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ANNUAL REPORT
01" THE

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY
TO

TTTFi

SECOND SESSION OF THE FIFTIETH CONGRESS
OP

THE UNITED STATES.

DECEMBER 1, 1888.

IN TWO VOLUMES.
VOLUME I.

WASHINGTON:
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.




1888.




TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
Document No. 1160, 3d ed.
Comptroller of the Currenqj.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.
REPORT.
Page.
Report submitted to Congress
1
Requirements of section 333, Revised Statutes of the United States, in detail, as to Comptroller's report
1
Summary of the state and condition of every national bank reporting during the year
2
Statement ot national banks closed during the year
.
_
3
Suggestions as to amendments to the laws by which the system may be improved, and effect of
laws regulating interstate commerce
4
State banks, saviDgs banks, private banks, and loan and trust companies
16
Resources, liabilities, aad condition thereof
18
Names and compensation of officers and cleiks iu the office of the Comptroller of the Currency
25
Organization and expenses of the office
26
Organization of national banks
27
Number, capital, bonds, and circulation of banks existing October 31,1887, and of those organized during the year
28
Increase or decrease
29-32
National-bank depositaries
32
Amount of bonds transferred from security for national-bank circulation to security for public
deposits
33
Bond purchases by the Treasury
34
Prices of United States registered bonds during the year . . ,
36
Comparative investment value of bonds
37
Increase and reduction of capital by national banks
37-39
Converted and original banks
39
National banks of primary organization, number in voluntary liquidation and number insolvent...!
41
Extension of corporate existence of national banks
42
Distribution of national-bank stock
43-47
Dissolution of national banks
48
Failed during the year
48
Causes of failure
49
Dividends paid to creditors of r i vent national banks during the year
53
Number, capital, and liability ..£ national banks, organized and failed, since establishment
of system
54
Amount paid to creditors r insolvent national banks
54
Amounts collected from isessments on shareholders
54
Inactive receivership
56
Circulating notes..56
1
Minimum of bor' required by going banks
57
Maximum circu ttion
57
Bonds deposited and minimum required, and percentage of excess deposited by banks organized since July 1,1882
57
Interest-bearing funded debt of the United States, and amount held by national banks
58
United States bonds of all classes held by the banks
59
Comparison of amounts for seven years
59
Decrease in national-bank circulation
60
Number and capital of national banks by geographical divisions, bonds deposited, minimum,
excess, and percentages
61
Changes in capital and circulation during past year
62




III

IV

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

Banks without circulation
Issues and redemptions during the year
Additional circulation on bonds
Issues of national-banknotes
Process of redemption of national-banknotes
Five per cent, redemption fund
Receipts and deliveries by national-bank redemption agency
Amount and mode of payment of national-bank notes redeemed
Redemption of circulation ot insolvent national banks
Lawful money deposited
National bank notes received for redemption by the Treasurer of the United States to date, and
amounts received during the past year
National-bank notes received monthly for redemption by the Comptroller of the Currency
Amount destroyed yearly since establishment of the system
Supervision of national banks
Violations of law
Loans upon security of real estate
Investment in bonds, stocks, and other securities
Deficient reserve
Excessive and unlawful dividends
Improper reduction of surplus
Reports of national banks
Compendium of capital, surplus, undivided profits, circulation, bonds, deposits, loans and discounts, specie, etc., 1866-1888
Classification of loans in reserve cities
In New York City for five years
Amount of reserve, and ratio of deposits, New York City, Chicago, Saint Louis, reserve cities,
and States and Territories
C leai ing-house transactions
Kinds of money and amount used in settlement of balances
New York Clearing-House transactions for thirty-five years
Clearing-house transactions of the assistant treasurer of the United States in New York
Comparative statements of clearing-houses in the United States
Increase and decrease in exchanges and balances of the clearing-houses of the United States.
Movement of reserve, weekly, in New York City
Duties, assessments, and redemption charges
Legal decisions construing statutes relating to national banks
Conclusion
^

Page.
62
62
63
64
64
64
65
67
68
69
69
70
70
71
71
71
72
72
72
73
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
79
80
80
81-83
84
84
85
96

APPENDIX.
Contents of digest of national-bank c a s e s . . . .
101
Digest
103
Digest of recent decisions in banking law
127
Estimated population of each State and Territory, aggregate capital, surplus, undivided profits,
and individual deposits of national aud other banks, J u n e 30, 1888, and per-capita avorages
of resources
139
Number of banks organized in liquidation and in operation, capital, bonds, circulation issued,
redeemed, and outstanding
140
National-bank currency issued, redeemed, and outstanding
141
Number and denominations of national-bank notes issued and redeemed
142
Increase or decrease of national-bank circulation
144
Additional circulation issued and lawful money deposited to retire circulation
145
National-bank notes outstanding, and lawful money on deposit with the Treasurer of the
United States
146
National banks in States, Territories, and reserve cities, their capital, minimum amount of
bonds required by law, bonds held, and circulation outstanding
147
National banks in each State, Territory, and reserve city with capital of $150,000 and under,
and increase or decrease during past year.
149
National banks in each State, Territory, and reserve city with capital exceeding $150,000, and
increase or decrease during past year
,
151
National banks in voluntary liquidation under sections 5220 and 5221 Revised Statutes
153-161
National banks in voluntary liquidation under sections 5220 and 5221 Revised Statutes for
the purpose of organizing new associations
162
National banks in liquidation under section 7 of the act of July 12, 1882
164




TABLE OF CONTENTS.

V

Page.
National banks in liquidation under section 7 of the act of July 12, 1882, succeeded by associations with the same or different title
165
National banks in the hands of receivers
166-179
Liabilities of national banks, and reserve required
180-197
Amount of each kind of coin held by the national banks
198
Earnings and dividends of national banks
202-211
Ratios of dividends and earnings to capital and to capital and surplus
212
Classification of loans and discounts of national banks
214
Clearings and balances of banks in New York City
215
Abstract of reports of condition of State banks, savings banks, private banks, loan and trust
companies, official and unofficial
216
Report of the condition of the National Savings Bank of the District of Columbia
238
Aggregate resources and liabilities of national banks from 1863 to 1888
239
Summary of the state and condition of national banks on dates of reports during past year ...
259
General index
331
Condition of each national bank at close of business October 4,1888
Vol. II

11028—CUR 88




II

REPORT
OF

THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY,
Washington, December 1, 1888.

SIR : In obedience to law, I have the honor to submit a report for the
year ending October 31, 1888, exhibiting—
irirst. A summary of the state and condition of every association from
which reports have been received the preceding year, at the several
dates to which such reports refer, with an abstract of the whole amount
of banking; capital returned by them, of the whole amount ot their debts
and liabilities, the amount of circulating notes outstanding, and the
total amount of means and resources, specifying the amount of lawful
money held by them at the times of their several returns.
Second. A statement of the associations whose business has been
closed during the year, with the amount of their circulation redeemed
and the amount outstanding.
Third. Suggestions as to amendments to the laws relative to banking,
by which it is thought the system may be improved.
Fourth. A statement exhibiting, under appropriate heads, the resources and liabilities and condition of the banks, banking companies,
and savings banks organized under the laws of the several States and
Territories, such information being obtained by the Comptroller from
the reports made by such banks, banking companies, and savings banks
to the legislatures or officers of the different States and Territories, and
where such reports could not be obtained the deficiency lias been supplied from such other authentic sources as were available.
Fifth. The names and compensation of the clerks employed in the
office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and the whole amount of the
expenses of the banking department during the year.
This is the twenty-sixth annual report of the Comptroller of the
©urrency.
1
11028—CUR 88
1




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
FIRST.
SUMMARY OF THE STATE AND CONDITION OF EVERY NATIONAL BANK REPORTING
|
DURING THE YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 3 1 , 1888.
December 7. j February 14. |
3,070 banks.

3, 077 banks.

April 30.

|

3, 098 banks.

June 30.

|

3,120 banks.

October 4.

3,140 banks.

UESOUUCBS.

Loans and discounts. |$1,574.762.436.38'$1,576,386,276.39 $1,599,273,484.28 $1,619,999,200.68i$l,674.886,285.20
Overdrafts
i
9,179,048.58
7,784,094.12
7,124,439.67
8,125,364.15:
9,294,338.98
U. S. bonds to secure j
'
'
'
'
circulation
186, 431, 900.00J 181, 845, 450.00 181, 042,950. 00 177, 543, 900.00J 171, 867, 200.00
IT. S. bonds to secure
deposits
42, 203, 000. 001 56, 863, 000. 00 56,643,000. 00 55, 788, 000. 00J 54,208, 000.0»
U. S. bonds on band..
6,988,550.00|
6,450, 500.00
6, 507, 050.00
7, 639,350.00
7, 830,150.00
Other stocks, bonds,
90, 775,413.31 94,153, 688. 97 95, 296,917.07J 96, 265,812.31 99, 752, 403. 73
and mortgages
Due from approved
132, 959, 765.34 155, 341, 240. £ 146, 477, 902. 83] 158,133, 598.31 170,458, 593. 83
reserve agents
Due from other national banks
98, 227, 065, 30 92,980,682.481 95, 519,102,26 101,689, 774.90| 99,821,000. 57
Due from State banks
21,995, 356.41 21, 880, 069.60 22, 709, 703.01 22,714, 258. 27 23, 767, 260.53
and bankers
Eeal estate, furni58, 825,168.16 59, 366, 247. 85j 60, 111, 356.86J 61,101, 833.19j 62, 634, 791. 74
ture, and fixtures
Current e x p e n s e s
10, 600, 817. 35
and taxes paid
6, 531,237.71!
9, 843, 637. 81
5, 685,313.21 i
8,498, 758. 28
Premiums paid
18, 797, 205.79i 19, 779, 498. 56J 19, 501,481.06 18, 903,434.54| 17, 615, 898.02
Checks ami other
cash items
13,336,455.77
12,255,978. 69 14,644,675. 77 16, 855, 801.15| 15,071,024. 30
Exchanges for clearing-house
,
85,097,380.411 73, 418,037.29 117, 270,706.86| 74, 229, 763. 69' 102, 439, 751.67
Bills of other banks.
23,447,294. 00] 23,145| 206.00 24,434,212.00
21, 343, 405. 00 21, 600, 818.09
Fractional currency.
554,906.551
683,148.93
684, 268.41
662i 722. 27
' 632, 602. 42
Trade-dollars
351.15
328.09
437. 59
419.05
•Specie, viz:
371.76j
Gold coin
73,677,376.76
74,317,628.26 74, 921, 739.83
70,222, 885.95
Gold Treasury
74, 825, 782.84
certificates . .
44, 341,120.00 • 55, 230, 029. 00 54,604,280.00
Gold clearing68, 761,930. 00 79,883,810.0©
house certificates
25,485,000.00
26,246,000.00
24,050, 000. 00 20, 884, 000. 00 10, 385, 000.00
Silver coin, dol7,051,931.06
7,724,334.00
7,835, 028.00
lars
7, 569,827. 00
6,906, 432.00
Silver coin, frac2,983,267.72
3,256, 654. 3e|
3, 255, 891.69
tional
2,819,277.92
3,114,507.36
Silver Treasury
5, 029, 545.00
6,945,275.0Q
7, 813, 657.00
certificates ...\
7, 094,854. OO! 7, 298, 298.00
75, 361, 975.00 82,317,670.00' 83, 574, 210. 00 81,995, 643.00 81, 099,461.00
Legal-tender notes..
U.S. certificates of
deposit for legal6,165,000.00
10,120, 000. 00
8, 955, 000.00
tender notes
9, 330, 000. 00 12, 315, 000. 00
Five per cent, redemption
fund
8,168,503.201
7,993,189.221
7,887,950.36J
7, 765, 837.16
7, 555, 401. 72
with Treasurer . . .
Due from Treasurer
other than redemp1,068,117.43|
1,240,035.56j
1, 361,033.74J
1, 236, 675.6
tion fund
935,799.31
Aggregates... |2, 624,186, 330.55:2,664, 366, 304.44J2, 732,423,198.19& 731,448, 016.162, 815, 751, 341.07
•Total specie..

150, 240, 643.48j 173,830,614.62( 172,074,011.19| 181,292,276.76;

LIABILITIES.
;
Capital stock paid in. $580,733,094.42 $582,194,263.75^ $585, 449, 487. 75J $588, 384, 018.25 $592, 621, 656. 04
175, 246, 408.26. 179, 533, 475. 38j J80,053, 507. 27j 183,106, 435.70j 185,520,564.68
Surplus fund

Other u n d i v i d e d i
profits
|
National-bank circu- i

I
79, 899, 218. 06;
'

66, 606, 930.87|

78,196, 768.91]

70,296,173.07

77, 434, 426.23

i.5O
lation outstanding.! 164, 904, 094.00, 159,750,193.50. 158,897, 572.00Jj 155,313,353.50; 151,702,
State - b a n k notes
.
!
'
outstanding
98,676.50'j
98,652.501
94,878.501
82,372.50!
82,354.50
Dividends u u p a i d . . .
1,343,963.981
1, 534, 314. 51 j
1, 766,496. ll!
7,381,894.42;
2,378,275.70
Individual deposits. 11, 235, 757, 941.50,1, 251, 957, 844.42 1, 309, 731,015.161, 292, 342,471. 28 1,359, 320, 861.11
U. S. deposits
! 38, 416, 276. 87) 55,193, 899.19J 54, G91, 454. G9; 54, 679, 643.93| 52,140, 562.97
Deposits of CT. S.dis- j
;
;
j
i
bursing officers . .
4,515,024.05|
4,255,362.02;
4,789,093.63j
3,690,652.65j
3,993,900.51
Due to other national]
223, 088, 927. 85| 241, 028, 499. 93i 237, 056, 940.91 j 248,248,440.031 260,697,968.60
banks
D u e t o State banks
98, 809, 314.66j 105, 539, 405.53| 104, 502, 668. 21 j 109, 871, 372. 41 114,936,397.15
and bankers
Notes and bills rediscounted t"?. Z.. j 16, 268,247. 74! 12, 866, 722. 8o[ 12,724.23ft *11 13,096,119.55^ 17,305,750.61
4,955,068.27;
6,615,813.47
5,105| 112.57,
3j 796', 739.91)1 4,469, u.o. u4j
Bills payable.
Aggregates ... \2, 624,186, 330.55 2, 664, 366, 304.44|2, 732,423,198.19,2, 731,448,016.16 2, 815, 751, 341. OT




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
SECOND.
STATEMENT OF NATIONAL BANKS CLOSED DURING THE YEAR.

Name and location of bank.

First National Bank, Tecumseh, Nebr
Third National Bank, Saint
Paul, Minn -.
Fifth National Bank, Saint
Louis, Mo
First National Bank, Marshall,
Mo
First National Bank, Greene,
Iowa
Fulton National Bank, New
York, N.Y
Fayetteville National Bank,
Fayetteville, N. C
National Bank of Somerset, Ky.
First National Bank, Richburgh, N. Y
Scituate National Bank, North
Scituate, R. I
First National Bank, Auburn,
N.Y
National Bank of Franklin, Ind.
First National Bank, Hampton,
Iowa
Metropolitan National Bank,
Cincinnati, Ohio .. . .. ..
Greene County National Bank,
Springfield, Mo
First National Bank, Greensburgh, Kaus
First National Bank, Central
City, Nebr
Duluth National Bank, Duhith,
Minn
Union Stock Yards National
Bank, Chicago, 111
Bismarck National Bank, Bismarck, Dak
First National Bank, Ashton,
Dak
Commercial National Bank,
Dubuquo, Iowa
State National Bank, Raleigh,
N.C
...
Citizens' National Bank, Sioux
Falls, Dak
First National Bank Stanton,
Mich
First National Bank, Fairmont, Nebr
Second National Bank, Xenia,
Ohio
...
First National Bank, Grecnleaf,
Kan.s
National Bank of Genesee, Batavia, N. Y
Strong Citv National Bank,
Strong City, Ivans
Citizens' National Bank, Saginaw, Mich
Madison National Bank, Madison, Dak
..
Saugerties National Bank, Sauecvti«s, N. Y
Hyde National Bank, Titnsville.Pa
State National Bank, Omaha,
Nebr
Cincinnati National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
First National Bank, "Worthington, Minn
South Framingham National
Bank, South" Framingham,
Mass




Circulation.

Date of authority to Date of clos- Capital
commence
ing.
| stock.
business.

Issued.

He- jOutstanddeemed.
ing.

May 19,1883 j Nov. 3,1887

$50,000 !

$4,380 |

$7,320

Aug. 5,1884 Nov. 4,1887

500, 000

45,000 ;' 13,470 I

31,530

Dec. 12,1882 Nov. 7,1887

300, 000 i

44, 430 !

Feb. 14,1883 Dec. 6,1887

100, 000 i

22,500 •

7,600 \

10, 750

3, 000 •

Nov. 2,1883 Dec. 15,1887 i

50, 000 I

$11,700

j

44, 430

14,900
7, 750

j

July 31,1805 Dec. 20,1887 i 300,000 ;.
!
Dec. 21,1870 Dec. 31,1887
200,000 I • 39, 580 13,749 |
45, 000
10,790 :
Dec. 8,3870 Dec- 31,1887
50.000 !
j

Aug. 11,1881

Jan. 10,1888 j

Sept. 7,1865 Jan. 11,1888 J
Feb. 4,1864 Jan. 23,1888 j
Aug. 29,1882 Jan. 31,1888 j

Oct. 13,1881 Feb.

1,

50,000 :

25, 905
35, 018

34, 210

9,770 '

56,000 j

25,831

10,230 |

16,135
150, 000
50, 000

44, 400
11, 250

18, 100 !
3,635 I

24,788
26, 300
7,615
7,810

50, 000

11, 250

3,440 !

July 12,1881 Feb. 6,1888 j 1,000,000

277,745

68,490 !

209, 255

Feb. 17,1868 Feb. 8,1888|

100,000

22, 500

5,247

17, 253

Apr.

5,1887 Feb. 10,1888

50, 000

11,240

1,960

9,280

Feb.

2,1883 Feb. 11,1888

50, 000

10,710

3,310 j

7,400

Aug. 26,1882 Feb. 20,1888

300, 000

45,000 :

9,140 !

35, 860

Mar. 12,1868 Feb. 29,1888

500,000

45,000 j

9,765

35, 235

50,000

11,250 j

3,160

8,090

50, 000

11,250 \ 2, 420

8,830

Mar. 11,1871 M a r . 20,1888 j 100, 000 j

62,170 : 36,849

45, 321

J u n e 17,1868 Mar. 26,1888 j

100,000 j

22,500

22, 500

Nov. 8,1886 Apr. 24,1888 j

50, 000

11,250

1,730

9,520

Apr.

50, 000

H i 250

2,460

8,790

July 26,1884 May 1,1888

50, 000

11,250 j

2, 550

8,700

Feb. 24,1864 | May 3,1888

150,000 I

48,470 i 8, 325

40,145

May

3,1882 M a r . 1,1888 j

Jan. 19,1886 M a r . 6,1888

!

i Oct.

5,1883 Apr. 30,1888 '

7,1886 j May 9,1888

Apr. 28,1S65 I May 21,1888
July 13,1883 j May 26,1888
I Sept. 24,1880 j June 1,1888
; Dec. 7,1886 j June 13,1888
June 2,1865 June 16,1888
Mar. 16, 1880 June 21,1888
i Dec. 15,1880 July 18,1888

i

50,000 !

11,250

75, 000 '
I

44, 434 | 7, 090

1,340

9,910
37,344

11,250 j

1,900

45,000 j

5, 960 |

9,350

50,0:)0 '
100, 000
50,000 j
125,000 |
300,000 I
!
100,000 i

i Apr. 12,1883 I Aug. J, 1888 j 280,000 ;
I
!
:
Aug. 19,1886 Sept. 5,1888 i 75,000 :

11,250 j.
93,310 I
74,730 \

|

11, 250

9,420 I

83,896

18,990 I

j
2.800 I
i
52, 510 i

22,500 |

16,875 |

39, 040

3,010 j

55,740
19, 700
49, 500
14, 475

2,400 i
J u n e 28,1880 Sept, 8,1888 I

100,000

21,720 i

1, 350 !

20,370

4

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
STATEMENT OF NATIONAL BANKS CLOSED DURING THE YEAR—Continued.

Name and location of bank.

Lowell National Bank, Lowell,
Mich
First National Bank, Grass
Valley, Cal
Merchants' National Bank of
West Virginia, Morgantown,
W.Va
First National Bank, Cawker
City, K a n s .

Date of authority to
commence
business.

Date of closing.

Capital
stock.

Circulation.
Issued.

June 14,1865 Sept, 11,1888

$50, 000

$24,870

j Mar. 16,1887 Sept. 18,1888

50,000

ReOutstanddeemed.
ing.

11,250

Aug. 3,1865 Oct.

4,1888

110, 000

81, 480

Mar. 1,1882 Oct.

9,1888

50, 000

$2, 230

11,250

11,250

6, 071, 000 1,482, 053

Total .

$22,640

1,070

80, 410
11,250

291,130

1,190,923

Of the above banks thirty-four went into voluntary liquidation and
eight failed.
THIRD.
SUGGESTIONS AS TO AMENDMENTS TO THE LAWS RELATING TO BANKTNG BY WHICH THE SYSTEM MAY BE IMPROYED AND THE SECURITY
OF THE HOLDERS OF ITS NOTES AND OTHER CREDITORS MAY BE
INCREASED.

I have the honor to renew the recommendations made in the Report
of 1887 and to ask for them attention at this session. After carefully
considering all the suggestions that have been made from time to time
toward providing an adequate and acceptable basis for national-bank
circulation to take the place of the bonds now become too scarce and
too dear for the purpose, I feel it my duty to submit for the consideration of Congress the following view of the whole subject of nationalbank circulation:
Continued contraction in the volume of circulation has been the most
prominent feature in the history of the national banks during the last
ten years.
The statements in this report, under the proper head, exhibit the persistency of the influences heretofore operative to reduce the volume of
national-bank circulation; they also indicate the advent of new influences which are accelerating this reduction, not only by curtailing the
circulation of banks already in existence, but by repressing the normal
increase of circulation incident to the formation of new banks.
Year by year the Comptroller's reports have called attention to the
rising scale of reduction of circulation among existing banks and to the
declining ratio in which new banks take out circulation in excess of the
amount issued upon the minimum requirement of bond deposits; during
the past year there has been practically no such excess, and the effect
of the bond situation has extended beyond circulation. It is now checking the formation of new banks, which is like arresting a stream at its
source.
During the past year only $2,375,550 was added to circulation by the
new banks and banks increasing capital, while during the previous year
$4,592,000 was added in the same way.
Besides the falling off in the formation of new banks this year, as
compared with the two years preceding it, and with the average of
the live years from 1883 to 1887, inclusive, 127 national banks have during the past twelve months reduced their bond holdings to the minimum,




KEFORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

5

and this alone caused the withdrawal of bonds to the amount of
$14,014,400, reducing circulation by $12,600,000.
On October 31, there were only 1,180 banks that held bonds in excess of the minimum. The amount of bonds so held was $77,255,863,
and the circulation secured by these bonds amounted to $69,953,277,
At the present rate of reduction the excess may disappear in two years,
and is sure to do so when the 4i per cent, bonds mature in October, 1891,
On page 00 is a table showing the net decrease of circulation during
each of the last five years. The exceptionally large decrease during
1885 and 1886 is attributable to the redemption of the 3 percent, bonds.
The limit of $3,000,000 a month imposed by section 9, act July 12,
1882, upon reduction of national-bank circulation does not apply to such
reduction when it is a result of the payment of matured bonds; hence
banks holding the 3 per cent, bonds in excess of the minimum requirement generally surrendered the circulation secured by those bonds as
fast as these were called for payment, a conclusive proof that circulation was no longer profitable.
During the recent purchases of bonds by the Treasury the restriction
of the above section has repeatedly operated to retard and in somecases
to prevent sales of bonds held by the Treasurer as security for nationalbank circulation; hence the reduction of circulation has not been as
large this year as it would have been had there been no hindrance in
the law.
The limit of $3,000,000 a month which restricts the voluntary reduction of circulation to $36,000,000 a year does not apply to the circulation of banks that fail or of those that go into voluntary liquidation,
hence whatever addition to circulation may result from the formation
of new banks, and from the smaller banks increasing their capital, is
liable to be offset by the retirement of notes of failed and liquidating
banks, so that the net decrease may amount to fully $36,000,000 in a
year, and may even exceed that amount if the forces now repressing
the growth of the system should reach an intensity sufficient to drive
banks out of it.
Whether there is or is not at present any danger of the nationalbank system being actually forced into a decline in consequeuce of the
growing scarcity and high prices of United States bonds, there is enough
warning in the facts of its recent history and present condition to demand prompt and effectual relief.
Our national banks are too valuable, too deeply rooted in the confidence of the public, too intimately interlaced with the industrial interests and employments of our people, to be left to the risks of neglect or
even of inattention.
Apart from whatever danger to the system there may be in. neglecting at an early day to provide adequate relief against the influences now
operating adversely to its growth, the national-bank circulation taken
by itself, merits earnest consideration and A\ ill be found well worthy
of preservation.
For many years after the inception of the national-bank system the
circulation was its most important feature; important, to the banks, still
more important to the public: for, besides performing a service of incalculable value in the promotion of internal trade through the regulation of domestic exchanges, it constituted up to 1879 an important check
upon the gold premium, and thus assisted in the preservation and extension of our valuable foreign commerce on a secure basis.
Eesumption would hardly have been attempted in 1879 unless the
composition of the currency had been such as to engage the banks to




6

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

co-operate in the movement, and without such co-operation resumption could not have been accomplished. On November 1, 1878, the
Outstanding legal tenders were estimated at $346,681,016; fractional
currency at $16,000,000; the national-bank circulation outstanding
against bonds was $319,652,121, and against lawful money deposited in
the Treasury, about 82.500,000 more, making in all $685,000,000 of paper
against which the Treasury held only $126,000,000 in gold coin and
bullion and the banks less than $31,000,(KM).
Grave apprehensions were entertained as to the prudence of undertaking resumption with only $157,000,000 of gold to meet possible demands amounting to $685,000,000. There was a vast amount of discussion through the medium of the press and in Congress, while the
records of Congressional inquiry on this subject, as late as December,
1878, make quite a volume and show with what misgivings the project
was regarded.
The real strength of the situation, however, consisted in the fact that
the national banks were holding in legal tender notes and certificates
$97,000,000, which, with the $15,000,000 in the 5 per cent, redemption
fund, represented $112,000,000 of demands upon the Treasury that
would not be presented for redemption, and thus the Government was
set^free to use its $126,000,000 of coin in preserving the convertibility
of only $234,000,000 legal tenders, scattered all over the country.
The banks had the physical power, of course, to demand coin for their
$112,000,000 on January 1, 1879, but to have exercised that power
would have been to ruin themselves, because a run upon the Treasury would*have induced a run upon the banks, and they owed the public
$319,000,000 on their circulating notes and $620,000,000 in deposits,
while their entire holdings of lawful money on October 1, 1878, were
only $143,000,000, consisting of—specie, $30,^686,806, legal-tender notes,
$64,428,600, United States certificates of deposit, $32,690,000, five per
cent, redemption fund, $15,205,541.
It is evident, therefore, that the resumption of specie payments by
the Treasury on January 1, 1879, was made possible only by the relations which the law established between the national banks and the
Government, because it was the coercion of the law in respect to reserve
that accumulated in the banks so large a percentage of the legal-tender
notes and thus brought them into hands where the highest conception
of public obligation, as well as the most intelligent appreciation of selfinterest, came into play to assist in the success of the Treasury policy.
The national banks, therefore, which had at the supreme crisis'of
1863 saved the finances of the Government, rendered in 1879, a service
only second in importance to that, in enabling the reunited industrial
interests of the country to regain the firm footing of definite and stable
values.
As soon as resumption was effected, however, the national-bank circulation came under the influences which have since been steadily
reducing its volume. The maximum of circulation had been reached
in December, 1873, when 1,976 banks, with an aggregate capital of
$490,000,000, had outstanding $341,000,000 in circulating notes. The
long depression following the panic of 1873 arrested ttie growth of the
system so that in June, 1877, 2,078 banks had an aggregate capital of
$477,000,000 and $299,000,000 circulation.
During three and a half years, therefore, the number of banks increased only 102, while there was a shrinkage in capital of $13,000,000,
and in circulation of $42,000,000.
At that point of time the refunding operations of the Treasury and




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

7

the preparations for resumption began to exercise upon the banks influences tending to reduce their number and capital, but even then
their circulation increased slightly. In April, 1879, there were only
2,048 banks in existence, 30 less than in Jane, 1877, and in October,
1879, there were 2,052 banks, which had barely $454,500,000 capital,
a falling off of $22,500,000 in two years and four months, while the
total circulation had risen to $322,000,000 from $209,000,000, thus making up for the reduction of capital.
After this date new influences arose, the banks began to increase in
number and to enlarge their capital, while the rapid increase of deposits,
due undoubtedly to the confidence inspired by the success of resumption, enabled them to expand their accommodations to the public.
Individual deposits in national banks amounted in October, 1805, to
$500,000,000, but in April, 1879, they were less than $000,000,000,
although the banks had increased in number from 1,513 to 2,048; their
capital, surplus, and undivided profits had gone up from $404,000,000
to $010,000,000, and their circulation had grown from $171,000,000 to
$304,000,000.
During the thirteen and a half years between these dates the average
amount of individual deposits, as .shown by all the reports of condition,
was a trifle under $600,000,000, while the maximum was only $083,000,000, but immediately after resumption was recognized as a fact established, deposits began to increase; in December, 1880, the aggregate
exceeded $1,000,000,000; it rose in 1881 above $1,100,000,000, and has
steadily increased since; the average of 1888Vis $t,301,088,048, and the
highest point was reached on October 4, L 8S, when the amount was
$1,350,320,861.
Year by year, with increasing capital and deposits, loans and diseounts expanded. In December, 1873, they were less than $857,000,000,
and in April, 1879, they were only $835,000,000, but in 1888 they have
averaged $1,017,030,312, and have been as high as $1,074,880,285.
According to all natural laws the circulation of these banks should
have kept pace with augmenting resources and with increasing deposits and expanding business, but it has not been so.
Since December, 1879, the national banks have increased in number
from 2,052 to 3,151, which is over 53 per cent. Their capital, surplus,
and undivided profits were then $017,501,307.08; they are now (October
4,1888), $855,570,040.95, an increase of 38.55 p(jr cent. Loans and discounts have gone up from $933,000,000 to $1,074,880,285.29, an increase
of 79.} per cent.; but the circulation has declined from $322,000,000 to
$151,702,809, a decrease of nearly 53 per cent.
If we deduct from circulation" at each of these periods the amount
represented by the obligatory deposits of bonds, the remainders will
represent the circulation voluntarily maintained. In December, 1879,
this voluntary circulation was $233,179,905; on October 31,1888, it was
only $08,950,027, a reduction of 70J per cent.
The constant shrinkage of national-bank circulation is attributable
largely to the growing scarcity and rising price of United States bonds,
but there is also another influence at work of which the importance is
not generally recognized, namely, the displacement of national-bank
notes by other forms of money.
At the end of 1878 the paper money of the country amounted, as has
been stated, to $085,000,000, which supplied all the needs of Treasury
disbursements and of currency circulation, except those arising out of
transactions in foreign exchange, the payment of gold interest, and the
collection of duties on imports.




8

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

These latter needs were supplied by a stock of coin and of coin certificates held in the principal Eastern sea-ports, estimated at $35,000,000,
which, with $40,000,000 coin said to have been in circulation in Texas
and on the Pacific slope, and the $085,000,000 of paper, made the total
circulation at the end of 1878 about $700,000,000. The Treasury
held in United States and national-bank notes $82,000,000, against
which there were outstanding certificates of deposit to the amount of
$39,000,000, leaving the balance, viz, $43,000,000, to be deducted from
the total of $760,000,000 in order to ascertain the amount of currency
actually employed. Upon this computation it would appear that the
effective circulation just before resumption was less than $720,000,000.
The resumption of specie payments went into effect on January 1,
1879, and as soon as the public became satisfied that it was permanent, the heretofore hoarded specie began to enter into general circulation. The effect, of course, was an expansion of the currency; not
suddenly, because the habit of hoarding is never suddenly discontinued, but gradually, as confidence in the situation made its way among
the people.
The amount thus added to the circulating medium has been estimated at $140,000,000, which includes subsidiary and minor silver coin,
$70,000,000.
Another influence under which the volume of the circulating medium
has constantly been expanded is that of the silver-dollar coinage law of
1878. Under that law the number of standard silver dollars coined up
to October 31, 1888, is $309,780,790, and every month hereafter, as long
as the law exists, at least $2,000,000 more must be coined and sent to
the Treasury to be put into circulation.
The standard silver dollars, as coins, have never entered into circulation in numbers at all proportioned to the number coined, nor did the
silver certificates issued under the act of February 28, 1878, fare any
better, but the silver certificates authorized by the act of August 4,
1886, have been very largely absorbed by the public, not apparently
because any attention is paid to the basis of their issue, but because
they constitute the only supply of notes of small denominations.
As a result of all the influences that have come into play since 1879,
the total volume of money in the United States has so increased that
it is now estimated to amount to $1,700,000,000, against less than
$1,040,000,000 on January 1, 1879, an increase of $060,000,000 in total
volume, while the national-bank circulation in the same time has decreased by nearly $83,500,000.
The fact that for a long time past large sums have been accumulated
in the Treasury without disturbance to business affords very strong
grounds for believing that the volume of currency is excessive, and
this inference is strengthened by two facts of recent occurrence—first,
the fact that when the Treasury accumulations rose, as they did, during
September, 1887, from $259,546,540 to $275,307,883.25, the effect upon
business was immediate and serious, and, secondly, the fact that the
transfer from the Treasury to depository banks of about $40,000,000
between October, 1887, and January, 1888, relieved the stringency,
although a large part of this sum was offset by excessive revenues during that period, and although also the Treasury still contained a great
deal of idle money.
While this is being written another fact of still greater significance
is added to those already cited, namely, the export of gold. To any one
who considers the component elements of our currency it must be
obvious that gold is the only one that can be both increased and dimiu-




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

9

ished in volume in response to the changing volume of the need or more
properly of the use, for currency; and its export, except when assignable to other causes, is a sure indication that the total volume of currency is for the moment in excess of the amount that can be profitably
employed.
The silver element is by statute constantly augmenting in volume,
but the export of our silver coins is prevented because they have, in
the United States, a value as compared with the same weight and fineness of silver uncoined as 100 is to 73, while everywhere else they have
only their bullion value. For a like reason silver coins are not used in
the arts as gold coins are; because to workers in silver, bars are far
cheaper than dollars. Hence the silver coinage is an element constantly
increasing in volume.
The legal tenders are fixed by statute at 8340,08l,01C, so that their
volume is subject to neither increase nor decrease.
The national-bank uotes are theoretically subject to increase and decrease of volume, but apart from the influences which have for a long
time produced a steady decrease, the law itself interposes an obstacle
to flexibility. Section 9, act July 12,1882, limits the voluntary decrease
of national-bank circulation to $3,000,000 a month and forbids any increase of circulation to be issued to a bank within six mouths after it
has made a deposit of lawful money for the purpose of reducing circulation.
The gold element of the currency is alone and peculiar in this, that
its volume and distribution are determined not by statute, but by the
natural laws of finance.
During the years subsequent to 1878, when business, restored to the
solid basis of gold values, was constantly expanding and therefore constantly needing increased supplies of circulating medium, we not only
retained lor home use our large annual production of gold, but whatever
additional amounts our business required flowed into the country from
foreign nations, and that in spite of some very distinct efforts on their
part to prevent it.
On the other hand, when from time to time there occurred a subsidence in the tide of national prosperity or a depression in any of our
greater industries, so that for the moment the amount of money in circulation exceeded the use for it, gold exports relieved the situation.
Of late years, however, the gold movement across the Atlantic has
become much more sluggish because something has been found to take
its place, and, to some extent at least, to serve the purpose of regulating exchanges and transferring capital. Certain securities on the New
York stock-list have come to be largely and constantly dealt in at the
European monetary centers, and as, by means of cable communication
and through the (dose competition of dealers, their values are generally
nearly at a level in all markets, they supply a cheaper medium of settlement than gold and a more convenient basis for exchange operations.
This "arbitrage" business, as it is called, has already exercised an
important influence upon the preservation and distribution of our stock
of gold, and has probably contributed to crowding national-bank notes
out of circulation by impelling the export of gold at times and under
conditions which would at former periods have produced an outflow.
To explain: Before this new business came in the dealers in foreign
exchange, lx ing dependent wholly upon gold to settle their balances, or
to serve as a basis for drafts or credit whenever the supply of commercial bills proved insufficient, were compelled to carry a stock of coin
or bullion, and this constituted a fund apart from the general monetary




10

REPORT OF THE COM!TROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

stock of the country; its transfer back or forth across the Atlantic followed the fluctuations in foreign-exchange premium, and only when
it became exhausted, or threatened to become exhausted, was there any
drain upon the general stock of gold currency. The publicity attending gold shipments enabled the whole business world to perceive the
drift of the metal one way or the other, and bankers and merchants
alike could prepare in advance for the moment when the stock of current coin should be drawn upon to supply the foreign demand.
It is not so with the securities in question; they have become the
stock in trade of dealers in foreign exchange; they are shipped back
and forth according as exchange quotations fluctuate; indeed, in manj
cases they are not even shipped; the ownership of them is transferred
by a cablegram, anil this transfer supplies a basis for bills or credits.
Whether they are shipped or otherwise dealt with, however, the transactions in these securities, or in respect to them, are completely cloaked
from public observation, and, therefore, neither bankers nor merchants
can now obtain any warning of the approach of a state of foreign
exchanges which may necessitate the export of gold, nor can they by
any means perceive, nor by the exercise of any sagacity securely estimate, the extent to which such shipments may be made or the length
of time they may continue.
The old computations as to what was called " the balance of trade-7'
supplied some sort of basis for an estimate of probable gold movements,
but now the utility of such computations has been destroyed because
the values transferred through the medium of securities are very great
and are utterly beyond determination.
Another feature of the present foreign exchange business should not
be overlooked in tracing the relations between that business and our
monetary system, namely, the existence of banking houses with partners
or agents on both sides of the Atlantic, and employing a great money
capital.
Formerly capital was seldom transferred from one country to another
for long periods of time without either a change in its ownership or a
change of domicile on the part of its owner, whereas now there are
masses of capital that really belong to no particular country, but are
always u on the road-" in the form of bills of exchange. This capital,
supplemented by the almost unlimited credit of the bankers who direct its employment, substantially controls the course of international
exchanges, but its movements are as noiseless as those of the electric
current by which they are guided, and as secret as the cipher language
in which alone they are recorded.
It is impossible that there should be no danger in all this to a monetary system like ours. While the arbitrage business has set free some
gold for other employment, it creates by that very effect a danger of
considerable importance, namely, the danger of a general disturbance
of industry whenever the balances to be settled or the movements of
capital exceed the available supply of securities, and resort must again
be had to gold shipments, producing not only a contraction of the currency, which, under existing circumstances, is no great matter, but also,
what is far more disturbing, causing a visible depletion of reserves at
the main center of our entire monetary system.
It must be remembered that gold has only been relegated to the second place in our foreign exchange dealings; it is not banished nor disqualified. It has not, like silver, become fundus offieio in international
trade; it is still the measurer of commercial values, still the only medium of liquidation that is equally effective everywhere, and the danger




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

11

now is that, instead of moving in small amounts promptly in sensitive response, as formerly, to fluctuations in exchange, it may some
day slide away from us in masses under some sudden escape of influences heretofore concealed fro in observation, and also perhaps held
in check, by the arbitrage system. If we are really exposed to such
a danger, we can not begin too soon to prepare for it, and prudence
counsels that the first step should be to protect the Treasury against
any possible embarrassment.
The $346,000,000 of greenbacks are the weak point in our currency
system. The gold coins and certificates stand first, the national-bank
notes next, the silver coins and certificates third, and the greenbacks
last in the order of assured value, and it would be a great benefit to the
whole mass of the currency if this, its frailest element, could be eliminated from it.
The present state of things seems favorable to the substitution of
national-bank notes for greenbacks, and to that end I venture to submit for the consideration of Congress the following measures:
1. Funding in bonds the greenback debt of $340,681,016, or so much
of it as may be presented at the Treasury within a limited period of
time, say three years.
2. The bonds to be issued only to national banks presenting greenbacks for that purpose; to bear a low rate of interest, not-exceeding 2J
per cent., and to mature only upon the failure of the bank or upon its
dissolution, whether voluntary or upon expiration of its corporate existence.
3. The bonds so issued to be available only as a deposit to secure
national-bank circulation and to entitle the banks depositing them to
receive circulating notes to the amount of their face.
4. Existing banks to be required, for a time at least, to retain on deposit the bonds they nowT have to the minimum amount required by existing laws and to use the new bonds only for procuring additional
circulation, or in substitution for whatever bonds they may now have
on deposit in excess of the minimum, but the new bonds to be available
for all purposes by banks organized after the passage of the act.
5. The National Bank Redemption Agency at Washington to be
transferred to New York, and a sub agency to be established at each
central reserve city, the notes of all banks wherever situated to be redeemed at whichever agency they may be presented.
In support of these measures it may be said—
1st. That they provide for the retirement of the greenback circulation
without even a temporary contraction of the currency, because arrangements can and should be made to issue the national-bank notes immediately upon the presentation of the greenbacks for the purpose of
being funded.
2d. That upon the retirement of these obligations the $100,000,000 of
gold held in the Treasury as a special fund for their redemption will
become an available asset and may be paid out, adding just that much
to the active circulation.
3d. With the greenbacks taken out of the category of demand obligations of the Government, the Treasury will be in a better position than
now to maintain the silver coinage at par with gold; and, on the other
hand, specie and specie certificates will be held much more largely by
the banks than they are now, and this will tend to relieve the strain
upon the Treasury.
4th. As the greenbacks will not be extinguished, but held in a state
of suspended monetary vitality until the failure or liquidation of a bank




12

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

requires their use in the redemption of its notes, they will constitute a
reserve fund lying in the Treasury ready for use, at any moment of
emergency, in the redemption of any portion of the national-bank currency that may become discredited.
5th. Assuming that $300,000,000 of greenbacks will be eventually
funded in this way; assuming that the bonds bear interest at the rate
of 2 J per cent, per annum, payable semi-annual^7, and assuming that the
present tax on circulation is maintained at the rate of one-half per cent,
every six months, the annual charge to the Government will be about
$4,500,000, and against this it gets the use of $100,000,000 for paying
off that much bonded debt bearing 4£ percent, per annum interest, and
escapes the expense ot redeeming and renewing the legal-tender notes.
6th. Eveu if the entire $4,500,000 per annum should be added to the
permanent expenses of the Government it would be but a small price
to pay for the service which the banks will render both to the Government and to the public through tne instrumentality of such a circulation
as theirs will then be.
7th. The moderate profit of 1J per cent, per annum will be materiallyreduced by the expenses of redemption and supervision, including loss
of interest on the redemption fund, so that the banks will not realize
quite as much as the Government pays, but still it will probably constitute a sufficient incentive to banks to fund all the greenbacks they
can, and when the whole issue is funded whatever amounts are from
time to time paid out in redemption of the notes of failed banks will
probably be collected and presented afresh in order that circulation may
be obtained for them.
8th. The public will be benefited by having a bank note circulation
amply secured and of which every note is redeemable in coin or in a
certificate representing coin actually on deposit in the Treasury, and
redeemable, too, not only at the bank which issued it, but at any central reserve city; a circulation large enough in volume to admit of easy
and prompt adjustment to the varying needs of different localities, its.
flexibility secured by the constant pressure of the Government tax on
the one side and the constant inducement of the bond interest on the
other, while the numerous points of issue and their wide distribution
over the country afford ample protection against combinations or other
devices for artificially expanding and contracting the circulation.
9th. With such a resource at hand we may view with indifference
the transfer abroad of a large part of our burdensome and unprofitable
stock of gold, where it will be more useful to us in expanding the
markets for our exports of agricultural products than it can be here
locked in the Treasury.
10th. The national-bank system will be restored to healthy activityand stimulated to fresh growth especially in those parts of the country
where such banks are most needed and are now found in least numbers.
LAWS REGULATING INTERSTATE COMMERCE.

Occasion was taken last year to call attention to the divergent, and
even contradictory, character of the laws prevailing and of the decisions
which have been rendered, in different States in respect to substantially the same points of general commercial practice. A more extended
observation of interstate commercial relations, particularly in connection with so much of the business of the national banks as consists of
operations in exchange arising out of transactions between citizens of
different States, confirms the views intimated in the Report of 1887 as




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

13

to the importance of national legislation for removing the confusion
and friction caused by the differences of local laws and judicial construction.
The establishment and extension of tin*, national banking system and
the regulation by Congress of interstate transportation constitute successive steps in the direction of that regulation of trade between the
States which the Constitution authorizes if it does not enjoin upon
Congress.
The next step to these, in logical sequence, would appear to be the
enactment of a commercial code applicable to transactions between
citizens of different States, and as such a code would naturally tend to
the extension of the benefits now derived by the public from the national banking system, it seems proper to include this subject among
those which the Comptroller of the Currency is privileged to bring to
the attention of Congress.
The proposition to establish an interstate commercial code rests, of
course, upon the assumption that constitutional authority to do so is
included in the power to regulate commerce between the States.
Without venturing to discuss the constitutional question, it may be
said in support of the assumption, that the complete regulation of commerce would seem necessarily to involve the enactment, or at least the
sanction, of some body of laws defining the obligations and securing
the rights of persons engaged in such commerce. The identity in
origin of our State systems of law and jurisprudence, and the similarity
of the local conditions affecting their development, preserved among
them for a long time sufficient uniformity to make them practically a
common law, but of late years there has arisen more and more divergence, especially in court decisions, and now the commercial dealings
between citizens of different States have become materially embarrassed
by the variety and even the contrariety of law and practice prevailing
in different parts of the Union with respect to negotiable instruments,
partnership accounts, and contracts.
While the banks seem to have the chief interest in this matter, because the laws and decisions in question affect directly that in which
they deal, yet this interest is representative only, because behind each
check, draft, bill of lading, or promissory note held by a bank there is
dependent upon the paper a commercial transaction in which the bank
has no part and from which it can derive no profit.
The purchase and sale of merchandise is only the initial point of a
commercial transaction ; to render it complete the goods must be delivered by the seller and they must also be paid for by the buyer.
From the initial bargain to the final settlement each step is taken
only upon the assurance that all the others will follow in due succession ; hence an obstruction at any point, either to the delivery of commodities or to payment for them, arrests the whole current of dealings
running toward consummation at that point, producing stagnation at
the sources of its supply and the paralysis of every organ through
which the demand should be transmitted.
Practical experience of the importance of preventing obstruction in
the channels of transportation, produced and sustains the law regulating interstate commerce by railroad and river, and now the public is
beginning to realize the importance also of preventing obstruction in
the channels through which instruments of exchange must pass part
$assu with the parallel passage of the goods they represent.
The free movement of interstate exchanges is as essential to the marketing of crops and to the distribution of industrial products as are




14

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

railroads and steamboats. The latter never move a ton of anything
until the exchange drawn against it is negotiated, and assurance is thus
secured that the article shipped will be paid for. Producers have suffered a loss of markets from financial disorder much more frequently
than from transportation derangement; hence, in facilitating financial
transactions and relations between citizens of different States, Congress will promote the great industrial interests of the country quite as
effectually as by facilitating the physical transportation of the products
of those industries.
Without attempting to cite specific instances or to designate the States
concerned,it is sufficient to gay that in respect to commercial paper the
conflict of law in different States extends to every branch of the subject; and it i$ not confined to cases of rare occurrence, or to those in
which the circumstances are unusual or peculiar, but exists in respect
to many matters which are elementary and fundamental, as, for example, the legal force of such instruments as bills of lading, promissory
notes, bills of exchange, etc., the obligations of the parties thereto, the
steps necessary to charge the different parties with liability, and the extent to which the instruments constitute a charge or lien upon the
property in respect to which they are made. In many instances the
force of the instruments has to be determined by the laws of a State in
which the statutes or the leading decisions differ from those prevailing
at the place of negotiation ; and as bank officers can not be familiar with
the laws of every State and Territory, and also with all the decisions
throughout the country, they must often be thrown into perplexity about
what might be a very simple business, except for this conflict of laws.
In all such cases increased expense affords the only practicable solution,
and such increase falls upon the producer in the form of premium or
discount.
The laws of the various States differ most widely in respect to bills
of lading. In some States a bill of. lading is by statute a negotiable
instrument, while in other States it retains its common law characteristics. Even the statutes making it negotiable are much broader in
some States than in others. For example, the statutes of Pennsylvania and Missouri prescribe simply the manner of negotiation, i. e., by
indorsement and delivery; but do not define the effect of such negotiation, nor place such instruments on the footing of instruments which
are the representatives of money, so as to charge them with all the
consequences which usually attend or follow the negotiation of bills
and notes (Shaw v. Railroad Company 101, U. S., 557); whereas, on the
other hand, the Maryland statute expressly declares them to be negotiable instruments in the same sense as bills of exchange and promissory
notes (Tiedman v. Knox, 53 Md., 012).
Again, the laws vary in the different States as to the liability of the
carrier for the representations made in the instrument. In New York,
for instance, it is the rule that the carrier is bound by the representations of its agent that the goods were received, and though, in fact there
were no goods received, it is estopped to set up such defense (Armour v.
Mich. Cent. Il.ll. Co., 65 K Y., I l l ) ; but in the Supreme Court of the
United States, and in other jurisdictions, the English rule prevails, that
the carrier is not liable if its agent issued the bill of lading without any
actual receipt of the goods (Vinton v. Pollard, 105 IT. S., 7). By the^
laws of some States, therefore, the banker need not look beyond the bill
of lading, whereas by the laws of other States he must make further inquiries, if he would be sure of the security. To ascertain, then, how far
he may rely upon the bill of lading, he must refer to the laws of the
State by which the instrument is governed, which will often be a State




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

15

different from his own. Nor can be always determine with certainty
what laws apply to it; for it is frequently a very nice and difficult question to decide whether these are rhehivvs prevailing at the place of shipment or those obtaining at the place of delivery.
As to the rules which may govern a draft, or bill of exchange, the
conflict is equally great. In the first place, provisions which, by the
laws of some States, may be properly inserted, would, by the laws of
other States, destroy the negotiable qualities of the instrument, as
might likewise the omission of certain provisions; and while the instrument might be negotiable according to the laws of the State where
drawn, it might not be such according to the laws of the State in which
it is made payable. Again, the rules as to the time of payment are different in the different States, and the banker (with whom It is often important to know the precise time he may expect payment of his bills
receivable) may frequently be at a loss to know with respect to an important collection, whether it is payable immediately or is entitled to
days of grace. Still again, the contracts of the indorsers may, by some
decisions, be governed by laws different from those by which the contract of the drawer is determined. Numerous other questions of this
kind will suggest themselves as likely to arise in respect both to the
bill of lading and the draft; but it is needless to multiply illustrations.
It has been suggested that uniformity of laws on this subject might
be secured by appropriate legislation by the various States. But such
uniformity has as yet been unattainable in respect to other matters for
which it has been desired. The subject of a uniform system of legal
procedure has been agitated for many years, and some very strong efforts have been made in that direction, but as yet little has been accomplished. But were it possible to procure similar legislation by an j
considerable number of States, or even by all, we should be merely
back again where we were under the common law, and as the different
provisions of the statutory law would have to be construed by the
various State courts, it is not unlikely that these courts would often
reach dissimilar conclusions as to the meaning and force of the same
provision in the different statutes, just as they have diverged in their
application of identical common-law principles. We have an additional
illustration of this tendency in the diversity of exposition given to the
same or similar provisions in the various codes of procedure, and in the
dissimilitude of the decisions in the different States as to the extent to
which these provisions change or modify the old rules of pleading and
practice. It is true that a system of commercial law adopted by Congress would likewise be subject to judicial construction, but being a
statute of the United States, the duty of construing it would properly
belong to the Federal courts, and the rules of interpreting it prescribed
by the United States Supreme Court would be binding upon every
other court; so that, in the main, and certainly in process of time, it
would receive the same construction in all courts and in all parts of
the country.
The objection to putting general rules of law into the form ot statutes
would have no application to a code of the kind proposed, for the purpose is not to change the form of expressing the law, by substituting
statutory rules for judicial precedents, but to render certain and uniform
those rules of commercial law which are now uncertain or different io
different localities, a purpose which can not be accomplished by any
number of judicial determinations, since the decisions in one State are
not binding as precedents in any other States, nor are the Federal courts
bound by the adjudications of State courts, or the State courts by
Federal decisions.




16

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
FOURTH.

STATE, SAYINGS, AND PRIVATE BANKS, AND LOAN AND TRUST COMPANIES.

In order to comply with the fourth requirement of section 333 of tha
Eevised Statutes of the United States, the Comptroller has obtained,
through the courtesy of the authorities of twenty four States which
exact returns of this nature, all the information received by them.
This information, transmitted sometimes in detail and sometimes compiled by the State officers, embraces the affairs of 2,008 incorporated
institutions and 212 private banking concerns, making 2,220 in all.
The returns of the 2,008 corporations obtained from the State authoiities comprise statements of condition of 1,209 banks operated
lander State charters, aggregate capital, $130,288,327, surplus and undivided profits, $51,575,928, deposits, $387,017,523, of 50 loan and
trust companies, capital, $26,9.13,200, surplus and undivided profits.
$23,411,982, deposits, $208,739,626; and of 743 savings banks, of which
598 report no capital, and 145 report capital aggregating $13,122,434.
The aggregate surplus and undivided profits of the 743 savings banks
is $1 :'3,35i;,()(i2, and their aggregate deposits amount to $1,248,072,843.
Two hundred and twelve private banks report capital to the amount of
$6,712,636, surplus and undivided pr< fits of $2,212,158, and deposits of
$20,353,852.
Even among the States which exact returns from banks there are but
few that provide adequately for the scrutiny and compilation of the
returns by any State officer, and of course no such provision exists
where returns are not required. Without some such provision, however,
there can be no certainty that there are not errors and omissions in the
reports. In one State, in response to the request for a summary of reports of banks reporting, the chief of the department in charge of the
returns wrote: u We # have no printed report of the condition of banking institutions in this State. We can have an abstract if you wish it.
It will cost you $25, as we will have to get some outside party to come
in and make it." In reply that officer was advised that " while Congress requires the Comptroller to get that information (that is, all available information relative to the condition of banks other than national),
no appropriation has ever been made to meet any expense attending it,
nor are there funds available for defra\ ing^the cost of summarizing the
reports filed in your office. In a number of States the condition is the
same us exists in yours, but without an exception the reports have been
intrusted to this office, a copy of the abstract being returned with the
reports." The communication concluded with the request that the reports be forwarded at the expense of this office, and with the offer to
return, with the papers, a, copy of the abstract. Neither the papers
nor a reply was received. In another State, banks report only such
items as are required to enable the tax department to make the assessment.
In order to obviate error, and as far as possible to obtain complete information, the names and addresses of over 5,700 banks and bankers
were secured, and to each was mailed a circular letter, inclosing a blank
form, requesting a report of condition ot date, June 30, 1888. The request was complied with by over 2,000 banking associations and bankers. Later in the season about one-third of the banks so responding
were found to be included in those reported officially by State officers,
so that the number, from which returns are classified as unofficial, is
1,307, namely, private banks 991, and incorporated institutions 316.
These 1,307 concerns are in States and Territories in which report*




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

17

are not required to be made to local authorities, and they consist of 194
State banks having an aggregate capital of $18,643,541, surplus and
undivided profits of $5,309,160, and deposits of $23,030,319; 64 loan
and trust companies, with capital of $26,330,310, surplus and undivided
profits of $12,539,705, and deposits of $49,138,488; 58 savings banks,
of which 28 report capital amounting to $3,227,887. The aggregate
surplus and undivided profits of the 58 savings banks is $9,343,620, and
their aggregate deposits amount to $116,123,707. Nine hundred and
ninety-one private bankvS report capital to the amount of $34,129,438,
surplus and undivided profits of $12,665,828, and deposits of
$74,524,990.
A comparison of these returns with those of last year will show an
increase of 418 institutions reporting officially, a decrease of 47 reporting unofficially, a net increase of 371.
The returns indicate an increase in number of institutions of about
10 per cent., and of assets of about 9 per cent. Banks to the number
of 341 have organized since the last report, the capital of which slightly
exceeds $16,000,000.
As much interest attaches to the operations of the savings banks of
the country, a special effort has been made to collect and tabulate all
obtainable information relative thereto. The abstract shows returns,
official and unofficial, from mutual and stock savings banks, separated
and aggregated, and the average amount due each depositor in each
class by States, the average of all by classes, and the average of all
banks combined.
In 1887 reports were received from 684 savings banks, of which 600
were mutual institutions ; this year 801 reported, of which 628 are mutual. Of the latter number all but 22 are located in the New England
States and in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and
Maryland; in all of which, except the three latter States, statistics are
at hand giving the average dividends paid; in one the rate is 2 | per
cent., in three over 3J per cent, and less than 4 per cent., and in three
over 4 per cent, and less than 4J per cent.
It would be interesting to compare the earnings of the mutual savings banks with those of savings banks having capital stock, but it
has been impossible to ascertain the earnings of the latter, owing to the
fact that none but the California institutions report dividends and interest allowed depositors.
In California 23 such banks reported to the commissioners on January 1,1888, of which 18 paid dividends on capital stock of from 4 to 13
per cent., making an average of 7.2 per cent., nearly; 21, namely, the
18 above mentioned and three others (two of the three having a reserve
fund but no capital) paid interest to depositors to the aggregate amount
of $2,551,043.31, the rate varying from 3 to 6 per cent., while two report
the payment of neither dividends nor interest. As eleven of the 21
banks pay interest at two or more rates, the amounts on which each rate
is paid not being given, it is impossible to show the average, though it
appears to be about 4J per cent. This would indicate that so far as
the returns to depositors are concerned, the public benefit of the two
classes of savings banks—the stock and the purely mutual—is nearly
identical.
All stock savings banks in California are stated by the California
bank commissioners, in their report for 1888, to be u business enterprises of private individuals with incidental benefit to the public, in
nowise differing1 in this regard from commercial banks."
Such institutions are regarded on the Pacific coast as an improve11028—CUE. 88




2

18

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

ment on the purely mutual system. The funds of the stockholders are
a guaranty for the safety of those of the depositors, the stockholders
being liable for all obligations of the institution to an amount equal to
the value of their stock. In addition, the directors or trustees are jointly
and severally liable to the creditors and stockholders for all moneys
embezzled or misappropriated by the officers.
With a view of throwing some light upon the distribution of the circulating medium of the country, every effort was made to obtain from
State banks, Private banks, and Savings institutions the details of
their cash holdings. The result will be found on page 24.
In the appendix tables will be found showing by States and Territories the condition of these banks as obtained from official sources
and from banks direct (classified as unofficial returns); aggregate
resources and liabilities of each class and from both?sources; comparative statements of condition of State banks, 1872- 88; loan and trust
companies, 1883-'84 to 1887-'88; savings banks, 1883-'84 to 1887-'88;
growth of savings banks as shown by deposits, by States, 1830, 1840,
and 1850 to 188rt ; and deposits in savings banks, number of depositors,
and average amount due each, by States, in 1886-?87 and 1887-'88.
The following tables present summaries of this information:
AGGREGATE RESOURCES, LIABILITIES, AND CONDITION OF STATE BANKS, LOAN AND
TRUST COMPANIES, AND SAVINGS AND PRIVATE BANKS, ORGANIZED UNDER STATE
AND TERRITORIAL LAWS.
(FROM OFFICIAL SOURCES.)

State banks.

Loan and
trust
companies.

Savings

1,209 b a n k s .

56 b a n k s .

743 banks.

$21, 404,692

$21, 719, 668

$479, 369, 744 $2,433,700

125, 881, 958
253,163, 012
1,808,140
2, 030, 634

133, 078, 950
28, 634, 649
4,741
22, 443, 398

141, 598, 935
66, 333, 458
147,049
163, 843,109

12, 266, 824
5, 822, 935
465, 767
326, 307

412, 826,667
353, 954, 054
2,425, 697
188, 643, 448

144, 801
29, 500
86, 004

1, 981, 329
8, 513,428
437, 988

280, 625,187
70, 865, 515
40, 741, 610

1,731

282, 753, 048
79, 408, 443
41, 265, 602

28,122, 372

21, 441, 353

40, 006, 319

737, 680

90, 307, 724

54, 272,878

13, 756,139

52, 450, 672

3, 682,698

124,162,387

18,113,980

7, 647,122

26, 431, 082

1, 678, 696

53, 870, 880

1,454,014
101, 054,228
10, 241, 395

139,117
11, 062,751
4, 404, 623

221,181
17,414, 793
10, 426, 713

41, 764
3, 690,773
295, 094

1,856, 076
133, 222, 545
25, 367, 825

617, 807, 608

275, 265, 256

1, 390,475, 367

31, 443, 969

2, 314, 992, 200

136, 288, 327
37, 928, 240
13, 647, 688
121,244
816, 347
387, 017, 523

26, 913,200
15, 454, 606
7, 957, 376
a 5, 066, 708
22, 464
208, 739, 626

13,122,434
102, 985, 283
20, 367, 379

6, 712, 636
1,002,948
1, 209, 210

23,438
1, 248, 072, 843

20, 353, 852

183,036,597
157, 371, 077
43,181, 653
b 5,187, 952
862, 249
1, 864,183, 844,

721

26, 309
895, 452
5, 008, 538

11,732
1, 404, 969
748, 622

272, 818
35, 509 214
25, 359 766

31,443,969

2,314,992,200

banks.

Private

banks.

Total.

212 banks.

2,220 b a n k s .

RESOURCES.
L o a n s on real estate
L o a n s on personal and collateral
security
L o a n s and discounts
Overdrafts
U n i t e d States bonds
States, county, a n d municipal
bonds
,
Railroad bonds and stocks
B a n k stocks
Other stocks, bonds, and mortgages
D u e from o t h e r b a n k s and
bankers
Heal estate, furniture, and fixtures
C u r r e n t expenses and taxes
paid
Cash a n d cash items
All o t h e r resources
Total.

$524, 927, 804

LIABILITIES.
Capital stock
Surplus fund
Other undivided profits
State-bank notes outstanding . .
Dividends unpaid
Individual deposits
State, county, and municipal deposits . . . . '
Deposits of Slate, county, and
municipal disbursing officers
Due to otner banks and"bankers.
Other liabilities

Total.
a Debenture bonds.




261, 086
32, 891, 639
8, 834, 793

317,154
10, 767, 813

617,807,608

275,265,256

27, 030

1,390,475,367

b Debenture bonds, $5,066,708; State-bank notes, $121,244.

19

KEPOKT OF THE (JOMl'TKOJ.LEK OF THE OUKliENUY.

AGGREGATE EESOURCES, LIABILITIES, AND CONDITION OF STATE BANKS, LOAN AND
TRUST COMPANIES, AND SAVINGS AND PRIVATE BANKS, ORGANIZED UNDER STATE
AND TERRITORIAL LAWS. (FROM UNOFFICIAL SOURCES.)

State banks.

Loan and
trust
companies.

Savings
banks.

194 banks.

64 banks.

58 banks.

$2, 087,884

$24,886,722

$21, 697,345

$7,140, 369

$55,812, 320

13, 512,317
15, 952, 800
193, 641
(37, 0U0
372, 320
3, 938, 380
133,049
1, 960, 611
4, 505, 328
2.132, 674
314,144
4, 260, 719
4, 468, 842

41, 954,943
425, 716
19, 570
456, 368
25,150
7,189, 002
222, 4H0
9,868,417
6, 035, 783
6, 304, 669
466, 056
8, 725, 547
1,807, 798

23, 578, 691
10, 576, 042
11,152
19, 684,166
6, 823, 938
18, 849, 843
454, 556
14,655,317
4,652,485
2, 558, 261
254, 226
4,150, 524
1, 514,136

54, 340,185
20, 972,444
1, 606, 619
1, 392, 415
760, 673
1,168, 584
695, 492
3, 680, 009
17, 218,193
8, 431, 614
866, 808
11, 136,398
2, 859,484

133, 386,136
47, 927, 002
1, 830, 982
21, 599. 949
7, 982; 081
31,145, 809
1. 505, 577
30,164,354
32,411, 789
19, 427, 218
1, 901, 234
28, 273,188
10, 650, 260

53,899,709

108,388,221

129, 460, 682

132,269,287

424, 017, 899

18, 643, 541 26, 330, 310
3, 227, 887
3,446, 228
8, 650,765
6, 651, 657
1, 862, 932
3, 888, 940
2, 691, 963
27,190 a 9, 353,829
229,112
175, 855
i4,*050"
23, 030, 319 49,138,488 116,123, 707
114, 531

34,129, 438
8,585,290
4, 080, 538
21, 000
84, 658
74, 524, 990
2, 419, 440

82,331,176
27, 333, 940
12, 524, 373
6 9,402,019
503, 675
262, 817, 504
2, 533, 971

Private
banks.

Total.

991 banks. 1,307 banks.

EESOURCES.

Loans on real estate
Loans on personal and collateral
security
Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
United States bonds
States, county, and municipal bonds
Railroad bonds and stocks
Bank stocks —
Other stocks, bonds, and mortgages .
Due from other banks and bankers..
Eeal estate, furniture, and fixtures ..
Current expenses and taxes paid
Cash and cash items
All other resources
Total.
LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
Surplus fund
Other undivided profits
State-bank notes outstanding
Dividends unpaid
Individual deposits
State, county, and municipal deposits
Deposits of State, county, and municipal disbursing officers
Due to other banks and bankers
Other liabilities
Total.,
a Debenture bonds.




74, 618
1, 647, 303
4, 823, 935
53, 899, 709

1, 729, 811
9,120, 223

10, 680
159, 358
581, 380

1, 052, 307
3,496,479
3, 875,147

1,137, 605
7, 032, 951
18, 400, 685

108, 388, 221

129, 460, 682

132, 269, 287

424, 017, 899

6 Debenture bonds, $9,353,829; State-bank notes, $48*190.

20

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

AGGREGATE RESOURCES, LIABILITIES, AND CONDITION OF ALL STATE BANKS, LOAN
AND TRUST COMPANIES, AND SAVINGS AND PRIVATE BANKS, ORCANIZED UNDER
STATE AND TERRITORIAL LAWS.
Official.

Unofficial.

Total.

2,220 banks.

1,307 banks.

3,527 banks.

RESOURCES.

$524, 927, 804
412, 826, 667
353, 9)4, 054
2, 425, 697
188, 643,448
2«2, 753, 048
79, 408, 443
41, 265, 602
90, 307, 724
124,162, 387
53, 870, 880
1, 856, 076
133, 222, 545
25, 367, 825

$55, 812,320
133,386,136
47, 927, 002
1, 830, 982
21, 599, 949
7, 982, 081
31,145, 809
1, 505, 577
30,164, 354
32, 411, 789
19,427,218
1,901,234
28, 273,188
10, 650, 260

$580, 740,124
546, 212, 803
401, 881, 056
4, 256, 679
210,243, 397
290, 735,129
110, 554,252
42, 771,179
120,472, 078
156, 574,176
73, 298, 098
3, 757, 310
161, 495, 733
36,018, 085

2, 314, 992, 200

424, 017,899

2, 739,010, 099

183, 036, 597
157, 371, 077
43,181, 653
a 5,187, 952
862, 249
1, 864,183, 844
27, 030

82, 331,176
27, 333, 940
12, 524, 373
b 9, 402, 019
503, 675
262, 817, 504
2, 533, 971

265, 367, 773
184, 705, 017
55, 706, 026
C 14, 589, 971
1, 365, 924
2,127, 001, 348
2, 561, 001

272, 818
35, 509, 214
25, 359, 766

1,137, 605
7, 032, 951
18, 400, 685

1, 410,423
42, 542,165
43, 760,451

2, 314, 992, 200

Loans on real estate
.
Loans on personal and collateral security
Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
United States bonds
State, county, and municipal bonds
Railroad bonds and stocks
Bank stock s
Other stocks, bonds, and mortgages
Due from other banks and bankers
Real estate, furniture, and fixtures
Current expenses and taxes paid .-.*
Cash and cash items
All other resources

424, 017, 899

2, 739, 010, 099

,

Total
LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
„-..
Surplus fund
Other undivided profits
State-bank notes outstanding
Dividends unpaid
Individual deposits
State, county, and municipal deposits
Deposits of State, county, and municipal disbursing
officers
Due to other banks and bankers
Other liabilities
Total

a Debenture bonds, $5,066,708; State-bank notes, $121,244.
b Debenture bonds, $9,353,829; State-bank notes, $48,190.
c Debenture bonds, $14,420,537; State-bank notes, $169,434.
NUMBER, CAPITAL STOCK, SURPLUS AND U N D I V I D E D P R O F I T S , AND D E P O S I T S O F
STATE BANKS, 1887-'68.

OFFICIAL.
States, etc.

New Hampshire
Rhode Island...
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania...
Virginia
North. Carolina ..
Louisiana
,
Kentucky
Oijio
Indiana
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
California
Montana
Total




No.

Surplus and
Capital.

undivided
profits.

Deposits.

1
10
8
122
8
77
64
16
6
83
25
32
31
64
74
61
238
177
L10
2

$50, 000
1, 766, 685
2, 390, 000
24,920, 700
1, 085, 000
7, 852, 589
3, 468, 739
1, 095,170
2,117, 259
12, 597, 937
1,504,100
1, 742, 500
2, 071, 200
3, 821,100
4, 028, 743
5, 733, 000
13, 430, 003
6, 569, 699
39, 893, 903
150, 000

$14, 549
173, 853
438, 533
16, 374,623
341, 654
2, 892, 777
1,167, 989
340, 048
567, 308
3,357, 941
319,079
259,136
549, 013
1, 301, 602
930, 462
1, 544, 270
7, 667, 806
985,129
12, 341, 586
8,570

$40, 257
1, 267, 567
3, 985, 603
140, 043,155
3,128, 522
30, 412, 607
10, 653, 301
1,181,422
5, 819, 890
19, 919, 044
3, 837, 018
3, 304, 201
6, 539, 253
22, 429,490
7,167, 008
14,702,727'
54, 058, 807
9, 887, 858
48, 309,118
330,675

1,209

136,288,327

51,575, 928

387,017,523

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER 01' THE CURRENCY.

21

NUMBER, CAPITAL STOCK, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, AND DEPOSITS OF
STATE BANKS, 1887-788—Continued.

UNOFFICIAL.

States, etc.

No.

Delaware
Maryland
West Virginia.
South Carolina
Georgia
, Alabama
Mississippi
Arkansas
Tennessee
Nebraska
Dakota

28
60
23

Total....

j

194

Surplus and
undivided
profits.

Capital.

$420, 000
2, 484, 480
453, 744 !
;
420, 000
7,064,477 !
705,625 i
1,079,000 !
288,000 I
2,336,690 !
2,201,100 *
590,425 !

2
9
10
8
19

$71,419
536, 279
241,900
110, 700
2, 680, 518
216, 699
36*, 210
46, 811
578,580
370, 509
87, 535
5, 309,160

18,643,541

Deposits.

$455,175
3, 861, 217
1, 471, 307
436, 720
5, 328, 861
716,333
2, 245,511
618,174
4,033,526
3, 314, 267
549, 228
23, i;30,319

NUMBER, CAPITAL STOCK, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, AND DEPOSITS OF
LOAN AND TRUST COMPANIES, 1887-'88.

OFFICIAL.

I

States, etc.

I No.

Capital.

•

Maine
New Hampshire.
Massachusetts...
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
Minnesota

:
21
j

Total .

Surplus and
! undivided
profits.

Deposits.

$435,000
400,000
5, 050, 000
1,500, 000
1,036,600
16, 596, 100 ;
1,895,500 ;

$44, 223
41,173
2, 715, 395
159, £04
299, 607
19,942,211
209, 569

$725, 300
297, 520
41, 230, 824
8,180,236
2, 985, 732
154,601,138
7i8, 876

20,913,200 •

23,411,982

208, 739, 626

UNOFFICIAL.

States, etc.

Pennsylvania
Illinois
Iowa
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Dakota
Total ..,




Capital.

$14,106,
2, 479,
1, 415,
2,176,
3, 838,
1, 390,
924,

1
Surplus and
j undivided
proms.

Deposits.

610
000
000
700
600
000
400

$9, 050, 674
1, 230, 054
173, 917
827, 405
801, 577
310,821
145, 256

$38, 589,403
7, 364, 824
343,190
888,083
1, 649,194
258, 219
45, 575

26, 330, 310

12, 539, 705

49,138,488

22

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NUMBER, CAPITAL STOCK, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, AND DEPOSITS OF
SAVINGS BANKS (MUTUAL AND STOCK ASSOCIATIONS), 1887-r88.

MUTUAL, OFFICIAL.
States, etc.

Capital.

No.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
District of Columbia
Ohio
Indiana
Minnesota
,

55
69
19
173
37
85
118
24
1
4
6
7

Surplus and
undivided
profits.
$2, 403, 008
5,115, 995
772, 625
13,833,916
2, 996, 982
3,514,772
85, 249, 647
2, 482,129
21, 006
1. 441, 514
183, 203
183,208

Total

Deposits.
$38, 819, 643
f 3, 939, 079
13, 009, 847
302,948, 624
55, 363, 283
102,189,934
505, 017, 751
29, 060,189
923, 958
16, 444, 306
2, 645, 967
3, 786, 366

118,198, 005 1,124,148, 947

STOCK, OFFICIAL.

States, etc.

Capital.

No.

Surplus and
undivided
profits.

Deposits.

......

Iowa
California
Total

10
4
1
22
43
42
23

$475, 450
88, 975
100,000
1,712, 400
3, 703, 762
2, 637,400
4, 404,447

$129, 347
8,638
49,149
339, 623
1, 034, 244
540,129
3, 053, 527

$3, 592,219
127,186
664, 098
7, 609, 974
22, 943, 806
11, 268, 079
77, 718, 534

145

Vermont
North Carolina
Louisiana
Ohio

13,122, 431

5,154, 657

123, 923, 896

MUTUAL, UNOFFICIAL.

Capital.

No.

States, etc.

Surplus and
undivided
profits.

Deposits.

7
2
17
4

Total

$55,469, 516
3,187,886
32, 044, 508
1,249, 614

30

Maryland
Illinois

$5,116, 764
284, 419
1,201,448
198, 339
6, 800, 970

91, 951, 524

STOCK, UNOFFICIAL.

States, etc.
Maryland
South Carolina . . . . . .
Georgia
Ohio
Illinois
Utah

...

Total




Capital.

No.

.......

Surplus and
undivided
profits.

Deposits.

5
6
5
6
5
1

$184,656
330, 540
308, 600
1,379, 091
975, 000
50, 000

$35,492
350,189
85, 022
815, 251
1, 234, 231
22,465

$368, 579
3, 243, 811
1, 761, 282
7, 748, 204
10, 581, 240
469,067

28

3,227,887

2. 542, 650

24,172,183

REPORT OP THE COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

23

NUMBER, CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED. PROFITS, AND DEPOSITS OF PRIVATE
BANKS, 1888.

OFFICIAL.
States, etc.

No.

Capital.

Surplus and.
undivided
profits.

Deposits.

10
72
91
30
9

Total

$73, 267
554, 281
892, 447
596, 838
95,325

$404,026
5,742, 445
7, 014, 669
6, 477, 331
715, 381

212

California
Wyoming

$247, 000
972, 978
1,370,241
3, 793, 092
329, 325
6, 712, 636

2, 212,158

20, 353, 852

UNOFFICIAL.
States, etc.

No.

Capital.

Maine ..,
Massachusetts
Connecticut ..
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania..
Maryland
,
Virginia
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi...
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
"Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Colorado
Nevada
,
California
Oregon
Arizona
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico...
Utah
Washington ..
Wyoming
,

2
5
3
3C
6
39
3
3
3
8
7
6
2
2
26
7
12
69
39
120
53
3
134
39

Total...,

991




r

122
125
16
2
3
7
4
63
1
2
3
6
9
2

$60, 000
420, 000
56, 285
903, 738
346, 214
1, 286, 843
133, 408
110, 000
161, 353
600, 898
129,164
273,500
52, 000
167,000
2, 833, 569
219, 500
536,180
2, 492, 534
2, 264, 609
5, 067,412
1, 087, 687
12, 000
4,174,133
919, 652
200, 000
3, 834,127
2, 492, 292
474, 897
168, 700
99, 573
187, 900
160, 000
1,130, 824
50, 000
119, 320
105, 800
279, 811
488, 515
30, 000
34,129,438

Surplus and
undivided
profits.

Deposits.

$6,597
217, 210
2,997
364, 921
206, 396
1,116, 847
1,465
42, 726
5,567
34, 638
25, 772
1, 223,175
18, 728
26,125
323, 067
26, 030
60, 729
984, 821
354, 895
2, 829, 321
209, 922
6,207
1, 010,102
293,266
35, 834
734, 341
677, 848
135, 978
34, 834
7,878
18, 950
60, 291
250, 886
145, 000
80,159
8, 954
1, 025, 459
53, 368
4,524

$146, 626
626,414
268, 804
2, 259,153
1,470,396
8, 932,477
63,192
386, 325
43, 513
171, 672
374, 885
1,315, 669
73,161
82, 642
2, 590, 754
437, 820
' 1, 010, 819
8, 637, 624
4, 893, 064
15, 335,137
2, 278, 518
107, 349
6, 388, 870
1, 796, 211
447, 335
4, 084, 959
3, 447, 089
1, 259, 495
102, 272
81, 930
185, 612
288, 407
874, 716
12, 000
1,365, 804
154, 345
894, 021
1, 619, 370
16, 540

12, 665, 828

74, 524, 990

24

REPORT OP THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NUMBER, CAPITAL STOCK, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, AND DEPOSITS OF
ALL STATE BANKS, LOAN AND TRUST COMPANIES, AND SAVINGS (MUTUAL AND
STOCK) AND PRIVATE BANKS, 1887-'88.
OFFICIAL.
Classes.
State banks
Loan and trust companies .
Savings banks (mutual)
Savings banks (stock)
Private banks
Total

No. j
., 209
56
598
145
212

Capital.

: $136, 288,327
! 20,913,200
'
j 13,122,434
'
0,712,636

| 2,220 j 183,036,597 |

Surplus and
undivided
profits.
$51, 575, 928
23, 411, 982
118,198, 005
5,154, 657
2, 212,158

Deposits.
$387, 017, 523
208, 739, 626
1,124,148, 947
123, 923, 89fi
20, 353, 852

200,552,730 j 1,864,183,844

UNOFFICIAL.
Classes.
State banks
Loan and trust companies
Savings banks (mutual)...
Savings banks (stock)
Private banks

No.

Capital.
$18, 643, 541
26, 330, 310

1, 307

Total

194
64
30
28
991

Surplus and
undivided

profits.

Deposits.

3, 227, 887
34,129, 438

$5,309,160
12, 539, 705
6, 800, 970
2, 542, 650
12, 665, 828

$23, 030, 319
49,138, 488
91, 951, 524
24,172,183
74, 524, 990

82, 331,176

39,858,313

262, 817, 504

A table in the appendix, page 139, shows, by States and Territories,
the estimated population of each on June 1, 1888, and the aggregate
capital, surplus, undivided profits, and individual deposits of national
and {State banks, loan and trust companies, and savings and private
banks in the United States on June 30, 1888; the average of these per
capita of population, and the per-capita averages of such resources in
each class of banks, from which it appears that the estimated population of the United States is 61,394,000; total banking funds amount to
$4,766,909,263, which is an average of $77.64. The per-capita averages
of such resources in each class of banks are: National banks, $34.76;
State banks, $10.13; loan and trust companies, $5.65; savings banks,
$24.64, and private banks, $2.46.
The total " cash in bank?? held by the 3,527 institutions reporting
officially and unofficially is $161,495,733, of which $44,288,254 is taken
as gold (that amount includes $5,587,144 in coin, $591,385 in gold certificates, $18,445,351 specie, and $19,664,374, the amount in the California banks), $1,358,513 silver coin, $553,507 silver certificates,
$28,954,575 legal tenders and national-bank notes, and $86,340,884 not
classified.
For purposes of comparison, the following table is appended:
STATEMENT SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF GOLD, SILVER, ETC., HELD BY NATIONAL
BANKS AND OTHER BANKING ASSOCIATIONS, JUNE 30, 1888.
Classification.
Gold coins
Gold certificates
Gold certificates (clearing-house) .
Silver, dollars
Silver, fractional
Silver certificates
National-bank notes
Legal-tender notes
Specie, not classified
Cash, not classified
Total .




National
banks.
$74, 825,
68, 761,
20. 884,
6, 906,
2, 819,
7, 094,
21, 343,
81,995,

284, 631, 325

Other(3 527)
banking
associations.

Total.

$25, 251, 518
591, 385

$100,077,301
69, 353, 315
20, 884, 000

1, 358, 513

11, 084, 223

553, 507

7, 648, 361

28, 954, 575
18, 445, 351
86, 340, 884

132, 293,623

161, 495, 733

446,127, 058

18,445,351
86, 340, 884

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

25

FIFTH.
NAMES AND COMPENSATION OF OFFICERS AND CLERKS IN THE OFFICE OF THE
COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, OCTOBER 31? 1888.

Names.
William L. Trenholm
Jesse 1). Abrahams
George M. Coffin
John J. Crawford
Alonzo B. Dickerson
Thomas McGrain
George B. Faxon
David L. Perkins
Theodore O. Ebaugh
Charles J. Stoddard
Charles E. Bray ton
Edward A. Demaray
Watson W. Eldridge
John A. Hebrew
George T. May
Edmund E. Schreiner
Walter Tay]or
Charles McC. Taylor
Thomas P. Kane
Harriet M. Black
Sarah F. Fitzgerald
Willis J. Fowler
William H. Heald
Edward S. May
Washington K. McCoy
Isaac C. Miller
Joseph K. Miller
William D. Swan*
Ephraim S.Wilcox
George H. Wood
William E. Colladay
Julia R.Donoho ..."
K. LeRoy Livingston
Mary L. McCormick
Morris M. Ogden
Frank E. Patterson
Margaretta L. Simpson
Arthur M. Wheeler
Eveline C. Bates
AVillardE. Buell
Eliza R. Hyde
Carrie L. Pennock
Charles A. Stewart
Therese E. Tilley
Anna M. Whiteside
Frederick Widdo ws
Eliza M. Barker
Alice M. Kennedy
Lafayette J. Garner
Thomas H. Austin
Margaret L. Browne
Philo L. Bush
Louisa Campbell
Sarah M. Cartwright
"Virginia H. Clarke
Sarah G. Clemens
Geraldine Clifford
Mary L. Conrad
William S. Davenport
Amanda W. Doty..
Kossa F. Downing
Elizabeth E. Esje
Henry S. Goodall
Margaret E. Gooding
Mary B. Harvell
Lucretia W. Knowlton
Emma Lafayette
Loren H. Milliken
Franklin L. Mitchell
Mary E. Oliver
William W. Poultney
Carrie B. Pumphrey
Marie Richardson
Francis M. Richardson
Hannah Sanderson




Salary.

Grade.
Comptroller
Deputy comptroller.
Chief of division
do.
do .
do .
Superintendent
Teller
Book-keej>er
,
Assistant book-keeper .
Fourth-class clerk
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Stenographer
Third-class clerk
,
,

:

.,«. ..

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Second-class clerk
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
First-class clerk
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Clerk
do
Engineer
Clerk
do
do
do
do
Clerk
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
......do
do
do
do
do
do

* Additional as bond clerk, $200.

,

$5, 000
2,800
2,200
2, 200
2,200
2,200
2,000
2,000
2,000
2, 000
1,800
1,800
1,800
1,800
1,800
1,800
1,800
1,800
1,600
1,600
1,600
1, 600
.1, 600
1,600
1,600
1, 600
1, 600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,400
1, 400
1,400
1,400
1,400
1, 400
1,400
1,400
1,200
1, '200
1, 200
1,200
1, 200
1, 200
1, 200
1, 200
1,000
1,000
1, 000
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900

26

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NAMES AND COMPENSATION OF OFFICERS AND CLERKS IN THE OFFICE OF THE
COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, OCTOBER 31, 1888—Continued.
Names.
Eliza A. Saunders
Fayette C. Snead
Mathilda C. Stotfregen.
Warren E. Sullivan
EliseK. Taylor
Sarah A. W. Tiffey
Julia C. To wnsend
Caius E. Triplet
Morris A. Moore
Harry C. Derby
William Griffiths
Silas Holmes
John F. Robertson
Langston W. Allen
W. Frank Robey
Samuel M. Freeman . . .
Bessie P. Oowell
James F. Govern
Herman Stiebeling

Grade.
Clerk...
do.
.do.
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do.
.do .
Messenger
.'
Assistant messenger.,
do
do....
do
Watchman,
do .
Fireman .
Laborer..
do ..
do ..

Salary.
$900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
840
720
720
720
720
720
720
720
660
660
660

EXPENSES OF THE OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY FOR THE
YEAR ENDING JCTNE 30, 1888.
For special dies, plates, printing, etc
For salaries.
For salaries, reimbursable by national banks

$57,113.26
101,878.04
16,550.39

The contingent expenses of the office are not paid by the Comptroller,
but from the general appropriation for contingent expenses of the
Treasury Department $ no separate account of them is kept.
ORGANIZATION AND EXPENSES OF THE BUREAU OF THE CURRENCY.

It is unnecessary to reiterate what was said in the last Annual Eeport
upon this subject, and what will be found on one point or another in
every Keport of the Comptroller of the Currency since 1876, as to the
inadequacy of the clerical force or means at the disposal of the Comptroller.
I respectfully repeat, however, the specific recommendations submitted last year, as, "in order that the present work of the Bureau
may be properly performed, the following changes are essential:
" 1 . The Deputy Comptroller should have a salary of $3,500. Ub
less sum can be depended&upon to secure or to permanently retain any
one entirely qualified for the position.
U
2. There should be provided for the Bureau a responsible legal
adviser, with such clerks and books as may be necessary to the proper
examination of the questions that are daily presented iu almost every
branch of commercial law.
" 3. There should be added to the four divisions now existing a division of archives and statistics.
" Provision should be made by appropriation for an annual conference in Washington of all examiners of national banks, for the employment of supervising examiners, as recommended elsewhere, for such
traveling expenses as may be incurred by the Comptroller or Deputy
Comptroller in visiting different sections of the country in connection
with the banks and banking interests there, and for the accumulation
of a library of standard books of reference on subjects relating to banking and financial legislation and administration."




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF TTTE CURRENCY.

27

INFORMATION.

Section 333 of the Eevised Statutes of the United States, in prescribing the scope of the annual report to be made by the Comptroller of the
Currency, imposes upon that officer the further duty of submitting to
Congress such other information in relation to the banks as in his judgment may be useful. The following information is accordingly submitted.
THE ORGANIZATION OF NATIONAL BANKS.

During the year under review there has been no change in the laws
governing the organization of national banking associations, nor in those
which provide for the conversion into such an association of any banking corporation having a State or Territorial charter; hence what was
said on this subject in the last Report still applies.
The four following tables give for each State and Territory the number, aggregate capital, bonds, and circulation of national banks existing
October 31,1887, and of banks organized during the year ending October 31, 1888, and show the net increase or decrease in capital, bonds,
and circulation for each class of banks during the past year, including
failed and liquidating banks.
It will be observed that in the first table the figures showing circulation do not bear in all cases to the figures showing the amount of bonds
the relative proportion to be expected from the provision of law which
is intended to keep the circulation at 90 per cent, of the par value of
bonds. Where discrepancies exist they are attributable to two causes:
(1) The occasional surrender of circulation prior to the actual withdrawal of the bonds. (2) The redemption of the notes of failed banks
for which deposits have been made with the Treasurer out of collections
by receivers in cases where the state of the trust allowed of the retention of bonds for the sake of the interest accruing upon them which
would otherwise have been lost if the redemption fund had been provided for by their sale.
Banks newly organized are required to pay in the subscribed capital
as follows: At date of authority to commence business, 50 per cent.,
each month thereafter 10 per cent.; bonds may be deposited in proportion to capital paid in; circulation is issued only upon bonds actually
deposited.




28

REPOBT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
BanU s

Banks existing October 31,1887.

States and Territories.

No.

Capital.

Bonds.

Circulation.

organized during year ending
October 31,1888.

No.

Capital.

Bonds.

Circulation.

Maine
New Hampshire...
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut

73 $10, 490, 700
49 6, 205, 000
49 7, 566, 000
252 95, 740, 500
61 4)0 340 050
83 24,405,410 ;

545
492
054
347
584
540

2

$100, 000

$25, 000

$22, 500

2

300, 000

62, 500

56, 250

50,000

12,500

11, 250

Division No. 1..
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania

567 :104, 747, 660 j 61,903,250 55, 333, 562

5

450,000

100, 000

90, 000

324 85, 724, 2«0
81 13,024,220
303 66, 389,140

30,149, 050
6, 8«2,100
19,701,800

27,181,183
5, 981, 337
17, 609, 492

3

250, 000
300, 000
1, 014, 000

62, 500
75, 000
203, 500

56, 250
67, 500
. 180, 000

Division No. 2.. 708 165,137, 620
Delaware
17 2, 083, 985
Maryland
48 14, 509, 960
Districtof Columbia
8 1, 827, 000
Virginia
25 3, 796, 300
West Virginia
20 1, 961, 000

56, 712, 950

50, 772, 012

19

1, 564, 000

341, 000

306, 900

1, 596, 700
3, 417, 000
930, 000
1, 352, 500
761, 250

I, 348, 070
3, 290, 499
744, 388
1, 171,366
707,392

1
1

50, 000
60, 000

12, 500
15, 000

11, 250
13, 500

1

50, 000

12, 500

11, 250

Division No. 3..
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia.
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Division No. 4..
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Division No. 5..
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Division No. 6..
Colorado
Nevada
California
Arizona
Division No. 7..
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
Utah
Washington
Wyoming
Division No. 8..
United States

$5, 496, 000
4, 019, 500
3, 891, 000
33, 596, 750
fi 18^ 900
9,716,100

$5, 004,
2, 622,
2, 999,
30, 504,
4, 686,
9, 516,

i ;

r

11

118

24, 178, 245

8, 057, 450

7, 261, 715

3

160, 000

40, 000

36,000

18
15
21
10
20
12
13
91
7

928, 500
867, 940
624, 750
553, 215
9W8, 500
888, 151
217,500
141. 108
900,500
831,937
320, 000
258, 530
1,500,000
1,442,262
2, 41.">, 300 i 2, 167,628
422, 500
335. 764
4,105, 000
3, 783, 331
1, 483, 750
1, 126, 410

2
1
4
3
2

150,000
50, 000
250,000
250,000
100, 000

37,
12,
62,
62,
25,

33,
11,
56,
56,
22,

6X
40

2,412, 280
1, 698, 000
3, 050, 520
600, 000
3, 485,100
1, 055, 000
3, 425, 000
9,919,750
1, 000, 000
13,310,400
7, 460, 000

315

500
500
500
500
000

75a
250
250
250
500

9

1, 395, 000

237, 500

213, 750

2
2

164, 000
150,000

41, 000
37, 500

36, 900
33, 750

47, 416, 050

13, 906, 300

12, 396, 276

25

2, 509, 000

516, 000

464, 400

216 39, 896, 020
93 11.894. 500
178 ' 20 3sn 500
108 14, 558, 140
5, 092, 000
56

14, 329, 650
4, 848, 800
5, 809, 000
3, 387, 750
1, 673, 000

12, 809 832 i
4, 477, 806
5,168, 390
3,150, 395
1, 478, 779

fi

4
5
5
3

960, 000
420, 000
1,150, 000
350,000
250, 000

177,500
105, 000
150, 000
87, 500
62, 500

159,
94,
135,
78,
56,

651 J00, 832,160

30,048,200 ' 27, 085, 202

23

3,130, 000

582, 500

524, 250

4
1
3

65,
12,
125,
402
77,

58,
11,
112,
3rt9
69,

129
58
50
142
104

10, 230, 000
13, 740, 000
11,757,280
10 780 800
8, 456,100

3, 080, 500
1, 863, 550
2, 053, 300

483

54, 964,180

31
2
33
23
1

2, 751, 8.'0
150, 000
6, 870, 000 |
i
100, 000

I, 876, 500

2, 789, 963
1, 753, 225
1,857,0(58
2 474 115
1, 652, 338

9;*
6

260, 000
50, 000
650, 000
1,610,000
310, 000

11,690,850

'). 817 ()()(»

500
250
500
9^0
750

10, 526, 709 ;

37

2, 880, 000

682, 500

989, 000
37, 500
1, 838, 750
644 800
25, 000

869, 835
15, 444
1, 549,135
6L7 100
21,870

3

200, 0U0

50, 000

45, 000

6
4'

650, 000
200, 000

162, 500
50, 000

146, 250
45, 000

3,073,384 !

13

1, 050, 000

262, 500

236, 250

!
1

100,000
100, 000

25, 000 ~'
25, 000

22,500
22, 500

i

210,000
50, 000

52, 500
12, 500

47, 250
11, 250

460,000

115, 000

103, 500

12, 203, 000 2, 639, 500

2, 375, 550

90

11, 666, 850

3, 535, 050

62
6
17
9
7
20
8

3, 720, 000
350, 000
1, 975, 000
850, 000
850, 000
1, 580, 000
1, 075, 000

962, 500
92, 800
480, 600
240,000
390, 000
480, 000
223, 750

866 297
72, 266
449, 745
196, 243
363 116
522,140
170, 455

129

10, 400, 000

2, 869, 650

2,610,262

7

3,061 579, 342, 765 188, 723, 700 169, 089,122

132




000
500
000
500
500 |

750
500
000
750
250

614,250

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLEK OF THE CURRENCY.

States and Territories.

Increase among banks existing October
31, 1887, and number of banks concerned
in such increase.
No.

Capital.

Bonds.

Circulation.

29

Total increase, and number of
banks concerned in such increase.
^T
JNo
:

-

Capital.

Bonds.

Circulation.

I

M!aine

.

1

$100, 000

$12,500

Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Division No. 1..
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Division No. 2..

5

500, 000

600, 000

12, 500

33,750 ;

Division No. 3..

Division No. 4..
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Division No. 5..
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Division No. 6..
Colorado
Nevada
California
Oregon
Arizona
Division No. 7..
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
Utah
Washington
Wyoming
Division No. 8..
United States

$200, 000

$37,500

«oo nno

62, 500

50,000

12, 500

11, 250

10

1,050,000

112, 500

123, 750

9
6

$44,990
11, 250
10
56,250

6
1

820, 000

121, 250

314, 000

525, 000

182, 095
11,250
378, 350

13

1, 070, 000
300,000
1, 328, 000

183, 750
75, 000
725, 000

238, 345
78, 750
561, 500

10

1,134, 000

646, 250

571, 695

28

2, 698, 000

987, 250

878, 595

10

2

50, 000
60, 000

12, 500
15, 000

11,2(50
13, 500

IVIar viand
Districtof Columbia

North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi....
^Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee

3
1
1
4

3

i

West Virginia

!

1

x

1
2

$22,490
11,250
10

1

5,000

1,250

1,130

1
1

50, 000
5,000

12,500
1,250

11, 250
1,130

2

5,000

1,260

1,140

5

165, 000

41, 250

37,140

5,625
50, 380
31, 370
11,250
11, 260
10
55, 200
10, 000

150,
75,
325,
300,
100,
50,

37,
18,
81,
62,
25,
12,

330,000
115, 000

17, 750

15, 985

2
2
6
4
3
1
1
16
1
5
6

22

1, 090, 700

116, 200

191, 080

47

3, 599, 700

632, 200

655, 480

6

88, 500
30, 000

34, 630
81, 070

1
2
1

725 000
70 000
150, 000
] 35, 000
200, 000

8,750
6,000

8, 310
5,415

12
6
5
7
4

1, 685, 000
490, 000
1, 300, 000
485, 000
450, 000

266,
135,
150,
96,
68,

000
000
000
250
500

194, 380
175, 570
135, 000
87, 060
61,665

12

1, 280, 000

1
2
1
1
1
1
7
1
3
4

25, 000
75, 000
50, 000

6,250
18, 500

50, 000

12, 500

445, 700

61, 200

0(,0
000
000
000
000
000

500
750
000
500
000
500

33,
16,
106,
87,
33,
11,

1, 840, 700

208, 700

494, 000
265, 000

41, 000
55, 250

268,
10,
36,
49,

750
875
630
620
750
260
10
950
000
900
735

133, 250

129,425

34

4, 410, 000

715, 750

653, 675

000
000
000
000
000

62, 500
77,500
350
56, 250
31, 250

9,010
24, 750
360
113, 005
22, 530

5
8
4
29
12

310, 000
805, 000
1,150, 000
1, 960, 000
1,180, 000

127, 500
90, 000
125, 350
458, 750
108,750

67, 510
36, 000
112,860
475, 255
92, 280

21

2,625,000

227,850

169, 655

5
2
7
3

480, 000
132,000
650,000
375, 000

17

1, 637, 000

1
1
I
1
1
3
1

100, 000

1
6
2
6
6

50,
755,
600,
350,
870,

50,
50,
75,
50,

000
000
000
000

58

5,105, 000

910,350

783, 905

240
700
280
510

8
2
13
7

680,000
132, 000
1, 300, 000
575, 000

82, 500
33,000
225, 000
75, 000

74,240
29, 700
202, 530
67, 510

153, 000

137, 730

30

2, 687, 000

415, 500

373, 980

25, 000

2
2
1
1

200 000
100,000

50 000
25,000

37, 500

50
24,750
7,520
33, 750

16, 2"0
12,500

33, 360
11, 240

7 ;
2

32,
33,
62,
25,

500
000
500
000

29,
29,
56,
22,

]

50, 000
no ooo

37, 500

22, 550
47, 250
7,520
33, 750

285,000
100,000

68, 750
25, 000

80, 610
22, 490

9

325, 000

91, 250

110, 670

16

785,000 | 206,250

214,170

98

8, 696, 700

1, 381, 505

1, 345,145

230

20, 897, 700 ,4, 021, 050

3, 720, 695




30

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
Total.

Decrease in capital, bonds, and circulation, with number of banks concerned in
such decrease.
Failed and liquidating banks.

States and Territories.

No.

Capital.

Bonds.

|

Banks existing October 31, 1887.

Circulation No.

Capital.

12

Bonds.

Circulation

$300, 000

$572, 500
355, 000
377, 000
5,985, 650
550, 000
954,000

Division No. 1..

2

156, 000

40, tOO

35, 220

80

300, 000

8, 764,150

7, 913, 030

New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Division No. 2..

5

700, 000

254, 500

102, 450

1

300, 000

50, 000

45, 000

35
8
26

162, 000
20, 000
125, 000

3,488, 200
383, 350
1, 5u8, 000

3,139,350
345, 015
1, 357, 200

,000,01)0 i 304,500

147, 450

69

307, 000

5, 379, 550

4, 841, 565

1, 2fi8, 500
100, 000
210, 000
37,500

1,141, 650
90, 000
189, 000
33,750

jjg-^y Hampshire

Vermont
Massachusetts
Hhode Island
Connecticut

Dist. of Columbia.
Virginia
West Virginia
Division No. 3..
North Carolina
South Carolina.

1 $100, 000
1
56, 000

6

$25, 000
15, 000

$21, 720
13, 500

5
39
3
16

$515, 250
319, 500
339, 300
5,386, 380
495, 000
857,600

1

110, 000

50,000

10, 700

7
1
1
1

1

110,000

50, 000

10, 700

10

1, 616, 000

1, 454, 400

2

300, 000

75, 000

62, 080

3
3
1

175, 000
175, 000
75, 000

157, 500
157, 500
67, 500

50, 000

45, 000

Florida
Alabama . .
Mississippi
..
Texas

3

72, 900

80, 000

72,000

Xentuckv
Tennessee

1

50, 000

50, 000

45, 000

6
5

20, 000

684, 000
97, 500

615,600
87, 750

Division No.4..
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan

3

Division No. 5..
Iowa
Missouri
Kansas . . . . . . . . . .
Nebraska
Division No. 6..
Colorado....
Nevada
California
Oregon .
Arizona
Division No. 7..
Dakota
Idaho .
.. .
New Mexico
Utah .
"Washington.
Division No. 8..
United States

350, 000

125, 000

107, 080

21

92, 900

1, 336, 500

1, 202, 850

3 1,430,000
50, 000
1
1 500, 000
3 20U, 000

167, 500
12, 500
50, 000
75, 000

165, 470
11, 2f,0
45, 000
81,120

19
7
10
5
1

100, 000
125, 000
27, 500

2, 298, 850
330,000
274, 500
212,500
50, 000

2, 068,
297,
247,
191,
45,

8 2,180, 000

305, 000

302,840

42

252, 500

3,165, 850

2, 849, 265

3
3
3
4
4

200, 000
875, 000
500, 000
200,000
250, 000

50, 000
118,750
100, 000
50,000
63, 000

84 170
106, 875
89, 430
44, 990
56,160

2

100, 000

38, 000

34, 200

4
2
1

25, 000

568, 400
50, 000
12, 500

511, 560
45, 000
11, 250

17 2, 025, 000

381, 750

381, 625

10

125,000

668, 900

602, 010

12, 500

11, 250

2
1

125, 000
200, 000

112, 500
180, 000

3

325, 000

292, 500

77 500

69, 750

1

50, 000

1

50, 000

12, 500

11, 250

4

200, 000

50, 000

45 000

j

1

25. 000

2
4

200, 000

965
000
050
250
000

50, 000

45, 000

3

25, 000

77, 500

69, 750

42 6,071, 000 il, 268, 750

1, 041,165

238

1,102, 400

21,363,450

19, 225, 370




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

31

Net increase and decrease during the year ending October 31,1888.

States and Territories.

Net increase.
Capital.

Bonds.

Net decrease.

Circulation.

Capital.

$200, 000

Circulation.

$535, 000
355, 000
377, 000
5, 738,150
565, 000
941, 500

$470,260
308,250
339, 290
5,162, 850
508, 500
846, 350

594, 000

8, 511, 650

7, 635, 500

208, 000
280 000
903 000

"Wgw Hamnshire
"Vermont
--»

3, 546, 450
308 350
790, 000

2, 992, 205
266, 265
805,150

4, 644, 800

4, 063, 620

1, 253, 500
100,000
137, 500
86, 250

1,128,150
90, 000
123, 750
43,320

1, 564, 750

1, 373, 960

212, 500
156, 250

185, 830
140,625

693, 000
42, 250

623, 700
38, 015

700, 000
$56,000
250, 000

Division N o . l
New Y ork
Pennsylvania
Division No. 2
Delaware
JVlaryland

--- . . . . .

"Virginia
West Virginia

1, 391, 000
50, 000
60, 000

$12, 500

$11, 260

50 000
105, 000
55 000
150, 000

South Carolina
fJeoriria
Florida
.
Alabama
.....

000
000
000
000
000

6,000
62, 500
25, 000
12, 500

1, 767, 800

IVxas
Arkansas

75,
325,
300,
100,
50,

218, 700

39,130
87,620
33, 750
11,260
10
196, 950
10, 000

424, 000
265, 000

r

_LViinesspp

Division No. 4
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois

Division No 5

779, 300

Division No. 7

50, 860
70, 875
488,130

140, 300

199, 730

125, 000

358, 750
33, 250

112, 490

385, 265
24, 870

680, 000
132,000
1, 250, 000
575, 000

Division No. 6
Colorado
Nevada
California

Dakota
Idaho
^Montana

750, 000
1,735,000
930, 000

28, 750
543, 050

39, 500
70, 000

......

2, 498, 430

16, 665

1 977 500
10, 000

2,040, 055
132, 680
157, 050
185, 310

2, 755,100

18, 500

609, 450

2, 200, 350
207, 500
174, 500
191, 250

3 156 800
155,000 i
315, 000
772, 500
285,000
450, 000

Wisconsin

Towa
^Minnesota
Missouri
ICansas
Nebraska

Bonds.

82, 500
33, 000
87, 500

74, 240
29, 700
78,780

2, 637, 000

78, 000

70, 230

100, 000

25, 000

3, 355, 000

-

Utah
Washington
Division No. 8
United States




22, 450
000
000
000
000

37, 500

47, 250
7, 520
33, 750

25, 000

10, 860
22,490

560, 000

78, 750

99, 420

50,
50,
285,
100,

13, 726,300

25, 000
8,750

18, 239,150

16, 545, 740

32

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

With a net increase during the year of 90 in the number of banks,
and of $13,726,300 in national-bank capital, there has been a net decrease in circulation of $10,545,740.
By reference to the table on page Gl, showing the details of bond deposits by banks organized within the year, it will be seen that these
banks deposited only the minimum required by law, and thesame is true
of banks increasing their capital.
The table on page 28, exhibiting the elements of increase and decrease during the year, shows that of the $3,720,G95 added to nationalbank circulation since November 1, 1887, $2,375,550 has been issued
upon bonds deposited, not for the sake of circulation, but to secure
the other advantages afforded by the national-bank system; while on
the other hand, with the exception of $1,041,165 in notes of failed and
liquidating banks, the whole reduction in national-bank currency represents the voluntary surrender of circulation by banks which have
heretofore held bonds in excess of the minimum requirement.
The circulation surrendered by such banks is $19,225,370, which is
about 20 per cent, of the circulation outstanding a year ago on the
bonds representing the excess above the minimum required by law and
which may be called the voluntary circulation.
Two new influences have come into play during the past thirteen
months, accelerating the retirement of national-bank circulation, viz,
(1) the transfer to national-bank depositaries of a part of the redundant
revenues of the Government, and (2) the large purchases of bonds by
the Treasury Department.
NATIONAL BANK DEPOSITARIES.

* In October, 1887, with a view to averting a threatened monetary
stringency arising from the abnormal accumulation of cash in the
Treasury, the Secretary resolved to increase the amounts in national
bank depositaries under section 5153, Revised Statutes. The depositaries have always been required to give United States bonds as security for the public moneys intrusted to them, but owing to the high
price, of the bonds and the requirement of section 5191, Revised Statutes as to the reserve to be held against all deposits, the banks were
unwilling to receive additional amounts at the old rate of 90 per cent,
on 4J per cent, bonds and par on the 4 per cent., so that it was determined that banks depositing $1,000,000 in 4J per cent, bonds might
carry not exceeding $1,000,000 of public moneys, and those depositing
$1,000,000 in 4 per cent, bonds might carry $1,100,000. Subsequently
banks were allowed to deposit less than $1,000,000 in bonds and to
carry balances in the above proportions. Since the bonds of both
classes held as security for circulation entitled the banks to only 90 per
cent, of their face in circulating notes, against which beside they had
to keep up a redemption fund of 5 per cent., the opportunity of obtaining Government deposits on the above terms operated as an inducement to the surrender of voluntary circulation, in order that the bonds
thereby released might be transferred to the Secretary to be held as
security for public moneys.
The precise extent to which this influence was effective in reducing
circulation can not be shown because the transfers were not always made
directly. Jn some cases banks intending to withdraw 4£ per cent, bonds
and to surrender the circulation outstanding against "them, deposited
lawful money to effect the withdrawal and afterward sent on 4 per cent,




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

33

bonds as security for the public moneys, and in other cases the deposit
of 4 per cent, bonds was made first and the withdrawal of 4J percents
effected afterward, but in both cases it was the terms on which Government funds could be obtained that operated to reduce national-bank circulation.
The subjoined table, showing the transfers directly made from circulation account to public moneys account in each month for the past two
years, exhibits in a striking manner the effect of this influence.
STATEMENT B Y MONTHS, SHOWING T H E AMOUNT OF U N I T E D STATES BONDS TRANSF E R R E D FROM T H E S E C U R I T I E S H E L D I N T R U S T B Y T H E T R E A S U R E R O F T H E U N I T E D
STATES F O R NATIONAL-BANK CIRCULATION TO T H E S E C U R I T I E S SO H E L D FOR P U B L I C
D E P O S I T S DURING TUP: TWO YEARS ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1887-788, AND T H E M E T H -

ODS BY WHICH SUCH TRANSFER WAS MADE.

Date.

Total.

Exchanged.

Substituted.

Transferred by retirement of
circulation.

1886.
$70,000
200, 000

November .
December..

$70,000
100, 000

$100, 000

1887.
530, 000
220, 000
145, 000
40, 000
155, 000
GO, 000
130, 000
30, 000
202, 500

715,000 |
2,018,000
2, 804, 000

Total for eleven months
October —
November .
December..
1888.
January
Total for four months . . .
February..
August
September.




$50, 000

530,000
220, 000
145, 000
40, 000
155, 000
60, 000
80, 000

270, 000

50, 000

1, 462, 500

115,000
50,000

100, 000
250, 000
300, 000

500, 000
1, 718, 000
2, 504, 000

62, 500

2,479, 000

870, 000

1, 509, 000

265, 000

1,520, 000

6, 231, 000

75, 000
200, 000
1,000, 000

3

100, 000

8, 016,000

Total for nine months
Total for twenty-four months .

11028—CUR 88

30, 000
140, 000

1, 782, 500 |

January...
February..
March
April
May
June
July
August
September.

1,000,000

75, 000
200, OuO

1, 275, 000

1,000, 000

11, 073, 500

1, 535, 000

275, 000
1, 570, 000

7, 968, 500

d4

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The total transfers during eleven months ending September 30,1887,
amounted to $1,782,500, an average of $171,127 per month, while during the next four months the transfers amounted to $8,016,000, an
average of over $2,000,000 a month, which four months embrace the
period in which the Government funds in national-bank depositaries
were being increased, for no new depositaries were designated and no
increase of deposits was made after January. During the nine months
since January last the transfers amount to only $1,275,000, of which a
million dollars represents merely an exchange or cross transfer between
the two accounts, and should not, therefore, be considered at all in this
connection.
The effect upon circulation is shown by the fourth column of the
table, i. e., during the first eleven months of the period the amount of
bonds withdrawn from circulation account without being replaced was
$1,462,500; during the next four months this amount was $6,231,000,
while during the remaining nine months it was only $275,000, viz:
$75,000 in February and $200,000 in August, 1888.
BOND PURCHASES BY THE TREASURY.

As has been shown, there was almost a cessation in bond withdrawals
frqin security for circulation as soon as the designation of new depositaries was discontinued.
On April 17 a circular was issued inviting proposals for the sale of
bonds to the Government, which resulted in purchases as follows:
4 per cent,
bonds.

MoDth.

per cent,
bonds.

Total.

April
May
June
July
August
September .
October —

$1, 075, 000
12,112,200
5, 094, 900
444, 550
4, 373,050
15, 80*0, 250
11, 502, 700

$2, 490, 000
5, 027, 450
820,100
564, 700
1, 628, 000
7, 674, 350
15, 038, 000

$3, 565, 000
17,139, 650
5, 915, 000
1, 009, 250
6, 001, 050
23, 474, 600
26, 540, 700

Total

50, 402, 650

33, 242, 600

83, 645, 250

The subjoined table shows the bond withdrawals from circulation account during the year ending October 31,1888, divided into two periods
of six months each, namely, from November 1, 1887, to April 30, 1888,
and from the latter date to October 31,1888.
STATEMENT SHOWING TOTAL WITHDRAWAL OF BONDS HELD AS SECURITY FOR
NATIONAL-BANK CIRCULATION BETWEEN OCTOBER 31,1887, AND OCTOBER 31, 1888,
IN PERIODS OF SIX MONTHS EACH, AND THE REDUCTION OF CIRCULATION CONSEQUENT THEREON.

Period.
From October 31,1887, to April 30, 1888
From April 30,1888, to October 31, 1888
Total




Bonds
Circulation
withdrawn. reduced.
$8,672,500
13, 470, 372

$7,805,250
12,123, 335

22,142, 872

19, 928, 585

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

35

During the first period the withdrawals amounted to $8,672,500,
from which should be deducted the withdrawals for transfer directly to
public moneys security account, as shown in a previous table, viz,
$5,731,000, which leaves a balance of $2,941,500 withdrawn otherwise.
During the second period the total withdrawals were $13,470,372,
and of this amount, the bonds withdrawn for delivery directly to the
Secretary for purchase amounted to $5,066,950, as is shown by the following statement:
BONDS WITHDRAWN FROM D E P O S I T AGAINST CIRCULATION AND T R A N S F E R R E D TO THE
SECRETARY OF T H E T R E A S U R Y F O R P U R C H A S E UNDER T R E A S U R Y CIRCULAR O F
A P R I L 17, 1888, SHOWING AMOUNTS OF EACH CLASS OF BONDS AND T H E E F F E C T O F
SUCH W I T H D R A W A L S UPON CIRCULATION.

Withdrawn.
Date.
4 per cent.

May
June
July
August
September
October
Total

$637, 500
180, 000
299, 500
90, 000
992, 500
1, 877, 650

4

AT r

Substituted.

Total

4percentJ

$196, 000 $833, 500
$16, 000
210, 000 390 000 !
171,000 470,500 i
75, 000 165,000 !
65, 000 1,057,500 !
748, 800 2,626,450 i 390,000

4, 077,150 1, 465, 800 15, 542, 950 [ 406, 000

£p
**P«
cent.

P.E.R.
6 per cent.

Total.

$16, 000
20,000

Total withdrawn upon
deposit
of lawful
money.

$50, 000

50, 000
390, 000

$817,500
370, 000
470, 500
165, 000
1, 007, 500
2, 236, 450

50, 000

476, 000

5, 066, 950

$20, 000

20, 000

NOTE.—Total of bonds withdrawn, $5,542,950; total of bonds deposited in substitution, $476,000;
net withdrawal of bonds, $5,066,950; which is made up of reductions in bonds deposited as follows: 4
percents, $3,671,150; 4£ percents, $1,445,800, and an increase of 6 per cent, bonds of $50,000.

It is not as easy to trace bonds withdrawn for sale as to follow those
transferred from one account to another in the Treasury, hence the records of this office do not show the displacement of circulation by bondpurchases quite as fully as they show the displacement by Government
deposits, but there can be little doubt that the absorption of so large an
amount of bonds in so short a time must have produced a strong influence tending to the reduction of the voluntary circulation of banks,
and in the absence of any other known influence of the same tendency
this must be considered as accounting for the pressure to withdraw
bonds which has for three months in succession carried the deposits of
lawful money up to the limit of $3,000,000 imposed by section 9, act
July 12, 1882.
'
'
In some cases banks have withdrawn their bonds and sold them on
the general market, but in time these bonds, or others which they replaced, have come into the Treasury purchases.




36

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The influence of high prices for bonds in reducing voluntary circulation is more a matter of inference than of demonstration, but the following table of prices of bonds during the year will be of interest in
this connection:
OPENING, HIGHEST, AND LOWEST PRICES OF UNITED STATES REGISTERED 4 PER CENT,
AND 4 | PER CENT. BONDS IN NEW YORK FOR EACH WEEK FROM NOVEMBER 4, 1887,
TO NOVEMBER 2, 1888

[Compiled from the Commercial and Financial Chronicle.]
4 per cent, bonds.

44 per cent, bonds.

Week endingOpening. Highest. | Lowest.
No v. 4, 1887..
Nov. 11, 1887..
Nov. 18, 1887..
Nov. 25, 1887..
3>c. 2,1887..
Dec. 9, 1887..
Dec. 16, 1887..
Dec. 23, 1887..
Dec. 30, 1887..
Jan, 6,1888..
Jan. 13, 1888..
Jan. 20, 1888..
Jan. 27, 1888..
Feb. 3, 1888..
Feb. 10, 1888..
Feb. 17, 18*8..
Feb. 24,1888..
Mar. 2, 1888..
Mar. 9, 1888..
Mar. 16, 1868..
Mar. 23, 1888..
Mar. 30, 1888..
Apr. 6,1888..
Apr. 13, 1888..
Apr. 20, 1888..
Apr. 27, 1888..
May 4, 1888..
May 11, 1888..
May 18, 1888..
May 25, 1888..
J u n e 1, 1888..
J u n e 8,1888..
J u n e 15, 1888..
J u n e 22,1888..
J u n e 29,1888..
July 6,1888..
J u l y 13,1888..
July 20,1888..
J u l y 27,1888..
Aug. 3,1888 .
Aug. 10,1888 .
Aug. 17,1888 .
Aug. 24,1888 .
Aug. 31,1888 .
Sept. 7,1888 .
Sept. 14,1888 .
Sept. 21,1888 .
Sept. 28,1888 .
Oct. 5,1888 .
Oct. 12,1888 .
Oct. 19,1888 .
Oct. 26,1888.
Nov. 2,1888.

126$
126g
127
126*
12fi*
1244
124
125
126
1254
1254
1264
126£
326
126*
|
125*
124|
124*
1241
124|
124
124
123*.
1241
126*.
126f

126|
1264
126$
127
1274
127J
127i
127i
127?,
127ft
127*
127#

4

1274
128
128|
129
129
129
127|

im
1274

126|
126J

Opening. Highest
108$
107|
107$
1071
1074
107*
107i
107ft
108i
107J
107|
108"
108
108
106$
1<16$
1001

1064
106*
106|
106*
10(5-4
1064
1064
1064
107|
107ft
106ft
10'ift
106J
107
107
1074
107
1074
1071
107-1
107*
107ft
107*
106ft
106*
1064
1061
106ft
106$
1065
1074
107 ft
1084
1081
1084

Lowest.

108$
107$
107$
1074
1074
107*
1074
1084
108*
107$
1084
108
108
108
10t>$
106$
106ft
1064
106*
106$
106$
1064
1064
1004
1074
107$
107f
100$
107
107*
107
107
1074
1075
107£
1071
107*
107#
107§
107*
106g
106$
106ft
106ft
106$
106$
1074
107§
1O8£

107|
107§
1074
1074
107*
107
1074
107|
108
1074
107|
108
1074
106$
106$
10f>4
lOfil
106
1004
106*
1004
1004
1004

1081
108g108g-

1081
1084
1074

1064
1064
1074
1064
106j|
l0ti£
106§
107
107
107
107
1074
1074
107£
107*
107*
106
106*
106*
3084
106ft
106ft
106$
106*
1074
307ft
10P4

The quotations given in the above table are not higher than some
quotations in previous years, but as the bonds approach maturity their
investment-value declines, and this is to be considered in comparing
present prices with those prevailing at past periods of time.




REPORT

OF THE COMPTROLLER

OF THE

37

CURRENCY.

The following table will serve to illustrate this:
COMPARATIVE IN VESTMENT-VALUE OF UNITED STATES BONDS, AS DETERMINED BY
MONTHLY AVERAGES TAKEN AT INTERVALS OF THREE MONTHS DURING THE
YEARS 1885, 1886, 1887, AND 1888.
[Compiled from the records of the office of the Actuary of the Treasury.]
4£ per cent, bonds.
Date.

1885:
January .
April . . . .
July
October..
1886:
January .
April
July
October..
1887:
January .
April
July
October..
1888:
January .
April .'...
July
October..

4 per cent, bonds.

Rate of
Rate of
Average
interest
Average
interest
price Hat. realized by price flat. realized by
investors.
investors!
Per cent.
112. 7788
112. 4350
112.7525
112.9421

Per cent, j Per cent.
2. 655
121. 9086
2.488
121.8028
2.365
122. 6462
2.250
123.4004

Per cent.
2.726
2.721
2.668
2. 619

112. 7000
112.4759
111.8156
111.9855

2.208
2.150
2.149
2. 003

123.4325
126.2980
126. 4975
128. 6659

2.607
2.444
2.420
2. 289

110. 2775
110.1947
109.1475
108. 5553

2.290
2. 019
2.340
2.339

127. 8325
129.2451
127.8425
125.7885

2. 320
2. 227
2.284
2.390

108. 2375
107.1025
J 07.5175
108.4213

2.289
2.478
2.195
1.693

126.1275
124. 6400
127. 4825
128.1204

2.341
2.409
2.230
2.178

INCREASE AND REDUCTION OF CAPITAL BY NATIONAL BANKS.

The laws relating to changes in the capital stock of national banks
nave undergone several modifications, and still need amendment in
important particulars as pointed out in Annual Report for 1887. The
changes recommended are embodied in the draught of a national-bank
code submitted with that report. The latest enactment on the subject
is the act of May 1, 1886, and the tables which follow are designed to
show the changes which have occurred since that date.




oo

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

T A B L E SHOWING N U M B E R O F BANKS INCREASING CAPITAL UNDER T H E A C T O F M A Y
1, 1886, SHOWING C H A N G E S I N EACH STATE DURING EACH YEAR SINCE T H E PASSAGE OF THE ACT, AMOUNT OF INCREASE AND PERCENTAGE OF INCREASE IN
P R O P O R T I O N TO CAPITAL.

States and Territories.

M^ain©
New Hampshire
"Vermont
........
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey . . . . .
Pennsylvania
Delaware

Amount
of increase.

Percentage on
former No.
capital.

Amount
of increase.

1
1

No.

$50, 000
50, 000

PercentAmount
age on
of informer No. crease.
capital.

Percentage on
former
capital.

1
....

$350, 000

. 800
.606

$100, 000

.950

2

500, 000

.518

1

6

820,000

.945

.010

3

314,000

.467

50, 000

2. 040

1

5,666

.240

1
2
1

.540

. 005

100,000

1 !
3

25, 000
75, 000
50, 000

1. 040
2.161
.557

50 000

:

1

District of Columbia
Virginia......
"West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina

i..

1

25, 000

1.107 | 1

1
Florida
Alabama
.
Mississippi
Louisiana . . . . . .
Texas
.Arkansas
Kentucky.....
Tennessee

1888.

1887.

1886.

50, 000

1.802

4
2

265, 000
125, 000

3.040
16. 050

1

50, 000

.810

2

135, 000

.305

i
l

100,000
50, 000

. 305
. 305

4
5
4

675, 000
248, 000
375, 000

5. 031
3.051
5.004

1

50,000

2. 050

1
2

50, 000
50, 000

5. 080
1.050

1

200, 000

3. 053

2

80, 000

7.508

1

50, 000

.452

7

2. 322
10. 000
.379
10. 354

7

445, 700

3.764

4
3

235, 000
95, 000
50, 000
775
700, 666

1.702

1
2
2
2

200,
105,
35,
70,

000
000
000
000

.682
.718
.666
.688

3
4
2
6
2
1
2

6
4

460, 666
350, 000

.407
4.147

2

170, 000

9.030

1
6
7
6
2
3
5
1

330, 000
115, 000
600, 000
725, 000
70, 00 >
150, 000
135,000
200, 000
50, 000
755, 000
350, 000
870, 000
132, 000
375, 000
480,000
50, 000

2.420
1.490
4.359
1.765
.582
.501
.902
3.510
• 48g
5.415
2.680
9.280
4.680
15.849
13.900
5.555

2

57, 500

2.071

2
4

85, 000
200,000

2.020
10.206

1
1
1
3

50, 000
50, 000
100, 000
75, 000

4.255
5.555
2.615
4.021

8

575, 000

8.030

7

650, 000

7. 914

.

Ohio
Indiana . . . .
Illinois
Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . .
" isconsin
W
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas *
Nebraska . . . . . .
Nevada
Oregon . . . .
Utah
Idaho
M^ontana
~W\romin°"
New Mexico
Dakota
Washington
California
United States

34 2, 798, 000

Total increase in three years, $16,037,200.




?

59 4, 542, 500

]

90 8, 696, 700

39

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

TABLE OF BANKS DECREASING CAPITAL UNDER THE ACT OF MAY I, 1886, SHOWING CHANGES IN EACH STATE DURING EACH YEAR SINCE THE PASSAGE OF THE
ACT.
1886.

States and Territories.

Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Missouri
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
..
Kansas
Nebraska
Nevada
Oregon
Colorado
Utah
Idaho
Montana
Wyoming
New Mexico
Dakota
Washington
Arizona
California

1888.

Amount PercentAmount PercentAmount Percentage on
age on
age on
of deof deof deformer No. crease. former No. crease. former
crease. capital.
capital.
capital.

No.

•
New Hampshire . . . . . .
Vermont
Massachusetts
Hhode Island
.......
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
•- •
Pennsylvania
Delaware . .
^Maryland
District of Columl)ia
Virginia
._
W^st Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi

1887.

3 $175, 000
5 550 000

2.312
. Kfifl

2
4

1

1
1

100,000
J25, 000

2.919
1.631

1

100, 000

.149

50,000

.343

1

.115

.516
.277

1

$75, 000

1

125, 000
240, 000

50, 000

1.404

I
500. 000
1 j 20 000

14.059
.197

1

50, 000

3
2
1
3

$300, 000
162, 000
20, 000
125, 000

1.239
.186
.149
.185

1

72, 900

.615

.378
1

200, 000

.519

1
1
2

75, 000
50, 000
125, 000

.182
.412
.426

1
1
2

100,000 j
125.000 I
27 500 '

1

10, 000

.097

4

160, 000

1.573

1

100, 000

1

.258

20, 000

3

25, 000

.244
1.030
O1f
*

.918
.191
•

.

.

1
1

7

United States

510, COO

10, 000

25, 000

1.265

.264

29 2, 280, 000

18 1,102,400

Total decrease in three years, $3,892,400.

CONVERTED AND ORIGINAL BANKS.

National banks are of two classes, viz, institutions already organized under State laws, converted to national banks under section 5154,
Eevised Statutes of the-United States, and national banking associations primarily organized as such under various acts of Congress.
The following tables show the history of these two classes:




WHOLE NUMBER OF STATE BANKS CONVERTED TO NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATIONS, THEIR CAPITAL AT DATE OF CONVERSION, PRESENT
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, SPECIFYING SUCH AS HAVE SINCE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION, AND SUCH AS HAVE BECOME INSOLVENT.

Tears.

Whole
number
converted. Number.
12
150
284

12
345
220
3

4
9
5
2
3
7
10
6
11
12
11
1
5
8
11
7
"499

Y

1877..
1878...
1879...
1880...
1881..
1882
1883.
1884.
1885..
1886*
1*871
1888 :...!"/.".
Totals .

* To November 1.




Present
capital.

Surplus.

$6,110, 000
66, 589, 500
58, 395, 000
860,300

$9, 610, 000
71, 965, 200
57,135, 700
250,000

$3,048, C O
O
27,214,100
28, 354, 800
43. 000

250, 000

1863
1864
,
1865
,
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
'
1872
1873....
1874
""•
1875....

1876

Existing.

50, 000

10, 000

1, 000, 000
1, 378, 000
1,110,000
855, 000
2, 244, 000
850, 000
161, 000
680, 000
710, 000
1, 285,000
3,147, 000
1, 445, 700
990, 300
925, 000
50, 000
850, 000
2,100, 000
1,350,000
350, 000
151, 685, 800 |

Voluntary liquidation.
Capital at
Surplus at
Num- dati- of con- Capital at
date of
date of
ber.
version. I liquidation. liquidation.
$200,
32, 496,
275,
50,
200,

000
200
000
000
000

$250,
10, 582,
250,
100,
200,

000
200
000
000
000

300, 000
1,500,000
164, 000
278, 000
300, 000
925, 000
3i
211, 000
150,000
150, 000
2 I
1, 030, 000
221, 000
605, 000
540,100
250, 000
250, 000
2, 410, 000
229, 500
200, 000
130, 000
675, 000
29, 500
141,000
320, 000
800, 000
50, 000
50, 000
244,000
769, 000
470, 500
1,435,000
354, 700
1,340,000
479,400
1,863, 200
331, 900
1, 630, 300
•I158,400
1, 075, 000
305,000 :
300, 000
600, 000
100, 000
170, 500
850, 000
503,100
2, 610, 000
50,000 '
50, 000
227, 600
1, 500, 000
13, 300
300, 000
160, 769, 400 ; 64, 238, 400 I 73 j 14.504,000 ; 12,602,200

tFrom November 1, 1886, to November 1, 1887.

Insolvent.
Capital at
Num- Capital at
date
date of
ber. conversion.
of failure.

$38,900 |
1,996,400 j
52,200
11,100
29, 700

3 i
14
1 |

$417, 000
4, 401,100
3, 410, 300

$367, 000
4, 371, 100
2, 500, 000

K

O

35, 000
13, 500

o

15, 500
12, 000
4, 500 ,

130,000

200,000

500 I
2, 220, 500"|

21

300,000

50,000

11, 200

130, 000

50*000

8,(508,400 I

J From November 1, 1887, to November 1, 1888.

Percentage of capital of national banks, organized as such, that "went into voluntary liquidation. 14.5
Percentage of capital of national banks, organized as such, that went into insolvency
2. 6
Percentage of capital of national banks, organized as such, that are in existence
".
82.9
Percentage of capital of converted banks that went into voluntary liquidation
Percentage of capital of converted banks that went into insolvency
Percentage of capital of con verted banks that are still in existence

7
4.3
88. 7

Percentage of increase of capital of national banks organized as such
Percentage of increase of capital of converted banks

38. 6
6

7,718,100

s

WHOLE NUMBER OF NATIONAL BANKS OF PRIMARY ORGANIZATION UNDER THE NATIONAL-BANK LAWS, CAPITAL AT DATE OF ORGANIZATION, AND
PRESENT CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, SPECIFYING SUCH AS HAVE SINCE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION, AND SUCH AS HAVE BECOME INSOLVENT.
Existing.

Whole
number
organized.

Tear.

Capital a t
date of
Number.
organization.
294
69
437
23
7
5
4
38
108
97
38
46
79
23
21
18
25
40
84
208
208
169
139
135
212
125

474
104
603
33
9
10
8
62
148
156
53
72
94
27
26
23
30
4.7
97
230
236
179
142
142
214
125

1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1808
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877.
1878
1879
1880 . . .
1881
188"*
1883
1884
18S5
1886*
18871
1888:

3,344

Total

Voluntary liquidation.

Present
capital.

$40, 428, 900 "$Gl,"842,To"o"
11, 848,100
19,523,450
107, 503, 000
111,198,875
5, 035, 000
2, 730, 000
850. 000
1, 800, 000
410,000
450,000
850, Of 0
650, 000
4, 998, 000
4,188, 000
14,363,900
11, 5G8, 000
12,951,100
9, 074, 700
4, 655, 000
4,611,000
3, 726, 500
4, 483, 000
10, 012, 000
11,224,000
2, 020, 800
2, 377, 800
1, 864, 000
2, 749, 0(0
1, 760, 000
1, 625, Oi.O
2, 550, 000
3, 505, 000
4, 522,100
5, 797,100
7, 735, 000
9, 531, 0l!0
28, 068. 000
34, 977, 000
22,182, 000
26, 234, 000
16,719,000
20.106, 800
13, 593, 000
14,' 478, 000
15,128,000
16, 855, 000
30, 331, 000
29, 096, 000
10, 309, 741
11, 603, 000

2, 652 i 364, 550, 100 | 432, 242, 216

" To November 1.

Capital a t
date of
organization,

Number.

Surplus.

Capital at
date of
liquidation.

Surplus a t
date of
liquidation.

Insolvent.
Number.

Capital at
date of
organization.!

$25,557,200
9, 641, 300
37, 068,911
2, 230, 200
654, 000
141,000
215,000
1, 534, 400
5,168, 900
4, 042, 800
1, 283,1G0
1, 443, 600
2, 964, 200
743. 200
1, 368, 000
417, o00
691,200
1, 395, 400
2, 731, 700
9, 334, 300
4, 465, 900
3, 090, 800
2, 216, 300
1, 545, 200
1, 250,100
72, 600

147
$14, 984, 200
$25, 424, 600 j
31
4, 310, 000
6,166, 000 !
146
19,816,700
18, 675,000 I
800, 000
8
775, 3(0 j
150, 000
2
150, 000 I
400,000 .
4
800, 000
260,000 I
2
310, 000 I
2,511,000 i
22
3,130, 000 I
3,040,000 I
34
3, 000,COO !
4,255,000 ! 3, 843,100 :
48
925,000 ! 1,125. 000 j
13 I
1,350,000 '
. 1, 320,000 1
22
1, 000, 000 j
1, 010.000
1± I
250,000 !
250, 0t 0
4 !
150. COO i
150, 000
250,000 j
250, 000
200,000 !
200, 000
95(>, 000 j
750, 000
6 !
1,820,000 I
1, 870,000
1, 030, 000 I 1,830, COO
11 i
2,935,000 I
22 !
2, 715,000
1,000,000 I
.1, 000.000
200, 000
200, 000
425, 000
425, 000
100, 000
100, 000

$7, 839, 300
1,558,900
4, 934, 400
176,200
14,300 :
127,500 :
48,500
475, 300
656, 000
585,100
116, 700
86, 900
75. 800
11,400
21, 000
21. 400
13,200
86, 800
95, 100
157, 200
109, 000
21, C00
5, 500
11, 000
3,500

33
4
20
2 I

121,266, 611 j
j

586 j

17, 251, 000

100 •

i!
SI

63, 711, 900 ;

tFrow November 1, 1886, to November.1, 1887.

75, 4(39, 000

1 !
2 ;
2
6 i
11 i
2
4
1

$3,620,000 '••
450,000 s
2,525,000 !
100, 000
100.000
350.000
300,000
1,100,000
1,450,000
370,000
350,000
50,000

i
i
;
;
•
I

Capital a t
date of
failure.
$5, 569, 500
500,000
3,610,000
150, 000
100, 000
350, 000
350, 000
1, 400, 000
1,485,000
350, 000
350, 000
50, 000

300, 000

1, 011, 300

60, 000
50, COO
555, 000
225, 000
550, 000
50, 000

60, 000
50, 000
1, 050, 000
225, 000
350, 000
50. 000

1, 000, 000

Dissolved.
Num- I n liquidation, voluntary or by expiration.
ber.
Number.

Total




3,937 j

73 j
586 i

12
17

21
106

CO CO

Converted from State system.
593 j
Other banks
3,344 1

Total
number
P e r c e n t . . Number. Per cent. dissolved.
Failed.

94
692

659

17

127

3

786

Number.

cent.

499
2, 652

85
80

3,151

80

Per

5?

H
O

h
o

13,555,000

18, 060, 800

SUMMARY OF NATIONAL BAXKS ORGANIZED AND DISSOIVKD SINCE FEBRUARY 25, 1863, AND THE NUMBER EXISTING NOVEMBER 1, 1888.

Banks organized.

o
o

1,000,000

+F10111 November 1, 1887, to November 1,1888.

Now existing.

O

Remarks.
The difference ($15,553) in the aggregate amount of surplus, as shown
by this and the preceding table, when compared with the table vn
page
, is accounted for by tho fact that in estimating the sur
plus for this table all amounts under $50 were rejected.
Of 659 banks which have gone into voluntary liquidation 503 took
that step for the purpose of winding up their affairs, 79 for the
purpose of reorganization, and 77 went into liquidation by reason
of expiration of charter. 38 of them having since been reorganized.

2
2

42

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

EXTENSION OF THE CORPORATE EXISTENCE OF NATIONAL BANKS.

During the past year seven associations have availed themselves of
the provision made by the act of July 12, 1882, for the extension of the
corporate existence of national banks. Annexed is a table brought
down to October 31, 1888, showing the capital of these extended banks
and their geographical distribution.
TABLE SHOWING, BY STATES, THE NUMBER AND CAPITAL OF NATIONAL BANKS, THE
CORPORATE EXISTENCE OF WHICH WAS EXTENDED PRIOR TO NOVEMBER 1, 1888.
States and Territories.
Alabama
Arkansas
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia.
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Idaho
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri

No. of
banks.

Capital.

Capital.-

States and Territories.

2
$350, 000 Montana
1
250. 000 Nebraska
3
460, 000 New Hampshire
73 22, 450, 820 New Jersey
11 1, 503,185 New York .
2
500, 000 North Carolina
6 1, 450, 000 South Carolina.
48 6, 240, 000 Ohio...
32 4,157,000 Oregon
25 2,695,000 I Pennsylvania
100, 000 Rhode Island
1
300, 000 Tennessee
3
11 3. ir>o, ooo Texas
2 1, 300, 000 Vermont
53 8,630,000 !! Virginia
29 12,069,000 i West Virginia
200 85,962,500 j Wisconsin
19 1,575.000
2,225.000
Total
3,150.000 ,

$500, 000
750, 000
4, 655, 000
9, 783, 350
72, 672,460
650, 000
850, 000
14, 854, 000
250, 000
44, 704, 390

19, 959, 800
1,750, 000
625, 000
5,256, 000
2, 016, 000
1, 341, 000
1, 685, 000

1,241

340, 819, 505

TOTAL NUMBER OF BANKS ORGANIZED UNDER THE NATIONAL CURRENCY ACT OF
FEBRUARY 25, 1863, AND THE NATIONAL-BANK ACT OF JUNE 3, 1864, THE NUMBER EXTENDED UNDER THE ACT OF JULY 12, 1882, AND STILL IN OPERATION
UNDER THEIR ORIGINAL CERTIFICATES OF ORGANIZATION, AND THE TOTAL NUMBER IN OPERATION OCTOBER 31, 1888.
Banks organized.
Under
Totals. act February
25,1863.

Under act J u n e 3, 1864.
Before 1882.

Originallv organized
Out of existence July 12,1882

2, 766
493

488
146 : : : : : : : :

2,278
347

In operation July 12,1882

2,273

342

Since 1882.

1,931

Organized since July 12,1882
Since passed into voluntary liquidation to
wind up affairs

173

7

111

Since in voluntary liquidation by expiration of corporate"existence

77

20

57

Placed in hands of receivers

35

1

1,171

*23
28

Extended under act of July 12,1882

1,241

55

314

11
191

66

927

Passed out of the system since extension...

26

Still in existence
To reach the term of corporate existence...
Passed into voluntary liquidation since extension
Placed in hands of receivers since extension

901
839
3
5
8

Still in operation under original organization certificate

2,046

306

Total number in operation October
31,1888

3,151

306

1,740
1,740

1,10

* Twenty-four banks were in this category, but one was restored to solvency and resumed business.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

From the foregoing table it will be found that all of the banks organized under the national currency act of 1863 have either ceased to
exist or have had their corporate existence extended, while of those organized prior to July 12,1882, under the national-bank act of 1864,1,740
are still in operation under their original certificates of organization.
The following table shows how many of these banks will reach the
expiration of their corporate existence during each year from 1889 to
1902, inclusive, with their capital and circulation:
Capital.

1889.,
1890..
1891..
1892..
1893..
1894..
1895..
1896..

100
38
G.i
76
23

Circulation.

$600, 000
9, 560, 500
12,358,900
13,815,100
4,701,000
7, 628, OOo
11,259,000
2,173,800

iSTo. of
banks.

Tears.

$184, 500 , 1897
364, OdO 1898
4, 040, 685 1899
4, 562, 760 . 1900
1,982,925 ! 1901
2, 812, 720 ; 1902.
4,431,610
986, 650 |
Total....

|
i
!
'
i
i

No. of
banks.

Years.

Capital.

Circulation.

$3,419, 000
2, 679, 0(10
4, 995, 000
7, 807,100
14, 669,150
21,177,300

$1,171, 295
1, 198, 350
2,270, 700
2,153,330
3, 702, 350
5, 352, 350

839 • 116, 842, 850

35, 214, 225

24
25
39
50
108
132

The number, capital, and circulation of the national banks of which
the periods of succession terminated between October 31,1887, and October 31, 1888, are shown by the following table, which also indicates
the number of which the corporate existence has been extended:
Date.

Is"o. of banks
that have
expired.

1887.
November

Capital.

Circulation.

No. of b a n k s
t h a t have
extended.

Capital.

Circulation.

1

$250, 000

$45, 000

1

$250, 000

$45, 000

100,000
200, 000
100, 000
75, 000
100,000
125, 000
50, 000
50, 000

22, 500
67, 500
22, 500
18,000

1
Liquidation.
1

100, 000

22, 500

22,
28.
45,
11,

100, 000
75, 000

Failed

22, 500
18, 000

,

1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1

125, 000
50, ()()')
50, 000

28. 800
45, 000
11,250

Total ...

10

1, 050, 000

283, 050

7

750, 000

193, 050

1888.

January
February
March
May
June
August
September
October

f)0()
800
000
250

The corporate existence of one national bank, with a capital of $50,000,
will expire in November of this year, and that of three national banks,
with an aggregate capital of $G00,0007 will expire during the year 1889,
as shown in the following table:
NATIONAL BANKS OF WHICH THE CORPORATE EXISTENCE WILL EXPIRE DURING THE
YEAR 1889, WITH THE DATE OF THE EXPIRATION, THE AMOUNT OF CAPITAL STOCK
OF EACH BANK, THE UNITED STATES BONDS ON DEPOSIT WITH THE TREASURER,
AND THE AMOUNT OF CIRCULATION ISSUED THEREON.
Charter
number.

Title of bank.

State.

Expiration 1
of corporate
stock.
existence.

U. S. bonds.

Circulation.

1689

The Ohio National Bank of
Cleveland
Ohio
Jan. 1,1889
The First National Bank of
Hurfreesborou^h
Tennessee. Feb. 27, 1889
1694 The National Bank of Lebanon
Kentucky. April 7,1889
1692

$400, 000

$56, 00C

•100, 000

100,000

90, 000

100, 000

50, 000

45, 000

$50,400

SHAREHOLDERS IN BANKS.

The table subjoined hereto exhibits the distribution of national-bank
stock as reported by the banks on the first Monday in July, 1888.




44

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

DISTRIBUTION, BY STATES, ETC;., NCJMB-KR, AND P A R VALUE AT $100 EACH, O F S H A R E S

Number of shares
held by—

No. of
banks.

State, etc.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Maine . . . .
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Boston
Rhode Island.
Connecticut

....

13
14

savings
Religbanks,
ious,
All
Munic- loan
Nonliharitaand
other
State Natural )le, and ipal
State
trust corporesidents. resi- persons. educa- corpo- and indents.
tional rations. urance rations.
institucomtions.
panies.
100,557
56, 439
65, 533
412,096
473, 913
188. 653
218,818

6,043
5,611
10,127
35, 309
37, 587
14,188
22, 625

80, 469
49, 036
71, 851
363, 635
283, 675
163, 789
156, 599

3,707

116 22, 230
12, 378
496
194 " " " 2 7 2 ' 3,179
139 75,488
7, 363
107 12, 003
14, 798
705 30, 477
6, 733
277 73,395
10, 394

78
140
164
780
917
1,137
778

43,685

1,616 429,150

3,994

350, 491
453, 813
16, 691
130,009
334, 240
226, 460
100, 668

659
4, 684
220
632
1, 066
839
719

647
31, 968
589
1,871
1,176
2, 574
2,877

131
511

718 1,423,024 241,370 1,612,372

Division No. 1
8
9
10
11

75
49
49
198
54
60
83

Same, in detail, neld b y -

8,819

42

41, 702

1,459

1,151

243
263
9,669
110
143
342

61
492
572

10, 770

2,240

29
530
1,429

30
60
14

211
5

20

568 1, 516, 009 131,490 1,169,054

New York
New York City
Albany . . .
New J e r s e y
Pennsylvania..
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh

270
46
0
84:
245
43
24

Division No. 2
Delaware.
Maryland

335,159
319, 998
16 463
118 376
315, 605
216, 550
100, 873

16, 769
171,002
1 037
14 207
21, 398
13,530
3, 427

24
3
5
10

68
516
197
36

21

22
24
26
27
29
30
31
32
33
34

17 799
26 957
110^ 268
2, 059
12, 044
30 480
15, 790

3 546
1 210
6,865
461
3,706
7 483
2,720

20,771
20 9f>8
98, 562
2,410
15,607
36 358
17, 300

270
454
7, 179

"VV^ash in °"ton
District of Columbia
Virginia)
W e s t Virginia

18
31
17
1
7
25
19

900

id

Division No. 3

15
16
17
19
18

118

215, 397

25, 991

217, 966

9, 251

1,161

18
16
23
13
21
12
5
8
98
7
60
9
41

19, 845
16, 434
22, 573
7 171
31*420
7,689
4 855
20, 944
90, 757
8, 227
95,419
31,360
69, 827

2,915
1,296
10, 037
1 829
4*020
2, 86 L
145
8,306
23,900
1, 273
5,610
4,155
7,473

22, 701
17, 000
31,153
9 000
35 209
10, 545
4 960
28, 278
114, 475
9, 500
100,118
35, 119
76, 845

446
225
55

465
121
400

50

331

426, 521

North Carolina
South Carolina.
Georgia
Florida

.

Mississippi
Louisiana
N e w Orleans
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Louisville
Tennessee

31
968
152

494, 963

863

4,310

205

15,141
11,818
2, 618
10 893
10 489
20, 244
10, 666
2,149
3 774
3, 237

241,400
88, 630
66,500
119 154
146 033
151,725
108, 675
39, 960
46, 975
8,500

219
380

2,371
2,476

214

91, 029 1, 017, 552

740

Division No. 5

662

933, 792

45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53

Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
_ ..
Saint Louis
Kansas City .
Saint Joseph . .
Kansas
Nebraska
Omaha

129
55
34
4
10

82 719
97, 076
21, 549
25,155
25, 002
2,357
86 534
49, 362
16, 968




9
4
30

73, 820

40
41
42
43
44

Division No. 6

80
14

815
300

197
228, 849
14
79, 982
9
63, 882
94 ' 108 502
162 I 135* 901
19
132, 256
100
98, 080
8
37, 851
56
43, 226
3
5,263

Division No. 4
Ohio
Cincinnati. . . .
Cleveland
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
Detroit
^Wisconsin
.
.
Milwaukee

35
36
37
38

448

157
96
7

...

494

18 881
42,124
2,76L
6, 845
39, 998
643
38 957
12, 538
7,032

406, 722 169, 779

101 114
137, 039
21, 270
31, 594
60, 389
3,000
122 278
61, 763
24, 000
565,447

100

24
33

130
305
775
20

34
40
10

87
201
73

87
19
17

15
100

6,092
486
1,935
40
205
4,538

337
139

85

2 738
137

390

446

10, 079

529

45

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
OF STOCK OF NATIONAL BANKS ON THE FIRST MONDAY OF JULY,
Total
shares
issued.

1888.

Number of shareholders.

Number of shareholders owning specific
amounts.

Number
Nonreduced Natural Corporesito par
persons. rations. Resident. dent.
value of
$100 each.

Owning
Over
shares to
Over
the par $1,000 and $5,000 and Over
value of less than less than $30,000.
$1,000 and $5,000.
$30,000.
less.

Total.

1,828

7,014
3,400
3,471
28, 630
17, 875
11,353
12, 426

619
481
453
3,088
2,411
1,503
1,808

7, 633
3,881
3,924
31,718
20, 286
12,856
14, 234

5, 396
2, 668
2,495
22,189
11, 209
8,105
9, 706

1,118
7,892
6,289
3, 877
3,587

1,569
2,663
839
806

12
15
18
68
125
35
85

7, 754

84,169

10, 363

94, 532

61, 768

25, 586

6,820

358

57
507
9
74
177
133
69

14,140
8,813
562
8, 255
21,230
10,009
3,818

1,100
6,556
56
1,062
946
863
182

15,240
15, 369
618
9, 317
22,176
10, 872
4,000

8, 516
6,804
• 292
G,4L6
14, 906
6,363
2,010

5,154
5,880

1,488
2,504

2, 397
5,759
3, 345
1,433

1,446
1,126

530

82
181
4
14
65
38
27

76, 566

1,026

66, 827

10, 765

77, 592

45, 307

24,196

7,678

411

21, 345
28,167
117,133
2 590
15, 750
37,963
18, 510

1,742
1, 938
5, 224
157
608
1,518
900

23
43
264
1
2
16
4

1,416
1,888
5,068
119
513
1, 260
759

349
93
420
89
97
274
145

1,765
1,981
5, 488
158
610
1.534
904

1,072
1,335
3,192

573
547
66
199
399
294

118
96
487
g
62
201
72

241, 388

12, 087

353

11, 023

1,417

12, 440

7, 485

3,860

1, 045

50

22, 760
17, 730
32, 610
9, 000
35, 440
10, 550
5,000
29, 250
114,657
9, 500
101, 029
35, 515
77,300

865
1,075
1,056
308
849
355
99
701
2,564
242
3, 850
1,279
2, 422

2
32
24

867
1,107
1,080
308
855
356
101
706
2, 573
242
3, 890
1, 290
2, 429

449
759
621
186
369
185
42
320
112

301
279
267
83
277
106
29
228
738
84

40
11
7

726
1, 040
£68
216
698
274
97
550
1,870
201.
3, 668
1,108
2, 205

1,952

1,393

7
3
14
3
14
1
4
14
57
3
17
7
21

500, 341

15, 665

139

13, 581

2,223

243, 990
91, 800
66, 500
119, 395
146, 390
152, 500
108, 746
40,000
47, 000
8,500

7,997
1,504
865
2,410
4, 432
1,614
3,312
627
1,303
144

53
36

7,497
1,396
801
2,198
4,063
1,351
2,964
579
1,143
40

553
144
64
288
379
267
352
49
162
104

1, 024, 821

24,208

116

21, 962

101, 600
139, 200
24, 310
32, 000
65, 000
3 000
125, 491
61. 000
24, 000

3,317
3,004
826
704
1, 593
48
4,157
1, 534
133

10
24
1
7
51

2,430
2,095
691
454
366
ts8
2, 598
1,130
101

576, 501

15,316

162

9, 893

100, 600
62, 050
75, 600
447, 405
511, 500
202, 841
241, 443

6,925
3,690
3,864
30, 269
16,819
12, 224
12, 987

.708
191
CO
1,449
3,467
032
1,247

1, 647, 499

86, 778

351, 928
491,000
17,500
132, 583
337, 003
230, 080
104, 300

15,183
14, 862
609
9, 243
21, 999
10, 739
3, 931

1, 664, 394

6
1
2
5
9




6
10
4
4
1
2

64
5

.

141
67
212.
92
157
82
4
156
703
41
222
122
224

83
345
925
533

995

228

1,782

397
203
293

94
490

2
3

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

8
9
10
11
12
13
14

15
16

• 27 17
4
9
5

1, 065

495
916

110
66
178
36
195
64
26
144
593
43
528
179
427

15, 804

7,854

5,196

2,589

3, 826

2, 876

1,286

428
169
808

536
270
857

2, 226

1, 405

1,455

1,167

142
613
52

214
392
67

531
390
630
760
688
666
246
287
19

62
45
36
61
51
91
28
26
13
6

2, 362

24,324

10,133

8,269

5,503

419

897
933
136
257
1, 278
20
1, 623
409
32

3, 327
3, 028
827
711
1,644
48
4, 221
1, 539
133

1,682
1,164

1,081
1,009

423
282
748
20

265
251
494
13

35
59
6
15
23
2
37
25
25

5? 585

15, 478

227

22
23
24

165

8, 050
1,540
865
2,410
4, 442
1,618
3,316
628
1,305
144

19
18
20
21

1,185

609

354

485

2,381

1,126

682
21

458
17

529
796
133
163
379
13
677
374
70

7, 403

4,714

3,134

?*>

26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34

35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

45
46
47
48
49
5(i
j 51
52
53

46

KEPORT

OF THE

COMPTROLLER

OF THE

CURRENCY.

DISTRIBUTION, BY STATES, ETC., NUMBER, AND TAR VALUE AT $100 EACH, OF SHARES
Number of shares
held by—

No. of
banks.

State, etc.

54
55
56
57
58

Colorado
Nevada
California
San Francisco
Oregon. . . . .

33

2
35
3
25

Division No. 7
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
06

Idaho
Montana*
New ^Mexico
Utah
Washington
V voming
V
A_rizona

98

...
.... .

Division No. 8
United States




53
7
17
9
7
24
8
1
131

Same, in detail, held by—

NonState
State
residents. residents.

Savings
Religbanks,
ious,
charita- Munic- loan
All
and
Natural ble, and ipal
other
trust
persons. educa- corpo- and in- corpotional rations. surance rations.
institucomtions.
panies.

26, 752
1,817
46,980
25, 842
19, 967

4,098
683
4,270
1,158
2, 933

30, 825
2,500
50, 978
26, 068
22, 815

72

121, 358 13,142

133,186

72

18, 950
3, 650
14,438
6,257
7,610
11,443
5,722
515

16,800
850
5, 062
2,243
890
7,207
5,028
485

35, 401
4, 500
19, 500
8,440
8, 500
18, 559
10, 670
1,000

68, 585 38, 565

25

106, 570

3,120 5,111,408 785,186 5, 317,110

200
932
85
1,242
332

10

35

7

25

91
80
7

63, 876

458

115

2,926 503, 803

8,879

KEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

47

OF STOCK OF NATIONAL BANKS ON THE FIRST MONDAY OF JULY, 1888—Continued.
Total
shares
issued.

Number
reduced
to p a r
value of
$100 each.

30, 850
2,500
51, 250
27, 000
22, 900

Number of shareholders owning vspeciflc
amounts.

Number of shareholders.

NonNatural Corporesipersons. rations. Resident. dent.

1
4
3
1

568
38
8n3
141
325

470
31
801
133
293

Total.

99
7
96
11
33

569
38
897
144
326

Owning
shares to
Over
Over
the par- $1,000 and $5,000 and
value of
less than less than
$1,000 and
$5,000.
$30,000.
less.

235
4
284
17
94

Over
$30,000.

162
15
319
40
86

160
18
265
66
136

12
1
29
21
10

134, 500

1?965

9

1,728

246

1,974

634

622

645

73

35, 750
4, 500
19, 500
8,500
8,500
18, 650
10, 750
1,000

1,040
83
261
203
253
377
142
6

8

596
67
187
120
238
249
59
4

452
16
74
86
15
130
84
2

1,048
83
261
206
253
379
143
6

537
33
111
86
137
162
30
3

312
23
68
75
76
93
42

195
26
68
41
37
119
64
1

4
1
14
4
3
5
7
2

859

2,379

1,099

689

551

40

33, 820 244, 523

141,683

73,132

27, 965

54
55
56
57
58

1,743

3
2
1

107,150

2,365

14

1, 520

5, 896, 594

234, 950

9,573

210, 703

59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66

NOTE.—The difference in the amount of capital stock, as shown by this table and by the reports of
condition on October 4, is accounted for by the fact that twenty-two banks were organized during the
three months just preceding that date, and other banks increased their capital stock.




48

REPORT OF THE

COMPTROLLER OF THE

CURRENCY.

DISSOLUTION.

The total number of national banks organized since February 25,
1863, is 3,937, of which there are now in operation, as shown elsewhere,
3,151; passed out of the system 786, accounted for thus:
Passed into voluntary liquidation to wind up their affairs

-

512

Less number afterward placed in hands of receivers

9
503

Passed into ]iquidation for purpose of reorganization
Passed into liquidation upon expiration of corporate existence
Placed in hands of receivers

79
*77
128
787
1

Less restored to solvency and resumed business
Total passed out of system

786

* Thirty-eight of these have been reorganized.

The corporate existence of ten national banks expired during the year
ending October 31, 1888 ; of these, seven obtained an extension in accordance with the provisions of the act of July 12, 1882, two suffered
dissolution, and one failed.
FAILED BANKS.

Eight national banks, with an aggregate capital of $1,900,000, failed
and were placed in the hands of receivers during the year, as is shown
in the following tabulated statement, to which is appended an account
of the chief cause of failure in each case. In one case the creditors have
been paid in full, principal and interest; in two others they have received 80 per cent., and in the remaining cases 40, 25, and 20 per cent.,
respectively, on account of the claims proved:
STATEMENT O F F A I L E D B A N K S , T H E I R CAPITAL, S U R P L U S , AND L I A B I L I T I E S ACCORD-

ING TO LAST EEPORT OF CONDITION.

Date of
Date of Receiver
Name and location of bank. authority to failure.
apcommence
pointed.
business.

Fifth National Bank, Saint
Louis, Mo
First National Bank, Auburn, N. Y.t.
Metropolitan National Bank,
Cincinnati, Ohio
:..
Commercial National Bank,
Dubuoue, Iowa
State National Bank, Ralei£h,N.C
Second N a t i o n a l Bank,
Xenia, Ohiot
Madison National Bank,
Madison, Dak
Lowell National Bank, Lowoil, Mich.t
Total.

As shown at date of last report of condition in each case.
Date of
last report of
d i v i ( I e d Inabilities.'
condiprofits, j
tion.
Surplus I

uapitai.

1887.
1887.
1887.
Dec. 12,1882 Nov. 7 Nov. 15 $300, 000 $59,456 '$1, 305, 883 j Oct. 5
1888.
1888.
Feb. 4,1864 Jan. 23 Feb. 10 150,000 • 42, 379 I 611, 703 | Dec. 7
July 12,1881 Feb. 6 Feb. 20 1,000,000 j 221,810 I 1,585,840 D e c . 7
1888.
Mar. 11,1871 Mar. 20 Apr. 2 100,000 I 26, 410
736, 771 Feb. 14
June 17,1868 Mar. 27 Mar. 31

100,000 j 27, 561

351,155 Feb. 14

Feb. 24,18G4 May 2 May 9

150, 000

364, 872 Feb. 14

Dec. 7,1886 June 13 June 23

50, 000

6,166

86, 738 Apr. 3

June 14,1865 Sept. 11 Sept. 19

50, 000

17, 768

126, 023 June 30

20, 020

, 900, 000 421, 570 5,168, 985

* Total, as per report, except capital, surplus, circulation, undivided profits, and unpaid dividends.
A
Extended.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

49

The Fifth National Bank of Saint Louis, Mo., closed its doors November 7, 18>7, and on November 9 its cashier was arrested on a warrant
charging fraud and falsification of entries, and placed under bond. The
case has not yet been reached in the courts, and the cashier is still at
large.
The failure may be traced to the fact that the bank, originally a savings institution, was carrying, when it became a national bank, a considerable amount of doubtful and worthless paper, which was allowed
to remain among the assets. Then the officers and some of the directors
of the new organization were interested in various businesses carried on
with the funds of the bank, and dependent wholly upon that support.
The general administration was weak and in some respects vicious.
Overdrafts were permitted in large amounts, and bad accounts were
disguised by passing fictitious drafts through the bank. The statutes
were violated with respect to overloans, false entries were made upon
the books to deceive the national-bank examiner and the Comptroller,
and these were concealed by the use of notes in several names for money
borrowed by one and the same party.
The directors claimed to be unaware of these transactions, and sought
to excuse themselves by saying that the bank was managed wholly by
the president and cashier to whom alone the facts were known, and on
whose statement the directors relied.
In December, 1886, at a meeting of the shareholders it had been resolved to increase the capital stock from $300,000 to $500,000, and subsequent publication was made in the Saint Louis newspapers that the
stock of the bank was $500,000.
After the failure it transpired that the payment on account of the
new shares amounted to only a little over $126,000, and the subscribers
to the increased capital now insist upon being treated as depositors to
the extent of the amount paid in on the subscriptions. The receiver
claims that these subscriptions are binding, and the question is now
pending in the courts.
As preliminary to an action against the directors of the bank to establish their individual liability under the provisions of section 5239,
Revised Statutes, proceedings were taken by the Comptroller for the
forfeiture of all the rights, privileges, and franchises of the association,
and in April last the United States circuit court adjudged the forfeiture.
A dividend of 50 per cent, was paid to the creditors about three
months after date of failure, and, as will be seen elsewhere, 30 per cent,
more has been paid since, making 80 per cent, within the first twelve
months of the receivership.
The First National Bank of Auburn, £T. Y., closed its doors on the
morning of January 23, the cashier and one of the book-keepers having
previously absconded to Canada, taking with them a considerable
amount of money belonging to the bank. The association was found
to be hopelessly insolvent; past-due paper in large amounts had been
accumulating for some years, and leaves which had been cut out of the
ledgers and hidden, showed when discovered, that overdrafts had been
carried to an amount greatly exceeding the capital stock of the bank.
The records had been negligently kept, and in many cases entries were
altered and false entries were made, so that the ascertainment of the
condition of the association has been slow and difficult, while transactions to considerable amounts are still involved in obscurity. In one
case, however, funds of the bank have been traced into a local "bucket
shop." The bank was sustaining outside business firms with large loans
and overdrafts, having little or no security.
11028—CUR 88
4




50

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY

The case of this bank furnishes still another instance of an officer
enjoying unlimited confidence, mismanaging its affairs, squandering its
resources, and finally stealing its cash under the eyes of directors and
stockholders. It also adds another to the numerous illustrations of the
temptation to dishonesty which is the direct effect of the facility of escape to Canada and the immunity from extradition enjoyed by such
fugitives.
A dividend of 25 per cent, has been paid during the year, but there
seems little doubt that the loss to depositors will be heavy.
The Metropolitan National Bank of Cincinnati was reported by the
national-bank examiner, in January, as being in a perilously weak condition. The officers and directors were large borrowers, and the management of the bank was found to be inefficient and unbusinesslike.
Irregular means had been resorted to in order to cover up large loans,
and evidences of the publication of false reports and of violations of the
provisions of section 5209 of the Revised Statutes were discovered.
The examination showed, however, that the assets were undoubtedly
sufficient to pay creditors in full, and the examiner united with the
directors in an effort to tide over the exigency. Considerable collections were made from the directors and large stockholders who were
debtors to the bank, and from those who were unable to pay, the examiner succeeded in obtaining available securities to a considerable
amount. The directors on their part fortified their cash resources by
obtaining loans from other banks, and for a time there seemed to be a
fair prospect that the bank could be saved from suspension. It proved
impracticable, however, to make headway against the growing distrust
among depositors, and the board of directors resolved, on February G,
to close the doors. A receiver was appointed, and the president and
vice-president are now under indictment.
Every effort was made by the receiver to expedite the liquidation,
and there was no litigation of any consequence, so that within six weeks
from the date of failure the creditors were paid in full, principal and
interest, and assets to the nominal value of upward of $1,300,000 were
turned over to the agent of the stockholders in accordance with the
provisions of the act approved June SO, 1S76.
The Commercial National Bank of Dubuque, Iowa, failed March 20.
The bank was wrecked by the diversion of funds to sustain outside
business interests of the president and those of his immediate family
connections. An amount not less than four times the capital stock of
the bank was borrowed by members of the family and persons connected
with them in support of enterprises which depended upon the bank for
their existence, and the immediate cause of failure was the inability of
these borrowers to liquidate their indebtedness.
The violation of the statute, which the excessive and illegal loans involved, was concealed by making use of the names of irresponsible persons, and the security upon which the directors affected to rely has
proved to be insufficient or worthless.
Dividends amounting to 40 per cent, have been paid, and an assessment to the lull extent authorized by law has been levied upon the
stockholders.
The State National Bank of Kaleigh, N. C, closed its doors March
27, the president and cashier having absconded to Canada, taking with
them about $25,000. An examination disclosed the fact that the bank
had been completely wrecked, and that preparations for defalcation
bad been in progress for a long time.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

51

The rogues in this instance had resorted even to forgery, and thereby
became amenable to extradition. So swift was the pursuit and arrest
that most of the stolen money was found still concealed in the clothing
of the prisoners and in the original packages.
The offense being one against the State statutes, subsequent proceedings are beyond the official cognizance of the Comptroller of the
Currency.
The history of this association is instructive.
A private banker in Raleigh organized the bank, took shares for the
assets he turned over to it, and upon the credit thus created he obtained
deposits enough to carry on business. His assets, taken as capital, were
really worth very little, if anything. His management of the bank was
no better than that of his private business. He went on making bad
debts and unprofitable investments, and when he died, in 1883, his successors continued to do likewise. His estate and family owned most of
the stock, and were also debtors to nearly the par value of their shares.
His wife assumed the presidency of the bank, and her brother, the
cashier, succeeded to the actual management. Always weak he rapidly became dishonest, and finally ended his career by entering into
collusion with the new president, a son-in-law of the deceased founder
of the bank, to seize all the plunder they could and decamp.
A dividend of 20 per cent, was declared and distributed June 8.
The Second National Bank of Xenia, Ohio, closed its doors May 2,
having been reduced to insolvency by the negligence of the directors
and the incompetency of its officers. The cashier was utterly unfit for
his position, and nobody else looked after matters. Bad debts and large
overdrafts were allowed to accumulate, and the bank's funds were locked
up in all sorts of investments that should never have been even entertained.
The directors, active business men, supposed to be in good financial
condition, were large borrowers, and allowed their over-due obligations
to lie unpaid.
The receiver has collected about $190,000 from the assets, and the
directors have contributed $42,000 more in order to facilitate a speedy
liquidation. There has been but little litigation attending the administration of this trust.
Dividends amounting to 80 per cent, have been paid since the failure.
The Madison National Bank of Madison, Dak., was organized in December, 1886, having been converted from a State bank. The officers,
directors, and stockholders were composed of the president, cashier,
their wives, and one other person, the first two holding 470 of the 5(K)
shares into which the capital stock was divided. From the first the
management of the bank was so conducted as to call for repeated notices
from the Comptroller to the directors to correct irregularities, such as
shortage in reserve, dealings with a mortgage and investment company,
of which the president and cashier were trustees, excessive loans, overdue paper, etc. Plausible explanations were made by the directors, who
alleged inexperience in national-bank methods and misunderstanding
of the law. They professed both the intention and the desire to do
right, and repeatedly made statements which appeared to show amendment of administration. In May last, however, transactions were discovered which were not only in violation of the national-bank law, but
which also involved criminal misconduct of the officers.
The case was so obviously one of premeditated plunder that the examiner was directed to act in concert with the district attorney$ and
accordingly on a day agreed upon these officers met at Madison, the




52

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

examiner took charge of the bank, and the president and cashier were
arrested.
A receiver was duly appointed, and every effort has been made by
attachment and otherwise to save something for the creditors, but these
efforts have not received the local support necessary to their success.
The accused officers readily obtained bail, and seem to have access to
sufficient means to thwart and embarrass the receiver.
After the alleged capital of the bank had been withdrawn in loans
to the officers, and its deposits had been absorbed by these officers
through the transfer of worthless paper, they set about selling their
stock, offering it generally at distant points, and succeeded in making
considerable sales, mostly in New England.
The Lowell National Bank of Lowell, Mich., failed September 11,
principally on account of the bad management of its president, who
seemed to have been uncontrolled by the directors.
Among the nominal assets the receiver has found a large amount of
worthless paper, most of it connected with a manufacturing company
which was obviously insolvent during the whole time that it was absorbing the resources of the bank. The methods resorted to by the officers
of this company with the connivance of the bank were siniply scandalous.
Besides the losses incurred in this way the bank's valid resources had
become gradually locked up in unproductive real estate and in other inconvertible investments.
As stated in the last Report indictments were found against several
persons connected with the Fidelity National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio,
and suits were brought against the directors implicated in violations of
law. These suits have not yet been decided.
Upon trial, the vice-president and assistant cashier were found guilty,
and sentenced to serve a term in the penitentiary, the former for ten
years. The cashier died before the trials came up.
A table, appendix, p. 172, has been prepared with great care and
minute particularity, showing under appropriate heads all collections
made from the assets of each of the 128 national banks which have
become insolvent, how and for what purpose disbursements were made,
and accounting for all moneys and every asset of whatever description
which passed through the hands of the receiver or the Comptroller.
The labor involved in the preparation of this table has been very great,
but as the accounts of receivers are now kept upon the principle applied
in the table, and their quarterly reports conform to the same arrangement, there will be no difficulty hereafter in carrying forward the results from year to year.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

53

DIVIDENDS, THIRTY-FOUR IN NUMBER, PAID TO CREDITORS OF INSOLVENT NATIONAL
BANKS DURING THE PAST YEAR, WITH TOTAL DIVIDENDS IN EACH CASE, UP TO
NOVEMBER 1, 1888.
Dividends paid during tho past year. ! Total
._
jdividends
Date of ap- _
i paid depointment of
Name and location of bank.
receiver.
Date
- LOiai
Percent ^ p e T
.uciiA,.

n,v^,.^+

L

^l '--eni.

(per

cent.).
First National Bank of Angelica, N.Y
First National Bank of Auburn, N. Y
Pacific National Bank of
Boston, Mass
First National Bank of Buffalo, K.Y
Farmers' National Bank of
Bushnell, 111
Metropolitan National Bank
of Cincinnati, Ohio
First National Bank of
Corry, Pa
Commercial National Bank
of Dubuque, Iowa
Do
Henrietta National Bank of
Henrietta, Tex
Do
Middletown National Bank
of Middletown, N. Y
Marine National Bank of the
city of New York, N. Y...
Do
Exchange National Bank of
Norfolk, Va
Do
First National Bank of Pine
Bluff, Ark
State National Bank of llaleigh,N.C
Richmond National Bank of
Richmond, Ind
Do
Vermont National Bank of
Saint Albans, Vt
Fifth National Bank of Saint
Louis, Mo
Do
Do
Stafford National Bank of
Stafford Springs, Conn
Do
Do
National Bank of Sumter,
S.C
Do
Do.
First National Bank of Wallpeton, Dak
Do
Second National Bank of
Xenia,Ohio
Do
Total.

Apr. 19, *886 -Jan. 20,1888

$13, 466. 01

Fob. 20,1888 July 21,1888

190, 612.75

May 22,1882 May 31,1888

Proportion of
interest
paid depositors
(per
cent.).

147, 367. 80

15

100

100

25

Apr. 22,1882 Jan. 4,1888

44, 736. 58

5

Dec. 17,1884 Jan. 21,1888

51, 759. 75

GO

Feb. 10,188S Mar. 1G, 1888

400, 997. 59

100

100

Oct. 11,1887 Jan. 21,1888

85, 992. 8ti

50

50

Apr. 2,1888 J u l y 20,1888
Oct. 2G, 1888
do

118, 732. 73
39, 577. 62

30 !
10

30
40

25
15

75
90

10

80

Aug. 17,1887 Mar. 1,1888
Oct. 16,1888

20, 572. 27

....do

12, 323. 31

Nov. 29,1884 Oct. 31,1888

65,431.92

J u l y 23,1884 ' M a y 1,1888
....do
; Oct. 20,1888
A u g . 9,1883 | Oct.

20

18, 294.17
36, 586.19

8,1888

45

61,427.93

Apr. 19,1888

100

55
GO
45
50

20, 677. 72

Apr. 9,1885 May 21,1888
do .'.
! Oct. 24,1888

Mar. 31,1888 [ J u n e

100

223, 713. 28
222,852.07
144, 704. 01
144, 508. 93

May 13,1884 Dec. 6,1887
Apr. 17,1888
do

Nov. 20,1886

43

Gl
71
67. 50

31,1888

99, 425. 94

Nov. 15,1887 | F e b . 1, Ii88
do
! A p r . 9,1888
do
j Oct. 20,1888

479, 805.70
143, 929. 74
143, 907. 93

50
65
80

Oct. 17,1887 • J a n . 27,1888
!
....do
Mar. 15,188*
....do
Oct. 20,1888

123, 718.14
61,859.07
69, 918. 24

50
75
100

A u g . 24,1887 ! Dec. 21,1887
do
May 17,1888
do
Oct. 27,1888

37, 462. 30
9, 248.04
13, 561. 07

50
62
80

A p r . 8,1886 ; A u g . 2,1888
....do
• Oct. 23,1888

27, 677.19
11, 065. 87

May 9,1888 | J u l y 21,1888
'do
| Oct. 29,1888!

119, 020. 55
119, 020. 55

10

100

35
45
40
80

• *3, 523, 955. 82

* Tho number of dividend checks involved in the payment of this amount to creditors was 17,859.




54

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The following table shows the number, capital, and liabilities of
national banks, organized and failed, up to the end of each official year
from 1864 to 1888, inclusive, and the percentages in each case:
Capital, surplus, and undivided
pro tits.

Number.

Yesir.

1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
]875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888

OrPergan- Failed. centized.
age.

561
1, 601
1, 6jp5
1, 673
1,685
1,694
1, 729
1, 894
2, 061
2,129
2, 200
2,307
2, 343
2,372
2,400
2. 438
2, 491
.-. 2,581
2, 808
3,070
3,261
3,406
3,580
3, 805
3,937

1
3
10
13
15
15
15
21
32
35
40
49
59
73
81
84
84
87
89
100
104
112
120
128

Averages, 25 years.

Other liabilities.

Percentage
PerAggregate Aggregate of cap- Aggregate Aggregate centage
of banks
of banks
of b a n k s
of banks of liaital,
surorganized.*
failed.
organized.*
failed.
bilities.
plus,
etc.
$94 775 480
464^ 270' 865
501, 975,133
522, 537, 865
536,983,183
555, 815, 793
565, 633, 365
604,130, 906
641,134,136
674, 676, 245
683, 265, 502
702, 350, 609
689, 795, 508
661, 953, 797
642, 294, 048
629,711,325
644, 468, 749
668, 597, 284
698, 331, 568
735, 571, 822
758,167,132
T57, 714, 293
796, 921,031
850, 314, 989
883, 964, 263

$50,000
550, 000
2, 017, 417
2, 257, 027
2, 564, 007
2, 564, 007
2, 564, 007
4, 623, 661
8, 773, 998
9, 057, 837
10,199,810
11, 345, 779
15,137, 227
18,312,619
19, 556, 491
20, 256, 491
20, 256, 491
22, 069, 594
22, 319, 594
23,606,512
24, 229, 722
24, 927, 616
26, 487, 616
28,387,616

3.163
3. 0:J4
3.113
3.198
3.128
3.115
3.212

$202 332 715
$166,089
895, 713, 298
1, 027, 072, 803 1, 535,133
984, 770, 208 5, 821, 596
1, 031,167, 125 6, 271, 508
950, 660, 912 6, 686, 094
954, 329, 973 6, 686, 094
1,135,875,911 6, 686, 094
1,129, 979, 707 10, 633,084
1,184, 811, 768 20, 086,170
1,223,665,826 20, 692, 549
1, 213, 587, 296 23, 528, 788
1,174,104,032 25, 288, 394
1,153, 816, 770 29, 548, 677
1,176, 717, 660 33, 419, 956
1, 293, 512, 595 34, 880, 000
1, 517, 682, 833 B6,108, 466
1, 746,155, 064 36,108,466
1, 766, 769, 875 43, 198,173
1, 703, 296, 794 43, 892, 658
1, 595, 385, 786 50, 452, 476
1, 753, 992, 684 54, 564, 253
1,797,645,010 55, 783, 683
1,85(5,731,276 60, 365,174
2, 024,120, 015 63, 945, 321

.019
.150
.591
.608
. 703
.700
. 589
.941
1.695
1.691
1. 939
2.154
2.561
2.840
2.696
2. 371
2.068
2.445
2. 577
3.162
3.054
3.103
3. 251
3.159

638, 614,112

.062
.180
. f.9V
.771
.885
.867
.792
1.019
1.503
1.591
1. 734
2.091
2.487
3.042
3.322
3.368
3.254
3.098
2.899
3.067
3.053
3.128
3.154
3.251

12, 884,-605

2.018 1, 299, 759, 916 27, 053, 960

2.081

.011
. 109
. 3^6
. 420
. 461
. 453
.424
.721
1. 300
1. 320
1.452
1. 645
2. 287
2.85L
3.106
3.142
3. O:JO

* Exclusive of banks in voluntary liquidation.

Out of 3,937 national banks organized since February, 1863, only 128,
or about 3J per cent.,have been placed in the hands of receivers; this
includes 9 which had been previously placed in liquidation by their
stockholders, but upon their failing to pay their depositors the Comptroller appointed receivers to wind up their aifairs. Out of the above
total of 128 failed banks, 45 have paid their creditors iu full, while 33
have besides paid interest, 27 in full and 6 in part. The affairs of 90
banks of the 128 have been finally closed, leaving 38 in process of settlement, of which, as has been seen, 8 are virtually closed, with the exception of pending litigation, leaving 30 receiverships only in active
operation.
The total amount so far paid to creditors of insolvent national banks
has been $33,027,451 upon proved claims amounting to $51,924,977. The
amount paid during the year has been $3,523,955.82, besides $68,510 paid
for dividends declared prior to November 1,1887, on claims proved since
that date. Assessments amounting to $12,555,350 have been made U£>on
stockholders of insolvent national banks under section 5151 of the Eevised Statutes of the United States. From this source the gross collections amount to $5,346,171, of which there has been received during the
past year $308,591. Suits are pending in some cases.
Each year's experience confirms the opinion that it would be wise to
so amend the laws as to allow banks to commute the liability of their




REPORT OP THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

55

shareholders into a special reserve fund, as recommended in the Reports of 188(5 and 1887.
Upon a general view of the data relating to insolvent national banks,
it appears that while the number of failed banks is about 3£ per cent, of
the total number of banks organized, the percentages of their capital
and other liabilities, taken at time of failure, are less.
To make the comparison complete, however, there should be added
to the capital,.surplus, and undivided profits, as given for the year 1888,
viz, $883,964,263, the capital, surplus, and undivided profits of all
banks that have gone into voluntary liquidation, and of all that have
been wound up *it the end of their corporate existence, because in
these cases shareholders have recovered all they put in and kept in.
The amount is $125,894,506, and with the aggregate in the table makes
$1,009,858,769, for which the system has been accountable to its proprietors. Against this vast sum should then be set the capital, surplus, and undivided profits of failed banks, viz, $28,387,616, increased
by ajnounts collected by assessment from shareholders, $5,346,171, diminished by the amount, as nearly as can be ascertained, repaid to
shareholders out of assets, viz, $3,535,545. The net loss will then be
seen to be only $30,198,242, which is not quite 3 per cent, of total investments. Against this loss a superabundant offset is afforded by the
dividends paid out of profits amounting in many cases to very large
percentages.
Again, from the total "other liabilities;? of failed banks, viz,
$63,945,321, should be deducted, amount of circulation $15,432,360, and
total dividends paid to creditors $33,027,45L, aggregate $48,459,811,
net loss $15,485,510, which is 0.83 per cent, upon the $1,872,417,724
of such liabilities resting upon the system at large.
The affairs of five failed banks have been closed during the past year,
and final dividends have been paid to their creditors. These banks,
with the total dividends paid in each case, are given below :
Name ami location of bank.

First National Bank, Angelica, N. Y
Farmers' National Bank, Bushnejl, 111
Metropolitan National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
Stafford National Bank, Stafford Springs, Conn
National Bank of the State of Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo




Date of ap- ! Total divi- Proportion
poiu tin en t of; (lends on of interest
paid.
receiver, i principal.

Apr. 19,1880
Dec. 17, 1884
Feb. 10,1888
Oct. 17, 1887
June 23,1877

Per cent
100
100
100
100
100

Per

cent
100
100
100
100
100

56

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
INACTIVE RECEIVERSHIPS.

These were fully described in the last Annual lieport.
The following table shows the receiverships that are now in this condition :
Name and location of bank.

F i r s t National Bank, Albion, "N. Y
F i r s t National Bank, Anderson, I n d
T h i r d National Bank, Chicago, 111
Central National Bank, Chicago, 111
People's National Bank, Helena, Mont
H o t Springs National Bank, Hot Springs, A r k
F i r s t National Bank of Union Mills, Union City, P a
German-American National Bank, Washington, D. C

D a t e of
appointment
of receiver.

Aug. 26, 1884
Nov. 23, 1873
Nov. 24, 1877
Dec. 1. 1877
Sept. 13 1878
J u n e 2, 1884
Mar. 24 1883
Nov. 1 1878

Dividends
paid.
Per cent.
39
*100
60
40
100
65
50

*And interest.

During the past year the following trusts have passed into this category, viz, the First National Bank of Albion, N. Y., and the Hot Springs
National Bank of Hot Springs, Ark.
By reference to the Eeport of 1887 it will be seen that the National
Bank of the State of Missouri, Saint Louis, has disappeared from the
inactive receiverships. At the date of that report the receivership had
not terminated because of the failure of the agent elected by the shareholders in June, 1887, to qualify by giving the bond required by law.
During the present year the receivership was closed, and cash assets
were turned over to the agent amounting to $26,720, and nominal assets
amounting to $36,957. Among the nominal assets was real property
which has enormously increased in value, and it is not unlikely that
enough may be realized by the agent to reimburse the shareholders for
the amount paid under assessment upon stock.
The First National Bank of Albion, N. Y., which was wrecked by its
president, who squandered the funds of the bank in speculation, has
been placed on the inactive list. The assets of the bank were almost
entirely worthless, and a sufficient sum has not been realized to pay a
dividend.
An assessment of 100 per cent, was levied upon the stock, nearly all
of which was owned by an estate, and a judgment obtained by the
receiver^ but the demand of the trust was met by counter claims of the
estate, which have not yet been judicially determined.
The receiver brought suit against the brokers through whom the
president carried on his speculations, and, as will be seen by reference
to page 89, obtained judgment for a considerable sum, but the defendants
have appealed.
CIRCULATING NOTES.

Under present laws the minimum deposit of bonds required to be
made by the 3,140 national banks iu operation in the United States on
October 4, 1888, amounts to $91,988,805.
A table in the appendix, p. 149, shows by States and geographical
divisions the national banks in operation on October 4, 1888, separated
into two classes, namely, banks of which the capital does not exceed
$150,000 and banks of 'which the capital exceeds $150,001). The first
class contains 2,229 banks, with an aggregate capital of $185,551,921$




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

57

tlie second, 911 banks, with an aggregate capital of $407,069,735. The
minimum of bonds required to be kept on deposit by the entire body of
banks in the first class is $40,387,980; the minimum for the 911 banks
of the second class is $45,550,000. If all banks held only the minimum of bonds, the total national-bank circulation could not exceed
$82,744,025, while the possible maximum of circulation, namely, 90
per cent, of the aggregate of the national-bank capital, would be
$533,359,491.
The actual circulation on October 4, 1888, was $151,700,809, which is
exclusive of $88,521,813 still outstanding, but which, having been surrendered by the banks that issued it, is no longer represented by bonds,
but by that amount of lawful money deposited with the Treasurer of
the United States to redeem the notes as they are presented.
The $151,700,809 of circulation for which the banks are responsible
consists of $68,410,823 secured by the bonds deposited by the 2,229
banks having $150,000 capital and less, and $83,289,986, secured by the
bonds belonging to the 911 banks of which the capital exceeds $150,000.
The first class of banks have, therefore, $26,661,641 more than their
minimum, and $98,585,906 less than their possible maximum circulation, while the larger banks have $42,294,986 more than their minimum
and $283,072,776 less than their maximum.
The following table show^s the number of banks organized from July
1, 1882, to July 1, 1888, their capital stock, amount of bonds deposited,
and the circulation issued thereon:
Year.
July
July
Julv
July
July
July

1, 1882, to
1,1883, to
1,1884, to
1, 1885. to
1,1886, to
1,1887, to

July
July
July
July
July
July

Ko.
1,1883
1,1884
1, 1885
1, .188(5
1, 1887
1,1888

251
218
142
103
217
104

Capital.

Minimum
bonds
required.

Bonds
actually
deposited.

$26, 552, 300
19, 944, 000
15, 205, 000
17, 553, 000
31,414,000
16, 734, 000

$5,155, 500
4,01(5,000
3, 0G1, 250
3, 404, 500
4, 98(5, 000
3, 308, 500

$7,116,400
4, 67(5,100
3, 332, 800
3, 715, 500
5, 051, 300
3, 324, 750

P e r c e n t , Circulation
issued.
of excess.
28
14
8
8
1
0.5

$6, 404, 760
4, 208, 490
2, 999, 520
3, 343, 950
4, 546,170
2, 992, 275

From the foregoing table it appears that 1,155 banks have been organized between the dates given, with a capital of $127,432,300 ; that
they have received circulation to the amount of $24,495,165 on bonds
deposited to the amount of $27,216,850, and that the minimum deposit
of bonds required by law for these banks is $23,931,750.
The actual deposit of bonds during the whole period exceeds the
minimum by about 12 per cent, only, and taken year by year the percentage of excess has decreased from 28 per cent, in 1882-'83 to onehalf of 1 per cent, in 1887-'S8.
Of the 164 national banks organized during the past fiscal year, 93
have a capital of $50,000 each, amounting to $4,650,000; 55 have a
capital of over $50,000 and not exceeding $150,000, amounting to
$5,384,000; and 16 have a capital of $6,700,000. The 16 largest banks
deposited the exact amount of bonds required by law, with one exception,
and out of 148 banks, of which the capital does not exceed $150,000, only
4 have deposited bonds in excess of the requirement.
Tables will be found in the appendix, p. 147, etc., showing for the
national banks in each State, Territory, and reserve city the minimum
amount of bonds required by law, the bonds actually held, and the circulation thereon outstanding October 4, 1888; also all other information deemed useful as to circulation.




58

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

INTEREST-BEARING FUNDED DEBT OF THE UNITED STATES, AND THE
AMOUNT HELD BY NATIONAL BANKS.

The connection between the banks and the distribution of the funded
debt of the United States renders the following statement appropriate:
The x>ublic debt at its maximum, on August 31, 1865, amounted to
$2,844,049,626, of which obligations not bearing interest amounted to
$461,616,3LI, leaving interest-bearing debt $2,383,033,315. On October 31, 1888, the interest-bearing debt amounted to $958,123,282.
The following table shows the class of bonds, authorizing act, date
of maturity, rate of interest, and intermediate changes:
BONDED DEBT AT DATES NAMED.
Date.
Aug. 31, 1805.
J une 30, 1806.
June 30, 18(57.
June 30, 3 868.
June 30,1809.
June 30, 1870.
June 30, 1871.
June 30, 187a.
June 30,1873.
June 30,1874.
Juno 30, 1875.
June 30, 187(5.
June 30, 1877.
June 30, 1878.
June 30, 1879
June 30, 1880.
June 30,1881.
June 30, 1882...

G per cent.

5 per cent.

$908, 518, 091
1, 0J8, 388,409
1,421,110,719
1,841,521,800
1, 880, 341, 300
1, 7(54, 932, 300
1, 013, 897, 300
1, 374, 883, 800
1, 281, 238, 650
1,213,624,700
1,100,865,550
984, 99!), 650
85 i, (521. 850
738,619,000
310, 932, 500
235, 780, 400
196, 378, G O
O
Continued at;
3£ per cent.
58,957,150

$199, 792,100
198, 528, 435
198, 533, 435
221, 588, 400
221, 589, 300
221, 589, 300
274, 236, 450
414, 567, 300
414, 567, 300
510,628,050
607,132, 750
711, 685, 800
703, 266, 650
703, 266, 650
646, 905, 500
484, 864, 900
439, 841, 350
Continued a t
3£ per cent.
401, f>93, 900
32, 082, 600
F u n d e d into
3 per cents,
act J u l y 12,
1882.
304, 204, 350
224,612,150
194,190,500
144, 046. 600
19, 716, 500

June 30, 1833.
June 30, 1884.
June 30, 1885.
June 30, 1886
June 30, 1887.
June 30, 1888.
Oct. 31, 1888.

4£- per cent.*' ; 4percent.!6 per cent.J

Total.

$1, 258, 000 $1,109, 568,191
6, 042, 000 1, 212,958, 904
14, 762, 000 1, 634,406,154
29, 089, 000 2, 09>,199, 200
58, 638, 320 2, 166,568, 920
64, 457, 320 2, 050,978, 920
64, 618, 832 1, 952,752, 582
64, 623, 512 1, 845,074,612
64, 623, 512 1, 760,429, 462
64, 623, 512 1, 788,876, 262
64, 623, 512 1, 772,621, 812
64, 623, 512 1,761, 308, 962
64, 623, 512 1, 761,512.012
$140,000,000
240, 000, 000 $98, 850, 000 64,623,512 1,845, 359,162
250, 000, 000 679, 878,110 64, 623, 512 1, 952,339, 622
250, 000, 000 7;J9, 347, 800. 64, 623, 512 1,774, 616,612
250, 000, 000 739, 347, 800 64, 623, 512 1, 690,191, 262
250, 000, 000 739, 349, 350 64, 623, 512 1,514,433,912
^250, 000, 000 737, 942, 200 64, 623, 512 1, 388, 852, 662
250, 000, 000
250, 000, 000
250, 000, 000
250, 000, 000
222, 207, 050
197, 302, 000

737, 661, 700
737, 719, 850
737, 759, 700
737, 800, 600
714,177, 400
682, 068,150

64, 623, 512
64, 623, 512
64, 623, 512
64,623,512
64, 623, 512
64, 623, 512

1,276,897,362
1, 246, 533, 862
1, 196,429,812
1, 072,140, 612
1, 001, 007, 962
943, 993, 662

* Funded loan 1891; authorizing act, July 14, 1870, and January 20, 1871; date of maturity, 1891.
t Funded loan 1907; authorizing act, July 14, 1870, and January 20, 1871; date of maturity, 1907.
X Pacific railroad bonds ; authorizing act, July 1, 1862, and July 2, 1864 ; date of maturity, 1895 to 1899.
The Xavy pension fund, amounting to $1.4,000,000 in 3 percents, the interest; upon which is applied
to the payment of naval pensions exclusively, and $129,620 of refunding certificates are not included
in the table.

During the year ending October 31, 188S, $50,412,650 of 4 percents
and $33,242,600 of 4^ percents were purchased for sinking-fund purposes, making a total" of $83,655,250. Of this amount $4,077,150 of 4
percents and $1,465,800 of 4J percents were withdrawn by the national banks from deposit to secure circulation, making total withdrawals from this cause $5,542,950, while the replacement by deposits
of 4 percents amounted to only $406,000.
Changes in the debt have induced corresponding changes in the bonds
held by the national banks. In January, 1866,1,582 banks, with capital,
surplus, and undivided profits of $475,330,204, held $440,380,350 of United
States bonds. On October 4, 1888. 3,140 banks, with capital, surplus,
and undivided profits of $855,576,646, held only $232,582,250 of bonds.
The total bank circulation on January 1, 1866, was $213,239,530, and
on October 4, 1888, that which was secured by bonds was $151,702,809.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

59

The amount and classes of United States bonds owned by the banks,
including" those pledged as security for circulation and for public deposits, on June 30 in each year since 1865 are exhibited in the following table:
United States bonds lield as security for circulation.
Years.
3 per cent,
bonds.

5 per cent,
bonds.

\\ per cent, 4 per cent,
bonds.
bonds.

$170,1582 500
$65, 576, 600
241, 083J 500
86, 226, 850
251, 4,30, 400
89,177,100
250. 726, 950
90, 768, 950
255,190, 350
87,661,250
247, 355, 350
94, 923, 200
220, 497, 750
139,387,800
173, 251, 450
207,189,250
160, 923. 500
229, 487, 050
154, 370, 700
236, 800, 500
136, 955,100
239, 359, 400
109,313,450
232, 081, 300
87, 690, 300
206, 651, 050 $44, 372, 250
82, 421, 200
199, 514, 550
48, 448, 650
56, 042, 800
144,616,300
35, 056, 550
58, 056,150
139, 758, 650
37, |fi(), 950
61, 901, 800
172, 348, 350
32,600, 500
Continued a t Continued a t
3h percent.:
3 | p e r cent.,:
25, 142, 600
202, 487, 650
32, 752, 650
1882..
7,402, 800i
385, 70(K 3 per cents: > 39, 408, 500
200, 877, 850)
46, 546, 400
172, 412, 550
1884.
Pacifies.
1885 .
3, 520, 000
142, 240, 850 48, 483, 050
188(5 .
3, 565, 000
50, 484, 200
107, 782,100
3,175, 000
67, 743,100
1887 .
5, 205, 9.30
3,181,000
69, 670, 300
1888.
37, 500
1865 .
1866 .
1867 .
1868 .
1869 .
1870 .
1871 .
1872.
1873 .
1874.
1875.
1876 .
1877 .
1878.
1879.
1880 .
1881.

$10,162,000
118,538,950
120, 076, 300
93, 637, 700

Total.

United
States
bonds held
for other
purposes at
nearest
date.

Grand
total.

$235, 959,100 $155,785,750 $391,744,850
327, 310, 3<J0 121,152,950 448, 463, 300
84, 002, 650 424, 610,150
340,607,500
80, 922, 500 422,418,400
341, 495, 900
55, 102, 000 397, 953, 600
342, 851, 600
43, 9^0, 600 386, 259,150
342, 278, 550
39, 450, 800 399, 336, 350
359, 885, 550
380, 440, 700
31, 868, 200 412,308,900
390, 410, 550
25, 724, 400 416,134, 150
391,171,200
25, 347,100 416, 518. 300
376, 314, 500
26, 900, 200 40:J, 214, 700
341.394,750
45,170, 300 386, 56.% 050
338,713,600
47, 315, 050 386, 028, 650
349, 546,400
68, 850, 900 418, 397, 300
351,254,600
76, 603, 520 430, 858,120
361, 652, 050 42, 831. 300 404, 481, 350
3G0, 488, 4U0
63, 849, 950 424, 338, 350
4C0, 935, 250

97,429,800

357,812,700

43,122,550

104, 959G50

353, 029, 500

34, 094,150 387,123, 650

111,690,900 I 330,649,850

31,203,000

361, 852, 850

117,901,300
114, 143, 500
115, 842. 650
105,423,850

32,195,800
31, 345, 550
33,147, 750
63, 618,150

344,341.000
307. 320, 350
224,814,450
241, 930, 800

312,145,200
27">, 974, 800
191, 906, 700
178, 312, 650

SECURITY FOR CIRCULATING NOTES.

The following table shows the amount of bonds held by the Treasurer
as security for the circulating notes of the national banks on October
31 of each year from 1882 to 1888, inclusive, the amount held by the
banks for all other purposes, and the total of these two:
United States bonds hold as security for circulation.
Tear.

Number of
banks. 4 £ per cent, 4 per ceni
bonds.
bonds.

2, 30l!$33, 754, 650 $104, 927,
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887.
1888

2,522
2,671
2, 727
2,868
3,061
3,151

41,319,700
49/537,450
49, 547, 250
57,436, 850
69, 696,100
66,121,750

Pacific 6
3 p e r cent, per cent.
bonds.
bonds.

Total.

United
States
1)0rids held
for other
purposes
at nearest
date.

Total.

jjjjjj \ $3, 526, 000 $362, 505, 650 $37, 563, 750;$400, 069, 400

106,164,850!|20i;fJ;?«»* 3, 463, 000 352, 877, 300 30,674,050 383,551,350
116,705,450 155, 604, 400
116, 391, 650 138, 920, 650
115,383,150 69, 038, 050
115,731,400
144,500
100, 413, 600 None.

3, 469, 000
3,505,000!
3, 586, 000
3, 256, 000
3,468,000

325,316,300: 30,419,600'
308,364,550! 31,780,100
245, 444, 050 32, 431, 400;
188, 828, O O 34, 671, 350,
Oj
170,003,350| GO, 715, 050!

355,735,900
340,144,650
277, 875, 450
223, 499, 350
230,718,400

* Three and one-hall" per cent.

The foregoing tables show how the banks have shifted their investments from one class of bonds to another, and the following table exhibits especially the steady decrease in the amount of bonds held for
circulation.
It is worthy of note in this connection that the recent increase in
bonds held otherwise than as security for circulation is directly at-




60

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

tributable to the requirement of these as security for deposits of public money. It is matter of general knowledge that a considerable percentage of bonds deposited as security for public moneys are not owned
by the banks making the deposit, but that they have been borrowed
for the purpose.
TABLE SHOWING THE DECREASE OF NATIONAL-BANK CIRCULATION DURING EACH
OF THE YEARS ENDING OCTOBER 31, FROM 1884 TO 1888, INCLUSIVE, AND THE
AMOUNT OF LAWFUL MONEY ON DEPOSIT AT THE END OF EACH YEAR.

National-bank notes outstanding October 31, 1883, including notes of national gold banks
$352,013,787
Less lawful money on deposit at same date, including
deposits of national gold banks
35,993, 461
$316,020,326
National-bank notes outstanding October 31, 1884, including notes of national gold banks
Less lawful money on deposit at same date, including
deposits of national gold banks

333, 559, 813
41,710,163

Net decrease of circulation
Net outstanding as above, October 31, 1884
National-bank notes outstanding October 31, 1885, including notes of national gold banks
Less lawful money on deposit at same date, including
deposits of national gold banks

24,170,676
291,849,650
315,847,163
39.542,979
'.

Net decrease of circulation^*Net outstanding as above, October 31, 1885
National-bank notes outstanding October 31, 1886, including notes of national gold banks
Less lawful money on deposit at same date, including
dex>osits of national gold banks

276, 304,189
301,529,889
81, 819,233
—

Net decrease of circulation

219,710,656
56,593,533
219,710,656

272,041,203
102,826,136

Net decrease of circulation
Net outstanding as above, October 31, 1887
National-bank notes outstanding October 31, 1888, including notes of national gold banks
Less lawful money on deposit at same date, including
deposits of national gold banks

276,304,189
15,545, 461

Net decrease of circulation
Net outstanding as above, October 31, 1886
National-bank notes outstanding October 31, 1887, including notes of national gold banks
Less lawful money on deposit at same date, including
deposits of national gold banks

291,849,650

169,215,0b7
50,495,589
169,215,067

239,385,237
87,018,909

152,366,328
16,848,739

The following table extended from the last Report shows the diminishing scale on which banks organized during each of the past six years
have availed themselves of the privilege of issuing circulation upon
bonds in excess of the minimum which the law obliges them to keep
on hand.
For the sake of conciseness in the table the circulation is omitted,
but as every bank has received circulation to the amount of 90 per
cent, of the bonds deposited, the proportions of the table reflect faithfully the features of the circulation.




EKPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

61

N U M B E R AND CAPITAL OF NATIONAL BANKS ORGANIZED I N EACH
GEOGRAPHICAL
DIVISION OF T H E U N I T E D STATES FROM OCTOBER 3 1 , 1 8 8 2 , TO OCTOBER 3 1 , 1 8 8 8 ,
SHOWING T H E AMOUNT OF BONDS DEPOSITED TO SECURE THEIR CIRCULATION, T H E
MINIMUM AMOUNT OF BONDS REQUIRED B Y THE ACT OF J U L Y 12, 1 8 8 2 , AND T H E
EXCESS DEPOSITED OVER REQUIREMENTS BOTH I N AMOUNT AND PERCENTAGE.
U n i t e d States bonds.
Number of
banks.

Divisions.*

Capital.
Deposited.

Minimum.

Excess.

Excess
over
minimum.

1883.
- .......

...

Fi fth
Sixth
Eighth
Total

7
38
5
43
61
71
11
26

$1,275,000
2, 975, 200
295, 000
3, 643, 6.r>0
11, 210, 000
7, 085, 500
620,000
1,550,000

$995, 000
1, 854, 500
155, 500
1, 238,100
2, 578, 000
1, 729, 250
268, 400
556, 800

$312, 500
.743, 800
73, 700
748, 400
1. 765, 000
1, 246, 400
155, 000
375, 000

$682,500
1,110, 700
81, 800
489, 700
813,000
482,850
113,400
181, 800

Per ct.
218.40
149.32
110.99
65.43
46.06
38. 73
73.16
48.48

262

First
Second
Thi ril

28, 654, 350

9, 375, 550

5,419,800

3, 955, 750

72.99

1884.
First
Second
Third

190.000
340, 500
70, 000
627, 700
570, 700
1, 135, 600
95, 000
285, 700

123, 000
377, 500
96, 500
65, 900
356, 300
104,150
25, 000
23, 550

64.73
110.86
137.85
10.49
62. 43
9.17
26. 31
8.24

16,042, 230

4, 487,100

3, 315, 200

1,171, 900

35.35

4
18
3
20
35
41
8
16

400, 000
2, 635, 000
660, 000
2, 025, 000
7,123, 000
2, 350, 000
725, 000
1, 020, 000

100, 500
1, 037, 500
112,500
561, 500
1, 963, 500
759,80C
169,000
255, 000

100,000
543,700
112,500
506, 100
1,218,200
587, 500
168,700
255, 000

500
493, 800

.50
90.82

55, 400
745, 300
172, 300
300

10.95
61.17
29.33
.18

16, 938, 000

4,959,300

3, 491, 700

1,467,600

42.03

5
15
4
23
27
58
18
24

500, 000
4, 000, 000
450, 000
1, 658, 000
5, 465, 000
5.830, 000
2,100, 000
1, 355, 000

125, 000
525, 000
112,500
404,750
813, 000
982, 500
367,500
353, 250

125, (00
525, 000
112, 500
402, 000
743,750
982, 500
360, 000
313, 750

2,750
99, 250

.68
13.34

7,500
39, 500

2.08
12.59

174

21, 358, 000

3, 713, 500

3, 564, 500

149, 000

4.18

400, 000
7, 025, 000
500, 000
6,199, 000
5, 010, 000
9, 002, 000
1, 510, 000
900, 000

100, 000
771, 550
115, 000
1, 262, 500
959, 500
1, 400, 500
377, 500
225, 000

100, 000
743, 750
112,500
1, 262, 250
952, 500
1,400,500
377, 500
225, 000

27, 800
2, 500
250
7,000

3.74
2.22
.02
.74

225

Total

313, 000
718, 000
166, 500
6!)3, 600
927, 000
1, 239, 750
120,000
309, 250

5
27
6
50
37
70
17
13

Fifth
Sivth
Si* von tli
Ei flith

810,000
1 60° ?50
280, 000
2,861,100
3,413,100
5, 492, 780
380, 000
1,143, 000

145

..... .... .

10
22
6
27
34
C8
5
19
191

. •»

30, 546, 000

5, 211, 550

5,174, 000

37, 550

.72

5
19
3
25
23
37
13
7

450, 000
1, 414, 000
160, 000
2, 509, 000
3,130, 000
2, 880, 000
1, 050, 000
460, 000

100, 000
341, 000
40, 000
516, 000
582, 500
682, 500
262, 500
115, 000

100, 000
341, 000
40, 000
514, 750
582, 500
682, 500
262, 500
115, 000

1,250

132

12, 053, 000

2, 639, 500

2, 638, 250

1,250

1885.
First
Second.
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Sixth

.

. . . .

-

...

Eighth

Total
1886.

First
Second . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * . . ..
Third
Fi ft h
Sixth
Ei ghth
Total
1887.

First
Third
Fifth
Sixth
Seventh
Eighth
Total

1888.

First
Second . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Third
Fifth
Sixth
Seventh
Eighth
Total




*See page 147.

62

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The following table exhibits in detail the changes which have occurred
during the past year in the amount of national-bank circulation, so
arranged as to illustrate the process by which the circulation steadily
decreases concurrently with the accession of new banks and an increase
in the aggregate national-bank capital :
CAPITAL AND CIKCULATXON.

Paid-in capital.
Increase by banks existing November 1, 1887
Increase caused by formation of now banks
Total increase

Circulation
represented by
bonds.

$8, 696, 700
11, 789, 000
414, 000

•. -. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$1, 345,145
2, 372, 400
3,150

20, 899, 700

...

...

19, 225, 370
1, 041, 065

7,173,400

Net increase of capital

3, 720, 695

1,102, 400
6, 071, 000

Decrease of banks still in operation November 1, 1888
Decrease by banks going into voluntary liquidation and failed

20, 266,435

13, 726, 300
16, 54.5, 740

BANKS WITHOUT CIRCULATION.

As reported last year, some national banks have not availed themselves of the privilege of taking out circulating notes, and others have
surrendered their entire circulation. The following is a complete list of
such banks, with capital and bonds :
Title of bank.

Capital.
$300, 000
1, 000, 000
5, 000, 000
200,000
50, 000
100. 000
2, 000, 000
300, 000

Total

$50, 000
50,000
50, 000
50, 000
12, 500
25, 000
50,000
50, 000

8, 950, 000

Chemical National Bank, New York, N. T
National City Bank, New York, N. Y
American Exchange National Bank, New York, N. Y
National Bank of Washington, I). C
Chestertown National Bank, Chestertown, Md
,
First National Bank, Houston, TeK
Mechanics' National Bank, New York, N. Y
Metropolitan National Bank, Washington, D. C..

Bonds.

337, 500

ISSUES AND REDEMPTIONS.

The following table exhibits the number and amount of nationalbank notes of each denomination which have been issued and redeemed
since the organization of the system, and the number and amount outstanding on October 31, 1888:
Number of notesDenominations.
Issued.

Redeemed.

Outstanding.

23,167,677 22, 783, 281
384, 396
Ones
7,747,519
7, 619, 436
98, 083
Twos
104,101), 700 90, 617, 308 13,492, 392
Fives
44, 219, 831 36,443, 660
7, 776,171
Tens
13, 786, 873 10, 940, 346 2, 846, 527
Twenties
1, 624, 608
1,897,847
273, 239
Fifties
1, 422,156 1,198, 720
223, 436
One hundreds
23,413
23, 924
Five hundreds
511
7,320
One thousands
7, 369
49
Fractions outstanding.

Total.

196, 382, 896 171, 288, 092

Issued.
$23,107, 677
15, 495, 038
520,548,500
442,198, 310
275, 737, 460
94, 892, 350
142,215,600
11, 962, 000
7, 369, 000

Redeemed.
$22, 783, 281
15, 298, 872
453, 08C, 540
364, 436,600
218, 806, 920
81, 230,400
119, 872, 000
11, 706, 500
7, 320, 000

25, 091, 804 1, 533, 585, 935 1,294, 541,113

Notes of gold banks are not included in this table.




AmountOutstanding.
$384, 396
196,166
461, 960
761, 710
930, 540
661, 950
343, 600
255, 500
49, 000
24, 408

67,
77,
56,
13,
22,

239, 069,230

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

63

Distinct accounts are kept for the incomplete currency issued to
banks in replacement of notes redeemed and destroyed under the provisions of the act of June 20, 1874, to banks taking out new circulation
upon an extension of their corporate existence under the act of July
12, 1882, and to old and new banks increasing the volume of their circulation by adding to the amount of bonds deposited.
TABLE SHOWING BY STATES THE AMOUNT OF "ADDITIONAL CIRCULATION" ISSUED
AND RETIRED DURING THE YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1888, AND TOTAL AMOUNT
ISSUED AND RETIRED SINCE JUNE 20, 1874.

States and Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New Yoik
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
De la ware
Maryland
District of Columbia
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee,
Missouri
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas
Nebraska
Nevada
Oregon
Colorado
Utah
Idaho
Montana
Wyoming
New Mexico
Dakota
Washington
California
Arizona

Circulation
issued
under act
of July 12,
1882.

$591, 080
586, 750
531, 090
3, 218, 085
901, 305
1, 373, 000
4, 406, 200
1, 133, 550
1, 585, 945
299, 325
300, 335
63,150
9ri, 240
152,170
30, 800
34., 150
1.7,'750
12, 400
38, 770
125, 350
66, 400
92, 470
689, 821
438, 320
270, 725
88, 480
147,100
169, 290
53, G30

Grand total October
31, 1888

$44, 990
11, 250
10
56,250
*" 11,240
238, 345
78, 750
558, 350
11, 260
11, 250
1,130
33,750
16, 875
50, 380
87, 620
11, 250
11, 260
10
268, 950
10, 000
36, 900
49, 735
112, 860
194, 380
81,070
135, 000
87,060
61, 605
67, 510
36, 000
458, 380
92, 280
29,700
67, 510
74, 240
36,
7,
22,
33,
22,
80,
202,

,

Total
Surrendered to this office
and retired
From June 20, 1874, to October 31, 1887
Surrendered and retired
same dates

Circulation retired.
Additional
circulation
issued.

17, 635, 681

000
520
490
750
550
610
530

Total
issued.

$636,070
598, 000
531,100
3, 274, 335
961, 305
1, 384, 240
4, 644, 545
1,212,300
2,144, 295
310, 585
360, 335
63,150
109, 490
153, 300
64, 550
36,875
84, 530
87, 620
29, 000
11,260
12, 410
307, 720
10, 000
162, 250
116,135
205, 330
884, 201
519, 390
405, 725
175, 540
208, 7(55
236, 800
8!>, 630
458, 380
92, 280
29, 700
67, 510
74, 240
36, 000
7, 520
22, 490
33, 750
22, 550
80,610
202, 530

Under act I n s o l v e n t
and
of Juno 20,
liquidating
1874.
banks.
$570, 037
347, 749
455, 901
4, 986, 483
1, 435, 692
1, 51)2,145
3, 533, 870
664, 769
3, 406, 982
79, 660
744, 047
16, 368
182, 525
142, 555
35, 879
26,147
94, 214
7, 650
36, 526
40
128, 862
20, 448
13, 685
308, 887
95, 679
164, 686
1, 4(50, 726
592, 257
507, 246
287, 448
185, 234
223, 302
123,058
32, 202
61, 226
40
8, 650
79, 063
416

$771,015
448, 894
672,176
7, 361, 043
1,335,223
1, 752, 806
2,962,185
537, 439
4, 495, 535
22, 560
920, 389
47,110
206, 280
86, 730
110,855
197, 941
181, 320
122, 920
600
118,237
102, 245
3, 781
1,423, 695
278, 260
216, 579
2, 890, 840
82<i, 248
759, 401
450, 909
227, 434
439, 885
140, 944
111,254
165, 763
51, 550
46,103
29, 260
14, 550
8, 945

3,770

Total
retired.

$1,341,052
796, 643
1,128, 077
12, 347, 526
2, 770, 915
3, 254, 95 L
6, 496, 055
1, 202, 208
7,992,517
102, 220
1, 664, 436
63, 478
388,805
229, 285
146, 734
224, 088
275, 5:U
7, 650
159, 446
640
247, 099
122, 693
17, 466
1, 732. 582
373, 9:J9
381, 265
4,351,566
1,4)8,505
1, 2(56, 617
7;58, 357
412, 6(W
6(W, 187
264, 002
143, 456
226, 98!)
40
60, 200
125,166
29, 676
14, fvo{)
12, 715

81,151
38, 720
32, 550
140, 390

3, 800
24, 800
6, 89!
7,350
7, 010

84, 951
63, 580
39,441
147, 740
7,010

3, 502, 660 21,138, 341 30,831,715

22, 706, 035

53, 537, 750

207, 878, 247 193, 732, 779

76, 713, 746

270, 446, 525

189, 830

15, 537, 733
229, 016, 588 224, 564, 494

99, 419, 781

339, 711, 838

Notes of gold banks are not included in the above table.

Of the above $3,502,660 there were issued to banks organized during
the year, $2,356,235, and to already existing banks increasing their
circulation, $1,146,425.




64

REPOIiT

OF THE

COMPTROLLER

OF THE

CURRENCY.

ISSUES.

The total issues of incomplete currency during the year are shown by
the vault account, as follows:
National-bank currency in vaults, October 31, 1887
Amount received from Bureau of Engraving and Printing during the
year ending October 31, 1888

$50, 210,250
44,488,880

Total
"94", 699,130
Amount issued to banks during the year
$49, 6(58, 460
Amount canceled during the year, not having been issued..
861, 500
50,529,960
Balance in vaults

44,169,170
REDEMPTION.

The provisions of law relating to the redemption of the circulating
notes of national banks were fully described in the Eeport of 1887, and
need not be here repeated. Two principles have been adhered to in all
legislation on this subject.
These are, first, that every bank must redeem on demand at its place
of business any of its circulating notes presented there for redemption
during business hours 5 and, second, that the medium of redemption
must be "lawful money of the United States."
The act of June 3, 1864, established redemption cities, but the act of
June 20, 1874, establishing the National-Bank Redemption Agency of
the Treasury at Washington, repealed all requirements as to redemption agents elsewhere, and obliged every bank to keep up a redemption
fund in the hands of the Treasurer of the United States equal to 5 per
cent, of its outstanding circulation.
The following table, compiled from the Treasurers reports, shows the
practical working of the law as to the 5 per cent, redemption fund:
TABLE SHOWING MODE OF REIMBURSEMENT OF FIVE PER CENT. REDEMPTION FUND
BY NATIONAL BANKS, BY FISCAL YEARS, FROM 1875 TO 1888, INCLUSIVE.

Years.

1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888

Deposits of
lawful money
with assistant
treasurers,
United States.
$88, 834, 653.12
105, 134,528.37
116,044,751.34
100, 819, 824. 50
101,194,261.04
46, 960, 242. 06
41, 411, 436.87
50, 531, 496. 68
113,726,801.90
89, 338, '255. 34
106,264,901.13
92, 363,184.15
46, 254, 760. 76
38, 499,139. 68

Total
Average

Deposits with Treasurer United States.
Deposits
received at
counter.

Remittances
Proceeds of
of lawful
national-bank
money by ex- notes redeemed.
press.

$989, 646. 63 $32, 308,100. 78 $18,742,163.00
- 604,989.45 19, 042, 491. 62 52, 643, 065. 00
(*)
7, 678, 7oO. 57 91,856,769.92
(*)
5, 935, 806. 89 98, 552, 739. 98
(*)
4, 894, 393. 06 50, 581, 484. 09
(*)
2, 627, 861. 16
6, 924, 097. 88
(*)
3,106,187.40
4, 313, 702. 36
(*)
2, 975, 682. 27
4, 534, 598. 69
<*)
2, 939, 882. 01
5, 248,120.14
(*)
3,801,957.46
5, 727, 786. 37
(*)
4, 503,141. 79
6, 376, 897. 26
1, 787, 241.84
3, 433,468. 78
5, 775, 498. 84
2, 077, 837. 82 2,000,214.04
2,189,546.65
1, 832, 545. 34 1, 574, 222.67
1, 384, 316.03

1,137,378, 236. 94 7,352,261.08
5.99
72.05

96, 822,160. 50
5.95

Total.

$140, 874, 563. 53
177, 485, 074.44
215, 5S0, 271.83
205, 308, 371. 37
156,670,138.19
56, 512, 201.10
48, 831, 326. 63
58,041,777.64
121, 914, 804. 05
98, 867, 999.17
117,144, 940.18
103, 359, 393.61
52, 522, 359. 27
43, 290, 223.72

354, 850, 786. 21 1, 596,403,444.73
100.00
21.36

* No record.

The following tables, compiled from the Treasurer's reports, show,
for the fiscal years 1874-75 to 1887-'88:
1. The amounts of national-bank currency received annually at the
Redemption Agency, and the disposition made of it.
2. The points from which this currency was forwarded and the percentage of the whole received from each point.
3. The total amount of notes redeemed, and the mode of redemption.
4. The cost of redemption.




TABLE SHOWING RECEIPTS AND DELIVERIES OF MONEYS BY THE NATIONAL-BAXK REDEMPTION AGENCY (UNITED STATES TREASURER'S OFFICE)
FOR EACH FISCAL YEAR FROM 1875 TO 18H8, INCLUSIVE.

Year ending Juno 30—

J875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
18S2
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888

""

""

""""
Total.

Year ending June 30—

1875 .
1876 .
1877.
1878 .
1879 .
1880 .
1881 .
1882 .
1883 .
1884 .
1885 .
1886.
1887.
1888.
Total.




Cash balance on
hand at close of
previous year.

$6,031,022.
7, 942, 539.
11,505,312.
8, 410, 848.
3, 785, 389.
3, 097, 9S3.
2, 844, 107.
3, 630, 989.
6, G72, 963.
6, 910, 452.
6,791,087.
3, 840. 402.
2,165, 539.
73, 628, 637.19

To national-bank
notes received
for redemption.

To " o v e r s " reported in nationalbank notes received for redemption.

$155,520. 880.48
209, 038, 854. 94
242, 885, 375.14
213,151, 458. 56
157, 656, 644. 96
61, 585, 675. GS
59. 650, 259.43
76^ 089, 327. 48
102, 699, 676. 73
126,152, 572. 34
150, 209, 129.01
130, 296, 606. 82
87, 689, 687.15
99,152, 364. 34

$24, 644. 85
16,491.42
24, 996. 58
37, 649. 'JO
22,148.42
6,461.30
13,231.38
11. 222.13
8, 092. 09
6, 006. 30
17, 060. 07
25,.528.97
16, 404. 07
14, 749.28

1, 871, 778, 513. 06

244, 746. 06

Aggregates.

By national-bank notes
fit for circulation, deposited in the Treasury,
and forwarded to national banks by express.

$155, 545, 525. 33
215, 086, 36S. 68
250, 852, 910. 72
224, 094, 420. 28
166,089,641.71
65, 377, 526. 27
62, 761, 474. 58
78.94 4,656.98
106, 338, 758.14
132, 838, 602. 49
157, 136,641.11
137,113. 223. 72
91, 546; 493. 27
101.332,653.03

$26,163, 291. 0D
102, 478, 700. 00
151,070,300.00
152, 437, 300. 00
112,411,800.00
24, 980, 500. 00
6, 763, 600. 00
3,801,500.00
15,572,100,00
26, 255, 500. 00
45, 634, 800. 00
46,701,100.00
20, 786, 640. 00
17, 453, 780. 00

•1,945,658,896.31

752,513,911.00 I

By national-bank By notes of failed
and liquidating
notes, unfit for circulation, delivered national banks, deto the Comptroller posited iu United
States Treasury.
of the Currency.
$115,109, 445. 00
78, 643,155. 00
62,518, 600. 00
51, 585,400. 00
40, 204,700. 00
29, S61,700.00
40, 080,700. 00
53, 838,500. 00
78, 664,758. 00
95,616, 064. 00
98, 598,170. 00
8.', 256,713. 50
66,841, 550.00
75, 912,756. 45
969, 732, 211. 95

By national-bank notes—j
"less than three-fifths, j By " shorts " reBy United States
By packages reBy
ported in nationalnotes deposited in ferred and moneys By express charges notes counterfeit
rejected and lacking signatures, and !bank notes received
the Treasuiy of the
stolen—rejected and
deducted.
returned.
returned.
United States.
returned, and discount on for redemption.
United States currency.

$959,132. 00
428, 686. 00
30, 645. 00
24, 970. 00
7, 267. 00
81, 858. 00
177, 350. 00
111, 924. 50
126,727.10
182, 678. 30
2,131,237.90

$1, 620,557. 39
1, 065,002.20
If 278,903. 86
384, 372. 22
329, 323. 34
305, 432. 14
569, 971.06
672, 427. 09
727, 282.98
455, 333. 05
329, 249.19
277, 194.78
464, 413.45
806, 396. 48
9, 285, 859.23

$6, 579,217. 00
24, 927,000. 00
24, 439,700. 00
11, 852,100. 00
8,354, 250. 00
700. 00
6, 671,
12, 435,400. 00
16, 953,730. 00
4, 667,660. 00
3, 507,950. 00
5, 591,730.00
3, 910,573. 00
1,133, 215. 50
92, 672. 00

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131,117, 797. 50

Cash on hand at
close of year.

$25, 842.15
* 9,938.41
3,345.03
1,152.09
725. 84
523.54
612.25
526. 96
573. 58
716. 62

$3,741.00
5,188. 00
5,634.00
4, 008. 00
3, 016. 00
3, 846. 75
4, 324. 50
4,151.00
4, 559. 50
3, 770. 50
3, 560. 00
2, 720. 00
2, 924. 00
2, 722. 00

$15, 028.12
7, 709. 22
4, 755. 91
3, 997.13
6, 282. 58
7, 870. 23
22, 763. 37
3, 832. 35
4, 337. 62
3, 365. 77
3, 636.49
3, 822, 28
2, 554. 23
1, 979. 40

$20, 223. 50
16,175. 26
29, 704.43
16, 394. 60
9, 906. 35
9, 868. 97
6, 618. 25
13,405. 13
10,103,35
3, 785. 60
6, 445. 25
8, 246. 65
22, 356. 00
2,741.70

$8,031, 022.32
7, 942,539. 00
11, 505,312. 52
8,410, 848. 33
3, 785,389. 29
3, 097,983.77
2, 844,107.37
3, 630,981). 32
6. 672,D63.85
6,910, 452. 03
6,791, 087. 93
3, 840,402. 05
2,165, 539. 41
6, 876,210. 08

43, 956. 47

54,165. 25

91,934.70

175, 975. 04

80,504,847.27

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TABLE SHOWING, BY FISCAL YEARS, FROM 1875 TO 1888, THE AMOUNTS OF NATIONAL-BANK NOTES EECEIVED AT THE UNITED STATES TREASURY FOR REDEMPTION FROM THE PRINCIPAL CITIES AND OTHER PLACES, AND THE PROPORTION OF EACH AMOUNT TO THE WHOLE.

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Cincinnati.

Chicago.

Saint Louis.

w

Tear.
Amounts.

1875
1876 .
1877
1878
1879
1880
1£81
1882
1883
1^84
188")
1886
1887
1888 . .

.'

Per
cent.

Amounts.

Per
cent.

$80, 925, 000
78, 389, 000
76, 693, 000
66 273, 0C0
54,170, 0(,0
26, 460, 000
23 319 000
28,012,0(0
36, 042, 000
54, 327, 0i»0
75, 409, 000
49, 487, 000
31,314,583
43, 411,196

52.07
38.37
32.47
31.48
35. 00
42. 96
39. 09
36.82
35.10
43. 07
50, 20
37.98
35. 71
43.78

$17, 598, 000
55, 878, 000
75, 212, 000
80, 527, 000
59, 375, 000
11,701,000
5, 5t»5, 000
7, 370, 000
16,631,000
19,971,000
27,473,01)0
30,031,0:0
13,219,2^9
13, V62, 289

11.32
27. 35
31.84
38. 26
38. 36
19.00
9.33
9.69
16.19
15.83
18.29
23. 05
15.08
13.17

Baltimore.

Xew Orleans.

Amounts.

Per
cent.
5.85
4.79
8.89
5.15
4.56
5.45
8.25
7.81
7.14
5.41
4.81
5.62
7.95
6.46

$9, 096, 000
9, 778, 000
20, 988, 000
10, 836, 000
7, 052, 000
3, 358, 000
4, 919, 000
5, 939, 000
7, 333, 000
6, 830, 000
7, 220. 000
7, 323| 000
6, 972, 856
6, 400, 953

Providence.

Amounts.

Per
cent-

$6, 814, 000 * 4.39
4.89
10,106, 000
1.76
4, 162,000
1.52
3, 194, 000
1.11
1,719,000
2.72
1, 673, 000
4.45
2, 655, 000
4.66
3, 545, 000
5.98
6,146, 000
4.59
5, 794, 000
3.03
4, 558, 000
4.22
5, 493, 000
6.06
5,315,319
5.56
5, 508, 460

Pittsburgh.

Amounts.

$3, 676, 000
3, 085, 000
2,781,000
2, 268, 000
1,219,000
819, 000
996, 000
1,188,000
1, 774, 000
1, 822, 000
1,910,000
2, 263, 000
2, 244, 310
2, 725, 689

Per
cent.
2.37
1.51
1.18
1.08
.79
1.33
1.67
1.56
1.73
1.45
1.27
1.74
2.56
2.75

Other places.

Amounts.

$1, 384, 000
1, 019, 000
1, 292, 000
999, 000
1,487,000
302, 000
673, 000
1,061,000
1, 372, 000
1,155, 000
977, 000
3, 42i\ 000
3, 421, 698
3, 033, 908

Per
cent.
.89
.50
.55
.47
.96
.64
2.13
1.39
1.34
.92
.65
2.63
3.90
3.06

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Total.

Year.
Amounts.

1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888

$1,
3,
1,
1,

.
.
.

..




902, 000
265 000
821, 000
085, 000
693, 000
415,000
673, 000
947, 000
1, 626, 000
2, 853, 000
3, 7<>5, 000
3, 546, 000
3,102, 500
2, 927, 000

Per
cent.
1.22
1.60
.77
.52
.45
.67
1.13
1.24
1 58
2.26
2.47
2.72
3.54
2.95

Amounts.

$2, 063, 000
1, 42:5, 0i 0
1,316, OW
1, 327, 699

Per
cent.

1.37
1.09
1.50
1.34

Amounts.

$1, 388,000
3, 247, 000
5, 653, 000
4, 989, 000
3, 772, 000
1, 454, 000
1,419,000
1,426,000
1, 666, 000
1,81:0,000
2, 293, 000
1, 731, 000
1,015,131
874, 700

Per
cent.
.89
1.59
2.39
2.37
2.44
2.36
2.38
1.87
1.62
1.44
1.53
1.32
1.16
.88

Amounts.

$1, 449, 000
1, 425, 000
1, 322, 000
1,141,000
635, 0(30
547, 000
606, 000
880, 000
917,000
819,000
683, 000
526, 000
527, 800
647, 089

Per
cent.
.93
.70
.56
.54
.41
.89
1.01
1.16
.89
.65
.46
.40
.60
.65

Amounts.

Per
cent.

Amounts.

$31,189, 000
38, 108,000
46, 28(), <00
39, 179, 000
24, 647, 000
14, 767, 000
18,825,000
25, 721, 000
29,193,000
30, 761.000
23, 918. 000
25, 051, 6(i0
19, 240, 185
19, 233, 381

20.07
18.70
19.59
18.61
15.92
23. 98
31.56
33.80
28. 43
24.38
15. 92
19.23
21. 94
19. 40

$155, 421, 000
204, 300, 000
236,210,000
210,491,000
154,769,000
61,586,000
59, 650, 0(0
76, 089, 000
102, 700; 000
126,152, 000
150, 209, 000
130, 296, 600
87, 689, 687
99,152, 364

Per
cent.
100.00
100. 00
100.00
100.00
100. 00
100. 00
100. 00
100. 00
100. 00
100.00
100. 00
100. 00
100.00
100.00

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TABLE SHOWING TOTAL AMOUNT AND MODE OF PAYMENT FOR NATIONAL-BANK NOTES REDEEMED, BY FISCAL YEARS, COMMENCING WITH YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30, 1875.

Fiscal year.

Transfer checks.

United States
notes.

Fractional silver
coin.

$58, 825, 756. 00
92,374,801.00
95,212, 743. 45
75,361,427.23
51, 718, 2:>3.0G
10, 852, 505. 53
22,415,972.28
32, 992,144. 72
56,018,447.71
77,991,916.83
105, 840, 234. 80
74,149,555.26
39, 996, 984. 07
53, 463, 333. 36

Total

$50, 858, 842. 00
40,120, 3;i8.00
34,588,129.15
23,040,418,44
14,617,619.41
21,174, 820. 66
19,567,744.21
23,222,831.83
23, 668, 064.66
24,080, 304.62
19, 236, 730.27
9, 204, 752. 70
15, 657, 298. 62
19, 280, 725.65

847, 214, 075.30

1875
1876
1877
1878
1879..
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888

338, 324, 626. 28

Standard silver
dollars.

Credits to assistant
t r e a s u r e r s and
Credit in redempU. S. depositaries in tion accounts.
general account.

Redeemed at
counter.

$468,974.00
540,645.40
52,178. 90
28,230. 59
85,164. 56
246,447. 42
296,257. 79
158,127.60
135, 773.22
103,843.62
97, 670. 41
90,684. 97

$96, 683. 32
174, 831. 85
215, 045. 27
269, 918.44
242, 518.37
1, 015, 519.10
482, 500. 35
451, 194. 22
248, 970. 92
202, 537.79

$100, 000. 00
4, 7o8, 979. 00
6, 675, 000. 00
2,661, 021. 00
5, 089, 222. 80
3, 883, 417.60
3, 522, 6u7. 00
4, 033, 402.40
3, 941, 638. 00
3, 826, 293. 00
3, 848, 090.50
8, 385, 485. 00
4, 200, 654. 50
3, 229, 772. 00

2, 312, 998.48

3, 399, 719. 03

58,135, 582. 80

$24, 0G6, 844. 00
19, 078, 209. 00
12,789,757.00
12, 609, 033. 76
35.148, 181.38
18, 218, 070. 37
8, 936, 232. 92
10,106,238.45
12,428, 692. 86
12, 960, 221. 60
33,944, 370. 50
31,007,087.30
24, 7C8, 344. 79
20.149, 324. 00

356, 667, 877. 95

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1, 862, 265, 538.43

TABLE SHOWING, BY FISCAL YEARS FROM 1875 TO 1883, EXPENSES INCURRED IN THE REDEMPTION OF NATIONAL-BANK NOTES AT THE UNITED
STATES TREASURY.

Year.

1875
3876.
1877
1878,
1879.
1880
1881.
1882.
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888




Charges for
transportation.
$88, 098.31
159,142. 81
389,362.05
173, 420. G
O
98, 298.75
34, 764. 21
33, 843. 86
39,203.31
57,190. 86
68, 684.11
85, 255.48
74, 490.52
48, 020. 53
51, 529. 76

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$19, 040, 413. 00
52, 643, 005. 00
91,856, 769. 92
98, 552, 739. 98
50, 581, 48 k 09
6, 924, 097. 88
4, 313, 702.36
4, 534, 598. 69
5, 218, 120.14
5, 727, 786. 37
6, 413, 097. 26
6, 727, 700. 96
2, 243, 346. 65
1, 830, 349. 65

256, 210, 657. 99 I

Total.

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Costs for assorting notes.
Salaries.
$158, 227.39
188, 018. 94
150, 695. 68
136,580.63
133, 956. 27
104, 350.08
89, 564.72
87, 593.56
86,213.35
88, 426. 79
93,371.82
89.065.18
87, 450. 54
86, 232,40

Printing and
binding.

$6, 604. 30
2, 660.32
2, 894.60
2, 632.69
1, 220. 60
1, 535. 42
2, 401, 54
1, 935. 91
3,670.77
3,190. 89
1, 430. 93
2, 580. 78

Stationery.
*$12, 290. 72
*9, 174. 68
3, 818.10
3, 090. 00
2, 597. 22
1, 034. 29
1, 051. 27
806. 51
890.41
133. 84
114.19
163.65
053. 39
687.44

Postage.

[Contingent and
IjOther expenses, j

$3, 298. 80
3, 391. 00
3, 710. 66

*In 1875 and 1876 "Printing and binding" was included with item " Stationery.'

516,131.47
1, 993.01
2,869.31
2,190. 93
3, 203.11
947. 09
531. 07
390. 58
890.11
716.00
444. 90
333.11
1,011.61
111.10

Furniture.
$12,918.68
3, 472. 84

I

Total.
$290, 905. 37
365,193. 31
357,066.10
317, 942. 48
240,949.95
143, 728. 39
126,212.12
129, 529. 38
147, 592.27
160.896.65
181, 857.16
168, 243. 35
138, 967. 60
141,141.48

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68

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

REDEMPTION OF CIRCULATION OF BANKS IN THE HANDS OF RECEIVERS, OF THOSE IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION, AND OF THOSE REDUCING CIRCULATION UNDER THE ACT OF JUNE 20^ 1874.

The redemption of circulating' notes of failed banks at the United
States Treasury was provided for originally as it is now, by giving the
Comptroller power to cancel or to sell the bonds of the banks, and in
case of deficiency in the proceeds to make it good out of the assets of
the corporation { but before the act of 1874 went into effect the notes
of such banks were called in by public advertisement, whereas now
they are left in circulation until they are brought by the ordinary currents of redemption into the office of the Treasurer or of one of the assistant treasurers, or into the hands of a designated depositary of public moneys, or one of the national-bank depositaries.
Section 8 of the act of June 20, 1874, requires the Treasurer, assistant treasurers, designated depositaries, and national-bank depositaries
to assort and return to the Treasurer for redemption the notes of such
national banks as have failed, or have gone into voluntary liquidation,
and of all such as shall thereafter fail or go into such liquidation.
The following table, compiled from the records of the Bureau of the
Currency, shows the course of redemption of the notes of failed banks.
Total circulation of all failed banks, $15,432,360; amount redeemed,
$13,911,335; balance outstanding or lost, $1,521,025.
TABLE SHOWING, BY YEAKS, FROM OCTOBER 1, 1865, TO NOVEMBER 1, 1888, THE
TOTAL CIRCULATION OF BANKS FAILED, THE AMOUNT REDEEMED, AND THE
BALANCE OUTSTANDING AT CLOSE OF EACH YEAR. (COMPILED FROM KEPORTS
OF COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.)

Year ending—

October 1,1865
October 1, 1800
October 1, 1867
October 1, 1868
October 1,1809
October 1,1870
October 1,1871
November 1,1872
November 1, 1873
November 1, 1874
November 1,1875
November 1, 1876
November 1.1877
November 1, 1878
Novem bev 1, 1879
November 1, 1880
November 1, 1881
November 1,1882
November 1, 1883
November 1, 1884
November 1,1885
November 1, 1886
November 1, 1887
November 1,1888

,

Total.

Total circu- Total circu- Aggregate
lation outlation of
prestanding at
banks failed of two colvious
end of preduring
umns.
vious year.
tbe year.

$14,000.00
303. 680. 00
889*92. 00
562, 559. 00
332, 738. 45
318,835.85
208, 551. 60
501,3(33.00
302, 548. 00
037, 638. 00
39(5, 967. 50
976,296. 70
025, 625. 45
551, 454. 00
148, 679.00
332, 276. 00
949, 742. 00
401, 632.00
861,128.00
098, 288. 00
133, 4U. 00
458, 026. 00
425, 965. 00

Amount of Balance of
circulation circulation
of failed
of failed
banks rebanks outdeemed dur- standing at
ing year.
close of year.

$44, 000
265, 000
748, 900
321, 800
45, 000
129,700
None.
1, 388, 393
2, 522,100
230,000
628,676
540, 609
2,349,114
1, 3S5, 068
516, 825
506,143
None.
999, 500
108, 200
850,120
486, 550
434, 840
307, 738
614, 084

$44, 000. 00
None.
309, 000. 00
$5, 320. 00
1, 052, 580. 00 163, 288. 00
1, 211, 092.00 648; 533. 00
607, 559. 00 274, 820. 55
462, 438.45
143, 602. 60
318,835.85
110,234.25
1,596,944.60 1, 095, 581. 60
3, 023, 463. 00 720, 915. 00
2, 532, 548. 00 494, 910.00
2, 676, 314. 00 1, 279, 346. 50
1, 937, 576. 50 961, 279. 80
3, 325,410. 70 2, 299, 785. 25
2,410, 693.45
858, 239. 45
2, 068, 279. U0 919, 600. 00
1, 654, 822. 00 322, 546. 00
1, 332, 276.00 382, 534. 00
1, 949, 242. 00 547,610.00
1, 509, 832. 00 648, 704. 00
1,711,248.00
612, 960. 00
1, 584, 838. 00 451,424.00
1, 568, 254. 00 110, 228. 00
1,765,764.00
339, 799. 00
2, 040,049. 00 519, 024. 00

15,432, 360

13, 911, 335.00

$44, 000. 00
303, 680.00
889, 292.00
502, 559. 00
332, 738. 45
318,835.85
208, 551. 60
501,363.00
2, 302, 548. 00
2, 037, 638. 00
1, 396, 967.50
976,296. 70
1, 025, 625.45
1, 551,454. 00
1,148, 679. 00
1, 332, 276. 00
949,742. 00
1, 401, 632.00
861,128. 00
1, 098,288.00
1,133,414. 00
1, 458, 026. 00
1,425, 965.00
l,52i;025.00

Before the act of June 20, 1874, banks reducing their circulation
could withdraw their bonds from the Treasury only upon surrendering
there, for cancellation, an amount of their circulating notes proportioned
to the amount of bonds to be withdrawn, and up to July 14,1870, banks




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

69

for one year after going into voluntary liquidation had to resort to the
same means in order to withdraw their bonds; but after the expiration
of the year such banks might deposit lawful money for the difference
between the whole amount of circulation issued to them and the amount
surrendered, and thereupon get back the rest of their bonds. The
amount of such deposits and the time at which they should be mad a
were left to the choice of the bank. The act of July 14, 1870, made
the deposit of lawful money obligatory upon liquidating banks, and
the act of June 20, 1874, fixed six months after notice of liquidation as
the limit of time allowed for making such deposits.
The act of June 20, 1874, provided also that any national banking
association might withdraw its circulating notes upon the deposit of
lawful money with the Treasurer of the United States in sums of not
less than $9,000. Under this act, and on account of liquidating and
insolvent banks, and under section 6 of the act of July 12, 1882, which
provides for a deposit of lawful money to retire the old circulation
of national banks whose corporate existence has been extended,
$409,664,244 of lawful money has been deposited with the Treasurer.
This includes $2,663,720 for redemption of the notes of national gold
banks and $96,958,887 for the redemption of national-bank notes under
section 6 of the act of July 12, 1882.
During the year ending October 31,1888, lawful money to the amount
of $37,781,464 was deposited with the Treasurer to retire circulation, of
which $2,107,978 was deposited by banks in liquidation, $14,520,956
by banks reducing circulation under the act of June 20, 1874, and
$21,152,530 by banks retiring old circulation under the act of July 12,
1882. The amount previously deposited under the acts of June 20,
1874, and July 12, 1882, was $320,681,226, by banks in liquidation,
$65,446,364, making a total of $423,909,054. Deducting from the total
the amount of circulating notes redeemed and destroyed without reissue, which was $336,890,145, there remained in the hands of the Treasurer on October 31, 1888, $87,018,909 of lawful money for the redemption and retirement of national-bank circulation, including $188,987
for the redemption of the circulating notes of national gold banks.
Prior to June 20,1874, there were redeemed and destroyed $10,431,135,
and since that date $326,459,009 of bank notes have been redeemed,
destroyed, and retired. This latter amount includes $2,474,733 of the
notes of national gold banks, and $50,226,314 of the notes of national
banks whose corporate existence has been extended under the act of
July 12, 1882.
There are at present no national gold banks in existence. Of those
which have been organized, three went into voluntary liquidation and
the others became currency banks, under the provisions of the act approved February 14, 1880.
Under all the laws now in operation the Treasurer has received for
redemption up to November 1, 1888, national-bank notes aggregating
T
in amount $1,899,039,275.
During the past year the receipts at the Treasury amounted to
$1037945,471, of which amount $46,849,990, or 45 per cent., was received
from the banks in the city of New York, and $14,327,098, or 14 per cent.,
from banks in the city of Boston. The amount received from Philadelphia was $6,259,673; from Chicago, $5,694,050; from Cincinnati,
$2,337,754; from Saint Louis, $2,501,100; from Baltimore, $3,086,055;
from New Orleans, $1,444,067 5 from Providence, $902,677, and from
Pittsburgh, $666,786.




70

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The following table exhibits the amount of national-bank notes received monthly for redemption by the Comptroller of the Currency during the year ending October 31, 1888, and the amount received during
the same period at the Redemption Agency of the Treasury, together
with the total amount received since the passage of the act of June
20, 1874:
Received by the Comptroller of the Currency—

Months.

From the Redemption Agency—
From national banks
in connection
with reducFor reduc- Insolvent
tion of circuFor retion of
and
lation and placement circulation liquidating
replacement
with
under
national
with new new notes. act June 20, banks.
notes.
1874.

1887.
November
December

$92, 930 $1, 555, 575 $2, 321, 042
42, 340 1, 820, 780 2, 043, 736

1888.
January
February
March
April
-.
May
June
July
August
,
September
October
,
Received from June
20, 1874, to October
31,1888
Grand total.

7, 950
2,250
20
2,780
5, 325
1,5(30

Total.

Received at
United States
Treasury
Redemption
Agency.

$1, 005, 938
1, 464, 735

$5, 975,485
5, 371, 591

$5, 799, 075
8, 228, 273

2, 384, 230
2, 853, 080
2, 615, 800
2, 572, 775
3, 054, 790
2, 834, 220
2, 268, 735
1, 873, 395
1,975,540
2, 790, 610

3, 071, 765
3,411,525
2, 778, 293
2, 698, 282
3, 234,179
3,104, 570
2,179, 307
1, 900, 938
1, 932, 047
2, 103, 501

1, 956, 642
2, 206, 185
1,918,341
2,102, 422
2. 421, 361
2, 3S9, 175
1, 637, 574
1, 519, 240
1, 537, 671
1,5-16,751

7,420, 587
8, 473, 040
7, 312, 454
7, 376, 259
8, 715, 655
8, 329, 525
6, 085, 616
5, 294, 823
5, 445, 258
6, 442, 727

12, 232, 503
9,176,339
7, 916, 274
9, 642, 090
12,302,623
11, 387, 533
9, 224, 960
6, 984, 802
5, 205, 273
5, 845, 727

28, 599, 530

30, 779,185

22, 706, 035

82, 243, 020

103, 945, 472

16, 345, 425 765, 708, 615 193, 727, 009

76, 588, 755 1, 052, 369, 804

1, 705, 093, 803

16, 503, 695 794, 308,145 224, 506,194

99, 294, 790 1,134, 612, 824

1, 899, 039, 275

1,250

158, 270

Notes of gold banks^are not in eluded in t h e above table.

The following table, compiled from the books of the Comptroller of
the Currency, exhibits the amount of national-bank notes received at
this office and destroyed yearly since the establishment of the system:
P r i o r to November 1, 1865
D u r i n g year ended October 31—
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
.
1873
.
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878

$175,490
1, 050, 382
3, 401, 423
4, 602, 825
8, 603, 729
14, 305, 689
24, 344, 047
30,211,720
36, 433,171
49, 939, 741
137, 697, 696
98, 672, 716
76,918,963
57, 381, 249

During year ended October 31—
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
.
Additional amount of insolvent and
liquidating national banks
Total.

$41,101,830
35, 539, 600
54, 941,130
74, 917, 611
82, 913, 766
93,178, 418
91, 048, 723
59, 989, 810
47, 726, 083
59, 568, 525
109, 850, 919
1, 294, 515, 314

Notes of gold banks are not included in the above table.
There was in the vault of the redemption division of this office, awaiting destruction, at the
close of business October 31, 1887
$136,310
Received during the year ended October 31,1888
82,293,962
Total
Withdrawn and destroyed during the year
Balance in vault October 31, 1888




82,430,272
82, 325, 502
104,770

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

71

SUPERVISION.

Supervision over the national banks is maintained through a corps
of examiners, but it embraces also the scrutiny of the live reports of
condition required of every bank each year, and of the reports of earnings and dividends which are made twice a year by all banks, and
oftener by those by which dividends are oftener declared.
The Comptroller may call upon any bank, at his discretion, for such
special reports as he thinks proper, and au extensive correspondence is
kept up with officers and directors in regard to matters contained in
the examiners' reports and in the various reports received directly from
the banks.
Since directors are responsible in their individual capacity for all
violations of law which they knowingly commit or permit (sec. 5239
E. S.), the rule has been adopted of addressing to the board ott'directors
of each bank such correspondence with it as relates to violations of
law, and when the matter is serious a separate note is sent to each
director informing him of the letter addressed to the board.
Letters relating to the internal administration of the bank are addressed to its president, all others to the cashier.
From a review of the correspondence, as thus classified, it appears
that the matters requiring most frequent attention are as follows:
VIOLATIONS OF LAW.
1. EXCESSIVE LOANS.

Section 5200, Eevised Statutes, forbids loans to any person, firm,
company, or corporation exceeding 10 per cent, upon the capital of the
bank.
This restriction is too general in its terms, and is necessarily exceeded
by banks in large cities, where the magnitude of deposits and of transactions make conformity with the law impracticable. On the other
hand, it is a most salutary restraint upon banks in small communities,
preventing the accommodation they afford from being monopolized by a
few favored individuals, usually the directors and their friends or relations.
The enforcement of the law in these latter cases is, however, seriously
impeded by the notorious disregard of it in the former, and I therefore
earnestly repeat the recommendation made last year for new legislation
on this subject.
2. LOANS UPON THE SECURITY OF REAL ESTATE.

Section 5137, Eevised Statutes, prohibits national banks from holding
real estate by title or under mortgage, except in certain specified cases,
and the courts have construed this as forbidding, also, loans upon the
security of real estate.
The language of the statute is not explicit, and it has been variously
construed by different courts,nor has the restriction that popular support which is almost necessary to the official enforcement of any law.
On the contrary, there is a widespread feeling that tiie national bank
law discriminates against real estate unjustly, and in agricultural communities this feeling is so strong that in many cases it is resentful, and
is made the ground of popular opposition to the whole national-bank
system. Even among experienced and conservative bankers in certain




72

EEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

sections there appears to be a feeling that the restraint in this respect
is unreasonable.
Among the amendments to the national-bank law which were submitted with my last Annual Report wiil be found certain modifications
of the provisions bearing upon real-estate security, and I respectfully
repeat the recommendation for their speedy enactment.
3. INVESTMENTS IN BONDS, STOCKS, AND OTIIEK SECURITIES.

The Supreme Court (First National Bank v. National Exchange Banlcr
92 U. #., 122) has pronounced the dictum that a national banking association can not deal in stocks. Two State courts (Pennsylvania and
Maryland) have decided that such associations are not authorized to
act as brokers or agents in the purchase and sale of such securities.
Like other restrictions upon the national banks, this one, which in
the main is wholesome and in most cases necessary, in view of the
public uses to which the capital and resources of national banks are
dedicated, has been found in some peculiar cases to be in convenient*
In some sections, especially in New England, the number of banks and
the amount of floating capital are in excess of the business needs of
the locality. The more active and enterprising among these banks secure the commercial paper, and the others have either to lend out their
money at distant points, or invest it in securities. The latter is undoubtedly the safer, and therefore the better course, and the officers
and directors who resort to it are naturally disposed to dispute any interpretation of the law which is adverse to such investments.
The more I learn about the banking business of the country, however; and in this position the opportunities for learning are incessant
and excellent, the more satisfied I am that banks of deposit should
never invest in anything but bills of exchange or short-date commercial
paper. If capitalists desire to combine for the purpose of holding securities, or dealing in stocks and bonds, they have abundant facilities for
doing so outside of the national-bank system. There can be no question of the right of all citizens to invest their own means as they please,
but the national banks, under the operation of the laws made for their
government, have become the principal depositaries of the floating
capital of the country, hence the managers of these banks are bound
by duty to their depositors to regard strictly the limitations upon investments imposed by the law, and this obligation becomes strengthened
when, as in this case, the law is in harmony with sound banking principles.
Those who are charged with the enforcement of the national-banking law can not be too persistent in keeping the system as clear as possible of every variety of what may be called incrustations of capital.
4. DEFICIENT RESERVE.

There has been a marked improvement all over the country during
the last few years in the observance of the law as to reserves and in
the conscientiousness and accuracy with which reports are made.
The modifications suggested in the law would be very acceptable to
the banks, and would tend to the improvement of the system.
5. EXCESSIVE AND UNLAWFUL DIVIDENDS.

The provisions of law relating to dividends are substantially as follows:
1. The authority to declare dividends and to pay them is vested in
the board of directors.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF TPIE CURRENCY.

73

2. A dividend, may be declared only when the net profits actually
realized and on hand equal or exceed the total amount to be paid to
stockholders.
3. Net profits are to be ascertained by deducting from gross earnings and profits: first, all expenses and losses incurred up to the date
on which the books are closed; and second, all bad debts, which are
thus defined:
All debts due to any associations, on which interest is past due and unpaid for a
period of six months, unless the same are well secured, and in process of collection,
shall be considered bad debts within the meaning of this section.

4. Until the surplus fund amounts to twenty per cent, of the capital,
ten per cent, of net profits must be added to that fund every time a
dividend is declared, so that in such cases the fund available for dividend is only ninety per cent, of net profits.
(3. IMPROPER REDUCTION OF SURPLUS.

In many cases banks have passed to surplus account more than 10
per cent, of net profits, and subsequently before the surplus was full
some of these have claimed that such excess might be withdrawn in
dividends. Such a claim does not appear to be consistent either with
the language of the law or with its manifest purpose. In construing
the language of the law, it is to be observed that the act of 1863 required and that of 1864 authorized dividends exery six months out of
individual net profits actually on hand, while the latter act prescribed
that every six month each bank should make to the Comptroller a report of its profits, expenses, and losses, whether or not any dividend
should be then declared. The provision for a tithe to the surplus was
from the first implicated with the regulations as to dividends and the
charging off of losses, expenses, and bad debts, hence it seems clear
that according to the sum already carried to surplus is no longer a part
of the undivided profits. The surplus account is by the statute co-ordinated with shareholders as a beneficiary in the dividend fund, and if
an amount in excess of the obligatory tithe is once added to the surplus,
that amount ceases to be a part of the undivided profits out of which
alone dividends may be declared.
As long as the surplus is below 20 per cent, of capital, it can not be
reduced except by losses in excess of undivided profits.
The intention of the law in providing for a surplus fund seems to be
to afford to shareholders a protection against assessments. Such protection is valuable to all shareholders who are not capitalists, and who,
therefore, presumably are not prepared to respond to assessments upon
their shares, but it is of vital importance to small investors and to the
beneficiaries of trust and estate funds invested in national bank stock.
The surplus fund stands between such shareholders and their wealthy
partners as a safe guard against the process commonly known as u freezing out." Without this protection improvident or designing directors
would be constantly exposing their shareholders to assessments, and
on every such occasion the weak and helpless would be sacrificed, while
their stock would pass into the hands of the designing or the grasping.
REPORTS.

During the past year 15,505 reports of condition, about 6,137 reports
of dividends and earnings, and 3,166 reports from examiners have been
received at the office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and fully 17,000




74

EEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

letters and circulars have been sent out in connection with them. The
reports received are all carefully examined, compared with one another,
and abstracts are made from them.
From these various reports, after examination and verification, the
subjoined tables have been compiled, and other tables compiled from
the same sources will be found in the Appendix, pp. 180 to 215, showing the condition of the reserve of national banks, their loans and discounts, abstract of reports of dividends and earnings, ratios to capital
and to capital and surplus, and other valuable information as to the
condition of the national banks on the date of the last report.
A large table on folded sheet, appended hereto, exhibits for October,
1888, in aggregate, every detail embraced in the tabulated reports required of the banks. Similar tables are made up for the information of
the Comptroller from the reports gathered from all banks five times each
year. The amounts are given separately for each State, reserve city,
and Territory.
DIAGRAM.

With the Eeport of 188G a diagram was submitted grouping graphically the main features of the national banking system, and showing by
continuous lines the variations occurring between January 1, I860, and
October 7, 1880. it has not been considered necessary to reproduce
this diagram, because any one interested in the subject can extend the
lines by means o£ the figures contained in the summary of the condition
of the baiiKs, given on page 2 of this Keport.
The following table groups in a com pendious form the most important
facts shown in the diagram, extended to October 4, 1888. The exact
figures in each case are given in the table; in the diagram they had to
be abridged into round millions.
Highest point touched.
Jan. 1,180(5.

Amount.
Capital
v...
Capital, surplus, ami
undivided profits.
Circulation
Total investments
in United states
bonds
Deposits
Loans and discounts
Cash:
National -bank
notes
Legal-tender
notes
Specie

$403,357, 346
475, 330, 204
213, 239, 530

Lowest point touched.

Oct. 4,1888.

Date.

$592, 621, 650 $592, 621, 656 Oct.
855, 576, 640
151, 702, 809

Amount.

Date.

4,1888 $403, 357, 34G Jan.

1,1866

855, 576, 647 . . . . d o
475, 330, 204 ....do
341, 320, 256 Dec. 26, 1873 151, 702, 809 Oct.
4, 1888

440, 380, 350
232,582, 250
712, 437, 000 Apr. 4,1879 223, 242, 050 Aug.
5-JO, 212,174 1,350, 3_'0,801 l,350,3i>0,801 Oct. 4,1888 50-i,4()7,586 Oct.
500, 650,109 1,674, 886, 285 1, 074, 886, 285 ...do
500, 650,109 Jan.
20, 40G, 442

21, 600,818

28, 809, 699 Dec. 31,1883

187,816,548
10, 909, 303

81, 090, 461
178, 097, 816

205, 793, 579 Oct. 1,1866
181, 292, 276 June 30, fdSH

11,841,104 Oct.

1,1887
8,1870
1,1866
7,1867

52,156. 430 Mar. 11,1881
8, 050, 330 Oct. 1,1875

An examination of this table shows that the aggregate capital, surplus, undivided profits, circulation, and deposits have increased from
$1,208,731,908 in January, 1866, to $2,357,600,316 in October, 1888,
which is less than double, while the loans and discounts have gone up
from $500,650,101) to $1,674,886,285, which is more than treble, showing how much more widely the banks are now identified with the general business of the country than they were twenty-three years ago.
The investments in bonds have taken an opposite course. Amount,
ing to $440,380,350 in 1866, increasing to $712,437,900 in April, 1879-




75

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

they amounted on October 4 last to $232,582,250. Of this amount
$60,458,450 were held by the banks for public deposits and other purposes than circulation.
The specie, which at the beginning of the period was but $16,909,363,
had got down in October, 1875, to $8,050,330, is now $178,097,816, and
on June 30, 1888, was $181,292,276, the highest point yet reached. In
October, 1887, the specie amounted to $165,085,454.
It is interesting to see how these changes appear when reduced to
percentages.
The capital, surplus, undivided profits, circulation, and deposits constitute together the fund upon which a bank does its business.
Loans and discounts, United States bonds, specie, etc., are different
forms in which this fund is invested. Taking the fund at $1,208,781,908
in 1866, at $2,240,587,843 in 1887, and at $2,357,600,316 in 1888, these
investments represent the following proportions of those Amounts, viz :
18G6.

1888.

1887.

j Per ct. Per ct. Per ct.
70. 52
71.04
9.98
9.87
7. 37
11. 90

Loans and discounts
United States bonds
Specie

j 41.82
36. 30
1.5:
79.2

Total.

87. 87 !

02. 81

Another striking fact is that in 1866 the circulation was $213,239,530,
and on October 4, 1888, it is only $151,702,809. At the former period,
therefore, the circulation was nearly 45 per cent, of the capital, surplus,
and undivided profits, while now it is only about 18 per cent.
LOANS.

The following table gives a classification of the loans of the national
banks in each of the central reserve cities of New York, Chicago, and
Saint Louis, in other reserve cities classified in groups of four each, and
in the rest of the country at nearly the same dates in each of the last
three years :
OCTOBER 7, 1886.
On single
On United On other name paper
No. of I States
stocks,
banks, bonds on bonds, etc., without
other
demand. on demand. security.
New York
Chicago
Saint Louis
Group No. 1, 4 cities*
Group No. 2, 4 cities*
Group No. 3, 4 cities*
Group No. 4, San FranciscoCountry!
Total




45 $2, 002, 551 $91, 636, 791
15]
85,900 10, 6G3, 006
1, 028, 430
123 258,210 36, 617, 888
69, 005 7,440, 098
40
32 325, 339 7,715,715
10, 000
2
304, 737
2,590
563, 717 41,008,812

All other
loans.

Total.

$24, 646, 007 $135,447,027 $253, 732, 376
12,593,921
32, 058, 515j f=5; 401, 342
355, 373
8, 291, 9G8
9,675,771
33,499, 6(52 168, 072, 545 238, 448 305
6, 230, 954
35, 235, 704 48, 984; 761
38, 9G7, 756 54, 967, 034
7, 958, 224
886, 241
3, 358, 835
2,157,857
110, 677, 534 626, 849, 753 770, 099, 816

2,852 3, 314, 721 196, 415,477 198,128, 533 1, 045, 809, 5091, 443, QG8, 240

76

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
OCTOBER 5, 1887.
On single
OnUnited On other
No. oi'j States I stocks, namepaper
banks, bonds on bonds, etc., without
other
demand, on demand. security.

New York
Chicago
Saint Louis
Group No. 1, 4 cities*
Group No. 2, 4 cities'*
Group No. 3, 4 cities*
Group No. 4, 4 cities*
Country
Total

All other
loans.

Total.

47;$1,445, 900 $95, 075, 844 $17, 585, 496 $143, 906, 941 $258, 014,181
18;
500 10,821, 735 15, 498, 986
fil, 076,193
34, 754, 972
5
1,182, 214
279, 603
10, 382,753
8, 920, 93P
120
56, 805 37, 717, 725 32,464, 759 177,884, 888 248,124,177
41
60, 430 7,7K),369j 6,111,182
49,450, 807
35, 568, 827
35
48,400 8, 087, 222 7, 887, 689 43, 232, 749
59, 256,0G0
21
7, 500 1,117, 443| 8, 213, 092 20, 827, 885
30,165, 920
2, 75G| 1,413, 918; 44,335,893 124, 0^5,463 693, 790, 281 863, 575, 555
3,049: 3, 0 & 4 5 3 200,048,445 212, 076, 270 1,158,887, 4791, 580, 045, 647

OCTOBER 4, 1888.
New York
Chicago
Saint Louis
Group No. 1, 4 cities*
Group No. 2, 4 cities*
Group No. 3, 4 cities*
Group No. 4, 4 cities*
Country
Total

!, 466, 001
9,631,825
921, 854
44, 271,164
7, 806, 794
6, 570, 938
1. 205, 596
42, 586,172
i 3,140

$28,626,295' $153, 271, 026 $292, 495,481
14,155, 001]
41,129, 615
65, 275, 737
8, 216, 546
306, 4501
6, 988, 242
41,430,120 182, 567, 237 268,417, 291
52,435,975
37,435, 637
7,182, 779
66, 095, 010
7,260, 665!
42,188, 407
31, 012, 089
8, 501, 9G61
21,303,327
135, 967, 639, 721, 806, 861 900, 938,15G

221,460,344 243,430,915, 1,206,690,352 1, 674, 886, 285

* Group No. 1, Boston, Albany, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh. Group No. 2, Baltimore, Washington,
New Oilcans, and Louisville. "Group No. 3, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, and Milwaukee. Group
No. 4, Kansas City, Saint Joseph, Omaha, and San Francisco.
t Kansas City, Saint Joseph, and Omaha were not reserve cities in 1886.

In the table below is given a full classification of the loans in New
York City alone for the last five years:
Sept. 30,1884. Oct. 1,1885.

Oct. 7,1886.

Oct. 5,1887.

Oct. 4,1888.

45 banks.

47 banks.

46 banks.

Loans and discounts.
44 banks.

44 banks.

On indorsed paper
$116, 010,062 $114, 013, 775
On single name paper
82, 559,443
25, 331, 820
On XJ. S. bonds on demand
2, 933, 785
3, 280,124
On other stocks, etc., on demand
69,805,215
80, G87, 26f>
On real-estate security
1G3, 397
215, 385
All other loans
3, 881, 375
13, 289, 229
Total

205,353, 277

236,823,598

$121,381,380 $115, 316, 625
24, 646, 008
17, 585,496
2, 002, 550
1, 445, 900
91, G36, 791
95, 075, 844
211, 432
146, 885
13, 854, 215
28, 443, 431
253,732, 376

258, 014,181

$117,707,044
28, 626, 295
2,132,159
108,466, 001
113,494
35, 450, 488
292,495,481

The subjoined tables bring forward to the latest date the usual summary of information as to the course of deposits and reserves since the
act of June 20,1874, went into effect. They show the amount of deposits
and the state of the reserve at about October 1 of each year, in each
central reserve city, in all the reserve cities, and in the States and Territories, and conclude with a general summary embracing all banks.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

77

NEW YORK CITY.

Date.

Reserve held.
Reserve
No. of Net de- required
banks. posits. (z5 per
cent.).* Amount. Ratio to
deposits.

Classification of reserve.
Oilier law- Due from Redempful money. agents. tion fund.

Specie.

Oct. 2,1874
Oct. 1,1875
Oct. 2,1876
Oct. 1,1877
Oct. 1,1878
Oct. 2,1879
Oct. 1,1880
Oct. 1,1881
Oct. 3,1882
Oct. 2,1883
Sept. 30,1884
Oct. 1,1885
Oct. 7,1886
Oct. 5,1887
Oct. 4,1888

Millions. Millions. Millions. Per cent. Millions. Millions. Millions. Millions.
68.3
33.4
14.4
48
204.6
51.2
52.4
1.5
60.5
50.7
29.9
5.0
48
202. 3
54.4
1.1
49.5
60.7
30.7
14.6
47
197.9
45.3
0.8
43.7
48.1
27. 5 ' 13.0
47
174. 9
34.3
0.8
47.4
50. 9
26.8
13.3
47
189.8
30.5
1.1
52.6
53.1
25. 3
19.4
47
230.2
32.6
1.1
67.0
70.6
26.4
58.7
47
2G8.1
11.0
0.9
07.2
62. 5
23.3
50.6
48
268.8
10.9
1.0
63. 5
64.4
25.4
44.5
50
254. 0
18.9
1.0
66.7
70.8
26. 5
50.3
48
266.9
19.7
0.9
63.7
90.8
35.6
63.1
44
255.0
27.0
0.7
78.2
115.7
37.0
91. 5
44
312. 9
23.7
0.5
70.7
77.0
27.2
64.1
45 . 282.8
12.5
0.4
71.1
80.1
28.2
63.6
47
284. 3
16.1
0.4
85.5
96.4
28.2
73.9
46
342.2
22.1
0.3

Avevage for
15 years...

47

247.6

61.9

71.3

28.8

42.7

27.8

0.8

12. 9
13 1

6.7
7.8

0.05
0.05

1.3
1.0

1.3
1.1

0.03
0.02

CHICAGO.
Oct. 5,1887
Oct. 4,1888

18
19

64.6
69.3

16.2
17.3

19. 7
21. 0

30.5
30.2

SAINT LOUIS.
Oct.
Oct.

5,1887
4,1888

5
4

10.3
7.9

2.6
2.0

2.7
2.1

26.4
27.0

*A11 in cash.
RESERVE CITIES.*!
Reserve held.
Date.

Oct. 2,1874
Oct. 1,1875
Oct. 2,1876
Oct. 1,1877
Oct. 1,1878
Oct. 2,1879
Oct. 1,1880
Oct. 1,1881
Oct. 3,1882
Oct. 2,1883
Sept. 30,1884
Oct. 1,1885
Oct. 7,1886
Oct. 5,1887
Oct. 4,1888

No. of Net de- required
banks posits. (25 per
Ratio to
cent.). Amount. deposits.

182
188
189
188
184
181
184
189
193
200
203
203
217
223
224

Classification of reserve.
Other lawRedempSpecie. ful money. Due from tion fund.
agents.

Millions. Millions. Millions. Per cent. Millions. Millions. Millions. Millions.
4.5
34.3
3.7
221.4
55. 3
76.0
36.7
31.1
33.3
1.5
3.6
223. 9
56.0
74.5
37.1
32.3
35.1
4.0
3.0
217.0
54.2
76.1
37.1
32. 0
33.0
5.6
3.0
204.1
51.0
67.3
34.3
24.4
35.6
9.4
3.2
199.9
50.0
71.1
29.4
29.1
36.5
3.5
283.8
57.2
83.5
11.3
33.0
35.7
36.2
3.7
289.4
72.4
105.2
28.3
25.0
48.2
30.0
3.7
335.4
83.9
100.8
34.6
21.9
40.6
28.0
3.5
318.8
79.7
89.1
28.3
24.1
33.2
3.4
31.1
323.9
81.0
100.6
26.3
30.1
40.8
32.2
3.1
307.9
77.0
99.0
30.3
33.3
32.3
33.5
2.9
364.5
91.1
122. 2
42.0
34.9
42.4
29. 9
2.2
381.5
95.4
114. 0
44.5
26.0
41.3
21). 7
1.2
338.5
84.6
100.7
36.3
23.2
40.0
30.4
0.9
384.9
90.2
116.9
40.0
24.5
51.5
* Reserve 25 per cent., one-half in cash.
t Includes Chicago and Saint Louis up to October 5, 1887.




78

REPORT

OF

THE

COMPTROLLER

OF

THE

CURRENCY.

STATES AND TERRITORIES.*

Reserve held.
No. of Net debanks. posits.

Date.

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

2,1874 1,774
1,1875 1, 851
2,1870 1, 853
1,1877 1,845
1,1878 1,822
2,1879 1, 820
1,1880 1,859
1,1881 1, 895
3,1882 2,0^6
2,1883 2, 253
30,1884 2,417
1,1885 2,467
7,1886 2,590
5,1887 2, 756
4,1888 2, 847

Classification of reserve.

XuL. O " L V O

required
(15 per
Ratio to
cent.)* Amount. deposits.

Other law- Due from RedempSpecie. ful mone3:.
agents. tion fund.

Millions. Millions. Millions. Per cent. Millions. Millions.
293.4
100.6
44.0
34.3
2.4
33.7
100.1
307.9
1.6
46.3
32.5
33.7
291.7
99. 9
2.7
43.8
34.3
31.0
290.1
95.4
4.2
43. 0
32.9
31.6
100.1
289.1
8.0
43.4
36.7
31.1
329. 9
124.3
49.5
37.7
11.5
30.3
410.5
147. 2
61.6
35.8
21.2
28. 3
507. 2
158. 3
76.1
31.2
27.5
27.1
545.8
150.4
81.9
27.5
30.0
30.0
157. 5
577.9
86.7
27.2
31.2
30.8
535.8
156.3
80.4
29.2
35.2
30.9
570.8
177.5
85.6
31.1
41.5
29. 9
6H7.6
186.2
95.6
29. 2
47.8
30.1
090. G
190.9
103.6
27.6
50.8
32.6
739.2
209.8
110.9
28.4
50.2
34.5

Millions. Millions.
52.7
11.9
53.3
11.6
55.4
10.8
48.9
10.7
56.0
11.0
71.3
11.2
86.4
11.3
92.4
11.4
80.1
11.3
84.1
11.3
79.7
10.5
95.9
10.2
8.7
99.5
6.6
100.9
6.2
119.0

SUMMARY.

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

2,1874
1,]8W
2,1876
•, 1877
1,1878
2, 1879
1,1S80
1,1881
3, 1882
2, 18S3
30,1884
1,1885
7, 1886
5,1887
4,1888

2,004
2,087
2,089
2, 080
2,053
2, 048
2,090
2,132
2, 269
2, 501
2,664
2, 714
2,852
3,049
3,140

719. 5
7JJ4.1
706. 6
669.1
678.8
768.9
908. 0
1,111.6
1,118.6
1,168.7
1, 098. 7
1,248.2
1,301.8
1,388.4
1,543.6

150.1
152.2
147. 5
138. 3
140. 8
159.3
201. 0
227. 2
225.1
234.4
221.1
254.9
261. 7
278.0
311.9

244 9
235.1
236. 7
210.8
228.1
2G0. 9
323. 0
321. 6
303.9
328. 9
346.1
415.4
377. 2
394.2
446.2

34.0
32.0
33.5
31.5
33.6
33. 9
33.4
28.9
27.2
28.1
31.6
33.3
29.0
28.4
28.9

21.3
8.1
21.3
22. 8
30.7
42.2
1.08.2
112.7
102.8
107. 8
128.6
175. 0
156. 4
165.1
178.1

122.8
125.2
113.4
100.2
97.0
95.9
64.3
59.9
72.0
80.6
91.2
88.5
68.7
79.9
90.1

83.8
85.6
87.4
73.3
85.1
107.0
134.6
133. 0
113.3
124. 9
112.0
138.3
140.8
140.9
170.5

17.1
16.3
14.6
14.5
15.3
15.8
15.9
16.1
15.8
15.6
14.3
13.6
11.4
8.3
7.6

*• Reserve 15 per cent., two-fifths in cash in bank.

In the above tables the specie held represents the aggregate of the
gold and silver coin and Treasurer's certificates and clearing-house gold
certificates. In the appendix, page 198, will be found a table giving
the amount of each kind of coin and certificate held by the banks in
each one of the States and reserve cities in October, 1887, and October,
1888, conveniently arranged for purposes of comparison.
TRANSACTIONS OF THE NEW YORK CLEARING-HOUSE.

The Kew York Olearing-House Association is composed of 64 members, of which 44 are national banks, 19 are State banks, and the other
member is the assistant treasurer of the United States at New York.
Two national banks and 23 State banks in the city do not belong to the
association, but clear through associate members. Mr. W. A. Camp,
the manager of the Clearing-House, has kindly supplied the data for
the following tables, showing the transactions, during the year ending
October 1, 1888:




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

79

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT FOR TWO YEARS OF THE TRANSACTIONS OF THE NEW
YORK CLEARING-HOUSE, SHOWING AGGREGATE AMOUNT OF CLEARINGS, AGGREGATE BALANCES, AND THE KINDS AND AMOUNTS OF MONEY PASSING IN SETTLEMENT OF THESE BALANCES.
Kinds of money and arnouut of each kind.

Aggregate
clearings.

Dollars.

Year ending—

Aggregate
balances.

Dollars.

Bank of
U.S.
America
gold certifi- gold certificates.
cates.*

! Dollars.

Dollars.

Treasury
Percentages.
certificates for Legal
legal
tenders
tenders,
and I Gold
sec. 5193, minor \certifi- Legal
U. S. lie- coin. i cates. tenders.
vised
Statutes.
Dollars.

Dollars

134, 872, 848, 785 1, 569, 626, 324 812, 231. 000748, 409, 000 1, 410, 000 7, 576, 325 99+
:30, 863, 686, 609 1, 570,198, 527 889,197, 000 655, 033, 000 18,195, U0017, 773, 527 83.19— 16. 81+

Oct. 1, 1887
Oct. 1, 1888

D e c r e a s e . . . | 4, 009,162,176;

Increase .

!
j 93,376,000J
572, 2031 76, 906, 000
16, 785, 000

* When the Government ceased issuing gold certificates December 1, 1878, the New York banks
agreed to have a common depositary for their gold coin. The Bank of America performed this function. None of its certificates are now outstanding, the last having been canceled in July of the present year.

Following is a comparative statement of transactions of the ~New York
Clearing-House for thirty-five years, showing for each year the number of banks, aggregate capital, clearings, and balances, average of the
daily clearings and balances, and the percentage of balances and clearings:
Years.

No. of
banks.

Capital.*

1854

50

$47, 044, 900

1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1809
1870
1871
5872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
3878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888

48
50
50
46
47
50
50
50
50
49
55
58
58
59
59
61
62
61
59
59
59
59
58
57
59
57
60
61
63
61
64
63
64
63

48,884, 180
52, 883, 700
64, 420, 200
67, 146, 018
67, 921, 714
69, 907, 435
08, 900, 605
()S, 375, 820
68, 972, 508
68, 586, 763
80,363,013
82, 370. 200
81, 770, 200
82, 270, 200
82, 720, 200
83, 620, 200
84, 420, 200
84, 420,200
83, 370. 200
81,635,200
80, 435, 200
81,731,200
71, 085, 200
63,611,500
60, 800, 200
60, 475, 200
61,162, 700
60, 962, 700
61,162,700
60, 412, 700
58,612,700
59, 312, 700
60, 862, 700
60, 762, 700

169,182,678

Clearings.

Balances paid
in money.

$297, 411,494

Average
dealings.

289, 694,137
334,714,489
365, 313, 902
314, 238, 911
303, 9*4, 683
380, 693, 438
353, 383, 944
415, 530, 331
677, 626, 483
885, 719, 205
1, 035, 765,108
1,066,135,106
1,144, 963, 451
1,125, 455, 237
1,120,318,308
1, 036, 484, 822
1,209, 721, 0J9
1, 428, 582, 707
1, 474, 508, 025
1,286,753, 176
1,408,608,777
1,295,042,020
1,373,996,302
1, 307, 843, 857
1,400,111,063
1,516,538,631
1, 776, 018,162
1, 595, 000, 245
1, 568, 983,196
1, 524,930, 994
1, 295, 355, 252
1, 519, 565, 385
1, 569, 626, 325
1,570,198,528

$19,104,505
17,412,052
22,278, 108
26, 968, 371
15, 393, 736
20, 867, 333
23, 401, 757
19,269,520
22, 237, 682
48, 428, 657
77, 984, 455
84, 796, 040
93,541, 195
93,101,167
92,182,164
121,451,393
90, 274, 479
95, 133,074
109,884,317
115, 885, 794
74, 692, 574
81, 899,470
70, 349, 428
76, 358,176
73, 555, 988
82,015,540
121,510,224
159, 232,191
151, 637, 935
132, 543, 307
111,048,982
82, 789, 480
109,067,589
114, 337, 209
101,192, 415

+843, 806, 456, 479 ;37, 328, 816, 732

178, 623, 608

$5, 750, 455, 987
5,362,912,098
6, 906, 213, 328
8, 333, 226, 718
4, 756, 664, 386
6, 448, 005, 956
7,231,143 0.77
5,915,742,758
6,871,443,591
14, 867, 597, 849
24, 097,196, 656
26, 032, 384, 342
28,717, 146,914
28, 675, 159, 472
28, 48i, 288. 637
37, 407, 028, 987
27, 804, 539, 406
29, 300, 980, 682
33, 844, 369, 568
35,461,052,826
22, 855, 927, 636
25, 061, 237, 902
21, 597, 274, 247
23, 289, 243, 701
22, 508, 438,442
25,178, 770, 691
37, 182,128,621
48, 565, 818, 212
46,552,846,161
40,293, 165,258
34, 092, 037, 338
25, 250, 791, 440
33, 374, 682, 216
34, 872, 848, 786
30, 863, 686, 609

Average
daily balances paid
in money.

$988, 078
940, 565
1, 079, 724
], 182,246
1, 016, 9o4
1, 177, 944
1,232,018
1,151, 088
1,344, 7:>8
2, 207, 252
2, 866, 405
3, 373, 828
3, 472, 753
3,717,414
3, 64J. 250
3, 637, 397
3, 365, 210

Ratios.

Per ct.
5,2
5.4
4.8
4.4
6.6
5.6
5.3
6.0
6.0
4.6
3.7
4.0
3.7
4.0
4.0
3. 0
3. 7

3, 927, 066
4, 63H, 632
4, 818, 654
4, 205, 076
4, 003, 297
4, 218, 378
4, 504, 906
4. 274, 000
4, 560, 622
4, 956, 009
5, 823, 010
5,195, 440
5,161,129
4,967, 202
4, 247, 069
4, 065,900
5,146, 316
5,148,192

4.1
4.2
4.1
5.7
5.9
5.9
5.8
5.6
4.1
3.5
3.4
3.9
4.5
5.1
4.5
4.5
5.1

t3,478, 725

4.4

5. 6

* The capital is for various dates, the amounts at a uniform date in each year not being obtainable,
t Yearly averages foi thirtv five j ears.
I Totals for thirty-five years.




80

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The clearing-house transactions of the assistant treasurer of the
United States at JSew York for the year ending October 1, 1888, were
as follows:
Exchanges received from clearing-bouse
$353,718,586.60
Exchanges delivered to clearing-house
103,560,040. 74
Balances paid to clearing-house
250, 541,227.49
Balances received from clearing-house
382,681. 63
Showing that the amount paid by the assistant treasurer to the clearing-house was in excess of the amount received by him
150,158, 545. 86

The debit balances were paid to the clearing-house as follows:
United States gold certificates
Legal tenders and change

250,387,000.00
154,227.49
250,541,227.49

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE EXCHANGES OF THE CLEARING-HOUSES OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR OCTOBER, 1888, AND OCTOBER, 1887.

Clearing-house at—

New York
Boston
Philadelphia...
Chicago
Saint Louis
San Francisco .
New Orleans...
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Kansas City...
Louisville
Providence
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Paul
Minneapolis ...
Omaha
Cleveland
Columbus
Denver
Memphis
Indianapolis...
Hartford.
New Haven —
Peoria
Springfield
Saint Joseph...
Worcester
Duluth
Portland
Norfolk
Galveston
Los Angeles ...
Grand Rapids .
Lowell
Syracuse
Wichita
Total
Increase.




Comparisons.
Exchanges for Exchanges for !
October, 1888. October, J887.
Increase. Decrease.
$3, 194,301,364 £2, 978, 940, 406 $215, 360, 958
387, 775, 488
472, 338, 749
84, 563, 261
307, 553, 909
272, 500, 752
35, 053,157
323, 057,170
267, 556, 325
55, 500, 845
83, 430, 317
74, 855, 029
8, 575, 288
87, 702, 944
74, 355, 337
13,347,607
42, 257, 63G
42, 603, 842
61, 987, 682
56, 795, 652 "5,192,030
56, 777, 983
10, 002, 917
46, 775, 066
47, 535, 350
47, 782, 200
41, 228, 195
11,435,204
29, 792, 991
24,812,647
23,210,780
1, 601, 867
23, 837, 500
23, 748, 800
18, 374, 899
24, 075, 034
5, 700,135
20,123, 277
24, 265, 352
4, 142, 075
18, 376, 835
19, 262, 0(>()
885, 231
22,826,010
27, 377, 185
4,551,175
12,759,306
16,763,220
4, 003, 914
14, 340, 059
16, 044, 333
1, 704, 274
10,616,739
10,121,511
10,812,462
12, 608, 062
"i, 795, 600
10, 725, 296
11, 783.630
1, "058, 334
8, 777, 909
8, 564, 210
8, 603, 088
973, 071
7, 630, A17
5, 360, 758
5, 576. 3-15
215, 587
5, 429,418
6, 899, 276
1, 469, 858
5, 604, 758
5, 653, 280
6,217, 191
6, 659, 426
5, 074, 835
4, 722, 433
352, 402
13,050,016
11,521,332
4, 607, 692
5, 013, 220
"405," 528
5,818,627
5, 780, 841
8, 865, 282
10, 252, 789
1," 387," 507
5,160,513
4, 062, (.67
2,725,819
2,161, 752
3,161,806
3, 366, 071
204, 265
3, 199,441
3,392, 184
192, 743
2, 844, 044
2, 426, 217

$346, 206
246, 850
"'88," 700

495, 228
"2i3,'699

48, 522
442, 235
1, 528, 684
""'37,786
1,097,846
564, 067
417, 827

5,023,549,915 4, 559, 402, 732 469, 674, 833 5, 527,650
5, 527, 650
4, 559, 402, 732
464,147,183

464,147,183

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

81

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE EXCHANGES OF THE CLEARING-HOUSES OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR WEEKS ENDING OCTOBER 27, 1S88, AND OCTOBER 29, 1887.

Clearing-house at—

New York
Boston
Philadelphia...
Chicago
Saint Louis ...
San Francisco.
New Orleans...
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Kansas City ...
Louisville
Providence
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Paul
Minneapolis ...
Omaha
Cleveland
Columbus
Denver
Memphis
Indianapolis...
Hartford
New Haven
Peoria
Springfield
Saint Joseph...
Worcester
Duluth
Portland
Norfolk
Galveston
Los Angeles ..,
Grand Rapids..
Lowell
Syracuse
Wichita
Total
Increase.

11028—CUR 88-




Comparisons.
Exchanges for Exchanges for !
week ending week ending
October 27,1888. October 29,1887. Increase. Decrease.
$683,132, 609
102, 015, 751
09, 077, 942
61,960,300
17, 079, 627
15, 590, 311
10, 283, 492
12, 378,141
13,170,190
9, 938, 900
8, 953,105
4, 742, 440
5, 955, 700
4, 563, 733
5, 087, 632
3,811,615
4, 982. 574
3, 550| 527
3, 599, 380
2,168, 420
2, 394, 498
2, 796, 774
1,891,482
1, 654,034
1, 074, 393
1, 456, 481
1, 137,703
1,263,313
1, 079, 739
2, 226, 760
1, 021, 693
1, 326, 554
1, 994, 297
681, 380
540, 444
802,151
688, 518
500, 630
1, 066, 579, 239
996, 499, 801
70,079, 438

$647, 590, 729 $35, 541, 880
83, 700, 976 18,314,775
58, 729, 071 10, 34S, 871
3, 553,184
58, 407,116
1, 021, 876
16, 057, 751
17, 495, 345
$1, 905, 034
9, 863, 406
420, 086
12, 618, 840
240,'699
11, 708, 842
1, 461, 348
9, 749, 950
188,950
7, 407, 620
1, 545,485
4, 800, 855
58,415
5, 937, 900
17, 800
4,079,159
484, 580
4, 702, 794
384, 838
4,108, 446
296, 831
4, 806, 272
176, 302
2,812,343
738,184
3, 263, 297
336, 083
2,285,210
116, 790
2, 800, 391
405,893
2, 532,120
264, 654
2,130, 383
238, 901
1,482, 341
*i7i, 693
1,101, 904
1, 177,341
279,140
1, 007, 778
129, 925
1, 70:\ 006
438, 693
969, 381
110,358
3, 224, 865
998,105
1, 039, 033
17, 340
1, 469, 657
143,103
2,193, 753
199,461
1,133,462
452, 082
533, 679
6, 765
650,419
151, 732
623, 200
65, 318
602,161
95, 531
996, 499, 801

75, 713, 827 5, 634, 389
5, 634, 389
70, 079,438

82

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The following tables exhibit the transactions of the clearing-houses
located in thirty-eight cities for the year ending September 30, 1888,
from official returns received from the manager of the JSTew York Clearing-House, comparisons being made with the year ending September
30, 1887, the increase or decrease in the exchanges acd balances being
indicated:
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE EXCHANGES OF THE CLEARING-HOUSES OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR YEARS ENDING SEPTEMBER 30,1888, AND SEPTEMBER 30,1887.

Clearing-house at—

New York

Boston
Philadelphia . .
Chicago
Saint Louis . . San Francisco.
NewOrleans . .
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Kansas City . .
Louisville
Providence
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Paul . . . .
Minneapolis.-Omaha"?
Cleveland
Columbus
Denver
Memphis
Indianapolis .Hartford
New Haven . . .
Peoria
Springfu-ld
Saint J o s e p h . Worcester
Duluth
Portland
Norfolk
Galveston
Los Angeles...
Grand Kapids •
Lowell
Syracuse
Wichita
Total
Decrease




Exchanges for Exchanges for
year ending
No. of
year ending
banks. September 30, September 30,
1888.
1887.

Comparisons.
Increase.

64 $30,863,686,609 $34,872,848,786
54 4,288, 878, 016 4,408, 269, 992
40 3,155,190, 237 3,186,188, 935
$202, 012,135
21 3, 089, 288,194
2, 887, 276, 059
17
886, 812, 201
879, 272, 738
7, 539, 463
17
823, 436, 263
800, 092, 859
23, 343, 404
14
450, 792, 897
412, 231,400
38, 561, 497
23
614, 399, 374
665, 676, 756
19
566,135,"994
490,319,705
75, 816, 269
17
518, 620, 450
564, 377, 200
13
382, 284, 073
380, 407, 069
1, 877, 004
21
295, 711, 094
269, 786, 547
25, 924, 547
34
248,135, 800
240, 838,100
7, 297, 700
16
218,695,351
] 88, 6-J9, 384
30, 065, 967
11
222, 609, 808
240,127, 909
14
194, 026, 801
200, 364, 307
16
204, 040, 477
184, 700, 022
19,340,455
7
166,007,003
137,220,535
28, 786, 468
11
160, 430, 904
160, 010, 840
420, 064
113,647,539
53,311,425
60, 336,114
17, 339, 630
7
127,579,797
110,240,167
11,666,560
8
105,908,050
94,241,496
12, 427, 301
6
99, 576, 811
87,149, 510
15
88, 625, 091
89, 871, 078
10
60,704,610
63,931,325
12,289,914
9
67, 296, 258
55, 0()6, 344
10
56,383,130
50,593,291
5, 789, 839
7
69,449,822
67,239,133
2, 210, 689
8
51, 286,739
47,197, 687
4, 089, 052
6
113,280,043
(New.)
113, 280, 043
6
50,156, 342
49, 588, 652
567, 690
6
44, 877,181
40, 016, 323
4, 860,858
7
57,165, 444
63,182, 557
8
63,050,981
(New.)
63, 050, 981
7
31,025,179
26,229,598
4, 795, 581
7
32, 986, 992
31, 670, 050
1, 316, 942
8
33,845,318
28,596,708
5, 248. 610
35,628,078
(Xew.)
35, 628, 078
48,651,654,957

52,126,704,488
48, 651, 651, 957
3,475,049,531

815, 982,875

Decrease.
:, 009,162,177
119, 391, 977
30, 998, 698

51, 277, 382
"45," 756," 750

17, 518,101
6, 337. 506

1, 245, 987
3, 226, 715

6, 017,113

4, 290,932, 406
815, 882, 875
3,475,049, 531

83

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE BALANCES OF THE CLEARING-IIOUSES OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR YEARS ENDING SEPTEMBER ;J0,1888, AND SEPTEMBER 30,1887.
Balances
Balances
No. of ', for year ending for year ending
banks. September 30, j September 30,
1888.
1887.

Clearing-bouse at—

New York
Boston
Philadelphia
Chicago
Saint Louis
San Francisco
New Orleans
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Kansas City
Louisville
Brovidence
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Paul
Minneapolis
Omaha
Cleveland
Columbus
Denver
Memphis
Indianapolis
Hartford
New Haven
Peoria
Springfield
Saint Joseph
Worcester
Duluth
Portland
Norfolk
Galveston
Los Angeles
Grand Rapids
Lowell
Syracuse
Wichita
Total
Increase.

,

,

,

$1, 570,198, 528
502, 980, 813
305, 238, 423
301,387,880
141, 142,096
121,091,092
53, 726,18C
89, 604, 272
99,552,128
70, 969, 900
No record
67, 619, 594
17, 741, 600
36, 422, 898
34, 537, 980
34, 053, 304
32, 514, 595
No record
No record
No record
15, 640, 765
24, 012,189
25, 096, 548
24,930,316
13, 788, 891
18, 060, 330
17, G26, 378
19,090,231
13,813,833
26, 987,462
10,145, 041
6, 932, 332
No record
10, 572, 388
6,411,338
10, 079, 280
7, 797, 597
N o record
3,729,772,214 I
3, 667, 768, 563 j
62,003,651 j .

.$1, 569, 626,
510,625,
298, 701,
301, 574,
142, 259,
124, 200,
47, 805,
89, 504,
81, 520,
96, 204,
N o record
63, 564,
N o record.
31,729, 276
40, 817, 909 |
33,193, 845 ;
30, 465, 326
N o record.
N o record
8, 378, 319 I
15, 8150, 79L I
24, 0,0, 2 1 3 ;
18, 660, 73 4 !
25, 689,
J5,176,
13, 974, 158 i
14, 929, 388 !
17, 667, 401 I
13, 406, 230 |
New
9, 495,
6, 453,
N o record.
New
5, 670, 88;! j
10, 168, 362 I.
6, 358, 243 !
New
I3, 607, 768, 503

Comparisons.
Increase.

Decrease.

$572, 203

" 6," 537 "lift'

$7, 644, 644
186, 790
1,117, 876
3,109,123

5, 920, 579 ;
99,991 ;
18,031,740
25, 234, 300
4,055, 437
17, 741, 600
4, 693, 622
6, 279, 929
859,459
2, 049, 269
8, 378, 319
226,026
8,024
6, 435,814
759, 452
1,388,011
4, 086,172
2, 696, 990
1,428,830
347, 603
26, 987, 462
649, 961
479,175
10, 572, 388
740, 452
89*, 082
1, 439, 354
116, 425, 227
54, 421, 576

54, 421, 576

62, 003, 651

From the foregoing tables it will be seen that the exchanges in New
York Gity during the past year amounted to 63.4 per cent, of the whole
sum, and the balances in that city were 42.1 per cent, of the total
balances.




84

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The following table, compiled from returns made to the ClearingHouse by the national banks in New York City, exhibits the movement
of their reserve, weekly, during October, for the last twelve years:
Hatio of reserve t o Week ending—

October 6,1877
October 13, 1877
October 20,1877
October 27,1877
October 5,1878
October 12,1878
October 19,1878
October 26,1878
October 4,1879
October 11,1879
October 18,1879
October 25,1879
October 2,1880
October 9,1880
October 16,1880
October 23,1880
October 30,1880
October 1,1881
October 8,1881
October 15,1881
October 22,1881
October 29,1881
October 7,1882
October 14,1882
October 21,1882
October 28,1882
October 6,1883
October 13,1883
October 20,1883
October 27,1883
October 4,1884
October 11,1884
October 18,1884
October 25,3884
October 3,1885
October 10,1885
October 17,1885
October 24,1885
October 30,1885.
October 2,1886
October 9,1886
October 16,1886
October 23,1886
October 30,1886
October 1, 1887
October 8,1887
October 15,1887
October 22,1887
October 29,1887
October 6,1888
October 13,1888
October 20,1888
October 27,1888

Specie.

:

Legal tenders.

Total.

$14, 665, 600 $36,168, 300 $50, 833, 900
35,178, 900
49, 905, 400
14, 72G, 500
35,101, 700
49,189,100
14, 087, 400
49, 576, 800
34, 367, 800
15, 209, 000
53, 300, 700
38, 304, 900
14, 995, 800
49, 869, 700
37, 685,100
12,184, 600
50,107, 400
36, 576, 000
13, 531, 400
53, 074, 700
35, 600, 500
17, 384, 200
53, 347, 600
34, 368, 000
18, 979, 600
53, 722,100
32, 820, 300
20, 901, 800
53, 991, 700
29, 305, 200
24, 680, 500
52, 349, 900
25, 636, 000
26, 713, 900
59,823, 700
11,129,100
70, 952, 800
62,521,300
10, 785, 000
73, 306, 300
62, 760, 600
10, 939, 200
73, 699, 800
10, 988, 200
60, £88, 200
71, 876, 400
10, 925, 000
61, 471, 600
72, 396, (500
12,150, 400
54,954, 600
67,105, 000
12,153, 800
65,441,700
53, 287, 900
12, 452, 700
63,461, 000
51, 008, 300
12,496,500
66, 512, 700
54, 016, 200
68, 909,100
12, 947, 900
55, 901, 200
18, 384, 500
65, 400, 500
47, 016, 000
18, 002, 700
48,281,000
66, 283, 700
17, 023, 900
66, 542,100
49, 518, 200
17, 201, 700
65, 578, 900
48, 374, 200
20,122, 500
51, 586, 700
71, 709, 200
21, 145, 800
50, 894, 000
72, 039, 800
20, 719, 700
47, 262, 900
67, 982, 600
46, 372, 800
20, 617, 600
66, 990, 400
25, 817, 300 93, 287, 900
67, 470, 600
27, 654,100
68, 922, 500
96, 576, 600
27,875,500
67, 579, 400
95, 454, 900
27, 354, 200
67, 638, 000
94, 992, 200
24, 516, 600 116, 868, 200
92, 351, 6uO
23, 002, 000 116, 644, 500
93, 642, 500
91, 945, 300
22, 221,100 114,166, 400
87, 309,100
21, 059, 800 108, 368, 900
84, 954, 600
21,874,900 106, 829, 500
64, 111, 700
14, 607, 700
78, 719, 400
65, 723, 800
13, 209,100
78, 932, 900
65, 228, 600
13,133,100
78, 361, 700
12, 803, 800
65, 668, 400
78, 472, 200
13,177, 200
66,195,100
79, 372, 300
64, 619, 200
15, 767, 500
80, 386, 700
64. 317, 500
16, 229, 700 80, 587, 200
64, 663,100
16, 885, 400
81, 548, 500
64, 918, 700
16, 735, 500
81, 654, 500
17, 542, 600
82, 848, 400
66, 005, 800
23, 204, 300
74,411,300
97, 615, 600
73,901,500
22, 017, 800
95, 919, 300
81, 457, 700
21, 386, 800 102, 844, 500
81,212, 600
21, 329, 800 102, 542, 400

Circulation and Deposits.
deposits.
Per cent. Per cent.
27.0
29.5
26.7
29.2
26.5
29.0
26.8
29.4
25.7
28.4
24.4
27.0
24.7
27.3
25.8
28.5
23.3
25.8
23.4
25.9
23.5
26.1
23.0
25.5
25.4
26.4
25.4
27.2
25.5
27.1
24.8
26.6
25.0
26.7
23.1
24.8
23.1
24.9
23.2
25.0
24.6
26.6
25.6
27.4
24.0
26.3
24.7
26.6
25.0
26.8
24.8
26.5
25. 5
27.0
25.4
26.8
24.5
25.9
24.5
25.9
34.5
36.3
35.2
36.9
34.8
36.5
34.6
36.3
36.0
37.1
35.8
37.0
34.9
36.0
33.5
34.5
33.0
34.1
27.1
27.9
27.0
27.7
26.7
27.4
26.9
27.7
27.1
27.9
27.7
28.5
27.4
28.2
27.3
28.1
27.4
28 2
27.8
28.6
27.4
27.9
27.8
28.4
29.3
29.9
29.3
29.8

DUTIES, ASSESSMENTS, AND REDEMPTION CHARGES.

National banks are subjected to a semi-annual duty of one-half of 1
per cent, upon the average amount of their notes in circulation during
the preceding six months. They are also required by the act of June
20,1874, to pay the cost of the redemption of their notes at the office of
the Treasurer of the United States at Washington and the cost of the
plates from which their notes are printed. Banks extending their corporate existence have to pay for new plates. Previously to the act of
June 20? 1874, the expense of the plates had been paid out of the t




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

85

on the banks, which at that time attached to capital and deposits as
well as to circulation.
The banks are further required to pay the fees of the examiners employed to ascertain their condition, under section 5240, Eevised Statutes
of the United States.
The taxes and assessments collected during the past year are as
follows:
Semi-annual duty on circulation
Cost of redemption of notes by United States Treasurer
Assessment for cost of plates, new banks
Assessment for cost of plates, extended banks
Assessment for examiners' fees, sec. 5*240, E. S
Total

$1, 616,127.53
141,141.48
14,100. 00
3, S00. 00
121,777. 86
1,897,046.87

The following table is a comparative statement ot taxes assessed as
semi-annual duty on circulation, cost of redemption of notes, cost of
plates, and examiners' fees for the past six years:

Tears.

Cost of
Assess- Assessment AssessSerai-annual redemption ments for for cost
ment for
of notes
duty on circu- by United
cost of
of plates, examiners'
lation.
plates, new extended fees (sec.
States
banks.
5240 H.S.).
banks.
Treasurer.

Total.

$3,132,006.73 $147, 592. 27 $25, 980. 00 $34,120. 00 $04, 606.16 $3,434, 305.16
3, 024, 668. 24 160, 896. 65 18,845.00
1, 950. 00 99, 642. 05 3, 306, 001. 94
2, 794, 584. 01 181, 857.16
13,150. 00 97, 800. 00 107,781.73
3,195,172. 90
2, 592, 021. 33 168, 243. 35 14, 810. 00 24, 825. 00 107, 272, 83 2,907,172.51
2, 044, 922.75 138,967.00
18, 850. 00
1, 750. 00 110,219.88 I 2, 314, 709. 63
1, 616,127. 53 141,141. 48 14,100. 00
3,900. 00 121, 777. 86 j 1,897,046.87

1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888

Total .

15,204, 330. 59 938, 697. 91 105, 735. 00 164, 345. 00 641, 300. 51

17, 054, 409.01

The total tax collected on circulation up to July 1, 1888, amounted
to $67,457,848.83.
LEGAL DECISIONS.
CONSTRUCTION OF STATUTES RELATING TO NATIONAL BANKS.

The " Digest of National-Bank Cases " presented in the Report of 1887
is reproduced in the appendix, page 101, enlarged by the incorporation of
decisions announced during the last twelve months. The most important of these new decisions are as follows:
(1) An opinion rendered by the Supreme Court of the United States,
February 20, 1888, in what is commonly called " The Pacific NationalBank Cases," holding that attachment of assets of national banks,
whether insolvent or not, is invalid and that United States statute
takes away the power of the courts to issue injunctions against national
banks.
The opinion is as follows:
All of these cases involve tlie same general question, and they may properly be considered and decided together. From the records ifc appears that the Pacific National
Bank of Boston was an association for carrying on the business of banking, organized
under the national-bank act. On the 20th of November, 1881, it became embarrassed,
and was placed in charge of a bank examiner, in whose control it remained until
March 18, 1882, when its doors were opened for business with the consent of the
Comptroller of the Currency.
By statute, in Massachusetts, civil actions are begun by original writ, which "may
be framed either to attach the goods or estate of the defendant, and, for want thereof,
to take his body; or it may be by original summons, with or without an order to
attach the goods or estate." (Pub. Stat. of Mass., 1882, chap. 161, sees. 13,14.) "All




86

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

real and personal estate liable to be taken on execution * * * m a y be attached
upon the original writ in any action in which debt or damages are recoverable, and
may be held as security to satisfy such judgment as the plaintiff may recover." (Sec.
38.) "A person or corporation whose goods or estate are attached on mesne process
in a civil action may, at any time before final judgment, dissolve such attachment by
giving bond with sufficient sureties, * * * with condition to pay to the plaintiff
the amount, if any, that he may recover within thirty days after the final judgment
•in such action." (Sec. 122.)
At the time the bank resumed business it was indebted to George Mixter in the
sum of $15,000; to Henry M. Whitney also in the sum of $15,000; to Daniel L. Demmon in the sum of $25,000 ; and to Calvin B. Prescott in the sum of $5,000.
On the 24th of March, 1881, Mixter and Prescott each began a suit against the bank
in the circuit court of the United States for the district of Massachusetts, by writ directing an attachment, to recover the amounts due them respectively. Deinraon also
began a suit in the same court and in the same way on the 28th of March, to recover
the amount due him, and Whitney another on the 28th of April, upon the claim in
his favor. At the time these suits were begun the bank had money on deposit to its
credit in the Maverick National Bank and in the Howard National Bank, and the
necessary steps were taken to subject these deposits to the attachments which were
issued in the several suits.
The bank arranged with Lewis Coleman and John Shepard to "become its sureties
upon bonds to dissolve attachments in any actions that might be brought against it,
and placed in their hands a certificate of deposit in the Maverick National Bank for
$100,000, to be held as their protection against all liabilities which should be thus
incurred. This certificate was afterwards exchanged for $121,000 of the bonds of the
Nantasket Company, $20,000 of the bonds of the Toledo, Delphos and Burlington
Railroad Company, and $15,000 of the bonds of the Lebanon Springs Railroad Company.
Immediately after each of the attachments in the above actions had been made, the
bank executed a bond to the plaintiff in a penal sum suited to the amount of the claim,
with Coleman and Shepard as its sureties, reciting the attachment, and that the bank
"desiresto dissolve said attachment according to lawT," and conditioned to be void "if
the Pacific National Bank of Boston shall, within thirty days after the final judgment in the aforesaid action, pay to the plaintiff' therein named the amount, if any,
which he shall recover in such action.'7 Upon the execution of the bond in each
case, the attachment was dissolved.
After this the bank closed its doors a second time, and on the 22d of May, 1882, a
receiver was appointed by the Comptroller of the Currency in accordance with the
provisions of section 5234 of the Revised Statutes, and at once took possession of its
assets and proceeded to wind up its affairs.
When the receiver was appointed he found the several suits which had been commenced still pending. In the cases of Mixter, Whitney, and Demmon he appeared,
answered for the bank, filed motions to discharge the attachments, and motions to
dismiss the suits. His motions were all overruled, and, his defenses not being sustained, judgments were rendered against the bank in each of the cases for the amounts
found to be due the several plaintiffs, respectively. For the review of the action of
the court in these cases the writs of error which are now under consideration were
brought.
The suit of Prescott still remains undisposed of in the circuit court.
Failing in his motions and in his defenses at law, the receiver filed a bill in equity
in the circuit court against the several attaching creditors and the sureties on the
bonds given to dissolve the attachments, the object of which was to reduce to his
possession the securities which were held by the sureties for their protection against
liability, and to restrain the several attaching creditors from enforcing the attachment bonds on the ground, among others, "that the attachments made in said actions
were unauthorized, illegal, and void." This bill was dismissed by the circuit court
(22 Fed. Rep., 694), and from that decree the appeal, which is now one of the subjects
of consideration, was taken.
In the view we take of the case, the most important question to be considered
is whether an attachment can issue against a national bank before judgment in a
suit begun in the circuit court of the United States. Section 5242 of the Revised
Statutes of the United States contains this provision : "No attachment, injunction,
or execution shall be issued against such association or its property before final judgment in any suit, action, or proceeding, in any State, county, or municipal court."
The original national-bank act contained nothing of this kind, but the prohibition
first appeared in the act of March 3, 1873 (chap. 269, sec. 2, 17 Stat., 603), as a new
proviso added to section 57 of the act of June 3, 1864 (chap. 106, Sec. 2, 13 Stat., 116).
That section was originally as follows:
"That suits, actions, and proceedings against any association under this act may
be had in any circuit, district, or Territorial court of the United States held within




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87

the district in which such association may be established, or in any State, county, or
municipal court in the county or city in which said association is located, having j ur is*
diction in similar cases: Provided, however, That all proceedings to enjoin the Comptroller under this act shall be had in a circuit, district, or territorial court of the
United States, held in the district in which the association is located."
The amending act was as follows:
" That section fifty-seven * * * be amended by adding thereto the following :
'And provided further, That no attachment, injunction, or execution shall be issued
against such association, or its property, before final judgment in any such suit, action,
or proceeding in any State, county, or municipal court.'"
Section 52 of the original national-bank act was as follows:
" That all transfers of the notes, bonds, bills of exchange, and other evidences of
debt owing to any association, or of any deposits to its credit; all assignments of
mortgages, sureties on real estate, or of judgments or decrees in its favor; all deposits
of money, bullion, or other valuable thing for its use, or for the use of any of its shareholders or creditors; and all payments of money to either, made after the commission
of an act of insolvency, or in contemplation thereof, with a view to prevent the application of its assets in the manner prescribed by this act, or with a view to the preference of one creditor to another, except the payment of its circulating notes, shall be
null and void." (13 Stat., 115.)
This was evidently intended to preserve to the United States that " first and paramount lien upon all the assets of such association" which was given by section 47
as security for the repayment of any amount expended by them to redeem the circulating notes, over and above the proceeds of the bonds pledged for that purpose, and
to place all the other creditors on that equality in the distribution of the assets of an
insolvent bank which was clearly provided for in section 50, where the Comptroller
of the Currency is required to make ratable dividends of the proceeds of the assets of
the association realized by the receiver "on all such claims as may have been proved
to his satisfaction, or adjudicated in a court of competent jurisdiction." (National
Bank vs. Colby, 21 Wall., 609, 613.)
In the revision of the statutes, section 52 of the original act, and the amendment of
section 57 adopted in 1873, relating to attachments and injunctions in State courts,
were re-enacted as section 5242, the amendment of section 57beingput in the revision
at the end of what had been the original section 52. As the Revised Statutes were
first adopted, the proviso of section 57, which related sj)ecially to proceedings to enjoin the Comptroller, was re-enacted as section 736, but all the rest of the original section
was left out. That omission was, however, supplied by the act of February 18, 1875
(chap. 80, 18 Stat., 316, 320), which re-enacted it as part of section 5198, putting it at
the end of that section as it originally stood in the revision.
The fact that the amendment of 1873 in relation to attachments and injunctions in
State courts was made a part of section 5242 shows the opinion of the revisers and of
Congress that it was germane to the other provision incorporated in that section,
and was intended as an aid to the enforcement of the principle of equality among the
creditors of an insolvent bank. But, however that may be, it is clear to our minds
that, as it stood originally as part of section 52 after 1873, and as it stands now in the
Revised Statutes, it operates as a prohibition upon all attachments against national
banks under the authority of the State courts. That was evidently its purpose when
first enacted, for then it was part of a section which, while providing for suits in the
courts of the United States or of the State, as the plaintiff might elect, declared in
express terms that if the suit was begun in a State court no attachment should issue
until after judgment. The form of its re-enactment in the Revised Statutes does not
change its meaning in this particular. It stands now, as it did originally, as the
paramount law of the land that attachments shall not issue from State courts against
national banks, and writes into all State attachment laws an exception in favor of
national banks. Since the act of 1873 all the attachment laws of the State must be
read as if they contained a provision in express terms that they were not to apply to
suits against a national bank.
The prohibition does not in express terms refer to attachments in suits begun in the
circuit courts of the United States, but as by section 915of the Revised Statutes those
courts are not authorized to issue attachments in common-law causes against the property of a defendant, except as " provided by the laws of the State in which such court
is held for the courts thereof," it follows that, as by the amendatory act of 1873, now
part of section 5242 of the Revised Statutes, all power of issuing attachments against
national banks before judgment has been eliminated from State statutes, there can
not be any laws of the State providing for such a remedy on which the circuit courts
may act. The law in this respect stands precisely as it would if there were no State
law providing for such a remedy in any case. It was suggested in argument that the
prohibition extended only to the use of the remedy by State courts, and that the remedy itself still remained to be resorted to in the courts of the United States. But we
do not so understand the law. In our opinion the effect of the act of Congress is to




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REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

deny the State remedy altogether so far as suits against national banks are concerned,
and in this way it operates as well on the courts of the United States as on those of
the States. Although the provision was evidently made to secure equality among
the general creditors in the division of the proceeds of the property of an insolvent
bank, its operation is by no means confined to cases of actual or contemplated insolvency. The remedy is taken away altogether and can not be used under any circum-*
stances.
It was further said that if the power of issuing attachments has been taken away
from the State courts, so also is the power of issuing injunctions. That is true.
While the law as it stood previous to the act of July 12, 1882 (chap. 290, sec. 4, 22
Stat., 163), gave the proper State and Federal courts concurrent jurisdiction in all
ordinary suits against national banks, it was careful to provide that the jurisdiction
of the Federal courts should be exclusive when relief by attachment or injunction
before judgment was sought. Until the act of 1882 the Federal courts had ample
authority to grant injunctions in proper cases, and all a person need do to invoke
that authority was to bring his suit in one of those courts. Whether since the act of
1882 this remains so is a question for the consideration of Congress. Some amendment to existing legislation may be necessary, but this does not shed any light on the
interpretation of the old law. The difficulty arises from the change that has been
made, not from the law as it stood originally.
We are, therefore, of opinion that the attachments in all the suits were illegal and
void, because issued without any authority of law. But it is insisted that notwithstanding this the bonds are valid and may be enforced.
It is undoubtedly true that the sureties on a bond of this kind are estopped from
setting up, as a defense to an action for a breach of its condition, any irregularities
in. the form of proceeding to obtain an attachment authorized by law which would
warrant its discharge upon a proper application made therefor. As the purpose of
the bond is to dissolve an attachment, its due execution implies a waiver both by the
defendant and his sureties of all mere irregularities. So, too, it is no defense that the
property attached did not belong to the defendant, or that it was exempt, or that
the defendant has become bankrupt or is dead. In all such cases, where there was
lawful authority for the attachment, the simple question is, whether the condition of
the bond has been broken; that is to say, whether there has been a judgment in the
action against the defendant for the payment of money which he has neglected for
thirty days afterwards to make.
In the present case, however, the question is whether the bond creates a liability
when the attachment on which it is predicated was actually prohibited bylaw. In
other words, whether an illegal and therefore a void attachment is sufficient to lay
the foundation for a valid bond to secure its formal dissolution. The bond is a substitute for the attachment, although not affected by all the contingencies which
might have discharged the attachment itself. (Carpenter vs. Turrell, 100 Mass., 450,
452; Tapley vs. Goodsell, 122 Mass., 176, 182.) Such being the case, it necessarily
follows that if there was no authority in law for the attachment, there could be none
for taking the bond. If the attachment itself is illegal and therefore void, so also
must be the bond which takes its place. Objections can be made to an attachment
issued on proper legal authority, which can not be used as a defense to a bond taken
under the statute for its dissolution; but if there can be no lawful attachment, there
can be no valid bond for its dissolution. The case is to be considered as though there
was no law whatever for the seizure of property by attachment before judgment in
any case. As the taking of the property under such circumstances would be unlawful, so also would be the act of the magistrate in accepting the bond.
Neither is the bond binding as a common-law bond. If the attachment had been
valid, and the bond taken had not been in all respects such as the statute had required,
it could nevertheless have been enforced as a common-law bond, because it was executed for a good consideration, and the object for which it was given had been accomplished. But here the difficulty is that there was no lawful attachment, and
therefore no lawful authority for taking any bond whatever. The bond is consequently neither good under the statute nor at common law, because there is no sufficient foundation to support it.
Objection is made to the relief which is sought in equity, because if the attachment bonds are void there is an adequate remedy at law in the suits that may be brought
for their enforcement. If the suit in equity had been brought by the sureties to get
rid of their obligation, this objection might be good; but such is not its character.
The sureties have in their hands assets of the bank which the receiver seeks to reduce to his possession, and which they claim the right to hold until they have been
fully indemnified against or discharged from liability on the bonds. The receiver
says there is no liability, because the bonds are invalid; and to have that question
settled once for all he has brought the persons interested, creditors as well as sureties, before the court in order that it may be conclusively adjudicated between them.
Such a suit ia clearly cognizable in equity. The sureties are in a sense stake-holders.




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89

They do not claim the securities unless they are liable on the "bonds, and the suit,
although not brought by them, is in the nature of au interpleader to save them " from
the vexation of two proceedings on a matter which may be settled in a single suit."
The decree will bind all alike, and if the sureties are held not to be liable it will
conclude the creditors from all further proceedings against them on the bonds, and
. leave them free to surrender the securities to the receiver. This will not affect the
judgments that the creditors have recovered any further than to limit their operation, so far as the receiver and the sureties on the attachment bonds are concerned,
to the adjudication of the debts as claims entitled to dividends from the proceeds of
the assets of the bank. To that extent, certainly, the court had jurisdiction in each
of the suits after the insolvency; but as the attachments were void the judgments
are inoperative as a basis of recovery upon the bonds.
The judgment in each of the suits at law is affirmed, but the decree in the suit in
equity is reversed, and the cause remanded with instructions to enter a decree setting
aside and annulling the bonds which were given to dissolve the attachments, and
enjoining each and all of the creditors, and those claiming under them, from proceeding in any manner to enforce the same against the sureties, and directing the
sureties to surrender to the receiver the securities they hold for their indemnity.

(2) An opinion rendered by the United States circuit court, southern district of New York, in an action of trover to recover moneys of
a national bank (afterward insolvent) alleged to have been wrongfully
appropriated by certain brokers and used in stock speculations.
The opinion is as follows :
This action is in substance one of trover to recover moneys of the First National
Bank of Albion, alleged to have been wrongfully appropriated by the defendants
during the years 1880 and 1881. The case was tried with a jury, and the jury found
a verdict for the plaintiff for $103, 000 principal, with $544,759 interest. The case is
now here upon a motion by the defendants for a new trial.
It appeared by the evidence that in 1880 one Warner was the cashier of the Albion
bank, and for some time had been intrusted with the almost exclusive management
of its affairs. In November, 1881, he became its president. In August, 1884, the bank
failed, "Warner absconded, and the plaintiff, who was appointed its receiver, took possession of the assets. An examination of its affairs showed that Warner had misappropriated moneys and securities of the bank to the amount of over $300,000 and was
otherwise indebted to the bank in a considerable sum. It was further shown that
Warner had been carrying on stock speculations through the agency of the defendants, who were stock brokers and bankers of New York city; that he opened a customer's account with them May 11, 1880, and continued to buy and sell stocks and
securities upon margins through them, and to deposit with and draw upon them as
bankers, during that year and the next; and that from time to time the defendants
received large sums of money from him by checks of the Albion bank, payable to their
order, drawn by Warner, as cashier, upon the Third National Bank of New York city.
The defendants collected these checks, and placed the proceeds to Warner's credit in
his account with thera.
It was also proved that for many years the Albion bank had kept a banking account
with the Third National Bank of New York, and had been accustomed to draw upon
if; at sight, and send it collections and remittances; that after Warner became the
cashier of the Albion bank he took personal charge of the correspondence between
that bank and the New York bank, and intercepted the letters of advice and monthly
statements sent by the New York bank to the Albion bank, and adopted other methods
to conceal from the other persons associated with him in conducting the Albion bank the
true state of the account between the two banks; that from time to time he deposited
with the New York bank, in the name of the Albion bank, funds in his possession, and
from time to time drew checks and drafts in the name of the Albion bank, as cashier,
upon the New York bank, for his own transactions and speculations; and that the
checks and drafts thus drawn by Warner for his own use were not credited to the
New York bank on the books of the Albion bank, nor were the deposits made in the
name of the Albion bank by Warner personally charged to the New York bark on
the books of the Albion bank, although they were credited to the Albion bank by the
New York bank; and neither the checks nor drafts, nor the credit items appeared in
any way upon the books of the Albion bank.
The evidence was sufficient to justify the jury in finding that Warner used the account of the Albion bank with the New York bank as the means of appropriating,
without the knowledge of the directors or other officers of the Albion bank, and clandestinely, the funds and credit of that bank for his own benefit. It appeared by the
books of the two banks that the checks and drafts upon the New York bank and
charged to the Albion bank, but not credited by the Albion bank to the New York
bank, during the period of Warner's defalcations amounted to $267,000, and the de-




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REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

posits credited by the New York bank to the Albion bank, but not charged by the
Albion bank to the New York bank, during the same period amounted to $281,000.
The checks received by the defendants between May 11, 1880, and August 26, 1881,
and including those dates, aggregated the amount of $103,000. During the same
period they received from Warner from other sources $107,703. The defendants
bought and sold stock for Warner on a margin of 10 per cent., and many of the checks
in question were received by them pursuant to their request to remit for margins.
The first and last checks were for $10,000 each; one was for $15,000. In January,
1881, they received checks for margins aggregating the sum of $50,000. Testimony
was given for the plaintiff tending to show that Warner was rated, where he resided,
as worth from $15,000 to $20,000; and testimony was given for the defendants tending to show that they supposed that other persons were interested with Warner in
his stock transactions, and did not suspect that he was using the funds of the bank
illegitimately. It also appeared that from time to time Warner drew on the defendants, and that during the period covered by the checks in controversy they paid on
his drafts, into the Third National Bank, to the credit of the Albion bank, at various
times, sums aggregating $89,202, and that this amount was credited to the Albion bank
on the books of the New York bank, and $25,850 thereof was charged on the books of
the Albion bank to the New York bank, but the rest did not appear in the books of
the Albion bank.
Upon the trial, the court excluded the testimony offered by the defendants to show
that it was customary with bankers and brokers of New York City to receive cashiers' checks and drafts drawn in favor of their own banks upon New York banks as
cash, upon transactions with the cashier individually. At the close of the testimony,
the defendants requested the court to instruct the jury to find a verdict for the defendants. Defendants also requested the court to instruct the jury that the defendants were not liable for any sum in excess of the difference between the sums received
by them from Warner upon the checks of the Albion bank and the sums paid by them
on Warner's drafts to the New York bank to the credit of the Albion bank. The
court refused such instructions. The court instructed the jury, in substance, that it
was incumbeut upon the plaintiff to establish that the moneys represented by the
checks received by the defendants were moneys of the bank which had been misappropriated by Warner; and that, when the defendants received the checks, they
took them with guilty knowledge that Warner in using them was misappropriating the
funds of the bank ; and that, unless they found both these propositions established
by the evidence, their verdict should be for the defendants. They were further instructed that they might find upon the evidence that Warner was^ permitted by the
directors of the bank to draw such checks for his own use, or to use the money of
the bank for his own purposes, or they might find that the directors of the bank
were in collusion with Warner and cognizant of his transactions ; that if they found
that those who represented the stockholders of the bank as its directors or managers
permitted Warner to draw such checks or use the moneys of the bank for his own
purposes, not as co-conspirators or collusively, but trusting in his integrity or believing that the bank would not be injured, or through loose management on their
part, the plaintiff could not recover; but if they did this collusively their consent
could not shelter the defendants, because they had no power by virtue of their position to consent to a fraud upon the stockholders. The jury were further instructed
that upon the issue whether the defendants received the checks with guilty knowledge, the question was not whether they were negligent in receiving them or in allowing Warner to deal with them as they did, but the question was whether they
were guilty of bad faith; that defendants were bound to know that a cashier
has no authority as such to loan the money of the bank or use its checks for his personal use; that the jury were to infer that the defendants knew this when they received the checks, and therefore the question was whether the defendants believed
that by some special arrangement or confidence Warner was permitted by those who
were associated with him in the management of the bank to use its checks and moneys
as he did ; and if the jury found that the defendants so believed, the defendants were
not guilty of mala fides. The defendants insist upon this motion that the court erred
in excluding the testimony of custom, in refusing to instruct the jury as requested,
in the instructions given to the jury, and urge other grounds for a new trial.
In some aspects this is a hard case for the defendants. If the verdict stands, they
are made responsible to pay over a very large sum of money which came to their
hands to be invested and handled for another person in consideration of a small commission to be received by them, and which they have paid back to the person from
whom they received it; and there is no reason to suppose that they had any active
or defined purpose when they received the money, or at any time, of assisting the
person from whom they received it to defraud others, or to injure others in any way.
It is altogether likely that they could have shown, if they had been permitted to do
so, by the testimony of any number of respectable bankers and brokers, that it is
every-day practice in Wall street, for those in their line of business to buy and sell




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91

stocks for bank presidents and cashiers who are speculating there, and to accept
drafts and negotiable paper of the corporations of these officers, made by them officially, in payment of the margins* or purchase-money, and that such transactions are
so frequent and common in Wall street that they do not attract special notice, and
do not usually excite a passing suspicion that they; are irregular or improper.
But no usage, however common and well recognized, can be invoked to justify a
banker, or any one else, in taking money or negotiable paper in payment of an agent's
debt, known to belong to his principal, or known to belong to a trust-estate, to satisfy
the trustee's personal debt, or to shield the banker from accountability who wilfully
closes his eyes andstops his ears to facts and circumstances which import notice that the
agent or trustee is misappropriating the money or property intrusted to him. Therefore,
if there is any significance in the fact that a bank president or cashier offers negotiable
paper of his corporation, made by him in his official character, inpayment of his per
sonal debt, or to raise money for his personal use, it matters not that bankers generally do not appreciate it. If they regard the transaction as equivalent to one in
which the individual comes with money in hand, they ignore its real character, because in that case he comes with what purports to be his own, having the possession
which implies title and ownership, and the right to use it as he sees fit. When he
comes with the money-obligation of a corporation, which is the contract of a corporation only because he has made it, and which is not its contract if he has made it without authority, the transaction is a very different one. Every person who takes such
an obligation must ascertain at his peril that the agent who has made it was authorized todo so ; and the moment that it appears that the contract has been made for
the agent's own use and benefit, that moment his authority is impugned and impeached.
No principle of the law of agency is better settled than that no person can act as
the agent for another in making a contract for himself. Therefore it is that a bank
president or cashier has no implied authority to bind his corporation to negotiable
paper made for his own use; and if it appears upon the face of the paper that it is
payable to the individual who has made it in an official capacity, the obligation is
nugatory, and no purchaser can enforce it.
Upon this principle it was held in Clan1 in v. The Farmers and Citizens' Bank (25 N.
Y., 293) that a general authority to the president of a bank to certify checks drawn
upon it does not extend to checks drawn by himself; and if the face of the check
shows the president's attempt to use his official character for his private benefit,
every one to whom it comes is put upon inquiry, and if the certificate is false no one
can recover against the bank as a bonafule holder. So, too, it was held in WTest Saint
Louis Savings Bank v. Shawnee County Bank (95 U. S., 557), where a bank cashier
made his individual note payable to the order of his bank, and indorsed it officially,
that a purchaser of the note was charged with notice that the indorsement was not
within the implied authority of the cashier, and must prove actual authority in order
to recover of the bank as indorser.
It can make no difference whether the agent or officer appears to be the party to
whom the paper is payable upon the face of the instrument, or whether it appears by
extrinsic facts that he is the real party for whose benefit it was made; consequently,
whenever he offers the instrument under circumstances which show that he has made
it officially for his private use, the party dealing with him must take notice of his
want of authority, and can not treat it as the obligation of the principal, unless he
can prove the existence of some special and extraordinary authority on the part of
the agent. For these reasons the testimony offered by the defendants to show that
cashiers' checks, when used in the private transactions of bank cashiers, are by
usage regarded as cash, was properly excluded. If the tendency of the testimony
was to establish a usage to the effect that such payments are regarded by bankers as
ordinary payments of cash made by individuals for their own account, the usage
would contravene well-settled legal principles. In any other aspect the testimony
was immaterial.
The views thus expressed are pertinent in considering "whether the instructions
given to the jury were correct respecting the title acquired by the defendants to the
checks and moneys the checks represented. If the instructions did not accurately
present to the jury the legal principles by which, upon the evidence, the rights of
the parties were to be determined, they certainly did no injustice to the defendants.
The case was put to the jury upon the theory that the defendants, in taking the checks,
occupied the position of purchasers of commercial paper, and as though their liability
was to be tested by the rule applicable to actions for the wrongful conversion of such
paper. If they acquired title to the checks as against the bank, of course they acquired title to the proceeds, and, if they were bona fide purchasers, their title was
perfect; otherwise they became liable for the proceeds as for a conversion. (Cornstock v. Hier, 73 N. Y., 269). The defendants were given the full benefit of the distinction between negligence and malafidesin the purchase of negotiable paper, and the
jury were instructed that mere suspicion on the part of the defendants was not suffi-




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REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

cient to charge them with notice that Warner was using the checks without authority.
The doctrine of Goodman v. Simonds(20 How., 343) was adopted as applicable to the
facts.
The facts in evidence certainly justified the submission of the question to the jury
whether the defendants did not have notice that Warner wras availing himself of
fiduciary rpowers to use the funds of tl^e corporation for unauthorized purposes. As the
checks w ere made payable to the order of the defendants for Warner's individual use,
in legal effect they wTere made payable to Warner's oAvn order. The defendants knew
that he was not acting within the scope of any ordinary agency when he made checks
officially for use in his private transactions. The authority of a cashier to represent
the bank does not extend to a contract involving the payment of money not loaned
by the bank in the ordinary way. (United States Bank v. Dunn, 6 Pet., 51; United
States v. City Bank of Columbus, 21 How., 35(5; Merchants' Bank v. State Bank, 10
Wall., C)04.) As the executive officer of the bank, he transacts its business under the
orders and supervision of the board of directors. Authority to use its credit, or transfer its funds for his private use, can not ,be implied from the fact that his official
position puts it within his power to act dishonestly in this behalf.
Although the defendants were bound to know when they took the checks that the
paper could not be treated as the. paper of the bank unless the managers of the bank
had loaned himthe money represented by it, there was evidence which, unexplained,
tended to show that such a loan had been in fact made. The evidence consisted is.
the circumstances that the checks were drawn upon the regular correspondent of the
bank, were drawn frequently, were for large amounts, and the transactions extended
over a considerable period of time. Thesecircu instances indicated the improbability
that the cashier was acting clandestinely or criminally, and suggested that he was
acting with the acquiescence of the directors or that the directors were grossly inattentive to their duties. If the circumstances were sufficiently notorious and peremptory to preclude any other theory than that the directors were aware of what
was being done, and were not such as to imply that the directors were willfully ignoring their duties, and acting collusively with Warner, they would afford sufficient
evidence of Warner's authority to use the funds of the bank as he did, and would have
justified the defendants in relying upon the ostensible authority evinced by the acquiescence and recognition of the directors. As was said by the court in Martin v.
Webb (110 U. S., 14., 3 Sup. Ct. Rep., 428):
u
I t is clear that a banking corporation maybe represented by its cashier—at least
where its charter does not otherwise provide—in transactions outside of his ordinary
duties without his authority to do so being in writing, or appearing upon the record
of the proceedings of the directors. His authority may be by parol and collected
from circumstances. It may be inferred from the general manner in which, for a
period sufficiently long to establish a settled course of business, he has been allowed
without interference to conduct the affairs of the bank. It may be implied from the
conduct or acquiescence of the corporation, as represented by the board of directors.
When, during a series of years, or in numerous business transactions, he has been
permitted, without objection, and in his official capacity, to pursue a particular course
of conduct, it may be presumed, as between the bank and those who in good faith
deal with it upon the basis of his authority to represent the corporation, that he has
acted in conformity with instructions received from those who have the right to control its operations. Directors can not, in justice to those who deal with the bank,
shut their eyes to what is going on around them. It is their duty to use ordinary
diligence in ascertaining the condition of its business, and to exercise reasonable
control and supervision of its officers. * * * That which they ought by proper
diligence to have known as to the general course of business in the bank, they may
be presumed to have known in any contest between the corporation and those who
are justified by circumstances in dealing with its officers upon the basis of that course
of business."
The defendants could rightfully assume that the directors of the Albion bank did
use reasonable diligence in acquainting themselves with the state of its account with
its principal agent, the New York bank, and did exercise proper control and supervision generally in the management of its affairs; and the fact that Warner was
nevertheless able to use the funds of the bank in such large amounts, for so long a
period of time, and through the medium of the regular correspondent of the bank,
was inexplicable, except upon the theory of the acquiescence of the directors, or of
their guilty complicity with him, or of the existence of an extraordinary laxity on
their part in the conduct of the affairs of the bank. The defendants, however, chose
to rely upon appearances, instead of seeking authentic information. They were not
certain, and could not be from the nature of the case, whether, notwithstanding appearances, the directors were not being deceived by Warner, and were not in fact ignorant that he had ever made any of the checks in question. It was incumbent upon the
defendants to show that the directors knew and acquiesced in what was being done
by Warner, before they could rely upon his official signature. The evidence raised a




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

93

presumption of sucli knowledge and acquiescence on the part of the directors, but did
not show it conclusively ; it presented a question of fact for the consideration of the
jury; and the jury found, as the evidence fully warranted them in doing, that the
directors were ignorant of Warner's acts.
As is stated in Wharton on Agency (sec. 139): "The pretension by an agent to extraordinary or peculiar powers is by itself sufficient to arouse suspicion." When
the transaction is such as should arouse suspicion of the agent's authority to represent his principal, it is the duty of those who deal with him in a representative character to apply to his principal for information. The defendants did not choose to take
the safer course; they x^referred to rely upon the evidence of Warner's authority
evinced by the facts and circumstances which tended to show that the directors must
have known of and consented to his use of the funds of the bank. The jury found
not only that the directors did not know this, but also found that the defendants did
not believe, when they took the checks, that Warner was authorized to make them
by his co managers of the bank. The doctrine that a purchaser of negotiable paper
acquires a good title if he acquires it for value, and honestly, notwithstanding he may
have been grossly negligent in failing to make proper inquiries, has no application to
a case like the present. A purchaser of commercial paper, made by an agent, can not
acquire any title to it as against the principal, unless he is able to show that it is the
paper of the principal, made by the agent, by due authorization. When ho has information that the agent who has made the paper has made it in the name of the
principal, for his own use, he must be prepared to show that special authority in that
behalf has been delegated by the principal, and can not rely upon the implied authority of the agent to make such paper in the ordinary business of the principal. In
accordance with these views, the defendants were not entitled to the instruction that
they were only liable if the jury found they took the checks with guilty knowledge
that Warner had no authority to use them; and it would have been proper to instruct
the jury that the plaintiff was entitled to a verdict if they found that Warner had no
authority, actual or ostensible, to use them.
It is insisted for the defendants that, inasmuch as the checks were paid by the New
York bank out of funds in part contributed by Warner himself, the Albion bank was
not a loser of the face amount of the checks and the plaintiff ought not to recover beyond the extent that 'the checks were paid out of the moneys of the Albion bank.
The evidence did not indicate that the New York bank had any notice that the checks
were not put out by Warner in the course of the ordinary business of the bank; consequently, when they were presented to and collected of the New York bank, the latter became a bona fide holder for value, and the Albion bank became liable to it for
the face amount of the checks. Several of the adjudications which decide that the
maker of commercial paper can maintain an action for conversion against the person
who, with notice that it has been put fraudulently into circulation, negotiates it to a
hona fide holder for value, also decide that he can recover the amount of the paper
without averring or proving that he has paid it to the holder, and that it is enough,
prima facie that he has become liable to pay it, to entitle him to recover the face
amount (Decker v. Mathews, 12 N,. Y., 313; Evans v. Kymer. 1 Barn. & Adol. 528;
Payne v. Pritchard, 2Car. & P., 558). It has been held that the defendant may prove
the insolvency of the maker, and thereby lessen the damages; but, in the absence of
evidence of any want of ability of the maker to pay, the presumption is that he is
able to pay the paper, and will be obliged to do so (Potter v. Merchants' Bank, 28
N. Y., 641). It is enough for him to show that he has incurred a liability to pay the
amount by the wrongful act of the defendant; but, if the facts are such that this liability will not result in actual loss, he will only be entitled to recover nominal damages. The law presumes that loss will follow liability; consequently, it is for the
defendant to overcome the presumption by evidence which will take the case out of
the ordinary category.
A check is not only a bill of exchange upon which an action can be maintained
against the drawer by the drawee who has paid it, but is a bill which is presumed to
be drawn on actual funds, and appropriates the funds to the drawee upon payment.
Undoubtedly, in an action for the wrongful conversion of such paper, if the defendant proves that payment of the check was refused by the drawee, that it has never
reached the hands of a bona fide holder, and that he is ready to surrender it to the
maker upon the trial, these facts would go in mitigation of damages, and the recovery of the plaintiff would be limited to his actual loss. If, in the present case, the
action was merely for the conversion of the checks, the plaintiff would be entitled
to recover their face upon proof that they were paid by the New York bank, without
more; but the action is for the money of the Albion bank, obtained upon its checks
" paid by the New York bank out of and from the moneys and accounts of the Albion
bank." If the evidence established that the checks were not paid by the New York
bank out of the moneys or funds of the Albion bank, but were paid out of moneys
provided for that purpose by Warner the jury should have been instructed that their




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REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

verdict could be only for nominal damages. But the payment of the checks by the
New York bank was none the Jess a payment by the Albion bank, or a payment out
of its funds, because the latter was put in funds without the knowledge of its officers, and its correspondent paid the checks without their knowledge. If Warner
had made deposits in his own name with the New York bank, and that bank, pursuant to his instructions, had charged the checks, when it paid them, against his account, the defendants might well insist that the checks were not paid by the Albion
bank, or out of its funds. Under such circumstances, the plaintiff would certainly
be required to prove that the deposits made by Warner were funds of the Albion
bank. But when Warner caused deposits to be made with the New York bank in
the name of the Albion bank, the title to the fund created by the deposits vested
in the latter as against Warner. When the New York bank credited the Albion
bank with these deposits it assumed the relation of a debtor, not to Warner, but to
the Albion bank for the amount; and when it paid checks drawn against the
fund and charged them to the Albion bank, it paid them out of the funds of the
Albion bank as between itself and the Albion bank and as between the latter and
Warner. It may be that third persons, whose moneys were misappropriated by Warner and deposited with the New York bank to the credit of the Albion bank, can
reclaim the amount of the Albion bank; but Warner himself could not, because he
relinquished his title by his own act. Whether the deposits made by him are to be regarded as the property of the Albion bank because made by a fiduciary who has willfully commingled his own funds with the trust funds in such a manner that the line
of distinction between them can not be traced, or as voluntary payments which he
can not reclaim because they were voluntary, need not be considered. He doubtless
made them to conceal his use of the funds of the bank, knowing that he could not
overdraw the account of his bank with the New York bank without risk of detection.
The defendants have no interest in the question whether the Albion bank paid the
checks out of the moneys for which it is accountable to third persons, or even out of
the money for which it may be accountable to Warner. It suffices that the checks
were paid out of funds to which it had the legal title. Nor is it material that the
defendants paid to Warner various sums of money which were'ultimately received
by the Bank of Albion. It was open to the defendants to show upon the trial that
the Albion bank did not eventually sustain any loss by Warner's misappropriations
of its checks or moneys, and thus reduce the plaintiff's recovery to nominal damages.
This they did not attempt otherwise than by showing that Warner deposited various
sums of money to the credit of the Albion fyank, which were uot charged by that bank
to the New York bank. The presumption is as cogent that these deposits secretly made
by Warner represented the moneys which he knew belonged to the Albion bank as that
they were his own money. The case for the plaintiff was complete when it appeared
that the checks which were wrongfully received and collected by the defendants had
been paid by the New York bank out of funds standing to the credit of the Albion
bank. He was then entitled to recover the full amount. It was unnecessary for him
to assume the affirmative, and show that the deposits made by Warner in the New
York bank were not the funds of Warner, but consisted of misapplied funds of the
bank, or the proceeds of securities belonging to it, or for which it was responsible
to others; but it was for the defendants to prove that, notwithstanding their
wrongful participation with Warner in misappropriating the funds of the bank,
the bank did not suffer loss. If they had shown that all his misappropriations had
been made good by the return of what he had misapplied, it is not entirely clear
that they would have been liable only for nominal damages. CHanmer v. Wilsey,17Wend.,9J ; Otis v. Jones, 21 Wend., 394 ; The People v. Bank of North America,
75 N.Y., 547.) These cases hold that the defendant in an action for conversion of
property can only claim a mitigation of damages because of a return of the property, where the owner has accepted its return, or has resumed dominion over it as
owner; and that it is not enough that the property, without his consent, has been
applied to the satisfaction of his debts. It is not necessary to consider whether this
doctrine should be applied to a case for the conversion of money which has been returned to the owner, and used by him without knowledge of the conversion or restitution. Here all the money returned by Warner was insufficient to replace his defalcations by an amount much larger than the sum sought to be recovered of the defendants, and the bank had no knowledge that he had returned anything to replace what
he had misapplied until he had again misappropriated it. It is not unjust or unreasonable to compel the defendants to restore such of the funds of the bank as they received when they are unable to prove that the bank was not directly or ultimately a
loser in consequence of their acts. It may be that Warner would have misappropriated the money of the bank in other ways, if they had refused to receive the checks,
but certainly one temptation would not have been in his path if he had found that
he could not use the paper of the bank for his speculations with the same facility as
though it were his own money.




KEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

95

Several points discussed upon the motion for a new trial, among them the point
that the jury should have been instructed not to include interest in their verdict accruing before the commencement of the suit, do not seem to merit consideration.
The views expressed cover all the controlling questions in the case, and lead to a
denial of the motion.

(3) An opinion rendered by the Supreme Court of the United States
November 12, 1888, with respect to the liability of a married woman
holding stock of an insolvent national bank to an assessment upon such
stock levied by the Comptroller of the Currency where the assets of the
•bank were not sufficient to pay creditors in fullOn the 4th of February, 1885, Martin L. Bundy, receiver of the Hot Springs National Bank, of Hot Springs, in the State of Arkansas, filed his bill of complaint in
the circuit court of tlie United States for the district of Kentucky against William
M. Cocke and Amanda M. Cocke, his wife, and James Flanagan and Sue Flanagan,
his wife, all of the defendants being alleged in the bill to be citizens of Kentucky.
The bill alleges that, on the 1st of March, 1884, the bank was a corporation created and organized under the national banking statutes, with a capital stock of
$50,000, divided into500 shares of $100 each at their par value; that it had its office
of discount and deposit in the city of Hot Springs, in the State of Arkansas; that it
suspended the business of banking on the 27th of May, 1884 ; that the plaintiff was
duly appointed receiver of the bank on the 2d of June, 1884 ; and that, on the 25th of
July, 1884, the Comptroller of the Currency determined that it Avas necessary to enforce the individual liability of the shareholders in the bank, to the amount of 50 per
centum of the par value of its capital stock, u and did make an order and requisition
on the stockholders and each and every one of them, equally and ratably, as the
shares were held and owned by them respectively at the time said bank suspended
and ceased to do business," and directed the plaintiff "as such receiver" to take the
necessary legal proceedings to enforce such assessment against the shareholders in
said bank, and each and every one of them.
The bill then contains the following allegation:
"And your orator would farther state that, on the 27th day of May, A. D. 1884,
when said bank suspended and ceased to do business, Amanda M. Cocke, wife of
William M. Cocke (both of whom are made defendants hereto), was the owner of
one hundred shares of the capital stock thereof, of the par value of ten thousand
dollars, and the same still stands in her name on the books of the said association,
on which the equal and ratable assessment and requisition made by the Comptroller
as aforesaid is live thousand dollars, with interest thereon from the said 25th day of
July, 1884; that said defendant Amanda is possessed of property in her own right
amply sufficient to pay said assessment, but utterly refuses to do so."
Then follows a like allegation as to Mrs. Flanagan, as the owner of twelve shares
of the stock.
The prayer of the bill is, that an account be taken of the shares of stock held by
each of the married Avornen defendants, respectively, at the date of such suspension
and the assessment and requisition made by the Comptroller of the Currency thereon,
and that a decree be made for the payment thereof out of the separate property held
by the married women defendants in their own right, as each may be found indebted,
with interest.
Mr. and Mrs. Cocke filed a demurrer to the bill for want of equity and also for
mullifariousness. The plaintiff then amended the bill by striking out the names of
Flanagan and his wife as defendants; and in July, 1885, he fileda bill of revivor, based
on the fact of the death of Mrs. Cocke in March, 1885.
The bill of revivor alleges that, when Mrs. Cocke died, she was a citizen of Kentucky, and was domiciled and resident therein; that she left a will whereby her husband was appointed her sole executor and her sole residuary legatee and divisee; that
the will had been duly proved and recorded in the proper court in Kentucky; and
that Mr. Cocke had accepted the terms of the will and taken upon himself the office
Q{ such executor. The bill prays for the revival of the suit against Mr. Cocke as
devisee and legatee of his wife and as sole executor of her will, and for relief against
him out of all assets received or held by him as devisee or legatee of his wife, or as
executor of her will.
Mr. Cocke appeared and filed a demurrer to the bill of revivor, for want of equity.
The cause was heard on the demurrer to the bill and the demurrer to the bill of revivor.
The court sustained both of the demurrers, giving to the plaintiff time to amend his
bill, and, he declining to do so, a decree was entered dismissing it. From that decree
the plaintiff has appealed.
From the opinion of the court, accompanying the record, the ground of the dismissal appears to have been, that the bill was defective in not alleging that, at the time
Mrs. Cocke became a stockholder, she had the capacity to become a stockholder.




96

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

But we think the bill is not open to this objection. It alleges that, at the time the
bank suspended, Mrs. Cocke "was the owner" of the 100 shares. This is an allegation that she was then the lawful owner of those shares, and had lawfully become
such owner, with the capacity to become such owner at the time she became such
owner. It is consistent with this allegation, that she may have owned the shares before she married Mr. Cocke, or that, when she became such owner, if she was then the
wife of Mr. Cocke. she had the right to become such owner by virtue of the laws of
the State of Arkansas, where the bank was located, in connection with the provisions
of the statutes of the United States in regard to national banks.
Section 4194 of the Digest of the Statutes of Arkansas, published in 1874 (chap. 93,
p. 756), provides as follows:
"Sec. 4194. A married woman may bargain,, sell, assign, and transfer her separate*
personal property, and carry on any trade or business, and perform any labor or services on her sole and separate account; and the earnings of any married woman from
her trade, business, labor, or services shall be her sole and separate property, and may
be used or invested by her in her own name; and she may alone sue or be sued in
the courts of this State on account of the said property, business, or services."
Under this provision, if it was in force at the time of the transaction, it would seem
that Mrs. Cocke, when a married woman, might lawfully have either subscribed for
or taken an assignment of the shares, they being shares of a national bank in Arkansas, and the transaction being, therefore, governed by the statutes of Arkansas, unless,
under special circumstances, a different rule ought to govern. (Milliken v. Pratt,
125 Mass., 374.)
As the bill alleges that Mrs, Cocke is possessed of property in her own right amply
sufficient to pay the assessment, and as the prayer of the bill is for a decree for the
payment of the amount of the assessment out of the separate property held by her in
her own right, and as the bill of revivor prays for relief against Mr. Cocke out of the
assets received by him as the legatee or devisee of his wife, or as executor of her will,
the case is clearly one of equitable cognizance, because it does not appear that she
could be sued at law, to reach her separate property. (3 Pomeroy's JSq. Juris.,
§ 1099.)
The original bill and bill of revivor are sufficient on their faces to call upon Mr.
Cocke to answer them, and, when all the facts bearing upon the case are fully developed the rights of the parties can be properly adjudicated. For that reason we
refrain from considering any of the other questions discussed at the bar.
The decree of the circuit court is reversed, and the case is remanded to that court,
with a direction to overrule the demurrer to the original bill and the demurrer to the
bill of revivor, and to take such further proceedings as may be proper and not inconsistent with this opinion.
CONCLUSION.

^n presenting this report I gladly take occasion to bear testimony to
the excellent spirit prevailing among the officers and directors of national banks all over the country, and to the intelligence and conscientiousness which they habitually display in the conduct of business.
Although the requirements of the national-bank laws are often rendered onerous by local conditions, and many of its restraints are not
only irksome but sometimes in particular cases seem to be unreasonable, there exists everywhere as a rule a spirit of sincere and ready acquiescence. In the comparatively few cases where this spirit is wanting
the power of the Comptroller to enforce compliance with law has been
found to be ample, and its exercise has but in one case had to transcend
the limits of a courteous but firm admonition. In that case the bank
was closed and placed in the hands of a receiver, the president and
cashier were arrested and indicted, and the property of the directors
was attached.
For several years past, under the influence of the act of July 12,1882,
the national-bank system has been growing vigorously, and its benefits have been thus brought within reach of a constantly increasing
•number of people, and have been extended into communities where
they were not previously enjoyed.
At present this healthy and desirable growth is checked and is in
danger of being arrested by the scarcity and dearness ofbonds. In




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

97

the proper place in this report I have called especial attention to the
value and capabilities of the bank-note feature of the system and have
ventured to submit a plan for its preservation and extension into full
utility. The subject is one of national importance, and yet it is also of
definite pecuniary interest to each and every industrial worker in the
country, however obscure his employment may seem or however secluded
his location.
The functions performed by banks are essential to the free and full
j)lay of industrial activities, whether these are agricultural, mechanical, or professional. The products of all industries must be marketed
in order that the workers may enjoy the fruits of their toil or the rewards of their skill, and without banks the marketing of the vast masses
of the products of •American industry would be simply impossible.
The banks as a body establish and maintain, ready for use at all
times and to any extent required, a line of communication between the
world's consumers and the remotest farmer on the Western plains or
among the Southern forests. Break this line of communication and the
abundance of the farm becomes a rotting incubus. Interrupt it, burden
it with tolls or taxes, and the farmer loses in the price of his products
or pays in the cost of what he buys more than the toll-gatherer or the
tax collector receives.
A great prejudice has been excited in agricultural sections against
the national banks, because they are forbidden to lend money on realestate securities. Never was there any prejudice more unreasonable
and more harmful to those who entertain it than this prejudice.
In the first place, if national banks absorbed all the capital of the
country or directed its employment and investment, not only their interests, but even their very existence would necessitate the setting aside
of a large part of that capital for investment exclusively in real estate
or in real-estate securities, because such investments are essential to
the progress of every community.
But the national banks do not by any means occupy that position.
Private capitalists, corporations, such as savings banks, insurance companies, loan and trust companies, farm and mortgage investment companies, abound; they possess and control more capital than the national
banks, and for all these there can be no investment safer, more attractive, and more appropriate than real estate or its representative instruments.
The national banks, on the other hand, constitute a body of backers
exclusively devoted to the collection, the safe-keeping, and the employment in temporary loans of the floating capital of the country. If in
any community the national-bank capital and deposits exceed what can
be safely and profitably employed there in that way, the floating capital
of that community is excessive and a part of it may with advantage be
converted into fixed forms, but it should first be withdrawn from the
national banks. These institutions are too expensive to be used as mere
agencies for keeping bonds and stocks, and collecting interest quarterly
or half yearly. Such misuse of a national bank is bad econoaiyj it is
as if a farmer should buy wagons and carriages for storing his crop instead of building a barn.
Again, to entertain a prejudice against national banks and to oppose
the improvement and healthy extension of the system is unwise because
we must have banks, and these are the best that have ever existed in
this country or in any other. It is especially unwise on the part of
farmers to entertain such prejudice because they are more dependent
upon other people's floating capital than any other industrial class.
11028—CUR 88
7




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REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

Miners, manufacturers, transportation companies, and other large employers keep a part of their capital in money, and depend upon the
banks for only a moderate proportion of the cash funds needed to liquidate their transactions, but farmers can not afford to keep any amount
of money idle while their crops are growing or their cattle are taking
on flesh or their sheep and hogs are multiplying. It is more profitable
for them to use all their own money in enlarging the scale of their
operations; and, therefore, when their crops come to be harvested or
their stock h ready to be driven to market, it is of supreme importance
to them to be able to get the ready money for the purpose, either
directly ov through the medium of dealers in their products. Whether
obtained directly or through merchants or drovers, the money essential
to the marketing of the farm produce is supplied? by the banks, and
could not be supplied by them at that moment of supreme need if it had
previously been lent to the farmers upon the security of their lands.
The banks that serve the farmers best are those that move their crops
with least delay. A bank in an agricultural section that gets its funds
ied vp in long loans to farmers mistakes its office and vocation, and is
15 great an obstruction to local prosperity as a railroad would be that
jhOitOd hire all its freight cars out during the dull season for an employneat that keeps them out of its reach and control beyond the season
during which the community depends upon it to take away the prodice of its year's labor, and to bring back the commodities essential to
l* winter's comfort and maintenance.
Very respectfully,
W. L. TRENHOLM.

Comptroller of the Currency.
Hon. JOHN G. CARLISLE,

Speaker of the House of Representatives.







APPENDIX.

A DIGEST OF NATIONAL-BANK CASES.
CONTENTS*
I. Constitutional law.
(1) Powers of Congress; (2) Powers of the States. t
II. Powers and liabilities of national banking associations.
(1) Implied powers; (2) As to collateral securities; (3) Special deposits; (4)
Government securities; (5) Certified check; (6) Purchasing check; (7)
Stocks;, (8) Deposits to secure performance of contracts ; (9) Loans in excess of one-tenth capital; (10) Real estate; (11) Certificates of deposits;
(12) Lien on dividends; (13) Contracts and obligations of old corporation;
(14) Place of business; (15) Circulating notes; (10) Business of liquidating association.
III. Ultra vires.
(1) Dealing in stocks; (2) Purchasing negotiable paper; (3) Lending credit;
(4) Mortgages on real estate; (5) When association cannot set up want oi
power.
IV. Stock.
(1) Purchasing its own stock; (2) Liens on stock; (3) May be attached; (4)
Capital set free belongs to shareholders; (5) Contracts to give shares for
business; (6) Transfer of stock; (7) Subscriptions to increase of capital
stock; (8) Specific performance of contract to sell.
V. Shareholders.
(1) Estopped to deny incorporations ; (2) Individual liability.
VI. Officers.
(1) Tenure of office ; (2) Bonds of officers ; (3) Directors must act as a board;
(4) Borrowing of association; (5) Liability for violations of law; (6)
Directors of converted banks; (7) Retirement of directors.
VII. Interest.
(1) What interest associations may take ; (2) On claims against insolvent and
liquidating associations; (3) Usury.
VIII. Insolvent associations.
(1) Not subject to bankrupt act; (2) What constitutes insolvency; (3) Assets
a trust fund; (4) United States has no priority; (5) Claims for torts; (6)
Preferences; (7) Basis for estimation of dividends; (8) Set-off; (9) Claim
for breach of contract of lease.
IX. Receivers.
(1) Officer of the United States ; (2) Whom he represents ; (3) How far subject
to Comptroller's orders; (4) Power of courts to appoint; (5) Debtors of
association can not question legality of appointments; (6) Receiver's decision not final; (7) Sale by ; (8; Contracts of; (9) Expenses of receivership
for association which has gone into liquidation.
X. Taxation.
(1) What may be taxed ; (2) Rate; (3) Valuation ; (4) Exemptions; (5) Collection of tax from association; (6) License tax; (7) Powers of taxing officers ; (8) Enforcement of taxes; (9) Location of association for taxing
purposes.
*Cases which tnrned upon a peculiar state of facts, ana many which but reiterate settled principles, have been omitted; also, a few which are reported so badly or so meagerly that the precis*
points decided do not clearly appear.




in

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REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

XI. Jurisdiction.
(1) Jurisdiction of Federal conrts prior to the act of July 12,1882 ; (2) Jurisdiction of Federal courts subsequent to act of July*12, 1882; (3) Jurisdiction of State courts; (4) United States can not be subjected to jurisdiction
of court; (5) Citizenship.
XII. Suits.
(1) By and against associations; (2) By shareholders; (3) By receivers; (4) By
creditors of insolvent association; (5) For.usury; (6) To enforce liability
of shareholders; (7) Execution; (8) Attachments; (9) Abatement; (10)
Estoppel; (11) Suits against liquidating associations; (12) Transitory and
local suits; (13) Survival of suits.
XIII. Evidence.
(1) Certificates of Comptroller; (2) Evidence of insolvency; (3) Necessity for
assessment by Comptroller.
XIV. Crimes.
(1) Under United States laws; (2) Under State laws; (3) Term " United States
currency " in penal statutes.




liEPOUT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

103

I. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW.
1. POWERS OF COXGRESS:

(a) Congress has the constitutional power to incorporate banks. (McCulloch v
Maryland, 4 Wheat., 316; Osbornv. Bank of the United States, 9 Wheat., 738.)
(&) Congress has power to clothe national banking associations, as to their
contracts and dealings with the world, with any special immunities and
privileges exempting them, in their trade and intercourse with others, from
the laws and remedies applicable in like cases to other citizens. (The Chesapeake Bank v. The First National Bank of Baltimore, 40 Md., 269.)
(c) Thus, the provision of the banking law that no attachment, injunction, or
execution shall issue against a national banking association before final
judgment in any suit, action, or proceeding in a State court is constitutional*
(Ibid.)
(d) The tax imposed on State or national banks paying out the notes of individuals or State banks used for circulation is constitutional. ( Veazie Bank
v. Fenno, 8 Wall., 533.)
(e) So is the tax imposed on them for 7paying out the circulating notes of municipal corporations. (Merchants National Bank of Little Bock v. United
States, 101 U. S., 1.)
( / ) Such a tax is not a direct tax within the meaning of the clause of the Constitution, which declares that " direct taxes shall be apportioned among
the several States, according to their respective numbers.;; ( Veazie Bank v.
Fenno, and Merchants7 National Bank of Little Rock v. United States, supra.)
(g) Congress having, in the exercise of undisputed constitutional powers, undertaken to provide a currency for the whole country, may secure the benefit
of it to the people by appropriate legislation. (Veazie Bank v. Fenno, supra.)
(h) Congress has the power to divest the United States courts of their jurisdiction of suits by or against national banking associations. (Rational Bank
of Jefferson v. Fare et al, U. S. C. C. (E. D. Texas), 25 Fed. Rep., 209.)
2. POWERS OF THE STATES:

(a) National banking associations, being instruments designed to aid the Gov
eminent in the administration of a branch of the public service, cannot be
controlled by the States, except in so far as Congress may see proper to permit. (Farmers and Mechanics' Bank v. Bearing, 9L U. S., 29.)
(b) No authority from the State is necessary to enable a State bank to convert
itself into a national banking association. (Casey v. Galli, 94 U. S., 673.)
(c) National banking associations located outside of a State are subject to its
restraining acts prohibiting all corporations, not authorized by the law of
the State, from keeping therein offices for the purpose of discount and deposit. (National Bank of Fairhartn v. The Fhcenix Warehousing Company, 6Hun, 71. )
(d) It is competent for a State by penal enactments to protect its citizens in
their dealings with national banking associations located within the State*
(State v. Fuller, 34 Conn., 280; see also Taxation and Jurisdiction.)
II. POWERS AND LIABILITIES.
1. IMPLIED POWERS:

To the enumerated powers of national banking associations are to be superadded
all the powers incidental to the business of banking. (Pattison v. Syracuse
National Bank, 80 N. Y., 82.)
2. AS TO COLLATERAL SECURITIES:

(a) A national banking association may take stock of a corporation as collateral security for a loan. (Shoemaker v. The National Mechanics7 Bank, 2 Abb.
U. S., 416; Canfield v. The State National Bank of Minneapolis, U. S. C. C.
(Dist. Minn.), 1 Northwestern Reporter, 173.)
(b) And it may take for such purpose the stock of another national banking association. (National Bank v. Case, 99 U. S., 628.)
NOTE.—But this point was not necessary to the decision of the case.




104

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

2. As TO COLLATERAL SECURITIES—Continued.

(c) A national banking association may take a pledge of personal chattels as
security for a loan. (Pittsburgh Locomotive and Car Works v. State National
Bank of Keokuk, U.S. C. C. (Eighth Circuit, 1875), 2 Cent. L. J.,692.)
(d) A national banking association may take as security lor a loan the indorsement of a married woman, charging her separate estate. Such security is
to be treated as personal security, within the meaning of the banking law,
and not as a mortgage. (Third National Bank v. Blake, 73 JV. ¥., 260.)
(e) A national banking association may take as collateral security for a loan
a warehouse receipt for merchandise. (Cleveland, Brown Sf Co. v. Shoeman,
40 Ohio St., 176.)
(/) A national banking association may take as security for a loan the stock of
a corporation whose entire capital is vested in real estate. Such a loan
does not amount to a lending upon, mortgage. (Baldwin v. Canfieldf 26
Minn., 43.)
(g) An agreement by a national banking association to the effect that, in case
a note discounted by it shall not be paid, a mortgage given by the maker
to his indorser shall inure to the benefit of the association, is not inhibited
by the national banking law. (First National Bank v. Haire, 36 Iowa, 443;
see also National Bank v. Matthews, 98 U. S., 621.)
(h) A national banking association having taken a mortgage on real estate to
secure a debt previously contracted may, in order to protect itself, pay off
a prior lien on the said real estate ; and the lien which it thus acquires it
may enforce. (Ornn v. Merchants' National Bank, 16 Kans., 341; Holmes v.
Boyd, 90 Ind., 332.)
(i) Where a national banking association has taken collaterals to secure a loan,
and, after the loan has been repaid, holds them to secure future advances,
it is not a gratuitous bailee ; and it is responsible for the loss of such collaterals occasioned by its lack of ordinary care and diligence, though at
the time the bailor was not indebted to it. (Third National Bank of Baltimore v. Boyd, 44 Md.f 47.)
3. SPECIAL DEPOSITS :

(a) A national banking association may receive special deposits. The provision in section 5228, Revised Statutes, authorizing an association u to deliver
special deposits " implies that it may receive them as a part of its legitimate
business; and this implication is as effectual as an express declaration to
the same effect would have been. (National Bank v. Graham, 100 U. £.,699.)
(&) National banking associations have power to receive special deposits either
gratuitously or otherwise. (Pattison v. Syracuse National Bank, 80 N. Y.,82.)
(c) But the executive officers of an association cannot bind it as a gratuitcm
bailee, unless they have a special authority from the board of directors so
to do, or there exists a general custom or usage to that effect. (First National Bank of Lyons v. Ocean National Bank, (J0 N. ¥., 278.)
4. GOVERNMENT SECURITIES :

(a) National banking associations can engage in the business of dealing in and
exchanging Government securities. ( Fan Leuven v. First National Bank, 54
N. F.,671; Yerkes v. National Bank of Port Jems, 69 N. T.,383; Leach v.
Hale, 31 Iowa, 69.)
(b) And where an association receives United States bonds of one class for the
purpose of having them converted into bonds of another class, it is not a
mere mandatary, but is responsible for the failure to deliver the bonds on
demand. (Leach v. Hale, supra.)
5. CERTIFIED CHECK :

A national banking association may "certify " a check. A "certified" check
is not within the meaning of section 5183, Revised Statutes, which prohibits the issuing of post-notes or any notes to circulate as money other than
such as are authorized by the national banking law. (Merchants1 National
Bank v. State National Bank, 10 Wall., 604.)
6. PURCHASING CHECK :

A national bank may buy a check drawn upon another bank ; and whether the
check is payable to order or to bearer is immaterial. (First National Bank
of Rochester v. Harris, 108 Mass., 514.)
7. STOCKS :

(a) A national banking association, in the compromise of a claim growing out
of its legitimate business, may take railroad stock. (First National Bank
of Charlotte v. National Exchange Bank of Baltimore, 92 U. S., 122.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

105

7. STOCKS—Continued.
(&) And when necessary to do so, it may pay the difference between the value
of the stock and the amount of the claim. {Ibid.)
(c) A national banking association may take and hold the coupons of municipal bonds, and may maintain actions thereon. (First National Bank of North
Bennington v. Town of Bennington, U. 8. C. C. (Dist. Ft.), Browne's N. B.
Cas., 437; see also Lyons v. Lyons National Bank, 19 BJatch., 279.)
8. DEPOSITS TO SECURE PERFORMANCE OF CONTRACT:

A national banking association may receive a deposit to be held by it as security for the faithful performance of a contract between the depositor and
another. (Bushnell v. The Chautauqua Count}/ National Bank, 10 Hun, 378.)
NOTE.—But the court put the decision upon the further ground that even were
the contract ultra vires, the association, having received the deposit, was
estopped from setting up its want of power.
9. LOANS IN EXCESS OF ONE-TENTH CAPITAL:

(a) Sec. 5200, Revised Statutes, which provides that the total liabilities to
any association of any person, etc., shall not exceed one-tenth part of the
capital stock paid in, was intended only for the guidance of the association, and, though its franchises may be liable to forfeiture for violation of
the law, the association may recover of the borrower the full amount of
the loan. {GoldMining Company v. Rocky Mountain National Bank, 96 U. S.y
640 ; O'Harev. Second National Bank of Titusville, 77 Venn. St., 96; Shoemaker
v. The National Mechanics' Bank, 2 Abb. U. 8., 416; Stewart v. National Union
Bank of Maryland, 2 Abb. U. S., 424.)
(ft) A note is not illegal because at the time it was discounted by the association the maker was indebted to the association in a sum equal to more than
one-teuth part of its capital. (O'Hare v. Second National Bank of Titusville,
supra.)
(c) And a court of equity will not enjoin an association, at the instance of the
borrower, from transferring to innocent third persons notes and securities,
on the ground that the notes represent part of a loan made in excess of 10
per cent, of the capital of the association. {Elder v. First National Bank of
Ottawa, VI Eans., 238.) #
(d) Where a State bank makes a loan to one person of an amount in excess of
one-tenth part of its capital, and is afterward converted into a national
bank, it may, after conversion, extend the time for payment of such loan
without violating section 5200, Revised Statutes. (Allen v. The First National Bank of Xenia, 23 Ohio St., 97.)
10. REAL ESTATE :

(a) Where a national banking association acquires real estate which it is not
authorized to take, the conveyance to it is not void, but only voidable.
And the title of the association to such real estate is good until assailed
in a direct proceeding by the Government. (Reynolds v. Crawfordsville Bank,
112 U. S., 405; see also National Bank v. Matthews, 98 U. S., 621; National
Bank v. Whitney, 103 U. S., 99; Swope v. Leffingwell, 105 U. S., 3 ; Fortier v.
New Orleans Bank, 112 U. S., 439.)
(6) The amount of real estate which a national banking association may purchase to secure a pre-existing debt is not limited to the exact amount of
the debt, but as much may be purchased as is necessary to secure the debt
due, so long as the security of such debt is the real object of the purchase.
( Upton v. National Bank of South Reading, 120 Mass., 153.)
(o) Where the purpose is to secure a debt previously contracted, a national
banking association may take a conveyance of real estate worth more than
the debt, and pay the difference between the debt and the value of the
property. (Libby v. Union National Bamk, 99 III, 622.)
(d) Where a national banking association sells real estate it may take a mortgage thereon to secure the payment of the purchase-money. (New Orleant
National Bank v. Raymond, 29 La. Ann., 355.)
11. CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT :

National banking associations may issue certificates of deposit. Such certificates are not post-notes within the prohibition of section 5183, Revised
Statutes. (Hunt v. Appellant, Supreme Court of Mass., May 7, 1886 ; Riddle
v. First National Bank, U. S. C. C. ( W. D. Perm.), 27 Fed. Rep., 603.)
12. LIEN ON DIVIDENDS :

*

• An association has an eqniftible lion upon dividends declared for any just debt
due to it from the shareholders. (Haqer v. Union National Bank. 63 Me.,
509.)




106

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

13. CONTRACTS AND OBLIGATIONS OP OLD CORPORATION :

(a) Where a State bank has been converted into a national banking association i^Bjay enforce all contracts made with it while a State corporation.
(City National Bank v. Phelps, 97 N. Y., 44.)
(b) And it is liable, after the conversion, for all the obligations of the old institution. (Coffee v. The National Bank of Missouri, 46 Mo., 140; Kelsey v. The
National Bank of Crawford, 69 Penn. St., 426.)
(c) A national banking association organized as the successor of a State bank
may take and hold the assets of the bank whose place it takes, though there
was not in form a conversion from a State to a national corporation, but
the organization of a new corporation. (Bank v. Mclntire, 40 Ohio St., 528.)
(d) And such association will be liable to the depositors of the former bank.
(Earn v. Exchange Bank, 79 Mo., 182.)
14. PLACE OF BUSINESS :

(a) The provision requiring u the usual business " of the association to be transacted " at an office or banking-house in th© place specified in its organization
certificate" must be construed reasonably; and a part of the legitimate
business of the association which can not be transacted at the banking-house
may be done elsewhere. (Merchants' Bank v. State Bank, 10 Wall., 604.)
(b) Although the general business of a national banking association is to be
transacted at its plaoe of business, yet, if the association is fully advised of
the facts, and does not object, and there is no fraud, Its officers, when acting within the general scope of their authority, may bind it by acts done
at another place. (Burton v. Burley, 9 Biss., 253.)
15. CIRCULATING NOTES :

The circulating notes of a national banking association are valid, though they
do not bear the imprint of the seal of the Treasury. Such imprint was
intended to be simp|y evidence of the contract, and forms uo part of the
contract itself. (United States v. Bennett, 17 Blatch.t 357.)
16. BUSINESS OF LIQUIDATING ASSOCIATION :

After an association goes into liquidation there is no authority on the part of
its officers to transact any business in its name so as to bind its shareholders, except that which is implied m tiie duty of liquidation, unless
such authority has been expressly conferred by the shareholders. (Richmond v. Irons, 121 U. S., 27.)
III. ULTRA VIRES.
1. DEALING IN STOCKS:

(a) A national banking association is not authorized to act as a broker or agent
in the purchase of bonds and stocks. (First National Bank of AUento-wn v.
Hoch, 89 Penn St., 324 ; Weckler v. The First National Bank of Hagerstownt
42 Md., 581.)
(b) A national banking association can not deal in stocks. The prohibition is
to be implied from the failure to grant the power. (First National Bank v.
National Exchange Bank, 92 U. S., 122.)
NOTE.—But see as to its power to deal in Government securities, Powers, 4.
2. PURCHASING NEGOTIABLE PAPER :

A national banking association can not purchase negotiable paper. (Lazear v.
National Union Bank of Baltimore, 52 Md.,78', First National Bank of Rochester
v. Pieraon, 24 Minn., 140; see also Farmers and Mechanics' Bank v. Baldwin,
28 Minn., 198. But see Smith v. The Exchange Bank of Pittsburgh, 26 Ohio
St., 141.)
3. LENDING CREDIT:

(a) A national banking association can not lend its credit. (Johnston v. Charlottesville National Bank, 3Hughes, 657; Seligman v. Charlottesville National
Bank, 3 Hughes, 647.)
(b) A national banking association can not guaranty the paper of a customer
for his accommodation. (Seligman v. CharlottesvuJe National Bank, supra.)
(c) The accommodation paper of a national banking association is void in the
hands of one who takes it with knowledge of its character. (Johnston v.
Charlottesville National Bank, supra.)
4. MORTGAGES ON REAL ESTATE :

(a) National banking associations are by implication prohibited from taking
mortgages on real estate as security for contemporaneous loans. ' (National




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

107

4. MORTGAGES ON REAL ESTATE—Continued.

Bank v. Mattheivs, 98 U. 8., 621; Fowler v. Scully, 72 Penn. St., 456; Kansas
Valley National Bank v. Rowell, 2 Dill., 371; Commonwealth Bank v. Clark,
4 Mo., 59 ; Crocker v. Whitney, 71 JV. F., 161; Fridley v. Jfoirew, 87 ZZZ., 151.)
(b) But where such security has been taken, no one but the Government can be
heard to complain that the association has exceeded its powers. (National
BankY. Matthews, supra ; National Bank v. Whitney, 103 U. S., 99; Swope v.
Leffingwell, 105 U. S., 3 ; Reynolds v. National Bank, 112 U. S., 405 ; Fortierv,
National Bank, 112, U. S., 439.)
NOTE.—These decisions overrule, on this point, Kansas Valley National Bank
v. Bowell, 2 Dill., 371; Crocker v. Whitney, supra; Foicbr v. Scully, supra;
Mattheivs v. Skinker, 62 Mo., 329 ; TFoocZs v. People's National Bank of Pittsburgh, 83 Penn, St., 57 ; Fridley v. Bowen, supra.
5. WHEN ASSOCIATION CAN NOT SET UP WANT OF POWER :

Where a national banking association has entered into a contract which it was
not authorized to make, a party who has enjoyed the benefit of such contract can not question its validity. (Casey v. La Societe de Credit Mobilierf
2 Woods, 77 ; German National Bank v. Meadowcroft} 95 III., 124.)
IV. STOCK.
1. PURCHASING ITS OWN STOCK :

Where a national banking association purchases shares of its own stock, and
divides them among its directors, to whom the shares are transferred upon
the stock books, the transaction is void, and no title passes. (Meyers v.
Valley National Bank, U. S. D. C. (E. Dist. Mo.), 13 National Bankruptcy
Register, 34.)
2. LIENS ON STOCK :

(a) A national banking association can not acquire a lien on the stock of a
shareholder. And a by-law prohibiting a transfer until all liabilities of
the shareholder to the association are discharged, or a provision to that
effect in the certificates of stock, is void. (Bullard v. National Bank, 18
Wall., 589; BankY. Lanier, 11 Wall., 369; ConkliiiY. The Second National
Bank, VoN. Y., 655.)
(b) A national banking association can not take a pledge of its stock to secure
a deposit made by it with another bank. Such a transaction amounts to
a lending upon the security of its own shares. (Bank v. Lanier, supraT)
(c) Though a bank is prohibited fiom lending money upon the security of its
own shares, yet if the shares have been sold and the proceeds applied to the
payment of the debt, the courts will not aid the shareholder to recover the
value of the shares. He can dispute the validity of the transaction only
while the contract is executory, and the security still subsists in the possession of the bank. (National 1'av'k of Xenia v. Stewart, 107 U. S., 676.)
3. MAY BE ATTACHED :

The stock of a shareholder indebted to it may bo attached by the association
and sold on execution. (Hagar v. Union National Bank, 03 Me., 509.)
4. CAPITAL SET FREE BELONGS TO SHAREHOLDERS :

When a national banking association reduces its capital stock the amount of
capital thus released belongs to the shareholders pro rata, and must be
returned to them ; and it can not be retained by the association for a surplus. (Seeley v. New York National Exchange Bank} 8Daly, 400; s. c, 4 Abb.
N. C, 61; affirmed, 78 N. Y., 608.)
5. CONTRACTS TO GIVE SHARES FOR BUSINESS :

Where an association has made or ratified a contract to give a person a certain
number of the shares of its stock, upon condition that he will continue to
do his business with it, and derives the benefit irom this contract, the other
party may recover of the association the value of the shares. (Rich v, State
National Bank of Lincoln, 7 Nebr., 231.)
6. TRANSFER OF STOCK:

(a) The transfer of shares in national banking associations is not governed by
different rules from those which are ordinarily applied to the transfer of
shares in other corporate bodies. (Johnson v. Lajlin, 103 U. S., 800.)
(6) The entry of the transaction in the books of the association is required, not
for the translation of the title, but for the protection of the parties, and
others dealing with the association, and to enable it to know who are its
stockholders. (Ibid.)




108

KEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

6. TRANSFER OF STOCK—Continued.

(c) A shareholder in a national bank, while it is a going concern, has the absolute right, in the absence of fraud, to make a bonaiide and actual sale and
transfer of his shares, at any time, to any person capable in law of purchasing and holding the same, and of assuming the transferor's liabilities
in respect thereto ; and this right is not, in such cases, subject to the control of the directors or other stockholders. (Johnson v. Laflin, 5 Dill, 65.)
(d) Under the pretense of prescribing the manner thereof, an association can
not clog the transfer with useless restrictions. (Johnson v. Laflin, supra.)
(e) When a shareholder, acting in good faith, delivers his certificates of stock,
with a blank power of attorney for making the transfer, and receives the
purchase-money, the sale is complete and the title passes. (Ibid.)
(/) Where a cashier, who is intrusted by the directors with the duty of transferring the stock of the association, refuses, for insufficient reasons, to
transfer shares, and the association subsequently becomes insolvent, the
owner of the shares may maintain an action against the receiver for the
injury sustained. (Case v. Citizens' Bank, 100 U. S., 446.)
(g) Where a shareholder who has sold his stock has delivered to the bank the
certificates of stock and a power of attorney with the request that the
transfer be made upon the books of the bank, and has had no reason to
suppose that such transfer was not made, he will not, should the bank afterward become insolvent, be held liable as a shareholder, although he
still appears as such on the books of the bank. ( Whitney v. Butler, 118 U,
S., (355.)
(h) But where the president of the bank is himself the purchaser of the stock
then the delivery of the certificates and power of attorney to him with the
request to make"the transfer upon the books of the bank would not be sufficient to discharge the seller from liability as a stockholder. (Eiohmond
v. Irons 121 U. &, 27.)
7. SUBSCRIPTIONS TO INCREASE OF CAPITAL STOCK :

(a) Where one subscribes for shares in the increase of the capital of a national
banking association in a certain amount, such subscription and payment
are upon the implied oomlition that the increase shall bo in theexact
amount so fixed ; and ii' such amount is changed, the subscriber may avoid
the subscription and recover the amount paid in. (Eaton v. Pacific Bank,
144 ifass., 260.)
(b) And the certificate of the Comptroller of the Currency that the amount of the
increase in another sum has been paid in, which, amount includes what was
paid by the dissenting subscriber, will not be conclusive upon such subscriber. (Ibid.)
(c) But if such subscriber has assented to or ratified the change he will be held
a shareholder. (Delano v. Butler, 113 U. i$., 634.)
8. SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE OF CONTRACT TO SELL:

A specific performance of a contract to sell the stock of a national banking association will not be enforced in favor of a purchaser who places his claim
for equitable relief upon tho ground that he desires to obtain control of the
association. Such an object is contrary to public policy. (Foil's Appeal,
81 Penn. St., 434.)

V. SHAREHOLDERS.
1. ESTOPPED TO DENY INCORPORATION:

A shareholder who has held himself out to tho world as such is estopped to deny
that the association was legally incorporated. (Casey v. Galli, 94 U. S., 673 ;
Wheelook v. Eost, 77 III, 296.)
2. INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY:

(a) The question whether there is a deficiency of assets, and when it is necessary to enforce the individual liability of shareholders, is for the Comptroller to determine ; and his decision in this matter is final and conclusive.
(Kennedy v. Gibson, 8 fFaZJ.,498; National Bank v. Case, 99 U. S., 628; Casey
v. Go//*,'94 £7..&,ti73.)

(b) The amount contributed by each shareholder should bear the same proportion to the whole amount of the deficit as his own stock bears to the whole
amount of tho capital stock at its par value. Aud the solvent shareholders
can not be made to contribute more than their proportion to make good the
deficiency caused by the insolvency of other shareholders. ( United States Y,
Enox, 102 U. 8., 422.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

109

2. INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY—Continued.

(c) A shareholder who disposes of his stock will continue to be liable thereon
until the transfer is noted on the books of the association. (Bowdellv.
Farmers and Merchants1 National Bank of Baltimore, U. S. 0. C. (D. Md., 1877),
Browne's N. B. Cas., 147.)
(d) The individual liability of a shareholder adheres to his estate after his death
until his place as a member of the association is taken by some new shareholder. [Davis v. Weed, U. S. D. C. (Dist. Conn.).reported 44 Conn., 569.)
(e) The receiver has a valid claim against the estate generally of a deceased
shareholder who died prior to the insolvency of the bank, but whose stock
has not been transferred. (Eichmond v. Irons, 121 U. S., 27; David v. Weed,
supra.)
(/) And the fact that the title to the stock of a deceased shareholder vests in
his administrator does not relieve the estate from the burden of an assessment. (Davis v. Weed, supra.)
(g) Nor will the fact that the administration is complete, and all the assets
have been distributed, defeat an action brought to recover the assessment.
(Ibid. But see Witters v. Sowles.)
(h) One who appears on the books of the association as the owner of shares of
its stock is individually liable, though he hold the stock merely as collateral
security. (National Bank v. Case, 99 U. S., 623; Moore,Y. Jones, 3 Woods,
53; Bowdell v. Farmers and Merchanis' National Bank of Baltimore, supra;
Halev. Walker, 31 Iowa, 344; Wheelock v. Kost, supra.)
(i) But where a pledgee, for the express purpose of avoiding a personal liability, and before the association becomes insolvent, or is in danger of insolvency, transfers the stock to an irresponsible person, he, the pledgee, will
not be liable to contribute as a shareholder. (Anderson v. Warehouse Company, 111 U. S., 479.)
(j) And where stock has been transferred as collateral security for a loan, with
the understanding that in case of default in the payment of the loan the shares
shall be sold, the transferee, upon default made, and before the bank closes
its doors, may sell the stock for a nominal consideration, though his purpose be to avoid a personal liability; and such a transaction can not be set
aside as a fraud upon the creditors of the association. (Alagruder v. Colston,
44 Md., 349.)
NOTE.—The court put the decision upon the ground that the sale was in pursuance of a stipulation which formed a part of the contract between the
original owner and his transferee. See also Eohjoke Bank v. Burnham, 11
Cash., 187, upon the authority of which the Maryland case was decided.
(k) If the trusteeship of one who holds stock in trust does not appear upon the
books of the association he will be individually liable. (Davis v. Essex
Baptist Society, U. S. D. C. (Dist. Conn.), reported 44 Conn., 582.)
(I) A transfer of shares for the purpose of avoiding liability, though made
"out and out," is void. (National Bank v. Case, supra ; Bow den v. Santos,
1 Hughes, 158.)
(m) And where a shareholder, who has knowledge of the insolvent condition of
the bank, transfers his shares, without consideration, to a person unablw to
respond to the assessment, the transfer may be set aside and the individual
liability of the transferer enforced. (Bowden v. Johnson, 107 U. S., 251.)
(n) The real owner of the stock is liable as a stockholder, though when he purchased the stock he had it transferred upon the books to another. (Davis
v. Stevens, 17 Blatch.,2b9.)
NOTE.—The case of the owner of stock is thus different from that of a
pledgee. (See Anderson v. Warehouse Company, supra.)
(o) Where shareholders have assessed themselves to the amount of the par value
of the stock for the purpose of restoring impaired capita!, the contributions
made in pursuance of such assessment, though all used in paying the debts
of the association, will not so operate as to discharge the shareholders from
their individual liability. (Delano v. Butler, 118 U. 6'.,634.)
(p) The individual liability of the shareholders of an insolvent association may
be enforced for the purpose of paying all of its liabilities, and uot merely
forth© purpose of paying its " debts,?: technically so called. (Stanton v.
Wilkeson, 8 Ben., 357.)
(q) The individual liability of the stockholders must be restricted in its meaning to such contracts, debts, and engagements of the association as have
been duly contracted in the ordinary course of its business. And, therefore, creditors of an association who make settlements after the association is
put into liquidation and receive from the president payment of their claims
in paper of the association, or the individual notes of the president himself,




110

REPORT OF -THE COMPTROLLER OF THB CURRENCY.

2. INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY—Continued.

indorsed or guaranteed in the name of the association, are not to be considered as creditors of the association entitled to subject the stockholders
to individual liability; for these are new contracts. (Richmond v. Irons.
121 U. 8.9 27.)
(r) The individual liability of the stockholders is enforcible only in behalf of
all the creditors, and any security given by a stockholder for his liability
in this respect should likewise be for the benefit of all the creditors. Accordingly, a mortgage of all the individual property of a stockholder, made
after the bank has closed its doors, for the purpose of securing a single
depositor, is void as against a judgment obtained against such stockholder
in an action by the receiver to recover the amount of his individual liability. (Gatch v. Fitch, 34 Fed. Hep., 5G6.)
(s) Where a married woman is by the State law capable of holding stock in a national bank in her own right, she is liable to an assessment upon her shares,
though the law of the State does not authorize married women to bind themselves by contracts for the payment of money. The law annexes her obligations by its own force; no act or capacity to act on her part is required.
(Witters y. Soivles, 35 Fed. Rep., 640; S. C. 32 Fed. Rep., 767.)
(t) While it is undoubtedly the rule as regards stockholders that one put upon
the boots as a stockholder without his consent can not be held for any liability in respect to such stock, yet where the person to whom the stock is
transferred is a director of the bank, and is concerned in the management
of its affairs, he must bo presumed to hare knowledge of the fact that the
stock stood in his name, and, if he has not repudiated the transfer to himself, is liable as the holder of such stock. (Brown v. Finn, 34 Fed. Rep.,
124.)
(u) In such case the mere return of the dividends paid upon the stock to the
person by whom the transfer was made will not be a sufficient repudiation
thereof. (Ibid.)
3. WHEN LIABILITY DISQUALIFIES FROM VOTING:

The provision of section 5144, Revised Statutes, which disqualifies shareholders "whose liability is past due and unpaid/7 from voting at meetings of
shareholders, applies only to liability for unpaid subscriptions for stock.
(United States, ex rel. v. Barry, 36 Fed. Rep., 246.)
VI. OFFICERS.
1. TENURE OF OFFICE:

(a) The officers of a national banking association can hold their positions only
by the tenure specified in section 5136, Revised Statutes, viz, the pleasure
of the board of directors. (Harrington v. First National Bank of Chittenango,
S. C. N. Y., 1873; Thomp. N. B. Gas., 761; see also Taylor v. Hutton, 43 Barb.,
195.)
(b) Directors of national banking associations may remove the president, both
under the law of Congress and the articles of association, where the latter
so provide. The power exists though the association has adopted no bylaws. (Taylor v. Hutton, supra.)
2. BONDS OF OFFICERS :

(a) It is not necessary that national banking associations shall signify their approval of the official bonds of their officers by memoranda entered upon the
journals or minutes of the directors. The acceptance is to be presumed
from the retention of the bond, and from the fact that the officer is permitted to enter upon or continue in the discharge of his duties. (Grover v. The
Lebanon National Bank, 10 Bush, 23.)
(b) Where the sureties of an officer can reasonably be presumed to have been
deceived by the statement of the condition of the bank published just prior
to the execution of the bond, and to have been led to think that there was
no deficit, whereas there had been a misapplication of a large part oi' the
funds b j the officer whose bondsmen they became, which fact would have
been ascertained had the directors exercised ordinary diligence, the sureties are discharged from their liability. (Grover v. The Lebanon National
Bank, supra.)
3

IJIRECTORS MUST ACT AS A BOARD :

The election of an individual as a director does not constitute him an agent
of the corporation with authority to act separately and independently
of his fellow members. It is the board duly convened and acting as a unit




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

Ill

3. DIRECTORS MUST ACT AS A BOARD—Continued.

that is made the representative of the association. The assent or determination of the members of the board acting separately and individually
is not the assent of the corporation. The law proceeds upon the theory
that the directors shall meet and counsel with each other, and that any
determination affecting the association shall be arrived at and expressed
only after a consultation at a meeting of the board, attended by at least a
majority of its members. {National Bank v. Drake, 35 Kans., 564.)
4. BORROWING MONEY OF ASSOCIATION:

An officer may, in the ordinary course of business, borrow money of the association. (Blair v. First National Bank of Mansfield, U. S. C. G. (N. D. Ohio,
1877, 10 Chicago Legal News, 84.)
5. LIABILITY FOR VIOLATIONS OF LAW :

(a) All directors who participate in and assent to a loan in excess of one-tenth
of the capital of the bank, in violation of section 5200, Revised Statutes,
will be liable to the bank for all damages sustained by it in consequence of
such loan. (Witters v. Sowles, U. S. C. C. {District of Vermont), 31 Fed.
Rep., 1.)
(?>) If a cashier, without authority from the directors so to do, makes a loan in
excess of one-tenth of the capital of the association, he will be liable, in case
of loss, for the amount of the excess. (Second National Bank of Oswego v.
Burt, XIV. Neiv York Weekly Digest, 290. Reversed in Court of Appeals on
ground that transaction was discount of bill of exchange drawn against
actually existing values, 93 N. F.,233).
(c) The directors of a national bank will not be held liable for loss occasioned
to the bank through the frauds of a co-director in which they had no part,
and which were perpetrated without their connivance or knowledge. It is
not sufficient to charge them with liability that the frauds might have been
prevented by the exercise on their part of a proper degree of supervision
over the affairs of the bank. (Movius v. Lee, U. S. C. C. (N. D. New York),
SO Fed. Rep., 298.)
6. DIRECTORS OF CONVERTED BANKS:

(a) When a State bank is converted into a national banking association all of
the directors at the time will continue to be the directors of the association
until others are appointed or elected, though some of them may not have
joined in the execution of the articles of association and organization certificate. (Lockwood v. The American National Bank, 9 R. L, 308.)
(b) And, semble, that the directors of a bank at the time of its conversion into a
national banking association are not required to take the oath of directors.
(Ibid.)
(c) But even were the oath required, a majority of all who were directors at
the time of the conversion, and not merely a majority of those who take
the oath, are necessary to constitute a quorum. (Ibid.)
7. RETIREMENT OF DIRECTORS:

(a) The law providing no particular mode by which a director is to resign from
the board, an oral resignation would be as good as any. (Movius v. Lee,
SOFed.Bep.,298.)
(b) The president being the head of the board, a resignation to him is a resignation to the board. (Ibid.)
(c) A director is not prohibited from resigning during the year. The apparent
purpose of the provision in regard to the term of office is to make it conform to the time of the new election, and not to absolutely require every
director to serve the full term. (Ibid.)
VII. INTEREST.
1

WHAT INTEREST ASSOCIATIONS MAY TAKE:

(a) The provision in section 30 of the act of 18G4 " that where, by the law of
any State, a different rate is limited for banks of issue organized under
State laws, the rate so limited shall be allowed for associations organized
in any such State under the act," is enabling, and not restrictive; and,
therefore, a national banking association in any £>tate may stipulate for as
high a rate of interest as by the laws of such State a natural person may,
although State banks of issue are restricted to a less rate. (Tiffany v. National Bank of the State of Missouri, 18 Wall., 409.)




112

REPORT OF'-THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

1. WHAT INTEREST ASSOCIATIONS MAY TAKE—Continued.

(b) But it is not to be inferred from Tiffany r. National Bank of Missouri that
whatever by the laws of the State is lawful tor natural persons in acquiring title to negotiable paper by discount is lawful for national banks.
(National Bankv. Johnson, 104 U. S., 271.)
(c) The interest which a national banking association may charge is limited to
the rate allowed to the banks of the State generally; and the fact that a
few of the State banks are specially authorized to take a higher rate is
not a warrant for a national banking association to do so. (Duncan v. First
National Bank of Mount Pleasant, U. 8. B. C.(W. B. Penn., 1878), 11 Bank.
Mag., 787 ; Gruber v. First National Bank, 87 Penn. St., 468.)
(d) Where the State law does not limit the rate of interest which may be
charged on loans to corporations, a national banking association located in
that State can not charge more than 7 per cent, interest on such loans:
(In re Wild, 11 Blatch., 243.)
(e) Where by the statutes of the State parties are authorized to contract for
any rate of interest, national banking associations in that State may likewise contract for any rate, and are not limited to 7 per cent. (Hinds v.
Marmelejo, 60 Cal., 229; National Bank v. Bruhn, 64 Tex., 571.)
2. ON CLAIMS AGAINST INSOLVENT AND LIQUIDATING ASSOCIATIONS:

(a) A depositor in a national banking association which has become insolvent
is entitled to interest on his deposit. (National Bank of Commonwealth v.
Mechanics1 National Bank, 94 U. S., 437.)
(b) He is entitled to interest from the date of the suspension of payments; and
no demand upon the association is necessary. (Chemical National Bank v.
Bailey, 12 Blatch., 480.)
^
(c) Claims, when proved to the satisfaction of the Comptroller, are upon the
same footing as if put in judgment, and therefore bear interest; and the
fact that, under certain circumstances, there might be thus a compounding
of interest'will not defeat the right to interest. (National Bank of Commonwealth v. Mechanics1 National Bank, supra.)
(d) But where a creditor has obtained judgment against an insolvent national
banking association for the full amount of his claim and interest, he is not
entitled to interest upon the face of the judgment, but only upon the amount
of the claim at the time of the failure. ( White v. Knox, 111 U. 8., 784.)
(#) The creditors of an insolvent national banking association in the hands of
a receiver are entitled to interest on their claims during the period of administration. (Chemical National Bank v. Bailey, supra.)
(/) The assessments made by the Comptroller upon the shareholders of an insolvent association bear interest from the date of the order. (Casey v. Galli,
94 U. S., 673.)
(g) In the case of book accounts in favor of depositors, interest begins to run against an association in liquidation from the date of the suspension of
business. (Richmond v. irons, 121 U. S., 27.)
3. USURY:

(a) The usury laws of the States do not apply to national banking associations,
(Farmers and Mechanics1 Bank v. Bearing, 91 U. 8.9 29; Central National
Bankv. Pratt, 115 Mass., 539; First National Bankv. Gorhnghouse, 22 Ohio
St., 492; Bavis v. Randall, 115 Mass., 547; Rintermister v. First National
Bank, UN. T.,212.)
(b) And the remedies provided by the State for the taking of usury can not be
resorted to. (Farmers and Mechanics1 Bank v. Bearing, supra; Wiley v.
Starbuck, 44 Ind., 298.)
(c) The taking of illegal interest by a national banking association does not
render the contract void. (Farmers and Mechanics1 Bank v. Bearing, siqira.)
(d) It does not invalidate an indorsement or a guaranty of the notes upon
which the usurious interest was paid. (Gates v. First National Bank of
Montgomery, 100 U. 8., 239; Lazear v. National Union Bank of Baltimore, 52
Md., 78.)
(e) But usury destroys the interest-bearing power of the obligation ; and there
will be no point of time from which it can bear interest. (Lucas v. Government National Bank, 78 Penn., M., 228.)
(f) The usury wprks a forfeiture of the entire interest accruing after maturity
and before judgment, as well as that which accrues before maturity.
(Shunk v. The First National Bank of Gallon, 22 Ohio St., 508.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

113

3. USURY—Continued.
(g) The discounting of business paper by a national banking association at a
higher than the legal rate is usurious, though the law of the State fixes no
limit to the rate which natural persons may take for the discount or purchase of such paper. {Johnson v. National Bank of Gloversville, 74 N Y.,
329; affirmed in National Bank v. Johnson, 104 U. S., 271.)
(7*) By charging more than legal interest on overdrafts, a national banking
association loses the right to recover any interest; at all. (Third National
Bank of Philadelphia v. Miller, 90 Penn. St., 241.)
(i) The liabilities of antecedent parties to a note or bill will not be affected by
the usurious character of the transaction between the payee and the association ; and the association may recover the full amount of the note or bill
from the maker or acceptor. (Smith v. The Exchange Bank of Pittsburgh, 26
Ohio St., 141.)
(j) Usurious interest which has been paid to a national banking association
can not be applied by way of payment or set-off in any action by the association to recover the amount of the loan. (Barnet v. Muncie National Bank,
98 U. S., 855.)
(k) Nor can the penalty for taking the usurious interest be recovered by way
of counter-claim in such action, but a separate action must be brought
therefor. (Ibid.)
NOTE.—This case overrules portions of the decisions in Lucas v. Government
National Bank, supra; Overholtv. National Bank, 82 Penn. St., 490; Cake v.
The First National Bank of Lebanon, 83 Penn. St., 303.
(I) A director is not by reason of his position estopped from setting up the defense of usury in an action brought against him by the association. (Bank
of Cadiz v. Slemmons, 34 Ohio St., 142.)
(jn) Where a national banking association has discounted notes for another
bank at a usurious rate of interest, the fact that the other bank has charged
illegal intere'st on those notes to its customers will not affect its right to
set up the defense of usury in an action by the association. (Third National
Bank of Philadelphia v. Miller, supra.)
(n) The amount which may be recovered from the association as a penalty is
twice the amount of interest paid, and not simply twice the amount in excess of the legal rate. (Crocker v. First National Bank of Chetopa, TJ. 8. C. C.
(Eighth Circuit), 3 Am. L. T. [N. S.], 350; Overholi v. National Bank of
Mount Pleasant, 82 Penn. St., 490; see also Barnet v. Muncie National Bank,
supra.)
VIII. INSOLVENCY.
1. NOT SUBJECT TO BANKRUPT ACT:

National banking associations were not subject to the bankrupt act while that
act was in force. (In re Manufacturers7 National Bank, 5 Biss., 499.)
2. WHAT CONSTITUTES INSOLVENCY:

The term "insolvency," as used in section 5242, Revised Statutes, forbidding
transfer of the assets of national banking associations after, or in contemplation of, such insolvency, has the same meaning as it had when applied
to traders in the bankrupt act; that is, it does not mean an absolute inability of a debtor to pay his debt at some future time, upon a settlement
and winding up of his affairs, but a present inability to pay in the ordinary
course of business. (Case v. Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, 2 Woods, 23; Market
Bank v. Pacific National Bank, 30 Sun, 50.)
3. ASSETS A TRUST FUND:

Upon the appointment of a receiver all the assets of the association become in
his hands a trust fund which the statute of limitations does not touch or
affect. (Riddle v. First National Bank, U. 8. C. C.(W. D. Penn,), 27 Fed.
Ilep.,503.)
NOTE.—But this point was not necessary to the decision of the case, for suits
against insolvent corporations are by a law of Pennsylvania expressly excluded from the operation of the statute.
4. UNITED STATES HAS NO PRIORITY :

(a) Section 3466, which gives the United States a priority for all claims it has
against insolvent debtors, does not apply to the case of an insolvent national
banking association. (Cook County National Bankv. United States, 107 V.
S., 445.)
(b) And as against the proceeds of the bonds deposited to secure circulation
the United States can set off no claim, except for money advanced to redeem the notes. (Ibid.)
11028—CUR 88
8




114

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

4. UNITED STATES HAS NO PRIORITY—Continued.

(c) And upon the failure of an association its five per cent, redemption fund
can not be retained by the Treasurer to pay taxes due to the United States,
but the fund passes to the Comptroller as an asset of the association.
(Jackson v. United States, 20 Cf.Cfe., 298.)
5. CLAIMS FOR TORTS :

Claims arising out of the non-feasance or malfeasance of the association should
be paid ratably with the debts, technically so called. (Turner v. The First
National Bank of Keokuk et al., 26 Iowa, 562.)
6. PREFERENCES:

(a) A preference, to be within the meaning of section 5242, Revised Statutes,
must be given to an existing creditor to secure a pre-existing debt. A transfer by an insolvent bank to secure a contemporaneous loan is not a violation
of the law. (Casey v. La Societe de Credit MoHlier, 2 Woods, 77.)
(o) The insolvency need be in the contemplation of the bank only. It need1
not be known to the person to whom the transfer is made. (Case v. Citizens
Bank of Louisiana, supra.)
(c) After the directors of an insolvent association have voted to close its doors,
any transfer of assets whereby a creditor secures a preference must be presumed to be made with an intent to prefer. (National Security Bank v.
Price, 22 Fed. Bep., 697.)
(d) Where the officers of an association which is in danger of insolvency, for the
purpose and in the expectation of preventing a failure, make a pledge of securities to a depositor to induce him not to withdraw his deposit, such a pledge
is not a preference within the meaning of section 5242, Revised Statutes,
and will not be set aside when the association afterward is declared insolvent. (Boherts v. Hill, 23 Fed. Bep., 311.)
(e) Where an insolvent association receives a deposit a short time before closing
its doors, its officers knowing of the insolvency at the time, the receipt of
such deposit is a fraud upon the depositor, and no title passes to the association ; and, therefore, the depositor may reclaim the whole amount of the
deposit; and as he claims under his original title, and not under a transfer
from the association, such reclamation does not amount to a preference.
(Cragie et al. v. Hadley, 99 N. Y., 131.)
(/) But a creditor will not have a lien upon the funds of the association because checks given in settlement of balances were fraudulent, and were
given at a time when the bank was hopelessly insolvent, and its officers
were contemplating flight. (Citizens' National Bank v. Doivd, 35 Fed. Bep.,
340.)
7. BASIS FOR ESTIMATION OF DIVIDENDS :

In estimating the dividends to be paid out of the assets of an insolvent association, the value of the claims at the time when the insolvency is declared
is to be taken as the basis of distribution. ( White v. Knox, 111 U. S., 784.)
8. SET-OFF:

(a) A person liable upon a note to an insolvent national bank may set off against
his indebtedness the amount of his deposit with the bank. (Platt v. Bentley,
Thorn. N.B. Cas., 758.)
(b) But a debtor can not set off the amount of a deposit assigned to him after
the act of insolvency committed. (The Venango National Bank v. Taylor, 56
Penn. St.,U.)
(c) Where a note has not matured when the bank which has discounted it becomes insolvent, the maker, in an action against him by the receiver, can
not set off the amount of his deposit with the bank at the time of the insolvency. (Armstrong v. Scott, 36 Fed. Bep., 63.)
9. CLAIM FOR BREACH OF CONTRACT OF LEASE:

Where a national bank has leased a banking house for a long term of years,
and subsequently becomes insolvent, but during the time it continued,
business had not defaulted in paying the rent, the lessor has no claim
against the receiver by reason of the insolvency or dissolution of the corporation or the forfeiture of its franchises, or by the refusal of the receiver to
take under the contract, and pay the rent. (Fidelity Safe Deposit and Trust
Co. v. Armstrong, 35 Fed. Bep., 567.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

115

IX. RECEIVERS.
1. OFFICER OF THE UNITED STATES :

A receiver, when appointed by the Comptroller, with the concurrence of the
Secretary, is an officer of the United States. (Stanton v. Wilkeson, 8 Ben.,
357.)
2. WHOM HE REPRESENTS:

He represents the bank, its stockholders, and its creditors ; but he does not
in any sense represent the Government. (Cose v. Terrell, 11 Wall., 199.)
3. HOW FAR SUBJECT TO COMPTROLLER'S ORDERS :

(a) The clause of section 50, act of 1864, which prescribes that the receiver shall
be " under the direction of the Comptroller," means only that he shall be
subject to the Comptroller's direction, not that he shail not act without
orders. He may bring suit to collect assets without having been instructed to do so by the Comptroller. (Bank v. Kennedy, 17 Wall.)
(b) The receiver of a national bank is tho instrument of the Comptroller, and
may be removed by him. (Kennedy v. Gibson, 8 Wall., 505.)
4. POWER OF COURTS TO APPOINT :

(a) The power of the Comptroller to appoint a receiver is not exclusive; it does
not oust the courts of equity of their authority in the matter ; and therefore, a court of competent jurisdiction may place the bank in the hands
of a receiver in cases where, according to the rules of equity, it may pursue such a course with regard to insolvent corporations generally. {Irons v.
Manufacturers' National Banlc, 6 Biss., 301; Wright v. Merchants' National
Banh, 1 Flippin, 561.)
(b) Where a bank has gone into voluntary liquidation, and the Comptroller has
no power to appoint a receiver, a proper court, in a case where such action
is necessary to protect the interests of a creditor, will appoint a receiver
for it. (lions v. Manufacturers'' National Banlc, supra.)
5. DEBTORS OF ASSOCIATION CAN NOT QUESTION LEGALITY OF APPOINTMENT :

The legality of the appointment of the receiver can not be questioned by the
debtors of the bank when sued by him. The bank may move to have the
appointment set aside, but the debtors can not. (Cadle v. Balcer, 20 Wall.,
650; see also Plait v. Beebe, 57 N. ¥., 339.)
6. RECEIVER'S DECISION NOT FINAL :

The decision of a receiver rejecting a claim is not final. The claimant still
has the right to sue. (Bank of Bethel v. Pahquioque Banlc, 14 Wall., 383.)
7. SALE BY:

(a) Tho receiver can not sell the real or personal property of the bank without
an order from a court of competent jurisdiction. ([Ellis v. Little, 27 Kans.,
707.)
(b) Nor can he sell upon terms in conflict with the order. (Ibid.)
(c) And under an order permitting him to sell the property of the bank he can
not exchange, trade, or barter it for other property. (Ibid.)
(d) A sale made.by a receiver under order of a court is to all intents and purposes a judicial sale. (In re Third National Banlc, 9 Biss., 535.)
8. CONTRACTS OF :

(a) As the power of a receiver of a national bank appointed by the Comptroller
is limited, a person dealing with him in his official capacity is bound as a
matter of law to have knowledge of his authority to act, and if contracts
and agreements are entered into with the receiver in excess of his authority
as conferred by law, the parties contract at their own peril, and the estate
of the bank can not be charged for the default or inability of a receiver
acting outside of his functions as receiver and beyond the duties which it
involves. (Ellis v. Little, 27 Kans., 707.)
(b) The receiver can not charge the estate of the bank by any executory contract, unless authorized so to do by tho provisions of the national banking
law, and the order of a court of competent jurisdiction obtained upon the
terms of said law. (Ibid.)
9. EXPENSES OF RECEIVERSHIP FOR ASSOCIATIONS WHICH HAVE GONE INTO LIQUIDATION:

Where, after an association bank has gone into liquidation, a receiver is appointed at the instance of the creditors, the expenses of such receivership
must be paid by the creditors. The shareholders can not be made individually liable for such expenses, (Richmond v, Irons.)




116

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
X. TAXATION.

1. WHAT MAY BE TAXED :

(a) A State can not tax the capital stock of a national bank, as such. The tax
must be assessed upon the shares of the different stockholders. {Collins v.
Chicago, 4 Biss., 472.)
(b) The entire interests of the shareholders may be taxed without any deduction for that portion of the capital which is invested in United States securities. ( Van Allen v. The Assessors, 3 Wall., 573.)
(c) New shares issued by a national banking association can. not be taxed until
the increase of capital has been approved by the Comptroller of the Currency. (Charleston v. People's National Bank, 5 S. C, 103.)
(d) The manifest intention of the law is to permit the State in which a national
bank is located to tax, subject to the limitations proscribed, all the shares
of its capital stock without regard to their ownership; and, therefore, a
national bank may be taxed upon the shares which it holds in another national bank. (Bank of Redemption v. Boston, 126 U. S., 60.)
(e) The undivided surplus of a national banking association, unless invested in
Federal securities, may be lawfully taxed by the State. (North Ward National Bank of Newark v. City of Newark, 10 Vroom, 380; First National Bank
v. Peterborough, 56 N. H., 38.)
(/) But, of course, if the surplus is taken into consideration in estimating the
taxable value of the shares, it is not to be taxed separately. (North Ward
National Bank v. City of Newark, supra.)
NOTE.—But it has been held in Maryland that the stock of an association
represents its whole property, and where a tax is assessed upon the shares
a separate tax upon the real or personal estate amounts to double taxation ; and, therefore, where the organic laws of the State prohibit double
taxation, such a tax upon the property of an association is void. (County
Commissioners v. Farmers and Mechanics1 National Bank, 48 Md., 117; see
also National State Bank v. Young, 25 Iowa, 311, wherein it was held that
the States could tax only the shares eo nomine and the real estate.)
(g) The surplus fund of a national banking association is not excluded in the
valuation of its shares for taxation. (Strafford National Bank v. Dover, 59
N.H., 316.)
(h) Where shares of stock are assessed at their actual cash value without any
deduction for the real estate owned by the association the real estate should
not be taxed eo nomine. (Commissioners of Bice County v. Citizens' National
Bank of Faribault, 23 Minn., 280.)
(i) The States can not tax the circulating notes of national banking associations.
(Home v. Greene, 52 Miss.y 452; Contra Board of Commissioners v. Elston,
32 Ind.y 27; see also Buffin v. Board of Commissioners, 69 N. C, 498; Lily
v. The Commissionersj 69 N. C, 300.)
2. R A T E :

(a) Where the State banks are taxed upon their capital, no tax can be imposed
upon the shares of national banking associations ; for as the capital of the
State banks may consist of the bonds of the United States, which are exempt from State taxation, a tax on capital is not equivalent to a tax on
shares. (Van Allen v. The Assessors, 3 Wall.. 573: Bradleyv. The People,4
JFaZZ.,459.)
(b) But though the tax upon the State banks is not eo nomine a tax on shares,
yet if it is equivalent to such a tax the shares in the national banking associations located in that State may be taxed. (Frazer v. Seibern, 16 Ohio St.,
614; Van Slyke v. State, 23 Wis., 656; Boynoll v. State, 25 Wis., 112.)
(c) When by local legislation different rates are prescribed for different classes
of moneyed capital, the rate imposed upon shares of national banks should
approximate as closely as may be to the rate imposed upon other moneyed
capital of the same or similar class, viz, shares of State banks. (City National Bankv. Paducah, U. S. C. C. (Sixth Circuit, 1877), 5 Cent. L. J,, 347.)
(d) Congress meant no more than to require of the States as a condition to the
exercise of the power to tax the shares in national banks, that they should,
as far as they had the capacity, tax in like manner the shares of banks of
issue of their own creation. (Lionberger v. Bouse, 9 Wall., 468.)
(e) Therefore, where a State has previously contracted with the banks which
it has chartered that they shall not be taxed above a certain rate, a tax
upon national-bank shares at a greater rate is not invalid, if this rate is
not greater than that assessed upon all the moneyed capital within the
State, except that of the State banks. (Ibid.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

117

2. RATE—Continued.
(/) Any system of assessment of taxes which exacts from the owner of the
shares of a national banking association a larger sum in proportion to the
actual value of those shares than it does from other moneyed capital,
valued in like manner, taxes the shares at a greater rate, notwithstanding that the percentage of tax on the valuation is the same as that applied to other moneyed capital. (Pelton v. Commercial National Bank, 101
U.S., 143.)
3. VALUATION :

(a^> In estimating the value of the shares for the purpose of taxation reference
may be had to all the property and values of the bank. (Saint Louis National Bank v. Papin, U. 8. C. C. (Eighth Circuit), 3 Cent. L. J"., 669.)
(b) If no excessive valuation is complained of, and a correct result is arrived
at, equity will not restrain the collection of a tax because the method of
computation was erroneous. (Ibid.)
(c) The shares may be valued for taxation at an amount exceeding their face
value, if this amount is not at a greater rate than the valuation set upon
other moneyed canitalin the State. (Hepburn v. School Directors, 23 Wall.,
480.)
(d) Under the statute of New York, shares in national banking associations
should be taxed at their real or market value. (People v. The Commissioners
of Taxes and Assessments, 94 U. 8.9 415.)
(e) Where shares in national banking associations are purposely valued proportionally higher than the other moneyed capital in the State, the assessment is void. (Pelton v. National Bank, 101 U. 8., 143.)
(/) And the collection of what is in excess of the rate imposed on the other
moneyed capital may be enjoined. (Ibid.)
(g) It is not required that the States should abandon systems of taxation of
their own banks, or of money in the hands of their other corporations,
which they may think the most wise and efficient modes of taxing their
own corporate organizations, in order to make that taxation conform to the
system of taxing the national banks upon the shares of their stock in the
hands of the shareholders ;; all that is necessary is, that the system of State
taxation of its own citizens, of its own banks, and of its own corporations
shall not work a discrimination unfavorable to the holders of the shares of
the national banks. (Davenport Bank v. Davenport, 123 U. S., 83.)
4. EXEMPTIONS:

(a) The intention of Congress was that the rate of taxation of the shares
should be the same as, or not greater than, the tax upon the moneyed capital of the individual citizen which is subject and liable to taxation. (People
v. The Commissioners, 4 Wall., 244.)
(b) Therefore, it is not a ground of objection to the validity of a tax on shares
that, while deductions for United States bonds are made from the personal
estates of individuals and the capital of State corporations, no deductions
are made on account of the capital of national banking associations invested in such bonds. (Ibid.)
(c) The fact that by the statutes creating them, which statutes were passed
prior to the national banking law, State banks are entirely exempt from
taxation, will not render a tax upon the shares of national banking associations void. (City of Richmond v. Scott, 48 Ind., 568.)
(d) And a State tax upon shares in national banking associations is not rendered invalid by an exemption of the shares of other corporations the capital of which consists of property required to be listed for taxation, as such.
(Alclver v. Robinson, 53 Ala., 456.)
(e) Merely a partial exemption of other moneyed capital will not invalidate a
tax upon shares in national banking associations. (Hepburn v. School Directors, 23 Wall,, 480.)
(/) But though Congress did not contemplate that there should be an absolute
equality (which in the nature of things is impossible), yet it did intend
that there should be a substantial equality; and, therefore, if the exemptions in favor of other moneyed capital are so palpable as to show that
there is a serious discrimination against capital invested in the shares of
national banking associations, the tax will be declared unlawful. (Boyer
v. Boyer, 113 U. 5., 690.)
(g) A State law which does not permit a deduction to bo made from the assessed value of bank shares for all debts due by the holder thereof, while
authorizing such a deduction to be made from the assessed value of moneyed
capital otherwise invested, is void. (People ex rel. Williams v. Weaver, 100
U. S., 539, reversing S. C, 67 JV. Y., 516, and overruling People v. Dolan, 36
JV.r.,59.)




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REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

4. EXEMPTIONS—Continued.

(h) The main purpose of Congress in fixing limits to State taxation on investments in the shares of national banks, was to render it impossible for the
State, in levying such a tax, to create and foster an unequal and unfriendly
competition, by favoring institutions or individuals carrying on similar business
and operations and investments of a like character; and the language of the
law is to be read in the light of this policy. And, therefore, the exemption
of shares of stock in corporations, the business of which does not come into
competition ivith that of the national banks (e. g., railroad companies, mining
companies, manufacturing companies, and insurance companies) does not
invalidate a tax upon national-bank shares. Capital thus employed is not
"moneyed capital" within the meaning of the act of Congress. (Mercantile Bank v. 2seiv York, 121 U. S., 133.)
(i) Bonds issued by a State, or under its authority by its public municipal
bodies, although they undoubtedly represent moneyed capital, yet as from
their nature they are not ordinarily the subject of taxation, are not within
the reason of the rule established by Congress for the taxation of nationalbank shares, and the fact that the State exempts them from taxation does
not deprive it of the right to tax shares of stock of national banks in the
State. (Ibid.)
(j) Although deposits in savings banks constitute moneyed capital in the
hands of individuals within the terms of any definition which can be given
of that phrase, yet they are not within the meaning of the act of Congress
in such a sense as. to require that, if they are exempted from taxation,
shares of stock in national banks must thereby also be exempted from
taxation; for it can not be supposed that savings banks come into any possible competition with national banks. (Ibid.)
ft COLLECTION OF TAX FROM THE ASSOCIATION :

(a) A State tax upon shares is valid, though the tax is collected from the bank.
(National Bank v. Commonwealth, 9 Wall., 353.)
(b) And the State may require the banks to pay a tax rightfully laid upon the
shares. (Ibid.)
(c) And where the tax on shares is payable by the association the collection
of the tax may be enforced by distraint of its property. (First National
Bank v. Douglas County, 3 Dill., 330.)
(d) But where the tax laws of the State make the bank the mere agent for paying the tax on shares, and direct it to retain so much of the dividends as
will answer that purpose, other agents being required to pay taxes for their
principals only when they have under their control the property, money,
or credit of such principals, the bank can not be made liable unless it has
the control of the property, etc., of its shareholders, or has dividends in its
possession, or has failed to retain them. (Hershirev. The First National
Bank, 35 Iowa, 272.)
6. LICENSE TAX:

(a) National banking associations can not be subjected to a license or privilege
tax. (Mayor v. First National Bank of Macon, 59 Ga., 648; City of Carthage
v. First National Bank of Carthage, 71 Mo., 508; National Bank of Chattanooga v. Mayor, 8 Heiskell, 814.)
(b) A State law prohibiting the establishment of banking companies in the
State without authority of the legislature' was not intended to apply to
banking corporations created by authority of Congress, since such corporations may be legally established in the State without the consent of the
legislature. (Stetson v. City of Bangor, 56 Me., 274.)
7. POWERS OF TAXING OFFICERS:

(a) Municipal officers can not asses3 a tax upon the shares of national banking
associations until authorized to do so by some law of the State. (Stet&on v.
City of Bangor, 56 Me., 274.)
(b) The officers of a national banking association can not be compelled to exhibit to the taxing officers of a State the books of the association showing
the deposits of its customers. (First National Bank of Youngstown v. Hughes,
TJ. S. C. C. (N. D. Ohio, 1878), Browne's N B. Cas., 176.)
(c) A national banking association is not exempt from examination by internalrevenue officers when it has in its possession any articles subject to an internal-revenue tax. Such an examination is not the exercise of a visitorial
power, and, therefore, is not prohibited by the provision of section 5241,
Revised Statutes, that the national banks shall not be subject to any visitorial powers except those authorized by the national-bank act or vested
in the courts of justice. ( United States v. Bhaivn, U. S. D. C. (E. D. Penn.),
Thomp. N. B. Cas., 358.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

119

7. POWERS OF TAXING OFFiCERs—Continued.

(d) Where by the tax laws of a State a perpetual lien for taxes attaches to
property only by virtue of a levy thereon, and such levy is not made prior
to the insolvency of the bank, tl^e taxing officers of the State will be restrained, at the instanee of the receiver,"" from levying upon the property of
an insolvent national bank, and selling it, for the purpose of collecting a
tax. (Woodward v. Ellsworth, 4 Colo., 580.)
(e) A State may require the cashiers of national banking associations located
within its territory to transmit lists of the shareholders to the taxing officers of the various towns in which the shareholders reside. (Walte v. Dowley, 94 U. S., 527.)
8. ENFORCEMENT OF TAXES:

A tax duly assessed upon shares may be enforced in accordance with the general laws of the State on that subject. (Weld v. City of Bangor, 59 Me.,
416.)
9. LOCATION OF ASSOCIATION FOR TAXING PURPOSES :

An association which opens an office for the purpose of receiving deposits in
another place than that In which it was organized does not become " located " i n that place for purposes of taxation. {National State Bank of
Camden v. Pierce, U. S. C. C. (E. D. Penn.), 18 Alb. L. J.y 16.)
XL JURISDICTION.
NOTE.—The jurisdiction of the Federal courts in national-bank cases was very
materially changed by the proviso to the fourth section of the act of July
12, 1882. The proviso is as follows :
"Provided, however, That the jurisdiction for suits hereafter brought by or
against any association established under any law providing for national
banking associations, except suits between them and the United States, or
its officers and agents, shall be the same as, and not other than, the jurisdiction for suits by or against banks not organized under any law of the
United States which do or might do banking business where such national
banking associations may be doing business when such suits may be begun. And all laws and parts of laws of the United States inconsistent with
this proviso be, and the same are hereby, repealed."
The jurisdiction of the United States circuit courts in suits by or against national banks is thus denned by section 4, act March 3, 1887 :
"SEC. 4. That all national banking associations established under the laws of
the United States shall, for the purposes of all actions by or against them,
real, personal, or mixed, and all suits in equity, bo deemed citizens of the
States in which they are respectively located j and in such cases the circuit and district courts shall not have jurisdiction other than such as they
would have in cases between individual citizens of the same State."
"The provisions of this section shall not bo held to affect the jurisdiction of
the courts of,the United States in cases commenced by the United States
or by direction of any officer thereof, or cases for winding up the affairs of
any such bank."
1. JURISDICTION OF FEDERAL COURTS PRIOR TO THE ACT OF JULY 12, 1882:

(a) National banking associations may sue in the Federal courts. The word
" b y " was omitted from section 57 of the act of 1864 by mistake. (Kennedy
v.Gibson, 8 Wall., 505.)
(b) A national banking association may sue and be sued in the circuit court for
the district in which the association is located, irrespective of the amount
in controversy and the citizenship of the parties. (County of Wilson v. National Bank, iO3 U. S., 770; Mitchell v. Walker, U. S. C. C. {W. D. Perm.,
1879), Browne9s N. B. Cas., 180; Commercial Bank of Cleveland v. Simmons,
U. S. C. C. (W. D. Ohio), 10 Alb. L. J.: 155.)
(c) But where the amount in controversy does not exceed five hundred dollars,
the association can not sue in a Federal court outside of the district in which
it is established. (Saint Louis National Bank v. Brinkman, U. S. C. C. (D.
K ) l),ed.Rep.,Ao.) )
F d R A
(d) A national banking association located in one State may bring an action in
the circuit court of the United States sitting within another State against
a citizen of that State. (Manufacturers' National Bank v. Baack, 8 B latch.,
147.)




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REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

1. JURISDICTION OF FEDERAL COURTS PRIOR TO THE ACT OF JULY 12,188*2—Continued.

(e) When a national bank is sued in a Federal court the suit must be brought
in the district in which the bank is located. And service upon an officer of
the bank in another district w|ll not give the court of that district jurisdiction of the cause. (Maine v. Second National Bank of Chicago, 8 Biss., 26.)
(f) A United States district court has jurisdiction of a suit in equity by or
against a national banking association located within the district. (First
National Bank of Pittsburgh v. Pittsburgh and Castle Shannon Railroad Company, 1 Fed. Rep., 190.)
(g) A circuit court has no jurisdiction of a suit by a private person to compel
the Comptroller of the Currency and the Treasurer of the United States to
disclose what disposition has been made of the United States bonds deposited with the Treasurer by a national banking ass3ociation, and for a decree directing those officers as to their duty regarding such bonds. (Van
Antwerp v. Hulburd, 7 Blatch., 425; Van Antwerp v. Hulburd, SBlatch., 282.)
(h) Section 380 Revised Statutes, which provides that "all suits and proceedings arising out of the provisions of law governing national banking associations, in which the United States or any of its officers or agents shall be
parties, shall be conducted by the district attorneys of the several districts
under the direction and supervision of the Solicitor of the Treasury," does
not enlarge the jurisdiction of the circuit court, and can not be held to confer jurisdiction in such suits or proceedings upon a court not having, independently of this section, authority to entertain them. (Van Antwerp v.
Hulburd, 7 Blatch., 4*26 supra).

(i) National banking associations, being corporations organized under the laws
of the United States, are entitled as such to remove into the circuit courts of
the IJnited States suits brought against them in the State courts. (CruikslianlcY. Fourth National Bank. 21 Blatch., 322: see also Removal Cases, 115
U.S.,1.)
(?) A United States district court has jurisdiction to authorize a receiver to
compromise a debt. (Matter of Platt, 1 Ben., 534.)
(k) An action at common law to recover a debt due to the bank may be instituted by a receiver in a United States district court, he being an officer of
the United States within the meaning of section 563, Revised Statutes.
(Plait v. Beach, 2 Ben., 303; Stanton v. Wilkeson, 8 Ben., 357.)
(I) The power of a national banking association to take a mortgage upon real
estate is a question which the party raising it should bo permitted to litigate in a Federal court; and he should not be sent into the State courts to
try this question on the distribution of surplus moneys in a foreclosure
suit, or in a suit brought by the party holding the alleged invalid mortgage. (In reDuryea, U. S. D. C. {S. D. N. Y.), 17 National Bankruptcy Register, 495.)
2. JURISDICTION OF FEDERAL COURTS SUBSEQUENT TO ACT OF JULY 12, 1882:

(a) The tenth subdivision of section 629, Revised Statutes, which confers upon
the circuit court of the United States jurisdiction of all suits by or against
any national banking association established in the district for which the
court is held, has been repealed by the proviso to section 4 of the act of
July 12,1882. (National Bank of Jefferson v. Fare et ah, U. S. C. C. (E. D.
Tex.), 25 Fed. Rep., 200.)
(b) The object of this proviso was to deprive the United States courts of jurisdiction of suits by or against national banking associations in all cases
where banks organized under State laws could not likewise sue or be sued
in such courts. (National Bank of Jefferson v. Fare et al.f supra.)
(c) But the proviso does not affect the right of the receiver of an insolvent association to sue in a Federal court. (Hendee V. Connecticut and P. R. R. Co.,
26 Fed. Rep., 677.)
(d) Nor would the act of July 12,1882, take from the circuit court jurisdiction
of a suit brought against a director for negligent performance of his duties ; for as such suit rests upon the requirements of the United States
laws, and by-laws made pursuant thereto, it is a case arising under the
laws of the United States. (Witters v. Foster, U. 8. C. C. (D. Vt.), 28 Fed.
Rep., 737.)
3. JURISDICTION OF STATE COURTS:

(a) State courts have jurisdiction of suits by and against national banking associations. (Bank of Bethel v. Pahquioque Bank, 14 Wall., 383; see also Ordway v. Central National Bank, 47 Md., 217, and ClaMin v. Houseman, 93
V. 8., 130.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

121

3. JURISDICTION OF STATE COURTS—-Continued.

(h) Where a national banking- association is sued in a State court the suit must
be brought in the city or county in which the bank is located. (Cadle v.
Tracey, 11 Blatcli., 10L; Crocker v. Maine National Bank, 101 Mass., 240.)
NOTE.—But the New York court of appeals has held that the provision of the
national banking law as to the jurisdiction of State courts is permissive
only, and not mandatory, and that a State court, in a proper case, may entertain a proceeding against a national bank located in another State.
(Cooke v. The State National Bank of Boston, 52 N. Y., 96; Robinson v. National Bank of New Berne, 81 N. Y., 385; see also Adams v. Baunis, 29 La.
Ann., 315.) And in Talmagev. Third National Bank, 27 Hun, 61, the supreme court of New York said: "The words of restriction to the place
where said 'association is situated7 apply to the county and municipal
courts and not to the State courts. In the {State courts of general jurisdiction a national banking1 association can be sued whenever an individual
can be for the same cause." In Cooke v. The State National Bank, Chief
Judge Church questioned the constitutional right of Congress to deprive
the State courts of jurisdiction in such cases.
(c) A State court can entertain an action brought to recover of a national banking association the penalty for taking usury. (Ordway v. The Central National Bank, 47 Md., 217; Radev. McVay, 31 Ohio St., 231; Bletz v. Columbia
National Bank, 87 Penn. St., 87.)
(d) The State courts have jurisdiction of an action brought by a shareholder
on behalf of himself and other shareholders to recover of the directors of
an insolvent association damages for injuries resulting from their negligence and misconduct. (BrinckerhoffY. Bostivtck, 88 N. Y., 52.)
(e) A State court has no power to make an order directing tire receiver of a
national bank, who has been appointed by the Comptroller of the Currency,
to pay a judgment obtained against the bank before the receiver was appointed. (Ocean National Bank v. Carll, 7 Run, 237.)
(/) State courts have no jurisdiction of the case of an embezzlement of the funds
of the association by one of its officers. (Commonwealth v. Felton, 101 Mass.,
204 ; Commonwealth, exrel. Torrey v. Ketner, 92 Penn. St., 372.)
(g) The defense of usury may be set up in-action brought in a State court.
(National Bank of WintersetY. Eyre, 52 Iowa, 114.)
4. UNITED STATES CAN NOT BE SUBJECTED TO JURISDICTION OF COURT:

Neither the Comptroller nor the receiver by putting in an appearance to a suit
can subject the United States to the jurisdiction of a court. (Case v. Terrell, 11 Wall., 199.;
5. CITIZENSHIP :

A national banking association is for jnrisdictional purposes a citizen of the
State in which it is located. (Davis v. Cook, 9 Nev., 134.)
XII. SUITS.
1. B Y AND AGAINST ASSOCIATIONS:

(a) Suit may be brought against a national banking association though it is in
the hands of a receiver. (Bank of Bethel v. Pahquioque Bank, 14 Wall., 383;
Security National Bank v. National Bank of the Commonwealth, 2 Run, 287 ;
Green v. The Wallkill National Bank, 7 Run, 63.)
(b) Where the tax on shares is collected from the association it may bring a
suit to enjoin the collection of an illegal tax. (Cummings v. National Bank,
101 U. S., 153; PeltonY. Commercial National Bank, 101 U. S., 143: BoyerY,
Boyer, 113 U. S., 143.)
(c) A State law authorizing national banking associations which have been
converted from State banks to use the name of the original corporation for
the purpose of prosecuting and defending suits is not in conflict with the
national banking law, and therefore proceedings based upon a judgment
obtained before the conversion may be instituted by such association in its
former corporate name. (Thomas v. Farmers' Bank of Maryland, 46 Md., 43.)
(d) A national banking association is a foreign corporation within the meaning
of a State statute requiring corporations created by the laws of any other
State or country to give security for costs before prosecuting a suit in the
courts of the State. (National Park Bank v. Gunst, 1 Abb. N. C, 292.)
(e) As a national banking association can acquire no title to negotiable paper
purchased by it, it can maintain no action thereon in a State where the
person suing must be owner of the paper. (First National Bank of Rochester
Y. Pierson} 24 Minn., 140.)




122

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

1. B Y AND AGAINST ASSOCIATIONS—Continued.

(/) But in a State where the holder may sue without respect to the ownership
an association may bring suit upon paper so acquired. {National Pemberton
Bank v. Porter, 125 Mass., 333; Atlas National Bankv. Savery, 127 Mass.,
75.)
(g) Suits brought by a receiver can not be settled or compounded upon an order
of the Comptroller; this can be done only with the authority of the court.
(Case v. Small, 2 Woods, 78.)
2. B Y SHAREHOLDERS :

(a) A shareholder of a national banking association can not maintain an action
against the directors to recover damages sustained for neglect and mismanagement of the affairs of ihe association, whereby it became insolvent and
its stock was rendered worthless. Such an action can be brought only by
the corporation itself. (Conway v. Halsey, 15 Yroom, 462.)
(h) But where the receiver refuses to bring an action against negligent directors to recover tho amount which the shareholders have been compelled
to contribute to pay the debts of the association, an action against such
directors may be brought by a shareholder on behalf of himself and the
other shareholders* (Nelson v. Burrows, 9 Abb.N. C, 280.)
(c) And when the receiver is a director, and one of the parties charged with
misconduct and against whom a remedy is sought, the action may be brought
by a shareholder on behalf of himself and the other shareholders. (Brinckerhoffy. Bostwick, 88 N. Y, 52.)
3. BY RECEIVERS :

(a) A receiver may sue either in his own name or the name of the bank. (National Bank v. Kennedy, 17 Wall., 19.)
(b) Suits and proceedings under the act in which the United States or their
officers or agents are parties, whether commenced before or after the appointment of a receiver, are to be conducted by the district attorney under
the direction of the Solicitor of the Treasury. (Bank of Bethel v. Pahquioque
Bank, 14 Wall, 3d3.)
(c) But section 380, Revised Statutes, is directory merely, and the employment
of private counsel by the receiver can not be made a ground of defense to a
suit brought by him'. (IMd.)
(d) Receivers may sue in the courts of the United States by virtue of the act,
without reference to the locality of their personal citizenship.
(e) The provisions of the codes that every action must be brought in the name
of the real party in interest, except in the case of the trustee of an express
trust, or'bf a person authorized by statute to sue, does not apply to the receiver of a national banking association suing in a Federal court held in
a State which has adopted the code procedure; for the right of the receiver
to sue is derived from the national banking law. (Stanton v. Wilkeson, 8
Ben., 357.)
(/) Under section 1001 of the Revised Statutes no bond for the prosecution of
the suit, or to answer in damages or costs, is required on writs of error or
appeals issuing from or brought to the Supreme Court of the United States
by direction of the Comptroller of the Currency in suits by or against insolvent national banking associations, or the receivers thereof. (Pacific
National Bank v. Mixter, 114 U. S., 463.)
4. BY CREDITORS OF INSOLVENT ASSOCIATION:

The creditors of an insolvent association must seek their remedy through the
Comptroller, in the mode prescribed by the statute; they can not proceed
directly in their own names against the stockholders or debtors of the bank.
(Kennedy v. Gibson, 8 Wall., 498.)
5. FOR USURY:

(a) The penalty for all illegal interest paid to a national banking association
within two years prior to the commencement of proceedings may be recovered in a single action, whether the amount was in one payment or in
several. (Hintermister v. First National Bank, 64 N. Y., 212.)
(b) Where a bankrupt has paid usurious interest, his assignee may bring an action against the association to recover the penalty. ( Wright v. First National Bank of Greensburgh, U. S. C. C. (Dist. Ind., 1878); Crocker v. First
National Bank of Chetopa, U. S. C. C. (Eighth Circuit, 1876); 3 Am. L. T.3
N S., 350.)
(c) The party who paid the usurious interest is the only party to the note who
is entitled to sue for the penalty. (Lasear v. National Union Bank of Maryland, 52 Hd., 78.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

123

6. TO ENFORCE LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS:

(a) When the full personal liability of shareholders is to he enforced the action
must be at law. (Kennedy v. Gibson, 8 Wall., 505; Casey v. Galli, 94 U. 8.,
673.)
(b) And it may he at law though the assessment is not for the full value of the
shares; for, since the sum each shareholder must contribute is a certain,
exact sum, there is no necessity for invoking the aid of a court of equity.
(Bailey v. Sawyer, 4 Dill., 463.)
(c) But the suit may be in equity. (Kennedy v. Gibson, supra.)
7. EXECUTION:

A judgment against a national bank in the hands of a receiver only establishes
the validity of the claim; the plaintiff can have no execution on such j udgment, but must wait pro-rata distribution. (Bank of Bethel v. Pahquioaue
Bank, 14 Wall., 383.)
8. ATTACHMENTS:

(a) When a creditor attaches the property of an insolvent bank he can not
hold such property against the claim of a receiver appointed after the attachment suit was commenced. Such creditor must share pro rata with
*all others. (First National Bank of Selmav. Colby, 21 Wall., 609; Harvey
v. Allen, 16 Blatch., 29.)
(b) No State court can issue an attachment against the funds of a national
bank. Although the provision forbidding attachments was evidently made
to secure equality among the general creditors in the division of the proceeds of the property of an insolvent bank, its operation is by no means
confined to cases of actual or contemplated insolvency ; but the remedy is
taken away altogether and can not be used under any circumstances. The
effect of the provision in section 5242, Revised Statutes, is to write into all
State attachment laws an exception in favor of national banks, and all
such laws must be read as if they contained an exception in favor of national banks. (Pacific National Bank v. Mixter, 124 U. £.,721.)
NOTE.—This case overrules the decision of the New York Court of Appeals in
llobinson v. National Bank of Neiv Berne (81 N Y.< 385), where it was held
that the national banking law does not prohibit attachments against the
property of national banks, except in cases where an act of insolvency has
been committed or is contemplated. See also National Shoe and Leather
Bank v. Mechanics'1 National Bank, 89 N. Y., 467 ; Bay nor v. Pacific National
Bank, 93 N. Y., 371; Southivick v. First National Bank of Memphis, 7 Hun, 96.
(c) Nor can an attachment be issued by a circuit court of the United States;
for as by the law of Congress all power of issuing attachments against national banks before judgment has been eliminated from State statutes,
there can be no laws of the State providing for such a remedy on which
the circuit court can act. (Ibid.)
9. ABATEMENT:

An action brought by the creditor of a national bank is abated by a decree of a
district or circuit court dissolving the corporation and forfeiting its franchises. (First National Bank of Selma v. Colby, 21 Wall., 609.)
10. ESTOPPEL:

(a) A shareholder against whom suit is brought to recover the assessment made
upon him by the Comptroller will not be permitted to deny the existence of
the association, or that it was legally incorporated. (Casey v. Galli, 94 U.
£.,673.)
(b) Where one sued by a national bank is accustomed to deal with it, as such,
and does so deal with it in respect to the matter in suit, he is estopped from
denying its incorporation. (National Bank of Fairhaven v. The Phcenix Warehousing Company, 6 Hun, 71.)
11. SUITS AGAINST LIQUIDATING ASSOCIATIONS :

A national bank which has gone into voluntary liquidation will continue to
exist as a body corporate for the purpose of suing and being sued until its
affairs are completely settled. (National Bank v. Insurance Company, 104
U. S., &4; Ordivay v. Central National Bank, 47 Md., 217.)
12. TRANSITORY AND LOCAL SUITS :

The provision of the banking law (section 5198 Revised Statutes) which requires that actions brought against national banking associations in State
courts shall be brought in the county or city in which the association is
located, applies only to transitory actions; it was not intended to apply to
actions local in their character. (Casey v. Adams, 102 U. S., 66.)




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REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

13. SURVIVAL OF SUITS:

Whether^ suit against a director for negligent performance of his duties, as required by the statutes of the United States and the by-laws of the association, will survive against the executor or administrator depends upon State
laws. (Witters v. Foster, U. S. C. C. (Dist. Vt.), 25 Fed. Bep., 737.)
XIII. EVIDENCE.
1. CERTIFICATES OF COMPTROLLER:

(a) The certificate of the Comptroller of the Currency that an association has
complied with all the provisions required to be complied with before commencing the business of banking is admissible in evidence upon a plea of
nul tiel corporation; and such certificate, together with proof that the association has been acting as a national banking association for along time,
is amply sufficient evidence to establish, at least, prima facie, the existence
of the corporation.7 (Mix v. The National Bank of Bloomington, 91 III., 20;
see also Merchants National Bank of Bang or v. Glendon, 120 Mass., 97.)
(b) The certificate of the Comptroller that the association, has complied with
all the provisions of law touching the organization of associations removes
any objection which might otherwise have been made to the evidence upon
which he acted. (Casey v. Galli, 94 U. S., 673; Thatcher v. West Biver National Bank, 10 Mich., 196.)
(c) And in a suit against the association or its shareholders such certificate of
the Comptroller is conclusive as to the completeness of the organization.
(Casey v. Galli, supra.)
(d) A letter from the Comptroller directing the receiver to institute suit, if not
objected to at the time, is sufficient evidence that the Comptroller has decided that the enforcement of the individual liability of the shareholders
is necessary. {Bowden v. Johnson, 107 U. S., 251.)
2. EVIDENCE OF INSOLVENCY:

(a) It is not necessary that the facts upon which the Comptroller bas^s his
action in appointing a receiver should be established by what is competent
legal evidence; but he is left to be satisfied as best he can be, under the
peculiar circumstances of each case, of the facts and the necessity for the
exercise of his authority. (Flatt v. Beebe, 57 N. Y., 330.)
(b) A return ofnulla bona upon an execution issued against the property of
national bank is proof of its insolvency. (Wheelock v. Kost, 77 III., 296.)
3. NECESSITY FOR ASSESSMENT BY COMPTROLLER :

It is not essential, in an action to enforce the individual liability of the shareholders of an insolvent national banking association, to aver and prove that
the assessment was necessary; for the decision of the Comptroller on this
point is conclusive. (Strong v. Southivorth, 8 Ben., 331; Kennedy v. Gibson,
S Wall., 505; Casey v. Galli, 94 U. S., 673.)
XIV. CRIMES.
1. UNDER UNITED STATES LAWS:

(a) The willful misapplication of the moneys and funds of a national banking
association, made an offense by section 5209, Revised Statutes, must be for
the use or benefit of the party charged or of some person or company other
than the association. (United Stales v. Bntton, 107 U. S., 655.)
(b) The exercise of official discretion in good faith, without fraud, for the advantage or the supposed advantage of the association is not punishable;
but if official action be taken in bad faith, for personal advantage and with
fraudulent i n tent, it is punishable. ( United States v. Fish, 24 Fed. Bep., 585.)
(c) It is not necessary that the officer should personally misapply the funds
of the association. He will be guilty as a principal offender though he
merely procures or causes the misapplication. (Ibid.)
(d) A loan in bad faith, with intent to defraud the association, is a willful misapplication within the meaning of the statute. (Ibid.)
(e) It is no defense to a charge of embezzlement, abstraction, or misapplication
of the funds of a national banking association that the funds were used
with the knowledge and consent of the president and some of the directors.
The intent to defraud is to be conclusively presumed from the commission
of the offense. ( United States v. Taintor, i l Blatch., 374.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

125

1. UNDER UNITED STATES LAWS—Continued.

(/) Where the president charged as a trustee with the administration of the
funds of the bank in his hands, converts them to his own use without authority for so doing, he embezzles and abstracts them within the meaning
of section 5209, Revised Statutes. (In the matter of Van Campen, 2 Ben..
419.)
(g) If, with intent to defraud the association, an officer allows a firm in which
he is a member to overdraw its account, he will be guilty of misapplying
the funds of the association. (Ibid.)
(h) As the national banking law makes the embezzlement, abstraction, or willful misapplication of the funds of a national banking association merely a
misdemeanor, a person who procures such an offense to be committed can
not bo punished under a State statute which provides that a person who
procures a felony to bo committed may be indicted and convicted of a substantive felony. (Commonwealth v. Felton, 101 Mass., 204.)
(i) An indictment charging defendants with aiding and abetting a director in
a willful misapplication of the money of an association must state facts
to show that there has been such misapplication committed by the director.
( United States v. Warner, U. S. C. C. (S. D. N. Y.), Feb. 13, 1886, 26Fed. Rep.,
616.)
(j) Allowing the withdrawal of the deposit of one indebted to the association
can not be charged as a misapplication of the money of the association.
(United States Y\ Britton, 108 U. S., 193.)
(k) It is not a willful misapplication of the moneys of the association within the
meaning of section 5209, Revised Statutes, for a president who is insolvent
to procure the discounting by the association of his note not well secured.
(Ibid.)
(I) To constitute the offense of a willful misapplication of the moneys, funds,
or credits of the association within section 5209, Revised Statutes, it is not
necessary that the person charged with the offense should have been previously in the actual possession of such moneys, funds, and credits under
or by virtue of any trust, duty, or employment committed to him. Nor is
it necessary to the commission of this offense that the officer making the
willful misapplication should derive any personal benefit therefrom.
When the funds or assets of the bank are unlawfully taken from its possession, and afterward willfnlly misapplied by converting them to the use
of any person other than the bank, with intent to injure and defraud, the
offense as described in the statute is committed. ( United States v. Harper,
33 Fed. Rep., 471.)

(m) This criminal act may be done directly and personally, or it may be done
indirectly through the agency of another. If the officer charged with it
has such control, direction, and power of management by virtue of his relation to the bank as to direct an application of its funds in such manner
and under such circumstances as to constitute the offense of willful misapplication, and actually makes such direction, or causes such misapplication
to be made, he is equally as guilty as if it was done by his own hands.
(Ibid.)
(n) Any entry on the books of the bank which is intentionally made to represent what is not true or what does not exist, with intent either to deceive
its officers, or defraud the association, is a false entry within the meaning
of the statute. ( United States v. Harper, 33 Fed. Rep., 471.)
(o) It may be made personally or by direction.
(p) The erasure of figures already written in the books of a national bank, and
the substitution of other figures which falsify the state of the account, constitute a "false entry" within the meaning of section 5209, Revised Statutes, by which it is declared to be a misdemeanor to make " any false entry
in any book, report, or statement of the association with intent to injure
or defraud," etc. ( United States v. Crecelius, 34 Fed. Rep., 30.)
(q) Where false entries are made by a clerk at the direction of the president, the
latter is a principal. (In the matter of Van Campen, supra) United States v.
Fish, supra.)
(r) Prior to the act of February 26, 1881, a notary public holding his commission under a State liad no authority to administer the oath required by section 5211, Revised Statutes; and, therefore, a cashier who made oath before
such notary to a false statement of the condition of his association was not
guilty of perjury. ( United States v. Curtis, 107 U. S.s 671.)
(s) To constitute the offense of willful abstraction by an officer, defined by the
statute, it is necessary that the money or funds of the association should
be withdrawn by the officer or by his direction; that such taking or withdrawing should be without the knowledge or consent of the bank, or of its




126

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

1. UNDER UNITED STATES LAWS—Continued.

board of directors, that the money or funds so taken or withdrawn should
be converted to the officer's own use, or for the benefit and advantage of
some person other than the association, and that this should be done with
intent to injure and defraud the association. ( United States v. Harper, 33
Fed. Hep., 471.)
2. UNDER STATE LAWS:

{a) An officer of a national banking association can not be punished under State
laws for embezzling the funds of the association. {Commonwealth exrel.
Torrey v. Ketner, 92 Penn. St., 372; Commonwealth v. Felton, 101 Mass., 204.)
(&) But where the offense committed by an officer is properly a larceny of the
•funds, and not -an embezzement, he may be indicted under a State law.
(Commomvealth v. Barry, 116 Mass., 1.)
(c) And an officer may be punished under State laws for making false entries
in the books of the association with intent to defraud it. (Luoerg v. Commonwealth, 94 Penn. St., 85.)
(d) The officers of a national banking association may bo prosecuted under State
statutes for fraudulent conversion of the property of individuals deposited
with, and in the custody of, the association. (Commonwealth v. Tenney, 97
Mass., 50; State v. Fuller, 34 Conn., 280,)
3. TERM " UNITED STATES CURRENCY" IN PENAL STATUTE:

The circulating notes of national banking associations are included in the
phrase " United States currency" wlion used in a penal statute^ (State v.
Gasting, 23 La. Ann,, 1609.)




A DIGEST OF RECENT DECISIONS IN BANKING LAW.
BANKS AND BANKING.
CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISION :

The term " banking powers," as used in the constitution of the State of Ohio,
has a restricted meaning, and relates only to the powers of making and issuing paper money, or, at most, to powers exercised by associations organized to deal in money, including tho making and issuing of bills and notes
intended to circulate as money. (Dearborn v. Bank, 42 Ohio State, 617.)
POWER OF SAYINGS BANK TO BORROW MONEY :

A savings bank having the usual powers of such an institution may borrow
money in the course of its legitimate business, and may make and indorse
negotiable paper for the money so borrowed. (Fifth Ward Savings Bank v.
First Natioyial Bank, 48 JV. J. Law, 513.)
WRONGFUL PAYMENT TO AGENT:

S. drew his check for $5,000 on the People's Bank of New York, payable to the
order of the United States Trust Company, and delivered it to C. with verbal instructions to deposit it to his (S.'s) credit with tho trust company. C.
delivered the check to the trust company, but, instead of doing as directed,
requested and received from the company a certificate of deposit payable
to himself as trustee of S., and shortly thereafter drew the money and converted it to his own use. Held, that the trust company was not authorized
in paying the money to C , and was liable to the executors of S. for the
amount. The use of the company's name as payee of the check indicated
the drawers intention to lodge the moneys in its custody and place them
under its control, and nothing further than this was inferable from the language of the check. (Sims v. United States Trust Company, 103 N. Y., 472.)
NOTE.—Upon the trial, evidence of a custom to make such payments was submitted to the jury; but the evidence was conflicting, and the jury found
against the existence of the custom. (Id.)
EVIDENCE OF CUSTOM TO BORROW MONEY:

In order to show that the borrowing of money was within the scope of the ordinary and customary business of a firm doing a banking business, evidence
that such is the custom of the banks in the same place is admissible. (Crain
et al. v. National Bank, 114 III, 51G.)
PAYMENTS THROUGH CLEARING-HOUSE:

(a) Where, by the rules of a clearing-house, checks not good are to be returned
by the banks receiving them to the banks from which they are received
as soon as the fact that they are not good is discovered, and in no case to he
retained after a certain hour, yet when by mistake as to a matter of fact a
bank has delayed to return a check until after the hour so fixed, it may
demand repayment of the other bank, if in the interval between the time fixed
by the rule and the time of the actual return the latter bank has not changed its
position, as, for instance, by paying over the amount of the check to the person
who had deposited it for collection. (Merchants1 Bank v. Bank of Commonwealth, 139 Mass., 213.)
(?>) But in such case tho recovery could be only the difference between the sum
which the depositor has to his credit and the amount of the check; notwithstanding that, by the course of dealing between banks in the clearinghouse association, the ordinary custom is to return the check as not good
when there is not money enough to pay it in full; for the clearing-house
rules not having been complied with by the return of the check within the
127




128

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

PAYMENTS THROUGH

CLEAHING-HOUSE—Continued.

time fixed, these rules can not control in determining how much shall be
returned after payment of it has been made. (Merchants' Bank v. Bank of
Commonwealth, 139 Mass., 513.)
NOTE.—Under a similar rule of the Chicago Clearing-House it has been held by
the United States circuit court for the northern district of Illinois that no
such mistake could be corrected after the time allowed by the rule. Blodgett., J., said: " If parties competent to contract within what time they
may correct mistakes in their dealings with each other have so contracted,
it seems to me the courts have no right to override or disregard such an
agreement. If a mistake which is discovered within an hour or within ten
minutes after the expiration of the time limited by the agreement for its
correction may be corrected, I can see no reason why it can not be corrected
a week afterward, or whenever it is discovered.77 (Preston v. Bank3 23 Fed.
Rep., 179.)
(c) Where a check received through the clearing-house by the bank on which
it was drawn was placed upon the rile and entered in the journal, but subsequently, and before 1 o'clock of the same day (the time within which
checks not good are by the rules of the clearing required to be returned),
was sent back to the bank from which it was received : Held, that the filing
and entry in the journal did not operate as a payment or acceptance of the
check so as to deprive the bank of the right to return it. (German NationaUJSank v. Farmers7 Deposit National Bank, 118 Penn. St., 294.)
PASS-BOOK :

(a) The duty of a depositor in respect to examining his pass-book and reporting
any mistake to the bank is such as that which prudent men usually bestow
on the examination of such accounts. (Leather Manufacturers'' Bank v. Morgan, 111 U. £.,96.)
(b) And by neglecting to make an examination of his pass-book within a reasonable time, a depositor may estop himself from afterward questioning its
correctness. (Ibid.)
DUTIES AND LIABILITIES OF BANKS MAKING COLLECTIONS:

(a) Where a certified check is left with a bank for collection the collecting
bank does not discharge its duty by forwarding that check to the bank on
which it is drawn ; and if it does so forward the check, and loss results, it
will be liable for such loss. (Drovers' National Bank v. Provision Co., il7
/ZZ.,1OO.)
(b) Nor would it in any case be a sufficient discharge of the duty of the collecting bank to forward the check to the bank on which it is drawn. (Merchants' National Bank v. Goodman, 109 Penn. St., 422.)
NOTE.—In Indig v. National City Bank, 80 N. Y., 100, it was said that when
there are no indorsers to charge, sending the check through the mail to the
bank on which it is drawn is a good presentment. (See also Heywood v.
Pickering, L. R., 93 B., 428.)
(c) Where paper is received by a bank in the ordinary course of business for collection, such bank will be responsible for the neglect or misconduct of any
sub-agent employed by it in the business of making the collection. (Simpson v. Walby, Supreme Ct. Mich., 1886, 30 N. W. Rep., 199.)
NOTE.—The same rule has recently been adopted by the Territorial court of
Montana. (Power v. First National Bank, 6 Mont., 251.)
This is now the rule in the Supreme Court of the United States (Exchange
National Bank v. Third National Bank, 112 TJ. S., 276); in England (Mac'kersy v. Ramsay, 9 Cl. and Fin., 818); in New York (Ayrault v. Pacific Bank,
47 N. F., 570); in New Jersey (Titus v. Mechanics' Bank, 35 N. J. Law, 588);
in Pennsylvania (Wingate v. Mechanics' Bank, 10 Penn. St., 104); in Ohio
Reeves v. State Bank, 8 Ohio St., 465); in Indiana (Tyson v. State Bank, 6
Blackf, 225) ; in Michigan (Simpson v. Walby, supra), and in Montana.
In other jurisdictions the rule prevails that the bank is only bound to transmit the paper to a suitable agent at the place of payment for that purpose,
and when a suitable sub-agent is thus employed, in good faith, the collecting bank is not liable for his neglect or default. This is tho rule in Massachusetts (Fabens v. Mercantile Bank, 23 Pick., 330; Dorchester Bank v.
New England Bank, 1 Cush., 177); in Maryland (Jackson v. Union Bank, 6
Har. and Johns., 146); in Connecticut (Lawrencev. Stonington Bank, 6 Conn.,
521; East Haddam Bank v. Scovil, 12 Conn., 303); in Missouri (Daly v.
Butchers and Drovers' Bank, 56 Mo., 94); in Illinois (Mtna Insurance Co. v.
Alton City Bank, 25 III., 243); in Tennessee (Bank of Louisville v. First




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 129
DUTIES AND LIABILITIES OF BANKS MAKING COLLECTIONS—Continued.

National Bank, 8 Baxter, 101); in Iowa (Guelich v. National State Bank, 56
Iowa, 434); in Wisconsin (Stacy v. Dane County Bank, 12 Wis., 629; Vilas
v. Bryants, Wis., 702).
BANKERS' LIEN AND RIGHT OF SET-OFF:

(a) Where a customer deposited with his bankers a policy of life insurance to
secure any indebtedness of his to them then due, or which should thereafter become due, not exceeding at any one time the sum of £4,000:
Held, that the bankers had no lien for any indebtedness of the customer in
excess of £4,000; for as the express terms of the deposit limited the security to that amount, it would be inconsistent with those terms that the
bank should hold the policy for something more. {Earl of Strathmore v.
Vane, £.£.,33 Ch.Biv.,586.)

(b) Where agents deposit money in bank for the benefit of their principals, and
the purpose of the deposit is known to the bank, the deposit is impressed
with a trust, and the bank can not charge against it any indebtedness of the
agents, even with their consent. (Baker et al. v. New York National Bank. 100
N.Y.,31.)
(c) The general rule is that a bank has the right to set off as against a deposit
only where the person who is both depositor and debtor stands in both
these characters alike, in precisely the same relation, and on precisely the
same footing toward the bank, and hence an individual deposit can not
be set off against a partnership debt. (International Bank v. Jones, 119 III.,
407.)
(d) And notwithstanding that it is the duty of a partner to pay the firm's debt;
to the bank, still, inasmuch as the bank could not set off the firm debt
against his deposit, he could lawfully appropriate such deposit to the payment of a bonafide creditor of his own. (Id.)
STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS:

(a) Where notes deposited with a bank as collateral security fora line of discounts are paid, it is the duty of the bank to carry the proceeds to the credit
of the borrower's account, when he will occupy the position of depositor;
and then, as to any part of such proceeds, the rule will apply, that when a
deposit is made in bank the statute of limitations does not begin to run
until demand is made. (Humphrey v. National Bank of Clearfield, 113 Penn.
££.,417.)
(b) Whenever demand is made by presentation of a genuine check in the hands
of a person entitled to receive its amount, for a portion of the amount on
deposit, and payment is refused, a cause of action immediately arises in
favor of the drawer; and as to the amount specified in the check the statute
of limitations begins to run from that time. (Viets v. Union National Bank
of Troy, 101 N. F.,564.)
(c) Although it is a general rule that a bank in accepting and paying a check
drawn by a customer is generally held to know the signature, and if a forged
check ie paid by it it will not bo heard to assert a mistake as to the signature, yet where one in whose favor a forged check is drawn takes it under
suspicious circumstances, and gives it credit by indorsing his own name thereon,

and collects the money on it, the bank may recover the amount from him.
(Eouvant v. San Antonio National Bank, 63 Tex., 610.)
(d) The statute of limitations begins to run against a banker's certificate of
deposit drawn " payable on the return of this certificate properly indorsed "
(which is the same thing as payable on demand;from the date of the same,
and no special demand is necessary to put the statute in motion. (Curran
v. Witter, 68 Wis., 16.)
NOTE.—The same is held in Michigan (Tripp v. Curtenius, 36 Mich., 496) and
in California (Brummagin v. Tallaut, 29 Cal., 503). In other States it is held
that such a certificate is not due until presented for payment, and hence
that the statute of limitations does not commence to run against it until
such presentation. This is the rule in New York (Payne v. Gardiner, 29 N.
Y., 146; Hunger v. Albany City National Bank, 85 N. Y, 589); in Maryland
(Fell's Point Savings Inst. v. Weedon, 18 Md.y 320), and in Vermont (Bellows
Falls Bank v. Eutland Co. Bank, 40 Ft, 377).
BANK OFFICERS.
POWERS OP OFFICERS:

(a) The treasurer of a savings bank is an officer of much more limited powers
than the cashior of a commercial bank. His duties more nearly resemble
11028—CUR 88
9




130

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

POWERS OF OFFICERS—Continued.

those of the paying and receiving tellers of banks. He can not, simply in
virtue of his office as treasurer, create obligations which will be binding
upon the bank, as by indorsement of notes, or transfer to a purchaser a
promissory note belonging to the bank. {Fifth Ward Savings Bank v. First
National Bank, 48 N. J. Laiv, 513.)
(b) A cashier of a bank may, without authority from the board of directors, employ an attorney to collect outstanding debts due the bank; and this
though the bank has regularly retained counsel. His authority in this respect is incidental to his duty to collect. (Root v. Olcotl, 49 Hun, 536.)
(c) Knowledge acquired by the cashier of a bank in Ms capacity as an officer of.
another corporation can not be imputed to the bank, unless he communicated
that knowledge to some one or more of the other officers of the bank.
( Wilson v. Second National Bank of Pittsburgh, 7 Att. Bep., 145.)
(d) Where a president of a bank takes other promissory notes in settlement for
notes over-due, he is not performing the duties of the directors respecting
discounts, but is a mere agent, and whatever he does within the apparent
scope of his authority to obtain the new security is binding upon the bank
when it accents and holds the security. (Cake v. Poltsville Bank, 116 Penn.
St., 264.)
(e) Evidence is not admissible to show a custom of bankers and brokers to receive cashiers' checks and drafts drawn in favor of their own banks upon
New York banks as cash upon transactions with the cashier individually,
for no usage, however common and well recognized, can be invoked to justify a banker in taking money or negotiable paper known to belong to the
principal in payment of the agent's debt. (Anderson v. Kissam, 35 Fed.
2^.,699.)
(/) Whenever an officer of a bank offers paper of the bank under circumstances
which show that he has made it officially for his private use, the party
dealing with him must take notice of his want of authority, and can not
treat it as the obligation of the bank unless he can prove the existence of
some special and extraordinary authority on the part of such officer. (Anderson v. Kissam, supra.)
CASHIER'S BOND :

(a) The sureties on a cashier's bond will not be discharged by an increase of
the capital stock of the bank when this increase is made under the authority of a provision of the law under which the bank is organized. The
bond must be understood and read in the light of the law existing at the
time it was made; and the parties must have contemplated that the bank
would enlarge its business by all lawful ways and means, not going beyond
a banking business. (Lionberger v. Krieger, 88 Mo., 160.)
(b) The cashier's bond will not be invalidated by the fact that he is not a director, though the law under which the bank is organized provides that the
cashier shall be chosen from among the directors. (Id.)
LIABILITY OF DIRECTOR:

(a) Where a director and member of the finance committee of a savings bank,
acting with the president, invests the funds of the institution contrary to
the provisions of the law by which it is governed, he will be liable for the
loss on such investment. (Williams v. McDonald, 42 N. J. Eq., 392.)
(b) And in such case it is not essential, in order to charge him with liability for
the loss, to show that he acted fraudulently, or that he derived any benefit
from the loan ; it is sufficient that there was a culpable lack of prudence,
or failure to exercise with ordinary care his functions as quasi trustee of
the funds of the bank, by reason of which loss was sustained. (Id.)
(c) Directors of a bank are trustees for depositors as well as stockholders. They
are bound to the observance of ordinary care and diligence, and are hence
liable for injuries resulting to depositors from a failure to exercise such care
and diligence. (Delano v. Case, 121 III. ,247; S.C., 17 Bradw., 531.)
(d) A depositor can maintain an action at law against the directors for loss resulting to him by reason of the neglect of the directors to use due care and
diligence. (Ibid.)
BUSINESS PAPER.
CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS :

(a) It is not unconstitutional for a State to enact a law making the liabilities
of signers of commercial paper made and payable within its limits entirely
different from the laws of other States respecting such liabilities, and by




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

131

CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS—-Continued.

statute change absolutely the operation of the law merchant, so far as it
affects contracts made and to be performed within that State. (Shoe and
Leather National Bank v. Wood, 142 Mass., 563.)
(b) A provision in a State law requiring that the words " given for a patent
right" shall be inserted in every promissory note executed in consideration
of the sale and transfer of a patent right is constitutional. (Newv. Walker,
108 Ind., 365.)
(c) This provision is in the nature of a police regulation. But independent of
this consideration it is valid, because it simply proscribes what shall be
written in a promissory note given for a particular class of property. (Id.)
BILLS DRAWN IN ANOTHER COUNTRY:

Where bills of exchange were drawn in France by a domiciled Frenchman, in
the French language, but according to the English form, on an English
company, by which they were duly accepted: Held, that the bills were to
be regarded as English bills, at least so far as the acceptor was concerned,
and that their negotiability could not be attacked by the company on the
ground that the indorsement of the drawer was not a good indorsement
according to the French law. (In re Marseilles Extension Railway and Land
Company, L. R. 30 Ch. Div., 598.)
NOTES GIVEN FOR PATENT RIGHTS:

(a) Where a State statute requires that notes for which the consideration is the
assignment of a patent right shall contain the words " given for a patent
right," notes issued in violation of such provision will be unenforciblo as
between the parties, and when in the hands of a purchaser with notice of
the nature of the consideration. {New v. Walker, 108 Ind., 365.)
(1)) But they will not be void in the hands of an innocent purchaser unless the
statute, either expressly or by necessary implication, declares them to b©
void. But this the Indiana statute (section 6055 R. S.) does not do. (Id.)
NOTE.—Similar statutes in Pennsylvania and Ohio have received the same construction. (Haskellv. Jones, 86 Penn. St., 173 ; Tod v. Wick, 36 Ohio St., 370.)
INCOMPLETE INSTRUMENT:

Where one signs and delivers a note in blank to be used as security, the law
implies that he means to become liable upon a completed and perfected
note, and so far as the same is, at the time of his signature, an incomplete
and imperfect instrument, he is held to have authorized the filling of such
blank by the agent intrusted with the note for use; but nothing more than
this is implied. And, therefore, if a matter of special agreement (e. g., a
provision for a special rate of interest) is crowded into it, there being no
blank space left for such insertion, the alteration is material, and discharges
the indorser. (Weyerhauser v. Dun, 100 N. Y, 150.)
SUNDAY CONTRACT:

Where a note is signed on Sunday, but not delivered until Monday, it is not
open to the objection that it is a Sunday contract; for a promissory note
becomes a contract from the time of its delivery. (Bell v. Mohin, 69 Iowa,
408.)
NOTE PAYABLE ON DEMAND :

Although the principle laid down in the case of Merritt v. Todd (23 N. Y., 28),
has been criticised in later cases, it has been acquiesced in too long as the
law of New York to be open to question or dispute. That principle is
that a promissory note payable on demand', with interest, is a continuing
security; so that the holder may make demand when he pleases, and is
not chargeable with neglect if he does not make it within any particular
time, and an indorser on such note remains liable until an actual demand.
(Parker et al. v. Stroud, 98 N. Y, 379.)
A note payable " on call" is the same as payable " on demand." (Mobile Savings Bank v. McDonnell, 80 Ala., 83.)
PROMISE TO PAY FORGED NOTE :

An oral promise to pay a note by one whose signature has been forged to the
note is nothing more than an oral promise to pay the debt of another, and
is ineffectual to bind the promissor. (Smith v. Tramel, 68 Iowa, 488.)
AUTHORITY AND LIABILITY OF AGENT:

(a) Where a bill drawn upon him by his principal is accepted by an agent by
signing his own name thereto, with the addition of words describing him-




132

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

AUTHORITY AND LIABILITY OF AGENT—Continued.

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(/)
$1061.24.

self as agent and giving the name of his principal, he will be individually
liable upon such acceptance ; and he will not be allowed to show that the
acceptance was intended to charge only his principal. {Robinson v. Kanawha Valley Bank, u Ohio, 441.)
44
Where a note ran w e promise to pay," and was signed " Pioneer Mining
Company, John E. Mason, sup't," parol evidence was held admissible, in a
suit by the payee, to show that the note was given as that of the company,
and not as the note of the company and MasoD. (Bean v. Pioneer Mining
Co., 66 Cal, 451.)
Where a bill of exchange, drawn on a firm, was accepted by one of the
partners by signing the name of the firm and adding his own underneath :
Held, that the acceptance was that of the firm, and that the individual
partner was not separately liable. (Edwards v. Barned, L. R., 32, Ch. Div.,
447.)
In the case of a non-trading partnership, in order to subject the firm to
liability upon a bill or note executed by one partner in its name, a course
of conduct, or usage, or other facts sufficient to warrant the conclusion that
the acting partner had been invested by his copartners with the requisite
authority must appear, or that the firm has ratified the act by receiving the
benefit of it. (Pearse v. Cole, 53 Conn., 53.)
Where a note was made payable to " the order of T. W. Woollen, AttorneyGeneral:" Held, that the words ''Attorney-General" were merely descriptive of the individual, and that as the persons in giving the note had executed a commercial instrument, fair on its face and complete in all its
parts, they could not, as against a bonafide holder, set up the defense that
the payee had no right to transfer it. ( Wallce v. Kuhne, 109 Ind., 313.)
A note was drawn in the following form:
DETROIT, MICHIGAN, August 4,1880.

Four (4) months after date we promise to pay to the order of Geo. Moebs, Sec.
& Treas., ten hundred sixty-one and. fifo dollars, at Merchants and Manufacturers' National Bank, value received.
PENINSULAR CIGAR CO.
GEO. MOEBS, SEC. & TKEAS.

Indorsed: Geo. Moebs, Sec. & Treas.
Held, that the indorsement purported to be that of the Peninsular Cigar Company ; that it was not ambiguous, and that, therefore, evidence was not
admissible to show that it was the intention of the indorser to bind himself personally by the indorsement. {Folk v. Moebs, 127, U. £.,597.)
CONSIDERATION :

(a) One dollar is a mere nominal consideration, and therefore not sufficient to
constitute the holder of a note a purchaser for value. (Proctor v. Cole, 104
Ind., 373.)
(b) An agreement to pay one-half the proceeds that may be realized upon a note
is a venture approaching very near a wagering contract; at all events, it
is not such an agreement as will create a right against prior equities. (Td.)
(c) It is the law of New York that one who takes commercial paper upon a pre
existing debt, without parting with any right or property of value, is not
a bonafide holder for value who will be protected against the equities of
third persons. (Webster fy Co, v. Howe Machine Co., 54 Conn., 394.)
NOTE.—See for this the following New York cases: Coddington v. Bay, 20
Johns., 637 ; Stalker v. McDonald, 6 Hill, 93 ; McBride v. Farmers'' Bank of
Salem, 26 N. Y, 450; Comstock v. Hher, 73 N. Y., 269. For the contrary
rule see Swift v. Tyson, 16 Peters 1; Railroad Company v. National Bank,
102 U. S., 14.
(d) An existing debt is a sufficient consideration to constitute a pledgee of a
negotiable instrument a holder for value. (Spencer v. Sloan, 108 lnd.y 183.)
(e) The pledgee of negotiable securities received by him as collateral security
for an antecedent debt is not a holder for value, and is not protected from
antecedent equities. (Appeal of the Leggett Spring and Axle Co., I l l Penn.
St., 291.)
NOTE.—The rule in the Supreme Court of the United States is in accordance
with that in the Indiana case. (Railroad Company v. National Bank, 102
V. S., 14.)
(/) If the compounding of a felony affected the consideration of a note in any
way, or such purpose entered into the consideration, or such motive actuated the




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

133

CONSIDEKATION—Continued,

maker in any respect, the contract is illegal. And, therefore, where H.
and his wife had given their note to R., the employer of their sou, to prevent R. from criminally prosecuting the son for theft, they could not recover from R. the amount which they had heen compelled to pay to a bona
fide purchaser of the note; and in such case the makers of the note could
not set up that it was obtained from them by duress and undue influence j
for such a right does not exist when the contract is tainted with a corrupt
consideration. {Haynes y. Riidd, 102 N. Y., 372.)
{g) If one becomes a bonafideholder for value of a bill before its acceptance,
it is not essential to his right to enforce it against a subsequent acceptor
that an additional consideration should proceed from him to the drawee.
The holder does not trust wholly to the credit of the drawer. He believes
and expects that the drawee will accept, and upon such belief and expectation he acts. {Jleuterematte v. Morris, 101 N. Y., 63; Credit Company v.
Howe Machine Co., 54 Conn., 357. )
(h) The promise of a husband who has borrowed money of his wife to pay it to
her children is a consideration sufficient to constitute one of those children
a bonafideholder of a note assigned to him by the husband. {Proctor v.
Cole, 104 1M., 373.)
(£) Where the instrument to secure which negotiable securities are deposited
as a pledge turns out to be a forgery, this circumstance will not defeat
the title of the pledge to the securities ; for these having in themselves a
negotiable character, the pledgee does not need to make any other title to
them than such as springs from a delivery for value. {Fifth Ward Savings
Bank v. First National Bank.)
{j) Where a bank lias discounted for the drawer drafts to which forged bills of
lading are attached, the acceptors can not afterward defeat the claim of
the bank on the ground that they accepted the drafts in the belief that the
bills oi lading were genuine. {Goetz v. Bank of Kansas City, 119 U. S., 551.)
(k) After discounting the drafts the bank stands toward the acceptors in the
position of an original lender, and can not be affected in its claim by the
want of a consideration from the drawer for the acceptance or by the failure of such consideration. {Id.)
{I) To enable one of the makers of a joint note to set up the defense that as to
him there was no consideration for it, he is not necessarily obliged to show
that it was without consideration as to all the makers; for, though presumably all makers executed it at the same time, and upon ample consideration as to each and all, it is possible that one might have signed the note
without any consideration for his contract running to him or to any one
else. {Moyer v. Bound, 102 Ind., 301.)
PRESENTMENT AND NOTICE :

{a) As to every bill not payable on demand, the day on which payment is to be
made to prevent dishonor is to be determined by adding three days of grace,
where the bill itself does not otherwise provide, to the time of payment as
fixed in the bill. Thus, where the acceptor had stated in his acceptance
"Due 21st May," it was held that the bill was not due until three days after
the 21st of May. The time named in the acceptance after the word *' due"
was to be regarded as the time of payment to which days of grace were to
be added, and not as a date which included days of grace. {Bell v. First
National Bank of Chicago, 115 U. S., 373.)
(b) A draft drawn upon a bank, and purporting to be drawn upon funds deposited, and payable on demand, is to be regarded as a banker's check.
And whero such a draft is payable at a different place from that in which
it is negotiated, the holder should, as a general rule, forward it for presentment on the day on which it is received, or on the next succeeding day;
and although this general rule may be varied by the particular circumstances of the case, the presentment must be made, iu every instance, with
all the dispatch and diligence consistent with the transaction of other commercial matters. Therefore, where the holders retained a draft for several
days in their possession, for no other reason than that they chose to send
it through a local bank with which they did business, and it did not suit
their convenience to deposit it at an earlier date: Held, that they could
not recover against the indorsers. {Northwestern Coal Company v. Boivman
.4- Co., 69 Iowa, 150.)
(c) And in such case it makes no difference as between the indorsee and his indorser that the drawer had no funds on deposit with the bank at the time
the draft was drawn. {Id.)




134

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

PRESENTMENT AND NOTICE—Continued.

(d) Where notice of the dishonor of a draft was sent by the notary to the indorsee at Boone, Iowa, when their post-office address was Odebolt, in a different county: Held, that tnis was not a sufficient notice to fix their liability. (The Northwestern Coal Company v. Bowman $ Co., 69 Iowa, 150.)
(e) Where there was written upon a note " I hereby acknowledge the receipt
of notice of protest on the within note," and this was signed by all the indorsers: Held, that the word "protest" included all acts necessary to hold
indorsers, and the legal effect of the acknowledgment was to release the
holder from any obligation to make demand or give notice. (City Savings
BankY.Hopson, 53 Conn., 453.)
BONTA FIDE HOLDER:

(a) Mere notice of facts such as would have put a prudent person upon inquiry .
is not sufficient to impeach the title of the holder of negotiable paper taken
for value before maturity, and his right to recover can be defeated only by
proof of such circumstances as show that he took the paper with knowledge of some infirmity in it, or with such suspicion with regard to its validity as that his conduct in taking it was fraudulent. {National Bank of'
the Republic v. Young 41 N. J. Eq., 531; Fifth Ward Savings Bank v. First
National Bank, 48 N. J. Law, 513; Credit Co. v. Howe Machine Co., 54 Conn.,
357; Morton fy Bliss v. N. 0. and Selma Railway Co., 79 Ala., 590; Mayes
v. Robinson, 93 Mo. 114.)
(b) Therefore, where the vice-president of a bank, who had negotiated a loan
upon the paper of a corporation was advised by one of the officers of the
corporation that it had outstanding a large amount of accommodation paper : Held, that this was not sufficient to defeat the claim of the bank as a
bona iide holder of paper of the corporation discounted after such notice to
the vice-president. {National Bank of the Republic v. Young, supra.)
(c) But in cases of this kind the burden of proof is on the holder to show that
he took the instrument before maturity bona fide and for value. The mere
possession of it, when it has been obtained or issued under such circumstances, is not enough. (Id.)
(d) But when he has shown that he became the holder of it before maturity
and for value, in the due course of business, he has established all the
facts that are necessary to fulfill the burden of proof laid ujjon him, and
from these facts the law will imply that he is a bouaficle holder, unless there
should be circumstances from which bad faith may be inferred. (Id.)
(e) The bad faith in the taker of negotiable paper which will defeat a recovery
by him mnst be something more than a failure to inquire into the consideration upon which it is made or accepted, because of rumors of general
reputation as to the bad character of the maker or drawer. (Goetz v. Bank
of Kansas City, 119 U. 8., 551.)
(/) The failure to pay interest on coupon bonds as it becomes due does not dishonor them before maturity so as to subject them to antecedent equities in
the hands of otherwise innocent purchasers for value. (Morton ty Bliss v.
N. O. and Selma Railway Co., 79 Ala., 590.)
(g) Where a negotiable bond or other negotiable instrument is taken in such
a way that the purchaser is not affected by antecedent equities, a mortgage given to secure payment is likewise protected against such latent
defenses. (Spence v. Mobile and Montgomery Railway Co., 79 Ala., 576.)
NOTE.—The contrary is held in Ohio and Illinois. (See Bailey v. Smith, 14
Ohio St., 396; Kleeman v. Frisbie, 63 III, 462.)
(h) Where the condition of a bond is that the principal shall become due and
payable upou the failure to pay any of the coupons as they become due,
after demand made, the fact that the bonds have so become due and payable, as it rests upon an extrinsic matter, foreign to the face of the paper,
and which does not dishonor it upon its face, does not of itself operate to
charge the purchaser with knowledge that the bonds have been dishonored.
The law does not in such case charge him with knowledge of the fact, unless he either knows it, or exhibits bad faith by intentionally avoiding a
knowledge of it. And mere neglect to inquire whether there has been a
demand made is not evidence conclusive of a fraudulent intent. (Morton
<f Bliss v. N. O. and Selma Railway Co., 79 Ala., 590.)
(i) Where a State repeals the law under which it had become the indorser of
the bonds of a corporation, and by which provision was made for the payment of the bonds in the event of a default of payment by the corporation
as maker, such action—whether or not it was an open repudiation by the
State of its liability as indorser of the bonds, such as to dishonor them ipso
facto—was at least sufficient to put the purchaser on inquiry, and charge him




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, 135
BONA FIDE HOLDER—Continued.

with notice of the fact that there was something wrong ahout the bonds,
especially when taken in connection with another fact—that, at the time
of such repeal, several years of overdue coupons remained unpaid, and
were attached to the bonds. (Morton $• Bliss v. New Orleans and Selma Railway Company, supra.)
(j) By the law of Kentucky, promissory notes in the hands of an indorsee are
subject to any defense, discount, or offset that the maker had or might
have had against the payee before notice of the assignment. (Shoe arid
Leather National Bank v. Wood, 142 Mass., 536. See Gen. Sts. of Kentucky
c. 22, sees. 6, 22.)
(k) A note transferred as collateral security for an existing debt, and upon no
new consideration, is open to all defenses which could have been made
against the payee. (Haden v. Lehman, 83 Ala., 243.)
(I) As the rights of the parties are to be determined by the relation they sustain to the contract to be performed, and not by the nature of the security
given for its performance, one who is a bona fide holder of a note for value
before maturity (under the rule that gross negligence in taking negotiable
instruments is not sufficient to lefc in the defenses of prior parties) is in
equal measure the bona lide holder of a deed of trust given to secure such
note, and in determining the question as to such deed of trust, the rules
governing the transfer of commercial paper should obtain, and not the
rules applicable in the case of a purchase of real estate. (Hayes v. Bobinson, 93 Mo., 114.)
CHECKS :

(a) A check in the usual form, not accepted or certified by its cashier to be
good, does not constitute a transfer of any money to the credit of the
holder ; it is simply an order which may be countermanded, and payment
forbidden by the drawer at any time before it is actually cashed. It creates no lien on the money which the holder can enforce against the bank.
It does not of itself operate as an equitable assignment. (Florence Mining Company v. Brown, 124 TJ. S., 386.)
(b) Where, by the law of a State the drawing of a check by a depositor amounts
to an assignment of his deposit pro tanto, that result will follow where the
check is upon a bank in that State, though the check is drawn in another State
in which this peculiar rule as to the effect of drawing a check does not prevail. (Bank of America v. Indiana Banking Company, 114 III., 483.)
(c) A check becomes no valid claim upon the funds against which it is drawn
until the bank is notified of its existence. (Laclede Bank v. Schuler, 120 TJ.
8., 511.)
(d) And however the doctrine that a check is an appropriation of the amount
for which it is drawn of the funds of the drawer in the possession of the
bank may operate to secure an equitable interest in the funds after notice
given to the bank (a question which the court expressly stated it did not
undertake to decide), yet the bank, so far as concerns itself and its duties
and obligations in regard to the fund, remains unaffected by the execution
of the check until notice has been given to it, or demand of payment made
upon it. (Id.)
(e) Although the practice of drawing instruments in sets for the payment of
money is generally confined to foreign bills of exchange, yet there is nothing in the purpose or effect of that practice which would render it inapplicable under all circumstances to checks. And, therefore, the character of
an instrument as a check is not destroyed by the fact that it contains the
words "original" and "second unpaid." These words do not make the
instrument payable conditionally. (Merchants' National Bank v. Betzinger,
188111,484.)
(f) Whenever demand is made by presentation of a genuine check in the hands
of a person entitled to receive its amount, for a portion of the amount on deposit, and payment is refused, a cause of action immediately arises in favor
of the drawer; and as to the amount specified in the check the statute of
limitations begins to run from that time. (Viets v. Union National Bank of
Troy, 101 N. F., 564.)
(g) Where, by the law of a State the drawing of a check by the depositor operates as the assignment of the deposit pro tanto, a bank in such State upon
which process of garnishment has been served should be allowed credit for
the amount paid upon checks of the depositor drawn before such service
though not presented for payment until after such service. (Bank of America v.
Indiana Banking Co., 114 III., 483.)
(h) But for no.credit for checks paid after service, and which do not appear to
have been drawn before. (Id.)




136

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

CHECKS—Continued:

(i) A fraudulent change in the date of a check, whereby the time for Its payment
is accelerated, is an alteration which vitiates the instrument. (Crawford Y.
West Side Bank, 100 N. Y., 50.)
(j) If a bank pay a check so altered, it can not charge the amount against the
account of the drawer. (Id.)
(7c) And holding the check until its true date will not entitle the bank to charge
it to the drawer, for the possibility that the check could ever become a legal
liability in the hands of any person was destroyed by the fraudulent alteration. (Id.)
(I) An indorsee of a bank check, taking it six months after date, for a valuable consideration and without notice, the funds against which it was drawn
still remaining with the bank, is protected against any right of set-off, existing between the maker and the payee. (Bull v. Bank of Kasson, 123 U.
S., 105.)
(m) Where a bank certifies for the drawer a check made payable to the drawer's
own order, it incurs no liability to any subsequent holder until the check
is indorsed by the drawer. (Lynch v. First National Bank of Jersey City,
107 N Y, 179.)
NOTE.—It was held by the same court in Freund v. Importers and Traders1
Bank (76 JV. Y., 352) that a certification by the bank of a check in the hands
of a holder who had purchased it for value from the payee, but which had
not been indorsed by him, rendered the bank liable to such holder for the
amount thereof. Distinguishing these two cases the court pointed out
that in the earlier case the bank by certifying the check took, as it had
the right to do, the risk of the title which"the holder claimed to have acquired from the payee, and entered into a contract with the holder by
which it accepted the check, and promised to pay it to him, notwithstanding it lacked the indorsement provided for, while in the case under consideration the certification was made at the request of the drawer and was
subject to the condition imposed by him, plainly written in the check, that
it should not thereafter be payable except by his indorsement.
(n) In the absence of an agreement to the contrary, a check or promissory note
of either the debtor or a third person, received for a debt, is merely conditional payment, that is, satisfaction of the debt, if and when paid; but the
acceptance of such check or note implies an undertaking of due diligence
in presenting it for payment, etc., and if the party from whom it is received
sustains loss by want of such diligence it will be held to operate as actual
payment. (Kilpatrick v. B. $ L. Ass., 119 Penn. St., 30.)
CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT:

A certificate of deposit in the ordinary form of such instruments is in substance
and legal effect, a negotiable promissory note. (Curran v. Witter} 68 Wis.,
16.)
PAPER OF CORPORATIONS:

(a) A corporation engaged in business has implied power to make negotiable
paper for use within the scope of its business, but it has no power, express
or implied, to become a party to bills or notes for the accommodation of others, and such paper is valid and enforcible only in the hands of a holder
taking the same before maturity bonafideand without notice. (National
Bank of Republic y. Young, 41 N. J. Eq., 531.)
(b) The general doctrine of the law is that where a corporation has powers
under any circumstances to issue negotiable paper, a bonafideholder has a
right to presume that the paper was issued under the circumstances which
give the requisite authority, and such paper is no more liable to be impeached for any infirmity in the hands of such a holder than any other
commercial paper. And this doctrine is applied to commercial paper made
by a corporation for the accommodation of a third person when in the
hands of a bonafideholder who has discounted it before maturity on the
faith of its being business paper. (Id.)
(c) As corporations may accept drafts for some purposes, and as the purpose for
which a draft is drawn does not ordinarily appear on its face, the question
as to all parties with notice is, Was it drawn for a legitimate purpose ? As
to all others the implied inquiry is, Is the holder a bonafideholder for
value? (Credit Company v.Hoive Machine Co., 54 Conn., 357.)
(d) Although it is a correct proposition that persons dealing in the commercial
paper of a corporation are bound to take notice of the limits of the corporate power in this respect, j et a distinction is to be observed between the
terms of the power and the circumitmces under which it is exercised. Parties




EEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 137
PAPER OF CORPORATIONS—Continued:

must take notice of the former, but they are not required to have knowledge of the latter. And, therefore, a purchaser of such paper, when the
same has been accepted by the proper officer of the corporation, is not
bound to inquire whether it was issued in the legitimate exercise of the
officer's power to so bind the corporation, for this he has the right to presume. (Credit Company v. Howe Machine Co., 54 Conn., 357.)
(e) The fact that bonds of a private corporation were sold in violation of a restriction in the charter as to the price can not be set up to defeat the claim
of a bonafide holder of such bonds. (Ellsworth v. St. L., A. $ T. JR. R. Co.,
98 N. Y., 553.)
(/) When a corporation gives its promissory note in pursuance of a contract,
which is afterward performed on his part by the payee, the corporation
can not, in a suit upon the note, set up that the contract was ultra vires.
(Main v. Casserhj, 67 Cal., 127.)
PROVISIONS WHICH DESTROY NEGOTIABILITY:

(a) Where a note was made payable twelve months after date, but contained a
further provision " t h a t the payee or his assigns may extend the time of
payment thereof from time to time indefinitely, as he or they irtay see fit " :
Held, that the latter provision, as it made the time of payment uncertain and
indefinite, destroyed the negotiable character of the instrument. (Gidden
v. Henry, 104 Ind., 278.)
(b) Where a note contained the following stipulation: "This note is given in
consideration of, and is subject to one certain contract existing between S.
B. J. Bryant and Jacob Haas, of even date with this": Held, that this provision destroyed the negotiable character of the instrument, and that the
assignee took it subject to all existing equities. (McComasv. Haas, 1Q7
Ind., 512.)
(c) A note containing a power of attorney, which, in effect, authorizes a confession of judgment at any time after date is not negotiable. (Richards v.
Barlow, 140 Mass., 218.)
(d) A provision in a note for the payment of an attorney's fee in case suit should
be brought thereon destroys the negotiability of the instrument, (ishase
v. Whitmore, 68 CaZ.,545.)
(e) But an agreement inserted in a note to pay "all costs of collection, including 10 per cent, attorney's fees," does not render the note non-negofciable.
This stipulation does not make the amount which the maker is to pay uncertain, for the promise to pa,y a fee of 10 per cent, excludes the possibility
that the makers could be compelled to pay a fee more or less than that
amount, and as to the costs, as they must necessarily fall upon the losing
party, the stipulation as to them is to be regarded as mere surplusage.
(Schlesinger v. Arline (U. S. C. C, S. D. Georgia), 31 Fed. Rep., 648.)
NOTE.—As to whether a provision for the payment of an attorney's fee will
render a note non-negotiable, the authorities are conflicting. That it will
have this effect hasbeen decided in Pennsylvania ( Woods v. North, 8iPenn.
St., 407; Missouri (First National Bank v.Gay, 63 Mo., 38); Minnesota
(Jones v. Radatz, 27 Minn., 240); Wisconsin (FirstNational Bank v. Larsen,
60 Wis., 206); North Carolina (First National Bank v. Bynum, 84 N. C, 24);
and in the United States circuit court for the district of Minnesota, 14 Fed.
Rep., 705. The contrary rule prevails in Indiana (Stoneman v. Pyle, 35 Ind.,
103; Wyant v. Pattorf, 37 Ind., 512); Iowa (32 Iowa, 184); Kansas (Seaton
v. Scoville, 18 Kans., 433); Louisiana (Dietrich v. Baylie, 23 La. Ann., 767) ;
Nebraska (Heard v. Dubuque Bank, 8 Nebr., 10).
In neither class of cases is any distinction taken between provisions for a fee
at afixedpercentage and a provision to pay a " reasonable attorney's fee" or
simply " a n attorney's fee." The courts wbich sustain the negotiability
of notes containing such provisions, rest their decisions in the main upon
the ground that so long as the amount payable is certain up to the time of
maturity and dishonor, it is not essential that after that time, when the
instrument has for other reasons become non-negotiable the certainty
as to the amount should continue (see Stoneman v. Pyle, supra, and Wyant
v. Pattorf, supra). The courts which hold that such provisions destroy
the certainty essential to commercial instruments follow the reasoning of
Sharswood, J., in Woods v. North, supra In that case the stipulation was
to pay " five per cent, collection fee if not paid when due." In the course
of his opinion Judge Sharswood said: " It is a mistake to suppose that if
this note was unpaid at maturity the five per cent, would be payable to
the holder by the parties. It must go into the hands of an attorney for collection. It is not a sum necessarily payable. The phrase i collection fee 7
necessarily implies this. Not only so, but this amount of percentage can




138

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

PROVISIONS WHICH DESTROY NEGOTIABILITY—Continued.

not be arbitrarily determined by the parties. It must be only what would
be a reasonable compensation to an attorney for collection. This, in reason
and usage of the legal profession, depends upon the amount of the note.
* * * How then can this note be said to be certain as to its amount, or an
amount unaffected by any contingency ? Interest and cost of protest, after
non-payment at maturity, are necessary legal incidents of the contract, and
the insertion of them in the body of the note would not affect its negotiability. But a collateral agreement, as here, depending, too, as it does,
upon its reasonableness, to be determined by the verdict of a jury, is entirely different. * * * If this collateral agreement may be introduced
with impunity, what may not be ? "
(/) The negotiability of an instrument will not be destroyed by the use of the
term " i n current funds;" for since the issue of legal-tender notes, the
meaning of such term is that payment is to be made in whatever is receivable and current by law as money, whether in the form of notes or coin.
(Bull v. Bank of Kasson, 123 £7. S., 105.)
DEFENSES :

(a) In a suit upon a promissory note evidence is not admissible to show that
the note was given upon an understanding between the parties that it
should not be of any force. (Davy v. Kelly, 66 Wis., 452.)
(b) The drawer of a bill of exchange will not be permitted to show that at the
time the instrument was drawn there was verbal agreement that he should
not be held liable thereon as drawer. (Cummings v. Kent, 44 Ohio St., 92.)
(c) Although it is the rule in Iowa that when there is a blank indorsement of
a promissory note, a different contract from that which in such case is implied by law may be established by parol evidence, yet this rule will not
be extended further so as to allow it to be shown by parol that no contract
of any description was entered into or intended by such indorsement.
(Geneser v. Wissner, 69 Iowa, 119.)
(d) Where the payee of a promissory note is sued as indorser thereon, he
may show by parol evidence that when he wrote his name on the note the
note had already been paid, and that he put his name thereto at the request,
of the holder merely as evidence of the payment. (Spencer v. Sloan, 108
Ind., 183.)
(e) Where a promissory note has been given in part payment of a house, the
maker of the note may, as against the purchaser of the note with notice of
the facts, set up as a defense to it the damages sustained by him by reason
of the false and fraudulent representations of the vendor as to the condition of one of the walls. (Applegarth v. Robertson, 65 Md., 493.)
(/) The rule early established in Pennsylvania, that an iudorser of a negotiable instrument is not a competent witness to invalidate it, is still adhered
to in that State. It has not been changed by legislation. (John's Adm'r
v. Par dee, 109 Perm. St., 545.)
INDICIA OF OWNERSHIP:

(a) Where by the laws of the State a married woman can not transfer, without the
written or oral assent of her husband, shares of stock held by her in a corporation, and she delivers to her husband the certificates of stock and a
power of attorney in blank, and such stock is pledged by the husband, but
the power of attorney is not accompanied by written evidence of the assent of
the husband, a transferee from the pledgee is put upon inquiry, and his title
to the stock can bo no better than that which by the assent of the husband
the pledgee had ; for in such case, all the indicia of ownership are not conferred upon the pledgee. (Leipefs Appeal, 109 Penn., 377.)
(b) If the true owner of a negotiable note overdue, or a non-negotiable note,
clothes another with the usual evidences of ownership, or with the full
power of disposition, and third persons are led into dealing with such apparent owner, they will be protected in their dealings. This is upon the
principle that where one of two innocent parties must suffer for the wrongful act of another, the loss must fall upon him who put the wrong-doer in
the position to do the wrongful act. (Nenhoffv. O'Beilly, 93 Mo., 164.)
AMOUNT WHICH PLEDGEE MAY RECOVER:

Where negotiable instruments have been transferred as collateral security by
one who is not a bona fide holder for value, the pledgee, if he has taken
the instruments in goodfaith for value before maturity, will still be allowed
to prove against the maker of the instruments for the full amount thereof;
but the amount of his recovery can not exceed the debt for the security of
which the instruments were pledged, and interest. (Morton <$- Bliss v. New
Orleans and Selma Hallway Company, 79 Ala., 590.)




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 139
T A B L E SHOWING, B Y STATES AND T E R R I T O R I E S , T H E ESTIMATED POPULATION O F
EACH ON J U N E 1, 188H, AND T H E AGGREGATE CAPITAL, SURPLUS, U N D I V I D E D P R O F -

ITS, AND INDIVID UAL DEPOSITS OF NATIONAL AND STATE BANKS, LOAN AND TRUST
C O M P A N I E S , AND SAVINGS AND P R I V A T E BANKS I N T H E U N I T E D STATES ON J U N K
OO, 1 8 8 8 ; T H E AVERAGE O F T H E S E P E R CAPITA O F POPULATION, AND T H E P E R CAPITA AVERAGES O F SUCH RESOURCES I N EACH CLASS O F BANKS AND I N ALL.
Loan
National
banks.

All banks.

Estimated
population
States and Territories. June 1,

nies.

1888.*
Capital, etc.

Maine . . . . . .
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
District of Columbia..
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida....,
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Colorado
Nevada
California
Oregon
Arizona
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
Utah
Washington
Wyoming
Total

669,400
375, 200
334, 000
2, 07G, 000
331,300
704, 900
5, 715,100
1, 343, 900
4, 971, 700
168,400
1, 081,100
224, 300
1, 770,400
784, 200
1,701,200
1, 208,600
1, 870. 500
346; 900
1,506,200
1,414,700
1,134, 700
2, 373, 200
1,116, 900
1, 944, 200
1, 796,100
3, 681, 000
2, 278, 700
3, 576, 000
2, 0C0,800
1, 555, 000
2, 025, 400
1,125,200
2,572, 800
1, 6,34, 600
852, 800
419, 400
83, 200
J,159,4tO
'261,400
80,100
351,100
52, 500
59,200
147, 900
200, 500
137, 700
35, 600
61, 394, 000

and
State trust Savings Private
banks. compa- banks. banks.

I
$60, 510,496
73,918,344
34,122, 592
639,142, 605
111, 978, 926
176, 676, 326
1, 448, 485, 390
90, 674, 08!}
469,163, 521
11,553,009
87,477,119
11, 272, 382
31, 205,474
7, 708, 545
10, 038, 749
12,109, 535
27, 972, 594
4, 045, 583
14,124,288
6, 885, 696
28,470,000
35, 973,1.28
5,170, 809
69,286,211
28, 618, 518
173, 604,141
56, 517,198
178, 639, 393
90,148, 028
60, 758, 467
74, 712, 040
75,611,381
125,579,107
64, 475, 949
43,673, 831
23, 470, 661)
944, 221
225, 652, 814
9, 261, 289
748, 659
14, 843, 857
1,' 438,138
14,130, 757
3. 026, 578
G, 651, 976
10, 446, 016
3,900, 974
4,766,909,263

Average per
capita.

Aver- Aver- AverAverage per age per age per age pei
capita. capita. capita. capita.

1.36
i97. 01
102.16
307.87
337. 99
250.64
253.44
71.93
94,37
68. 60
80.91
50.25
17.62
9.83
5.91
9.54
14. 95
11.66
9.37
4.87
25. 09
15.15
4.63
35.64
15.93
47.16
24. 80
49.96
43.74
39.06
36.88
67. 22
48.81
38.90
51.21
55.96
11.34
194. 63
35.43
9. 35
42. 28
27.39
238. 69
20.46
33.17
75. 80
111. 26

$35. C6
37. 37
48.33
131.07
122.46
84.. 42
84.38
43. 57
59.20
42.36
43. 07
46.04
8.69
7. 07
3.81
5. 52
4.99
10.13
6.42
2.16
16. 62
12.74
3.17
16.36
12.07
32.15
17.94
36.38
24.13
16.59
17.10
38. 98
14.21
10.39
34.25
51.50
7.67
24.90
33. 93
3.00
29.18
23. 45
203.99
18.64
19. 51
60.17
77.81

77.64

34.76

;0.28
9.68
9.67
31. 73
3.39
8.28
5.62
6.37

$1.80
1.97
*23.60
29. 70
6.13
33.44
"i2.*42

$61.58
157. 39
53.83
152.59
176.15
149. 96
103.28
23.47
12.19
20.61
31.29
4.21

8.63
2.76
1.54
.76
8.38

.13
3.09
1.15

1.08
2.61
7.49

.72

10.18
1.24
3.98
13.43
.95
2. 50
1.51
3.80
2.30

80. 72
3.49

7.13
3.53

73.47
3.17

2.70

10.13

.01
.46
.62
1. 50
2.28

'""."is
.30

.85
18.45
3.87
1.54
2.33
"i'. 44*
17.71
L 98
19.53
29.21
10.54
6.90

$0. 32

24.64

. 43
.17
.43
1. 52
1.87
.10
.24
2.41
.61
.83
3. 29
3. 29
6.5(5
1.73
4.75
5.71
2.68
3.88
5. 23
7.76
4.46
3.67
9. 54
1.50
6.35
6.42
3.94
26.44
1.82
10.96
15.69
33.45
2.46

*The estimate of population was prepared, at special request, by Mr. Jos. S. McCoy, acting Government actuary.




140

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NUMBER OF BANKS ORGANIZED, IX LIQUIDATION, AND IN- OPERATION, WITH THEIR
CAPITAL, BONDS ON DEPOSIT, AND CIRCULATION ISSUED, REDEEMED, AND OUTSTANDING ON OCTOBER 31, 1888.
Circulation.

Banks.
Capital U . S . bonds
States and TerIn
stock paid. on deposit.
In
ritories.
3rgan- liqui- operadaized.
tion. tion.
Maine
N e wHampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts.
Rhode Island ..
Connecticut...

85
54
63
268
64
97

10
5
14
16
4
13

631

62

569

Now York
New Jersey . . .
Pennsylvania..
Delaware
Maryland
Dist. Columbia.

428
97
365
18
52
13

537,960,115

457,955,753

86,753,710
13, 328, 600
67,211,311
2,128, 985
14, 559, 9(i()
1, 827, 000

26.931,250
6,704, 750
18, 2C9, 000
1, 685, 200
1, 408, 950
9J 0, 000

274, 590,025
50, 586,130
189, 684, 045
6,961, 975
37, 368, 720
5, 097, 600

238, 262, 811 36,327,214
42,496, 086 8, 090, 044
158, 944,*}49 30, 739, 596
5,281,938
1, 680, 037
32,043, 50*7 5, 325, 213
4, 313, 888
783,712

561, 288,495

481,342,679

82, 945, 816

11,899,480
7,401,410
6, 416, 470
5,403, (K5
7, 988, 990
448, 750
4, 932, 770
517, 380
6, 352, 690
1, 283, 220
33, 672, 405
10,930,810

10,174,961
6, 260, 823
5,496,741
4, 747, 228
6, 739, 767
211,077
3, 916, 033
244, 269
8, 596, 928
3,832, 689
920,663
28,03), 342
9,169,161

1, 7*24, 519
1,140, 617
919.729
656,397
1,249, 223
237, 673
1, 016, 737
273,111
1, 895, 022
2,520,001
302, 557
5, 6 »., 353
1, 761, 649

56, 544, 340 14, 768, 300

107, 740, 070

88,341,482

19, 398, 588

50 12, 881, 000
919, 000
219 41, 063, 000 12,949,000
96 11,884,500
4, 809, JiuO
1H2 i.9, 930, 0(,0 5,674, 000
110 14, 960. i/0l' 2, 9.!6, 000
00 5. 6.05, 000 1, 699, 000
130 10/224,000
2,9.8,000
Ctt 13, 938, 200 2, 034, 200
160 13, 002, 600 3, 2:9, 250
Iu6
9, 325, OOu 1,978,2:0

177

53, 618, 850

10,898,915
98,761,100
51,091,825
50, 340, 035
27, 699, 000
12,6)7,680
21,735,500
11. 826, 980

322
86
313
18
49
8

3
5

Middle States..

973

40
27
23
18
3L
15
25
14
17
106
10
83
58

14
8
5
2
6
2
3

Southern States

467

83 | 382

Missouri
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas
Nebraska

80
304
15G
248
154
92
180
77
185
110

30
85
60
66
44
32
f.O
21
25
10

3
27
43
10
7
22
9
10
70
27
4
4>

Pacific States &
Territories..

274

26
19
18
16
25
13
22
12
13
100
7
69
42

4
6
3
14
16

3, 846, 300
2, 066, 000
2, 366, 000
1, 774, 200
3,411,000
895, 510
3, 561, 080
1, 105, 000
3, 425, 000
11, 784, 8f,0
9-0, 000
13,644,400
7,715,000

423 1,169 162,913,250 i
2
282, 01 0
1
27 2, 360, 000
34 3, 455, 000
9
7
900. C O
O
3
7
440, 0U0
17 1, 975, 000
5
9
1, 175, 000
j
9
900, 000
11
59 3, 775, 000
3
24 1, 860. 000
3
1
100,000
38 8,175,000
4
40

i

234 25, 397, 000

Add for mutilated notes-.
Total currency
banks
t
Add gold banks
United States

$28, 885, 282 $7,020,418
18,618,500
4, 488. 005
27, 093, 964 4, 254, 756
257 J U 1 , 076 43, 099, 879
54,1384,167
8, 581, 788
71, 362, 764 12, 559, 516

L65,449, 920

Virginia
West Virginia.
North Caroliua.
South Carolina.
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee

Nevada
Oregon
Colorado
Utah.
Idaho
Montana
Wyoming
Now Mexico .
Dakota
Washington -.
Atizona
California

Outstanding.*

796 185, 809, 566 55, 009,150

106
11
52

Western States 1,592

Redeemed.

$35, 905, 700
23,106, 505
31,348,720
300, 410, 955
63, 205, 955
83, 922, 280

75 510, 560, 000 $5,005, 950
49 6, 205, 000 3, 764, 800
49
3,241,400
7, 566,000
252 96,640, 500 28,472,650
60 20, 284,050 4,031,800
84 24,194, 370 9,102, 250

Eastern States.

Issued.

1, 353, 850
592, 650
726, 000
523, 500
894, 500
280, 000
826, 000
332, 500
1,418,800
2, 624, 000
422, 500
?,. 202, OoO
1,512,100

10. 491, 9J">0

80, 004, 362

5, 800, 010

14,481,657
2,417,258
81. 352, 878 17,408,282
44; 230, 043 6,861,782
43, 495, 830 6, 844, 205
23. 620, 875 4,078,125
10,530,593
2, 087, 087
18,181,677
3, 553, 823
9.795, 426 2, 031, 554
4,719,923
3, 023, 937
3,968,165
1, 891, 845

39,120, 00U j 304,574,9t5

254, 377, 0G7 50,197, 898

7, 743, 8<JO

69, 500
519, £00
l,00i>, 000 !
3i)0, 000 |
117, 800
500. 600
298, 7 5 J
307, 500
1, 005, 000
308, 750
25, 000
2, 028, 750

239,460
1, 604, 350
4,413,810
1,523,700
434, 980
1,713,620
520, 140
3,448,270
2,144,770
1,1 HO, 140
9'i, 160
3, GfcO, 890

192,063
927. 400
3, 393,182
1,153,851
338, 775
1,247,741
334, 505
1, 139, G4 8
1, 218, 701
587, 723
60, 040
1,906,035

47, 397
676, 890
1,020,628
369, 849
96,205
465, 879
191,635
808, 622
926,069
608,417
36,120
1,774,855

6,580,450

19.022,290

1?, 499, 724

6, 522,566
127,020

1,533,585,935 1, 204, 510, 705 239,069,230
1
li, 4(15, 240
IS, 276", 2531
188,987
3,937

1787 3,150 596,114,076

170, 003, 350 1,537,051,175 jl, 297, 792,958 239, 385, 237

i n c l u d i n g $87,018,909 for which lawiul money lias been deposited with the Treasurer of tho United
States to retire an equal amount of circulation which bas not been presented for redemption.
tOne bank restored to solvency and resumed business, raakiug total going banks, 3,151.




NATIONAL-BANK CURRENCY ISSUED, REDEEMED, AND OUTSTANDING FOR THE YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1888.
Denomination of notes
on each plate.

Amount.

Total.

Twos.

Ones.

Issued, including those
canceled:
$5—$5—$5—$5
$18,419,160
146 760
$10 $10 $10 $10
$10—$10—§10—$20.... 24, 663, 550
$20—$20—$20—$20
57,440
$20—$20—$20—$50
57, 200
$OQ $90_$50 $100
17 100
$50—$30
37, 000
7 084 950
$50 $100
$100—100
46, 800

Total
Canceled: *
$5 $5 $5 $5
$10—$10—$10—$10 .
$] 0—$10—$10 $20
$50 $100
$100—$100

Fives.

$18, 419,160
_
..

18,410,160

$30, 520, 960.00

Tens.

$146,760
14, 798,130

Twenties.

$9, 865, 420
57, 440
31,200
3, C O
O

14, 944, 81)0

9, 057, CCO

9,9^0
364, 650

$26,000
4, 5(30
37, 000
2, 361, 650

243,100

One
Five
hundreds. thousands.

$9, 000
4, 723, 300
46, 800

2, 429,150

O
O

4, 779,1C0

148,280

14R 99.0

9 9!0
I fil)7 750

!

,

5" 350
43 200

Total.

One
hundreds.

Fifties.

i.

17,450
148, 280

861 500 00

Actual issues to banks fi(mi October
31 1887, to November 1 i fcfifi
Total issues to banks prior to November 1 1887

1, 4,83, 917, 475. 00 $23,167, 077 $15,495,038

Total issues to banks since organization
Total redeemed and destroyed

1,533,585,935.00
1,294,541,113.00

23,167, 677
22,783,281

Total whole notes outstanding
Total fractions outstanding

239, 044, 822.00
24, 408.20

384, 396

Total national-bank currency outstanding 1

374, 570

243,100

17, 450

o

34, 000
4"! 200
78 K 0

239, C69, 230. 20

o

18, 270, 880

14, 570, 320

9, 714, 560

2,411,700

502, 277, 620

427, 627, 990

266, 022, 900

92, 480, 650

137,514,000 $11,962,000

$7, 369, 000

15, 495, 038
15,298,872

520, 548, 500
453, 086, 540

442,108,310
364,4'JG, C O
O

275,737,460
218, £00, 020

94, 892, 350
81,230,400

142,215,600
119,872, tOO

11,902,000
11,706,500

7, 369,000
7, 320,0G0

190,166

67,461,960

77,76 ,710

56, 930, 540

13, 6G1, C50

22, 343,600

255, 500

49, 000

49, 6G8,460.00

4,701,000

* National-bank currency canceled is such os has never been issued, but is left on hand in the vaults in this office by banks which extend their corporate existence, fail, or
go into voluntary liquidation.
t Exclusive of gold notes, $188,987; amount duo banks for mutilated notes, $127,020.




9

142

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NUMBER AND DENOMINATIONS OF NATIONAL-BANK NOTES ISSUED AND REDEEMED
AND THE NUMBER OF EACH DENOMINATION OUTSTANDING, ON OCTOBER 31, IN
EACH YEAR FROM 18(58 TO 1888.

Ones.

1868:
Issued
Redeemed

Twos.

Fives.

Tens.

Twenties.

Fifties.

One
hundreds.

Five
One
hunthoudreds. sands.

8,89C, 576 2,978,100 23, 106,728 7,915,914 2,219,322
!,
142, 359
36, 355
254, 754
73,176
482,132

355,181
17, 256,

267, 350
15, 583

13,480
1,759

4,746
1,846

Outstanding.. 8, 641, 822 2,904, 984 22, C24, 596 7, 773, 555! 2,182, &C7

337, 925

251, 767

11, 727

2,900

9,589,160 3, 209, 38823, 676, 760 8, 094, 645 2, 269, 764
I,
904, 013 232, 224
985, 940
71, 655
272, 495

363,523
22,859

274,799
25,908

13, 668
2, 585

4,769
2, 415

Outstanding.. 8,685,14' 2, 977,164 22, 690, 820 7, 821,150 2,198,109

334,664;

248,831

11, 083

2,354,

|
1870:
Issued
10,729,327 3,590,157 24, 636, 720 8, 413, 244, 2, 370, 056
Redeemed... 2, 568,703 667,733 1, 737, 983 484,135| 129,185

378,482;
47, 845j

284,460
43, 599

13, 926
3,952

4,779
3,263

8,160, 624 2, 922,424 22, 898, 737 7,029,109: 2,240, 871 j 330, G37j 240. 861

9,974

1,516

14,642
6? 017

4,843
4,005

8,625

838

367, 797 15, 62J.
110,989 7,867

4,933
4,315

18G9:
Issued
Redeemed

Outstanding.

1871:
12,537,657 4,195,791 28,174, 940 9, 728, 375 2, 779,392 433,420 321,163
Issued
Redeemed... 5,270,057)1,493,326 3,276,374
82,972|
70,287
245, 3(31
933, 445
Outstanding.
1872:
Issued
Redeemed

7, 261, 600 2, 702, 465 24, 898, 566 8,794,930 2, 534,0311 350,454j
114, 297, 360 4, 782, 628 31 933,348 11, 253, 452 225, 688 497,199
,
3,
7, 919, 389 2, 408, 389 5,900,607 1,699,702
438, 852 126,180

244, 876J

Outstanding.. 6, 377, 9712, 374, 239 25, 972, 681 9, 553, 2, 780, 836 371, 019 256,808
750
1873 :
Issued
Redeemed

7, 754

618

.2,
115,524,189 5,195,11134, 894,450 1 560, 399 3,608,219 559, 722 416, 590 16, 496
34,
9,891,606 3,120,723 ~
9,141, 963 2, 573, 070 653, 071 168, 976 144, 057 9,658

5,148
4,530

6,838

618

Issued
6, 548, 259 5,539,113 39, 243,136 13,337, 070 962,109 660, 950 492,482 17, 344
3,
Redeemed . . . 1,143, 606|3, 555, 019(13, 041,- 3,912,707 1,171, 608 231, 550 190, 572 11, 670
605

5,240
4,683

Outstanding..

5,632, 583 2,074,388 25,752,493 9,987,329 2,955,148

390,746

272,533

1874:

Outstanding..
1875:
Issued
Redeemed
Outstanding..
1876:
Issued
Redeemed
Outstanding..
1877:
Issued
Redeemed
Outstanding .

5,404, 053 1,984, 044 • 26, 201, 531 9,424, 309

2, 790, 501 435,394 295,910

5,668

557

\
.8,046,176 6, 039, 752 47, 055,184 17, 410, 507
.4, 092,12614, 616, 623!24, 926, 771 •7,608,532
~

5, 296,064 884,165 645, 838 18.476
2,204,464 381, 037 299,428 14J 471

5,530
5,048

503,128 346,4=10

4,005

482

18, 849, 264 ;6,307, 448 51,783, 528 20, 008, 652 6,086,4921 985,615 710, 900
15, 556,708.5,124, 546 32, 382,056 1.0, 369,214 3,052,246 515, 784 395,785

18, 721

5,539
5,272

3,954,050 1,423,129j22,128, 413

9,801,975 3,091, 600

16,2r

315,115

2,504

267

20, G16, 024 0,890,908 56, 816,848 22,266, 064
6,776,253 1, 079.781 767, 317
L,
16, 815, 568 5,555, 526 38,115, 868 12,434, 779 703, 528 634, 079 479, 317
3,

20, 022
17, 615

5,668
5,411

3,292, 550:1,182, 902 19,401,472

3, 800,456 1, 341,442 18, 700,

9, 639, 4383, 034,246

469, 831

445,102

288, 000

2,407

257

1878:
22,478, 4157, 517, 705 61,191, 288
Issued
24,157, 293 7, 344,107 1,147, 578
728,222
Redeemed... 18,194,196 6,026, 692J42', 683,433 13, 839J 149 4#, 133', 178
Outstanding. 4, 284,219 1,491,073 18, 507, 855 298,144 3, 210, 989 419, 350
10,

812, 903
541, 859

20, 210
18, 895

6,204
5,900

271,044

l r 315

304

1879:
I
Issued
23,167,677 7,747, 519 65, 578, 440 25, 904,223 7,869,9511,2.11,701 850, 720
ft n 0 2 7 1 ^ ooft r>T*!i/i 930,' n o • •""
Redeemed... 19, 600,477 6, 5 m 1 ,W f t0^ Q9Q, OlGiU,<v»n r599 4,437, 343 785,263 581,604

20, 570
19, 287

6,340
6,057

1, 283

283

879,490 20, 703
610, 601 i 19,434

0,303
6,124

9, 831, 285 3,072,725

Outstanding.. 3,567,200 1,246,249 19, 582, 364 10,973, 624! 3, 432,608

426,498

1880 :
Issued
23,167, 677 7, 747, 519 69,131, 976 27, 203,168; 8, 266,3981. 253, 86:
Redeemed... 20, 875, 215 C, 943, 889149,149, 824 15, 821,1101 4, 684, 820J 825, 499
Outstanding.

2,292,402




803,630 ! l9,982,15211, 382,058 3, 581,578| 428,36G1

269,116

268, 889|

1, 27!

239

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

143

NUMBER AND DENOMINATIONS OF NATIONAL-BANK NOTES ISSUED AND REDEEMED
AND THE NUMBER OF EACH DENOMINATION OUTSTANDING, ETC.—Continued.
One. a.
1881:
Issued
Redeemed

Twos.

Fives.

Tens.

Twenties.

Fifties.

Outstanding..
1883:
Issued
Redeemed
Outstanding..
1884:
Issued
Redeemed
Outstanding..

Five
hundreds.

3,167, 677 7, 747, 519 73, 612, 504 29, 477,519; 8,940,817(1,357,574 959,712 21,959
1, 838, 555i7, 286,434 53, 5W, 488 17^ 346, 635' 5, 084, 992 891, 890J 660, 202 20, 495

Outstanding,. 1,329,112 461,085- 20, 096, 016 12,130, 884 3,855, 825 465, G84|
1882:
Issued
Redeemed

One
hundreds.

299,510

thousands.
7,144
6,943

1,464

201

23,167, 677 7, 747, 519 78, 697, 424 32, 042; 260 9, 751, '84 1,, 453, 324 1,, 035,118 22, 787
, 747,1
22,353,
'""
313,
1,877 7., 484,140 59,! 233 19, 770, 934 5, 751, 707 980,182 719,130 20,880

7,187
6,990

813, 800

1,907

197

23,167, 677;7, 747, 519 83,447,208)34, 544, 086 10, 578, 8461, 556, 009 1,114, 722 23,163
22, 593,909|7, 570, 903 65,142, 567"22, 712,355| 6,424,638 1, O9o| 703 789,125 21, 307

7,277
7,092

263, 379 19, 384,19112, 271, 326 4, 000,077

473,142

315, 988

1,796

185

23,167, 677 7,7*7, 519'88,101,1S8J37,182,10211, 442, 091 1,661, 010 1,199, 750 23, 736
—'
22, 671, 936 7, 603, 285:71, 039, 357j26, 050,107 7,481,762 1, 216, 573 874, 543 21, 981

7,369
7,156

573, 768

176, 616 18, 304, 64111, 831, 731 4,154, 208 465,306

144, 234J17,061, 831jll, 131, 995 3, 960, 329

325, 597

1, 755

213

1885:
1
=
23,167, 677 7, 747, 519 93,208,400 39, 804, 001 318,173 1, 758, 533 1, 287, 686 23,924
Issned
12,
22, 731,963 7, 628, 877|76,817, 066^9,382, 872 563, 797 1,345, 762 971, 922 22, 72"
Redeemed—
8,

7,369
7,238

495, 741

444, 437

325,207

==

Outstanding.

118, 642J16, 391, 334 10,421,1293, 754, 376 412, 771

1,197

131

188G:
23,167,677 7, 747, 519 97,667, 300 41, 695,970 12, 945, 618 1, 815,174 1,342, 001 924
23.
Issued
Redeemed... 22, 757,987 7, 639, 806 81,109, 272 31, 767,278
9,397,85411,451,301 1,055, 330, 23,138

7,369
7,290

Outstanding.

435, 714

315, 764:

786

79

1887:
23,167, 677 7, 747, 519100,455,524 42, 762, 799 13,301,145jl, 849, 613 1, 375,146 924
Issued
23,
Redeemed..- 22, 776,403 7, 646, 720 85,170, 819 33, 799,928 10, 091, 94111, 536,143 1,127, 452 293
23,

7,369
7,305

Outstanding.

409, 690

391,274

107, 713 16, 558, 088 928,692 3, 547,764
9,

100, 799 15,284,705 8,962,871 3, 209,204

363, 873

313,470

286, 671

247,694

631

1888:
23,167,
r, 747, 519|104,l09,700 44, 219, 831 13, 786, 873 1,897,
Issued
I,
, 422,156 23, 924
r,
Redeemed... 22,783,2817, 649,436190, 617, 308 36,443,
i, 940,346 1,,624, 6081, 198, 720 23, 413
Outstanding.




98,08313,492,392 7,776,171 2,846,527

273,239

223, 436

511

7,369
7,320
49

144

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

STATEMENT OF MONTHLY INCREASE OR DECREASE OF NATIONAL-BANK CIRCULATION FOR THE YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, lH8rf, PRECEDED BY QUARTERLY INCREASE OR DECREASE SINCE JANUARY 14, 1H75.

National-bank circulation.
Increase.
Issued.

From Jan. 14 to Jan. 31,1875 .

,
,
...

,.

November, 1887.
December, 1887 .
January, 1888 . . .
February, 1888...
March, i888
April, 1888
May, 1888
June, 1888
July, 1888
August, 1888
September, 1888.
October, 1888....

$537, 580

$255, 600

4, 409, 220
4, 1-4,165
1, 915, 710
2, 504, 600
877, 580
1,107,310
2, 604,390
3,188, 630
4,363,010
3, 000, 230
5, 754,160
6, 725, 585
3, 036, 760
4, 252,980
2, 276, 360
3, 097, 060
7, 039, 300
3, 674, 830
9,122, 3i 0
7, 289, 805
3,163, 820
1,748,660
1,199, 930
2, 234, 780
12, 690 890
9, 569, 410
6,484, 550
5, 625, 200
2,991,400
4, 054, 740
9,792,910
4, 588,850
3, 638, 650
3,527,100
2, 755,600
2,748, 270
2, 052, 294
2, 778, 960
2, 792,170
1, 265, 520
2,125, 260
2,160,110
5. 591, 760
7,751,794
4,700, 384
1, 469, 325
1,566,700
1, 243, 550
2, 901, 775
2, 936, 670
4, 021, 350

3, 336, 804
5,423,930
5,f>53,971
3, 852, 731
5, 425, 539
9, 663, 984
8, 564, 727
4, 759, 015
5,0 5,596
4, 984, 399
3, 516, 321
2, 701, 885
1,906,721
3, 453, 080
2, 924, 430
717, 327
1,82.', 988
2,715,524
1,754, 558
674,129
1,555,766
2, 427, 398
1, 535, 760
1, 361, 534
4, 426, 596
4, 734, 578
3,182,551
3, 354.153
4,414,865
5,741,456
5,611,497
4, 927, 020
6, 510, 245
0, 868,245
6, 369, 273
5,172, 714
8, 430, 804
7, 883,997
6, 833, 874
7, 842, 055
8,135,112
5, 731, 673
6,758,154
5, 581, 261
8, 397,163
8,425, 486
6, 468, 227
9, 580, 973
11,014,057
11,307,718
8, 421, 529

1, 072, 416

203,133, 747

For quarter endingApr. 30,1875
July 31,1875
Oct. 31,1875
Jan. 31,1876
Apr. 30, J876
July 31,1876
Oct. 31,1876
Jan. 31,1877
Apr. 30,1877
July 31,1877
Oct. 31,1877
Jan. 31,1878
Apr. 30,1878
July 31,1878
Oct. 31,1878
Jan. 31,1879
Apr. 30,1879
July 31,1879
Oct. 31,1879
Jan. 31,1880
Apr. 30,1880
July 31,1880
Oct. 31,1880
Jan. 31,1881
Apr. 30,1881
July 31,1881
Oct. 31,1881
Jan. 31,1882
Apr. 30,1882
July 31,1882
Oct. 31,1882
Jan. 31, 1883
Apr. 30, J883
July 31, 1883
Oct. 31, 1883
Jan. 31, 1884
Apr. 30, 1884
July 31, 1884
Oct. 31, 1884
Jan. 31, 1885
Apr. 30, 1885
J u l y 31, 1885
Oct. 3t, 1885
Jan. 31, 1886
Apr.30, 1886
J u l y 31, ^86
Oct. 31, 1886
Jan. 31, 1887
Apr.30, 1887
July 31, 1887
Oct. 31, 1887

268, 048, 993

59, 560, 061

1,687,897
2,039, F03
2,416,929
1, 889, 790
2, 855, 660
3, 009, 966
2, 910, 246
2,122, 69"
1,155, 590
492,355
251,020
306, 390

3, 845, 055
3,393, 874
4, 951, 230
5, 010, 081
5,412,719
4, 582, 779
5, 684, 642
5, 570, 022
3, 860, 521
3, 678, 093
3, 063,105
4, 536, 570

21,138,341
Total
Surrendered to this office and retired from
Jan. 14, 1875, to Oct. 31, 1888
Grand total.




Decrease.

Retired.

$1, 299, 765
3, 638, 261
1, 348,131
4, 547, 959
8, 556, 874
5,960, 337
1, 570, 385
642, 586
1, 984,169
2, 237, 839
4, 023, 700
1,130, 039
797, 900
648, 070
2, 349, 733
5,216,3:2
959, 306
7, <J67, 742
6, 615, 676
1, 608, 054
678, 738
335,830
873, 246
8, 264, i94
4, 834, 832
3,301,999
2, 271,047
1,423,465
1,686, 716
4,181, 413
338,170
2, 871, 595
3, 341,145
3,613,673
2,424, 444
6, 378,510
5,105, 037
4,041, 704
6, 576, 535
6, 009, 8i*(,
3, 571, 563
1,166, 394
2,170, 533
3, 696, 779
6,956,161
4,901,527
8, 337,423
8, 052,282
8,371,048
4,400,179

2,157,158
1, 354, 071
2, 534, 301
3,120, 291
2, 557,05!)
•1,572,813
2,774, 396
3,447, 327
2,704,931
3,185, 738
2,812,085
4, 230,180

53. 588, 691 I

224, 272, 088

321,637,684

224,272, 088

337, 305, 247

124, 475, 307

32,450, 350
59, 560, 061

156, 925,657

59, 560, 061

172, 593, 220

15,667,563

15, 667,563

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

145

TABLE SHOWING, BY STATES, THE AMOUNT OF NATIONAL-BANK CIRCULATION ISSUED, THE AMOUNT OF LAWFUL MONEY DEPOSITED IN THE UNITED STATES
TREASURY TO RETIRE NATIONAL-BANK CIRCULATION FROM JUNE 20, 1874, TO
OCTOBER 31, 1888, AND THE AMOUNT REMAINING ON DEPOSIT AT THE LATTER
DATE.

Lawful money deposited to retire national-bank
circulation since June 20,1874.
Additional
circulation
Tor reStates and Territories, issued since demption
June 20,1874. of notes of
liquidating
banks.
Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pen nsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
District of Columbia.
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Missouri
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas
..
Nebraska
Nevada
Oregon
Colorado
Utah
,
Idaho
Montana
Wyoming
New Mexico
Dakota
Washington
Arizona

$3, 364, 559
2, 073, 965
3, 776, 015
37,467, 255
5,152, 955
8,257, 000
44, 056,140
6, 027,485
28, 386,415
914, 810
3, 292, 275
565,150
1,708, 740
627, 364
1,445,100
262, 905
936, 060
278, 970
680,350
337, 500
2, 5(55, 900
2, 902,475
519, 750
6, 859, 750
1,913,455
3, 568, 385
17, 741, 956
7, 581, 090
7,500,145
4, 923,170
2, 735,055
4,399,179
2, 318, 565
3,154, 580
2, 307,41:0
76,950
506,120
1,346,: 80
488,150
103, 750
638, 590
179,715
281, 2oO
1, 253, 915
840,350
75,590
2, 613, 870

California
Lawful money deposited prior to June
20,1874, and remaining at that date
Total.

$786, 500
465, 983
1,059,277
1, 907,105
257, 768
993, 381
8, 549, 294
1, 389, 908
4,441, 545
184, 800
455, 664
1,176,419
870, 550
330, 480
33,750
330, 925
19, 210
135, 000
6( 6, 413
147, 080
55, 880
1, 200, 247
915,191
1, 273,795
7,473, 713
5,189, 860
3, 780,444
2, 882,605
1,219,990
1, 749,513
959, 754
881, 391
1,7,720
347,475
161,191

To retire
circirculation To retireununder act culation of
der act
of July 12, June 20,1874.
1882.
$2, 581, 035
1,431, 550
1, 916, 642
24, 622, 617
6, 010, 801
6, 480, 097
15, 639, 615
3, 072, 436
15, 801, 685
458, 645
3, 665, 625
76,310
649, 480
586, 425
68, 350
32,930
429, 720
107, 750
802, 250
69, 060
1,254, 648
238, 620
586, 4 1 9
5, 053, 934
1, 255, 924
1, 518, 890
374, 524
646, 000
604, 845
407,420
50, 900
194, * 00
82,450
186,490

189,940
1% 500
133, 330
40, 500
50, 590
101,250

$3,418, 840
1, 524,100
4, 380, 503
43, 626,498
7, 890, 641
10, 387, 810
49, 541,119
6, 689, 814
31, 863, 922
231, 750
6, 022,870
743,800
2, 203, 550
810, 240
2, 044, 085
1, 899, 335
1.496, 075
7, 790
1,013, 320
88, 450
3,109,400
1, 052, i:o
268,120
8, 5,'J7, 765

2,139, 374
6,070, 911
17, 056, 332
11,245,666
11, 749,101
5,493, 816
2, 379,739
4.497, 683
2, 482,081
893, 520
1,120,3.50
13, 500
180, 860
428,310
379,050
74| 250
272,250
15, 750
285, 200
295,905
374, 600
2,500
760,150

Total
deposits.

$6, 786, 375
3,421,633
7, 356, 422
70,156, 220
14,159, 210
17,861,288
73, 730, 028
11,152,158
52,107,152
690, 395
9, 873, 295
1, 273, 834
4, 029, 449
2, 267, 215
2, 442, 915
1, 966, 015
2, 256, 720
27, 000
1, 256, 070
38, 450
4, 78, 063
1, 268, 290
3 4, 000
10, 992, 660
3, 323,185
7, 931,125
29, 583,979
17, 691, 450
17,048,435
8, 750, 945
4, L45, 729
6, 85 .',041
3, 849, 255
1, 825, 811
1,492, 670
13, 500
263, 310
962, 275
540,241
74, 250
462,190
15, 750
300, 700
429, L35
415,100
53, 090
861, 400

Lawful
money on
deposit
wilti the
United
States
Treasurer
at date.
$2,491, 522
1,176, 583
1, 630, 892
18, 064, 706
4,431,643
4, 995, 959
12,164, 221
2,418,037
13, 866, 558
323, 212

3,171,054
146, 344
720, 893
467, 065
177, 519
252,687
377, 603
10, 305
219,800
961
455, 301
167, 443
1(5, 453
2,480, 842
707, 564
1, 001, 790
6, 632, 948
2, 591, 817
1,811,475
1, 089, 700
5*9, 59:{
743, - 40
349, 503
174,13'
217, 557
1, bY.i
173, 90
73, 413
8. 23»
1, 439
9,144
170
7f), 729
68, 572
7;{, 887
8,680
155, 600

3, 813, 675
*229,006, 588

53,030,931

96,958,887

257,010,705

410, 814,198 186,fc'29,922

* This includes circulation issued under act of J u l y 12,1882.
t Exclusive of $188,987 on deposit to retire circulation of national gold banks.

11028—CUR 88




10

146

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

STATEMENT SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF NATIONAL-BANK NOTES OUTSTANDING, .THE
AMOUNT OF LAWFUL MONEY ON DEPOSIT WITH THE TREASURER OF THE UNITED
STATES TO REDEEM NATIONAL-BANK' NOTES, AND THE KINDS AND AMOUNTS OF
UNITED STATES BONDS ON DEPOSIT TO SECURE CIRCULATION AND PUBLIC DEPOSITS ON OCTOBER 31, 1888, WITH THE CHANGES DURING THE PRECEDING YEAR
AND PRECEDING MONTH.
October 31,
1887.

September
29, 1888.

Total amount outstanding at the dates named
Additional circulation issued during the intervals:
To new banks
To banks increasing circulation

$271,801, 274

$243,409,950

2,328,110
18, 810, 231

Aggregate
Surrendered and destroyed during the intervals...
Total amount outstanding October 31, 1888* .

292,939,615
53, 7*3, 3G5

103,570
202, 820
243, 716, 340
4, 520,090

239,196, 250

239,196,250

NATIONAL-BANK NOTES.

Total circulation.

Decrease in total circulation since October 31, 1887
Decrease in total circulation since September 29, 1888 .

32, 605, 024
4,213,700

Circulation based on United States bonds.
Amount outstanding at the dates named
Additional issued during the intervals as above.

169,215,067
21,138,341
190, 353, 408

Total retired during the intervals

155, 671,298

173,250
650, 545
37,163, 285

Aggregate.
Betired during the intervals:
By insolvent banks
By liquidating banks
By reducing banks

155,364,908
306, 390

101,250
46, 645
3,157, 075

37, 987, 080

Decrease in circulation since October 31, 1887
Decrease in circulation since September 29,1888.,

3, 304,970

152, 366, 328

Outstanding against bonds October 31, 1888.

152, 366, 328

16, 848, 739
2, 998, 580

Circulation secured by lawful money.*
Amount of outstanding circulation represented by lawful money on deposit with the Treasurer of the United States to redeem notes':
Of insolvent national banks
Of liquidating national banks
Of national banks reducing circulation under section 4 of the act of
J u n e 20, 1874
Of national banks retiring circulation under section C of the act of
J u l y 12, 1882

Lawful money deposited in October, 1888
National-bank, notes redeemed in October, 1888
Decrease in aggregate deposit since October 31, 1887
Decrease in aggregate deposit since September 29,1888

1, 099, 076
6,552, 061

46,756, 970

32,446, 211

45, 077, 842

46, 732, 574

102, 586, 207

Total lawful money on deposit.,

958, 902
9, 792, 493

86,829,922
3,318,840
4,533,960

15, 756, 285

To secure
circulating
notes.

"1,215," 120
To secure
public deposits.

United States registered bonds on deposit.
$3, 468,000
66,121, 750
100,413,600

Pacific Bailroad bonds, 6 percents.
Funded loan of 1891, 4£ percents...
Funded loan of 1907, 4 percents
Funded loan of 1882, 3 percents
Total on deposit October 31, 1888

,

$1,185,000
3.7,813, 500
32,513. 500
110, 000

170,003,350

51,622,000

* Circulation of national gold banks not included in the above, $188,987.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

147

TABLE, BY STATES, TERIUTORIES, AND RESERVE CITIES, EXHIBITING THE NUMBER
OF BANKS IN EACH, WITH THEIR CAPITAL, MINIMUM AMOUNT OF BONDS REQUIRED
BY LAW, BONDS ACTUALLY HELD, AND CIRCULATION OUTSTANDING THEREON ON
OCTOBER 4, 1888.

United States bonds.

States, Territories, and reserve cities.

Capital.

No.

Circulation
outstanding
October 4,
Minimum re- Held Octo1888.
quired.
ber 4,1888.

Maine
New Hampshire .
Vermont
Massachusetts...
Boston
Rhode Island
Connecticut

75
49
49
198
55
60
84

$10, 6G0, 000
6, 205, 000
7, 566,000
44, 740, 500
51,400,000
20, 284, 050
24,194, 37d

$2,
1,
1,
8,
2,
2,
3,

Division No. 1.
New York
New York City.
Albany
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia....
Pittsburgh

570

165, 049, 920

21, 809, 700

270
46
6
85
246
43
24

35, 042, 760
49,100, 000
1,750,000
13,318,350
33, 592, 291
23, 008, 000
10, 430, 000

Division No. 2.
Delaware
Maryland
Baltimore
District of Columbia..
Washington
Virginia
West Virginia

720

000
250
50<)
375
000
250
325

$4, 961, 000
3, 677, 000
3, 614, 000
21,813,400
6, 464, 650
5,143, 900
8, 832, 600

$4, 403, 033
3, 276, 550
3, 227, 765
19,454,153
5, 703, 530
4, 589, 032
7, 871, 452
48,525,515

2, 287, 500
300, 000
2, 677, 088
7, 214, 330
2,137, 500
1,175,000

18, 098, 050
7, 920,000
948, 000
6, 716, 250
14,059, 300
3, !S7,500
1, 615, 500

16,121, 838
6, 693,465
780, 390
5,992, 912
12,336,7fl6
2,833. 324
1,395; 680

166, 241, 401

23, 478, 833

52,544,600

46,154,405

2,129,885
2,810,700
11, 713, 260
252, 000
1,575,000
3, 840. 300
1, OGG, 000
•

54,500,550

454,175
691, 250
850, 000
50, 000
3-25, 000
772, 750
502,500

1, 599, 200
1, 311, 000
900, 000
250,000
580, 000
1,155,000
725, 000

1,407,210
1,138,690
790,890
201,100
425, 820
1, 025,920
C26,460

120

24,299,145

3, 645, 675

6, 520, 200

5, 616, 090

18
16
24
13
21
12
5
8
10)

Division N o . 3

North Carolina...
South Carolina...
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
New Orleans .
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Louisville
Tennessee

2, 266, 000
1, 773, 000
3, 361, C00
896, 900
3, 544, 000
1,10.">, GOO
500, 000
2, 925, 000
11, 80:>, 700
950, Oflo I
10,102,900 i
3,651,500 |
7,715,000 I

529, 000
430, 750
652, 750
221,247
667, 250
276, 250
125, 000
400, 000
2, 606, 4>5
225, 000
2,146,975
450, 000
1,147,500

760, 000
468, 500
969, 500
280.000
863, 000
332, 500
125, 000
1,375,000
2, 634, 000
410, 000
2, 937, 000
500, 090
1, 421, 500

647, 780
420,030
860,150
194, 750
748, 580
292, 860
110,415
1,216,595
2,312,615
368, 940
2, 630,030
449, 890
1, 253, 520

50,596,090

9, 881,147

13, 082, 000

11, 506,155

24, 399, 000
8, 900, 000
6, 650, 000
11, 964, 500
14, 824, 000
15, 250, 000
10,974, 600
4, 000, 000
4, 680, 000
850, 000

5, 415, 000
650, 000
450, 000
2, 640,125
3, 518, 500
950, 000
2, 39'i, 500
400, 000
1,157, 500
150,000

9,476, 300
1, 977, 000
606, 000
4, 573, 800
4, 534. 500
1,100,000
2, 784, 000
400, 000
1, 391, 500
300, 000

8,430,451
1, 750,700
543, 380
4, 084, 375
3,985,675
744,420
2,485, 960
343, 286
1, 241,925
270, 000

60
9
42

Division N o . 4
197
13

Ohio
Cincinnati

Cleveland
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
Detroit
Wisconsin
Milwaukee

015,
501,
541,
094,
750,
439,
468.

.•

163
19
101

77

Division No. 5.
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Saint Louis . Kansas City..
Saint Joseph.
.Kansas
Nebraska
Omaha

603
129
50
34
4
10
2
160
97
7

10,148, 000
13, 964, 500
2,431,000
3, 200, 000
6, 600, 000
300, 000
12, 854, 700
6, 235, 000
3, C50,000

2, 437, 000
1, 547, 375
607, 750
200, 000
500, 000
75, 000
3, 013, 675
1, 533, 750
325, 000

Division No. 6.

499

58, 783, 200

10, 239, 550




10.2,492,100

17, 730, 625

27,143,100

23, 880,166

3, 082, 500 ~~2, 752,~533
1, 784, 800
1, 585,360
732,750
656,195
360,000
324, COO
500, 000
450, 000
100, 000
89,990
3,138, 250
2,818,570
1, 541,000
1, 383,710
325, 000
291,900
11, 564, 300

10, 352, 258

148

KEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

TABLE, BY STATES, TERRITORIES, AND RESERVE CITIES, EXHIBITING THE NUMBER
OF BANKS IN EACH, WITII THEIR CAPITAL, ETC.—Continued.
United States bonds.

States, Territories, and reserve cities.

No.

Colorado
Nevada
California
San Francisco ...
Oregon
Arizona
Division No. 7.
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
Utah
Washington




Circulation
outstanding
October 4,
1888.

131
3,140

$769,450
70, 500
1,106, 250
150, 000
502,500
25, 000

$1, 071, 500
70, 500
1, 276, 250
650, 000
519, 800
25, 000

$958,670
63,410
1,103,570
575,650
447,690
22, 500

14, 374, 800

2, 643, 700

3, 613, 050

3,171,490

3, 625, 000
430, 000
1, 950, 000
900,000
850, 000
1, 855,000
1,175, 000

102

"Wyoming

United States

Minimum re- Held Octoquired.
ber 4,1888.

$3,457, 800
282,000
5,475. 000
2, 700; 000
2, 360, 000
100,000

*..,

Division No. 8

Capital.

906, 250
107, 500
400, 000
225, 000
212, 500
463,750
243, 750

937, 500
112,800
480, 600
252, 500
390, 000
471,250
248,750

839J00
99,045
421,450
226,410
269.690
420, 520
220, 515

10, 785, 000
592,621,656

2, 558, 750

2, 893, 400

2,496,730

91, 987,980

171,867,200

151,702,809

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 149
TABLE BY STATES, TERRITORIES, AND RESERVE CITIES, EXHIBITING THE NUMBER
OF BANKS IN EACH, WITH CAPITAL OF $150,000 AND UNDER, FOR THE YEARS 1887
AND 1888, AND THE INCREASE OR DECREASE IN BANKS AND CAPITAL DURING THE
INTERVAL.

October 5, 1887.
States, Territories, and reserve cities.
No.

Capital.

October 4,1888.
No.

Capital.

58
41
36
87

$5,110, 000
4,405, 000
3, 566, 000
10,177, 500

61
41
36
87

$5, 260, 000
4, 405, 000
3, 566, 000
10,177, 500

26
29

2. 813,000
3, 204, 340

25
33

Division No. 1

277

29, 275, 840

T rk
New York City

210
1

18, 931,160
150, 000

53
178
1
1

Maine
New Hampshire
Massarhimptts
Uhodo IslcLiid.

N

Now Jersey
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh

Increase.
No.

Capital.

3

4

29, 838, 800

7

618, 960

211
1

18,949, 660
150, 000

1

18, 500

4,814,220
16, 716,170
150,000
100, C O
O

57
188
1
1

5,108, 350
17, 257, 321
150, 000
100,000

4
10

Capital.

468, 9G0

283

No.

$150, 000

2, 757, 000
3, 073, 300

Decrease.

294,130
541,151

1

444

40,801, 550

459

41, 715, 331

15

13
28

970, 800
2,145,000

14
28

1, 016, 700
2,165, 000

1

1
17
18

100, 000
1,441,000
1, 6o5,000

1
18
18

100, 000
1, 491, 000
1, 610, 000

1

50, 000
5,000

77

6, 261, 800

79

6, 382,700

2

120, 900

12
12
16
8
12
12
4

1, 062, 280
1, 048, 000
1, 300, 520
500, 000
1, 010,100
1, 055, 000
300,000

13
13
19
13
13
12
4

1,116, 000
1,123, 000
1,611,000
896, 990
1, 069, 000
1,105,000
300, 000

1
1
3
5
1

53, 720
75, 000
310,480
396, 990
58, 900
50, 000

79
5
36

6, 559, 750
500, 000
3,773, 900

85
5
36

7, 225, 700
500, 000
3, 787, 900

6

665, 950

29

2,160, 000

31

2, 390, 000

2

56, 000

45, 900
20,000

"Washington
Virginia
Woof- Virginia

1

853, 781

Delaware
Marvland

$5(5, 000

230, 000
1, 855, 040

Division No. 2

Division No. 3
North Carolina
South Carolina
Florida
Alahamai

Texas
Kentnrkv
Iiouisvil] e
Tennessee

14, 000

225

19, 269, 550

244

21,124, 590

19

Ohio

155

13,542,02 J

156

13,460, 000

1

Indiana
Illinois

72
148

6, 264, 500
11,441, 500

74
151

6, 584, 500
11,674,000

2
3

320, 000
232, 500

88

6, 874,600

88

6,974,000

49

3, 592, 000

52

3, 830, 000

3

238,000

Division No. 4

Wisconsin

82, 020

99, 400

512

41, 714,620

521

42,522, 500

9

889, 900

Iowa
IMinnesotci

122
39
34

8,450, 000
2, 715,000
2, 317, 280

123
38
33

8,548, 000
2,589, 500
2,231, 000

1

98, 000

Kansas City
Saint Joseph
Kansas
Nebra sk a
Omaha

1
1
131
93
2

140, 000
100,000
8, 530, 800
5, 500,100
200,000

1
151
95
1

100, 000
10, 254, 700
5,735, 000
100, 000

20
2

1, 723, 900
228, 900

423

27, 959,180

442

29, 558, 200

23

2, 050, 800

Division No. 5

Division N o . 6 . . . ^ . - -




82,020
1
1

125, 500
86f280

1

140,000

1

100,000

4

451,780

150

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

TABLE B Y STATES, T E R R I T O R I E S , AND R E S E R V E CITIES, E X H I B I T I N G T H E N U M B E R
OF B A S K S I X EACH, W I T H C A P I T A L , ETC.—Continued.

Increase.

October 5, 1867. October 4, 1888.

States, Territories, and reserve cities.
Colorado
Nevada
California
San Francisco
Oregon
Arizona
Division No. 7
Dakota.

JLdalio
JM out ami
jjo-nr TVlexioo
TJtah
W ashin °"ton
Wyoming
Division No. 8

United States




No.

Capital.

26 $1, 651, 850
2
150,000
21 1, 760, 000

No.

Capital.

• 27 $1, 757,800
82, 000
1
2, 225, 000
24

Capital.

No.
1

$105, 900

3

465, 000

21
1

1 295,000
100, OUO

24
1

1 410,000
100, 000

3

4, 050, 850

77

5, 574, 800

7

685, 950

02
6
15
9
5
18
6

3, 720, 000
350, 000
1, 225, 000
850 000
450, 000
1, 280, 000
475, 000

58
7
15
9
5
23
7

3, 62o, 000
4i<0 000
1,200, 000
900 000
450,000
1, 655, 000
575, 000

121

8, 350,000

124

No.

1

Capital.

.

$68,000

115 000

71

Increase.

1

80 000

1
4

68, 000
95, 000
25, 000

50 000
5
1

375, 000
100, 000

8, 835, 000

7

605, 000

4

120, 000

2,150 178,649, 390 2,229 185, 551, 921

89

7, 680, 331

10

777, 800

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

151

TABLE BY STATES, TERRITORIES, AND RESERVE CITIES, EXHIBITING THE NUMBER
OP BANKS IN EACH, WITH CAPITAL EXCEEDING $150,000, FOR THE YEARS 1887 AND
1888, AND THE INCREASE OR DECREASE IN BANKS AND CAPITAL DURING THE
INTERVAL.
October 5,1887.
States, Territories, and reserve cities.
.Maine
New Hampshire
"Vermont
Massachusetts
Boston
Uihode Island
Connecticut
Division No. 1
New York City
Albanv
New Jersev
Pennsv] vania
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Division No. 2

October 4,1888.

No.

No.

14
8
13
111
54
35
54

Capital.
$5, 330,
1, 800,
4, 000,
34, 613,
50, 950,
17, 527,
21, 301,

700
000
000
000
000
050
070

289 13.1, 521, 8L-.0
59
46
G
28
59
42

15, 793,100
49, 000,000
1, 750, 000
8, 210, 000
16,834,970
22, 508,000
10, 080, 000

262 124,17G, 070

14
8
13
111
55
35
51

Capital.
$5, 400, 000
1, 800, 000
4, 000, 000
34, 563, 000
51,400, 000
17, 527, 050
20, 521, 070

287 135,211,120
59
45
6
28
58
42
23

Division No. 3
North Carolina
South Carolina

No.

Capital.

No.

Capital.

$69 300
$50,000
1

450, 000

1

519, 300

3

16,093,100
48, 950, 000
1,750,000
8,210,000
16, 334, 970
22, 858, 000
10, 330, 000

1

261 124, 520, 070

1

900, 000

780,000

3

830,000

350, 000
250, 000

4
3
17
1
G
8

1,113,185
651, 700
11,713,260
252, 000
3,475,000
2, 355, 300
356, 000

4
3
17
1
G
8
2

41

17, 910, 445

41

1, 350, 000
650, 000
1, 750, 000

5
5

2, 475, 000

8
1
8
15
2
24
9
11

200, 000
2, 925, 000
4, 580, 000
450,000
6, 3L5,000
3, 651, 500
5, 325, 000

27, 996, 500

91

37 ' 9, 254, 000
15 10, 400, 000
G, 700, 000
9
5, G30, 000
21
2, 900, 000
12
18 15, 050, 000
3, 800, 000
12
3, 883, 540
8
850, 000
4
650, 000
3

41
13
9
20
12
19
13
8
4
3

500,000

2

550, 000

1

200,000

1

200, 000

2
1

1, 500, 000
50,000
250, 000

1,800,000

2, 475, 000

200, 000
2, 925, 000
3 3G0 000
450, 000
5, 985, 000
3,551,500
5, 300, 000

1

1,150, 000
650, 000
1, 750, 000

1
8
12

50, 000

17, 910,445

G
3
5

300, 000

....„

1,113,185
651, 700
11,713,260
252, 000
1,475,000
2 355 300
356, 000

8

TVI&r viand
13t\ltinioro
District of Columbia
Washington
Virginia
West Virginia

Decrease.

Increase.

Florida
Mississippi
Louisiana
New Orleans
Arkansas
K tr pT™

Tennessee
Division No. 4
Ohio
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Detroit
"W"i scon sin

Milwaukee

23
9
11
88

3

1, 220, 000

1

330, 000
100, 000
25, 000

29,471, 500

4

1, 675, 000

10,939, 000
8, 900, 000
6. 650, 000
5, 380, 000
3,150, 000
15, 250, 000
4, 000, 600
4,000, 000
850, 000
850, 000

4

1,685,000

1
1

250, 000
200,000
200, 600
116, 460

59, 969, 600

6

2, 652, 060

3

350,000

1

200, 000
800, 000

1

200, 000

139

Iowa
Minnesota
[Missouri
Saint Louis
Kansas Citv
Saint Joseph
Kansas
Nebraska
Omaha.
Division No. 6




59,117, 540

142

6
19
1
7
1
8
2
6

1,700,000
11, 025, 000
200, 000
3, 000, 000
5, 800, 000
200, 000
2, 000, 000
500, 000
2,200,000

G
18
1
4
10
1
9
2
6

1,600,000
11, 375,000
200, 000
3, 200, 000 . . . . . . .
6, 600,000
200, 000
2, 600, 000
1
500, 000
2, 950, 000

55

26, 625, 000

57

29,225,000

4

100,000

600,000
750,000
2, 700,000

2

100, 000

152

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

TABLE BY STATES, TERRITORIES, AND RESERVE CITIES EXHIBITING THE NUMBER
OF BANKS IN EACH, WITH CAPITAL, ETC.—Continued.
October 5, 1887.
States, Territories, and reserved cities.

No.

Colorado
Nevada
California
San Francisco
Oregon . .
Arizona . . . .
-

No.

Capital.

No.

Qapital.

5

$1,100,000

9
3
2

2,410,000
2,700,000
500, 000

7
1
11
3
3

$1,700,000
200,000
3,250,030
2, 700, 000
950, 000

2
1
2
1

25

8, 800, 000

6

No.

Capital.

450, 000

6,710, 000

Decrease.

$600, 000
200, 000
840,000

19

Division No. 7
Dakota

Capital.

Increase.

O c t o b e r 1. 1888.

2, 090, 000

'

IMontRn a

2

750, 000

2

750, 000

Utah
Washington
Wyoming

2

400, 000

200,000

600, 000

400, 000
200, 000
600, 000

1

2

2
1
2

6

1,750,000

7

1,950, 0C0

1

200,000

911 407,069,735

23

10, 736,360

.,

Division No. 8
United States




809 399,813,375

11

$3,480,000

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

153

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PROVISIONS or SECTIONS 5*220 AND 5221 OF THE REVISED STATUTES OF THE UNITED
STATES, WITH THE DATES OF LIQUIDATION, THE AMOUNT OF THEIR CAPITAL, CIRCULATION ISSUED AND RETIRED, AND CIRCULATION OUTSTANDING, OCTOBER 31, 1888.
Circulation.

Name and location of bank.

Date of

liquidation

Capital.
Issued.

Retired.

Outstanding.

First National Bank, Penn Tan, N. T.* Apr. 0,1864
First National Bank, Norwich, Conn* . May 2,18G4
Second National Bank, Ottumwa, Iowat May 2, 1804
Second National Bank, Canton, Ohiot.. Oct. 3,1864
First National Bank, Lansing, Mich.t... Dec. 5,1864
Sept. 19,1804
First National Bank, Columbia, Mo.
$100, 000
$89, 875
$90, 000
$125
First National Bank, Carondelet, Mo... Mar. 15,1865
25,389
30, 000
25, 500
111
June 9,1865
First National Bank, Utica, N. Y.*
Sept. 16,1865
Pittston National Bank, Pittston, Pa
200, 000
Fourth National Bank, Indianapolis, Ind. Nov. 30,1865
100, 000
100, 000
99,220
780
Berkshire National Bank, Adams, Mass.} Dec. 8,1866
100, 000
National Union Bank, Rochester, N. T . Apr. 26,1866
400, 000
192, 500
191, 363
1,137
First National Bank, Leonardsville. N. Y. July 11,1866
50, 000
44, 385
45, 000
615
Farmers' National Bank, Richmond, Va. Oct. 22,1866
100, 000
85, 000
83,228
1,772
Farmers' National Bank. Waukesha, Wis. Nov. 25,1866
100, 000
90, 000
89, 520
480
National Bank of Metropolis, Washington, D. C
T.. Nov. 28,1866
200, 000
176. 875
180, 000
3,1^5
First National Bank, Providence, Pa
Mar. ],1867
100, 000
88, 665
90, 000
1,335
National State Bank, Dubuque, Iowa
Mar. 9,1867
150, 000
125, 605
1,395
127, 000
First National Bank of Newton, Newton ville, Mass
Mar. 11,1867
130, 000
128, 646
150,000
1,354
First National Bank, New Him, Minn... Apr. 18,1867
60, 000
54, 000
53,155
845
National Bank of Crawford County,
Meadville, Pa
Apr. 19,1867
300,000
Kittanning National Bank, Kittanning,
Pat--.-*
T.. Apr. 29,1867
200, 000
City National Bank, Savannah, Gai
May 28,1867
100, 000
Ohio National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio.. July 3,1867
500, 000
443, 690
450, 000
6,310
First National Bank, Kingston, N. Y... Sept. 26,1867
200, 000
177,604
180,000
2,396
First National Bank, Bluffton, Ind . . . . Dec. 5,1867
50, 000
44, 566
45, 000
436
National Exchange Bank, Richmond, Va. Dec. 5,1867
200, 000
179,135
180, 000
865
First National Bank, Skaneateles, N. Y. Dec. 21,1867
150, 000
133,601
135, 000
1,399
Dec. 26,1867
First National Bank, Jackson, Miss
100,000
45, 320
45, 000
180
First National Bank, Downinston, Pa... Jan. 14,1868
100, 000
88, 911
90, 000
1, 089
First National Bank, Titusville, Pa . . . . Jan. 15,1868
100, 000
85,724
86, 750
1, 026
Appleton National Bank, Appleton, Wis. Jan. 21,1868
44 362
45 000
50 000
638
Feb. 14,1868
National Bank of Whitestown, N. Y
45, 213
45, 500
120, 000
287
First National Bank, New Brunswick,
N. J.
Feb. 26,1868
88, 609
1, 391
100, 000
90, 000
First National Bank, Cuyahoga Falls,
Mar. 4,1808
44,421
Ohio
50, 000
45, 000
579
First National Bank, Cedarburg, Wis .. Mar. 23,1868
89,437
563
100, 000
90, 000
Commercial National Bank, Cincinnati,
Ohio
Apr. 28,1868
343,365
2,585
500, 000
345, 950
Second National Bank, "Watertown, N. Y. July 21,1868
100,000
90,000
1, 200
88,800
First National Bank, South Worcester,
N.Y
Aug. 4,1868
155,731
1,669
175, 500
157,400
National Mechanics and Farmers' Bank,
Albany, N.Y
Aug. 4,1868
312,890
314, 950
2,060
350,000
Second National Bank, DesMoines, Iowa Aug. 5,1868
42,132
42, 500
368
50, 000
First National Bank, Steubenville, Ohio. Aug. 8,1868
132, 982
135, 000
2,018
150, 000
First National Bank, Plumer, Pa
Aug. 25,1868
86, 047
1,453
100,000
87, 500
First National Bank, Danville, Va
Sept. 30,1868
44, 615
385
50, 000
45, 000
First National Bank, Dorchester, Mass. Nov. 23,1868
130,384
2,116
150, 000
132, 500
First National Bank, OskalOosa, Iowa.. Dec. 17,1868
66, 960
540
75, 000
67, 500
Merchants and Mechanics' National
Bank, Troy, N.Y . ,
Dec. 31,1868
183, 030
1,720
184, 750
300,000
National Savings Bank, Wheeling, W.
Va
Jan. 7,1869
89, 320
90, 000
100, 000
First National Bank, Marion, Ohio
Jan. 12,1809
108, 864
986
109, 850
125, 000
National Insurance Bank, Detroit, Mich Feb. 26,1869
84, 423
577
85, 000
200, 010
National Bank of Lansingburg, N. Y
Mar. 6,1869
133,620
135, 000
1,380
150, 000
National Bank of North America, New
York, N.Y
Apr. 15,1869 1, 000, 000
333,000
330,530
2,470
First National Bank, Hallo well, Me
Apr. 19,1869
53,350
52,857
493
60, 000
First National Bank, Clyde, N. Y
Apr. 23,1869
44,000
43,240
760
50,000
Pacific National Bank, New York, N.Y. May 10,1869
134,990
134,042
948
422, 700
Grocers' National Bank, New York, N. Y June 7,1869
85,250
84,866
384
390, 000
Savannah National Bank, Savannah, Ga. June 22,1869
85,000
84,395
605
100, 000
First National Bank, Frostbure, Md
July 30,1869
45,000
44,732
268
50, 000
First National Bank, La Salle,lll
Aug. 30,1869
45,000
44,475
525
50, 000
* N e w bank r with same title, t Never completed organization. Consolidated with another bank.




154

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER Tiin PROVISIONS OF SECTIONS 5220 AND 5221 OF THE REVISED STATUTES, ETC.—Continued.
Circulation.
Name and location of bank.

Date of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued.

National Bank of Commerce, George$100, COO
town, D.C
Oct. 28,1869
Mineis' National Bank, Salt Lake City,
150, 000
Utah
'.. Dec. 2,1869
50, 000
Dec. 13,1869
First National Bank, Vinton, Iowa
National Exchange Bank, Philadelphia,
300. 000
Jan. 8,1870
Pa
] 00, 000
Jan. 10,1870
First National Bank, Decatur, 111
II 0, 000
an. 11,1870
National Union Bank, Owego, N. Y
500, 000
an. 25,1870
First National Bank, Berlin, Wis.
500, 000
Central National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio Mar. 31,1870
150, 000
Apr. 9,1870
First National Bank, Dayton, Ohio
100, 000
National Bank of Chemung, Elmira, N. Y June 10,1870
Merchants' National Bank, Milwaukee,
100, 000
June 14,1870
Wis
200, 000
First National Bank, Saint Louis, Mo... July 10,1870
Chemung Canal National Bamk, Elmira,
100,000
Aug. 3,1870
N.Y...
J 00, 000
Central National Bank, Omaha, Nebr.A.. Sept. 23.1870
50, 000
Oct. 13,1870
First National Bank, Clarksville, Va
300, 000
Oct. 35,1870
First National Bank, Burlington, Vt
100, 000
Oct. 24,1870
First National Bank, Lebanon, Ohio
National Exchange Bank, Lansiugburg.
100, 000
Dec. 27,1870
N. Y
Muskingum National Bank, Zanesville,
100, 000
Jan. 7,1871
Ohio
-.
50, 000
United National Bank, Winona, Minn... Feb. 15,1871
100, 000
First National Bank, Des Moines, Iowa Mar. 25,1871
Saratoga County National Bank, Water150,000
ford, N. Y . . . .
Mar. 28,1871
100, 000
State National Bank, Saint Joseph Mo.. Mar. 31,1871
100, 000
May 2,1871
First National Bank, Fenton, Mich
First National Bank, Wellsburgh, W.
100, 000
Va
June 24,1871
• 200, 000
Clarke National Bank, Rochester, N. Y. Aug. 11,1871
Coinmercial National Bank, Oshkosh,
100, 000
Wis
Nov. 22,1871
Fort Madison National Bank, Fort Mad75, 000
ison, Iowa
Dec. 26,1871
300,000
National Bank of Maysville, Ky
Jan. 6,1872
105, 500
Fourth National Bank, Syracuse, N. Y.- Jan. 9,1872
American National Bank, New York,
500, 000
N.Y
May 10,1872
Carroll County National Bank, Sand0,000
wich, N.H
May 24,1872
100, 000
Second National Bank, Portland, Me
June 24,1872
200, 000
Atlantic National Bank, Brooklyn, N. Y July 15,1872
Merchants and Farmers' National Bank,
150, 000
Quincy, 111
Aug. 8,1872
400, 000
First National Bank, Rochester, N. Y.. Aug. 9,1872
Lawrenceburg National Bank, Indiana. Sept. 10,1872
200, 000
Jewett City National Bank, Jewett City,
Conn
'. Oct. 4,1872
60, 000
First National Bank, Knoxville, Tenn .. Oct. 22,1872
1(10, 000
First National Bank, Goshen, Ind
115, 000
Nov. 7,1872
Kidder National Gold Bank, Boston,
Mass
300, 000
NOT. 8,1872
Second National Bank, Zanesville, Ohio Nov. 16,1872
15-4, 700
Orange County National Bank, Chelsea,
Vt
.'
200, 000
Jan. 14,1873
Second National Bank, Syracuse, N.Y. Feb. 18,1873
100, 000
Richmond National Bank, Richmond,
Ind.*
230,000
Feb. 28,1873
First National Bank, Adams, N. Y
M a r . 7,1873
75, 000
Mechanics' National Bank, Syracuse,
N. Y
.'
140, 000
Mar. 11,1873
Farmers and Mechanics' National Bank,
Rochester, N. Y
100,000
Apr. 15,1873
Montana National Bank, Helena, Mont Apr. 15,1873
] 00,000
First National Bank, Havana, N. Y
50, 000
June 3,1873
Merchants and Farmers' National Bank,
Ithaca, N.Y
50,000
J u n e 30,1873
National Bank of Cazenovia, N. Y
150, 000
July 18,1873
Merchants' National Bank, Memphis,
Tenn
250, 000
A u g . 30,1873
*New bank, with same title.




Retired.

Outitanding.

$90,000

$89, 025

$975

135, 000
42, 500

133, 812
42, 283

1,158
217

175, 750
85. 250
88, 250
44, 000
425, 000
135, 000
90, 000

17.3,519
84,184
87,170
43,6] 1
4*20, 865
133, 752
89, 448

2,231
], 066
1, 080
389
4,135
1,248
552

90, COO
179, 990

89,230
178, 543

770
1,447

90, 000

89, 095

905

27, 000
270, 000
85, 000

20, 880
26fi, 573
81,248

120
3, 427
752

90, 000

89, 336

664

90, 000
45, 000
90, 000

89,105
44, 510
89,1C8

835
460
892

135, 000
90, 000
49, 500

133,913
8!), 439
48, 998

1,087
561
502

00, 000
180, 000

837
1,893

90, 000

89,163
178,107
89,188

07,500
270, 000
91, 700

66, 940
268, 382
90, 738

560
1, 618
962

450, 000

443,450

6,550

45,000
81,000
165, 000

44, 373
79, 749
163,420

627
1,251
1,580

135, 000
206,100
180,000

133, 565
203, 629
177, 578

1,435
2,471
2,422

48,750
80, 910
103, 500

48,152
79, 974
102,13G

598
930
1,364

120, 000
138,140

120, 000
136, 318

1,822

180, 000
90, 000

177,206
88, 755

2,794
1, 245

207,000
6b*, 900

207, 000
65, 920

980

93, 800

92, 730

1,070

83,250
31, 500
45,000

82,179
31,365
44, 285

1,071
135
715

45, 000
116, 770

44, 215
115,169

785
1,601

225, 000

222, 053

2,947

812

KEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY,

155

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PRO-

VISIONS or SECTIONS 5220 AND 5221 OF THE REVISED STATUTES, ETC.—Continued.
Circulation.

Name and location of bank.

Manufacturers' National Bank, Chicago,
111
Second National Bank, Chicago, 111
Merchants' National Bank, Dubuque,
Iowa
Beloit National Bank, Boloit, Wis
Union National Bank, Saint Louis, Mo..
City National Bank, Green Bay, Wis ...
First National Bank, Shelbiua, Mo
Second National Bank, Nashville, Tenn.
First National Bank, Oneida, N. Y
Merchants' National Bank, Hastings,
Minn
National Bank of Tecnmsoh, Mich
Gallatin National Bank, Shawneetown,
III
First.National Bank, Brookville, Pa
Citizens' National Bank, Sioux City,
Iowa
Citizens' National Bank, Charlottesville, Va
Farmers' National Bank, Warren, 111...
First National Bank, Medina, Ohio
Croton River National Bank, South
East,N.Y
Merchants' National Bank of West Virginia, Wheeling, W. Va
Central National Bank, Baltimore, Md..
Second National Bank, Leavenworth,
Kans
Teutonia National Bank, New Orleans,
La
City National Bank, Chattanooga, Tenn
First National Bank, Cairo, 111
First National Bank, Olathe, Kans
First National Bank, Beverly, Ohio
Union National Bank, La Fayette, Ind .
Ambler National Bank, Jacksonville,
Ma.*
Mechanics' National Bank, Chicago, 111
First National Bank, Evansville, Wis ..
First National Bank, Baxter Springs,
Kans
People's National Bank, Pueblo, Colo...
National Bank of Commerce, Green Bay,
Wis
"..
First National Bank, Millersburg, Ohio..
First National Bank, Staunton^Va
National City Bank, Milwaukee, Wis
Irasburg National Bank of Orleans, Irasburgh, Vt
First National Bank, Pekin, 111
Merchants and Planters' National Bank,
Augusta, Ga
Monticello National Bank, Montieello,
Iowa
Iowa City National Bank, Iowa City,
Iowa
First National Bank, Wheeling, W. Va ..
First National Bank, Mount Clemens.
Mich
First National Bank, Knob Noster, Mo ..
First National Bank, Brodhead, Wis
Auburn City National Bank, Auburn,
NY
!
First National Bank, El Dorado, Kans ..
First National Bank, Junction City, Kans.
First National Bank, Chetopa, Kans
First National Bank, Golden, Colo
National Bank of Jefferson, Wis
Green Lane National Bank, Green Lane,
Pa..
State National Bank, Topeka, Kans




Date of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued.

Retired.

Outstanding.

Sept. 25,1873
Sept. 25,1873

$500,000
100, 000

$438, 750
97, 500

$432,622
95, 891

$6,128
1,609

Sept. 30,1873
Oct. 2,1873
Oct. 22,1873
Nov. 29,1873
Jan. 1,1874
Jan. 8,1874
Jan. 13,1874

200,000
50, 000
500,000
50, 000
100, 000
125,000
125, 000

180,000
45, 000
150, 300
45, 000
90, 000
92, 920
110, 500

175,546
44, 25G
148,103
44,110
89, 085
91, 335
108, 700

4, 454
744
2,137
890
915
1,585
1,800

Feb. -7,1874
Mar. 3,1874

100, 000
50, 000

90, 000
45, 000

88, 235
44, 230

1, 765
770

Mar. 7,1874

250, 000
100, 000

225, 000
90, 000

222, 318
88, 605

2,682

Apr. 14,1874

50, 000

45, 000

44, 740

Apr." 27,1874
Apr. 28,1874
May 6,1874

100, 000
50, 000
75,000

90, 000
45, 000
. 45, 000

44, 301
44, 636

1,101
699
I;(J4

May 25,1874

200,000

166, 550

163,401

3,149

July 7,1874
July 15,1874

500, 000
200, 000

450, 000
180,000

443, 712
178, 351

6, 288
1, 649

Mar. 2G, 1874

July 22,1874

100,000

90, 000

87, 666

2,334

Sept. 2,1874
Sept, 10,1874
Oct. 10,1874
Nov. 9,1874
Nov. 10,1874
Dec. 4,1874

300, 000
170, 000
100, 000
50, 000
102, 000
250, 000

270,000
143, 001
90, 000
45, 000
90, 000
224, 095

266, 600
146, 379
88, 370
44, 564
88, 223
219, 674

3,400
1, 622
1,630
436
1,777
4,421

Dec. 7,1874
Dec. 30,1874
Jan. 9,1875

42, 500
250, 000
55, 000

125, 900
45,000

123, 310
44, 474

2, 590
526

Jan. 12,1875
Jan. 12,1875

50, 000
50, 000

35, 585
26,793
88, 995
59, 810
88, 777
58,825

415
207
1,005
590
1,223
1,175

12,1875
12,1875
23,1875
24,1875

100, 000
100, 000
100, 000
100, 000

36, 000
27,000
90, 000
60,400
90, 000
60, 000

Mar. 17,1875
Mar. 25,1875

75, 000
100, 000

67, 500
90,000

66,254
88, 384

1,246
1,616

Mar. 30,1875

200, 000

169, 000

166, 260

2,740

Mar. 30,1875

100, 000

45, 000

44, 384

61G

Apr. 14,1875
Apr. 22,1875

125, 000
250, 000

104, 800
225, 000

102,962
220, 315

May 20,1875
May 29,1875
June 24,1875

50, 000
50, 000
50, 000

27, 000
43, 800
45, 000

26, 850
43, 383
44, 372

1,838
4,685
150
417
628

June 26,1875
June 30,1875
July 1,1875
July 19,1875
Aug. 25,1875
Aug. 26,1875

200, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 200
60, 000

141, 300
45, 000
45, 000
36,000
27, 000
54, 000

138,467
44,452
44, 645
35, 612
26, 788
52, 8C7

2,838
548
355
388
212
1,193

100, 000
Sept. 9,1875
60, 500
Sept. 15,1875
*N/o circulation.

90, 000
30, 600

89,419
30,417

581
183

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.

156

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PRO-

VISIONS OF SECTIONS 5220 AND 5221 or THE REVISED STATUTES, ETC.—Continued.
Circulation.
Name and location of bank.

D a t e of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued.

Farmers' National Bank, Marshalltown,
Sept. 18,1875
Iowa
„
Eichland National Bank, Mansfield.Ohio. Sept, 25,1875
Planters' National Bank, Louisville, Ky. Sept, 30,1875
First National Bank, GalUuin, Tenu
Oct. 1,1875
First National Bank, Charlostown, W.
Oct. 2,1875
Ya
People's National Bank, Winchester, 111 Oct. 4,1875
First National Bank, New Lexington,
Oct. 12 1875
Ohio
First National Bank, Ishpeming, Mich .. Oct. 20,1875
Fayefrte County National Bank, Washington, Ohio
Oct. 26,1875
Merchants' NationalBank, Fort Wayne,
Nov. 8,1875
Ind
^,,v>
KansnaCityNational JStfric, Kansas City.
Mo
.'.. Nov. 13,1875
First National Bank, Schoolcraft, Mich.. Nov. 17,1875
First National Bank, Curwensville, Pa .. Dec. 17,1875
National Marine Bank, Saint Paul, Minn. Dec. 28,1875
First National Bank, Rochester, Ind
J a n . 11,1876
J a n . 11,3876
First National Bank, Lodi, Ohio
Iron National Bank, Portsmouth, Ohio.. J a n . 19,1876
J a n . 26,1876
First National Bank, Ashland, Nebr
J a n . 28, ] 876
First National Bank, Paxton, III
First National Bank, Bloomfield, Iowa.. Feb. 5,1876
Marietta National Bank, Marietta, Ohio. Feb. 16,1876
Salt Lake City NationalBank, Salt Lake
Feb. 21,1876
City, Utah
First National Bank, La Grange, Mo
Feb. 24,1876
First National Bank, Atlantic, Iowa
Mar. 7,1876
First National Bank, Spencer, Ind
Mar. 11, 1876
National Currency Bank, New York,
Mar. 23,1876
N. Y
Caverna National Bank, Caverna, Ky.. M a y 13,1876
City National Bank, Pittsburgh, Pa .... May 25,1876
National State Bank, Des Moines, Iowa J u n e 21,1876
First National Bank, Trenton, Mo
J u n e 22,1876
J u l y 10,1876
First National Bank, Bristol, Tenn
First National Bank, Leon, Iowa
J u l y 11,1876
Anderson County National Bank, LawJ u l y 29,1876
renceburgh. Ky
A u g . 7,1876
First N atonal Bank, Newport, Ind
First Nai »onal Bank, De Pere, Wis
A u g . 17,1876
Second National Bank, Lawrence, Kans Aug. 23,1876
Commercial National Bank, Versailles,
Ky
A u g . 26,1876
State NationalBank, Atlanta, G a
*
Aug. 31,1876
Syracuse National Bank, Syracuse,
Sept. 25,1876
N
Y
;
First National Bank, Northumberland,
Pa
Oct. 6,1876
First National Bank, Lancaster, Mo . . . Nov. 14,1876
First National Bank, Council Grove,
Kans
Nov. 28,1876
National Bank Commerce, Chicago, 111 - Dec. 2,1876
Dec. 12,1876
First National Bank, Palmyra, Mo
Dec. 16,1876
First National Bank, Newton, Iowa
National Southern Kentucky Bank,
Dec. 23,1876
Bowling Green, Ky
First National Bank, Monroe, Iowa
J a n . 1,1877
First National Bank, New London,
Conn
J a n . 9,1877
Winona Deposit National Bank, Winona,
Minn
J a n . 28,1877
First National Bank, South Charleston,
Feb. 24,1877
Ohio
Lake Ontario National Bank, Oswego,
Feb. 24,1877
N. Y
First National Bank, Sidney, Ohio
, Feb. 26. 1877
Apr. 9,1877
Chillicothe National Bank, Ohio
First National Bank, Manhattan, Kans Apr. 13,1877
National Bank, Monticello, Ky
A p r . 23,1877
First National Bank, Rockville, Ind
A p r . 25,1877
Georgia NationalBank, Atlanta, Ga
May 31,1887
J u n o 11.1877
First National Bank, Adrian, Mich




Retired.

Outtanding.

$50, 000
150, 00(1
350, 000
75, 000

$27, 000
130, 300
315, 000
45, 000

$26, 775
127,119
306, 755
44, 490

$225
3,181
8,245
510

100, 000
75, 000

90,000
67, 500

88, 926
(36, 628

1,074
872

50, 000
50, 000

45, 000
45, 000

44,525
44, 087

475
913

100, 000

81,280

80,146

1,134

100, 000

46, 820

46, 055

765

100, 000
50, 000
10(1, 000
100,000
50, 000
10l-,0U0
100, 000
50,000
50, 000
55,000
150, 000

65, 901
45, 000
90, 000
59, 710
45, 000
90, 000
90, 000
45, 000
45, 000
49,500
90, 000

63, 796
43, 362
87, 808
58, 045
43, 967
87, 867
83, 857
44, 495
44,051
48,320
87, 572

1,195
638
2,192
1,665
2,033
2,133
1,143
505
949
1,180
2,428

100,000
50, 000
50, 000
70, 000

45, 000
45, 000
45,000
63, 000

43,958
45, 324
44, 336
62, 272

1,042
676
664
728

100, 000
50, 000
200, 000
100, 000
50, 000
50, 000
60,000

45, 000
45, 000
68, 929
50, 795
45, 000
45, 000
45, 000

43, 610
44t 505
66, 547
48, 988
44, 376
44,530
43, 818

100,000
60, 000
50, 000
100, 000

45, 000
45, 000
31, 500
67, 500

44, 560
43, 798
31,174
66, 415

440
1,202
326
1,085

170, 000
200, 000

153, 000
73, 725

149, 855
71, 500

3,-145
2,225

200, 000

117,961

113,150

4,811

100, 000
50, 000

62,106
27, 000

59, 783
26, 777

2, 323
223

50.000
250, 000
100, 000
50, 000

26, 500
71, 405
46,140
45, 000

26,
69,
44,
43,

077
746
610
299

423
1,719
1,510
1,701

50, 000
60, 000

27, 000
35, 700

26, 649
35,115

351
585

100, 000

38, 300

36,161

2,139

100, 000

63, 285

63, 232

2,053

100, 000

90, 000

87,413

2,587

275, 000
52, 000
100, 000
52, 000
60, 000
200, 000
100, 000
100, 000

66, 405
46, 200
53, 825
44,200
49, 500
173, 090
45, 000
43, 500

61, 868
44, 917
51,555
43, 439
47, 460
1G8, 000
43, 374
42, 336

4,537
1, 283
2,270
761
2,040
5,090
1,626
1,164

•

1,390
495
1,382
1,807
624
470
1,182

REPOET OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 157
NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GO;NE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF SECTIONS 5220 AND 5221 or THE REVISED STATUTES, ETC.—Continued.

Circulation.
Name and location of bank.

Date of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued.

First National Bank, Napoleon, Ohio . . J u n e 30,1877
First National Bank, Lancaster, Ohio.. Aug. 1,1887
First National Bank, Minerva, Ohio... Aug. 24,1877
Kinney National Bark, Portsmouth,Ohio Aug. 28,1877
First National Bank, Green Bay, Wis . Oct. 19,1877
National Exchange Bank, Wakefield,
Oct. 27,1877
E.I..
F i r s t National Bank, Union City, I n d . . Nov. 10,3877
F i r s t National Bunk, Negaunee, Mich . . Nov. 13, J 877
Tenth National Bank, New York, N. Y Nov. 23,1877
Dec. 1,1877
F i r s t National Bank, Paola, Kans
National Exchange Bank, Troy, N . Y . . Dec. 6,1877
Second National Bank, La Fayette, I n d . Dec. 20,1877
State Nation'ABank, Minneapolis, Minn. Dec. 31,1877
Second National Bank, Saint Louis, M o . Jan. 8,1878
Jan. 8.1878
First National Bank, Sullivan, I n d
Rockland County National Bank, NyJan. 10,1878
ack, N . Y
F i r s t National Bank, Wyandotte, Kans Jan. 19,1878
Jan. 22,1878
First National Bank, Bo'one, Iowa
First National Bank, Pleasant Hill, Mo. Feh. 7,1878
Feb. 28,1878
National Bank of Gloversville, N. Y
First National Bank, Independence, Mo. Mar. 1, J878
Mar. 2,1878
National State Bank, Lima, I n d
Mar. 4,1878
F i r s t National Bank, Tell City, I n d
Mar. 5,1878
F i r s t National Bank, Pomoroy, Ohio
Eleventh Ward National Bank, Boston,
Mar. 14,1878
Mass
F i r s t National Bank, Prophetstown, 111. Mar. 19,1878
F i r s t National Bank, Jackson, Mich . . . Mar. 26,1878
F i r s t National Bank, E a u Claire, Wis . . Mar. 30,1878
F i r s t National Bank, Washington. Ohio. Apr. 5,1878
F i r s t National Bank, Middleport, Ohio.. Apr. 20,1878
First National Bank, Streator, III
! Apr. 24,1878
Apr. 25,1878
First National Bank, Muir, Mich
Kane County National Bank, Saint
Charles, 111'.
May 31,1878
First National Bank, Carthago, Mo
Juno 1,1878 |
Security National Bank, Worcester,
Juno 5,1878
Mass'
First National Bank, Lake City, Colo... Juno 15,1878
July 31, 1878
People's National Bank, Norfolk, V a
Topeka National Bank, Topeka, Kans . - , Aug. 7,1878
First National Bank, Saint Joseph, Mo..j Aug. 13,1878
First National Bank, Winchester, Ind . . Aug. 24,1878
Muscatino National Bank, Muscatine,
Iowa
Sept. 2,1878
Traders' National Bank, Chicago, 111 I Sept. 4,1878
Union National Bank, Rahway, N. J
Sept, 10,1878
First National Bank, Sparta, W i s .
| Sept. 14,1878
Herkimer County National Bank, Little I
Falls, N . Y
I Oct. 11,1878
Farmers' National Bank. Bangor, M e . . . Nov. 22,1878
Pacific National Bank, Council Bluffs,
Iowa
Nov. 30,1878
First National Bank, Anamosa, Iowa . . . Dec. 14,1878
Smithfield National Bank, Pittsburgh,
Pa
Dec. 16,1878
F i r s t National Bank, Buchanan, Mich . . Dec. 21,1878
F i r s t National Bank, Prairie City, 111
Dec. 24,1878
Corn Exchange National Bank, Chicago,
J a n . 4,1879
Franklin National Bank, Columbus,
Ohio
Jan. 4,1879
Traders' National Bank, Banuor, Me
Jan. 14,1879
First National Bank, Gonic, N. II
Jan. 14,1879
First National Bank, Salem, N. C
Jan. 14,1879
First National Bank, Granville, Ohio
Jan. 14,1879
Commercial National Bank, Petersburgh.
Va
1 . Jan. 14,1879
First National Gold Bank, Stockton,
Cal
Jan. 14,1879
First National Bank, Sheboygan, Wis . . Jan. 14.1879
First National Bank, Boscobel, Wis
Jan. 2i;i879
National Marine Bank, Oswego, N. Y
Jan. 25,1879




Retired.

Outstanding.

$50,000
60, 000
50, 000
100, 000
50, 000

$45, 000
54, 000
45, 000
90, 000
4.5, 000

$43, 804
52,021
44,107
88,235
43, 565

$1,196
1, 979
893
1,765
1,435

70, 000
50, 000
50, 000
500,000
50. 000
100,000
200, 000
100, 000
200, 000
50, 000

34, 650
45, 000
.45, 000
441,000
44, 350
90, 000
52,167
82, 500
53, 055
45, 000

32, 987
43, 565
43,901
416,157
43, 223
86, 808
47, 694
79,165
47, 913
44,14.5

1,663
1,435
1,099
24, 843
1,127
3,192
4,473
3, 335
5,142
855

100, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
100, 000
50, 000
100, 000
50, 000
200, 000

89, 000
45, 000
32,400
45, 000
64, 750
27, 000
33,471
44, 500
75, 713

86,
44,
31,
43,
62,
25,
31,
43,
70,

106
005
355
854
742
051
732
770
932

2,894
995
1,045
1,146
2, 008
1,949
1, 739
730
4,781

200, 000
50, 000
100, 000
60, 000
200, 000
80, 000
50, 000
50, 000

89, 400
45,000
88, 400
38,461
69, 750
31,500
40, 500
44, 200

86, 995
44,669
85, 055
37,427
65,825
30, 925
39,865
43, 309

2,405
631
3,345
1,034
3, 925
575
635
891

50, 000
50,000

26, 300
44, 500

25, 568
43, 550

732
950

100, 000
50, 0U0
100, 000
100, 000
100, 000
00, 000

49,000
29, 300
85, 705
89, 300
67,110
52,700

47,480
28,994
81,115
84, 819
62,801
49, 915

1,520
306
4,590
4,481
4,309
2,785

100,000
200, 000
100, 00')
50,000

44, 200
43, 700
89, 200
45, 000

40,
39,
85,
43,

756
440
007
261

3, 444
4,260
4,193
1,739

200, 000
100, 000

178, 300
89,100

169, 513
84, 602

8,757
4,498

100,000
50, 000

45,000
44,500

43,415
41, 817

1,555
2,653

200. 000
50] 000
50, 000

78, 750
27, 000
27, 000

73, 450
26, 395
24, 570

5,300
605
2,430

500, 000

59,160

52, 504.

6,656

100, 000
100, 000
60, 000
150,000
50, 000

93, 070
76,400
45, 597
128, 200
34, 365

87,953
70, 987
43, 058
120, 540
32,139

5,117
5, 413
2, 539
7,660
2, 226

91,968

7, 832

238, 600
45,000
43, 900
44, 300

218, 716
43, 775
42, 517
41,489

19, 884
1,2-25
l,3t'3
2,811

120, 000
300, 0D0
50, 000
50, 000
120,000

158

REPORE OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PRO-

VISIONS OF SECTIONS 5220 AND 5221 OF THE REVISED STATUTES, ETC.—Continued.
Circulation.
Name and location of bank.

Date of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued.

Central National Bank, Hightstown, N, J\ Feb. 15,1879
Brookville National Bank, Brookville,
Ind
Feb. 18,1879
Farmers' National Bank, Centreville,
Feb. 27,1879
Iowa
Mar. 1,1879
First National Bank, Glarinda, Iowa
Waterville National Bank, Waterville,
Mar. 3,1879
Mo
Mar. 4,1879
First National Bank, Tremont, Pa
Apr. 15,1879
First National Bank, Atlanta/Ill
Apr. 22, 1879
Union National Bank, Aurora, 111
Apr. 26, 1879
National Bank of Menasha, Wis
National Exchange Bank. Jefferson City,
May 8, 1879
Mo
May 15, 1879
First National Bank, Hannibal, Mo
Merchants' National Bank. Winona,
June 16,1879
Minn
Farmers' NaiionalBank,Keithsburgh, 111. July 3, 1879
July 5,1879
First National Bank, Franklin, Ky
July 8, 1879
National Bank of Salem, Salom, Ind
Fourth National Bank, Memphis Teim. July 19, 1879
Bedford National Bank, Bedford. Ind... July 21, 1879
Aug. 15,1879
First National Bank, Affcon, Iowa
First National Bank, Deer Lodge, Mont. Aug. 16,1879
Aug. 30, 1879
First National Bank, Batavia, 111
National Gold Bank and Trust Company, San Francisco, Cal
.... Sept. 1,1879
Gainesville National Bank, Gainesville,
Nov. 25,1879
Ala
First National Bank, Hackensack, N. J. Dec. 6, 1879
National Bank of Delavan, Delavan, Wis. Jan. 7, 1880
Mechanics' National Bank, Nashville,
Jan. 13, 1880
Tenn
.
Manchester National Bank, Manchester,
Jan. 13, 1880
Ohio
First National Bank, Meyersdale, Pa... Mar. 5, 1880
First National Bank, Mifflinburgh, Pa... Mar. 8, 1880
National Bank of Michigan, Marshall,
M a y 14, 1880
Mich
National Exchange Bank, Houston, Tex Sept. 10, 1880
Asciitney National Bank, Windsor, Vt. Oct. 19, 1880
First National Bank, Seneca Falls, N. Y. Nov. 23, 1880
Nov. 27, 1880
First National Bank, Baraboo, Wis
Bundy National Bank. New Castle, Ind. Dec. 6,1880
Vineland National Bank, Vineland, N. J . Jan. 11, 1881
Ocean County National Bank, Tom's
River, N. J
Jan. 11, 1881
Hungerford National Bank, Adams, N.Y. Jan. 27, 1881
Merchants' National Bank, Minneapolis,
Minn
Jan. 31, 1881
Farmers' National Bank, Mechanicsburab, Ohio
Feb. 18, 1881
First National Bank, Green Spring, Ohio. Feb. 18, 1881
First National Bank, Cannon Falls, Minn- Feb. 21, 1881
First National Bank, Cosbocton, Ohio... Feb. 21,1881
Manufacturers' National Bank, Three
Rivers, Mich
, Feb. 25,1881
First National Bank, Lansing, Iowa
Feb. 25,1881
First National Bank, Watertown, N. Y M a y 26,1881
First National Bank, Americus, Ga ... June 17,1881
First National Bank, Saint Joseph, Mich. June 30,1881
First National Bank, Logan, Ohio
July 8,1881
First National Bank, Rochelle, 111
Aug. 9,1881
First National Bank, Shakopee, Minn.. Aug. 10,1881
National State Bank, Oskaloosa, Iowa.. Aug. 13,1881
First National Bank, Hobart, N. Y
Aug. 27,1881
Attica National Bank, Attica, N. Y. ... Aug. 30, 1881
National Bank of Brighton, Boston, Mass Oct. 4,1881
Clement National Bank, Rutland, Vt.*.. Aug. 1,1881
First National Bank, Lisbon, Iowa
Nov. 1,1881
First National Bank, Warsaw, Ind
Dec. 1,1881
Brighton National Bank, Brighton, Iowa. Dec. 15,1881
Merchants'National Bank, Denver, Colo. Dec. 24,18S1
Merchants' National Bank, Holly, Mich, Dec. 31, 188L
irst National Bank , Alliance, Ohio
Jan. 3,1882




Ketired.

Outstanding.

$100,000

$32,400

$31, 520

100, 000

89, 000

83, 735

5,265

50, 000
50, 000

41, 500
45, 000

40, 578
44, 029-

922
971

125, 000
75, 000
50, 000
125, 000
50, 000

110, 300
64, 600
26,500
82, 000
44, 500

104, 234
59,415
25, 040
76, 765
43,134

6,066
5,185
1,460
5, 235
1,366

50, 000
100,000

45, 000
88,200

2, 239
6,104

100,000
50, 000
100, 000
50, 000
125, COO
100, 000
50,000
50,000
50, 000

35, 000
27, 000
54, 000
44,400
45, 000
87, 200
26, 500
45, 000
44,300

42, 761
82, 096
34,033
25,61o
51,040
43, 495
41, 870
84, 777
25, 294
43,710
41, 908

750,000

40, 000

28,230

11, 770

100, 000
• 100, 000
50,000

90, 000
90, 000
27, 000

S3, 435
85,122
25, 090

6,565
4,878
1,910

967
1,390
2,960
905
3,130
2, 423
1, 200
1,290
2,392

100, 000

90, 000

80, 400

9,600

50, 000
50, 000
100, 000

48, 303
30, 600
90, 000

44, 893
29, 770
82, 565

3,410
830
.7, 435

120,000
100,000
100, 000
60, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000

100, 800
31, 506
90,000
54, 000
27, 000
43,000
45, 000

94,407
29, 111
83, 634
52, 248
25, 821
44,159
43, 943

0,393
2,389
6,366
1,752
1,179
841
1,057

100,000
50, 000

119,405
45, 000

109, 550
40, 537

9,855
4,463

150, 000

98, 268

95, 305

2,963

100, 000
100, 000
50,000
50,000

30,140
45, 000
45, 000
53, 058

28, 775
43,433
43, 540
51, 063

1,365
1,567
1,460
1,995

50,000
50, 000
100, 000
60, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50,000
50,000
50, 000
100, 000
50, 000
300, 000
100, 000
50. 000
50, 000
50, 000
120,000
50, 000
50, 000
*New bank, with same title.

45, 000
45, 000
75,510
45. 000
26, 500
45, 000
45,000
45,000
81, 665
90, 000
45, 000
270, 000

43, 466
42, 987
66, 905
43, 446
25, 006
43, 015
43, 099
42, 625
75, 815
82, 856
42, 890
249, 958

1,534
2,013
8,605
1,554
1,434
1,985
1,901
2,375
5,850
7,144
2,110
20, 042

45, 000
48, 500
45, 000
72, 000
45,000
45, 000

43, 320
46, 250
43, ]G8
63, 720
43,195
4i, 878

1,680
2, 250
1,832
8,280
1,805
3,122

KEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

159

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PRO-

VISIONS or SECTIONS 5220 AND 5221 OF THE REVISED STATUTES, ETC.—Continued.
Circulation.
Narue ami location of bank.

Date of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued.

National Union Bank, New London,
Conn
Jan. 10,1882
National Bank of Royalton, Vt.
Jan. 10,1882
First National Bank, Whitehall, N. Y . . . Jan. 18,1882
Jan. 23,1882
National Bank of Pulaski, Tenn
Mar. 30,1882
First National Bank, Alton, 111
Havana National Bank, Havana, N. T . . . Apr. 15,1882
First National Bank, Brownsville, Pa... May 2,1882 [
Secood National Bank, Franklin, Ind... June 20,1882
Merchants' National Bank, Georgetown,
Colo
June 22,1882
" "
Commercial National Bank, Toledo, Ohio July 6,1882
.
Harmony National Bank, Harmony, Pa.. July 7,1882
July 22,1882
First National Bank. Liberty, Ind
Manufacturers' National Bank, Amsterdam, N. Y
Aug. 1,1882
First National Bank, Bay City, Mich.... Nov. 8,1882
First National Bank, Ripley, Ohio
Nov. 10,1882
National Bank of State of New York,
New York, N. Y
Dec. 6,1882
First National Bank, Wellington, Ohio.. Dec. 12,1882
Second National Bank, Jefferson, Ohio.. Dec. 26,1882
First National Bank, Painesville, Ohio.. Dec. 30,188-!
Saint Nicholas National Bank, New
Dec. 80,1882
York, N.Y
Dec. 30,1882
Fifth National Bank, Chicago, 111
First National Bank, Dowagiac, Mich . . Jan. 3,1883
First National Bank, Greenville, 111 . . . . . Jan. 9,1883
Merchants' National Bank, East Sagi_ naw, Mich
Jan. 9,1883
-Logan County National Bank, Russell- j
ville, Ky ..'.
Jan. 9,1883
National Bank of Vandalia, 111
Jan. 11,1883
Traders' National Bank, Charlotte, N. C. Jan. 16,1883
First National Bank, Norfolk, Nebr
I Feb. 3,1883
First National Bank, Midland City, I
Mich.*
"... Feb. 5,1883
Citizens' National Bank, Now Ulm, Minn. [ Mar. J, 1883
National Bank of Owen, Owcnton, Kv . -1 Mar. 5,1883
Merchants' National Bank, Nashville,
Tenn
| June 30,1883
Indiana National Bank, Bedford, Ind
i Aug. 25,1883
Stockton National Bank, Stockton, Cal.. j Oct. J, 1883
Wall Street National Bank, New York, |
N.Y
Oct. 15,1883
Commercial National Bank, Reading, Pa Oct. 23,1883
Cora Exchange National Bank, Chicago,
111.*
.'
Nov. 10,1883
Farmers' National Bank. Sullivan, Ind.J Dec. 24,1883
City National Bank, La Salle, 111
j Jan. 8,1884
Hunt County National Bank, Greenville, |
Tex
| Jan. 22,1884
Waldoboro' National Bank, Waldoboro', i
Me
i Jan. 31,1884
Third National Bank, Nashville, Tenn..I Feb. 20,1884
Madison County National Bank, Anderson, Ind
Mar. 25,1884
First National Bank, Phoenix, Ariz
! Apr. 7,1884
st
ion
,
oe,
Gd
M
Cobbosseo National Bank, Gardiner, Me. Apr. 18,1884
Mechanics and Traders' National Bank,
New York, N.Y
Apr. 24,1884
Princeton National Bank, Princeton,
May 17,1884
N.J
Kearsarge National Bank, Warner, N. H. Juiie 30,1884
Second National Bank. Lansing, Mich .. J u l y 31,1884
First National Bank, Ellensburg, Wash. Aug. 9,188*
German National Bank, Millerstown, Pa. Aug. 12,1881
Exchange National Bank, Cincinnati,
Aug. 27,1884
Ohio
Sept. 30,1884
First National Bank, Rushville, 111
Mechanics' National Bank, Peoiia, 111 .. Oct. 4,1884
Oct. 10,1884
First National Bank, Freeport, Pa
Gcnesee County National Bank,Batavia,
N. Y
Oct. 11,1884




Retired.

Out.
standing.

$300, 000
100, 000
50, 000
70, 000
100, 000
50, 000
75, 000
100, 000

$112, 818
90, 000
45,000
43, 700
90, 000
45, 000
67, 500
81,0(30

$100, 526
81, 489
40, 341
39,146
82, 794
42, 231
59, 670
70, 540

$12,292
8,511
4, 659
4,554
7,206
2, 769
7, 830
10, 520

50, 000
100. COO
50, 000
60, 000

45, 000
90, 000
45, 000
54, 000

43,183
84, 820
41, 080
50, 317

1,817
5,180
3, 920
3,683

80, 000
400,000
100, 000

72, 000
156,100
69, 201

66, 760
141, 802
59, 578

5, 240
14, 298
9,623

800, 000
100, COO
100, 000
200, 000

397, 004
90, 000
90, 000
162,800

365, 757
83,141
79, 228
143, 037

31, 247
0,859
10, 772
19, 763

500, 000
500, 000
50, 000
150, 000

450, 000
29, 700
45, 000
59, 400

396, 970
20, 547
41,868
50, 693

53, 030
9,153
3,132
8,707

200, 000

101,100

89, 716

11, 384

50, 000
100, 000
50, 000
45, 000

40, 050
90, 000
38, 800
11, 240

37, 650
78, 250
35, 933
10,100

2,400
11, 750
2,867
1,140

30, 000
50, 000
5(5, 000

27, 000
48, 900

23,560
48,150

3,440
5, 750

300, 000
35, 000
100, 000

141, 200
11, 250
90, 000

113, 590
11,250
78,930

11,070

500, 000
150, 000

102,800;
135, 000

87, 036
112, 530

15, 764
22,470

700, 000
50, 000
100,000

45, 000
22, 500

30, 710
15, 550

8,290
6,9*0

27, C10

68, 250

17, 300

12, 530

4,770

50, 000
c00, 000

44, 000
167, 600

36, 530
142,125

7,470
25,475

50, 000
50, 000
150, 000

45, 000
11, 240
90, 000

39,770
9,700
73, 212

5,230
1,540
16,788

200,000

85, 400

68, 820

16, 580

100,000
50, 000
50, 000
50,000
50, 000

72, 500
23, 586
40, 000
13,500
45, 000

63,805
20,914
30, 561
10, 670
32, 755

8,635
2, 072
9,439
2, 830
12,245

500, 000
75, 000
100, 000
50, 000

78.000 ;
66, 500
72, 000
44, 200

56, 080
47, 245
52, 538
32,020

21, 920
19, 255
19, 462
12,180

45, 000

37, 790

7,210

50,000 i

160

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PRO-

VISIONS OP SECTIONS 5220 AND 5221 OF THE REVISED STATUTES, ETC.—Continued.
Circulation.
Name and location of bank.

Date of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued.

Valley National Bank, Red Oak, Iowa...
Merchants' National Bank, Bismarck,
Dak
Manufacturers1 National Bank, Minneapolis, Minn
Farmers and Merchants' National Bank,
Uhricli*rille, Ohio ...
Metropolitan National Bank, New York,
N. Y
First National Bank, Grand Forks, Dak.
Iron National Bank. Gnnnison, Colo
Freehold National Banking Company,
Freehold, N. J
Albia National Bank, Albia, Iowa
First National Bank, Carlinville, 111
Freeman's National Bank, Augusta, Me.
First National Bank, Kokomo, Ind
First National Bank, Sabetha, Kans
First National Bank, "Wyoming, 111
First National Bank, Tarentum, Pa
First National Bank, Walnut, III
Farmers' National Bai*k,Eranklin, Tenn
Citizens' National Bank, Sabetha, Kans
First National Bank, Tucson, Ariz.
Ripon National Bank, Ripon, Wis
Farmers' National Bank, Franklin, Ohio.
First National Bank, Prescott, Ariz
National Union Bank, Swanton, Vt
German National Bank,Memphis, Tenn.
Merchants and Farmers' National Bank,
Shakopee, Minn
First National Bank, Superior, Wis
Shetucket National Bank, Norwich,
Conn
Cumberland National Bank, Cumberland, It. I
First National Bank, Columbia, Tenn...
Union National Bank, New York, N. Y
First National Bank, Centerville, Ind
Manufacturers' National Bank, Appleton, Wis
First National Bank, Plankinton, Dak..
Valley National Bank, Saint Louis, Mo..
First National Bank, Belton, Tex
First National Bank, Granvillo, Ohio...
Concordia National Bank, Concordia,
Kans
Citizens'National Bank, Boloit. Wis
First National Bank, Dayton, Wash
First National Bank, Macomb, III
First National Bank, Jesup, Iowa
Dallas National Bank, Dallas, Tex
First National Bank, Lewiston, 111
First National Bank, Cedar Rapids. Iowa.
First National Bank, Socorro, N. Mex ..
Custer. County National Bank, Broken
Bow, Nebr
Roanoke National Bank, Roanoke, Va..
First National Bank, Brownville, Nebr..
First N:itional Bank, Leslie, Mich
Mount Vernon National Bank, Mount
Vernon, 111
National Bank of Piedmont. W. Va
Fnst National Bank, Saint Clair, Mich..
First National Bank, Milford, Mich
National Bank of Kingwood, W. Va
Merchants' National Bank, Lima. Ohio..
Hubbard National Bank, Hubbard, Ohio.
Commercial National Bank, Marshalltown, Iowa
First National Bank, Indianapolis, Ind..
First National Bank, Concord, Mich
Jamestown National Bank, Jamestown,
Dak
First National Bank TWprn-. Ohio




Oct. 20,1884

Retired.

Outstanding.

$50, 000

$22,150

$16,840

Oct. 28,1884

73,000

22, 500

17, 900

4,600

Nov. 1,1884

300,000

45,000

31, 460

13,540

$5,310

Nov. 10,1884

50, 000

34, 600

25,120

Nov. 18,1884
Dec. 2,1884
Dec, 8,1884

3, 000, 000
50, 000
50, 000

1, 447, 000
19,250
11, 250

1,100, 520
17, 070
8,550

Dec. 10,1884
Dec. 16,1884
Dec. 16,1884
Dec. 26, 1884
Jan. 1,1885
Jan. 2,1885
Jan. 13,1885
Jan. 13,1885
Jan. 21,1885
Jan. 24,1885
Jan. 27,1885
Jan. 31,1885
Fob. 7,1885
Apr. 1,1885
Apr. 9,1885
Apr. 28,1885
May 6,1885

50, 000
50,000
50, 000
100, 000
250, 000
50,000
50, 000
50, 000
60, 000
50, 000
50, 000
100,000
50, 000
50, 000
50,000
50,000
175,300

93, 000
11,240
22, 450
90, 000
45, 000
10, 740
11,200
42, 500
36, 000
10, 740
11,240
28,100
16, 200
27, 350
11,250
43, 800
120,100

74, 822
9,350
18, 592
08, 235
34, 820
8, ;180
7.500
30, 450
25,440
8, 240
8,740
24,160
11, 885
21,350
8, 050
31, 770
81, 818

346,480
. 2,180
2,700
18,178
1,890
3,858
21, 765
10,180
2,160
3,700
12, 050
10, 500
2.50Q
2,500
3,940
4, 315
6,000
3, 200
12,030
38, 282

May 12,1885
May 16,1885

50, 000
60, 000

10, 240
18, 900

7,550
16,840

2,690
2,060

9,480

May 18,1885

100, 000

72, 000

53, 213

18, 787

June 5,1885
July 14, 1885
July 21,1885
Oct. 3,1885

125, 000
100, 000
1, 200, 000
50,000

106,200
66, 800
25,100
27, 350

78, 475
44, 513
11,733
18, 400

10,1885
21,1885
4,1885
6,1886
15,1886

50, 000
50,000
250, 000
50, 000
50,000

45, 000
11,250
44, 9G0
23, 490
26, 500

30, 043
6,760
25, 220
14, 200
16,140

27, 725
22, 287
13, 367
8,950
14, 957
4,490
19, 740
9, 290
10, 360

Mar. 12,1886
Mar. 22,1886
Mar. 24,1886
Apr. 14,1886
Apr. 20,1886
May 8,1886
May 12,1886
May 28,1886
July 31,1886

50, 000
50. 000
50, 000
100, 000
50,000
150, 000
50, 000
100,000
50, 000

11, 240
11,240
13,490
89, 520
25,760
33, 750
45, 000
35, 490
15, 500

7,410
6, 920
10, 520
48,194
18, 400
17, 000
22,130
17,110
8,120

3,830
4,320
2,970
41,326
7,360
16, 750
22, 890
18, 380
7,380

Aug. 9,1886
Sept, 16,1886
Sept. 16,1886
Sept. 25,1886

50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000

11, 240
11,250
39, 680
13,410

11,240
6,040
18, 402
7,500

5, 210
21, 278
5,910

11,1886
14,1886
20,1886
21,1880
21,1886
22,1886
23,1886

51,100
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
125, 000
50, 000
50, 000

45, 000
45, 000
39,310
45, 000
96,140
45, 000
45,000

Oct. 25,1886
Nov. 11,1886
Nov. 27,1886

100, 000
500, 000
50, 000

22, 500
162, 325
11, 250

22,495
22,410
21,658
20, 840
31, 630
19, 720
22, 839
9,590
70,365
6,570

50, 000
50, 000

11, 250
45, 000

4,080
22, 794

Oct.
Oct.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

Nov. 29,1886
Dec. 1,1886 I

22, 505
22, 590
17, 652
24.160
64,510
25, 280
22.161
12,910
91,960
4,680

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

161

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PRO-

VISIONS OF SECTIONS 5220 AND 5221 OF THE REVISED STATUTES, ETC.—Continued.
Circulation.
Date of
liquidation.

Name and location of bank.

Capital.
Issued.

First National Bank, Allerton, Iowa
Dec. 6,1886
Second National Bank, Hillsdale, Mich.. Dec. 18, 1886
Dec. 28,1886
Topton National Bank, Topton, Pa
Dec. 31,1886
First National Bank, Warsaw, 111
First National Bank, Hamburg, Iowa... Dec. 31,1886
Darlington National Bank. Darlington,
Feb. 10,1887
S.C
Union National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio.. Feb. 14,1887
Roberts National Bank, Titusville, Pa... Feb. 28,1887
National Bank of Rahway, N. J
Mar. 9,1887
Olney National Bank, Olney, 111
Mar. 11,1887
Metropolitan National Bank, Leavenworth, Kans
Mar. 15,1887
Ontario County National Bank, CananMar. 23,1887
daigua, N. Y
Winsted National Bank, Winsted, Conn. Apr. 12,1887
Council Bluffs National Bank, Council
May 5,1887
Bluffs, Iowa
J u n e 22,1887
First National Bank, Homer, 111
June 30,1887
First National Bank, Beloit, Wis
Mystic National Bank, Mystic, Conn ... July 7,1887
Exchange National Bank, Louisiana, Mo. July 12,1887
Exchange National Bank, Downs, Kans. Aug. 1,1887
First National Bank, Tccumseh, Nebr .. Nov. 3,1887
Third National Bank, Saint Paul, Minn Nov. 4,1887
Dec. 6,1887
First National Bank, Marshall, Mo
Dec. 15,1887
First National Bank, Greene, Iowa
Fulton National Bank, New York, N. Y . Dec. 20,1887
Fayetteville National Bank, FayetteDec. 31,1887
ville,N.C
Dec. 31,1887
National Bank of Somerset, Ky
First National Bank, Richburgh, N. Y.. Jan. 10,1888
Scituate National Bank, North Scituate,
E.I
Jan. 11,1888
National Bank of Franklin, Ind
Jan. 31,1888
First National Bank, Hampton, Iowa... Feb. 1,1888
First N ational Ban k, Green sb urgh, Kan s. Feb. 10,1888
First National Bank, Central City, Nebr. Feb. 11,1888
Feb. 20,1888
Duluth National Bank, Duluth, Minn
Bismarck National Bank, Bismarck, Dak. Mar. 1,1888
Mar. 6,1888
First National Bank, Ashton, Dak
Citizens' National Bank, Sioux Falls,
Apr. 24,1888
Dak
Apr. 30,1888
First National Bank, Stanton, Mich
First National Bank. Fairmont, Nebr ... Ma^y 1,1888
First National Bank, Greenleaf, Kans ... May 9,1888
National Bank Genesee, Batavia, N. Y... May 21,1888
Strong City National Bank, Strong City,
May 26,1888
Kans
Citizens' National Bank, Saginaw, Mich. June 1,1888
Saugerties National Bank, Saugerties,
June 16,1888
N.Y
June 21,1888
Hyde National Bank, Titusville, Pa
July 18,1888
State National Bank, Omaha, Nebr
Cincinnati National Bank, Cincinnati,
Ohio
Aug. 1,1888
First National Bank, "Worthington,
Minn
Sept. 5,1888
South Framingham National Bank,
Sept. 8,1888
South Framingham, Mass
First National Bank, Grass Valley, Cal.. Sept. 18,1888
First National Bank, Cawker City, Kans. Oct. 9,1888
Merchants' National Bank, West Virginia, Morgantown, W. Va
, Oct. 4,1888
Total.

11028—OUR 88




Eetired.

Outstanding.

$50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000

$11, 250
13, 892
18,000
38, 250
13, 500

$6,450
6, 381
7, OfiO
14, 950
6,605

$4, 800
7,511
10, 940
23,300
6,895

100, 000
500, 000
100, 000
100, 000
60, 000

22, 500
237, 230
75, 610
42, 500
27, 000

12, 430
114, 052
34, 560
17, 754
12, 760

10, 070
123,178
41, 050
24, 746
14, 240

100, 000

22, 500

50, 000
50, 000
100,000
50, 000
50, 000
52,450
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
500,000
100, 000
50, 000
300, 000

11, 250
11, 250

6,540
5,350

4,710
5,900

22, 500
11, 250
11, 250
47,205
11,250
11, 250
11, 700
45,000
22, 500
10,750

6,630
7,465
4,940
20, 046
4,500
3,060
4,380
13, 470
7,600
3,000

15, 870
3,785
6,310
27,159
6,750
8,190
7,320
31, 530
14, 900
7,750

200, 000
50,000
50, 000

39, 580
45, 000
25, 905

13, 749
10, 790
9,770

25,831
34, 210
16,135

56, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
300,000
50, 000
50, 000

35, 018
11, 250
11, 250
11, 240
10, 710
45, 000
11, 250
11, 250

10, 230
3, 635
3,440
1,960
3,310
9,140
3,160
2,420

24, 788
7,615
7,810
9, 280
7,400
35, 860
8,090
8,830

50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
75, 000

11, 250
11,250
11, 250
11,250
44,434

1,730
2,460
2,550
1,340
7,090

9,520
8,790
8,700
9,910
37,344

50,000

11,250
45, 000

1,900
5,960

9,350
39,040

125,000
300,000
100, 000

93, 316
74, 730
22, 500

9,420
18,990
2,800

n3, 896
55, 740
19, 700

280, 000

52,510

3,010

49,500

75,000

16,875

2,400

14,475

100,000
50, 000
50,000

21, 720
11, 250
11, 250

1,350

20,370
11, 250
11,250

110, 000

81,480

1,070

80,410

ioo, eoo

13, 610

64,779, 700 38,457,315 34,897,466 3,550, 849

11

162

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER-OF THE CURRENCY.

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PRO-

VISIONS OF SECTIONS 5*220 AND 5221 OF THE REVISED STATUTES OF THE UNITED
STATES, FOR THE PURPOSE OF ORGANIZING NEW ASSOCIATIONS WITH THE SAME OR
DIFFERENT TITLE, WITH DATE OF LIQUIDATION, AMOUNT OF CAPITAL, CIRCULATION
ISSUED, RETIRED, AND OUTSTANDING ON OCTOBER 3 1 , 1888.

Circulation.
Name and location of bank.

First National Bank, Ronaout, N. Y
First National Bank, Huntington, Ind ..
First National Bank, Indianapolis, I n d . .
First National Bank, Valparaiso, Ind
First National Bank, Stillwater, Minn . .
First National Bank, Chicago, 111
First National Bank, Woodstock, 111
Second National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
Second National Bank, New York, N. Y.
First National Bank, Portsmouth, N. H .
First National Bank, Richmond, Ind . . .
Second National Bank, Cleveland, Ohio..
First National Bank, New Ha^en, Conn.
First National Bank, Akron, Ohio
First National Bank, Worcester, Mass ..
First National Bank, Bane, Mass
First National Bank, Davenport, Iowa..
First National Bank, Kendallville, I n d . .
Fi it National Bank, Cleveland, Ohio . . .
Fi \st National Bank, Youngstown, Ohio
Fi. st National Bank, Evansville, Ind...
Fi st National Bank, Salem, Ohio
Fi sfc National Bank, Scrantou, Pa

Date of
liquidation.

Oct. 30,1880

Capital.
Issued.
$300, 000

100, 000
Jan. 31.1881
300, 000
July 5.1881
50, 000
Apr. 24.1882
130, 000
Apr. 29,1882
Apr. 29,1882 1, 000, 000
Apr. 30,1882
50, 000
Apr. 28,1882
200, 000
Apr. 28, Ife82
300, 000
Apr. 29,1882
300, 000
May 5.1882
200, 000
May 6,1882 1, 000, 000
May 6,1882
500, 000
May 2,1882
100, 000
May 4,1882
300, 000
May 9,1882
150, 000
May 9,1882
100, 000
May 12, 1882
150, 000
May 13,1882
300, 000
May 15,1882
500, 000
May 15,1882
500, 000
May 15,1882
50, 000
Ma} IS, 188?
20D, 000
JTj_ st National ^ . . ^ ^ Centrevillo, Ind... May 18,1882
_
_
_
50, 000
Bank, v ^ v.
300, 000
Nil
Bk
F t Wayne, Ind.. May 22, 1882
Id
First National Bank' Fort W
May 22, 1882
100,000
First National Bank, Strasburgh, Pa
May 27,1882
100, 000
First National Bank, Marietta, Pa
150, 000
First National Bank, La Fayetto, Ind.. May 31,3882
First National Bank, McConnelsville,
50, 000
Ohio
May 31, 1882
200, 000
First National Bank, Milwaukee, Wis . May 31, 18e2
100, 000
Second National Bank, Akron, Ohio. .. May 31,2882
100, 000
First National Bank, Ann Arbor, Mich.. June 1, 1882
100,100
First National Bunk, Geneva, Ohio
June 1, 1882
50, 000
First National Bank, Oberiin, Ohio
June 1, 1882
First National Bank, Philadelphia, Pa.. June 10, 1882 1, 000, 000
200, 000
First National Bank, Troy, Ohio
Juno 10, 1882
Third National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio.. June 14, 1882
800, 000
First National Bank, Cambridge City,
Ind
50,000
June 15,1882
First National Bank, Lyons, Iowa
100, 000
J u n o ] 5,1882
500, 000
First National Bank, Detroit, Mich. .. J u n e 17,1882
375, 000
First National Bank, Wilkes Barro, Pa June 20,1882
100, 000
First National Bank, Iowa Citv, Iowa.. June 24,1882
100, 000
First National Bank, Nashua, N. II.
Juno 24, 18S2
First National Bank, Johnstown, Pa
60, OdO
June 24,1882
First National Bank, Pittsburgh, Pa... June 29,1882
750, 000
First National Bank, Terre Ilaute, Ind June 29,1882
200, 000
First National Bank, llollidaysburgh,

First National Bank, Bath, Me
First National Bank, Janesville, Wis..
First National Bank, Michigan City,
Ind
First National Bank, Monmouth, 111 . . .
First National Bank, Marion, Iowa
First JNational Bank, Marlborougb,
Mass
National Bank of Stanford, Ky
First Xational Bank, Sandusky, Ohio..
First National Bank, Sandy Hill, N. Y.
First National Bank, Lawrenceburgh,
First National Bank, Cambridge, Ohio.
First National Bank, Oshkosh, Wis ...
First National Bank, Grand Rapids,
Mich
:.....
First National Bank, Delphos, Ohio . . .
First National Bank, Freeport, 111
First National Bank, Elyria, Ohio
,
First National Bank, Troy, N. Y




Retired.

Outstanding.

$270,000
90, 000
279, 248
45, 000
83,456
90, 000
45, 000
180, 000
376, 890
286, 000
87,400
510, 800
355, 310
114, 822
252,000
135, 000
45, 000
90, 000
266, 462
441, 529
442,870
110, 540
45, 000
64, 525
45, 000
79, 200
99, 000
175, 060

$248, 577
85, 630
248, 404
42,131
79, 516
80, 053
41, 940
' 159,950
342, 070
259, 653
76, 427
452, 240
325, 890
99, 983
231,753
122, 041
39, 068
81,218
233, 661
405, 513
395,165
99, 085
37, 470
58, 801
37,191
72,167
87, 705
158, 429

$21,423
4,370
30. 844
2,869
3,940
9,947
3,060
20, 050
34, 820
26, 347
10, 973
58, 560
29,420
14, 839
20,247
12, 959
5,932
8,782
32, 801
36, 016
47, 705
11,455
7,530
5,724
7, 809
7,033
11, 295
16, 631

84, 640
22!), 170
102, 706
80, 078
90, 000
58, 382
799, 800
180, 000
609, 500

75, 856
206,132
91, 976
77,143
79,050
51, 030
695,190
162,725
539, 830

8,784
23, 038
10, 730
7,935
10, 950
7, 352
104, 610
17, 275
69, 670

45, 000
90,000
336, 345
337, 500
88,400
CO, 000
54, 000
594, 000
141, 575

39,204
76, 913
310,668
301,645
80, 905
79, 668
48,165
527, 890
124,438

5,796
13, 087
25,677
35, 855
7,495
10, 332
5, 835
66,110
17,137

June 30,1882
June 30,1882
June 30,1882

50, 000
200, (00
125, 000

45, 000
180,000
121, 050

41, 425
161, 683
108, 020

3,575
18, 317
13, 030

June 30,1882
July 3,1882
July 11,1882

100,000
75, 000
50,000

45, 000
45, 000
45, 000

43, 358
42, 474
41,894

1,642
2,526
3,106

Aug.
Oct.
Oct.
Dec.

3,1882
3,1882
6,1882
31,1882

200, 000
150, 000
150, 000
50, 000

180, 000
135, 000
90, 000
45, 000

163, 521
123, 260
77, 951
39, 942

Feb. 24,1883
Feb. 24,1883
Feb. 24,1883

100, 000
100, 000
100,000

90, 000
80,800
47, 800

81, 505
70, 616
44,220

16, 479
11, 740
12, 049
5,058
8,495
10, 184
3, 580

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.

400, 000
50, 000
100, 000
100, 000
300, 000

155, 900
45, 000
53, 500
90,000
229, 550

144,870
40, 633
49, 870
79, 540
207, 111

11,030
4,367
3,630
10, 460
22,439-

24,1883
24,1883
24,1883
24,1883
24,1883

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

163

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE GONE INTO VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF SECTIONS 5220 AND 5221 OF THE REVISED STATUTES, ETC.—Continued.
Circulation.
Name and location of bank.

Date of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued,

Second National Bank, Detroit, Mich... Feb. 24,1883 $1, 000, 000
100, 000
Second National Bank, Peoria, 111
Feb. 24,1883
National Fort Plain Bank, Port Plain,
200, 0C0
Feb. 24,1883
N. Y
Logansport National Bank, Logansport,
100,000
Dec. 1,1883
50, 000
May 14,1884
National Bank of Birmingham, Ala
50, 000
First National Bank, Westfield, N. Y... June 1,1884
First National Bank Independence,
100, 000
Iowa
Oct. 31,1884
Dec. 31,1884
50,000
First National Bank, Sturgis, Mich
Jan. 13,1885
500, 000
National Bank of Rutland, Vt
50,000 I
Kent National Bank, Chestertown, Md.. Feb. 12,1885
National Fulton County Bank, GloversFeb. 20,1885
150, 000
ville, N.Y
80, 000
Feb. 25,1885
First National Bank, Centralia, 111
75, 000
National Exchange Bank, Albion, Mich. Feb. 28,1885
Mar. 31,1885
100, GOO
First National Bank, Paris, Mo
First National Bank, Yakima, Wash
June 20,1885
50, 000
First National Bank, Flint, Mich
June 30,1885
200,000
Total.




17,570, 000

Retired.

Outstanding.

$363, 700
90, 000

$317, 387
71, 718

174, 300

154,651

$46,313
18, 282
19, 649

16, 850
45, 000
42, 800

13, 700
38, 527
33,656

3,150
6, 473
9,144

90, 000
43, 850
238, 700
18,200

70, 210
35, 519
184, 444
13,490

135, 000
70, 600
30, 000
89,155
14, 650
122, 500

102, 966
49, 340
21,163
61,025
10, 360
85,172

19, 790
8, 331
54,256
4,710
32, 034
21, 260
9,437
28,130
4,290
37, 328

12,430, 713

10,995,380 1, 435, 333

164

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

NAMES OF BANKS IN LIQUIDATION UNDER SECTION 7, ACT JULY 12, 1882, WITH
DATE OF EXPIRATION OF CHARTER, CIRCULATION ISSUED, RETIRED, AND OUTSTANDING OCTOBER 31, 1888.

Circulation.
Name and location of bank.

Date of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued.

Dec. 31,1881
First National Bank, Pontiac, Mich
First National Bank, Washington, Towa- Apr. 11,1882
May 22,1882
First National Bank, Fremont, Ohio
May 26,1882
Second National Bank, Dayton, Ohio
June 1,1882
First National Bank, Grirard. Pa
Feb. 24,1883
First National Bank, Xenia, Ohio
Feb. 24,1883
First National Bank, Peru, 111
Feb. 24,1883
First National Bank, Elmira. N". Y
First National Bank, Chittenango, N. Y- Feb. 24,1883
July 4,1884
First National Bank, Eaton, Ohio
First National Bank, Leonrinster, Mass. July 5,1884
First National Bank, Winona, Minn . July 21,1884
American National Bank, Hallowell, Me. Sept. 10,1884
Oct. 28,1884
First National Bank, Attica, Ind
Citizens' NationalBank, Indianapolis, Ind Nov. 11,1884
First National Bank, North East, Pa.... Dec. 23,1884
Jan. 2,1885
First National Bank, Galva, 111
First National Bank, Thorntown, Ind .- Jan. 13,1885
Jan. 28,1885
Muncie National Bank, Muncie, Ind
Merchants' National Bank, Evansville,
Feb. 6,1885
Ind
Say brook National Bank, Essex, Conn.. - Feb. 20,1885
Mar. 7,1885
Union National bank, Albany, N. Y
Battenkill National Bank, Manchester,
Mar. 21,1885
Vt
Apr. 14,1885
First National Bank, Owosso, Mich
Coventry National Bank, Anthony, R. I - Apr. 17,1885
M a y 23,1885
State National Bank, Keokuk, Iowa
Tolland County National Bank, Tolland,
June 6,1885
Conn
June 9,1885
City National Bank, Hartford, Conn
"West River National Bank, Jamaica, Vt A u g . 17,1885
A u g . 30,1885
National Bank, Lebanon, Tenn
Greene County National Bank, SpringFeb. 8,1886
field, Mo
Union Stock Yards National Bank, ChiFeb. 29,1886
cago, 111
Total.




Retired.

Outstanding.

$50,000
100, 000
100, 000
300,000
100,000
120, 000
100,000
100, 000
150, 000
50, 000
300. 000
50, 000
75,000
56, 000
300,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
200,000

88, 565
90, 000
262,941
90, 000
108, 000
45, 000
90,000
135,000
44, 300
244,400
44,200
67, 500
50,400
87, 800
24. 550
36; 000
43, 740
161,000

$79,565
79, 768
80, 216
231,130
82, 085
93, 900
37,436
79,550
126, 369
32, 990
201,450
37,364
53,955
42, 265
62, 253
19,427
26,154
31, 550
117,436

$9,325
8,797
9,784
31,811
7,915
14,100
7,564
10,450
8,631
11, 310
42,950
6,836
13, 545
8,135

250,000
100,000
250,000

90, 800
61,200
144,400

65,761
48, 650
119,825

25,039
12,550
24,575

75,000
60, 000
100,000
150,000

57,700
47,700
89, 000
45,000

42,958
27, 345
66, 945
27,810

14,742
20,355
22,055
17,190

100, 000
550, 000
60,000

44,100
90, 000
54,000
24,550

31,646
63, 828
38,719
11,040

12,454
26,172
15,281
12,910

22,500

5,247

17,253

45,000

9,765

35, 235

2,618,236

1TO75,OO2

543,234

50,000
100,000
500,000
4,646,000

25,547
5,123
9,846
12,190
43,564

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

165

N A M E S OF BANKS I N L I Q U I D A T I O N UNDER SECTION 7, ACT J U L Y 12, 1882, W I T H
DATE OF E X P I R A T I O N OF CHARTER, CIRCULATION I S S U E D , R E T I R E D , AND O U T -

STANDING, SUCCEEDED BY ASSOCIATIONS WITH THE SAME OR DIFFERENT TITLE,
OCTOBER 31,

1888.

Circulation.
Name and location of bank.

Date of
liquidation.

Capital.
Issued.

First National Bank, Kittanning, Pa
National Bank of Beaver County, New
Brighton, Pa
National Bank, Beaver Dam, Wis
Merchants' National Bank, Cleveland,
Ohio
Union National Bank, Chicago, 111
First National Bank, Le Roy, N. Y
Evansville National Bank, Evansville,
Ind
National Albany Exchange Bank, Albany, N. Y ....
National Bank, Galena, 111
National State Bank, La Fayette, Ind...
First National Bank, Knoxyille, 111
Farmers' National Bank, Ripley, Ohio..
City National Bank, Grand Rapids, Mich.
Lee County National Bank, Uixon, 111 ..
Fort Wayne National Bank, Fort
Wayne, Ind
National Exchange Bank, Tiffin, Ohio...
National Bank, Malone, N. Y
Jefferson National Bank, Steubenville,
Ohio
First National Bank, Battle Creek, Mich.
Central National Bank, Danville, Ky
Knox County National Bank, Mount
Yernon, Ohio
First National Bank, Houghton, Mich ..
National Bank, Fort Edward, N. Y
National Bank, Salem, N. Y
National Exchange Bank, Seneca Falls,
N
Trumbull Y
National: Bank, :
Warren, Ohio.
Attleborongh National Bank, North Attleborough, Mass
American National Bank, Detroit, Mich.
First National Bank, Paris, 111
First National Bank, Saint John, Mich..
Second National Bank, Pontiac, Mich...
Raleigh National Bank of North Carolina, Raleigh, N. C
First National Bank, Danville, Ky
,
Total




July 2,1882

Retired.

Outstanding.

$200, 000

$199, 500

$176, 510

$22, 990

Nov. 12,1884
Dec. 24,1884

200, 000
50, 000

97, 300
41,100

73,187
33, 089

24,113
8,011

Dec. 27,1884
Dec. 29,1884

800, 000
1, 000, 000

228,100
62, 800
135, 000

166,176
38, 240
103, 844

61, 924
24, 560
31,156

Jan.

2,1885

150,000

Jan. 3,1885

800, 000

543, 050

383,142

159, 908

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

10,1885
11,1885
16,1885
16,1885
17,1885
21,1885
21,1885

300, 000
100, 000
300, 000
GO, 000
100, 000
300, 000
100, 000

243, 900
55, 900
615, 000
43, 600
87, 400
45, 000
41, 500

190,030
39,2>94
576, 002
32,412
61, 880
35, 580
32, 867

53, 870
16, 606
38, 998
11,188
25, 520
9,420
8, 633

Jan. 25,1885
Mar. 1,1885
Mar. 9,1885

350, 000
125, 000
200, 000

257, 300
50, 500
65, 900

181, 072
34, 543
47,484

76, 228
15, 957
18,416

Mar. 21,1885
Mar. 28,1885
Mar. 28,1885

150, 000
100, 000
200, 000

132, 600
89, 200
180,000

90, 942
57,160
119, 784

41, 658
32, 040
60, 216

Apr. 1,1885
Apr. 18,1S85
Apr. 22,1885
M a y . 4,1885

75, 000
100, 000
100, 000
100, 000

53, 200
45, 000
88, 900
86,100

36, 592
31,282
67,135
63, 015

16,608
13, 718
21, 765
23, 085

May. 6,1885
July 5,1885

100, 000
150, 000

88, 400
132,400

66, 392
80, 770

22, 008
51, 630

July 17,1885
July 24,1885
Aug. 12,1885
Aug. 14,1885

Sept. 1,1885

100, 000
400, 000
125, 000
50, 000
100, 000

84, 300
251, 500
111, 500
21, 000
43, 000

60, 478
166,820
67, 820
13, 590
30, 057

23, 822
84, 680
43, 680
7,410
12, 943

Sept. 5,1885
Sept. 22,1885

400, 000
150, 000

123, 900
130, 500

80, 315
80, 399

43, 585
50,101

7,535,000

4,474, 350

3, 317, 903

1,156,447

166

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE BEEN PLACED IN THE HANDS OF RECEIVERS,
AT DATE OF FAILURE, CAUSE OF FAILURE, DIVIDENDS PAID WHILE SOLVENT,
REDEEM CIRCULATION, THE AMOUNT REDEEMED, AND THE AMOUNT OUTSTANDING
Total dividends
paid during
existence as a
national banking association.

Organization.
Name and location of bank.
Charter
number.
First National Bank, Attica, N. Y....
Venango National Bank, Franklin, Pa.
Merchants' National Bank, Washington, D. C
First National Bank, Medina, N. Y.. i
Tennessee National Bank, Memphis,
Tenn
First National Bank, Selma, Ala
First NationalBank, New Orleans, La.
National Unadilla Bank, Unadilla,
NY.
Farmers and Citizens' National Bank,
Brooklyn, N. Y
Croton National Bank, New York,
N. Y
First National Bank, Bethel, Conn
First National Bank Keokuk, Iowa..
National Bank of Vicksburg, Miss
First National Eank, Eockford, 111...
First National Bank of Nevada, Austin, Nev
Ocean National Bank, New York,
NY
Union Square National Bank, Now
York, N.Y
Eighth National Bank, New York,
N.Y
Fourth National Bank, Philadelphia,
Pa
Waverly National Bank, Waverly,
N.Y
First National Bank, Fort Smith, Ark.
Scandinavian National Bank, Chicago, 111
Walkill National Bank, Middletown,
N.Y
Crescent City National Bank, New
Orleans, La
Atlantic National Bank, New York,
N.Y
First National Bank, Washington,
DC
National Bank of Commonwealth,
New York, N.Y
Merchants' National Bank, Petersburgh, Va
First National Bank, Petersburgh, Va.
First National Bank, Mansfield, Ohio.
New Orleans National Banking Association, New Orleans, La
First National Bank, Carlisle, Pa
First National Bank, Anderson, Ind..
First National Bank, Topeka, Kans..
First National Bank, Norfolk, Va
Gibson County National Bank, Princeton, Ind
First National Bank of Utah, Salt
Lake City, Utah
Cook County National Bank, Chicago,

Date.

199
1176

Jan. 14,1864
May 20,1865

$50, 000
300, 000

627
229

Dec. 14,1864
Feb. 3,1864

200, 000
10, 000

1225
1537

June 5,1865
Aug. 24,1865
Dec. 18,1863

100,000
100, 000
500, 000

162
U63

Capital.

July 17,1865

Amount.

Per
cent.

aw
2
2%
$1, 780

150, 000

June 5,1865

300, 000

1223
1556
1U1
80
803
429

Sept. 9,1865
May 15,1865
Sept. 9,1863
Feb. 14,1865
May 20,1864

200, 000
60, 000
50, 000
50,000
50, 000

2, 236

&:

El!

1331

June 23,1865

155, 000

1232

June 6,1865

1, 000,000

1691

Mar. 13,1869

250,000

384

Apr. 16,1864

250, 000

283

Feb. 26,1864

100, 000

1192
1631

May 29,1865
Feb. 6,1866

106,100
50, 000

1978

May 7,1872

250, 000

1473

July 21,1865

175, 000

103, 250

1937

Feb. 15,1872

500, 000

25, 000

5

1388

July 1,1865

300, 000 59,472

183, 000

61
161

4.9
42.1

140, 000

9,42 i

$7, 500
421, 052

465

56

24,403
18, 000

59

26

July 16,1863

500, 000

805, 000

1372

July 1,1865

750, 000

420, 250

57.2

1548
1378
436

Sept. 1,1865
July 1,1865
May 24,1864

140, 000
120, 000
100, 000

134, 200
97, 770
102, 660

95.9
81.5
102.6

1825
21
44
1660
271

May 27,1871
Juno 29,1863
July 31,1863
Aug. 23,1866
Feb. 23,1864

600, 000
50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
100,000

108, 000
42, 000
31,150
46, 000
90, 500

18
84
62.3
92

2066

Nov. 30,1872

1695

Nov. 15,1869

50, 000
100, 000
300, 000
100, 000

1845 July 8,1871
First National Bank, Tiffin, Ohio
900 Mar. 16,1865
CharlottesviMe National Bank, Char100, 000
lottesville, Va
1468 July 19,1865
Miners' National Bank, Georgetown,
150,000
Colo
2199 Oct. 30,1874
100, 000
Fourth National Bank, Chicago, 111. *. 276 Fob. 24,1864
50,000
First National Bank, Bedford, Iowa.. 2298 Sept. 18,1875
50, 000
First National Bank, Osceola, Iowa... 1776 Jan. 26,1871
* Formerly in voluntary liquidation.




Surplus

90.5
6,000
12
125, 000
53, 333
108, 279

125
17.8
108.2

149, 245

149.

4,500
184, 008

3
184

23,500

46.1

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

167

TOGETHER WITH THEIR CAPITAL AND SURPLUS AT DATE OF ORGANIZATION AND
CIRCULATION ISSUED, LAWFUL MONET DEPOSITED WITH THE TREASURER TO
ON OCTOBER 31, 1888.

Circulation.

Failures.
1
1

Lawful
money deposited.
Capital.

.Receiver
appointed.

Cause
of
failure.

Apr. 14,1865
Mav 1 1866

W

Surplus.

$50, 000
300, 000
200, 000
50, 000

May 8,1866
$2, 288 Mar. 13,1867

100, 000
100,000
500, 000

20, 435 Mar. 21,1867
4,788 Apr. 30,1867
37, 903 May 20,1867

120, 000

Aug. 20,1867

300, 000
200, 000
60, 000
100, 000
50, 000
50, 000

TJ

u

Issued.

Redeemed. Outstanding.

$44, 000
85, 000

$44, 000
85, 000

$43,751
84, 774

$249
226

1
2

180, 000
40, 000

180,000
40, 000

179, 314
39,756

686
244

3
4

90, 000
85, 000
180, 000

90, 000
85, 000
180,000

89, 688
84, 557
178, 766

312
443
1, 234

5
6
7

ioo, ouo

100, 000

99, 770

230

g

32, 000 Sept. 6,1867

U

253, 900

253, 900

252, 694

1,206

9

Oct.
4,610 Feb.
20,000 Mar.
5,000 Apr.
1,400 Mar.

G
N

180, 000
26, 300
90, 000
25, 500
45, 000

180, 000
26, 300
90, 000
25, 500
45, 000

179, 641
26, 095
89, 624
25, 429
44, 688

359
205
376
71
312

10
11
12
13
14

1,1867
28,1868
3,1868
24,1868
15,1869

3

250, 000

5,580 Oct. 14,1869

B
TJ

129, 700

129, 700

128, 641

1,659

15

1, 000, 000

150, 000 Dec. 13, 1871

V

800, 000

800, 000

791, 917

8,083

16

200, 000

Dec. 15,1871

TJ

50, 000

50, 0i»0

49, 689

311

17

250, 000

40, 000 Dec. 15,1871

F

243, 393

243, 393

240, 721

2,672

18

200, 000

33, 905 Dec. 20,1871

U

179, 000

179, 000

177, 500

1,500

19

106.100
50, 000

TJ
V

71, 000
45, 000

71,000
45, 000

70, 032
44,485

968
515

20
21

250, 000

27, 139 Apr. 23,1872
2, 509 May 2,1872
Dec. 12,1872

B

135,000

135, 000

134, 546

454

22

175, 000

17, 000 Dec. 31,1872

B

118, 900

118, 900

117, 487

1,413

23

500, 000

3,045 Mar. 18,1873

M

450, 0u0

450r 000

447, 000

3,000

24

300,000

56, 000 Apr. 28,1873

A

100, 000

100, 000

98, 630

1,370

25

500, 000

108, 000 Sept, 19,1873

M

450,000

450, 000

441, 079

8,921

26

750, 000

56, 027 Sept. 22,1873

V

234, 000

234, 000

230, 382

3,618

27

ill
I'll"

T
V
B
Q
TV

18, 302 Sept. 25,1873
11, 801 Sept. 25, 1873
16, 000 Oct. 18,1873

R
R
P

360, 000
179, 200
90, 000

360, 000
179, 200
90, 000

354, 080
176,110
88, 586

5,920
3, 090
1,414

28
29
30

14,161
25, 000
23, 839
7, 000
3,000

Oct. 23,1873
Oct. 24,1873
Nov. 23,1873
Dec 16,1873
June 3,1874

W
TJ
V
P
(>

360, 000
45,000
45, 000
90,000
95, 000

360,
45,
45,
90,
95,

354, 000 •
44,315
44,095
88, 641
93, 310

6,000
685
905
1,359
1,690

31
32
33
34
35

1,000

Nov. 28,1874

36

600, 000
50, 000
50, 000
101), 000
100. 000
50,000

000
000
OuO
000
0U0

X

43, 800

43, 800

43, 390

410

150, 000

18, 719 Dec. 10,1874"

V

118,191

118,191

116, 769

1, 422

37

500, 000
100, 000

80, 000 Feb. 1,1875
20, 000 Oct. 22,1875

V

285,100
45, 000

282, 308
43, 759

2,792
1,241

38
39

200, 000

22, 254 Oct. 28,1875

E
TJ

285,100
45,000
146, 585

146, 585

143, 675

2,910

40

150,
200,
30,
50,

Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
10, 000 Feb.

N
V

45, 000
85, 700
27, 000
45,000

44,460
82, 283
26, 300
44, 291

540
3,417
700
709

41
42
43
44

000
000
000
000

968




24, 1876
1,1876
1,1876
25, 1876

45,
85,
27,
45,

000
701)
000
000

168

EEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE BEEN PLACED IN THE HANDS OF RECEIVERS,
Total dividends
paid during
existence as a
national banking association.

Organization.
Name and location of bank.
Charter
number.
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77

78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
87

First National Bank, Duluth, Minn..
First National Bank, LaCrosse, Wis.
City National Bank, Chicago, 111
Watkins National Bank. Wat-kins,
N.Y
First National Bank, Wichita, Kans First National Bank, Greenfield, Ohio*
National Bank of Fishkill, N. Y
First National Bank, Franklin, Ind...
Northumberland Couraty National
Bank, Shamokin, Pa
First National Bank, Winchester, 111 .
National Exchange Bank, Minneapolis, Minn.
National Bank of State of Missouri,
Saint Louis Mo
First National Bank, Delphi, Ind
First National Bank, Georgetown,
Colo
..."
Lock Haven National Bank, Lock
Haven, Pa
Third National Bank, Chicago, 111
Central National Bank, Chicago, 111 ..
First National Bank, KansatfCity, Mo.
Commercial National Bank, Kansas
City. Mo
First National Bank, Ashland Pa.*..
First National Bank, Tarry to wn, N. Y.
First National Bank, Allentown, Pa.*.
First National Bank, Waynesburgh,

Date.

1954
1313
818

Apr. 6,1872
J u n e 20,1865
Feb. 18,1865

$50, 000
50, 000
250,000

$25, 000
31, 500
182, 500

456
1913
101
971
50

June
Jan.
Oct.
Apr.
Aug.

75, 000
50, 000
50,000
200, 000 $36, 205
60, 000

85,450 113. 9)
36, 975 73. 9!
80, 300 160.6
143, 000 71.5
222, 319 370.5

689
1484

J a n . 9,1865
J u l y 25,1865

2,1864
2,1872
7,1863
1,1865
5,1863

Capital.

67, 000
50,000

719

J a n . 16,1865
Oct. 30,1866
Mar. 25,1872
May 31,1872
June
Feb.
Sept.
Nov.

1995
403
364
161

J u n e 3,1872
Apr. 27,1864
Apr. 5,1864
Dec. 16,1863

50
63 j
73 |

670, 000 000
71, 750 143.5

50, 000

1273
236
2047
1612

Per
Amount. cent*

124, 000 248

3,410, 300
100, 000

1991

2,976

50, 000

1665
1949

Surplus.

14,1865
5,1864
18,1872
23,1865

45, 000

45

153,600 128
120, 000 15, 000
120, 000
1, 035, 000 862.5
200,000
38, 000 19
100, 000 1,000
540, 500 540.5
100, 000
60, 000
50, 000
100,000

7,214

25, 000 25
187,131 311.9
132, 250 264.5

305 Mar. 5,1864
86, 692
100, 000
222
Washington County National Bank,
205, 940 102.9
1266 J u n e 13,1865
200, 000
Greenwich, N. Y
45, 750 45.
2157 J u l y 16,1874
100, 000
First National Bank, Dallas. Tex
10,000 10
100,000
People's National Bank, Helena, Mont. 2105 May 13,1873
20,000 40
50, 000
First National Bank, Bozeman, Mont- 2027 A u g . 14,1872
Merchants' National Bank, Fort Scott,
34, 731 69.5
50, 000
Kans.*
t
1927 J a n . 20,1872
Farmers' National Bank,Platte City,
4,000
50, 000
8
2356 May 5,1877
Mo
First National Bank, Warrensburgh,
57,750 115.5
50,000
1856
J u l y 31,1871
Mo
German-American National Bank,
2358 May 14,1877
130, 000 2,000
Washington, D. C
250, 000
German National Bank, Chicago, HI.*. 1734 Nov. 15,1870
Commercial National Bank, Saratoga
100,000 11,872
113,000 113
1227 J u n e 6,1865
Springs, N. Y
392,125 392.
100. 000
Second National Bank, Scran ton, Pa.*.
49 Aug. 5,1863
92,000 92
100,000
National Bank of Poultney, Vt
1200 May 31.1865
7,400 14.
50, 000
First National Bank, Monticello, Ind.. 2208 Dec. 3,1874
139, 000 278
50, 000
First National Bank, Butler, Pa
309 Mar. 11,1864
248,400 354.
70,000
First National Bank, Meadville, P a . . 115 Oct. 27,1863
605, 250 484,
First National Bank, Newark, N. J . . .
52 Aug. 7,1863
125, 000
387, 000 387
First National Bank, Brattleboro\Vt. 470 J u n e 30,1864
100, 000
Mechanics' National Bank, Newark,
N.J
500, 000 251,802 1,198, 000 239.6
1251 J u n e 9,1865
287 500 287.
100. 000
First National Bank, Buffalo, N. Y... 235 Feb. 5,1864
75, 000 30
250, 000
Pacific National Bank, Boston, Mass. 2373 Nov. 9,18ft
First National Bank, Union Mills,
91, 955 183.
Union City, Pa
110 Oct. 23,1863
50, 000
Vermont National Bank, Saint Al186, 000 93
200,000
1583 Oct. 11,1865
bans, Vt
63,000 105
60, 000
First National Bank, Leadville, Colo 2420 Mar. 19,1879
City National Bank, Lawrenceburgh,
3,000
100, 000
Ind.*
2889 Feb. 24,1883
197, 000
First National Bank, Saint Albans, Vt. 269 Feb. 20,1864
100, 000
15, 000
First National Bank, Monmouth, HI. 2751 July 7,1882
Marine National Bank, New York,
75, 000
659, 643 164.
N.Y
1215 Jnne 3,1865
Hot Springs National Bank, Hot
400, 000
3,000
Springs, Ark
2,000
2887 Feb. 17,1883
50,
* Formerly in voluntary liquidation. 000




REPORT

OF THE COMPTROLLER

UF T±±JU UUKKUJNUI.

±VV

TOGETHER WITH THEIR CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, ETC.—Continued.

Failures.

Circulation.
Lawful
money deposited.

Capital.

$100, 000
50, 000
250, 000
75,
60,
50,
200,
132,

000
000
000
000
000

67, 000
50, 000

Receiver
appointed.

Surplus.

Mar. 13,1876
$25, 000 Apr. 11,1876
130, 000 May 17,1876
3,000
12, 000
10,000
30, 000
28, 538

July 12,1876
Sept. 23,18T6
Dec. 12,1876
Jan. 27,1877
Feb. 13,1877

Cause
of
failure.

Issued.

Redeemed.

Outstanding.

P
P
V

$45, 000
45, 000
137, 209

$45, 000
45, 000
137, 209

$44,358
43, 993
133, 237

$642
1, 007
3,972

45
4:6
47

a

67, 500
43, 200
29, 662
177, 200
92,092

67,
43,
29,
177,
92,

05,
42,
28,
172,
88,

349
434
445
256
682

2,151
766
1,217
4,944
3,410

48
49
50
51
52

58,415
43, 745

1,885
1,255

53
54

Mar. 12,1877
17,135 Mar. 16,1877

B
IT
B
B
M
W

60, 300
45, 000

500
200
662
200
092

60, 300
45, 000

100, 000

20, 000 May 24,1877

M

90, 000

90, 000

86, 535

3,465

55

2, 500, 000
50, 000

248, 775 June 23,1877
20, 000 July 20,1877

O
W

1, 693, 660
45, 000

1, 693, 600
45, 000

1, 668, 042
43, 749

25, 618
1,251

56
57

75, 000

65, 000 Aug. 18,1877

45, 000

TJ

45, 000

120, 000
750, 000
200, 000
500,000

8, 000
200, 000
10, 000
25, 000

Aug. 20,1877
Nov. 24,1877
Dec. 1,1877
Feb. 11,1878

V
V
V
X

71,200
597,840*
45, 000
44, 940

100,000
112,500
100, 000
250, 000

6,392
19, 000
25, 000
220,000

Feb.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.

11,1878
28,1878
23,1878
15,1878

V
V
V
N

44,
75,
89,
78,

500
554
200
641

May 15,1878

v

69, 345

June 8,1878
June 8,1878
Sept. 13,1878
Sept. 14,1878

p
V

114,220
29, 800
89, 300
44, 400

50, 000

13, 500 Sept. 25,1878

X

50, 000

Oct.

1,1878

N

100, 000

10, 600 Nov. 1,1878

130,000
500, 000

100,000

43, 775

1,225

53

71,
597,
45,
44,

200
840
000
940

68, 023
560, 997
43, 529
41,130

3,177
36, 843
1,471
3,810

59
60
61
62

44,
75,
89,
78,

500
554
200
641

42, 652
70, 269
85,195
73, 883

1,848
5,285
4,005
4,758

63
64
65
66

69, 345

68 410

935

67

220
800
300
400

109,929
29, 025
86, 741
43, 445

4,291
775
2, 559
955

68
69
70
71

35, 328

35, 328

34,295

1,033

72

27, 000

27, 000

26,425

575

73

X

45, 000

45, 000

43,645

1,355

n

2,000 Nov. 1,1878
125, 000 Dec. 20,1878

p
B

62, 500
42, 795

62, 500
42, 795

61, 660
36, 780

840
6,015

75
76

Feb.
Mar
Apr.
July
July
June
June
June

11,1879
15,1879
7,1879
18,1879
23,1879
9,1880
14,1880
19,1880

X
X
X
N
E
R
F
N

86, 900
91, 465
90, 000
27, 000
71,165
89, 500
326, 643
90, 000

86, 900
91, 465
90, 000
27, 000
71,165
89, 500
326, 643
90, 000

83, 844
85,143
86, 487
26,152
64,360
82, 920
305, 698
80, 202

3,056
6, 322
3,513
848
6,805
6, 580
20, 945
9,798

77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84

500, 000
100, 000
961,300

400, 000 Nov. 2,1881
50, 000 Apr. 22,1882
May 22,1882

P

449, 900
99, 500
450, 000

449, 900
99, 500
450, 000

407, 033
92, 325
435, 607

42, 867
7,175
14, 393

85
86
87

50, 000

13, 455 Mar. 24,1883

s

43, 000

43, 000

39, 690.

3,310

88

200, 000
60, 000

25, 000 Aug. 9,1883
15, 000 Jan. 24,1884

V
B

65, 200
53, 000

65, 200
53, 000

55> 942
47,865

9,258
5,135

89
90

100,000
100, 000
75, 000

Mar. 11,1884
40, 000 Apr. 22,1884
15, 000 Apr. 22,1884

G
P
B

77, 000
89, 980
27, 000

77, 000
89, 980
27, 000

65,680
74,578
19, 510

11, 320
15, 402
7, 490

91
92
93

400, 000

225, 000 May 13,1884

T

260,100

260,100

230,157

29,943

94.

June 2,1884

E

40,850

40,850

2.7,820

13,030

95

200,
50,
100,
50,

000
000
000
000

100, 000
200, 000
100, 000
50, 000
50,000
100, 000
300, 000
300,000

60, 000

24, 000
5, 000
8,000
7,000

40, 476
70, 000
4,000
2,000
10, 600
20, 000
62, 584
57, 000

180




yj

s

114,
29,
89,
44,

170

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAVE BEEN PLACED IN THE HANDS OF RECEIVERS,

Total dividends
paid during
existence as a
national banking association.

Organization.
Name and location of bank.
Uhartei
number.
Richmond National Bank, Eichmond,
Ind
97 First National Bank, Livingston,
Mont
98 First National Bank, Albion, N. Y
99 First National Bank, Jamestown, Dak
100 Logan National Bank, West Liberty,
Ohio
101 Middletown National Bank, Middletown, N. Y.
102 Farmers' National Bank, Bushnell,
111
103 Sclioharie County National Bank,
Schoharie, N. Y
104 j Exchange National Bank, Norfolk,
Va
105 First National Bank, Lake City,
Minn
106 Lancaster National Bank, Clinton,
Mass
107 First National Bank, Sioux Falls,
Dak
108 First National Bank, Wahpeton,
Dak
109 First National Bank, Angelica,
N. Y
110 City National Bank, William sport,
Pa
111 Abington National Bank, Abington,
Mass.t
112 First National Bank, Blair, Nebr
118 First National Bank, Pine Bluff, Ark.
114 Palatka National Bank, Palatka, Fla.
115 Fidelity National Bank, Cincinnati,
Ohio
116 Henrietta National Bank, Henrietta,
Tex
117 National Bank of Sumter, S. C
118 First National Bank, Dansville, N. Y.
119 First National Bank, Corry, Pa
120 Stafford
National Bank, Stafford
Springs. Conn
121 Fifth National Bank, St. Louis, Mo...
122 Metropolitan National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
123 First National Bank, Auburn, N. Y.
124 Commercial National Bank, Dubuque,
Iowa
125 State National Bank, Raleigh, N. C .
126 Second National Bank, Xenia, Ohio..
127 Madison National Bank, Madison,
Dak
128 Lowell National Bank, Lowell, Mich.
Total.

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L

Date.

Surplus.

Per
Amount. cent.

5,1873

$270, 000

$274, 000

3006 J u l y 16,1883
166 Dec. 22,1863
2578 Oct. 25,1881

50, 000
50, 000
50, 000

170, 500

2090

Mar.

Capital.

2942

May

1276

J u n e 14,1865

1791

F e b . 18,1871

50, 000

1510

A u g . 9,1865
May 13,1865

100, 000

337, 500

1740

Nov. 29,1870

50,000

90,142

583

Nov. 22,1864

200, 000

2465

Mar. 15,1880

2624

Feb.

7,1883

50, 000

4,000
356,000

178

38, 500

200, 000 $23,128

77

337. 5
180.

285, 000

142.5

50, 000

10, 000

20

2,1882

50, 000

12, 000

24

564

Nov. 3,1864

100, 000

186, 000

186

2139

Mar. 17,1874

100, 000

1386
2724
2776
3266

July
June
Sept.
Nov.

150,000 I 15, 000
50,000
50, OJ
tO
50, 000

3461

Feb. 27,1886

1, 000, 000

2,784

3022
3082
75
605

Aug.
Nov.
Sept.
Dec.

8,1883
26,1883
4,1863
6,1864

50, 000
50, 000
50, 000
100, 000

12, 250
13, 500
75, 825
168,500

24.
27
151.
168.

686
2835

J a n . 7, 1865
Dec. 12,1882

150, 000
200, 000

306, 000
75, 000

204
37.

2542 J u l y 12,1881
231 F e b . 4,1864

500 000
100, 000

215, 000
266, 000

43
266

1801
1682
277

Mar. 11,1871
J u n e 17,1868
Feb. 24,1864

100, 000
loo,ooo
60, 000

146, 806

146.

278, 000

453.

3597
1280

Dec. 7 1886
J u n e 14,1865

50, 000
50, 000

5,000
159, 494

10
318.

22,108,400 484, 690 16, 376, 700

74.

1,1865
7,1882
18,1882
20,1884

32, 894

38,500

10, 000

307, 382
23, 000

* Formerly in voluntary liquidation.
t Restored to solvency.
Defalcation of officers.
Defalcation of officers and fraudulent management.
Defalcation of officers and excessive loans to others.
Defalcation of officers and depreciation of securities.
Depreciation of securities.
Excessive loans to others, injudicious banking, and depreciation of securities.
Excessive loans to ottiicers aud directors and depreciation of securities.
Excessive loans to officers and directors and investments in real estate and mortgages.
Excessive loans to others and depreciation of securities.
Excessive loans to others and investments in real estate and mortgages.
Excessive loans and failure of large debtors.
Excessive loans to officers and directors.




341

100, 000

1137

101.5

204.9
46

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

171

TOGETHER WI1H THEIR CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, ETC.—Continued.

Failures.

Circulation.

Lawful
money deposited.
Capital.

$250,000

Receiver
appointed.

Surplus.

Cause
of
failure,

$33, 000

July 23,1884

50, 000
100, 000
50, 000

20, 000
12, 500

Aug. 25,1884
Aug. 26,1884
Sept. 13,1884

X
B
E

50, 000

1,000

Oct. 18,1884

P

200,000

40, 000

Nov. 29,1884

I

50, 000

7,500

Dec. 17, 1884

L

50, 000

15, 000

Mar. 23,1885

B

300,000

150, 000

Apr.

9,1885

O

50, 000

10, 000

Jan.

4,1886

E

1.00, 000

20, 000

Jan. 20, 1886

B

50, 000

30,447

Mar. 11,1886

J

50, 000

4,000

Apr. 8,1886

J

100, 000

20,100

Apr. 19,1886

A

100, 000

12, 500

May

4,1886

D

150,
50,
50,
50,

000
000
000
000

25, 300
11, 000
20, 000

Aug. 2,1886
Sept. 8,1886
Nov. 20,1886
J u n e 3,1887

L
U
V
Y

1, 000, 000

50, 000
8,000
10, 000
15, 000
10,183

Aug. 17,1887
Aug. 24,1887
Sept. 8,1887
Oct. 11,1887

200, 000
300, 000

24, 000
30, 000

Oct. 17,1887
Nov. 15,1887

1, 000, 000
150, 000

180, 000

Feb. 10,1888
Feb. 20,1888

100, 000
100,000
150, 000

20, 000
14,000

Apr. 2,1888
Apr. 11, 1888
May 9,1888

50, 000
50, 000

3,000
10, 000

J u n e 23,1888
Sept. 19,1888

25,958,900

4,074,438 I.

Redeemed.

$158, 900

$158,900

$124, 525

11, 240
90, U00

J 1,240
90, 000
18, 650

9, 605
72, 297

18, 650
23, 400
149,000 |
44, 000
38, 350
228, 200
44, 420
72, 360
10, 740
8,120
89, 000
43,140
108, 870
26,180
15, 030
19, 210

23, 400
176, 000
44, 000
38, 350
228, 200
44,420

16, 557
17, 440
143, 209
35, 487
28,110
169, 328

Outstand-

$34,375 96
1,635 i 97
17,703 ! 98
2, 093 j 99
5,960 100
32, 791 101
8,513 '102
10,240 '103
58,872 104
15,420 ; l05

72, 300

29, 000
46, 224

10, 740

6,650

17,120

8,120

9,000 108

89, 000

54, 473

34,527 |1O9

43,140

22, 010

21,130 |ll0
105, 945 HI
11,485 112
11,250 !113
9,965 1114

131,
26,
26,
19,

370
180
280
210

26,136 106
4,090 107

10, 000

J u n e 27,1887

000
000
000
000

50,
50,
50,
100,

Issued.

K
A
B
V
B
F
V
R
V
B
V

90, 000

25, 425
14, 695
15, O;JO
9, 245
9,097

11, 250
11, 250
4, 480
29, 379

11,250
11, 230
15, 730
73, 829

600
910
4,480
23, 672

10, 650
10, 340
"11,250
50,157

139, 048

139,048
44, 430

49,163

89, 885 120
44, 430 121

277, 745
19, 046

277, 745
44, 400

68, 490
18,100

209, 255 192
26, 300 123

39, 670

62, 170
22, 500
48, 470

10, 849
8 " 325
,

45, 321 124
22, 500 125
40,145 126

2,230

11,250 127
22, 640

" 4 8 , " 470

S

w

13,620
14, 991, 626

11,250 !.
24.870 i

80, 003 115
116
117
118
119

15, 43., 360 ! 13,911,335 | 1,521,025

M Failure of large debtors.
N Fraudulent management.
O F r a u d u l e n t m a n a g e m e n t , excessive loans to officers a n d directors, and depreciation of s e c u r i t i e s .
P F r a u d u l e n t m a n a g e m e n t a n d depreciation of securities.
Q F r a u d u l e n t m a n a g e m e n t a n d injudicious b a n k i n g .
R F r a u d u l e n t m a n a g e m e n t , defalcation of officers, and depreciation of securities.
S F r a u d u l e n t management, injudicious b a n k i n g , i n v e s t m e n t s in real e s t a t e a n d m o r t g a g e s , a n d depreciation of securities.
'T F r a u d u l e n t m a n a g e m e n t , excessive loans to officers a n d directors, a n d excessive loans t o o t h e r s .
U Injudicious b a n k i n g .
Y Injudicious b a n k i n g a n d depreciation of securities.
W Injudicious b a n k i n g a n d failure of large d e b t o r s .
X I n v e s t m e n t s in real estate a n d m o r t g a g e s a n d depreciation of securities.




172

REPOiiT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

INSOLVENT NATIONAL BANKS, DATES OF ORGANIZATION, APPOINTMENT OF R E SYSTEM, WITH AMOUNTS OF NOMINAL AND ADDITIONAL ASSETS, AMOUNTS COLON ASSETS, EXPENSES OF RECEIVERSHIP, CLAIMS PROVED, DIVIDENDS PAID,

Name and location of bank.

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67

Date of organization.

Capital
stock.

Receiver
appointed.

$50, 000 Apr. 14,1865
Jan. 14, 1864
First National Bank, A ttica, N. Y p
300, 000 May 1,1866
May 20, 1*05
Venango National Bank, Franklin, »
200, 000 May 8,1866
Dec 14,1864
Merchants National Bank, Washington, D. C .
Feb. 3,1804
50, Oi'O Mar. 13, 1867
First National Bank, Medina, N. Y
Juno 5. IHM
loo. ooo Mar. 21,1867
Tenneseee National Bank, Memphis, Tenn . . .
Aug. 24, 1865
100, 0i)\) Apr. 30,1867
First National Bank, Selma,, Alax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X' unit XN itbiuiiaM
u a u a , t a c i i u o r .n.i<
Dec. 18, ]8«>3
500, 000 May 20,1867
First National Bank, New Orleans, La
July 17.1865
120, U00 Aug. 20,1867
National Unadilla Bank, Unadilla, N. Y
Fanners and Citizens' National Bank, Brooklyn, N. Y .. J Jmio 5, 1865 300.000 Sept. 6,1867
I Sept. J), 1865
1, 1867
200, 000 Oct.
Croton National Bank, New York, N. Y
i May 15, 1865
60, 000 Feb. 28,1868
First National Bank, Bethel, Conn
!
Sept. 9,1M3
100, 000 Mar. 3,1868
First National Bank, Keokuk, Iowa
Fro. 14,1805
50,000 Apr. 24,1868
National Bank of Vicksburg, Miss
g,
May 20, 1864
5l), 000 Mar. 15,1869
First National Bank, Roekford, 111
June 23, 1865
250, 000 Oct. 14,1869
First National Bank of Nevada, Austin, Nev
Juno C, 1865 1, 000, 000 Dec. 13,1871
Ocean National Bank, New York, N. Y
Mar. 30,1869
2U0,000 Dec. 15,1871
Union Square National Bank, New York, N. Y
Apr. 6,1804
250, 000 Dec. 15,1871
Eighth National Bank, New York, N. Y
Feb. 2fi. 1804
200, 000 Dec. 20,1871
Fourth National Bank, Philadelphia, Pa
May 29,1865
106.1 (JO Apr. 23,1872
Waverly National Bank, Waverly, N.Y
Feb. 6,1866
f>0, 000 May 2,1872
First National Bank, Fort Smith, Ark
May 7,1*72
250, 000 Dec. 12,1872
Scandinavian National Bank, Chicago, 111
July 21,1865
175, 000 Dec. 31,1872
Wallkill National Bank, Middletown, N.Y
Feb. 15,1872
500, 000 Mar. 18, 1873
Crescent City National Bank, New Orleans, La
July 1,1865
300, 000 Apr. 28, 1873
Atlantic National Bank, New York, N. Y
July 10,1863
500, 000 Sept. 19,1873
First National Bank, Washington, D. C
750, 000 Sept. 22,1873
National Bank of the Commonwealth, New York, N. Y- July 1,1805
Sept. 1,1865
40;', ooo Sept. 2 \ 1873
Merchants' National Bank, Petersburgh, Va
July 1,1805
First National Bank, Petersburgh, Va
2r-0, 000 Sept. 25,1873
May 24,1864
First National Bank, Mansfield, Ohio
100, 000 Oct. 18,1873
New Orleans National Banking Association, New Or600, 000 Oct. 23,1873
May 27,1871
leans, La
50, 000 Oct. 24,1873
July 7,1863
First National Bank, Carlisle, Pa
50, 000 Nov. 23,1*73
July 31,1863
First National BanK, Anderson. Ind
100,000 Dec. 16,1873
Aug. 23,1866
First National Bank, Toneka, Kans
100,000 June 3,1874
Feb. 23,1864
First National Bank, Norfolk, Va
Nov. 30,1872
50, 000 Nov. 28,1874
Gibson County National Bank, Princeton, Ind
Nov. 15,1869
150, 000 Dec. 10,1874
First National Bank of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
July 8,1871
500, 000 Feb. 1,1875
Cook County National Bank, Chicago, 111
Mar. 16,1865
100, 000 Oct. 22,1875
First National Bank, Tiffin, Ohio.
July 19,1865
200,100 Oct. 28,1875
Charlottesville National Bank, Charlottesville, Va
Oct' 30,1874
150, 000 Jan. 24,1*76
Miners' National Bank, Georgetown, Colo
Feb. 24,1864
200, 000 Feb. 1,1876
Fourth National Bank, Chicago, ILL*
Sept. 18,1875
30, 000 Feb.- 1,1876
First National Bank, Bedford, Iowa
Jan. 26,1871
50, 000 Feb. 25,1876
First National Bank, Oscoola, Iowa
Apr. 6,1872
100,000 Mar. 13,1876
First National Bank, Duluth, Minn
June 20,1865
50, 000 Apr. 11,1876
First National Bank, LaCrosse, Wis
Feb. 18,1865
250, 000 May 17,1876
City National Bank, Chicago, III
June 2,1864
75, 000 J u l y 12,1876
Watkins National Bank, Watkins, N. Y
Jan. 2,1872
First National Bank, Wichita, Kans
60, 000 Sept. 23,1876
Oct. 7,1863
50,000 Dec. 12.187&
First National Bank, Greenfield, Ohio*
200, 000 Jan. 27,1877
National Bank of Fishkill, N.Y
Apr. 1,1865
_,
132, 000 Feb. 13,1877
First National Bank, Franklin, Ind
Aug. 5,1863
Northumberland County National Bank, Shamokin, Pa Jan. 9,1865
67, 000 Mar. 12,1877
July 25, 1865
First National Bank, Winchester, 111.
50, 000 Mar. 16,1877
Jan. 16,1865
100, 000 May 24,1877
National Exchange Bank, Minneapolis, Minn
National Bank of the State of Missouri, Saint Louis,
Mo
Oct. 30,1866 2,500, 000 J u n e 23,1877
50, 000 July 20,1877
Mar. 25,1872
First National Bank, Delphi, Ind
May 31,1872
75, 000 Aug. 18,1877
First National Bank, Georgetown, Colo
June 14,1865
120, 000 Aug. 20,1877
Lock Haven National Bank, Lock Haven, Pa
Feb. 5,1864
750, 000 Nov. 24,1877
Third National Bank, Chicago, 111
Sept. 18,1872
200, 000 Dec. 1,1877
Central National Bank, Chicago, 111
Nov. 23,1865
500, 000 Feb. 11,1878
First National Bank, Kansas City, Mo
June 3,1872
100, 000 Feb. 11,1878
Commercial National Bank, Kansas City, Mo
Apr. 27,1864
112, 500 Feb. 28,1878
First National Bank, Ashland, Pa.*
Apr. 5,1864
100, 000 Mar. 23,1878
First National Bank, Tarry town, N. Y
Dec. 16,1863
250, 000 Apr. 15,1878
First National Bank, Alien town, Pa.*
Mar. 5,1864
100, 000 May 15,1887
First National Bank, Waynesbnrgh Pa.*
J u n e 30,1865
200, 000 J u n e 8,1878
Washington County National Bank, Greenwich, N. Y July 16,1874
50,000 J u n e 8,1878
First National Bank, Dallas, Tex
May 13,1873
100, 000 Sept. 13,1878
Peoples' National Bank, Helena, Mont
Aug. 14,1872
50, 000 Sept. 14,1878
First National Bank, Bozeman, Mont
Jan. 20,1872
50, 000 Sept. 25,1878
Merchants' National Bank, Fort Scott, Kans.*.
-L1 1 J . O U X l CVV±\J1±CLL

O-'CtJ-lJA.,




JLJailLcLZ*^

L O \ .

. - . . « «

,

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

173

CEIVER, AND CLOSING, SINCE THE ORGANIZATION OF THE NATIONAL BANKING
LECTED FROM ALL SOURCES, LOANS PAID AND OTHER DISBURSEMENTS, LOSSES
AND REMAINING ASSETS RETURNED TO STOCKHOLDERS.
Nominal assets at date of suspension.
Estimated
good.
$50,823
83,713
18," 424
50, 000
116,422
853,148
36, 748
1.175, 656
255, 235
39, 486
98, 240
21, 584
7,000
129, 721
1, 867, 641
364,973
229, 617
653, 658
86,493
15, 800
100, 000
127, 769
379, 020
336, 8*3
1,000, 000
1,435,113
342,260
100, 000
94,483

Additional
assets
received
since date
of susEstimated Estimated
doubtful. worthless. pension.
$28, 053
57, 0^9
860, 929
2,029
395,412
96,556
276, 400
69, 857
121, 683
144, 903
4,809
79, 652
49,959
811
497, 292
736, 997
40, 000
14,174
100,000
50, 000
110,450
58, 852
1, 277, 690
473, H72
252, 250
50, 000
173, 378

300, 000
100, 000
23,077
55, 886
80,000
50, 000
85, 000
25,000
56,350
77, ~23
32, 011
51, 2v>6
204, M O
6, 300
1, 250,163
619, Bm
120,000
140, 000
169,520 ! 105, 218
390,069
20,000
131, 227
27,123
26,858
29, 752
10,938
74, 376
18, 093
118, 300
35,000
25, 000
453,037
478, 917
86,014
44,582
59, 226
18, 387
57,675
262,909
194, 665
58,188
86,492
112,026
67, 246
66, 025
67, 541
90, 704
135, 231
935, 999
175, 254
34, 368
220,481
1, 330, 215
157, 488
1,118,118
52, 349
107,318
100, 994
19, 879
311, 324
48,149
32, 559
39, 010
21,225

2, 818, 966
6,250
52,627
150,650
631, 797
161,441
313, 726
74, 724
41,584
132,445
15, 809
27, 894
36, 245
95, 251
76, 046
15, 543




$115, 538
818,154
'""i6if"072
""78,'4io
701,116
86, 856
272,757
65, 361
83, 830
125, 057
22, 569
91,412
942, 283
91, 355
165,442
37,494
25,000 ;
168, 100 !
25,000
148,920 !
283, 550
453, 593
321, 722
79, 409
7,954

Total
assets.

$13, 692
27,741

$208,106
986, 637
860, 929
126, 925
5,400
471, 991
26, 579
349,125
57, 732
156,575 1, 987, 239
212,910
19, 449
121,017 i 1, 691,113
21,572 ! 487, 071
140, 337
12, 212
316, 375
13, 426
94,112
30, 371
38,182
42,236 , 760,661
124,832 2, 934, 756
468, 223
11,895
49,409 1,181,465
653, 658
196, 504
32,517
61, 511
6,537
392, 966
24, 866
227, 871
25,102
168,603
806, 993
128, 337
807, 572
215, 724 2,493,414
404,431 2,766, 509
103,609 1, 019, 841
43, 225 ! 272, 634
21,095 i 296,910

51,403
200, 909
25, 941
79,101
124, 371

654,185 1, 431, 055
2,574 . 115, 304
332, 984
995,927
263, 098
14, 241
217, 912
3,542
125,178
12, 816
229,432
15, 258
678, 349 2, 699, 787
342,059
18,439
563, 089
30, 696
237, 358
27,287
227, 236
3,084
75, 604
9,635
115,213
15,162
186, 064
13,816
169, 912
44, 815
86,248 1,104,007
161,439
21, 738
148, 825
3,681
376
58,051
558,418
49,441
369,806
24, 217
219, 983
14, 770
226, 937
14,270
368, 717
18, 411

633, 744
6,596
629,113
24, 990
330, 704
170, 712
405, 000
51,175
19, 070
153, 467
185, 220
42, 284
236, 971
67,423
166,151
333
46,588

433,400
13, 478
30,398
34, 350
297,166
16,073
19, 817
6,723
8,859
20,289
2,171
1,861
13, 749
4,305
67, 942
21, 090
1,892

376, 870
29, 267
103, 057
78, 857
80,297
29, 055
3, 274
151,439
63, 620
257, 655
65,802
9,359
5,737
35, 855
65, 097
85,805
9,105
67,531

Offsets
allowed
and
settled.

$18,661
69,445

6,845
58, 645

Loss on i
assets com-1
pounded
or sold
under order j
of court.
$114,236
796,197
686, 665
93, 638
380, 383
179, 894
929, 289
132, 806
400, 903
187, 586
70,122
123, 409
57, 938

55, 342
30, 641
1,570
33, 454
4,608
274
317,742
219, 750
285, 736 1, 254, 358
101, 719
38, 911 "*379,'794
303, 504
15, 780
56, 011
37, 629
224,703
6, 211
22, 084
30, 378
285,346
8,949
161, 013
98,460
765, 356
280, 955
589,213 i
368,992
616, 642
103, 842
146, 764
3, 225
182, 231
5,735
8,964
7,068
10, 410
26, 951
2,191
3,595
2,869
452,953
60, 447
24, 882
8,761
2,100
3,510
3,043
1,139
4,296
48,381
3,151
17, 409
13,192"
60, 311
8,487
6,537
21,498

166,831
4, 822,109
62, 774
201,578
746, 506
36, 598
430,471
41, 324
2,589,882
59, 323
505, 664
7,245
1, 856, 661 1,482,725
22, 962
184,971
16,072
176, 831
164, 949
274, 750
339, 715
20, 608
60,014
714
589,938
18, 541
156,122
12,492
361, 903
7,700
136,479
85, 248
178

715, 584
51,294
167, 702
118, 083
55, 917
54,332
196,231
1, 948, 095
84,709
58, 715
186, 254
6,266
49, 929
30, 319
111, 780
85,019
470,908
18,635
67, 345
44,344
223, 375
203, 792
99, 588
117,173
139, 309
1, 771,699
1,310
606, 580
143, 664
310, 813
79,038
22, 559
67, 396
268, 000
47, 239
6,972
106,292
32,372
20,141

Nominal
value of
assets
returned
to stockholders.

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
$89, 855 17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

53,473

36,957
34, 259

31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55

56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
112, 818 64
65
66
67
279, 987 68
69
70
71
72

174

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

INSOLVENT NATIONAL BANKS, DATE OF ORGANIZATION, APPOINTMENT OF R E SYSTEM, WITH AMOUNTS OF NOMINAL AND ADDITIONAL ASSETSf

Name and location of bank.

73
74
75
70
77
78
79
80
81
8:2
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
9.")
90
97
98
99
10;)
101
102
!(){

104
10')
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
11-J
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128

Date of organization.

May 5,1877
Farmers' National Bank, Platte City, Mo
July 31,1871
First National Bank, Warrensburgh, Mo
May 14,1877
German-American National Bank, Washington,D. C . .
Nov. 15,1870
German Nat ional Bank, Chicago, 111.*
Commercial National Bank, Saratoga Springs, N. Y . . . June 6, 1865
A u g . 5,1803
Second National Bank, Scranton, Pa.*
May 31, 1865
N ationa 1 Bank of Poultney, Vt
Dec. 3, 1874
First National Ban k, Monticello, Ind
Mar. 11,1864
First National Bank, Butler, Pa
Oct. 27,1863
-First National Bank, Meadville, Pa
Aug. 7.1863
First National Bank, Newark, N . J
June 30,1864
First National Bank, Brattleborough, Vt
Mechanics' National Bank, Newark, N. J
| June 9,1865
First National Bank, Buffalo, N. Y
' Feb. 5,1864
Pacific National Bank, Boston, Mass
Nov. 9,1877
First National Bank of Union Mills, Union City, Pa .. Oct. 23,1863
Vermont National Bank, Saint Albans, Vt
; Oct. 11,1865
First National Bank, Leadville, Colo
Mar. 19,1879
City National Bank, Lawrenceburgh, Ind.*
j Fob. 24,1863
First National Bank, Saint Albans, Vt
! Feb. 20,18G4
Fust, National Bank, Monmouth, 111
July 7,1882
Marine National Bank, New York, X. Y
June 3,1805
Hot Springs National Bank, Hot Springs, Ark
j Feb. 17,1883
Richmond National Bank, Richmond, Ind
Mar. 5,1873
First Nationil Bank, Livingston, Mont
July 16,1883
F u s t National Bank, Albion, X. Y
Dec. 22,1863
First N.'iti'.iiuil Bank, Jamestown, Dak
Oct. 25,1881
Logan National Bank, West Liberty, Ohio
| May 7,1883
June 14,1865
Middlrtowu National Bank, Middletowa, N. Y
Feb. 18,1871
Fanners' Xational Bank, lUushnell, III
Sch'shsirio County National Bank, Schoharie, N. Y . -.. Aug. 9,1805
May 13,1865
Bxchuiigo National Bank, Norfolk, Va
Nov. 29,1870
First Xat ional Hank, Lake City, Minn
Lancaster National Bank, Clinton, Mass
— Nov. 22,1864
Mar. 15,1880
First, National Bank. Sioux Falls, Dak
Feb. 2,1882
First National Bank, Wahpeton, Dak
Nov. 3,1864
First National Bank, Angelica, N. Y
Mar. 17. 1874
City National Bank, Williamsport, Pa
July 1,1865
Aldington National Bank, Abington, Mass.t
Juiio 7, 18*2
First'National Bank, Blair, Nebr
Sept. 18,1882
First National Bank, Pine Bluif, Ark
Nov. 20,1884
Palatka National Bank, Palatka, Fla
Feb. 27,1886
Fidelity National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
Aug. 8,1883
Henrietta National Bank, Henrietta, Tex
Nov. 26,1883
National Bank of Smntor, S. C.
Sept. 4,1803
i First National Bank, Dansville, N. Y
Dec. 6,1864
I First Xatioiiil Bank, Corry,JPa
Jan. 7,1865
Stafford National Bank, Stafford Springs, Conn.....
Dec. 6,1882
Fifth National Bank, Saint Louis, Mo
June 23,1881
Metropolitan National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
Jan. 13,1864
First National Bank, Auburn, N. Y .
Mar. 4,1871
Commercial National Bank, Dubuque, Iowa.
June 2, 1868
State Nat ional Bank, Raleigh, N. C
,
Jan. 1,1864
Second National Bank, Xenia, Ohio.
Nov. 29,1886
Madison National Bank, Madison, Dak.
J u n e 14,1865
Lowell National Bank, Lowell, Mich
Total.
* Formerly in voluntary liquidation.




Capital

stock.

$50, 000
100, 000
130, 000
500, 000
100, 000
200, 000
100,000
50, 000
50, 000
100,000
300, 000
300, 000
500, 000
100, 000
961, 300
50, 000
200,000
60, 000
100, 000
100, 000
75, 000
400, 000
50, 000
250, 000
50, 000
100, 000
50, 000
50, 000
200,000
50, 000
50, 000
300, 000
50,000
100, 000
50,000
50, 000
100, 000
100,000
150, 000
50, 000
50, 01)0
50, 000
1, 000, 000
50,000
50, 000
50, 000
100,000
200, COO
300, 000
1, 000, 000
150, 000
100, 000
100, 000
150, 000
50, 000
50, 000

Receiver
appointed.

Oct. 1,1878
Nov. 1,1878
Nov. 1,1878
Dec. 20,1878
Feb. 11,1879
Mar. 15, 1879
Apr. 7,1879
July 18,1879
July 23,1879
Juno 9,1880
June 14,1880
Juno 19,1880
Xov. 2,1881
Apr. 22,1882
May 22,1882
Mar 24,1883
Aug. 9,1883
Jan. 24,1884
Mar. 11,1884
Apr. 22,1884
Apr. 22,1884
May 13,1884
June 2,1884
July 23,1884
Aug. 25,1884
Aug. 26,1884
Sept. 13,1884
Oct. 18,1884
Nov. 29,1884
Dec. 17,1884
Mar. 23,1885
Apr. 9,1885
Jan. 4,1886
Jan. 20,1886
Mar. 11, 1886
Apr. 8,1$86
Apr. 19,1886
May 4,1886
Aug. 2,1886
Sept. 8,1886
Nov. 20,1886
June 3,1887
J u n e 27,1887
Aug. 17,1887
xVug. 24,1887
Sept, 8,1887
Oct. 11,1881
Oct. 17,1887
Xov. 15,1887
Feb. 10,1888
Feb. 20,1888
Apr. 2,1888
Mar. 31,1888
May 9,1888
J u n e 23,1888
Sept. 19,1888

25, 958, 900

t Restored to solvency.

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 175
CEIVER, AND CLOSING, SINCE THE ORGANIZATION OF THE NATIONAL BANKING
AMOUNTS COLLECTED FROM ALL SOURCES, ETC.—Continued.
Additional
assets
received
since date
Estimated Estimated Estimated
of susgood.
doubtful. worthless. pension.
Nominal assets at date of suspension.

$9, 561
90, 953
250, 286
104, 966
13a, 169
264, 908
68, 078
23, 646
12, (547
115, 012
418. 951
51, 574
1,114, 503
488, 892
648, 710
161, 699
124,114
72,197

$18, 691
194, 457
139, 514
101, 971
167, 503
101,178
97, 257
6,734
134, 716
22, 515
64, 041

$42, 296
11, 578
37, 923
475, 052
28, 969
104, 858
18, 384
4, 374
34, 737
12, 863
55, 895
302, 654
78, 286
696, 987
1, 307, 334
16, 309
118, 618
102,112
2,554
49, 951
9, 688
1, 508, 609
27,190
171, 319
22, 255
113, 329
29, 352

185, 002
65, 526
1,416, 793
46, 829
520, 917
56, 042
14, 500
13, 993
96, 873
217,314
96, 543
172, 940
2, 776, 636 1,736,106
3!, 058
27, 774
367, 109
72, 356
33. 543
15, 304
55, 763
44, 446
29, 826
7,519
22, 695
60, 096
53, 692
167, 075
60U, 810
62,229
13.170
3,874
28, 010
96, 891
39, 593
938, 816
1, 273, 711 1, 441, 378
7,291
91, 996
57, 487
8, 094
144. 850
138, 707
3,821
48, 510
137,859
21, 410
44, 884
66, 085
59, 810
70, 458
28, 459
154, 879
24, 398
26, 825
122, 551
5,462
168,164
235, 474
6,834
8, 000
50,793
4,909
82,612 '
15, 646
8,791
32, 092
2, 464, 079
915, 577 2, 494, 511
12, 995
74.171
35, 990
159
66, 081
37, 572
17,449
8,397
66, 710
156, 586
20, 239
60, 8fJ9
208,243
119, 869
61,622
580, 321
929, 388
125, 236
1, Q()S, 952 787, 598
510, 790
268, 961
160, 617
15,112
333, 506
324, 872
152, 390
137, 561
176, 652
181, 870
214, 560
78, 496
17,136
9i,153
20, 025
55, 535
71,124
1,316
34, 633,197 26,134, 648 20, 958, 429




$1, 944
33, 375
61,147
29, 881
17,085
47, 591
19, 560
15,017
27, 503
19, 198
41, 173
43, 895
107, 243
36. 308
394, 883
23, 589
19, 963
34,556
1, 599
68, 912
28, 049
833,204
6, 339
120, 850
846
185, 441
3,312
40, 454
112, 039
11, 899
4, 731
169, 295
57,994
65,390
7,023
2,599
7,798
35, 202
21, 633
5,439
2, 550
1,790
39, 034
22, 969
2, 768
2,280
22, 790
29,150
55, 768
7,111
57, 906
16, 220
2, 561
56, 321

7, 862, 852

Total
assets.

$72, 492
330,363
494, 870
711, 870
346, 726
518, 535
203, 279
49, 771
209, 603
169, 618
580, 060
398,123
1, 485, 034
1, 287, 713
3, 857, 720
248, 426
783, 612
264, 907
32, 646
433, 050
307, 220
6, 854, 555
92, 3C1
731, 634
71,948
398, 979
70, 009
123, 245
933, 616
91,172
169, 225
3, 823, 200
214, 768
357, 041
197, 213
134, 978
166, 525
241, 304
317, 810
255, 747
140, 864
58, 319
5, 913, 201
146,134
69, 008
65, 698
206, 325
418, J 31
1, 627, 099
2, 588, 897
998, 334
689,710
469,164
531, 247
129, 204
127, 975

allowed
and
settled.

$10, 947
55, 255
165, 846
6,170
17,475
36, 737
3,353
8,411
11, 920
3,345
154, 945
4,902
73, 925
172, 063
172, 843
4,376
19,141
8,971
52
9,888
5, 075
734, 289
5,381
32,233
4,146
5
11, 099
21,114
3,411
508
188, 920
584
18, 717
37,157
1,168
1,284
4,104
3,721
5, 645
127
309, 375
6, 594
883
13, 266
8, 079
10, 556
146, 308
17, 528
20,110
59, 250
6,842
10, 201
2,001

Loss on
assets com'
pounded
or sold
under order
of court.

$8, 207
118, 507
42, 883
521, 783
101, 810
203, 982
25, 729
64
106, 562
26, 043
4,000
801
54, 338
55, 274
565, 779
14,013
5, 541
18,418
16,017
23, 293

Nominal
value of
assets
returned
to stockholders.

$69, 659
72, 754
77, 592
26, 439
"302," 654

3,019
29, 880
211, 773
6, 333
125, 9(56
49,155
3, 436
350
78, 405
161,127
30, 867
3, 493
4,281
10,211
816
76, 659
2, 358
57, 000

41,079
65, 573

77, 725
70,715
38,917
43, 697
44, 068

15,155
421
2, 983
10,02t;
50, 028
16, 000
233
24,491

9, 589, 126 7, 833,139 i 20, 836, 047

1,164, 063

73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
HI
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128

2, 735, 647

176

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

INSOLVENT

NATIONAL BANKS, DATE OF ORGANIZATION, APPOINTMENT OF RESYSTEM, WITH AMOUNTS OF NOMINAL AND ADDITIONAL ASSETS

Collected Total colNominal
L o a n s paid
value of re- Collected from assess- lections and other Dividends
maining as-|fro] m assets. ment upon from all
paid.
sharehold- sources. disbursesets.
ments.
ers.

80,420

67, 835

291, 357
196, 790

893,241
274,465

250, 854
30,504
32, 519

$75,209
120, 995
174, 264
33, 287
91, 608
162, 386
399, 305
79, 904
1, 234, 868
268, 844
68, 645
159, 512
31, 566
37, 908
223,169
1, 394, 662
276, 649
762, 760
350,154
124,713
23, 882
1«2, 052
175,409
512, 698
548, 099
1, 447,103
1, 808, 304
299, 357
122,645
108,944
706, 507
56, 942
74,452
58, 064
91,969
67, 251
30, 332
208, 739
196, 903
188,135
42, 341
22, 080
22,165
48,488
73,145
80, 597
584, 718
86,180
64, 071
13,707
321, 851
105, 703
111, 908
103, 227
307, 910
2, 846, 622
103, 235
103,328
245, 483
1, 326, 505
144, 916
351, 377
94, 613
47, 941
109,801
51,107
12, 061
284,438
19, 742
66,185
78,134
19, 266
20, 819
156,601
125, 693
183,917




$1,164
1,245
16, 488
4,000
7,500
38,224
2,125
28, 935
8,936

348, 961
"136," 172

10, 079
42,795
109, 707
228,580
5,200
19,675
11, 400
303, 813
2,250
37, 597
66, 535
93, 619
106, 451
11, 269
1,100
42, 212
4,510
58, 826
15; 552
2, 664
122,127
91, 930
43, 232
8,044
9,548
245,108
47, 949
65," 132'

16,455
54, 536
16, 447
123,430
16, 500
23, 622
1,811
2,880
16, 277
52,631
80,257

$76, 373
122, 240
190, 752
37, 287
91, 608
169, 886
1, 037, 529
82, 029
1, 234, 868
268, 844
97, 580
168,448
31, 566
37,908
223,169
1, 743,623
276, 649
898,932
350,154
124, 713
23, 882
172,131
218, 204
622, 405
776, 679
1, 452, 303
1, 808, 304
299, 357
142, 320
120,344
1, 010, 320
56, 942
74, 452
60, 314
129, 566
67, 251
30,332
3G5,274
19f>, 903
281,754
148, 792
33, 349
23, 265
48, 488
115, 357
85,107
643, 544
86,180
79, 623
10, 371
443, 978
197, 633
155,140
111, 271
217,450
3, 091,730
103, 235
103, 328
293, 432
1, 326, 505
210, 048
351, 377
94, 613
47, 941
126, 256
105, 643
28, 508
407, 868
36, 242
89, 807
79, 945
22,146
20, 819
172, 878
178, 054
264,174

$70, 811
101,387
$275 ! 165, 769
816
32, 305
935
65, 335
507
132, 608
17, 477
884. 429
7, 054
58, 661
18, 655 1,138, 870
72, 399
143,307
208
86, 737
15, 507
134, 929
3,786
16, 654
2,926
29, 277
4,932
163,982
203,170 1, 326, 487
72, 365
175, 920
596,482
263, 065
342, 054
"*"2,"296"
77, 568
15,142
1,300
143, 209
6, 248
175, 430
18, 964
549.427
35, 839
661,816
16, 393 1, 374, 339
746,153
747.428
20, 315
259, 487
4,545
125, 667
107, 258
3,630
862, 203
4,350
46, 634
57, 004
31, 668
559
101, 545
296
62, 646
19, 002
56, 921
228, 412
74, 896
108, 318
2,309
226, 308
445
135, 797
18, 258
12,624
3,928
34, 536
3,616
88, 697
5, 385
65,783
63, 475
545, 593
1,579
60, 647
16, 773
59,121
9,456
5,000
388, 856
520
173,512
4,797
136,474
8,805
89,715
753
202, 753
658, 784 2,165, 388
4,059
81, 941
73, 890
7,846
254, 647
167,402 1,071, 774
177,254
1,791
316, 828
3,048
52, 514
33,105
107, 575
1,576
79, 725
21, 710
*ii4,"226"
262, 887
29, 377
9,762
65, 368
2,125
69, 033
16, 670
272
11, 803
1,633
47, 315
100,870
52, 092
87, 260
49,466
182,572

Keceiver's
Legal ex- salary and
penses.
other expenses.

$6,463
11, 281
1,258
6,182
12, 247
43,183
6,673
28, 677
17, 134
5,315
3,977
1,773
2,705
9,091
76, 648
10,437
9,436
3,085
362
6,037
16, 709
25, 376
27, 330
24, 241
13, 637
728
250
1,270
67, 569
1, 267
4,718
6, 075
8,232
1,166
42,067
21,495
3,946
4,731
1,367
2,077
8,804
5,060
13, 802
592
2,200
2,751
25,040
5,146
966
2,082
1,898
79, 802
2,690
11, 987
6,668
11, 395
12, 077
5,444
576
3,974
5,546
11, 006
2,315
10,129
825
1,352
634
1,488
850
3,838
10, 306

$5, 562
14, 390
13, 427
2,908
19.156
24, 524
92, 440
9,442
48, 666
35, 983
5,320
14, 008
9,353
3,000
45,164
137, 318
16, 713
29, 766
8,100
8,264
1,878
21, 564
19, 817
28, 638
51,445
37,328
53, 287
18, 827
11, 858
11, 362
76,858
4,691
12,291
8, 278
19,230
4,309
10,164
37, 874
13, 689
31, 642
8,604
10, 348
9,274
7,935
10, 005
8,879
19,880
13, 874
1,529
4,164
25,082
9,716
12, 903
10,669
12, 046
161,036
10, 919
17,251
24,271
57, 512
14,129
27, 314
1,604
5,013
13,135
13,336
4,483
4,950
6,040
11,476
8,153
3,716
3,005
8,176
20,964
32,136

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

177

CEIVER, AND CLOSING, SINCE THE ORGANIZATION OF THE NATIONAL BANKING
AMOUNTS COLLECTED FROM ALL SOURCES, ETC.—ContiDued.
Balance in

hands of
Comptroller
or receiver.

Amount returned to
shareholders
in cash.

Amount of
assessment
upon shareholders.

$50,
300.
200,
50,

000
000
000
000

100, 000
500,000
120, 000

$199
21

26, 000
39, 300
100, 000

27

400, 000
$1, 214
183

135, 000
33, 500
6,500
125, 000
52, 500
350, 000
300, 000
300, 000

249
202
247,799"

400,
50,
100,
600,

454
439

000
000
000
000

50, 000
45, 000
100, 000
500, 000
200,
150,
34,
50,

12
50

12
4,185

794

000
000
000
000

75, 000
50, 000
250, 000

9,488

8,739

26, 720
3 626

60, 000
30,000
:4o, 000
132, 000
67, 000
50, 000
53, 000
625, 000

200
72, 000
18,422
6,588

200, 666
36, 871
5, 849

15, 682
1,849
108

3,420
12, 679

7,432

11028— CUR 88




35,
125,
36,
160,
50,
100,
21,
17,

000
000
000
000
000
000
500
000

50, 000
130, 000
191 750

12

Interest
dividends,
per cent.

'
$122, 089
434, 531
669, 513
82, 338
376, 392
289, 467
1,119,313
127, 801
1.191,500
170, 752
68, 986
205, 256
33, 870
69,874
170, 012
1, 282, 254
157,120
378, 722
645, 558
79, 864
15,142
254, 901
171, 468
657, 020
597, 885
1, 619. 965
796', 995
992, 636
167, 285
175, 081
1, 429, 595
67. 292
144, 406
55, 372
176. 601
62, .646
93, 021
1, 795, 992
237, 824
376, 750
177,512
35, 801
56, 457
34, 535
91, 801
135,952
703, C.")8
59, 226
97, 464
35, 023
352, 062
185, 760
175, 952
140, 735
227, 355
1, 935, 721
133,112
196, 356
254, 647
1,061, 598
298, 324
392, 394
75,175
29, 204
118, 371
90, 424
36,109
262, 887
77, J04
168, 048
70,191
27, 801
32, 449
156,260
282, 370
197, 353

58
23.37
24.70
39.15
17. 333
46.60
79
45.90
96
88.50
100
68.33
49.20
41.90
92.70
100
100
100
100
100
100
57.46
100
84.83
100
100
100
34
76
57.50
62
73. 50
39.50
58. 30
57.50
100
24.391
14.941
66
62. 50
70.50
51
22. 50
100
100
48.40
77. 512
100
70
27
100
I'
100
81.59
63.60
89.179
100
100
37.6483
100
100
60
100
100
100
90.50
88
60
100
38.10
40
98.35
60
100
100
50
100

64

46

30

"56'

"ioo"

Finally
closed.

Jan. 2,1867
Feb. 2,1885
I May 14.1883
July 28,1870
Feb. 4,1870
Nov. 25,1882
Sept. 28,1882
Dec. 19,1874
Nov. 18,1874
Au£. 15,1872
Apr. 7,1881
Nov. 30, 1872
Nov. 25,1882
Dec. 4,1875
May 16.1884
Apr. 20.1882
Nov. 16,1874
Sept. 1,1875
Feb. 13,1872
Oct. 2,1877
Jan. 3,1876
Feb. 15,1886
Jan. 8.1880
June 1.1881
Apr.
July 29,1884
Mai-. 24,1876
May 31.1883
1, 187S
May 15,1876
Nov.
Mar. 30,1883
Dec. 21,1887
6.1882
Sept, 11,1878
June 2,1883
Sept. 18,1876
May 14,1879
Nov. 20,1883
Mar. 19,1879
Apr. 5, 1886

June 2, I88i

Mar. 4, L880
Mar. 28,1883
Feb. 28,1878
Jan. 31,1881
100
July 20,1882
Feb. 28,1885
May 23,1888
100
July 14,1880
Nov. 25,1882
38."50 Aug. 11,1884
Sept. 14,1881
100
Jan. 18,1883
July 23,1881
J u n e 10,1880
Mar. 26,1888
100
Oct. 15,1881
100
Oct. 5,1885
Mar. 3,1882
100
100
100

July 6,1881
Mar. 9,1882
Auej. 5,1879
June 20,1882
Mar. 9,1885
Sept. 7,1885
July 5,1879
Mar. 24,1885

100
100

Oct. 28, 1886
Apr. 8. 1881
Oct. 10, 1.879
Mar. 15,1881

42.30

Mar. 1,1884

1
2
3
4
t-

6
7
8
0
10
11
12
13

H

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
20
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
68
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76

178

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

INSOLVENT NATIONAL BANKS, DATE OF ORGANIZATION, APPOINTMENT OF RECEIVER,
AMOUNTS OF NOMINAL AND ADDITIONAL ASSETS, AMOUNTS

Collected
| value of re r , -,, , -i I from assessCollected ! m e n t n p O n
| mamingas rom assets.:
sharell*ld.
sets.
era.
$157, 782
205, 062
96, 605
29, 419
91,121
113,7
327, 684
89, 766
1,239,240
117,531
455, 674
604, 702
2, 065, 043 1, 054,055
146,007
84, 0 0
208, 371
5;>0, 539
118, 749
118, 769
16,577
278,431
121,438
250,276
51,809
2, 940, 581 3,176, 666
20,3:
36, 761
272, 82
214, 800
22,623
42, 992
57, 380
211. 487
20, 849
40, 863
503, 674
46, 332
76,122
1,522,417
148, 611
204, 970
102, 487
30, 785
125, 778
24, 007
105, 522
77, 305
165, 669
198, 513
204, 047
58, 853
14,251
3, 979, 889 1, 608, 782
57, 713
81,827
3,001
65,124
43, 747
8, 264
159, 564
95, 699
135, 742
261,807
611, 608
819,155
391,306
242, 755
735, 469
177, 708
452, 752
76, 979
385,110
261, 692
234,863
121,814
5,389
127,975




23, 500
91,149

50, eoo
1,400
161, 893

Total col- Loans paid
lectioDS and other Dividends
from all
disbursepaid,
sources.
ments.
$157,782
260, 012
90 605
M, 096
114,122
113,791
594, 995
154,421
1, 734, 790
409,124
1,683,113
154, 294
323,575
123,739
40, 309
329, X36
314, 426
3,443,090
50, 330
346, (J02
40, 882
61, 580
20, 849
64, 363
594,823
,332
77, 522
3,684,310 |
148,611
204, 970
30,
59, 607
77, 305
165,669 !
198,513 !
204,047
58, 853
14, 251
1,608,782 i
81,827
81,392
8. 264

5, 099
3, 392
17,
13, 349
429, 742

$137,428 i
166, 587
88,176 ,
20,758
82,060
96,176
528, 305
09, 847
1, 627, 558
384 735
1, 312. C93
118, 740
268,450
,864
26, 809
72,398 I
225 G18 !
2,684,120 '
36, 527
2G0,190
18,331
,807
41,324
520,329
86, 263
56,131
1, 446, 691
131,024
119, 269
10, 208
49, 799
C6, 394
335,574
117, 878
82, 946
37,971
9,492
881, 048
73,939
60,271 i

247
859
8,473
782, 390
419
5, 810
65
513

,993
255,495
767, 644
400, 998
190, 613
158, 310
61,428
238, 041

Receiver's
salary and
other ex
penses.
$12,119
24, 551
7,517
11, 296
16, 475
6, 739
39,600
10, 832
22,819
29, 844
80,0
16, 785
33,144
18, 223
7,885
15, 364
17, 593
105, 918
9,995
19, 363
31, 390
11, 771
5,475
8,699
15, 803
8, 244
14, 111
39, 936
2,314
32, 893
7,942
7,139
6,607
7,321
5,208
4,279
6,478
1,348
27, 947
6,205
2, 335
3,099
2,963
3,161
15, 629
11, 572
5,130
3,595
2,552
2,988
1,736

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER

OF TPIE CURRENCY.

179

AND CLOSING, SINCE THE ORGANIZATION OF THE NATIONAL BANKING SYSTEM, WITH
COLLECTED FROM ALL SOURCES, ETC.—Continued.

Amount returned to
shareholders
in cash.

Amount of
assessment
upon shareholders.

$829
884
859

Balance in
hands of
Comptroller
or receiver.

$160, 000
10, 000
50, 000

$240
1, 357

7,651
25,103
40, 769

57.851
11, 445
43, 074
10,007
11, 103
13,018
19, 040
49 905
161, 8G2
430
143
8, 009
20, 631

300, 000
75, 000
500, 000
100, 000
901, 300
50, 000
200, 000
60, 000
50, 000
100, 000
75. 000
400, 000
25, 000
250, 000
32, 500
100, 000
50,
200,
50,
50,
300,

9, 454
34, 508
4, 724
5,970

000
000
000
000
000

14, 850
62, 304
5,851
913

50, COO
3,149
5,172
75, 229
10, 074
50, 000

14,404
3,329
670,209
678
17, 274
2, 873
6,191
2,174
18, 885

19, 500
50, 000
60, 000
195, 716

46, 055
17, 825
12, 084
19, 583
3,588
1,409, £82

100, 000

799,898




12.555, 350

Amount of
claims
proved.

$128, 832
132, 461
81,801
21,182
108, 385
93, 625
580. 592
104, 749
2, 730,179
894, 735
2, 4G5, 393
186,893
401, 492
202, 260
40,441
294, 521
237, 524
4, 476. 088
36, 520
365, 931
28,350
158, 008
8,131
82, 018
650, 421
86, 258
140, 333
2,805,515
127, 524
171,581
51, 278
110, 568
03, 6(39
130,772
116, 020
80,452
81, 383
9, 379
3,525,213
82,155
75,550 1
141, 485
172, 956
247,920
959, 548
398, 236
700,101
395, 776
295, 626
297, 551
11,798
51,924,977

Interest
dividends,
per cent.

Dividends,
per cent.

100
100
100
98
81
100
100
100
61.25
43
55
65
67. 50
40
81.10
25
95
60
100
71
75
100
50
80
100
40
50
100
70
20
45
100
100
100
100
45
100
25
90
J-0
50
100
80
100
40
20
80

Finally
closed.

100
100
100

Jan.
Apr.
Auc.
Feti.
Aug.
Feb.
Feb.
Oct.

100
100
100

17,1881
24,1886
1, 188L
6, 1883
6.1887
4.1882
18,1885
12,1885

77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85

so
Oct. 25,1886

.

...
100

i Oct. 29,1885
i

100

Feb. 10,1888

100

J u n e 1,1880

90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102

im

100
100
100
100

Mar. 2,1888
Au£. 18,1887
Feb. 17,1887
Apr. 30,1887

100

Oct. 17,1887

100

Oct. 20,1888

100

J u n o 27 1888

104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
10
121
192
123
125
126
127
128

180

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

L I A B I L I T I E S OF T H E NATIONAL BANKS, AND T H E R E S E R V E R E Q U I R E D AND H E L D AT
T H R E E D A T E S I N T H E YEARS 1884, 1865, 188G, 1887, and 1888.

STATES AND TERRITORIES EXCLUSIVE OF RESERVE CITIES.

No. of
banks.

Classification of reserve.
Reserve beld.
Net de- Reserve
RedempDue
Other
posits. required. Amount. Ratio to Specie. lawful
tion
from
deposits.
fund.
money. agents.

Apr. 24,1884
J u n e 20,1884
Sep*t. 30,1884

2,340
2, 376
2,417

Millions. Millions. Millions. Per cent. Millions. Millions. Millions. Millions.
10.9
83.7
81.5
162.5
36.4
576.0
86.4
28.2
10.7
66.8
32.0
146.0
36.4
544.7
81.7
26.8
10.5
79.7
30.9
156.3
35.2
535.8
80.4
29.2

May
July
Oct.

6,1885
1,1885
1,1885

2,432
2,442
2,467

540.3
552.2
570.8

81.1
82.8
85.6

171.0
170.3
177.5

31.6
30.8
31.1

40.7
40.1
41.5

30.2
28.1
29.9

90.0
92.1
95.9

10.1
10.0
10.2

Mar. 1,1886
J u n e 3,1886
Oct. 7,1886

2,518
2, 552
2,590

596.1
611.7
637.6

89.4
91.8
95.6

181.6
181.6
186.2

30.4
29.7
29.2

45.1
49.1
47.8

27.7
29.7
30.1

98.9
93.5
99.5

9.8
9.3
8.7

May 13,1887
Aug. 1,1887
Oct. 5,1887

2, 724
2,756

682.8
683.0
690.6

102.4
102.4
103.6

198.9
189.5
190.9

29.1
27.7
27.6

51.1
48.9
50.8

32.9
31.3
32.6

107.8
102.6
100.9

6.8
6.6
6.6

Apr. 30,1888
J u n e 30,1888
Oct. 4,1888

2,809
2,829
2, 847

707.5
711.8
739.3

106.1
106.8
110.9

193.9
199.2
209.8

27.4
28.0
28.4

51.0
49.1
50.2

33.8
31.5
34.5

102.8
112.2
118.9

6.4
6.3
6.2

Date.

NEW YORK CITY.
75.2
69.1
90.8

26.6
29.8
35.6

49.5
43.5
63.1

24.9
24.9
27.0

0.8
0.7
0.7

78.2

123.5
132.8
115.7

41.5
42.5
37.0

96.5
96.5
91.5

26.4
37.5
23.7

0.6
0.6
0.5

323.6
296. 8
282. 8

80.9
74.2
70.7

101.2
89.9
77.0

31.3
30.3
27.2

77.2
57.9
64.1

23.5
31.5
12.5

0.5
0.4
0.4

May 13,1887
Aug. 1,1887
Oct. 5,1887

299.7
294.0
284.3

74.9
73.5
71.1

82.8
82.6
80.1

27.6
28.1
28.2

63.6
65.0
63.0

18.8
17.2
16.1

0.4
0.4
0.4

Apr. 30,1888
J u n e 30,1888
Oct. 4,1888

316.7
358.4
342. 2

79.2
84.6
85.5

94.8
102.7
96.4

29.9
30.3
28.2

69.4
73.4
73.9

25.0
28.8
22.1

0.4
0.4
0.3

Apr. 24,1884
J u n e 20,1884
Sept. 30,1884

282.2
231.8
254.9

70.5
57.9
63.7

May
July
Oct.

6,1885
1,1885
1,1885

297.7
312.7
312.9

74.4

Mar. 1,1886
J u n e 3,1886
Oct. 7,1886

78. 9.

CHICAGO.
May 13,1887
Aug. 1,1887
Oct. 5,1887

18
18
18

68.0
66.3
64.6

17.0
16.6
16.2

20.7
22.0
19.7

30.4
33.1
30.5

13.0
14 6
12.9

7.6
72
6.7

0.05
0.05
0.05

Apr. 30,1888
J u n e 30,1888
Oct. 4,1888

18

71.3
71.8
69.3

17.8
18.0
17.3

21.2
22.5
21.0

29.7
31.4
30.2

13.4
14.1
13.1

7.8

19
19

0.05
0.05
0.O5

8.4
7.8

SAINT LOUIS.
May 13.1887
Aug. 1J1887
Oct. 5,1887

5
5
5

10.8
10.3

2.2
2.7
2.6

3.3
3.4

36.4
31.1)
26.4

1.5
1.6
1.3

1 8

Apr. 30,1888
J u n e 30,1888
Oct. 4,1888

4
4

8.7
8.9

2.2
2.2

3.5
3.7

1.6
1.8

7.9

2.0

2.1

40.1
42.0
27.1

1.8
1 9

4

1.0

1.1




9.1

1.8
1.3

0.03
0.03
0.03
0.03
0.03
0.C2.

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 181
LIABILITIES OF THE NATIONAL BANKS, AND THE RESERVE REQUIRED AND HELD AT
THREE DATES, ETC.—Continued.
OTHER EESERYE CITIES.*
Reserve held.

I

Ratio to

Classification of reserve.
Redempi Other | Due
tion
Specie. | lawful j from
money, i agents. fund.
Millions. Millions. Millions.
38.8
28.8
33.3
28.4
29.7
29.9
32.3
30.3
33.3

Apr.. 24,1884
J u n e 20,1884
Sept. 30,1884

Millions.
3.2
3.1
3.1

40.2
41.0
41.9

39.9
38.8
35.0

40.9
40.7
42.4

3.0
2.9
2.9

49.3
50.5
44.5

28.2
30.2
26.0

43. J)
39.6
41.3 I

2,5
2.2

Mav 13,1887
Aug.. 3,1887
Oct. 5,1887

38.0
34.8
36.3

26.4
24.2
23.2

40.2 |
37.7 I
40.0

1.4
1.2
1.2

Apr. 30,1888 !
Juno 30,1888 |
Ocr.

36.7
42.9
40.0

24.5
23. 6
24. 4

43.7
45.9
51. 5

1.0
1.0
0.9

SUMMARY. *
Apr. 24,1884
J u n e 20,1884
Sept 30,1884

2,589
2,625
2,664

1.196. 2
1, 079. 3
1, 0-98. 7

241.4
215.3
221.1

341.8
308. 2
346.1

28.6
28.4
31.6

114.7
109. 6
128.6

89.7
86.8
91.2

1°2. 5
95.' 2
112.0

14.9
14.5
14.3

May
Julv
Oci.'.

6,1885
1,1885
1,1885

2,678
2,689
2,714

1,184. 5
1, 221.4
1, 248.2

242,1
250.1
254.9

418.5
426.5
4J5.4

35.3
34.9
33.3

177.4
177.6
174.9

96.5
102.6
88.6

130.9
132.8
138. 3

13.7
13.5
13.6

Mar.
June
Oct.

1, 1886
3,1886
7,1886

2,768
2,809
2, 852

1, 297.6
1, 295. 7
1, 301. 8

264. 8
262.8
261.7

406.8
394.2
377.2

31.3
30.4
28.9

171. 6
157.5
156. 4

79.4
91.6
68.7

142.8
133. 0
140.8

12.9
12.2
11.4

May 13,1887
Aug. 1,1887
Oct; 5,1887

2,955
3,014
3, 049

1,404. 7
1, 389. 7
1, 388.4

282.9
279.1
278.0

411.9
396.0
394.2

29.3
28. 5
28.4

167. 3
165.1
165.1

87.6
82. 3
79.9

148.1
140. 3
140.9

8.8
8.3
8.3

Apr. 30,1888
J u n e 30,1888
Oct. 4,1888

3,098
3,120
3,140

1, 459. 6
1, 503. 5
1, 543.6

294.1
304. 7
312.0

419.3
441. 5
446. 2

28.7
29.4
28.9

172.1
181.3
178.1

92.9
94.3
90.0

146. 5
158.1
170. 5

7.9
7.8
7.6




*Includea Chicago and Saint Louis up to 1887.

182

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

T A B L E SHOWING, B Y GEOGRAPHICAL D I V I S I O N S , TUP: R E S E R V E C I T I E S AND CENTRAL
R E S E R V E C I T I E S , T H E N U M B E R OF BANKS I N OPERATION AT E V E R Y DATE ON W H I C H
R E P O R T S OF CONDITION HAVE B E E N MADE, FROM MARCH 11, 188*2, TO OCTOBER 4,
1888, INCLUSIVE, TOGETHER W I T H T H E AMOUNT O F R E S E R V E R E Q U I R E D AND T H E
AMOUNT HELD AT EACH O F THOSE D A T E S , AND T H E CLASSIFICATION O F T H E R E SERVE HELD, SHOWING AMOUNTS AND PERCENTAGES IN EACH CASE.
[Division INTO. 1.—Maine, Now Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut,
excluding reserve cities 1

I
Dates.

1882.
Mar. 11..
May 19..
July 1...
Oct. 3
Dec. 30..

Reserve held.

Amount of
reserve required, 15
of
percent, of
banks net deposits.

502
503
504
505
507

j
Amount. | Ratio.

Classification of reserve held.
Lawful money (6
With reserve
Five
percent.).
-agents (9 per cent.), per cent,
redemp;ion fund.
Amount. Ratio. Amount. Ratio.

Per ct.
$14, 962, 799 $29, 478, 6*18 29.55
$7, 223, 511
15, 068, 764 31,457,478 31.31
7, 495,171
15, 505, 375 29, 835, 966 28. 86
7, 585, 373
16, 296, 302 29, 332, 584 27. 00
7, 916, 022
16, 254, 969 33,151, 031 30.59
8,197, 588

Per ct.
7.24
7.46
7.34
7.29
7.56

$17, 716, 653
19, 488,807
17, 833, 751
16, 949,16L
20, 509, 426

Per ct.
17.76 $4, 538,454
19.40 4, 473, 500
17.25 4, 416, 842
15.96 4, 467,401
18.93 4, 444, 017

1883.
Mar. 13..
May 1...
June 22 .
Oct. 2
Dec. 31..

507
509
510
511
512

15, 342, 235
15, 309, 783
15, 369, 906
16,161,030
16, 426,477

28, 288, 564
27, 968, 728
28, 844, 230
31,164,435
34, 548, 821

27.66
27.40
28.15
28.93
31.55

7, 552, 020 7.38
7, 495, 846 7.34
7, 685, 718 7.50
7, 650, 678 7.10
8,144, 345 7.44

16, 299,167
16,040, 299
16,722,029
19, 099, 067
21, 965,101

15.94
15.72
16. 32
17.73
20.06

4, 437, 377
4, 432, 583
4, 436, 483
4, 414, 690
4, 439, 375

514
514
514
514
515

15, 959, 007
16, 081, 733
15,103, 686
15, 614,046
15,216,181

32, 510, 901
31, 256, 427
27, 470, 663
32,199,345
31, 576, 643

30. 56
27.15
27.28
30.93
31.13

7, 875, 750
8,138, 314
8, 231, 410
8,199, 770
8, 273, 291

7.40
7.59
8.17
7.88
8.16

20, 374, 517
18, 787,103
14, 972, 792
19, 833, 278
19, 211,124

19.15
17.52
14.87
19.05
18.94

4, 260, 634
4, 331, 010
4, 266, 461
4,166, 297
4, 092, 228

514
511
512
506
506

15, 553, 913
16, 093, 617
16, 589, 066
17,218, 577
17,150, 864

33, 563, 396
34, 886, 766
34, 597,448
34,416, 314
32, 831, 670

32.37
32. 52
31.31
29.98
28.71

8,416, 689
8, 641,121
8, 951, 595
9, 549, 345
9, 562, 800

8.12
8.05
8.10
8.32
8.36

21,146, 721
22,184,176
21, 637, 813
20, 832, 605
19, 311, 376

20.39
20.68
19.58
18.15
16.89

3, 999,986
4, 061, 469
4, 008, 040
4, 034, 364
3, 957, 494

507
510
509
510
511

17,185,207
16,473, 718
17, 388, 516
18, 295, 909
17, 815, 957

32, 588, 870
32, 509, 786
31, 345, 788
35, 762,441
33, 229, 398

28.44
27.91
27.04
29. 32
27.98

9,772, 588
10, 304, 208
10, 316, 259
10, 335,491
10, 888, 90-2

8.53
8.85
8.90
8.47
9.17

18, 969, 980
18, 555, 748
17,449, 280
21, 995, 854
19, 338,260

16.56
15.93
15.05
18.03
16. 28

3,816,302
3,649,830
3, 580, 249
3,431, 096
3, 002, 236

511
513
512
512
514

17,464,118
17, 918,113
17,228,499
17, 758, 954
17, 341, 009

34,081, 099
33, 354, 311
28, 645, 014
32, 079,549
29,625, 990

29. 27
27.92
24.94
27.10
25.64

10,261, 663
10,470,249
10, 202, 657
10, 081, 047
10,316,792

8. 81
8.77
8.88
8.51
8.92

21,137,117
20, 384, 444
16,106, 385
19, 698, 402
17, 045,118

18.15
17.06
14.02
16.64
14.74

2, 682, 319
2,499, 618
2, 335, 972
2, 300,100
2, 264, 080

514
514
515
515

18,229, 528
18, 287, 862
18,929, 571
19, 889, 593

33, 096,440
32, 928, 907
35,172, 829
36,547,994

27.23
27.01
27.87
27.56

9, 937, 633 8.18
10,402, 526 8.53
10, 047, 520 7.96
10, 745, 765 8.11

20, 928,
20, 330,
22, 986,
23, 704,

17. 22
16.68
18. 21
17.88

2, 230,122
2,195, 415
2,139, 058
2, 098,167

1884.
Mar. 7...
Apr. 24..
June 20..
Sept. 30..
Dec. 20..
x 1885.
Mar. 10..
May 6...
Jul'yl...
Oct. 1 . . .
Dec. 24..
1886.
Mar.l...
June3...
Aug. 27..
Oct. 7 . . .
Dec. 28..
1887.
Mar. 4...
May 13..
Aug.l...
Oct. 5....
Dec. 7...
1888.
Feb. 14..
Apr. 30..
June 30. .
Oct. 4 . . . .




685
966
251
062

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

183

T A B L E SHOWING, B Y GEOGRAPHICAL D I V I S I O N S , T H E R E S E R V E C I T I E S AND C E N T R A L
R E S E R V E C I T I E S , T H E N U M B E R OF BANKS I N OPERATION, ETC.—Continued.
j Division Xo. 2.—Xew York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, excluding reserve cities.]
Classification of reserve held.

Reserve held.

Dates.

Amount of
!Sro. reserve reof I quired, 15
janks' per cent, of
net deposits.

Lawful money (6
percent.)!
Amount.

Ratio.
Amount.

1882.
Mar. 11..
May 19..
Julyl...
Oct. 3 . . .
Dec. 30..

507 $24,513,805
514 24, 825, 609
515 25, 243, 576
515 25, 702, 599
521 26, 500, 579

$47, 919,202
49, 038, 897
47,501,012
47, 834, 868
48,071, 228

With reserve
agents (9 per cent.).

Ratio

Amount.

Ratio.

Five
per cent,
redemption fund.

°er ct.
Per ct
*er ct.
8.90 $30,249, 865 18.51 $3,122, 723
29.32 $14 546,614
30,100, 831 18.19 3,110, 858
29.63 15, 827, 208 9.56
28.23 15, 228,446 9.05
29, 217,784 17.36 3, 054, 782
27.92
28, 868, 395 16.85 3, 084, 567
15, 881, 906 9.27
27.21 16, 667, 008 9.43
28, 338,020 16.04 3, 066, 20G

1883.
525
532
537
545
549

26,151,831
26,557,410
26,409, 027
26,885,132
26,992,446

48,
45,
50,
48,
50,

550
554
501
503
5G0

27,
27,
25,
25,
24,

003,470
240,954
502,692
245, 939
531, 549

53, 829,445
53, 358, 232
45, 241,638
49,189,650
50,799,720

559
559
561
557
567

25.
25.
25,
26,
26,

258,857
204, 559
615, 062
291, 732
843,401

55,463, 538
53, 071, 039
51, 945, 847
56,170, 958
58, 345,580

570
571
572
572
575

27,453, 354
27, 533,873
28, 253, 322
28, 830, 549
28, 792, 675

56,
54,
56,
54,
53,

576
580
586
587
591

29, 020,465
29, 685, 015
29, 837,428
30, 064,960
30, 090,137

54, 867, 767
56, 268, 209
51, 361, 676
52, 990, 784
52,172, 378

Feb. 14... 593
Apr. 30.. 596
June 30 . . 598
Oct. 4 . . . . 601

31,181, 582
31, 422, 827
31,184, 265
32, 659,379

57, 520,460
55, 782,017
56, 274,855
62,056, 372

Mar. 13..
May 1 . . .
June 22..
Oct. 2
Dec. 3 1 . .

307, 519 27.71
564,935 25. 74
817, 552 28.86
979, 043 27.33
577,804 28.11

15, 232, 686
16, 603, 462
16, 240, 341
16, 912, 419
17, 734, 066

8.74
9.38
9.22
9.44
9.86

30,026, 506
25, 905, 781
31, 528, 884
29, 011, 331
29, 840, 086

17.22
14. 63
17.91
16.19
16.58

3, 048, 327
3, 055, 692
3, 048, 327
3, 055, 293
3, 003, 652

29. 90
29.38
26.61
29.23
31.06

16, 983, 453
18, 854, 082
18, 801, 649
18, 694, 389
18, 036, 445

9.43
10.38
11.06
11.11
11. 03

33, 924,115
31,556,160
23, 558, 015
27, 634, 801
29, 977, 889

18.84
17.38
13.86
16.42
18.33

2,921,877
2, 947, 990
2,881,974
2, 860, 460
2, 785, 386

32.94
31.58
30.42
32.05
32.60

18, 925, 754
20, 044, 604
19,178, 305
20, 055, 448
18, 913,441

11.24
11.93
11.23
11.44
10.57

33, 766, 999
30, 262, 857
30, 033, 212
33, 297, 308
36, 653, 591

20. 05
18.01
17.59
19.00
20.48

2, 770, 785
2, 763, 578
2, 734, 330
2,818,202
2, 778, 548

026,945 30.61
618,391 29.75
916, 208 30.21
836, 089 28.53
341, 795 27.79

18, 960, 011
20, 795, 357
20,185, 336
20,192, 341
20, 360,434

10.36
11. 33
10.71
10.51
10.61

34, 334,359
31, 241, 898
34,176, 300
32, 249,120
30,849,802

18.76 2, 732, 575
17.02 2, 581,136
18.14 2, 554, 572
16.78 2, 394, 628
16.07 2,131, 559

28.36
28.48
25.82
26.44
26.01

19, 405, 628 10.03
20,193,151 10.20
19, 291,157 9.70
19, 775, 576 9,87
20,038, 795 9.99

33,449, 631
34,160,474
30,226,408
31, 370,441
30, 215,646

17.29 2,012, 508
17.26 1, 914, 584
15.20 1,844. Ill
15.65 1, 844, 767
15.01 1,817, 937

27.67
26.63
27,07
28.50

20, 111, 377
20, 936, 380
19,371,217
21,624, 500

9.67
9.99
9.31
9.93

35,617, 574
33, 066, 277
35,146, 229
38, 705,110

17.13
15.78
16.91
17.78

IS 8-1.
Mar. 7...
Apr. 21..
Juno 20 .
Sept. ;)0 .
Dec. 20..
1885.
Mar. 10..
May 6...
July 1...
Oct. 1 ....
Dec. 24 .
1880.
Mar. 1 . .
June 3 . . .
Aug. 27..
Oct. 7....
Dec. 28 ..
1887.
Mar. 4..
May 13.
Aucr.l...
Oct. 5...
Dec. 7 . .




1,791, 509
1, 779, 360
1, 757, 409
1, 726,762

184

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

T A B L E SHOWING, B Y GEOGRAPHICAL D I V I S I O N S , T H E R E S E R V E C I T I E S AND C E N T R A L
R E S E R V E CITIES^ T H E N U M B E R OF B A N K S I N O P E R A T I O N , ETC.—Continued.

[Division No. 3.—Delaware, Maryland, Virginia. West Virginia, and the District of Columbia, ex
eluding reserve cities.]
Reserve held.

Dates.

No.
of
banks

Amount of
reserve required, 15
per cent, of
net deposits.

Classification of reserve held.
Lawful money (6
per cent.).

Amount.

With reserve
agents (9 per cent.).

Amount.

Five
:»er cent,
redeinp-.
Ratio. tion fund.

$3, 212, 987
2, 597, 775
3, 000, 277
3,752, 436
3,098, 400

Per ct.
14.49 $1,385,775
12.07
381,183
379, 300
i;>. 66
391,502
15. 63
391,241
13.06

Ratio. ;
Amount.

Ratio.

1882.
Mar. 1 1 . . .
May 39...
July 1....
Oct. 3
Dec, 30...

Per ct.
28.41
27.16
28.83
29.28
27.11

Per ct.
$2,702,126 12.18
2,867, 270 13. 32
2,951,218 13.44
2, 883,425 12.01
2, 943, 333 12.40

73
74
74
76
77

$3, 326, 580
3, 229,343
3, 293, 618
3, 600, 294
3, 559, 250

77
77
78
82
82

3, 527, 516
3, 528,471
3, 621, 398
4,152, 516
3, 998, 036

5, 733, 788 24.38
5, 790, 224 24.61
6, 406,495 26. 54
7, 383, 800 26.67
6, 620, 987 24. 82

2,337, 863
2, 713, 896
2,774, 761
3, 088, 038
3, 018, 536

9.94
11.54
11.49
11.15
11. 33

3, 008,054 12.79
2, 691,467 11.44
3, 243, 785 13.44
3, 901,193 14.09
3, 210, 691 12.05

387,871
384, 861
387,949
394, 569
391, 760

83
83
83
88
88

3, 877, 353
3, 812, 038
3, 513,153
3, 702,825
3,3B5,854

6, 822, 590 26.36
6,446, 814 25.37
5, 375,113 22.95
6,837,101 27, 70
b,467,992 28.82

2, 873, 867
3, 045, 651
2,975,931
3, 220, 417
2, 942, 926

11.12
11.98
12.71
13. 05
13.12

3, 582, 688
3, 027, 832
2, 025, 960
3, 246, 528
3,164,161

13.86
11.91
8.65
13.15
14.10

366,035
373, 331
373, 222
370,156
360, 905

88
87
87
88
80

3,361,044
2, 854,130
2, 919,436
3, 286,346
3,162,147

6, 282, 532 28,04
5, 624, 698 29.56
5,311,397 27.29
7, 338, 927 33. 50
7,070, 981 33. 54

3, 043,637 IB. 58
2, 9*5, 242 15. 69
2, 758, 277 14.17
3,134, 687 14.31
2, 887, 760 13.70

2, 895,186
2, 289, 321
2,199,965
3, 850,486
3, 825, 340

12.92
12. 03
11.30
17.57
18.15

343, 709
350,135
353,155
353, 754
357, 881

89
90
91
89
91

3,163, 328
3, 259,103
3, 490,359
3, 525,434
3,459, 845

6, 579,113
6,761,881
7,337,721
7,125, 856
6, 826, 991

31.20
31.12
31.53
30. 32
29.60

3, 079,948
3, 414,420
3, 313,468
3, 405, 443
3,124,102

14.60
15.71
14.24
14.49
13.54

3,153, 202
3, 034,136
3, 714, 380
3, 414,134
3,414, 702

14. 95
13.97
15.96
14.53
14.80

345,963
313, 325
309, 873
306,279
288,187

91
92
93
94
94

3, 541, 988
3,434,211
3, 681, 532
3, 789, 907
3, 748, 997

6, 685, 225
6,233, 763
6,591, 665
6, 641,421
6, 728,437

28. 31
27.16
26.86
26.29
26.92

3,061,122
3, 351, 755
3, 397,925
3,402,471
3,329, 980

12. 96
14.64
33.84
13.47
13.32

3,370,568
2, 640, 664
2, 952, 617
3, 004,141
3,157, 971

14.27
11.53
12.03
11.89
12.64

253, 535
241,344
241,123
234, 809
240,476

94
94
95
96

3, 827,479
3,789,898
3,902,911
4,364,275

6, 737, 364 26.40
6, 554, 763 25.94
6, 688, 570 25.71
8,474, 938 29.13

3, 272, 849
3, 340, 776
3, 320,174
3,672,305

12.83
13.22
12.76
12.62

3, 236,123
2.988,503
3,150, 750
4, 582, 280

12. 08
11.83
12.11
15.75

228, 392
225, 484
217, 646
220,353

$6, 300,888
5, 846, 228
6, 330, 795
7, 027, 363
6,432,974

1883.
Mar. 1 3 . . .
May 1 . . . .
J u n e 22..
Oct. 2 . .
Daa. 3 1 . . .
1884
Mar. 7 . . . .
Apr. 24...
J u n e 20...
Sept. 30...
Dec.20J...
1885.
Mar. 1 0 . . .
May 6 . . . .
July 1....
Oct.l
Dec. 24...
1886.
Mar. 1 . . . .
June 3 . . .
Aug. 27..
Oct. 7
Dec. 2 8 . . .
1887.

Mar. 4
May 13...
Aug.l....
Oct. 5
Dec. 7
1888.
Feb.
Apr.
June
Oct.

14...
30..
30..
4....




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

185

T A B L E SHOWING, B Y GEOGRAPHICAL D I V I S I O N S , T H E R E S E R V E C I T I E S AND C E N T R A L
R E S E R V E C I T I E S , T H E N U M B E R O F BANKS I N O P E R A T I O N , E T C . — C o n t i n u e d .

[Division No. 4.—North Carolina, South Carolina, G-eorgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana,
Texas, Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee, excluding reserve cities.]
Reserve held.
Dates.

Amount of
reserve reNo.
quired, 15
of
per cent, of
banks
net deposits.

Classification of reserve held.
Lawful money (6

per cent.).

Amount.

With reserve
agents (9 percent.).

Amount.

Ratio.

Five

Amount.

per cent,
redemption fund.
Ratio.

Ratio.

1882.
May 1 1 . . .
May 1 9 . . .
Julyl....
Oct. 3
Dec. 30 . . .

141
144
148
154
159

$5,185, 281
4, 915, 899
5,115,956
5, 266, 274
5, 978, 914

$10,013,832
10,118, 504
10, 326, 820
9, 392, 645
12, 718, 655

Per ct.
28.97
30. 87
30. 28
26. 75
31. 91

Per ct.
$5, 4«6. 058 15.81
5, 419, 385 16.54
5, 227,153 15. 33
4, 771, 326 13. 59
6, 340,182 15.91

$3, 758, 544
3, 906, 752
4, 313, 224
3, 827.425
5, 584, 656

Per ct.
10.87
11.92
12. 65
10.90
14.01

$789, 230
792, 367
786,443
793, 894
793, 817

164
169
175
191
197

6, 116, 981
6,190, 892
6.143,331
6, 267, 968
6, 761, 077

13, 254,160
12, 890, 743
12, 353, 975
10. 275.182
12, 940, 873

32.50
31.23
30.16
24. 59
28. 71

6, 396, 960 15. 69
6 543, 434 15 85
6, 475, 724 15.8.1
6. 589, 270 15. 77
6, 968,159 15. 46

6, 086,199
5, 555, 724
5, 075, 892
3, 887, 690
5,170, 209

14.92
13.46
12. 39
9.30
11.48

771,001
791.585
802| 359
798, 216
802, 505

201
204
208
216
220

6, 816, 062
6.874,431
6, 449,163
6, 042, 864
6, 491, 216

13, 644, 672 30. 03
12, 348, 517 26.95
11,364,136 26. 43
11,168,565 27. 72
14, 560, 732 33. 67

6, 883, 358
6, 803,162
6. 826, 409
6, 334, 635
7, 007, 016

15.15
14.84
15.88
15. 72
16.19

5, 979, 687
4, 762, 025
3, 782, 006
4, 087, 448
6,806, 367

13.16
10.39
8.80
10.15
15.73

781, 627
783. 330
755. 721
746,482
747, 349

226
229
232
232
235

6, 669, 784
6, 483,495
6,442, 590
6, 388, 330
7,142, 914

15,098,820 33.96
13,065,477 30.23
12,404, 357 28. 83
11, 874, 404 27. 88
15, 834,011 33.25

7, 964, 807
7, 563, 398
7,159, 393
6, 826, 279
8, 001, 784

17.91
17- 50
16. 67
16.03
16.80

6, 385,184 14.36
4,765, 739 11.03
4, 532,187 10. 55
4, 322, 038 10.15
7,141, 940 15. 00

748, 829
736, 340
712, 777
725, 487
090, 287

240
245
251
251
253

7. 583, 952
7, 493, 063
7, 301, 499
7, 520, 093
8, 863, 744

16, 308, 788
15. 598,452
13; 956, 929
13, 597, G92
21,096, 851

32. 26
31. 23
28.67
27.12
35.70

8, 523, 863
8,108, 413
7, 650, 399
7, 565,181
9, 659, 357

1.6.86
16.2)}
15.72
15.09
16. 35

7,114,169
6. 863,196
5, 699, 062
5, 474, 973
10, 914, 071

14.07
13. 74
11.71
10. 92
18.47

670, 756
020,843
607, 468
557, 538
523, 423

265
279
290
296
301

9,951, 682
9, 403, 413
9, 227,123
9,183, 326
9, 671,142

22,483,366
18,093, 369
15, 981, 046
16, 341, 034
18,963, 708

3,?. 89
28.86
25.98
26.69
29.41.

10, 365, 065 15.62
9, 623,458 15.35
8,924, 833 14.51
9, 728,521 15.89
10, 375, 365 16.10

11. 607, 039
7, 965, 043
6, 555, 611
6.100,154
8,072, 837

17. 50
12.71
10. 06
9. 96
12.52

511,262
504, 868
500, 602
512, 359
515, 506

305
307
313
318

10, 241, 743
9, 775,180
9, 683,437
9, 543,970

21,109, 205
17, 945, 763
17, 925, 943
16,380,467

30.92
27.54
27. 77
25.74

11,248,310
9, 916. 320
9, 397, 854
9, 557, 311

9,353,121 13. 70
7, 522, 773 1L54
8, 027, 614 12.44
9.96
6, 338, 284

507, 774
506, 670
500,475
484, 872

1883.
Mar. 1 3 . . .
May 1 . . . .
J u n e 22 . .
Oct. 2
Dec. 31 . . .
1884.
Mar. 7
Apr. 2 4 . . .
J u n e 20 . .
Sept. 30 . .
Dec, 20 . . .
1885.
Mar. 10 . .
May 6.....
Julyl....
Oct.l . . . .
Dec. 24 . . .
1886.
Mar. 1 . . . .
Juno 3
Aug. 27...
Oct.'7 . . . .
Dec. 28 . . .
1887.
Mar. 4 . . . .
May 1 3 . . .
Aug. 1
Oct. 5 . . . .
Dec. 7 . . . .
1888.
Feb. 1 4 . . .
Apr. 3 0 . . .
June 3 0 . . .

Oct. 4




16. 47
15. 22
14.56
15.02

186

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

T A B L E SHOWING, B Y GEOGRAPHICAL D I V I S I O N S , T H E R E S E R V E C I T I E S ANI> C E N T R A L
R E S E R V E C I T I E S , T H E N U M B E R O F B A N K S I N O P E R A T I O N , ETC.—Continued.

[Division Xo. 5.—Oliio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and "Wisconsin, excluding- reserve cities.]
Reserve held.
Dates.

A m o u n t of
Xo.
reserve required, 15
of
banks p e r cent, of
net deposits.

Classification of reserve held.

With reserve
agents (9 per cent.). Five
per cent,
redemption fnndL
Ratio. Amount. Ratio.

Lawful money (6
percent.).

Amount.

Ratio.
Amount.

1882.
Mar. 1 1 . . .
May 19...
July 1 . . . .
Oct. 3
D e c 30 . . .

503
512
514
519
523

Per ct.
Per ct.
$19,032,152 $27, 890,100 29.78 $17, 235,102 13.58 $18, 689, 973
17,572,569 14.04
18,358,481
18, 777. 697 37,819,405 30.22
16, 982, 358 13.43
18, 910, 821
18.063,931
37, 703, 899 29.82
17, 205, 670 13. 39
16, 875, 972
19, 272, 709 35, 969, 848 27.99
17,047, 7ii9 13.57
16,905,680
18,845,485
35,817,290 28.51

Per ct.
14.73
14.67
14.96
13.13
13.4(5

$1, 965, 025
1, 888, 355
1, 810, 720
1, 888, 206
1, 863, 871

1883.
Mar. 1 3 . . .
May 1 . . . .
June 22...
Oct. 2
Dec. 31 . . .

530
536
544
554
554

19,081, 9(50
18, 892, 570
18, 680, 838
18, 563, 099
17, 961, 597

36, 507, 835
34, 009,157
32, 831, 22:J
34,705, 552
34, 790, 630

27. 17
27. 00
25.14
28.04
29.05

16, 401, 301
17, 003,342
15.616.973
16, 503, 659
16,853,215

12.89
13.50
12.54
13.34
14.07

18, 281, 364
15,146, 613
15, 394, 648
16, 347, 350
16,142, 536

14. 38
12. 03
12. 30
13. 21
13.48

1, 825,170
1, 859, 202
1,819,607
1,854,543
1, 794,879

558
560
569
574
572

17, 808, 933
17. 392, 601
16, 640, 340
15,784.480
15, 040, 275

34, 832, 320
32, 291, 594
30, 968, 073
31,545,494
33,478, 235

29.34
27.81
29.15
'29. 98
33.39

16,461,984
16, 913, 978
16,186, 847
16,127, 230
15, 563, 364

13.87
14.59
14.59
15.33
15.52

16, 636, 811
13, 623,182
1'*, 081, 876
13, 764,179
16 332,719

14.01
11. 75
11.79
13.08
16.29

1, 733, 525
1, 757,434
1, 699, 350
1, 654, 079
1, 582,152

567
568
567
570
570

15, 800, 692
15, 954, 519
16,118, 869
16, 501,187
18, 497,191

36, 876,186
35, 963,168
36, 162, 987
37,477,345
30, 220, 910

35. 07
33.81
33.65
34.07
32.93

16, 882, 609
17,117,106
15, 936, 895
17, 019, 462
16,050, 698

16. 03
16.09
14. 8.'{
15.47
14.59

18, 475, 898
17, 336,757
18,738,134
18, 934, 890
18, 653, 616

17.54
16.30
17.45
17.21
16.96

1, 517, 679
1, 509, 305
1, 487, 958
1, 522. 993
1, 522, 596

571
575
582
580
576

17,184, 663
17,452, 850
18, 315, 951
18,438,101
18,828,474

38,467, 958
36, 682, 622
41, 364, 412
39, 891,410
40, 251, 058

33.57
31.53
33.88
32.45
32.07

16, 692,494
17, 849, 509
17,118, 272
17, 974, 624
18,082,937

14.57
15.34
14.02
14.62
14.41

20, 284, 810
17, 426,446
22,867, 315
20, 594, 220
20, 974,170

17.78
14.98
18.73
16.75
16.71

1,490,654
1,406, 667
1, 378, 825
1, 322, 566
1,193, 951

582
584
594
598
600

19,446, 236
20, 082,778
20,814,218
20, 576, 959
20,237,953

42,186,629
41, 866, 938
44,475, 533
4§, 983,916
39,116,212

32. 54
31.27
32.05
29.88
28.99

18, 037, 638
19, 111, 576
18,401,230
19,171,016
18,425, 529

13.91
14.27
13.26
13.98
13.66

23, 012, 354
21, 673, 404
25, 021, 687
20, 771, 852
19, 629,800

17.75
16.19
18.03
15.14
14.55

1, 136, 637
1,081, 958
1, 052, 616
1, 041, 048
1, 060,883

603
60(5
609
611

20, 788, 469
20, 795, 516
20, 756, 627
21,297,373

40, 918,158 29. 52
39,175, 386 28.26
39, 806, 200 28.77
42,224,352 29.74

18, 290, 041
18, 869, 077
17, 754,453
18,466,510

13.20
13.61
12.83
13.01

21,600,663
19,298, 656
21, 045, 051
22,763,433

15. 59
13.92
15. 21
16.03

1, 0?7. 454
1, 007, 053
1, 006, 696
994,40*

-1 QQA

Mar.7....
Apr. 2 4 . . .
J u n e 20...
Sept. 30 ..
Dec. 2 0 . . .
1885.
Mar. 10...
May 6 . . . .
July 1 . . . .
Oct. 1
Dec.24 . . .
1886.
Mar.l....
June 3
Aug. 27 . .
Oct.7 . . . .
Dec. 2 8 . . .
1887.

Mar. 4 . . . .
May 13...
Aug.l....
Oct.5
Dec.7....
1888.
F e b . 14 . . .
Apr. 30...
J u n e 30 . .
Oct.4




187

EEPOET OF THE COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

TABLE SHOWING, BY GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS, TMK RESERVE CITIES AND CENTRAL
KESEJIVE CITIES, THE NUMBER OF HANKS IN OPERATION, ETC.—Continued.
[Division No. 6.—Iowa, Mkmesota, Missonri, Kansas, and Nebraska (Omaha transferred to division
No. 9, October 5, 1887 ; Kansas City and Saint Joseph transferred to division No. 9, May 13, 1887), excluding reserve cities.]
Classification of reserve held.

Reserve held.
Amount of
reserve reNo.
quired, 15
of
Dates.
jbanks per cent.of
net deposits.

Lawful money (6
percent.).'
Amount.

Amount.
1882.
Mar. 11..
May 19..
July 1 . . .
Oct. 3 . . .
Dec, 30 . .

With reserve
agents (9per cent.).
Amount.

Five
percent,
redempRatio. tion fund.

Ratio.

Per et.

Ratio.

27.17
27. 62
26. 33
24. 68
26.63

$5, 719,125
5, 557,107
5, 865, 877
5, 934, 099
6, 513,480

Per ct.
13.11
12.43
12.67
12.34
13.35

$5, 665, 681
6, 323, 635
5, 866,168
5, 440, 789
5,975,158

Per ct.
12.99
14.14
12. m
11.32
12.25

$465,161
467, 997
460, 311
491,205
496, 908

207
216
227
257
270

7, 692, 300 13, 780, 065 26.88
8, 007, 308 13, 928, 636 26. 09
16, 331, 528 28.26
8,669,016
9, 087, 854 15, 692, 927 25.90
9, 269,439 16,068,106 26.00

6,048,070
6, 926. 476
6, 739, 738
7, 240, 980
7, 756, 806

11.79
12.98
11.66
11. 95
12.55

7, 237,137
6, 496, 8(52
9,100, 816
7, 922, 362
7, 788, 201

14.11
12.17
15.75
13.08
12.60

500, 858
505, 298
490, 974
529, 585
523, 099

287
298
309
329
329

9, 365, 609 16,334,768 26.1G
9, 712,119 17, 385,106 26. 85
9, 546, 762 16,682,585 26. 21
9,158, 231 16, 305,178 26. 70
8, 643,147 15, 874, 452 27.55

7, 297, 414
8, 463, 096
9, 366, 090
8,1,'JO, S78
7, 734, 917

11.69
13. 07
14.72
13.32
13. 42

8, 526,486
8, 406, 680
6, 806, 044
7, 677, 976
7, 642, 884

13.66
12.98
10.69
12.58
13. 26

510,868
51% 030
510,451
494, 324
496, (551

157
1C5
171
184
197

$6, 541,424
6, 707, 034
6, 945,887
7, 211, 774
7, 314, 811

$11, 849, 967
12, 348, 739
12,192, 356
11, 866, 093
12, 985, 546

1883.
Mar. 13..
May 1 . . .
June 22..
Oct. 2 . . . .
Dec. 31 ..
1884.
Mar. 7 . . .
Apr. 24..
June 2 0.
Sept. 30..
Dec. 20..
1885.
Mar. 10..
May 6 . . .
July l - . Oct. 1 . . .
Dec. 24..

336
340
346
359
363

9, 202,146 18,064,151
9, 643, 675 19,112, 996
10,105, 532 20,186, 373
10, 526,279 19,159, 727
10,511, 542 19,128,184

29. 45
29. 73
29.96
27.30
27.30

8,442, 274
8, 803, 813
8, 868, 049
8, 896, 805
9, 309, 286

13.76
13,69
13.16
12.68
13. 28

9,131, 647
9, 806, 853
10, 827, C81
9, 768, 829
9, 315,121

14.89
15. 25
16.07
13. 92
13.29

490, 2l?0
502, o-'-O
490,6 m
494, 093
503, 777

377
391
404
406
418

10, 872, 988
12, 203, 046
12, 349, 300
12, 377, 733
12, 811,418

19, 373, 302
23,020,432
24,464, 927
21, 931, 867
23, 053, 002

26. 73
28.30
29. 72
26.58
26.99

8, 838,140
11, 204, V»06
10, 229, 545
11, 019, 342
11, 752, 951

12.19
13.77
12.43
13.35
13.76

10, 043, 854
11, 339, 220
13, 747,424
10, 422, 066
10, 848,107

13.86
13. 94
16.70
12.03
12.70

491, 308
476, 306
487, 95:;
490, 450
451,944

427
428
438
455
462

14,184, 873
13, 368,183
12,435, 313
12, 258,402
11,440, 774

27, 752, 343
26, 723, 837
25, 056,695
22,367, 310
20,023,408

29.35
29.99
30. 22
27.37
26.25

11,860, 366
12, 010, 369
10.458, 690
10, 275,484
9, 831,122

12.54
13.48
12. 62
12.57
12.89

15, 441, 590
14, 290, 849
14,175, 769
11, 660, 633
9, 753, 960

16.33
16.04
17.10
14. 27
12.79

450, 387
422, 619
422, 2H6
431,193
438, 32G

460
468
471
476

11, 915,472
12,191175
12, 423, 419
12, 646, 574

24,167, 651
24,2JT7, 974
25, 363, 996
23, 898, 707

30.42
29.80
30.62
28.35

10, 418, 840
10, 851,, 912
10, 547,101
10,011,097

13.12
13.35
12. 73
11.87

13,308,830 j 16.75 i 409, 981
12,924,379 15.90 i 441,f>83
14, 367, 058 17. 05 I 449,507
13,400,021 : 15.94 ; 450, 0&9

3886.

Mar.l...
June 3 . .
Aug. 27 .
Oct. 1 ...
Dec. 28..
1887.
Mar. 4...
May 13 . .
Aug.l...
Oct. 5 . . .
Dec. 7 . . .
1888.
Feb. 14..
Apr. 30 .
June 30 .
Oct. 4 . . .




188

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

T A B L E SHOWING, B Y GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS, T H E R E S E R V E CITIES AND CENTRAL
R E S E R V E C I T I E S , T H E N U M B E R OF BANKS I N OPERATION, ETC.—Continued.
[Division No. 7.—Colorado, Nevada, California, and Oregon, excluding reserve cities.]
Classification of reserve held.
Lawful money (6
agents (9 per cent.)
Ratio.

Amount.

I

Ratio.

\Pcrct.
16.08
17.40
17. 34
17.44
16.20

Per st
14. 83
14. 69
13.72
li.63
16.56

$2, 576, 675
2, 696, 322
2, 693, 926
2, 868,124
2, 871, 064

$5,408,452
5, 872, 661
5, 682, 235
6, 241, 813
6, 379, 306

Mar. 13.
May 1 . .
J u n e 22
Oct. 2 . . .
Dec. 31.

2, 866, 867
2, 890, 642
2, 984, 656
3. 206, 008
3, 241,147

6, 081, 382
5, 487,840
6, 855.648
5, 839, 540
6, 447, 703

31.86
28.51
31.97
27. 35
29.88

3, 594. 598
3,133, 202
3, 203; 157
3, 098, 370
3, 558, 027

18.83
16.28
16.11
14. 51
16.50

2, 374, 534
2, 240, 755
3, 033, 366
2, 619, 307
2, 763,101

12.44
11.64
15. 20
12.27
12. 80

Mar. 7..
Apr. 24.
J u n e 20
Sept, 30
Dec. 20.

3, 009, 761
3, 028, 531
2, 748, 621
2, 600, 548
2, 560, 777

5, 6/26, 902
5, 791, 614
5, 492, 659
5, 798, 359
5, 524, S)39

28.08
28.68
29.97
32. 69
32.36

3, 217, 309 16.05
3, 207,082 15.88
3, 664, 908 20.00
3,346,017 18.86
3,180, 260 18.63

2, 287. 585
2,462, 898
1, 717, 837
2, 341,155
2, 239, 427

11.46
12.20
9.37
13.20
13.12

2, 663, 353
2, 683, 438
2,721,004
2, 920, S66
3,189, 900

5, 978, 551
5, 699, 692
5, 697,478
6, 635, 005
7, 038, 522

33.67
31. 86
31.41
34.07
33.10

19.43
18.65
16.36
16.74
17.55

2, 419, 586 13. 63
2,256,198 12.61 I
2, 626,141 | 14.48 •
3,264,417 i 16.76
3,192,688 ' 15. 01

108,436
106, 960
101.461
110, 034
113,125

3, 329, 624
3, 598, 749
3, 863, 286
3, 971, 589
4, 329, 961

7, 529, 982
7, 672, 897
8, 288, 012
7, 896, 910
9, 221, 771

33. 92
31.98
32.18
29. 83
31.95

17.78
16.82
15.91
15. 50
18.28

3,465, P53 i 15. 61
3, 527, 877 | 14. 70
4,075,587 I 15.82
3,672,731 13.87
3, 828, 979 13. 26

116,814
110. 093
116, 038
119, 9G6
115, 853

4, 674, 444
5, 276, 435
5, 719, 220
6, 330, 097
6,291,325

10,289, 333
11,540, 55411,799, 910
13 784. 605
12, 882, 230

13 02
1
32.8
95
;o
32 6G
30 71

5,672,302 18.20
5, 990, 889 ! 17.03
6,134,729 ! 16. 09
7,276,703 ! 17.24
7,540,479 ! 17.98

4, 504, 028
5, 438, 612
5, 548, 590
6, 385, 396
5. 218, 778

113, 0C3
Gil, 053
116, 507
122, 506
122, 973

6,149,731
1-1 4 4-3, 902
6, 042, G09 11,390 749
5,924, 963 11,634, 948
6, 0;W. 317 12,503 944

30 36
28.29
29 46
31.07

7,457,014 IS. i!)
6,557,882 i 16.28
6, 338,182 16. 05
6, 338, 048 15.75

4,801.503
4,708,00(3
5,171,147
6,034,811

122, 008
121,634
109,914
111, 187
105, 252

1887.
Mar. 4 . . .
May 13..
Aug.l...
Oot/5....
Dec.7 ...

i

1888.
Feb. 14 . .
Apr. 30..
June 3 0 .
Oct. 4 . . .

14.45
15.46
14.55
15.13
12.44

87
94
9G
98 |




'
i
i
j

11.86
11.69
13.09
15.00

128,295
130,801
125,619
131, 085

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY. 1 8 9
T A B L E SHOWING, B Y GEOGRAPHICAL D I V I S I O N S , T H E R E S E R V E C I T I E S AND CENTRAL
R E S E R V E C I T I E S T H E NUMBER OF BANKS I N OPERATION, ETC.—Continued.
[Division Xo. 8.—Arizona, Dakota, Montana, New Mexico, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. "
J
Reserve held.
! A mount of Xo. I reserve re- •
Dates. I of' ! quired, 15 i

Classification of reserve held.

i
!

Lawful money (6 j

i - ^ ^ > —

B o
. .
Uj

P^cen,,
Amount. I Ratio.

1882.

With reserve

Five

^^percenU.^
tion fund.
Amount. : Ratio.

$1,144, 970
1, 340, 349
1, 379, 900
1, 662, 285
1, 815, 318

$1, 864,032
2, 242, 753
2, 335,024
2, 686, 299
3, 276, 376

Per ct,
24.42
25.10
25. 38
24.24
27.07

$1, 234, 034
1, 346, 771
1, 265, 644
1, 566, 209
1, 893, 011

Per ct.
16.17
15.07
13. 76
14.13
15. 64

Per ct.
$547, 357 7.17
803, 072 8.99
970, 470 10. 55
1, 019, 233 9.20
1, 276, 446 10.55

$82, 641
92, 910
98, 920
100, 857
106, 919

1, 857,414
2,072, 505
2, 234, 510
2, 362,081
2, 280, 534

3,171, 854
3,196, 343
3, 787,433
3,453,105
3, 746,766

25.62
23.13
25.42
21.93
24.64

1, 944, 893
1, 946, 749
1, 946, 924
2, 000, 374
2,450, 974

15.71
14.09
13. 07
12.70
16.12

1,118, 433 9.03
1,139, 293 8.25
1, 726,181 11.59
1, 331, 438 8.46
1,177, 548 7.75

108, 528
110,301
114, 328
121,293
118, 244

2,206, 520
2, 256, 846
2,194, 632
2,162,177
2.193. 537

3,406,474 23.16
3,584,760 23.83
3, 402, 695 23.26
3, 263, 041 22.64
3, 581, 574 24.49

2, 332,136
2,421, 783
2,377, 061
2, 077, 673
2,357,403

15.85
16.10
16.25
14.41
16.12

955, 815
1, 038, 881
899, 284
1,066, 754
1,114, 624

6.50
6.90
6.15
7.40
7.62

118, 523
124, 096
126, 350
118, 614
109, 547

88
89
92
94
107

2,132, 223
2,124, 749
2, 317, 930
2, 492, 432
2, 633, 914

3, 703, 384
3, 587, 997
3, 939,596
4,420, 239
4, 881, 391

26.05
25.33
25.48
26.60
27.80

2, 525,590
2, 387, 887
2, 354, 579
2,600, 691
3,166, 234

17.77
16.86
15.24
15.65
18.03

1, 068, 609 7.52
1, 089,153 7.69
1, 473, 460 9.53
1, 704, 733 10.26
1. 594, 293 9.08

109,185
110, 957
111, 557
114, 815
120, 864

107
109
113
114
111

2,
2,
2,
2,
2,

4, 716, 817
4, 688,187
5,173, 789
5,149, 624
5, 258,108

26.86
25.61
29. 67
28.87
27. 65

3, 057, 426
3, 091, 659
3,135, 269
3, 360, 609
3, 560, 333

17.41
16,89
17.98
18.79
18.70

1, 535, 412
1, 471,191
1, 013,185
1, 669, 970
1, 577, 946

8.74
8.04
10.97
9.36
8.25

123, 977
125, 339
125, 335
119, 045
119, 829

121
125
128
128
130

3,019, 568
3, 258,730
3, 501, 233
3, 630, 696
3, 787, 621

4,
4,
5,
5,
6,

765
756
017
545
797

24.65
22. 02
24.13
23. 68
24. 91

3, 418, 756
3, 357, 718
3, 492, 525
3, 715,196
4, 255, 601

16.98
15.46
14. 96
15.35
16.85

1, 421, 601
1,303,545
2, 010, 740
1, 888, 860
1, 908,315

7.06
6.00
S.57
7.80
7.56

121,408
121, 493
122,752
126,489
126, 881

131
130
130
132

3, 779, 467
3, 824, 435
3, 972,189
4,461, 321

5, 791, 312
5, 935, 373
6, 292, 050
7, 758,182

22.98
23.28
23. 76
26.08

3, 874, 586
3, 887, 931
3, 874,153
4, 241, 947

15. 38
15.25
14. 63
14. 26

1, 787, 096
1, 919, 790
2, 289, 537
3, 386, 255

7.09
7.53
8.65
11. 39

129,630
127, 652
128, 360
129, 980

Mar. 11..
May 19 . .
July 1 - - .
Oct 3 . . .
Dec. 30 . .
1883.
Mar. 13..
Mayl...
J u n e 22 .
Oct.2 . . .
Dec. 31 . .
1884.
Mar. 7 . . .
Apr. 24..
J u n e 20..
Sept. 30 .
Dec. 20 . .
1885.
Mar. 10..
May 6 . . .
Julyl...
Oct. 1 . . .
Dec. 24 . .
1886.
Mar. 1 . . .
June 3 . . .
Aug. 27..
Oct. 7 . . .
Dec. 28 . .

643,
745,
615,
675,
852,

604
657
777
213
550

1887.
Mar. 4 . . .
May 1 3 . .
Aug. 1 . . .
Oct. 5
Dec. 7 . . .

961,
782,
626,
730,
290,

1888.
Feb. 14 . .
Apr. 30..
June 30. .
Oct. 4




!

190

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

TABLE SHOWING, BY GI-:OGR\PHICAL DIVISIONS, THE RESERVE CITIES AND CENTRAL
RESERVE CITIES, THE NUMBER OF BANKS IX OPERATION, ETC.—Continued,
'Division No. 9.—Reserve cities—Boston, Albany, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh. Baltimore, Washington,
New Orleans, Louisville, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, Saint Louis, and San
Francisco.]
Classification of reserve held.

Reserve held.

Dates.

Amount of
reserve required, 25
banks percent, of
net deposits.

Lawful money (12£
With reserve
per cent.).
agents(12$percciit.).j

No.
of

Amount.

I

Ratio.
Amount.

1882.
Mar. 1 1 . . .
May 19 . . .
July 1 Oct. 3 . . . .
Dec.30 . . .

192
192
193
193
195

Ratio.

Amount.

Five
per cent,
redempRatio. | tion fund.

Per ct
Per ct.
$77, 032, 003 $93, 401, 093 SO. 31 $54, 818, 246 17.79 $34,852, 796
80, 294, 028 102, 352, 999 31.87
59, 3is, 593 18.47
39, 467, 976
81,760,651 95, 874, 953 29. 32 57, 206, 564 17.49 35, 23>:>\ 042
79, (594, 569 89,143, 583 27. 96 52, 41.3, 086 16.44
33, 213, 032
77, 095, 866 95,051,887 30. 82 54, 211, 536 17. 58 37, 282,190

Per ct.
11.31
12.29
10. 77
10.42
12. 09

$3, 730,051
3, 566,430
3,435, 347
3, 517,465
3, 558,161

1883.
Mar. 13...
Mayl ....
June 2J...
Ot't 2 . . .
Dec, 31 . . .

198
199
200
200
202

77,419,867 89, 796, 88S
78, 644, 546 91, 787, 852
83, 005.153 103, 900, 990
80,961,109 100,638, 235
83, 646,150 105, 535, 835

29.00
29. 18
31. 29
31.08
31. 54

49, 661, 801 16.04
54,129, 582 17.21
59, 515, 283 17.93
56,425,407 17.42
63, 273, 391 18.91

36, 592, 761
34, 090, 027
40, 821, 353
40, 798, 990
38, 942,133

11.82
10.84
12.29
12.60
11.64

3, 542, 326
3, 568, 243
3, 564, 354
3,413,838
3, 320, 311

202
202
204
203
203

85, 297, 591 111, 255, 631
84, 514, 593 104,165,958
75, 708. 561 91,103,676
76,984,342 99, 022, 475
78, 739, 375 103,685,153

32. 61
30.81
30.08
32.16
32.92

61, 563, 512 18.04
62,160,250 18.39
59,623,045 19.69
63, 578, 992 20. 65
66, 011, 790 20. 96

46, 437, 308
38, 827,197
28, 403, 338
32. 340,900
34, 672, 781

13. 61
11.49
9.38
10.50
11.01

3, 254, 811
3,178, 511
3, 077, 293
3,102, 583
3, 000, 582

202
202
202
203
202

83, 462, 537
86, 628, 766
89,118, 594
91,118, 639
91,151,185

118, 522, 306
123,962,577
123, 423, 045
122,186, 751
117, 043, 608

35. 50
35. 77
34.62
33. 52
32. l i

74, 383, 404
80,109, 098
79,828,139
76, 907, 632
74, 674, 927

22.28
23.12
22.39
21.10
20.48

41,172, 443
40,912,049
40,661,809
42, 402, 600
39, 551,479

12.33
11. 81
11.41
11. 63
10.88

2, 966, 459
2,941,430
2, 933, 097
2,876,510
2, 817, 202

205
212
215
217
218

94, 506, 304
96, 810, 237
93, 802, 959
95, 363,719
94, 305,102

124, 034, 337
122, 784,157
110,584,456
113,951, 757
112,821,235

32.81
31.71
29.42
29.88
29.91

77,446, 733
80, 738, 933
68, 232, 506
70, 489,135
70, 633, 785

20.49
20.85
18.19
18.48
18.72

43, 904, 247
39, 567, 423
40, 072, 689
41, 271, 509
40, 371, 942

11.61
10.22
10.68
10. 82
10.70

2, 683, 357
2, 477, 801
2, 279, 261
2,191,113
1, 815, 508

220
210
221
223
223

99, 518, 660 124, 447, 510
86, 270, 869 106,121,301
83, 889,166 98,389, 974
84, 621,164 100, 714, 633
84,031,602 97,132,024

31.26
30.75
29.32
29.75
28.90

73, 631, 556
64, 496, 954
59, 504, 534
59, 524, 848
58, 086, 213

18.50
18.69
17.73
17.59
17.28

49, 217, 253 12.36
40, 210,839 11. 65
37, 672, 349 11.23
39, 993, 709 11.82
37, 957, 340 11.29

1, 598, 701
1, 413, 508
1, 213,090
1,196, 076
1,088,471

222
221
224
224

88, 281, 912
88, 841, 975
93,119,904
96,217, 307

107, 045, 750
105, 914, 479
113,399,111
116,864, 734

30.31
29.80
30.44
30.36

61, 380.008
61, 211, 749
66,493, 977
64,447, 941

17.38
17.22
17.85
16.75

44, 647, 555 12.63
43, 718, 493 12.30
45,949,662 12.34
51, 508,038 13.38

1, 018,187
984, 237
955, 472
908, 755

1884.
Mar. 24...
Apr. 7 . . . .
June 20...
Sept. 30 ..
Dec. 20...
1885.
Mar. 10...
May 6 . . . .
Julyl....
Oct. 1 . . . .
Dec. 24...
1886.
Marl ....
June 3 . . .
Aug. 27...
Oct. 7. . . .
Dec. 28...
1887.
Mar. 4 . . .
May 13* ..
Aug. I t . . .
Oct.5
Dec. 7
1888.
"Feb. 14...
Apr. 30...
June 30...
Oct. 4 . . . .

* Kansas City and Saint Joseph included from May 13,1887, and Chicago and Saint Louis transferred
to Division No 10.
t Omaha included from August 1, 1887.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 191
TABLE SHOWING, BY GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS, THE RESERVE CITIES AND CENTRAL
RESERVE CITIES, THE NUMBER OF BANKS IN OPERATION, ETC.—Continued.
[Division No. 10.—Central reserve cities—New York, Chicago, and Saint Louis.]
Chicago.

New York City.

Saint Louis.

Amount
Amount
Amount
of reserve Eatio
of reserve Ratio
of reserve Eatio
No. of required,
No. of required,
of
of
No. of required,
of
banks. 25 p e r c e n t , reserve banks. 25 percent, reserve b a n k s . 25 per cent, reserve
of net deof net deof net deheld.
held.
held.
posits.
posits.
posits.

Dates.

1882.
Mar, 11
Ms.y 10.
Julv 1
Oct. 3
Dec.HO

!

50
50
M)
50
48

Per ct.
$63 9H2 629 25.16
GO. 708, 718 26.14
fif) :VM *>fi0 25. 99
61.' 5iW 245 25. 36
I f»4 .'501 2 4 5 26 14

Per ct

Per ct.

:

1883.
Mar. 13
May 1
J u n e 22
Oct. 2
Dec 31

'
-

48
4H
48
48
47

62,437,901
63,422,340
69. 809, 640
66 735 374
69; 509, 209

23. 59
95 48
28 81
26. 53
27.58

47
47
45
44
44

75, 373, 0C9
70, 540, 863
57 948 702

28.94
26. 65
29. 82

68,335,552 j 38.25

44
44
45
44
45

73,191,705 | 40.12
74,436,136 ! 41.48
78.181,211 ! 42.47
78 914 6^6
3fi Qt
f
75, 516, 839
32. 76

45
45
45
45
45

80, 887, 727
74,187, 977
70,386, 879
70, 697, 561
73, 607, 025

31 28
30. 28
27.46
27.24
29.89

45
46
46
47
47

78, 607, 422
74, 921. 637
73, 497, 514
71, 084,776
72, 379, 059

28.70
27.64
28.11
28.18
27.18

18 $16, 993, 940
18 16, 579, 934
18 16,161, 735
18 15, 537, 512

30.41
33.14
30.53
28.80

5
5
5
4

$2, 280, 864
2, 710, 600
2, 574, 297
1,999,375

36.40
31.89
26.44
29.79

46
46
46
46

80, 277, 202
79,168, 388
84, 608, 091
85, 539, 988

30.29
29.93
30.34
28.16

18 16,167, 806
18 117, 822, 500
19 17, 961, 506
19 17, 332, 756

31.68
29.75
31.37
30.24

4
4
4
4

2,202, 808
2,177,175
2, 217, 845
1, 970, 308

34.05
40.11
42.10
27.07

!

1881.
Mar. 7
Apr. 94
J u n e 'JO
Sept. 80
Dec 20
1885.
Mar. 10
May 6
JnTv 1
Oct 1
Dec. 24
1886.
Mar.l.
June 3
Aua;.27
Oct.7
Dec.28
1887.
Mar 4
May 13
An<' 1
Oe+ 5
Dec 7
1888.
Feb. 14
Apr. 30
J u n e 30
Oct. 4




192

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY

AVERAGE WEEKLY DEPOSITS, CIRCULATION, AND RESERVE OF THE NATIONAL
BANKS OF NEW YORK CITY, AS REPORTED TO THE NEW YORK CLEARING-HOUSE,
FOR THE MONTHS GIVEN, IN THE YEARS 1832, 1833, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888.
Liabilities.

Reserve.

Week endingCirculation. Net deposits.

Sept.
Sept.
Wept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oet.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

2, 1882 $18, 278, 400 $271, 999, 400
9, 1882 18, 307, 000 265, 566, 900
16, If82 18, 357, f>00 263,736, 700
23, 1882 18,623, 700 260, 205, 800
30, 1882 18,768, 100 251, 858, 100
7,1882 18, 894, 8U0 249,136, 800
14,1882 18, 732, 000 249, 629, 700
21. 1882 18, 749, 400 247, 974, 400
28; 1882 18,764, 500 247,575, 400

Total.

Specie.

Legel tend-

Total.

I Ratio to
Inabilities.

$290, 277, 800 $49, 775, 400 $19, 953,100 $69,728, 500
283, 873, 900 47,148, 500 19, 448, 800 66, 597, 300
282, 094, 200 48, 571, 500 18, 691, 500 67, 263, 000
278, 829, 500 47,114,000 17, 993, 700 65,107, 700
270, 644, 200 44, 925, 500 18,389,000 63, 314, 500
268, 031, 600 47,016,000 18,384,500 65, 400, 500
268,361,700 48,281,000 18, 002, 700 66, 283, 700
266, 723, 800 49, 518, 200 17, 023, 900 66, 542.100
266, 339,900 48, 374, 200 17, 204, 700 65, 578, 900

Per cent.
24.02
23.40
23. 84
23. 35
23.25
24. 03
24.70
24. 97
24.77

Sept. 1, 1883
Sept. 8, 1883
Sept. 15, 1883
Sept. 22, 1883
Sept. 29, 1883
Oct. 6, 18S3
Oct. 13, 1883
Oct. 20, 1883
Oct. 27, 1883

15, 622, 600
15, 527, 000
15, 519, 700
15, 394, 600
15,184,800
15, 069,100
15,164,200
15, 252, 900
15, 336, 20*0

269,961,900
268, 805, 500
272, 325,100
271, 728, 200
268,496, 600
265, 592, 500
268, 942, 000
262, 535, 700
258, 589, 600

285, 584, 500
284, 332, 500

287, 844. 800
287,122, 800
283,681,400
280, 661, 600
284,106, 200
277, 888, 600
273, 925, 800

53, 529, 000
52, 601, 400
53, 397, 400
49, 360, 600
50, 067, 900
51, 586, 700
50, 894, 000
47, 262, 900
46, 372, 800

21, 729, 000
21, 074, 500
20, 662, 700
22, 443, 300
20, 566, 800
20,122, 500
21,145, 800
20, 719, 700
20, 617, 600

75, 258, 000
73, 675, 900
74, 060,100
71, 803, 900
70, 634, 700
71, 709, 200
72, 039, 800
67, 982, 600
66, 990, 400

26.35
25.91
25. 73
25. 01
24.90
25.51
25. 36
24.47
24.46

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

6,1884
13, 1884
20,1884
27,1884
4.1884
11,1884
18,1884
25.1884

14, 221, 000
14,132, 300
14, 081, 400
14, 083, 300
13, 578, 400
12, 884', 700
12, 752,700
12,910, 900

251, 527, 200
251, 654, 700
254,141, 200
252, 765, 500
256, 696, 800
261,801,600
261, 527, 700
261, 405,400

265. 748, 200
265, 787, 000
268, 222, 600
266, 848, 800
270, 275, 20o
274, 686, 300
274 280, 400
274J 316, 300

64, 899, 900
64, 288, 200
65, 409, 500
64, 302, 000
67, 470, 600
68, 922, 500
67, 579, 400
67, 638, 000

25, 060, 800
25,191, 800
25, 268,000
25, 375, 700
25,817,300
27, 654,100
27, 875, 500
27, 354, 200

89, 960, 700
89, 480, 000
90, 677, 500
89, 677, 700
93, 287, 900
96, 576, 600
95, 454, 900
94,992, 200

33. 85
33. 67
33. 8 L
33. 61
34. 52
35.16
34.80
34. 63

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

5.1885
12, 1885
19.1885
26,1885
3, 1885
10,1885
17,1885
24.1885
31, 1885

9,704, 700
9, 753, 300
9, 735, 800
9, 808, 000
9,902, 900
9, 921, 20u
9, 954, 000
10, 006, 000
9, 989,800

321, 859, 000 331, 563, 700 102,921, 100
300
320, 910, 000 330, 663, 300 jlOO, 255,
200
319, 060, 800 328, 796, 800 ' 97,333,
316, 767, 000 326, 575, 000 95, 037,900
315, 002, *K)0 324, 905, 500 92,351, 600
315, 596, 200 325, 517, 400 93, 642,500
317, 296, 700 327. 250, 700 91, 945,300
313, 767, 200 323, 773, 200 87, 309,100
313, 399, 700 323, 389, 500 84, 954,600

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

4.1886
11,188ti
18, 1HH6
25.1886
2,1886

9.1886
16,1886
23,1886
30.1886

8, 059, 200
8, 058, 000
8,104, 800
8,136,100
8,161,800
8, 110, 700
8, 215, 900
8, 246, 400
8, 234, 900

283, 366,700
282,417,800
281 4C6, 500
283,170, 900
282, 295, 800
281,170, 758
295, 713, 'd00
283, 693, 500
284, 522, 500

291, 425, 900
290, 475, 800
289,571,300
291, 307, 000
290, 457, 600
289, 281, 458
303, 929, 800
291,939,900
292, 757, 400

61,371,600 ,19, 071, 400
63,403 700 16, 929, 300
63, 823, 900 '15, 876, 700
66, 714, 600 15, 252, 200
64, 111, 700 14, «07, 700
65, 090, 900 13, 069, 500
65, 028, 600 13, 133,100
65, 668, 400 12, 8u3, 800
66,188,100 13,177, 200

80, 443, 000
80, 333, 000
79, 700, 600
81, 966, 800
78, 719,400
78.160, 400
78.161, 700
78, 472, 200
79, 365, 300

27.60
27.66
27.52
28.14
27.10
27. 02
25. 72
26.88
27.11

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.

3, 1887
10.1887
17,1887
24,1887
1.1887
8,1887
15,1887
22,1887
29,1887
5.1887
12.1887

8,112, 000
8,115,600
8,126, 000
8, 235, 300
8, 202, 500
8,186, 800
8,199,100
8, 216, 200
8,115,100
8, 046,100
8, 033, 700

281, 345, 100
279, 915, 600
279, 283, 500
278, 573, 000
281, 647, 300
285,703, 700
289, 861, 500
289, 542,800
289, 601, 900
289, 954, 700
288, 289, 700

289, 457,100
288, 031, 200
287, 414, 500
286, 808, 300
289, 849, 800
293, 890, 500
298, 060, 600
297, 759, 000
297, 717,000
298, 000, 800
296, 323, 400

59, 175, 700
58, 851, 300
59, 052, 900
60, 635, 900
64,619,200
64, 317, 500
C4, 663,100
64, 918, 700
66, 005, 800
64,639,8-0
63, 791, 600

18, 786,100
17, 769, 000
16, 389, 600
16, 259, 600
15, 767, 500
16, 269, 700
16, 885, 400
16, 735, 800
17, 542, 400
17, 810, 700
18, 070,800

77, 961, 800
76, 620, 300
75,442, 500
76, 895, 500
80, 386, 700
80, 587, 200
81, 548, 500
81, 654, 500
83, 548, 200
82, 450, 500
81, 862,400

26.93
26.60
26. 25
26.81
27.73
27.42
27.36
27.42
28.06
27.67
27.63

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.

1.1888
8,1888
15,1888
22,1^83
29. 1888
6,1888
13.1888
20,1888
27,1888
3,1888

7, 770, 400
7, 850, 400
7, 892, 900
7, 927, 700
6, 836, 400
6, 515, 300
6,516.700
6,488, 700
6, 484, 50J
6, 363, 200

341, 477, 200
336, 495, 600
312, 995, 600
333, 959, 700
336, 016, 200
349, 506, 800
337, 755, 000
343, 953, 000
343,813,200
343, 587, 300

349, 247, 600
344, 346, 000
320, 888, 500
341, 887, 400
342, 852, 600
356, 022,100
344, 271, 700
350, 441, 700
350, 297, 700
349. 950, 500

73, 344, 200
69, 844, 500
69, 723,700
70, 054, 900
74,146, 500
74, 411, 300
73, 901, 500
81,457,700
81, 212, (!00
80,140, 2U0

30, 687, 300 104, 031, 500
28, 797, 600 98, 642,100
28, 238, 900 97, 962, 600
26, 320, 600 96, 375, 500
24, 994,100 99,140, 600
23, 204, 300 97,615,600
22, 017, 800 95,919,300
21.386,800 102, 844, 500
2L, 329, 800 102,542,400
21, 700, 800 101, 841,000

29.79
28.65
30.53
28.02
28.92
27.42
27. 86
29.35
29. 27
29.10




28, 701, 900 '131,623,000
28, 842, BOO i 129, 097, 600
! 27, 662. 800 1124, 99(5, 000
26, 014, 800 1121,052,000
24, 516. 600 116,8158,200
|23, 002, 000 116, 644, 500
' 22, 221, 100 114, 166, 400
21, 059, 800 108, 368, 900
21, 874, 900 106,829, 500

39.70
39.04
38.01
37.07
35.07
35. 83
34.89
33. 47
33.03

JKEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
STATE OF THE LAWFUL-MONEY RESERVE OF THE NATIONAL BANKS AS

STATES AND

Pates.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
2t
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

Oct. 3,1882.
Dec. 30,1882.
Mar. 13,1883.
May 1,1883.
J u n e 22,1883.
Oct. 2,1883.
Dec. 31,1883.
Mar. 7,1884.
Apr. 24,1884.
J u n e 20,1884.
Sept. 30,1884.
Dec. 20,1884.
Mar. 10,1885.
May 6,1885.
J u l y 1,1885.
Oct" 1,1885.
Dec. 24,1885.
Mar. 1,1886.
J u n e 3,1886.
Aug. 27,1886.
Oct. 7,1886.
Dec. 28,1886.
Mar. 4,1887.
May 13,1887.
Aug. 1,1887.
Oct. 5,1887.
Dec. 7,1887.
Feb. 14,1888
Apr. 30,1888.
J u n e 20,1888.
Oct. 4,1888

No. of
banks. Net deposits.

2,026
2,065
2,097
2,128
2,169
2,253
2, 280
2,314
2,340
2,376
2,417
2,417
2,425
2,432
2,442
2,467
2, 485
2,518
2, 552
2,589
2,590
2,612
2,644
2, 676
2,724
2,756
2,778
2,787
2,809
2,827
2,847

$545, 842, 660
554, 245, 520
550, 892, 283
556, 309,464
500, 731, 879
577, 880, 812
579, 512,711
573,619,524
575, 995, 025
544, 660, 331
535, 807, 406
520, 283, 576
537, 613, 418
540, 281, 214
552,196, 593
570, 838, 327
580. 879,155
596, 051, 483
611,733,799
623, 886, 736
637, 564,136
651, 697, 492
675, 355, 824
682, 845, 855
682, 963,777
690, 622, 007
684, 059,721
707,423,152
707, 530, 013
711, 849, 213
739, 325,350

Reserve required.

$81, 880. 361
83,140,390
82, 637 104
83, 449, 581
84, 112, 683
86, 685, 688
86,930, 753
86, 046, 715
86, 399,253
81,699,049
80, 371,110
' 78, 042,536
80, 642,012
81,042,182
82, 829, 489
85,625,749
87,131, 873
89, 407, 722
91,760, 0C9
93,583,010
95, 634,620
97, 754, 624
101, 303, 374
102,426, 878
102, 444, 566
103, 593, 301
102, 608, 958
106,113,472
106,129, 502
106, 777, 382
1L0,898, 802

RESERVE
Oct. 3,1882
Dec. 30, 1882
Mar. 13, 1883
May 1,1883
J u n e 22, 1883
Oct. 2,1883
Dec. 31, 1883
Mar. 7,1884
Apr. 24, 1884
J u n e 20, 1884.
Sept. 30,1884
Dec. 20, 1884
Mar. 10, 1885
May 6,1885
J u l y 1,1885
Oct. 1,1885
Dec. 24, 1885
Mar. 1,1886
June 3,1886
Aug. 27,1886
Oct. 7,1886
Dec. 28,1886
Mar. 4,1887
May 13, 1887
Aug. 1,1887
Oct. 5,1887
Dec. 7,1887...
Feb. 14, 1888
Apr. 30,1888
J u n e 30,1888
Oct. 4,1888

.,

,

.*...




243
243
246
247
248
248
249
249
249
249
247
247
246
246
247
247
247
250
257
260
262
263
265
279
290
293
292
290
289
293
293

572, 791, 257
565,948, 445
559,431, 070
568, 267, 546
611, 259,171
590, 785, 930
612, 621, 435
642,682,644
620, 221, 832
534, 629,056
562, 888,105
588, 299, 710
626, 616, 971
644, 259, 607
669,199, 'J14
677, 333, 060
666, 672, 097
701, 576,125
683, 992, 858
656, 759, 355
664, 245,121
671, 648, 508
712, 504, 320
721, 869, 242
706, 708, ,847
697, 767*1*89
695, 790, 194
747,718,913
752, 040,152
791,629,383
804,241,438

143,197, 814
141,487, 111
139, 857, 768
142, 066,886
152, 814, 793
147,696,483
153,155, 359
160, 670,660
355,055,456
133,657, 263
140, 722,026
147, 074,927
156, 654, 242
161, 064,902
167, 299, 805
169, 333, 265
166,668 024
175,394,031
170, 998, 214
164,189,838
166,061,280
167, 912,127
178,126, 082
180,467, 310
176,677,212
174,441,972
173,947, 548
186, 929, 728
188, 010,038
197,907,346
201,060, 359

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

195

SHOWN BY THEIR REPORTS FROM OCTOBER 3, 1882, TO OCTOBER 4? 1888.
TEEEITORIES.
He serve held.

Amount.

$150,351, 513
158, 832,406
155,131,167
148, 836, 606
157, 728,089
157,493, 584
] 67, 741, 690
167, 008, 072
162, 466, 064
145, 997, 562
156, 304, 733
161, 864, 287
175,030,558
171,011,833
170, 245, 483
177, 470, 804
181,357,249
3 81, 591, 775
181, 552, 648
188, 847. 786
186,191, 889
192, 278, 974
203, 307, 527
198,863,737
183,537,562
190, 919,164
185, 803,160
201,787,492
193, 936, 932
199,159, 391
209, 844, 956

Eatio
to liabilities.
27.5
28.7
28.2
26.7
28.1
27.2
28.6
29.1
28.2
26.8
29.2
31.1
32.6
31.6
30.8
31.1
31.2
30.4
29.6
30.2
29.2
29.5
30.1
29.1
27.7
27.6
27.2
28.5
27.4
28.0
28.4

Classification of reserve held.

Specie.

Legal

LCLIU."! $•

$30, 024, 289
31, 095,496
30, 072, 360
31,414,155
31,055, 220
31, 253,194
33,178, 829
33,471,053
36, 352, 684
36,407, 051
35, 238,175
34, 587, 231
38, 852, 692
40, 736, 609
40, 065, 640
41, 467, 335
42,195, 802
45,138, 994
49, 082, 209
47, 370, 313
47, 824, 967
50,326,819
50, 884,172
51,145,531
48, 955, 455
50, 821, 078
51, 696, 357
51, 835, 866
50, 988,350
49,123,698
50,188, 336

$28, 318, 646
31, 038, 111
28, 871, 031
30, 367, 252
29,053,116
30, 245, 600
32, 695, 299
29, 859, 218
30, 944,464
31,448, 254
30, 392, 840
29, 943, 391
30,134,197
29, 508, 036
27,473, 329
29, 375, 936
28, 898, 910
27, 257, 991
29, 256,191
28, 214, 619
29, 672, 277
31, 879,137
30, 643, 368
32, 418, 634
30, 878, 291
32,129, 936
31,997, 316
32, 264,784
33,260, 054
31,021,956
33, 789, 747

United States
EedempDue
certificates of from reserve tion fund with
deposit.
agents.
Treasurer.
$610,000
635, 000
565, 000
585, 000
575, 000
585, 000
610,000
595, 0C0
550, 000
575, 000
500, 000
565. 000
665, 000
635, 000
635, 000
500, 000
530, 000
475, 000
465, 000
460, 000
400, 000
500, 000
555, 000
545, 000
470, 000
475, 000
520, 000
510, 000
515, 000
505, 000
680,000

$80, 064,196
84, 783, 917
84,431, 394
75, 216, 795
85, 825, 601
84,119, 738
88, 057,473
92, 267, 704
83, 664, 761
66, 843, 814
79,652,119
86, 489,195
95, 289, 830
89, 991, 054
92, 068, 593
95, 954, 541
99, 687, 965
98, 901, 439
93,459,713
103, 642, 532
99,493, 068
101. 746, 037
113,943, 928
107, 857, 035
102, 597, 807
100, 879, 879
95, 002,425
110, 693, 685
102, 759,410
112,183, 937
118,950, 556

$11, 334, 382
11, 279, 882
11,191, 382
11,253,404
11,219,153
11,290,052
11, 200, 089
10, 815,097
10, 954,155
10, 723,443
10, 521, 599
10, 279,470
10, 088, 839
10,141,074
10,002,921
10,172,992
10, 044, 572
9, 818, 351
9. 289, 535
9, 160, 322
8, 741, 577
7, 826, 981
7, 281, 059
6, 897, 537
6, 636. 009
6, 613, 271
6, 587, 062
6, 483,157
6,414,118
6, 324, 800
6, 236, 317

CITIES.
153, 557, 856
162, 387, 772
148, 706, 922
156, 419,122
184, 362, 295
171, 448, 008
182,221,554
198, 511, 843
179, 371,793
160, 231, 029
189, 850,706
208, 349,105
235,974,313
247,455, 612
256, 223,121
237, 894,989
215,991, 777
225, 227, 964
212, 639,672
187, 891,591
190, 985,722
200,813,518
214,686, 473
212, 950,477
206, 466,135
203, 291, 575
196,092, 726
227,815, 221
225, 407,142
242, 342, 965
236, 321, 317

26.8
28.7
26.6
27.5
30.2
29.0
29.7
30.9
28.9
30.0
33.7
35.4
37.7
38.4
38.3
35.1
32.4
32.1
31.0
28.6
28.7
29.9
30.1
29.5
29.2
29.1
28.2
30.5
30.0
30.6
29.4




72, 883,489
75,331, 663
67, 890,006
72,193, 111
84, 299,176
76, 564, 789
81, 097, 329
88, 609, 073
78,392, 023
73, 254, 631
93,371,299
105,159,848
328,265,181

136, 678, 750
137, 546, 852
133,405, 237
123,158, 550
126,476,925
108, 377, 660
101, 630,179
108, 562, 730
116, 656, 737
120, 794, 734
116,170,136
116,148, 755
114, 264, 376
107, 544, 286
121,994, 748
121,085,661
132,168, 579
127, 799, 480

34,994,871
37,440,310
31, 977,037
37, 88C 216
44, 779,342
40,437, 397
47, 864,497
45, 987, 877
46, 768,164
45,468, 958
46, 651, 819
46,426,164
40,883,125
47.828,963
52', 228,023
40, 362,183
38, 686, 556
39,756,895
50,400, 597
35, 825,132
33,140, 045
35, 860, 691
35, 584, 790
47,176,454
4?., 599, 051
41, 621, 319
43, 364,659
50, 052,886
50,314,156
50, 973, 687
47, 309, 714

8, 035,000
7,840, 000
7, 840, 000
7, 835,000
10,070, 000
9, 375,000
10, 230, 000
13,450,000
11,440, 000
9, 295,000
13, 700, 000
18, 475, 000
22, 095, 000
18, 500, 000
22, 285, 000
18, 300, 000
11, 235, 000
11, 955, 000
11, 385, 000
7, 655,000
5, 395,000
5, 695, 000
7,090, 000
7,480, 000
7, 340,000
5, 715, 000
5, 645, 000
9, 610, 000
8, 815, 000
11,810,000
8, 385, 000

33,213, 032
37, 282,190
36, 592,761
34, 090, 027
40, 821,353
40, 798,990
38, 942,133
46,437, 308
38,827,197
28,403, 338
32, 340,900
34, 672, 781
41,372,443
40, 912,049
40, 661, 809
42, 402, 609
39, 551, 479
43, 904, 247
39, 567,423
40, 072, 689
41, 271, 509
40, 371, 942
49, 217, 253
40, 210, 839
37, 672, 349
39, 993, 709
37, 957, 340
44, 647, 555
43,718,493
45, 949, 662
51, 508, 038

4,481,464
4,493, 609
4,407,118
4,411, 768
4,392,424
4,271, 832
4, 087,595
4,027,585
3,944, 410
3,809,102
3, 786; 688
3, 615, 312
3, 560, 564
3, 535, 850
3, 501, 437
3, 424, 960
3, 360,192
3,134, 897
2, 908, 991
2, 708, 591
2, 616, 438
2, 229,148
1, 999, 696
1, 913, 048
1, 705,980
1, 697.171
1,581,'441
1, 510, 032
1,473,832
1, 441, 037
1, 319, 085

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

196

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

LAWFUL-MONEY RESERVE OF THE NATIONAL BANKS, AS SHOWN BY THE REPORTS

Cities, States, and Territories.

New York City.
Chicago
Saint Louis
Total of central reserve cities. ..

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New J e r s e y
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
District of Columbia. ,
Virginia
West Virginia
North CaroMna
South C arolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama.
,
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Colorado
Nevada
California
Oregon
Arizona
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
Utah
Washington
Wyoming

I

Reserve
required,
25 per cent.

Reserve
held.

$85, 539, 988
17, 332, 756
1, 970, 308

$96, 360, 786
20, 962,421
2,133*, 376

Per cent.
28.16
30.24
27.07

104,843,052 j119,456, 583

28.48

419, 372, 209

Boston
Albany
Philadelphia ..
PittsbdPgh
Baltimore
Washington ...
New Orleans...
Louisville
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Detroit
Milwaukee
Kansas City ...
Saint J oseph..
Omaha
San Francisco.
Total of reserve cities
Total of all reserve cities .

Deposits.

$342, 159, 954
69, 331, 024
7, 881, 231

No. of
banks.

111, 893, 891
10,642,314
93, 043,1G9
28,470,937
20,401,455
7, 344, 348
12,031, 639
7, 001, 993
27,316,129
12, 983, 675
14, 270, 491
5,850,4L9
14, 989, 302
2, 686, 848
11, 879,156
4,063, 433

27,973,473 I
2,600,578 !
23,260,800 i
7,117,734 i
5,100,364 ;
1,836,087 I
3,007,910 ;
l,7r,0,498 i
6,829,032 •
3,245,919 !
3,507,623 i
1,402,605 i
3, 747, 325
67.1, 712
2, 969, 789
1, 015, 858

224

384, 869, 229

96,217,307 ! 116,864,734

293

804,241,438 | 201,060,359 j 236,321,317 i

75
49
49
198
60
84
270
85
246
18
31
1
26
20
18
16
24
13
21
12
5
100
7
60
42
197
94
163
101
56
129
56
34
160
97
34
2
35
27
1
58
7
17
9
7
24

15 per cent.
10,958, 376
1,643, 756
7,229,121 |
1,084,368
7,326,362 I
1, 068, 954
60,127, 265 ' 9, 019, 090
16,595, 281
2, 489, 292
30, $$,888
4, 584,133
93, 99,325
14, 069, 899
45, 543, 352
6, 831, 503
78,386,514
11, 757, 977
4, 906, 203
735, 930
8, 08fi, 845
1, 213, 027
776, 227
116,434
11, 943, 257
1, 791,489
3, 382, 632
507, 395
3,406, 579
510, 987
3,980, 355
597, 053
4, 802, 070
720, 310
2,160, 808
324,121
4, 877, 086
731, 563
1, 381, 586
207, 238
955, 681
143, 352
15, 685,484
2,352, 823
2, 306, 780
346, 017
11, 794, 203
1, 769,130
12, 275, 841
1, 841, 376
43,171, 990
6,475,799
24, 884, 485
3,732, 673
38. 007, 718
5, 701,158
22, 354, 505
3, 353,176
13, 563, 781
2, 034, 567
21, 845, 468
3, 276, 820
29, 557, 038
4,433, 556
4, 510, l'20
676,518
17, 534, 605
2, 630,191
10, 863, 257
1, 629,489
18,436, 216
2, 765,432
395, 707
59, 356
14, 820, 235
2, 223, 035
6, 589, 960
988, 494
132,168
19, 825
6, 311, 234
946, 685
896, 505
134,476
9,134, 781
1, 370, 217
1,862,967
279,445
3, 024, 769
453, 715
6, 676, 034
1,001,405
1, 703,686
255, 553

Total of country banks.

2,847

United State3

3,140 1,543,566,788




Ratio
of
reserve.

739,325, 350

31, 442, 978
3, 832, 064
27, 359, 870
9, 542,029
6, 334, 268
2, 739, 060
3, 024, 021
1, 795,037
8, 907,727
3,921,069
4, 427, 266
2, 074, 546
5, -88, 460
848, 633
3, 945, 567
1, 382, 139

3, 437, 882
2,139,197
2, 016, 305
16, 069, 986
4, 022, 603
8, 860, 9-J1
25, 200, 989
13,288,044
23, 567, 339
1, 784, 524
2, 288, 749
341, 294
2, 979, 576
1, 080, 795
764, 634
671, 288
1,134,876
578,146
1,415,414
412, 907
254, 361
5, 097, 546
565, 507
3, 004, 843
2, 480, 945
12, 917, 236
7, 953, 678
12, 035, 045
6, 035, 826
3, 282, 567
5, 928, 905
7, 450, 667
1, 403, 672
6,181, 390
2, 934, 073
6, 484, 580
82, 873
4, 559,446
1, 377, 045
26, 072
1,478, 033
260, 525
2, 340,145
543,107
903,022
1, 605, 759
601, 519

28.10
36.01
29. 41
33. 51
31.05
37. 29
25.13
25.64
32.61
30.20
31.02
35.46
35.28
31.58
33. 21
34. 01
30. 36 i
29.38 j
31.37
29.59
28. 29
26. 73
24.25
28.99
26. 87
29.18
30.07
36.37
28.30
43.97
24.95
31.95
22.45
16 87
23.63
26.76
29.02
29.89
26.62
32.50
24.51
25.48
20. 21
29.92
3L96
31.66
27.00
24.20
27.14
25.21
31.12
35.25
27. 01
35.17
20.94
30.77
20.90
19. 73
23.42
29.06
25. 62
29.15
29. 85
24.05
35. 31

110, 898, 802 209, 844, 956

j
28.38 |

311, 959,161 416,166,273

28.90 i

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

197

OP THEIR CONDITION" AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON OCTOBER 4, 1888.

Cash reserve.
Required.

Held.

Classification of reserve held.
Specie.

Legal
tenders.

Due
Redemption
United States
certificates from reserve fund with
Treasurer.
of deposit.
agents.

$73, 797,196 $17, 763, 440
13, 071, 2*42 7, 792,199
962,497
964, 679

$345,150
48, 980
16, 200

$4, 455, 000
50, 000
190, 000

$85,194, 838
17, 283, 776
1, 954,108

$96, 015,636
20,913,441
2,117,176

104,432,722

119, 046, 253

87,830, 935

13,842, 407
1, '.UO, 806
11, 558,708
3, 522, 531
2, 529, 932
907, 244
1, 473, 017
864, 000
3, 370,034
1, 609, 324
1, 774, 811
724, 552
1, 862, 413
333, 611
1,477,582
493, 304

14,555,789
1,382, 875
17, 927,261
5, 274, 641
4,221,943
1,712,245
2,144,135
924, 737
4, 886, 368

2, 016, 826
1, 897, 557
967, 770
3, 000,413
340,544
2, 040, 384
1,154,453

11, 498, 028
979, 332
12,391, 700
3, 240, 969
2. 244, 841
953, 586
933,121
342, 301
869,721
988, 826
1, 089, 555
593,184
1,504,628
174, 374
1, 022, 208
1,142,171

64,447,941 j

39,968,545

20, 789, 396

3, 690, 000

51,508,038

183,494,194 | 127,799,480

47, 309,714

8, 385, 000

51, 508, 038

1, 319, 0H5

2, 255, 364
1,432, 866
1, 260, 447
10, 450,288
2, 536,132
5, 768,965
15,121, 360
8, 756, 234
14,827,516
1,224,296
1,289, 583
60, 643
1, 499, 380
508, 378
263,298
174, 286
211, 989
300, 643
552, 950

213, 895
163,170
145, 670
982, 588
215, 700
377,144
806, 509
298, 494
621, 759
71,913
54, 476
11,250
50,145
32, 509
34,469
20, 082
41, 007
11, 071
37,085
14, 512
5,624
115,189
18, 450
129, 629
57, 754
406, 796
203, 236
199,454
123, 008
61, 915
133, 396
76, 354
32, 973
138, 635
69, 331
48,217
3,172
57,431
22,265
1,125
42,174
5,075
21, 625
10, 932
17,550
20, 305
11,194

47, 654, 276
152, 080, 998

571, 944
368, 479
369, 314
3, 214, 601
909, 437
1,682,796
5, 305, 356
2, 613, 204
4, 454, 487
265, 607
463, 420
42, 074
G96, 538
189, 930
190,607
230, 788
271, 722
125, 220
277, 791
77,090
55, 091
895, 054
131, 027
655, 800
713,449
2, 427, 601
1, 411, 775
2, 200,681
1, 292, 067
789, 061
1, 257, 370
1, 742, 881
257, 418
996, 622
624, 063
1, 086, 886
22, 473
866, 242
386, 491
7,480
361,805
51, 760
539, 437
107, 405
1"74,466
392, 440
97, 744

968, 623
543, 261
6iO, 188
4. 637,110
1, 271, 771
2, 714, 812
9, 273,120
4, 233, 316
8,118, 064
438, 315
944, 690
269,401
1,430,051
539,848 !
466,867 I
476,920
881,880 !
266,432 I
825,379 !
335, 726
200,196
3,122, 551
261, 584
1,118,437
1,601,339
6,291,982
3, 990, 268
4, 452, 752
2,290, 949
1,440, 559
2, 717,143
3,101,412
543, 636
2, 522,085
1,127, 421
2, 451, 545
60, 099
2, 799, 283
1, 027,121
24, 947
839,138
207, 759
1, 413, 329
208, 858
451,651
852, 306
243, 959

717.498
397, 288
405, 734
2, 970, 553
658, 748
1, 795, 932
5,612,604
1,875,038
5, 016, 657
268,189
536.499
229,271
618,431
272,925
228, 899
200, 948
531, 924
107,338
437, 392
149, 680
136,949
1, 305, 386
120, 750
550,902
836, 714
3, 023, 828
2,150,522
2, 621, 931
1, 385, 426
949, 014
1, 626, 265
2,169,217
281, 414
1, 238, 506
736,498
1, 455, 536
55, 546
2,616,791
940, 619
15,947
470, 615
117, 511
870, 407
124,449
396,128
749, 741
210,176

41, 864, 994

84, 658, 083

50,188, 336

193, 951,992

268, lf>2, 277

177,987,816




26, 520, 318
2, 822, 761 !
253, 543 '
4,315,561
2, 033, 672
1, 427,102
638, 659
1, 211, (X14
582,436
2, 616, 647
1,013,000
808, 002
374, 586
1,495, 785
166,170
1, 018,176
12, 282

251.125
145, 973
204,454
1, 471. 557
613,023
918,880
3, 245,516
2,348,278
3,091,407
210.126
408,191
40,130
811, 620
266,923
237, 968
275, 972
349, 856
159,094
387, 987
186, 046
63, 247
1, 817,165
140, 834
567, 535
764, 625
3, 238,154
1, 839, 746
1, 820, 821
905, 523
491, 545
1, 090, 878
932,195
262, 222
1,283, 579
390,923
996, 009
4, 553
182,492
86, 502
9,000
368, 523
90, 248
542, 922
84,409
55, 523
102, 565
33, 783
33, 789, 747
81,099,461

4,695,000 I

410,330 I

235,000 ! $16, 598, 530
150,000 I 2, 410, 222
1,220,000 ! 9,289, 225
4,194,716
2,071,825
550, 000
1,005,215
120, 000
818, 0L1
847, 802
3, 9.i2, 394
1, 400, 000
1, 876, 97'.J
15, 000
2, 511, 709
1, 093, 270
2,265, 547
503, 599
1, 890, 5i"8
198, 436

288, 659
38, 907
143,384
72,672
40, 500
21,600
61, 875
22, 498
88. 965
27, 270
18, 000
13, 500
22,500
4, 490
14, 625
29, 250

195, 000
415, 000
10,000
10, 000
10, 000

30, 000
10,000

48, 541
1, 859,806
285, 473
1,756, 777
821, 852
6, 218,458
3, 760,174
7, 382,839
3, 621, 869
1, 780, 093
3, 078, 366
4, 272, 901
827, 063
3, 520, 670
1, 737, 521
3,984,818
19,602
1, 702, 732
327, 659
596,721
47, 691
905,191
323,317
433, 821
733,148
346, 366

908, 755

680, 000

118, 950, 556

6, 236, 317

9, 065,000

170,458, 594

7, 555,402

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
10
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

198

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

TABLE, BY STATES, TERRITORIES, AND RESERVE CITIES, EXHIBITING THE AMOUNT OF
OCTOBER, 1887, AND
OCTOBER, 1887.

States.

Gold eoin.

Gold
Silver coin.
Silver
Gold
TreasTreas- clearinghouse
ury cerury cer- certifitificates. cates. Dollars. Fractional tificates.

$600,450. 02 $10, 500
Maine
296, 886. 00
1,360
New Hampshire..
314,532.13
9,440
Vermont
2,167,416.60
251, 450
Massachusetts
4, 926, 938.23 4, 515, 530
Boston
462. 030.20
60, 410
Rhode Island
1, 263, 656. 05 205, 950
Connecticut
Division No. 1 10,031 909.23 5, 054, 640
New York
New York City
Albany
New Jersey
Pennsylvania. . . .
Philadelphia...
Pittsburgh

3, 368, 827. 67 1,114,140
8, 028,172.10 38, 270, 930 $16,186,000
451,231.00
435, 350
1,231,381.75
167, 4(30
3,012,712.85
282,490
2,921,241.00
132, 940 7, 685, 000
1,987,189. 55 765, 610

$44,263 $23,141.91 $15, 275
56,168
9,582
30,038.15
34,720
8,136
20, 865. 45
347. 81! 199, 767.25
81, 504
J 57, 633 64, 060. 05 332, 515
67, 074 40,102. 32 45, 875
43, 063
130,912 104,71^.57
838, 585

482, 688. 70

347, 50!) 252, 342. 48
469, 781 233,183.84
14, 683
5,227. 50
253, 541, 101, 609. 24
536, 348 197, 806, 40
355, 894 189, 2-J2. ±102, 620
33, 645.66

Total.

$693, 629.93
394 034.15!
387, 693. 58
3,047,952.85
9, 996, 676. 28
675,491,52
1, 748, 294. 62

535,950 16, 943, 772.9
116, 868 ~5,199, 687.15"!
434, 86-2 63, 622, 928.94i
8,700
935,191.50'
98, 444 1, 852, 443. 99|
145, 46) 4,774,820.341
274, 638 11, 558, 9;>5, 47|
91, 244 2,980,318.21

Division No. 2. 21, 600,755. 92 41, 208, 920:23, 871, 000|2,080, 393 1, 013, 037.68 1,150, 219 90, 924, 325. 60
22, 550
44,410
555, 080
70,000
631, 550
24,140
9,800

35, 021
61,224
101, 972
5.370
19, 386
66, 311
26, 309

Division No. 3.. 2,729,260.39 1,357,530

315, 593

180,883.44
Delaware.
273, 335. 87
Maryland.
1, 36T, 424. 50
Baltimore
83, 093. 50
Dist. of'Columbia .
174, 938. 50
Washington ..
420, 8:>0. 10
Virginia
228,164. 48
West Virginia

Division No. 4.
Ohio
Cincinnati
Cleveland . . .
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
Detroit
Wisconsin
Milwaukee - . .

2,876, 861.20

655,940

2, 399, 305.04
101,430
282,135. 82 261, 500
565, 345. 00 200, 000
2, 008,434.47
117, 450
2,115, 668.98
180, 250
9,040, 388. 50 3, 430, 550
1, 377, 900.45
38,210
982, 324.50
5,680
862,290.15
8,290
399, 800. 03 110, 000

Division No. 5.. 20,032,592.91 4,453,360
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Saint Louis..
Kansas Ciiy.
Saint Joseph.
Kansas
Nebraska
Omaha

1, 214, 595. 55
2,124, 645, 09
255,469.18
757, 410.19
1, 085,952. 50
63,122.50
1,155,756.41
654,171. 90
766, 633. 35

Division No. 6.

8, 077, 756. 67




91,040
26, 000
12, 900
391, 570J

239, 320!
23, 820
43, 690
15, 550
20, 560
864,450

965,447

156, 492. 37 282, 634

4, 841,509. 76

2,250
~ 1 1 , 317. 88
10, 719. 90 12, 737
23, 224. 00 122,199
8, 321, 50
960
10, 282.8.J
49,953
7, 502. 631 48, 622
9, 738. 94! 47, 384
5, 377. 751 364, 273
33, 542. 071 191, 703
6, 435.60! 58, 570
17, 665. 76' 17,120
2,168. 58
8,000
37, 035. 30 70, " '

300
43, 240
147, 690
640
36, 820
18, 540
2.860
72, 680
157, 720
19,170
45, 010
7,500
103, 770

North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
New Orleans..
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Louisville
Tennessee

20,807. 771 14,3"
273,639.21!
34, 804. 86 27, 200
440, 974. 73;
43, 287. 83 62, 336 2,130,100. 33;
168, 658. 75j
1, 035, 25
8,560
945,334.00!
7,135. 50 112, 324
606, 840.38:
40, 241. 28 55, 328
275, 962. 30
2, 5091
9,179.88

195, 240. 38
325,300.95,
547, 316. 35*
107, 762. 30j
365,448 G5!
153,407.13?
99, 713.441
776.2f5.25;
1, 256, 594. 67,
1C6, 679. 60'
556. 561. 01|
262, 254. 08
803, 549.15|

994, 462

5, 676, 042. 96|

183, 332.76

260, 507 106,273. 87 ~55,~540: ~?79237055. Oli
74, 575 29, 557. 50 15, 400
663,168. 32|
5,029.43
818, 379. 43
48, 005
254, 465 71, 926. 99 49, 210 2,501,486.46
59,162 2, 692, 576.26
230,473 107, 022.28
177,607
52, 972. 24 256, 900 12,958,417.74
133, 854
62, 412. 22 23, 535 1.635,911.67
6, 289 1,064,667.01
50, 572 19, 801. 51
6,319
995, 859. 66
82, 628 36, 332. 51
5,150
5, 560.00
532, 678. 00
13,168
1, 325, 854 496,888. 55

T
165, 091
42, 719
20,460
89, 477
16, 752
149, 933
62,323
118, 702
803, 897

477, 505 26, 786, 200.46

64, 803.73 ~37,~579
57, 812. 50 13, 729
3,815
9,120. 00
8, 440. 25 160,160
32, 620. fi0| 30, 394
8,168. 651 44, 521
40, 899.10; 69, 879
24, 231.32! 11.198
17, 459. 56! 24, 090
263, 555.71

1, 540, 458. 28
2, 387, 277. 59j
324, 023.18}
1, 338, 040.44
1.486, 764.10
156, 384.15
1, 460, 157. 51
767, 474. 22
947, 444. 91

398, 365 10, 408, 024. 38

REPORT OF TIIU COMPTROLLER O P THE! CURRENCY.

199

EACH KIND OB1 COIN AND COIN CERTIFICATE HELD BY THE NATIONAL BANKS IN
OCTOBER,

1883.
OCTOBER, 1888.

Total.

Silver coin.
Silver.
Treasury certiQcales. Fractional. Dollars

Gold
clearinghouse
certificates.

Gold
Treasury certificates.

Gold coin.

States.

$717, 497. 0' $35, 303
397,288. 50 16, 432
405. 7*33. 85 5,045
2, 970, 552.92 140,162
11,493, 027. 85 693, 321
G58, 748. 04 87,102
1, 795, 931. 78 86, 480

$28,894.91
28.661. 80
28, 023. 36
200, 543. 74
81, 047. 76
44. 740.69
103, 636. 67

$36,088
71 483
40, 823
315,188
108, 687
59,372
134, 863

$8,400 $608, 811. 76 Maine
7,780
272, 931.70 New Hampshire..
324, 242.49 Vermont
7,600
239, 520 2, 075,139.18 Massachusetts...
Boston
6, 619,800 3, 995,172.09
67, 670
399,863, 35 Rhode Island
182,770 1, 288,182.11 Connecticut

1,
18, 443, 780. 61 063, 845

515, 548. 93

766, 504

7,133, 540 8, 964, 342. 68

5, 612, 603. 78 255, 317
73, 797,196.14 1, 771, 348
14 L,
979, 331. 50 14, 000
1,875,037.60 171,323
5, 016, 656. 83 191,152
12,391,700.19 548.152
3, 240, 9G9. 23 94, 708

266, 313.30
219, 845.64
8,171. 00
107, 949. 01
251,439.41
169,237.19
38, 003. 53

1,216,790
385.1U6
64,305,120
362,213
535, 700
18,500
309, 470
194, 805
284,160
541,141
346, 946;$8,890, 000 172, 450
823,100
154, 299!

Division No. 1.

3,489, 057.48 Now York
New York City
7,138, 669.50
Albany
402, 960.50
1, 091,490.59 New Jersey
3,748, 764.42 Pennsylvania
Philadelphia...
2, 264, 915.00
Pittsburgh
2,130, 858. 70

102, 913, 495. 27 3, 046,000 1, 060,959. 08 2, 003, 030 8, 890, 000 67, 646, 780 20, 266, 716,19 Division No. 2.
268,188.59
536.499.41
2,244,840.86
229,271.50
053,586.50
618,431.05
272,925.15

37,894
65,154
249,872
6,980
192,624
84,470
8,309

29,751.09
35,612.29
39,337.36
5,260.50
14,974.50
42,127.05
9,963.02

46,450
69,251
101,658
4,060
13,165
87,756
19,157

5,123,743.06;

645,303

177, 025. 81

341,497

10
228,899.10
8,562
200, 948. 05
531, 923. 661 116, 61!)
107, 338. 39i
1,385
437,392. 36j 45, 293
149.080.15]
40,185|
136^ 949. 051 76,7361
933,120. 85 505, 643!
1, 305, 386.15 218, 363|
120,750 101 40, 210j
550, 901. 69; 36, 895i
342, 300. 75|
l,400 !
830, 713. 85:
72, 270

418.10
142.05
005. 03
552. 39
180. 36
503. 65
668. 05
523. 85
749. 95
572.10
984. 33
022. 75!
858. 851

5, 882,304.151,163, 571
3, 023, 827. .661 45, 973
869, 721. 25 150, 500
25, 000
988, 826. 41
40, 376
2,150, 521.51
98, 558
2,621, 931.42
13,071, 241.60 416, 725
20, 575
1, 385, 425. 60
12, 535
1, Orfl, 554. 86
11,371
949, 014.41
8, 534
593, 184. 00
20, 713, 248.72

836.147
58, 790
12,160
8,587
92, 400
87,120
26, 327
63, 947
32, 582
11, 540

9, 715, 607. 39

393,453




22, 640
131, 453. 50 Delaware
44,180
322, 302.12 Maryland
Baltimore
468, 680 1, 385, 293. 50
116, 500
96,471.00 Dist. of Columbia.
Washington . .
531,040
201, 783. 00
9, 480
394, 598. 00 Virginia
10, 400
225, 096.13 West Virginia . . .
1, 202, 920 2, 756, 997.25

50,873
63, 841
191, 526
46, 468
52, 607
32,1221
26, 565
114, 592
416,152
25, 523
67, 570
43,630;
215, 062j

420
55, 500
3,580
19, 520
4,000
4, 5001
127, 920
139, 590
14,270
41,390
1, 500!
117,100

295,181.46 1, 346, 531K

529,290 j

116, 657. 86
11,671.75
14, 904. 91
62, 733. 89
104,820. 92
254, 807.10
45, 064.67
53, 500.36
46, 524. 54
9, 040. 00

292,133i
60, 552
39,132
205,120
247,130
215,851
135, 933
45, 385
93, 807
20, 233

719, 726. 00 1, 355, 276

Division No. 3.

160, 598. 00 North Carolina
108, 983.00 South Carolina
144, 273. 63 Georgia
39, 353. 00 Florida
306, 792.00 Alabama
64, 869. 50 Mississippi
12,480. 00 Louisiana
New Orleans..
123, 442. 00
481, 531. 20 Texas
Arkansas
33,175. 00
389, 062.36 Kentucky
Louisville
290, 748. 00i
392,423.00, Tennessee
1
Division No. 4.
2, 547, 730. C
2,422, 423.80
309, 997. 50
729, 789. 50
1,729,041.62
1, 972, 502.50
9,757.108. 50
1.1M, 512.93
972,174.50
785, 011. 87
455, 377. 00

Ohio
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
Detroit
Wisconsin
Milwaukee . . .

3, 484,160 20, 347, 939. 72

Division No. 5.

146,640
271,000
180, 000
113, 250
198,920
2, 426,750
29, 340
5,960
12, 300
100,000

774.07
569. 40
621. 51
878. 00
738. 97
668. 70
451.10
980.85
685.12

176, 286
265,136
34, 539
20, 000
72, 817
4,378
134, 328
69, 250
67, 536

1, 240, 734. 58 Iowa
75,i
5,:
If 794, 471.24 Minnesota
9,000
220, 667.00 Missouri
Saint Louis...
355, 000
487, 219.00
Kansas City..
251, 200 1, 054, 752.50
Saint Joseph..
740. 00
50, 260
89.
24, 260
967; 519. 80 Kansas
595, 725. 45 Nebraska
15, 960
Omaha
881, 497.10
32, 950

325,367. 72

844, 270

820,190 7, 332, 326.61

74,
91,
8,
7,
38,
3,
48,
22,
28,

Division No. 6.

200

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
TABLE, BY STATES, TERRITORIES, AND RESERVE CITIES, EXHIBITING THE
OCTOBER, 1887—Continued.

States.

Gold coin.

Silver coin.
Gold
Gold
Treas- clearinghouse
ury certificates. certifi- Dollars. Fractional.
cates.

Silver
Treasury cer;ificates.

Colorado
$1, 286, 250. 30 $13,070
$91,106 $24,962.17
Nevada
50, 380. 00
3,805
3,30 L 42
California
3,151, 990. 25 '239,'800
90, 483 25, 550.17
260 $110, 000 18,100
958, 262.50
San Francisco
3,855.90
3,170
906,327.50
13,919
Oregon
14,525.38
18, 535.00
450
Arizona
366.95
Division No. 7.. 6,371, 745. 55
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
Utah
Washington
Wyoming

Total.

$7, 601 $1,422, 989.47
57,486.42
64,104 3,571,927.42
1,090,478.40
947,473.88
"9*532
19,351.95

217, 863

72, 561. 99

81, 237 7,109,707.541

49,110;
1,250
50,660'
4,180)

37, 621
3,097
37, 616
9,943
12, 600
30, 235
4,624

14, 246.45
819.40
10, 558. 35
3, 853. 91
5,829. 70
7, 853. 70
3, 807. 50

5,838
2,06L
19,711

110, 550

135, 736

46, 969. 00

41, 008 2, 395, 870. 75!

256,300

"386/718.90.1
42. 750.00
643; 194.95
84,496.50
230,277. 50
447,269.25
,.
226,900.65

~ 5,230

Division No. 8.. 2, 061, 607.75

120

110,000

7, 875
4,836
684

449,654.35;
48,847.40;
760,193. 30!
99, 543.40
307,242.20:
494, 373.95:
236, 016.15,

Total of U . S . . . 73,782,489.62 53,961,690 23,981,000 6,683,368 2,715,526.76 3,961,380 165,085,454.38




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AMOUNT OF EACH KIND O P COIN AND COIN CERTIFICATE,
OCTOBER,

Total.

$11, 698
285
52, 220

6, 226, 6 1. 00
470. 615.00
117,510.8?
8 0,407.00
L24, 448. 85
396, 127. 76
749, 740. 99
210,176.00

$28, 756. 56
2.845.09
42; 964. 08
15, 255. 32
13, 979. 80
1, 437.10

$74, 457
5,629
113, 289
14, 643
18, 034
500

83, 046

105, 237. 95

226, 552

9, 496
6,117
32, 524
2,100
5, 009
8, 895
792

21,154.90
1, 217. 35
11, 744. 00
4, 522.35
5, 597.45
7, 804, 29
4, 804.40

50, 879
6,762
48, 589
8, 557
6,213
42, 344
4,927

64, 933

56, 844. 74

168, 271

20, 843

ETC.—Continued.

1888—Continued.

Silver coin.
Gold
Silver
clearingTreashouse
u r y cercertifitificates. Fractional. Dollars. cates.

$1,455,536.21
55. 546. 59
2, 616,790. 98
1, 142.170. 82
940, 619. 30
15, 947.10

201

$180,000

180,000

Gold
Treasu r y certificates.

Gold coin.

$6,490 $1, 334,134. 65
46, 727. 50
60
122,180 2, 286,137. 90
928, 622. 50
3,650
875, 572.50
12,190
14,010. 00
144, 570 5,485,205.05
17, 240
1,630
40,600
1,000
55, 500
10, 700
660

371, 845.10
101, 784. 50
736, 950. 00
108, 269. 50
323, 808.30
679, 997. 70
198, 992.60

States.

Colorado
Nevada
California
San Francisco
Oregon
Division No. 7.
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
Utah
Washington
"Wyoming

127, 330 2, 521,647.70

Division No. 8.

177, 987, 816.64 7, 298, 298 3, 255, 891. 69 7,051, 931 9,070,000 81,088,790 70,222,905.95

Total of U . S . . .

2, 939, 026.44




54
55
56
57
58
59

60
61
62
63
64
65
66

202

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF EARNINGS AND DIVIDENDS OF NATIONAL BANKS

States, Territories, and re- No. of lapital stock.
serve cities.
banks.

Maine
New Hampshire.
Vermont
Massachusetts ..
Boston
Rhode Island . . .
Connecticut

Surplus.

Capital and
surplus.

Gross earnings.

$854, 581.12
475, 970. 63
558, 620.16
3, 754, 239.54
3, 724, 944. 84
1,200,162.54
1, 727, 695.94

73
49
49
198
54
(51
S3

$10, 560, 000
6, 205, 000
7,116. 000
44, 790, 500
50, 950, 000
20, 340, 050
24, 444. 370

$2, 426,100. 48
1, 454,176. 55
1,597,760.13
14,232,518.45
12, 592, 0*6. 30
4, 278, 272. 41
6, 878, 905 17

$12, 986,100. 48
7, 659,176. 55
8, 713, 760.13
59,023,018.45
63, 542, 036. 30
24,618,322.41
31, 323, 275.17

207,865, 689.49 12, 296,214. 77

Division No. 1.

567

164,405, 920

43,459,769 49

New York
New York City .
Albany
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia....
Pittsburgh

270
47
6
81
237
43
23

34, 614. 760
49,150. 000
1,7,'0,000
13,108. 350
33, 3G0, 340
22, 758, 000
10,180, 000

10, 349, 680. 39
31, 019, 319.58
1, 246, 000.00
4, 650, 853.11
11, 910, 384.73
10,961,303.08
4, 705, 950. 50

Division No. 2.

707

164, 951, 450

74, 843, 500. 39

2, 083, 985

2, 806, 700
11,713,260
252, 000
1, 575, 000
3, 796,300
1, 961, 000

814, 000. 00
920,016.40
3, 543, 510. 62
60, 000. 00
408,500. 00
1, 488, 541.93
405,690. 78

2, 897, 985. 00
3,726,716.40
15, 256,770.62
312, 000. 00
2, 073, 500. 00
5, 284, 841. 93
2, 426, 690. 78

24, 188,245

7, 790, 259. 73

31,978,504.73

2, 426, 000
1, 698, 000
3,106,000
535, 000
3, 344, 000
1, 055, 000
500, 000
2, 925, 000
10, 082, 700
950,000
9, 708, 900
3,551,500
7, 485, 000

232, 368.31
3, 004,287. 26
292, 077. 37
2, 482, 000. 00
339,491.15
4,100, 353. 65
93, 976. 59
76, 000.00
• 611,000.00
401, 964.78
691,586.54
4,035, 586. 54
130,142. 43
190,213.12
1, 245, 213.12
69, 594. 75
60,280. 02
560, 280. 02
492,439.75
1, 346,000. 00 4, 271, 000. 00
2, 587, 724.14 12, 670,424.14 1, 512,125. 27
140, 062. 20
169, 300. 00
1,119, 300. 00
786,113.21.
2, 338, 000. 71 12, 046,900. 71
305,006.97
953,175. 36
4, 504,675.36
874, 264. 59
1, 535, 249. 88 9,020,249. 88

Delaware
Maryland
Baltimore
District of Columbia.
Washington
Virginia
West Virginia
Division No. 3.
North Carolina...
South Carolina...
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
New Orleans .
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Louisville
Tennessee
313

DivisiotuNo. 6




22, 902, 000
10,180,000
6, 700, 000
11, 844, 500
14, 291, 500
15, 050, 000
10, 722, 933
4, 000, 000
4, 550, 000
650, 000

650

100, 890, 933

127
57
34
4

Division No. 5.
Iowa
Minnesota
,
Missouri
Saint Louis
Kansas City..
Saint Joseph.
Kansas
Nebraska
Omaha

47,367,100

192
15
9
92
159
18
100
8
54
3

Division No. 4.
Ohio
Cincinnati .
Cleveland . .
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
Detroit
Wisconsin
Milwaukee.

10, 050, 000
13,490, 000
2, 431, 000
2, 700, 000
5,975,000
300, 000
10, 412,100
6, 065, 000
2, 400, 000

138
95

-•

473

53, 823,100

44, 964,449.39
80,169,319.58
2, 996, 000. 00
17, 759, 203.11
45, 300, 724.73
33, 719, 303.08
14, 885,950. 50

3, 884, 020. 88
8, 905,914. 75
312, 848. 86
1,576,169.07
3, 231, 967. 26
2, 412,147. 76
1, 085,687. 28

239, 794, 950. 39 21,408, 755. 86
201, 731. 86
286, 441. 51
879, 620. 17
26, 478.42
193, 005. 66
494, 936. 28
188, 251. 22
2, 270, 465.12

578, 287. 26
784, 000.00
994, 353. 65

12, 304,170. 68
5, 233, 670. 24
1, 880, 000.00
959, 000. 00
3, 560, 682.94
4, 749, 273.46
4, 727, 837. 65
2,353,461.46
487, 000. 00
1,248,850.81
390, 000. 00

59, 671, 270. 68 5, 669, 627.37
28,135,670.24
12,060, 000. 00
7, 659,000.00
15. 405,182. 94
19, 040, 773.46
19, 777, 837.65
13, 076, 394.46
4, 487,000. 00
5, 798, 850. 81
1,040,000.00

2, 262, 238. 41
882, 386. 52
505, 668.00
1,358,641.49
1, 728, 016. 95
2, 280, 906.60
1, 261, 330.13
509,142.14
631,250.78
146, 285. 60

25, 589, 776. 56 126,480, 709. 56 11, 565, 866.62
2,622,310.61
12, 672,310.61
2, 548, 262. 39 16, 038,262. 39
2, 980,523.49
549, 523.49
1, 040, 000. 00 3, 740,000. 00
512, 000.00
6, 487,000. 00
110,000.00
410, 000.00
1,686,436.83 12, 098, .36.83
990,439.54
7, 055,439.54
583, 500. 00
2, 983,500.00
10,642,472.86

64,465,572.86

1,168, 759.48
1,420, 090. 01
270, 051.49
403, 710. 75
659, 244. 77
73, 361. 81
1, 523,912.29
849,250.11
369, 379.87
6,737,760.58

REPORT OF THE

COMPTROLLER

OF THE CURRENCY.

203

IK THE UNITED STATES FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1887, TO MARCH 1, 1888.
Charged off.

Eatios.
Net earnings.

Losses and
premiums.

Dividends.

Expenses and

taxes.

Net earn- Dividends
ings to
to capital Dividends
and
capital and
to capital.
surplus.
surplus.
3.84
3.79
3.74
3.53
2.85
3.23
3.41

4.05
3.70
4.10
2.82
2.97
3.40
2.02

3.12
3.07
3.05
2.68
2.28
2.67
2.66

5,426,177.80

2.98

2.61

4.06
4. c;{
2. 80
5.1:2
4. 02
3.(18
5.05

3.08
2.64
3.18
3. 30
2.79
2.47
2.60

4.00
4.31
5.45
4.47
3.78
3.66
3.80

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

3.30

1, 385, 065.72
2,118,155.18
95, 355. 00
586, 234. 00
1,261,469.10
831,860.00
386, 750. 00

$147, 820. 77
65, 625. 42
52, 045. 42
795, 251. 22
486, 439. 82
139, 765. 87
671, 591. 21

$180,742.06
127, 212.75
149, 018. 22
1, 293, 739. 34
1, 352, 544. 95
222, 398. 07
424,424.43

$526, 018. 29
283,132.46
357, 556. 52
1, 665, 248. 98
1, 885, 960. 07
837, 998. 60
631, 680.30

$405, 300. 00
235, 050. 00
265, 805. 00
1, 579, 505. 90
1,450,234.40
657,164. 00
833,118. 50

2, 358, 539. 73

3, 750, 079. 82

6,187, 595.22

629, 058. 57
1, 545, 048. 62
95,141.54
156, 092.44
518,589.86
338, 360. 25
52, 540. 82

1,427,795.18
3, 846,178. 07
138, 955. 80
403, 030.55
894, 041. 62
833, 233. 50
281, 979.39

1,827,167.13
3, 714, 688. 06
83, 751. 52
927, 046. 08
1, 819, 355. 78
1, 240, 554. 01
751,167. 07

3, 334, 812.10

7, 710, 214.11

8
9
10
11
12
13
14

10, 363, 729. 65

6, 664, 889. 00

4. 32

2.78

4.04

17,900.73
32, 635. 65
151,130.88
7, 000. 00
15,177. 61
89, 276.41
46, 232. 68

59,182. 99
112,228.15
268, 238. 26
8,194. (JO
77, 610. 22
175,721.29
71,100. 35

124, 648.14
141, 577. 71
460, 251. 03
11,283.82
100,217.83
229, 938. 58
70,918.19

98,745.95
113,616.54
408, 308. 30
10, 080. 00
50, 875. 00
142, 692. 00
80, 280. 00

4.30
3.80
3. 02
3.62
4.83
4. 35
2. 92

3.41
3. 05
2.68
3.23
2.45
2.70
3.31

4.74 15
4.05 10
3.49 17
4.00 18
3.23 19
3.76 20
4.09 21

359, 353. 96

772, 275. 86

1,138, 835. 30

904, 597. 79

3. 56

2.83

3.74

20, 673. 64
15, 360. 07
13, 5i2. 59
3, 034. 21
70, 656.04
10,544.15
6, 230. 90
128,640.30
2«J9, 283. 94
10, 841. 92
85, 877.37
36, 950. 32
54, 086. 23

91,458.30
99, 261.15
149,114. 84
50,387. 27
137,192. 65
44, 073. 02
22, 973. 95
1!)9, 596. 40
487, 840.11
47,361.06
244,127. 30
119,411.16
264,443. 21

120, 236. 37
177,456.15
176, 853.72
40, 555.11
194,116.09
75, 525. 26
40, 389. 90
164, 203. 05
725,001.22
81, 859. 22
456, 108.54
148, 645.49
555, 735.15

91, 811.55
140,490.00
119,140.00
21,000.00
111,000.00
43, 000. 00
8,000. 00
124,750.00
579, 450. 00
46,000.00
350, 345.00
130,560.00
309, 550. 00

4.00
7.15
4.31
6.64
4.81
6. 07
7.21
3. 84
5.72
7.31
3.79
3.30
6.16

3.06
5.66
2.90
3.44
2.75
3.45
1.43
2.92
4. 57
4.11
2.91
2.90
3.43

3.78
8.27
3. 83
3.93
3. 32
4.08
1.60
4.26
5.75
4.84
3.01
3.68
4.14

755, 701. 68

1, 957, 240.42

2, 956, 685. 27

2, 075, 066.55

4.95

3.48

774, 753.12
388, 866. 84
182, 037. 66
463, 455.4(3
552, 797.17
751, 325.17
393, 471.73
230, 616. 43
220, 757. 97
71, 770. fi5

1, 085, 819.26
285, 554. 64
262,423.21
694, 206.87
957, 010. 65
1, 344, 647. 65
764,288 09
221,831.46
362, 785. 75
37, 918. 44

886,116.80
332, 500. 00
177, 000. 00
467, 990. 00
693, 369.66
623, 000. 00
604, 321.70
154, 000.00
221,250.98
42, 000. 00

3.86
2.37
3.43
4.50
5.03
6.80
5.84
4.94
6.26
3.65

3.15
2.76
2.31
3.04
3.64
3.15
4.62
3.43
3. 82
4.04

3.87
3.27
2.64
3. 95
4.85
4.14
5.64
3.85
4.86
6.46

1, 519, 528.40

4, 029, 852. 20

6, 016,486. 02

4, 201, 549.14

4.76

3.32

4.16

110,173.45
172,083.01
9, 303.40
105,199. 56
79, 602.88
35, 740. 26
76. 819.64
57,156. 29
77, 312.67

461, 675. 29
371,343.24
114, 572. 08
207, 200.07
239, 940.21
21, 560.11
582, 379.01
323,056.18
180, 688. 20

596, 910. 74
876, 663.76
146,176. 01
91,311.12
339, 701.68
10, 061. 44
864, 713. 64
469, 037. 61
111, 379. 00

565, 391. 88
560, 625. 00
117,476.35
80, 000. 00
234, 000. 00
10, 000. 00
604, 737. 37
342, 846. 30
75, 000. 00

4.71
5.47
4.90
2.41
5.24
3.92
7.15
6.07
3.73

4.46
3.50
3.94
2.14
3.61
2.43
5.00
4.86
2.51

5. 03
4.16
4. 83
2.96
3.92
3.33
5.81
5.65
3.13

723, 391.16

2, 502,414.39

3, 511; 955.03

2, 590, 076. 90

5.45

4.02

4.81

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
?A)
31
32
33
34

4.38

401, 666.03
207, 965. 04
61, 207.13
200, 979.16
218, 209.13
184,933.78
103,570.31
56, 694.25
47, 707.06
36, 596. 51

90




35
36
37
33
39
40
41
42
43
44

45
4b
47
48
49
50
51
52
53

204

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF EARNINGS AND DIVIDENDS OF NATIONAL BANKS IN

States, Territories, and re- No. of Capital stock.
banks.
serve cities.

Surplus.

Capital and
surplus.

54
55
50
57
58

Colorado
Nevada
California
San Francisco
Oregon

59
60
Gl
62
63
61
65
fifi

Arizona
Dakota

United States




..

31
2
28
3
23

$2,785,000
150,000
3,805,000
2. 700,000
1,815,000

$982,000.00
60, 000. 00
848, 548. 67
266,871. 44
241, 550. 00

$3,767, 000.00
210, 600.00
4, 653, 548.67
2,966,871.44
2,056, 550.00

$1,122,076.48
33,910.87
714,672.68
209,831.69
317, 778. 68

87

,...

Division No. 7

Montana
New Mexico
Utah
Washington
AVyoming -Division No. 8

Gross earnings.

11,255,000

2,398,970.11

13,653,970.11

2, 398, 270. 40

1
62
6
17
9
7
19
8

100, 000
3, 725,000
350, 000
1,975, 000
850, 000
850, 000
1,330, 000
1,075,000

5, 000.00
751,94iJ.O3
58,000.00
501,250.00
176, 910.60
382, 278. 00
269,816. 53
223,030. 78

105, 000. 00
4, 476, 942.03
408, 000.00
2, 476,250. 00
1,026,910.60
1, 232, 278. 00
1, 599, 816.53
1, 298,030.78

18, 903.13
543,151.82
61, 366.13
388, 815.25
122, 041.66
129,442. 85
284, 839.10
126, 744.41

129

10,255,000

2,368,227.94

12,623,227. 94

1,675,304 35

3,044

577,136,748

179,397,147.76

756,533,895.76

64,022,265.07

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

205

THE UNITED STATES FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1887, TO MARCH 1, 1888—Continued.
Charged off.
Losses and Expenses and
taxes.
premiums.

Ratios.
Net earnings.

Dividends.

Net earnings to
capital and
surplus.

Dividends
to capital jDividends
to capital.
and
surplus.

$112,835.67
920. 31
62,616.35
12, 587.82
9, 799.13

$280,148.16
11,892.93
200,553.26
50, 543.77
93,127. 31

$729,092.65
21, 097.63
451,503.07
146, 700.10
214,852.24

$284,900.00
6,000.00
154,500.00
52, 500.00
315, 500.00

198,759.28

636,265.43

1, 563, 245.69

813,400.00

11.38

5.96

7.23

625. 00
62,299.06
3,074.46
46,645.23
29,791.34
17, 634.67
4,713.42
28, 307.39

4,468.83
209,065.20
26, 542.56
138,017.66
56,812. 36
46,136.84
72,914.96
65,492.63

'13,809.30
271, 787.56
31,749.11
204,152.36
35,437.96
65, 671.34
207,210.72
32, 944.39

6,000.00
149,600.00
17,000.00
83, 500.00
32, 500.00
46, 000.00
56,750.00
21,500.00

13.15
6.07
7.78
8.24
3.45
5.33
12.95
2.00

5.71
3.34
4.16
3.37
3.16
3.73
3.55
1.66

6.00
4.02
4.86
4.23
3.82
5.41
4.27
2.54

19.35
• 10.05
9.70
4.94
10.45

7.56
2 86
3.32
1.77
15.34

10.23
4.00
4.06
1.94
17.38

193,090.57

619,451.04

862,762.74

412,850.00

6.82

3.27

4.03

9,443,176.88

21,977,793.27

32,601,294.92

23,088,607.18

4.31

3.05

4.00




54
55
56
57
58

59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66

206

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF EARNINGS AND DIVIDENDS OF NATIONAL BANKS

No. of
States, Territories, and re- bauks. Capital stock.
serve cities.

Maine
Is ew Hampshire.
Vermont
Massachusetts ..
Boston
Rhode Island
Connecticut

Surplus.

Capital and
surplus.

Gross earnings.

75
49
49
198
54
60
83

$10,710,000
6,205,000
7,566,000
44,790,500
50,950,000
20,284,050
24,144, 270

$2,459, 848. 80 $13,169,848.80
1,471,914.46
7,676,914. 46
1,689,976.41
9, 255, 976.41
14,229,541). 98 59, 020, 040.98
13,134, 514. 60 64, 084, 514. 60
4, H27, 768.26 24, 611, 818. 26
6, 883,854. 39 31, 028,124. 39

Division No. 1.

568

164, 649, 820

44,197, 417.90

New York
New York City..
Albany
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia.
Pittsburgh

272
46
6
83
246
43
24

35,079,760
49,100, 000
1,750,000
13,190, 530
33, 715,340
22,758, 000
10,180, 000

10,715,1)46.26
31,661,303.26
1, 249, 000. 00
5, 086, 931.73
12,291,033.16
10, 990, 803. 08
4, 929, 935. 06

720

165,779,630

76,931,012.55

2,083, 985
2,816,700
11, 713, 2G0
252, 000
1, 575,000
3,796, 300
1,961, 000

8:U,300.00
971, 857. 33
3, 672,588.47
60, 000. 00
532, 000.00
1,514,193.44
465, 555.27

2,915, 285. 00
3,788,557.33
15, 38.5, 848.47
312,000.00
2,107, 000. 00
5,310,493.44
2,426, 555.27

201, 354.63
348, 051.57
1,014,569.47
24,115.38
246, 697.99
440, 216. 62
166, 271. 02

24,198,245

8, 047, 494. 51

32, 245, 739. 51

2, 441, 276. 68

2,226, 000
1,773, 000
3,236, 000
700, 000
3,344, 000
1,055, 000
500, 000
"2, 925, 000
10,970.700
950, 000
10,134, 300
3,551, 500
7,680, 000

565, 632.95
787, 800. 00
1, 035,460. 30
89, 820. 00
674,430.38
239,289.59
84,213.06
1, 424, 000. 00
2, 743,342.43
191,000.00
2,458,127.24
958, 514. 96
1, 613,154. 88

2, 791,632.95
2, 560, 800. 00
4, 271,460.30
789, 820. 00
4,018,4IJ0. 38
1, 294, 289. 59
584, 213.06
4, 349,000. 00
13,714,042.43
1,141,000.00
12, 592,427.24
4,510, 014,96
9, 293,154.88

254,161.48
295,000.75
393, 670.44
121, 014.39
376, 051.73
177,952. 05
81, 256. 39
515,424.10
1, 399,952.07
157,644. 54
825, 208.28
300, 385. 33
831, 662.17

Division No. 2 .
Delaware
Maryland
Baltimore
District of Columbia.
Washington
Virginia
,
West Virginia
Division No. 3.

119

North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia . . «
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
New Orleans
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Louisville
Tennessee
Division No. 4 .
Ohio
Cincinnati .
Cleveland..
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
Detroit
Wisconsin
Milwaukee Division No. 5.
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Saint Louis...
Kansas City..
Saint Joseph.
Kansas
Nebraska
Omaha
Division No. 6.




208, 847, 237. 90 12,515,970.42
45, 795, 706. 26
80, 761, 363. 26
2, 999, 000. 00
18, 283, 461. 73
46,006, 373.16
33, 754, 803.08
15,109, 935. 06

4, 088, 894. 01
8, 783, 965. 69
280, 683.13
1,648,885.92
3, 332, 941. 53
2, 349, 656. 50
1,106, 771.45

242,710, 642. 55 21,591, 798. 23

61, 910,285. 79 "57735, 383. 72

323

49,045,500

12, 864,785.79

"194
14
9
93
162
18
100
8
54
3

23,999, 750
9,180,000
6,650, 000
11,834, 500
14,574,000
15,(50,000
10,874, 600
4, 000, 000
4, 550, 000
650, 000

5, 467, 840. 66
1, 700, 500. 00
1, 000, 000.00
3, 596,277.79
4, 576,616. 88
5, 305, 626. 43
2, 457,498.09
500,000.00
1,317,217.80
370, 000. 00

29,467, 590.66
10, 880, 500. 00
7, 650, 000. 00
15,430,777.79
19,150, 616.88
20-, 355, 626.43
13,332,098.09
4, 500, 000. 00
5, 867, 217. 80
1, 020, 000.00

2, 409, 389, 99
1,172,903. 80
640, 999.97
1,368,996.01
1,808,871.62
2, 279,170.70
1,157,216.86
4'ol, 801.70
595, 421.75
162,276. 87

655

101,362, 850

26,291, 577.65

127,654,427.65

12, 057, 049.27

128
56
34
4
8
2
151
95

10,100, 000
12,420,000
2,431,000
3,200, 000
6,050,000
300, 000
12,062,100
6,035, 000
2,500, 000

2, 696, 719.12
2, 535,462. 39
549,130.76
640, 000. 00
585, 000. 00
110,000.00
1, 833,686. 56
1,074,146.28
658, 600. 00

12, 796, 719.12
14, 955, 462.39
2, 980,130.76
3,840,000.00
6, 635, 000. 00
410,000. 00
13, 895,786. 56
7,109,146.28
3,158,600.00

1, 229, 513. 38
1,407,018.95
259, 916.63
351, 628.67
664, 569. 60
76,590.41
1, 555,103.58
907, 012. 90
379,572.42

486

55, 098,100

10 682,745.11

65, 780, 845.11

6, 830, 926.55

2,085, 000
250, 000
4,915,000
2, 700,000
2,090, 000

1,126, 990. 42
90, 000. 00
994, 828. 74
310,000.00
313, 450. 00

4,111,990.42
340, 000.00
5, 909, 828.74
3, 010, 000. 00
2,403, 450. 00

820,482. 54
54, 535. 06
883, 740. 26
216,964.99
394, 323.18

12,940,000

2, 835, 269.16

15, 775,269.16

2, 370, 046.03

Colorado
Nevada
California
San Francisco.
Oregon
Division No. 7.

$827, 523. 50
470,785. 70
530, 094. 72
3, 608,444. 83
4, 061, 494. 84
1, 234,266. 96
1,783,359.87

93

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

207

IN THE UNITED STATES FROM MARCH 1,1888, TO SEPTEMBER 1, 1888.
Charged off.

Ratios.

Losses and Expenses and
premiums.
taxes.

Net earn- Dividends
ings to cap- to capital Dividends
ital and
and sur- to capital.
surplus.
plus.

Net earnings.

Dividends.

$176, 690. 39
40, 037. 61
27,658.19
714, 360. 23
431,676.05
166, 889. 44
• 425, 509. 18

$180,930.49
120, 925.42
161, 467. 24
1,116, 265. 93
1, 513, 256. 30
235, 784.49
465, 279. 02

$469, 902. 62
309, 822. 67
340, 969. 29
1, 777, 818. 67
2,116, 562. 49
831, 593. 03
892, 571. 67

$405, 800. 00
240,050. 00
260, 305. 00
1, 495, 225. 00
1, 459, 250. 00
657,127. 25
831, 824. 60

3.57
4.04
3.68
3.01
3.30
3.38
2.92

3.08
3.13
2.81
2.53
2.28
2.67
2.68

1,982,821.09

3, 793, 908. 89

6, 739, 240. 44

5, 349, 581. 85

3.23

2.56

3.25

670, 873. 28
1,310,166.21
48, 737.92
277, 295. 86
473, 223. 48
354, 323. 58
94,126. 91

1, 542, 924.83
3, 250, 710. 59
153, 039. 25
409, 688. 23
1,121,425.32
916,734.0L
394,198. 87

1, 875,095. 90 ~ 1 ^ 4 3 2 J 5 4 . 2 3
4, 223, 088. 89
2, 238, 875. 00
78, 305. 96
88, 000. 00
587, 734. 00
901, 901,83
1, 738, 292. 73
1, 312, 369.10
1, 078, 598.91
810,509.68
388,750.00
618, 445. 67

4.09
5.23
2.61
4.93
3.78
3.20
4.09

3.13
2.77
2.93
3.21
2.85
2.40
2.57

4.08 8
4.56 9
5.03 10
4.45 11
3.89 12
3.56 13
3.82 14

3, 228, 747. 24

7, 849, 321.10

6, 858, 392. 01

4.33

2.83

4.14

11,410. 94
28,119. 00
129, 574. 80
3,173. 30
6.">, 025.10
68, 647. 79
22, 538. 24

56,401.27
110, 519. 60
310, 097. 68
10,241.55
79, 697.62
181,486.11
55, 319.47

133, 542. 42
209, 412. 97
574, 896. 99
10, 700. 53
101, 975. 27
190, 082. 72
88,413.31

98,445.95
117,918.00
429,110.87
10, 080. 00
50, 875. 00
144, 022.00
62, 230.00

4.58
5.53
3.74
3.43
4.84
3.58
3.64

3.41
3.11
2.79
3.23
2.41
2.71
2.56

4.72
4.19
3.66
4.00
3.23
3.79
3.17

328, 489.17

803,763. 30

1, 309, 024. 21

912,681.82

4.06

2.83

3.77

31,589.05
49, 547. 01
19,013. 58
3, 527. 58
65, 612. 22
9, 352.26
17, 912.19
268, 291. 82
165,122.46
18, 627.17
104,363.75
83, 490. 37
55, 073. 38

78, 784. 99
103,435.04
139, 539.33
65, 208.25
145, 027.16
56, 647. 67
22, 685. 23
187,118.08
510,188. 23
53, 305. 31
244,364.17
109,456. 82
301,335.43

143, 787. 44
142,018.70
235,117.53
52, 278. 56
165,412. 35
111,952.12
40, 658. 97
60, 014. 20
724, 641.38
85,712. 06
476, 480. 36
113,438.14
475, 253. 36

69, 500. 00
80,120.00
118,360.00
27, 000. C
O
114,500.00
38,000.00
10, 000. 00
108, 750. 00
557, 950.00
37, 500.00
410,595.00
130, 560. 00
280, 850. 00

5.15
5.55
5. 50
6.63
4.12
8.65
6.96
1.38
5 28
8.39
3.78
2.52
5.11

2.49
3.13
2.77
3.42
2.85
2.94
1.71
2.50
4.07
3.29
3.26
2.89
3.02

3.T2
4.52
3.66
3.86
3.42
3.60
2.00
3.72
5.09
3.95
4.05
3.68
3.66

10,513,729.89

3.79
3.87
3.44
3.34
2.86
3.24
3.45

891,522.84

2, 017, 095. 71

2, 826, 765.17

1,983,685.00

4.57

3.20

824, 998. 93
558,138. 73
218, 903.08
492, 357.73
689,405.73
938,409. 54
359, 701.89
231, 321. 53
218,592.40
71,551.05

1, 243, 409.14
397, 621.17
338,161.39
562,191.12
842,406. 03
1,140, 559.16
659,569.48
211,027.50
353, 288.00
87,643.12

877, 230.99
310,000.00
182, 000. 00
490, 537. 38
756. 330.00
553, 000. 00
481,074.00
158,000.00
264,075. 00
132,000.00

4.22
3.65
4.42
3.65
4.40
5.60
4.95
4.69
7.26
8.59

2.98
2.85
2.38
3.18
3.95
2.71
3.61
3.51
5 43
12.94

3.66
3.38
2.74
4.14
5.19
3.67
4.42
3.95
5.80
20.31

1, 617,682. 55

4, 603,430.61

5, 835, 936.11

4, 204, 247.37

4.57

3.29

621,315.26
585, 792.19,
127,155.19
171, 729. 83
346,117.52
2, 455. 86
839. 205. 32
461,559.67
94, 004. 43

455, 200.00
515, 950.00
101,706.06
606, 000. 00
254, 000. 00
10,000.00
563,176. 00
330, 755.60
85, 000. 00

4.86
3.92
4.27
4.47
5.22
6.04
6.49
2.98

3.56
3.45
3.41
15.78
3.83
2.44
4.U5
4.65
2.69

4.51
4.15
4.18
18.94
4.20
3.33
4.67
5.48
3.40

683, 822.15

2, 897, 769.20

3, 249, 335.20

2, 921, 787.66

4.94

4.44

5.30

104,401. 66
383. 62
64, 382. 59
10,179. 72
11, 703. 20

314,536.49
9, 780. 77
262,472. 69
56, 610. 94
107, 271.51

401,544.39
44, 370. 67
556, 884.98
150,174.33
275, 348.47

276, 800. 00
12,000.00
366, 750. 00
52, 500. 00
84,100. 00

9.77
13.05
9.42
4.99
11.46

6.73
3.53
6.21
1.74
3.50

9.?7
4.80
7.46
1.94
4.02

191, 050. 79

750, 672. 40

1,428, 322. 84

792,, 150.00

9.05

5.02

6.12

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34

4.15

471, 627.14
601, 071.97
107,946.00
166,172. 68
286, 490.98
23,143.92
611, 529.13
415, 227.27
214, 560.11

15
16
17
18
19
20
21

4.04

340,921.92
217. 093. 90
83, 935. 50
314,447.16
277, 059.86
200, 202.00
137,945.49
19,452.67
23,541.35
3, 082. 70

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

136, 570.98
220,154.86
24,815.45
13,726.16
31, 961.10 »
50, 990.63
104,369.13
30, 225. 96
71, 007.88




.60

35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

45
4C
47
48
49
50
51
52
53

54
55
56
57
58

208

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF EARNINGS AND DIVIDENDS OF NATIONAL BANKS IN

States, Territories, and re- No. of Capital stock.
serve cities.
banks.

Arizona
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico .
Utah
Washington..
Wyoming
Division No. 8.
United States




$100,000
3, 575, 000
350, 000
1, 975, 000
830, 000
850, 000
1,690,000 i
1, 075, 000 j

Surplus.

Capital and
surplus.

$9, 000. 00
804, 062. 32
85,000.00 !
506, 000. CO i
185, 225. 93 '
417,150.00
322, 750. 00
237, 500.00

$109, COO. 00
4, 379, 062. 32
435, 000. 00
2,481,000.00
1, 035, 225. 93
1,267,150.00
2, 012, 750. 00
1,312,500.00

Gross earnings.

$15,105. 32
488, 463. 88
50, 300. 39
361, 014. 77
100, 361.75
139, 719. 53
326, 687. 44
95, 582. 25

129

10,405, 000

2, 566, 688. 25

13,031,688.25

1, 583, 235. 33

3,093

583,539,145

184,416,990. 92

767, 956,135. 92

657l25,686.23

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

209

THE UNITED STATES PROM MARCH 1, 1888, TO SEPTEMBER 1, 188S-—Continued.
Eatios.

Charged off.
Losses and Expenses and
premiums.
taxes.
$4, 792.40
225,480.48
19, 955.70
128,124.24
44, 020. 55
37, 853.94
100, 625. 60
46, 257. 09

$43, 553. 75
4,561.75
44, 590, 37
11, 028, 75
1, 875. 5,5
11, 855. 43
1, 820.90

Net earnings.

$10, 312. 92
219,429.65
25,782. 94
188,300.16
51,312.45
99, 990.06
214,206.41
47, 503.36

Dividends.

$6, 000. 00
143, 000, 00
27, 000. 00
65, 400. 00
37, 000. 00
43, 000. 00
87, 625. 00
11, 500. 00

Net earnings to cap- Dividends Dividends
to capital to capital.
ital and
surplus. and surplus •
9.46
5.01
5. 93
7.59
4. 96
7.89
10.64
3.62

5. 50
3.27
6.21
2.64
3. 57
3.39
4.35
.88

6.00
4.00
7.71
3,31
4.35
5.06
5.18
1.07

119,286.48

607,110. 90

856, 837. 95

420, 525. 00

6.58

2.96

3. 68

9,043,422.31

23,323,072.11

32,759,191.81

23,443,050.71

4.26

3.05

4.02

11028

OUR 88




14

59
60
61
62
63
64
65
60

210

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

EARNINGS AND DIVIDENDS OP THE NATIONAL BANKS, ARRANGED BY GEOGRAPHICAL
DIVISIONS, FOR SEMI-ANNUAL PERIODS FROM SEPTEMBER 1,. 1879, TO SEPTEMBER

1, 1888.
Eatios.
Geographical divisions.

No.
of
oanks

Capital.

Surplus.

Dividends. Net earnings.

It Hi |m
8S
5 « S
o
q

A

Pr.ct. Pr. ct. Pr. ct.

Sept., 1879, to March, 1880:
New England States...
Middle States
Southern States
Western States
Total

546 $164,820,020 $37,869, 312
640
175
685
2,046

March, 1880, to Sept., 1880:
Now England States...
Middle States
Southern States
Western States
Total

548
654
176
694
2,072

Sept., 1880, to March, 1831:
New England States...
Middle States
Southern States
Western States
Total
March, 1881, to Sept., 1881:
New England States...
Middle States
Southern States
Wes tern States
Total
Sept., 1881, to March, 1882:
New England States..
Middle States
Southern States
Western States
Total
March, 1882, to Sept., 1882:
New England States..
Middle States
Southern States
Western States
Total
Sept., 1882, to March, 1883:
New England States...
Middle States
Southern States
Western States
Total
March, 1883, to Sept., 1883:
New England States...
Middle States
Southern States
Western States
Total
Sopt., 1883, to March, 1884.:
New England States...
Middle States
Southern States
Western States
Total




550
657
178
702
2,087
550
660
181
709
2,100
553
666
188
730
2,137
555
678
194
770
2,197
557
687
207
816
2,267
562
698
224
875
2,350
565
715
248
963
2,491

51, 306,583
5, 210,198
22,840,408

$5,409, 351 $5, 610, 287
7,151,166 9, 220, 826
1, 240, 470 1, 278, 695
4, 314,286 5, 042, 976

3.3
4.2
4.1
4.8

2.7
3.2
3.5
3.8

2.8
4.2
3.6
4.5

454,080, 090 117, 226, 501

18,121, 273 21,152. 784

4.0

3.2

3.7

7, 413, 622
9, 805,448
1,434,102
5, 380, 078

3.5
4.2
3.7
4.7

2.9
3.2
3.2
3.7

3.6
4.1
4.0
4.8

18, 290, 200 24, 033, 250

4.0

3.2

4.2

6,757, 787
9,162, 771
1, 905, 690
6, 625, 773

3.6
4.1
4.2
5.3

2.9
3.1
3.5
4.2

3.3
4.1
5.2
5.8

18,877,517 24,452, 021

4.1

3.3

4.2

39,878, 448
55, 747, 501
6, 530,694
25, 081, 751

6,005,608 8,166, 022
7,558,407 11,925, 784
1,282,120 2, 300, 624
4, 653, 833 6, 778,112

3.6
4.4
4.1
5.1

2.9
3.3
3.4
3.9

4.0
5.3
6.1
5.8

458, 934,485 127, 238, 394

19,499, 968 29,170, 542

4.3 | 3.3

5.0

169,399,170
30,432, 700
89,428,200

165,380,242
169, 343,870
30, 423, 700
89,067, 250

38, 450,297
52, 762, 674
5, 516, 335
23,416, 343

454,215,062 120,145, 649
165,623,120
170, 739, 045
30,4.48,70i>
90,034,000

38, 944,841
53, 536, 248
5, 898,107
24-, 102, 592

456,844,865 122,481,788
165,373,120
171, 560,315
30, 973,950
91, 027,100

162, 650,870
171, 488, 315
31, 672, 700
94, 542, 600

5, 858, 434
7,120, 204
1,139, 203
4,172, 359

5,900, 861
6,974, 934
1,264,398
4, 737, 324

40, 703, 776
57, 470, 278
6, 928, 882
26,188, 953

5, 952, 275 7,123,339
7, 367, 409 10, 210, 373
1, 333, 715 1, 981, 226
5, 261, 976 7, 768, 661

3.7
4.3
4.2
5,6

2.9
3.2
3.5
4.3

3.5
4.5
5.1
6.4

460, 354,485 131, 291, 889

19, 915, 375 27, 083, 599

4.3

3.4

4.6

6, 732, 530
9, 704, 251
2, 062, 960
7, 737, 893

3.5
4,1
4.0
6,5

2.8
3.1
3.2
5.1

3.3
4.2
5.2
6.0

473,947, 715 133, 570, 931 | 20, 896, 553 26, 237, 635

4.4

3.4

4.3

165,653,070
174, 375, 472
33, 963, 000
109, 099, 800

6, 200, 443
9, 900, 021
2, 198, 993
8,133,477

3.5
4.3
4.1
5.1

2.8
3.2
3,3
4.1

3.0
4.2
5.2
6.0

20,285,102 2G, 432, 934

4.2

3.3

4.2

6, 651, 595
9, 960, 685
2,433, 336
8, 528, 648

3.5
4.3
4.0
4.7

2.8
3.2
3.2
3.8

3.2
4.2:
5.4
5.9-

20, 393, 576 27, 574, 214

4.1

3.2

4.3

6,095,915
9, 529, 978
2, 950, 096
9, 418, 775

3.4
4.4
4.4
4.7

2.7
3.2
3.5
3.9

2.9
4.0
6.1
6.0

21,082,806 27,994,764

4.1

3.2

4.3-

165, 515, 870
173,270,315
32, 212, 700
102,948, 830

41,033,206
58, 491, 696
7, 503, 078
26, 542, 8G2

41, 341,246
62,118, 694
8, 228, 309
25, 881, 856

483,091,342 137, 570,105
166, 793, 070
173,915,465
35,685, 300
118, 246,305

41,727,679
63,453, 454
9, 084,011
26,967, 043

494, 640,140 141,232,187
167,478, 070
175,317,315
38, 214, 310
126,959,605

41,863,161
64, 841,178
9, 854, 923
29,041,587

507, 969, 300 145, 600, 849

5, 729,842
7,194, 528
1, 289, 362
6, 662, 821

5,
7,
1,
5,

819, 093
542,146
405,019
518, 844

5, 861,182
7, 556, 795
1, 415, 529
5, 560, 070

5, 726,356
7, 639,670
1, 700,113
6, 016, 667

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

211

EARNINGS AND DIVIDENDS OF THE NATIONAL BANKS, ETC.—Continued.

Ratios.
Geographical divisions.

No.
of
banks

Capital.

Surplus.

Dividends.

N e t earnings.

o

11111g-S.fr
ft

go.

^3 a a

Fr. ct. Pr.cl Pr. ct
March, 1884, to Sept., 1884 :
2.7
New England States... 568 $167, 600, 370 $41, 905, 905 $5, 551, 603 $5, 738, 456 3.3 2.6
7, 089, 673 8,198, 912
3.4
4.0 2.9
723 175, 767, 355 64, 580, 406
Middle States
40, 638, 300 10, 726, 209
1, 691, 520 2, 747, 018
4.2 3.3
5.3
264
Southern States
5, 838, 871 7, 683, 633
4.3 3.5
1,027 134, 599, 700 30, 508, 955
4.7
Western States
Total

2, 582

Sept.,T 1884, to March, 1885:
iS ew England States... 567
Middle States
732
Southei n States
278
Western States
3,073
Totnl

2, 650

518, 605, 725 147,721,475

20.171,667 24, 368, 019

3.9

3.0

3.7

41,413 826
64,741,009
11, 527, 942
31, 0*8, 344

5,661,537 4,388,812
7,156, 680 7,474, 752
1, 790, 726 2, 426, 858
5, 828, 707 7, 310, 780

3.4
4.1
4.2
4.2

2.7
3.0
3.3
3.4.

2.1
3.1
4.5
4.3

3.9

3.0

3.2

4, 725, 395
7, 297,159
2, 282, 782
7, 718, 959

3.3
4.0
3.8
45

2.6
2.9
3.0
3.6

2,3
3.1
4.2
4.5

20, 218, 471 22, 024, 205

3.9

3.0

3.3

5, 925, 381
9, 484, 324
2,705,274
9, 412, 687

3.2
4.0
4.4
4.6

2.6
2.9
3.4
3.8

2.8
3.9
4.7
5.2

530, 956,195 |l53, 532, 919 21,335,436 27, 527, 666

4.0

3.1

4.0

6, 736,479
9,'. 89,135
2, 553, 055
8, 834, 050

3.2
4.2
4.3
4.2

2.5
3.0
3.4
3.5

3 2
4.0
4.0
4.7

27, 912, 719

3.9

3.0

4.0

41,897,072
73, 445, 033
12, 463, 050
35, 926, 745

5, 318, 480 6,176, 707
7, 574, 627 12,072,419
'.', '43.870 2, 646, 393
7, 111, 610 10, 803, 275

3.2
4.:;
4.6
4.4

2.6
3.0
3.6
3.6

3.0
4.8
4.5
5.5

548, 355, 770 163, 731, 900

22.148, 587 31,698.794

4.0

3.1

4.5

43,118, 790
76, 574,179
13,247, 285
38, 314.199

5, 355, 787 7, 224, 781
7, 357, 400 1, 360, 893
2,137,328 3,268,973
7,153, 305 10, 953, 427

3.2
4.2
4.1
4.3

2.6
2.9
3.3
3.5

3.5
4.5
50
5.4

558, 544, 541 171, 254, 553

22, 003, 820 32, 808, 074

3.9

3.0

4.5

43,459, 769
80, 679, 527
14, 258, 403
40, 999, 447

5, 426,178 6,187, 595
7, 346, 515 11, 201, 708
2, 298, 039 3, 257, 542
8, 017, 876 11, 954,449

3.3
4.0
4.3
4.5

2.6
2.8
3.4
3.7

3.0
4.2
4.8
5. 5

577,136, 748 179, 397,147

23, 088, 607 32, 601, 294

4.0

3.0

4.3

3.2
4.1
4.0
4.6

2.6
2.8
3.1
3.8

3.2
4.3
4.4
5.1

167, 400, 370
173,212,145
42, 648, 400
139, 638, 800

522, 899, 715 148, 771,121

March. 1885, to Sept., 1885:
Kew .England States . . . 562 165, 668, 370
Middle States
731 172,907,352
Southern Stares
43, 500, 300
287
Western States
1, 085 142, 523, 580
Total

2, 665

Sept., 18S5, to March, 1886:
New England States... 559
Middle States
738
Southern States
294
Western States
1,117
Total

2,708

40,786,007
64, 247, 888
lx, 505, 477
30, 364,123

524, 599, 602 .146, 903, 495
165, 203, 920
172, 435, 295
44,437,400
148,879, 580

41,128,387
67, 583, 309
12,053, 524
32, 767, 699

20, 437, 650 21,601,202
5, 391,401
6, 953, 332
1, 655, 261
6,218,477

5, 375, 226
7, 044, 535
1,969,190
6, 946,485

March, 1886, to Sept., 1886:
New England States... 563 165,352, 320 41,581,845
5, 338, 635
Middle States
7, 328, 798
744 173, 628, 875 70, 044, 187
Southern Slates
45, 444, 000 11, 967, £21
1, 994, 537
:j03
Western States
6, 485,172
1,174 153,138, 453 33, 470, '.'25
Total
2,784 537, 563, 648 157, 064, 778 21,147,142
Sept., 1886, to March, 1887:
New England States . r 563 165, 252, 370
Middle States
754 175, 873, 735
Southern States
46, 213, 240
313
Western States
1, 225 161, 016, 425
Total

2,885

March, 1887, to Sept., 1887 :
New England States... 566
Middle States
764
Southern States
343
Western States
1,269
Total

2,942

Sept., 1887, to March, 1888:
New England States... 567
Middle States
780
Southern States
358
Western States
1,339
Total

3,044

164.
176,
51,
165,

837,
635,
515,
556,

370
656
315
200

164, 405, 920
183, 382, 395
53,124,400
176, 224, 033

March, 1888, to Sept., 1888 :
New England States... 568 164, 649, 820 44,197, 418
Middle States
793 184, 220, 575 82, 998, 759
Southern States
369
54, 802, 800 14, 844, 534
Western States
1, 363 179, 865,950 42, 376, 280
Total

5, 349,
7, 564,
2,189,
8, 338,

582
8'22
937
710

6, 739, 240
11, 544, 258
3,105, ' 6 1
1, 370, 432

583, 529,145 184, 416,991

23, 443, 051 32,759,192

4.0

3.0

4.3

General average . . . 2, 506 1 508,126, 587 146, 064, 037

20, 634, 934 27, 079, 611

4.1

3.0

4.1




3,093

212

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

TABLE, B Y STATES AND R E S E R V E

CITIES, OF THE RATIOS TO CAPITAL, AND TO
FROM M A R C H 1, 1884,

Eatio of dividends to capital for six months ending—

States, Territories, and
reserve cities.

i

!

1
*s
a,
©

1
2
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
24
25
26
°7
29
°1
nn
oo

34
*}**»

36
no

oq

40
41
49
43
\<\
46
47
48
49
50
*>•>

53
54

Ul

56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
61
65
66

P.ct. P.ct. P.ct. P.ct
Maine
. . . . . . 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.3
3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7
New Hampshire
3.9 3.8 3.6 3.2
Vermont
3.6 3.3 8.6 3.4
2.7
2.8 2.7
Boston
3.4 3! 3 3.3 3.2
Rhode Island
3.9 8.8 3.7 8.6
Connecticut - •
4,2 8.9 3.7 3.7
New York
New York City.. 4.* 4.3 4.5 4.3
6,& 4 2 6,?, 3.3
Albany
...
4.T 4.4 4 . 5 4.4
New Jersey
4.0 3.5 3.8 3.7
Pennsylvania
4.7 4.6 4.6 4.6
Philadelphia
3.8 3.7 3.8 3.7
Pittsburgh
4.6 4 8 4 8 4.9
Delaware
4,4 4.5 4.2 4.1
Maryland
3.7 8.8 3.8 3.7
Baltimore
District of Columbia. 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0
3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4
Washington
5.7 4.0 4.2 4.0
Virginia
4.1 3.7 3.9 3.7
West Virginia
3.9 3.3 4.5 3.7
North Carolina
4 3 4 0 4.3 4.3
South Carolina
3.5 3 ?, 3 7 3.6
Georgia
2.5 2.5 3.0 2.3
Florida
3.8 3.6 4.5 4.4
Alabama
7.4 9- 8 5.4 3.1
^Mississippi
4.0 4,0 4.0 4.0
Louisiana . . . . . .
6.6 3.6 4.1 3.9
New Orleans
Texas
5 0 5.7 5 5 3, 3
5.8 4.4 4.4 3.8
Arkansas
8.6 4 . 1 8 6 3.8
Kentucky
3.5 ;:. 8 3.3 3.5
Louisville
5.0 4.7 5 3 4.4
Tennessee
4.0 4.0 3 8 3,7
Ohio
3.3 3.2 3.1 3.3
Cincinnati.
3.8 4.1 ?, 3 2.S
Cleveland
4 . 1 3.9 3 7 4.6
Indiana
5 7 5.0 4 9 4,9
Illinois
3.7 4.7 4.9 4.3
Chicago
5,9 4.4 4 8 4.5
Michigan
4.2 4.2 4,6 4.7
Detroit
7 0 5.3 4.8 4.1
Wisconsin
4.9 6. 5 6.5 4.9
Milwaukee
4 9 4.4 4.5 5.0
Iowa
5 "?, 3.1 3.9 4.1
Minnesota
4.?, 4.1 3.5 8.7
Missouri
3.6 3.0 3.5 2.8
Saint Louis
Kansas City

1
P.ct.
4.8
3.6
3.5
3.4
2.5
3.1
36
3.8
4.3
4.3
4,4
3.7
4.5
3.6
44
4.6
3.7
4.0
3.4
4.9
3.9
4.3
4.0
38
1.5
3.9
7.3
4.0
3.7
5.9
4.9
3.7
3.6
5.1
3.7
3.5
3.2
4.3
5.0
4.6
4.7
4.7
6.1
8 0
4.6
4.3
4 8
8.8

7.4
59

8.8
4.9

3.9
4.9

5.6 5.2
5 3 5.8

7.0
Colorado
12.0
Nevada
7.9
California
San Francisco . . . 4.0
10.8
Oregon
7.0
Arizona
3.0
Dakota
22.5
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
'8.Y
5.2
Utah
1.6
Washington
Wyoming
22.5

10. 0
10.0
3.5
4,0
6.0
3.3
4.6

9.6
10.0
4.5
4.0
5.8

7.0 7.7
8.0 10,0
4.3 8.9
4.0 4.0
5.6 4.6

Kansas
Nebraska

Average




4.2

7*. 8
4.7
3.1
3.0
3.9

*4.*9
14.0
0.8 'i.Y
6.1 5.5
3 9 5.6
3.9 3.9
3.6 3.7
3.9

00*

1 1 4

1-1

iT

3

CO

Eatio of dividends to
capital and surplus
for six months ending—

3.8

i

4.0

PH

Ul

P.ct. P.ct.
3.5 3.8
3.7 3.7
3 4 3.5
3.4 3.4
2.7 2.7
3.2 3.2
3.6 3.7
3.8 4.2
4.5 4.6
6,6 3.8
4.5 4.7
5.C 3.7
4.1 4.0
3.6 3.8
4.4 4 3
4 3 47
3.6 3.7
4.0 4.0
3.7 3.1
3^2 3.7 3.7
3.7 3.9 3.5
3.8 3.9 3.0
7 31 4 3 3 8
3.3 3 7 5 7
1.4 4.6 4.9
4.8 4.3 3.8
3.3 5.6 ? 8
4.0 4 0 3,0
3.5 5.5 3.5
4,4 7 0 4,6
3.9 5.4 14.6
3 8 3 8 40
3.6 3,8 3.7
8 1 4.7 3 6
3.7 3 8 4.1
2.8 3.2 3.2
3.1 9, 9 3.6
4.4 4.9 4 9
5 ? 4.9 4 9
3.8 4.0 3.5
4.2 5 1 4,6
3,7 4 9, 3 6
4.6 4.9 5.8
6,4 4.0 6 5
4.9 5.4 5 0
4 9, 4.3 4 6
3,9 3.7 4.7
3.8 3.5 3.7
4.1
33
4.9 5.8 5.3
5 ?, 5.4 6 4
3.1
7.2 7.9 8.2
8.0 5.3 4.0
4.9 4.7 5.6
3.5 2.0 1.9
3.8 5.0 3.3

P.ct.
3.8
3.9
3.4
3.3
2.9
3.2
3. 1
4.1
4.6
5,0
4.4
3.9
3.6
3.8
4.7
4 9,
3.7
4,0
3.2
3.8
3.2
3.1
4 5
3 7
3.9
3.4
3.6
9 0
3.7
51
3.9
4.0
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.4
2.7
4.1
5.2
3.7
4.4
3,9
5.8
?,0. 3
4.5
4. 1
4.2
18.9
4.2
3.3
4.7
5.5
3.4
9.3
4.8
7. 5
1.9
4.0
6.0
4.0
7.7
3.3
4.3
5.1
5.2
1.1

!

7.1
3.3

4.3
4.1
7.1
4.7
3.3
6.5

4.9
5.3
4.5
3.2

P.ct.
3.8
3 8
3.7
3.5
2.8
3.2
3.4
4.0
4.3
5.4
4.5
3.8
3.7
3.8
4.7
4.0
3.5
4.0
3.2
3.8
4.1
3.8
8.3
3 8
3.9
3.3
4.1
1.6
4.3
5.7
4.8
8.6
3.7
4.1
39
3.3
96
3.9
4.8
4. 1
56
3,8
4.9
6.5
5.6
4.2
4 8
3.0
3.9
3.3
5.8
5.6
3.1
10.2
4.0
4.1
1.9
17.4
6.0
4.0
4.9
4.2
3.8
5.4
4.2
2.5

3.9

4.0

3.9

4.0

P.ct.
4.1
3.8
3,4
3.3
2.6
3.1
3.7
3.7
5.5
4.9
4.4
3.7
4.4
3.6
4.3
4.3
3.7
4.0

4 "6"

10.0
2.9
8.1
4.1
4.3
7.5

3

I

+s

3.Y Tl"

2.2
4.8

i.Y

1
* &
P.ct. P.ct.
3.3 3.3
3.1 3.1
3.2
2.8 2.5
2.2 2.3
2.9 2.7
3.1 3.0
3.3 3.1
3.2 2.9
3.5
3.6 8.3
3.1 2.7
3.1 3.0
2.9 2.7
3.4 3. 6
3.4 3.4
3.0 3.0
3.2 3.2
2.7 2. 7
4.3 s!o
3.2 3.0
3.2 2.7
3,1 9 8
?, 7 9 4
2.2 2.9,
3.2 3 0
7 0 2.6
3 8 3 8
4.8 2.7
3.7 4.3
5.0 3.3
3.0 3.5
2.8 3.1
4,2 4.0
3.3 3.3
3 0 2.9
3 3 3.6
3.2 3.1
4 3 3.8
2.9 3.6
4.8 3.6
3.9 3,9
5.7 4.3
3.2 4.2
4.0 3.6
4.3 2.6
3 5 3,4
2.9 2.4

i
,-r
0

1

S
1

P.ct.
3.3
3.1
3.0
2.8
2.3
2.8
2.9
3.0
3.0
3.5
3.4
2.9
3.0
2.8
3 5
3.2
3.0
3.2
2.7
3.0
3. 1
3.6
3.0
2.7
2.7
3.9
5.1
3.7
3.0
4.2
3.2
3.0
2.7
4.3
3.1
2.7
2.0
2.9
3.7
3.9
3.9
4.2
3.8
4.?,
3.6
3.3
2.9
2.7

P.ct.
3.5
3.1
2.7
2 . 6 '•
2.2 ,
2.7 '
2.8 i
3.0 I
2.9 i
2.0
3.4
2.8
3.0 :
2.7
36
3.1 i
2.9
3.2
2.7 !
2.9 I
2.9
3.0
3.0
2.7
2.0
3.8
2.8 '
3.7 1
2.8 '
2.5 '
3.0
3.2
2.9
3.7
3.0'
2.9
2.5
3.6
3.7
3.5
3.8
4.3
3.3
3.2
4.1
3.5
7.4
2.2

6,3
5.0

7.7
4.2

3.4
4.2

4.8
4.5

4.8
9. 5
6.6
3,5
9.6
6.8
2.4
20.4

6.5
7.5
2.7
3.5
5.4
3. 3
3.8

6.0
7.5
3.6
3.5
5.3

4.7
6.0
3.5
3.5
5.1

3.5
1.5
19.4
4.0 3.2

6.0
34
2.9
2.6

13.'0
0.7
5.1
2.7
3.6
2.9

3.0

3.0

"s.Y

"3*3

"i.Y
4.5
3.8
3.5
3.2
3.0

NOT£.—Figures printed in bold-face type in

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

213

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, OF THE EARNINGS AND DIVIDENDS OF NATIONAL BANKS
TO SEPTEMBER 1, 1868.
Ratio of dividends to capita and
surplus for six months ending—

arch 1

I

CO
CO

i

§§
00

O
S

m

ft
1)

rH

a

rH

28
CO

A

CO

Ratio of earnings to capital and surplus for six months endiag—

ft
tfl

in

4
"
^
•§

1
CO

A

r-T

CO

rf

i
A

2. 8 2.8

2.9
3.0
2.9
2.6
2.2
2.6
2.8

2.9
3.2
2.4
3.3
2.7
2.8
2.6
3.2
3.2
2.9
3.2
2.5
2,4
2.9
2.5
5.0
2.5
1.3
3.4
3,0
3,6
2.6
3.3
3.1
3.1
2.8
6.9
3.1
2.4
2.7
3.4
3.9
3.1
3.5
3.3
3.6
4.2
4.0
3.6
3.3
2.9

2.8
3.8
3.4
3.8
2.7
2.0
3.2
3.2
2.8
3.2
2.9
2.7
3.1
3.2
3.0
2.8
4.2
3.6
4.9
3.6
4.1
5.4
4.2
3.1
3.0
3.9
3.1
2.7
2.6
3.8
3.7
3.2
4.3
3.8
3.9
2.5
4.3
3.6
3.2
2.6

3.0
2.8

2. 5

3.3
2.8
2.9
2.6
3.3
3.5
2.9
3.2
2.6
3.7
3.1
3.4
2.8
2.9
1.4
3.3
6.6
3.6
2.6
4.5
3.9
3.0
2.9
4.2
3.1
3.1
2.8
3.4
3.8
3.7
3.9
4.2
4.8
5.2
3.7
3.7
4.0
2.9

3.2
3.1
2.9
2.5
2.1

2. 5

3. 0

3.1
3.0
2.9
2.6
2.1
2.7
2.9
3.3
2.8
2.2
3.4
2.8
2.7

3.1
3.1
3.0
2.7
2.3
2.7
2.7
3.1
2.6
3.2
3.3
2.8
2.5
2.6
3.4
3.0
2.7
3.2
2.4
2.7
3.3
3.1
5.7
2.9
3.4

2. 7

3.1
3.5
2.8
3.2
2.4
2.7
2.8
2.5
2.6
4.3
4.4
3.2
2.4
2.8
2.0
3.6

• 2.7
3.4
1.4
2.9
4.6
4.1
2.9
2.9
3.4
3.1
2.8
2.3
3.0
3.6
3.1
4.6
3.4
3.8
4.0
4.5
3.5
3.9
2.1
3.6
2.4
5.0
4.9
2.5
7.6
2.9
3.3
1.8

13.0
3.2
3.0
3.0
3.3
2.7
2.3
3.2
3.7
2.8
3.8
3.2
4.5
4.0
4.0
3.9
3.8
2.7

36

4.5
5.0

4.2
4.3

5.0
4.5

5.3
7.5
7.1
3.4
4.2

5.3
6.1
3.9
3.0
3.5

5.8
4.4
3.8
1.8
4.7

2.5
4.5
5.5
2.5
6.0
3.2
4.6
1.8
3.0

4.0
9.2
2.5
6.5
3.1
3.8
6.3

2.6

3.2

3.5

"\~2

3.9
3.0
6.2
2.8

3.4
5.9
3.4
2.9
5.4

3.1

3.0

3.1

3.0

i.9

40.0

in

12.9
3.6
3.4
3.4

15.8
O Q

2.4
3.9
3.3
2.9
2.5
3.3
3.3
3.5
3.0
4.1
4.7
4.5
4.4
4.3
4.9
4.4
3.9
2.8
4.4
6.3
3.9
4.2
6.6
5.5

2.3

m

8.4
4.4
4.4
7.8
4.5
3.7
5.0
4.2
5.1
6.1
6.3
6.7
6.5
6.0
5.9
7.9
6.6
5.0

12.0
4.4
3.8
5.4
3.4
2.9
2.4
3.4
5.2
5.7
4.0
5.6
5.0
5.0
5.1
4.3
5.5
3.8

10.7
11.3

9.2
7.3

7.5
7.5

8.1
7.2

15.4
12.4

8.7

12.0

6.2

3.9
5.8
6.3
6.5

12. 3

3.0
2.4
3.3
2.7
4.0
2.2
2.4
4.0
3.9
4.1
3.9
3.8
4.4
3.9
3.6
3.7
5.2
3.9
4.6
6.7
4.8
6.9
3.3
8.9
5.9
5.1
8.5

1.7

11.1
11.4

9.2
7.2
6.5
8.4
7.9

3.0

3.0

4.3

3.7

5.7
3.3
4.2
3.4
3.2
3.7

3. 5

9.0
7.6

1.8
3.2

8.1
8.5
7.6
2.1
9.8
1.4
4.0

22.7

10.4

10.9

7.7
4.6

0.1
3.5

19.5 16.6
9.8
7.7
9.1

column for 1884 and 1886 signify percentage of loss.




7.7
2.6
7.0
8.5
7.5
3.2

3.3
3.0
2.3
2.5
1.7
2.5
2.4
3.2
3.0
1.0
3.2
3.1
3.4
2.6
4.4
3.5
2.7
3.6
4.3
4.7
2.5
2.9
3.9
4.3
7.3
0.0
9.2
5.4
4.2
4.3
4.2
3.9
3.1
4.9
2.9
4.0
3.7
4.4
5.2
4.1
4.9
4.7
5.4
4.7
4.0
0.4
3.6

4.1
3.8
3.6
2.5
2.5
2.6
3.2
4.1
4.4
1.0
4.0
3.6
3.4
3.5
4.4
4.0
3.4
4.0
3.1
3.6
3.7
3.6
4.3
2.4
5.2
6.8
7.0
5.0
3.0
6.2
4.9
5.6
3.6
5.6
3.5
3.6
3.7
5.9
5.0
5.9
4.6
8.6
5.6
7.4
4.7
4.9
5.0
3.5

1

ft

CO

rf
eg

ft
CD
W.

P.ct P.ct. P.ct P ct P.ct
3.4
3.7
3.3
3.0
3.0
3.4
3.6
3.9
4.6
2.4
4.9
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.9
3.6
3.0
3.9
4.5
3.2
3.4
2.9
3.6
5.7
4.4
4.7
8.8
3.8
6.7
6.5
4.1
4.7
5.8
3.5
3.5
3.2
3.8
4.7
5.1
5.2
4.8
5.0
6.6
4.3
4.3
4.8
4.7

7.6
6.8

7.7
3.1

9.0
7.2

5.1
8.6
6.5
3.3

6.7
8.0
6.5
3.5

1-1.7

11.5

6.3
9.2
6.3
3.1
7.1

9.1
5.8
7.0
2.7
9.5

11.8

4.2
6.0
5.2
5.7
3.5
8.6

5.1
7.0
6.4
7.2
5.7
6.1
7.6

4.8
5.8
4.8
5.5
8.8
7.1
6.2

6.1
6.1
9.4
5.0
6.1
7.2
5.7

3.2
3.4
8.0
3.7
5.1
8.2
6.0

3.3

4.0

4.0

4.5

4.5

10.1

~

w

1.8
4.0
3.7
2.9
2.8
3.4
3.3
4.4
5.9
5.4
5.1
4.6
3.9
4.2
4.5
4.1
4.0
3.8
5.1
4.1
3.2
4.2
4.1
3.5
6.1
7.0
6.1
4.3
4.4
5.7
6.4
3.7
3.0
5.7
3.7
4.1
3.9
4.3
5.3
6.4
5.5
5.0
5.7
5.2
5.1
6.8
5.8
3.0

34

r l

rf

"ft

2.9
3.7
2.0
2.2
1.4
2.2
2.1
2.9
2.9
4.1
3.3
3.7
2.7
3.3
5.0
3.6
3.8
3.6
1.5
3.8
3.1
3.7
3.3
3.8
4.6
4.9
5.4
4.2
2.9
8.0
5.2
4.1
2.5
5.3
3.5
3.2
2.2
3.3
5.0
1.6
4.3
5.9
4.8
1.3
4.9
4.6
5.5
3.7

2.9
2.6

2.4
4.0
4.6
2.7
6.7
3.5
6.2
1.7
3.5
5.5
3.3
6.2
2.6
3.6
3.4
4.3
0.9

15.3

4,1
Sf.7
3.7
2.6

3.1
3.1
2.8
2.5
2.3
2.7
2.7
3.1
2.8
2.9
3.2
2.8
2.4
2.6
3.4
3.1
2.8
3.2
2.4
2.7
2.6
2.5
3.1
2.8
3.4
2.8
2.9
1.7
2.5
4.1
3.3
3.3
2.9
3.0
3.0
2.8
2.4
3.2
3.9
2.7
3.6
3.5
5.4

rH

OQ

CD

ed
co

"ft

"ft

P.ct P.ct. P. ct. P. ct. P.ct P.ct P.ct. P. ct P.ct. P.ct. P.ct
3.5
3.0
2.9
2.6
2.1
2.6

00
CO
CO

2.1

3.9
4.2
3.5
3.8
3.3
3.5
2.9
4.2
5.6
4.4
5.0
3.7
3.7
4.6
4.6
3.9
2.8
3.7
4.8
4.1
3.3
3.6
5.3
5.5
7.7

11.4
9.0
8.0
4.8
4.5
7.9
3.6
3.2
6.4
4.2
6.5
3.7
4.2
4.5
7.0
5.3
4.7
6.6
5.7
5.2
4.3
5.1
5.0
8.4
3.8
6.7
7.2
3.5
8.4
6.7
7.3
3.2

4.0
3.7
4.1
2.8
3.0
3.4
2.0
4.1
4.6
2.8
5.2
4.0
3.7
5.0
4.3
3.8
3.0
3.6
4.8
4.3
2.9
4.0
7.1
4.3
6.6
4.8
6.1
7.2
3.8
5,7
7.3
3.8
3.3
6.2
3.9
2.4
3.4
4.5
5.0
6.8
5.8
4.9
6.3
3.6
4.7
5.5
4.9
2.4
5.2
3.9
7.1
6.7
3.7

3.6
4.0
3.7
3.0
3.3
3.4
2.9
4.1
5.2
2.6
4.9
3.8
3.2
4.1
4.6
5.5
3.7
3.4
4.8
3.6
3.6
5.1
5.5
5.5
6.6
4.1
8.6
7.0
1.4
5.3
8.4
3.8
2.5
5.1
4.2
3.6
4.4
3.6
4.4
5.6
4.9
4.7
7.3
8.6
4.9
3.9
4.3
4.5
5.2
0.6
6.0
6.5
3.0
9.8

9.7
4.9

9.4
5.0

19.3
10.0 13.0
10.4 11.5
13.1 9.5
6.1
7.8
8.2
3.4
5.3

5.0
5.9
7.6
5,0
7.9

12.9

10.6

4.3

4.3

2.0

3.6

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
H4
25
26
^7
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
3b
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66

214

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

CLASSIFICATION OF THE LOANS AND DISCOUNTS OF THE NATIONAL BANKS IN THE
'
RESERVE CITIES AND IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES ON OCTOBER 4, 1888.

Cities, States and

Territories.

On United
No. of On singleStates
banks. name paper. bonds.

New York City
Chicago
Saint Louis
Boston
Albany
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Washington
New Orleans
Louisville
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Detroit
MiLwaukee
Kansas City
Saint Joseph
Omaha
San Francisco
Total of cities.
Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
District of Columbia
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
"Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Colorado
Nevada
California
Oregon
Arizona
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
Utah
Washington
Wyoming

Total of country bank
United States....

9
8
3
10
2
7
3

On other
bonds and
stocks.

All other loans

Total.

$28,626, 294.76 $2,132,159.50 $108, 466,001.44 $153,271,025.45 $292,495,481.15
65, 275, 737. 30
631, 824.69
41,129,615.37
14,155,000.90 359, 296.04
8, 216, 545. 97
921,853.59
6,988, 242.38
306,450.00
414, 349. 39
89,992, 897.83 136, 249, 455.91
30, 565.00
22,811,643.69
179,484. 99
8, 907, 268.47
5,205,628.26
19, 855.00
502, 300.22
672, 898.00
91, 66G, 236. hi
85,200.00
59,932,015.23
16,976,123.58
004, 431.57
13,150.00
31,594,329.95
1,140, 053.01
27,436, 695.37
509,914.14
600.00
28,136,752.72
6,218,236.60
18,408,001.98
140, 480.QA
10,164.50
4, 248, 633.95
70,019.22
3, 027, 970. 20
440, 506. 33
10,981,449.78
612,972.61
7, 897, 910.84
715,833.67
9, 069,138.49
251,550.68
8,101, 754.14
095,721.98
21, 344, 578.12
4, 307, 374.00
75, 000.00
14,860,482.14
237, 067.3F
16, 849, 782.62
1,185, 580.00
13,427,135. 24
669, 787.36
13, 716, 569.76
1,157, 357.48
10,889,421.92
568,301.56
4.184, 079.35
610, 352.88
3,005, 364.91
422, 438.44
14, 66J, 245.44
3,134,821.92
1, 200.00
11,104, 785. 08
7, 205.00
1,749, 7.43. M)
420,630.45
1,321, 908.35
259,079.55
9, 478. 207. 58
1,939,915.09
7, 279, 212.94
516, 873.40
5,120,891.8.3
3, 006, 598. 36
1, 597, 420.07

293 .07, 463, 275.45 2,727,190.04 178, 874,172. 81 484, 883, 490.70
75
1,440, 681. 26
75, 721.46
77, 678. 00
49
898,170. 73
19, 676. 20
49
998,301. 51
45, 077. 00
198 17, 312, 848. 64
100.00
60
8, 563, 059. 58
84
7, 825, 406. 09
1, 325. 00
270
9, 231, 218.87
69, 515. 22
85
3, 472, 736.30 150, 675. 00
6, 537, 501. 37
246
• 2 ,004. 86
18
183, 668. 81
332, 760. 44
"200." 00
31
1
596,172. 82
26
50.00
20
150,368.18
18
372,426.11
16
202,502. 21
50.00
24
803, 071. 92
13
382, 005.53
21
1,188, 911. 491
12
251, 586. 26
5
294,746.16
42, 695.
100
5, 411, 362. 77
202, 756. 61
2, 500.00
7
615.25
1,390, 578. 64
60
4, 050,409.25
42
5,181,048.12
1, 500. 00
197
94
3,160, 437. 94
17,450. 81
7, 336, 227. 70
45, 718. 29
163
5,135, 897.50
101
932.23
56
1, 977, 204.71
5,888,271.35
129
56 13, 563, 865.17
571,141.42
34
160
3, 025, 637.83
2, 282, 960.94
97
34
4, 098,137.64
257, 440. 92
2
35
2, 615, 447. 59
4,000. C
O
27
2, 322, 332.43
42, 045. 80
1
58
1,117, 573.19
20, 000. 00
224, 331.74
7
17
2, 369,454. 81
9
496, 546.90
700, 710.12
7
949, 041. 01
24
558, 632. 99
9
2,847 135, 967, 639.37

577,484.54

945. 563.64
1,215,939.86
432, 854. 36
6, 212,429.50
892, 653.26
3, 327, 356.67
6, 773, 267. 69
6, 271, 9!)5. 50
1,460, 057. 0"
188,847.15
304, 787. 33
63, 972. 30
587,155. 38
300 00
99, 039. 44
249, 340.16
1,171, 949. 58
61, 817.62
637,114.91
279, 902.66
239, 838. 22
233, 742.18
402,159. 32,105,754.71
1, 729, 531.75
614,303.67
1, 030, 224, 78
334, 621. 23
345, 727. 00
449, 444. 99
1, 574, 303. 5
78, 395.9C
112, 556. V
102,483. 6
334, 809. 51
31, 705. 3'
3,140, 313.81
87, 502. 62
68, 585. 34
2, 389.14
83, 528. 7<
64, 358. 5:
78, 653.4P
93, 262. 23
11,631.42
42, 586,171.59

773,948,129.00

20,151, 745. 84
17, 689, 779. 48
7,900,392.48
10, 092,181. 07
11, 201, 583. 58
12, 652, 415. 65
70, 991, 934. 09
94, 562, 289. 23
26, 074, 980.54
35, 530,793. 38
32, 486, 293.44
43, 640, 381. 20
84,815, 618. 91 100, 889,620. 69
32,120, 593. 98
42,016,000.78
75,103,182.00
83,102, 745. 30
5, 410, 973. 71
5,038,457. 75
7,024,579.01
7, 662, 327.08
272, 687. 87
336, 600.17
9, 8?1, 384. 27
11,054,662.47
3, 979,109.19
4,129, 827. 37
4, 711, 060. 58
5,182, 526.13
5,400, 623. 76
5, 852, 466.13
6, 509, 453. 82
8,484, 525. 32
1,483,783.04
1, 927,606.19
5, 558, 025. 23
7,381,051.63
2, 019, 389.
2,550, 878. 62
922,113.99
1, 259, 555. 37
17, 313, 377. 021 22, 964", 578. 01
2, 750, 420.14
2,311,421.35;
16, 461, 788. 94| 18,315,142.14
19,510,843.35
13,354,679.39
46, 616,136. 94] 53, 528, 216. 8!
27,709,014.10
23,916,821.68
38, 705,777. 99
30, 293, 607.22
28, 660, 852. 28
23,189, 401. 32
14, 861, 654. 54
12, 538, 722. 83
25, 981, 051. 20
19, 643, 334. 86
36, 625,142.42
21, 486, 973. 74
4, 477, 728. 50
5,127, 265. 82
19,612,696.01
22, 750, 889. 98
14, 849, 380. 87
12,463, 936. 32
13,951,336.38
9,518,389.17
595, 201. 80
306, 055.51
14, 359, 004. 35
10, 599, 242. 96
6, 526,473. 69
4,116, 638. 64
144,921.02
102,875.22
6,108,602.89
7, 314, 761. 42
642, 050. 38
415, 329. 50
6,145, 337.68
8, 598,321. 23
1,746,291.58
1,185.386.17
2,407,512.56
1,628,148. 97
6, 043, 797. 77
5,001, 494.53
2, 394, 021.13
1, 823, 756.72
721, 806, «60. 79

900,938,156.29

3,140 243, 430, 914. 8213,304, 674.58 221,460, 344.40|l, 206, 690, 351.49 1, 674, 880, 285. 29




REPORT OP THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 215
CLEARINGS AND BALANCES OF THE BANKS OF NEW YORK CITY FOR THE WEEKS
ENDING AT THE DATES GIVEN.
Week ending—

Clearings.

Balances.

Sept. 1,1883.
Sept. 8,1883.
Sept. 15,1883.
Sept. 22.1883.
Sept. 29i 1883.
Oct. 6,1883.
Oct. 13,1883.,
Oct. 20,1883.
Oct. 27,1883.,
Nov. 3,1883Nov. 10,1883..
Nov. 17, 1883.
Nov. 24,1883.

$645, 021, 546. 86
739, 732, 907.18
732,316,071.00
700, 082, 400. 54
763, 567, 3I>6. 28

759, 872, 865. 58
833, 9G5, 918. 88
919,608,026.44
906, 319, 847. f.l
817,996,284.43
622,487, 973. 40
783, 0U4, 622. 25
682,451,400.44

$26, 472. 98G. 85
31, 195; 746. 55
30.914,820.30
30, 001, 000.19
Ml), 2G0, 285.71
32,844,144.42
31, 303, 439.91
31,917,847.01
31,844,418.48
29,708,441.71
28,478,167.32
33,519,483.15
28,333,2G3.G1

Sept. 6,1884.
Sept. 13,1884.
Sept. 20,1884.
Sept. 27,1884.
Oct. 4,1884.
Oct. 11.1884.
Oct. 18,1884..
Oct. 25,1884...
Nov. 1,1884..
Nov. 8,1884..
Nov. 15,1884..
Nov. 22,1884..
Nov. 29,1884..

463,912, 628. 57
422, 613,919.74
492, 069.873. 0G
491, 357,601. 20
554, 062,698. G9
496, 582,476. 56
518, 575,214. 89
605,195, 931. 55
458, 532,568.11
477, 210,695. 35
527, 541,755. 74
555, 711,509. 01
459, 294,007. GO

21,278,921.75
22,793,219.60
21, 412, 307. 53
22, 028, 008.11
32,6-8,517.10
26, 358, 572. 40
28, 690, 794. J)3
27, 673, 214. r!!5
23, 225, 190. >9
28, 209, 591. 59
26,823,201.20
20, 496, 903.13
21, 392, 407. G3

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.

5,1885..
12,1885..
19,1885..
26,1885..
3,1885..
10,1885..
17,1885..
24,1885.,
31,1885.,
7,1885..
14,1885..

476, 800. 526. 7&
484, 537, 657. 96
480,733,380. 21
471, 652, 048. 41
572,076, 277. 97
659, 560, 549. 70
702, 000, 829. 74
828, 373, 048. 53
695, 214, 389. 87
775,416.616.98
779, 244, 286.61

22, 090,
23, 969,307.40
24, 410,868. 93
22, 978,989. 03
30,158, 232.32
28, 46k:,678. 38
29, 632,037. 42
30, 475,583.77
29, 590,574. 77
30, 751,563. 50
27, 323,721. 40

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.

4,1886.
11,1886.
18,1886.
25,1886.
2,1886.
.9,1886.
16,1886..
23,1886.
30,1886..
6,1886.
13,1886.

485, 535, 545. 80
520, 437, 476. 86
590, 366, 037. 81
691, 723, 05(5. GO
744, 533,107. 30
830, 726, 858.70
774,127, 054.20
734, 586, 056.19
625,098,064.48
735, 609, 027.93
704, 572, 284. 86

28, 387, 297.77
21, 805,163. 40
28.050,351.78
25, 603, 758, 94
31,285,172.38
29, 904, 285.79
30, 952, 375.99
27, 767, 549.6(5
26, G07, 923.82
31, 825, 400. 11
28, 005, 250. 87

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.

3,1887..
10,1887.
17,1887.
24,1887.
1,1887.
8,1887.
15,1837.
22,1887.
29,1887.,
5,1887..
12,1887.,

629,926, 782.37
562, 627,925.28
6-28, 634,786.18
659, 048,314.43
575, 717,723.42
676, 201,491. 67
718,896, 811.83
742,551, 452. 60
647, 590,728. 82
706. 280, 839.34
602, 240,351. GO

29,
22,
31,
30,
31,
29,
31,
33,
29,
31,
23,

Sept.
Sopt.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.

1,1888.,
8,1888..
15,1888.
22,1888.
29,1888..
6,1888.
13,1888.,
20,1888.
27,1888.,
3,1888..
10,1888.,

501, 823, 033.31
538,170, 073.22
613,165,583.40
762, 313, 474. 79
635, 316, 704. 00
811,518,650.80
722, 328, 937.35
667,105, 762. 02
683,1S2,608. 85
671,138,259.14
*539,072,637. 58




* Five days.

322, 367. 47
329, 268.73
404, 534. 44
974, 062. DO
069, 309.36
825, 323. 74
170, 113. 34
350, 889. 58
809, 361.75
289, 781.13
758. 351.39

26, 231, 528. 08
34, 047, 518, 67
34,285,911.38
33,177, 594. 55
34,537, 541.08
38, 746, 427.25
44, 039,134. 77
38,103, 879. 02
35. 700,246.69
34. 892,9G9. 62
*26| 376, 380. 51

ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF CONDITION

State Banks, Loan and Trust Companies, Savings and Private Banks,
1887-'88,
ARRANGED BY STATES AND TERRITORIES.

NOTE.—Under the heading "official- are placed reports from State officers, and under the heading
'unofficial" reports from other sources.




217

218

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OP CONDITION OF STATE BA"NKS AND LOAN AND
RESOURCES.

Date of re- No. of
Loans
port. . banks Ldans on on personal Loans
and coland
real estate. lateral se- discounts.
curity.

Location.

STATE BANKS—OFFICIAL.
Mar. 51,1888
Nov. 15,1887
J u l y 1,1888
J u n e 16,1888
Dec. 31,1887
Xov. —, 1887
J u n o 30,1888
do
..do .
..do.
Apr. 2, 1888
Oct. 31, 1887
J u l y 2, 1888
..do .
J u n e 30, 1888
do
Apr. 30, 1888
Dec.l,'87,and
J u n e 30, '88
J u l y 1, 1888
J u n o 30,1888

New Hampshire .
Kliode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Virginia
North Carolina...
Louisiana
Kentucky
Ohio
Indiana
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
California.

Montana ..

1
10
8
122
8
77
64
16
6

$41, 772
$2,506,813
4,665, 678
126,414, 734
3, 441, 820

:, 623,160

22, 790, 294

" 768," 063'

'""i82 f "ii7

74
61
238

3, 409, 367
11,075
13, 459,956
73, 835

207, 071
55, 572, 004
113,377

11, 902, 256
1, 993,385
3, 823,470
27, 409,171
4, 254, 980
3, 741, 645
7, 229, 799
] 8, 720, 018
8, 859, 405
.16,668,397

46, 975, 323

177
110
2
1,209

Total.

$50,425

11, 439, 960
91,481

21,404,692 125,881, 958 253,163, 012

STATE BANKS—UNOFFICIAL.

June 30,:
do...
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
..do.
..do.
..do .
..do.

Delaware
Maryland
West Virginia..
South Carolina .
Georgia
Alabama
Mississippi
Arkansas
Tennessee
Nebraska
Dakota
Total

23
194

Total, official and unofficial .

1,403

68,250
62, 718
306, 926
147,800
333, 912
1,620
15, o03
17, 000
86, 326
956, 090
91, 349

309,151
971, 931
1, 262,2(50
463, 200
3, 298, 454
935, 356
461,693
568, 092
1, 523, 655
2, 965, 829
752, 696

2, 087, 884

13, 512, 317

219, 697
3, 6G2, 841
58,433
310,416
5,503,488
333, 034
1, 883, 383
248
3, ?>?8, 350
480, 541
110,303
15, 952, 800

23,492,576 139, 394, 275 269,115, 812

LOAN AND TRUST COMPANIES—OFFICIAL.

Maine
New Hampshire
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
Minnesota

,

Nov.
Mar.
Oct.
Nov.
July
Jan.
June

1,1887
31,1888
31,1887
15,1887
1,1888
1,1888
30,1888

Total.

208, 847
1,586,464
9, 205,141
1,101, 295

155, 557
143,242
9, 518, 512
4, 758, 203

418, 252
18,100,955

8,612, 799 118,450,617
52, 819
1, 005,122
21, 719, 668 133,078,950

28, 634, 649

4, 319,781
1,185, 015
5, 697,116
4,000,743
5, 682, 291
3, 396,476
605,300

56

2, 56.-), ( 57
6, 535, 4f 6
1, 014, 929

32, 527, 847
8, 037, 790
213,123
131, 4'26
574, 701
255, 429
214,537

126,144
2,268
131,743
12,253
30, 966
87,507
34,745

24,886,722

41, 954, 943

425, 716

46,606,390 175, 033, 893

29, 060, 365

LOAN \ND TRUST COMPANIES—UNOFFICIAL.
1
Pennsylvania.
2 Illinois
3 Iowa
4 ! Missouri
5 i Kansas
6 I Nebraska
7 Dakota

Total
Total, official and unofficial.




June 30,1888
....do
..do .
..do .
.do.
.do .
.do.
64
180

J
!
i
j
i
;
i
;

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

219

TRUST COMPANIES, FROM OFFICIAL AND UNOFFICIAL SOURCES, IN 1887-'88.
RESOURCES—continued.

Over-

drafts.

$10,862
75, 027
271

State,
Real
Due from
Current
county,
R.R
estate, expenses
U.S.
Bank All other
other
bonds. municipal, bonds and stocks. bonds and banks and furniture, and taxes
etc.,
stocks.
stocks.
and
bankers. fixtures.
paid.
bonds.

$5,000

$3,600
73,700
127, 588
20, 000

134, 450
40, 520
23
62, 634
3*6,156
3G, 952
150,950
81, 659
42, 724
25, 000
158,919
277, 833
108, 481
30, 098
666, 082 1, 557, 048
97, 001

$2, 500 $2,400
79,104

31,000
47,100

27, 000

2,000

61, 701

12, 500

2,500

8,042
1, 808,140

2, 030, 634

144, 801

35, 000

222,162

2, C O
O
406
47, 463
10, 795
11, 731
24, 336
26, 361
48, 976
21, 513

67, 000

29, 500 86, 004 38,122, 372

995,153
1, 794, 924
8, 460, 9G1 3,911,114
15,0G8
115,414

9,625

85,113
612,693
71, 796
22,416
362, 093
110,200
188, 250
28, 780
170,403
3G9, 982
80. 270

372, 320 3, 938, 380 133, 049

1,900, 611

4, 505, 328

2,132, 074

22, 000
3,410,048

77, 056
23,187
20, 984
2,430

15, 647

517,121

8,690

18, 700
50,628

$4, 570
3,922
710, 256
17, 220
162, 014
89,110
27, 391
4,664
17, 865
36, 321
38, 906
10, 909
27, 828

1
2

• s
4
5
0
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
150, 703 17
140, 215 18
19
20

54,272, 878 18,113, 980 1,454, 014

115,516
389, 765
266, 326
32, 509
986,407
191, 494
620, 850
181, 555
749, 704
764, 512
206,690

43, 275 2,506
438, 720 51, 590

14,751
11, 750

2,001, 781 2, C97, 634

184, 429
4, 045, 554
7,903

$3,454
230, G O
O
211, 627
3,155,994
118,191
1,784,818
485,454
165, 573
415,101
997, 837
281, 257
225,213
206, 219
637,811
646, 822
1, 030, 932
2, 595, 079

140, 220
1G6, 212
93, 500
12,039
717, 813
225, 663
88,970
697
282,187
208, 205
19,101

32,000

193,641

$165, 253
$152, 248
711, 048 1, 264, 025
6, 045, 035 12, 907, 652
438,128
344, 825
5,415,699 4, 031,118
1, 322, 010 1,248, 937
392, 533
74, 938
5,405
607,754
3,275, 547
1,162,863
575,007
117, 524
769,126
113, 445
80, 411 1, 090, 207
2, 005,679 4, 435, 331
1, 962, 986
931, 814 2, 607,441
4, 739,193 8, (572,103

0,844
1
32, 543 2
4,708
13,433 4
69, 604 5
8, 996 6
33, 093 7
6<)9 R
48, 727 9
70, 894 10
18, 543 11
314,144

3, 967, 880 219, 053 30, 08^, 983 58, 778, 206 j20,246, 054 1, 768,158

14, 721
10, 237
3,526
33,128
332,006 100, 244
33, 474
346, 526
31,922
915, 386
875, 888
2,183, 432 1,146, 201 6, 957, 6i2 204,167 1, 330, 777
166,000
94
732,137
802, 000 1, 388,950 73, 000
677, 476
294,173
4,603
1,191
885,127
11, (532, 715 5, 946, 340
19, 516, 850
19,161,588
203,315
514,340
138
6,262
18, 465
35,460 60, 577

7,784
230
104, 728
3,200
2,403

4,741 22,443, 398 1, 981, 329 8,513,428 437,988 21, 441, 353 13, 756,139

139,117

1, 957
1,309
6,369
1,874
8,061
19,570

354, 568
26, 800

13,000
12,150

75, 000

7, 029,812 123, 063
112, 200 60, 000

25,150

33, 217

3,200
45G, 368

43, 790

2,000
4,200

7,189, 002. 222,480

24, 311 22,899, 766 2,006, 479 15, 702,430 660,468




7,647,122

22, 646

7, 361, 396
132,108
00,194
2€8, 536
1, 997, 548
48, 030
54, 545

3, 791, 316 4,158,798
138, 833
1,172, 389
142, 532 1 14, 910
53,147
251, 343
242
467, 492
305, 928 141, 623
323, 078 1, 246, 874
75, 903
188, 292
47,463
59, 571
39, 409
151,731
34, 974

9, 868,417

6, 035, 783 <3, 304, 6G9

406, 056

31,309, 770 19, 791, 922 13, 951, 791

605,173

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

1
2
4
5
G
7

220

EEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF CONDITION OF STATE BANKS AND LOAN AND TRUST

RESOURCES—continued.

Location.

Cash
and cash
items.

Other
resources.

Total.

LIABILITIES.

Capital
stock.

Surplus.

STATE BANKS—OFFICIAL—continued.
New Hampshire.
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
..
Pennsylvania
Virginia
North Carolina..
Louisiana
Kentucky
Ohio
Indiana
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
,
Minnesota
Missouri
,
Kansas
,
California
Montana
Total

$7,481
123, 615
$59, 801
468,470
2
50, 073,233
293, 387
286, 040
5,849
2, 846,103 1, 225, 614
899,123
38,475
297,117
54, 832
3,627,371
72,642
4, 571,784
187, 982
534, 832
1,758
557, 538
765,141
3," 188
3, 054,837
9*802
830, 279
52
1, 925,448
11,053,118 2, 919, 012
3,190, 778
182,773
15,877,795 5,186,226
64,125
101,054,228 10,241, 395

$113. 032
3, 325, 604
7,335, 634
199, 735, 318
4, 726, 044
42, 006, 408
16,139, 815
3, 851, 352
8, 616, 4G0
37, 982, 921
5, 990,241
5, 527, 532
9, 521, 359
29, 040,423
12, 587,127
23, 459, 426
82, 586,985
18, 259, 042
106, 513,610
489, 245

$50, 000
$14, 549
1, 766, 685
2, 390, 000
220, 000
24,920, 700 8, 694,102
1, 085, 000
207, 520
7, 852, 589 1, 988,490
3, 468, 739
781,018
1, 095,170
211, 890
2,117, 259
250, 000
1J, 597, 937 1, 960, 935
1, 504,100
228, 612
1, 742, 500
259,136
2, 071, 200
353, 349
3,821,100 1,301,602
4, 028, 743
561,139
5, 733, 000
724, 775
13, 430, 003 7, 487, 209
6, 569, 699
342, 328
39, 893, 903 12, 341, 586
150, 000

617, 807, 608 136, 288, 327 37, 928, 240

STATE BANKS—UNOFFICIAL—COnt'd.
Delaware
Maryland
West Virginia..
South Carolina.
Georgia
Alabama
Mississippi
Arkansas
Tennessee
Nebraska
Dakota

16,281
3
553,669
9,156
174,138
750
71,114
7
1,259, 656 4, 427, 823
214, 898
3,430
498, 431
13,306
146, 573
24
840, 610
6,323
377, 519
1,329
107, 830
6,685

Total

4,260, 719 4,468,842

Total, official and unofficial. 10^ 314,947 14,710, 237

1,012, 862
7,209, 000
2,240, 867
1,110, 211
20,429,169
2,054,198
3, 942,219
991,19J
7, 203, 014
6, 282, 307
1,424, 671

420,000
48, 274
2,484, 480
372,000
453,744
184,223
420,000
54, 422
7, 664,477 2,070, 200
705, 625
64, 337
1,079, 000
224, 373
288,000
23, 500
2, 336, 690 246, 367
2, 201,100
122,681
590, 425
35, 848

53, 899, 709 18,643, 541 I 3,446, 228
671, 707, 317 154, 931,868 41, 374,468

LOAN AND TRUST COMPANIES—OFFICIAL—continued.

Maine
New Hampshire
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
Minnesota

109,266
67, 578
36, 848
1,420
3, 785, 900
93, 246
536, 909
280,192
157,636
6, 403, 530 3,827,335
32, 662
134,852

1, 300, 670
435,000
5,000
1, 926,658
400, 000
20, 000
54,421, 345 5, 050,000 1, 318, 016
9, 840, 040 1, 50u, 000
4, 587,726 1, 036, 600 155,060
.200,087, 230 16, 596,100 13, 879, 978
3,101,587
1, 895, 500
76, 552

Total

11,062,751 4,404,623

275,265, 256 26, 913,200 15, 454, 606

LOANS AND TRUST COMPANIES—UNOFFICIAL—continued.

Pennsylvania
Illinois
Iowa
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Dakota
Total

6,587, 902
1, 823, 532
141, 944
9,878
38, 086
6,354
117, 851

688,570
6, 260
137,143
268,757
190, 594
175, 789
340, 685

8,725, 547 1,807,798

Total, official and unofficial.. 19,788, 298 6,212,421




67, 222, 987 14,106,610 6, 350, 272
12, 728, 014 2,479, 000 1, 005, 644
6,693,304
1,415,000
107,317
5, 705, 012 2,176, 700
344, 242
10,162,605
3, 838, 600 576, 924
4, 278, 262
1,390
176, 885
1,598, 037
924,400
89, 481
108,388, 221 26,330,310
383,653,477

8, 650, 765

53, 243, 510 24,105, 371

REPORT OF THE COMPTKOLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

221

COMPANIES, FROM OFFICIAL AND UNOFFICIAL SOURCES, ETC.—Continued.
LIABILITIES—-continued.

Deposits of
State,
State,
State-bank Dividends Individual county, and county, and
undivided
unpaid.
deposits. municipal municipal
notes.
profits.
deposits. disbursing
officers.
Other

'"$173," 853
218,533
7, 680, 5'21
134, 134
904, 287
386,971
128,158
317, 308
1, 397, 006
90, 467

$1,101
3,142
9,556
8,065
71,066
8,582
19, 732

195,664
369, 323
819,495
180, 597
642, 801
8,570
13, 647, 688
23,145
164,279
57, 677
56,278
610, 318
152,362
143, 837
23,311
332,213
247, 825
51, 687
1, 862, 932
15, 510,620

121,244

$40, 257
1, 267, 567
3,985,603
140,043,155
5,099 3,128, 522
30, 412, 607
83,188 10,653, 301
4,028 1,181, 422
49,113 5, 819, 890
389, 577 19, 919, 044
1,052
3,837,018
148, 140 3, 304, 201
19, 780 6, 539,253
22,429, 490
7,167, 008
43," 305* 14,702, 727
54, 058, 807
16, 451 9, 887, 858
48,309,118
330, 675
$1,145
9,984
44, 885

810, 347 387, 017,523

$261,086
$721

721

1, 500
10,785
33,186
1,200

2,096
20,229
2,258
3, 283
15, 000
51,671
19,238
750

229,112

23, 030,319

114,531

148, 434 .1,045,459 410, 047, 842

115,252

27, i25
27,190

43,380
10, 720
4,000
141,170
3,17L

$5,980
104.371
467, 057
15, 624, 111
135,169
492, 397
256, 034
215,980
54,336
1,011,780
172, 768
29,443
54, 995
460,914
1,012,487
7,100,964
167, 338
5, 525,515

455,175
3,861,217
1,471, 307
436, 720
5, 328, 861
716, 333
2, 245, 511
618,174
4, 033, 526
3, 314, 2G7
549, 228

65

Due
to other
banks.

261,086 32, 891,639

13,500
3,641
10, 510
1,542

9,684
216, 609
27,831
12,857
954, 097
18,412
67, 823
604
127,245
188,658
23,483

74, 618

1, 647, 303

11,804
1,213
32,408

Other
liabilities.

$2
2, 503,578
30,000
284, 251
510,564
1,014, 704
2
686, 910
156,224
44,112
287,118
1,488,231

1
2
3
4
5

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
" 423," 637" 16
329,405 17
632,567 18
443,488 19
20
8,834,793

56, 584 1
66,970 2
23, 561 3
122,625 4
3, 607,409 5
391,700
178, 392 7
7,602 8
60, 876 0
137,714 10
170, 502 11
4, 823,935

335, 704 34, 538, 942 13,658,728

1,077

725,300
297, 520
41,230,824
8,180, 236
18, 873 2, 985, 732
154, 601,138
718,876

26,"369"

4,961,873
251,333

7, 957, 376 a5,066,708

22,464 208,739,626

26,309

317,154 10,767,813

298,000
85, 579
4,610,900
1,677,800
2,259, 500

39, 223
21,173
1, 397,379
159, 804
144, 547
6,062,233
133,017

1, 080, 800

3, 985, 908

2,514

422,050

175, 855 49,138,488

11,846,316 al4,420,537

198, 319 257,878,114

2, 700, 402
224,410
66,600
483,164
22 \, 653
133,936
55,775




95, 070
107,165
5,352,372

246,914

33, 869 38,589,403
61,957 7,364, 824
53, 888
343,190
14,135
888, 083
6 1, 649,194
12, 000
258,219
45, 575

3, 888, 940 ad, 353, 829

70,240

6,955
1,504,158
20,100
52,700
60,622
85,276

5,137,476
2,442
76,309
68,188
1, 553,106
2,221,946
60,756

1,729,811

26,309

a Debenture bonds.

9,120,223

2,046,965

19,888,036

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

1
2
2
4
5
6
7

ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF CONDITION OF STATE BANKS, 1872-'73 TO 1887-'88.
INS

1872-'73.*

Total
Liabilities:
Capital stock
Circulation
Surplus
Undivided profits
Dividends unpaid
Deposits
Due to banks
Other liabilities
Total

— banks.

551 banks.

1875-'7C.

1874-'75.

— banks.
Resources:
Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
United States bonds
Other stocks, bonds, and mortgages
Due from banks
Real estate, furniture, and fixtures
Other resources
Expenses
Cash items
Specie
.
Legal-tender>nd other notes

1873-74.

I

1876-'77.

1877-'78.

1878-'79.

1879-'8O.

633 banks.

592 banks.

475 banks.

616 banks.

620 banks.

$266, 585,314
516, 565
929, 260
23, 209, 670
25, 201, 782
12, 609,1C0
6,442, 710
1,211,416
9,816, 456
2, 319, 659
34, 415, 712

$169, 391, 427
319, 959
2,150, 880
19,398,287
25,107,149
11,092,118
10, 694, 390
914, 726
7, 320, 845
3, 041, 676
28, 480, 374

$191, 444, 093
447, 302
7, 739, 203
21,916,024
22,169, 065
14, 264, 835
9. 221, 760
801,005
8, 767, 391
1, 979, 701
37,088, 961

383, 257, 704

$119,332,341
237,104
1, 544,296
9,617,667
12, 605,100
3, 269, 233
944,079
886, 348
18, 977, 324
3, 020,139
8,447, 776

$154,377, 672
212, 772
1, 961,447
16,437,815
19, 050, 046
5, 372,188
1,164, 999
1,284,344
10,434, 018
1,980,083
25,126, 706

$176,308, 949
877, 297
23, 667, 950
19, 851,146
9, 005, 657
4, 909,190
1,353, 006
8, 624, 086
1,156,456
26, 740, 215

$178,983,496
348, 604
869,144
19, 364,450
23, (96, 812
8, 561, 224
6, 863,0S3
1,559,404
9, 059,547
1, 926,100
27, 623, 988

178,881,407

237, 402, 088

272,338, 996

278, 255, 852

42, 705, 834
174,714
2,109, 732
]0,027,6b8
33,492
110, 754,034
8, 838,3o5
4, 237, 578
178,881,407

59, 305, 532
153, 432
2, 942, 707
12, 363, 205

344, 984

137, 594, 961
14,241, 004
10,463, 357

69,084, 980
177, 653
6, 797,167
9, 002,133
83, 722
165,871,439
10, 530, 844
10,791, 0:8

237, 402, 088

272, 338, 996

337, 290

277, 911, 831 I

315, 839, 340 |

$206, 821,194
528, 543
7,142, 532
17,117,117
36,180,435
14,227,927
5, 801, 796
878, 696
11,176, 374
6, 201, 617
48, 828, 255
354, 904, 486
354, 904, 486

10,457,346
393,419
157,928,658
13, 307,398
8, 327,183

110,949,515
387, 661
5, 665, 854
18, 283, 567
335, 904
226,654, 538
9,412, 876
11, 567, 789

95,193, 292
388, 298
7, 983, 990
11,693,064
324,176
142,764,491
10,348,911
9, 215, 603

104,124,871
389, 542
16, 667, 574
5, 666, 221
501, 831
166,958,229
\\ 093,069
8, 438, 003

90, 816, 575
283, 308
18,816,496
6,721,615
474, 567
208, 751, 611
18, 462, 707
10, 577, 607

278, 255, 852

383, 257, 704

277,911,831 |

315,839,340

354, 904, 486

80,425, 634
388, 397
7,027,817

*In compliance with a House resolution, making it one of the duties of the Comptroller of the Currency, the Annual Report for 1873 contained the first report of State
and savings banks made to this Office, and was the first call of that character ever made upon State by Federal officer.




O

s
o
o
H

o

H
O

a
w
w
H

a
j

ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF CONDITION OF STATE BANKS, 1872-'73 TO 1887-'8S—Continued.
1880-'81.

Total
Liabilities:
Capital stock . Circulation
Surplus
Undivided profits
Dividends unpaid
Deposits
Duo to banks
Other liabilities
Total




1882-83.

1883-'84.

1884-'£5.

1885-'8G.

1886-'87.

1887~'88.

652 banks.
Resources:
Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
United States bonds
Other stocks, bonds, and mortgages
Due from banks
Real estate, furniture, and fixtures
Other resources
Expenses
Cash items
Specie
Legal-tender and other notes

1881-'82.
672 banks.

754 banks.

817 banks.

975 banks.

819 banks.

1,413 banks.

1,403 banks.

$250, 819,420
1,335, 310
12, 048,452
24, 904, 903
46, 657, 328
13, 914,238
10, 542,266
965, 327
16, 900, 325
17,071,445
23, 797, 046

$272, 520,217
1,196, 369
8, 739,172
19, 780, 527
49, 919,183
13, 037,939
12, 306, 578
999, 944
18, 546,073
17, 201,489
24, 586, 682

$322, 358, 227
1, 392, 961
5, 287,606
22, 083, 304
58, 709, 516
13, 592, 791
9,943, 706
918,403
35,118, 379
17, 429, 817
25, 302, 316

$331, 049, 510
1, 262, 725
2, 337,705
31, 452, 019
48, 836, 689
15,058,411
7,071,876
1, 025, 237
28, 219, 414
25, 376, 565
28, 787, 615

$347, 880, 520
1, 349, 998
2,994,806
32, 644, 859
59, 062.405
15, 873, 312
5,791,111
1,130, 883
25,972, 922
29, 867, 724
30, 994, 221

$331,183, 626
$435, 854, 364
1,169, 388
2, 395, 610
4, 392,421
2, 530,156
27,194, 693
30, 544, 699
49, 747, 429
64, 774, 881
14, 605, 853
20, 475,102
8, 224, 886
15, 237, 643
1,017,782
2,123, 672
51,6(58,218
24,734,684 I 110,845,718
14,726,940

418, 956, 060

438, 834,173

512,137, 026

521, 077, 766

553, 562, 761

528, 695, 920

684, 781, 845

071, 707, 317

H

92,922, 525
274,941
20, 976,167
7, 943,466
567,171
261,362,303
18, 870,466
16, 039,021

91,808, 213
286, 391
23,148, 050
8, 902, 579
481,858
281,835,496
18, 262,172
14,109, 414

102, 454, 861
187, 978
25, 762, 738
11, 287,623
442,652
334,995,702
20, 651,930
16, 353, 542

110,020,351
177, 554
31,483,942
12, 718, 894
473,735
325,365,669
27,125,108
13,712, 513

125, 258, 240
98,129
30, 669, 575
11, 574, 736
493,926
344, 307, 996
29, 950,453
11,209,706

1C9, 611, 596
103, 430
27,813, 5C8
10, 095, 760
430, 699
342, 882,767
27, 800, 280
9, 957, 880

141, 000, 377
228, 956
38, 519, 720
14, 452,490
749,749
446, 560, 022
32,445,414
10, 825,117

154,931,868
148,434
41,374,408
15, £10, 620
1, 045, 459
410, 047, 842
34, 538, 942
14,109,684

t"1
t"1
g
W

418, 956, 060

438, 834,173

512,137, 026

521, 077, 766

553, 562, 761

528, 695, 920

684, 781, 845

671,707,317

S
H

W
h:

o
W
$432, 002, 663
2, 001, 781
2, 097, 634
34, 787, 037
58, 778, 206
20,240, 654
14,710,237
1, 7C8,158
105, 314, 947

O
^
£
ffl
H
O

O
h3

O
^

224

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
LOAN AND TRUST COMPANIES—OFFICIAL AND UNOFFICIAL.

AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF LOAN AND TRUST COMPANIES FROM

1883-'84 TO 1887-'88.
1883-'84.

1884-85.

1885-'8G.

188G-'87.

1887-'88.

35 banks.

40 banks.

42 banks.

58 banks.

120 banks.

Resources and liabilities.

Resources.
Loans on real estate
Loans on pers'l and collat'l security. >$158,018,009 $141, 542, 649 $156, 828,458
I
Other loans and discounts
135, 919
419
367, 749
Overdrafts
23,371, 084 25, 376,400 27, 985, 658
United States bonds
State, county, and municipal bonds.
Railroad bonds and stocks
\ 27,879, 858 29, 750, 200 43, 816, 716
Bank stocks
Other stocks, bonds, and mortgages.
Due from other banks and bankers. 16, 517, 457 23, 458, 985 16,160,112
8, 759, 291 9, 774, 575
6,152,771
Real estate, iurniture, and fixtures.
302, 052
664,497
209,842
Current expenses and taxes paid...
Gold coins
Gold certificates
1, 388, 065
552,192
Silver coins
19, 644, 510
Silver certificates
3, 871, 990 8, 557, 796
Legal tenders and nat'1-bank notes.
94, 672
88,802 I
Checks and other cash items
2,84i;937 j 9,023,654
3,439, 646
Other resources
Total.

239,871,691

($16, 269, 993
< 36, 544, 018
(143, 282, 819
12, 810
28, 787, 717
f 178,148
J 7,400,348
1
132,651
[ 36, 428, 878
18, 795, 503
11, 087, 272
433, 509

$46,606, 200
175, 033, 893
29, 060, 365
24.31L
22, 899, 700
2, OOG, 479
15, 702,430
6C0, 468
31,30), 770
19,791,922
13, 951, 79i
605,173

16, 822,224

19, 788, 208

2,949, 767

248,389,683 278, 314, 591 319,125, 657

6, 212, 421
383, 653,477

Liabilities.
23, 938, 600 26,428, 600 27, 644,150
36, 355, 769
53, 243, 510
Capital stock
10, 695, 984 21, 671,152 15, 841, 793
10,191,544
24,105, 371
Surplus fund
9,619, 067
8, 508, 000
2, 849, 549 11, 351, 526
11,846,316
Other undivided profits
Debenture bonds
14,420,537
25, 282
19, 251
581, 255
38, 900
Dividends unpaid
198, 319
188,745,922 188,417,293 214, 06*3,415 240,190,711
Individual deposits
257, 878,114
State, county, and municipal de38, 084
posits
26, 309
Deposits of State, county, and municipal disbursing officers
761,888
197, 893
192, 243
5, 606, 897
Due to other banks and bankers...
2, 046,965
6,589,388 14,122, 662 11, 855,182
9,159,622
Other liabilities
19,888, 036
Total.




239,871,691 248,389,683

278,314,591

319,125, 657

383,653,477

226

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
ABSTRACT OP REPORTS OF CONDITION, FROM OFFICIAL AND UNOFFICIAL
RESOURCES.

Location.

Loans
No. of
banks. Loans on on personal Loans and
and col- discounts.
real estate. lateral security.

Date.

MUTUAL—OFFICIAL.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
C onnecticut
New York
New Jersey
District of Colombia .
Ohio
Indiana
Minnesota

Nov. 1,1887
Mar. 31,1888
Juno 30,1888
Oct. 31,1887
Nov. 15,1887
Oct. 1,1887
Jan. 1,1888
do
June 30,1838
Apr. 2,1888
Oct. 31,1887
July 31,1888

55
69
19
173
37
85
118
24

$6, 352, 794
27, 429, 608
8,197, 111
119, 792, 832
23, 331, 736
41,712,904
193, 764,194

$5, 833 779

$7, 883, 804
1,521,356
81, 256, 586
9, 932, 831
11, 379, 789
10, 078.190
10,287,115
247, 400
258, 753

145, 139
9,956 736
177, 931
2,182, 997
6, 373, 955
2,182, 985

711, 352
598 422, 780, 733 133, 298, 428 26, 853, 522

Total.
STOCK—OFFICIAL.

Vermont
North Carolina.
Louisiana
Ohio
Michigan
Iowa
California

J u n e 30,1888
....do
....do
Apr. 2,1888
July 2,1888
J u n e 30,1888
J u l y 1,1888

1, 994,180
33, 895

768, 485

793, 662

23, 733

74,190
213, 936
594, 5?2
6, 749, 970
20,119, 237
11, 728, 081

Total, mutual and stock.

53, 767, 274

7, 508, 289

-i 145

Total

22
43
42
23

58,589,011

8, 300, 507 39, 479, 936

-I 743 479, 369, 744 141, 598, 935 66, 333,458

MUTUAL—UNOFFICIAL.

Pennsylvania .
Delaware
Maryland
Illinois
Total.

J u n e 30,1888 :
7 11, 883, 231
Dec,'87, and !
May,'88,-2
J u n e 30,1888 ;•• 17 j 4,508,335
do
4 I 657,791

7,142,416

7, 232,813

3, 688, 511
264, 763

733, 537
592,164
12, 970

17,049,357

11,095, 690

8, 571,484

199, 226
241, 026
364,186
2, 584, 716
1, 008, 834
250,000

186, 636
255, 033
282,665
372, 524
141,931
244, 212

91,414
963, 673
103,634

4,647,988

483, 001

2, 004, 558

58 21, 697, 345

578,691

10, 576, 042

801 501,067, 089 165,177,626

76,909,500

30

STOCK—UNOFFICIAL.

Maryland
South Carolina.
Georgia
Ohio
Illinois
Utah
Total
Total, mutual and stock.
Total, all savings banks.




June 30,1888
....do
....do
....do
....do
...do

I

28

845,837

227

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
SOURCES, OF MUTUAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS IX 1887-?88.
RESOURCES—continued.
State,
R. R.
county,
Overdrafts. U. S. bonds. municipal, bonds and
stocks.
etc.,

Bank

stocks.

bonds.

. $8,475

$1, 879, 754
341, 000
2 1 0 , [>Q{)
8, 640, 378
3, 526, 000
2, 879, 705
132,704,160
10 710,170
200. 000
2 255 000
133, 8 i2
53, 300

$12, 433,106 $8, 856, 055
7,013,430 8, 500, 701
2, 566,92'
31, 663, 672 24, 265, 901
5, 651, 863 8, 796, 529
17,183, 804 20, 446, 329
201,200,769
170, 000
545 065
130,500

Real
Current
D u e from
estate,
expenses
All o t h e r
other
and
bonds a n d b a n k s a n d furniture,
and
taxes
stocks. b a n k e r s .
fixtures.
paid.

$2, 120, 065 $1,164, 632
$1, 233, 938
660,342
2, 092, 522 4, 451, 603 "$723," 982*
414, 630
212, 277
237 380
8, 240, 919 4, 902, 502
26, 850, 920
2, 392,180
2, 895,173
6, 388, 275
4,606,113
33," 630," 607' 7, 736, 103
1,079,636
4,997,051
14,013
247 658
7 406 726
779, 032
121,691
3, 000
95, 446
1*052,841 """680,245"

$7,
16,
8,
27,

kid
712
048
053

i 8,475 163, 542, 259 278, 559,131 70, 865, 515 40, 587, 335 19,072, 853 44,489,428 23, 287, 88(5

60,252

238, 824
28, 050

14, 788
3,450

3,475

341, 371
379, 722
387,164
2,016,701
3,1-43,196

160, 929

147, 049 163, 843,109 ' 280, 625,187 70, 8G5, 515 |40, 741, 610 40, 006, 319 52, 450, 672 26, 431, 082

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
0
10
11
12

221,181

45, 650

154, 275

908,196
5 100

8,404
50, 639
79, 439

70, 000
183, 20 J

86,315
1,066,445

2,000
155, 416
1, 040, 933
887, 936
18, 847,181

725, 586
4,005, 829
1, 866, 478
1, 096, 477

138, 574

300, 850

2, 066, 056

154, 275 20, 933, 4ti6

7, 961, 244

92

8, 866, 312
' 9,787,034
81, 470
18. 734, 816

3, 628, 392 12, 918, 468

49, 824

3, 805, 418

1, 090, 869

1,361,618

105, 407

136, 215
5, 440, 279
34, 891

73,136
254,462
59, 206

2,114, 762
4, 989 301
98, 495

157, 345
152, 077

240, 734
494, 826
75, 281

112, 588
3,829

436, 628 11, 007, 979

1, 400, 291

2,172, 459

221, 824

17, 710
1, 735, 617
45, 098
430, 068
1, 418, 845

20,150
372, 373
27, 958
1, 3G3, 962
1, 449, 947
17, 804

31,121
100, 744
74, 579
77. 907
86, 826
14, 625

991
8,740
7, 348
15, 323

3, 647, 338

3, 252,194

385, 802

32, 402

454, 556 14, 655, 317 4, 652,483

2, 558, 261

254, 226

97, 500
2, 733, 208
6, 742

6, 465, 842 18, 629, 853

4,000

8, 000

7,928

306, 990
5,000

10, 000

50, 000
469
:
2,424
i 4,676
; 3,583

350,100
549, 250

11,152

949, 350

11,152

19, 684,166

32, 264
125,190

1
2
3
4
5
fi
7

36 798
317, 298

358, 096

319, 990

6, 823, 938 18, 849, 843

17, 928

9;

158, 201 183, 527, 275 287,449,125 89,715,358 41,196,166 54, 661,636 57,103,157 28, G89, 343 475, 407




3
4

1
?,
3
4
5
6

228

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF CONDITION, FROM OFFICIAL AND UNOFFICIAL

RESOURCES—continued.

LIABILITIES.

Location.

Capital

Total.

Surplus.

stock.

MUTUAL—OFFICIAL.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont.
MuSvsacliusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York.
Mew Jersey
District, of'Columbia
Ohio
Indiana
Minnesota.

J

$41,283,614
59, 249, 863
13, 782, 474
317,097,499
58,460,527 |i.
107,896,912 !j!
590,458,751 i1

! ij 505| 360
!
18, 250
!
222, 345 \
i
333, 490 j
j
68, 509 ;

31,732,0-4
944, 9G5
17, 885, 820
2,915,805
4,640,259

!
:

i .
|i
!
;j
j|

j

.ii 1,170, 000
. ..jj
182,562
.II
151,234

,032 il, 246, 348, 513

Total.

515,531
237,167
a90, 411
202,170
50, 000
5'4, 772
249, 647
482,129

. 102,151, 623

STOCK—OFFICIAL.

1 Vermont
2 j North Carolina
3 Louisiana
4
5
<i
7

4, 247, 017
302, 808
813,4:8
9, 775, 558

.

$475, 450
88, 975
luO, 000
1,712,400

10, 000
1,056

i Ohio
• Michigan
• Iowa
; California

|
5153, 802
! 2,171, 722

319,848 i

'

; 4,333,129

565,681 | 144,120, 854 '13,122,434 j

Total
Total mutual and stock

223, 7i0
345,129
253, 755

28,035,467 I 3,703,702
14,625,024 j 2,037,400
85,727,492 ,; 4,404,447

833,660

' 17,414,793 |lO,426, 713 11,390,475,367 i;13,122, 434 102,985,283

MUTUAL—UNOFFICIAL.

Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
Illinois

;

Total
STOCK—UNOFFICIAL.
Maryland
South Carolina
Georgia
Ohio
Illinois
Utah
Total

Total mutual and stock

2, 539, 608
23, 202
374, 365
70,643

13, 762
60, 638,138
53,219 : 3,472, 305
133, 037 , 33, 265, 458
10, 004 : 1,528,162

3,007,818

.'

210,022 |

'8,904,003 |;

4, 052, 074
284, 419
290, 541
174,157
I 4,801,191

'
!
i

13, 300
30,148 I
930 :
240,050 I
29, 749 ' 1,270.914 i
18, 907
121,277
3
710,173
11, 309

j 1,142, 706

610,624 ;
!
3,968,186,!
2,243,398 |
9,971,550 .
1
13,221,322 !:
j
541,533 ,

184,656
330,540
308.600
1,379,091
975,000 j
50,100 \

15,600
222, 500
57, 000
605, 560
927, 341
22, 465

1,304,114 j% 30,556,619 jj 3,227,887 j 1,850,466

| 4,150, 524 17514,136 j 129,4607682~ 1 "37227^887^j
1

7 7

Total all savings-banks. .. 21, 565, 317 11,940,849 1,519,936,049 |16,35O,321 109,636,940




'I

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

229

SOUKCES, OF MUTUAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS IN 1887-'88—Coutiuucd.
LIABILITIES—continued.

Other
undivided Dividends
unpaid.
profits.

21,006
265, 514
641
31, 974
16, 046, 382

Due
to other
banks.

3, 955, 426 i

3,1G0,130 |

3,681

3,592,219 i
127,180 !
664,098 I
7, 609,974
22, 943, 806
11,208,079
77,718,534

50,001 .':
73,788 i:

838
42
1, 945
2 225
9 COO

692,184

14,050

308, 579
3,^43,811
1, 761, 282
7. 748, 204
10,581,210
469, 067
24,172,183 |

i 2, 691, 963

14, 050

116,123,707

i 23,0597342

37, 488 1, 364,196, 550

$325.58 1
385.36 2
278.61 3
320; 66 4
460.81 5
367. 041 (
>
381.32 7
274.42 8
97.84 9
388. 42 30
236.14 11
223. 22 12
355. 73 |

331. 81
87.83
284. 28
318.11
259.16
312. 96
731.38

849, 317 j 1, 053,112 | 209,328
,

460.12

73, 017
544, 579
179,416
48, 624

j

J
|

1 I

39,335 j
387,627 !:
"502,'366'lj

i9,502
Z>57, 888

197, 695
13, 524
120, 955
14, 632

129,248

22,321

10, 680

:\
4
5
6
1

280. 58
235. 72
264. 93
85.40

346, 806

265.14

1,935
8,800
11,939
15,491
19, 862
4,000

190.48
368. 61
147. 52
500.17
532. 73
117. 26

f>2. 027

389. 70

51,858

$10, 680

1

f

895, 452 | 5, 008, 538 | 3, 429, 458 |
|
363. 93

91,951,524 I

19,892
127, 689
28,022
209, 691
303, 890

Average
amount
due each.

10, 826
1,448
i, 336
in, 922
88, 529
36, 004
106, 263

1

55, 469, 516
3,187, 886
38,041,508
1, 249, 614

1,999,779

'86,635
a668, 385

46,135

23, 438 jl, 248, 072, 843 j

91.6,907
24,182

$G0,963
194, 789
2
314, 959
56,427
2,192,206
191, 353
189, 706
1

2, 300

23, 438 I 123, 923, 896 j

1,0G4 , 690

No. of
depositors.

Other
liabilities.

119, 229
139, 967
46, 694
944, 778
120,144
278,415
1,325,062
105, 895
9, 443
42, 836
11,205
16, 962

$43, 835

.1,124,148,947

119,347
7, 582
49,149
180
1, 209
115, 903
689,115
21,449
236, 374 '
3,053,527 j . _ . . . . .

20, 307, 379

Deposits of
State,
county, and
municipal
disbursing
officers.

$38, 819,
53, 939,
13, 009,
302, 948,
55, 363,
102,189,
505, 017,
29,060,
923,
16, 444,
2, 645,
3, 786,

$887, 477
2, 878, 828
382,214
8, 631, 746
2, 946, 982

4, 320, 997 |

Individual
deposits.

.1
9, 756
37, 053
10, 784 !
73, 444
137, 037 I

21,059 j
33, 848 j
49, 496 !
10,001 I
337,727 :
1:
452,132

10, 680

~159, 358

408, 833

284. 03

10, 680

1, 054, 810

3, 838, 291

355. 41

a Includes $459,008 commercial deposits, $150,000, the capital of two banks, and $56,007 dividends
unpaid.
b Includes $55,000, tho capital of two banks which claim to he mutual.




230

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF CONDITION, FROM OFFICIAL
RESOURCES.

Date of re- No. of
Loans
port.
banks Loans on on personal Loans and
and colreal estate. lateral se- discounts.
curity.

Location.

OFFICIAL.

1
2
3
4
5

North Carolina
Wisconsin
.
Missouri
California
Wyoming

June 30,1888
July 2,1888
Apr. 30,1888
July 1,1888
June 30,1888

Total

10
72
91
30
9

504,107
1, 828. 317
4, 500

$5,174, 076
6,715,640
377,108

362, 29J

212

.

$96.. 776

2,433, 700

12, 266, 824

5, 822, 935

21,400
845, 210
82,118
495,152
23, *)0
11,050
23, 502
53, 931
15, 385
134,400

132, 075
422, 635
15, 615
554, 384
739,017
2, 8U5, 405
57,924
3G0, 641
62, 259
284, 868
269, 232
242, 963

$686,169
4, 774, 473

UNOFFICIAL.

1 M^aine
<•>

3
4
fi
7
8
9
10
U
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
21
»?,
23
9

5

9Q

27
28
29
30
31
3'}
33
34
35
3(5
37
38
39

Massachusetts
Connecticut
Now York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
M^arylond
Virginia
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas

.-.

-- . . . . .

June 30,1888
do
do

do
..do
..do
do
do
do
do

..do
. do
.. do
.

Ohio ....'
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan.
Wisconsin
Iowa
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Colorado
Nevada
California
Oregon.
Arizona
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico
Utah
AVashin^ton
Wyoming
Total




do
do
do

.

..

do
..do
do
do

..

...

do
...do
do

...do
do

do
do
do
do
do

do
do

do
do
do

... do
do
do

....do

2
5
3
30
6
39
3
3
3
8
7
6
2
2
26
7
12
69
39
120
53
3
134
39
5
122
125
16
3
7
4
63
1
2
3
6
9
9

1,300
313, 559
17, 583
2,100
1, 063,089
355, 944
1, 335,252
3G6, 240
32, 055
585, 038
154,194
74, 277
260, 385
194, 308
97, 297
56,587
16,450
103, 517
4,800
33,165
165,618
201, 363

HO, 977
1, 862, (;95
2S1,100
818,301
6, 752, 243
3, 758, 887
13, 062, 194
1, 062, £94
3,749
a, 165, 392
1, 570, 791
316,153
4, 228, 610
4,118,466
527, 263
198,129
66, 370
201,173
198,174
1, 232, 805
7,200
1G, 023
10J, 755
1, 317, 545
689, 278

13,000 :
288 141
1,110^ 681
714,237
4,618,531
78, 542
26, 9B9
21, 246
22,100
26,148
860, 878
104,854
1 484 481
34,419 |
473,810
676, 343
443, 537
2, 522, 072
968, 5G4
GO, 392
•1,701,741
523, 116
11, 550
1,158, 5JQ
351, 351
613, 448
1, 420
13,777
63, 649
8s), 350
20, 000
1,174,903
10, 652
44, 837
372, 221
30, 886

991

7,140, 369

54, 340,185

20, 972,444

1,203

9, 574, 069

66, 607, 009

26, 71)5, 379

PtEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AND UNOFFICIAL

SOUIICHS, or

PIUVATE BANKS IX

231

1388.

RESOURCES—continued.

Overdrafts.

State,
R. II.
county,
municipal, bonds and
stocks.
etc.,
bonus.

U.S.
bonds.

5,657
8, 181
5, 939
1, 828
55 509
176, 58!)
5, *>81
18,408
6;.), 840
24, 755
298, 473
7, 502
9

44 799
57 485
5, 6G9
118,437
107.319
28; 287
79, 131

!

i

$203, 614
3,000
12,940
86, 510
343, 771

i

$25, 728

80, 000

4,000
16, 605

36, C O
O
1
i

8,290
1, 500
2,000

1,000
74,715

29,000

40, 600

44,646

21,800
825

97,600

20, 694

!

130, 209
2, 000

3, 000
5,000
10, 979
113,714
31, 580
79, 203
6,500

1,000
100

72, 644
4,000
1,000
124, 049
13, 000

!
i

190,095
890, 320
1G4,600
11,000

10,
43,
463,
12,

36, 6,36
184, 885

800
500
280
000

38 900

I
i

1,994
330

8, 285
19 895
3l' 259

70,690
4,240

5,080
5 281
58 381
27, 936

Duo from
other
banks and
bankers.

Real
Current
estate,
expenses
furniture, and taxes
and
paid.
fixtures.

$74
370,
451).
7^9
44,

042 i
797
810
f>27
410

339
65, 483

15, 750

$126,774
1,122, 089
2 035 864
171 640
220, 331

737 680

;

1,731

58,100

d

KIO, 093
520,101
22, 674

i

500

78, 723
46
36,175

b

$04, 212

1,431
326, 307

| AH other

•&&• j ^ :

i

18, 964

561
15, 899

,„

$300

$27, 933
14H 479 $240, 855
85. 452
j 270,391

465, 767

T.

3, 682, 698

1, 678 696

10, 000
32,433
11, 862
206, 956
45, 372
367, 936
6, 620
15, 244
18, 280
11, 935
3, 000
941, 405
5,900
3, 225
178,317
1, 000
43,176
148, 342
228, 458
419, 589
29, 688
500
149,457
42, 893
149, 352
231, 331
31,737
27, 543
25, 005

39, 008
240, 000
58, 320
509,993
212,829
1, 608, 977
14, 878
58,521
25, 263
44, 781
93, 092
305, 290
16, 346
28, 032
709, 443
189, 770
198, 901
1,388,275
1, 014, 988
3, 523, 239
476, 794
18,978
1,898,342
5-9,281)
64,471
1, 058, 907
1, 042, 821
346,128
15,551
32 582

2, 860
4,000

48,145
45, 461
75,000

35, 839
40, 572
301, 553

358
33, 774
90, 715

140, 947
63; 144
403, 527
398, 629
11,110

185, 796
71, 335
289,715
25, 051
34, 606
64, 053
356, 148
33,658
244, 049
8, 495
21, 629
564, 878
21,188
24, 280
623, 327
394, 641
1,377,089
328,835
3, 300
1,105,141
208, 270
20. 752
1, 048, 750
679, 214
90,101
21,800
;<3 718
24, 309
24, 61-3
269, 608
44, 200
25, 305
15, 050
44, 527
80, S74
4, 280

$3 410
32, 729
5,616
41 704.

2,284
4,931
1,729
11,938
15, 323
47, 860
361
4,351
500
5,147
2,818
12, 037
2, 802
841
18, 732
6, 604
4,728
73, 646
23,816
140, 543
34, 205
30
104, 695
38, 858
1,122
95, 501
108, 666
23, 390
1,569
4,570
2,081
3,435
39, 902
10, 028
921
8,174
8,095
515

j'l, 606, 619 1, 392, 415

760, 673 1,168, 584

695,492 3, 680, C09

17, 218,193

8,431,614

866, 808

2, 072, 386 1, 718, 722

-762, 404 1,168, 584

695,492 4,417, 689

20, 900,891

10,110,310

908, 572




1
3
4
5

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
2(5
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39

232

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
ABSTRACT O F R E P O R T S OF C O N D I T I O N , F R O M O F F I C I A L AND

RESOURCES—continued.

Location.

North Carolina.
Wisconsin
Missouri
California
Wyoming

Cash
and cash
items.

Other resources

Total.

LIABILITIES.

Capital.

Surplus.

$15,617
37,318
26, 799
235, 357
3

$1,163, 931
7, 458, 978
9, 829, 512
11,815,549
1,175, 999

$247, 000
972.978
1, 370, 241
3, 793, 092
329, 325

3, 690,773

Total.

752, 238
1,142, 320
1,614,857
112, 669

295, 094

31,413,969

6, 712, 636 1,002 948

13, 936
83, 205
34, 964
188, 742
148, 481
812, 315
8,525
29, 002
11,102
33, 648
82, 202
193, 728
22, 875
17,342
670, 709
122, 995
84,732
213,122
874,109
408, 111
305,431
13, 521
971, 624
200, 639
49, 475
831,317
438, 777
205, 612
40, 593
55, 971
41,071
62,988
194, 520
1, 800
208, 485
35, 911
134, 248
286,254
4,316

15, 000
1,560
145, 594
11, 696
32, 223
4:*3
1,917
3,469
7,890
5,667
503, 037
1
22, 903
227,105
28, 072
4, 551
152, 685
39, 802
929, 453
142, 963
168
126, 512
47,414
2, 003
135, 341
17, 387
' 558
6,168
1
34, 406
3
143, 310
64, 000
3
5
6,019
164
1

213,223
1, 320,187
385, 073
3, 851, 233
2,143, 523
11, 761, 323
215,880
666,796
231,174
897, 705
53!\ 383
3, 613, 772
163, 926
291, 768
6,230,202.
713,012
1, 720.632
12,66i;3l2
8, 124, 346
27, 453, 307
3, 754, 676
133, 293
12,164, 285
3, 376, 946
695, 824
9, 294,158
7,103, 476
1, 9G5, 627
387, 952
194, 632
417, 588
548, 644
2, 455, 525
217, 000
1, 580, 774
270, 584
2, 216, 650
2, 242, 762
51,114

60, 000
420, 000
166 544
56, 285
903, 738
296, 986
346, 214
127, 500
1, 286, 843
912, 376
133,408
498
110,000
15, 400
161,353
5, 567
600, 898
25, 000
129,164
12, 929
273, 500
428, 316
52, 000
11,100
167, 000
19,923
98, 670
2, 833, 569
219, 500
9,448
5:i6,180
36,456
2,492, 534
665, 534
2, 204, 009
248, 148
5, 067, 412 2, 370, 644
1, 087, 687
139, 002
12, 000
5, 303
4,174,133
617, 723
919, 652
200, 797
200, 000
32, 000
3,834,127'
404,471
2, 492, 292
365, 730
474, 897
59, 737
168, 700
29, 362
99, 573
187,900
12,961
160, 000
50, 000
1,130, 824
118,453
50, 000
25, 000
119, 320
50, 620
105, 800
4, 720
279, 811 1, 003, 372
488, 515
15, 000
30,000

11,136, 398 12, 859,484

132, 269, 287

34,129, 438 8, 585, 290

14,827,171 3,154, 578

163, 713, 256

40, 842, 074 9, 588, 238

$(J8, G89

$39, 450

892, 447
71 051

UNOFFICIAL.

lAIaino
Massachusetts .
Connecticut"
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania ..
Maryland
Virginia
South Carolina .
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota.
Missouri . . . .
Kansas
Nebraska
Colorado
Nevada
California
Oregon
Arizona
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico . . .
Utah
Washington
Wyoming
Total.
Total, official and unofficial




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

23o

LrN< tFi/U'iAL S O U R C E S , O F PiiiVATE. B A N K S I N 1 8 8 8 — C o n t i n u e d .
LIABILITIES—continued

Other
undivided
profits.

State-bank

notes.

Deposits of
State,
State,
Dividends Individual county, and county, and
unpaid.
deposits. municipal municipal
disbursing
deposits.
officers.

$33, 817
554, 281

20, 353, 852

6 597
50 OliO
2, 997
(37, 935
78 896
204,471
907
27 3°6

146 626
0"6 414
20sl 804
2, 259,153
1,470 396
8, 932, 477
63, 11)2
386 3 9 5
43 5L3
171. 672
374. 885
1 315 6(i9
73 161
8? (M2
2, 590, 754
437, «20
1,010,819
8, 637, 624
4, 893, 064
15, 335,137
2 278, 518
107 349
6, 388, 870
1, 796, 211
447, 335
4 084,959
3, 447, 089
1 259 495
102 272
81 930
185,612
288, 407
874,716
12, 000
1, 365, 804
154 345
894, 021
1, 619, 370
10, 540

1, 885, 464

638
843
85()
6 '8

300

6
224'
10
24,
319
10!),
458,
70

'M)"-*
397
5*<2
273
287
747
677
y >o
904
392, 379
92,469
3 834
3°9 870

8
10, 641
10,081
12,659
5,884

312,118

7, 357
4, 220
5, 000
14, 383
5,240

76
5
1
5

781

$21, 000

241
472
878
989

25

10,291
132 433
120, 000
29, 539
4 234
22, 087
38, 368
4,524

3 762

16

$15, 707
186,518
454,261
744, 400
4, 023

$423, 931
2, 756
97, 894
203, 828
20, 213

11,732

1, 209, 210

9
12
704
7

Other
liabilities.

$11,'732

590, 838
24, 274

$404,026
5 74"> 445
1 014' 669
6, 477, 331
715, 381

$2, 075
486
1,734

Due
to other
banks.

1,404,969

748, 622

1, 940
12 500
10, 300

20,000
24, 987
95, 679
38 6^0
185, 522

36, 563
32, 000
221,978
40 691
227, 600
17,815
76 002
8 604
57, 825
2,466
631,368
14 502

3
4
5

1

$1,749
28 220

24 642
3, 383
1,153
5,016

15, 213
861

30, 000

10,764
28,730

5, 000

36, 930
294, 574
222,128
6,914
6 517
148,410
97, 734
6,904

115,390
69, 964
144 674
81,779

55, 999
10, 486

17, 640
33, 391

13, 672

3, 606
40,100

27 041
8, 754
31, 519
1 780
154, 847
4 674
16 000
G5, 806
731
76, 321
195, 033
192,292
1,742,241
21, 630
45, 670
75, 649
751
128 155
115, 231
49 906
55, 498
5 250
5, 964
27,878
12, 728
15,
1
12,
40,

489
483
782
568

1

3
4
R
(5
7
H

0
10
11
12
13

14

375,461 1 5
201 1 6
30, 575 1 7
298, 729 1 8
114,831 1 9
358, 945 20
144,121 ">]
274, 353 23
120, 250 24
'•>•>

353
206,
34
26,

519
992
865
648
1
1,497
12,068
135, 546
10, 000
2
2
955
841
50

4, 030, 538

21, 000

84, 658

74, 524, 990

2, 419,440

1, 052, 307

3, 496, 479

3,875,147

5, 289, 748

21, 000

84, 658

94, 878, 842

2,419,440

1, 064, 039

4, 901, 448

4, 623, 769




s

27

29
30
31
3?
33
34
35

37
38
39

234

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
SAVINGS BANKS—OFFICIAL AND UNOFFICIAL/

AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES

I

1883-'84.

OF SAVINGS BANKS FROM 1883-'84 TO

1884-'85.

1885-'8G.

1886-'87.

1887-'88.

638 banks.

684 banks.

801 banks.

Resources and liabilities.
636 banks. • 646 banks.
Resources.
$418, 372, 64! $457, 441, 666
Loans on real estate
$358, 686, 040 $389, 953, 928
145, 553,135
Loans on pers'l and collat'l security 141, 457, 111 133, 716, 902127, 677,70
37, 904, 817
Other loans and discounts
90,125
Overdrafts
196, 226, 202 191, 980, 698 197,171, 307 180, 248, 754
U.S. bonds
State, county, and municipal bonds. 222, 218,006 228,993,250 241,051,536 215,764, 815
50, 994, 579 59, 585,489 63, 511, 735 74,408,931
K. R. bonds and stocks
37, 929, 754 38, 460, 603 39, 029, 813 40, 067, "'
Bank stocks
50, 684,227
Other stocks, bonds, and mortgages.
55,109, 727
Due from other banks and bankers
52, 358, 971 46,125, 014
43, 689,10;
29, 639, 750
Real estate, furniture, and fixtures
34, 467, 276 32,174, 810
30, 984, 88!
1, 761,450
Current expenses and taxes paid...
156,944
166, 636
142, 71'
Gold coins
Gold certificates
Silver coins
14, 079, 452 13, 423, 064 19, 757,941 18, 005,235
Silver certificates
Legal tenders and nat'1-bank notes.
Checks and other cash items
69,166, 584 68,445,304
Other resources
79, 451, 562 70, 980, 412

$501, 067,089
165,177, 626
76, 909, 500
158,201
183, 527, 275
287, 449,125
89,715,358
41,190,160
54, 661, 63(5
57,103,157
28, 989, 343
475, 407
21,565,317
11, 940, 849

1,177, 740, 919 1,203, 025, 698 1, 260,840, 9411, 377,660,724 1,519, 936, 049

Total .
Liabilities.

r

10,090, 866 16, 350, 321
Capital stock
82, 395, 717 88, 647, 315 96,924,117 lift, 695, 310 109, 636,940
Surplus fund
7,204,933
23, 059, 342
16, 904,753 13,106, 359 15,326,391
Other undivided profits
193, 386
37,488
Dividends unpaid
Individual deposits
1, 073, 294,955 1, 095,172,14' 1,141, 530, 578 1,235, 736,069 1,364,196, 550
State, county, and municipal deposits
Deposits of State, county, and mu10,680
nicipal disbursing officers
054, 810
90, 788
Duo to other banks and b a n k e r s —
589, 918
4, 649, 372
Other liabilities
5,145,494
6, 099,877
7, 059, 855

Total.




1,177,740, 919 1,203, 025, 698 1,260, 840,9411, 377, 660, 724 1, 519, 936, 049
* Official only prior to 1886-'87.

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

235

TABLE, BY STATES, OF THE AGGREGATE DEPOSITS OP SAVINGS BANKS, WITH THE
NUMBER OP THEIR DEPOSITORS AND THE AVERAGE AMOUNT DUE TO EACH, IN

1886-'87 AND 1887->88.
1886-'87.
States.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
KhGde Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
District of Columbia!
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Louisiana
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Iowa
Minnesota
Utah
California
Total.

Number of
depositors.

Amount of
deposits.

1887-'88.
Average
to each
depositor.

114, G91
132, 714
53, 810
906, 039
119,159
260, 888
1, 264, 535
98,137
156, 722
12, 744
59, 505
8, 215
*377

$37, 215, 071
50, 822, 762
15, 587,050
291,197, 900
53, 284, 821
97,424,8-iO
482, 48(5, 730
27, 482,135
42,219,099
2, 771, 392
19, 020, 962
834, 524
11, 307

*41, 059
9, 933
"•28, 038

15, 005, 659
2, 312, 013
14, 061, 258

366.93 (
232. 75
501.51 !

*39, 638
15, 474

9, 969, 019
3, 402,950

251.50 I
219.91

*90, 245

70, 077, 899

3, 418, 013 1, 235, 247, 371




Number of
depositors.

A m o u n t of
deposits.

Average
to each
depositor.

776. 52

119, 229
139,967
57,520
944, 778
120,144
278,415
1,325,062
305,895
197, 695
13, 524
122,890
9, 443
1,448
8,800
11,939
2,336
*8l, 749
11, 205
*34,494
*8H, 529
*36. 004
16; 962
4,000
*100, 203

$38, 819, 643
53, 939, 079
16, 602, 066
302, 948, 624
55, 363, 28:1
102,189, 934
505, 017, 751
29, 000,189
55,460,516
3,187, 886
32,413,087
923, 9")8
127,186
3, 243, 811
1, 761, 282
' 664, 098
31,802,484
2, 645, 907
11, 830, 854
22, 943, H)0
11,268,079
3, 786, 306
460, 067
77,718,534

$325.58
3HA 36
288.63
320.66
460. 81
367.04
381.12
274.42
280. 58
235.72
263. 75
97.84
87.83
368. 61
147. 52
284. 28
3S0. 02
236.14
342.98
259.16
312. 96
223. 22
117.26
731. 38

361. 39

3, 838, 291 1, 364,190, 550

355.41

$324.47
382.94
289.67
321.40
447.18
365.04
381.55
280,04
269. 39
217.46
319.33
101.22
30.00

*Partially estimated.

236

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

TABLE SHOWING THE GKOWTII OF SAVINGS BANKS, AS INDICATED BY DEPOSITS, IN
THE STATES NAMED, IN 1830, 1840, AND 1850 TO 1887-88.*

Date.

California.

Maine.

N. Hampshire.

Vermont.

Massachu- Rhode
Island.
setts.

Connecti- XewYork.
cut.

sey.

$350,000 $2, 623, 304
$2, 500, 000 $200,000i
$250, 000
1830..
500, 000 1, 500, 000 5, 431, 966
5,819,554
750, 000
1840..
13,600,024 1, 495, 545 5, 466, 444 20, 832, 972
1, 641, 543 $199, 376
1850 . .
282, 217 15, 554, 089 1,907,233 6, 698,158 24, 006, 599
1, 776, 768
1851..
407,188 18, 401, 308 2,474,109 8,135,016 27, 541, 923
2, 009, 617
1852..
704, 990 23, 370,102 3, 308,769 8, 883, 397 32,824,177
2, 507, 909
1853..
901, 789 25, 936, 858 4,104, 091 10,006,131 33, 453,781
3,222,261
1854 . .
897,40" 27,296,217 4, 834, 312 10, 844,933 26,012,713
$867,131 3,341,256
1855..
897,432 30, 373, 447 5, 797, 857 12,162,136 41, (599, 502
919, 571 3, 537, 363
1856..
875, 909 33,015.757 6, 079, 053 12, 562, 594 41,422,672
968, 325 3, 748, 285
1857..
819, 650 33,914,972 6,340,621 14, 052,181 48,194, 8=T
968,194 3, 588, 658
1858..
940, 816 39,424,419 7, 765, 771 16,565,284 58,178,160
923,397 4,138, 222
1859 . .
1, 539, 257 4, 860, 024 1, 111, 532 45, 054, 230 9,163, 760 19,377,670 67,440, 397
I860..
5, 590, 052 1, 231, 940 41,785,439 9,282,879 19, 983, 959 64, 083,119
1,708,961
186L . .
1,876,165! 5,653,535 1,348,833 50,403,674 9,560,441 2JJ, 146, 930 76, 538,183
18G2 . .
2,641, 476 6, 560, 308 1,678,26' 56,883,828 11,128,713 26, 951, 802 93, 786, 384 $5, 500, 000
1863 ..
3, 672, 975 7, 661, 738 1,952,500 62, 557, 6U4; 12, 815,097 20,142,288111,737,763 6, 570, 839
1864 ..
3, 336, 828 7,831,335
1865.. $7, 005, 062 3,336,828 7,831,335 1,708,531 59, 936, 48213, 533, 002 27, 319,013[115, 472.56C 6,450, 357
1866 ..10, 358, 888 3, 946, 4331 7, 857, 601 1, 589, 354 67, 732, 26417, 751, 713 31, 224, 4(34 131, 769, 074 7, 620, 180
J867 ..17,365, 597 5, 598, 600 10, 463, 418 1, 815, 662 80, 431, 583 21, 413, 647| 36, 283, 4G0J151,127, C62 9,431, 807
1868 . 23, 818,. 533 8, 032, 246 13, 511, 534 2. 046, 321 94,838,336 24,408,635 4l| 803^ 681 i 169i 808, 678 11, 545,526
1869 .128,893,64:" 10, 8J9,955|16, 379, 857 2, 601, 940 112, 111), 016 27, 067, 072 47, 904, 834j 191, 360, 21715, 428, 910
1870 . |36, 555,909!16, 597,888118, 759, 461 2, 745, 779 135, 745, 097 30, 708, 501 55,297, 705-230, 749,408 20, 001, 951
1871 . :44, 235, 010:22, 787, 802j21,472,120 3,172, 525 L63, 704,077,30, 289, 703 62,717, 8141267, 905, 826 25,231, 311
431, 326126, 151, 333:24, 700, 774 3, 830, 224 1S4, 797, 313! 42, 583, 538 68, 523, 397i285,286,621 28, 754, 482
1872 .. 51,
1873 .. 5^ 833, 373! 29, 556, 523|29, 671,114 4, 478, 842 202, 195, 343 46, 61.7,183 70, 769,407.285, 520,085 30, 060, 534
1874.. 69, 020. 603 31, 051, 963 28,829, 376 5, 011, 8311217, 452,120 48, 771, 501 73, 783, 802303, 935, 649 32, 044, 840
4
1875 .. 70, 152, 5(58 ;30, 757, 651:30,214, 585 6, 004, 694234, 974, 69151,311,331 76, 875, 0491311), 260, 202 32, 727, 342
00:
"
1876-7 31, 85 (!0i) 26 662,150130,963,047 6,815,829 243, 340, 643,50, 512, 272 78, 524,172 319, 716, 864 29, 318, 543
18,
!
77, 214, 372:312, 823, 058 16, 353, 275
i,
1877-8 70, 984,704125,708, 472 28, 789, 54!) (5,722,691
562
1878-9 57, 843, 025 21,164, 50326, 282,136
014
1879-0 47, 719, 829 20, 978, 140 28, 204, 791
638
1880-1 49, 954, 33323, 277, <>76J32f 097, 734
[>;4G, 771, 723' 8!), 522, 30ll387,832, 8i>325,321, 713
1881-2 53,
20H, 789 26,474, 555|30,181,187
27, 344, 035
1882-3 56,
03, 890|39,124, 815 10, 686, 941 241, 311, 362 48, 320, 072j 84, 942, 410 412,147, 213
29, 323,428
1883-4 59,
501 24, 017,917
1884-5 58,
250 25,335, 780
1885-6 60,
135
1886-7 70, 077,' 803:371 215,' 072j56; 822,762! 15', 587^ 050!291.; 197; 9 0 0 ^ 284, 821 97; 424; 820J482,486; 730 27,482,
18t)
1887-8 77,
718 534 38 819, 643 53, 939, 079!10, 602, 0661302, 948, 624 55, 363, 283 102,189, 931 505, 017,751129, 060,
I
I I
I
I
I
I
I

Date.
1876-7
1877-8
1878-9
1879-0
1880-1
1881-2
1882-3
1883-4
1884-5
1885-6
1886-7
1887-8

Pennsylvania.

Delaware.

Maryland.

South
Dist. of
North
Georgia.
Columbia. Carolina. Carolina.

$19, 543, 967
$17, 577, 468
19,739,206 * "$382," 905
17,1)23,825
19, 981, 366
280, 609
19,923,95! ..........
367, C92
23, 956,28 5
462, 636
23, 824, 354
26, 895, 295
9
548, 532
25, 989, 874
9 913 Olio
690,400
27, 205, 225
32, 347, 733
622, 304
28, 336, 934
34, 031, 154
731, 733
28, 663, 083
35 362 6G0
793,943
30,542, 992
37, 5:30, 370
8:54, 524 '""$ii,~307
42, 219, 099 $2,771,392 19,020,962
923, 958
55, 469, 516 3,187, 886 32, 413, 0S7
127,186

Date.
1876-' r
1877-"! 8
1878-' r "9
1879-'* 0
1880-'*51
1881-'*52
1882-'*53
1883-'*54
1884-'*55
1885-'*56
1886-'*37 .
1887-'*38

Indiana.

Illinois.

Michigan.

Louisiana.

Ohio.

$1," 932," 330
2,009,835

$10, 041, 726
8, 623, 245
8,796,811
9, 710, 771
10, 902, 052
12,417, 317
12, 969, 666

1*
12
15
$1," 761,' 282 ""664,098 31

Iowa.

$1,986, 025

Minnesota.

605, 008
823, 374
065,659
802,484

Utah.

$280,146

.
1,330, 956
1, 755, 256
2,108,428
2,171, 009
,
2, 312,013 $14, 001,258
2, 645,967 11,830, 854 $22, 943, 806

$9,969, 019
11,268, 079

3,195
3, 654,
3, 891,
3, 786,

926
528
650
366 $469, 067

* For the years 1830 to 1875 inclusive, from E. W. Keyes' History of Savings Baaks in the United
States; for later years from returns compiled in this Bureau.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

237

PRIVATE BANKS-OFFICIAL AND UNOFFICIAL.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF PRIVATE BANKS IN 1887

AND

1888.

Resources and liabilities.
1,001 banks. 1,203 banks.
Resources.
Loans on real estate
Loans on personal and collateral security
Other loans and discounts
Overdrafts
United States bonds
State bonds .."
Railroad bonds and stocks
Bank stocks Other stocks, bonds, and mortgages
Due from other banks and bankers
Real estate, furniture, and
Current expenses and taxes paid
Gold coins
Gold certificates
Silver coins
Silver certificates
Legal tenders and national-bank notes
Other resources

,

fixtures

$17, 588,540
63, 774,934
24, 305, 262
1, 858, 778
4, 354, 65(3
35f?, 234
I
904,872
,
592,991
6, 743, 050
' 22, 226, 065
j 9, 757, 816
751, 547
\
!")
!|
j > 15, 663, 724
i|
Ij
3, 539,870

$9, 574, 069
66, 607, 009
26, 795, 379
2, 072, 386
1,718,722
762,404
1,168, 584
695,492
4, 417, 689
20, 900, 891
10,110 310
908; 572
14, 827,171
3,154, 578

174, 478, 339 163, 713, 256

Total.
Liabilities.
Capital
Surplus fund
Other undivided profits
State-bank notes outstandin;
Dividends unpaid
Individual deposits
State, county, and municipal deposits
Deposits of State, county, and municipal disbursing officers .
Duo to other banks and bankers
Other liabilities
Total




40, 079,438
12, 238, 065
5, 925, 835
2,155
170, 055
' 96, 580, 457
946,192
158,905
813,151
564, 086

i

40,842,074
9, 588,238
5, 289,748
21,000
84, 638
94, 878,842
2, 419, 440
1, 064, 039
4, S01,448
4, 623, 769

! 174, 478, 339 163, 713,256

238

EEPOitT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE NATIONAL SAVINGS BANK OF THE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA, AT WASHINGTON, D. C , AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS OX THE 4TH DAY
OF OCTOBER, 1888.
CR.

DR.
RESOURCES.

LIABILITIES.

Loans and discounts (see schedule) . . . $558, 201. 98 Undivided profits
Individual deposits subUnited States bonds on hand (par
value), 4 per cents —
200, 000. 00
ject to check
$957,363.45
Other stocks, bonds, and mortgages
Time certificates of do170, 000. 00
posit
1,000.00
(market value, see schedule)
Duo from State and private banks and
3, 821. 35
bankers (see schedule)
3, 730.75
Current expenses and taxes paid
28, 600. 00
"Premium (market value) on bonds
Checks and other cash items (see
2 777.28
60.00
Bills of other banks
Fractional paper currency, nickels,
23 89
and cents
•
Specie, viz:
Gold coin
$90. 00
Silvercoin
370.00
Silver Treasury certificates
1,440.00

$13,251.80

958, 363.45

1 Q00 00
2,500. 00

Legal-tender notes
Total

971, 615. 25

Total

971, 615.25

SCHEDULES.
Loans and discounts.
On mortgages and other real-estate security
On United States bonds (demand loans)
On other stocks, bonds, etc. (demand loans)

$319, 383.86
4,200.00
234,618.12
558,201.98

Other stocks, oonds, and mortgages,
50,000 District of Columbia 5s
50,000 District of Columbia 6s
40,000 District of Columbia 3.65s
30,000 Georgia 7s
Total

$50, 000.00
50, 000.00
40,000.00
30, 000. C
O
170, 000. G
O

I, Benjamin P . Snider, president of the National Savings Bank of the District of Columbia, do
solemnly swear that the above statement is true, to the best of my knowledge and belief.
BENJAMIN P . SNYDER,

President.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,

City of Washington :
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 8th day of October, 1888.
[SEAL.]

GEO. W. BUAUG,

Notary Public.
Correct.

Attest:
ANDREW AVYLIE,
M. G. EMERY,
LEWIS CLEPIIANE,
ZEXAS C. EOBBIXS,

The highest rate of interest paid by the bank is 2 per cent.
Number of depositors October 1, 1888, 9,852.




Directors.

AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES

THE NATIONAL BANKS
FROM

OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTOBER, 1888.




2H9

240

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF THE NATIONAL

APRIL.

JANUARY.

JULY.

OCTOBER 5.

Resources.
66 banks.
T oins find discounts
TJ S l)onds and securities

$5, 4G6, 088.33
5, 662, 600.00
106, 009.12

Due from nat'l and other b'ks
Real estate furniture etc
Premiums paid

2, 625, 597.05
177, 565. 69
53, 808. 92
2, 503.69

Specie and other lawful niou'y

492,138. 58
761, 725.00
1,446, 607. 62

1

Total

>

16, 797, 644.00

1864.
JANUARY 4.

APRIL 4.

JULY 4.

OCTOBER 3.

139 b a n k s .

307 banks.

467 banks.

508 banks.

Loans and discounts
TJ. S. bonds and securities...
Otheritems

$10, 666, 005. 60
15,112, 250. 00
74, 571.48

$31, 593, 943.43
41,175,150. 00
432, 059. 95

$70, 746, 513. 33
92, 520, 500.00
812, 017. 73

$93, 238, 657.92
108, 064,400.00
1,434, 739. 76

Due from national banks
Due from other b'ks and b'krs
Real estate, furnikae, etc
C in-rent expenses

*4, 786,124. 58
3S1,144. 00
118, 854.43

4, 699, 479. 56
8, 537,908.94
755, 696. 41
352, 720. 77

15, 935, 730.13
17, 337, 558. 66
1, 694, 049.46
502, 341. 31

19, 965, 720.47
14,051,396.31
2, 202, 318. 20
1, 021, 569. 02

Checks and other cash items.
Bills of nat'l and other banks
Specie and other lawful nion'y

577, 507. 92
895, 521. 00
5, 018, 622. 57

2, 651, 916. 96
1,6G0, 000. 00
22, 961,411. 64

5, 057,122. 90
5, 344,172.00
42, 283, 798. 23

7, 640,169.14
4,687, 727. 00
44, 801,497.48

37, 620, 691. 58

114, 820, 287. 66

252, 273, 803. 75

297,108,195. 30

Total

1865.
JANUARY 2.

APRIL 3.

JULY 3.

OCTOBER 2.

638 b a n k s .

907 banks.

1,294 b a n k s .

1,513 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts
U. S. bonds and securities...
Other items

$166, 448, 718. 00
176, 578, 750.00
3, 294, 883. 27

$252,401,208.07
277,619, 900. 00
4, 275, 769. 51

$362,442, 743. 08
391, 744, 850. 00
12, 569,120. 28

$187,170,136. 29
427, 731, 300.00
19, 0i8, 513.15

Due from national banks
Due from other b'ks and b'krs
Real estate, furniture,jetc
Current expenses
Premiums paid

30, 820,175. 44
19, 836, 072. 83
4,083,226.12
1, 053, 725. 34
1, 323, 023. 56

40,963, 243.47
22, 554, 636. 57
6, 525,118. 80
2, 298, 025. 65
1, 823,291. 84

76,977, 539. 59
26, 078, 028. 01
11, 231, 257. 28
2, 338, 775. 56
2, 243, 210. 31

89,978,980. 55
17, 393, 232. 25
14, 703, 281. 77
4, 539, 525.11
2, 585, 501.06

Checks and other cash items
Bills of nat'l and other banks.
Specie
Legal tenders and frac'l cur'y

17, 837,496. 77
14, 275,153. 00
4,481, 937. 68
72, 535, 504. 67

29, 681, 394.13
13, 710, 370. 00
6, 659, 660.47
112,999, 320. 59

41, 314, 904. 50
21, 651, 826. 00
9,437.060.40
168,426,166. 55

72, 309, 854.44
16, 247,241.00
18,072,012. 59
189, 988,496. 23

512, 568, 666.68

771, 514, 939.10

1,126,455,481. 66

1,359,768,074.49

Total..




* Including amount due from national banks.

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

^J-JZJ

1863.
BANKS FROM OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTOBER, 1888.

JANUARY.

APRIL.

JULY.

OCTOBBR 5.

Liabilities.
66 b a n k s .
Capital stock

-

$7,188, 393.00
128, 030. 06
8,497,681.84
981,178.59
2, 360. 51

Individual andotberdeposits.
Duo to nat'l and other ban iis*.

Total

16,797,644.00

1861.
JANUARY 4.

APRIL 4.

139 b a n k s .

307 b a n k s .

$14, 740, 522. 00

JULY 4.
467 b a n k s .

OCTOBER 3.
508 banks.

$42, 204, 474. 00

$75, 213, 945. 00

$86, 782, 802. 00

432, 827.81

1, 625, 656. 87

1,129,910.22
3, 094, 330.11

2,010,280.10
5, 982, 392. 22

30,155. 00
19,450, 492. 53
2,153, 779. 38
822, 914. 86

9, 797, 975.00
51,274,914.01
6, 814, 930 40
3,102, 337. 38

25, 825, 665. 00
119,414,239.03
27,382. 000. 37
213, 708. 02

45, 260, 504. 00
122,100,536.40
34, 862, 384. HI
43, 289. 77

37,630,691.58

Capital stock

114, 820, 287. 66

252, 273, 803. 75

297,108,195. 30

Surplus fund
Undivided profits
Nationalb'knotes o u t s t a n d i n g
Individual amLother deposits
Due to nat'l a n a other banks*
Other items

Total

1865.
JANUARY 2.

907 b a n k s .

1,294 banks.

$135, 618, 874.00

$215, 326, 023.00

$325, 834, 558.00

$393,157,200.00

8,663,311.22
12, 283, 812.65

S u rpl n s fun d
Undivided profits

JULY 3.

638 b a n k s .

Capital stock

APRIL 3.

17,318,942.65
17, 809, 307.14

31,30:5,565.64
23,15U, 408.17

3^,713. 3F0. 72
32,350, 2/8. li>

OCTOBER 2.
1,513 banks.

National b'knotes outstanding

66,769,375.00

98, 896, 488.00

131, 452,158. 00

171,321,903.00

Individual and other deposits
United States deposits

183,479, 636.98
37, 764, 729.77

262,961,473.13
57,630,141.01

398, 357, 550.59
58, 032, 720. 67

500, 910. 873.25
48,170, 381.31

Duo to notional banks
Due to other b'kt; and bankers*

T 619,175.57
O
37,104,130.02

41.301,031.16
59,002,581.04

78,261,045.64
79, 591, 5U4. 93

90, 041,ft',7.08
84, 135, 101.27

265, 6'iO. 87

578,951.37

462,871.02

044.053.70

512, 568, 6 J6.08

771, 514, 939.10

1, 120,453,481.06

1,350,768.074.49

Other news
Total

* Including State bank circulation outstanding;.

.11028-CUR 88




16

242

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF TIIE NATIONAI

1

§66.

Loans and discounts
U.S.b'ds dep'd to secure circ'n
OtherU. S.b'ds and securities.
Otli'r stocks,b'ds,andniortg's
Due from national banks
Due from otherb'ks and b'k'rs
Real estate, furniture, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Checks and other cash items.
Bills of nationaland other b'ks
Specie
Legal tenders and fract'l cur'y
Total

JANUARY 1.

APRIL 2.

JULY 2.

OCTOBER 1.

1,582 banks.

Resources.

1.612 banks.

1,634 b a n k s .

1,644 banks.

$500, 650,109.19
298, 376, 850. 00
142, 003, 500.00
17,483, 753.18
93, 254, 551.02
14, 658, 229.87
15, 436, 296.16
3,193, 717. 78
2, 423, 918. 02
89, 837, 684.50
20,406,442.00
19, 205, 018. 75
187, 846, 548.82

$528, 080, 526. 70
315,850,300.00
125, 625, 750.00
17, 379, 738.92
87, 564, 329. 71
13, 082,345.12
15, 895, 564.46
4, 927, 599.79
2, 233, 516.31
105,490, 619.36
18,279,816.00
17, 529, 778.42
189,867, 852.52

$550, 353, 094.17
326,483, 350.00
121,152,950. 00
17,565,911.46
96, 696,482.66
13,982,613.23
16, 730, 923.62
3,032, 716. 27
2,398,872.26
96, 077,134.53
17, 866, 742.00
12, 629, 376.30
201,425,041.63

$603, 314, 704. 83
331, 843, 200.00
91,974,650.00
15, 887, 4G0.06
107, 650,174.18
15, 211,117.16
17,134, 002. 58
5, 311, 253.35
2, 493, 773.47
103, 684, 249. 21
17, 437, 779.00
9, 226, 831.82
205, 793, 578. 76

1,404, 776,619.29

1,442,407,737.31

1,476,395,208.13

1, 526,962, 804. 42

OCTOBER 7.

1§67.
JANUARY 7.

Total

JULY 1.

1,648 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts
U. S. b'ds dep'd to secure circ'n
U.S.b'ds dep'd to sec're dep'ts
TJ.S.b'ds andsec'tieson hand.
Oth'r stocks, b'ds,and mortg's
Duo from national banks
D ue from other b'ks and b'k'rs
lieal estate, furniture, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Checks and other cash items.
Bills of national banks
Bills of other banks
Specie
Legal tenders and fract'l cu'y
Compound-interest notes

APRIL 1.
1,642 banks.

1,636 b a n k s .

* 1,642 b a n k s .
*

92, 552, 206. 29
12,996,157.49
18, 925, 315. 51
2, 822, 675.18
2, 860, 398. 85
101, 430, 220.18
19, 263. 718.00
1,176,142.00
19, 726. 043. 20
104, 872, 371. 64
82, 047, 250. 00

$597, 648, 286. 53
338, 863, 650. 00
38,465, 800. 00
46, 639,400.00
20,194,875.21
94,121,186. 21
10, 737, 392.90
19, 625, 893. 81
5, 693, 784.17
3,411, 325.56
87, 951, 405.13
12, 873, 785.00
825, 748.00
11,444, 529.15
92, 861, 254.17
84, 065, 790.00

$588,450, 396.12
337, 684, 250.00
38. 368, 950.00
45, 633, 700.00
21,452,615.43
92, 308, 911. 87
9, 663, 322. 82
19, 800, 905.86
3, 249,153. 31
3, 338, 600. 37
128, 312,177. 79
16,138, 769. 00
531, 267. 00
11,128, 672.98
102, 534, 613. 46
75,488, 220.00

95,217,610.14
8, 389, 226.47
20, 639, 708 23
5, 297, 494.13
2, 764,186.35
* 134, 603, 231.51
11, 841,104.00
333, 209. 00
12, 798,044.40
100, 550, 849. 91
56, 888, 250.00

1, 511, 222, 985.40

1,465,451,105. 84

1, 494, 084, 526.01

1,499,469, 060.17 {

$608, 771, 799.61
339, 570, 700.00
36,185, 950.00
52. 949, 300.00
15,073, 737.45

$609,675,214.61
3#8, 640,150.00
37,862,100.00
42, 460, 800.00
21, 507, 881.42

1808.
JANUARY 6.

Loans and discounts
U.S.b'ds dep'd to secure circ'n
U. S.b'ds dep'd to sec're dept's
U.S.b'dsand sec'ties ou hand.
Oth'r stocks,b'ds,and mortg's
Due from national banks
Due from otherb 'ks and b'k'rs
Heal estate, furniture, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Checks and other cash items.
Bills of national banks
Bills of other banks
Fractional currency
Specie
Legal-tender notes
Compound-interest notes
Three per cent, certificates..
Total




APEIL 6.

JULY 6.

OCTOBER 5.

1,642 b a n k s .

1,643 banks.

l ; 640 banks.

1,643 banks.

$616,603,479.89
339, 0o4, 200.00
37, 315, 750. 00
44,164, 500. 00
19, 365, 864. 77
99, 311,446.60
8, 480,199. 74
21,125, 605.68
2, 986, 893. 86
2,464. 536. 96
109, 390, 266. 37
16, 655, 572. 00
261, 269.00
1, 927, 876. 78
20 981 601.45
114, 306, 491. 00
39, 997, 030.00
8, 245, 000. 00

$628, 029, 347.65
339, 686, 650. 00
37, 446, 000 00
45, 958, 550.00
19, 874, 384.33
95, 900, 606. 35
7,074,297.44
22, 082, 570. 25
5,428,460. 25
2, 660,106. 09
114, 993, 036. 23
12, 573, 514. 00
196,106. 00
1, 825, 640.16
18 373,943.22
84, 390,219.00
38, 917,490.00
24, 255, 000. 00

$655,729,546.42
339, 569,100. 00
37,853,150. 00
4.3, 068, 350,00
20,007,327.42
114,434, 097.93
8, 642, 456. 72
22, 699, 829. 70
2,938,519.04
2,432,074.37
124, 076, 097. 71
13, 210,179.00
342, 550.00
1, 863, 358.91
20 755,919.04
100,166,100.00
19, 473,420.00
44, 905, 000.00

$657, 668, 847. 83
340,487, 050.00
37,360,150.00
36, 817, 600. 00
20, 693,406.40
102, 278, 547. 77
7, 848,822,24
22, 747, 875.18
5, 278; 911. 22
I, 819, 815.50
143,241, 394.99
11, 842, 974. 0i)
222, 668. 00
2, 262, 791. 97
13,003, 713 39
92,453,475.00
4, 513, 730. 00
59, C80, 000.00

1, 502, 647, 644.10

1, 499, 668, 920. 97 1, 572,167, 076. 26

1, 559, 621, 773.49

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 243
BANKS FROM OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTOBER, 1888—Continued.

I860.
JANUARY 1.

APRIL 2.

JULY 2.

OCTOBER 1.

1,582 b a n k s .

1,612 b a n k s .

1,634 b a n k s .

1,644 b a n k s .

$403, 357,346.00

$409, 273, 534.00

$414,270,493.00

43, 000, 370. 78
28/J72, 493. 70

44,687,810.54
30, 964,422. 73

50,151, 991. 77
29, 286,175.45

53, 359, 277. 64
32, 593, 486. 69

National b'k notes outstand'g
State banknotes outstanding'.

213, 239, 530. 00
45,449,155.00

248, 886, 282. 00
33, 800,865.00

267, 798, 678. 00
19, 996,163. 00

280,253,818.00
9,748, 025. 00

Individual deposits
U. S. deposits
Dep'tsofU.S.disb'sing officers
Due to national banks
Due to other b'ks and bankers

522,507, 829. 27
29, 747, 236.15

534,734,950.33
29,150,729. 82

53.3,338,174.25
36, 038,185. 03
3, 066, 892. 22

564,616,777.61
30, 420, 819. $ 0
2, 979, 955. 77

94,709,074.15
23,793, 5S4.24

89, 067, 501. 54
21,841, 641.35

96, 496, 726.42
25, 951,728. 99

110, 531, 957. 31
26,986, 317. 57

1, 404, 776, 619.29

1, 442,407, 737. 31

1,476, 395, 208.13

1,526, 962,804.42

Liabilities.
Capital stock
Undivided profits

Total

$415, 472, 369. 00

1867.
JANUARY 7.

JULY 1.

OCTOBER 7.

1,648 b a n k s .

Capital stock

APRIL 1.
1,642 b a n k s .

1,636 b a n k s .

1,642 b a n k s .

$420,229, 739.00

$419,399,484.00

$418,558,148, 00

$420,073,415.00

59,992, 874. 57
26, 961, 382.60

60,206, 013. 58
31,131, 034. 39

63, 232, 811.12
30, 656, 222.84

66, 695, 587.01
33,751,446.21

National b'k notes outstand'g
State banknotes outstanding.

201,436,749.00
6,961, 499.00

292,788,572. 00
5,460, 312. 00

291, 769, 553. 00
4, 484,112. 00

293,887,941.00
4,092,153.00

Individual deposits
U. S. deposits
SDep's ofU.S.disb'sing officers

558, 699, 768. 0G
27, 284, 876. 93
2,477, 509.48

512,046,182.47
27, 473, 005. 66
2,650,981.39

539,599, 076.10
29,838, 391. 53
3,474,192. 74

540, 797, 837. 51
23,062,119.92
4,352,379. 43

Due to national banks
Due to other b'ks and bankers

92,761,998.43
24,410, 588. 33

91,156,890.89
23,138, 629.46

89,821,751.60
22, 659,267.08

93,111,240.89
19,644,940. 20

1,465, 451,105. 84

1, 494,084, 526. 01

1,499,469, 060.17

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

Total

1,511,222,985.40

1368.
JANUARY 6.

Capital stock

APRIL 6.

JULY 6.

OCTOBER 5.

1,642 b a n k s .

1,643 b a n k s .

1,640 b a n k s .

1,643 b a n k s .

$420,676, 210. 00

$420,105, 011.00

$420, 634, 511. 00

72, 349,119. 60
32, 861, 597. 08

75, 840,118.94
33, 543, 223. 35

77,995,761.40
36, 095,883. 98

295,336,014.00
3,310,177.00

294, 908, 264. 00
3,163, 771. 00

295,769, 489. 00
2, 906, 352.00

534, 704,709. 00
24, ;-;o5, (\?&. 02
3, 208, 783. 03

532,011,480.36
22, 750, 342. 77
4, 976, 682. 31

575, 842, 070.12
24, 603, 676.96
3, 499, 389. 99

580, 940, 820.85
17, 573, 250. 64
4,570, 478.16

98,144,669.61
21, 867, 648.17

94, 073, 631. 25
21,323,636.60

113,306,346.34
27, 355, 204. 56

99,414, 397. 28
23, 720, 829.18

1, 502,647, 044.10

1,499,66-, 920. 97

1, 572,167, 076. 26

1,559, 621, 773.49

$420, 260, 790. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits
National b'k notes outstand'g
State bank no tes outstanding.

294, 377, 390. 00
3, 792,013.00

Ind i vidu.il deposits
II. S. deposits
Dep'tsof U.S.disb'si'gofficers
Due to national banks
Duo to other b'ks and 'jankers

Total




70, 586,125.70 *
31,399, 877. 57

244

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF THE NATIONAL

1869.
JANUARY 4.

APRIL 17.

JUNE 12.

OCTOBER 9.

1,628 banks.

1,620 banks.

1,619 b a n k s .

1,617 banks.

Resources.
Loans and discounts
U. S. bonds to securecirc'lat'n
U. S. bonds to secure deposits.
0". S. b'ds and seo'ties on hand.
Qth'r8tocks,b'ds,andmortg's
Due from redeeming agents
Due fvom other national b'nkp
D ue from State b' kaand b'k'rs
Iloal estate, furniture, etc ...
Current expenses
Premiums* paid
Checks and other cash items.
Bills of other national banks.
Fractional currency
Specie
Legal-tender notes
Three per cent, certificates..
Total

$644, 945, 039. 53
338, 539, 950. 00
34, 538, 350. 00
35, 010, 600. 00
20,127, 732.96
65, 727, 070. 80
36, 067, 316. 84
7, 715, 719. 34
23, 289, 8I58. 28
3, 2G5, 990. 81
1, 654, 352. 70

$686, 347, 755. 81
338, 699, 750. 00
27, 625, 350. 00
27, 476, 650. 00
20, 777, 560. 53
62, 912, 636 82
35, 556, 504. 53
9,140, 919. 24
23, 839, 271.17
5, 820, 577 87
1, 809, 070. 01

$682, 883,106. 97
339,480,100.00
18, 704, 000. 00
25, 903, 950. C
O
22, 250, 697.14

161, 614, 852. 66
11, 524,447. 00
1, 804, 855. 53
18, 455, 090, 48
80. 934,119. 00
49, 815, 000.00

108, 809, 817. 37
10, 776, 023. 00
2, 090, 727. 38
23, 002, 405. 83
83, 719, 295. 00
45, 845, 000. 00

1, 564,174,410. 65

1,497, 226, 604. 33

$662, 084, 813.47
338, 379, 250. 00
29, 721, 350. 00
30, 226, 550. 00
20, 074, 435. 69
57, 554, 382. 55
30, 520, 527. 89
8, 075, 595. (50
23, 798,188.13
5, 641,195. 01
1, 716, 210.13
154,137,191. 23
11, 725, 239. 00
2, 088. 545.18
9, 944, 532.15
80, 875,161. 00
51,190, 000. 00

142, 605, 984. 92
14, 684, 799. 00
2, 280, 471.06
29, 626, 750. 26
88, 239, 300. 00
52, 075, 000. 00
1, 540, 394, 266. 50

1, 517, 753,167. 03

56, 669, 562 84
35, 393, 563. 47
8,790,418.57
25,169,188 95
5,646,382.96
2, 092, 364. 85

JANUARY 22.

MARCH 24.

JUNE 9.

OCTOBER 8.

DECEMBBR 28.

1,615 banks.

1,615 banks.

1,612 banks.

1,615 banks.

1,648 banks.

Loans and discounts. $688, 875, 203. 70 $710, 848, 609. 39 $719, 341,186.06 $715, 928, 079. 81 $725,515,538.49
Bonds for circulation 339, 350, 750 00 339, 251, 350. 00 338, 845, 200. 00 340, 857, 450. 00 344,104, 200. 00
Bonds for deposits . . 17, 592, 000. 00
15, 381, 500. 00
15,189, 500. 00
16,102, 000 00
15, 704,000. 00
22, 323, 800. 00
U. S. bonds on hand. 24, 677,100. 00
23, 893, 300. 00
27, 292,150. 00
28, 276, 600.00
23,614, 721. 25
22, 686, 358. 59
Ofchev stocks and Vds 21, 082,412. 00
20, 524, Ite. 55
23,300, 681.87
64, 805, 062. 88
Due from red'g ag'nta 71, 641, 486 05
73,435,117. 98
66, 275, 668. 92
74, 635, 405. 61
37, 478,166. 49
Due from nat'l banks 31, 994, 609. 26
33, 948, 805. 65
29, 510, 688.11
36,128, 750. 66
9, 824,144.18
Due from State banks
9. 319, 560. 54
9, 202,496. 71
10, 238, 219. 85 10, 430, 781. 32
28, 021, 637. 44
Real estate, etc
26, 002,713. 01
27,470, 746. 97
26, 593, 357. 00
26, 330, 701. 24
6, 905, 073. 32
Current e x p e n s e s . . .
3,469, 588.00
5, 871, 750. 02
6, 324, 955. 47
6, 683,189. 54
3, 251, 648. 72
Premiums paid
2, 439, 591.41
2,491, 222.11
3, 076, 456. 74
2, 680, 882. 39
111, 624, 822.00
12, 536, 613. 57
13, 229, 403. 34
Cash items
11, 267, 703.12
11. 497, 534.13
79, 089, 688. 39
76, 208, 707. 00
CIVg-honse exch'gs.
75,317,992.22
83, 936, 515. 64
16, 342, 582. 00
12, 512, 927. 00
17. 001, 846.00
National b a n k n o t e s . 15. 840, 669. 00
14, 226, 817. 00
2,184,714.39
2, 476, 966. 75
2, 078.178. 05
2,150, 522. 89
Fractional currency.
2, 285, 499. 02
31, 099, 437. 78
48, 345, 383. 72
18,460,011.47
26,307,251.59
Specie
37,096, 543. 44
94, 573, 751.00
79, 324, 577. 00
80, 580, 745. 00
Legal-tender n o t e s . . 87, 708, 502. 00
82,485.978.00
43,465, 000. 00
43, 345, 000. 00
41, 845, 000. 00
Threepercent.cert'fs 43, 820,000. 00
43, 570, 000. 00

Total

1,546,261,357.44 1,529,147,735.85 1,565,756,909.67 1,510,713,236.92 1,538,998,105 93

MARCH 18.

AFRIL 29.

JUNE 10.

OCTOBER 2.

DECEMBER 16.

1,688 b a n k s .

1,707 b a n k s .

1,723 b a n k s .

1,767 b a n k s .

1,790 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts. $767,
Bonds for circulation 351,
Bonds for deposits.. 15,
U. S. bonds on hand
23,
Other stocksand b'ds 22,
Due from red'g ag'nts
D a e from nat'l banks
Duefrom State banks
Real estate, etc
Current e x p e n s e s . . .
Premiums paid

858, 490. 59 $779, 321, 828.11 $789,416, 568.13 $831, 552, 210. 00 $818, 996, 311. 74
556, 700.00 354, 427, 200. 00 357, 388, 950. 00 364, 475, 800. 00 366, 840, 200. 00,
231, 500. 00
15, 236, 500. G
O 15, 250, 500. 00
28, 087, 500. 00
23,155,150. 00
911, 350.10
22,487, 950. 00
24, 200, 300. 00
17, 733, 6,"0. 00
17, 675, 500. U)
763, 869. 20
22, 414, 659.05
23,132, 871. 05
24, 517, 059. 35
23, 061,184. 20
83, 809,188. 92
85, 061, 016. 31
92, 369, 246. 71
77. 985, 600. 53
86,878,608.84
20, 201,119. 99
38, 332, 679. 74
39, 636, 579. 35
43, 313, 344. 78
43, 525, 362. 05
10, 271, 605. 34
11, 478,174. 71 11, 853, 308. 60
13, 069, 301.40
12, 772, 669. 83
28. 805; 814. 79
29, 242, 762. 79
29 637, 999. 30
30. 0T0, 380. 57
30, 089, 783. 85
6 694, 014.17
6, 764,159. 73
6, 295, 099. 46
7, 330. 424. 12
6,153, 370. 29
3, 939, 995. 20
4, 414, 755. 40
5,026, b85. 97
5, 956, 073. 74
5, 500, 890.17

Cash items
11, 642, 644. 74
12, 749, 289. 84
13,101, 497. 95
Cl'r'g-house exch'gs. 100, 693,917. 54 130, 855, 698.15 102, 091, 311. 75
National b a n k n o t e s . 13,137, 006. 00
16, 632, 323. G
O 19,101, 389. 00
Fractional currency.
2,103, 298.16
2,135, 763. 09
2 160, 713. 22
Specie
' . . 25, 769,166. 64
22, 732, 027. 02
19, 924, 955.16
Legal-tender n o t e s . . 91,072, 349. 00 106. 219,126. 00 122,137, 660. 00
Threepercent.cert'fs
37, 570,000. 00 33, 935, 000. 00
30, 690, 000. 00

Total

14,058,268.86
101,165, 854. 52
14,197, 653. 00
2, 095, 485. 79
13, 252, 998.17
109, 414, 735. 00
25, 075, 000. 00

13, 784. 424. 76
114, 538, 539 93
13, 085, 904. 00
2, 061, COO. 89
29, 595, 2P9 56
93,942,707.00
21, 400, 000. 00

1,627,032,030. 28 1,694.440,912. 94 1,703,415,335.65 1,730,566,899. 72 1,715,861,897.22




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

245

BANKS FROM OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTOBER, 1883—Continued.

1869.
JANUARY 4.

JUNE 12.

OCTOBER 9.

1,620 b a n k s .

1,619 b a t i k s .

1,617 b a n k s .

$419, 040, 931. 00

Capital stock

AVKIL 17.

1,628 b a n k s .

Liabilities.

$420, 818, 721.00

$422, 659, 260. 00

$426,399,151.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits
,..
Nat'lbank notes outstanding.
State bank notes outstanding.

81,169, 936. 52
35, 318, 273. 71

82, 653, 989.19
37, 489, 314. 82

82, 218, 576.47
43, 812, 898. 70

86,165, 334. 32
40, 687, 300.92

294,476, 702. 00
2, 734, 669. 00

292, 457, 098. 00
2, 615, 387.00

292, 753, 286. 00
2, 558, 874.00

293, 593, 615.00
2, 454, 697.00

Individual deposits
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S. disburs'g officers.

568, 530, 934.11
13, 211, 850.19
3, 472, 884.90

547, 922,174.91
574, 307, 382. 77
10,114, 328.32 " 10, 301, 907. 71
. 3, 665,131.61
2,454, 048.99

511, 400,196.63
7,112, 646.67
4, 516, 648.12

Due to national banks
Due to State banks andb'k'rs.

95,453,139.33
26, 984, 945. 74

92, 662, 648.49
23, 018, 610.62

100, 933, 910.03
28, 046, 771. 30

95, 067, 892. 83
23, 849, 371.62

2, 464, 849. 81
1, 870, 913.26

2, 392, 205.61
1, 735, 289.07

3, 839. 357.10
2,140, 363.12

1, 517, 753,167.03

1, 564,174,410.65

1,497, 226, 604.33

Notes and bills re-discounted.
Bills payable
Total

1, 540, 394, 266. 50

1§7O.
JANUARY 22.

JUNE 9.

OCTOBER 8.

1,615 b a n k s .

Capital stock

MARCH 24.
1,615 b a n k s .

1,612 b a n k s .

1,615 b a n k s .

$426, 074, 954.00 $427, 504, 247.00 $427, 235, 701.00 $430, 399, 301.00

DECEMBER 28.
1,648 b a n k s .
$435, 356, 004.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits . . .

90,174, 281.14
34, 300,430.80

90, 229, 954. 59
43,109,471.62

91, 689, 834.12
42, 861, 712. 59

94, 061, 438.95
38, 608, 618.91

94, 705, 740.34
46, 056, 428.55

Nat' I bank circulat'n.
State bank circulat'n

292,838,935.00
2, 351, 993.00

292, 509,149.00
2, 279, 469.00

291,183, 614.00
2, 222, 793.00

291, 798, 640. 00
2,138, 548.00

296, 205, 446.00
2, 091, 799.00

Dividends unpaid

2,299,296.27

1, 483,416.15

1, 517, 595.18

2, 462, 591.31

Individual deposits.
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S. dis. offic's

546, 236, 881.57
6, 750,139.19
2, 592, 001.21

516, 058, 085. 26
6, 424, 421. 25
4, 778, 225.93

542, 261, 563.18
10, 677, 873. 92
2, 592, 967.54

501, 407, 586.90
6, 807, 978.49
4, 550,142.68

507, 368, 618. 67
6, 074, 407. 90
4,155, 304. 25

Due to national banks
Due to State banks..

108, 351, 300.33
28, 904, 849.14

100, 667, 715.95
29, 767, 575.21

115, 456,491. 84
33, 012,162. 78

100, 348. 292. 45
29, 693, 910.80

106, 090, 414. 53
29, 200, 587. 29

Notes re-discounted .
Bills payable

3, 842, 542.30
1, 543, 753.49

2, 462, 647.49
2,873,357.40

2, 741, 843. 53
2, 302, 756.99

3, 843, 577. 67
4, 592, 609. 76

4,612,131.08
4, 838, 667.83

1,546,261,357.44

1,529,147,735.85

Total

1,565,756,909.67 1,510,713,236.92

2,242,556.49

1,538,998,105.93

18*71.
MARCH 18.

Capital stock

APRIL 29.

JUNK 10.

OCTOBER 2.

1,688 b a n k s .

1,707 b a n k s .

1,723 b a n k s .

1,767 b a n k s .

$444, 232, 771.00 $446, 925, 493.00 $450, 330, 841.00 $458, 255, 696.00

DECEMBER 16.
1,790 b a n k s .
$460,225, 866.00

Surplus funds
Undivided profits ...

96, 862, 081.66
43,883, 857.64

97, 620, 099.28
44, 776, 030. 71

98, 322, 203. 80
45, 535, 227. 79

101,112, 671.91
42, 008, 714.38

101, 573,153. 62
48, 630, 925.81

Nat'lbank circulat'n.
Statebank circulat'n.

301, 713, 460. 00
2, 035, 800.00

306,131, 393.00
1, 982, 580.00

307, 793, 880.00
1, 968, 058.00

315, 519,117.00
1, 921, 056.00

318, 265, 481.06
1, 886, 538.00

Dividends unpaid . . .

2,235,248.46

1,408, 628.25

4, 540,194.61

1, 393.427. 98

Individual deposits..
U.S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S. dis. offic's

561,190, 830. 41 611, 025,174.10
6. 521, 572. 92
6, 314, 957. 81
3, 757, 873.84
4, 813, 01C. 66

602,110, 758.16
6, 265,167. 94
4, 893, 907. 25

600, 868.486.55
20, 511, 935. 98
5, 393, 598.89

596, 586, 487. 54
14, 829, 525. 65
5, 399,108.34

Duo to national b'nks
Due to State banks..

118, 904, 865. 84
37, 311, 519.13

128, 037, 4G9.17
36,113, 290.67

135,167, 817. 69
41, 219, 802.96

131, 730, 713. 04
40, 211, 971.67

118, 657, 614.16
38,116, 950. 67

Notes re-discounted .
Bills payable

3, 256, 896.42
5, 248, 206.01

3, 573, 723.02
5, 740, 964. 77

3,120, 039.09
5, 278, 973. 72

3, 964, 552. 57
4, 528,191.12

4,922,455. 78
5, 374, 362.67

Total

1, 263, 767. 70 -

1,627,032,030..28 1,694,440,912.94 1,703,415,335.65 1,730,566,899.72




1, 715, 861, 897.22

246

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF THE NATIONAL

18*72.
FEBRUARY 27.

APRIL 19.

JUNE 10.

OCTOBER 3.

DECEMBER 27.

1,814 b a n k s .

Resources.

1,843 b a n k s

1,853 b a n k s .

1,919 b a n k s .

1,940 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts $839. 005,077.91 $844,902,253.49
Bonds for circulation 370, 924. 700.00 374,428,450.00
Bonds for deposits.. 15, 870, 000.00 15,169,000.00
V.S.bonds on hand 21, 323,150.00 19, 292.100.00
Other stocks and b'ds 22, 838, 388.80 21,538,914.00
Due from red'g ag'nts 89, 548, 329.93 82.120,017.24
Due from nat'l banks 38, 282, 905. 80 36, 697, 592.81
D ue from State banks 12, 209, 822.68 12, 299, 716.94
30, 637, 070. 75 30, 809, 274.98
Real estate, etc
7,026,041.23
Current expenses -.. 6, 265,655.13.
6, 544,279.29
0, 308, 821.86
Premiums paid
12,461,171.40
12,143,403.12
Cash items
Clear'g-houseexch'gs 93,154, 319. 74 114,195, 966.36
National-bank notes 15, 552, 087.00 18,492,832.00
2,143,249.29
Fractional currency. 2, 278,14C. 24
25, 507, 825. 32 24, 433,899.46
Specie
Legal-tender notes . 97, 865, 400.00 105,732,455.00
TJ.S.cer'fs of deposit
Three percent.cert'fs 18,980,000.00 15,365,000.00
Total

$871, 531,448.67 $877,197, 923.47 $885, 653, 449.62
377, 029, 700.00 382, 046,400.00 384,458, 500.00
15,479, 750.00
15,409, 950.00
16, 304, 750.00
12,142, 550.00
16,458, 250.00
10, 306,100.00
23, 533,151.73
22, 270, 610.47
23,160, 557.29
80, 717, 071.30
91, 504, 209.53
80,401, 459.44
34,486, 593.87
39,408, 323.39
42, 707, 613.54
12, 976, 878.01
13, 014, 205.26
12, 008, 843.54
32, 276, 498.17
31,123,843.21
33, 014, 796.83
6, 310, 428. 79
6,719,794.90
8, 454, 803.97
6, 546, 848.52
0, 010,174. 75
7, 097, 847. 86
14,916,784.34
13,458, 753.80
13,690, 723.85
88, 592, 800.10 110, 086, 315.37
90,145, 482. 72
15, 787, 296.00
10, 253, 500.00
19, 070, 322.00
2,151, 747.88
2,069,4(34.12
2, 270, 576.32
10, 229, 756. 79 19, 047, 336.45
24, 256, 644.14
122,994,417.00 105,121,104.00 102, 922, 369.00
6, 710, 000.00
12, 650, 000. 00
7,140,000.00
4,185,000.00
12,005,000.00

1,719,415,057.34 1,743,652,213.55 1,770,837,269.40 1,755,857,098.24 1,773,556,532.43

1§ 7 3 ,
FEBRUARY 28.
1,947 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts. $913,265,189.67
Bonds for circulation 384, 675, 050.00
Bonds for deposits .. 15, 035, 000.00
U. S. bonds on hand 10,436, 950.00
Other stocks and b'ds 22,063, 306.20
Due fromred'g ag'nts 95, 773,077.10
Due from nat'l banks 39, 483, 700. 09
Due from State banks 13, 595, 679.17
34, 023, 057.77
Heal estate, etc
Current expenses ... 6, 977, 831.35
7, 205, 259. 07
Premium s paid
11, 761, 711.50
Cash items
C lear' g-house exch' gs 131, 383, 860.95
National-bank notes. 15, 998, 779.00
Fractional currency. 2, 289, 080.21
17, 777, G73. 53
Specie
Legal-tender notes.. 97,141, 900. 00
TJ.S.cert'fs of deposit 18,400, 000.00
Three per cent.cert'fs 1, 805, 000.00
Total

APRIL 25.

JUNE 13.

SEPTEMBER 12.

DECEMBER 26.

1,902 b a n k s .

1,968 b a n k s .

1,976 b a n k s .

1,970 b a n k s .

$912, 064,267.31 $925,557,082.42 $944,220,110.34 $850, 810, 555.05
386, 763, 800.00 388, 080, 300.00 388, 330, 400.00 389, 384, 400.00
15, 935, 000.00
14, 805, 000. 00
16, 235, 000.00
14, 815, 200. 00
9, 789,400.00
8, 824, 850.00
9, 613, 550.00
8, 630, 850.00
22,912,415.03
23, 709, 034. 53
22,449,140.04
24, 358,125.00
97,143, 320.94
90,134,120. 06
88, 815, 557.80
73, 032, 046. 87
38, 071, 088. 63 43, 328, 71)2. 29 41. 413, 680. 06
40, 404, 757. 97
14,073, 287.77
12,022,873.41
12, 883, 353. 37
11,185, 253.08
34, 820, 502. 77 34, 061, 823.21
34, 210, 878.07
35, 550, 740.48
7,154,211.69
6, 985, 436.99
7,410, 045.87
8, 678, 270.39
7, 890, 962.14
7, 752, 843.87
7, 559, 987.07
7, 987,107.14
13, 036,482. 58
11,433, 913. 22
11, 425, 2U9. 00
12, 321, 972. 80
91,918, 526.59
88,926, 003.53
94,132,125.24
62, 881, 342.16
20, 394, 772.00
10,103, 842.00
19, 310, 202.00
21, 403,179. 00
2,197,559. 84
2, 302, 775.20
2,198, 973.37
2, 287,454.03
27, 950, 086. 72 19,808,409.45
10, 86H, 808. 74
26, 907, 037.58
92, 522, 663.00 108, 719, 506.00
100, 005, 287.00 106, 381,491.00
22, 365, 000.00
20, 610, 000.00
18, 370, 000. 00
24, 010, 000.00
305, 000.00
710, 000.00

1,839,152,715.21 1,800,303,280.11 1,851,234,860.38 1,830,027,845.53 1,729,380,303.61

1874.
FEBRUARY 27.

MAY 1.

JUNE 26.

OCTOBER 2.

DECEMBER 31.

1,975 banks.

1,078 banks.

1,983 b a n k s .

2,004 b a n k s .

2,027 banks.

Loans and discounts $897,859,600.46
Bonds for circulation 389, 014, 700.00
Bonds for deposits .. 14,000, 200.00
U. S.bonds on hand 11, 043,400.00
Other stocks and b'ds 25, 305, 736.24
Due from resVe ag'ts 101, 502, 861.58
Due from nat'l banks 36, 024, 001.39
Due from State banks 11,490,711.47
Real estate, etc
30,043,741.50
Current expenses ... 6, 998, 875. 75
Premiums paid
8, 741, 028.77
Cash items
10, 269, 955.50
DIear'g-house exch'gs 62, 768,119.19
National-bank notes. 20, 003,251.00
Fractional currency. 2, 309, 919. 73
Specie
33,305, 803.58
Legal-tender notes.. 102, 717, 503.00
TT.S.cerffs of deposit 37, 235,000.00
Dep. with TJ. S. Treas
Total

$923,347 030. 79 $926,195,671. 70 $954, 394, 791. 59 $955, 802, 580. 51
389,249,100.00 390, 281,700.00 383,254, 800.00 382, 976, 200. 00
14, 890, 200.00
14,890, 200.00
14,691,700.00
14, 714, 000. 00
10, 450, 900.00
10,152, 000.00
13,313, 550.00
15, 290, 300.00
27, 010, 727.48
25,400,460.20
27, 807, 826.92
28, 313,473.12
97, 871,517.00
94, 017, 603.31
83, 885,126.94
80,488,831.45
45, 770, 715.59
41, £91, 015.24
39, 695, 309.47
48.100, 842.02
12,409, 592.33
12,374,391.28
11,196, 611.73
11,655,573.07
37, 270, 870.51
30, 708,066.39
38,112,926. 52
39,190, 683.04
7, 550,125.20
7, 547, 203.05
7, 658, 738.82
5, 510, 566.47
8, 503, 202.27
8, C80, 370.84
8,376, 659.07
8, 620,112.16
10, 496, 257.00
11, 949,020.71
12,296,416.77
14, 005, 517.33
63, 896, 271.31
94, 877, 790.52
97,383,087.11 112, 995, 317.55
23, 527, 991.00
20, 073,452.00
18, 450, 013. 00
22,532, 330.00
2, 263, 898.92
2,187,180.09
2, 224, 943.12
2, 392, 608.74
22, 326, 207.27
32, 569, 969.20
21, 240, 945.23
22, 436, 761. 04
101, 092, 9.'!0.00 103,108, 350.00
80, 021, 940.00
82, 604, 791.00
47,780, 000.00
40,135, 000.00
42, 825, 000.00
33,070, 000.00
91, 250.00
£0, 349, 950.15
21, 043, 084. 36

1,808,500,529.16 1,867,802,796,28 1,851,840,913.64 1,877,180,942.44 1,902,409,638.46




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 247
BAJSTKS FROM OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTOBER, 1888—Continued.

I § 72.
FEBRUARY 27.

APRIL 19

JUNE 10.

OCTOBER 3.

DECEMBER 27.

1,853 banks.

1, 919 b a n k s .

1, 940 b a n k s .

Liabilities.
1,814 b a n k s .
Capital stock

1,843 b a n k s .

$464, 081, 744. 00 $467, 924, 318. 00 $470,543, 301. 00 $479,629,174. 00 $482,606,252. 00

Surplus fund
103, 787,082.62
Undivided profits . . - 43,310, 344.46

110,257, 516.45
46,623,784. 50

111, 410, 248.98
oii, 762,411.89

Nat'l bank circulation 321,634, 675. 00 325, 305, 752. 00 327, 092, 752. 00 333, 495, 027. 00
State bank circulation
1, 700, 935. 00
\ 763, 885.00
1, 830, 503. 00
1,567,143.00

336, 289, 285. 00
1,511,396.00

Dividends unpaid . . .

104, 312, 525.81 105,181,943.28
46,428, 590. 90 50,234, 298.32

3,149, 749. 61

1, 356,934. iS

Individual deposits.. 593, 645, 666.16
U. S. deposits
7,114,893. 47
Dep'tsU.S.dis.onicers
5,024, 699.44

620, 775, 265. 78 618, 801, 619.49 613, 290, 671.45
6, 993, 014. 77
6,355, 722.95
7, 853,772. 41
3,416,371.16
5,463,953.48
4, 563, 833.79

598( 114, 679. 26
7,863, 894. 93
5 136, 597.T 4

Due to national banks 128, 627, 494. 44
Due to State banks.. 39, 025,165.44

120, 755, 565. 86 132, 804, 924. 02 110, 047,347. 67
39,878, 826.42
35,005,127.84
33, 769, 083. 82

124, 218, 392. 83
34, 794, 963.37

Notes rediscounted..
Bills payable
Total

1, 451, 746. 29

3, 818, 686. 91
6, 062, 896. 91

1, 561, 914. 45

4,225,622. 04
5,821,551. 76

1,454, 044. 06

4, 745,178.22
5, 942, 479. 34

5, 549, 431. 88
6, 040, 562.66

6, 545, 059. 78
6, 946, 416.17

1,719,415,657.34 1,743,652,213.55 1,770,837,269.40 1,755,857,098.24 1, 773,556,532.43

FEBRUARY 28.

JUNE 13.

SEPTEMBER 12.

DECEMBER 26.

1, 947 b a n k s .
Capital stock

APRIL 25.
1,962 b a n k s .

1, 968 b a n k s .

[1, 976 b a n k s .

1,976 b a n k s .

$484, 551, 811. 00 $487,891, 251.00 $490,109, 801. 00 $491, 072, 616. 00 $490, 266,611. 00

114, 681,048. 73 115, 805, 574. 57 116, 847, 454. 62 120, 314,499. 20
S u r p l u s fund
55, 306,154. 09 54, 515,131. 76
Undivided profits . . . 48, 578, 045. 28 52,415, 348.46

120, 961, 267. 91
58, 375,109. 43

338,163,864. 00 338, 788, 504. 00 339,081, 799. 00
1, 280, 208. 00
1, 224, 470. 00
1,188, 853. 00

341, 320 256. 00
1,130, 585. 00

Nat'l b a n k circulation 336, 292, 459,00
State bank circulation
1, 368, 271.00

1,462, 336. 77

1,400, 491. 90

1, 402, 547. 89

1, 269, 474. 74

Individual deposits . 656,187, 551. 61 616, 848, 358.25 641,121, 775. 27 622, 685, 563. 29
U. S. deposits
7, 044, $48. 34
7, 880, 057. 73
8, 691, 001. 95
7, 829, 327. 73
Dep'tsU.S.dis.onicers
5, 835, 696. 60
4,425,750.14
6,416, 275.10
8, 098, 560.13

540, 510, 602. 78
7, 680, 375. 26
4, 705, 593. 36

D u e to national b a n k s 134,231, 842. 95 126, 631, 926. 24 137, 856, 085. 67 133, 672, 732. 94
40,741,788.47
Dfc© to State b a n k s . . 38,124, 803. 85
35, 036,433.18
39, 298,148.14

114, 996, 666. 54
36, 598, 076. 29

Dividends unpaid . . .

Notes rediscounted..
Bills payable
Total

1, 405, 993. 60

5,117, 810. 50
5, 672, 532.75

5,403, 043. 38
7, 059,128.39

5, 515, 900". 67
7, 215,157. 04

5, 987, 512. 36
5,480, 554. 09

3, 811,487. 89
7, 754,137.41

1,839,152,715.21 1,800,303,280.11 1,851,234,860.38 1,830,627,845.53 1,729, 380, 303. 61

187
FEBRUARY 27.

MAY 1.

JUNE 26.

OCTOBER 2.

DECEMBER 31.

1,975 b a n k s .

1,978 b a n k s .

1,983 b a n k s .

2, 004 b a n k s .

2, 027 b a n k s .

$490,859,101.00 $490,077, 001. 00 $491,003,711.00 $493,765,121.00

$495, 802,481. 00

123,497, 347.20 125, 561, 081. 23 126,239,308.41 128,958,106, 84
Surplus fund
58, 332, 965. 71 51,484, 437.32
Undivided profits . . . 50,236, 919. 88 54, 331, 713.13

130,485,641. 37
51, 477, 629. 33

Nat'l bank circulation 339, 602, 955. 00 340, 267, 649.00 338, 538, 743.00
1, 049, 286. 00
1, 009,021.00
1,078, 888.00
State bank circulation

331,193,159. 00
860,417.00

Capital stock

2,259,129.91

3, 516, 276. 99

6, 088, 845. 01

Individual deposits.. 595, 350, 334.90 649, 286,298.95 622, 863,154.44 669, 068, 995. 88
7, 302,153. 58
7, 994, 422. 27
7, 322, 830. 85
7, 276, 959. 87
U. S. deposits
3, 927, 828. 27
3, 297,689. 24
3, 238,639. 20
5, 034, 624.46
Dep' t sU. S. dis. officers

682, 846, 607.45
7, 492, 307. 78
3, 579, 722. 94

Due to national banks 138,435, 3S8. 39 135, 640, 418. 24 143, 033, 822. 25 125,102, 049. 93
50, 227,426.18
48, 683, 924.34
50, 718, 007. 87
Due to State banks.. 48,112, 223. 40

129,188, 671. 42
51, 629, 602. 36

Dividends unpaid . . .

Notes rediscounted..
Bills payable
Total

1,291, 055. 63

3,448, 828. 92
4, 275, 002. 51

4, 581,420. 38
4, 772,662. 59

1,242,474.81

333, 225, 298. 00
964, 567. 00

4,436,256. 22
4, 352, 560.57

4,197, 372. 25
4,950, 727. 51

6, 365,652.97
5,398, 900.83

1,808,500,529.16 1,867,802,796.28 1,851,840,913,64 1,877,180,942.44 1,902,409,638.46




248

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF THE NATIONAL

1875.
MARCH 1.

MAYl.

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 1.

DECEMBER 17.

2,029 b a n k s .

2,046 baukd.

2,076 b a n k s .

2,088 b a n k s .

2,086 b a n k s .

Resources.
Loans and discounts. $956,485, 930.35

$971, 835, 298. 74 $972, 926,532.14 $984, 691.434.40 $962, 571, 807. 70
Bonds for circulation 380, 682,650.00 378,026, GOO. 00 375,127,900.00 370, 32.1, 700.00 363, 6L8,100. 00
13,981. 500.00
14,097,200.00
14,147,200.00
Bonds for deposits . . 14,492, 200.00
14, 372, 200.00
16, 009, 550 00
13, 989, 950.00
12, 753, 000.00
IT. S. bonds on band . 18, 062,150.00
14, 297, 650.00
31, 657, 960. 52
33, 505, 045.15
32, 010, 316.18
Other stocksand b'ds 28, 268, 841.69
29,102,197,10
81,462.682.27
89, 788,903. 73 85, 701, 259.82
D a e from res've ag'ts 89, 991,175. 34
80, 620, 878. 75
44,831,891.48
47, 028, 769.18
48,513,388.86
Duo from nat'l banks 44, 720, 394.11
46, 039, 597.57
11, 895, 551. 08
11,963, 768.90
11, 625,647.15
D u e from State banks 12, 724, 243.97
12, 094, 086.39
41,583,311.94
39,430, 952.12
42,366,647.65
40,969,020.49
Keal estate, etc
40, 312, 285.99
9,218,455.47
7, 790, 581. 86
7, 841, 213.05
4, 992, 044.34
C u r r e n t exx)enses . . .
7, 706, 700.42
9,442,801.54
9,006, 880. 92
8,670,091.18
8, 742, 393.83
P r e m i u m s paid
8,434,453.14
11,238,725.72
11, 734, 762.42
12,758,872.03
12,433,100.43
Cashitems
13,122,145.88
67, 886, 967.04
75,142, 863.45
88, 924,025,93
Clear'g-houseexeh'gs 81,127, 796. 39 116, 970, 819.05
17,160,190.00
18, 528, 837.00
24, 261, 961.00
Bills of o t h e r b a n k s . 18, 909, 397. 00
19, 504, 640.00
2,901,023.10
3,008, 592.12
2, 595, 631. 78
2. 620, 504.26
Fractional currency.
2, 702, 326.44
17; 070, 005. SO
16, 667,106.17
8, 050, 329. 73
18,959, 582.30
Specie
10, 620, 361.64
70, 725, 077.00
76, 458, 734.00
87, 492, 895.00
Legal-tender n o t e s . . 78,508,170.00
84,015, 928.00
31, 005, 000.00
48,810.000.00
47, 310, 000.00
U.S.cert'fs of deposit 37, 200,000.00
38, 615, 000. 00
19, 202, 256.68
19, 686, 960.30
19, 640, 785.52
D u e from IT. S. T r e a s 21,007,919. 76
21,454,422.29
Total

J

1,869,819,753.22 1,909,847,891.40 1,913,239,201.16 1,882,209,307.62 1,823,469,752.44

187

6.

MARCH 10.

MAT 12.

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 2.

DECEMBER 22.

2,091 banks.

2,089 b a n k s .

2,091 b a n k s .

2,089 b a n k s .

2,082 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts. $950,205,555.62 $939, 895,085.34 $933,686,530.45 $931, 304, 714.06 $929,066,408.42
Bonds for circulation 354, 547, 750.00 344, 537, 350.00 339,141, 750.00 337,170,400.00 336, 705, 300.00
14,128,000.00
14, 328, 000.00
14,698, 000. 00
14, 757, 000.00
Bonds for deposits . . 14, 216, 500.00
26, 577, 000.00
30, 842, 300.00
33,142,150.00
31, 937. 950.00
U. S. bonds on hand . 25, 910, 650.00
30, 905,195. 82
32,482, 805. 75
34,445,157.16
31, 565. 914. 50
Other stocks and b'ds 30, 425, 430.43
87,989, S00.90
87,326,950.48
83,789,174.65
D n e from res've ag'ts 99,068, 360. '35 86, 769, 083.97
44, 328, 609. 46
47, 417, 029. 03
47, 525, 089. 98
44, Oil, 664.97
D u o from n a t ' l banks 42,341, 542.67
11,262,193.96
10, 989, 507.95
12, 061, 283.08
12,415, 841.97
Duo from State banks 11,180, 562.15
41, 937, 617.25
42,183,958. 78
42, 722,415.27
43,121,942,01
43.498,445.49
Keal estate, e t c
8, 296, 207.85
6, 820, 573.35
5,025, 549.38
6, 987,644.46
9, 818. 422.88
Current expenses...
10, 946, 713.15
10, 414, 347. 28
10,621, 634.03
10, 715, 251.16
10,811,300.66
P r e m iums paid
9, 517,868.86
9, 693,186. 37
11,724,592.67
12,043,139.68
10,658, 709.26
Cash i t e m s
56, 806, 632.63
75, 328, 878.84
87, 870, 817.06
68,027,016.40
Clear'g-houseexch'gs 58, 863,182.43
20, 347,964.00
20, 398,422.00
15,910, 315.00
17, 521, 663. 00
Bills of other b a n k s . 18, 536, 502. 00
3, 215, 594.30
2,771, 886.26
1,987,897.44
1,417, 203.66
1,146,741.94
Fractional currency.
29,077, 345.85
21, 714, 594.36
25,218,469. 92
21,360,767.42
32, 999, 647.89
Specie
79,858,661.00
90, 836, 876.00
84, 250, 847.00
66,221,400.00
Legal-tender notes . . 76, 768,446.00
27, 380, 000.00
27,955,000.00
29,170,000.00
26,095,000.00
U. S. cert'fs of deposit 30, 805, 000.00
16,911, C80.20
17,063,407.65
16, 743,695.40
16, 359,491. 73
D u e from TJ. S. T r e a s 18,479,112.79

Total

1,834,369,941.70 1,793,306,002.78 1,825,760,967.28 1,827,265,367.61 1,787,407,093.76

187
JANUARY 20.

2,083 banks.
Loans and discounts. $920,561,018.65
Bonds for circulation 337,590, 700.00
Bonds for deposits .. 14,782, 000.00
TJ. S. bonds on hand . 31,988,650.00
Other stocks and b'ds 31, 819,930.20
Due from res've ag'ts 88,698,308.85
Due from nat'l banks 44, 844, 616.88
Due from State banks 13,680,990.81
43,704,335.47
Heal estate, eto
Current expenses... 4,131,516.48
10, 991, 714.50
Premium B paid
10,295,404.19
Cashitems
Clear' g-house exch 'gs 81,117, 889.04
Bills of other banks.. 18,418, 727. 00
Fractional currency. 1,238,228.08
49,709,267.55
Specie
Legal-tender notes.. 72,689, 710.00
U.S.cert'fs of deposit 25,470,000.00
Due from TJ. S. Treas 16,441,509.98
Total

APRIL 14.

2,073 banks.

7.
JUNE 22.

OCTOBER 1.

2,078 banks.

2,080 banks.

DECEMBER 28.
2,074 b a n k s .

$911,946,833.88 $901,731,416.03 $891,920, 593.54 $881, 856, 744.87
339, 658,100.00 337, 754,100.00 336, 810, 950.00 343, 869, 550.00
15,084,000.00
14,971,000.00
14,903,000.00
13,538,000.00
32, 964, 250.00
32,344, 050.00
30,088,700.00
28,479, 800.00
32,554,594.44
35, 653, 755.29
34,435,995.21
32.169, 491.03
84,942,718.41
82,132,099.96
73,284,133.12
75,960,087.27
42,027,778.81
44.567.303.63
45. 217,246.82
44,123,924.97
11,911,437.36
11, 246, 349. 79
11,415,761.60
11,479,945.65
44,736,549.09
44,818,722.07
45,229, 983.25
45,511,932.25
7,842,296.86
7,910,864.84
6,915, 792. 50
8, 958, 903.60
10,494,505.12
10, 320, 674.34
9, 219,174.62
8.841,939.09
10,410,623.87
10,099,988.46
11, 674, 587.50
10, 265,059.49
85,159,422.74
67, 861,481.13
74,525, 215.89
64,664,415.01
17,942,693.00
20,182,948.00
15, 531, 467.00
20, 312, 692.00
1,114,820.0*
1,055,123.61
900, 805.47
778,084. 78
27,070, 037.78
21, 335,996.06
22, 658, 820, 31
32, 907, 750. 70
72,351, 573.00
78, 004, 386.00
66,920,684.00
70, 568, 248.00
32,100,000.00
44,430,000.00
32,410, 000.00
26, 515, 000.00
16, 291, 040.84
17, 932, 574.60
16, 021, 753. 01
16,493, 577.08

1,818,174,517.68 1,796,603,275.29 1,774,352,833.81 1,741,084,663.84 1,737,295,145.79




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

249

BANKS FROM OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTORER, 1888—Continued.

1875.
MARCH 1.

Capital stock

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 1.

2,029 b a n k s .

Liabilities.

MAYl.
2,046 b a n k s .

2,076 banks.

2,088 b a n k s .

$496, 272,901.00 $498, 717,143.00 $501, 568,563. 50 $504, 829, 769.00

DECEMBER 17.
2,086 b a n k s .
$505,485, 865.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits . . .

131, 249, 079.47
51, 650, 243. 62

131, 604, 608.66
55,907,619.95

133,169, 094. 79
52,160,104. 68

134, 356, 076. 41
52,964,953. 50

133,085,422. 30
59, 204,957. 81

Nat'lbankcireulatiou
St&tebankcirculation

324, 525, 349. 00
824, 876.00

323, 321, 230. 00
815, 229. 00

318,148, 406. 00
786, 844. 00

318, 350, 379. 00
772,348.00

314, 979,451. 00
752,722.00

Dividends unpaid ..,

1, 601, 255.48

2, 501,742. 39

6,105, 519. 34

4, 003, 534. 90

1, 353,396. 80

Individual deposits U. S. deposits
Dept'sU.S.dis.officers

647, 735, 879. 69
7, 971,932. 75
5, 330, 414.16

695, 347, 677. 70
6, 797, 972. 00
2, 766, 387. 41

686, 478, 630. 48
6, 714, 328. 70
3,459,061. 80

664, 579, 619. 39
% 507, 531. 59
4, 271,195.19

618, 517,245.74
6, 652, 556.67
4, 232, 550. 87

Due to national banks
Due to State banks..

137, 735,121. 44 127, 280, 034. 02
55, 294, 663. 84
53,037, 582. 89

138, 914, 828. 39
55, 714,055.18

129, 810, 681. 60
49,918, 530. 95

119,843, 665.44
47,048,174.56

4,261,464. 45
5,758, 299.85

5, 254,453. 66
6, 590, 234.43

5,257,160.61
7,056, 583. 64

1,869,819,753.22 1,909,847,891.40 1,913,239,201.16 1,882,209,307.62

1,823,469,752.44

Notes re-discounted.
Bills payable
Total

4, 841, 600.20
4,786, 436. 57

5, 671, 031. 44
6, 079, 632. 94

1 8 76.
MARCH 10.

Capital stock

MAT 12.

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 2.

2,091 b a n k s .

2,089 b a n k s .

2,091 b a n k s .

2,089 b a n k s .

DECEMBER 22.
2,082 b a n k s .

$504, 818, 666.00 $500, 982, 006. 00 $500, 393,796.00 $499, 802,232.00

$497,482,016. 00

Rurplnsfund
Undivided profits . . .

133,091, 739. 50 131,795,199.94
51,177,031.26
49, 039, 278. 75

131,897,197.21
46, 609, 341. 51

132,202, 282. 00
46,445, 215. 59

131, 390, 664. 67
52, 327,715.08

Nat'l bankcirculation
S tate bankcirculation

307,476,155. 00
714,539. 00

294, 444, 678. 00
658,938.00

291, 544, 020. 00
628, 847.00

292, 011, 575. 00
008, 548.00

300, 252, 085.00
667,060. 00

Dividends unpaid...

1,405,829.06

2,325, 523.51

6,116, 679. 30

3, 848, 705. 64

1, 286, 540. 28

Individual deposits .
U.S. deposits
Dept'sU. S. dis. ofiicers

620, 674, 211. 05
6, 606, 394. 90
4, 313,915. 45

612, 355, 096.59
8, 493,878.18
2, 505, 273. 30

641, 432, 886. 08
7, 667, 722. 97
3,392,939. 48

651, 385, 210.19
7,256, 801. 42
3,746,781.58

619, 350, 223. 06
6, 727,155.] 4
4,749, 615.39

Due to national banks
Due to State banks.-

139,407, 880. 06
54, 002,131.54

127, 880, 045. 04
46, 706, 969. 52

131, 702,164. 87
51,403,995.59

131, 535,969. 04
48, 250, 111. 63

122,351,818.09
48, 685, 392.14

Notes re-discounted .
Bills payable

4, 631, 882, 57
6,049, 566.31

4, 653, 460. 08
5, 650,126.87

3, 867, 622. 24
6,173,006. 03

4, 464, 407. 31
6,154, 784. 21

4, 553,158.76
5, 882, 672.15

1,834,369,941.70 ;,793,306,002. 78 1,825,760,967.28 1,827,265,367.61

1,787,407,093. 76

Total

18*7
JANUARY 20.
2,088 b a n k s .
Capital stock

APRIL 14.
2,073 b a n k s .

7.
JUNE 22.

OCTOBER 1.

2,078 b a n k s .

2,080 b a n k s .

$493,634,611.00 $489, 684, 645.00 $481,044,771.00 $479,467,771.00

DECEMBER 28.
2,074 b a n k s .
$477,128,771.00

Surplus fund
130,224,169.02
Undivided profits . . . 37,456, 530.32

127, 793, 320. 52
45, 609,418. 27

124,714,072.93
50, 508, 351.70

122, 776,121. 24
44, 572, 678.72

121, 618,455. 32
51, 530,910.18

N a t ' l b a n k circulation 292, 851,351.00
Statebankcirculation
581,242.00

294,710, 313. 00
535,963. 00

290, 002,057.00
521, 611.00

291, 874,236.00
481,738.00

299, 240,475. 00
470, 540.00

Dividends u n p a i d . . .

1,853,974.79

1,398,101.52

3,623,703.43

1,404,178.34

I n d i v i d u a l deposits . 659, 891,969.76
U . S . deposits
7, 234,696. 96
Dept'sU.S.dis.ofiicers
3,108, 316.55

641,772, 528.08
7, 584, 267.72
3, 076, 878.70

636, 267, 529. 20
7,187,431.67
3, 710,167.20

616,403,987.12
7,972, 714.75
2,376,983.02

604, 512, 514.52
6,529, 031.09
3, 780,759.43

D u e t o national b a n k s ISO, 293, 566.36
D u e t o State b a n k s . . 49, 965, 770. 27

125,422, 444. 43
48, 604,820. 09

121, 443, 601.23
48,352,583.90

115,028,954. 38
46,577,439.88

115,773, 660. 58
44,807,958.79

3, 985,459.75
5, 969, 241.94

2, 953,128. 58
6, 249,426. 88

3, 791, 219.47
6,137,116. 83

4, 654, 784. 51
5,843,107.03

1,818,174,517.68 1,796,603,275.29 1,774,352,883.81 1,741,084,663.84

1,737,295,145.79

N o t e s re-discounted Bills payable
Total

2,448,909.70

4, 000,063. 82
6,483, 320.92




250

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF THE NATIONAL

1878.
MAY 1.

JUNE 29.

OCTOBER 1.

DECEMBER 6.

2,063 b a n k s .

Resources.

MARCH 15.

2,059 b a n k s .

2,056 b a n k s .

2,053 b a n k s .

2,055 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts. $854, 750, 708. 87
Honda for circulation 343, 871, 350.00
Bonds for deposits .. 13,329,000.00
X . S. bonds on band. 34, 881,600.00
T
Other stockt and b'ds 34, 674, 307.21
Due from res've agt's 86, 016,990. 78
Due from nat'l banks 39,692,105.87
Due from State banks 11, 683, 050.17
45, 792, 363.73
Real estate, etc
Current expenses ... 7, 786, 572.42
Cash items
Clear' g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks,
fractional currency.
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
U. S. cert'fs of deposit
Due from U. S. Treas.
Total

7, 806, 252.00
10,107, 583. 76
66,498, 965.23
16, 250, 569. 00
697,398.86
54,729, 558.02
64, 034, 972.00
20, 605,000. 00
16, 257,608.98

$847,620,392.49 $835,078,133.13 $833, 988, 450.59 $826,017,451.87
345,256,350. 00 347, 332,100.00 347, 556, 650.00 347, 812,300.00
47,936,850.00
28,371, 000.00
49,110, 800.00
19, 536,000.00
46, 785, 600. 00 44,255,850. 00
33, 615, 700. 00 40,479, 900.00
36, 859, 534. 82
36, 694,996.24
35, 816, 810.47
34,697,320.53
85, 083, 418. ol
78,875, 055.92
81, 733,137.00
71, 331, 219. 27
41,492, 918. 75
43,144, 220.68
40, 545, 522. 72 41, 897, 858.89
12, 314, 698.11
12, 232, 316.30
12, 259, 856.09
12,413,579.10
46,702,476.26
46,153,409.35
46,728,147.36
45,901, 536.93
6, 272, 566. 73
4, 718, 618.66
7, 608,128.83
7, 239, 365. 78
7,134, 735.68
7, 335,454.49
6, 978, 768.71
7, 574, 255.95
10, 982,432.89
11, 525, 376. 07
9, 985,004.21
10,989, 440. 78
82, 372, 537.88
87,498, 287.82
61,998, 286.11
95,525,134.28
16, 929, 721. 00
17,063, 576.00
19, 392, 281.00
18, 363, 335.00
515, 661.04
610,084.25
496,864.34
661, 044. 69
30,688, 606.59
29, 251,469. 77
34, 355, 250. 36
46, 023, 756.06
64, 428, 600.00
71,643,402.00
64, 672, 762.00
67, 245, 975.00
32, 690, 000.00
36, 905, 000.00
32, 520, 000.00
20, 995, 000.00
16, 543, 674. 36
16, 798,667.62
17,940, 918.34
16,364,030.47

1,729,465,956.90 1,741,898.959. 05 1,750,464,706.51 1,767,279,133.21 1.742,826,837.37

1 8 79.
JANUARY 1.
2,051 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts. $823, 906, 765.68
Bonds for circulation 347,118, 300.00
Bonds for deposits... 66, 507, 350.00
U. S. bonds on hand . 44, 257, 250.00
Other stocks and b'ds 35, 569,400.93
Due from res've agt's 77,925,008.68
Due from nat'l banks 44,161,948.46
Due from State banks 11, 892, 540.26
Real estate, etc
47, 091, 964. 70
Current expenses . . . 4, 033, 024.67
Premiums paid
6,366,048.85
Cash items
13, 564, 550.25
Clear'g-house exch'gs 100,035, 237. 82
Bills of other banks. 19, 535.588.00
Fractional currency.
475, 538.50
Specie
41,499, 757.32
Legal-tender notes.. 70, 561,233.00
U. S. cert'fs of deposit 28, 915,000.00
Due from U. S. Treas. 17,175, 435.13
Total

APRIL 4.

JUNE 14.

2,048 b a n k s .

2,048 b a n k s .

$814, 653, 422.69 $835, 875, 012.36
348,487, 700.00 352, 208, 000.00
309, 348,450.00 257, 038, 200.00
62,180, 300.00
54, 601, 750.00
37, 617, 015.13
36, 747,129. 40
93,443,463.95
74,003,830.40
48,192, 531.93
39,143, 388.90
11,258,520.45
10, 535, 252.99
47, 796,108. 26
47,461,614.54
6, 913,430.46
6,693,668.43
5,674,497. 80
6,609, 390.80
10,209,982.43
10,011, 294.64
83,152, 359.49
63, 712,445.55
16, G85,484.00
17,068, 505.00
446, 217.26
467,177.47
42,333,287.44
41,148,563.41
67,059,152.00
64,461,231.00
25,180, 000.00
21, 885,000.00
16, 620, 986. 20
17, 029,121.31

OCTOBER 2.

DECEMBER 12.

2,048 b a n k s .

2,052 b a n k s .

$878, 503, 097.45 $933,543,661.93
357, 313, 300.00 364, 272, 700.00
18, 204:650.00
14, 788, 800.00
52, 942,100.00
40, 677,500.00
39, 671, 916.50
38, 836, 369.80
107, 023, 546.81 102,742,452.54
46, 692, 994. 78
55, 352,459. 82
13,630,772.63
14,425,072.00
47, 817,169.36
47,992, 332.99
6, 111, 256.56
7,474,082.10
4, 332,419.63
4,150, 836. \1
11, 306,132.48
10, 377,272.77
112,9fi4, 964.25 112,172, 677.95
16, 707, 550.00
16, 406, 218.00
396, 065.06
374,227.02
42,173, 731.23
79, 013, 041.59
69,196,696.00
54, 715,096.00
26, 770, 000.00
10, 860, 000.00
17,029,065.45
17,054,816.40

1,800,592,002.25 1,984,068,936.53 2,019,884,549.16 1,868,787,428.19 1,925,229,617.08

188O.
FEBRUARY 2 1 .

APRIL 23.

JUNE 11.

OCTOBER 1.

DECEMBER 31.

2,061 banks.

2,075 b a n k s .

2,076 b a n k s .

2,090 banks.

2,095 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts. $974,295,360.70
Bonds for circulation 361,901,700.00
Bonds for deposits... 14,917,000.00
U. S. bonds on hand. 36,798,600.00
Other stocks and b'ds 41,223, 583 '33
Due from res've agt's 117, 791, 386.81
Due from nat'l banks 53, 230, 034.03
Due from State banks 14, 501,152.51
Real estate, etc
47,845,915. 77
Current expenses . . . 6,404, 743.54
Premiums paid
3, 908, 059. 27
Cash items
10, 320, 274.51
Clear'g-house exch'gs 166,736,402.64
Bills of other banks. 16,369, 257.00
Fractional currency.
397,187.23
Specie
89,442, 051. 75
Legal-tender notes.. 65, 229,408.00
U. S. cert'fs of deposit 10, 760, 000.00
Due from U. S. Treas. 16,994,381.37
Total

$992,970,823.10 $994,712,646.41 $1,040,977,267.53 $1,071,356,141.79
357,789,350.00
361,274,650.00 359,512, 050.00
358,042,550.00
14,827,000.00
14, 727, 000.00
14, 722,000.00
14,726,500.00
28,793,400.00
28,605, 800. 00
29, 509, 600.00
25,016,400.00
48,863,150.22
44,947,345.75
42,494,927. 73
48,628,372.77
134,562,778.70
103,964.229.84 115, 935,668.27
126,155,014.40
63,023,796.84
56,578,444.69
54,493,465.09
69,079,326.15
15.881,197.74
13,861, 582.77
13, 293, 775.94
17,111,241.03
48,045,832.54
47,979,244.53
47,808, 207.09
47,784,461.47
6,386,182.01
6, 778, 829.19
7,007, 404.19
4,442,440.02
8,488,470.11
3, 702, 354. 60
3,791,703.33
3,288,602.63
12,729.002.19
9,980,179.32
9,857, 645.34
14,713,929.02
121,095,249.72
99,357,056.41 122,390,409.45
229,733,904.59
18,210,943.00
21,908,193.00
21,064, 504.00
21,549,367.00
367,171.73
387,226.13
395,747.67
389,921.75
109,346,509.49
99, 506, 505.26
86,429,732.21
107,172,900.92
56,640,458.00
64,470, 717.00
61,048,941.00
59,216,934,00
7,655,000.00
12,510,000.00
7,890, 000.00
6,150,000.00
17,103,866.00
16,999,083.78
17, 226,060.01
17,125,822.37

2,038,066,498.46 1,974,600,472.95 2,035,493,280.15




2,105,786,625.82 2,241,683,829.91

KEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

251

BANKS FROM OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTOBER, 1888—Continued.

1878.
MARCH 15.

Liabilities.
Capital stock
Surplus fund
Undivided profits ...
Nat'l bank circulat'n
State bank circulat'n

MAT 1.

JUNE 29.

OCTOBER 1.

DECEMBER 6.

2,063 b a n k s .

2,059 b a n k s .

2,056 b a n k s .

2,053 b a n k s .

2.055 b a n k s .

$473, 952, 541. 00 $471, 971,627. 00 $470, 393, 366. 00 $466,147,436. 00

$464, 874, 996. 00

120, 870, 290.10
45, 040, 851. 85

119,231,126.13
43, 938, 961. 98

118,178, 530. 75
40, 482, 522. 64

116,897,779.98
40, 936,213. 58

116,402,118.84
44, 040,171. 84

300, 926, 284. 00
439, 339. 00

301, 884, 704. 00
426, 504. 00

299, 621, 059. 00
417, 808. 00

301, 888, 092.00
413, 913. 00

303, 324, 733. 00
400, 715. 00

Dividends unpaid ...
Individual deposits..
U. S. deposits
Dep'sU.S.dis.officers

1, 207, 472. 68

1,930, 669. 58

5,466, 350.52

3,118, 389. 91

1 473,784. 86

602, 882, 585.17
7, 243, 253. 29
3,004, 064. 90

625,479,771.12
13, 811, 474.14
2, 392, 281.61

621, 632,160. 06
22,686,619.67
2, 903, 531. 99

620, 236,176 82
41, 654, 812. 08
3, 342, 794. 73

598.805,775.56
40, 269, 825. 72
3,451,436. 56

Dne to national banks
Due to State banks..

123, 239,448. 50
43,979,239. 39

109, 720, 396. 70
44,006,551.05

117, 845,495. 88 122,496, 51«. 92
43,360, 527. 86 42,636,703.42

120, 261, 774. 54
41, 767,755.07

Notes re-discounted.
Bills payable

2, 465, 390. 79
4, 215,196. 23

2, 834, 012. 00
4, 270, 879. 74

Total

2,453, 839. 77
5, 022, 894.37

3, 007, 324. 85
4, 502, 982. 92

3, 228,132. 93
4, 525, 617. 45

1,729,465,956.90 1,741,898,959. 05 1,750,464,706. 51 1,767,279,133. 21 jl, 742, 826, 837.37

1 § 7 9.
JANUARY 1.

APRIL 4.

JUNE 14.

OCTOBER 2.

DECEMBER 12.

2,051 b a n k s .

2,048 b a n k s .

2,048 b a n k s .

2,048 b a n k s .

2,052 b a n k s .

$462,031,396. 00 $455,611,362. 00 $455,244,415. 00 $454, 067,365. 00 $454,498,515.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits ...
Nat'l bank circulat'n
State bank circulat'n

116, 200, 863. 52
36, 836, 269.21

114, 823, 316.49
40, 812, 777. 59

114, 321, 375. 87
45, 802, 845.82

114, 786, 528.10
41,300,941.40

115,429, 031.93
47, 573, 820. 75

303, 506, 470. 00
388, 368.00

304,467,139.00
352, 452. 00

307, 328, 695. 00
339, 927. 00

313, 786, 342. 00
325, 954. 00

321,949,154. 00
322, 502. 00

Dividends unpaid...

5, 816, 348. 82

2,158, 516. 79

Individual deposits.. 643, 337, 745. 26
U. S. deposits
59, 701, 222. 90
T)ep's U.S.dis.oflicers 3, 556, 801. 25
Due to national banks 118, 311, 635. 60
Due to State banks.. 44, 035, 787. 56
"Notes re-discounted . 2, 926, 434. 95
3, 942, 659.18
Bills payable
Total
1,800,592,002.25

1, 309, 059.13

2, 658, 337. 46

1, 305,480.45

598, 822, 694. 02 648, 934,141.42
303,463, 505. 69 248, 421,340. 25
2, 689,189.44
3, 682, 320.67

719, 737, 568. 89
11,018,862.74
3,469,600. 02

755, 459, 966. 01
6,923, 323.97
3, 893, 217.43

110,481,176.98
43,709,770.14

137,360, 091.60
50, 403, 064. 54

149,200,257.16
52, 022,453. 99

152,484,079,44
59, 232,391.93

2, 224, 491. 91
4, 452, 544.48

2, 226, 396. 39
4, 510, 876.47

2, 205, 015. 54
4, 208, 201. 89

2,116, 484.47
4, 041, 649. 70

1,984,068,936. 53 2,019,884,549.16 1,868,787,428.19 1,925,229,617.08

1880.
FEBRUARY 21.

JUNE 11.

OC1OBER 1.

DECEMBER 31.

2,061 b a n k s .

Capital stock

APRIL 23.
2,075 b a n k s .

2,076 b a n k s .

2,090 b a n k s .

2,095 b a n k s .

$454, 548, 585. 00 $456, 097, 935. 00 $455, 909, 565.00 $457, 553, 985. 00 $458, 540, 085.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits .. -

117, 044, 043. 03
42,863, 804. 95

117, 299, 350. 09
48, 226, 087. 61

118,102, 014.11
50,443, 635.45

120, 518, 583. 43
46,139, 690.24

121, 824,629. 03
47,946, 741.64

Nat'l bank circulat'n
State bank circulat'n

320, 303, 874. 00
303,452. 00

320, 759,472. 00
299, 790.00

318,088.562.00
290, 738. 00

317,350, 036. 00
271, 045. 00

317,484,496. 00
258,499.00

3,452, 504.17

6,198, 238. 38

Dividends unpaid ...

1, 365, 001.91

Individual deposits..
U. S. deposits
Dep's U.S.dis.oflicers

848, 926, 599. 86
7, 856, 7»J. 97
3, 069, 880.74

791, 555, 059. 63
7, 925, 988. 37
3, 220, 606. 64

833,701,034.20
7,680, 905. 47
3, 026, 757. 34

Due to national bank3
Due to State banks..

170, 245, 061. 08
65, 439, 334. 51

157,209,759.14
63, 317,107. 96

171, 462,131. 23 192,124, 705.10
67,938, 795. 35 75, 735, 677. 06

192,413,295. 78
71,185, 817. 08

Kotes re-discounted.
Bills payable

1, 918, 788. 88
4,181,280. 53

2, 616, 900. 55
4, 529,967.98

3,178, 232. 50
5, 031, 604.96

3,354, 697.18
4, 636, 876. 05

Total

1,542,447.98

1, 330,179. 85

2,258, 544. 72
5, 260, 417.43

873, 537, 637. 07 1, 006,452,852. 82
7, 898,100. 94
7, 548, 538. 67
3,489, 501. 01
3, 344, 386. 62

2,038,066,498.46 1,974,600,472. 95 2,035,493,280.15 2,105,786,625.82 2, 241,683,829. 91




252

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF THE NATIONAL

1 §8 1 .
MARCH ll".

MAY 6.

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 1.

DECEMBER 31.

2,094 b a n k s .

2,102 b a n k s .

2,115 b a n k s .

2,132 b a n k s .

2,164 b a n k s .

Resources.
Loans and discounts. $1,073,786,749.70 $1,093,649,382.18 $1,144,988,949.45 $1,173,796,083.09 $1,169,177,557.16
Bonds for circulation 339,811,950.00 352,653,500.00 358,287,500.00 363,385,500.00 368,735,700.00
14,851,500.00
15,240,000.00
Bonds for deposits ..
15,265,000.00
15,540,000.00
15,715,000 00
46,626,150.00
44,116,500.00
U. S. bonds on band .
48,584,950.00
40,866,750.00
31,884.000.00
49,545,154.92
Other stocks and b'ds
52.908,123.98
58,049,292.63
61,952,402.95
62,663.218.03
Due from res've ag'ts 120.820,691.09 128,017,627.03 156,258,637.05 132,968,183.12 123,530,465.75
62.295,517.34
Due from nat'l banks
75,703,599.78
63,176,225.67
78,505,446.17
77,633,902.77
17,032,261.64
Due from State banks
18,850,775.34
19,306.826.62
16,938,734.56
17,644,704.62!
47,525,790.02
Real estate, etc
47,834,060.20
47,329,111.16
47,445.050.46
47,791,348.36
7,810.930.83
Current expenses. ^.
4,235,911.19
6,731,936.48
4.647,101.041
6,096,109.78
3,530,516.71
Premiums paid
4,115,980.01
4,138,485.71
3,891,728.72
4.024,763.60
10,144.682.87
Cash items
13,534,227.31
14,831,879.30
17,337.964. 78
11,826,603.16
Clear'g-houseexch'gs 147,761,543.96 196,633,558.01 143,960,236.84 189,222,255.95 217,214,627.10
17,733,032.00
Bills of other banks.
21,631,932.00
17,732,712.00
24,190,534.00
25,120,933.00
386,569.63
Fractional currency
372,140.23
373,945.96
366.361.52
386,950. 21
105,156,195.24
Specie
128,638.927.50
114,334,736.12
113.680;639.60
122,628,562.08
52,156,439.00
Legal-tender notes ..
58,728,713.00
53,158,441. 00
60,104,387.00
62,516,296.00
6,120,000.00
TJ. S. cert's of deposit
9,540,000.00
6,740,000.00
7,930.000.00
8,045,000.00
17,015,269.83
Due from U.S. Treas
17,251,868. 22
17,472,595.96
18,097,923.40
18,456,600.14
Total

2,140,110,944.78 2,270,226,817.76 2,325,832,700.75 2,358,387,391.59 2,381,890,866.85

188 2.
MARCH 11.

MAY 19.

JULY 1.

OCTOBER 3.

DECEMBER 30.

2,187 b a n k s .

2,224 b a n k s .

2,239 b a n k s .

2,269 b a n k s .

2,308 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts. $1,182,661,609.53 $1,189,094,830.35 $1,208,932,655.92 $1,243,203,210.08 $1,230,456,213.97
360,153,800.00
355,789,550.00
357,631,750.00
Bonds for circulation
367,333,700.00
357,047,650.00
15,920,000.00
15,920,000.00
16.111,000.00
Bonds for deposits . .
16,093,000.00
16,344,000.00
29,662,700.00
27,242,550.00
21314,750.00
U. S. bonds on h a n d .
28,523,450.00
15,492,150.00
65,274.999. 32
66,691,399.56
66,168,916.64
Other stocks and b'ds
64,430,686.18
66,998,620.36
124,189,945.23
118,455,012.38
113,277,227.87
Due from res've agt's
117,452,719. 75
122,066,106.75
66,883,512.75
75,366,970.74
68,516,841.06
D u e from nat'l b a n k s
68,301,645.12
76,073,227.76
16,890,174.92
16,344,688.66
17,105,468.44
Due from State b a n k s
15,921,432.07
18,405,748.49
46,956,574.28
46,425,351.40
46,537,066.41
Real estate, etc
47,073,247.45
46,993,408.41
6,774,571.86
3,030,464. 69
7,238,270.17
Current expenses...
8,494,036.21
5,130,505.53
5,062.314.52
5,494,224 35
6,515,155.03
Premiums paid
3,762,382.59
6.472,585.82
12,295,256.96
20,166,927.35
14,784,025. 21
Cash items
13,308,120.70
16,281,315.67
107,270,094. 71
159,114,220.08
208,366,540.08
Clear'g-houseexch'gs
162,088,077.94
155,951,194.81
25,226,186.00
21,405,758.00
20,689,425.00
Bills of other b a n k s .
19,440,089.00
25,344,775.00
51)0,236.36
373,725.83
396,367. 64
Fractional currency.
389,508.07
401,314.70
112,415,806.73
111,694,262.54
102,857,778.27
Specie
109,984,111.04
106,427.159.40
65,969,522.00
64,019,518.00
63,313,517.00
Legal-tender n o t e s . .
56,633,572.00
68,478,421. 00
10,395,000. 00
11,045,000. 00
8,645,000.00
TJ.S. cert's of deposit.
9,445,000.00
8,475,000. 00
17,099,385.14
16,830,407.40
17,161,367.94
Due from U. S. T r e a s
17,720,701.07
17,954,069.42

Total

2,309,057,088. 72 2,277,924,911.13 2,344,342,686.90 2,399,833,676. 84 2,360,793,467. 09

1883.
MARCH 13.

MAY 1.

JUNE 22.

OCTOBER 2.

DECEMBER 31.

2,343 b a n k s .

2,375 banks.

2,417 b a n k s .

2,501 b a n k s .

2,529 b a n k s .

~
Loans and discounts $1,249,114,879. 43 $1,262,339,981.87 $1,285,591.902.19 $1,309,244,781. 64 $1,307,491,250. 34
"
354,480,250.00
354,002,900.00
354,746,500.00
351,412,850.00
345,595,800.00
Bonds for circulation
17,116,000.00
16,949.000.00
16,799,000.00
17,081,000.00
16,846,000.00
Bonds for deposits . .
16,978,150.00
17,850,100.00
15,870,600.00
13,593,050.00
13,151,250.00
U. S. bonds on hand .
68,552,073.03 i
68,428,685.67
68,340,590.79
71,114,031.11
71,609,421.62
Other stocks a n d b'ds
121,024,154.60
109,306,82ft. 23
126.646,954.62
124,918,728.71
126,999,606.92
D u e from res've ag'ts
67,263,503.86
68,477,918.02
66,164,638.21
65,714,229.44
77,902,785.07
Due from nat'l banks
16,993,341.72
19,382,129.33
19,451,498.16
18,266,275.05
19.402,047.12
D u e from S t a t e b a n k s
47,063,305.68
47,155.909.80
47,502,163.52
48,337,665.02
49;540,760.35
Real estate, etc
8,949.615.28
7,754.958.86
8,829,278.26
6,808,327.30
4,878,318.44
Current expenses. - 7,420,939.84
7,798,445.04
8,079,726.01
8,064,073.60
8,647,252.98
P r e m i u m s paid
11,360,731.07
15,461,050.16
11,109,701.18
13,581,049.94
17,491,804.43
Cash items
107,790,065.17
145.990,998.18
90,792,075.08
96,353,211.76
134,545,273.98
Clear'g-houseexch'gs
19,739,526.00
26,279,856.00
22,655,833.00
22,675,447.00
28,809,699.00
Bills of other b a n k s .
431,931.15
456,447.36
446,318.94
443,951.12
427,754.35
Fractional currency.
97.962,366.34
115,354,394.62
103,607,266.32
107.817,983.53
114,276,158.04
Specie
60,848,068.00
73,832,458.00
68,256,468.00
70,672,997.00
80,559,796.00
Legal-tender n o t e s . 8,405,000.00
10,685,000.00
8,420,000.00
9,970,000.00
10,840,000.00
U . S. cert's of deposit
16,726,451.30
17,407,906. 20
17,497,694.31
16,586,712.60
16,865,938.85
D u e from U. S. Treas
Total

2,298,918,165.11 2,360,192,235.85 2,364,833,122.44 2,372,656,364.82 2,445,880,917.49




EEPOET OF THE COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.

253

BANKS FROM OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTOBER, 1888—Continued.

18 81.
MARCH 11.

MAY 6.

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 1.

DECEMBER 31.

2,102 banks.

2,115 b a n k s .

2,132 b a n k s .

2,164 banks.

Liabilities.
2,094 banks.
Capital stock

$458, 254, 935. 00 $459, 039, 205. 00 $460, 227, 835. 00 $463, 821, 985. 00 $465, 859, 835. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits...

122, 470, 996. 73
54, 072, 225. 49

124, 405, 926. 91
54, 906, 090.47

Nat'lbank circulation
State bank circulat'n

298, 590, 802. 00
252, 7G5. 00

309, 737,193. 00 312, 223, 352. 00
252, 647.00
242, 967. 00

320, 200, 069. 00
244, 399.00

325,018,161.00
241, 701. 00

5, 871, 595. 59

3, 836, 445. 84

6, 372, 737.13

Dividends u n p a i d . . .

1, 402,118. 43

2, 617,134. 37

126, 679, 517. 97
54, 684,137.16

128,140, 617. 75 129, 867,493. 92
56, 372,190. 92 54, 22.1, 816.10

Individual deposits..
U. S. deposits
Dep's U. IS. dis. officers

933, 392, 430. 75 1, 027, 040, 514.10 1, 031, 731, 043.42 1, 070. 997, 431. 711 102, 679,163. 71
,
L,
7,381,149.25
9,504,081,25
8,971,826.73
8, 476, 689. 74
8, 796, 678. 73
3, 839, 324. 77
3, 371, 512.48
3, 272, 610.45
3, 631, 803. 41
3, 595, 726. 83

Due tonal ionalbanks
Due to State b a n k s . .

181, 677, 285. 37
71, 579, 477.47

191, 250, 091. 90
80, 700, 506. 06

223, 503, 034.19
91, 035, 599. 65

205, 862, 945. 80
89, 047,471.00

197, 252, 326. 01
79, 380, 429. 38

Notes re-discounted.
Bills payable

2, 616, 203. 05
4, 581, 231.47

2,908, 370.45
4,493, 544. 77

2, 220, 053. 02
5,169,128. 57

3,091,165. 30
4, 664, 077.12

4,122, 472. 79
4, 482, 325. 25

Total

2,140,110,944.78 2, 270, 226, 817. 76 325, 832, 700. 75 2, 358, 387, 391. 59 2, 381, 890, 866.85
2,

1 8 8 2•
MARCH 11.

JULY 1.

OCTOBER 3.

DECEMBER 30.

2,187 banks.
Capital stock

MAY 19.
2,224 banks.

2,239 banks.

2,269 banks.

2,308 b a n k s .

$469, 390, 232. 00 $473, 819,124.00 $477,184,390. 00 $483,104, 213. 00 $484, 883, 492. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided p r o f i t s . . .

130, 924,139. 66 129, 233, 358. 24
60,475, 764. 98 62, 345,199.19

Nat'lbankcirculation
State bank circulat'n

323, 651, 577. 00
241, 527. 00

315, 671, 236. 00
241, 319. 00

308, 921, 898. 00
235,173. 00

314, 721, 215. 00
221,177. 00

315, 230, 925 00
207, 273. 00

Dividends u n p a i d . . .

1, 418,119.12

1, 950, 554. 88

6, 634, 372. 20

3,153, 836. 30

6, 805, 057. 82

131, 079, 251.16 131, 977,450. 77 135, 930, 969. 31
52,128, 817. 73 61,180, 310. 53 55, 343, 816. 94

Individual deposits.. 1, 036, 595, 098. 20 1, 001, 687, 693. 74 1, 066, 707, 248. 751,122,472, 682.46 1, 066, 901, 719. 85
8, 853, 242.16
9, 741,133. 36
8, 817,411. 21
9,817,224.44
U. S. doposits
9, 622, 303. 56
3, 372, 363. 96
3, 493, 252.88
2, 867, 385. 63
3, 786, 262. 20
Dep's U.tt.dis.officers
3, 627, 846. 72
Due to national banks
Duo to State b a n k s . .
Notes re-discounted.
Bills payable
Total

187,433, 824. 90 192, 067, 865. 26 194, 868, 025.46
78,359, 675. 85 78, 911, 787. 20J 84, 066, 023. 66
3,912, 992. 38
4, 428, 531. 51

3, 754, 041. 38
5, 008, 343. 00J

4.195, 210. 99
5, 637, 665. 88

180, 075, 749. 77
79, 885, 652. 22

194, 491, 260. 60
77, 031,165. 82

5, 747, 614. 68
4, 848, 517.18

6, 703,164.45
3,850,056.54

2, 309, 057, 088. 722, 277,924, 911.13:2, 344, 342, 686. 90 , 399, 833,676. 84 2, 360, 793, 467. 09

1883.
MARCH 13.
2,343 b a n k s .
Capital stock

MAY

1.

2, 375 b a n k s .

JUNE 22.

OCTOBER 2.

DECEMBER 31.

2,417 b a n k s .

2,501 banks.

2,529 banks.

$490 456, 932. 00 $493, 963, 069. 00$500, 298, 312. 00$509, 699, 787. 00$511, 837, 575. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits...

136, 922, 884. 44 137, 775, 004.39 138, 331, 902. 06 141, 991, 789.18 144, 800,252.13
59,340,913.64
60, 739, 878. 85 68, 354,157.15 61, 560, 652. 04 58, 787, 945. 91

Nat'l bank circulation
State bank circulat'n

312, 778, 053. 00 313, 549, 993. 00 311, 963, 302 00 310, 517, 857. 00 304,944,131.00
206, 779. 00
198,162. 00
189, 253. 00
184, 357. 00
181,121.00

Dividends u n p a i d . . .

1, 389, 092. 96

2, 849, 629. 87

1,454,232.01

3, 229, 226. 31

7, 082, 682.28

763.
Individual deposits.. 1, 004, 111, 400. 55 1, 067, 962, 238. 35 1,043,137, 111, 049,437, 700. 57 1,106, 453, 008. 23
U. S. deposits
9, 613, 873. 33
11, 624, 894. 57
10,130, 757. 88
10,183,196. 95
10, 026, 777. 79
Dep's U.S.dis.officers
3,787,225,31
3,618,114.79
3,743,326.56
3, 980, 259. 28'
3, 768, 862.04.
Due to national banks
Due to State b a n k s . .
Notes re-discounted,
bills payable
Total

191, 296, 859.14 180,445, 876. 92 194,150, 676. 43 186, 828, 676. 27 200, 867, 280. 06
80, 251, 968. 26 78, 544,128. 82 84, 744, 666. 35 83, 602, 073.01 84, 776,421. 60
5,101, 458. 69l
3, 660, 724 79

5, 557,183. 69
3, 364, 061. 60

5.197, 514.12
3,137, 259. 7

7, 387, 537. 40
4, 053, 252. 81

8, 248, 562. 67
4,106, 297. 78

2,298, 918,165.11 2, 360,192, 235. 85 2, 364, 833,122.44 2, 372,656, 364. 82 2,445, 880,917.49




254

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF THE NATIONAL

1884.
MARCH 7.
Resources.

APRIL 24.

JUNE 20.

SEPTEMBER 30.

DECEMBER 20.

2,563 banks.

2,589 banks.

2,025 banks.

2,664 banks.

2,664 banks.

Loans and discounts $1,321,548,289.62 11,333,433,230. 54 $1,269,862,935. 96 $1,245,294,093. 37 $1,234,202,226.44
Bonds for circulation 339,816,150.00 337, 342, 900. 00 334,346, 350. 001 327,435,000. 00 317, 586, 050. 00
Bonds for deposits .
16, 850, 000.00
17,135, 000.00
17, 060, 000. 00;
16, 840, 000. 00
16,740,000.00
TJ. S. bonds ori hand.
18,672,250.00
15, 560, 400.00
13, 579, 600. 00
12, 305, 900.00
14,143,000.00
Other stocks and b'ds
73,155, 984. G
O
73,424, 815.97
71, 363, 477.46
73,449, 352.07
72, 572, 306.93
Due from res've ag'ts 138, 705, 012. 74 122,491, 957.98
95,247,152.62 111, 993, 019.65 121,161, 976.80
Due from nat'l banks
64, 638, 322.58
68, 031, 209.90
66, 335, 544. 57
69, 459, 884.45
64, 891, 670.13
Due from State banks
17,937, 976.35
18,145,827.61
15, 833, 982.98
16, 306, 500.91
18, 329, 912.01
49, 6C7,126. 87
49,418,805.02
49, 900, 886. 91
Real estate, etc
50,149, 083.90
49, 889, 936.OS
6, 913, 508.85
7, 813, 880.56
8, 866, 558.09
8, 054, 296.82
9, 670,996.14
Current expenses . . .
11, 632. 631. 68
•*, 742, 601.42
11, 923,447.15
Premiums paid
9, 826, 386. 76
10, 605, 343.49i
13,103,098.55
11, 383, 792.57
11,924,152.89
11, 237,975.71
Cash items
11, 382,292.691,
1, 690, 000, 00
1, 870, 000.00
Cl'g-house loan cert's
10, 335, 000.00'
66, 257,118.15
75,195, 955.95
68,403,373.30
Clear' g- house exc'gs
83, 531,472. 58
69,498. 913.13!
23, 258, 854.00
22,377,965.00
Bills of other banks .
23,485,124.00
23, 386, 695.00!
26, 525,120.00
469, 023. 89
456, 778.26
fractional currency491, 067. 76
489, 802.51
473, 046.66
Specie
122, 080,127.33 114, 744, 707.09 109,661,682.11; 128, 609,474.73 139, 747, 079. 53
77, 044, 659.00
76, 369, 555.00
75, 847, 095. 00
Legal-tender notes..
77, 712, 628.00
76, 917, 212.00
U.S. cert's of deposit.
14,045,000.00
14, 200, 000. 00
19, 040. 000.00
11,990, 000.00
9, 870, 000.00
Due from U.S. Treas.
16, 465, 785. 66
17, 739,906.28
15,442, 306. 52
17,468, 976.58
17,022, 999.341
Total

2,390, 500,638.51 2,396, 813, 834.92 2, 282, 598, 742.96 2,279,493, 880.07 2, 297,143,474.27

1885.
MARCH 10.

MAY 6.

JULY 1.

OCTOBER 1.

DECEMBER 24.

2,671 b a n k s .

2,678 b a n k s .

2,689 b a n k s .

2,714 banks.

2,732 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts 11,232,327,453.69 $1,241,450,649. 7» $1,257,655,547.92 51,306,143,990. 46 $1,343,517,559.96
"
310,102,200.00 307, 657, 050.00 304, 776, 750. 00
Bonds for circulation 313,106,200.00 312,168, 500.00
~~
17,607, 000. 00
17,457,000.00
16,815,000. 00
16, 740, 000.00
Bonds for deposits..
18,012, 000.00
14, 588,800. 00
14, 329,400. 00
14,769,250.00
U. S. bonds on hand.
14,607, 650.00
12, 665, 750.00
77,249,159.42
77,495.230.25
75,019, 208.99
Other stocks andb'ds
77,533, 841. 38
75,152,919. 35
Duo from res've ag'ts 136,462, 273.26 130,903,103. T 132, 733, 904.34 138, 378, 515.15 139, 239, 444. 80
77, 220, 972. 29
Duo f romnat'l banks
79,452,309.67
78, 967, 007. 86
66, 442, 054.87
67, 866,656. 51
17,180, 008.46
Due fromStatebanks
18, 553,946.46
17, 987, 891.44
17, 572, 822.65
17, 348, 938.11
50, 729,896. 08
51, 963, 062.01
51, 293, 801.16
49,699,501.42
49,886, 378. 87
Heal estate, etc
3, 533, 759.49
9,416,971. 01
6, 853, 392.72
7, 877, 320. 27
7,096,268.06
Current expenses...
12, 690, 663.41
11,802,199.86
12,511, 333.41
12, 330, 437. 60
12, 358, 982. 70
Premiums paid
17, 214, 373. 52
12,810,187. 64
14, 347, 579. 53
11, 228, 856. 82
11, 276, 626.48
Cash items
1, 380, 000. 00
630,000.00
1,110,000. 00
1, 530, 000.00
1,430, 000. 00
Cl'g-house loan cert's
92, 351, 296. 77
81, 926, 730. 76
59, 085, 781.9G
72,259,129. 39 113,158,675. 32
Clear' g-house exc'gs
23,465,388.00
23,178, 052. 00
23,062, 765.00
22, 013, 314. 00
26, 217,171.00
Bills of other banks.
489, 927.18
415, 082.64
477, 055.17
519, 529.96
513,200.12
Fractional currency
1,670, 961. 77
1,605,703.69
Trade dollars
167,115,873.67 177,433,119. 30 177, 612, 492. 02 174,872, 572. 54 165, 354,352.37
Specie
67, 585, 466. 00
69,738,119. 00
79, 701, 352. C
O
71,017,322.00
77,336,999. 00
Legal-tender notes..
11, 765, 000. 00
18, 800, 000. 00
22,920, 000. 00
22, 760, 000. 00
19,135,000. 00
U.S. cert's of deposit
14,981, 021. 79
14, 897,114. 24
14, 617, 897.02
15, 079,935. 8C
15,473, 270. 84
Due from U.S.Treas
Total

2, 312, 744, 247.35,2, 346, 682,452.99 2, 421, 852, 016.47(2,432, 913,002.38 2,457,675,256.13

18 86.
MARCH 1.

JUNH 3.

AUGUBT 27.

OCTOBER 7.

DECEMBER 28.

2,768 banks.

2,809 banks.

2,849 banks.

2,852 banks.

2,875 banks.

Loans and discounts $1,367,705,252. 80 $1,398,552,099.71 $1,421,547,199.22 $1,450,957,054.93 $1,470,157,681.13
Bonds for circulation 296, 661, 400. 00 279,414,400.00 270,315,850.00 258, 498, 950. 00 228, 384, 350.00
""
""
""
Bonds for deposits..
18,637, 000. 00 18, 810, 000.00 19, 984,900. 00 20,105, 900. 00 21,040, 900. 00
U. S. bonds on hand.
12,326, 500. 00 10, 576, 200.00
16, 580,050.00
12, 535, 550.00 14,368,950.00
Other stocksand b'ds
81, 825, 266. 40 81,431, 000. 66
80, 227, 388.98 83,347,119. 93 82,439,901.64
Bue from res've ag'ts 142,805, 686. 91 133, 027,136. 53 143,715,221.45 140, 764, 579. 01 142,117, 979.28
Due from nat'l banks
78,091,411.58
80, 526,615. 77 88,271,697.96
76, 933, 579.67 77, 632,198.47
Due fromStatebanks
18, 834, 235. 88 17, 720, 924.26 18, 387, 215. 76 20,140, 256. 27 21, 465,427.08
Real estate, etc
53, 834,583. 58 54, 090, 070.94 54, 763, 530. 37
52,262,718.07
53,117,564.42
Current expenses...
5,837,175.21
7, 438, 741.12 10, 283,007.79
7, 705,850. 57 8, 684, 672.33
Premiums paid
12, 237, 689.15 13, 298,269. 23 13, 641,463. 72 14, 303, 529. 55 15,160,621. 67
13,218,973.44
Cash items
15,135,538.48
12,181, 455.80 10,408,981. 58 13,277,169.64
Cl'g-houseloan cert's
85, 000.00
505,000.00
205, 000.00
Clear'g-house exc'gs
99,923,656.84
95, 536, 941.15 70, 525,126.92
76,140, 330. 60 62,474,605.90
Bills of other banks.
20, 503, 303.00 25.129,938. 00 21, 602, 661. 00 22, 734, 085. 00 26,132,330.00
Fractional currency
451, 308.89
434, 220.93
447, 833. 09
470,175.18
452, 361. 34
Trade dollars
1, 713, 384.35
1, 857,041. 56
1, 889, 794. 55 1, 827,364.20
1,681,530.65
Specie
171, 615, 919. 39 157,459, 870.49 149,000,492.10 156, 387, 6S6.00 166, 983, 556. 01
79, 656, 788.00 64,039, 751.00 62, 812, 322. 00 67, 739, 828. 00
Legal-tender notes..
67,014,886.00
5, 855, 000.00
6,195,000.00
U. S. cert's of deposit
8,115,000. 00
12,430, 000. 00 11, 850, 000. CO
5% fund with Treas.
12, 953, 248. 20 12,198, 526.43 11, m8, 912. 52 11,358, 014. 97 10, 056,128. 39
1,416, 892.00
Dae from U. S. Treas
975, 376.96
1, 599, 303. 36 2, 592, 042. 94
1,513,019.67
Total

2, 494, 337,129. 4412,474, 544, 481. 89 2,453. 666, 930. 07 2, 513. 854. 751.17 2, 507, 753, 912.95




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

255

BANKS FROM OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTOBER, 1888—Continued.

1884.
MARCH 7.

Liabilities.
Capital stock.
Surplus fund
Undivided<profits . . .
Nat'l bank circulatrn
State bank Circulati'n
Dividends unpaid ...

APRIL 24.

JUNE 2Q.

SEPTEMBER 30.

DECEMBER 20.

2, 563 blinks.

2,589 b a n k s .

2,625 b a n k s .

2, 664 b a n k s .

2,664 banks.

$515, 725, 005. 00 $518,471, 844. 00 $522, 515, 996. 00 $524, 271, 345. 00 $524,089,065. 00
145, 741,679.
63, 644.861.

146,047,958.07
67,450,459.00

145, 763,416.17
70, 597, 487.21

147, 055, 037. 85
63, 234, 237.62

146, 867,119.06
70, 711, 369.95

298, 791, 610.
180, 589.

297, 506, 243.00
180,576.00

295,175, 334.00
179, 666.00

289, 775,123. 00
179,653.00

280,197,043. 00
174,645.00

1, 384, 686. 71

3, 686,160.33

1,331,421.54

L
Individual deposits.. 1, 046,050,167. 90 1. , 060, 778,388.06
11, 233,495. 77
U. S. deposits
9,956, 875. 24
3, 588, 980.50
Dep's U. S. dis. offic'rs
3,856, 461, 66

979, 020, 349.63
10, 520, 759.44
3, 664, 326.13

975,243, 795.14
10,367, 909.92
3, 703, 804.34

987,649,055.68
10,655,803. 72
3,749,969.85

Due to national banks
Due to State banks..

207,461,179. 63
88,466, 363, 89

192, 868,942. 31
86, 778,138. 85

155, 785, 354.44
70,480, 617.11

173, 979,149.80
72,408,206.85

187,296,348.30
72,572,384.43

Notes re-discounted.
Bills payable
Cl'g-house loan cert's

6, 234, 202. 32
2, 968,740. 50

7,299, 284. 58
3,193,635.20

11, 343, 505.55
4, 262, 244.57
11, 895, 000.00

11,008, 595.07
4, 580,862.15

8,433, 724.67
3,415,524.07

Total..

1,422, 901.91

1,415,889.58

2, 390, 500, 638.51 2, 396, 813,834.92 2, 282, 598,742, 96j2, 279,493, 880.07 2, 297,143,474.27

1885.
MARCH 10

JULY 1.

OCTOBER 1.

DECEMBER 24.

2, 671 b a n k s .

Capital stock .

MAY 6.
2.678 banks.

2, 689 b a n k s .

2,714 b a n k s .

2,732 banks.

$524,255,151.00 $525,195, 577.00 $526, 273,602.00 $527,524,410.00 $529,360,725.00

Surplus fi:ndi
Undivided profits . . .

145, 907, 800.
60, 296,452.

145,103, 776.01
60,184,358.12

146, 523, 799.94
52,229, 946.61

146, 624,642.06
59,335, 519.11

150,155,549.52
69,229,645.82

N a t ' l b a n k circulati'n
State bank circulati'n

274, 054,157.
162, 581.

273, 703, 047.00
144,498.00

269,147,690.00
144,48i). 00

268, 869, 597.00
136, 898.00

267,430, 837.00
133,932.00

6,414,263.98

3,508, 325.38

1, 360,977.27

Dividends unpaid . . .
Individual d e p o s i t s . .
U. S. deposits

1, 301, 937.73

2,577,236.0

996, 501,647.40 1,035, 802,188. 56 1,106,
1,376, 516.80 1,102, 372,450. 351,111,429,914.98
!,
11,690, 707.52
10,995,974.68
"
11,006,919. "
" "'"
~
"~
11,552,621.98
""
12,058,768.36

Dep's U.S. dis. offic'rs

3,039,646.

3,330, 522.70

3, 027, 218.02

2,714,399.37

3,005,783.11

Due to national banks

205, 877, 203.09l

199, 081,104.40

203,932, 800.05

213, 534,905.08

216,564,533.96

Due to State b a n k s . .

82,190, 567.43

81, 966,092.25

88, 847,454.78

86,115, 061.25

85,060,162.27

5, 736, 012.02
2,167,333.33

5; 864, 000. 85
2, 074,259.76

8,432, 792.64
2,191,380.16

9,932,828.24
1,951, 598.60

Notes re-discounted.
Bills payable
Total.

6, 299, 722.
1, 850,462.

312,744, 247.35J2,348,682,452.99$, 421, 852, 016.47 2, 432, 913, 002.38 2,457,675,256.13

1886.
MARCH 1.

Surplus fund
Undivided p r o f i t s . . .
N a t ' l b a n k circulati'n

AUGUST 27.

OCTOBER 7.

DECEMBER 28.

2, 768 b a n k s .
Capital stock

JUNE 3.
2, 809 b a n k s .

2,849 banks.

2, 852 b a n k s .

2,875 banks.

$533, 360, 615.00 $539,109, 291.72 $545, 522, 598.00 $548,240, 730.00 $550, 698,675.00
152, 872, 349.01
59, 376, 381. 80

153., 642, 934.86
67, 662,886.02

157, 003, 875.60
62, 211, 565.63

157, 249,190.87
66, 503,494.72

159, 573,479.21
79,298,286.13

256,972,158.00

244, 893, 097.00

238, 273, 685.00

228, 672, 610.00

202,078,287.00

133, 931.00

132, 470.00

128, 336.00

125, 002.00

115, 352.00

1, 534, 905.58

1, 526, 776.66

1,863,303.62

2,227, 810.59

- 1,590,345.06

State b a n k circulati'n
Dividends u n p a i d . . .

,
.,
1,152, 660,492.06 1.
.,146,246,911.431., 113,459,187.35 1, 172, 968, 308.64 1, 169, 716, 413.13
Individual deposits..
13, 842,023.69
13, 705, 700.73
13, 670,721.76
12, 414, 566. 52
14, 295, 927.74
U. S. deposits
2, 721, 276. 77
4, 276, 257.85
2, 798, 864. 55
2, 884, 805.62
3, 019, 018.72
D e p ' s U . S . dis. oflSc'rs
«
204,405, 273.11 218, 327, 437.33 218, 395, 950.54 223,842,279.46
219, 778,171.
Due to national b a ' k s

92,663,570.46

90, 591,102.81

90, 366, 354. 90

90, 246,483.31

91, 254, 533.23

Due to State b a n k s . .

8, 376, 095.20

8, 718, 911.71

7, 948, 698.27

10, 594,176.56

9,159,345.79

Notes re-discounted.

1,174, 874.29

1,145, 240. 26

1, 381, 095.01

2, 067, 693.48

2,444,958.36

Bills payable

2,494,337,129.44 2,474, 544,481.89 2, 453, 606, 930.07 2, 513,854,751.17 , 507,753,912.95

Total




256

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
AGGREGATE RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES OF THE NATIONAL

MARCH 4.

MAY 13.

AUGUST 1.

OCTOBER 5.

DECEMBER 7.

2,909 hanks.

2,955 banks.

3,014 b a n k s .

3,049 b a n k s .

3,070 b a n k s .

lie sources.

1,583,941,484. C6[
Loans and discounts !$ 1,515,534,674.67 $1,560,291,810. 73 $1,560.371,741. 05 $1,587,549,133. 76 $1
186,431, JH)(). 00
Bonds for circulation 211,537,150.00 200,452, 300.00 189,032, 050. 00 189, 083.100.
22,976,900.00
24, 990, 500. 00
26, 402, 000. 00
27, 757, 000.
42, 203, 000. 00!
Bonds for d e p o s i t s . .
9, 721, 450. 00
8.157, 250. 00
7, 808, 000. 00
6, 914, 350.
U.ri. bonds on hand
6, 98H. 550.00
87,441, 034. 86
Other stocks and b'ds
88, 031,124.15
88, 374, 837.99
88, 831, 009.
90, 775, 413. 311
Due from res've ag'ts 163,161; 181.37 148, 067, 874.43 140, 270,155. 75 140, 873, 587.
13L',9.10, 76"). 34
D u e from nat'l b a n k s
80, 460, 829.09 105,576,811.99
99, 487, 767. 80
93, 302, 413.
98, 227, 065. 30
Due from State b a n k s
21, 725, 805.99
20, 952,187. 86
22,103, 677.
22, 746,190.43
21, 995, 35G. 41
55,128, 600.78
56, 954, 622. 58
57, 968,159.
55, 729, 098. 76
58,825,168. 16
Heal estate, otc
8,064,292.40
5,158, 940. 83
8, 253, 890.
7, 781,151.97|
10,600,817.35
Current e x p e n s e s . . .
15, 537, 721. 22
17, 288, 771.
16,806,431.83!
17, 353,130.17
18, 797, 205. 79
Premiums paid
,
13, 308, 520. 04
14, 691, 373.
13, 065, 663. 79!
16, 914, 070.02
13, 336, 455. 77j
Cash items
89, 239,194. 59
88, 775,457.
83, 829, 363. 73 128, 211,628. 48
85, 097, 380. 41
Clear'g-house exc'gs
22, 235, 206.00
21,937, 884.
Bills of other b a n k s .
25,188,137.00
23, 447, 294. 00
22, 962, 737.00
Fractional currency
577, 878. 03
540, 594.
556,186. 75
554, 906. 55
564, 263. 72
1, 803, 661.40
509.
328. 09
Trade dollars
184, 203.08
63, 671.97
171, 678, 906.15 167, 315, 665. 62 165,104, 210. 28 165, 085, 454.
159, .240, 643. 48
Specie
66, 228,158.00
73, 751, 255.
79, 595, 088.00
74,477, 342. 00
75,361,975.00
Legal-tender n o t e s . .
7, 645, 000.00
6,190, 000.
8, 025, 000.00
7, 810, 000. 00
6, 165, 000. 00
U. S. cert's of deposit
9,280, 755.33
8, 310, 442.
5 % fund with Troas.
8, 810, 585.351
8, 341, 988. 77
8, 1C8, 503. 20
Duofrom TJ. S.Treas.
1, 856,195.13
985,410.
1,113,554.81
660, 818.42
1, 068, 117. 43
Total

2, 581,143,115.05 2, 029, 314,022.42,2, 637, 276,167. 722, 620,193,475.59 2,624,180,330.55

188$.
FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 4.

3,077 banks.

3,098 b a n k s .

3,120 b a n k s .

3,140 b a n k s .

Resources.

$1, 584,170, 370. 51 $1, 606,397, 923. 95 $1, 628,124, 564.83
Loans and discounts
181,845,450.00
Bonds for circulation
181, 042, 950. 00
177,513,900.00
56, 863, 000. 00
Bonds for deposits
56,643, 000. 00
55,788, 000. 00
6,450, 500. 00
U. S. bonds on band
7, 639, 350. 00
7,830,150.00
91,153,688.97
Other stocks and bonds
95, 296, 917. 07
96, 265, 812. 31
155, 341, 240. 86
Due from reserve agents —
146, 477, 902. 83
108,133, 598. 31
92, 980, 082. 48
Due from national banks . . .
95, 519,102. 26
101, 689, 774. 90
21,880,069.60
Duo from State banks
22,709, 703.01
22, 714,258. 27
59, 366, 247. 8 ^
Real estate, etc
60, 111,356.86
61,101, 833.19
6,531,237. il
Current expenses
9,843,637 81
5,685,313.21
19,779,498.56
Premiums paid
19, 501, 481. 06
18,903,434.54
12, 255,978.69
Cash items
14, 644, 675. 77
16,855,801.15
73, 418, 037. 29
Clearing-house exchanges ...
117, 270,706. 86
74, 229, 763. 69
23,145,206.00
Bills of other banks
24, 434, 212. 00
21, 343, 405. 00
683,148. 93
Fractional currency
662, 722. 27
632, 602. 42
437. 59
Trade dollars
351. 15
371. 76
173, 830, 614. 62
Specio
172, 074,011.19
181,292,27(5.76
82, 317, 670. 00
Legal-tender notes
8 { 574, 210. 00
,
81,995,643.00
10,120, 000. 00
D". S. certificates of deposit .
9, 330, 000. 00
12,315,000.00
7, 993, 189. 22
£>% fund with Treasurer
7, 887, 950. 36
7, 765, 837. 16
1, 240, 035. 56
Due from U. S. Treasurer ...
1, 361, 033. 74
1, 236, 675. 66

Total




2, 664, 366, 304. 44

2,732,423,198.19

2,731,448,016.16

$1, 684,180, 624. 27
171, 867, 200. 00
54, 208, 000.00
6, 507, 0f)0. 00
99, 752,403. 73
170,458,593.83
99,821,000.57
23, 767,200. 53
62,634,791.74
8, 498, 758. 28
17, 015, 898. 02
15,071.024.30
102,439, 751. 67
201, 600, 818. 00
684, 2G8.41
419.05
178,097, 816.64
81,099,461.00
. 8,953,000.00
7,555,401.72
935,799. 31
2,815, 751,^41.07

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

257

BANKS FROM OCTOBER, 1863, TO OCTOBER, 1888—Continued.

1887.
MARCH 4.

MAT 13.

AUGUST 1.

OCTOBER 5.

DECEMBER 7.

2,909 banks.

2,955 banks.

3. 014 banks.

3,049 b a n t s

3, 070 banks.

Liabilities.

$555, 351, 765.00 $565, 629, 068.45 $571, 6i3, 811. 00 $578,462, 765. 00 $580, 733,094.42

Capital stock

164, 337, 132.72! 167, 411, 521.03 172, 348, 398. 99 173, 913, 440.97
',
67,248,949.16; 70,153, 368.11 62, 294S 634. 02J 71, 451,167.02

Surplus fund
Undivided profits...

Nat'lbankcirculat'n I 186, 231,4C8. C 176, 771, 539.00
O
98,716.00
106,100.00
State bank circuiat'nj
1,441,628.17;

Dividends unpaid...

375,246,408.26
79, 899, 218. 06

166, 625, 658. 00; 167, 283, 343. 00. 164, 904, 094. 00
98,697.001
98,676.50
98, 699.00|

1, 977, 314.40'

2,239,929.46;

1,343,903.98

2,495,127.83:

Individual deposits. 1, 224,925, 698. 26 1, 266, 570, 537.67 1, 285, 076. 978. 58 1, 249,477,126. 95 1, 235, 757, 941. 59
U.S. deposits
I 15,233,909.94
17,550,485.93, 19,180, 712.77j 20. 392, 28 L 03 38,410,27(3.87
Dep'sU.S.dis.offic'rs1
4,277,187.61
3,779,735.14
4,074,903.62
4,831,666.14!
4,515,024.05
249, 337,482.40| 244, 575, 545.12- 235, 9«6; 622.46

227, 491, 984.15

223, 088, 927. 85

Due to State banks. j 103, 012. 552.48i 102, 089,438.63[ 103, 603, 598.14

Due to national ba'ks

102, 094, 625.68

98, 809, 344. 60

Notes re-d^scounted
Bills payable
Total

7, 556, 837.10
2, 082, 374. 21

10,132, 799. 61
2,567,953.30

11,125, 236. 08
2,985,087.00

17, 3'12, 806. 39
4, 888, 4;.;9.43

10, 268, 247. 74
5, 103,112. 57

2, 581,143,115.05 2, 629, 314, 022.42 2, 637, 276,167. 72!2, 620,193,475.59:2, 624,186,330.55

!

!

i

I

I

1 § 8 §.
FEBRUARY 14.

JUNE 30.

Liabilities.
3,077 banks.
Capital stock
Surplus fund
0 nuivided profits
National bank circulation . . .
State bank circulation
Dividends unpaid

$582,194, 263. 75

3,098 banks,

j 3,120 banks.

3,140 banks.

$585, 449, 487. 75 ] $588, 384, 018. 25 '

$592, 621, 856. 04

179, 533, 475. 38
06, 606,930.87

180,053,507.27
78,196,768.91

183,106,435.70
70, 290,173. 07

185,520,564.68
77, 434, 420. 23

159, 750,193. 50
98, 652. 50

158, 897, 572. 00
94,878.50

155, 313,? 53. 50
82, 372. 50

i:»l, 702, 809. 50
82, 354. 50

1,534,314.51

Individual deposits
1, 251,957, 844.42
55, 193,899.19
U. S deposits
4, 255,302. 02
Deposits U. S. dis. officers . . .

7,381,894.42
1,766,496.41 !
2, 378, 275. 70
I
1,309,731,015.16 1,292,342,471.58 1,350,320,861.11
51,691,454.09
54, 675), 043. 93
52,140, 562. 97
4,789,093.63 |
3,690,652.05 !
3, 993, 900. 51

Due to national banks

241, 03S, 499. 93

237,056,940.91

248,248,440.03 |

Due to State banks

105, 539, 405. 53

104, 502, 668. 21

109,871,372.41

12, S66, 722.85
3, 796, 739. 99

12,724,238.71
4, 469, 076. 04

260, 697, 968. 60

I

Notes and bills re-discounted
Bills payable
Total

11028—CUR




2, 60i, 366, 304.44

2,732, 423,198.19

13,096,119.55 ,
4,955,068.27 !

114,936,397.15
17, 305, 750. 61
6, 615, 813. 47

2, 731, 448, 016.16 I 2,815, 751, 341. 07

A SUMMARY
STATE AND CONDITION

THE NATIONAL BANKS
DECEMBER 7, 1337, FEBRUARY 14, APRIL 30, Juxrc 30, AND OCTOBER 4, 1HS8.

Arranged by Slates, Territories, and Reserve Cities.

NOTE.—The abstract of each State is exclusive of any reserve city therein.




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CU/;ItENTCY.

260

Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887,
MAINE.
DECEMBER 7.
Resources.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 4.

74 banks.

75 banks.

75 b a n k s .

75 b a n k s .

75 banks.

Loans and discounts. $18, 898, 502. 90 $18,477,001.20 $18, G73, 708. 56 $18, 910, 936. 77 $20,192,140.20
5, f.08, 5i;0. 00
5, 533, fi()0. 00
5, 493, 500. 00
5,,2l'8, 500. 00
Bonds for circulat ion.
4,961,000.00
170, tiOO. 00
170, 000. 00
170, OuO. 00
170, 000. 00
Bonds for deposits . .
170, 000.00
400. 00
50U. 00
400.00
U. S. bonds on h a n d . .
100.00
867, 273. 83
894, 678. 85
884,745.18
911,211.40
Oilier stocks and b'ds
912,017.38
1, 434, 674. 81
1, 983,691. bS
1,379,080.42
1, 519, 972.14
Due from res've ag'ts
2, 255, 364.43
513,189.62
446, 243. 90
452, 754. 45
517,091.97
Due from nat'l banks
536, 705. 45
14, 678. 15
5 755. 78
11, 040. 59
26, 771. 20
Due from State banks
26, 843. 66
511,008.00
516, 290. 88
512,833.90
543, 942 05
544, 927. 05
Real estate etc . . . . .
77, 060.39
39. 766. 53
58, 594. 36
20, 089. 58
55,446.71
Current expenses....
263, 8"i0. 98
256, 528. 99
252,314.55
219, 474. 06
P r e m i u m s paid
182,324.58
197, 992. 00
183,532.29
185, 325.96
195, 530.14
227, .'02. 58
Cash items
73, 753. 90
88, 825. £4
102, 376. 06
89,152.17
117,990.67
Clear'"-house exeh'gs
353, 861. 00
293,140.00
304,153. 00
263, 681. 00
350, 620 00
Bills of other b a n k s . .
3, 343. 48
4, 035.21
4, 021. 35
3, 232,1£
3, 563.65
Fractional currency.
T r a d e dollars
727, 620.69
709, 727.64
714, 082. 97
717,497.67
679, 292.68
Specie
211,082.00
195, 720. 00
221,413.00
206, 319. 00
251,125. 00
Legal-tender notes . .
U. S. cert's of deposit.
239, 280. 27
239, 997. 50
213, 894. 50
220,912.00
237, 047. 00
5 % fund with T r e n s .
7, 650. 00
7, 000. 00
3,716.33
9,146. 33
6, 100. 00
Due from U. S. Treas
30, 063, 829. 24
29,715,254.65
29,661,107.68
31,725,763.53
30, 055, 234. 97
Total

N B W HAMPSHIRE
49 banks.

49 banks.

49 banks.

49 banks.

49 banks.

Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulat ion.
Bonds for deposits...
U I bonds on hand
S
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts.
Due from nat'lbanks.
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items

$9,583,071.30
3, 919, 500.00
450, 000. 00
6 000 00
1, 775, 207. 41
1, 084, 687.62
183,313.26
53,490.3 2
211,608.48
56, 683. 8!)
295, 963. 60
181, 908. 34

$9,393,100.26
3,919,500.00
4G0, 000. 00
6 000.00
1,822,704.83
1,082,042.58
140, 510.13
48,416.47
202,144. 84
40, 806. 97
266,795.16
158, 060.35

$9,401,184.20
3, 869, 500. 00
450, 000. 00
6 000 00
1, 936, 517. 36
1,144,018.59
124,135. 74
47, 327. 98
202, 319. 34
53, 552. 08
269, 152. 08
196, 288.11

$9, 652. 860. 02
3, 827, 000. 00
450, 0C0. 00
1, 882, 308. 71
1, 297, 460. 13
175, 595.42
47, 418. 32
200, 845. 20
38, 218. 42
255, 683. 33
164, 410. 32

$10,150 394.19
3, 677, 000, 00
450, 000. 00
100 00
1, 830, 575. 58
1,432, 866. 35
221, 800.97
43, 990. 69
211, 337. 49
48, 388. 30
247, 043. 50
196,716. 59

Bills ol" other banks*!.
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes . .

238, 665. 00
4, 658. 75

249, 592. 00
7,117. 60

219, 419.00
6, 325.85

279,140.00
6, 686.11

416, 484.46
132, 8(J9. 00

198, 697. 00
5, 897. 57
5. 00
364, 499.74
117,411.00

444, 0!>4,22
142, 502.00

360 697.28
128, 240. 00

397 288 50
145,973.00

5 % fund with. Treas.
Due from U. S. Treas.

174, 022. 50
3, 475. 90

1/75,612.50
17, 250. 00

174, J02. 50
20.00

170, 917. 50
2, 543. 60

163,170.00
4,717.90

18, 771, 759.63

18, 409, 454. 40

18, 717, 423.80

18, 879, 943.10

19, 507,189.17

Total

VERMONT.
49 b a n k s .
Loans a n d discounts $13, 075, 357.05
Bonds for circulation.
3, 81*. 000. 00
Bonds for d e p o s i t s . . .
188, 000. 00
U. S. bonds on h a n d . .
127, 450. 00
Other stocks and b'ds
806,214.22
818, 636. 42
D u e from res've ag't s
D u e fromnat'l banks
179, 542.63
Due from State banks
36, 375.60
220, 145.66
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
62, 202. 50
Premiums paid
150, 381. 48
Cash items
71, 088. 73
Clear'g-house exch'gs
127, 227. 00
Bills of other b a n k s . .
Fractional c u r r e n c y .
4,117.98
T r a d e dollars
Specie
430,919.11
178, 952. U0
Legal-tender notes ..

U.% fund with Treas.
5 S. cert's of deposit
Due fromU. S. Treas.
Total

49 b a n k s .
$12, 626, 899. 49
3, 764, 000. 00
438, 000*)0
128, 300. 00
768, 973. 78
968, 799. 06
250, 008. 30
46, 219. 52
228, 479.17
25, 634. 84
188,118. 70
61,662.35

49 b a n k s .

49 b a n k s .

$12,704,021.32 $12, 584, 804. 38
3, 764, 000. 00
3, 689, 000.00
438, (!00. 00
438, 000. 00
148,3l'O. 00
149, 400. 00
796,410.98
850, 819.08
876, 842. 57
1,161,338.51
153, 510. 98
156, 437. 54
45,917.94
48, 045. 66
229,109.80
228, 464. 29
51, 296.29
46, 948. 82
191,553.08
182,244 46
61,633.54
92, 678, 01

49 b a n k s .
$12,800,451.86
3,614,000.00
438, 000. 00
127, 650. 00
924, 787.56
1,260,446.82
227, 895. 75
49,419.22
224, 434. 01
43,150. 55
185, 271. 59
73, 612. 48

117,190.00
4, 695. 60

104, 252.00
4, 912.14

133, 33 >. C
O
4,261.70

118,427.00
4, 561. 94

417,154.26
166, 640. 00

369, 711.89
184, 405.00

394 724 39
199, 606. 00

405 733 85 !
204,454.00

149, 489. 50
210. 00

154,050.00
2, 900.00

152,100. 00
1, 860. 00

146, 017.55

145, 670.00

20, 440, 309. 88

20, 357, 725.07

20, 277, 837. 53




20, 506,150. 39

20, 847, 966. 63

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 261
arranged by States and reserve cities.
MAINE.
j DECEMBER 7. i FEBUUA11Y 14.
'—
74 b a n k s .
I 75 banks.

Liabilities.

APRIL 30.

OCTOBER 4.

j

75 banks.

|

75 banks.

75 banks.

$10, 585, 352. 42 ; $10, 035, 000. 00

Capital stock

$10, GOO, 000. 00

$10, 000, 000. 00

$10, 660, 0C0. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

2,406,281.88 I
1,504,043.97 ;

2, 426, 282. 98
1,247,980.70

2, 427, 208. 34
1,403,725.84

2,451.776.56
1, 278, 040. 77

2. 54!), 995. 80
1,394,133.81

Xat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

4, 807, 403. D
O

4,821,598,00

4,814,555.00 I

4,593,203.00

4 , 4 0 3 , 033. 00

I

271.801.75

71. 570.38

9, 706, 720.44
55,381.31
77, 555. 77

9,817,916.57
o3,169. 00
87, 919.10

9, 348, 523.18
70,618.83 |
78,788.81 j

9, 480, 280. 52
63, 321. 80
74, 549. 29

11,004,053.05
07,119. 69
81,049.38

538, 529.22

476,003.38

390,563.09 j

302, 029.19

576,166.87

106,353.74

186, 343. 02

100,318.73 '

89,580.01

129,370.10

152, 015. 76

183, 059. 06

185, 033.04

100, 749.47

100,443.30

17. 994. 40

00,044.34

117,135.12

2-9, 801.03

531,622. OP

30, 055, 234; 97

30, 063, 829. 24

29, G61,107. 08

29, 715, 254. 65

31, 725, 703. 53

Dividends unpaid

36, 4G0. 00

Individual deposits . .
U. S. deposits

51,913.03

52, 037.10

Dep'ts U.S.dis. officers
Due to national banks
Due to State b a n k s . .
Notes re-discounted..
Bills payable
Total

NEW

HAMPSHIRE.

49 banks.

49 banks.

49 banks.

49 banks.

$6, 205, 000. 00

$0, 205, 000. 00

$0, 205, 000. 00

$0, 205, 000.00

$0, 205, 000. 00

Surplus fund
'Undivided profits

1, 454, 7F0.45
720, 405. 08

1, 454, 251. 55
007, 394. 73

1,459,010.85
713,285.71

1,466,054.79
689, 002.43

1, 497, 304. 40
735, 093.15

iVat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

3, 490, 050. 00
0, 829.00

3, 478, 795. 00
0, 829. 00

3, 40(5, 045. 00
0, 829. 00

3, 378, 560. 00
6, 829.00

3 270,550.00
0, 829. 00

»Janital stock

49 banks.

17, 949.66

25,370.44

33,488.81

84, 603.13

31, 803.36

Individual deposits . .
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers

5, 594, 387.98
333, 515. 00
134, 745. 30

5, 255, 070.25
330, 444. 38
150,902.17

5, 508, 728. 70
328, 497. 27
130, 097. 02

5, 659, 514. 24
415,929.82
00, 485.39

0,301,001.44
375, 093.87
97,144. 00

Due to national banks

498, 704. 40

529, 980.48

612,018.58

586, 343. 23

66-2,197. 88

Due to State b a n k s . . .

250, 776. 20

297, 508. 27

260, 029.92

307, 777.91

243, 211.25

Notes re-discounted..

39, 010. 34

51, 302.13

11,192.3-4

8, 732. 80

12, 300.00

Bills payable

24, 279. 00

10, 000/00

30, 000. 00

.11,110.30

18,771,759.03

18, 409, 454. 40

3.8, 717, 423. 80

18, 879, 943.10

Dividends unpaid

Total

19,507,189.17

VERMONT.
49 banks.

49 banks.

"$7l566,"000.'oo"|

Capital stock
Surplus fund
Undivided profits

j

1
j

Na-t'l-bank circulation!
State-bank circulation

$7, 566, 000.00

1, 572, 213. 75 !
812, 489.40

1, 597, 771. 57
580,311.42

3,401,985.00
3, 500. 00

3,351,215.00
3, 434.00

;

8, 076. 59

10, 818.10

1 ndividual deposits.. i
U. S. deposits

6, 339, 889. 2G
181,722.30
8, 790. 07

6,311,125.96
457,217.52
9,] 97. 47

395, 050.82

255, 512.32

82, 266.73

03, 025.04

Dividends unpaid

Dep'ts U.S.dis.ooiceir
Due to national banks
Due to State banks...

48,290.71

Xotns re-discounted..
Bills payable
Total

!

20,029.25 !
20, 440, 309. 88




49 banks.

j

49 banks.

49 banks.

$7, 500, 000. 00 j $7, 560, 000. 00

$7, 500, 000. 00

1, 597. 880.
764, 733.

3,608,386.00
091,083.39

1, 690, 476.41
732, 229,34

3, 319, 515.
3, 434.

3, 201, 000. 00
3, 434.00

3, 227. 705. 00
3. 434. 00

119,558.15

11, 743. 94

G, 217, 034. 44

471, 288.22
7, 579. 71

0, C97, 226. 21
406. 258.90
13,295.92

374, 800. 78

278,283.50

203, 254. 83

64, 959. OS

98,266. 59

130, 324.57

109, 490. G7 \

07,597.00

77, 878.23

00, 957. 51

30,000.00

50,000.00

45,157. 50

45, 000. 00

20, 357, 725. 07 | 20, 277, 837. 53

20,500,150.39

20, 847, 900. 03

9, 380. 54
5, 978, 572.
408, 787.
12,170.

262

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
MASSACHUSETTS.
OCTOBER 4.

DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

198 b a n k s .

198 b a n k s .

198 b a n k s .

$91, 587, 597. 64
23,892, 900.00
300, 000.00
131,250.00
4, 519, 352.70
7,129, 932.33
1, 292, 339.18
271, 366.46
2,261,460. 55
548, 651. 20
1,044, 776. 81
745, 720. 93
53, 899. 65
1, 286, 285. 00
40, 383. 95
3, 020, 526. 68
1,185, 597.00
200, 000. 00
1, 061,495. 50
51,444.11

$90, 932, 518.57
22, 890, 900. 00
1, 575, 000.00
129, 750.00
4, 487,148. 45
8, 362, 540. 66
973,337. 07
171,575.76
2, 286,119. 62
477, 581. 03
1,119,631.44
690, 535. 67
63,129. 04
1,144, 832. 00
45, 523.50
1.00
2, 870, 846.44
1,190, 806. 00
200, 000. 00
1, 019,815. 50
43, 980. 00

$91, 522, 664.58 $92, 291,101. 68
22, 190,900.00
22, 690, 900. 00
1, 575, 000. 00
1, 575, OOi). 00
118, 650.00
120, 850. 00
4, 592, 577.17
4,437,551.59
9,145,601.26
9,123,805. 71
1, 045,948. 75
1, 049, 683.45
137,410.10
188, 8 >9. 63
2,316,329.68
2,317,544.98
239, 578. 37
206,183. 73
968, 902. 87
1, 030, 342.11
1,007,288.23
731,859. 39
78,428.99
65,879.76
1, 072, 239. 00
1, 008, 745. 00
39,106.66
41, 713. 47
5.00
6.00
2, 858, 510. 93
2, 888,126. 84
1, 273, 792.00
1,349, 900. 00
195, 000. 00
195, 000.00
979, 505. 60
1, 008,195. 50
31, 892. 50
82,830.00

$94,674, 951.93
21,813,400. 00
1, 575, 000.00
93,850. 00
4, 608,443. 57
10, 450, 288. 04
987,174.40
163, 696. 21
2, 326, 666. 23
243, 889. 67
912, 563.06
890, 974. 07
.
69,918.05
1, 252, 635.00
39,030.46
6.00
2, 970, 552. 92
1, 471, 557. 00
195, 000. 00
982, 587. 50
28, 355.00

140,633, 979.69

140, 675, 601. 75

141, 635, 621. 74

142,157, 768. 79

145,750, 539.11

54 b a n k s .

55 banks.

Resources.
Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulation.
Bonds for deposits...
U. S. bonds on hand..
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts.
Due from natrlbanks.
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractioual currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legai-render notes ..
U. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with Treas.
DuefromTJ. S. Treas.
Total

|

CITY OF BOSTON.
54 banks.
54 b a n k s .
54 banks.
Loans and discounts. $125, 029,621.35
Bonds for circulation
8, 788,150. 00
Bonds for deposits... 3, 505,000. 00
XJ. S. bonds on hand..
48,350.00
Other stocks and b*ds 2, 868, 346.06
Due from res Ve ag'ts. 13, 141,793.19
Due from nat'l banks. 11, 584, 037.74
Due from State banks
298, 178. 72
Real estate, etc ,
2.924,493. 58
Current expenses
658,075,83
Premiums paid
873, 258.76
Cash items
436,872. 86
Clear'g-house exch'gs 9, 522,820.87
Bills of other banks.. 1,616,216.00
Fractional currency.
17, 881.56
Trade dollars
Specie
.8,515,027.18
Legal-tender notes .. 2, 865, 676. 00
TJ. S. cert's of deposit.
325, 000. 00
5 % fund with Treas.
374, 601. 75
Due from TJ. S. Treas.
269,820.00
Total

193, 663, 221.45

JUNE 30.
199 b a n k s .

198 b a n k s .

$130,175,453. 77 $127,936,199.45 $134,833,892.39 $136, 312, 847. 61
6, 937, 650.00
6, 464, 650. 00
7, 338,150.00
7, 258,150. 00
4, 655, 000. 00
4,455, 000. 00
4, 955, 000. 00
4, 955, 000. 00
66, 600.00
53,050.00
7,400. 00
41, 200.00
3, 575, 835.46
3, 534, 675.45
3, 449, 888. 65
3, 367, 281.15
14, 378, 022. 54
16, 598,529.64
14, 955, 074.11
15,193,186. 27
12,093, 085.15
12, 221, 419.01
11, 300, 662. 68
10, 744, 938.82
245, 737.16
273, 219. 99
195,140. 50
617, 977. 43
2, 871, 7G6. 82
2, 893, 349. 52
2, 909, 559. 51
2, 868, 616. 88
441, 576.72
33,292. C
O
1, 002,163. 98
167, 833.80
879, 778. 52
809,154. 86
954, 214. 20
958, 848.15
927, 956. 69
336, 550. 90
284, 009. 29
519,559.07
10, 311, 766.18
9,864,113.03
8,881,471.36
11,509,708.16
1, 054, 229. 00
1, 099, 765. 00
1,161,178. 00
1,122, 014. 00
17, 993-. 88
16, 869. 02
22, 986. 06
18,768.41
9, 330, 501.15
2, 331,872.00
885,000.00
330,181. 75.
188, 010. 00

9, 544, 241. 77
2, 076, 429. 00
495, 000.00
317, 671. 75
75, 570. 00

10, 265, 675. 86
2,187,934.00
675, 000. 00
312,159. 25
46, 002. 00

11,498,027.85
2,822,761.00
235,000.00
288, 659. 25
28, 250.00

200,657,917.01

199, 788,194.11

206, 777, 663. 62

209, 839,184. 73

RHODE ISLAND.
60 b a n k s .

60 b a n k s .

60 b a n k s .

61 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulation.
Bonds for deposits...
TJ. S. bonds on hand..
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts.
Duo from nat'l banks.
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specio
Legal-tender notes ..
U. S. cert's of deposit.
5% fund with Treas.
DuefromTJ. S. Treas.
Total

61 b a n k s .

$34,922,019.77
5,183, 900. 00
150, 000. 00
130,050.00
1, 537,896.22
1,728, 566.01
830,361.18
41,246.94
668, 759.32
117, 989. 58
413, 761. (J0
147, 909.49
301,780.01
308, 226.00
11,765.65
5.00
695 193.26
626, 314.00

$34,635,004.63
5,108, 900. 00
150, 000. 00
47,150. 00
1, 565, 617. 56
2, 383, 227. 23
8013,151.10
61, 909. 03
698,154. 81
79, 960. 35
379,121. 6o
181, 027. 74
373, 095.61
318,132.00
14,418.15
3.00
666,007.11
589,121. 00

232,175. 50
13, 062. 50

220, 670. 50
18, 862. 50

223, 575. 50
49, 662. 50

227,035. 50
43,152. 50

215,700.50
15, 022.50

48,0G0, 988. 33

48, 352, 533. 97

47,686,372.31

48,698,952.59

49,620, 691.57




$34, 520, 432.97 $34, 800, 469. 32
5,168, 900.00
5,168, 900. 00
150, 000.00
150, 000. 00
51, 400. 00
46, 550. 00
1, 478, 554.19
1,439,295.65
1, 846, 354.25
2, 534, 709.46
764, 959. 89
846, 855.16
58,929. 93
44,907. 51
720, 309. 07
710,294.15
106,091.55
58, 077. 22
372, 807. 62
364,829. 81
154, 937. 03
164, 528. 29
374,291.74
575, 222. 09
371, 250. 00
290, 927. 00
12, 254. 58
> 11, 498.44
4.00
14.00
651,017.49
646, 7C5. 49
574, 921. 00
610, 640. 00

$35, 568, 742. 23
5,143, 900. 00
150, 000. 00
45, 050. 00
1,482,885.99
2, 536,132.23
1,124, 84«. 14
22, 708. 02
717,144.61
96, 454. 33
354, 283. 39
170,431.32
418,300.47
274, 718. 00
12, 578. 80
20.00
658, 748. 04
613, 023.00

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

263

by States and reserve cities—Continued.
MASSACHUSETTS.
DECEMBER 7.

198 banks.
$44, 790, 500.00

Capital stock

FEBRUARY 11.

APRIL 30.

198 banks.
198 banks.
$44, 790, 500.00 $44, 790, 500.00

JCSK 30.

199 banks.
$44, 826, 005.00

OCTOBER 4.
198 b a n k s .
$44, 740, 500.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

14, 203, 975.17
4, 938, 885.61

14, 253, 059.21
5, 031, 288.15

14,211,944.83
4,446, 094. 55

14, 226, 686. 53
5, 012, 511.40

14, 301, 455. 57
4,385,4^8.49

Xat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

21,090, 083.00

20, 213, 059.00

20,158,814. 00

19, 719,114.00

19, 454,153. 00

Dividends unpaid

122, 065. 85

113,249. 64

Individual deposits...
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers

52, 320, 485.16
285,981.03
18,138.83

51, 978, 259. 28
1,635, 262.64
50, 052.12

53, 501, 613. 58
1, 707, 948. 93
1,465.75

53, 713, 060. 66
1, 708, 381.25
2, 233.17

Due to national banks

2,242,717.73

227, 335.02

298, 785.19

551, 423.23
57, 814,224.14
1, 700,254. 33
645. 53

1, 939,874.10

1, 991, 389.79

2,281,973.98

Due to State banks...

219, 776. 73

211,901.63

328, 288. 83

250,201.28

322, 914. 30

Notes re-discounted..

366, 370.58

443, 095. 98

260, 226.46

108, 813.33

173, 313.90

35,000.00

10, 000.00

10, 000.00

10, 000.00

34, 989.80

141, 635,621. 74 142,157, 768.79

145, 750, 539.11

Bills payable

<...

Total

140, 633, 979. 69 140, 675,601. 75
CITY

OF BOSTON.

54 banks.
Capital stock
Surplus fund
Undivided profits
Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

2, 205, 22Q. 82

54 banks.

54 banks.

54 banks.

$50, 950,000.00

$50,950,000.00

$50, 950, 000.00

$51,150, 000.00

55 banks.
$51, 400, 000.00

12, 652, 035. 50
4, 547, 546.19

12, 652, 535. 50
5, 966, 354.33

13,134,513.80
4, 028, 737.34

13,059,513.80
5, 099,419. 98

13, 293, 256. 20
3,939,833.47

7, 868, 095.00

6, 540, 640.00

6, 476, 380.00

6, 205,280.00

5, 703, 530. 00

43, 733. 45

27, 719. 70

76, 752. 28

47,262. 96

353, 625. 79

Individual deposits...
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis. officers

79, 838, 623. 43
3,735,112.34
37,409.39

82, 818,189.13
5, 223, 749. 76
34, 687. 02

83, 950, 607. 78
5, 227, 850. 31
34, 253.16

85,013,023.98
4, 900,458.91
52, 373.84

86,487,661.52
4.68S, 889.90
38, 790.48

Due to national banks

25, 929, 752.86

28, 046, 434.25

25, 661, 282. 05

30, 599, 850. 75

32, 515, 805.13

Due to State banks...

7,930, 913. 29

8, 292, 907.32

10, 241, 811. 39

10, 395, 473.40

11,267,629. 04

Dividends unpaid

Notes re-discounted
Bills payable
Total

130, 000.00

104, 700.00

193,663,221.45

200, 657,917.01

6, 000.00.
199,788,194.11

249, 000.00
206, 777, 663. 62

150,157.20
209, 839,184. 73

RHODE ISLAND.
61 banks.
Capital stock

61 banks.

60 banks.

60 banks.

$20, 340, 050.00

$20, 284, 050.00

$20, 284, 050.00

$20, 284, 050.00

60 banks.
$20, 284,050.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

4,257, 984.72
2, 008, 759.75

4, 285, 701. 74
1, 952, 672. 08

4, 306, 733. 38
2,110, 754.62

4. 322, 923. 96
1, 880, 655. 51

4, 363, 658. 81
1, 942,209. 79

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

4, 629, 582. 00
890.00

4, 565,722.00
890. 00

4, 574, 247. 00
890. 00

4,562,812.00
890. 00

4, 589, 032.00
885.00

84, 358. 57

104,413. 95

89, 995.72

306, 559. 63

Individual deposits ..
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers

14, 085, 063. 93
74,012.98
62, 243. 81

14, 370,163.13
130, 0;#. 80
25, 413. 55

13, 891,230.90
107,163.15
38, 070. 94

14, 082, 885. 64
98, 897. 50
29,1T7. 49

14, 998, 920. 57
80, 610. 85
53, 042. 81

Due to national banks

1, 570, 075. 78

1, 694,170. 79

1,109, 9C0. 53

1, 690, 676. 27

2, 013, 227.25

1,156,348.29

1, 405, 672. 09

1,150, 400. G2

Dividends unpaid

Due to State banks...

852, 966.79

939, 297.03

6 775.00

Notes re-discounted
Bills pay able
Total

139, 653.87

10,152.78

35, 000. 00
48,060, 988.33




48,352,533.97

33, 752.50

5,000.00

47,686,372.31

48, 698, 952.59

49, 620, 691.57

264

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
CONNECTICUT.
DECEMBER 7.
Resources.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 4.

83 b a n k s .

83 banks.

83 b a n k s .

83 b a n k s .

84 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts $42, 478,196.18 $42, 918, 685. 89 $42, 971, 9.19.11 $42 967, 841. 89 $43, 818, 391. 96
9,616, l<0. 00
9, 370,100. 00
9, 220, >:)0. 00
8, 832, 600. 00
H, 935,100. 00
Bonds for circulation.
2, 938, 000. (JO
2, 938, 000. 00
3,038, 000. 00
1, 388, 000. 00
2 938, 000. Ot)
Bonds for deposits . .
153, 150.00
103, 15J. 00
113. 150. 00
53, 1C0. 00
155,150.00
U. S. bonds on hand..
3 350, 895.14
333,714.99
3, 408,138. 79
3, 795, 756. 73
3 57t5, 900.32
3,
Other stocks and b'ds
4 848, 611.42
6 148,383.41
5, Q'60, 864.17
5, 768, 965.17
7 327,169. 34
Due from res've ag'ts
2, 868,2*1.96
2, 702,182.46
3, 014, 326. 86
3 0.61, C88. 98
1, 933, 572, 87
Due from nat'l banks.
2^0, 563. 59
246, 4r>9. 76
316. 000. 64
S06, 000.15
41)7, 887. 82
Due from State banks
1,686,295. 15
1 479, 274. 63
1 519, 306. 29
1, 536,108.47
1 556, 045. 36
Heal estate, etc
209, 542. 88
137, 329. 90
240, 337. 87
2t)£. 409. 78
88,481.03
Current expenses
892, 859. 38
1 01)1,011.00
922, 820. 0 *
78H, 527. 62
820, 949.17
Premiums paid
298, 055. 90
287, 925. 28
354, 944. 08
516, 775. 08
426, 669. 38
Cash items
215,218.19
334,109.16
316,012.81
376. 252. 74
234, 843. 65
Clear'g-houso exch'gs
674,103. 00
585, 3-10. 00
703, 5o9. 00
600, 683. 00
639,090. 00
Bills of other banks..
22, 837. 04
19, 304.49
18, 347. 57
17, 9S8. 90
21,696.19
Fractional currency.
45.00
5700
55.00
54.15
45.95
Trade dollars
1 799 594 45
1 759 052 05
1 795 931 78
1, 722, C04. 51
711 498 76
St)pcie
672, 755. 00
700, 503.00
Legal-tender notes . .
918, 880. 00
909, 028. 00
818,153. 00
X S cert's of deposit
T
419,944 50
407,611.41
400, 393. 75
377,144. 00
5 % fund with Treas.
394,669.50
2.1,907.30
20, 801. 00
53, 046. 00
14,656.75
31, 369.75
Due from U.S. Treas.
71 220,452. 33
Total
74 581,334.75
75,140, 783. 22 76 201,357.88
74, 762, 377. 20

NEW Y ORK.
272 b a n k s .

271 b a n k s .

272 banks.

272 b a n k s .

270 banks.

Loans and discounts $100,324,493.54 $98, 548, 487.17 $100, 532, 993.43 $100, 005, 461.05 $101,262,149,67
18,878, 550.00
18, 789, 550. 00
Bonds for circulation. 19,468,550.00
18, 400, 050.00
18,098,050.00
2, 567, 000. 00
1, 177, 000. 00
2, 567, 000. 00
Bonds for deposits . .
2, 567, 000. 00
2.467, 000. ()»
869, 600 00
810,900.00
873, 400. 00
U. S. bonds on hand..
741, 950. 00
665, 450.00
9,010,111.61
8, 682, 670.86
8,815,139.21 • 8,581,888.55
Other stocks and b'ds
8, 971, 591. 98
15, 071, 854.17
13,1)1-6, 876.85
Due fromres'voag'ts. 13,6G5, 063. 38
15,122, 845.95
15,121, 360.2 L
2, 772,168. 67
2,742,327.15
3, 071, 399. 75
Due from nat'l banks.
3, 2'M, 752. 76
2,611,638.90
678, 632. 54
704, 3*28. 30
721, 223. 60
Due from State banks
801, 798. 46
690,213.87
3, 389, 829.14
3, 450, 720. 88
3, 405, 866. 99
Real estate, etc
3,398,521.54
3, 410, 823. 80
352, 729. 85
697,418.17
583, 235. 60
Current expenses
371, 509.11
466, 902.14
1, 375, 055. 73
1, 311, 445. 37
1, 367, 873. 72
Premiums paid
1,324,063.41
1,193,516.10
1, 367, JC6. 87
1,728,610.50
1, 9G6, 133. 76
Cash items
1, 800, 925. 98
1, 567, 029.85
45,093.47
48,928.91
54, 620. 07
Clear'g-house exch'gs
42, 492. 62
61,856.55
1, 263, 038. 00
1, 292,187. 00
1, 207, 002. 00
Bills of other banks..
1,161, 350. 00
1, 399, 776. 00
46,168.92
40, 456. 45
45, 989. 65
Fractional currency.
39, 438.83
45,800.87
161.94
138.14
66.50
Trade dollars
87.01
176.40
5, 440, 201. 34
5,192, 967. 92
5,310,149.36
Specie
5, 020, 269. 20
5, 612, 603. 78
3,271,436.00
3,106, 669. 00
3, 079,177.00
Legal-tender notes . .
2, 952, 674. 00
3, 245, 516. 00
250, 000. 00
260, 000. 00
270, 000. 00
U. S. cert's of deposit
270, 000.00
415, 000. 00
833, 023. 75
860,196.75
835,810.58
5 % fund with Treas.
811,798.05
806, 509. 25
77, 749.48
59, 020. 68
115,755.74
Due from U. S. Treas.
28,912.48
15, 490. 64
Total

165, 684, 093. 00

166,108, 228. 65 167, 527, 263. 81 166, 764, 789. 00

168,128, 506. 07

NEW YORK CITY
47 b a n k s .

40 banks.

46 b a n k s .

46 b a n k s .

46 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts. $258, 201, 928.14 $267, 805,004. 72 $264, 780, 220. 51 $276, 693, 049.29 $292, 771, 593.11
9, 420,000.00
Bonds for circulation
9, 495,000.00
9, 420, 000. 00
7, 920,000. 00
9,420, 000. 00
11,400,000.00
Bonds for deposits...
8, 970, 000. 00
10, 500, 000. 00 10, 070, 000. 00
8. 440, 000. 00
566,900.00
U. S. bonds on hand..
6-78, 050. 00
2, 303, 500. 00
1, 384, 350.00
3, 026, 300. 00
17, 540, 603. 57
Other stocks and b'ds 16, 625, 775. 37
18,155, 040. 03
19, 202, 856. 09
18, 125, 273. 65
Due from res've ag'ts.
Due from nat'l banks. 25, 707, 282. 01 19, 598, 570. 72 23,916,241.91
22, 745, 739. 80
24, 223, 566. 55
Due from State banks
2, 534, 648.19
2, 348, 259. 67
2, 823, 465. 81
2, 790, 014.23
2, 730, 786. 06
Real estate, etc
10,196,414.44
10,524,561.00
10, 247, 888.09
10, 253, 682.24
10, 244, 799. 94
Current expenses
517,273.20
1, 696, 572. 55
1, 308,158. 05
1,127,077.46
145, 352.12
Premiums paid
2, 148,440.68
1, 747, 669. 50
1, 876, 678. 80
2,258. 142.31
2, 450, 261. 06
Cash items
1,503,767.38
1,901,542.15
2, 136, 322. 72
2, 621, 776. 95
3. 003, 015. 54
Clear'g-houso exch'gs 54,404,861.01
45, 599, 292 58
68,110, 358. 48
83, 718, 631. 64
34,467,391.19
Bills of other b a n k s . .
1, 900, 024. 00
1, 800,162. 00
1, 348, 742.00
2, 969, 348.00
2, 454,197.00
Fractional currency.
52, 061. 34
27, 026. 81
68, 761. 39
51, 881. 81
54, 439. 82
Trade dollars
Specie
58, 577, S06. 83 71, 302, 678. 36
69, 414, 603. 75 73, 420,414. 94
73, 907,196.14
Legal-tender notes . . 17, 871,132. 00
22, 640, 579. 00 21,901,354.00
23,444, 696. 00
17, 763, 440.00
1, 815, 000. 00
T7. S. cert's of deposit
2, 920, 000. 00
3, 065, 000. 00
5, 400, 000. 00
4, 345, 000. 00
416, 025. 00
5 % fund with Treas.
414,900.00
412,650.00
406, 370.00
345,150.00
176,651.70
Due fromXJ. S. Treas.
444, 044.20
295,297.81
548, 652, 32
336, 766. 03
Total

473, 045,305. 74 488, 356,455.99




530,103, 209. 04

500, 328, 565.48

537, 082,466. 51

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 265
by States and reserve cities—Continued.
CONNECTICUT.
DECEMBER 7.
Liabilities.
Capital stock

FEBRUARY 14.

APR*. 30.

JUNE 30.

83 b a n k s .

83 b a n k s .

83 b a n k s .

83 b a n k s .

OCTOBER 4.
84 b a n k s .

O
$24, 444, 370. 00 $24, 344, 370. C $24, 344, 370. 00 $24,144, 370. 00

$24,194,370. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

6, 910, 032. 82
2,134, 928.10

6, 856, 559.75
1, 580, 755. 84

6, 860, 554.62
1, 994, 774. 77

6, 875, 854.39
1, 513, 830.52

6,924,891.66
1, 902, 603. 57

? at'1-bank circulation
N
State-bank circulation

8, 517, 523. G
O
4, 785.00

8,198,725.00
4, 785.00

8,108, 805.50
4, 785. 00

7, 859, 057. 50
4, 764. 00

7,871,452.50
4, 7G4. 00

55, 714. 90

5", 929.49

63,224. 39

456, 437.09

o3,314.61

Individual deposits. .
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis. officers

23, 828, 571.83
1,468,168.61
11, 969. 51

26, 281, 463. 74
3,105,271.11
11,609.09

25, 745, 944.08
2, 603, 084. 64
513,045. 88

26, 973, 403. 78
3, 098, 397. 70
13,724.14

27, 505, 287.12
3,091,337.08
12, 949.45

Due to national banks

2, 958, 304. 08

3,258, 042.88

3, 912, 289.08

4,315,956.00

2, 617, 356. 39

Due to State banks...

636, 962.05

641, 344.86

930, 062.98

945, 562. 76

394, 050.82

Notes re-discounted..

199,122. 43

205, 447.99

59,842.28

3, 000.00

50, 000. 00

40, 000.00

71,220,452.33

74,581,334.75

Dividends unpaid

Bills payable
Total

NEW

271 banks.

$34, 872, 260.00

$34, 774, 760. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

10,134, 596.98
7, 177, 800. 90

10,465,19:2, 82
5, 672, 593. 78

Xat'1-bank circulation
State-bankcirculation

17, 328,183. 00
24,191. 00

Dividends u n p a i d

75,140, 783. 22

76,204,357.88

74, 762, 377. 20

YORK.

272 b a n k s .
Capital stock

40, 000.00
140, COO. 00

|

272 banks.

272 banks.

$35,142, 7G0.00

$35? 067, 760.00

$35, 042, 760.00

10,481,839.39
6, 791, 953. 61

10, 662, 671.48
6,4o9, 856. 71

10,806,446.26
6, 805,005. 97

16. 700, 858. 00
24, 191.00

16, 564, 258. 00
24,191.00

16, 209, 200. 50
24,191. 00

16,121,838.50
24,191.00
77, 400.02

270 banks.

62, 380. 55

91,118.38

77,401.15

396, 304.81

Individual deposits . .
U. S. deposits
D e p ' t s U.S.dis.officers

8$, 508, 094. 23
1,107, 733. 87
114,157. 73

89, 803,102.86
2, 579, 887.8'i
108, 231. 95

88, 358, 560.85
2,578,777.51
104, 745.96

87,521,597.13
2, 591, 228.92
112, 900. 62

90, 774, 453. 80
2,437,011. 11
145, 353. 89

D u e t o national b a n k s

4,170, 527.06

4, 024, 750.20

4, 785, 625. 28

5, 039, 683.87

3, 84.2, 575. 98

Duo to State banks...

1, 350,139. 07

1,365,400.34

1, 409,115.18

1, 355, 997. 79

1, 286, 015. 01

Kotes re-discounted..

711, 765. 69

403, 284.81

1,117,445.12

1,188,472. 30

719, 737.91

Bills payable

122, 262. 86

94, 856. 68

87, 590.76

134, 907. 87

45,716.62

165, 684, 093.00

160,108, 228. 65

167, 527, 263.81

166, 764, 789. 00

168,128, 506.07

Total

NE W

YOR K

CITY.

47 b a n k s .
Capital stock
Surplus fund
Undivided profits
Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

46 b a n k s .

$49,150, 000.00

$48,850, 000. 00

30, 620, 762.28
11, 257, 387. yi

30, 957, 244. 78
10, 0J5, 525. 30

31,0">3,8L9. 78
11,970,354.17

31,636,319.78
9, 492,100. 76

31, 66L, 363.26
12, 415, 018. 27

8,155, 992.00
24, 362.00

7, 747, 982.00
24, 360.00

7, 886, 887. 00
24, 3(iO. 00

7,767,480.00
24, 360.00

6, 693,465.00
24,360. 00

Dividends unpaid

46 b a n k s .

|

46 b a n k s .

$49,100, 000. 00 $49,100, 000. 00

46 b a n k s .
$49,100, 000. 00

132,352. 05

157, 750.46

366,518.38

1,478, 829.19

188, 922.67

Individual deposits.. 226, 090, 463.45
U. S. deposits
9, 181, 672. 40
Dept's U.S.dis.officers
313, 030.29

226, 421, 547.78
12, 035, 097.80
174, 226. 27

271,145, 644.09
11, 058, 553. 72
176, 903. 78

240,473, 298.45
10, 568, 8^4. 85
162,073. 37

261,464,825.90
8, 667, 282.14
139, 829. 54

Due to national banks 101, 335,423. 07

113,281,712.07

110,625,196.82

Due to State b a n k s . . .

Ml, 199, 076. 02

123,096, 685.15

36, 783, 880. 29

38, 671, 009. 53

36, 694, 970. 70

38,426,193. 06

43,630, 714.58

473, 045, 305. 74

488, 356,455.99

530,103,209. 04

500, 328, 565.48

537, 082,406.51

Notes re-discounted..
Bills payable
Total




266

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
CITY OF ALBANY

Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulation.
Bonds for deposits...
X S bonds on hand
T
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts.
D lie from nat'l banks.
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current exnenses
Premiums paid
Cash, items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
TJ. S. cert's of deposit
5 % fund with Treas.
DuefromTJ.S. Treas.
Total

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

6 banks.

Kesources.

6 banks.

6 banks.

6 banks.

6 banks.

$8, 077, 919. 96
1,148,000. 00
150, 000. 00

$8,167, 235. 78
1,148, 000. 00
150, OUO. 00

$8, 084, 234. 46
1,148, 000. 00
150, 000. 00

$8, 583,401. 22
9*8,000.00
150,000.00

$8, 908, 291. 87
94.*, 000. 00
150, 000. 00

327,154.22
1, 381, 667.40
870,263. 57
69, 704.49
332,585. 61

275,354.22
1, 708,110. 50
777, 972.12
64, 923. 04
355, 724. 54

239.441.60
2, 728; 158. 01
892, 015. 73
193,684.00
380, 805. 48

341,226.60
1, 885, 865.43
1, 201, 485. 27
60,561.32
380, 706. 60

309,949.30
2, 410, 222. 27
960, 974. 38
110,575.91
368,155. 60

163, 565. 00
96, 589. 53
116, 099. 77
111, 612. 00
785. 66

159, 565. 00
73, 275.41
114,269.78
116, 477. 00
958. 83

158,
122,
115,
125,

995. 00
390. 47
245.44
028. 00
678.95

103, 370. 00
71,791.81
119,577.02
113, 541. 00
449. 98

103,370.00
52,491.74
103, 769.19
104, 466. 00
756. 81

684, 493. 20
142, 962.00
200, 000.00
51, 657. 50
2,049. 51

884, 642. 80
112,867.00
150,000.00
47, 508. 61
3, 530. 00

924,420. 50
197, 000. 00
150, 000. 00
49, 604. 50
1, 640. 00

1,035, 083. 50
276, 332.00
150, 000. 00
42, 657. 50
1, 819.60

979,331.50
253, 543. 00
150, 000. 00
38, 966. 80
2,000.00

13, 927,609. 42

14,310,414. 63

15, 661, 342.14

15,465,871. 85

15, 954, 864.23

DECEMBER 7.

OCTOBER 4.

NEW JERSEY.
81 banks.
Loans and discounts $40,815, 284. 89
Bonds for circulation
6,837,100.00
Bonds for deposits - .
950, 000. 00
U . S . bonds on h a n d . .
175, 500. 00
Other stocks and b'ds
4,155,407. 03
Due fromres'veag'ts
5, 694, 622. 48
Due from nat'lbanks
1, 569,872. 55
Due from State banks
223. 058. 22
Real estate, etc
1,710,334.11
Current expenses
308, 373. 32
Premiums paid
596, 003. 40
Cash items
846, 736. 80
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other b a n k s . .
560, 714. 00
Fractional currency.
23, 514.66
Trade dollars
2.00
Specie
1, 760, 705. 91
Legal-tender notes . .
1, 995, 947. 00
TL S. cert's of deposit.
30, 000. 00
5 % fund with Treas.
297, 858.45
Due from TJ. S. Treas.
15. 080. 00
Total

68,566,114.88

84 b a n k s .

85 b a n k s .

$40, 517, 388. 29 $41,022,524.19
6,842,100. 00
6, 829, 600. 00
1,950, 000. 00
1,950, 000.00
54, 700. 00
43,200. 00
3, 850, 703. 88
3, 855,376.14
6, 535, 082. 24
7, 234, 084. 37
1, 617, 295. 61
1,760,256.14
296,464,71
305, 874. 46
1,772,646.56
1, 728, 923. 73
222,058. 40
150, 362.17
651,868.62
667, 924.12
1, 083, 243. 22
1,178, 824. 47

$40, 702, 329. 25
6, 804, 600. 00
1,950, 000. 00
15, 050. 00
3,993, 576.26
6, 863, 748. 79
1, 835,150. 81
250, 644. 34
1, 809, 800. 22
130, 018. 56
619,180. 62
1, 270, 916. 32

$42, 062, 341. 26
6, 716, 250. 00
1, 950, 000. 00
14, 950. 00
4, 819,848. 38
8, 756, 234. 00
1, 681, 849: 63
269, 758. 23
1,842,253.68
173, 820. 94
589, 737.10
921, 522. 65

485,646.00
25,284. 20
5.00
1,722,755.88
1,943, 809. 00
30, 000. 00
301,688.45
17, 249. 70

408, 914. 00
24,126. 24
15. 00
1, 751, 297. 36
2, 000, 844. 00
20, 000. 00
303,080. 95
11, 390. 00

416, 902. 00
25,139.49

482, 296. 00
24, 892. 35

1,619,019.52
1,667,216.00
10,000.00
302,704.95
14, 610. 00

1, 875, 037. 60
2, 348, 278.00
10, 000. 00
298, 494. 20
5,431. 00

70, 672,119. 33

70, 554, 517. 77

70, 299, 667.13

74, 842, 997. 02

82 banks.

83 banks.

PENNSYLVANIA.
238 banks.
Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulation
Bonds for deposits ..
TJ. S. bonds on hand..
Other stocks and b'ds
Due fromres'veag'ts
Due from nat'lbanks.
Due from State banks
Heal estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
U. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with Treas.
Due fromTJ. S. Treas
Total

241 b a n k s .

241 b a n k s .

245 b a n k s .

$80, 833, 298.11 $80, 201, 657. 65 $82,425, 580. 62 $81, 014, 507. 95
15,126, 300. 00
14, 878, 800. 00
14, 726, 300. 00
15, 066, 300. 00
480,000.00
830, 000.00
830, 000. 00
830, OUO. 00
507,150. 00
521,800. 00
491, 000. 00
552, 250.00
9, 882,209.40
10, 604, 736.17
10, 909, 497. 90
9, 905, 007. 03
10, 855,960. 21
12, 614, 318. 07
13,159,634.41
13,311,635.86
2, 734, 687. 31
3, 754, 956. 74
3, 644, 576.10
3, 015, 524. 50
1,127, 390. 83
1, 522, 556. 79
1, 503, 210. 01
1, 222,163. 24
3, 761, 267. 95
3, 867, 842. 21
3, 906,188. 77
3, 857, 618. 08
373,147.63
761, 754.17
393, 235. 75
335, 666. 62
1, 348, 096. 94
1, 329, 382. 27
I, 279, 835. 09
1, 355, 439. 72
826,107. 39
845, 865.16
992, 375. 36
800, 203. 57

246 banks.
$83. S89,337. 67
14, 059, 300. 00
830,000. 00
540, 000. 00
11,372,241.18
14, 827, 515.73
2, 624, 650. 37
1,191,625.59
3,891,866.83
554, 608. 05
1, 255, 700.12
984, 587. 69

1,173, 509. 00
49,679. 80
15. 65
4,911,449.15
2,871,056.00
10, 000. 00
659, 882. 25
39, 058. 23

1,145, 822. 00
64,211. 94
• 38.50
4, 785, 632. 67
2,657,512.00
10, OUO. 00
656, 796. 83
38, 247. 88

1, 315, 678. 00
59, 949.19
16.30
5,036, 253. 01
3,458, 660.00
10, 000. 00
642, 4G8. 45
66, 216.89

4, 875,165. 45
2, 953, 874. 00
10, COO. 00
642, 905. 61
29,015.94

1,140, 692. 00
61, 049. 24
5.00
5, 016, 656. 83
3,091,407. 00
10, 000. 00
621, 759. 48
33,161. 84

137, 570, 265. 85

139, 811, 758. 09

144,546,834.04

142,516,494.01

145,486,464.62




1, 097, 424. 00
57, 747. 67

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

267

by States and reserve cities—Continued.
CITY OF ALBANY.
DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

6 banks.

6 banks.

6 banks.

6 banks.

$1,750,000.00

$1, 750,000. 00

$1, 750, 000. 00

$1,750,000.00

$1, 750, 000. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

1, 243, 000. 00
268, 235. 03

1, 246,000. 00
194, 095.41

1,246,000. 00
233, 532.55

1, 246, 000. 00
250, 892. 80

1, 274,000.00
228,374. 57

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

1, 014, 160. 00

995, 870. 00

1, 020, 510. 00*

760, 500. 00

780,390. 00

Liabilities.
Capital stock

Dividends unpaid

OCTOBER 4.
6 banks.

997.26

8, 922. 85

11, 428.75

13,294.15

12, 303. 01

Individual deposits..
TJ. S. deposits
Dep'tsU.S.dis.oflicers

6, ?70, 825. 97
148,869. 27
1,130. 73

6, 938,856. 39
149,477.32
522. 68

8, 065, 864. 68
146, 732. 6-1
3, 548.15

8, 551, 745. 92
145, 963. 55
2, 698. 71

8,676,285.48
148,414.07
1, 395. 93

Due to natioaal banks

2, 859, 032.27 * 2, 688, 680.95

2,532, 678. 89

2, 439, 655. 69

2, 593,177.69

371,358.89

337, 989. 03

651, 046.48

305,121. 03

490, 523.48

13,927, 609.42

14, 310,414. 63

15, 661, 342.14

15,465, 871. 85

15,954, 864. 23

Due to State banks...
Notes re-discounted..
Bills payable
Total

NEW JERSEY.
81 b a n k s .

82 b a n k s .

$13, 098,350. 00

$13,123,350. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

4, 514,267. 99
2, 549, 348. 92

4,870, 853.11
1, 919,160. 53

4,906, 353.11
2, 242, 232.14

5, 017, 546. 08
2,053, 271.76

5,155,431. 73
2,158, 354.01

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

6,114, 271. 00
8, 358. 00

6,060,496. 50
8,402. 00

5, 962, 016. 50
7, 827. 00

5, 991, 741. 50
7,827. 00

5,992,911.50
7,827.00

Capital stock

Dividends unpaid

83 banks.

84 b a n k s .

$13,173,350. 00 . $13,221,390.00

85 b a n k s .
$13,318,350.00

44, 639. 66

67,142.24

51,239. 51

294, 650. 47

109,998. 85

Individual deposits. -.
U. S. deposits
Dep'tsU.S.dis.oflicers

37, 974,941.48
941,944.89
11,604.77

39, 075, 395. 55
2, 045,705.19
11,100. 00

38,571,653.53
2, 038,862. 23
17, 885. 82

38,261,375.46
2, 040,174. 23
14,102. 81

42,138,479.17
2,041,098.70
16, 086. 30

Due to national banks
Due to State banks. .-

2, 683,806.45

2, 847,100. 37

2,791,389.53

2, 507,454. 27

3,204,307. 31

409, 581. 72

441,027. 72

374,874. 84

454,112.47

467, 287.50

Notes re-discounted..

55,000. 00

52, 386. 06

191,833. 56

182, 521.08

49,864. 95

160, 000. 00

150, 000.00

225, 000. 00

248, 500. 00

183, 000.00

68, 566,114. 88

70,672,319.33

70, 554, 517. 77

70,299, 667.13

74, 842,997. 02

Bills payable
Total

P E NISYL VANIA.
238 b a n k s .

Capital stock
Surplus fund
Undivided profits
Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

241 b a n k s .

241 b a n k s .

245 b a n k s .

$33, 615, 340. 00

$33, 526,475. 00

$33, 631, 919. 09

$33, 525, 340. 00

$33, 592,291.04

11, 651,310. 31
3, 537, 789. 58

11,878,009.15
3, 258,033.14

11, 940, 654.15
4, 309, 612. 33

12,187,861.87
3,485, 627.41

12, 316,112. 53
4, 305, 389. 74

13, 333,145. 00
4, 745. 00

13,193, 500. 00
4, 745.00

13,031, 566. 00
1, 548. 00

12, 782, 692.00
1, 548. 00

12, 336,796.00
1, 543. 00

Dividends unpaid

246 b a n k s .

214, 922. 43

173, 977.19

136, 294. 42

2£0,976. 36

147, 368.41

Indi vidual deposits..U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers

70, 838, 847. 94
471, 440. 94
11,078.01

72, 816, 813. 63
789, 907. 73
10,121.32

76,177,533.45
818, 396. 49
28, 748.13

75,132, 362. 54
827,884. 26
17, 853. 60

78, 535, 049. 38
826, 500. 69
18.287.53

Due to national banks

3, 071, 981. 04

3, 374, 879.12

3, 697, 410. 03

3, 611, 693.97

2, 719, S86. 62

Due to State banks...

391, 692. 96

414, 884.55

459, 379. 58

428, 887. 40

284,086.10

Notes re-discounted..

392,482. 36

312, 421.98

228,266. 34

243,276.32

352,663.30

35, 490. 28

57, 990. 28

85, 506. 03

10,490. 28

50,490.25

137,570, 265.85

139,811,758.09

144, 546, 834. 04

142, 516,494. 01

145,486,464. 62

Bills payable
Total




268

KEPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
CITY OF PHILADELPHIA.
DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

43 banks.

Resources.

43 banks.

43 banks.

43 banks.

Loans and discounts. $83, 428, 797. 29
Bonds for circulation 2,737, 500. 00
700. 000. 00
Bonds for deposits...
10,100. 00
U. S. bonds on hand..
3, 332, 673,48
Other stocks and b'ds
Duo frorares've ag'ts 6, 692, 776. 40
Due from nat'l banks G, 139, 823.16
910, 406. 59
Due from State banks
3, 401, 516. 82
Seal estate, etc
208,709.55
Current expenses ...
479,341.85
Premiums paid
544, 575.32
Cash items
Ulear'g-house exch'gs 8, 331, 052.44
543,828.00
Bills of other banks..
42,477.17
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
10,812, 359. 76
Legal-tender notes .. 4,558, 333. 00
U. S. cert's of deposit 1, 090, 000. 00
5 % fund with Treas.
123,133.74
Due from U. S. Treas.
30, 317. 21
134,117,721.78
Total

307, 852. 57
2, 737, 500.00
1, 350, 000. 00
1,100. 00
4,128, 564.17
8,182,687.63
5, 631, 544. 52
1,051,146.35
3, 505, 825. 82
415,804.97
510,132. 07
644, 587.89
7, 350, 644. 38
417, 731. 00
45,145.0G

$B2,

$84, 370, 326.15 $86,608,004.00
3,187, 500. 00
3,187,500.00
1, 350, 000. 00
1, 350, 000. 00
1,100.00
1, 100.00
3, 975, 847. 58
4,022, 043. 86
8, 199,049.75
8, 734, 954. 39
7,080,418.27
7, 246,106. 22
1, 203, 061. 62
1,162, 862. 97
3, 504, 491. 99
3, 485, 834.05
320,046.18
620,780. 06
514,905.54
514,302.32
808, 353.46
658, 936. 20
14, 524, 52G. 97
7, 734, 385.20
367, 543. 00
514,479.00
37, 775. 52
33, 815.17

OCTOBER 4.
43 banks.
$91,678,393.95
3,187, 500.00
1,400,000.00
1, 100.00
3,944,291.78
9, 289 225. 04
5,819,510.43
l,16ri, 395.G8
3, 525, 364. <J5
642, 844. 20
484, 046. 74
620,138. 07
8,678,951.75
39U, 777. C
O
43, 848. 71

9, 985, 282. 74
4,176, 243. 00
2, 020, 000.00
123,133.24
27,100. 00

9, 965, 269. 73
4,190,003. 00
2, 040, 000.00
138, 513. 74
66, 374.00

15, 576, 009. 28
4,083,926. 00
2, 540, 000. 00
143, 383. 74
40,467.40

12,391,700.19
4,315.561.00
1, 220, 000. 00
143, 383. 74
27, 807.00

134, 612, 025. 41

140,037,646. 06

154, 066, 410. 30

149, 002, 8159. 93

CITY O F P I T TSBURGH.
23 banks.
Loans and discounts $31,733, 910.13
1, 765, 500. 00
Bonds for circulation 600, 000. 00
Bonds for deposits . .
2, 150. 00
TJ. S. bonds on h a n d . .
330,106. 80
Other stocks and b'ds
2,323,621.87
D u e from res've ag'ts
1,068,898.81
D u e from n a t ' l b a n k s
212,312.54
Due from State banks
1, 498, 807. 2*
Real estate, etc
122, 098. 83
C u r r e n t expenses
177, 340. 86
P r e m i u m s paid
254,270.11
Cash items
1, 282, 472. 46
Clear'g-house exch'gs
468, 497. 00
Bills of other b a n k s . .
9, 879. 83
Fractional currency.
28. 00
T r a d e dollars
3, 279, 878. 06
Specie
1, 766, 863. 00
Legal-tender notes . .
U. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund w i t h T r e a s .
79, 422. 50
Due from U . S. T r e a s .
35, 076. 20

Total

47, 011,134. 20

23 banks.

23 banks.

24 b a n k s .

24 banks.

$31,158,069.99
1, 765, 500. 00
800, 000. 00
2, 600. 00
349,940. 87
2, 969,800. 72
1, 418, 809. 74
201,840.82
1, 520, 984. 59
85, 009. 53
223, 869. 71
212,416.86
1, 278,133. 38
397, 280. 00
12, 636. 89
28.00
3,001, 589. 30
1, 775,847. 00

$32,183,130.81
1, 565, 500. 00
800, 000.00
200.00
311,750.82
2, 686, 328.90
1, 296,137.43
233,589.66
1,524,302.30
174,008.17
219,269.71
213, 258.19
1, 626, 779. 06
392, 228. 00
10, 405.36
28.00
2, 970, 635. 40
1, 941,684. 00

$32,188, 927. 54
1, 615, 500. 00
800, 000.00
336, 558. 70
3, 314,483.87
1,747,431.31
349,103.85
1, 640, 959. 88
79,133. 59
217, 885. 86
338, 068. 27
1,929,811.29
398, 257. 00
11, 006. 86
25.00
3,149,283. 70
1,970,755.00

$31, 665,005. 94
1,615,500.00
800,000.00
3, 850. 00
332, 769.6*
4,194,715.50
1, 808, 287.83
222, 898. 49
1,714,184.66
183,321.73
216, 535. 86
229,288.84
1, 475, 017. 55
525, 701. 00
11, 253.48
40.00
3. 240, 9G9. 23
2, 033,1372. 00

79,422. 50
20, 643. 94

70, 422.50
5, 880. 00

72, 672.50
13, 205. 00

72, 672. 50
14,180. 00

47,274,483.84

48, 225, 548. 31

50,173,129. 22

50, 359,867. 29

DELAWARE.
17 banks.
Loans and discounts.
Bondsfor circulation.
Bonds for deposits ..
X S bonds on hand
T
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts.
Duo from nat'lbanks
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
U. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with Treas
Due from U.S. Treas.
Total

17 banks.

17 b a n k s .

18 banks.

18 b a n k s .

$4,925, 715. 88
1, 596,700.00
50, 000.00

$4, 918, 087. 30
1, 596, 700. 00
50, 000. 00

$4,977,123.58
1, 586,700.00
50, 000.00

$4, 934, 673.17
1, 599, 200. 00
50, 000.00

$5, 415, 498. 52
1, 599, 200. 00
50, 000.00

256,173.14
722,131.46
179, 336. 80
47,124.89
264, 468. 37
36, 962. 37
129, 904. 24
54, 570. 05
26,141.43
72,120.00
2,072.05

261,845.25
633, 782. 06
176,741.25
64, 264. 89
263, 707. 04
13, 808.74
129, 077. 50
42, 335. 61
17,164.38
• 61,880.00
2, 681.14

261, 524.29
623, 805. 26
254, 323.20
66, 699. 79
265, 036. 84
30, 945.01
127,715.00
41, 502. 03
50, 689.04
100, 697. 00
2, 950.53

250, 716.79
707, 241. 99
243, 364. 56
76, 707. 59
266,436. ?9
31,764.79
129, 771. 25
51, 097. 85
30, 097.36
90, 688. 00
2, 711. 24

237, 430.70
1, 224, 296.41
167, 541. 53
38,178.91
270,137. 26
29, (JO. 22
124, (M2. 29
46,764.07
17, 957.29
124, 398. 00
3, 632. 87

281, 054.68
129,179. 00
10, 000. 00
71,099. 50
2,110.00

250, 720.55
140, 023. 00
10, 000. 00
69,649. 50
24, 030. 00

274, 728. 70
171,421.00
10, 000. 00
69, 079. 50
22, 550. 00

223,
143,
10,
69,
13,

8,856,863.86

8, 726,504.21




8,987,490.77 |

867. 38
567.00
000. 00
650. 00
620.00

268,188.59
210, 126.00
10, 000. G
O
71,912.50

8,925,175.86

9, 909,011. 22

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 269
by States and reserve cities—Coiitiimed.
CITY OF PHILADELPHIA.
Liabilities.
Capital stock
Surplus fund
Undivided profits
Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

OCTOBER 4.

DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

43 banks.

43 banks.

43 banks.
$22, 758, 000.00

43 b a n k s .
$22, 758, 000. 00

$23, 008,000. 00

10, 886. 303. 08 " 10,926,303.08
2, 952,163. 52
2, 095J 974. 03

10, 966, 803. 08
2,1(J7, 833.37

10, 981, 803. 08
2, 923, 879. 21

2, 828, 994. C
O

2, 822, 279. 00

2, 833, 324. G
O

$22, 758, 000. 00 $22,758, COO. 00
10, 856, 303. 08
1,796,221.98
2, 372, 889.00

Dividends unpaid

2,429, 494. 00

43 banks.

80, 870. 81

44, 250. 46

82, 054. 47

48, 764. 06

Individual deposits .. 76,581,273.59
681,047. 59
U. S. deposits
Dep'tsU.S dis officers

75,713,806.11
1,406,129. 70

78, 928, 971. 06
1,411,288.99

91,304,051.94
1, 407, 208. SO
J

85, €84, 064.87
1,371,064.16

Due to national banks 15,162, 208. 50

15,164, 708. 53

15,845,461.65

17, 976,138.15

17,188,817.50

4, 582, 041.39

4, 837, 553. 05

140, 037, 646. 06 154, 0(i0, 410. 30

149, 002, 809. 93

Due to State banks...

3, 678, 907. 23

4, 063, 359. 50

33,699.51

4, 202, 764. 25

Notes re-discounted
Bills payable
Total

150, 000. 00

50, 000.00

134,117, 721. 78

134, 612, 025.41

150, 000. 00

125, COO. 00

C I T Y O F P I T T S BURGH.
23 banks.

23 banks.

Capital stock

23 banks.

$10,180, 000. 00 $10,180, 000. 00 $10,180,000.00

24 bunks.
$10,376,150.00

24 banks.
$10, 430, 000. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

4,415,034.80
1,146,495.53

4, 705, 950. 50
846, 935. 98

4, 789, 950. 50
1, 0U2, 6U*. 50

4, 8^9, 935. 06
814,113. 05

4, 919, 935. 06
1, 103, 599.44

Xat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

1,563,910.00

1, 559,450. 00

1.370,640.00

1,405,030.00

1, 395, 680. 00

81,274.00

76,176. 00

69, ;:80. 75

199, 574. 00

85, 876.00

24, 343, 098. 20
665, 'J73.05
210,966.98

25,557,961.74
762,781.92
105, h61.47

26, 728, 336. 04
718, 665. 59
128, 895. 37

26,273,810.02
713, 708. 82
171, 889. 83

Dividends unpaid

Individual deposits. - 24, 476, 559. 93
344, L02. 57
U. S. deposits
263, 061.16
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers
Due to national banks 2, 576,167. 78
Due to State banks... 1,781,246.36
Notes re-discounted..
Bills payable
Total

2, 843, 993. 26

2, 686, 782. 04

3, 053, 944. 01

3, 233, 380.4Q

1,800,415.51

1, 564,125. 98

1, 803, 036. 52

2,024,171.28

178,182.07

37, 224. 36

70,395.41

50,449. 58

7,810.38

5, 000.00

5, 000. 00

5, 000. 00

47, 011,134. 20

47,274,483.84

48, 225, 548. 31

5, 000. 00
50,173,129. 22

50, 359, 867. 29

DELAWARE.
17 banks.

17 banks.

17 banks.

$2,083,985.00 | $2,083,985.00 I $2, 083, 985. 00
Capital stock
824, 000. 00
814,000.00
Surplus fund
809,350.00 j
255, 250.44
268,300.06
188, 767. 46
Undivided profits....
1,391,870.00
Nat'1-bank circulation 1,420,570.00
1, 399, 340. 00
574. 50
State-bank circulation
574.50 j
574. 50

18 banks.

$2,129, 885. 00

824, 000. 00
292,770.45

831.300. C
O
270, 76.;. 39

1, 377, 280. 00
• 574.50

1,407,210.00
574. 50

Di vi dends unpaid...

7,208.50 :

14, 763.10

8, 975. 45

12,641.40

Individual deposits ..
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.oflicers

3,908,793.55 !
41,686.77 i
3,288.83

3,847,331.84
41, 007. 92

3.946,124.18
41,855.41

3,903,414.51
39,884.08
2, 871. 53

285, Oil. 12

Due to national banks

16, 979. 89

3,144. 59
389,440.08

11,115. 64

Notes re-discounted..
8,856,863.86 I




13, 214. 00

7,100.92 I

15, 200. 00

Due to State banks...
Bills payable
Total

3, 992. 06
304, 328. 31

35,170.20 j

8,726,504.21

8, 987, 490. 77

18 banks.

$2, 118, 985. 00

10,219.45
4,978,196.79
39, 742. S»4
4, 726. 61

327,229.12

183,566.76

10, 825. 27

37, 825. 78

14, 700. C
O
5, 000.00

15, 000. 00

8, 925,175. 86

9,909,011.22

270

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
MARYLAND.

Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulation.
Bonds for deposits ..
U. S. bonds on hand..
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res' veag'ts
Due from nat'lbanks
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
TJ. S. cert' s>of deposit
5 % fund with Treas
Due from IT. S. Treas.
Total

DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

31 b a n k s .

Resources.

31 banks.

31 b a n k s .

31 banks.

31 banks.

$6, 915, 553. 69
1,517,000.00
230, 000. 00
54, 300.00
830, 533. 50
996, 363.39
331, 627. 88
72, 627.99
346, 633. 34
67,640.16
149, 873. 61
32, 265. 61

$6,893,167.65
1, 517,000. 00
280,t)00. 00
57. 500. 00
811,435. 52
1,135,605.65
466,450.62
57, 253.41
346, 027. 80
27, 603. 59
149,102.79
50, 043. 31

$7, 076, 339. 54
1, 517, 000. 00
280, 000. 00
37, 300. 00
859, 707. 02
930,143. 39
458,088.95
53,907. 29
351, 878. 34
54, 356.48
152, 269.07
41,614.24

$7,371,868.40
1, 367, 000. 00
280, 000. 00
37, 300. 00
881, 343. 71
891,317.46
336, 314.89
38, 324. 51
353,171.98
30, 623. 69
140, 262. 24
83, 944.13

$7, 708,491.06
1,311,000.00
280, 000. 00
39, 300.00
990, 953. 65
1, 289, 582. 69
535, 794.47
52, 859.39
368,055.74
66, 252.28
136, 037. 55
63, 990.11

48,402.00
4,159.77

61, 528.00
4, 627.10

83, 649. 00
5,679.65

83, 959.00
5, 569.15

66,837. 00
4, 702. 05

466,176. 58
314, 099. 00

477, 260. 77
378, 999. 00

505, 651.34
386, 753. 00

476,152.00
400, 515.00

536,499.41
408,191.00

64,757. 59
5, 710.00

63,861.59
2, 550.00

59,127.09
10, 240. 00

52, 687.59
10, 958.00

54,476. 09
2, 510. 00

12, 447, 724.11

12,780, 010.80

12, 863, 704.40

12, 841,311. 75

13,915,532.49

CITY OF BALTIMORE.
17 banks.
17 banks.
17 b a n k s .
17
Loans and discounts
Bonds for circulation.
Bonds for deposits...
U S bonds on hand
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts.
Due from nat'lbanks.
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
T7. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with Treas.
Due from U. S. Treas.
Total

OCTOBER 4.

banks.

17 banks.

$26,091,532.08
1,900,000.00
550, 000.00

$26, 013,483.70
1,900, 000. 00
5C0,000. 00

$27, 342, 682. 68
1, 450, 000.00
550, 000. 00

$27, 067, 028.57
950, 000.00
550, 000. 00

$28,179, 375. 54
900, 000. 00
550, 000. 00

939, 723.12
1, 875, 497.18
1,978,532.73
284, 297. 89
790, 530.07
177,776.69
60, 784. 38
86, 747. 26
1, 340, 511. 21
347, 793. 00
11, 071. 86

939, 887. 41
1,940,594.57
1,319,172.03
217, 504.32
792, 446. 29
62,196.77
58,684.38
80, 051.15
886, 924. 69
309,084.00
6,578. 53

923,887.41
1, 625, 529. 21
1,334,665.72
262, 847.48
80S, 234. 41
144,970.75
58,446. 88
80,104.04
1,569,196.40
269, 077.00
4,807. 05

903, 787.41
1, 899,268.73
1, 980, 095. 03
233, 657.00
891, 524.41
50, 772.93
43,175.00
112,161.10
1, 785, 038.73
243, 832. 00
5, 620.17

880, 257.43
2,071,824.78
1, 667,134.79
280, 461.62
918, 724.41
146,097.18
42, 937. 50
54, 821.81
1, 387, 845. 00
270, 449.00
7, 914.42

2,597,145.00
1, 240,285. 00
700, 000. 00
85, 500. 00
31,000.00

2, 531, 243. 65
1, 281,447. 00
2, 030, 000. 00
85, 500. 00
22,850.00

2,128, 940. 88
998, 821.00
960, 000.00
65, 250.00
2, 280.00

2,137,673. 70
1,452, 521.00
1,210, 000.00
42, 750. 00

2, 244, 840.86
1,427,102.00
550, 000.00
40, 500.00
1,000.00

41,088,727.47

41,027,648.49

40, 574, 740. 91

41, 558, 905. 78

41, 621, 286. 34

DISTRICT OP

COLUMBIA.
1 bank.
1 bank.

1 bank.

1 bank.

Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulation.

$357,717.12
250,000.00

$323, 247.51
250,000. 00

$300, 001. 08
250, 000. 00

$314, 994.61
250, 000.00

U. S. bonds on hand..
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res'veag'ts.
Due from nat'lbanks
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
U. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with TreasDue from U.S. Treas.
Total

151,200.00
192,930.00
63, 625. 54
• 6,341.41
502. 93
23, 000. 00
5,977.97
32, 357.18
5, 653.00

151, 200. 00
200,287.18
97, 507. 41
21,437.67
967. 35
23, 000.00
1,764.76
25, 000.00
1, 776.65

151,200. 00
210, 762.18
65,555.26
10, 233.05
1, 361. 75
23, 000. 00
5, 563.02
25, 000.00
11, 611. 05

151, 200.00
208, 762.18
60,664. 42
10,432. 05
626.89
23, 000.00
44.85
25, 000. 00
16,109. 21

4, 080.00
44.08

4,oob. QO
52.18

3,255. 00
43.71

4, 605. 00
11.15

4, 550. 00
18.24

197, 791. 25
70,500.00

207,117. 50
95,000. 00

220, 422.45
48, 523. 00

223,405.75
33, 565.00

229,271. 50
40,130.00

11,250.00

11,250. 00

11, 250. 00

11,250.00

11, 250.00

1,372,970.48

1,413, 608. 21

1,337,781.55

J, 333,671.11

1,367,923.51




1 bank.
$336,912.49
250, 000. 00
151,
208,
60,
11,

200. 00
762.18
643.24
581.12
710.86
23,000.00
3, 812. 09
25, 000. 00
11, 081. 79

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 271
by States and reserve cities—Continued.
MARYLAND.
OCTOBER 4.

DECEMBER 7.

Capital stock

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

31 b a n k s .

31 b a n k s .

31 b a n k s .

31 b a n k s .

$2, 806, 700. 00

$2, 816, 700. 00

$2, 816, 700. 00

$2, 816, 700. 00

$2, 816, 700. 00

902,096.40
360,587.13

920,016.40
264, 576. 54

920,016.40
362, 690. 01

960, 900. 33
320, 953. 67

971,857.33
3C9, 307. 84

1, 343, 855. 00

1, 335, 020.00

1, 318,330. 00

1,185,675. 00

1,138, 690. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits
Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bankcirculation
Dividends unpaid

31 b a n k s .

25, 346.09

17,221.53

15, 955. 89

47, 464. 38

30,154.90

Individual deposits ..
IT. S. deposits
Dep'tsU S dis officers

6, 390,192. 37
198, COO. 00

6, 768, 843. 51
301, 942. 50

6, 729, 684. 32
308, 000.00

6,692,264.13
308, 000. 00

7, 815, 520.91
308,000.00

Due to national banks

303, 535. 88

276, 621.23

303, 057. 70

327, 758.87

312,116.49

Due to State banks...

47,809.48

52, 762. 91

69, 3S5.37

61,550.85

68,179.02

Notes re-discounted

44 601.76

26 312 18

• 19, 884. 71

65, 044. 52
55, 000. 00

85, 000. 00

12, 780, 016.80

12, 863,704.40

12,841, 311. 75

13,915, 532.49

Bills payable
Total

25, 000. 00
12, 447, 724.11

CITY
17 banks.
Capital stock

oF

B AL TIMORE.

17 b a n k s .

$11 713,260.00

$11, 713,260. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

544, 400. C
O
1, 322,172.68

3, 565,400. 00
973,975.50

Nat'1-bank circulation
State- bank circulation

1, 695, 560. 00
16, 543.00

1, 694,180. 00
16,543.00

Dividends unpaid

17 banks.

17 b a n k s .

17 banks.

$11, 713,260. C $11, 713,260. 00
O

$11 713. 260.00

3, 605, 400. 00
1, 268, 677. 73

3, 833,400.00
884,871.58

3 840, 000. 00
1, 165,742. 24

1, 275, 880. 00
16, 541. 00

848, 640. 00
4,056. 00

790, 890. 00
4,048.00

63, 481.64

45, 971. 80

229, 005.18

65, 683.18

Individual d e p o s i t s - . .
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers

18, 522, 509. 31
541, 711. 56
24, 224.67

18 940,151.16
548, 309. 70
27,736. 02

18, 377, 221.84
56:?, 123.93
23, 670.03

19, 340, 044.78
53L\ 515. 58
49,038.65

19,109, 559. 77
551,848.43
20, 325. 52

D u e to national b a n k s

3 129, 291.07

3 000, 419. 67

3, 120, 332.95

3, 547, 082. 67

3 542,436. 72

Due to State banks...

527, 647. 58

484,191. 80

504, 661. 63

570,391.34

657, 492. 48

51, 407. 60

Notes re-discounted..

100, 000. 00

Bills payable
Total

41 088,727.47

41 027,648.49

40, 574,740. 91

41, 558, 905. 78

41 621,286.34

DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA.
1 bank.

Capital stock

1 bank.

1 bank.

1 bank.

$252, 000. 00

$252,000. 00

$252, 000. 00

$252, 000. 00

$252, 000. 00

60, 000. 00
66,665. 83

60, 000.00
53, 653. 93

60, 000. 00
63,682.99

60, 000. 00
54, 259. 84

60, 000. 00
65,114.49

201, 040. 00

206, 350. 00

209,650.00

211,000.00

201,100. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits
Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation
Dividends unpaid

1 bank.

2, 740. 00

3,128.00

3, 008. 00

12, 616. 00

2, 940.00

775,074. 76

832, 528. 67

730,273. 05

736,255.14

777,837.46

15, 449. 89

5, 947. 61

13,167. 51

7, 481.62

8, 802.78

58 51

Individual deposits -.

128 78

1, 333, 671.11

1,367,923.51

Dep'tsU S.dis.officers
Due to national banks
Due to State banks
Notes re-discounted
Bills payable
Total

1,372, 970.48




1, 4.13, 608. 21

1,337,781. 55

272

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
CITY OF WASHINGTON.

Resources.
Loans and discounts
Bonds for circulation
Bonds for deposits ..
U. S. bonds on hand..
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts
Due from nat'l banks
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
U. S. cert's of deposit.
5 %fim<lwith Treas.
Due from U. S. Treas
Total

OCTOBER 4.

DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRJL 30.

JUNE 30.

7 banks.

7 banks.

7 banks.

7 banks.

7 banks.

$4, 090, 540. 34
680, 000. G
O
150 000. 00
739,400. 00
356, 310. 02
482,634.28
228,173. 04
21,l68.i)9
617,482.28
59,181.77
185, 978. 36
105, (396. 59
71,414.98
26, 342. 00
9, 227.69

$3, 893, 496. 45
680, 000. 00
150,000.00
736,100.00
365, 522. 99
784, 561. 04
215,035.18
20, 022.12
651,030.59
14, 324. 83
184,871.74
94, 824. 97
54,214 31
29, 284. 0!)
8, 345.68

$3, 999,663. 28
6«0, (.00. 00
150,000.00
749, 500. 00
440,451.69
987, 903. 01
412,059.21
11,025.78
6:9,890.99
49, '.07. 00
125, 529. 49
142,223.12
50, 743. 53
o9, 991.00
7, 340. 22

$4,221,576.92
680, 000. 00
150, 000. 00
739, 600. 00
451,709.95
1,035,504.13
301,071.52
42, 657. 36
654, 583. 28
8,164.08
123,095.23
123, 255.49
101,946.97
25,427. 00
6, 316. 82

$4,255,631.32
580, 000.00
150, 000. 00
814, 700. 00
466, 646. 53
1, 005, 214. 96
403,091.42
27,077.03
659, 042. 30
34, 922.66
112,934.65
125, 770. 47
74,134. 80
17, 794. 00
7, (>04. 00

803, 376. 00
513,126.00
120, 000. (i0
25, 735. 50
2, 727. 08

897,977. 50
450, 444. 00
130, 000. 00
26, 750.50
2, 611. 08

899, 200. 25
443,210.00
130, 000. 00
26,100.00

801,105. 75
515,763.00
90, 000. 00
26,100. 00
2, 065. 00

9, 288, 535. 52

9, 389, 422. 98

9, 9S4, 039.17

10, 099, 942. 50

953,
638,
120,
21,

586.
659.
000.
600.

50
<!0
00
00

10, 468, 409. 64

VIRGINIA.
; 23 banks.
25 b a n k s .
Loans and discounts !! $10,551,739.21 $10 705,772.08
Bonds for circulation. ! 1, 352, 500. 00 1,202,50*00
Bonds for deposits .. 1, 550, 000. 00 1, 700, 000. 00
9, 200. 00
TJ S bonds on hand •
9' ^00. 00
819, aC7. 00
873,856.18
Other stocks and b'ds
1,076,782.27
1,068,561.46
Due from res've ag'ts
523,177. 33
647,715.07
Due from nat'l banks.
300, 346. 32
297, 388.46
Due from State banks
404, 814. 15
395, 445. (50
Real estate, etc
30, 630. 47
131,441.15
Current expenses
334, 376. 70
391, 008. 68
Premiums paid
230, 787. 75
212, 440. 56
Cash items
53, 938. 87
38, 636.77
Clear'g-housc oxch'gs
179,103. 00
264,916.00
Bills of other banks..
5, 969.19
5, 332. 30
Fractional currency.
1.80
l.«0
Trade dollars
524, 249. 04
567,141. 92
Specie
634, 740. 00
775,144. 00
Legal-tender notes...
U. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with Treas.
59,492 50
51, 582,16
Due from U. S. Treas.
4, 249. 62
19.66
19,191, 981. 32
18, 791, 547. 75
Total

25 b a n k s .

25 b a n k s .

26 b a n k s .

$1.0, 810, 876. 49
1, 202, 500. 00
1, 700, 000. 00
9, 200. 00
820, 417. 79
1, 052, 065. 64
494, 825. 80
256,193. 54
422, 702.11
101,371.68
329,176. 70
224, 284.14
17, 355. 93
181,610.00
6,132.10
1.80
525, 004. 01
604, 680. 00

$10,927, 353.17
1, 202, 500. 00
1, 700, 000. 00

$11,109,287.46
1,155, 000. 00
1, 700, 000. 00

828, 539.12
1,195, 224. 53
542, 641. 68
254, 297. 00
421, 766.11
27, 579. 29
307, 527. 43
476, 886 82
14, 819.44
169, 677. 00
5,782. 87
1.80
542, 397. 65
779, 508. 00

900, 323.19
1, 499, 379. 90
623, 858. 22
269, 952. 42
426,122. 55
81,990.71
321,966.06
357, 127.69
26, 733. 72
158. 570. 00
3, 906. 68
1.80
618, 431. 05
811,620.00

52,952, 16
2, 499. 62

50, 402. 00
8, 097. 77

50,144.66
550. 00

18, 903, 855. 51

19,455, 001. 68

20,114, 966.11

WEST VIRGINIA.
20 b a n k s .

20 banks.

$4, 062, 744. 02
761, 250. 00
75, 000. 00
14, 500. 00
78, 518. 28
307, 288. 86
240,142.116
52,143. 33
233, 341. 98
48, 223. 73
60, 358. 79
17, 072. 31

$4, 029, 907. 75
761, 250. 00
75, 000. 00
14, 500. 00
78, 765. 03
292, 446. 41
252,183. 37
52, 607. 85
232, 342. 97
17, 370. 01
52, 737. 96
17, 437.50

$4,084,197.82
761, 250. 00
75, 000. 00
14, 500. 00
79, 453. 32
316,933. 81
240, 029. 84
51,455.00
232, 367. 97
37, 515.19
52,136.77
18, 401. 72

$4,086,691.16
761, 250. 00
75, 000. 00
17,000.00
76, 395. 32
296,301.42
230, 772.22
71, 093. 78
233, 579. 01
27, 923. 20
48, 098. 05
24, 027.14

$4,144, 023.05
725, 000. 00
75, 000. 00
17, 000. 00
78, 814. 27
508, 378. 98
297, 590. 83
65, 808.47
235, 786. 08
29, 549.19
45, 650. 65
17,194. 53

72, 854. 00
I, 724. 02
22. T
O
291,795.69
227,107. 00

71, 873. 00
2,160. 67
26.00
301,136.83
253, 601. 00

79, 769. 00
2, 335. 83
271,961.67
231, 625. 00

66, 652. 00
2, 068.15
16.00
272, 556.49
214, 639.00

90, 865. 00
2, 033. 03
48.70
272,925.15
266, 923. 00

33, 877. 43
2, 054. 83

32, 049. 20
2, 004. 70

33, 076.25
6, 553. 20

33, 656. 25
7,163. 70

32, 568. 75
2, 883.45

6, 580, 019. 23

6, 539, 400. 25

6, 588, 562.39

6, 544, 882. 89

6,908,043.13

20 b a n k s .

Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulation.
Bonds for deposits ..
U. S. bonds on hand..
Other stocks and b'ds
Duefroinres'veag'ts.
Due from nat'l banks.
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
'..
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
TJ. S. cert's of deposit.
Si % fund with Treas.
Due from TJ. S. Treas.
Total




20 b a n k s .

20 b a n k s .

273

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER O# THE
by States and reserve cities—Continued.
CITY OP WASHINGTON.
DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNB 30.

OCTOBER 4.

7 banks.
$1, 575, 000. 00

7 banks.
$1, 575, 000.00

7 banks.

7 banks.

$1, 575, 000.00

$1,575,000.00

7 banks.
$1, 575,000.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

481,203. 75
245, 235.73

518,500.00
154, 659. 48

533, 500.00
210, 3li9.31

540, 500.00
168,86L20

567v000.00
209,314.68

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

532, 910. 00

522, 520.00

517, 270.00

512,410.00

425, $20.00

Liabilities.
Capital stock

1, 953.50

Dividends unpaid
Individual deposits ..
TJ. S. deposits
Dep'tsU.S.dis.officers

6,111,055 92
96,871.09

Due to national b$nks

151,132. 75

Due to State banks..

30, 672.78

3,Q83,5t)

2,183.00

25,332.00

3.379;00

6,828,054.08
142, 933.83

6, 940, 541.66
143, 353. 21

7 t 278,316,29
154,581.72

137,645.01

125, 528. 52

139, 792.16

190,111*29

17,625.86

24, 240. 43

29,152.27

39,886,66

6, 275, &30. 49
122, 058. 64

2f otes re-discounted
62, 500. 00

Bills payable
Total

9, 288, 535. 52

62, 500. C
O
9,4589,422.08

25,000.00

25, 0Q0.00

25,009,00

9,984,039.17

10,099,942.50

Jft 468,409.64

VIRGINXA.
25 banks.

25 banks.

$3, 796,300.00

$3, 796, 300. 00

25 banks.
$3, 796, 300. 00

$3, 796, 300.00

$3,846,300.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

1,424,892.81
677, 352. 73

1,488,541.93
348, 658.13

1, 488,-541. 93
513, 923.44

1, 513, 541. 93
355, 626. 85

1,5!6;19&44
51Sil9Q.13

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

1,199, 390. 00

1,079,890.00

1,075,040.00

1,068,540.00

1,025,920. 00

3,235.65

6, 400. 34

3,233.34

9,404,023.41
1,492,751.22
96, 643.12

9, 084, 798. 21
1,608,899.90
138,484. 66

8, 931, 780. 01
1, 579, 942.48
137, 423. 69

25 banks.
Capital stock

Dividends unpaid
Individual deposits..
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis. officers

26 banks.

102,053.79

3,867; 15

9,710,924.54
1,630,620.85
98,058. 92

10,176,756.93
1,542,038.20
280; 444.61

Due to national banks

482,354.32

492, 942. 98

444, 420. 86

463, 096, 09

613, 296; 39

Due to State banks...

412, 240. 26

4.18,169. 95

436, 794. 56

378, 749. 68

555; 968.12

Notes re-discounted. .

162,798.30

288, 461. 65

245, 605. 20

153, 489. 03

110, 901,14

40, 000.00

40,000,00
18,791,547.75

250,850.00

184, 000. 00
19, 455, 001. 68

80,000,00
20,114,966.11

Bills payable
Total

19,191, 981. 32

Capital stock

WEST VIRGINIA.
20 banks.
20 banks.
20 banks.
'$1^961,000.00
$1, 961, 000.00 $1, 961, 000. G
O

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

464, 870. 98
158,343.36

455,452.86

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

672,170.00

672,835.00

Dividends unpaid

74, 560. 70 :

18,903,855.51

20 banks.

20 banks.

$1, 901,000. 00

$1, 966, 000. 00

454, 775. 50
144, 682.10

459,949.88
136,109.56

4,57, 987. 73
l56;73i;07

670, 655. 00

669,965.00

626,460.00

15,159.00

21,138.00

16,656. 00

38,243,00

19,891.00

Individual deposits.,.
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.oflicers

2,997,1S6.17
75,000.00

3,028,i 921.55
82.500.00

3,031,166.70
82, 500. 00

2,984,533. 99
82,500.00

3.371,105.58
82,500.00

Due to national banks

158,447.38

155,775.64

131, 259. 30

127,981.14

174,389.67

Due to State banks...

54,733.54

49,815.15

07, 406.70

48,218.17

48,915.08

Xotes re-discounted..

22,079.80

31,715.35

24,775.00

28,196.15

3,720.00

Bills payable
Total

1,029.00

5, 686.00

3, 686. 00

8,180.00

343.00

6,580,019.23

6, 539,400.25

6,588,562,39

6,544,882.8^)

o, nosi or>. n




274

REPORT, OF fTHjE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
QAROLINA.
FEBKUAE* ]4.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

18 banks.

17 banks.

17 banks.

18 banks.

$4,819,: 92(3.50
903, 500.00
100,000.00

$4,753,184.04
878, 500. 00
150,000.00

$4, 938,792.15
753, 500.00
150, 000. 00

$5,245,311.65
766, 000. 00
150, 000.00

314,662.84
473, 869.67
370, 432.13
109,769.65
299, 509.93
67, 782.25
90, 271.22
39,401.57

341, 615.32
757,401.93
289, 489.30
102, 206.49
287, 525. 92
22,506.92
81, 334.39
47, 075.14

298, 695.67
485, 598.95
208,146. 34
80, 242.28
234,311.22
48, 536.37
88, 884.39
38, 773.95

320, 727.07
416,158.54
226, 603.47
59, 407.50
229, 035.24
24, 790. 50
77, 396. 89
42,192.48

307, 877. 89
263, 298. 36
244,077.77
122, 062. 97 '
234,018.37
41, 792.76
77,851.89
40,122.41

101,246.00
2, 547.21
i 9.50
201,973.21
271, 482.00

190,518.00
2,050.69
17.10
260, 220. 70
256, 569. 00

111,805.00
1, 855. 23
42.15
269,685.40
321. 741.00

77, 754.00
2, 050.15
70.00
242,282.16
229,179. 00

84,791, 50
3, 421. 64
228, 899.10
237, 968. 00

41, 221.25
2, 646. 20

38, 917.00
1, 827.55

37,497.40
6, 971.80

32, 507.00
1, 704.40

34,469. 50
1, 290. 00

8,427,977.80

8,503,122.00

8,074,471.19

7, 854,150. 55

8, 083, 253. 81

DECEMBER 7.

Resources.
Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulation.
Bonds for deposits...
TT 'firffe^ynds o n K&iid. '

19 banks.
$4,987, 652.67
953, 500.00
ioa,ooo.oo

Other stocks and b'ds
Dub from res Ve &g'ts.
Due from natlbanks
Due from State banks
ReaL estate, etc ./-•-..
Current expenses....
Premiums p a i d . . . . . .
Oa)&h'itfems
......
Clear' g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fj&ctioiual currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
'.i.v.'.
Legal-tender notes . .
TT,S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with Treas
Bue from TJ. S. Treas.
Total

OCTOBER 4.

S O FT H C'A;S OLINA.
16 banks.
Loans and discounts. $4,376, 673. 85
612,,250. 00
B;pnds forjcirculaijion.
500,000.00
Bonds for deposits . .
24,100.00
u. S. bonds on hand..
£72, 343. 58
Other stocks and b'ds
852, 893. 20
Due from res' ve ag'ts.
363, 590. 70
Due from nat'l banks 130, 067. 67
Due from State fea-nks
188,589. 99
Real estate, etc
72,0£7.48
Current expenses.. ....
64,688.75
Paremipmp paid.,.., 107, 221.20
CMi,i!tems-.,..j.-,, i
Clear'g-houseexch'ga
Billsflitother banks, w
104,182.00
Fractional currency.
1,615.54
Trade dollars ..„,._„.
Specie
294,379.30
Lqgal-tpnder notes -.
439,768.00
tf. S. cert's of deposit.
£.% fund with. Treas
26,988.25
Due from U. S. Treas.
180.00
Total

9,031.619.46

16 banks.
$4,703,414.00
537, 250. 00
575,000. 00
24,100.00
©33, 633. 07
736,111.91
314, 257. 80
81, 003.16
188, 546.10
17, 353. 86
66, 7(i6. 25
67, 074.97

16 banks.
$5,229,371.45
543, 500.00
675,000. 00
29,100. 00
921,807.18
173,418.97
157,120.27
103, 098.73
193, 344. 90
67, 464. 32
68,649.07
43,528.67

$5,484,153. 77
493, 500.00
675, 000. 00
28,100. 00
972, 664.78
294,397.93
160, 840.40
93, 473. 57
181, 684.26
82,328. 92
56,782. 50
42, 760.64

16 banks.
$5, 909, 970. 44
468, 500. 00
675, 000. 00
28,100. 00
815, 497.66
174, 285. 52
161,071.64
143, 578. 29
182, 276. 83
43, 268. 25
53, 593. 75
55, 908. 43

121, 832. 00
2,741. 55

70,120. 00
3, 517.54

37, 039. 00
1, 696.40

82,212.00
4,763.13

386,415.80
452,937.00

406, 642.40
240, 623, C0-

264,049.15
225, 741.00

200, 948.05
275, 972. 00

23, 613.25
5,498. 80

24,456.60
11,500.00

22,206. 50
1, 550. 00

20,082. C
O
6,100.00

9, 237,599. 52

8,962,358.00

9,123,968.82

9, 361,193. 99

16 banks.

GEORGIA.
21 banks.
Loans and discounts. $7,489, 556.16
988,500.00
Bondsforcirculation,
150, 000.00
Bonds for deposits...
TJ. S. bonds on hand
261,477.65
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res'voag'ts
276, 720. 50
Duo from natlbanks
327,328.01
DuofromState banks
269, 828.79
Real estate, etc
460,719.97
Current expenses
104, 303.71
Premiums paid
80, 197.86
Cash items
140, 825.98
Clear,'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
203,281. 00
Fractional currency3,592.14
Trade) dollars
515,967. 85
Specie
Legal-tender notes . .
417, 643. 00
TJ. S. cert'sof deposit.
5 % fund with Treas.
42, 832. 50
Due from IT. S. Treas.
2, 054. 85
Total

11, 734, 379. 97




22 backs.

22 banks.
$7,209,844.39
951,000.00
150, 000. C
O

23,banks.

24 banks.

$7, 339,989.61
. 951,000.00
150,000.00

$7, 445, 379. 67
964,500. 00
150,000.00

$8, 662, 056.32
969, 500. 00
150,000. 00

380, 030. 91
436, 948.02
286,516.41
260,. 117.12
466,444.05
29, 055. 81
82, 679". 65
132, 610. 50

372, 51 j . l i
487,509.18
221,041.23s
150,927.23
469, 58J. 29
87, 527. !03
80,548.40
161,430.60

340, 916. JO
360,623.70
192,348.28
194,807. 97
480, 226. 09
76,193. 34
77,835.90
104,141.51

345,312. 65
211,989.05
338,168. 50
350, 012. 61
481, 687. 63
63, 884. 81
75, 652.59
185,503.71

33*, 630. 00
4,386. 39

252,222. 66
4,595.52

163,028.00
5,053.09

197,291.00
3, 932.99

549,910.27
455, 095. 00

528, 702. 83
366, 253.00

476,726. 41
308,805.00

523,773. 66
358,106.00

42, 7U4. 50
6,452. 60

41,544.50
.21,050.30
11,565,296.91

42, 333. 40
21,004.84

41,006.70
30, 373:14

11,908,680.84

11,483,923.30

12, Q88} 251. 36

BEPOBT OP THE COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.

275

by States and reserve cities-—Continued.
NO

RTH

CAROLINA.

DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

19 banks.

18 b a n k s .

17 banks.

17 banks.

$2, 476,000. 00

$2, 297, 613.75

$2, 226, 000. 00

$2, 226, 000. 00

$2, 266, 000.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

544, 490.66
343, 605.56

526,287. 26
239, 830. 88

529, 287.26
291, 754. 54

554, 987. 26
253,514.04

562, 242.99
270,110.15

N"at'l-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

791, 510.00

769,440.00

735, 770.00

634, 870. 00

647, 780.00

OCTOBER 4.

Liabilities.
Capital stock

18 banks.

5, 368. 00

3, 913. 50

3,155. 50

34, 995. 50

4, 858.10

Individual deposits...
TJ. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis. officers

3, 694, 263.61
53,182.45
29,566. 62

4,256, 220.12
70, 436. 00
26, 214.07

3, 723,549. 64
110, 838.07
49,400.80

3,438, 516. 36
134, 805. 90
29,436.69

3, 329,094. 79
127, 514. 37
29, 902. 92
227, 970. 54

Dividends unpaid

Due to national banks

164, 985. 51

118,462.42

127,749.78

129,444.15

Due to State banks...

67, 3'93.79

66,107.41

53, 866. 69

60, 033.13

42,146.24

Notes re-discounted..

221, 605.77

114, 596. 59

223, 098. 91

327, 547.52

454,133. 71

30,000. 00

121, 500. 00

8,074,471.19

7, 854,150. 55

8,083, 253. 81

36,005.33

14,000.00

8,427,977.30

8,503,122.00

Bills payable
Total

SOUTH

CAROLINA

16 b a n k s .

16 b a n k s .

16 banks.

16 banks.

$1, 723,000.00

$1,728,000.00

$1,773,000.00

$1,773,000.00

$1,773,000.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

778, 800.00
798,234.36

788, 827.82
702,429.72

784, 000.00
826,524.49

787, 000. 00
841, 425.33

787,800.00
797,755.79

K a t ' l b a n k circulation
State-bank circulation

538, 065.00

469, 370.00

479, 395.00

442,130.00

420, 030.00

Capital stock

16 banks.

9,031.50

15, 899.50

12,128.00

27, 994. 50

12, 615.50

4,097,704.92
509, 718. 98
41,034.89

4,471,105. 52
593, 472.17
39, 704.35

3, 694, 569.92
673,102.63
51,129.73

3,605,717.41
699,762.02
29, 581. 94

3, 095,982. 88
690, 326.91
42, 246.86

Due to national banks

173,32*. 98

232,096.76

298, 300. 84

140,286.29

359, 364.66

Due to State banks...

28* 539. 53

176,693.68

205,423.67

294, 948.75

166,679.86

Notes re-discounted..

72,000.00

20, 000.00

99, 783.72

277,122.58

712, 216.53

65, 000.00

205, 000.00

503,175. 00

9,237,599. 52

8, 962, 358. 00

9,123, 968. 82

9,361,193.99

Dividends unpaid
Individual d e p o s i t s . . .
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers

2,160.30

Bills payable
Total

9,031,619.46

GEORGIA.
21 banks.

22 banks.

22 banks.

23 banks.

$3,106,000.00

$3,166,000. 00

$3,176, 000.00

$3, 236, 000.00

$3,361, 000. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits.

951,731.71
645,345.15

994,353.65
494,411.26

994, 353.65
643, 933.99

1, 007, 853.65
699,427. 30

1, 055,460. 30616, 930.28

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

872, 900. 00

823,100.00

831, 730. 00

829, 810.00

Capital stock

Dividends unpaid

2,162.00

5, 641. 50
5,128,305.78
119,793.42
32,885. 65

3,822.00

24 banks.

860,150.00

3, 259.00

4,240. 00

4, 393, 344.99
99,263. 62
81, 671.99

4,813,247.93
91,694.21
90,178. 47

Individual deposits..
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers

4, 903, 751.17
118,462.14
37,046.71

Duo to national banks

343,387.95

287,143.37

215,329.17

244,168.38

Due to State banks...

351,707.19

303,828.11

237,763.99

248,387.24

190,714.27

610,737.13

1,136,006.89

393, 885.95

453, 218.10

508,074. 22

8, 000.00

100, 000. 00

80,000.00

11, 734,379. 97

11,908,680. 84

11,565,296.91

Kotes re-discounted.
Bills payable
Total

4, 700,614.36
90, 700. 06
82,975.47




30, COO. 00
11,483,923.30

438, 629.01

330, 000. 00
~12,988,251. B6

276

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
FLORIDA.

i
Loans and discounts Bonds for circulation Bonds for deposits . .
XJ S bonds on hand
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res'Ye ag'ts.
Due from nat'lbanks.
Due from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills or other banks..
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
TJ S cert's of deposit
5 % fund with Treas.
Due from U. S. Treas.
Total

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

11 banks.

11 banks.

13 b a n k s .

$1, 724, 705. 84
230, 000.00
200, 000. 00

$1, 737, 998.83
230, 000. 00
200, 000. 00

98, 002. 76
156,622.44
75,401. 86
62, 893. 94
108, 663.54
22, 916.25
37,532. 78
19, 799.77

111, 853.39
284,196. 75
142, 001. 91
63, 449. 47
115, 838. 00
18,171. 51
53, 035. 90
22, 283. 50

113, 513. 75
438,445.75
217,497. 39
74,139. 53
143, 560. 78
27, 6i>2.26
50,580. 28
27, 694. 28

$2,100, 291. 54
280, 000.00
200, 000. 00
1, 000. 00
109, 408. 36
353, 023. 54
210,443. 06
60, 552. 68
156, 407.30
34,272.95
62, 546. 54
23,811.85

77,849. 00
1,474.11

il7, 215.66
1, 322.33

105, 957.00
1,166.14

94, 991.00
1,057.46

97, 664. 00
939.39

76 060.37
138, 856. 00

98, 055. 58
172,120. 00

131, 206. 77
170, 660.00

147,291.33
198,175.00

107,338 39
159,094.00

8, 779. 00
730. 57
2,816,449.29

16,328. 97

16, 198.97

3,364,578.15

3,680,311.73

11, 505.97
4,000. 00
4,048,778.58

11,071.47
1, 000. 00
3,725,486.65

DECEMBER 7.

11 banks.
$1,600,866.90
2&0,000.00
100, 000. 00

OCTOBER 4.
13 b a n k s .
$1,979, 954. 55
280, 000. 00
200, 000. 00
119,267.42
300, 642. 52
82,695.50
100, 486. 23
169,919. 22
28,416.00
62,345. 92
24,652. 04

ALABAMA.
20 banks.
$6, 558,958. 54
900, 500.00
250,000. 00

21 banks.

21 banks.

$6, 751,746. 64
900, 500. 00
300, 000. 00

$7,026, 955. 87
913,000.00
300, 000.00

$7,459,418.85
863, 000.00
300, 000.00

926,514.94
891,578.46
625, 720.13
237, 877. 09
388, 375.18
47,465.28
123,020. 30
94, 542.03

849, 083. 83
703,780.49
531,1-9. 89
246,709. 69
397,574.14
93,639. 51
125, 551.53
47, 297. 73

842,100.88
708, 668.14
351, 276. 60
194,622.11
412,633. 32
79, 547.61
125, 598.40
31, 665. 32

859,067. 51
552, 950. 49
270, 538. 29
210, 669.26
443, 689. 85
58,541.35
119, 889. 03
45, 016.18

219, 216. 00
3,601. 55
7.00
489,436.64
503,546.00

239, 582.00
2, 231.40
2.00
364, 851. 65
449, 789.00

154, 554. 00
1,940.28
6.00
408 336 48
295, 620.00

210, 754.00
1,625. 00
4.00
437 392 36
387, 987.00

38, 622. 50
673. 24
12,299,654.88

20 banks.
.Loans and discounts. $7, 630, 795.21
900, 500. 00
Bonds for circulation.
Bonds for deposits - 100,000. 00
X S bonds on hand
T
855,430.16
Other stocks and b'ds
609, 702.11
Due from res've ag'ts.
510, 353. 96
Due from nat'l banks 162,072.38
Due from State banks
382, 573. 64
Real estate, etc
110,160. 20
Current expenses
119,273. 53
Premiums paid
89,781.14
Cash items
Clear' g-house exch'gs
216,843. 00
Bills of other banks..
3, 214. 29
Fractional currency.
1.00
Trade dollars
378,977.80
Specie
. . .
442, 695.00
Legal-tender notes ..
TJ S cert's of deposit
40,022. 50
5 % fund with Treas"
2,763.24
Due from I)'. S. Treas.
12,555,159.16
Total

37,672. 50
6, 759.79
12,047,901.79

40, 072. 50
2,988.49
11,889,586.00

37,085. 00
3, 666. 24
12,261,294.41

20 banks.

MISSISSIPPI.
12 banks.
Loans and discounts. $2, 512, 630. 80
320,000.00
Bonds for circulation
Bonds for deposits .
TJ S bonds on hand
67, 357.12
Other stocks and b'ds
254, 608. 05
Due from res've ag'ts.
81,100.18
Due from nat'l banks.
75, 797. 60
Due from State banks
47, 628.59
Real estate, etc
36,396. 67
Current expenses
35, 800.65
Premiums paid
26.596. 66
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
u, iii. 66
Fractional currency.
362.89
168,623. 85
Specie
158, 224. 00
Legal-tender notes ..
TT. S. cert's of deposit.
5% fund with Treas.
13,643. 57
Due fromTJ. S. Treas.
Total

3, 812,881. 63




12 banks.

12 banks.

12 banks.

12 banks.

$2,086,420.55
320,000.00

$2, 317,364.94
320, 000. 00

$2,248,282.47
320, 000. 00

$2, 646, 803. 78
332, 500.00

30, 000. 00
29, 280. 27
481, 573. 48
225,491. 00
99,988. 28
47,455. 94
16, 063.02
36,484.48
36,886.44

30, 000. 00
51,102.93
366, 598. 56
104,180.20
48,298.43
52,999. 94
39, 703. 69
35, 314.48
15, 567.60

30,000.00
59, 586. 54
239,208. 43
96,474.78
41,702.29
53,026.44
19, 337. 95
32,780. 57
15, 639.07

60,000.00
75.784.26
62,668.90
71, 951. 09
37, 032. 91
60, 695. 22
28, 555. 40
38,168.07
34,102.83

29,905.00
928. 08

18, 528. 00
1, 365. 94

20,065. 00
1, 369. 64

13,651.00
2, 090.43

243,024. 70
224,771.00

168,445.65
161,387. 00

144,180. 83
153,952.00

149,680.15
186,046.00

13, 913. 57
2, 486.85
3, 924, 672. 66

13, 839. 50
4,100. 00

13,459.50
2, 650. 00

14,532.00

3,748,796.86

3,491,715. 51

3,814, 242.04

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

277

by States and reserve cities— Continued.
PL ORIDA.
DECEMBER 7.

Capital stock

FEBRUAEY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

OCTOBER 4.

11 b a n k s .

11 b a n k s .

11 b a n k s .

13 b a n k s .

13 b a n k s .

$640,000.00

$672,820.00

$700,000.00

$894,200.00

$896, 990. 00

66, 680.00
67,106. 76

76, 000. 00
57,571.14

80,000. 00
82,492. 90

86, 000. 00
95,345. 75

98, 820. 00
78, 793. 77

145, 730. 00

184,100. 00

179, 760. 00

176, 070.00

194, 750. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits
Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation
Dividends unpaid

6, 514. 00

40.00

569.00

54.00

Individual deposits ..
U. S. deposits
Dep'tsU.S.dis.oflicers
Due to national banks

1,642,112. 73
96, 988. 51
2,790.77

2, 058, 096. 76
102, 355.43
105,444. 57

2, 334, 821. 59
108, 309. 57
99,491.28

45,207.06

67, 362. 81

61, 875.58

65,348. 20

113,281.16

Due to State banks...

17,124. 95

24, 015.11

28, 506.81

62, 540. 54

29, 985.11

Notes re-discounted..

62,668. 51

6, 243.33

5, 000. 00

14, 760. 00

Bills payable
Total

30, 000. 00

10, 000. 00

2,816, 449. 29

3, 364, 578.15

2,440,216.23
107, 453.4. L
100,330. 45

1, 2G1. 00
2, 048, 955.82
147, 529. G
O
GO, 725.40

22, 394. 79
32, 000. 00

.3,680,311.73

4, 048, 778. 58

3, 725,486. 65

ALABAMA.
20 b a n k s .

20 b a n k s .

20 b a n k s .

21 b a n k s .

$3,494, 000.00

$3,494,000.00

$3,494, 000.00

$3, 544, 000. 00

$3, 544,000.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

639, 903. 66
571, 535. 79

665,709. 36
414,197.36

666, 586. 54
550, 368.39

678,122.42
569, 585. 87

724,414. 48
4<J5, 214. 88

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

783, 050.00

779,170.00

773,030.00

765, 230.00

748, 580.00

Capital stock

Dividends unpaid

21 b a n k s .

6, 525.00

4, 790. 20

2,174.00

32,153. 00

4,779. 99

Individual deposits...
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts TJ.S.dis.ofncers
Due to national banks
Due to State banks...

5,689,818.85
79, 296.45
851.46

5,867, 040.38
249, 350. 58
387.52

5, 366,489.89
288, 840.26
11,159. 74

4, 881, 579.28
293, 360.86
4, 637. 71

4, 785, 060.18
295,743.18
2, 256.82

344,944.22

247, 081.10

171, 647.41

162, 322. 28

270, 710. 26

109,743.70

127,333.12

107,165. 52

107,895.78

72, 367. 39

Notes re-discounted. .

685,490. 03

393,595.26

519, 432. 59

786,520. 62

1,250,167.23

Bills payable
Total

150, 000. 00

57, 000.00

97, 007.45

64; 178.18

68, 000. 00

12, 555,159.16

12,299,654.88

12, 047, 901. 79

11,889,586.00

12,261,294.41

MIS SISSIPPI.
12 banks.

12 b a n k s .

12 b a n k s .

12 b a n k s .

$1,055,000.00

$1,055,000.00

$1,055,000.00

$1,055,000.00

$1,105,000.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

128, 868.27
141, 835. 33

190, 213.12
68,487.54

190,213.12
142, 360. 34

210, 513.12
108, 932. 84

242,289. 59
92, 863. 05

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

283, 820.00

279,230.00

275,110. 00

278, 970.00

292, 860. 00

728.00

20 00

18,875. 00

382.00

2, 220, 945.19

1,983,280.17

1,674,639.59

1, 379, 274. 07

111, 275. 89

Capital stock

Dividends unpaid

12 b a n k s .

Individual deposits...
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis. officers
Due to national banks

1,857,800.45

82,786.75

56, 294.37

51,940.58

24,959. 74

Due to State banks...

23,167.48

19,623.69

34,701. 65

48,415.05

13,287. 99

Notes re-discounted..

224, 603. 35

34,150. 75

16,171. 00

71, 910.17

492, 008. 85

3, 924, 672.66

3, 748,796. 86

3,491,715.51

3,814, 242. 04

Bills payable
Total

15, 000. 00
3, 812, 881. 63




85, 000. 00

278

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
Abstract of reports since October 5,1837, arranged
LOUISIANA.
DECEMBER 7.

Loans and discounts Bonds for circulation
Bonds for deposits ..
U. S. bonds on hand..
Other stock and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts
Due fromnat'l banks
Dae from State banks
Real estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-houseexcb'gs
Bills of other banks .
1 ractional currency.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

5 banks.

Resources.

5 banks.

5 banks.

5 banks.

$1,274,831.63
125,000.00

$959, 560.12
125,000.00
100,000. 00

OCTOBER 4.
5 banks.

75,000. 00
44,638.87
100,397.47
7,635.73
3,475.27
9. 218.29
14,444.85
32, 888.13
19, 843.96
27,365.00
368.17

Specie
Legal-tender notes -.
TT. S. cert's of deposit
ft % land with Treas.
Due from U. S. Treas
Total

41, 197.94
231,013.41
45,315.80
12,721. 71
9,338.19
3; 429.55
39, 896.03
5, 932.65

$1,009,191.57
125,000. 00
100, 000.00
15. 000.00
37, 956.!)6
157, 041.50
97, 033.50
11, 556.12
9, 354.34
11,315.48
43, 284. 88
2, 055.98

26,605.00
200.49

17, 600.00
168.37

15, 0?0.00
93.20

12, 800.00
1, 507. 02

117, 745.65
57,001.00

167, 281.35
93,652.00

142, 762.30
66,862.00

138,164.10
51,659.00

136,949.05
63, 247. ©•

5, 624.00

5, 624.00
10,000 00

5,624.00

5,624.00
15,000.00

5, 624.50

1,915,478.02

1,876, 768.84

1,851, 807.00

1,802,249. 74

2,049, 229.07

$935,436.78
125, 000.00
100,000.00
1-0,000.00
40,814.93
2; 5, 583.20
59,720.13
28,130.88
9,354.34
10, 590.64
26,4f)0.00
5, 558.44

$1, 399, 624.09
125, 000.00
100, 000. 00
5X), 000.00
46.187.41
48,541.12
10 559.24
£6, 865.39
9, 354. 34
8,266.97
27,372.48
7, 330.46

CITY OP NEW ORLEANS.
8 banks.
8 banks.
8 banks.
8 banks.

8 banks.

L o a n s and discounts. $10, 853,741.15
1, 375, 000.00
Bonds for circulation.
400, 000.00
Bonds for deposits - .
210,450.00
TJ. S. bonds on h a n d . .
1, 612, 839.28
Other stocks and b'ds
970,129.71
D u e from res've ag'ts
401, 912. 85
D u e from nat'l b a n k s .
492, 557.63
D u e from State banks
477, 726. 32
Heal estate, etc
164, 590.19
C u r r e n t expenses
236, 540. 87
P r e m i u m s paid
5, 402.28
Cash items
1,412,198.57
Clear'g-house exch'gg
95, 208.00
Bills of other b a n k s . .
4, 215. 91
Fractional c u r r e n c y .
T r a d e dollars
1, 236, 833.60
Specie
951,776.00
Legal-tender notes ..

$9,478,08i. 51
1, 375, 000.00
600, 000. 00
203, 650. 00
1, 939, 681. 65
1,527.943.40
525, 243.23
606, 921. 28
407, 49 L. 27
43, 982. 00
276, 048.44
5, 898.39
1, 662, 994.85
167, 643.00
4, 844. 01

$9,463, 871. 70
1, 375, 000.00
600, 000. 009, 700. 00
2, 326, 554. 20
1,226,012.40
325,297.13
403, 756.20
404,181.05
121,526.49
258, 209. 79
2,716.24
1, 096, 753.00
176, 947. 00
7, 441.40

$9, 362, 253.70
1, 375, 000.00
600. OCO. 00
0,900.00
2,129, 072.56
1,599,505.72
602, 456. 44
2 9,174.03
390, 256. 51
250, 710. 83
3, 346.25
961, 259.19
110.840.00
9, 548.64

$11, 019, 516.97
1, 375, 000. 00
600, 000. 00
14.100. 00
2, 038^ 075. 06
818,011.40
238, 502. 56
247, 541. 59
. 394,174.39
93, 062. 28
253. 330.41
4. 728.04
1,168.357.48
109, 692.00
8, 944.17

1, 992, 480. 75
1, 792, 593. 00

1, 843, 886.00
1,464,112. 00

1, 536,757.35
1, 415, 076. 00

933,120. 85
1, 211, 014. 00

61,875.00
5, 600. 00

61,875.00
1, 000.00

• 61,875.00

61, 875.00
1, 850. 00

61. 875. 00
5,000.00

20,968,597.36

22,679,371.78

21,167,839.60

20,692,882.22

20, 594,046.80

91 banks.

94 banks.

96 banks.

98 banks.

100 b a n k s .

$19,728,582.83
2,415,300.00
400,000.00

$20,212,680.26
2, 515, 500. 00
400,000.00
380,953.47
2, 362,183.16
1,267, 68tJ. 32
752, 905.34
1, 214,411. 37
133, 737.49
353, 631.49
199,671.14

$21, 793,400. 44
2,615,500.00
400 000.00
1, 500. 00
387, 347. 62
2, 287, 553.12
1,432,619.36
891,432.01
1,277,529.67
198, 522. 82
344,353.41
258, 676. 34

$24, 688~800.15
2, 634, 000. 00
400, 000.00

404, 544.04
2, 277, 283.13
1, 401,800. 24
890,144.42
1,138,241.39
310,330.06
357,127.71
199,391.72

$21, 306,143. 28
2, 552, 500.00
400, 000.00
1. 500. 00
385:622,67
1, 879. 975 18
1,286,698.31
761,152.28
1,255,223.90
281,686.71
35G, 927.40
163,097.04

911, 923. 00
11,306.05
11.00
1, 571, 470.66
2,130, 613.00

991,494.00
12,126. 24
12.00
1,452, 393. 85
2,145, 971.00

701, 547. 00
16, 948.03
12.00
1, 363,024.85
1,581,313.00

523, 405.00
17, 365.95
1, 365, 725.11
1, 690, 410. 00

1, 305,386.15
1,817,165.00

107, 087. 55
4, 926. 62

108, 513. 60
4, 987.12

109, 389.50
10, 754.62

112,488.75
9,039. 62

115,188. 75
4,159. 84

34, 260, 083.42

34, 508,857. 85

34,407,515.77

35,606, 869.22

38, 471,456. 50

IT. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with Treas.
Due from U. S. Treas.
Total

TEXAS.
Loans and discounts
Bonds for circulation
Bonds for deposits...
TJ S. bonds on hand
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts
Due from nat'l banks
Due from State banks
Heal estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks..
Fractional currency .
Trade dollars
Specie
Legal-tender notes ..
U.S. cert's of deposit
5 % fund with Treas.
Due from TJ. S. Treas.
Total




467 410.22
1, 859, 806.42
1,531, 603.91
820, 839. in
1,443,619.30
244, 948. 08
347,771.60
260, 523.39
•

510, 669. 00
19,565.42

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CORU&NCY.

279

by States and reserve cities—Continued.
LOUISIANA.
DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE'30.

OCTOBER 4.

5 banks.

Liabilities.

5 banks.

5 banks.

5 banks.;

5 banks.

$500, 000. 00

$5LO, 000. 00

$500, 000. 00

$500, ,eou. eo

$50^000/80

30,308.44
60, 607. 93

60, 280. 02
23, 842.24

60, 280. 02
56, 534. 71

73, 865. 37
38,151.20

84,24 4i 06
4.V067.21

101,490.00

101, 070.00

101,980.00

105, mi. oo

110* 415.00

Capital stock
Surplus fund
Undivided profits
jS"at'l-bank circulation
State-bank circulation
Dividends unpaid

8.00

88.00

36.00

6, 036.00

78.00

Individual deposits..
U S. deposits
Dep'tsU.S.dis.officers

868, 092.80

1,065, 219.26
110, 000.00

1,014,616.29
110, 000. 00

905,714.61
110, 000.00

788; 735-89
110,000,00

7, 319.32

8, 315.11

2, 817. 56

94, 697; 57

Due to national banks

174. 209. 92

Due to State banks ..

218.80

Notes re-discounted..

160,468.80

Bills payable
Total

44 87

12, 396. 2$

8,950. 00

273,627; 06

20, 073. 33
1, 915, 478. 02

CITY

B0,000.00
1, 876, 768.84

1,851,807.00

1, 802, 249. 74

2, 049,229.07

OP NEW ORLEA N S .

8 banks.

8 banks.

8 banks.

8 banks.

$2,925,000. 00

$2,925, COO. 00

$2, 925,000. 00

$2, 925,000.00

$2,9*6; 0G0;00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

1,199,000.00
738, 976.51

1, 346,000.00
368, 320. 62

1, 346, 000. 00
554, 007.83

1,424,000.00
151,913.88

1, 424,000:00
349,849.53

Xat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

1, 235,775. 00
492.00

1, 229, 855.00

1, 225, 615. 00

1, 207, 765.00

1,216,595.00

Capital stock

Dividends unpaid

8 banks.

11, 019.50

25, 376. 81

11, 075. 81

118,589.81

14, 487. 57

Individual d e p o s i t s . . .
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U S.dis.officers

11,646,301.91
402, 353.79

14, 012, 505. 64
641,686. 75

12, 926,349.81
655, U»J1.07

12, 797, 884.11
641,030.99

11,123,200.02
641,791.25

Due to national banks

1,123, 747. 20

1, 219,862.24

965t 255.27

709,466. 80

979,447.77

Due to State banks...
Xotes re-discounted..

1, 327,581.24

910,763.72

558, 614.81

717, 231. 63

1,036, 806. 55

Bills payable
Total

35 9 869 11

158 350.21
200, 000.00
20,968, 597. 36

530, 000. 00
22, 679, 371. 78

21,167, 839.60

20, 692, 882.22

20, 594, 046.80

TEXAS.
91 b a n k s .

94 b a n k s .

96 banks.

98 b a n k s .

$10,047,000.00

$10,745, 700. 00

$10, 970,400. 00

$L1,327,358.25

$11,805,700.00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

2,457, 987.96
1, 511,036. 60

2,490,480.54
879,648. 54

2, 530, 920.54
1, 2li2, 383. 35

2, 564,207.66
1,193,458.25

2, 776,767.43
1,128, 945.91

Tsrat'l-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

2,140,415. 00

2,189, 950. 00

2,215,565.00

2, 233, 075. 00

2, 312, 615. 00

Capital stock

100 b a n k s .

5,380. 00

23,864. 52

4,286. 55

150, 283.05

11,545.00

Individual deposits..
U. S. deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers

15, 381, 227. 88
274,303.40
127,790.17

15,523, 230.41
264,178. 97
142,132.45

14,623, 345.00
264. 544.17
144,738.87

15,140,714.35
281,780.87
113,468.73

15, 784,698. 56
256,590. 68
143,319.17
1,185,243.31

Dividends unpaid

Due to national banks

984, 052.57

1, 093,685.84

S22.371.06

843,846.98

Due to State banks...

015,029.41

628, 854.99

590, 708. 92

564, 598.63

688,472.09

Notes re-discounted..

670,860.43

517,131.59

956,752. 31

1,133, 077.45

2, 038,626. 00

45, 000. 00

10, 000. 00

21, 500. 00

61,000.00

338,933. 35

34,260, 083.42

34,508,857. 85

34, 407, 515. 77

35,606, 869. 22

38,471,456.50

Bills pavablo
Total




280

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OP "THE CURRENCY.
Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
ARKANSAS.
DECEMBER 7.

FEBRUARY 14.

7, banks.

7 banks.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

7 banks.

7 banks.

OCTOBER 4.
7 banks.

Loans and discounts. $3,013,971.45
410,000.00
Bonds for circulation
150,000. 00
Bonfiafor deposits.. 51,400.00
U. S. bonds on hand..
34, 803.24
Other stocks and b'ds
167,925. 51
Due trom res' ve ag?ts
87,171.91
Dae from nat'lbanks
96, 894.58
Due from State banks
33, 763.20
Real estate, etc... ^...
11,936.91
Current expenses
95, 065. 00
Premiums paid
8, 368.67
Gash items
01 ear' cr-house excli' srs
54,773. 00
Bills or other banks..
768.18
Fractional currency.

$2, 815,377.26
410,000. 00
150, 000. 00
51,600.00
48, 581). 07
352,330.75
56, 596.12
61, 555. 25
32, 233.93
6,928. 00
92, 30!). 00
10, 895. 08

$2,769, 382. 24
410,000.00
150, 000. 00
66, 600.00
40, 776.37
365, 286.07
127,265.62
109, 616. 22
32. 7(59. 93
6, 746. 77
93, 246. 50
15, 802. 06

$2, 559,275. 99
410,000. 00
150, 000. 00
55, 700. 00
52,635. 51
338,672.95
98, 422. 93
85,401. 99
32, 261. 93
10, 767.91
92, 271.25
9,145.69

$2, 768, 208. 36
410, 000. 00
150 000.00
55, 700. 00
47, 09:*. 17
285,473.04
40, 677. 27
82, 005. 68
32, 711. 93
4,169. 59
84, 958. 75
8, 936. 07

33, £47.00
837.47

39,100.00
870.44

39, 402.66
724.21

35,193. 00
968. 60

175,733.45
161, 856.00

176,155.25
128,195.00

204,025.10
133, 303. 00

128, 330. 70
106, 007. 00

120,750.10
140, 834. 00

18,450. 66
1,618.30

18,45*6. 66

i8, 450.66
500.00

17,400. 00
1, 224.15

18,450. 66
198. 30

4,574,499.40

4, 445,899.18

4, 589, 740. 32

4,187, 644.21

4, 286, 327.86

60 b a n k s .

60 b a n k s .

Specife...i
Legal-tender notes...
TJ-o "cert'to of deuosit
5 % fund with Treas.
DijeftomlT. S. Treas.
Total.

KBNTU CKY.
59 b a n k s .
Loans and discounts. $17,569,511.27
Bonds for circulation.
3,311,000.00
Bonds for deposits...
1, 370,000. 00
U. S. bonds on hand..
104,150. 00
Other stocks and b'ds
741, 377. 72
Due from res've ag'ts.
1,780. 399.11
Dne from nat'l banks.
937, 504. 50
Due from State banks
232, 975. 34
Real estate, etc
532, 672. 89
Current expenses
149,221.65
Premiums paid
398,117.95
Cash items
161,524.69
Clear' g-house exch'gs
Bills or other b a n k s . .
251, 810.00
Fractional currency.
3,131.70
Trade dollars
Specie
548, 929. 92
Legal-tender notes . .
544,194.00
U. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with Treas.
145,237. 94
Due from U. S. Treas.
951.25
Total

28,782,709. 93

59 b a n k s .

1

60 b a n k s .

$17,879,062.96 $18. 334, 770. 68 $18, 423,748. 32
3,*190, 000. 00
3, 302, 000 00
3, 286, 000. 00
1, 445. 000.00
1,445, 000.00
1, 420, 000. 00
101,300.00
102,400.00
104, 050,00
710 490. 71
713, 930. 58
783, 698.09
1,483. 346.94
1, 337, 799.83
1,670, 905. 01
755. 601. 80
776, 712. r>3
1,136,278.22
246. 222. 66
276, 492.61
351, 23.1.40
533, 699.72
524,101.44
531, 604.01
54, 578. 87
-115, 213.25
58,813.14
366,9,8.64
388, 272.45
388, 620.13
81, 561. 94
52, 365.37
51,433.11

$18, 600, 858. 56
2, 937. 000. 00
1, 445, 000. 00
104,300.00 !
798.808.41
1, 756. 776. 62
729. 063.14
235, 086.06
530, 218. 09
133, 499. 80
365, 075. iiO
77,179. 60

232, 735.66
4, 068. 30
38.00
610, 658. 49
564, 422.00

246, 986. 00
3, 318. 83
55.00
581, 878. 79
566, 095. 00

228, 723. 00
4, 031. 24
50.00
537,912.48
607, 613. 00

202. 465. 00
3,413. 20
23.00 !
550,901.09 !
567, 535. 00

141, 377. 94
2, 002.56

140, 757. 94
3, 000. 00

136, 797. 94
2, 850.00

129, 629. 40
11,301.33

29, 216,998.36

28,911,150.30

28, 910, 487.26

29,178,194.20

CITY OP LO1CJIS V I L L E .
9 banks.

9 banks.

9 banks.

$9,454, 909. 73
694, 000. 09
900, 000.00

$9, 327, 046. 69
600, 000. 00
900, 000.00

$9,488,854.87
600,000. 00
900, 000. 00

$9,172, 346.69
600, 000. 00
800, 000. 00

$9,197, 272. 62
500, 000. 00
900, 000. 00

225, 822. 02
653, 306.14
359, 592. 24
156, 805. 00
155, 300. 52
39, 574. 63
91, 245.74
34,173. 20
87, 519.18
55, 674. 00
1, 641. 96
4.00
239, 827. 45
701, 643.00

216,116. 58
789, 528.09
336,927.97
232, 882. 88
158, 227.14
43, 788. 94
85,418.75
16, 072.42
129,104. 32
88, 948. 00
2, 093. 37

222,851.30
894,462. 51
271, 025. 63
205, 444. 50
153, 401.83
53, 938. 84
80, 787. 50
41, 670.75
91,822. 57
92, S65. 00
1, 639. 89

188,184. 72
875, 409. 62
424, 455. 09
205,869.10
154, 202. 79
20, 688. 56
71,287.50
57,448.85
105,469.19
51, 096. 00
745. 88

1*54,626.95
847, 802. 35
363,172. 65
194, 058.60
193, 995. 38
94, 423. 52
80, 618.75
35, 560. 77
34, 896.66
42, 780. 00
505. 79

394,116.60
1, 021, 475. 00

381,269 69
986,197. 00

399, 295.70
679, 043.00

342,300. 75
582, 436.00

31,227.50
2, 000. 00

26, 997. 50
5, 500. 00

26, 997. 50
3, 000. 00

26, 997. 50
2, 000.00

22. 497. 50
3, 000.00

13, 884, 256. 31

14, 374, 244. 25

14, 496, 229. 38

13,834,540.19

13, 589, 342.29

9 banks.
Loans and discounts.
Bonds for circulation.
Bonds for deposits . .
TJ S bonds on hand
Other stocks and b'ds
Due from res've ag'ts.
Due from nat'l banks
Due from State banks
Eeal estate, etc
Current expenses
Premiums paid
Cash items
Clear'g-house exch'gs
Bills of other banks -.
Fractional currency.
Trade dollars
Specie .
Legal-tender notes . .
TJ. S. cert's of deposit.
5 % fund with Treas
Due from U.S. Treas.
Total




9 banks.

REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. 281
by States and reserve cities—Continued.
ARKANS A S .
DECEMBER 7.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

7 banks.

7 banks.

7 banks.

$950, 000. 00

Capital stock

FEBRUARY 14.

7 banks.

Liabilities.

$950, 000. 00

$950, 000.00

$950, 000. 00

7 banks.
$950, 000. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

111,500.00
337,441.56

169, 300. 00
68, 095. 02

169, 300. 00
100,661.08

180. 300. 00
99, 332.34 |

191, 000. 00
104, 748.14

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

365, 000. 00

363, 050.00

359, 910. 00

362,240.00 I

368, 940. 00

Dividends unpaid

2,002.00 |

2,146. 00

23,418.00

1, 783.00

Individual deposits ..
U. S. deposits
j
Dep'ts U.S.dis.officers

2, 569, 259. 72
116,162.88
43,831.12

2,592,578.11
116, 554. 74
41, 320.78

2, 661, 081. 42 i
119,523.41 j
40,476.59 !

1,218.00

!, 304,841. 60
128, 782. 51
31, 217.49

2,180,190.12
129, 627. 28

Due to national banks

92, 699. 59

6, 987.20

19,480.92 i

14,449.61

Dne to State banks.. -•

61, 349.97

76, 245. 00

146,603.49 I

93, 062. 66

Notes re-discounted..!

104,252. 56

38, 622.33

6,485.41

30, 372. 72
36, 612.21

i

71, 340. 58

Bills payable

!

Total

I

21,000.00

21,000. 00

15, 000.00

4,574,499.40

4,445,899.18

4, 589, 740. 32

211, 713. 81

4,187, 644.21

10, 000. 00
4, 286, 327. 86

KENTU CKY.
59 b a n k s .

59 b a n k s .

60 banks.

60 b a n k s .

$9, 758, 900.00

$9, 938, 900.00

$10, 072, 423. 66

$10, 099,300. 00

$10,102,900. 00

Surplus fund ...
Undivided profits

2,340,618.35
«48,193.42

2, 318, 360. 71
566,176. 86

2, 323, 527.14
814,692.64

2, 395, 037. 00
518, 526. 54

2, 386, 927.24
815,6,75. 71

Natl-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

2,966, 840. 00

2, 939, 550. 00

2, 936, 070. 00

2, 854, 570.00

2, 630, 030. 00

19,981.50

33, 756.00

26,666. 00

130, 890. 50

35,187. 00

Individual deposits..
U. S. deposits
Dep'tsU.S.dis.oflicers

10, 057, 834. 49
1, 360,170. 77
69, 575.51

10,435,464.61
1, 456, 340. 40
50, 988. 05

9, 901,656. 58
1, 487, 208. 06
67, 457.68

10,128, 623.88
1, 500, 697. 84
53, 250. 54

10,408, 093. 72
1, 532, 826. 97
20, 560. 0'J
548, 285.58

Capital stock

Dividends unpaid

60 b a n k s .

Due to national banks

574,172. 47

566, 535.13

528, 832.03

453, 780. 91

Due to State banks . -

458, 332.84

537, 809. 94

336, 399.49

323, 321.12

349, 636. 74

Notes re-discounted..

293,090. 58

368,117. 66

416, 217.02

442,488.93

290, 071.16

10, 000.00

58, 000. 00

28, 911,150.30

28, 910, 487.26

29,178,194. 20

Bills payable
Total

35,000.00

5, 000. 00

28, 782, 709. 93

29, 216, 9D8. 36

CITY
9 banks.
Capital stock

oF
9

L O U IS VILLE.
9
banks. j 9 b a n k s .

banks.

9 banks.

$3, 551, 500. 00

$3, 551, 500.00

$3, 551, 500.00

$3, 551, 500.00

$3, 651, 500. 00

Surplus fund
Undivided profits

951,175.36
220, 200. 29

953,175.36
230, 066. 75

953, 175.36
260 866.49

958, 514. 96
145, 261.02

992, 514. 96
287, 540. 64

Nat'1-bank circulation
State-bank circulation

624,490. 00

539, 890. 00

639 830. 00

539, 890. 00

449, 890. m

Dividends unpaid

7, 999. 50

7, 394.00

14, 620. 00

44, 386. 00

5, 461. 50

3 889, 851. 30
557, 563. 39
354, 051. 36

3 944, 022.42
619, 689. 90
252, 513. 36

4, 288, 213. 32
682, 973. 46
207, 022. 66

4,006, 796.65
681,877. 44
168,117. 08

3, 890, 913. 33
66(5, 931. 78
199, 734. 66

Due to national banks

1, 419, 310.96

1 917, 914. 97

1, 985, 144.54

1, 732,013.69

1, 577, 213. 68

Due to State banks ..

1, 581, 953. 23

1 742, 579. 21

1, 601, 064. 68

1,461,243.62

1, 296, 645. 51

Notes re-discounted..

676,170. 92

565, 498. 28

411, 758.87

404, 939. 73

440, 996. 24

50, 000. 00

50, 000.00

13,884, 266.31

14 374, 244.25

Individual deposits..
U. S deposits
Dep'ts U.S.dis.ofl&cers

Bills payable
Total




140, 000. 00
14,496, 229.38

130, 000. 00

13, 834,540.19

13 589, 342. 29

282

REPOftT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
Abstract of reports since October 5, 1887, arranged
TENNESSEE.
DECEMBER 7.

FEI5RUARY 14.

APRIL 30.

JUNE 30.

40 banks.

41 b a n k s .

41 b a n k s .

41 b a n k s .

OCTOBER 4.

Resources.
42 b a n k s -

Loans and discounts. $19, Oil, 797. 50 $18, 518,909. 48 $18,423,280.17 $18, 206,079. 29 $19, 849, 784. 71 !
1, 483, 750. 00
1, r>26, 500 00
1,421,500 00
1, 484, 000. 00
1,520,000.00
Bonds foi" cue ulati on.
450,000 00
450,000 00
450,1)00. 00
450,000. 00
450, 000. 00
Bonds for deposits . .
2 100. 00
1,200.00
iOO. 00
1,050.00
U S. bonds on hand..
50., 217. O'.i
411,975.1;-!
3f;0,145. 06
Other stocks and b'ds !
347, 627. 11
3W,6 9.71
1, 122,803.76
1, 148,817. oV)
1,127,318.84
8 >i, 851. 75
1,1:00,377.52
Due from i es'veag ts.
H)3, 534. 85
1,068,908.27
966, 736. :>9
703, 6 i 6. 08
781,240.24
Due from nat'l banks
227,33;* Cl
- 2i4,142.67
170, 325. 61
1%, 3^8.11
190,452.84
Due from State banks
5^5, 529. 91
531,498.40
549 528. 98
541, 217. 86
51)5,710. i 8
Real estate, etc
148,028.96
128,333.07
M8, 6-1'). 49
96, 599. 59
if*.-., 423. 57
Current expenses
234,44S. 17
232, 587. 66
128, 903.61
222, 528. 426
211,011. bl
Premiums paid..
242,988. 41
263, 536. 73
280, 428. 75
297, 949. 68
849, 741. 59
Cash items
141,069.43
111,596.26
Jol, 180.24
55, 006. (JO
103,471.74
Clear'g house exch'gs
371,1