.
Total.

31,1871
31,1872
30,1872
31,1872

1,142
1,523
1, 037
507

56
82
05
50

4, 210 93
16,253 65

Total amount received, in gold.,

I

Number of reports of ocean postages to the Postmaster-Geno^al, and amounts reported.'
J
J.
w....^ ' ^ l ' ^ - " " ^
i
/
tl
1
^
Third quarter of 1872.

1
p<
t

F o u r t h quarter of 1872.

, -2
o
ft

Amounts.

u

^
o

o
o

1^
$17,861 57
11,790 40
10, 524 27 i 1
8", 587 42
7, 598 69 i 1
7, 406 40 1 ^•
2,592 11 1 ]_ 1, 7.32 08
1, 696 36
1, 517 04
1,411 34
775 39
547 79
423 86
362 67
276 71
264 49
232 70
189 00
178 71
166 53
157 ^22
150 78
126 21
122 36
63 39
42-65
21 43
. 18 80
18 20
17 50 ;
15 12 1
2 02 1

76, 891 21

35

t:
o
a

. 83; 106 02

1

31




;H

$18, 824 56 17, 331 31
11, 643 .41
11, 191 66
7, 692 31
7, 394 93
1,711 69
1, 632 87
1,316 56
860 65
594 30
546 06
526 75
492 24
415 72
283 22
177 03
151 48
127 36
120 19117 51
97 23
90 86.
43 89
34 93
• 14 98
11 76
9 38
7 21
3 57
1 89

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

83, 467 51

28

1

T( 3tal n u m b e r of report s m a d e , 127.

p<

Amounts.

o
o
12;

^
$18, 085 35
14,450 74
10, 095 23
8,158 64
6, 002 41
5, 970 83
5, 2^0 01
5,169 79
1, 331 05
1,274 60
1, 271 51
901 77
704 30"
665 84
585 83
469 35
382 27
321 07
270 83
263 31
197 61
195 00
145 18
137 37
134 05
121 80
116 20
111 72
100 79
, 69 46
48 79
18 45
17 71
15 80
1 36

Second quarter of 1873.

o
Amounts.

•t

o
6

d

^

33.

Amounts.

First qu arter of 1873.

T o t a l amount report e d , $ 322,296.29. '

$19, 825
14,116
9, 799
8, 246
8, 093
. 6, 809
3, 774
1, 695
1,266
1, 058
709
517
508
421
414
390
384
199
111
108
79
73
56
55
43
34
27
7

94
40
16
83
32
62
17
31
24
96
01
55
62
26
61
49
93
64
09
85
87
93
77
09
89
79
39
82

p

78,'831 55

286

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

PAY DIVISION—A. E . BOONE, PRINCIPAL CLERK.

This division has in charge the settlement and payment of all accounts
for transportation of the mails, including railroad companies, steamboat
companies, and other.mail-contractors, special mail-carriers, mail-messengers, railway postal clerks, route-agents, special agents, letter-carriers,
and all. miscellan eous payments.
To this division is also assigned the registration of all warrants and
drafts countersigned by the Auditor, and the custody of the archives
pertaining to all branches of the office.
Accounts of contractors settled during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1873.
Quarter.
In
In
In
In

the
the
the
the

quarter
quarter
quarter
quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

September 30, 1872.
December 31, 1872..
March 31, 1873
J u n e 30,1873

, Total.

Amouut.
7,269
7,370
7,315
7. 382
29, 336

Total.
Mail-messenger service :
Accounts settled during the fiscal y e a r :
In the quarter ended September 30, 1872 .
I n the quarter ended December 31, 1872,..
In the quarter euded March 31., T873
I n the quarter ended J u n e 30, 1873
Total.
W a r r a n t s issued by the Postmaster-General arid countersigned b y the Auditor,
passed, aud registered:
I n the quarter ended September 30, 1872
,
In the quarter ended December 31, 1872
In the quarter ended March 31, 1873
In the quarter euded J u n e 30, 1873
Total.

In
In
In
In

Drafts issued b y the Postmaster-General and countersigned by the Auditor,
passed, and registered:
the quarter ended September 30, 1872
the quarter ended December 31, 1872 . . . ,
the quarter ended March 31, 1873
i
the quarter ended J u n e 30, 1873
:
.Total.

Railway postal clerks, route, and other
I n the quarter ended September 30, 1872..
I n the quarter euded December 31, 1872 ..
In the quarter ended March 31, 1873
In the quarter ended J u n e 30, 1873
Total.
Miscellaneous accounts:
I n the quarter euded September 30, 1872.
I n the quarter ended Decemher 31, 1872 ..
In the quarter ended March 31, 1873
In the quarter ended J u n e 30, 1873

Total.




98
65
50
66

13, 473, 555 79
1. 054, 053 89

Foreign mail accounts settled in the fiscal y e a r .
Collection orders sent out to postmasters :
I n the quarter ended September 30, 1872
In the quarter ended December 31, 1872
I n the quarter ended March 31, 1873
•
In the quarter ended J u n e 30, 1873

$3, 087,195
3, 377, 008
3, 475, 339
3, 534, Oil

24,
24,
24,
25,

728
884
856
997

639,
767,
838,
768,

435
578
427
521

48
08
94
49

100,465

3, 013, 962 99

3.057
, 3, 259
3,285
3, 308

121, 387
125,462
136, 850
130,416

12, 909

514,116 I

04
4538
21

1,767
],975
2,119
2,108

2, 283, 812
2, 457, 098
2, 484,144
2, 485, 695

7,969

9, 710, 750 74

4, 676
4, 703
4,904
4,615

706, 541
6.34, 915
764, 188
649, 246

18, 898

2, 754, 891 63

32
47
32
63

83
33
43
04

1,835
1,880
2, 067
2,224

433,123
447,841
465, 955
483, 973

63
58
61
56

I, 006

1, 830, 894 38

169

207, 469
227, 383
283,543
283, 699

687

10, 002, 095 64

143
167

46
17
11
90

SIXTH

287

AUDITOR.

Accounts of contractors settled during thefiscalyear—Continned.
Quarter.

In
In
In
In

Accouuts of letter-carriers :
the quarter ended September 30, 1872
=
.
the quarter ended Deceraber 31, 1872
the quarter ended March 31, 1873
the quarter ended J u n e 30, 1873
-.--•-'
Salary of special ageut paid out of appropriation for letter-carriers.

1,587
^782
1,649
i,589
0,607

Total .
Accounts of
In the quarter
I n the quarter
I n the quarter
In the quarter

special mail-carriers:
ended September 30, 1872.
ended December 31, 1872 .
ended March 31, 1873
ended J u n e 30, 1873

09
62
21
21
35

1,422,495 48

1,4.52
1, 4421,437
1,464'

49, 303 38

195
221
196
215

special agents :
euded September 30, 1872 .
ended December 31, 1872..
ended March 31, 1873
ended J u n e 30, 1873

12, 018 71
12,134 52
12,932 35
12,217 80

5,795

Total .
Accounts of
I n the quarter
I n the quarter
I n the quarter
I n the quarter

$354, 204
359, 402
352, 826
353, 342
2, 720

'46,751 26
55,884 12
50, 539 05
55.912 53

Total.

Eeport of the archives cleric for thefisoal year..

Quarter.

^xi

Si
In
In
In
In

quarter
quarter
quarter
quarter

ended
ended
end^d
ended

Total

^ o a

6,556
8,001
7,708
6,^43

1, 509
.5.98
9, 330
8,374

5, 519
3,650
4, 543
5, 893

2, 384
2, 665
1, 736
2,652

29, 208

19, 811

19, 605

1,437

September 30, 1872
December '31, 1872.
March 31, 1873
J u n e 30, 1873
«t

MONEY-ORDER DIVISION-—JOHN LYNCH, PRINCIPAL CLERK.
•

^

!"

'

'

'

'

.

'

.

Number.

Domestic money-order statements received, examined, and* registered during
the fiscal year, as follows :
Quarterended September 30, 1872
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
•
Quarter fended March 31, 1873
•
Qnarter ended Jnne 30} 1873
_,
;
Total

. . .

1

.;

^
34,942
33,183
33,180
33,174
134,479

' *

British international money-order statements received, examined, and registered during the fiscal year :
Quarterended September 30, 1872...
Quarter ended Decemhbr 31, 1872
'
Quarter ended March 31, 1873.
= .i
1
Quarter ended June. 30, 1873
L
Total.




9,714
11, 088
11,088
11,088
42, 978

288

REPORT ON THE FINANCES. .
Number.''

Swiss international mo.ney-order statements received, examined, and registered duriug the fiscal year :
Quarterended September 30, 1872
...:
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
..."...•
Quarterended March 31, 1873.\
Quarter ended June 30,1873
...•
Total-.............'

7,399

German international money-order statements received, examined, and registered during the fiscal year:
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
Quarterended March 31, 1873
Quarter ended June 30., 1873
,
Total

1,963
1,812
1,812
1,812

.''

6,012
6,012
6,012
18,036

Number.

Ambunt.

Domestic money-orders issued during the fiscal year:
3, 355,686 $57,516,214 69
British international money-orders isssued during the fiscal
year
" 69,592
1,364,476 32
Swiss international monev-orders issued during the fiscal
year,.- I
'.
2,801
78, 313 93
German international money-orders issued duriug the fiscal
year
19,454
420,722 12
Domestic money-orders paid, received, examined', assorted,
checked, and filed during the fiscal year
3,314,818
56,900,351 23
British international money-orders paid, received, examined,
assorted, checked, and filed during the fiscal year
10, 486
215, 087 61
Swiss international money-orders paid, received, examined,
assorted, checked, and filed during the fiscal year
600
16, 809 58
German international money-orders paid, received, examined, assorted, checked, and filed during the fiscal
year
:.
:...
11,613
310,108 26
Certificates of deposit registered, compared, and entered
during the fiscal year :
Quarter ended September 30', 1872
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
Quarter ended March 31, 1873
Quarter ended June 30, 1873
1
Total

:

40, 427
42,576
46,119
46,184

Transfers registered compared and filed during the fiscal y e a r :
Quarter euded September 30, 1872
:
Quarter ended December 31,1872
Quarter ended March 31, 1873
Quarterended June 30, 1873..Total
Drafts registered during the fiscal year:
Quarter ended September 30, 1872
Quarter ended December 31,1872
Quarter ended March 31, 1873.'
,
Quarterended June 30, 1873

:




49,049,503 28

1,746
1,712
1,504
1,747
6,709

Total
•
Money-orders returned for correction during the fiscal year
; Letters written by the division during the fiscal year:
Quarter ended September 30, 1872
Quarter ended December 31, 1872
Quarter ended March 31, 1873
Quarter ended June 30, 1873
:
Total

^

175,306

^

1,202,186 68

2, 313
2, 663
2,373
2,720
10,069 5,002,745 00
15,115
.
-'
•. . . . .

355
436
727
619
2,137

SIXTH AUDITOR.

289

' In concluding this report I am gratifi.ed to say that the"" work performed by the employes in my Bureau has been done with alacrity and
promptness, and, I think, to the satisfaction of the Post-Office Department and the public generally. To the energy and efficiency of my
chief clerk, Mr. J. M, McG-rew, and the heads,of the divisions, I am
greatly indebted for these results.
Yery respectfully, your obedient servant,
J. Jo M A E T m ,
Auditor.
Hon. W I L L I A M A.

RICHARDSON,

Secretary of the Treasuryo
19 F







REPORT OF TREASURER OE THE UNITED STATES.







REPOET

TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES.
TREASURY OF TPIE U N I T E D STATES,

WASHINGTON, Novemher 1,1873.
S I R : For the thirteenth time since I came in charge of this office, it
has become my duty, by virtue of statutory law and of Departmental regmlations, to make a full and correct exhibit and statement to the Secretary of the Treasury of the actual condition of the Treasury of the
United States, as it truly appeared from the books of this office at tlie
close of business on the thirtieth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and seventy-three.
The statements and tables hereto appended will fully exhibit not only
the actual condition of this office at the close of the fiscal year on the
aforesaid day, but its movement for the year preceding; and show
the actual amount of moneys received, and from what sources receivecl,
and the actual amount of disbursements, and for what purposes disbursed, in said fiscal year.
I have also taken the liberty to make such suggestions as have occurred to me in regard to* the future conduct and management of the
office; and have perhaps gone beyond what is expected or required of
me, by making some remarks in regard to the currency and the finances
of the country.
If therein I have transgressed, I hope for forgiveness therefor.
On comparing the tables of '^Eeceipts '^ and of '' Expenditures^"^^ that
appear at the beginning of the appendix, hereto annexed, with the like
tables in my report of the preceding year, it will appear that there has
been a large falling off in the receipts, amounting to $28,280,764.07 on
Customs^ and to $16,912,863.58 on Internal Bevenue.
This decrease in the revenue is mainly due to the great reduction of
taxation in both of these, the main sources of national income, that was
made by the last Congress, which was demanded by the people, and has
received their sanction and approval.
But, unfortunately, it will also appear from further inspection, that
the expenditures are largely in excess of those for the preceding year.
This increase of expenditures is mainly due to the large appropriations
made by the last Congress in excess of the estimates made by the several
Executive Departments of the Government. The falling ofi' of the receipts, and the increase of expenditures, have put a check upon the rate
per annum at which the public debt was paid off in preceding years.'
These facts combined make an interesting subject for reflection, the
study of which will make a good guide, if not a warning, to Congresst
and the administrative officers as well, of the course that should be pursued in the future. Either taxation must be increased, an expedient
that can hardly be thought of, or the appropriations must be kep,



294

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

largely below the receipts. Otherwise the rapid reduction of the public
debt will be arrested, if not abandoned.
I N T E R C H A N G E ABILITY

OF UNITED STATES NOTES AND BONDS.

Few, if any, believe that the volume of the circulating medium, as
fixed by law, stands at an amount that is exactly right. The people are
divided into two parties, holding directly opposite opinions; the one,,
judging from the difficulty of procuring sufficient money, at certain seasons ofthe year, to move the crops and other products, contending that
there should be a large increase; the other, knowing that at other times
there is a plethora of currency that for the time being drives men into
. the wildest speculations, insisting that the volume of the circulating me-,
dium should be greatly reduced, through «which speculations would be
checked, and a return to specie paiyments thereby be speedily and
easily assured.
Kow, both are, from their respective stand-points, entirely correct;
and yet, paradoxical as it may seem, both are wrong.
It must be obvious to all who have an interest in, and who have
watched the course of, the business aiid financial relations of the country,
that there are times when the real wants of the country demand and
there should be an increase of currency; and that there are other times,
when the safety of all legitimate business requires that it should.be
largely reduced. What is really needed is a currency so flexible as to,
at all times, accommodate itself to the real business wants of the whole
couiitry.
The greatest objection to ah exclusively metallic currency is its want
of elasticity. That there are regularly recurring times when the wants
of legitimate trade require an expansion of the circulating medium to
an a.mount much greatei? than is necessary at other times, is a fact that
is patent to all observing business men. When the times arrive for the
purchase of the crops and other products of the countryj and for their
transportation from the interior to the sea-board and a market, immense
amounts of currency are imperatively demanded for the purpose, which,
when the missiou is accomplished, are not wanted for any legitimate ^
purposes of trade and commerce; and therefore seek, for the time being,
other channels of profitable use. Unfortunately, not being needed as a
inedium for the interchange of values, this then redundancy of the currency is driven into channels of wild speculation in fancy stocks and
^ visionary enterprises. Here it is stranded; iand when again needed for
the teal wants of the people, for the proper transaction of the business
of the country, it cannot be had, and the staple commodities and crops
that then seek a inarket are hindered and kept back, through which all
classes of pieople are injured and damaged.
i t has, perhaps, not occurred to every one who has not studied the
subject, that during the suspension of specie payments, and when the
amount of paper"money is limited to a certain sum, as ours is, by law,
the rigidity Or want of fliexibility and elasticity of such currency is
greater, ahd consequently more injurious to the interest of the people
than a metallic Currency can possibly be. Coin always flows to the
• countries where it is appreciated and most- wanted. So, in case of
heed, it would flow in from other countries in exchange for ohr surplus
products. ' An irredeemable paper carrency, oh the cohtrary, is confined
exclusively to the country that issues i t ; and when the amount is fixed
and unalterable, for all the year round, the eff'ect is that at certain times
^ of the year, as is the case now, it is altogether insufficieiit for the genuine



TREASURER.

295

purposes of trade and commerce, and for bringing forward the great
staples of the country, wherewith to pay our debts and enrich the country by bringing the balance of trade ih our favor.
At other seasons of the year nothing like the legally fixed quantity
of currency is needed ; neither can it be used for any legitimate purposes.
At such times the holders, naturally desirous to ''turn an honest penny ,'^
finding allthe legitimate avenues of trade closecl, either engage in speculations themselves, or place their money at iiiterest with corporations
aild individuals, who too often use it for purposes that, in point of
morality, are but little renioved from ordinary gambling and downright.
swindling. ,
.
^
Partially by the force and more by the abuse of law, the arrangement between the country banks and those located in cities, where the
redemption of the circulating notes of national banks is required to be
made, has originated nearly all the evils that have, from time to time,
deranged the business and financial affairs bf the country. Banks, in
certain locations, are permitted by law to have their redem ption agencies
in interior cities. These, in turn, have theirs in the large cities oh
the Atlantic coast, principally in the city of -l^ew York. Certain
amounts of the legal-tender reserves of the interior banks are perrnitted
by law to be deposited with their redemption agencies. This forms a
nucleus arounci which larger amounts, above what is required for the
reserve deposits, accumulate. For all these deposits interest is allowed.
In times of partial stagnation of business, which always occur at. certain seasons of the year, money accumulates in country bauks. These
banks being unable,' at those times, to make more x)rofitable use of their
funds, send them to their redehiption agencies in order to make and receive interest thereon. The city banks, particularly those in the city of
New York, are thus flooded with money at the very time, and for the
reason that there is then no legitimate use for it anywhere. The city
banks being obliged to pay interest on these enormous deposits, look
around for some profitable employment of thesefunds. They find it inost
convenient, for their present interest, to loan them on notes subject to
call, with all kinds of stocks as collaterals. Soon the times change, the
business season returns, and money, in large amounts, is now required
to move the crops and staple commodities that seek a market. The
money being locked up, or perhaips swamped in disastrous schemes and
wild speculations, cannot be had for the purposes of legitimate trade
and commerce that then so inuch need it, and for the want thereof these
languish, to the great injury ofthe people of the whole country.
For these notorious evils a remedy should be found and interposed.
In looking over the whole ground, no scheme has presented itself that
would be so likely to accomplish the end in view as the authorization
by Congress of the issue of a certain amountof legal-tender notes, that
could at all times be converted into a currency interest-beariiig stock of
the United States, and fdr which the holder bf such stock so authorized
could at pleasure at any time receive legal-tender notes, with the accriied
interest, fiom the day of issue of such stock to the day of its redemption. It is believed that a rate of interest no higher than S/Q-^Q percent,
will be high enough to absorb the desired amouiit of the circulation
when not needed for commercial purposes, and low enough to force the
return of the bonds in exchange for legal-tender notes at the times, when
the business wants of the country shall require more currency..
This rate of interest, being just one cent a day for the use of one hundred dollars, would be popular with the masses of the people, because
of the ease with which interest could be computed on any amount for the



296

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

known number of days that a bond may have run. It is very probable
that the legally authorized amount of four hundred million dollars of legaltender notes need not be increased in order to carry out this scheme;
and it is more than likely that under the then changed condition of the
currency, with no tendency to go into wild projects and stock speculations, the minimum amount of three hundred aud fifty-six million dollars would, on account of its being readily obtained in exchange for the
proposed stocks, be sufficient for the easy transaction of the legitimate
business of the country at times when commercial wants shall need the
largest amount. It is believed that with this new attribute of the legaltender notes, the parties who are now so clamorous for more paper currency will become satisfied that no more is needed; and that those who
believe that it is mischievously redundant and a hinderance to the resumption of specie payments, will have opportunity to judge of the correctness of their preconceived opinions.
In addition to the urgent economical reasons, there are strong moral
ones why the legal-tender notes should again be made to be convertible
into United States stocks. The first issues of these notes bore the following legend upon their backs: ''This note is a legal tender for all
debts, public and private, except duties on imports and interest on the
public debt; and is exchangeable for United States six per cent, twenty years'^
^ow(?s, redeemable at the pleasure ofthe United States after five years."
These notes, so indorsed, were issued by virtue of and in accordance
with the acts of February 25, 1862, and of July 11, 1862. By the act
of March 3, 1863, the right of the holders of these notes to so convert
themwa,s made to cease and determine on the first day of July then following. The disavowal by the Government of this obligation was, no
doubt, influenced .by the fact that on the day of the passage, of the lastnamed act gold was quoted at 171 per cent. It was a war measure,
and was considered as a thing necessary to be done, at a time when,
the life of the republic was in peril. On no other ground could
such an^ act be justified. There is no longer any such necessity, and
it would seem to be but fair and just that the attribute of the convertibility of these notes into a stock of the United States should be
restored. The privilege of the reconvertibility of the stock into notes
would, perhaps, be an equivalent for the lower rate of interest that it is
now proposed to allow, below that fixed by former laws. Should the
national banks be. permitted to hold the proposed new bonds in part, or
, for the full amount of the legal-tender reserves required of them by existing laws, it would go far to prevent the pernicious practice on their
part of paying interest on deposits.
This practice has been, and will continue to be, unless inhibited by
force of law, the main source of all the financial troubles that have of'
late years disturbed and damaged all the business relations of the country. Banks were created for the purpose of loaning money, for the more
easy transaction of business, and not for the purpose of borrowing it for
purposes of speculation, and thus blocking the channels of legitimate
trade and commerce. So long as they confine themselves to this, their
legitimate business, they benefit themselves and the community as well.
But the moment they reverse the machinery and become borrowers instead of lenders of money, they not only put their own interests in peril,
but they become insti'uments of great danger to everybody within their
influence.
This practice on the part of national banks of paying interest on
deposits, and especially that of one bank allowing interest on the deposits of another, whetlier they be permitted to hold the proposed bonds



TREASURER.

':297

as a part of their reserves or not, should' be forbidden by law, under
the severe penalty of the forfeiture of their charters.
Objection will, no doubt, be made to the new attribute proposed to be
given to the legal-tender notes, on the ground that interest will have to
be paid on that part of them .which will be represented by the proposed
stock. The minimum amount of legal-tender notes, $356,000,000, is now
a loan from the people to the Government without interest. Should the
plan proposed be adopted, it is believed that at times the part of these
notes represented by stocks would amount to $150,000,000, and that at
, other times it would not be more than one-half that amount. This would
bring the average amount at iuterest to about $112,000,000. If the
. maximum of $400,000,000, authorized by law, should be issued, it woiild
reduce the amount on the diff'erence of interest to be paid by $44,000,000,
being an average of $68,000,000 on which interest would have to be
paid. This at 3/^% per cent, would amount tcf,$2,482,000 per annum.
The whole circulation issued by the Governn'^nt, including the fractional currency, would then be about four hunu^ed and forty million
dollars, on which the interest at five per cent.> H'Ould be twenty-two
million dollars. Deducting the amount of curreh>v^ interest that would
probably be paid on the contemplated new bonds j-S aforesaid, it would
still leave over nineteen and a half million of doll ?s as the saving of
gold interest by reason of this large loan by the pt \iple to the Government, on which thelatter pays no interest. The a iparent loss of less
than two and a half million dollars in currency to thvi people, who would
hold the stock, would be a mere trifle as compared with the great gain
that would accrue to^ the whole country in consequence of the better
circulating medium that would be introduced, and which, it is believed,
would protect them iu the future from " corners " of all kinds, and from
financial convulsions like the one that has just now swept over the whole
country like a tornado. This could not have happened bad there.been
an elastic and flexible, instead of our present rigid and unyielding, currency. There is. scarce a doubt but this financial revulsion has cost the
people in the aggregate hundreds of millions of dollars, to say nothing
> of the loss of revenue to the Government.
,
There are, no doubt, those w^ho suppose it to be their interest to have
money matters remain as they now are, who prefer a state of suspension
and unsettled values to the resumption of specie payments and a fixed
standard for the measure of exchangeable commodities, on the ground
that a return to specie payments would make money scarce, and thus
produce a great shrinkage in all values. These may .dismiss their fears.'
An irredeemable currency, fixed as to amount, rigid, like ours, makes
an uncertain measure of commodities, while a circulating medium that
is elastic, with gold for the standard, insures one that is more uniform
and equitable for both buyer and seller. Besides, resumption would
not necessarily reduce the volume of paper money; but it would certainly increase the aggregate circulation of the country by the amount
of gold and silver coin that would thereby be added to it. Expansion,
rather than contraction, would be a much likelier consequence as the
result of the resumption of specie payments.
Should, how^ever, the maximum of legal-tender notes authorized by
law be found to be inadequate and insufficient to prevent the brigands
and banditti who infest our money-marts, and who ^at times conspire
against the public weal by " lock-wps^^^ making money scarce when most
needed for business purposes, thereby robbing whole communities to
enrich themselves, the Secretary of the Treasury might be authorized
by law, in such case, or at any other time, when the exigencies of the



298

' REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Treasury may require the same, to issue an additional limited amount
of such convertible legal-tender notes in exchange for any United States
six per cent, stocks, allowing on and paying on such six per cent, stocks,
on such exchange, the average price borne by them on actual sales thereof in the open stock-market in the city of New York for the three
business days next preceding such purchase and exchange.
Should this become necessary and be done, the saving of interest on
the six per cent, bonds would probably more than equal the interest
that would be paid on the new bonds, into which legal-tender notes are
to be made convertible, as hereinbefore proposed ; thus not only making
the interest on the public debt less than would otherwise be paid, but
making a part of it payable in currency to our own people at home, instead of in gold to foreigners abroad.
The Postmaster-General has done me the honor to consult with me in
regard to a scheme that he proposes to recommend to Congress, for the
prtssage of a law authorizing tbe creation of a United States savings
institution, under the joint management of the Post-Office and the
Treasury Departments. By this plan, which, in some shape, has been
adopted in Great Britain and in other coantries, all persons will be
enabled to deposit with postmasters in all parts of the country amounts
of money for which, when received at the Treasury, will be issued to
them currency interest-bearing bonds of a like character as hereinbefore
described. As this would change a large amount of the indebtedness
of the nation from six per cent, gold interest-bearing bonds to others
bearing a lower rate of interest, payable in currency, thus making ia
great saving to the nation, and, at the same time, giving to all the
people, who choose to avail themselves of its benefits, a place of safe
deposit where they will be able to receive interest on their surplus
means, and as it will be an auxiliary and a help in the project before
indicated for the improvement of the currency, the plan commends
itself strongly to my judgment as one that would not only be of great
benefit to the individual depositors, who would at all times be able to
receive their deposits, wath the accrued interest, but to the people of
the whole country as well.
Should the plans herein proposed go into operation, they would, no
doubt, on the one hand, arrest the wild schemes of visionaries, who coiitract large debts abroad, for w^hich there is a continuous drain on this
country for the payment of the interest, on their unproductive undertakings, and on the other hand would facilitate the early aud rapid transportation of the staple products of. the country to the sea-board, for exportation to a foreign and profitable market. Both combined would
soon bring the balance of trade largely in our favor. After which it
would require no statutory enactments to enforce a return to specie payments. The natural laws of trade and commerce will, under such circumstances, bring about the desired resumption in a way peculiar to
themselves; and the transition from a state of suspension, to that of^
honest specie payments, will be so easy, that the world will wonder why
it did not take place before.
With a paper currency as proposed, secured as ours is, that will at
all times adjust and accommodate itself to the real business wants of
the country, and made still more elastic by the return to specie payments, and thus being at all times convertible into coin at the pleasure
of the holder, ihe country will possess a circulating medium superior to
that of any that has ever been known to any nation of the earth.




TREASURER.

299

DISBURSINa-OFFICERS^ CHECKS.

The act of Congress, passed May 2,1866, entitled " An act to facilitate
the settlement of the accounts of the Treasurer of the United States,
and to secure certain moneys to the people of the United States, br to
the persons to whom they are due, and who are entitled to receive the
same," has relieved this t)ffice of numerous accounts, some of which had
remained on.the books of the Treasurer for forty years. By the operation of this law, all moneys represented by these accounts that had
remained unchanged for three years or more on the books ofthe Treasury, or any of the. offices thereof, were covered into .the Ti^easury by
warrant to an appropriation account denominated "outstanding liabilities.^' The workings under this law have been satisfactory to all > persons claiining payment on drafts and checks. There has been no difficulty in the way of persons entitled to receive pay therefor, such payment being made upon the statement of accounts'in their favor by the
First Auditor.
Occasiohally claim is made that credit be given to a disbursing officer,
on the settlerneht of his accounts, on outstanding thecks issued by him,
on which he may have before received a credit on the receipt taken on
the delivery of the checks. If allowed, the bfficer Would thus receive
two credits for one payment. In order to obviate this difficulty, and to
reinove all doubt as to whom the credit is due, it is suggested that the
heads of the diff'erent Departments Of the Government may be asked to
issiie orders to all their disbursing officers Who make payments by
checks on the Treasury, or on any bf the bfficei?s thereof,'requiring the
disbursing officers, in such cases, to place the number of the check upoii
the receipt received therefor, and the number, of the receipt upon the
check given in payment for the same. If this cannot be done by departmental regulations, then it is suggested that Congress may be asked to
amend the act aforesaid, or to pass such a new law as will compel all
disbursing officers who make payments by checks on the Treasury to
conform to the above-mentioned regulations.
OUTSTANDING UNITED STATES CURRENCY.

The amount of outstanding national .currency at the close of the fiscal year was as follows:
Legal-tender notes
Deduct ambunt on hand
Fractional currency...-.
Deduct amount on hand

•.
i
...^..
i

Deriiand notes..^•.^.;.
.................
One-year notes
Two-year n o t e s . . . . .
Coupon two-year notes . . . . . . . .
Compound-interest'notes
Total amount of currency outstanding

J.
:
..:

$356,000,000 00
6,392,77100
:
— $ 3 4 9 , 6 0 7 , 2 2 9 00
44,799,.365 44
6,7D9,847 71
38,089,517 73
79,967 50
88,705 00
'
28,200 00
31,250 G
O
499,780 00
——
—7^7,002 50
.

388,424,649 23

From this amount there should be allowed a large margin for notes
bf all kinds that have been destroyed and lost, and that will never be
presented for redemption. The following table exhibits the amount of
the fractional currency of the first issue, commonly known as " postage
currency,'^ outstanding at the end of each of the fiscal yea-rs for ten



300

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

years from 1864 to 1873, both inclusive, and also shows the amount
redeemed and the percentage of redemptions in each of the ten years
mentioned.
The figures of the table show that in the year 1864 the amountof
this currency then outstanding was $14,842,335; of this amount there
was redeemed in the next fiscal year $4,903,747;34, being at the rate of
33 per cent., or very nearly one-third of the whole amount outstanding
at the .beginning of the year.
After that the falling off' of the amount of redemptions is shown to be
very great. By inspection of the last column of the table it will be seen
that while the decrease of redemptions in the next year was twenty-nine
per cent., it has been running down with highly accelerated speed from
year to year until, for the year closing with the thirtieth of June last, the
actual redemptions on the amount outstandiiig was a trifle less than
one-third of one per cent. These facts would seem to indicate that
nearly the whole of this issue, originally amounting to $20,215,635, that
still exists,, has been redeeined, and that probiibly about four million
dollars has been destroyed, and can be fairly deducted from the actual
circulation of the fractional currency, and that the national indebtedness
is reduced by that amount.
This is, to be sure, an extreme case. It is not probable that the saihe
rate of loss will obtain in the case of any of the other issues of the Government. This particular fractional currency was all issued between
August 21, 1862, and October 10, 1863, in a period of less than fourteen
months, in the early part of the rebellion, at which time it was extensively used for the payment of troops in the field, in the States then in
a state of insurrection, when and where, no doubt, the greater part of
that which remains unredeemed was lost.
Table shoioing the decrease in outstanding fractional currency., from year to
year . of the first issue, commonly known as postage-currency, .
J

For year ending—

1863
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

:..
30, 1864
30, 1865
30, 1866
30, 1867
30, 1868
30, 1869
30, 1870
30, 1871
30, 1872
30, 1873

Amount
outstanding.

$20,215,635 00
14,842, 335 00
9,938,387 66
7,041, 279 78
5,497, 538 934,881, 095 27
4,605,712 52
999
4, 476, 87
4,414, 025 04
4,391,299 09
979 15
4, 376,

Rate per
Actual decrease cent, of decrease.

$5, 373, 300 00
4,903,747 34
-2,897,307 88
1,543,740 85
616, 443 66
275,382 75
128,712 65
62,974 83
22,725 95
14,319 94

.265
.330
.291
.219
.112
.056
.028
.0140
.0050
.0032

In high contrast to this stand the redemption and percentage of the
outstanding circulation of the old demand notes. These are the other
extreme, and the redemption has been greater, and is nearer to the
full amount issued than that of any of the issues of United States currency. These notes were all issued within the space of one and a half
years prior to December 31,1862. This thorough and quick redemption
is due to the fact that they have always been receivable for customs
duties, and have for many years been redeemed in gold.
Gold was at a premium of thirty-three per cent, and upward when



TREASURER.

'301

the legal-tender notes were substituted in their stead, thus making three
demand notes equal to four legal: ten der notes of like denominations,.
These notes were always the eq.uivalent of gold. This, with their short ^
term of circulation, accounts for the small amount left outstanding.
Sixty million dollars of these notes, of the denominations of fives, tens,
and twenties, were issued, all of which, except $79,967.50, were redeemed
at the close of the fiscal year, being only about one and a third of one
per cent, left outstanding, while the outstanding part of the first issue
of the fractional currency is over twenty-one and one-half of dne per
cent, on the whole amount issued.
CONDITION OF THE CURRENCY.

The various offices of the Treasury, located in all the principal cities
of the country, afford to the holders of mutilated and defaced currency,
of all the kinds issued by the United States, facilities to have the same
exchanged for new currency of like kinds. The Department off'ers
additional inducements for sucli exchanges by paying the express
charges, both ways, on the transportation of old currency to the^
Treasury, and on the new in return for the same. In this way all
the issues of the legal-tender notes, and of the fractional-currency
as well, are kept in tolerably good condition. Not so with the issues
of the national banks; these have no such facilities, and no motive
for making such exchanges. .The consequence is that the larger part of
the notes of these banks is in a most wretched condition, many of them
being totally unfit for circulation. Section 23 of the national currency
act provides that these notes ^'shall be received at par in all parts of
the United States in paymentof taxes, excises, public lands, and all
other dues to the United States, except for duties on imports, and also
' for all salaries, and other debts and demands owing by the United States
to individuals, corporations, and associations, within the United States,
except interest on the public debt and in redemption of t h e national
currency." Under this provision of law. the national bank notes are received, in large numbers and amounts, in payment of taxes and dues,
by the assistant treasurers, designated depositaries, and national banks
designated as such depositaries, in the various places all over the United
States where these officers are located. These officers, finding that the
holders of drafts and checks on their offices refuse to receive these notes
on account of their worn and ragged condition, send them as transfers'
of funds by express from their offices to the Treasury.
Here, because no other disposition can be made of them, they are
assorted at considerable expense and with much labor, and sent, so
assorted, to the offices of the assistant treasurers, designated depositaries, and national banks designated as such depositaries,-in the cities
where the banks that issued such notes, or their redemption agencies,
.are respectively located, thus incurring a second expense for their
transportation, besides the loss of interest for three months' time from
the date of their original receipt until the time they .can be. converted into funds fit to be used in payment of dues from the Government. The cost of two transportations by express, the necessary expenses incurred for clerk hire, and other incidental expenses attending
their assorting and preparation for transportation to the various banks
and agencies, and the interest on the amount for the time consumed in
converting them into currency that can be used, amounts to more than
two per cent.




302

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The amount of legal-tender notes outstanding, as by the
books of this office, on November 1, 1872, w a s , . . . . . $360, 566, 764:
On the third, of October of the same year,
the national banks and their agencies
held of these notes as their reserves required by l a w . . . . . . . . . . . V - r.-.-..-.-. T -. $102,074,104
And there was in the offices of the Treasury, exclusive of special deposits for
certificates . . . ,
,...
6,392, 771
108,466,875
Leaving the actual circulation at . . . . . . ^ . , . . . . . . - »
252, 099,889
On the day first named the circulation of the national
banks amounted to
..-.-.- ,
3.40,993,470
The exchange of legal-tender notes for the year jjireced-.
ing, counted up in individual notes, w a s . . . . , . , . . . . ,
14,221,291
That of the naitional babuks, for the same time, deduct-. , '
ing 568,512 notes of banks in liquidation, for which no
new notes were issued, amounted to only.
5, 688,868
These figures, when compared with the respective issues outstanding,
arid on the supposition that like amounts, represent like numbers of
notes, would indicate that the United States had replaced one notaih
every s^eventeen and a .half, and. the national bankS; only pjie note in.
sixty.
Some, idea may be formed frprn this statem^At of the relative, condition of the two. kinds of currency. The. consequence is, that many of
the notes of the banks are so badly worn, torn, dirty, and defaced, t h a t
even experts: are often in doubt and unable to correctly judge of theirgenuineness, making it always a ri^k, often ending in loss to take, them.
Some remedy must be found for the correction of this evil. Unless,
the banks can be induced to provide for the prompt retirement, of such
of their notes aS: are and may beeorne unfit for circulation. Congress,
should he asked for the; passage of a, law compelling them to do so,; or
to authorize some arrangement through which the exchange of new for.
old and defaced notes of all the national banks can be made thrpug^h^
the instrumentality of the. Treasury Department.
I feel sure that you will be able to. devise sonie, ivlan tha-t. Congress
will, on your reconiinendation, enaotanto a.law that wiU work a perfect
cure, of the evil complained qf.
I)iscoMntorjb mutilated currency.
Formerly, under and by virtue of Treasury regulations, deductions^
were made, from the par face value of all United States: notes aiid frac^tional currency, for the proportional part that was missing from any
note returned to the Treasury for redemption. While the old rules CQUT
tinued in force, the deductions so made amounted to the, large sum of
$227,044.14. This source of revenue, if so i t may be called, has, now:
entirely ceased; and it: is feared-that frauds are being perpetrated.
A great clamor was raised by persons, who desired to commit frauds.,
Newspapers, whose editors and managers did not understand the frauds^
that. were.attempted to be practiced by so. manipulating like:notes as:
to compel the redemption, af a larger from a smaller number, joined the)
rogues in the unreasonable clamor, through which the Department waS)
induced to change the rule. Under the old regulations, the penalties^
collected for deductions, proportioned to the missing parts of mutilated



TREASURER.

.

303

notes deterred evil-minded persons from mutilating the currency. Under the new rules discounts ceased, and the practice of mutilation has
largely increased. Some penalty is necessarily required/to arrest the
evil. The national banks have, their protection in section 58 o f t h e
*' act to provide a national currency, secured by a pledge of United
State bonds.''
It is therein enacted: " T h a t every person who shall mutilate, cut,
deface, disfigure, or perforate with holes, or shall unite or cement together, or do any other thing to any bank-bill, draft, note, or other evidence of debt, issued by any such association, or shall cause or procure
the same to be done with intent to render such bank-bill, draft, note,
or other evidence of debt unfit to be re-issued by said association, shall,
upon conviction, forfeit fifty dollairs to the association who shall be injured thereby, to be recovered by action in any court having jurisdiction." Such a law, as far as it is applicable, with an additional clause ,
'declaring it forgery to mutilate any United States notes with the intent of
making a greater from a smaller number of such notes, has now, under
the changed rules aiid regulations, become necessary for the protection
of the public interest. But even such a law would not be as effective to
prevent frauds, nor as profitable, as were the old Treasury regulations,
which imposed the penalty on .the instant, in every case, and which
worked adjuQirably in everything- except for the interest of swindlers>
bent upon defrauding the Govemment and people by getting more notes
redeem.ed than were issued.
It is therefore most: respectfully, recommended that the; former riile%
and regulations, in regard to the redemption of United States noites and
fi'actional currency from which parts may be missing, may be again put
in force, or that Cphgress may be asked to pass such a law as may, at
|ea;St in part, prevent, in this/tegard, frauds iipon the Treasu.ry.
CONCLUSION.

The business of the office has been regularly performed by the officers,
clerks, and other employes belonging to it, to the satisfaGtion of the public doing business with thera, and it really affords mCi great pleasuTe, to
cornmend them for their industry and zeal in the performance of their
official duties. In this connection I desire to reiterate my often-repeated
expressions of opinipn, in my reports of fo.rm:er years, that the employes
of this office, through whose hands pass millions upon millions of inoney,^
receive a compensation lower than that paid for like, but less responsi-.
ble, services in banks or the offices of business mjen. I am sure, that*
they earn and deserve to receive better pay from the Government that
they serve so faithf'ully. Notwithstanding their: inadequate pay, not
one of the hundreds employed in this office has, since my last report,
taken a cent from thei money that is always within their reach. Through,
their vigilajnce; others have not been able tp; steal. I congratulate with
you that not one cent has been lost to the Treasury within the fiscal
year or since, through, any fault of any one Gonneoted! with this office.
I have the honor to be your obedient servant,
• ^ ' F ; F . SFINNEB,
Treasurer ofthe United States.
Hon.

W M ; A. EICHARDSON,

Secretary of the Treasury.




APPENDIX.
A.—GENERAL TREASURY.
I.—RECEIPTS A:!^D E X P E N D I T U R E S .

1.—Eeceipts and exxDenditures by warrants.
The books of the Office were closed June 30, 1873, after the entry of all moneys received and disbursed on anthorized warrants, as follows:
Eeceipts.
From—

Net.

Repayments.

Counter-warrants.

Totals.

$214,931,017 00
Loans
Customs
, . . 188,089,522 70
Internal Revenue
113,729,314 14
Lands....
2,882,312 38
', 840 95
Miscellaneous
29,037,055 45 ^2,023,227 38
V^^ar
2,264,035 12 29,402,654 11
990,788 14 2,752,791 26
Navy
208,862 26
1,464,545 48
Interior

,931,017 00
188,089,522 70
113,729,314 14
2,882,312 38
31,346,123 7831,666,689 23
3,743, 579 40
1, 673, 407 74

548,669,221 67 I 6,742,596 12 132,650,148 58
Late United States depositary, Galveston, Texas, formerly c r e a t e d
as unavailable
Balance from J u n e 30, 1872

588,061,966 37
2,033 32
106,551,641 24
694,615,640 93

Expenditures.
On acconnt of-

Net.

Repayments.

Counter-warrants.

Totals.

799 17
17 $607,630
21,851 91
47
216,630
208,862 26
74 1,464,545
2,817 58
77
38,383
31 2,264, 035 129,402,654 11
23
11,134
2,752,791 26
79
990,788
88,252 47
81
493,863
48,909 34
85
133,727
35
753 48
41
190,504 39
2,457 00
01
331,354 00

|21,837, 622 73
6,938, 600 67
38,984, 539 48•
7, 087, 860 96
77, 989, 827 54
20, 474 26.
27,269, 836 19
33,163, 655 50
1,755, 399 64
589, 451 35
3,910, 302 28
343,889, 772 01

524,044,597 91 1 6,742,596 12 132,650,148 58

563,437, 342 61

Amount allowed Treasurer United States by act of Marcli 3, 1873 —
Balance J u n e 30, 1873..
•...
•

161 00
131,178,137 32

Customs
Internal Reyenue
Interior
Interior, civil
Waj:

War, civil
Navy
Treasnry
Diplomatic
Quarterly salaries
Jndiciary
Pnblic Debt

- $21, ip9, 193
6,700, 118
37, 311, 131
7, 046, 659
46,323, 138
'
9, 340
23,526, 256
32,581, 539
1,572, 762
589, 451
3,719, 044
343,555, 961

694,615,640 93
NOTE.—Tbe above balance in t b e Treasury June 30, 1873, differs from tbat of tbe
Secretary and Register $161, tbe amount allowed t b e Treasurer as above, not yet credited by those officers.



TREASURER.

"

305

Monej^s advanced to disbursing officers, in excess of tbe amonnts required for disbursement, are returned to tbe Treasnry and carried to tbe credit of tbe ai^propriation
from which they were drawn by repay covering-warrants.
Connter-warrants represent moneys returned to appropriations, which moneys had
previously been expended on some other acconnt.
2.— Warrants.
The receipts, as stated in the foregoing table, were carried into the Treasury by
14,560 covering-warrants, which is 2,110 more than were issued dming the preceding
year. The payments Avere made on 31,493 authorized Warrants by 36,234 drafts on the
Treasury and the various branches thereof.
This is an increase in the nnmber of warrants issued over the nnmber issned during
the. preceding year of 4,473; and in the number of drafts of 4,477.
3.—Eeceipts and Expenditures by Ledger.
The actual receipts, as shoivn. by Cash-Ledger, were as follows:
Cash, Dr.
•
Cash-Ledger Balance, June 30, 1872
$107,587,169 25
Cnstoms
•
$188,061,469 07
InternalRevenue
113,715,722 83 •
Lands
2,884,375 89
Miscellaneons Revenue
4,276,761 27
Semi-Annual Duty National Banks
6,84^,379 24
Fines, Penalties, and Forfeitures
1,305,490 16 '
Premium on Sales of Coin
11,301,794 34
Profits on Coinage
535,419 17
Patent Fees
694,153 33
Pacific Raikoad repayments
532,903 38
Proceeds sales Government property, (War & N a v y ) . .
1,565,908 31
Conscience Money
•
25,55121
Sales of India,n Lands
714,361 71
Indian Trust-Funds
\.
234,301 17
Alaska Commercial Company
307,181 12
, Captured and Abandoned Proj)erty
88,991 67
Real Estate, direct t a x
, "
315,254 51
United States of Colombia!, South America
114,307 10
Prize-Money....;
298,364 87
Back pay of Members of Congress
' 196,513 02
'Slxper cent. Bonds of 1881..
150 00
Five-twenty Bonds, 1867
: . 1,500 00
Three j)er cent. Certificates
5,000 00
Coin Certificates
•
•
55,570,500 00
Certificates of Deposit, Act June 8,1872
; 57,240,000 00
Fractional Currency
38,674,800 00
United States Legal-Tender Notes..'.
63,519,067 00
War Repayments
2,270,644 23
Navy Repapnents
758,624 39
, .
Miscellaneons Repayments—chiefly Pensions
3,222,491 11
_
..— 555,273,980 10
Add amount received from late United States Depositary, Galveston, Texas
, 2,033 32
. Total

662,863,182 67

The actual expenditures, as shown by Cash-Ledger, were as follows:
Cash, Cr.
Pnblic Debt
War p i p p e r . . . .
.-.:
War, civil branch
'
Navjr
Interior, (Pensions and I n d i a n s ) . - - ' . . - - - .
Quarterly Sahmes
Judiciary
Customs
•

20 F



...j
..J

,^....

•

$343,887,315
48,735,191
20,474
24,523,617
, 38,619,682
589,298
3,910,058
21,667,662

01
36
26
31
27
05
00
34

306

R E P O R T ON T H E

Treasnry
•
Interior Civil, (Lands and Courts)
Diplomatic
Internal Revenue

FINANCES.

".

$33,152,570
7,085,042
1,706,219
6,890,062

:

10
98
60
75

Amonnt allowed Treasurer United States by Act of March 3, 1873

530,787,194 03
• 161 00 -

Actual gross expenditures

530,787,355 03

-

•.

Balance of cash in Treasnry Jnne 30, 1873 - -

132,075,827 64
662,863,182 67

The cash' balance consists of coin and coin items
Other lawful money
-.
Total-...^
Deduct cash-not covered by Warraiits
Balance, as showii by Warrant-Ledger

1 -.
:....

88,145,324 22
43,930,503 42
132,075,827 64
897,690 32
131,178,137 32

It.—BALAJS^CES T O T H E C R E D I T O F T H E T R E A S U R E R o r THE UNITED STATES, JUNE 30,

1873.
Treasurer United States, Washington
Assistant Treasurer, NeAV York
:
Assistant Treasurer, Boston
Assistant Treasurer, Philadelphia
Assistant Treasui'er, Saint L.omis
Assistant Treasurer, San Francisco
Assistant Treasui-er, NCAV Oiieans
Assistant Treasurer, Charleston
Assistant Treasurer, Baltimore
Assistant Treasurer, Chicago
Assistant Treasurer, Cincinnati
Depositary United States, LouisAaUe
Depositary United States, Buffalo
Depositary United States, Pittsburgh
Depositary United States, Santa F6
Depositary United States, Tucson
Depositary United States, Gah'-eston
NationalBanks
"
Assay-Office, NCAV York.-..
United States Mint, Philadelphia
,
United States Mint, Philadeli)h.ia, Nickel Account
United States Mint, San Francisco
United States Mint, Carson City
•
United States Mint, Deiwer
United States Mint', Charlotte
United States Mint, Dahl6nega
:

„. -.
:
'

Total.....,...-...

$28,483, 524 78
48,726,236 62
7,420,928 09
10,285, 894 99
. 1, 319,236 13
2,660,745 30
2,375, 089 58
80,949 28
2,542,242 85
302,555 37
1,774,003 31
105, 510 84
166,247 30
197,208 72
28,775 10
153, 549 35 •
• 778 66
7,510,920 56
10,503,023 22
3,197,913 29259,444 27
3,768,000 00
. 150,000 00
3,100 00
32,000 00
27,950 03
132,075,827 64

HI.—DISBURSING OFFICERS.

1.—Balances.
Treasurer United States, Wasbington.
Assistant Treasurer, Boston
Assistant Treasurer, NeAv York
Assistant Treasurer, Philadelphia
Assistant Treasurer, Baltimore
Assistant Treasurer, Charleston
Assistant Treasurer, Cincinnati
Assistant Treasurer, Cbicago
Assistant Treasurer, Saint Louis
Assistant Treasurer, New Oiieans
Assistant Treasurer, San .Francisco




•.

|1,487, 488 57

;

$616,784
4, 962, 982
938, 670
331, 386
156, 811
185,088
547,249
612,808
753,831
835,445

18
24
07
11
03
19
38
85
92
39
—.

9,941,057 36

TREASURER.
Depositary
Depositary
Depositaiy
Depositary
Depositary

United
United
United
United
United

States,
States,
States,
States,
States,

'

Biiffalo
Pittsburgh
Lonisville
Santa F6
Tucson

307
$78, 434
179, 029
340, 054
251, 623
130,245

68
42
85
00
11
$979,387 06
5,228,712 47

134 National Banks.
Total in all offices

17,636,645 46
2.—Eepforts.

There were received for examination, certification, and return to the Bureaus from
which they Avere sent, 73,715 reports of 1,666 Disbnr.sing Officers, as follows:
Officers of the United States Army:
Quartermasters
Commissaries
Recruiting Officers
Paymasters
Corps of Engineers
Ordnance Corps
Ad,iutant-Generars
Surgeon-General's
'.
Signal Corps
:
>
Superintendent United States Military Academy

424
303 '
\ . 79
'.. 54
47
29
15
6"
1
1
959

Officers of the United States NaA^y:
Pay Inspectors
Pay Directors
Paymasters
Assistant Paymasters
Past-Assi stant Paymasters

^

CiA'il Officers:

....

10
10
16
5
3

-

44
. *

Collectors of Internal ReA^enne, Disbursing Agents
Collectors of Customs, Disbursing Agents
Suiweyors of Cnstoms, Disbursing Agents...'.
•
India.n Agents,- Disbursing Agents
United States Marshals, Disbursing Agents
Officers of the Light-House Board, Disbnrsin g Agents
Commissioner of Northern Bonndaiy SurA'cy, Disbursing Agent
ReA^enue Marine Officer, Disbursing Agent
Other Disbursing Clerks and Agents
•
•

^-.'
-

364
^72
11
70
61
64
1
1
19
663

Total.,

1,666
IV.—TRANSFERS OF FUNDS.

To facilitate payments at points where the moneys were needed for disbursement,
transfer -letters, transfer orders, and bills of excbange Avere issned as follows:
1,910 Letters onNational Banks
..-:
....'...
$37, 301,004'76
220 Transfer orders on National Banks
....-..-,..
3,435, 000 00
40 Bills of Exchange on Collectors of Custoins
200, 000 00
737 Transfer Orders on Treasurers, Assistant Treasmers, and Depositaries
149,849,011 76
2,907 Transfers, amountingto
Of which amount there was in coin
And in currency




'
'.

190,785,016.52
35, 589,004 76
155,196, Oil 46

308

R E P O t l T ON T H E

FINANCES.

v.—UNAVAILABLE FUNDS JUNE 30, 1873.

Cuxrency:
First National Bank, Selma, Ala
Venango National Bank, Franklin, Pa

'

$59,978 07
217,391 38

Total witb National Banks
Deficit at New Oiieans, (Whitaker's)
Deficit at Santa F6, (Collins's)

$277,369 45
675, 325 22
30,058 83

Total with Assistant Treasurers and Depositaries. ..'.

705,384 05

Total Currency...*.
. Coin:
Balances at tbe outbreak of the rebellion: .
United States Mint, Charlotte, N . C
'
United States Branch Mint, Dahlonega, Ga
United States Depositaiy, Galveston, Tex

982 753 50

$32,000 00
27,950 03
778 66

Totai Coin

"

Total unaA-ailable

:

60,728 69

- - . . . 1,043,482 19

V I . — N A T I O N A L BANK D E P O S I T A R I E S .

The business transactions between the Treasury and National Banks as depositaries
were as folio AVS :
•
Balances bronght from last year's account
$7,777, 873 00
Receipts during the fiscal year
104,872, 605 87
Receipts on acconnt of transfers
, 6, 023, 387 50
Receipts for fractional cuiTency
2, 868,833 79
•

Total..

-

:

121,542,700 16

Payments dnring the year
Balance due the United States June 30, 1873
Total

.-..-..
1

,

114,031,779 60
7, 510,920 56
121,542,700 16

Payments through Expresses at GoA'^ernment expense
Payments Avithout exj)ense to the Government

3,435,000 00
110, 596,779 60

Total,....:

114,031,779 60
V T I . — O U T S T A J S ^ D I N G LIABILITIES.

Amount coA^ered into the Treasnry J n n e 30, 1872
And ill the fiscal year

:

Total

$263, 950 11
^ 107,267 41

...*.

371,217 52

Tbere had been jpaid to parties entitled to receiA^e tbe same,
Jime 30, 1872...
.^.
$38,633 a5
Paid during the fiscal year
....^.
26,393 18
65,026 23
306,191 29

Unclaimed balance remaining in the Treasury
•

Total

371,217 52
VIII.—CONSCIENCE

FUND.

Amount received from various persons from December Ij 1863, to Jnne 30,
1872
:
.:
•
$129,144 77
And in the fiscal year
25, 551 21
Total amount receiA^ed since NoA^ember 30, 1863



154,695 98

TREASURER.

309

I X . — O P E N ACCOUNTS.

With
With
With
With
With
With

Treasurer
Assistant Treasurers
Designated Depositaries
United States Mints
General Treasnry of the United States
National Bank Depositaries .'

,

.'

'

\ 1
10
6
8
1
159

B.—POST-OFFICE DEPARTMENT.
I . — R E C E I P T S AND E X P E N D I T U R E S .

The receipts and exxDenditures for and on account of the Post-Office DeiDartment
were as f OUOAVS :

Cashj Dr.

.

^

Balance fi'om. June 30, 1872
, $1,112,3,20 80
ReceiA'ed by Treasurer United States, Washington . ..j.
$57,468 63
Received by Assistant Treasurer,. NCAA^ York
6,794, 029 95
ReceiA^ed by Assistant Treasurer, Boston
550,955 33
ReceiA'ed by Assistant Treasurer, Philadelphia
487,178 30
Received by Assistant Treasurer, Saint Louis
173, 949 12
ReceiA^ed by Assistant Treasurer, Charleston
47,536 30
Received by Assistant Treasui'er, NCAV Oiieans
:.
105,468 28
ReceiA^ed by Assistant Treasurer, San Francisco
254,750 16 .
ReceiA'ed by Assistant Treasurer, Baltimore
124,283 28
ReceiA^ed by Assistant Treasurer, Chicago
134 40
Received by Depositary United States, Buffalo
468 93
ReceiA^ed by Depositary United States, LouisAille r.-....
515 00
ReceiA^ed by Depositary United States, Mobile
29,752 81
ReceiA^^ed by Depositary United States, Pittsburgh
3,483 89
^
ReceiA^ed by Atlanta National Bank, Ga
200 00
Received by First National Bank, Dubuque, Iowa
415 91
Received by First National Bank, Galveston, Tex
426 96
ReceiA^ed by First National Bank, LeaveuAvorth, Kans
578.55
Received by First National Bank, Portland, Oreg
75 00
Received by First National Bank, Springfield, 111
132 18 .
Received by Second National Bank, Detroit, Mich
3,527 13
Received by Second National Bank, LeaveiiAvorth, Ka<n-..
156 70
ReceiA'-ed by Second National Bank, New Haven, Conn . . .
500 00
Received by First National Bank, Richmond, Ya
157 99
ReceiA'-ed by First National Bank, Memphis, Tenn
3,234 54
Received by First National Bank, NCAV Albany, Ind
177 00
ReceiA^ejd by First National Bank, Trenton, N. J
78 17
ReceiA^ed by LynchbuTgh National Bank, Va
103 50
ReceiA^ed by Ea'st Tennessee National Bank, Knoxville...
114 44
ReceiA^ed b y Indianapolis National Banlv, Ind
650 04
ReceiA^ed by Merchants' National Bank, Little Rock, Ark.
551 33
ReceiA^ed by Merchants' National Bank, CleA^eland, Ohio..
1, 017 99
Received by Merchants' National Bank, SaA^annah, Ga
32,931 28
ReceiA^ed by Raleigh, National Bank, North Carolina .
2,140 50
ReceiA^ed by San Antonio National Bank, Texas
548 69
Received by The National Bank of Lawrence, Kans
55 59

:
Total receipts dnring the year
.\
To which add amonnt of drafts drawn in former years,
canceled this yeai?
Add also drafts canceled, and amounts carried to the credit
of the payees on the books of the Auditor for the PostOffice Department:
Drafts dated previous to the rebellion
Drafts dated since the rebeUion
•

:

%
,
8,677,747 87

120 90

107,339 55
8,725 76
116,186 21

Total




9,906,254 88

310

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Cash, Cr.
WiJrrants Avere issued on A^arious offices for the payment of the exx)enses of Postal
affairs, as follows:
.
On
On
On
• On
On
On
On
On
On

Treasurer United States, Washington
Assistant Treasurer, NCAV York
Assistant Treasurer, Philadelphia
Assistant Treasurer, Boston
1
Assistant Treasui'er, Charleston
Assistant Treasurer, Saint Louis
,
A ssistant Treasurer, NCAV Oiieans
Assistant Treasurer, San Francisco
Assistant Treasurer, Baltimore

$540,009^ 08
5,660,764 87
573,465 01
w • 607,984 22
271, 847 39
967,809 15
492,092 28
309, 939 43
285, 800 42

-.

Total amount of warrants drawn.
9,709,711 85
Add amonnt of Avarrants hitherto reported as canceled, but UOAV charged
back by direction of the Auditor for the Post-Office. Department
329 11
Balance due tbe Post-Office Department J u n e 30, 1873
196,213 92
Total..:

9,906,254 88

II.—APPROPRIATIONS FROM TREASURY FOR POST-OFFICE DEP^y^TMENT.

Moneys included in the foregoing statement of receixits Avere drawn from the Gen
ral Treasury on account of. the Post-Office Dexiartment under ax^x^rox^riations made by
Congress, as folloAvs:
To supx3 ly deficiencies in tbe revenues of the Post-Office Department, Acts Marcb 3, 1871, and June 1, 1872:
Jnly 6, 1872, paid part Treasury Avarrant No. 927
$268, 750
October 8, 1872, paid part Treasui'y Avarrant No. 1501
1, 046, 725
Jannary 4, 1873, paid part Treasnry Avarrant No. 18
. . . 1, 018, 750
Aprft. 5, 1873, paid part Treasury Avarrant No. 538
1,200, 000
, $3, 534, 225
For Mail-Steamsbix^ seiwice between San Francisco, Japan, and
China:
Julv 6, 1872, paid part Treasury warrant No. 927
October 8,1872, paid part Treasury Avarrant No. 1501
Jannary 4,1873, paid part Treasury Avarrant No. 18
April 5,1873, paid part Treasnry Avarrant No. 538
;
For Mail-Steamship service between San Francisco and the SandAAich Islands:
October 8,1872, paid part Treasury warrant No. 1501 . . . . . .
January 4,1873, paid part Treasury Avarrant No. 18
April 5,1873, paid part Treasnry warrant No. 538

125, 000
125, 000
125,000
125, 000
• 500, 000

18,750
18,750
18,750
56,250

For Mail-Steamshix) seiwice between the United States and
Brazil:
July 6,1872, paid part Treasury Avarrant No. 927
October 8,1872, paid part Treasury Avarrant No. 1501
JaniKiry 4,1873, paid x^art Treasnry AA^arrant No. 18
April 5, 1873, paid -pant Treasnry Avarrant No. 538

37,500 ,
37,500
37,500
37, 500
150,000

For free mail-matter under Acts March 3,1847, and March 3,1851:
July 6,1872, paid part Treasury warrant No. 927
Total amount receiA^ed from the Government

350,000
4, 590, 475

I I I . — R E C E I P T S AND PAYMENTS BY POSTMASTERS.

Moneys received by Postmasters on account of postage on letters, newsx^apers, x^amx^hlets, registered letters, emoluments, &c., disbursed by the Post-Office DexDartment with


TREASURER.

^

311

out beiug paid into the Treasuiy, but afterward carried into and out of the Treasnry
by Avarrant, Avere as fOUOAVS :
For
For
For
For

quarter
qnarter
qnarter
quarter

ending
ending
ending
ending

Sexitember 30,1872
December 31,1872
March 31,1873
June 30, 1873

:

.....:.

$4,506,835
4,723,512
4,789,427
4,730,494

,

Total

62
12
18
34

. . . . . 18,750,269 26

I V . — T O T ^ i L R E C E I P T S A N D E X P E N D I T U R E S ON A C C O U N T O F T H E P O S T - O F F I C E D E P A R T MENT.

Cash, Dr.
Balance from last year
!..-.
$1,112,320 80
From Postmasters and others
$4,087,272 8.7
From Treasury, on AA^arrants to supply deficiencies
3, 534,225 00
°Fi'om Treasury, on Avarrants for subsidies to steamsbix^s.
706,250 00
From Treasury, on Avarrants for free mail-matter
350,000 00
From cancellation of drafts
116,186 21
8,793,934 08
FromPostmasters, by w a r r a n t . .
„ 18,750,269 26
Total

28,656,524 14
Cash, Cr.

.

.^

By 8,005 Post-Office warrants drawn
9,709,711 85
By Amount of warrants for xDayments by Postmasters
18,750,269 26
By Warrants charged back by direction of the Auditor for ^the PostOffice Department
329 11
By Balance, cash on hand Jnne 30,1873
....,
196,213 92
Total...

28,656,524 14
C—NATIONAL BANKS.
I . — N U M B E R O F NATIONiiX B A N K S .

On the 30tb June, 1872, the numberof NationalBanks organized iand which had
dexiosited securities for their cii'culation, was
2,007
Number of banks organized in fiscal year

108

Number of National Banks to J u n e 30, 1873
The number of National Banks doing business June 30, 1873, was
Number failed x:>rior to Jnly 1,1872
\
Failed in fiscal year
HaAing IIQ circnlation, securities withdraAvn
Number in voluntary liquidation and closed

2,115
1,980
22
'
4
.:.
12
97

•.:

Total number of banks organized

2,115

II.—NEAV N A T I O N A L B A N K S .

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873.
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The

National Bank of Lyons, Mich.
Fit dC National Bank of Americus, Ga.
Ashland National Bank of Ashland, Ky.
First National Bank of Kansas, 111.
First National Bank of Belle Plains, Iowa.
First National Bank, of Carthage, Mo.
National Gold Bank of D. 0. Mills & Co., Sacramento, Cal.
Fayette County National Bank of West TJnion, loAva.
Home National Bank of Elgin, 111.
First National Bank of Muii", Mich.




•

.

312

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

The National Bank of Sxiring City, Pa.
The Springfield National Bank of Sp.ringfield, Tenn.
The Merchants' National Bank of Saint Paul, Miiin.
The Kane County National Bank of Saint Charles, 111.
The Farmington National Bank of Farmington, N.. H.
The National Bank of Marshall, Mich.
The Second National Bank of New Mexico, at Santa F<^.
The Merchants' National Bank of Middletown, Ohio.
The Second National Bank of Jefferson, Ohio.
. The First National Bank of Bozeman, Mont.
The First National Banls: of Clarinda, loAva.
The Merchants and Planters' National Bank of Montgomery, Ala.
The FiL-st National Bank of Fergus Falls, Minn.
The Ashtabula National Bank of Ashtabula, Ohio.
The Louisa County National Bank of Columbus Junction, Iowa.
The Brighton National Bank of Brighton, loAva.
The First National Bank of Garrett ville, Ohio.
Tlie r.ir8t National Bank of Lima, Ohio.
The Vinton County National Bank of McArthur, Ohio.
The First National Bank of Green Sxirings, Ohio.
»
The Second National Bank of Washington, D. C.
The Citizens' National Bank of Hillsborough, Ohio.
The Mannfactui'ers' National Bank of NCAV ark, N. J.
The First National Bank of Alliance, Oliio.
The First National Bank of CarliuAiUe, 111.
The Washington National Bank, of Washington, Ind.
:^ The Bank of Charleston National Banking Association, Charleston, S. C.
The German National Bank of NcAvark, I^. J.
The Fh'st National Bank of Buchanan, Mich.
The Central National Bank of Chicago, IU.
The Home National Bank of Chicago, 111.
The East Tennessee National Bank of KnoxAille, Tenn.
The Lehigh Valley National Bank of Bethlehem, Pa.
The First National Bank of Boone, Iowa.
The Malta National Bank of Malta, Ohio.
The First National Bank of Medina, Ohio.
The Fixst National Bank of GreeuAille, Mich.
The National Exchange Bank of Jefferson City, Mo.
The First National Bank of NCAA^ Lexington, Ohio.
The First National Bank of Lebanon, lud.
The Crooker National Baiik of Turner's Falls, Mass.
The Deseret National Bank of Salt Lake City, Utah.
The Merchants and Planters' National Bank of Union, S. C.
The Third National Bank of Sandusky, Ohio.
The German National Bank of Louisville, Ky.
The' Pella National Bank of Pella, loAva.
The State National Bank of Atlanta, Ga.
The National Bank of Birmingham, Ala.
The Gibson County National Bank of Princeton, Ind.
The City National Bank of Goshen, Ind.
The First National Bank of Yankton, Dak.
The First National .Bank of Eau Claire, AVis.
The American-German National Bank of Paducah, Ky..
The Third. National Bank of Urbana, Ohio.
The National Bank of Anderson, S. C.
The First National Bank of Northfield, Minn.
The Citizens' National Bank of the City of Yonkers, N. Y.
The City National Bank of Griffin, Ga.
The National Union Bank of Dover, N. J.
The First National Gold Bank of Stockton, Cal.
The Fii'st Naitional Bank of Conshohocken, Pa.
The First National Bank of Baraboo, Wis.
The Monticello National Bank of Monticello, Iowa.
The Lumberman's National Bank of Muskegon, Mich.
The Atchison National Bank of Atchison, Kans.
The North Ward National Bank of NeAvai'k, N. J .
The First National Bank of Ishpeming, Mich.
The First National Bank of Negaunee, Mich.
The Hibernia National Bank of NCAA^ Orleans, La.
The Winnsboro' National Bank of Winnsbo.ro', S. C.




TREASURER.
The Union National Bank of Rochester, Minn.
The Veazie National Bank of Bangor, Me.
The Richmond National Ba,nk of Richmond, Ind.
GThe Phosnix National Bank of Medina, Ohio.
The National Exchange Bank of Houston, Texas.
The City National Bank of Paducah, Ky.
The First National Bank of Manhattan, Kans.
The First National Bank of Centreville, Mich.
The Fourth National Bank of Memphis, Tenn.
The Lime Rock National Bank of Rockland, Me.
The Lagonda National Bank of Sxiringfield, Ohio.
The First National Bank of Denison, Tex.
The Edgar County National Bank of Paris, 111.
The First National Bank of Micbigan City, Ind.
The Noble County National Bank of CaldAveU, Ohio.
The Central National Bank of Boston, Mass.
The First National Gold Bank of Santa Barbara, CaL
The PeoxDle's National Bank of Helena, Mont.
The Missoula National Bank of Missoula, Mont.
The Natick'National Bank of Natick, Mass.
The Union Market National Bank of Watertown, Mass.
The National Bank of Barre, Vt.
.
The Wyoming Natioiial Bank of Lara.mie City, Wyo.
The Manufacturers' National Bank of Boston, Mass.
The First Ward National Bank of Boston, Mass.
The First National Bank of Ashburnham, Mass.
The First National Bank of Fayetteville, Tenn.
The Farmers' National Bank of Marshalltown, Iowa.

313

•
^

III.—NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE FAILED.

l.--Before July 1, 1873
The First National Bank of Attica, N. Y., in 1865.
The Merchants' National Bank of Washington, D. C , in 1866.
The Venango National Bank of Franklin, Pa., in 1866.
The First National Bank of Medina, N. Y., in 1867. ,
The First National Bank of Newton, NcAvtonville, Mass., in 1867.*
The Tennessee National Bank of MemxDhis, Tenn., in 1867.
The First National Bank of NCAV Oiieans, La., in 1867.
The First National Bank of Selma, Ala., in 1867.
The National UnadiUa Bank of Unadilla, N. Y., in 1868. *
The Farmers' and Citizens' National Bank of Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1868.
The Croton National Bank of the City of NCAV York, in 1868.
The First National Bank of Bethel, Conn., in 1868.
The First National Bank, of Keokuk, Iowa, in 1868.
The National Bank of Vicksburg, Miss:, in 1868.
The First National Bank of Rockford, 111., in 1869.
The First National Bank of NcA^ada, Austin, NeA^., in 1869.
The Fourth National Bank of Philadelphia, Pa., in 1871.
The Eighth National Bank of the City of NCAV York, 1871.
The Ocean National Bank of the City of NCAV York, in 1871.
The Union Square National Bank of the City of New York, in 1871.
The Waverly National Bank of Waverly, N. Y., in 1872.
The First National Bank of Fort Smith, Ark., in 1872.
2.—In the fiscalyear.
The Walikill National Bank of MiddletoAvn, N. Y., in 1873.
The ScandinaAian National Bank of Chicago, 111., in 1873^
. The Crescent City National Bank of NCAV Orleans, La., in 1873.
The Atlantic National Bank of the City of New York, in 1873,
^ Wbole number failed, 26. "
*The National Security Bank of Boston, Mass., has assumed the circulation of this
bank.




314

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
IV.—NATIONAL BANKS I N VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION.

1.—Before July 1, 1872.
The National Farmers and Mechanics' Bank of Albany, N. Y;
The Ax3pleton National Bank of Appleton,. Wis.
The First National Bank of Berlin,, Wis.
The Fii'vst National Bank of Bluffton, Ind.
The First National Bank of Carondelet, Mo.
The First National Bank of Cedarburg, Wis.
The Central National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio.
The Commercial National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio.
The Ohio National Bank of Cincinnati, Obio.
The First National Bank of Cuyahoga FaUs, Ohio.
The First National Bank'of ClarksAille, Va.
The First National Bank of Columbia, Mo:
^ The First National Bank of Dayton, Ohio.
The First National Bank of Decatur, 111.
The First National Bank of Des Moines, Iowa.
The Second National Bank of Des Moines, Iowa.
The National Insurance Bank of Detroit, Mich.
The National State Bank of Dubuque, loAva.
The National Bank of Chemung, Elmira, N. Y.
The Chemung Canal National Bank of Elmira, N. Y.
The Fort Madison National Bank of Fort Madison, loAva.
The First National Bank of Fenton, Mich.
The First National Bank of Frostburg, Md.
The First National Bank of HalloAvell, Me.
The Fourth National Bank of Indianapolis, Ind.
The First National Bank of Jackson, Miss.
The First National Bank of La SaUe, 111.
The National Bank of Lansingburg, N. Y.
The National Excbange Bank of Lansingbui^g, N. Y.
The First National Bank of Lebanon, Ohio.
The First National Bank of Marion, Ohio.
The National Bank of Maysville, Ky.
The Merchants' National Bank of MilAvaukee, Wis.
The First National Bank of NCAV Ulm, Minn.
The Grocers' National Bank of the City of NCAV York.
The Pacific National Bank of the City of NCAV York.
The National Bank of North. America of the City of NCAV York.
The Commercial National Bank of Oshkosh, Wis.
The First National Bank df Oskaloosa, loAva.
The National Union Bank of OAvego, N. Y.
The National Exchange Bank of Richmond, Va.
The Farmers' Nationfu Bank of Richmond, Va.
The National Union Bank of Rochester, N. Y.
The Fonrth National Bank of Syracuse, N. Y,
The SaA^annah National Bank of SaA'-anna.b, Ga.
The Miners' National Bank of Salt Lake City, Utah.
The First National Bank of South Worcester, N. Y.
The First National Bank of Skaneateles, N. Y.
The First National Bank of Saint Louis, Mo.;
The State National Bank of Saint Josepb, Mo.
The Merchants and Mechanics' National Bank of Troy, N. Y.
The First National Bank of Vinton, loAva.
The Farmers' National Bank of Waukesha, Wis.
The Saratoga County National Bank of Waterford, N. Y.
The First National Bank of AVellsburg, West A^a.
The United National Bank of Winona, Minn.
The National Savings Bank of AVbeeliug, West A^a.
The National Bank of WhitestoAvn, N. Y.
The Muskingum National Bank of ZanesAille, Ohio.
Whole number in liquidation before July 1, 1872, 59.
2.—In thefisoal year.
The National Bank of Couamerce of Georgetown, D. C.
The First National Banlv of Danvillej Va.
The First National Bank of Rochester, N. Y.



315

TEEASUEEE.
The Clarke National JBank of Rochester, N. Y.
The Merchants and Farmers' National Bank of Quincy, 111.
The Laurenceburg National Bank of Laurenceburgh, Ind.
The First National Bank of Knoxville, Tenn.
The National Bank of the Metropolis, AVashington, D. C.
The First National Bank of Goshen, Ind.
The Atlantic National Bank of Brooklyn, N. Y.
The Second National Bank of Zanesville, Ohio.
The Second National Bank of Sj^racnse, N. Y.
The Mechanics' National Bank of Syracuse, N. Y.
The Montana National Bank of Helena, Mont.
Number in fiscal year
Number before July 1, 1872

14
59

AVhole number in liquidation to July 1, 1873

73

v . — R E D E M P T I O N O F C I R C U L A T I N G N O T E S OF N A T I O N A L B A N K S , F A I L E D AND I N L I Q U I DATION.

• ftij
CD

Name of Bank.

CO
©
OQ

•g.2 o

^^
National Mechanics' and Farmers' Bank,
Albany, N. Y
Ax)xdeton National Bank, Appleton, AVis.
First National Bank, Attica, N. Y
First National Bank of NcA^ada, Austin
Nev
First National Bank, Berlin, Wis
First National Bank, Bethel, Conn
First National Bank, Bluffton, Ind
Farmers and Citizens' National Bank,
Brooklyn, N. Y
Atlantic National Bank, Brooklyn, N. Y..
First National Bank, Carondelet, Mo
First National Bank, Cedarburg, Wis
Central National Bank, Cinciunati, Ohio.
Commercial National Bank, Cincinnati,
Ohio
-.
Ohio National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio...
First National Bank, Cuyaboga Falls
Ohio
:
First National Bank, ClarksAille, Va
First National Bank, Columbia, Mo
ScandinaAian National Bank, Chicago
111
First National Bank, Dayton, Ohio
First National Bank, Decatur, 111
First National Bank, Des Moines, Iowa .
Second National Bank, Des Moines, loAva,
National Insurance Bank, Detroit, Mich.
National State Bank, Dubuque, loAva
First National Bank, Danville, Va
National Bank of Chemung, Elmka, N. Y.
Chemung Canal National Bank, Elmira,
N.Y
....:
^.
First National Bank, Fenton, Mich
Venango National Bank, Franklin, P a . . .
First National Bank, Frostburg, M d . . . . .
Fort Madison National Bank, Fort Madi-|
son, Iowa
First National Bank, Fort Smith, Ark.




,197 75
35,283 85
42,406 50

$28,102 50
5,800 00
500 00

$242, 300 25
41,083 85
42,906 50

101,721 50
30,575 80
23,339 50
32,446 25

15,11^ 00
6,210 00
2,000 00
5,000 00

116,836 50
36,785 80
25,339 50
37,446 25

239,163 25
24,348 75
56,497 00
142,000 00

. 7,187 00
89,505 00500 00
• 8,.500 00
120,115 00

246,350 25
89,505 00
24, 848 75
64, 997 00
262,115 00

285,455 00
192,000 00

34,000 00
148,240 00

319,' 455 00
340,240 00

16,804 75
10,000 00
10,425 00

11,500 00
11,155 00
1, 000 00

28,304 75
21,155 00
11,425 00

104,688 05
69,674 30
64,551 25
31,147 00
58,513 75
69,518 75
75,093 25

72,700 00
15,793 00
8, 900 00
15,002 50
5,500 00
11,000 00
27,425 00
24,500 00
9,505 00

72,700 00
120,481 05
78,574 30
79,553 75
36, 647 00
69,513 75
96,943 75
24,500 00
84,598 25

67,582 00
35,523 25
82,628 50
32,822 75

10,957 00
9, 500 00
500 00
3,500 00

78,539 00
45,023 25
. 83,128 50
36,322 75

7,500 00
3,500 00

44,000 00
32,005 00

51,500 00
35,505 GO

316

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.
V.—REDEMPTION OF CIRCULATING NOTES, ETC.—Continued.

<23 on

T i TH

Name of Bank.
(i) Cy
CJ

jH r^

•g-S o
P^

National Bank of Commerce, Georgetown,
D.C
First National Bank, Goshen, Ind
Montana National Bank, Helena, Mont..
First National Bank, HalloAvell, Me
Fourth National Bank, Indianapolis, I n d .
First National Bank, Jackson, Miss
First National Bank, Keokuk,' Iowa
First National Bank, Knoxville, T e n n . . .
National Bank of Lansingbnrg.h, N. Y . . .
National Exchange Bank, Lansihgbuigli,
N.Y
First National Bank, Lebanon, Obio
First National Bank( La Salle, 111
...
Lanrencebuxgh National Bank, Laurenceburgh, Ind
First National Bank, Marion, Ohio
National Bank of MaysAille, ICy
First National Bank, Medina, N. Y
Tennessee National Bank, Memxihis, Tenn.
Merchants' National Bank, MilAvaukee,
AVis.AVallkill National Bank, Middletown, N. Y.
First National Bank, NCAV Oiieans, La. ..
Crescent City National Bank, New Orleans, La
First National Bank, New Ulm, M i n n . . .
Croton National Bank, New York, N. Y . .
Eighth National Bank, NCAV York, N. Y . .
Grocers'National Bank, NA ^ York, N. Y . .
cA
Ocean National Bank, New A^'ork, N. Y . .
Pacific National Bank,.New York, N. Y . .
Union Square National Bank, New York,
NY.
National Bank of North America, New
York, N . Y
Atlantic National Bank, NCAV York, N. Y.
First National Bank, Oskaloosa, loAva...
National Union Bank, OAvego, N. Y . . . . . .
Commercial National Bank, Oshkosh, AVis.
Fourth National Bank, Philadelphia, P a .
Merchants' and Farmers' National Bank,
. Quincy, 111
National Exchange Bank, Richmond, A^a.
Farmers' National Bank, Richmond, V a . .
First National Bank, Rockford, 111
First National Bank, Rochester, N. Y . . . .
Clarke National Bank, Rochester, N. Y ..
National Union Bank, Rochester, N. Y . .
SaA^annah National Bank, SaA^annah, Ga.
Miners' Natioual Baaik, Salt Lake, Utah.
First National Baaik, Selma, Ala
First National Bank, South AVorcester,
• N. Y . . . . . . . - ' t . . . . - ' .'
F.iTst National Bank, Skaneateles, N. Y.
First National Bank, Saint Louis, M o . . .
State National Bank, Saint Joseph, Mo .
Second National Bank, Syracuse, N. Y . .
Fourth National Bank, Syracuse, N. Y . .




$50,505 00
49,400 00
$39, 690 75
33,500 00
31,515 00
86,149 0097, 012 -85
63,454 30
67,023 75

83,076
73,800
38,306
84,698

85
00
75
75

36,500 00

'i69,"5i6'56

5,953
29,300
4,500
2,000
41,700
15,679

00
00
00
00
00
00

45,643 75
62, SQO 00
36,015 00
88,149 00
41,700 00
112,691 85

12, 903 50
8,500 00
26,500 00

76, 357 80
75,523 75
26,500 00

111,400
13,341
139,500
500
3,180

00
50
00
00
00

36,502 50
57,900 00
4, 665 00

14,000 00
17.2,731 75
126,400 00
28,271 00
451,500 00
98, 542 25

148,000 00
18,710 00
3,659 00
78,399 00
5, 305 00
233,035 00
19,820 00

26,500 00

15,847 00

203,039 65
51,449
3,600
10,000
95,000

85
00
00
00

64,500- 00
31,533 25
39,983 00
184,518 25
68,325 25
28,300 00
80,816 75
124,838
103,995
142,691
61,158

75
20
05
20

11,000 00

$50,505- 00
49, 400 .00

111,400
96,418
213,300
38,806
87,878

00
35
00
75
75

73,002 50
57,900 00
174,175 50
148, 000
32,710
176,390
204,799
33,576
684,535
118,362

00
00
75
00
00
00
25

42,347 00

00
00
00
50
00
00

235,560 65
26,300 00
58,127 85
28,306 50
73,015 00
151, 005 00

92,000 00
81,705 00
29,550 00
3, 000 ,00
151, 602 50
113,910 00
22,590 00
8, 930 00
41,432 00
2,000 00

92,000 00
146,205 00
61,083 25
42,983 00
151, 602 50
113,910 00
171,108 25
7.7,255 25
69,732 00
82,816 75

32,521
26,300
6,678
24,706
63,0J5
56,005

16,002
13,177
18,298
16,307
35,000
62,435

50
00
00
50
00
00

140,841
117,172
160,989
77,465
35,000
73,435

25
20
05
70
00
00

317

TEEASUEEE.
v . — R E D E M P T I O N OF CIRCULATING NOTES, ETC.—Continued.
p^ C
O

ns C
O

Name of Bank.

t

O 4^

^'
Mechanics' National Bank, Syracuse,
N. Y . . . Merchants' and Mechanics" Bank, Troy,
N.Y
National Unadilla Bank, Unadilla, N. Y National Bank at A^icksburg, Miss - - . . ° . .
First National Bank, Vinton, Iowa
Merchants' National Bank, AVasliington,
D.C
National Bank of t h e Metropolis, AVashington, D . C
Farmers' National Bank, AA^aukesha, AVis .
AVaverly National Bank, \A^aveiiy, N. A^. .
Saratoga Countj^ NationalBank, AVaterford, N. Y
First National Bank, AVellsburg, AV..Va.-.
United National Bank, AVenona, M i n n . . .
National SaAings Bank, AA^heeling, AV. Va.
National Bank at \A''hitestOAvn, N. Y. . . .
Second National Bank, ZanesAille, Ohio
Muskingum National Bank, Zanesville,
Ohio - - - - Total.
VI.—DEPOSITS

$31, 000 00

$31,000 00

$139,622 20
94,519 50
21,208 75
32,523 75

18,819 00
2,995 00
2,900 00
5,500 00

158,441 20
97,514 50
24,108 75
38,023 75

171,334 00

3,570 00

174, 904. 00

• 61,500 00
5,000 00
44,665 00

61,500 00
86,820 25
53,965 00

88,322 55
37,503 00
19,OOQ 00
28,000 00
34,163 25

24,752 50
38,265 00
18,375 00
28,500 00
6, 350 00
68,500 00

113,075 05
75,768 00
37,375 00
56,500 00
40,513 25
68, 500 00

28, 000 00

42,000 00

81,820' 25
9,300 00

6, 035,657 70 3,241,778 00
MADE

O

P
^

70,000 00
9, 277,435 70

A N D BALAJNCES REM2VINING T O C R E D I T O F NATIONAL BANKS

FAILED AND IN LIQUIDATION.

Name of Bank.
National Mechanics and Farmers' Bank, Albany, N. Y .
Aunleton National Bank Annleton. AVis
•.
First National Bank, Attica N. Y
.
First National Bank of NeA^'ada, Austin, NCA'^
First National Bank Berlin AVis
First National Bank, Bethel, Conn
:
First National Bank, Bluftton, Ind
Farmers and Citizens' National Bank, Brooklyn, N. Y .
Atlantic National Bank, Brooklyn, N. Y
First National Bank, Carondelet, Mo
c
First National Bank. Cedarburo" AA^is
. . .
Central National Bank, Cincinnati,.Ohio
Commercial National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
....
Ohio National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
.•
.
First National Bank, Cnyaho2;a Falls, Ohio
First Nati onal Bank, ClarksA^'ille, Va
First Natioual Bank, Columbia, Mo
ScandinaAian National Bank, Chicago, 111
First National Bank, Dayton, Ohio
First National Bank, Decatur, 111
Fii;st National Bank, Des Moines, loAva
Second National Bank, Des Moines, loAva
National Insurance Bank, Detroit Mich .
National State Bank, Dubuque, loAN'^a
First National Bank, Danville, Va




Deposits to redeem notes.
$266,540
45,000
44,000
129,700
40,077
26,300
,41,230
253,900
154,000
25,500
72,000
319,870
345,950
404,900
32, 400
27,000
11,990
135,000
132,100
^ 85,250
89,300
40,300
75,500
I12,600
35,000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00^
00
00
00
00

Balance remaining.
$24,239 75
3,916 15
1,093 50
12,863 50
3 291 20
960 50
3,783 75
7,549 75
64,495 00
651 25
7 OO.'^ 00
57,755 00
26,495 00
64,660 00
4,095 25
5,845 00
565 00
62, 300 00
11,618 95
6,675 70
9,746 25
3 653 00
5,986 25
15,656 25
10,500 00

318

REPORT

ON T H E FINANCES.

VI.—DEPOSITS MINJDE AN^D BALiVNCES REMAINING, ETC.—Continued.

Name of Bank.
National' Bank of Chemung, Elmira, N. Y
Chemung Canal National .Bank, Elmira, N. Y
First National Bank, Fenton, Mich
A^enango National Bank, Franklin; P a
First National Bank, Frostburg, Md
Fort Madison National Bank, Fort Madison, loAva . . .
First National Bank, Forfc Smith, Ark
National Bank of Commerce, GeorgetoAAni, D. C
First National Bank, Goshen, Ind
'.
Montan a National Bank, lielena, Mont
2
First National Bank, HalloAA-^CU, Me
irourth National .Bank, Indianapolis, Ind
First National Bank, Jackson, Miss
First National .Bank, Keokuk, loAA'a
First National Bank, KnoxAille, Tenn
National Bank of Lansingburgh, N. Y
National Exchange Bank, Lansingburgh, N. Y
First National Bank, Lebanon, Ohio
First National Bank, La Salle, 111
Laurenceburgh National Bank, Laurenceburgh, Ind .
First National Bank, Marion, Ohio
National Ba.nk of Maysville, Ky
First National Bank, -Medina, N. Y
Tennessee National Banli, Memphis, Tenn
Merchants' National Bank, Mihvaukee, AA^is
AVallkill National Bank, MiddletoAvn, N. Y
First National Bank, NCAV Oiieans, La
Crescent City National Bank, NCAA^ Orleans, L a
First National Bank, NCAA^ Ulm, Minn
Croton National Bank, NCAV York, N. Y ...Eighth National Bank, New York, N. Y
,,
Grocers' National Bank, NCAY York, N. Y
Ocean National Bank, New York, N. Y
Paciiic National Bank, NCAV York, N. Y
Union Square National Banlv, NCAV York, N. Y
National Bank of North America, New Yorlc, N. Y . . .
Atlantic National Bank, NCAV York, N. Y
\
Fii'st National Bank, Oskaloosa, loAva
:
National Union Banlv, OAvego, N. Y
Commercial National'Bank, Oshkosh, AA'is
'
Fourth National Bank, Philadelphia, P a
Merchants' and Farmers'National Bank, Quincy, 111.
National Exchange Bank, Richmond, A^a
Farmers' National Bank, Richmond, A^a
First National Bank, Rockford, 111
First National Bank, Rochester, N. Y
/Clarke National Bank, Rochester, N. Y
National Unioii Bank, Rochester, N. Y
SaA^annah National Bank, Savannah, Ga
Miners' National Bank, Salt Lake, Utah
:
First National Bank, Selma, Ala
First National Bank, South AA^orcester, N. Y
First National Bank, Skaneateles, N. Y
Fii'st National Bank, Saint Louis, Mo
State National Bank, Saint Joseph, Mo
Second National Bank,'Syi'acuse, N. Y
Fourth National Bank, Syracuse, N. Y.
Mechanics' National Bank, Syracuse, N. Y
...
Merchants' and Mechanics' National Bank, Troy,N. Y,
National Unadilla Bank, Unadilla N." Y
'
NatioJial Bank of A^icksburg, Miss
First National Bank, Vinton, loAva
:
Merchants' National Bank, A\^ashington, D . C




Deposits to re
deem notes.
$90,000 00
86,500 00
49,500 00
85, 000 00
40,750 00
67,500 00
45,OdO 00
68,400 00
103,500 00
31,500 00
50,850 0075,100 00.
40,500 00
90,000 00
80,910 00
123, 000 00
85,692 00
• 85,000 00
33,200 00
179,500 00
105,833 00
270,000 00
40,000 00
90, 000' 00
90,000 00
118,900 00
180,000 00
193,437 50
42,200 00
180,000 00
243,393 00
39,440 00
800,000 00
130,275 00
. 50,000 00
267,200 00
27,363 75
63,745 00
.$82, 850 00
90,000 00
179,000 00
135, 000 00
. 172 120 00
76,500 00
45,000 00
206,100 00
153,900 00
189,950 00
85,000 00
90,000 00
85,000 00
152,900 00
128,415 00
179,990 00
86,187 00
90,000 00
91,700 00
93,800 00
170,850 00
100,000 00
25,500 00
41, 615 ^00
180,000 00

Balance remaining.
$5,401 75
7 961 00
4 476 75
1 871 50
4 427 25
16 000 00
9 495 00
17 895 00
54 100 00
31 500 00
5 206 25
12 300 00
4 485 00
1 851 00
39 210 00
10 308 15
9 334 20
9 476 25
6 700 00
68 100 00
9 414 65
56 700 00
1 193 25
2 121 25
16 997 50
61 000 00
5 8.24 50
45 437 50
9 490 00
' 3 609 25
38 594 00
5 864 00
115 465 00
11 912 75
7 653 00
31 639 35
1 063 75
.7
5 6 1 15
$54 543 50
985 00
16
27 995 00
43 000 00
25 915 00
15 416.75
2 017 00
54 497 50
39 990 00
18 841 75
7 744 75
20 258 00
2 183 25
12 058 75
11 242 80
19 000 95
8 721 30
55 000 00
18 265 00
62 800 00
12 408 80
2 485 50
1 391 25
. 3 591 25
5 096 00

TREASURER.

»

319

VI.—DEPOSITS MADE AND BALANCES REMAINING, ETC.—Continued.

Balance remaining.

Deposits to redeem notes.

Name of Bank.

11,195,038 25

Total

$55,400
3,179
17,035
13,924
13,732
6,750
11,200
3,986
69,640
16,200

$116,900 00
90,000 00
71,000 00
127,000 00
89,500 00
44,125 00
67,700 00
44,500.00
138,140 00
86,200 00

National Bank of the Metropolis, AVashington, D. C Farmers' National Bank. AVankesha. AVis
AVaverlA^ National Bank. AVaverlv. N. Y .. .
. 1.
Saratoga County National Bank,.AVaterford, N. Y
First National Bank. AVellsburg'. AVest Va
ITnited National Bank AVenona. Minn
National SaA'^ino's Bank AVheeliner. AVest Va
National Bank of AVhitestoAvn, N. YSecond National Bank, ZanesAille, Ohio
Muskingum National Bank, Zanesville, Ohio

00
75
00
95
00
00
00
75
00
00

1,917,602 55

VII.—SECURITIES HELD I N TRUST FOR NATIONAL BANKS.

1.—To assure the redeinption of circulating notes, June 30, 1873.
Registered United States Bonds, 6 per cent., coin
Registered United StatesBonds, 5 per cent., coin

$146, 823,500
229,487,050

Registered United States Bonds, 6 per cent,, currency
Amount, June 30, 1873
Amount received in fiscal year .•
Amount Avithdravni in fiscal year
Increase in fiscal year
Amount held J u n e 30, 1872
Total

14,100,000

'.

•

390,410,550

''
-

-. -

:..-

31, 916,400
21,946,550
9,969,850
380,440,700
390,410,520

2.—To assure puhlic Deposits with National Banlc Dexiositaries, June 30, 1873.
Registered United States Bonds, 6 per cent., coin
Registered United States Bonds, 5 per cent., coin
Registered United States Bonds, 6 per cent., currency
Coui)on United States Bonds, 6 per cent., coin
Coupon United States Bonds, 5 per cent., coin.
Personal Bonds

$6, 352,900
6,713, 200
784,000
503, 400
856, 500
350,000

.-

15,560, 000
Amount withdrawn in fiscal year
Amouiit received in fiscal year

^
i

Decrease within fiscal year
Total June30,1873

-•....

Amount held June 30, 1873

1,606, 000
1,407,000
199,000
15,560,000
15,759,000

3.—Eecapituiation.
To. assure the redemption of circulating notes of National Banks
To assure Public deposits with National Banks
.'
To assure subscriptions to the Funded Loan of 1881
Total securities .of National Banks at par




$390,410, .550
15,560, 000
12,774, 350
418,744,900

320

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

4.—Depositaries.
On the 30th June, 1872, the number of Banks, Depositaries, of the United States,
Avas
Number designated and re-instated in fiscal year
6
Number discontinued in fiscal year
11
—
Number of Depositaries June 30,1873

163'
5
158

5..—Statement by Loans of United States honds held in trust for National Banlcs.

Bonds.

Rate of interest.'

AVhen redeemable.

Amount.

REGISTERED.

Title:
Loan of 1858
. . '
Loan of February 1861, (1881s) ..
Loan of July and August, 1861,
(1881s.)
5-20s of 1862
:..
Loan of 1863, (1881s)
10-40s of 1864
5-20s of March, 1864
5-20s of 1865
'...
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867
Consols of 1868
Funded Loan of 1881
Pacific Raihvay July 1, 1862, and
July 2, 1864.
5-20s of 1864

5 per cent., coin . After Jan. 1,1874
6 per cent., coin . Dec. 31, 1880
6 per cent., coin . Jime 30, 1881 . . . .

$620 000
4,230, 000
59 997,400

6 per cent., coin .
6 per cent., coin .
5 per cent., coin .
6 per cent., coin .
6 x^cr cent., coin .
6 x^er cent., coin .
6 ^QT cent., coin .
6 per cent., coin 5 x^cr cent., coin .
6 per cent., cia^rency.
6 per cent., coin .

April 30,1867.....
4, 543, 850
June 30, 1881 . . . . 32,667,000
Feb. 28, 1874.
109,268,550
October 31, 1869.
709,000
October 31, 1869. 10,627,700
July 1, 1870
8, 532,150
July 1, 1872
17,147, 650
July 1, 1873
• 3,987,000
M a y l , 1 8 8 1 . . . . . . 126, 311,700
January 1895-'98
14, 884, 000
October .31, 1869

10,734,650

6 x^er
6 x'xsr
6 ]}eT
6 x^cr
5 x^er
6 x^er
6 per
6 per
6 per

July 1, 1881
Jnne 30, 1881 . . . .
AxDiil 30, 1867....
June 30, 1881
Feb. 28, 1874 . . . .
October 31, 1869
October 31, 1870
July 1, 1870
July 1, 1872

47, 900
37,500
12,500
200 000
856,500
78,000.
60,000
• 63,500
4, 000
350,000

COUPON.

Title:
Oregon AA^ar Debt
Loan of July and August, 1 8 6 1 . . .
5-20sof 1862
Loan of 1863, (1881s)
10-40s of 1864
5-20s of June, 1864
5-20sofl865
. ...
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867
Personal bpnds held for public
deposits.
Total secui'ities

cent.,
cent.,
cent.,
cent.,
cent.,
cent.,
cent.,
cent.,
cent.,

coin
coin
coin
coin
coin
coin
coin
coin
coin

.
.
.
.
.
.

405,970, 550

6.—Special deposits of bonds by National Banks designated hy the Department as Coin Depositaries for subscriptions to the Funded Loan of 1881.
From February 14, 1873, to June 30, 1873, the First National Bank of AVashington,
D. C , made deposits of United States bonds with the Department as security for siibscrix^tions to said loan, which Avere xilaced in custody of this office, namely :
Number of deposits made
92
Number of Avithdrawals made
188
Largest amount on deposit. May 2, 1873
$14,277,450
On the 30th June, 1873, the amount on dex)osit Avas $12,774,350, all of which has since
been AvithdraAvn.




TREASURER.

321

7.—Eeceipts and withdrawals of United States bonds held for circulation:
Loan.

Received.

Amount held for circulation July 1,1872.
Loanof 1858
.Loan of Februaiy, 1861
Loan of July and August, 1861, (1881s)...
.5-20s of 1882
Loanof 1863, (1881s).10-40sof 1864
•....:
5-20sof 1864
.5-20s of 1865
Consols of 1865
Consols.of 1867-..*
Consols of 1868
:
5-20sof March, 1864
Pacific Railway
Funded Loan of 1881
Amount on hand June 30, 1873

A¥itb drawn.

$380, 440,700
254, 000
857,150
25, 000
890,700
880, 550
98,600
121, 000
428,250
242, 050
535, 000
10, 000
19, 574,100
412, 357,100

Total.

.

$20,000
124, 000
1, 389, 300
4,355, 950
480,500
3^ 148,150
5,933, 300
1,999,200
651,250
627, 700
321, 500
1,395,000
512,000
988,700
390,410, 550
412,357,100

8.—Eeceipts and withdrawals of United States honds held for Public deposits.
Loaii.

ReceiA^ed.

Amonnt bonds on hand Julv 1.1872
Oregon AA^ai^ Debt
Loan of February, 1861, (1881s)
Loan of Jnly and Angust, 1861, (1881s)
5-20s of 1862
Loan of 1863, (1881s)
10-40s of 1864
5-20s of June, 1864
5-20s of 1865
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867
Consols of 1868
Pacific Railway
Funded Loan of 1881
Personal bond
Amount held June 30, 1873
Total

•

$15,759, 000
31,900
2,000
43, 050
103,450
381,000
44, 000
95, 700
92, 900
78,500
• 514,500
20,000

' $50,000
62, 500
102, 000
51, 000
522, 000
41,000
10,000
197, 000
360, 500
210,000
15,560,000

17,166,000

:

AV^ithdrawn.

17,166, 000

9.—Coupon Interest.
Payment of coin interest on conxoon bonds held in trust was made by tbe issue of 117
drafts, amounting to $107,987.
10.-^Examination of securities.
The number of examinations of securities held in trust for National Banks, made
under section 25 of the National Currency act, was 1,300.

21 F




322

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

'

AT:II.—SEMI-ANNUAL DUTY.

i.—Semi-annual Duty paid hy National Banlcs during the calendar year xireceding January 1,
1873,. wide)' section 41 of the National Currency act.
For the term of six months x:)receding July 1, 1872:
On circnlation
Ondeposits
On ca,xHtal-For the term of six inonths xireceding January 1, 1873:
On cit'culation
On deposits
On capital
Total duty for the y e a r . . - -

$1,618,127 75
1,571,969 10
197,768 22
$3,387,865 07
'
1,664,469 71"
1,572,870 35
221,115 53
3,458,455 59

-

'

6,846,320 66

2.—Comxmrison, of Duty for 1871 and 1872.
Amount receiA^ed in the year x:>recedin.g Jannary 1, 1873
Amount receiA^ed in the yeai' preceding January 1, 1872

'

Increase of duty in last calendar year

$6,846, 320 66
6,505,812 21
.....

340,508 45

D.—UNITED STATES PAPER CURRENCY.
I.—ISSUED, REDEEMED, AJS^D OUTST^VNDING TO JUNE 30, 1873, INCLUSIATH:.

Old Deinand Notes.
Denominations.

Issued.
$21,800,000 00
20,030 00
18,200, 000 00

Total

$21,769,037 50
20,001,115 00
18,179, 880 00

$30,962 50
28,885 00
20,120 00

60,030,000 00

Five Dollars . ^
Ten Dollars
Twenty Dollars

Redeemed,

. 59,950,032 50

79,967 50

Outstanding.

Legal-Tendei' Notes, new issue.
Denominations.
One Dollar
.......
Two Dollars
Five Dollars
Ten Dollars
Twenty Dollars
Fiity Dollars
One Hundred Dollars..
Five Plundred Dollars.
One Thousand Dollars.
Total.

Issued.

$28,351, 348 00 $26, 449,336 50
31,725, 313 00
34, 071,128 00
000 00
84, 496,762 50
101, 000,
118,010, 000. 00 92, 019,770 00
7a, 644,500 00
102,920, 000 00
27,350, 400 00
30, 055,200 00
35,883, 400 00
40, 000,000 00
56, 283,.500 00
58,986, 000 00
155,928, 000 00 152,711, 000 00

Outstanding.
$1, 902,Oil 50
2, 345,
815 00
' 16,503, 50
237
25, 990,
230 00
24,275, 500 00
2,704, 800 00
4,116,600 00
2, 702,500 00
000 00
3, 217,

669,321,676 00
Deduct discounts for mutilations.
Total amonnt actually outstanding.

585,563,982 00

83,757, 694 00

135,000 00

669,321,676.00

Destroyed in Chicago, denominations unknoAvn




Redeemed.

135,000 00

585,698,982 00

83,622,694 00
200 00
83,622,494 00

-

323

TREASURER.
Legal-Tender Notes, series of 1869.
Denominations.

Issued.

One Dollar

Redeemed.

Outstanding.

$36, 312,OGO 00
42, 848,000 00
41, 940,000 00
000
. 73, 480, 00
60, 880,000 OO30,200, OOO 00
28, 720,000 00
34, 800,000 00
54, SOO,000 00

--

FiA'e Dollars.'
TenDollars--TAventy Dollars
Fifty Dollars
One Hundred Dollars".
FiA^e liundred Dollars:
One Thousand Dollars.

$9,302,702 00
10,982,959 00
1, 043,270 00
2,618,160 00
781,800 00
642,925 00
485,800 00
5,063,500 00
5,454,000 00

$27, 009,298 00
31, 865,041 00
40, 896,730 00'
70, 861,840 00
60, 098,200 00
29, 557,075 00
28, 234,200^ 00
29,736, 500 00
49, 346,000 00

403,980, 000 00

TAVO Dollais

36,375,116 00

367,604, 884 00

865,000 do

865,000 00

37,240,116 00

366,739, 884 00
94,362,578 00

Destroyed in Chicago, denominations iniknoAA" n
Total
403,980,000 00
Deduct for ncAv^ notes not pi^t in circnlation

272,377,306 00

245 oa

Deduct discounts for mutilations
Total amount actually outstanding.

272,377,061 00

Legal-Tender Notes, new issue, and series of 1869.
Issued.

Denominations.

$64,663,348
76,919 128
14.2, 940, 000
191,490,-000
163, 800, 000
60,255,200
6S, 720,000
93,786,000
210,728,900

Redeemed.
50
00
50
00
00
00
00
00
00

$28,911, 309 50
34, 210,856 m
57, 399,967 50^
96,852, 070 00
84, 373,700 00
32,261, 875 00
32, 350,800 00
32, 439,000 00^
52, 563,000. 00

621,939, 098 00
1,000,000 00

451, 362, 578 00.
1,000,000 00'

622,939, 098 00
Deduct for nCAv notes not put in circulation .

450,362„578 00
94,.362, 578 00

Deduct discounts for mutilations

356,.000,000 00
445 00^

One Dollar
TwoDollars
FiA^e Dollars
Ten Dollars
Twenty Dollars
.Fifty Dollars
One Hundred Dollars
Five Hundred Dollars
One Thonsq^nd Dollars

,..
-

Total
1,073,301,676
Destroyed in Chicago, denominations unknown ..

Total amonnt actually outstanding .
''New Issue," less discount, outstan di ng"-.-.
'^ Series of 1869," less discount, outstanding
Total as above




$35,752, 038
42,708, 272
85, 540, 032'
• 94,637, 930
79, 426,- 300
27, 993, 325
36,369, 200
61, 347, 000
158,165, 000

Outstanding.

355,999,555 00'
83,.622,.494 00
272,377,061 00
355,999,.555 0 ^

324

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

One-Year Notes of 1863.
D enomin ation s.

Redeemed.

Issued.

Outstanding. •

$6,200, 000
16,440, 000
8,240,000
13,640, 000

$6,182, 965
16,397, 540
8, 225,500
13, 625,200

$17,035
42,460
14,50014, 800

, • • Total
.......|
44,520,000
Deduct for unknoAvn denominations destroyed.

44,431,205

88,795
90

Ten Dollars
-..,..
Twenty Dollars
FiftyDollars
One Hundred Dollars ,

Total amount actually outstanding

88,705

Two-Year Notes of 1863.
Denominations.

Issued.

Redeemed.

Outstanding.

$6,800,000
9,680, 000

Total

$6,783,800
9, 668, 000

$16,200
12,.000

16, 480, 000

Fifty Dollars
One Hundred Dollars

16,451,800

'28,200

Two-year Conxion Notes of 1863.
Denominations.
Fifty Dollars . .1
One Hundred Dollars"
Five Hundred Dollars
One Thousand Dollars

Issued.

Redeemed.

$5,905,600
14,484, 400
40,302,000
• 89,308,000

'.

150,000,000
Total
. . .
Dednct for unknoAAm denomination s destroyed

Outstanding.

$5,900,850
14,473,900
40,298, 500
89,285,000
.

$4 750
10,500
3 500
23,000

149,^58,250

41 750
10,500
, 31, 250

Compoimd-Interest Notes.
Denominations.
Ten Dollars
Twenty Dollars
Frt'ty Dollars
One Hundred Dollars
Five Hundred Dollars
One Thonsand Dollars
Totiil
Outstanding J n n e 30, 1872
Redeemed AA'ithin the fiscal year
Outstanding as above ..




Issned.

,.

Redeemed.

Outstanding.

$23,285,200
30,125, 840
60,824,000
45, 094, 400
67,846,000
39, 420,000

$23,200,990
30. 001,470
60>659,600
45,004,100
67,819,500
39, 410,000

$84,210
124, 37.0
. 164,400
90, 300
26,500
10 000

• 266, 595, 440

266, 095,660

499 780
622,'530
122 750
499,780

325

TEEASUEEE.
Fractional Currency, First Issue.

(

Five Cents
Ten Cents
Twenty-fiA''e Cents
Fiftv Cents

Redeemed.

Issued.

Denominations.

Outstanding.

•

$1,. 204, 587 54 $1,038,301 46
$2, 242, 889
1,267,653 30
'2,847,724.70
4,115, 378
1,059, 883-14
4,165,812 86
5, 225, 696
1, Oil, 141 25
8, 631, 672 . 7,620,530 75

.":
•
•

20,215, 635

Total
Deduct discounts for mutilations

15,838,655 85

.

Total amount actually outstandingT " '
3

4,376,979 15
13 30
4, 376,965 85

-

Fractional, Currency, Second Series.
Issued.

Denominations.
Five Cents
Ten Cents
Twenty-fiA^^e Cents
Fifty Cents

-.
,.-.. . ^ . . . i . .

Total
'.
..--'.
Deduct disconnts for mutilations.. -

Outstanding.

Redeemed.

$2,794, 826 10
6,176, 034 30
^ 7, 648, 341 25
6,545.. 232 00

$2,086, 382
5, 242, 567
6,886, 423
5,768,703

23,164,483,65

19,984,077 38

85
75
78
00

Total amount actually outstan ding

$708,443
933,516
761,917
776,529

25
55
47
00

3,180,406 27
15 02
3,180,391 25

Fractional Currency, Third Issue. ,
Denominations.

Issued.
$60i; 923
657,002
16, 976,134
*1,352
31,143,188
36,735, 426

Three Cents
Five Cents
TenCents...
Fifteen C e n t s . . . . TAventv-five Cents.
Fifty Cents
Total
Deduct discounts for mutilations

Redeemed.
90
75
50
40
75
50

I 86,115,028, 80

$508, 4.56
521,095
15,814,040
3
30,095, 831
35, 694,102

14
09
00
08
38
75

82,633,528 44

Total amonnt actually outstanding.

Outstanding.
$93,467
135,907
1,162, 094
1,349
1,047,3.57
1, 041, 323

76
66
50
32
37
75

3, 481,500 36
•523 09
3, 480, 977 27

* Specimens..

Fractional Currency, Fourth Issue, First Series.
Den minations.

Issued.

Redeemed..

Outstanding.

•
Ten Cents
Fifteen Cents
TAventA''-fiA^e Cents,
Fiftv Cents
Total.:
Deduct discounts for mutilations

$30,677,400 $22,637,358 05
4, 501, 416
3,244,348 18
47,646, 500
35, 267, 612 11
9, 576, 000
9,124,901 25
92, 401, 316
.

Total amount actually outstan diuff




70, 274,219 59

$8, 040, 041 95
1, 257, 057 82
12, .378,887 89
451,098 75
22,127,096 41
344 2'l
22,126,752 20

326

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

Fractional Currency, Fourth Issue, Second Series.
Redeemed.

Issued.

Denominations.
Fifty cents
Peduct discounts for mutilations...

•

$40,404: 00

_._^-',...'

Outstanding.

<lf;2R.7.38. 616 7.^ 11,665,383 25
80 25
^:'........

Total amount actually outstaniding

11,665,303 00
22,126,752 20

Fourth Issue, First Series, outstanding, less discount.
Fourth Issue, Second Series, outstanding, less discoui^t---

,.- 11,665,303 00

Total Fourth Issue outstandin ^, less discount

33,792,055 20

M^actional Currency—E6sume.
Denominations.
Three Cents
Five Cents
Ten Cents
Fifteen Cents
Twenty-five Cents .
Fifty Cents

Issued.
L, 923
5, 694, 717
57,944,996
4,502,768
91,663,726
101,892,330

Outstanding.

Redeemed.
90
85
80
40
00
50

3,456
% 812,065
46,541,690
3,244, 351
76,415,680
86, 946,854

14
48
50
26
13
50

467
1, 882, 652
11,403, 306
1,258, 417
15,248, 045
14, 945, 476

76
37
30
14
87
00

Totals
•.
262,300,463 45 217,469,098 01
Deduct for unknown series and denominations destroyed in Chicago

44,831, 365 '44
32, 000 00

Deduct discounts for mutilations.

44,799, 365 44
975 87

Total amount actually outstanding
Of the above-stated amount there was held in the Office at the close
of business Jnne 30,1873

44,798, 389 57

Leaving the actual circulation at

40,463, 839 57

4, 334, 550 00

II.—LEGAL-TENDER NOTES ISSUED DURING FISCAL YEAR.

One Dolhir notes
Two Dollar notes
Five Dollar notes
Ten D°ollar. notes
Twenty Dollar notes
Fifty Dollar notes
One Hundred Dollar,notes .
Five Hundred Dollar notes.
One Thonsand Dollar notes.
Total ,

$4, 428, 000
3, 608, 000
5, 240, 000
1, 000. 000
7,360;000

21, 536,000

III.—NEAV L E G A L - T E N D E R N O T E S ON H A N D N O T Y E T P U T I N CIRCULATION,

One Dollar
,.
Two Dollaxs...
Five Dolla.rs
Ten Dollars
TAventy Dollars
'.
Ffty Dollars
One Hundred Dollars..
Five Hundred Dollais.
One Thousand Dollars.
Total.



$3, 699, 578
6, 736, 000
11, 000, 000
23, 520, 000
17, 200, 000
6, 065, 000
4, 610, 000
7, 175, 000
14, 357, 000
94, 362, 578

TREASURER.

327

lA^—FRACTIONAL CURRENCY ISSUED DURING FISCAL YEAR.

TenCents
Fifteencents
Twenty-five Cents
Fifty Cents
Total

'

$9,156, 80]).
300,000
15,898,000
13,320,000

,..
.'

38,674,800
V.—SPECIMEN FRACTIONAL CURRENCY.

There has been, received from the sale of the various kinds of fractional currency,
with faces and backs printed on sexDarate xiieces of paper, and mostly pasted on cards,
as folloAvs:
Up to and including June 30, 1872
:
$15,175 78
During fiscal year
^
1
190 42
Total amount sold

15,376 20

V I . — C U R R E N C Y OUTSTANDING AT T H E

CLOSE OF E A C H F I S C A L Y E A R F O R T H E LAST

TAVELVE Y E A R S .

June 30, 1862:.
Old Deinand Notes
Legal-Tender Notes, n'ew issue
Totc^l

$51,105,235 00
96,620,000 00

-

June 30, 1863 :
Old Demand Notes
Legal-Tender Notes, new issue
Fractional Currency, first issue

:

---- 147, 725, 235 00

5
.'

Total......

411,223,045 00

June 30, 1864:
.Old Deraand Notes
Legal-Tender Notes, new issue
Compound-Interest Notes. •
On6-Year Notes of 1863
•
Two-Year Notes of 1863
TAA-o-Yea.rCoux3on Notes of 1863Fractional Currency, first issue
Fractional Currency, second issue -----

v.

$789,037
447,300, 203
'6,060,000
44,520,000
. . . . . . : . . . . . 16,480,000
111,620,-550
- 14,819,156
7, 505,127

-

Total.............




$472,603
431, 066,427
191,721,470
8,467,570
7,715,950
34,441,650
9,915, 408
12,798,130
2, 319,589

:

.'

Total

Total

50
10'
00
00
00
00
00
10

649,094,073 70

June 30, 1865:
Old Demand Notes
L
Legal-Tender Notes, ncAv issue
Compound-Interest Notes
One-Year Notes of 1863
• Two-Year Notes of 1863
TAvo-A?'ear Conxion Notes of 1 8 6 3 . . . . . . .
Fractional Currency, first issue
Fractional Currency, second issue
Fractional Currency, third issue

J u n e 30, 1866:
Old Demand Notes
Legal-Tender Notes, ncAv issue
Comx-)Ound-Interest Notes
One-Year Notes of 1863
Two-Year Notes of 1863
TAVO-Year Coupon Notes of 1863..
Fractional Currency, first issue
Fractional Currency, second issue
Fractional Currency, third issue

. . .
$3,384,000 00
. . . 387, 646, 859 00
20,192, 456 00

1

.•

698,918,800 25

1

,
.'.
•
•

50
99
00
00
00
00
66
60
50

$272,162 75
400,780, 305 '8o
172,369,941 00
2,151, 465 50
5,209,522 50
1,078, 552 50
7,030, 700 78 7,937, 024 57
12,041,150 01
608,870,825 46,

328

REPORT ON THE

June 30, 1867:
Old Demand Notes
^Legal-Tender Notes, new issue
Compound-Interest Notes...<
One-Year Notes of 1863
TAVO-Year Notes of 1863
TAVO-Year Coupon Notes of 1863.
Fractional Currency, first i^sue
Fractional Currency, second issue
Fractional Currency, third issue

FINANCES.

•
.....:

^
.'

'--

Total

-536,567,523 02

June 30, 1868:
Old Demand Notes
Legal-Tender Notes, ncAv issue--:
Comx^ound-Interest Notes
One-Year Notes of 1863
TAVO-Year Notes of 1863
Two-Year Coupon Notes of 1863
Fractional Currency, first issue
Fractional C urrency, second issue - - Fractional Currency, third issue
Total

$208, 432 50 >
371,783,^7 00
134,774,981 00
. 794,687 00
396,950 00
134,252 50
5,497, 534 93
4, 975,827 08
18, 001,261 01

:
•
,

'

:

June 30, 1869 :
Old Deraand Notes
Legal-Tender Notes, ncAv issue
, Compound-Interest Notes....".
On6-Year Notes of 1863
Two-Year Notes of 1863
T wo-Year Coupon Notes of 1863..:
Fractional Currency, first issue
Fractional Currency, second issue
Fractional Currency, third issue
Total
June 30,1870 :
Old Demand N o t e s - - . . . .
LegalrTender Notes, new issue
United States Notes, series of 1869
Compound-Interest Notes
One-Year Notes of 1863
. Two-Year Notes of 1863
Two-Yeax Coupon Notes of 1863
Fractional Cui-rency, first issue
Fractional Currency, second issue
Fractional Currency, third issue
Fractional Currency, fourth issue

$143,912 CO
356,000,000 O
O
54,608,230 O
O
458,557 O
O
188,402 50
:.
69,252 50
-.
4, 881,091 27
3,924,075 22
23,922,741 98

.•

444", 196,262 47

o
$123,739
356,000, 000
:.
3,063,410
220,517
84,752
42,502
4,605,708
3,528,163
• "23, 980,765

.'..'

,

391,649,558 61
i
$106,256
289,145,0.32
66,854,968
2,191,670
".
160,347
56,402
37, 202
4,476,995
3,273,191
10,666,556
21, 461,941

•.-...
,
,
'.

Total
June 30, 1871:
.
Old Demand Notes
l... :
Legal-Tender Notes, new issue
United States Notes, series of 1869
Compound-Interest Notes
One-Year Notes of 1863
:
TAVO-Year Notes of 1863
Two-Year Coupon Notes of 1863
•Fractional Cu.i're.n.cy,,first issue
Fractional Currency, secoud issue
Fractional Currency, third issue
Fractional Currency, fourth issue
Total



25
00
00
00
.50
50
52
65
19

00
00
00
00
00
50
50
87
03
52
06

398,430,562 48
•
' $96,505 50
181,806,518 00
174,193,482 00
814,280 O
Q
128,037 00
44,502 50
33,452 50
4,414, 025 04
3,218,156 /37
5,617,535 75
27,333,157 40

:
1
.'
.'•

'

397,699,652 06

TREASURER.
Jnne 30, 1872:
Old Demand Notes
Legal-Tender Notes, new.issue
United States Notes, series of 1869
Compound-Interest Notes
One-Year Notes of 1863
TAVO-Year Notes of 1863
TAVO-Year Coupon Notes of 1863
Fractional Currency, first issue
Fractional Currency, second is.sue
Fractional Currency, third issue
Fractional Currency, fourth issue

'

$88,296 25
123,271,568 00
234,228,432 00
623,010 00
109,967 00
36,402 50
•....
31,852,50
•....
4,391,299 09
3,190,283 51
4,039,955 26
29,234,297 41

•

:
^

June 30, 1873:
"Old Demand Notes
."•:
Legal-Tender Notes, ncAV issue
United States Notes, series of 1869
One-Year Notes of 1863
Two-Year Notes of 1863
Two-YeaT Coupon Notes of 1863
ComxDound-Interest Notes
Fractional CinTcncy, first issue
Fractional Currency, second issue
Fractional Currency, third issue
Fraction al Currency, fourth issue, first series
Fractional Currency, fourth issue, secoii"*^ series

329

'

.•

Total

Total

'

399,245,363 52
...^....
:

.'
-

•.

;

$79,967
83,622,694
272,377,306
88,705
28,200
^31,250
. 499,780
4, 376,979
3,180,406
: 3,481,500
22,095,096
11,665,383

50 .
00
00
00
00
00
00
15
27
36
41
25

401,527,267 94

VIL—COMPARATIAHE S T A T E M E N T O F TOTAL O U T S . T > ) L N D I N G F O R TPIE LAST TAVELVE Y E A R S .

Outstanding June 30,1862
Outstanding June 30,1863
Outstanding June 30,1864
Outstanding .June 30,1865---.
'
Outstanding Jmie 30,1866
'.
Outstanding June 30,1867
Oiitstanding'June30,1868:
Outstanding June 30,1869
'.
Outstanding June 30,1870
Outstanding Jnne 30,1871
•
Outstanding June 30,1872
• Outstanding J u n e 30,1873
.-

.'

$147,72.5,235
411,223,045
649,094,073
698,918,800
608,870,825
536,567,.523
444,196,262
391,649,-558
398,430,562
397,699,652
399,245,363
401,527,267

'
-.--.
•
.....:
.-.

-

00
00
70
25
46
02
47
61
48
06
52
94

E.—REDEMPTIONS.
I . — R E D E M P T I O N AND D E S T R U C T I O N OF M O N E Y S AND S E C U R I T I E S D U R I N G T H E F I S C A L
.
°
YEAR.

Old Demand Ndtes
Legal Tender Notes
Legal Tender Notes, series of 1869..:
One-Year Notes of 1863.-..
:.
Two-Yeai'Notes of 1863
Two-Year Conxion Nptes of 1863
Comx:)Ound-Interest Notes
Fractional Currency, first issue
Fractional Currency, second issue
Fractional Currency, third issue
Fractional Currency, fourth issue, first series.. Fractional Currency, fourth issue, second series. .•
Coin Certificates, old issue
.'
Coin Cei'tificates, series of 1870
Coin Certificates, series of 1871
Discounts on above, arising from half notes




-..-.
•.....-

.,

$6,200 00
39,415,463 50
24,502,664 00
21,025 00
8,0.50 00
600 00
122,750 00
394 90
406 38
463,196 95
21,703, 081 34
12,408,525 75
278,000 00
43,923,5,00 • 00
678,300 00
143,532,157 82
1,420 87
143,533,578 69

330

R E P O R T ON T H E

NationalBank Notes.Discount on same

*.
•

'..

Statistical m a t t e r . - . . .
Balance on hand July' 1, 1873

FINANCES.
:

$3,24L778 00
25 00
——

146,775, .381 69
420,782,006 11
N 814,757 36

.,
,

3,241,803 00

,

568,372,145 16
Cash Acconnt, Dr.
Balance from last yeax

-.

Amount received cluring the year

'

1,158, 834 86

:

.,

Total

• 143,188, 080 32
144,346,915 18

Contra, Cr.

'

Amount destroyed durinfi: the year

143,532,1.57 82

B a l a n c e o n h a n d July 1,1873

814,757 36
144,346, 915 18

Destroyed as money during the year.!
Destroyed as per last report
Statisticalh^ destroyed during the year
As X3er last report.Certificates of indebtedness
National Bank Notes
As per last rexiort
'.

-

$143, 533,578
1,808, 314, 475
420,782, 006
2,961,136,928

69
69 1,951, 848, 054
11 .
73 3,381,918,934
^5,333,766,989
592,905, 350
3,241,803 00
6,038,229 00
9,280,032

-•.-

38
84
22
26
00

5,935,952,371 48
Total of all destroyed during the year
Total as per last report

567,557, 387 80
5, 368,394, 983 68
. .
5,935,952, 371 48

I I . — D I S C O U N T S ON M U T I L A T E D C U R R E N C Y .

1. Discounts for missing xiarts ^ of mutilated currency destroyed during thefisoal year arising
from half notes.
. On Legal-Tender Notes
On Legal-Tender Notes, series of 1869
On Fractional Currency, first issue'
1
On Fractional Currency, second issue
On Fractional Currency, third issue
On Fractional Currency, fourth, issue, first series. -. 1
On Fractional Currency, fouith issue, second series

$200
245
13
15
523
344
80

1,420 87
349 74

On moneys redeemed but not destroyed
Total discount since July 1, 1872

00
00
30
02
09
21
25

...'.

.-.

1,770 61

2. Discount Account.
Discounts for fiscal year arising from half notes
Discounts on moneys on hand July 1, 1873
Discounts on moneys on hand J u l y 1,.1872
Total •discounts for fiscal year
Amount on band J u l y 1,1872, a;s aboA'e
Total discount since July 1, 1 8 7 2 . . . . :

1, 420 87
.

349 74
127 57

•,...•
'

-

-..

222
1, 643
127
1,770

17
04
57
61

This discount being altogether on half notes is apparent and not real, as the corresponding halA^es may haA^e been or may hereafter be redeemed.
NOTE.—Discounts to J u l y 1, 1872, amounting to $227,732.33 have been covered into
the Treasury since last report.




TREASURER.

331

I I I . — D E S T R U C T I O N OF P A P E R M O N E Y .

1. Number of notes destroyed.
There haA^e been destroyed since the commencement of the rebellion, X)ax3er representing money, as f OHOAA'S :
^
,
o
Old Demand Notes:
FiA'-e Dollars---.
Ten Dollars
TAventy Dollars
Total number of notes desti-oyed
Legal-Tender Notes:
One Dolhu---.
TAVO Dollars
:
Five DoUars
•:
TenDollars...
TAventy Dollaxs
Fiftv Dollars
One'^Prundred Dollars
FiA^e Hundred D o l l a r s . - . . :
One Thousand Dollars

,,

:

4,353,807^
2,000,111^
908,994
7,262", 913

..,.-..'

•
_

26,449,380
15,862,671
16,899,362
. 9,201,981
,3,932,227
547,008
358 834
112,567
152,711

•

:

Total number.of notes destroyed

73,516,741

Legal-Tender Notes, series of 1869:
One Dollar
.'
Two Dollars
Five Dollaxs
,
TenDollars
'
Twenty Dollars
•
FiftyDollars
:
One Hundred Dollaxs
Five Hundi'ed Dollars
:
One Thousand Dollars

'

9,302,780
5,491,513
208,661
•
261,818
39,091
12,859
.-4,858
10,127
5, 454

Total number'of notes destroyed

15, 337,161

. One-Year Notes of 1863:
Ten Dollars
Twenty Dollars
FiftyDollars
One Himdred D o l l a r s - - . - . .

'

Total nnmber of notes destroyed
TAVO-Year Notes of 1863:
FiftyDollars
One Hundred Dollars

,

,
. ' . . . . . . . . . . : ..,

1,738,935^
:

135,676
96,680

Total number of notes destroyed
Two-Year Coupon Notes of 1863:
FiftyDollars....
One Hundred Dollars
Five Hundied Dollars,
,
One Thousand Dollars

232, 356
118,017
144,739
80,597
89,285

'.
:

Total number of notes destroyed
Compound-Interest Notes:
Ten Dollars
Twenty Dollaxs
'
infty Dollars
One Hundred Dollars
Five Hundred Dollars
One Thousand Dollars

•

Total number of notes destroyed....•




618,296i
819,877
164,510 "
136,252

43'2,638

1.:

2,320,099
1,500,073^
1,213,192
450,041
135,639
,
39, 410
5,658, 454^

332

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Fractional Currency, first issue:
Five Cents
'
TenCentsTAA-enty-five Cents
Fiffcy Cent^

•..
:

Total number of notes destroyed

84, 473, 379^

Fractional Currency, second issue :•*
Five C e n t s . . . . . . . . . . . . .
:.:......:
Ten Cents-..-•-.
:.:
TAventy-fiA^e Cents
Fifty Cents

41,727,747
52,425,723
27,545,707
11, 537, 412

-.

' Total number of notes destroyed

133,236,589

Fractional Currency, third issue:
Three Cents
Five Cents
Ten Cents
Fifteen Cents
TAventy-five Cents
Fifty Cents . . : . ' .

.-

:

1'

.--.--:

•

,

Total number of notes destroyed

226,375,336
21,629,163
141,070,89118,249,866

Total nuinber of notes destroyed

407, 325,256

Fractional Currency, fourth issue, second series:
Fifty Cents
,.--

57,477,394'
45, 820
116,195
17, 988
59, 979
64, 588
2,500

'
:

Total nnmber of notes destroyed

'

Coin Certificates, series of 1870:
Five Hundred Dollars
One Thousand Dollars
FiA^e Thousand Dollars
Ten Thousand Dollars

307,070
12,424
21, 238
8,131
7, 600

:
-.

Total number of notes destroyed'

49,393

Coin Certificates, series of 1871:
One Hundred Dollars

•.

* Notes of National Banks, failed and m liquidation:
One Dollar
:
TAVO Doll a r s . . .
FiA^eDollars
Ten Dollars
:......:
.TAventy Dollars
'.
Fifty Dollaxs
.•
One Hundred Dollars
Total number of notes destroyed




16,948,551
10,421,954
158,142,539
21
120,383,890
71,388,536
377, 285,491

Fractional Currency, fourth issue, first series: '
TenCents
Fifteen Cents
Twenty-five Cents
.."
Fifty Cents
--..:..

Coin. Cei'tificates, old series:
Twenty Dollars
One Hundred Dollars
Five Hundred t)olla,rs
Oj:ie Thousand Dollars
Five Thousand Dollars
Ten Thousand Dollars

,.
"
24,091,763
28,477,277^
16,663,265
15,241,-074.

:

9,550
142,027
53,095
870,233
237 129
69,588
7,624
5, 364
1,385,060

TREASURER.

333

2.—Numher of notes of each Icind destroyed during the fiscal year.
Old Demand Notes
•
745
Legal-Tender Notes, iieAA^ issue
5,357, 042
Legal-Tender Notes, series of 1869
8,803, 457
One-Year Notes of 1863 ...'
...«,
947^
Two-Yeax Notes of 1863
123
Two-Yeax Coupon Notes of 1863
.
11
Compound Interest Notes
•
4, 589
Fractional Currency, first issue
2,551 •
'Fractional Currency, second issue
'
3, 353
Fractional Currency, third issue
2,107,262
Fractional Currency, foui'tb issue, first series
134,499,752
Fractional Currency, fourth issue, second series
24, 817., 212
(|)oin Certificates, old series
• 2,781
Coin Certificates, series of 1870
.•.15,142
Coin Certificates, series of 1871
6, 805
'
Total
National Bank Notes
Total of all for the year . . . . . .
Number as per last report
.

175, 621, 772^
467, 314

'
:

• 176, 089, 086^
989, 639,292^

Total nnmber to July 1, 1873

1,165,728,379

I V . — D E S T R U C T I O N ACCOUNT.

Statement of face value of moneys destroyed since 1861. °
Old-Demand Notes
:....
--Legal-Tender Notes, UCAV issue
Legal-Tender Notes, series of 1869
1
One-Year Notes of 1863
-. TAVO-Year Notes of 1863
T\vo-year Coupon Notes of 1863
-.'.
Compound Interest Notes
Fractional Currency, first issue
.•
Fractional C urrency, second issue ,.'.
.----•
Fractional Currency, third issue
•
.• . . . -.
Fractional Currency, fourth issue, first series
•
•.
Fractional Currency, fourth issue, second series
Coin Certificates, old issue
•
^
'
Coin Certificates, series of 1870
'.
Coin Certificates, series of 1871
-

Total amount destroyed to July 1, 1873

:

50
00
00'
00
00
00
00
15
40
53
80
00
00
00
00

1,951, 848, 054
3, 381,918,934
9,280,032
592,905,350

Total amount destroyed as money
Total amount destroyed statistically
National.Bank Notes
Certificates of indebtedness

$.59,950,032
585,699,182
37,240, 361
44,431,295
16,451,800
149,968,750
266, 095, 660
15,838,669
19, 984, 092
82,634, 051
70, 306,563
28,738,697
429,448,900
144,105, 000
955,000

38
84
00
26

5,935,952, 371 48

V . — R E D E M P T I O N ACCOUNT.

Statement of redemption of'moneys since 1861.
Moneys destroyed before July 1, 1872
Moneys destroyed within the year. - -Discounts on same, arising from half notes
Total.-'.-.
National Bank notes before July 1, 1872
National Bank notes during the year
Statistical matter destroyed before July, 1872
Statistical matter destroyed during the year
Certificates of indebtedness

$1, 808, 314, 475 69
143,532,157 82
1,420 87

--..
1,951,848,054
$6, 038,229 00
3,241,803 00
9,280,032
2,961,136,928 73
420,782, 006 11
•
3,381,918,934
592,905, .350

38
00
84
26

Total amonnt destroyed to J u l y 1, 1873
Balance on band July 1, 1 8 7 3 . . . . . . . . .

5,935,952, 371 48
814,757 36

Total amount redeemed to July 1, 1873

5,936,767,128 84




334

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
VI.—REDEMPTIONS AND DISCOUNTS.

Amounts paid, discounts, and amounts retired to July 1,1873.
Old Demand Notes.

Amount paid.

Denominations.

Total amonnt
retired.

$21,769, 037 50
20,001,115 00
18,179,880 00

. . .

$21, 769, 037 50
20,001,115 00
18,179,880 00

59,950, 032 50

Five Dollaxs
Ten Dollars
Twenty Dollars
Total

Amount discounted.

59,950, 032 50

Legal-Tender Notes, new issue.

Denominations.

Aniount x^aid.

One Dollar

* Am't discoun t'd Total amount
during fiscal
retired.
year.

Five Dollars
Ten Dollaxs
Twenty Dollars
Fifty Dollars
One flundred Dollars
FiA''e Hundred Dollars
One Thousand Dollars
Denomination unkuoAVU
Total

-

$26,449,336 50
31,725,313 00
84,496,762 50
92,019,770 00
78,644, 500 00
27,350,400 00
35, 883, 400 00
56,283,500 00
152,711,000 00'
135,000 00

$43 50
29 00
47 50
40 00
40 00

$26,449,380 00
31,725,342 00
84,496, 810 00
92,019,810 00
78,644,540 00
27, 350, 400 00
35, 883, 400 00
56, 283,500 00
152,711, 000^ 00
135,000 00

585,698, 982 00

TAVO Dollaxs .•

200 00

585,699,182 00

Legal-Tender Notes, series of 1869.

Denominations.

One Dollar

,

TAA-O Dollars

Five Dollars
Ten Dollars
TAA'cnty Dollars Fifty Dollars
One Hundred Dollars
Five Hundred Dollars
One Thousand Dollars
Denomination unknown
Total

Amount x^aid.

$9, 302,702 00
10.982,959 00
1, 043,270 00
2, 618,160 00
781,800 00.
'642, 925 00
. 485,800 00
5, 063, 500 00
5,454, 000 00
865,000 00
37,240,116 00

*Am!tdisconnt'd
during fiscal
year.
•

$78 00
67 00
35 00
20 00
20 00
• 25 00

$9,302,780 00
10,983, 026 00
1, 043, 305 00
2,618,180 00
781,820 00
. 642,950 00
485,800 00
5, 063,500 00
5, 454, 000 00
865,000 00

245 00

37, 240, 361 00

* This is 011I5' apparent, as the amount is made u]) of half-notes.
^




Total amount
retired.

335

TREASURER.
One-Year Notes of 1863.

Denominations.

$6,182,965
16,397,540
8,225,500
13,625,200
90

Ten Dollars
Twenty Dollaxs.".
Fifty Dollars
One Hundred Dolla-rs
UnknoAvn.
Total

Am't discounted
during fiscal
year.

Amount paid.

00 .
00
00
00
00

J.

44,431,295 00

Total amount
retired.
$6,182,965
• 16, 397, 540
8,225, 500
13, 625,200
90

00
00
00
00
00

44, 431,295 00

Two-Year Notes'of 1863.

Denominations.

Am't discount'd
during fiscal
year.

Total amount
retired.

$6,783,SOO 00
9,668,000 00

Fifty Dollars
One Hnndi'cd Dollars
Total

Amount paid.

.«

$6,783,800 00
9,668,000 00

16,451,800 00

16,451, 800 00

Two- Year Couxmn Notes of 1863.

Denominations.

FiftyDollars
One Hundied Dollars
Five Hundred Dollars
One Thousand Dollars
UnknoAA^n
Total

Amount x>aid.

Am't discounted
duriiig fiscal Total amount
retired.
year.

$5,900, 850
14, 473, 900
40,298, 500
89,285, OCO
10,500
149,968,750

$5, 900,850
14, 473, 900
40,298,500
89,285, 000
10,500
149,968,750

Comx)ound-Interest Notes.

D enomi nations.

Ten Dollars
Twenty Dollars
FiftyDollars'
One HuncUed Dollars .
Five Hundred Dollars .
One Thousand Dollars'.
Total




Amount paid.

Am't discounted
during fiscal, Total amount
retired.
year.

$23,200,990
30, 001, 470
60, 659, 600
45, 004,100
67,819, 500
39, 410, 000

$23,200,99030,. 001,470
60, 659, 600
45, 004,100
67,819;500
39,410, 000

266,095,660

266, 095,660

336

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

F'actional Currency, first issue.

Amount paid.

Denominations.

/

'''Am't discount'd
during fiscal Total amount
retired.
year.

$1,204,587 54
2, 847, 724 70'
4,165,812 86.
7,620,530 75

Total

$0
3
3
6

15,838,655,85

Five Cents
Ten Cents
TAventy-five Cents
Fifty Cents

61 $1,204,588 15
05
2,847,727 75
39
4,165, 816 25
25
7,620.537 00

13 30

15,838,669 15

Fractional Currency, second'.ssue.

Amount paid.

Denominations.

Five Cents
•.
Ten Cents
Twenty-five Cents
Fifty Cents

...

.

.

$2,086, 382
5,242,567
6,886. 423
5, 768, 703

* Am't discount'd
dui'ing fiscal Total amonnt
retired.
year.
$4
4
2
0 3

85
75
78
00

19, 984, 077 38

Total

50 $2,086 387
55
5,242,572
97
6,886,426
00. 5,768,706

15 02

35
30
75
00

19,984,092 40

Fractional Currency, third issue.

D enomin ation s.

Three Cents
Five Cents
Ten Cents
Fifteen Cents
.
Twenty-fiA^e Cents
Fifty C e n t s . . . . . . .
Total

Amount x^aid.

$508,456
521, 095
15,814,040
3
30,095,831
35,694,102

,

14
09
00
08
38
75

82, 633, 528 44

'Am't discount'd
during fiscal Total amount
retii'ed.
year.
$0 39
$508, 456 53
-2 61
521,097 70
213 90 15,814, 253 90
. 07
• 3- 15
141 12 30,095,972 50
165 00 35,694,267 75
523 09

82,634,051 53

Fractional Currency, fourth issue, first set^ies.

Denominati ons.

Ten Cents
Fifteen Cents . . . . .
Twenty-Five Cents
Fifty Cents
UnknoAvn
Total

Amonnt paid.

$22,637, 358
3,244, 348
35,267, 612
9,124,901
32,000

05
18
11
25
00

70,306,219 59

^ Am't discounted
dnring fiscal Total amoiint
retired.
year.
$175
26
110
31

55 $22, 637,533 60
27
3, 244, 374 45
64 35,267, 722 75
75
9,124, 933 00
32, 000 00

344 21

^ This is only .apparent, as the amount is made-up of half-notes.




70,306,563.80

337

TREASURER.
Fractional Currency, fourth issue, second series.

Amount paid.

Fifty C e n t s . : - - . . . .

* Am't discounted Total amount
diuing fiscal
retired.
.year.

$28,738,616 75

Denomination.

$80 25 $28,738,697 00

V I I . — D E S T R U C T I O N OF N O T E S O F N A T I O N A L B A N K S , B R O K E N AND I N L I Q U I D A T I O N .

1.—Notes destroyed, by denominations.
Amonnt paid. ^ Am't discount'd. Total amount
retired.

Denominations.
One Dollar
Two Dollars
Five Dollars
Ten Dollars
TAA''enty Dollars.
. .
FiftyDollars
. . .
One tlundred Dollars
*

Total

-• . .

$141,973
106,169
4, .350, 910
2, 371,247
1, 391, 749
381,190
536,395

35"
60
00
00
00
00
00

$53
20
255
43
11
10
5

9,279,633 95

. ..

65
40
00
00
00
00
00

398 05

$142,027
j06,190
4,351,165
2, 371, 290
1,391,760
381,200
536,400

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

9,280, 032 00

2.—Destruction Account.
Total amount destroyed during the year.
As shown by last rexDort

$3,241,778 00
6,037,855 95

Total from tbe beginning
Discounts during the fiscal year
As shoAvn by last report

:

9,279,633 95

„.

$25 00
373 05
398 05

Total destruction to J u l y 1, 1873

.:

9,280,032 00

F.—STATISTICAL DESTRUCTIONS.
I . — D E S T R U C T I O N O F STATISTICAL M A T T E R .

Coupon Bonds, Loan of 1858 :
One Thousand Doll