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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

Secretary of the Treasury
ON THE STATE OF THE
FINANCES
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
ENDED JUNE 30

1913
With Appendices

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1913







TREASURY DEPARTMENT.

Document No. 2688.
Secretory.

LL

CONTENTS,
Page,

Financial aid to Dayton, Ohio
$500,000,000 emergency currency announcement
Crop-moving deposits
Currency legislation
Interest on Government deposits
Income tax
Customs service
Convention of customs collectors
Change in the manner of handling and disbursing public funds
Public Health Service
New revenue cutters
Coast guard
:
Ice patrol
Saving of life and property on interior navigable rivers and waters
Panama Canal
•
Public buildings commission
Central heating and power plant
Contingent fund
Finances
Receipts and disbursements
Fiscal year 1913
General fund
Postal service
,.
United States notes (greenbacks)
Gold reserve fund
'.
Trust funds
Sinking fund
Condition of Treasury June 30, 1913.
Cash in the Treasury June 30, 1913
Comparison of receipts, fiscal years 1912 and 1913
Comparison of disbursements, fiscal years 1912 and 1913
Estimates
Estimated ordinary receipts, fiscal year 1914
Estimated ordinary disbursements, fiscal year 1914.
Postal service, estimate of probable expenditures for fiscal year 1914
Estimated ordinary receipts for fiscal year 1915
Estimates of appropriations for fiscal year 1915 as submitted b y executive departments
Postal service, estimate of probable expenditures for fiscal year 1915
Estimates for 1915 and appropriations for 1914
Exhibit of appropriations tor 1914.,

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Abstracts of reports of bureaus and divisions.
Treasurer of the United States
District of Columbia
Comptroller of the Currency
Mint Service
Operations of the mints
Appropriations, earnings, and expenditures
Deposits, earnings, and expenditures b y institutions
Charlotte ofiice closed
Production and consumption of gold and silver




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III

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IV

CONTENTS.

Internal Revenue
Income-tax law
Recommendations
".
White phosphorus matches
Bureau of Engraving- and Prmting
.'
Improved machinery
Money laundering
New building
Special Agents' Division
Office of the Supervising Architect
:
Public-Health Service
Division of Scientific Research
Hygienic Laboratory
Division of Foreign and Insular Quarantine and Immigration
Division of Domestic (Interstate) Quarantine
Division of Sanitary Reports and Statistics
Division of Marine Hospitals and Relief
Division of Personnel and Accounts
Miscellaneous Division
Recommendations
Life-Saving Service
Sources of assistance to vessels
Flood service in the Middle West
Power boats for rescue and salvage work
Miscellaneous sei-vices of station crews
Establishment, rebuilding, and improvement of stations
Retirement pay for the life-saving corps
Revenue-Cutter Service
Removal of derelicts
Ice patrol
;
Protection of the fur seal
^
Enforcement of navigation, anchorage, and other laws
Proposed consolidation of the Revenue-Cutter and Life-Saving Services
as the "Coast Guard "
History
Coast Guard
,
Existing conditions
'.
Cost.^
Special cruises
New vessels and repairs
•.
Service depot in Alaska
Saving of life and property on interior navigable waters
Appointment of cadets.
Inadequate appropriations
Division of Loans and Currency
Public-debt transactions.
Interest on registered bonds
Insular and District of Columbia loans
Circulation
,
Redemption of currency, etc
:
'Paper custody
:
National currency associations (act of May 30, 1908)
*...
Division of Public Moneys
Division of Bookkeeping and Warrants
State bonds and stocks owned by the United States
Secret-Service Division
:.
Division of Piinting and Stationery
Printing and binding.
Stationery
Check paper
Postage
Materials for bookbinder
Duplicating work
Department advertising
Addressing machines
:




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CONTENTS.

V

Tables accompanying the report of the Secretary.Table A.—Statement of the outstanding principal of the public debt of the
United States, June 30, 1913
Table B.—Statement of the outstanding principal of the public ,debt of the
United States on the 1st of July of each year, from 1856 to 1913,
inclusive
:
Table C.—Analysis of the principal of the interest-bearing public debt of the
United States from July 1, 1856, to July 1, 1913
Table D.—Statement of the issue and redemption of loans and Treasury notes
and of deposits and redemptions in national-bank note account
(by warrants) for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913
Table E.—Sinking-fund account for fiscal year 1913
Table F.—Population, ordinary receipts and disbursements of the Government from 1837 to 1913, exclusive of postal, and per capita on
receipts and per capita on disbursements
Table G.—Statement showing the ordinary receipts and disbursements of the
Government by months; the legal-tender notes, net gold, and
available cash in the Treasury at the end of each month; the
monthly redemption of legal-tender notes in gold and the imports
and exports of gold, from July, 1896, to June, 1913, inclusive
Table H.—Statement of the balance in the general fund of the Treasury,
including the gold reserve, by calendar years, from 1791 to 1842,
and by fiscal years from 1843 to 1913
Table I.—Receipts and disbursements of the United States; recapitulation of
receipts by fiscal years
Table J.—Statement of the coin and paper circulation of the United States
from 1860 to 1913, inclusive, with amount of circulation per
capita
Table K.—Statement of United States bonds and other obligations received
and issued by the office of the Secretary of the Treasury, from
November 1, 1912, to October 31, 1913
Table L.—Internal and customs receipts and expenses of collecting, from 1858
to 1913
Table M.—Statement showing the aggregate receipts, expenses, average number of persons employed, and cost to collect internal revenue in
the several collection districts during the fiscal year ended June
3/3, 1913
Table N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1913.
Table 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise, collections, and expenses, for the fiscal year ended June
30, 1913
R E P O R T OF THE T R E A S U R E R

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106
108
108
109

116
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130
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131

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186

199-300

Receipts and disbursements for 1912 and 1913
'
Panama Canal
Receipts and disbursements on account of the Post Office D e p a r t m e n t . . . .
Transactions in the public debt
Public debt, 1912 and 1913
Payment of interest on registered bonds of the United States
Reserve and trust funds
Redemption of notes in gold
State of the Treasury, general fund—cash in the vaults
'.
Net available cash balance, 1906 to 1913
Gold in Treasury from 1906
Bonds held as security for national-bank circulation and deposits
Bonds held as security for postal savings funds
Postal savings bonds and investments therein
Withdrawal of bonds to secure circulation
National banks designated as depositaries
° Public deposits in national banks
General account of Treasurer of the United States
Monetary stock, 1912 and 1913
•Ratio of gold to total stock of money
Money in circulation
Circulation and population
Condition of the United States paper currency




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VI

CONTENTS.

REPORT OF THE T R E A S U R E R — C o n t i n u e d .

United States notes
!
Treasury notes of 1890
Gold certificates
Silver certificates
,
Changes in denominations during fiscal year 1913
Pieces of- United States paper currency outstanding
Denominations outstanding J u n e 30, 1913
Ratio of small denominations to all paper
>
Cost of paper currency
Average life of paper currency
Paper currency prepared for issue and amount issued
Paper'-currency held in the reserve vault
Paper currency redeemed
Standard silver dollars.
Subsidiary silver coin
Minor coin
•
Transfers for deposits in New York—money for moving the crops, etc
Use of order gold certificates for exchange
Deposits of gold bullion at mints and assay offices, 1912 and 1 9 1 3 . . . :
Shipments of currency from Washington, 1912 and 1913
Recoinage, 1912 and 1913
.^
Redemption of national-bank notes
,
Spurious issues detected in the fiscal year
Special trust funds and changes therein during the fiscal year
District of Columbia sinking fund
Legislation recommended

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Tables accompanying the report ofthe Treasurer.
No. 1.—Receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year 1913
No. 2.—Net ordinary receipts and disbursements for each quarter of the fiscal
year 1913
No. 3.—Receipts and disbursements on account of the Post Office Department
for the fiscal year 1913
No. 4.—Post Office Department warrants issued, paid, and outstanding for the
fiscal year 1913
•
,
No. 5.—Assets and liabilities of the Treasury offices, June 30, 1913
No. 6.—Assets of the Treasury in the custody of mints and assay offices, J u n e
30, 1913
No. 7.—General distribution of the assets and liabilities of the Treasury
No. 8.—Distribution of the General Treasury balance, June 30, 1913
No. 9.—Available assets and net liabilities of the Treasury at the close of June,
1912 and 1913.
:
No. 10.—Assets and liabilities of the Treasury in excess of certificates and
Treasury notes at the close of June, 1912 and 1913
No. 11.—Estimated stock of gold coin and bullion, the amount in the Treasury,
and the amount in circulation at the end of each month, from January, 1908
No. 12.—Estimated stock of silver coin, the amount in the Treasury, and t h e
amount in circulation at the end of each month, from January, 1908.
Also silver, other than stock, held in the Treasury.
No. 13.—^United States notes. Treasury notes, and national-bank notes outstanding, in the Treasury, and in circulation at the end of each
month, from January, 1908
No. 14.—Gold certificates and silver certificates outstanding, in the Treasury,
and in circulation at the end of each month, from January, 1 9 0 8 . . .
No. 15.—Estimated stock of all kinds of money at the end of each month, from
January, 1907
No. 16.—Estimated amount of all kinds of money in circulation at the end of
each month, from January, 1907
No. 17.—Assets of the Treasury other than gold, silver, notes, and certificates at
the end of each month, from January, 1907
•
No. 18.—Assets of the Treasury at the end of each month, from January, 1907.
No. 19.—Liabilities of the Treasury at the end of each month, from January,
1907
:
,
No. 20.—United States notes of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding at the close of each fiscal year, from 1906




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CONTENTS.

VII
Page.

No. 21.—Treasury notes of 1890 of each denomination issued, redeemed, and
outstanding at the close of each fiscal year, from 1907
No. 22.—Gold certificates of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding at the close of each fiscal year, from 1908
No. 23.—Silver certificates of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding at the close of each fiscal year, from 1908
No. 24.—Amount of United States notes. Treasury notes, gold and silver certificates of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding at the
close of each fiscal year, from 1906
No. 25.—Amount of paper currency of each denomination outstanding at the
close of each fiscal year, from 1906
No. 26.—Old demand notes of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding June 30, 1913
No. 27.—Fractional currency of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding June 30, 1913
No. 28.—Compound-interest notes of each denomination issued, redeemed,
and outstanding June 30, 1913
No. 29.-^One and two year notes of each denomination issued, redeemed, and
outstanding June 30, 1913
No. 30.—^United States paper currency of each class, together with one and two
year notes and compound-interest notes issued, redeemed, and outstanding June 30, 1913
\
No. 31.—United States notes and Treasury notes redeemed in gold, from 1879,
and imports and exports of gold during each fiscal year, from 1897.
No. 32.—^Treasury notes of 1890 retired by redemption in silver dollars, and
outstanding, together with the silver in the Treasury purchased by
such notes, for each month, from January, 1907
No. 33.—^Transactions between the subtreasury and clearing house in New
York during each month, from January, 1907
No. 34.—Amount of each kind of money used in settlement of clearing-house
balances against the subtreasury in New York during each month,
from January, 1907
No. 35.—Balance in the Treasury, amount in Treasury offices, and amount in
depositary banks, from 1789 to 1913
No. 36.—National banks designated depositaries of public moneys, with the
balance held June 30, 1913
:
No. 37.—Receipts and disbursements of public moneys through national-bank
depositaries, by fiscal years, from 1901
No. 38.—Number of national banks with semiannual duty levied, by fiscal
years, and number of depositaries with bonds as security, by fiscal
years
No. 39.—Shipments of silver coin from each office of the Treasury and mint for
the fiscal years 1912 and 1913
:
No. 40.—Shipments of silver coin from the Treasury offices and mints during
each ficsal year, from 1901, and charges thereon for transportation..
No. 41.—United States bonds retired, from May, 1869, to June 30,1913
No. 42.—Seven-thirty notes issued, redeemed, and outstanding June 30,1913...
No. 43.—Refunding certificates, act of February 26, 1879, issued, redeemed,
and outstanding
:
'...
No. 44.—Checks issued for interest oh registered bonds during the fiscal year
1913
No. 45.—Interest on 3.65 per cent bonds of the District of Columbia paid during
the fiscal year 1913
No. 46.—Coupons from United States bonds and interest notes paid during the
fiscal year 1913, classified by loans
No. 47.—Bonds and other securities retired for the sinking fund during the fiscal
year 1913, and total from May, 1869
No. 48.—Public debt at the close of June, 1912 and 1913, and changes duruig
the year
No. 49.—Public debt, exclusive of certificates and Treasury notes, at the end
of each month, from January, 1907
No. 50.—Lawful money deposited in the Treasury each month of the fiscal year
1913 for the redemption of national-bank notes
No. 51.—Disbursements from redemption accounts of national banks each
month of the fiscal year 1913.
No. 52.—Result of the count of national-bank notes received for redemption, by
fiscal years, from 1900




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Vm

CONTENTS.

No. 53.—National-bank notes outstanding at the end of each month, and
monthly redemptions, from January, 1900
No. 54.—Redemptions and deliveries of national-bank notes each month of the
fiscal year 1913
No. 55.—Redeemed national-bank notes delivered from the Treasury each
month of the fiscal year 1913
No. 56.—Assets and liabilities of the 5 per cent redemption fund of national
banks at the end of each month of the fiscal year 1913
No. 57.—National-bank notes received for redemption from the principal cities
and other places, by fiscal years, from 1900, in thousands of dollars..
No. 58.—Disposition made of the notes redeemed at the National Bank Redemption Agency, by fiscal years, from 1900
,
No. 59.—Mode of payment for notes redeemed at the National Bank Redemption Agency, by fiscal years, from 1900
'...
No. 60.—Deposits, redemptions, assessments for expenses, and transfers and
repayments on account of the 5 per cent redemption fund of national
banks, by fiscal years, from 1900
No. 61.—Deposits, redemptions, and transfers and repayments on account of
the retirement redemption account, by fiscal years, from 1900
No. 62.—Expenses incurred in the redemption of national-bank notes, by fiscal
years, from 1900
No. 63.—General cash account of the National Bank Redemption Agency for the
fiscal year 1913, and from July 1,1874
No. 64.—^Average amount of national-bank notes redeemable and amount
redeemed, by fiscal years, from 1900
No. 65.—Percentage of outstanding national-bank notes redeemed and assorted
each fiscal year from 1903, by geographical divisions
No. 66.—Average amount of national-bank notes outstanding and the redemption, by fiscal years, from 1875 (the first year of the agency)
No. 67.—Changes during the fiscal year 1913 in the force employed in the Treasurer's office
No. 68.—Appropriations made for the force employed in the Treasurer's office,
and salaries paid during the fiscal year 1913
•
R E P O R T OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE M I N T .

Operations of the mints
Philadelphia Mint
San Francisco Mint
:
Denver Mint
Assay office at Charlotte closed
Assay office at New York.
Western assay offices
Employees and expenditures of the Mint Service, 1893-1913
Gold-certificate bars
'
Estimates for the fiscal year 1915
Appropriations for 1913
Parting and refining fund
Consolidated income and expenditures
Deposits of gold bullion
'...
Deposits of foreign gold bulhon and coin
Deposits and purchases of silver
'
Deposits of foreign silver bullion and coin
Coinage
Purchase of minor coinage metal
Purchase of minor coinage blanks
Distribution of minor coins
Philippine coinage
Work of the Government refineries
By-products of refineries
Exchange of fine gold bars for gold coin and gold bullion
Mint at Philadelphia
Mint at San Francisco
:
Mint at Denver
Assay office at New York
Assay office at Seattle
Other assay offices
°.
•
Life of coinage dies




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301-397

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CONTENTS.

IX

R E P O R T OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT—Continued.

Page.

Deposits, earnings, and expenditures b y institutions
Operations of t h e melter and refiners and t h e coiners
Wastage ^and loss on sale of sweeps and gains from operations
Receipts and disposition of gold bullion
Balances, receipts, and disbursements
Laboratory of the Bureau of the Mint
Proceedings of the Assay Commission, 1913
Movement of gold from port of New York
Net exports United States gold coin
Stock of money i n United States
Standard silver dollars used i n subsidiary silver coinage
Recoinage of uncurrent silver coins
United States gold in Canada
Monetary systems and approximate stock of money in principal countries of t h e world, 1912
Monetary stocks
Gold movement to India
Gold and prices
Average wholesale prices for 1912
World prices. .
United States gold coin imported and melted b y various countries, 1912
Values of foreign coins

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357.
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364
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367

Tables accompanying the report of the Director of the Mint.
No. 2.—Domestic production, deposits, purchases of gold b y value, 1913
No. 4.—Domestic production, deposits, and purchases of silver b y subsidiary
coinage value, 1913
No. 5.—Mutilated and uncurrent domestic coins received for recoinage, 1913..
No. 7.—Earnings and expenditures of t h e United States Mints and Assay
Offices, 1913.....^
No. 12.—Seigniorage on coinage of subsidiary silver and minor coins, and distribution, 1913
No. 13.—Average price of a n ounce of gold in London and equivalent value in
the United States since 1870
No. 14.—Bullion value of the silver dollar at the aimual average price of silver
from 1837
No. 15.—Coinage of nations
No. 18.—Coinage of gold and silver of the United States since 1873, fiscal y e a r s . .
No. 19.—Coinage of t h e mints, authority for coining, changes in weight and
fineness, etc
No. 20.—Foreign coins melted b y various countries
No. 21.—Recoinages of the world
No. 22.—Coinage of t h e mints from their organizations, b y calendar years
R E P O R T OF T H E COMPTROLLER OF T H E CURRENCY

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381
383
383
384

399-481

Condition of national banks
Loans and discounts of national banks
Loans maturing i n 90 days or less
Reserves of national banks
Changes i n loans, bonds, cash, and deposits
Savings depositors and deposits in national banks
Classification of national banks b y capital stock
Relation of capital to deposits, etc., of national banks
Bonds and other similar investments b y national banks
Productivity of loans and bond investments
Percentage of principal items of assets and liabilities of national banks
Development in national banking
Bonded debt of the United States and national-bank holdings
Deposits and withdrawals of bonds during the year
Earnings and dividends of national banks
National-bank shareholders
National-bank notes in circulation
Capital stock, bonds, and circulation
Circulation issued, redeemed, and outstanding
National-Bank Redemption Agency receipts and redemptions
E3q)enses of banks incident to the issue of circulation, a n d expenses of the
Ourrency B u r e a u - , . , . . . , . , . , . , . , . , . , , , , , , , . , , . . , . , . , . , . , . , , . . , . , . , . , .




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X

CONTENTS.

R E P O R T OF T H E COMPTROLLER OF T H E CURRENCY—Continued.

Profit on national-bank circulation
Organization of national banks
Extensions and expirations of charters
Changes of title of national banks
Voluntary liquidation of national banks
National currency associations organized
Clearing-house exchanges
Rates for money
,
Reports of condition of banks in the United States
The growth of banking in the United States
The growth of banking in recent years
Banking power of the United States
Resources and liabilities of the banks, b y States
Classification of loans and discounts in all banks
Investments of all banks i n bonds and other securities
Money in banks
Distribution of money in the United States
Individual deposits i n all banks i n the United States
Savings deposits in all banks
State, savings, and private banks, and loan and trust companies
State banks
Savings banks
Mutual savings banks
"
Stock savings banks
Private banks
Loan and trust comi)anies
Banks and banking i n t h e District of Columbia
Banks and banking i n the island possessions
Philippines
Hawaii
Porto Rico
State and private bank failures
Building and loan associations i n the District of Columbia
Building and loan associations in the United States
School savings banks
Savings banks i n foreign countries
Insolvent national banks
R E P O R T OF THE R E G I S T E R OF THE T R E A S U R Y

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. 475
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483-492

Number and amount of bonds received, examined, entered, sealed, and
signed
Number and amount of bonds canceled
Registered bonds redeemed
Coupon bonds redeemed
Registered bonds outstanding
Coupon bonds outstanding
Coupon and registered bonds outstanding
Debt on which interest has ceased since maturity
Coupon bonds
Coupons
Number and amount of paid interest checks received, etc
Gold certificates
Number and amount of different classes of notes and certificates received
from various banks, etc
Issue, redemption, and outstanding of various loans, etc
Number and amount of redeemed securities on
file
R E P O R T OF T H E COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL R E V E N U E

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490
492

493-514

Accounts and statistics
Receipts i n large tax-paying States and collection districts
Cost of collecting internal-revenue taxes
Estimated expenses for next fiscal year
Salaries
. Scale of salaries of collectors
:
Field f o r c e , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . , , , , , , , ; , , , . , . , . , , . , , . , , . , . , . , . . , , , . , , . . . . , .




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49^

CONTENTS.

XI

R E P O R T OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL R E V E N U E — C o n t i n u e d .

Objects of taxation
Distilled spirits
Denatured alcohol
Industrial distilleries
Distilleries
Fermented Liquors
Tobacco
Special excise tax on corporations
oleomargarine
Adulterated butter.
Renovated butter
Laboratory work
Claims
Litigation
Court decisions
Legacy t a x cases
Delinquent corporations
Old judgments
Legislation
Stamps
Revenue agents
Recommendations—
Denatm-ed alcohol
Tobacco
Oleomargarine
Adulterated butter




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ANNUAL REPORT ON

THE FINANCES.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Washington., December 1, 191S.
SIR : The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to make the following report:
FINANCIAL AID TO DAYTON, OHIO.

I n the latter part of March, 1913, a great storm swept over the Ohio
Valley, causing disastrous floods, from which the city of Dayton,
Ohio, became a special sufferer. So serious were the losses, that, as
the waters began to recede, the banks in that city were afraid to
reopen their doors because of the temporary impairment of confidence^—subsequently happily dissipated—in the recuperative powers
of the city and in the ability of the banks to meet the extraordinary
demands which might be made upon them.
On the 4th of April, 1913, a telegram was received from the chairman of the Citizens' Eelief Committee, asking that a representative of
the Department " be sent right away to see about financing our banking institutions," etc. A national-bank examiner was immediately
dispatched to Dayton, and within twenty-four hours after his arrival,
and upon his recommendation, the Department designated every national bank in the city of Dayton as a Government depositary, and
announced that it would deposit in said national banks $2,000,000
of Government funds, to be secured by State, municipal, or other
local bonds acceptable to the Secretary of the Treasury. The effect
of this action was to restore confidence at once. The banks reopened
their doors, and instead of the anticipated need of $2,000,000, the
Treasury was called on for only $182,000.
$500,000,000 EMERGENCY CURRENCY ANNOUNCEMENT.

A special session of Congress convened on April 7,1913, and immediately began to consider the important questions of tariff and currency reform. The vast economic changes involved in these two
important questions had ,the natural effect of causing in many quarters apprehension as to the possible effects of the anticipated legislation. A feeling of unrest began to pervade business circles. This
16726°—FI 1913




1

1

YI

R E P O R T O N T H E FINANCES.

was accentuated by a certain propaganda of pessimism which, whether
designedly or not, produced a condition of extreme nervousness and
tension. In the early part of June this assumed a serious aspect.
Complaints began to reach the Department from many parts of the
country that credits were being restricted, and that it was increasingly difficult to secure funds for the normal needs of legitimate business. To what extent these reports were justified there was no exact
means of ascertaining, but the general conditions indicated a more or
less acute state of affairs. In order to relieve anxiety and to let the
business interests of the country understand that there was no occasion for unreasonable restriction of credits, and to destroy apprehension based upon unjustifiable fears, and to assure the country that the
means were at hand to cope successfully with any situation that
might arise, the Secretary announced that there was actually on hand
in the Treasury and ready for immediate delivery to any and every
bank complying with the requirements of the law, five hundred
million dollars ($500,000,000) in new national-bank note currency,
which the Secretary said he would not hesitate to issue under the
provisions of the Aldrich-Vreeland Act of May 30, 1908, to banks
making application therefor in accordance with the terms of that
act. The relief occasioned by this announcement was instantaneous.
Confidence of the banks in their ability to meet the demands of their
customers was largely restored and the unfavorable symptoms
promptly disappeared. So completely effective was this action that
none of the five hundred million dollars ($500,000,000) of currency
was applied for by the banks.
CROP-MOVING DEPOSITS.

Toward the latter part of July symptoms of uneasiness began to
reappear. There was much talk about the difiiculty of moving the
fall crops and the annual apprehension on this score began to stalk
about the country with more than usual vigor. I t is a characteristic
of our imperfect and unsatisfactory banking system that the very
prosperity of the country becomes, at times, a menace, because of the
apprehended inability of the banks to meet the seasonal demand for
the large amounts of money required to move a bounteous harvest.
Conditions were again becoming acute when the Secretary determined to deposit from twenty-five millions to fifty millions of dollars
of Government funds in the national banks in those parts of the
country where the necessity for funds to move the crops existed.
The Secretary announced that, as security for such deposits, highclass commercial paper would be accepted at 65 per cent of its face
value, bearing the indorsement of the depositary bank. This was an
unprecedented step, because commercial paper had never before
been accepted as security for Government deposits. I t was, how-




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

'

3

ever, a necessary and highly beneficial step, because it enabled the
banks to obtain the required funds upon the pledge of available paper
already in their vaults. If the banks had been obliged to secure
these deposits with Government bonds or other fixed investments,
the relief would not have been effective, because many of the banks
would have been compelled to use the deposits for the purchase of
the bonds required by the Government as security.
In order to distribute intelligently the crop-moving deposits, three
conventions of bankers were held at the Treasury Department in
Washington during August, 1913, the first composed of bankers from
the South and Southwestern States; the second composed of
bankers from the Middle Western and Northwestern States; the
third composed of bankers from the Pacific Coast and Eocky Mountain States. I t was not necessary to extend aid to the Eastern States,
although the Department was ready to do so if it had been required.
It was essential that the action of the Department should be nonpartisan and nonpolitical; the crops of Eepublicans, Democrats,
Progressives, and all other classes of the people, had to be moved,
and the earnest desire of the Department was to have the benefits
of this action diffused as widely and impartially as possible. The
clearing-house associations in each of the cities invited to participate
in the conferences were asked, therefore,, to name the delegates. A
most interesting and intelligent body of men assembled in Washington and discussed with the Secretary and Assistant Secretary Williams (in charge of the fiscal bureaus) the needs of their seveial
communities and sections. As a result, allotment of these funds was
made upon the basis of the testimony of their several representatives,
as follows:
South and Southwest
Middle and Northwest
Pacific Coast and Rocky Mountain
Total

'.

$22, 550, 000
_______! 19,000,000
^__ 4,950,000
46,500,000

The Department, having no machinery for the investigation of
local credits, was obliged to rely upon the banks in the larger cities
as instrumentalities for the distribution of Government funds to the
banks in the smaller communities. I n the discussions at Washington, the representatives of the banks were urged to pass the Government funds on to their country correspondents upon reasonable
terms. The Secretary is gratified to be able to say that in most instances this was done upon a basis that seemed fair to all concerned.
The effect of this action was highly beneficial. Confidence was
restored. The readiness of the Government to meet every reasonable need of the banks for the legitimate purposes of crop moving
had the happy effect, so the Department is informed, of causing much




4-

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

hoarded money to be deposited in the banks. This increased their
ability to take care of their customers, and caused a decided relaxation
in the demands of country correspondents for accommodation, which,
prior to the announcement of the Secretary, had been much greater
than usual, because the small banks were attempting, very naturally,
to impound all the funds they could get to make them safe against
the anticipated stringency. The moment it became loiown that the
Government stood ready to assist, the tension was relieved, business resumed a normal aspect, and the fall movement of crops, trade,
and commerce proceeded upon an easier and safer basis than for
many years past.
I t is interesting to note that of the fifty million dollars which the
Department offered to place in the banks for crop-moving purposes,
only $34,661,000 had been called for up to November 25, 1913. These
funds will be gradually repaid to the Treasury beginning in January, 1914.
CURRENCY LEGISLATION.

The psychological arid practical value of these incidents can not be
overestimated. They demonstrate clearly that any improvement in
our financial system which will permanently establish confidence will
in itself be an immense gain, and if that improved financial system
assures the opportunity to secure at all times the necessary funds and
credits to meet the expanding and legitimate needs of the commerce
and industry of the country, it will be an achievement of enduring
benefit.
These incidents also show conclusively the enormous value of an
altruistic governmental agency in the financial affairs of the country.
So long as the Government has the power to intervene in a beneficent
and unselfish way, the danger of panics and of unjust practices will
be largely, if not wholly, destroyed. This is one of the chief objects
sought in the proposed reformation and reorganization of our banking and currency system. The people of the country are to be congratulated upon the early prospect of sound legislation on this vitally
important subject. Should the Congress enact the fundamentals of
the pending measure, it is believed that permanent protection will
be provided against recurring cornmercial crises and that adequate
facilities will be created for that legitimate and sound expansion of
credits so vital to the prosperity of our great and growing country.
I t has been, and will continue to be, the policy and purpose of the
Secretary to exercise all the powers of the Department for the protection of the public and the legitimate business interests of the
country.




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

5

INTEREST ON GOVERNMENT DEPOSITS.

Prior to 1908 interest had never been required on Government
deposits. After the act of 1908 interest at the rate of 1 per cent
per annum was collected on so-called " inactive accounts " in national
banks. By " inactive accounts " is meant a special deposit (usually
$1,000) which remains fixed or stationary in amount. The aggregate
of such accounts on the 1st day of June, 1913, was $1,286,500, and the
entire amount of interest collected by the Government thereon during
the preceding period of about five years was approximately $715,000.
On April 30, 1913, the Secretary announced that beginning June 1,
1913, all Government depositaries, active as well as inactive, would
be required to pay interest at the rate of 2 per cent per annum on Government funds. Only 9 of the total number of national banks holding Government deposits refused to pay interest under the new
regulation.
Hundreds of applications were received from other banks seeking
Government deposits on the new terms, many of which were granted.
The Government has not had the slightest difficulty in placing its
deposits at 2 per cent interest.
On the 1st of November, 1913, the total amount of Government
funds on deposit in national banks was reported at $98,334,917.36,
which, if this average balance should be retained, would add to the
net revenues of the Government approximately two million dollars
($2,000,000) per annum.
A careful calculation has been made of. the amount of public
money on deposit in national banks throughout the country for the
16 years preceding the 4th of March, 1913, namely, from 1897
to 1913, and it has been found that if the present policy of charging
2 per cent interest on such deposits had been established in 1897,
the Government would have received during that 16-year period a
total of about $30,610,381.
INCOME TAX.

The passage of the income-tax law on the 3d of October, 1913,
placed new duties and great responsibilities on the Treasury Department. This law went into effect immediately with the proviso that
collections at the source should begin on the 1st day of November,
1913. Only 28 days, therefore, were allowed the Department within
which to prepare regulations covering the collection of the tax at
the source. Many intricate and difficult problems are involved in the
initiation of a new law so far-reaching in its effects and so complicated in its operations. The Department, however, took vigorous
hold of the matter, and on October 25 issued the first of the series of




6

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

necessary regulations, namely, those governing the collection of the
tax, at the source, on coupon aiid registered interest payments on
bonded debts of corporations, etc. Supplementary regulations are
being issued from time to time, relating to other features and phases
of the law. The additional organization required for the administration of this law is being created as rapidly as possible. A certain
amount of confusion and inconvenience at the beginning is unavoidable, but every effort of the Department will be exerted fairly and
justly to interpret, elucidate, and administer the law in a reasonable
spirit.
I t is estimated that there are 425,000 individuals subject to the
income tax. The number of corporations making returns to the
Department for the calendar year 1912 was 305,336, but of these,
244,220 claimed no income or a net income of less than $5,000 and
were, therefore, not subject to taxation. Under the new law, all
corporations having any net earnings whatever are subject to the
payment of an income tax, whether their earnings be more or less
than $5,000. I t is expected, therefore, that approximately 150,000
corporations which have heretofore been exempt will now be required
to pay an income tax.
CUSTOMS SERVICE.

The principal achievement of the Customs Service in the fiscal year
1913 was the reorganization of that service under the Executive
order dated March 3, 1913, in pursuance of the authority granted
in the act of Congress approved April 23, 1912.
Prior to this reorganization there were 126 customs districts and
38 independent ports. The limits of many districts were not clearly
defined, and some of the districts overlapped, while large portions
of territory were not included within any customs district. By the
reorganization, the entire country was included in 49 customs districts, each with clearly defined limits, and all ports were included in
one or another of these districts and subjected to the control aud
supervision of the collector appointed for the district.
The system of compensating collectors of customs through fees,
storage charges, and other emoluments was abolished, and all collectors were placed on a salary basis payable by the Government, all
fees collected being required to be deposited and accounted for to the
credit of the United States.
By the reorganization, the right of certain collectors of customs to
sell blank forms at 10 cents each, solely for their own account arid
benefit, was taken away. Prior to the reorganization, those having
business with the customhouses where this practice was permitted




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

7

found it expedient to purchase their forms from collectors at a price
ten or more times their actual value. Such forms are, under the
reorganization, being sold at 1 cent each, and the proceeds are deposited to the credit of the Treasury.
The reorganization as it actually went into effect on July 1, 1913,
was, on a basis of expense, $356,000 annually less than the prior
organization.
During the latter part of the fiscal year 1913, when revision of
the tariff was under consideration by Congress, this Department closely followed the legislation as formulated, in order to be in
the best' position properly to administer the law when enacted, and
cooperated with the various committees of Congress by furnishing
such expert advice as it was able to command through its various
officers and employees familiar with tariff legislation and the administration of the customs laws.
The tariff act, materially reducing the rates of duty, went into
effect on October 4, 1913, without any delays or inconvenience to
business, other than the slight delay occasioned by the Jarge volume
of warehouse withdrawals, due to the congestion of merchandise
which had been stored in bonded warehouses pending the passage
of the new act, and the natural rush to withdraw the same immediately after the act became effective. While the new act will be
simpler of application than the act of 1909, the present indications
are that the volume of imports will largely increase, and that the
change from specific to ad valorem rates will require considerable
adjustment in the customs force to meet the new conditions. The
measure has not been in force for a sufficient length of time to make
possible an accurate estimate of its ultimate revenue-producing
powers.
Convention of customs coUectors.
I n view of the reorganization and consolidation of the customs
service, and of the ncAv tariff act, it seemed advisable to call a convention of the collectors of customs in all parts of the country, including Hawaii and Porto Eico, for the purpose of devising new
methods for increasing efficiency, reducing expenses, and eliminating
useless and unnecessary processes, as well as to diffuse a uniform and
common understanding of the requirements of the new law, to reimpress collectors of customs with the importance of their duties, and
to establish more effective means of cooperation in the common work.
This convention, the first of its kind ever held, was eminently successful. The interchange of views, and the consideration of the
problems involved, will result in the elimination of useless efforts, a




8

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

saving in expenditures, and the standardizing of the work and rates
of compensation paid for similar services at the various ports of
entry.
C H A N G E I N T H E M A N N E R OF H A N D L I N G AND DISBURSING P U B L I C F U N D S .

On the 9th of January^ 1913, former Secretary MacVeagh issued
Department Circular No. 5, which inaugTirated a radical change in
the manner of handling and disbursing tJie public funds. The objects
to be accomplished were announced as follows:
For the purpose of bringing the ordinary fiscal transactions of the Federal
Government more nearly into harmony with present business practices, it has
been determined that the daily receipts of the Government shall be placed with
the national-bank depositaries to the credit of the Treasurer of the United
states. Disbursements will be made by warrant or check drawn on the Treasurer, but payable by national-bank depositaries, as well as by the Treasurer and
subtreasuries.

The new system of accounting went into operation on February 1,
1913, and, as usual in such changes, complications, confusion, and
delays attended its introduction, causing some embarrassment, but
gradually the difficulties at first encountered are disappearing, and
the system appears to.respond to the public requirements, and to be
accomplishing the purposes for which it was devised.
P U B L I C H E A L T H SERVICE.

The attention of the Congress is invited to the report of the
Surgeon General upon the operations of the Public Health Service.
The importance of this service can not be overestimated. I t is daily
growing in usefulness. Through the Public Health Service we are
securing real conservation of our human resources, the first of all of
our natural resources. Conservation of our material natural resources will be enhanced and simplified if conservation of our human
natural resources is of the right sort. A vigorous, virile, and healthful race is of superlative importance. By a wise enlargement of the
functions and a rational extension of the facilities of the Public
Health Service through constantly generous, but not prodigal, appropriations this vital end may be achieved.
N E W R E V E N U E CUTTERS.

The Congress is respectfully urged to grant the necessary authority
and appropriation for the prompt construction of four new revenue
cutters. The service is being seriously crippled for lack of these
ships. The necessity for them is imperative.




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
COAST GUARD.

Suggestions frequently have been made for the consolidation of the
Eevenue-Cutter Service and the Life-Saving Service into one organization, to be known as the " Coast Guard," for the purpose of increasing the efficiency of these two kindred branches of the Government,
each of which is engaged in higlily important humanitarian work in
time of peace. The Life-Saving Service will by this means secure a
military status and will become a first naval reserve in time of war.
Attention is invited to the remarks of the Captain Commandant of
the Eevenue-Cutter Service on this subject, which are incorporated
in the abstracts of reports of bureaus and divisions attached to this
report. The Secretary is of the firm belief that the organization of a
Coast Guard, as proposed, would be a wise act and constructive administration of the best sort. Unless this is done the personnel of the
Life-Saving Service will deteriorate, and there will be increasing difficulty in maintaining the service at a reasonable point of efficiency.
The humanitarian achievements alone of the combined EevenueCutter and Life-Saving Services, as evidenced by 4,423 human lives
rescued from peril in the year 1913, justifies, if it does not require,
the earnest and powerful support of the Congress. On the material
side, the amount of property saved, or to which assistance was rendered, in the year 1913 alone, was $16,659,545. Material considerations combine with the humanitarian to emphasize the necessity for
maintaining and improving this splendid service—a service unapproached in its unique and useful functions by that of any other
nation in the world.
ICE PATROL.

During the months of April, May, and June last, the ice region
in the North Atlantic Ocean was patrolled by the revenue cutters
Seneca and Miami^ and warnings of the location of dangerous icebergs and floes were sent out by radio to the east and west bound
trans-Atlantic steamships. The duty was performed at the urgent
solicitation of the maritime associations at the principal seaports on
the Atlantic Coast. I t is now nearly two years since the loss of the
Titanic^ and during both ice seasons since that lamentable affair the
patrol has been maintained practically by the United States Government alone.
This patrol should be discontinued, and the important maritime
nations should unite in defining lanes of travel across the North
Atlantic, so as to avoid all danger of icebergs during the months of
April, May, and June of each year, and compel the steamship companies to observe them. This would result in increasing, to some




10

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

extent, the time of ocean passage during these three months, but it
would, on the other hand, insure immunity from the dangers of
icebergs during this season. The steamship companies should not be
permitted to jeopardize needlessly human life for the purpose of
shortening the trans-Atlantic journey by a few hours and saving a
comparatively few dollars; but if they are, then they should be compelled to maintain an effective ice patrol at their own cost. Failing
this, it would appear equitable that each of the maritime nations
concerned should, in the future, perform its share of this duty if it
be determined to maintain this patrol. This matter is to be brought
to the attention of the International Conference on Safety at Sea,
now in session at London, by the American delegate representing this
Department.
SAVING OF L I F E AND PROPERTY O N I N T E R I O R NAVIGABLE RIVERS AND WATERS.

The annual overflowing of the Ohio and Mississippi Eivers and
their tributaries, the great loss of life and property incident thereto,
and the necessity, as evidenced last year, of sending from the Great
Lakes and the Atlantic ports skilled men and life-saving apparatus
to aid in saving lives in the inundated regions, present a legitimate
field for the operations of the Eevenue-Cutter Service. Three typical
light-draft river steamers should be constructed and equipped as
revenue cutters; each of these craft provided with not less than 4
powerful motor lifeboats, and with such other life-saving appliances as may be necessary for work along the rivers. During the
flood seasons, these cutters should be directed to follow the crest of
the flood from Pittsburgh down to the mouth of the Mississippi, and
there is but little doubt that their services would be of great value in
rescuing lives and property, and in distributing food and clothing to
marooned people. During flood times surgeons could be detailed to
the cutters to render medical aid where needed. "When floods are not
raging, the 3 cutters could be very efficiently used in patrol of these
inland waters for the enforcement of the navigation and motor-boat
laws, and in rendering aid to vessels in distress.
Headquarters should be established at Louisville or Cincinnati on
the Ohio, at St. Louis on the Upper Mississippi, and at Helena, Ark.,
or Vicksburg, Miss., on the Lower Mississippi.
Cutters of this type can be constructed and properly equipped for
$80,000 each, or a total of $240,000 for the three. The annual cost
of maintenance would be approximately $80,000 for the 3 cutters,
a small sum to expend for the saving of life and property when compared with the vast sums annually lost through these floods.




SECRETARY OP T H E TREASURY.

11

PANAMA CANAL.

Transactions in the finances of the Government during the fiscal
year favored the maintenance of an adequate working balance in the
Treasury, and it was therefore unnecessary to sell additional bonds
for the construction of the Panama Canal. Expenditures on the
waterway during the year, amounting to $41,741,258.03, were paid
out of the general fund of the Treasury. The total net balance so
expended from the general fund to June 30, 1913, reimbursable from
the proceeds of bonds not yet sold, was $179,627,617.07.
PUBLIC BUILDINGS COMMISSION.

The public buildings act, approved March 4, 1913, provided for a
commission, with the Secretary of the Treasury as chairman, which
shall " present to Congress a connected scheme, involving annual
appropriations for the construction and completion of public buildings heretofore authorized within a reasonable time, and shall frame
a standard or standards by which the size and cost of public buildings
shall, as far as practicable, be determined, and shall report as to the
adaptability in size, accommodations, and cost of buildings hitherto
authorized to the requirements of the communities in which they are
to be located, and also w;hether the existing appropriations should
be increased or diminished to meet such requirements."
This commission has been organized and its work is well under
way. A careful and thorough investigation of this important subject, in all of its phases, has been undertaken, and promises to produce
excellent results. The report of the commission will, if possible, be
transmitted to the Congress before the close of the fiscal year.
CENTRAL HEATING AND POWER PLANT.

The sundry civil act, approved June 23, 1913, authorizes the construction of a central heating and power plant and places the direction of this very important project in the hands of this Department.
This plant will furnish heat, light, and power for the old and new
buildings of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the buildings of
the Department of Agriculture, the Treasury Building, the White
House and the buildings on its grounds, the State, War and Navy
Building, the Winder Building, the Mills Building, the Court of
Claims Building, the new and old buildings for the National Museum,
the Smithsonian Building, the Army Medical Museum Building, the
Fish Commission Building, the Washington Monument, the District
Building, the Post Office Department Building, and the buildings.




12

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

when constructed, for the Departments of State, Justice, Commerce,
and Labor.
At the time this plant is completed, it will undoubtedly be required
to serve the new Interior Department office building authorized to be
constructed on the site at Eighteenth and F Streets, the Lincoln
Memorial, and any similar buildings or structures which may be
authorized in the interim.
The Department is now preparing to carry into effect the provisions of the existing legislation and arrange for the construction of
this plant.
CONTINGENT FUND.

The " Contingent fund for the Secretary of the Treasury " for the
current fiscal year is $20,000. This sum is wholly inadequate to do
the effective work which can and ought to be done in the public interest. The activities of the Treasury Department are so great and
varied, and are increasing so much with the rapid growth of the
country and with the new duties and responsibilities imposed upon
the Department—such, for instance, as the new income-tax law—
that the Secretary should at all times have a sufficient fund to enable
him to make effective investigations in any part of the country that
will enable him to improve the administrative methods of the Department, to eradicate abuses, and to protect the public interest. I t
is earnestly hoped that the Congress will grant an appropriation of
$50,000 for the contingent fund.




SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

13

FINANCES.

The following statements showing receipts, disbursements, estimates, and the condition of the Treasury are submitted:
E E C E I P T S AND DISBURSEMENTS.

Fiscal year 1918.
The receipts and disbursements of the Government during the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1913, were as foUows:
(See details on p p . 18 to 23.)
GENERAL F U N D .

'

Receipts into t h e general fund, including various trust-fund
receipts, but excluding postal revenues:
Customs
Internal revenue—
Ordinary.
$309, 410, 665. 81
Corporation tax
35, 006, 299. 84

344,416, 965. 65
2, 910,204. 69
57,892,663.64

Sales of public lands
Miscellaneous
Total ordinary receipts
Disbursements from the general fund for current
expenses and capital outlays, including various
trust-fund disbursements, but excluding postal
and Panama Canal disbursements:
For civil establishment—
Legislative establishment
Executive office
State Department
,
Treasury Department proper
Public buildings, construction and sites.
War Department, civil
Department of Justice
Post Office Department proper
Postal deficiencies for prior years
Navy Department, civil
Interior Department proper
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Labor ^
Independent offices
District of Columbia

$318,891,395.86

724, 111, 229. 84

13, 291, 813. 52
592, 014. 73
4, 978, 380.09
48,092,168. 39
14, 021, 781. 21
2,220,460.24
10, 423, 632.19
2,169, 340. 97
1, 027, 368. 79
829, 554. 96
22, 383, 756. 70
20,469,027. 70
11,263,457.08
3, 347, 380.11
2, 878, 325. 95
12, 841,210. 79
170, 829, 673. 42

For military establishment, including rivers
and harbors, forts, arsenals, seacoast defenses, and miscellaneous

160,387,452. 85

1 Includes all expenditures made during 1913 for bureaus and offices transferred to the Department of
Labor.




14

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Disbursements from t h e general fund for current
expenses and capital outlays, etc.—Continued.
For naval establishment, including construction of new vessels, machinery, armament,
equipment, improvement at navy yards,
and miscellaneous
$133,262,861. 97
For Indian service
20, 306,158. 90
For pensions
175, 085, 450. 29
For interest on the public debt
22,899,108.08
Total ordinary disbursements

$682, 770, 705. 51

Excess of ordinary receipts
Panama Canal disbursements:
Disbursements for canal provided from general fund
Excess of disbursements including t h e Panama Canal
Issues and redemptions of public debt:
National-bank note fund—
Redemptions
$24,089,035. 50
Receipts
21,471,010. 00
Excess of redemptions over receipts
Miscellaneous redemptions.

41, 340, 524. 33
41, 741, 258. 03
400, 733. 70

2,618,025. 50
102,575.00
3,121,334.20

Postal savings—
Proceeds of bonds issued on savings deposits
Total excess of disbursements over receipts into general
fund

1,929,840.00

1,191,494.20

General-fund balances:
Balance in general fund June 30, 1912
Excess of general-fund disbursements for year

167,152,478. 99
1,191,494. 20

Balance in general fund June 30, 1913

165, 960, 984. 79

SUMMARY OF G E N E R A L - F U N D TRANSACTIONS.

Fiscal year ended June 30, 1913.
Ordinary receipts, including various trust-fund
Receipts.
receipts, b u t excluding postal revenues
$724, 111, 229.84
Disbursements for current expenses and capital
outlays, including various trust-fund disbursements, b u t excluding postal and Panama Canal
disbursements
Panama Canal disbursements
National-bank note fund:
Receipts
21,471,010. 00
Redemptions
Miscellaneous redemptions of the public debt
Receipts-, postal savings bonds
1, 929, 840. 00
Total receipts into the general fund
Excess of disbursements over receipts
Grand totals




Disbursements,

$682, 770, 705. 51
41,741, 258.03

24,089,035.50
102, 575. 00

747, 512,079. 84 .
1,191,494. 20
748, 703, 574. 04

748, 703, 574. 04

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

15

POSTAL SERVICE.

Exclusive of Post Office Department proper, which is included in "civil establishment."
Postal revenue receipts
Postal service paid from postal revenues of the year
Excess of postal receipts

$266, 619, 525. 65
262,108, 874. 74
4, 510,650. 91

Grants from the Treasury were made during the year for deficiencies in the postal revenues of prior years amounting to

1, 027, 368. 79

UNITED STATES NOTES (GREENBACKS).

Issues to replace worn and mutilated notes
Worn and mutilated notes retired

163,000, 000. 00
163,000,000.00

The redemptions during the year of the notes unfit for circulation necessitated the
issue of a like amount thereof to maintain the outstanding aggregate of the notes as
required by law.
GOLD RESERVE FUND.

Balance in reserve fund June 30, 1912
Balance in reserve fund June 30, 1913

$150,000,000.00
150,000,000.00

The redemptions of notes for gold from the reserve fund during the year were: United
States notes, $67,850,957, and Treasury notes of 1890, $67,830, a total of $67,918,787.
As the redeemed notes were exchanged each day for gold in the general fund, the
reserve was maiitained at the fixed sum of $150,000,000 required by law.
TRUST FUNDS.

Reserved against outstanding gold and silver certificates and Treasury notes of 1890.
Issues:
Gold certificates issued
$468, 730,000. 00
Silver certificates issued
403,952,000. 00
Total set aside in trust funds
Redemptions:
Gold certificates redeemed.
Silver certificates redeemed
Treasury notes of 1890 redeemed
Total redemptions paid out of trust funds

$872, 682,000.00
421,840,200. 00
401, 951,000.00
269,000.00
824,060,200.00

Increase in trust funds during year
48, 621,800.00
Of the certificates issued the sum of $823,791,200 was to replace
worn and unfit certificates presented for redemption; and Treasury
notes of 1890, amounting to $269,000, were redeemed and retired,
the net result being an increase in the trust funds of $48,621,800.
Balances in trust funds June 30, 1912.'.
1, 524, 535, 369.00
Balances in trust funds June '30, 1913




1, 573,157,169.00

16

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
SINKING FUND.

The securities redeemed on account of the sinking fund, included
in general-fund disbursements, were as follows:
Fractional currency
1-yearnotes of 1863
2-year notes of 1863
Old demand notes
Compound-interest notes
Refunding certificates
Funded loan of 1907
Ten-forties of 1864

$1,545.00
30.00
50.00
130.00
190.00
480.00
99, 950.00
100.00

Total

102, 475.00
CONDITION^ OF THE TREASURY J U N E 30,

1913.

The public debt of the United States at the close of the fiscal
year, as stated in the debt statement of June 30, 1913, is set forth in
detail as follows:
Interest-bearing debt:
Loan of 1925, 4 per cent
Loan of 1908-1918, 3 per.cent
Consols of 1930, 2 per cent
Panama Canal loan, 2 per cent
Panama Canal loan, 3 per cent.
Postal savings bonds, 2\ per cent

$118,489,900.00 r
63,945,460.00 « ^
646, 250,150. 00
84, 631,980.00
50,000,000.00
2, 389,120. 00 ^ "
.

Debt on which interest has ceased:
Funded loan of 1891
Loan of 1904
-.
Funded loan of 1907
Refunding certificates
Old debt
Debt bearing no interest:
United States notes (greenbacks)
National-bank notes, redemption account...
Old demand notes
1
.^...
Fractional currency

$965,706,610.00

28, 650. 00
13, 250. 00
700,400. 00
13, 570.00
903,680.26
1, 659, 550. 26
346,681,016.00
22,092,806.00
53,152. 50
6,854,609. 90
375, 681, 584.40

Total interest and noninterest-bearing
debt.
1, 343,047,744. 66
Certificates and notes issued on deposits of
coin and silver bullion:,
Gold certificates
„-.•--.. ^ 1,086,947,169.00
Silver certificates
483, 550,000.00
Treasury notes of 1890
2, 660,000. 00
1,573,157,169.00
Total debt June 30, 1913

2, 916, 204, 913. 66

I Including $220,000 gold certificates issued June 30, 1913; advices not received in time for inclusion in
tbe public-debt statement of that date.




SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
CASH IN THE T R E A S U R Y J U N E 30,

17

1913.

[From revised statements.]
Reserve fund:
Gold coin and bullion

$150,000,000. 00

Trust funds:
Gold coin and bullion
Silver d o l l a r s . . . . .
Silver dollars of 1890

$1,086,947,169.00
483,550,000.00
2, 660,000. 00
1, 573,157,169. 00

General fund:
I n Treasury officesGold coin
$25,413, 866. 87
• Gold certificates
82, 949,460. 00
Standard silver dollars.
9, 936,070. 00
Silver certificates
14,421,408.00
United States notes....
9,465,836. 00
Treasury notes of 1890.
3, 330.00
National-bank n o t e s . . . 15, 311, 542.47
Certified
checks on
banks
343,190.58
157, 844, 703. 92
Deduct current liabilities—
National-bank 5 per
cent fund
$28,092,127. 73
Less notes in process of
redemption
28,092,127. 73
Outstanding warrants
and checks
Balances to credit of
disbursing officers..,
Post Office
Department balances
Miscellaneous i t e m s . . .
Postal savings—5 per
cent account

34,118,314.81
90, 590, 674. 36
6,452, 334. 59
10, 618, 605.32
2, 540, 446. 92
144,320,376.00^

Less warrants and checks
not cleared

57, 528, 598. 04
86, 791, 777. 96

In

Working balance in Treasury offices
national-bank depositories—
To credit of t h e Treasurer of t h e United
States
$69, 746,133.15
To credit of disbursing
officers
6,517,48L91

71,052, 925. 96

76,263, 615. 06
16726°—FI. 1913-




18

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

General fund—Continued.
I n treasury of the Philippine Islands—
To credit of t h e Treasurer of t h e United
States
To credit of United
States
disbursing
officers

$1,061,897.26

2,910,482.71
$3, 972, 379. 97
80,235,995.03

Deduct current l i a b i l i t i e s Outstanding warrants.
Balances to the credit
of disbursing officers.

710,674.15
9,427,964. 62
10,138,638. 77

Balances in banks and in treasury of Philippine Islands
In Treasury offices—
Silver bullion (at cost)
$2,064, 332.43
Subsidiary silver coin
20,737,926.12
Fractional currency
276.87
Minor coin
1,997,166. 63
Awaiting reimbursement, United States
bonds and interest paid
11,000. 52

$70,097, 356.26

24,810,702.57
Total balance in general fund June 30, 1913

165,960, 984. 79
167,152,478. 99

Total balance in general fund J u n e 30, 1912.

1,191,494.20

Decrease in 1913
Comparison of receipts, fiscal years 1912 and 1913,
1913.

Increase, 1913. Decrease, 1913.

Customs
S318,891,395.86 |$311,321,672.22 S7,569,723.64
Internal revenue:
Ordmary
, 309,410,665.81 293,028,895.93 16,381,769.88
Corporation tax
, :35,006,299.84 28,583,303.73 6,422,996.11
2,910,204.69
5,392,796.75
S2,482,692.08
Sales of public lands
,
97,162.12
1,798,038.57
1,700,876.45
Consular fees
105,081.41
539,418.85
644,500.26
Chinese indemnity
5,545,148.05
6,970,159.43
1,425,011.38
Profits ou coinage, bullion deposits, etc...
1,446.24
9,493.19
8,046.95
.Payment of interest by Pacific railways..
93,050.30
3,730,059.08
3,637,008.78
Tax on circulation of national banks
40,675.01
34,609.91
6,065.10
Interest on public deposits
234,084.84
4,113.44
229,971.40
Night services, customs service
1,387,114.94
1,588,201.84
201,086.90
Customs fees, fines, penalties, etc
Navy hospital and clothing funds, fines
1,026,118.12
1,326,013.43
and forfeitures, etc
,
299,895.31
202,432.25
Sales of ordnance material, etc
224,732.28
22,300.03
390,490.11
Land fees
1,643,041.08
1,252,550.97
701.84
Fees on letters patent
,
2,076,399.85
2,077,101.69
Compromise and repurchase of forfeited
648,582.95
648, 682.95
lands
,
67,470.31
Depredations on public lands
161,070.71
103, 600.40
Proceeds of town sites, Reclamation Serv2,560.64
15,224.10
ioe
,
17, 784.74
308,582.24
2,158,344.99
Forest reserve fund
2,466, 927.23
3,336,519.33
1,398,542.67
4,735, 062.00
Immi^ant fund.
,
244,442.25
390, 425.50
145,983.25
Natural!zation fees
385,862. 28
255,221.71
130, 640.67
Proceeds of sealskins
• 225,639.43
19,732.15
205, 907.28
Alaska fund
1,274,839.66
150,889.79
1,123, 949.87
Judicial fees, fines, penalties, etc.
,




19

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
Comparison of receipts, fiscal years 1912 and 1913—Continued.
1913.
Sales of Government property
Rent ofpublic buildings, grounds, etc
Sales of lands and buUdings
District of Columbia, general receipts
Funds contributed for river and harbor
improvements
Panama Canal, rentals, work done, e t c . . .
Reimbursements on account of expenditures made for Indian tribes
Miscellaneous

1912.

Increase, 1913. .Decrease,1913.

$3,480,618.06
268,301.09
72,795.79
8,070,369.29

$2,782,028.47
204,342.69
33,201.30
7,774,381.09

$698,689.59
63,958.50
39,594.49
295,988.20

1,020,620.00
1,693,147.47

652,000.00
1,251,610.00

368,620.00
441,637.47

531,915.82
2,160,039.75

829,925.88
1,904,513.89

255,525.86

$298 010.06

TRUST FUNDS.

Library of Congress:
Trust fund bequest
Department of State:
Miscellaneous trust funds
War Department:
Army deposit fund
Soldiers' Home permanent fund
Miscellaneous trust funds
Navy Department:
Navy deposit fund
Marine Corps deposit fund
Interior Department:
Deposits for surveying pubhc lands..
Proceeds of Indian lands
Indian moneys, proceeds of labor
Miscellaneous trust funds
Personal funds of patients. Government Hospital for Insane
Pension money. Government Hospital for Insane
District of Columbia:
MisceUaneous trust fund deposits
Washington redemption fund
Pohce and firemen's rehef funds
Other trust funds
Total
Deduct—
Moneys covered by warrant in
year subsequent to the deposit
thereof.
AddMoneys received in fiscal year but
not covered by warran t
Ordinary receipts

20,000.00
1,149,880.22

968,8.32.86

1,589,835.51
504,289.93
4,5.18.19
284,608.56
159,880.80

1,869,401.54
446,597.88

279,506.03

67,774.26
3,739,104.72
4,489,248.60
156,199.22

71,606.98
3,264,763.79
3,079,440.57

23,864.84
97,396.46

Public debt receipts..
Total receipts, exclusive of postal...
Postal revenues
Total receipts, including postal




457,003.92
148,922.20

59,687.02

57,692.05
4,518.19
10,958. 60
474,340.93
1,409,808.03
96,512.20

172,395.36
3,832.72

7,723.29

31,588.13
6,289.39

510,120.53
117,769.02
109,703.38
19,618.47

91,107.07
448,381.62
110,383.43
99,29L39
61,253.18

61,738.91
7,385.59
10,411.99

723,942,849.30

691,902,667.88

38,525,467.73

G, 485,286.31

38,525,467.73

6,361,083.80

337,590.05

461,792.56

723,605,259.25

691,440,875.32

505,970.59

337,590.05

38,693,848.27

31,634.71

168,380.54

724, 111, 229.84 691,778,465.37

Public debt:
Proceeds of bonds, Panama Canal
Premium on sale of bonds
Panama Canal bond receipts... .
Postal savings bonds
National-bank note fund

20,000.00

181,047.36

124,202.51

32,358,366.00
830,738.15
1,929,840.00
21,471,010.00^
23,400,850.00
747,512,079.84
266,619,625.65

6,361,083.80
32 358,366.00
830,738.15

33,189,104.15
• 459,280.00
20,078,365.00

1,470,560.00
1,392,645.00

53,726,749.15

2,863,205.00

33,189,104.15

33,189,104.15

745,505,214. 6:2 41,557,053.27 39,550, .187.95
246,744,015.88 19,875,509.77

1,014,131,605.49 992,249,230.40

61,432,563.04

39,550,187.95

20

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Comparison of disbursements, fiscal years 1912 and 1913.
1913.

1912.

Increase, 1913. Decrease,1913.

CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT.

Legislative:
Senate
House of Representatives
Legislative, miscellaneous
National Monetary Commission.
Pubhc Printer .
Library of Congress .
Botanic Garden
Total legislative
Executive proper:
Salaries and expenses
Administration of the customs laws..
Inquiries for change of methods of
transacting public business
Civil Service Commission
Total executive proper
Department of State:
Salaries and expenses
'...
Foreign intercourseDiplomatic salaries...
Consular salaries
Contingent expenses of foreign
missions
Contingencies of consulates
Emergencies arising in the Diplomatic and Consular Service
Miscellaneous items..
Trustfunds
Total Department of State
Treasury Department:
Salaries Secretary's office and divisions thereof
Contingent fund for Secretary
Contingent expenses of department...
Customs ServiceCollecting customs revenue
Detection and prevention of
frauds
Refundmg excess of deposits
Debentures or drawbacks
Compensation in heu of moieties..
Miscellaneous refunds .
Internal-Revenue ServiceExpenses of collecting
Refunds and reliefs
Suppressing counterfeiting and other
crimes
Accounting offices
Miscellaneous offices
Public Health Service
Epidemic diseases
Engraving and Printing...
Paper, etc., for United States securities .
Revenue-Cutter Service
Revenue vessels
Life-Saving Service
Independent Treasury
Mints and assay offices
Public buildings—
Sites,construction,and equipment
Current maintenance
Miscellaneous items.
Special f u n d s Phil iDnine SDecial funds
Night services. Customs Service..
Total Treasury Department
War Department:
Salaries and expenses
Public buildings and grounds
Total War Department
Navy Department:
Salaries and expenses




$86,469.76
407,315.60
127,076.34

5,444,754.11
559,255. 78
29,792.17

$1,847,946.28
4,740,722.59
48,480.89
47,102.26
5,423,583.19
593,282.38
28,832.02

13,291,813.52

12,729,949.61

642,992.77

214,012.15
10,438.81

236,871.39
280,128.92

78,083.62
289,480.15

126,685.25
280,293.01

9,187.14

592,014.73

923,978.57

9,187.14

343,226.33

362,076.12

18,849.79

733,409.76
1,427,968.89

804,591.06
1,528,666.97

71,181.30
100,698.08

329,769.71
453,572.23

301,787.50
455,155.75

27,982.21

47,736.41
585,649.16
1,057,047.60

5,752.40
652,328.27
401,116.59

41,984.01
655,931.01

4,978,380.09

4,511,474.66

725,897.23

617,923.39
14,794.96
245,605.34

599,080.49
5,560.89
238,620.06

18,842.90
9,234.07
6,985.28

10,924,669.88

10,234,894.82

689,775.06

160,422.98
3,957,897.95
4,653,388.39
49,975.69
56,934.81

164,347.15
4,863,886.80
4,681,994.84
100,422.92
16,615.74

40,319.07

5,514,201.00
. 885,817.21

5,398,947.23
605,714.50

115,253.77
280,102.71

134,044.88
1,696,951.67
1,062,435.28
1,984,608.91
245,636.54
3,538,146.11

137,009.11
1,686,212.36
1,052,988.02
1,768,706.00
308,829.75
3,595,865.06

10,739.31
9,447.26
215,902.91

420,738.85
2,328,706.80
2n,063.88
2,344,609.83
566,743.09
1,067,509.26

425,068.19
2,318,630.08
628,628.86
2,398,619.67
678,938.93
821,615.48

245,893.78

14,021,781.21
4,704,202.99
167,076.50

18,034,385.07
4,802,747.07
9,697.57

157,378.93

308,986.22
229,075.98

126,308.71
238,687.97

183,677.51

62,113,949.60

65,942,023.34

1,993,629.28

1,857,794.17
§62,666.07

1,923,988.94
329,484.81

33,181.26

2,220,460.24

2,253,473.75

33,18L26

829,554.96

797,704.03

31,850.93

$1,934,416.04
5,148,038.19
175,557.23

21,170.92
960.15

$47,102.26
34,026.60
81,128.86
22,859.24
269,690.11

10,076.72

48,601.63
341,150.98

1,583.52
66,679.11
258,991.80

3,924.17
905,988.85
28,606.45
50,447.23

2,964.23

63,193.21
57,718.95
4,329.34
417,564.98
54,009.84
112,195.84
4,012,603.86
98,544.08

9,611.99
5,821,703.02
66,194.77
66,194.77

21

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
Comparison of disbursements, fiscal years 1912 and 1913—Continued.
1913.
Interior D e p a r t m e n t :
Salaries a n d expenses, office of Secretary
General L a n d Office
Public lands service..
I n d i a n Office
Pension Office
P a t e n t Office
Bm*eau of E d u c a t i o n
. . .
Colleges for agriculture a n d t h e m e chanic a r t s
Geological S u r v e y
B u r e a u of Mines
Office of S u p e r m t e n d e n t of Capitol
B u i l d i n g and G r o u n d s
National parks
Beneficiaries
Meridian Hill P a r k , District of Columbia
P r o t e c t i n g l a n d s a n d p r o p e r t y in t h e
I m p e r i a l Valley
E n l a r g i n g t h e Capitol g r o u n d s
Miscellaneous i t e m s
Special funds—
R e c l a m a t i o n fund
F i v e , t h r e e , a n d t w o p e r cent
f u n d s , sales of l a n d s
R e v e n u e s of n a t i o n a l p a r k s a n d
H o t Springs, A r k
:
P u b l i c schools, Alaska fund
Miscellaneous special funds
Trust f u n d s Deposits for surveying p u b l i c
lands
Miscellaneous t r u s t funds
Total I n t e r i o r D e p a r t m e n t
P o s t Office D e p a r t m e n t :
Salaries a n d expenses
Deficiency in postal revenues
E s t a b l i s h i n g postal savings depositories
• .
. .
Parcel p o s t e q u i p m e n t
Miscellaneous i t e r n s . .
T o t a l P o s t Office D e p a r t m e n t
D e p a r t m e n t of A g r i c u l t u r e :
Salaries and mi.^^oellaneous.
Expenses, Animal Industry
Meat i n s p e c t i o n . A n i m a l I n d u s t r y . . . .
E x p e n s e s of P l a n t I n d u s t r y a n d cotton boll weevil investigation
P u r c h a s e of seeds
F o r e s t Service
Acquisition of l a n d s for protection of
watersheds, navigable streams
E n f o r c e m e n t food a n d d r u g s act
Agricultural e x p e r i m e n t s t a t i o n s .
Weather Bureau
Special f u n d s P a y m e n t s to States a n d Territories from N a t i o n a l Forests f u n d .
R o a d s a n d trails for States
Miscellaneous special f u n d s . . . . . . .
T o t a l D e p a r t m e n t of Agriculture
D e p a r t m e n t of Commerce:
Salaries a n d expenses
B u r e a u of S t a n d a r d s
Census Office
Coast a n d Geodetic S u r v e y
Lighthouse Estabhshment
B u r e a u of Fisheries
F i s h hatcheries
S t e a m b o a t - I n s p e c t i o n Service
MisceUaneous i t e m s .
T o t a l D e p a r t m e n t of C o m m e r c e —




1912.

Increase, 1913 Decrease,1913.

$10,253.10

$680,051.37
678,321.93
2,700,073.99
226,033.99
1,986,349.75
1,452,151.62
289,306.12

$690,304.47
661,395.72
2,729,591.31
225,821.32
1,754,329.26
1,458,800.39
283,841.59

2,500,000.00
,1,268,782.60
564,986.66

2,500,000.00
1,266,147.12
506,547.21

587,573.08
165,388.40
623,921.36

436,069.62
170,989.25
640,886.96

51,922.93

439,249.92

50,240.46
1,119,156.72
65,932.61

169,360.84
314,006.42

248,073.81

6,607,086.09

8,980,014.45

2,372,928.36

238,889.77

247,856.76

8,965.99

59,454.18
58,250.74
34,728.72

99,825.37
50,809.19
20.75

40,37L19
7,441.55
34,707.97

161,510.47
213,643.24

207,923.19
202,607.71

11,135.63

22,383,756.70

24,036,297.82

1,639,643.96

1,555,422.65
1,027,368.79

1,597,691.58
1,568,194.88

230,305.23
370,217.26
13,395.83

287,653.80
7,79L62

370,217.26
5,604.21

3,196,709.76

3,461,231.88

375,821.47

5,972,89L65
1,283,929.54
2,933,855.04

6,437,372.31
1,271,413.07
3,003,165.17

12,516.47

1,617,185.43
286,549.94
2,998,875.59

1,382,915.04
295,184.94
2,763,402.35

234,270.39

897,245.99
536,518.57
1,598,565.32
1,636,466:27

111,518.70
517,336.69
1,588,434.24
1,608,347.30

785,727.29
19,181.88
10,131.08
28,118.97

506,603.58
153,524.49
46,816.29

482, .376.18
10,101.43

24,227.40
153,524.49
36,714.86

20,469,027.70

19,471,567.42

1,539,886.07

846,963.91
622,048.15
1,334,295.25
1,003,523.23
5,472,158.71
1,399,439.41
45,006.32
527,980.89
12,041.21

' 782,942.31
553,708.30
2,274,531.29
959,241.17
4,956,516.21
839,483.94
65,472.57
520,619.18
5,732.72

64,02L60
68,339.85
44,282.06
515,642.50
559,955.47

11,263,457.08

10,958,247.69

1,265,91L68

$16,926.21
29,517.32
212.07
232,020.49
6,648.77
5,464.63
2,635.48
58,439.36
161,503.46
5,600.85
16,965.60
387,326.99
119,120.38
1,119,156.72

46,412.72
3,292,185.08
42,268.93
540,826.09
57,248.67

640,343.59
464,480.66
69,310.13
8,635.00

235,473.24

542,425.79

940,236.04

20,466.25
7,36i.7i
6,308.49
960,702.29

22

RE.PORT ON THE FINANCES.
Comparison of disbursements, fiscal years 1912 and 1913—Continued.
1912.

Department of Labor:
Salaries and expenses
Bureau of Labor Statistics
. Bureau of Immigration and Naturahzation
Regulating immigration
Immigration stations
Specif fund, immigration stations...

Increase, 1913. Decrease, 1913.

$35,65L21
164,154.16

$185,223.01

344,084.92
2,455,387.72
251,943.98
96,158.12

306,661.67
2,649,651.66
95,910.18
271,304.10

13,347,380.11

3,508,750.62

229,108.26

1,523,067.65

1,388,562.60

134,505.15

1,619,479.79
103,623.23
1,595,184.91
1,210,449.98
631,925.00
1,048,104.23
243,529.45
116,972.04
521,087.84
275,733.93

1,539,505.25
68,030.63
1,380,893.34
1,056,845.46
547,588.12
1,028,639.60
334,36L27
117,938.64
522,941.58
237,134.96

79,974.54
35,592.60
214,291.57
153,604.52
84,336.88
19,464.63

580,055:80
954,418.34

500,083.93
994,474.48

79,971.87

10,423,632.19

9,716,999.76

840,340.73

1,644,299.39
152,403.56
418,955.87
105,338.13
217,433.30

1,388,203.60
152,940.37
561,695.31
102,966.62
183,032.41

256,095.79

160,865.91
179,029.79

164,909.37

2,878,325.95

2,553,747.68'

11,249,763.13

11,610,777.41

836,348.25
8,279.42

662,707.64
10,098.68

173,640.61

605,758.16
116,694.95
105,472.26
18,894.62

• 410,145.24
113,300.00
100,276. 76
62,236.73

95,612.92
3,394.95
6,195.50

Total District of Columbia.

12,841,210.79

12,959,642.46

277,843.98

396,175.65

Total CivU Establishment..

170,829,673.42

173,824,989.29

10,077,192.74

13,072,508.61

Total Department of Labor
Department of Justice:
Salaries and expenses
Salaries of justices, assistant attorneys, etc
Court of Claims
Salaries, fees, etc., of marshals
Fees of witnesses
Salaries and fees, district attorneys...
Fees of jurors
Fees of clerks
Fees of commissioners
Support of prisoners
Pay of baihfls
MisceUaneous expenses. United States
courts
MisceUaneous items
Total Department of Justice.
Independent bureaus and offices:
Interstate Commerce Commission
Smithsonian Institution
National Museum
Zoological Park
Territorial governments
State^ War, and Navy Department
Building
Commissions
Total independent bureaus and
offices
District of Columbia:
Salaries and expenses
Special f u n d s Water department
MisceUaneous special funds
Trust funds—
MisceUaneous trust-fund deposits.
Washington redemp tion fund
Police and firemen's relief funds..
Other trust funds

$35,65L21
$21,068.85
37,423.25
*i56,'633."86'

194,263.94
"i75,'i45.'98
390,478.77

90,83L82
966.60
1,853.74

38,598.97

2,371.51
34,400.89
179,029.79
471,897. S

40,056.14
133,708.30
536.81
142,739.44

4,043.46

147,319.71
361,014.28
1,819.26

33,342.11

MILITARY E S T A B U S H M E N T .

Quartermaster Corps
29,726,187.39
28,927, 678.89
797,608.50
Pay, etc., of the Army
48,559,871.71 44,539, 312.67 4,020,559.04
Subsistence of the Army
.«..
10,193,025.64
8,501, 166.01 1,691,859.63
National cemeteries
264, 762.33
6,263.65
258,498.68
Medical Department
960, 069.71
868,099.11
91,970.60
Ordnance Department
.6,023, 446. 76
6,500,645.77
477,199.01
Engineer Department
4,034, 635.53
2,074,046.38
1,960,589.16
Signal Service
156,528.41
756,214.64
600, 686.23
Military Academy
51,122.15
1,261,078.96
1,209, 956.81
Improving harbors
9,923,121.43
9,974, 318.40
61,196.97
Improving rivers
31,539,430.41 25,573, 299.17 6,966,131.24
Military posts
:.',
2,852, 014.61
2,469,855.80
382,158.81
National nomes for disabled soldiers
3,837,932.65
3,878, 816.92
40,884.27
397,338.84
State homes for disabled soldiers
1,549,771.16
1,152, 432.32
1,224,299.64
Militia
4,720, 167.04
6,944,466.68
232.12
Raising the U. S. S. Maine
72,139.48
210,092.64
Sufferers from floods, Mississippi and Ohio
169,797.29
711,840.79
881,638.08
VaUeys
98,780.49
100,455.79
1,675.30
Soldiers' Home interest account
»Includes aU expenditures made during the fiscal year 1913 for bureaus and offices transferred to the
Department of Labor, which was created March 4, 1913.




23

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
Comparison of disbursements, fiscal years 1912 and 1913—Continued.
1913.

Monuments
,
War claims and relief acts
Miscellaneous items.
,
Special funds:
Wagon roads, etc.. Alaska fund..
Ordnance material, powder, etc..
For rivers and harbors
MisceUaneous special funds
Trust funds:
Pay of the Army, deposit fund...
Soldiers' Home permanent fund..
MisceUaneous trust funds
,

1912.

Increase, 1913. Decrease, 1913.

$78,528.55
645,846.79
946,635.56

$166,887.58
391,774.27
875,372.94

227,932.05
61,616.40
807,770.00
137,158.89

152,061.77
139,778.03
97,000.00

1,189,163.52
486,319.23
4,618.19

1,848,012.94
647,400.00
45.00

4,473.19

160,387,452.85

148,795,421.92

16,035,153.96

Increase of the Navy
Bureau of Yards and Docks
Bureau of Equipment
Bureau of Navigation
Bureau of Construction and Repair
Bureau of Ordnance
Bureau of Steam Engineering
Bureau of Supplies and Accounts
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery
:..
Marine Corps
Naval Academy
Pay of the Navy
Judgments, Court of Claims and United
States courts
General account of advances:
Miscellaneous items
Special f u n d s Naval hospital fund
Ordnance material (proceeds of sales).
Fines and forfeitures
Clothing fund
Trust f u n d s Pay, Marine Corps, deposit fund
P a j of the Navy, deposit fund
,
Prize money

29,436,786.37
6,002,676.39
8,075,366. 28
2,964,348.85
' 7,702,238.98
14,856,414. 42
5,477,048.18
9,972,017.46
536, 406.99
6,953,293.21
704,016.39
37,992,814.90

29,803,245.74
8,479,179. 80
8,619,441.00
3,218,959.31
8,506,224.25
12,938, 629.91
6,010,212.19
7,894, 616.51
460, 285.04
7,328,800.92
687, 509.52
37,373,323.49

198,381.77
130,376.10
69,148.62

2,294,316.37
10,632. 45

"58," 516." 67"

293,637.95
146,977.80
621,972.79
477,720.85

387,273. 63
75,407.42
959,014.75

71,579.38

197,891.53
452,362.70
963.54

72,942.00
470,617.73
1,323.69

124,949.53

Total Naval Establishment.

133,262,861.97

135,591,955.72

6,638,444.29

1,102,545.05
669,219.50
614,923.10
2,357,071.92
3,960,186.99
2,846,003.27
8,756,209.07

370.87
708, 780. 21
599, 820.36
1,726,047.38
3,369,303.71
3,387, 638.34
9,358,878.93

118,174.18
15,102.74
631,024.64
690,883.28

20,134,839.80

1,355,184.74

Total MUitary Establishment.

$88,359.03
$254,072.52
71,262.62
75,870.28
78,161.63
710,770.00
137,158.89
658,849.42
161,080.77
4,443,123.03

NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT.

366,459.37
2,476,503.41
544,074.72
254,610.46
803,985.27
1,917,784.51

633,164.01
2,077,400.95
76,121.95

16,506.87
619,491.41
198,38L77

376,507.71

2,163,940.27
93,635.68
337,041.96

"477,'720.'85'
18,255.03
360.15
7,967,538.04

INDIAN SERVICE.

Current and contingent expenses
Fulfilling treaty stipulations
Miscellaneous supports
Interest on Indian trust-fund accounts.
Support of Indian schools
Miscellaneous expenses
Trust funds
.Total Indian Service.

20,306,158.90
175,085,450.29
22,899,108.08

Pensions
Interest on the public debt
Ordinary disbursements ^
Panama Canal disbursements...
Public debt:
National-bank note fund
Funded loan of 1907
Miscellaneous redemptions..
Public debt disbursements

39,560.71
541,635.07
602,669.86
1,183,865.64

153,590, 456.26 21,494,994.03
22,616, 300. 48
282,807.60

2,770,705.51

654,553,963.47

54,883,777.36

41,741,258.03

35,327,370.66

6,413,887.37

24,089,035.60
99,950.00
2,625.00

28,527,711.60
116,360.00
4,266.03

4,438,676.00
16,400.00
1,641.03
4,456,717.03

24,191,610.50

28,648,327.63

Total disbursements, exclusive of
postal

748,703,574.04

718f,529,66L66

61,297,664.73

Postal service, payable from postal revenues 2..:

262,108,874.74

246,744,015.88

15,364,868.86

including
, 1,010,812,448.78 965,273,677.54

76,662,523.69

26,667,035.32

Total disbursements,
postal

31,123,752.35

31,123,752.36

1 Exclusive of Panama Canal, public debt, and postal service disbursements.
2 Exclusive of grants from the 'jfreasury for deficiencies in postal revenues included in expenses of civil
establishment, p . 21.




24

REPORT ON T.HE FINANCES.
t^

ESTIMATES.

The ordinary receipts for the fiscal year 1914 are estimated at
$736,000,000 and the ordinary disbursements at $701,900,000,
showing an estimated surplus of ordinary receipts over ordinary
disbursements of $34,100,000 for the year ending June 30, 1914.
Payments which may be made for the Panama Canal during the
year from the general fund, in the estimated sum of $41,000,000,
would, however, absorb the excess of ordinary receipts and show an
excess of disbursements of $6,900,000.
With a new tariff and income tax law in operation under the act of
Congress approved October 3, 1913, it is evident that the annual
revenues to be received under its provisions can not be approximated
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1915, as closely as would be the case
if comparisons could be made with tha operations of this law for
three-quarters of a preceding year. However, it is estimated that,
for the fiscal year 1915, the ordinary receipts of the Government
will be $728,000,000.
The estimates for the"" ordinary and extraordinary appropriations for
1915 payable from the general fund of the Treasury, as submitted by
the several executive departments and oflSices, are $714,684,675.02,
which would indicate on the basis of estimated receipts an excess of
ordinary receipts over ordinary expenditures of $13,315,324.98, but as
the appropriations for public works can not be expended in full during the year, it is estimated that the charge upon the general fund for
1915 for ordinary purposes will not exceed $702,000,000, and that
the ordinary receipts will therefore probably exceed the ordinary
expenditures by the sum of $26,000,000.
The estimated expenditures for the Panama Canal to be paid from
the general fund without sales of bonds are estimated at $26,326,985,
and the excess of ordinary receipts should therefore practically meet
the payments which may be made for the canal under the appropriations as submitted for the year 1915.
Detailed estimates for the fiscal years 1914 and 1915 follow:
Fiscal year 1914. The ordinary receipts of the Government for the current fiscal
year are estimated upon the basis of existing laws as follows:
From customs
'
From internal revenue:
Ordinary
Corporation excise tax
Income tax—
Corporations
Individuals




$270,000,000
$312,000,000
8,000,000
-

33,000,000
54,000,000
407,000,000

SECRETARY OF T.HE TREASURY.

.

25

From sales of public lands
From miscellaneous sources

$3,000,000
56,000,000

Total estimated ordinary receipts

736,000,000

The disbursements for the same period are estimated as
follows:
For
For
For
For
For
For

the civil establishment
the War Department
the Navy Department
the Indian Service
pensions
interest on the public debt

$177,000,000
170,000,000
136,000, 000
21,000, 000
175,000, 000
.22, 900,000

Total estimated ordinary disbursements

701, 900,000

Estimated surplus of ordinary receipts
For Panama Canal: Estimated disbursements to be made from the general fimd of the Treasury during the year without sales of bonds

34,100, 000

An excess of disbursements, including the Panama Canal, of
Public debt: Redemptions of the public debt, including transactions in
deposits and redemptions for the national-bank note redemption
account under the act of July 14,1890, which, for the year ended J u n e
30, 1913, aggregated the net sum of $2,720,600, are excluded from the
estimates, as payments on these accounts will probably be approxijnately offset by receipts from postal sa\dngs bonds.

6,900,000

41,000,000

POSTAL SERVICE.

The Post Office Department estimates the probable expenditures
for the postal service for the fiscal year 1914 at approximately
$285,500,000, and believes t h a t if the business conditions of the
country continue normal the postal revenues will probably equal
the expenditures.
Fiscalyear 1915.
I t is estimated that upon the basis of existing laws the ordinary
receipts for the fiscal year 1915 will be:
From customs
From internal revenue:
Ordinary
Income tax—
Corporations Individuals.

$249,000,000
$315,000,000
40, 000,000
65, 000,000
•

From sales of public lands
From miscellaneous sources
Total estimated ordinary receipts

420,000,000
3,000,000
-56,000,000
728,000,000

The estimates of appropriations for the fiscal year 1915, as submitted by the executive departments and ofl&ces, are as follows:




26

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Legislative establishment
:
..:...
$7, 533, 331.50
Executive establishment:
Executive proper
$599, 980.00
Department of State
354,060.00
Treasury Department
12, 597, 497.00
War Department
1, 944, 718.00
State, War, and Navy Department Building, expenses
285,020.00
Navy Department
862,390.00
Department of Interior
5, 761, 765. 00
Post Office Department
1, 850, 000. 00
Department of Agriculture
19, 061, 332. 00
Department of Commerce
4, 943, 810. 00
Department of Labor
790, 010. 00
Department of Justice
:
612, 880. 00
Territorial governments
207,138. 20
49,870,600.20
Judicial establishment
,
1, 242,110. 00
Foreign intercourse
4, 447, 042. 66
Military Establishment
105, 937, 544. 26
Naval Establishment, including increase of the Navy for new and
prior Navy building programs, $19,262,000 and $19,073,234, respectively
:
139,831,953.53
Indian Affairs
10, 208, 865. 06
Pensions
,
169,150, 000. 00
Public works:
<
a
Legislative
$607, 000. 00
TreasuryDepartment, public buildings and.works. 8, 431, 343. 94
War Department, exclusive of rivers and harbors. 13, 044,173. 59
Rivers and harbors
41, 483, 895. 00
Panama Canal
26,326,985.00
Navy Department
'
4, 585, 500. 00
Department of Interior
495,995.00
. Department of Commerce
1, 910, 500. 00
Department of Labor
812,200.00
Department of Justice
220, 000. 00
97,917,592.53
Postal service payable from postal revenues
306, 953,117.00
Miscellaneous:
Legislative
$6, 340, 682. 96
Executive
32, 500. 00
Treasury Department
28, 472, 206. 00
War Department
6,160, 718. 81
Department of Interior
5, 789, 213. 32
Department of Commerce
8,461, 960.00
Department of Labor
3,161, 280. 20
Department of Justice
8, 666,187. 50
District of Columbia
14, 491, 614. 49
Smithsonian Institution and National M u s e u m . . .
821, 850. 00
Interstate Commerce Commission
1, 695, 000. 00
Board of Mediation and Conciliation
50, 000. 00
Commission on Industrial Relations
250, 000. 00
— 84,393,213.28




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

27

Permanent annual appropriations:
Interest on the public d e b t . . . ,
$22, 900, 000. 00
Refunds—
Customs and internal revenue. $9,036,000.00
Other refunds
10,834,900.00
19, 870, 900. 00
Reclamation fund
9, 000, 000. 00
Sinking fund
!
60, 717, 000. 00
Miscellaneous.
18, 708, 507. 00
$131,196, 407. 00
Total estimated appropriations for 1915
1,108,681,777. 02
Deduct:
Postal service payable from postal revenues, $306,953,117; sinking fund, $60,717,000; Panama Canal, $26,326,985; an aggregate of
393,997,102.00
Total estimates for ordinary appropriations for 1 9 1 5 . . . . . ^
Add estimates for Panama Canal appropriations
Total estimated appropriations for 1915 to become a charge on
the general fund without bond sales for the Panama Canal.
Estimated ordinary receipts for 1915
Estimated ordinary expenditures for the year (see page 24)
Estimated excess of ordinary receipts (which excess of receipts should meet payments for the Panama Canal appropriations as submitted for the year 1915)..'.

714, 684, 675. 02
26, 326, 985. 00
741, Oil, 660. 02
728, 000,000. 00
702, 000, 000. 00

26,000, 000. 00

POSTAL SERVICE.

The Post OflB.ce Department estimates the probable expenditures
for the postal service for the year 1915 at approxunately $307,000,000,
and believes that if the business conditions of the country continue
normal the postal revenues wUl probably equal the expenditures.




28

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
ESTIMATES FOR 1915 AND APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1914.

Comparison of the estimates for 1915, with the appropriations for
1914, shows an increase in the 1915 estimates of $12,842,061.29, including the Panama Canal, as exhibited in the tables following:
Statement of estimates of appropriations for 1915, increased over, appropriations for 1914.
[ E x c l u d i n g s i n k i n g fund, a n d postal service p a y a b l e from t h e postal revenues.]

D e p a r t m e n t s , etc.

Legislative
Executive
D e p a r t m e n t of S t a t e
,
Treasury Department:
T r e a s u r y D e p a r t m e n t , exclusive of
public buildings
Public buildmgs
N e w revenue cutters
War Department:
W a r D e p a r t m e n t , exclusive of rivers
and harbors
Rivers and harbors
Navy Department:
N a v y D e p a r t m e n t , exclusive of
buildmg program
N a v y buildmg program, new
N a v y b u i l d i n g p r o g r a m , prior y e a r s . .
D e p a r t m e n t of t h e I n t e r i o r :
D e p a r t m e n t o f t h e I n t e r i o r , exclusive
• of jpensions a n d I n d i a n s
Pensions
Indians
P o s t Ofiice D e p a r t m e n t , exclusive of
p o s t a l service
D e p a r t m e n t of Agriculture
D e p a r t m e n t of Commerce
D e p a r t m e n t of L a b o r
D e p a r t m e n t of Justice
Territorial g o v e r n m e n t s
I n d e p e n d e n t offices
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a
Interest o n t h e p u b l i c d e b t . .
Ordmary
,
N e t increase i n o r d i n a r y . .
PanamaCanal.
Total
Total n e t mcrease.




1915 estimates, 1914 a p p r o p r i a - Increase in
Decrease i n
including
tions, includ- 1915 estimates 1915 estimates
permanent
ing p e r m a n e n t over 1914 a p - u n d e r 1914 a p annual.
annual.
propriations. propriations.
$14,481,814.46
632,480.00
4,972,102.66

$13,474,489.50
677,170.00
4,567,322.66

50,395,703.00
8,066,343.94
365,000.00

49,702,876.40
14,552,500.00

133,730,154.66
44,158,495.00

117,172,430.44
53,631,239.00

16,667,724.22

108,826,086.53
19,262,000.00
19,073,234.00

108,164,423.53
• 35,325,695.00

661,663.00
3,009,639.00

24,414,473.32
169,150,000.00
17,608,865.06

25,138,351.51
180,300,000.00
15,401,819.67

2,207,045.39

.1,850,000.00
25,060,532.00
15,319,270.00
4,763,490.20
10,888,677.50
260,138. 20
3,159,500.00
15,346,314.49

1,917,565.04
23,959,824.37
11,093,813.00
3,443,290.00
10,287,226.00
220,410.00
3,012,215.12
12,220,113.11

1,100,707.63
4,225,457.00
1,320,200.20
601,451.50
39,728.20
147,284.88
3,126,201.38

691,784,675.02
22,900,000.00

684,162,774.35
22,860,000.00

35,522,243.96
40,000.00

27,900,343.29

714,684,675.02

707,022,774.35

35,662,243.96
7,661,900.67

27,900,343.29

$1,007,324.96
55,310.00
404,780.00
692,826.60
365,000.00

$6,486,166.06

9,472,744.00

723,878.19
11,150,000.00
67,565.04

26,326,985.00

21,146,824.38

6,180,160. 62

741,011,660.02

728,169,698.73

40,742,404.58
12,842,061.29

27,900,343.29

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

29

Exhibit of appropriations for 1914.
Appropriations made for the fiscal year 1914 and for prior years
during the third session Sixty-second Congress, including those
made in the sundry civil and Indian acts of the first session
Sixty-third Congress, and estimated permanent and indefinite
appropriations, and appropriations for the postal service payable from postal revenues
$1,098, 602, 065. 64
. Deduct decrease in permanent appropriations for 1914 by current
revised estimates therefor
86, 770. 63
1, 098, 515, 295. 01
Additional appropriations for 1914 and for prior years made by
first session Sixth-third Congress

6, 327, 850. 09

Total appropriations for 1914 and for prior years
Deduct—
From appropriations of third session Sixtysecond Congress:
Postal service for 1914 payable from the
postal revenues
$285, 376,271.00
Postal deficiencies of prior years payable
from postal revenues
942, 854. 26
Deficiencies for prior years
27, 080, 512. 29
Sinkingfund
60,695,000.00

1,104, 843,145.10

374, 094, 637. 55
From appropriations of first
session Sixty-third ConDeficiencies for
prior
years
$2,513,908.82
Postal deficiencies payable from postal revenues
65,000.00
2, 578, 908. 82
r

376,673,546.37

Total appropriations for 1914, exclusive of sinking fund
and postal service payable from postal revenues

728,169,598. 73

agreeing with the appropriations for 1914 shown in the preceding table, against which
the estimates of appropriations submitted for 1915 show an increase of $7,661,900.67
in the ordinary, and $12,842,061.29 including tbe Panama Canal.

Attention is respectfully called to the two further divisions of
this report, to wit, the condensed annual reports of the various
bureaus and divisions of the Treasury Department and the tables
accompanying the report on the finances.
W.

G.

MCADOO,

Secretary.
To the SPEAKER OF THE H O U S E OF REPRESENTATIVES.







ABSTRACTS OF REPORTS OF BUREAUS AND DIVISIONS.
The following is a summary of the reports of bureaus and divisions
of the Treasury Department for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913,
with the exception that the figures in relation to public moneys and
loans and currency are brought to November 1:
TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES.

The ordinary revenues, by warrants, and adjustments for moneys
received but not covered by warrants in the year were $724,111,229.84, an increase of $32,332,764.47 over those of 1912, while the
ordinary disbursements were $682,770,705.51, an increase of $28,216,742.04, as shown by similar comparison. The net result of ordinary
transactions was a surplus of $41,340,524.33.
The balance in the general fund June 30, 1913, was $165,960,984.79,
which was less by $1,191,494.20 than the balance on June 30, 1912.
The working balance in the vaults of the Treasury was $71,052,925.96.
Transactions in the governmental finances during the fiscal year
favored the maintenance of an adequate working balance in the
Treasury; therefore it was not deemed advisable to offer for sale additional bonds of the Panama Canal loan. The expenses incurred in
the construction of the canal during the year, amounting to $41,741,258.03, were paid out of the general fund of the Treasury, and the
total net balance so expended to June 30, 1913, reimbursable from
the proceeds of bonds not yet sold, was $179,627,617.07.
Postal savings bonds, authorized by the act of June 25, 1910, were
issued during the year to the amount of $1,929,840, while the deposits
of lawful money of the United States, under the act of July 14, 1890,
to retire national-bank notes were $21,471,010, making a total of
$23,400,850 in actual cash received on account of the public debt
proper. The cash disbursements on account of the principal of matured loans and fractional currency were $102,575, and for national
bank notes canceled and retired $24,089,035.50, a total disbursement
for the public debt of $24,191,610.50. The net result was an excess
of disbursements of $790,760.50.
The trust funds, consisting of gold and silver dollars, held for redemption of the certificates and notes for which they are respectively
pledged, amounted to $1,573,157,169 at the close of the last fiscal
year, an increase of $48,621,800 as compared with that of 1912.
The redemptions from the reserve fund during the fiscal year 1913
were, in United States notes, $67,850,957, and in Treasury notes of
1890, $67,830, making a total of $67,918,787. The redeemed notes
were restored to the general fund in exchange for gold, and the reserve
thereby maintained at the fixed amount of $150,000,000. There was




31

32

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

no apparent disposition on the part of holders of United States notes
to use them in withdrawing gold coin from the Treasury. The
transactions in the reserve fund represent more triily exchanges to
secure an accommodation in denominations of currency.
Gold continues to accumulate in the Treasury, and the holdings on
June 30, 1913, amounted to $1,262,361,035.87, of which $1,011,245,007.44 was in coin. Set apart for the respective uses, it was held on
the following accounts: Reserve fund, $150,000,000; trustfunds (for
redemption of gold certificates in actual circulation), $1,003,997,709;
and in general fund (belonging to the Treasury), $108,363,326.87.
The imports of gold during the year were $69,194,025, the exports
$77,762,622, and the net excess of exports $8,568,597.
The United States bonds pledged to secure bank circulation increased $16,035,510 during the fiscal year and amounted to $740,529,250 on June 30, 1913. The securities pledged for pubhc deposits
in national banks amounted to $61,646,300. Under the provisions
of the act of June 25, 1910, estabhshing the Postal Savings System,
the Treasurer of the United States held in trust, as security for postal
savings, bonds and securities amounting to $63,851,061.42 on June
30, 1913
National-bank notes presented for redemption during the fiscal year
1913 amounted to $675,889,000, or 90.01 per cent of the average circulation outstanding. Of the total received, 47.62 per cent was sent
by banks in New York City. The largest amount presented during
a month was $79,753,664 in January, and the smallest, $41,816,565,
in September. The national-bank notes assorted and dehvered during the year amounted to $669,405,645.50, of which $218,884,750 were
returned to the respective banks of issue for further circulation.
Redemptions of national-bank notes during the year have been in
excess of the 5 per cent fund in all months except portions of December and January, and the Treasury advanced payment out of the
general fund as the notes were received. The largest overdraft at one
time was $23,914,635.44 on January 18, 1913. The expenses incurred
for redemptions of national-bank notes during the year amounted to
$517,842.93 and have been assessed upon the banks in proportion to
their notes redeemed at the rate of $0.77293 per $1,000.
At the close of the fiscal year 1913 the general stock of money in
the United States amounted to $3,720,070,016, an increase of
$71,199,366 as compared with that of 12 months earher. Gold took
on a growth of $52,573,418, the silver coins advanced in volume by
$4,872,034, and national-bank notes furnished $14,022,914 of the
total increase. Treasury notes to the amount of $269,000 were canceled and retired. The money in circulation increased in volume by
$79,225,356 and amounted to $3,363,738,449 on June 30, 1913. The
circulation per capita was $34.56 and the share of gold to whole
circulation 47.93 per cent.



SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

33

The notes and certificates of United States paper currency issued
during the fiscal year numbered 318,264,407 pieces, of the total value
of $1,035,462,000. . The redemptions were 291,131,640 pieces, of the
total value of $987,060,200. The pieces outstanding number
354,461,922, of the total value of $1,920,618,185. There is great
demand for denominations of $5. and under, and the burden of supplying these denominations falls upon the Treasury. The department has employed all its resources to respond to the needs of business. Through the process of redeeming the larger denominations of
United States paper currency and issuing smaller denominations in
Ueu thereof, the Treasury has been enabled to supply the greater part
of the demand for such bills. The denominations of gold certificates
are restricted to $10 and above, but as the department is hmited in
its resources for the issue of currency of small denominations it
becomes more apparent each year that a $5 gold certificate is an
absolute necessity. Large amounts of gold certificates are returned
to the Treasury daily for redemption, usually accompanied with a
request for the return of a part of the proceeds in denominations of
$5. If the department was clothed with authority to issue a $5 gold
certificate, it would be in condition to respond to all demands for
denominations of $5 and under. The average cost of each piece of
United States paper currency issued and redeemed is about 1.526
cents, and the annual cost of maintenance of the currency issued by
the National Government averages shghtly more than one-fifth of 1
per cent of the amount outstanding.
Shipments of gold, silver, and minor coins to depositors therefor,
at the expense of the consignee for transportation, during the fiscal
year were: Gold coin, $11,513,233.50; standard silver dollars,
$12,560,078; subsidiary silver coin, $22,767,796.80; and minor coin,
$5,391,313.92.
The shipments of currency from the Treasury in Washington to the
subtreasuries and to the banks during the fiscal year 1913 amounted to
$882,677,335, against $761,847,077 during the preceding year.
The balance of pubhc moneys on deposit in national banks at the
beginning of the fiscal year 1913 amounted to $48,506,185.77. The
working balance in the Treasury offices at the same time was $98,742,425.40, an amount largely in excess of the actual requirements
of the department for the transaction of the pubhc business. As
there was no necessity for withdrawing the pubhc deposits from
national banks, there was but shght change in the total balances of
pubhc moneys therein during the first half of the fiscal year.
On January 9, 1913, the Secretary of the Treasury (Mr. MacVeagh)
issued Department Circular No. 5, which inaugurated a radical
change in the manner of handling and disbursing the pubhc funds.
I t provided, first, that on and after February 1, 1913, every deposit of
16726°—FI 1913



3

34

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

funds to the official credit of a disbursing officer (except those stationed in the Philippine Islands) should be made with the Treasurer
of the United States; second, all moneys standing to the ofl^icial
credit of disbursing officers with assistant treasurers and active
designated depositary banks at the close of business January 31,1913,
should be transferred to hke credit of such disbursing officers with
the Treasurer of the United States, through the medium of the general
account of the Treasurer of the United States; third, aU Treasury
Department warrants. Post Office Department warrants, disbursing
ofl&cers' checks, checks in payment of interest on the public debt, and
Secretary's special deposit checks should be drawn on the Treasurer of
the United States. I t contemplated that each assistant treasurer and
each active depositary bank should pay the warrants and checks enumerated in the foregoing when drawn on the.Treasurer of the United
States and presented in due course of business; the warrants and
checks so paid to be scheduled daily, charged in the regular transcript
of the general account as a transfer of funds, and forwarded to the
Treasurer of the United States. I t made necessary a more extended
use of national banks as Government depositaries, and required
an adjustment of the balances then in such depositaries with a view
of making a broader distribution of the pubhc funds. At the close
of January, immediately preceding the beginning of operations
under the new system of accounting, the pubhc deposits in banks
amounted to $46,580,888. 59. At the close of the fiscal year on June
30, 1913, the total balance of pubhc moneys held by banks was
$76,263,615.06.
District of Columbia.
The net expenditures on account of the District of Columbia for
the fiscal year 1913 by warrants paid were $12,841,210.79. The net
revenues deposited in the Treasury by warrants on this account for
the same period were $8,827,580.69.
The amount of the funded debt retired during the year was $647,700,
reducing the annual interest charge by $23,641.05.
The total issue of the 3.65 per cent bonds is limited by law to
$15,000,000, and of this sum $14,997,300 has been issued, of which
$7,386,450 has been redeemed. The bonded debt outstanding June 30,
1913, consisted of $7,610,850 in bonds bearing 3.65 per cent interest.
At the close of the fiscal year 1913 the 10 per cent guaranty fund
retained from District of Columbia contractors amounted to $252,808.18, and was represented by $157,010 in bonds, purchased at the
request and risk of contractors, and $90,143.35 uninvested cash.
Detailed information in regard to the affairs of the District of
Columbia will be found in the reports of the District Commissioners
and the Treasurer of the United States, ex officio cominissioner of
the sinking fund of the District of Columbia.




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

35

COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

At the close of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913, there were in
active operation 7,492 national banks, with authorized capital of
$1,063,986,175; bonds to secure circulation, $740,529,250; circulation outstanding on bonds, $737,065,050; and circulation secured by
' deposit of lawful money, $22,092,856, or a total of $759,157,906.
Since the national-banking system was first estabhshed charters
have been issued to 10,415 banks. Of the banks chartered, 2,420
have left the system by voluntary liquidation and 503 failed and
affairs hquidated through instrumentahty of receivers. During the
fiscal year the Comptroller of the Currency issued charters to 196
national banks, with authorized capital aggregating $15,195,000, which
number included 48 conversions of State banks, 50 reorganizations
of State and private banks, and 98 primary organizations. I n the
same period 98 national banks discontinued business, of which 94
were placed in voluntarj^ hquidation by their stockholders and 4
failed and were placed in charge of receivers. I n addition a receiver
was appointed for one bank that had been previously placed in voluntary liquidation by its shareholders. Of the banks placed in voluntary liquidation, 43 were either absorbed by or reorganized as
State banks, 39 were taken over by national banks, 8 were reorganized
as national banks, and 4 discontinued business. I n the number of
banks liquidated are included 4 associations the corporate existence
of which expired by limitation. The 5 banks for which receivers
were appointed during the year had capital at the date of closing
aggregating $750,000, and the liabihties to depositors and other
general creditors amounted to $3,469,-546.59. Three of the 5 banks
that failed paid dividends to creditors as follows: One, 50 per cent;
one, 25 per cent; and one, 20 per cent.
From the date of the passage of the national-bank act, February 25,
1863, to June 3, 1864, the date on which it was repealed, there were
456 national banks chartered, of which 226 are still in active operation. Under the act of 1864 charters were granted to 6,677 associations, under the gold bank act of 1870 to 10, and under the act of
1900 to 3,272.
The act of March 14, 1900, authorized the incorporation of national
banks with minimum capital of $25,000, and permitted the issue of
circulation to the par value of bonds deposited, and reduced the tax
on circulating notes. On that date there were in operation 3,617
national banks, and since that date to July 1, 1913, 5,151 national
banks, with aggregate capital of $329,248,300, have been authorized
to begin business, of which number 3,272 banks, with aggregate
capital of $85,270,500, were chartered under authority of the act of
March 14, 1900, with individual capital of less than $50,000. The




36

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

majority of these banks incorporated with the minimum capital of
$25,000, the average capital of the banks of this class being $26,060.
The remaining banks organized during the period mentioned, 1,879
in number, with capital of $243,977,800, were incorporated under
the act of 1864.
A comparison of conditions on March 14, 1900, with those of June =
30, 1913, shows the net increase in the number of banks in operation
to be 3,875, and in authorized capital $447,678,080. Outstanding
circulation of the banks has increased during t h a t period from
$254,402,730 to $759,157,906—an increase .of $504,755,176. During
the fiscal year 1913 the bond-secured circulation increased
$16,640,940, or from $720,424,110 to $737,065,050. The amount of
circulation secured by the deposit of lawful money was, at the close
of business on June 30 last, $2,618,026 less than the amount on
June 30 of the prior year. The total increase during the year of
circulation secured by bonds and by lawful money amounted to
$14,022,914.
The percentage of national banks closed or which are being closed
by receivers is 4.8; the percentage of voluntary, liquidations is 23.3.
The banks in active operation represent 71.9 per cent of the total
number chartered.
The number and capital of national banks organized since March
14, 1900, by State and geographical divisions, together with the
number and paid-in capital stock of national banks on June 4, 1913,
appear in the following table:
Summary by states, geographical divisions, and classes, of national banks organized
from Mar. 14, 1900, to June 30, 1913, and the paid-in capital stock of all reporting
national banks on June 4, 1913.
•

Capital
S2'5,000.

States, etc.
No.

C a p i t a l over
$25,000 a n d
less t h a n
S50,000.

C a p i t a l . No.

Capital.

C a p i t a l 150,000
a n d over.

No.

Capital.

N ti
T o t a l organiza- r e pao r oin a l Jb a n k s
t n g u n e 4,
tions.
1913.

No.

Capital.

No.

Capital
p a i d in.

N E W ENGLAND
STATES.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
R h o d e Island
Connecticut

4
4
5
2

.sioo.ooo

5

125,000

Total

20

500,000

130,000

100,000
125,000
50,000

30,000

7
2
2
19
1
5

$385,000
200,000
150,000
4,450,000
. 500,000
250,000

11
7
7
21
1
10

$485,000
330,000
275,000
4,500,000
500,000
375,000

69
56
49
180
20
79

$7,740,000
5,285,000
4,985,000
58.042,500
6,320,000
19,314,200

36

5,935,000

57

6,465,000

453

101,686,700

172,794,600
22,292,000
118,979,040
1,723,975
16,982,710
6,602,000
339,374,325

E A S T E R N STATES.

NewYork
N e w Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
District of C o l u m b i a . .
Total

107 2,675,000
55 1,375,000
230 5,750,000
6
150,000
32
800,000
.430 10,750,000




287,500
240,000
807,000
95,000
172,000

105 18,520,000
42 3,610,000
226 24,290,000
1,480,000
1,750,000

221 21,482,500 474
105 5,225,000 200
480 30,847,000 836
, 9
245,000 , 26
: 50 2,452,000 .105
12
5 1,750,000

49 1,601,500

391 49,650,000

870 62,001,500 1,653

I
24
3
5

13
5

S7

SECEETAEY OF THE TEEASUEY.

Summary by states, geographical divisions, and classes, of national banks organized
frorn Mar. 14, 1900, to June 30, 1913, and the paid-in capital stock of all reporting
national banks on June 4, 1913—Continued.
Capital
$25,000.
States, etc.
No.

Capital over
$25,000 a n d
less t h a n
$50,000.

C a p i t a l . No.

Capital.

C a p i t a l $50,000
a n d over.

Capital.

No.

T o t a l organiza- N a t i o n a l b a n k s
r e p o r t i n g J u n e 4,
tions.
1913.

No.

Capital.

No.

Capital
p a i d in.

SOUTHERN STATES.

39 $1,275,000 11 $396,000
52 1,000,000 12
425,000
21
4
525,000
130,000
13
325,000
26
650,000 20
675,000
9
7
225,000
225,000
304,500
875,000 10
4
125,000
200,000
1
300,000
30,000
12 5,825,000 85 2,716,000
233
1
525,000
30,000
21 1,325,000
7
230,000
53
7
900,000
210,000
36
558 13,950,000 169 5,496,500

Virginia
W e s t Virginia
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Carolina.
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi;
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky .
Tenne-ssee

1

Total

46 $5,140,000
42 3,415,000
30 3,160,000
23 2,435,000
53 5,100,000
28 5,325,000
36 2,975,000
20 1,915,000
20 3,610,000
147 17,560,000
27 2,120,000
35 5,270,000
35 3,835,000

lOS $6,811,000
94 4,840,000
55 3,815,000
36 2,760,000
99 6,425,000
44 5,775,000
81 4,154,500
32 2,240,000
33 3,940,000
465 26,101,000
49 2,675,000
95 6,825,000
78 4,945,000

133
116
73
48
118
52
87
33
31
514
49
144
107

$17,668,500
10,158,132
8,610,000
6,365,000
15,218,500
7,475.800
9,964,500
3,385.000
8.220.000
50,155 000
5,065,000
17,765,900
13,015,000

542 61,860,000 1,269 81,306,500 1,505

173,066,332

MIDDLE W E S T E R N
STATES.

Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri

:..
;

Total

109
90
168
14
37
179
117
37

2,725,000
2,250,000
4,200,000
350,000
925,000
4,475,000
2,925,000
925,000

19
15
19
4
4
15
21
15

658,000
483,000
663,500
130,000
125,000
471,000
710,000
480,000

89
72
99
27
30
30
67
42

12,925,000
10,450,000
14,750,000
4,890,000
3,550,000
4,700,000
4,070,000
16,085,000

217
177
286
45
71
224
205
94

380
254
457
99
129
271
340
133

61,969,100
27,858,000
75,407,935
15,010,000
17,770,000
25,356,000
23,005,000
36,035,000

753 18,775,000 112 3,720,500

456 71,420,000 1,319 93,915,500 2,063

282,411,035

123
70
104
94
23
12
52
24
•345

•

139
87
163
136
43
23
101
39
444

5,210,000
4,185,000
16,286,200
12,292,500
5,135,000
1,710,000
10,940,000
2,215,000
14,288,200

16,308,000
13,183,000
19,613,500
5,370,000
4,600,000
9,646,000
7,705,000
17,490,000

W E S T E R N STATES.

North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Montana
WyomiTig
Colorado
N e w Mexico
•Oklahoma. •.
Total

3,075,000
7
1,750,000
4
2,600,000 20
2,350,000 11
4
575,000
300,000
1,300,000 • 11
4
600,000
8,625,000 30

847 21,175,000

215,000
120,000
.715,000
390,000
130,000
361,000
125,000
980,000

91 3,036,000

9

13
39
31
16

n
38
11
69
237

500,000
700,000
3,395,000
2,400,000
1,340,000
625,000
3,310,000
625,000
5,305,000

3,790,000
2,570,000
6,710.000

5,i4o;ooo

144
103
242
213
57
30
126
40
325

2,045,000
925,000
4,971,000
1,350,000
14,910,000
18,200,000 1,175 42,411,000 1,280

72,261,900

PACIFIC STATES. '

Washington
Oregon
Cahfornia
Idaho
Utah
Nevada .
Arizona
Alaska
Total

35
875,000
32
800,000
112 2,800,000
' 30
750,000
7
175,000
3
75,000
4
100,000

2
3
6
0
1

70,000
91,000
190,000
200,000
30,000

1

30,000

223 5,575,000

19

611,000

31 3,545,000
27 2,295,000
121 26,612,800
14 1,010,000
6 1,275,000
9 1,225,000
5
250,000
1
50,000

68 .4,490,000
62 3,186,000
239 29,602,800
50 1,960,000
14 1,480,000
12 1,300,000
10
380,000
1
50,000

77
83
252
54
23
11
13
2

12,210,000
9,436,000
55,923,500
3,370,000
3,555,000
1,760,000
1,155,000
100,000

214 36,262,800

456 42,448,800

515

87,509,500

ISLAND POSSESSIONS.

Hawaii
P o r t o Rico
Total
G r a n d total

2

50,000

2
1

550,000
100,000

4
1

600,000
100,000

4

610,000

2

50,000

3

650,000

5

700,000

4

610,000

2,831 70,775,000 441 14,495,500 1,879 243,977,800 5,151 .329,248,300 7,473 1,056,919,792




38

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

I t is of interest to note, in connection with the statistics submitted
relative to the organization, capital, and circulation of national banks
since 1900, the increase in the banking business generally, as evidenced
by the reports of condition for February 13, 1900, the date of the call
immediately preceding the legislation authorizing the incorporation
of banks with a minimum capital of $25,000, etc., and those for June
4, 1913. Total assets of banks increased from $4,674,910,713.09 to
$11,036,919,757.04; loans from $2,481,579,945.35 to $6,143,028,132.94;
paid-in capital Stock from $613,084,465 to $1,056,919,792; outstanding circulation from $204,912,546 to $722,125,024; and individual deposits from $2,481,847,035.62 to $5,953,461,551.12.
Comparison of the returns for June 14, 1912, with those for June 4,
1913, shows an increase in the number of reporting banks on the latter ,
date of 101, and in loans and discounts $189,123,701.09. Specie held
decreased $32,688,060.36, while the holdings of legal-tender notes increased $1,467,806. Investment in United States bonds, including
premium, increased $12,005,220.17. Over 92 per cent of the United
States bonds owned or held by national banks is on deposit with the
Treasurer of the United States to secure chculation. The increase
in other bonds, securities, etc., was $16,402,583.99. Of the habihties
of the banks, capital stock increased during the past year $23,349,117;
surplus and undivided profits, $37,920,240.46; individual deposits,
$128,000,387.76; and aggi^egate resources, $175,155,879.89.
The number and capital of State banks converted, reorganized
banks, and banks of primary organization since March 14, 1900,
classified by capital stock, are shown in the following table:
Summary, by classes, of national banks organized from Mar. 14, 1900, to June 30, 1913.
R eorganizations.

Conversions.

Primary organizations.

No.

No.

Total.

Classification.
No.
Capital less than $50,000
Capital $50,000 or over
Total
.. .

Capital.

Capital.

Capital.

No.

974 $25,822,000 1,825 $46,930,500 3,272
588 83,915,000 961 112,225,000 1,879
803 60,355,800 1,562 109,737,000 2,786 159,155,500 5,151

473 $12,518,000
330 47,837,800

Capital.
$85,270,500
243,977,800
329,248,300

•
The number of banks and the bond and circulation accounts on
March 14, 1900, and June 30, 1913, together with the increase between
these periods, are shown in the accompanying table:
Mar. 14, 1900. June 30, 1912.
Number of banks. .

3,617

Authorized capital
$616,308,095
Bonds on deposit
244,611,570
Circulation, on bonds
216,374,795
38,027,935
Circulation, lawful money...
254,402,730
Total circulation




7,394

June 30, 1913. Increase, 1900 Increase, 1912
to 1913.
to 1913.
7,492

3,876

98

$1,040,545,435 $1,063,986,175 $447,678,080
724,493, 740
740,529, 250 495,917,680
720,424,110
737,065,050 520,690,255
24,710,882
22,092,856 115,935,079
745,134,992
759,157,906 504,755,176

$23,440,740
16,035,510
16,640,940
12,618,026
14,022,914

1 Decrease.

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

39

MINT SERVICE.

Operations of the mints.
The three coinage mints at Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco, and nine assay offices, located at New York, Charlotte, New
Orleans, Deadwood, Helena, Seattle, Boise, Salt Lake Cit37', and
Carson City, were in operation during the fiscal year.
The original deposits of gold at all of the offices of the mint service
during the year amounted to $161,131,878.30. The total coinage
of the year amounted to $37,496,529.70, of which $30,058,227.50
was gold, $3,448,199.75 was silver, $2,861,768.55 was nickel, and
$1,128,333.90 was bronze.
The purchases of silver during the year amounted to 1,779,992.99
ounces, costing $1,086,347.87, at an average cost of 61 cents per fine
ounce. The seigniorage on subsidiary silver coins during the year
amounted to $1,618,475.17, and the seigniorage on the minor coin
amounted to $3,584,520.03, all of which was duly accounted for and
turned into the Treasury.
The mint at Philadelphia during the year also coined 803,348
pieces of silver for the Government of Costa Rica, and the mint at
San Francisco coined 2,638,820 pieces of silver and 5,001,000 bronze
pieces for the Phihppine Islands government.
Appropriations, earnings, and expenditures.
The total appropriations available for the mint service during the
last fiscal year were $1,243,355.43, and, together with reimbursements
within the service and by other Government services, aggregated
$1,287,613.04. The actual expenditures amounted to $1,171,600.77.
The earnings and gains reahzed by the Treasury from the mint
service, including seigniorage and the expenditures and losses on the
same account, are shown by the following statement:
Earnings and expenditures, fiscal year 1913.
EARNINGS.

Mint charges
Seigniorage on silver coinage
Seigniorage on minor coinage
Profits on medals and proof coins
Medals furnished Government departments
Surplus bullion recovered
Surplus bullion recovered (minor)
Sale of old material
Receipts for special assays
Work for other Government institutions
Foreign coinage charges
By-products
Gain on bullion shipments
Total



•

$291,198. 23
1, 618,475.17
3, 584, 520. 03
2, 971. 07
9, 625. 57
44, 695. 27
10.45
1, 713. 66
3,496.40
4, 538. 71
30,093. 33
69, 735. 03
523. 30
5, 661, 596. 22

40

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
EXPENDITURES.

Salaries of officers and clerks
$273,494. 78
Wages of workmen
626,537.43
Contingent expenses, less amount to reimburse wastage and loss on sale
. of sweeps
194,184. 34
Wastage of operative officers
19, 564. 68
Loss on sweeps sold
7,032. 61
Expense of distributing minor coin
24, 692. 95
Freight on bullion and coin
23,696.23
Loss on recoinage, minor coinage
6, 330. 88
Total

1,175, 533. 90

Deposits, earnings, and expenditures by institutions.
The deposits, earnings (including seigniorage), and expenditures of
each ofiice of the mint service during the fiscal year 1913, and the
number of employees in each, are shown in the following table:
N u m b e r of—
Institution.
Deposits.
Philadelphia
S a n Francisco
Denver
NewYork ' .
N e w Orleans
Carson City
Boise
Helena
Charlotte
Deadwood
Seattle
Salt L a k e City
Total

Redeposits.

V a l u e of gold
a n d silver deposits.

Earnings.

Expenditures.!

Freight
on coin
Ema n d b u l - ployees.
lion.

$469,532.54 $5,211.40
192,543.45
183,413.27
191,119.17
18,535.76 1,451.57
14,160.55
979.38
14,868.80 1,103.13
18,500.13 1,620.50
2,661.06
35.05
14,394.33 3,804.00
41,371.94 8,802.65
14,648.87
688.55

327
114
94
90
14
7
9
9

5,661,812.19 1,175,749.87 23,696.23

697

4,622
7,780
3,723
13,324
596
891
957
669
143
426
1,558
300

184 $12,926,883.73 $3,648,421.97
517,707.11
90 55,152,050.60
1,248 37,645,870.86 1,283,418.78
171 67,374,598.71
166,641.53
5,250.70
956,607.73
3,072.10
735,085.95
3,908.21
1,022,087.29
6,438.97
1,521,620.87
1,107.70
29,428.30
13,208.24
7,388,284.97
10,875.19
4,976,444.91
1,761.69
600,632.02

34,989

1,693 190,329,595.94

6
19
8

1 Includes freight on shipments of coin and bullion between mints and assay offices.

Charlotte office closed.
The assay office at Charlotte, N. C , was closed at the end of the
fiscal year and the equipment distributed to other offices or sold at
auction. The Charlotte office was originally established as a branch
mint by act of Congress approved March 3, 1835. This action was
prompted by the fact that in the year 1834 approximately $900,000
worth of gold was received at the Philadelphia Mint from the southern Appalachian region. The first coinage was done in 1837, and
coinage operations were continued until the outbreak of the Civil
War. The total coinage of the institution was $5,059,188. Iii 1867
the institution was reopened as an assay office, and operations were
continued until June 30, 1913, when. Congress having made no further provision for its support, it was definitely closed. The deposits
at the office in recent years have been very small.




41

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Production and consumption of gold and silver.
The production of gold in the United States for the calendar year
1912 is estimated by the Bureau of the Mint, in conjunction with
the Geological Survey, at 4,520,719 fine ounces, of the value of
$93,451,500, and the production of silver is estimated at 63,766,800
fine ounces, of the commercial value of $39,197,500. The industrial
consumption of new gold in the United States during the year is
estimated at $35,870,552. The industrial consumption of silver for
the year is estimated at 22,644,821 fine ounces.
INTERNAL REVENUE.

The receipts from internal-revenue taxes for the fiscal year 1913,
as shown by collectors' reports, were $344,424,453.85, a net increase
of $22,808,559.16 over the preceding fiscal year. The principal
items comprising such increase were as follows: Distilled spirits,
$7,487,854.77; manufactured tobacco, including cigars, cigarettes,
and snuff, $6,199,273.15; fermented liquors, $2,998,219.09; special
excise tax on corporations, $6,423,040.03.
The total expenditures for the collection of the internal revenue for
the fiscal year 1913 were $5,489,654.61. This included expenditures
from the appropriation ^ ^Expenses of collecting the corporation tax,"
which were $143,995.77, but did not include payments from the appropriation ^^Refunding internal-revenue collections,'' amounting to
5,513.19, as they were in no sense an expense.
The cost of collecting $1 of internal revenue was $0.0159.
Receipts from internal revenue, 1912 and 1913.
Fiscal year ended—
Increase.

Sources.
June 30,1912.
Distilled spirits
Manufactured tobacco .
Fermented liquors
Special excise tax on corporations
Oleomargarine
Filled cheese
Mixed flour
Adulterated butter
Process or renovated butter
Miscellaneous
Total
Net increase

i

$156,391,487.77 $163,879,342.54
70,590,151.60 176,789,424.75
63,268,770.51 66,266,989.60
28,583,259.81 35,006,299.84
1,259,987.67
1,128,707.25
630.31
3,143.25
3,223.98
54,189.72
46,102.40
98,241.52
119,536.18
1,484,105.61 2 1,066,754.23
321,615,894.69

Decrease.

June 30,1913.
$7,487,854.77
6,199,273.15
2,998,219.09
6,423,040.03
131,280.42
80.73
8,087.32

:

344,424,453.85 23,247,835.51
22,808,559.16

$630.31
21,294.66
417,351.38
439,276.35

1 Includes $319,100.64 from sale of internal-revenue stamps affixed to Philippine products, as provided
for in the act of Aug. 5,1909.
2 Includes $655,283.10 from playing cards; $401,910.26 from penalties; and $9,560.87 from miscellaneous
sources.

The total production of distilled spirits, exclusive of fruit brandies,
was 185,353,383.1 taxable gallons, against 178,249,985 gallons in
1912, an increase of 7,103,398.1 gallons.




42

*

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The production of fruit brandies was 8,252,874.8 taxable gallons,
against 9,321,823.5 gallons in 1912, a decrease of 1,068,948.7 gallons.
During the fiscal year 1913, 870 distiUeries of all kinds were operated,
an increase of 49.
The production of fermented hquors was 65,324,876 barrels, an
increase over the previous fiscal year of 3,148,182 barrels. There
were removed from breweries for export free of tax 79,332 barrels.
The income-tax law.
A distinct change in the method of providing revenue for the expenses of the Federal Government has been instituted by section 2
of the act of October 3, 1913, which provides for a tax to be levied,
assessed, collected, and paid annually upon the net income of every
citizen of the United States, whether residing at home or abroad,
and upon the net income of every person residing in the United
States, though not a citizen thereof, and upon the net income from
all property owned and of every business, trade, or profession carried
on in the United States by persons residing elsewhere, and a like tax
upon domestic corporations and foreign corporations doing business
in the United States.
In the year 1861 an income-tax law was enacted for the purpose
. of increasing the revenues of the Government during the period of
the War between the States, but this law was distinctly a war measure
and was repealed in 1871.
On August 28, 1894, in response to a general sentiment throughout
the United States, an income-tax law was again enacted, which was
however, of short duration, the Supreme Court of the United States
deciding that that act was unconstitutional before the first annual
tax under its provisions had been collected.
The sentiment for an income tax, however, was not abated, and
in the first session of the Sixty-first Congress a resolution was passed
proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States,
which amendment would permit the levying of an income tax on
the people of the United States. This amendment was submitted
to the States for ratification and was ratified by the necessary threefourths of the legislatures of the several States, and the amendment
to the Constitution of the United States was announced by the
Secretary of State on February 25, 1913.
In pursuance of this amendment to the Constitution an incometax law was enacted October 3, 1913, providing for collections at
the source beginning November 1, 1913, and the Treasury Department immediately began preparation for its administration through
the oflBice of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue.
The law being new in character and some of its provisions little
understood by the people, particularly those relating to the with


SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

43

holding of the tax at the source, which provisions became effective
on November 1,*1913, less than a month after the enactment of the
law, the department exerted every effort to place its interpretation
of the law before the taxpayers; and the first regulations, which were
those relative to the withholding of the tax at the source on coupon
and registered interest payments on bonded and other similar
indebtedness of corporations, joint-stock companies or associations,
and insurance companies, were issued October 25, 1913, and were
followed on October 31, 1913, by the regulations relative to the
withholding of the tax at the source on salaries, rents, and other
fixed and determinable annual income in excess of $3,000.
The tax on individuals is calculated on the calendar year, and the
regulations and forms for the returns of income of individuals and
corporations wUl be issued in ample time to enable the taxpayers to
make their returns of annual net income within the period prescribed
by law, that is, on or before March 1, 1914, except in the case of cor•porations which may have chosen, in the manner prescribed by law,
to make their returns for their fiscal years instead of the calendar year.
Less confusion than was expected has been experienced thus early
in the operations of the law and each day's added experience indicates
that the law, whUe complicated, will admit of interpretation, and that
a proper administration of it can be established within a reasonable
period of time.
Recommendations.
Several of the following recommendations for statutory changes
have been made from year to year in the various annual reports,
but inasmuch as the need of the legislation referred to is very great,
I have the honor again to include some of those recommendations,
with certain others, as follows:
1. Denatured alcohol.—To impose a nominal tax—say 1 cent per
proof gaUon—on all alcohol withdrawn for denaturation, which tax
would yield a return approximately equal to the amount that should
be appropriated to properly take care of the work.
2. Tobacco.—^That section 3360 of the Revised Statutes be amended
to require every dealer in leaf tobacco to give bond, make a true inventory of stock annually on the 1st day of January in each year,
and to render a report of his transactions quarterly, monthly, or for
such periods as the Commissioner of Internal Revenue may prescribe;
section 35, act of August 5, 1909, so as to require retail dealers in
leaf tobacco to give bond; section 26, act of October 1, 1890, so as to
require registry of manufacturers of cigars, manufacturers of tobacco,
dealers in leaf tobacco, retail dealers in leaf tobacco, and peddlers
of tobacco only on commencing business and not annuaUy on the
1st day of July in each year, as at present.




44

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

3. Oleomargarine.—Considerable comment,has been indulged in as
to the matter of the production of Ulicit spirits and the consequent
loss of taxes to the Government on that account, and whUe it is true
that the Government sustains quite a loss on this account, it is not
to be compared with the loss that may be and has been sustained in
the Ulicit traffic in oleomargarine.
In any of the three or four large cities in the country the Government, unless the illicit traffic in the manufacture and sale of oleomargarine is controlled, wUl lose more taxes from this source alone
than would be lost in the way of taxes on distUled spirits Ulicitly
produced in all the Southern States.
This condition of affairs with respect to the Ulicit traffic in oleomargarine is brought about wholly and solely by the difference in the
rate of tax on that commodity. The tax on oleomargarine free from
artificial coloration is one-quarter cent per pound, whUe the tax
on oleomargarine that contains artificial coloration is 10 cents per
pound. The Ulicit dealer in oleomargarine can, by the use of artificial coloration, which is inexpensive, manipulate a thousand pounds
of uncolored oleomargarine upon which the tax of one-quarter cent
per pound has been paid and produce an article upon-which the tax
of 10 cents per pound should be paid, thereby defrauding the Government of 9 | cents on each pound thus Ulicitly produced, amounting to
$97.50 on the thousand pounds thus manipulated.
An Ulicit distillery, in order to defraud the Government out of that
amount of tax, would have to produce in the neighborhood of 89 gallons of proof spirits, which would require, under the most favorable
circumstances, 72 hours' fermentation before the distUler could produce any spirits. In three days the illicit oleomargarine dealer can
manipulate, by adding artificial coloring matter to uncolored oleomargarine, anywhere from 1,000 to 3,000 pounds, thereby defrauding the Government of 9 | cents on each pound so manipulated.
The present oleomargaruie law is not satisfactory, either from an
admiaistrative or revenue standpoint, and should be so amended as
to remedy it in both respects.^
A law imposing a fiat tax of a nominal rate without any differentiation based upon coloration, with provision for individual
stamped or original packages of certain sizes adequately marked
and branded, and safeguarded by imposing penalties for infractions,
would be easier of enforcement and yield greater revenue than the
present law, and with less expense to the Government.
4. Adulterated butter.—Practically all cases involving manufacture
and sale of adulterated butter were based on a moisture content of
16 per cent or more.
This law, which was evidently intended to prevent the manufacture and sale of butter adulterated within the common meanino: of



SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

45

the term, has, because of its definition and drastic provisions, brought
about very unfortunate conditions through its enforcement. I t has
increased the work of the officers in the field and in the administrative office without any appreciable revenue, and at the same time
has imposed hardships upon many who produced and sold butter
which was afterwards found to contain abnormal moisture, thereby
involving themselves, as well as dealers handling the product, in
liabilities to the heavy special taxes imposed by the law.
White phosphorus matches.
Regulations were promulgated on May 10, 1913, to carry into
effect the provisions of the act of April 9, 1912, relating to the tax on
^'white phosphorus'' matches. These regulations were effective on
July 1, 1913, with respect to filing of notices, bonds, monthly returns,
etc., effective on January 1, 1915, as to the payment of the tax. I t
is not expected that much revenue wUl be derived from this source,
as the tax of 2 cents per 100 matches will practically be prohibitory.
BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING.

The appropriations by Congress for this work amounted to $3,687,206.39, and the repayments received for services and materials
furnished the several executive departments and bureaus were
$859,200.99, the aggregate available for the work during the year
having been $4,546,407.38., The expenditures were $210,174.15 for
salaries, $1,695,811.32 for compensation of employees, of which
$2,250 was for employees detailed to other branches of the pubhc
service and not reimbursed; $1,880,'314.75 for wages of plate printers
and assistants; and $663,431.92 for materials and miscellaneous
expenses, making an aggregate expenditure of $4,449,732.14.
The work executed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing
during the fiscal year was 9.4 per cent more than in the preceding
year, while its expenditures increased only 3.35 per cent. The total
number of sheets dehvered was 287,192,192, an increase of 24,763,453
over the previous year. The dehveries comprised 76,797,500 sheets
of United States notes and certificates; 34,869 sheets of United
States bonds; 12,508,747 sheets of national-bank notes; 79,472,550
sheets of internal-revenue stamps; 255,300 sheets of customs stamps;
100,490,096 sheets of United States postage stamps; 14,223,835
sheets of United States parcel-post stamps; 218,868 sheets of Phihppine postage stamps; 354,600 sheets of silver certificates, documentary and internal-revenue stamps, postal cards, and checks on
Treasurer for the Phihppine Islands; and 2,835,827 sheets of checks,
drafts, commissions, etc. In addition to these sheets dehvered,
miscellaneous work was executed to the value of $93,552.52. The
face value of all classes of securities, internal-revenue stamps, postage
stamps, etc., delivered by the bureau amounted to $2,060,409,515.



46

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Compared with the deliveries in the fiscal year 1912, there was an
increase of 1.73 per cent in United States notes, certificates, and
bonds, 6.65 per cent in national-bank notes, 5.45 per cent in internalrevenue stamps, 43.06 per cent in customs stamps, 18.91 per cent
in postage stamps, and 7.04 per cent in checks, drafts, etc.
Improved machinery.
By authority of the act approved August 24, 1912, during the year
the printing of checks was transferred from hand-roUer plate printing
presses to offset presses at an annual saving of $30,000, and thc
printing of one-fifth of the backs of paper money was transferred
from the hand presses to electric-power plate presses at a saving of
$90,000. On July 1, 1913, the number of power presses engaged in
printing backs was increased from 16 to 30.
Money laundering.
Eleven machines for cleetnsing paper money were installed in
the offices of the Treasurer of the United States and of several assistant treasurers, in the belief that the reuse of the laundered notes
would result in considerable economy due to the reduction in the
number of new notes necessary to be issued, but indications now
are that the anticipated results wUl only be partly realized.
New building.
The new building to house the Engraving and Printing Bureau
is nearly completed and some portions of the work of that bureau
are expected to be commenced therein by February 1, 1914.
I t is estimated that the use of the old bureau building by the
auditors of the department, instead of renting buildings, will result
in annual saving to the Government of $35,750.
SPECIAL A G E N T S '

DIVISION.

The Special Agents' Division of the Treasury Department has
during the past year examined and reported upon the personnel and
the administrative methods of 23 customs districts and recommended
many changes to increase efficiency and reduce expense.
Its iavestig'ations of undervaluations and wrongful classifications
of imported merchandise led to additional and increased revenue
and recovery of withheld duties amounting to approximately $800,000.
A large portion of this sum was paid directly into the Treasury in
compromise of civU claims for withheld duties upon past entries,
notably at the port of New York, where such specific recoveries
reached the sum' of $274,004.17




SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

47

As a result of the work of the service fines and penalties for violations of the customs and navigation laws were imposed, aggregating
$74,692.70.
In addition thereto 205 seizures were made of merchandise, valued
at $273,648.95, and 171 arrests, 94 of which were for violation of the
customs laws and 77 for the violation of the opium laws, were made.
Eighty civU suits were instituted, involving claims on behalf of the
Government for $127,947.71.
The work of the service has been largely increased in some respects
which do not permit of a financial showing of results. Under the
Panama Canal act a wide range of merchandise is entered free of duty
for the construction, repair, and equipment of vessels built in the
United States. Investigations throughout the United States have
been made by the various agents to insure that merchandise so
entered actuaUy becomes incorporated in the ship for which intended
as a part of its structure, repair, or equipment.
Of equal if not greater importance is the drawback work of the
agents. Rates for the payment of drawback upon the exportation
of manufactured articles made from imported materials are established
upon the basis of investigations m.ade by the special agents' service.
Such investigations require .close analyses of industrial processes,
frequently intricate and involved, at times including relative quantities of imported and domestic material and wastes involved therein.
Modern industrial organization, bringing into conjunction many formerly distinct activities, has rendered this work mqre difficult and
also more necessary because of the enormous sums involved.
The enforcement of the opium laws has been an active part of the
work of the agents of this division. Their effectiveness in this
regard could be greatly increased by strengthening the laws prohibiting the importation and manufacture of smoking opium, for which
purpose a number of bills have been submitted and to which I
respectfully invite the attention of Congress.
OFFICE OF THE SUPERVISING ARCHITECT.

The work in the Supervising Architect's office during the past
fiscal year has been carried on in accordance with pohcies previously established.
The year ending June 30, 1913, was the first completed fiscal year
following the material reduction in the force in the office of the
Supervising Architect in October, 1911. Through the elimination
of unnecessary routine, this reduced force has accomplished a proportionately larger output of construction work than was accomplished during the preceding fiscal years. The experience of the




48

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

year just closed, however, shows that the force, as reorganized, is
not properly balanced, and does not handle the present output in
the most efficient manner.
The public buUdings act, approved March 4, 1913, created a
commission to present to Congress a connected scheme of annual
appropriations for the construction and completion of pubhc buildings already authorized, to frame a standard for the determination
of the size and cost of buUdings, etc. In view of the existence of
tliis commission, and the probabUity that Congress will take action
upon the report which it wUl submit, no recommendations are
made at this time concerning the work of the office of the Supervising
Architect.
The work authorized in the omnibus public buildings act of 1910,
and not under contract, together with the work authorized in the
act of 1913, placed in this office a very large volume of work at the
close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1913.
The tabulations given below show in summarized form the status
of projects authorized by Congress and the financial operations of
the office.
BUILDINGS.

Buildings completed and occupied at the close of the preceding fiscal year,
June 30, 1912, including 50 marine hospitals and quarantine stations...
Buildings completed during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913, including
Galveston (Tex.) quarantine station
Buildings placed under contract during the fiscal year ended June 30,
1913, including San Juan (P. R.) quarantine station
^
Buildings authorized prior to act of Mar. 4, 1913, not under contract June
30, 1913, including Portland (Me.) quarantine station and Key West
(Fla.) marine hospital
Buildings authorized in the act of Mar. 4, 1913

779
84
63
926

204
304
508

Total buildings completed, under contract, or authorized

1,434

EXTENSIONS.

Extensions
Extensions
Extensions
30, 1913
Extensions

completed during the fiscal year ended. June 30,1913
placed under contract during the fiscal year ended June 30,1913...
authorized prior to the act of Mar. 4, 1913, not under contract June
authorized in act of Mar. 4, 1913

Buildings completed during the fiscal year ended June 30,1913
Extensions completed during the fiscal year ended June 30,1913

11
16
11
23
84
11
95

Buildings placed under contract during the fiscal year ended June 30,1913
Extensions placed under contract during the fiscal year ended June 30,1913...




63
16
79

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

49

Buildings in course of construction June 30, 1913, including quarantine station, San Juan, P. R
Extensions in course of construction June 30, 1913, including marine hospital,
NewYork, N . Y

113
19
132

Statement of appropriations for public buildings, July 1,1912, to June 30, 1913.
,

E X P E N D I T U R E S D U R I N G T H E FISCAL Y E A R .

For statutory salary roll
$85,931. 95
For general inspector of supplies
1,106.40o
For sites and additional land
701, 832. 48
For construction of new buildings
10,103, 886.19
For extensions to buildings
800, 205. 33
For special repairs to buildings
,
366, 330.05
For rent of buildings
:
127, 680. 08
For repairs and preservation
544, 663. 21
For mechanical equipment
344,175. 95
For vaults, safes, and locks
".
92, 980.17
For operating supplies.
1, 553, 593. 94
For electrical protection to v a u l t s . . .
18,020. 22
For general expenses
641, 539. .96
For furniture and repairs of same
. 720, 514. 85
For furnishing new post office, customhouse, and courthouse at Cleveland, Ohio
6, 651. 6.6
For operating force
2,131, 205. 44
For lands and other property
37. 50
For architectural competitions
55, 998. 28
Total

18, 296, 353. 66
CONTRACT LIABILITIES EXLSTING ON J U N E 30, 1913.

On
On
On
On
On

account
account
account
account
account

of statutory roll
of sites and additional lan>d
of construction of new buildings
of extensions to buildings
of special repairs to buildings

| 3 , 493. 85
215, 711. 00
$11, 514, 274. 51
2, 500, 709. 56
216, 721. 84
14, 231, 705. 91

Less authorized contract liabilities in excess of amounts
appropriated
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On

account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account

of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of

rent of buildings
repairs and preservation
mechanical equipment
vaults, safes, and locks
operating supplies
electrical protection to vaults
general expenses
furniture and repairs of same
operating force
architectural competitions

Total
16726°—FI 1913




$558, 572. 86
$13, 673,133. 05
101,198. 52
275, 770. 81
211,110. 93
51, 273. 24
221, 828. 79
4,438. 50
78, 692. 52
345, 248. 01
362, 534. 65
12,118. 08
15, 556, 55L 95

4

50

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
BALANCES AVAILABLE J U L Y 1, 1913.

For statutory salary roll
$237, 350. 09
For general inspector of supplies
349. 93
For sites and additional land
1,167, 273. 97
For construction of new buildings
11, 669, 301. 31
For extensions to buildings
:
1,121, 698.42
For special repairs to buildings
451,.421. 74
For rent of buildings
242, 507. 67
For repairs and preservation
685,456. 48
For mechanical equipment
448,486. 53
For vaults, safes, and locks
100, 951. 06
For operating supplies
1, 735, 823. 99
For electrical protection to A^aults
26, 633. 53
For general expenses
542,467. 83
. For furniture and repairs of same
922, 080. 99
For furnishing new post office, customhouse and courthouse, Cleveland, Ohio
10, 815. 04
For operating force..
2, 975,097.10
For lands and other property
853.45
For architectural competitions
106, 883. 64
Total
22, 445, 452. 77
Less unexpended balances of annual appropriations whose availability expired with the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913
546, 870. 02
Available for authorization and expenditure during fiscal year ending
J u n e 30, 1914
21, 898, 582. 75
PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.

The Surgeon General reports the operations of the service through
the seven administrative divisions of the bureau as follows:
Division of Scientific Research.
The scientific investigations authorized by law have been carried
on during the year as facihties would permit. While the work has
increased, both in the laboratories and in the field, the providing of
funds on June 23, 1913, to enforce the act of August 14, 1912, authorizing larger investigations of the diseases of man and matters pertaining to the pubhc health, marks a new era in this direction.
Comprehensive investigations of trachoma, pellagra, malaria,
tuberculosis, typhoid fever, and other diseases, pollution of navigable waters, sanitary administration, school sanitation, and hygiene
of occupation are accordingly being planned and executed.
In accordance with an act of Congress approved August 24, 1912,
an extensive iavestigation was made of contagious and infectious
diseases among the Indians. Fourteen officers were engaged in the
work, 25 States were visited, and a total of 39,231 Indians examined.




SECRETARY OF TJSE TREASURY.

51

AU the data which were collected, and which showed a high prevalence of trachoma and tuberculosis among this class of the population,
were analyzed and embodied in a report which was submitted to
Congress January 23, 1913, and pubhshed as Senate Document
1038, Sixty-second Congress, third session.
The investigations of peUagra have been continued at the maruie
hospital at Savannah and elsewhere during the year. This complex
problem wiU require enlarged systematic studies, and with the funds
available measures are being developed to carry them on. The
general prevalence of the disease has been outhned and it has been
shown to be on the increase.
Systematic studies of malaria, begun at the marine hospital at Mobile and elsewhere, have been continued to ascertain the prevalence
of the disease and to stimulate measures for its prevention, a prehminary survey of the State of Alabama having been made and the
results pubhshed. This survey is being extended to other States
and intensive studies are being conducted in heavily infected districts
to determine the index of infection and the infiuence of quinine as a
prophylactic.
On account of the announcements of discoveries of aUeged cures
for tuberculosis and their bearing on the pubhc health, important
investigations of them have been undertaken. Studies of the Friedmann treatment were sufficiently advanced by May 16, 1913, to
justify a report that the observations made up to that time did not
warrant the confidence in the remedy which had been inspired by
widespread pubhcity. This investigation is being continued, as are
also studies of other preparations claimed as cures.
The demonstration of the undue prevalence of trachoma among
the Indians and among the mountaineers of Kentucky has necessitated the undertaking of surveys to ascertain the prevalence of the
disease among school children in Cahfornia, Minnesota, Tennessee,
Virginia, and West Virginia, and chnics have been estabhshed in
two counties of Kentucky to demonstrate the eradicability of the
infection from among infected populations.
The widespread prevalence of pohomyehtis (infantile paralysis)
necessitated the continuation of epidemiologic studies of this disease
in Arkansas, New York, and Texas, and laboratory studies in Washington. Studies of typhus fever were also conducted.
The investigations of typhoid fever which have been a prominent
part of the research work of the service since 1906 were continued.
Epidemics were investigated at Fort Dodge, Iowa, other Iowa and
Ilhnois towns, and Roanoke, Va., and systematic studies of the
disease conducted in the. rural communities of the last-named State.




52

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Pollution of navigable waters.—The sanitary surveys of interstate
and international waters were continued. A prehminary survey of
the lower Missouri watershed was completed and the results pubhshed. Cooperation was rendered the International Joint Commission in its investigations of the boundary waters between the United
States and Canada, and systematic investigations are now being
made of the pollution of the Ohio and Potomac Rivers to the end
that measures may be devised for its control.
In the enforcement of the act of July 1, 1902, regulating the propagation and sale of biologic products, 25 estabhshments were inspected, 111 relicensed, and 6 licensed for the first time, while the
issue of licenses to the remaining establishments was under consideration at the end of the fiscal year.
The Eleventh Annual Conference of State and Territorial Health
Authorities with the Pubhc Health Service was held in Minneapolis,
Minn., June 16, 1913. The service was also represented at a number
of important meetings of scientific and pubhc health associations, and
assisted the officers of the International Congress of Hygiene and
Demography in promoting the interests of the congress and exhibit
which were held in Washington September 23-28, 1912.
Hygienic Laboratory.—The work of this research institution has
progressed as space and available facilities would permit. Special
studies were made of typhus fever, cholera, and infantile paralysis.
Other experimental work in the laboratory related to disinfectants,
standardization of drugs, and examinations of pubhc health specimens. The studies of ^the nutritive value of pasteurized and raw
milk were continued.
Supplies of antityphoid vaccine and antirabic treatments have
been prepared, the former for use of beneficiaries of the service and
during epidemics, and the latter for issue to State health authorities
and for administration at the laboratory to persons bitten by rabid
animals.
The increasing importance of this institution as an agency in public health work necessitates provision for an additional building and
for an increase of the laboratory staff.
Leprosy investigation station.—The investigations of leprosy in
Hawaii have been continued at the receiving station at Kahhi and
the leprosy settlement on Molokai. As adviser to the Territorial
authorities, the director of this station has rendered important service
in the improvement of sanitation, especially in respect to the suppression of mosquitoes in and around Honolulu.
In order that the research work shaU be properly developed, it
should be supported by adequate funds, and the personnel to carry
it on should be increased.




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

53

Division of Foreign and Insular Quarantine and Immigration.
Quarantine operations during the year have been active under two
general headings, one being the work of eradicating rats from vessels
and the other being special precautions against the introduction of
yellow fever from Mexican ports into the ports of the United States.
In connection with rat-eradicative work, 1,737 vessels have been
fumigated at Federal quarantine stations during the fiscal year just
ended. This does not include the number of vessels fumigated by
State and local quarantine authorities in compliance with our national
quarantine pohcy. Anticipating the appearance of yellow fever in
or near certain of the coast cities of Mexico (bordering upon the
Mexican Gulf), the usual quarantine measures against the introduction of this disease into the United States were instituted early in the
season. The subsequent appearance of yellow fever in certain localities in Mexico has justified these precautionary measures. Neither
plague nor cholera has in itself caused special quarantine activity
during the year.
The bubonic plague was eradicated both from the ports of Habana,
Cuba, and San Juan, Porto Rico.
At the 50 quarantine stations on the continental United States,
7,821 vessels, carrying 599,955 passengers and crews, were inspected
and 113 vessels were disinfected. In addition to these, as mentioned
above, 1,737 vessels were fumigated for rat or mosquito destruction.
National quarantine has been administered as usual at 8 ports in the
PhUippine Islands, 8 in Porto Rico, and 7 in Hawaii. Officers have
been stationed in the American consulates of the principal ports of
Italy and Mexico and in Asiatic ports to enforce the Treasury foreign
quarantine regulations. Inspection has been maintained as usual on
the Mexican border.
The quarantine stations are at present in a very satisfactory condition as to equipment and preparedness.
Medical inspection of immigrants.—Duruig the fiscal year 1,574,371
aliens were inspected and 38,558 were certified for rejection on account
of physical or mental defects. Inspections were conducted at 80 stations in the United States, Hawau, and in the PhUippines. Service
officers, under the supervision of commissioners of immigration, have
conducted the large immigrant hospitals at EUis Island, N. Y., and
Angel Island, Cal. The staff of medical officers and the corps of
attendants at the EUis Island immigration station have been added
to during the year.
The following comparison of work done during the fiscal year just
passed and the fiscal year ended June 30, 1912, is interesting. During




54

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the last-mentioned period 726,040 immigrants arrived at the port of
New York During the fiscal year just closed 1,044,057 immigrants
arrived. The total rejections at that port for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1912, were 17,067 as compared with 22,733 for the fiscal
year just ended, 150 mental defectives having been certified during
the fiscal year 1912 as compared with 661 for the fiscal year 1913.
This increase of activity in the medical inspection of aliens entering
the United States is not confined to New York, but is evident at all
the other immigration stations. At the Ellis Island hospital during
the year past 10,165 patients were admitted for treatment, the daily
average of patients in hospital being 229.
Division of Domestic (Interstate) Quarantine.
Plague-suppressive measures in California and near-by States were
carried out during the fiscal year in accordance with the plan which
was outlined in the last annual report of the Surgeon General.
In San Francisco the work of destroying rats was continued, more
than 90,000 having been collected and forwarded to the Federal laboratory for bacteriological examination. Throughout the year 1913 no
rats were reported plague infected or suspicious of plague.
Duruig the fiscal year particular attention has been given to ratguarding of ships engaged in trans-Atlantic and Pacific trade and
calling at San Francisco. The regulations of the department in this
regard have been strictly enforced.
Operations in Oakland and Berkeley have consisted solely of the
trapping of rats for the purpose of determining whether plague infection had appeared, as plague infection has existed for some time
among the ground squirrels that infest the rural districts surrounding
these cities. Rats to the number of 40,000 were collected and sent
to the laboratory for examination. No plague infection was found.
The squirrel-free zone around the cities bordering upon San Francisco Bay was maintained throughout the year. Whereas in previous
years plague infection had been demonstrated among the squirrels
upon this'zone, careful hunting has faUed to discover any infection
during the year just passed, though infection has been found in
contiguous territory.
But one case of human plague occurred during the fiscal year
1913. The patient died June 13, 1913. As infected squirrels had
been found in the immediate vicinity and no rats were discoverable
about her residence, it is believed that the infection was obtained
from ground squirrels.
On June 17, 1912, the presence of bubonic plague was reported
in San Juan, P. R. Officers were ordered to Porto Rico for the pur-




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

55

pose of suppressing the epidemic. This work has been accomplished,
and these officers wUl be withdrawn very shortly.
On the request of the secretary of the Department of Public Health
of Montana an officer was directed to proceed to Montana for the
purpose of taking charge of the eradication of Rocky Mountain
spotted fever, a disease which is widely distributed throughout the
Pacific States and which exists in virulent form in the Bitter Root
Valley of Montana. The disease has been successfully comb att ed
in the latter region.
The occurrence of two cases of leprosy in persons who had resided
in Michigan for some years brings again to general attention the
need for a definite policy which wUl act unUormly throughout the
country for the control and segregation of lepers.
The Surgeon General was directed to cooperate with State and
local health officers of Ohio and Indiana during the disastrous floods
which occurred in the spring of 1913. He not only directed his
own officers in the field, but aided the local authorities with timely
advice on sanitation.
On request of the Secretary of the Interior an officer was detaUed
to investigate sanitary conditions in Alaska and to make reports
and recommendations thereon.
Amendments to article 3 of the Interstate Quarantine Regulations
have been made relating to the common drinking cup, the common
towel, and pure drinking water and ice for passengers in interstate
traffic. These regulations have met with very general acceptance "
and have resulted in a marked improvement in sanitary conditions
on interstate carriers.
In order that there might be a standard from which to judge of
the purity of water and ice supplied passengers, a commission has
been appointed, consisting of eminent scientists, together with
officers of the Public Health Service, for the purpose of determining a standard of purity for drinking water. This commission is
stUl at work, and its report is expected at an early date.
A great forward step has been made in protecting the health of
passengers traveling on common carriers in interstate traffic. In
addition to amendments to the Interstate Quarantine Regulations
inspection reports from service officers traveling on official duty as
to sanitary conditions on trains and vessels have been regularly
received. When poor sanitary conditions are observed, notification of such conditions is rendered to the officials of the raUroad or
steamship line. In practicaUy all such cases officials have shown
a ready wUhngness to cooperate effectively in remedial measures.




56

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

In accordance with Executive order of May 12, 1912, detaUed
sanitary inspections of Government buUdings in Washington are
regularly made and a permanent record kept of sanitary conditions
in each room in such buUdings.
Division of Sanitary Reports and Statistics.
Pursuant to acts of Congress approved February 15, 1893, and
August 14, 1912, the Public Health Reports have been issued weekly
during the year. They have supplied quarantine officers, health
officers, and other sanitarians with current information of the prevalence of diseases dangerous to the public health and of the measures
being adopted by State and local health officers to prevent their
spread through the adoption of sanitary laws or regulations. The
Public Health Reports have also contained information on other
related subjects for the use of health authorities in the protection
of the health of the people.
To prevent the spread of disease in interstate traffic or from one
locality to another it is necessary to have current information of
the prevalence of disease and the occurrence of epidemics. This
information is secured through the reporting of cases of disease, a
subject concerning which many States have enacted laws. For the
control of disease in its broader sense and the protection of the lives
and conservation of the health of the people it is desirable that
unUorm and effective requirements be adopted by the several States.
This matter has been a subject of careful consideration during the
year, and at the Eleventh Annual Conference of State and Territorial
Health Officers with the Pubhc Health Service on June 16, 1913, a
model State law on morbidity reports was adopted. This law should
be enacted by the several States as soon as practicable.
State and municipal laws for the control and prevention of disease
have been coUated and studied that the department might at all
times be informed of the measures being taken by State and local
authorities for the prevention of the spread of disease. These laws
have been published that municipal and State authorities might
keep informed regarding the measures taken by other States and
cities and the trend of practical sanitation as sho\\Ti by the adoption
of legislation.
Division of Marine Hospitals and Relief.
Duruig the fiscal year 1913, 50,604 patients received treatment,
14,097 being treated in hospital and 36,507 as dispensary or out
patients. The hospital patients received a total of 405,944 days'
treatment. The service operated 23 marine hospitals, owned by the




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

57

Government, and maintained 125 other relief stations, where seamen
were given hospital and dispensary treatment.
At the sanatorium for consumptive beneficiaries, located at Fort
Stanton, N. Mex., 314 patients were cared for during the year. Of
these, 121 were discharged, 47 died at the sanatorium, and 146
remained under treatment at the close of the year.
Aid was extended to other branches of the Government in the
physical examination of 9,971 persons, of whom 381 were rejected.
In addition, 744 merchant seamen were examined to determine their
fitness for shipment on American vessels, of whom 20 were rejected;
also 15 foreign seimen, of whom 7 were rejected.
Owing to the smaU amount of relief work done, the rehef station
at Morgan City, La., was closed during the year.
Division of Personnel and Accounts.
Commissioned and other oficers.—The commissioned medical officers
at the close of the fiscal year numbered 144, as follows: The Surgeon
General, 10 senior surgeons, 63 surgeons, 40 passed assistant surgeons, and 30 assistant surgeons. The acting assistant surgeons
numbered 226, making, all told, 370 medical officers. The total
personnel of the service, including 46 pharmacists, 1,028 attendants,
and 68 other employees, numbered 1,512.
Expenditures.—The appropriations for the ordinary maintenance
of the service were $1,721,817.50. The receipts from aU sources, repayments for care of foreign seamen, etc., were $14,118.77. The
expenditures were $1,674,004.65; estimated outstanding liabihties,
$16,907.07, leaving an estimated balance of $45,024.55.
The amount available of the appropriation for preventing the introduction and spread of epidemic diseases at the beginning of the
fiscal year was $89,621.73. During the year an appropriation of
$200,000 was made. The expenditures were $244,502.45, leaving
a balance June 30, 1913, of $45,119.28, less estimated outstanding
habUities, $6,596.40.
The appropriations for the maintenance of the quarantine service
were $169,000. The amount of repayments was $1,298.44. The
expenditures were $157,646.51, which, deducting outstanding liabUities, leaves an estimated balance of $2,035.58.
The amount avaUable of the appropriation for national quarantine and sanitation at the beginning of the fiscal year was $58,803.95;
the expenditures were $34,533.86, leaving a balance June 30, 1913,
of $24,270.09, less esthnated outstanding liabUities $1,472.08.
MisceUaneous Division.
Publications.—Bureau publications aggregating 555,087 were distributed during the calendar year ended June 30, 1913. Requests
for public^ions of the service are steadily increasing.



58

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Life-Saving Service claims.—During the year, 450 claims for benefits under the act of March 4, 1882, by keepers and surfmen of the
Life-Saving Service have been passed upon by the officer in charge
of this division, based upon the medical evidence submitted. Physical examinations of keepers and surfmen of said service have been
continued.
. Recommendations.
An increase in the number of commissioned medical officers of the
Public Health Service is one of its most urgent needs. Requests for
the assistance and advice of experts in the management of epidemics
of contagious diseases, in work of sanitation, and to address meetings
both of public health organizations and of citizens, have been received from State and local health.officers in far greater number than
in any previous year of the history of the service. Every effort has
been made to meet these requests for cooperation, but in many cases
the lack of avaUable officers has prevented the bureau's compliance.
An additional buUding should be provided for the use of the Hygienic Laboratory in Washington. The work of the laboratory has
grown apace with the uicrease in public health iaterest and activity
throughout the country, and additional duties recently imposed by
statute in connection with the investigation of diseases of man, pollution of navigable streams, and problems involved m the sanitation of interstate carriers, render additional accommodations necessary for the work.
Larger editions of service publications, and particularly those of a
less technical nature, should be provided for. One of the most important of the bureau's publications is the Weekly Public Health
Reports, which contains current uiformation relative to the prevalence and distribution of diseases throughout the United States and
the entire world. I t is believed that the circulation of this publication should be enlarged to include every health officer and physician
actively interested in public health work throughout the country.
One of the essential factors in the conduct of public health work is a
thorough knowledge of the occurrence, prevalence, and distribution
of disease. I t is apparent that to eradicate or to prevent the spread
of disease, information inust first be had as to where it is present.
Provision should be made whereby the Public Health Service can be
kept currently informed regarding the prevalence of disease throughout the country. Its information of this nature is largely dependent
upon the voluntary cooperation of State and local health authorities.
WhUe this cooperation is in many instances all that could be desired,
in some others reports are not promptly received. In the estimates
for the fiscal year 1915 an appropriation has been requested with
which to insure prompt and regular receipt of such information by
the employment of persons already in the service of health organiza-




59

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

tions, whose duty it would be to furnish accurate and prompt transcriptions of all morbidity statistics collected by these agencies.
The continuation of the appropriation ' ' F o r field investigations of
public health matters," provided by Congress for the fiscal year 1914,
is of greatest importance. With the establishment of this fund it
has been possible for the service to undertake work that has long been
deferred. The investigation of the pollution of navigable waters,
particularly those which are interstate in character, is clearly the
function of the Federal health agency, whUe studies of the causes
and conditions iafluenciag the spread of disease are of benefit to the
country at large, regardless of the locality in which they are conducted.
LIFE-SAVING

SERVICE.

The number of documented vessels sustaining disaster during the
last fiscal year within the field of operations of the Life-Saving
Service was 552. They carried 5,787 persons, of whom 73 were lost.
The estimated value of the vessels was $12,128,070, and of their
cargoes $2,529,170, making a total value of $14,657,240. Of this
amount, $1,721,215 represented the estimated value of the property
lost.
There were also involved in casualty during the year 1,191 undocumented vessels—those of less than 5 tons' burden—such as smaU
launches, sailboats, rowboats, etc. These were valued at $965,910
and the loss they sustained is estimated at $41,935. There were on
board 3,254 persons, 14 of whom perished.
Shelter and subsistence were afforded at the service stations to
437 persons who were victims of shipwreck and of boating accidents.
These were furnished a total of 756 days' rehef.
The foregoing data and other information of importance relating
to the year's work of the life-saving corps are presented for ready
reference in tabular form as follows, the figures pertaining to each
class of vessels (documented and undocumented) being given
separately:
Dooumented
vessels.

N u m b e r of vessels involved
Vessels totally lost
Persons on board
L i v e s lost
P e r s o n s succored a t stations
D a y s ' succor afforded
V a l u e of vessels i n v o l v e d
V a l u e of cargoes
T o t a l v a l u e of p r o p e r t y i n v o l v e d
V a l u e of p r o p e r t y saved
V a l u e of proi)erty lost




552
40
5,787
73
223
505
§12,128,070
$2,529,170
§14,657,240
$12,936,025
§1,721,215

Undocumented

1,191
.29
3,254
14
214
251
§952,310
§13,600
§965,910
§923,975
§41,935

Total.

1,743
69
9,041
87
437
756
§13, 080,380
§2: 542,770
§15. 623,150
§13, 860,000
§ 1 763,150

60

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The number of casualties, as shown in the foregoing statement,
exceeds that reported for any previous year within the lUstory of
the estabhshment. The value of imperiled property was greater,
also, than ever before except for the year 1909. Notwithstanding
this, a lower percentage of property loss is not to be found in any
former aimual summary of service operations. I t has been equaled
only tmce, namely, in 1896 and 1898. The value of property endangered, however, during the first of these two years was approximately $3,000,000 less, and during the last-mentioned year $8,000,000
less, than was imperiled during 1913.
The loss of life within the last year was also exceptionally large,
exceeding that of any previous year since the season of 1877-78. I t
is also widely at variance with the average annual record of fatahty
since the introduction of the present life-saving system in 1871,
which has been 33. This unusual record was due to two disasters
which took place upon the Pacific coast: One, the wreck of the steamer
Rosecrans, January 7, 1913, off the entrance to the Columbia River,
with the loss of 33 of the 36 persons she carried; the other, the destruction of the German bark Mimi, April 6, 1913, near the mouth of the
Nehalem River, Oregon, with the loss of 16 of the 20 persons on board.
I n neither of these instances could those who perished have been saved
by any human agency. I t should be stated, moreover, that all of the
hfe-saving crews present at these wrecks performed vahant service,
those engaged at the disaster first mentioned losing two powerful motor
Hfeboats while making desperate and, happily, successful efforts to
rescue two sailors, all t h a t remained alive on board when the rescuers
appeared after a search of several hours made for the vessel in an
impenetrable fog. The work of the corps upon this occasion was
marked by incidents of heroism and devotion to duty that have never
been surpassed. I t evoked the highest encomiums of press and pubhc,
and was specially recognized by the passage of resolutions of commendation by the Legislature of the State of Oregon and the adoption of similar resolutions by various city governments and commercial organizations. Recognition by the National Government was
extended to each man who participated in the work in the form of a
gold medal, bestowed under authority of the act of June 20, 1874.
I t is appropriate to state in this connection that none of the instances
of loss of hfe during the year was due to the failure of the corps to
perform their full duty.
Sources of assistance to vessels.
Of the 1,743 vessels included in the tabular statement, 1,364, or
78 per cent, valued with their cargoes at $6,032,935, and carrying 5,168
persons, were assisted" only by the crews of the service; 307, valued
with their cargoes at $7,785,205 and having on board 3,270 persons.




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

-

61

were assisted by the service corps, working in conjunction with revenue cutters, wrecking vessels, etc.; 33, valued with their cargoes at
$1,353,455, and carrying 376 persons, were assisted only by private
agencies; while 39, valued with their cargoes at $451,555, and carrying 227 persons, got out of danger unassisted or suffered destruction
before assistance could reach them.
In addition to the services performed by the corps as already set
forth, aid was extended to 288 vessels finding themselves in divers
situations of need of assistance, though not in immediate danger.
The assistance thus afforded consisted largely of emergency piloting,
carrying persons to and fro between ship and shore, caring for sick
and injured officers and seamen, etc.
Warning signals were given also to 182 vessels running into danger.
Of these, 117 were steamers. On 147 occasions these warnings were
given in the night. Of course no figures can be furnished showing
the value of the vessels so warned or the number of persons they carried. I t may be assumed, nevertheless, that the signals were instrumental in preventing the loss of much property and perhaps loss of
hfe as well.
The net expenditure for the maintenance of the service during the
year was $2,204,074.50.
Flood service in the Middle West.
The spring of 1913 will be long remembered for its record of casualties due to storm and fiood. The effedts of high water, felt generally
in Ohio and Indiana, extended also to portions of West Virginia,
Kentucky, lUinois, Missouri, Tennessee, and other States farther
south bordering upon the Mississippi River.
Under personal instructions of the Secretary, given when the news
first reached Washington that life was in jeopardy in certain sections
of the inundated territory, a number of life-saving crews, with the
necessary boats and equipment, was placed at the disposal of State
officers and others having charge of relief work. Seven crews in aU
performed fiood service, namely, from the Louisville (Ky.), Cleveland and Lorain (Ohio), Michigan City (Ind.), and Jackson Park,
Old Chicago, and Evanston (111.) stations. Their work took them to
Dayton, Ohio; Covington and Dayton, Ky.; Fort Wayne, Peru, and
Terre Haute, Ind.; and Cairo, III. The crews of the Cleveland,
Lorain, and Louisville stations also rendered valuable assistance to
victims of flood in their home cities. The seven crews rescued and
succored while in the performance of flood duty a total of 3,509
persons, besides saving personal property, consisting mostly of hve
stock, to the value of $30,000. A special report describing in detail
the operations of the corps in the flooded districts is contained in
House Document No. 94, Sixty-third Congress, first session*



62

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Power boats for rescue and salvage worTc.
From the field continue to come demands for power craft to replace
certain of the larger types of service boats propeUed by oars. This
demand is being met as rapidly as appropriations will allow. At the
close of the year 68 self-righting and self-baihng power lifeboats and
58 Beebe-McLellan self-bailing power surfboats (126 boats in aU)
were in use at the stations, 19 of the type last described having been
put in commission during the year. Of.the lifeboats, 28 are of the
36-foot length and 40 of the 34-foot length.
The marked growth of late years in the work of the service does
not necessarily indicate a corresponding increase in the number of
casualties to vessels along our coasts, but rather the ability of the
corps, with their improved boats, to cover more territory than
formerly. Of the 4,096 endangered persons taken ashore or to
other places of safety by the life-saving crews during the year,
2,748 were transported in the power boats of the service. .
MisceUaneous services of station crews.
A considerable amount of miscellaneous work, unassociated with
casualties to vessels, was performed by the station crews during
the year. The service of this description of the most importance
was as follows: The rescue of 106 bathers and swimmers and persons otherwise endangered; first-aid treatment given to 96 sick
and injured persons; shelter 'and subsistence provided to 116 persons overtaken on the beaches by inclement weather; the saving,
upon 157 occasions, of various articles of property, such as automobiles, horse-drawn vehicles, fishnets, lumber, livestock, aeroplanes, baUoons, money, etc., caught in mire and quicksands, endangered by floods and high tides, lost, stolen, etc.; and assistance
given in 47 instances at fires involving public and private buildings
and other structures and forests.
Establishment, rebuilding, and improvement of stations.
The stations of the establishment number 285, one station haviag been completed and manned during the year at Eagle Harbor,
Mich. Their distribution is as foUows: 203 on the Atlantic and Gulf
coasts, 63 on the Great Lakes (including 1 at the Falls of the Ohio
River, LouisviUe, Ky.), and 19 on the Pacific coast.
Reference was made last year to contracts entered into for rebuilding the Blue Point, Moriches, and Rockaway stations, on the coast
of Long Island. This work was completed within the year, as was
also the rebuilding of the station at Rockaway Point, on the same
coast, and the station at City Point, Mass., to replace structures
that were old and unsuited to present-day needs. The rebuilding




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

63

of the station at Brazos, Tex., destroyed by hurricane October 16,
1912, was also completed during the year..
Contract was entered into for rebuilding stations at Nags Head
and Poyners HiU, N. C , and for extensive improvements to the
stations at Point Allerton, Mass., Ocean City, Md., and Burnt Island,
Me. This work has all been completed, as has also the work of
repair and construction mentioned in last year's report as having
been begun at Cobb Island, Va. The rebuilding of the station at
Cape Fear, N. C , begun within the year, is still under way.
Retirement pay for the life-saving corps.
Retirement pay for the life-saving corps has been so repeatedly
recommended in former reports and the crying need of such a provision of law so fuUy set forth tha,t further ad version to the subject
seems but a waste of words. I t is felt to be a duty, however, to
continue to speak.
The life-saving establishment enjoys a justly earned reputation
for efficiency, but it may be truthfuUy said that its prestige has
been held in the face of a steady deterioration of its personnel only
because the improvement of its materiel—its boats and apparatus—
has not been hampered by the difficulties that have been encountered
in keeping its stations properly manned.
While improved life-saving appliances have thus far largely
offset the lowered physical standard and morale of the corps, due
to the inability of the service to attract and hold able recruits,
modern equipment and up-to-date methods can not much longer
overbalance the deficiencies of a host of old and in many instances
physically unsound men whom it is necessary to reenlist from year
to year in order that the station crews may not be shorthanded.
Men of the sort the service needs have no incentive nowadays
to enter an employment that takes the best they can give of youth,
health, and zeal in an arduous and oftentimes hazardous routine of
duty, then casts them aside like driftwood. The records show
that many of those who do enlist leave the establishment after short
periods of service, preferring to foUow private pursuits in which,
if their earnings are less certain, the chances for getting ahead appear
to them to be better.
Years ago, when wages in the business world were not so high as
at present and the cost of living was less, the young men reared on
the coast looked to the Life-Saving Service as their natural field of
work. In short, it offered them a career such as suited their train
ing and preparation for life.
For more than a decade, however, the service has ceased to attract
the class of men best suited to its peculiar demands. In preference
to joining the corps they are migrating to the larger cities and becom


64

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

ing police officers, members of fixe companies, street-car conductors,
and motormen, etc. Strong of body as a rule, they have no difficulty in getting work in the city. Moreover, their changed environment enables them to give their families advantages not to be secured
in isolated localities, and they frequently find themselves so situated
that they may complacently regard the future, seeing before them
that incentive to fidelity that the Life-Saving Service has been
unable to hold out, namely, retirement for age or disability.
A biU in the interest of the corps is now pending in the Senate.
I t is believed that it wiU overcome the objections raised against
former biUs of the kind, in that it proposes to remove the life-saving
crews from their present civilian status and place them under a new
bureau to be known as the Coast Guard, said bureau to include the
present Life-Saving Service and Revenue-Cutter Service. This
bUl provides for the rank and file of the life-saving establishment
and for certain of its officers the same retirement and other benefits
now enjoyed by the officers and enlisted men of the Revenue-Cutter
Service.
As the work of the two services is similar, so far as relates to the
saving of life and property from shipwreck, and as the personnel
of the two bureaus are in constant cooperation in that line of
endeavor, the joining of the two services, as proposed, and the
granting of equal benefits to the officers and employees of each
alike would seem to be a step in the interest of efficient and
economical administration and deserving of the favorable consideration of Congress.
REVENUE-CUTTER SERVICE.

The foUowing is a summary of the results of the operations of t h e
Revenue-Cutter Service during the fiscal year 1913:
Lives saved or persons rescued from peril
327
Persons on board vessels assisted
2, 755
Persons in distress taken on board and cared for
264
Vessels boarded and papers examined
25, 079
Vessels seized or reported for violation of law
850
Fines and penalties incurred b y vessels reported
$180,470. 00
Regattas and marine parades patrolled in accordance with l a w . . .
39
Vessels to which assistance was rendered
179
Derelicts and obstructions to navigation removed or destroyed
31
Value of vessels assisted (including cargoes)
$10, 607, 710. 00
Value of derelicts recovered and delivered to owners
$18, 900. 00
Appropriation for 1913, including appropriation for repairs
$2, 474, 857. 00
Net expenditure for maintenance of the service, including r e p a i r s . . . $2,471, 532. 51
Estimated unexpended balance
$3, 324. 49

To accomplish this there have been 25 cruising cutters and 18
harbor vessels and launches actively employed during the year.




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

65

The winter season of 1912-13 was of unusual mildness compared
with the severe weather of the previous whiter; but the occurrence of
several gales along the coast, together with accidents to shipping
from other causes, called forth the usual vigilance and activity of the
fleet of revenue cutters, and the result of these operations of the service during the past fiscal year shows that $10,626,610 worth of property has been saved from the perils of the sea and that there have
been 327 lives saved or persons rescued from danger. As the total
cost for the maintenance of the service during that period was
$2,471,532.51, the year's efforts represents a conservation of $4.29 for
each dollar thus invested by the Government.
Notwithstanding the unusually mild weather conditions of the past
winter season, the vessels forming the patrolling fieet were kept busily
cruising along the coast to aid ships in distress. The vicissitudes
which beset seafaring men are of such an unending variety that even
when fair weather prevails accidents of one kind or another occur
frequently, and usually at the most unexpected time. Hence it is
that the officers and men attached to these winter-cruising cutters
are under a constant tension, not knowiag at what moment their
services may be called for in the saving of life and property. During
the past winter season the patrol was so vigilant that there is no
instance on record where a call for help went unheeded.
Of the 179 cases of assistance rendered during the fiscal year no
two were exactly alike, and all are of interest to show the variety of
dangers encountered by seafarers. The following are conspicuous
examples of the aid furnished by the cutters and will in a manner
illustrate the diversity of the assistance given to vessels in distress:
From October 21 to 26, 1912, the Seminole saved from destruction
the steamship BerTcshire, which was on fire off the coast of North Carolina. This steamer was loaded with a valuable cargo of highly
inflammable materials, such as cotton, resin, pine tar, turpentine, etc.,
and it was only after the most persistent efforts on the part of the
cutter that the fire was brought under control and finally extinguished. On the second day of the fire an accumulation of gases in
the hold caused an explosion, which blew off the hatch covers and
caused a panic among the passengers. This also was subdued by the
officers and the crew of the Seminole, and the 21 passengers were then
taken on board the cutter and later transferred in smaU boats to the
Cape Lookout Life-Saving Station. The BerTcshire and her cargo were
valued at a half million dollars.
WhUe the new revenue cutter Miami was en route to her future
headquarters at Key West, Fla., on the afternoon of November 5,
1912, off HiUsdale Light, on the east coast of Florida, she sighted the
lumber-laden three-masted schooner S. M. Bentley, waterlogged and
helpless. Perched on the top of her cabin 12 people could be dis16726°—FI 1913



5

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REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

cerned through the glasses. These proved to be eight members of
the crew and the wife and three smaU chUdren of the master of the
schooner. A 10-inch hawser was sent to the wrecked vessel by
means of the line-throwing gun, and the wreck taken in tow. The
surfboat was then sent alongside, and after considerable difficulty the
woman and chUdren were taken off and brought on board the cutter
for safety. For over 24 hours the shipwrecked people had had
nothing to eat but raw ham, and just as the Miami reached them
they had succeeded in starting a fire and were boUing some potatoes
which they had picked up from the sea. Fresh provisions and water
were furnished the men on the schooner, who remained on board to
steer the disabled craft, whUe the cutter towed the vessel hi safety to
Key West, Fla.
In December, 1912, word reached the Treasury Department that
the freight schooner Rouse Simmons, laden with Christmas trees for
the approaching holidays, had left a small port in northern Michigan
bound for Chicago and that at the time was a month overdue. The
season of navigation on the Great Lakes had drawn to an end, nearly
all the lighthouses had been closed and buoys removed, ice was
forming and fog and snowstorms prevaUed, and it was feared the
missing vessel had been lost. There was a hope, however, that she
might have blown ashore in some out-of-the-way place, and the
cutters Tuscarora and MacTcinac were directed to investigate. A
thorough search was made of Lake Michigan and of the small islands
in the northern part of that lake, but not a vestige of the vessel could
be found. I t is presumed the unfortunate craft foundered with all
hands on board, thus adding another chapter to the great mysteries
of the sea.
The somewhat unusual experience of a vessel needing assistance
twice in less than a inonth occurred ia the iastance of the steamship
Alcazar, from Trinidad, West Indies, laden with logwood, which was
found by the Seminole off Cape Lookout Shoals Light Vessel, abandoned, on December 25, 1912. This steamer was badly listed to
port, about 45°, and was down by the head. I t was necessary to
tow her stern first, and it was only after extreme difficulties on
account of the yawiag from side to side that she was finally towed in
safety to Lookout Bight and there anchored. On January 5, 1913,
the same steamer was driven ashore in Lookout Bight and was floated
by the efforts of the Seminole, which cutter put officers on board to
act as customs iaspectors whUe the dutiable cargo was being removed.
After a three days' search, aided by radiograms from passiag
steamers, the Onondaga succeeded in locating the three-masted
schooner Bessie Whiting, which during a severe gale off Cape Hatteras
on January 4,1913, had lost hermainsaU and flyiag jib, had her main
gaff broken, and the seams opened in the stern and amidships. On




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

67

January 6 the Onondaga picked her up 20 mUes northeast of Cape
Charles Light Vessel and towed her to Hampton Roads, Va. During
the gale one of the schooner's crew, whUe trying to steer the vessel,
was thrown overboard by the steeriag wheel and lost; another who
took his place had been seriously injured by the wheel, and arrangements were made by means of a radiogram from the Onondaga to
give the injured man hnmediate treatment upon arrival off Old
Poiat Comfort by the hospital ship Chase, anchored at that place.
On the mornuig of January 10, 1913, the Woodbury received word
that the steamer Monhegan, with engine disabled and distress signals
flying, was anchored off Middle Ledge on the rock-bound coast of
Maine, and was gradually beiag forced toward the reef by the gale
of wind then prevaUing. The cutter went immediately to her assistance and succeeded in getting a line to the ill-fated steamer, which,
with her crew and passengers—numbering 21 souls—had about
abandoned hope of rescue. Although the Woodbury is a cutter now
over 50 3^ears old and had only a temporary steering gear, she succeeded in towing the disabled craft at a rate of 3 knots an hour to a
place of safety. The master of the Monhegan stated ia a letter to the
commandiag officer of the cutter that ^ t h r o u g h your assistance the
Monhegan was saved from certain destruction/'
Removal of derelicts.
The duty of searching for and removing derehcts and other menaces
to navigation has been continued throughout the year, with the
result that 26 of these obstructions have been removed or destroyed,
and 5 derehcts, representing a value of $18,900, were recovered and
restored to their owners.
Reference was made in the last annual report to the fact that, at
the request of the War Department, sunken obstructions to navigation were removed by the Revenue-Cutter Service. Jurisdiction
over such obstructions is vested by law in the War Department, and
hitherto delays have been occasioned in removing these from the
paths of commerce, owing to the official correspondence necessary
between the Engineer Corps of the War Department and the RevenueCutter Service, whereby the cutters could receive specific authority
to act as agents of the Secretary of War for the removal of the obstructions. After conferences with the War Department officials, a set of
regulations was agreed upon and promulgated under date of April 2,
1913, which secured close cooperation in these matters, and provided
for the prompt action of the commanding officer of any revenue
cutter in the removal of sunken obstructions without preliminary
correspondence.




68

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Ice patrol.
The loss of the Titanic by collision with an iceberg on April 16,
1912, called the attention of the maritime world to the necessity for
providing some systematic means of giving to the trans-Atlantic
steamers approaching the regions traversed by the ice in the spring
and summer months timely warning as to the exact location of
dangerous bergs and fields of ice. The United States Government,
always among the first in humanitarian enterprises, maintained an
efficient ice patrol by means of two scout cruisers of the" Navy during
the months of May and June, 1912. No naval vessels were available
for this duty during the spring months of the current year, and therefore, at the earnest sohcitation of the large maritime exchanges of
this country, two revenue cutters, the Seneca and Miami, were
detailed by the Secretary of the Treasury for the patrol of the ice
regions.
Using the port of Hahfax, Nova Scotia, as a base for coal and
supplies, these two vessels made alternate cruises of 15 days in the
ice danger zone and maintained a continuous patrol during the
months of April, May, and June, 1913. At the end of this period the
reports from the vessels indicated that the icebergs and ice floes had
ceased to be a menace to the trans-Atlantic steamer lanes, and the
patrol was discontinued for the season as no longer necessary.
Protection of the fur seal.
During the months of July, August, and September, 1912, and
again in May and June, 1913, an efficient patrol of the Bering Sea
and North Pacific Ocean was maintained for the purpose of enforcing
the provisions of law and the convention entered into by the United
States, Great Britain, Russia, and Japan for the preservation of the
fur seal and the sea otter. The cutters emplo3^ed in 1912 were the
McCulloch, Tahoma, and Manning, and for the season of 1913 the
Tahoma, Manning, and Unalga were detailed for this duty.
Enforcement of navigation, anchorage, and other laws.
Twenty-five thousand and sevent3^-nine vessels were boarded and
examined during the year in enforcing the navigation and motor-boat
laws. Of these, 850 were reported for violation of law, involving
fines in the total sum of $180,470. Practically the same number of
vessels were boarded in 1913 as in 1912, and the fact that but 850
were found violating the law in 1913, as agaiast 1,208 in 1912, is
gratifying evidence of an increasing regard for the requirements of
the law on the part of the owners and the masters of vessels. .
The duty of enforcing the law and regulations governing the
anchorage of vessels in the harbors of New York and Chicago and the



SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

69

Kennebec River has contiaued during the year. The Manhattan
and Guide were assigned to this work in New York Harbor and the
launch Patrol in Chicago. The estabhshment of definite anchorage
areas in these crowded harbors has added materially to the safety of
navigation and greatly facilitated traffic in these waters, and the
recommendation of last year is renewed, namely, that similar laws
governing the anchorage of vessels be enacted for all the large seaports.
The important duty of regulating the movements of vessels through
the St. Marys River, Mich., has been continued, requiring the use of
the third-class cutter MacTcinac and two launches. I n addition,
three lookout stations have been maintained at important points in
the river to observe and regulate the speed of passing vessels, and
during the past year it has been necessary to estabhsh a fourth
station, at Brush Point. All of the commerce between Lake Superior
and the lower lakes, aggregating 72,472,676 tons for the season of
1912, must pass through the St. Mary's River and the connecting
canal systems. During the season of 1912 the total number of
vessels passing through the locks was 19,691, and the greatest number
passing through in one day was 124—on September 24,1912. There
was at no time a congestion approaching a blockade, except from ice,
on December 12 and 13, and the number of vessels delayed at that
time was small.
At the request of the Secretary of Commerce, vessels or officers
were detailed in 39 instances to enforce the regulations for the safety
of hfe during regattas or marine parades.
Proposed consolidation of the Revenue-Cutter and Life-Saving Services
as the '^ Coast Guard.^^
There exist in the Treasury Department two distinct organizations,
the Revenue-Cutter Service and the Life-Saving Service, whose main
functions are practically identical, i. e., the saving of life and property
from the perils of the sea.
The magnitude of these two seryices and the net results of their
operations in rescue work may be summarized, as foUows:
REVENUE-CUTTER

Number of ships:
Seagoing
Harbor tugs and launches

SERVICE.

25
19

Total
44
.Authorized personnel (commissioned officers, warrant officers, and eh, listed men)
1,838
Annual cost of maintenance (1913)
".
$2,471, 532
Lives rescued from peril (1913)
327
Value of vessels and cargoes assisted (1913)
$10, 626, 610




70

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
LIFE-SAVING

SERVICE.

Number of stations
Authorized personnel (superintendents, keepers, surfmen)
Annual cost of maintenance (1913)
Lives rescued from peril (1913)
Value of vessels and cargoes assisted (1913)

279
2,255
$2, 246, 306
4,096
$6,032,935

History.
The Revenue-Cutter Service was founded in 1790, and was the first
regularly organized armed maritime service of the Government. I t
has taken a conspicuous part ia every maritune war hi which this
country has been engaged, and its mUitary status has been fixed by
Congress. Its officers and men have the benefits of retirement,
mUitary titles, courts-martial, and they rank with officers of the
Army and Navy.
The LUe-Savhig Service was originated in the Revenue-Cutter
Service and for several years after its inception was operated under
its direction. I t became a separately organized service in 1878, but
since that time officers of the Revenue-Cutter Service have been
detaUed as the inspectors and drill masters of the Life-Saving Service.
Coast Guard.
I t is proposed to unite these two services under one administrative
head into an organization to be known as the Coast Guard, which,
whUe continuiag its present humanitarian functions in time of peace,
wUl have a mUitary status, and become a ffi^st naval reserve in time of
war. The principal advantages to be derived from this consolidation
will be:
« {a) Increased efficiency in the saving of lUe and property by closer
.
cooperation between the sea life-savers and the coast life-savers.
(6) Simplification of the administrative functions.
(c) A retired list for the highly deserving men of the Life-Saving
Service, whose hazardous duties from J:he modern viewpoint of the
public entitle them to this consideration on the part of the Government.
'
°
{d) The creation of a fhst naval reserve of approximately 4,100
trained and experienced men, which simply by an Executive order
wiU be immediately transferred to the naval forces of the Government either in war or peace, whenever the exigency requiring such
action may arise.
Existing conditions.
To attract competent men in any branch of human endeavor the
pay and emoluments offered must be commensurate with the work
to be performed and the risks to health and life which must be
incurred. The rates of pay in the Life-Saving Service can not with




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

71

justice be fixed solely with reference to the actual work performed,
for in a hazardous caUing of this kind there must be considered the
ever-present risk of injury, the possible loss of life, and the necessity
for providing for the declining years when the human physique
becomes, through advancing age, incapable of standing the strains
incident to such a strenuous occupation. Prior to 1908, owing to the
small pay and lack of a retired hst, the ranks of the Life-Saving Service became much depleted. Congress by act of March 26, 1908,
sought to remedy this condition by a shght raise of pay for keepers
and surfmen. " For a brief time some improvement was apparent, but
at present the conditions are even worse than before.
Good men are continuaUy leaving the service because they are
able to earn a greater income in civil pursuits, and the Life-Saving
Service offers no advantage to offset this difference in pay. These
conditions make it more and more difficult to secure even sufficient
apphcants for current vacancies, and it is necessary to employ temporary men, picked up by the keepers from such material as can be
obtained from among the unemployed in their vicinity. These men
are too frequently of the ne'er-do-well, shiftless, and incompetent
type, unable or unwilhng to qualify for regular enlistment; men who
wiU remain in the service for comparatively short periods, necessitating frequent changes and the consequent training of new men.
Their influence in the crews is bad and it is difficult to hold them
amenable to disciphne, in consequence of which the efficiency of the
stations is inevitably lower, aPxd the extra work and responsibUity
thrown on the keeper and the regular members of the crew are sources
of discontent and friction. The presence of such untrained men in
the boats adds greatly to the perils of the rescue work at wrecks,
often endangering both the lives of the crew and of those whom it is
sought to save. In many of the life-saving stations the best qualified
and most reliable men are those who have reached such an age as to
place them beyond the probabUity of being able to secure other
regular employment, and who are retained in the service solely for
the reason that they, even in their advanced years, are better than
such new men as can be obtained with the smaU inducements offered.
During the past fiscal year about 11J per cent of the total force
have either been discharged for physical disabUity or declined to
continue in the service under existing conditions. In several of the
districts it appears to be impossible to secure sufficient men to fill
the current vacancies, and in one district particularly there are 58
vacancies and not a man on the eligible list. I t is believed that the
organization of the Coast Guard as proposed wUl remedy the existing
evUs and save this highly meritorious branch of the public service
from decadence.




72

.

REPORT ON TPIE FINANCES.

The experience of the Revenue-Cutter Service bears out this belief,
as since the enactment of legislation giving its officers and men the
benefits of retirement this arm of the Government has increased its
efficiency more than fourfold.
Cost.

Naturally such an increase hi efficiency must result in an increased
cost of maintenance, but the advantages gained wUl be greatly in
excess of such increased cost, and reference is again made to the
experience of the Revenue-Cutter Service in support of this assertion.
For example, during the four fiscal years 1898 to 1901 (prior to the
enactment of any remedial legislation) statistics show that for each
dollar invested in that service it was instrumental in saving $2.39
worth of marine property. For the corresponding period of the next
decade, 1908 to 1911, after Congress had given the service a retired
list and increased pay, an investment of $1 saved $4.43 of the floating
property belonging to the public.
The Senate of the United States on two occasions by a unanimous
vote has passed a bill giving the Life-Saving Service a retired list as a
separate organization, but the contemplated legislation has on both
occasions failed in the House of Representatives, owing to the reluctance of that body to grant a retired list to a branch of the civil force
of the Government. The increased cost, as estimated, on account of
the requirements of that bill, .would have been approximately
$450,000.
The legislation as proposed for the formation of the Coast Guard
would, on account of the military status it gives to the Life-Saving
Service, in all probabUity, remove the objection heretofore made by
the House, and the net increased cost over existing conditions would
be only $397,700.
Special cruises.
I n September last the new revenue cutter TJnxflga, built at Newport News, Va., and destined for service in Alaskan waters, was dispatched to her headquarters, via the Suez Canal. This route to the
Pacific coast was selected rather than the shorter one via Cape Horn
for the reason that the excessive price of coal along the shorter route
made the total cost of fuel less over the longer route. November 10,
1912, shortly after she had left Port Said, instructions were cabled
to the American consular agency at Suez to intercept the vessel by
radio and transmit orders for the Unalga to return to Port Said and
await further orders. This interruption of the voyage was made at
the request of the State Department, owing to the fact that an unsettled state of affairs existed in Turkey, and there was no United States
naval vessel in those waters. Subsequent orders were cabled to the
commanding officer to report by radio to the American ambassador
at Constantinople and, if the latter deemed it advisable, to proceed




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

73

to such ports in Turkey as he might designate. The cutter remained
at Port Said in constant readiness to answer any caU from the ambassador until December 16, 1912, when the arrival of the U. S. cruiser
Montana in those waters made the presence of the Unalga no longer
necessary, and she was directed to resume her voyage. The vessel
finaUy arrived at Port Townsend, Wash., March 23, 1913, and began
immediate preparations to take up her duties in connection with the
Bering Sea patrol for the enforcement of the seahng convention.
The Thetis made several cruises to Lysianski, Necker, and Bird
Islands, and French Frigate Shoals, transporting to and from these
remote insular possessions in the Pacific Ocean a party of scientists
and Government agents sent out from the Department of Agriculture for the purpose of obtaining information relating td, and taking
steps to conserve, the bird life on these reservations.
At the request of the Department of Justice the Thetis was again
placed at the disposal of the ^'floating court" in the spring of 1913,
and was assigned the duty of transporting the United States District Court and its attaches to remote places in southern and southwestern Alaska, in order to minimize the expense of administering
the law in these out-of-the-way places.
The Bear was dispatched to precede the fleet of merchant vessels
bound to Nome at the opening of navigation in the spring of 1912
in order to safeguard navigation by developing the extent and condition of the ice fields and keeping the approaching steamers advised
by radio of dangerous areas. This vessel carried to northern Alaska,
at the request of the Postmaster General, the large accumulation of
winter maU, aggregating 12 tons. After the ice had passed out of
the Bering Sea and open navigation was assured, the cutter made
her annual cruise through the Arctic Ocean to Point Barrow, visiting
all the vUlages and Government schoolhouses in those remote districts, assisting shipping, and overlooking Government interests in
general. The Department of Justice appoints one officer of the Bear
a United States commissioner and another officer a deputy United
States marshal in order that court may be held in minor cases, and
thus avoid the considerable expense of transporting such minor
offenders to Nome for trial, After the cruise through the Arctic was
completed, the Bear returned to the Bering Sea and remained in the
vicinity of Nome untU the close of navigation in November, 1912,
to render such assistance as might be needed to vessels during those
stormy months.
New vessels and repairs.
The new cutters Unalga and Miami have during the year taken
up their duties on the stations for which they were constructed, the
former with headquarters at Juneau, Alaska, and the latter at Key
West, Fla. The old cutters Rush and Forward have, in accordance




74

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

with the requirements of law, been condemned, advertised for sale,
sold to the highest bidder in each instance, and stricken from the list.
During the year the old practice ship Chase has also been stricken
from the list. This vessel, a bark-rigged saUing craft, was used for
many years as a school of instruction for the line cadets of the service, and nearly all the present line officers on the active list have
secured their preliminary training on this vessel. She had, however,
outlived her usefulness as a practice ship, and by dhection of the
Secretary of the Treasury was altered into a quarantine vessel and
transferred to the Public Health Service, under which branch of the
Treasury Department she is now performing service at Fortress
Monroe, Va. No other changes in the list of vessels have occurred
during the year.
Attention is again invited to the urgent necessity of providing new
ships to supply the pressing needs of the service. Unfortunately a
bUl to provide four new vessels to replace the Perry, Woodbury,
Manhattan, and Winona, although receiving the unanimous approval
of the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, f aUed
of passage at the last session of Congress. The bUl has since been
reintroduced duriag the present session of Congress, and, as the
necessity for these new vessels is even greater than it was a year ago,
it is earnestly hoped t h a t the bill will be passed at the earliest possible
time. In order to expedite the construction of these vessels, so
badly needed, plans and specifications for the new craft are now
being prepared by the technical officers having charge of such work.
The. Woodbury, Manhattan, and Win/ynxi are in such condition t h a t .
it is extremely difficult to keep them up in such a state as to enable
them to perform any service. The Perry, as previously reported, was
lost in the Bering Sea during the summer of 1910, and- her absence
makes it almost impossible to perform efficiently the duties required
of the service on the Pacific coast.
Current repahs to the vessels of the service have been made as the
necessities for them became apparent and, in addition thereto, extensive repairs have been made to the Manning, Calumet, and Morrill. The former vessel was reboUered and additional bunkers added.
The main engine was altered to the end t h a t a greater ratio of expansion might be obtained. By these improvements the steaming radius
of this vessel has been nearly doubled, a most desirable feature for
the Bering Sea cruising, and this too without reducing the maximum
speed of the cutter. The Calumet was provided with a new boUer
and at the same time fitted with oU-fuel burning apparatus. The
entire absence of smoke incident to this change and her readiness
to respond to hurry calls makes this fuel an ideal one for vessels on
boarding duty. The Morrill was given a thorough overhauling,
including new decks, new house, new masts, and the installation of
radio apparatus.



SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

75

Many of the older vessels of the service need extensive repairs to
both hull and machinery, but the appropriation allowed annually
(only $175,000 for the entire service) makes it impossible to provide
these repairs on more than two or three vessels each year and at the
same time keep up the current repairs of a minor nature. I t is hoped
during the current fiscal year to make repahs to the McCulloch similar to those made to the Manning during the last year. Such repairs
alone cost upward of $60,000 for one vessel, a considerable proportion
of the total allotment for the entire service, but the gains in the
economy of operation and the efficiency consequent to the greatly
enlarged steaming radius make the investment an excellent one.
Service depot in AlasTca.
I t is recommended that a permanent depot be established either at
Dutch Harbor or Unalaska, Alaska, as a base for the operations of
the service in northern waters. For many years past one or the other
of these places, located about 1 mUe apart, has been used as a temporary base for the Bering Sea patrol fleet and other vessels in Alaskan
waters; in fact, owing to their geographical location and their safe
harbors they are the only ports that can be used for this purpose.
As the growing importance of Alaska, the increase in its shipping,
and the duty of enforcing the convention for the prevention of pelagic
sealing will require such a supply base for years to come, either of
these two ports must continue to be so used, and in the interest of
economy the Government should have its own station at one of these
places for the storage of necessary fuel and supplies.
At the present time coal for the fleet must be purchased practically
•without competition, since there is but one concern at each of these
ports from which fuel can be obtained. During the past 2 years coal
has cost at Unalaska $12 a ton and fresh meat 30 cents a pound.
The average amounts of these items purchased annually are 4,500
tons of coal and 30,000 pounds of fresh meat. Good coal can be
purchased at the mines and delivered at Unalaska for about $7 a ton.
Allowing $1 for handling, it wUl be seen that a saving of $4 a ton, or
$18,000 annually, would be effected in the matter of coal alone if
the Government had its own station at Dutch Harbor or Unalaska.
There are other Government vessels belonging to other departments which are obliged to coal at Unalaska, and the total saving
to the Government annuaUy in the cost of coal would not be less than
$20,000.
Dutch Harbor would be the better location, because of its larger
harbor, but if the Government could not acquire at a reasonable cost
the site at that place, now owned by the North American Commercial
Co., consisting of about 40 acres, with wharf, storehouses, and other
buildings, a reservation could be had at Unalaska, about 1 mUe to




76

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the southward, and the wharves and buildings now occupied by the
Alaska Commercial Co. could be purchased and put in proper condition.
Saving of life and property on interior navigable waters.
In view of the beneficial results of the activities of the RevenueCutter Service in the saving of life and property along the Atlantic,
Gulf, and Pacific coasts and on the Great Lakes, the question naturally arises why these benefits should not be extended to the inhabitants and shipping interests along the navigable waters in the great
Middle West and Southwest.
The annual overflowing of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and their
tributaries, the great loss of life and property incident thereto, and
the necessity, as evidenced last year, of sending from the Great Lakes
and the Atlantic ports skilled men and life-saving apparatus to aid
in saving lives in the inundated regions, presents a legitimate field
for the operations, of the Revenue-Cutter Service. Three typical
light-draft river steamers should be constructed and equipped as
revenue cutters; each of these craft provided with not less than four
powerful motor lifeboats and equipped with such other lUe-saving
appliances as may be necessary for work along the rivers. During the
flood seasons these cutters should be directed to follow the crest of
the flood from Pittsburgh down to the mouth of the Mississippi,
and there is but little doubt that their services would be of great value
in rescuing lives and property and in distributiag food and clothing
t o marooned people. During flood times surgeons could be detaUed
to the cutters to render medical aid where needed. Duriag the
periods when floods are not raging, the three cutters could be very
efficiently used in patrolling these inland waters for the enforcement
of the navigation and motor-boat laws and in rendering aid to vessels
in distress.
Headquarters should be assigned to these cutters at Louisville or
Cincinnati on the Ohio, at St. Louis on the upper Mississippi, and at
Helena, Ark., or Vicksburg, Miss., on the lower Mississippi.
Cutters of this type can be constructed and properly equipped for
$80,000 each, or a total of $240,000 for the three. The annual cost
of maiatenance would be approximately $80,000 for the three cutters,
a small sum to expend for the saviag of life and property when compared with the vast sums annually lost through these floods.
This matter is earnestly submitted for consideration.
Appointment of cadets.
Some relief from the critical situation regarding the recruithig of
its commissioned personnel, which confronted the service duriag the
past year, was afforded by a clause in the sundry civU bill for the
fiscal year 1914, which provided for the appoiatment of 7 cadets dur


SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

77

ing the current year. Even with these 7 appointments, there still
exist 7 vacancies which can not be filled at the present time. I t is
therefore earnestly recommended that 7 additional cadetships be
authorized for the fiscal year 1915, makiag a total of 14 cadets and
cadet engineers for that year. I t is also urged that in 1916 permanent
authorization be made for 21 cadets and cadet engineers. The record
of the past shows that 7 cadets is the average number needed each
year to fill vacancies, and as three years is the maximum period of
probation for cadets, there should be 21 cadets and cadet engiaeers
under instruction all the time to provide for the vacancies which occur
in the authorized personnel of 242 officers of all grades.
Inadequate appropriations.
Reference was made in the last annual report to the fact that notwithstandiag the constantly increasing duties requhed of the RevenueCutter Service, the appropriations for the maiatenance of the service
during the past two or three years have been reduced. In 1911, a
horizontal cut of $100,000 was made, to be foUowed by a stUl further
reduction of $28,000 for the fiscal year 1913, and this despite the
almost universal advance in the cost of fuel, rations, and supplies.
The statement was made hi the last annual report that this condition
would inevitably force an application to Congress for a deficiency
appropriation, and it has been found necessary to obtain deficiency
funds on two occasions in order to carry the service through the last
fiscal year. In addition to this, and despite the fact that substantial
economies were effected by purchasing supplies through the Navy
contracts, other methods had to be adopted to keep the expenditures
within the limit of the sums appropriated. Therefore, the crews of
certain cutters on the Atlantic coast were reduced and the activities
of these vessels restricted duriag the months of May and June. These
expedients are not in the true iaterests of economy, as they actually
cripple the service by preventing the efficient performance of its
legitimate functions. For the current fiscal year an increase of
$40,000 over that of the appropriation for 1913 was allowed, but even
with this increase the authorized appropriation is much less than the
total amount for which carefully prepared estimates were submitted,
and in all probabUity the expedients resorted to last year wUl have
to be repeated before the close of the current fiscal year. I t is therefore earnestly requested that Congress be urged to allot a sufficient
amount for the maintenance duriag the next fiscal year, to the end
that the service may be able to perform the duties required of it.




78

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

DIVISION OF LOANS AND CURRENCY.

Public-debt transactions.
Changes in interest-bearing debt of the United States:
Amount outstanding J u n e 30, 1912
Postal savings bonds, third series, dated J u l y 1, 1912
Postal savings bonds, fourtli series, dated Jan. 1, 1913

$963, 776, 770
854, 860
1, 074, 980

Amount outstanding J u n e 30, 1913

965, 706, 610

Interest on registered bonds.
Interest amounting to $20,996,243.50 on registered bonds of the
United States became due, involving the issuance of 129,487 interest
checks.
Transfers, exchanges, and redemptions.
Amount transferred and exchanged
Amount redeemed (matured debt on which interest had ceased)

$108, 624,140
57,560

Insular and District of Columbia loans.
The foUowing table shows the changes in these loans:
Philippine
Islands.
Amount outstanding June 30,1912
Increase
Decrease

.

. .

Porto Rico.

District of
Columbia.

$16,125,000

$8,258,600

16,125,000

Amount outstanding June 30,1913

$425,000
1,100,000
1,525,000

7,610,850

647,750

Interest on the above loans amounting to $949,840.25 became due
and was certified to the Treasurer for payment.
Circulation.
The changes in the amounts of the several kinds of money in the
United States outside the Treasury between November 1, 1912, and
November 1, 1913, are shown in the table following:
o

Comparative statement showing the changes in circulation.
In circulation—
Classes.

Decrease.
Nov. 1, 1912.

Gold coin
standard silver dollars
Subsidiary silver
Gold certificates
Silver certificates..
Treasury notes, act of July 14,1890
United States notes
Q
National-bank notes
Total
Net increase...




$610,614,208
73,599,090
151,580,472
943,545,429
481,749,136
2,825,887
342,543,914
721,648,264
.

.

3,328,106,400

Increase.

Nov. 1, 1913.
$614,478,201
74,012,152
160,486,188
1,021,451,879
480,079,731 $1,669,405
2,583,874
242,013
•41,401,413
1,142,501
722,616,240

$3,863,993
413,062
8,905,716
77,906,450

3,417,109,678

92,057,197

.

3,053,919

967,976

89,003,278

79

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Redemption of currency, etc.
During the year 291,730,000 pieces of United States currency and
7,071,895 internal-revenue stamps were counted for redemption and
destroyed, 49,351,299 pieces of national-bank currency were destroyed,
and 9,722,991 sheets of imperfect paper or mutilated work were
counted and destroyed.
Paper custody.
Stock on hand July 1, 1912, aU kinds
Received from contractors during year
Issued to Bureau of Engraving and Printing
On hand June 30, 1913, aU kinds

sheets.. 34, 417, 576
do
192,181, 508
do
208,120, 321
d o . . . . 18, 478, 763

National currency associations {act oj May SO, 1908).
During the period July 1, 1912, to November 1, 1913, two new
associations have been formed (at Louisville and San Francisco) and
the following changes have been made in the associations named:
Washington, 2 banks added; Boston, 1 bank added; Detroit, 1 bank
withdrawn; Albany, 2 banks added; Kansas City, 3 banks added;
Cincinnati, territory extended to include contiguous parts of the States
of Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky, 28 banks have been added and 1 bank
has withdrawn; Alabama, 1 bank withdrawn; Louisville, 2 banks
added.
Date of
approval of
formation by
Secretary.

Number
of
banks.

Aggregate
capital
and
surplus.

Wasliington, D.C
City of New York, N. Y
,
City of Philadelphia, Pa
State of Louisiana
City of Boston, Mass
State of Georgia
City of Chicago, 111
St. Louis. Mo
TwtQ Cities, St. Paul, Minn
,
City of Detroit, Mich
Albany, Rensselaer, and Schenectady
Counties, N . Y
,
Kansas City and St. Joseph, Mo
City of Baltimore, Md
Cincinnati, Ohio
DaUas, Tex
State of Alabama
Denver, Colorado Springs, and Pueblo,
Colo
Los Angeles, Cal
Louisville, Ky
San Francisco, Cal
•
Total, 20 associations.

Capital.i

Surplus.i

$6,602,000
117,052,000
20,975,000
6,100,000
26,700,000
8,195,000
42,900,000
19,510,000
13,050,000
6,525,000

$5,067,000
129,025,000
37,740,000
4,105,000
19,450,000
6,651,000
26,400,000
9,095,000
11,065,000
3,490,000

$11,669,000
246,077,000
58,715,000
10,205,000
46,150,000
14,846,000
69,300,000
28,605,000
24,115,000
10,015,000

12,1910
14,1910
20,1910
22,1910
9,1911
8,1911

3,825,000
7,350,000
11,840,710
17,630,000
4,260,000
5,700,000

3,800,000
3,960,000
8,020,010
9,004,000
3,225,000
3,652,500

7,625,000
11,310,000
19,860,720
26,634,000
7,485,000
9,352,500

N o v . 15,1911
Apr. 18,1912
A u g . 25,1913
Sept. 5,1913

4,650,000
6,925,000
6,795,000
28,500,000

5,055,000
2,648,000
3,178,000
16,670,000

9,705,000
9,573,000
9,973,000
45,170,000

338 365,084,710

Name.

311,300,510

676,385,220

July 18,1908
July 30,1910
Aug. 9,1910
Aug. 18,1910
Sept. 15,1910
Sept. 16,1910
Oct. 14,1910
Oct. 31,1910
do
Nov. 28,1910
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
July

1 As shown by reports to Comptroller of the Currency dated Aug. 9,1913.

DIVISION OF PUBLIC MONEYS.

The monetary operations of the Government have been conducted
through the Treasurer of the United States, 9 subtreasury offices,
the treasury of the PhUippine Islands, the American Colonial Bank
of Porto Rico, and 1,575 national bank depositaries.



80

REPORT ON, TPIE FINANCES.

The amount of public moneys held by the bank depositaries on
June 30, 1913, including funds to the credit of the Treasurer's general
account and United States disbursing officers, was $76,263,615.06,
an increase since June 30, 1912, of $27,757,429.29. On June 30,
1913, there were 850 regular depositaries and 691 temporary depositaries; 218 were designated during the year and 34 discontinued.
On November 1, 1913, the number was 1,621, and the amount of
public moneys held by them was $98,069,011.43.
DIVISION OF BOOKKEEPING AND WARRANTS.

The fiscal transactions recorded in this division during the year
ended June 30, 1913, were as foUows:
The books of the division have carried open receipt and appropriation accounts during the year to the number of 7,500, which have
been charged and credited with aU warrant entries affecting the
receipts and disbursements.
Approximately 7,600 active accounts of coUecting and disbursing
officers were carried in the current personal ledgers of the division,
recording their transactions as to deposits of public moneys and expenditures made from moneys advanced to them.
The method formerly used of recording receipt and pay warrants
in permanent registers in manuscript has been replaced by a system
of loose-leaf registers, typewritten records therefor in quadruplicate
being produced at one writing, one copy for this division and separate
copies for similar records in the offices of the ComptroUer of the
Treasury and the Treasurer of -the United States, where books in
manuscript have heretofore been kept. Additional copies of the paywarrant schedules are also furnished the Auditor for the Treasury
Department for information in stating the quarterly accounts of the
Treasurer of the United States, and the original sheets of receipt
and repay warrants are furnished the several auditors for their use
in settling the accounts of fiscal officers.
A totar of 113,716 receipt and pay warrants, aggregating $3,9.26,923,553.16, was issued during the year., Of this number30,952
were for the receipt of moneys into the Treasury, and 82,764 for disbursements from the Treasury.
Of the above sum, warrants in the amount of $1,496,215,653.88,
representing receipts of $747,512,079.84 and disbursements of
$748,703,574.04, including public-debt items, were credited and
charged respectively to the general fund of the Treasury; warrants
representing $2,022,742,200 were issued for public-debt receipts and
redemptions not affecting the general fund of the Treasury, the
moneys involved beiag held for the redemption of certificates and
notes for which the funds are respectively pledged; and warrants rep-




81

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

resenting $407,965,699.28 were issued for adjustment of appropriation accounts, largely for the naval '^General account of advances.''
The foUowing table exhibits the totals of the receipts and disbursements of the year for the general fund, details of which are
shown on pages 18 to 23.
Excess of receipts
(+) or of disbursements (—).

23,400,850.00

$682,770,705.51
41,741,258.03
24,191,610.50

.+$41,340,624.33
- 41,741,258.03
790,760.50

747,512,079.84

Ordinary
Panama Canal
Public debt

Disbursements.

748,703,574.04

Receipts.

~

$724,111,229.84

. . ^ '.

Total

-

1,191,494.20

This shows a surplus of ordinary receipts over ordiaary disbursements of $41,340,524.33 and an excess of aU disbursements over all
receipts of $1,191,494.20, taking hito account public debt transactions and payments from the general fund of the Treasury during
the year of $41,741,258.03 forthe Panama Canal without sales of bonds.
State bonds and stocTcs owned by the United States.
, The foUowing statement shows, the nonpaying State bonds and
stocks, formerly ia the Indian trust fund, now in the Treasury,
belongins: to the United States:
Principal.

Louisiana
North Carolina

Interest
coupons due
and unpaid.

.

.

,.

Total

$37,000.00
58,000.00
335,666.66§

$17,220.00
88,140.00
157,830.61

430,666.661

.-

TerJTiftssPA-

263,190.51

A history of these State stocks and bonds is given in House Document No. 263, Fifty-fourth Congress, second session.
SECRET-SERVICE DIVISION.

There were 6 counterfeit-note issues during the year, which shows
a marked decrease compared with 1912, when there were 24; of these
6 but 1 was at all dangerous. The total representative values of
notes and coins captured durhig the year was $42,000, as against
$39,000 for 1912. There were 365 arrests, against 324 in 1912.
The note raiser was unusually active, 58 of the 67 persons charged
with violating sections 148 and 151 of the Penal Code beiag note
raisers or passers of raised notes. The Pacific coast suffered most
from the operations of these offenders, but since the arrest in January
16726°—FI 1913




6

82

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

of 1 of the principal offenders and 15 confederates at San Francisco,
Cal., and Portland, Oreg., that section of the country has experienced
rehef in this respect. While coin counterfeiters represent more than
60 per cent of the total arrests and there was an increase in the
amount of counterfeit coins captured during the year, the ^^coiner''
is apparently abandoning the more difficult and expensive method
of striking his coins from dies in favor of the easier and cheaper
molding process. There were 16 dies captured during the year, as
against 25i in 1912, whUe 184 molds were seized, compared with 119
the previous year.
DIVISION OF PRINTING AND STATIONERY.

Printing and binding.
The appropriations, expenditures, and unexpended balances for
the fiscal years 1911, 1912, and 1913, were as follows:
Year

1911
1912 . . .
1913

i

Appropri- Expended.
ated.
$350,000
360,000
340,000

$332,827
328,303
294,403

Unexpended
balance.
$17,173
31,697
45,597

The above discloses a gradual reduction in expenditures on account
of printing and binding. In 1911 there was an expenditure of
$332,827; in 1912, $328,303; and in 1913, $294,403. The number of
requisitions on the Pubhc Printer was also correspondingly reduced.
In 1911 there were 7,327; in 1912,5,947; while in 1913 there were but
5,147. The foregoing reduction resulted from a careful supervision
of the work and in no way interfered with the efficiency of the service.
The amounts expended for printing and binding by bureaus, offices,
and divisions during the fiscal year 1913 were as follows:
Ofiice of the Secretary:
Secretary and Assistant Secretaries
Chief clerk and superintendent
Disbursing clerk
Diyision of Appointments
Division of Bookkeeping and Warrants
Division of Customs
Division of Public Moneys
Division of Printing and Stationery
Division of Loans and Currency
Division of Revenue-Cutter Service
Division of Mail and Files—
Division of Special Agents
Division of Secret Service
Government actuary
Section of surety bonds




$10,114. 82
506. 95
364.05
612. 98
17,3 36.18
2,358. 81
451.55
479. 50
1, 674. 07
2,422.10
7. 66
237. 53
162.90
133. 84
584. 56
$37, 247. 50

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
Oflace of Comptroller of the Treasury
Office of Comptroller of the Currency
Office of Auditor for the Treasury Department
Office of Auditor for the War Department
Office of Auditor for the Interior Department
Office of Auditor for the Navy Department
Office of Auditor for the State and other Departments
Office of Auditor for the Post Office Department
Office of Treasurer of the United States..
Office of Treasurer of the United States (N. B. R. A . ) . . . . . . . .
Office of Register of the Treasury
Office of Commissioner of Internal Revenue
Oflice of Director of Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Office of Supervising Architect
Office of Director of the Mint
Office of Surgeon General Public Health Service
Office of General Superintendent Life-Saving Service
Miscellaneous
Reimbursable accounts other than N. B. R. A

83
$4,593.88
18,326.04
950. 53
871.31
809.58
2,922.04
747. 35
5,846.49
8,037.63
4,969.03
227. 70
5,699. 98
4, 775. 56
36,262.86
3,348. 35
34,481.50
2,364.18
22,599.07
21,911. 23
$179, 744.31

Treasury service outside of Washington:
Customs
Independent Treasury.
National-bank depositaries
Life-Saving
Public Health
Revenue-Cutter
Internal Revenue
Mint and Assay
Custodians, etc., of public buildings
Transportation companies

49,530.98
5,141.89
4,223.10
1,683.69
3,034.51
2,703. 29
31,877. 71
2,768.56
3,182. 26
145.01
104,291.00

Total expenditure
Reimbursements

321,282. 81
26, 880.26

Net expenditure

294, 402. 55

A net balance of

45, 597.45

Stationery.
Three hundred and thhty-six principal items of stationery were
ordered and issued during the year, based on 2,563 requisitions from
34 bureaus, offices, and divisions of the department in Washiagton
and 9 outside Treasury services, including among others the Customs,
Internal Revenue, Subtreasury, Life-Saviag, and Public HealthServices. Envelopes to the number of 15,194,000 were requhed to
supply the needs of the service durhig the year.




84

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Statements showiag the appropriation and stock accounts for the
fiscal year 1913 and a comparison of the issues for the years 1912
and 1913 follow:
Appropriation account.
Appropriation
Reimbursements received
Reimbursements not received

$136,150. 00
$5,051.19
28.10
5,079.29

Total credit
Vouchers....,

141,229.29
113,761.19

Unexpended balance

'..

27,468.10

Stationery stock.
On hand July 1, 1912.,
:
Amount ordered, less freight allowed

$30,843. 07
113, 761.19

To be accounted for
Issues
:
Freight allowed

144,604. 26
$107,190.73
30. 22
107,160.51

Balance
Changes on account of contract prices and adjustments

37,443. 75
1,160. 94

Inventory asof 1914 value

36, 282. 81

I S S U E S BY OFFICES AND SERVICES D U R I N G FISCAL Y E A R

1913.

Inside service.
Office of the Secretary:
Secretary and Assistant Secretaries
Chief clerk and superintendent
Division of Appointments
Division of Bookkeeping and Warrants
Division of Customs
Division of Public Moneys
Division of Printing and Stationery
Division of Loans and Currency
Division of Revenue-Cutter Service
Division of Mails and Files
Division of Special Agents
Disbursing clerk
Government actuary
Section of surety bonds
Auditor for the Treasury Department
Auditor for the War Department
Auditor for the Interior Department
Auditor for the Navy Department
Auditor for the State and other Departments
Auditor for the Post Office Department
Comptroller of the T r e a s u r y . . . . ,
Comptroller of the Currency




'.

1

$1,333. 96
370.96
486. 55
492. 68
315. 93
'
216.17
1, 749. 40
1, 018. 78
604. 69
57. 78
134. 31
336.11
1. 59
59. 60
389. 30
1, 365. 45
451. 74
371. 80
294. 82
3,192. 42
373. 97
7, 207. 68

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
Treasurer of the United States
Register of the Treasury
Supervising Architect
Internal Revenue.
Public-Health Service.....
Life-Saving Service
Bureau of the Mint
Secret Service
Account of the General Supply Committee
Damage account

^

85
$11,214.88
147.63
5,230.24
6,778. 59
,. 1,231. 50
:
396. 99
104. 25
257. 76
56. 20
7. 51

'

Total
Total fiscal year 1912

46, 251. 24
41,167. 78
Outside services.

Internal Revenue
Customs
Revenue-Cutter Service
Life-Saving Service
Public-Health Service
"
Superintendents of construction
Custodians
Mints and Assay offices
Assistant treasurers
Bureau of Engraving and Printing

$12,498.16
29,211. 99
1,067. 01
741.30
1,483. 33
725. 63
1,116. 93
992.48
4,087. 24
3,936.13

-

Total

55,860. 20
Reimbursable accounts.

Treasurer of the United States (N. B. R. A.)
President's Commission on Economy and Efficiency

$4,649. 86
36. 04

General Supply Committee

393. 39

TotaL.

$5, 079. 29

Total outside and reimbursable
Total outside and reimbursable, 1912
Grand total, 1913
Grand total, 1912

"

60, 939. 49
68, 307. 88
107,190. 73
109,475.66-

ChecTc paper.
The appropriation for the purchase of paper to be used in prhiting
checks for the use of the disbursing officers of the Government was
$9,000. The authorized expenditures from this appropriation duriag
the year were $8,830.64, leavhig a balance of $169.36.
Acting on the recommendation of the Chief of the Division of
Printiag and Stationery, the administration of the appropriation for
check paper was transferred to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing,
to take effect July 1, 1913.




86

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Postage.
The appropriation for postage to prepay matter addressed to
Postal Union countries and for postage for the Treasury Department
for the fiscal year 1913 was $1,000. Expenditures from the appropriation amounted to $961.53, with a resulting balance of $38.47.
Materials for booTcbinder.
The expenditures from the appropriation of $250 for materials for
the department bookbinder for the fiscal year 1913 amounted to
$247.93, leaving a balance on hand of $2.07.
Duplicating worJc.
Duriag the year 918 requisitions were made for duplicatiag forms
in the duplicating section of the division. This plant is used for
duplicating circulars, smaU forms, etc., on which quick delivery is
necessary. In addition to this feature, the plant has proved quite
an economy, saving the cost of prhiting at the Government Printing
Office which would otherwise have been required.
Department advertising.
The number of authorizations for advertising issued to newspapers
and periodicals durhig the year was 3,234, and vouchers for the same
were examined and certified to the auditor for settlement. The expenditure for advertising was approximately $18,500. It was in
large part for soliciting bids for the purchase of buUding sites and
for the erection of public buUdings and their equipment and maintenance, though a portion of it was for supplies for the RevenueCutter, Life-Saving, and Public Health Services, and the notices of
seizures, unclaimed goods, and sales authorized to be made by collectors of customs and internal revenue ia connection therewith.
Addressing machines.
The addressing machines operated hi the division for the benefit of
the department have proved both useful and economical. On these
machines were addressed during the year many thousands of envelopes. They are especially useful and convenient in hurried work
and in emergencies, • as in the case of bank caUs by the Comptroller
of the Currency, the date and hour of which are unknown except to
the comptroller, and in connection with the issuance of hurried and
important financial statements by the Secretary.




TABLES ACCOMPANYING THE REPORT ON THE FINANCES.




87




TABLE A.—Statement ofthe outstanding principal ofthe public debt ofthe United States June 30,1913.
Length of
loan.
OLD DEBT.
For detailed information in regard to the earlier loans embraced under
this head, see Finance Report for 1876.
TREASURY NOTES PRIOR TO 1846.
Acts of October 12,1837 (5 Statutes, 201); May 21,1838 (6 Statutes, 228);
March 2,1839 (5 Statutes, 323); March 31, 1840 (5 Statutes, 370); February 15,1841 (5 Statutes, 411); January 31,1842 (6 Statutes, 469); August 31,1842 (5 Statutes, 581); and March 3, 1843 (5 Statutes, 614).
TREASURY NOTES OF 1846.
Actof July 22,1846 (9 Statutes, 39)
MEXICAN INDEMNITY.
Act of August 10,1846 (9 Statutes, 94)
TREASURY NOTES OF 1847.
Act of January 28,1847 (9 Statutes, 118)
TREASURY NOTES OF 1857.
Actof December 23,1857 (11 Statutes, 257)
BOUNTY-LAND SCRIP.
Act of February 11,1847 (9 Statutes, 125)
LOAN OP 1847.
Act of January 28,1847 (9 Statutes, 118)
TEXAN INDEMNITY STOCK.
Act of September 9,1850 (9 Statutes, 447)
LOAN OF 1858.
Actof June 14,1858 (11 Statutes, 365)
I
LOAN OF FEBRUARY, 1861 (1881s).
Act of February 8,1861 (12 Statutes, 129)
TREASURY NOTES OF 1861.
Actof March 2,1861 (12 Statutes, 178)
OREGON WAR DEBT.
Actof March 2,1861 (12 Statutes, 198)
1 Included in old "debt."




When redeem- Rate of in- atPrice
which
able.
terest.
sold.

On demand... 5 and 6 per
cent.
land.2 years 1 and 2 years TV of 1 to 6
per cent.
from date.

Amount
authorized.

Amount issued.

Amount outstanding.

8151,610.26

Indefinite .

Par.

$51,000,000.00

$47,002,900.00

0)

w
tei

o
t^

>

1 year

1 year from
date.

:^ of 1 to 5 | P a r .
per cent.

10,000,000.00

7,687,800.00

5 years

5 years from
date.

5 per cent... P a r .

320,000.00

303,573.92

(»)

23,000,000.00 2 26,122,100.00

(0

52,778,900.00

0)

233,075.00

0)

1 and 2 years 1 and 2 years 5 | and 6 per
cent.
from date.

Par.

3 to 6 per
cent.

Par.

1 year

1 year
date.

from

Indefinite . . At the pleas- 6 per c e n t . . . P a r .
ure of the
Government.
Jan. 1,1868.... 6 p e r c e n t . . . Ik to 2
20 years
per ct.
pre.
J a n . l , 1865.... 5 p e r c e n t . . . Par
14 years

Indefinite . ..
Indefinite

23,000,000.00 3 28,230,350.00

Ki

o

w

tei

950.00

10,000,000.00

5,000,000.00

20,000.00

20,000,000.00

20,000,000.00

2,000.00

10 or 20 years Dec. 31,1880... 6 per cent-.. (Av.)89.03| 25,000,000.00

18,415,000.00

>
d
w

5,000.00

15 years

Jan. 1,1874.... 5 p e r c e n t . . . Av. pre.
of 3 ^ .

36,364,450.00
60 days or 2 6 p e r c e n t . . . Par to Indefinite
It^^per
years after
ct. pre.
date.
2,800,000.00
July 1,1881 . . . 6 p e r c e n t . . . Par
1,090,850.00
20 years
2 Including reissues.
3 Including conversion of Treasury notes.
60 days or 2
years.

2,300.00
2,250.00

00

TABLE A.—Statement ofthe outstanding principal ofthe public debt, etc.—Continued.
L e n g t h of
loan.

When redeemable.

R a t e of i n terest.

After J u n e 30,
1881.

Price
i,t w h i c h
sold.

6 per c e n t . . .

Amount
authorized.

CO

o
A m o u n t issued,

A m o u n t outstanding.

L O A N O F J U L Y A N D A U G U S T , 1861.
T h e a c t of J u l y 17,1861(12 S t a t u t e s , 259), a u t h o r i z e d t h e i s s u e of
$250,000,000 b o n d s , w i t h i n t e r e s t a t n o t e x c e e d i n g 7 p e r c e n t u m p e r
a n n u m , r e d e e m a b l e a f t e r t w e n t y y e a r s . T h e a c t of A u g u s t 5, 1861
(12 S t a t u t e s , 316), a u t h o r i z e d t h e i s s u e of b o n d s , w i t h i n t e r e s t a t 6 p e r
c e n t u m p e r a n n u m , p a y a b l e after t w e n t y years from date, i n exc h a n g e for 7-30 n o t e s i s s u e d u n d e r t h e a c t of J u l y 17, 1861.
L O A N O F J U L Y A N D A U G U S T , 1861.
C o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t i n t e r e s t , a n d r e d e e m a b l e a t t h e p l e a s u r e of t h e
Government.
OLD D E M A N D N O T E S .
A c t s of J u l y 17, 1861 (12 S t a t u t e s , 259); A u g u s t 5, 1861 (12 S t a t u t e s , 313);
F e b r u a r y 12, 1862 (12 S t a t u t e s , 338).
S E V E N - T H I R T I E S O F 1861.
A c t o f J u l y 17, 1861 (12 S t a t u t e s , 259)
F I V E - T W E N T I E S O F 1862.
A c t s of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862 (12 S t a t u t e s , 345); M a r c h 3, 1864 (13 S t a t u t e s ,
13); a n d J a n u a r y 28, 1865 (13 S t a t u t e s , 425).
LEGAL-TENDER NOTES.
T h e a c t of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862 (12 S t a t u t e s , 345), a u t h o r i z e d t h e i s s u e of
$150,000,000 U n i t e d S t a t e s n o t e s , n o t b e a r i n g i n t e r e s t , p a y a b l e t o
b e a r e r a t t h e T r e a s u r y of t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s , a n d of s u c h d e n o m i n a t i o n s , n o t less t h a n five d o l l a r s , a s t h e S e c r e t a r y of t h e T r e a s u r y
m i g h t d e e m e x p e d i e n t , $50,000,000 t o b e a p p l i e d t o t h e r e d e m p t i o n
of d e m a n d n o t e s a u t h o r i z e d b y t h e a c t of J u l y 17,1861; t h e s e n o t e s
t o b e a . l e g a l t e n d e r i n p a y m e n t of a l l d e b t s , p u b l i c a n d p r i v a t e ,
w i t h i n t h e U n i t e d States, e x c e p t d u t i e s on i m p o r t s a n d interest o n
t h e p u b l i c d e b t , a n d t o b e e x c h a n g e a b l e for 6 p e r c e n t U n i t e d
S t a t e s b o n d s . T h e a c t of J u l y 11,1862 (12 S t a t u t e s , 532), a u t h o r i z e d
a n a d d i t i o n a l i s s u e of $150,000,000, of s u c h d e n o m i n a t i o n s a s t h e Secr e t a r y of t h e T r e a s u r y m i g h t d e e m e x p e d i e n t , b u t n o s u c h n o t e
s h o u l d b e for a f r a c t i o n a l p a r t of a d o l l a r , a n d n o t m o r e t h a n
$35,000,000 of a l o w e r d e n o m i n a t i o n t h a n five d o l l a r s ; t h e s e n o t e s t o
b e a l e g a l t e n d e r as before a u t h o r i z e d . T h e a c t of M a r c h 3, 1863
(12 S t a t u t e s , 710), a u t h o r i z e d a n a d d i t i o n a l i s s u e of $150,000,000, of
s u c h d e n o m i n a t i o n s , n o t less t h a n o n e d o l l a r , a s t h e S e c r e t a r y of t h e
Treasury m i g h t prescribe; w h i c h notes w e r e m a d e a legal t e n d e r
as before authorized. T h e same a c t limited t h e t i m e i n w h i c h t h e




20 i'^ears.

Indefinite .. At t h e pleasu r e of t h e
Government.

$250,000,000.00 $189,321,350.00

3 years

A u g . 19 a n d
Oct. 1, 1864.

1,600.00

O

1 60,030,000.00

53,152.50

H
O

Indefinite

139,999,750.00

9,360.00

515,000,000.00

514,771,600.00

107,150.00

1—I

346,681,016.00

o

3iper cent.. Par.

60,000,000.00

I n d e f i n i t e . . On d e m a n d . . . N o n e .

7 ^ per cent. Av. pre.
of l^«T^.

5 or 20 y e a r s - M a y 1, 1867 . . . 6 p e r c e n t . . . A v . p r e .
of^V
Indefinite . . On d e m a n d . . . N o n e

Par.

$15,050.00

"4

>
450,000,000.00

tei
Ul

Treasury notes might be exchanged for United States bonds to July
1,1863. The amount of notes authorized by this act were to be in
lieu of $100,000,000 authorized by the resolution of January 17,1863
(12 Statutes, 822). The act of May 31, 1878 (20 Statutes, 87), provides
that no more of the United States legal-tender notes shall be canceled or retired, and that when any of said notes are redeemed or
received into the Treasury under any law, from any source whatever, and shall belong to the United States, they shall not be retired,
canceled, or destroyed, but shall be reissued and paid out again, and
kept in circulation.
The act of March 14, 1900, provides that United States notes, when
presented to the Treasury for redemption, shall be redeemed in gold
coin of the standard fixed in said act, and that in order to secure
the prompt and certain redemption of such notes it shall be the
duty of the Secretary of the Treasury to set apart in the Treasury a
reserve fund of one hundred and fifty million dollars in gold coin and
bullion, to be used for such redemption purposes only, and that
whenever and as often as any of said notes shall be redeemed from
said fund it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Treasury to
use said notes so redeemed to restore and maintain the reserve fund
so established—first, by exchanging the notes so redeemed for any
gold coin in the general fund of the Treasury; second, by accepting
deposits of gold coin at the Treasury or at any subtreasury in exchange for such notes; third, by procuring gold coin by the use of
said notes in accordance with the provisions of section 3700 of the
Revised Statutes of the United States. The above-mentioned act
also provides that if the Secretary of the Treasury is unable to
restore and maintain the gold coin in the reserve fund by the foregoing methods, and the amount of such gold coin and bullion in
said fund shall at any time fall below one hundred million dollars,
it shall be his duty to restore the same to the maximum sum of one
hundred and fifty million dollars by borrowing money on the credit
of the United States, and for the debt so incurred to issue and sell
coupon or registered bonds of the United States bearing interest at
the rate of not exceeding three per centum per annum, payable
quarterly, the bonds to be payable at the pleasure of the United
States after one year from the date of their issue, and to be payable,
principal and interest, in gold coin of the present standard value,
the gold coin received from the sale of said bonds to be exchanged
for an equal amount of the notes redeemed and held for exchange,
and the Secretary of the Treasury may, in his discretion, use said
notes in exchange for gold, or to purchase or redeem any bonds of
the United States, or for any other lawful purpose the public interests may require, except that they shall not be used to meet deficiencies in the current revenues.
The act of March 4, 1907, section 2, provides that whenever and so
long as the outstanding silver certificates of the denominations of
one dollar, two dollars, and five dollars, issued under the provisions
of section seven of an act entitled " A n act to define and fix the
standard of value, to maintain the parity of all forms of money
issued or coined by the United States, to refund the public debt, and
for other purposes," approved March fourteenth, nineteen hundred.




Ul

teJ
o
tef
H

>
o

H

K
H

%
>
Ul

CO

1 Including reissues.

CO
E>0

TABLE A.—Statement ofthe outstanding principal of the public debt, etc.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

When redeemable.

Rate of in- at Price
which
terest.
sold.

Amount
authorized.

Amount issued. Amount outstanding.

LEGAL-TENDER NOTES—Continued.
shall be, in the opinion of the Secretary of the Treasury, insuflacient
to meet the public demand therefor, he is hereby authorized to issue
United States notes of the denominations of one dollar, two dollars,
and five dollars, and upon t h e issue of United States notes of such
denominations an equal amount of United States notes of higher
denominations shall be retired and canceled: Provided, however,
That the aggregate amount of United States not; s at any time outstainding shall remain as at present fixed by law: And provided
further, That nothing in this act shall be construed as affecting the
right of any national bank to issue one-third in amount of its circulating notes of the denomination of five dollars, as now provided by
law
TEMPORARY LOAN.
Acts of February 25, 1862 (12 Statutes, 346); March 17, 1862 (12 Statutes, 370); July 11,1862 (12 Statutes, 532), and June 30,1864 (13 Statutes, 218).

o
O
Indefinite .. After 10 days'
. notice.

Par

$150,000,000.00 1 $716,099,247.16

$2,850.00
tej

CERTIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS.
Acts of March 1, 1862 (12 Statutes, 352); May 17, 1862 (12 Statutes, 370),
and March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 710).

4, 5, and 6
per cent.

.
lyear

1 year
date.

after

6 per c e n t . . . Par

No limit

561,753,241.65

3,000.00

>

FRACTIONAL CURRENCY.
Acts of July 17, 1862 (12 Statutes, 592); March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 711),
and June 30, 1864 (13 Statutes, 220).

Indefinite .. On presentation.

None

Par

50,000,000.00 1368,720,079.51

6.854,609.90

o
teJ
Ul

LOAN OF 1863.
J u l y l , 1881... 6per c e n t . . . Av. pre.
The act of March 3,1863(12 Statutes, 709), authorized a loan of $900,000,000, 17 years
and the issue of bonds, with interest not exceeding 6 per centum per
of4xm.
annum, and redeemable in not less than ten nor more than forty
years, principal and interest payable in coin. The act of June 30,1864
(13 Statutes, 219), repeals the above authority, except as to the
$75,000,000 of bonds already advertised for.
Bonds of this loan continued at 3i per cent interest, and redeemable Indefinite.. At t h e pleas- 3i per cent.. Par
at the pleasure of the Government.
ure of the
Government




s

75,000,000.00

76,000,000.00

3,100.00

100.00

ONE-YEAK NOTES OF 1863.
Act of March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 710)

lyear

TWO-YEAR NOTES OF 1863.

•... 1 year
date.

after 5per cent...

400,000,000.00

44,520,000.00

30,330.00

26,800.00

2 years

2 years after
date.

5per cent... P a r .

400,000,000.00

166,480,000.00

Acts of March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 710), and June 30, 1864 (13 Statutes,
218).
TEN-FORTIES OF 1864.

3 years

3 years from
date.

6 per cent
compound.

400,000,000.00

266,695,440.00

Acts of March 3,1864 (13 Statutes, 13)

10 or 40 years Mar. 1, 1874... 5 per cent-.. Par to 7
per ct.
prem.

200,000,000.00

196,118,300.00

Actof March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 710)
COMPOUND-INTEREST NOTES.

FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1864.
Act of June 30, 1864 (13 Statutes, 218)

18,550.00

^
teJ

o
125,661,300.00

14,000.00

1867
1868 •7^ per cent. Av. pre. 800,000,000.00 1829,992,500.00
1868
oi2^hs-

120,100.00

5 or 20 years. Nov.l, 1869... 6 per c e n t . . . Av. pre. 400,000,000.00
of 2 ^ ^ .

g
H

SEVEN-THIRTIES OF 1864 AND 1865.
Actsof June 30, 1864 (13 Statutes, 218); Januarv 28, 1865 (13 Statutes,
425), and March 3, 1865 (13 Statutes, 468).

3 years

FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1865.
Acts of March 3,1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12.1866 (14 Statutes, 31).. 5or 20 years. Nov. 1, 1870... 6 per cent... Av. pre. Indefinite ..
of 3.,^^.
CONSOLS OF 1865.

203,327,250.00

Actsof March3,1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12,1866 (14 Statutes, 31).. S or 20 years. July 1, 1870... 6 p e r c e n t . . . Av. pre. Indefinite . .
ofl^^.
CONSOLS OF 1867.

332,998,950.00

57,400.00

6 p e r c e n t . . . Av. pre. Indefinite ..
ofxf^o.

379,618,000.00

93,750.00

Acts of March 3,1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12,1866 (14 Statutes, 31)., 6or 20 years. July 1, 1873... 6 per cent... Av. pre. Indefinite . .
ofr^.
THREE-PER-CENT CERTIFICATES.

42,639,930.00

9,900.00

185,165,000.00

6,000.00

Acts of March 3,1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12, ]866 (14 Statutes, 31).. 5 or 20 years. July 1, 1872.

19,850.00

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CONSOLS OF 1868.

Actsof March 2,1867 (14 Statutes, 558), and July 25,1868 (15 Statutes, 183).. Indefinite .. On d e m a n d . . . 3 per cent.
1 Including reissues.




Par.

76,000,000.00

CO
00

TABLE A.—Statement of the outstanding principal ofthe public debt, etc.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

When redeemable.

Rate of interest.

Price
at which
sold.

Amount
authorized.

CO

Amount issued,

Amount outstanding.

FUNDED LOAN OF 1881.
The act of January 14,1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary
of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from time to time in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of, at
not less than par, in coin, either of the description of bonds of the
United States described in the act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272),
to the extent necessary for the redemption ol fractional currency in
silver coins of the denominations of ten, twenty-five, and fifty cents
of standard value.
The act of March 3,1875 (18 Statutes, 466), directs the Secretary of the
Treasury to issue bonds of the character and description set out in
the act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272), to James B. Eads, or his
legal representatives, in payment at par of the warrants of the Secretary of War for the construction of jetties and auxiliary works to
maintain a wide and deep channel between the South Pass of the
Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico, unless Congress shall have
previously provided for the payment of the same by the necessary
appropriation of money.
The act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272), authorizes the issue of
$200,000,000 at 5 per centum, principal and interest payable in coin
of the present standard value, at the pleasure of the United States
Government, after ten years; these bonds to be exempt from the
payment of all taxes or duties of the United States, as well as from
taxation in any form by or under State, municipal, or local authority.
Bonds and coupons payable at the Treasury of the United States.
This act not to authorize an increase of the bonded debt of the
United States. Bonds to be sold at not less than par in coin, and
t h e proceeds to be applied to the redemption of outstanding 5-20's
or to be exchanged for said 5-20's, par for par. Payment of these
bonds, when due, to be made in order of dates and numbers, beginning with each class last dated and numbered. Interest to cease at
the end of three months from notice of intention to redeem. The act
of January 20,1871 (16 Statutes, 399), increases the amount of 5 per
cents to $500,000,000, provided the total amount of bonds issued shall
not exceed the amount originally authorized, and authorizes the
interest on any of these bonds to be paid quarterly.
The act of December 17,1873 (18 Statutes, 1), authorized the issue of
a n equal amount of bonds of the loan of 1858, which the holders
thereof ma^^ on or before February 1,1874, elect to exchange for the
bonds of this loan.




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10 years..-

May 1, 1881.

$517,994,150.00

5 percent.

$22,400.00

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$1,500,000,000

FUNDED LOAN OF 1891. (REFUNDING.)
The act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272), authorizes the issue of 15 years.
$300,000,000 at 4^ per centum, payable in coin of the present standard value, at the pleasure of the United States Government, after
fifteen years; these bonds to be exempt from the payment of all
taxes or duties of the United States, as well as from taxation in any
form by or under State, municipal, or local authority. Bonds and
coupons payable at the Treasury of the United States. This act not
to authorize a n increase of the bonded debt of the United States.
Bonds to be sold at not less than par in coin, and the proceeds to be
applied to the redemption of outstanding 6-20's or to be exchanged
for said 5-20's, par for par. Payment of these bonds, when due, to
be made in order of dates and numbers, beginning with each class
last dated and numbered. Interest to cease at the end ^ of three
months from notice of intention to redeem.

185,000,000.00

Sept. 1,1891... 4^ per cent.

23,660.00

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FUNDED LOAN OF 1891. (RESUMPTION.)
The a c t of January 14, 1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary
of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from time to time in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of,
at not less than par in coin, either of the descriptions of bonds of the
United States described in the act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272),
for the purpose of redeeming, on and after January 1, 1879, in coin,
at the of&ce of the assistant treasurer of the United States in New
York, the outstanding United States legal-tender notes when presented in sums of not less than fifty dollars.

15 years.

Sept. 1,1891...

^percent.. P a r t o
1^ per
ct.pre.

65,000,000.00

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FUNDED LOAN OF 1907. (REFUNDING.)
The act of July 14,1870 (16 Statutes, 272), authorizes the issue of
$1,000,000,000 at 4 per centum, payable in coin of the present standard
value, at the pleasure .of the United States Government, after thirty
years; these bonds to be exempt from the payment of all taxes or
duties of the United States, as well as from taxation in any form by
or under State, municipal, or local authority. Bonds and coupons
payable a t tbe Treasury of the UnitedStates. This act not to authorize an increase of the bonded debt of the United States. Bonds
to be sold at not less than par in coin, and the proceeds to be applied
to the redemption of outstanding 5-20's, or to be exchanged for said
5-20's, par for par. Payment of these bonds, when due, to be made in
order of dates and numbers, beginning with each class last dated and
numbered. Interest to cease at the end of three months from notice
of intention to redeem. See Refunding Certificates, page 98.

July 1,1907 . .

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4per c e n t . . . P a r t o
¥ per
ct. pre.

710,430,950.00

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700,400.00

FUNDED LOAN OF 1907. (RESUMPTION.)
The act of January 14, 1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary 30 years.
of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from time to time in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of,




H

July 1,1907 . .

4 per cent .

Indefinite -.

. 30,500,000.00

CO

T A B L E A.—Statement ofthe outstanding principal of the public debt, etc.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

When redeem- Rate of interest.
able.

Price
at which
sold.

Amount
authorized.

Amount issued,

Amount outstanding.

FUNDED LOAN OF 1907 (RESUMPTION)—Continued.
at not less than par, in coin, either of the description of bonds of
the United States described in the act of July 14,1870 (16 Statutes,
272), for the purpose of redeeming, on and after January 1,1879, in
coin, at the office of the assistant treasurer of the United States in
New York, the outstanding United States legal-tender notes when
presented in sums of not less than fifty dollars.
GOLD CERTIFICATES.
The act of March 3,1863 (12 Stat., 711), authorizes the Secretary of Indefinite .. On demand .
the Treasury to receive deposits of gold coin and bullion in sums of
not less than twenty dollars, and to issue certificates therefor in
denominations of not less than twenty dollars each; the coin and
* bullion deposited for or representing the certificates to be retained
in the Treasury for the payment of the same on demand. The certificates so issued to be received at par in payment of interest on the
public debt and for duties on imports. The act of July 12, 1882 (22
Statutes, 165), provides that the Secretary of the Treasury shall suspend the issue of gold certificates whenever the amount of gold
coin and gold bullion in the Treasury reserved for the redemption of
United States notes falls below one hundred millions of dollars.
The act of March 14, 1900, as amended by the act of March 4, 1907,
authorizes and directs the Secretary of the Treasury to receive deposits of gold coin with the Treasurer or any assistant treasurer
of the United States, in sums of not less than twenty dollars, and
to issue gold certificates therefor in denominations of not less
than ten dollars, and the coin so deposited shall be retained in the
Treasury and held for the payment of such certificates on demand, and used for no other purpose; such certificates to be received for customs, taxes, and all public dues, and when so received
may be reissued, and when held by any national banking association may be counted as a part of its lawful reserve. The act also
provides that whenever and so long as the gold coin held in the
reserve fund in the Treasury for the redemption of United States
notes and Treasury notes shall fall and remain below one hundred
million dollars, the authority to issue certificates as herein provided
shall be suspended; and also, t h a t whenever and so long as the aggregate amount of United States notes and silver certificates in the
general fund of the Treasury shall exceed sixty million dollars, the
Secretary of the Treasury may, in his discretion, suspend the issue
of the certificates herein provided for; a n d further, that the Secretary of the Treasury may, in his discretion, issue such certificates in
denominations of ten thousand dollars, payable to order..




Indefinite .

$1,086,947,169.00

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The actof March 2,1911 (36 Stat., 965, sec. 1), provides that the Secretary of the Treasury may, in his discretion, receive, with the assistant treasurer in New York and the assistant treasurer in San Francisco, deposits of foreign gold coin at their bullion value in amounts
of not less than one thousand dollars in value and issue gold certificates therefor of the description herein authorized; and also provides that the Secretary of the Treasury may, in his discretion, receive, with the Treasurer or any assistant treasurer of the United
States, deposits of gold bullion bearing the stamp of the comage
mints of the United States, or the assay office in New York, certifying their weight, fineness, and value, in amounts of not less than
one thousand dollars in value, and issue gold certificates therefor of
the description herein authorized. But the amount of gold bullion
and foreign coin so held shall not at any time exceed one-third of
the total amount of gold certificates at such time outstanding. And
section fifty-one hundred and ninety-three of the Revised Statutes
of the United States is hereby repealed.

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SILVER CERTIFICATES.
The act of February 28,1878 (20 Statutes, 26, sec. 3), provides that any Indefinite .
holder of the coin authorized by this act may deposit the same with
the Treasurer or any assistant treasurer of the United States in sums
not less than ten dollars and receive therefor certificates of not less
than ten dollars each, corresponding with the denominations of the
United States notes. The coin deposited for or representing the certificates shall be retained in the Treasury for the payment of the
same on demand. Said certificates shall be receivable for customs,
taxes, and all public dues, and, when so received, may be reissued.
The actof August 4, 1886 (24 Statutes, 227), authorizes the issue of
silver certificates in denommations of one, two, and five dollars; said
certificates to be receivable, redeemable, and payable in like manner and for like purposes as is provided for by the actof February 28,
1878.
The act of March 14, 1900, provides that it shall be the duty o f t h e
Secretary of the Treasury, as fast as silver dollars are coined under
the provisions of the acts of July 14, 1890, and June 13, 1898, from
bullion purchased under the act of July 14,1890, to retire and cancel an equal amount of Treasury notes whenever received into the
Treasury, and upon the cancellation of Treasury notes, silver cer^ tificates shall be issued against the silver dollars so coined. The
act also provides that silver certificates shall be issued only of
denominations of ten dollars and under, except that not exceeding
in the aggregate ten per centum of the total volume of said certificates, in the discretion of the Secretary of the Treasury, may be
issued in denominations of twenty dollars, fifty dollars, and one
hundred dollars; and silver certificates of higher denomination
than ten dollars, except as therein provided, shall, whenever received at the Treasury or redeemed, be retired and canceled, and
certificates of denominations of ten dollars or less shall be substituted therefor, and after such substitution, in whole or in part, a




On d e m a n d . . . None .

Par.

No limit.

483,550,000.00

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TABLE A.—Statement of the outstanding principal ofthe public debt, etc.—Continued.

CO

00
Length of
loan.

When redeemable. °

Rate of in- at Price
which
terest.
sold.

Amount
authorized.

Amount issued. Amount outstanding.

SILVER CERTIFICATES—Continued.
like volume of United States notes of less denomination than ten
dollars shall from time to time be retired and canceled, and notes
of denominations of ten dollars and upward shall be reissued in
subs'titution therefor, with like qualities and restrictions as those
retired and canceled.
REFUNDING CERTIFICATES.
The act of February 26,1879 (20 Statutes, 321), authorizes the Secretary
of the Treasury to issue, in exchange for lawful money of the United
States, certificates of deposit of the denomination of ten dollars,
bearing intere.st at the rate of four per centum per annum, and convertible at any time, with accrued interest, into the four per centum
bonds described in the refunding act, the money so received to be
applied only to the payment of the bonds bearing interest at a rate
not less than five per centum, in the mode prescribed by said act.
FUNDED LOAN OF 1881, CONTINUED AT THREE AND ONEHALF PER CENT.
These bonds were issued in exchange for five per cent bonds of the
funded loan of 1881, by mutual agreement between the Secretary of
the Treasury and the holders, and were made redeemable at the
pleasure of the Government,
FUNDED LOAN OF 1891, CONTINUED AT TWO PER CENT.
These bonds were issued in exchange for the four and one-half per
cent funded loan of 1891, by mutual agreement between the Secretary of the Treasury and the holders, and were made redeemable at
the pleasure of the Government.
LOAN OF JULY 12, 1882.
These bonds were issued in exchange'for the five and six per cent
bonds which had been previously continued at three and one-half
per cent by mutual agreement between the Secretary of the Treasury and the holders, and were made redeemable at the pleasure of
the Government.
LOAN OF 1904.
The act of January 14,1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary
of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from time to time in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of at
 than par, in coin, either of the descriptions of bonds of the
not less



Indefinite .. C o n v e r t i b l e
into 4 per
cent bonds.

4 p e r c e n t . . . Par

No limit

$40,012,750.00

$13,570.00

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Indefinite .. At pleasure of
the Government.

3^ per cent.. Par

Indefinite .. At pleasure of
the Government.

2per c e n t . . . Par

Indefinite . . At pleasure of
the Government.

3per c e n t . . . Par

10 years

50.00

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Feb. 1,1904... 5 p e r c e n t . . . \117.077

25,364,500.00

5,000.00

200.00

1
f

100,000,000.00

13,250.00

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United States described in the act of July 14,1870 (16 Statutes, 272),
for the purpose of redeeming, on and after January 1, 1879, in coin,
at the office of the assistant treasurer of the United States in New
York, the outstanding United States legal-tender notes when presented in sums of not less than fifty dollars.
LOAN OF 1925.
The act of January 14,1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary
of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from time to time in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of at
not less than par, in coin, either of the descriptions of bonds of the
United States described in the act of July 14,1870 (16 Statutes, 272),
for the purpose of redeeming, on and after January 1, 1879, in coin,
at the office of the assistant treasurer of the United States in New
York, the outstanding United States legal-tender notes, when presented in sums of not less than fifty dollars.
LOAN OF 1908-1918.
The act of June 13,1898 (30 Statutes, 467, sec. 33), authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to borrow on the credit of the United States,
from time to time, as the proceeds may be required, to defray expenditures authorized on account of the war with Spain (such proceeds when received to be used only for the purpose of meeting
such expenditures), the sum of four hundred million dollars, or so
much thereof as may be necessary, and to prepare and issue therefor coupon or registered bonds of the United States in such form as
he may prescribe, and in denominations of twenty dollars or some
multiple of that sum, redeemable in coin at the pleasure of the
United States after ten years from the date of their issue, and payable twenty years from such date, and bearing interest payable quarterly, in coin, at the rate of three per centum per annum; the bonds
so issued to be exempt from all taxes or duties of the United States,
as well as from taxation in any form by or under state, municipal,
or local authority.
CONSOLS OF 1930.
The act of March 14,1900, section 11, authorizes the Secretary of the
Treasury to receive at the Treasury any of the outstanding bonds of
the United States of the five per cent loan of 1904, of the four per cent
funded loan of 1907, and of the three per cent loan of 1908-1918, and
to issue in exchange therefor an equal amount of coupon or registered
bonds of the United States, in such form as he may prescribe, in denominations of fifty dollars, or any multiple thereof, bearing interest
at the rate of two per centum per annum, payable quarterly, such
bonds to be payable at the pleasure of the United States after thirty
years from the date of their issue. The principal and interest of
said bonds to be payable in gold coin of the present standard value,
and to be exempt from the payment of all taxes or duties of the
United States, as well as from taxation in any form by or under state,
municipal, or local authority. The bonds to be issued at not less
than par and numbered consecutively in the order of their issue;
and when payment is made the last numbers issued shall be first




30 years .

Feb. 1,1925...

4 per cent...

ri04. 4946

162,315i 400.00

tni. 166

118,489,900.00

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10 years

After Aug. 1,
1908.

3 per cent.

$400,000,000.00

198,792,660.00

63,945,460.00

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After Apr. 1,
1930.

d
2 percent...

839.146, 340.00

646,250,150.00

646,250,150.00

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TABLE A.—Statement ofthe outstanding principal ofthe public debt, etc.—Continued.

CONSOLS OF 1930—Continued.
paid, and this order followed until all the bonds are paid. Interest
to cease three months after any call made by the Government to
redeem.
TREASURY" NOTES OF 1890.
The act of July 14, 1890 (26 Statutes, 289), directs the Secretary of the
Treasury to purchase, from tiiae to time, silver bullion to the aggregate amount of four million five hundred thousand ounces, or so
much thereof as may be offered, in each month, at the market price
thereof, not exceeding one dollar for three hundred and seventy-one
and twenty-five hundredths grains of pure silver, and to issue in payment for such purchases of silver bullion Treasury notes of the United
States, to be prepared by the Secretary of the Treasury, in such form
and of such denominations, not less than one dollar nor more t h a n
one thousand dollars, as he may prescribe. That said notes shall be
redeemable on demand, in coin, at the Treasury of the United States,
or at the office of any assistant treasurer of the United States, and
Avhen so redeemed may be reissued; but no greater or less amount of
such notes shall be outstanding at any time than the cost of the silver bullion and the standard silver dollars coined therefrom then
held in the Treasury, purchased by such notes; and such Treasury
notes shall be a legal tender in payment of all debts, public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract,
and shall be receivable for customs, taxes, and all public dues, and
when so received may be reissued; and such notes, when held by any
national banking association, may be counted as a part of its lawful
reserve. That upon demand of the holder of any of the Treasury
notes provided for, the Secretary of the Treasury shall redeem the
same in gold or silver coin, at his discretion, it being the established
policy of the United States to maintain the two metals on a parity
with each other upon the present legal ratio, or such ratio as may be
provided by law.
The act of November 1,1893 (28 Stat., 4), repeals so much of the act of
July 14,1890, as directs the Secretary of the Treasury to purchase
from time to time silver bullion to the aggregate amount of four
million five hundred thousand ounces, or so much thereof as may
be offered in each month, at the market price thereof, and to issue
in payment for such purchases Treasury notes of the United States.
The act of June 13, 1898 (30 Stat., 467), directs that all of the silver
bullion in the Treasury purchased in accordance with the provisions of the act of July 14, 1890, shall be coined into standard silver
dollars as rapidly as the public interests may require, to an amount
of not
 less than orie and one-half millions of dollars in each month,
and that said dollars, when so coined, shall be used and applied in



Length of
loan.

When redeemable.

Rate of interest.

Price
at which
sold.

Amount
authorized.

O
O
Amount issued. Amount outstanding.

$2,660,000.00

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the manner and for the purposes named in said act. The act of
March 14, 1900, provides that. United States notes, and Treasury
notes issued under the act of July 14,1890, when presented to the
Treasury for redemption, shall be redeemed in gold coin of the
standard fixed by said act, and requires that the Secretary of the
Treasury shall set apart in the Treasury a reserve fund of one hundred and fifty million dollars to be used for such redemption purposes only. It also provides that it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Treasury, as fast as silver dollars are coined under the
provisions of the acts of July 14,1890, and June 13, 1898, from bullion
purchased under the act of July 14, 1890, to retire and cancel an
equal amount of Treasury notes whenever received into the Treasury, and upon such cancellation to issue silver certificates against
the silver dollars so coined.
PANAMA CANAL LOAN.
The act of June 28,1902 (32 Stat., 484, sec. 8), provides that the Secretary 10 years
of the Treasury is hereby authorized to borrow on the credit of the
United States from time to time as the proceeds may be required to 10 years
defray expenditures authorized by this act (such proceeds when received to be used only for the purpose of meeting such expenditures), 50 years
the sum of one hundred and thirty million dollars, or so much thereof
as may be necessary, and to prepare and issue therefor coupon or registered bonds of the United States in such form as he may prescribe,
and in denominations of twenty dollars or some multiple of that sum.
redeemable in gold coin at the pleasure of the United States after ten
years from the date of their issue, and payable thirty years from such
date, and bearing interest payable quarterly in gold coin at the rate
of two per centum per annum; and the bonds herein authorized shall
be exempt from all taxes or duties of the United States, as wellas from
taxation in any form by or understate, municipal, or local authority:
Provided, That said bonds may be disposed of by the Secretary of tlie
Treasury at not less than par, under such regulations as he may prescribe, giving to all citizens of the United States an equal opportunity
to subscribe therefor, but no commissions shall be allowed or paid
thereon; and a sum not exceeding one-tenth of one per centum of
the amount of the bonds herein authorized is hereby appropriated,
out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay
the expense of preparing, advertising, and issuing the same; and the
actof December 21,1905 (34 Stat., 5, sec. 1), provides that the two per
cent bonds of the United States authorized by section eight of the act
entitled " A n act to provide forthe construction of a canal connecting the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans," approved June
twenty-eighth, nineteen hundred and two, shall have all the rights
and privileges accorded by law to other two per cent bonds of the
United States, arid every national banking association having on
deposit, as provided by law, such bonds issued under the provisions
of said section eight of said act approved June twenty-eighth, nineteen hundred and two, to secure its circulating notes, shall pay to
the Treasurer of the United States, in the months of January and
July, a tax of one-fourth of one per cent each half year upon the average amount of such of its notes in circulation as ai 3 based upon the




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Averag e
After Aug. 1, 2 p e r c e n t . . . $103.513
1916.
After Nov. 1, 2 per c e n t . . . 102.436
1918.
June 1,1961... 3 p e r c e n t . . . 102.582

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$54,631,980.00
;376,200,980.00

30,000,000.00 134,631,980.00
50,000,000.00

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TABLE A.—Statement ofthe outstanding principal ofthe public debt, etc.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

W hen redeem- Rate of in- at Price
which
terest.
able.
sold.

Amount
authorized.

Amount issued,

Amount outstanding.

PANAMA CANAL LOAN—Continued.
deposit of said two per cent bonds; and such taxes shall be in lien
of existing taxes on its notes in circulation imposed by section fiftytwo hundred and fourteen of the Revised Statutes.
The act of August 6, 1909 (36 Stat., 117, sec. 39), providesthat the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized to borrow on the credit of
the United States from time to time, as the proceeds may be required
to defray expenditures on account of the Panama Canal and to reimburse the Treasury for such expenditures already made and not
covered by previous issues of bonds, t h e sum of two hundred and
ninety million five hundred and sixty-nine thousand dollars (which
sum together with the eighty-four million six hundred and thirtyone thousand nine hundred [and eighty] dollars already borrowed
upon issues of two per cent bonds under section eight of the act of
June twenty-eighth, nineteen hundred and two, equals the estimate
of the Isthmian Canal Commission to cover the entire cost of the
canal from its inception to its completion), and to prepare and issue
therefor coupon or registered bonds of the United States in such
form as he may prescribe, and in denominations of one hundred
dollars, five hundred dollars, and one thousand dollars, payable fifty
years from the date of issue, and bearing interest payable quarterly
in gold coin at a rate not exceeding three per centum per annum;
and the bonds herein authorized shall be exempt from all taxes or
duties of the United States, as well as from taxation in any form
by or under State, municipal, or local authority: Provided, That said
bonds may be disposed of by the Secretary of the Treasury at not
less than par, under such regulations as he may prescribe, giving to
all citizens of the United States an equal opportunity to subscribe
therefor, but no commissions shall be allowed or paid thereon; and
a sum not exceeding one-tenth of one per centum of the amount of
the bonds herein authorized is hereby appropriated, out of any
money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay the expenses of preparing, advertising, and issuing the same; and the
authority contained in section eight of the act of June twentyeighth, nineteen hundred and two, for the issue of bonds bearing
interest at two per centum per annum, is hereby repealed.'
The act of March 2,1911 (36 Stat., 1013), provides that the Secretary of
the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized to insert in the bonds
to be issued by him under section thirty-nine of an Act entitled "An
Act to provide revenue, equalize duties, and encourage the industries of the United States, and for other purposes," approved August
fifth, nineteen hv^ndred and nine, a provision that such bonds shall
not be receivable by the Treasurer of the United States as security




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for the issue of circulating notes to national banks; and the bonds
containing such provision shall not be receivable for that purpose.
POSTAL SAVINGS BONDS.
Theact of June 25,1910 (36 Stat., 817, sec. 10) provides that any depositor in 20 years.
a postal savings depository may surrender his deposit, or any part
thereof, in sums of twenty doUars, forty dollars, sixty dollars, eighty
dollars, one hundred dollars, and multiples of one hundred dollars and
five hundred dollars, and receive in lieu of such surrendered deposits,
under such regulations as may be established by the board of trustees,
the amount of the surrendered.deposits iu United States coupon or registered bonds of the denominations of twenty dollars, forty dollars, sixty
dollars, eighty dollars, one hundred dollars, and five hundred dollars,
which Donds shaU bear interest at the rate of two and one-half per centum
per annum, payable semiannually, and be redeemable at the pleasure of
the United States after one year from the date of their issue and payable
twenty years from such date, and both principal and interest shall be
payable in United States gold coin ofthe present standard of value: Provided, That the bonds herein authorized shall be issued only (first) when
there are outstanding bonds of the United States subject to call, in which
case the proceeds of the bonds shall be appUed to the redemption at par
of outstanding bonds ofthe United States subject to call; and (second) at
times when under authority of law other than that contained in this act
the Government desires to issue bonds for the purpose of replenishing
theTreasury, in which case the issue of bonds under authority of this Act
shall be in lieu of the issue of a like amount of bonds issuable under authority of law other than that contained in this Act: Provided further,
That the bonds authorized by this Actshallbeissued by the Secretary of
the Treasury under such regulations as he may prescribe: And provided
furtfier, That the authority contained in section nine of this Act for the
investment of postal savings funds in United States bonds shall include
the authority to invest in the bonds herein authorized whenever such
bonds may be lawfuUy issued: And provided further, That the bonds
herein authorized shall be exempt from all taxes or duties of the United
States as well as from taxation in any form by or under State, municipal,
or local authority: And provided further, That no bonds authorized by
this Act shall be receivable by the Treasurer of the United States as security for the issue of circulating notes by national banking associations.
NATIONAL-BANK NOTES (REDEMPTION ACCOUNT).
The act of July 14, 1890 (26 Stat., 289), provides that balances standing with the Treasurer of the Unitea States to the respective credits
of national banks for deposits made to redeem the circulating notes
of such banks, and all deposits thereafter received for like purpose,
shall be covered into the Treasury as a miscellaneous receipt, and
the Treasurer of the United States shall redeem from the general
cash in the Treasury the circulating notes of said banks which may
come into his possession subject to redemption, * * * and the
balance remaining of the deposits so covered shall, at the close of
each month, be reported on the monthly public-debt statement as
debt of the tlnited States bearing no interest.




1 year after
- date.

2^ per cent. .

Par.

Indefinite.

%2,389,120.00

$2,389,120.00

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22,092,806.00

2,916,204,913.66

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TABLE B.—Statement ofthe outstanding principal ofthe public debt of the United States on the 1st of July of each year from 1856 to 1913, inclusive.
Year.

1856—Julyl..
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1865—Aug. 31
1866—Julyl-1867..:
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896




T o t a l interestbearing d e b t .
$31,762,761.77
28,460,958.93
44,700,838.11
58,290,738.11
64,640, 838.11
90,380, 873.95
365,304, 826.92
707,531, 634.47
1,359,930, 763.50
2,221,311,918.29
2,381,530,294.96
2,332,331,207. 60
2,248,067, 387.66
2,202,088, 727.69
2,162,060,522.39
2,046,455,722.39
1,934,696,750.00
1,814,794, 100.00
1,710,483, 950.00
1,738,930; 750.00
1,722,676,300.00
1,710,685,450.00
1,711,888,500.00
1,794,735,650.00
;L, 797,643,700.00
1,723,993, 100.00
1,639,567,750.00
1,463,810, 400.00
1,338,229, 150.00
850.00
1,226,563,950.00
1,196,150, 100.00
1,146,014,350.00
1,021,692,500.00
950,522,990.00
829,853, 110.00
725,313, 120.00
610,529,330.00
585,029, 100.00
585,037, 890.00
635,041,060.00
716,202,890.00
847,363,

D e b t on w h i c h Iaterest h a s ceased.
$209,776.13
238,872.92
211,042.92
206,099.77
201,449.77
199,999.77
280,195.21
473,048.16
416,335.86
1,245,77L20
1,503,020.09
935,092.05
1,840,615.01
1,197,340.89
5,260,181.00
3,708,641.00
1,948,902.26
7,926,797.26
51,929,710.26
3,216,590.26
11,425,820.26
3,902,420.26
16,648,860.26
5,594,560.26
37,015,630.26
7,621,455.26
6,723,865.26
16,260,805.26
7,831,415.26
19,656,205.26
4,100,995.26
9,704,445.26
6,115,165.26
2,496,095.26
1,911,485.26
1,815,805.26
1,614,705.26
2,785,875.26
2,094,060.26
1,851,240.26
1,721,590.26
1,636,890.26

D e b t bearing no
interest. 1

$158, 591,390.00
411, 767,456.00
455, 437,271.21
458, 090,180.25
461, 616,311.51
439, 969,874.04
428, 218,101.20
408, 401,782.61
421, 131,510.55
430, 508,064.42
416, 565,680.06
430, 530,43L52
472, 069,332.94
509, 543,128.17
498, 182,411.69
465, 807,196.89
476, 764,031.84
455, 875,682.27
410, 835,74L78
388, 800,815.37
422, 721,954.32
438, 241,788.77
538, 111,162.81
584, 308.868.31
663, 712,927.88
619, 344,468.52
629, 795,077.37
739, 840.389.32
787, 287,446.97
825, Oil, 289.47
933, 852,766.35
1,000, 648,939.37
958, 854,525.87
995, 360,506.42
958, 197,332.99
920, 839,543.14

O u t s t a n d i n g principal.

Cash in t h e T r e a s u r y J u l y 1.2

T o t a l d e b t less c a s h
in Treasury.

$31, 972,537.90
28; 699,831.85
44, 911,88L03
58, 496,837.88
64! 842,287.88
9o; 580,873.72
524, 176.412.13
1,119,772,138.63
1,815,784,370.57
2 , — 647,869.74
2,844; 649,626.56
2,773,236,173.69
2 , " - 126,103.87
2,611,687,851.19
2,588, 452,213.94
2,480; 672,427.81
2,353,211,332.32
2,253 251,328.78
2,234',482,993.20
2,251 690,468.43
2,232;284,531.95
2,180,395,067.15
2,205,301,392.10
2,256,205,892.63
2,245 495,072.04
2,120;415,370.63
2,069,013,569.58
1,918,312,994.03
1,~~- 171,728.07
1,830;528,923.57
• 1,863,
964.873.14
1,775,063,013.78
1,657,602,592.63
1,~" 858,984.58'
1,619;052,922.23
1,552, 140,204.73
1,545,996,591.61
1,588,464,144.63
1,545,985,686.13
1,632,253,636.68
1,676. 120,983.25
1,769;840,323.40

$21,006, 584.89
18,70i;210.09
7,011,689.31
5,091,603.69
4,877,885.87
2,862,212.92
18,863, 659.96
8,421,401.22
106,332, 093.53
5,832,012.98
88,218, 055.13
137,200,009.85
169,974, 892.18
130,834,437.96
155,680,340.85
149,502, 471.60
106,217, 263.65
103,470,798.43
129,020,932.45
147,541 314.74
142,243,361.82
119,469, 726.70
186,025 960.73
256,823, 612.08
249,080, 167.01
201,088,622.88
249,363, 415.35
243,289,519.78
345,389,902.92
391,985 928.18
488,612: 429.23
492,917 173.34
482,433; 917.21
629,854,089.85
643,113, 172.01
661,355, 834.20
694,083,
746,937, 839.83
707,016, 681.03
732,940,210.38
774,448,256.13
814,543,016.51
069.70

$10,965, 953.01
9,998, 62L76
37,900, 191.72
53,405 234.19
. 59,964; 402.01
87,718, 660.80
505,312, 752.17
1,111,350, 737.41
1,709,452, 277.04
2,674,815, 856.76
2,756,431 571.43
2,636,036; 163.84
2,508,151 211.69
2,480,853, 413.23
2,432,771, 873.09
2,331,169, 956.21
2,246,994, 068.67
2,1^9,780, 530.35
2,105,462, 060.75
2,104,149, 153.69
2,090,041, 170.13
2,060,925, 340.45
2,019,275, 43L37
1,999,382, 280.45
1,996,414, 905.03
1,919,326, 747.75
1,819,650, 154.23
1,675,023 474.25
1,538,781, 825.15
1,438,542, 995.39
1,375,352, 443.91
1,282,145, 840.44
1,175,168, 675.42
1,063,004, 894.73
975,939, 750.22
890,784, 370.53
851,912, 751.78
841,526, 463.60
838,969, 475.75
899,313, 380.55
901,672, 966.74
955,297, 253.70

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1897.
1898.
1899.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
1910.
1911.
1912.
1913

847,365,130.00
847,367,470.00
1,046,048,750.00
1,023,478,860.00
987, 141,040.00
931,070,340.00
914,541,410.00
895,157,440.00
895,158,340.00
895, 159,140.00
894,834,280.00
897,503,990.00
913,317,490.00
913,317,490.00
915,353,190.00
963,776,770.00
965,706,610.00

1,346,880.26
1,262,680.26
1,218,300.26
1,176,320.26
1,415,620.26
1,280,860.26
1,205,090.26
1,970,920.26
1,370,245.26
1,128,135.26
1,086,815.26
4,130,015.26
2,883,855.26
2,124,895. 26
1,879,830.26
1,760,450.26
1,659 550.26

968,960,655.64
947,901,845.64
944,660,256.66
1,112,305,911.41
1,154,770,273.63
1,226,259,245.63
1,286,718,281. 63
1,366,875,224.88
1,378,086,478.58
1,440,874.563.78
1,561,266;966.28
1,725,172,266.28
1,723,344,895.78
1,737.223,452.78
1,848,367,586.43
1,902,836;653.90
1,948,838,753. 40

1,817, 672,665.90
1,796, 531,995.90
1,991, 927,306.92
2,136, 961, O L 67
O
2,143, 326,933.89
2,158, 610,445.89
2,202, 464,781.89
2,264, 003,585.14
2,274, 615,063.84
2,337, 161,839.04
2,457, 188,061.54
2,626, 806,271.54
2,639, 546,241.04
2,652. 665,838.04
2,765; 600,606.69
2,868, 373,874.16
2,916, 204,913.66

831,016,579.76
769,446,503.76
836,607,07L73
1,029,249,833.78
1,098,587,813.92
1,189,153,204.85
1,277,453,144.58
1,296,771,811.39
1,284,748,291.87
1,372,720,152.25
1,578,591,306.51
1,688,673,862.16
1,615;684,710.25
1,606,216,652.79
1,749,816,288.23
1,840,799,176.88
1,887,640,858. 52

986,656,086.14
1,027,085,492.14
1,155,320,235.19
1,107,711,257.89
1,044,739,119.97
969,457,241.04
637.31
925, on;
967,231,773.75
989,866,771.97
964,435,686.79
878,596,755.03
938,132,409.38
1,023,861,530.79
1,046,449,185.25
1,015,784,338.46
1,027,574,697.28
1,028,564,055.14

1 Containing legal-tender notes, gold and silver certificates, etc.
2 Including gold reserve and coin set apart for redemption of certificates and treasury notes and exclusive of national bank 5 per cent fund, outstanding warrants and checks,
and disbursing officers' balances.




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TABLE C.—Analysis ofthe principal ofthe interest-bearing public debt ofthe United States from July 1,1856, to July 1, 1913.
Year.

2 percents.

1850—July 1 . . .
1857
1858.
1859
I860
1861
1862...:
1863
1864
1865
1865—Aug. 3 1 . .
1866—July 1.
1867.
1868. . . .
1869
'
1870. .
1871
1872
1873.
1874
1875.
1876
1877.
1878..'
1879. .
1880
1881...
1882
1883...
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894...
1895
1896..
1897




3 percents.

.

3i percents.

$64,666,656.66
66,125,000.00
59,550,000.00
45,885,000.00
24,665,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00 $460,461,050.00
318,204,350.00
32,082,600.00
238,612,150.00
208,190,500.00
158,046,600.00
33,716,500.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00
14,000,000.00

4.percents.

4^ percents.

$57,926,116.57
105,629,385.30
77,547,696.07
90,496,930.74
618,127.98
121,341,879.62
17,737,025.68
801,36L23

..'..'.....'..
678,000.00
678,000.00
678,000.00
678,000.00
678,000.00
98,850,000.00
741,522,000.00
739,347,800.00
739,347,800.00
739,349,350.00
737,942,200.00
737,951,700.00
737,960,450.00
737,967,500.00
737,975,850.00
714,315,460.00
676,214,990.00
602,297,360.00
559,659,920.00
559,664,830.00
559,672,600.00
559,677,390.00
590,837,560.00
721,999,390.00
722,000,630.00

$140,000,000.00
240,000,000.00
250,000,000.00
250,000,000.00
250,000,000.00
250,000,000.00
250,000,000.00
250,000,000.00
250,000,000.00
250,000,000.00
250,000,000.00
222,207,050.00
139,639,000.00
109,015,750.00
50,869,200.00
125,364,500.00
125,364,500.00
125,364,500.00
125,364,500.00
125,364,500.00
125,364,500.00

5 percents.
$3,632,000.00
3,489,000.00
23,538,000.00
37,127,800.00
43,476,300.00
33,022,200.00
30,483,000.00
30,483,000.00
300,213.480.00
245,709,420.63
269,175,727.65
201,982,665.01
198,533,435.01
221,586,185.01
221,588,300.00
221,588,300.00
'274,236,450.00
414,567,300.00
414,567,300.00
510,628,050.00
607,132,750.00
711,685,800.00
703,266,650.00
703,266,650.00
508,440,350.00
484,864,900.00
439,841,350.00

50,000,000.00
100,000,000.00
100,000,000.00
100,000,000.00

6 percents.

I f s percents.

T o t a l interestbearing d e b t .

o
A n n u a l interest charge.

$31,762,761.77 $1,869,445.70
$28,130,761.77
28,460,958.93 1,672,767.53
24,971,958.93
44,700,838.11 2,446,670.28
21,162,838.11
58,290,738.11 3,126,166.28
21,162,938.11
04,640,838.11 3,443,687.29
21,164,538.11
90,380,873.95 5,092,630.43
57,358,673.95
365,304,826.92 22,048,509.59
154,313,225.01 $122,582,485.34
707,531,634.47 41,854,148.01
431,444,813.83 139,974,435.34
842,882,652.09 139,286,935.34 1,359,930,763.50 78, 853,487.24
1,213.495,169.90 671.610,397.02 2,221,311,918.29 137,742,617.43
1,281,736,439.33 830,000,000.00 2,381,530,294.96 150,977,697.87
1,195,546,04L 02 813,460,621.95 2,332,331,207.60 146,068,196.29
1,543,452,080.02 488,344,846.95 2,248,067,387.66 138,892,451.39
37,397,196.95 2,202,088,727.69 128,459,598.14
1,878,303,984.50
1,874,347,222.39
2,162,060,522.39 125,523,998.34
1,765,317,422.39
2,046,455,722.39 118,784,960.34
1.613,897,300.00
1,934,696,750.00 111,949,330.50
1,814,794,100.00 103,988,463.00
1,374,883,800.00
1,281,238,650.00
1,710,483,950.00 98,049,804.00
1,738,930,750.00 98,796,004.50
1,213,624,700.00
1,100,865,550.00
1,722,676,300.00 96,855,690.50
984,999,650.00
1,710,685,450.00 96,104,269.00
854,621,850.00
1,711,888,500.00 93,160,643.50
738,619,000.00
1,794,735,650.00 94,654,472.60
1,797,643,700.00 83,773,778.50
283,681,350.00
1,723,993,100.00 79,633,981.00
235,780,400.00
196,378,600.00
1,639,567,750.00 75,018,695.50
1,463,810,400.00 57,360,110.75
1,338,229,150.00 51,436,709.50
1,226,563,850.00 47,926,432.50
1,196,150,950.00 47,014,133.00
1,146,014,100.00 45,510,098.00
1,021,692,350.00 41,780,529.50
950,522,500.00 38,991,935.25
829,853,990.00 33,752,354.60
725,313,110.00 29,417,603.15
610,529,120.00 23,615,735.80
585,029,330.00 22,893.883.20
585,037,100.00 22,894,194.00
635,041,890.00 25,394,385.60
716,202,060.00 29,140,792.40
847,363,890.00 34,387,265.60
847,365,130.00 34,387,315.20

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1898..
1899..
1900..
1901..
1902..
1903..
1904..
1905.,
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
1910.
11911912.

720.00
198,
240.00
$307,125,350.00 128,
420.00
99,
445,940,750.00
660.001
97,
445,940,750.00
060. oo!
83
520,143,150.00
360. 001
77,
542,909,950.00
360.00
77,
542,909,950.00
460.00
63,
595,942,350.00
460.00
63
676,250,150.00
960.00
700,882,130.00
78;
460.00
730,882,130.00
63,
460.00
730,882,130.00
63,
160.00
730,882,130.00
65,
r 730,882,130.00
945,460.00
[
2 459,280.00 113,
r 730,882,130.00
113,945,460.00
[ 2 2,389,120.00

1 Contiaued at 2 per cent.

722,002, 970.001
722,005, 530.00
617,879, 220.00
419,724, 770.00
368,203, 580.00
291,906, 150.00
275.112, 130.00
275.113, 030.00
235,271, 330.00
154,638, 670.00
118,489, 900.00
118,489, 900.00
118,489, 900.00
118,489,900.00

125,364,500.001 100,000,000.001
125,364,500.00 100,000,000.00
47,651,200.00
121,979,850.00
21,854,100.00
19,410,350.00
19,385,050.00

847,367, 470.001
046,048, 750.00
023,478, 860.00
987,141, 040.00
931,070, 340.00
914,541, 410.00
895.157, 440.00
895.158, 340.00
895.159, 140.00
894,834, 280.00
897,503, 990.00
913,317, 490.00
913,317, 490.00
915,353; 190.00

34,387, 408.80
40,347, 872.80
33,545, 130.00
29,789, 153.40
27,542, 945.50
25,541, 573.30
24,176, 745.00
24,176, 781.00
23,248, 064.00
21,628, 913.60
20,946, 270.41
21,275, 602.40
21,275, 602.40
21,330 637.40

118,489,900.00

963,776,770.00

22,787,084.40

118,489,900.00

965,706,610.00

22,835,330.40

2 Postal savings bonds, 2^ per cent.

NOTE 1.—Annual intcx-est charge is computed on amount of outstanding principal at close of fiscal year and is exclusive of interest charge on Pacific Railway bonds.
NOTE 2.—The figures for July 1,1879, were made up assuming pending funding operations to have been completed.
NOTE 3.—The temporary loan per act of July 11,1862, is iacluded in the 4 per cents from 1862 to 1868, inclusive, with the exception of the amount outstandiag Aug. 31, 1865,
this being the date at which the public debt reached its highest poiat. This loan bore interest from 4 per cent to 6 per cent, and was redeemable on 10 days' notice after 30 days, but
being constantly changing it has been considered more equitable to iaclude the whole amount outstandiag as beariag 4 per cent interest on an average for the year.




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108

REPORT ON" T H E FINANCES.

TABLE D.—Statement of the issue and redemption of loans and Treasury notes and of

deposits and redemptions in national-bank note account (by warrants) for the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1913.
Issues and deposits.

Redemptions.

Excess of
Excess of
issues and de- redemptions.
posits.

Old demand notes, act July 17,1861
Legal-tender notes, acts of Feb. 25 and
J^ly 11,1862, Jan. 7 and Mar. 3,1863,
Mar. 14,1900
$163,000,000.00
Fractional currency, acts of July 17,
1862, Mar. 3,1863, and June 30,1864..
Gold certificates, acts of Mar. 3, 1863,
July 12,1882, and Mar. 14,1900
468,730,000.00
Compound-interest notes, acts of Mar.
3,1863, and June 30,1864
One-year notes of 1863, act o ^ Mar. 3, i863.
Two-yearnotesof 1863, act of Mar. 3,1863.
One-forties of 1864, act of Mar. 3,1864...
Consols of 1865, act of Mar. 3,1865
Consols of 1867, act of Mar. 3,1865..
Silver certificates, acts of Feb. 28,1878,
and Mar. 14,1900
. . 403,952,000.00
Refunding certificates, act of Feb. 26,
1879
National-bank note account, act of July
21,471,010.00
14^890
Treasury notes of 1890, acts of July 14,
1890, and Mar. 14,1900
Funded loan of 1907, ^cts of July 14,
1870, Jan. 20,1871, Jan. 14, 1875, and
Mar. 14,1900
... .
Postal savings bonds, act of June 25,1910
1,929,840.00

$130.00

$130.00

1,545.00
421,840,200.00

1,545.00
$46,889,800.00

190.00
30.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
401,951,000.00

190.00
30.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
2,001,000.00

480.00

480.00

24,089,035.50

2,618,025.50

269,000.00

269,000.00

99,950.00

1,059,082,850.00 1,011,251,810.50

Total
Excess of issues
Excess of redemptions

1,929,840.00
50,820,640.00

To balance from last
year
$809,338,000.00
1,1912 . To 1 per cent on the
principal of the
public debt on
June 30,1912, less
coin certiflcates.
Treasury notes,
national b a n k
note redemption
account, and cash
available for reduction of the
debt, viz, $1,169,127,673.66
11,691,276.74
June 30,1913 To interest on redemptions prior
to fiscal year
48,956,520.12
1913
To interest on $102,575, amount of
debt " p a i d " during fiscal year
1913
3,561.10




869,989,357.96

June 30,1913

2,989,600.50

47,831,039.50

TABLE E.—Sinking fund account for fiscal year 1913.

July

99,950.00

50,820,640.00
2,989,600.50

^

Net excess of issues
DR.

163,000,000.00

CR.

By principal of
bonded debt redeemed in 1913...
$100,050.00
By accrued interest
thereon
1,256.19
By fractional currency and notes
redeemed in 1913..
2,425.00
By accrued interest
thereon
585.31
By balance
869,885,041.46

869,989,357.96

109'

SECRETARY OP THE TREASTJEY.

TABLE F.—Population, ordinary receipts and disbursements of the Government from

1837 to 1913, exclusive of postal, and per capita on receipts and per capita on
disbursements.
Year.
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843 (six months)
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1860
1861
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1866
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
'..
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

Population.

Ordinary
receipts.

15,656,000
16,112,000
16,584,000
17,069,453
17,591,000
18,132,000
18,694,000
19,276,000
19,878,000
20,500,000
21,143,000
21,805,000
22,489,000
23,191,876
23,995,000
24,802,000
25,615,000
26,433,000
27,256,000
28,083,000
28,916,000
29,753,000
30,596,000
31,443,321
32,064,000
32,704,000
33,365,000
34,046,000
34,748,000
35,469,000
36,211,000
36,973,000
37,756,000
38,558,371
39,555,000
40,596,000
41,677,000
42,796,000
43,951,000
45,137, 000
46,353,000
47,698,000
48,866,000
50,155,783
51,316,000
52,495,000
53,693,000
54,911,000
56,148,000
57,404,000
58,680,000
59,974,000
61,289,000
62,622,250
63,947,000
65,191,000
66,456,000
67,740,000
69,043,000
70,365,000
71,704,000
73,060,000
74,433,000
76,295,220
77,754,000
79,117,00(1
80,847,00(1
81,867,000
83,260,000
84,662,000
86,074,000
87,496,000
88,926,000
1 90,363,000
93,983,00(1
95,656,00(1
97,337,000

$24,954,153.00
26,302,562.00
31,482,750.00
19,480,115.00
16,860,160.00
19,976,197.00
8,231,001.26
29,320,707.78
29,970,105.80
29,699,967.74
26,467,403.16
35,698,699.21
30,721,077.50
43,592,888.88
62,555,039.33
49,846,815.80
61,587,03L68
73,800,341.40
65,350,674.68
74,056,699.24
68,965,312.67
46,655,365.96
52,777,107.92
56,054,599.83
41,476,299.49
51,919,261.09
112,094,945.5:.
243,412,971.20
322,031,158.19
519,949,564.38
462,846,679.92
376,434,453.82
357,188,256. O^i
395,959,833.87
374,431,104.94
364,694,229.91
322,177,673.78
299,941,090.8^:
284,020,771.41
290,066,584.7(1
281,000,642.00
257,446,776.40
272,322,136.851
333,526,500.98
360,782,293.00
103,525,260.00
398,287,582.00
348,519,870.0(1
323,690,706.00
336,439,727.0(1
371,403,277.00
379,266,075.00
387,050,059. Od
403,080,982.00
392,612,447.3:.
354,937,784.2385,819,628.78
297,722,019.25
313,390,075.11
326,976,200.38
347,721,705.16
405,321,335.20
515,960,620.18
567,240,851.89
587,686,337.53
562,478,233.2]
560,396,674.40
539,716,913.86
544,606,758.62
594,717,942.32
663,125,659. 92
601,060,723.27
603,589,489.84
675,511,715.02
701,372,374:99
691,778,465.37
724,111,229.84

Per capita on
receipts.

O r d i n a r y disbursements.

$1.59
$37,243,214.24
L63
33,864,714.56
L90
26,896,782.62
L14
24,314,518.19
.96
26,481,817.84
LIO
25,134,886.44
.44
11,780,092.51
L62
22,483,560.14
L61
22,935,827.79
27,261,182.86
L45
1.25
54,920,784.09
1.64
47,618,220.65
1.37
43,499,078.39
L88
40,948,383.12
2.19
47,751,478.41
2.01
44,390,252.30
2.40
47,743,989.09
2.79
65,038,455.11
2.40
58,630,662.71
2.64
68,726,350.01
2.38
67,634,408.93
L57
73,982.492.84
L72
68,993.599.77
L78
63,200,875.65
L30
66,650,213.08
L58
469,670,241.65
3.36
718,734,276.18
7.14
864,969,100.83
9.26 1,295,099,289.58
14.65
519,022,356.34
12.7J1
346,729,826.78
10.18
370,339,133.82
9.46
321,190,597.75
10.26
293,657,005.15
9.47
283,160,393.51
8.98
270,559,695.91
7.7J;
285,239,326.34
7.0].
301,238,800.21
6.46
274,623,392.84
6.48
265,101,084.59
6.06
241,334,474.86
5.41
236,964,326. SO
5.67
266,947,883.53
6.66
264,847,637.36
7.00
259,651,638.81
7.68
257,981,439.57
7.41
265,408,137.54
6.36
244,126,244.33
5.76
260,226,935.11
5.86
242,483,138.50
6.33
267,932,179.97
6.32
259,653,958. 67
6.3].
281,996,615.60
6.43 • 297,736,486.60
6.14
355,372,684.74
5.44
345,023,330.58
5.8]
383,477,954.49
4.40
367,525,279.83
4.54
356,195,298.29
4.65
352,179,446.08
4.85
365,774,159.57
5.55
443,368,682.80
6.93
605,072,179.85
7.43
487,713,791.71
7.56
509,967,353.15
7.11
471,190,857.6^:
6.93
506,089,022.04
6.59
532,237,821.31
6.54
563,360,093.62
7.02
549,405,425.35
7.70
551,705,129.04
6.87
621,102,390.64
6.79
662,324,444.77
7.48
659,705,391.08
7.46
654,137,997.89
7.2cl
654,553,963.47
7.44
682,770,705.51

Per capita
on
disbursements.
$2.38
2.10
L62
L42
1.51
L39
.63
L17
L15
L33
2.60
. 2.18
L93
L77
L99
1.79
1.86
2.08
2.15
2.45
2.33
2.49
2.25
2.01
2.14
14.36
21.54
25.40
37.27
14.63
9.58
10.01
8.51
7.61
7.16
6.66
6.84
7.04
6.25
5.87
5.21
4.98
5.46
5.28
5.06
4.92
4.94
4.45
4.63
4.22
4.56
4.32
4.60
4.75
6.66
.5.29
5.77
6.43
5.16
5.01
5.10
6.07
8.14
6.39
6.56
6.96
6.26
6.50
6.77
6.49
6.41
7.10
7.45
7.30
6.96
6.84
7.01

1 Estimated July 1.
N O T E . — T h e ordinary receipts and disbursements and per capita on receipts for 1891 were erroneously stated by the Register of the Treasury in his reports for 1891,1892, and 1893. (See Finance
Reports for those years, pp. 845,767, and 906.)




T A B L E G.—Statement showing the ordinary receipts and disbursements ofthe Government by months; the legal-tender notes, net gold, and available cash
i n the Treasury at the end of each month; the monthly redemption of legal-tender notes i n gold and the imports and exports of gold, from July, 1896,
to June, 1913, inclusive.

Month.

1896—July
August
September
October
*
.
November
December
1897—January
February
March
April
May
June
Total for 12 months
July
August
September
October
November
December
1898—January
February
March
April
May
June
Total for 12 months
July
August
September
October
November
December




Ordinary
disburseOrdinary ments, exclureceipts, sive of postal,
exclusive of principal of
postal.
debt, and
premium.

Surplus
receipts.

$29,029,209
25,562,097
24,584,245
26,282,830
25,210,696
25,867,114
24,316,994
24,400,997
36,217,662
37,812,135
29,797,391
36,584,708

$42,088,468 1 $13,059,259
35,701,677 110,139,580
26,679,635
11,995,290
33,978,277
17,695,447
33,260,720
18,050,024
23,812,665
2,044,449
30,269,389
1 5,952,395
28,796,057
14,395,060
27,212,998
9,004,664
32,072,097
5,740,038
29,109,259
688,132
22,934,695
13,650,013

347,721,705

365,774,160

118,052,455

50,100,909
33,588,047
25,368,816
33,701,512
37,810,839
27,634,092
36,696,711
26,599,256
31,882,444
^44,314,062
47,849,909
47,852,282

111,073,545
114,564,432
1 3,435,718
1 9,310,097
5,552,766
32,012,606
636,917
1,973,102
1,076,307
111,301,119
117,775,091
114,342,969

Balance in
Net gold general fund,
in Treasurv. including
net gold.

39,027, 364
19,023,615
21,933,098
24,391,415
43,363, 605
59,646,698
37,333,628
28,572,358
32,958,751
33,012,943
30,074,818
33,509,313
405,321,335

443,368,583
74,263,475
66,260,718
54,223,921
53,982,277
49,090,981
41,864,808

130,416,366
114,478,010
114,445,851
114,352,226
110,190,066
1 460,014

Exports of
gold.

140,817,699
144,216,377
147,663,105
153,573,147
157,363,851
160,911,547
164,236,793
167,623,182
174.584.136
181.238.137
171,818,055
167,004,410

233,016,457
218,561,207
"215,192,787
207,756,100
220,663,560
235,474,769
223,871,786
225,564,204
226,166,944
215,810,622
195,754,815
209,282,643

189,444,714
217,904,485
243,297,543
239,885,162
241,663,444
246,629,176

254,844,215
294,487,085
307,557,504
300,238,275
292,376,790
294,764,695

$1,667,986
4,289,538
34,347,009
28,193,769
7,487,300
2,801,044
943, 306
830,180
1.439,439
971,506
951,515
1,092,188

$11,931,436
1, 972,544
93,555
368,007
468,010
431,826
442,355
353,147
675,205
6,631,216
9,468,471
7,625,808

85,014,780

$110,718,746 $256,158,473
243,346,401
100,957,561
124,034,672- 241,154,457
117,126,524 233,572,762
225,357,098
131,510,353
137,316,644 228,320,380
215,362,421
144,800,493
212,837,256
148,661,209
222,045,606
151,786,464
228,090,517
153,340,890
230,113,813
144,319,563
244,466,202
140,790,738

138,047,248

•43,847,109
41,782,708
39,778,070
39,630,051
38,900,916
41,404,794

Imports of
gold.

40,361,580

938,951
4,720, 569
4,723,181
11,775,483
3,064,089
2,582,405
6,493,414
6,162,681
30,708,320
32,579,858
13,322,111
3,330,612

5,462,869
588
1,
142,922
313,311
699, 513
577,996
2,658,663
1,030,412
728,707
1,323,724
109,157
375,529

120,391,674

15,406,391

2,641,668
15,296,811
16,808,341
16,738,353
5,324,601
8,757,182

1,497,013
1,955,908
3,102,810
1,279,926
913,467
1,219,638

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1899—January..
February.
March
April
May
June
Total for 12 months.
July
August
September.
October
November.
December .
1900—January . . .
February..
March
April
May
June
Total for 12 monthsJuly
August
September.
October
November.
December .
-January . . .
February..
March
April
May . . .
June
Total for 12 months.
July
August
September.
October
November.
December..




41,774,930
37,979,333
57,030,240
41,611,587
44,786,014
47,126,915

51,122,771
43,918,929
42,978,671
65,949,106
40,513,005
31,382,762

19,347,841
15,939,596
14,051,669
1 24,337,519
4,273,009
15,744,153

515,960,620

605,072,180
56,561,090
45,522,312
37,579,372
44,174,027
40,769,848
39,145,560
39,189,097
37,738,472
32,188,271
40,903,928
40,351,525
33,540,673

18,506,832
4,455,861
7,754,773
3,359,562
6,175,724
7,613,544
8,823,068
7,892,793
16,538,566
4,135,399
4,814,528
17,895,159

567,240,852

487,713,792
53,979,653
50, 500,199
39,169,971
47,993,638
41,278,661
40,204,622
40,109,707
38,880,636
40,762,862
41,968,246
42,136,561
33,045,147

14,024,492
1811,443
6,134,355
3,632,429
7,065,854
6,641,886
7,410,580
6,963,487
9,128,263
5,799,605
10,492,879
17,288,761

587,685,338

509,967,353

12,749
6,042,628
12,123,687
9,186,017
5,517,860
9.742.967

274,844,167
279,352,872
287,695,613
289,391,540
286,216,440
283,595,453
292,49.0,973
298,362,824
306,792,996
296,117,548
295,783,530
306,827,605

77,717,985

52,307,591
39,351,498
32,310,736
40,645,936
40,198,917
37,318,998

245,254,534
248,757,971
254,328,820
252,223,797
239,744,905
236,909,230
218,613,617
232,225,336
248,358,064
229,461,962
218,857,545
220,557,185

79,527,060

49,.955,161
49,688,756
45,304,326
51,626,067
48,344,515
46,846,508
47,520,287
45,844,123
49,891,125
47,767,851
52,629,440
50,333,908

274,584,676
269,103,613
284,043,164
263,127,533
267,584,094
284,488,616

189,111, 560

48,054,258
49,978,173
45,334,145
47,533,589
46,945,572
46,759,104
48,012,165
45,631,265
48,726,837
45,039,327
45,166,053
51,435,832

228,652,341
231,124,638
245,413,707
246,140,226
228,415,238
240,737,212

52,320,340
45,394,125
44,434,423
49,831,953
45,716,777
47, 061, 965

1 Excess of disbursements.

2,606,457
2,099,062
618,995
379,752
264,310
11,857,511
5,691,290
1,403,658
1,081,280
1,961,680
12,209,596
8,093,268
48,266,759

Kl

11,263,332
4,238,358
7,861,553
10,731,375
12,641,988
3,386,611
4,265,626
1,859,274
2,520,455
2,249,038
1,772,834
3,260,743

3,272,739
18,084,938
806,672
441,962
677,207
410,533
8,221,159
416,812
490,269
4,916,965
10,101,177
5,344,844

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66,051,187
327,368,877
329,971,356
319,919,880
325,655,697
317,010,666
321,603,279

37,522,086

2,895,469
5,391,411
2,593,894
8,542,254
2,904,043
6,620,246
1,992,692
1,911,116
1,921,036
3,388,813
3,683,634
3,728,676
44,573,184

249,955,831
258,456,786
251,635,354
259,346,494
257,539,887
262,800,534

1,755,451
567,962
1,109,845
1,162,484
2,049,255
20,908,327

88,954,603

223,567,376
299,859,365
218,263,969
285,419,696
230,131,162
288,204,878
242,670,175
287,005,032
243,235,735
289,176,791
246,561,322
290,107,336
221,183,644
293,012,973
231,150,064
298,915,149
249,046,644
308,443,522
246,767,053 . 306,494,208
244,432,246
312,338,469
248,605,794
328,406, 798

6,392,344
5,148,906
3,187,575
2,482,871
3,070,265
3,105,686

53,185,177

4,076,113
3,490,528
11,905,431
9,138,638
7,431,678
2,791,622

2,876,120
150,861
163,362
• 4,066,747
16,292,500
4,744,123

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TABLE G.—Statement showing the ordinary receipts and disbursements ofthe Government by months, etc.—Continued.

Month.

1902—January
February
March
April
May
June

Total for 12 months
July
August
September
October. . :
November
December
1904—January
February
March
April
May
June
Total for 12 months




to
Surplus
recOTpts.

Balance in
Net gold
general fund,
in Treasury. including
net gold.

Imports of
gold.

Exports of
gold.

$38,548,278
39,099,291
38,102,437
40,799,263
38,746,798
33,837,859

$8,033,866 $239,040,401
2,060,448
238,821,209
8,398,977 244,858,050
4,416,127
242,945,286
10,762,652 246,554,393
16,839,609
253,801,291

562,478,233

471,190,878

91,287,376

49,305,691
48,605,813
48,580,381
51,391,262
43,599, ,001
47,151,300
45,996,338
43,028,180
45,435,435
43,326,101
44,113,970
• 48,354,054

56,813,568
43,113,611
37,554,798
46,904,965
43,036,273
36,533,744
42,632,244
37,750,750
44,987,587
41,763,814
40,586,997
34,583,738

1 7,507,877
5,492,202
11,025,583
4,486,297
562,728
10,617,556
3,364,094
5,277,430
447,848
1,562,287
3,626,973
13,790,316

560,396,674

506,089,022

54,307,652

48,611,576
49,852,678
44,969,819
46,963,213
44,692,595
42, 747,592
41,588,370
45,895,407
44,761,499
41,529,422
41,688,060
48,215,414

56,388,189
43,024,545
38,427,964
51,910,479
47,427,788
32,255,805
48,372,554
42,653,772
41,689,398
46,010,265
47,352,973
36,922,015

17,776,613
6,828,133
6,545,855
1 4,947,266
1 2,735,193
10,491,787
1 6,784,184
3,242,635
3,072,101
»4,480,843
15,664,913
11,293,399

$324,796,646
325,361,866
327,856,289
334,739,983
345,350,229
362,187,361

$1,405,787
1,696,967
2,636,313
1,864,767
1,497,053
4,086,457

$1,973,675
8,665,480
4,432, 946
2,844,214
1,968,407
391,525

52,021,254

$46,582,144
41,159,739
46,501,414
45,215,390
49,509,449
49,677,469

48,568,960

tei

Total for 12 months
July
August
September
October
November
December
1903—January
February
March
April
May
June

Ordinary
disburseOrdinary ments, exclureceipts, sive of postal,
exclusive of principal of
postal.
debt, and
premium.

•

539,716,914

632,237,821

7,479,093

248,499,879
253,201,871
260,714,057
258,892,307
267, Oil, 715
265,571,972
229,362,090
236,241,028
248,529,691
231,877,090
217,592,391
216,183,723

353,974,599
359,491,501
371,253,394
356,421,878
354,575,588
364,409,380
368,345,963
374,543,470
372,921,989
373,326,187
375,168,898
388,686,114

H

378,291,444
383,450,710
389,417,184
378,637,402
369,237,430
379,374,895
378,745,084
373,068,505
374,699,996
370,919,188
813,287,516
322,051,568

1,594,421
5,143,597
4,981,130
11,118,446
5,981,743
2,186,636
2,010,851
1,817,456
4,567,728
1,349, 621
1,462,845
2,767,553

2,305,714
530,029
1,460,829
720,331
2,853,112
85,951
1,506,370
1,042, 598
1,705,466
14,488,268
12,507,588

44,982,027

248,005,005
264,657,694
286,124,771
263,542,933
264,967,774
270,777,264
247,783,746
259,651,782
276,815,803
262,539,660
256,208,626
254,162,230

o

.pi

47,090,595

4,631,207
7,848,553
5,184,858
5,026,036
11,370,690
17,230,298
8,225,508
5,034,372
8,855,162
10,289,869
10,472,582
4,886,233

9,117,758
84,776
•998,076
352,177
993,150
1,464,656
591,567
732, 614
3,063,458
19,470,167
43,069,053
1,522,544

99,055,368

81,459,986

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July
August
September.
October
November .
CD
December..
S 1905- -January . . .
February . .
March
April
May
June

2
w

Total for 12 months.
July
August
September.
October
November .
December..
1906—January . . .
February . .
March
April
May
June
Total for 12 months.
July
August
September.
October
November .
December..
1907—January . . .
February..
March
April
May
June
Total for 12 months.




197,445,631
199,512,294
223,098,966
231,060.229
233,812,615
229,664,318
201,244,581
202,857,181
221,231,681
212,331,729
218,172,921
221,381,650

304,081,579
297,975,365
301,414,163
296,352,797
293,344,658
296,592,689
290,625,796
290,681,839
291,821,624
284,318,681
281,141,378
295,477,492

224,372,884
61,591,481 112,318,347
50,600,327
1 3,109,895 235,465,527
263,331,814
40,510,622.
9,740,537
54,589,836
1 4.097,144 273,076,079
285,582,811
46,211,544
2,789,325
42,830,311
7,520,152 284,836,080
259,856,877
45,671,353
5,018,743
41,409,095
6,785, 633 - 276,418,068
284,378,284
43,665,323
6,965,846
45,141,796
148, 928 260,229,777
269,690,707
43,124,646
4,855,378
290,489,841
34,001,856
21,865,225

279,865,731
277,697,345
286,823,693
281,816,289
285,310,840
289,780,373
293,885,083
302,718,086
309,859,322
307,126,224
310,385,376
330,689,355

46,786,387
44,903,392
46,344,683
48,990,608
45,576,877
45,047,905
43,410,285
44,608,073
46,267,756
39,778,182
43,758,933
47,950,777

64,019,115
51,131,604
40,391,358
52,500,873
49,434,318
41,315,731
49,488,299
41,151,234
44,985,127
48,339,465
46,048,144
34,687,523

117,232,728
16,228,212
5,953,325
13,510,265
13,857,441
3,732,174
1 6,078,014
3,456,839
1,282,629
18,561,283
12,289,211
13,263,254

544,606,758

563,360,093

594,717,942

549,405,425
63,483,563
45,997,502
39,154,801
52,678,473
46,642,880
44,497,456
45,732,517
43,983,148
40,150,934
45,324,832
45,940,845
38,476,021

111,184,710
10,010,095
12,342,390
4,563,526
8,959,618
11,315,524
9,604,983
9,942,348
14,071,020
7,935,760
11,647,167
24,236,442

663,125,659

551,705,129

111,420,530

290,313,464
311,358,446
313,714,775
302,973,951
317,952,371
313,999,622
285,Oil,577
310,617,216
310,760,992
296,040,433
292,821,224
304,619,431

319,963,942
360,686,875
371,213,096
373,300,810
381,470,287
388,997,076
394,708,206
400,164,655
402,868,003
401,388,342
407,629,665
422,061,445

92,694,024

4,973,241
3,213,216
5,543,692
10,722,132
6,202,790
4,028,881
2,605,709
2,079,683
6,630,695
14,941,583
34,911,028
2,369,080

1,159,274
274,153
1,412,904
310,696
1,137,318
2,668,532
5,741,665
8,486,330
5,918,627
2,485,562
6,722,148
3,256,392

96,221,730

45,312,517

52,298,853
56,007,597
51,497,191
•67,241,999
55,602,498
55,812,980
55,237.500
53,925,496
54,221,954
53,260,592
57,488,012
62,711,463

1,083,249
10,762,818
2,744,448
3,855.649
20,813,443
13,502,828
16,828,167
14,794,312
2,392,784
1,303,874
481,670
4,030,882

53,648,961

118,753,335

49,273,134
47,490,432
50,251,159
50,492,692
49,000,869
50,350,463
50,790,096
48,194,728
C50,631,169
45,092,868
47,980,024
55,367,081

8,925,418
7,764,491
4,241,035
8,045,275
4,727,105
3,336,184
1,895,691
2,192,919
5,133,592
2,581,057
2,657,143
2,149,051

38,573,591

9,834,333
7,972,868
31,431,038
27,250,852
8,935,274
7,617,237
3,270,505
3,329, 867
5,046, 243
4,974, 527
2,682,163
2,166,342

1,302,248
598,078
2,278,922
7,074,544
1,963,767
1,880,895
2,450,072
1,127,059
2,126,173
2,219,844
, 4.506,444
23,872,140

114,510,249

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51,399,176 •

1 Excess of disbursements.

CO

TABLE G.—Statement showing the ordinary receipts and disbursements ofthe Government by months, etc.—Continued.
»4^

Month.

1907—July
August
September
October
November
December
1908—January
February
March
April
May
June

,
,

Total for 12 months
July
August
September
October-../
November
December
1909—January
February
• March
April .May
June

,

Total for 12 months,
•July
August
September
October
November
December




,

Ordinary
disburseOrdinary ments, exclureceipts,
sive of postal,
exclusive of principal of
postal.
debt, and
premium.

Surplus
receipts.

$55,906,465
68.226.282
51,438, 483
59,028,246
45, 529,326
47,283,828
49.435.283
48,324.900
44,616,965
43,919,321
42,698,053
63,488,613

$60,864,924
52,995,047
44,646,469
45,58^, 297
41,624,354
52,824, 750
53,690,291
54,173,201
49,156.796
56,648,191
51,485,228
47,956,647

1 $4,958,459
5,431,235
6,792,014
13,439,949
3,904,972
1 5,540,922
1 4,255,008
1 5,848,301
14^539,831
112,728,870
1 8,787,175
5,531,966

601,060,723

621,102,390
71,390,958
48,114, 783
52,209,676
56,858,544
58,302,928
56,384,477
58,653,229
51,693,985
63,857,118
52,044,182
54,905,437
47,909,128

1 22,201,112
1 3,434,144
13,985,118
1 8,553,719
1 8,394,213
1 5,187.267
112,394,090
1 4,018,417
1 302,516
1 765,970
1 489,379
10,990,990

603,589,490

662,324,445

1 58,734,955

57,677,081
51,081,777
52,347,659
57,176,765
51,727,671
56,968,269

70,681,030
58,490,754
52,968,845
59,100,660
56,318,678
53,239,067

113,103,949
17,408,977
1 621,186
11,923,895
1 4,591,107
3,729,202

Imports of
gold.

Exports of
gold.

$293,670,624
284,300,724
280.808,512
237,987,850
245,500,558
249,344,971
217,475,100
210,382,518
204,492,080
193,772,017
213,684,683
221,924,733

230,238,004
214,915,676
222,058,504
232,051,793
228,201,751
232,703,457
204,776.864
234,094;571
240,173,188
235,590,916
224,263,038
227,698,852

$388,574,188
386, 660,408
389,551,314
387,227.019
400,551,014
419,519,991
416,417,301
418,845,804
412,608,191
401,596,987
390,933,256
395,171,348

353,628,173
339,890,139
329,052,573
316.882,253
301,387,362
319,501,417
299,701,585
291,263,813
283,934,071
277,433,835
269,901,309
276,375,428

$3,410,782
3,223,772
2,759,019
4,512,466
63,574,871
44,448,515
10,799,484
2,847,133
3,649,407
2,561,197
3,101,002
3,449,673

$7,478,366
4,596,879
1,503,836
3,716,258
615,169
1,004,441
444,200
1,967,597
1,447,206
14,476,341
26,555,913
8,626,718

148,337,321

I 20,041,667

49,189,846
44,680,639
^48,224,568
48,304,825
49,908,715
51,197,21046,259,139
47,675,568
53,554,602
51,278,212
54,416,058
58,900,118

Balance in
Net gold [general fund,
in Treasury.
including
net gold.

72,432,924

2,949,179
4,303,847
4,767,051
3,785,706
2,909,883
5,152,732
3,420,183
3,576,444
5,161, 648
3,345,861
2,263,721
2,367,735

4,845,272
6,699,742
3,974,391
1,952,574
2,967,795
7,357,707
7,865,356
8,860,814
21,252,462
6,337,994
11,171,265
8,346,446

44,003,989
235,720,333
237,184,857
242,873,342
254,735.467.
250,567,638
241,989,339

258,437,755
247,950,871
244,206,114
239,103,078
231,935,125
234,048,866

91,531,818

3,269,886
6,348,757
2,351,158
7,034,164
3,863,637
2,083,772

16,661,782
9,230,273
7,546,442
9,379,402
15,649,281
10,579,304

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1910—January
February
March
April
May
June

—

50,3-22,176
60,278,783
60,161,772
56,153,520
51,608,384
83,117,958

52,046,922
49,238,877
51,597,331
53,807,033
48,179,671
54,036,523

Total for 12 months

675,511,715

659,705,391

58,817,953
54,969,254
56,983,578
55,266,442
58,471,175
57,689,458
52,005,193
50,390,629
58,465,359
51,091,962
61,232,444
86,988,928

68,411,709
58,538,788
52,627,006
58,560,323
54,-231,830
52,798,711
52,271,910
60,051,017
51,649,855
52,558,029
55,908,354
46,630,466

19,593,756
13,569,534
3,456,572
13,293,881
4,239,346
4,890,747
1 266,717
339,612
6,815,504
11,466,067
5,324,090
40,358,462

701,372,375

654,137,998

220,256,764
226,656,329
247,576,175
244,001,134
229,620,847
242,411,286

230,960,864
230,571,813
238,885,265
233,462,139
232,165,417
256,894,676

228,421,383
229,628,447
244,362, Oil
261,024,062
256,832,205
254,003,571
220,261,901
227,178,354
231,726,269
220,749,280
206,383,234
233,533,255

242,356,224
239,523,208
240,984,016
235,688,932
236,683,886
239,393,472
235,466,829
235,525,708
239,454,526
235,705,902•
236,477,947
290,176,926

47,234,377

1910-July
August
September
October
November
December
1911—January
February
March
April
May
June
Total for 12 months.
1911—July
August
September
October
November
December
1912—January
February
March
April
May
June
Total for 12 months..




52,085,062
54,803,683
56,335,353
56,054,411
56,588,832
53,749,606
52,461,712
53,932,609
59,296.027
53,305, 712
58,369,952
84,795,506
691,778,465

11,724,746
1,039,906
8,554,441
1653,513
3,428,713
29,081,435

68,178,502
60,287,497
50,805,537
60,187,536
57,049,325
54,505,903
53,422,057
52,144,834
48,658,152
55,954,196
52,251,653
41,108,771

116,093,440
15,483.814
5,529,816
14,133,125
1 460,493
1 756,297
1 960,345
1,787,775
10,637,875
1 2,648,484
6,118,299
43,686,735

654,553,963

37,224,502

1 E x c e s s of d i s b u r s e m e n t s .

302,525,300
292,408,854
294,394,996
286,522,399
282,243,628
276,925,992
273,413,503
271,892,704
281,534,096
275,613,948
276,997,558
317,152,479

118,563,215

10,282,649
12,818,606
3,192,341
4,250,259
4,313,500
4,976,632
9,540,830
5,805,844
4,119,063
4,524,835
6,014,740
4,767,714

828,451
3,150,423
1,822,476
750,330
1,376,Oil
1,330,400
923,676
424,733
505,615
1,505,634
6,817,149
3,074,755

73,607,018
262,780,234
258,319,307
257,503,487
280,180,440
285,303,171
276,029,643
235,654,356
239,947,601
254,136,930
253,187,522
244,189,050
264,028,646

6,163,132
2,937,134
1,815,815
36,283,625
718,678
1,598,347

43,339,905

15,806,324

2,131,357
3,063,116
4,373,885
2,100,918
3,143,338
4,576,917

22,509,663

2,594,653
4,105,331
4,704,096
4,102,427
3,458,321
4,707,330
5,141,243
2,937,274
4,335,678
3,892,599
3,346.491
5,611,057

2,178,088
480,799
2,352,861
3,983,994
13,941,093
994,677
1,915,202
10,589,295
7,453,589
1,816,816
4,450.899
7,171,035

48,936,500

57,328,348

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TABLE G.—Statement showing the ordinary receipts and disbursements ofthe Government by months, etc.—Continued.

Month.

1912—July
August
September..
October
November..
December..
1913—January
February...
March
April.......
May..
June..
Total for 12 months

Ordinary
disburseOrdinary ments, exclureceipts,
exclusive of sive of postal,
principal of
postal.
debt, and
premium.

Surplus
receipts.

$59,536,334
60, 205,002
55, 682,556
469,504
• C4,
59, 069,394
55,821,539
60, 542,363
54, 803,419
56, 720,084
53, 452,557
370,364
438,114

$60,279,518
63,315,651
58,446,255
60, 606,534
54, 241,148
59,417,161
53, 605,790
52; 839,445
51; 478,553
57; 106,215
57; 957,870
53; 476,566

1 $743,184
13,110,649
12,763,699
3,862,970
4,828,246
13,595,622
6,936,573
1,963,974
5,241,531
13,653,658
12,587,506
34,961,548

724,111,230

682,770,706

41,340,524

Balance in
Net gold general fund,
in Treasury. including
net gold.

747,666
271, 733,772
285, 229,839
302, 675,520
304; 384,340
299 730,929
255; 750,031
262, 745,118
267, 930,180
265, 188,309
253 778,072
258, 363,327

$311, 648,787
304, 641,784
299, 846,615
298, 724,219
299, 946,420
293, 576,381
295; 846,020
297; 030,683
298; 496,280
291, 333,044
283; 977,282
315, 960,985

Imports of
gold.

h-1

Exports of
gold.

$3,747,869
5,576,900
4,200,682
11,887,492
4,474,480
11,397,007
6,210,360
5,356,471
4,380,993
4,013,537
4,561,260
3,386,974

$7,264,664.
2,498,472
568,302
330,270
2,709,594
656,704
17,237,648
12,373,409
18,076,584
3,010,168
12,467,492
569,315

69,194,025

77,762,622

1 Excess of disbursements.
NOTE.—The above figures are exclusive of disbursements for the Panama Canal, the first payrnents for which occurred in the fiscal year 1903.
NOTE.—The receipts and disbursements by months were made up from the partial reports prior to July 1,1908; and, being subject to change by subsequent concentration of
.accounts, did not agree with the totals by years. The latter are the actual results, as shown by complete returns.




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117

SECRETAEY OP THE TREASURY.

TABLE H.—Statement of the balance in the general fund of the Treasury, including the gold
reserve, by calendar years from 1791 to 1842, and by fiscal years from 1843 to 1913.^
Balance in
general fund.
Including
gold reserve
since 1875.

Date.

1791—December 31
[792—December 31
1793—December 31
1794—December 31
1795—December 31
1796—December 31
1797—December 31
1798—December 31
1799—December 31
1800—December 31
1801—December 31
1802—December 31
1803—December 31
1804—December 31
1805—December 31
1806—December 31
1807—December 31
1808—December 31
1809—December 31
1810—December 31
1811—December 31
1812—December 31
1813—December 31
1814—December 31
1815—December 31
1816—December 31
1817—December 31
1818—December 31
1819—December 31
1820—December 31
1821—December 31
1822—December 31
1823—December 31
1824—December 31
1825—December 31
1826—December 31
1827—December 31
1828—December 31
1829—December 31
1830—December 31
1831—December 31
1832—December 31
1833—December 31
1834—December 31
1835—December 31
1836—December 31
1837—December 31
1838—December 31
1839—December 31
1840—December 31
1841—December 31
1842—December 31
1843—June 30
1844—June 30
1845—June30... .
1846—June 30
1847—June 30
1848—June 30
1849—June 3 0 . . .
1850—June 30
1851—June 30
1852—June 30

. . .

:

$973,905.75
783,444.51
753,661.69
1,151,924.17
516,442.61
888,995.42
1,021,899.04
617,451.43
2,161,867.77
2,623,311.99
3,295,391.00
5,020,697.64
4,825,811.60
4,037,005.26
3,999,388.99
4,538,123.80
9,643,850.07
9,941,809.96
3,848,056.78
2,672,276.57
3,502,305.80
3,862,217.41
5,196,542.00
1,727,848.63
13,106,592.88
22,033,519.19
14,989,465.48
1,478,526.74
2,079,992.38
1,198,461.21
1,681,592.24
4,193,69().68
9,431,353.20
1,887,799.80
5,296,306.74
6,342,289.48
6,649,604.31
5,965,974.27
2 4,362,770.76
4,761,409.34
3,053,513.24
911,863.16
10,658,283.61
7,861,093.60
25,729,315.72
45,756,833.54
3 6,804,953.64
6,633,715.23
4,683,416.48
1,704,561.80
375,692.47
2,079,908.13
11,195,156.21
8,612,850.23
8,110,649.86
9,683,869.83
5,446,382.16
758,332.15
3,208,822.43
7,431,022.72
12,142,193.97
15,097,880.36

Balance In
general fund,
including
gold reserve
since 1875.

Date.

1853—June 30
1854—June 30 . .
1855—June 30
1856—June 30
1857—June 30
1858—June 30
1859—June 30
1860—June 30
1861—June 30
1862—June 30
1853—June 30
1864—June 30
1865—June 30
1866—June 30
1867—June 30
1868—June 30
1869—June 30
1870—June 30
1871—June 30
1872—June 30
1873—June 30 .
1874—June 30
1875—June 30
1876—June 30
1877—June 30
1878—June 30
1879—June 30
1880—June 30
1881—June 30
1882—June 30
1883—June 30
1884r—June 30
1885—June 30
1886—JuneSO
1887—June 30
1888—June 30
1889—June 30
1890—June 30
1891—June 30
1892—June 30
1893—June 30
1894—June 30
1895—June 30
1896—June 3 0 .
1897—June 30
1898—June 30
1899—June 30
1900—June 30
1901—June 30
1902—June 30
1903—June 30
1904—June 30
1905—June 30
1906—June 30
1907—June 30..1908—June 30
1909—June 30
1910—June 30
1911—June 30.
1912—June 30
1913—June 30

-.

. . .

:..

.

.

$22,286,462.49
20,300,636.61
19,529,841.08
20,304,844.78
18,218,770.40
6,698,157.91
4,685,625.04
3,931,287.72
2,005,285.24
18,265,984.84
8,395,443.73
112,002,776.10
26,440,930.29
112,476,770.66
161,175,174.31
115,133,529.82
126,542.842.77
113,485,981.01
91,739,739.00
74,437,358.54
59,762,346.64
72,159,597.17
63,274,721.71
58,947,608.99
91,694,006.29
177,498,846.71
367,054,575.14
168,299,404.40
182,678,977.44
162,323,331.14
161,382,637.70
165,046,380.59
182,622,360.17
232,099,178.05
207,600,698.44
244,094,169.01
210,737,083.76
190,841,184.72
156,847,826.49
129,178,792.53
124,824,804.94
118,885,988.16
196,348,193.17
269,637,307.07
244,466,201.95
209,282.643.13
284,488;516.20
306,827,605.37
328,406,798.13
362,187,361.16
388,686,114.23
322,051,568.02
295,477,491.89
330,689,354.82
422,061,445.47
395,171,347.73
276,375,428.10
256,894,675.67
290,176,926.13
317,152,478.99
315,960,984.79

1 This statement Is made from warrants paid by the Treasurer of the United States to Dec. 31, 1821,
and by warrants Issued after that date.
2 The unavailable funds are not Included from and after this date.
8 The amount deposited with the States under act of June 23,1836, havuig been taken out of the control
of the Treasury Department by the act of Oct. 2,1837, Is not Included from and after this date.




T A B L E I.—Receipts and disbursements of the UnitedStates.
00

RECAPITULATION OF RECEIPTS BY FISCAL YEARS.
O r d i n a r y receipts.
Miscellaneous.

Year.
Customs.

1791
1792
1793
1794
1795 .
1796
1797 .
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804.
1805
1806.
1807
1808.
1809
1810.
.
.
1811
1812
1813.
1814
1815.
1816
1817.
1818...
1819.
1820
1821;
1822
1 8 2 3 . . .
1824.
1825
1826...

.




0

$4,399,473.09
3,443,070.85
4,255,306.56
4,801,065.28
5,588,461.26
6,567,987.94
7,549,649.65
7,106,061.93
6,610,449.31
9,080,932.73
10,750,778.93
12,438,235.74
10,479,417.61
11,098,565.33
12,936,487.04
14,667,698.17
15,845,521.61
16,363,550.58
7,257,506.62
8,583,309.31
13,313,222.73
8,958,777.53
13,224,623.25
5,998,772.08
7,282,942.22
36,306,874.88
26,283,348.49^ .
17,176,385.00
20,283,608.76
15,005,612.15
13,004,447.15
17,589,761.94
19,088,433.44
17,878,325.71
20,098,713.45
23,341,331.77

Internal
revenue

$208,942.81
337,705.70
274,089.62
337,755.36
475,289.60
575,491.45
644,357.95
779,136. 44
809,396.55
1,048,033.43
621,898:89
215,179.69
50,941.29
21,747.15
20,101.45
13,051.40
8,190.23
4,034.29
7,430.63
2,295.95
4,903.06
4,755.04
1,662,984.82
4,678,059.07
5,124,708.31
2,678,100.77
955,270.20
229,593.63
106,260.53
69,027.63
67,665.71
34,242.17
34,663.37
25,771.35
21,589.93

Sales of p u b l i c
lands.

\
Direct t a x .

$4,836.13
83,540.60
11,963.11
443.75
167,726.06
188,628.02
165,675.69
487,526.79
540,193.80
765,245.73
466,163.27
647,939:06
442,252.33
696,548.82
1,040,237.53
710,427.78
835,655.14
1,135,971.09
1,287,959.28
1,717,985.03
1,991,226.06
2.606,564.77
3; 274,422.78
1,635,871.61
1,212,966.46
1,803,581.54
916,523.10
984,418.15
1,216,090.56
1,393,785.09

$734,223.97
534,343.38
206,565.44
71,879.20
50,198. 44
21,882.91
55,763.86
34,732.56
19,159.21
7,517.31
12,448.68
7,666. 66
859.22
3,805.52
2,219,497.36
2,162,673.41
4,253,635.09
1,834,187.04
264,333.36
83,650.78
31,586.82
29,349.05
20,961.56
10,337.71
6,201.96
2,330.85
6,638.76

O t h e r miscellaneous Items.1
$10,478.10
17,946.65
59,910.88
356,749.97
193,117.97
1,372,215.98
480,099.29
216,787.81
157,227.56
223,752.10
444,574.15
1,540,465.86
131,945.44
139,075.53
40,382.30
51,121.86
38,550.42
21,822.85
62,162.57
84,476.84
59,211.22
126,165.17
271,871.00
164,485.60
296,824.58
342,447.51
580,006.52
583,030.33
732,098.42
1,061,338.44
257,589.43
750,457.19
491,129.84
477,603.60
497,951.81
497,088.66

T o t a l ordinary
receipts. .

$4,409,951.19
3,669,960.31
4,652,923.14
5,431,904.87
0,119,334.59
8,420,329.65
8,688,780.99
7,979,170.80
7,546,813.31
10,848,749.10
12,945,455.95
14,995,793.95
11,064,097.63
11,826,307.38
13,560,693.20
15,559,931.07
16,398,019.26
17,060.661.93
7,773,473.12
9,384,214.28
14,422,634.09
9,801,132.76
14,340,709.95
11,181,710.95
15,708,458.56
47,745,650.82
33,366,868.88
21,585,583.66
24,603,374.37
17,840.669.55
14,573,379.72
20,232,427.94
20,540,666.26
19,381,212.79
21,840,858.02
25,260,434.21

Postal
revenue.

$71,295.93
92,988.40
103,883.19
129,185.87
163,794.54
195,043.44
213,992.74
233,144.73
264,850.39
280,806.06
320,444.81
326,831.65
359,952.41
389,711.49
422,129.07
446,520.34
484,134.45
460,717.77
506,633.95
551,754.97
587,266.73
649,151.22
703,220.73
730,953.13
1,043,021.74
961,718.04
1,002,973.26
1,130,202.99
1,204,737.39
1,111,760.72
1,058,302.10
1,117,555.36
1,130,214.35
1,197,298.93
1,306,253.59
1,447,660.04

S u r p l u s (-f) or
T o t a l ordinary
deficit (—) on
receipts a n d o r d i n a r y receipts,
postal r e v e n u e . including postal
deficiencies.

$4,481,247.12
3,762,948.71
4,756,806.33
5,561,090.74
6,283,129.13
8,615,373.09
8,902,773.73
8,212,315.53
7,811,663.70
11,129,555.16
13,265,900.76
15,322,625.60
11,424,050.04
12,216,018.87
13,982,822.27
16,006,451.41
16,882,153.71
17,521,379.70
8,280,107.07
9,935,969.25
15,009,900.82
10,450,283.98
15,043,930.68
11,912,664.08
16,751,480.30
48,707,368.86
34,369,842.14
22,715,786.65
25,808,111.76
18,952,430.27
15.631,681.82
21,349,983.30
21,670,880.61
20,578,511.72
23,147,111.61
26,708.094.25

1

-i-$l,312,498.04
— 4,599,909.44
+
805,993.24
— 865,917.17
— 1,190,266.19
-f 2,629,678.82
+ 2,680,153.74
+
371,584.48
— 1,749,004.82
+
34,778.09
+ 3,551,955.99
+ 7,019,541.88
-f 3,111,811.03
+ 3,188,399.73
+ 4,546,344.36
+ 6,110,753.45
+ 8,043,867.89
-t- 7,999,248.85
- 2,507,273.92
+
909,460.91
4- 6,244,593.66
—10,479,638.51
—17,341,142.19
—23,549,214.47
—17,235,202.68
+16,549,294.90
4-13,375,976.41
-\- 1,566,955.85
+ 3,091,370.37
444,865.34
- 1,276,173.14
-f 5,231,995.64
-f 5,834,036.27
— 892,489.85
+ 5,983,640.68
-f-8,232,574.99

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1827.
1828.
1829.
1830.
1831.
1832.
1833.
1834.
1835.
1836.
1837.
1838.
1839.
1840.
1841.
1842.
1843.
1844.
1845.
1846.
1847.
1848.
1849.
1850.
1851.
1852.
1853.
1854.
1855.
1856.
1857.
18581859.
1860.
1861.
1862.
1863.
1864.
1865.
1866.
1867.
1868.
1869.
1870 :
1871 .
1872.
1873.
1874 .
1875 .
1876 .

,283.29
19, 712,
23; 205,
,523.64
22, 681,
,965.91
21, 922,
,391.39
,224,
24,
,441.77
28, 465,
,237.24
29, 032,
,508.91
16, 214,
,957.15
19, 391,
,310.59
23, 409,
,940.53
11) 169, 290.39
,
, ,800.36
16, 1^8,
,137,
23,
,924.81
,499,
13,
,502.17
,487, 216. 74
14,
,
,187,
18,
,908.76
,01^, 843.91
7;
,183, 570.94
26;
27,,528, 112. 70
26;,712, 667. 87
,747,
23;,757,864.66
31,,346, 070.96
28,,668, 738. 82
39,,017, 686. 42
49, 339, 567.92
47, 931, 326. 62
58, 224, 865. 52
64, 025, 190. 27
53,022, 794. 21
64, 875, 863.50
63, 789, 905.05
41, 565, 620.96
49, 187, 824.38
53, 582, 511.87
39, 056, 125.64
49,059, 397. 62
69, 316, 642.40
102, 928, 152.99
84, 046, 260.60
179, 417, 651.58
176, 464, 810.88
164,048, 599.56
180, 538, 426.63
194, 270, 374.44
206, 370, 408.05
216,089, 286.77
188, 103, 522.70
163, 167, 833.69
157,071, 722.35
148,
984.61

19,885.68
17,451.54
14,502.74
12,160.62
6,933.51
11,630.65
2,759.00
4,196.09
10,459.48
370.00
5,493.84
2,467.27
2,553.32
1,682.25
3,26L36
495. 00
103. 25
1,777.34
3,517.12
2,897.26
375.00
375.00

37,640,787.95
109,741,134.10
209,464,215.25
309,226,813.42
266,027,537.43
191,087,589.41
158,356,460.86
184,899,756.49
143,098,153.63
130,642,177.72
113,729,314.14
102,409,784.90
110,007,493.58
116,700,732.03

1,495,845.26
1,018, 308.75
1,517, 175.13
2,329, 356.14
3,210, 815.48
2,623, 381.03
3,967, 682. 55
4,857, 600. 69
14,757, 600.75
24,877, 179.86
6,776, 236. 52
3,730; 945. 66
,
,576.40
7,361;
3,411, 818.63
1,365, 627. 42
1,335, 797.52
898, 158.18
2,059, 939.80
2,077, 022.30
2,694, 452. 48
2,498, 355. 20
3,328, 642. 56
1,688, 959. 55
1,859, 894. 25
2,352, 305. 30
2,043, 239.58
1,667, 084.99
8,470, 798.39
11,497, 049.07
8,917, 644.93
3,829, 486.64
3,513, 715.87
1,756, 687.30
1,778, 557. 71
870, 658.54
152, 203.77
167, 617.17
333.29
553.31.
031.03
1,163,575.76
1,348, 715.41
4,020, 344.34
3,350, 481.76
2,388, 646.68
2,575, 714.19
2,882, 312.38
1,852, 428.93
1,413, 640.17
1,129, 466.95

2,626.90
2,218.81
11,335.05
16,980.59
10,506.01
6,791.13
394.12
19.80
4,263.33
728. 79
1,687.70
755.22

1,795,33L73
1,485,103.61
475,648.96
1,200,573.03
1,974,754.12
4,200,233.70
1,788,145.85
765,685.61
229,102.88
580,355.37
315,254.51
93,798.80

1,735, 722.83
520, 126.49
602, 648.55
563, 227.77
1,074, 124.05
760, 410.61
945, 081.67
715, 161.82
1,266, 452.95
2,538, 576.90
7,001, 444.59
6,410, 348. 45
979, 939. 86
2,567, 112. 28
1,004, 054. 75
451, 995. 97
285, 895.92
1,075, 419. 70
361, 453. 68
289, 950.13
220, 808.30
612, 610. 69
685, 379.13
2,064, 308. 21
1,185, 166.11
464, 249. 40
988, 081.17
1,105; 352. 74
827; 731. 40
1,116, 190.81
1,259; 920.88
1,352; 029.13
1,454; 596. 24
1,088; 530.25
1,023; 515.31
915, 327. 97
3,741, 794.38
49,590, 595.99
30,693, 916.49
66,903, 980.19
29,192, 365.70
39,680, 390.13
26,373, 628.03
28,236, 255.67
30,986, 381.16
24,518 688.88
28,72i; 800.94
37,612; 708.54
19,411, 195.00
27,794, 148.11

22,966,363.96
24,763,629.23
24,827,627.38
24,844,116.51
28,526,820.82
31,867,450.66
33,948,426.25
21,791,935.55
35,430,087.10
50,826,796.08
24,954,153.04
26,302,561.74
31,482,749. 61
19,480,115.33
16,860,160.27
19,976,197.25
8,231,001.26
29,320,707.78
29,970,105.80
29,699,967.74
26,467,403.16
35,698,699.21
30,721,077.50
43,592,888.88
52,555,039.33
49,846,815.60
61,587,031.68
73,800,34L40
65,350,574.68
74,056,699.24
68,965,312.57
46,655,365.96
52,777,107.92
56,054,599.83
41,476,299. 49
51,919,261.09
112,094,945.51
262,711,865.33
327,283,518.68
557,817,230.34
477,001,523.47
398,369,440.36
369,564,545.47
411,253,971.24
383,323,944.89
374,106,867.56
333,738,204.67
304,978,756.06
288,000,051.10
293,790,130.50

1,524, 60L79
1,660, 276.46
1,778, 471.83
1,919, 313.70
2,105, 721.94
2,258, 570.17
2,617, Oil.88
2,823, 749.34
2,993, 556.66
3,408, 323.59
4,945, 668. 21
4,238, 733. 46
4,484, 656. 70
4,543, 521. 92
4,407, 726.27
4,546, 849. 65
4,296, 225. 43
4,237, 287.83
4,289, 841.80
3,487, 199.35
3,880, 309.23
4,555, 211.10
4,705, 176.28
5,499, 984. 86
6,410, 604.33
5,184, 526.84
5,240, 724. 70
6,255, 586.22
6,642, 136.13
6,920, 821.66
7,353, 951.76
7,486, 792.86
7,968, 484.07
8,518, 067.40
8,349, 296.40
8,299, 820.90
11,163, 789.59
12,438, 253.78
14,556, 158.70
14,436, 986.21
15,297, 026.87
16,292, 600.80
18,344, 510.72
19,772, 220.65
20,037, 045.42
21,915, 426.37
22,996, 741.57
26,471, 071.82
26,791, 360.59
28,644; 197.50

24,490 965.75
26,423;905.69
26,606,099.21
26,763 430.21
30,632;542.76
34,126,020.83
36,565,438.13
24,615,648.89
38,423,643.76
64,235,119.67
29,899,821. 25
30,541,295. 20
35,967,406.31
24,023,637. 25
21,267,886.54
24,523,046. 90
12,527,226.69
33,557,995. 61
34,259,947.60
33,187, 167.09
30,347,712.39
40,253,910.31
35,426,253. 78
49,092,873. 74
58,965,643.66
55,031,342. 44
66,827,756.38
80,055;927.62
71,992; 710.81
80,977,520.90
76,319,264.33
54,142,158.82
60,745,591.99
64,572,667.23
49,825,595.89
60,219,081.99
123,258,735.10
275,150,119.11
341,839,677.38
572,254,216.55
492,298,550.34
414,662;041.16
387,909,056.19
431,026,191.89
403,360,990.31
396,022,293.93
356,734,946.24
331,449,827.88
314,791 411.69
322,434,328.00

6,827, 196.80
8,368, 787.18
9,643 573.75
9,702 008.25
13,289, 004.18
14,578, 500.39
10,930, 874.27
3,164, 365.32
17,857, 273.74
19,958, 632.04
12,289, 061.20
7,562; 152.82
4,585, 966. 99
4,834, 402.86
9,621, 657.57
5,158, 689.19
3,549, 091.25
6,837, 147. 64
4- 7,034, 278. 01
2,438, 784.88
- 28,453, 380. 93
- 11,919; 521. 44
- 12,778, 000.89
4- 2,644, 505.76
4- 4,803, 560.92
4- 5,456, 563.24
4- 13,843, 042.59
4- 18,761, 886.29
4- 6,719, 911.97
4- 5,330, 349.23
4- 1,330, 903.64
- 27,327, 126.88
- 16,216, 491.85
7,146, 275.82
- 25,173, 913.59
-417,650, 980.56
-606,639, 330.67
-602,257, 235.50
-967,815, 770.90
4- 38,794, 874.00
4-130,272, 197.69
4- 28,030, 306.54
4- 48,373, 947.72
4-117,596, 966.09
4-100,163, 551.38
4-103,547 171.65
4- 48,498; 879.33
4- 3,739 955.85
4- 13,376, 658.26
4045.91
44444444444-

+
+

1 Including profits on coinage, payments by Pacific railways, tax on national-bank circulation, forest reserve fund, head tax on Immigrants, fees, flnes, and penalties, rent and sal_e
of Government property, District of Columbia receipts, etc.




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TABLE I.—Receipts and disbursements of the UnitedStates—Continued.

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RECAPITULATION OF RECEIPTS BY FISCAL YEARS—Continued.
Ordinary receipts.
Miscellaneous.

Year.
Customs.
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911.
1912
1913

Internal
revenue.

,493.07
$130,956,
130,170, 680.20
137,250, 047.70
186,522 064.60
198,159,676.02
,730.25
220,410;
,496.93
214,706;
195,067, 489.76
181,471;939.34
192,905 023.44
217,286; 893.13
219,091, 173.63
223,832, 741.69
229,668, 584.57
219,522, 205.23
177,452; 964.15
203,355, 016.73
131,818, 530.62
152,158, 617.45
160,021, 751.67
176,554,
;126.65
149,575; 062.35
206,128, 481.75
233,164, 871.16
238,585, 455.99
254,444, 708.19
284,479, 581.81
261,274, 564.81
261,798, 856.91
300,251, 877.77
332,233, 362.70
286,113, 130.29
300,711, 933.95
333,683, 445.03
314,497, 071.24
311,321,672.22
318,891,,395.86

$118,030, 407.83
110,581, 624.74
113,561, 610.58
124,009, 373.92
135,264; 385.51
146,497, 595.45
144,720; 368.98
121,586; 072.51
112,498; 725.54
116,805; 936.48
118,823; 391.22
124,296; 871.98
130,881, 513.92
142,606, 705.81
145,686; 249.44
153,971, 072.57
161,027; 623.93
147,111, 232.81
143,421, 672.02
146,762, 864.74
146,688, 574.29
170,900, 641.49
273,437, 161.51
295,327, 926.76
307,180, 663.77
271,880, 122.10
230,810, 124.17
232,904, 119.45
234,095, 740.85
249,150, 212.91
269,666,772.85
251,711, 126.70
246,212, 643.59
1289,933,519.45
2322,529,200.79
3321,612,199.66
4 344,416,
965.65

1 Includes $20,951,780.97 corporation tax.




Sales of public
lands.
$976, 253.68
1,079, 743.37<
924, 781.06
1,016, 506.60
2,201, 863.17
4,753, 140.37
7,955, 864.42
9,810, 705.01
5,705, 986.44
5,630, 999.34
9,254, 286.42
11,202, 017.23
8,038, 65L79
6,358, 272.51
4,029, 535.41
3,261, 875.58
3,182, 089.78
1,673, 637.30
1,103, 347.16
1,005, 523.43
864, 581.41
1,243, 129.42
1,678, 246.81
2,836, 882.98
2,965, 119.65
4,144, 122.78
8,926, 311.22
7,453, 479.72
4,859, 249.80
4,879, 833.65
7,878, 811.13
9,731, 560.23
7,700, 567.78
6,355, 797.49
5,731, 636.88
5,392. 796.75
2,910, 204. 69

Other miscellaneous items.

Direct tax.

$30.85

1,516.89
160,141.69
108,156.60
70,720.75
108,239.94
32,892.05
1,565.82

2 Includes $33,516,976.59 corporation tax.

Total ordinary
receipts.

$30,687, 068.20 $281,250, 222.78
15,931; 830.39 257,763,878.70
20,593; 801.87 272,330, 241.21
21,978, 525.01 333,526,500.98
25,154, 850.98 360,782, 292.67
31,703, 642.52 403,525, 250.28
30,796, 695.02 398,287, 581.95
21,984; 881.89 348,519, 869.92
24,014, 055.06 323,690, 706.38
20,989, 527.86 336,439, 727.06
26,005, 814.84 371,403, 277.66
24,674; 446.10 379,266,074.76
24,297; 151.44 387,050,058.84
24,447, 419.74 403,080, 982.63
23,374, 457.23 392,612, 447.31
20,251, 871.94 354,937,784.24
18,254; 898.34 385,8195 628.78
17,118, 618.52 297,722,019.25
16,706,438.48 313,390,075.11
19,186, 060.54 326,976, 200.38
23,614, 422.81 347,721, 705.16
83,602,501.94 405,321, 335.20
34,716,730.11 515,960,620.18
35,911, 170.99 567,240,851.89
38,954,098.12 587,685; 337.53
32,009, 280.14 562,478, 233.21
36,180, 657.20 560,396; 674.40
38,084, 749.88 539,716,913.86
43,852, 911.06 544,606,758.62
40,436,017.99 594,717,942.32
53,346,713.24 663,125,659.92
53,504, 906.05 601,060,723.27
48,964; 344.52 603,589,489.84
45,538, 953.05 675,511,715.02
58,614, 466.08 701,372,374.99
53,451, 796.74 691,778,465.37
57,892,663.64 724,111,229.84

Postal
revenue.

$27,531,585.26
29,277,516.95
30,041,982.86
33,315,479.34
36,785,397.97
41,876,410.15
45,508,692.61
43,325,958.81
42,560,843.83
43,948,422.95
48,837,609.39
62,695,176.79
56,175,611.18
60,882,097.92
65,931,785.72
70,930,475.98
75,896,993.16
75,080,479.04
76,983,128.19
82,499,208.40
82,665,462.73
89,012,618.55
95,021,384.17
102,354,579.29
111,631,193.39
121,848,047.26
134,224,443.24
143,582,624.34
152,826,585.10
167,932,782.95
183,585,005.57
191,478,663.41
203,562,383.07
224,128,657.62
237,879,823.60
246,744,015.88
266,619,525.65

s inciudes $28,583,303.73 corporation tax.

Surplus (4-) or
Total ordinary deficit (—) on
receipts and ordinary receipts,
postal revenue. Including postal
deficiencies.
$308,781,808.04
287,041,395.65
302,372,224.07
366,841,980.32
397,567,690.54
445,401,660.43
443,796,274.56
391,845,828.73
366,251,550.21
380,388,150.01
) 420,240,887.05
431,961,251.55
443,225,670.02
463,963,080.55
458,544,233.03
425,868,260.22
461,716,621.94
372,802,498.29
390,373,203.30
409,475,408.78
430,387,167.89
494,333,953.75
610,982,004.35
66^9,595,431.18
699,316,530.92
684,326,280.47
694,621,117.64
683,299,538.20
697,433,343.72
762,650,725.27
846,710,665.49
792,539,386.68
807,151,872.91
899,640,372.64
939,252,198.59
938,522,481.25
990,730,755.49

4-$39,915,747.92
4- 20,799,551.90
4- 5,382,357.08
4- 68,678,863.62
4-101,130,653.76
4-145,543,810.71
4-132,879,444.41
4-104,393,625.59
4- 63,463,77L27
4- 93,956,588.56
4-103,471,097.69
4-119,612,116.09
4-105,053,443.24
4-105,344,496.03
4- 37,239,762.57
4- 9,914,453.06
4- 2,341,674.29
- 69,803,260.58
- 42,805,223.18
- 25,203,245.70
- 18,052,454.41
-

38,047,247.60

- 89,111,559.67
4- 79,527,060.18
4- 77,717,984.38
4- 91,287,375.57
4- 54,307,652.36
4- ^7,479,092.55
- 18,753,335.00
.4- 45,312,516.97
4-111,420,530.88
- 20,041,667.37
-r, 58,734,954.93
+ 15,806,323.94
4- 47,234,377.10
4-37,224,501.90
4- 41,340,524.33

^ Includes $35,006,299.84 corporation tax.

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P u b l i c d e b t receipts.
P a n a m a Canal
receipts-proceeds of b o n d s
Proceeds of
Premium
Total public
a n d p r e m i u m . b o n d s a n d other
received.
debt.
securities.

Year.

1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
180G
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817 . .
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829.
1830

$361,391.34
5,102,498.45
1,797,272.01
4,007,950.78
3,396,424.00
320,000.00
70,000.00
200,000.00
5,000,000.00
1,565,229.24

•
:

$361,391.34
5,102,498.45
1,797,272.01
4,007,950.78
3,396,424.00
320,000.00
70,000.00
200,000.00
5,000,000.00
1,565,229.24

2,750,000.00

°.
. . .




.

2,750,000.00

12,837,900.00
26,184,135.00
23,377,826.00
35,220,671.40
9,425,084.91
466,723.45
8,353.00
2,291.00
3,000,824.13
5,000,324.00

12,837,900.00
26,184,135.00
23,377,826.00
35,252,779.04
9,425,771.00
466,723.45
8,353.00
2,291.00
3,040,824.13
5,000,324.00

5,000,000.00
5,000,000.00

$32,107.64
686.09

40,000.00

5,000,000.00
5,000,000.00

Excess of deposits to retire
national-bank
notes over
redemptions.

T o t a l of all
receipts.

$4,842,638.46
8,865,447.16
6,554,078.34
9,569,041.52
9,679,553.13
8,935,373.09
8,972,773.73
8,412,315.53
12,811,663.70
12,694,784. 40
13,265,900.76
15,322,625.60
11,424,050.04
12,216,018.87
13,982,822.27
16,006,451.41
16,882,153.71
17,521,379.70
8,280,107.07
12,685,969.25
15,009,900.82
23,288,183.98
41,228,065.68
35,290,490.08
52,004,259.34
58,133,139.86
34,836,565.59
22,724,139.65
25,810,402.76
21,993,254.40
20,632,005.82
21,349,983.30
21,670,880.61
25,578,511.72
28,147,111.61
26,708,094.25
24,490,965.75
26,423,905.69
26,606,099.21
26.763.430.21

S u r p l u s (4-) or
deficit ( - ) on
all receipts.

4- $978,088.02
—
174,059.44
60.66
4432,050.82
596,725.64
-f430,957.17
-f
190,308.33
—
356,610.89
4- 1,624,430.85
4535,114.32
4744,381.90
4- 1,776,281.60
—
151,246.00
733,072.08
—
1,602.72
4571,440.70
4- 5,170,944.69
4311,762.86
— 6,092,235.17
- 1,175,016.46
4899,375.23
4456,590.30
4- 1,402,133.60
— 3,464,115.10
4-11,678,010.38
4- 9,080,769.20
- 6,958,209.31
-13,412,534.93
4692,170.44
— 932,961.78
4363,906.85
4- 2,506,031.71
4- 5,197,932.12
- 7,510,505.04
4- 3,322,394.60
4- 1,208,897.01
4352,582.03
— 714,890.28
310,963.86
4228,032.48

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T A B L E I.—Receipts and disbursements of the UnitedStates—Continued.

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RECAPITULATION OF RECEIPTS BY FISCAL YEARS—Continued.
Public debt receipts.
Panama Canal
receipts—proProceeds of
ceeds of bonds
Total public
Premium
and premium. bonds and other
debt.
received.
securities.

Year.

1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853...
1854
1855
.•
1856
1857
1858
1859
I860
1861
1862
1863 . . . .
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868 . .
1869




•.

$2,992,989.15
12,716,820.86
3,857,276.21
5,589,547.51
13,659,317.38
14,808,735.64
12,479,708.36
1,877,18L 35
28,872,399.45
21,256,700.00
28,588,750.00
4,045,950.00
203,400.00
46,300.00
16,350.00
2,001.67
800.00
200.00
3,900.00
23,717,300.00
28,287,500.00
20,776,800.00
41,861,709.74
529,692,460.50
774,583,361.57
1,086,312,896.82
1,468,064,910.85
612,035,278.05
473,024,790.29
537,099,974.00
100,069,071.06

$71,700.83
666.60
28,365.91
37,080.00
487,065.48
10,550.00
4,264.92
22.50

709,357.72
10,008.00
33,630. 90
68,400.00
602,345.44
1,875,206.88
6,431,086.40
215,389.72
13,632,486.80
7,268,642.96
1,379,201.74

$2,992,989.15
12,716,820.86
3,857,276.21
5,589,547.51
13,659,317.38
14,808,735.64
12,551,409.19
1,877,847.95
28,900,765.36
21,293,780.00
29,075,815.48
4,056,500.00
207,664.92
46,300.00
16,372.50
2,001.67
800.00
200.00
3,900.00
23,717,300.0028,996,857.72
20,786,808.00
41,895,340.64
529,760,860.50
775,185,707.01
1,088,188,103.70
1,474,495,997.25
612,250,667.77
486,657,277.09
544,368,616.96
101,448,272.80

Excess of deposits to retire
national-bank
notes over
redemptions.!

Total of all
receipts.*

Surplus (4-) or
deficit ( - ) on
all receipts.

$30,632,542.76
34,126,020.83
36,565,438.13
24,615,648.89
38,423,643.76
54,235,119.67
32,892,810.40
43,258,116.06
39,824,682.52
29,613,184.76
34,927,203.92
39,331,782.54
25,078,635.88
35,435,843.56
34,259,947.60
33,187,167.09
59,248,477.75
61,547,690.31
64,502,069.26
53,149,373.74
59,173,308.58
55,077,642.44
66,844,128.88
80,057,929.29
71,993,510.81
80,977,720.90
76,323,164.33
77,859,458.82
89,742,449.71
85,359,475.23
91,720,936.53
589,979,942.49
898,444,442.11
1,363,338,222.81
1,816,335,674.63
1.184.504,884.32
978,955,827.43
959,030,658.12
489,357.328.99

— $1,412,646.16
— 2,496,848.89
4- 9,377,724.77
- 2,896,938.63
4- 18,093,152.12
4- 20,525,189.27
- 7,660,545.78
—
627,984.50
- 2,426,789.94
- 3,331,584.69
- 1,369,853.72
4720,154.21
4- 8,585,777.02
- 2,502,679.99
— 5-51,193.10
4- 1,478,847.28
- 5,251,916.09
- 3,434,303.15
4- 3,636,597.39
4- 3,331,702.05
4- 4,418,802.59
4- 1,256,583.57
4- 7,026,342.44
- 1,670,827.68
813,401.28
4- 1,330,557.67
— 2,305,374.80
- 11,689,520.78
- 1,904,677.28
213,717.82
— 2,015,672.95
4- 16,012,557.85
— 10,436,258.73
-H 97,919,902.71
-100,493,985.44
4-120,757,951.16
4- 29,995,625.29
— 38,051,314.22
4- 9,436,292.16

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1870.
1871.
1872.
1873.
1874.
1875.
1876.
1877.
1878.
1879.
1880.
1881.
1882.
1883.
1884.
1885.
1886.
1887..
1888.
1889.
1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.
18951896.
1897.
1898.
1899.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
1910.
1911.
1912.
1913.

$31,210,817.95
25,367,768.67
30,731,008.21
3 18,102,170.04
33,189,104.15

569,916.00
603,212.47
717,750.00
681,450.00
235,866.00
118; 500.00
928,950.00
134,650.00
850.250.00
578,010.00
065,540.00
678,200.00
225,300.00
372,850.00
404,650.00
58,150.00
39,850.00
40,900.00
48,650.00
24,350.00
21,650.00
13,750. 00
15,250.00
22,900.00
50, 014,250.00
81, 165,050.00
131,168,800.00
3,250. 00
'5,950.00
201,210.00
117,770.00
3,700.00
2,370.00
2,050.00
2,600.00
2,750.00
2,050.00
5,100.00
15,436,500.00

1,506.39

31,571,422.39
91,603,212.47
173,717,750.00
38,681,450.00
183,235,866.00
133,118,500.00
305,734.78 133,234,684.78
156,195.80 141,290,845.80
198,850,250.00
1,496,943.25 619,074,953.25
110.00
73,065,650.00
. 678,200.00
225,300.00
304,372,850.00
1,404,650.00
58,150.00
39,850.00
40,900.00
48,650.00
24,350. 00
21,650.00
13,750.00 $40,018,392.25
15,250. 00
22,900. 00
8,633,295.71
58,647,545.71
5,708,247.75
11,339,344.62
92,504,394.62
11,166,246.41 142,335,046.41
3,250.00
4,356,614.50
5,950.00
6,034,510.00
199,201,210.00
5,324,234.50
117,770.00
3,700.00
2,370.00
12,650,160.00
1,486,098.00
1,484,048.00
457,936.00
455,336.00
2,750. 00
532,374.00
530,324. 00
10,408,537.00
1,514,334.00
1,509,234.00
5,023,165.50
15,436,500.00
24,797,980.00
5,255,715.00

459,280.00
. 929,840.00
,

459,280.00
1,929,840.00

462,597,614.28 - 7 638,809.25
494,964,202.78 - 24,927,570.54
569,740,043.93 - 15 571,348.65
395,416,396.24 - 14,479,076.24
514,685,693.88 -f- 9,157,257.53
447,909,911.69 - 4 655,478.22
455,669,012.78 -• 4,204.784.11
450,072,653.84 4- 29, 967,068. 67
485,891,645.65 4- 75, 651,808.00
921,447,177.32 4-144,575,084.77
439,907,630.32 -141, 485,744.21
398,245,890.54 + 14,637,023.93
445,626,960. 43 - 20,736,144.84
748,169,124.56 - 1,178,462.55
393,250,478.73 + 4 531,941. 09
,
366,309,700.21 + 17,479,285.84
380,428,000.01 4- 49,412,595.20
420,281,787.05 - 24, 447,370.46
432,009,901.55 4- 36, 527,710. 58
443,250,020.02 - 33,503,357.76
463,984,730.55 - 19,601,877.53
498,576,375.28 - 34,132,372.16
425,883,510.22 - 27, 673,266.32
461,739,521.94 - 4 445,400.21
,
437,158,291.75
703,914. 32
482,877,597.92 - s; 192,425.01
551,810,455.19 4- 46, 580,230.86
434,747,032.39 4-104; 071,091.91
600,374,413.75 - 25,948,849.60
815,507,448.85 - 61,791,521.35
669,713,201.18 4-100,038.214.12
699,320,230.92 4- 23,
215,743.65
696,978,810.47 4- 21,
672, 596.43
696,107,216.64 4- 33,
266,651. 54
683,757,474.20 4- 26,
634,546. 21
697,436,093.72 - 66,
773,591,636.27 - 26, 574.076.13
884,458,982.94 4- 35, 211,862. 93
372,090.65
858,141,635. 35 4- 91,
837,882,881.12 - 26,890,097.74
-118, 795,919. 63
899,640,372.64
962,610,083.63 - 19,480,752.43
972,170,865.40 4- 33,501,36a 58
992,660,595.49 4- 26, 975,552.86
+ 3,319,156.71

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1 Only the annual excess of deposits over redemptions included In this column.
2 National-bank redemption fund herein Includes only the annual excess of deposits on account of national-bank redemption fund since 1890.
3 Includes deposits of $17,641,634, for principal of bonds, only $2,035,700 of which were actually Issued in 1911; the balance was issued in the fiscal year 1912.
NOTE.—The disbursements are stated by warrants paid to June 30,1866, and by warrants issued since that date.
The disbursements for postal deflciencies are grants by law from the Treasury, and differ from the fiscal year expenditures thereof shown by reports of the Auditor for the PostOflace Department.
Issues and redemptions of certiflcates and notes not affecting the cash in general fund are excluded from the public debt figures in this statement.




to
CO

T A B L E I.—Receipts and disbursements of the UnitedStates—Continued.

to

RECAPITULATION OF DISBURSEMENTS BY FISCAL YEARS.
Ordinary disbursements.
Year.

1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811...
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826

Civil and miscellaneous, exclusive
of postal deficiencies.

-

;

. . .

.




..

War Department.

$1,083,97L61
4,672,664.38
511,451.01
750,350.74
1,378,920.66
801,847.58
1,259,422.62
1,139,524.94
1,039,39L68
1,337,613.22
1,114,768.45
1,462,929.40
1,842,635.76
2,191,009.43
3,768,598.75
2,890,137.01
1,697,897.51
1,423,285.61
1,215,803.79
1,101,144.98
1,367,291.40
1,683,088.21
1,729,435.61
2,208,029.70
2,898,870.47
2,989,741.17
3,518,936.76
3,835,839.51
3,067,21L41
2,592,021.94
2,223,121.54
1,967,996.24
2,022,093.99
7,155,308. 81
2,748,544.89
2,600,177.79

$632,804.03
1,100,702.09
1,130,249.08
2,639,097.59
2,480,910.13
1,260,263.84
1,039,402.46
2,009,522.30
2,466,946.98
2,560,878.77
1,672,944.08
1,179,148.25
822,055.85
875,423.93
712,781.28
1,224,355.38
1,288,685.91
2,900,834.40
3,345,772.17
2,294,323.94
2,032,828.19
11,817,798.24
19,652,013.02
20,350,806.86
14,794,294.22
16,012,096.80
8,004,236.53
5,622,715.10
6,506,300.37
2,630,392.31
4,461,291.78
3,111,98L48
3,096,924.43
3,340,939.85
3,659,914.18
3,943,194.37

Navy Department.

$61,408.97
410,562.03
274,784.04
382,631.89
1,381,347.76
2,858,081.84
3,448,716.03
2,111,424.00
915,561.87
1,215,230.53
1,189,832.75
1,597,500.00
1,649,641.44
1,722,064.47
1,884,067.80
2,427,758.80
1,654,244.20
1,965,566.39
'3,959,365.15
6,446,600.10
7,311,290.60
8,660,000.25
3,908,278.30
3,314,598.49
2,953,695.00
3,847,640.42
4,387,990.00
3,319,243.06
2,224,458.98
2,503,765.83
2,904,581.56
3,049,083.86
4,218 902.45

Indians.

$27,000.00
13,648.85
27,282.83
13,042.46
23,475.68
113,563.98
62,396.58
16,470.09
20,302.19
31.22
9,000.00
94,000.00
60,000.00
116,500.00
196,500.00
234,200.00
205,425.00
213,575.00
337,503.84
177,625.00
151,875. 00
277,845.00
167,358.28
167,394.86
530,750.00
274,512.16
319,463. 71
505,704. 27
463,181.39
315,750. 01
477,005.44
575,007.41
380,781.82
429,987.90
724,106. 44
743,447.83

Pensions.

$175,813.88
109,243.15
80,087.81
81,399.24
68,673.22
100,843.71
92,256.97
104,845.33
95,444.03
64,130.73
73,533.37
85,440.39
62,902.10
80,092.80
81,854.59
81,875.53
70,500.00
82,576.04
87,833.54
83,744.16
75,043.88
91,402.10
86,989.91
90,164. 36
69,656.06
188,804.15
297,374.43
890,719.90
2,415,939.85
3,208,376.31
242,817.25
1,948,199.40
1,780,588. 52
1,499,326.59
1,308,810.57
1,558,593.83

Interest on the
public debt.

$1,177,863.03
2,373,611.28
2,097,859.17
2,752,523.04
2,947,059.06
3,239,347.68
3,172,516.73
2,955,875.90
2,815,65L41
3,402,601.04
4,411,830.06
4,239,172.16
3,949,462.36
4,185,048.74
2,657,114.22
3,368,968.26
3,369,578.48
2,557,074.23
2,866,074.90
3,163,671.09
2,585,435.57
2,451,272.57
3,599,455.22
4,593,239.04
5,990,090.24
7,822,923.34
4,536,282.55
6,209,954.03
5,211,730.56
5,151,004. 32
5,126,073.79
5,172,788.79
4,922,475.40
4,943,557.93
4,366,757.40
3,975,542.95

Total ordinary
disbursements,
exclusive of
postal deficiencies.
$3,097,452.55
8,269,869.75
3,846,929.90
6,297,822.04
7,309,600.78
5,790,650.83
6,008,627.25
7,607,586.32
9,295,818.13
10,813,971.01
9,393,499.96
7,976,252.07
7,952,286. 60
8,637,907. 65
9,014,348.84
9,449,177.62
8,354,151.37
9,061,413.08
10,280,747.04
8,474,753.37
8,178,040.43
20,280,771. 27
31,681,852.14
34,720,925.42
32,943,661.24
31,196,355.92
19,990,892.47
20,018,627.81
21,512,004.00
18,285,534.89
15,849,552.86
15,000,432.30
14,706,629.99
20,273,702.64
15,857,217.34
17,037,859.22

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1827.
1828.
1829.
1830.
1&31,
1832,
1833,
1834,
1835,
1836
1837
1838,
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
' 1874
1875
1876
1877
1878,




2, n s , 476.58
3,676,052.64
3,082,234.65
3,237,416.04
3,064,646.10
4,577,141.45
5,716,245.93
4,404,728.95
4,229,698.53
5,393,279.72
9,893,370.27
7,160,664.76
5,725,990.89
5,995,398.96
6,083,224.45
6,721,927.61
3,181,410.00
5,645,183.86
5,911,760.98
5,901,052.27
6,349,309.36
5,628,629.29
12,885,334.24
16,043,763.36
17,888,992.18
16,462,727.01
15,309,318.01
23,464,799.05
21,011,611.43
28,594,920.87
24,948,615.77
21,651,093.42
18,988,985.99
18,088,432.58
18,156,392.66
17,824,134.04
22,449,068.39
26,572,236.87
42,739,383.10
40,613,114.17
47,593,557.05
48,956,676.01
51,078,551.25
48,392,882.35
55,350,666.23
55,809,757.42
67,837,635.06
80,427,548.90
63,859,056.88
68,507,120.68
52,756,193.59
47,424,309.55

3,948,977.88
4,145,544.56
4,724,291. 07
4,767,128.88
4,841,835.55
5,446,034.88
6,704,019.10
5,696,189.38
5,759,156.89
11,747,345.25
13,682,730.80
12,897,224.16
8,916,995.80
7,095,267.23
8,801,610.24
6,610,438.02
2,908,671.95
5,218,183.66
5,746,291.28
10,413,370.58
35,840,030.33
27,688,334.21
14,558,473.26
9,687,024.58
12,161,965.11
8,521,506.19
9,910,498.49
11,722,282.87
14,648,074.07
16,963,160.51
19,159,150.87
25,679,121.63
23,154,720.53
16,472,202.72
23,001,530.67
389,173,562.29
603,314,411.82
690,391,048.66
1,030,690,400.06
283,154,676.06
95,224,415.63
123,246,648.62
78,501,990.61
57,655,675.40
35,799,991.82
35,372,157.20
46,323,138.31
42,313,927.22
41,120,645.98
38,070,888.64
37,082,735.90
32,154,147.85

4,263,877.45
3,918,786.44
3,308,745.47
3,239,428.63
3,856,183.07
3,956,370.29
3,901,356.75
3,956,260.42
3,864,939.06
5,807,718.23
6,646,914.53
6,131,580.53
6,182,294.25
6,113,896.89
6,001,076.97
8,397,242.95
3,727,711.53
6,498,199.11
6,297,177.89
6,455,013.92
7,900,635.76
9,408,476.02
9,786,705.92
7,904,724.66
8,880,581.38
8,918,842.10
11,067,789.53
10,790,096.32
13,327,095.11
14,074,834.64
12,651,694.61
14,053,264.64
14,690,927.90
11,514,649.83
12,387,156.52
42,640,353.09
63,261,235.31
85,704,963.74
122,617,434.07
43,285,662.00
31,034,011.04
25,775,502.72
20,000,757.97
21,780,229.87
19,431,027.21
21,249,809.99
23,526,256.79
30,932,587.42
21,497,626.27
18,963,309.82
14,959,935.30
17,365,301.37

750,624.88
705,084.24
576,344.74
622,262. 47
930,738.04
1,352,419.75
1,802,980.93
1,003,953.20
1,706,444: 48
5,037,022.88
4,348,036.19
5,504,191.34
2,528,917.28
2,331,794.86
2,514,837.12
1,199,099.68
578,371.00
1,256,532.39
1,539,351.35
1,027,693.64
1,430,411.30
1,252,296.81
1,374,161.55
1,663,591.47
2,829,801.77
3,043,576.04
3,880,494.12
1,550,339.55
2,772,990.78
2,644,263.97
4,354,418.87
4,978,266.18
3,490,534.53
2,991,12L54
2,865,481.17
2,327,948.37
3,152,032.70
2,629,975.97
5,059,360.71
3,295,729.32
4,642,531.77
4,100,682.32
7,042,923.06
3,407,938.15
7,426,997.44
7,061,728.82
7,951,704.88
6,692,462.09
8,384,656.82
5,966,558.17
5,277,007.22
4,629,280.28

976,138.86
850,573.57
• 949,594.47
1,363,297.31
1,170,665.14
1,184,422.40
4,589,152.40
3,364,285.30
1,954,711.32
2,882,797.96
2,672,162.45
2,156,057.29
3,142,750.51
2,603,562.17
2,388,434.51
1,378,931.33
839,041.12
2,032,008.99
2,400,788.11
1,811,097.56
1,744,883.63
1,227,496.48
1,328,867.64
1,866,886.02
2,293,377.22
2,401,858.78
1,756,306.20
1,232,665.00
1,477,612.33
1,296,229.65
1,310,380.58
1,219,768.30
1,222,222.71
1,100,802.32
1,034,599.73
852,170.47
1,078,513.36
4,985,473.90
16,347,621.34
15,605,549.88
20,936,551.71
23,782,386.78
28,476,621.78
28,340,202.17
34,443,894.88
28,533,402.76
29,359,426.86
29,038,414.66
29,456,216.22
28,257,395.69
27,963,752.27
27,137,019.08

3,488,071.51
3,098,800.60
2,542,843.23
1,912,574.93
1,373,748.74
772,561.50
303,796. 87
202,152. 98
57,863.08
14,996.48
399,833.89
174,598.08
284,977.55
773,549.85
523,583.91
1,833,452.13
1,040,458.18
842,723.27
1,119,214.72
2,390,765.88
3,565,535.78
3,782,393.03
3,696,760.75
4,000,297.80
3,665,832.74
3,070,926.69
2,314,464.99
1,953,822.37
1,593,265.23
1,652,055.67
2,637,649.70
3,144,120.94
4,034,157.30
13,190,344.84
24,729,700.62
53,685,421.69
77,395.090.30
133,067,624.91
143,781,591.91
140,424,045.71
130,694,242.80
129,235,498.00
125,576,565.93
117,357,839.72
104,750,688.44
107,119,815.21
103,093,544.57
100,243,271.23
97,124, S U . 58
102,500,874.65

16,139,167.16
16,394,842.05
15,184,053.63
15,142,108.26
15,237,816. 64
17,288,950. 27
23,017,551.98
18,627,570.23
17,572,813.36
30,868,164.04
37,243,214.24
33,864,714.56
26,896,782.62
24,314,518.19
26,074,160.84
25,081,189.44
11,758,789.51
22,483,560.14
22,935,827.79
26,450,951.24
54,384,485.10
47,595,998.69
43,499,078.39
40,948,383.12
47,751,478.41
43,348,807.92
45,590,239.09
51,831,109.48
55,551,848.71
65,527,232.01
64,017,525.93
69,233,569.84
64,185,041.36
53,311,329.93
61,479,318.02
466,008,513.10
717,984,962.20
863,969,120.83
1,294,849,289.58
519,022,356.34
343,212,659.11
366,285,942.16
315,795,087.47
. 288,812,425.94
278,029,143.51
265,384,695.91
279,748,850.34
296,524,755.50
267,411,746.74
260,008,544.23
235,164,135.92
231,210,932.78

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TABLE I;—Receipts and disbursements of the UnitedStates—Continued.

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RECAPITULATION OF DISBURSEMENTS BY FISCAL YEARS—Continued.
Ordinary disbursements.

Civil a n d miscellaneous, exclusive
of p o s t a l deficiencies.

Year

1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
.
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913 .
'..

'.

.




War Department.

$60,968,031.00
61,642,529.76
60,520,686.05
57,219,750.98
68,603,519.03
70,920,433.70
82,952,647.80
65,973,277.83
78,763,578.54
69,896,223.67
76,795,144.53
74,528,219.58
105,306,395.41
95,790,498.90
97,786,004.08
93,693,884.07
82,263,188.42
77,916,234.62
79,252,061.69
86,016,464.75
110,979,685.82
98,542,411.37
117,327,240.89
111,067,171.39
122,165,385.54
130,099,672.06
127,968,471.82
130,221,177.07
145,416,530.32
162,532,367.63
167,001,087.10
171,580,829.79
173,838,599.04
172,256,794.41
169,802,304.63

$40,425,660.73
38,116,916.22
40,466,460.55
43,570,494.19
48,911,382.93
39,429,603.36
42,670,578.47
34,324,152.74
38,561,025.85
38,522,436.11
44,435,270.85
44,582,838.08
48,720,065.01
46,895,456.30
49,641,773.47
54,567,929.85
51,804,759.13
50,830,920.89
48,950,267.89
91,992,000.29
229,841,254.47
134,774,767.78
144,615,697.20
112,272,216.08
118,619,520.15
115,035,410.58
122,175,074.24
117,946,692.37
122,576,405.49
137,746,523.95
161,067,462.39
155,911,705.93
160,135,975.89
148,795,421.92
160,387,452.85

Navy Department.

$15,125,126.84
13,536,984.74
15.686.671.66
15,032,046.26
15,283,437.17
17,292,601.44
16.021.079.67
13,907,887.74
15,141,126.80
16,926,437.65
21,378,809.31
22,006,206.24
26,113,896.46
• 29,174,138.98
30,136,084.43
31,701,293.79
28,797,795.73
27,147,732.38
34,561,546.29
58,823,984.80
63,942,104.25
55,953,077.72
60,506,978.47
67,803,128.24
82,618,034.18
102,956,101.55
117,550,308.18
110,474,264.40
97,128,469.36
118,037,097.15
115,546,011.09
123,173,716.68
119,937,644.39
135.591,955.72
133,262,861.97

Indians.

$5,206,109.08
5,945,457.09
6,514,161.09
9,736,747.40
7,362.590.34
6; 475,999.29
6,552,494.63
6,099,158.17
6,194,522.69
6,249,307.87
6,892,207.78
6,708,046.67
8,527,469.01
11,150,577.67
13,345,347.27
10,293,481.52
9,939,754.21
12,165,528.28
13,016,802.46
10,994,667.70
12,805,711.14
10,175,106.76
10,896,073.35
10,049,584.86
12,935,168.08
10,438,350.09
14,236,073.71
12,746,859.08
15,163,608.41
14,579,755.75
15,694,618.11
18,504,131.60
20,933,869.44
20,134,839.80
20,306,158.90

Pensions.

$35,121,482.39
56,777,174.44
50,059,279.62
61,345,193.95
66,012,573.64
55,429,228.06
56,102,267.49
63,404,864.03
75,029,101.79
80,288,508.77
87,624,779.11
106,936,855.07
124,415,951.40
134,583,052.79
159,357,557.87
141,177,284.96
141,395,228.87
139,434,000.98
141,053,164.63
147,452,368. 61
139,394,929.07
140,877,316.02
139,323,621.99
138,488,559.73
138,425,646.07
142,559,266.36
141,773,964.57
141,034,561.77
139,309,514.31
153,892,467.01
161,710,367.25
160,696,415.88
157,980,575.01
153,590,456.26
175,085,450.29

Interest on the
public debt.

$105,327,949.00
95,757,575.11
82,508,741.18
71,077,206.79
59,160,131.25
54,578,378.48
51,386,256.47
50,580,145.97
47,741,577.25
44,715,007.47
41,001,484.29
36,099,284.05
37;547,135.37
23,378,116.23
27,264,392.18
27,841,405.64
30,978,030.21
35,385,028.93
37,791,110.48
37,585,056.23
39,896,925.02
40,160,333.27
32,342,979.04
29,108,044.82
28,556,348.82
24,646,489.81
24,590,944.10
24,308,576.27
24,481,158.34
21,426,138.21
21,803,836.46
21,342,978.83
21,311,334.12
22,616,300.48
22,899,108.08

Total ordinary
disbursements,
•exclusive of
postal deficiencies.
$262,174,359.04
261,776,637.36
255,756,000.15
257,981,439.57
265,333,634.36
244,126,244.33
255,685,324.53
234,289,486.48
261,430,932.92
256,597,921.54
278,127,695.87
290,861,449.69
350,630,912.66
340,971,840.87
377,531,159.30
359,275,279.83
345,178,756.57
342,879,446.08
354,624,953.44
432,864,542.38
596,860,609.77
480,483,012.92
505,012,590.94
468,788,705.12
503,320,102.84
525,735,290.45
548,294,836.62
536,732,130.96
544,075,746.23
608,214,349.70
642,823,382.40
651,209.778.71
654,137,997.89
652,985,768.69
681,743,336.72

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Postal disbursements.
•

Year.

1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803.1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832

From postal
revenue.

.

$67,113.66
76,586.60
74,161.03
95,397.53
125,038.62
136,639.08
156,588.03
185,308.01
184,835.88
207,135.96
248,141.92
275,856.69
316,312.37
333,977.23
386,115.52
413,814.45
418,916.03
446,914.80
505,115.94
550,991.22
517,920.73
552,472.53
635,411.72
726,374.86
743,755.61
807,875.15
917,128.86
1,031,799.18
1,114,032.59
1,163,191.33
1,177,526.28
1,167,358.96
1,158,777.49
1,190,478.29
1,238,912.29
1,395,798.78
1,481,619.68
1,679,316.45
1,872,704.67
1,950,116.18
2,006,742.80
2,266,171.66




Total ordinary
disbursements
and postal
Panama Canal
From Treasury Total postal service, includ- disbursements.
grants for
disbursements. ing grants for
deficiencies
d.eficiencles.
thereto.
$67,113.66
76,586.60
74,161.03
95,397.53
125,038.62
136,639.08
156,588.03
185,308.01
184,835.88
207,135.96
248,141.92
275,856.69
316,312.37
333,977.23
386,115.52
413,814.45
418,916.03
446,914.80
505,115.94
550,991.22
517,920.73
552,472.53
635,411.72
726; 374.86
743,755.61
807,875.15
917,128.86
1,031,799.18
1,114,032.59
1,163,191.33
1,177,526.28
.1,167,358.96
1,158.777.49
1,190,478.29
1,238,912.29
1,395,798.78
1,481,619.68
1,679,316.45
1,872,704.67
1,950,110.18
2,006,742.80
2,266,171.66

$3,164,566.21
8,346,456.35
3,921,090.93
6,393,219.57
7,434,639.40
5,927,289.91
6,165,215.28
7,792,894.33
9,480,654.01
11,021,106.97
9,641,641.88
8,252,108.76
8,268,598.97
8,971,884.88
9,400,464.36
9,862,992.07
8,773,067.40
9,508,327.88
10,785,862.98
9,025,744.59
8,695,96L16
20,833,243.80
32,317,263.86
35,447,300.28
33,687,416.85
32,004,231.07
20,908,021.33
21,050,426.99
22,626,036.59
19,448,726.22
17,027,079.14
16,167,791.26
15,865,407.48
21,464,180.93
17,096,129.63
18,433,658.00
17.620,786.84
18,074,158.50
17,056,758.30
17,092,224.44
17,244,559.44
19,655,121.93

Public debt disbursements.
Redemption
of bonds
and other
securities.
$699,984.23
693,050.25
2,633,048.07
2,743,771.13
2,841,639.37
2,577,126.01
2,617,250.12
976,032.09
1,706,578.84
1,138,563.11
2,879,876.98
5,294,235.24
3,306,697.07
3,977,206.07
4,583,960.63
5,572,018.64
2,938,141.62
7,701,288.96
3,586,479.26
4,835,241.12
5,414,564.43
1,998,349.88
7,508,668.22
3,307,304. 90
6,638,832.11
17,048,139.59
20,886,753.57
15,086,247.59
2,492,195.73
3,477;489.96
3,241,019.83
2,676,160.33
607,541.01
11,624,835.83
7,728,587.38
7,065,539.24
6,517,596.88
9,064,637.47
9,860,304.77
9,443,173.29
14,800,629.48
17,067,747.79

Premium paid.

Total public
debt.
$699,984.23
693,050.25
2,633,048.07
2,743,771.13
2,841,639.37
2,577,126.01
2,617,250.12
976,032.09
1,706,578.84
1,138,563.11
2,879,876.98
5,294,235.24
3,306,697.07.
3,977,206.07
4,583,960.63
5,572,018.64
2,938,141.62
7,701,288.96
3,586,479.26
4,835,241.12
5,414,564.43
1,998,349.88
7,508,668.22
3,307,304.90
6,638,832.11
17,048,139.59
20,886,753.57
15,086,247.59
2,492,195.73
3,477,489.96
3,241,019.83
2,676,160.33
607,541.01
11,624,835.83
7,728,587.38
7,065,539.24
6,517,596.88
9,064,637.47
9,860,304.77
9,443,173.29
14,800,629.48
17,067,747.79

Excess of
national-bank
notes retired
over deposits
for retirement.

Total of all
disbursements.

$3,864,550.44
9,039,506.60
6,554,139.00
9,136,990.70
10;276,278.77
8,504,415.92
8,782,465.40
8,768,926.42
11,187,232.85
12,159,670.08
12,521,518.86
13,546,344.00
11,575,296.04
12,949,090.95
13,984,424.99
15,435,010.71
11,711,209.02
17,209,616.84
14,372,342.24
13,860,985.71
14,110,525.59
22,831,593.68
39,825,932.08
38,754,605.18
40,326,248.96
49,052,370.66
41,794,774.90
36,136,674.58
25,118,232.32
22,926,216.18
20,268,098.97
18,843,951.59
16,472,948.49
33,089,016.76
24,824,717.01
25,499,197. 24
24,138,383.72
27,138,795.97
26,917,063.07
26,535,397.73
32,045,188.92
36,622,869.72

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RECAPITULATION OF DISBURSEMENTS BY FISCAL YEARS-Contiaued.
Postal disbursements.
Year.
F r o m postal
revenue.

1833..
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839. .
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844.
1845
1840
1847
1848-.
1849
1850....:::....
1851. . ; : . : .
1852
1853
:.:....
1854
1855......
1856
1857
1858
1859.
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869

$2,930,414.87
2,910,605.08
2,757,350.08
2,841,766.36
3,288,319.03
4,430,662.21
4,636,536.31
4,718,235.64
4,499,527.61
5,674,751.80
4,374,753.71
4,296,512.70
4,320,731.99
4,076,036.91
3,979,542.10
4,326,850.27
4,479,049.13
5,212,953.43
6,278,40L68
7,108,450.04
5,240,724.70
6,255,586.22
6,642,136.13
6,920,82L66
7,353,951.76
7,486,792.86
7,968,484.07
8,518,067.40
8,349,296.40
8,299,820.90
11,163,789.59
12,438,253.78
14,556,158.70
14,436,986.21
15,297,026.87
16,292,600.80
18,344,510.72




Total ordinary
disbursements
and postal
P
Canal
service, includ- d ia n a m a m e n t s .
sburse
F r o m Treasury Total postal
i n g g r a n t s for
g r a n t s for
deficiencies
dis.bursements.
deficiencies.
therein.

$407,657.00
53,697.00
21,303.00
Sio,23i. 62
536,298.99
22,221.96

1,041,444.44
2,153,750.00
3,207,345.63
3,078,814.00
3,199,11&00
3,616,883.00
4,748,923.00
4,808,558.41
9,889,545.72
5,170,895.03
3,561,728.55
.749,313.98
999,980.00
250,000.00
3,516,666.67
4,053,191.66
6,395,510.28

$2,930,414.87 $25,947,966.85
2i;538,175.31
2,910,605.08
20,330,163. 44
2,757,350.08
33,709,930.40
2,841,766.36
40,531,533.27
3,288,319.03
4,430,662.21
38,295,376.77
31,533,318.93
4,636,536.31
29,032,753.83
4,718,235.64
30,981,345.45
4,907,184.61
30,809,638.24
5,728,448.80
16,154,846. 22
4,396,056.71
26,780,072.84
4,296,512.70
27,256,559.78
4,320,731.99
31,337,219.77
4,886,268.53
58,900,326.19
4,515,841.09
51,945,070.92
4,349,072.23
47,978,127.52
4,479,049.13
46,161,336.55
5,212,953.43
54,029,880.09
6,278,401.68
51,498,702.40
8,149,894.48
52,984,713.79
7,394,474.70
61,294,041.33
9,462,93L85
65,272,798.84
9,720,950.13
75,647,171.67
10,119,939.66
74,988,360.69
10,970,834.76
81,469,285.70
12,235,715.86
76,962,083.84
12,777,042.48
71,718,943.05
18,407,613.12
74,999,509.45
13,520,191.43
11,861,549.45 477,870,062.55
11,913,103.57 729,898,065.77
13,438,233.78 877,407,354.61
14,806,158.70 1,309,655,448.28
14,436,986.21 533,459,342.55
18,813,693.54 362,026,352.65
20,345,792.46 386,631,734.62
23,740,021.00 339,535,108.47

P u b l i c d e b t disbiu-sements.
Redemption
of b o n d s
a n d other
securities.

Premium paid.

E x c e s s of
national-bank
notes retired
over deposits
for retirement.!

$1,239,746.51
5,974,412.21
328.20

$1,239,746.51
5,974,412.21
328.20
21,822.91
5,590,723.79
10.718.153.53
3,912,015.62
5,315,712.19
7,801,990.09
338,012.64
11,158,450.71
7,536,349.49
371,100.04
5,600,067.65
13.036.922.54
12,804,478.54
3,656,335.14
654,912.71
2,152,293.05
6,412,574.01
17,556,896.95
6,662,065.86
3,614,618.66
3,276,606.05
7,505,250 82
14,685,043.15
13,854,250.00
18,737,100.00
96,097,322.09
178,982,635.07
388,010,965.49
605,456,311.68
530,229,114.10
576,120,500.11
603,449,086.68
138,711,248.31

Total public
debt.

00

$18,23L43

82,865.81
69,713.19
170,063.42
420,498. 64
2,877,818.69
872,047.39
385,372.90
363,572.39
574,443.08

i,7i7,966.ii
58,476.51
10,813,-849.38
7,001,151.04
1,674,680.05

21,822.91
5,590,723.79
10,718,153.53
3,912,015.62
5,315,712.19
7,801,990.09
338;012.64
11,158,450.71
7,554,580.92
371,100.04
5,600,067.65
13,036,922.54
12,8S7,344.35
3,656,335.14
724,625.90
2,322,356.47
6,833,072.65
20,434,715. 64
7,534,113.25
3,999,991.56
3,640,178.44
8,079,693.90
14,685,043.15
13,854,250.00
18,737,100.00
•96,097,322.09
178,982,635.07
388,010,965.49
607,174,211.79
530,287,590.61
586,933,849.49
610,450,237.72
140,385,928.36

.

T o t a l of all
disbursements.2

$27,187,713.36
27,512,587.52
20,330,491.64
33,709,930.40
40,553,356.18
43,886,100.56
42,251,472.46
32,944,769.45
36,297,057.64
38,611,628.33
16,492,858.86
37,938,523.55
34,811,140.70
31,708,319.81
64,500,393.84
04,981,993. 46
00,865,471.87
49,817,671.69
54,754,505.99
53,821,058.87
59,817,786.44
81,728,756.97
72,806,912.09
79,647,163.23
78,628,539.13
89,548,979.60
91,647,126.99
85,573,193.05
93,736,609.45
573,967,384.64
908,880,700.84
1,265,418,320.10
1,916,829,660.07
1,063,746,933.16
948,960,202.14
997,081,972.34
479,921,036.83

tei
tej

o

Pi
O
d
tei

>

fej
o
tei
ZP

1870,
1871
1872
1873
1874,
1875,
1876
1877,
1878,
1879,
1880,
1881
1882.
1883,
1884,
1885,
1886.
1887.
1888.
1889.
1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.
1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
1910.
1911.
1912.
1913.

19, 772,220.65
20, 037,045.42
21, 915,426.37
22, 996,741.57
26, 471,071.82
26, 791,360.69
28, 644,197.50
27, 531,585.26
29, 277,516.96
30, 041,982.86
33, 316,479.34
36; 785,397.97
41, 876,410.15
45, 508,692.61
43, 325,958.81
42, 560,843.83
43, 948,422.95
48: 837,609.39
52! 695,176.79
56, 175,611.18
60, 882,097; 92
65, 931,785.72
70, 930,475.98
75, 896,993.16
75, 080,479.04
76, 983,128.19
82, 499,208.40
82, 665,462.73
89, 012,618.55
95, 021,384.17
102; 354,679.29
111, 631,193.39
121; 848,047.26
134; 224,443.24
143, 582,624.34
""1,585.10
152, 932,782.95
167, 585,005.57
183, 478,663.41
191,
203, 562,383.07
128,657.62
224, 660,705.48
237, 744,015.88
246,
262, 108,874.74

4,844,579.21
5,131,250.00
5,175,000.00
6,490,475.00
4,714;044.71
7,211;646.10
5,092,540.36
6,170,338.94
5,753,394.02
4,773,524.49
3,071,000.00
3,895,638.66
74,503.18
4,541,610.58
8,193,652.02
6,501,247.05
3,056,037.13
3,868,919.73
6,875,036.91
4,741,772.08
4,05i;489.71
6,946!795.19
8,250;000.00
11,016,541.72
9,300,000.00
11,149,206.13
10,504,040.42
8,211,670.08
7,230,778.79
4,954,762.21
2,402,152.52
2,768,919.20
6,502,530.86
15,065,257.00
12,673,294.39
7,629,382.81
12,888,040.94
19,50r,062.37
8,495,612.37

1,568,194.88
1,027,368.79

24,616,799.86
25,168,295.42
27,090,426.37
28,487,216.57
31,185,116.53
34,003,006.69
33,736,737.86
33,701,924.20
35,030,910.97
34,815,507.35
36,386,479.34
40,681,036.63
41,876,410.15
45,583,195.79
43,325,958.81
47,102,454.41
52,142,074.97
65,338,856.44
55,751,213.92
60,044,530.91
67,757,134.83
70,673,557.80
74,981,965.69
81,843,788.35
83,330,479.04
87,999,669.91
91,799,208.40
93,814,668.86
99,516,658.97
103,232,954.25
109,585,358.08
116,585,955.60
124,250,199.78
136,993,362.44
150,085,155.20
167,891,842.10
180,606,077.34
191,214,388.38
204,366,704.35
223,063,445.44
232,624,269.99
237,660,705.48
248,312,210.76
263,136,243.53

313,429,225.80
303,197,438.93
292,475,122.28
308,236,066.91
327,709,872.03
301,414,753.43
293,745,282.09
268,866,060.12
266,241,843.75
296,989,866.39
298,163,116.70
296,437,036.78
299,857,849.72
310,916,830.15
287,452,203.14
302,787,778.94
286,431,561.45
316,769,789.36
312,349,135.46
338,172,226.78
358,618,584.52
421,304,470.46
415,953,806.56
459,374,947.65
442,605,758.87
433,178,426.48
434,678,654.48
448,439,622.30
532,381,201.35
700,093,564.02
590,068,371.00
621,598,646.54
593>038,904.90
640,313,465.28
675,820,445.65
716,186,678.72
717,338,208.30
735,290,134.61
812,581,054.05
865,886,827.84
883,834,048.70
891,798,703.37
901,297,979.35
944,879,580.25

$9;985.00
50,164,500.00
819.83
. 3,918,
19,379,373.71
27,198,618.71
38,093,929.04
31,419,442.41
33,911,673.37
37,063,515.33
35,327,370.66
41,741,258.03

140,810,642.13
207,677,539.65
285,878,003.54
96,553,485.68
176,423,490.77
151,150,636.48
166,128,514.80
151,239,525.05
143,997,993.90
479,882,226.16
280,434,937.41
86,110,581.05
166,505,255.55
438,430,756.96
101,266,334.50
46,042,635.43
44,583,843.36
127,959,368.15
74,862,213.05
121,288,788.35
104,663,799.50
101,003,056.37
24,348,086.98
709,903.00
256,447.20
2,494,549.93
7,294,103.35
11,378,502.00
29,942,062.00
14,622,363.48
22,790,058.25
36,112,798.78
56,223,918.00
16,608,833.00
18,622,730.75
605,230.80
244,711.80
30,373,043.00
34,356,750.00
15,434,687.00
760,925.00
246,496.35
120,616.03
102,575.00

15,996,555.60
9,016,794.74
6,958,266.76
5,105,919.99
1,395,073.55

2,795,320.42
1,061,248.78

8,270,842.46
17,292,362.65
20,304,224.06
10,401,220.61

33,147,054.81
14,649,572.95
14,043,391.14
10,907,119.82
1,257,678.01
1,417,479.53
225,095.97

156,807,197.73
216,694,334.39
292,836,270.30
101,659,405.57
177,818,564.32
151,150,636.48
166,128,514.80
151,239,525.05
143,997,993.90
479,882,226.16
283,230,257.83
87,171,829.83
166,505,255.55
438,430,756.96
101,266,334.50
.46,042,635.43
44,583,843.36
127,959,368.15
83,133,055.51
138,581,151.00
124,968,023.56
111,404,276.98
24,348,086.98 $13,254,883.00
709,903.00
6,100,071.50
256,447.20
2,494,549.93
1,012,196.50
7,294,103.35
5,257,466.60
11,378,502.00
29,942,062.00
14,622,363.48
55,937,113.06
669,603.00
50,762,371.73
6,743,569.00
70,267,309.14
27,615,952.82
2,001,161.00
19,880,308.76
4,526,766.00
605,230.80
3,299,440.50
1,662,191.33
30,598,138.97
34,356,750.00
15,434,687.00 43,937,843.50
760,925.00
614,478.00
246,49&35
8,449,346.50
120,616.03
102,576.00
2,618,025.50

470,236, 423.63
519,891, 773.32
685,311, 392.58
409,895; 472.48
505,528; 436.35
452,565; 389.91
459,873; 796.89
420,105; 585.17
410,239, 837.65
776,872, 092.55
581,393, 374.53
383,608, 866.61
466,363, 105.27
749,347; 587.11
388,718, 537.64
348,830; 414.37
331,015, 404.81
444,729; 157.51
395,482; 190.97
476,753; 377.78
483,586; 608.08
532,708; 747.44
453,556; 776.54
466,184; 922.15
442,862, 206.07.
436,685; 172.91
447,230; 224.33
459,818, 124.30
662,323; 263.35
714,715, 927.50
646,674, 987.06
678,104, 487.27
663,306, 214.04
669,840, 564.10
750,392, 020.41
724,010, 169.85
738,379, 773.34
793,086, 892.29
885,031, 733.09
956,678, 800.75
919,121, 125.07
929,108, 716.05
945,195, 312.64
989,341, 438.78

ZP

tei
o

Pi
Kj
O
tei

tei

I
ZP

d

1 Only the annual excess of redemptions over deposits included in this column.
3 National-bank redemption fund herein includes only the annual excess ol redemptions on accoimt of national-bank redemption fimd since 1890.




to
CO

130

REPORT ON T H E FUSrAI^CES.

TABLE J.—Statement ofthe coin and paper circulation ofthe United States from 1860 to
1913, inclusive, with amount of circulation per capita.

Coin, includ- United States
Year
Total money.
ending ing bullion in notes and
Treasury.
bank notes.
June 30.
I860..
1861..
1862..
1863..
1864..
1865..
1866..
1867..
1868..
1869..
1870..
1871..
1872..
1873..
1874..
1876..
1876..
1877..
1878..
1879..
1880..
1881..
1882..
1883..
1884..
1885.,
1886..
1887.,
1888.,
1889.,
1890.,
1891.
1892.
1898.
1894.
1895.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
1910.
1911.
1912.
1913.

$235,000,000
250,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
26,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
25,000,000
52,418,734
65,837,506
102,047,907
357,268,178
494,363,884
647,868,682
703,974,839
769,740,048
801,068,939
872,175,823
903,027,304
1,007,513,901
1,092,391,690
1,100,612,434
1,152,471,638
1,112,956,637
1,131,142,260
1,066,223,357
1,098,958,741
1,114,899,106
1,097,610,190
1,213.780,289
1,397,786,969
1,508,543,738
1,607,352,213
1,734,861,774
1,829,913,651
1,905,116,321
1,994,610,024
2,031,296,042
2,154,797,215
2,159,103,301
2,328,767,087
2,366,512,264
2,355,807,734
2,477,837,453
2,554,125,643
2,611,571,094

$207.102,477
202,005,767
333,452,079
649,867,283
680,688,067
745,398,620
729,430,711
703,334,669
692,336,115
691,471,653
698,940,094
719,539,283
740,960,724
751,363,213
781,024,781
773,273,609
738,264,550
697,216.341
687,743,069
676,372,713
691,186,443
701,723,691
705,423,050
703,496,526
686,180,899
665,750,948
655,691,476
625,898,804
599,043,337
558,059,979
532,651,791
564,837,007
621,076,937
672,584,935
706,618,677
704,460,451
702,364,843
692,989,982
675,788,473
681,550,167
732,348,460
748,206,203
733,353,107
779,594,666
808,894,111
851,813,822
915,179,376
956,457,706
1,049,996,933
1,040,816,090
1,063,783,749
1,078,121,524
1,094,745,008
1,108,498,922

$442,102,477
452,005,767
358,452,079
674,867,283
705,588,067
770,398,620
754,430,711
728,334,669
717,336,115
716,471,653
723,940,094
744,539,283
765,960,724
776,363,213
806,024,781
798,273,509
790,683,284
763,053,847
789,790,976
1,033,640,891
1,185,550,327
1,349,592,373
1,409.397,889
1,473,236,574
1,487,249,838
1,537,926,771
1,558,718,780
1,633,412,705
1,691,435,027
1,658,672,413
1,685,123,429
1,677,793,644
1,752,219,197
1,738,808,292
1,805,577,418
1,819,359,557
1,799,975,033
1,906,770,271
2,073,574,442
2,190,093,905
2,339,700,673
2,483,067,977
2,563,266,658
2,684,710,987
2,803,504,135
2,883,109,864
3,069,976,591
3,115,561,007
3,378,764,020
3,406,328,354
3,419,591,483
3,555,958,977
3,648,870,651
3,720,070,016

Coin, bullion,
and paper
money in
Circulation.
Treasury, as
$435,407,252
448,405,767
334,697,744
695,394,038
669,641,478
714,971,860
673,591,701
662,126,128
680,886,198
665,573,364
676,284,427
718,616,114
741,548,708
753,799,412
776,083,031
754,101,947
727,609,388
722,314,883
729,132,634
818,631,793
212.168.099
973,382,228
235,354,254 1,114,238,119
235,107,470 1,174,290,419
242.188,649 1,231,047,925
243,323,869 1,243,925,969
244,864,935 1,293,061,836
308,707,249 1,250,011,531
315,873,662 [1,317,539,143
319,270,157 1,372,164,870
278,310,764 1,380,361,649
255,872,159 1,429,251,270
180,353,337 1,497,440,307
150,872,010 1,601,347,187
142,107,227 1,596,701,065
144,270,253 1,661,307,165
217,391,084 1,601,968,473
293,540,067 1,506,434,966
265.787.100 1,640,983,171
235,714,547
837,859,895
286,022,024 1,904,071,881
284,649,675 2,056,150,998
307,760,015 2,175,307,962
313,876,107 12,249,390,551
317,018,818 2,367,692,169
284,361,275 |2,519,142,860
295,227,211 2,587,882,653
333,329,963 2,736,646,628
342,604,552 2,772,956,455
340,748,632 3,038,016,488
300,087,697 3.106,240,657
317,235,878 3,102,355,605
341,956,381 3,214,002,696
364,357,557 3,284,513,094
356,331,567 3,363,738,449
$6,695,225
3,600,000
23,754,335
79,473,245
35,946,589
55,426,760
80,839,010
66,208,541
36,449,917
50,898,289
47,665,667
25,923,169
24,412,016
22,563,801
29,941,750
44,171,562
63,073,896
40,738,964
60,658,342
215.009.098

Population.
31,443,321
32,064,000
32,704,000
33,365,000
34,046,000
34,748,000
35,469,000
36,211,000
36,973,000
37,756,000
38,558,371
39,555,000
40,596,000
41,677,000
42,796,000
43,951,000
45,137,000
46,353,000
47,598,000
48,866,000
50,155,783
51,316,000
52,495,000
53,693,000
54,911,000
56,148,000
57,404,000
58,680,000
59,974,000
61,289,000
62,622,250
63,844,000
65,086,000
66,349,000
67,632,000
68,934,000
70,254,000
71,592,000
72,947,000
74,318,000
76,303,387
77,754,000
79,117,000
80,487,000
81,867,000
83,260,000
84,662,000
86,074,000
87,496,000
88,926,000
90,363.000
93,983,000
95,656,000
97,337,000

Circulation
per
capita.
$13.85
13.98
10.23
17.84
19.67
20.58
18.99
18.29
18.42
17.63
17.51
18.17
18.27
18.09
18.13
17.16
16.12
15.68
15.32
16.76
19.41
21.71
22.37
22.93
22.65
23.03
21.78
22.45
22.88
22.62
22.82
23.46
24.60
24.07
24.56
23.24
21.44
22.92
25.19
25.62
26.93
27.98
28.43
29.42
30.77
31.08
32.32
32.22
34.72
34.93
34.33
34.20
34.34
34.56

NOTE 1.—Specie payments were suspended from January 1,1862, to January 1,1879. During the
greater part of that period gold and silver coins were not in circulation except on the Pacific coast,
where, it is estimated, the specie circulation was generally about $25,000,000. This estimated amount
is the only coin included in the above statement from 1862 to 1875, inclusive.
NOTE 2.—In 1876 subsidiary silver again came into use, and is included in this statement, beginning
with that year.
NOTE 3.—The coinage of standard silver dollars began in 1878, under the act of February 28,1878.
NOTE 4.—Specie payments were resumed January 1,1879. and all gold and silver coins, as well as
gold and silver bullion in the Treasury, are included in this statement from and after that date.
NOTE 5.—For redemption of outstanding certificates an exact equivalent in amount of the appropriate kinds of money is held in the Treasury, and is not included in the account of money held as
assets of the Government.
NOTE 6.—This table represents the circulation of the United States as shown by the revised statements of the Treasury Department for June 30 of each of the years specified.
NOTE 7.—The Director of the Mint made a revised estimate of the stock of gold coin, and, as a
consequence of such revision, the estimated stock of gold in the United States and of gold coin in
circulation has been reduced $135,000,000 in the figures for 1907.
NOTE 8.—The Director of the Mint ia 1910 made a revised estimate of the stock of subsidiary silver
coin, and, as a consequence of such revision, there was a reduction of $9,700,000.
NOTE 9.—The details of the foregoing table, showing the amount of each kind of money in circulation each year since 1860, are omitted; but they may be had upon application to the Secretary of the
Treasury, Division of Loans and Currency, where a publication covering information on the subject
has been prepared for distribution.




131

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE K.—Statement of United States bonds and other obligations received and issued by
the Office ofthe Secretary ofthe Treasury from Nov. 1, 1912, to Oct. 31, 1913.
Received Received
for transfer
for
redempand
tion.
exchange.

Title of loan.

Ten-forties of 1864 (act Mar. 3,1864)
Funded loan of 1891, 4^ per cent continued at 2 per cent
(actJulyl4,1870)..
Loan of 1904, 5 per cent (act Jan. 14,1875)
Funded loan of 1907, 4 per cent (acts July 14, 1870, and
Jan. 20,1871)
Refundiag certificates, 4 per cent (act Feb. 26,1879)
Consols of 1930, 2|per cent (act Mar. 14,1900)
$53,115,500
Loan of 1908-1918; 3 per cent (act June 13,1898)
9,603,700
Loan of 1925, 4 per cent ^act Jan. 14,1875)
25,527,500
Panama Canal loan, 2 per cent (acts June 28, 1902, and
Dec. 21,1905), series 1916-1936
4,134,960
Panama Canal loan, 2 per cent (acts June 28, 1902, and
Dec. 21,1905), series 1918-1938
2,173,400
Panama Canal loan,'S per cent (acts Aug. 5,1909; Feb. 4,
1910; and Mar. 2,1911), series 1911-1961
13,791,500
Postal savings bonds, 2^ per cent (act June 25,1910):
4,800
First series, 1911-1931
52,420
Second series, 1912-1932
103,520
Third series, 1912-1932
92,840
Fourth series, 1913-1933
24,000
Fifth series, 1913-1933
108,624,140

Total.

Issued.

Total
transactions.

$100

$100

1,000
200

1,000
200

55,700
560
$53,115,500
9,603,700
25,527,500

55,700
560
106,231,000
19,207,400
51,055,000

4,134,960

8,269,920

2,173,400

4,346,800

13,791,500

27,583,000

4,800
52,420
103,520
1,167,820
1,140,880

9,600
104,840
207,040
1,260,660
1,164,880

57,560 110,816,000

219,497,700

TABLE L.—Internal and customs receipts and expenses of collecting, from 1858 to 1913.
Customs receipts.

Internal revenue.
Year ended
June 30—

Receipts.i

Expenses of collecting.* 2

Receipts.!

Expenses of collecting.* ^

DoUars.
DoUars.
DoUars.
Per cent.
DoUars.
Per cent.
1858. .
41,789,620.96
2,903,336.89
6 94
(*)
1859
49,565,824.38
3,407,931.77
6.86
v)
6.27
1860
53,187,611.87
3,337,188.15
V)
(4)
1861
39,582,125.64
2,843,455.84
7.18
1862
6.67
49,056,397.62
3,276,660.39
37,640,787.95
1863
69,059,642.40
108,685.00
3,181,026.17
4 60
109,741,134.10
1864
263,372.99
4,192,582.43
.23 102,316,152.99
4.09
209,461,215.25
385,239.62
1866
.18 84,928,260.00 • 5,415,449.32
6.39
309,226,813.42
6,783,128.77
5,342,469.99
1866
1.87 179,046,65L58
2.98
266,027,537.43
7,335,029.81
5,763,979.01
1867.
2.77 176,417,810.88
3 26
191,087,589.41
8,705,366.36
7,641,116.68
4.55 164,464,699.56
1868
4.65
168,356,460.86
7,257,176.11
4.59 180,048,426.63
1869
6.388.082.31
2.99
184,899,756.49
7,253,439.81
3.92 194,538,374.44
1870
6,233,747.68
3.20
143,098,153.63
7,593,714.17
1871..
5.30 206,270,408.05
6,568,350.61
3.18
130,642,177.72
6,694,116.86
1872
4.36 216,370,286.77
6,950,173.88
3 21
113,729,314.14
5,340,230.00
4.69 188,089,522.70
7,077,864.70
1873
3^76
102,409,784.90
4,509,976.05
4.40 163,103,833.69
1874
7,321,469.94
4 49
110,007,493.68
3.89 157,167,722.35
4.289.442.71
7,028,521.80
1875
4.47
116,700,732.03
3.38 148,071, 984.61
l876 . . .
3.942.613.72
6,704,858.09
4 53
118,630,407.83
2.99 130,956,493.07
l877
3,656,943.85
6,501,037.57
4.96
110,581,624.74
2.96 130,170,680.20
3,280,162.22
1878
6.826.974.32
4.47
1 Based on warrants issued during the year.
2 The cost of collecting the internal revenue embraces the following items: Salaries and expenses of
the Internal-Revenue Service, including collectors, deputy collectors, clerks, etc., and including
expenses incident to enforcing the provisions of law taxing oleomargarine; salaries and expenses of
revenue agents, surveyors of distilleries, gaugers, storekeepers, and miscellaneous expenses; paper
for internal-revenue' stamps; expenses of detecting and punishing violations of internal-revenue
laws; and expenses of collecting the corporation tax.
3 The expenses of collecting the revenue from customs includes all sums drawn from the appropriation made by Congress forthat purpose. (See details on p. 134.) The money is expended for salaries,
rents, labor in weighing, gauging, and measuring imported merchandise, revenue boatmen, repairs,
and other expenses incident to rented buildings, stationery, and the traveling expenses of special
agents, but does not include disbursements for revenue cutters, fuel, lights, water, furniture, janitors,
etc., for buildings owned by the Government, nor disbursements for erecting new buildings, all of
which are paid for from specific appropriations made for those purposes.
The expenses of collecting internal and customs revenue do not include the disbursements for
salaries, etc., incident to auditing these accounts in the office of the Auditor for the Treasury
•Department.
«No data.




P

iii

132

REPORT ON T H E

FIJSTANTCES.

T A B L E L . — I n t e r n a l and customs receipts and expenses of collecting, from 1858 to 1913—

Continued.
Internal revenue.

C u s t o m s receipts.

Year ended
J u n e 30—
Receipts.

1879
1880 . .
1881
1882 . .
1883
1884
1885
1886 .
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893 .
1894
1895 .
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906..
1907
1908.
1909
1910 .
1911
1912
1913

;

DoUars.
113.561.610.58
124,009,373.92
135,264,385.51
146,497,595.45
144,720,368.98
121,586,072.51
112,498,725.54
116,805,936.48
118,823,391.22
124,296,871.98
130,881.513.92
142,606,705.81
145,686,249.44
153,971,072.67
161,027,623.93
147, 111, 232.81
143,421,672.02
146,762,864.74
146,688,574.29
170,900,641.49
273,437,161.51
295,327,926.76
307,180,663.77
271,880,122.10
230,810,124.17
232,904,119.46
234,095,740.85
249,150,212.91
269,666,772. 85
251,711,126.70
246.212.643.59
1289, 933, 519.45
2322,529.200.79
3321,612,199.66
4344,416,965.65

Receipts.

E x p e n s e s of collecting.
DoUars.
3,527,956.56
3,657,105.10
4,327,793.24
4,097,241.34
4,424,707.39
4,216,847.26
3,853,035. 94
3,578.679.42
3,826,507.98
3,626,038.91
3,770,388.72
3,780,950.41
4,003,485.65
3,879,082.31
4,144,927.02
3,749,029.22
3,754,935.45
3,846,887.55
3,606,798.85
3,705,256.95
4,350,543.05
4,446,318.98
4,404,986.68
4,360,144.97
4,496,479.28
4,507,867.83
4,338,184.70
4,391,660.65
4,641,169.95
4,650,049.89
•.4,547,715.05
5,008,191.77
5,027,871.39
6,059,286.49
5,166,301.36

P e r cent.
3.10
2.95
3.20
2.80
3.06
3.47
3.42
3.06
3.22
2.92
2.88
2.65
2.75
2.52
2.57
2.55
2.62
2.62
2.46
2.17
1.59
L51
L43
1.60
L95
L94
L85
L76
1.72
1.85
L85
1.73
1.55
1.57
1.50

E x p e n s e s of collecthig.

DoUars.
137,250,047.70
186,522,064.60
198.159.676.02
220,410,730.25
214,706,496.93
195,067,489.76
181,471,939.34
192,905,023.44
217,286,893.13
219,091,173.63
223,832,741.69
229,668,584.57
219.522.205.23
177,452,964.15
203,355,016.73
131,818,530.62
152,158,617.45
160,021,751.67
176,554,126.66
149,575,062.35
206,128,481.75
233,164,871.16
238,585,455.99
254,444,708.19
284,479,58L81
261,274,564.81
261,798,856.91
300,251,877.77
332,233,362.70
286,113,130.29
300,711,933.95
333.683.445.03
314.497.071.24
311,321,672.22
318,891,395.86

DoUars.
5,477,421.62
6,023,253.53
6,383,288.10
6,506,359.26
6,593,509.43
6,709,485.76
6,494,847.29
6,427,612.67
6,i855,801.74
7,156,187.77
7,030,487.00
6,859,986.09
6,964,367.09
6,646,276.06
6,756,790.98
6,791,872.86
6,736,690.92
7,237,796.40
7,075,372.05
7,152,276.58
7,361,562.83
7,467,692.48
7,713,418.82
7,967,472.89
8,468,710.19
8,665,636.37
9,115,499.44
8,997,669.41
9,436,752.68
9,580,626.25
10,261,073.33
10,665.770.12
11,015,254.24
10,804,979.15
10,285,613.95

P e r cent.
3.96
3.23
3.22
2.95
3.07
3.44
3.58
3.33
3.16
3.27
3.14
2.98
, 3.17
3.74
3.32
5.15
•4.43
4.52
4.01
4.78
3.57
3.20
3.23
3.13
2.98
3.32
3.48
3.00
2.55
3.85
3.41
3.20
3.50
3.47
3.23

1 Includes $20,951,780.97 corporation t a x .
2 Includes $33,516,976.59 corporation tax.
3 Includes $28,583,303.73 corporation tax.
4 Includes $35,006,299.84 corporation tax.

TABLE M:—Statement shoiuing the aggregate receipts, expenses, average number of persons employed, and cost to collect internal revenue i n the several collection districts
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913.

Collection districts.

Alabama
Arkansas
First California
Fourth California 2.
Sixth California
Colorado
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
First Illinois
Fifth Illinois
Eighth Illinois
Thirteenth Illinois.
Sixth Indiana

Aggregate receipts.i •

$441,644.91
190,665. 24
8,242,952.05
143,721.44
1,389,985. 67
1,013,276.62
3,228,161.49
1,429,929. 61
523,632.24
240,553.38
13,435.972. 58
34,000,994.53
10,523,030.15
642,604.10
10,902,839.17

Expenses.

$36,975.05
27,700.28
176,43L00
12,685.11
47,256.52
32,689.50
53,096.85
34,496.94
41,668.70
14,124.09
108,713.60
202,712.23
80,124,40
18,130.40
97,830.40

Average
number Cost to
of percollect
sons em$1.
ployed.
23
18
123
(})
23
35
27
27
8
72
137
56
13
69

$0,084
.145
021
088
034 :
032
016
024
080
059
008
006
008
028
009

1 Based on reports of collectors.
2 The fourth California was consolidated with the first California; twelfth Pennsylvania with the
ninth Pennsylvania; South Caroliaa district with the fourth North Caroliaa; and fourth Texas with
the third Texas, in efi;ect Oct. 1, 1912.
3 Included in the district in which consolidated.




133

SECRETARY OP THE TREASURY.

TABLE M.—Statement showing the aggregate receipts, expenses, average number of persons employed, and cost to collect internal revenue—Continued.

Collection districts.

Seventh Indiana
Third Iowa
Fourth Iowa
Kansas
Second Kentucky
Fifth Kentucky
Sixth Kentucky
Seventh Kentucky
.'..
Eighth Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Third Massachusetts
First Michigan
1
Fourth^ Michigan
Minnesota
First Missouri
Sixth Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
New Hampshire
First New Jerseyc.
Fifth New Jersey
New Mexico
Fii'st New York
Second New York
Third New York
Fourteenth New York
Twenty-first New York
Twenty-eighth New Y o r k . . .
Fourth North Caroliaa
Fifth North Carolina
North and South Dakota
First Ohio
Tenth Ohio
Eleventh Ohio..^.
Eighteenth Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
First Pennsylvania
Niath Pennsylvania
Twelfth Pennsylvania i
Twenty-third Pennsylvania.
South Carohna i
Tennessee
Third Texas
Fourth Texas 1
Second Virgtoia
Sixth Virgtoia
Washington
West Virginia
First Wisconsin
Second Wisconsin
Philippine Islands
Total

Aggregate receipts.

Expenses.

$20,720,666.45
541,356.03
639.499.44
732,152.46
395,948.11
859,830.88
135,486.30
492,012.91
317,628.24
462,094.33
038,928.27
239,575.98
324,920.80
977,096.11
274,511.22
615,889.29
854,823.43
861,958.74
697,049.76
885,244.67
843,214.35
559,912.18
240,338.24
327,343.28
951,402.85
508,611.70
617,513.95
564,921.74
280,652.82
517,138.71
259,129.15
198,540.46
024,160.69
050,528.31
280.155.45
815,112.65
177,649.30
822,730.30
078,808.59
239,219.96
680.378.02
961,124.09
51,112.75
384.189.03
509,462.57
74,978.37
735,970.93
323,217.36
448,007.90
898,998.78
380,883.67
183,308.46
319,100.64

$114,812.12
21,254.46
21,994.96
18,263.09
108,014. 21
392,263.90
98.892.16
182.508.33
152,918.89
59,941.26
191,521.24
107,398.54
45,288.35
19,769.77
54,474.12
65,498.86
59,454.34
28,203.61
56,857.20
25,411.32
19,081.96
52,849.89
15,197.04
65,195.63
93,766.66
66.132.29
57,202.33
48,834.26
50.252.17
61,823.77
49,766.07
19,311.55
180,309.16
41.850.30
28,118.55
42,673.80
15,821.96
25,139. 21
121,438.25
102,958.45
10,496.69
215,798.90
6,639.54
76,160.09
35,518. 64
4,860.79
63,226.30
79,407.67
42,861.72
44,770.39
73,648.01
31,712.92

344,424,453.85

4,652,200.76

Average
number Cost to
of per- collect
sons em$1.
ployed.
76
14
17
11
79
296
73
135
114
41
138
74
28
15
33
43
44
21
39
17
10
34
8
42
61
39
37
34
33
41
27
10
125
31
17
30
9
14
90
88
(2)

176
(2)

51
25
(2)

43
57
30
33
56
23

$0.006
.040
.034
.025
.025
.021
.024
.041
.046
.013
.021
.015
.006
.020
.017
.006
.032
.033
.021
.029
.023
.005
.063
.005
.009
.006
.010
.014
.015
.011
.009
.097
.011
.014
.022
.011
.089
.031
.012
.020
.015
.017
.131
.032
.024
.065
.009
.060
.030
.024
.009
.027

»3,241

Amount of expenses as above stated
$4,652,200.76
Expenses not included in above
• 837,453.85
*
Total expenses fiscal year ended June 30,1913
^b, 489,654.61
Cost to collect $1
0.0159
1 The fourth California was consolidated with the first California; twelfth Pennsylvania with the ninth
Pennsylvania; South Carolina district with the fourth North Carolina; and fourth Texas with the the
third Texas, in effect Oct. 1,1912.
2 Includea in the district in which consolidated.
3 Includes average number of storekeepers, storekeeper-gaugers, and gaugers employed not formerly
included in this table.
4 These expenses include salaries and expenses of internal-revenue agents and inspectors, salaries of the
officers, clerks, and employees in the office of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, amounts expended
ia detecting and punishing violations of internal-revenue laws, cost of paper for internal-revenue stamps,
and certain miscellaneous expenses, but which can not be apportioned among the several collection districts. Amounts paid from the appropriation "Refunding Internal-Revenue Collections," whic.h aggregated $23,513.19, do not appear anywhere in above statements, as they are in no sense an expense.
6 Based upon amounts actually paid. These expenses differ slightly from those shown on page 131,
which are based upon warrants issued.




TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913.
Vessels entered.

E n t r i e s of m e r c h a n d i s e .

Vessels cleared.

Districts a n d p o r t s .
Foreign.

Alaska:
Juneau
Cordova...
Eagle.
Fairbanks.
F o r t y Mile
Ketchikan . .
Nome
S t . Michael.
Skagway
Sulzer
Unalaska
WrangeU.
T o t a l '.

Domestic.

Foreign.

Domestic.

2
1
44

12
11

222
27

174
28

li)

653
25
10
10
11
10
5

323

747

2

17
18

.

Miscellaneous.

Mail.

7
3
4
16

587
24
8
29
20
11
6

170
67
22
1
18
29
66

64
138
42
2
258
2
3
33

2

270

720

543

715

2

940

41

6

6
372

14
6
6

2
2
12
8
3

66

61

484

96

17

815

29

Total
35

111
220

Apalachicola, F l a . :
Apalachicola.
Carrabelle

22
22

19
19-

9

44

Total

10
4
14

38

9

>
Zfl

o

2

..
2

66
924
797

:..:

tei

O

66

....

pi
O

181
556

o

78

100

141
14
26

Alexandria, Va
A n n a p o l i s , Md




T. & E .

71
4
98

.

Arizona:
Nogales . . . .
Douglas
Lochiei......:

I.T.

5

139
23
8

42

Albany, N . Y . . .
Albemarle, N . C :
E l i z a b e t h City
Edenton
Manteo

Documents
issued
to vessels. C o n s u m p - Warehouse.
tion.

365

2
6
4

CO

121
103 1

196
1

562
58

238
4

26
36

Total

Tyimp<;tf>"np

Madawaska
Mars H i l l .
Monticello
Van Bnren
Total

269

198

783

4
1
5

1,467

Aroostook, Me.:
Houlton
Bridsewater
F o r t Fairfield
Fort Kent

163

2,189

'.

1

316
41
421
228
56
39
37
41
288

..

45

10

-

15

246

77
104
10
63
66

1

110

1,325

52

1,288

107

684

1,641

769

1,924

1,079

16
273
9,278

1
13
433

3

Astoria, Oreg
A t l a n t a , Ga
Baltimore, Md

4

5

453
12

Naco
Ynma

5

3

43

34

4

1,345

ZP

6

2,500

61
17
IS
170
494

O

19
928
2,498

54

>

fei

pi
B a n g o r , Me.:
Bangor
Danforth
Frankfort
Hampden
Lowelltown
Moose R i v e r
St. John
Vanceboro
Hahfax

625
37

Total
B a t h , Me
Beaufort, N . C

3
5

5
4

3

43

6,

1

.-.

25

848

273

21,945

30

848

273

1

5

4

6

1

199

93

2

126
191

69

•r4

171
34
129

9,255

o

344

Pi

>

ZP

d

pi
Kl

4

2

9
1

-

4

92

Beaufort, S. C :
Beaufort
P o r t R o y a l .i

3
1

78

Total




15
35
50
99

1

21,249

Total
B a r n s t a b l e , Mass.:
Barnstable . .
Chatham
TTyannis.,
Provincetown

9,254

.

1

78

1

1

Oo

Ol

TABLE N . --Statement ' of business ofthe customs ports for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Ci>

Vessels entered.

Vessels cleared.
1

Districts and ports.
Foreign.
Belfast, Me.:
Belfast
Rockport
Stockton Springs
Vinaihaven

Domestic.

Foreign.

12
2
20

2

2
15
2
17

34

5

36

1,373

1,029

1,158

Entries of merchandise.

Documents
issued
Domestic. to vessels. Consump- Warehouse.
tion.

50
37

Boston and Charlestown, Mass.:
Boston
Cambridge
Dorchester
Hingham
Hull
Newburyport
Quincy
Weymouth
Worcester

Miscellaneous.

Mail.

1

5

3

1,158

397

47,025

6,273

4,213

21,541

3
28

2

112

1,159

400

48,372

3,950

6,273

4,215

21,653

4,050

728

127

8

29

58

5

58
22
18

1,158

4

38

1

1,029

40
127

747

3

1
16
2
19

1

1.373

Total

63
50

826

240
21

21

'

Brazos de Santiago, Tex.:
BrownsviUe
Brazos..
Edinburgh _
Rio Grande City
Roma
Santa Maria
Total
Bridgeport, Conn.:
Bridgeport
Greenwich
Norwalk
Stamford..:

37
6
20
25
:

21

15
1
10
5

6
1
1
2

295

4
1

30

609
44
146
63

88

26

31

10

325

862

303
55

Bridgeton, N. J
Bristol and Warren, R . I




T. & E.

1

.. -

Total

Total..

I.T.

—

3,922

3

4,050

Pi

4
1
4
8

29

62

26

O
pi
H:
O

10

>
ZP

B r u n s w i c k , Ga.:
Bruns^vick.
Darien

32
2

Total

28

93

27

1

4

5

57

53

28

93

27

1

4

5

372
61
2
352
24
24

1,703
10
228
1,137
8
72

285
2.259
3
562
38
18

1,839
6
201
1,161
9
83

460

26,042
867

28

2,321

365

835

.

43
10

34

T o t a l . . . .
Buffalo Creek, N . Y . :
Buffalo
Black Rock Ferry
Lackawana
N i g h t Clearance
North Buffalo.. .
Tonawanda

51
6

3,158

3,165

3,299

460

Total

3

2,241

6,693
21
33,623

5,824

28

651

8,065

2,321

368

(^
fej.

132
29

' 1

Burlington, Iowa
Burlington, N . J
Cairo, HI
Cape V i n c e n t , N . Y . :
Cape V i n c e n t
Alexandria Bay
Chaumont
Clayton . .
G rindstono Island
Kingston
Millers B a y
R o u n d T«?lan'l
Sacket Harbor
T h o u s a n d Island P a r k
Westminster Park

651

O

16
B
...

446
446
8
. 439

22
284
16
25

7
22

1

348

1,458

37

224
169
1
24
16

4
1

343

61

2

13
24

1

2

17

1,419
390
1
295
117

8

24

2

2

1,343

19
290
11
22

1

449
620
9
377

26
120

Kl

o
fet
W
fei'

17

2,264

37

582

2
2

2
38

4

i

40

Zfl

Castine, Me.:Castine
Bucksport
Deer Isle
Total
Champlain, N. Y.:
Plattsburg
Champlain
Chateaugay
Cherubusco
F o r t Covington
Hoeansburc
Mai One




1
6
5
12

9
3

70
40
94

12
5

1

14
2

12

204

17

1

16

Kl

9

291
223
386
32
6,607
41
9,406

366
CO

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Vessels cleared.

Vessels entered.

E n t r i e s of merchandise.

Districts and ports.
Foreign.

Champlain, N.Y.—Conthiued.
M cores J u n c t i o n . .
. .
Rouse Point
Trout River
Total

Domestic.

272

20

310

2,599

291

37,740

20

676

50
216

76

236
59

2

Miscellaneous.

Mail.

50

102

2,599

59

102

23

176
85

I
O
pi
H

313

O

^:

313

Total

H.
117
18
11

6,201
91
46
75

223
2
6
2

6,085
112
51
76

373

22,271

3,010

84

712

43,864

4,164

146

6,413

233

6,324

373

22,271

3,010

84

712

43,864

4,164

102

Total

2,313
552

168
5

15

165

118

46
1,735

192

147

299

960

28

1,781

192

147

299

960

28

Cincinnati, O h i o . _
C o l u m b u s , Ohio
Coos B a y , Oreg

•*"

Corpus Christi, T e x . :
Corpus Christi
Aransas
Laredo

v>

5

47

8

31
2

49

5

47

8

33

Council Bluffs, I o w a

160
. .

847
594
642

3,088
1,391
1.077

1,154
660
653

2,887
1,390
1,066

317

3,694

1
552

fei

>

M
a

Pi
Ul

53'

49

Total




T. & E .

..

Chicago, 111.:
Chicago
Indiana Harbor
Michigan City
Waukegan

Cuyahoga, Ohio:
Cleveland
Ashtabula
Conneaut

LT.

163
20,558
324

1,567

79

Documents
issued
to vessels. ConsumpWarehouse.
tion.

1,567

1,794

1,625
129

Foreign.

1,794

1,625

.

Charleston, S. C . .
Chattanooga, Tenn
Cherrystone,'Va.:
Cape Charles
Chincoteague.

Domestic.

Co
GO

3
5

25

5,168

27

XAJIdlU

30
46

418
707

19
178

417
619

Total

2,159

6,681

2,664

6,379

•

D a y t o n , Ohio •
Delaware:
Wilmington
Lewes
Seaford-

9

2

1

9

116

9

.

2

1

9

160

3,694

552

8

333

317

218

1

437

5

25

27

30
1

5,168

160

4

2

44

Total

.
.

D e n v e r , Colo
Des Moiaes, I o w a . . .
D e t r o i t , Mich.:
Detroit.
Gross e Isle
Monroe
. .
Mount Clemens...
Trenton
Wyandotte
. .

...

'.

. -.

Total
Dubuque,Iowa
D u l u t h , Minn.:
Duluth
Two Harbors.. .

2,074
220
40
26
2
51

3,765
1
102
84

2,413

1

3,760
1
102
83

74

2,.062
215
35
25
6
48

4,026

2,391

4,019

120

73

437

46

28,875
2
25
2

209

1

5

745
302

. .

3

2,298

4

2

1

2,173
80

414

2,707

1,675

648

ZP

fei
O

I

;>
K^

21
120

28,925

20

209

648

,2,707

1,575

141

2,298

121

138

344
103

2,301
1,147

268
24

2,402
1,211

553

1,159

21

8

953

341

57

.

447

3,448

292

3,613

553 =

1,159

21

8

953

341

4

36

5

33

51

51

1

26

51

51

1

26

36

°

339

550

361

537

92

264
8

o9

fei

57

Dunkirk, N . Y .
Eastern Maryland
E d g a r t o w n , Mass.:
Edgartown...
Vineyard H a v e n .

Total.

.

.




ZP

72

28

d
pi

.

137

339

Total
Evansville, I n d
F a l l R i v e r , Mass
Femandtaa, Fla

8
232
36

Total
Erie, Pa.:
Erie
Corry...

..

550

361

537

92

272

9

25
44

615
91

21
118

613
3

160
101
24

65
190
15

5
4
4

. . .

97

137

97

1

19
21
1

111

1

CO
CD

TABLE N.—Statement of business ofthe customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
f^^

Vessels entered.

Vessels cleared.

Districts and ports.
Foreign.
Frenchmans Bay, Me.:
Ellsworth
Mount Desert Ferry
Southwest Harbor

2
15
30

52
51
82

9

47

185

LT.

T. & E.

38

Miscellaneous.

Mail.

38

..

9
4
13

17
17

o

11
577
38

469
10

768
36

328

86

1,822
58

37

262
40

184
78

203

615

479

804

328

86

1,880

37

302

262

246

1,165

204

5

2,014
498

248
6

27
22

85

1,127

246

1,165

204

5

2,512

254

49

85

18
62
449

2,560

42

22

2,720

.96

1
137
86

244
119

292
510

80
2

3
40

219

836

13
28
52

57

203

381

59

3,580

100

18

4,736

37

59

3,580

100

18

4,736

37

105

220

9

35

88

Pi
H
O

203

1,127

Total.--..
Genesee, N. Y.:
Rochester
Charlotte
Oak 0rchard
Pultneyville
Waterloo

1

fei
fei

-.

Totals
Georgetown, D.C..Georgetown, S. C
Gloucester, Mass
Grand Rapids, Mich
Great Egg Harbor, N. J
Hartford, Conn

4
98

137
33

4

2

272

274
29
11
3
13

150

2
2
1
-

274

148

Hawaii:
Honolulu
Hilo
Kahului
Koloa
r
Mahukona




1
8

84

Total

Total

Foreign.

4
14
66

Galena, 111
Galveston, Tex.:
Galveston
Texas City
Velasco

Houston, Tex

Domestic.

Entries of merchandise.

Documents
issued
Domestic. to vessels. \ Consump- Warehpuse.
tion.

263
31
13
6
12

153

330

151

1

325

1

O
fei
ZP

.

10

3

756
203
224
101
20
195
1

634
169
53
71
10
100
6

740
248
250
96
18
214

320

13,062
60
1
75

5
29
75

49
195

7
34
85

1,609

1,287

1,692

320

80

Total
Ind.
Fla
Mo
Me

75

161

60

77

268
17
3

Total-...^

•. .-

595
35
116

8
10

560
15
111

136
4

Total
Louisville, K y
Machias, M e . . .
Marblehead, Mass:
Marblehead
Lynn,. , . ,
Total




21

49

81

'

37

234
64

107

1,150
10

110

13,564

26

995
215
1,261

33
22
2,125

21

49

1,388

42

1,140

155
726
1,764

ZP

fej

o

22
24
pi
K!

921
3
77

205

17

42

91
2
25

1,480

o
fej

3

W
fei
746

18

686

140

Knoxvijlft, Tp.nn..
L a Crosse,'Wis
Ltacoln, N e b r
Little Egg Harbor, N J
L o s Angeles, Cal.:
L o s Angeles
Redondo Beach
San P e d r o
Santa Barbara

1,140

26

2

...

Key West, Fla.:
Key West
Boca Grande.
Miami
Palm Beach..
P u n t a Gorda

2

65
1

1

Saginaw
St. Clair

Indianapolis,
Jacksonville
Kansas City,
Kennebunk,

15

1,277

.

197

1
1
53
199

H u r o n , Mich.:
Port Huron
Algonac
Alpena
B a v Citv
Harbor Beach
Marine C i t v "
Marvsville
Oscoda
R o b e r t s Landins?

6
630
152
59
64
6
107
5

H u m b o l d t ( E u r e k a ) , Cal

107

1,001

205

17

42

118

52

2

130

39

1,483

22

107

ZP

d

28
3,665

362

26

221

81

591

28

231

107

3,666

201

6

6

16,084

503

1

5

920

415

66

657
23

50

70

92
115

102

6

16,084

10

102
489

7

201

6

2

74

i

141

8
62

55
41

8

37

5

41

8

37

5

46
55

46

1

70

rf^

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.

l4^

to
Vessels entered.

Vessels cleared.

Districts and ports.
Foreign.
Memphis, Tenn
Memphremagog, Vt.:
Newport
Beecher Falls
Canaan
Derby Line
Island Pond
North Troy
Total

Total
Mnwaukee,Wis.:
Milwaukee
Green Bay
Kenosha
-.
Kewaunee
Manitowoc
Marinette
Oshkosh
Raciae




Foreign.

Domestic.

Documents
issued
to vessels. Consump- Warehouse.
tion.
214

570

200

13
106
3
:

9
2

988
493
62
624
753
319
2,079
479
108
371
1,162
345
223

197

17
116
1
2
8
3
10
19

1,346

86

647

992
, 490
73
644
748
320
2,079
478
110
367
1,143
346
225

319
12
35
70
36
8
84
60
18
45
22
11
11

I.T.

T. & E .
3

57

540
16

133

79

16

2,896

5

20

73
10

3,452

138

99

44

67

188

120

,

fei

o
%
o

36
fei

>
O
fei
ZP

133

8,006

176

8,015

731

120

13
19
1

5,737
640
364
387
1,724
683

42
20

615

2,782

8
9

5,660
639
360
387
1,722
679

i.43i

io

i,4i2

2
1

Miscellaneous.

Mail.

57

26

27,429

570
1,351

527
15,111
2,769
160
392
8,276
721

570

570

Miami (Toledo), Ohio
Michigan:
Grand Haven
Benton Harbor
Charlevoix
Cheboygan
Frankfort
. HnllanrI ,
Ludiagton
Manistee
Manistique
Muskegon
St. Ignace
St. Joseph
South Haven

Domestic.

Entries of merchandise.

36
87

82

53'

;;;

716

174

Sheboygan
Sturgeon Bay

616
842

Total

12,424

94

12,278

134

...

. ..

687
687

196
196

709
709

1

141

566
1,138

639^
928

716

174
980

117

27

2

1,572

ZP

4,362

1,007

58
36

5

94

fei
O

5

1,288

1,704

141

550
82

1
3

49

191

632

4

49

7

191

8
1,882
681
2
63
63
20
930

1

1

2

?d

1

1

3
3

2

627

>

pi.

fei
H
"P-J

>

ZP

d

pi

Ki

Total




8

5

83

4

Total

N e w H a v e n , Conn
N e w L o n d o n , Conn
N e w Orleans, L a
Newport, R . I

164

53

4,243

82

fei
.

Montana and Idaho:
Great Falls
Banff
Cottonwood
Eastport
Gateway
Glasgow
Peskan
Plentywood
Porthill
Sweet Grass
Whitlash
Nantucket, Mass
Nashville, Tenn
Natchez, Miss
Newark, N . J
New Bedford, Mass

13,709

• .

81

-

Total
Mobile, Ala.:
Mobile . . .
Birmingham

200

1,322
547
5
7
78
2,379
7
3,620
5,547
197

37

197

87,

1

37

-

2,782

28

1

Indus
International Falls

615

134

25

Gnnflint Tyako. . .

Pine Creek
Ranier
St. Vincent
Warroad

620
799

8

36

Minnesota:
St. Paul
Baudette

Minnftapolis....

3
2

4

3,656

2
59

. .

77
61
29
10
1,272
7

110
2
6
10
367
615

160
51
12
10
1,310

22
13
6
334
620

1,318
202
672
13
7,872
278

627

1,288

158

82
114
168
40
378
186

1

4

20
18

4

13
1
377

1
2,432

1,754

597
2
137
76
2,773
31

275
9
195
1
•1^

CO

TABLE N.—Statement of business ofthe customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Vessels entered.
Districts and ports.
Foreign.
Newport News, Va.:
Newport News
Yorlrtown

Domestic.

Foreign.

Documents
issued
Domestic. to vessels. Consumj)- Warehouse.
tion.

I.T.

T. & E .

Miscellaneous.

Mail.

227

Niagara, N . Y . :
Niagara Falls..
. .
Lewiston
North Tonawanda
Olcott
Schlossers
Youngstown

721

160

278

826

10

548

4

4

16

1,086

721

160

278

826

10

548

4

4

16

4,647

- 2,888

4,400

2,903

4,005
58

335,691

34,903

69,165

44,337

146,807

271,772

4,647

:

1,086

227

Total
New York, N. Y.:
NewYork
Cold Spring
Total

Entries of merchandise.

Vessels cleared.

2,888

4,400

2,903

4,063

335,691

34,903

69,165

44,337

146,807

271,772

6

26,591
20
124
3
15
12

9

949

10,403

14

83

....

815
108
151
16
2

346
1
55
27

817
81
151
8
2

380
1
65
28

o
pi
H

6

w
fei

Total

1,092

429

1,059

474

6

26,765

9

949

10,403

14

83

Norfolk, Va

211

2,383

1,147

2,045

560

413

2

7

1

25

54

272

62

15

24

38

North and South Dakota:
Pembina
Ambrose
Antler
Crosby
'
Hannah
Hansboro
Kermit
Mowbray
Neche
Portal
St. John
Sarles
Sherwood
Souris




Q

fei

'.

499
78
15
82
16
53
6
15
307
2,709
122
25
34
14

°

6
211

11
1,243
2

727

ZP

14
8

Walhalla
Westhope

3,997

1,630
8
1
4
166
411

.. 589

1,015
8
1

750

47

3
157
402
435

577

86

56

•1

420

63

4,168
111
319
144
32
758
3,045
315

334

585

781

65

48

2

1
. 183

1

334

965

66

589

2,018

755

47

8,892

885
227

168
71

795
284

237
30

8

353

104

51

144

20

1,216

Total

290

1,223

287

Paducah K y
Parolico ( N e w b e m ) , N . C

585

8

Zfl
fei
O
Pi
fei

>

10

45

176

122

829

45

186

122

o

fei

w

2
28

36
70

4

50

11
465

fei
1^

P a s o del N o r t e , N . Mex.:
E l Paso
Columbus

2,001
233

141

19

258

272

352

2,234

Total

141

" 19

258

272

352

21

39

110

108

21

39

110

108

fei

>

ZP

d
Pi

P a s s a m a q u o d d y , Me.:
Eastport
Calais
Lubec
Red Beach

986
131

•

.. . .1,117

128
5

. 133 •

905
196

125
1

136
115
11

848
1,421
78

. 1,101

126

262

2,347

Patchogue, N . Y




999

3

2,797

Total
Oswego, N . Y . :
Oswego
Fair Haven
0 n t a r io
Sodus Poiat
Utica

P e a r l R i v e r , Miss.:
Gulfport
B a v St. L o u i s
Biloxi
H e r a Island

1,256

28

,

Oswegatchie, N . Y . :
Ogdensburg
Hammond
Lisbon
Louisville
Massena
.
Morristown
Nyando
Waddiagton..

Total

217

525

Total
Omaha, Nebr

.

-

120
197
.'.

58

202

49

87
43
147

20

2
5

TABLE N.—Statement of buMness of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June SO, 1913—Continued.
Vessels entered.

Vessels cleared.

E n t r i e s of m e r c h a n d i s e .

Districts a n d p o r t s .
Foreign.

P e a r l R i v e r , Miss.—Continued.
Scranion
.
Ship Island

Foreign.

Domestic.

LT.

T. & E .

Miscellaneous.

Mail.

87

Peoria, 111
Perth Amboy, N. J
Petersburg Va




297

60

295

22

7

134
3

289
23

73
1

87

158

1

137

312

74

87

158

1

235

218

120

15
384
2

. 213
166
50

23
62
164

3

436
4,184

798

978

1,290

1,111
122

27,776

2,427

3,105

2,335

31,263

250

798

978

1,290

1,233

27,776

2,427

3,105

2,335

31,263

250

42

586

20

388
1,050

8
254
112

6
429
• 912

3
229
160

2,946
17
559
2,193

118

10
309
14

25
131

8
16

200
8

141
1,244

179
13

249
11
6
19
8
14
13
49
57

154
2
2
2
27
6
4
54
87

219
14
14
18
12
18
11
68
43

79

3,324
88
154
66
45
22
18
628
.1,328

39

38

30

716

183

3
25
3
5
46
74

Pittsburgh, Pa
P l y m o u t h , Mass .
P o r t l a n d , Me
P o r t l a n d , Oreg

Total.

83

6
9

3

'3

24
61

5
9

323

426

338

417

79

5,673

54

41

33

801

197

1,176

Total. . .

P o r t o Rico: i
San J u a n
Aguadilla
Arecibo
Arroyo
Fajafdo
Guanica
Humacao
Mayaguez
Ponce

2

1,176

Philadelphia, Pa.:
Philadelphia
Camden
Chester

IS

96

.

11

250

Total

95

221
29

.

25

284

Total
Pensacola, F l a . :
Pensacola
St A n d r e w s

Domestic.

Documents
issued
to vessels. C o n s u m p Warehouse.
tion.

. . .

. .

. . .

. . . .

163
4

•

1
332

o

pi
H
O
337
126

W
fei

>
a
fei
ZP

18
43

Total •

10
30

3
436

32
46

. 22
2,014

200
81
16
26
3

298
70
145
120
118

155
38
21
42
10

925

36

22

57

26

114
1

2
5

34
4
67
101
2,611
173
31
41
49
11

5

P u g o t Sound, Wash.:
Port Townsend
A berdeen
Anacortes
Behingham
Blaine
Chopaka
Danville
Everett
Ferry.
Friday Harbor
Kalama
Laurier
Molson
Northport
OroviUe
P o r t Angeles
Roche Harbor
Seattle
South Bend
Spokane
S u m a s ...Tacoma

419

217
61
176
146
129

Portsmouth, N, H
Providence, R. T

'
112

5

146

•

8
7

344

97
290

15
76

1

4
10

3
3

7

55
47
94
10

17
41
1

18
1

5
3

1
3
3
35
4

14
6
13
7
7

ZP
fej

2

4,495

120

12,800

1,405

Pi

O
fej

393
169
2,376
6

420
107
2,624
13

1

185

1,160
1

1,155
3

369

348
48
292
11
86
1
6,619

149

336

127

227

491
1,051
1,617

4
10
54

1
271
2,740

3
8
129

2,434

398

2,333

172
21
582

4,219

1,667

4,423

1,585

1,706

13,686

330

7,851

322

17,653

2,447

33

334

33

334

-.
*

. . .

4

247

o
H

t>

W

9

R i c h m o n d , Va^:
Richmond
West Point

1

23
29

477

87

Total

1

52

477

87

R o c k I s l a n d , 111
Sabine, Tex.:
Port Arthur
Sabine
'

Total

Saco, Me
Sag Harbor, N. Y
St. Augustine, Fla
S t . J o s e p h , Mo
S t . L o u i s , Mo
S t . M a r k s (Cedar K e y s ) , F l a
S t . M a r y s , Ga




fei

158

>

178
123

93
37

259
131

15

201

301

130

390

15

201

159

1

1

1
10
71
3
127
40
6

3
14
281
5,395
2

ZP

66
93

30
6

11

1

1

22
3

1 Porto Rico figures are not iacluded in grand total.

d
w
31
5
438

5

..

15

3
8
43
7,252

48
47

rf^

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
GO

Vessels entered.

Vessels cleared.

Districts and ports.
Foreign.
Salem and Beverly, Mass.:
Salem
Beverly
Danvers
Total...

Domestic.

Foreign.

,

Documents
issued
Domestic. to vessels. Consump- Warehouse.
tion.

57

1

15

27

37

57

1

15

27

37

Saluria, Tex.:
Eagle Pass
Boquillas
Del Rio....^
Langtry
Presidio
San Antonio

88

23

133
2,109
6
47

1,078

67

305

495
1

1,009
71
5

1

47

21
2

106
258
88
345

209

298

148

4

1,505

57

67

306

543

1 108

30

844
4
266
44
87

21

921

22

82

105

17

6

14

1

345

209

298

148

30

1,245

22

966
48
54
- 4
130
1

685
252
277
72
298
41

1,038
97
57
1
130
3

615
187
279
60
298
27

75

760
2

1,203

1,625

1,326

1,466

75

2
22
1
. 787

hj
O
Pi
H
O

H

K

fei

>
"A
o

fei
zsi

Total.




Miscellar
neous.

Mail.

63
60
10

Sandusky, Ohio:
Sandusky
Huron
Kelleys Island
Port Clinton
Put-ia-Bay
Vermilion
Total.....

T. & E.

23

63

Total

'.

LT.

206

Salt Lake City, Utah

San Diego, Cal.:
San Diego
Andrade
Calexico..
Campo
Tia Juana

Entries of merchandise.

921

39

88

119

1

39

23

1

39

23

'

S a n F r a n c i s c o , Cal.:
S a n Francisco
Casper
Fort Bragg
Mendoctao City
Monterey.
Noyo.:.......Oakland
Port Hartford
Total
Pavanna,h, Ga
Sioux C i t y , I o w a . . . . .
Sprtagfield, Mass
Rtonington, T o n n . . .
Superior, Mich.:
Marquette
Allouez B a y
Ashland
Bayfield
«
DeTour
Escanaba
Gladstone
Houghton
Isle Royale.:
•
Lake Linden
Mackinaw
, . ..
Menominee
Mnnisinf , . . . , , .
. ,
Ontonagon...-.
Presque Isle..
S a u l t Ste. Marie
Superior
Washburn
Total

582

794

1,658

580
2

1,353

Total
T a p p a h a n n n n k ^ Va.
, _
T e c h e ( B r a s h e a r , n o w Morgan C i t y ) , L a .




2,474

5,802

2
1

446

21,203

2

22

49

17

821

620
118
2
44
214
117
45
98
28
54
20
202

....

633

1,681

1,379

21,424

2,474

5,802

689

- 180

628

55

508
100
570
7

16

20

7

2

6

86
107

19
912
120
9

167
1,288
674
91
178
766
49
208
58
94
1,186
496
11
12
281
443
1,431
82

1,749

7,515

107

28
72
.70
44
102
38
66
23
176
3
59
7
1

87
885
71
10

211
1,097
618
87
173
767
63
222
30
100
1,172
513
10
12
215
481
1,510
78

1,951

7,359

73
1
2

3,002

26

1

139
38

•

89

21,203

3,003

4
24
923
23

446

68
5
57

ZP

fei

o
63

35

45

pi
fei
H

.>

1
78
45

1

5

288

.

O
hrj

21

fei

p^
1

3,089

2

517

4
971

60
27

677
8

980

150

751

2

72

2,534
396

Syracuse, N . Y
Tampa, Fla,:
Tampa
Port Tampa
S t . Petersburg..Sarasota
T a r p o n Springs

21,285

3
1
2

2

>
d

29

3

360

fei

137
122

94
167

104
39

95
121

196
3

2,730
36

633

70

21

142

261

143.

216

199

2,766

633

70

21

142

pi

94

259

ZP

94

11

======

2

198
94

= = =

CD

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Vessels cleared.

Vessels entered.
Foreign.
Vermont:
Burlington.
Alburg
. East Alburg
East Richford
Franklin
Highgate
Richford
St Albans
Swanton
West Berkshire
Wiadmill Poiat

Domestic.

Foreign.

54

..

.

91

3

113

Wheeling, W. Va
Wilmiagton, N C.
Wiscasset, Me.:
Wiscasset
Boothbay
Total




35,260

2

150

Miscellaneous.

Mail.

71

1
20
135

265
227

1,731
2,408

94

2
117
1

241
494
2

158

492

4,289

165

I
hrf
O

o

857

•
^

-,

1

4
116

33
203

4
80

5

1

2

1

120

236

84

5

1

2

63

39

32

96

191
78

2
134

5
9

>
o

ii

ZP

34

3

11

37

17
41

4

34

3

11

37

58

4

126

5
3

Yaquina (Newport), Oreg
York, Me
Grand total

24

T. & E .

fei

4
109

Total

161
12,073
251
. 33
196
403
8,751
12,746
92
554

LT.

6

Vicksburg, Miss . .
Waldoboro, Me.:
Waldoboro
Rockland

24

37

138

Total

3

...

138

o.

Entries of merchandise.

Documents
issued
Domestic. to vessels. Consump- Warehouse.
tion.

Districts and ports.

0\

135
43,097

82,157

1
46,417

82,090

27,211

15

73
4
4

1
1

13

•

825,283

56,582

111,633

98,815

364,967

302,581

fei .

[Extension of items.]
C u s t o m s receipts.

V a l u e of i m p o r t s .
V a l u e of
exports.

D i s t r i c t s And p o r t s .
Dutiable.

Alaska:
Juneau
Cordova
Eagle
Fairbanks
F o r t y Mile
Ketchikan
Nome
St. Michael
Skagway
Sulzer
Unalaska
Wrangell

$360,630

$621,641

$1,473,669

Excess
deposits
refunded.

S207.62

Drawback
paid.

360.630
:

621,641

1,461,410

848,855

1,473,669

Estimated
duties.

D u t i e s , in- Increased a n d F i n e s , p e n c l u d i a g fines
alties, a n d
additional
on m a i l imforfeitmres.
duties.
portations

$4,695.93
1,286.50
1,226.56

$30.40
18.00
26.16

$11.42
18.64
10.10

707.46
11,210.31
6,428.75
10.50
2,653.59
148.50
2,417.40
1,326.31

$8.10

13.15

Total
Albany, N . Y

Free.

8.40
24.41
12.00

612.90
16.20

220.77

8.10

32,111.81

237.40

2,581.94

37,541.22

518,104.50

1,126.08

671. 96
3,932.94

$954.34
240.00
115.63
1,355.31
592.72
208.99
590.57
542.18
204.48

2.70
46.00

1,110.05

O

W
fei

>
pi
O

4,804.22

580.15

ZP
fei

fei
W
fei

>
ZP

d

Total




11.00

118.03

Albemarle, N . C :
E l i z a b e t h City
Edenton
Manteo

Alexandria., V a
A n n a p o h s , Md

$35.00

AU o t h e r
customs
receipts.

3.75

Pi'
Ki

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.

to
V a l u e of i m p o r t s .
V a l u e of
exports.

Districts and ports.
Dutiable.

Apalachicola, Fla.c
Apalachicola
Carrabelle

Customs receipts.

Free.

$10
10

Total

$705,258
146,302

Excess
deposits
refunded.

Drawback
paid.

Estimated
duties.

..

D u t i e s , in- Increased and Fines, pencluding fines
additional
alties, a n d
on m a i l imduties.
forfeitures.
portations.

AU o t h e r
customs
receipts.

$6.26
6.26

851,560

$11.00
2.00
13.00

•

Arizona:
. ; Nogales.
DouglasLochiel....
Naco
Yuma

739,083
466,148
- 1,848
278,541. .
- 6,922

$92.71

$188,088.74
117,074.20
332. 73
64,516.69
.1,961.97

361.41
7.80

$4,265.84
2,859.12

2.44

371,974.33

371.65

3,712. 74
1,059.87
4,643.97
5,002.12
1,226.94
781.89
493.03
1,081.57
3,518.38

7.30

5.95

21,520.51

. 9.80

77. 70

3,954.57

1,114.25

131,619.92

6,590.05
81,695.36
4,387,633.08

20. 98
2,112. 65
12,327.06

392. 40
633. 62
26,696.69

75.00

116,476,088

74.70
187.01
32,402.29

451.65
3,173.56
9,020.71

20,083

31.59

23.32

2,896.02
7.00

6,797.75

LOO

$3,908,061
3,731,834
90
13,237,095

1,391,761
998.547

$3,653.71
715.29

5,308,167

1,918.45
14.90

1,492,542

20,877,080

7,698,475

6,302.35

Aroostook, Me.':
Houlton.
Bridgewater
F o r t Fairfield
Fort Kent.
Limestone
Madawaska
Mars HUl
Monticello
V a n B u r en

20,369
3,334
28,931
20,957
3,012
2,922
1,692
3,507
20,004

50,936
1,698
58,393
6,189
800
2,055
2,663
604
325,318

47,025
1,174
7,761
• 2,136

Total

104,628

448,556

63,173

13,350
315,129
18,060,139

66,445
9,090
14,865,563

952,095

28,744
68

8,078

Total.

Astoria, Oreg
A t l a n t a , Ga .
B a l t i m o r e , Md
Bangor, Me.:
Bangor i
Danforth
Frankfort




92.71

215.71
10.00

345.20

$4,837.67
1,151.49
97.80
1,043.00

7,470.16

7,129.96

225.71

499.62

1,113.85

o
pi'

o"^
B

W
feii

....

LOO
4.95

4,002
1,075

75.00
2.70

287.95
1,343.00
243.00
1,455.00

fei;

•

.40
Ct
fei
Zfl

i26.66

2.50

2,615.72

504.26

Hampden
Lowelltown
Moose R i v e r
St. John
Vanceboro
Halifax

54,014
33,709

Total

Bath, Me.
.
Beaufort N C

.

2,200,225

77.10

575

893.09

78.20

977.70

893.09

582.46

363,036.64

6,798.79

7,836

80.69

29.00

12.50

575

7,836

80.69

29.00

12.50

116,175
3,000

257

*23.32

12,115.83

17.04

701.78

2.25

.38

ZP
fei

O

pi
fei
P^
Kj

2.25
2.25

h3

2,957
1,834

°

3.36

6,905

B o s t o n a n d Charlestown, Mass.:
Boston
Cambridge
Dorchester
T
Hingham
Hull
Newburyport
Qnincy
Weymouth
Worcester




1,537,457

951.56

340,654.00

5

Total

Brazos d e Santiago, T e x . :
Brownsville
Brazos
Edinburgh
Rio Grande C i t y . . . '

22.30

25.05
1.04

5

Belfast, Me.:
Belfast
Rockport
Stockton Springs...
Vinaihaven

Total

2,092,919

11,490.70
7,988.92

>

Beaufort, S. C :
Beaufort
Port Royal

Total

1,443,981

4,476

.

2,733,496

763

.

23.21

763

Total....
B a r n s t a b l e , Mass.:
Barnstable
Chatham
Hyannis. ..
Provincetown

58,558
28,665

2,850,091

'.

83,288
2,110

7,787

1,555.97

6,905

12,578

1,559.33

70,672,633

75,147,345

fe3

1-5

>
69,526,269

238,562.88

240,279.87

23,472,678.29

112,228.97

204,783.56

3,161.34

52,455.84

.
189,416.70

156.17
112,385.14

206,346.45

903,962

213,529.10

55.76

1,573.03

9,990
1,765

1,890.64
1,185.49

199,594

3,078

75,346,939

69,529,347

757,675

476,006

10,882
7,234

2,050
437

238,562.88

240,279.87

Pi

336.70

• 1,562.89

23,662,097.99

581,497

d

5.47

3.00

71,254,130

Zfl

3,161.34.
688.25
139.00
583.85

52,798.01
1 122.35
CTI
CO

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
•1^

Value of imports.

Customs receipts. Value of
exports.

Districts and ports.
Dutiable.

Brazos de Santiago, Tex.—Continued.
Roma
. .
. ^
Santa Maria

Free.

Excess
deposits
refunded.

Drawback
paid.

Estimated
duties.

Duties, includiag fines Increased and Fines, penadditional alties, and
on mail imduties.
forfeitures.
portations.

AU other
customs
receipts.

$256.00
46.00

$7.50

479,270

920,722

216,907.23

63.26

$1,573.03

2,161.30

$1,122.35

40,483
4,711
75,632
196,257

$1,455.00
35.00
149.93
276.31

$99.07

334,802.95
4,381.20
38,750.78
7,338.65

148.06

1,029.92

38,313.96

85.64

1,177,231

Total

$5,005

993,422
23,662
117,009
43,138

Bridgeton, N. J
Bristol and Warren, R. I

$777

777,202

Total
Bridgeport, Conn.:
Bridgeport
Greenwich.
Norwalk
Stamford

$1,231
180

317,083

1,916.24

99.07

385,273.58

150.64

45,800.40

26

2.58

$312.45
437.75

38,313.96

85 64
fei

15.84

Brunswick, Ga.:
Brunswick
Darien

10,147

109,295

9,126,510
251,421

545.34

2,373.41

11.06

55.40

342 12

Total

10,147

109,295

9,377,931

545.34

2,373.41

11.06

55.40

342 12

8,530,817

5,988,149

65,378,183

12,203.42

1,367,211.88
.1,957.18

2,058.11

12,432.29

Buffalo Creek, N . Y . :
Buffalo
Black Rock Ferry
Lackawana
Night Clearance
North Buffalo
Tonawanda




;>
o
fei
ZP

21,297..84

,

Total
Burlington, Iowa
Burhngton, N. J
Cairo, IU

pi

o

150.79
1,180.71

o

8,530,817
"...

5,988,149

589

274

65,378,183

322,017.24
5,001.54
21,297.84

12,203.42

11 957 58

1,100.01

11,957.58

• 4,112.25

1,696,187.84

2,058.11

265.05
^ • •

1,100.01

165.50
25.95

16,544.54

72.63

Cape Viacent, N . Y,:
Cape V i n c e n t
Alexandria Bay
Chaumont
Clayton •
Grindstone Island
Kingston
MUlers B a v
R o u n d Island
°
Sacket H a r b o r
Thousand Island P a r k . .
W^estminster P a r k
Total

150,800
• 17,813
307
19,421
2,678

32,194
2,075
3,088
500

2,927

92
3

881

376
701

269

192,191

39,007

Total

9

Charleston, S . C
Chattanooga, Tp,nn_Cherrystone,' V a . :
Cape Charles
Chmcoteague

.18

16.15

12.80
15.10

18.60
1.44

'

i67. is

.75

36.23

166. 66
28,384.29

223,954

0

44.83

36.41

15.15

_

35.45
ZP

1
8

Total

44.83

6.80

Casttae, Me.:
Castine
Bucksport..
Deer Isle

Champlain, N . Y.:
Plattsburg
Champlain
Chateaugav -.
Cherubusco
Fort Coviagton
Hogansburg
Malone
^ Moores J u n c t i o n
Rouse Point
Trout River

21,694.64
2,772.68
101.60
3,296.01
225.53

221,027

5,330
4,970

551.69

10,300

551.69

5.03

1,806.78
1,076.95
2,165.50
142.90
176,549.06
. 995.77
236,538.34
1,358.98
331,221.29
1,269.20

fei

o

1.02
4.01

35.39

pi

fei
H

1,782.78

15
9,997
30,730
2,858
487,779
3,433
1,440,431
9,097
2,959,837
23,088

595,190
1,185
1,734,565
6,381
3,782,438
196

14,681,879

4,967,265

6,129,760

29,768,183

1,782. 78

19,255
20; 323

4,754,900
36,997

13,511,857
14,488

1,048.13

25,378,127

7,159,152

4,868,352

105,935.84

25,378,127

7,159,152

4,868,352

105,935.84

80,545.12

724
9,081

>
Pi
K-J
355.00

120.74

o

361.01

fei

i4,6i3.55

14.00
50.00

fei

92.14

3,773.14

57.4i

Pi

753,124. 77

127.53

17,916.56

837.42

9,269.16
7,519.05

103.40
69.01

534.19
13,206.39

66,710. 70

10,561,912.47

136,130.09

137,680.13

3,954.58

11,864.78

66,710.70

10,561,912.47

136,130.09

137,680.13

3,954.58

11,864.78

694,497

14,391,807
80,545.12

129.87

fei

>

120.74

ZP

528.10
76.10

Pi
Ki

d
-

Total
Chicago, IU.:
Chicago
Indiana Harbor
Michigan City
Waukegan
Total




ox

TABLE N.—Statement of business ofthe customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Customs receipts.

V a l u e of i m p o r t s .
V a l u e of
exports.

Districts and ports.
Dutiable.

Free.

Excess
deposits
refxmded.

Drawback
paid.

$1,092,732
60,706

Corpus Christi, Tex.:
Corpus Christi
Aransas
Laredo

1,215,419

430,296
662,290

$2,013,222
8,518,219

571.25

Total....

1,215,419

1,092,586

10,531,441

571.25

53,826
3,759,051

616,465

$480.09
198.93

2,764.65.

252,155.29

3,316.51

3,85L66

$5,566.05

184.40
1,144.55

2,764.65

252,155.29

3,317.01

3,85L66

5,566.05

1,328.95

1.25

Cuyahoga, Ohio:
Cleveland
Ashtabula
Connp.ant
Fairport
Lorain

1,601,301.35

16,357.19

14,595.80

1,189.81

3,520.88

..

...

. . . .

12,353,703
3,131,715
2,844,730
194,259
2,475,602

7,899.75

21,000,009

7,899.75

616,465

107,179

1,993.46

.05

Delaware:
Wilmiagton
Lewes
Seaford

537,298

2,955,805

3,457

637,298

2,955,805

3,457

344,289
90,551

178,020
25,823

4; 055,755
288
1,033

5,152,864
250
370
205

1,993.46

99,076

Total

.:

D e n v e r , Colo
D e s Moines, I o w a
Detroit, Mich:
Detroit
Grosse Isle
Monroe
,
M o u n t Clemens




$1,150.02
16.20

448.28

3,315.11

448.28,

1,601,301.35

16,357.19

14,595.80

115,722.24

3,759,051

Dayton, Ohio.

Total

$6,031.35
1,451.09

.50

CouncU Bluffs, Iowa

AU other
customs
receipts.

$768,134.95
146,803.03

$9,089.79

69,845

.

Duties, includiog fines Increased and Fines, penadditional alties, and
on mail imforfeitures.
duties.
portations.

23,965.82

$2,408.21
1,200.68

$1,235,255
303,847

Cincinnati, O h i o . . .

Columbus, Ohio
Coos Bav. Oreg

Estimated
duties.

87.42

792.29

231.94

52.00

5,286.00

270.52

62,706.21 •

1,189.81

3,520.93

3,315.11

• 62,706.21

52.00

5,286.00

270.52

169.62

174,174.05
45,009.44

3,932.81
292.36

1,649.33
225.86

29.60

19,788

1,433.11
167.21

62,222,302

8,007.53

9,699.30

6,903.36

24,437.48

2,197,686.00
42.70
63.25

_

1,438.24

9,811.51

O
pi
H
O

fei
fei

a

fei

ZP

Trenton
Wyandotte

i42'

Total

i4.*38'

8i7'
8,007.53

9,699.30

24,437.48

1,438.24

16.50

178.51

206.46

4,230.34

66.13

14,252.28
43.00

149,740.92

206. 46

4,230.34

66.13

14,295.28

3,136.72

62,222,302

84.67

2,197,806.33

4,057,218
41,295

320,944

2,864,530

2,472.96

12.08

320,944

2,864,530

2,472.96

12.08

8,750

5,294

6,903.36

149,740.92

956,608

Total.;...'...
Dunkirk, N . Y
.
Eastern Maryland.
E d g a r t o w n , Mass.:
Edgartown
Vineyard Haven

22,984

956,608

D u b u q u e , Iowa
D u l u t h , Mian.:
Duluth.
Two Harbors

5,154,506

21,734.69

82.54

i

82.54

w

12.50
15.00

pi
Kj

27.50

o
fei

^5

Total
Erie, Pa.:
Erie
Corry

183,761
183,761

26,716.76
17.00
393.62

7,168,535

172.51
172.51

37.73

144,960.06
50,316.11
4,589.79

820,093

12,739
43,513
68,292

32.11
5.62

15,564.24
11,152.52

820,093

72,351
195,405
7,249

Total

43,389
13,162
56,551

"

EvansviUe, I n d . . . . . .
F a l l R i v e r , lyfass
Fernandina, Fla
F r e n c h m a n s B a y , Me.:
Ellsworth .
M o u n t Desert F e r r y
Southwest Harbor

14.20
73.53

273.17
191.97

34.89

16.70
31.00

.

35,149

11.68
3.42

Total

4.20

Kl

2,823,137
202,431

239,010,811
42,606,930

7,038.22
121.71

45,527.72

1,174,539.60
11,750.89

368.02

29,330.47
137.88

305.16

4, OOL 97
30.00

5,337,272

281,617,741

7,159.93

45,527.72

1,186,290.49

368.02

29,468.35

305.16

4,121.97

1,396,549
59,922

. . .

4,889,070
448,202

3,025,568

Total

't
d

'

Oenesee, N . Y . :
Rocnester
Charlotte
Oak Orchard
Pultneyville
Waterloo

fei

4.20

15.10

35,149

G a l e n a , 111
Oalveston, Tex.:
Galveston
T e x a s City
Velasco

Total

9,8n.51

486,650
177,837

2,442.27

2,736.40

566,154.63
8,072.59

290.09

22,741.56

922.27

2,918,379

1,456,471

664,487

2,918,379

2,442.27

2,736.40

574,227.22

/ 290.09

22,741.56

1,222.27

300.00
.:




•

-a

TABLE

N . -—Statement

of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.

V a l u e of i m p o r t s .

Customs receipts.
Value of
exports.

Districts a n d p o r t s .
Dutiable.

$528,819
1,693
113,941
1,391,691
2,257,463

24,655
15,254
4,411

103,844

4,512,224

2,361,307

441,489
8,328

23, cS32

1,608,378
2,629
951
592,368

4,361,945
1,322

37,019,732

778

220,153
24,276

32,682
40

2,162

27,865

601,461
6,355

H u r o n , Mich.:
Port Huron
Algonac
Alpena
B a y City
H a r b o r Beach
Marine City
MarysviUe
Oscoda
Roberts Landing
Rogers Citv
T
Saginaw
St. Clair

17,984
2,708

1,193
39,665

..

2,844,994

4,386,899

37,333,029

31,590.14

8,729.30

395,048.95

81.42

407,569
117,243
1,360,232

363,599
1,252,836
671,401

. 2,448,273
215,508

• 1,700.00
102.96
2,214.83

616.94
248.58

231,433.10
34,-200.91
705,089.68

294.96
1,648.73
9,023.78

A l l other
customs
receipts.

$6,824.45

750,503
4,180
10,008

764,691

$297,856.36

$8,087.79

$3,165.74

$566 03

621.76
559. 36

1,750. 35
290. 64

3,206.05

373,234.47

13.06
79.99
112.35
319.13

2,000.00

$822.20

44,925.72
121,077.33

976.94

$18,908

13,544.59

9,380.14

1,764,903.56

12,761.42

35,202.57

9,380.14

751.43

31,590.14

8,729.30

1,775,519.59

12,761.42

35,239.02

73.49
33. 60

—

2,864.05

309,676. 75
250.99
59.50
36,651.56

8L42

3,56L12

"

6,988.01
2.00
36 00

868. 57
2.70

3,100.24
1.60

145

843 75

36.45

85,141.65
1,098.50

13,544.59

$233.50

4,339.63

5,134.58
4,739.85
741. 60

652,612

130

-

D u t i e s , ia- Increased a n d Fines, pencluding fines
additional
alties, a n d
on m a i l i m duties.
forfeitures.
portations.

4,467,904

Total




Estimated
duties.

984,868

-Houston, T e x
H u m b o l d t ( E u r e k a ) , Cal

Indianapolis, I n d
Jacksonville, F l a
K a n s a s City, Mo
K e n n e b u n k , Me

Drawback
paid.

232,067
224,915

Hawaii:
Honolulu
Hilo
Kahului
Koloa
Mahukona

Total

.Free.

Excess
deposits
refunded.

$673,551

"Georgetown D C
•Georgetown, S . C
Gloucester, Mass
G r a n d R a p i d s , Mich
•Great E g g H a r b o r , N . J
H a r t f o r d , Conn
,..,.,....-,,.

on
00

2,864.05

7,026.01
71 749 79

.961.91

4 492 87

3,561.12

961. 91

5,332.87

3,155.93
201. 72
4,937.83

73. 65

1,187.01
268. 42
5,829.75

c>-

33.03
44,817.14
458.14

840 00

K e y West, Fla.:
Key West
Boca Grande
Miami
P a l m Beach
P u n t a Gorda

520,489.66
2.07
243.56

152.53
6.45
20.79

2,869.34

6,197.29

8,478.64
30.00

64,320

5,107,930

315.22

417.20

620,735. 29

179. 77

2,869.34

6,197.29

8,508.64

844

6,533.60

16.80

113.62

139.40

24,773

59,621

1.3,531.86

293.22

143.30

970,923

563,916

40,643

709,589.05

7,506.25

19,875.21

612,681

600,081

212,919

1,583,604

1,163,997

253,562

12,197.86

466,949
9,724

•

398,260
14,539

9,233
250

690.13

13.16

59.70

•
•.

Total

93,074

Total
M e m p h i s , Tp.nn
Memphremagog, Vt.:
Newport..'
Beecher FaUs
Ca.nfi.a"n
Derby L i n e . . . 1
Island Pond
North Troy: 1
Total
M i a m i (Toledo) Ohio .

12,197.86

456.19

201.12

4,656.11

N

. 709,626.70

7,506.25

19,875. 21

218,430.39
674.83

2,589.91

793.45

9,082.06

456.19

i

Q
bd

37.65

10.47
105.77

201.12

4,656.11
835.30

^

Pi

H

o
fej

M a r b l e h e a d , Mass.:
Marblehead
T,ynn




417.20

16,315

LouisviUe, K y
Machias, Me

Michigan:
Grand Haven
Benton Harbor
Charlevoix
Cheboygan
Frankfort
HoUand
Ludiagton

4,634,043
439,332
34,555

824,511

Total
Knoxville, Tenn
L a Crosse, W^is
Lincoln, Nebr
Little Egg Harbor N . J .
L o s Angeles. Cal.:
L o s Angeles
Redondo Beach
San Pedro
Santa Barbara

56,079
3,882
4,359

315.22

4,523

819,988

3,088

72.37

1-3

65.54

fei

93,074

...

3,088

72.37

9,082.06

116. 24

65.54

171,892

8,669

167.97

79,461.15

122.47

1,267.86

1,602,213
41,125
2.480
64,517
1,086.939
71,476

2,537,680
546,704
16,262
26,084
1,954,931
21,658

23,459,374
69,485

211,697.44
5,495.14
269.20
5,457.80
127,671.97
6,99L78

148.98

4,825.98
39.21

3.44

352.30
547.43
21.30

2,868,749

5,103,319

25,546,185

668.19

2,801.98

357,583.33

152.42

5,786.22

544.05

48.22

675,629

223,451

1,378,549

2,290.94

23. 72

135,246.67

162.91

1,352.42

111.25

429.65

56,475

23,536

6,140.71

36.98

8.52

^

2,017,326

530.78

2,80L98

128.41
9.00

364.00
456.45

14.71
L36

87.60
3L02
1.13

H

;>

Ul

d
. Ki
w

186,539
82,143
h-l
6,498

cn

CO

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal yeaf ended June 30, 1913—Continued.

o
Customs receipts.

V a l u e of i m p o r t s .
V a l u e of
exports.

Districts a n d p o r t s .
Dutiable.

Michigan—Continued.
Manistee
Manistique
Muskegon
St. I g n a c e
St. J o s e p h
South Haven
Total
Milwaukee, Wis.:
Milwaukee
Green B a y
Kenosha
Kewaunee
Manitowoc
Marinette
Oshkosh
Racine
Sheboygan
Sturgeon B a y
Total
Minnesota:
St. P a u l
Baudette
Gunfliat Lake
Lidus
I n t e r n a t i o n a l Falls
Mianeapolis
P i a e Creek
Ranier
St V i a c e n t
Warroad
Total




Free.

Excess
deposits
refunded.

Drawback
paid.

Estimated
duties.-

D u t i e s , in- Increased a n d Fines, p e n c l u d i a g fines
alties, a n d
additional
on m a i l i m forfeitures.
duties.
portations.

AU o t h e r
customs
receipts.

$84,483
4,675
49,647

-

$56,475

$23,536

413,985

$6,140.71

$36.98

$8.52

735,855.09

1,109.96

6,172.09

..
1,961,489

2,831,659

215,648

$2,969.15

$1,341.67

hj
O
pi
H
O
$3,706.95

$2,582.62

>
"A
o
1,961,489

2,831,659

215,648

884,004
25,009
2C1
194
2,232
3,255,633
176
489,908
534,483
32,255

832,247
66,113

274,200

6,465
9,513
467,303
523
502,109
2,637,751
12,531

8,256,516
33,083,982
729,532

3.83
16.00

5,224,095

4,534,615

42,353,975

15,104. 58

9,745

1,341.67

735,855.09

1,109.96

6,172.09

3,706.95

2,582.62

3,166.58

.

2,969.15

5,846.76

418,948.75
2,079.71
36.67
24.40
402.80
828,570.14
35.54
35,858.44
34,375.81
2,438. 20

10,107.36

2,265.07
• 31.89

678.25

5,086.24
10.00

1,322,770.46

4.24
11,913.93

5,846.76

"

422.91

10,730.07

3.85
52.25

15
63 85
246 41

L90

84.66
2,214.77

4.40
40.05
2.75

57 50
15 00

10,532.17

15,326.46

781 55 1 ' ^ 470 i.f;

"''""""

fei
zn

Mobile, Ala.:
Mobile
Birmiagham

330,241
16,892

3,328,260
602

27,823,750

Total

347,133

3,328,862

27,823,750

5,588
240
410,376
1,683,831
3,810
27,961
3,997
1,977
48,492
2,186,272

415,358

46,173

11,388

1,003,110
204,485
397,936
16,705
26,759,207
88,419

750,865
235,152
• 79,037
30,906
55,639,893
100,449

731,675
58,806
842,636
15,603
171,391,831

1,712,836

558,546

Montana and Idaho:
Great Falls
Ranff .
Cottonwood
Eastport
Gateway
Glasgow
Peskan
Plentywood
PorthiU
Sweet Grass
Whitlash
Total
N a n t u c k e t , Mass
Nashville, Tenn
N a t c h e z , Miss
.'
Newark, N . J
N e w Bedford, Mass
New Haven, Conn.
N e w L o n d o n , Conn
N e w Orleans, L a
Newport, R. I
Newport News, Va.:
Newport News
Yorktown .

...

1,663.93
63.99

6,428.70

76,496.81
9,821.77

155.81
62.50

331.49
197.96

77.08

3,526.03
34 69

6,428.70

86,318.58

218.31

529.45

77.08

3,560.72

9,031

173.29

2,457.20

2,165
148,735
76,797
425
3,438
25,436
681
148,650

13,620
672,620

662.62
74,688.51
279,104. 37
1,025.25
7,527. 70
1,187. 26
220.42
10,314.31

4,576,355

374,903.73

2,457.20

2.00

18,731.89

128.10

298,679.68
42,354.50
127,975.00
1,585. 99
11,465,240.86
39,205.16

72.02
2.44
762. 79
87.62
169.56
100. 78
9,386.95
87.56

127,261.85
1,562.24

1,667.20

60.00
10.00
3,951.02

1,727.92

3,509,688
339,248
41,179

1,415.27
455.35
618.87

817.80
482.50

2.00

o
247.21

1 875.30

2,813.00
32,178.28

4, i99. 63
322.01
1,934.43

'

2,894.19

54,092.57
274.40

75,410.05

13,602,993

2,067.43

2,537.95

325,266.52

16.55

4,805.41

97.00

2,602.18

2,5.37.95

325,266.52

16.55

4,805.41

97.00

2,602.18

1,712,836

558,546

13,602,993

New York. N . Y.:
New Y o r k
Cold S p r i n g

495,681,368

552,651,547

917,960,810

2,750,452 66

3,235,554 42 201,357,440.24

678,6.16.76

1,266,667.49

733,864.86

279,087.45

Total

495,681,368

552,651,547

917,960,810

2,750,452.66

3,2.35,554.42 201,357,440.24

678,616.76

1,266,667.49

733,864.86

279,087.45

1,690,871
2,530
1,392,970
150

36,557,869
22,524

333.03

27,002.64

391,587.79
639.02
75,312.75
18.15

40.38

1,912.40

38L79

7,379.21

977

2,428,625
13,940
362,219
50
103,758
12

3,087,498

2,908,604

36,580,914

333.03

27,002.64

467,702.42

40.38

1,912.40

381.79

7,379.21

..

Niagara, N . Y . :
N i a g a r a Falls
Lewiston
North Tonawanda
Olcott
Schlossers
Youngstown
Total




.

..

..

>

19.40

2,067.43

Total

pi
fei
H
Pi

78.34

•

575.66
240.00
7.21

fei
Pi
fei

>

ZP

d

144.71

521

K!

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
to
C u s t o m s receipts.

V a l u e of i m p o r t s .
• V a l u e of
exports.

Districts and ports.
Dutiable.

Norfolk Va

$116,179

North and South Dakota:
Pembiaa
Ambrose.
Antler
CrosbyHannah
\
Han.sboro.
Kermit-,,.,
Mowbray.
Neche
Portal
St. J o h n
Sarles....
Sheiwood
Souris
WalhaUa
Westhope.

Free.

Excess
deposits
refunded.

...

Total
Omaha, Nebr
Oswegatchie, N . Y . :
Ogdensburg
Hammond
Lisbon.
Louisville
Massena...
Morristown
Nyando..
Waddiagton
Total
Oswego, N . Y . :
Oswego
Fair Haven




$1,998,881

$16,394,415

$428. 61

40,654
13,286
1,378
4,155
1,145
2,624
604
204
38,719
508,019
2,460
1,526
11,178
833
977
10,112

106,626
2,835
1,198
3,975
465
115
780
3,917
43,661
4,115,886
50,426

7,884,251

679.32

1,295
384
2,036

42,621

637,874

4,333,599

26,217,666

434,883

337,245

1,564,893
1,304
13,584
14,522
1,000
28,429
375,236
11,142

17,939,312
845
2,905
1,053
1,850
21,405
1,229,433
74,372

2,010,110
635,921

Drawback
paid.

$833.73
1,258.27

1,482,857
16,240,030
567,907

.Estimated
duties.

D u t i e s , in- Increased a n d F i n e s , pen- . AU other
c l u d i a g fines
alties, a n d
customs
additional
on m a i l i m forfeitures.
receipts.
duties.
portations.

$47,580.71

$44.32

4,462.15
2,921.63
562.13
1,139.69
283.65
663.80
190.90
64.99
4,713.81
94,942.63"
546.86
401.95
3,690.55
285.88
98.01
2,218.07

65.21

2.47

$1,449.96

$1,505 23
$773.61

20.00

H

o
244.20
204.62

25.43

59.39

25.00
555.35
fei.

148.45
5.90
26.98

>

118.75

679.32

1,258.27

117,186.70

90.64

478.27

158.09

1,650.79

139,089.55

2,289.91

4,322,346
65
325
1,588
1,200
30,297
2,485,532
11,260

1,015.45

3,394.70

119,038.36
75.08
685.04
813.11
184.08
3,322.25
54,394.09
897.77

89.37

708.38
.40

6.18

6,852,613

2,711.58

252,826

2,783,032
995.200

72.92

600.35

6.25
2,423.72

19,271,175

1,106.10

245.39

4.80
225.10
1,466.23
3,394.70

fei

o
w

179,409.78

95.55

41,080.73

15.72

'

3,138.75
24.10

30.00
235.34

2,425.60

235.34

2,425.60

O
fei
ZP

Ontario
Sodus P o i n t
Utica

4,'266'
417,146
1,053,067

Total

269,865

i66,'966'
1,879.56

12,839
3,945,198

193,527.16

234.74

1,406.12

1.952.48

234,607.89

250.46

1,430.22

Paducah, Ky
Pamlico (Newbern), N . C

224. 75
o

1.69.
46.53

P a s o del N o r t e , N . M e x . :
El Paso
Columbus

224.75

2,065,129
149,432

2,514,379
3,861

1,669.02

135.56

378,586.38
48,984.22

1,855.60

4,653.08

3,748.01

7,146.98

2,214,561

1,102,849'

2,518,240

1,669.02

135.56

427,570.60

1,855.60

4,653.08

3,748.01

7,146.98

176,409
91,527
6,488

289,747
306,726
114

1,033,370
348,580

2,392.32

37,918.62
10,760. 61
2,676.85

131.37

97.68
32.00

.90
50.35

o

274,424

Total

1,017,620
85,229

596,587

1,381,950

2,392.32

51,356.08

131.37

129.68.

51.25

pi

ZP

P a s s a m a q u o d d y , Me.:
Eastport.
Calais
Lubec...
R e d Beach

-

Total

Kl

Patchogue, N . Y

o

P e a r l R i v e r , Miss.:
Gulfport
B a y St. Louis
B iloxi
Horn Island
Scranton
Ship Island
Total...

fei

141,386

7,100,584

48.92

20

156

699,274

4.00

298

141,542

7,799,858

41,785

1,656,254

19,490,243
318,682

117.05

390.18

261

91.00

9.49

17

...

111.06

3.43

-

52.92

fej

H
W

fei

ii.66
12.92

111.06

102.00
ZP

Pensacola, F l a . :
Pensacola
St. Andrews
Total
Peoria, 111
Perth Amboy, N. J .
Petersburg, Va
Philadelphia, Pa.:
Philadelphia
Camden
Chester
Total
Pittsburgh, Pa




.9,704.90

18.63

52.50

150.00

590.50

41,785

19,808,925

117.05

390.18

9,704.90

18.63

52.50

150.00

590.50

64,346
10,455,922
28,226

3,030,303
4,014,847

22.00
2,316.47
43.68

15,010.49

21,360.29
599,563.84
135,467.50

93.90
177.38
62.49

1,974.43
25.90

25.00
229.29

6,907.40
2,182.14

66,679,628

.

1,656,254

38,319
1,382,693
542,116

37,530,050

76,306,520

141,244.35

248,734.39

20,012,042.81

112,838.09

255,784.19

1,749.74

41,881.84

65,679,628

37,530,050

76,306,520

141,244.35

248,734.39

20,012,042.81

112,838.09

255,784.19

1,749.74

41,881.84

1,806,150

702,502

4,511.23

3,115.10

825,394.09

1,117.74

4,817.35

d

°

-

28,938

818.01

Co

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Customs receipts.

V a l u e of i m p o r t s .
V a l u e of
exports.

Districts and ports. *
Dutiable.

Free.

P l y m o u t h , Mass
P o r t l a n d , Me
P o r t l a n d , Oreg

$28,586
633,382
1,757,635

$762,834
1,181,626
1,030,330

Porto Rico: i
San J u a n
Aguadilla
Arecibo
Arroyo
Fajardo
Guanica
Humacao
Mayaguez
Ponce

1,791,671
23,685
69,873
36,661
29,304
65,336
20,315
365,082
1,068,748

159,767
14,674
2,720
15,223

Total
Portsmouth, N. H
Providence, R . I

.

.

. . . .

Excess
deposits
refunded.

Drawback
paid.

$6,932,487
9,372,936

$1,298.50
4,797.57

$1,878.74
5,599.66

20,639.84
47.31
147.95
5.10
24.90

247.08

45,577

1,004,439
1,273,567
946,762
553
85
,2,547

2,550
34,141

1,771,881
3,565,018

1,687.73
3,293.34

3,470,675

274,652

8,664,852

25,846.17

32,260
2,152,772

11,586
329,066

1,411
656

60,687
1,251
2,014
35,358
228,066
12,737
3,489
3,942
217
1,001

504,204
90
265,163
115,763
573,914
6,729
31,898
16,490
2,833
443

5,402
3,741
3,793
693
6,354
60
3,738,781

2,023,296
1,741
• 29,449
4,442
5,750
1,050
18,599,447

839,607
790,919
141,246
333,962
9,802,565
164,841
128,050
448,245
77,364
24,201
87,625
514,171
14,407
517,680
61,498
1,583,355
26,545
21,016 081

Estimated
duties.

$3,899.92
167,730.40
664,799.98

D u t i e s , in- Increased a n d
Fines, penc l u d i a g fines
additional
alties, a n d
on m a i l i m duties.
forfeitures.
portations.

A l l other
customs
receipts.

$4.00
3,338.06
974.35

$640.31
3,203.50

$749.46
10,978.62

$63.81
1,047.35

603,959.93
10,429.70
21,124.72
16,154.91
11,935.17
22,288.25
8,410.68
125,278.07
293,045.82

6,263.04
2.25

20,760.90
29.29
8.88
130.51
49.74

190.38

232.67
391.33

1,661.56
4,354.03

243.57
26.00

7,725.19
58.80
28.60
13.10
11.63
61.50
295.61
519.62
1,543.50

247.08

1,112,627.25

6,889.29

26,994.91

459.95

10,257.55

1.01
2,464.07

394.05

3,358.09
612,746.49

130.27
461.36

8.46
15,702.79

3,362.00

125,035.31

50,675.68

9,353.05

7,894. 47
426.65
205.85
6,892.12
60,378.59
2,105.35
634.59
595.13
87.76
129.04

7.56
31.84

29.52

3,668.59

12.99

494.04
147.92

12 633.80
5.40
59.50
562.67
691.14
346.50
468.25
19.65
266.00

603. 75
403.94
519.25
129.10
1,050.49
14.39
1,359,892.35

9.00
3.83
5.35
87.87
1.80

hJ

o

H
O
H

W
fei

Puget Sound, Wash.:
Port Townsend
Aberdeen
Anacortes
Bellingham
Blaiae
Chopaka
DanviUe
Everett .
...
Ferry
Friday Harbor...
Kalama
Molson
Northport...
Oro ville
P o r t Angeles
Seattle.




338.06
41.60

.75
14.43

4.27
60.00
17.50

48,983.7i

6.45
3.87

* 110.00
>

707. 70
498.50
153.09

270.00
275.00
-

9, i63.92

2.00

836.2i

8,788.37

a

fei

ZP

Total

25
50,978
85,119
1,395,299

42
65,046
492,452
23,095, 434

3,316,958
22,326,482

5,639,007

45,834,676

62,382,992

643,985

South' B e n d
Spokane
Sumas
Tacoma

167,190

329,019

643,985

329,019

5.30
3,302.92

26,003.37
20,675.00
483,701.09

13,879.06

231.76
100.73
3,619.51

144.63
34.36
980.50

67.40
577. 75
2,517.95

1,971,342.28

66,346.41

13,819.49

6;758.95

28,365.67

272.76

1,033,205.25

111.44

1,554.71

1,146.76

272.76

1,033,205.25

111.44

1,554.71

1,146.76

50,675.68

Richmond, Va.:

9,353.05

West Point
Total

33.82

R o c k I s l a n d 111
Sabine, T e x . :
Port Arthur
Sabine
Total
Saco Me
Sag H a r b o r , N Y
St A u g u s t i n e F l a
St. J o s e p h , Mo.
St. Louos, Mo
St. Marks (Cedar K e y s ) , F l a
St. M a r y s , G a
Salem a n d B e v e r l y , Mass.:
Salem
Beverly
Danvers...
. .
Total
Salt L a k e City, U t a h .
Saluria, T e x . :
Eagle Pass
Boquillas.. . .
Del Rio
Langtry
Presidio..
San Antonio
Total




ZP

1,268
109

843,569
1,383,499

21,225,400
3,932,682

10,280.84

450.39
12.50

27.21

104.63

8.00

1,057.52
740.80

1,377

2,227,068

25,158,082

10,280.84

462.89

27.21-

104.63

8.00

1,798.32

33,974.06

274.98
2,194.65
61,887.57
2,211,366.15

2.10
39.12
60.69
23,939.19

2.20
63.76
6.53

381.65
993.14
786.64

59.46
79.28
6.43

37.72

72.49

2,161.43

145.17

37.72

2,708
6,094
123,908
5,565,663

206
165,345
1,004,620
18,521

1,075,690
1,182,000
81,445

203.90
• 12,901.57

789.14
28,469.50

343.79

3.22
32.70
'
45.901,561.78

fei

o

>

Pi
Kl

o
fei

fei
4,284
9,108
7,927

2,446
2,285

.

21,319

4,731

44,235

18,379

1,546,376
38,263
8,476

2,025,888

3,148,484

2,993

26, i76

3,296
126,708

4,463
17,552

28,005
1,710

i, 407.66

1,723,119

2,050,896

3,204,375

>
ZP'

d

15,595.02

443.59

431,017.00

2,429.00

829.00

3,359.00

2,360.00

1,438.00

2,032.75

i.46

iii 66

48,356.00

130.00

604.00

1,362.00
496.00

285.00

483,140.00

2,560.40

1,433.00

5,329.00

2,664.00

•
1,438.00

1,970.00
409.00

I Porto Rico figures are not included in grand total.
<0\

TABLE N.—Statement of busings of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Oi
Customs receipts.

V a l u e of i m p o r t s .
V a l u e of "
exports.

Districts and ports.
Dutiable.

Free.

Excess .
deposits
refunded.

S a n Diego, Cal.:
San D i e g o . .
Andrade
Calexico...
Campo
Tia Juana.

$504,366
3,080
112,912
10,519
28,271

$121,291

$541,881
6,331
385,445
38,069
253,083

.$420.07

215,955
2,329
13,329

Total

659,148

352,904

1,224,809

420.07

25,452
602

18,526

970,294
762,988

84.86

1,244

Drawback
paid.

200
1,077

S a n d u s k y . Ohio:
Sandusky
Huron
Kelleys I s l a n d
P o r t Clinton
Put-in-Bay
Vermilion

Estimated
duties.

D u t i e s , in- Increased a n d F i n e s , p e n c l u d i a g fines
alties, a n d
additional
on m a i l imforfeitures.
duties.
portations.

2,274.43

$91,702.28
466,07
28,958.70
4,076.37
7,539.71

$240.19

132,743.13

250.76

4,382.43
75.35

$2,274.43

48.80

$466.01

AU other
customs
receipts.

$1,140.40
10.40
181.21
.52
173.82

$756.10

466.01

1,506.35

766.60

921.87

130.00

20.98

10.57

10.50

o
o

.

Total

W

129.63

fei

17.79

142
27,440

19,803

1,733,282

52,180,524

76,294,060

98,229.96

4,605.20

84.86

16,029,385

S a n Francisco, Cal.:
S a n Francisco .
Casper
F o r t Bragg .
Mendocino City
Monterey
Noyo
Oakland
P o r t Hartford

244,822.33

48.80

921,87

130.00

20.98

6,211,931.13

104,526.07

97,659.88

2,608.66

23,064.09

fei

71,364

27,762.12

3,697

772.09

9.72

1,560,542

Total

16,100,749

52,184,221

77,854,602

98,229.96

244,822.33

6,239,693.25

104,526.07

98,431.97

2,608.66

23,073.81

227,016
25,083
1,560,237
22,591

4,232,891
119,569
80,344

58,228,714

• 128.30

95.24

76,815.47

317.50

11.50

568.74

597,418.25
1,999.97

33.30
9,063.50
715.03
28.27

4,682

651,580

1,546.53

101.80




O

ZP

S a v a n n a h , Ga
Sioux City, I o w a
Springfield, Mass
S t o n i n g t o n , Conn
Superior, Mich.:
Marquette
Allouez B a y

pi

.

...
—

1,088.63
10,488
296,354
331,463

2.46

2,687.17

1,308.64

330.90

*
45.85

46.29

Ashland
Bavfield
De Tour
Escanaba
Gladstone
Houghton

1,071,005
12,857
3,510
103,310

Lake Linden
Mackinaw
Menominee
Mnnising
Ontonagon
P r e s q u e Isle .
S a u l t S t . Marie
Superior
Washburn

623.341
149,456
29,614
42,690

52.56

343,575
486,155

' 3,217,940
• 6,738

121,831
5,503,501
4,785,986
1,625

175.16
2,918.44

3,906,547

12,995,232

3,472.84

178,540

135,577

120,652
3,703,410

161,666
606,188

3,824,062

.

767,854

.

Syracuse, N . Y

.

....

26,926.28
119,648.24

67.23
49.06

2,687.17

190,468.36

218.09

18,195.60

354.73

19.60

58,629.28

"203.72

2,034.86

1,853,355
2,472,345

1,124.35

2,070.38

1,754,527.25

246.02

59,113.93

4,325,700

1,124.35

2,070.38

1, 754,527.25

27,958
712,086
24,747
9,849
2,459
4,235
1,769,158
1,479,215
24,150
4,640

2,767,469
39,555

9,509
7,298,056

13.12
107.22
15.00

1,189.94

276.70
• 976.08

27,544.30
117,113.61
2,336.44
40. 24
782. 63
3,034.71
216,847.04
371,464.73
2,579.43
2,273.39

4,058,497

10,118., 269

1,388.12

1,189.94

744,016.52

.




59,113.93

92.85

45.85

387.08
6,677.30
7,232.42

1,077.82
1,410.24

... ,

222.00

fei
O

2,790.08

2,488.06

2,790.08

o
fei
M
i-M
fei

10.00
358.61
6,792.55
4.00

36.70
102.50

5,955.12
25.00

22,901.98
23,763.35
6.14

53,826.63

>
ZP

d
w
K}

235.30
8.75
37.23

77.21
152.45

35.40

129.15

Zfl

104.73

1.25

455.88

6,211.03

3,680
4,003,268

Total
V i c k s b u r g , Miss

246.02
24.30

305,410
700,490
10,216
497
9,259
32,227
1,325,126
1,569,363
16,962
33,718

.

16,361.75
1,504.32

Ta.ppa.ha,nnock, V a
T e c h e ( B r a s h e a r , n o w Morgan C i t y ) , L a
Vermont:
Burlington
Alburg
East Alburg
E a s t Richford
Franklin
Highgate .
Richford
St. Albans
Swanton
West Berkshire . .
Windniill Point

9.00
94.75

329.53

21,809
3,700

941,413

Tampa, Fla.:
Tampa
Port Tampa
. St. P e t e r s b u r g
Sarasota
T a r p o n Springs

42,674.24

376.78

181

Total

Total

90

.

18.00

.43
220.08

30,199

TABLE N.—Statenient of business ofthe customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
00
Customs receipts.

V a l u e of i m p o r t s .
Excess
deposits
refui:.ded.

V a l u e of
exports.

Districts a n d p o r t s .
Dutiable.

Free.

Drawback
paid.

Estimated
duties.

Duties, in- Increased a n d Fines, penc l u d i n g fines
additional
alties, a n d
on m a i l imduties.
forfeitures.
portations.

A l l other
customs
receipts.

Waldoboro, Me.:
Waldoboro
Rockland

$98,350

$6,600
49,823

$7,123.31

$3.00

$12.74

.$304.30

$226.50

Total

98,350

56,423

7,123.31

3.00

12.74

304.30

226.50

Wheeling, W . V a
Wilmington, N. C

138,595
76,964

127. 27
91.60

287.35

3,460,419

12,077.49
13,-315. 54

Wiscasset, Me.:
Wiscasset
Boothbay

. .

$19,510,926

$209.52

3,096.80

O
pi
O

3.74

...

4,665

Total.

3.74

4,665

^fe]'

Y a q u i a a ( N e w p o r t ) , Oreg
Y o r k , Me
G r a n d total

824,328,965 1,002,892,343 2,466,473,950

3,688,392.55 $4,652,347.71 3*13,356,295.90

1,390,710.57

2,655,081.68

857,797.25

840,725.87

a

fei

[Extension of items.]

ZP

Expenses.

Commerce a n d labor receipts.
Districts a n d ports.
Head tax.

Alaska:
Juneau
CordovaL
Eagle
Fairbanks
F o r t y Mile




Tonnage tax.

$58.02
41.60
280.72
?

AU other commerce a n d labor
receipts.

$439.50
85.50
479.82
.40

>

Collectmg
revenue.

$2,989.74
962.63
2,376.25
3,189.70

Compilation of
E n f o r c e m e n t of
statistics.
navigation l a w s . '

$11,211.52
1,694.25
2,377.29
16.50

$747.46

Average
n u m b e r of
persons
employed.

7
2
2
1
2

Cost to collect $1.

$2.401
1.571
2 210
41.250
4.455

2.629.47
1,518.46
1,817.65
5,378. 95
30.00
759.39
536.45

2,080.46

2,966.33

22,188.69

25,702.61
2,450.00

1,308.26
161.18

24.00

96.00

. .

Y

Albemarle, N . C :
E h z a b e t h City
Edenton
Manteo .

L130

13

.034

2
1
1

3.361

2,242.55

4

4.354

80.00

«

1,335.00
300.00

2
1

15.940

1,600.50
460.14

204.94
157.04

742.56
716.16

1,284.93
683.07

218.50

3
1

1.232
2.259

2,060.64

361.98

1,458.72

1,968.00

218.50

4

1.492

26,137.98
7,434.95
2,981.18
6,746.34
2,652.07

475.85
182.52
36.36
468.91
36.36

19
5
2
5
2

.134
.062
4.941
.109
1 370

45,952.52

1,200.00

33

121

8,966.70
1,327.20
4,180.60
2,784.96
1,326.40
1,414.80
1,325.03
1,325.50
2,403.60

Total

410.00

6
1
3
2
1
1
1

410.00

17

.954

800.00
250.00

11
3

.771
.077

. . .
20.00
. .

132.00

Total

}

25,054.79
328.00

i
I

1.758
1.252
.834
.438
.902
.632
2.682
1.225
.659

88.00
24.00

Aroostook, M e . :
Houlton.. •
Bridgewater
Fort Fairfield.,
Fort Kent
Limestone
Madawaska
Mars HiU
MonticeUo
Van Buren




29

515.00

Apalachicola, F l a . :
Apalachicola
CarrabeUe

Astoria, Oreg
A t l a a t a , Ga

747.46
1,095.00

1,73L05
246.45
265.05

.

Alexandria, Va
Annapolis Md

Total

.385
.503
14.766
L514
2.442
.784
.900

515.00

Total

Arizona:
Nogales
Douglas
Lochiel
Naco
Yuma

4
3
1
3
1
2
1

3,555.29
2,189.83
1,452.89
3.00
510.00
1,695.79
996.25

$60.00
12.00

Total
Albany N

27.54
47.36
138.32
17.46

1,464.19
146.67
2.00
138.90
25.18
30.94
153.23

14,382.48

Ketchikan
Nome
S t Michael
Skagwav.
Sulzer
Unalaska
WrangeU

11,360.78

1,267.95

6,513.06
6,526.95

8,495.54

O
fei
1^

W
fei

i
ZP-

d
w

Oi'
CO'

TABLE N.—Statement of business ofthe customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, .? Pi ,5—Continued.

o
Expenses,

Commerce a n d l abor receipts.
Districts a n d ports.
•Head t a x .

Collecting
revenue.

Enforcement of
navigation laws.

CompUation of
statistics.

Average
n u m b e r of
persons
employed.

Cost t o collect $1.

$60,115.76

$127,128.00

$8,664.06

$263,653.96

$13,147.54

$4,630.86

213

$0.0607

n.92

Baltimore, Md
Bangor, Me.:
Bangor
Danforth
Frankfort
Hampden
Lowelltown.
Moose R i v e r
St. J o h n
Vanceboro
Halifax

Tonnage tax.

All other commerce a n d labor
receipts.

85.80

5,621.38
740.00

168.00

1,637.00

6
1

.721
105. 714

35.00

3
1
1
8
1

.268
.142

'.
. .

3,054.62
1,140.40
604.15
12,915.85
1,107.35

"

18.00

94.00

opi

. 038
O

n.92

85.80

25,183.75

186.00

1,766.00

21

.072

4.00

3.52

142.87

175. 34
67.18
97.03
161.06

1,052.17
328.12
507.17
766.62

175.35
54.80
84.55
123.32

2
1
1
1

5.146

4.00

3.52

142.87

500. 61

2,654.08

438.02

5

13.180

187.66

493.36

2,881.25
602.45

3,350.40
807.35

120.00

6
2

.469

Beaufort, S. C :
Beaufort
Port Royal

48.50

1,581.85

77.45
1,098.00

2
1

32.695

Total

48.50

1,581.85

1,175.45

3

54.331

14.68
198.90
8.00

9.10
58.78
14.64
85.92

384.43
256.57
75.00152.31

1,076.37
718.41
210.00
426.48

76.88
5L32
15.00
30.46

2
1
1
1

123.409
13 970
1.404
369

221.58

168.44

868.31

2,431.26

173.66

5

1 78

Total
B a r n s t a b l e , Mass.:
Barnstable. .
Chatham
Hvannis . . .
Provincetown

. . .

Tot^l
B a t h , Me
Beaufort, N . C

Belfast, Me.:
Belfast
Rockport
S t o c k t o n Springs
Vinaihaven...

.-,

.

.

Total




,

.

W

fei

>

"A

O
fei
ZP

Boston and Charlestown, Mass.:
Boston
Cambridge
Dorchester
Hingham
HuU . .
'
....
'
Newburyport
Oiiincv
Weymouth
Worcester

254,872.00

96,549.20

254,872.00

Brazos de Santiago, Tex.:
Bro\vnsville
Brazos
Edinburgh
. .
Rio Grande Citv
Roma
Santa Maria

33,538.77

2.70

X-

Total...

958,146.46
3,095.74
684. 70
17.76
192.19
40.99
645.86
325.29
7,393.68

12,899.98

970,542.67

13,224.17

11,699.95

324.19

749

1

.040

32.70

.

4

.038

754

.040

600.00

25
1
3
4
3
2

2.217
3.351
7.958
6.066

53,302.46

33,541.47

11,699.95

33,833.46
1,535.00
4,500. 00
5,930.00
4,524. 00
2,980.00

96,549.20

236.00

Total
Bridgeport, Conn:
Bridgeport .
G reenwich
Norwalk
Stamford

.

600.00

38

.242

1,756. 03
3.70
39.15
389.75

434.98

8
1

.031
.019
.008
.086

2,188. 63

434.98

9

.030

.158
h^

N
H
i*>

236.00
101.56
10.58
34.08
442.40

Total

986.70
25.90
6L58
99.53

9,578.28
84.57
274.89
289.86

588.62

. .

1,173. 71

10,227.60

Bridgeton, N. J .
Bristol and Warrem, R. I

30.81

'

6
2

3,452.16
243.11

.075
15.347

^
o

Kl

w
fei
H^

fei
j>

Zfl

Brunswick, Ga.:
Brunswick
Darien

3,882.62
167. ^6

415.71
69.14

1,194. 75
63.29

2,389.54
234.52

398.27
33.07

4
1

.562
L458

Total

4,050.38

474.85

1,258.04

2,624.06

431.34

5

.59

. 256.90

. 46,696.22
2,841.36

1,350.00

48
3
1
2
23
1

.038
1.749

37.50
24,350.30
592.50

5,542.15
583.10
197.50
1,770.00
95.41
577.50

74,517.88

8,765.66

2,226.00

78

.049

357.95

47.05

1

.940

Buffalo Creek, N. Y.:
Buffalo
Black Rock Ferry
T/n,p.ka.wa.nna

Night Clearance
North Buffalo
Tonawa^nda
Total
Burhngton, Iowa




^

256.90

876.66

d

^

Kj

.077
.233
H-A

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Commerce a n d labor receipts.
Districts a n d ports.
Head tax.

Tonnage tax.

Expenses.

All o t h e r commerce a n d labor
receipts.

Burlington, N . J
Cairo, IU

E n f o r c e m e n t of
n a v i g a t i o n laws.

$354.00
6.00

Cape V i n c e n t , N . Y . :
Cane V i n c e n t
Alexandria Bay
Chaumont
Clayton
Griadstone Island
Kingston
MUlers B a y
R o u n d Island
Sacket H a r b o r
Thousand Island Park
Westmiaster Park

430.00
376.50
64.00
259.00
62.00

88.20

13,413.50

1,528.50

35.70
38.95
16.35

38.80

1.00
.20
1.60

CompUation of
statistics.

Cost to collect $1.

2
2

$150.00

6,600.50
1,547.60
364.00
1,360.50
668.00
228.00
675.00
96.00
643.00
943.00
288.00

$1.60
45.00

Total

$600.00

$3,590

5

.350
.679
4.212
.485
3.236
33.529
39.247
76.229

55.00
90.00
87.00
105.00

..

$0.26
8.66
1.62

Total

10.54

15

Total
Charleston, S . C

2,252.70
784.96
925.04

3
1
1

60.916
1.301
51.476

91.00

3,962.70

5

6.019

8,773.88
702. 75
1,013.00
225.00
3,966.26
848.00
12,704. 83
1,200.25
16,634.71
848.00

6
1
1 f
1
4
1
11
1
14
1-

5.048
652
.400
1.574
.022
.839
.055
.883
.054
668




4.00

2,860.88
$52.00

pi
H

O

.5433

:
2,860.88

fei

o

7.192
1.728

75.20

Castiae, Me.:
Castiae
Bucksport
Deer Isle

Champlam, N. Y.:
Plattsburg
• Champlaia
Chateaugay
Cherubusco
Fort Coviagton
Hogansburg
Malone
Moores J u n c t i o n
Rouse Poiat
Trout River

Collecting
revenue.

Average
n u m b e r of
persons
employed.

79.20

46,916.68

10,656.02

1,143.67

7,592.44

1,400.00

600.00

1,908.34

1,095.00
825.00
•.

1,095.00

2,225.00

4,098.34

41

068

4,428.92

632.71

11

.567

Clfei.
Zfl

1,000.70

2

.087

1,232.19
218.50

2
1

24.643

50.00

Total
Chicago, IU.:
Chicago
Indiana Harbor
Michigain Citv

685.31

142.86

50.00

1,450.69

3

29.013
.028

100.00

Chattanooga., T p n n . . .
Cherrystone,'Va.:

2,161.47

678.94

4,469.87

221
1
2
1

297,745.86

12,056.09

4,469.87

225

.028

110.00

C o r p u s Christi, T e x . :
Corpus Christi
Aransas
Laredo

11,056.30
251.42
448.37
300.00

2,161.47

Total
C i n c i n n a t i , Ohio
C o l u m b u s Ohio
Coos B a y , Oreg

297,745.86

3.5,454.02
9,180.83
1,521.10

918.04

840.00
64.40

95
4
2

.047
.062

6,295.30

1,418.97

1,140.00

4

159.536

25

.114

55.00
342. 23

2,140.00

Total
Council Bluffs, I o w a .

678.94

397. 23

. .

Total

1,154.13

1,140.00

29

.146

O

2

.049

H

.026
1.308

H

56.32

365.40
10.80
•.90
.10
1.10

38,179.10
222.58
231.88
153.00
123.75

4,190.87
1,050.37
1,096.87
397.80
618.75

860.20
140.05
146.25
61.20
82.50

30
2
2
1
1

14.367

2,219.82

378.30

38,910.31

7,354.66

1,290.20

36

.029

120.00

3

.045

4
3
1

...

8

.136

6

2

.067
.063

86
1
1

.046
8.571
7.483

D a y t o n , Ohio

5,211.58

Delaware:
Wilmington
Lewes
Seaford

1,119.24

233.63

1,119.24

Total

233.63

D e n v e r , Colo
D e s Moines, I o w a
Detroit, Mich.:
Detroit
Grosse Isle
Monroe




6,030.14
1,912.73

718.82
212.52
300.00

354.71

7,942.87

1,231.34

354.71

12,177.01
2,786.97
.<>

fei

.101

1,094.58
1,068.92

...

fei
H

>

32.25

1,418.97

36,873=13
• ^

C u y a h o g a , Ohio:
Cleveland
Ashtabula
Conneaut
Fairnort
Lorain

fei

o

Pi
30,577.S3

2,140.00

ZP

124.70

2,260.50

93,869.25
18.65
23.66

700.00
100.00
6,989.81
347.35
449.67

2,-500.00

•

.

I
>
ZP

'd
pi
K|

CO

TABLE N.—Statement of busings ofthe customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Commerce and labor receipts.
Districts and ports.
Tonnage tax.

Head tax.

Expenses.

All other commerce and labor
receipts.

Detroit, Mich.—Continued.
Mount Clemens
Trenton
Wyandotte

CoUecting
revenue.

Enforcement of
navigation laws.

$22.50
30.00
36.00

_

Total

$124.70

-4

$2,260.50

$427.50
570.00
684.00

94,000.06

9,468.33

CompUation of
statistics.

Average
number of
persons
employed.

1
1
1

Cost to collect $1.

^

$50.069

91

.047

32.00

1,174.63

$2,500.00

2

.055

O
pi

734.00

17
2

.100
15.965

O

Dubuque, Iowa
Duluth, Minn.:
Duluth
Two Harbors

608.50

13,263.79
135.50

2,966.86
551.00

Total

608.50

1«3,399.29

,3,517.86

734.00

19

.104

220.00

631.79
2372 60

222.78
2,138.47

401.48

2
3

-.389
10.800

216.28

46.85
489.74

377.26
323.40

892.36
756.60

-^
2

9 812
1.529

216.28

536.59

700.66

1,648.96

4

2.812

DunMrk, N. Y
Eastern Maryland
Edgartown, Mass.:
Edgartown
Vineyard Haven
Total
Erie, Pa.:
Erie
Corry

Total
Galena, 111




>
o

66.60

3,574.78
374.51

1,773.00

834.80

66.60

3,949.29

1,773.00

400.00

4

219

64.06
4,408.94

•101.60
224.90
672.69

7,012.34
2,861.31
2,302.32

315.00
1,790.79
499.82

585.07
717.57
333.36

4
4
3

054
106
322

15.98
L38
184. 70

22.94
62.88
356.72

759.25
153.19
221.70

925.31
733.39
1,034.84

60.00

3
1
1

44.824
11 062
2.306

202.06

442:54

1,134.14

2,693.54

60.00

5

5 855

834.80

....

Total
Evansville, Ind
Fall River,'Mass
Fernandina, Fla
Frenchmans Bay, Me.:
Ellsworth
Mount Desert Ferry
Southwest Harbor

fei

$8.00

363.00

400.00

4

1

.344
033

fei
ZP

Galveston. T e x . :
Galveston
T e x a s City
Velasco
Total

.

21,548.00
8.00

61,093.60
2,538.50
241.25

13,420.00
, 300.00
241.25

9,600.00

51
8
1

.064
.177

67,623.00

8,633.26

63,873.35

13,961.25

9,600.00

60

066

467.24

145.00
2.00

'19,585.26
3,842.12
488.00
488.00
300.00

130.00
60.00

960.00
90.00

14
4
1
1
1

.035
467
1.000

467.24

147.00

24,703.38

190.00

1,050.00

21

043

198.46

129.00

19,609.73

668.44

6.52

165.40

19,298.79
8,680.84
861.00
10,942.20

1,279.00
314.00
2,260.00

800.00

828.58

12
2
15
4
8
6

.452
.072
24 323
.033

32,655.74

2,700.62
10.00
13.00
18.50
5.50

88,823.03
180.00
201.00
14.00
112.00

4,799.99
1,566.67
1,163.34
805.84
775.83

3,799.99

293.34
346.86
59.64

67
1
1
1
1

.052
174.667
.250
.159
1.053

33,355.58

.

8,195.01
438.25

21,556.00

.

Genesee, N . Y . :
Rochester
Charlotte
Oak Orchard
Pultneyville
Waterloo

63,989.56
3,633.44

2,748.22

89,330.03

9,111.67

3,799.99

71

.054

504.98

177.00
95.80

6,557.59
1,051.48

158.00
721.90

140.04
1,051.58

3
4

.043
1.59

. .

Total
Georgetown, D . C
Georgetown, S. C
Gloucester Mass .
. .
G r a n d R a p i d s , Mich
Great Egg Harbor, N . J .
Hartford, Conn:
Hawaii:
Honolulu
Hilo
Kahului
Koloa
Mahukona

.
-

Total
Houston, Tex
H u m b o l d t ( E u r e k a ) , Cal
H u r o n , Mich.:
Port Huron
Algonac
Alpena
B a y City
H a r b o r Beach .
M a r i n e City
Ma,ry.sville - - . . , ,
Oscoda
Roberts Landing
Rogers C i t y
Saginaw
S t . Clair

40.00




300.00

070

i
>

Pi

o
fei
H

W

fei

>
ZP

45
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2

.314
300.000

1,846.00

57

.154

266.68
966.93

6
6

.050
.232

3,559.89
212.48
332.50
- 565.50
200.00
487.48
240.00
200.00
300.00
75.00
471.46
907.48

1,846.00

471.46
907.52

1.00

710.00

53,383.97

7,551.79

i,626.4i

11,653.83
6,106.08

2,666.83

710.00

49,866.95
212.52
332.50
565.50
487.52
240.00

...,..,..

300.00

Total
Indianapolis, I n d
JacksonviUe, F l a

1,871.80
1,500.00

1,135.00
177.16

1.00
•

i2.66

4,960.82

.173
1.693
11.176
.030

18.165
.021
1.398

d

TABLE N.—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Oi
Commerce a n d labor receipts.
Districts a n d p o r t s .
Head tax.

K a n s a s City, Mo
Kennp.bnnk, M e .

Tonnage tax.

Expenses.

AU other commerce a n d labor
receipts.

CoUecting
revenue.

E n f o r c e m e n t of
n a v i g a t i o n laws.

4,484.00
8.00
10,784.00

Total

15,276.00-

$32,244.03

$300.00
213.34

$999.96

22
2

$0.046

$2,679.74
2,344.28
74.94

4,472.87
222.82
544.53

34,690.28
1,034.10
2,305.80
669?60
45.60

3,916.72
114.90
256.20
74.40
2.40

900.00

32
1
3
1
1

.071
.439
.219

5,098.96

38,745.38

4,364.62

900.00

38

.078

46.07
300.00
68.55

2
1
3
1

.084

5,240.22

TCnovvlllft, T e n n
L a Crosse,'Wis _,
Lincoln, N e b r
Little Egg Harbor, N . J.
Los Angeles, Cal.:
Los Angeles.
Redondo Beach'
San Pedro
Santa Barbara

Cost t o collect $1.

$182.50

$8.00
..

Key West, Fla.:
Key West
Boca G r a n d e
Miami
.''.
Palm B e a c h . . .
P u n t a Gorda

Compilation of
statistics.

Average
n u m b e r of
persons
employed.

529.98
2,216.49
362.70

fej

o

p^
H
O
1^

.162

W

fei
fei
3.549

1,320.00

41

.075

600.00
40.00

9
6

.070
2.995

50.85
255.34

169.46
60.96

2
1

51.406
.161

2,120.20

306.19

230.42

3

.277

7,591.06

893.07

446.53

5

.109

3,120.00

23
3
1
2

.135
.573
2.608
.379

2,872.60

276.37

6,523.20

1,159.67

51,820 55

3,660.60

249.88

140.60
598.02

13,922.70
2,258.87

1,203.00
2,200.94

6L50

11.20
253.60

893.66
1,226.54

6L50

264.80
122.20
6.00

26,202.05
3,173.74
930.73
2,205.50

883.30

.

260.00

1,320,00

488.00
300.00

.

Total

.065

33
1
6
1

44,633.11
424.00
6,763.44

4,794.38
1,728.82

260.00

M

>
o
fei

LouisviUe, K y
Machias, Me
M a r b l e h e a d , Mass.:
Marblehead
Tyynn
Total
Memphis, Tenn
Memphremagog, Vt.:
Newport
Beecher FaJds
Canaan
.
D e r b y Line




.

..

.90

"

<

ZP

Island Pond
North Troy

14,174.97
1,935.00

Total

.110
275

.90

48,621.99

3,120.00

44

142

99.70

7,144.30

1,464.00

400.00

6

.065

33.50

Michigan:
Grand Haven
Benton Harbor
Charlevoix
Cheboygan
Frankfort '.

6.00

131.22

Miami (Toledo), Ohio

517.80

1,095.69

4,187.47
122. 00
261.25
511. 00
381. 43
122.00
520.13
416.10
117. 42
438. 00
164. 70
155.00
124.00

553.41

146.00

• Holland
Ludington . . .
Manistee
Manistique . . . .
Muskegon
St. Ignace
St. Joseph
South Haven

82.13

866

13: 75
73.00
20.07
27.37
21.90
4.58
27.37
18.30

ZP

fei
o
2
2

>

1,323.82

7,520.50

759.75

18

1 425

26,576.53

2,636.00
500.00
250.00
250. 00
300.00
300.00
250. 00
300.00
300.00
300.00

957.00

19

.040

26,576.53

5,386.00

957.00

28

.044

24,226.07
3,151.20
1,277.50
1,429.98
2,291.65
14,127:74
1,381.69
3,047.50
7.810.10
4,089.00

33.50

517. SO
142.00

Total

685.50
274.50

1,200.-00

16
3
1
1
3
10
1
3
7
5

.059
1 614
34.837
58 247
5.454
.017
38.87-7
.085
. 212
1.964

63,432.43

1,371.00

50

.048

o

MUwaukee, W i s . :
MUwaukee
Green B a y
Kenosha
Kewaunee
Manitowoc
Marinette
Oshkosh
Racine
Shebovgan
Sturgeon B a y
Total

13
2

•

:

142.00




H

W

fei

H

I
>
ZP

d

Minaesota:
St. P a u l
Baudette
. .
Gunflint Lake
Indus..
I n t e r n a t i o n a l FaUs
Minneapolis
P i n e Creek
Ranier
St. Vincent
Warroad
Total

fei

•

274.50
300.00

136.50
1,500.00

TABLE N.—Statement of busin^ess of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
00
Commerce and labor receipts.
Districts a n d p o r t s
Head tax.

Mobile, Ala.:
Mobile
Birmingham.

Total

CompUation of
statistics.

Cost to collect $1.

$5,159.95

$13,357.74
1,515.79

$5,565.84

$873.60

14
1

$0.190
.149

18,879.20

5,159.95

14,873.53

5,565.84

873.60

15

.185

f

3.847
1.128
1.950
.053
.015
1.246
.222
1.084
8.907
.281

.

8,921.11
648.80
1,292.70
4,089.53
4,294.55
1,277.50
1,675.45
1.289.75
1J974.55
2,903.00
644.00

.86

•
.40

.86

.40

516. 70
249.54
43.76
25.64
80,361.88
136.84

25.00
10.00
1,078.40
395.59
256.57
509.71
11,007.48
221.84

23.80
4,149. 29
572. 20
15,644.59
3,342.74
9,444.38
3,363.95
356,751. 02
3,339.05

1,456.00

20,97L16

5,227.46

1,456.00

20,971.16

5,227.46

. .

3,228.00
7,272.00

..

.

1,200.00

1
3
3
1
1
1
1
2
1

29,010.94

. .

.




Enforcement of
navigation laws.

$18,879.20

•

"Nantucket, Mass
Na.9hvillp Tpnn , ,
N a t c h e z , Miss
Newark, N . J . . .
N e w Bedford, Mass
N e w H a v e n , Conn
New London, Conn
N e w Orleans, L a
Newport, R. I

Total

CoUectmg
revenue.

Average
n u m b e r of
persons
employed.

404.00

*

Newport News, Va.:
Newport News.
Yorktown

All other commerce a n d labor
receipts.

$404.00

Total
Montana and Idaho:
Great FaUs
Banff
Cottonwood..
Eastport
Gateway. .
Glasgow
Peskan
Plentywood
Porthill
Sweet Grass
Whitlash

Tonnage tax.

'

Expenses.

1,200.00

21

.078

1
3
2
9
5
8
4
261
4

.238
45.996
.054
.132
.085
2.222
.032
.101

214.15
307.95

72.00

720.00
2,744.05
1,111.12
1,561.00
7,061.35
417.35

276.00
100.00
555.56
36.00
7,463.36
417.35

34,498.37

1,900.00
171.12

1,200.00

28
1

.104

34,498.37

2,071.12

1,200.00

29

.104

fei
o
pi
H
O

H
fei

>
a
fei
ZP

N e w York, N . Y . :
NewYork
Cold Spring

3,777,396.00

456,690.38

55,225.85

4,402,436.05
200.00

45,920.00

53,646.67

3,365

.022

Total

3,777,396.00

456,690.38

55,225.85

4,402,636.05

45,920.00

53,646.67

3,365

.022

439.85

67,660.88
1,612.00
1,746.00
468.00
198. 75
1,166. 75

80.00
175.00
207.00
81.00
90.00
30.00

1,680.00

56
1
1
1
1
1

.172
•2. 790
.025
30.247
1.387
8.269

Niagara, N . Y.:
N i a g a r a FaUs
Lewiston
N o r t h Tona.wa.nda, - ,
Olcott
Schlossers*
.
.
Youngstown

319.12
205.90

.

Total

2.20

525.02
96.00

444.25

72,852.38

663.00

1,680.00

61

.157

22,453. 76

7,169.88

8,66L12

5,920.33

1,310.78

11

.197

55.00

NorfoUs:, V a
North an d South Dakota:
Pembina
:
Ambrose
Antler
Crosby
Hannah
Hansboro
Kermit
Mowbray
Neche
Portal
St John
Sarles
Sherwood
Souris
Walhalla
;
Westhope

2.20

9,362.68
1,277.50
1,277.50
1,095.00
1,277.50
1,277.60
1,150. 50
1,277.50
1,325.50
3,518.00
1,220.50
1,277.50
1,277.50
1,277.50
1,425.50
1,277.50

208.00

5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1

1.779
.437
2.272
.960
4.503
1.924
6.026
19.656
.292
.045
2.414
2.321
.346
4.378
11.660
.546

. .
.;

Oswegatchie, N . Y . :
Ogdensburg
Hammond
Lisbon
LouisviUe
Massena
Morristown
Nyando
Waddington
Total




«
32.00

55.00
4.00
726. 92

30,595.18

1,304.00

23

.266

9,864.26

Total
Omaha, Nebr

132.00
832.00
100.00

306.34

4

.071

1,500.00

20
1
1
1
2
2
4
1

1,500.00

32

.199

tei
O

I
>
• O

fei
tei

>
ZP

d

.201
8.698
1.177
.794
9.734
.707
.072
.863

192.70

2.80

23, 111. 74
616. 55
756. 90
575. 66
1,686.90
2,128. 64
4,108.05
744.48

919. 62

538.90

33,728.92

536.10

ZP

1,285.00
40.00
50.00
70.00
105.00
230.00

1,980.00

200.00

Pi
Kl

-a
CO

TABLE N.—Statement of busings of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Coinmerce a n d labor receipts.
Districts a n d p o r t s .
Head tax.

Oswego, N . Y . :
Oswego
Fair Haven

Collectiag
revenue.

E n f o r c e m e n t of
n a v i g a t i o n laws.

Compilation of
statistics.

40. 211
.018

i

15

.073

o

3
2

13.932
6.963

H
O

1,400.00

50
5

• .184
.152

1,400.00

55

.180

10
11
2
1

.334
1.070
.659

24

.523

$2,310.60
254.00

104.50

10,472.63

4,148.90

2,818.60

60.00
130.00

660.25
1,229.29

"^ 199.25

$260.00

54.95

71,909.32
7,470.80

260.00

54.95

79,380.12

2,142.36

..

P a s o Del N o r t e , N . Mex.:
El Paso
Columbus
. ...

P a s s a m a q u o d d y , Me.:
Eastport
Calais
Lubec
Red Beach

254.00

551.02
104.52

1,163.67
168.04

10,935.86.
10,801.03
1,764.50
1,094.50

1,800.00
1,095.00

600.00

655.54

1,33L71

24,595.89

2,895.00

600.00

1,747.86

Total

576.75

2,157.26

120.00

120.00

Y

P e a r l R i v e r , Miss.:
GuUport .
B a v St Louis
BUoxi
H o r n l<?land
Scranton
Total




84.00

617.62

573.89

1,174.50
735.55
1,056.75

2,157.24
1,144.10
1,215.75
363.50
735.40
352.25

196.00

17,285.60

1,983.24

5,124.06

5,968.24

.112.00

16,667.98

1,393.25
16.10

. ..

Cost to collect $1.

$0.273
3.254

$3,465.90
254.00
175.00
254.00

.60

Average
n u m b e r of
persons
employed.

9
1
1
1
3

$6,025.70
291.25
175.00
289.00
3,691.68

$93.40
10.50

Paducah Ky
Parolico CNewbern"i N C

Patchogue N

All other commerce a n d labor
receipts.

19.22
.

Total

Expenses.

$1,888.04
235.10

Sodus Point
Utica
Total

Tonnage tax.

00

o

7

pi

te:;

>

"A
a
fei

.4
2
1
1
1
1
1

fei

.240
47.508
L139
.567

ZP

Pensacola, F l a . :
Pensacola
St Andrews

40.00
...

7,973.76
365.00

4,682.54
730.00

1,900.00

9
1

.470
.696

19,576.38

2,405.89

8,338.76

5,412.54

1,900.00

10

.481

2
6
5

.109
.017
.071

4.00

Total

70.00
1,805.35

2,301.98
6,960.79
9,799.89

35.00
3,005.55

107,078.02

21,046.17

537,806.96

12,920.06
1,554.00
40.00

8,410.50

454
1
3

.027

4,461.28

PhUadelphia, Pa.:
Philadelphia
Camden
Chester

4,098.70

20.00
486.24
62.24

244,984.00

Peoria, 111
Perth Amboy, N. J
Petersburg V a

P o r t o Rico: i
San J u a n
AguadUla .
•
Arecibo
Arroyo
Fajardo
Guanica
Humacao
Mayaguez .
Ponce

2,248.23
157.66

40.00

Total

Pittsburgh, P a
P l y m o u t h , Mass
P o r t l a n d , Me
P o r t l a n d , Oreg

18,162.64
1,413.74

. .

107,078.02

21,046.17

542,268.24

14,514.06

8,410.50

458

.027

198.90
23,336.12

120.00
53.30
3,144.54
1,967.20

25,978.74
848.24
48,084.36
50,942.09

1,100.00
517.52
6,274.28
6,900.00

240.00
205.00
1,100.00
1,500.00

16
2
36
40

.032
.377
.258
.086

62,941.23
912.17
1,055.17
1,298.27
1,949.75
1,164.60
1,792.44
7,169.84
17,209.20

3,313.28
48.00
54.95
68.33
102.61
61.28
94.33
377.35
905.74

• 1,400.00

.66
3.08
.35. 40
13.20
292.08
3,047.92

2,649.71
28.24
5.90
12.50
97.92
28.20
31.24
357.63
777.31

36
1
1
1
3
1
1
9
16

.103
.090
.052
.083
.169
.054
.215
.058
.059

13,910.50

3,988.65

95,492.67

5,025.87

69

.086

46,776.00.

43.60
3,627.40

115.57
1,047.60

1,077.16
25,052.46

770.94
2,010.00

410.00
1,680.00

3
22

.617
.035

496.00
652.00
8.00
4.00

4,087.76
1,710.92
340. 98
515.66
166.10

1,600.33
761.34
856.61
865.41
552.60

7,669.24
1,703.00
725.00
1,106.00
1,466.00

4,100.00

20.00

321.54

361.00

29.62

386.40
29.20

31,298.96
1,033.89
729.20
2,185.55
8,309.13
1,148.60
2,625.41
783.31
1,253.17
500.00

23
2
1
2
8
1
2
2
1
1
1

1.415
.762
.988
.373
. 170
.543
2.489
2.084
3.313
1.777
1.789

244,984.00
. .
15,920.00
1,220.00

Puget Sound, Wash.:
Port Townsend
Aberdeen
Anacortes
Bftllfngham
Blaine^.
Chopaka
DanviUe
Everett
Ferry
Friday Harbor
Kalama.




>

Pi

K{

10,444.58
73.58

.;

Total
Portsmouth, N. H
Providence, R. I .

Zfl
fei
O
pi
fei

"

1 Porto Rico figures not included in grand total.

1,802.00
500.00
52.25

1,400.00

200.00
855.00
. 185.00
225.00
200.00
118.00

fei

t
>
ZP

d

TABLE N.-—Statement

of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 79.?,?—Continued-.

Commerce and labor receipts. ,
Districts and ports.

Puget Sound, Wash.—Continued.
Laurier
......
Molson
Northport
. .
OroviUe
Port A n g e l e s . . . .
Roche Harbor
Seattle.
South Bend
Spokane
Sumas
Tacoma

Tonnage tax.

AU other commerce and labor
receipts.

CoUectiag
revenue.

Enforcement of
navigation laws.

7,108.00

13,628.46

4,733.26

42,350.12

28,017.07

172,644.59

31,615.49

10,120.00

155

.098

8.67

37.20
20.00

12,099.64

288.00
547.50

320.00

7
1

.012
27.375

8.67

57.20

12,099.64

835.50

320.00

366.50

280.95

$10,572.00

......

Total

$1,399.32
147.18
19,777.74
224.84

$1,297.21
853.21
15,611.78
108.72

1

$725.00
150.00
10,575.00
211.00
4,93L00

6
1

.590
.295

O

955.43

7

.529

ZP

1,526.52
1,60L03
210.00

234.32
85.55
1,200.00
79.45
170.00

2
1
2
3
46
3
2

1.224
l61
.084
.026
.318
7.708

48.00

18,514.14

3,045.60

7,745.34

4,015.45

in. 35

O

955.43

Total

42.00
20.00

fei

O
pi
H

fei

3,905.37
110.08

850.00
567.-81
5,212.81
58,449.83
554.16
326.58

1,950.00

.012

6,382.17
1,363.17

5.50
340.51

$1,053
1.777
4.130
3.313
.415
295
.059
1 259
.160
262
.106

19.143

2,244.56
801.04

4.66

525.00
925.00

1
1
2
1
1
1
69
1
4
4
26

8

15,098.22
3,415.92

Saco, Me
Sag Harbor, N, Y.
St. Augustiae. Fla
St. Joseph, Mo
St. Louis, Mo
St. Marks (Cedar Keys), Fia.
St. Marys, Ga
Salem and Beverly, Mass.:
Salem .
. . . .
Beverly
Da-nvers . .

$196.00
138.00
160.00
118.00
225.00

2

36.00
12.00




Cost to collect $1.

$1,194.47
1,679.75
2,654.85
1,495.60
722.65
150.00
74,555.04
215.67
4,6n.06
5,080.09
30,418.19

Rock Island, HI
Sabine, Tex.:
Port Arthur
Sabine

Total

CompUation of
statistics.

00

Average
number of
persons
employed.

18,860.00

Total
Richmond, Va.:
Richmond. .
West Point

Head tax.

Expenses.

165.00
789.65

5,093.14
57.14

222.56
34.52

164.82

361.05

1,299.07
114.77
57.84

4,274.77

417.00

6

6.195
.107
.069

164.82

361.05

1,471.68

4,274.77

417.00

6

2.147

Salt Lake a t y , Utah
Saluria, Tex.:
Eagle Pass
Boquillas

244.00

398.00

26
2
5
2
5
4

.067
1.000
2.540

392.00

50,978.00

392.00

398.00

44

.104

2,387.40

14,279.03
1,162.23
4,756.00
3,091.00
5,673.05

1,103.65

1,050.00

56
4
13
8
16

.160
2.439
.163
.758
.729

28,961.31

1,103.65

1,050.00

97

.216

2,434.00
2.00

2,144.00
255.00
197. 20
18S. 25
256.20
134. 65

225.00

3
1
1
1
1
1

.869
3.410

.55

Total

868.00

S a n Diego, Cal.:
San Diego.. .
Andrade
Calexico
Campo
Tia Juana

124.00

5,423.48

2,437.30

3,175.30

225.00

8

1.015

500,475.:67

10,876.00-

6,856.00

370

.079

64.00

Total

188.00

S a n d u s k y , Ohio:
Sandusky
° Huron
KeUeys I s l a n d
P o r t Clinton
Put-ia-Bay
Vermihon

5,423.48

2,387.40

19.46

.75

Total

19.46

S a n Francisco, Cal.:
San Francisco
Casper
F o r t Bragg
Mendociao City
Monterey
Noyo
Oakland
Port Hartford

34,148.00

34,596.58

5,426.23

^

2.421
.110

1.457
7.559

ZP

fei

o

pi
fei

>
O
fei
B

K

fei
pi
fei
flea

d
w
Ki

3
1

.157
.394

4.00

255.16

37,379.86

5,681.39

505,883.01

11,176.00

6,856.00

3-^4

.080

16.00
.

2,783.28

4,507.34
900.00

34,152.00

TotaL...




.186

29,065.00
409.00
6,375.00
2,916.00
6,704.00
5,509.00

36.00

Langtry
Presidio..
San A n t o n i o . . . . .

Superior, Mich.:
Marquette
Allouez B a y
Ashland
Bavfield

2

244.00

832.00

DerRio

S a v a n n a h , Ga
Sioux C i t y , I o w a
Sprtagfield, M a s s . . .
Stoninp'ton, Conn

168.49

3,201.01

17,385.62

1,552.35

5.46

88.50
47.80

11,045.31
660.60
10,954.85
421.91

776.00
132.35
240.00
421.93

1,022.00
13.95
400.00
26.08

9
2
7
2

.132
.089
.019
.417

21.00

290.40

1,156.50

2,507.25
275.00
881.37
137.50

872.25

5
1
3
1

47.822

300.00

5.134

oo

CO

TABLE N .—Statement of business of the customs ports for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Commerce a n d labor receipts.
Districts a n d p o r t s .
Head tax.

Superior, Mich.—Continued.
DeTour
Escanaba
Gladstone
Houghton
Isle R o y a l e
Lake Linden
Mackinaw
Menomuiee
Munislng
Ontonagon .
P r e s q u e Isle
S a u l t S t e . Marie .
Superior
Washburn
TotaJ

Tonnage tax.

Expenses,

All other commerce a n d labor
receipts.

$54.06

.50
2.00

•

220.00
825.00
275.00
143. 26
206.25
83.00

18,665.46
10,778.90

129.68

275.00
4,355.84
1,627.14
137.50

204. 74

300.60

38,829.75

12,768.11

.

2,107.38
1,045.05

39,025.34
3,243.25

175.00

Total

2,880.00

Tappahannofik, V a •- ,
•
Teche ( B r a s h e a r , n o w Morgan City), L a .

.

$2.181
50.439
.049
4.032
412.500

60

.242

3.05

pi.

o
fei

$872.25

4

.124

2,546.23
840.00
372.00
128.00
1,453.00

1; 080.00
120.00

27
4
1
1
1

.023
.236
8.302

3,327.43

42,268.59

5,339.23

1,200.00

34

.026

101.36

27.50

497. 98

667.36
2,489.89

331. 96

3
3

20.347

71.94

1, 400.00
547.54

24
-7
3
1
1
1
11

1.006
.071
1.494
20.904
1.148
.284
.050

i, 695.66

fei

I—t

>
!^

a
fei

23,727.68

32,684.48
8,299. 54
3,651.16
841. 20
898.54
917. 20
12,049. 64

fe?

o

.525
.097
1.052

140.00

7,464.17
11,193.90
12,533.78

Cost t o collect $1.

1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
23
12
1

$380.00
459.00

4.10
2.50
1.00

$80.00

72.00
2,808.00

Compilation of
statistics.

2,091.65

17.24

80.00

Tampa, Fla.:
Tampa
Port Tampa
St. Petersburg..
Sarsota
Tamon Snriags..




Enforcement of
n a v i g a t i o n laws.

$120.00
$0.10

Syracuse, N . Y

Vermont:
Burhngton
Alburg
East Alburg . .
E a s t Richford ;
Franklia
Highgate
. .
Richford

Collecting
revenue.

. Average
n u m b e r of
persons
employed.

ZP

156.92

Total

8.20

18,136.84
2,441.02
905.40
26.24

156.92

St. Albans. .
Swanton
West Berkshire..
Windmill Poiat

8.20

80,851.26

1,095.00

.048
.944
.391
3.691

4,137.54

69

.106

583.33
655.27

17
2
1
1

300.00

V i c k s b u r g , Miss

1

W a l d o b o r o , Me.:
Waldoboro
Rockland

1.34
374.50

15.68
715.47

2,262.98
1,982.55

1,129.32

46.17
63.49

.2
3

135.672
.362

Total

375.84

731.15

4,245.53

1,12?. 32

109. 66

5

.624

7,860.34

566.10

1,653.54
5,466. 21

467.30
660.90

342.ei

3
4

.169
.259

fei
O

70.80
292.59

538. 60
569.90

707.05
1,646.19

72.00

117.72

2
2

17.677
5.401

>

117. 72

363.39

1,108.50

2,353.24

72.00

4

7.288

190.00
2.50

1,024.00
504.90

30.00

3
2

5.547
201.960

254,346.66

9, 732,603.37

441,565.12

Wheelmg, W. V a
Wilmiagton, N . C

4.00

Wiscasset, Me.:
Wiscasset
Boothbay
Total
Y a q u i a a ( N e w p o r t ) , Oreg
Y o r k , Me
G r a n d total

4,578,566.00

1,259,434.63

204,253.78

ZP

Pi
O
fei

m

7,998

fei

Estimated duties (uicludiag duties and fines^on mail importations and increased and additional duties) and tonnage collected as reported by collectors
$318,661,522.78
Duties and tonnage covered into the Treasury by warrants in the fiscal year 1913
318,891,395.86
NOTE.—Difference arisiag in adjustment of receipts by covering warrants and ia the time the deposits entered the fiscal year accounts.
Expenses reported by coUectors, as above, to June 30,1913
$10,378,422.27
Add salaries and expenses of Board of General Appraisers
180,569.70
Add additional payments for 1913 account to Oct. 28,1913, not reported by coUectors to June 30,1913
6,934.94
Add payments for detection of frauds for 1913 account to Oct. 28,1913
159,520.32
Add salaries and expenses special agents and special inspectors for fiscal year 1913
148,050.50
Add payments for traveling and miscellaneous expenses.
15,635.12
Add $5,000 and $37,300, transferred from customs appropriation for expenditure by Department of Justice and Treasury Department, for fees of witnesses before
Board of General Appraisers and for stationery for the customs service, in the sums named
42,300.00
Total expense of the customs service for fiscal year 1913
,
10,931,432.85
Deduct expense enforcement navigation laws. Department of Commerce and Labor
$441,565.12
Deduct expense compUation of statistics, Department of Commerce and Labor
204,253.78
645,818.90
Net cost of coUecting customs revenue for the fiscal year 1913
Cost to collect $1, $0,033.




pi
fei

>

ZP

d

pi

10,285,613.95
00

186

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913.
Districts and ports.
Alaska:
Juneau
Cordova
Eagle
Fairbanks
F o r t y Mile
Ketchikaa
Nome
St. Michael
Skagway
Snlzer
Unalaska
WrangeU

Entries.

Receipts.

78
6
130

Expenses.

$6,224.61
1,690.24
2,149.99
.40
715.86
16,035.38
7,369.52
221.49
3,552. 63
221.04
3,131.54
1,70L48

$14,948 72
2,656.88
4,753.54
16.50
3,189.70
6,184.76
3,708.29
3,270.54
5,381.95
540.00
2,455.18
1,532.70

1,375

43,014.18

48,638.76

1,842

524,853.72

17,927.84

515.00

1,73L05
246.45
265.05

515.00

2,242.55

83.75

1,335.00
300.00

2

1,822.70
619.18

2,245.99
. 1,399.23

2

2,441.88

3,645.22

2,067
999
3
681
12

197,857.37
121,126.61
610.63
65,927.33
1,961.97

26,613.83
7,617. 47
3,017.54
7,215.25
2,688.43

Total

3,762

387,483.91

47,152.52

Aroostook, Me.:
Houlton
Bridgewater
F o r t Fairfield
Fort Kent
Limestone
Madawaska
Mars HiU
MonticeUo
Van Buren

429
52
489
294
- 56
90
54
54
459

5,333.51
1,059.87
5,006.92
6,348.22
1,469.94
2,236.89
4P4.03
1,081.57
3,646.88

9,376.70
1,327.20
4,180.60
2,784.96
1,326.40
1,414.80
1,325.03
1,325.50
2,403.60

1,977

26,677.83

25,464.79

36
1,214
16,108

20,486.81
87,615.19
4,6.34,201.08

15,808.60
6,776.95
281,432.36

9,301
1

10,296.84
7.00

7,426.38
740.00

797
72

11,515.75
7,989.90

22,524

342,576.85

3,089.62
1,140.40
604.15
13,027.85
1,107.35

32,695

372,386.40

27,135.75

4

272.58

1,402.86
450.10
688.75
1,05L00

4

272.58

3,592.71

72
2

13,515.67
.38

6,351. 65
L409.80

..

72
140
48
8
749
2
3
133

. .

.

Total
Albany, N . Y
Albemarle, N . C :
E h z a b e t h City
Edenton
Manteo

..

Total
Alexandria, Va
A n n a p o h s , Md
Apalachicola, F l a . :
Apalachicola
CarrabeUe
Total
Arizona:
Nogales
Douglas
Lochiel
Naco
Yuma

...
•...

.

-

:

Total
Astoria, Oreg
A t l a n t a , Ga
B a l t i m o r e , Md
Bangor, Me.:
Bangor
Danforth
Fraakfort...
Hampden.
Lowelltown
Moose R i v e r . .
St. J o h n
Vanceboro . . . .
Hahfax

. .
:
. . . .

Total
B a r n s t a b l e , Mass.:
Barnstable
...
Chatham
Hyannis
P r o v i n c e t o w n . . . . '.
Total

:

.

B a t h , Me
Beaufort, N . C. (9 m o n t h s ) .




:.. .

187

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, shoiuing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for thefiscal year ended June 30,1913—Continued.
Districts and ports.
Beaufort, S. C :
Beaufort
iP ort R o y a l

Entries,

Receipts.

Expenses.

1

50.75

2,757.30

12.46
73.46
213. 54
1,649.89

1,537.68
1,026.30
300.00
609.25

46

1,949.35

3,473.23

87,624

Total
B o s t o n a n d Charlestown, Mass.:
Boston
Cambridge
Dorchester
*'
Hingham
HuU.
Newburyport
Quincy
Weymouth
Worcester

$1,659.30
1,098.00

5
16
2
23

Total
Belfast, Me.:
Belfast
Rockport
S t o c k t o n Springs
Vinaihaven

$50.75

1

i

24,230,267.97

889
88,513

24,421,751.60

995,466.79

955

217,204.49

125
73
18
4

2,029.64
1,769.34
568.45
491. 25

34,433.46
1,535.00
4,500.00
5,930.00
4,524.00
2,980.00

1,175

.

222,063.17

53,902.46

630
44
146
63

375,468.79
4,417.68
38,997.23
7,883.16

11,769. 29
88.27
314.04
679.61

...
11.17

Total
Brazos d e Santiago:
BrownsviUe
Brazos
Edinburgh
R i o G r a n d e City
Roma
Santa Maria.

.

Total

191,472.46

982,746.39
3,095.74
684.70
17.76
192.19
365.18
645. 86
325.29
7,393.68

. .

1

B r i d g e p o r t , Conn.:
Bridgeport
.
Greenwich
Norwalk
Stamford

. .

883

426,766.86

12,851.21

Bridgeton, N . J
Bristol a n d W a r r e n , R . I

26

45,831. 21
15.84

3,452.16
243.11

B r u n s w i c k , Ga.:
Brunswick
Darien
..

37

7,080.32
226.90

3,982.56
330.88

37

7,307.22

4,313.44

35,231
867

1,395,016.77
1,957.18

8,937
21

326,129.49
5,001. 54

53,588.37
3,424. 46
197.50
1,807.50
25,321.71
1,170.00

45,056

1,728,104.98

85,509.54

133
29

430.55
98.58

405.00
354.00
156.00

1,697
559
2
319
133

39
144

21,769.20
2,832.78
101.60
3,334.81
225.53
6.80
18.60
2.44
.20
145.71
166.66

7,630.50
1,924.00
428.00
1,619.50
730.00
228.00
730.00
186.00
730.00
1,048.00
288.00

2,900

28,604.33

15,542.00

Total

Total.
Buffalo Creek, N . Y . :
Buffalo
Black R o c k F e r r y
Lackawanna
N i g h t Clearance
^
N o r t h Buffalo
Tonawanda

t
.

Total
Burlington, Iowa
Burliagton, N . J
Cairo, IU

. .

Cape V i n c e n t , N . Y . :
Cape V i n c e n t
Alexandria B a y
Chaumont.
Clayton
Grindstone Island
Kingston
Millers B a y
R o u n d Island
Sackets H a r b o r
Thousand Island P a r k
Westminister Park
Total




6
1

.

188

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for thefiscal year ended June 30,1913—Continued.
Entries.

Districts and ports.
Castiae, Me.:
Castiae
Bucksport
Deer Isle..

Receipts.

Expenses.

4
67
7

$36.98
603.31
17.97

$2,252.70
784.96
925.04

78

658.26

3,962.70

9
223
386
32
6,607
41
9,772
163
23,639
324

2,393.11
1,076.95
2,526.51
142.90
• 176,678.93
1,009.77
250,601.89
1,358.98
338,008.86
1,269.20

12,082.22
702.75
1,013.00
225.00
3,966.26
848.00
13,799.83
1,200.25
18,554.71
848.00

41,196
414
167

775,067.10
22,286.54
20,970.55

53,240.02
12,654.07
1,828.87

50.00

1,232.19
218.50

50.00

1,450.69

74,105

10,853,703.52

313,272.03
25i.42
448.37
300.00

74,105
2,779
557

10,853,703.52
775,906.41
148,469.25

314,271.82
37,212.06
9,245.23
1,521.10

Corpus Christi, Tex.:
Corpus Christi
Aransas...
Laredo

46
3,361

55.50
1,205.57
268,174.06

30,577.83

Total
Council Bluffs, Iowa

3,407
161

269,435.13
23,967.07

39,432.10
1,186.38

9,469
6

1,638,425.01
1,079.72
.95
.10
67.42

43,230.17
1,413.00
1,475.00
612.00
825.00

9,474

".

...

Total
Champlain, N. Y.:
Plattsburg
Champlain
Chateaugay
Cherubusco
Fort Coviagton '.
Hogansburg
Malone
Moores Junction
Rouses Point
Trout River

•

^ .--

Total
Charleston S C
Chattanooga, Tenn
Cherrystone, Va.:
Cape Charles .
Chincoteague

.

Total
Chicago, IU.:
Chicago
Indiana Harbor
Michigan City
Waukegan

,

'..

Total
Cincinnati Ohio
Columbus, Ohio
Coos Bay, Oreg

Cuyahoga, Ohio:
Cleveland
Ashtabula
Conneaut
Faiiport
Lorain

.. .

.

...

.

Total
Denver, Colo
Des Moiaes, Iowa
Detroit, Mich.:
Detroit
Grosse Isle .
Monroe
Mount Clemens
Trenton
Wyandotte
Total
Dubuque, Iowa




.-

5,331.58

69,667.60

7,103.67
2,125.25
300.00

449
3,382
382

. .

47,655.17

116,833.89

449

'. .

1,639,563.20»

742

Total
Dayton, Ohio
Delaware:
Wilmington
Lewes
Seaford

8,854.27

69,667.60
179,785.79
45,527.66

9,528.92
12,877.01
2,886.97

36,312
2
25
2

2,242,562.50
42.70
63.25

21

14.38

103,359.06
366.00
473.33
450.00
600.00
720.00

36,362

2,242,682.83

105,968.39

400

21,929.70

1,206.63

189

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for thefiscal year ended June 30,1913.—Continued.
Entries.

Districts and ports.
Duluth, Minn.:
Duluth
Two Harbors

Receipts.

Expenses.

2,539

169,147.63

17,651.15

100

3,221.39
220.00

1 256 05
2,376 07

129.39
706.02

1,269.62
1,080.00

835.41

. . . .

$16,964.65
686.50

2,539

Total
Dunkirk, N . Y
Eastern Maryland

$169,104.63
43.00

2,34^.62

16,682.76
11,173.14

5,747.78
374 61

Edgartown, Mass.:
Edgartown
Vineyard Haven
Total
Erie, Pa.:
Erie
Corry

498
18

Total

516

27,855.90

6,122.29

145,400.62
50,870.57
9,710.42

7,912.41
5,369.67
3,135.50

55
9
4
68

38.92
80.14
544.84

1,744.56
886 58
1,256.54

663.90

3,887.68

Galena, IU
Galveston, Tex.:
Galveston
Texas City
Velasco

2,508
. 176

1,302,367.79
15,998.46

84.113 60
2,838.50
482 50

Total

2,684

1,318,366.25

87,434.60

2,375
526

590,253.55
8,541.83
300.00

20,675.26
3,992.12
488 00
488 00
300 00

2,901

599,095.38

25,943.38

5,344

310,003.38

632
799

50,186.15
121,681.46
112.35
378,908.90

21,688.73
314 00
22,693.79
8,858.00
2,732.80
12,742; 20

8,471

1,858,075.97
10.00
5,441.52
5,143.66
842.74

97 423 01
i;746!67
1,364.34
819 84
887 83

8,471

1,869,513.89

102,241.69

352
5

158,010.50
1,775.58

6,875.63
2,824.96

15,448
70
1
75

319,485.07
250.99
59.50
36,651.56

146
1

3,100.24
1.60

55,272.84
425 00
665 00
1 131 00
200 00
975 00
480 00
200 00
600 00
75 00
942 92

EvansviUe, Ind
Fall River, Mass
Fernandina, Fla

..

.

Frenchmans Bay, Me.:
EUsworth
Mount Desert Ferry.
Southwest Harbor
Total

Total
Georgetown, D.C
Georgetown, S.C
Gloucester, Mass
Grand Rapids, Mich
Great Egg Harbor, N . J
Hartford, Conn

1,529

Hawau:
Honolulu
HUo
Kahului
Koloa
Mahukona..
Total
Houston, Tex
Humboldt (Eureka), Cal

Total



. .

363 00

Genesee, N. Y.:
Rocnester
Charlotte
Oak Orchard
PultneyAdlle
Waterloo

Huron, Mich.:
Port Huron
Algonac
Alpena
Bay City
Harbor B each
Marine City
Marysville
Oscoda
Roberts Landiag
Rogers City
Saginaw
St. Clair

.

200 '
215
20

:

39

33.03

234
174

44,817.14
1,298.14

16,188

405,697.27

1 815 Ofl

62 781 76

190

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for thefiscal year ended June 30,1913—Continued.
Entries.

Districts and ports.

Expenses.

1,205
1,029
5,150

676.05
300.00
2,285.04
362.70

747,765.42
2,042.84

48,825.71
424.00
7,251.44
300.00

749,808.26

56,801.15

2,048
23

222,789.65
1,522.73

15,725.70
4,499.81

8
108

Marblehead, Mass.:
Marblehead
•
Lynn

14,028.08

20,466

Total
LouisviUe, Ky
Machias, Me

44,010.00

6,803.47

20,324

•.

564,105.51

142

Los Angeles, Cal.:
Los Angeles
.Redondo Beach
San Pedro
Santa Barbara

39,507.00
1,149.00
2,562.00
744.00
48.00

i9i

Total
Knoxville, Tenn ..
La Crosse, Wis
Liacohi, Nebr
Little Egg Harbor, N . J

549,824.07
2,613.62
11,667.82

54

Key West, Fla.:
Key West
Boca Grande.
Miami
Palm Beach.
Punta Gorda

$11,920.51
9,973.84
33,543.99
213.34

.2,866

Kennpihnnk, IVfA.

$236,071.00
42,913.01
725,145.19

2,756

Indianapolis, Ind
JacksonvUle, Fla
Kansa.*? City, Mo--

21.67
9,568.47

1,113.97
1,542.84

116

•

;




364,121.14

51,741.99

137,533.82

9,008.30

6,737.51

5,836.57
122.00
275.00
730.00
401.50
122.00
647.50
438.00
122.00
547.60
183.00
155.00
124.00

156

6,737.51

9,604.07

3,894

Total

29,322.05
3,173.74
930.73
2,205.50
• 14,174.97
1,935.00

156

MUwaukee, Wis.:
Milwaukee
Green Bay
Kenosha
Kewaunee
Manitowoc
Mariaette
Oshkosh
Racine
Sheboygan
Sturgeon Bay

217,150.46
6,635.71
356.80
5,810.10
128,253.86
7,014.21

956

Michigan:
Grand Haven
Benton Harbor.
Charlevoix
Cheboygan .
Frankfort
HoUand
Ludiagton
Manistee
Manistique
Muskegon
St. Ignace
St. Joseph
South Haven

8,930.66

31,191

Total
Miami (Toledo), Ohio

2,656.81

81,337.68

15,920
2,786
160
392
11,213
721

Memphremagog, Vt.:
Newport
Beecher Falls
Canaan
Derby Line
Island Pond
North Troy

9,590.14

613

Total
Mftmphi.q, Tp.rm . , ,

Total

Receipts.

749,568.71

30,169.53
500.00
250.00
250.00
300.00
300.00
250.00
300.00
300.00
300.00

3,894

749,568.71

32,919. 53

191

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for thefiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Districts and ports.
Minnesota:
St. Paul
Baudette
GnnflintT.ake
Indus
International FaUs. .
Minneapolis . . . .
Pine Creek
Ranier
St. Viacent
Warroad .

Entries.

'

Receipts.

Expenses.

:..

Total
MobUe,Ala.:
Mobile
B irmingham

•.

Total
Montana and Idaho:
Great FaUs
Banff .
Cottonwood
Eastport
Gateway...
..
Glasgow
Peskan
-.
Plentywood
PorthiU
Sweet Grass
Whitlash
Total
Nantucket, Mass
Nashville, Tenn
Natchez, 'M.\SS
Newark, N, J
New Bedford, Mass
New Haven, Conn
New London, Conn
New Orleans, La
Newport, R . I
Newport News, Va.:
Newport News
Yorktown
Total

1,354,889.79

66,303.43

666
121

105,030.37
10,116.92

19,797.18
1,515.79

115,147.29

21,312.97

1,297
8
2,512
681
2
63
63
20
930

2,630.49
575.00
662.62
75,746.31
279,594.08
1,025.25
7,527.70
1,189.26
221. 68
10,314.31

10,121.11
648.80
1,292.70
4,089.53
4,294.55
1,277.50
1,675.45
1,289.76
1,974.55
2,903.00
644.00

379,486.70

30,210.94

178
2,212
204
832
90
15,403
310

18,976.41
12.44
308,131.39
46,637.26
130,439.32
2,232.12
11,706,149.24
41,213.64

237.95
4,529.24
572.20
16,640.59
6,186.79
11,111.06
4,960.95
371,275.73
4,173.75

1,408

360,442.28

37,598.37
171.12

1,408

.

$26, 111. 57
3,425.70
1,277.50
1,429.98
2,566.15
14,427.74
1,38L69
3,047.50
7,810.10
4,825.50

5,576

..

$437,085.67
2,121.60
36.67
24.55
470.50
840,021.78
35.54
35,947.50
36,690.03
2,455.95

787

.

6,626
547
5
7
78
2,611
7
4,825
7,615
197
22,518

..

360,442.28

37,769.49

New York, N. Y.:
NewYork
Cold Spring

902,675 208,604,989.03

4,502,002.72
200.00

Total

902,675 208,604," 989.03

4,502,202.72

38,049
20
124
3
15
12

401,741.42
639.02
75,634.07
18.16
208.10
144.71

69,420.88
1,787.00
1,953.00
549.00
288.75
1,196.75

38,223

478,385.47

75,195.38

502

80,299.86

15,892.23

848
78
15
82
16
53
6
15
326
4,952

5,378.44
2,931.63
562.13
1,139.69
283. 65
663. 80
190. 90
64.99
4,983.01
95,787.42

9,570.68
1,277.50
1,277.50
1,095.00
1,277.50
1,277.50
1,150.50
1,277.50
1,457.50
4 350.00

Niagara, N. Y.:
Niagara Falls
Lewiston - .
....
North Tonawanda
Olcott
Schlossers
Youngstown
Total .
Norfolk, Va
North and South Dakota:
Pembina
Ambrose
Antler
Crosby
Hannah
Hansboro
Kermit
Mobray
Neche

PortaL,

,..,.,,,,,.,.,,,.,,..,,..,,,.,,,,,.,,




192

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for the fiscal year ended June 30,1913—Continued.
Districts and ports.

Entries.

North and South Dakota—Continued.
St. J o l m
Sarles
Sherwood
Souris
Walhalla
Westhope

Receipts.

125
25
34
14
14
8

Expenses.

$546.86
550.40
3,690.55
291.78
124.99
2,336.82

$1,320.50
1,277.50
1,277.50
1,277.50
. 1,457.50
1,277.50

6,611

119,517.06

31,899.18

Omaha, Nebr

1,040

141,658.85

10,170.60

Oswegatchie, N . Y . :
Ogdensburg
Hammond
Lisbon
LouisviUe
... .
Massena
Morristown
Nyando
Waddington
. ...

5,981
111
319
144
34
760
3,228
315

123,760.07
75.48
685.04
813.11
184.08
3,334.68
56,817.81
1,093.27

25,896.74
656.55
806.90
645.66
1,791.90
2,358.64
4,108.05
944.48

10,892

186,763.54

37,208.92

363

43,101.99
245.60

11
808

19.82
195,392.77

11,802.20
799.25
350.00
797.00
3,691.68

Total

.*

Total
Oswego, N . Y :
Oswego
Fair Haven

:

Sodus P o i n t
-Utica

1,182

238,760.18

17,440.13

Paducah, K y
:
PamUco (Newbern), N . C

2
28

61.69
176.53

859.50
1,229.29

P a s o Del N o r t e , N . M e x . :
E l Paso
Columbus

3,043
233

397,648.83
48,984.22

73,309.32
7,470.80

3,276

446,633.05

80,780.12

1,126
1,421
78

39,863.26
11,115,52
2,676.85

13,335.86
11,896.03
1,764.50
1,094.50

2,625

53,655.63

28,090.89

Total

..

Total
P a s s a m a q u o d d y , Me.:
Eastport
Calais '.
Lubec
Red Beach

....

T otal

.0

2,324.61

Patchogue N Y
P e a r l R i v e r , Miss.:
Gulfoort
13av S t L o u i s
Biloxi
H o r n Island
Scranton
S h i n I'lland

22

18,427.64

5

25.59

2

1,290.51

Total

29

19,743.74

11,212.30

Pensacola, F l a . :
Pensacola
St Andrews

159

30,967.40
1,571.40

14,556.30
1,095.00

Total

159

32,538.80

15,651.30

237
1,336
4,524

21,524.19
614,556.16
137,967.32

2,356.98
10,452.58
9,862.13

67,156

20,797,404.86

559,137.52
1,554.00
4,501.28

67,156

20,797,404.86

565,192.80

.•

.

Peoria, 111
Perth Amboy, N. J
Petersburg Va
PhUadelphia, Pa.:
Philadelphia
Camden
Chester
Total

,




..

4,434.50
1,144.10
1,215.75
1,538.00
1,470.95
1,409.00

193

SECRETARY OE T H E TREASTJRY.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for thefiscal year ended June 30,1913—Continued.
Districts and ports.

Entries.

Receipts.

Expenses.

Pittsburgh, P a . . .
Plymouth, Mass..
Portland, Me
Portland, Oreg...

3,712
17
1,112
3,605

$832,267.19
4,156.12
214,921.70
684,191.00

$27,318.74
1,570.76
55,458.64
59,342.09

Porto Rico:
San J u a n . .
AguadUla..
Arecibo...
Arroyo
Fajardo...
Guanica...
Humacao..
Mayaguez.
Ponce

4,330
88
154
66
45
22
18
663
1,413

651,993.73
10,621.86
21,168.10
16,3n.68
12,097.54
22,413.35
8,750.73
128,585.20
303,185.91

67,654.61
960.17
1,110.12
1,366.60
2,052.36
1,225.88
1,886.77
7,547.19
18,114.94

6,799

1,175,128.10

101,918.54

134
2,531

3,655.99
808,758.95

2,258.10
28,742.46

41
18
67
188
3,050
268
41
69
.55
14

43,068.20
2,736.89
1,454.20
3,491.55
10,630.13
1,333.60
2,850.41
2,785.31
1,37L17
1,000.00
52.25
1,390.47
1,817.75
2,814.85
1,613.60
1,672.65
300.00
87,080.04
426.67
4,61L06
5,605.09
56,274.19

Total.
Portsmouth, N . H . .
Providence, R . I . . .
Puget Sound, Wash.:
Port Townsend...
Aberdeen
Anacortes
Belliagham.
Blaine
Chopaka.
DanviUe
Everett
Ferry
Friday Harbor...
Kalama
Laurier
Molson
Northport
Oroville
Port Angeles
Roche Harbor...
Seattle
South Bend
Sumas..
Tacoma.

3,105
1,361
7,455

30,418.03
3,588.15
1,470.94
9,346.89
62,274.41
2,45L85
1,145.19
1,336.02
413.76
562.56
29.20
1,320.45
1,022.72
681.56
486.97
4,025.82
1,014.78
1,473,626.08
338.86
28,750.08
21,387.84
530,167.83

Total.

363
• 57
310
53
97
1
25,686

42,289

2,175,859.99

214,380.08

Richmond, Va.:
Richmond...
West Poiat..

931

1,036,064.03
20.00

12,707.64
547.50

Total

931

1,036,084.03

13,255.14

33.82

647.45

Rock Island, IU.
Sabine, Tex.:
Port Arthur.
Sabine

93

19,026.53
4,982.26

11,242.97
1,473.25

Total.

159

24,008.79

12,716.22

6
53
377
13,152
2

285.80
2,606.98
62,787.30
2,265,893.76
5,335.70
9L66

. 165.00
350.00
1,59L78
5,298.36
61,176.35
2,234.64
706.68

966.98
1,072.42
830.79

5,990.84
114.77
57.84

Saco, Me
Sag Harbor, N . Y
St. Augustiae, Fla
St. Joseph, Mo
St. Louis, Mo
St. Marks (Cedar Keys), Fla..
St. Marys, Ga
Salem and Beverly, Mass.:
Salem
Beverly
Danvers
Total

156

16726°—FI 1913-




-13

2,870.19

6,163.45

2,315

Salt Lake City, Utah.

18,071.36

3,369.50

194

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for thefiscal year ended June 30,1913—Continued.
Districts and ports.
Salmia, Tex.:
Eagle P a s s . . .
Boquillas
Del Rio
Langtry
Presidio
San Antonio..

Entries.

Rexjeipts.

Expenses.

2,960
118

$440,680.00
409.00
2,609.40

127
312

2,769.00
49,871.00

$29,855.00
409.00
6,375.00
2,916.00
6,704.00
5,509.00

3,586

496,238.40

51,768.00

San Diego, Cal.:
San Diego...
Andrade
Calexico
Campo
Tia J u a n a . . .

1,995
4
304
. 44
87

102,239.86
476.47
29,160.98
4,076.89
7,777.53

16,432.68
1,162.23
4,756.00
3,091.00
5,673.05

Total.

2,434

143,731.73

31,114.96

823
2

5,523.54
75.35

'"i7.'79

4,803.00
257.00
197.20
189.00
256.20
136.20

860

5,746.31

5,837.60

54,212

6,513,960.64

518,207.67

140

28,543.93
3,042.44

4,507.34
1,200.00

Total..

54,352

6,545,647.01

523,915.01

Savannah, Ga
Sioux City, Iowa..
Sprtagfield, Mass..
Stonington, Conn..

616
129
1,639
30

96,700.48
9,063.50
699,861.32
2,081.50

12,843.31
806.90
11,594.85
869.92

143

2,051.87

10,536.00
275.00
. 881.37
137.50
480.00
459.00
2,091.65
220.00
825.00
275.00
160.50
. 206.26
83.00

Total.

Sandusky, Ohio:
Sandusky
Huron
KeUeys Island.
Port Clinton...
P u t in B a y . . . .
VermUion
TotaL
San Francisco, Cal.:
San Francisco...
Caspar
Fort Bragg
Mendociao City..
Monterey
Noyo
Oakland
Port Harford

Superior, Mich.:
Marquette
Allouez Bay
Ashland
Bayfield
DeTour..
Escanaba
Gladstone
Houghton
Isle Royale
Lake Linden....
Mackinaw
Menominee
Munis ing
Ontonagon
Presque Isle
Sault Ste Marie.,
Superior
'.—
Washburn
Total
Syracuse, N . Y
Tampa, Fla.:
Tampa
Port Tampa
St. Petersburg..,
Sarasota
Tarpon Springs.,
Total.
Tappahannock, Va
Teche (Brashear, now Morgan City), L a .




129.63

""i8*43
78
"339"

220.08
9.10
42,498.52
54.56
2.00
52.56

3,347
1,403

43,826.44
127,881.42
130.68

275.00
23,021.30
12,406.04
137.50

5,332

216,745.66

52,470.11

551

60,972.69

7,604.17

36

1,831,128.38
17,797.07
176.00

42,651.57
4,203.26
372.00
128.00
1,453.00

3,726

1,849,100.45

48,807.82

163.16

677.36
3,319.83

195

SECRETABY OP THE TREASURY.

TABLE 0.—Statement, by districts and ports, showing total entries of merchandise,
collections, and expenses, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913—Continued.
Districts and ports.
Vermont:
Burlington..
Alburg
East Alburg
East Richford...
Franklia
Highgate
Richford....
St. Albans...
Swanton
West Berkshire..
WindmiU Poiat.
Total

Entries.

Receipts.

Expenses.

234
12,342
252
34
196
403
11,008
16,104
92
556

$33,950.88
123,967.86
2,442.94
40.24
782.63
3,270.01
239,834.98
395,546.91
2,585.57
2,310.04
165.12

$34,156.42
- 8,847.08
3,651.16
841.20
. 898.54
917.20
13,144.64
19,231.84
. 2,441.02
905.40
609.57

41,221

804,897.18

85,644.07

Vicksburg, Miss.

300.00

Waldoboro, Me.:
Waldoboro..
Rockland

17.02
8,759.82

2,309.15
.3,175.36

Total.

92

8,776.84

5,484.51

Wheeling, W. Va..
WUmiagton, N. C.

95
154

12,492.11
24,954.38

2,120.84
6,469.72

74.54
410.31

1,317.65
2,216.09

484.85

3,533.74

190.00
2.50

1,054.00
504.90

Wiscasset, Me.:
Wiscasset..
Boothbay.
Total.
Yaquhia (Newport), Oreg.
York, Me
Grand total..

1,759,861 1 325,192,958.56 10,378; 422.27

] Includes all customs receipts and collections for Department of Commerce and Labor.







APPENDIX TO REPORT ON THE
FINANCES




197




A.i>i>E]sri:>ix.
REPOETS OF HEADS OF BUREAUS,
REPORT OF THE TREASURER.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
O F F I C E OF THE TREASURER,

Washington, November 20, WIS.
SIR : The transactions of the Treasury of the United States for the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1913, and its condition at the close of the
year are presented in the following report.
The ordinary receipts and disbursements, classified for the past
two years, are compared in the subjoined table:
Ordinary receipts and disbursements for thefiscal years 1912 and 1913:
Account.

1912.

1913.

Increase.

Customs
Internalrevenue:
Ordinary
Corporation tax
Lands
.
Miscellaneous
i
Receipts of the District of Columbia.

$311,321,672.22

$318,891,395.86

$7,569,723.64

293,028,895.93
28,583,303.73
5,392,796.75
45,092,313.79
8,483,685.46

309,410,665.81
35,006,299.84
2,910,204.69
48,896,702.41
8,827,580.69

16,381,769.88
6,422,996.11

Total
Deduct moneys covered by warrant
Ul year subsequent to the deposit
thereof

691,902,667.88

723,942,849.30

34,522,773.48

2,482,592.06

461,792.56

337,590.05

Total
Add moneys received in fiscal year
but not covered by warrant

691,440,875.32

723,605,259.25

34,522,773.48

2,358,389.55

Decrease.

RECEIPTS.

Net available.....

3,804,388.62
343,895.23

$2,482,592.06

124,202.51

337,590.05

505,970.59

168,380.54

691,778,465.37

724,111,229.84

32,332,764.47

12,729,949.61
923,978.57
4,676,384.03
65,942,023.34
2,253,473.75
797, 704.03
24,036,297.82
1,893,037.00
1,568,194.88
19,471,567.42

13,291,813.52
592,014.73
4,978,380.09
62,113,949.60
2,220,460.24
829,554. 96
22,383,756.70
2,169,340.97
1,027,368.79
20,469,027.70

14,466,998.31
9,716,999.76
2,388,838.31
12,959,542.46

14,610,837.19
10,423,632.19
2,878,325.95
12,841,210.79

143,838.88
706,632.43
489,487.64

173,824,989.29

170,829,673.42

3,509,434.10

148,795,42L92
135,691,955.72
20,134,839.80
153,590,466.26
22,616,300.48

160,387,452.85
133,262,86L97
20,306,158.90
175,085,450.29
22,899,108.08

11,592,030.93

664,553,963.47

682,770, 705. 51

37,224,50L90

41,340,524.33

DISBURSEMENTS.

Legislative
Executive
State Department
Treasury Department
War Department, civU
Navy Department, civil
. .
Interior, civil . .
Post Office Department proper...
Postal deficiencies
Department of Agriculture.
Department of Commerce and Labor
Department of Justice
Tndpppn(leut offif.PR. .

....

District of Columbia..
Total civU and miscellaneous.
Mihtary Establishment, including
rivers and harbors
Naval Establishment- Indian Service
Pensions.
Interest on pubhc debt
Total ordinary disbursements
Net.
Surplus




561,863.91
301,996.06
31,850.93
276,303.97
997,460.28

171,319.10
21,494,994.03
282,807. 60
37,050,585.76
28,216,742.04

331,963.84
3,828,073. 74
33,013.51
1,652,54L12
. 540,826.09

118,331. 67
6,504,749. 97
2,329,093. 75

8,833,843. 72

199

200

REPORT ON T H E FINTANCES.

The total ordinary receipts are, at $724,111,229.84, the largest in
our history, and this increase occurs by growth in all of the sources
except the sale of lands. The net increase was $32,332,764.47.
There was a reduction of expenditures in the civil and miscellaneous of $2,995,315.87, anci the Naval Establishment spent $2,329,093.75
less than in the preceding 12 months. Increased expenditures are
recorded by the Military Establishment of $11,592,030.93; in the
Indian Service of $171,319.10; interest on the public debt of $282,807.60, and in pensions of $21,494,994.03, which indicates the nation^s
liberality to its defenders. The net growth of expenditures for the
year was $28,216,742.04.
THE PANAMA CANAL.

The excess of mcome over outgo in the governmental finances
during the past fiscal year has maintained an adequate balance in
the Treasury for the ordinary operations, as well as the special
activities now under way; therefore it was not deemed advisable by
the Secretary of the Treasury to offer for sale additional bonds of
the Panama Canal loan. The expenses incurred in the construction
of that great work during the year, amounting to $41,741,258.03, were
paid out of the general fund of the Treasury, and the total net balance
so expended to June 30, 1913, reimbursable from the proceeds of
bonds not yet sold, is $179,627,617.07.
The proceeds of sales of bonds and the disbursements on account
of the canal to the close of the fiscal year 1913 are set forth by years
in the table following:
Receipts and disbursements on account of the Panama Canal.
Fiscal years.
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912

Proceeds of
U n i t e d States
b o n d s sold.

$31,210,817.95
25,367,768.67
30,731,008.21
18,102,170.04
33,189,104.15

Disbursements
for P a n a m a
Canal.
$50,174,485.00
3,918,819.83
19,379,373.71
27,198,618.71
38,093,929.04
31,419, 442. 41
33,911,673.37
37,063,515.33
35,327,370.66

Excess of—
Receipts.

Disbursements.
$50,174,485.00
3,918,819.83
19,379,373.71

$4,012,199.24
12,726,160.37
688,434.20
33,911,673.37
18,961,345.29
2,138,266.51

138,600,869.02

276,487,228.06
41,741,258.03

4,012,199.24

141,898,558.28
41,741,258.03

138,600,869.02

318,228,486.09

4,012,199.24

183,639,816.31
179,627,617.07

1913
Total
Net

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF THE POST OFFICE
DEPARTMENT.

The receipts on account of the Post Ofl&ce Department during the
fiscal year were $278,107,699.11, and the disbursements $271,001,697.41. Of these amounts $188,232,180.97, or more than two-thirds,
was received and disbursed directly by postmasters without being
deposited in the Treasury. Such disbursements are authorized by
existing law, and are accounted for under the provisions of section
406 of the Revised Statutes of the United States. Advances were
made from the Treasury to meet deficiencies in the postal revenues
of $3,027,368.79 during the year, of which $2,000,000 was repaid in
the month of January.
The Post Ofl&ce Department warrants issued by the Postmaster
General, which heretofore have been drawn on the assistant treasurers



201

TREASURER.

of the United States at Chicago, New York, and San Francisco, by
agreement of the Postmaster General were embraced in Department
Circular No. 5, and since February 1, 1913, have been drawn on the
Treasurer of the United States; they are payable by any assistant
treasurer or regular national-bank depositary of the United States.
A statement bf the transactions relating to the account for the
service of the Post Ofl&ce Department with the Treasury during the
fiscal year 1913 will be found on page 237.
TRANSACTIONS IN THE PUBLIC DEBT.

Postal-savings bonds, authorized by the act of June 25, 1910, were
issued during the fiscal year 1913 to the amount of $1,929,840. The
deposits of lawful money of the United States, under the act of July
14, 1890, to retire national-bank notes were $21,471,010, which, with
the deposits for the postal-savings bonds, makes a total of $23,400,850
in actual cash received on account of the public debt, while the cash
disbursements on account of the principal of matured loans and
fractional currency were $102,575 and for national-bank notes canceled and retired $24,089,035.50, a total disbursement for the public
debt of $24,191,610.50. The net result was an excess of disbursements of $790,760.50. .
The transactions relating to the replacing or retiring of the w^orn
and mutilated paper currency, issued under the direct authority of
the Government are included in the account of the public debt.
The details for the past two years may be observed in the table
following.
Receipts and disbursements on account of the p u b l i c debt f o r 1912 a n d 1913.
1912

Account.

1913

Increase.

Decrease.

RECEIPTS.

$459,280.00

1,392,645.00

23,400,850.00

2,863,205.00

149,660,000.00
355,760,000.00
411,432,000.00

Notes and certificates issued:
United States notes .
Gold certificates..
Silver certificates...

21,471,010.00

20,537,645.00

Total

$1,929,840.00

20,078,365.00

Postal-saviags bonds
Lawful money deposited to retire
national-bank notes.

163,000,000.00
468,510,000.00
403,952,000.00

13,340,000.00
112,750,000.00

916,852,000.00

Total
Panama Canal loan:
Proceeds of bonds sold—
Priacipal...
Premium

$1,470,560.00

1,035,462,000.00 ,126,090,000.00

32,358,366.00
830,738.15

7,480,000.00

32,358,366.00
830,738.15

33,189,104.15

TotaL.

33,189,104.15

970,578,749.15

1,058,862,850.00

88,284,100.85

119,380.00
1,236.03
28,527,711.50

101,030.00
1,545.00
24,089,035.50

308.97

28,648,327.53

24,191,610.50

308.97

149,660,000.00
317,000.00
310,573,300.00
393,382,000.00

Aggregate

$7,480,000.00

163,000,000.00
269,000.00
421,840,200.00
401,951,000.00

111,266,900.00
8,569,000.00

DISBURSEMENTS.

United States bonds retired
Fractional currency retired
National-bank notes retired

....
:

Total
Notes and certificates redeemed:
United States notes
Treasury notes
Gold certiflcates
SUver certificates...
Total....
Aggregate

853,932,300.00
'

Exc^ess of receipts




.

13,340,000.00

987,060,200.00 433,175,900.00

882,580,627.53

1,011,251,810.50

87,998,121.62

47,611,039.50

128,671,182.97

18,350.00
4,438,676.00
4,457,026.00

48,000.00

48 000.00

202

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

In a study of the foregoing table it will be observed that the
United States notes issued and credited in the general account as a
receipt are offset by an equal amount of worn or unfit notes in kind
withdrawn therefrom, canceled, and retired, which is in accordance
with the provisions of the act of May 31, 1878. In explanation of the
manner of issuing and redeeming gold certificates, silver certificates,
and Treasury notes of 1890, it may be said that for certificates issued
and credited in the general account an equal amount of the respective
kinds of money held in the general account is transferred therefrom
to, and retained in, the trust funds for their redemption; for gold certificates, silver certificates, and Treasury notes withdrawn from the
general fund, canceled, and retired, a like amount of the respective
coins is released from the trust funds and brought into the general
fund in their stead.
PUBLIC DEBT, 1912 AND 1913.

At the close of the fiscal year 1913 the outstanding priacipal of the
interest-beariag debt was $965,706,610, an increase of $1,929,840 as
compared with t h a t of 1912. The increase was caused by the issue
of postal-saviags bonds.
^
The debt bearing no iaterest amounted to $377,341,134.66, a
decrease of $2,720,600.50.
The certificates and notes issued on deposits of coin and bullion
(trust funds, act of March 14, 1900) increased $48,401,800, and
amounted to $1,572,937,169 at the close of the fiscal year June 30,
1913.
Comparison of the public debt is made, by items, for the fiscal
years 1912 and 1913 in the following statement:
Public debt, 1912 and 1913.
Rate.

Interest-bearmg debt:
Consols of 1930
L o a n of 1908-1918
L o a n of 1925
• P a n a m a C a n a l loan
Do
P o s t a l savings b o n d s
Total

-

:

P.ct.
2
3
....
4
2
3
2i

W h e n payable.

Outstanding
J u n e 30, 1912.

After A p r . 1,1930..
After A u g . 1,1908..
F e b . 1,1925
A u g . 1,1916
J u n e 1,1961
J u l y 1,1931

$646,250,150.00
63,945,460.00
118,489,900.00
84,631,980.00
50,000,000.00
459,280.00

$646 250,150.00
63,945,460.00
118,489,900.00
84,631,980.00
50,000,000.00
2,389,120.00

963,776,770.00

965,706,610.00

1,760,450.26
53,282.50
346,681,016.00
24,710,83L5O
6,856,154.90

1,659,550.26
53,152.50
346,681,016.00
22,092,806.00
6,854,609.90

380,061,735.16

377,341,134.66

1,040,067,369.00
481,549,000.00
2,929,000.00

1,086,727,169.00
483,550,000.00
2,660,000.00

..:

Debt bearing no interest:
M a t u r e d loans
Old d e m a n d notes
U n i t e d States notes
N a t i o n a l - b a n k notes
F r a c t i o n a l cuiTcncy

On demand
.....do
. . . do
do
do
...

Total
Certificates a n d n o t e s issued on deposits
of coin a n d buUion ( t r u s t funds, act
Mar. 14,1900):
Gold certificates
Silver certificates
T r e a s m y n o t e s of 1890
Total
Aggregate




On demand
do
do

Outstanding
J u n e 30,1913.

1,524,535,369.00

1,572,937,169.00

2,868,373,874.16

2,915,984,913.66

208

TREASURER.
PAYMENT OF INTEREST ON THE REGISTERED BONDS OF THE
STATES.

UNITED

For interest on registered bonds of the United States, due June 1,
1912, and thereafter, checks have been prepared and mailed from
the ofl&ce of the Secretary of the Treasury. Such checks bear a
certificate as to the principal of bonds registered in the name of the
payee, over the facsimile signature of the Chief of the Division of
Loans and Currency; they also bear t h e facsimile signature of the
Secretary of the Treasury, and are countersigned by a clerk in his
ofl&ce. These checks were embraced in Department Circular No. 5,
and since February 1, 1913, have been drawn on the Treasurer of the
United States, b u t are payable by any assistant treasurer or regular
national-bank depositary of the United States, and the amount so
disbursed is included inthe requisition for reimbursement made by the
Treasurer at the end of the month. The paid checks are sent to the
Register of the Treasury for an administrative examination, who in
turn forwards them to the Auditor for the Treasury Department.
RESERVE AND TRUST FUNDS.

The redemptions from the reserve fund during the past fiscal year
were, in United States notes, $67,850,957, and in Treasury notes
$67,830, making a total of $67,918,787. Under the provisions of the
act of March 14, 1900, the redeemed notes were exchanged for gold
coin each day, and thereby the reserve was maintained at the fixed
amount of $150,000,000. There was no apparent disposition on
the part of the holders of United States notes to use them in withdrawing gold coin from the Treasury. The transactions in the
reserve fund represent more truly exchanges to secure an accommodation in denominations of currency.
At the close of the fiscal year 1913 the trust funds amounted to
$1,572,937,169, of which $887,471,847 was in gold coin, $199,255,322
in gold bullion, and $486,210,000 in standard silver dollars.
There was an increase during the year of $46,669,800 in the gold
held against the outstanding gold certificates, and of $1,732,000 in
the silver dollars held against outstanding Treasury notes of 1890
and silver certificates.
The transactions in trust-fund obligations during the fiscal year
1913 are recorded in the statement foflowing:
Fiscal year 1913.
Outstandiag
.June 30, 1912.

Gold certificates
Silver certificates
Treasury notes

.. .

TotaL...

Outstandiag
June 30, 1913.

Issued.

Redeemed.

$1,040,057,369
481,549,000
2,929,000

$468,510,000
403,952,000

$421,840,200
401,951,000
269,000

$1,086,727,169
483,550,000
2,660,000

1,524,535,369

872,462,000

824,060,200

1,572,937,169

The foregoing statement does not include $220,000 in gold certificates, series of 1900, that had been issued but not reported in time
to be taken up in the public debt statement for June.




V

204

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
STATEMENT OF THE TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES.

At the close of the fiscal year 1913, from the revised figures of the
several funds, the holdings of moneys in the Treasury amounted to
$2,014,140,698.25 and was set apart as follows:
RESERVE rUND.

Gold coin and bullion

$150, 000, 000
TRUST FUNDS.

[Held for the redemption of the notes and certiflcates for which they are respectively pledged.]
Gold: .
Gold certificates
outCoin. . . . 1885,831,141
standing
$1,086, 947,169
Bullion . 201,116, 028
Silver certificates out$1, 086, 947,169
standing
483, 550, 000
Silver dollars
483, 550, 000 Treasury notes outstandSilver dollars of 1 8 9 0 . . . .
2, 660, 000
ing
2,660,000
Total:

1, 573,157,169
GENERAL FUND

Total....

1,573,157,169

CASH IN THE VAULTS.

After setting out from the assets of the Treasury the appropriate
kinds of money to meet the requirements of the reserve and trust
funds, the balances of each kind of money held belong to the general
fund of the Treasuiy, from which, however, must be deducted the
current liabilities.
The items composing the generar fund are subdivided; the first
part shows the amount of each kind of available cash actuaUy held
in the vaults of the Treasury ofl&ces, the demands against the same,
and the working balance in such offices; the second part shows the
amounts of public moneys in national banks and other depositaries
to the credit of the Treasurer of the United States and of disbursing
officeis, the demands against the sama, and the net balance in such
depositaries subject to draft; the third part shows the cash items
held in Treasury ofl&ces, but which, under provisions of law, are of
limited tender or unavailable for payinent.
The assets in the general fund in the Treasury on June 30, 1913,
and the demand liabilities outstanding on that date were as follows:
I n Treasury offices:
Gold coin
Gold certificates
Standard silver dollars
Silver certificates
United States notes
Treasury notes of 1890
National-bank notes
Certified checks on banks

$25, 413, 866.87
82, 949,460.00
9, 936, 070.00
14,421, 408.00
9,465, 836.00
:.
3,330.00
15, 311,542.47
343,190. 58
$157, 844, 703. 92

Deduct current liabilities:
National - bank
5 per cent
f u n d . . . . . . . . . $28,092,127.73
Less notes in
process of red e m p t i o n . . . . 28,092,127.73
Outstanding . warrants
and
checks
:
Balance to credit of disbursing
officers



34,118,314.81
90,590,674.36

TREASURER.
Deduct current liabilities—Con^.
Post Office Department balance
Miscellaneous items
Board of tfustees, Postal Savings System

205

$6,452, 334.59
10, 618, 605.32
2, 540,446.92
144, 320, 376.00

Less warrants and checks not
cleared

57, 528, 598.04
$86,791,777.96

Worldng balance in Treasury offices
I n national-bank depositaries:
To credit of the Treasurer of the
United States
$69, 746,133.15
To credit of disbursing officers..
6, 517, 481. 91
:
I n treasury of Philippine Islands:
To credit of the Treasurer of the
United States
1, 061, 897.26
To credit of United States disbursing officers
2, 910, 482.71

$71, 052, 925. 96

76,263, 615.06

3, 972, 379. 97
80, 235, 995.03
Deduct current liabilities:
Outstanding warrants
Balances to credit of disbursing
officers....

710, 674.15
9,427,964.62
10,138,638.77

Balance in banks and in treasury of Philippine Islands
70, 097, 356. 26
I n Treasury offices:
Silver bullion (at cost)
$2, 064, 332.43
Subsidiary silver coin
20, 737, 926.12
Fractional currency
276.87
Minor coin
1, 997,166.63
Awaiting reimbursement: Interest on public
debt
11, 000. 52
24,810,702.57
Total balance in general fund June 30, 1913
Total balance in general fund June 30, 1912
Net decrease

165, 960, 984. 79
167,152, 478.99
1,191, 494.20

AVAILABLE CASH BALANCE.

At the close of the fiscal year 1913 the available cash in the general
fund was $165,960,984.79, a decrease of $1,191,494.20 as compared
with that of 12 months earlier. This decrease is verified by the following transactions, which include the net results in all accounts of
receipts and disbursements shown on previous pages of this report:
Available cash balance June 30, 1912
$167,152,478.99
Add excess of ordinary receipts over disbursements
for 1913 (see p . 199)
$41, 340, 524.33
Deduct":
Excess of Panama Canal disbursements over receipts (see
p. 200)
$41, 741, 258.03
Excess of public debt disbursements over receipts (see p .
•
201)
790,760.50
42,532,018.53
1,191, 494.20
Available cash balance June 30, 1913...'.



165, 960, 984. 79

206

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The working balance in the vaults of the Treasury at the close of
the year was $71,052,925.96.
I t will be seen from the foregoing figures that if an emergency should
arise calling for an increase of Government deposits in depositary
banks the Secretary of the Treasury is in position to give prompt
and effective rehef to the business situation.
The balance in the Treasury at the end of each month from January,
1907, is stated in Table No. 19, page 261, ahd for July 1 in each year
since 1906 in the subjoined statement:
Available cash balance (including the reserve fund) on the dates named.
AvaUable cash balance.
Dates.
Reserve fund.
July 1,1906.
July 1,1907.
July 1,1908.
July 1,1909.
July 1,1910.
J u l y l , 1911.
July 1,1912
July 1,1913.

$150,000,000
150,000,000
150,000,000
150,000,000
150,000,000
150,000,000
150,000,000
150,000,000

General fund.

Total.

$180,689,354.82
272,061,445.47
245,171,347.73
126,375,428.10
106,894,675.67
140,176,926.13
167,152,478.99
165,960,984.79

$330,689,354.82
422,061,445.47
395,171,347.73
276,375,428.10
256,894,675.67
290,176,926.13
317,152,478.99
315,960,984.79

GOLD IN THE TREASURY.

The gold in the Treasury at the close of the fiscal year 1913
amounted to $1,262,361,035.87, of which $1,011,245,007.87 was in
coin.
Under the provisions of the act of March 2,1911, gold certificates are
issued against gold bullion and foreign coin deposited in the Treasury.
These certificates differ in no particular from those issued against
United States gold coin and are payable in such coin. The iatent and
effept of the act are not to limit the free coinage of gold. The mints
continue to receive all the gold that is offered, and it enters into circulation either in coin or in gold certificates. The effect is simply to
allow the Treasury to carry a portion of the reserves in bullion, thus
saving cost of coinage.
The amount of new gold coias of current coiaage shipped to depositors therefor at the expense of the consignee for transportation
charges during the fiscal year was $11,513,233.50. This is one of theannual demands made upon the Treasury and is due priacipally to
the popularity of these coins for Christmas gifts, Easter offerings,
birthday presents, and like purposes.
The total amount of gold in the Treasury on July 1 in each year
from 1906, set apart for the respective uses, is recorded in the statement following.




207

TREASURER,
Gold in the Treasury.

July 1,1906
July 1,1907
July 1,1908
July 1,1909
July 1,1910
July 1,1911
.July 1,1912
July 1,1913

For certiflcates ta
circulation.

General fund
(belonging to
Treasury).

$150,000,000 $516,561,849
150,000,000 600,072,299
150,000,000 782,976,619
150,000,000 815,005,449
150,000,000 802,754,199
150,000,000 930,367,929
150,000,000 943,435,618
150,000,000 1,003,997,709

Dates.

$140,489,841.30
154,619,431.14
71,912,063.18
77,698,852.02
92,411,286.24
83,533,254.56
114,028,646.22
108,363,326.87

Reserve.

Total.

$807,051,690.30
904,691,730.14
1,004,888,682.18
1,042,704,301.02
•1,045,165,485.24
1,163,901,183.56
1,207,464,264.22
1,262,361,035.87

The gold imported during the fiscal year amounted to $69,194,025,
while the exports of the precious metal aggregated $77,762,622, and
notwithstanding this drain there was a net increase of $54,896,771.65
in the amount held in the Treasury as compared with that of 12
months earlier.
BONDS HELD AS SECURITY FOR NATIONAL BANKS.

The Treasurer held in trust, at the close of the fiscal year 1913,
United States bonds to the amount of $740,529,250 as security for
the circulating notes of national banks. The securities pledged for
pubhc deposits in the depositary banks amounted to $61,646,300.
The kinds of bonds in the custody of the Treasurer of the United
States and the changes therein during the fiscal year 1913 are recorded
in the subjoined table:
Bonds held for national banks, close of June, 1912 and 1913, and changes during 1913.
Transactions during 1913.
Kinds of bonds.

Rate.

Held June
30,1912.
Deposited.

Withdrawn.

Held June
30,1913.

TO SECURE CIRCULATION.

United
United
IJnited
United
United

States loaa of 1925
States loan of 1908-1918
States consols of 1930
States Panama Canal, 19161
States Panama Canal, 1918.

P . ct.
4
3
2
2
2

$13,187,200
5,935,820
39,184,300
4,005,100
2,507,200

724,493?740

64,819,620

48,784,110

740,529,250

3,716,000
0,733,300
16,218,000
12,646,700
1,546,500
712,000
4,542,000
744,000
847,000
685,000
242,000

1,412,500
1,443,100
4,813,600
4,844,700
451,500
264,000
1,196,000
435,000
272,000
157,000
205,000

2,677,000

1,476,600
1,420,200
6,020,500
4,060,200
416,000
79,000
2,436,000
1,407,000
373,000
1,242,000
830,000
10,000
11,885,600

.2,825,000

3,780,100
3,710,400
17,425,000
11,862,200
1,611,000
527,000
5,782,000
1,716,000
948,000
1,770,000
867,000
10,000
11,737,600

48,309,500

Total.

$23,790,000
19,344,620
600,248,300
52,397,840
28,712,980

$4,252,700 $32,724,500
3,515,040 21,765,400
35,053,250 604,379,350
3,683,580 52,719,360
2,279,540 28,940,640

31,656,100

18,319,300

61,646,300

TO SECURE PUBLIC DEPOSITS.

United States loan of 1925
United States loan of 1908-1918
United States Paaama Canal, 1961.
United States consols of 1930
United States Panama Canal, 1916.,
United States Panama Canal, 1918.
.Phllppine loans
Porto Rico loans
District of Columbia
Territory of Hawah
Philipptae Railway
:
Manila Railroad
State, city, and railroad
Total.




4
3
3
2
2
2
4

4
3.65

(0
4
4

(0

1 Various.

208

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
BONDS HELD AS SECURITY FOR POSTAL SAVINGS FUNDS.

At the close of the fiscal year 1913 the Treasurer of the United
States held in trust, under the provisions of the act of June 25, 1910,
bonds and securities amountiag to $63,851,061.42, as security for
postal savings funds deposited in designated depositaries.
The kinds of securities held and the changes therein during the
year are recorded in the statement following:
Bonds held to secure postal-savings funds, close of June, 1912 and 1913, and changes
during 1913.
Transactions during 1913.
Kind of bonds.

Rate.

Held June 30
1912.

Held June 30,
1913.
Deposited.
2_

United States loan of 1925
United States loan of 1908-1918....
United States Panama, 1961
United States consols of 1930
United States Panama, 1916-1936.
United States Panama, 1918-1938.
Philippine loans
Porto Rico loans
District of Columbia
Territory of Hawau
State loans
City loans
County loans
Miscellaneous loans
Total.

Withdrawn.

$496,900.00
548,060.00
4,018,500.00
830,300.00
90,000.00
40,000.(f0
1,333,000.00
1,428,000.00
266,000.00
1,000,000.00
5,683,900.00
23,674,477.94
5,264,900.00
5,558,333.32

5,000.00
687,000.00
456,000.00
220,000.00
165,000.00
52,500.00
146,500.00
411,000.00
263,000.00
3,682,500.00
931,000.00
11,055,042.82 3,439,202.66
2,231,500.00
890,820.00
2,718, 700.00
937,950.00

$560, 900.00
618, 980.00
3,631,500.00
859, 300.00
108, 000.00
35, 000.00
1,564,000.00
1,483,000.00
172, 000.00
1,148,000.00
8,435,400. 00
31,290, 318.10
6,605,580.00
7,339,083.32

50,232,371.26

22,433,162. 82

63,851,061.42

$79,500.00
148,920.00
845,500.00
283,000.00
18,000.00

$15,500.00
78,000.00
1,232,500.00
254,000.00

8,814,472.66

1 Various.

The following-described securities, at the respective values herein fixed, will be
accepted by the board of trustees as security for postal-savings dei)osits, viz:
(a) Bonds of the United States, of the Phihppine Islands, of the District of Columbia,
and of Porto Rico, will be accepted at their par value.
(6) Bonds of any State of the United States and of the Territory of Hawaii will be
accepted at their market value, but if such market value is above par, they will be
accepted at their par value.
(c) Bonds of any city in the United States having a population of over 30,000, as
shown by the latest annual report of the Bureau of the Census, entitled ''Official Statistics of Cities having a Population of over Thirty Thousand," which has been in
existence for a period of 10 years, which for a j)eripd of 10 years previously has not
defaulted in the payment of any part of either principal or interest of any funded debt
authorized to be contracted by it, and whose net funded indebtedness does not exceed
10 per cent of the valuation of its taxable property, to be ascertained by the last preceding valuation for the assessment of taxes, will be accepted at 90 per cent of their
market value, but if such market value is above par, they will be accepted at 90 per
cent of their par value.
(d) Bonds of any other city, town, county, or other legally constituted municipality
or district in the United States, which has been in existence for a period of 10 years,
which for a period of 10 years previously has not defaulted in the payment of any part
of either prmcipal or interest of any funded debt authorized to be contracted by it,
and whose net funded indebtedness does not exceed 10 per cent of the valuation of its
taxable property, to be ascertained by the last preceding valuation for the assessment
of taxes, will be accepted at 75 per cent of their market value, but if such market value
is above par, they will be accepted at 75 per cent of their par value.
The term *'net funded indebtedness," for the purposes of paragraphs (c) and (d), is
hereby defined to be the difference between the legal gross indebtedness of a city,
town, county, or other municipality (including; the amount of any school district or
other bonds which depend for their redemption upon taxes levied upon property
within the municipality) and the aggregate of the following items:




209

TREASURER.

(1) The total of all sinking funds accumulated for the redemption of such gross
indebtedness, except sinking funds applicable to bonds hereafter described in this
section.
(2) The amount of outstanding bonds or other debt obligations made payable from
current revenues.
(3) The amount of outstanding bonds issued for the purpose of providing the inhabitants of a "municipality with public utilities, including the supplying of water or the
construction of subways and tunnels for railways: Provided, That evidence is submitted showing that the income from such utilities is sufficient for maintenance, for
payment of interest on such bonds, and for the accumulation of a sinking fund for their
redemption.
(4) The amount of outstanding improvement bonds, issued under laws which provide for the levying of special assessments against abutting property in sufficient
amounts to insure the payment of interest on the bonds and the redemption thereof:
Provided, That such bonds are direct obligations of the municipality and included in
the gross indebtedness of the municipality.
The board of trustees reserves the right to reclassify the securities acceptable for
deposits.and to change the valuation at which they will be accepted. Under no circumstances will securities of other classes than those above named be accepted.
POSTAL SAVINGS BONDS AND INVESTMENTS

THEREIN.

The trustees of the Postal Savings System, under a general authority conferred upon them in the postal saviags law, have arranged to
take over at par any of the postal savings bonds that depositors may
wish to turn back.
Under the arrangement outliaed in the foregoing the Treasurer of
the United States held on June 30, 1913, $117,460 ia postal savings
bonds, representing investments made by the board of trustees,
Postal Savings System. The first imvestment ia these bonds was
made on December 9, 1911, when they were quoted ia the open
market at 92^ cents on the dollar. All of such bonds held b}^ the
Treasurer are registered in the name of the board of trustees.
WITHDRAWAL OF BONDS TO SECURE CIRCULATION.

Under the provisions of the act of March 4, 1907, the deposits of
lawful money to retire national bank notes was limited to $9,000,000
per month, but this limit was not reached ia any month duriag the
past fiscal year. The national bank notes outstandiag took on a
growth of $14,022,914 during the fiscal year and amounted to
$759,157,906 on June 30, 1913, which apparently indicates that there
was an active demand for money throughout the country, and under
such conditions there was no disposition on the part of the national
banks to contract the volume of their circulating notes.
The deposits of lawful money and the amount of bank circulation
outstandiag may be studied in the monthly statement following:
Month.

July
August —
September.
October....
. November.
December.
January...

Deposits
of lawful
money.

Nationalbank notes
outstanding.

$1,452,000
1,263,360
1,804,000
1,425,425
785,492
821,800
1,106,393

$744,905,941
746,501,307
747,779,654
749,348,859
750,185,776
750,972,246
750,481,769

1 6 7 2 6 ° — F I 1913--




-14

Month.

Deposits
of lawful
money.

February...
March
April
May
June

$4,636,335
2,088,497
1,062,095
1,552,703
3,472,910

Total.

21,471,010

Nationalbank notes
outstandiag.
$751,117,794
752,059,332
753,076,674
755,294,066
759,157,906

210
NATIONAL

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
BANKS

DESIGNATED AS DEPOSITARIES
STATES.

OF

THE

UNITED

The Secretary of the Treasury determines, the number of such
depositaries and. the amount of public money required in each for the
transaction of the public busiaess, fixes the amount of balances they
may hold, and .requires the banks thus designated to give satisfactory
security, by the deposit of United States bonds and otherwise, for the
safe-keeping and prompt payment of the public money deposited with
them, and for the faithful performance of their duties as financial
agents of the Government. The regular depositaries receive and
disburse the public moneys, whUe the special depositaries hold only
the moneys transferred to them from the Treasury. All of the depositaries are required to pay iaterest at the rate of 2 per cent per annum
from and after June 1, 1913, on the average monthly amount of
public deposits held.
The number of national-bank depositaries at the close of the fiscal
years 1912 and 1913 may be observed in the statement followiag:
Regular.
Depositaries June 30,1912..
Depositaries June 30^ 1913..

424
850

Special.
1,353
1,535

At the close of the fiscal year 1913 there were 1,535 depositary
banks and the total amount of pubhc moneys held therein was
$76,263,615.06, which was secured by bonds pledged therefor with
the Treasurer of the United States.
PUBLIC DEPOSITS IN NATIONAL BANKS.

At the close of the fiscal year 1912 the balance in depositary banks
to the credit of the general fund was $37,953,488.51, and to the
credit of disbursing officers $10,552,697.26, making a total of
$48,506,185.77.
The worldng balance in the Treasury offices at the beginning of the
fiscal year 1913 was $98,742,425.40, an amount largely in excess of
the actual requirements of the department for the transaction of the
pubhc business. As there was no necessity for withdrawing the
pubhc deposits from national banks, there was but slight change in
the total holdings of the depositary banks during the first half of
thefiscal year.
On January 9, 1913, the Secretary of the Treasury (Mr. MacVeagh),
issued Department Circular No. 5, which inaugurated a radical
change in the manner of handhng and disbursing the pubhc funds.
I t provided, first, that on and after February 1, 1913, every deposit
of funds to the official credit of a disbursing officer (except those
stationed in the Phihppine Islands) shall be made with the Treasurer
of the United States; second, all moneys standing to the official
credit of disbursing officers with assistant treasurers and active
designated depositary banks at the close of business January 31,
1913, shall be transferred to hke credit of such disbursing officers
with the Ti^easurer of the United States, through the medium of the




TREASURER.

>211

general account of the Treasurer of the United Stateg; third, all
Treasury Department warrants. Post Office Department warrants,
disbursing officers' checks, checks in payment of interest on the
pubhc debt, and Secretary's special deposit checks shall be drawn on
the Treasurer of the United States.
I t contemplated that each assistant treasurer and each active
designated depositary bank shall pay the warrants and checks
enumerated in the foregoing when drawn on the Treasurer of the
United States and presented in due course of business; the warrants
and checks so paid tOt be scheduled daily, charged ui the regular
transcripts of the general account as a transfer of funds, and forwarded to the Treasurer of the United States. I t made necessary
a more extended use of national banks as Government depositaries,
and required an adjustment of the balances then in such depositaries
with a view of making a broader distribution of the pubhc funds.
At the end of January, immediately preceding the beginning of
operations under the new system of accounting, the balance in banks
to the credit of the general fund was $33,426,832.85, and to the
credit of disbursing officers $13,154,055.74.
Complying with the instructions given for operations under the
new system of accounting, large amounts standing to the credit of
disbursing officers on the books of depositary banks were transferred
to like credit with the Treasurer of the United States through the
medium of the general account, and as a result the balance in banks
to the credit of the general fund became $44,423,609.19 by the close
of February, while the amount standing to the credit of disbursing
officers (principaUy court funds and postmasters' balances) was
reduced to $4,644,873.51, making a total holding of $49,068,482.70.
As the warrants and checks issued on Government account drift to
commercial centers, the depositary banks thereia were called upon
to make payment of these obligations in greater amount than had
formerly been the practice; consequently there was necessity for
some increase of balances in the depositary banks located in such
centers, and the amounts requhed for the purpose were withdrawn
from dep'ositary banks ia localities where the funds were not required
for such disbui'sements. The adjustment of balances in banks to
meet the changed conditions was continued during the months of
March and April without increasing the public deposits therein to
any great extent.
On April 30, 1913, the Secretary of the Treasury gave notice that
on and after June 1, 1913, all depositary banks would be requhed to
pay interest at the rate of 2 per cent per annum on the average
monthly amount of public funds held by them, such interest to be
paid semiannally January 1 and July 1 of each year. The depositary
banks were requested to advise the department at once whether they
desired to contiaue as depositaries under this new regulation as to the
payment of interest, and if they wished to retain the full amount now
on deposit or only a portion of the public funds which they are
authorized to hold. Less than a dozen of the 1,500 depositaries
declined to retain the deposits and pay interest thereon, and a few
others requested that the public moneys therein be reduced.
The Secretary also stated that, under section 5153 of the Revised
Statutes, national banks which have been or may be designated as




212

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Government depositaries, instead of placing with the Treasurer as
security for deposits as heretofore bonds exclusively of the United
States or of the provincial Govermnents for the full amount of their
deposits, wUl hereafter be allowed to secure 70 per cent of such
deposits with Government bonds of the above classes and the remaining 30 per cent at the election of the depositary bank, either with similar Government bonds at par or with high-class State, city, and
county bonds, acceptable to the Secretary of the Treasury, to be
taken as security at 75 per cent of their market value, but not to
exceed par.
With the banks paying interest on Government deposits the Secretary is justffied in keeping larger balances in the national banks,
thereby increasing the volume of money in circulation, and to that
extent reducing the amount locked up in the Treasury. The free
balance in the general fund at this time being in excess of the immediate requirements of the department the Secretary has authorized
the transfer from the Treasury to national bank depositaries in diffeivent sections of the country of $10,000,000.
To offset the drain upon the money in circulation in the District of ^
Columbia due to the collection of taxes in the month of May and the
depo^sit of the money in the Treasury of the United States, the Secretary of the Treasury on May 6 directed that the public deposits in the
national banks of the District of Columbia be increased by $4,000,000,
the transfers to be made in four equal installments on May 15, 26,
June 5 and 16, and to be divided among the several banks ia proportion to the total deposits therein, and to be secured by bonds deposited with the Treasurer of the United States. Of the amount so
placed, the depositary banks were required to return to the Treasury
20 per cent on or before July 15, 1913, 20 per cent on or before August
15, 1913, 10 per cent on or before September 15, 1913, and a like sum
on or before the 15th of each succeediag month, making the final payment on or before February 14, 1914. The department reserved the
right to demand an earlier return of the money deposited if for any
reason it should be deemed advisable. Interest at the rate of 2 per
cent per annum is required on this deposit.
At the end of May, 1913, the balance in banks to the credit of the
general fund was $46,825,967.40 and to the credit of disbursing
officers $5,488,284.91, making a total of $52,314,252.31.
The greater part of the corporation tax is paid in June (the last
month of the fiscal year); therefore the income and outgo of public
moneys through the depositary banks is greater in this month than
in other months of the year. The collectors of internal revenue
rieceived payments of this tax until a late hour on the last day of the
fiscal year and as a result the collections were deposited in banks,
in many instances, after bankiag hours, and transfers thereof to
Treasury offices could not be eff'ected until the succeediag bushiess
day.
At the close of the fiscal year on June 30, 1913, the balance m
banks to the credit of the general fund was $69,746,133.15, and to the
credit of disbursiag officers $6,517,481.91, makiag a total of
$76,263,615.06.




TREASURER.

213

GENERAL ACCOUNT OF THE TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES.

The lYeasurer receives and keeps the moneys of the United States
and disburses the same upon warrants drawn by the Secretary of the
Treasury, countersigned by the Comptroller of the Treasury, and
not otherwise. He takes receipts for all moneys paid by him and
gives receipts for aU moneys received by him; and aU receipts for
moneys received by him are indorsed upon warrants signed by the
Secretary of the Treasury, without which warrant, so signed, no
acknowledgment for money received into the Public Treasury is
valid. He renders his accounts quarterly, or oftener if requhed,
and at all times submits to the Secretary of the Treasury and the
Comptroller of the Treasury, or either of them, the inspection of the
moneys in his hands.
As a matter of information, it may be said that all public moneys
paid into any subtreasury office, national bank depositary, or other
depositary, are placed to the credit of the Treasurer of the United
States and held subject to his draft. The public moneys in the hands
of any depositary of public moneys may be transf erred to the Treasury
of the United States or may be transferred from one depositary to any
other depositary, as the safety of the public moneys and the convenience of the public service shall require.
The public moneys in any subtreasury, mint, or other depositary
are subject to special exammation and count whenever it is deemed
advisable by the Secretary of the Treasury. Such examinations of
the moneys in the subtreasuries are frequently made by committees
representing the Secretary and the Treasurer. Annual examiaations
of the public moneys in mints are made by committees selected by
the Director of the Mint, but as these moneys are a part of the general
account it is suggested that the Treasurer of the United States
should have a representative on aU such committees.
Under the operations of department circular No. 5, an immense
volume of accounting was transferred to the office of the Treasurer,
requiring a large addition to the clerical force for the performance of
the duties. All credits to disbursiag officers are now placed on the
books of the Treasurer, and such disbursiag officers conduct theh
bushiess with the Treasurer of the United States only. There are
about 4,000 accounts with balances, of which more than 1,900 are
very active. The checks handled daily on these accounts number
approximately 30,000, and the regulations requhe monthly statements of transactions in each account to be rendered to the respective disbursing officers.
MONETARY STOCK.

The figures annexed give the data for a comparison of the monetary
stock of the country at the close of June, 1912 and 1913. The gold
coin and bulhon show an increase in the fiscal year 1913 of $52,573,418.
The silver coins advanced in volume by $4,872,034. United States
notes remained under the law unchanged. Treasury notes fell off
$269,000. National-bank notes received an increment of $14,022,914.
The net increase during the fiscal year was $71,199,366.




214

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Monetary stock.
[This statement represents the monetary stock of the United States, as shown by the revised statements
for June 30,1912 and 1913.]
In Treasury
and mints.

Kinds.

I n circulation.

T o t a l stock.

"jUN.E 30, 1912.
(rold coin a n d bullion
Silver dollars
S u b s i d i a r y silver

. , . , , . .

$610,724,153
70,339,574
145,034,198

$1,818,188,417
565,349,020
170,588,205

1,728,027,717

826,097,925

2,554,125,642

8,983,695
13, 430
39,992,733

Total m e t a l l i c . . . .
United States notes
T r e a s u r y n o t e s of 1890
National-bank notes

$1,207,464,264
495,009, 446
25,554,007

337,697,321
2,915, 570
705,142,259

346,681.016
2,929,000
745,134,992

48,989,858

Gold certificates
Silver certificates

1,045, 755,150

1,094,745.008

1, 777,017,575

1,871,853,075

3,648,870,650

96,621,751
12,324,600

Total notes
Aggregate metallic a n d notes

943,435, 618
469,224, 400

108,946,351

T o t a l certificates

1,412, 660,018
3,284,513,093

3,648,870,650

1,262,361,036
493,486,070
20, 737,926

608,400, 799
72,127,193
154,458,070

1,870,761,835
565,613,263
175,195,996

1,776,585,032

834,986,062

2,611,571,094'

9,465,836
3,330
43,403,670

337,215,180
2,656, 670
715,754,236

346,681,016
2,660,000
759,157,906

Aggregate =
.
J U N E 30, 1013.

Gold coin a n d bullion
Silver dollars
S u b s i d i a r y silver
T o t a l metallic
United States notes
T r e a s u r y n o t e s of 1890
National-banknotes

52,872,836

Gold certificates
Silver certificates

1,055,626,086

1,108,498,922

1,829,457,868

1,890,612,148

3,720,070,016

82,949,460
14,421, 408

Total notes
Aggregate metallic a n d n o t e s . .

1,003,997,709
469,128,592

97,370,868

T o t a l certificates

1,473,126,301
3,363,738,449

Aggregate .

3,720,070,016

RATIO O F G O L D TO T H E T O T A L STOCK OF M O N E Y .

The annual growth in the volume of gold as compared with the
total stock of money since July 1, 1906, may be observed in the table
following:
Ratio of gold to total stock of money from July 1, 1906.
[From the revised statements of the Treasury Department.]
Dates.
July
July
July
July
July
July
July
July

1,1906.
1,1907.
1,1908.
1,1909
1,1910
1,1911
1,1912
1,1913




Total stock of
money.

Gold.

$3,069,976,591 $1,475, 706, 765
3, M 5 , 728,887 1,466,389,101
1,618,133,492
3,378,764,020
3,406, 328,354 1,642,041,999
3,419, 591,483 1,636,043,478
3,555, 958,977 1,753,196,722
1,818,188,417
3,648,870,650
1,870,761,835
3,720,070,016

Percent.
48.07
47.06
47.89
48.20
47.85
49.30
49.82
50.28

215

TREASURER.
MONEY IN CIRCULATION.

The money in circulation has again broken the record of previous
years and attained a maxunum at $3,363,738,449 on June 30, 1913.
The increase during the last fiscal year was $79,225,356, of which
$58,238,737 was ia gold coin and gold certfficates. The circulation
per capita was $34.56.
I t will be observed that the volume of national-bank notes in circulation took on a growth of $10,611,977 as compared with that of
12 months earlier. I t has been asserted by financial students that
this increase in bank notes at a time of low-money rates would iaevitably have a tendency to produce exports of gold. If such results be
expected, it will be of interest to learn what proportion of the total
chculation the national-banlc notes represent as compared with thegold, sUver, and United States notes." This is shown in the statement
f ollowme::
July 1—
1906

1911

1913

Per cent. Per cent. Per cent. Per cent.
43.3045.53
47.28
47.93
24.13
21.96
20.67
20.68
1 12.54
10.65
11.08
10.11
20.03
21.43
21.40
21.28

Gold coin and certificates
Silver coin and certificates
United States notes.. .
Treasury notes of 1890
National-bank notes
Total...

1909

. . .

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

The most noticeable movement shown by this comparison is the
great increase in the gold chculation.
The kinds of money in circulation, the circulation per capita, and
the percentage of gold coin and certfficates to the total chculation
may be studied from the subjoined table:
Money in circulation at the end of each fiscal year from 1906.
Money in circulation.
•

Fiscal years.

1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912..
1913

United
Gold com
states notes Nationaland gold cer- ,and Treasury bank notes.
tificates.
notes.

Silver coin
and silver,
certificates.

Total.

$1,185,216,924 $343,277,540 $548,001,238 $660,150,926 $2,736,646,628
1,161,765,670 348,245,590 589,242,125 673,699,070 2,772,956,455
1,396,221,429 344,359,852 631,648,680 665,785,527 3,038,015,488
1,414,343,147 344,321,682 665,538,806 682,037,022 3,106,240,657
1,393,632,192 338,450,395 683,659,535 686,613,483 3,102,355,605
1,519,663,467 342,226,378 687,701, £83 664,411,468 3,214,002,596
1,554,159,771 340,612,891 705,142,250 684,598,172 3,284,513,093
1,612,398,508 339,871,850
715,754,236 695,713,855 3,363,738,449




Percentage of
Circu- gold coin
lation and certificates
per
capita. to total
circulation.
32.32
32.22
34.72
34.93
34.33
34.20
34.34
34.56

43.30
41.90
45.95
45.53
44.91
47.28
47.31
47.93

216

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
CIRCULATION AND POPULATION.

The population of the United States, it is estimated, has increased
over 12,000,000 since July 1, 1906, and the money in chculation for
the same period has taken on a growth of more than $630,000,000.
The per capita chculation grew in the meantime from $32.32 to
$34.56. I t IS apparent from the mcreasing growth in the amount of
money in chculation that it is equal to if not in excess of the legitimate
demand therefor. The .extension of habitation into remote districts,
multiplication of lines of traffic, and the development of industrial
activities are some of the requhements that must be provided for by
an annual iacrease of money in chculation.
Statistics relative to the money in chculation and the population,
by years, may be studied in the annexed table:
Increase in population and in circulation per capita.

F i s c a l years.

1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

-.-

Money i a
circulation.

$2,736,646,628
2,772,956,455
3,038,015,488
3,106,240,657
3,102, 355,605
3,214,002,596
3,284,513,093
3,363,738,449

Population.

Circulation
per c a p i t a .

P e r c e n t of
increase
of p o p u l a tion per
year.

84,662,000
86,074,000
87,496,000
88,926,000
90,363,000
93,983,000
95,656,000
97,337,000

32.32
32.22
34.72
34.93
34.33
34.20
34.34
34.56

P e r c e n t of
increase
of circulation per
c a p i t a per
year.

1.7
1.7
1.6
L6
1.6
4.0
1.7
1.1

3.9
1 .3
7.8
6
1 1.7
1 .3
.4
.6

1 Decrease.
CONDITION OF THE UNITED STATES PAPER CURRENCY.

Thei total stock of paper currency in the United States amounted
to $2,678,776,091 at the close of the last fiscal year, of which the
National Government issued $1,919,618,185, or 71.7 per cent, and
the national banks $759,157,906, or 28.3 per cent. The pieces outstandiag of the denominations of $5 and under number 327,008,021,
of which the Government issued 297,831,944, or 90 per cent, and the
national banks 29,176,077, or 9.9 per cent.
During the fiscal year 1913 the Government issued 318,264,407
pieces of paper currency of the total value of $1,035,462,000, while
291,131,640 pieces of worn and unfit paper money of the total value
of $987,060,200 were redeemed and retned.
National banks are precluded from issuing^ $1 and *$2 notes, and
the issue of $5 notes is limited to one-thhd in amount of the total
circulation of the banks. Experience shows that a large number of
the banks are reluctant to issue $5 notes. If the option of one-thhd
in $5 bills had been taken by all national banks the normal supply
of such bank bills on June 30, 1913, would have been $253,052,635
instead of tlie amount reported, viz, $143,751,670.
National-bank notes are not available for ^^reserves,'' and for this
reason large amounts of such circulation are returned to the Treasury
by the banks for redemption in order to replenish their^^reserves.^'
The expense of transportation to the Treasury in such cases is borne




TREASURER.

217

by the bank of issue, while the return of the proceeds is at the expense
of the owner of the notes. The owners oi Government paper currency sent to the Treasury for redemption have to pay the transportation charges both ways, and the payment of these charges under
contract rates gives rise to a burden that does not bear equally upon
the banks and other business interests in the different sections of
the country, as for instance, the contract rates from Chicago, St.
Louis, and Boston to Washington are 20 cents per $1,000, while such
rates from Savannah, Charleston, Richmond, and other southern
cities to Washington are 60 cents per $1,000.
I t would be a wise and popular measure for the Government to
bear the expense of transporting its unfit currency to the Treasury
for redemption; and it can well afford to do this, for by the use of
the registered mail, with the insurance feature attached, it would
give equal opportunities to the people of all sections and reduce the
expense. Bankiag institutions in all parts of the country are resorting to this method of transportation with satisfactory results. There
can be no objection to the same use of the registered mail by the
Government.
I t is apparent that there is necessity for legislation that will equalize the expense of redemption between the different sections of the
country. This may be accomplished through a more extended use
of the registered mail, and in this connection the Treasurer renews
the suggestion of his predecessor that recommendation be made to
Congress for legislation that will remove the Ihnit on the weight of a
package which may be sent through the registered mail of the United
States and that will authorize the transportation of moneys to and
from the Treasury or between Treasury offices by registered mail,
insured.
Laundering machiaes for cleaniog United States paper money
received for redemption, and rendering such currency fit for further circulation, have been installed in the Treasury at Washiagton and the
subtreasuries at New York, Boston, PhUadelphia, and Chicago. In
planniag work for these machines it was anticipated t h a t the subtreasuries at Baltimore, St. Louis, Cinciimati, and NewOrleans would
furnish from 15,000 to 20,000 notes each daily, but actual results
demonstrated the fact that these offices could supply only an average
of about 4,000 notes each per day. In the Treasury at Washington
there was lack of employees to properly handle this work, so t h a t the
roduct of the machines has been confined to such material as could
e readily furnished, being silver certfficates of the denominations
of $1, $2, and $5, and approximately 150,000 notes are now cleaned
daUy at the Treasury and the subtreasuries. I t is expected that the
number of pieces will be increased to at least 200,000 in a short time.
I t is not contended that the washed notes are equal to or will give
as much service as new notes, but it is believed t h a t the life of usefulness of the laundered notes will be prolonged at a very small expense.

E

UNITED STATES NOTES.

The principal issue of United States paper money is officiaUy caUed
United States notes. These are the well-known '^greenbacks'' or
'4egal tenders,'/ the first issue of which was authorized by the act of
February 25, 1862. The total amount authorized was $450,000,000,



218

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

and the highest amount outstanding at any time was $449,338,902,
on January 30, 1864.
Under the operations of enactments by Congress authoriziag the
canceling and rethiag of these notes as they were received in the
Treasury, the amount outstandiag had been reduced more than
$100,000,000 when the process was finally stopped by the act of May
31, 1878, which required the notes to be reissued when redeemed.
At that time the amount outstanding was $346,681,016 and it has
not been changed since.
The United States notes issued and redeemed during the last fiscal
year were $163,000,000, an amount that has not been exceeded in any
year smce the close of the War of the Eebellion. The demand for
small denomhiations of currency is at all times urgent. The growth
in the volume of United States notes of the denomhiation of $5 outstanding is the result of the efforts made by the department to supply
the demand through the process of redemption and reissue—that is
to say, by substituting the smaUer denomination for the higher,
denominations redeemed and retired.
The amounts issued and redeemed by denominations during the
fiscal year 1913 are recorded in ttie annexed table:
Fiscal year 1913.
Outstanding
June 30,1912.

Denominations.

One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars.
.
Ten dollars....
Twenty dollars
Fifty doUars
One hundred doUars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand doUars
Five thousand doUars
Ten thousand doUars
Total
Unknown, destroyed
Net '.

.

.
.

•

.

...
.

. . .

Issued.

$1,830,994
1,374,959
169,049,930 $135,520,000
27,480,000
114,137,926
12,192,432
1,841,375
4,696,400
4,470,000
38,077,000

Redeemed.

Outstanding
June 30,1913

$4,012
3,918
109,762,350
45,680,430
2,127,540
154,150
488,600
435,000
4,344,000

$1,826,982
1,371,041
194,807,580
95,937,496
10,064,892
1,687,225
4,207,800
4,035,000
33,733,000

10,000

10,000

347,681,016
1,000,000

163,000,000

163,000,000

347,681,016
1,000,000

346,681,016

163,000,000

163,000,000

346,681,016

TREASURY NOTES OF 1890.

The Treasury notes of 1890 are slowly disappearing under the provisions of the-act of March 14, 1900. The total amount of these notes •
issued for the purchase of silver bulhon to November 1, 1893, the date
of the repeal of the act, was $155,931,002. The amount redeemed
and retired during the fiscal year 1913 was $269,000, and the amount
outstanding at the close of the year was $2,660,000, against which
standard silver dollars in equal amount are held in the trust funds for
their redemption when presented.
. The amount outstanding, by denominations, on June 30 for the
past seven years is stated in Table No. 21, page 264.
GOLD CERTIFICATES.

The gold certfficates continue to advance in volumeyear by year and
to add strength to our circulation. There is no Umit to the volume
that may be issued for gold coin and bullion presented at the Treasury offices. The amount outstanding at the close of the last fiscal



219

TREASURER.

year was $1,086,727,169, an increase of $46,669,800 as compared with
that of the previous year. The denominations of these certificates
are restricted to $10 and above, but as the department is liinited in
its resources for the issue of currency of small denominations it becomes more apparent each year that a $5 gold certfficate is an absolute necessity. Large amounts of gold certificates are returned to
the Treasury daily for redemption usually accompanied with a request for the return of a part of the proceeds in denominations of $5.
If the departraent were clothed with authority to issue a $5 gold certificate, it would be in condition to respond to all demands for denominations of $5 and under.
The gold certificates issued and redeemed, by denominations, during
the fiscal year 1913 are stated in the table following J*
Fiscal year 1913.
Denominations.

Outstanding
June 30,1912.

Outstanding
June 30,1913.

Issued.

Total

$226,435,300
256,496,964
65,053,055
80,127,550
18,239,000
66,765,500
95,020,000
241,920,000

$179,360,000
103,680,000
19,400,000
24,400,000
4,100,000
10,500,000
10,000,000
117,070,000

$117,389,190
82,625,760
15,727,800
20,377,950
4,039,500
12,320,000
28,290,000
141,070,000

$288,406,110
277,551,204
58,725,255
84,149,600
18,299,500
. 64,945,500
76,730,000
217,920,000

1,040,057,369

Ten dollars
Twenty dollars...
Fifty dollars
One hundred doUars..
Five hundred dollars..
One thousand dollars.
Five thousand dollars,
Ten thousand dollars..

Redeemed.

468,510,000

421,840,200

1,086,727,169

SILVER CERTIFICATES.

The volume of silver certificates outstanding increased during the
fiscal year from $481,549,000 to $483,550,000, and this growth was
in denominations of $1, $2, and. $5.
The resources of the department for the issue of silver certificates
of the smaUer denominations, which are in great demand, is limited
to the free silver dollars in the Treasury, however this resource is
augmented through the process of redemption and reissue. The
silver certfficates of the denominations of $10 and above as they are
redeemed are reissued in denominations of $5 and under.
The transactions in silver certificates, by denominations, during
the last fiscal year are shown in the following table:
Fiscal year 1913.
Denominations.

Outstanding
Jime 30,1912.

Outstanding
June 30,1913.
Issued.

OnedoUar
Two doUars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty doUars
Fifty doUars
One himdred dollars.
Five hundred doUai's.
One thousand dollars.
Total




Redeemed.

$161,327,436
62,854,116
227,178,187
20,757,611
4,488,670
4,417,760
480,220
22,000
23,000

$204,048,000
68,664,000
131,240,000

$186,520,307
65,358,493
139,353,110
8,952,340
683,700
1,023,550
57,500

481,549,000

403,952,000

1,000

$178,855,129
66,159,623
219,065,077
11,805,271
3,804,970
3,394,210
422,720
21,000
22,000

401,951,000

483,550,000

;,ooo

220

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
CHANGES IN DENOMINATIONS.

Experience in all recent years makes clear that the supply of small
notes is hardly equal to the demand. No rule can be set up by
theory of the proper ratio of the several denominations to each other.
The needs of business must be recognized and obeyed. Those needs
make constant demand for small bills as instruments of local trade.
The burden of supplying the smaller denominations required falls
upon the Treasury, and it has employed all its resources to respond
to the conditions. Through the process of redeeming the larger
denomhiations of United States currency and issuing smaller denominations in lieu thereof the Treasury has been enabled to supply
the greater part £>i the demand for such bills.
The total amount of United States paper currency of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding at the close of the
fiscal year 1913 is recorded in the annexed statement:
Fiscal year 1913.
Denominations.

Outstanding
June 30,1912.

Issued.

Redeemed.

Outstanding
June 30,1913.

One doUar
Two dollars
Five doUars
Ten doUars
Twenty doUars
Fiftv doUars
One hundred dollars.
Five hundred dollars
One thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars

$163,532,036
64,470,819
. 396,916,277
362,229,307
273,613,036
61,326,740
85,470,670
22,731,000
104,976,500
95,020,000
241,930,000

$204,048,000
68,664,000
266,760,000
206,840,000
103,680,000
19,400,000
24,400,000
4,100,000
10,500,000
10,000,000
117,070,000

$186,531,964
65,368,956
249,171,570
172,133,010
85,492,600
16,906,550
20,943,050
4,475,500
16,677,000
28,290,000
141,070,000

$181,048,072
67,765,863
414,504,707
396,936,297
291,800,436
63,820,190
88,927,620
22,355,500
98,799,500
76,730,000
217,930,000

Total
Unknown, destroj'^ed

1,872,216,385
1,000,000

1,035,462,000

987,060,200

1,920,618,185
1,000,000

1,871,216,385

1,035,462,000

987,060,200

1,919,618,185

Net

PIECES OF UNITED STATES PAPER CURRENCY OUTSTANDING.

The demand for small denominations of paper currency, which is
supphed through the process of redeeming the larger denominations
and issuing smaUer denominations in lieu thereof, causes a steady
increase in the number of pieces of United States paper currency
outstanding. This increase may be observed from a comparative
monthly statement thereof for the fiscal years 1912 and 1913, as follows:
Fiscal year 1912, outstanding. Fiscal year 1913, outstanding.

Months.

July
August
September
October...
November,
December.
January...
February.
March
April
May
June




Number of
pieces.

Total value.

311,953,862 $1,809, 902,685
313,376,715
1,811, 631,685
315,080,350
1,816, 968,6&5
320,864,851
1,832, 162,685
1,843, 824,685
325,081,763
327,702 331 1,850, 896,385
1,870, 944,385
328,978,951
1,854, 363,385
322.490.473

323.892.474
325,096,917
325,967,213
327,329,159

1,866, 286,385
1,871, 146,385
1,868, 756,386
1,872, 216,385

Number of
pieces.

Total value.

331,009,946
336,404,037
343,583,145
342,643,988
346,471,441
351,425,617
347,504,385
343,821,000
347,337,622
349,741,218
353,155,771
354,461,922

$1,875, 485,285
1,893, 203,285
1,912, 097,185
1,895, 800,185
1,908, 418,185
1,925, — ,185
1,915, 014,185
l,90i; 945,185
1,— 839,185
1,906; 185,185
1,912, 843,185
1,920, 618,185

TREASURER.

221

PAPER CURRENCY, BY DENOMINATIONS, OUTSTANDING JUNE 30, 1913.

The amount of each kind of paper currency outstanding, by denominations, may be studied in the monthly statement for June, 1913:
Denomination.

United States Treasury National-bank
notes of
notes.
notes.
1890.

Gold certificates.

Silver certificates.

Total.

One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty aollars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dol" lars
Fractional parts

$1,826,982
1,371,041
194,807,580
95,937,496
10,064,892
1,687,225

$365,961
235,199
632,050
787,420
379,370
13,500

$343,587
164,312
143,751,670
331,208,900
230,391,800
19,587,900

4,207,800

147,500

34,855,550

84,149,600

422,720

123,783,170

89,000

18,299,500

21,000

22,444,500

23,000

64,945,500

22,000

98,822,500

Total
U n k n o w n , destroved

347,681,016

4,035,000
33,733,000

$181,391,65
67,930,175
558,256,377
728,145,197
622,192,236
83,408,090

76,730,000
10,000

52,007
2,660,000

760,467,726

76,730,000

217,920,000

217,930,000
52,007

1,086,727,169

483,550,000

2,681,085,911

1,086,727,169

483,550,000

2,678,776,091

11,309,820

1,000,000
346,681,016

Net

99,000

$178,855,129
66,159,623
219,065,077
$288,406,110 11,805,271
277,551,204
3,804,970
58,725,255
3,394,210

2,660,000

' 759,157,906

2,309,820

1 Redeemed but not assorted by denominations.
RATIO OF SMALL D E N O M I N A T I O N S TO ALL P A P E R

CURRENCY.

The ratio of denomhiations of $10 and less to the total paper currency, by fiscal years since 1906, is recorded in the statement
following:
Denominations of $10 and less.
Dates.

July 1,1906.
:iuly 1,1907.
July 1,1908..
July 1,1909.
July 1,1910.
July 1,1911.
July 1,1912..
J u l y l , 1913.

Total paper
currency.

$1,953, 712,245
2,111,659,575
2,345, 130,802
2,375, 261,959
2,419, 600,310
2,538, 656,263
2,619,224,099
2,681,085,911

One
doUar.

Two
dollars.

Five
doUars.

Ten
doUars.

Total.

Per cent. Per cent. Per cent. Per cent. Per ct.
19.67
2.51
27.43
54.93
5.31
19.48
2.69
25.84
53.26
5.24
20.79
2.46
26.00
54.19
4.92
19.84
2.44
25.77
53.40
5.33
20.62
2.54
26.53
55.62
5.93
20.39
2.45
26.28
55.16
6.02
20.55
2.46
26.33
55. 65
6.25
20.82
2.53
27.15
57.28
6.76

COST OF PAPER CURRENCY.

The paper currency issued by the United States is said to be
superior to that of any other nation in the world. The quality of the
material used and the artistic work of the engraver give us a product
that presents almost insurmountable obstacles to those who would
profit by false imitations. Inquiries often reach the department
relating to the production and the cost of the paper currency.
As a matter of information it may be stated that the paper used is
made by a secret process under Treasury supervision by annual con-




222

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

tract under competitive bids. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing/ a branch of the department, designs, under the direction of the
Secretary, engraves, and prints the notes and certificates complete.
This currency is delivered to the Treasurer in packages of 4,000 notes,
the product of 1,000 sheets of paper. Such a package is taken as the
unit from which to reckon the cost.
With the allowance for every item of expense attending the making,
the issue, and the redemption of this paper currency, it appears that
the average cost is as foUows:
Total average expense of 4,000 notes issued
Total average expense of 4,000 notes redeemed

152. 50
8. 54

Aggregate average expense of issue and redemption

61. 04

From the foregoing it may be readily ascertained that the average
cost for each note is 1.526 cents. Calculations based upon these
average expenses of issue and redemption indicate results that will
be very close to the actual cost of maintenance of the paper currency,
and such cost for the fiscal years 1912 and 1913 may be studied from
the details set forth in the annexed table:
Total expenses of issue and redemption.
Number of
pieces.

Fiscal years.

Issued
Redeemed. . •

1912..

..

...

Total

'.

Cost per
1,000
pieces.

Total cost.

290,809,347
273,426,336

$13.125
2.135

$3,816,872.68
583,765. 23

. . .
1913.

Issued
Redeemed

4,400, 637 91
318,264,407
291,131,640

13.125
2.135

Total.

4,477,220.34
621,566.05
4,798,786.39

United States pap)er currency outstanding and cost of maintenance.
Cost of maintenance.
fiscal years.

1912
1913

Amount outstanding.

$1,871,216,385
1,919,618,185

Amount.
$4,400,637.91
4,798,786.39

Per cent.
0.235
.249

I n this connection attention is invited to the saving of abrasion
on the gold and sUver coins held in the Treasury against outstanding
certificates and notes, which to all intents and purposes is an oft'setting item against the cost of the paper currency issued dhectly by the
Government, though not so treated in the foregoing calculations. >
AVERAGE LIFE OF PAPER CURRENCY.

The large amounts of the various kinds of currency presented for
redemption, and its condition, lead to the conclusion that the service of
our paper money is materially shortened by the increasing activities
of such currency in the channels of trade. This is especially noticeable in the smaUer denominations, $5 and under.




223

TREASURER.

The average lifetime of each note, in years by kinds, may be
studied in the subjoined statement:
United
States
notes.

Denominations.

Treasury
notes.

OnedoUar.
. .
...
T w o dollars
:
F i v e dollars
Ten dollars..
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
.
.
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars.
F i v e thousand dollars. . .
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars

3.12
3.23
2.93
3.63
5.94
6.15
6.12
3.80
4.18
.32
.16

1.74
1.87
2.96
3.72
4.00
3.72
3.63

All d e n o m i n a t i o n s

3.32

Gold
certificates.

2.20

.o
1.66
3.13
3.46
3.55
3.44
3.31
1.93
1.63

1.91

2.36

Silver
certificates.

Nationalbank
notes.

1.06
1.23
1.88
3.39
4.00
3.12
2.78
1.88
1.41

4.42
4.51
2.80
2.62
3.01
3.97
3.84
5.09
3.32

1.31

2.85

PAPER CURRENCY PREPARED FOR ISSUE AND AMOUNT ISSUED.

The growth in business activities, and the tendency toward the use
of small denominations are gradually increasing the pieces of United
States paper currency in circulation, which numbered 354,461,922
on June 30, 1913, of the total value of $1,920,618,185. The Government issues the greater part of the paper currency required; therefore
it is incumbent upon the Treasury to maintain this great number of
pieces and to provide for the annual growth of the smaller denomhiations so much in demand in the channels of trade. Experience and
forethought prompt the preparation of an adequate volume of paper
currency of the kinds and denominations authorized by law in
advance of putting same into chculation. The reserve vault should
be well stocked with such paper, and it should be retained there untU
it is thoroughly seasoned before it is issued. Heretofore but little
progress has been made in accumulating a sufficient reserve of such
bUls, but it is believed that with the improved facUities now in
operation the output in future wUl be ample for this purpose.
The number of pieces and amount of paper currency prepared for
issue and the amount issued since 1906 are recorded in the table
here:
P r e p a r e d for issue.
Fiscal years.

1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

P a p e r c u r r e n c y issued.

N u m b e r of
notes and
certificates.

Total value.

Average
value.

157,425,000
178,180,000
197,012,000
206,898,000
235,210,400
268,450,000
301,302,000
307,188,000

$602,172,000
679,480,000
858,944,000
637,320,000
809,579,600
957,744,000
990,096,000
903,716,000

$3,825
3.813
4.359
3.080
3.441
3.567
3.286
2.941




N u m b e r of
notes a n d
certificates.

TotaWalue.

172,930,548 $629,826,000
173,093.911
698,273,000
188,999,912
804,326,000
202,746,192
764,510,000
240,990,922
767,115,600
267,207,921
913,540,000
290,809,347
916,852,000
318,264,407 1,035,462,000

Average
value.

$3.642
4.034
4.255
3.770
3.183
3.418
3.152
3.253

224

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
United States paper currency issued during thefiscal years 1912 and 1913.
Fiscal year 1912.

N u m b e r of
notes a n d
certificates.

•-...

. . . .

. . . .
. . . .

Total

Total value.

Average
v a l u e of
notes
a n d certificates.

24,359,190
23,717,538
22,909,048
25,812,850
• 24,369,960
24,397,983
24,773,893
20,986,685
24,305,304
25,460,161
24,682,372
25,034,363

$74,750,000
75,400,000
73,250,000
79,530,000
70,984,000
74,110,000
96,390,000
62,970,000
81,152,000
77,518,000
73,304,000
77,494,000

$3,068
3.179
3.197
3.081
2.912
3.037
3.890
3.000
3.338
3.044
2.969
3.095

290,809,347

Months.

July...
August
September
October.
November
December. •
January
February..
March
April....
May
June

Fiscal year 1913.

916,852,000

3.152

8.8

0.4

P e r c e n t of increase over
nrecedincr v e a r .

SUPPLY OF UNITED

STATES PAPER

Average
value of
notes
a n d certificates.

N u m b e r of
notes a n d
certificates.

Total value.

• 24,502,669
26,002,122
26,877.306
29,328,778
24,284,613
27,854,516
28,144,055
23,538,549
26,781,873
26,197,840
27,768,548
26,983,538

$74,774,000
85,066,000
81,360,000
92,080,000
79,430,000
96,652,000
94,870,000
74,022,000
80,878,000
87,958,000
96,772,000
91,600,000

S3.051
3.271
3.027
3.139
3.270
3.469
3.370
3.144
3.020
3.357
3.484
3.394

318,264,407 1,035,462,000

3.253

9.4

CURRENCY

12.9

HELD IN

IRESERVE.

For the past two or three years practically othe whole output of
small denominations was required for issue; consequently but little
progress was.made in storing up an adequate supply of notes and
certificates fitted for good service.
A comparison by number of pieces of each denomination and total
value of the United States paper currency held in the reserve vault
at the close of the fiscal years 1912 and 1913 may be observed in the
following statement:
Held June 30, 1912.
Denominations.

One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty doUars
One hundred dollars..
Five hundred dollars..
One thousand dollars.
Five thousand dollars.
Ten thousand dollars.
Order gold certificates.
Total

Held June 30, 1913.

Number
of pieces.

Total value.

Number
of pieces.

12,188,000
5,716,000
5,776,000
7,376,000
2,968,000
740,000
140,000
35,700
31,800
2,000
5,600
8,837

$12,188,000
11,432,000
28,880,000
73,760,000
59,360,000
37,000,000
14,000,000
17,850,000
31,800,000
10,000,000
56,000,000
88,370,000

7,492,000
3,076,000
5,060,000
5,492,000
2,284,000
352,000
94,000
27,500
21,300
4,000
4,000
4,730

$7,492,000
6,152,000
25,300,000
54,920,000
45,680,000
17,600,000
9,400,000
13,750,000
21,300,000
20,000,000
40,000,000
47,300,000

34,987,937

440,640,000

23,911,530

308,894,000

Total value.

REDEMPTIONS OF PAPER CURRENCY.

The redemptions of currency have steadily increased and are now
nearly equal to the issues. There were 291,131,640 pieces of United
States paper currency redeemed during the last fiscal year, an increase
of 17,705,304 pieces, or 6.47 per cent, over those of the preceding 12
months. The pieces redeemed were 322,293 greater than those
issued in 1912.




225

TREASURER.

The transactions, by months, for the past two fiscal years are
recorded in the table followiag:
United States paper currency redeemed during thefiscal years 1912 and 1913:
Fiscal year 1912.
Months.

July
August
September
October
November
December
January
February.
March
AprU
May
June..

Number of
notes and
certificates.

Average
value of Number of
notes and notes and
Total value.
certificates.
certificates.

Average
value of
notes and
Total value.
certificates.

22,351,476
22,.294,686
21,205,410
20,028,349
20,152,651
21,777,812
23,497,273
27,475,164
22,903,304
24,255,717
23,812,075
23,672,419

$74,144,000
73,671;000
67,913,000
64,336,000
59,322,000
67,038,300
76,342,000
79,551,000
69,229,000
72,658,000
75,694,000
74,034,000

$3.317
3.304
3.202
3.212
2.943
3.078
3.248
2.895
3.226
2.995
3.178
3.127

20,821,974
20,607,940
19,698,199
30,267,934
20,4.57,160
22,900,337
32,065,288
27,221,933
23,265,250
23,794,245
24,353,996
25,677,384

$71,505,100
67,348,000
62,466,100
108,377,000
66,812,000
79,371,000
105,555,000
87,091,000
88,984,000
75,612,000
90,114,000
83,825,000

$3.434
3.268
3.171
3.580
3.265
3.465
3.291
3.199
3.824
3.177
3.700
3.264

273,426,336

853,932,300

3.123

291,131,640

987,060,200

3.390

.-.
,

Total

Fiscal year 1913.

Per cent of. increase over
preceding'year

5.7

STANDARD SILVER

6.47

DOLLARS.

The stock of standard sUver dollars at the close of the fiscal year
1913 was $565,613,263, of which $72,127,193 were m chculation, and
$493,486,070 were held ia the Treasury, agaiast which sUver certificates to the amount of $483,550,000 were outstanding. There is
some demand for these sUver dollars, which are shipped to depositors
therefor at the expense of the consignee for transportation charges.
The amount so distributed duriag the last fiscal year was $12,560,078,
an increase of $718,204 as compared with such shipments in 1912.
The shipments, by offices, for the past three fiscal years are set
out ia the statement followhig:
Fiscal year1911

1912

1913

Washington
Baltimore
New York
Philadelphia
Boston
Cincinnati
Chicago
St. Louis
New Orleans
San Francisco
Mint, New Orleans.
Mint, Philadelphia.
Mint, San Francisco

$489,475
146,400
183,125
848,200
349,200
2,381,735
3,458,500
3,457,445
2,082,700
518,800
10,000
134,755
200

$475,045
64,400
151,500
801,250
276,600
2,077,639
2,894,875
2,780,425
1/848,700
289,900

$579,638
122,700
183,125
774,375
267,100
.2,025,625
3,018,900
3,367,275
1,703,500
373,950

181,540

143,890

Total..

14,060,535

11,841,874

12,560,078

16726°—FI 1913-

-15




226

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
SUBSIDIARY SILVER COIN.

The general stock of subsidiary sUver coin hi the United States at
the close of the fiscal year 1913 was $175,195,996, an mcrease of
$4,607,791, as compared with that of 1912. The amount in chculation was $154,458,070, and there were held as assets in t h e Treasury
$20,737,926. The amount of these coins shipped to depositors therefor m 1913 was $22,767,796.80, as agahist like shipments of $21,476,457.40 m 1912, an increase of $1,291,339.40.
The subsidiary silver corns are redeemable ia the lawful money of
the United States, and under the operation of this provision of law
there is usually an accumulation of tnese coias ia the Treasury offices
from January to June, but after this period the seasonable movement
begms and great quantities are distributed, either to depositors therefor by express, at the expense of the consignee for transportation
charges, or are<paid over the counter at subtreasuries in exchange for
other kinds of money.
The amount shipped to depositors therefor, by offices, during the
past three fiscal years is recorded in the subjoined table:
Fiscal year—
Oflices.
1911
Washington
Baltimore
.
New York
Philadelphia
Boston.
Cincinnati
Chicago .
St. Louis
New Orleans
San Francisco
Mint, Denver
Mint, New Orleans.
Mint, Philadelphia
Total

1912

1913

$775,067.60
549,910.00
4,844,259.40
2,334,375.00
1,362,400.00
1,718,591.00
2,950,940.00
2,199,495.00
1,196,300.00
797,545.00
1,505,499.80
1,087,285.00
635,180.00

\

$1,010,360.60
534,605.00
4,009,295.00
2,412,135.00
1,410,380.00
1,808,300.00
2,576,932.00
1,564,450.00
1,384,720.00
755,510.00
1,231,930.80
2,787,839.00

2,619,607.10

21,956,847.80

21,476,457.40

22,767,796.80

$1,183,200.30
581,210.00
3,630,364:80
2,731,885.00
1,379,600.00
1,751,551.00
2,856,696.80
2,029,998.00
1,579,595.00
615,895.00
1,808,193.80

MINOR COIN.

These token coias form no part of the stated stock of money in the
country, but the demand for tnem attest t h e h popularity ia the channels of trade. They are redeemable in the lawful money of the
United States when presented in sums or multiples of $20 to t h e
Treasurer or any Assistant Treasurer.
The net addition made to the outstanding during t h e last fiscal
year was $4,106,794.86, of which $1,056,814.12 was in bronze cents
and $3,050,724.55 in nickel 5-cent pieces, whUe t h e older coins decreased $743.81.
The amount of each denomiaation of minor coia outstanding a t
the close of the fiscal years 1912 and 1913 m a y be studied in the
statement following.




227

TBEASUEEB.
Fiscal year 1913.

Outstanding
June 30, 1913.

Outstanding
June 30, 1912.
Issued.
$1,182,060.03
39,926.11
1,203,758.56
20,106,972.29
.571,759.68
657,837.53
31,424,465.05

Copper cents
Copper half cents...
Copper nickel cents.
Bronze 1-cent pieces.
Bronze 2-cent pieces.
Nickel 3-cent pieces.
Nickel 5-cent pieces.
Total

55,186,779. 25

Remeited.
$59.81

215.00
$1,078,292.60 21,478. 48
. 133.00
336.00
3,162,824. 60 112,100.05
4,241,117.20

134,322.34

$1,182,000.22
39,926.11
1,203,543.56
21,163,786.41
571,626.68
657,501.53
34,475,189.60
59,293,574.11

Minor coins can be obtained from the Treasury and subtreasuries
over the counter in exchange for other kinds of money, or they will
be shipped to depositors therefor at the expense of the consignee for
transportation charges.
The shipments, by offices, for the past three fiscal years are set
out in the annexed statement:.
Fiscal yearOffices.
1913
Washington
Baltimore
^Boston
"Chicago
Cincinnati
New Orleans
NewYork
Philadelphia.
St. Louis
San Francisco
Mint, Philadelphia..
Mint, Sah Francisco.
Mint, Denver

$103,210.80
53,095.00
164,190.00
514,335.00
268,660.05
189,820.00
885, 795.00
341,820.00
333,510.00
90,630. 00
1,250,289.10
10.00

$114, 758.20
55, 600.00
142, 905.00
572, 325.00
267, 141.00
224, 270.00
688, 560.00
336, 325.00
291, 525.00
68, 386.00
2,425, 154.14
134, 210.39
70, 154.19

4,195,364.95

Total.

$123,196.07
54,820.00
160,430.00
411,500.00
272/256.00
209,385.00
725,970. 00
328,375. 00
247,434.00
77,350. 00
1,373,047. 60
7,089. 40
11,851.15
4,002,704.22

5,391,313.92

TRANSFERS OF FUNDS FOR DEPOSITS MADE IN NEW YORK.

. The cooperation of the Treasury is frequently'requested by banking institutions in the transfer of large amounts of money between
subtreasury cities, through the medium of the general account, to
be used in the movement of crops or to meet other demands of
business. These requests are granted when such transfers are not
incompatible with the public interest.
The following table gives the deposits in New York in calendar
years and the resultant payments in the several cities from 1908 to
June 30, 1913:
Gold coin and
certificates.

Transactions.
190&—Receipts
.Paid by the Treasm-er and assistant
treasurers of the United States:
Washington
Chicago.:
•.;...•.
Denver mint
New Orleans




'

United States Silver doUars
notes.
and certificates.

Total.

30,000.00
100,000.00
1,638,000.00

$108,000.00

$100,000.00

$4,233,779.00

400,000.00

$4,025,779.00

200,000.00

60,000.00

98,000.00

600,000.00
30,000.00
100,000.00
1,796,000.00

228

EEPOET ON T H E FINANCES.
Gold coin and United States Silver doUars
certificates.
and certificates.
notes. ,

Transaction^.
Paid by the Treasurer and assistant
treasurers of the United States—Con.
Philadelphia
.. .
San Francisco.

$5,000.00
1,702,779.00

3,475,779.00

Total
]^9()9—Receipts . . .

$5,000.00
1,702,779.00

. . . .

Paid by the Treasurer and assistant
treasurers of the United States:
Washington .
Chicago
Cincinnati
..•
New Orleans
Total . . .
1910—Receipts
Paid by the Treasm-er and assistant
treasurers of the United States:
AVashinfifton
New Orleans
.......
San Francisco
Total

Total.

$460,000.00

19,172,000.00

5,000.00

$298,000.00

450,000.00

257,000.00

505,000.00

18,315,000.00

100,000.00

55,000.00

600,000.00
200,000.00
615,000.00
16,900,000.00

4,233,779.00
19,177,000.00

357,000.00

11,815,000.00

550,000.00
600,000.00
200,000.00
927,000.00
16,900,000.00
19,177,000.00
11,815,000.00

400,000.00
3,146,000.00
7,360,000.00

780,000.00

129,000.00

10,906,000.00

780,000.00

129,000.00

400,000.00
4,055,000.00
7,360,000.00
11,815,000.00

1911—Receints

23,350,000.00

23,350,000.00

Paid by the Treasurer and assistant
treasurers of the United States:
Washington...
ChicaEfo
Cincinnati
New Orleans
Philadelphia
San Francisco

400,000.00
10,000,000.00
100,000.00
200,000.00
900,000.00
11,750,000.00

400,000.00
10,000,000.00
100,000.00
200,000.00
900,000.00
11,750,000.00

Total

23,350,000.00

23,350,000.00

1912—Receipts

25,il7,805.29

25,117,805.29

Paid by the Treasurer and assistant
treasurers of the United States:
Washington
New Orleans
Philadelphia.
St Louis
SanFrancisco...

400,000.00
4,220,000.00
2,900,000.00
250,000.00
17,347,805.29

400,000.00
4,220,000.00
2,900,000.00
250,000.00
17,347,805.29

0

25,117,805.29

25,117,805.29

562,183.33
126,775.00
1,200,000.00
700,000.00
1,000,000.00

562,183.33
126,775.00
1,200,000.00
700,000.00
1,000,000.00

3,588,958.33

3,588,958.33"

1,100,000.00
500,000.00

1,100,000.00
500,000.00

Total

1,600,000.00

1,600,000.00

San Francisco—
in January
In February
In March
In April
InMay

562,183.33
126,775.00
100,000.00
200,000.00
1,000,000.00

562,183.33
126,775.00
100,000.00
200,000.00
1,000,000.00

Total
1913—Receipts:
In January
In February
In March
In April
In May
In June
Total
Paid by the Treasurer and assistant
treasurers of the United States:
Cincinnati—
In March
In April

Total

1,988,958.33

1,988,958.33
•

Ag^egate




3,588,958.33

3,588,958.33

229

TREASURER.

USE OF ORDER GOLD CERTIFICATES FOR EXCHANGE ON NEW YORK.

Previous to February 1, 1910, the banks in San Francisco, under
provisions of existing law, exchanged gold coin at the Subtreasury
for demand gold certificates of large denominations, which they sent
by registered maU to their correspondents in New York, thus effecting a transfer of funds at small cost to the banks. The demand gold
certificates were shipped from Washington to San Francisco by
express at the rate of $1.75 per $1,000, while order gold certfficates
(incomplete) were sent by express in packages of $5,000,000 at a
total coast of only $15.
I n order to eliminate the expense of transporting demand certfficates to San Francisco, and at the same time to grant to the banks
in that city their rights under the law to deposit gold coin in exchange
for gold certificates, it was deemed advisable to issue to said banks
order gold" certificates, series of 1900, and to make them payable by
the assistant treasurer of the United States, New York. Under this
plan an actual saving of expense was effected even if it should later
become necessary to transport the gold coin so deposited to New
York, because the transportation charge on gold coin from San
Francisco to New York is less than the charge on demand gold certfficates from Washington to San Francisco. However, there is
usually a '^return movement^' at certain season^ of the year, during
which it becomes deskable on the part of banks to mak^ deposits of
funds in New York, and to have payments made therefor in gold
coin at the Subtreasury in San Francisco.
The transactions, semiannually, since February, 1910, are recorded
in,the statement following:

Period.

1910—February to June, inclusive..
July to December^ inclusive..
1911—January to June, mclusive...
July to December^ inclusive..
1912—January to June, mclusive...
July to December^ inclusive..
1913—January to June, mclusive...
Aggregate..

Order gold
Deposits in
certificates
New York for
issued in
which paySan Francisco
ments were
and redeemed
made in
in New York. San Francisco.
$3,750,000
600,000
5,100,000
3,000,000
5,200,000
2,900,000

$2,650,000
4,260,000
3,500,000
8,250,000
10,418,566
6,929,239
1,988,958

20,550,000

37,996,763

I t wUl be observed that the deposits made in New York on account
of the return movement are $17,446,763 in excess of the payments
made for gold-certfficates issued at San Francisco. This method
of using the order certificates is in the interest of good administration, and has made it possible to discontinue the shipments of demand
gold certificates from Washington to San Francisco, with a resultant
saving of transportation charges.




280

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

DEPOSITS OF GOLD. BULLION AT MINTS AND ASSAY OFFICES IN THE
FISCAL YEARS 1912 AND 1913.

Under the provisions of an act of Congress approved March 2,
1911, the new product of ourgold mines and all imports of gold may
be deposited in the mints and assay offices, for which the full value
thereof wUl be paid, either in coin or by check on the Treasurer of
the United States, and against the gold, so deposited and paid for,
the Secretary of the Treasury may, in liis discretion, issue gold certificates.
The new product of the mines or original deposits of gold bullion
at the mints and assay offices during, the fiscal years 1912 and 1913
may be observed in the statement following:
1912

Office.
Philadelphia
San Francisco
Denver
New York
New Orleans
Carson
Helena
Boise
~.
Charlotte
Deadwood
Seattle".
. .
Salt Lake City

$1,619,039.16
53,864,397.23
20,330,523.60
52,921,293.75
1,394,110.89
997.917. 63
1,815,788.13
870,145.44
78,356. 86
7,592,261.74
5,818,676.64
1,122,600. 67

'.

..
•

$1,493,553.40
54,101,615.95
21,075,876.26
65,612,158.65
897,328.15
724,853.37
1,495,788.35
1,008,940.29
29,244.45
1,290,951.52
4,951,640.57
595,520.36

148,425,111.74

..

Total

1913

159,277,471.32

SHIPMENTS OF CURRENCY FROM WASHINGTON.

During the fiscal year 1913 the currency distributed from the
Treasury in Washington to the subtreasuries and to banks amounted
to $882,677,335, against $761,847,077 during the.preceding 12 months.
I n 1912, 17,822 packages were sent by registered mail and 97,596
by express, while in 1913, 18,971 went by registered mail and 106,073
by express.
The transactions during the past two fiscal years are compared in
the statement following:
Fiscal year 1912.
Number of
packages.
Total by express
Total by registered mail
Aggregate

.
..

.. .

Amount.

97,596 $758,634,665
17,822
3,212,412
115,418

Fiscal year 1913.
Number of
packages.

.

761,847,077

106,073
18,971
125,044

Amount.
$878,703,859
3,973,476
882,677,335

RECOINAGE IN THE FISCAL YEAR 1913.

Gold coins presented for payment or deposit on any account at
the Treasury offices are weighed in, and the pieces that are too light
for further circulation are segregated for transmission to the mint.
The subsidiaiy silver coins and miaor coins received are assorted,
and the pieces that are unfit for circulation are set aside for simUar
disposition. The gold coins sent to the mint for recoinage during the
fiscal year 1913 amounted to $912,799, the silver coins to $407,075,
and the minor coins to $134,284.



231

TREASURER.

The face value in each case, and the loss in gold, silver, and minor
coin, respectively, are set forth for the past two fiscal years in the
subjoined table:
-.

Fiscal year 1912.
Face value.

'
D o u b l e eagles . . .
Eagles
Half eaeles
Quarter eagles
Three-dollar pieces
One-dollar pieces

$487,560.00
721,860.00
1,227,860.00
9,867.50
18.00
30.00

<
.

T o t a l gold

:

Half doUars
Q u a r t e r dollars
T w e n t y - c e n t pieces
Dimes
Half dimes
Three-cent pieces

-

T o t a l silver

Loss.

-:

2,447,195.50

Fiscal year 1913.
Face value.

Loss.

$169,840.00
246,250.00
491,300.00
5,350.00
15.00
44.00
$4,848.09

196,157.00
215,572.50
63.60
261,968.80
954. 90
.. 70.47

912,799.00

$8,470.62

113,595.00
147,146. 25
10.20
145,878. 70
400.30
44.55

674,787.27

407,075.00

9,186.49

134, 284.00

6,941.41

3,253,909.27

Aggregate

44,321.70

131,926.50

Minor coins

58,356.28

1,454,158.00

41,659.04

26,247.01

REDEMPTION OF NATIONAL-BANK NOTES.

There has been a constant increase' in redemptions of national-bank
notes for a number of years past and during the fiscal year 1913 the
amount presented was $675,889,000, 90.01 per cent of the average
circulation outstanding, and was $25,934,289 more than the largest
amount previously received during a year, which was in 1912. Of
the total received, 47.62 per cent was sent by banks in New York City.
The number of remittances was 46,703, and these contamed 69,832,398
notes. The average value of notes presented was $9.62, whUe that of
the outstanding was $10.20. Of the average am'ount of $5 notes outstandiag, 104.26 per cent was redeemed; of the $10 notes, 93.28 per
cent; of the $20 notes, 80.18 per cent; of the $50 notes, 73.53 per cent;
and of the $100 notes, 61.80 per cent. The receipts for the first six
months of the fiscal year, July to December, were 44.74 per cent of the
total, and those for the last six months, January to June, 55.26 per
cent. The largest amount presented duriag a month was $79,753,664
in January, and the smallest $41,816,565 in September.
Payment was made for notes receiveci as follows: By Treasurer's
checks to the amount of $230,238,151, by remittances of $352,869,976
in new United States currency, by remittances of $122,710 in gold,
silver, and minor coia, and by credit of $89,891,431 in various accounts.
Notes assorted and delivered durhig the year amounted to $669,405,645.50. Of this sum $218,884,750 was fit for use and was forwarded by express to banks of issue ia 143,257 packages; the remainder was unfit for use and was delivered to the Comptroller of the
Currency, $426,431,860 for destruction and reissue, hi 218,754 p a c k ages, and $24,089,035.50 for destruction and retirement, ia 13,277
packages.
Owing to heavy redemptions the amount of notes on hand
exceeded the balance in the 5 per cent fund, except during portions
of the months of December and January, and the Treasury advanced



232

REPORT ON TPIE FINANCES.

payment out of the general fund as the notes were received. The
largest amount advanced at one time was $23,914,635.44, on January
18, 1913. As the redemptions were greater during 1913 than 1912,
the condition durhig 1913 was an improvement over that of the previous year, when the 5 per cent fund was at no time equal to the
demands made upon it, and the largest advance at one time was
$3,000,000 more than on the above date.
The expenses of redemption, amounting to $517,842.93, have been
assessed upon the banks in.proportion to their notes redeemed at the
rate of $0.77293 per $1,000.
SPURIOUS ISSUES DETECTED IN 1913.

The counterfeit coins and paper currency detected at the Treasury
during the past fiscal year were $1,569.20 less in face value than in
the 12 months preceding.
Comparison, by items, for the past three fiscal years follows:
Kinds.

$3,796.00
74.00
150,00
723.00
3,978.00
333.00
3,075.00
385.61
153.30
200.00

:
..
•.
..

.
"

.
*

Total

1912
$3,934.00
27.00
20.00
850.00
3,279.00
324.00
3,118.45
157.81
106.85
500.00

$2,641.00
54.00
470.00
1,308.00
2,106.00
462.50
3,063.35
403.36
189.70
50.00

12,867.91

U n i t e d States notes
T r e a s u r y notes of 1890
Gold certificates
Silver certificates
N a t i o n a l - b a n k notes
Gold coin
..
Silver coin
Minor coin
F r a c t i o n a l currency
Compound-interest notes

1911

12,317.11

10,747.91

1913

SPECIAL TRUST FUNDS.

The Treasurer of the United States is custodian of several special
trusts, consisting of bonds and other obligations, which are held under
provisions of law or by direction of the Secretary of the Treasury.
The kinds of bonds or obligations held on each account and transactions therein during the past fiscal year are recorded in the subjoined statement:
•

F i s c a l y e a r 1913.
Account and kinds.

H e l d J u n e 30,
1912.
Deposited.

s t a t e b o n d s belonging to t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s :
Louisiana State bonds
N o r t h Carolina S t a t e b o n d s
Tp.nTift.<?.SP.P, Statf- b o n d s .
U n i t e d S t a t e s b o n d s h e l d u n d e r special provisions of l a w : M a n h a t t a n Savings I n s t i t u t i o n
H e l d for t h e Secretary of W a r : C a p t u r e d b o n d s
of t h e S t a t e of Louisiana
H e l d for t h e Secretary of t h e T r e a s u r y : P a n a n i a
P . R . notes
H e l d for t h e D i s t r i c t of Columbia:
B o n d s for a c c o u n t of D i s t r i c t c o n t r a c t o r s . . .
Chesapeake & Ohio C a n a l b o n d s
B o a r d of a u d i t certificates
H e l d for t h e b o a r d of t r u s t e e s . P o s t a l Savings
S y s t e m : P o s t a l savings b o n d s
Total




Withdrawn.

H e l d J u n e 30,
1913.

$37,000.00
58,000.00
335,666.661

$37,000.00
58,000.00
335,666.661
75,000.00

75,000.00

545,480.00

' 545,480.00
3,247,332.11

3,247,332.11
197,680.00
84,285.00
20,134.72

$14,550.00

5,460.00

$55,870.00

156,360.00
84,285.00
20,134.72

65,870.00

4,676,718.49§

112,000.00

4,606,038.491

126,550.00

117,460.00

TREASURER.

-

233

The General Assembly of the State of Louisiana in July, 1912,
passed a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the constitution
of the State, authorizing the board of liquidation of the State debt to
create a sinking fund and to provide, for the payment in full out of
the first surplus accruing in the sinking fund the amount of principal
and interest due on the bonds of the State, the face value of which
aggregates $37,000, and which are held by the United States as trustee for certain Indian funds. This proposition was submitted to the
qualified electors of the State and was ratified by them at the general
election on November 5, 1912.
The State of North Caroliaa has authorized and appointed commissioners to take under consideration a plan for settling the iadebtedness of that State to the United States, but Congress postponed
action on a measure providing for representatives on the part of the
Government.
'
Commissioners representing the Government and the State of Tennessee, under provisions of law, have now under consideration a plan
for settling with that State. I t is apparent that some progress has
been made toward a settlement with the three States named in the
foregoing for the unpaid matured bonds of those States belonging to
the United States.
The bonds held for the Manhattan Savings Institution are in trust
for that institution as indemnity for certain stolen bonds, as provided
by act of December 19, 1878 (20 Stat., 589), and wiU be held for such
time as, in the judgment of the Secretary of the Treasury, wUl secure
the Treasurer of the United States against loss.
Recommendation has been made to Congress for authority to
return to the State of Louisiana the bonds of that State captured at
Shreveport by the Union forces during the War of the Rebellion,
now held as a special deposit by the Secretary of War.
The special trust held for the Secretary of the Treasury is composed of notes of the Panama Railroad Co. drawing 4 per cent interest
payable to the United States, and is security for money advanced
for the equipment and construction of said raUroad.
The special trust held for the District of Columbia represents, first,
the moneys retaiaed from contractors under provisions of law and
invested at the request and risk of said contractors, and, second,
obligations that belong to the District of Columbia.
The special trust held for the board of trustees. Postal Savings
System, consists wholly of postal savings bonds, representing investments made by said board, as described on page 209.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

The transactions of the Treas.urer of the United States, ex officio
commissioner of the sinking fund of the District of Columbia, pertaining to the affairs of the District are fully set forth in a separate
report.
During the fiscal year 1913 the funded debt retired amounted to
$647,700, resulting in the reduction of the annual interest charge by
$23,641.05.
On July 1, 1878, when the Treasurer was charged with the duties
of the late commissioners of the sinking fund of the District of Colum-




234

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

bia, the bonded debt was $22,106,650; since that date 3.65 per centbonds have been issued, amounting to $1,254,050, making a total debt
of $23,360,700. This sum has been decreased by the operation of the
sinking fund and otherwise $15,749,850, leaving outstanding July 1,
1913, $7,610,850 of bonds bearing 3.65 per cent interest.
The annual interest charge on July 1, 1878, was $1,015,759.12 and
on July 1, 1913, $277,796.02, showing a reduction of $737,963.10.
The retentions from 30 contracts with the District of Columbia were
canceled during the year by the return to the contractors of $44,020
in bonds and $24,307.70 in cash.
At the close of the fiscal year the 10 per cent guaranty fund held
for account of contracts amounted to $252,808.18 and is represented
by $157,010 in bonds purchased at the request and risk of contractors
and $90,143.35 uninvested cash.
The securities of the District in the care and custody of the Treasurer
are:
Bonds for account of contractors
Chesapeake & Ohio Canal bonds
Board of audit certificates
TotaL----

-'-

^ $157, 010. 00
84, 285. 00
20,134. 72
261, 429. 72

LEGISLATION RECOMMENDED.

I t is suggested that recommendation to Congress be made in such
form as may be deemed advisable for legislation that wUl authorize
favorable action on the following subjects:
1. Gold certificates for $5.—There is necessity for increasmg the
resources of the Treasur}^ for the issue of small denominations of currency. I t is believed that the issue of gold certificates for $5 instead
of restricting the issue as now to $10 and above wUl enable the department to respond to the demands for small denominations.
2. Increased facilities for exchanging worn and defaced United States
paper currency for new.—There is a constant and widespread interest
which advocates a cleaner and more sanitary currency. The sentiment is a laudable one and should be attainable, because the expense
is but a trifle as compared with the beneficent results. The Government can well afford to replace its paper issues when unfit for
circulation.
3. Increase ofthe 5 per cent hanlc-note redemption fund.—Experience
shows that the 5 per cent redemption fund is not adequate for the
purposes intended. For the greater part of the last fiscal year the
Treasury had to advance money for the redemption of bank notes
on the security of the notes themselves. As the notes are not obligations of the Treasury, the banks should be required to deposit a
greater amount to provide for current redemptions.
4. Restriction on amount of $5 hanlc notes.—It appears that national
banks located in commercial centers are not disposed to issue the full
amount of $5 notes authorized by law, whUe the Hanks located in the
interior or outlying sections of the country would largely increase the
amount of their $5 notes but for the limitation by statute. Therefore
it is believed that the repeal or modification of the provision limiting
1 Of which $650 was received and sent to the office of the Secretary for transfer, but was not placed in
the custody of the Treasurer until July 1, 1913.




TREASURER.

235

the $5 notes to one-third in amount of the circulating notes of national
banks would be the means of increasing the amount of such notes in
circulation, and would accordingly reduce the demand upon the
Treasury for United States paper currency of small denominations.
5. Removing limit on weight of registered pacTcage.—It is believed that
the removal.of the limit on the weight of a package which may be sent
through the registered maU of the Unitea States would facilitate a
greater use of this method of transportation; and if followed by an
enactment that wUl authorize the transportation of paper currency
to and from the Treasury or between Treasury offices by registered
maU insured, it would be in the interest of economical administration.
Upon the termination of the administration of Hon.. Carmi. A.
Thompson, March 31, 1913, the duties of the office of Treasurer of
the United States devolved upon the present incumbent.
The transfer involved an examination of the moneys, securities,
and other evidences of value that came into the Treasurer's immediate
charge, amounting to $1,426,422,051.48§. The examination was concluded April 8, 1913, and th.e report of the cominittee in charge gave
the most satisfactory assurance that the funds transferred were absolutely correct and in agreement m t h the accounts.
This result is undoubtedly the best comment on the zeal and active
interest which the staff, chiefs of ciivisions, clerks of every grade, and
every person employed in the office have taken in the performance of
their responsible duties.
Respectfully,

JOHN BURKE,

Treasurer.
Hon. WILLIAM G . MCADOO,

Secretary ofthe Treasury.




APPENDIX TO REPORT OF THE TREASURER.
No. 1.—Receipts and disbursements for thefisf^al year 1913, as shown by warrants issued.

Account.

Receipts.

Customs
Internal revenue
Lands
Miscellaneous
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a . .
Miscellaneous series
Interior:
Civil
Pensions
.^
Treasury
P o s t a l deficiency
W a r , civil
N a v y , civil .
War
Navy
Indians
I n t e r e s t on t h e p u b l i c d e b t
Total
P o s t a l savings b o n d s
PanamaCanal
Publicdebt.
Redemption national
notes.
Aggregate

$318,891,395.86
344,416,965.65
2,910,204.69
48,606,671.41
9,117,611.69

Disbursertients.

R e p a y m e n t s from
Counter credits
unexpended
a p p r o p r i a t i o n s . ' to a p p r o p r i a t i o n s .

$12,841,210.79
69, 413,372.34

$1,338,480.73
3,178,635.62

$519,817.67
998,973.10

22,383,756.70
175,085,450.29
62,113,949. 60
1,027,368.79
2,220,460.24
829,554.96
160,387, 452. 85
133,262,861.97
20,306,158.90
22,'899,108.08

2,372,175.54
1,768,416.59
4,898,218.58
2,000,000.00
12,340.38
10,738.34
6,488,152.00
2,095,692.43
1,58.5,668.27
1,326.63

1,120,015.40
2,343.65
1,119,553.89

723,942,849.30
1,929,840.00

682,770,705.51

25,749,845.11

177,397,158. 89

24,751.59

811,094.05

1,035,682,000.00

41,741,258.03
987,162,775.00

25,774,596.70

178,208,252.94

-.

1,972 26
4,382.60
4,269,514.17
108,162,946; 25
1,197,639.90

bank
21,471,010.00

24,089,035.50

1,783,025,699.30

1,735, 763,774.04

No. 2.—Net ordinary receipts and disbursements for each quarter of the fiscal year 1913,
as shown by warrants issued.
.First q u a r t e r .

Second q u a r t e r . T h i r d q u a r t e r . F o u r t h q u a r t e r .

Total. ~

$87,044,382.54
78,037,185.74
801,423.' 99
12,318, 746. 70

$80,247,541.01
85,423.442.81
825,296.96
11,576,348.69

$85,171,376.05
7.3,574,997.55
645,460.42
14,245,115.30

$66,428,096.26
107,381)339.55
638,023.32
19,5^4,072.41

$318,891,395.86
344,416,965.65
2,910,204.69
57,724,283.10

T o t a l . . . . . . . . . 178,201,738.97

178,072,629.47

173,636,949.32

194,031,531.54

723,942,849.30

86,079,110.96
42,251,967.41
34,172,966.38
6,197,410. 71

82,492,766.04
32,921,172.99
31,584,627.67
5,789,924.37

85,842,493. SO
36,580,163.62
34,682,474.35
5,317,565.64

345,915,123.71
160'. 387,452.85
133,262,861.97
20,306,158.90-

Account.
RECEIPTS.

Customs
Internal revenue
Lands
Miscellaneous

DISBURSEMENTS.

Civil a n d misceUaneous
War
Navv.
.
. . . .
Indians
I n t e r e s t on t h e p u b l i c
debt.
. . . .
Total
E x c e s s of receipts
E x c e s s of disbursements
;

236




91,500,752.91
48,634,148.83
32,822, 793.57
3,001,258.18
5,732,315.24

5,788,691.76

5,233,383. 46

6,144,717.62

22,899,108.08

181,691,268. 73

174,490,147.22

158,021,874.53

168,567,415.03

682,770,705.51

3,582,482.25

15,615,074.79

25,484,116.51

41,172,143.79

3,489,529.76

237

TEEASUEEE.

No. 3.—Receipts and disbursements for service of the Post Office Department for thefiscal
year 1913.
Fiscal year 1913.
Balance
June 30,1912.

Office.

Receipts.

Disbursements.

Washington
Baltimore
Boston
Chicago^.:.:
Cincinnati
New Orleans
New York
Philadelphia
San Francisco
St; Louis
National-bank depositaries.
In transit

$3, 219.65 $47,856,876.50 $35,664,651.33
677, 921.22
689, 472.39
11; 551.17
2,929,742.71
2,981,557.42
51, 814.71
25,344, 594.52
25,919, 148.31
574, 553.79
2,414, 286.13
2,212,666.31
201, 619.82
534, 216.33
516, 850.11
17, 366.22
396. 61 24,573, 286. 65 26,800, 683.26
2,227,
3,980, 008.44
3,931, 882.01
48, 126. 43
5,224,919.55
4,927,854.95
297,064. 60
1,552,883.42
1,502,424. 98
50, 458. 44
902.89
42. 512.34
23, 609.45
18,
560: 000.00
560, 000.00

. • Total
Deduct:
Transfers between offices
Advances from the Treasury and
repayments by the Post Office
Department on account of postal
deficiency
,

4,062,074.33

2,000,000.00

89,875, 518.14

82,769,516.44

45,3»8,858.58
47,018,219.06
47,646,720.67
48,228,382.66

45,338,858.58
47,018,219.06
47,646,720.67
48,228,382.66

278,107,699.11

$12,195,444.82

21,594,822.48

3,027,368.79

Total
Net excess of receipts over disbursements

106,364,338.92

21,594,822.48

Net receipts and disbm'sements by
Treasury offices
Receipts and dlsbm-sements by
postmasters for quarter ended—
Sept. 30,1912
Dec. 31,1912
Mar. 31,1913
June 30, 1913

114,497,709.41

Balance
June 30,1913.

271,001,697.41

12,195,444.82

7,106,001.70

No. 4.—Post Office Department warrants issued, paid, and outstanding for the fiscal
year 1913.
Fiscal year 1913.
Warrants drawn on—

Treasurer of the United States,
Washuigton
Assistant treasui'er of the United
States:
Baltimore
Boston
Chicago
Cincinnati
-.
i New Orleans
i NewYork
/ Philadelphia
\ San Francisco
i St. Louis
Total.




Warrants
Number of outstanding
warrants
June 30,
issued.
1912.

138,422

Amount of
warrants
issued.

Amount of
warrants
paid.

Warrants
outstanding
June 30,
1913.

$210.16 $36,569,208.94 $31,010,988.62

$5,558,430.48

1,064.59
697.24
1,683.13
576.57
1,011,236.90 22,100,032.81 23,093,002.98
681. 71
439.77
1,363.53
827.56
977,182. 60 25,631,640.18 26,406,873.01
94,515
734.54
550.55
254,644.69 4,'iss,'040.'26" 4,432,181.48
'i9,'i78'
2,825.04
1,958.27

367.35
1,106.56
18,266.73
241.94
535.97
201,949.77
183.99
10,503.41
866.77

329,911 2,251,626.89 88,488,922.13 84,948,096.05

5,792,452.. 97

77,796

238

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
No. 5.—Assets and liabilities of the Treasury offiices, June 30, 1913.
Washington.

Baltimore.

NewYork. -

Philadelphia.

Boston.

ASSETS.

Gold coin...
. . $2,530,565.84
Gold bullion (bars)
157,097,219.66
Standard silver dollars
Subsidiary silver coin
1,414,104.53
United States notes
2,062, 503.00
Treasury notes of 1890
National-bank notes
38,398,248.20
6,894,330.00
Gold certificates
4,595,798.00
Silver certificates
Minor coin
51, 605.62
Fractional currency
Certified checks on bariks..
Interest on public deb t paid
Total cash assets

213,044,374.19

$9,274,487.24
4,646. 940.00
31S;965.20
87,087.00
524.00
175,-370.00
5, 722,320.00
' 434,285.00
•44, 428. 42
1, 496.85

$40,999,597.50 $17,896,395.75 $13,018,108.84
3.116,1.56. 75
6.051,962.00
83; 055,113. 00
1,215,504.00
' 749,959. 68
6,249. 623.85
9.53,357. 45
112,000.00
3,933; 335.00
179,438. 00
137.00
91.085.00
36, 000. 00
28,040. 00
3/529,000.00
39,217,760.00
3,165,100. 00
112,152. 00
486, 712.00
4, 761,036.00
156,830.33
269,324.98
118, 711.11
178.93
54.00
343,190.58
118.95
2,127. 42
370.35

20, 705,903. 71 182,038,404.08

28,644,597.64

19,165,478.75

174,970. 88

4,257,661.92

422,117.37

207,945.37

718,924.00

LIABILITIES.

Outstanding warrants and
checks.
Disbursing officers' balances
Post Office Department
account
Bank note 5 per cent redemption fund
Other deposit and redemption accounts
Board of trustees. Postal
Savings System

34,118,314.81
83,304,521.25
6,402,991.85
26,593,959.99
2,098,748.67

41,530.00

1,148,883. 48

274,351. 75

• 2,525,174.92

10,496.22

236,948.41.

115,582.83

87,556. 66

Total agency account 155,043, 711. 49
Balance to credit of mints
9, 783,964. 50
and assav offices
:.
Balance general account... 48/216,698.14

226,997.10

5, 643, 493.81

812,051.95

1,014, 426. 03

176,394,910.27

27,832,545. 69

18,151,052.72.

28, 644, 597. 64

19,165, 478. 75

Total.

•.

213, 044,374.19

Cincinnati.

20,478,906. 61

20, 705,903. 71 182,038,404. 08

Chicago.

St. Louis.

N e w Orleans.

San F r a n cisco.

ASSETS.

$14,677,569.39 $82,198,930.11
Gold coin...
Gold bullion (bars)
7,594,964.00
3,050,275.00
Standard silver dollars
599,271.60
2.074,363.00
Subsidiary silver coin
301,815.00
United States notes
' 1-93,149.00
Treasury notes of 1890
458,435.00
24,825.66
National-bank notes. - .
3,003,960.00 10,188,650.00
Gold certificates
439,219.00
1,130,417.00
Silver certificates
Minor coin-..
31,346.98
35,414.27
Fractional currency....-...
Certified checks on banks..
Interest on public debt paid
Total

22,561,891.97 103,440,712.38

$31^ 704, 754. 94 $10,329,977. 02 $52,046,890.94
2,295,585.00
2, 702,124.00
422,000.00
1,500.00
499,500.00
5,549,500.00
6.58,337.00
48,957.31

15,216,857.00 24,562,759.00
858,951.55
1,196,782.50
291,841.00
1,014,668.00
1,103.00
66.00
•731,350.00
1,935,817.00
2,782,110. 00 • 1,170,290.00
341,200.00
75,192.00
15,984. 54
8)992.24
43.94

247. .50

241.10
30,569,374.11

82, Oil, 742. 72

249,119. 79

83,545.28

212,389.31

43,882,505.75

LIABILITIES.

Outstanding warrants and
checks
Disbursing officers' balances
Post-Office Department
account
Other deposit and redemption accounts
Board of trustees. Postal
Savings System
Total agency account
Balance to credit of mints
and assay offices
Balance general account...
• Total




277,605.58

1,242,473.00

156,292.92

553,380.00

70,807.00

116,260.00

30,000.00

384, 718.35

179,142.46

44,005.93

272,354.16

2,180,571.35

499,069.25

243,811.21

514,743. 47

21, 734,433.27 101,260,141.03

43,383,436. 50

30,325,562.00

81,496,999.25

22,561,891.97 103,440, 712.38

43,882,505. 75

30,569,374.11

82, Oil, 742. 72

393,560.20
827,458. 70

TREASURER.

239

No 6.—Assets ofthe Treasury in the custody of mints and assay offices, June 30, 1913.
Boise City.

Carson City.

Deadwood.

Helena.

BULLION" F U N D .

Gold coin
Gold bullion
,
Standard silver dollars
Subsidiary silver coin
Silver bullion
Gold certificates
Minor coin
Balance with Treasurer United States..

$100.00

$483.10
93.53

9.41
"3.03
1,390.00

16.32
399.25

$18,474.17

$769.75

137,083.42 -

92,959.96

365,208.33

44,403.03

138,585.86

Total

93,952.16

383,682.50

45,172.78

Salt Lake City.

Seattle.

New York.

$624,390.91

$7,420.77
24,987,662.77

New Orleans.

BULLION F U N D .

Gold coin
. .
Gold bullion
Standard silver dollars
Subsid iarv sitver coin
Silver bullion
.
Gold certificates
~...
Minor coin.
Balance with Treasurer United States..

$577.15

$12,466.33
22,475,000.00

531,435.37

13.08

80,957.17

1,254,585.51

2,220,248.42

71,359.77

81,534.32

Total

1,878,976.42

27, 746, 767.33

22,558,839.18

Philadelphia.

San Francisco.

Denver.

Total.

BULLION F U N D .

$407,528,232.50 $313,435,828.50 $15,595,765.00 $736,567,729.87
Gold coin . .
Gold bullion
81,623.115.16
6,715,709.28 134,016,512.63 247,999,871.68
61, 400,000. 00 191,358,892.00
Standard silver dollars
107,483,892.00
Subsidiary silver coin
3,165,250.90
434,336.83
809.30
3.600,422.76
254,077.31
Silver bullion
530,150.90
748,253.49
2; 064,3.32. 43
Gold certificates
2,780.00
40,270.00
44,440.00
Minor coin
38.51
.05
38.56
624,069.15
Balance with Treasurer United States..
3,879,964. .31
986,438.39
9,757,277.46
Total bullion fund.

493,473,637.12

429,411,201.01

230, 420.95
6,067.41

3,000.00
55.00
917,185.26
1,525.47

215,580,656.08 1,191,393,004.76

MINOR COIN AND METAL F U N D .

Gold certificates
Silver certificates
Minor coin
Balance with Treasurer United States..
AgCTCgate assets




493, 710,125. 48 430,332,966.74

57.926.06
5; 234.57

3,000.00
55.00
1,205,532.27
12,827.45

215,643,816.71 1,192, 614, 419. 48

240

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 7.—General distribution of the assets and liabilities of the Treasury June 30,1913.
Treasury
offices.

Mints a n d

National bank|
a n d other
In transit.
depositories.

Total.

ASSETS.

$274,677,277.57 $736,567,729.87
Gold coin
Gold b u l h o n
3,116,156.75 247,999,871.68
S t a n d a r d silver d o l l a r s . . . 304,787,178.00 191,358,892.00
S u b s i d i a r y s i l v e r coin
17,117,503.36
3,600,422. 76
Silver bullion
2,064,332.43
United States notes
8,597,836.00
T r e a s u r y n o t e s of 1 8 9 0 . . .
3,330.00
National-bank ndtes
42,378,670. 20
Gold certificates
81,223,020.00
47,440.00
Silver certificates
13,034,348.00
55.00
Minor coin
781,595.80
1,205,570.83
Fractional currency
276.87'
Certified checks o n b a n k s
343,190.581
I n t e r e s t on pubUc d e b t
paid
4,602.17
Deposits in
national
banks-, etc
$67,379,695.03
Public moneysin transit
t o or from n a t i o n a l

$1, Oil,245,007.44
251,116,028.43
496,146,070.00
$20,000.00
20,737,926.12
2,064,332.43
868,000.00
9,465,836.00
3,330.00
1,025,000.00
43,403,670.20
1,679,000.00
82,949,460.00
1,387,005.00
14,421,408.00
10,000.00
1,997,166.63
276.87
343,190.58
6,398.35
o

12,856,300.00
T o t a l a v a i l a b l e assets! 746,064,985.30 1,182,844,314.57|
Balance with Treasurer
UnitedStates
9,770,104.91
W a r r a n t s a n d checks
paid b u t not'cleared...
Checks d r a w n b y b o a r d
of t r u s t e e s , P o s t a l Savings S y s t e m , t r a n s f e r ' r i n g balances
Aggregate.

746,064,985.30 1,192,614,419.48

11,000.52
67,379,695.03
12,856,300.00

67,379,695.03 17,851,703.35 2,014,140,698.25
13,859.65

9,783,964.56

57,528,598^04

57,528,598.04

1,709,093.22

1,709,093.22

67,379,695.03 77,103,254.26 2,083,162,354.07

LIABILITIES.

Outstanding
warrants
a n d checks
D i s b u r s i n g officers' b a l ances
P o s t Office D e p a r t m e n t
account
B a n k - n o t e 5 per-cent r e demption account
O t h e r deposit a n d r e demption accounts
B o a r d of t r u s t e e s , P o s t a l
Savings S y s t e m
T o t a l agency a c c o u n t
B a l a n c e t o c r e d i t of '
m i n t s a n d assay offices.
B a l a n c e general a c c o u n t .
Aggregate




34,118, 314.81

710,674.15

90,432, 349.75

9,427,964.62

34,828,988.96
158,324.61

100,018,638.98

6,402, 991.85

49,342.74|

6,452,334.59

26,593, 959.99|

1,498,167.74

28,092,127.73

5,209, 177.82

5,409,427.50|

10,618,605.32

7,115,262.59

184,260,235.72

4,249,540.14

4,249; 540.14
167,006,334.36

10,138,-638.77

9,783, 964.56
569,274, 686.38 1,192,614,419.48

9,783,964.56
57,241,056.26 69,987,991.67 1,889,118,153.79

746,064,985.30 1,192,614,419.48

67,379,695.03 77,103,254.;

2,083,162,354.07

241

TEEASUEEE.
No. 8.—Distribution of the .general Treasury balance June 30, 1913.

Receipts
Treasurer's gen- not covered Balance as shown
by warrants.
eral account. by warrants

Location.

$48,216, 698.14 $67,239.16
8,625.40
20,478, 906. 61
176,394, 910. 27 15,100.61
27,832, 545.69
39.12
18,151, 052.72 12,315.99
21,734, 433. 27
1,716.06
101,260, 141.03 20,873.54
5,304.35
43,383, 436.50
1,497.38
30,325, 562.90
81,496 999.25 34,628.35
1,192,614', 419.48
56,497, 305.15 247,894.69
743, 751.11 90,735.94
69,987, 991. 67

Total Treasury balance,

$48,149, 458.98
20,470, 281. 21
176,379, 809.66
27,832, 506.57
18,138, 736. 73
21,732, 717. 21
101,239, 267.49
43,378, 132.15
30,324, 065.52
81,462, 370.90
.,192,614, 419.48
56,249, 410.46
653; 015.17
69,987, 991.67 .

1,889,118,153.79

Washington
Baltimore
1
New York
Philadelphia
—
Boston.
•
Cincinnati
Chicago
St. Louis
New Orleans
• San Francisco
Mints and assay offices
National bank:
Treasury of Philippine Islands..
Ih transit

1,888,61^2,183. 20

N o . 9.—Available assets and net liabilities of the Treasury at the close of June, 1912 and
1913.
June 30,1912.

June 30,1913.

$1,004,524,844.66
202,939,419.56

$1, Oil, 245,007.44
251,116,028.43

1,207,464,264.22

1,262,361,035.87

.497,938,446.00
25,554,006- 86
2,071,857-69

496,146,070.00
20,737,926-12
2,064, 332.43

Total
Paper:
United States notes
Treasury notes of 1890
National-bank notes
Gold certificates
Silver certificates

525,564,310.55

518,948,328.55

8,983,695.00
13,430.00
39,992,732.70
96,621,751.00
12,324,600,00

9,465,836.00
3,330.00
43,403,670.20
82,949,460.00
14,421,408.00

Total.
Other:
Minor coin currency
Fractional
Certified checks on banks
Deposits in national banks, etc
Interest on public debt paid

157,936,208.70

150, 243,704. 20

2,386,924.87
301.68
723,316.13
53,050,382.63
34,623. 65

1,997,166.63
276 87
343,190.58
80,235,995.03
11,000.52

Gold:
Coin
Bullion

'

''^^^''^•

Total
Silver:
Dollars
Subsidiary coin
Bullion

s

'
..

:

.:

'

Total

56,195,548.96

General account:
Gold certiflcates
Silvercertificates
Treasury notes of 1890
Reserve fund
•.
Balance

^

8,709,456.84
61,874,219.07
1,310,447.44
24,349„ 434. 05
8,728,927.04

34,828,988.96
100,018,638.98
6,452,334.59
28,092,127.73
10,618,605.32
2,540,446.92

105,472,484.44

182,551,142.50
57,528,598.04

105,472,484.44

Total
Less warrants and checks paid but not cleared

2,014,140,698.25

125,022,544.46

1,040,057,369.00
481,549,000.00
2,929,000.00
150,000,000.00
167,152,478.99

Agency account:
LUBaiTiES.
Outstanding warrants and checks
Disbursing officers' balances
Post Office Department account
Bank-note 5 per cent redemption account
Other deposit and redemption accounts
Board of trustees. Postal Savings System

82,587, 629.63

1,947,160, 332.43

Aggregate

1,086,947,169.00
483,550,000.00
2,660,000.00
150,000,000.00
165,960,984. 79

Total

1,841^687,847.99

1,889,118,153. 79

Aggregate

1,947,160,332.43

2,014,140,698. 25

16726°—FI 1913


-16

242

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 10.—Assets and liabilities ofthe Treasury in excess of certificates and Treasury notes
at the close of June, 1912 and 1913.
June 30,1912.

June 30,1913.

ASSETS.

Gold coin and bullion
Silver dollars and bullion
Subsidiary silver coin
United States notes
Treasury notes of 1890.
Natidrial-bank notes
Minor coin
Fractional currency
Certified checks on banks
Deposits in national banks, etc
Interest on public debt paid

$264, 028,646. 22
27, 856,903.69
25, 554,006.86
983,695.00
13,430. 00
992,732. 70
386,924.87
301. 68
723,316.13
050,382.63
34,623.65

$258,363,326.87
26,421,810.43
20,737,926.12
9,465,836.00
"3,330. 0043,403,670.20
1,997,166.63
276.87
343,190.58
80,235,995.03
' 11,000.52

422,624,963. 43

440,983,529. 25

105,472,484.44
150,000,000.00
167,152,478.99

125,022,544.46
150,000,000.00
165,960,984. 79

422,624,963.43

440,983,529.25

Total
LIABILITIES.

Agency account
Reserve fund
Available cash balance
Total.-

No. ll.—Estimated stock of gold coin and bullion, the amount in the Treasury, and the
araount in circulation at the end of each mpnth, from Januanj, 1908.
Months.
1908—Januarjr:
Estimated stock.
In theTreasury.
In circulation
February:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
March:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
AprU:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
May:
Estima,ted stock.
In the Treasury.
Ih circulation
Jiifie:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
July:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
Augiist:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
September:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
October:
Estimated stock
I n the Treasury.
In circulation...,
i^To vember:
Estimated stock
Iri the Treasury.
In circulation...
December:
Estimated stock
In the Treasury.
In circulation...




Gold coin.

Gold bullion.

Total.

$1,463,271,296
821,775,200
641,496,096

$165,329,279
165,329,279

$1,628,600,555
987,104,459
641,496,096

1,483,613,475
849,809,418
633,804,057

152,234,999
152,234,999

1,635,848,474
1,002,044,417
633,804,057

1,501,092,789
871,360,084
629,732,705

141,472,825
141,472,825

1,642.565,614
1,012,832,909
629,732,705

1,527,262,767
899,093,879
628,168,888

112,004,617
112,004,617

1,639,267,384
1,011,098,496

1,538,405,225
919,784,464
* 618,620,761

77,608,708
77,608,708

1,616,013,933
997,393,172
618,620,761

1,535,169,328
921,924,518
.613,244,810

82,964,164
82,964,164

1,618,133,492
1,004,888,682
613,244,810

1,536,611,207
920,822,931
615,788,276

93,688,682
93,688,682

1,630,299,889
1,014,511,613
615,788,276

1,538,216,009
918,225,746
619,990,263

103, ,342,939
103,342,939

1,641,558,948
1,021,568,685
619,990,263

1,530,087,479
914,132,361
615;955,118

113,593,907
113,593,907

1,643,681,386
1,027,726; 268
615,955,118

1,528,297,418
' 918,236,856
610,060,562

121,061,326
121,061,326

1,649,3.58,744
1,039,298,182
610,060,562

1,535,520,290
918,522,229
616,998,061

123,323,861
123,323,861

1,658,844,151
1,041,846,090
616,998,061

1,541,657,483
922,339,642
619,317,841

112,224,324
112,224,324

1,653,881,807
1,034,563,966
619,317,841

TREASURER.

243

No. 11.—Estimated stock of gold coin and bullion, etc.—Continued.
Months.
1909—January:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
February:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
March:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
April:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
May:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
June:
Estimated stock.
In theTreasury.
In circulation
,July:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
August:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In chculation
September:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
October:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
November:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation—
December:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
1910—January:
'
Estimated stock.
In;the Treasury.
In circulation
February:
.Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
March:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
^In chculation
April:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
May:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
June:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
July:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation....
August;
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...,




Gold coin.

Gold bulhon.

Total. <

$1,538,476,008
932, .531,108
605,944,900

$110,553,295
110,553,295

$1,649,029,303
1.043,084,403
'605,944,900

1,543,640,861
933,661,.502
609,988,359

113,07.5,248
113,075,248

1,656,725,109
1,046,736,750
609,988,359

1,531,914,472
923,621,813
608,292,659

113,507,584
113,507,584

1,645,422,0.56
1,037,129,397
608,292,659

1,557,115,972
947,826,635
609,289,337

92,373,570
92,373,570

1,649,489,542
1,040,200,205
609,289,337

1,576,806,675
971,562,999
605,243,676

68,094,058
68,094,058

1,644,900,733
.1,039,657,057
605,243,676

1,574; 906,904
975,569,206
599,337,698

67,135,095
67,13.5,095

1,642,041,999
1,042,704,301
599,337,698

1,563,4.53, 111
966,646,676
596,S06,435

74,°35S, 016
74,358,016

1,637,811,127
1,041,004,692
596,806,435

1,556,714, .542
968,875,785
587,838,757

79,781,241
79,781,241

1,636,495, 783
1,048,6.57,026
587,838,757

1,563,011,877
964,568,877
598,443,000

83,821,624
83,821,624

1,646,833,501
1,048,390,501
598,443,000

1,561,651,476
962,878,301
598,773,175

87,062,655
87,062,655

1,648,714,131
1,049,940,9.56
598,773,175

1, .551,702,508
947,741,192
603,961,316

93,203,715
93,203,715

1,541,100,375
934.887,962
606,212,413

97,008,446
97,008,446

1,638,108,821
1,031,896,408
606,212,413

1,540,260,782
936.746,130
603', 514,652

99,702,013
99,702,013

1,639,962,795
1,036,448,143
603,514,652

1,541,073,698
943,174,760
597, 798,938

101,110,148
101,110,148

1,642,083,846
1.044.284.908
597,798,938

1,544,213,200
9.50,127,482
594,085,718

104,649,952
104,649-, 952

1,648,863,152
1,0.54,777,434
594,085,718

1,515,679,850
923,865,142
591,814,708

104,842,241
104,842,241

1,620, .522,091
1,028,707,383
,591,814,708

1,525,090,144
930,045,336
594,954,808

102,428,170
102,428,170

1,627,428,314
1,032,473,506
594,954,808

1,531,074,997
940,197,004
590,877,993

104,968,481
104,968,481

1,636,043,478
1,045,165,485
590,877,993

1,530,837,770
939,172,332
591,665,438

120,912,080
120,912,080

1,651,749,850
1,060,0.84,412
591,665,438

1,540,829,608
948,144,600
592,685,008

135,3.50,316
1.35,350,316

1,676,179,924
1,083,494,916
592,685,008

.

1,644,906,223
1.040.944.907
603,961,316

244

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
No. II.—Estimated stock of gold coin and bullion, eic—Continued.
Months.

1910—September:
Estimated stock.
In tho Treasury.
In circulation
October:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
November:
Estimated stock.
In theTreasury.
In circulation..,.
December:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
1911—January:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
February:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
March:
Estimated stock.
" In the Treasury .
In circulation
April;
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
May:
Estimated stock".
In the Treasury.
In circulation..-.
June:
Estimated stock.
Ih the Treasury.
In circulation
July:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
August: '
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
September:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
October:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
November:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation
December:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation....
1912—January:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
February:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
March:
Estimated stock
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
April:
Estimated stock
I n the Treasury.
In circulation...




Gold coin.

Gold bullion.

Total.

$1,549,619,071
956,548,991
593,070,080

$133,778,979
133,778,979

$1,683,398,050
1,090,327,970
593,070,080

561,775,877
966,840,932
594,934,945

130,983,299
130,983,299

1,692,759,176
1,097,824,231
594,934,945

,575,806,210
974,314,025
601,492,185

125,392,577
125, .392,577

1,701,198,787
1,099,706,602
601,492,185

,587,473,973
981,823,886
605,650,087

121,354,324
121,354,324

1,708,828,297
1,103,178,210
0 605,650,087

,592,641,988
995,354,104
597,287,884

126,294,149
126,294,149

1,718,936,137
1,121,648,253
597,287,884

,609,263,114
,015,591,664
593,671,450

121,198,179
121,198,179

1,730; 461,293
1,136,789,843
593,671,450

,623,930,729
,033,761,672
590,169,057

113,830,216
113,830,216

1,737,760,945
1,147,591,888
590,169,057

,631,408,079
,041,974,554
589,433,525

113,180,235
113,180,235

1,744,588,314
1,155,154,789
589,433,525

,636,821,562
,035,957,210
600,864,352

116,626,653
116,626,653

1,753,448,215"
1,152,583,863
600,864,352

. 628,918,138
,
,039,622,600
589,295,538

124,278,584
124,278,584

1,753,196,722
1,163,901,184
589,295,538

.,628,496,372
.,038,265,552
590,230,820

135,610,731
135,610,731

1,764,107,103
1,173,876,283
590,230,820

.,627,640,691
.,034,154,933
593,485,758

147,854,063
147,854,063

1,775,494,754
1,182,008,996,
593,485,758

,625,959,188
.,030,824,729
595,134,459

156,804,787
156,804,787

1,782,763,975
1,187,629,516
595,134,459

.,624,405,372
.,029,988,211
594,417,161

167,154,228
167,154,228

1,791,559,600
1,197,142,439
594,417,16!

.,622,798,501
.,006,020,860
616,777,641

174,923,059
174,923,059

1,797,721,560
1,180,943,919
616,777,641

I, 614,288,817
.
.,000,261,911
614,026,906

182,712,099
182,712,099

1,797,000,916
1,182,974,010
614,026,906

[,612,843,485
1,009,369,049
603,474,436

190,438,836
190,438,836

1,803,282,321
1,199,807,885
603,474,436

1,603,747,458
[,008,285,828
595,461,630

190,804,569
190,804,569

1,794,552,027
1,199,090,397
595,461,630

[,603,758,028
1,006,642,688
597,115,340

194,631,497
194,631,497

1,798,389,525
1,201,274,185
597,115,340

1,611,507,861
1,006,146,931
605,360,930

199,007,920
199,007,920

1,810,515,781
1,205,154,851
605,360,930

TREASURER.

245

No. 11.—Estimated stock of gold coin and bullion, etc.—Continued.
Months.
1912—May:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
I n circulation
June:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
I n the Treasury.
I n circulation
July:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
I n circulation
August:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
I n circulation...
September:
E s t i m a t e d stock
In the Treasury.
I n circulation...
October:
E s t i m a t e d stock,
In the Treasury.
I n circulation
November:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
I n the Treasury.
I n circulation
December:
E s t i m a t e d stock
I n the Treasury.
I n circulation...
1913—January:
E s t i m a t e d stock
I n the Treasury.
I n circulation...
February:
E s t i m a t e d stock
In the Treasury.
I n circulation...
March:
E s t i m a t e d stock
In the Treasury.
I n circulation...
April:
E s t i m a t e d stock
I n the Treasury.
I n circulation...
May:
E s t i m a t e d stock
In the Treasury.
I n circulation...
June:
E s t i m a t e d stock
I n the Treasury.
I n circulation...




Gold coin.

Gold b u l l i o n .

Total.

,613,009,112
,004,469,096
608,540,016

$200,027,283
200,027,283

$1,813,036,395
1,204,496,379
608,540,016

,615,248,998
,004,524,845
610,724,153

202,939,419
202,939,419

1,818,188,417
1,207,464,264
610,724,153

,617,733,665
,008,987,295
608,746,370

205,876,260
205,876,260

1,823,609,925
1,214,863,555
608,746,370

., 617,182,123
,005,482,770
611,699,353

214,901,441
214,901,441

1,&32,083,564
1,220,384,211
611,699,353

,614,734,663
,004,824,337
609,910,326

226,647,772
226,647,772

1,841,382,435
1,231,472,109
609,910,326

., 614,949,636
,004,335,428
610,614,208

241,885,521
241,885,521

1,856,835,157
1,246,220,949
610,614,208

.,615,788,712
994,582,600
621,206,112

251,559,549
251,559,549

1,867,348,261
1,246,142,149
621,206,112

.,617,073,329
993,914,108
623,159,221

261,503,793
261,503,793

1,878,577,122
1,255,417,901
623,159,221

.,619,631,581
.,002,577,743
617,053,838

255,994,537
255,994,537

1,875,626,118
1,258,572,280
617,053,838

.,611,790,988
., 001,433,247
610,357,741

255,429,710
255,429,710

1,867,220,698
1,256,862,957
610,357,741

,610,221,955
,003,086,482
607,135,473

248,347,939
248,347,939

1,858,569,894
1,251,434,421
607,135,473

.,614,806,056
.,003,100,279
611,705,777

252,281,029
252,281,029

1,867,087,085 •
1,255,381,308
. 611,705,777

.,615,906,704
., 005,902,275
610,004,429

245,463,191
245,463,191

1,861,369,895
1,251,365,466
610,004,429

.,619,645,807
1,011,245,008
608,400,799

251,116,028
2.51,116,028

1,870,761,835
• 1,262,361,036
608,400,799

246

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 12.—Estiinated stock of silver coin, the amount in the Treasury, and the amount in
•circulation at the end of each month, from January, 1908; also silver other than stock
held in the Treasury.
Months.

1908—January:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
February:
E s t i m a t e d stock
In the Treasury.
I n circulation....
March:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
I n t h e Treasury.
In circulation...
April:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
i n circulation...
May:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
I n t h e Treasury.
In circulation...
June:
E s t u n a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
July:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
August:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
September:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
October:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
November:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In theTreasury.
In circulation...
December:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
1909—January:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In theTreasury.
In circulation...
February:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
March:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
April:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
May:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
June:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
I n t h e TreawSury.
In circulation...
July:
E s t u n a t e d stock
I n the Treasury.
In circulation...
August:
E s t i m a t e d stock.
I n the Treasury.
I n circulation...




Standard
dollars.

Subsidiary'
silver.

O t h e r silver
items held.

$562,849,
473,292,
89,557;

$141,517,793
10,816, 738
130,701,055

$704,367,775
484,109,628
220, 258,147

$9,715,900

562,930
476,391
86,539;

143,464,623
16,075,711
127,388,912

706, 395,605
492 467,468
213; 928,137

10, 264,137

563,009
479,412;
83,596;

144,486,463
18,452,313
126,034,150

707 496,445
497 865,309
209; 631,136

11,305,261

563,097
482,347'
80,750;

144,809,002
20,267,842
124,541,160

707 906,984
502: 615,430
205; 291,554

11,128,435

563,179
485,076;
78,103j

143.538.263
22,155,411
121, 382, 852

706, 718,245
507; 232,062
199, 486,183

10,829,470

563,277
486,949',
76, r " '

147,355,783
23,177,618
124,178,165

710. 633,595
510; 126, 773
200; 506,822

11,078,247

563,357,
488,172'
75,185;

147,005,385
24,222,649
122,782,736

710, 363,367
512 395,497
197; 967,870

10,642,882

563,413.
488,522;
74,891

147,779,837
23,774,263
124,005,574

711 193,819
512: 297,150
198;

10,432,468

563,493,
488,409'
75,084

145,770,090
21,746,013
124,024,077

709 264,072
510: 155,848
199; 108,224

10,156,193

563,554.
488,8I4:
74,740;

150,935,970
19,272,269
131,663,701

714 490,782
508: 086,836
206: 403,946

9,903,429

563,610.
488,379:
75,213;

151,173,805
17,913,465
133,260,340

714 784,617
506; 310,584
208, 474,033

9,720,695

563,663
491,220!
72,443;

153,226,112
18.162.747
135,063,365

716, 889,924
509 382,966
207: 506,958

8,920,444

563,734
490,964'
72,770;

154,387,552
22,899,998
131,487,554

718, 122,364
513. 864,135
204; 258,229

9,205,407

563,791
491,632;
72,158,

155,622,140
24,855,000
130,767,140

719, 413,952
516, 487,913
202, 926,039

563,861
492,179
71,682;

153,845,035
25,957,101
127,887,934

717 706,847
518; 136,398
199, 570,449

563,930,
492,700;
71,229,

154,608,399
26,899,135
127.709.264

718, 539,211
519, 600,129
198, 939,082

563,985,
493,245,
70,740,

158,587,115
27,2.50,163
131,336,962

722, 572,927
520, 495,749
202, 077,178

564,061
492,073:
71,987;

159,408,546
27.076.748
132,331,798

723, 470,265
519: 150,567
204; 319,698

1,457,393

564,090.
492,203;
71, — '

159,428,122
26,571,114
132,857,008

723 518,934
518; 774,238
204; 744,696

; 352,521
,

564,139.
491,582!
72,556^

155,766,307
25,270,932
130,495,375

719, 906,119
516, 853,763
203 052,356

i 306,676
,

, 761,650

247

1?REASURER.
No. 12.—Estimated stock of silver coin, etc.—Continued.
Months.

Standard
dollars.

Subsidiary |
silver.

n.^^^

1909—September:
$564, 188,812 $160,026,753 $724,215,565
Estimated.stock..
21,577,881
512,187,964
490, 610,083
I n t h e Treasury...
138,448,872
212,027,601
73, 578,729
In circulation
October:
160,276,491
724,519,210
564, 242,719
Estimated stock..
17,952,453
507,811,315
489, 858,862
I n t h e Treasury...
142,324,038
216,707,895
In circulation
74, 383,857
November:
725,599,352
161,304,633
564, 294,719
Estimated stock..
15,963,589
505,659,901
489, 696,312
I n t h e Treasury..
145,341,044
219,939,451
In circulation
74, 598, 407
December:
727,135,856
162,801,137
564, 334,719
Estimated stock..
505,404,193
15,832,549
489, 571,644
I n t h e Treasury...
221,731,663
146,968,588
In circulation
74, 763,075
'.910—January:
727,718,824
564, 382,719
163,336,105
Estimated stock...
510,627,216
19,703,483
490, 923,733
I n t h e Treasury...
143,632,622
217,091,608
73, 458,986
In circulation
February:
728,242,605
163,815,886
564, 426,719
Estimated stock..
513,014,382
21,389,008
491, 625,374
In the Treasury..
215,228,223
142,426,878
In circulation
72, 801,345
March:
161,343,971
725,820,690
564, 476,719
Estimated stock..
513,243,624
21,384,171
491, 859,4.53
In the Treasury.212,577,066
139,959,800
In circulation
72, 617,266
April:
161,472,306
725,992,025
564, 519,719
Estimated stock..
513,446,745
21,594,391
491, 852,354
In the Treasury.212,545,280
139,877,915
72, 667,365
In circulation
May:
164,753,394
729,319,113
564, 565,719
Estimated stock..
21,367,285
513,500,230
492, 132,945
I n t h e Treasury.143,386,109
215,818,883
72, 432,774
In circulation
June:
719,764,256
564, 605,508 1 155,158,748
Estimated stock..
511,748,011
492, 172,994
19,575,017
I n t h e Treasury.208,016,245
72, 432,514
135,583, 731
In circulation
July:
720,050,581
155,405,862
564, 644,719
Estimated stock..
512,866,392
492, 488,565
20,377,827
In the Treasury..
207,184,189
135,028,035
In circulation
72, 156,154
August:
720,124,546
564, 690,508
155,434,038
Estimated stock..
512,280,328
20,366,533
491, 913,795
I n t h e Treasury..
207,844,218
135,067,505
In circulation
72, 776,713
September:
720,049,014
564, 731,508
155,317,506
Estimated-stock..
509,553,611
490, 733,547
18,820,064
I n t h e Treasury..
73, 997,961
136,497,442
210,495,403
In circulation
October:
720,906,304
564, 759,508
156,146,796
Estimated stock..
506,696,746
16,995,517
I n t h e Treasury..
489, 701,229
214,209,558
139,151,279
In circulation
75, 058,279
November:
564, 783,508
156,546,852
721,330,360
Estimated stock..
14,974,568
504,230,438
489, 255,870
In the Treasury..
217,099,922
141,572,284
In circulation
75, 527,638
December:
722,669,561
564, 805,508
157,864,053
Estunated stock..
504,412,439
15,401,350
In the Treasury..
489, Oil, 089
218,257,122
794,419
142,462,703
In circulation.:..
. 75,
1911—January:
564, 851,508
723,038,402
158,186,894
Estimated stock..
509,618,896
19,091,685
In the Treasury..
490, 527,211
213,419,506
139,095,209
In circulation
74, 324,297
February:
156,369,541
564, 889,508
721,259,049
Estimated stock.:
20,661,890
511,649,022
I n t h e Treasury..
490, 987,132
135,707,651
209,610,027
In circulation
73, 902,376
March:
723,466,537
564, 920,508
158.546,029
Estimated stock..
512,410,442
20,935,886
I n t h e Treasm'y..
491, 474,556
211,056,095
137,610,143
" In circulation
73, 445,952
April:
723,841,489
564, 958,508
158,882,981
Estimated stock.
21,278,864
513,181,969
In the Treasury..
491, 903,105
137,604,117
In circulation
210,659,520
73, 055,403
1 A revised estimate adopted, making a reduction of $9,700,000.




Other silver
items held. .

$8,127,316

8,083,657

7,788,748

6,901,631

7,158,382

9,241

7,035,125

6,867,448

6,940,796

7,217,834

6,832,816

6,947,235

6,853,365

7,104,040

7,045,344

6,573,911

6,528,480

6,402,986

7,065,139

'7,'i7i,'8i6

248

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
No. 12.—Estimated stock of silver coin, etc.—Continued.
Months.

1911—May:
Estimated stock..
I n t h e Treasury...
I n circulation
June:
Estimated stock..
I n t h e Treasury...
In circulation
July:
Estimated stock..
I n t h e Treasury...
In circulation
August:
Estimated stock..
In the Treasury..
In circulation
September:
Estimated stock..
In the Treasury..
In circulation
October:
Estimated stock..
In theTreasury..
I n circulation....
November:
Estunated stock..
In the Treasury..
In cii'culation
December:
Estimated stock..
In the Treasury..
In circulation
1912—January:
Estimated stock..
In the Treasury..
In circulation
February:
Estimated stock.,
In the Treasury..
In circulation
March:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury..
In circulation
April:
Estiinated stock.
I n t h e Treasury..
In circulation
May:
Estimated stock.
I n t h e Treasury..
I n circulation
June:
Estimated stock.
I n t h e Treasury..
In circulation
July:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury..
In circulation
August:
Estimated stock.
I n the Treasury..
In circulation.,..
September:
Estimated stock.
In theTreasury..
In circulation
October:
Estimated stock.
In the Treasury..
I n circulation
November:
Estimated stock.
I n the Treasury..
In circulation
December:
Estimated stock.
• In the Treasury..
I n circulation




Standard
dollars.

Subsidiary
silver.

$564,991,508
492,147,149
72,844,359

$159,201,448
21,388,360
137,813,088

$724,192,956
513,, 535,509
210,657,447

$7,193,226

565,033,367
492,587,318
72,446,049

159,607,364
21,185,641
138,421,723

724,640,731
513,772,959
210,867,772

7,187, 374

565,059,508
4,92,833,659
V2,225,849

159,709,862
21,153,059
138,556,803

724; 769,370
513,986,718
210,782,652

7,276,937

565,076,508
492,604,703
72,471,805

160,617,839
21,093,644
139,524,195

725,694,347
513,698,347
211,996,000

6,783,939

565,111,508
491,526,216
73,585,292

162,804,189
19,537,456
143,266,733

727,915,697
511,063,672
"216,852,025

6,605,677

565,141,367
490,931,067
74,210.300

161,264,426
18,617,856
142,646,570

726,405,793
509,548,923
216,856,870

6,097,082

565,168,367
490,925,423
74,242,944

164,080,387
17,490,432
146,589,955

729,248,754
508,415,855
220,832,899

5,557,907

565,186,367
490,647,776
74,538,591

165,789,312
18,016,294
147,773,018

730,975,679
508,664,070
222,311,609

4,762,138

565,222,367
492,116,937
73,105,430

164,667,449
21,775,660
142,891,789

729,889,816
513,892,597
215,997,219

4,534,173 •

565,239,367
492,688,795
72,550,572

167,332,556
23,468,394
143,864,162

732,571,923
516,157,189
216,414,734

4,473,648

565,269,367
494,740,904
70; 528,463

165,073,658
24,306,074
140,767,584

730,343,025
519,046,978
.211,296,047

4,713,877

565,301,367
494,884,971
70,416,396

165,763,883
24,738,979
141,024,904

731,065,250
519,62.3,950
211,441,300

4,821,793

565,322,367
494,961,344
70,361,023

169,884,577
25,584,334
144,300,243

735,206,944
520,545,678
214,661,266

4,640,489

565,349,020
495,009,446
70,339,574

170,588,205
25,554,007
145,034,198

735,937,225
520,563,453
215,373,772

5,000,858

565,368,367
494,830,659
70,537,708

170,680,698
25,530,820
145,149,878

736,049,065
520,361,479
215,687,586

5,206,799

565,395,367
494,326,706
71,068,661

171,425,508
25,308,849
146,116,659

736,820,875
519,635,555
217,185,320

4,907,803

565,424,367
496,449,306
68,975,061

171,749,957
23,100,165
148,649,792

737,174,324
519,549,471
217,624,853

5,296,650

565,442,020
491,842,930
73,599,090

172,078,534
20,'498,062
151,580,472

737,520,554
512,340,992
225,179,562

5,423,182

565,465,020
491,274,226
74,190,794

173,340,756
19,300,084
154,040,672

738,805,776
510,574,310
228,231,466

4,762,152

565,481,020
490,952,022
74,528,998

174,538,163
17,814,865
156,723,308

740,019,183
508,766,877
231,252,306

"4,"i39,'i86

Other silver
items held.

249

• TREASURER.
No. 12.—Estimated stock of silver coin, etc.—Continued.
Standard
dollars.

Months.

1913—January:
Estimated stock
In the Treasury
In circulation
February:
Estunated stock
I n the Treasury..
In circulation
March:
Estimated stock
In the Treasury
In circulation
April:
Estimated stock..
In the Treasury
In circulation .
May:
Estimated stock..
In the Treasury
In circulation .
June:
Estimated stock..
In the Treasury
In circulation

Subsidiary
silver.

Total.

Other silver
items held.

$565,505,020' $174,667,638
492,256,283
20,621,533
73,248,737
154,046,105

.

,

174,897,996
21,562,760
153,335,236

740,434,016
514,530,937
225,903,079

4,555,187

565,556,020
493,269,843
72,286,177
. . . .

$4,449,634

565,536,020
492,968,177
72,567,843

.

$740,172,658
512,877,816
227,294,842

174,981,948
21,865,085
153,116,863

740,537,968
515,134,928
225,403,040

4,609,071

565,569,020
496,372,856
72,196,164

175,087,365
21,624,333
153,463,032

740,656,385
514,997,189
225,659,196

4,680,186

565,590,020
493,494,137
72,095,883

175,299,876
21,179,158
154,120,718

740,889,896
514,673,295
226,216,601

4,719,810

565,613,263
493,486,070
72,127,193

175,195,996
20,737,926
154,458,070

740,809,259
514,223,996
226,585,263

4,724,332

No. 13.— United States notes. Treasury notes, and. national-bank notes outstanding, in
the Treasury, and in circulation at the end of each month, from January, 1908.
Months.

1908—January:
Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury.
I n circulation..
February:
Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury,
I n circulation..
March:
Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury
In circulation..
April:
- Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury
I n circulation..
May:
Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury
In circulation..
June:
Outstanding...
In t h e Treasury
In circulation..
July:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
August:
Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury
In circulation..
September:
Outstanding...
I n t h e Treasury
I n circulation.,
Octpber:
Outstanding...
I n t h e Treasury
In circulation.,
November:
Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury
In circulation..




United
States notes.

Treasury
notes.

Nationalb a n k notes.

$346,681,016
7,509,361
339,171,655

$5,400,000
7,516
5,392,484

$695,402,762 $1,047,483,778
30,401,444
37,918,321
665,001,318 1,009,565,457

'346,681,016
9,627,701
337,053,315

5,319,000
10,499
5,308,501

695,674,519
30,955,156
664,719,363

1,047,674,535
40,593,356
1,007,081,179

346,681,016
13,167,707
333,513,309

5,240,000
14,256
5,225,744

696,407,355
40,581,561
•655,825,794

1,048,328,371
53,763,524
994,564,847

346,681,016
10,449,437
336,231,579

5,152,000
12,735
5,139,265

697,645,698
49,767,343
647,878,355

1,049,478,714
60,229,515
989,249,199

346,681,016
11,488,742
335,192,274

5,070,000
16,101
5,053,899

698,449,517
60,997,318
637,452,199

1,050,200,533
72,502,161
977,698,372

346,681,016
7,284,694
339,396,322

4,982,000
18,470
4,963,530

698,333,917
66,685,237
631,648,680

1,049,996,933
73,988,401
976,008,532

346,681,016
5,645,634
241,035,382

4,903,000
13,211
4,889,789

692,088,991
64,772,332
627,316,659

1,043,673,007
70,431,177
973,241,830

346,681,016
5,369,090
341,311,926

4,847,000
9,582
4,837,418

685,326,108
54,692,308
630,633,800

1,036,854,124
60,070,980
976,783,144

346,681,016
5,490,551
341,190,465

4,767,000
16,191
• 4,750,809

675,612,327
39,829,288
635,783,039

1,027,060,343
45,336,030
981,724,313

346,681,016
3,686,960
342,994,056

4,705,000
13,775
4,691,225

665,844,192
22,642,191
643,202,001

1,017,230,208
26,342,926
990,887,282

346,681,016
3,043,833
343,637,183

4,649,000
10,143
4,638,857

667,178,177
17,752,117
649,426,060

1,018,508,193
20,806,093
997,702,100

Total.

250

'

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 13.— United States notes, Treasury notes, etc.—Continued.
Months.

1908—December:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
I n circulation
1909—January:
Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury..
I n circulation
February:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
I n circulation
March:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
I n circulation
April:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
I n circulation
May:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
I n circulation
Jime":
Outstanding.
I n t h e Treasury..
I n cii'culation
July:
Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury..
I n circulation
August:
Outstanding
I n t h e Treasury.^.
I n circulation
September:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
I n circulation
October:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
I n circulation
November:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
In circulation....
December:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
I n circulation
1910—January:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
I n circulation
February:
Outstanding
I n the Treasury..
I n circulation
March:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
I n circulation
April:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
I n circulation
May:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
I n circulation
June:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
In circulation....
July:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
I n circulation —




United
States notes.

Treasury
notes.

Nationalbank notes.

$346,681
10,25S;
336,422,

$4,596,000
6,811
4,589,189

$677,068,165 $1,028,345,181
25,287,727
35,552,585
651,780,438
992,792,596

346,681
8,661
338,019;

4,525,000
.15,276
4,509,724

676,673,092
37,762, 721
638,910,371

1,027,879,108
46,439,993
981,439,115

346,681
10,922;
335,758,

4,468,000
•15,336
4,452,664

678,285,600
30,686,733
647,598,867

1,029,434,616
41,624,579
987,810,037

346,681
7,552;
339,128,

4,398,000
11,193
4,386,807

684,407,615
22,816,033
661,591,582

1,035,486,631
30,379,395
1,005,107,236

346,681
5,902;
340,778,

4,329,000
8,481
4,320,519

687,408,227
25,263,392
662,144,835

1,038,418,243
31,174,624
1,007,243,619

346,681
7,158;
339,522,

4,274,000
8,812
4,265,188

688,183,115
25,425,734
662,757,381

1,039,138,131
32,592,755
1,006,545,376

346,681
6,562;
340,118,

4,215,000
11,585
4,203,415

689,920,074
24,381,268
665,538,806

1,040,816,090
30,955,602
1,009,860,488

346,681
7,752;
338,928,

4,169,000
12,879
4,156,121

695,354,164
27,406,977
667,947,187

1,046,204,180
35,172,438
1,011,031,742

346,681
6,905:
339,775;

4,120,000
12,725
A, 107,275

698,845,474
26,902,024
671,943,450

1,049,646,490
33,820,500
1,015,825,990

346,681
4,27S;
342,402,

4,071,000
7,165
4,063,835

702,807,459
23,641,951
679,165,508

1,053,559,475
27,928,040
1,025,631,435

'346,681
4,501
342,179;

4,034,000
12,465
4,021,535

703,940,756
17,944,644
685,996,112

1,054,655,772
22,458,163
1,032,197,609

346,681,
4,459'
342,221;

3,982,000
4,530
3,977,470

707,-433,457
17,709,371
689,724,086

1,058,096,473
22,173,168
1,035,923,305

346,681,
7,8I4;
338,866;

3,942,000
8,162
3,933,838

710^354,253
23,240,419
687,113,834

1,060,977,269
31,063,334
1,029,913,935

346,681
8,402;
338,278;

3,894,000
9,751
3,884,249

709,879,333
37,293,444
672,585,889

1,060,454,349
45,705,291
1,014,749,058

346,681
5,906;
340,774;

3,850,000
20,286
3,829,714

710,022,868
30,426,739
679,596,129

1,060,553,884
36,353,447
1,024,200,437

346,681
5,861
340,819;

3,800,000
18,019
3,781,981

717,258,996
21,596,041
695,662,955

1,067,740,012
27,475,806
1,040,264,206

346,681
6,857;
339,823;

3,757,000
15,560
3,741,440

713,461,586
25,396,364
688,065,222

1,063,899,602
32,269,211
1,031,630,391

346,681
6,835:
339,845'

3,711,000
10,797
3,700,203

712,242,841
29,373,061
682,869,780

1,062,634,857
36,219,371
1,026,415,486

346,681
11,893
334,787;

3,672,000
9,475
3,662,525

713,430,733
29,771,198
683,659,535

1,063,783,749
41,673,819
1,022,109,930

346,681,
8,789:
337,89i:

3,632,000
11,046
3^620,954

712,029,468
36,666,030
675,363,438

1,062,342,484
45,466,115
1,016,876,369

Total.

251

TREASURER.

No. 13.— United States notes. Treasury notes, etc.—Continued.
Months.

1910—August:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
September:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
October:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation. =
November:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
December:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
" In circulation..
1911—January:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In ciiculation..
February:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
March:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
AprU:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In cii'Culation..
May:
Outstanding...
In the Treasmy
In cii'culation..
June:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
July:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
August:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
September:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In cii'culation..
October:
Outstanding...
In the Treasmy
In circulation..,
November:
Outstanding
In the Treasm-y
In circulation..
December:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In cu'culation..,
1912—January:
Outstandmg
In the Treasmy
In circulation..
February:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation...




United
States notes.

Treasury
notes.

Nationalbank notes.

$346,681
6,320;
340,360,

$3,587,000
10,719
3,576,281

$717,321,051 $1,067,589,067
41,929,342
35,598,345
681,722,706 1,025,659,725

346,681
5,325:
341,355;

3,546,000
8,775
3,537,225

720,795,606
29,810,242
690,985,364

1,071,022,622
35,144,896
1,035,877,726

346,681
5,496:
341,184:

3,518,000
7,442
3,510,558

724,874,308
18,805,902
706,068,406

1,075,073,324
24,309,908
1,050,763,416

346,681
6,169:
340,5ii:

3,494,000
9,626
3,484,374

726,855,833
20,430,734
706,425,099

1,077,030,849
26,609,451
1,050,421,398

346,681
9,268;
337,412,

3,472,000
10,507
3,461,493

727,705,981
23,614,689
704,091,292

1,077,858,997
32,893,958
1,044,965,039

346,681
8,532:
338,148:

3,426,000
10,877
3,415,123

726,445,388
37,863,433
688,581,955

1,076,552,404
46,406,623
1,030,145,781

346,681
5,718:
340,962:

3,388,000
9,749
3,378,251

728,935,041
31,472,797
697,462,244

1,079,004,057
37,200,928
1,041,803,129

346,681.
5,665:
341,015;

3,357,000
12,724
3,344,276

729,152,916
27,560,025
701,592,891

1,079,190,932
33,238,695
1,045,952,237

346,681
10,660:
336,020:

3,319,000
8,743
3,310,257

728,144,518
30,356,824
697,787,694

1,078,144,534
41,026,094
1,037,118,440

346,681
.11,664
335,016;

3,286,000
10,194
3,275,806

728/478,011
30,964,360
697,513,651

1,078,445,027
42,638,968
1,035; 806,059

346,681.
7,69l
338,989;

3,246,000
8,744
3,237,256

728,194,508
40,493,225
687,701,283

1,078,121,524
48,193,863
1,029,927,661

346,681
5,032:
341,648:

3,218,000
9,315
3,208,685

732,824,016
42,774,016
690,050,000

1,082,723,032
47,816,057
1,034,906,975

346,681
4,249:
342,431;

3,201,000
15,227
3,185,773

737,206,748
43,430,951
693,775,797

1,087,088,764
47.695.488
1,039,393,276

346,681
4,926;
341,754

3,166,000
10,251
3,155,749

737,788,358
41,068,954
696,719,404

1,087,635,374
46.005.489
1,041,629,885

346,681
4,768:
341,912;

3,138,000
9,868
3,128,132

739,165,313
33,166,353
705,998,960

1,088,984,329
37,944,322
1,051,040,007

346,681
5,868
340,812;

3,111,000
8,230
3,102,770

7.39,764,346
29,800,608
709,963,738

1,089,556,362
35,676,870
1,053,879,492

346,681
8,730;
337,950,

3,093,000
14,386
3,078,614

740,603,187
35,366,945
705,236,242

1,090; 377; 203
44,112,047
1,046,265,156

346,681
9,547:
337,133:

3,057,000
11,651
3,045,349

741,661,968
47,855,918
693,806,050

1,091,399,984
57,414,603
1,033,985,381

346,681
9,567
337,113:

3,040,000
12,386
3,027,614

744,272,273' 1,093,993,289
38,963,623
48,543,350
705,308,650 1,045,449,939

Total.

252

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
No. 13.— United States notes. Treasury notes, etc.—Continued.
Months.

1912—March:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
April:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation..,
May:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
June:
Outstanding..,.,
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
July:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation..
August:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation..,
September:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation..,
October:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation..,
November:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation..
December:
Outstanding..'.
In the Treasury
In circulation..
1913—January:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation..
February:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
March:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
AprU:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation..
May:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..
June:
Outstanding...
In the Treasury
In circulation..




United
States notes.

Treasury
notes.

Nationalbank notes.

Total.

$346,681,016
8,880,271
337,800,745

$3,010,000
11,004
2,998,996

•346,681,016
9,625,444
337,055,572

2,978,000
8,183
2,969,817

745,720,348
33,623,681
712,096,667

1,095,379,364
•43,257,308
1,052,122,056

346,681,016
8,657,798
338,023,218

2,957,000
.14,110
2,942,890

745,492,672
35,937,196
709,555,476

1,095,130,688
44,609,104
1,050,521,584

346,681,016
8,983,695
337,. 697,321

2,929,000
13,430
2,915,570

745,134,992
39,992,733
705,142,259

1,094,745,008
48,989,858
1,045,755,150

346,681,016
8,497,777
338,183,239

2,911, O'OO
12,573
2,898,^427

744,905,941
42,711,981
702,193,960

1,094,497,957
51,222,331
1,043,275,626

346,681,016
8,067,352
338,613,664

2,884,000
8,454
2,875,546

746,501,307
40,879,280
705,622,027

1,096,066,323
48,955,086
1,047,111,237

346,681,016
5,295,957
341,385,059

2,855,000
8,740
2,846,260

747,779,654
36,770,326
711,009,328

1,097,315,670
42,075,023
1,055,240,647

346,681,016
4,137,102
342,543,914

2,836,000
10,113
2,825,887

749,348,859
27,700,595
721,648,264

1,098,865,875
31,847,810
1,067,018,065

346,681,016
5,824,179
340,856,837

2,813,000
8,440
2,804,560

750,185,776
27,800,403
722,385,373

1,099,679,792
33,633,022
1,066,046,770

346,681,016
6,995,837
339.685.179

2,797,000
10,115
2,786,885

750,972,246
30,787,771
720,184,475

1,100,450,262
37,793,723
1,062,656,539

346,681,016
9,971,816
336,709,200

2,773,000
7,089
2,765,911

750,481,769
46,623,063
703,858,706

1,099,935,785
56,601,968
1,043,333,817

346,681,016
7,729,631
338,951,385

2,742,000
9,843
2,732,157

751,117,794
39,756,894
711,360,900

1,100,540,810
47,496,368
1,053,044,442

346,681,016
8,560,513
338,120,503

2,722,000
6,886
2,715,114

752,059,332
33,648,311
718,411,021

1,101,462,348
42,215,710
1,059,246,638

346,681,016
8,456,369
338,224,647

2,709,000
13,766
2,695,234

753,076,674
36,495,987
716,580,687

1,102,466,690
44,966,122
1,057,500,568

346,681,016
7,845,947
338,835,069

2,688,000
9,639
2,678,361

755,294,066
40,620,480
714,673,586

1,104,663,082
48,476,066
1,056,187,016

346,681,016
9,465,836
337.215.180

2,660,000
3,330
2,656,670

759,157,906
43,403,670
715,754,236

1,108,498,922
52,872,836
1,055,626,086

$744,871,283 $1,094,562,299
34,887,276
43,778,551
709,984,007 1,050,783,748

253

TEEASUEEE.

No. 14.—Gold certificates and silver certificates outstanding, in the Treasury, and in circulation at the end of each month, from January, 1908.
Months.

1908—January: "
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In chculation...
February:.
Outstanding
" In the Treasury.
' I n circulation...
March:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
April:
Outstanding
In the "Treasury.
In circulation...
May:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation...
June:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation...
. July:
Outstandmg
" In the Treasury
In circulation...
August:
Outstanding
In theTreasury.
In circulation...
September:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
October:
Outstanding—
In the Treasury
In circulation...
November:
Outstanding—
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
December:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
1909—January:
Outstanding...
• In the Treasufy.
In circulation...
February:
Outstanding—
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
March:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation...
AprU:
Outstanding—
In the Treasury
In circulation...
May:
Outstanding—
In the Treasury
In circulation...
June:
Outstanding—
In the Treasury
In circulation...
July:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation...




Gold certificates.

Silver certificates.

$610, 215,869
40, 586,510
769, 629,359

$464,704,000 $1,274,919,869
11,290,360
51,876,870
453,413,640 1,223,042,999

Total.

830, 046,869
38, 384,970
791 661,899

457,044,000
10,852,631
446,191,369

1,287,090,869
49,237,601
1,237,853,268

835,010,869
26, 670.040
340,829

452,048,000
13,866,783
438,181,217

1,287,058,869
40,5,36,8231,246,522,046

,910,869
29, 584,390
817, 326,479

463,778,000
17,520,019
446,2.57,981

1,310,688,869
47,104,409
1,263,584,460

825, 730,869
42, 022,380
783, 708,489

474,054,000
17,385,516
456,668,484

1,299,784,869
59,407.896
1,240,376,973

822, 923,869
39, 947,250
782,
,976,619

474,350,000
9,071,295
465,278,705

1,297,273,869
49,018,545
1,248,255,324

818, 758,869
34,,485,260
784, 273,609

484,054,000
9,363,038
474,690,962

1,302,812,869
43,848,298
1,258,964,571

837, 564,869
30, 911,760
653,109

487,768,000
12,684,277
475,083,723

1,325,332,869
43,596,037
1,281,736,832

842, 045,869
36, 378,105
805; 667,764

488,208,000
12,364,058
475,843,942

1,330,253,869
48,742,163
1,281,511,706

850, 817,869
43, 571,480
807, 246,389

488,793,000
4,893,158
483,899,842

1,339,610,869
48,464,638
1,291,146,231

863, 262,869
49, 618,530
813; 644,339

488,125,000
7,382,500
480,742,500

1,351,387,869
57,001,030
1,294,386,839

858, 272,869
56, 412,360
801, 860,509

491,216,000
20,378,201
470,837,799

1,349,488,869
76,790,561
1,272,698,308

864, 263,869
25 956,330
307,539

480,898,000
19,535,237
461,362,763

1,345,161,869
45,491,567
1,299,670,302

860, 341,869
47, 699,690
812, 642,179

484,754,000
13,342,608
471,411,392

1,345,095,869
61,042,298
1,284,053,571

844, 617,869
47, 661,660
796, 956,209

483,365,000 1,327,982,869
6,607,037
54,268,697
476,757,963„ 1,273,714,172

846,
42, 089,580
804, 609,289

482,547,000
5,965,203
476,581,797

1,329,245,869
48,054,783
1,281,191,086

842, 855,869
27, 461,850
815, 394,019

486,390,000
6,987,843
479,402,157

1,329,245,869
34,449,693
1,294,796,176

852, 751,869
37, 746,420
815, 005,449

484,414,000
6,696,676
477,717,324

1,337,165,869
44,443,096
1,292,722,773

852, 034,869
46, 750,510
805, 284,359

487,008,000
9,794,233
477,213,767

1,339,042,869
56,544,743
1,282,498,126

254

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 14.—Gold certificates and silver certificates, etc.—Continued.
Months.

1909—August:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation
September:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
In circulation
October:
Outstanding
In the Treasury..
In circulation
November:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation
December:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation
1910—January:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
In circulation
February:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
In circulation—
March:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
In circulation
April:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
•In circulation—
May:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation
June:
Outstanding
Ih the Treasury.
In circulation—
luly:
Outstanding
In thc Treasury.
In circulation—
August:
Outstanding
, In the Treasury.
In circulation
September:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation
October:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In circulation
November:
Outstanding
In the Treasury.
In chculation—
December:
Outstanding
In theTreasury..
In circulation
' 1911—January:
Outstanding
I n the Treasury.
In circulation
February:
Outstanding...'..
In the Treasury.
I n circulation




Gold certificates.

$859,392,
47,920,
811,472,

Silver certificates.

$487,586,000 $1,346,978,869
9,501,446
57,422,146
478,084,554 1,289,556,723

864; 162,
58,645,
805,517,

484,826,000
5,135,169
479,690,831

1,348,988,869
63,780,879
1,285,207,990

874,656,
79,451, 380
795,205,

487,587,000
5,792,111
481,794,889

1,362,243,869
85,243,491
1,277,000,378

c884,339,
93,962,
790,377,

487,038,000
5,928,407
481,109,593

1,371,377,869
99,891,007
1,271,486,862

874,792,
84,885,
789,907,

487,-355,000
12,965,542
474,389,458

1,362,147,869
97,851,342
1,264,296,527

866,808,
50,617,
816,191,

484,665,000
10,624,977
474,040,023

1,351,473,869
61,242,467
1,290,231,402

858,472,
40,844,
817,628,

485,775,000
6,537,927
479,237,073

1,344,247,869
47,382,217
1,296,865,652

852,877,
45,676,
807,201,

489,834,000
5,688,438
484,145,562

1,342,711,869
51,365,048
1,291,346,821

851,665,
66,959,
784,706,

489,798,000
5,947,355
483,850,645

1,341,463,869
72,906,975
1,268,556,894

857,003,
54,151,
802,852,

489,317,000
8,053,089
481,263,911

1,346,320,869
62,204,299
1,284,116,570

862,936,
60,182,
02,754,

489,117,000 1,352,053,869
70,702,432
10, .519,762
478,597,238 1,281,351,437

870,597,
38,934,
831,663,

489,474,000
12,810,624
476,663,376

1,360,071,669
51,745,264
1,308,326,405

889,811,
35,945,
853,866,

485,939,000
10,267,573
475,671,427

1,375,750,669
46,212,773
1,329,537,896

895,178,
49,212,
845,965,

484,657,000
• 5,238,487
479,418,513

1,379,835,669
64,451,197
1,325,384,472

899,859,
^3,059,

489,068,000
5,691,589
483,376,411

1,388,927,669
68,751,089
1,320,176,580

910,354,
67,480,
842,874,

488,190,000
7,462,588
480,727,412

1,398,544,669
74,942,860
1,323,601,809

922:, 855,
73,681,
849,174,

485,571,000
11,237,501
474,333,499

1,408,426,669
84,918,531
1,323,508,138

937,757,
36,371,
901,386,

480,003,000
10,692,058
469,310,942

1,417,760,669.'
47,063,375
1,370,697,294

940,079, (
30,468,:
909,611,'

478,686,000
6.485,117
472,200,883

1,418,765,669
36,953,297
1,381,812,372

255

TREASURER.
No. 1.4.—Gold certificates and silver certificates-, etc.—-Continued.
Gold certificates.

1911—March:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation
April:
' Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation
May:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation
June:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation
.July:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation.
August:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation
September:
- Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation
October:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation
November:
Outstanding
In the Treasmy
In chculation
December:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation
1912—January:
Outstandhlg
In the Treasury
In chculation
February:
=i
Outstandhlg
In the Treasury
In chculation
March:
Outstandhlg
In the Treasury
In chculation
AprU:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation
May:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation
June:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation
July:
Outstanding
In the Treasur}'
In chculation
August:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation.!
September:
Outstandhlg
In the Treasury
In circulation

Silver certificates.

$950,380,669
34,515,050
915,865,619

Months.

$474,096,000 $1,424,476,623
6,673,373
41,188,490
467,422,627 1,383,288, 246

Total.

967,232,669
32,827,160
934,405,509




1, 459,003,669
87,206,986
1,371,796,683

466,411,000
6,062,089
460,348,911

1,460,749,669
76,711,069
1,384,038,600

464,051,000
5,610,683
458,440,317

1,^466,121,669
77,555,323
1,388,566,346

484,281,000
8,590,586
475,690,414

1,481,343,669
88,691,256
1,392,652,413

.,002,579,669
106,938,921
895,640.748

490,453,000
7,001,027
483,451,973

1,493,032,669
113,939,948
1,379,092,721

1,010,956,369
104,012,002
906,944,367

489,166,000
11,138,716
478,027,284

1,500,122,369
115,150,718
1,384,971,651

1,035,612,369
71,458,840
964,153,529

484,594,000
15,934,925
468,659,075

1,520,206,369
87,393,765
1,432,812,604

1,025,723,369
06,580,573
959,142,796

477,919,000
10,235,603
467,683,397

1,503,642,369
76,816,176
1,426,826,193

1,028,432,369
81,295,114
947,137,2.55

487,163,000
12,307,624
474,855,376

1,515,595,369
93,602,738
1,421,992,631

1,034,296,369
82,329,040
951,967,329

486,191,000
10,883,976
475,307,024

1,520,487,369
93,213,016
1,427,274,353

1,034,895,36974,588,040
960,307,329

483,223,000
11,489,859
471,733,141

1,518,118,369
86,077,899
1,432,040,470

1,040,057,369
96,621,751
943,435,618

481.549,000
12,324,600
469,224,400

1,521,606,369
108,946,.351
1,412,680,018

1,037,068,259
90,952,380
946,115,889

:

467,546,000
6,845,366
460,700,634

997,062,669
80,100,670
916,961,999

'.

1,458,369,669
74,458,044
1,383,911,625

1,002,070,669
71,944,640
930,126,029

.•

463,499,000
9,955,304
453,543,696

994,338,669
70,648,980
923,689,689

.....'

1,451,594,669
42,806,272
1,408,788,397

991,457,669
80,361,620
911,096,049

•.

468,436,000
5,848,232
462,587,768

994,870,669
64,502, 740
930,367,929

'

1,439,864,662
39,438,039
1,400,426,637

983,158,669
36,958,040
946,200,629

"

472,632,000
6,610,877
466,021,123

487,825,000
15,077,673
472,747,327

1,524,893,269
106,030,053
1,418,863,216

1,053,126,269
104,475,830
948,6.50,439

489,512,000
17,665,069
471,846,931

1,542,638,269
122,140,899
1,420,497,370

1,065,408,169
119,165,899
946,242,270

496,153,000
13,785,.334
482,367,6u6

1,561,561,169
132,951,2.33
1,428,609,936

\
,

•.
'
-.

256

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 14.—Gold certificates and silver certificates, etc.—Continued.
Months.

1912—October:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In circulation...
November:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation...
December:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation...
1913—January:
Outstanding....
In the Treasury
In chculation...
February:
Outstandhlg
In the Treasury
In circulation...
March:
Outstandhlg
In the Treasury
In circulation...
AprU:
Outstandhlg
In the Treasury
In chculation."..
May:
Outstanding
In the Treasury
In chculation."..
June^
Outstandhlg
In the Treasury
In chculation...




Gold certificates.

$1,056,017,169
112,471,740
943,545,429

Silver certificates.

Total.

$489,266,000 $1,545,283,169
119,988,604
7,516,864
481,749,136 1,425,294,565

1,068>346,169
126,588,360
941,757,809

489,578,000
9,542,337
480,035,663

1,557,924,169
136,130,697
1,421,793,472

1,084,434,169
128,747,197
955,686,972

490,787,000
12,814,458
477,972,542

1,575,221,169
141,561,655
1,433,659,514

1,086,351,169
83,528,920
1,002,822,249

478,209,000
14,344,733
463,864,267

1,564,560,169
97,873,653
1,466,686,516

1,082,198,169
88,080,330
994,117,839

469,324,000
8,401,306
460,922,694

1,551,522,169
96,481,636
1,455,040,533

1,068,610,169
85,105,928
983,504,241

474,826,000
10,216,445
464,609,555

1,543,436,169
95,322,373
1,448,113,796

1,075,198,169
S5,005,170
990,192,999

480,597,000
11,405,472
469,191,528

1,555,795,169
96,410,642
1,459,384,527

1,079,407,169
81,819,775
997,587,394

483,067,000
15,685,730
467,381,270

1,562,474,169
97,505,505
1,464,968,664

1,086,947,169
82,949,460
1,003,997,709

483,550,000
14,421,408
469,128,592

1,570,497,169
97,370,868
1,473,126,301

257

TEEASUEEE.

No. 15.—Estimated stock of all kinds of money at the end of each month, from January,
1907.
[Notes include United States notes. Treasury notes, and national-bank notes.)
Months.
1907—January . .
February.
March
AprU
May
June
July
August....
September
October...
November,
December.
1908—January...
February.
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September
October...
November.
December.
1909—January...
February.
March
AprU
May
June
July
August—
September.
October...
November.
December.
1910—January...
February.
March
AprU
MTay
June
July
August....
September
October...
November.
December.
1911—January...
February.
March
AprU
May
June
July
August....
September
October...
November,
December.
1912—January...
February.
March
AprU
May

Jurie

July
August....
September
October...
November
December.
1913—January...
February.
March
AprU
May
June

16726°—FI 1913- -17



Gold.
116,107
972,427
373,750
893,741
136,891
,389,101
168,738
563,328
969,710
742,845
714,719
,530,493
600,555
848,474
565,614
267,3cS4
013,933
,133,492
299,889
558,948
681,386
3.58,744
844,151
881,807
029,303
725,109
422,056
489,542
,900,733
,041,999
811,127
,495,783
833,501
714,131
906,223
,108,821
,962,795
,083,846
803,152
522,091
428,314
,043,478
749,850
179,924
398,050
759,176
198,787
828,297
,936,137
,461,293
760,945
588,314
448,215
196,722
,107,103
494,754
763,975
559,600
721,560
,000,916
,282,321
552,027
389,525
515,781
036,395
188,417
,609,925
083,564
382,435
835,157
348,261
577,122
,875,626,118
867,220,698
858,569,894
867,087,085
„_,369,895
870,761,8:35

SUver.

690;
692,
692,
693,
693,
695,
696,
698:
702:
704:
706;
707,
707:
706:

7io:
7io:
711'
709:
714:
714:
716;
718,
719,
717
718:
722;
723
723
719;
724
724:
725:
727:
727;
728,
725,
725,
729,
719,
720,
720:
720:
720:
721'
722:
723;
721
723:
723;
724
724:
724;
725:
727:
726:
729:
730:
729:
732:
730:
731'
735:
735:
736:
736:
737:
737:
738:
740:
740:
740:
740:
740:
740:
740;

Notes.
$949,
1,366,585 $3,236, 720,700
949,
1,409,038 3,244,382,436
950:
1,175,079 3,251 953,412
952,
1,776,856 3,262. 509,616
954,, 699,566 3,266; 789,005
:
956:
1,4.57,706 3,11.5,561,007
955:
1,967,902 .3,123, 333,737
956:
',524,337 3,123,056,673
956:
1,375,130 3,134,688,449
962:, 274,482 3,148,776,911
!
1,445,212 3,269,065,058
oos:
042:
1,290,911 3,349,223,380
047:
•,4.83,778 3,380,452,108
047:
,674,535 3,389,918,614
:
048:, 328,371 3,398 390,430
1,478,714 3,396: 653,082
049:
1,200,533 3,372: 932,711
o.5o:
1,996,933 3,378; 764,020
049:
;
043:, 673,007 3,384, 336,263
1,854,124 3,389 606,891
036:
,060,343 3,380: 005,801
027:
,230,208 3,38i;079,734
017:
: 508,193 3,392,136,961
ois:,
,345,181 3,399,116,912
028:
,879,108 3,395, 030,775
027;
,434,616 3,405: 573,677
029,
,486,631 3,398: 615,534
035,418,243 3,406' 446,996
038 ,138,131 3,406; 611,791
0391,816,090 3,406,328,354
040;
,204,180 3,407,534,241
046,
,646,490 3,406,048,392
049,
,559,475 3,424,608,541
053:
,655,772 3,427,889,113
054:
,096,473 3,42.S,602,048
058;
1,977,269 3,426,221,946
060.
1,454,349 3,428,135,968
O6O:
1,553,884 3,4.30,880,335
O6O:
',740,012 3,442,423,854
067:, 899,602 3,410,413,718
:
063:
1,634,857 3,419,382,284
062:, 783,749 3,419,591,483
i
063:
1,342,484 3,434,142,915
062:
,589,067 3,463,893,537
067:
,022,622 3,474,469,686
071'
1,073,324 3,488,738,804
075:
,030,849 3,499,559,996
077:
,858,997 3,509,356,855
077:
1,552,404 3,518,526,943
076:
,004,057 3,530,724,399
079'
,190,932 3,540,418,414
079;
1/144,534 3,546,574,.337
078;
1,445,027 3,556,086,198
0781,121,524 3,555,958,977
078:
1,723,032 3,571,599,505
082:
',088,764 3,588,277,865
087:
,635,374 3,598,375,046
087:
1,984,329 3,606,919,722
1,556,362 3,616,526,676
1,377,203 3,618,353,798
,399,984 3,624,572,121
1,993,289 3,621,117,239
,562,299 3,623,294,849
1,379,364 3,636,960,395
1,130,688 3,643,374,027
: 745,008 3,648,870,650
,
: 497,957 3,654,156,947
,
.,066,323 3,664,970,762
,315,670 3,675,872,429
1,865,875 3,693,221,586
1,679,792 3,705,833,829
1,450,262 3,719,046,567
1,935,785 3,715, 734,561
1,540,810 3,708, 195,524
,462,348 3,700)570,210
1,466,690 3,710,210,160
: 663,082 3,706,922,873
,
1,498,922 3,720,070,016

258

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 16.—Estimated amount of all kinds of money in circulation at the end of each month,
from January, 1907.
Gold.
1907—January
February...
March
AprU
May
June
•Tuly
August
September..
October
November..
December..
1908—January
Febmary...
March
April
May
June
.July
August
September..
October
November..
December..
1909—January
February...
March
April
May
June
July
August
September..
October
November..
December..
1910—January
February...
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September..
Oetober
November..
December..
1911—January
Februa:'ry...
March
AprU
May
June
JiUy
August
September..
October
iSfovember..
December..
1912—January
February...
March
AprU
May
.June
July
, August
September..
October
November..
December..
1913—January
February...
March
AprU
May
June




$695,539,841
692,895,812
090,439,279
691,481,469
695,680,258
.561,697,371
566,036,725
560,356,994
561,956,589
574,459,086
640,577,952
648,573,173
641,496,096
633,804,057
629,732,705
628,168,888
618,620,761
613,244,810
615,7S8,276
619,990,263
615,955,118
610,060,562
616,998,061
619,317,841
605,944,900
609,998,359
608,292,6.59
609,289,337
605,243,676
599,337,698
596,806,4.35
587,838,757
598,443,000
598,773,175
603,961,316
606,212,413
603,514,652
597,798,938
594,085,718
591,814,708
594,954,808
590,877,993
591,665,438
592,685,008
593,070,080
594,934,945
601,492,185
605,650,087
597,287,884
593,671,450
590,169,057
589,433,525
600,864,352
589,295,538
590,230,820
.593,485,758
595,134,459
594,417,161
616,777,641
614,026,906
60.3,474,436
595,461,630
597,115,340
605,360,930
608,540,016
610,724,153
608,746,370
611,699,353
609,910,326
610,614,208
621,206,112
623,159,221
617,053,838
610,357,741
607,135,473
611,705,777
610,004,429
608,400,799

SUver.
$203,,581,203
203 ,690,890
203 ,983,239
203 ,878,005
203 ,810,469
203 ,487,845
203 ,504,285
205;,233,277
209,,744,403
216, ,284,188
223:,959,161
226:1,293,287
220:,258,147
213:1,928,137
209:1,631,136
205:,291,554
199: ,486,183
2oo;,.506,822
197 ,967,870
,896,669
198;,108,224
199,403,946
206;
,474,033
208,
,506,958
207,
,258,229
204,
1,926,039
202,
,570,449
199,
1,939,082
198,
1,077,178
202:
,319,698
204', 744,698
:
204:
1,052,356
203:
,,027,601
212:
.,707,895
216 ,939,451
219 ,731,663
221,091,608
217r 228,223
,
215.,577,066
212;
1,545,280
212,
,818,883
215,
,016,245
208,
,184,189
207,
,844,218
207,495,403
210:
,209,558
214'
,099,922
217:
1,257,122
218;
,419,506
213,
',610,027
209,
,056,095
211'
1,650,520
210:
',657,447
210:
1,867,772
210:
1,782,652
210:
,996,000
2111,852,025
216:
i,cS56,870
216:
1,832,899
220:, 311,609
!
222:
,997,219
215:
.,414,734
216:
,296,047
211 ,441,300
211 ,661,266
214:
.,373,772
215:
.,687,586
215:
,185,320
217:
,624,853
217:, 179,562
.
225:, 231,466
.
225:
,252,306
231' 294,842
,
227:
.,903,079
225:
.,403,040
225:
.,659,196
225:
1,216,601
226:
1,585,263
226:

Notes.
$923,280,171
928,052,632
934,841,838
936,545,549
939,197,181
937,487,715
933,504,724
935,200,569
933,101,522
943,979,945
999,115,141
1,029,779,142
1,009,565,457
1,007,081,179
994,564,847
989,249,199
977,698,372
976,008,532
973,241,830
976,783,144
981,724,313
990,887,282
997,702,100
992,792,596
981,439,115
987,810,037
1,005,107,236
1,007,243,619
1,008,545,378
1,009,860,488
1,011,031,742
1,015,825,990
1,025,631,435
1,032,197,609
1,035,923,305
1,029,913,935
1,014,749,058
1,024,200,437
1,040,264,208
1,031,630,391
1,026,415,486
1,022,109,930
1,016,876,369
1,02.5,659,725
1,0.35,877,726
1,050,-763,416
1,050,421,398
1,044,965,039
1,030,145,781
1,041,803,129
1,045,952,237
1,037,118,4.40
1,035,806,059
1,029,927,661
1,034,906,975
1,039,393,276
1,041,629,885
1,051,040,007
1,053,879,492
1,046,265,156
1,033,985,381
1,045,449,939
1,050,783,748
1,052,122,058
1,0.50,521,584
1,045,755,150
1,043,275,826
1,047,111,237
1,05.5,240,647
1,067,018,065
1,066,046,770
1,062,656,539
1,043,333,817
1,053,044,442
1,0.59,246,638
1,057,500,568
1,056,187,016
1,055,626,086

Certiflcates.

Total.

$1,080,500,878 $2,902,902,093
2,890,721,222
1,068,081,888
2,906,399,868
1,077,135,512
2,932,106,025
1,100,201,002
2,9.39,782,589
1,101,094,661
2,772,958,455
1,070,283,524
2,7.31,323,560
1,078,277,826
2,789,201,820
1,088,410,780
2,805,854,374
•1,101,051,860
2,876,368,696
1,141,045,477
3,008,241,583
1,144,589,329
3,078,989,298
1,174,343,696
3,094,382,099
1,223,042,999
3,092,666,641
1,237,853,268
3,080,450,734
1,248,522,046
3,088,294,101
1,263,584,460
3,036,182,289
1,240,376,973
3,038,015,488
1,248,255,324
3,045,982,547
1,258,984,571
3,077,406,908
1,281,736,832
3,078,299,361
1,281,511,708
3,098,498,021
1,291,146,231
3,117,581,033
1,294,388,839
3,092, .315,703
1,272,698,308
3,091,312,548
1,299,670,302
3,084,778,006
1,284,053,571
3,086,684,518
1,273,714,172
3,098,663,124
1,281,191,086
3,108,662,408
1,294,790,178
3,106,240,857
1,292,722,773
3,095,080,999
1,282,498,128
3,096,273,826
1,289,558,723
3,121,310,028
1,285,207,990
3,124,679,057
1,277,000,378
3,131,310,934
1,271,488,882
3,122,154,538
1,284,298,527
3,125,586,720
1,290,231,402
3,134,093,250
1,298,865,652
3,138,273,811
1,291,346,821
3,104,547,273
1,268,556,804
3,121,305,747
1,284,118,570
3,102,355,605
1,281,351,437
3,124,052,401
1,308,328,405
3,155,728,847
1,329,537,896
1,325, .384,472 3,104,827,881
3,180,084,499
1,320,176,580
3,192,815,314
1,323,001,809
3,192,380,388
1,323,508,138
3,211,550,485
1,370,697,294
3,226,898,978
1,381,812,372
3,230,465,635
1,383,288,246
3,237,838,117
1,400,426,632
3,256,116,255
1,408,788,397
3,214,002,596
1,383,911,625
3,207,717,130
1,371,796,683
3,228,913,634
1,384,038,600
3,242,182,715
1,388,566,346
3,254,988,451
1,392,852,413
3,270,582,753
1,379,092,721
3,207,575,322
1,384,971,651
3,288,289,640
1,432,812,604
3,284,152,496
1,426,826,193
3,281,187,766
1,421,992,631
3,296,198,639
1,427,274,353
3,30.5,763,336
1,432,040,470
3,284,513,093
1,412,660,018
3,286,572,798
1,418,883,216
3,296,493,280
1,420,497,370
3,311,385,762
1,428,609,938
3,328,106,400
1,425,294,565
3,337,277,820
1,421,793,472
1,433,659,514 .3,350,727,580
3,354,369,013
1,466,686,516
3,344,345,795
1,455,040,533
3,339,898,947
1,448,113,796
3,354,250,068
1,459,384,527
3,357,376,710
1,464,968,684
3,363,738,449
1,473,126,301

259

TEEASUEEE.

No. 17.—Assets of the Treasury other than gold, silver, notes, and certificates at the end of
each month, from January, 1907.

Months.

1907—January
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November..
December..
1908—January
.February...
March
AprU
May

Jurie

July
August
September.
October
November..
December..
1909—January
February...
March
April
May
Jimc
July
August
September.
October
November.
December..
1910—January
February...
March
April
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November.
December..
1911—January
February...
March
April
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November..
December..
1912—January
February...
March
AprU
M;ay
June
July
August
September.
October
November.
December..
1913—Januaiy
February...
March..!...
AprU
May
June

M i n o r coin. Fractional

Deposits
in national
banks.

$58 $160,654,952
73 150 486,236
159 165 235,680
80 178 691,078
150 183 810,572
57 178 741,438
91 156 990,205
147 157 102,219
58 170 512,212
92 220 270,625
107 236 548,321
172 256 920,155
75 238 190,042
129 230 515,443
47 202 882,822
117 200 713,219
85 164 912,412
141 180 357,000
75 130 660,745
3,098 8:^4
125 12S 907,343
2,898 359
92 129 925,200
2,665 449
135 131 693,492
2,306 071
97 130 111,806
2,023 737
239 123 928,438
2,36i0 179
103 100 511,200
2,423 955
165
72 343,825
2,802 819
35
70 518,470
2,745 130
59
71 159,294
2,582 133
146
72 946, OSO
2,607 433
79
71 662,SOl
2,430 978l s 54 022, 746
i
1,923 098
53
51 851,531
1,972 344
53
50 604,523
1,519 743
125
49 497,654
1,222 515
59
49 069,718
1,060 ,531
110
47 926,877
1,187 889
183
48 353,942
1,192 280
87
48 618,090
1,022 457
136
47 603,386
1,148 185
138
46 944,681
1,257 024
78
50 841,325
938 199
131
52 209,5S6
1,144 107
127
48 390,919
922 151
65
48 765,121
882 828
134
48 047,442
652 188
63
47 898,287
583 325
100
47 868,364
499 536
137
47 135,285
880 763
98
48 695,234
1,417 100
127
46 867,652
1,351 229
53
46 732,832
1,162 994
77
48 393,015
990 174
127
49 828, 771
1,979 184 12,302,030
47 647,685
894.419
1,883 208
49 244,763
1,757 755
819,745.
48 684,242
1,464 244
401,672
48 568,692
2,202 828
1,003,308
48 200,874
1,673 S6V
817,838
47 820,242
1,434 516
699,488
47 768, 604
1, 797 922
1,058,487
47 439,242
1,074,287
2,050 105
46 748,305
2,330 084 • 1,039,299
44 961,011
2,571 412
658,0.55
44 839,428
2,689 355
741,798
47 525,400
2,386 925
723,619
4S 506,185
2,239 191
896,538
47 924,685
2,069 781
695,804
47 417,809
1,933 270
748,559
47 136,906
1,760 666
910,803
46 787,010
1,203 922
861,271
48 798,058
704,473
877 126
46 524,543
1,345 416
844,999
46 580,888
1,246 430
955,914
49 068,482
1,356 700
10,690
47 731,531
1,717 1.50
51,917
48 239,524
1,930 bV4
16,358
52 314,252
1,997 167
343,468
76 263,615

$1,065,121
1,063 125

893 730
2,022 713
1,834 313
1,642 938
1,424 650
1,183 838
884 615
1,500 150
1,133 863
1,159 206
1,665 027
1,995 907
2,826 075
2,771 583
2,889 089
3,164 307
3,077 284

Deposits in B o n d s a n d
treasury of
interest
PhUippine
Islands.
200,305
422.551
887,713
799.552
112', 786
984.102
253,678
731,183
593,868
084,571
939,200
353,145
004.169
996,970
084,367
366,421
451,942
971,068
448,751
455,226
687,105
029,618
769,987
009,72S
323,011
472,902
428,338
135,946
2S2,808
770,878
901,272
032,190
800,898
107,046
863,025
631,183
725,884
243,930
857,190
481,524
728,698
470,850
228, 662
110,363
128,254
421, .814
197,865
427.103
437, a36
194,992
261,144
929,019
584,013
746,800
249,867
.504,172
208,288
334,028
138,300
853, 794
470.553
316,837
923,814
047,267
659,006
544,196
051, 665
020,499
506,882
739.170
849,320
269,211
380,564
847,339
192,919
326,282
570,176
972,380

$513.
3o;
596,
26,
40,
60,
517,
105,
59,
49.
56:
57:
15:
32:
11
22:
37:
33:
21:
17:
9:

is:

27:
26:
23:
24

is:
24'
59:

is:

26:
9:
4:
14:
26:

s:
5:

4s:

17:
27:
16;
12.
28;
14
12;
15,
20,
IS.
25:

is:
22:
10:
7:
11
14
7:
6;

50,
10;
21
4

1 Including certified checks on banks from and after this date.




Total.

paid.

$165 933, 755
155 002, 775
170 613, 888
184 ,539,877
189 798, 511
183 428, 918
163 186, 548
163 122, 439
177 049, 965
226 884, 593
241 677, 604
262 4S9, 729
243 874, 850
235 540, 463
209 564, 875
206 874, 078
170 271, 264
735
165 525, 562
139 208, 702
138 476, 522
137 518, 872
138 407, 579
137 215, 23 S
130 988, 019
107 218,
;'835
78 265,'749
77 765, 117
78 065, 237
79 870, 854
77 059, 490
62 381, 987
5S 815, 397
57 382, 222
57 139, 035
56 182, 531
54 827, 892
54 253, 432
54 102, 422
53 500, 077
52 602, 593
56 843, 663
58 828, 809
55 792, 221
55 812, 710
54 070, 938
54 987, 562
54 689, 067
54 071, 424
54 032, 050
54 305, 284
53 363, 370
52 507, 753
56 393, 357
55 883, 036
59 084, 715
55 780, 360
57 650, 101
57 747, 825
56 500, 680
55 766, 173
. 6 773, 167
5
55 211, 245
53 258, 722
54 120, 120
56 625, 548
56 195, 270
237
56 117, 042
56 234, 385
56 .339,
56 203, 920
55 732, SSI
149
54 377, 374
55 1.59,767
56 203, 619
54 348, 891
55 348, 630
59 918,
82 587,

260

REPORT ON l^HE FINANCES.
No.. 18.—Assets ofthe Treasury at the endof each month, from January, 1907.
Gold.

Months.
1907—January...
February..
March
April
May
June
July
August
September,
October...
November.
December.
1908—January...
February..
March
April
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November.
December.
1909—January...
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September.
October...
November.
December.
1910—January . .
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September.
October...
November.
December.
1911—January...
Februarj^.
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September.
October...
November.
December.
1912—January...
February..
March
AprU
May

Jurie

July
August
September.
October...
November.
December.
1913—January...
February.,
March
April......
May
June

$902 576,
912 076,
920 934,
926 412,
923 456,
904 691,
908 132,
912 206,
921 013,
915 283,
921 136,
955 957,
987 104,
,002 044,
,012 832,
,011 098,
997 383,
L,004 888,
,014 511,
,021 568,
,027 726,
,039 298,
,041 846,
,034 563,
,043 084,
,046 736,
,037 129,
,040 200,
,039 657,
,042 704,
,041 004,
,048 657,
,048 390,
,049 940,
,040 944,
,031 898,
,038 448,
,044 284,
,054 777,.
,028 707,
,032 473,
,045 165,
,080 084,
,083 494,
,090 327,
,097 824,
,099 706,
,103 178,
,121 648,
,136 789,
,147 591,
,155 154,
,1,52 5S3,
,163 901,
,173 876,
,182 008,
,187 629,
,197 142,
,180 943,
,182 974,
L,199 807,
,199 090,
,201 274,
,205 154,
,204 496,
,207 464,
,214 863,
,220 384,
,231 472,
,246 220,
,246 142,
,255 417,
,258 572,
,256 862,
,251 434,
,2.55 381,
,251 365,
L,262 361,




Silver.

Notes.

$493 ,765,992 $26,
16,086,414
495:,054,708
!1,356,406
21,
495:,179,853
5,333,241
15,
496,681,764
6,231,307
16,
497;,994,644
5,502,385
15,
499,,254,430
8,969,991
18,
500;,103,061
12,463,178
22,
498;,996,139
11,323,768
21,
494,,973,464
13,273,608
23,
489,,400,842
.8,294,537
is;
483:,598,056
9,330,071
9,
484:,643,67cl
2,511,769
12,
493:,825,528
17,918,321
37,
502;,731,605
0,593,356
40,
509,,170,570
3,763,524
53,
513 , 743,865 60,
10,229,515
518;,061,532
'2,502,161
72,
'3,988,401
521 ,205,020
73,
0,431,177
523;,038,379
70,
10,070,980
522,,729,618
60,
5,336,030
520,,312,041.
45,
16,342,926
517;,990,265
26,
10,806,093
,031,279
20,
516,
5,552,585
,303,410
35,
518;
6,439,993
46;
523 ,069,542
1,624,579
,249,56^1
525;
41,
0,379,395
,964,965
526,
30,
1,174,624
,984,706
527,
31,
2,592,755
,647,077
528,
32,
0,955,602
.30,
,607,960
527,
5,172,438
,128,759
527,
35,
3,820,500
,
525, 160,439 33,
17,928,040
,315,280
520,
27,
12,458,163
,894,972
515,
22,
12,173,168
513 , 448,64f 1 22,
1,063,,334
,305,824
512;
31,
5,705,291
,785,598
517,
45,
8,353,447
,003,62c
520,
36,
17,475,806
,278,749
520,
27,
2,269,211
,314,19c:
520,
32,
6,219,371
,441,027
520;
36,
1,673,819
,965,845
518;
41,
5,466,115
,
519; 969,208 45,
1,929,342
,227,56c:
519,
41,
5,144,896
,35,
,406,976
516,
14,309,908
513 ,800,786
24,
16,609,451
511 ,275,782
26,
2,893,958
,986,350
510;
32,
6,406,623
,147,376
516,
48,
7,200,928
,052,008
518;
37,
3,238,695
,475,581.
519;
33,
1,026,094
,353,785
520,
41,
2,638,968
,728,735
520,
42,
8,193,863
520,
,960,33cl
48,
7,816,057
521 ,263,655
47,
7,695,488
,482,286
520;
47,
6,005,489
,669,349
517,
46,
7,944,322
515,
,646,005
37,
5,676,870
,35,
513 ,973,762
4,112,047
513 ,426,208
44,
.7,414,603
518;
,426,770
57,
8,543,350
520, 630,837 48,
,
3,778,551
523; 760,855 43,
,
3,257,308
524 ,445,743
43,
4,609,104
525; 186,167 44,
,
8,989,858
525,
,564,31:.
48,
1,222,331
525,
,568,278
51,
8,955,086
524 ,543,358
48,
42,
524 , 846,121 • 2,075,023
1,847,810
,764,17^
517;
31,
3,633,022
,336,462
515,
33,
7,793, 723
512,
,906,057
37,
6,601,968
517,
,327,450
56,
7,496,368
519,
,086,12^:
47,
2,215,710
,743,999
519,
42,
4,966,122
,677,375
519,
44,
8,476,066
,393,105
519,
48,
.2,872,836
52,
5is:,948,328

Certificates.

$47 711
51 993,
46 729
48 285
55 889
83 918,
90 721,
94 ,539,
93 561,
78 519,
74 316,
64 078,
51 876,
49 237,
40 536,
47 104;
59 407,
49 018,
43 848,
43 596,
48 742,
48 464,
57 001;
76 790,
45 491,
61 042,
54 268,
48 054,
34 449,
44 443,
56 544,
57 422,
63 780,
85 243,
99 891,
97 851,
61 242,
47 382,
51 365,
72 906,
62 204,
70 702,
51 745,
46 212,
54 451,
68 751,
74 942,
84 918,
47 063,
36 953,
41 188,
39 438
42 806,
74 458
87 206
76 711
77 555,
88 691,
113 939,
115 1.50,
87 393,
76 816
93 602
93 213,
86 077,
108 946,
106 030,
122 140
132 951,
119 988,
136 130,
141 561,
97 873,
96 481,
95 322,
96 410,
97 .505,
97 370,

Other.

Total.

$165,933,755 $1,636,
16,074,418
155,002,775
1,635,
•5,484,485
170,613,888
1,648,
8,790,810
184,539,877
1,672,
2,151,087
189,798,51:
1,682,
.2,641,381
183,428,918
1,690,
10,263,414
163,186,548
1,684,
4,605,843
163,122,43^1
0,187,769
1,690,
177,049,965
1,709,
19,871,167
226,884,59c
1,728,
18,283,123
241,677,601,730,
0,059,038
262,489,729
1,779,
'9,680,664
243,874,85(1
1,814,
4,050,028
235,540,46c
0,147,442
1,830,
209,564,875
1,825,
15,868,701
206,874,078
1,839,
9,050,363
170,271,26^
1,817,
7,636,025
165,525,735
1,814,
4,626,383
139,208,562
1,791,
1,038,029
138,476,702
1,786,
6,442,022
137,518,522
1,779,
9,635,024
138,407,672
1,770,
0,503,683
137,215,579
1,772,
2,900,071
130,988,238
1,796,
6,198,760
107,218,019
1,765,
5,303,524
78,265,835
1,752,
2,919,025
77,765,749
1,726,
6,508,203
78,065,117
1,725,
5,479,435
79,870,237
1,715,
5,216,819
77,059,85^t
1,722,
2,770,813
1,722,
62,381,490
12,230,122
58,615,987
1, 723,
13,676,098
57,382,397
1,717,
7,797,097
57,139,222
1,730,
0,676,804
1,732,
56,182,035
2,639,766
.54,627,531
1,727,
17,744,439
54,253,892
1,715,
5,435,391
54,102,432
1,702,
12,126,627
53,500,422
17,-397,459
1,707,
52,602,077
1,706,
16,799,839
56,843,59c
1,708,
18,181,796
56,628,66;
1,733,
3,136,244
55,792,809
1,733,
3,057,808
55,812,22:
1,746,
6,676,815
10,401,749
54,070,71(1
1,750,
19,673,952
1,759,
54,987,938
54,669,562
1,767,
17,204,257
54,071,067
1,786,
16,048,116
54,032,421,785,
:5,298,.051
1,783,
3,301,126
54,305,050
4,857,871
53,363,281,794,
52,507,370
1,808,
18,480,075
5,151,591
56,393,753
1,815,
.55,683,357
1,863,
3,196,781
1,889,
•9,247,017
59,084,036
12,678,554
55,780, 715 1,882,
1,886,
16,510,037
57,650,36(1
1,897,
7,171,123
57,747,10:
1,901,
1,035,124
56,500,625
55,766,680
1,911,
1,429,663
56,773,17;:
1,919,
9,816,196
55,211,167
0,291,927
1,900,
5,674,574
53,258,245
1,915,
54,120,722
0,191,640
1,920,
6,994,669 •
56,625,120
1,916,
1,947,
7,160,332
56,195,548
3,801,487
1,953,
56,117,270
2,2.57,791
1,972,
56,234,237
56,339,042
1,987,
7,683,528
1,972,
2,024,922
56,203,385
55,732,92(
1,986,
16,975,250
2,002,
12,057,217
54,377,881
55,159,14<
l,9i!5.
5,534,500
1,976,
6,130,459
56,203,374
54,348,767
1,963,
3,065,270
55,348,61fi
1971
1,784,066
59,918,89:
1,976,
'6,659,083
2,014,
4,140,698
82,587,630

TREASURER.

261

No. 19.—Liabilities ofthe Treasury at the endof each month, from January, 1907.
Months.

1907—January
February..
March
April
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November..
December..
1908—January
February..
March
April
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November..
December..
1909—January
February..
March
AprU..
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November.,
December..
1910—January
February..
March
AprU
May
,
June
July
August
September.
October
November..
December..
1911—January
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November.,
December..
1912—January
February..
March
April
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November..
December..
1913—January
February..
March
April
May
Jime




Certificates
and Treasury notes.
134; 700,869
124, 460,869
130, 146,869
154, 668,869
163, 061,869
160, 189,889
174, 889,869
188, 736,869
200, 319,869
225, 777,869
224, 451,869
243, 900,869
280, 319,L69
292, 409,869
292; 298,869
315, 840,869
304, 854,869
302; 255,869
307,715,869
330,179,869
335,020,869
344,315,869
356,036,869
354,084,869
349,686,869
349, 563,869
332; 380,869
333,574,869
333,519,869
341, 380,869
343, 211,869
351 098,869
353; 059,869
366, 277,869
375,359,869
366,089,869
355, 367,869
348,097,869
346,511,869
345, 220,869
350;031,869
355, 725,869
363 703,669
379; 337,669
383,381,669
392, 445,669
402,
411
421; 186,669
422. 153,669
427: 833,669
443, 183,669
454,880,669
461 615,669
462; 221,669
463,950,669
469,287,669
484, 481,669
496,143,669
503,215,369
523, 263,369
506; 682,369
518, 605,369
523,465,369
521,075,369
524,535,369
527,804,269
545, 522,269
564 416,169
548; 119,169
560, 737,169
578, 018,169
567; 333,169
554, 264,169
546; 158,169
558,504,169
565, 162,169
573, 157,169

Agency
account.

$106,665
110,868;
.115,775
116,093;
111,949;
108,012;
121,141
114,790;
119,999
115,278;
105,056;
116,259;
117,862;
118,891
120,961
121,6I2;
121,847;
117,199;
129,693,
116,372;
115,561
109,305
115,475;
122,612,
115,915
112,091
110,193:
114,470;
111,795,
105,014,
120,580;
124,626,
120,531
125,295
125,344;
127,605
129,106;
123,456,
122,000;
128,116,
125,984,
120,515;
126,997,
127,815,
126,036,
131,539,
128,481
134,755
128,644;
125,621
127,569;
129,590,
123,792,
111,404
124,500;
126,319,
122,827;
126,167
122,647;
131,288;
123,139;
121,716;
115,535,
121,112,
118,921
105,472;
114,348,
122,093,
123,420,
125,181
126,291
130,462;
122,355
124,829;
118,410,
121,946,
127,519;
125,022,

Balance.

$394,708,:
i,207
400,154,1
,654
402,868,1
,003
401,388,;
,343
407,629,i
,665
422,061,
,445
388,574,:
,188
386,660,^
),408
389,551,
,314
387,227,<
,019
400,551,1
,013
419,519,!
,991
416,417,;
,301
418,845,1
,804
412,608,:
^191
401,596, <
),9S8
390,933,;
,256
395,171,;
,348
353,628,:
5,173
339,890,:
),139
329,052,i
},573
316,882,:
J, 253
301,387,;6 2
\3
319,501,'
,417
299,701,i
,585
291,263,!
,813
283,934, (
,071
277,433,!
,835
269,901,;
,309
276,375,
),428
258,437,'
^755
247,950,!
),871
244,206,:
>,114
239,103, (
5,078
231,935,:
,125
234,048,!
5,866
230,960,!
),864
230,571,;
,813
238,885,:
),265
233,462,:
},139
232,165,
,417
256,894,1
,675
242,356,:
),224
239,523,:
5,208
240,984, (
,016
235,688,!
5,932
236,683,;
,886
239,393,^
,472
235,466,!
),829
235,525,'
,708
239,454,i
,526
235,705,!
),902
236,477,!
^947
290,176,!
),926
302,525,;
,300
292,408,!
5,854
294,394,!
,996
286,522,:
},399
282,243,1
,628
276,925,!
),993
273,413, i
:,503
271,892,'
J,
281,534,1703
,096
275,613,!
1,947
276,997,i
r,558
317,152,'
?,479
311,648,'
5,787
304,641,'
,784
299,846,1
),615
298,724,:
,219
299,946,'
),420
293,576,;
),381
295,846, (
),020
297,036, (
),683
298,496,:
),280
291,333, (
,044
283,977,:
',281
315,960,!
),985

Total.

$1 636,
.,074,418
ihV},,484,485
1,790,810
648,
1,151,087
672,
,
682,: 641,381
690,,263,414
684,,605,843
,
690,' 187,769
709,,871,167
728,,283,123
730,,059,038
'
779, , 680,664
814,,600,028
•,147,442
830,
825,,868,701
1,050,363
839,
817,,636,025
814,,626,383
791,,038,029
1,442,022
786,
1,635,024
779.
1,503,683
770,
1,900,071
772,
1,198,760
796,
765,,303,524
1,919,025
752,
1,508,203
726,
.,479,435
725,
.,216,819
715,
1,770,813
722,
1,230,122
722,
1,676,098
723,
717,,797,097
1,676,804
730,
1,639,766
732,
',744,439
727;
715,,435,391
1,126,627
702,
707,,397,459
1,799,839
706,
1,181,796
708,
1,136,244
733,
1,057,808
733,
1,676,815
746,
1,401,749
750,
1,673,952
759,,204,157
767,
.,048,116
786,,298,051
785,
1,301,126
783,, 857,871
:
794,
1,480,075
808,
.,151,591
815,
1,196,781
863,
1,247,017
889,
1,678,554
882,
1,510,037
886,,171,123
897,,035,124
901,,429,663
911,
1,816,196
919,
1,291,927
900,
.,674,574
915,
1,191,640
920,
1,994,669
916,,160,332
947,
1,801,487
953,
1,257,791
972,,683; 528
987,
1,024,922
972,
1,975,250
986,
1,057,217
002,,534,500
985,
.,130,459
976,,065,270
963,,784,066
971,,659,033
976,, 140,698
t
2 014,

262

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 20.— United States notes of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanzling at
the close of each fiscal year from 1906.
T o t a l issued.

.Pedeemed
d u r i n g year.

T o t a l redeemed.

$188,384,160
186,763,048
592,821,760
1,208,531,240
528,682,400
147,015,200
. 191,714,000
219,276,000
414,548,000
20,000,000
40,000,000

$13,093.00
13,952.00
1,706,195.00
95,839,150.00
5,519, ,560.00
760,150.00
1,500,900.00
'717,000.00
1,770,000.00

$186,478,236.80
185,330,018.20
585,878,855.00
932,182,559.00
507,396,948.00
143,093,025.00
.1.84,454,150.00
211,532,000.00
393,709,000.00
19,990,000.00
39,990,000.00

$1,885,923.20
1,433,029.80
6,942,905.00
276,348,681.00
21,285,452.00
3,922,175.00
7,259,850.00
7,744,000.00
20,839,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00

107,840,000

3,737,715,808

107,840,000.00

3,390,034,792.00
1,000,000.00

347,681,016.00
1,000,000.00

107,840.000

3,737,715,808

107, .840,000.00

3,391,034,792.00

346,681,016.00

188,364,160
186,763,048
593,521,780
1,312,851,240
528,682,400
147,015,200
191,714,000
219,276,000
414,54:8,000
20,000,000
40,000,000

10,535.00
11,660.00
1,022,790.00
98,910,975.00
3,719,190.00
480,250.00
1,035,800.00
630,000.00
1,199,000.00

186,488,771.80
185,341,678.20
588,901,645.00
1,029,093,534.00
511,116, i:38.00
.143,573,275.00
185,489,750.00
212.162,000.00
394;908,000.00
19,990,000.00
:39,990,000.00

1,875,388.20
1,421,369.80
6,820,115.00
283,757,706.00
17,568,282.00
3,441,925.00
6,224,250.00
7,114,000.00
:i 9,840,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00

105,020,000

3,842,735,808

105,020,000.00

3,495,054,792.00
1,000,000.00

347,881,018.00
1,000,000.00

105,020,000

3,842,735,808

105,020,000.00

3,496,054,792.00

;346,6S1,018.00

. 188,364,160
186,763,048
671,741,780
1,335,331,240
531,582,400
147,015,200
193,914,000
219,628,000
432,028,000
20,000,000
40,000,000

14,048.00
13,344.00
9,523,650.00
102,919,770.00
3,275,240.00
466,150.00
1,108,SOO.00
1,880,000.00
4,419,000.00
10,000.00

188,502,817.80
185,355,022.20
598,425,295.00
1,132,013,304.00
514,391,378.00
144,039,425.00
186,598,550.00
214,022,000.00
399,327,000.00
20,000,000.00
39,990,000.00

1,861,342.20
1,408,025.80
75,316,465.00
203,317,936.00
17,171,022.00
2,975,775.00
7,315,450.00
5,604,000.00
.32,701,000.00

123,610,000

3,966,345,808

123,610,000.00

3,618,664,792.00
1,000,000.00

;347,6S1,016.00
1,000,000.00

123,610,000

3,966,345,808

123,610,000.00

3,619,664,792.00

346,681,018.00

One doUar
T w o doUars
F i v e dollars
T e n doUars
T w e n t y doUars
Fifty dollars
O n e h u n d r e d doUars
F i v e h u n d r e d doUars
One t h o u s a n d doUars
F i v e t h o u s a n d doUars
'^Pp.n thnnRa,nd dollars

$188,364,160
186,763,048
722,261,760
$50,520,665
54,440,000 1,389,771,240
535,882,400
4,320,000
147,015,200
194,974,000
1,060,000
221,926,000
2,300,000'
452,328,000
20,300,000
20,OOOO, 000
40,000,000

$11,396.00
12,414.00
37,871,840.00
84,440,590.00
4,857,160.00
385,200.00
1,450,400.00
544,000.00
3,458,000.00

$186,514,213.80
135.367,438.20
834; 297,135.00
1.218,453.894.00
• 519,04S;533.00
144,404,625.00
188,048,950.00
214,566,000. CO
402,914,000.00
20,ooo; 000.00
39,990,000.00

$1,849,948.20
1,395,611.80
87,964,625.00
173,317,346.00
16,833,862.00
2,610,575.00
6,925,050.00
7,360,000.00
49,414,000. CO

Total..
U n k n o w n , destroyed

132,940,000

4,099,285,808

132,940,000.00

3,751,804,792.00
1,000,000.00

347,881,016.00
1,000,000.00

132,940,000

4,099,285,808

132,940,000.00

3,752,604,792.00

346,681,016.00

Issued during year.

Denominations.

Outstanding.

1906.
One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
. ...
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars .
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . .
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
Ten thousand dollars.

$107,840,000

Total
Unknown, destroyed..
Net:
1907.
O n e dollar
Two dollars.
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
I^wenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hmidred dollars...
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
O n e t h o u s a n d dollars
Five thousand d o l l a r s . . .
T e n tliousand dollars
Total
Unkno^vn, d e s t r o y e d . .
Net

700,000
104,320,000

1908.
O n e dollar °.
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
Ten d o l l a r s . . .
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . . ' .
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
Ten thousand dollars.
Total
Unknown, destroyed..
Net

78,220,000
22,480,000
2,880,000
2,200,000
350,000
17,480,000

10,000.00

1909.

^

Net




i6,666.66

263

TEEASUEEE.

No. 20.^—United States notes of each denomhiation issued, redeemed, and outstanding at
close of each fiscal year from 1906—Continued.
Issued during j^ear.

T o t a l issued.

Redeemed
d u r i n g year.

Total
redeemed.

$188,364,160
188,783,048
800,451,760
1,432, 751,240
543,322,400
147,015,200
196,304,000
.221,926,000
452,328,000
20,000,000
40,000,000

$7,391.00
7,334.00
51.384.295.00
66,502,900.00
4,192,280.00
302,950.00
1,428,850.00
943,000.00
5,191,000.00

$186,521,604.80
185,374,770.20
685,661,430.00
1,282,956,794.00
523,240,818.00
144,707,575.00
189,477,800.00
215,509,000.00
408,105,000.00
20,000,000.00
39,990,000.00

$1,842,555.20
1,388,277.80
114,790,330.00
149,794,446.00
20,081,582.00
2,307, 625.00
6,826,200.00
6,417,000.00
44,223; 000.00

129,940,000

4,229,225,SOS

129,940,000.00

3,881,544,792 00
1,000,000.00

347,881,018.00
1,000,000.00

129,940,000

4,229,225, SOS

129,940,000.00

3,882,544,792.00

346,681,016.00

188,364,160
186, 763,048
912,311,780
1,465,751,240
.543,322,400
147,015,200
196,304,000
221,926,000
454,328,000
20,000,000
40,000,000

5,964.00
6,026.00
74,902,160.00
60,988,890.00
4,453,460.00
281,100.00
1,312,900.00
1,216,500.00
3,693,000.00

188,527,588.80
185,380, 796.20
760,563,590.00
1,343,945,684.00
527,694,278.00
144,988,675.00
190,790,700.00
216,725,500 00
411,798,000.00
20.000,000.00
39; 990,000.00

1,836,591.20
1,382,251.80
151,74S, 170.00
121,805,556.00
15,628,122.00
2,028,525.00
5,513,300.00
5,200,500.00
42,530,000.00

146,860,000

4,376,085,808

148,860,000.00

4,028,404,792.00
1,000,000.00

347,681,016.00
1,000,000.00

146,860,000

4,376,085, SOS

146,860,000.00

4,029,404,792.00

348,681,016.00

188,364,160
186,763,048
1,019,491,760
1,508,231,240
543,322,400
147,015,200
196,304,000
221,926,000
454,328,000
20,000,000
40,000,000

5,597.00
7,293.00
S9,878,240.00
50,147,630.00
3,435,690.00
185,150.00
816,900,00
730,500.00
4,453,000.00

186,533,165. SO
185,388,089 20
850,441,830.00
1,394,093,314.00
531,129,968.00
145,173,825.00
191,607,600.00
217,456,000.00
416,251,000.00
20,000,000.00
39,990,000.00

1,830,994.20
1,374,958.80
169,049,930.00
114,137,926.00
12,192,432.00
1,841,375.00
4,698,400.00
4,470,000.00
38,077,000.00

149,660,000

4,525,745,808

149,660,000.00

4,178,064,792.00
1,000,000 00

347,681,016.00
1,000,000.00

149,660,000

Denominations.

4,525,745,SOS

149,860,000.00

4,179,064,792.00

346,681,016.00

188,364,160
186,763,048
1,155,011,760
1,535,711,240
543,322,400
147,015,200
196,304,000
221,926,000
454,328,000
20,000,000
40,000,000

4,012.00
3,918.00
109,782,350.00
45,630,430.00
2,127,540.00
154,150.00
488,600.00
435,000 00
4,344,000 00

186,537,177.80
185,392,007.20
960,204, ISO. 00
1,439,773,744.00
533,257,508.00
145,327,975.00
192,096,200.00
217,891,000 00
420,595,000 00
20,000,000 00
39,990,000 00

1,826,982.20
1,371,040.80
194,807,580.00
95,937,496.00
10,064,892.00
1,687,225.00
4,207, SOO. 00
4,035,000.00
33,733,000.00

163,000,000

4,688,745,808

163,000,000,00

4,341,084,792 00
1,000,000 00

347,681,016.00
1,000,000.00

163,000,000

4,688,745,808

163,000,000.00

4,342,064,792 00

346,681,016.00

Outstanding.

1910.
One doUar
T w o doUars
F i v e dollars..
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty doUars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d doUars . .

$78,190,000
42,980,000
7,440,000
1,330,000

Total
U n k n o w n , destroyed
Net

10,000.00

1911.
O n e doUar
T w o dollars
F i v e doUars
Ten.doUars..
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
O n e h u n d r e d doUars.. . .
F i v e h u n d r e d doUars . . .
One t h o u s a n d doUars
Five thousand doUars...
T e n t h o u s a n d doUars

111,860,000
33,000,000

2,000,000

Total
U n k n o w n , destroyed
Net
1912.
OnedoUar
T w o dollars.
F i v e doUars
T e n doUars
T w e n t y doUars
Fifty aollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars . . .
O n e t h o u s a n d dollars
Five thousand doUars...
T e n t h o u s a n d doUars
Total
U n k n o w n , destroyed . .
Net

10,000.00

.
107,ISO. 000
42,480,000

10,000.00

1913.
OnedoUar
T w o dollars..
F i v e doUars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y doUars
Fifty doUars.
One h u n d r e d doUars
F i v e h u n d r e d doUars . . .
One t h o u s a n d doUars
Five thousand dollars...
T e n t h o u s a n d doUars
Total
U n k n o w n , destroyed
Net

135,520,000
27,480,000




10,000 00

264

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 21.—Treasury notes of 1890 of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding
at the close of each fiscal year from 1907.
Issued d u r - T o t a l issued. R e d e e m e d
ing year.
d u r i n g year.

Denominations.

1907.
O n e doUar
T w o doUars
F i v e doUars
T e n doUars
T w e n t y doUars
Fifty doUars.
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars

Total
redeemed.

Outstanding.

$64,704,000
49,808,000
120,740,000
104,680,000
35,760,000
1,175,000
18,000,000
52,568,000

$64,241,013
49,483,702
119,384,815
102,489,590
34,661,930
1,148,350
17,687,600
52,350,000

$462,987
324,298
1,355,185
2,190,410
1,098,070
26,650
312,400
218,000

447;435,000

1,398,000

441,447,000

5,988,000

64,704,000
49,808,000
120,740,000
104,680,000
35,760,000
1,175.000
18,000,000
52,568,000

28,606
26,154
210,790
432,350
202,900
4,100
43,100
58,000

64,269,619
49,509,856
119,595,605
102,921,940
34,864,830
1,152,450
17,730,700
52,408,000

434,381
298,144
1,144,395
1,758,060
895,170
22,550
269,300
180,000

447,435,000

1,006,000

442,453,000

4,982,000

64,704,000
49,808,000
120,740,000
104,680,000
35,760,000
1,175,000
18,000,000
52,568,000

23,557
20,558
184,005
320,220
167,460
2,300
31,900
17,000

64,293,176
49,530,414
119,779,610
103,242,160
35,032,290
1,154,750
17,762,600
52,425,000

410 824
2771586
960,390
1,437,840
727,710
20,250
237,400
143,000

447,435,000

767,000

443,220,000

4,215,000

64,704,000
49,808,000
120,740,000
104,680,000
35,760,000
1,175,000
18,000,000
52,588,000

15,467
15,748
117,925
226,020
122,940
1,900
28,000
15,000

64,308,043
49,548,162
119,897,535
103,468,180
35,155,230
1,156,650
17,790,600
52,440,000

395,350
261,837
842 468
1,211; 825
604 770
181350
209,400
128,000

447,435,000

543,000

443,763,000

3,872,000

64,704,000
49,808,000
120,740,000
104,680,000
35,760,000
1,175,000
18,000,000
52,568,000

10,989
10,776
86,605
181,360
98,920
2,450
21,900
13,000

64,319,632
49,556,938
119,984,140
103,649,540
35,254,150
1,159,100
17,812,500
52,453,000

384,368
251,062
755,860
1,030,460
. 505 850
15,900
187,500
115,000

447,435,000

426,000

444,189,000

3,246,000

64,704,000
49,808,000
120,740,000
104,680,000
35,760,000
1,175,000
18,000,000
52,568,000

10,762
9,318
67,700
131,990
70,880
1,350
21,000
4,000

64,330,394
49,566,256
120,051,840
103,781,530
35,325,030
1,100,450
17,833,500
52,457,000

373,606
241,744
688,160
898,470
434,970
14,550
166,500
111,000

447,435,000

Total

$33,097
32,208
303,515
601,800
266,180
5,100
49,100
107,000

317,000

444,506,000

2,929,000

64,704,000
49,808,000
120,740,000
104,680,000
35,760,000
1,175,000
18,000,000
52,568,000

7,645
6,545
58,110
111,050
55,600
1,050
19,000
12,000

64,338,039
49,572,801
120,107,950103,892,580
35,380,630
1,161,500
17,852,500
52,469,000

447,435,000

269,000

444,775,000

1908.
One doUar
T w o doUars
F i v e doUars.
.
T e n doUars
T w e n t y doUars
Fifty doUars
One h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
Total

....

..
1909.

One doUar. .
.
T w o doUars
F i v e doUars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y doUai's
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
O n e t h o u s a n d dollars

.

.

Total
1910.
One doUar
T w o doUars
F i v e doUars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y doUars
Fifty d o U a r s . . .
O n e h u n d r e d doUars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
Total
1911.
One doUar
T w o doUars
F i v e dollars
T e n doUars
T w e n t y doUars
Fifty doUars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
Total

.

1912.
One doUar
T w o dollars
F i v e doUars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y doUars
Fifty doUars
One h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d doUars
Total
1913.
One doUar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty doUars..'
One h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d doUars
Total




'

:...

365,961
235,199
632,050
787,420
379,370
13,500
147,500
99,000
2,660,000

265

TEEASTJEEE.

No. 22.—Gold certificates of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding at the
close of each fiscal year from 1908.
Issued during year.

Total issued.

Redeemed
during year.

$107,760,000
87,280,000
12,000,000
15,600,000
6,100,000
14,300,000
17,000,000
138,320,000

$107,800,000
575,200,000
135,200,000
199,434,300
104,044,000
300,681,000
681,040,000
1,310,060,000

378,360,000

$9,618,840
60,820,260
11,447,400
14,144,000
3,640,500
10,195,000
16,185,000
110,790,000

$9,822,840
317,981,896
84,532,245
126,619,450
84,519,500
235,229,500
598,890,000
1,136,300,000

$98,177,160
257,238,104
50,667,755
72,814,850
19,524,500
65,451,500
82,150,000
173,760,000

3,413,459,300

238,821,000

2,593,875,431

819,783,869

147,280,000
39,480,000
620,560,000
45, "^80,000
141,800,000
6,600,000
213,434,300
14,000,000
105,894,000
1,850,000
316,181,000
15,500,000
704,040,000
23,000,000
148,920,000 1,458,980,000

31,261,540
69,893,560
12,396,800
-16,806,600
3,890,500
11,758,000
8,505,000
109,580,000

40,884,380
387,855,456
96,929,045
143,428,050
88,210,000
246,987,500
605,395,000
1,245,880,000

106,395,620
232,704,544
44,870,955
70,008,250
17,684,000
69,193,500
98,645,000
213,100,000

3,708,169,300

261,892,000

2,855,567,431

852,601,889

88,868,000
66,640,000
12,200,000
19,600,000
950,000
8,700,000
86,220,000

236,148,000
687,200,000
154,000,000
233,034,300
106,844,000
324,881,000
704,040,000
1,545,200,000

42,800,470
65,471,280
10,931,800
17,212,450
3,247,000
10,505,000
14,265,000
108,610,000

83,484,850
453,326,736
107,860,845
100,638,500
91,457,000
257,492,500
619,660,000
1,354,490,000

152,663,150
233,873,264
46,139,155
72,395,800
15,387,000
67,388,500
84,380,000
190,710,000

3,991,347,300

272,843,000

3,128,410,431

862,936,8

128,080,000
86,560,000
17,400,000
21,600,000
4,550,000
9,000,000
. 16,500,000
125,210,000

384,228,000
773,780,000
171,400,000
254,634,300
111,394,000
333,881,000
720,540,000
,670,410,000

69,327,600
71,518,800
11,446,700
16,238,100
2,959,000
9,101,000
5,085,000
91,290,000

152,812,450
524,845,538
119,307,545
178,876,600
94,416,000
268,593,500
624,745,000
1,445,780,000

211,415,550
248,914,464
52,092,455
77,757,700
16,978,000
67,287,500
95,795,000
224,630,000

408,900,000

4,400,247,300

278,986,200

3,405,376,631

994,870,669

108,080,000
83,360,000
17,000,000
20,400,000
3,950,000
9,500,000
6,000,000
107,470,000

472,308,000
857,120,000
188,400,000
275,034,300
115,344,000
343,381,000
728,540,000
1,777,880,000

93,060,250
245,872,700
75,777,500
600,623,036
14,039,400
133,346,945
194,906,750
18,030,150
97,105,000
2,689,000
276,615,500
10,022,000
631,520,000
6,775,000
' 90,180,000 1,535,960,000

226,435,300
256,498,964
55,053,055
80,127,550
18,239,000
66,765,500
95,020,000
241,920,000

355,760,000

Total.

Outstanding.

283,178,000

1908.
Ten doUars
Twenty dollars
Fifty doUars
One hundred doUars...
]Five hundred dollars..
One thousand doUars..
Five thousand doUars.
Ten thousand doUars..

Total
redeemed.

294,710,000

Denominations.

4,756,007,300

310,573,300

3,715,949,931 1,040,057,369

179,360,000
103,680,000
19,400,000
24,400,000
4,100,000
10,500,000
10,000,000
117,070,000

651,668,000
960,800,000
207,800,000
299,434,300
119,444,000
353,881,000
736,540,000
1,894,950,000

117,389,190
82,625,760
15,727,800
20,377,950
4,039,500
12,320,000
28,290,000
141,070,000

363,261,890
683,248,798
149,074,745
215,284,700
101,144,500
288,935,500
659,810,000
1,677,030,000

468,510,000

5,224,517,300

421,84p,200

4,137,790,131 1,086,727,169

1909.
Ten doUars
Twenty dollars
Fifty doUars
•...
One hundred doUars...
Five hundred doUars..
One thousand doUars..
Five'thousand doUars.
Ten thousand doUars..
Total.
1910.
Ten doUars
Twenty doUars
Fifty doUars
One hundred doUars...
Five hundred doUars..
One thousand dollars .
Five thousand doUars.
Ten thousand doUars..
Total.
1911.
Ten doUars
Twenty doUars
Fifty doUars
One hundred doUars...
Five hundred doUars..
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand doUars.
Ten thousand dollars..
Total.
1912.
Ten doUars
Twenty dollars
Fifty doUai's
One hundred doUars...
Five hundred doUars..
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand dollars..
Ten thousand doUars..
Total.,
1913.
Ten doUars
Twenty doUars
Fifty doUars.-.
One hundred dollars...
Five hundred dollars..
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand doUars.
Ten thousand doUars..
Total-




288,408,110
277,551,204
58,725,255
84,149,600
18,299,500
64,945,500
76,730,000
217,920,000

S66

RiEPORT ON TBtE FINANCES.

No. 23.—Silver certificates of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding at the
close of each fiscal year from 1908.
Issued during year.

Denominations.

1908.
One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars

$106,832,000
46,084,000
125,100,000
8,800,000
8,960,000
6,600,000

T o t a l issued.

Redeemed,
d u r i n g year.

Total
redeemed.

Outstanding.

$915,688,000 $102,077,663.00
458,032,000
45,044,352.00
1,728,760,000 151,075,315.00
583,314,000
3,001,410.00
299,826,000
2,022,260.00
78,050,000
430,000.00
81,540,000
120,000.00
16,650,000
5,000.00
32,490,000
7,000.00

$802,882,205.90 $112,805,794.10
401,988,257.60
56,043,742.40
1,463,130,717.50 263,629,282.50
565,118,889.00
18,195,111.00
285,052,710.00
14,773,290.00
68,008,140.00
8,041,860.00
80,752,580.00
787,420.00
16,619,500.00
30,500.00
32,447; 000.00
43,000.00

4,190,350,000

30.3,783,000.00

3,716,000,000.00

474,350,000.00

127,768,000 1,043,456,000
49,832,000
507,864,000
124,980,000 '1,851,740,000
25,680,000
608,994,000
299,826,000
8,600,000
84,650,000
81,540,000
16,650,000
32,490,000

116,432,634.00
49,595,506.00
142,599,070.00
10,053,290.00
3,863,900.00
4,140,300.00
100,800.00
2,500.00
8,000.00

919,314,839.90
451,583,763.60
1,605, 729, 787.50
575,172,179.00
288,916,610.00
72,148,440.00
80,853,380.00
16,822,000.00
32,455,000.00

124,141,180.10
58,280,236.40
246,010,212.50
33,821,821.00
10,909,390.00
12,501,560.00
686,820.00
28,000.00
35,000.00

336,860,000

4,527,210,000

326,798,000.00

4,042,796,000.00

484,414,000.00

151,907,600
56,020,000
138,270,000
7,800,000

1,195,383,600
583,SS4,000
1,988,010,000
616,794,000
299,826,000
80,650,000
81,540,000
16,650,000
32,490,000

135,229,421.00
52,538,084.00
138,718,915.00
14,723,550.00
3,188,800.00
4,802,950.00
83,400.00
1,500.00
8,000.00

1,054,544,260.90
504,121,827.60
1,744,44S,702.50
589,895, 729.00
292,105,410.00
76,951,:390.00
80,936,780.00
16,623,500.00
32,463,000.00

140,819,339.10
59,762,172.40
243,561,297.50
28,898,271.00
7,720,590.00
9,698,610.00
603,220.00
28,500.00
27,000.00

353,997,600

4,881,207,600

349,294,600.00

4,392,090,800.00

489,117,000.00

187,738,000
60,184,000
129,860,000

1,363,099,600
624,068,000
2,117,870,000
616,794,000
299,826,000
86,650,000
81,540,000
16,650,000
32,490,000

158,077,985.00
59,367,820.00
148,878,345.00
11,707,100.00
1,891,300.00
3,411,7.50.00
59.200.00
2,500.00
2,000.00

1,212,622,245.90 150,477,354.10
583,489,647.60
60,578,352.40
1,893,327,047.50 224,542,952.50
601,602,829.00
15,191,171.00
293,996,710.00
5,829,290.00
80,383,140.00 • 6,286,S60.00
80,995,980.00
544,020.00
16,626,000.00
24,000.00
32,465,000.00
25,000.00

357,780,000

5,238,987,600

383,398,000.00

4,775,488,600.00

463,499,000.00

186,460,000
65,152,000
145,580,000
14,240,000

1,549,559,600
' 689,220,000
2,263,450,000
631,034,000
299,826,000
88,650,000
81,540,000
18,6.50,000
32,490,000

175,609,919.00
62,876,236.00
142,944,765.00
8,673,580.00
1,340,820.00
1,869,100.00
63, SOO. 00
2,000.00
2,000.00

1,388,232,164.90
626,365,883.60
2,036,271,812.50
610,276,389.00
295,337,330.00
82,232,240.00
81,059,780.00
16,628,000.00
32,467,000.00

161,327,435.10
62,854,116.40
227,178,187.50
20,757,611.00
4,488,670.00
4,417,760.00
480,220.00
.
22,000.00
23,000.00

411,432,000

5,650,419,600

393,382,000.00

5,168,870,600.00

481,549,000.00

204,048,000
68,664,000
131,240>000

1,753,607,800
'"^757,884,000
2,394,690,000
631,034,000
299.826,000
86;650,000
81,540,000
16,850,000
32,490,000

ISO,520,307.00
65,358,493.00
139,353,110.00
8,952,340.00
6S3,700.00
1,023,550.00
57,500.00
1,000.00
1,000.00

1,574,752,471.90
891,724,376.60
2,175,624,922.50
619,228,729.00
296,021,030.00
83,255,790.00
81,117,280.00
16,629,000.00
32,468,000.00

178,855,128.10
66,159,623.40
219,065,077.50
" 11,805,271.00
3,804,970.00
3,394,210.00
422,720.00
21,000.00
22,000.00

403,952,000

6,054,371,600

401,951,000.00

5,570,821,600.00

483,550,000.00

302,356,000

Total
1909.
One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
. Total..
1910.
One dollar
T w o dollars.
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars . .
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars

2,000,000

Total.
1911.
One doUar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty doUars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
Total

" .

1912.
One dollar.
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars.
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
Total

.

r

1913.
One doUar
T w o doUars
,
F i v e dollars
'.
T e n dollars.
T w e n t y doUars
Fiftv dollars.
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
Total




267

TEEASTJEER.

No. 24:.:—Amount of United States notes, Treasury notes, gold and silver certificates of
each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding at the close of each fiscal year
from 1906.
Issued d u r ing year.

Denominations.

1908.
One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d doUars
F i v e h u n d r e d doUars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
F i v e t h o u s a n d doUars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars

T o t a l issued.

Redeemed
d u r i n g year.

Total
redeemed.

Outstandhlg.

$959,928,180 $91,661,640.00
599,787,048 41,623,185.00
2,161,261,760 166,318,545.00
1,887,725,240 104,293,290.00
1,268,428,400 51,239,140.00
323,240,200 11,764,200.00
452,688,300 16,119,100.00
4,324,000.00
328,770,000
774,487,000 10,787,000.00
2,045,000.00
659,035,000
1,099,640,000 77,270,000.00

$856,525,9.56.70 $103,402,203.30
48,961,626.20
550,825,421.80
1,853,736,372.50
307,525,387.50
1,591,732,938'. 00
295,992,302.00
1,037,769,894.00
230,658,506.00
273,403,460.00
49,836,740.00
380,428,180.00
72,260,120.00
305,248,500.00
23,521,500.00
693,575,500.00
80,911,500.00
600,665,000.00,
58,370,000.00
120,880,000.00
978,760,000.00

629,826,000 10,514,991,108 577,445,100.00

9,122,671,223.00 1,392,319,885.00
1,000,000.00
1,000,000.00

629,826,000 10,514,991,108 577,445,100.00

9,123,671,223.00 1,391,319,885.00

$102,512,000
40,544,000
178,100,000
107,840,000
66,000,000
12,200,000
16,800,000
4,900,000
11,200,000
5,750,000
83,980,000

Total
U n k n o w n , destroyed
Net
1907.

1,061,924,160 95,008,371.00
648,539,048 40,943,864.00
2,315,921,760 184,605,490.00
1,992,085,240 101,971,665.00
1,363,228,400 48,180,260.00
340,840,200 11,981,150.00
475,088,300 15,857,200.00
4,407,000.00
333,870,000
785,987,000 11,157,000.00
2,050,000.00
684,040,000
1,211,740,000 88,740,000.00

951,534,327.70
591,769,285.80
2,018,341,862.50
1,693,704,803.00
1,085,950,154.00
285,384,610.00
396,285,3S0.00
309,655,500.00
704,732,500.00
802,715,000.00
1,065,500.000.00

110,389,832.30
58,769,762.00
297,579,897.50
298,380,637.00
277,278, 246.00
55,455,590.00
78,802,920.00
24,214,500.00
81,254,500.00
81,325,000.00
146,240,000.00

One dollar
T w o dollars
*.
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y d ollars. . . .
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
Five h u n d r e d dollars,
One t h o u s a n d dollars
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars

101,998,000
48,752,000
154,660,000
104,360,000
94,800,000
17,600,000
22,400,000
5,100,000
11,500,000
25,005,000
112,10*0,000

Total
TJnknown, d e s t r o y e d .

698,273,000 11,213,264,108 582,902,000.00

9,705,573,223.00 1,507,690,885.00
1,000,000.00
1,000,000.00

698,273,000 11,213,264,108 582,902,000.00

9,706,573,223.00 1,506,690,885.00

One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
Ten dollars.
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
Five hundred d o l l a r s . . . . .
One t h o u s a n d dollars
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars

106,832,000
48,064,000
203,320,000
139,040,000
79,120,000
18,600,000
17,800,000
8,450,000
31,780,000
17,000,000
138,320,000

1,053,654,642.70
636,853,135.80
2,179,151,617.50
1,809,678,973.00
1,152,270,814.00
297,732,260.00
411,701,280.00
315,161,000.00
719,411,500.00
618,890,000.00
1,176,290,000.00

Total
Unknown, destroyed

804,326,000 12,017,590,108 865,220,000.00 10,370,793,223.00 1,646,796,885.00
1,000,000.00
1,000,000.00

Net
1908.

Net

1,168,756,160
694,603,048
2,519,241,760
2,131,125,240
1,442,348,400
359,440,200
492,888,300
340,320,000
817,767,000
701,040,000
1,350,060,000

102,120,315.00
45,083,850.00
180,809,755.00
115,972,370.00
66,320,680.00
12,347,650.00
15,415,900.00
5,505,500.00
14,679,000.00
16,175,000.00
110,790,000.00

115,101,517.30
57,749,912.20
340,090,142.50
321,448,267.00
290,077,586.00
61,707,940.00
81,187,020.00
25,159,000.00
98,355,500.00
82,150,000.00
173,770,000.00

804,328,000 12,017,590,108 665,220,000.00 10,371,793,223.00 1,645,796,885.00
1909. .

O n e dollar
•.
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
Ten dollars.
T w e n t y dollars
'.
Fifty dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h m i d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars
Total
U n k n o w n , destroyed
Net

127,768,000
49,832,000
175,500,000
119,600,000
49,680,000
15,200,000
15,060,000
4,150,000
. 35,800,000
23,000,000
: 148,920,000

1,298,524,160 116,467,587.00
744,435,048 49,628,478.00
2,694,741,760 180,654,915.00
2,250,725,240 126,075,640.00
1,492,028,400 78,582,080.00
374,840,200 16,904,600.00
507,948,300 18,389,700.00
4,237,000.00
344,470,000
853,587,000 15,370,000.00
6,505,000.00
724,040,000
1,498,980,000 109,580,000.00

1,170,122,229.70
686,4ai,613.80
2,359,806,532.50
1,935,752,613.00
1,230,852,894.00
314,636,880.00
430,090,980.00
319,398,000.00
734,781,500.00
625,395,000.00
1,285,870,000.00

126,401,930.30
57,953,434.20
334,935,227.50
314,972,627.00
261,175,506.00
60,003,340.00
77,857,320.00
25,072,000.00
118,785,500.00
98,645,000.00
213,110,000.00

764,510,000 12,782,100,108 722,395,000.00 11,093,188,223.00 1,688,911,885.00
1,000,000.00
1,000,000.00
764,510,000 12,782,100,108 722,395,000.00 11,094,188,223.00 1,687,911,885.00




268

REPORT ON TISE FINANCES.

No. 24.—Amount of United States notes. Treasury notes, gold and silver certificates of
each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding at the close of each fiscal year
from i^Oe^-Continued.
Denominations.

Issued during year.

Total issued.

Redeemed
during year.

Total
redeemed.

Outstanding.

1910.
One dollar
. . . . $151,907,600 $1,448,431,760 $135,252,279.00 $1,305,374,508.70
56,020,000
800,455,048 52,561,146.00
739,042,759.80
Two dollars
214,460,000 2,909,201,760 190,201,135.00 2,550,007,667.50
Five dollars
.»
139,648,000 2,390,373,240 124,052,940.00 2,059,805,553.00
Ten dollars.
74,080,000 1,566,108,400 72,975,300.00 1,303,828,194.00
Twenty dollars
14,200,000
388,840,200 16,039,600.00
330,676,460.00
Fifty dollars
20,930,000
528,878,300 18,752,700.00 -448,843,680.00
One hundred dollars
950,000
345,420,000 4,191,500.00
323,589,500.00
Five hundred dollars :
8,700,000
750,500,500.00
862,267,000 15,719,000.00
One thousand dollars
724,040,000 14,265,000.00
639,660,000.00
Five thousand dollars
86,220,000 1,585,200,000 108,610,000.00 1,394,480,000.00
Ten thousand dollars
Total
Unknown, destroyed

$143,057,251.30
61,412,288.20
359,194,092.50
330,567,687.00
262,280,206.00
58,163,740.00
80,034,620.00
21,830,500.00
111,766,500.00
84,380,000.00
190,720,000.00

767,115,600 13,549,215,708 752,620,600.00 11,845,808,823.00 1,703,406,885.00
1,000,000.00
1,000,000.00
767,115,600 13,549,215,708 752,620,600.00 11,846,808,823.00 1,702,406,885.00

Net
1911.

167,736,000
60,184,000
241,720,000
161,080,000
88,560,000
• 17,400,000
21,600,000
4,550,000
11,000,000
16,500,000
125,210,000

Total
Unknown, destroyed

913,540,000 14,462,755,708 807,650,200.00 12,653,459,023.00 1,809,296,685.00
1,000,000.00
1,000,000.00

Net ..

1,616,167,760
860,639,048
3,150,921,760
2,551,453,240
1,652,668,400
406,240,200
550,478,300
349,970,000
873,267,000
740,540,000
1,710,410,000

158,094,938.00 1,463,469,446.70
59,384,622.00
798,427,381.80
223,867,110.00 2,773,874,777.50
142,204,950.00 2,202,010,503.00
77,962,480.00 1,381,790,674.00
15,142,000.00
345,818,460.00
17,632,100.00
466,475,780.00
4,178,000.00
327,767,500.00
12,809,000.00 . 763,309,500.00
5,085,000.00
644,745,000.00
91,290,000.00 1,485,770,000.00

One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars.
.
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars

152,698,313.30
62,211,666.20
377,046,982.50
349,442,737.00
270,877,726.00
60,421,740.00
84,002,520.00
22,202,500.00
109,957,500.00
95,795,000.00
224,640,000.00

913,540,000 14,462,755,708 807,650,200.00 12,654,459,023.00 1,808,296,685.00

1912.
One dollar.
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars.
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars

186,460,000
85,152,000
252,760,000
164,800,000
83,360,000
17,000,000
20,400,000
3,950,000
9,500,000
6,000,000
107,470,000

Total
Unknown, destroyed

916,852,000 15,379,607,708 853,932,300.00 13,507,391,323.00 1,872,216,385.00
1,000,000.00
1,000,000.00

Net

1,802,627,760
925,791,048
3,403,681,760
2,716,253,240
1,736,028,400
423,240,200
570,878,300
353,920,000
882,767,000
746,540,000
1,817,880,000

175,626,278.00 1,639,095,724.70
62,892,847.00
861,320,228.80
232,890,705.00 3,006,765,482.50
152,013,430.00 2,354,023,933.00
80,624,690.00 1,462,415,364.00
16,095,000.00
361,913,460.00
18,931,850.00
485,407,630.00
3,421,500.00
331,189,000.00
14,481,000.00
777,790,500.00
6,775,000.00
651,520,000.00
90,180,000.00 1,575,950,000.00

163,532,035.30
64,470,819.20
396,916,277.50
362,229,307.00
273,613,036.00
61,326,740.00
85,470,670.00
22,731,000.00
104,976,500.00
95,020,000.00
241,930,000.00

916,852,000 15,379,607,708 853,932,300.00 13,508,391,323.00. 1,871,216,385.00
1913.

One dollar
Two dollars
1
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars
Total....
Unknown, destroyed
Net




204,048,000
68,664,000
286,760,000
206,840,000
103,680,000
19,400,000
24,400,000
4,100,000
10,500,000
10,000,000
117,070,000

2,006,675,760
994,455,048
3,670,441,760
2,923,093,240
1,839,708,400
442,640,200
595,278,300
358,020,000
893,267,000
756,540,000
1,934,950,000

186,531,964.00
65,368,956.00
249,171,570.00
172,133,010.00
85,492,600.00
16,906,550.00
20,943,050.00
4,475,500:00
16,677,000.00
28,290,000.00
141,070,000.00

1,825,627,688.70
926,689,184.80
3,255,937,052.50
2,526,156,943.00
1,547,907,964.00
378,820,010.00
506,350,680.00
335,664,500.00
794,467,500.00
679,810,000.00
1,717,020,000.00

181,048,071.30
67,765,863.20
414,504,707.50
396,936,297.00
291,800,436.00
63,820,190.00
88,927,620.00
22,355,500.00
98,799,500.00
76,730,000.00
217,930,000.00

1,035,462,000 16,415,069,708 987,060,200.00 14,494,451,523.00 1,920,618,185.00
1,000,000.00
1,000,000.00
1,035,462,000 16,415,069,708 987,060,200.00 14,495,451,523.00 1,919,618,185.00

269

TEEASUEEE.

N o . 25.—Amount of paper currency of each denomination outstanding at the close of each
fiscal year from 1906.
Denominations.

Legal-tender
notes.

1906.
OnedoUar
Two dollars
;
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars...
Five hundred dollars..
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand dollars.
Ten thousand dollars..

$2,382,007
1,789,536
8,601,605
279,140, 891
22,649, 702
3,953, 925
7,621, 350
7, 744, 000
21,164,000
10, 000
10, 000

Total
U nknown, des troyed.

355,067, 016
1,000,000

Certificates.

$101,020,197
47,172,090
208,923, 782
16,851,411
208, oos: 804
45,882; 815
64,638, 770
15, 777, 500
59,747, 500
58,360, 000
120,870,000
1,037,252,869

National-bank
notes.

$344,352
164,806
76,889; 175
240,007, 710
181,097, 620
19,934, 800
42,515, 600
94, 500
24,000

561,072,563

1,037,252,869

Net.

Total.

$103,746,556
49,126, 432
384,414,562
536, 000, 012
411, 756,126
69,771,540
114, 775, 720
23,616,000
80,935, 500
58,370, 000
120,880, 000
1,953,392,448
1,000,000
1,952,392,448

1907.
OnedoUar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty d o l l a r s . . . ,
FUty dollars
One hundred dollars...
Five hundred dollars...
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand dollars..
Ten thousand dollars..

2,338,;375
1.745,668
7; 975. 300
285,948; 116
18,664,332
3, 468,575
6,536,650
7,114, 000
19,858, 000
10, 000
10,000

Total
Unknown, destroyed.

353,669,016
1,000,000

1,154,021,869

603, 747,0,52 2,111,437,937
1,000,000

352,669,016

1,154,021,869

603, 747,052 2,110,437,937

Net.

108,051, 458
55,024,094
289, 604,597
12,432,521
258,613,914
51; 987,015
72,266,270
17,100, 500
61,396, 500
81,315, 000
146,230,000

344,249
164, 708
113.826, 705
247; 378, 750
183.971,240
18,239,300
39,705,100
93; 000
24,000

110, 734,082
56,934, 470
411, 406, 602
545,759,387
461,249,486
73, 894,890
118,50S. 020
24,307; 500
81,278,500
81,325,000
148,240,000

One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
FUty dollars
One hundred dollars...
Five hundred dollars..
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand dollars.
Ten thousand dollars..

2,295,723
1, 706,170
76,460,860
205,075,996
18; 066,192
2,998,325
7,584, 750
5,604,000
32,861,000

Total
Unknown, destroyed.

352,663,016
1,000,000

1,294,133,869

698,290,593

2,345.087,478
1; 000,000

351,663,016

1,294,133,8

698,290,593

2,344,087,478

Net.

10,000

112,805, 795
56,043,742
263,629,282
116,372,271
272, Oil, 394
58, 709, 615
73,602,270
19.555, 000
65; 494; 500
. 82,150, 000
173, 760,000

343.878
164; 470
147,594,415
288,381,100
202,533,280
18,389,150
40, 787,300
93,000
24,000

115,445, , 9
36
57,9.14,382
487,684, 557
609,829,367
492,610,866
80.077,090
121; 974,320
25,252,000
98,379.500
82, loO; 000
173, 770,000

1909.
OnedoUar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
;..
One hundred dollars..
Five hundred doilars..
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand dollars.
Ten thou.sand dollars..

2,260,770
1,673,198
88,925,015
174,755,186
17,561, 572.
2,630, 825
7,162, 450
7,360, 000
49,557, 000

Total
Unknown, destroyed.

351,896,016
1,000, 000

1,337,015,889

689,874, 665 2,378, 786,550
1,000,000

350,896,016

1,337,015,8

689,874,665

Net




10,000

124,141,161
56.280,236
246; 010,212
140,217,441
243,613,934
57,372, 515
70,694, S70
17, 712, 000
69,228, 500
98,645, 000
213,100, 000

343,613
164. . 2
32
136,436; 440
297,260, 690
200,682,100
16,857, 300
38,016.200
91; 000
23,000

126, 745,544
58,117, 756
471,371, 667
612,233,317
461.857,606
76,860, 640
115,873,520
25.163,000
118,808,500
98,645,000
213,110,000

2,377,786,550

270

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 25.—Amount of paper currency of each denomination outstanding at the close of each
fiscal year from 1906—Continued.
Denominations.

Legal-tender
notes.

Certificates.

National-bank
notes.

Total.

1910.
One dollar
. T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars.
T w e n t y dollars
F U t y dollars
One hundred dollars..
Five hundred dollars..
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . .
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars.
Ten thousand dollars..

$2,237,912
1, 650.116
115,632:795
15i; ooo; 266
20,686. 352
2,325: 975
7,035, 600
6, 417, 000
44,351,000

Total
Unknown, destroyed.

35.1,353.016
1,000; 000

1,352,053,889

718,146.015 2,419.552.900
1 2, 782; 692
3;782;802

350,353,016

1,3.52,05.3,!

713,383,323

Net

10, 000

$140,819,340
59, 762,172
243, .581,297
179, 58i: 421
241,593: 854
55,837:785
72,999; 020
15,413, 500
67,415. 500
84,3S0: 000
190, 710; 000

$343,610
164.;320
139,884:175
311,289; 990
211,974,920
16,033,000
38,383; 000
90. 000
23,000

$143,400,882
61,576,60S
499,058,267
641,837, 677
474,255,126
74.196.740
n o ; 417; 620
21,920,500
111,789,500
84.380,000
190: 720, 000

1911.
OnedoUar
Two dollars....
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
One h i m d r e d d o l l a r s . .
Five hundred dollars..
One thou.sand d o l l a r s . .
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars.
Ten thousand dollars..

2.220,959
1;633.314
152,504,030
122; .836, 016
18,132, 972
2,042, 425
5, 700, SOO
5,200, 500
42,645, 000

Total
Unknown, destroyed.

350.927, 018
1,000, 000

1, 458,369,669

729.310. 455
1 1; 165, 070

2,538,607,140
2,165,070

349.927,016

1,458,369,1

728,145,385

2, .536,442,070

Net.

10, 000

150, 477.355
60,578, 352
224,542, 952
228,806,721
254, 743, 754
58,379, 315
78,301,720
17,002.000
67,312; 500
95, 795, 000
224,630, 000

343,610
184,320
140,87S. 555
317,935; 200
217,732,020
18,148, 850
30,194, 900
90, 000
23,000

153.041.924
82;375,988
517, 725,537
067.377.937
4SS,800. 746
76,570, 590
120,197, 420
22,202.500
109,9S0; 500
95,795.000
224,640; 000

1912.
OnedoUar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars...
.Fivehundred dollars..
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand dollars..
Ten thousand dollars..

2,204,600
1,618, 703
169,738, 090
115, 038, 396
12,627, 402
1,855,925
4,862,900
4; 470. 000
38,188, 000

Total...:.
Unknown, destroyed.

161,327, 438
62,854,116
227,178,187
247,192, 911
280; 985, 634
59,470. 815
80,807,770
18,261,000
68,788, 500
95,020, 000
241,920, 000

343, .588
164,312
141,585,470
328,508.S70
224,856; 140
16,373, SOO
35,032,350
89,500
23,000

163,875.824
64,635;131
538,481, 747
690, 738,177
49S, 469,176
77,700, 540
120,503; 020
22,820. 500
104,999,500
95,020,000
241,930,000

350,610,016
1,000,000

1,521,608,389

746,957, 030
1 1„S72,722

2,619,173,415
2,872,722

349,810,016

1,521,606,369

One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e doUars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s . . .
Five hundred dollars..
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . .
Five thousand dollars..
Ten thousand dollars..

2,192,944
1,606,239
195,439; 630
98,724.918
10, 444:262
1,700, 725
4,355,300
4,035,000
33,832; 000

178,855,128
68,159, 624
219,065,077
300,211,381
281,356,174
62,119,465
84,572,320
18, ,320, 500
64,987; 500
76, 730, 000
217,920, 000

343,587
164,312
143,751.670
331.208.900
230:391,SOO
19, .587. 900
34,8.55.550
89,000
23,000

181,391,659
67,930,175
558,256,377
72S, 145,197
522,192.236
83,40S; 090
123, '783,170
22,444,500
98,822, 500
76, 730,000
. 217,930, 000

Total
Unknown, destroyed.

350,341,018
1,000,000

1,570,277,169

780, 415,719
'1,309,820

2,681.033,904
2;309,820

349,341.016

1,570,277,169

759,105,899

',078,724,084

Net.

10,000

2,816,300,693

1913.

Net.




10,000

1 R e d e e m e d b u t n o t assorted b y d e n o m i n a t i o n s .

271

TEEASUEEE.No.

26.—Old demand notes of each denomination issued, redeemed, and
J u n e 30, 1913.

T o t a l issued.

Denominations.

F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars

Total
redeemed.

Outstandhlg.

$21,800,000
20,030,000
18,200,000

$70
60

$21,778,692.50
20,010,295.00
18,187,860.00

. $21,307.50
19,705.00
12,140.00

60,030,000

•

. Total

No.

Redeemed
d u r i n g year.

outstanding

130

59,976,847. .50

53,152.50

27.—Fractional currency of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding
J u n e 30, 1913.

Denominations.

Total issued.

Redeemed
during year.

Total
redeemed.

Outstanding.

Three cents
Five cents
•—
Ten cents
Fifteen cents
Twenty-five cents..
Fifty cents

$601,923.90
5,694, 717.85
82,198, 456.80
5,305,568.40
139,031,482.00
135,891,930.60

$10.00
263.10
15.00
603;'90
653.00

$511,724. .35
3,&36,259.34
77,143,373.83
5,085,620.84
134,765,442:91
132,139,109.95

$90,199.55
1,858,458.51
5,055,082.97
239,947.56
4,-266,039.09
3,752,820.55

Total
Unknown, destroyed.

368, 724,079.45

1,545.00

353,461,531.22
32,000.00

15,262,548.23
• 32,000.00

353,493,531.22

15,294,548.23

Net

368,724,079.45

No. 28.—Compound-interest notes of each denonnination issued, redeemed, and outstanding
J u n e 30, 1913.

T e n dollars
Tw^enty dollars
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars

$90
20
150

$23,265,530
30,094,270
60,762,900
45,062,600
67,835,000
39,416,000

$19,670
31,570
61,100
•31,800
11,000
4,000

266,595,440

-

Redeemed
d u r i n g year.

$23,285,200
30,125,840
60,824,000
45,094,400
67,846,000
39,420,000

. .

Total

Total
redeemed.

T o t a l issued.

Denominations.

260

266,436,300

159,140

Outstanding.

No. 29.—One and two yeaf notes of each denomination issued, redeemed, and outstanding
J u n e 30, 1913.

T o t a l issued.

Denominations.

T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty doUars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . . .
Total
U n k n o w n , destroyed
Net




Redeemed
d u r i n g year.

Total
redeemed.

Outstanding.

$6,200,000
18,440,000
- 20,945,600
37,804,400
40,302,000
89,308,000
~ .

$10
20
50

$6,190,000
16,427,840
20,932,350
37,788,600
40,300,500
89,289,000

$6 000
12,160
13,250
15,800
1,500
19,000

211,000,000

SO

210,932,290
10,590

67,710
10,590

211,000,000

80

210,942,880

57 120

272

REP0:RT

O N THE

FINANCES.

No. 30.— United States paper currency of each class, together with one and two year notes
and compound-interest notes, issued, redeemed, and outstanding June 30, 1913.
Issued durmg year.

Class.

Old demand notes...
United Statesnotes.. $163,000,000
Treasury notes of
1890
Gold certificates
468,510,000
SUver certificates
403,952,000
Currency certificates.
Fractional currency.
One and two year
notes
Compound - interest
notes

Redeemed durTotal redeemed.
ing year.

Outstandhlg

$60,030,000.00
4,688,745,808.00

$130.00
163,000,000.00

$53,152.60
346,681,016.00

447,435,0.00.00
5,257,517,880.46
6,054,371,600.00
1,473,625,000.00

269,000.00
421,840,200.00
401,951,000.00

Total is!5ued.

80.00

211,000,000.00

266,595,440.00
1,035,482,000 18,828,044,807.91

Total

1,545.00

368i 724,079.45

260.00
987,082,215.00

$59,976,847.50
4,342,064,792.00

444,775,000.00
2,660,000.00
4,170,790,711.46 1,086,727,169.00
5,570,821,600.00
483,550,000.00
1,473,625,000.00
15,230,548.23
363,493,531.22
57,120.00
210,942,880.00
169,140.00
266,436,300.00
16,892,926,662.18 1,935,118,145.73

No. 31.— United States notes and Treasury notes redeemed in gold from J a n . 1, 187-9, to
June 30, 1913, also imports and exports of gold, by fiscal years, from 1897.
Periods.

T o t a l t o J u n e 30,1896..
Fiscal year 1897
Fiscal year 1898
Fiscal year 1899
Fiscal year 1900
F i s c a l y e a r 1901
Fiscal year 1902
F i s c a l year 1903
Fiscal year 1904
Fiscal year 1905
F i s c a l y e a r 1908
F i s c a l year 1907
F i s c a l year 190S
Fiscalyear 1 9 0 9 . . . : . . .
Fiscal year 1910.
Fiscal year 1911
T o t a l to J u n e 30, 1911.
1911—July
"^ A u g u s t
,. S e p t e m b e r .
'October
November..
December..
1912—January
February...
March
AprU
May
June
T o t a l for fiscal year 1912.
191^-July........
August
September.
October
November..
December..
1913—January
February...
March
AprU
May
June
T o t a l for fiscal year 1913.
Aggregate to J u n e 30,
1913




U n i t e d States
notes.

Treasury
notes.

Total.

$426,190,220 $80,073,325
68,372,923
9,828,991
22,301,710
2,696,253
18,64.5,015
6,997,250
28,637,601
6,'960,836
23,776,433
448,678
17,482,590
1,274,690
7,154,718
1,112,527
11,081,068
473,976
11,517,579
340, 675
11,452,195
192, 810
12,690,,S87
101,278
21,278,307
41,706
19,984,536^
31,405
11,696,012
9,880
22,844,636
48,160

$606,263,545
78,201,914
24,997,963
25,642,265
35,698,337
24,223,111
IS, 757, ISO
8,267,246
11,556,044
11,858,254
11,645,005
12,792,165
21,320,012
20,015,941
11,704,892
22,892,796

735,106,329 110,630,339

I m p o r t s of
gold.

E x p o r t s of
gold. .

845,735,668

2,052,372
3,101,119
2,980,696
2,717,825
2,731,643
'3,736,969
6,976,040
3,182,310
3,147,180
4,182,287
5,407,960
5,274,059

640
120
120
510
40
100
4,040
180
120
2,125
60

2,052,912
3,101,239
2,980,716"
2,718,325
2,731,683
3,736,969
6,976,140
3,186,360
3,147,360
4,182,407
5,410,075
5,274,119

$86,014,780
120,391,674
SS, 954,603
44,573,184
66,051,187
62,021,264
44,982,027
99,066,368
53,648,961
96,221,730
114,610,249
148,337,321
44,003,989
43,339,905
73,607,013

$40,361,580
16,408,391
37,522,086
48,266,759
53,185,177
48,568,960
47,090,595
81,459,986
92,594,024
38,673,591
51,399,176
72,432,924
91,531,818
118,563,215
22,509,663

2,594,653
4,105,331
4,704,096
• 4,102,427
3,468,321
4,707,330
5,141,243
2,937,274
4,335,878
3,892,699
3,346,491
5,611,057

2,178,088
480,799
2,362,861
3,983,994
13,941,093
994,677
1,916,202
10,589,295
.7,453,589
1,816,816
4,450,899
7,171,035

45,490,360

7,965

45,498,305

48,936,500

57,328,348

5,184^175
5,261,4.51
4,344,385
4,980,979
3,745,667
4,074,762
8,698,515
6,243,780
6,497,421
5,585,690
7,352,438
6,891,794

14,110
3,040
20
30
10
1,010
80
27,610

5,198 285
5,254,491
4,344,405
4,981,009
3,745,577
4,075,772
8,698,595
6,271,290
6,497,421
5,585,710
7,374,438
6,891,794

3,747,869
5,576,900
4,200,682
11,887,492
4,474,480
11,397,007
6,210,360
5,366,471
4,380,993
4,0.13,537
4,561,260
3,386,974

7,264,664
2,498,472
568,302
330,270
2,709,594
656,704
17,237,648
12,373,409
18,076,584
3,010,168
12,467,492
569.315

67,850,957

67,830

67,918,787

69,194,025

77,762,822

848,446,636 110,706,124

959,152,760

20
22,000

273

TEEASUEEE.

N o . 32.— Ti'easury notes of 1890 retired by redemption in silver dollars and outstanding,
together with the silver in the Treasury purchased by such notes, for each month, from
January, 1907.
Rethed by
redemption.

Months.

$128,000
103,000
103.000
100,000
104,000
90,000
97,000.
104,000
80,000
94,000
67,000
67,000
79,000
81,000
•79,000
88,000
82,000
88,000
79,000
56,000
•80,000
62,000
66,000
53,000
71,000
57,000
70,000
69,000
56,000
59,000
46,000
49,000
49,000
37,000
52,000
40,000
48,000
44,000
50,000
43,000
46,000
39,000
40,000
45,000
41,000
28,000
24,000
22,000
46,000
38,000
31,000
•38,000
33,000
40,000
28,000
17,000
35,000
28,000
27,000
18,000
36,000
17,000
30,000
32,000
21,000
28,000
18,000
27,000
29,000
19,000
23,000
16,000
24,000
31.000
20,000
13,000
21,000
28,000

1907—January...
February..
March
. AprU
.May
June
July
August
September.
October...
November.
December..
1908—January...
February..
March
AprU
May......
June
July
August
Septemper.
October...
November.
December.
1909—January...
February.,
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September.
October...
November.
December.
1910—January...
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September.
October...
November.
December.
1911—January...
February.
March
AjprU
May
June
July
August.:.
September
October...
November.
December.
1912—January...
February.
March
AprU
May
June
July
August —
September
October...
November.
December.
1913—Januaiy...
February.
March
AprU
May
June

167g6°—FI 1913



m

Outstanding.

$6,488,000
6,385,000
6,282,000
6,182,000
6,078,000
5,988,000
5,891,000
5,787,000
5,707,000
5,613,000
5,546, 000
5,479,000
5,400,000
5,319,000
5,240,000
5,162,000
5,070,000
4,982,000
4,903,000
4,847,000
4,767,000
4,705,000
4,649,000
4,598,000
4,625,000
4,488,000
4,398,000
4,329,000
4,274,000
4,215,000
4,189, 000
4,120,000
4,071,000
4,034,000
3,982,000
3,942,000
3,894,000
3,850,000
3,800,000
3,757,000
3,711,000
3,672,000
3,632,000
3,587,000
3,546,000
3,518,000
3,494,000
3,472,000
3,426,000
3,388,000
3,357,000
3,319,000
3,286,000
3,246,000
3.218,000
3,201,000
3,166,000
3,138,000
3,111, 000
3,093,000
3,057,000
3,040,000
3,010,000
2,978,000
2,957,000
2,929,000
2,911,000
2,884,000
2,855,000
2,836,000
2,813,000
2,797,000
2,773,000
2,742,000
2,722,000
2.709,000
2,688,000
2,660,000

:Bullion in
Treasury.

DoUars in
Treasury.
488,000
386,000
282,000
182,000
078,000
988,000
891,000
787,000
707.000
613,000
646,000
479,000
400,000
319,000
240,000
152,000
070,000
982,000
903,000
847,000
767,000
706,000
649,000
696,000
526,000
468,000
398,000
329,000
274,000
215,000
169,000
120,000
071,000
034,000
982,000
942,000
894,000
850,000
800,000
757,000
711,000
672,000
632,000
587,000
546,000
518,000
494,000
472,000
426,000
388,000
357,000
319,000
286,000
246,000
218,000,
201,000
166,000
138,000
111, 000
093,000
067,000
040,000
010,000
978,000
967,000
929,000
911,000
884,000
855,000
836,000
813,000
797,000
773,000
742,000
722,000
709,000
688,000
680,000

.274

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

No. 33.—Transactions between the subtreasury and dealing house in New York during
eachmonth,from January, 1907.

Months.

1907—January...
February..
March
AprU
May.
June
July
August...
September.
October...
November.
December.
1908—Oaniiary...
February.
March....
AprU
May
June
July
August...
September.
October:..
November.
' December.
1909—January...
February.
March
AprU
May
June
•
July
August...
September
October...
November.
December.
1910—January..
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August...
September
October...
November.
December.
1911—January...
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August...
September
October...
November.
December.
1912—January...
February.
March
AprU
May
June
July
August...
September
October...
November.
December.
1913—January...
February.
March
AprU
May
June




Checks sent to
clearing house.

$23,812,324.68
23,269,992.41
25,062,275.59
23,208,102.21
21,632,532.92
20,864,865.38
28,764,435.33
30,782,-311.56
24,983,421.44
33,892,636.66
28,556,691.97
18,862,343. 70
20,287,286.27
26,608,121.64
24,802,630.15
23,037,267.40
26,176,221.18
25,848,826.01
30.710.802.27
24,764,721.78
34,207,314.96
39,809,942.01
33,263,633.61
36,101,209.32
27,663.803.30
32, soo; 185.60
29,194,692.33
27,900,695.19
27,685,647.20
29,989,716.96
38,566,891.36
35,088,909.68
34,719,066.26
40,497,778.12
34,698,563.49
33,641,116.03
29,625,689.28
33,826,200.42
36,925,209.97
30,106,731.00
29,587,059.09
38,220,632.87
38,5-59,024.19
36,809,686.59
37,042,021.66
42,180,426.38
36,216,997.44
40,035,163.67
33,738,920.42
32,346,711.71
47,809,502.10
44,964,301.72
44,012,773.26
67,033,327.47
83,169,881.74
62,203,054.18
57.123,358.88
64,495,971.78
65,776,164.00
62,816,124.78
60,568,007.63
64, .523,064.06
61,993,854.30
61,444,590.54
64,023,321.39
67,776,496.56
73,064,112.40
66,999,009.14
59,092,185.41
72,811,862.98
66,719,146.17
65,659,117.40
61,844,908.72
62,027,287.28
54.224.012.28
49,956,878.13
48,907,447.12
61,761.207.27

Checks received
from clearing
house.
$44,822,538.29
34,265,137.69
37,746,229.90
42,994,466.83
38,191,399.28
.34,195,552.74
54,054,139.63
41,987,887.40
31,669,037.19
39,110,722.73
16,856,939.93
14,652,801.00
67,084,776.26
62,212,932.49
65,613,884.92
65,924,686.07
66,556,169.30
67,218,270.04
76,982,674.93
65,173,065.08
50,725,444.32
63,257,916.35
53,253,192.51
55,842,116.68
78,340,869.97
55,779,637.63
59,668,666.37
58,963,309.45
57,314,410.09
56,147,626.57
64,723,251.30
57,992,969.22
46,277,901.42
51,605,719.54
49,560,130.75
5,3,237,283.55
64,687,717.44
63,420,898.89
53,563,063.97
52,230,222.78
55,072,019.04
53,410,343.44
63,569,104.24
65,393,277.61
43,958,308.00
52,749,729.30
65,543,710.00
60,596,625.39
72,430,664.46
58.429,957.99
60,110,577.46
66,481,687.15
61,680;480.46
68,871,169.82
69,739,681.92
63,635,173.77
54,659,695.68
65,354,590.49
60,067,931.60
61,204,121.47
81,965,1,53.19
59,809,276. i S
54,825,506.15
62,754,252.95
63.787,358.77
54, 765,211.26
62,391,033.88
59,728,264.91
4.5,013,749.80
66,905,737.94
59,186, 798.^1
63,260,669.20
90,196,866. 46
52,5.39,839.61
45,692,394.71
45,536,120.99
46,385,163.08
66, .358,131. 76

Balances d u e
subtreasury.

$2,140,926.57
15,443.69
385,374.72
835,695.58
7,462.54
163,05L84
3,546,013.55
3,471,583.68
4,962,869.90
12,161,572.97
4,903,-464.78
1,677,327.92
276,154.23

1,003,190.58
992,113. Sd
323,035.67
1,276,882.14
937,570.28
805,731.89

830,639.44
1,264,695.09
1,638,286.52
.1,738,431.35
177,748.8
360,531.22
759,050.44
1,707,748.80
2,408,770.18
127,169.35
2,876,965.81
1,325,377.86
396,654.48
1,467,260.90
1,890,498.46
231,206.04
1,294,893.05
8,694,216.76
18,871,484.72
6,73.3,424.36
7,768,820.58
6,305,723.76
8,279,453.25
8,530,337.00
2,120,953.95
10,843,687.59
10,800,666.17
4,916,843.86
7,612,207.50
16,317,525.91
14,009,925.98
14,428,439.95
14,393,694.39
10,897,187.33
10,892,149.17
9,336,952.50
1,669,142.62
13,066,708.08
12,406,740.11
8,925,665.28
7,575,346.34
11,718,292.27

Balances d u e
clearing house.

$23,151,140.18
11,010,588.97
13,069,329.03
20,622,059.20
16,566,328.90
13,493,739.20
25,289,704.30
14,751,589.40
10,147,199.43
10,180,965.97
461,920.93
693,922.08
36,797,488.99
27.282.138.77
31,087,409.00
42,887.428.67
40,379,948.12
41,369,444.03
47,275,063.24
40,408,333.30
17,510,243.22
23,771,009.91
21,266,441.04
20,678,476.54
50,687,056.67
23,785,183.92
30,473,974.04
31,062,614.26
29,628,762.89
26,157,909.61
26,996,999.38
24,168,754.63
13,197,130.68
12,846,372.77
14,861,567.26
19,773.916.41
35,062,028.16
19,965,229:69
17,386,894.44
22.124.491.78
25,484,959.95'
16,897,459.37
27,418,850.23
28,710,760.37
9,793,262.15
11,894,680.78
19,723,367.04
22,027,732.62
38,691,644.04
26,083,246.28
14,191,573.82
21,748,591.47
18,962,600.25
10,532,059.11
5,441,284.90
8,165,543.95
5,305,167.38
7,164,342.47
2,571,220.85
6,918,333.69
23,528,099.51
6,129,900.01
3,632,307.02
6,226,506.27
7,376,244.88
3,306,241.61
3,336,847.46
7,157,695.72
315,158.78
3,991,062.29
4,358,801.51
7,038,504.30
80,021,100.36
3,579,260.41
3,775,122.54
4,505,908.14
5,053,061.30
5,325,216.76

275

TEEASUEEE.

No. S4:.—Amount of each kind of money used in settlement of clearing-house balances
against the subtreasury in Neiv York during each month, from January, 1907.
Months.

Gold coin.

1907—Januarj''
February
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
....
1908—.Tanuarv
February
March..'
AprU
May
June
July
August
September..
.:
October
November
December
1909—Januarv
February
March
AprU
May..
June
July.
August
Sex) tember
October
November
December.
1910—Januarj'^
February
March..
AprU.....
May..
.Tune... *
July..
August..
September
October
November
December
1911—January
February.
March
AprU...

my....:.

June
July
August
September
October
November
December
1912—Januarj'-...
February
March
April. .
Jklay
June.
July
•
August.
September.
October
November.
December
1913—January.
February
March...
AprU
l^Iay.
June....

. .

. .
.^..




United States
notes.
$20,140
19,589
19,329
23,059
23,329
24,739
26,704
19,589
18,199
15,956
1,921
5,922
27,489
89
119
1,775,139
128
6,'988,134
3,000,123
143
68,103
400,130
101
228, ,307
4,013,917
12,634,184
11,166; 414
5,890,414
5,472,763
3.162,910
5,976,999
2,153,4S6
8,097,131
5,703,063
10,761,567
6,483,916
1,132,028
2,466,230
3.496,394
3,073,492
2,374,960
2,346,459
2,178,860
2,060, 760
1,113.252
1,094,681
901,267
2,007,733
91,644
283,240
1,691,574
748,691
462,600
1,032,069
1,285
366,644
305,157
4,342
71,221
518,334
528,100
129,900
32,307
26,506
6,245
6,242
6,847
7,696
15,159
1,062
8,802
38,504
21,100
9,260
5,123
5,908
' 3,061
6,217

Treasury
notes.

Gold certificates.
$23,131,000
10,991,000
13,050,000
20,599,000
16,643,000
13,469.000
26,263,000
14,732,000
10,129,000
10,165,000
460,000
688,000
36,770,000
27,282,060
31,0.S7,290
41,112,290
40,379,820
34,381,310
44,274,940
40,408,190
17,442,140
23,370,880
21,266,340
20,450,170
46,673,140
11,151,000
19,307,660
25,172,200
24,156,000
22,995,000
21,020,000
16,016,270
5,100,000
7,143,310
4,100,000
14,290,000
33,930,000
17,490,000
13,891,600
19,051,000
2.3,110,000
14,652.000
26,240; 000
26,660,000
8,680,000
10,800,000
18,822,100
20,020,000
38,600,00025,800,000
12,600,000
21,000,000
18,500,000
9,600,000
5,440,000
7,800,000
6,000,000
7,160,000
2,600,000
6,400,000
23,000,000
6,000,000
3,600,000
6,200,000
7,370,000
3,300,000
3,330,000
7,150,000
300,000
3,990,000
4,350,000
7,000,000
30,000,000
3,570,000
3,770,000
4,500,000
6,050,000
5,320,000

SUver certificates.

Total.

$23,15L140
11,010 58913,069 329
20,622 059
16,566 329
13,493 739
25,289 704
14,751 589
10,147 199
10,180 956
461 921
693 9?2
36,797 489
27,282 139
31,087 409
42,887 4?9
40,379 948
41,369 444
47,276 063
40,408 333
17,510 943
23,771 010
21,266 441
20,-678 477
50,687 057
23,7S5 184
30,473 974
31,062 614
29,628 763
26,157 910
26,996 999
24,168 755
13,197 131
12,846 373
14,861 587
19,773 916
35,082 0'>8
19,955 230
17,386 894
o22,124 492
25,484 980
16,897 459
27,418 850
28,710 760
9,793 '?52
11,894 881
19,723 387
22,027 733
38,691 644
26,083 246
14,191 574
21,748 591
18,962 600
10,5.32 059
5,441 285
8,165 544
5,305 157
7,164 342
2,571 ??1
6,918 334
23,528 100
6,129 900
3,632 307
.6,226 508
7,376 245
3,306 ?4?
3,336 847
7,157 696
315 1.59
3,991 062
4, .358 SO?
7,038 504
30,021 100
3,579 ?80
3,775 123
4,506 90S
5,063 061
6,,325 ?17

276

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 35.—Balance in the Treasury ofthe United States; amount in Treasury offices, and
amount in depositary banks, at the end of each calendar year from the adoption ofthe
Constitution in 1789 to 1842, and at the end of each fiscal year thereafter to 1913.
Balance i n t h e T r e a s u r y .
Dates.
I n Treasm-y
offices.
1789—Dec. 31
1790—Mar. 31
J u n e 30
Sept.30
Dec. 31
1791_june30.
Septo 30
Dec.31
1792—Mar. 31
J u n e 30
Sept. 30
Dec.31
1793—Mar. 31
J u n e 30
Dec. 31
1794_Dec.31
1795—Dec.31
1796—Dec.31
1797_Dec.31
1798—Dec. 31
1799_Dec. 31
1800—Dec. 31
1801—Dec. 31
1802—Dec 31
1803—Dec. 31
1804—Dec. 31
1805—Dec. 31
1808—Dec. 31
1807—Dec 31
1808—Dec. 3 1 . ' J
1809—Dec 31
1810—Dec. 31
1811—Dec. 31
1812—Dec. 31
1813—Dec. 31
1814—Dec 31
1815—Dec. 31
1818—Dec. 31
1817—Dec.31
1818—Dec. 31
1819—Dec. 31
1820—Dec. 31
1821—Dec. 31
1822—Dec. 31
1823—Dec. 31 .
1824—Dec. 31
1825—Dec. 31
1826—Dec. 31
1827—Dec. 31
1828—Dec 31
1829—Dec. 31
1830—Dec. 31
1831—Dec. 31
1832—Dec. 31
1833—Dec. 31
1834—Dec. 31
1835—Dec 31
1836—Dec.31
. . .1837—Dec. 3 1 . . . . ;
1838—Dec. 31
1839—Dec. 31 '.
1840—Dec. 31
1841—Dec. 31
1842—Dec. 31
1843—June 30
1844—June 30

$10,490.54

232.14

:..
....

700,000.00
1,025,610.63
1,268,827.62
691,097.04
1,414,029.62
205,330.74
380,199.04
669,889.11
390,199. 04

I n depositary
banks.
$28,239.61
60,613.14
155,320.23
349,670.23
570,023.80
571,699.00
679,579.99
973,905.75
751,377.34
623,133.61
420,914.51
,,
783,212.37
1,036,973.09
561, 435.^33
753,661.69
1,151,924.17
516,442.61
SSS, 995.42
1,021,899.04
617,451.43
2.161.887.77
2,623,311.99
3,295,391.00
5,020,697.64
4,825,811.60
4,037,005.26
3,999,388.99
4,538,123.80
9, 643,850.07
9,941,809.96
3.848.056.78
2,672,276.57
3,502,305.80
3,862,217.41
5,196,542.00
1,727,848.63
13,106,592.88
22,033,519.19
14,989,465.48
1,478,526.74
2,079,992.38
1,198,461.21
1,681,592.24
4,193,690.68
9,431,353.20
1,887, 799.80
5, 296,306.74
6,342,289.48
6,649,604.31
5,965,974.27
4,362,770.76 •
4,761,409.34
3,053,513.24
911,863.16
10, 668,283.61
7,861,093.60
25,729,315.72
45,056,833.64
5,779,343.01
5,364,887.61
3,992,319.44
290,532.18
170,361.73
1,699,709.09
10,625,267.10
8,222,651.19

Total.

$28,239.61
60,613.14
155,320.23
349,670.23
570,023.80
582,189.54
679,579.99
973,905.75
751,377.34
623,133.61
420,914.51
783,444.51
1,035,973.09
- 561,435.33
.753,661.69
1,161,924.17
516,442. 61
888,996.42
1,021,899.04
617,451.43
2,161,867. 77
2,623,311.99
3,295,391.00
6,020,697.64
4,825, 8 n . 60
4,037,005.26
3,999,388.99
4,638,123.80
9,643,860.07.
9,941,809.96
3,848,056.78
2,672,276.57
3,502,305.80
3,882,217.41
5,196,542.00
1,727,848.63
13,108,592.88
22,033,519.19
14,989,465.48
1,478,526.74
2,079,992.38
1,198,461.21
1,681,692.24
4,193,690.68
9,431,363.20
1,887,799.80
5,296,306.74
6,342,289.48
6,649,604.31
5,966,974.27
2 4,362,770.76
4,761,409.34
3,053,513.24
911,863.16
10,668,283.61
7,861,093.60
25,729,316.72
45,756,833.64
8 6,804,953.64
6/633. 715.23
4,683,416.48
1,704,561.80
375,692.47
2,079,908.13
11,195,156.21
8,612,860. 23

Number
of
depositary
banks.

3
3
3
3
3
3
4
6
6
9
9
8

14
16
15

• 94
29

58
55
58
60
59
59
56
40
40
42
41
62
50
44
91
54
43
27
. 11
19
26
30
34

1 This statement is made from warrants paid by the Treasurer of the United States to Dec. 31,1821, and
by warrants issued after that date.
2 The unavailable funds are not included from and after this date.
3 The amount deposited with the States under act of June 23,1836, having been taken out of the control
gi the Treasury Departm.ent by th^ act of Oct. 2,1837, is not inglu^ed froni and after this d^b^e,




TREASURER.

277

No. 35.—Balance in the Treasury of the United States, etc.—Contiaued.
Balance in the Treasury.
Dates.
I n Treasury
ofiices.
1845—June 30
1846—June 30
1847—June 30
1848—June 30
1849—June 30
1850—June 30
1851—June 30
1862—June 30
1853—June 30
1854—June 30
1855—June 30,
1856—June 30
1857—Jime 30
1858—June 30
1859—June 30
1860—June 30
1861—June 30
1862—June 30
1863—June 30
1864—June 30
1865—June 30
1866—June 30
1867—June 30
1868—June 30
1869—June 30,
1870—June 30
1871—June 30
1872—June 30
1873—June 30
1874—June 30
1875—June 30
1876—June 30
1877—June 30
1878—June 30
1879—June 30
1880—June 30
1881—June 30
1882—June'30
1883—June 30
1884—June 30
1885—June 30
1886—June 30
1887—June 30
1888—June 30
1889—June 30
1890—June 30
1891—June 30
1892—June 30
1893—June 30
1894—June 30
1895—June 30
1896—June 30
1897—June 30
1898—June 30
1 8 9 9 - J u n e 30
1900—June 30
1901—June 30
1902—June 30
1903—June 30
1904—June 30
1905—June 30
1906—June 30
1907—June 30
1908—June 30
1909—June 30
1910—June 30
1911—June 30
1912—June 30
1913—June 30




$726, 199.04
768: 000.00
5,446: 382.16
758: 332.15
3,208: 822. 43
7,431 022.72
12,142: 193. 97
15,097; 880.36
22,286, 462.4,9
20,300, 636.61
19,529 841.06
20,304; 844.78
18,218, 770.40
6,r 167.91
4,685; 625.04
3,931 287.72
2,005: 285.24
18,265; 984.84
8,395 443.73
72,022; 019.71
2,374. 744.10
78,352; 599.12
135,270, 243.63
92,363. 732.20
117,944; 915.43
105,279 800.67
84,819: 993.41
61,935: 763.46
52,628: 793.63
64,723: 630.48
51,712: 042.19
51,427: 414.23
84,394: 007.01
130,570; 578.16
159,020, 734.90
160,528 170.50
173,974: 146.61
152,941: 618.24
151,579: 255.91
154,557 652.96
171,851 780. 21
218,277 107.25
188,625: 383.03
189,395: 440.66
167,646: 333.23
164,061' 481.40
135,448: 137.33
118,728: 662.52
114,862: 278.94
108,462: 220.55
185,369: 687.37
258,221 832.65
232,304: 043.90
176,438; 942.32
214,193 189. 26
214,206: 233.65
234,964 115.04
246,046: 797.03
248,685: 097.53
217,591 929.57
230,674: 025.69
249,958; 296.77
255,257 493.51
247,479: 310.94
215,947: 902.41
216,263: 086.09
254,128; 166.75
279,239 692.86
246,214: 851.64

I n depositary
banks.
$7,386,450.82
8,916,869.83

39,980,756.39
24,066,186.19
34,124,171.64
25,904,930.78
22,779,797.62
8,597,927.34
8,206,180.34
6,919, 745.59
12,501,596.08
7,233,551.11
7,435,966.69
11,562,679.52
7,520,194.76
7,299,999.28
46,928,268.66
208,033,840.24
7,771,233.90
8,704,830.83
9,381,712.90
9,803,381.79
10,488,827.63
10,770,679. 96
13,822,070.80
18,975,315.41
54,698,728.38
43,090,750.53
26,779,703.32
21,399,689.16
10,460,130.01
9,962,626.00
10,423,767.61
10.978.605.80
11,415,474.42
12,162,168.05
33.843.700.81
70,295,326.94
92,621,371.72
93,442,683.09
117,141,564.13
140,001,016.70
104,459,638.45
• 64,803,466.30
80,731,058.05
166,803,951.96
147,692,036.79
60,427,525.69
40,631,589.58
36,048,759.38
37.912.786.14
69.746.133.15

Total.

$8,110
9,683 869.83
5,446 382.16
758 332.15
3,208 822.43
7,431 022.72
12,142: 193.97
15,097: 880. 36
22,286'462.49
20,300 636.61
19,529 841.06
20,304 844. 78
18,218, 770.40
6,698. 167.91
4,685'626.04
3,931 287. 72
2,005 285.24
18,266 984.84
8,395 443.73
112,002 778.10
26,440 930.29
112.476 770. 66
161,176 174.31
116,133 529.82
126,542: 842.77
113,485 981.01
91,739 739.00
74,437 368.64
69,762 346.64
72,169 697.17
63,274: 721.71
58,947: 608.99
91,694' 006.29
177,498: 846. 71
367,054 575.14
168,299 404.40
182,678: 977.44
162,323 331.14
161,382 637.70
165,046 380.59
182,622 360.17
232,099: 178.05
207,600 698.44
244,094 189.01
210,737 083. 76
190,841 184.72
166,847,826.49
129,178,792.63
124,824 804.94
118,885 988.16
196,348 193.17
269,637 307.07
244,468 201.96
209,282 643.13
284,488' 516.20
306,827 605.37
328,406 798.13
362,187. 361.18
388,686: 114.23
322,051' 668.02
295.477 491.89
330,689 354.82
422,061 445.47
395,171 347.73
276,375: 428.10
256,894' 675.67
290,176 928.13
317,152 478.99
315,960 984.79

Number
of
depositary
banks.

43
49

204
330
382
385
370
276
148
- 159
183
158
164
145
143
146
124
127
131
130
134
140
136
132
160
200
290
270
205
185
159
180
155
160
160
168
172
357
442
448
677
713
842
837
928
1,255
1,438
1,414
1,380
1,362
1,353
1,535

278

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 36.—National banks designated as depositaries of public moneys, with the balance
held June 30, 1913.
REGULAR DEPOSITARIES.

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

COLORADO—continued.
First National Bank, Birmingham...
Traders' National Bank, Birmingham
Bank of Mobile, National Banking
Association, Mobile
First National Bank, Montgomery..
TaUadega National Bank, Talladega.
First National Bank, Tuscaloosa
City National Bank, Tuscaloosa

$125,000.00
68,125.00
49,804. 48
47,616.34
10,000.00
25,269.26
15,531.72

United States National Bank, Denver
First National Bank, Durango
First National Bank, Montrose
First National Bank, Pueblo
Mercantile National Bank, Pueblo..
Logan County National Bank, Sterling

$46,128.44
71,233.34
50,000.00.
79,802.82•
18,500.00
14,984.98

CONNECTICUT.
ALASKA.

First National Bank, Fahbanks.....
First National Bank, Juneau

148,511.65
99,977.85

ARIZONA.

First National Bank, Douglas
Fhst National Bank, Nogales
Phoenix National Bank, Phoenix...
Prescott National Bank, Prescott...
Arizona National Bank, Tucson
Consohdated National Bank, Tucson
Yuma National Bank, Yunia

Fhst National Bank, Fort Smith
Exchange National Bank, Little
Rock
First National Bank, Paragould

25,000.00
25,000.00
60,000.00
40,000.00
24,909.45
42,806.69
48,270.95




10,000.00
89,901.41
25,000.00
25,000.00
100,000.00
25,000.00

25,000.00
70,908.07

25,000.00
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

100,000.00
10,000.00

74,500.00
40,000.00
25,000.00
300,193. 23
7,000.00
25,000.00
14,477. 73

American National Bank, Washington
Commercial National Banlc, Washington
District National Bank, Washington.
Federal National Bank, Washington
National Bank of Washington,
Washington
National Metropolitan Banlc, Washington
Riggs National Bank, Washington..

322,419.83
246,809.27
242,993.82
156,319.17
660,368.50
668,102.61
1,293,050.89

70,000.00

49,630.80
30,698.98
376,470.32
178,933.91
248,140. 60
110,829.75
101,646.02
120,627.65
210,154.23
10,000.00

COLORADO.

American National Bank, Alamosa..
First National Bank, Colorado
Springs
First National Bank, Denver
Colorado National Bank, Denver
Denver National Bank, Denver
Hamilton National Bank, Denver...

89,863.51
49,669.38

DELAWARE.

Central National Bank, Wilmington.
Union National Banlc, Wilmington.

CALIFORNIA.

First National Bank, Eureka
Fhst National Bank, Fresno
Farmers' National Bank, Fresno
Fhst Nationa] Bank, Los Angeles...
Fhst National Bank, Napa
Fhst National Bank, Oakland.
Central National Bank, Oakland
California National Bank Sacramento
National Bank of D. O, MiUs & Co.,
Sacramento
Fhst National Bank, San Diego
Fhst National Bank, San Francisco,
American National Bank, San Francisco
Anglo and London-Paris National
Bank, San Francisco
Bank or Cahfornia, National Association, San Francisco
Crocker National Bank, San Francisco
Mercantile National Bank, San
Francisco
Wells, Fargo-Nevada National Bank
San Francisco
Whittier National Bank, Whittier.,

Fhst-Bridgeport National Bank,
Bridgeport
City National Bank, Bridgeport
Windham Comity National Bank,
Danielson
Charter Oak National Bank, Hartford
Hartford National Bank, Hartford...
First National Banlc, Meriden
Second National Bank, New Haven,
Thames National Bank, Norwich...

6,000.00

14,000.00
297,044. 57
201,420. 85
329,811.17
26,707. 87

First National Bank, Bradentown..
First National Bank, FeiTiandina...
First National Bank, Gainesville....
Florida National Bank, Gainesville.
Atlantic National Banlc, JacksonvUle
Bamett National Banlc, JacksonviUe
Florida National Bank, JacksonviUe.
First National Bank, Key West
First National Bank, Pensacola
American National Bank, Pensacola
First National Bank, Tampa
Exchange National Bank, Tampa..

Albany National Bank, Albany
Third National Bank, Atlanta
Fourth National Bank, Atlanta
Atlanta National Bank, Atlanta
Fulton National Bank, A t l a n t a . . . . .
Lowry National Bank, Atlanta
National Bank of Brunswick, Brunswick
:
Third National Bank, Columbus

10,000.00
7,000.00
20,296.77
16,000.00
60,149.21
60,468.95
59,296.71
43,012.17
26,003.50
26,104.60
124,987.84
49,906.33

15,000.00
50,000.00
128,266. 54
. 127,185.46
49,999.96
143,337.61
10,000.00
7,000.00

279

TEEASUEEE.

No. 36.—National banks designated as depositaries of public moneys, with the balance
held June 30, i9i^—Continued.
REGULAR DEPOSITARIES—Contmued.

T'tles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

INDIANA—contiued.

GEORGIA—continued.
First National Bank, Elberton
Commercial National Bank, Macon.
National Bank of Savannah, Savannah
First National Bank, Valdosta

$10,000.00
50,095.66

First National Bank, Blackfoot....
Boise City National Bank, Boise
Exchange National Bank CoeQr
d'Alene
Hailey National Bank, Hailey
First National Bank, Lewiston

33,444.71
104,430.28

First National Banlc, Amboy
First National Bank ArenzviUe
Champaign National Bank, Champaign
First National Bank, Chicago
Continental and Commercial National Bank, Chicago
Com Exchange National Bank,
Chicago
,
Fort Dearborn National Ban^, Chicago
'.
National Bank of the Repubhc, Chicago
National City Bank, Chicago
Danville National Bank, DanviUe...
Palmer National Bank, Danville
MiUkin National Bank, Decatur
Southern Illinois National Bank,
East St. Louis
First National Bank, Edwards ville..
First National Bank, Joliet
Will County National Bank, Joliet..
American National Bank, Mount
Carmel
First National Bank, NashviUe
Edgar County National Bank, Paris
Farmers' National Bank, Pekin
German-American National Bank,
Pekin
Herget National Bank, Pekin.
First National Bank, Peoria.
Central National Bank, Peoria
Commercial-German National Bank,
Peoria
:
Illinois National Bank, Peoria
Merchants' National Bank, Peoria..
Quincy National Bank, Quincy
Ricker National Bank, Quincy
Rockford National Bank, Rockford..
Peoples National Bank, Rock Island.
Rock Island National Bank, Rock
Island
First National Bank, Springfield
Illinois National Bank, Sprmgfield..
State National Bank, Springfield....
Bedford National Bank, Bedford...
Citizens National Bank, Bedford
Bloomington National Bank, Bloom-

ington




Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
ahd United
States disbursing officers.

150,000.00
10,000.00

24,644.05
15,077.80
19,823.78
10,000.00
26,000.00
22,580.00
1,473,619.10
714,069:28
519,972.84
50,000.00
210,009.49
257,549.03
149,338.51
10,000.00
24,699.21
60,000.00
10,000.00
26,000.00
10,000.00
• 10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
200,000.00

Corydon National Bank, Corydon...
First National Bank, Crawfordsville;
City National Bank. EvansvUle
Old State National Bank, EvansvUle
First National Bank, Fort Wayne..
Hamilton National Bank, Fort
Wayne
Central National Bank, Greencastle.
First National Bank, Hammond
Citizens' German National Bank,
Hammond
Fletcher American National Bank,
Indianapolis
Indiana National Bank, Indianapolis
Merchants' National Bank, Indianapolis .'
National City Bank, Indianapolis...
Howard National Bank, Kokomo...
Dearborn National Bank, Lawrenceburg
Peoples' National Bank, Lawrenceburg
:...
Marion National Bank. Marion
Peoples' National Bank, Princeton..
Second National Bank, Richmond..
Citizens' National Bank, South
Bend
South Bend National Bank, South
Bend
First National Bank, Terre Haute...
McKeen National Bank, Terre
Haute
,
Terre Haute National Bank, Terre
Haute
First National Bank, Vincennes
Second National Bank, Vincennes..
German National Bank, Vincennes..

Citizens National Bank, Belle Plaine.
First National Bank. Burlington
200,000.00 Merchants National Bank, Burlington
200,000.00
349,892.25 Cedar Rapids National Bank, Cedar
Rapids
374,929.55
Merchants National Bank, Cedar
Rapids
,
375,000.00
350,000.00 Commercial National Bank, Charles
City
375,333. 59
25,000.00 City National Bank, Clinton
29,909.91 First National Bank, Council Bluffs.
8,000.00 First National Bank, Davenport
26,073.10 Citizens' National Bank, DesMomes.
Des Moines National Bank, Des
Moines
25,000.00 Iowa National Bank, Des Moines..,
30,000.00 Valley National Bank, Des Moines..
25,000.00 Second National Bank, DuDuque..,
25,204.64 Fhst National Bank, Mason City..,
First National Bank, Ottumwa
Ottumwa National Bank, Ottumwa,
10,000.00 Red Oak National Bank, Red Oak..
10,000.00 Shenandoah National Bank, Shenandoah
7,000.00
Security National Bank, Sioux City,

$10,000.00
3,000.00
38,525..09
50,000.00
35,000.00
35,000.00
10,000.00
126,000.00
.125,000.00
70,061.72
376,042.07
24,004.65
25,000.00
10,000.00
100,000.00
125,000.00
229,608.59
50,000.00
10,000.00
14,880.01
25,000.00
199,387.48
200,000.00
199, 250.65
50,000.00
50,000.00
100,000.00

10,000.00
30,000.00
20,198.72
20,000.00
24,258.86
10,000.00
35,000.00 •
37,177.95
60,823.79
59,130.60
13,356.01
62,221.75
40,546.94
60,000.00
10,000.00
25,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
12.5,000.00

280

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 36.—National banks designated as depositaries of public moneys, with the balance
held June 30, ./9:?,?—Continued..
REGULAR DEPOSITARIES—Contmued.

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing offi-

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

MAINE.

Exchange National Bank, Atchison.
National Bank of Commerce, Dodge
City
F h i t National Bank, Hutchinson..
Citizens National Bank,,Independence
Northroup National Bank, lola
First National Bank, Junction City.
Lawrence National Bank, Lawrence.
Fhst National Bank, Leavenworth.
Leavenworth National Bank, Leavenworth
Fhst National Bank, Pittsburg
National Bank of Sabetha, Sabetha.
Central National Bank, Topeka
Slerchants' National Bank, Topeka.
Citizens National Bank, Bowling
Green
Carrollton National Bank, Carrollton.
First National Bank, Covington
Citizens' National Bank, Covington.
German National Bank, Covhigton.:
Citizens' National Bank, Danville..
Farmers' National Bank, DanviUe..
First-Hardin National Bank, Elizabethtown
State National Bank, Frankfort
Henderson National Bank, Henderson
Anderson National Banlc, Lawrenceburg
Lawrenceburg National Bank, Law.renceburg
Marion National Bank, Lebanon
Fayette National Bank, Lexington..
Lexington City National Bank,
Lexington
i
PhoenLx & Third National Bank,
Lexington
First National Bank, LouisvUle
American National Bank, Louisville.
Citizens' National Bank, Louisville.
National Bank of Commerce, LouisvUle
:
National Bank of Kentucky, Louis-"
viUe....
.....:..
Southern National Bank, Louisville,
Union National Bank, LouisvUle
State National Bank, MaysviUe
Morganfield National Bank, Morganfield
First National Bank, Owensboro..
National Deposit Bank, Owensboro
City National Bank, Paducah
First National Bank, Paris
First National Bank, Somerset

$20,000.00
25,000.00
15,000.00
6,060.00
10,000.00
24,364. 43
16,579.07
394,242. 71
200,000.00
15,000.00
10,000.00
52,500.00
349,320.02

20,000.00
26,000.00
57,617.68
75,000.00
75,000.00
14,000.00
60,043.07
7,000.00
99,827.63
25,000.00
25,000.00
25,000.00
25,000.00
.40,000.00
40,000.00

39,000.00
149,990. 20
150,000.00
148,940. 55
50,000.00
153,502.51
152,502. 77
350,000.00
15,000.00
10,000.00
59,939.33
59,949. 22
15,000.00
11,000.00
10,000.00

LOUISIANA.

Commercial National Bank, N e w
Orleans
Hibei'nia National Bank, N e w
Orleans
New Orleans National Bank, New
'Orleans
Whitney-Central National Bank,
New Orleans
Commercial National Bank, Shreveport




68,509.83
25,000.00
53,547.64
425,939.91
25,000.00

Fhst National Bank, Augusta
Granite National Bank, Augusta
First National Bank, Bangor
First National Bank, Houlton
Portland National Bank, Portland..

$9,000.00
60,000.00
50,000.00
14,862.59
122,436.11

MARYLAND.

First National Bank, Baltimore
Citizens National Bank, Baltimore.
Maryland National Bank, Baltimore.
Merchants-Mechanics N a t i o n a l
Bank, Baltimore
National Bank of Baltimore, Baltimore
National Bank of Commerce, Baltimore
National City Bank, Baltimore
National Exchange Bank, Baltimore
National Marine Bank, Baltimore...
National Union Bank of Maryland,
Baltimore
Western National Bank, Baltimore.
First National Bank, Cuml)erland...
Second National Bank, Cumberland
Citizens National Bank, "Cumberland
Patapsco National Bank, EUicott
City
:
Citizens National Bank, Frederick..
Farmers & Mechanics National
Bank, Frederick
Second National Bank, Hagerstown.
Salisbury National Bank, Salisbury.

132,377.05
184,931.58
3,000.00
358,430.86
343,798.80
33,636.10
49,901.02
137,216.63
32,181.00
50,000.00
46,723.30
40,000.00
40,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
30,000.00
30,000.00
25.000.00
s! 000.00

MASSACHUSETTS.

Andover National Bank. Andover..
First National Bank, Attleboro
First National Bank, Boston
Second National Bank, Boston
Fourth-Atlantic National Bank, Boston
Merchants National Bank, Boston..
National Shawmut Bank, Boston..:
National Union Bank. Boston
South End National Bank, Boston..
Webster & Atlas National Bank,
Boston
:
Winthi'op National Bank, Boston...
Fitchburg National Bank, Fitchburg
Safety Fund National Bank, Fitchburg
Westminster National Bank, Gardner
Traders National Bank, Lowell
National City Bank, Lynn..'
First National Bank, Marlboro
...
Mechanics National Bank, New
Bedford
Merchants National Bank, New
Bedford...
Merchants National Bank, Newburyport.
First National Bank of West Newton, Newton.
•.
Northampton National Bank, Northampton
Third National Bank, Springfield.

10,000.00
10,000.00
2,37,803.39
100,465.33
50,000.00
125,000.00
563,785.71
584,131.12
21,000.00
49,356.24
49,243.28
10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
9,000.00
20,000.00
10,000.00
40,000.00
25,016.85
10,000.00
49,481.05
10,000.00
107,406.87

281

TEEASUEEE.

No. 36.—National banks designated as depositaries of public moneys, with the balance
held June 30, 1913—Continued.
REGULAR

Titles of banks.

DEPOSITARIES-Contmued.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

Titles of banks.

MASSACHUSETTS—COlltillUed.

MISSOURI—continued.

Mechanics National Bank, Worcester...
Merchants National Bank, Worcester

National Resei-ve Bank, Kansas City
Southwest National Bank of Commerce, Kansas Citj'^
Traders National Bank, Kansas City.
First, National Bank of Buchanan
County, St. Joseph
Burnes National Bank, St. Joseph..
German-American National Bank,
St. Joseph
Third National Bank, St. Louis
Mechanics-Ameri can National Bank,
St. Louis
Mercantile National Bank, St. Louis.
Merchants-Laclede National Bank,
St. Louis
National Bank of Commerce, St.
Louis
State National Bank, St. Louis
Third National Bank, Sedalia

To the cred it
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing ofRcers.

$25,000.00
25,000.00

MICHIGAN.

• Central National Bank, Battle
Creek
Old National Bank, Battle Creek..
First National Bank, Bay City
First National Bank, Detroit
National Bank of Commerce, Detroit
Old Detroit National Bank, Detroit.
Fourth National Bank, Grand Rapids
Grand Rapids National City Bank,
Grand Rapids
Old National Bank, Grand Rapids..
Houghton National. Bank, Houghton
Miners National Bank,Ishpeming..
Peoples National Bank, Jackson
First National Bank, Kalamazoo
Capital National Bank, Lansing
First National Bank, Marquette
First National Bank, Menominee...
First National Exchange Bank,
Port Huron:
,.
Second National Bank, Saginaw
First National Bank, Sault Ste.
Marie
Frist National Bank, Traverse City.

20,000.00
15,000.00
50,000.00
328,290.76
21,000.00
100,000.00
60,000.00

90,391.57
50,000.00

40,000.00
75,000.00
22,112.32
8,000.00

19,709.66
150,000.00
50,000.00
10,000.00
149,665.10
17,387.17
60,080.15
10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
399,784.45
50,000.00
150,236.90
250,000.00
10,000.00

MISSISSIPPI.

First National Bank, Greenville
First National Bank, Meridian
First National Bank, Vicksburg

288,255.87
40,920.57
51,807.05
25,000.00
30,000.00
73,582.69
95,000.00
200,000.00
232,867.75
150,003.00
446,859.69
10,000.00

MONTANA.

25,000.00
50,000.00
10,000.00
25,000.00
10,000.00
24,834.10
15,000.00

MINNESOTA.

Merchants National Bank, Crookston
First National Bank, Duluth
American Exchange National Bank,
Duluth
Citizens National Bank, Faribault.
First National Bank, Minneapohs...
Northwestern National Bank, Minneapolis
Security National Bank, Minneapolis
Northfield National Bank, Northfield
National Farmers Bank, Owatonna.
First National Bank, St. Cloud
First National Bank, St. Paul
' American National Bank, St. P a u l . .
Capital National Bank, St. Paul
Merchants National Bank, St. Paul.
First National Bank, Wabasha

$100,000.00

20,000.00
26,000.00
99,491.37

Merchants National Bank, Billings.
Yellowstone National Bank, Billings
Commercial National Bank, Bozeman
First National Bank, Butte
First National Bank, Glasgow
First National Bank, Glendive
First National Bank, Great Falls
Havre National Bank, Havre
American National Bank, Helena...
National Bank of Montana, Helena..
Conrad National Bank, Kalispell
First National Bank, Lewiston
First National Bank, Miles City
State National Bank, MUes City
First National Bank, Missoula
Western Montana National Bank,
Missoula
V

15,000.00
40,000.00
14,890.06
75,000.00
15,000.00
15,000.00
49,979.30
24,878.85
71,851.31
124,758.58
26,000.00
25,000.00
44,537.75
50,000.00
38,743.72
74,840.34

NEBRASKA.

Alliance National Bank, Alliance
First National Bank, Lincoln
Central National Bank^ Lincoln
City National Bank, Lmcoln
National Bank of Commerce, Lincoln
Fhst National Bank, Mitchell
First National Bank, Omaha
City National Bank, Omaha
Corn Exchange National Bank,
Omaha
Merchants' National Bank, Omaha..
Nebraska National Bank, Omaha...
Omaha National Bank, Omaha
United States N a t i o n a l Bank,
Oinaha
Packers National Bank, S. Omaha..

14,434.13
59,912.57
50,000.00
24,285.13
10,000.00
11,060.82
99,968.69
53,778.30
50,000.00
99,953.31
100,179.13
200,795.91
99,632.98
25,000.00

. NEVADA.

Farmers and Merchants' National
Bank, Reno
,
'

60,000.00

MISSOURI.

First National Bank, Kansas City...
Gate City National Bank, Kansas
City
National Bank of the Republic,
Kansas City




196,341.41
48,164.40
100,000.00

N E W HAMPSHIRE.

First National Bank, Concord
National State Capital Bank, Concord
First National Bank, Manchester...

49,784.58
9,000.00
10,000.00

282

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 36.—National banks designated as depositaries of public moneys, with the balance
held June 30, 1913—Continued.
REGULAR DEPOSITARIES—Continued.

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

Titles of banks.

NEW HAMPSHIRE—continued.

NEW YORK—continued.

Amoskeag National Bank, Manchester
Manchester National Banlc, Manchester
Merchants National Bank, Manchester
Souhegan National Bank, Milford...
First National Bank, Portsmouth ..
New Hampshhe National Bank,
Portsmouth.

Chatham and Phenix National Bank,
NewYork
.•
Citizens' Central National Bank,
New York
Coal & Iron National Bank, New
York
Garfield National Bank, New York.
Gotham National Bank, New York.
Hanover National Bank, New York.
Harriman National Bank, New York
Lincoln National Bank, New York.
Mechanics & Metals National Bank,
New York
Merchants Exchange National Bank,
New York
Merchants National Bank, New
York
National Nassau Bank, New York..
National Park Bank, New York
National Reserve Bank, New York.
New York County National Bank,
New York
Seaboard National Bank, New York.
State National Bank, North Tonawanda
National Bank of Norwich, Norwich.
National Bank of Ogdensburg, Ogdensburg
;
Wilber National Bank, Oneonta
Fhst National Bank, Oswego
Peekskill National Bank, PeekskUl.
Westchester County National Bank,
PeekskUl
Plattsburg National Bank, Plattsburg
Lincoln National Bank, Rochester..
Traders' National Bank, Rochester..
First National Bank, Syracuse
Thhd National Bank, Sj^acuse
Commercial National Bank, Syracuse
National State Bank, Troy
First National Bank, Utica
Second National Bank, Utica
Utica City National Bank, Utica
First National Bank, Waterloo
Waterto\\m National Bank, Watertown:
:

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing OfRcers.

$24,928.47
15,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
174,581.67
20,033.82

NEAV J E R S E Y .

Bridgeton National Bank, Bridgeton
First National Bank, Camden
Camden National :Bank, Camden...
National State Bank, Elizabeth
First National Bank, Jersey City.. .•.
National Iron Bank, Morristown
Essex County National Bank, Newark
National Newark Banking Co., Newark
Union National Bank, Newark
Passaic National Bank, Passaic
First National Bank, Paterson
Paterson National Bank, Paterson..
First National Bank, Perth Amboy.
Fhst National Banlc, Princeton
First National Bank, Trenton

25,000.00
15,000.00
25,000.00
34,876.53
"125,000.00
25,000.00
24,837.95
25,000.00
588,038.24
13,609.43
50,000.00
30,000.00
40,000.00
13,281.35
124,989.88

N E W MEXICO.

Fhst National Bank, Albuquerque..
State National Bank, Albuquerque.
First National Bank, Carlsbad
First National Bank, Roswell
Citizens National Bank, Roswell
First National Bank, Santa Fe
First National Bank, Tucumcari

125,000.00
50,000.00
15,000.00
15,000.00
10,000.00
30,000.00
14,027.37

N E W YORK.

Fhst National Bank, Albany
National Commercial Bank, Albany.
First National Bank, Binghamton..
Nassau National :Bank, Brooklyn...
National City Bank, Brookljm
Thhd National Bank, Buffalo
Columbia National :Bank, Bufl'alo...
Marine National Bank, Buffalo
Second National Bank, Elmha
Merchants National Bank, E l m h a . .
First National Bank, Highland Falls
Niagara County National Bank,
Lockport
Black River National Bank, LowvUle
First National Bank, Mamoroneck..
National City Bank, New Rochelle..
Second National Bank, New York..
Fourth National Bank, New York..
American Exchange National Bank,
New York
Bank of New York National Banking
Association, New York
Battery Park National Bank, New
York
Chase National Bank, New York




297,219.11
150,000.00
25,000.00
201,172.76
150,000.00
100,000.00
49,360.00
125,000.00
30,000.00
10,000.00
3,548.10
10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
98,277.52
199,617.70

486,700. 50
84,087.17
26,000.00
62,706.36

$198,583.32
240,235.29
96,294.28
49,902.78
101,667.29
2,269,121.13
47,511.18
11,600.35
284,3^1.43
100,000.00
167,110. 28
105,000.00
550,000.00
53,009.31
60,000.00
84,657.09
25,000.00
10,000.00
40,000.00
10,000.00
49,160.02
60,000.00
100,000.00
^40,000.00
74,811.52
24,974.80
50,000.00
49,914.38
50,000.00
23.S46.45
44,271.66
50,000.00
25,000.00
30,000.00
25,000.00

N O R T H CAROLINA.

American National Bank, AshevUle.
First National Bank, Burlington
Commercial National Bank, Charlotte
First National Bank, Durham
Citizens' National Bank, Durham...
Fhst National Bank, Elizabeth City.
Greensboro National Bank, Greensboro
Commercial National Bank, High
:Pohit
:
Citizens' National Bank, Raleigh...
Commercial National Bank, Raleigh
Merchants National Bank, Raleigh..
First National Bank, StatesvUle
Murchison National Bank, Wilmington
Southern National Bank, WUmhigton
Peoples' National Bank, Winston...

30,000.00
10,000.00
50,000.00
60,000.00
60,000.00
10,000.00
~ 25,000.00
25,000.00
75,409.97
20,000.00
'92,926.60
40,000.00
50,000.00
19,388.44
160,000.00

283

TEEASUEEE.

No. 36.—National banks designated as depositaries of public moneys, with the balance
held June 30, 1913—Gontinued.
REGULAR DEPOSITARIES—Continued.

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

OKLAHOMA—Continued.

N O R T H DAKOTA.

Fhst National Bank, Bismarck
City National Bank, Bismarck
Dakota National Bank, Dickinson..
Fhst National Bank, Fargo
Fargo National Bank, Fargo
Second National Bank, Mmot
First National Bank, WiUiston

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

$24,748.71
10,000.00
15,077.95
100,136.45
5,000.00
60,000.00
14,703.06

First National Bank, Muskogee
Commercial National Bank, Muskogee
Oklahoma Stock Yards National
Bank, Oklahoma City
Western National Bank, Oklahoma
City
,
Fhst National Bank, Woodward

16,000.00
10,000.00
25.000.00
8,000.00

First National Bank, Burns
Fhst National Bank, Hermiston
Fhst National Bank, Klamath FaUs.
La Grande National Bank, La
Grande
First National Bank, Lakeview.....
First National Bank, Portland
Lumbermen's National Bank; Portland
Merchants' National Bank, Portland
United States National Banlc, Portland

$75,000.00
75,000.00
10,000.00
140,000.00
31,178.48

OHIO.
OREGON.

First-Second National Bank, Akron
National City Bank, Akron
First National Bank, A thens
First National Bank, BamesvUle
Farmers and Merchants National
Bank, Bellaire
First National Bank, Chillicothe
First National Bank, Cincinnati.....
Second National Bank, Cincinnati .
Fourth National Bank, Cincinnati..
Fifth-Third National Bank, Cincinnati
A tlas National Bank, Cincinnati
Citizens' National Bank, Cincinnati.
German National Bank, Cincinnati.
Market National Bank, Cincinnati..
First National Bank, Cleveland
Bank of Commerce National Association, Cleveland
Central National Bank, Columbus..
City National Bank, Columbus
Commercial National Bank, Columbus
Hayden-Clinton National Bank, Co• iumbus
New First National Bank, Columbus
Ccshocton National Bank,Coshocton
Third National Bank, Dayton
City National Bank, Dayton
First National Bank, Hamilton
Second National Bank, Hamilton...
First National Bank, Ironton
Merchants' National Bank, Middletown
Citizens National .Bank, New Philadelphia
•...
First National Bank, Norw ood
First National Bank, Portsmouth..
Central National Bank, Portsmouth
Farmers National Bank, Salem
Commercial National Bank, Sandusky
Citizens' National Bank, Tippeca. noe City
First National Bank, Toledo
.-...
Second National Bank, Toledo
Troy National Bank, Troy
First National Bank, Wilmington..

25,000.00
25.000.00
278,759.11
200,428. 75
203; 996.23
319,647.58
49,536. 76
237,203. 79
03,353.76
200,000.00
500,001.00
160,000.00
100,000.00
24,374.79
26,569.03
100,000.00
100,000.00
7; 000.00

200,000.00
90,000.00
72,698.17
13,738.70
30,000.00
75,000.00

9,000.00
10.000.00
23,181.52
14,374.61
20,000.00
25,000.00

7,000.00
60,000.00
77,629.41
25.000.00
lO;000.00

OKLAHOMA.

Fhst National Bank, Alva
Ardmore National Bank, Ardmore..
First National Bank, Chickasha
Duncan National Bank
Citizens' National Bank, El Reno...
Fhst National Bank, Guthrie
...
Fhst National Bank, Lawton
City National Bank, Lawton




16,679.42
19,083.68
6,000.00
10,000.00
12,287. 71
75,000.00
75,000.00
10,000.00

14,390.00
15,000.00
14,465.31
15,000.00
15,087.02
279,770.37
94,293.35
94,709.12
300,000.00

PENNSYLVANIA.

Merchants' National Bank, Allentown
Fhst National Bank, Altoona
Ashland National Bank, Ashland...
First National Bank, BlairsviUe
Miners National Bank, Blossburg...
Fhst National Bank, Canton
National Bank of Catasaqua, Catasaqua
County National Bank, Clearfield...
First National Bank, Danville
First National Bank, Dunmore.
First National Bank, Easton.,
First National Banlc, Erie
First National Bank, Greenville
First National Bank, Harrisburg....
First National Bank, Houtzdale....
Conestoga National Banlc, Lancaster.
Northern National Bank, Lancaster.
National Banlc of Malvern, Malvern.
Grange National Bank, Mansfield...
First National Bank, McKeesport...
New First National Bank, Meadville.
Citizens National Bank, Meyersdale.
First National Bank, Nanticoke
First National Bank, Perkasie
First National Bank Philadelphia..
Second National Bank, Philadelphia.
Ninth National Bank, Philadelphia.
Tenth National Bank, Philadelphia.
Bank of North America, PhUadelphia
Com Exchange National Bank,
Philadelphia
Farmers and Mechanics National
Bank, Philadelphia
Manayunk National Bank, Philadelphia
Market Street National Bank, Philadelphia
National • Bank of Germantown,
Philadelphia
National Bank of the Northern Liberties, Philadelphia

25,000.00
50,000.00
7,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
9,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
25,000.00
10,000.00
25,000.00
49,932.93
10,000.00
50,000.00
14,059.60
60,027.53
10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
25,000.00
10,000.00
25,000.00
10,000.00
1,059,393.36
21,664.50
28,838.30
23,120.22
94,662.20
150,000.00
99,414.67
26,627.22
52,575.04
10,000.00
30,000.00

284

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 36.—National banks designated as depositaries of public moneys, with the balance
held June 30, 1913—Qontinued.
REGULAR DEPOSITARIES—Continued.

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

PENNSYLVANIA—continued.
National Security Bank, PhUadelphia
Penn National Bank, PhUadelphia..
Quaker City National Bank, PhUadelphia
Southwark National Bank, PhUadelphia
Tradesmen's National Bank, PhUadelphia
First-Second National Bank, Pittsburgh
Columbia National Bank, Pittsburgh.
'
German National Bank, Pittsburgh.
MeUon National Bank, Pittsburgh..
Miners' National Bank, PottsvUle..
First National Bank, Reading
Reading National Bank, Reading...
Thhd National Bank, -Scranton
Traders' National Bank, Scranton..
Union National Bank, Scranton
Market Street National Bank, Shamoktn
First National Bank. Spring Grove.
Stroudsburg National Bank, Stroudsburg
Warren National Bank, Warren
Citizens National Bank, Waynesburg.
First National Bank, Wilkes-Barre.
Luzerne County National Bank,
Wilkes-Barre
West Branch National Bank, Williamsport
First National Bank, York
.-

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

sotJTH DAKOTA—continued.
Pierre National Bank, Pierre
$77,676.69 First National Bank. Rapid City
> 63,698.60 Minnehaha National Bank, Sioux
Falls..:
207,738.31 Sioux Falls National Bank, Sioux
Falls
24,301.23

$14,980.40
16,000.80
75,867.88
20,000.00

TENNESSEE.

24,984.36
158,991.51
160,000.00
26,000.00
895,430.97
26,000.00
26,300.00
25,000.00
74,906.72
26,000.00
26,066.31
10,000.00
7,000.00
50,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
65,000.00
20,000.00

7,000.00
50,000.00

Fhst National Bank, Bristol
First National Bank^Chattanooga..
Citizens' National Bank, Chattanooga
Hamilton National Bank, Chattanooga
First National Bank, ClarksviUe
Manufacturers' National Bank, Harriman
Unaka National Bank, Johnson City.
City National Bank, KnoxvUle.....
East Tennessee National Bank,
Knoxville
Holston National Bank, KnoxviUe..
American National Bank, Lebanon..
Lebanon National Bank, Lebanon..
First National Bank, Memphis..:...
National City Bank, Memphis.......
Fourth and First National Bank,
NashviUe
American National Bank, NashviUe.
Broadway National Bank, Nashville.
Cumberland VaUey National Bank,
NashviUe
First National Bank, Tullahoma

14,993.93
129,240.37
50,000.00
25,000.00
25,000.00
25,000.00
100,000.00
75,000.00
59,796.06
20,000.00
10,000.00
7,000.00
149,370.93
33,442.13
147,726.54
100,000.00
50,629:41
50,000.00
14,930.18

TEXAS.
R H O D E ISLAND.

Aquidneck National Bank, Newport
Merchants' National Bank, Providence
•
National Exchange Bank, Providence

200,000.00
124,981.19
60,000.00

SOUTH CAROLINA.

First National Bank, Charleston
Bank of Charleston, N. B. A.,
Charleston
Peoples National Bank, Charleston.
Palmetto National Bank, Columbia.
National Union Bank, Rock HUl
Central National Bank, Spartanburg

95,617.36
20,000.00
50,000.00
80,000.00
15,000.00
10,000.00

SOUTH DAKOTA.

Aberdeen National Bank, Aberdeen.
Dakota National Bank, Aberdeen...
Whitbeck National Bank, Chamberlain '.:
First National Bank, Deadwood
Gregory Nationail Bank, Gregory
First National Bank, Huron
Fhst National Bank, Lemmon
First National Bank, Mitchell
Mitchell National Bank, Mitchell...
First National Bank, Pierre




26,806.78
25,000.00
16,084.26
100,000.00
60,000.00
16,000.00
15,000.00
16,000.00
16,966.02
15,000.00

American National Bank, Austin...
Austin National Bank Austin
First National Bank, Beaumont
American National Bank, Beaumont
Gulf National Bank, Beaumont
First National Bank, Brownsville...
Merchants' National Bank, BrownsvUle
American Exchange National Bank,
DaUas
City National Bank Dallas
Merchants' National Bank, Dallas...
First National Bank, Eagle Pass
First National Bank, El Paso
City National Bank, El Paso
First National Bank, Galveston
City National Bank, Galveston
National Bank of Commerce, Houston
South Texas Commercial National
Bank, Houston
Union National Bank, Houston
Laredo National Bank, Laredo
Marshall National Bank, Marshall...
First National Bank, Mount Pleasant
First National Bank, Orange
,
Orange National Bank, Orange
First National Bank, Port Arthur..
San Antonio National Bank, San
Antonio
Merchants & Planters' National
Bank, Sherman

75,000.00
76,027.30
166,814.20
97, 700.00
98,100.00
25,000.00
11, ooo: 00
81,850.28
89,741.39
24,000.00
26,000.00
163,610. 22
47,314.31
49,353.94
44,885.62
49,978.50
50,000.00
50,000.00
24,733. 77
7,000.00
10,000.00
73,000.00
33,500.00
13,375.65
299,872.51
49,798.03

285

TEEASUEEE.

N o . 36.—National banks designated as depositaries- of public moneys, with the balance
held June 30, i^J?^—Continued.
REGULAR DEPOSITARIES—Continued.

Titles of banks.

To the credit
of the Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

Titles of banks.

TEXAS—continued.

WASHINGTON—continued.

Texas City National Bank,, Texas
City
Victoria National Bank, Victoria
Citizens' National Bank, Waco

Vancouver National Bank, Vancouver
First National Bank, Walla WaUa:.

To the credit
ofthe Treasurer of the
United States
and United
States disbursing officers.

$50,000.00
10,000.00
42,788.78

$44,997.50
14,969.97

AVEST VIRGINIA.
UTAH.

First National Bank, Ogden
Pingree National Bank, Ogden
Utah National Bank, Ogden
Deseret National Bank, Salt Lake
City
National Bank ofthe Republic, Salt
Lake City
National City Bank, Salt Lake City.

99,939.69
20,000.00
44,931.24
76,022:41
151,097.42
20,000.00

Citizens' National Bank, Charleston.
First National Bank, Grafton
First National Bank, Huntington ..
American National Bank, Huntington
Old National Bank, Martinsburg...
First National Bank, Parkersburg..
Second National Bank, Parkersburg.
National Exchange Bank, Wheeling.

100,027.91
25,000.00
49,760.91
23,124.08
25,000.00
25,000.00
26,278.54
125,000.00

AVISCONSIN.

Peoples' National Bank, Barre
Merchants' National Bank, Burlington
Montpelier National Bank, Montpelier
National Bank of Newport, NewTport.
First National Bank, St. Johnsbmy.

First National Bank, Abingdon
First National Bank, Alexandria
Citizens' National Bank, Alexandria.
Dominion National Bank, Bristol...
Culpeper National Bank, Culpeper..
IFirst National Bank, Danville
Front Royal National Bank, Front
Royal
First National Bank, Hampton
Lynchburg National Bank, Lynchburg
First National Bank, Martinsville...
First National Bank, Newport News.
National Bank of Commerce, Norfolk
Norfolk National Bank, Norfolk
Virginia National Bank, Petersburg.
First National Bank. Richmond
American National Bank, Richmond
Merchants' National Bank, Richmond
Planters' National Bank, Richmond.
First National Bank Roanoke
National Exchange Bank, Roanoke.

7,000.00
25,027.79
20,000.00
40,000.00
20,000.00

40,000.00
24,972.82
26,000.00
20,000.00
10,000.00
26,000.00
22,505.71
10,000.00
75,000.00
10,000.00
56,402.12
462,005.84
459,693.47
29,446.37
100,676.74
150,000.00
196,190.51
100,000.00
20,000.00
20,000.00

WASHINGTON.

First National Bank, BeUingham...
First National Bank, North Yakima.
First National Bank, Okanogan
First National Banlc, Fort Townsend
First National Bank, Seattle
....
National Bank of Commerce, Seattle.
Seattle National Bank, Seattle
Exchange National Bank, Spokane..
Fidelity National Bank, Spokane...
National Bank of Commerce, Spokane
,
Old National Bank, Spokane
Traders' National Banlc, Spokane...
First National Bank, Sunnyside
National Bank of Commerce, Tacoma
Pacific National Bank, Tacoma..




25,000.00
51,991.60
• 14,898.74
98,148.61
60,000.00
400,000.00
600,000.00
86, 230.65
20,000.00
24,796.82
74,446.56
10,000.00
15,000.00
175,000.00
35,000.10

First National Bank, Antigo
Citizens' National Bank, Appleton..
Ashland National Banls^ Ashland...
Union National Bank, Eau Claire...
Fond du Lac National Bank, Fond.
du Lac
Kellogg National Bank, Green B a y . .
McCartney National Bank, Green
Bay
Rock County National Bank, JanesviUe
National Bank of La Crosse, La
Crosse
First National Bank Madison
Commercial National Bank, Madison
First National Bank, MUwaukee
National Exchange Bank, Milwaukee
Wisconsin National Bank, Milwaukee
Old National Bank, Oshkosh
First National Bank, Ripon
German National Bank, Ripon
First National Bank or the City of
Superior, Superior
^...

7,000.00
10,000.00
14,967.57
10,000.00
10,000.00
30,000.00
20,485.80
7,500.00
30,000.00
49,370.13
14,089.99
198,977.68
242,528.32
215,466.49
15,000.00
10,000.00
7,000.00
40,000.00

WYOMING.

First National Banlc, Cheyenne
Citizens' National Bank, Cheyenne..
Stock Growers' National Bank,
Cheyenne
First National Bank, Evanston
First National Bank, Lander
First National Bank, Powell
Fhst National Bank, Rock Springs..

41,473.81
24,813.69
111,635.14
14,945.00
23, 258. 20
16,000.00
10,000.00

ADDITIONAL DEPOSITARIES.

First National Bank of Hawaii,
Honolulu

643,244.98

PHILIPPINE I S L A N D S .

Treasury of the Philippine Islands,
Manila

3,972,379.97

American Colonial Bank of Porto
Rico, San Juan

200,491.80

286

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 36.—National banks designated, as depositaries of public moneys, with the balance held
June 30, 1913—Continued.
SPECIAL DEPOSITARIES.
To the credit
Num- of the Treasber
urer of the
United States.

State.

$11,000
1,000
4,000
17,000
7,000
8,000
1,000
880,000
4,000
17,000
6,000
32,000
35,000
42,000
32,000
18,000
6,000
6,000
17,000
25,000
12,000
14,000
8,000
18,000
22,000

Alabama
Arizona
,
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska

State.

To the credit
Num- of the Treasber.
urer of the
United States.

Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina..
North Dakota..
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania...
Rhode I s l a n d . . .
South Carolina..
South Dakota...
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia..
Wisconsin
Wyoming

$2,000
9,000
8,000
2,000
42,000
9,000
1,000
49,000
9,000
10,000
89,000
2,000
5,000
2,000
3,000
25,000
6,*000
21,000
4,000
13,000
15,000
6,000

Total

1,573,000

No. 37,—Receipts and disbursements of public moneys through national-bank depositaries
by fiscal years from 1901.

'
Fiscal years.

1901...
1902
1903 . .
1904
1906
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

Receipts.

F u n d s transF u n d s transferred t o b a n k s . ferred t o T r e a s u r y
b y banks.

$313,373,160.38 $125,443,007.66
157,041,571.84
281,234,091.57
244,947,528. 71 201,897,430.60
176,189,611.66
• 251,970,882.51
134,884,137.86
261,265,327.39
233,200,148.62
267,418, 788.43
349,196,379.80
313,824,771.09
297,371,652.96
293,869,490.31
192,639,93^.96
300,924,352.92
226,151,893.16
342,600,932.99
235,563,144.18
377,280,054.97
224,961,946.42
378,597,729. 27
474,167,662.26
464,820,349.19




$413,853,457.60
388,229,463.27
388,539,946.66
414,301,176.71
388,889,785.82
427,142,930.07
516,805,991.82
544,689,160.96
502,286,496.43
510.782.692.86
539,491,903.99
630,597,076.26
871.295.113.87

AVarrants p a i d
by banks.

.

$24,141,398.97
26,347,319.10
35,446,560.08
49,400,676.71
66,905,851.68
57,548,415.23
60,142, 265.16
66,763,897.28
79,016,707.39
78,346,522.81
77,822,223.75
70,093,031.83
48,644,079.04

Balance.

$93,657,444.47
117,366,325.51
140,215,778.08
104,674,399.83
65,018,227.68
80,946,819.43
167,018,713.34
147,906,798.17
60,167,888.23
39,791,598. 71
35,320,670.12
38,190,237.72
57,239,066.26

287

TEEASUEEE.

N o . 38.—Number of national banks with semiannual duty levied, by fiscal years, and
number of depositaries with bonds as security at close of each fiscal year from 1901.
N u m b e r t B o n d s held
o secure cirof b a n k s .
culation.

Fiscal years.

1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

-..
.

4,187
4,653
5,014
5,409
5,782
6,138
6,538
0,827
7,020
7,207
7,337
7,428
7,532

$326,119,230
317,038,530
375,068,770
418,018,690
468,088,940
520,605,210
'558,364,860
628,172,130
860,689,070
688,974,880
698,532,060
724,493, 740
740,529,250

Semiannual
d u t y levied.

Number
of depositaries.

B o n d s held
to secure
deposits.

448
577
713
. 842
837
927
1,255
1,436
1,414
1,3S0
1,362
1,354
1,478

$105,765,450
124,718,650
152,852,020
112,902,550
80,404,950
95,575, 725
193,244,052
ISO,459,419
81,244,071
51,774,700
50,206,800
48,309,500
61,646,300

$1,599,221.08
1,633,309.15
1,708,819.92
1,928,827. 49
2,163,882.05
• 2,509,997.80
2,806,070.54
3,090,811.72
3,190,543.04
3,463,408.68
3,567,037.21
3,690,313.53
3,804,762. 29

Total b o n d s
held.

$431,884,680
441,767,180
527,920,790
528,919,240
548,471,890
618,180,935
751,808,712
SOS,631,549
741,933,071
738,749,580
748,738,860
772,803,240
802,175,650

No. 39.—Shipments of silver coin from each office of the Treasury and mints during i
fiscal years 1912 and 1913.
During fiscal year 1912.
Standard
dollars.

Subsidiary
silver.

During fiscal year 1913.
Standard
dollars.

Subsidiary
silver.

TREASURY.

Washington...
Baltimore
Boston
Chicago
Cincinnati
New Orleans...
New York
Philadelphia...
St. Louis
San Francisco.

$475,045
64,400
276,600
2,894,875
2,077,639
1,848,700
151,500
801,250
2,780,425
289,900

Denver
New Orleans.
PhUadelphia.

181,540

Total...

11,841,874

$1,010,360.60
534,605.00
• 1,410,380.00
2,576,932.00
1,808,300.00
1,384, 720.00
4,009,295.00
. 2,412,135.00
1,564,450.00
.
755,510.00

$579,638
122, 700
287,100
3,018,900
2,025,625
1,703,600
183,125
774,375
3,387,275
373,950

$1,183, 200.30
581, 210.00
1,379, 600.00
2,856, 696.80
1,751, 551.00
1,579, 595.00
3,630, 384.80
2,731, 885.00
2,029, 998.00
615, 895.00

143,890

"2,"6i9,'607."i6

12,560,078

22,787,798.80

1,808,193.80

1,221,930.80
"2," 787,'839." 65'
21,476,457.40

No. 40.—Shipments of silver coin from the Treasury offices and mints during each fiscal
year from 1901, and charges thereon for transportation.
Fiscal y e a r s .

1901
1902
1903
1904
1905 . . .
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

...

Standard
dollars.
$38,338,519.00 •
40,404,325.00
41,182,154. 00
41,032,715.00
44,988,746.00
41,582, 828.00
37,500,118.00
31,486,911.00

i
(0

Subsidiary
sUver.
$21,075,146.85
21,871,959.35
24,112,444.65
24,382,947.90
27,606,184.80
29,378,631.40
30,395,662.55
31,438,830. 99
36,058,567.75
43,977,039.70

(^)
(«)
(«)

Total.

$59,413,865.85
62,276,284. 35
85,294,598. 66
65,415,682.90
72,594,930.80
70,941,459.40
67,895, 780.^55
62,905, 741.99
36,058,567.75
43,977,039.70

Charges.

$125,742.99
124,003. 65
132,265.05
126,359. 81
, 137,597.21
152,184. 90
163,051.55
154,069.35
104,443. 28
84,457. 58

1 $11,865,180 in standard sUver doUars shipped at expense of consignee.
2 $14,384,734 in standard sUver dollars shipped at expense of consignee.
' $14,060,535 in standard silver dollars shipped at expense of consignee.
* $21,956,847.80 in subsidiary sUver shipped at expense of consignee.
5 $11,841,874 in standard sUver dollars shipped at expense of consignee.
fi $21,476,457. 40 in subsidiary sUver shipped at expense of consignee.
7 $12,560,078 in standard silver doUars shipped at expense of consignee.
8 $22,767;796.80 in subsidiary sUver shipped at expense of consignee,




R a t e per
$1,000.
$2 12
1.99
2 03
1.93
1 90
2.15
2 40
2.45
2.90
1.92

288

.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 41.— United States bonds retired, from May, 1869, to June 30, 1913.
R a t e of
interest.

T i t l e of loans.

L o a n of 1847
B o u n t y - l a n d scrip
L o a n of F e b r u a r y , 1861
Oregon w a r d e b t
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861
Five-twenties of 1882
L o a n of 1883
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864
Five-twenties of 1865
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867
.•
Consols of 1868
T e x a s i n d e m n i t y stock
L o a n of 1860
L o a n of 1858
Ten-forties of 1864
F u n d e d loan of 1881
F u n d e d loan of 1891
F u n d e d loan of 1907..
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, continued
L o a n of 1883
F u n d e d loan of 1881 c o n t i n u e d
L o a n of J u l y 12,1882.
L o a n of 1908-1918
F u n d e d loan of 1S91 c o n t i n u e d
B o n d s issued t o Pacific railroads:
Central Pacific
U n i o n Pacific
.
K a n s a s Pacific
Central B r a n c h , U r u o n P a c i f i c .
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City & Pacific
'. .
L o a n of 1904
L o a n of 1925
Total

.. .

Redeemed.

P e r ct.
6
6,
6
6
6
6
6
8
6
6
8
0
8
5
5
5
5
5
4-^
4

$47,900
1,175
7,798,000
885,950
12,932,400
430;418,100
4,684,700
• 2,382,200
69,888,900
157,697,450
205,287,400
'310,108,700
37,478,750
232,000
7,022,000
8,041,000
192,459,250
72,867,850
81,045,950
61,933,350

3J

Purchased.

$10,612,000
256,800
48,778,700
57,155,850
19,854,250
1,119,800
43,459,750
36,023,350
118,950,550
02,848,950
4,794,050

441,728,950

25,885,120
27,238,512
6,303,000
1,600,000
1,970,560
1,828,320
19,371,800

132,449,900

25,407,200

8
8
8
8
8
8
5
4

380,500
12,218,650
9,586,600
8,703,600
6,568,600
258,650

13,231,650
292,349,600
2,913,540

2

$27,091,000

13,957,000
2,089,600
43,599,000
143,618,200
238,675,400

127,595,600
37,226,200
109,155,250
306,581,050

f
3

Converted
and
exchanged.

.2,349,953,837

8,543,850
43,825,500

72,071,300

882,825,340 1,032,683,500

Total.

$47,900
1,175
18,410,000
942,750
61,709,100
514,664,950
24,538,950
3,882,500
125,547,300
203,307,400
332,941,560
379,524,250
42,529,450
232,000
7,022,000
19,998,000
194,548,750
116,466,850
224,584,160
740,237,700
127,595,600
50,457,850
401,504,850
305,581,050
135,363,440
25,407,200
25,885,120
27,236,612
6,303,000
1,600,000
1,970,560
1,828,320
99,988,750
43,825,600
4,285,462,477

No. 42.—Seven-thirty notes issued, redeemed, and outstanding June 30, 1913.
Issue.

Redeemed to Redeemed
Total issued. June 30,1912. during year.

July 17,1861.
Aug. 15,1864
June 15,1865,
July 15,1865.

$140,094,750
299,992,500
331,000,000
199,000,000

$140,085,400
299,947,200
330,970,200
198,954,900

Total..

970,087,250

969,957,700

Total redeemed.

Outstanding.
$9,350
45,300
29,800
45,000

969,967,800

$100

$140,085,400
299,947,200
330,970,200
198,955,000

129,450

No. 43.—Refunding certificates, act of Feb. 26, 1879, issued, redeemed,-and outstanding.

How payable.

To order
To bearer
Total




Redeemed
during
year.

T o t a l retired
to J u n e
30,1913.

$58,500
39,954,250

$480

$58,480
39,940,700

$20
13,550

40,012,750

4S0

39,999,180

13,570

Issued.

Outstanding.

289

TEEASUEEE.

N o . 44.—Checks issued by Treasurer's office for interest on registered bonds during the
fiscal year 1913.
Title of loans.

Amount.

PhUippine loan of 1914-1934 (L. P.)
Phihppine loan of 1915-1935 (P. L B . )
Phihppine loan of 1915-1935 (M. S. & W.)
Phihppine loan of 1916-1936 (P. I. B . ) . . . .
PhUippine loan of 1917-1937 (M. S. & W.)
Phihppine loan of 1918-1938 (M. S. & W.)
Phihppine loan of 1919-1939 (P. I. B.)....
Phihppine loan of 1921-1941 (Cebu)
Porto Rican gold loan of 1920-1927
Porta Rican gold loan of 1922-1937
District of Columbia 3.66 per cent bonds..

$280,000.00
100,000.00
40,000.00
40,000.00
80,000.00
40,000.00
60,000.00
5,000.00
17,000.00
2,000.00
263,840.25

Total

927,840.25

N o . 45.—Interest on 3.65 per cent bonds of the District of Columbia paid during thefiscal
year 1.913.
Where paid.

Coupons.

No. 46.—Coupons from

Title o f l o a n s .

Total.

$16,146.68

T r e a s u r y U n i t e d States, W a s h i n g t o n .

Checks.
$263,201.60

$279,348.18

United States bonds and interest notes paid during the fiscal
year 1913, classified by loans.
Number
of
coupons.

F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862 . . . \ . . .
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1866
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1868
F u n d e d loan of 1891
:..
^Loan of 1904
F u n d e d loan of 1907
L o a n of 1925
• L o a n of 190&-1918
Con<^ol<^ of 19.30

Amount.

1

$L50

3

7.60

2

1.12

2,092
90,158
261,827
21,337

13,197.00
760,758.60
586,980.75
77,553.50

P a n a m a Canal loan:
1916-1936
1918-1938
1961..
P o s t a l Savings loan:
F i r s t series
Second series
T h i r d series
7 30 notes of 1864-65.
Total

16726°—FI 1913-




-19

Number
of
coupons.

Title of loans.

Amount.

....

572
1,600
66,990

$422 80
6,426.10
444,996.25

...

113
1,867
860
1

103 25
1,967. 75
- 1,169.00
1.82

446,323 1,893,575.84

290

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 47.—Bonds and other securities retired from the sinking fund during the fiscal year
1913, and total from May, 1869.

Title of loans.

War-bounty scrip
Loan of 1860
?
Loan of February, 1861
Oregon war debt
—
Loan of July and August, 1861
Five-twenties of 1862
.1
Loan of 1863
Ten-forties of 1864
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of June, 1864
Five-twenties of 1865
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867
Consols of 1868
Funded loan of 1881
Funded loan of 1891
Funded loan of 1907
Loan of 1904
Loan of July and August, 1861, continued.
Loan of 1863, continued
Funded loan of 1881, continued
Loan of July 12,1882
:
Loan of 1908-1918
Funded loan of 1891, continued
Loan of 1926
Treasury notes Issued prior to 1846
Treasury notes of 1861
Temporary loan certificates, act 1862
Certificates of indebtedness, act 1862
Certificates of indebtedness of 1870
One-year notes of 1863
Two-year notes bf 1863
Compound-interest notes
'.
Seven-thhtles of 1861
Seven-thirties of 1864-65
Fractional currency
United States notes
Old demand notes
:
Refunding certificates
Certificates of indebtedness
Total.




Retired
during
fiscal
year.

$100.00

99,950.00

From May, 1869.
Redeemed.

Purchased.

$175.00
10,000.00
3,000.00 $10,612,000.00
i;550.00
256,800.00
78,450. 00 48,776, 700.00
24,029,150.00
30,047,400.00
23,100. 00 19,864,260.00
691,700.00
361,600.00
11,072,100.00
18,366,100.00
1,982,450.00
16,866,150.00
65,460.00
48,166,160.00
76,700.00
32,115,600.00
21,360.00
2,213,800.00
25,091,660.00
43,599,000.00
50,764,900. CO 46,274,850.00.
60,514,500.00 134,291,400.00
19,371,800.00
8,543,650.00
56,633,000.00
37,220,300.00
43,710,300.00
168,692,760.00

2,396,800.00
26,407,200.00

43,'825," 566.'66

30.00
60.00
190.00
1,646.00
130.00
480.00

110.00
200.00
110.00
1,000.00
678,000.00
5,375.00
1,700.00
30,500.00
• 1,500.00
13,400.00
26,261,273.03
29,090,584.00
3,315.00
9,420.00
13,938,500.00

601,512,692.03

1,500,000.00

Total.
$175.00
10,000.00
10,615,000.00
258,350.00
48,855,150. 00
64,076,560.00
19,877,350.00.
691,700.00
361,600.00
29,428,200.00
18,848,600.00
48,231,600.0032,192,300.00
2,235,150.00
68,690,550.00
97,039,750.00
194,805,900.00
27,915,460.00
56,633,000.00
37,220,300.00
43,710,300.00
168,692,760.00
2,396,800.00
26,407,200.00
43,825,500.00
110.00
200.00
110.00
1,000.00
678,000.00
5,376.00
1,700.00
30,500.00
1,600.00
13,400.00
26,281,273.03
29,090,664.00
3,315.00
10,770.00
15,436,500.00

502,040,850. 00 1,103,553,542.03

TREASURER.

»

291

No. 48.—Public debt June 30, 1912, and June 30, 1913, and changes during the year.

Title ofloans.

Rate
of interest.

Outstanding
J u n e 30, 1912.

Issued during, R e t h e d d u r h i g
year.
year.

Outstandhlg
J u n e 30, 1913.

$47,964,300.00
41,900.00
417,3S0.00

$118,489,900.00
63,945,460.00
646,250,150.00
54,631,980.00
30,000,000.00
50,000,000.00
41,900.00
417,380.00

. 48,423,580.00

963,776,770.00

INTEREST-BEARING DEBT.

L o a n of 1925
L o a n of 1908-1918 .
. . .
Consols of 1930.. . .
P a n a m a Canal loan of 1918-1936
P a n a m a Canal loan of 1918-1938
P a n a m a Canal loan of 1961
P o s t a l Savings loan, 1st series..
P o s t a l Savings loan, 2d series..

Perct.
4
3
2
2
2
3
2-^
2i

Total

$118,489,900.00
63,945,460.00
646,250,150.00
54,631,980.00
30,000,000.00
2,035,700.00

916,353,190.00

D E B T ON WHICH I N T E R E S T
HAS CEASED.

Old d e b t
i^toO
L o a n of 1847
6
T e x a n i n d e m n i t y stock
6
5
L o a n of 1858
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862
6
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e , 1864
6
6
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865
5
Ten-forties of 1864
6
Consols of 1865
6
Consols of 1867
. . .
6
Consols of 1868
L o a n of F e b r u a r y , 1861
6 °
F u n d e d loan of ISSI .
5
F u n d e d loan of 1881, c o n t h i u e d .
3-^
Oregon w a r d e b t
6
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1S61.
6
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861,
continued.. .
U
L o a n of 1863 (ISSl's)
6
L o a n of 1863, c o n t i n u e d
3^^
L o a n of J u l y 12, 1882
3
F u n d e d loan of 1891
4^
F u n d e d loan of 1891, c o n t i n u e d .
2
L o a n of 1904
5
F u n d e d loan of.l907
4
T r e a s u r y n o t e s of 1861.
6
S e v e n - t h h t i e s of 1861
One-year n o t e s of 1863
5
Two-year notes of 1863. . . .
5
C o m p o u n d - i n t e r e s t notes
6
Seven-thirties of 1864-85
7A
Certificates of i n d e b t e d n e s s
6
T e m p o r a r y loan
4 to 6
3 p e r c e n t certificates
3
4
R e f u n d i n g certificates
Total

151,610.26
950.00
20,000.00
2,000. 00
107,150.00
14,000.00
19,850.00
18,650.00
57,450.00
93,800.00
9,900.00
5,000.00
22,400.00
60.00
2,250.00
15,060.00

$100.00
60.00
50.00

1,600.00
3,100.00
100.00
200.00
23,650.00
6,000.00
13,250.00
800,350.00
2,300.00
9,350.00
30,360.00
26,850.00
159,230.00
120,100.00
3,000.00
2,850.00
5,000.00
14,050.00

151 610.26
950.00
20,000.00
2,000.00
107,150.00
14,000.00
19,850.00
18,550.00
57,400.00
93 760.00
9,900.00
5,000.00
22, 400.00
50.00
2,250.00
15,050. 00

480.00

1,600.00
3,100.00
100.00
200. 00
23,650.00
5,000.00
13,250. 00
700,400.00
2,300.00
9,350.00
30,330.00
26,800.00
159,040.00
120,100.00
3,000.00
2,860.00
6T000.00
13,570.00

1.00,.900.00

1,669,650.26

130.00
149,660,000.00

63,152.60
346,681,016.00

99,950.00
30.00
50.00
190.00

1,760,450.26

D E B T B E A R I N G NO I N T E R E S T .

Old d e m a n d notes
U n i t e d States n o t e s . . . .
N a t i o n a l - b a n k notes, r e d e m p tion account
Fractional currency
Total

53,282.50
346,681,016.00

149,660,000.00

33,160,178.00
6,857,390.93

20,078,366.00

28,527,711.50
1,236.03

24,710,831.60
6,866,164.90

386,751,867.43

169,738,365.00

178, ISS, 947.53

378,301,284.90

994,870,669.00
463,499,000.00
3,246,000.00

355,760,000. 00
411,432,000.00

310,573,300.00 1,040,067,369.00
393,382,000.00
481,549,000.00
2,929,000.00
317,000.00

CERTIFICATES AND TREASURY
NOTES.

Gold certificates
SUver certiflcates
T r e a s u r y notes of 1890
Total

1, 461,615,669.00

787,192,000.00

704,272,300.00 1,524,535,369.00

Aggresfate..

2, 765,600,556. 69

985,353,946.00

882,580,627.63 2,868,373,874.16




292

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 49.—Public debt, exclusive of certificates and Treasury notes, at the endof each month,
from January, 1907.

Months.

1907—January...
February..
March
AprU
May.
June
July
August
September.
October...
November.
December.
1908-^January...
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September.
October...
November.
December.
1909—January...
February..
March
April
May
June
July
August
September.
October...
November.
December.
1910—January...
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August
September
October...
November.
December.
1911—January...
February..
March
AprU
May
June
July
August:...
September
October...
November.
December.
1912—January...
February..
March
AprU
May..
June
July
August
September
October...
November.
December.
1913—January...
February..
March
AprU
May
Juiie




Interest
bearing.

$922 020,
920 099,
908 233,
901 568,
899 972,
894 834,
858 685,
858 685,
858 685,
858 685,
869 603,
898 210,
898 753,
898 753,
897 503,
897 603,
897 503,
897 603,
897 503,
897 503,
897 253,
897 253,
883 317,
912 900,
913 307,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
913 317,
915 353,
939 258,
963 118,
963 344,
963 349,
963 359,
983 359,
983 776,
983 778,
963 776,
963 778,
983 778,
983 776,
984 831,
984 831,
984 631,
964 631,
964 631,
964 631,
965 708,
985 706,

985 706
985 706
985 708,
965 706,

U n i t e d States
notes a n d
fractional currency.

National-bank
notes, r e d e m p t i o n account.

$1,096, 745.26 $363 599,
,535.78
1,095, 695.26 353 598,
1,775.78
1,095, 365.26 353 598,
1,775.78
1,095, 135.26 353 598, 775.78
;,
1 , - " - 925.26 353 ,598, 776.78
;,
815.26 353 598, 292.78
1,
;,
i,
13,563, 135.26 353 .598, 292.78
i,
9,623; 105.26 353 ,598, 292.78
,292.78
8.272, 545.26 353 598,
,847.78
6,930; 955.26 3.53 .597,
,847.78
6,228, 015.26 353 597,
,
5,580; 385.26 353 .597, 732.78
',
5,107, 205.26 3.53 ,597, 732.78
',
4,887, 095.28 353 597, 732.78
',
4,875, 215.26 3.53 ,597, 132.78
',
4,600, 695.26 3.53 ,597, 112.78
',
4,291, 305.28 3.53 ,597, 112.78
',
4.130, 015.28 3.53 ,597, 112.78
745.26 3.53 ,596, 672.78
i,
3,943,
\,
3,867, 625.26 3.53 ,596, 672.78
195.26 3.53 ,596,
,672.78
3,823,
,,
3,738 235.26 3.53 ,598, 222.78
265.26 3.53 ,596, 222.78
i,
3,647,
,222.78
3,448, 935.26 353 598,
,
3,373, 705.26 3,53 .595, 865.7.3
.,
3,338, 485.26 353 595, 655.78
1,655.78
3,292, 356.26 353 595,
115.26
.,
3.131, 115.26 3.53 .595, 655.78
;,
2,987, 855.26 3.53 .595, 085.78
.,085.78
2,883, 475.26 3.53 .595,
,085.78
2,814, 625.26 3.53 .595,
,607.78
2,793 285.26 3.53 .594,
,192.78
2,761, 895.26 3.53 .594,
:, 010.78
2 , — 325.26 3.53 .594,
,010.78
2,378, 725.26 3.53 ,594,
,010.78
2,385, 296.26 353 594,
,010.78
2,322, 865.26 353 .594,
,520.78
2,262, 445.26 3.53 .593,
,520.78
2,246, 275.28 353 .593,
,520.78
2,237, 815.26 353 ,593,
,
2,209, 895.26 353 593, 120.78
,120.78
2,124, 105.26 3.53 .593,
,119.43
2,074, 545.26 353 593,
:,
2,069, 685.26 3.53 .592, 734.43
!,
2,063, 985.26 353 592, 734.43
1,734.43
2,056, 255.26 3.53 592,
1,734.43
2,042, 045.26 353 .592,
1,734.43
1,995, 095.26 3.53 .592,
1,734.43
1,988, 635.26 353 ,592,
1,204.43
1,961, 715. 26
1,204.43
353 592,
1,918, 910.26 3.53 .592,
1,204.43
1,905, 750.26 3.53 ,592,
,689.43
1,893, 830.26 , 3.53.591,
,689.43
1,879, 780.26
,678.40
353 591,
1,872, 410.26
,318.40
1,866, 780.26 353 591,
3.53 591,
,318.40
1,854, 810.26
,318.40
1,851, 500.26 3.53 591,
,318.40
3.53 591,
1,824, 830.26
1,938.40
1,821, 220.26 363 591,
,938.40
353 590,
1,818, 750.26
1,938.40
1,814, 240.26 353 590,
1,938.40
353 690,
1,805, 230.26
i,-453.40
1,770, 210.26 353 590,
1,453.40
1,765, 450.26 353 590,
1,453.40
1,760, 010.26 353 590,
,
353 590, 128.40
1,731, 510.26
1,128.40
1,728, 380.26 353 590,
1,128.40
353 590,
1,728, 870.26
,128.40
1,706, 450.26 353 590,
,708.40
1,695, 070.26 353 590,
, 708.40
1,695, 390.26 353 589,
1,708.40
1,678, 650.26 3.53 ,589,
,163.40
1,677, 690.26 3.53 ,589,
,
1,675, 580.26 3.53 .589, 908.40
,778.40
1,664, 900.26 3.53 588,
,778.40
1,660, 550.26 353 588,
,778.40
1,659,
353 588,
353 583,

$45 434, 571.00
46 006, 527.00
49 046, 767.00
48 463, 418.00
47 753, 708.00
47 6,58,804.50
47 428, 404.00
46 445. 882.00
46 993, 774.00
47 239, 336.50
45 601, 979.70
46 162, 653.60
51 597, 010.20
62 028, 732.40
66 653, 189.10
71 162, 425.00
71 879, 462.50
72 459, 284.50
57 393, 588.00
438.00
48 SOS, 365.00
42 642, 430.00
39 069, 945.00
50 259, 160.00
46 905, 967.50
43 560, 127.50
40 700, 089.50
36 505, 397.00
33 373, 227.00
30 131, 941.00
28 618, 058.50
26 822, 358.50
25 772, 008.50
25 870, 036.00
25 549, 931.00
26 428, 473.00
26 943, 722.00
28 447, 090.50
30 126, 253.00
31 938, 470.50
30 197, 880.60
29 467, 463.00
27 904, 118.00
27 4.52,387.75
30 730, 771.76
32 628, 205.50
33 529, 133.00
33 1.51,668.00
34 326, 928.00
33 496, 168.00
35 830, 623.00
35 849, 740.50
•36 462, 468.00
34 7,53, 178.00
33 160, 673.00
31 387, 568.00
30 016, 646.50
28 802, 118.00
28 056, 750.50
27 839, 861.50
26 203, 715.00
28 158, 812.50
25 714, 532.50
27 860, 412.60
27 113, 399.50
25 622, 831.50
24 710, 743.50
23 282, 701.00
22 595, 261.00
22 384, 493.60
441.00
22 179, 373.50
21 670, 098.50
21 143, 078.50
20 650, 281.00
22 871, 033.50
22 659,
21 982, 201.00
21 539, 806.00
22 092.

Matured.

Total.

412.04
508.04
668.04
959.04
189.04
192.54
342.04
790.04
122.04
649.54
852.74
821.64
938.24
550.44
527.14
223.04
870.54
402.54
996.04
726.04
223.04
878.04
923.04
168.04
818.54
758.54
590.54
668.04
918.04 .
372.04
109.54
081.54
976.54
432.04
757.04
699.04
518.04
966.54
709.04
756.54
306.54
969.04
832.69
157.44
681.45
415.19
612.69
937.69
247.69
497.69
032.69
345.19
397.69
887.69
021.66

293

TEEASUEEE.

No. 50.—Lawful money deposited in the Treasury each month of thefiscal year 1913 for
thS redemption of national-bank notes.
Retirement account.
Five per cent
account.

Months.

Insolvent and
liquidating.

Total.
Reducing.

1912—July
August
September
October...
November
December.
1913—January...
February.
March
April
May
June

$56,870, 643.77
53,074, 512. 76
41,689, 019.47
56,148, 897.22
46,311, 804.55
46,752, 081.49
68,752, 269.89
59,513, 308.60
54,593, 180.36
57,997, 170.02
61,317, 811.61
56,668, 126.25

$435,000.00
263,300.00
421,500.00
203,075.00
272,992.50
364,950.00
490,847.60
513,045.00
54,497.50
133,350.00
70,202.50
533,910.00

$1,017, 000.00
1,000,080.00
1,382,500.00
1,222,350.00
512, 500.00
456,850.00
615, 745.00
4,123,290.00
2,034,000.00
928, 745.00
1,482,500.00
2,939,000.00

$58,322, 643.77
54,337, 872. 76
43,493,019.47
57,574,322.22
47,097, 297.05
47,573, 861.49
59,858, 662.39
64,149, 641.60
58,681, 677.86
59,059, 265.02
62,870, 514.11
60,141 036.25

Total.

649,688,803.99

3,766,470.00

17,714,540.00

671,159,813.99

No. 51.—Disbursements from redemption accounts of national banks each month of the
fiscal year 1913.
For notes redeemed.

Months.

1912—July
August
September
October...
November.
December.
1913—January...
February..
March
AprU
May
June

$.55,919, 020.60
54,299, 365.00
44,238, 422.60
57,360, 930.00
43,793, 107.50
48,960, 060.00
68,813, 390.00
58,972, 432.50
58,937, 792.60
67,954, 855.00
61,753, 730.00
60,009; 295.00

Total..

669,002,400.50

Transfers and
repayments.

Total disbursements.

$116, 418.54 $66,0,35,439.04
77, 674.04
54,376,939.04
68,
,596.47
44,307, 018.97
140,6.58.30 57,601, .588.30
44,171,961.65
378, 844.16
47,295, 811.85
346, 751.85
68,901,097.36
87, 707.36
225.82
.59,285,658.32
313,
59,088, 109.65
150,317.15
58,102, 652.7S
147,697.78
61,905, 513.19
151, 783.19
60,288, 678.63
277,383.63

•
•

2,265,968.28

Balance.

$44,647, 859.90
44,608, 793.82
43,794, 794.12
4,3,867,528.04
46,792, 873.44
47,070, 923.08
38,028, 488.11
42,892, 471.39
40,486, 039.60
41,442, 761.84
42,407, 752.76
42,262, 110.38

671,258,358.78

No. 52.—Result ofthe count of national-bank notes receivedfor redemption, by fiscalyears,
from 1900.
Fiscal year.

1900.
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

...

Claimed b y
owners.

" O v e r s . " " S h o r t s . " Referred a n d Counterrejected.
feit.

$96,982,607:88
147,486,577.93
171,512,762.90
196,786,126.61
262,141,930.23
308,298,760.03
296,292,884.95
240,314,680.86
349,634,341. 42
461,522,201.92
602,498,993.94
5.51,5,31,596.52
649,964,710.29
675,888,999.60

$8,092.25 $11,685.80
$750,902.15 $1,706.00
19,903.52 20,620.30
340,636.30 1,432.00
7,269.23
6,999.40
462,958. 75 1,754.00
29,339.97 12,998.30
439,173.50 1,901.00
18,489.36 30,839.28
385,636.85 1,307.00
61,102.05 19,032.80 1,521,902.10 1,308.00
41,359.06 35,882.00 1,121,987.50 1,685. 75
28.549.10 31,794.80 1,474, 686.65 1,567.00
41,978.85 39,976. 70 1,085, 629.22 1,130.60
83,100.36 99,060.05 1,967,445.65 1,300.76
74,856.24 87,264.80 2,885,196.31
910.05
73.285.11 24,929.89 2,089,931.60 1,815.60
87,491.45 32,869. 23 2,983,863.09 2,514.35
101,414.16 31,981.16 2,834,307.05 1, 439.60




Express
charges.
$124.70
143.95
174.62
200.40
250.81
261.75
268.95
316.S5
403.16
487.63
596.45
502.26
390.70
418.40

N e t proceeds.

$96,226,281.48
147,143,649.90
171,048,135.36
196,361,193.28
261,742,386.65
308,817,357.43
295 174 41Q m
238,834,864.76
348,549,280.70
469,537,008.30
499,599,883.57
549,487,701.38
647,022,664.37673,122,267.50"

294

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 53.—National-bank notes outstanding at the end of each month, and amount and per
cent of rrionthly redemptions, from January, 1901.
Redemptions.
Outstandmg.
Amount.

1901—January
February
March
April
May
June
July
• August
September...
October
November...
December—
1902—January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September...
October
November...
December
1903—January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September...
October
November...
December
1904—January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September...
October
November...
December
1905—January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September...
October
Novenber
December
1906—January
February...
March
April
May
June
July
August
September..
October
November..
December...
1907—January
February...
March

.$346,821,871 $19,482,754
348,655,255 12,799,120
350,101,405 12,358,659
350,764,267 11,305,800
351,582,590 14,188,094
'353,742,187 13,415,238
356,152,903 13,378,875
357.419.155 14,336,572
8,792,245
358,830,548
359,911,683 11,384,984
359,720,711 11,087,009
360,289,728 13,351,267
359,444,615 20,863,764
358,434,867 14,999,349
357,476,407 14,610,899
356,987,399 15,450,660
358,747,184 17,243,753
358,672,091 18,369,881
358,984,184 15,334,988
381,282,691 13,213,682
386,993,598 11,242,551
380,476,334 12,483,910
384,854,514 13,800,790
384,929,784 18,557,201
383,973,546 24,364,960
382,798,845 13,916,434
382,519,258 14,446,393
391,151,728 17,012,685
406,443,205 20,578,357
413,670,650 21,679,690
447,346,487 22,953,412
418,587,975 18,856,085
420,428,535 16,830,510
419,610,683 17,488,970
421,106,979 13,654,484
426,183,018 22,080,483
426,857,627 29,541,701
430,324,310 21,006,260
434,909,942 21,667,430
437,080,573 23,783,646
445,988,565 25,702,886
449,235,095 28,676,063
450,206,888 27,138,361
452,516,773 24,922,175
456,079,408 18,187,050
457,281,500 20,200,180
460,679,075 22,291,957
464.794.156 27,355,322
467,422,853 35,687,232
489,203,840 24,706,431
475,948,945 26,964,598
481,244,945 24,505,427
488,327,516 27,265,778
495,719,806 29,074,289
503,971,395 25,624,807
512,220,367 22,912,285
518,352,240 19,073,810
524,408,249 20,612,185
533,329,258 21,561,971
540,914,347 24,832,551
543,230,080 36,710,959
550,803,895 23,716,730
554,666,967 27,021,045
556,648,282 22,758,848
559,129,660 27,590,918
561,112,380 23,876,995
561,481,045 21,768,334
589,852,303 18,804,632
573,903,108 14,538,106
583,171,985 15,370,970
593,380,549 15,483,851
596,162,469 16,903,980
596,197,569 31,730,178
596,343,022 20,296,964
597,212,063 18,187,816




Redemptions.
Months.

Per
cent.
,5.62
3.67
3.53
3.22
4.04
3.79
3.76
4.01
2.45
3.16
3.08
3.71
5.80
4.18
4.09
4.33
4.83
4.59
4.27
3.66
3.06
3.28
3.53
4.82
6.35
3.64
3.78
4.35
5.06
5.24
5.50
4.50
4.00
4.17
3.24
5.19
6.92
4.88
4.96
5.44
5.76
6.38
6.03
5.51
3.99
4.42
4.84
5.89
7.83
5.27
5.67
5.09
5.58
5.87
5.08
4.47
3.69
3.93
4.04
4.59
6.76
4.31
4.87
4.09
4.93
4.26
3.88
3.30
2.53
2.64
2.61
2.84
5.32
3.40
3.05

Outstanding.
Amount.

1907—April
May
June
July
August
September...
October
November...
December
1908—January
February
March
April
May
June
'
July
August
September...
October
November...
December
1909—January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September...
October
November...
December
1910—January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September...
October
November...
December
1911—January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September...
October
November...
December.
1912—January...
February.
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October...
November
December
1913—January..
February
March
April
May
June

$599,913,840 $21,522,289
801,940,560 22,278,235
603,788,690 23,431,356
603,395,886 25,748,794
604,056,321 22,285,888
603.987.114 19,329,739
609,980,467 19,955,863
858,218,196
7,749,881
690,130,895 11,736,620
695,402,762 43,425,863
695,874,519 29,627,608
696,407,355 38,949,474
897,645,698 42,491,474
698,449,517 43,212,118
898,333,917 45,121,039
692,088,991 38,319,375
685,326,108 29,442,768
675,612,327 24,776,186
665,844,192 27,507,778
687,178,177 27,801,459
677,068,165 34,874,210
678,673,092 56,627,458
678,285,600 37,227,225
684,407,615 42,637,791
687,408,227 46,125,141
688.183.115 48,247,752
689,920,074 47,935,059
695,354,164 46,403,870
698,845,474 36,939,830
702,807,459 31,890,067
703,940,756 31,759,164
707,433,456 33,253,015
710,354,263 43,484,347
709,879,333 60,864,575
710,022,868 41,570,159
717,258,998 39,917,273
713,461,586 45,222,008
712,242,841 46,299,971
713,430,733 44,894,723
712,029,488 45,504,817
717,321,051 39,504,676
720,795,606 32,366,779
724,874,308 31,268,843
726,855,833 35,036,595
727,705,981 41,371,476
726,445,388 64,785,436
728,935,041 46,524,453
729,162,916 49,353,908
728,144,718 51,487,162
728,478, Oil 54,006,009
728,194,608 60,321,441
732,824,016 54,003,825
737,206,748 49.174.135
737,788,368 40,026,992
739,165,313 41,248,347
739,764,348 48,646,904
740,803,187 54,363,693
741,661,988 77,819,645
744,272,273 50,283,920
744,871,283 53,149,946
745,720,348 55,320,499
745,492,672 65,929,473
745,134,992 61,987,331
744,905,941 59,666,461
746,501,307 54.271.136
747,779,654 41,816,565
749,348,859 48,103,770
760,185,776 46,030,678
750,972,246 52,532,627
750,481,769 79,763,664
751,117,794 51,790,011
752,059,332 53,306,522
753,076,674 61,163,185
755,294,066 66,525,360
759,157,906 60,929,020

295

TEEASUEEE.

No. 54.—Redemptions and deliveries of national-bank notes each month of thefiscal year
1913.

Months.

1912—July
August
September
October
November
December
1913—January.
February
March
April
May
June
Total

On hand
charged to 5
p e r cent
account.

Redemptions.

Deliveries on
redemption
accounts.

$59,493,013.99
53,384,391.50
41,417,874.75
48,784,367.50
44,849,273.05
60,241,342.72
82,297,181.98
51,891,547.00
53,027,052.44
60,377,532.43
'.... 65,299,060.24
62,059,649.96

$56,657,410.50
64,271,96.5.00
44,686,762.50
57,265,235.00
44,734,442.50
47,343,380.00
67,212,567.60
59,083,566.00
68,206,222.60
68,225, 797.60
62,001,437.60
69,716,860.00

$95,229.00
72,260.06
68,717.00
67,743.00
71,334.00
66,153.00
82,433.00
65,716.00
105,737.00
107,395.00
70,070.60
88,472.00

873,122,267.55

669,405,645.50

On h a n d
unassorted.

$2,399,420.00
2,426,820.00
1,978,480.00
2,074,175.00
1,132,840.00
739,520.00
2,340,342.60
2,229,210.00
2,960,780.00
2,689,837.50
2,442,130.00
2,734,565.00

$35,972,830.19
34,986,606.64
32,106,341.89
23,462,026.39
24,446, 857.94
27,672,987.66
41,074,346.64
33,927,745.14
27,911,268.08
30,226,550.51
.33,701,800.25
35,663,683.20

950,249.55

Deposited in
Treasury.

No. 55.—Redeemed national-bank notes delivered from the Treasury each month of the
fiscal year 1913.
Months.

1912—July
August
September
October
November
December
1913—January
February
March
April
.
May
June
Total

F o r r e t u r n to
b a n k s of issue.

F o r destruction a n d
reissue.

F o r destruc-.
tion a n d
retirement.

Total.

$18,025,260.00
17,360,450.00
13,866,150.00
17,447,650.00
14,800,850.00
16,164, 700.00
22,817,000.00
19,141,600.00
18,844,500:00
19,272,150.00
20,983,500.00
20,180,960.00

$35,752,072.50
$2,880,088.00 $66,657,410.60
1,950,402.50
54,271,966.00
34,971,112.60
2,015,440.00
44,686,782.50
28,816,172.50
1,630,192.50
67,265,236.00
38,187,392.60
1,294,645.00
44,734,442.50
28,639,047.60
29,829,812.50 • 1,348,867.50' 47,343,380.00
1,699,667.50
67,212, 567.50
42,695,900.00
2,316,355.00
69,083,666.00
37,628,610.00
2,300,295.00
58,206,222.50
37,061,427.50
1,739,342.50
58,225,797.60
37,214,305.00
1,995,5.35.00
62,001,437.50
39,022,402.50
2,919,305.00
59,716,880.00
36,816,606.00

218,884,750.00

426,431,880.00

24,089,0.35.50

Balance.

$38,372,250.19
37,412,426.64
34,084,821.89
25,636,201.39
25,679,697.94
28,412,607.66
43,414, 689.14
36,156,965.14
30,872,048.08
32,916, .388.01
30,143,930.25
38,398.248.20

889,405,645.50

No. 56.—Assets and liabilities of the 5 per cent redemption fund of national banks at the
end of each month of thefiscal year 1913.
Liabilities.

Assets.
Months.

On deposit National- Expenses
bank notes
in
paid.
Treasury. on hand.

1912—July
August
September..
October
November..
December..
1913—January
February...
March
April
May
Juiie




$38,372,250
37,412,427
34,084,822
26,536,202
25,579,898
2S, 412,508
43,414,6S9
36,156,966
30,872,048
32,916,388
36,143,930
38,398,248

Total.

To
national
banks.

To
Treasury.

$38,372,250 $21,365,116 $14,667,477
37,412,427 22,013,093 12,931,966
34,084,822 21,410,533 10,654,044
$506,735 26,041,937 21,688,035
2,236,565
229,916 26,298,818 25,122,433
28,412,508 25,927,550
1,712,386
43,414,689 17,478,390 23,562,042
36,168,955 20,021,393 13,871,477
30,872,048 17,826,759 10,049,349
32,916,388 19,480,718 10,728,945
36,143,930 20,868,552 12,796,277
38,398,248 20,169,304 15,466,600

On other
accounts.
$2,439,657
2,467,368
2,020,245
2,117,337
1,176,385
772,673
2,374,257
2,264,085
2,995,940
2,726,725
2,479,101
2,772,344

296

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 57.—National-bank notes received for redemption from the principal cities and other
places, by fiscal years, from 1900, in thousands of dollars.
CincinSt.
nati. Louis.

Fiscal
years.

York.

B o s t o n . Philadelphia.

Baltimore.

Chicago.

1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
:.
1906.......
1907..:....
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912

$62,707
81,263
86,749
98,650
141,660
159,432
150,087
102,279
193,292
236,101
234,110
262,105
327,793

$12,427
19,467
18,672
19,543
22,834
24,416
22,656
• 18,087
20,075
29,435
35,492
• 37,920
47,704

$8,390
9,097
10,788
14,306
18,688
21,483
20,422
17, 778
20,437
28,887
36,640
36,199
43,314

$2,633
4,747
5,835
7,009
9,338
11,768
10,789
9,222
7,941
10,301
11,561
11,549
13,007

$4,804
8,662
14,192
18,739
21,910
26,798
28,160
27,677
30,612
47,504
63,397
69,373
71,262

$1,218
1,644
3,198
4,449
6,417
7,724
8,321
7,285
8,026
12,34211,712
11,981
14,281

$2,320
6,008
12,847
9,311
12,301
18,672
13,764
13,044
16,147
28,268
30,286
29,799
29,887

' 1912.
July
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec

28,024
26,440
18,484
22,015
21,676
26,262

5,879
6,628
4,066
4,908
4,965
4,544

4,182
3,369
2,745
3,539
3,120
3,473

1,426
1,353
763
996
860
876

7,202
7,309
6,924
5,250
5,005
5,033

1,478
1,018
1,167
1,241
1,099
1,275

2,138
1,644
1,476
1,608
1,068
2,097

719
406
304
249
443
406

8,618
8,206
6,889
8,298
7,815
8,678

59,666
54,271
41,817
48,104
46,031
52,533

1913.
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
June

41,691
24,674
26,668
29,676
29,769
28,498

7,669'
4,593
3,678
3,711
5,874
6,220

5,061
2,923
2,999
4,608
3,767
4,190

1,249
998
1,177
1,333
1,732
1,273

8,135
6,859
5,938
7,253
8,323
6,149

1,491
1,286
1,073
1,443
1,558
1,516

3,606
3,466
3,890
3,624
4,606
3,194

970
785
627
736
710
781

9,893
7,206
8,258
8,979
10,298
9,109

79,754
51,790
53,306
61,163
66,625
60,929

43,866
6.49

14,035
2.08

77,380
11.45

15,644
2.31

32,106
4.76

7,135 102,142
16.11
1.06

676,889
.100.0

Total,fiscal year
1913....
Per cent...

New

•

61,725
9.13

321,857
47.62

.

New
Other
Orleans. places. Total.
$710 $11,773
1,628 16,171
2,271 17,617
3,176 21,347
4,034 24,960
5,372 32, 734
6,346 36,748
6,418 38,625
5,896 47,308
7,838 60,846
6,586 72,715
7,710 84,898
6,797 95,930

$96,982
147,487
171,869
196,430
262,142
308,299
296,293
240,315
349,634
461,622
502,499
561,532
649,956

No. 58.—Disposition made of the notes redeemed at the national-bank redemption agency,
by fiscalyears, from 1900.
Delivered to t h e Comptroller of
t h e Currency.
R e t u r n e d to
b a n k s of issue.

Fiscal years.

Deposited in
Treasury.

Balance on
hand.

For destruction For destruction
a n d reissue.
and retirement.
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908.1909 .
1910
1911..
1912
1913

.




$25,620,660
57,668,715
67,303,620
•62,663,430
92,025,556
106,286,870
88,930,700
. 43,140,206
62,194,660
89,629,100
118,015,100
107,017,870
198,550,800
218,884,750

$49,006,445.00
71,432,232.50
89,646,745.00
104,604,266.60
136,444,406.00
174,417,382.60
184,561,827.60
168,940,465.00
196,449,107.50
321,446,652.50
343,645,282.50
398,279,110.00
417,932,800.00
426,431,860.00

$17,909,793.00
18,626,437.50
20,085,274.60 26,272,086.00
30,936,971.00
26,857,368.00
24,724,136.00.
26,464,254.50
39,536,156.50
89,562,083.00
32,288, 770.50
34,976,840.00
28,627,711.50
24,089,035.50

$111,699.00
122,883.13
148,477.00
174,806.60
291,351.00
308,647.60
267,461.60
295,300.00
469,965.00
532,949.00
640,328.00
610,141.60
738,723.60
960,249.55

$8,787,132.32
6,080,614.09
9,944,632.96
12,691,238.23
14,735,342.88
14,682,632.31
11,372,838.12
12,377,478.38
62,277,880.08
20,646,203.88
26,765,608.45
34,369,346.33
36,631,875.70
38,398,248.20

297

TEEASUEEE.

No. 59.—Mode of payment for notes redeemed at the national-bank redemption agency, by
fiscal years, from 1900.
Fiscal years.

Treasurer's
checks.

United States
currency.

Gold, silver,
Credit i n genand minor
eral a c c o u n t
coin.

Credit in
redemption
account.

1900.
1901
1902
1903..
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908..-.
1909
1910....
1911.
1912.... . .
1913

$28,433,009.35
65,936,811.50
61,870,406.60
63,546,611.10
96,694,893. 78
107,599,646.95
122,862,833.45
126,576,021.21
172,719,196.76
219,617,316.49
171.238.564.95
192,124,524. 68
241,466,409.01
230.238.160.96

$65,877,983.30
68,986,976.64
74,811,828.26
96,919,863.47
123,698,061.41
146,513,677.16
123,371,141.71
62,747,460.05
123,985,046.30
166.668.342.33
260.279.311.34
280,827,486.49
319,249,866.07
352,869,975.89

$78,301.35 $11,380,978.28
41,954.90 21,608,997.10
46,770.80 33,603,046.00
47,084.45 36,178,617.60
31,829.60 41,360,671.40
81,430.80 50,629,868.00
109,491.20 46,965,078.63
151,694.40 47,676, 609.26
190,323.66 48,732,300.17
187,978.58 65,451,853.20
239,196.18 65,740,145.68
121,080.80 61,092,783.79
142,889.60 66,615,692. 70
122,709. 65 72,110,619.47

$456,009.20
689,909.86
716,084.80
669,216. 76
1,167,040.46
1,992,834.62
1,875,874.92
1,683,179.85
2,922,415.83
8,611,617.70
12,102,686.42
16,321,826.62
19,548,706.99
17,780,911.58

Total.

$96,226,281.48
147,143,649.90
171,048,135.36
196,361,193.28
261,742,386.65
306,817,357.43
295,174,419.81
238,834,864. 76
348,649,280.70
469,537,008.30
499,599,883.57
649,487, 701.38
647,022,664.37
673,122,287.65

No. 60.—Deposits, redemptions, assessments for expenses, and transfers and repayments
on account of the 5 per cent redemption fund of national banks, by fiscal.years, from
1900.
Deposits.

Fiscal years.

1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1908
1907:
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

.

.

'

$78,354,882.88
131,536,726.84
148,687,860.76
169,458,361.28
230,962,146.79
282,914,986.56
279,186,849.36
214,868,638.72
260,678,988.70
415,116,821.67
466,351,212.01
505,754,509.69
617,425,172.82
649,688,803.99

Assessments. Transfers a n d
repayments.

Redemptions.

$74,872,477.50
128,928,835.00
147,010,875.00
167,643,585.60
228,324,620.00
280,998,292.50
272,996,687.60
212,082,400.00
261,197,306.00
409,517,715.00
461,232,132.60
506,809,020.00
618,160,280.00
644,913,366.00

$121,420.28
122,544.28
153,334.03
156,409.72
176,464.24
223,672.88
249,360.38
248,742.26
234,300.66
271,934.30
398,612.85
442,668. 78
437,838.01
504,688.24

Balance.

$1,021,916.07 $11,140,721.93
723,459. 79 12,901,609.70
1,622,486.52 12,802,774.90
1,176,007.51 13,285,123.45
1,351,771.62 14,384,414.38
977,191.78 15,100,243.78
1,670,711.65 19,470,443.70
1,480,983.67 20,516,956.49
2,347,492.91 17,416,846.62
2,367,908.44 20,376,110.65
1,676,725.54 22,420,851.67
1,820,609.03 20,103,063.45
1,280,294.69 17,649,823.67
1,751,270.04 20,169,304.38

No. 61.—Deposits, redemptions, and transfers and repayments on account ofthe retirement
redemption account, by fiscal years, from 1900.
Deposits.
Fiscal
years.

1900
1901
1902.'....
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

Redemptions.
Insolvent and
liquidatmg.

Reducing.

$3,776,186.00
2,795,986.00
8,314,110.50
10,029,185.50
8,027,613.00
16,862,474.00
19,207,466.10
11,029,187.00
30, 743,532.00
14,841,244.50
14,341,980.00
19,898,587.50
6,753,905.00
3,756,470.00

$14,626,460.00
10,861,289.00
26,232,209.50
17,181,070.00
18,879,475.00
8,301,695.00
17,467,742.50
22,224,662.60
37,112,837.50
30, 780,495.00
17,332,312.50
20,334,017.50
13,324,410.00
17,714,540.00

$18,402,646.00
13,657,275.00
33,548,320.00
27,210,255.50
26,907,088.00
24,164,169.00
36,675,207.60
33,253,849.50
67,856,369.50
45,621,739.50
31,674,292.50
40,232,605.00
20,078,315.00
21,471,010.00

Transfers a n d
repayments.

Balance.

Total.




$17,909,793.00
18,626,437.50
20,085,274.50
26,272,086.00
30,936,971.00
25,857,368.00
24,724,135.00
25,454,254.50
39,535,156.50
89,562,083.00
32,288,770.50
34,976,840.00
28,527,711.50
24,089,035.50

$1,162,356.00 $35,147,878.50
774,406.50 29,404,309.50
793,385.50 42,071,969.50
2,956,830.50 40,053,308.50
496,883.00 35,526,542.50
1,606,241.50 32,227,102.00
1,542,535.60 42,635,639.00
2,776,429. 50 47,658,804.50
3,520,733.00 72,459,284.50
28,518,941.00
27,904,463.00
33,160,228.00
24,710,831.50
22,092;806.00

298

REPORT ON T H E FIN^ANCES.

No. 62.—Expenses incurred in the redemption of national-bank notes, by fiscal years, from
1900..
Salaries.

C o n t i n g e n t expenses.

StationCharges
e r y , p r i n t - Office of
Office of
Fiscal years. for t r a n s Office of
ing, a n d
Treasurer
Treasurer
portation.
Comptrol- binding.
ofthe
of t h e
ler of t h e
United
United.
Currency.
State?.
States.
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910..:
1911
1912
1913

$31,767.33
55,549.75
59,957.96
67,998.88
96,580.12
111,-661.20
104,477.20
73,101.56
104, 685.62
147,020. 70
171,073.57
168,463.38
235,825.34
244,616.74

$70,173.58 $18,812.72
70,783.34 18,272. 76
70,761.90 16,663.35
83,012.64 16,790.03
97,737.26 16,803. 54
104,739.87 21,497.78
118,288.39 19,767.83
123,145.38 28,332.39
124,950.19 31,471.00.
199,338.89 30,707.91
212,988.04 29,985.99
218,410.82 31,683.35
213,688.99 38,211.45
217,961.97 41,623.72

$3,561.94
.2,859.25
4,621.51
4,693.88
6,055.20
7,508.28
6,790.10
5,909.38
8,506.90
10,748.36
12,038.34
8,761.70
10,581.53
9,618.89

Office of
Comptroll e r of t h e
Currency.

$669.19
771.08
1,791.61
1,982.19
2,917.01
2,688.15
3,600.92
3,181.83
1,226.50
8,929.29
8,009.16
14,726.49
6,228.59
3,484.04

Total.

Rate
of expense
$1,000.

$122,984.76 $1.33558
146,238.18
.9956
.92444
153,796. 33
90262
174,477.62
219,093.13
.84716
247,973.28
80993
250,924.24
.84528
233,850. 52
.98815
270,840.21
.90386
398,743.15
.79782
434,093.10
.SS068
. 81977
$1,334.58 443,380.12
1,199.31 505,735.21
.78233
537.57 517,842.93
.77293

No. 6.3.—General cash account of the national-bank redemption agency for the fiscal year
1913, and from July 1, 187A.
F o r fiscal year. F r o m J u l y 1,1874.
DR.

B a l a n c e from previous y e a r
N a t i o n a l - b a n k notes received for r e d e m p t i o n
"Overs"

$35,631,875.70
675;SSS,999.60
101,414.18
711,622,289.48

iS,073.14

218,884,750.00
450,520,895.50
950,249.55
2,825,881.00
418.40
1,439.60
8,428.05
31,9S1.,16
38,398,248.20

2,373,559,S98.00
5,168,486,374.60
139,986,138.73
35,989,481.61
88,886.88
99,377.20
195,282.54
784,387.5S
38,398,248.20

711,622,289.46

Total

$7,756,570,292.06
1,017,781.08

7,757,588,073.14

CR.

N a t i o n a l - b a n k n o t e s forwarded to b a n k s of Issue
,
N a t i o n a l - b a n k n o t e s delivered to Comptroller of t h e C u r r e n c y
Money, deposited in T r e a s u r y
P a c k a g e s referred a n d m o n e y s r e t u r n e d
E x p r e s s charges d e d u c t e d
Counterfeit n o t e s r e t u r n e d
•.
U n c u r r e n t n o t e s r e t u r n e d or d i s c o u n t e d
*' S h o r t s "
Cash b a l a n c e J u n e 30,1913
Total

No. 64.—Average amount of national-bank notes redeemable and amount redeemed, by
fiscal years, frora 1900.
O u t of deposits for retirement.

O u t of 5 per c e n t fund.

Fiscal years.
Average
redeemable.
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905..1906
1907 .
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

$36,424,466
31,258,712
35,966,721
43,179,711
38,920,347
32,798,435
38,019,161
47,075,981
57,388,822
44,837,970
28,243,118
33,441,142
28,062,282
22,087,685




Redeemed.

Average
redeemable.

Redeemed,
fit for use.

$17,909,793
. 18,626,437
20,085,275
26,272,086
30,938-,971
25,857,368
24,724,135
25,454,255
39,535,156
89,562,083
32,288, 770
34,976,840
28,527,711
24,089,035

$223,869,280
308,625,545
322,207,220
339,993,484
389,966,135
435,487,040
500,046,264
542,369,618
605,084,732
635,828,337
679,678,209
691,469,927
711,878,462
728,819,192

$25,620,660
57,668,715
57,303,520
62,563,430
92,026,555
106,286,870
88,930,700
43,140,205
62,194,650
89,629,100
118,015,100
107,017,870
198,550, SOO
218,884, 750

Redeemed,
unfit for use
$49,008,445
71,432,232
89,648,745
104,604,266
136,444,405
174,417,383
184,561,828
168,940,465
196,449,108
321,445,552
343, .545,283
398,279,110
417,932,800
428,431,860

Total
redeemed.
$74,627,105
129,100,947
148,950,265
167,167,696
228,469,960
280,704,253
273,492,52S
212,080,670
258,643,758
411,074,652
461,560,383
505,296,980
616,483,800
645,316,610

299

TEEASUEEE.

No. 65.—Percentage of outstanding national-bank notes redeemed and assorted each fiscal
year from 1903, by geographical divisions.
1903

1904

1905

1908

1907

1908

1909

1910

1911

1912

55.33
59.69
59.03
04.85
66.27
63.67

64.88
67.93
70.36
69.65
87.66
67.54
80.56

68.49
89.61
70.73
73.78
88.82
80.27
87.76

56.31
59.40
60.16
66.33
78.32
68.43
73.10

41.54
42.19
44. 91
45.52
51.62
53.69
50.61

43.59
43.83
47.17
47. 21
50.96
54.44
54.98

74.41
76.78
79.81
82.21
97.18
81.69
9.8. 79

78.17
81.36
83.68
85.04
91.34
89.53
95.36

79.08
83.61
83.89
88.17
90.14
98.39
95.56

98.56
102.66
96.72
105.12
118.95
110.86
111.31

62.14

73.25

77.39

67.10

47.36

9.31

88.63

87.18

73.07

89. 24
101.62
89.17
62.13
81.97
61.10
64.15
134.30
74.24

74.54
114.02
104.62
68.69
78.18
66.87
82.23
143. 86
.77

70.13
83.80
89.33
60. 72
73.47
65.01
79. 66
111.89
75.88

48.04
47.23
57.70
47.00
52.67
54.05
63.11
75.57
60.83

54.31
i.23
92.15
54.07 100.09
95. 77
60.07 121. 26 119.79
48.44 82.64
80.28
51.55 90.18 104.44
51.87 82.99
88.87
57.25 93. 77 95. 74
63.75 98.04
99.94
63.03 105.57 100.74

66.!

80. 46

88.70

74.56

49.75

53. 20

94. 60

92.75

96.82

117.48

48.80
39.42
49.84
50.33
44.88
42.66
43.10
47.23
58.22
38.81
34.88
38.68
35.06
6.75

53.26
51.59
54.64
62.29
58.56
49.63
47.66
48.92
39. 25
74.87
41.82
32.20
42.24
38.63
67.25

69.85
60.39
69.24
77.37
80.88
55.80
54.18
51.10
41.99
84.28
48.24
40.27
48.19
45.02
66.90

58.02 44.58
52.02 38.44
55.73 43.56
81.30 45.19
52.55 41.02
48. 88 40.70
44.08 35.23
50.71 37.01
40.43 44.28
71.09 66.04
39.75 30.80
33. 60 28. 82
42.32 33..52
41.85 35.99
65.90 37.05

58. 25
49.70
68.73
58.33
54.85
45.75
54.66
43.66
46.83
48.79
45.68
40.82
40.44
43.68
57.15

82.36
71.54
88.25
88.40
78.58
78.98
76.19
63.30
70.42
78.14
59.46
57.28
57.21
63.83
71.80

SO. 83
67.38
82.12
95.51
80.98
73.17
72.15
57. 28
56.58
57.36
61.67
60.43
53.66
63.08
47.85

89.18
75.96
89.19
103.45
89.97
75.67
76.74
63.92
63.82
66.46
71.76
64.99
61.35
69. 25
43. 88

100.10
90.72
98.42
112.77
94.71
82.49
80.27
64.87
68.60
71.47
74.40
89.47
69.57
72.63
92.50

Southern..

41.25

47.55

54.64

46.83

37.63

48.36

.18

67.45

75.59

81.83

Ohio
Cincinnati.
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
St. L o u i s . . .

35.77

41.75
52.° 43
36.88
35.50
58.69
34.42
30.70
34.43
35.62
28. S3
51.68

46.15
53.43
40.61
40.27
55.31
39.35
34.64
39.70
40.30
41.34
53.44

40.76
40.23
34.85
35.93
38.68
34.38
27.80
32.72
33.18
32.32
42.36

34.27
30.96
29.24
30.02
31.82
28.70
24.52
28.44
27.62
27.65
37.84

38.12 56.83
36.37 67.69
33.59 50.92
33.98 •49.93
28.93 49.10
31.68 47.13
29.99 47.00
32.81 50.97
31.51 43.07
37.56 50.61
36.41 54.99

51. 60
55.68
49. 82
50.55
48.09
44.26
42.21
43.69
42.72
46.16
51.74

55.82
68.12
62.28
55.79
54.62
48.28
46.70
62.42
49.00
55.08
63. 81

60.08
74.79
67.11
61.40
59.01
53.98
62.78
68:44
52.83
58.03
71.31

34. 45

39.59

43.96

36.75

30.75

33.90

51.63

48.47

55. 84

61.07

29.89
31.40
34.51
32.00
33.70
34. .53
39.72
37.97
32.24
37.13

34.83
35.91
35.30
34.54
37.80
38.33
40. 43
44.84
34. 90
39.48

40.70
36.30
37.32
41.42
40.09
41.74
35.87
49.23
50.22
49.64

32.97
32.82
30.90
34.42
35.03
35.20
32.17
42. 44
37.88
38.20

24.99
27.08
28.04
27.78
29.06
27.55
30.93
31. 71
30.18
30.72

34.42
32.85
30.07
33.02
34.33
37. 47
33.85
39.88
41.29

51.83
43.44
44.72
45.44
51.31
53.92
53.89
52.03
59.31

43.58
40. 28
43.00
43.97
48.31
51.67
48.09
51.36
56.39

50. 89
47.28
47.77
47.51
52. 81
57.93
51.40
55.81
59.97

55.73
53.42
53.05
53. .55
59.95
66.19
60.24
65.52
67. 61

34.52

36.79

40.78

33.81

28.41

34. 45

50.07

46. 76

51.26

58.05

38.28
45.82
43.00
34.06
33.28
41.54
42.96
10.00
45.22

44.06
51.22
48.72
46.33
38.45
43.98
28.47
49. 85
18. 40
139.99

47.03
57.48
52.13
45.20
42.27
40.64
46.03
48.40
26.80
96.57

35.82
48.53
48.25
38. 49
33.66
35.15
46.14
43.35
14.29
88.31

31. 74
33.39
35.56
33.89
28.63
31.03
44. 71
38.38
28.32
60.55

33. 66 51. 78
44.92 65.26
44.99 73.35
37.82 66.67
34.90 51. 42
38. 71 55.19
58.21 67.71
50.19 65.74
32.32 48.80
59.65 118. 23

47. 64
56.93
72. ,53
59.98
47.60
54.62
61.39
62.69
37.62
209.41

51. 87
60.63
68.13
70. 88
54.78
58.77
60.22
86.37
43.88
166. 25

83.38
62.73
85.76
78. 86
58.70
66.27
76. 60
73.83
46.24
180.15

Pacific

41.50

47.67

49.10

42.35

34.40

41.34

66.02

62. 48

66.68

76.88

United States.

51.68

60.62

66.84

65.21

40.27

44.87

72.85

Maine
New Hampshire.
Vermont
Massachusetts
Boston
R h o d e Island
Connecticut
New England.
New York
New York C i t y . .
N e w Jersey
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
Delaware
Maryland
Baltimore
District of C o l u m b i a .
Eastern.
Vhginia
West Vhginia
North Carolina...
South Carolina...
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
New Oiieans.
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
P o r t o Rico

Middle.
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Montana
Wyoming
Colorado".
N e w Mexico
Oklahoma
Indian Territory.
Western...
. Washington
Oregon
California
San Francisco..
Idaho
Utah
Nevada
Arizona
:
Alaska
Ha\yaU




73.51
54.78
83.18
63.80

28.74
35.45
31.37
31.39
29.75
32.51
38.26

108.89
93.59
104.87
119.99
84.06
105.58
93.81
98.74
104.34
103.32

75.09

112.02
133.31
148.64
100.72
119.88 .
111.02
113.92
118.54
125.12

300
No.

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

66.—Average amount of national-bank notes outstanding and the redemptions, by
fiscal years, from 1875 {the first year of the agency).

R e d e m p t ions.

Redemptions.
Years.

Average
outstanding.

3

Amount.
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894

$354,238,291
344,483,798
321,828,139
320,625,047
324,244,285
339,530,923
348,314,471
359,736,050
359,868,524
347,746,363
327,022.283
314,816,970
293,742,062
285,622,692
230,648,247
196,248,499
175,911,373
172,113,311
174,756,365
205,322,804

Average
outstanding.

Years.

Amount.

Per cent.

$155,520,880
209,038,855
242,885,376
213,161,458
167,866,645
61,586,676
69,650,269
76,089,327
102,699,677
126,162,572
160,209,129
130,296,607
87,689,687
99,152,364
88,932,069
70,266,947
67,460,619
69,625,046
76,846,225.
105,330,844

43.90
60.68
75.47
.66.48
48.62
18.13
17.22
21.16
28.53
36.27
45.93
41.38
29.85
37.32
38.65
35.80
38.34
40.45
43.40
51.30

1895
1896
1897
1S9S
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

$207,860,409
217,133,390
232,888,449
228,170,874
239,287,673
.260,293,746
339,884,257
358,173,941
3S3,173,195
428,886,482
468,285,475
538,065,425
589,446,699
862,473,654
680,666,307
707,919,327
724,911,069
739,940,744
750,906,777

Per cent.

$86,709,133
108,260,978
113,673,776
97,111,687
90,838,301
98,982,608
147,486,578
171,889,258
196,429,621
262,141,930
308,298,760
296,292,885
240,314,681
349,634,341
461,622,202
502,498,994
561,531,696
649,964,710
675,889,000

41.71
49.85
48.76
42.66
37.96
37.25
43.39
47.98
51.26
61.12
65.84
66.07
40.77
52.78
67.80
70.98
76.08
87.84
90.01

N o . 67.—Changes during thefiscal year 1913 i n the force employedin the Treasurer's office.
Total force June 30,1912:
Regular roll
Agency roll

312
216
528

Discontinued
Died
Resigned
Transferred
Detailed from

4
1
22
15
4

.,

46
Appointed
Transferred to
Reappointed
Detailed
Vacancies

13
31
2
107
11

'. —
:
;

164
118
Total force June 30,1913

646

N o . 68.—Appropriations made for the force employed i n the Treasurer's office and salarie
paid during thefiscal year 1913.

Roll on which paid.

Regular roll
"
.
•
.
Reimbursable roll (force employed in redemption of national currency)
Reimbursable roll (expenses Postal Savings System)
Aggregate '.




Appropriated.

Expended. Balance unexpended.

$347,458.47 $336,719.17

$10,739.30

220,823.06
18,000.00

217,961.97
13,810.01

2,861.08
4,189.99

586,281.52

568,491.16

17,790.37

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
BUREAU OF THE MINT,

Washington, D. C, January 10,1914SIR: In compliance with the provisions of section 345, Eevised
Statutes of the United States, I am submitting herewith a report
covering the operations of the mints and assay offices of the United
States for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913, being the forty-first
annual report of the Director of the Mint. I am also submitting for
publication in connection therewith the annual report of this bureau
upon the production and consumption of the precious metals in the
United States for the calendar year 1912.
MINT

SERVICE.

OPERATIONS' OF T H E M I N T S .

The three coinage mints at Philadelphia, Denver, and Sau Francisco were in operation during the fiscal year, and nine assay offices,
located at New York, Charlotte, New Orleans, Deadwood, Helena,
Seattle, Boise, Salt Lake City, and Carson.
The original deposits of gold at all of the offices of the Mint Service
during the year amounted to $161,131,878.30. The total coinage of
the year amounted to $37,496,529.70, of which $30,058,227.50 was
gold, $3,448,199.75 was silver, $2,861,768.55 was nickel, and
$1^28,333.90 was brcDnze.
The purchases of silver during the year amounted to 1,779,992.99
ounces, costing $1,086,347.87, at an average cost of 61 cents per ounce.
The seigniorage on subsidiary silver coins during the year aniounted
to $1,618,475.17, and the seigniorage on the minor coin amounted to
$3,548,520.03, all of which was duly accounted for and turned into
the Treasury.
The mint at Philadelphia during the year also coined 803,348
pieces of silver for the Government of Costa Kica, and the mint at
San Francisco coined 2,638,820 pieces of silver and 5,001,000 bronze
pieces for the Phihppine Islands government.
PHILADELPHIA MINT.

The Philadelphia Mint has been in operation throughout the year,
excepting the period required for the annual settlement. A new
minor coinage plant has been put into partial operation during the
year. Heretofore the minor com ingots nave been made of approximately the same size as the ingots of gold and silver and roUed in the
same mills. The new ingots are 23 inches long, 4J inches wide, and




301

302

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

three-fourths of an inch thick, and will be rolled in 16-inch miQs installed for this purpose. The capacity of the mint for minor coins
is greatly increased. Particulars are given elsewhere in this report.
Continuous, experiments with oil-burning furnaces have been under
way at this mint for the last two years, but the results have not been
entirely satisfactory. The increase in the price of gasohne duruig
the year has been so great that after a calculation of costs it was
found advantageous to go back to the use of illuminating gas for
melting purposes.
SAN FRANCISCO M I N T .

A change of superintendents has occurred at this mint since the
close of the fiscal year, Thaddeus W. H. Shanahan succeeding Mr.
Frank A. Leach. The latter origuially served between August, 1897,
and November, 1907, becoming Director of the Mint at the latter
date. Having resigned the latter position in 1909, he was reappointed
in August, 1912, as superintendent of the mint, to fiU the vacancy
caused by the death of Edward Sweeney.
A complete settlement of the accounts and count of funds was had,
which was completed November 12, 1913. In making the count,
vaults beheved to contain in the aggregate $61,395,000 m silver dollars, which had not been disturbed for more than 30 years, were
opened, the bags emptied, and the contents examined and weighed.
Five bags were found to have been, tampered with, 18 coins in all
having been abstracted and iron washers substituted therefor. This
pilfering was undoubtedly done at the time the coins were origuially
sacked, as the vaults have been continuously under seal. The
original sacking was done in 1880, 1881, and 1882-. Aside from these
discrepancies, all bulhon and moneys were accounted for and duly
delivered to the incoming, superintendent.
DENVER

MINT.

A change in superintendents at this institution has been made since
the close of the fiscal year, Thomas Annear succeeding Frank M.
Downer, who had held the position since September 3, 1902. Under
his administration, in 1906, the institution was reorganized from
simply -an assay office to a coinage mint. Upon settlement everything was found in order, and the bullion and coin charged to the
institution, amounting to $499,695,091.90, was turned over to the
incoming superintendent.
In the detailed report upon the operations of this mint wiU be
found an account of successful experiments in the re&iery by which
an important economy has been developed in the electrolytic process.
At the close of the fiscal year B. P . Wirth, who has been in charge of
this re&iery almost from the opening of the mint, was transferred
and promoted to the position of superintendent of the melting and
refining department ofthe New York assay office.
ASSAY OFFICE AT CHARLOTTE CLOSED.

The United States assay office at Charlotte,
finally on June 30, 1913, Congress having failed
for its support beyond t h a t date. Such pieces of
valuable for further use were shipped to other




N. C , was closed
to make provision
equipment as were
institutions of the

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

303

service and the remainder of the furniture and outfit was sold at
auction on the premises and the proceeds turned into the Treasury.
I n recent years the receipts of buUion at the Charlotte office have
been insufficient to warrant its contiauance, amounting in the last
fiscal year to only $29,428.30.
The Charlotte assay office was originally established as a coinage
mint in an act approved March, 3, 1835, which also established branch
mints at New Orleans, La., and Dahlonega, Ga. The mints at Charlotte and Dahlonega were designed to serve the gold-producing districts of the southern Appalachian region, which at that time comgrised the only gold-mmmg territory in the United States. New
Orleans was an important commercial port, and the mint there was
expected to operate upon foreign coin and bullion.
From 1804 to 1823 small deposits of native gold aggregating iri
three years $47,000 had been received at the Philadelphia Mint from
North Carolina. The receipts from this State gradually increased,
and in 1829 they amounted to $134,000, and there was also $2,500
from Virginia and $3,500 from South Carolina. I n 1830 Georgia
entered the list of gold-producing States with an output of $212,000,
and the yield of the four States aggregated $466,000. In 1831
Alabama and Tennessee each made a small showing and in 1834 tfie
southern Appalachian region made its best output, approximately
$900,000. i n the following year the act providing for the three new
branch mints was passed.
I n November, 1835, Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Treasury,
was notified by Samuel McComb, who had been appointed to select a
site for the Charlotte branch, that he had purchased from William
Carson and F . L. Smith a full square containing near 4 acres of land
for $1,500.
Proposals for the erection of the builduig were advertised for in the
Charlotte Journal, Washington Globe, Richmond Inquirer, and the
North Carolina Standard. The contract was awarded to Perry &
Ligon, of Raleigh, N. C , on October 15,1835, at $29,800, to be completed January 1, 1837. The cost of the machinery, to be furnished
by the Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, was estimated at $15,000.
Coleman, Sellers & Sons, Philadelphia, furnished the steam engine,
shaft, etc., for $8,297, while Merrick, Agnew & Tyler furnished
coining presses, draw benches, etc., for $6,690. This equipment was
shipped to Charlotte in April, 1837. Considerable difficulty occurred
in transporting the heavy machinery to Charlotte, and the steam
engine was not set up untU the middle of August.
John H . Wheeler, of North Carolina, was appointed as the first superintendent. J. H. Gibbon and John R. Bolton, of Pennsylvania, were
appointed assayer and coiner, respectively. I n December, 1837, the
Secretary of the Treasury was adVised tnat the deposits of gold had
amounted to $130,600 and the coinage to $84,165. The dies for this
coinage were made at the PhUadelphia Mint, and in transmitting
them the Director of the Mint urged Col. Wheeler, the superintendent,
to hasten the coiaage, and mentioned that although the dies are dated
1838, there was no objection to using them in 1837. The reason
given for haste was that the equipment might be tested and particularly the operation of the coinage press by steam power, which
was regarded as in some degree experimental. The application of




304

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

steam power to coinage was first made in this country at the Philadelphia Mint in 1836.
On the night of July 27, 1844, it was nearly destroyed by fire,
which occurred in the coining room, and nearly consumed the entire
buUding. The machinery was seriously injured but the records being
stored iri the vault, were not injured. Mr. Caldwell, the superintendent, reported that evidently the fire was the work of a thief, as
his living apartments had been entered and articles stolen.
The present building was authorized by act of March 3, 1845, and
was completed a t a cost of $31,572.97, and occupied in 1846, and
used for coinage purposes until May 20, 1861, when North Carolina
entered the Confederacy and operations were suspended. The building was used duiing the Civil War as a Confederate hospital.
The coinage made at Charlotte was as follows:
Gold.
Calendar year.

Total value.
Half
eagles.

1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
18451
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855 '
1856
1857
1858
'1859
I860
18612

$64,565
117,335
95,140
107,555
137.400
221,765
118,155

..

.

.

.

..
..
:

Total

64,975
420,755
322,360
324,115
317,955
245,880
362,870
327,855
196,455
198,940
142,285
156,800
194,280
159,235
74,065
34,395
4,405,135

1 Mmt burned July 27,1844.

Quarter,
eagles.

Dollars.

$19,770.00
45,432.50
32,095.00
25,742.50
16,842.50
65,240.00
29,055.00

$84,335.00
162,767.50
122,235.00
133,297.50
154,242.50
287,005.00
147,210.00

i'2,620.66

76,995.00
478,820.00
364,330.00
361,299.00
347,791.00
324,454.50
396,734.00
339,370.00
. 214,696.50
217,935.50
162,067.50
170,080.00
216,920.00
164,470.00
92,737.50
34,395.00

58,065.00
41,970.00
25,550.00
22,870.00
37,307.50
24,430.00
18,237.50
9,192. 50
19,782.50

$11,634
6,966
41,267
^ .9,434
11,515
4
9,803
13,280

22,640.00
5,235
18,672.50
544,915.00

109,138

5,059,188.00

» Operations suspended May 20,1861.

I n 1867 the assay office a t Charlotte was reestablished by act of
Congress dated March 19, and was maintained as such until the close
of the fiscal year 1913.
The mint a t Dahlonega was never reopened after the Civil War.
Coinage operations were resumed a t New Orleans after the war, b u t
were suspended and the coining niachinery removed in 1910.
ASiSAY OFFICE AT NEW YORK.

The New York assay office has handled more bullion and made
more assays during the past year than ever before, and the work has
been done under many difficulties, the chief of which have been due
to insufficient appropriations. The receipts of the office are steadily
increasing and the amount of jewelers^ gold and silver bars issued is
constantly increasing, all making more work. The closing of the
refinery in the Philadelphia Mint and opening of the new electrolytic




DIRECTOR OF T H E M I N T .

305

refinery in the New York office has greatly increased the expenses.
The earniags of the office from charges on bullion for treatment
and for the manufacture of bars have correspondingly increased, b u t
these earnings go directly into the Treasury and are not available
for the payment of expenses.
These earnings for the last three fiscal years were as follows:
Fiscal year.

Amount.
$95,940.62
110,266.16
166,641.53

1910-11
1911-12
1912-13

The total expenditures of this office for the fiscalyear 1913 were
$191,773.47, so that it does not fall far short of reimbursing the
Treasury for all expenditures in its behalf. As the larger part of the
receipts consists of refined gold, which under the law is almost free
from charges, the proportion of earnings to expenditures is very high.
I t is earnestly represented that the increased estimates submitted
for this office should be allowed in fuU.
The office is stUI crowded into the rear buUding intended to accommodate only the melting and refining departments. The rooms are
inadequate for the entire office force and are unsuitable for transactions with the public. I t is very much hoped that the new building
planned for the Wall Street front may be pushed forward for early
occupancy.
W E S T E R N ASSAY O F F I C E S .

The appropriations for the fiscal year 1914 for the assay offices
at Deadwood, Helena, Salt Lake City, Boise and Carson were finally
agreed to in conference between the two houses of Congress on the
morniag of March 4, 1913, after a protracted struggle between the
House of Representatives, favoring the abolition of these offices, and
the Senate, desiring to retain them. By the agreement the appropriations were cut below the cost of maintaining the offices on an
efficient basis, and the appropriation for the transportation of buUion
from the assay offices to the mints was cut far below the amount
required for this purpose if aU of these offices are to be kept open on
the usual terms. The department has had no alternative but to
cease receiving buUion at these offices, except upon the condition that
the buUion would be transported to the mints at the expense of the
depositors. This condition has been comphed with to some extent,
but the deposits at all of the minor offices have faUen off in consequence.
If these offices are to be maintained at all, the appropriations
should be sufficient for the employment of competent assayers and
helpers to safely and promptly care for the bullion. The assayers
are authorized to buy all of the gold bullion offered and to draw
checks on the Treasury of the United States in payment therefor.
This is an important responsibUity and should only be trusted with
men of technical abihty and substantial character. The estimates
submitted for the fiscal year 1914 are made upon the lowest possible
basis consistent with the proper administration of these offices.
16726°—FI 1913




20

306

REPORT ON, THE FINANCES.

EMPLOYEES AND EXPENDITURES OF THE MINT SERVICE, 1893-1913.

The number of employees in the entire mint service on the 1st day
of July, 1913, was less by 25 than on the 1st day of July, 1912. In
this connection it will be interesting to note that the number of
employees in the service is now considerably less than it was 20 years
ago, although more offices are maintained and the volume of business
is much larger. The number of persons on the pay roUs at each
institution in 1893, 1912, and in 1913 are given below:
Institution.

July 1,
1893.

Philadelphia....
San Francisco .
Denver.
.
New Orleans..
Carson
New York.
Helena
Boise
St. Louis
Charlotte.
Deadwood
Seattle
Salt Lake
Bureau

387
174
16
107
31
67
13
10
3
3

Total

July 1,
1912.

July 1,
1913.

333
124
93
14
8
89
8
10

329
115
93
14
5
92
6
5

18

3
5
19
6
14

5
19
4
14

829

726

701

The amount of business handled in each of the two years 1893 and
1913 is shown by the following figures:
Item.
Gold deposits
Operating expenditures
Income from charges, by-products, etc —
Net operating expenditures
Gold bars made for the arts
Gold bars made for certificate reserve
Coinage:
Value
Pieces
.*
Bulhon treated in refineries: Fine ounces..

1893
$46,449,841
$1,344,006
$196,257
$1,176,620
$12,996, 491

$161,131,878
$1,175,750
$482,317
$693,433
$38,011,583
$101,677,121

$43,685,179
97,280,875
6,419,134

$37,539,375
195,070,039
11,501,736

The only faUing off shown by operations in 1913 from 1893 was in
the value of the gold coinage, which was due to the law of 1911,
aUowing gold bars to^ be carried in the certificate reserve. The number of pieces coined in 1913 was twice as many as in 1893, owing to
the increased demand for the smaU coins. I t should be added t h a t
in 1893 the one and five cent blanks were purchased of outside
manufacturers, while in 1913 aU coins were made in the mints complete from the ingots. I t should also be said t h a t the wage scale
averaged higher in 1913 than in 1893.
These results were due for the most part to the introduction of
improved equipment, much of it automatic machinery, and practically all of it developed within the mint service and buUt by the
mint mechanics.




DIRECTOR OF T H E M I N T .

307

GOLD CERTIFICATE BARS.

At the close of the fiscal year refined gold bars, duly stamped with
their weight, fhieness, and value, in accordance with the provisions
of the act of Congress approved March 2, 1911, providing for the
issue of gold certificates against gold bullion and loreign gold coin,
were held at the several mints and the assay office at New York as
follows:
San Francisco Mint
Denver Mint
New York assay office

'

Total

$44, 887, 579.12
16,085,408.79
44, 887, 558. 45
105, 860, 546. 36

ESTIMATES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1915.

The total of estimates for the mint service for the fiscal year 1915,
including the bureau office in Washington, is $1,217,830, which
compares with estimates of $1,222,270 for the fiscal year 1914 and
appropriations for the latter year of $1,154,130.
As already stated above, the appropriations for the support of
several of the assay offices during the current year are too small to
allow of their being conducted in a proper manner. Either the
appropriations should be increased or the offices should be abolished.
In making comparison between appropriations since the fiscal year
1912 with appropriations for prior years it should be understood
that in former years the earnmgs from charges upon bullion were
directly available for use in payment of expenses, thus supplementing
the annual appropriations, while since 1912 all charges upon bullion
have been paid into the general fund of the Treasury as a miscellaneous
receipt. The charges during the fiscal year 1913, thus applicable
under former practice to current expenses, amounted to $356,079.24.
APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1913.

The amounts appropriated for.conducting the mint service during
the fiscal-year 1913 totaled $1,230,002.08, to which should be added
the reimbursements for work done for the Philippine and Costa
Rican Governments and for United States Government institutions,
amounting^ to $44,277.11; also unexpended balances of permanent
appropriations amounting to $13,353.35; this gives the total amount
"availaole for use during the fiscal year 1913, $1,287,632.54.
The expenditures from above funds (includuig the reimbursements
noted) total $1,171,964.39, to which a few minor unsettled bills may
be added.
The unexpended balance totals $120,372.10, from which should
be deducted deficiencies totaliag $4,703.95, giving net unexpended
balances of $115,668.15. Of the unexpended balances $12,700.13
(permanent appropriation balances) continues to be available until
used, and the remainder, $107,671.97, reverts to the surplus fund of
the Treasury.
The deficiencies occurred at the New York assay office and the
Denver Mint-and were occasioned, principally, by losses of precious
metals in refinery operations. In prior years such losses were paid
frofQ the earnings; but, beginning with the fiscal year 1913, are now
payable from our annual appropnations.



308

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Details, by institutions, are shown in the following tabulated
statement:
Appropriations, reimbursements, expenditures, and balances, all offices, fiscal year 1913.
Appropriations.

Items.
Salaries.

Oflice Director of M n t :
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
Expended
Unexpended b a l a n c e . . .
Mint a t P h i l a d e l p h i a :
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
Reimbursements
U n e x p e n d e d b a l a n c e of
p e r m a n e n t appropriation

W a g e s of
workmen.

Contingent expenses.

Equipment,
New
York
assay
office.

Unexpended b a l a n c e . . .

New machinery
and apphances.

Totals.

$26,124.72
24,895.28

$4,800.00
3,708.32

$25,000.00
123,696.23

$55,924.72
52,099. 83

1,429.44

1,091.68

1,303.77

3,824.89

74,246.28s!;305.000.00 70,000.00
6,272. 68 10,563.79

449,245.28
16,836.47
$4,873.24

2,692.44

11,102.38

4,873.24

4,873.24

470,954.99
444,032.85

4,873. 24

74,245.28 311,272.68 80,563.79
71,652.84 300,170.30 72,309.71

Available for use
Expended

Freight
on b u l lion a n d
coin.

26,922.14

(5,211.40)

8,254.08

Mint a t San Francisco:
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1 9 1 3 . . . . . 54,300.00 122,500.00 40,000.00
18,212.20 9,106.09
II el m b u r s e m e n t s

216,800.00
27,318.29

54,300.00 140,712.20 49,106.09
48,262.57 118,208.65 27,927.85

244,118.29
192,398. 77

6,037.43

24,503.65 21,178.44

51,719.52

47,332.50

94,000.00 35,000.00
59.85
62.50

176,332.60
122.35

47,332.50
45,284.73

94,082.50 36,069.85
90,047.78 35,901.66

Available for use
Expended
Unexpended b a l a n c e . . .
jS:int a t D e n v e r :
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
Reimbursements.
U n e x p e n d e d b a l a n c e of
permanent appropriation
Expended .
Unexpended' b a l a n c e . . .
Assay office a t N e w Y o r k :
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
U n e x p e n d e d balance of
p e r m a n e n t appropriation
Available for use
Expended
..

343.01

2,047. 77
60,422.78

4,014.72

5,563.79
190,422.78

80,000.00 60,000.00
$8,137.10

8,137.10

50,422.78
.'.. . . 49,642.20

80,000.00 60,000.00 8,137.10
663. 22
77,716.81 63,862.24

198,559.88
191,773.47

880.58

2,284.19 2 3,862.24 7,483.88

6,786.41

Unexpended balance...
M i n t a t N e w Orleans:
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
Exnended

Assay office at Helena:
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
Unexpended balance...

10,300.00
7,900.00

7,600.00
7,079.70

3,500.00
2,104.49

2,400.00

420.30

6,350.00
6,360.00

6,200.00
4,779.60

3,000.00
2,037.02
962.98

10,400.00
8,800.00

6,500.00
5,194.75

3,260.00
2,884.88

1,600.00

1,305.25

365.12

21,300.00
17,084.19

1,396.51

1,420.60

Unexpended balance...
M m t a t Carson City:
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1 9 1 3 . . . . .

1 Chargeable, as indicated tn parentheses, to the various offices.




176,797.86
171,234.07

343.01

2 811.71

343.01

343.01

(1,451.57)

4,215.81
16,560.00
13,168.52

(979.38)

2,383.48

(1,620.60)

_

'

20,150.00
16,879.63
3,270.37

2 Deficiency, $4,703.95.

309

DIEECTOE. OF T H E M I N T .

Appropriations, reimbursements, expenditures, and balances, all offices, fiscal year 1913Con tinued.
Appropriations.

Items.
W
Salaries. w oa g e seof.
rkm n

Assay office at Boise:
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
Expended.

$8,060.00
8,046.83

. 260.00
900.00
898.91

400.00
208.63

3.09
6,236.80
6,106.61

3,000.00
2,994.99

1,500-. 00
1,488.37

130.19

Unexpended balance..
Assay office a t Seattle:
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
Expended

5.01

11.63

13,060.00
13,060.00

22,000.00 • 6,500.00
14,695.25 4,827.05
7,304.76

7,100.00
7,100.00

Unexpended balance ..

4,600.00
3,487.50

3,500.00
3,302.48

430.73
2,800.00
2,803.64

(35.06)

196.46
10,738.80
10,589.97

(3,804.00)

148. 83
41,650.00
32,572. 30

(8,802.66)

1,672.95

1,032.50

U n e x p e n d e d balance
Assay office a t Salt L a k e City:
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
Expended .

Totals.

$14,090.00
13,659.27

($1,103.13)

• 193.37

U n e x p e n d e d balance
Assay office a t D e a d w o o d :
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1 9 1 3 . . . ! .
Expended
."

Freight New mao n bulchinery
hon and and apcoin.
phances.

178.58

1,600.00
1,600.00

'.

Equipment,
New
York
assay
office.

$3,640.00 $2,600.00
3,290.00 2,323.44

4.17

Unexpended balance...
Assay office a t C h a r l o t t e :
A p p r o p r i a t e d for .1913
Expended

Contingent expenses.

197.62

8,977.70
15,100.00
13,869.98

(688.55)

1,230.02

Totals, e n t h e service:
315,412.08 656,640.00 233,960.00
25,000.00
A p p r o p r i a t e d for 1913
1,230,002.08
44,277.11
24,547.38 19,729.73
Reimbursements
U n e x p e n d e d balances of
p e r m a n e n t appropria$8,137.10
$6,216.25
13,353.35
tions
A v a h a b l e for use
Expended

315,412.08 680,187.38 263,679.73 8,137.10 26,000.00
663.22 23,696.23
298,190.06 628,641.04 222,883.84

U n e x p e n d e d b a l a n c e . . . 17,222.02

53,646.34 30,796.89 17,483.88

6,216.26 1,287,632. 54
1,171,964.39

1,303.77 16,216.25

115,668.16

1 AvaUable for future use, $12,700.13.

PARTING AND REFINING FUND.

The balance in the parting and refining fund, which, prior to
the fiscal year 1913, formed a permanent indefinite appropriation
for the expense of parting and renning buUion, was on June. 30, 1913,
$694,804.11. Against this there is a known encumbrance of $3,000.
The remainder, $691,804.11, is to be covered into the Treasury as a
misceUaneous receipt on June 30, 1914.
The expenses of parting and refining bullion are now paid from our
regular annual appropriations.
CONSOLIDATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURES.

A complete statement of the income and expenditures of the
Treasury on account of the mint service, including seigniorage on
the silver and minor coins, is shown in the statement foUowing.




Consolidated statement of income and expenditures of the entire mint service for the fiscal year 1913.
Compensation of employees:
Mints and Assay Offices—
Salaries appropriation
Wages appropriation
Bureau of the Mint, salaries appropriation.

$273,494.
626,541.

O

Deductions on bullion deposits:
Parting and refining charges
Melting charges
Assaying and stamping charges
Alloy charges
Fine-bar charges

• $900,035.82
. 24,695.28
$924,731.10

Equipment, stores, and other expenses:
Mints and Assay Offices—
Contingent
appropriation
(Including
$17,744.86 operating waste of precious
metals and $7,032.81 loss on assay value
of precious metals contained in operative
sweeps sold)
219,175.62
Equlpmentof New York assay office, appropriation
653.22
Freight on bullion and coin shipments between mints and assay offices, appropriation
23,696.23
Bureau of the Mint, contingent appropriation.

GO

EARNINGS.

EXPENDITURES.

243,524.97
3,708.32
247,233.29

$199,406.64
39,775.84
24,219.45
15,291.34
36,005.14

Special assays of bullion and ores
Proceeds of sale of medals and proof coins
Relmbmrsements to appropriations:
Contingent. Wages.
For manufacture of machinery and
appliances for Government institutions
$2,053.89 $2,504.32
For manufacture of medals
8,141.26
1,484.31
For manufactmre of Philippine
comage
9,106.09 18,212.20
For manufactmre of Costa Rican
coinage
428.49
2,346.55
19,729.73

24,547.38

Totals.
$4,558.21
9,d25.57
2,775.04

Net revenues from mint service




365,442.99
806,521.40
1,171,964.39

Seigniorage:
On subsidiary (silver) coinage
$1,618,475.17
On minor (nickel and bronze) coinage
$3,583,256.87
LessOperating waste
$1,819.82
Cost of distribution
24,692.95
26,512.77
3,556,744.10
Surplus bullion recovered:
From deposit melting room grains and sweeps
From coining operations
From" melting and refining operations
From gain on shipment (difference in assays)
Less losses on shipments

$739.27
.215.97

Gain on light weight gold coin purchased for recoinage.
Proceeds of sale of byproducts (platinum, etc.)
:.
Proceeds of sale of old materials
5,291,896.«

O

44,277.11

1,171,964.39

16,521.40

O

27,318.29

Total earnings
Net expenditures, to profit and loss statement, below.
Net expenditures, from earnings and expenditmes statement, above
. . . . $6,330.88
Loss on face value of minor coins recoined
. . . . 1,263.16
Less seigniorage on recoinage of minor coin

$314,698.41
3,496.40
2,971.07

W
^

>
O

$5,175,219.27

33,279.15
203.27
11,156.59

45,162.31
66.71
69,735.03
. 1,713.66
5,291,896.98

311

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.
DEPOSITS OF GOLD BULLION.

The value of aU gold bullion contained in original deposits at the
mints and assay offices during the fiscal year 1913 was $161,131,878.
The. redeposits during the year, consisting of buUion transferred from
one office to another, and bars bearing the stamp of one of the mints
or assay offices, amoimted to $27,937,471. The value of the gold
buUion and uncurrent domestic and foreign coin received, including
redeposits, amounted to $189,069,349, which was the total of gold
receipts at aU offices.
Statements which show the classification of deposits, the source of
domestic bulhon by States and Territories, and the receipts at the
several offices of the service appear in tabular form in this volume
elsewhere.
DEPOSITS OF FOREIGN GOLD BULLION AND COIN.

Foreign gold bulhon containing 1,547,317 fine ounces, of the value
of $31,985,879, and foreign gold coin containing 132,172 fine ounces,
of the value of $2,732,228, were deposited, and consisted of bullion
and coin produced in the following-named countries:
Crude bullion.

Refined b u l h o n .

Coin.

,

Country.
Fine
ounces.
51,235
545
126,781
903
26,388
82,769
148,474
233

Coining
value.
$1,059,121
11,268
2,620,382
18, 687
545,488
1, 710,986
3,069,230
4,817

Fine
ounces.

Coining
value.

Fine
ounces.

Coining
value.

^356

9,047,316

$202,624

435,281

8,998,057

2,180
142
•6,673

$45,064
2,935
116, 204

13, 737,881

206
280
10
21
6,954
1,119
27
24,661
20
14
199
91,607
36
123

4,258
5,788
206
434
123,079
23,130
568
509 788
413
289
4 113
1,893,683
744
2,542

1,109,653

22,938,662

132,172

2,732,228

7,359

437,684

Total

9,802

664,570

British Columbia
Northwest Territory
Ontario a n d Quebec
N o v a Scotia
Mexico
Central America
South America
West Indies
Great B r i t a i n
Austraha
Canada
S o u t h Africa
Russia
Germany
France
Spain
Holland
Sweden
Turkey
Japan
•
A u s t r i a - H u n gary
Other

DEPOSITS AND PURCHASES OF SILVER.

The deposits of sUver at the mints and assay offices during the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1913, for return to depositors in fine or
unparted. bars, with the weight and fineness stamped thereon, aggregated 2,238,284.41 fine ounces. The United States assay office at
New York received the greaiter part of these deposits.
The Government of the Philippine Islands deposited at the United
States mint at San Francisco silver coins issued under the act of
March 2, 1903, containing 342,054 fine ounces, for recoinage into
coins of reduced weight and fineness as authorized by the act of June
23,1906.




312

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

, ># The purchases and deposits of silver buUion at the mints and assay
offices of the United States during the fiscal year 1913 were as follows:
Items.

F i n e ounces.

Cost.

1,287,791.07
488,852. 62
1,764. 58
1,784. 74
2,238,284.41
342,053.53

Total

$787,041.00
297,166.13
1,072.28
1,068.45
1,358,845.79
335,381.41

4,360,330.93

Commercial b a r s p u r c h a s e d
Unrefined deposits, p a r t i n g s , charges, a n d fractions
M u t i l a t e d a n d u n c u r r e n t coins
Assay coins a n d s u r p l u s b u l h o n
F o r r e t u r n of fine b a r s
_
P h i h p p i n e coins transferred for recoinage

2,780,575.07

DEPOSITS OF FOREIGN SILVER BULLION AND COIN.

Foreign sUver bullion containing 624,215 fine ounces and foreign
silver coin containing 17,010 fine ounces were received from various
countries as follows:
Crude
bulhon.

B r i t i s h Columbia
Northwest Territory
Ontario a n d Quebec
N o v a Scotia
Mexico
West Indies
Central America
S o u t h America
China
S o u t h Africa
Spain
Other

. ..

Refined
bulhon

F i n e ozs.
13,090
129
25,141
65
384,005
75
81,944
133,652
117
12

Country of origin.

F i n e ozs.

Coin.

F i n e ozs.
1
1
1

5,9S5
3,550
1 523
11,937

618,230

Total

5,985

17,010

COINAGE.

The domestic coinage during the fiscal year 1913 amounted to
186,626,871 pieces of the value of $37,496,529.70, as foUows:
Philadelphia.

San Francisco.

Denomination.
Pieces.
Gold:
D o u b l e eagles
Eagles
Half e a g l e s . .
Q u a r t e r eagles
T o t a l gold
Silver:
Half dollars
Q u a r t e r dollars
Dimes
T o t a l silver
Minor:
5-cent nickels.
1-cent bronze

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

176,091
743,050
1,340,099
810,185

$3,521,820.00
7,430,500.00
6,700,495.00
2,025,412.50

66,000
800,000

$660,000.00
4,000,000.00

3,069,405

19,878,227.50

886,000

4,660,000.00

1,074,236
4,104,235
3,730,235

537,117.50
1,026,058.75
373,023.50

708,000
40,000
480,000

354 000 00
10,000.00
48,000.00

8,908,705

1,936,199.75

1,228,000

412,000.00

43,727,371
95,748,390

2,186,388.55
957,483.90

2,852,000
6,104,000

142,600.00
61,040.00

T o t a l minor

139,475,761

3,143,852.45

8,958,000

203,640.00

T o t a l coinage

151,453,871

24,758,279.70

11,050,000

5,275,640.00




313

DIEECTOB OF T H E M I N T .
Denver.

Total.

Denomination.
Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

C.olCi:

O o u b l e eagles
Eagles
Half eagles
Q u a r t e r eagles

286,000

$5,720,000.00

462,091
809,050
2,140,099
810,185

$9,241,820.00
8,090,500.00
10,700,495.00
2,025,412.50

T o t a l gold

286,000

5,720,000.00

4,221,405

30,058,227.50

2,200,000

1,100,000.00

3,982,235
4,144,235
4,210,235

1,991,117.50
1,036,058.75
421,023.50

Silver:
Half dollars
Q u a r t e r dollars
Dimes
T o t a l silver

2,200,000

1,100,000.00

12,336,705

3,448,199.75

Minor:
5-cent nickels.
1-cent bronze

10,658,000
10,981,000

532,800.00
. 109,810.00

57,235,371
112,833,390

2,861,768.55
1,128,333.90

T o t a l minor

21,637 000

642,610.00

170,068,761

3,990,102.45

T o t a l coinage

24,123,000

7,462,610.00

186,626,871

37,496,529.70

The approximate amount of copper used tn the above coinages was 819.142 tons, of which 5.539 tons
were used in alloying gold and 9.502 tons in alloying silver, whhe 804.101 tons were used in minor coinage.

In addition to the regular coinage there were manufactured at the
mint at Philadelphia sUver coins for the Government of Costa Rica,
as follows:

Denomination.

Silver:
10 centavos .
5 centavos '.

Pieces.

Value.

Value in
United
States
subsidiary
coin.

Silver consumed in
coinage.

.

.

Total

287,783
535,565

Colons.
28,778.30
26,778. 25

$21,422.63
21,422.62

F i n e ozs.
15 496.59
15,496. 59

803,348

.

53,656.55

42,845.25

30,993.18

For the government of the Philippine Islands the mint at San
Francisco manufactured silver and bronze coins as foUows:

Denomination.

Pieces.

Value.

Value in
United
States
subsidiary
coin.

Silver:
Pesos
20 centavos
10 centavos

385,000
743,565
1,510,265

Pesos.
385,000.00 $270,167.23
148,713.00
99,168.60
151,025.50 104,460.05

T o t a l silver
Bronze: 1 c e n t a v o . .

2,638,820
5,001,000

684,738.50
50,010.00

T o t a l coinage

7,639,820

734,748.50 1498,790.78

1 Value in United States minor coin.




473,785.78
125,005.00

2 Troy ounces.

M e t a l consumed in
coinage.

F i n e ozs.
195,432.22
71,728.78
75,563.79
342,724.79
2 833,500.00

S14

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
PURCHASE OF MINOR COINAGE METAL.

There were purchased during the year" 14,834,078.26 ounces,
avoirdupois, of minor coinage metals, at a cost of $202,493.32, which
was dehvered at the coinage mints as foUows:
Philadelphia.

San Francisco.

Metal.
Ounces.
Copper
Tin
Zinc .
Nickel

Cost.

Ounces.

Cost.

8,753,901.62

1,548.92
37,930.66

583, 333. 33
17,995.83
15,472.91
218,749.99

$7,180. 00
632 42
• 68 98
5,893. 60

10,611,126.20

Total

$102,673. 44

298.827.09
1,458,397.49

142,063.02

835,662.06

. 13,754.98

Denver.

Total.

Metal.
Ounces.
Copper
Thi
Zmc
Nickel..

Cost.

Ounces.

Cost.

2,916,754.16
46,136.42
88.010. 42
437; 500. 00

Total

.•

•-.

$32,750.91 12.253,989.11
1,666.38
63,131.25
512. 99
402,310. 42
11,855. 04 2,114,647. 48

$142,484.35
2,198.80
2,130.87
55,679.30

3,487,400.00

46,685.32 14,834,078.26

202,493.32

Minor coinage metals were purchased, during the fiscal year, for
Philippine coinage for delivery at San Francisco Mint:
Metal. '

Ounces.

Cost.

•-.
-

Total

874,708.33
29,895.83
30,245. 83

$10,076. 64
1,048.37
134. 60

934,849.99

Copper.
Tin
Zinc

11,259.61

PURCHASE OF MINOR COINAGE BLANKS.

There were purchased during the year 499.40 pounds of prepared
nickel blanks at a cost of $149.82; and 1,368.79 pounds of prepared
bronze blanks at a cost of $273.76, for delivery at the Philadelphia
Mint.
DISTRIBUTION OF MINOR COINS.

The amount of minor coins distributed was $4,139,066.40, and the
expenses for distribution, including cost of bags, twine, seals, and
tags, were $24,992.95, as foUows:
Denomination.
5-cent nickels
1-cent bronze
Total distribution.
E x p e n s e s of d i s t r i b u t i o n :
Transportation
Bags
Seals
Drayage...
Total




Frora Philadelphia.
$2,433,954.25
878. 427. 42

F r o r a San
Francisco.

From
Denver.

$77,152.90 $557,146. 75
53,967. 24 138.417.84

Total.
$3,068.263.90
1,070,812. 60

3,312,381.67

131,120.14

695,564.59

4,139.066. 40

8, 739. 56
3,370.20
465. 00

254. 70

11,390. 79
754. 70
18.00

20,130. 36
4,379.60
466.00
18.00

12,574. 76

254. 70

12,163.49

24,992.95

315

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.
Minor coinage issued, melted, and amount outstanding.
Denomination.

Corned.

Philadelphia:
Copper cents
Copper half cents
Copper-nickel cents
Bronze 1-cent pieces
Bronze 2-cent pieces
Nickel 3-cent pieces
Nickel 5-cent pieces

$1,662,887.44
39,926.11
,.. 2,007,720.00
21,339,296.73
912,020.00
941,349.48
38,102,724.60

TotaL

Issued.

$1,562,887.44
39,926.11
2,007,720.00
21,187,221.33
912,020.00
941,349.48
37,239,048.96

64,906,923.36 63,890,173.31

San Francisco:
Nickel 5-cent pieces
Bronze 1-cent pieces

Melted.

Outstanding,
June 30,1913.

$380,887.22

On hand.

$1,182,000.22
39,926 11
1,203,543.56
20,732,304.73
571,826.68
657,601.53
33,853,989.45

804,176.44
454,916.60
$152,074.40
340,393.32
283,847.95
863 675.65 3,385,069.50
1,015,760.05

6,649,281.03 58,240,892.28

142,600.00
219,020.00

77,152.90
198,433.34

65,447.10
20,688.66

77,162.90
198,433.34

361,620.00

276,586.24

86,033.76

275,586.24

765,600.00
254,540.00

675,747.25
234,448.34

189,862.75
20,091.86

31,700.00
1,400.00

544 047 25
233,048.34

1,020,140.00

810,196.59

209,944.41

33,100.00

777,095.59

" Total
^
Denver:
Nickel 5-cent pieces .
Bronze 1-cent pieces
Total

-

66,287,683.36 64,975,965.14

Grand total

1,311,728.22 5,682,381.03 59,293,574.11

The uncurrent minor coins melted at the mint at Denver are not
necessarily of the former coinage of that particular mint.
PHILIPPINE COINAGE.

The following coinage was executed during the fiscal year 1913
at the United States mint at San Francisco for the Philippine Islands
Government:
•
P eces.

Denomination.
silver:
Pesos
20 centavos
10 centavos

-

Total silver

Consumed in
coinage.

385,000
743,566
1,510,255

Fine ounces.
196,432.22
71,728.78
76,663.79

2,638,820

Bronze: 1 centavo

5,001,000

-

Total coinage

342,724.79
Troy ounces.
833,600.00

7,639,820

The total silver coinage to June 30, 1913, from coins received from
Phihppine Islands for recoinage and from bullion purchased for such
coinage was as follows:
Denomination.

Pesos
60 centavos
20 centavos
10 c e n t a v o s . . .
Total

Coined from new bullion,
actsofMar.2,1903,and
June 23,1906
Pieces.
93,445
3,342,126
3,668,152
6,077,392
13,179,115

Coined from Philippine
coin received for recoinage, act of June 23, 1906.

Total.

Fine ounces22,124,705.00
534,382.25
411,240.02
289,171.75

Pieces.
43,008,504
5,478,126
7,680,476
11,642,647

Fine ounces.
22,172,773.11
1,340,252.38
764,840.38
582,253.96

1,500,620.81 64,630,638 123,359,499.02

67,809,753

24,860,119.83

Fine ounces.
Pieces.
48,068.11 42,915,059
805,870.13 2,138,000
353,600.36
4,014,324
293,082.21 5,566,265

1 Included iu this amormt is 12,542.29 fin© ounces of coins reserved for assay.




316

REPORT ON
WORK OF THE

THE

FINANCES.

GOVERNMENT

REFINERIES.

BuUion was operated upon by the refineries connected with the
mints at San Francisco and ^Denver and the assay ofiice at New
York, during the fiscal year 1913, as follows:
S e n t to refinery.

„ R e t u r n e d from refinery.

Institution.
Shver.

Gold.

Gold.

silver.

Firie ozs.
868,064.252
1,711,670.548
4,164,629.661

Total

F i n e ozs.
246,614.33
1,276,561.06
3,254,406.01

F i n e ozs:
868,338.613
1,711,490.188
4,163,866.791

F i n e ozs.
249,741.00
1,276,917.20
3,251,928.48

6,724,164.461

San Francisco
Denver
New York

4,777,571.40

6,723,695.572

4,778,686.68

A p p a r e n t gain.

A p p a r e n t loss.

Institution.
Shver.

Gold.
F i n e ozs.
274.381

San Francisco.
Denver
NewYork

F i n e ozs.
3,128.67
386.14

274.361

Total

Gold.

Silver.

F i n e ozs.

F i n e ozs.

3,492.81

80.380
662.870

2, i l l . y63

743.250

2,477.53

NOTE.—Refinery operations were suspended at the PhUadelphia Mint and the equipment was removed
to the assay office at New York.

Bullion upon which charges were collected and bullion owned by the Government.

Bullion u p o n w h i c h charges
for p a r t i n g were collected.
Institution.

«
San Francisco
Denver
NewYork
Total

Gold.

Silver.

Bullion o w n e d b y t h e Gove r n m e n t retained b y t h e
refinery for p a r t i n g ' p u r poses on
w h i c h no
charges were Imposed.
Gold.

SUver.

Total.

Gold.

Silver.

F i n e ozs.
329,098.180
1,244,893.041
1,605,399.972

F i n e ozs.
F i n e ozs.
528,968.072
163,097.80
466,877.507
604,263.81
2,678,434.26 2,649,129.689

F i n e ozs.
F i n e ozs.
183,516.53
858,064.252
672,563.39 1,711,570.548
575,97L75 4,154,529.681

F i n e ozs.
246,614.33
1,276,917.20
3,254,406.01

3,079,391.193

3,445,795.87 3,644,773.268

1,432,041.67 6,724,164.461

4,777,937.54

BY-PRODUCTS OF R E F I N E R I E S .
Institution.

San Francisco
Denver.
New York
Total

Electrolytic copper.

Sponge p l a t i n u m . Sponge p a l l a d i u m .

Pounds.
3,085.50
477.50

Value.
$516.82
506.93

Value.
Ounces.
$895.99
205.74
58.20 2,328.00
1,403.00 69,712.09

Ounces.

Value.

10.16
18.10

1,023.75

1,686.94 62,936.08

28.25

1,166.20

Total.

Ounces. Value.
0.35 $1,400

Value.
$1,428.81
3,240.93
60,472.29

$406.00
760. 20

3,563.00

Osmhidlum,




.35

1,400

65,140.03

DIRECTOR OF T H E

817

MINT.

EXCHANGE OF FINE GOLD BARS FOR GOLD COIN AND GOLD'BULLION.

The value of the fine gold bars exchanged for gold coin and buUion,
monthly, by the United States Mint at Philadelphia and assay oflSice
at New York for the fiscal year 1913 was as follows:
E x c h a n g e d for gold b u l h o n .

E x c h a n g e d for gold coin.
Months.

Philadelphia.

New York.

$467,967.42 $5,782,225.55 $6,260,182.97
661,170.19 2,436,562.36 2,997,732.55
725,096.19 2,683,582.01 3,408,658.20
526,822.18 3,632,890.69 4,069,712.87
394,968.02 2,671,164.94 2,966,132.96
222,68L10 2,241,919.53 2,464,600.63

$17,616.26
17,695.12
16,824.24
20,084.60
22,303.26
16,634.05

$361,667.89
341,460.79
298,684.26
377,788.37
397,780.42
302,556.61

$379,074.15
359,146.91
316,508. 50
397,872.97
420,083.68
319,190.66

2,818,265.87 3,044,978.58
3,436,186.24 3,887,887.45
15,666,340.65 16,120,860.80
2,936,730.49 3,448,539.36
14,699,297.30. 15,193,749.91
2,822,345.19 3,278,708.58

20,621.26
20,452.30
15,95L98
22,034.32
21,756.60
22,181.67

329,080.96
246,888.77
314,913.71
313,685.61
311,488.78
278,772.59

349,682.20
267,341.07
330,866.67
335,719. 83
333,245.38
300,954.26

6,696,042.13 61,425,490.72 67,121,532.85

234,055.63

3,874,628.66

Philadelphia.

New York.

Total.

Total.

1912
July
August
September..
October
November..
December...
1913
January
February...
March
April
May
Jime

426,712. 71
462,701. 21
454,310.25
512,808. 86
494,452. 61
466,361.39

Total.

4,108,684.28

MINT OF THE UNITED STATES AT PHILADELPHIA.

This mint was in operation throughout the year.
P R O O F COINS A N D M E D A L S .

The following table shows the number of proof coins and medals
and their nominal value manufactured during the fiscal year:
Pieces. Nominal
value.

Articles.
Gold medals
Silver medals
Bronze medals
Gold proof coins
Silver proof coins
Minor proof coins

.-

^

Total

164 $7,375.20
574 1,384.70
7,751 3,463.49
340 2,860. 00
780
221. 00
4,012
120.36
13,621

16,424.75

T H E STATE OF T H E NUMISMATIC COLLECTION.

Although for the fiscal year just past the numismatic coUection
has not had the usual smaU apj)ropriation for the purchase of historical coins and medals, yet the increase of the number of specimens
in the coUection has not faUen much short of the normal aggregate
of accessions in late years. And if the cost and historical value of
the couis acquired the past year be taken into consideration the
cabinet has fared unusually weU.
^ These favorable results in a year that opened so inauspiciously are
directly due to the action of the officials of the Treasury JDepartment
in placing with the cashier of the mint a considerable number of gold
coins which commanded a premium amo'ng coUectors. The most of



318

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

these pieces were disposed of and the premium received used for the purchase of coins and medals. A few of the eagles are stUlin hand. Persons interested in the welfare of the cabinet of coins, and there are many
who are interested in it, wiU feel grateful to the oflS.cials who made
this continued growth possible by a wise use of a number of coins
which eventu.aUy would have slowly dribbled into private possession
at face value.
A cause of no little, gratification has been the sale of the large
catalogue of the collection pubhshed in 1912. Numismatic pubhcations are of such narrow appeal that the sale of even the customary
small editions is generaUy very slow. The ready exhaustion, therefore, of the first edition of this unpretentious catalogue foUowed by
the sale of nearly all of the second edition is more than was expected.
There has been prepared during the past year a small guide book
for the coUection, a pamphlet of little more than a hundred pages.
This guide is sold at 10 cents. I t was prepared with a view of meeting
the demands of visitors as their desires have been ascertained by the
interest they manifested and the questions they asked. The guide
can be mailed for 2 cents postage.
MACHINE

SHOP.

In addition to the regular repairs and upkeep of the machinery and
appliances, the foUowing new work was done for this mint: 4 tumbhng
barrels of washing machine; 3 scrap cutters; metal work of 2 coinreviewing machines; 5 sets of old-style nickel molds; 1 six-foot balance for transfer weigh room; 2 twenty-five horsepower roUing miUs
changed to fifty horsepower; 1 six-inch lever shear; 4 beds and
punches for cutting 6 bronze planchets; 4 beds and punches for cutting 5 nickel planchets; 2 centrifugal coin-drying machines instaUed
in minor coinage plant; 8 coUars for dime coinage; 588 coUars for
nickel coinage; 103 coUars for bronze coinage; 4 sectional collars for
eagle coinage; and 2 sectional coUars for double-eagle coinage. There
are also 2 automatic weighing machines under construction in the
shop, about 50 per cent of the work on which is completed.
During the same period the following work was done in the shops
for the various mints and assay oflBices:
Mint of the United States at San Francisco, Cal.: Special screws for
automatic weighing machine; 30 coUars for nickel coinage; 10 coUars
for bronze coinage; 10 coUars for dime coinage; 5 coUars for haUeagle coinage; and 15 coUars for Philippine coinage.
Mint of the United States at Denver, Colo.: 12 coUars for bronze
coinage; 30 collars for nickel coinage; 1 set of double-eagle dressing
tools for mUhng machine; 25 center-knife edges and 50 end-knife
edges for automatic weighing machines; 20 beams complete for automatic weighing machines; 25 basket traps for automatic weighing
machines; 25 basket backs for automatic weighing machines; and 25
kickers for automatic weighing machines.
United States assay ofiice at New York, N. Y.: 1 bullion-clipping
machine; 1 pair of long couplings for vertical rolhng mill; 8 silver
disks for Smithsonian Institution; 30 silver disks for Geological Survey; and 22 silver disks for Bureau of Engraving and Printing.




DIRECTOR OF THE M I N T .

319

There have been designed and built 4 rotary baU-bearing turntables
and 44 ingot molds. The turntables are made up of 2 six-foot castiron disks. The bottom disk is the ball race, which carries 146 oneinch diameter hardened steel baUs. The top disk has a cone which
fits the bottom race. On the top disk are mounted 11 ingot molds
equally spaced on a four-foot six-inch circle in an upright position.
The molds will produce either a nickel or bronze ingot 24 inches long,
4i inches wide, three-quarters of an inch thick. The back half, or,
in other words, the plain part of the mold, is bolted fast to the table,
and the half that carries the ingot swings down to an angle of 45° on
two trunnion bearings which are bolted to the table. The locking
device for clamping the mold wliile the ingot is being poured is four
links connected to the stationary part of the mold with a loose bolt.
The other end of the hnk carries two eccentric pressure bars which
clamp on three lugs equaUy spaced on the mold. The one end of
each hnk carries an eccentric bushing which can be adjusted to take
up any expansion or contraction. This principle eliminates aU
handling and lifting of the mold.
Q
CARPENTER

SHOP.

Besides the general repairs and upkeep of the machinery and
appliances, the following work was done by the chief carpenter and
his assistants during the year:
The tar or mastic appUed to the roof to stop leaks would not
adhere to the glazed tiles and formed regular water pockets. This
was all removed, the roof painted and covered with painted mushn,
and the joints filled up with plastic cement, which proved very satisfactory. The same method was applied as new leaks appeared.
Eleven ventilating monitors were built on the northwest terrace
roof to give light and ventilation to the basement, in which the new
minor-coinage plant is installed. Three of these monitors, which
were crushed by falling stone when the building was struck by
lightning, were rebuilt.
The room on the second floor formerly occupied by the electrician
was fitted up as a telephone exchange. The partitions between this
and the counting room were fined with beaver board to deaden the
sound of the noise made by the counters, which proved very satisfactory. A new wardrobe for the operator was built.
The new minor-coinage plant was equipped with all necessary water
and acid tubs, vats, and tanks, 20 extra large copper-lined strip cars,
switchboards, etc.
Two new coin-reviewing machines were built and some very important improvements made bn them. The 'same improvements Were
made on the six older machines.
One counting hopper and eleven counting boards, of the following
denominations, were made for the subtreasury at St. Louis, Mo.:
Two 1-cent boards, two 5-cent boards, two dime boards, two quarterdollar boards, two half-dollar boards, and one 1-dollar board. All
patterns for new machinery," etc., were made in this department.




320

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
SEWING ROOM.

The sewing room, besides making the necessary repairs to fiags,
awnings, window shades, rugs, machine belts, etc., manufactured for
this mint 957 pairs asbestos mitts; 1,496 pairs fire mitts; 5,222
aprons, sleeves, and miscellaneous articles, and. 122,450 coin bags
received from contractor were marked.
There were also manufactured for the New York assay office 656
pairs canvas mitts, 194 pairs asbestos mitts, and 22,500 anode bags.
For the mint at San Francisco, 206 pairs fire mitts, 118 pairs
asbestos mitts.
For the assay ofiice at Deadwood, 4 pairs asbestos mitts.
For the assay ofiice at Boise, 12 pairs asbestos mitts.
For the assay oflice at Helena, 12 pairs asbestos mitts.
ASSAYING DEPARTMENT.

The operations of this department during the fiscal year 1913 were
as follows:
^
Samples operated on.
Item.
Gold.
3,859
660
12

Deposits..
Ingots
Fine melts
Bullion assay samples...-....
Superintendent's grain bars..
Assayer's bars
Melter's bars
Sweep samples
SUver-purchase bars.'

SUver.

Gold and
silver.

684
325
225
79
41
45
27
376

Total.

4,531

989

793

The number of assays made was as follows:
Deposits and purchases
Ingots (gold and silver)
Special assays
,.
Miscellaneous assays, bronze and nickel
SUver purchases
OU tests

—

39,920
3,488
2,724
1..
529
392
23

Total

47,074

The average cost per assay during the year was $0,469.
I n addition to the above, 490 ounces of proof gold and 300 ounces
of Droof silver were made.
Of the 660 melts of gold ingots made in the melting and refining
department, 90 were returned for remelting and 1 was condemned.
Of the 325 melts of silver ingots, 1 was returned for remelting.
The fineness of the gold melts passed was:
11 melts at.
30 melts at
116 melts at
174 melts at
171 melts at
64 melts at
3 melts at
569




900.2
900.1
900. 0
899. 9
899. 8
899. 7
899.6

The fineness ofthe silver melts passed was:
899.75
7 melts at
. 899.5
43 melts at
. 899.25
47 melts at
899.
109 melts at
. 898.75
52 melts at
898.5
41 melts at
...
. 898.25
14 melts at
. 898
11 melts at

321

DIRECTOR OF T H E M I N T .
MELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT.

Dming the fiscal year^ 660 gold-ingot melts were made, making a
total charge to the melting pot of 2,066,745.994 fine ounces. There
was 1 melt condemned. Out of this quantity of bullion melted,
the loss found at settlement amounted to 26.421 fine ounces, or 1.27
p.er cent of legal allowance based on actual charge.
I t has been the custom here for years past to make gold-ingot melts
to the full capacity of the No. 70 crucible, which amounts to approximately 6,000 ounces gross of standard metal. We find, however, if
our basis of coinage metal is not electrolytic gold but uncurrent coin,
and fine gold lower in fiuaeness than 998, that, owing to impurities,
segregation troubles this department greatly on these large melts,
and great difficulty is experienced in getting an ingot melt of uniform
composition. In order not to reduce our melting capacity or increase
labor, we decided to melt the same amount of metal per pot, but stir
the charge twice, treating it as two melts. In other words, when full
pot is ready for dipping, use plunger 100 strokes and dip half out of
ot, giving this half a number; then again using plunger on second
alf 100 times and giving this second half of the melt a number. In
this way a smaller volume is expected to be uniform and is more
easily mixed, and results prove the benefit of this method in reducing
the ounces remeited.
In silver there were 325 melts made, none condemned, making a
total charge to melting pots of 1,013,263.95 fine ounces. Upon
settlement of the accounts of this department a gaia in silver of
355.46 ounces was found, which in no way removes the fact that a
loss of 87 ounces in melting was suffered.
During the fiscal year this department received from the superintendent bullion containing 1,993,067.302 fine ounces in gold, the
coinage value being $41,200,357.57. The silver contents of buUion
received contained 1,818,499.04 fine ounces, of the coinage value of
$2,513,909.14.
The melts made aggregate as foUows:

E

Melts.

Bars.

21

640
280
3,519
4,123

86
1

1

57

Total




ConRemelts. demned.

23
34

Gold
Silver
Bronze
Cupro nickel..

16726°—Fl 1913

Ingots.

8,562

87

1

Good ingots.
Ounces.
1,935,752.905
986,410.35
11,978,490.60
12,127,186.30
27,027,840.165

322

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

During a nine days^ run,including overtime to 10 p.m., from March
20 to 29, inclusive, working three gangs of men, 10 sets of molds,
12 and 13 furnaces, 12 men to gang, the results in melting cupro
nickel were as follows:
N u m b e r of—
W e i g h t of Ingots m a d e .

Date.
Melts.

Mar. 20 '.
21.
22
24.
25
26.
27
28.
29

61
61
61
61
81
58
84
59
64

Ounces.
192,150.60
190,688.40
192,387.30
192, 704. 50
192,388. 60
176,120.00
197,108.60
187,710. 60
197,192.40

548

Total
D a i l y average

2,829
2,810
2,837
2,843
2,836
2,811
2,918
2,777
2,925
26,385

1,718,446.90

80.9

..

Ingots.

2,820 5

190,938.54

The total amount of ingots poured (25,385) in this time amounts
to the large weight of 59 tons.
Sweeps cellar operations.
Departments.

K m d treated.

Recoveries:
/ G o l d a n d silver
Melting a n d refimmg.
\ M i n o r coin m e t a l
S u p e r i n t e n d e n t ' s — Gold a n d silver
Coming
do
do
U n i t e d States assay
office, N e w Y o r k .
Total

Number
barrels.

40

Gold

SUvei.

Ounces.
.81.382

Ounces.
296.58

Bronze.

Cupro
nickel.

Ounces.

Ounces.

15,822.55
12
6
88

58.298
18.368
189.468

128

346.606

1,065.14

31,261.70

15,822.55

31,261.70

80.83
62.04
636.69

In treating the broken crucibles, burned out refractories, and
drosses from the minor coinage meltiag operations, the larger material is put through the crusher, then it is fed, together with the smaller
refuse, into the Ellspass mill and crushed in the wet way. The more
or less large pellets remaining upon the pan of the mUl are saved; the
resultiag fine material, or tailings, is thrown away.
The value of the metals saved by thus treatiag these waste materials was upward of $800. The cost to recover same ia labor, power,
and maintenance was not half this amount.
Since the refinery operations have been discontinued here and the
bulk of the old equipment sent to New York, we have found it greatly
to our advantage to separate the precious-metal operations from that
of the minor coiQage metals by using for gold and sUver nigot purposes
the furnaces left vacant by the closing of our refinery. These five
furnaces are connected to a settling chamber, and this room being far
removed from our regular melting room, and being of ample size,
gives convenient facilities for handliag this branch of ingot making
without any risk of contaminating the preQiQus metals.




DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

323

The first instaUation of the new large molds on turntable for bronzeingot making has been put in successful' operation. This change
enables us to cast a melt of 3,200 ounces into ingots (24 b y 4|- by |
inches) in four minutes. I t is proposed that one turntable, holding 11
molds, will serve two furnaces, with two melters pouring together
and three men manipulating molds and ingots, as follows: Two
melters pour simultaneously, table then turned until next mold is in
position for filling; first helper opens up mold and releases ingot,
second helper picks up ingot, conveys it to pickling and coohng tanks,
while third helper removes pellets and slivers and greases, closes, and
clamps mold. As a heat can be taken off this way in 5 minutes, an
actual saving of 10 minutes is eft'ected on each melt, or 50 minutes
in a day^s work per furnace, which can be utilized toward getting
more metal melted. These ingots in bronze weigh 23 pounds, or
about six times what our small ingot weighs, making 10 to a heat, in
place of 60 of the smaller ingots. The filing is slightly heavier than
on tlie small ingots, but in linear measure is 40 feet, as against 120.
The topping is done on heavy shears made in mint machine shop and
placed in position on melting-room fioor this fiscal year. This large
shearing machine is a valuable acquisition, for it is no little trouble
to top the large ingots and shear copper bars and zinc slabs to any size
desired. Four such turntables are soon to be put in place on meltingroom fioor; these will serve the present coinage requirements for large
ingots.
This department has been on the lookout for an oil-burning furnace for the past two years, and this fiscal year tested four dift'erent
makes, with a view of recommending the equipment that together
showed low fuel cost per 1,000 pounds of metal melted with practical and suitable furnace details for our special requirements. The
results of our tests showed a wide variation in fuel consumption,
running from $4.77 per 1,000 pounds of cupro nickel melted up to
$10. This is based on oil at 9 cents per gallon, an extremely high,
price, b u t the cost to us at this time in 6-barrel lots.
The furnace showing lowest oil consumption per 1,000 pounds of
metal melted was of the pit type, and upon our melting-room floor
stood too high and rendered dipping extremely difficult. Not one
of these furnaces fulfilled our requirements, and up to date no recommendation has been made. A modified furnace is still awaiting a
test, which we hope to run as soon as a little let-up can be indulged
in. I n the meantime, due to poor and inconstant results with our
present furnaces on account of high price and low quality gasoline,
we made some tests using city gas as fuel. We found that our
present furnaces with but little alteration could be adapted to this
illuminating-gas fuel, and by using same show a saving over gasoline
fuel and secure uniform melting periods for our dift'erent metals,
which constancy and -convenience appealed so strongly to us as to
warrant a recommendation that city gas fuel be used. This recommendation being approved, we are now in the position of being promised a fuel entirely satisfactory, in so far as convenience, sufficient
heat units, and suitability for our melting-room requirements are
concerned. On the other hand, oil fuel is cheaper, though the life
of furnace parts is shorter and punishment to melters much greater;
how much cheaper, and if better, when everything is considered, we
hope to determine next year,.
-




324

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Minor coinage metal operations.

During the year the melting and reflning department received from the
superintendent minor coin metal
Delivered prior to settlements:
Cupro nickel
Bronze

Troy ounces,
27,700,946.72
Troy ounces.
11,730,196.90
11,776,770.90
23,506,987.80

Delivered at settlement June 14,1913:
Bronze mgots, small
Bronze mgots, large
Bronze grains
Cupro nickel ingots, small
Cupro nickel ingots, large
Cupro nickel residue
Cupro nickel grains
Cupro nickel cubes.
Ingot copper
SUicon copper
Thi
Zmc

,

Troy ounces.
198,359.20
3,360.50
,
3,830.50
373,926.60
•...
22,962.80
6,274.80
2,501.00
784,758.33
2,243,937.50
720.30
229,551.75
233,482.02
4,103,665.30
27,610,633.10

Total loss
F h s t loss, Aug. 23, 1912

90,313.62
9,070.30

Second loss, June 14,1913

81,243.32

Receipts and deliveries by the superintendent of the melting and refining department,
June 30, 1913.
Minor coinage m e t a l a c c o u n t .
Gold-account.

Items.

SUver account.
Nickel.

Receipts:
S e t t l e m e n t m e t a l J u n e 30,1912
Deposits a n d p u r c h a s e s
Clippings
Transfers from N e w Y o r k .
Treasury purchases
Silver p u r c h a s e s b y Costa R i c a
Certificate b a r s
F i n e bars
Medal clips, Ingots, e t c
U n c u r r e n t coin
Silver p u r c h a s e d for m e d a l s . . . .
Coiner's, residues, a n d grain b a r s . . .
Assayer's proof
I n g o t Conner
SUicon copper
Tin . . .
Zinc
Clippings
Nickel cubes
U n c u r r e n t coin
....
Total

'.

253,223.940
89,747.420
2,675. 982
41,021.811
945.013
172.103

F i n e ozs.
1,805.62
157,119.26
699,320.83
428,219.48
260,521.98
30,993.18

Troy ozs.
714,878.53

Troy ozs.
3,309,074. 59

4,181,666.86
3,756.21

F i n e ozs.
216.480
92,216.478
1,047,508. 618
485,439.477

Bronze.

4,588,333.34

2,698. 03
3,618.38
238,724.16
1,181.80
3,683.93
456.96

6,426,424.20
1,448,333.33
247,928.16
1,993,067.302

1,818,143.58

13,002,984.09




197,869. 41
14,897,962.63
13,002,984.09
27,700,946.72

T o t a l m i n o r coinage m e t a l
Deliveries:
Ingots
..
.
M e r c h a n t bars
F i n e bars
N e w Y o r k transfer
Clippings
U n p a r t e d bullion
Assayer's proof
Medal ingots
Strips a n d disks
Coiner's, residues, a n d grain b a r s .
Sweeps
I n g o t Conner
Sihcon oopper
Tin . . .
Zinc.
Nickel cubes-.
,

298,827.09
8 304 068.20

1,716,667.715
178,676.016
22,821.803
72,880.677798.964
1,645.241
14.301
627.238
81.382

1,141,898.58
58,664. 67
16,354.81
394,377.08
43,047. 54
154,1)81.84
1,1)46. 95
4,824.78
230.93
3,670. 60
295. 58

12,127,086.30

11,978,490.60

38,570.36
720. 30

2,205,367.14
229,551.75
233,482.02

784.758. 33

325

DIEECTOB OF THE MlliTT.

Receipts and deliveries by the superintendent of the melting and refining department,
June 30, iP.?,?—Continued.
Minor coinage metal account.
Items.

Gold account. SUver account.
NiGfeel.

Deliveries—Continued.
Sweep grains
Residues
'
Total

Fine ozs.

1,993,003.226

Fine ozs.

1,818,393.16

Bronze.

Troy ozs.
2,501.0b
6,274.80

Troy ozs.
3,830.60

12,969,911.09

14,660,722.01
12,959,911.09

Total of minor coinage metal

27,610,633.10

Wastage settlement:
Aug. 23, 1912
June 30, 1913

37. 666
26.421

105.88

64.076

105.88
356.46

2,068,746.994

1,013,263.95

12,907,842.69

12,454,302. 73

2,068,745.994

1,013,263.95

12,907,842.69

12,454,302.73
12,907,842.99

Surplus June 30, 1913, settlement
Ingot room charge
Total operated upon
Total minor coinage metal

90,313.62

24,362,145.42

COINING

DEPARTMENT.

From fJuly 1, 1012, to August 23, 1912, when settlement was made
with the coiner, whose office was abolished by act of Congress and
in lieu thereof the ofl&ce of superintendent of the coining department
created, the coiner received from the superintendent and operated
upon 322,233.810 standard ounces of gold, from which there was
produced 205,593.750 standard oances oi coin, of the value of $3,825,000, or 486,000 pieces, which was delivered to the superintendent
during this part of the fiscal year. Prior to this settlement there
was returned to the superintendent 90,591.912 standard ounces of
gold in clippings, condemned coin, and bars, and there was delivered
in settlement 26,048.010 standard ounces in coin -and blanl^s. The
entire operation showed a loss of 5.444 standard ounces, of the value
of $101.28, being 3.37 per cent of the legal allowance. The percentage of coin produced to the amount operated upon was 66.83.
During this same period, from July 1, 1912, to August 23, 1912,
the coiner also received from the superintendent and operated upon
1,229,270.65 standard ounces of silver, from which there was produced 502,896.96 standard ounces of coin, of the value of $626,000
in subsidiary silver coin, or 3,450,000 pieces. Prior to the coiner's
settlement of August 23, 1912, he returned to the superintendent
227,779.57 standard ounces of chppings, condemned coin, and bars,
and dehvered at settlement 498,576.76 standard ounces finished, unfinished, and condemned coin. Upon the entire operation there was
a wastage of 17.41 standard ounces of the value oi $9.4.0, being 1.41
per cent of the legal allowance. .The percentage of coin produced
to the amount operated upon was 76.02.
The coiner also received from the superintendent during the same
period, from July 1, 1912, to August 23, 1912, 3,059,415.80 standard
ounces of bronze ingots, of which 2,935,905.20 standard ounces were
operated upon, from which there was produced 1,327,408.25 stand


326

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

ard ounces of 1-cent pieces, of the face value of $132,700, or 13,327,000
pieces, upon which there was a wastage of 874.35 standard ounces of
the value of $10.23, being 29.74 per cent of the legal allowance as
allowed on silver. There was returned to the superintendent prior
to the coiner's settlement August 23, 1912, 1,058,085.50 standard
ounces in clippings, condemned coin, and blanks, and there was delivered in settlement 673,047.70 standard ounces in ingots, strips,
and condemned coin. The percentage of coin produced to the amount
of metal operated upon was 45c21.
In addition to tbe gold and sUver received for coinage, the coiner
received from the supermtendent 294.422 standard ounces oi fine
gold for medals, of which 47.999 standard ounces were used in the
manufacture of medals. This amount and 167.147 standard ounces
in clippings were dehvered to the superintendent prior to settlement,
and 78.970 standard ounces were delivered at settlement. The
coiner also received from the superintendent during the same period
873.27 standard ounces of fine silver. Of this amount 301.77 standard ounces were used in the manufacture of medals, which, with
305.04 standard ounces in clippings, were delivered to the superintendent prior to settlement and 266.41 standard ounces delivered at
settlement. The slight loss in gold and silver is included in the
wastage in the manufacture of gold and silver coin.
The gold, silver, a,nd minor coinage for this period of the fiscal
year, July 1, 1912, to August 23, 1912, amounted to $4,583,700, or
5,268,000 pieces. The net wastage in coining this.amount was
$120.91.
Receipts and deliveries by the coiner, July 1 to Aug. 23, 1912.
Silver
account.

Items.

Gold
account.

Receipts:
Settlement metal of June 30,1912..
Ingots
Ingots, medal..

Standard ozs.
221,298.330
101,100.200
131.702

Standard ozs.
• 775,848. 45
453,641.80
655. 87

322,528. 232

1,230,143.92

3,059,415.80

205,593.750
90,591.912
26,043.010
215.148
78.970

502,896.96
64,300.00
229,758. 87
432,297. 46
606. 81
266. 41

1,181,596.10
549,537 10

322,522. 788
5. 444

1,230,126.51
17.41

3,058,541.45
874.35

322,528. 232

1,230,143.92

3,059,415.80

68.83

78.02

45. 21

3.37

1.41

29.74

Total....
Deliveries:
CornDomestic
Costa Rica
Clippings, condemned, and bars
Coin and blanks .
Medals and clippings
Medal metal
Total
Wastage

•

Amount operated upon
Percentage of coin to amount operated
upon
Percentage of legal allowance for wastage

Nickel
account.
Troy ozs.

Bronze
account.
Troy ozs.
3,059,415.80

1,327,408.25

From August 24, 1912, to June 30, 1913, the coining department
received from the superintendent 1,736,813.980 fine ounces of gold
for coinage, which was operated upon and from which there was produced 766,899.881 fhie ounces of coin, of the value of $15,853,227.50,
or 2,583,405 pieces, and 964,351.001 fine ounces in chppings, condemned coin, blanks, and bars delivered to the superintendent dur


DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

"
"

32^

ing this portion of the fiscal year prior to settlement, and there was
delivered in settlement 5,553.256 fine ounces in condemned coin,
blanks, bars, and sweeps. The entire operation showed a wastage
of 8.845 fine ounces, of the value of $182.84. The percentage of coin
to the amount of metal operated on was 44.15. The percentage of
the legal allowance was 1.60.
During the same period the coining department also received from
the superintendent for coinage 1,430,828.87 fine ounces of silver, of
which 1,429,555.91 fine ounces were operated upon, and from which
there was produced 947,255.37 fine ounces of coin, of the value of
$1,310,199.75, or 5,458,705 pieces in subsidiary silver coin, and
30,993.18 fine ounces of silver coin, of the value of $42,845.25 in
United States subsidiary coin, or 803,348 pieces for the Government
of Costa Rica, 451,231.43 ounces in clippmgs, condemned coin, and
bars were returned to the superintenaent prior to settlement and
1,342.20 fine ounces in ingots, condemned coin, and blanks were
delivered at settlement. Upon the entire operation there was a
wastage of 4.64 fine ounces, of the value of $2.84, being 0.43 per cent
of the legal allowance. The percentage of coin produced to the
amount operated upon was 68.43.
There was also delivered to this department during the same period
13,586,385.90 ounces of nickel ingots and 7,283 ounces of ScovUl
blanks, from which there was produced from the metal operated upon
7,027,438.50 ounces of 5-cent pieces, of the face value of $2,186,368.55,
or 43,727,371 pieces. Of this amount $154,329.25, or 3,086,585
pieces, were the old design, and $2,032,039.30, or 40,640,786 pieces, of
the new buffalo design, all of which and 6,416,424.20 ounces of clippings, condemned coin, and blanks were delivered to the superintendent prior to settlement. There was also delivered at settlement
136,244 ounces in ingots, coin, and blanks. On the entire operation there was a wastage of 13,562.20 ounces, qf the value of $175.87.
The percentage of the legal allowance, based on the silver aUowance,
was 99.76. The percentage of coin produced from amount of metal
operated upon was 51.77.
This department during the same period received 13,353,939.50
ounces of bronze in ingots and blanks, and 19,961.54 ounces in ScovUl
blanks, from which there was produced from the metal operated
upon 8,242,710.30 ounces of 1-cent coin, of the face value of
$824,783.90, or 82,478,290 pieces. This amount, together with
5,120,527.10 ounces in clippings, condemned coin, and blanks, were
delivered prior to settlement. The amount returned a t settlement
was, ingots 6,632.70 ounces, condemned coin and blanks, 177.60
ounces. The wastage on this operation amounted to 3,853.34.
ounces, of the value of $49.97. The percentage of wastage was 28.88.
The percentage of good coin produced to amount operated upon was
67.38.
In addition to the buUion received for coinage, the following shows
the amount used in the manufacture of medals:
Of the 754.574 fine ounces of gold received from the superintendent
286.839 fine ounces were used in the manufacture of medals, which,
together with 300.836 fine ounces in clippings were delivered prior to
settlement and 167.896 fine ounces returned in settlement.




328

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The amount of fine sUver received was 2,167.63 ounces, of which
843.37 fine ounces were used in the manufacture of medals, and that
amount, with 1,021.90 fine ounces of clippings, were delivered prior
to settlement and 304.41 ounces returned in settlement.
The slight gain in gold and sUver is included in the loss in gold and
sUver coinage.
On this large operp^tion, including coin and medals, the wastage
amounted to the very low figure of $411.52.
Total amount of domestic coin for fiscal year ended June 30, 1913.
Items.
Gold
Silver
5-cent nickel
1-cent bronze .
Total

Pieces.

Value.

3,069,405
8,908,705
43,727,371
96,748,390
151,463,871

.
.

$19,678,227.50
1,936,199.75
2,186,388.66
957 483 90
24,768,279.70

I n addition the following coin was made for the Government of
Costa Rica:
Items.

Pieces.

Value.

'267,783
635,566

$21,422.63
21,422. 62

803,348

10 centimes.
5 centluxos..

42,845.25

Receipts and deliveries by superintendent of coining department, fiscal year 1913.
Items.

Gold a c c o u n t .

Receipts:
Settlement metal, June 30,1912....
Ingots
Medalingots
Scovlll b l a n k s

F i n e ounces.
199,188. 697
1,804,365. 450
812. 672

Total
Dehveries:
D o m e s t i c coin
Costa R i c a coin
Clippings, c o n d e m n e d a n d b a r s . . . .
Sweeps
Coin a n d b l a n k s
Medals
Medal clippings
Ingots

Silver account. N i c k e l account. Bronze account.
F i n e ounces.
698,261.80
1,390,387.23
•2,518.14

Troy ounces.
1,753,039.5011,833,346.40

Troy ounces.
16,865,753.20

7,283.00
2,004,344. 823'
951,934.256
1,045,883.722
18. 368
5,534. 888
297. 481
662.363

2,091,167.17
1,399,862.63
30,993.18
656,260. 24
62.04

19,961.54

13,693,668.90

15,885,714. 74

7,027,438.50

9,670,118.55

6,416,424.20

6,304,236. 80

123,394.80
843.37
1,872.44
1,272.96

12,849. 20

6,832.70

Total
Wastage

2,004,331.078
13.745

2,091,146.86
20.31

13,580,106.70
13,582.20

15,880,987.05
4,727.69

A m o u n t operated upon
."
P e r c e n t a g e of c o m p r o d u c t i o n to
a m o u n t o p e r a t e d r.pon
P e r c e n t a g e of legal allowance for w a s t age

2,003,632.151

2,088,649.03

13,680,819.70

16,879,082.04

47.51

67.02

61.77

60 26

1.37

.97

99.76

29 77

IMPROVEMJENTS.

Reference has aheady been made in last year's report to the minorcoin plant. I t was well under way at that timCc I t has since been
completed and is now in operation.




DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

329

Two large 16-inch rolls are breaking down and finishing bronze
and nickel. The ingots used are 23 mches long, 4J inches wide,
and three-fourths of an inch thick. A copper ingot wUl produce
2,200 blanks and the nickel ingot about 1,500 blanks. Two cutting
presses, each running 170 revolutions per minute, are used in cutting
bronze and nickel blanks. When cutting these blanks six pieces of
the former and five of the latter are punched at each stroke, making
respectively 1,020 and 850 pieces per minute. Up-to-date cleaning
and annealing machinery, consistmg of rotary annealing furnaces,
tumbling barrels, and centrifugal. dryers prepare the blanks for
stamping. In addition to the rotary annealing furnaces two strip
annealing furnaces have been added and gas is used to operate these
furnaces. The object of this plant is to keep the workings of the
base metal isolated ^s much as possible from those of the precious
metals and also to turn out the minor coin more rapidly and at less
expense. Owing to the increasing demand for minor coin we wUl be
compelled to enlarge this plant in the near future by installing two
additional rolls and more cutting presses. At times we could use
the rolls in our regular rolling room, when not working on gold or
sUver, but to do so when working the precious metals would be
defeating the principal object for which this minor-coin plant was
created.
During the past year we have made and placed in operation two
reviewing machines simUar to those now in use for reviewing coined
money. These machines, being much faster and more accurate,
wUl replace the old-style selecting tables.
The only annoying feature we had to contend with during the past
year was a very inferior quality and irregular fiow of gas for annealing.
This appears to have been due to a low grade of naphtha and a mucm
heavier tax on the gas plant. The trouble has been overcome by
installing city gas. We find that, owing to the increased price in
gasoline, we can buy city gas cheaper than we can make our own
supply.
At present the workings are equally balanced, having sufficient
facUities for operating the product of one department with the other
without any delay or annoyance. I t wUl be our aim to keep up this
well-balanced system, thereby reducing the cost of production to
the lowest figure.
All gold and silver now used in the operation of coinage is calculated
at 1,000 fine instead of 900 standard as heretofore. The figures in
the above report from August 23, 1912, are 1,000 fine ounces.
The only blanks now adjusted are the double eagle and eagle; all
other denominations, except dunes and the minor coin, are weighted
after coinage. Five automatic weighing machines are doing this
work.
Our system for keeping the daUy records of the metal in operation,
recently introduced, is giving entire satisfaction. A tabulated
statement of the metal passing from one department to the other
during the day is kept. This shows the amount of finished and
unfinished metal, together with the wastage or loss at the close of
each day's workings.




330

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
ENGRAVING DEPARTMENT.

AU the dies used in coining operations in all of the mints are made
in the engraving department at Philadelphia. The embossedenvelope dies used by contractors supplying envelopes for the Post
Office Department and postal savings bank are also made here; also
dies for Army and Navy and other authorized public medals. The
mint is reimbursed for the actual expenditures for labor and materials
on these medal accounts.
The number of dies prepared for United States coinage last year was
2,640. I n addition, 175 dies were made for Philippine coinage, 30
for the Post Office Department, 9 for medals, and 36 master dies and
hubs; in all 2,890, as foUows:
Philadel- San F r a n - D e n v e r .
phia.
cisco.

Denomination.

Gold:
D o u b l e eagle
Eagle
Half eagle
Q u a r t e r eagle

10
22
110
50
.

56
20
20

76
52
160
50

50

96

338

15
13

•.

10
10
30

192

:

Total
Silver:
H a h doUar
Q u a r t e r doUar...
Dime

Total.

20
20
20

86
20
20

106
55
53

•

Total ..

28

60

126

214

Minor:
5 cents
1 cent

830
645

170
70

•203
140

1,203
855

Total

1,475

240

343

'2,058

Phihppine:
20 centavos
10 centavos
1 centavo

. .

Total

i
.1

1

Grand total coinage dies
Proof dies
Master dies and hubs for coinage
United States embossed-envolope dies (stamp dies)
Medal dies

45
60
70

45
60
70

175

176

2,785
30
36
30
9

Total

2,890
NUMBER o r EMPLOYEES.

The total number of employees in this mint at the close of the fiscal
year was 327, distributed in the several departments as follows:
General
Assayer's
Melting and refining
Coinhig
Engraver's

'.

Total

163
12
47
97
8
327

VISITORS.

A large number of visitors from aU States of the Union and from
foreign countries visited the mint during the year, 86,278 having been
shown through the building by the several guides.




331

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.
MINT OF THE UNITED STATES AT SAN FRANCISCO.

This mint was in operation throughout the fiscal year.
MINOR COINAGE.

Minor coins to the amount of $131,120.14 have been distributed
during the year, as follows:
5-cent nickel pieces
1-cent bronze pieces
Total minor

S77,152.90
53,967.24
131,120.14

'
-

During the above-mentioned period bronze 1-centavo pieces have
been coined for the Government of the Philippine Islands from new
metal deposited and from old Spanish copper coins received for recoinage, as follows:
Items.
1-centavos, from—
Metal deposited
Minor coins for recoinage ...

Value.

5P135,233.00
59,061.12

'

194,294.12

Total

SEIGNIORAGE.

The seigniorage on the coinage of purchased metal for the fiscal
year was $417,045.19, as shown by the follo\\dng table:
Items.
Subsidiary shver coins
5-cent nickel coins
1-cent bronze coins.
Total....




Coined.

Seigniorage.

$412,000.00
142,600.00
61,040.00

$227,791.87
136,129. 75
53,123.57

615,640.00

417,045.19

332

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
ASSAY DEPARTMENT.

The operations of this department during the fiscal year were as
follows:
Number samples operated on.
Items.
Gold.
Deposits
Redeposits
Exchange bars
Purchase bars
Return bars
Anode melts
Mint fine melts
Ingot melts
Mass melts
Experimental bars
Bullion assay samples
Superintendent's gi-ain bars
Melter and refiner's settlement bars
Coiner's settlement bars
Assayer's bars
Sweeps
General Land Office samples
Forest Service samples

17,147
424
46
198
42
311
832
640
168
112
35
22
148
12
24
76
156
19

Total

20,412

Silver.

Total

457

76
154
19

17,604
424
400
198
45
517
1,024
1,949
168
138
35
22
178
22
30
152
310
38

2,842

23,254

"354'
3
206
192
1,309

In addition there were assayed for the General Land Office and
Forest Service six samples for tin, one sample for zinc, one sample
for lead, and eight samples for copper.
Number of assays made and segregated.
Assays.
Gold
Silver
Sweeps..
Bureau of the mint...
General Land Oflice.,
Forest Service

Assays.

Number.
52,3054,739
255
2,090
636
92

Deposits
Purchases
Ingots
."
Refinery
Miscellaneous.

60,117

Total..

46,339
1,462
4,060
3,746
4,510

Total.,

0,117

Cupels made
Leads cut and rolled
Parting silver disks made .

.ounces..

998.3
998.5
998.7
998.8...
998.9
999.0
999.1
999.2
999.3
999.4
999.5
999.6
999.7
Total. . .




100,000
100;000
5,000

Fine silver determinations.

Fine gold determinations.
Fineness.

Number.

Fineness.

Melts.
i
1
2
3
1
11
12
6
9
6
14
20
4
90

998.5

Melts.

....

999.5

•.

Total

1

47

4'?.

333

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.
Ingot melts.
Passed
on first
melting.

Melts.

Remelted.

Condemned.

287
180

Gold ingots
SUver ingots
P h i l i p p i n e pesos
P h h i p p i n e 20-centavos
P h h i p p i n e 10-centavos

Total.

291
208
280
54
80

Total....

913

Finenesses of ingot melts.
Domestic coinage.

Phhippine coinage.

Shver.

Gold.
5 at 899.7
38 at 899.8
113 at 899.9
93 at 900.0
33 at 900.1
8 at 900.2
l a t 900.3

12 at 898.8
50 at 899.1
43 at 899.3
77 at 899.5
9 at 899.8
12 at 900.0
l a t 900.4

204

291

Pesos.

20-centavos.

272

l a t 748.2
2 at 748.5
9 at 748.7
25 at 748.9
12 at 749.2
5 at 749.6

1 at 748.2
5 at 748.5
13 at 748.7
16 at 748.9
14 at 749.2
16 at 749.6
7 at 749.8
8 at 750.0

54

2 at 798.4
2 at 798.6
16 at 798.9
15 at 799.0
62 at 799.2
33 at 799.4
78 at 799.6
30 at 799.8
30 at 800.0
6 at 800.2

10-centavos.

80

The reports covering the workings of the operative departments
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913, which foUow, show the wastage and surplus for the year. The wastage and surplus so shown
will be a part of the wastage and surplus taken up in the bullion
accounts at such time as the settlement is made.
MELTING A N D R E F I N I N G

DEPARTMENT.

The melter and refiner received, operated upon, and dehvered
gold and silver bullion and minor-coinage metal during the fiscal
year 1913, as follows:
Items.
Receipts:
Settlement metal—
Of June 30,1912....
:
Of Aug. 28, 1912 .
Deposits and purchases
Philippine Islands silver for recoinage
Redeposits
Clippings and coiner's bars
UncmTent coin
Superintendent's sweep bar
Comer's sweeps
Proof gold
Ingot copper
".
Tin
Zmc
Nickel shot
Total..
Total minor coinage metal




Gold account. Silver account. Nickel account. Bronze account.

Fine ozs.
1,271^ 488.613
1,830,446.382
2,616,774.939
40,111. 095
202,604.605
522. 804
58.512
26.086
96. 750

•

Fine ozs.
348,071.43
388,874.17
480,779.46
342,065.59
19,204.17
520,627.87
89.31
46.37
143.59

Troy ozs.

229,454.80

218,749.99
5,962,127.786

2,099,901. 96

448,204.79

Troy ozs.
559,315.78
560)397.20

723,261.60

1,458,041.66
47,891.66
45,718.74
3,394,626.54
448,204.79
3,842,831.33

334

BEPOET ON T H E FINANCES.
Items.

Gold a c c o u n t . S h v e r account. N i c k e l a c c o u n t . B r o n z e account.

Deliveries:
Gold certificate b a r s
Merchant bars
Fine bars
Unparted bars
Ingots".
Sweeps
S e t t l e m e n t m e t a l , A u g . 28, 1912
Nickel
Clippings
Copper
Tops and bars
Tin
Zinc
Alloy

F i n e ozs.
2,171,436.640
10,972.557
217,384.648
. 650,267.807
1,081,030.950
972.161
1,830,446.382

F i n e ozs.
141,386.28
88,328.76
349.631.24
1,132,007.66
3,747.81
388,874.17

Troy ozs.

687,962.10

Troy ozs.

2,260,150.30
560,397. 20

97,408.71
24,614.60
1,700.70

Total

173,275.50
3,385.44
8,949.10
10,325.30
5.013.20

5,962,510.145

382.359

Total

249,74L00
1,226,497.28

714,819.41

2,321,683.31

1,965,563.084

Amount operated upon:
Refinery
I n g o t room .
. .

4,073.96

858,338.613
1,107,224.471

- T o t a l minor coinage m e t a l
Surplus
Wastage

2,103,975.92

1,476,238.28

714,819.41

2,321,583.31
714,819.41

8n,686.11

3,021.496.04
811,686.11
3,833,182.15
1,081.42
10,730.60

T o t a l m i n o r coinage m e t a l

3,036,402.72

COINING D E P A R T M E N T .

The coiner"" received gold, sUver, nickel, and bronze from and delivered to the superintendent during the fiscal year 1913 as follows:
Receipts and deliveries by the superintendent of the coining department, fiscal year 1913.
Items.

Gold account.

Receipts:
S e t t l e m e n t m e t a l of J m i e 30,1912...
Ingots..

F i n e ozs.
55,181.178
1,081,030.950

F i n e ozs.
105,822.92
1,132,007.66

1,136,212.128

225,427.500

Total....
Deliveries:
CornDomestic
P h h i p p i n e Islands
Clippings (cond.), sweeps a n d b a r s . .
Coin a n d b l a n k s
Ingots
Total.. .
Surplus
Wastage
A m o u n t operated u p o n
Percentage of coin to a m o u n t operated
upon..




Silver accoimt. Nickel account. Bronze account.
Troy ozs.
687,962.10

Troy ozs.
42,711.70
2,260,160.30

1,237,830.58

687,962.10

2,302,862.00

298,072.12
342,724.79
521,117.47
12,196. 47
63,553.67

457,347.58
,229,454.80

610,828.38
833,822.10
731,615.80

1,136,221.961
9.833

1,237,664.52

686,802.38

2,301,443.28

166.06

1,159.82

1,418 72

428,214.330

1,135,638.48

687,962.10

2,174,068.80

62.70

58.13

68.47

68.64

202,664; 903
851.508
707,278.050

125,177.00

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

335

The^ foUowing table shows the coinage during the fiscal year 1913:
DOMESTIC COINAGE.
.

Denominations.

Gold

Pieces.
•

Value.

866,000

$4,660,000.00

Silver

1,228,000

412,000.00

Minor:
5 cents
1 cent

2,852,000
6,104,000

142,600.00
61,040.00

8,958,000

5,276,640.00

2,638,820
5,001,000

^"684,738.60
60,010.00

7,639,820

Total domestic comage

203,640.00

11,050,000

Total minor

734,748.50

P H I L I P P I N E COINAGE.
Silver
Bronze
Total Phhippine coinage.

-

MINT OF THE UNITED

S T A T E S AT

DENVER.

This miat was in operation during the entire fiscal year, the coinage being of the denominations of double eagles, half doUars, nickels,
and bronze cents.
The particulars as to bullion deposits and coinage will be found in
tables numbered 1 and 3, and in the general coinage statement, numbered 22.
IMPORTANT R E F I N E R Y

CHANGE.

In the spring of 1913 there was installed in the refinery of this institution a novel special induction potential regulator, embodying
the ideas of the foreman of the refinery, Mr. B. JP. Wirth, who was
seconded in perfecting his plans by Mr. White, chief electrician of
the mint. The new equipment consists of the foUowing items:
One special induction potential regulator, single-phase, 60-cycle, oil-immersed
primary 2,200, secondary potential 36-volt, maximum secondary current 1,300 amperes,
complete, with all necessary oil.
One complete switchboard panel, including wiring, having mounted thereon the
following:
One single-phase, 60-cycle, 2-wire watt-hour meter to read direct the current
, used through the above induction regulator.
One 2,000 to 100 volt potential transformer.^
One 2,000-volt series transformer, proper ratio.
One Type II automatic oil circuit breaker with inverse Mme-limit attachment.
One low-tension switchboard on which are mounted the following:
One voltmeter, maximum scale 30 volts.
One ammeter, scale 1,500 amperes.
One series transformer, ratio 1,500 to 5.
One double-pole, single-throw, l,600-amper3 time switch.
One electrolytic lightning arrester, 2,200 volts, single-phase, 60-cycle, complete,
with oil, electrolyte, and horn gaps, for outdoor mounting.

The cost of the above, delivered at the mint, was $1,374.
About the middle of March the general use of the pulsating current
in the gold ceUs in the refinery was Qommenced, The alternating




336

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

current is delivered through a 39-kilowatt induction regulator^ with
200 volts on the primary circuit, and a capacity of 36 volts, 1,300
amperes, on the secondary circuit. A direct-current voltage of 1.2
per cell and an alternating-current voltage (maximum) of 1.8 per cell
is used; current density, 65 amperes per square foot. The electrolyte contains 60 grams of gold per liter, and from 4 to 7 per cent
hydrochloric acid; temperature, 65° C.
NOTABLE

BENEFITS.

The benefits of this new system, as applied to the character of
buUion received at this mint, can be best shown by a comparison with
the operations under the former, or direct-current, system. The
refinery has been in operation (in this fiscal year) since October 1,
1912, a period of seven months; the months of October, November,
and December, 1912, and January and February, 1913 (which shall
hereafter be referred to as the ^^five months^ 0? the refinery operated
under the old system. I n March the change was made, and in that
month the refinery was operated under both systems, and in April
the new system was used exclusively; so, in making comparisons,
the month of March will be omitted and the first five months under
the direct-current system used, and the average of those months
compared with the month of April under the pulsating-current
system.
Under the old method there could not be ^'made up^' many gold
anode melts, because there was not received enough high-grade bullion to permit it; so, in October, after four months^ shutdown of the
refinery, 25 were made; in November, 9; in December, 12; in January,
10; and in February, 7; total for the five months, 63 melts, weighing
387,333.32 ounces; while in April, without any change in the character
of the deposits, under the new system 44 gold anode melts were
made, weighing 236,778.77 ounces, and many more could have been
made had they been needed.
During the ^^five months'' the gold anodes amounted to 18.6 per
cent of the total amount of bullion operated upon in the refinery,
whUe during the month of AprU the gold anodes comprised 58.5
per cent of the total operated upon. The radical dift'erence is due
to the reduced necessary fineness of the gold anodes.
In the ^^five months'' there were produced 731,669.949 ounces of
fine gold an,d recovered from the slimes (and scrap gold contained
therein) 125,821.3 fine ounces; that is, the gold in the slimes equaled
in amount 17.19 per cent of the fine gold deposited on the cathodes.
In the month of AprU there were produced 224,161.16 ounces of fme
gold and recovered from the slimes (and scrap gold therein) 25,496.89
ounces of fine gold, so t h a t in this month the gold recovered from the
slimes equaled m amount 11.37 per cent of the gold deposited on the
cathodes, and the average fineness of the fine gold under each system
was 0.9995 plus.
Further, m the ^^five m o n t h s " acids were used as follows: Hydrochloric, 28,184 pounds, and nitric, 28,023 pounds, an average per
month, respectively, of 5,637 and 5,605 pounds. In AprU, 12,954
pounds of hydrochloric acid were used, an increase above the average
of 7;317 pounds, costing $109.75, and 1,041 pounds of nitric acid; a




DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

337

decrease below the average of 4,564 pounds, which would have cost
$422.17, thus making a net saving in acid for AprU of $312.42.
Further, the cost of operating the refinery for the ^^five m o n t h s "
was $23,332.94 (including in each month $414.41 as one-ninth shutdown cost), beiag an average of $4,665.58, and the cost for AprU
(including said $414.41) was $4,478.38.
Further, the production of fine gold for the ^^five m o n t h s " was
731,669.949 ounces, an average of 146,333.989 ounces per month, and
the production of fine gold in AprU was 224,161.16 ounces, being an
increase over the average of said ^^five m o n t h s " of 53 per cent.
Further, m the ^^five months" there were sent to the refinery 244
sUver anode melts, weighiag 1,319,761.9 ounces, an average per
month of 263,952.38 ounces, and in the month of AprU there were
sent 20 sUver anode melts, weighing 104,047.6 ounces; and in the
^^five m o n t h s " there were used 139,718.97 ounces of mint fine sUver
bars in making up the said sUver anode melts, which were absolutely
necessary on account of the comparatively small amount of sUver
deposits received at this mint. However, in AprU, no mint fine
sUver was used, and also one-half of the sUver cells were cut out of
operation.
LOWER GRADES BULLION DIRECTLY THROUGH GOLD CELLS.

The most important benefit derived from the operation of this new
regulator and transformer lies in the fact that it is possible to treat
directly through the gold cells bullion of a much less fineness in gold
than it was possible to so treat with the direct current only. Formerly
bullion of a less fineness than 900 could not be successfully treated
in the gold cells, whUe the regular bullion, running as low as 800 parts
gold, is successfully treated. This table exhibits the fineness of all
of the bullion received at this mstitution, including both the deposits
and redeposits, for the months of January, February, and March, 1913,
as follows:
Below 700
From 700 to 800
Prom 800 to 850
From 850 to 900
From 900 to 925
From 925 to 950
From 950 to 999

fine
fine
fine
fine
fine
fine
fine

Total

°

Gross
ounces.
263,302.87
135,901.42
77,769.48
80,514.79
43,757.30
24,611.66
44,417.23
670,264.75

From an examination of this table it wUl be readily seen t h a t a
large percentage of the bullion received at this institution runs less
than 900 in gold; in fact, 83 per cent of it runs less than that figure,
and but 17 per cent 900 or more.
The number of sUver cells in operation in the refinery have been
reduced one-half. Heretofore it has been necessary to rely very
largely on the output of the sUver cells for bullion of a proper fineness
in gold to use in the gold cells. The number of sUver cells now in
operation wUl just about take care of receipts of bullion that must
necessarUy be put through tha,t system. I t wUl also be noted that
it is no longer necessary to re-treat mint fine silver in the sUver ceUs,
as was formerly the case.
16726°—ril913



22

338

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
ANODE MELT OF LOW FINENESS.

The anode melt of the lowest gold fineness treated in April was
No. 125; the make-up of that melt was as follows:
Fineness.
Items.

One bar from the Seattle oflSce.
Do
Do
One Goldfield Consolidated bar
One Homestake bar from Deadwood ofl&ce

Gross
weight.

Ounces.
901 01
995 07
841 12
852 78
1,965 39

Gold.

819.0
820.2
88L2
780.0
768.0

Silver.

177 2
173 2
115.0
116 2
216 0

The resulting anodes ran 804.7 gold, 171.6 silver. Especial attention is directed to the large amount of silver in the melt.
Gold anode melt No. 1 of this fiscal year, which was treated directly
through the gold cells through the old system, ran 921.2 gold, 52
silver.
This equipment and its operation has, without doubt, fulfilled in
every respect our expectations. I t has increased the output at a
reduced cost per ounce. I t more than paid for itself during the six
weeks it was in operation, from the middle of March to the 1st of May.
ASSAY DEPARTMENT.

The operations of this department during the fiscal year 1913 were
as follows:
Melts operated on.
Items.
Gold.
3,094
1,248
50
7

Deposits
Redeposits
Exchange bars
Return bars
Purchase
Anode melts
Mint fine melts
Ingot melts
Consolidated melts
Experimental samples
Bullion assay samples
Copper melts
Superintendent's grain bars
Melter and refiner's settlement...,
Coiner's bars
Assayer's bars
Coin samples
Sweep samples
Forest Service samples
Nickel and bronze ingot samples..

170
197
134
2
314
4
9
12
16
4
38
86
44
37
5,444

Total.

SOver. Total
629
11
1
430
301
144
328
195
45
1
7
363
44
37
2,536

3,723
1,248
61
471
341
462
2
509
4
9
12
61
5
43
429
88
74
47
8,027

Number of actual assays made.
Gold.
35,860 Bronze and nickel Ingots
Silver
24,285
Sweeps
431
Total
Forest Service
156
There were 60,450 cupels made and 60,450 pieces of lead cut and rolled.




60,873

339

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

The reported fineness of the refined gold and silver melts were as
follows:
Determinations.
F i n e shver.

Gold ingots.
Fineness.
999.3....
999 4 . . .
999.5
999 6
999.7
999.8 .o

..

-

Melts.
4
31
60
69
31
2
197

Total..

Fineness.

Melts.
3
65
25
61

9981
999
999i
999^

Total...

144

INGOT F I N E N E S S .

The reported fineness of gold and sUver ingot melts were as foUows:
Gold Ingots.
Fhieness.
899.7
899 8 .
899.9
900 0 . .
900.1
Remelts

Total..




Shver ingots.
Fineness.

Melts.
2
10"
68
44
8
2

134

898.6
898 7 . . .
898.8
898 9 . . .
899.0
899 1 . . .
899.2
899.3
899.4
899.5
899.6
899.7
899.8
900.0
Remelts..
Total..

:

. .

Mehs.
4
11
32
26
61
62
61
37
20
5
4
2
2
1
2
330

340

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
MELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT.

The superintendent of the melting and refining department received from and delivered to the superintendent of the mint during
the fiscal year 1913 the foUowing:
Items.

Gold account.

Receipts:
S e t t l e m e n t m e t a l of J u n e 3 0 , 1 9 1 2 . . .
Deposits
Redeposits
Clippmgs....
C o n d e m n e d coin a n d b l a n k s
U n c u r r e n t coin.
I n g o t copper
Tin
Zinc
C u b e nickel

F i n e ozs.
685,562.345
1,011,763.840
756,108. 785
109, 758. 637
41,468.490

Total

Silver account. Nickel account. Bronze account.
F i n e ozs.
299,808.59
971,077.03
271,969.72
310,087.03
112,046.12

.

Troy ozs.
999,877.33

Troy ozs.
18,414.06

778,598.10
53,131.10
96,184.12
1,458,420.83

348 377 30
12,036.10
13,432.20
1,468,333.33
45,136.42
88,010.42

437,500.00

-.

2,804,649.997

Total

3,823,709.48

1,983,737.83

733,234. 437
130. 040
1,093,127.342

3,793.70
1,195,346.13
446.66
766,434.30

2,473,734.50

1,498,447.70

1,338,665.18

477,123.23

2,804,623. 469

Deliveries:
Gold certificate b a r s
Commercial b a r s . . .
Ingots
Sweeps
."
S e t t l e m e n t m e t a l of J u n e 3 0 , 1 9 1 3 . . .

1,964,988.49

1,966,020.79

3,812,299.68

1,975,670.93

778,131.660

Surplus
Wastage

1,032.30
26.528

A m o u n t operated u p o n .

11,409.80

2,464,865. 743 •

2,511,269.54

8,186.90

2,485,144.30

1,606,614.60

The refinery also returned 477.5 pounds copper, 58.2 Troy ounces
platinum, and 10.15 Troy ounces palladium.
The refinery earnings were as follows:
Charges collected on bullion treated
By-products as above Itemized (approximated)

$71,995.43
3,240.93

Total

75,236.36

Melts made.
Gold.

Deposits
Anodes
Cathodes
Ingots
Fine bars
Slimes
Settlement
Sweats
N i c k e l Ingots
B r o n z e ingots
Miscellaneous

-.

-

Silver.

4,823
170
28
134
197

920
308
19
328
144

16

Item.

45

Total.
5,543
476
47
482
341
486
61
534
729
378
9
9,068

Total
Ingot melts condemned, none; ingot melts remeited, 2 gold and 2 silver.
COINING DEPARTMENT.

During the year
silver, nickel, and
producing 276,705
fine ounces silver,




1913 the coining department operated upon gold,
bronze, as follows: 445,089.816 fine ounces gold,
ounces coin, valued a t $5,720,000; 1,218,179.03
producing 795,509.14 fine ounces of coin (half

DIRECTOR OF T H E

341

MINT.

doUars), valued at $1,100,000; 2,547,803.10 Troy ounces nickel, producing 1,712,782.80 ounces coin, valued at $532,800; 1,458,708.6
ounces bronze, producing 1,097,837.7 ounces coin, valued at $109,810.
Receipts and deliveries by the superintendent of the coining department.
Gold.

Silver.

Nickel.

Fine ounces.
733,234.437

Fine ounces.
1,326,873.75

Troy ounces.
2,577,803.50

Troy ounces.
1,626,255.70

Deliveries:
Coin
cunnings, etc

276,705.000
456,527.735

795,509.14
530,973.81

1,712,782.80
881,727.60

1,097,837.70
527,959.50

Total
Wastage

733,232.735
1.702

1,326,482.95
390.80

2,574,510.40
3,293.10

1,625,797.20
458 50

Total

733,234.437

1,326,873.75

2,577,803.50

1,626,255.70

445,089.816

1,218,179.03

2,547,803.10

1,458,708.60

65.30

67.23

75.26

Item.

Receipts: Ingots

Amount operated upon
Percentage of good coin produced to
amount operated upon

62.17

Bronze.

VISITORS A N D MINT F O R C E .

During the year 64,312 visitors witnessed the coining operations
from the balconies.
On June 30 there were 94 officers and employees of this mint,
divided as foUows among the departments:
General
Assay
Coining
Melting, and refining .^.

49
9
14
22

:

U N I T E D S T A T E S ASSAY O F F I C E

AT N E W

YORK.

This assay office and refinery were in operation throughout the
year, and the records show that the business transacted continued to
increase.
On account of the delay in erecting the new buUding on Wall
Street, the clerical force and the assay, department are stUl in the
refinery buUding, and the employees deserve credit for the manner
in which they have performed their duties in crowded and unsuitable
conditions.
During the year 485,691.188 fine ounces of gold and 428,628.51 fine
ounces of silver were transferred to the mint at Philadelphia.
Gold bars were issued to depositors for domestic use in payment
for bullion for $3,873,693.93, and gold bars were exchanged for gold
coin for domestic use in the arts, etc., for $30,196,829.92, showing a
total increase of $5,320,361.80 compared with the previous year.
Gold bars were exchanged for gold coin forexportfor$41,363,473.89,
showing an increase of $21,238,568.04.
The income received for the exchange of gold bars for gold coin
amounted to $31,888.42, an increase of $11,323.97.
There were stamped during the year 75,104 bars of fine gold, an
increase of 11,292 bars, and 16,018 bars of fine silver, an increase of
3,145 bars.




342

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The total number of deposits received was 13,324, an increase of
659, and 171 redeposits were received from New Orleans and Charlotte, being an increase of 58.
There was received from the sale of platinum and palladium
'0,472.29.
MELTING AND REFINING DEPARTMENT.

The melter and refiner received, operated upon, and delivered gold
and sUver bullion during the fiscal year 1913 as follows:
Receipts and deliveries by the superintendent of melting and refining.
Gold account. Silver account.

Items.

Fine ounces.
894,142. 292
3,179,981.503
51,830.833
28,454.095
120. 938

Total

2,764,083.86
3,175.50
484,669.12
2,477.53

4,154,529.661

Deliveries:
Gold certificate bars
Commercial (fine) bars
^Sweeps
Balance, June 30,1913
Wastage

3,254,406.01

1,969,063.605
1,647,094.656
1,345.502
536,363.028
662.870

Total.

Fine ounces.
1,046,284.51
2,180,083.46
27,938.04

4,154,529.661

Receipts:
Settlement metal of June 30,1912.
Deposits and purchases
Redeposits.
Uncurrent coin
Transfers from Philadelphia

3,254,406.01

100.00

Yearns operations in refinery.
Sent to refinery.
Gold:
Crude bullion with charges
Bullion without charges
Amount operated upon

Returned from refinery.
Fine ounces.
1,505,399.972
2,849,129.689
4,154,529.661

Silver:
Crude bullion with charges
Bullion without charges

2,678,434.26
575,971.75

Amount operated upon ^

3,254,406.01

Gold:
Fine bars
Settlement bars, sweeps, etc...

Fine ounces.
3,616,158. 261
537,708.530

Total

4,153,866.791

682 870

Silver:
Fine bars
Settlement bars, sweeps, etc.. Total
Wastage

2,764,083.86
487,844.62
3,251,928.48
2,477.53

By-products of refinery. United States assay office at New York, fiscal year 1913.
Classification.

Sponge platinum
Sponge palladium.,
Total value

Weight.
Ounces.
1,403.00
18.10

Value.

S59,712.09
760.20
60,472.29

SUver buUion sent tp the refinery upon which refining charges were
coUected contained by assay 2,299,853.78 fine ounces, and sUver
owned by the Government returned to the refinery for parting
purposes upon which no parting charges were coUected contained by
assay 103,678.08 fine ounces.




DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

343

All copper recovered during that year is unrefined and in the form
of settlement bars and slabs, weighing in gross 22,484.90 ounces, and
containing 366.486 ounces of fine gold and 458.32 ounces of fine sUver.
A S S A Y E R ' S DEPARTMENT.

During the fiscal year 1913 there were made a total of 109,925
assays upon 40,388 samples, divided as foUows:
Items.

Samples.

Deposits
Refinery
specials

32,451
5,944
1,993

Assays.
89,864
14,060
6, Oil

Average cost per assay was SO.237.

The deposit samples came from 11,258 melts of gold and 2,237
melts of sUver, the refinery samples from 344 melts of fine gold, 594
melts of fine sUver, gold and silver anodes, sweeps, and other refinery
assays, and the specials from 665 deposits of small samples for the
determination of gold and sUver fineness. Many of these specials
were articles of jewelry and manufacturer's samples, some of them
being used for the enforcement of the law relating to the manufacture
and sale of jewelry, etc., marked with karat fineness. Others were
samples from the Mint Bureau, and there were also many made in a
careiul investigation of the relative accuracy of humid .assays for
sUver in gold buUion by cadmium-sodium chloride and cadmiumsulpho cyanate^ methods, the results of which were embodied in
reports to the Director of the Mint.
The refinery operations this year, including metal that had accumulated during the suspension of refining, resulted in sweeps containing
noticeable amounts of platinum, and the platinum contained was
therefore reported, thus decreasing the usual losses in the sale of
sweeps.
The large amount of current work (the gold deposits being greater
in number than in any previous year) required the constant effort of
the force to complete with promptness and accuracy, but special
attention has been given to the correct determination of sUver in gold
bullion by humid assay and to the assay of fine gold from the refinery
and in deposits made into certificate bars.
About 95,000 cupels were made, and the sUver disks used in aUoying
the assays for parting were roUed and cut in the department. The
fine gold, fine sUver, and standard bars made were all stamped with
the assay fineness.
The number of officers and employees at this assay office at the
close of the fiscal year was as follows:
General department
Assayer's department
Melter and refiner's department
Total.




48
15
27
:

90

344

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

THE ASSAY OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES AT SEATTLE, WASH.

The total number of deposits of gold dust and bullion received
during the fiscal year was 1,558 weighing 239,557.528 fine ounces of
the value of $5,006,750.25.
The origin of these deposits is shown below:
Source.

Total coining
value.

Gold.

Silver.

,

F i n e ounces.
4,118.837
9,311.639
12,913.380
1,342.604
68,541.766
5,296.408
8.674
48,067.153
2,716.019
20,912.964

F i n e ounces.
979.52
1,164.40
2,115.31
233.20
10,412.91
235. 22
1.32
5,392.22
546.94
3,663.30

S88,498.02
194,096.27
269,867.48
28,076.47
1)431,278.00
109,8n.64
181.13
1,001,090.49
56,880.51
437,373.51

T o t a l for Alaska
California
'Colorado
Idaho
Montana
Nevada
Oregon
Washington
British Columbia
British Columbia, r e f i n e d . . .
Y u k o n Territory
Mexico
U n i t e d States gold coin
Jewelry, old p l a t e , etc
Deposit m e l t i n g room grains
Gains on purchases

173,228.343
•62.773
2.269
338.799
1,714.080
17. 905
758. 554
1,527.009
51,053.051
9,802.229
288.123
LOOO
21.914
729.324
20. 076
2.079

24,744.34
10.94
.34
69.79
220.19
7.12
297.13
639.14
13,063.39
.00
77. 61
.12
.00
387.04
2.91
17.23

3,615,153.52
1,106.04
47.37
7,100.09
36,737.57
379.99
16,091.46
32,449.62
1,073,419.16
202,630.05
6,083.31
20.84
453.01
15,611.51
419.03
67.68'

239,667.528

39,637.29

6,006,760.26

Alaska:
Circle
Cooks I n l e t
Copper R i v e r
Eagle
Iditarod
Koyukuk
Koskokwim
Nome
_ Southeast Alaska
Tanana

Total

Statement of gold deposits from the opening ofthe institution on July 15, 1898, to the close
of business June 30, 1913.
N u m b e r of deposits
T r o y ounces
Avoirdupois t o n s
Coming value

t

;

61,297
12,294,202.83
421.3
S211,363,034.76

ORIGIN OF THE FOREGOING.

A IQCITQ •

Noime
Tanana
Iditarod
Balance of
T o t a l for Alaska
Canada:
British Columbia
Yukon Territory.
All other sources
Total




:

$48,863,771.90
42,846,278.63
3,417,725.19
- 11,121,489.37

-.

S106,248,265.09
:

15,893,597.97
86,774,974.80
2,448,198. 90
211,363,034.76

345

DIRECTOR OF T H E M I N T .

The following table shows the number, weight before and after
melting, loss in melting, and percentage of loss of the various classes
of bullion received:
Character of deposit.

Weight be- Weight
I^ss in PercentDeposits. fore melt- after melt- melting. age of
loss.
mg.
mg.

Bars
Dust
Retort
Nuggets
Mixed deposits
Jewelry, bars and scrap.
Dental, bars and scrap.,
United States gold coin.

374
599
221
106
162
61
21
14

1,568

Total

Ounces.
Ounces.
210,971.00 210,83L05
49,030.80 47,032.69
11,259.94
10,669.81
2,284.52
2,162.86
15,778.90
14,792.51
2,284.37
2,314.87
153.00
17L64
24.41
24.41

Ounces.
139.95
1,998.11
590.13
121.66
986.39
30.50
18.64

Ounces.
0.066
4.075
5.240
5.325
6.261
1.317
10.859

287,950.70

3,885.38

L331

291,836.08

The average fineness of the buUion deposited was as follows: Gold,
831.8; silver, 137.2.
For convenience in shipping to the mint for coinage, 1,252 bars,
each under 400 ounces in weight and aggregating 65,437.80 ounces
Troy, were melted into 72 large bars.
A summary of the work done in the assaying department during
the year is as follows:
Quartation shver manufactured
Cupels manufactured
Bullion assays made
Ore assays made for gold and shver
Ore assays made for base metals
Assays of slag, etc., from melting room
Special buhion assays made
Muthated domestic coins tested (gold)

ounces..
460
number.. 17,500
do
6,000
do —
181
do
92
do—
250
do
27
do
58

e

!

There were 19 persons, male, employed at the close of the fiscal
year.
ASSAY OFFICES AT CHARLOTTE, DEADWOOD, HELENA,
. LAKE CITY, NEW ORLEANS, AND CARSON.

BOISE,

SALT

These offices were open throughout the year as usual for deposit
of bullion.
LIFE OF COINAGE

DIES.

Average number of pieces struck per die at the coinage mints during the calendar year 1913:
Phhadelphla.

San Francisco.

Denver.

Denomination.
Obverse. Reverse. Obverse. Reverse. Obverse. Reverse.
United States:
Double eagles..
Eagles
Half eagles
Quarter eagles
Half dollars
Quarter dollars
Dimes
6 cents, nickel
1 cent, bronze
Phihppines:
20 centavos
10 centavos
1 centavo




Pieces.
43,445
49,331
32,564
49,867
101,198
100,308
166,152
104,428
337,752

Pieces.
43,445
63,425
39,348
60,552
101,198
167,180
201,756
125,314
323,621

Pieces.
20,833
34,301
106,148
21,467
92,214

Pieces.
20,833
34,301
106,148
21,467
215,166

177,319
41,589
218,275

132,989
51,187
160,835

50,160
97,896
142,953

36,655
91,370
142,963

Pieces.
44,880

Pieces.
44,880

71,472
86,607

107,211
115,343

98,412
501,364

146,015
391,309

,

346

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
DEPOSITS, EARNINGS, AND EXPENDITURES, BY INSTITUTIONS.

The deposits, earnings (including seigniorage), and expenditures of
each office of the mint service during the fiscal year 1913, and the
number of employees in each, on July 1, 1913, are shown below:
N u m b e r of—
V a l u e of gold
a n d silver
deposit.

Institution.
Depos- R e d e its.
posits.
Phhadelphla
S a n Francisco
Denver
New York
N e w Orleans
Carson City
Boise
Helena
Charlotte
Deadwood
Seattle
Salt L a k e C i t y
Total

4,622
7,780
3,723
13,324
596
891
. 957
669
143
426
1,558
300

184
90
1,248
171

34,989

1,693

Earnings.

$12,926,883.73 $3,648,421.97
517,707.11
55,152,050.60
37,645,870.86 1,283,418.78
67,374,598.71
190,141.71
956,607.73
5,250.70
735,085.95
3,072.10
1,022,087:29
3,908.21
1,521,620.87
6,438.97
29,428.30
1,107.70
7,388,284.97
13,208.24
4,976,444.91
10,875.19
600,632.02
1,761.69
190,329,595.94

5,685,312.37

Freight on Employcoin a n d
ees J u l y
bullion.
1,1913.

Expenditures.!

$449,244.25
192,398.77
171,234.07
191,773.47
18,535.76
14,145.90
14,762.40
18,500.13
2,638.69
14,393.97
41,374.95
14,568.63

$5,211.40

1,143,560.79

23,^698.23

1,451.57
979.38
1,103.13
1,620.50
35.05
3,804.00
8,802.65
688.55

329
115
93
92
14
5
5
6
5
19
4
687

1 Includes freight on shipments of coin and bullion between mints and assay oflices.
OPERATIONS

OF

THE

MELTER AND REFINERS
FISCAL YEAR 1913.

AND

THE

COINERS,

The quantity of metals operated upon in the different departments
of the mints and assay office at New York during the fiscal year 1913
aggregated 13,001,515 fine ounces of gold and 12,210,488 fine ounces
of sUver. There were also operated upon at the coiaage mints
68,718,751 ounces of minor coinage metal. The figures in the table
following are the actual figures as obtained at the settlements of the
accounts:
GOLD.

Institution and
department.

Philadelphia l i m t :
M e l t m g a n d refining.
Coining
San Francisco M m t :
M e l t m g a n d refining.
Coining
Denver Mint:
Melting a n d refining.
Coining
N e w Y o r k assay office:
Melting a n d refining.

Amount
delivered b y
superhitendent.

Amount
r e t u r n e d to
superintendent.

Amount
operated
upon.

PerW a s t - centage
of good
age
coin
per
pro1,000
Surplus. W a s t a g e . ounces d u c e d
to
operaamount
operaupon.
ted
upon.

F i n e ozs. F i n e ozs
F i n e ozs.
F i n e ozs.
F i n e ozs.
64.078
1,993,067.302 1,993,003.226 2,086,745.994
13.745
2,004,344.823 2,004,331.078 2,003,532.151
5,962,127.786 5,962,510.146 1,965,563.084
428,214.330
1,136,212.128 1,136,221.981

382.359
9.833
26.528
1.702

0.010
0.003

4,154,529.661 4,153,868.891 3,617,503.763

662.870

0.183

382.359
9.833

753.474
15.447

18,588,168.134 18,687,789.505 13,001,514.881

392.192

768.921




47.51
52.64

2,604,649.997 2,604,623.469 2,464,865.743
733,234.437
733,232.736
455,089.816

Total:
Melting a n d refining. 14,714 374. 746 14,714,003.731 10,114,678.584
Coining
3,873,791.388 3,873,785.774 2,886,836.297
Grand total

0.031
0.006

62.17

347

DIRECTOR OF T H E M I N T .
SILVER.

Institution and
department.

Philadelphia Mint:
Melting and refining.
Coining
San Francisco Mint:
Melting and refining.
Coining
Denver Mmt:
Melting and refining.
Coining
New York assay office:
Melting and refining.

Amount
dehvered by
superintendent.

Amount
returned to
superintendent.

Fine ozs.
Fine ozs.
1,818,143.58 •1,818,393.16
2,091,167.17 2,091,146.86

Amount
operated
upon.

PerWast- centage
of good
age
coin
per
pro1,000
Surplus. Wastage. ounces duced
to
operaamount
ted
upon. operated
upon.

Fine ozs:- Fine ozs. Fine ozs.
1,013,263.95
355.46
20.31
2,088,649.03

0.009

67.02

0.146

56.13
65.30

2,099,901.96
1,237,830.57

2,103,975.92
1,237,664.51

1,476,238.28 4,073.96
1,135,638.48

1,984,988.49
1,328,873.75

1,966,020.79
1,326,482.95

2,511,259.54 1,032.50
1,218,179.03

390.80

0.320

3,254,406.01

3,251,928.48

2,767,259.36

2,477.53

0.895

Total:
Melting and refining. 9,137,440.04
Coining
4,666,871.49

9,140,318.35
4,655,294.32

7,768,021.13 5,461.92
4,442,486.54

2,477.53
577.17

13,793,311.63 13,795,612.67 12,210,487.67 5,461.92

3,054.70

Grand total

166.06

NICKEL.
Philadelphia Mint:
M e l t m g a n d refining
Coining
S a n Francisco M i n t :
Melting a n d refining.
Coining
Denver Mint:
Melting a n d refining.
Coining

Tray ounces. Troy ounces. Troy ounces. Troy ozs. Troy ozs.
13,002,984.09 12,959,911.09 12,907,842.69
43,070.00
13,593,668.90 13,580,106.70 13,580,819.70
13,562.20

3.337
0.998

51.77

488,204. 79
687,962.10

811,686.11
686,802.28

714,819.41
687,962.10

1,460.85
1,159.82

2.074
1.688

3,823,709.48
2,577,803.60

3,812,299.68
2,674,510.40

2,485,144.30
2,547,803.10

11,409.80
3,293.10

4.591
1.292

67.23

Total:
Melting a n d refining. 17,314,898.36 17,583,896.88 16,107,806.40
Coining
16,859,434.50 16,841,419.38 16,816,584.90

55,940.65
18,015.12

47,240.62
4,727.69

3.793
0.297

60.26
68.44
'75.'26

Grand total

34,174,332. {

34,425,316.26 32,924,391.30

73,955.77

BRONZE.
Phhadelphla Mint:
Melting a n d refining.
Coining
San Francisco M i n t :
Melting a n d refining.
Coining
Denver Mint:
Melting a n d refining.
Coining

14,697,962.63 14,650, 722.01 12,454,302. 73
15,885,714.74 15,880, 987.05 15,879,082.04
3,394,625.54
2,302,862.00

3,021, 496.04
2,301, 443.28

2,321,583.31
2,174,068.80

9,289.75
1,418.72

3.993
0.653

1,983,737.83
1,626,255.70

1,975, 670.93
1,625, 797.20

1,506,614.60
1,458,708.60

8,166.90
458.50

5.422
0.314

Total:
Melting a n d refining. 20,076,326.00 19,647, 788.98 16,282,500.64
Coining
19,814,832.44 19,808, 227.63 19,511,869.44

64,677.27
6,604.91

Grand total

39,891,158.44 39,458,018. 61 35,794,360.08'




71,282.18

348

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

WASTAGE AND LOSS ON SALE OF SWEEPS AND GAINS FROM OPERATIONS.

The value of the precious metals wasted in the metallurgical and
mechanical departments was $17,744.86. A loss of $7,0.32.61 occurred
from the difference between the assay value of the bullion contained
in sweeps sold and the amount received for the same, as described in
the following table:
Mint at—
Items.

Philadelphia.

Gold wastage of melting and refining department.
Silver wastage of melting and refining department
Gold wastage of coining"department" .. .^
Silver wastage of coining department
Loss on sale of sweeps
.

San
Francisco.

Assay office at
NewYork.
Denver.

Total.

1,311.60

2,468.83

19,079.62

24,777.47

1,917.52

l,3n.60

2,468.83

16,988.10
2,111.42

22,666.05
2,111.42

1,917.52

Total

$98.50
1,213.10

$13,702.74 $16,575.69
1,443.22 1,506.77
319.30
232. 36
343. L
O
1,852. 91 "'3,"933.'56' 7,032.61

1,917.52

Total
Paid as foUows:
From contingent appropriation
Frnm parting anri refining appropri ation

$1,324.57
63.55
284.12
12.24
233.04

1,311.60

2,468. 83

19,079.52

24,777.47

$548.38

35. is

The gains from operations in bullion during the fiscal year 1913
amounted to $115,180.02, as follows:
Character of gains.

Amount.

• Surplus bulhon recovered by the operative officers
Value of deposit melting room grains and sweeps
'
Net gains on bulhon shipped from assay offices to mints for coinage
Gain on hght weight-gold coin purchased for recoinage
,
Receipts from the sale of by-products
,

$11,359.86
33,279.15
739.27
68.71
69,736.03

Total

116,180.02

Deducting the wastage and loss. $33,144.14, from the gains, $115,180.02, gives a net gain from bulhon operation durmg the fiscal year 1913 of $82,035.88.

Receipts and disposition of gold bullion, fiscal year 1913.
Deposited.
Institution.
Deposits.

Philadelphia
San Francisco
Denver
New* York
New Orleans
Carson
Helena....
Boise
Charlotte
Deadwood
Seattle
Salt Lake City
Total




$1,787,275.88
54,104,136.11
21,068,164.73
66,195,661.80
941,005. 21
724,617. 20
1,495,670. 25
1,007.332.06
29,187.77
7,290,751.45
4,951,634.71
595,352. 65
160,190,658.82

Surplus
Uncm-rent
bulhon
United States . recovered.
coin transferred for
recoinage.

Redeposited
receipts from
mints and
assay offices.

Total.

$904,295.23

$2,351.18
4,061.51
6,340.04
5,211.22
636.91
364.69
162. 41
714.08
103. 76
197.27
458.87
167.36

10,041,911.61
831,380.98
15,998,911.00
1,073,938.48

$12,735,833.90
64,939,577.60
37,073,405.77
67,274,811.48
941,542.12
724,881.89
1,496,832. 66
1,008,046.14
29,271.63
7,290,948. 72
4,952,093.58
595,520.01

904,295.23

20,669.30

27,948,142.05

189,061,765.40

"
"

349

DIRECTOR OF THE M I N T .

The disposition of gold buUion contained in the above table is as
follows:
Institution.

Bars paid
depositoi-s.

Shipment
to mint
for coinage.

Sold i n
sweeps.

Bars
exchanged
for coin.

Coinage.

Wastage.

Total.

$947. 29 $5,711,031.89 $19,678,227.50 $1,608.69 $25,629,297.48
P h i l a d e l p h i a . . . . $237,482.11
4,905,089.04
206,596.53 4,660,000.00
20,226. 47
18,266.04
San F r a n c i s c o . . .
5,720,000.00 1,513.90 5,745,059. 83
18,567.24
4,978.69
Denver
"NJftw "Vovlc
3,873,693.93 $10,040,127.92 30,392.19 71,560,303.81
85,604,517.85
18,348.80 1,037,132. 37
1,053,479.17
746,602. 81
746,802.81
Cai'son
Helena
1,584,653.59
1,584,653.59
15.32 1,046,037.88
1,046,032.56
Boise
Charlotte
11.28
29 271.53
29,270.25
7,500,438.11
Deadwood
7,500,438.11
5,212,988.16
5,212,988.16
Seattle
650,940.42
Salt L a k e C i t y . .
650,940.42
Total

4,166,316.56 27,848,186.19 54,584.21 77,477,932.23 30,058,227. 50 3,129.19 139,608,375.87

1 Loss in mass melts.
BALANCES, RECEIPTS, AND DISBURSEMENTS.

Balances of gold buUion on hand June 30, 1912, and receipts,
disbursements, and balances, June 30, 1913, at the mints and assay
offices are shown in the following table:
Institution.

Phhadelphla .
S a n Francisco
Denver
New York
N e w Orleans
Carson
Helena
Boise
Charlotte
Deadwood
Seattle
Salt L a k e C i t y
Total

R e c e i p t s during t h e fiscal
year 1913.

Total.

Dlsbm-sements
d u r i n g fiscal
year 1913.

$32,352,332.29
139,119,789.19
87,368,174. 99
109,877,207.90
1,068,019.29
747,095.59
1,585,416.57
1,045,137.93
29,271.53
7,525,767.13
5,213,996.58
651,598.41

$26,629,297.48
4,905,089.04
5,745,059.83
85,504,517.85
1,053,479.17
746,602 81
1,584,653.59
1,046,037.88
29,271.53
7,500,438.11
•5,212,988.16
660,940.42

$6,723,034.81
134,214,700.15
"81,823,115.16
24,372,690.05
12,540.12
492 78
762 98
100 05

234,818. 41
281,903.00
55,997.36

$12,735,833.90
54,939,577.60
37,073,405.77
67,274,811.48
941,542.12
724,881.89
1,495,832.66
1,008,046.14
29,271.53
7,290,948.72
4,952,093.58
595,601.05

197,519,960.96

189,061,846.44

386,581,807.40

139,608,375.87

246,973,350.49

B a l a n c e on
J u n e 30, 1912.

$19,618,498.39
84,180,211. 69
50,294,769. 22
42,602,398. 42
124,477.17
22,213. 70
89,583.91
37,091. 79

B a l a n c e on
J u n e 30, 1913.

24,329. 02
1,008.42
• 676 95

LABORATORY OF THE BUREAU OF THE MINT.

From the coinage of the calendar year 1912 the assayer of this
bureau tested 170 gold and 378 silver coins, aU of which were found
within the legal requirements as to weight and fineness.
I n the gold coins the greatest deviation above standard (the legal
limit being 1 point above or below) was 0.5 and below, 0.6.
The greatest deviation of silver coins above standard (the legal
limit being 3 points above or below) was 1.3 and below, 1.3.




350

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The following table summarizes these assays:
Denver.

Phhadelphla.

San Francisco.

Total.

Fineness. •
Gold, c Shver.
898.7
.9
899.1
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
900.0
.1
.2
.3
4
.5
7
.9
901.1
3

3
3
12
19
30
32
,23
16
2
2
2

...

Total
. '
Average fineness

Shver.

Gold.

Shver.

1
2
10
15

-.

. .

Gold.

144
' 899.96

1
4

29

13

46

4

47

14

44

15

20

13

15

15
2
1
2

7
4
1

Gold.

5
6

234
899. 95

None.

76
900.11

1
1
2
4
5
7
5
1

1
1

1
4
5
16
24
37
37
24
16
2
2
2

6
9
13
11

2
26
899.82

68
900.21

170
899.89

Silver.
1
2
12
20
47
59
74
70
48
27
12
2
4
378
900.09

Besides the coins tabulated above, two coins from the Philadelphia
Mint on repeated assays showed wide variations, but within the limits
above stated, in the composition of the metal within the coin. Twenty
additional assays were made on this lot. There were also examined
32 Philippine silver coins from the San Francisco Mint, which were
found to be within the legal requirements as to weight and fineness.
PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASSAY COMMISSION, 1913.

The following-named gentlemen were designated as commissioners
to test and examine the weight and fineness of the coins reserved at
the several mints during the calendar year 1912 pursuant to the provisions of section 3547 of the Revised Statutes:
Dr. R. C. Benner, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Mr. Judson Brenner, De Kalb,
IU.; Hon. Theo. Davidson, Asheville, N . C ; Mr. George M. Eckels,
Chicago, 111.; Mr. L. A. Fischer, Bureau of Standards, Washington,
D. C.; Mr. Charles R. Fitzpatrick, Warrenton, Ga.; Mr. WiUiam F .
Gibson, St. Anthony, Idaho; Mr. A. J. Hazeltine, Warren, Pa.; Hon.
James H . Manning, Albany, N. Y.; Mr. W. H . Starr, Decatur, 111.;
Mr. Robert A. Roos, San Francisco, Cal.; Dr. Owen Louis Shinn,
PhUadelphia, Pa.; Mr. Albert L. Smith, Helena, Mont.; Mr. Joseph
W. Smith, Philadelphia, Pa.; Mr. Ambrose Swasey, Cleveland, Ohio;
Mr. George Vaux, jr., Bryn Mawr, P a . ; Col. Richard J. Woods, Sioux
Falls, S. Dak.; Mr. Addison B. Colvin, Glens Falls, N . Y.
The commission met at the mint at Philadelphia on February 12,
1913, and Hon. James H . Manning was elected chairman.
The following committees were appointed by the chairman with the
approval of the commission:
Committee on counting.—Mr. Hazeltine, chairman; Messrs. Eckels,
Gibson, J. W. Smith, Starr, and Fitzpatrick.
Committee on weighing.—Mr. Fischer, chairman; Messrs. Brenner
and Vaux.




351

DIRECTOR OF THE M I N T .

Committee on assaying.—Dr. Shinn, chairman; Messrs. Comings,
Davidson, A. L. Smith, and Swasey.
The committee on counting reported that the packages containing
the pieces reserved by the several mints for the trial of coins were
delivered to them, and that they were compared with the transcripts
kept by the Director of the Mint and found to°be correct. After
verification the coins were delivered to the committees on weighing
and assaying.
The coins reserved by the mints for the purposes of the assay commission were as follows:
Gold.

Shver.

Institutions.
Pieces.
Philadelphia
Denver
San Francisco:
United States coin
Philippine Islands coin

Value.

1,969 $12,657.50
692

4,960.00

Pieces.

Value.

12,688
7,031

$1,910.10
1,163.60

2,749
1,222

602.00

The committee on weighing reported that the working standards
of the mint were compared with the standards in the possession of
the mint which were certified to by the Bureau of Standards, test
No. 9502, September 15, 1911. The 10-ounce and the 20-ounce
weights were found to be correct to within 1 part in 250,000; the
30-ounce and 40-ounce weights were found to be correct to within
1 part in 150,000. The other weights, bothlarger and smaUer, were
all found to be correct to within 1 part in 100,000. The peso, 50centavo, 20-centavo, and 10-centavo weights used in testing the
Philippine coins were tested by comparison with the standards of
the mint which had been verified by the Bureau of Standards, and
the deviations from the statutory standard weights of the coins examined were aU within the legal limit of tolerance.
The committee on assaying reported receivuig and making assays
of coins reserved from the mints at PhUadelphia, San Francisco, and
Denver, representing the deliveries made by the coiners to the superintendents during the calendar year 1912.
The highest assay value of the gold coinage at the different mints
(the limit of tolerance beiag one one-thousandth) is at—
Philadelphia
San Francisco

900.3
900.3

The lowest assay value of the gold coinage at the different mints
(the limit of tolerance being one one-thousandth) is at—
Philadelphia
San Francisco

899.7
899.7

The highest assay value of the sUver coinage at the diSferent mints
(the limit of tolerance being three one-thousandths) is at—
Philadelphia
San Francisco
Denver

900.9
901.1
901.1

The lowest assay value of the sUver coinage at the different mints
(the limit of tolerance being three one-thousandths) is at—
Philadelphia
San Francisco
Denver




898.6
899.1
899.1

352

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The highest assay value of the PhUippine sUver coinage is at—^
San Francisco (pesos)
San Francisco (subsidiary).,

.'

801.1
760.0

,

The lowest assay value of the PhUippine silver coinage is at—
San Francisco (pesos)
San Francisco (subsidiary)...".

.*

799.6
748.8

The committee also tested the quartation sUver and found it free
from gold, and the lead used in the assay of the gold buUion and
found it free from gold and silver. The acid used in the humid
assay of silver was found to be free from silver and also from chlorine.
The balances used were tested and found to be correct.
The committee therefore deem the assays exhibited in the accompanying schedules to be entirely trustworthy.
COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS.

Mr. Eckels, chairman, submitted the report of the committee on
resolutions, which was unanimously adopted, as foUows:
Whereas the interest i n t h e national coin collection in the m i n t at Philadelphia is
rapidly increasing because of its educational and historical value; and
Whereas t h e collection is annually visited by thousands who are anxious to secure a
souvenir of t h e m i n t ; and
Whereas i n t h e near future t h e United States will consummate one of the greatest
engineering projects of the world's history in completing the canal across the Isthmus
of Panama: Now, therefore be i t
Resolved, First. That the annual assay commission of 1913 hereby renews the recommendations of. prior commissions with reference to the maintenance and increase
of the national coin collection <at the Philadelphia Mint.
Second. T h a t t h e commission recommends t h a t an official souvenir m i n t medal of
typical and characteristic design be struck, to be sold at a moderate price, and that the
proceeds from such sales be devoted exclusively to the extension of the collection
under the supervision of the Secretary of the Treasury.
Third. T h a t t h e commission further recommends t h a t a suitable medal be struck to
commemorate t h e opening of the Panama Canal. Be i t further
Resolved, That t h e thanks of the commission be heartily tendered to Hon. George
E . Roberts, Director of the Mint, Mr. J. W. Sheetz, and to the yarious officials and
employees of the m i n t for^heir uniform courtesies extended during the session,
Kespectfully submitted.
'.
GEORGE M . E C K E L S ,

Chairman.
JUDSON B R E N N E R .

MOVEMENT OF GOLD FROM THE PORT OF N E W YORK.

The superintendent of the United States assay office at New York
has prepared the following table, giving exports of gold through the
port of ivTew York:




DIRECTOR OF T H E

353

MINT.

Statement of United States gold coin and gold bullion exported from the port of New York
to Europe during thefiscal year erided June 30, 1913.

1912.
July 1
15
A u g . 12
13
Sept. 9

Amount.

Country.

Date.

France
do
Netherlands
do
do
do

$2,012,119
2,091,825
600
600
500
500

,
.

1913.
Jan.
8 France
.. .
do
11
15 . . . do
do
17
20 . . . d o
do
31
do
Feb
3
do
Mar. 7
7 Belgium
8
do
8 Netherlands
12 F r a n c e
14
do
15 G e r m a n y
do .
18
19 . . . d o
.
A p r . 25 B e l g i u m .
May 5 France
. . . . do
9
do
14 . . . . dOi
do
15
21
do
.
June 6 Belgium. .

i

-

.>
.

-.--.

-

2,023,288
1,012,093
2,060,448
2,018,206
2,031,352
989,426
1,063,516
2,045,617
500,000
220,053
250,000
2,040,753
2,007,702
714,000
2,001,969
4,046,032
220,499
2,027,610
2,014,608
2,007,471
2,024,202
2,014,064
2,022,185
220,492

R a t e of
exchange.

•

$4.8720
4.8735'
4.8740
4.8725
4.8720
4.8720
4.8610
4.8700
4.8700
4.8730
4.8740
4.8725
4.8735
4.8790
4.8790
4.8790
4.8790
4.8760
4.8695
4.8710
4.8710
4.8780
4.8675
4,8675
4.8660
4.8610
4.8640
4.8630
4,8650
4.8690

41,670,529

Total

Recapitulation of gold exports to Europe.

Classification.

U n i t e d States coin
Bullion

.

Germany.

France.

$714,000 $39,543,485

Total

714,000

39,543,485

Belgium.

Netherlands.

$600,000
661,044

$252,000

1,161,044

252,000

Grand total of exports to Europe
$41,670,529
During the same period there were shipped to West Indies, Mexico, Central and South
America, etc., the followiag:
United States coin
$23,835,353
Foreign coin
689,572
Total gold exports to other ports

24,524,925

Grand total of gold exports

66,195,454

The imports during the same period were as follows:
From Europe:
United States coin
Foreign coin
Foreign bullion
Bullion In ore

$1,168,453
640,931
9,572,477
7,288

Total gold Imports from Europe
From other ports (West Indies, Central and South America, Cuba, etc.):
United States coin
Foreign coin
Foreign bullion
Bullion In ore

1,058,712
978,504
17,735,052
121,218

$11,387,149

Total gold Imports from other ports.

19,893,486

Grand total of gold imports

31,280,635

.16726°—FI 1913




23

354

REPORT

NET

EXPORTS,

ON

THE. FINANCES.

UNITED

STATES

GOLD

COIN.

The net exports of United States gold coin since 1870 were as
follows:
Imports and exports of United States gold coin since 1870.
Fiscal y e a r s .

Imports.

J a n . 1 t o J u n e 30—
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882.
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887.
1888
1889.
1890
1891
1892
1893

\
0)
$7,325,783
3,654,859
18,207,559
7,577,422
4,796,630
8,112,265
3,824,962
3,362,090
1,687,231
5,862, 609
5,181, 513
1,403,819
1,949,552
2,824,146
15^432,443
6,074,899

Exports.

Fiscal years.

$12,768,501
55,491,719
40,391,357
35,861,863
28,766,943
59,309, 770
27,542,861
21,274,565
6,427,251
4,120,311
1,687,973
1,741,364
29,805,289
4,802,454
12,242.021
2,345,809
5,400,970
3,550,770
3,211,399
4,143,939
3,951,738
67,704,900
42,841,963.
101,844,087

J a n . I t o J u n e 30—
Continued..
1894
1895 . . .
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903 . . .
1904
.1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911 .
1912
1913
Total
N e t exports'.

Imports.

Exports.

$30,790,892
10,752,673
10,189,614
57,728,797
40,593,495
7,779,123
8,659,850
3,311,105
3,870,320
1,519,758
5,780,607
2,236,399
35,251,921
44,446,402
44,929,518
4,642,690
2,060,563
6,041,648
8,283,968
13,941,240

$64,303,840
55,096,639
77,789,892
23,646,535
8,402,216
27,419,737
30,674,511
8,425,947
9,370,841
18,041,660
15,682,424
54,409,014
20,573,572
22,632,283
28,246,170
66,126,869
86,329,314
20,651,276
25,877,378
34,238,021

438,067,067

1,274,787,960
836,700,893

1 Imports of United States gold coin not separately given prior to the fiscal year 1878.
STOCK

OF

MONEY

IN

THE

UNITED

STATES.

On June 30, 1913, the stock of domestic coins in the United States
wa3 $2,363,115,066, as shown by the following table:
OffiMal table of stock of coin in the United States June 30, 1913.
Items.
E s t i m a t e d stock of coin, J u n e 30,1912
N e t i m p o r t s U n i t e d S t a t e s coin, fiscal y e a r 1913
Coinaee fiscal v e a r 1913 . . . .

Gold.
;..

Total
Less:
U n i t e d S t a t e s coin m e l t e d for recoinage (face v a l u e ) . .
U n i t e d S t a t e s coin e s t i m a t e d t o h a v e b e e n u s e d i n
arts
N e t e x p o r t s U n i t e d S t a t e s coin, fiscalyear 1913
Total
E s t i m a t e d stock of coin In t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s , J u n e 30,
1913.. . . •

$1,615,248,998

Silver.

TotaL

30,058,228

$738,866,225
1,668,707
3,448,382

$2,354,115,223
1,668,707
33,506,590

1,845,307,228

743,983,294

2,389,290,520

1,864,638

414,035

2,278,673

3,500,000
20,296,781

100,000

3,600,000
20,296,781

25,661,419

514,035

28,175,454

1,619,645,807

743,489,259

2,363,115,066

NQTE.^The number of standard silver dollars coined to June 30, 1913, was 570,272,610, which, added to
the Hawaiian dollar coinage, 500,000, plus the number-imported from the Philippine Islands, 150,000, and
the number ret^rnedan Government transports, 496,859, equals 571,419,469. Since July 1,1898, the number
of standard silver dollars exported in transports has been 2,495,000; and since 1883 the number melted to
June 30,1913, has been 196,085 (see Report of the Director of the Mint, 1913); and the number of Hawaiian
dollars melted to June 30,1913, has been 455,141, a total disposition of 3,148,206. leaving in the UnitedStates
on June 30,1913,568,273,263 standard silver dollars and 175,195;996 dollars In subsidiary silver coins.




355

DIRECTOR OF T H E M I N T .
Bullion i n mints and assay offices, June 30, 1913.
Bullion.
Gold
Silver

, .

-

-- -

Value.
$246,973,360
2,116,705

-

Total

249,090,065

Metallic stock June 30, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, and 1913.
J u n e 30,1908. J u n e 30,1909. J u n e 30,1910. J u n e 30,1911. J u n e 30,1912. J u n e 30,1913.

Coin a n d bullion.

$1,615,140,575 $1,640,567,131 $1,635,424,513 $1,753,134,114 $1,812,866,241 $1,866,619,167
727,078,304
723,694,695
733,250,073
732,002,448
741,184,095
745,585,964

Gold
• Silver

2,338,735,170 2,373,817,204 2,362,502,817 2,485,136,562 2,654,040,336

Total

2,612,205,121

Ownership of gold and silver i n the United States, June 30, 1913.
Silver coin a n d bullion.
Ownership.

Gold coin
a n d bullion.

SHver
dollars.

Subsidi a r y coin.

Silver
bullion. •

Total
silver.

T o t a l gold
a n d silver
coin a n d
bullion.

; U n i t e d S t a t e s T r e a s u r y (free) — $254,220,648 $27,017,478 $20,737,926 $2,116,706 $49,872,109 $304,092,757
• U n i t e d S t a t e s T r e a s u r y (for certiflcates o u t s t a n d i n g )
. . , 1,003,997,709 469,128,592
469,128,592 1,473,126,301
33,909,334
N a t i o n a l b a n k s ( J u n e 4 , 1 9 1 3 ) . . . . 143,762,659 13,720,873 20,188,461
177,671,993
N a t i o n a l b a n k s (for clearing89,443,500
i house certificates)
89,443,600
192,675,929
567,870,670
' P r i v a t e b a n k s a n d i n d i v i d u a l s . . 375,194,641 58,406,320 134,269,609
Total

1,866,619,157 668,273,263 176,196,996 2,116,705 745,585,964 2,612,205,121

..

Location of moneys of Uniteci States June 30, 1913.

Money.

I n Treasury.

I n National
banks
J u n e 4,1913.

In.other banks
a n d In
circulation.

Total.

METALLIC.

Gold bullion
Silver bullion
Gold coin
Silver dollars
S u b s i d i a r v silver coin
T o t a l metallic

$246,973,350
2,116,705
1,011,245,007
496,146,070
20,737,926

1 $233,206,159
13,720,873
20,188,461

$375,194,641
58,406,320
134,269,609

$246,973,350
2,116,705
1,619,645,807
568,273,263
175,196,996

1,777,219,068

267,115,493

667,870,570

2,612,205,121

9,465,836
3,330
43,403,670

189,908,013
2 63,106,604

147,307,167
2,656,670
662,647,632

346,681,016
2,660,000
759,157,906
1,108,498,922

^ PAPER. 0

Legal-tender notes (old Issue)
Legal-tender notes ( a c t J u l y 14,1910)
N a t i o n a l b a n k notes
T o t a l notes

52,872,836

263,014,617

802,611,489

Gold certificates
Silver certificates

82,949,460
14,421,408

277,813,310
133,339,825

726,184,399
335,788,767

97,370,868

411,153,135

1,061,973,166

1,927,462,762

931,283,245

2,432,455,206

T o t a l certificates
G r a n d total

1 Includes $89,443,500 gold clearing-house certificates.
2 Includes $11,667,796 of their own, held by different national banks.




3,720,704,043

356

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Estimated stock of gold and silver in the United States and the amount per capita at .the close
of each fiscal year since 1873.
T o t a l stock of coin a n d bullion.
Fiscal y e a r e n d e d J u n e 30—

Gold.

41,677,000
42, 798,000
43,951,000
45,137,000
48,353,000
47,598, 000
48,886,000
50,155, 783
51,318,000
52,496,000
53,693,000
54,911, 000
56,148,000
57,404,000
58,680, 000
69,974,000
61,289,000
62,622, 250
63,975,000
66,520,000
68,946,000
68,397,000
69,878,000
71,390,000
72,937,000
74,622,000
76,148,000
76,891,000
77,764,000
79,117,000
80,847,000
81,887,000
83,259,000
84,662,000
86,074,000
87,498,000
88,926,000
90,363,000
93,983,000
95,666,000
97,337,000

1873.
1874.
1875.
1876.
1877.
1878.
1879.
1880.
1881.
1882.
1883.
1884.
1886.
1886.
1887.
1888.
1889.
1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.
1896.
1896.
1897.
1898.
1899.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907;
1908.
1909,
1910;
1911.
1912.
1913.

Per capita.

Population.

$136,000,000
,379,493
147,
,134,906
121,
,058,907
130,
,501,472
167,
,199,977
213,
.741,837
246,
351,841,206
478,484, 538
508,767,715
542,732,063
546,500,797
588,697,038
590,774,461
654,620,336
705,818,865
680,063.505
695,563,029
646,582,862
,275,336
664,
597,897,885
627,293, 201
636,229,825
599,597,964
,270,542
696,
861,514,780
982,866.506
1,034,439,264
1,124,662,818
1,192,395,607
1,249,552,758
1,327,872,672
1,357,881,188
1,472,995,209
1,466,056,632
.140,676
1,615,
,
1,640, 667,131
1,635,424,513
,
1,753, 134,114
,866,241
1,812,
,619,167
1,866,

SUver.

$8,149,305
10,365,478
19,367,995
36,416,992
56,464,427
88,047,907
117,526,341
148,522, 678
175,384,144
203,217,124
233,007,986
265,568,142
283,478,788
312,252,844
362,993,586
386,611,108
420,648,929
483,211,919
622,277, 740
570,313,544
616,861,484
624,347, 757
625,854, 949
628,728,071
634,509, 781
637,672,743
639,288,743
647,371,030
661,206,403
670,540,106
677,448, 933
682,383,277
686,401,168
687,958,920
705,330,224
723,594,595
733,260,073
727,078,304
732,002,448
741,184,095
745,585,964

Gold.

Silver.

$3.23
3.44
2.76
2.88
3.61
4.47
5.02
7.01
9.32
9.86
10.10
9.93
10.48
10. 29
11.16
11.76
11.09
11.10
10.10
10.16
8:93
9.18
9.10
8.40
9.56
11.56
12.64
13.45
14.47
16.07
15.45
16.22
16.31
17.40
17.03
18.46
18.45
18.10
18.65
18.95
19.17

STANDARD S I L V E R DOLLARS U S E D I N S U B S I D I A R Y , S I L V E R

$0.15
.24
.44
.81
1.21
1.86
2.40
2.96
3.41
3.87
4.34
4.65
6.05
5.44
6.00
6.44
6.86
7.39
8.16
8.70
9.20
9.13
8.97
8.81
8.70
8.56
8.40
8.42
8.60
8.48
8.38
8.33
8.24
8.12
8.20
8.27
8.26
8.05
7.79
7.75
7.66

Total
metallic.
$3.38
3.68
3.19
3.69
4.82
6.32
7.42
9.97
12.73
13.52
14.44
14.68
15.53
15.73
17.15
18.20
17.95
18.49
18.26
18.85
18.13
18.31
18.07
17.21
18.25
20.12
21.04
21.87
22.97
23.55
23.83
' 24.55
24.55
25.52
25.23
26.73
• 26.70
26.15
26.44
26.70
26.83

COINAGE.

There, were purchased as bullion and melted at the mints and
assay offices 4,757 mutilated silver dollars during the fiscal year 1913,
which were used in the manufacture of subsidary silver coin.
The following have been used since 1883:
Fiscal years. Amount.

Fiscal years. Amount.

$621 1891
1883 . . . . . .
1892
1884.....
1885
1,850 1893 .
1894
1886
.8,292- 1895 .
1887
14,055, 1898...'.
1888
31,042 1897.....
1899
. ,11,977 1 1898
1890




• $10,800
42,881
10,500
15,055
18,580
2,034
1,898
1,365

Fiscalyears. Amount.
1899
1900
1901.
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906

$1,734
1,341
1,786
1,893
1,777 !
1,304
2,298
909

0 .

Fiscal years.

1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

Amount.
$1,548
1,170
1,293
961
1,320
1,024
4,757

Total...

196,065

DIRECTOR OF T H E

357

MINT.

RECOINAGE OF UNCURRENT UNITED STATES SILVER COIN.

The table following shows the face value of abraded subsidiary
coin transferred and purchased for recoinage, the amount of new
coin made therefrom, and the loss since 1891:
Fiscal years.

1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1898
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913

Face value.

V a l u e of n e w
coin p r o d u c e d .

Loss.

$910,046.69
.7,118,602.78
7,818,198.25
7,184,472.17
4,361,781.36
4,627,141.48
3,197,998.50
0,109,772.32
8,584,304.28
5,261,070.35
3,832,280.69
3,333,437.06
3,008,747.98
2,828,384.90
1,964,476.11
1,414,963.90
1,142,184.00
1,162,982.08
977,321.23
814,361.57
583,538.44
678,457.94
414,035.30

...
..
Total

$48,366.28
180,716.76
236,908.87
259,719.12
199 940 03
249,883.06
149,136 86
289,813.16
485,819.08
310,981.39
219,259.10
191,889.02
178,857.27
172,280.69
125,258.87
92,129.63
77,367.61
78,290.12
65,020.83
55,686.02
38,999.35
44,356.00
26,008 93

77,128,539.32

..

$861,680.41
6,937,886.02
7,381,289.58
6,924,753.05
4,161,820.73
4,377,258.40
3,048,881.84
5,820,159.16
8,098,485.18
4,950,088.96
3,613,021.59
3,141,548.04
2,829,890.71
2,656,104.21
1,839,219.24
1,322,834.27
1,064,828.39
1,086,691.94
912,300.40
758,695.55
544,539.09
634,101.94
388,028.37
73,354,082.87

3,774,456.15

The loss on the recoinage of $1,863,637.50 in worn and uncurrent
gold coins was $16,757.58 and the net loss on the recoinage of
$414,035.30 in worn and uncurrent silver coins was $26,008.93.
: The Treasury was reimbursed from the appropriation for that purose the foUowing losses on uncurrent com transferred during the
seal year 1913 for recoinage:

E

UncmTent gold coins
Uncurrent silver coins
UncmTent minor coins

$148.43
28,000.75
8,170.36

Total

34,319.54
UNITED STATES GOLD IN CANADA.

The holdings of United States gold coin in the treasury of the
Dominion of Canada on December 31, 1912, was $98,648,736.50.
The holdings of United States gold coin of the chartered banks (25 in
number) on the same date aggregated $19,210,327.
The total amount of United States gold coin in Canadian reserves
on the foregoing date was, therefore, $117,859,063.50.




358

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Monetary systems and approximate stock of money in the aggregate
Stock of gold.
Countries.

United States
Austria-Hungary
Belgium
British Empire:
Australia
Canada
United Kingdom
India
South Africa
Straits Settlements«..
Bulgaria
Cuba5.:
Denmark
Egypt
Finland
France
Germany 8
Greece
Haiti
Italy
Japan
Korea (Chosen)
Mexico
Netherlands
Norway
Portugal
Roumania
Russia
Servia
Siam
South American States:
Argentina
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Ecuador
GuianaBritish
Dutch
French
Paraguay
Peru'.
Uruguay
Venezuela
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
Central American States.
Total.

Monetary Monetary unit.
standard.

Geld.
..do.
..do..

Dollar.
Crown.
Franc.

Popula- In banks
tion.
and pub- In circulic treas- lation.
uries.

Total.

ThouThousands.
sands.
96,500 1,494,600
49,400 245,900
7,500
41,400

385,000 1,879,500
294,500
48,600
61,400
20,000

4,600
162,900
7,200 1137,800
45,400 2 395,100
244,300 3 124,000

14,000
10,000
335,800
250,000

186,900
147,800
730,900
374,000

15,000

57,600

Thou-

Thousands.

.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do..
-do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
-do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do..

Pound sterling..
Dollar
Pound sterhng..
Pound sterhng
and rupee.
Pound sterhng..
Dollar
Lev
Peseta
Crown
Piaster
Markka
Franc
Mark
Drachma
Gourde
Lira
Yen
do
Peso
Florin
Crown
Escudos
Lei
Ruble
"....
Dinar
,
Tical

.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do..

Peso
BoUviano.
Milreis
Peso
Dollar
Sucre

7,200
2,300
17,300
3,400
5,200
1,300

281,400
7,800
125,500
500

281,400
7,800
125,500
500

2,300

2,300

Pound sterhng..
Florin
Franc
Peso
Sol
Peso
Bohvar
Peseta
Crown
Franc
Piaster
Peso

300
100
100
700
4,600
1,200
2,700
19,700
5,600
3,700
23,800
4,700

100
200
100

100
200
100

...do..
...do..
...do..
...do..

..do.....
..do
..do
..do
..do
..do
..do
..do
..do
..do
..do
Silver 10.

6,000
2,000
4,400
2,200
2,700
11,300
3,100
39,600
64,900
2,600
2,000
34,700
53,000
14,800
15,100
6,000
2,400
8,000
7,300
167,000
2,900
8,100

42,600
4,900
9,800
21,400
8,800
6,900
619,000
213,400
3,000
1,300
248,300
124,500
4,400
31,200
66,000
10,300
65,600
30,000
648,100
9,700
100

8,300
21,700
800
123,600
27,000
33,40014,900
1,800

4,900

181,200
3,700
581,000
650,000
2,000
2,100
17,700
7,000
6,100
8,200
2,100
354,100

3,900
2,600

3,200
11,600
127,500
100

9,800
30,000
21,400
6 190,000
10,600
171,200,000
863,400
5,000
3,400
248,300
142,200
4,400
31,200
73,000
16,400
73,800
32,100
1,000,200
9,700
100

12,200
21,700
3,300
123,600
30,200
45,000
142,400
1,900

1,016,900 5,408,300 3,042,400 8,480,700

NOTE.—The blank spaces in this table signify that no satisfactory Information is available. In some instances the amount of gold in banks and public treasuries is carried out as the total stock in the country,
although an unlaiown amount Is in circulation. The case of Italy Is an example of this. The per capita
circulation is based upon known amounts only. All estimates for stock of money tn circulation must be
accepted with reserve.
1 "Specie " includes subsidiary coin In banks.
* Estimates for the United Ejngdom prior to 1910 were for coin only; these figures include $100,000,000 for
bullion In banks.
3 Based on estimate of active rupee circulation by Accountant General of India in 1908.
* Includes Straits Settlements, Malay States, and Johore.
^ United States paper currency is legal tender and constitutes a considerable proportion of the circulation




359

DIRECTOR OF T H E M I N T .
and per capita in the principal countries of the world, Dec. 31,1912.
Stock Of silver.

Full tender.

Limited
tender.

Per capita.

Total.

Thousands.
368,300
Nil.
30,000

Thousands.
173,800
152,000
13,000

Thousands.
642,100
162,000
43,000

Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
3 850,000

10,000

10,000

lie'soo'

iie'soo'

46,000

890,000

20,000
6,900
4,800
600
7,900
15,800
500
63,700
261,700
3,000
1,500
1,400
57,800
3,900
4,000
29,000
3,700
33,100
12,600
78,800
1,300

20,000
6,900
4,800
500
7,900
16,800
600
411,100
261,700
3,000
2,600
24,100
67,800
3,900
56,000
29,000
3,700
33,100
12,600
78,800
1,300
37,100

Uncovered
paper.

Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
347,400
Nil.
Nil.
1,000
22,700
Nil.
Nil.
62,000
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
37,100
Nil
Njl.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.

9,400
700
25,000
8,500
2,100
1,300

9,400
700
25,000
8,500
2,100
1,300

Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
142,300
Nil.
2,600
Nil.
2,500

4,300
10,800
32,800
8,600
12,900
26,400
9,200

4,300
10,800
176,100
8,600
16,400
26,400
11,700

1,865,800

1,276,900

3,132,700

2,466

2,166"

Thousands.
781,600
279,400
14,400

94,'666'
115,200
45,400

5,'666'

9,900

is,'666'

7,000
14,900
325,800
261,600
20,800
8,200
182,300
101,400
8,000
51,200
59,200
9,900
89,900
52,000

4,'966'

3,000

234,600
2,000
174,700
19,000
9 10,000
2,400

466"

i,'i66'

800
94,600
26,600
29,600

ii5,"966'

Gold.

Silver.

19.48
5.96
8.18

5.61
3.07
6.73

36.28
20 62
16.10
1.63

2.17

9.60
2.45
2.23
13.63
7.92
16.81
3.42
30.30
13.30
1.92
1.70
7.15
2.68
.30
2.07
12.17
8.83
12.30
4.40
5.98
3.36
.01
39.08
3.39
7.26
.15
i.'77'

Paper.

7.89
5.65
1.92

32.98
14.68
15.83

•

1
2
3

•2! 54
.18

38.45
33 57
21.21
5.19

3.33
3.46
2.60
1.09
2.25
.22
2.92 ' " " ' 6 * 8 9 '
L39
.62
-.16
4.80
10.38
8.23
4.03
4.03
1.16
8.00
1.-25
4.10
.69
6.26
1.09
1.91
.26
.64
3.71
3.39
4.83
9.88
1.64
4.13
6.51
11.66
1.72
7.12
.47
.46
i'.m
4.62
.37

12.93
8.40
5.57
13.86
17.73
18.82
8.38
48.91
21.36
11.07
7.05
13.09
5.68
1.10
9.17
26.88
12.50
29.46
13.24
6 45
5.49
5.00

8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

72.96
4.56
18.79
8.24
2.32
4.62

30
31
32
33
34
35

.
.33
* 2.00
1.00
.67
' 3.17
22.68
5.61
19.96
11.69
24.32
7.09
27.55

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

2.'57'
3.48

1.30
.30
1.44
2.50
.40
1.00

13.65

32.58
.87
10.10
6.69
1.92
1.85

.33
2.00
1.00
2.65
18.08
1.22
6.27
6.60
12.16
5.98
.40

Total.

.'57'
.52
3." 58'
.92
4.00
.29
8.89
4.80
1.54
4.55
4.18
8.00
1.11
2.49 " " ' 2 4 . ' 6 6 '

4
5
6
7

3,234,200

6 Based upon a calculation by Messrs. P. Arminjon and B. Michel in 1908, who then estimated the stock
of gold at 33,000,000 to 41,000,000 Egyptian pounds. The mean of these figures was adopted. Since then
the net imports of Egypt, by customs records, have been $50,000,000, but the 1908 estimate has been changed
only to the extent of the Increase in bank holdings. I t does not seem probable that Egypt can have absorbed the amount of gold Indicated by the customs records.
7 Estimate of A. De Foville, 1909.
8 The figmes for the stock of gold in Germany are based upon an estimate by Dr. Arnold, a director of the
Reichsbank, of 3,000,000,000 marks in German coin in the country at the end of 1910. At the close of 1912
the Reichsbank held $80,284,892 in bullion and foreign coin.
9 This paper currency has been reduced to a gold basis at 100 pesos to the United States dollar.
10 Except Costa Rica and British Honduras (gold standard countries).




360

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
MONETARY STOCKS.

The. foregoing table is offered \vith the usual words of explanation
and caution. The footnotes should be carefully observed. The information is sought through the diplomatic representatives of the
United States at foreign capitals.
The figures for stock of money in banks and treasuries are usuaUy
from official sources, although for some of the smaUer countries it is
sometunes necessary to resort to financial journals. The figures for
the amount of money in circulat