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c Z ?

*

3

o
Analysis of
Work Stoppages, 1 9 7 5 ^ # ^
—

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1977
Bulletin 1940




-

-o 4 —
*

Co-

Analysis of
Work Stoppages, 1975
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1977
Bulletin 1940




For sale b y the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D .C . 20402
Stock No. 029-001-02019-8




P reface

This bulletin, continuing an annual feature of the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the
field of industrial relations since 1941, provides a detailed statistical presentation of work
stoppages in 1975. The data presented in earlier bulletins have been supplemented by the
addition of a historical record by industry group, 1937-75 (appendix A).
Preliminary monthly estimates of the level of strike (or lockout) activity for the
United States as a whole are issued about 30 days after the end of the month of reference
and are available on request. Preliminary estimates for the entire year are available at the
year’s end; selected final tabulations are issued in the early summer of the following
year. The methods used to prepare work stoppage statistics are decribed in appendix B.
The Bureau wishes to acknowledge the cooperation of employers and employer
associations, labor unions, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and various
State agencies which furnish information for this program.
The bulletin was prepared in the Division of Industrial Relations, Office of Wages and
Industrial Relations, by Frances E. Kanterman. The cover photographs have been provided
through the courtesy of The A F I-C IO N ew s . Other material in this publication is in the
public domain and maybe reproduced without the permission of the Federal Government.
Please credit the Bureau of Labor Statistics and cite the name and number of the
publication.




hi




Contents
Page
Summary .......................................................................................................................................................................................
Duration .......................................................................................................................................................................................
Size .................................................................................................................................................................................................
Industry
.......................................................................................................................................................................................
Trends, 1940-75 .......................................................................................................................................................................
Characteristics and comparisons, 1974-75
Month ............................................................................................................................................................................................
Union affiliation............................................................................................................................................................................
Major issues .................................................................................................................................................................................
Contract status ............................................................................................................................................................................
Occupation of workers..................................................................................................................................................................
Location of stoppages..................................................................................................................................................................
Region ......................................................................................................................................................................................
S ta te ...........................................................................................................................................................................................
Metropolitan area ..................................................................................................................................................................
Mediation .........................................................................................................
Type of se ttlem en t.......................................................................................................................................................................
Procedures for handling unsettled issu e s...................................................................................................................................

1
1
1
2
2
5
6
6
6
7
7
8
8
8
8 #
8
8
9

Charts:
1. Distribution of work stoppages, bysector, 1940-75 ......................................................................................................
2. Distribution of workers involved, bysector, 1940-75
3. Distribution of days of idleness, bysector, 1940-75 ......................................................................................................

3
3
4

Text
1.
2.
3.

tables:
Major work stoppages, 1966-75 ........................................................................................................................................
Percent distribution of work stoppages in each size class by major issue, 1975 ......................................................
Percent distribution of work stoppages, workers involved, and days idle
by industry group, 1940-75 .................................
4. Major work stoppages in mining, construction, and government,
1940-75 ..................................................................................................................................................................................
5. Work stoppages involving no unionor employee association, 1961-75 .......................................................................
6. Prevalence of cost-of-living escalator clauses and work stoppages
involving escalator clauses, 1967-75
.............................................................................................................................

Reference tables:
Work stoppages:
1. In the United States, 1927-75
2. By month, 1974-75 ........................................................................................................................................................
3. By size and duration, 1975 ........................................................................................................................................
4. Involving 10,000 workers or more, 1927-75
5. Involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1975 ..........................................................................................
6. By industry group and size, 1975 ..............................................................................................................................
7. By affiliation of unions involved, 1975 ....................................................................................................................
8. By contract status and size, 1975 ..............................................................................................................................
9. By industry group and contract status, 1975




v

2
2
4
5
6
7

10
11
12
13
14
17
18
19
20

Contents—Continued
Page

10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.

By contract status and major issue, 1975 ...............................................................................................................
By major issue, 1975 ...................................................................................................................................................
By industry group and major issue, 1975 ...............................................................................................................
By major issue and size, 1975 ....................................................................................................................................
By industry, 1975 ........................................................................................................................................................
By industry group and occupation, 1975 ...............................................................................................................
By major issueand level of government, 1975 ...........................................................................................................
In government by major issue and union participation,1975 ....................................................................................
By occupation and level of government, 1975 ...........................................................................................................
In government by level, function, and occupation, 1975
In government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 1975
................................................................................
By region and State, 1975 .........................................................................................................................................
By region, State, and occupation, 1975 ....................................................................................................................
In States having 25 stoppages or more by industry group, 1975 ...........................................................................
By State and metropolitian area, 1975
By industry group and duration, 1975
By major issue and duration, 1975
By contract status and duration, 1975
By contract status and mediation, 1975 .....................................................................................................................
By contract status and type of settlement, 1975 ......................................................................................................
By major issue and type of settlement, 1975 ..........................................................................................................
By industry group and type of settlement, 1975 .....................................................................................................
By contract status and procedure for handling unsettled issues, 1975 .................................................................

22
23
24
26
27
33
35
36
37
38
44
50
51
^

60
62
64
65
66
0/
:
00
69
z

q

<i ad

Appendixes:
Work stoppages by industry group, 1937-75 ............................................................................................................... 72
Scope, definitions, and methods .................................................................................................................................... 78




VI

Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1975
Summary

Median duration was much shorter than mean duration
because of the overwhelming proportion of relatively
short disputes. The largest concentration of strikes (18.7
percent) lasted only 1 day in 1975, the greatest proportion
recorded in this category since 1944. Over one-half of all
stoppages were in effect no longer than 2 weeks, with
approximately one-fourth of the 1.7 million strikers re­
maining off their jobs for 3 days or less (table 27).
The longest stoppages, those lasting at least 90 days,
tended to be relatively small. In 1975, as in 1974, slightly
more than three-fourths of these lengthy disputes involved
fewer than 250 workers each (table 3).
The vast majority of 1-day walkouts (676 of a total of
936) were in the mining industry in 1975, as was the case
in 1974 (table 25). Since the preponderance of mining dis­
putes occur during the term of the agreement, it is not
surprising that 87 percent of the 1-day stoppages took
place while an agreement was in force. The longer strikes,
60 days or more, were generally a result of renegotiation
disputes (table 27).
It appears that workers are willing to remain on strike
the longest over monetary issues (table 26). General wage
change disputes accounted for three-fourths of the stoppages
that lasted 1 month or more and the same proportion of
workers who stayed off their jobs for 60 days or more.
At the other end of the spectrum, plant administration
grievances were the basis for almost one-half of the disputes
terminated within 6 days.

In contrast to the 1974 peak in work stoppages, all
major measures of strike activity declined sharply in 1975.
This relative industrial harmony, though partially attribut­
able to the light collective bargaining calendar in 1975,
may also reflect the economic climate that prevailed
throughout most of that year. The civilian labor force
unemployment rate (which includes all civilian workers
age 16 or older) climbed from 5.6 percent in 1974 to
8.5 percent in 1975. Seasonally adjusted data indicate that
the brunt of 1975 unemployment was felt in May, June,
and July, when the rate approached 9 percent and over 8
million jobseekers were without work. These and other
factors combined to reduce the number of stoppages to the
lowest level since 1972, the first full year of wage and price
controls. The 5,031 stoppages recorded in 1975 were also
well below the levels for the several years immediately
preceding the imposition of controls.
Except for 1972, fewer workers participated in strikes
in 1975 than in any year since 1965. The number of workers
involved (1.7 million) in 1975 was 37 percent below 1974
levels— the greatest proportionate decrease among the
major measures of strike activity between the two years
(table 1). The percentage of the labor force participating
in strikes this year (2.2 percent) was the smallest since 1963.
Strike idleness, at 31.2 million days in 1975, was about
35 percent lower than in 1974, but above 1972 and 1973
levels. The 1.6 days idle per thousand worked (0.16 percent
of estimated total working time) was well below the 2.4
days recorded in 1974, but was above the 1972 and 1973
levies of 1.5 and 1.4 days, respectively. Average days idle
per worker was the only measure of strike activity to rise
in 1975 (from 17.3 days in 1974 to 17.9 days in 1975),
and was indicative of the trend towards smaller stoppages.
From 1967 through 1971, strikes averaged 557 workers each,
while from 1972 through 1975, the average size of each
dispute was only 395 workers.

Size

The distribution of work stoppages by size in 1975
exhibited only slight variation from 1974 (table 8).
The largest concentration of strikes (37 percent) involved
20 to 99 workers; the next largest (25 percent) involved
100 to 249 workers. At the two extremes, the smallest
stoppages (between 6 and 19 workers) accounted for 12.2
percent of the total (slightly above 1974 levels) and the
largest (10,000 workers or more) represented 0.4 percent,
as in the previous year.
Regardless of size, most stoppages lasted less than 1
month. Only in the largest size-group (10,000 workers or
more) did the proportion of strikes lasting at least 30 days
approach one-half (table 3).
The number of major work stoppages (those involving
10,000 workers or more) declined by 7, to a total of 20 in
1975, as the workers involved (474,000 in 1975) and idle-

Duration
After having risen to a record level of 14 days in 1974
(from 8 and 9 days in 1972 and 1973, respectively), the
median duration of the 4,998 stoppages ending in 1975
declined significantly, to 11 days, a level consistent with
those for 1968-71 (table 1). The mean duration of these
stoppages decreased only slightly, from 27.1 to 26.8 days.




1

ness resulting from these disputes (7.5 million days in 1975)
were both reduced by over 40 percent (table 4). The
year-to-year fluctuation in both the number and intensity
of these major disputes depends to a great extent on the
bargaining calendar, since the great majority of these
disputes occur during the renegotiation of agreements
(text table 1 and table 8).

larger (5,000 workers or more) stoppages varied most
frequently from the total distribution. The smallest stop­
pages were caused by union organization and security
and interunion or intraunion disputes with greater fre­
quency than were all strikes; they resulted from plant
administration grievances less frequently. Similarly, walk­
outs involving 5,000 workers or more were precipitated
by job security disputes more often than others. There
were no strikes over interunion or intraunion matters that
involved between 5,000 and 9,999 workers, inclusive; 6.3
percent of all disputes were over this issue. While economic
issues caused one-half of the stoppages involving 10,000
workers or more, they caused 55.8 percent of all strikes.

Text table 1. Major work stoppages, 1966-751
During renegotiation
of agreement
Percent of all
Number
major work
stoppages

All major
work stoppages

Year

1966 .................
1967 .................
1968 . . . . . . .
1969 .................
1970 .................
1 9 7 1 .................
1972 .................
1973 .................
1974 .................
1975 .................

26
28
32
25
34
29
18
25
27
20

21
24
24
17
25
23
12
21
r24
15

Industry
Trends, 1 9 4 0 -7 5 . Over the past 35 years, there has been a
noticeable proportionate shift towards greater strike activity
in the nonmanufacturing sector than in manufacturing
(charts 1, 2, and 3, text table 3, and appendix A). In the
earlier years, isolated interstate or nationwide strikes in
certain nonmanufacturing industries (most notably mining)
may have skewed a particular year’s figures out of line
with the overall trend (as do large manufacturing strikes in
the latter years). Nonetheless, the shifts in the distribution
of work stoppage measures by sector generally have
reflected the trends in the mining and construction
industries, and, in the past 10 years, in government.

80.8
85.7
75.0
68.0
73.5
79.3
66.7
84.0
88.9
75.0

r= r e v is e d .
M a jo r w o r k s to p p a g e s a re t h o s e in v o lv in g

1 0 ,0 0 0 w o rk e rs o r

m o re .

Strikes in the mining and construction industries have
represented an increasing proportion of all disputes in
each decade since 1940-49. The decline in workers involved
and days of idleness in these two industries during the
1950’s is primarily attributable to the absence of frequent
interstate or nationwide mining stoppages that marked the
1940’s. During that decade, almost 42 percent of all

With certain significant exceptions, the distribution of
stoppages by major issue did not vary much with size. The
distribution by major issue of strikes involving 500 to
999 workers did not vary more than 5 percentage points
from the distribution by major issue of all strikes (text
table 2). The very smallest (6 to 19 workers) and the

nonm anufacturing workers on strike were accou n ted for

by the 30 major mining disputes. In the following decade,

Text table 2. Percent distribution of work stoppages in each size class by major issue, 1975
All
sizes

Major issue

A l l is s u e s

E c o n o m ic 1

100-249
workers

250-499
workers

500-999
workers

1,0004,999
workers

5,0009,999
workers

10,000
workers
or more

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

........................................................................................

55.8
1.5
5.3
5.1
22.7
2.7
6.3

* 54.4
* 2.6
12.5
* 3.3
9.6
*2 .4
13.5

*60.3
* 1.6
* 6.8
* 3.9
17.3
*2 .0
*7 .4

* 53.5
*0 .7
* 3 .0
* 6.2
29.4
* 3.3
*3.4

45.1
* 1.1
* 1.5
* 7.3
37.0
* 3 .5
* 4 .2

*5 9 .8
* 1 .6
* 3 .4
* 4 .7
* 23.7
* 3.7
* 3.1

64.6
* 3 .5
* 1.5
*4 .5
*1 8 .2
* 3 .0
*4 .5

* 58.8
*0 .0
0.0
23.5
17.6
*0 .0
0.0

50.0
*0 .0

U n i o n o r g a n i z a t i o n a n d s e c u r i t y ..................................
....................................................................................

P la n t a d m in is tr a t io n

................................................................

O t h e r w o r k i n g c o n d i t i o n s ...................................................
In te r u n io n o r in tr a u n io n m a tte r s

In c lu d e s
w age

20-99
workers

....................................................................................

O t h e r c o n t r a c t u a l m a t t e r s ...................................................

J o b s e c u r it y

6-19
workers

g e n e ra l

a d ju s tm e n ts ,

and




w age
h o u rs

..............................

changes,
of

s u p p le m e n ta r y

b e n e fits ,

NO TE:

w o rk .

A s te r is k

(*)

p e rc e n ta g e p o in ts b e tw e e n

in d ic a te s a

of

le s s t h a n

*1 0 .0

5 .0 0

t h e d i s t r i b u t i o n f o r t h e t o t a l o f a l l s iz e s

a n d t h e d is t r ib u t io n f o r t h e s iz e -g r o u p .

2

d iffe r e n c e

* 5.0
20.0
15.0
*0 .0

Chart 1. Distribution of work stoppages, by sector, 1940-75
Percent

90
Nonmanufacturing

1940

1945

1950

1955

1960

1965

1970

1975

1960

1965

1970

1975

Chart 2. Distribution of workers involved, by sector, 1940-75

Percent
100
Nonmanufacturing

90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10

0

1940




1945

1950

1955

3

Chart 3. Distribution of days of idleness, by sector, 1940-75
Percent
100

1940

1945

1950

1965

1960

1955

1970

1975

Text table 3. Percent distribution of work stoppages, workers involved, and days idle by industry group, 1940-75
W o r k s to p p a g e s

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

D a y s id le

N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g

N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g

P e rio d
T o ta l

T o ta l

T o ta l

M in in g

M in in g
econom y

econom y
T o ta l1

and con­

M in in g
econom y

T o ta l1

s t r u c t io n

and c o n ­

T o ta l1

s t r u c t io n

and con­
s t r u c t io n

1 9 4 0 -4 9

..............................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

4 0 .7

1 9 .9

1 0 0 .0

4 4 .3

3 0 .2

1 0 0 .0

4 0 .1

1 9 5 0 -5 9

..............................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

4 6 .9

2 7 .1

1 0 0 .0

3 7 .7

2 3 .6

1 0 0 .0

3 0 .5

1 9 .3

1 9 6 0 -6 9

..............................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

4 9 .6

2 7 .2

1 0 0 .0

4 7 .8

2 2 .4

1 0 0 .0

4 1 .6

2 2 .9

1 9 7 0 -7 5

..............................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

5 7 .0

3 0 .6

1 0 0 .0

6 5 .4

3 2 .4

1 0 0 .0

5 1 .0

2 6 .9

2 7 .1

In c lu d e s t h e m in in g a n d c o n s t r u c t io n in d u s tr ie s .

this proportion was reduced to under 5 percent. Construction
workers, faced with a different set of market conditions
than mine workers in the postwar decade, walked off their
jobs in greater numbers than before (more than 1 million
construction workers walked off their jobs in 50 major
stoppages during the 1950’s). However, the increase in
construction workers on strike was not enough to offset
the decrease in striking mine workers (text table 4).
The 1960’s witnessed the advent of relatively frequent
(compared with previous periods) major disputes in the
public sector, also classified as a nonmanufacturing in­
dustry. While workers involved in disputes in the mining




and construction industries declined from the previous
decade, increases in the number of government strikers
served to raise the proportion of workers involved for the
nonmanufacturing sector as a whole.
In the 1970’s, for the first time in any decade since
comparable data have been collected, the number of workers
involved and days of idleness in nonmanufacturing ex­
ceeded the numbers in manufacturing. This resulted, again,
from an increase in strike activity among mine, construc­
tion, and government workers. By 1975, these three
industries accounted for 44.6 percent, 58.3 percent, and
35.7 percent of the number of strikes, workers involved,
4

Text table 4. Major work stoppages in mining, construction, and government, 1940-751

Work
stoppages

Period

Workers
involved
(in thousands)

Work
stoppages

Workers
involved
(in thousands)

30
9
8
12

4,282.6
397.0
294.8
521.3

14
50
54
49

247.6
1,025.0
954.0
1,350.9

1 9 4 0 -4 9 ..................................................
1 9 5 0 -5 9 ..................................................
1 9 6 0 -6 9 ..................................................
1970-75 ..................................................

M a jo r
or

w o rk

s to p p a g e s

a re

th o s e

in v o lv in g

1 0 ,0 0 0

Government

Construction

Mining

Work
stoppages

Workers
involved
(in thousands)

22
14
17

231.0
317.0
505.5

b a r g a in c o l l e c t i v e l y a n d t h e o t h e r w a s a s t r i k e o f c i t y t r a n s i t w o r k e r s .

w o rk e rs

m o re .

2

O n e w as a g e n e ra l s to p p a g e o v e r th e

NO TE:

r ig h t o f c i t y w o r k e r s to

and finance, insurance, and real estate-totaled only
315,100 days.
More strikes occurred in mining than in any other major
industry group. In general, these stoppages were in bitu­
minous coal and lignite mining, were of small to moderate
size, occurred during the term of an agreement, and
involved plant administration issues. Most of these strikes
lasted less than 1 week, with a mean duration of 5.8 days.
Slightly more than one-half of these were short protest
or sympathy strikes, and ended with no formal settlement
(tables 6 ,9 , 12, 14, and 31). More mine workers walked off
their jobs than workers in any other industry group. All
but 100 of the 391,600 miners who engaged in work
stoppages were production and maintenance employees
(tables 14 and 15).
Disputes in the construction industry resulted in over
7.3 million days off the job, far more than any other
industry group. The 600 construction stoppages (more than
any other group except mining) were longer than the
national average, with a mean duration of 33.7 days, com­
pared with 22.0 days for all industries. They also tended to
be small, involving fewer than 250 workers over two-thirds
of the time. Jurisdictional disputes accounted for most of
the 237 construction strikes which occurred during the
term of the agreement. However, these 237 stoppages
involved only 30,000 workers and resulted in just 104,900
days of idleness, compared with the 269,500 construction
workers who participated in 327 renegotiation disputes,
contributing over 7.0 million days of idleness to the to tals.
Work stoppages involving 5,000 workers ,or more were
in the minority; however, in this category, a greater num­
ber of strikes occurred in nonmanufacturing than in
manufacturing industries: 34 compared to only 3 (table 6).
Of these large stoppages, 14 were in construction, 8 were in
government, and 6 were in transportation, communication,
electric, gas, and sanitary services.
Economic disputes caused the majority of days of idle­
ness in the petroleum industry, which had the highest idle­
ness rate of all industries. Despite this, a substantial number

and days of idleness, respectively, in the total economy.
Although absolute levels of strike idleness have been
higher in nonmanufacturing than in manufacturing indus­
tries, rates of idleness (idleness as a percent of estimated
total working time) have been lower in the nonmanufac­
turing sector in every year since 1944. With only three
exceptions (mining; construction; and transportation, com­
munication, electric, gas, and sanitary services), the idle­
ness rate indicates that nonmanufacturing industries have
remained relatively untroubled by labor-management dis­
putes. Idleness rates in 1975 illustrate the differing impact
of strike activity upon tne two sectors. Days off the job in
nonmanufacturing exceeded those in manufacturing by
approximately 1.5 million (16.4 million and 14.9 million
days, respectively). However, the idleness rate in manufac­
turing, at 0.32 percent, was almost three times as high as
the 0.11 percent recorded in nonmanufacturing.
C haracteristics a n d co m p a riso n s , 1 9 7 4 -7 5 . Despite overall
lowers levels of strike activity in 1975, all major measures in­
creased in three industries: Ordnance and accessories, petro­
leum refining and related industries, and government.1 All
the ordnance and accessories stoppages, as well as the vast
majority of those in petroleum, occurred during contract
renegotiations; on the other hand, over one-fifth of
the government disputes involved the negotiation of a first
agreement or occurred during the term of the contract
(table 9).
Certain measures of strike activity increased in several
other industries. The number of strikes rose in mining and
services. The most substantial increase in workers involved
was in government, up 157,800 from 1974. The other four
industries in which this measure rose (ordnance and
accessories; petroleum refining and related industries; trans­
portation, communication, electric, gas, and sanitary ser­
vices; and finance, insurance, and real estate) had a
combined increase of only 46,400 workers.

The only sizable increases recorded in days of idleness
were in government (up 800,200 days) and petroleum (up
465,200 days). Rises in tour other industries—
ordnance
and accessories, instruments, miscellaneous manufacturing,




D ash es d e n o te z e ro s .

1 See Work S to p p a g es in Governm en t,
(B ur eau o f Labor Sta tis tic s, 1 9 7 6 ) .

5

1975,

R e por t

483

of days off the job in this industry were incurred over other
contractual matters and plant administration matters (table
12). Transportation equipment, with the second highest level
of idleness in 1975, accounted for 37.6 percent of all days
off the job due to job security disputes.

Text table 5. Work stoppages involving no union or
employee association, 1961-75
Stoppages beginning in the year
Year
Number

Workers involved
(in thousands)

Month
1 9 6 1 .....................................
1962......................................
1963 ................... ................
1964 ....................................
1965 ....................................
1966......................................
1967 ....................................
1968 ....................................
1969 ....................................
1970 ....................................
1971 ....................................
1972 ....................................
1973 ....................................
1974 ....................................
1975 ....................................

The distribution of strikes by month has in the past
reflected the seasonal nature of such activities. Tradition­
ally, measures of strike activity have peaked for the year
during May, June, and July, due in large measure to a
preponderance of large stoppages in the construction in­
dustry around this time. In 1975, largely because of the
decrease in both the incidence and intensity of construction
disputes, coupled with two large government stoppages
in September, the peak level for certain measures occurred
later in the year (table 2).
Most of the major disputes began in July, and in the
same month more workers walked off their jobs than in any
other month in 1975. The number of workers involved
(230,800) was well below the number for July 1974
(364,000), and was exceeded four additional tim es-in May,
June, August, and November— in 1974.
Idleness in July, at 4.5 million days, was also the highest
for any month in 1975, but again, was well below 1974
levels. The material increase in days of idleness in September
over 1974 levels corresponds to the rise in public sector
work stoppages in 1975.2

2.0
1.5
1.7
5.8
6.6
4.8
6.5
12.4
14.7
7.9
9.5
20.3
2.5
3.9
2.1

category, one sub-group— escalator clauses that tie wage
increases to the rate of inflation— was established in 1974 as
a significant, though not predominant, cause of strikes.
Despite declines in both the number and proportion of
such stoppages in 1975, this issue still exerted considerable
influence upon the decision to walk off the job (text table 6
and table 11).

Union affiliation

Coverage of workers under collective bargaining agree­
ments containing escalator provisions has expanded signifi­
cantly over the years. Although the data in text table 6 are
limited in that the measure of workers with escalator
provisions includes only collective bargaining situations
covering 1,000 workers or more and excludes government
employees, the general trend toward increased coverage is
apparent. Coincident with a rise in the Consumer Price
Index of over 12 percent, over 300,000 workers walked off
their jobs in 1974 in an effort to protect themselves against
inflation. By January 1, 1975, 50 percent of all those
involved in major collective bargaining situations were
covered by these types of clauses. As a clause becomes wide­
spread, it becomes an intrinsic part of contract demands.
In 1975, there were almost 300 stoppages in which escalator
clauses played a major role, despite the high coverage on
January 1 of that year. By contrast, in 1967, with only 21
percent of the workers under major agreements covered by
escalator clauses, only eight strikes occurred over this issue.
Disputes over job security and plant administration were
more dominant in 1975 than in most other years, account­
ing for approximately 37 percent of all strikers and onefifth of total idleness. Approximately one-half o f the strikes

Since 1969 (shortly after the United Auto Workers were
suspended and withdrew from the AFL-CIO in July 1968)
there has emerged a slight but steady downward trend
(except for 1974) in the proportion of work stoppages
attributable to AFDCIO affiliates. Even with this decline,
such stoppages have contributed significantly to the total
number of strikes, workers involved, and days idle. In 1975
they accounted for slightly over one-half of the strikes and
workers involved and represented almost three-fourths of
all days idle (table 7). In 1975, professional and State
employee associations represented 12.1 percent of all
workers on strike, the highest level ever recorded in that
category.
Stoppages which involve no union or employee associa­
tion appear to be on the decline. From the early 1960’s
through the end of that decade there was a noticeable
upward trend in this type of strike. However, in the past
three years the number of disputes in which no organization
was involved has decreased significantly (text table 5).
Major issues

Economic concerns, such as monetary gains and supple­
mentary benefits, have always been the primary motivation
for strikes, with 1975 no exception. Within this broad




30
30
42
36
49
54
68
61
106
95
88
112
52
58
40

See Work Sto p p a g es in Governm ent, 1975.
6

Text table 6. Prevalence of cost-of-living escalator clauses and work stoppages involving escalator clauses, 1967-75
Stoppages beginning in the year
involving escalator clauses

Workers in major bargaining situations1

Year

1967............................... .........................
1968 .......................................................
1969 .......................................................
1970.........................................................
1971 .......................................................
1972 .......................................................
1973 .......................................................
1974 .......................................................
1975 .......................................................

M a jo r
1 ,0 0 0
t h is

b a r g a in in g

Covered by escalator clauses
as of January 1

Total
(in thousands)

s itu a tio n s

Number
(in thousands)

10,600.0
10,600.0
10,800.0
10,800.0
10,600.0
10,400.0
10,500.0
10,500.0
10,100.0

in c lu d e

o n ly

The

m o re

th a n

6 0 0 ,0 0 0

p o s ta l

c o n tr a c ts

w o rk e rs

have

21
23
25
26
28
41
39
38
50

c o v e re d

c o v e r in g

by

an

b a r g a in in g

Labor

been

8
14
26
35
31
25
73
549
293

e s c a la t o r

m a jo r

over general wage changes involved fewer than 100 workers,
while those over plant administration disputes tended to be
somewhat larger, the majority involving between 100 and
500 workers (table 13). Strikes over plant administration
disputes, prevalent in the mining industry, tended to be
short, with 87.3 percent lasting less than 1 week (table 26).

S t a t is tic s ,

c la u s e

s itu a tio n s
D iv is io n

of

2.3
8.6
15.8
8.6
12.6
6.2
24.2
332.5
64.4

s in c e

w e re

1972.

o b ta in e d

T re n d s

in

D a ta
fro m

E m p lo y e e

on

w o rk e rs

th e

B u re a u

in
of

C o m p e n s a tio n .

workers. Government workers walked off their jobs with
the greatest frequency during this contract status, but in
total, only 10,500 of them did so. Renegotiation disputes
had the greatest impact on idleness in the construction
industry, resulting in over 7.0 million days off the job. The
only sizable number of stoppages during the term of the
agreement occurred in mining and construction— 1,371
out of a total of 1,733 for all industries (table 9).

Contract status

Slightly over 8 percent of all stoppages in 1975 occurred
during the negotiation of a first agreement or during a
union’s attempt to gain recognition, the lowest proportion
ever recorded in this category. However, as in previous years,
more disputes were associated with the renegotiation of
agreements than with any other contract status.
The majority of strikes during the negotiation of a first
agreement were small (over three-fourths involved fewer
than 100 workers), and generally involved either economic
or union organization and security issues, but did not
evidence any specific trends with regard to duration. These
strikes were a disproportionately large percent of dis­
putes that terminated with the strike broken (tables 8, 10,
27, and 29).
Renegotiation disputes generally arose over economic
issues, unlike stoppages during the term of an agreement,
which more often than not arose from plant administration
grievances (table 10). A majority of renegotiation disputes
continued for 2 weeks or more, while those during the
term of the contract tended to terminate within 1 week
(table 27).
Among the industries, the largest group of strikes during
negotiation for a first agreement or while a union attempted
to gain recognition was in wholesale and retail trade.
These 73 stoppages were quite small, involving only 2,100




Percent of total

2,200.0
2,460.0
2,660.0
2,800.0
3,000.0
4,300.0
4,100.0
4,000.0
5,100.0

w o r k e r s o r m o r e . G o v e r n m e n t e m p lo y e e s a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m

n u m b e r.

Workers involved
(in thousands)

Number

Occupation of workers

Production and maintenance employees constituted the
largest occupational group of workers to participate in work
stoppages in 1975, accounting for almost 7 out of every 10
workers on strike (table 15). More than twice as many of
them participated in strikes in the non manufacturing sector
as in manufacturing, with over half the total in the mining
and construction industries.
Whether due to the degree of unionization, structural
situations that promote labor-management harmony, or
other factors, occupational groups other than production
and maintenance workers are less prone to walk off their
jobs. When they do strike, the other five distinct classes of
workers substantially affect the levels of strike activity in
only a few industries. Of the 214,000 protective and profes­
sional and technical employees on strike in 1975, 93 per­
cent were government workers. And, of the 191,000
professional and technical government employees on strike,
182.300 were teachers (table 19). As might be expected,
considering the nature of both the occupational classifica­
tions and the industry, most strikers in the sales and clerical
occupations were in wholesale and retail trade. Of the
27.300 service workers who walked off their jobs, 23,800
7

M e tro p o lita n area. Four metropolitan areas recorded more

were employed either in transportation, communication,
electric, gas, and sanitary services, or in services (table 15).

than 100 work stoppages each in 1975: Pittsburgh (140),
Philadelphia (134), Chicago (122), and New York City
(122) (table 24). New York City was the only metropolitan
area in which more than 100,000 workers walked off their
jobs. This high level resulted directly from a strike involving
63,000 teachers in New York City’s public school system.
Generally, major stoppages extend beyond the boundaries
of metropolitan areas, in which case the workers involved
are allocated among the respective areas. But in this instance,
all 63,000 workers were employed within the New York City
metropolitan area.
Idleness exceeded 1 million days in six metropolitan
areas— Chicago (1.6 million), Dallas-Forth Worth (1.6
million), St. Louis (1.5 million), Beaumont-Port ArthurOrange, Texas (1.4 million), New York City (1.1 million),
and New London-Norwich, Connecticut and Rhode Island
(1.1 million). Almost all of the New London-Norwich idle­
ness resulted from the General Dynamics strike of 10,000
workers that lasted 149 days.

Location of stoppages
R eg io n . Among the 10 regions of the Nation, the incidence

of stoppages and workers involved in Region III was higher
than in any other geographic area. This region includes the
two States which recorded the greatest number of disputes
in 1975— Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Some 44 percent
of the disputes in Region III occurred in the mining and
construction industries in these two States, while strikers
in these industries in these same States accounted for more
than one-half of the workers on strike in the region (tables
21 and 23).
As in previous years, heavily industrialized Region V led
in days of idleness, with 7.6 million days off the job in 1975.
This region includes 2 of the 4 States with the greatest
strike-related idleness (Illinois and Ohio).
Twelve major work stoppages (those involving at least
10,000 workers) were confined to States within one region;
the other eight crossed regional boundary lines. In several
instances, major strikes represented a significant portion of
either the workers involved or days of idleness in the regions
in which they occurred. The General Dynamics strike in
Connecticut accounted for 39.7 percent of the days idle in
Region I. Four major strikes in Region II (two in each State)
represented 43.1 percent of the workers involved in stop­
pages in that region. One large, long construction stoppage
in Texas alone accounted for 32.1 percent of the total
days off the job in Region VI.

Mediation

Mediation as an impasse procedure was used in 44.5
percent of the 4,998 work stoppages ending in 1975 (table
28). Private mediation sources were tapped rarely (4.3
percent), State mediation boards or agencies slightly more
often (14.2 percent), and Federal agencies (mainly the
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service) most con­
sistently (73.8 percent). Mediation was employed most
frequently in disputes stemming from the renegotiation
of agreements, and least frequently in stoppages arising
during the term of the contract.

Pennsylvania again experienced more stoppages—
654— than any other State. This State was also the only one
where more than 200,000 workers participated in strikes
in 1975. As has been stated previously, a large portion of
the strike activity in Pennsylvania is traceable to mining and
government disputes (table 23).
Largely as a consequence of one long stoppage of 26,000
construction workers that resulted in almost 1.5 million
days off the job (details in table 5), Texas recorded the
most days of idleness among the States. Texas was also the
only State in which more than one metropolitan area
registered over 1 million days off the job in 1975.
More idleness was incurred in the District of Columbia
in 1975 than in any previous year. The 807,600 days off the
job was almost nine times as high as the 1974 level. Thus,
the District of Columbia had an idleness rate of 0.55 percent
in 1975 (5.5 working days idle per thousand), above any
State other than West Virginia, whose 0.63 percent rate
was due primarily to large amounts of idleness in the mining
industry. The District of Columbia’s extraordinarily high
level of idleness is directly attributable' to one major stop­
page, lasting 50 days and involving 15,000 construction
workers, that contributed 525,000 days off the job to the
total.
S ta te.




Type of settlement

As in prior years, over three-quarters of all disputes in
1975 ended with formal settlements, that is, either all issues
were resolved or a procedure for handling unsettled issues
after the strike was agreed to as part of the settlement
(table 29). In 13.5 percent of the stoppages employees
returned to work without a formal settlement. Strikes were
broken in 3.8 percent, and the employer went out of
business in 0.6 percent.
Strikes were broken with the greatest frequency during
stoppages over negotiation of a first agreement or union
recognition— 16.1 percent of these terminated in this
manner. Still, 78.2 percent of these disputes ended with a
formal settlement.
An overwhelming proportion of renegotiation disputes—
93.6 percent— terminated with a formal settlement, while
more than one-third of all strikes during the term of the
agreement ended without a formal settlement. In an addi­
tional 7.2 percent of the stoppages occurring during the
term, workers returned to their jobs under a court injunction.
8

procedure for handling unsettled issues as part of a formal
settlement. Of these, information on the type of procedure
was available for 499.3 The most common procedure was
direct negotiation, which was employed in 45.9 percent of
the cases. An additional 27.5 percent referred the dispute
to a government agency, and 11.6 percent provided for
arbitration. Fifteen percent of the cases utilized other
means of settlement that were unclassifiable (table 32).
A majority of the disputes ending with a procedure for
handling unsettled issues occurred during the term of the
agreement. The settlements in more than one-half of these
cases delineated a process other than direct negotiation.

More than one-half of the stoppages involving plant
administration issues ended without a formal settlement,
with a court injunction, or with the employer out of
business, unlike disputes over economic issues, which
generally ended with a formal settlement (table 30). In 68.9
percent of the stoppages over union organization and
security, a formal settlement was achieved. Even so,
this was the only issue over which more than 20 percent of
the disputes terminated with the strike broken. Among
strikes where the formal settlement consisted of a pro­
cedure for handling unsettled issues, an equal proportion
were disputes over general wage changes, plant administra­
tion, and interunion or intraunion matters.
Procedures for handling unsettled issues

3
For 84 strikes, 16,000 workers, and 714,900 days of
idleness, no information as to type of procedure was available.

There were 583 strikes that ended in 1975 with a




9




Table 1. Work stoppages in the United States, 1927-751
(WORKERS IMP DATS IDLE I I

THOOSARDS)
WORK S T O P P A G E S

WORKERS I R Y O L V E D

DAYS I D L E

DORIRG

YEAR

YEAH
D O RA T IO M
(DAYS)

R OB B E R
BEAR

g/

R OB B E R

BB DIAR

PE RCEH T
OP
TOTAL
EBP LOYED

R OB BE R

P E RCBRT OP
E S T . T O TA L
HORKIHG
TIB E 1 /

PE R
WORKER
IRYOLYED

1 9 2 7 ........................................................
1 9 2 8 ........................................................
1 9 2 9 ........................................................
1 9 3 0 ........................................................
1 9 3 1 ........................................................

707
604
921
637
810

26.5
2 7 .6
2 2 .6
2 2 .3
1 8 .8

3
(9)
(9)
(4)
(9)

330
314
289
183
342

1 .4
1 .3
1.2
.8
1 .6

26,2 0 0
1 2 ,6 0 0
5 ,3 5 0
3 ,320
6 ,890

(9)
(4)
(9)
(*»)
(4)

7 9 .5
4 0 .2
18.5
18. 1
2 0 .2

1 9 3 2 ........................................................
1 9 3 3 ........................................................
1 9 3 4 ........................................................
1 9 3 5 ........................................................
1 9 3 6 ........................................................

841
1 ,695
1 ,8 5 6
2,0 1 4
2 ,1 7 2

19 .6
1 6 .9
1 9 .5
2 3 .8
2 3 .3

(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

324
1, 170
1 ,4 7 0
1 ,1 2 0
789

1 .8
6 .3
7 .2
5 .2
3.1

1 0 ,5 0 0
1 6 ,9 0 0
19 ,6 0 0
1 5 ,5 0 0
1 3 ,9 0 0

(4)
(9)
(4)
(9)
(9)

3 2 .4
1 4 .4
1 3 .4
1 3 .8
1 7 .6

1 9 3 7 ........................................................
1 9 3 8 ........................................................
1 9 3 9 ........................................................
1 9 4 0 ........................................................
1 9 4 1 ........................................................

4,7 4 0
2,7 7 2
2 ,6 1 3
2 ,5 0 8
4,2 8 8

2 0 .3
2 3 .6
2 3 .4
2 0 .9
18 .3

(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(4)

1,8 6 0
688
1 ,1 7 0
577
2 ,3 6 0

7 .2
2 .8
3 .5
1 .7
6. 1

28,4 0 0
9,1 5 0
1 7 ,8 0 0
6 ,7 0 0
2 3 ,0 0 0

(«)
(9)
.2 1
.0 8
.2 3

15 .3
1 3 .3
1 5 .2
1 1 .6
9 .8

1 9 4 2 ................................. - ..................
1 9 4 3 .......................................................
1 9 4 4 ........................................................
1 9 4 5 ........................................................
1 9 4 6 ........................................................

2 ,9 6 8
3 ,752
4,9 5 6
4,7 5 0
4 ,985

1 1 .7
5 .0
5 .6
9 .9
24 .2

(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

840
1 ,9 8 0
2 ,1 2 0
3 ,4 7 0
4 ,6 0 0

2 .0
4 .6
4 .8
8 .2
1 0 .5

4 ,1 8 0
1 3 ,5 0 0
8 ,720
3 8 ,0 0 0
1 1 6 ,0 0 0

.09
.1 0
.0 7
.31
1.09

5 .0
6 .8
4. 1
1 1 .0
2 5 .2

1 9 4 7 ........................................................
1 9 4 8 ........................................................
1 9 4 9 ........................................................
1 9 5 0 ........................................................
1 9 5 1 ........................................................

3 ,6 9 3
3 ,4 1 9
3,6 0 6
4 ,8 4 3
4 ,7 3 7

2 5 .6
2 1 .8
2 2 .5
1 9.2
1 7 .4

(9)
(9)
(9)
8
7

2, 170
1 ,9 6 0
3 ,0 3 0
2,4 1 0
2 ,2 2 0

4
4
6
5
4

1 9 5 2 ........................................................
1 9 5 3 ........................................................
1 9 5 4 ........................................................
1 9 5 5 ........................................................
1 9 5 6 ........................................................

5 ,1 1 7
5 ,0 9 1
3,4 6 8
4,3 2 0
3 ,8 2 5

19 .6
20 .3
2 2 .5
1 8 .5
18 .9

7
9
9
8
7

3 ,5 4 0
2 ,4 0 0
1 ,5 3 0
2,6 5 0
1 ,9 0 0

1 9 5 7 ........................................................
1 9 5 8 ........................................................
1 9 5 9 ........................................................
1 9 6 0 ........................................................
1 9 6 1 ........................................................

3 ,673
3,6 9 4
3 ,708
3,3 3 3
3 ,3 6 7

1 9 .2
1 9.7
2 4 .6
2 3 .4
2 3 .7

8
8
10
10
9

1 9 6 2 ........................................................
1 9 6 3 ........................................................
1 9 6 4 ........................................................
1 9 6 5 ........................................................
1 9 6 6 ........................................................

3
3
3
3
4

,6 1 4
,3 6 2
,6 5 5
,9 6 3
,405

2 4 .6
2 3 .0
2 2 .9
2 5 .0
2 2 .2

1 9 6 7 ........................................................
1 9 6 8 ........................................................
1 9 6 9 ........................................................
1 9 7 0 ........................................................
1 9 7 1 ........................................................

4 ,5 9 5
5,0 4 5
5 ,7 0 0
5 ,716
5 ,138

1 9 7 2 ........................................................
1 9 7 3 5 / ..............................................
1 9 7 4 5 / ..............................................
1 9 7 5 ........................................................

5,0 1 0
5 ,3 5 3
6 ,0 7 4
5,0 3 1

34,6
3 4 ,1
5 0 ,5
3 8 ,8
2 2 ,9

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

.3 0
.2 8
.44
.33
.18

1 5 .9
17 .4
1 6 .7
16 .1
1 0 .3

7 .3
4 .7
3 .1
5 .2
3 .6

59
28
22
28
33

00
00
00
00
00

.4 8
.2 2
. 18
.2 2
.2 4

1 6 .7
1 1 .8
1 4 .7
1 0 .7
1 7 .4

1,3 9 0
2 ,0 6 0
1,8 8 0
1 ,3 2 0
1 ,4 5 0

2 .6
3 .9
3 .3
2 .4
2 .6

16, 500
2 3 ,9 0 0
69,0 0 0
1 9 ,1 0 0
1 6 ,3 0 0

.12
.1 8
.50
.1 4
.11

11 .4
1 1 .6
3 6 .7
1 4 .5
1 1 .2

9
8
8
9
9

1 ,230
941
1 ,640
1 ,5 5 0
1 ,9 6 0

2 .2
1 .1
2 .7
2 .5
3 .0

18 ,6 0 0
1 6 ,1 0 0
22,9 0 0
2 3 ,3 0 0
2 5 ,4 0 0

. 13
.11
.15
.1 5
. 15

1 5 .0
1 7.1
14 .0
1 5.1
1 2 .9

2 2 .8
24.5
22.5
2 5 .0
2 7 .0

9
10
10
11
11

2 ,8 7 0
2 ,6 4 9
2 ,4 8 1
3 ,305
3 ,2 8 0

4
3
3
4
4

4 2 ,1
4 9 ,0
4 2 ,8
66,4
4 7 ,5

0
1
6
1
8

0
8
9
4
9

.25
.28
.2 4
.3 7
.26

1 4 .7
1 8 .5
1 7 .3
2 0 .1
14 .5

2 4 .0
2 4 .0
2 7 .1
26.8

8
9
14
11

1,7 1 4
2 ,2 5 1
2 ,7 7 8
1 ,7 4 6

2. 3
2 .9
3 .5
2 .2

27
27
47
31

66
48
91
37

.15
.14
.2 4
.1 6

1 5 .8
1 2 .4
1 7 .3
1 7 .9

1 T h e n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s an d w o r k e r s r e la t e to
th o s e s to p p a g e s th a t b e g a n in th e y e a r ; a v e r a g e d u ra tio n ,
to th o s e en d in g in th e y e a r . D ays of id le n e s s in c lu d e a ll
s to p p a g e s in e f f e c t. W o r k e r s a r e c o u n te d m o r e th a n o n ce
if th e y w e r e in v o lv e d in m o r e th a n 1 s to p p a g e d u rin g th e
y e a r.
A v a ila b le in fo rm a tio n f o r e a r l i e r p e r io d s a p p e a r s
in H andbook of L a b o r S ta t is t i c s . 1975 R e f e r e n c e E d itio n .
BLS B u lle tin 1865 (1 975), t a b le s 159-64. F o r a d is c u s s io n
of th e p r o c e d u r e s in v o lv e d in th e c o lle c tio n an d c o m p ila ­
tio n of w o rk s to p p a g e s t a t i s t i c s , s e e BLS H andbook of
M e th o d s . B LS B u lle tin 1910 (1 9 7 6 ), c h . 27.
c F ig u r e s a r e s im p le a v e r a g e s ; e a c h s to p p a g e is

.7
.2
.7
.1
.5

.3
.8
.5
.7
.5

,1
,3
,6
,2
,1

,0
,9
,9
,2

g iv en e q u a l w e ig h t r e g a r d l e s s of i t s s i z e .
3 A g r ic u lt u r a l an d g o v e r n m e n t e m p lo y e e s a r e i n ­
clu d e d in th e t o t a l e m p lo y e d an d t o ta l w o rk in g tim e ; p r i v ­
a te h o u s e h o ld , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r y e m p lo y e e s a r e e x ­
c lu d e d . An e x p la n a tio n o f th e m e a s u r e m e n t of i d le n e s s
a s a p e r c e n t a g e of th e t o t a l e m p lo y e d l a b o r f o r c e an d
of th e to ta l t im e w o r k e d is found in " T o t a l E co n o m y
M e a s u r e of S tr ik e I d l e n e s s , " M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w .
O c t. 1968.
4 N ot a v a ila b le .
5 D o e s n o t in c lu d e a n u n d e te rm in e d n u m b e r of
j u r i s d i c t i o n a l d is p u te s f o r w h ic h id e n tify in g in fo rm a tio n
w a s n o t a v a ila b le .

10

Table 2. Work stoppages by month, 1974-75
( N O R K E R S AMD

DAYS I D L E

III

THOUSANDS)

NUMBER
HOMTH

BEGINNING

IN

OF

MONTH

STOPPAGES

N O R K ER S I N V O L V B D

IN EFFECT
D U R I N G MONTH

B E G IN N IN G

MONTH

PER CENT

NUMBER

PE R C E N T

1 9 7 4 ..............................................
J A N U A R Y ...........................
F E B R U A R Y .......................
MARCH.................................
A P R I L .................................
H A Y .......................................
J U N E ....................................
J U L Y .....................................
A U G U S T ..............................
S E P T E M B E R ....................
O C T O B E R ...........................
N O VE M B E R ........................
D E C E M B E R ........................

6 ,074
379
377
484
607
795
677
683
509
514
513
353
183

1 0 0 .0
6 .2
6 .2
8 .0
1 0 .0
13.1
11.1
1 1.2
8 .4
8 .5
8 .4
5.8
3 .0

1 0 ,5 3 9
573
589
763
918
1 ,1 9 1
1,1 8 7
1 ,1 9 9
1 ,0 5 7
910
911
742
499

10 0 .0
5 .4
5 .6
7 .2
8 .7
1 1 .3
11 .3
1 1 .4
1 0 .0
8 .6
8 .6
7 .0
4 .7

2 ,7 7 8
1 0 9 .2
1 2 6 .5
15 7 .9
1 8 9 .6
4 0 4 .6
4 8 8 .1
36 4 .0
2 5 0 .5
1 8 7 .5
14 5 .5
2 5 0 .9
10 3 .5

1 0 0 .0
3 .9
4 .6
5 .7
6 .8
14.6
17 .6
13 .1
9 .0
6 .7
5 .2
9 .0
3 .7

4,5 6 0
17 1 .6
1 6 7 .4
2 2 8 .9
27 7 .6
5 2 4 .2
7 0 7 .3
6 6 7 .1
5 7 1 .5
3 2 0 .0
2 6 7 .3
3 5 1 .5
30 6 .0

1 9 7 5 ..............................................
J A N U A R Y ...........................
F E B R U A R Y .......................
MARCH.................................
A P R I L .................................
H AY ........................................
J U N E ....................................
J U L Y .....................................
A U G U S T ..............................
S E P T E M B E R ....................
O C T O B E R ...........................
N O V B H B E R .......................
D E C E M B E R ........................

5 ,0 3 1
340
339
375
491
555
533
518
420
495
426
300
239

10 0 .0
6 .8
6 .7
7 .5
9 .8
11 .0
10 .6
1 0.3
8 .3
9 .8
8 .5
6 .0
4 .8

8,8 9 7
581
540
612
751
850
876
899
836
907
823
656
566

10 0 .0
6 .5
6 .1
6 .9
8 .4
9 .6
9 .8
10 .1
9 .4
1 0 .2
9 .3
7 .4
6 .4

1,7 4 6
13 2 .3
1 0 8 .6
1 0 0 .9
13 1 .3
1 8 6 .6
174. 3
2 3 0 .8
17 1 .7
2 1 6 .8
1 4 3 .4
6 2 .8
8 6 .1

1 0 0 .0
7 .6
6.2
5 .8
7 .5
1 0 .7
1 0 .0
1 3 .2
9 .8
1 2 .4
8 .2
3 .6
4 .9

2 ,906
1 7 8 .2
1 7 1 .0
16 8 .5
2 0 5 .4
26 5 .2
29 7 .7
3 8 1 .8
3 2 4 .9
3 7 1 .7
2 4 5 .8
1 4 2 .8
15 3 .4




PERCENT

NOTE:
t o ta ls .

11

DA I S

IN EFFBCT
D U R I N G MONTH

NUMBER

S ee fo o tn o te 3, t a b le 1,

NUMBER

IN

NUMBER

ID L E

DU R I N G

H O NTH

PERCENT OF
E S T . T O TA L

NUMBER

PERCENT

1 0 0 .0
3 .8
3.7
5 .0
6 .1
1 1 .5
15 .5
14 .6
1 2 .5
7 .0
5 .9
7 .7
6 .7

47 ,9 9 1
1 ,3 6 2 .9
1 ,3 7 0 .1
2 ,1 1 8 .6
2 ,9 4 4 .8
6 ,0 5 0 .4
6 ,9 4 0 .1
8 ,9 5 3 .8
5 ,8 8 1 .8
3 ,0 2 7 .9
2 ,8 5 4 .2
3 ,8 0 7 .4
2 ,6 7 8 .9

1 0 0 .0
2 .8
2 .9
4 .4
6 .1
1 2 .6
1 4 .5
1 8 .7
1 2 .3
6 .3
5 .9
7 .9
5 .6

.2 4
.0 8
.09
.1 3
.1 7
.3 4
.4 3
.5 1
.33
.1 9
.1 7
.24
.1 6

1 0 0 .0
6 .1
5 .9
5 .8
7 .1
9 .1
1 0 .2
13.1
11 .2
1 2 .8
8 .5
4 .9
5 .3

3 1 ,2 3 7
1 ,6 0 4 .9
1 ,5 5 7 .3
1 ,7 7 4 .3 ’
2 ,1 7 7 .0
3 ,3 1 9 .0
3 ,3 6 2 .0
4 ,4 6 4 .5
3 ,3 7 6 .7
3 ,6 8 3 .8
2 ,3 2 7 .0
1 ,7 3 6 .8
1 .8 5 3 .7

1 0 0 .0
5 .1
5 .0
5 .7
7 .0
10 .6
1 0 .8
14 .3
1 0 .8
1 1 .8
7 .4
5 .6
5 .9

.16
.0 9
.1 1
.1 1
.1 3
.20
.2 0
.2 6
.2 0
.2 2
.1 4
.1 1
.1 1

PERCENT

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,

T IM E

1/

s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l

Table 3. Work stoppages by size and duration, 19751

ALL

WORKBRS

IIVOLVED

TOTAL

1
DAT

4-6
DATS

2-3
D AT S

7-14
DATS

ST O PPA G E S

N OH B E B O F

ENDING

30-59
D AT S

15-29
D A TS
IN

60-89
D AT S

9 0 D AT S
AMD O VE B

T EA R

S T O P P A G E S .............................................. ...............................

4 ,9 9 8

936

652

521

739

730

742

325

353

6 AMD OMDBB 2 0 ..................................................................................
2 0 AND DNDEB 1 0 0 ...........................................................................
1 0 0 AMD U N DE B 2 5 0 ........................................................................
2 5 0 AMD O N DE B 5 0 0 ........................................................................
5 0 0 AMD 0 M D E B 1 0 0 0 ....................................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AMD O ND EB 5 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AMD O ND EB 1 0 , 0 0 0 ........................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AMD O T E B ...............................................................................

605
1 ,8 6 6
1 ,2 4 2
732
316
202
15
20

95
306
279
192
48
15
1

45
200
203
124
56
21
1
2

55
190
112
94
37
32
1

99
290
176
99
32
37
4
2

97
311
153
69
60
29
5
6

110
308
169
80
34
34
2
5

50
118
78
42
22
14
-

54
143
72
32
27
20
2
3

WORKERS
ALL

IN VOLVED

(IN

1

THOOSANDS)

S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

1 ,7 3 1 .8

22 3 .3

21 7 .0

1 6 1 .2

2 6 6 .3

3 4 8 .4

27 9 .3

8 1 .5

1 5 4 .9

6 AMD ONDEB 2 0 ..................................................................................
2 0 AMD 0 MDE B 1 0 0 ...........................................................................
1 0 0 AMD O ND EB 2 5 0 ........................................... ............................
2 5 0 AND O ND EB 5 0 0 ........................................................................
5 0 0 AMD O HD EB 1 0 0 0 .....................................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AMD OMDEB 5 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AMD OMDEB 1 0 , 0 0 0 ........................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AMD O V E B ...............................................................................

7 .6
97 .4
1 9 8 .4
2 5 5 .4
2 1 4 .2
3 8 8 .4
9 6 .4
4 7 4 .0

1 .2
16 .7
4 7 .2
69 .4
3 3 .0
3 3 .5
-

.6
1 0 .4
3 2 .9
4 2 .2
3 6 .3
4 1 .5
9 .0
4 4 .2

.6
1 0 .4
1 7 .4
3 3 .5
2 5 .0
6 8 .2
6 .0

1.2
15.1
2 7 .8
3 4 .3
2 1 .0
70.5
2 1 .4
7 5 .0

1.3
16 .4
23.1
2 3 .9
4 2 .3
5 9 .4
3 2 .4
1 4 9 .6

1 .4
1 5 .9
2 6 .3
2 7 .2
2 3 .4
5 3 .3
1 3 .5
1 1 8 .2

.6
5 .6
1 2 .4
1 4 .4
1 4.1
2 4 .4
1 0 .0

.6
7 .0
1 1 .2
1 0 .6
1 9.1
37 .7
14 .0
5 4 .7

3 ,8 9 2 .9

6 ,3 7 6 .3

3 ,8 8 0 .6

1 2 ,5 4 5 .5

1 8 .6
2 4 2 .2
339. 3
3 3 3 .3
6 6 3 .3
7 6 6 .2
42 7 .2
1 ,1 0 2 .6

4 0 .8
4 5 6 .7
7 5 7 .4
7 9 4 .8
6 2 9 .9
1 ,4 9 4 .9
3 7 1 .5
1 ,8 3 0 .4

3 1 .4
2 8 4 .9
6 0 5 .4
6 8 8 .9
7 1 1 .4
1 ,1 5 6 .2
4 0 2 .4

63 .3
6 9 4 .0
1 ,1 1 4 .6
1 ,0 0 3 .4
1 ,7 5 5 .0
3 ,1 2 8 .8
1 ,2 0 7 .4
3 ,5 7 8 .9

2 2 .4

DATS
S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

2 9 ,6 0 4 .3

2 2 3 .3

6 AND U NDE R 2 0 * * * * * « « « * « « * « « * « « « « « « * « » * «
2 0 AND ONDEB 1 0 0 ...........................................................................
1 0 0 AND U N DE R 2 5 0 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
2 5 0 AND U ND ER 5 0 0 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
5 0 0 AND U ND ER
1 , 0 0 0 AND U ND ER 5 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ........................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND O V E R ................. ...

167 .5
1 ,8 6 2 .2
3 ,1 7 7 .2
3 ,3 1 8 .0
4 ,0 8 6 .4
7 ,3 3 0 .0
2 ,1 8 1 .0
7 ,4 8 2 .0

1 .2
1 6 .7
4 7 .2
6 9 .4
3 3 .0
3 3 .5
22.4

IDLE

(IN

THOOSANDS)

S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

1 0 0 .0

6 AMD OMDEB 2 0 ..................................................................................
2 0 AMD U NDE B 1 0 0 ...........................................................................
1 0 0 AMD OMDEB 2 5 0 ........................................................................
2 5 0 AMD OMDEB 5 0 0 ........................................................................
5 0 0 AND O N DE B 1 0 0 0 .....................................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AMD ON DE B 5 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AMD OMDEB 1 0 , 0 0 0 .............................. .........................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AMD O T E B ...............................................................................

12.1
37 .3
2 4 .8
14 .6
6 .3
4 .0
.3
.4

ALL

10 0 .0
10. 1
3 2 .7
2 9 .8
2 0 .5
5 .1
1 .6
. 1

497. 1

1 ,7 7 6 .5

2. 2
3 7 .0
57.8
11 0 .2
8 3 .7
2 0 0 .1
6 .0
-

8 .8
10 9 .5
1 89.6
23 5 .3
13 7 .8
4 6 7 .9
1 4 1 .8
4 8 6 .0

PERCENT

ALL

DISTRIBUTION

41 1 .9
1. 1
2 1 .2
6 5 .8
82 .8
7 2 .3
8 2 .4
2 7 .0
5 9 .3

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0
6 .9
3 0 .7
31. 1
19.0
8 .6
3 .2
.2
.3

1 0 .6
3 6 .5
21 .5
1 8 .0
7. 1
6.1
.2
*

PE BCENT
A LL

S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

- -

ST O PPA G E S

1 0 0.0

1 0 0 .C

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 3 .4
3 9 .2
23 .8
13 .4
4. 3
5 .0
.5
.3

1 3 .3
4 2 .6
2 1 .C
9 .5
8. 2
4 .0
•7
.8

1 4.8
4 1 .5
2 2 .8
1 0 .8
4 .6
4 .6
.3
.7

1 5 .4
3 6 .3
2 4 .0
1 2 .9
6 .8
4 .3
.3

15 .3
4 0 .5
2 0 .4
9.1
7 .6
5 .7
.6
.8

DISTRIBUTION

—

WORKE RS

INVOLVED

A LL

10 0 .0

100 .0

10 0 .0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

10 0 .0

10 0 .0

.4
5 .6
11 .5
14 .7
12.4
2 2 .4
5 .6
27.4

.5
7 .5
2 1 .2
3 1 .1
1 4.8
1 5 .0
1 0 .0

.3
4 .8
15 .2
1 9 .4
1 6 .7
1 9 .1
4. 1
2 0 .3

.4
6 .4
1 0 .8
2 0 .8
1 5 .5
4 2 .3
3 .8

~

.5
5.7
10.4
1 2 .9
7 .9
2 6 .5
8 .0
28 .2

.4
4 .7
6 .6
6 .9
12.1
17 .0
9 .3
42 .9

.5
5 .7
9 .4
9 .7
8 .4
19.1
4 .8
4 2 .3

.8
6 .9
1 5 .2
17 .6
17 .3
2 9 .9
1 2 .3

.4
4 .5
7 .3
6 .8
1 2.3
24.4
9 .0
35.3

PEBCENT

6 AMD OMDBB 2 0 ..................................................................................
2 0 AMD OMDEB 1 0 0 ...........................................................................
1 0 0 AMD O ND EB 2 5 0 ........................................................................
2 5 0 AND O ND EB 5 0 0 ........................................................................
5 0 0 AMD O ND EB 1 0 0 0 .....................................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AMD ONDEB 5 , 0 0 0 ............................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AMD OMDEB 1 0 , 0 0 0 ........................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AMD O V E R . . . .....................................................................

10 0 .0

DISTR IB U TIO N

S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

10 0 .0

100 .0

6 AMD OMDEB 2 0 ..................................................................................
2 0 AND ONDEB 1 0 0 ...........................................................................
1 0 0 AND OMDEB 2 5 0 ........................................................................
2 5 0 AMD U ND ER 5 0 0 ........................................................................
5 0 0 AMD OMDEB 1 0 0 0 .....................................................................
1 , 0 0 0 ADD ONDEB 5 , 0 0 0 ............................................. ..
5 , 0 0 0 AMD ONDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ........................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AMD O V E R ...............................................................................

.6
6 .3
1 0.7
1 1.2
1 3.8
2 4 .8
7 .4
2 5 .3

.5
7. 5
2 1 .2
31 .1
14 .8
1 5 .0
1 0 .0

1 T o ta ls in this

10 0 .0
.3
5. 1
1 6 .0
2 0 .1
1 7 .6
2 0 .0
6 .6
1 4 .4

tab le d iffe r fr o m th o se in p re c e d in g ta b le s b e c a u s e •
th e se sto p p age s ended d urin g the y e a r , and thus include id le n e ss o c c u r r ing in p r io r y e a r s .




- -

D AT S

IDLE

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

10 0 .0

.4
7 .4
11 .6
22.2
1 6 .8
4 0 .2
1 .2

.5
6 .2
1 0.7
13.2
7 .8
26 .3
8 .0
2 7 .4

.5
6 .2
8 .7
8 .6
17 .0
1 9 .7
11 .C
28.3

.6
7 .2
11 .9
12 .5
9 .9
2 3 .4
5 .8
28 .7

.8
7 .3
1 5 .6
1 7 .8
1 8 .3
2 9 .8
10 .4

.5
5 .5
8 .9
8 .0
1 4 .0
2 4 .9
9 .6
2 8 .5

"

N O T E : B e c a u s e of rounding, su m s of in d ivid u al ite m s m a y not eq ual <
to ta ls . D a sh e s (-) denote z e r o s ,

12




Table 4. Work stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more, 1927-75
( WO BK BB S AMD D A T S

ID LE

II

TH00SA1PS)

R OB K B B S I B V O L V B D

YBBB
M0 HBBB

I0 H B B B

O AT S

IOLB

O O B I B O T BA B

P B B C B N T OF
T O T A L F OB
TFAB

I0 H B B B

P B B C B B T OF
T OTAL FOB
T BA B

PB BCBBT O F
B S T . TOTAL
■OBKIIG
TIH B 1 /

1 9 2 7 .....................................................
1 9 2 8 .....................................................
1 9 2 9 .....................................................
1 9 3 0 .....................................................
1 9 3 1 .....................................................

1
5
1
1
6

165
137
15
30
122

5 0 .0
4 3 .6
5 .2
16.4
3 7 .7

9 ,737
10 ,0 8 6
195
270
1,9 5 4

3 7 .2
8 0 .0
3 .6
8 .1
28.4

.1 4
.14
(2)
(2)
.0 3

1 9 3 2 .....................................................
1 9 3 3 .....................................................
1 9 3 4 .....................................................
1 9 3 5 .....................................................
1 9 3 6 .....................................................

7
17
18
9
8

140
429
725
516
169

4 3 .2
3 6 .7
4 9 .3
4 6 .1
2 1 .4

5 ,3 3 7
5 ,1 9 9
7 ,4 8 8
4 ,5 2 3
2 ,8 9 3

5 0 .8
30.7
3 8 .2
2 9 .2
2 0 .8

.12
.1 1
.1 5
.08
.0 4

1 9 3 7 .....................................................
1 9 3 8 .....................................................
1 9 3 9 .....................................................
1 9 4 0 .....................................................
1 9 4 1 .....................................................

26
2
8
4
29

528
39
572
57
1 ,0 7 0

28
5
48
9
45

.4
.7
.9
.9
.3

9 ,1 1 0
171
5 ,7 3 1
331
9 ,344

3 2 .1
1 .9
32.2
4 .9
4 0 .6

.14
(2)
.0 9
(2)
.13

1 9 4 2 .....................................................
1 9 4 3 .....................................................
1 9 4 4 .....................................................
1 9 4 5 .....................................................
1 9 4 6 .....................................................

6
10
16
42
31

74
737
350
1 ,3 5 0
2 ,9 2 0

3
1
3
6

8
7
6
8
3

.8
.2
.5
.9
.6

245
9,4 2 7
1 ,2 5 9
1 9,300
6 6 ,4 0 0

5 .9
6 9 .8
1 4 .4
5 0 .7
5 7 .2

(2)
.10
.0 1
.2 4
.8 2

1 9 4 7 .....................................................
1 9 4 8 .....................................................
1 9 4 9 ....................................................
1 9 5 0 .....................................................
1 9 5 1 .....................................................

15
20
18
22
19

1 ,0 3 0
870
1 ,9 2 0
738
457

47
44
63
30
20

.5
.5
.2
.7
.6

17,7 0 0
1 8 ,9 0 0
3 4 ,9 0 0
2 1 ,7 0 0
5 ,6 8 0

51.2
5 5 .3
6 9 .0
5 6 .0
2 4 .8

.21
.20
.41
.2 5
.57

1 9 5 2 .....................................................
1 9 5 3 .....................................................
1 9 5 4 .....................................................
1 9 5 5 .....................................................
1 9 5 6 ....................................................

35
28
18
26
12

1,6 9 0
650
437
1 ,2 1 0
758

4 7 .8
27. 1
2 8 .5
4 5 .6
3 9 .9

3 6 ,9 0 0
7 ,2 7 0
7,5 2 0
12,3 0 0
19 ,6 0 0

6 2 .6
25.7
33.3
4 3 .4
59 .1

.3 6
.0 7
.0 7
.1 1
.1 7

1 9 5 7 .....................................................
1 9 5 8 ....................................................
1 9 5 9 .....................................................
1 9 6 0 .....................................................
1 9 6 1 .....................................................

13
21
20
17
14

283
823
845
384
601

2 0 .4
4 0 .0
4 5 .0
2 9 .2
4 1 .4

3 ,0 5 0
10 ,6 0 0
5 0 ,8 0 0
7 ,140
4 ,950

1 8 .5
4 4 .2
7 3 .7
3 7 .4
3 0 .4

.2
.1
.4
.0
.0

1 9 6 2 .....................................................
1 9 6 3 .....................................................
1 9 6 4 .....................................................
1 9 6 5 ....................................................
1 9 6 6 .....................................................

16
7
18
21
26

318
102
607
387
600

2 5 .8
1 0 .8
3 7 .0
2 5 .0
3 0 .7

4 ,800
3 ,5 4 0
7,9 9 0
6 ,070
7 ,2 9 0

2 5 .8
2 2 .0
34.8
2 6 .0
2 8 .7

.04
.03
.0 6
.05
.05

1 9 6 7 .....................................................
1 9 6 8 .....................................................
1 9 6 9 .....................................................
1 9 7 0 .....................................................
1 9 7 1 .....................................................

28
32
25
34
29

1 ,3 4 0
994
668
1 ,6 5 3
1,9 0 1

4 6 .5
37 .5
2 6 .9
5 0 .0
5 8 .0

2 1 ,4 0 0
2 0 ,5 1 4
1 7 ,8 5 3
3 5 ,4 4 0
2 3 ,1 5 2

5 0 .7
4 1 .8
4 1 .6
5 3 .4
4 8 .6

.1 5
.1 2
.1 0
.2 0
.1 3

1 9 7 2 .....................................................
1 9 7 3 .....................................................
1 9 7 4 .....................................................
1 9 7 5 .....................................................

18
25
27
20

390
713
836
474

2 2 .7
3 1 .7
3 0 .1
2 7 .2

7,4 9
6 ,06
1 2,86
7 ,48

2
2
2
2

.0 4
.03
.06
.04

9
2
1
2

7
1
6
4

.7
.7
.8
.0

L e s s th a n 0 .0 0 5 p e r c e n t .

S ee fo o tn o te 3, ta b le 1,

13

6
0
5
6
4

Table 5. Work stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1975
B eg in n in g
d a te

A p p r o x im a te
d u r a tio n
(c a le n d a r
d a y s)1

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s)
an d lo c a tio n (s )

ate
- U nion(s) -in v -o lv-e d 2- - FAn-p pmro xeim of- - - - - - - u -b rw o rk e rs
in v o lv e d 3

M a jo r t e r m s o f s e t t l e m e n t 4

P h ila d e lp h ia F o o d
S to r e E m p lo y e r s
C o u n cil—P e n n s y l­
v a n ia , N ew J e r s e y ,
D e la w a re

R e ta il C le rk s
I n te r n a tio n a l
A s s o c ia tio n

17, 700

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t n e g o tia te d on J a n u a r y 2 7 , 1975, p r o ­
v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e s o f 1 3 .9 - 16 p e r c e n t e f fe c tiv e J a n ­
u a r y 19, 1975, 4 - 5 . 6 p e r c e n t on J a n u a r y 18, 1976, an d 4 6. 5 p e r c e n t on J a n u a r y 16, 1977; d o u b le -tim e fo r S unday
w o r k (w as d o u b le - tim e an d a h a lf); c o s t - o f - l i v in g c la u s e
w a s e s ta b lis h e d ; i m p r o v e m e n ts in v a c a tio n a n d h o lid a y
p r o v i s i o n s ; g e n e r a l im p r o v e m e n ts in p e n s io n an d m e d i c a l
p la n s in c lu d in g fu ll v e s tin g a f te r 10 y e a r s .

B u rlin g to n N o r th e r n
R a i l r o a d , Inc;
L o u is v ille an d N a s h ­
v ille R a ilro a d ;
C h e s a p e a k e a n d O hio
R a ilw a y C o. — 22
S ta te s

I n te r n a tio n a l B r o t h e r ­
hoo d of B o ilm a k e r s ,
I r o n S hip B u ild e r s ,
B la c k s m ith s , F o r ­
g e r s , an d H e lp e r s ;
B ro th e rh o o d of
R a ilw a y C a rm e n
of th e U n ite d S ta te s
an d C a n a d a ; I n t e r ­
n a tio n a l B r o t h e r ­
h o o d of E l e c t r i c a l
W o rk e rs; In te r n a ­
tio n a l B ro th e rh o o d
of F ir e m e n an d
O ile rs

2 2 ,4 0 0

S tr ik e p r e c i p i ta t e d by l a c k of p r o g r e s s in i n d u s tr y w a g e
n e g o tia tio n s in W a s h in g to n , D. C.
W o rk e rs re tu r n e d a t
u rg in g of u n io n l e a d e r s h i p .

23

B itu m in o u s c o a l
in d u s tr y — V ir g in ia ,
W e s t V irg in ia ,
O hio

U n ite d M ine W o r k e rs
of A m e r ic a ( I n d .

1 1 ,4 0 0

W ild c a t s t r i k e o v e r u n io n 's d e la y in d i s tr i b u ti n g b itu m in o u s
co a l c o n tra c t.
No f o r m a l s e ttle m e n t.

93

M cD o n n ell D o u g las
C o r p .—M is s o u r i,
C a lif o r n ia , F lo r id a

I n te r n a tio n a l A s s o c i a ­
tio n o f M a c h in is ts
and A e ro sp ac e
W o r k e rs

1 8 ,7 0 0

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d fo r w a g e i n c r e a s e s of 5 p e r c e n t
e f fe c tiv e S e p te m b e r , 1974, 3 p e r c e n t in S e p te m b e r , 1975
an d S e p te m b e r , 1976; o t h e r t e r m s g e n e r a l l y s i m i l a r to
M cD o n n ell D o u g la s -A u to W o r k e r s s e t t l e m e n t (S ee C u r r e n t
W age D e v e lo p m e n ts , A p r il 1975, p . 17).

M ar. 5

48

N o r th A m e r ic a n
C o al C o r p o r a tio n —
O hio, We s t V ir g in ia ,
P e n n s y lv a n ia

U n ite d M ine W o r k e rs
o f A m e r ic a (In d .)

1 4 ,3 0 0

S a fe ty d is p u te in v o lv in g i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f " h e l p e r " c l a u s e .
I s s u e w a s r e te n t io n o f s e c o n d m a n on r o o f b o lt m a c h in e .
A r b it r a t io n s e t t l e d d is p u te .

A pr. 1

68

A s s o c i a te d G e n e ra l
C o n tr a c to r s of
A m e r ic a In c . ;
M e tro P a v e r s an d
H e a v y H ighw ay C o n ­
tr a c to r s A s s o c ia ­
tio n —M a r y la n d

U n ite d B ro th e rh o o d of
C a r p e n t e r s an d J o i n ­
e r s of A m e r ic a (C JA );
L a b o r e rs ' In te rn a tio n ­
a l U nion of N o r th A m e r i c a (LIU N A ); In ­
te r n a t io n a l U nion of
O p e ra tin g E n g in e e rs
(IOUE)

1 0 ,0 0 0

Jan.

13

15

Jan .

27

1

F eb.

10

F eb.

10

)

C JA :

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e of 90
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e A p r il 1, 1975, 88 c e n ts
on A p r il 1, 1976; 59 c e n ts p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n
to p e n s io n fund e f fe c tiv e A p r il 1, 1975 (w as 60
c e n ts ) , 69 c e n ts on A p r il 1, 1976; 65 c e n ts p e r
h o u r c o n trib u tio n to h e a lth an d w e lf a r e fu n d (w as
60. c e n ts ) , 75 c e n ts on A p r il 1, 1976; w a g e r e ­
o p e n e r on A p r il 1, 1977.

L IU N A : 2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f 75
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e A p r il 1, 1975, an d 75
c e n ts on A p r il 1, 1976.
IO U E :

M ay 1

35

M ay 1

154

June

13

50

B u ild in g C o n tr a c to r s
of N ew J e r s e y N ew J e r s e y

U n ite d B ro th e rh o o d
C a r p e n t e r s and
J o i n e r s of A m e r ic a

1 2 ,0 0 0

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e of 45 c e n ts p e r
h o u r e f fe c tiv e M ay 1, 1975,
30 c e n ts on D e c e m b e r 1,
1975, 60 c e n ts 2nd y e a r , an d 69 c e n ts 3 rd y e a r .

N o r th T e x a s C o n tr a c ­
t o r s A s s o c ia tio n —
T exas

I n te r n a tio n a l A s s o c i a ­
tio n o f B rid g e , S tr u c ­
tu ra l, and O rn am en ­
ta l Iro n w o rk e rs
(BSOIW ); L a b o r e r s '
I n t e r n a tio n a l U nion
of N o r th A m e r ic a ;
U n ite d B ro th e rh h o d
of C a r p e n t e r s an d
J o i n e r s of A m e r ic a ;
U n ite d A s s o c ia tio n
of J o u rn e y m e n an d
A p p r e n tic e s of th e
P lu m b in g an d P ip e fittin g In d u s tr y of
th e U n ite d S ta te s
an d C a n a d a ( P P F )

2 6 ,0 0 0

BSOIW : 2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w age i n c r e a s e o f 80
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e M ay 8, 1975, 4 6 .5 c e n ts
on M ay 1, 1976, an d 46 c e n ts on N o v e m b e r 1, 1976.

U n ite d B ro th e rh o o d of
C a r p e n t e r s an d J o i n ­
e r s o f A m e r ic a ; L a ­
b o r e r s ' I n t e r n a tio n a l
U n io n o f N o r th A m e r i ­
c a ; I n te r n a tio n a l
B r o th e rh o o d o f T e a m ­
s t e r , C h a u ff e u rs ,
W a re h o u s e m e n an d
H e lp e r s of A m e r ic a
( I B T - I n d .); I n t e r ­
n a tio n a l U n io n of
O p e ra tin g E n g in e e r s

1 5 ,0 0 0

C o n s tr u c tio n C o n ­
t r a c t o r s C o u n c il,
In c . — a sh in g t o n ,
W
D. C.

S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d of t a b le .




2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e of $1
p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e A p r il 1, 1975, 91 c e n ts on
A p r il 1, 1976; 65 c e n ts p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to
p e n s io n fund e f fe c tiv e O c to b e r 1, 1975 (w as 50
c e n ts ) ; 65 c e n ts p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to h e a l th
a n d w e lf a r e fund e f fe c tiv e A p r il 1, 197B (w as 50
c e n ts ) ; 21 c e n ts p e r h o u r fo r e i t h e r p e n s io n o r
h e a l th an d w e lf a r e fund e f fe c tiv e A p r il 1, 1976
o r O c to b e r 1, 1976.

14

LIU N A : 3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w age i n c r e a s e s of 35
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 8, 1975, an d 40
c e n ts on M ay 1, 1976 an d M ay 1, 1977.
C JA :

3 3 -m o n th a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e of
40 c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 30, 1975, 40
c e n ts on N o v e m b e r 1, 1976, M ay 1, 1977, a n d
N o v e m b e r 1, 1977, 5 c e n ts on N o v e m b e r 1, 1975,
a n d 75 c e n ts on M ay 1, 1976.

PPF:

2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f 40
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 9, 1975, 40 c e n ts
on N o v e m b e r 1, 1975, M ay 1, 1976, an d N o v ­
e m b e r 1, 1976.

C JA :

1 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f
$ 1 .0 5 -$ 1. 095 p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e M ay 1, 1975; 49
c e n ts p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to p e n s io n fund (w as
3 9 c e n ts ) ; 50 c e n ts p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to h e a l th
an d w e lf a r e fund (w as 35 c e n ts ) .

LIU N A : 3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f 6 0 75 c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u n e 1, 1975; 35 c e n ts
p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to h e a lth an d w e lf a r e fund
(w as 28 c e n ts ) ; 2 n d-and 3 r d - y e a r i n c r e a s e s to
m a t c h th o s e o f c a r p e n t e r s an d o p e r a tin g e n g i­
n e e rs.

Tahte 5. W ork stoppages involving 10.000 wnricnrs nr mnra beginning in 197S—Continued
B eg in n in g
d a te

A p p r o x im a te
d u r a tio n
(c a le n d a r
d a y s )1

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s)
an d lo c a tio n (s )

\ j n i o n ( s) in y o lv e d 2

A p p r o x im a te
n u m b e r of
w o rk e rs
in v o lv e d 3

M a jo r t e r m s o f s e t t l e m e n t 4

IB T :

J u n e 16

35

J u ly 1

149

J u ly 1

20

J u ly 1

J u ly 1

14

16

3 3 -m o n th a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e of
6 5 -7 0 c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e M ay 8, 1975, 5 0 60 c e n ts on M ay 1, 1976, 6 5 -7 5 c e n ts on M ay 1,
1977, an d 10 c e n ts on S e p te m b e r 1, 1977; 4 2 .5
c e n ts p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to p e n s io n fund e f fe c ­
tiv e S e p te m b e r 1, 1976 (w as 25 c e n ts ) ; 4 1. 5 c e n ts
p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to h e a lth an d w e lf a r e fund
e f fe c tiv e S e p te m b e r 1, 1975 (w as 25 c e n ts ) .

IU O E :

J u n e 13—
C o n tin u e d

1 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f 65
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e M ay 1, 1975, an d 10
c e n ts on N o v e m b e r 1, 1975.

C JA :

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f 50
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 1975, 20 c e n ts on
O c to b e r 1, 1975, 60 c e n ts on M ay 1, 1976, and
65 c e n ts on M ay 1, 1977.

U n ite d B ro th e rh o o d
of C a r p e n t e r s an d
J o i n e r s of A m e r ic a ;
I n te r n a tio n a l A s s o ­
c ia tio n of B rid g e ,
S tr u c t u r a l, an d O r n a ­
m e n ta l Ir o n w o r k e r s ;
B ric k la y e rs , M asons,
an d P l a s t e r s ' I n t e r ­
n a tio n a l U nion of
N o r th A m e r ic a (BM P);
L a b o r e rs ' In te r n a ­
tio n a l U nion of N o r th
A m e r ic a

15, 000

G e n e r a l D y n a m ic s E l e c t r i c B o at
D iv is io n —G r o to n ,
C o n n e c tic u t

M e ta l T r a d e s C o u n c il

1 0 ,0 0 0

4 3 -m o n th a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e of
13 p e r c e n t e f fe c tiv e N o v e m b e r 30, 1975, 6 p e r c e n t in N ov­
e m b e r 1976, N o v e m b e r 1977, a n d N o v e m b e r 1978; c o s t o f- liv in g a d ju s tm e n t (no fo r m u la ) i n c r e a s e s o f 18 c e n ts
p e r h o u r on J u l y 1, 1976, 10 c e n ts on M ay 2 8 , 1978; i m ­
p r o v e m e n ts in p e n s io n fund, s ic k n e s s , h o s p ita liz a tio n ,
an d d e n ta l p la n s .

S ta te o f P e n n s y lv a n ia

A m e r ic a n F e d e r a t i o n
of S ta te , C o u n ty ,
an d M u n ic ip a l E m ­
p lo y e e s (A FSCM E);
P e n n s y lv a n ia E m ­
p lo y m e n t S e c u r ity
E m p lo y e e s A s s o c i a ­
tio n ( P E S E A - I n d .);
P e n n s y lv a n ia S o c ia l
S e r v ic e s U nion
(P S S U - In d .)

5 2 ,7 0 0

A F S C M E : 2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e of 16
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e M ay 1975, 11 c e n ts in
J a n u a r y 1976, an d 30 c e n ts in J u ly 1976; 12 c e n ts
p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to h e a lth a n d w e lf a r e fund
(w as 6 c e n ts ) .

I n te r n a tio n a l U nion
of O p e ra tin g E n g i ­
n e e r s ; I n t e r n a tio n a l
A s s o c ia tio n of B rid g e ,
S tr u c t u r a l, an d O r n a ­
m e n ta l Ir o n w o r k e r s

1 2 ,0 0 0

A s s o c ia te d G e n e ra l
L a b o r e r s ' I n t e r n a tio n a l
C o n tr a c to r s o f
U nion o f N o r th A m e r i ­
c a ; U n ite d B r o t h e r ­
A m e r ic a , In c . ;
hood of C a r p e n t e r s
A s s o c ia te d S te e l
a n d J o i n e r s of A m e r i ­
E r e c t o r s an d H e av y
E q u ip m e n t O p e r a t o r s , c a ; I n te r n a tio n a l
I n c .— e o rg ia
G
A s s o c ia tio n o f B rid g e ,
S tr u c t u r a l, an d O r n a ­
m e n ta l I r o n w o r k e r s ;
I n te r n a tio n a l U nion
of O p e ra tin g
E n g in e e rs

1 0 ,0 0 0

A m e r ic a n G e n e ra l
C o n tr a c to r s o f
M in n e s o ta ; M in n e ­
s o ta C o n c re te a n d
M a s o n r y C o n tr a c to r s
A s s o c ia tio n ; M in n e ­
a p o lis B u ild e rs
A s s o c i a ti o n - i n t r a ­
s ta te - M in n e s o ta

A s s o c ia te d G e n e ra l
C o n tr a c to r s of
N ew J e r s e y — ew
N
Jersey

BSOIW : 3 - y e a r c o n t r a c t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f 60
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 1975, 20 c e n ts on
O c to b e r 1, 1975, 75 c e n ts on M ay 1, 1976, and
75 c e n ts on M ay 1, 1977.
B M P:

Id e n tic a l to C JA .

LIU N A : 3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f 50
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 1975, 15 c e n ts on
O c to b e r 1, 1975, 50 c e n ts on M ay 1, 1976 an d
M ay 1, 1977.

P E S E A : 2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n ts p ro v id e d fo r w a g e i n c r e a s e s
PSSU : o f 3 .5 p e r c e n t e f fe c tiv e J u ly 1975, 2. 5 p e r c e n t
a n d 6 p e r c e n t in J u ly 1976; 12 c e n ts p e r h o u r
c o n tiru b tio n to h e a lth an d w e lf a r e fund (w as 4
c e n ts ) .
IU O E :

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f 80
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 1975, 8 p e r c e n t
w a g e i n c r e a s e J u ly 1976 a n d J u ly 1977.

BSOIW: 2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e of 80
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 1, 1975, 90 c e n ts
on J u ly 1, 1976; $ 1 p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to v a c a ­
tio n fund (w as 95 c e n ts ) ; $ 1. 12 p e r h o u r c o n t r i ­
b u tio n to h e a lth an d w e lf a r e fund (w as 67 c e n ts ) ;
$ 1. 20 p e r h o u r c o n trib u tio n to a n n u ity fund (w as
$ 1. 15).
LIU N A : 2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e of 15
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 17, 1975, 15 c e n ts
on J a n u a r y 17, 1976, 20 c e n ts on J u ly 1, 1976,
an d 35 c e n ts on J a n u a r y 1, 1977.
C JA :

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w age i n c r e a s e o f 15
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 18, 1975, 20 c e n ts
on J a n u a r y 1, 1976, 30 c e n ts on J u ly 1, 1.976,
a n d 35 c e n ts on J a n u a r y 1, 1977.

BSOIW : 3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e s o f 15
c e n ts p e r h o u r e f fe c tiv e J u ly 1, 1975, 20 c e n ts
on J a n u a r y 1, 1976, 30 c e n ts on J u ly 1, 1976,
an d 35 c e n ts on J a n u a r y 1, 1977.
IU O E :

2 -y e a r

a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e of 15

c e n ts e ffe c tiv e Ju ly

1,
1,

1,

19 7 5 ,

20

c e n ts

1976, an d 30 c e n ts on J u ly 1,
1977.

on Ja n u a r y

1976 an d J u ly

A ug.

11

43

B itu m in o u s C o al
I n d u s tr y - W e s t
V ir g in ia , T e n ­
n e s s e e , P e n n s y l­
v a n ia , Ohio, K e n ­
tu c k y , A la b a m a ,
V irg in ia , In d ia n a

U n ite d M ine W o r k e rs
of A m e r ic a ( I n d .).

61, 900

G e n e ra l s t r i k e o v e r d e la y s in im p le m e n tin g g r ie v a n c e p r o ­
c e d u re .
S e c o n d a ry i s s u e s w e r e a lle g e d s a f e ty v i o la tio n s .
No f o r m a l s e t t l e m e n t .

S e p t.

3

15

B o a rd of E d u c a tio n
of th e C ity of
C h ic a g o — h ic a g o ,
C
Illin o is

C h ic a g o T e a c h e r s
U nion

2 7, 500

1 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t w h ic h i n c r e a s e d s a l a r y l e v e ls to a ra n g e
o f $ 11, 000 to $ 2 2 ,6 0 0 (w as $ 1 0 ,6 0 0 to $ 2 0 ,9 9 6 ); c l a s s
s iz e k e p t to m a x im u m of 32 s tu d e n ts in s o m e s c h o o ls ;
d e n ta l in s u r a n c e p r o g r a m e s t a b l i s h e d ; 1 ,5 2 5 te a c h in g jo b s
to b e e l i m in a te d , w e r e r e ta i n e d .

S e p t.

9

8

N ew Y o rk C ity B o a rd
A m e r ic a n F e d e r a t i o n
of E d u c a tio n — ew
N
of T e a c h e r s
Y o rk C ity , N ew Y o rk

6 3 ,0 0 0

2 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d c o s t-o f -liv in g i n c r e a s e s fo r
a l l t e a c h e r s , lo n g e v ity i n c r e a s e s w h e re d u e , an d r e s t o r a ­
tio n of c l a s s s iz e m a x im u m .

O c t.

16

2

S o u th e rn P a c if ic
R a ilr o a d — outhw e s t
S
an d F a r W e st

3 0 ,0 0 0

S tr ik e fo llo w e d b re a k d o w n o f ta lk s in v o lv in g y e a r-lo n g d i s ­
p u te c o n c e rn in g r e a s s i g n m e n t of e m p lo y e e s .
S tr ik e w a s
e n jo in e d .
W o r k e rs r e tu r n e d .

B ro th e rh o o d o f R a i l ­
w a y , A ir l i n e , an d
S te a m s h ip C le r k s ,
F r e i g h t H a n d le r s ,
E x p r e s s an d S ta tio n
E m p lo y e e s

S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d o f t a b le .




15

Table 5. Work stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1975—Continued
B e g in n in g
d a te
O c t. 28

D ec.

6

A p p r o x im a te
d u r a tio n
( c a le n d a r
d a y s)1
3

16

E s ta b lis h m e n t( s ) 1
an d lo c a tio n (s )
W e s te r n E l e c t r i c ,
I n c .— ew Y o rk
N

U nion( s) in v o lv e d 2

C o m m u n ic a tio n
W o r k e r s o f A m e r ic a

U n ite d A i r l i n e s , I n c .— I n te r n a tio n a l A s s o c i a ­
N a tio n w id e
tio n o f M a c h in is ts
an d A e r o s p a c e
W o rk ers

1 In c lu d e s n o n w o r k d a y s , s u c h a s S a tu r d a y s , S u n d a y s , an d e s t a ­
b lis h e d h o lid a y s .
2 T h e u n io n s l i s t e d a r e th o s e d i r e c t ly in v o lv e d in th e d is p u te
b u t th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d m a y in c lu d e m e m b e r s o f o th e r
u n io n s o r n o n u n io n w o r k e r s id le d by d is p u te s in th e s a m e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
T h e u n io n s a r e a f f ilia te d w ith th e A F L -C IO , e x c e p t w h e re th e y a r e n o te d
a s in d e p e n d e n t ( I n d .).




16

'A p p r o x im a te
n u m b er of
w o rk e rs
in v o lv e d 3

M a jo r t e r m s o f s e t t l e m e n t 4

1 4 ,2 0 0

W ild c a t s t r i k e c a u s e d by j u r i s d i c t i o n a l d is p u te c o n c e rn in g
i n s ta l la t io n o f f i r e d e te c tio n s y s t e m s .
No fo rm a l s e ttle ­
m e n t.

3 0 ,2 0 0

3 - y e a r a g r e e m e n t p ro v id e d w a g e i n c r e a s e o f 5 p e r c e n t
e f fe c tiv e N o v e m b e r 1975, 4. 7 p e r c e n t on J u ly 1, 1976,
2 . 8 p e r c e p t o n J a n u a r y 1, 1977. 4 .3 p e r c e n t on J u ly 1,
1977, 3 .4 p e r c e n t on J a n u a r y 1, 1978, an d 2 .2 p e r c e n t
on J u ly 1, 1978; c o s t-o f liv in g c la u s e a d j u s t m e n t i n c r e a s e d
to 12 c e n ts m a x im u m (w a s 10 c e n ts ) ; 4 w e e k s p a id v a c a ­
tio n a f te r 12 y e a r s s e r v ic e (w a s 13 y e a r s ) ; fu ll r e t i r e ­
m e n t a t a g e 62 (w a s 65); im p r o v e m e n ts in s u p p le m e n ta r y
p e n s io n b e n e f its , s i c k l e a v e , s e v e r a n c e p a y .

3 T h e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d i s th e m a x im u m m a d e id le fo r
1 s h if t o r l o n g e r i n e s ta b l i s h m e n t s d i r e c t ly in v o lv e d in a s to p p a g e . T h is
d o e s n o t m e a s u r e th e i n d i r e c t o r s e c o n d a r y e f f e c t on o t h e r e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n ts o r i n d u s tr i e s w h o s e e m p lo y e e s a r e m a d e i d le a s a r e s u l t o f
m a te r ia l o r .s e r v ic e sh o rta g e s .
4 A d a p te d l a r g e l y f r o m C u r r e n t W age D e v e lo p m e n ts , p u b lis h e d
m o n th ly b y th e B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta t is t i c s .

Table 6. Work stoppages by industry group and size, 1975
IN DUST RY

GROUP

6
AND UNDER
20
H O R KE R S

TOTAL

20
AND UNDER
100
H O R K ER S

100
AND UNDER
250
H OR KE RS
STOPPAGES

ALL

250
UNDER
500
H O R KE R S

AND

BEGINNING

500
AND UNDER
1 ,0 0 0
H O R KE B S
IN

1,0 0 0
5 ,0 0 0
AND UNDER AND UNDER
5 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,0 0 0
H O RK E RS
H OR KE RS

1 0 ,0 0 0
H OR KB RS
OR
MORE

YE AR

I N D U S T R I E S .................................................................

1 /5 ,0 3 1

614

1 ,8 8 2

1,2 3 6

743

321

198

17

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................................................

1 /1 ,8 9 7

194

803

481

224

118

74

1

2

_

2
69
-

1
42
-

1
20
-

2
6
-

3
5
-

_

_

-

-

20

O RDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ........................ .....................
FOOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................
T OB AC CO H A N U F A C T U R E S ...........................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ........................................................

9
166
-

24
-

21

6

7

6

1

1

-

-

A P P A R E L , E T C . J / ........................................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R B S .....................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................

55

6

27

14

6

1

1

_

_

61
57
68

8
9
4

20
20
25

20
16
28

6
5
6

3
5
4

4
2
1

-

-

*

47
109

7
15

23
49

5
24

3
14

4
6

5
1

-

-

30

1

9

7

2

7

4

*

-

57
9
140
161
309

1
1
21
6
24

27
5
60
63
170

19
2
42
41
70

6
-

1
-

12
32
26

3
1
4
12
11

1
7
8

-

-

M A CH I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...........................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..............................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 4 / ...........................................................
MISC ELLANEOUS HANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S .

274

27

123

63

25

24

11

1

_

120
137
32
37

14
11
5
4

40
38
11
15

27
37
7
11

23
26
5
5

8
12
2
2

8
11
2

-

-

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G .................................................................

1 /3 ,1 3 4

124

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................
P E TR OL E UM R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................................
R UBBE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...........................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S .......................
P R IM A RY METAL I N D U S T R I E S ..............................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 3 / .................................

420

1 ,0 7 9

755

519

7
1 ,165
600

1
38
102

4
302
215

1
397
105

1
315
75

_
85
40

268
371

67
112

115
189

37
41

16
15

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E . . . .
S E R V I C E S .................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 5 / ..................................................................................

18
228
478

7
57
36

8
105
141

_
41
133

1
13
83

H O RK E RS
ALL

INVOLVED

16

_

1
7

3
7

14
4

13
7

2
1

4
2

1
8
51

(IN

_

24
49

1
4
26

_
-

-

5

3

4 7 4 .0

7 .7

9 8 .0

1 9 7 .3

2 5 9 .6

2 1 8 .3

3 8 2 .3

10 8 .3

H A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................................................

J/4 6 3 .8

2 .5

4 2 .6

73 .7

7 6 .9

81.5

1 5 0 .4

7 .5

O RDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..............................................
FOOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................
T OBA CCO H A N U F A C T U R E S ...........................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S .......................................................

6 .9
2 9 .1
-

.2
6 .8

.3
6 .5

1 .1
3 .9

A P P A R E L , E T C . 2 / ........................................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S .....................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................

.3
-

-

2 .2

.1

.4

5.2
8. 1

_

.3

.6

-

-

-

-

-

10.0

.1

1 .6

2.1

1 .8

.9

3 .5

_

_

1 7 .2
1 1.6
1 2.2

.1
.1
.1

1 .1
1 .1
1 .3

2 .8
2 .5
4 .5

1 .9
1 .8
2 .2

1 .8
3 .9
2 .6

9 .5
2.1
1 .6

-

-

13 .5
1 7.7

.1
.2

1.1
2 .7

.8
3 .6

1 .0
4 .9

2 .7
4.1

8 .0
2 .2

-

-

(6)

.5

.9

.8

5 .5

12 .7

(6 )
(6 )

2.9
.3
6 .5
6 .5
1 0 .7

2 .0

.3
.1
.3

1.4
.2
2 .8
3 .6
8 .7

-

-

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................
P E TR O L EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................................

2 0 .4

RU BB ER AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S .....................
P R I M A R Y METAL I N D U S T R I E S ..............................................
F A B R I C A T E D M ET AL P R O D U C T S 3 / .................................

1 0.4
1 .0
1 7.6
4 2 .6
4 8 .6

1 .9

3 .8
1 0 .5
9 .1

2 .1
.5
2 .7
8 .1
8 .1

1 .5
1 3 .7
1 1 .7

-

-

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...........................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..............................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 4 / ...........................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S MA N UF AC TU RI N G I N D U S T R I E S .

7 4 .4

.3

6 .6

9 .6

8 .7

1 6 .9

3 4 .0
7 7 .9
1 0 .7
5 .8

.2
.1
.1
.1

2 .4
2 .3
.6
.9

3 .8
5 .8
1.0
1.5

8. 4
9 .4
1 .7
1 .8

5 .2
7 .9
1 .2
1 .5

1 4 .0
2 3 .7
6 .1

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G .................................................................

1 /1 ,2 8 1 .8

5 .2

5 5 .4

12 3 .7

1 8 2 .7

13 6 .8

2 3 1 .8

.2
67.6
1 5.9

.3
113 .5
2 5 .4

5 .9
5 .9

5 .3
5 .2

-

*

*

2 4 .8

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . .
M I N I N G ........................................................................................................
CO NT RA CT C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , CO MMUNICATION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S .
H H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ........................................
F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E . . . .
S E R V I C E S ..................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 5 / .............................. ...................................................

.7
39 1 .6
3 0 8 .0

.5
1.1

.2
1 7 .3
1 1 .1

1 6 6 .8
6 3 .4

.9
1 .4

5 .3
8 .3

3.0
2 9 .9
31 8 .5

(6)

.7

.4
5.1

.5

.1

7 .7

S ee fo o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b le .




2 8 .7
_

-

-

1.0

_

THOUSANDS)

1 /1 ,7 4 5 .6

. 1
3 .3

18

_

I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................................

-

2
-

*

203

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . .
M I N I N G ........................................................................................................
C ON TR AC T C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , CO MMUNICATION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S .
H H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ........................................

-

17

_
6 .2
2 1 .9

. 4
4. 1
2 8 .6

7 .5
~
1 0 0 .8

_
2 8 .7
44 5 .4

_

_

_

5 5 .4
2 5 .1

4 0 .3
88. 1

9 .4
4 1 .3

8 7 .6
1 00.0

28.4
15 .8

15 .8
5 .0

9 5 .8
18 .7

1 .4
8 .0
4 9 .9

29.4

-

9 .4
3 .0
.6
5 .8
3 7 .4

_

_
14 3 .2

Table 6b Work stoppages by industry group and size, 1975—Continued
IND USTRY

G ROUP

TOTAL

6
AND UNDER
20
WORKERS

20
100
AND UN DE R AND UNDER
100
250
HORKERS
H O R KE R S
DA YS

ALL

I N D U S T R I E S .................................................................

ID LE

250
AND UNDER
500
H O R KE R S

DURING

YEAR

(IN

500
AND U ND ER
1 ,0 0 0
WORKERS

1 ,0 0 0
AND UNDER
5 ,0 0 0
H ORK ERS

5 ,0 0 0
AND UNDER
1 0 ,0 0 0
H O RK E RS

1 0 ,0 0 0
WORKERS
OR
MORE

T H OU S AN D S)

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................................................

17 8 .5

1 ,9 1 9 .3

3 ,1 5 7 .5

3 ,7 1 6 .8

4 ,7 0 1 .5

7 ,2 6 8 .1

2 ,8 1 3 .1

7 ,4 8 2 .0

6 6 .2

1 /3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

1 ,1 4 2 .2

2 ,1 7 1 .6

2 ,5 2 9 . 1

3 ,3 5 6 .5

3 ,2 6 7 .8

2 2 1 .5

2 ,1 2 1 .2

.5
6 7 .4
-

1 6.5
1 7 4 .9
-

5 .1
2 8 1 .2
-

7 0 .8
2 4 0 .7
-

100.8
6 5 .6
_

_

_

_

_

_

2 1 .0

-

-

1 1 .7
1 6 0 .3
24 5 .0

5 9 .7
52 .8
83.5

-

1 5.9
18 6 .7

3 6 .2
2 9 1 .6

135 .6
4 2 .7

-

385.1

~

-

5.8

-

_
.

-

*

ORDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..............................................
FOOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................
T O B A CC O M A N U F A C T U R E S ...........................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ........................................................

19 3 .7
8 3 8 .4
2 7 .3

1 .0

3 .6

1 5 .3

5 .6

1 .8

-

A P P A R E L , E T C . 2 / ........................................................ , . . . .
LU BB ER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S .....................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................

109 .5

1 .3

33.0

41.2

9 .4

3 .6

2 8 2 .6
3 5 4 .4
6 2 2 .2

1 .7
3 .4
1 .5

34.4
1 4 .8
4 4 .4

1 0 7 .7
5 1 .0
1 5 9 .8

6 7 .4
7 2 .1
8 8 .2

3 7 .8
8 5 .4

8 .8
13 1 .6

8 .5
-

-

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................................
C H E H I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................
P ET RO L EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................................

2 3 7 .6
7 4 7 .4

3 .2
9 .3

6 1 3 .3

.1

23. 1

33 .9

37 .2

1 3 4 .0

RUBBER AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S *
P R O D U C T S ...........................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S .......................
P R I M A R Y METAL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................... ...
F A B R I C A T E D H BT A L P R O D U C T S 3 / .................................

23 8 .1
9 .3
48 4 .3
1 ,1 6 8 .9
1 ,7 7 9 .3

1 .0
.1
6 .1
2 .1
5 .6

5 3 .7
2 .2
8 6 .4
1 1 4 .3
2 3 1 .3

8 3 .9
5 .4
1 6 7 .0
2 1 6 .2
3 7 9 .4

5 3 .8
8 0 .8
4 0 3 .5
3 2 8 .6

3 9 .9
1 .6
1 2 0 .0
34 8 .2
2 9 7 .1

2 4 .0
8 4 .6
5 3 7 .3

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T B L E C T R I C A L .................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..............................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 4 / ...........................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S MA N UF AC TU RI N G I N D U S T R I E S .

2 ,3 7 0 .8

1 1 .7

17 3 .1

2 3 5 .6

3 6 8 .2

73 1 .9

6 2 8 .7

85 0 .7
3 ,4 0 4 .9
28 7 .9
2 5 5 .6

3 .2
3 .4
2 .6
.4

4 3 .3
5 9 .0
1 8 .3
16 .0

1 1 3 .6
1 3 2 .0
3 0 .4
67 .5

228. 1
2 1 1 .1
5 6 .0
30. 2

180. 1
2 2 7 .8
1 5 0 .7
63 .4

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................................

1 /1 6 ,3 6 0 .9

1 1 2 .3

77 7 .2

98 5 .9

1 ,1 8 7 .7

1 .3 4 5 .0

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . .
M I N I N G .........................................................................................................
C O N T RA C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COMMUNICA TION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S .
H H O L E S A L B AND R E T A I L T R A D E ........................................

3 5 .9
1 ,6 4 2 .8
7 ,3 0 7 .3

.6
1 .0
12 .7

4 .0
6 9 .2
1 1 4 .9

2 .0
1 2 2 .7
2 5 7 .1

2 9 .3
2 6 2 .3
4 6 4 .6

1 1 2 .4
45 0 .5

3 ,0 8 9 .0
1 ,4 2 6 .0

2 6 .7
4 3 .4

1 2 4 .8
22 6 .3

13 2 .2
1 8 0 .6

9 3 .5
7 6 .6

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E . . . .
S E R V I C E S ..................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 5 / .................................................................................

169 .0
4 8 6 .6
2 ,2 0 4 .4

4 .3
20.5
3 .2

2 4 .2
1 5 0 .7
6 3 .0

7 /9 .7
113 .4
1 6 8 .2

2 .0
5 8 .9
2 0 0 .6

-

2 8 2 .3
6 5 0 .4
2 9 .9
7 /7 8 .1

2 2 1 .5
-

2 , 1 2 1 .2
-

-

-

2 .5 9 1 .6

5 .3 6 0 .8

2 1 2 .2
1 ,5 6 9 .5

6 0 .3
1 ,3 3 4 .9

8 0 2 .6
3 ,1 0 3 .2

25 5 .0
5 6 .2

1 ,4 9 0 .1
2 6 4 .6

5 9 8 .2
3 8 0 .0

3 6 8 .5
19 8 .2

3 9 .6
7 9 .6
3 5 1 .7

8 9 .3
6 3 .5
3 1 1 .2

.

4 ,0 0 0 .3
.

_
-

_

___ 2'Jbl. ___ S M

N O T E ; B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l
t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

Table 7. W ork stoppages by affiliation of unions involved, 1975
ST O PPA G E S

BEGINNING

A FFILIA TIO N

IN

YEAR

H ORK ERS
PE RC ENT

A LL S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

5,0 3 1

1 0 0 .0

A F L - C I O ........................................................................................................
U N A F F I L I A T E D U N I O N S .................................................................
S I N G L E F I R M U N I O N S .....................................................................
D I F F E R E N T A F F I L I A T I O N S 1 / ..............................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L E M P L O Y E E A S S O C I A T I O N S .................
NO U N I O N I N V O L V B D ........................................................................

2 ,7 2 1
1 ,9 5 9
18
39
254
40

5 4 .1
3 8 .9
.4
.8
5 .0
.8

1 In c lu d e s w o rk s to p p a g e s in v o lv in g e i t h e r 1 u n io n o r m o r e
a f f ilia te d w ith A F L -C IO and 1 u n a f filia te d unio n o r m o r e , o r 2
u n a f filia te d u n io n s o r m o r e ,
2 L e s s th an 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .




_
-

d e e m e d to f a ll w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o rk s to p p a g e .
T h is d e ­
c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s
ta k e n p l a c e in v io la tio n of an y law o r p u b lic p o lic y .
* F e w e r th a n 50.
7 I d le n e s s r e s u lt i n g f r o m s to p p a g e ( s ) b eg in n in g in p r i o r y e a r ( s ) .

1 T he n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s r e p o r t e d f o r a m a j o r in d u s tr y g ro u p o r
d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m of i ts c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l s to p ­
p a g e s o c c u r r i n g in 2 o r m o r e g ro u p s a r e co u n te d in e a c h . W o r k e r s in ­
v o lv e d a n d d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d am o n g th e r e s p e c t i v e g r o u p s .
2 In c lu d e s o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r
m a te r ia ls .
3 E x c lu d e s o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , an d t r a n s p o r ta t io n e q u ip m e n t.
4 In c lu d e s p r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , an d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n t s ; p h o to ­
g ra p h ic an d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s an d c lo c k s .
5 T he s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h av e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n

NUMBER

-

18

NUMBER
(IN
THOUSANDS)
1 ,7 4 5 .6
9 3 8 .7
54 1 .0
12 .0
40. 1
2 1 1 .7
2. 1

DAYS I D L E D U R I N G YEAR
(ALL STOPPA G ES)

INVOLVED

PERCENT

1 0 0 .0
5 3 .8
3 1 .0
.7
2 .3
1 2 .1
. 1

NUMBER
(IN
T H O US A ND S )

PER CENT

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 3 ,3 8 5 .8
4 ,7 0 2 .9
1 5 1.0
1 ,6 6 2 .2
1 ,3 2 2 .0
1 3 .0

7 4 .9
15.1
.5
5 .3
4 .2
(2)

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y
not equal to ta ls .

Table & Work stoppages by contract status and size, 1975
STOPPAGES

B E G IN N IN G

C O N TR A C T S T A T U S AND
NUMBER O P H O R K E R S I N V O L V E D

IN

YEAR

R O RK E RS
NUMBER

PERCENT

DAYS I D L E D U R I N G YEAR
(A LL S T O PPA G E S)

INVOLVED

NUMBER
(IN
THOUSANDS)

NUMBER
(IN
T H O U S A ND S )

PERCENT

PERCBIT

S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

5,0 3 1

1 0 0 .0

1 ,7 4 5 .6

10 0 .0

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

1 0 0 .0

6 AMD U I O E R 2 0 ..................................................................................
2 0 A I D U I D E R 1 0 0 ...........................................................................
1 0 0 A I D U I D E R 2 5 0 ........................................................................
2 5 0 AND U I D E R 5 0 0 ........................................................................
5 0 0 A I D U I D E R 1 , 0 0 0 ..................................................................
1 , 0 0 0 A I D U I D E R 5 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
5 , 0 0 0 A I D U I D E R 1 0 , 0 0 0 ........................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND O V E R ..............................................................................

614
1 ,8 8 2
1 ,2 3 6
743
321
198
17
20

12.2
3 7 .4
2 4 .6
14 .8
6 .4
3 .9
.3
.4

7 .7
9 8 .0
19 7 .3
2 5 9 .6
2 1 8 .3
3 8 2 .3
1 0 8 .3
4 7 4 .0

.4
5 .6
11.3
14.9
1 2 .5
2 1 .9
6 .2
2 7 .2

17 8 .5
1 ,9 1 9 .3
3 ,1 5 7 .5
3 ,7 1 6 .8
'♦ ,7 0 1 .5
7 ,2 6 8 .1
2 ,8 1 3 .1
7 ,4 8 2 .0

.6
6 .1
10. 1
1 1 .9
1 5.1
23 .3
9 .0
2 4 .0

N E G O T I A T I O N O F F I R S T A GRE EME NT OR
U N I O N R E C O G N I T I O N ..................................................................
6 A I D UNDER 2 0 ...........................................................................
2 0 AND U I D B R 1 0 0 .....................................................................
1 0 0 A I D UNDER 2 5 0 ..................................................................
2 5 0 A I D U I D B R 5 0 0 .................................................................
5 0 0 A I D U I D E R 1 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 .....................................................
5 , 0 0 0 A I D U NDE R 1 0 , 0 0 0 .................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND O Y E R ........................................................................

422
136
207
56
12
6
4
1

1 ,1 8 6 .3
6 2 .6
3 7 8 .3
2 5 3 .6
1 4 2 .0
2 0 2 .3
4 2 .4
10 5 .0

3 .8
.2
1.2
.8
.5
.6
.1
.3

-

REN E G O T IA T IO N O F AGRBEHEIT
( E X P I R A T I O N OR R E O P E N I N G ) ........................................
6 AND UNDER 2 0 ............................................................................
2 0 AND U ND ER 1 0 0 .....................................................................
1 0 0 AND UNDER 2 5 0 ..................................................................
2 5 0 AND UNDER 5 0 0 ..................................................................
5 0 0 AND UNDER 1 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AND UN DE R 5 , 0 0 0 ....................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND U ND ER 1 0 , 0 0 0 ..................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND O V B R ........................................................................

2,6 8 8
276
1,0 5 8
643
354
197
131
14
15

5 3 .4
5 .5
21.0
1 2 .8
7 .0
3 .9
2 .6
.3
.3

1 ,0 8 6 .8
3 .7
55.7
9 9 .8
12 0 .6
13 6 .3
2 4 0 .6
8 7 .9
3 4 2 .2

6 2 .3
.2
3 .2
5 .7
6 .9
7 .8
1 3 .8
5 .0
1 9 .6

2 7 ,3 3 6 .1
87 .1
1 ,3 6 0 .1
2 ,6 6 9 .2
3 ,1 7 2 .7
4 ,1 4 2 .1
6 ,6 4 3 .1
2 ,6 4 1 .8
6 ,6 2 0 .1

8 7 .5
.3
4 .4
8 .5
1 0 .2
1 3 .3
2 1 .3
8 .5
21.2

D U R I N G T ERH O F A G R E EM E N T ( N E G O T I A T I O N
O F NEB A GR EE M EN T NOT I N V O L V B D ) .......................
6 AND UNDBR 2 0 ...........................................................................
2 0 A I D UNDER 1 0 0 .....................................................................
1 0 0 AND UNDER 2 5 0 .................................................................
2 5 0 AND UNDER 5 0 0 ..................................................................
5 0 0 AND UNDBR 1 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AND U NDE R 5 , 0 0 0 ....................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND U ND ER 1 0 , 0 0 0 .................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND O V E R ........................................................................

1 ,7 3 3
158
528
505
363
112
60
2
5

3 4 .4
3 .1
1 0 .5
1 0 .0
7 .2
2 .2
1 .2
(D
.1

5 9 3.1
1 .9
28 .8
8 4 .4
13 0 .4
7 3 .2
127 .2
1 5 .4
1 3 1 .8

34 .0
.1
1 .6
4 .8
7 .5
4 .2
7 .3
.9
7 .5

2 ,3 1 3 .3
1 6 .0
1 0 7 .6
1 9 1 .4
3 1 9 .5
2 6 1 .4
4 8 9 .2
6 6 .4
8 6 1 .9

7 .4
. 1
.3
.6
1 .0
.8
1 .6
.2
2 .8

88
23
39
12
6
5
3

1 .7
.5
.8
.2
.1
.1
.1
-

1 5 .3
.3
1 .6
1 .8
2 .0
3 .9
5 .6
-

.9

2 1 3 .8
4 .3
2 3 .3
12 .0
1 5.8
64 .9
9 3 .4
-

100
21
50
20
8
1
-

2 .0
.4
1 .0
.4
.2

A LL

NO C O N T R A C T OR O T H E R C O N TR AC T S T A T U S . . . .
6 AND UNDER 2 0 ...........................................................................
2 0 AND UNDER 1 0 0 .....................................................................
1 0 0 AND UNDER 2 5 0 .................................................................
2 5 0 AND UNDER 5 0 0 ..................................................................
5 0 0 AND UNDER 1 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 5 , 0 0 0 .....................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UN DE R 1 0 , 0 0 0 .................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND O V E R ........................................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N ON C O N T R A C T S T A T U S ....................
6 AND UNDER 2 0 ...........................................................................
2 0 AND UNDER 1 0 0 .....................................................................
1 0 0 AND UNDER 2 5 0 ..................................................................
2 5 0 AND UNDER 5 0 0 .................................................................
5 0 0 AND UNDBR 1 , 0 0 0 ...........................................................
1 , 0 0 0 AND U ND ER 5 , 0 0 0 ....................................................
5 , 0 0 0 AND UNDER 1 0 , 0 0 0 .................................................
1 0 , 0 0 0 AND O V E R ........................................................................




1 L e s s th a n 0. 05 p e r c e n t .

8 .4
2 .7
4.1
1.1
.2
. 1
.1

4 1 .1
1 .6
9 .3
8 .2
4. 1
4 .1
8 .8
5 .0

(D

2 .4
. 1
.5
.5
.2
.2
.5
.3

~

-

-

-

(D
. 1
.1
.1
.2
.3
*

9 .2
.3
2 .7
3. 1
2 .5
.8

(D
-

*

.5
(D
.2
.2
. 1
(D
-

1 8 7 .4
8 .6
5 0 .0
3 1 .3
66.8
3 0 .8
-

.7
(D
. 1
(D
. 1
.2
.3
*
.6
(D
.2
.1
.2
. 1
-

"

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y
n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

19

Table 9. Work stoppages by industry group and contract status, 1975
( H O B K E B S AMD

DAYS I D L E

I M , THOUSANDS)

INDUST RY

G RO UP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

DAYS
ID L E DURING
Y EA R ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

ST O PPA G E S
B E G IN N IN G IN
YEAR
NUMBER

IN V O LV ED
A LL

R E N E G O T I A T I O N O F A G RE EME NT
( E X P I R A T I O N OB R E O P E N I N G )

NEGOTIATION OF F IR S T
A GR EE ME N T
OB U N I O N R E C O G N I T I O N

TOTAL

STOPPAGES
DAYS
BE G IN N IN G IN
I D L E DURING
YEAR
YEAR ( A L L
H O R K E R S NUMBER A G E S H O R KE R S
STOPP
)
H O RK E RS
HUMBER
INVOLV ED
INV OLV ED

DAYS
I D L E DURING
Y EA R ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................

1 /5 ,0 3 1

1 ,7 4 5 .6

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

422

4 1 .1

1 ,1 8 6 .3

2,6 8 8

1 ,0 8 6 .8

2 7 ,3 3 6 .1

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...............................................................................

1 /1 ,8 9 7

46 3 .8

1 4 ,8 7 6 .1

178

16 .5

6 7 6 .9

1 ,4 3 3

33 2 .1

1 3 ,3 3 6 .6

O RD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O B I E S ..................................................
FOOD AND K I N D B E D P R O D U C T S ................................. * . . .
T OB AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

9
166

6 .9
29 .1

19 3 .7
8 3 8 .4

-

-

-

-

9
133
-

6 .9
24.3
-

1 9 3 .7
7 8 1 .3
2 2 .6

-

21

-

2 .3

-

51.2
-

21

2 .2

2 7 .3

6

.2

1 .7

10

1 .7

55

1 0 .0

1 0 9 .5

13

.7

2 6 .8

14

2 .2

61
57
68

1 7 .2
1 1 .6
12 .2

2 8 2 .6
3 5 4 .4
6 2 2 .2

6
5
2

• 1.3
.3

.3

2 5 .6
6 .5
2 1 .2

45
48
61

5 .1
1 0 .6
11. 1

16 9 .7
3 3 3 .6
5 9 6 .9

m
109

1 3 .5
1 7 .7

2 3 7 .6
7 4 7 .4

5
12

.1
1 .0

11 .3
41 .8

33
89

10 .4
1 5 .6

1 67.2
6 9 8 .1

30

20 .4

6 1 3 .3

3

.2

10.6

26

1 5 .7

5 9 8 .3

57

1 0 .4
1 .0
17 .6
42.6
48.6

238. 1
9 .3
4 8 4 .3
1 ,1 6 8 .9
1 ,7 7 9 .3

.7

1 4 .5
-

46

140
161
309

.3

116
127
258

7 .5
.9
1 3 .6
2 5 .0
43 .8

2 0 7 .5
7 .6
3 7 5 .7
9 5 1 .4
1 ,6 9 3 .8

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T .................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 4 / ..............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S MA NU FA CT U RI N G I N D U S T R I E S . .

274

7 4 .4

198

4 7 .7

2 ,0 3 2 .8

120
137
32
37

3 4 .0
7 7 .9
10.7
5.8

71
91
23
29

2 2 .0
5 8 .8
4 .0
5 .3

775
3 ,2 2 9
230
227

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G . .................................................................

1 /3 ,1 3 4

1 ,2 8 1 .8

16, 36 0 .9

50 9 .4

1 ,2 5 5

7 5 4 .7

1 3 ,9 9 9 .5

.7

1
6
11

.4
6.6

.6
1 3 .8
122. 5

2
24
327

.1
6 .8
26 9 .5

3 .6
2 1 8 .7
7 ,0 4 8 .5

1 .3
2 .1

1 0 1 .4
9 4 .8

147
263

10 7 .6
58.0

2 ,8 6 5 .0
1 ,3 0 0 .2

15
134
343

2 .9
2 1 .8
28 7 .9

1 5 5 .9
3 3 8 .2
2 ,0 6 9 .4

A P P A R E L , E T C . 2 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
R UB BE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A T , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R I M A R Y ME TAL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D ME TA L P R O D U C T S J / .....................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N TR A C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COMMUNICA TION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
H H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................
F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT £ / .............................................................. ......................

9

7

10
10
23

2.1
1.4

1 2 .0
1 1 0 .3
4 2 .2

2 ,3 7 0 .8

29

2 .4

1 7 7 .4

8 5 0 .7
3 ,4 0 4 .9
2 8 7 .9
2 5 5 .6

7
14

.6
1 .9

5

.5

2

.2

244

2 4 .6

1 ,1 6 5
600

3 9 1 .6
3 0 8 .0

3 5 .9
1 ,6 4 2 .8
7 ,3 0 7 .3

268
371

1 6 6 .8
63 .4

3 ,0 8 9 .0
1 ,4 2 6 .0

46
73

18
228
478

3 .0
2 9 .9
31 8 .5

1 6 9 .0
48 6 .6
2 ,2 0 4 .4

2
63
42

S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d of ta b l e .




6
-

20

(5)

(5)
3.6
10.5

19. C
5 6 .9
2 6 .8
21. C

10.8
9 7 .5
6 8 .C

7

43. 1

.5
.8
.2
.7

Table 9. Work stoppages by industry group and contract status, 1975—Continued
DURING TERM OF AGREEMENT
(NEGOTIATION OF NEW
AGREEMENT NOT INVOLVED)
INDUSTBY GBOUP

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR
INVOLVED

NO CONTRACT OR OTHER
CONTRACT STATUS

NO INFORMATION ON
CONTRACT STATUS

STOPPAGES
STOPPAGES
DAYS
DAYS
BEGINNING IN
BEGINNING IN
IDLE DURING
YEAR
YEAR
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
YEAR (ALL
NUMBER NUMBER
WORKERS WORKERS
STOPPAGES)
STOPPAGES)
NUMBER
WORKERS
INVOLVED
INVOLVED

DAYS
IDLE DURING
YEAR (ALL
STOPPAGES)

ALL INDUSTRIES.......................................................

1 /1 ,7 3 3

593.1

2 ,3 1 3 .3

88

15.3

213.8

100

9 .2

187.4

MANUFACTURING...............................................................

1/217

103.2

600.9

22

6.7

132.4

47

5.4

129.2

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.......................................
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.....................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES.................................................
TEXTILE HILL PRODUCTS...............................................
APPAREL, ETC. 2 / ............................................................
LUBBER AND W
OOD PRODUCTS, EXCEPT
FURNITURE.........................................................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES.............................................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.....................................
PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES......................................................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...........................
PETROLEUM REFINING AND RELATED
INDUSTRIES......................................................................

-

-

-

9
1

2.3
(5)

-

4 .8
(5)

-

-

-

4

21

6.9

35.9

8
3
3

10.4
.1
.5

7 2.9
.2
2 .7

7
4

2.2
.6

28. 2
1.2

_

-

.3

-

-

.1

3
3.0

-

-

-

1.0

.1

3.1

2
1
2

.3
.5
.2

14.5
14.1
1.4

-

-

2

30.8
-

1
•4

.1
.5

.1
6 .2

-

.1
.1
.4
.8
.9

4.1
1.5
2.1
31.4
31.6

5
-

.6

.1
-

1

.7

1

4.5

4 .5

-

-

RUBBER AND MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS
PRODUCTS...........................................................................
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS.............................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.....................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES.......................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS 3 / .............................

3
1
11
19
19

2.2
. 1
3.3
13.7
2.6

6.7
. 1
94.5
66. 3
11.7

-

-

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELBCTRICAL.............................
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, AND
SUPPLIES...........................................................................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT.......................................
INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 4 / .................................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..

40

22.8

146.8

3

1.3

9.5

4

.3

4.2

35
26
3
3

10.2
14.3
6.2
.1

47.7
4 5.2
30.1
1.3

1
4

.6
2.7

4 .3
68.4
1. 1

6
2
1
1

.6
.2

4.1
4.6
.9
4 .5

NONMANUFACTURING......................................................

1/1,516

490.0

1,712.4

66

8.7

8 1.4

AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
MINING.....................................................................................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION...............................................
TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION,
ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES..
1H0LESALE AND RETAIL TRADE..................................

2
1,134
237

.4
383.9
30.0

29.3
1,409.4
104.9

2
1
11

.2
.4
.5

2 .3
.9
7.7

50
12

53.3
2.2

83. 1
15.8

12
7

4.0
.2

27.3
3.2

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE...........
SERVICES................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 6 / ....................................................................

1
14
67

(5)
3.4
16.8

2 .3
36.7
30.9

1 The n um b er of sto p p age s re p o rte d fo r a m a jo r in d u stry group o r
d ivisio n m a y not equal the su m of its com ponents b e c a u s e in d ivid u al sto p ­
p a g e s o c c u r rin g in 2 o r m o re gro u p s a r e counted in ea ch . W o r k e r s in ­
v o lv ed and d ays id le a r e a llo c a te d am on g the r e s p e c tiv e g ro u p s .
2 In clud es other fin ish ed p ro d u c ts m ad e fr o m f a b r ic s and s im ila r
m a t e r ia ls .
3 E x c lu d e s o rd n an ce, m a c h in e ry , and tra n sp o rta tio n equipm ent.
4 In clud es p r o fe s s io n a l, s c ie n t ific , and co n tro llin g in stru m e n ts; photo­
gra p h ic and o p tica l go o d s; w a tc h e s and c lo c k s .




-

7 /5 .2

-

-

-

. 1

-

9
24

9 .5
-

2

2
1
3
3
9

.9

2
-

-

(5)
.1

53

3.9

58.2

14

1.5

23.8

13
16

.6
.9

12.1
12.0

-

_
-

.

-

-

.4

4 .4

8

.6

9.8

2.9

35.5

2

.3

.5

5 F e w e r than 50 .
6 The situ a tion s re p o rte d h e re have, fo r s t a t is t ic a l p u r p o s e s , been
I deem ed to fa ll w ithin the B u r e a u 's d efinition of a w o rk sto p p age . T h is
de­
c is io n does not con stitu te a le g a l d ete rm in a tio n that a w o rk sto p p age has
taken p la c e in v io latio n of an y la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
f Id le n e ss re s u ltin g fr o m sto ppage(s) begin nin g in p r i o r y e a r ( s ) .
N O T E : B e c a u s e of rounding, su m s of in d ivid u al ite m s m a y not
to ta ls . D a sh e s (-) denote z e r o s .

21

equal

Table 10. W ork stoppages by contract status and major issue, 1975
STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
CONTRACT STATUS AND MAJOR ISSUE

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR
(ALL STOPPAGES)

WORKERS INVOLVED
NUMBER

PERCENT

NUMBER
(IN
THOUSANDS)

NUMBER
(IN
THOUSANDS)

PERCENT

PBRCENT

ALL STOPPAGES...............................................................

5,031

1,745.6

100.0

31,237.0

100.0

NEGOTIATION OF FIRST AGREEMENT........................
GENERAL W
AGE CHANGES............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS.......................................
W
AGE ADJUSTMENTS.......................................................
HOURS OF WORK...............................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS...............................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY................
JOB SECURITY.................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION............................................
OTHER WORKING CONDITIONS..................................
INTBRUNION AND INTRAUNION MATTERS...........
NOT REPORTED.................................................................

422
202
4
3
5
175
20
8
3
2

8.4
4.0
. 1
. 1
. 1
3 .5
.4
.2
. 1
(D

4 1 .1
28.1
.2
.4
.1
9.6
1.7
.6
.4
(2)

2.4
1.6
(D
(D
(D
.5
. 1
(D
(D
(D

1 ,186.3
674.3
.8
16.0
3.9
414.0
59.9
8.4
8.8
(2)

3.8
2.2
(D
.1
(D
1.3
.2
(D
d)
(D

RENEGOTIATION OF AGREEMENT (EXPIRATION
OR REOPENING)...............................................................
GENERAL WAGE CHANGES.............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS.......................................
WAGE ADJUSTMENTS.......................................................
HOURS OF WORK...............................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS...............................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY................
JOE SECURITY.................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION............................................
OTHER WORKING CONDITIONS..................................
INTERUNION AND INTRAUNION HATTERS...........
NOT REPORTED.................................................................

2,688
2,311
41
30
5
62
56
122
44
10
6
1

53.4
45.9
.8
.6
.1
1.2
1 .1
2.4
.9
.2
.1
(D

1,086.8
764.7
20.0
4.8
. 2
19.1
13 . 1
172.3
86.4
5.9
.2
(2)

6 2.3
43.8
1.1
.3
(D
1 .1
.8
9 .9
4 .9
.3
(D
(1)

27,336.1
2 1 ,313.6
244.0
143.4
9.5
389.7
501.1
2,995.1
1,699.2
37.3
2.5
.4

87.5
68.2
.8
.5
(1)
1.2
1.6
9 .6
5.4
.1
(D
(1)

DURING TERM OF AGREEMENT (NEGOTIATION
OF NEW AGREEMENT NOT INVOLVED)...................
GENERAL WAGE CHANGES............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS.......................................
WAGE ADJUSTMENTS.......................................................
HOURS OF WORK................................' .............................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY................
JOB SECURITY.................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION............................................
OTHER WORKING CONDITIONS..................................
INTERUNION AND INTRAUNION MATTERS...........
NOT REPORTED.................................................................

1,733
17
4
90
1
6
29
104
1,057
119
302
4

34.4
.3
.1
1.8
(1)
. 1
.6
2.1
21.0
2.4
6.0
.1

59 3. 1
5.9
2.0
33 . 2
(2)
4. 4
69.4
30.7
337.0
33.1
77. 1
.3

34.0
.3
. 1
1.9

2,3 1 3 .3
38.6
26.6
204.0
(2)
9.4
569.7
93.2
1,030.2
147.6
193.2
.9

7.4
.1
. 1
.7

NO CONTRACT OR OTHER CONTRACT STATUS____
GENERAL W
AGE CHANGES............................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS.......................................
W
AGE ADJUSTMENTS.......................................................
HOURS OF WORK..............1..............................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL MATTERS................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY................
JOE SECURITY.................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION.............................................
OTHER WORKING CONDITIONS..................................
INTERUNION AND INTRAUNION HATTERS...........
NOT REPORTED.................................................................

88
33
3
1
1
1
4
7
24
5
7
2

1.7
.7
.1

(D

15.3
6.3
.7
.1
(2)
(2)
. 1
.5
6.5
.6
.4
(2)

(1)
d)
(D

213.8
79.7
3.6
.7
.3
1 .1
1.6
4.2
112.0
4.1
5.1
1 .3

NO INFORMATION.................................................................

100

2.0

9. 2

.5

187.4

100.0

(1)
(D
(D

. 1
. 1
.5
. 1
.1

(11

.9
.4
(D
(D
(D
(D
(D
d)

.4

(D
(D

1.8
.3
3.3
.5
.6
(D

.7
.3
(D
(D

(1)
(D

(1)
(D

.4
(1)
(D

(1)
.6

N O T E : B e c a u s e of rounding, su m s of ind ividu al item s
lot equal to ta ls. D ash es (-) denote z e r o s .

1 L e s s than 0. 05 p e rc e n t,
2 F e w e r than 50 .




d)

. 3
4 .0
1.8
19.3
1.9
4 .4

22

m ay

Table TL Work stoppages by mqjor issue, 1975
STOPPAGES

M A JO R

BE G IN N IN G

ISSU E

IN

YEAR

R OR K ER S

DAYS I D L E D U R I N G YE AR
(A LL S T O PPA G E S)

I M VO L VB D
MU HBEB

NUMBER

A LL

PERCENT

NUMBER
(II
T H O U S A ND S )

PE RCENT

i n
T HO U SA N DS )

PERCENT

S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

5 ,0 3 1

1 0 0 .0

1 ,7 4 5 .6

1 0 0 .0

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

1 0 0 .0

G E N E R A L RAGE C H A N G E S ..............................................................
G E N E R A L HAGB I N C R E A S E ....................................................
G E N E R A L HAGB I N C R E A S E P L U S
S U P P L B H E N T A R Y B E N E F I T S ...........................................
G E N E R A L HA GS I N C R E A S E , HOUR D E C R E A S E . .
G E NE R A L R AG E D B C R B A S B ....................... ............................
E SCA L A T IO N ( C O S T - O F - L I V I N G ) I N C R E A S E . . . .
G E N ER A L R AG E I N C R E A S E AND E S C A L A T I O N . .
RAGE S AND R O R K I N G C O N D I T I O N S ..............................

2 ,619
938

5 2 .1
18 .6

8 1 0 .4
2 8 7 .5

4 6 .4
16 .5

2 2 ,2 2 1 .7
6 ,0 2 4 .0

71 .1
19 .3

1 ,1 1 1
6
1
39
254
270

2 2 .1
.1

3 1 7 .9
.7
.1
8 .6
55.8
139 .7

1 8 .2
(D
(D
.5
3 .2
8 .0

1 0 ,7 7 6 .3
10 .4
.1
2 2 4 .8
2 ,0 1 6 .3
3 ,1 6 9 .7

3 4 .5

(1)
.8
5 .0
5.4

S U P P L E M E N T A R Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
P E N S I O N S , I N S U R A N C E , AMD O T HE R
R E L F A R E P R O G R A M S ..............................................................
S E V E R A N C E OR D I S M I S S A L P A Y , AND O T H E R
P AY ME NT S ON L A Y O F F OR S E P A R A T I O N . . . .
P R EM I UM P A Y .....................................................................................
O T H E R ........................................................................................................

(D
(1)
.7
6 .5
10. 1

53

1.1

2 3 .0

1 .3

2 7 7 .8

.9

29

.6

18.1

1 .0

18 6 .6

.6

5
4
15

.1
.1
.3

1.4
.6
2 .9

.1
(D
.2

1 8 .4
16 .5
5 6 .2

.1
.1
.2

R A G E A D J U S T M E N T S ...........................................................................
I N C E N T I V E PAY R A T E S OR A D M I N I S T R A T I O N .
J O B C L A S S I F I C A T I O N OR R A T B S .................................
D OH NG RA D IN G .....................................................................................
R E T R O A C T I V I T Y ..............................................................................
METHOD O F C O M P U T I N G P A Y ..............................................

126
22
52
2
2
48

2 .5
.4
1.0

2 .2
.8
.8
(D
d )
.6

3 6 4 .3
191 .2
144 .2
2 .4
.3
2 6.2

1 .2
.6
.5

(D
(D
1 .0

3 8 .5
1 3 .2
1 3 .7
.7
.1
10 .9

H OU R S O F H ORK .....................................................................................
I N C R E A S E ..............................................................................................
D E C R E A S E ...............................................................................................

7
3
4

.1
.1
.1

.3
.2
.1

(D
(D
(1)

9 .8
6.1
3 .7

O T HE R C O N TR AC TU A L H A T T E R S ...............................................
D U R A T IO N O F C O N T R A C T ........................................................
L OC AL I S S U E S S U P P L E M E N T I N G N A T I O N A L
C O N T R A C T ........................................................................................
U N S P E C I F I E D .....................................................................................

75
14

1 .5
.3

23 .6
6 .0

1 .4
.3

4 0 5 .8
1 44.4

1 .3
.5

4
57

. 1
1 .1

6 .7
1 1 .0

.4
.6

52 .6
20 8 .8

.2
.7

U N I O N O R G A N I Z A T I O N AMD S E C U R I T Y ...........................
R E C O G N I T I O N ( C E R T I F I C A T I O N ) .................................
R E C O G N I T I O N AND J O B S E C U R I T Y I S S U E S . . .
R E C O G N I T I O N AND E C O N O M I C I S S U E S ....................
S T R E N G T H E N I N G B A R G A I N I N G P O S I T I O N OR
U N I O N S H O P AND E C O N O M I C I S S U E S .................
U N I O N S E C U R I T Y ...........................................................................
R E F U S A L T O S I G N A G R E E M E N T ........................................
O TH ER U N I O N O R G A N I Z A T I O N H A T T E R S .................

268
114
5
16

5 .3
2 .3
.1
.3

9 2 .3
5 .5
.3
1 .9

5 .3
.3

1 ,4 8 8 .0
1 6 8 .0
17 .1
4 9 .1

4 .8
.5
.1
.2

78
15
12
28

1 .6
.3
.2
.6

1 3 .6
6 3 .2
.5
7 .2

.8
3 .6

J O B S E C U R I T Y ........................................................................................
S E N I O R I T Y A N D / O R L A Y O F F ..............................................
D I V I S I O N O F H O R K.....................................................................
S U B C O N T R A C T I N G ...........................................................................
NEN M A CH I NE RY OR O T H E R T E C H N O L O G I C A L
I S S U E S ..............................................................................................
J O E T R A N S F E R S , B U M P I N G , E T C .................................
T R A N S F E R O F O P E R A T I O N S OR
P R E F A B R I C A T E D G O O D S .....................................................
J O B S E C U R I T Y AND E C O N O M I C I S S U E S .................
O T H E R ........................................................................................................

257
40
3
14

2 0 5 .7
17 .3
.3
3 .3

1 1 .8
1 .0

.4
1.1

(D
.1

122
72

2.4
1 .4

P L A N T A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..............................................................
P H Y S IC A L F A C I L I T I E S , S U RRO U N D IN G S,
E T C ........................................................................................................
S A F E T Y M E A S U R E S , D A NG ER OU S E Q U I P M E N T ,
E T C ........................................................................................................
S U P E R V I S I O N .....................................................................................
S H I F T H ORK ........................................................................................
HORK A S S I G N M E N T S .....................................................................
S P E E D U P ( R O R K L O A D ) ..............................................................
HORK R U L E S .........................................................................................
O V E R T I M E H O R K..............................................................................
D I S C H A R G E AND D I S C I P L I N E ...........................................
O TH ER .....................................................................................................

1 ,1 4 2
152
165
26
37
108
25
37
45
211
336

O T H E B R O R K I N G C O N D I T I O N S .................................................
A R B I T R A T I O N .....................................................................................
G R I E V A N C E P R O C E D U R E S ........................................................
U N S P E C I F I E D C O N T R A C T V I O L A T I O N S ....................
I N T E R U N I O N OR I N T R A U N I O H H A T T E R S .......................
U N I O N R I V A L R Y £ / .....................................................................
JU R ISD ICTION-REPRESENTATION
O F H O R K E R S 3 / ........................................................................
J U R I S D I C T I O N - H O R K A S S I G N M E N T ..............................
U N I O N A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J j / ..............................................
S Y M P A T H Y ...............................................................................................
O TH ER .....................................................................................................
NOT

R E P O R T E D ........................................................................................

5. 1
.8
. 1
.3

2
4

(1)
.1
-

(D
.2

5 9 9 .6
6 0 3 .0
2 4 .7
2 6 .5
3 ,1 5 3 .6
2 2 7 .7
.6
2 5 .5
3 .1
4.1

1.9
1.9
. 1
.1
1 0.1
.7
(D
. 1
(D
(D

-

-

167 .5
1 5 .7

9 .6
.9

2 ,8 3 8 .9
53 .6

9 .1
.2

2 2 .7

4 3 1 .6

2 4 .7

2 ,8 8 3 .7

9 .2

3 .0

2 4 .9

1 .4

4 7 .5

.2

3.3

3 .2
.4
1 .3
1 .7
4 .3
3 .0

561 .9
2 4 .7
1 2 0 .0
16 9 .8
4 0 6 .4
98 0 .1
28 .1
23 7 .1
3 0 8 .0

1 .8
.1
.4

.9
4 .2
6 .7

5 6 .7
7. 1
2 2 .1
2 9 .2
7 4 .6
52.2
9 .2
6 7 .2
8 8 .5

137
10
41
86

2 .7
.2
.8
1.7

4 0 .0
9 .3
1 0 .8
1 9 .9

2.3

317

6 .3
.1

7 7 .7

.5

.7
.5
.7

3

6 .0

.4

2
231
18
62
1

(D
4 .6

d )

3 5 .4
1 5 .0
2 0 .4
.5

30

.6

2 .5

.4
1 .2

1 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
2 In c lu d e s d is p u te s b e tw e e n u n io n s of d i f f e r e n t a f filia tio n s ,
s u c h a s th o s e b e tw e e n A F L -C IO a f f i l ia t e s an d in d e p e n d e n t o r g a n i ­
z a tio n s .
3 In c lu d e s d is p u te s b e tw e e n u n io n s , u s u a lly of th e s a m e
a f filia tio n , o r b e tw e e n 2 l o c a ls of th e s a m e union, o v e r r e p r e ­




(D
.4

(D
(D
(D

-

2 .1

-

(D
. 1

(D
(D
. 1

23

.5
3 .8
5. 1

.5
.6
■1 .1

1 9 7 .9
3 9.1
12 4 .6
3 4 .1

4 .5
. 3

2 0 0 .9
8 .0

(D
2 .0
.9
1 .2
(D

1 13.1
3 0 .4
46 .6
2 .4

.1

3 3 .5

s e n ta tio n of w o r k e r s .
4
In c lu d e s d is p u te s
of unio n a f f a i r s o r r e g u la tio n s .

.4

.5
1 .3
3 .1
.1
.8
1 .0
.6
. 1
.4
.1
.6
(D
(D

.4

. 1
.1
(D
. 1

w ith in a unio n o v e r th e a d m i n i s tr a t i o n

N O T E: B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s
n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

m ay

Table XL Work stoppages by industry group and major issue, 1975
(W O R K E R S AMD

DATS ID L E

III

THO U SA N D S)

GENERAL

TOTAL

IN D U S T R Y

GROUP

STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR

DAYS
I D L E D U R IN G
Y E A R (A L L
STO PPA G ES)

RAGE

CHANGES

SU PPL E H E N T A R Y

STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
IE A R
NUHBER

IN V O L V E D

STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR

DAYS
I D L E D U R IN G
YEAR (A L L
N O R K E R S N U H O P P A G E SH O R K B R S
S T BEB
)
NUH BER
IN V O L V E D

NORKERS
IN V O L V E D

B E N E F IT S

DA Y S
I D L E D U R IN G
Y E A R (A L L
STO PPA G ES)

I I D U S T R I E S .....................................................................

1 /5 ,0 3 1

1 ,7 4 5 .6

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

2 ,6 1 9

8 1 0 .4

2 2 ,2 2 1 .7

53

2 3 .0

2 7 7 .8

B A N U F A C T U R IN G ...............................................................................

1 /1 ,8 9 7

4 6 3 .8

1 4 ,8 7 6 .1

1 ,3 8 3

2 8 7 .5

1 0 ,8 6 4 .3

30

8 .4

1 8 9 .6

ORDKAMCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..................................................
FO O D AND K IN D R E D P R O D U C T S .............................. ...
TO B A C C O B A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

9
166
21

6 .9
2 9 .1
2 .2

1 9 3 .7
8 3 8 .4
2 7 .3

6
138
11

4 .4
2 3 .3
1 .0

1 2 6 .5
7 8 5 .3
1 1 .6

A P P A R E L , E T C . 2 / ...........................................................................
L U B B E R AND WOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N IT U R B ...........................................................................................
F U R N IT U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P B R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................

55

1 0 .0

1 0 9 .5

16

5 .4

6 6 .3

1

61
57
68

1 7 .2
1 1 .6
1 2 .2

2 8 2 .6
3 5 4 .4
6 2 2 .2

45
47
50

5 .7
1 0 .4
6 .7

1 7 4 .6
3 1 8 .5
3 5 7 .1

1
1
3

47
109

1 3 .5
1 7 .7

2 3 7 .6
7 4 7 .4

26
87

9 .4
1 3 .7

1 8 1 .7
4 8 2 .7

30

2 0 .4

6 1 3 .3

19

1 2 .0

4 5 9 .5

57
9
140
161
309

1 0 .4
1 .0
1 7 .6
4 2 .6
4 8 .6

238. 1
9 .3
4 8 4 .3
1 ,1 6 8 .9
1 ,7 7 9 .3

46
7
105
127
249

7 .3
.4
1 1 .8
2 6 .5
3 7 .1

B A C H IN E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R I C A L B A C H IN E R Y , E Q U I P H E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N E Q U I P H E N T .................................................
I N S T H U H E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
H IS C E L L A N E O U S B A N U F A C T U R IN G I N D U S T R I E S . .

274

7 4 .4

2 ,3 7 0 .8

195

120
137
32
37

3 4 .0
7 7 .9
1 0 .7
5 .8

8 5 0 .7
3 ,4 0 4 .9
2 8 7 .9
255. 6

75
83
25
28
1 ,2 3 6

5 2 2 .9

1 1 ,3 5 7 .4

ALL

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E B IC A L S AND A L L IE D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E T R O L E U H R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
R U BBER AND H IS C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N B , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ..........................
P R IH A R Y H E T A L I N D U S T R I E S .................................................
F A B R IC A T E D H E T A L P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................

N O N H A N U F A C T U R IN G .....................................................................

1 /3 ,1 3 4

1 ,2 8 1 .8

1 6 ,3 6 0 .9

A G R IC U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
H I R I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N T R A C T C O N S T R U C T IO N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N , C O H H U N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
1 H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

7
1 ,1 6 5
600

.7
3 9 1 .6
3 0 8 .0

3 5 .9
1 ,6 4 2 .8
7 ,3 0 7 .3

1 6 6 .8
6 3 .4

3 ,0 8 9 .0
1 ,4 2 6 .0

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G O V ER N H EN T £ / .....................................................................................

18
228
478

3 .0
2 9 .9
3 1 8 .5

1 6 9 .0
4 8 6 .6
2 ,2 0 4 .4

U N IO N

ALL

O R G A N IZ A T IO N
S E C U R IT Y

2
1

-

.8
5 .4

. 1
. 1
(3 )
(3 )
1 .7

1

. 1
.1
.1
8 4 .2

. 1

2 .2

2

1 .0

1 2 .9

1 8 8 .1
7 .3
338. 3
9 8 4 .7
1 ,4 8 0 .3

1
1
2
1
4

.1
.5
.3
.6
.3

9 .2
1 .6
4 .7
3 .3
4 .3

1 ,6 7 5 .7

4

1 .1

2 9 .5

7 7 4 .1
2 ,0 2 2 .8
2 1 3 .1
2 1 6 .1

1
1
1
2

.2
.1
1 .3
.2

.9
.7
2 5 .1
4 .7

_

23

_

4 .1
2 6 7 .2

1 3 0 .4
7 ,0 6 8 .4

-

154
273

3 5 .4
4 8 .6

1 ,5 9 7 .3
8 5 2 .0

14
147
312

2 .8
2 1 .7
1 4 3 .1

1 3 6 .0
3 3 3 .1
1 ,2 4 0 .1

JO B

1 4 .6

8 8 .2

_

_

AND

.6

-

3 7 .9

20
316

.

-

2 0 .0
4 6 .5
4 .0
3 .8

_

268
371

-

_
-

5

1 .7

2 1 .8

4
6

9 .2
.3

3 5 .8
4 .9

_

4
4

S E C U R IT Y

_
1 .2
2 .2

1 0 .6
1 5 .1

PLA N T A D H IN IS T R A T IO N

I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................

1 /2 6 8

9 2 .3

1 ,4 8 8 .0

257

2 0 5 .7

3 ,1 5 3 .6

1 ,1 4 2

4 3 1 .6

2 ,8 8 3 .7

B A N U F A C T U R IN G ..............................................................................

1 /9 1

9 .1

5 9 2 .2

94

3 1 .3

1 ,8 0 0 .4

142

6 9 .7

7 2 3 .3

_

_

_

2 5 .4
-

-

O RDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..................................................
FOOD AND K IN D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T O B A C C O B A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

-

-

5 9 .7
1 8 .2
-

_

_
5

-

2 .1
-

5

_
1 .9

-

6 .1
-

3

.1

2 .2

12

A P P A R E L , B T C . 2 / ...........................................................................
L U B B E R AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N IT U R B AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................

.7

26. 1

3

.4

.6

9

1 .8

. 1

3 .8
1 .5
68. 1

4
3
7

1 .5
.8
1 .9

3 3 .7
3 1 .5
1 0 6 .5

4
1
3

4 .6
. 1
.3

3 3 .6
.1
4 .2

8 .6
2 6 .4

2
5

.1
.6

3 .9
8 4 .0

7
6

3 .2
1 .7

3 0 .8
9 8 .2

*

3

5 .1

3 4 .5

1
2
3

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E B IC A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
PB T R O L E U H R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
R U B B E R AND H IS C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R IH A R Y B E T A L I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R IC A T E D H E T A L PR O D U C T S 4 / ....................................

.6
. 1

1
6

(3 )
1 .0

5
4

. 1
.5

2

.1

4
-

.2
-

10
3
9

.8
.1
.8

5 .7

1
2
5
3

1

-

-

3 .6

2
-

.5

6
6
17

1 4 .6
-

9 .2

.6
.8
4 .1

1 1 .5
40. 3
1 5 6 .2

3
1
9
12
14

2 .2
.1
1 .8
2 .6
2 .3

1 2 .5
.1
1 1 .7
9 .1
4 8 .0

-

0 .4
1 .3
5 .8

2 .3

.2

B A C H IN E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R IC A L B A C H IN E R Y , E Q U I P H E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N E Q U IP H E N T ..................................................
I N S T R U H E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
H IS C E L L A N E O U S B A N U F A C T U R IN G I N D U S T R I E S . .

16

2 .1

1 7 0 .4

12

1 .5

5 7 .9

23

1 8 .4

2 6 7 .1

1
5
3
1

(3 )
1 .3
.3
(3 )

.9
6 2 .8
1 5 .9
1 .0

6
13

2 .6
1 2 .5
-

1 5 .7
1 ,1 8 7 .3
-

3

1 .3

3 1 .3

18
20
1
2

8 .3
1 4 .8
(3 )
.5

3 4 .1
1 2 0 .3
.1
1 .3

N O N H A N U F A C T U R IN G .....................................................................

1 /V 7 7

8 3 .2

8 9 5 .8

163

1 7 4 .4

1 ,3 5 3 .2

1 ,0 0 0

3 6 1 .9

2 ,1 6 0 .4

1
23
16

(3 )
6 7 .9
2 .4

.6
5 8 3 .7
2 3 .3

2
74
2

.2
1 8 .7
.4

2 .3
4 1 .8
7 .7

3
863
24

.4
2 3 4 .0
6 .5

3 2 .2
6 8 4 .8
4 6 .9

25
46

.8
1 .6

3 7 .3
8 7 .2

13
10

5 8 .8
4 .8

7 6 5 .7
6 1 .9

35
12

4 3 .4
6 .1

5 7 7 .7
3 9 5 .3

2 .3
8 .2

2 /1 0 .4
7 0 .6
8 2 .6

A G R IC U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
B I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N T R A C T C O N S T R U C T IO N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C O H H U N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
■ H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................
F I N A N C B , IN S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G O V E R N H E N T & / ....................................................................................

-

41
25

See footnotes at end of table.




24

-

-

8
54

1 .1
9 0 .3

2 4 .5
4 4 9 .2

-

_
16
47

2 .7
6 8 .7

_
2 4 .3
3 9 9 .2

Table 12. Work stoppages by industry group and major issue, 1976—Continued
(W O RK ERS AMD

D A TS

ID L E

IN

TH O U SA N D S)

NAGE A D JU S T M E N T S

IN D U S T H Y

GROUP

STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR
NUMBER

ALL

W ORK ERS
IN V O L V E D

HOURS OF

DAYS
I D L E D U R IN G
Y EA R (A L L
STO PPA G ES)

STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR
NUMBER

WORKERS
IN V O L V E D

WORK

OTHER

DAYS
I D L E D U R IN G
Y E A R (A L L
STOPPAGES)

CONTRACTUAL

STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YBAB
NUMBBR

W O RK ERS
IN V O L V E D

HATTERS

DAYS
I D L E D U R IN G
YEAR ( » L L
STO PPA G ES)

I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................

1 /1 2 6

3 8 .5

364. 3

7

.3

9 .8

75

2 3 .6

4 0 5 .8

H A N U F A C T U B IN G ..............................................................................

1 /4 5

2 1 .4

2 9 4 .0

2

.1

1 .6

31

1 1 .3

2 2 4 .7

O RD N A N CE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
FO O D AND K IN D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T O BA CCO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P B O D U C T S ...........................................................

1
1

RU BBER AND M IS C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S .................................................................................... ... .
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A T , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R IM A R Y METAL I N D U S T R I E S .................................................
F A B R IC A T E D M ETAL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................

A G R IC U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M IN IN G ...........................................................................................................
CO N T R A C T C O N S T R U C T IO N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C O M M U N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
B H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................
F IN A N C E , IN S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 6 / .....................................................................................

-

-

_

_
-

-

-

2
5
5

5. 1
.3

9

7 .3

1 6 3 .1

7
3
1

.6
.7
.3

1 0 .0
1 .4
2 6 .9

1 7 .2

.1
-

3
2

.2
.8

3 .7
5 1 .8

-

4

2 .3

1 0 0 .8

_
_
-

_
-

.1

_
_

1 .3

_

_
-

-

1

.3
-

-

-

5

.2

_
1

(3 )

-

.2
3 .9
.2

_

_

-

_
_

2
3
5

_

-

-

2 /1 .9

44

1 2 .3

.

_

_

_

1 3 .7
.6

2 8 .3
2 .4

-

-

-

4
13

2 .4
6 .1

7 2 .6
5 8 .3

8
3

1 .6
.2

1 0 .4
9 .2

-

-

-

-

-

5
9

2 .4
.6

2 5 .7
6 .5

1
4
8

.1
.3
.5

1 5 .5
1 .4
1 .0

-

_

_
3
7

' .3
.9

2
1
2

1 6 .3
3 .7

C O N D IT IO N S

.1

_

4 .8
3 .4
. 1

(3 )
(3 )

_

IN T E R U N IO N OR I N T R A U N IO N
HATTERS

NOT

_

R EPO RTED

1 /1 3 7

4 0 .0

1 9 7 .9

317

7 7 .7

2 0 0 .9

30

2 .5

1 /5 0

1 6 .4

1 4 7 .0

17

7 .5

2 2 .5

12

1 .2

_

A G R IC U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ...........................................................................................................
C O N T R A C T C O N S T R U C T IO N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C O M M U N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
B H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................
F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND B E A L E S T A T E . . . . .
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 6 / ....................................................................................

_
.4

3

-

-

.1
.1

-

-

2
1
2

.1

.3

1

(3 )
2 .2

-

.1
-

1 .4
.1
4 .4

4 .4

2 .8

1

1 .7
1 .7
4 .8
(3 )

1 2 .2
8 .6
4 .8
1. 1

1
1
-

-

2 3 .6

5 0 .8

300

7 0 .3

1 7 8 .4

1
60
214

(3 )
3 0 .6
2 2 .6

.8
6 6 .6
7 3 .7

1 3 .8
1 .0

2 8 .9
5 .3

_

_

1 /8 7
-

-

-

64
3

1 9 .8
.3

3 4 .0
.7

8
1

1 .2
(3 )

-

3 .7
.1

1

2. 3
10. 1

(3 )

10

2 .2

11
5

1
9

(3 )
2 .2

-

-

_
.4
. 1
.1

_

-

-

1 .2

(3 )

3

-

_

-

_

1 .3
_

1 7 .0
_

.3
.3

2
2

.5
4 .0

.3
.2

5
6
_
3
-

2 .5
-

18

_

(3 )
3 .2

7 /.2
1 .8
.6
.5

.2

-

.4
-

_

.1
.9

(3 )

.

_
-

_

1 .7

7
10
1
1

9 .1
-

2
1
1

1 3 .8
. 2

14

.3

-

-

.5

.1

(3 )

-

-

(3 )

1
3

_
-

-

1

-

-

.1

-

-

1 6 .5

_

-

-

.2

3 3 .5

_

1

(3 )

.5

-

-

2

1

-

(3 )

1

8 9 .7
1 .5
2 3 .3

_

-

-

-

.9
1 .5
3 .4

-

-

1
2

.3
.7

-

-

3

-

2
2

.4

-

-

-

.4

_

-

.4
.2

1 The n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s r e p o r t e d f o r a m a j o r i n d u s tr y g ro u p o r
d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m of i t s c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l s t o p ­
p a g e s o c c u r r in g in 2 o r m o r e g ro u p s a r e c o u n te d in e a c h . W o r k e r s in ­
v o lv ed an d d ay s id le a r e a llo c a te d am o n g th e r e s p e c t i v e g ro u p s .
2 In c lu d e s o th e r fin is h e d p r o d u c ts m a d e f r o m f a b r i c s an d s i m i l a r
m a te r ia ls .
3 F e w e r th a n 50.
4 E x c lu d e s o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e ry , an d tr a n s p o r ta t io n e q u ip m e n t.
5 In c lu d e s p r o f e s s i o n a l , s c ie n tif ic , an d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n t s ; p h o to ­




2
-

.1
(3 )

_

_

.3

(3 )

2
1

_
1 .1

2

M A C H IN E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R IC A L M A C H IN E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N E Q U IP M E N T ..................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ...............................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S M A N U FA C T U R IN G I N D U S T R I E S . .
N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G .....................................................................

_

-

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M IC A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
RU B B ER AND M IS C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ..........................
PR IM A R Y M ETAL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R IC A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / .....................................

1 8 1 .1

_
55
5

_

I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................

A P P A R E L , E T C . 2 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N IT U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................

.4
_

-

8 .2

4 .5
2 3 .2
2 0 .9

.4

M A N U F A C T U R IN G ..............................................................................
ORD N A N CE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
FOOD AND K IN D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
TOBA CCO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

.9
.1

(3 )

-

1

1 /8 1

1
1

-

-

7 0 .3

1 .6
3 9 .9
9 .6

.8

5 .6
3 .4

-

-

-

.8

-

~

-

7 .2
.3

.6

-

-

_

3

-

-

8 .4
.1

*

1 .8
. 1
_

_

.3
.1

1
1

_

-

_

2 6 .6
2 .7

4 .9
.2

-

_

"

3
1
-

1
2
3

3 .0

.8

O T H E R H O R K IN G

ALL

_
_

5

M A C H IN E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R IC A L M A C H IN E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N E Q U IP M E N T .................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S M A N U FA C T U R IN G I N D U S T R I E S . .
N O N M A N U FA C T U B IN G ....................................................................

. 3
.3

-

-

A P P A R E L , E T C . 2 / ...........................................................................
LU B B E R AND MOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N IT U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M IC A L S AND A L L IE D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND B E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................

. 1
.1

6 .6
3 .7
_

.3
-

2 .3
“

g ra p h ic and o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .
6
T he s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h av e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p obse e n
es,
d e e m e d to fa ll w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e f in itio n of a w o r k s to p p a g e . T h is d e c is io n d o es n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n t h a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s
ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of a n y law o r p u b lic p o lic y .
' Id le n e s s r e s u lt i n g f r o m s to p p a g e (s ) b e g in n in g in p r i o r y e a r(s ) ,
N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,
t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

25

sum s

of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l

Table 13. Work stoppages by major issue and size, 1975
M A JO R

IS S U E

TO TA L

6
UNDER
20
ROBBERS

AND

100
AND UNDER
250
HOBKEBS

20
AND U N DER
100
HOBKEBS

STO PPA G ES
ALL

S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

GEM BBA L R A G E C H A R G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E M E N T A B Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
HAGS A D J U S T M E N T S ...........................................................................
H O U BS O F H O B K .....................................................................................
O T H E B C O H T B A C T U A L H A T T E B S ..............................................
U N IO N O B G A N IZ A T IO N AND S E C U B I T Y ...........................
J O B S E C U B I T Y ........................................................................ . . . . .
P L A N T A D H I N I S T B A T I O N ........................................... ...................
O TH EB R O B B IN G C O N D I T I O N S ..................................................
IN T E B U N IO N OB IN T B A U N IO N H A T T E B S ........................
NOT B E P O B T E D ........................................................................................

250
UNDER
500
HOBKEBS

AND

B E G IN N IN G

IN

5 ,0 0 0
AND UNDBB
1 0 ,0 0 0
HOBKEBS

1 0 ,0 0 0
HOBKEBS
OB
HOBS

Y E A fi

5 ,0 3 1

614

1 ,8 8 2

1 ,2 3 6

743

321

198

17

20

2 ,6 1 9
53
126
7
75
268
257
1 ,1 4 2
137
317
30

313
7
12
2
16
77
20
59
15
83
10

1 ,0 7 1
17
42
5
30
128
74
326
37
140
12

614
13
34
-

312
2
21
-

170
11
11
-

120
2
6

9
1
-

9
37
77
364
41
42
5

8
11
54
275
26
31
3

5
11
15
76
12
10
-

7
3
9
36
6
9
-

4
3
-

10
1
4
3
2
-

H O B K EB S IN V O L V E D
S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

8 1 0 .4
2 3 .0
3 8 .5
.3
2 3 .6
9 2 .3
2 0 5 .7
4 3 1 .6
4 0 .0
7 7 .7
2 .5

(IN

TH O U SA N D S)

7 .7
'

9 8 .0

1 9 7 .3

2 5 9 .6

2 1 8 .3

3 8 2 .3

1 0 8 .3

4 7 4 .0

4 .0
.1
.2

1 ,7 4 5 .6

G E N E B A L R A G E C H A N G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E M E N T A R Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
RAGE A D JU S T M E N T S ........................................................ ' . ...............
HOUBS O F H O B K .....................................................................................
O T H E B C O N T B A C T U A L M A T T E R S ...............................................
U N IO N O B G A N IZ A T IO N AND S E C U B I T Y ...........................
J O B S E C U R I T Y ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..............................................................
O T H E B R O B B IN G C O N D I T I O N S ..................................................
I N T E B U N IO N O B IN T B A U N IO N H A T T E B S .......................
NOT B E P O B T E D ........................................................................................

ALL

1 ,0 0 0
500
AN D U N D ER AND UNDER
5 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0
HOBKEBS
HOBKEBS

5 4 .8
1 .0
2 .4
.2
1 .4
5 .9
4 .2
1 8 .8
2 .0
6 .6
.7

9 4 .5
1 .7
5 .6
1 .3
5 .6
1 3 .4
6 2 .0
6 .3
6 .2
.7

1 0 6 .4
.6
7 .6
2 .6
3 .9
1 8 .9
9 8 .9
8 .8
1 0 .9
.9

1 1 8 .3
7 .7
7 .6
3 .6
7 .4
1 0 .9
4 9 .0
7 .6
6 .2
-

2 1 5 .1
2 .9
1 5 .2
1 4 .5
6 .8
1 8 .5
7 3 .0
1 5 .2
2 1 .2
-

5 3 .3
9 .0
-

1 6 3 .9
6 1 .9
1 1 5 .3
1 0 7 .3
2 5 .6
-

(D
.2
.9
.2
.8
.2
.9
.1

DAYS

ID L E

D U R IN G

YEAB

(IN

2 4 .2
2 1 .9
-

T H O U SA N D S)

S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

1 7 8 .5

1 ,9 1 9 .3

3 ,1 5 7 .5

3 ,7 1 6 .8

4 ,7 0 1 .5

7 ,2 6 8 .1

2 ,8 1 3 .1

7 ,4 8 2 .0

G E N E B A L R A G E C H A N G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E M E N T A R Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
RAGE A D J U S T M E N T S ...........................................................................
HOUBS O F H O B K .....................................................................................
O T H E B C O N T B A C T U A L H A T T B B S ..............................................
U N IO N O B G A N IZ A T IO N AND S E C U B I T Y . . . .................
J O B S E C U R I T Y ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D H I N I S T B A T I O N ...............................................................
O T H E B R O B B IN G C O N D I T I O N S ..................................................
IN T E B U N IO N OB IN T B A U N IO N H A T T B B S .......................
NOT R E P O R T E D ........................................................................................

2 2 ,2 2 1 .7
2 7 7 .8
3 6 4 .3
9 .8
4 0 5 .8
1 ,4 8 8 .0
3 ,1 5 3 .6
2 ,8 8 3 .7
1 9 7 .9
2 0 0 .9
3 3 .5

9 7 .6
1 .3
1 .1
.3
6 .5
4 0 .5
7 .5
7 .8
4 .4
7 .1
4 .4

1 ,3 0 3 .6
1 8 .2
3 8 .0
9 .5
3 9 .2
2 5 5 .9
9 4 .5
9 7 .7
2 0 .0
3 0 .7
1 2 .0

2 ,4 3 6 .3
4 0 .9
4 9 .5
-

2 ,7 0 3. 1
9 .0
6 6 .7
-

3 ,8 1 4 .C
7 2 .7
6 7 .8
-

5 ,2 0 8 .1
1 0 8 .6
1 4 1 .0
-

3 3 .8
1 5 7 .0
2 1 9 .0
1 8 5 .2
1 1 .7
2 1 .6
2 .6

4 9 .5
1 2 6 .0
3 8 5 .5
3 2 3 .4
1 7 .2
2 1 .8
1 4 .6

1 ,9 6 7 .0
2 7 .0
1 5 7 .3
6 6 1 .8
-

4 ,6 9 2 .1
5 4 9 .9
1 ,5 5 0 .0
6 3 9 .9
5 0 .1

ALL

1 F e w e r th a n 50.




NOTE:
equal to ta ls .

26

1 4 1 .9
1 7 3 .9
1 0 0 .5
2 1 4 .7
1 0 2 .1
.1 3 .8

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s
D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

1 3 4 .8
1 8 4 .8
6 3 9 .3
7 5 3 .2
4 2 .5
5 5 .9
*

of in d iv id u a l it e m s

m ay

not

Table 14. Work stoppages by industry, 1975
(WORKERS AMD DAYS IDLE IN THOOSANDS)
STOPPAGES

B E G IN N IN G

IN

YEAR

DAYS I D L E DO RIM G YEAR
(A L L S T O P P A G E S )

IN D U S T R Y
N O HBER

HEAR
D O R A T IO N
(D A Y S ) 1 /

NOBKERS
IN V O L V E D

P E R C E N T OF
E S T . TOTAL
W O RK IN G
T IM E 2 /

NOHBEB

A L L I B O O S T B I B S .....................................................................................

1 /5 ,0 3 1

2 2 .0

1 ,7 4 5 .6

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

0 .1 6

H A N D ?A C T O B IM G ...............................................................................................

3 /1 ,8 9 7

3 7 .9

4 6 3 .8

1 4 ,8 7 6 .1

.3 2

O RD N A N C E AMD A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................................
G O B S , H O W IT Z E R S , M O R T A R S , AMD B E L A T E D
E Q O I P H E N T .....................................................................................................
A H H O M IT IO N , E X C E P T EO R S H A L L A S M S ..............................
T A N K S , AMD TA N K C O M P O N E N T S .....................................................
S I G H T I N G AND F I B E C O N T R O L E Q O I P H E N T .......................
S H A L L A B H S .........................................................................................................
S H A L L ARMS A H H O N IT IO M .....................................................................
ORD N A N CE AND A C C E S S O R I E S NOT E L S E W H E R E
C L A S S I F I E D ..................................................................................................

9

40. 5

6 .9

1 9 3 .7

.4 5

1
7

1 4 5 .0
3 8 .7
-

.2
6 .4
-

1 6 .5
1 7 2 .1
-

1

.3

5 .1

FO O D AND K IN D R E D P R O D O C T S ..............................................................
H EA T P R O D O C T S ...............................................................................................
D A IR Y P R O D O C T S ...........................................................................................
CANNED AND P R E S E R V E D F R O I T S , V E G E T A B L E S ,
AND S E A F O O D S ........................................................................................
G R A IN H I L L P R O D O C T S ...........................................................................
BAKERY P R O D O C T S ........................................................................................
S O G A R ........................................................................................................................
C O N F E C T IO N E R Y AND R E L A T E D P R O D O C T S ...........................
B E V E R A G E S ...........................................................................................................
H IS C E L L A N E O O S FO O D P R E P A R A T IO N S AMD K IN D R E D
P R O D O C T S ........................................................................................................

166
28
12

2 3 .6
3 3 .1
13. 1

2 9 .1
3 .8
1 .4

8 3 8 .4
3 7 4 .3
1 3 .5

17
19
18
3
3
49

24. 1
4 4 .4
1 0 .4
4 0 .6
5 .1
1 7 .5

4 .2
3 .2
4 .7
.4
.8
8 .2

7 3 .1
1 1 0 .7
5 3 .7
1 0 .8
3 7 .5
1 0 8 .5

17

3 4 .7

T O B A C C O H A M O F A C T O R E S ..............................................................................
C I G A R E T T E S ........................................................................................................
C I G A R S .....................................................................................................................
TO BA CCO (C H E W IN G AND S M O K IN G ) AND S H O F F . . . .
TO BA CCO S T E H H IN G AND R E D R Y IM G ...........................................

_

T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D O C T S ...........................................................................
BBOADWOVEN F A B R I C H I L L S , C O T T O N ....................................
BBOADWOVEN F A B R I C H I L L S , H A N -H A D E F I B E R
AND S I L K ........................................................................................................
BBOADWOVEN F A B R I C H I L L S , WOOL IN C L O D IN G
D Y E IN G AND F I N I S H I N G .................................................................
NARROW F A B R I C S AND O T H E R S H A L L W A R E S H I L L S :
C O T T O N , W O O L, S I L K , AND H A N -H A D E F I B E R . . .
K N I T T I N G H I L L S ...........................................................................................
D Y E IN G AND F I N I S H I N G T E X T I L E S , E X C E P T WOOL
F A B R I C S AND K N I T G O O D S ...........................................................
F L O O R C O V E R IN G H I L L S ........................................................................
YARN AND T H R E A D H I L L S ................................................................. .'
H IS C E L L A N E O O S T E X T I L E G O O D S .................................................

2 2 .0

2 .3

5 6 .3

_

-

_
-

_
-

-

*

"

-

2 .2
.7

.2 0

2 7 .3
2 .6
2 .0

21
2

1 6 .5
5 .2

-

_

-

1

3 3 .0

.1

2

1 2 .4

.3

.5

1
5

3 5 .0
2 1 .6

.2
.4

3 .8
6 .4

5
1
1
3

1 0 .5
6 .0
3 .0
3 9 .1

.1
.2
.1
.3

.5
.6
.4
1 0 .5

55

1 0 .5

1 0 .0

1 0 9 .5

1

64. »

(9 )

19
16

6 .9
8 .3

3 .5
4 .7

1 8 .3
4 3 .1

4
1
3

.4
.1
.3

3 .5
.9
3 .8

3
8

9 .9
8 .0
1 9 .2
4 4 .8
2 9 .0

L O H E E R AND WOOD P R O D O C T S , E X C E P T F O R N I T O R E . . .
L O G G IN G C A R P S AND L O G G IN G C O N T R A C T O R S .................
S A W M IL L S AND P L A N IN G H I L L S .....................................................
H IL L W O R K , V B N B E R , PL Y W O O D , AMD
P R E F A B R IC A T E D ST B O C T O R A L WOOD P R O D O C T S . . .
WOODEN C O N T A I N E R S ..................................................................................
H IS C E L L A N E O O S WOOD P R O D O C T S .................................................

61
4
21

2 2 .7
2 0 .0
1 4 .2

25
2
10

F O R N IT O R E AMD F I X T O R E S ........................................................................
H O O SE H O L D F O R N I T O R E ...........................................................................
O F F I C E F O R N I T O R E .....................................................................................
P O B L I C B U I L D I N G S AND R E L A T E D F O R N I T O R E ..............
P A R T I T I O N S , S H E L V I N G , L O C K E R S , AND O F F I C E
AND S T O R E F I X T O R E S ........................................................................
H IS C E L L A N B O O S F O R N IT O R E AND F I X T O R E S ....................

.0 1

A P P A R E L AND O T H E R F I N I S H E D P R O D O C T S HADE FROM
F A B R I C S AND S I H I L A B M A T E R IA L S ...........................................
H E N 'S , Y O O T H S ', AND B O Y S ' S O I T S , C O A T S , AND
O V E R C O A T S .....................................................................................................
H E N 'S , Y O O T H S ', AND B O Y S ' F O R N I S H I M G S , WORK
C L O T H IN G , AND A L L I E D G A R M E N T S ....................................
W O M E N 'S , H I S S E S ' , A N D J O M I O R S * O O T E B W E A R .. .
W O M E N 'S , H I S S E S ' , C H I L D R E N 'S , AND I N F A N T S '
O N D E R G A R H E N T S ........................................................................................
H A T S , C A P S , AMD H I L L I N E R Y ........................................................
G I R L S ' , C H I L D R E N 'S , AND I N F A N T S ' O O T E B W E A R .
FO R G O O D S ...........................................................................................................
H IS C E L L A N E O O S A P P A R E L AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................
H IS C E L L A N E O O S F A B R IC A T E D T E X T I L E P R O D O C T S ..

-

.7

.0 4
|

. 1
.9

2 1 .6
1 7 .7

1 7 .2
2 .1
9 .8

2 8 2 .6
2 3 .4
1 0 3 .4

32. 1
3 1 .0
7 6 .3

4 .1
.3
1 .0

9 1 .0
5 .8
5 9 .0

57
30
6
4

45. 5
4 0 .9
7 8 .6
1 4 .7

1 1 .6
6 ‘. 7
2 .2
1 .0

12
5

3 6 .2
2 6 .4

1 .5
.1

3 9 .1
3 .3

P A P E R AND A L L IE D P R O D O C T S ..............................................................
P O L P H I L L S ........................................................................................................
P O L P H I L L S E X C E P T B O IL D IN G P A P E R H I L L S ..............
P A P E R B O A R D H I L L S .....................................................................................
C O N V E R T E D P A P E R AND P A P E R B O A R D P R O D O C T S ,
E X C E P T C O N T A IN E R S AMD B O X E S ...........................................
P A P E R B O A R D C O N T A IN E R S AND B O X E S ....................................
B O IL D IN G P A P E R AND B O I L D I N G BO A RD H I L L S . . . .

68
3
11
6

6
4
9
3

1 2 .2
1 .3
4 .8
.6

6 2 2 .2
3 9 .5
3 2 2 .9
1 5 .3

23
23
2

4 8 .0
4 6 .6
5 9 .0

2 .4
2 .3
.7

8 3 .4
8 6 .9
7 4 .2

P R I N T I N G , P O B L I S H I M G , AMD A L L I E D I N D U S T R I E S . .
N E W S P A P E R S : P O B L IS H IM G AND P R I N T I N G .......................
P E R I O D I C A L S : P U B L I S H I N G AND P R I N T I N G ....................
B O O K S ........................................................................................................................
H IS C E L L A N E O O S P U B L I S H I N G ...........................................................
C O H H E R C IA L P R I N T I N G ...........................................................................
M A N IF O L D B U S I N E S S F O R H S ..............................................................
G R E E T IN G C A R D P O B L I S H I M G ; .................................. : ..................
B L A N K B O O K S , L O O S E L E A F B I N D E R S AND
B O O K B IN D IN G WORK..............................................................................
S E R V I C E I N D U S T R I E S FO R T H E P R I N T I N G T R A D E ..

47
13
4
-

1 6 .1
1 0 .2
-

1 3 .5
7 .9
-

2 3 7 .6
1 4 2 .2
-




S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d

5 .7
3. 3
4 .5
6 .4

3 5 4 .4
1 8 0 .4 1 2 1 .9
9 .8

.9

1 .2

1 .5
1 8 .5
2 2 .0
-

-

-

26
1
-

3 .7
.3
-

5 1 .8
4 .5
-

3

68. 1

.8

3 7 .3

l /-

o f t a b le .

27

5

.2 0

.3 1

.3 8

.0 9

Table 1 . Work stoppages by industry, 1975—Continued
4
(WORKERS AMD DAYS IDLE IM THOUSANDS)
STO PPA G ES

B E G IN N IN G

IN

YEAR

CAYS I D L E D U R IN G YEAR
(A L L S T O P P A G E S )

IM D U S T B Y
NUMBER

H A H U F A C T O R IN G

-

MEAN
D U R A T IO N
(D A Y S ) ! /

WORKERS
IN V O L V E D

NUMBER

PER C EN T OF
E S T . TOTAL
WORKING
T IM E 2 /

C O N T IN U E D

C H E B I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................................
IN D U S T R I A L I N O R G A N IC AND O R G A N IC C H E M IC A L S .
P L A S T I C S M A T E R IA L S AND S Y N T H E T IC R E S I N S ,
S Y N T H E T IC R U B B E R , AND O T H E R MAN-MADE
F I B E R S , E X C E P T G L A S S ..................................................................
D R U G S ........................................................................................................................
S O A P , D E T E R G E N T S , AMD C L E A N IN G
P R E P A R A T I O N S , P E R F U M E S , C O S M E T I C S , AND
O T H E R T O I L E T P R E P A R A T I O N S .................................................
P A I N T S , T A R N I S H E S , L A C Q U E R S , E N A M E L S , AND
A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..................................................................................
GUM AND HOOD C H E M I C A L S .................................................................
A G R IC U L T U R A L C H E M I C A L S ..................................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S C H E M IC A L P R O D U C T S .....................................

109
44

5 2 .2
4 3 .0

1 7 .7
1 0 .1

7 4 7 .4
3 0 3 .6

16
5

6 5 .4
3 2 .9

1 .0
1 .3

4 2 .2
4 7 .6

7

9 4 .4

.5

4 6 .5

11
4
5
17

4 1 .9
1 5 2 .6
1 3 .5
5 7 .6

.7
1 .0
.5
2 .5

2 0 .5
1 0 0 .0
1 3 .9
1 7 3 .0

P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D P R O D U C T S ..................
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G ..............................................................................
P A Y IN G AND R O O F IN G M A T E R IA L S ..............................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S P R O D U C T S O F P E T R O L E U M AND
C O A L ......................................................................................................................

30
25
5

41. 1
4 1 .8
1 4 .0

2 0 .4
1 9 .9
.5

6 1 3 .3
6 0 3 .6
9 .7

R U B B E R AND M IS C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S P R O D U C T S . . .
T I R E S AND I N N E R T U B E S .....................................................................
RU B B E R FO O T W E A R ........................................................................................
R E C L A IM E D R U B B E R .....................................................................................
F A B R IC A T E D R U B B E R P R O D U C T S NOT E L S E W H E R E
C L A S S I F I E D ..................................................................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S P R O D U C T S ....................................

57
6
2
-

2 8 .2
1 5 .8
2 7 .7
-

1 0 .4
3 .0
1 .0
-

17
32

4 1 .3
3 0 .3

2 .7
3 .6

9
3

L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................................
L E A T H E R T A N N IN G AND F I N I S H I N G ...........................................
IN D U S T R I A L L E A T H E R B E L T IN G AND P A C K IN G ..............
BOOT AND S H O E C U T ST O C K AND F I N D I N G S ....................
F O O T W E A R , E X C E P T R U B B E R ..............................................................
L E A T H E R G L O V E S AND M I T T E N S .....................................................
L U G G A G E ..................................................................................................................
HAN D BA G S AND O T H E R P E R S O N A L L E A T H E R G O O D S ..
L E A T H E R GOODS NOT E L S E W H E R E C L A S S I F I E D ..............

-

-

-

0 .2 9

1 .2 3

238. 1
3 5 .4
2 0 .3
-

.1 6

9 0 .2
9 2 .3
9 .3
4 .5

2

1 1 .5
2 4 .6
1 7 .0
5 .3
2 6 .5

S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................................
F L A T G L A S S ........................................................................................................
G L A S S AND G L A S S W A R E , P R E S S E D OR BLOW N.................
G L A S S P R O D U C T S , H A D E FROM P U R C H A S E D G L A S S . .
C E M E N T , H Y D R A U L IC ..................................................................................
S T R U C T U R A L C L A Y P R O D U C T S ...........................................................
P O T T E R Y AND R E L A T E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
C O N C R E T E , G Y P S U M , AND P L A S T E R P R O D U C T S ..............
C U T S T O N E AND S T O N E P R O D U C T S ...............................................
A B R A S I V E S , A S B E S T O S , AND M IS C E L L A N E O U S
N O M H E T A L L IC M IN E R A L P R O D U C T S .................................... *

140
3
6
7
3
13
10
71
9

2 5 .0
4 0 .0
1 3 .5
1 1 .3
2 1 .2
3 7 .9
1 2 .6
3 1 .3
2 6 .7

23

2 9 .5

2 .7

161

2 9 .8

4 2 .6

1 ,1 6 8 .9

33
40

1 8 .0
2 8 .3

1 3 .6
1 1 .6

3 1 3 .2
2 8 5 .0

3

1 .5

1 .6

2 .1

7

2 2 .8

.4

8 .7

F A B R IC A T E D M ETAL P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T O R D N A N C E ,
M A C H IN E R Y , AND T R A N S P O R T A T IO N E Q U I P M E N T . . . .
M ETAL C A N S .........................................................................................................
C U T L E R Y , H A N D T O O L S , AND G E N E R A L H A R D W A R E ...
H E A T IN G A P P A R A T U S (E X C E P T E L E C T R I C ) AND
P L U M B IN G F I X T U R E S ...........................................................................
F A B R IC A T E D S T R U C T U R A L M ETAL P R O D U C T S ....................
SCREW M A C H IN E P R O D U C T S , B O L T S , N U T S ,
S C R E W S , AND R I V E T S ........................................................................
M ETAL S T A M P I N G S ........................................................................................
C O A T I N G , E N G R A V IN G , AND A L L I E D S E R V I C E S . . . .
M IS C E L L A N E O U S F A B R IC A T E D W IR E P R O D U C T S ..............
M IS C E L L A N E O U S F A B R IC A T E D M ETA L P R O D U C T S . . . .
M A C H IN E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................................
E N G IN E S AND T U R B I N E S ........................................................................
FARM M A C H IN E R Y AND E Q U IP M E N T ..............................................
C O N S T R U C T IO N , M I N I N G , AND M A T E R IA L S
H A N D L IN G M A C H IN E R Y AND E Q U I P M E N T ...........................
M ETA LW O RK IN G M A C H IN E R Y AND E Q U IP M E N T ....................
S P E C I A L IN D U S T R Y M A C H IN E R Y , E X C E P T
M ETALW O RK IN G M A C H IN E R Y ...........................................................
G E N E R A L IN D U S T R I A L M A C H IN E R Y AND E Q U IP M E N T .
O F F I C E , C O M P U T IN G , AND A C C O U N T IN G M A C H IN E S .
S E R V I C E IN D U S T R Y M A C H IN E S ........................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S M A C H IN E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .




1
3
-

1 .0
.3

.0 1

5 8 .6

P R IM A R Y M ETAL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................................
B L A S T F U R N A C E S , S T E E L W O R K S, AND R O L L IN G
AND F I N I S H I N G H I L L S .....................................................................
IR O N AND S T E E L F O U N D R I E S ...........................................................
P R IM A R Y S M E L T IN G AND R E F I N I N G OF N O N FE R R O U S
M E T A L S ...............................................................................................................
SEC O N D A R Y S M E L T IN G AND R E F I N I N G OF
N O N FE R R O U S M E T A L S ...........................................................................
R O L L I N G , D R A W IN G , AND E X T R U D IN G O F
N O N FE R R O U S M E T A L S ...........................................................................
N O N FE R R O U S F O U N D R I E S ........................................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S P R IM A R Y M ETAL P R O D U C T S ....................

-

-

-

(4 )
.7
(4 )
1 7 .6
.4
1 .3
1 .9
.6
1 .6
3 .0
5 .9
.1

.5
3 .4
.9
4 8 4 .3
1 0 .1
1 3 2 .3
1 5 .5
9 .0
7 4 .8
4 2 .3
1 3 9 .1
2 .6

32
21
25

4 7 .6
5 6 .0
38. 3

5 .5
3 .1
6 .8

3 9 .0
3 5 .4
5 0 .0

4 8 .6
1 .8
4 .8

1 ,7 7 9 .3
6 2 .3
1 7 9 .4

13
154

7 3 .4
3 1 .8

2 .2
2 3 .7

.3 9

2 2 1 .8
1 2 5 .9
2 1 2 .4

309
11
25

.3 1

1 0 0 .7
8 8 2 .6

14
23
18
15
36

7 1 .7
36. 1
3 4 .3
2 6 .0
4 1 .3

2 .7
3 .8
1 .1
1 .6
7 .0

274
32
13

37. 4
3 4 .2
2 4 .9

7 4 .4
2 1 .1
2 .7

2 ,3 7 0 .8
5 0 5 .4
6 0 .4

46
55

2 9 .8
5 1 .5

1 6 .4
9 .8

4 2 7 .7
381 .4

30
44
3
28
23

5
3
3
3
2

6 .9
6 .7
.1
6 .8
4 .0

3 1 3 .4
2 4 1 .8
2 .8
3 5 5 .7
8 2 .1

Se e footnotes at end of tab le.

28

5. 5
8 .9
5 .3
9 .8
8 .0

.5 3

1 8 7 .4
9 9 .8
2 5 .9
4 2 .1
199. 1
.4 5

Table 14 Work stoppages by industry, 1975—Continued
(WORKERS 1VD OATS IDLE IB THOOSAIDS)
STOPPAGES

E E G IE B IR G

IB

Y EA R

DA Y S I D L E D U R IB G YBAR
(A L L S T O P P A G E S )

IR D U S T B Y
RUBBER

H A B U F A C T U R IB G

-

HEAR
D U R A T IO B
(D A IS ) 1 /

WORKERS
IH V O L V E D

BO BBER

PERCEH T OF
E S T . TOTAL
W O RK IBG
T IH E 2 /

C O R T IR U E D

E L E C T B IC A L H A C H I B E R Y , B Q O I P H B B T , ABD
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................................
E L E C T R I C T R A B S H I S S I O B ABD D I S T B I B O T I O B
E Q D I P H E B T ................................................. ...................................................
E L E C T B IC A L I R D O S T B I A L A P P A R A T U S .....................................
HO U SEH O LD A P P L I A B C E S ........................................................................
E L E C T R I C L I G H T I B G ABD B I R I B G E Q U I P B E N T ..............
R A D IO ABD T E L E V I S I O B B E C B I T I B G S E T S , E X C E P T
C O H H U B IC A T IO B T Y P E S .....................................................................
C O R E U R IC A T IO R E Q U I P H E B T ..............................................................
E L E C T R O B IC C O H P O R E R T S ABD A C C E S S O R I E S ..................
H IS C E L L A B E O U S E L E C T R IC A L H A C H I R E R Y ,
E Q U I P H E B T , ABD S U P P L I E S ........................................................
T R A B S P O R T A T IO B E Q U I P H E B T .................................................................
H O TOR Y E H IC L B S A B C H O TOR V E H I C L E E Q U I P H E B T .
A IR C R A F T ABD P A R T S ..............................................................................
S H I P ABD B O A T B U IL D IB G ABD B E P A I R I R G .......................
R A IL R O A D E Q U I P H E B T ..............................................................................
H O T O R C Y C L E S , B I C Y C L E S , ABD P A R T S .................................
H IS C E L L A B E O U S T R A B S P O R T A T IO B E Q U I P H E B T ..............
P R O F E S S I O B A L , S C I E R T I F I C , ABD C O B T R O L L IB G
I B S T R U H E B T S ; P H O T O G R A P H IC ABD O P T I C A L
G O O D S ; B A T C H E S ABD C L O C K S ........................................................
E B G I R E E B I H G , L A B O R A T O R Y , ABD S C I E R T I F I C ABD
R E S E A R C H I B S T R U H E B T S ABD A S S O C IA T E D
E Q U I P H E B T .....................................................................................................
IB S T R U H E B T S F O R H E A S U R I B G , C O B T R O L L I B G , ABD
I B D I C A T I B G P H Y S I C A L C H A R A C T E R I S T I C S ....................
O P T I C A L I B S T R U H E B T S ABD L E R S E S ........................................
S U R G I C A L , H E D I C A L , ABD D E B T A L IB S T R U H E B T S
ABD S U P P L I E S ...........................................................................................
O P H T H A L IH IC G O O D S .................................................................................
P H O T O G R A P H IC E Q U IP H E B T ABD S U P P L I E S .......................
H A T C H E S , C L O C K S , CLOCKWORK O P E R A T E D D E V I C E S
ABD P A R T S .....................................................................................................
H IS C E L L A B E O U S H A B U F A C T U R IB G I R D U S T R I E S ....................
J E W E L R Y , S I L V E R W A R E , ABD P L A T E D H A R E .....................
H U S IC A L I B S T R U H E B T S ...........................................................................
T O Y S , A H U S B H E B T , S P O R T I B G ABD A T H L E T IC
G O O D S ..................................................................................................................
P E B S , P E B C I L S , ABD O T H E R O F F I C E ABD
A R T I S T S ' H A T E R I A L S ........................................................................ '
C OSTUHE JE W E L R Y , COSTUHE B O V E L T IE S ,
B U T T O B S , ABD H IS C E L L A B E O U S B O T I O B S ,
E X C E P T P R E C I O U S H E T A L S ...........................................................
H IS C E L L A B E O U S H A B U F A C T U R IB G I R D U S T R I E S ..............

120

2 8 .3

3 4 .0

8 5 0 .7

25
26
13
17

2 5 .4
4 9 .0
2 4 .4
20. 1

8 .9
7 .2
5 .2
2 .5

1 6 1 .7
2 6 0 .8
1 5 1 .9
4 4 .2

8
12
9

1 0 .5
2 1 .4
2 9 .4

1 .4
2 .2
3 .4

5 8 .3
6 8 .1
6 9 .0

10

1 3 .2

137
65
20
30
8
-

5 9 .3
28. 1
7 0 .0
8 6 .6
35. 1
-

3 .2
7 7 .9
1 8 .5
2 2 .8
2 4 .8
1 0 .5
-

0 .1 9

3 6 .5
3 ,4 0 4 .9
438. 1
1 ,2 4 5 .6
1 ,4 3 1 .4
2 6 1 .0
-

14

3 2 .5

1 .2

2 8 .7

32

3 3 .7

1 0 .7

2 8 7 .9

.8 2

7

8 .0

5 .6

5 4 .3

12
2

8 0 .8
3 8 .7

3 .1
(4 )

1 7 5 .0
9 .1

5

4 3 .4
-

.4

3

2 0 .4

.2 3

1 8 .0
5 /1 .9
1 .8

-

.1

3

2 7 .0

1 .4

2 7 .8

37
4
1

2 8 .2
4 6 .2
1 3 .0

5 .8
.9
.4

2 5 5 .6
5 8 .6
3 .5

9

5 5 .3

1 .3

6 1 .6

4

2 0 .8

.9

1 0 5 .5

.2
2 .1

2 .5
2 4 .0

3
16

24. 1
1 5 .9

.2 5

H O B H A R U F A C T U R IH G .....................................................................................

1 /3 ,1 3 4

1 6 .6

1 ,2 8 1 .8

1 6 ,3 6 0 .9

.1 1

A G R IC U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , ABD F I S H E R I E S ...........................
A G R IC U L T U R A L P R O D U C T IO H ..............................................................
A G R IC U L T U R A L S E R V I C E S ABD H U B T IB G ABD
T R A P P I B G .........................................................................................................
F O R E S T R Y ...............................................................................................................
F I S H E R I E S ............................................................................................................

7
3

72. 5
8 3 .8

.7
.5

3 5 .9
3 1 .6

.0 1

3

1 8 .0
-

1

(6 )

1 ,1 6 5
6
-

5 .8
5 7 .0
-

3 9 1 .6
.7
-

81. 1
3 1 .4
-

-

H I B I B G ............................................................................................................................
H E T A L H I B I B G ..................................................................................................
IR O R O R B S .....................................................................................................
C O P P E R O R E S ...............................................................................................
L E A D ABD Z I B C O R E S ........................................................................
GO LD ABD S I L V E R O R E S .................................................................
B A U X IT E ABD A L U H IB U H O R E S .................................................
F E R R O A L L O Y O R E S E X C E P T V A B A D IU H ..............................
H E T A L H I B I B G S E R V I C E S ..............................................................
H IS C B L L A R E O U S H E T A L O R E S .....................................................
A N T H R A C IT E H I B I B G ..................................................................................
B I T U H IB O U S C O A L ABD L I G R I T E .................................................
C R U D E P E T R O L E U H ABD BA TU RA L G A S ....................................
C R U D E P E T R O L E U H ABD B A TU RA L G A S ..............................
BA T U R A L G A S L I Q U I D S .....................................................................
O I L ABD G A S F I E L D S E R V I C E S ..............................................
H I B I B G ABD Q U A R R Y IH G O F B O B H E T A L L IC
H I B E R A L S , E X C B P T F U E L S ...........................................................
D I H B E S I O R S T O B B ..................................................................................
C R U S H E D ABD B R O K E R S T O R E ,
IB C L U D I B G R I P R A P ........................................................................
S A B D ABD G R A V E L .................................................................................
C L A Y , C E R A H I C , ABD R E F R A C T O R Y H I B E R A L S . . .
C H E H IC A L ABD F E R T I L I Z E R H IB E R A L H I B I B G . . .
B O B H E T A L L IC H IB E R A L S (E X C E P T F U E L S )
S E R V I C E S ..................................................................................................
H IS C E L L A B E O U S B O B H E T A L L IC H I B E R A L S ,
B X C E P T F U E L S .....................................................................................
COETRACT




C O R S T R U C T IO H ............................................................................

-

2
2
2
1
1 ,1 3 9
2
-

2 4 .5
2 8 .0
5 .4
1 0 5 .4
-

2

1 .4

.1
-

-

(4 )

.4
.1

1 0 5 .4

2 .8
1 ,6 4 2 .8
2 8 .9
2 2 .5
3 .3
-

.2
2 .2
3 8 7 . 2«
. 1
-

3 .1
4 4 .0
1 ,5 0 1 .3
9 .3
5 /4 .8
4 .4

1 .4
.2

5 9 .3
7 .5

6 8 .9
4 0 .4
-

4
6
-

.1

48. 1
(6 )

17
2

.4
.5
-

1 3 .7
1 4 .6
-

4

5 3 .2

_

_

.3

_

1

3 2 .0

(4 )

600

3 3 .7

3 0 8 .0

S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d of ta b le .

29

.8 8

9 .9

_
1 3 .5
7 ,3 0 7 .3

.8 4

Table 14 Work stoppages by industry, 1975—Continued
(WOBKBBS AMD DAYS IDLE IH THOUSANDS)
STO PPA G ES

R E G IN N IN G

IN

YEAR

DAYS I D L E D U R IN G YBAR
(A L L S T O P P A G E S )

IH D U S T B Y
NUMBER

N O N M A N U FA C T U R IN G

-

WORKERS
IN V O L V E D

NUMBER

PE R C E N T OF
E S T . TOTAL
WORKING
T IM E 2 /

C O N T IN U E D

T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C O M M U N IC A T IO N , E L E C T R I C , G A S ,
AND S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S .....................................................................
B A IL B O A D T B A N S P O B T A T IO N ..............................................................
B A IL B O A D S .....................................................................................................
S L E E P I N G CA B AND O T H E B P A S S E N G E R CAB
S E R V I C E .....................................................................................................
B A IL N A Y E X P R E S S S E R V I C E ........................................................
LO C A L AND S U B U R B A N T R A N S I T AMD IN T E B U R B A N
HIGHW AY P A S S E N G E R T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ..........................
LO CA L AND S U B U R B A N P A S S E N G E R
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ...............................................................................
T A X I C A B S .........................................................................................................
I N T E R C I T Y AND RU R A L HIGHWAY P A S S E N G E R
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ..............................................................................
P A S S E N G E R T R A N S P O R T A T IO N C H A R T E B S E R V I C E .
SC H O O L B U S E S ............................................................................................
T E R M IN A L AND S E R V I C E F A C I L I T I E S FOR MOTOR
V E H IC L E P A S S E N G E R T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ....................
MOTOR F R E I G H T T B A N S P O R T A T IO N AND
W A R E H O U S IN G ...............................................................................................
T R U C K IN G , L O C A L AND LONG D I S T A N C E .......................
P U B L I C W A R E H O U S IN G ........................................................................
T E R M IN A L AND J O I N T T E R M IN A L M A IN T E N A N C E
F A C I L I T I E S F O R MOTOR F R E I G H T
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ...............................................................................
WATER T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ........................................................................
D E E P S E A F O R E IG N T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ..............................
D E E P SEA D O M E S T IC T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ...........................
G R E A T L A K E S - S T . LA W RENCE SEAWAY
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ..............................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ON R IV E R S AND C A N A L S .................
LO C A L WATER T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ..............................................
S E R V I C E S IN C I D E N T A L T O WATER
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ...............................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N BY A I R .....................................................................
A IR T R A N S P O R T A T I O N , C E R T I F I C A T E D
C A R R I E R S ..................................................................................................
A I R T R A N S P O R T A T I O N , N O N C E R T IF IC A T E D
C A R R I E R S ..................................................................................................
F I X E D F A C I L I T I E S AND S E R V I C E S R E L A T E D TO
A I R T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ..................................................................
P I P E L I N E T R A N S P O R T A T IO N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N S E R V I C E S ..............................................................
F R E I G H T F O R W A R D IN G ........................................................................
A RRANGEM ENT O F T R A N S P O R T A T IO N .....................................
ST O C K Y A R D S ...............................................................................................
R E N T A L O F R A IL R O A D C A R S ........................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S S E R V I C E S IN C I D E N T A L TO
T B A N S P O R T A T IO N ..............................................................................
C O M M U N IC A T IO N ...............................................................................................
T E L E P H O N E C O M M U N IC A T IO N ( W IR E OR R A D I O ) . .
T E L E G R A P H C O H M U N IC A T IO N (W IR E OR R A D I O ) . .
R A D IO B R O A D C A S T IN G AND T E L E V I S I O N .......................
C O H M U N IC A T IO N S E R V I C E , NOT E L S E W H E R E
C L A S S I F I E D ...........................................................................................
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S ....................
E L E C T R I C C O M P A N IE S AND S Y S T E M S .................................
G A S C O M P A N IE S AND S Y S T E M S .................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N C O M P A N IE S AND S Y S T E M S .......................
WATER S U P P L Y ...........................................................................................
S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S ...........................................................................
STEAM S U P P L Y ...........................................................................................
I R R I G A T I O N S Y S T E M S ........................................................................
W H O LESA LE AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................................
W H O L E SA L E T R A D E ........................................................................................
MOTOR V E H IC L E AND A U T O M O T IV E E Q U I P M E N T . . .
D R U G S , C H E M I C A L S , AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S . . . .
P I E C E G O O D S , N O T I O N S , A P P A R E L ....................................
G R O C E R IE S AND R E L A T E D P R O D U C T S .................................
FARM P R O D U C T S -R A W M A T E R IA L S ...........................................
E L E C T R IC A L G O O D S ..............................................................................
H A R D W A R E, AND P L U M B IN G AND H E A T IN G
E Q U IP M E N T AND S U P P L I E S .....................................................
M A C H IN E R Y , E Q U IP M E N T , AND S U P P L I E S ....................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S W H O L E S A L E R S .................................................
R E T A I L T R A D E ..................................................................................................
B U IL D IN G M A T E R I A L S , H A R D W A R E , AND FARM
E Q U IP M E N T D E A L E R S .....................................................................
LUMBER AND O T H E B B U IL D IN G M A T E R IA L
D E A L E R S .....................................................................................................
P L U M B IN G , H E A T I N G , AND A I R C O N D I T I O N I N G
E Q U IP M E N T D E A L E R S ..............................................................
P A I N T , G L A S S , AND W A L L PA PE R S T O B B S ..............
E L E C T R IC A L S U P P L Y S T O R E S ..............................................
HARDWARE AND FARM E Q U IP M E N T D E A L E R S . . . .
G E N E R A L M E R C H A N D IS E S T O R E S ..............................................
D E PA R T M E N T S T O R E S .....................................................................
H A IL O R D E R H O U S E S .....................................................................
V A R IE T Y S T O R E S ..............................................................................
M E R C H A N D IS IN G M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R S .......................
D IR E C T S E L L I N G E S T A B L I S H M E N T S ..............................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S G E N E R A L M E R C H A N D IS E
S T O R B S ..................................................................................................




M IA N
D U R A T IO N
(D A Y S ) 1 /

268
3
2

1 8 .7
2 .0
1 .6

1 6 6 .8
5 4 .0
5 2 .4

3 ,0 8 9 .0
7 3 .2
5 2 .4

_

_

1

1 7 .0

1 .6

2 0 .8

31

2 3 .7

4 .8

1 5 7 .2

7
8

4 3 .3
3 0 .0

.8
1 .5

6 8 .7
4 9 .0

5
2
8

1 4 .9
34. 1
2 7 .5

2. 1
.1
.3

0 .2 7

3 0 .3
2 .2
6 .8

_

1

3 8 .0

<<*)

95
75
19

1 7 .2
1 6 .6
2 8 .2

1 0 .8
9 .9
.8

1
17
1
-

1 .0
7 .3
1 8 .9
-

.1
5 .6
(*»)

_

_

2
5

_

10. 1
2 4 .6

.2
1 3 4 .3
1 2 0 .4
1 3 .8

. 1
3 5 .6
.6
_

.1
.3

.6
1 0 .9

6 .1
1 2 .9

5 .2
4 9 .0

2 3 .5
1 ,0 8 7 .5

8

12. 1

4 7 .5

1 ,0 4 2 .9

1

4 7 .0

6
2
3
2
1

3 7 .1
8 1 .6
1 6 .3
1 7 .6
1 0 .0
-

_

_

56
29
1
17

1 3 .2
1 1 .7
3 6 .0
5 5 .7

9
46
11
13
6
4
12
-

17. 3
7 7 .7
8 6 .9
3 0 .0
1 3 3 .3
16. 6
1 0 .3
-

371
188
24
12
4
32
6
7

2 9 .1
3 2 .8
3 3 .9
1 0 4 .3
22. 4
19. 1
47. 1
6 .8

6 3 .4
1 7 .0
.8
. 5
.1
3 .5
.4
1 .4

5
26
72
183

4 0 .5
5 9 .3
1 9 .3
2 7 .9

.1
5 .4
4 .8
4 6 .4

20

1 4 .5

2 .6

18

1 8 .5

1 .1

1 5 .3

_

_

_

_

9
15

-

.1
1 .4
.1
.2
. 1
(9 )
-

_

_

2 0 .2
1 9 .0
.6
.3

397
365
15
12

.3
.2
.6
.7
.4
.3
1 .2
-

22
5
7
7

-

1
.

1
23
13
1
1
6
2

9 .0
4 3 .0
11. 4
9 .4
9 .0
1 3 1 .0
3 0 .0
2 7 .2

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .

30

1 .9
4 2 .7
5 .6
1 .9
1 .7
.2
-

1 .4
.1
5 .8
5 .3
(“ )
<*»)
.4
(« )

.8
.4
.0
.8

4 .5
1 ,1 9 5 .9
3 3 5 .1
1 6 6 .2
6 7 7 .2
5 .5
1 1 .8
1 ,4 2 6 .0
4 5 9 .9
2 6 .0
3 7 .7
1 .4
5 4 .7
1 1 .6
9 .0
3 .7
2 4 6 .9
6 8 .9
966. 1
2 8 .2

9 .6
3 .2
7 5 .1
6 4 .2
.2
.9
9 .3
.6

.0 3

Table 14. Work stoppages by industry, 1975—Continued
(WORKERS AND DAYS IDLE IN THOPSAMDS)
STO PPA G ES

B E G IN N IN G

IN

YEAR

DAYS I D L E D U R IN G YEAR
(A L L S T O P P A G E S )

IH D O S T B I
NUMBER

N O N H A N U F A C T U R IN G

-

WORKERS
IN V O L V E D

NUMBER

PER C EN T OF
E S T . TOTAL
W ORKING
T IM E 1 /

C O N T IN U E D

W H O LESA LE AMD B E T A I L T B A D E - C O N T IN U E D
B I T A I L T B A D E - C O N T IN U E D
FO O D S T O B E S ...............................................................................................
G R O CERY S T O R E S ..............................................................................
HEAT AND F I S H
(S E A FO O D ) M A R K E T S ....................
F B U I T S T O B E S AMD V E G E T A B L E M A R K E T S ..............
C A N D Y , M O T S , AND C O N F E C T IO N E R Y S T O R E S . .
D A IR Y P R O D U C T S S T O B E S ........................................................
R E T A I L B A K E R I E S ...........................................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S FOOD S T O R E S ...........................................
A U T O M O T IV E D E A L E R S AND G A S O L IN E S E R V I C E
S T A T I O N S ..................................................................................................
MOTOR V E H IC L E D E A L E R S (N E N AND USED
C A R S ) .....................................................................................................
MOTOR V E H I C L E D E A L E R S (U S E D C A R S O N L Y ) .
T I R E , B A T T E R Y , AND A C C E S S O R Y D E A L E R S . . .
G A S O L IN E S E R V I C E S T A T I O N S ...........................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S A I R C R A F T , M A R I N E , AND
A U T O M O T IV E D E A L E R S ...........................................................
A P P A R E L AND A C C E S S O R Y S T O R E S ........................................
H E N 'S AND B O Y S ' C L O T H IN G AND
F U R N I S H I N G S S T O R E S ...........................................................
W O M E N 'S R E A D Y -T O -W E A R S T O R E S .................................
W O M EN 'S A C C E S S O R Y AND S P E C I A L T Y S T O R E S .
C H I L D R E N 'S AND I N F A N T S ' WEAR S T O R E S . . . .
F A M IL Y C L O T H IN G S T O R E S .....................................................
SH O E S T O R E S ........................................................................................
CUSTOM T A I L O R S ..............................................................................
F U R R I E R AND F U R S H O P S ........................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S A P P A R E L AND A C C E S S O R Y
S T O R E S ..................................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E , HOME F U R N I S H I N G S , AND
E Q U IP M E N T S T O R E S ........................................................................
F U R N I T U R E , HOME F U R N I S H I N G S , AND
E Q U IP M E N T S T O R E S , E X C E P T A P P L I A N C E S . .
H O U SEH O LD A P P L IA N C E S T O R E S ........................................
R A D I O , T E L E V I S I O N , AND M U S IC S T O R E S . . . .
E A T IN G AND D R IN K IN G P L A C E S ...............................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S R E T A I L S T O R E S ...........................................
DRUG S T O R E S AND P R O P R IE T A R Y S T O R E S ..............
L IQ U O R S T O R E S .................................................................................
A N T IQ U E S T O R E S AND SE C O N D H A N D S T O R E S . . .
BOOK AND S T A T IO N E R Y S T O R E S ........................................
S P O R T IN G G O O D S S T O R E S AND B IC Y C L E
S H O P S .....................................................................................................
FARM AND G A RD EN S U P P L Y S T O R E S ..............................
JE W E L R Y S T O R E S ..............................................................................
F U E L AND I C E D E A L E R S ...........................................................
R E T A I L S T O R E S , NOT E L S E W H E R E
C L A S S I F I E D .....................................................................................
F I N A N C E , IN S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............................
B A N K IN G ..................................................................................................................
F E D E R A L R E S E R V E B A N K S ..............................................................
C O M M E R C IA L AND S T O C K S A V IN G S B A N K S ....................
MUTUAL S A V IN G S B A N K S .................................................................
T R U S T C O M P A N IE S N O T EN G A G ED I N D E P O S I T
B A N K IN G .....................................................................................................
E S T A B L IS H M E N T S P E R F O R M IN G F U N C T IO N S
C L O S E L Y R E L A T E D TO B A N K IN G ........................................
C R E D I T A G E N C IE S O T H E R TH A N B A N K S .................................
R E D IS C O U N T AND F I N A N C IN G I N S T I T U T I O N S FO R
C R E D IT A G E N C IE S O TH ER TH A N B A N K S ....................
S A V IN G S AND LOAN A S S O C I A T I O N S ....................................
A G R IC U L T U R A L C R E D I T I N S T I T U T I O N S ..........................
P E R S O N A L C R E D I T I N S T I T U T I O N S ........................................
B U S I N E S S C R E D I T I N S T I T U T I O N S ........................................
LOAN C O R R E S P O N D E N T S AND B R O K E R S ..............................
S E C U R IT Y AND CO M M O D ITY B R O K E R S , D E A L E R S ,
E X C H A N G E S , AND S E R V I C E S ........................................................
S E C U R IT Y B R O K E R S D E A L E R S , AND F L O T A T IO N
COMP AN I B S ...............................................................................................
CO M M ODITY C O N T R A C T S B R O K E R S AND D E A L E R S . .
S E C U R IT Y AND COM M O D ITY E X C H A N G E S ..........................
S E R V I C E S A L L I E D W ITH T H E E X CH A N G E OF
S E C U R I T I E S OR C O M M O D IT IE S ...........................................
IN S U R A N C E C A R R I E R S ..............................................................................
L I F E I N S U R A N C E .....................................................................................
A C C ID E N T AND H E A L T H I N S U R A N C E ....................................
F I R E , M A R IN E AND C A S U A L T Y IN S U R A N C E .................
S U R E T Y IN S U R A N C E ..............................................................................
T I T L E I N S U R A N C E .................................................................................
IN S U R A N C E C A R R I E R S NOT E L S E W H E R E
C L A S S I F I E D ...........................................................................................
IN S U R A N C E A G E N T S , B R O K E R S , AND S E R V I C E ..............
R E A L E S T A T E .....................................................................................................
R E A L E S T A T E O P E R A T O R S (E X C E P T D B V E L O P E R S )
AND L E S S O R S ........................... .............................................................
A G E N T S , B R O K E R S , AND M A N A G E R S ....................................
T I T L E A B S T R A C T C O M P A N IE S .....................................................
S U B D I V I D E R S AND D E V E L O P E R S ..............................................
O P E R A T IV E B U I L D E R S ........................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S O F R E A L E S T A T E , IN S U R A N C E ,
L O A N S , LAW O F F I C E S ........................................................................




MEAN
D U R A T IO N
(D A Y S ) 1 /

40
34
2
-

1 7 .0
17. 1
3 7 .9
-

4

2 8 .6
2 7 .3
<<»>
-

3 6 2 .3
3 4 8 .1
1 .0
-

1 4 .9
-

1 .2
-

46

8 5 .0

7 .7

4 4 6 .5

37
-

90. 1
-

7 .1
.5

4 3 8 .6
-

-

1 3 .2
-

6
2

1 7 .8
8 .5

<<*)

7 .4
. 1

1
4

2 3 .0
2 3 .9

(“ )
. 1

.4
2 .3

2
1

1 6 .3
4 8 .0
-

(<»)
(« )

1
-

-

.6
.5
-

. 1
-

1 .2
-

-

-

7

4 3 .1

.1

4. 1

4
1
2
32
12
3
1
1

1 7 .5
(6 )
7 7 .7
4 4 .9
9 .6
2 7 .0
5 .0
2 0 .0

.1

.9
.3
2 .9
3 8 .6
9 .0
6 .3
5 /. 4
(4 )
1 .0

-

7

(M
.1
1 .0
.4
.1
(**)
.1
-

18
-

6 9 .3
-

.2

1 .4

3 .0
-

1 6 9 .0
5 /. 5

6 .3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

3 6 .6

-

4

3 6 .6
-

-

-

.1
-

-

-

,

7
1
4

7 3 .3
1 6 .0
7 3 .6
-

<“ )
2 .5
-

1

3 8 .0

(<♦>

1

8 6 .0
18. 1

-

(6 )
3 5 .0
-

(<*)

7
1
2
3
1

2 .6

.1
.3
. 1

2 9 .4
1 0 .0

"

31

1 4 5 .9
.2
1 3 2 .4
1 0 .0
3 .4
5 /. 2
2 0 .3
1 5 .5
2 .6
-

.1
. 1
•

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .

2 .0
-

-

-

-

2 .0
-

-

-

-

5 /. 5

. 1

-

W

1 .5
.7
“

0 .0 2

Table 14 Work stoppages by industry, 1975—Continued
(W O R K E R S I M P

DA Y S

ID L B

IN

T H O U SA N D S)

STO PPA G ES

E E G IN N 1 N G

IN

YEAR

DAYS I D L E D U R IN G YEAR
(A L L S T O P P A G E S )

IB D O S T B Y
NUMBER

N O N M A N U FA C T U R IN G

-

MEAN
D U R A T IO N
(D A Y S ) 1 /

W ORKERS
IN V O L V B D

NUMBER

P E R C E N T OF
E S T . TOTAL
W O RKING
T IM E 1 /

C O N T IN U E D

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E C O N T IN U E D
H O L D IN G AND O T H E R IN V E S T M E N T C O M P A N IE S ..............
H O L D IN G C O M P A N I E S ...........................................................................
IN T E S T H E N T C O M P A N IE S ..................................................................
T R U S T S .............................................. ................................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S I N V E S T I N G I N S T I T U T I O N S ..............

-

-

*

-

-

-

S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................................
H O T E L S , B O O H IN G H O U S E S , C A M P S , AND O TH ER
L O D G IN G P L A C B S .....................................................................................
H O T E L S , T O U R I S T C O U R T S , AND H O T E L S ....................
RO O M IN G AND B O A R D IN G H O U S E S ...........................................
T R A I L E R P A R K S AND C A M P S ........................................................
O R G A N IZ A T IO N H O T E L S AND L O D G IN G H O U S E S ,
ON M E M B E R S H IP B A S I S .....................................................................
P E R S O N A L S B R V I C E ................. - ................................................................
L A U N D R I E S , LA U N D RY S E R V I C E S , A R C C L E A N IN G
AND D Y E IN G P L A N T S .....................................................................
P H O T O G R A P H IC S T U D I O S , IN C L U D IN G
C O M M E R C IA L P H O T O G R A P H Y ..................................................
BEA U TY S H O P S ............................................................................................
B A R B E R S H O P S ............................................................................................
SH O E R E P A IR S H O P S , SH O E S H IN E P A R L O R S ,
AND HAT C L E A N IN G S H O P S .....................................................
F U N E R A L S E R V I C E S AND C R E M A T O R IE S ...........................
GA RM EN T P R E S S I N G , A L T E R A T IO N , AND R E P A I R .
M IS C E L L A N E O U S P E R S O N A L S E R V I C E S ..............................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S B U S I N E S S S E R V I C E S .....................................
A D V E R T I S I N G ...............................................................................................
CO NSUM ER C R E D I T R E P O R T IN G A G E N C I E S ,
M E R C A N T IL E R E P O R T IN G A G E N C I E S , AND
A D JU S T M E N T AND C O L L E C T IO N A G E N C I E S ..............
D U P L IC A T IN G A D D R E S S IN G , B L U E P R IN T IN G ,
P H O T O C O P Y IN G H A I L I N G L I S T , AND
S T E N O G R A P H IC S E R V I C E S ........................................................
S E V I C E S TO D W E L L IN G S AND O T H E R B U I L D I N G S .
NEWS S Y N D I C A T E S ..................................................................................
P R I V A T E E M PLO Y M EN T A G E N C I E S ...........................................
B U S I N E S S S E R V I C E S , NOT E L S E W H E R E
C L A S S I F I E D ...........................................................................................
A U T O M O B IL E R E P A I R , A U T O M O B IL E S E R V I C E S AND
G A R A G E S ............................................................................................................
A U T O M O B IL E R E N T A L S , W IT H O U T D R I V E R S .................
A U T O M O B IL E P A R K I N G ........................................................................
A U T O M O B IL E R E P A I R S H O P S ........................................................
A U T O M O B IL E S E R V I C E S , E X C E P T R E P A I R ....................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S R E P A I R S E R V I C E S ...........................................
E L E C T R IC A L R E P A I R S H O P S ........................................................
W A TCH , C L O C K , AND JE W E L R Y R E P A I R ...........................
R E U P H O L S T E R Y AND F U R N IT U R E R E P A I R ........................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S R E P A I R S H O P S AND R E L A T E D
S E R V I C E S ..................................................................................................
M O T IO N P I C T U R E S ........................................................................................
AM USEMENT AND R E C R E A T IO N S E R V I C E S , E X C E P T
M O T IO N P I C T U R E S .................................................................................
M E D IC A L AND O T H E R H E A L T H S E R V I C E S ..............................
L E G A L S E R V I C E S ...........................................................................................
E D U C A T IO N A L S E R V I C E S ........................................................................
M U SEU M S, A R T G A L L E R I E S , B O T A N IC A L AND
Z O O L O G IC A L G A R D E N S ........................................................................
N O N P R O F IT M E M B E R S H IP O R G A N I Z A T I O N S ...........................
P R I V A T E H O U S E H O L D S ..............................................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S S E R V I C E S ..................................................................

228

1 7 .7

2 9 .9

4 8 6 .6

15
14
1
-

2 1 .3
1 9 .6
4 4 .0
-

1 .0
.9
.1
-

2 0 .3
1 8 .7
1 .6
-

_

_

G O V ERN M EN T 7 / ......................................................................................................
F E D E R A L . . 7 .........................................................................................................
S T A T E .............................. ..........................................................................................
C O U N T Y .....................................................................................................................
C I T Y ...........................................................................................................................
S P E C I A L D I S T R I C T .....................................................................................

478
32
44
252
150

_

_

16

1 6 .9

1 .7

2 9 .9

15

1 6 .9

1 .7

2 8 .9

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

*
-

_

_

_

_

1
46
5

(6 )
1 4 .7
2 0 .4

(9 )
4 .2
.1

1 .1
4 7 .2
2 .3

5 /.5

6 7 .4
2 3 .2
-

(4 )
1 .5
-

21

8 .9

2 .6

1 6 .4

11
5
-

6 7 .9
1 1 3 .6
-

.4
.1
-

1 8 .7
1 2 .1
-

6
12
1
1

4 1 .9
-

-

10
4

9 6 .4
3 9 .3

.5
.2

3 2 .5
8 .1

23
63
1
22

1 4 .6
1 4 .2
5 .4
1 5 .5

4 .9
1 1 .3
(4 )
4 .0

5 8 .8
1 9 7 .5
.2
4 2 .9

2
18
-

7 7 .0
2 1 .0
3 3 .0

_

»

2 5 .3
4 1 .9

12
3

1 M ea n d u r a tio n is c a lc u la te d only f o r s to p p a g e s en d in g
in th e y e a r , an d is w e ig h te d by m u ltip ly in g th e d u ra tio n of e a c h
s to p p a g e by th e w o r k e r s in v o lv e d .
2 S ee fo o tn o te 3, ta b le 1.
3 T he n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s r e p o r t e d fo r a m a j o r in d u s tr y
g ro u p o r d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m of i ts co m p o n e n ts b e ­
c a u s e in d iv id u a l s to p p a g e s o c c u r r i n g in 2 o r m o r e g ro u p s a r e
c o u n te d in e a c h . W o r k e r s in v o lv e d an d d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d
am o n g th e r e s p e c t i v e g r o u p s .
4 F e w e r th a n 50.




0 .0 2

9. 2
5 .4
7 .5
9 .9
12. 9

1 .0
2 6 .9
-

.2

6 .6

.7
.1

3 4 .9
2 .1
.3

-

(4 )

_

_

1 .2
-

2 2 .4
-

.2

5 .7

3 1 8 .5
-

2 ,2 0 4 .4
-

6 6 .6
1 5 .0
1 9 2 .3
4 4 .7

3 0 0 .5
7 8 .8
1 ,4 1 9 .4
40 5 .7

.0 6

5 Id le n e s s due to s to p p a g e (s ) b e g in n in g in p r i o r y e a r ( s ) .
6 No s t r i k e in th is in d u s tr y e n d e d d u rin g th e y e a r .
7 T he s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h av e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r ­
p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a ll w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a
w o rk s to p p a g e . T h is d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e t e r ­
m in a tio n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n
of
an y law o r p u b lic p o lic y .
N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l
m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

32

ite m s

Table 15. Work stoppages by industry group and occupation, 1975
(H O B K E R S AMD P I T S

ID L E

IM

TH O O SA N PS)

P R O F E S S IO N A L

TOTAL

IM D U S T B Y

GROUP

STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR
N O H BEB

HOBKERS
IN V O L V E D

DAYS
I D L E D O B IN G
Y E A R (A L L
STO PPA G ES)

AND T E C H N IC A L

STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR
NUHBEB

HOBKERS
IN V O L V E D

DAYS
I D L E D O B IN G
YEA B (A L L
STO PPA G ES)

C L E R IC A L
STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G IN
Y EA B
N O H BEB

HOBKERS
IN V O L V E D

I N D O S T B I E S . . . . . . . . . ........................................

1 /5 ,0 3 1

1 ,7 4 5 .6

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

281

2 0 6 .1

1 ,6 2 2 .3

38

2 0 .2

H A N D F A C T O B IM G ..............................................................................

1 /1 .8 9 7

4 6 3 .8

1 4 ,8 7 6 .1

2

.1

.3

9

.5

OBDMAHCE A I D A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
FO O D AND K IN D R E D P B O D O C T S ..............................................
T O B A C C O H A N O F A C T O B B S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P B O D O C T S ...........................................................

9
166
-

6 .9
2 9 .1
-

1 9 3 .7
8 3 8 .4
-

21

2 .2

2 7 .3

D A IS
I D L E D O B IN G
Y EA B (A L L
STO PPA G ES)

ALL

B O BBEB AND H IS C B L L A N E O O S P L A S T I C S
P B O D O C T S ..............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P B O D O C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A T , AND G L A S S P B O D O C T S ...........................
P B IH A B Y H E T A L I N D O S T B I E S .................................................
F A B R IC A T E D H E T A L P B O D O C T S 4 / .....................................

-

-

-

_

(2 )
-

1 0 .0

1 0 9 .5

-

-

2 8 2 .6
3 5 4 .4
6 2 2 .2

-

-

-

47
109

1 3 .5
1 7 .7

2 3 7 .6
7 4 7 .4

-

30

2 0 .4

6 1 3 .3

57
9
140
161
309

1 0 .4
1 .0
1 7 .6
4 2 .6
4 8 .6

238. 1
9 .3
4 8 4 .3
1 ,1 6 8 .9
1 ,7 7 9 .3

1

-

1 7 .2
1 1 .6
1 2 .2

1
-

-

(2 )

-

-

*

2 , 3 7 0 .8
8 5 0 .7
3 ,4 0 4 .9
2 8 7 .9
2 5 5 .6

N O N H A N O F A C T O B IN G ....................................................................

1 /3 ,1 3 4

1 ,2 8 1 .8

1 6 ,3 6 0 .9

A G B IC U L T O R E , F O B E S T B Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
H I R I N G ...........................................................................................................
C O N T R A C T C O N S T B O C T IO N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C O H H O N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
H H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

7
1 ,1 6 5
600

.7
3 9 1 .6
3 0 8 .0

3 5 .9
1 ,6 4 2 .8
7 ,3 0 7 .3

268
371

1 6 6 .8
6 3 .4

3 ,0 8 9 .0
1 ,4 2 6 .0

F IN A N C E , I N S O B A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T B ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G O V EBN H EN T 2 / .....................................................................................

18
228
478

3 .0
2 9 .9
3 1 Q .5

1 6 9 .0
4 8 6 .6
2 ,2 0 4 .4

35
233

-

1
. 1 •

1

-

-

1
1
-

279

2 0 6 .1

-

-

-

29
-

-

9
4
7

.9
.1
.3

4 7 .5
1 .5
2 .9

P B O D O C T IO N

P R O T E C T IV E

AND H A IN T E N A N C E

1 ,7 0 7

3 7 7 .8

1 1 ,8 5 7 .2

-

.8

1 3 .8
-

8
109
20

5 .1
1 8 .3
2 .2

1 8 6 .5
6 7 1 .2
2 7 .1

F I N A N C E , IN S O R A N C B , AND B E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E B V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G O V EB N H EN T 7 / .............................................................................. ... .

6 .3

34

3 0 .7

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

*

-

-

-

51

9 .5

1 0 8 .3

-

-

-

-

-

-

61
53
66

1 7 .2
1 0 .3
1 1 .4

2 8 2 .6
3 0 7 .8
5 6 1 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 1 8 .C
6 0 8 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

40
98

9 .9
1 5 .1

"

-

*

25

7 .8

-

-

~

-

-

-

53
7
133
148
288

9 .2
.9
1 7 .0
3 5 .8
4 3 .7

2 1 7 .5
7 .6
4 7 6 .4
9 4 0 .5
1 ,6 7 2 . 1

- '
-

-

-

-

“

1
-

1 .3

. 1
-

-

-

_
1

-

-

-

5 8 .6

1 ,9 2 4 .7

-

-

-

104
122
30
34

3 0 .5
5 9 .4
1 0 .3
5 .5

7 1 8 .7
2 ,1 9 4 .3
2 8 2 .4
2 4 7 .3

-

-

-

1 1 0 .7

2 ,3 0 6

8 1 5 .7

1 1 ,0 4 3 .1

6
1 ,1 6 2
596

.6
3 9 1 .5
3 0 7 .8

166
198

6 1 .7
2 7 .1

“

_

_

_

-

-

-

1
34
-

(2 )
6 .1
_

3
1

-

259

-

6 .4

1 /3 9

2 0 3 .9

.3

(2 )
-

.2
9 8 .1
-

. 1
.2

1 0 .0
2 .3

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




-

1 1 0 .5
1 ,4 5 5 .8

_

1 5 .5

A G B IC U L T O R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
H I R I N G ...........................................................................................................
C O N T R A C T C O N S T B O C T IO N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C O H H O N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
H H O L E S A L E AND B E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

2 5 5 .5

5 .3
1 9 1 .0

_

.9

N O N H A N O F A C T O B IN G .....................................................................

1 9 .7
-

2 .7
2 0 1 .1

1 /1 3

H A C H IN E R Y , E X C E P T B L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R IC A L H A C H IN E R Y , E Q O I P H E N T , AND
S O P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N E Q O I P H E N T ..................................................
IN S T R U H E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
H IS C B L L A N E O O S H A N O F A C T O B IN G I N D U S T R I E S . .

-

.2
1 8 .3

H A N O F A C T O B IN G ..............................................................................

RO BBER AND H IS C B L L A N E O O S P L A S T I C S
P B O D O C T S ..............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P B O D O C T S ...........................
P B IH A B Y H E T A L I N D U S T R I E S .................................................
F A B R IC A T E D H E T A L P R O D U C T S 4 / .....................................

.1
3 .3

.1

2
7

2 2 ,9 0 0 .4

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E H IC A L S AND A L L I E D P B O D O C T S .................................
P E T B O L E O H R E F I N I N G AND B E L A T E D
I N D O S T B I E S ........................................................................................

-

(2 )

5 5 .2
6 /.4

-

1 ,1 9 3 .4

A P P A R E L , B T C . J / ...........................................................................
L O H BEB AND HOOD P B O D O C T S , B X C E P T
F O B N I T O B E ...........................................................................................
F O R N IT O R E AND F I X T O B E S ........................................................
P A P E B AND A L L I E D P B O D O C T S ..............................................

-

9 .8

11

4 ,0 1 3

-

1 .3
6 .2

.1

-

1 ,6 2 1 .9

1 2 6 .1

_

-

(2 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 .3

-

.2
.3

(2 )
(2 )

.3

(2 )

-

1
1

1 /5 2

_

.8
-

-

-

I N D O S T B I E S .....................................................................

11

.2

*

7 4 .4

_

(2 )

-

-

3 4 .0
7 7 .9
1 0 .7
5 .8

-

(2 )

1

-

(2 )

-

120
137
32
37

ORD N A N CE AND A C C E S S O B I E S .................................................
FOOD AND K IN D R E D P B O D O C T S ..............................................
TO BA CCO H A N O F A C T O B E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P B O D O C T S ...........................................................

1 .2

*

274

SALES

-

~

55

H A C H IN E R Y , B X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R IC A L H A C H IN E R Y , E Q O I P H E N T , AND
S O P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N E Q O IP H E N T ..................................................
I N S T B O H E N T S , E T C . % / ..............................................................
H IS C B L L A N E O O S H A N O F A C T O R IN G I N D O S T B I E S . .

ALL

-

-

1

1 3 .4

-

-

61
57
68

A P P A R E L , B T C . J / ...........................................................................
LO HBBB AND HOOD P B O D O C T S , E X C E P T
F U B N I T O B E ...........................................................................................
F O B N IT O B E AND F I X T O B E S ........................................................
P A P E B AND A L L I E D P B O D O C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T B I E S ........................................................................................
C H E H IC A L S AND A L L IE D P B O D O C T S .................................
P E T B O L E O H R E F I N I N G AND B E L A T E D
I N D O S T B I E S ........................................................................................

.

2 6 8 .9

33

4
55
120

.2
4 .2
2 2 .6

35. 1
1 ,6 3 8 .9
7 ,3 0 4 .5

-

“

~
34

6 .3

3 0 .7

_

_

_

-

-

-

1 ,0 2 2 .5
8 0 3 .9

-

-

-

~

$ /.1

2 .0
7 7 .5
1 5 8 .8

_

3
31

.1
6. 1

1 .5
2 9 .1




Table 15. Work stoppages by industry group and occupation, 1975—Continued
(W O RK ERS

AMD P I T S

ID L E

IM

TH O PSA M D S)

S E R V IC E

IM D O S T B Y

G RO U P

STOPPAGES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR
NUMBER

ALL

I I D U S T B I E S ........................................................

M A N U F A C T U R IN G ..............................................................................
O RD N A N CE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..................................................
FO O D AND K IN D R E D P B O D U C T S ..............................................
TO B A C C O M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E M IL L P B O D U C T S ...........................................................
A P P A R E L , E T C . 1 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AMD ROOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N IT U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AMD A L L I E D P B O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................a ................................................................
C H E M IC A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
PE T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S . . ..................................................................................
R U BBER AND M IS C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A T , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ..........................
P R IM A R Y M ETA L I N D U S T R I E S .................................................
F A B R IC A T E D M ETA L P B O D U C T S 4 / ....................................

A G R IC U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M IM IN G ...........................................................................................................
C O N TRA CT C O N S T R U C T IO N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C O M M U N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N IT A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
H H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................
F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .............................. ......................................................................
GOVERNM ENT 7 / .....................................................................................

DAYS
I D L E D U R IN G
YEAR (A L L
STO PPA G ES)

NUMBER

HOBKERS
IN V O L V E D

DAYS
I D L E D U R IN G
YEAR (A L L
STO PPA G ES)

1 /1 5 9

2 7 .3

9 0 0 .9

454

2 8 5 .0

5 ,3 8 7 .7

1 /7

.2

7 .1

159

8 4 .3

2 ,9 8 2 .5

1
45

1 .8
1 0 .0
-

7 .2
1 5 2 .2
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

6
8

3 .6
2 .5

1 9 .4
1 3 7 .8

5

1 2 .6

4 0 9 .5

4
1
6
12
21

1 .2
(2 )
.6
6 .7
4 .9

2 0 .6
.4
6 .5
2 2 2 .2
1 0 7 .2

13

1 5 .8

4 4 5 .6

.6
1 .5
4 .5

13
12
1
2

3. 5
1 8 .3
.4
. 1

8 9 3 .8

29 5

-

1

(2 )

1
2
1
1

(2 )
(2 )
(2 )

. 1
(2 )

. 1

1 /1 5 2

2 7 .0

1

(2 )

1

(2 )

.8

-

(2 )

2 0 0 .7

_

4 5 .8
6 0 .7

1 3 1 .6
1 ,2 0 6 .8
4 .0
3 .8
2 ,4 0 5 .1

_
3
3

. 1
. 1

30
49

1 7 .4
2 .4

6 9 1 .7
7 5 .3

58
83

7 7 .9
9 .4

3
65
3

.1
6 .4
.7

1 8 .3
9 8 .6
9. 1

2
63
83

1 .8
1 3 .8
97. 5

1 The n u m ber of sto p p age s re p o rte d fo r a m a jo r in ­
d u s try grou p o r d iv isio n m a y not eq ual the su m of its c o m ­
ponents b e c a u s e in d ividu al sto p p age s o c c u r r in g in 2 or
m o re gro u p s a r e counted in e a ch . W o rk e r s invo lve d and
d ays id le a r e a llo c a te d am ong the r e s p e c tiv e
gro u p s.
2 F e w e r than 50 .
3 In clu d e s oth er fin ish ed p ro d u c ts m ade fr o m fa b r ic s
and s im il a r m a t e r ia l s .
4 E x c lu d e s ord nance, m a c h in e ry , and tra n sp o rta tio n
equipm ent.
5 In clu d e s p r o fe s s io n a l, sc ie n t ific , and con tro llin g
in stru m e n ts; p h o to gra p h ic and o p tica l goods; w a tc h e s and
c lo c k s .

1 .1

1. 1
.8

.5

-

*

.5

3
2

-

-

.2

(2 )

3

(2 )

-

M A C H IN E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R IC A L M A C H IN E R Y , E Q U IP M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N E Q U IP M E N T .................................................
IN S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S M A N U FA C T U R IN G I N D U S T R I E S . .
N O N H A N U F A C T U R IN G ....................................................................

W ORK ERS
IN V O L V E D

C O M B IN A T IO N S
STO PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G IN
YEAR

3 .9
2 .8
1 ,3 1 6 .8
247. 1
1 0 1 .2
1 8 7 .0
5 4 6 .4

6
Id le n e ss re s u ltin g fr o m stoppage(s) beginning in
p r io r y e a r (s ).
The situ a tion s re p o rte d h e re have, fo r s t a t is t ic a l
p u r p o se s, been d eem ed to fa ll w ithin the B u r e a u 's d e fin i­
tion of a w o rk sto p p age . T h is d e c isio n does not constitu te
a le g a l d ete rm in a tio n that a w o rk stoppage h a s taken p la c e
in v io latio n of any law o r pu b lic p o lic y .

ite m s

34

N O T E : B e c a u s e of rounding,
su m s
of
individu al
m a y not eq ual t o ta ls . D a sh e s (-) denote
zero s.

Table 16. Work stoppages by major issue and level of Government, 19751
M A JO R

IL L

IS S U E

TO TA L

FBD BRA L

S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

478

”

G E N E R A L WAGE C H A R G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E M E N T A R Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
R A G E A D JU S T M E N T S ............................................................................
HO U RS O F R O B E .....................................................................................
O T H E B C O N T R A C T U A L H A T T E R S ..............................................
U N IO N O R G A N IZ A T IO N AND S E C U R I T Y ...........................
J O B S E C U R I T Y ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..............................................................
O T H E R R O B K IN G C O N D I T I O N S ..................................................
IN T E R O N IO N OB IH T B A U N IO N H A T T E R S .......................
N O T R E P O R T E D '........................................................................................

312
4
7
2
8
25
54
47
10
9

STO PPA G ES
32

_
-

-

ST A T E

“

CO U N T Y

B E G IN N IN G

8
2
1
1
2
8
7
1
2

ALL

S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

3 1 8 .5
1 4 3 .1
2 .2
.9
(2 )
.5
8 .2
9 0 .3
6 8 .7
2 .2
2 .2

S P E C IA L
D IS T R IC T

Y EA R
^ 5 2

31
1
1
1
2
4
2
2

164
1
4
1
5
15
28
26
6
2

T50
109
1
1
1
1
7
16
10
1
3

~

R O B B E R S IN V O L V E D

G E N E R A L RA G E C H A N G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E M E N T A R Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
R A G E A D JU S T M E N T S ...........................................................................
H O U R S O F M O RE.....................................................................................
O T H E B CO N T R A C T U A L H A T T E R S ..............................................
U N IO N O R G A N IZ A T IO N AND S E C U R I T Y ...........................
J O B S E C U R I T Y ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..............................................................
O T H E B R O B B IN G C O N D I T I O N S .................................................
IN T E R U N IO N OR I N T R A U N IO N H A T T E R S .......................
NOT B E P O R T E D ........................................................................................

IN
44

C IT Y

(IN

-

THOUSA ND S)

6 6 .6

1 5 .0

1 9 2 .3

4 4 .7

1 .6
1 .2
.1

-

1 0 .2
-

9 8 .9
.8
.7
(2 )
.2
3 .2
2 0 .6
6 5 .8
1 .7
.3

3 2 .4
.2
(2 )
(2 )
. 1
.7
9 .7
1 .3
(2 )
.2

_
-

-

(2 )
-

.1
1 .0
5 9 .8
1 .3
.1
1 .4

(2 )
3 .3
.3
.4
.4
.4

-

-

DA Y S I D L E

D U R IN G

YEAR

(IN

THOUSANDS)

A L L S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

2 ,2 0 4 .4

-

3 0 0 .5

7 8 .8

1 ,4 1 9 .4

4 0 5 .7

G E N E R A L RAGE C H A N G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E M E N T A R Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
R A G E A D JU S T M E N T S ...........................................................................
H O U RS O F R O B E .....................................................................................
O T H E R C O N T R A C T U A L H A T T E R S ..............................................
U N IO N O R G A N IZ A T IO N AND S E C U R I T Y ...........................
J O B S E C U R I T Y ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..............................................................
O T H E R R O B B IN G C O N D I T I O N S .................................................
IN T E R U N IO N OR I N T R E U N I O N M A T T E R S .......................
NOT R E P O R T E D ........................................................................................

1 ,2 4 0 .1
1 5 .1
3 .7
.1
1 .0
8 2 .6
4 4 9 .2
3 9 9 .2
1 0 .1
3 .2

-

1 1 .0
14. 1
2 .1
.1
1 4 .0
2 5 4 .6
2 .9
.3
1 .4

3 6 .3
-

9 1 7 .3
.8
1 .4
.1
.3
2 5 .4
7 5 .5
3 8 9 .8
8 .4
.5

2 7 5 .6
.2
.2
(2 )
.1
1 0 .5
1 1 3 .7
3 .5
1 .0
.9

The situ ation s re p o rte d h e re h ave, fo r
p o s e s , been deem ed to fa ll w ithin the B u r e a u 's
w o rk sto p p age . T h is d e c isio n d oes not con stitu te
m in ation that a w o rk sto ppage h a s taken p la c e
an y law o r pu b lic p o lic y .




1

~

s t a tis tic a l p u r ­
d efinition of a
a le g a l d e t e r ­
in v io latio n of

35

~

(2 )
.5
3 2 .7
5 .5
3 .0
.4
.4

*

2 F e w e r than 50 .
N O T E : B e c a u s e of rounding,
su m s of in d ividu al item s
m a y not equal to ta ls . D a sh e s (-) denote z e r o s .




Table 17. Work stoppages in Government by major issue and union participation,
19751
U N IO N
H A JO R

TOTAL

STO PPA G ES
ALL

P A B T IC IP A T IO N

CALLED
OB
SUPPORTED
S T R IK E

IS S U E

D I D NOT
C A L L OR
SU PPO RT
S T R IK E

B E G IN N IN G

IN

NO
IN F O R H A T IO N

YEAB

S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

478

421

45

12

G E N E R A L S A G E C H A N G E S ...............................................................
S U P P L E H E N T A B Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
P A G E A D J U S T H E N T S ............................................................................
H O U B S O F H O B K ........................................................................... ...
O T H E B C O N T B A C T U A L H A T T E B S ..............................................
U N IO N O B G A N IZ A T IO N AND S E C U B I T Y ...........................
J O B S E C U B I T Y ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D H I N I S T B A T I O N ..............................................................
O T H E B H O B K IN G C O N D I T I O N S .................................................
IN T E B U N I O N OB IN T B A U N IO N H A T T E B S ........................
NOT B E P O B T E D ........................................................................................

312
4
7
2
8
25
54
47
10
9

292
4
7
2
6
22
47
27
8
6

18
-

2
-

1
1
5
17
1
2

1
2
2
3
1
1

*

"

*
PORKERS

ALL

IN V O L V E D

(IN

T H O U S A N IS )

S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

3 1 8 .5

3 0 6 .5

1 1 .3

G E N E B A L P A G E C H A N G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E H E N T A B Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
P A G E A D JU S T M E N T S ...........................................................................
HOUBS O F P O B K .....................................................................................
O T H E B C O N T B A C T U A L H A T T E B S ..............................................
U N IO N O B G A N IZ A T IO N AND S E C U B I T Y ...........................
J O B S E C U B I T Y ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D H I N I S T B A T I O N ..............................................................
O T H E B P O B K IN G C O N D I T I O N S .................................................
I N T E B U N I O N OB IN T B A U N IO N H A T T E B S ........................
NOT B E P O B T E D .........................................................................................

1 4 3 .1
2 .2
.9
(2 )
.5
8 .2
9 0 .3
6 8 .7
2 .2
2 .2
-

1 4 1 .1
2 .2
.9
(2 )
.3
8 .1
8 3 .5
6 6 .5
2 .2
1 .6
-

1 .9

DAYS
ALL

S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

G E N E B A L P A G E C H A N G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E H E N T A B Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
R A G E A D J U S T H E N T S ...........................................................................
H O U BS O F H O B K .....................................................................................
O T H E B C O N T B A C T U A L H A T T E B S ..............................................
U N IO N O R G A N IZ A T IO N AND S E C U B I T Y ...........................
J O B S E C U B I T Y ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D H I N I S T B A T I O N ...............................................................
O T H E B H O B K IN G C O N D I T I O N S .................................................
I N T E B U N I O N OB IN T B A U N IO N H A T T B B S ........................
NOT B E P O B T E D ........................................................................................

ID L E

D U R IN G

2 ,2 0 4 .4

■-

YEAB

1 ,2 3 5 .0
1 5 .1
3 .7
. 1
.8
8 2 .6
4 4 0 .3
3 9 5 .5
1 0 .0
2 .3

1 T h e situ ation s re p o rte d h e re h ave,
fo r
s t a t is t ic a l p u r p o se s, been deem ed to f a ll w ithin
the B u r e a u 's definition of a w o rk sto p p age .
T h is
d e c isio n d o es not con stitu te a le g a l d ete rm in a tio n
that a w o rk sto ppage h as taken p la c e in v io latio n
of an y law o r p u b lic p o lic y .

-

(2 )
(2 )
6 .7
2 .0
(2 )
.5
-

2 ,1 8 5 .6

1 ,2 4 0 .1
1 5 .1
3 .7
. 1
1 .0
8 2 .6
4 4 9 .2
3 9 9 .2
1 0 .1
3 .2

.6
(2 )

(IN

.1
(2 )
.1
.2
(2 )
.1
-

T H O U SA N D S)

1 7 .5

1 .3

5 .1
(2 )
(2 )
8 .7
3 .0
(2 )
.7

.1
.1
(2 )
.2
.7
(2 )
.1
“

2 F e w e r than 50 .
NO TE:
v id u al ite m s
note z e r o s .

36

B e c a u s e of rounding,
m a y not eq ual to ta ls.

su m s of in d i­
D a sh e s (-) d e ­

Table 1& Work stoppages by occupation and level of Government, 19751
STO PPA G ES

TOTAL

FEDERAL

STA TE

STO PPA G ES

C IT I

COONTI

B E G IN N IN G

IN

S P E C IA L
D IS T R IC T

TEAR

S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

478

-

32

44

252

150

T E A C H E R S .....................................................................................................
M O H S E S ...........................................................................................................
T E A C H E R S AND O T H E R P R O F E S S I O N A L AND
T E C H N IC A L .....................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L ..
O T H E R P R O F E S S IO N A L OR T E C H N IC A L ...........................
C L E R I C A L .....................................................................................................
S A L E S ..............................................................................................................
S A N IT A T IO N N O R K B R S .....................................................................
C R A F T W O R K ER S.....................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N O F B L O E -C O L L A R W O R K E R S .................
B L O B -C O L L A R AND H A N O A L .................... ...................................
P O L I C B ...........................................................................................................
FIREFIGHTERS .............................................................................................
P O L I C E AND F I R E F I G H T E H S ....................................................
O T H E R C O M B IN A T IO N S O F P R O T E C T I V E .......................
O T H E R P R O T E C T I V E ...........................................................................
S E R V I C E W O R K E R S..............................................................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L , T E C H N I C A L , AND C L E R I C A L . . .
C L E R I C A L AND B L O B -C O L L A R ..................................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L , T E C H N IC A L AND B L O E - C O L L A R .
S A L B S AND B L O E -C O L L A R ...........................................................
P R O T E C T IV E AND B L O E - C O L L A R ...........................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L , C L E R I C A L , AMD B L O E -C O L L A R .
S A L E S AND C L E R I C A L .....................................................................
S A L E S , B L O E - C O L L A R , AND C L E R I C A L .......................
S E R V I C E AND B L O E - C O L L A R .....................................................

218
4

_
-

6
1

8
2

98
1

106
-

2
-

-

-

2
2
4
9
3
1
-

2
-

-

A IL

9
7
1
6
7
25
82
11
11
3
6
3
15
27
15
1
9
16
-

2
1
7
3
1
2
2
2
-

4
2
3
4
-

2
3
-

~

*

5
3
6
7
21
43
8
10
3
3
2
6
17
4
7
6
-

2
23
3
6
6
1
3
-

"
WORKERS

IN V O L V E D

(IN

TH O OSANDS)

A L L S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

3 1 8 .5

-

6 6 .6

1 5 .0

1 9 2 .3

4 4 .7

T E A C H E R S .....................................................................................................
N O R S E S ...........................................................................................................
T B A C H E R S AND O T H E R P R O F E S S I O N A L AND
T E C H N IC A L .....................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L ..
O T H E R P R O F E S S IO N A L OB T E C H N I C A L ...........................
C L E R I C A L .....................................................................................................
S A L E S ..............................................................................................................
S A N I T A T I O N W O R K E R S.....................................................................
C R A F T W O R K E R S.....................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N O F B L O E -C O L L A R W O R K E R S .................
B L O E -C O L L A R AND MAMOAL........................................................
P O L I C E ...........................................................................................................
FIREFIG H TERS .............................................................................................
P O L I C E AND F I R E F I G H T E R S ....................................................
O T H E R C O M B IN A T IO N S O F P R O T E C T I V E .......................
O T H E R P R O T E C T I V E ...........................................................................
S E R V I C E W O RK ERS...............................................................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L , T E C H N I C A L , AMD C L E R I C A L . . .
C L E R I C A L AND B L O E - C O L L A R .................................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L , T E C H N IC A L AND B L O E - C O L L A R .
S A L E S AND B L O E -C O L L A R ...........................................................
P R O T E C T I V E AND B L O E - C O L L A R ...........................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L , C L E R I C A L , AND B L O E -C O L L A R .
S A L E S AND C L E R I C A L .....................................................................
S A L E S , B L O E - C O L L A B , AND C L E R I C A L .......................
S E R V I C E AND B L O E - C O L L A R ....................................................

1 8 2 .3
1 .1

_

1 .4
(2 )

6 .4
.3

1 4 3 .4
.8

3 1 .1
-

6 .2

-

-

1 .4
.3
.2
6 .4
.5
2 .7
1 3 .0
2 .1
1 .5
1 .5
1 .0
.7
3 .7
1 2 .8
1 1 .4
(2 )
2 .0
6 7 .6
-

-

.3

-

6 .4
.5
2 .5
7 .9
1 .6
1 .4
1 .5

-

.8
.5
.4
6 .5
.2

.2
.2
2 .3
4 .6
3 .1

.5
.6
.5

-

-

.5
5 4 .1
-

ID L E

-

.2
.4
.4
.1

1 .7
-

1 .5
7 .1

5 .3

YEAR

(IN

.1
3 .0
.5
1 .0
7 .7
(2 )
1 .2
-

-

-

D O B IN G

-

-

-

DATS

1 .0
.1

-

.2
-

-

6 .2
.1
.2

-

THOOSANDS)

A L L S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

2 ,2 0 4 .4

-

3 0 0 .5

7 8 .8

1 ,4 1 9 .4

4 0 5 .7

T E A C H E R S .....................................................................................................
N O R S E S ...........................................................................................................
T E A C H E R S AND O T H E R P R O F E S S I O N A L AND
T E C H N I C A L .....................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L ..
O T H E R P R O F E S S I O N A L O B T E C H N I C A L ...........................
C L E R I C A L .....................................................................................................
S A L B S ...............................................................................................................
S A N I T A T I O N W O R K E R S.....................................................................
C R A F T W O R K E R S.....................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N O F B L O E -C O L L A R W O R K E R S .................
B L O E -C O L L A B AMD H A N O A L ........................................................
P O L I C B ...........................................................................................................
FIREFIG H TERS .............................................................................................
P O L I C E AND F I R E F I G H T B R S ....................................................
O T H E R C O M B IN A T IO N S O F P R O T E C T I V E .......................
O T H E R P R O T E C T I V E ...........................................................................
S E R V I C E W O R K ER S...............................................................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L , T E C H N I C A L , AND C L E R I C A L . . .
C L E R I C A L AND B L O E - C O L L A R .................................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L , T E C H N IC A L AND B L O B - C O L L A R .
S A L E S AND B L O E - C O L L A R ...........................................................
P R O T E C T I V E AND B L O E -C O L L A R ...........................................
P R O F E S S I O N A L , C L E R I C A L , AND B L O E - C O L L A B .
S A L E S AND C L E R I C A L .....................................................................
S A L E S , B L O E - C O L L A B , AND C L E R I C A L .......................
S E R V I C E AND B L O E - C O L L A R ....................................................

1 ,4 1 9 .8
1 .9

_

1 3 .6
(2 )

2 0 .0
1 .1

1 ,1 0 8 .6
.8

2 7 7 .5
-

2 7 .0
7 .2
2 .9
2 .3
7 .0
2 .6
3 1 .9
1 1 7 .4
5 .9
1 1 .6
5 .9
5 .7
9 .1
2 2 .7
9 6 .5
1 0 7 .9
.2
8 .5
3 1 0 .7
-

-

1 T he situ a tion s re p o rte d h e re h ave, fo r
p o se s, been d eem ed to fa ll w ithin the B u r e a u 's
w o rk sto p p age . T h is d e c isio n d oes not con stitu te
m in ation that a w o rk sto ppage has taken p la c e
any la w o r pu b lic p o lic y .




-

-

4 .6
2 .3
-

37

, .5
4 .0
.7
.8

7 .8
4 .3
.5
1. 1
5 4 .3
.2
.5
2 1 1 .2
•

s t a t is t ic a l p u r ­
d efinition of a
a le g a l d e te r ­
in v io latio n of

.5
.6

2 .3
5 .5
5 .6
3 7 .1
•

2 7 .0
2 .0
.6
7 .0
2 .6
3 1 .3
9 0 .5
5 .2
1 0 .8
5 .9
1 .4
8 .6
1 4 .7
2 4 .2
1 2 .4
8 .0
5 7 .9
-

1 .7
1 5 .0
4 .7
1 2 .5
8 9 .7
.2
4 .4
~

2 F e w e r than 50 .
N O T E : B e c a u s e of rounding,
su m s of in d ivid u al ite m s
m a y not eq ual to ta ls . D a sh e s (-) denote z e r o s .

Table 19. Work stoppages in Government by level, function, and occupation, 19751
P R O F E S S IO N A L
AND TECHNICAL
LEVEL

EN D

E D U C T IO N

TEACHERS

N URSES

OTHER

O TH ER
S A N IT A ­
T IO N

STO PPA G ES
ELL

S T O P P E G E S ........................................................

A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E B V I C E S ..............................
W E L FA R E S E B V I C E S .....................................................
L E V E N F O R C E M E N T END C O R R E C T IO N . . .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N ........................................................
S E N I T E T I O N S E H V I C E S ...........................................
E D O C E T IO N ............................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ..............................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ..............................................
L I B R A R I E S ............................................................................
M U SEU M S..................................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH S E R V IC E S..........................
TRANSPORTATION AND A LLIED FA C IL .................
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S ........................................................
O T H E R .........................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S .................................................................
F E D E R A L ..................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S B R V I C E S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAN E N F O R C E M E N T END C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N ..................................................
S E N I T E T I O N S E R V I C E S .....................................
E D O C E T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS
....................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
H O SE O M S............................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES ................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL .............
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................
C O M B I N A T I O N S ...........................................................
S T A T E ........................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAW E N F O R C E M E N T AND C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N ..................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S .....................................
E D U C A T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION
.....................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
M U SEU M S............................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES - ................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL .............
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................'
C O M B I N A T I O N S ...........................................................

2 /4 7 8
3
5
18
11
13
277
17
4
1
19
19
9
13
74

4

218
218
-

11
1
1
2

-

7
1

-

-

3
4

2
1

-

1

C RA FTS

B E G IN N IN G

-

-

6

-

. 1
-

1

OTHBR

IN

P O L IC E

F IR E

P O L IC E
AMD F I R E

OTHER

YEAR
107

11

11

-

7

6

6
5

-

11
-

11
-

-

1
28
16
14
6
9
33

6

87

1

3

-

-

4
2

3
-

-

2
3

23
1
2
1
13
4
2
3
37

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

32
1
1
4
10
1
8
7
3
2

-

-

6

1

6
-

(

1

'

-

-

-

-

-

7
2
1
-

1
-

-

~

~

1
■

~

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

"

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

*

~

“

3
1
2

3

*

S ee fo o tn o te s a t end of t a b le .




P R O T E C T IV E

PRODUCTION AND
M A IN T E N A N C E
C L E R IC A L

TO TA L

38

1
~

13
1
2
2
7
3
1
2

Table 19. Work stoppages in Government by level, function, and occupation, 19751
—Continued
PRODUCTION AND
HA IN T E N A N C E

P R O F E S S IO N A L
AND TECHNICAL
LEVEL

AMD F U N C T IO N

TOTAL
TEACHERS

NURSES

OTHER
S A N IT A ­
T IO N

OTHER

STO PPA G ES
C O D I T I ....................................................................................
A D M IN IS T R A T IV E S E R V I C E S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAN B H FO R C E H E M T AND C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S ....................................
E D U C A T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS .......................................
PARKS AND RECREATION .......................................
L I B R A R I E S ....................................................................
(iO S E U H S ...........................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH S E R V IC E S...................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA CIL .............
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R .................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................

44
1
2
4
1
10
7
6
2
11

8
8
-

2
-

1
1

2
-

-

2
1
1

252
1
2
10
10
13
126
8
3
-

S P E C I A L D I S T R I C T ....................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C B S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAW E N FO R C E M E N T AND C O R R E C T IO N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S ....................................
E D U C A T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
M U SEU M S...........................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES ................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED F A C IL .............
O TH ER U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................

150
-

106
-

131
1
1
1
3
11
2
-

106
~
-

-

-

*

-

2

-

C I T Y ...........................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S B R V I C B S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAW E N FO R C E M E N T AND C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S ....................................
E D U C A T IO N ....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS
....................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S ....................................................................
MUSEUM S............................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES ................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL .............
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ..........................................................

2
1
7
t.
61

98
98
-

1

7
1
1
1

-

3
1

1

-

-

-

„

-

6
-

2
7
1
3
7

-

6
1
-

64
1
12
8
1
5
7
30

2
-

-

39

_
-

_
-

12
10
1
-

-

2
-

P O L IC E

F IR E

P O L IC E
AND F I R E

OTHER

YBAR
13
-

6

3
-

IN

~

-

C R A F T S O THER

B E G IN N IN G

-

3
-

S ee fo o tn o te s a t end of t a b l e .




P R O T E C T IV E

C L E R IC A L

-

*

23
-

-

-

-

"

-

-

3
3
-

1

8
8
-

1
-

10
—
10
-

3

_
-

-

3
1
7
3

42
-

-

1

2

10
1

-

-

_
-

19
-

3
-

2

1

-

-

13
-

1
1
28

11
1
1
1
3
1
1
-

Table 19. Work stoppages in Government by level, function, and occupation, 19751
—Continued
P R O F E S S IO N A L
AND TECHNICAL
LEVEL

AMO F U N C T IO N

C L E R IC A L
TEACHERS

NURSES

OTHER

S T O P P A G E S ........................................................

A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ..............................
V E L F A B E S B B V I C E S .....................................................
LAN E N F 0 B C E H B 1 T AMO C O B B E C T I O M .. .
F I B E P R O T E C T I O N ........................................................
S A N IT A T IO N S B B V I C E S ...........................................
E D U C A T IO N ............................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ..............................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ..............................................
L I B R A R I E S ...........................................................................
M USEUM S..................................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH S E R V IC E S.........................
TRANSPORTATION AND A LLIED FA C IL ................
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S ........................................................
O T H E R ........................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ..................................................................

3 1 8 .5

1 8 2 .3

.4
2 2 .8
3 .7
1 .5
7 .1
2 1 1 .7
.7
.5
. 1
-

_
-

4 .5
2 4 .9
3 .2
.8
3 6 .7

1 8 2 .3
-

1 .1
1 .1
-

7 .6
.1
.7
.1

F E D E B A L ..................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S B B V I C E S ........................
N E L F A B E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAN E N F 0 B C E H 1 N T AND C O B R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S ....................................
E D U C A T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
M U SE U M S............................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SE R V IC E S ...................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL .............
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S ..................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................
S T A T E .........................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ........................
N E L F A B E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAN E N F O R C E M E N T AND C O B R E C T I O N .
F I B E P R O T E C T I O N ..................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S .....................................
E D U C A T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ...........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
M U SEU M S............................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES ...................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S ..................................................
O T H B R ..................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................

6 6 .6
.2
2 1 .8
1 .6
5 .5
. 1

1 .8
2 2 .3
.3
1 2 .9

-

.1
.3

1 .4
-

-

(3 )
-

.1
3 .2
.7
-

-

_
-

~

-

.3
(3 )
-

S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d of ta b le .




.5

-

40

P O L IC E
AND F I R E

2 .1

1 .5

1 .5

1 .5
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

.3
-

-

F IR E

_

_
-

*

-

-

-

(3 )

1 5 .6

_
-

.1

-

(3 )
-

-

-

P O L IC E

OTHER

THOUSANDS)

3 .2
3. 1
.4
4 .9

-

1 .4
-

.5

OTHER

_
-

(3 )

*
_
-

(IN

6 .4

6 .4
. 1

-

-

-

-

(3 )

CRAFTS

IN V O L V E D

.3

6 .3
-

-

-

OTHER
S A N IT A ­
T IO N

NORKERS
A LL

P R O T E C T IV E

PRODUCTION AND
M A IN T E N A N C E

TOTAL

2 .1
-

1 .0
.2
.6
.2
-

9 8 .4
_
2 2 .1
1 .0
- 1 9 .8
(3 )
.3
.1
3 .3
2 1 .5
(3 )
.3
3 0 .1

~

1 .5

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .7
.8
. 1
-

-

_
-

_
-

.8
.1

-

.8
.2

.6
-

6 2 .3
2 1 .8
1 .0
3 .3
1 .8
2 1 .2
.2
1 2 .9

Table 19. Work stoppages in Government by level, function, and occupation, 19751
—Continued
P R O F E S S IO N A L
AND TECHNICAL
LEVEL

AMD FO M CTIO M

C L E R IC A L
TEACHBRS

NURSES

OTHER

OTHER
S A N IT A ­
T IO N

C R A F T S OTHER

W ORKERS IN V O L V E D
C O O S T Y ....................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ........................
W ELFA R E S E R V I C E S ...........................................
L A I E N FO R C E M E N T AND C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S .....................................
E D U C A T IO N ....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS .......................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
H U S B U H S ...........................................................................
HOSPTIALS AND HEALTH S E R V IC E S...................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL .............
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R .................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................

1 5 .0
(3 )
.1
.5
.1
6 .6
.3
-

C I T Y ...........................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
L A I E N FO R C E M E N T AND C O R R E C T IO N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S .....................................
E D U C A T IO N ....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S ....................................................................
M U SEU M S...........................................................................

1 9 2 .3
. 1
.9
1 .6
1 .9
7. 1
1 5 8 .8
.3
.3
-

HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES ................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL .............
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R .................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ..........................................................

.8
. 1
3 .2
.9
1 7 .3

S P E C I A L D I S T R I C T ....................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ........................
W ELFA RE S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAW E N FO R C E M E N T AND C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .............................. ...................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S ....................................
E D U C A T IO N ....................................... .............................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S ....................................................................
M USEUM S...........................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SER V IC ES I................
TRANSPORTATION AND A LL IED F A C IL ............
OTH ER U T I L I T I E S .............................................
O T H E R ..........................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S .....................................................

.8
. 1
6 .5

6 .9
6 .9
-

1 9 3 .9
-

.3
-

. 1
(3 )
-

.3

. 1
-

-

.8
-

.2
(3 )
. 1

-

-

(3 )
-

_

-

3 1 .1
-

9 0 .9
(3 )
.2
. 1
1 .0
2 .5
(3 )
-

3 1 .1
-

-

-

-

-

-

6 .9

-

-

.8

.1
. 1

41

_
-

.9

(3 )
. 1

.5
(3 )

_
-

-

.2
.3

.5

F IR E

.9

.6

6 .9

.1

P O L IC E

P O L IC E
AND F I R E

O TH ER

T H O U SA N D S)

-

-

-

9 9 .7
-

(IN
-

-

-

S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d of t a b le .




-

. 1

7 .1
. 1
.7
(3 )
6 .3
-

1 9 3 .9
-

-

P R O T E C T IV E

PRODUCTION AND
M A IN T E N A N C E

TOTAL

1 0 .3
.1
1 .5
.3
.1
3 .1
.3
9 .8
3 .0
.7
2 .2
(3 )
-

.1
-

-

-

-

-

"

1 .6
-

1 .9
- •
1 .9
-

1 .5
-

"

-

1 .5

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

*

.1
_
-

-

1 .6
-

6 .8
-

.1

.5
.1
6 .2
.2

-

1 8 .8
.2

(3 )
-

7 .5
-

.2
-

.1
(3 )
(3 )
1 1 .0
1 0 .5
8 .9
(3 )
.2
.1
1 .0
.2
(3 )
-

Table 19. Work stoppages in Government by level, function, and occupation, 19751
—Continued
P R O F E S S IO N A L
AND TECHNICAL
LEVEL

AMD F U N C T IO N

n U v d TV
U SIf I r

TOTAL
TEACHERS

NURSES

OTHER

S T O P P A G E S ........................................................

2 ,2 0 4 . < 1 ,4 1 9 .8
1

A D H I MI S T E A T I T E S E R V I C E S ..............................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S .....................................................
LAW BM FO BCBH EM T AMD C O R B E C T I O M .. .
F I B E P B O T E C T IO M ........................................................
S A N IT A T IO N S E R V I C E S ...........................................
E D U C A T IO N ............................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ..............................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ..............................................
L I B R A R I E S ............................................................................
M U SEU M S..................................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH S E R V IC E S .........................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL ...................
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S ........................................................
O T H E R ........................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ..................................................................

.6
9 0 .4
1 3 .0
1 1 .6
9 .7
1 ,6 3 6 .3
6 .1
9 .9
2 .1
1 7 .1
1 1 9 .0
6 0 .4
8 .8
2 1 9 .5

F E D E R A L ..................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ...............................................
LAW E N F O R C E H E N T AND C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N ..................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S .....................................
E D U C A T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
M U SEU M S...........................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH S E R V IC E S ...................
TRANSPORTATION AND A LLIED FA C IL .............
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S ..................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................

_
-

S T A T E .........................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAW E N F O R C E H E N T AND C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S .....................................
E D U C A T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
M U SEU M S...........................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES ................
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL
.. .
O T H BR U T I L I T I E S ..................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................

1 ,4 1 9 .8
-

.3
.7
.5

(3 )
2 .3
.5

3 1 .3
.2
6 .2
1 1 0 .8
3 .2
5 2 .7

1 3 .6
1 3 .6
-

-

2 7 .4
.7
3 .8
.8

7 .0

Y EA R

O THER

(IN

2 .6

(3 )
(3 )
"

P O L IC E

F IR E

5 .9

1 1 .6

5 .9

-

-

-

_

_

O TH ER

-

2 .5
-

-

-

-

5 .7

_

7 .0
-

-

.. 1
-

2 2
5
9
60
5
4 5

.3
.7
.9

.3
.2
.0
.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 .8
6 .2
.2
1 .4
.1

-

-

-

*

-

_
*-

-

*

5 .9

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

5 .9
-

1 1 .6
-

-

4 .6
3 .8
.8

42

P O L IC E
AND F I R E

TH O USANDS)
1 4 9 .2

_
-

S ee fo o tn o te s a t end of t a b le .




D U R IN G

2 .9

_
1 .9
-

ID L E

3 4 .1

CRA FTS

"
3 0 0 .5
.2
8 9 .2
6 .6
-

-

1 .9

P R O T E C T IV E
OTHER

S A N IT A ­
T IO N
DA Y S

A LL

PRODUCTION AN!
M A IN T E N A N C E
ii
r ti

.2
4 .1
1 .3
-

_
-

5 5 7 .9
8 9 .7
2 .6
- .
1 6 4 .1
.2
8 .5
2 .1
1 4 .6
1 0 5 .9
(3 )
3 .0
1 6 7 .3
_
-

-

-

_
-

*

4 .3
.2
4 .1
-

2 7 0 .1
8 9 .2
2 .6
1 1 .5
6 .2
1 0 5 .7
2 .3
5 2 .7

Table 19. Work stoppages in Government by level, function, and occupation, 19751
—Continued
PRODUCTION AND
M A IN T E N A N C E

P R O F E S S IO N A L
AND TECHNICAL
LEVEL

AND F U N C T IO N

T O TA L
TEACHERS

N U R SE S OTHER

7 8 .8
(3 )
.1
.8
.8
2 0 .7
3 .3
7 .1
.6
4 5 .2

C I T Y ...........................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAW E N FO R C E M E N T AND C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C B S .....................................
E D U C A T IO N ....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
M U SEU M S...........................................................................
...............
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES
TRANSPORTATION AND ALLIED FA C IL ...........
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................

1 ,4 1 9 .4
.3
1 .1
5 .6
1 0 .8
9 .7
1 ,1 9 6 .3
2 .4
2 .5
1 .0
3 .0
6 0 .4
4 .9
1 2 1 .5

1 ,1 0 8 .6
1 ,1 0 8 .6
-

S P E C I A L D I S T R I C T .....................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E R V I C E S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAW E N FO R C E M E N T AND C O R R E C T I O N .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S ....................................
E D U C A T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS ........................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
M U SEU M S...........................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SER V IC ES .................
TRANSPORTATION AND A LL IED F A C IL ...........
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................

4 0 5 .7
3 8 8 .0
.2
7 .4
2 .1
-

2 7 7 .5
-

Y EA R

-

.6
(3 )
-

-

.5

-

-

-

1 .1
-

.1

.4

-

2 9 .0
.3
.7
.3
2 7 .4
.3
-

-

2 7 7 .5
-

.8

.5

-

.8

_

-

7 .0
.6

-

1 .7
1 .7
-

_

-

-

-

•

■

.8
3 .3
.3
.1

.1
-

~

P O L IC B

F IR E

P O L IC E
AND F I R E

OTHER

THOUSANDS)
4 .6
-

2 .6
2 .5
-

*

-

-

7 .0
-

-

-

-

.6
-

OTHER

(IN

-

1 .1
-

1 The s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h av e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b ee n
d e e m e d to fa ll w ith in th e B u re a u 1s d e fin itio n of a w o rk s to p p a g e . T h is d e ­
c is io n d o es not c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s
ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of any law o r p u b lic p o lic y .
T he to ta l n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s r e p o r t e d f o r a l l fu n c tio n s o r an in ­
d iv id u a l le v e l m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m s of i ts c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l




D U R IN G

C RA FTS

-

2 0 .0
2 0 .0
-

TRANSPORTATION AND A LLIED FA C IL ...........
O T H E R U T I L I T I E S .................................................
O T H E R ..................................................................................
C O M B IN A T IO N S ...........................................................

2 .8
5 .2
(3 )
-

OTHER
S A N IT A ­
T IO N

DAYS ID L E
COU M TY .....................................................................................
A D M I N I S T R A T I V E S E E V I C E S ........................
W E L FA R E S E R V I C E S ..............................................
LAW EW FO RCEH EW T AMD C O R R E C T I O B .
F I R E P R O T E C T I O N .................................................
S A N I T A T I O N S E R V I C E S .....................................
E D U C A T IO N .....................................................................
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS .......................................
PARKS AND RECREATION ........................................
L I B R A R I E S .....................................................................
M U SEU M S...........................................................................
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH SERVICES
. . . .

P R O T E C T IV E

C L E R IC A L

1 2 1 .8
.3
5 .7
2 .4
3
60
4
45

.0
.2
.6
.6

"

.7
-

5 .0
(3 )
-

"

.8
.8

5 .2
5 .2
-

•

1 5 .0
1 0 .0
-

-

-

.7
-

1 0 .8
1 0 .8
-

-

5 .6
.3
4 4 .6

5 .9
-

1 .4
-

-

-

5 .9

.1

1 .3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

5 0 .6
.1
-

1 2 5 .8
.4
5 4 .0
1 .1
(3 )
.4
7 0 .0
1 1 1 .4
9 8 .7
.2
7 .4
2 .1
2 .8
.2
< 3)
-

~

s to p p a g e s
o c c u r r i n g in 2 o r m o r e g ro u p s a r e c o u n te d in e a c h . W o r k e rs
and d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d am o n g th e r e s p e c t i v e g ro u p s .
3 F e w e r th a n 50.
to ta ls .

43

N O T E: B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,
D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t eq u a l

Table 20. Work stoppages in Government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 19751
ALL
STA TE

O N IO N S

2/

AND A S S O C I A T I O N S

A FL

-

C IO

TOTAL
O F F IC IA L L Y
R E C O G N IZ E D

NOT
R E C O G N IZ E D

NO
IN F O R M A T IO N

O F F IC IA L L Y
R E C O G N IZ E D

NOT
R E C O G N IZ E D

NO
IN F O R M A T IO N

m
STO PPA G ES

B E G IN N IN G

IN

YEAS

S T O P P A G E S . . . . .................................................................

478

447

16

-

182

ALA BA M A ........................................................................................................
A L A S K A ............................................................................................................
A B I Z O H A ........................................................................................................
A fiK A H S A S .....................................................................................................
C A L I F O R N I A ..............................................................................................

2
2
3
1
37

1
2
2

1

_

1

C O L O R A D O .....................................................................................................
C O N N E C T IC U T ...........................................................................................
D E L A W A R E ................................................................................. ...................
D I S T R I C T O F C O L O M B IA ...............................................................
F L O R I D A ........................................................................................................

2
15
9
2
2

1
15
9
2
2

G E O R G I A ........................................................................................................
H A W A I I ............................................................................................................
ID A H O ...............................................................................................................
I L L I N O I S .....................................................................................................
I N D I A N A ........................................................................................................

4
1
7
41
6

1
1
7
38
6

ALL

IO W A ..................................................................................................................
K A N S A S ............................................................................................................
K E N T U C K Y .....................................................................................................
L O U I S I A N A ..................................................................................................
M A IN E ...............................................................................................................

-

1
1
2

34

-

-

-

-

2

9
7
2

-

-

-

-

1

~

_
-

-

-

-

4
1
1

"

M I S S O U R I .....................................................................................................
M ONTANA.........................................................................................................
N E B R A S K A .....................................................................................................
N EV A D A ............................................................................................................
NEW H A M P S H IR E .....................................................................................

6
10
1

6
10
1

_

-

-

~
-

-

-

-

1

~

-

"

7
12
2

1

~

-

-

~
4
7
1

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

~

1

“

*

22
2
32
1

22
1
30

-

-

4

-

-

NEW J E R S E Y ...............................................................................................
NEW M E X IC O ...............................................................................................
NEW Y O R K .....................................................................................................
N O RTH C A R O L IN A ........................................................ .........................
NORTH D A K O T A ........................................................................................

•

•

O H I O ..................................................................................................................
OKLA H O M A .....................................................................................................
O R E G O N ............................................................................................................
P E N N S Y L V A N IA ........................................................................................
RHODE I S L A N D ........................................................................................

53
3
2
107
21

50
1
2
107
21

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

4

1
-

“

~
2
1
-

-

26
31
9

~

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

7
-

3

1

-

-

1

1

1
1
6
2
7

1
1
6
1
7

3
-

~
“

"

S e e fo otnotes at end of ta b le .




-

-

1
12
28
7

V E R M O N T ........................................................................................................
V I R G I N I A .....................................................................................................
W A S H IN G T O N ...............................................................................................
W EST V I R G I N I A .....................................................................................
W I S C O N S I N ..................................................................................................
W Y O M IN G ........................................................................................................

~
-

_
1

4
1
1

2
16

-

“
-

1
12
28
8

SO U T H C A R O L I N A ..................................................................................
SO U T H D A K O T A ........................................................... ............................
T E N N E S S E E ..................................................................................................
T E X A S ..................................................................................................
U T A H ..................................................................................................................

1

-

■

M A R Y LA N D .....................................................................................................
M A S S A C H U S E T T S .....................................................................................
M I C H I G A N .....................................................................................................
M IN N E S O T A ..................................................................................................
M I S S I S S I P P I ...........................................................................................

-

1
1
1

17

-

_

-

-

1

1
4
2
1

-

7
_

44

-

~
1
1
3
1
5

-

~

“

-

-

“

~

-

Table 20. Work stoppages in Government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 19751
—Continued
OTHER UNIONS

EMPLOYEE ASSOCIATIONS

STATE

NO UNION
OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

NO
OFFICIALLY
INFORMATION RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

NO
INFORMATION

STOPPAGES BEGINNING IN YEAR
ALL STOPPAGES..............................................................
ALABAMA...................................................................................
ALASKA......................................................................................
ARIZONA...................................................................................
ARKANSAS.................................................................................
CALIFORNIA...........................................................................
COLORADO................................................................................
CONNECTICUT.........................................................................
DELAWARE................................................................................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA..................................................
FLORIDA...................................................................................
GEORGIA...................................................................................
HAWAII......................................................................................
IDAHO........................................................................................
IL L I N O I S ................................................................................
INDIANA...................................................................................

27

1
4
1

IONA...........................................................................................
KANSAS......................................................................................
KENTUCKY................................................................................
LOUISIANA..............................................................................
MAINE.........................................................................................

-

MARYLAND................................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS....................................................................
MICHIGAN.................................................................................
MINNESOTA..............................................................................
M IS S I S S I P P I .........................................................................

_
-

MISSOURI................................................................................
MONTANA...................................................................................
NEBRASKA.................................................................................
NEVADA......................................................................................
NEW HAMPSHIRE....................................................................
NEW JERSEY............................................................................
NEW MEXICO...........................................................................
NEW YORK.................................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA.................................................................
NORTH DAKOTA......................................................................
OHIO................................................................. .........................
OKLAHOMA.................................................................................
OREGON......................................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA......................................................................
RHODE ISLAND......................................................................

4
1
-

5

-

1

_
-

-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

-

2

238

-

*

1
1
-

-

*
_
-

-

-

-

-

4

1
-

-

-

1
6
2
1
5
18
5
-

_
-

_

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

1

1

1
1

-

1
9

-

*

1
_
*

_
-

-

-

-

17
1
24

_
-

_
-

_

-

-

-

VERMONT...................................................................................
V I RGI NI A.................................................................................
WASHINGTON............................................................................
WEST V I RG IN IA ....................................................................
WISCONSIN..............................................................................
WYOMING....................................................................................

_

_

_

_

-

*

-

-

-

~

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d of t a b l e .

45

-

-

-

1
-

*

1
1

-

-

1

-

1
3
-

_

3
2
-

1
-

_

_

-

-

-

1
-

1
*

-

24
1
1
67
12

-

-

1

2
3

_

3

-

-

-

1

1

1
5
12
5

SOUTH CAROLINA.................................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA......................................................................
TENNESSEE..............................................................................
TEXAS.........................................................................................
UTAH...........................................................................................




_
-

-

-

_

-

-

15

2

2
-

1
1
-

15
-

_

_

*

-

1
-

Table 20. Work stoppages in Government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 19751
—Continued
ALL UNIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS 2 /
STATE

AFL - CIO

TOTAL
OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

NO
OFFICIALLY
INFORMATION RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

NO
INFORMATION

WORKERS INVOLVED (IN THOUSANDS)
ALL STOPPAGES..............................................................

318. 5

315.9

1.9

-

98.7

ALABAMA...................................................................................
ALASKA.....................................................................................
ARIZONA...................................................................................
ABKANSAS.................................................................................
CALIFORNIA...........................................................................

1.4
.4
.4
.1
12.5

1.0
.4
.4

.4

1.0

-

12.2

-

6.1

(3)

-

COLORADO................................................................................
CONNECTICUT.........................................................................
DELAHARE......................................................... .......................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA..................................................
FLORIDA...................................................................................

1.1
5.7
7.2
.4
4.4

1.1
5.7
7.2
.4
4.4

(3)
-

-

4. 4
3.4
.4

(3)
-

-

GEORGIA...................................................................................
HARAII......................................................................................
IDAHO.........................................................................................
IL L I N O I S .................................................................................
INDIANA...................................................................................

1.6
(3)
2.2
38.0
2. 3

1 .6
(3)
2.2
37.9
2.3

_
(3)

_
•-

.2
32.2

_
(3)

_
-

_
-

_
-

IONA...........................................................................................
KANSAS.............................................................* .......................
KENTUCKY.................................................................................
LOUISIANA..............................................................................
MAINE.........................................................................................

.3
. 3
1.0
(3)

.1
. 1
.2

_

-

. 3
-

_
-

.3

MARYLAND.................................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS....................................................................
MICHIGAN.................................................................................
MINNESOTA..............................................................................
M I S S I S S I P P I .........................................................................

1.3
11.3
7.9
1.4

1.3
11.3
7.9
1.3
-

MISSOURI.................................................................................
MONTANA...................................................................................
NEBRASKA.................................................................................
NEVADA......................................................................................
NEW HAMPSHIRE....................................................................

1.8
3.1
.3

1 .8
3.1
.3

_
-

(3)

NEW JERSEY...........................................................................
NEW MEXICO............................................................................
NEW YORK.................................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA.................................................................
NORTH DAKOTA.......................................................................

7 .3
.3
77.5
(3)

7.3
.3
77.3
-

OHIO...........................................................................................
OKLAHOMA................................................................................
OREGON......................................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA......................................................................
RHODE ISLAND......................................................................

15.7

SOUTH CAROLINA.................................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA......................................................................
TENNESSEE..............................................................................
TEXAS........................................................................................
UTAH...........................................................................................

(3)
2.9
3.4

VERMONT...................................................................................
VIRGINIA................................................................................
WASHINGTON...........................................................................
WEST VIRGINIA....................................................................
WISCONSIN..............................................................................
WYOMING...................................................................................

(3)
. 1
2.7
.2
10.2

. 1
.1

.5

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

2.8
-

. 1
-

3.4

-

_
-

_
.3
.6

.1
2.7
. 1
1 0 .2

46

-

.3

8.5
2.7
.1

_
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

(3)
-

-

8.2
15.3
3. 1

.
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

1 .3
1 .5
.3
(3)
2.3
1 .4
-

2.8
"

*

(3)

-

-

-

. 1

. 1
84.4
6.3

S ee fo o tn o te s a t end of t a b le .




_

-

15.6

.1
84.4
6.3

.7

.1
.1

(3)

(3)
_
-

(3)

_
-

.3
.6

-

.6

-

(3 )

.1
1.4
.1
1 .0
*

Table 20. Work stoppages in Government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 19751 Continued
-—
OTHER UNIONS

EMPLOYEE ASSOCIATIONS

STATE

NO UNION
OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

NO
OFFICIALLY
INFORMATION RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZBD

NO
INFORMATION

WORKERS INVOLVED (IN THOUSANDS)
ALL STOPPAGES...............................................................

.3

9.0

ALABAMA...................................................................................
ALASKA......................................................................................
ARIZONA...................................................................................
ARKANSAS................................................................................
CALIFORNIA...........................................................................

_

COLORADO.................................................................................
CONN ECTI COT......................................................................
DELAWARE.................................................................................
DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA..................................................
FLORIDA...................................................................................
GEORGIA...................................................................................
HAWAII......................................................................................
IDAHO.........................................................................................
IL LI N O IS ................................................................................
INDIANA....................................................................................

_
-

_
*

_
-

*

_
(3)
-

_
-

(3)

_
-

IOWA...........................................................................................
KANSAS.....................................................................................
KENTUCKY................................................................................
LOUISIANA..............................................................................
MAINE........................................................................................

-

_
-

-

MARYLAND................................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS....................................................................
MICHIGAN................................................................................
MINNESOTA..............................................................................
M IS S I S S I P P I .........................................................................

_
-

_
-

_
*

-

-

_
-

-

MISSOURI.................................................................................
MONTANA...................................................................................
NEBRASKA................................................................................
NEVADA......................................................................................
NEW HAMPSHIRE...................................................................
NEW JERSEY...........................................................................
NEW MEXICO...........................................................................
NEW YORK................................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA.................................................................
NORTH DAKOTA......................................................................
OHIO...........................................................................................
OKLAHOMA.................................................................................
OREGON......................................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA.......................................................................
RHODE ISLAND......................................................................
SOUTH CAROLINA.................................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA......................................................................
TENNESSEE..............................................................................
TEXAS........................................................................................
UTAH...........................................................................................
VERMONT...................................................................................
VIRGINIA.................................................................................
WASHINGTON............................................................................
WEST VIRGINIA...................................................................
WISCONSIN..............................................................................
WYOMING...................................................................................

.2
.2

-

.2

.3

-

.4

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

(3)

_
-

(3)

_
.2
.2
-

-

5.9

-

1. 1
1.3
3.8

.6

.2

.1

4.4
1 .6
2.0
5.4
2.3

_

-

*

.3

.1

_
-

_
-

_
.2

_
. 1

6.3
-

-

-

(3)
.1
. 1
.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

. 1
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

.5
1 .5

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

1.3
2.8
4.1
1 .2

-

-

-

“

-

1 .1

*

*
*

_
-

4.8
.3
69.6
"

-

7.4
.5
(3)
68.8
3.2

"

3.4

_

_

-

-

-

.1

-

_
(3)

.1

(3)

-

(3)
(3)

*

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

(3)
.1
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

See foo tn o te s at end of t a bl e.




1.0

208.2

_
*

47

1 .3
9. 3

. 1
-

Table 20. Work stoppages in Government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 19751
—Continued
ALL UNIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS 2 /
STATE

AFL - CIO

TOTAL
NOT
RECOGNIZED

OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NO
OFFICIALLY
INFORMATION RECOGNIZED

NOT
RECOGNIZED

NO
INFORMATION

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR (IN THOUSANDS)
ALL STOPPAGES...............................................................

2

, 204.4

2

, 185.7

16.6

-

883.1

1.8

_
-

2C .7
58.3

_
-

_
23.9
32.6
.4
-

_

-

ALABAMA...................................................................................
ALASKA......................................................................................
ABIZONA...................................................................................
ARKANSAS.................................................................................
CALIFORNIA...........................................................................

22. 5
1.6
3 .3
4.1
98.9

20.7
1 .6
2. 1
98.0

COLORADO................................................................................
CONNECTICUT.........................................................................
DELAWARE................................................................................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA..................................................
FLORIDA...................................................................................

14. 1
29.4
43.9
.4
13.0

12.1
29.4
43.9
.4
13.0

GEORGIA...................................................................................
HAWAII......................................................................................
IDAHO.........................................................................................
IL L I N O I S .................................................................................
INDIANA...................................................................................

1.8
(3)
17.0
365.6
9.0

1 .6
(3)
1 7 .0
364.8
9.0

IOWA....................................................................,.....................
KANSAS......................................................................................
KENTU CK Y.... ......................................................................
LOUISIANA..............................................................................
MAINE.........................................................................................

_

MARYLAND.................................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS....................................................................
MICHIGAN.................................................................................
MINNESOTA..............................................................................
M I S S I S S I P P I .........................................................................

1.2
4. 1
. 5
-

2.0

_
.8
-

2.6
342.1
-

_
-

1.2
4.1
(3)
-

2.0

_
.8

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

1 .3
89.6
41.4
7.4

_
-

_
~

_
47.0
1 4 .0
.6

_
-

_
-

15.8
24.4
.3
.1

15.8
24.4
.3
.1

_
-

_
-

15.3
8.0
. 3
. 1

_
-

_
-

NEW JERSEY............................................................................
NEW MEXICO...........................................................................
NEW YORK.................................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA.................................................................
NORTH DAKOTA.......................................................................

50.7
2. 1
448.6
. 1

50.7
1.9
447.5

_
-

-

7.2
11.0

-

-

_
(3)
-

OHIO...........................................................................................
OKLAHOMA.................................................................................
OREGON......................................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA......................................................................
RHODE ISLAND......................................................................

92.6
2. 1
.4
562.5
54.1

92.0
1 .6
.4
562.5
54.1

SOUTH CAROLINA.................................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA......................................................................
TENNESSEE..............................................................................
TEXAS.........................................................................................
UTAH...........................................................................................

. 1
13.3
13.6

12.8
13.6

VERMONT...................................................................................
VIRGINIA................................................................................
WASHINGTON...........................................................................
WEST VIRGINIA....................................................................
WISCONSIN..............................................................................
WYOMING...................................................................................

(3)
3.0
54.4
.5
94.0

(3)
3.0
54.4
.4
94.0
"

.9
1.5
4. 4
.1

_

-

1 1 .4
(3) (4)

_
1.5
1.3
. 1

-

1.3
89.6
41.4
7.7

MISSOURI.................................................................................
MONTANA....................................................................................
NEBRASKA.................................................................................
NEVADA......................................................................................
NEW HAMPSHIRE....................................................................

-

3.1

1. 1
-

1.5
1.3
. 1

-

S ee fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




.9

48

.6
. 3

-

-

-

-

-

1 2 .8
-

-

-

(3)
3.0
41.8
.4
7.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

. 1

3.1

_
-

58.5
144.9
26.9

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

*

_

Table 20. Work stoppages in Government by State, affiliation, and recognition, 19751
—Continued
OTHER UNIONS

EMPLOYEE ASSOCIATIONS

STATE
OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZED

NOT
RBCOGNIZED

NO UNION
NO
OFFICIALLY
INFORMATION RECOGNIZED

NOT
NO
RECOGNIZED ‘ INFORMATION

DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR (IN THOUSANDS)
ALL STOPPAGES...............................................................
ALABAMA...................................................................................
ALASKA.....................................................................................
ARIZONA...................................................................................
ARKANSAS................................................................................
CALIFORNIA...........................................................................

31.6
_
1.4
1.4
-

.9

1.7
_
_
-

COLORADO................................................................................
CONNECTICUT.........................................................................
DELAWARE................................................................................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA..................................................
FLORIDA...................................................................................

_
_
(3)

_

IOMA...........................................................................................
KANSAS......................................................................................
KENTUCKY................................................................................
LOUISIANA..............................................................................
MAINE........................................................................................

_

-

_

_
-

GEORGIA...................................................................................
HAMAH......................................................................................
IDAHO........................................................................................
IL L I N O I S .................................................................................
INDIANA...................................................................................

MARYLAND................................................................................
MASSACHUSETTS....................................................................
MICHIGAN................................................................................
MINNESOTA..............................................................................
M I S S I S S I P P I .........................................................................
MISSOURI................................................................................
MONTANA...................................................................................
NEBRASKA................................................................................
NEVADA......................................................................................
HEM HAMPSHIRE...................................................................
NEW JERSEY...........................................................................
NEM MEXICO...........................................................................
NEM YORK................................................................................
NORTH CAROLINA.................................................................
NORTH DAKOTA......................................................................
OHIO..........................................................................................
OKLAHOMA................................................................................
OREGON......................................................................................
PENNSYLVANIA......................................................................
RHODE ISLAND......................................................................
SOUTH CAROLINA.................................................................
SOUTH DAKOTA......................................................................
TENNESSEE..............................................................................
TEXAS........................................................................................
UTAH..........................................................................................
VERMONT...................................................................................
VIRGINIA................................................................................
WASHINGTON...........................................................................
WEST VIRGINIA...................................................................
WISCONSIN..............................................................................
WYOMING...................................................................................

_
-

_
-

3.8

13.0
1.6

_
_
-

14.4
19. 1
8.8

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_

-

_
.

1 .3
42.6
23.5
6.9

_

_
_

_
_
.5

_
_
_
_
-

.
_
_

_
_
_
_
-

_
.9
_
_
_

_
_

_

-

_
_
_
_
-

(3)

2. 1

_
_
_
-

_

_

_
_

-

.4

_
_

_
-

.3

_
(3)

_
_
_
-

-

_

_
_
.2

_
_
-

.2
-

_
_
_

.5
16.5

_
_

_
_
_

_

_

-

_
-

"

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

9.8
-

-

1. 1

-

_
-

. 1
10.3
-

-

.2
.3

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

_
_

_

-

.1

_
_
_

-

_

_

_
-

_
_
_
-

-

1
S to p p a g e s ex te n d in g a c r o s s S ta te lin e s a r e c o u n te d s e p a r a t e ly
in e a c h S ta te a ffe c te d ; w o r k e r s in v o lv e d and d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d
a m o n g th e S ta te s . The s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h av e , fo r s t a t i s t i c a l
p u r p o s e s , b e e n d e e m e d to f a ll w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o rk
s to p p a g e . T h is d e c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a le g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t
equal
a w o rk s to p p a g e h a s ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of an y law o r p u b lic p o lic y .




12.1
5.5
11.3

-

_

_
_

38.8

-

-

-

1.8
.2
.7

_

_

_
-

3.6

_

-

-

-

_
-

1,270.9

_
_
-

3.5
.2

-

_
_
_
_

49

43.3
1 .9
426.6

_
_

_

_
_
_

-

-

33.5
1.6
.3
407.2
27.3
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_
_

. 1

_

. 1

.4

_
_
_
_

_

-

-

. 1
.2

. 1

_
_

_
_

1 3 .6

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

12.6

_
_

_
_
_

86 . 1

_

_

*

-

.5

. 1
-

2 E x c lu d e s s t r i k e ( s ) w h e re t h e r e is no u n io n .
3 F e w e r th a n 50.
4 Id le n e s s r e s u lt i n g f r o m s to p p a g e (s ) b e g in n in g in p r i o r y e a r ( s ) .
NOTE:
to ta ls .

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not
D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

Table 21 Work stoppages by region and State, 19751
(W O R K E R S I M P

D A IS

ID L E

III

THOUSANDS)

STO PPA G ES

R E G IO N

A ID

IN

YBAB

D A Y S I D L E D U R IN G YEAR
(A L L S T O P P A G E S )

STATE
NUMBER

U N IT E D

B E G IN N IN G

S T A T E S ..............................................................................

MEAN
D U R A T IO N
(D A Y S ) 1

5 ,0 3 1

2 2 .0

W ORKEBS
IN V O L V E D

NUMBER

/

P E R C E N T OF
. non- a g r .
W O RKING
T IM E 3 /

est

1 ,7 4 5 .6

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

.1 6

B E G IO N I .....................................................................................................
C O N N E C T IC U T .....................................................................................
B A I N E ........................................................................................................
M A S S A C H U S E T T S ..............................................................................
HEN H A H P S H I B E ..............................................................................
BH ODE I S L A N D ..................................................................................
V ERM O N T..................................................................................................

24 3
69
9
109
15
49
7

4 6 .7
7 6 .3
2 4 .6
3 4 .6
2 3 .9
2 8 .5
8 .1

7 6 .1
2 4 .9
.7
3 4 .1
1 .6
1 3 .6
1 .1

2 ,5 9 5 .3
1 ,3 0 9 .1
1 2 .7
8 7 6 .4
2 5 .6
3 6 5 .0
6 .5

.2 2
.4 3
.0 1
.1 5
.0 3
.4 2
.0 2

R E G IO N I I ..................................................................................................
NEH J E R S E Y . ....................................................................................
NEN Y O R K ...............................................................................................

521
191
338

1 5 .6
2 1 .5
1 3 .3

2 3 5 .0
6 5 .3
1 6 9 .7

3 ,2 6 7 .3
1 ,0 3 9 .7
2 ,2 2 7 .6

.1 4
.1 5
.1 3

R E G IO N I I I ..............................................................................................
DELA W A R E...............................................................................................
D I S T R I C T O F C O L U M B IA ........................................................
MARYLAND...............................................................................................
P E N N S Y L V A N IA .................................................................................
V I R G I N I A ..............................................................................................
N E S T V I R G I N I A ..............................................................................

1 ,5 4 5
33
31
58
654
238
560

1 3 .6
1 4 .4
3 2 .5
3 4 .7
1 4 .8
6 .7
7 .3

5 1 9 .5
1 2 .8
3 2 .8
2 2 .9
2 4 5 .1
5 4 .3
1 5 1 .6

5 ,5 6 9 .1
1 4 0 .5
8 C 7 .6
5 9 0 .9
2 ,8 5 1 .8
2 8 7 .6
8 S 0 .7

.2
.2
.5
.1
.2
.0
.6

R E G IO N I V .................................................................. ...............................
ALA BA M A ..................................................................................................
F L O R I D A ..................................................................................................
G E O R G IA ........................................ 1 ......................................................
K E N T U C K Y ...............................................................................................
M I S S I S S I P P I ....................................................................................
N O RTH C A R O L IN A ...........................................................................
SO U TH C A R O L IN A ...........................................................................
T E N N E S S E E ...........................................................................................

427
63
54
46
171
18
13
7
73

1 7 .8
1 4 .3
1 5 .7
1 8 .2
1 2 .6
3 5 .1
2 2 .8
4 9 .3
3 4 .6

1 3 6 .9
1 5 .1
2 1 .5
2 0 .6
5 7 .3
2 .9
2 .7
1 .5
1 5 .4

2 ,5 1 8 .3
2 3 9 .6
6 3 7 .8
2 5 5 .9
6 6 6 .0
8 7 .8
1 7 2 .6
5 1 .6
4 0 6 .9

.0 8
.0 8
.0 9
.0 6
.2 5
.0 5
.0 3
.0 2
.1 1

R E G IO N V .....................................................................................................
I L L I N O I S ........................ ......................................................................
I N D I A N A ..................................................................................................
M IC H IG A N ...............................................................................................
M IN N E S O T A ...........................................................................................
O H I O ............................................................................................................
W I S C O N S I N ...........................................................................................

1 ,3 1 2
38 2
173
189
91
432
72

2 2 .0
1 9 .9
2 4 .4
3 0 .3
2 2 .0
2 2 .0
1 9 .8

4 2 5 .1
1 5 1 .5
3 8 .6
3 5 .0
4 1 .7
1 3 0 .3
2 8 .0

7 ,5 6 7 .9
2 ,3 5 1 .3
7 1 8 .5
9 3 4 .6
6 7 2 .1
2 ,2 3 2 .7
6 5 8 .6

.1 8
.2 1
.1 5
.1 2
.1 8
.2 2
.1 6

R E G IO N V I ..................................................................................................
A R K A N S A S ...............................................................................................
L O U I S I A N A ...........................................................................................
NEW M E X IC O ........................................................................................
OKLAHOMA...............................................................................................
T E X A S ........................................................................................................

213
13
49
13
29
113

5 8 .7
3 5 .4
2 3 .7
2 8 .9
5 0 .8
6 8 .8

1 0 0 .6
3 .0
1 8 .2
1 .8
3 .9
7 3 .6

4 ,5 3 8 .5
8 5 .7
5 3 5 .7
4 7 .0
1 6 4 .8
3 ,7 0 5 .3

.2
.0
.1
.0
.0
.3

R E G IO N V I I ...............................................................................................
IO W A ...........................................................................................................
K A N S A S .....................................................................................................
M I S S O U R I ..............................................................................................
N E B R A S K A ...............................................................................................

211
66
28
108
17

4 5 .6
1 2 .8
2 3 .8
7 0 .4
1 8 .6

5 7 .7
1 5 .7
3 .4
3 1 .4
7 .2

2 ,1 1 7 .7
2 9 3 .7
1 1 4 .7
1 ,6 0 8 .7
1 0 0 .6

.2 1
.1 2
.0 6
.3 7
.0 7

R E G IO N V I I I ............................................................................................
C O L O R A D O ..................................i .........................................................
M ONTANA..................................................................................................
NORTH D A K O T A .................................................................................
SO U T H D A K O T A ....................................... .........................................
U T A H ...........................................................................................................
W YOMING..................................................................................................

121
47
30
10
11
24
8

1 7 .3
1 8 .4
1 9 .4
3 4 .3
2 4 .8
7 .9
3 6 .9

3 4 .7
1 5 .2
5 .6
1 .5

5 4 8 .2
2 0 4 .7
8 4 .8

1 0 .0
1 .7

6 7 .5
1C 9. 3
4 4 .1

.1 0
.0 9
.1 4
.0 8
.1 3
.0 8
.1 2

R E G IO N I X ..................................................................................................
A R IZ O N A ..................................................................................................
C A L I F O R N I A ........................................................................................
H A W A I I .....................................................................................................
N E V A D A .....................................................................................................

362
27
313
13
17

2 1 .0
1 8 .7
2 1 .6
1 2 .4
9 .7

1 1 2 .8
1 0 .4
9 8 .8
1 .9
1 .8

1 ,8 9 5 .8
1 3 7 .2
1 ,7 1 3 .0
3 2 .4
1 3 .2

.0 8
.0 8
.0 9
.0 4
.0 2

R E G IO N X .....................................................................................................
A L A S K A .....................................................................................................
ID A H O ........................................................................................................
O R E G O N .....................................................................................................
W A S H IN G T O N ........................................................................................

168
18
18
46
94

1 7 .1
8 .6
1 1 .0
1 8 .2
1 9 .3

4 7 .2
5 .7
3 .1
1 2 .9
2 5 .5

6 1 9 .0
3 7 .0
2 3 .1
1 6 6 .2
3 9 2 .7

.1 0
.0 9
.0 3
.0 8
.1 3

1 Stoppage extending a c r o s s State lin e s a r e counted
s e p a r a te ly in e a ch S ta te a ffe c te d ; w o r k e r s in vo lve d and d ays
id le a r e a llo c a te d am on g the S t a te s .
2 M ean d uratio n is c a lc u la te d only fo r sto p p age s end­
ing in the y e a r , and is w eigh te d b y m u ltip lyin g the d u ra ­




50

.7

3 7.7

5
5
5
6
6
7
3

4
5
8
5
7
3

tion of ea ch sto ppage b y the w o r k e r s in v o lve d .
3 E x c lu d e s p r iv a te household w o r k e r s .
N O T E : B e c a u s e of rounding, su m s of ind ividu al item s
m a y not eq ual to ta ls.

Table 22. Work stoppages by region, State, and occupation, 19751
O C C U P A T IO N
R E G IO N

AND S T A T E

TOTAL

P R O F E S S IO N A L
AND
T E C H N IC A L

C L E R IC A L

SA LESW O RK ERS

STOPPAGES
U N IT E D

S T A T E S ........................................

5 ,0 3 1

P R O D U C T IO N
AND
M A IN T E N A N C E

B E G IN N IN G

IN

P R O T E C T IV E

YEAR

38

52

9 ,0 1 3

39

159

959

2

3

197
38
7
71
9
21
5

1

13
6
2
3
2
-

90
13
29
3
10
1

38
11
28

76
36
99

25

96
6

293
69
9
109
15
99
7

37
12
-

17
1

1

R E G IO N I I ...........................................................
NEW J E R S E Y .................................................
NEH Y O R K ........................................................

521
191
338

99
15
30

6
3
3

5
2
3

396
122
226

R E G IO N I I I ........................................................
D EL A W A R E ........................................................
D IS T R IC T OF
C O L U M B IA .................................................
H A RY LA N D ........................................................
P E N N S Y L V A N IA ...........................................
V I R G I N I A ........................................................
WEST V I R G I N I A ........................................

1 ,5 9 5
33

76
3

11
1

8

1 ,3 2 6
23

R E G IO N I V ...........................................................
ALABAMA...........................................................
F L O R I D A ...........................................................
G E O R G IA ...........................................................
K E N T U C K Y ........................................................
M I S S I S S I P P I ..............................................
NORTH C A R O L IN A ....................................
SO U T H C A R O L IN A .....................................
T E N N E S S E E ....................................................

927
63
59
96
171
18
13
7
73

R E G IO N V ..............................................................
I L L I N O I S ........................................................
I N D I A N A ...........................................................
M IC H IG A N ........................................................
M IN N E S O T A ....................................................
O H I O .....................................................................
W I S C O N S I N .....................................................

1 ,3 1 2
382
173
189
91
932
72

R E G IO N V I ...........................................................
A R K A N S A S ........................................................
L O U I S I A N A ....................................................
NEW M E X IC O .................................................
OKLAHOMA........................................................
T E X A S ..................................................................

213
13
99
13
29
113

-

R E G IO N V I I ........................................................
IO W A .....................................................................
K A N S A S ..............................................................
M I S S O U R I ........................................................
N E B R A S K A ........................................................

211
66
28
108
17

-

R E G IO N V I I I .....................................................
C O L O R A D O ........................................................
MONTANA...........................................................
NORTH D A K O T A ...........................................
SO U TH D A K O T A ...........................................
U T A H .....................................................................
W YOM ING...........................................................

121
97
30
10
11
29
8

R E G IO N I X ...........................................................
A R IZ O N A ...........................................................
C A L I F O R N I A .................................................
H A W A I I ..............................................................
N EV A D A ..............................................................

362
27
313
13
17

29
2
20
2
1

R E G IO N X ..............................................................
A L A S K A ..............................................................
ID A H O .................................................................
O R E G O N ..............................................................
W A S H IN G T O N .................................................

168
18
18
96
99

12
1
5
9
9

See

fo o tn o te s




a t en d

C O M B IN A T IO N S

281

R E G IO N I ..............................................................
C O N N E C T IC U T ..............................................
H A IM B ..................................................................
H A S S A C H O S E T T S ........................................
NER B A H P S H I R E ........................................
RHODE I S L A N D ...........................................
T E R E O N T ...........................................................

31
58
659
238
560

S E R V IC B

-

7
-

1

2
1

-

9
3
67
1

-

2
1
3

1
10
-

3

9

9

1

-

9
2
-

-

1
1

1

1

-

1

-

-

86
31
5
22
7
22
9
1

8
2

8
1
1
3

2
2
2

2
1

"

_

7
1
1

5
1
1
2
1

1
1

6
1
9
1
1
-

170
61
22
81
11

3

-

3
2

1 ,0 9 8
305
196
138
69
395
57
177
11
38
10
25
99

89
90
15
7
9
20
5

-

-

5
1

387
56
92
39
161
17
11
7
67

5

1

18
96
973
239
551

1
-

1

1

-

1
1

9

10
-

3
1

10
-

-

2

2

-

1
1

2

o f ta b le .

51

295
18
212
7
9
117
11
11
31
66

1
-

6
2
9
1

~
1
-

2
1
23
2
6
3
2
1

9
7
77
1
6

1

23
9
5
9
7
1
9

33
11
1
5
9
13
1

121
31
20
19
8
92
9

7

1
3

17
6
1
2
10

11
1
1
8
1

17
2
2
13
2

7
2
3
2

-

19
3
6
1
3
2

17
1
19
3

53
5
97
3
3

12
2

23
9
2
6
15

2
1
1
-

-

*
8
1
1
6

9
1

-

-

9

2
' 1

2
1
1

-

1
1
-

-

9
1
7
1
~

9
6

Table 22 Work stoppages by region, State, and occupation, 19751
—Continued
O C CUPA TIO N
REGION

AND

STA TE

TOTAL

PROFESSIONAL
AND
T E C H N IC A L

CLERICAL

SAL ESN ORK ERS

WORKERS
UNITED

S T A T E S .......................................

1 ,7 4 5 .6

(IN

PROTECTIVE

SERV ICE

20.2

7 .3

1 ,1 9 3 .4

6 .3

. 1

.1

2 4 .5
7 .6
.7
1 0.2
1 .2
3 .8
1 .0

.4

76 .1
2 4 .9
.7
34. 1
1 .6
1 3 .6
1.1

18.9
5.0
-

R E G I O N I I ...........................................................
NEN J E R S E Y .................................................
NEN Y OR K........................................................

2 3 5 .0
6 5 .3
16 9 .7

R E G I O N I I I ........................................................
D EL A WA RE ........................................................
D I S T R I C T OF
C O L U M B I A .................................................
MARYLAND........................................................
P E N N S Y L V A N I A ...........................................
V I R G I N I A ........................................................
N E S T V I R G I N I A ........................................

-

-

. 1

.1
(2 )
-

75 .2
2 .7
7 2 .5

9.7
8 .9
.7

1 .4
(2)
1 .4

1 16.1
42 .0
74 .1

5 1 9 .5
12 .8

2 8 .9
4 .8

9.3
1.7

.3

3 8 0 .1
4 .6

3 2 .8
2 2 .9
2 45.1
• 54 .3
1 5 1 .6

.2
1.3
2 2 .6
(2)

(2)
7 .6
-

8.1
5.7
(2 )

(2)
-

.1
(2)
. 1
. 1

R E G I O N I V ...........................................................
ALABAMA...........................................................
F L O R I D A ...........................................................
G E O R G I A ...........................................................
K E NT U C KY ........................................................
M I S S I S S I P P I ..............................................
NORTH C A R O L I N A ....................................
S OU T H C A R O L I N A ....................................
T E N N E S S E E .....................................................

13 6 .9
15. 1
2 1 .5
2 0 .6
5 7 .3
2.9
2 .7
1 .5
15 .4

4.8
4.7
.1
-

R E G I O N V ..............................................................
I L L I N O I S ........................................................
I N D I A N A ...........................................................
M I C H I G A N ........................................................
M I N N E S O T A .....................................................
O H I O .....................................................................
W I S C O N S I N .....................................................

425. 1
151 .5
3 8 .6
3 5 .0
4 1 .7
13 0 .3
28 .0

6 1.2
36 .3
2 .3
6 .4
6.2
7.1
2.9

R E G I O N V I ...........................................................
A R K A N S A S ........................................................
L O U I S I A N A .....................................................
NEW M E X I C O ................................. ...
O KL AHOMA........................................................
T E X A S ..................................................................

1 0 0.6
3 .0
1 8 .2
1 .8
3 .9
7 3 .6

-

R E G I O N V I I .............. .. ......................................
I O W A .....................................................................
K A N S A S ..............................................................
M I S S O U R I ........................................................
N E B R A S K A ........................................................

5 7 .7
1 5.7
3 .4
31 .4
7 .2

,8
(2 )
.6
.1

R E G I O N V I I I .....................................................
C O L O R A D O ........................................................
MONTANA...........................................................
NORTH D A K OT A ...........................................
SO OT H D A K O T A ..........................................
U T AH .....................................................................
WYOMING...........................................................

3 4 .7
1 5 .2
5 .6
1 .5
.7
1 0 .0
1.7

6.2
1.1
1 .6
.1
3.4

R E G I O N I X ...........................................................
A R I Z O N A ...........................................................
C A L I F O R N I A .................................................
H A W A I I ..............................................................
N E VA D A ..............................................................

11 2 .8
1 0 .4
9 8 .8
1 .9
1 .8

5.0
.2
4.6
.2
.1

R E G I O N X ..............................................................
A L A S K A ..............................................................
I D A H O .................................................................
O R E G O N ..............................................................
W A S H I N G T O N .................................................

47.2
5 .7
3 .1
1 2 .9
2 5 .5

5.2
.1
2 .0
.2
2 .9

.2

.1

-

(2)
.2
-

(2 )
*
.4
(2)
(2 )
.2
.1
(2 )

-

_
*
(2)
(2 )

5 1 .8
1 5 .6
2.7
2 6 .7
6 .8

.2

(2)
. 1
.1

8 2 .2
2 .9
1 6 .0
1 .2
2 .4
59 .7

.1
(2 )
(2)
C2)
.1

-

3 2 0 .7
10 3 .6
3 3 .6
2 5.1
3 2 .4
10 8 .7
17.3

.6
(2)
.1
.4

.5
.3

.1

11 8 .6
1 3.2
10 .5
1 8 .5
5 4 .9
2 .9
2 .5
1 .5
14 .5

(2)
-

(2)

-

3 0 .3
17.7
1 23.7
5 3 .6
1 50.2

(2)

"

2 2 .7
1 1.7
1 .8
1.4
.7
5 .6
1.5

.1
-

.2

.1
-

-

(2 )
(2)

-

.4

.2
-

.4

. 1
(2)

~
3.9
-

. 1
-

.1
3 .8

. 1

S ee fo o tn o te s a t end of t a b le .

52

CO MBIN A TIO N S

THOUSANDS)

2 0 6.1

R E G I O N I . . . . . ..............................................
C O N N E C T I C U T ..............................................
E A I N E ..................................................................
M A S S A C H U S E T T S ........................................
NEN H A M P S H I R E ........................................
RHODE I S L A N D ..........................................
V ER MO N T...........................................................




INVOLVED

PR ODUCT ION
AND
M A IN T E N A N C E

4 7 .8
7 .6
3 8.6
. 9
.6
28.9
4 .8
.9
8. 5
14 .6

2 7 .3
.8
.3
. 1
.1
.3

.4

2 8 5 .0
3 1 .3
1 2 .0
-

-

-

.8
(2 )
.7
.2
~

1 5 .2
. 1
4 .0
(2)

5 .6
.6
5 .0

2 6 .2
1 0 .9
15 .3

5 .9

9 4 .8
1.8

~

.2
~

.1
.2
5 .2
.4
“

.1

(2)

(2 )
(2 )
-

.7
.1
.1
.6

1.0
.1

5 .6
. 1
5 .3
.2
-

2.1
3 .5
8 5 .8
.3
1 .3
7 .6
1.8
1 .0
1 .8
2 .3
(2)
.8

5 .0
1 .2
(2)
.6
1 .8
1 .3
. 1

36 .6
9 .9
2 .7
2 .7
1. 2
1 2 .5
7 .7

.2
-

-

. 1
.3
.5

.1
. 1

-

1 .1
.3
.8
-

1 .5
(2)
(2)
1 .4
(2)

2. 4
(2)
.3
1 .8
. 2

.4
.2
.2
.1

5 .0
2. 1
1.7
-

.1
.1
-

-

(2)
1 .0
. 1

1 .5
.1
1 .3
.1

5 6 .0
2 .3
5 1 .9
. 8
.9

.7
.2

8 .6
.6
.2
4 .0
3 .7

2 .0
.2
1.8
(2)
-

1 6 .6
2 .0
.3
.9
1 3 .4

. 1
.3

Table 22. Work stoppages by region, State, and occupation, 19751
—Continued
O CCUPA TIO N
REGION

AND S T A T E

TO TAL

PROFESSIONAL

AND

SALESH O R K B R S

C L ERICAL

TEC H N IC A L

P RODUCTION
AND
M A I NTENANCE

DAYS IDLE D OBING YEAN

P R O T ECTIVE

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

1 ,6 2 2 .3

2 6 8 .9

B E G I O N I ..............................................................
C O N N E C T I C U T ..............................................
M A I N E .................................................................
M A S S A C H U S E T T S .......................................
NEW H A H P S H I B E .......................................
BHODE I S L A N D . .......................................
V ERMO NT ...........................................................

2 ,5 9 5 .3
1 ,3 0 9 .1
1 2 .7
8 7 6 .4
2 5 .6
3 6 5 .0
6.5

154 .8
2 8 .0
7 3 .7
53.1
(2)

6 .3

B E G I O N I I ...........................................................
NEW J E R S E Y .................................................
NEW Y OR K.......................................................

3 ,2 6 7 .3
1 ,0 3 9 .7
2 ,2 2 7 .6

4 8 7 .0
23.7
463.3

1 4 0 .0
9 7 .9
42.1

1 7 .3
.8
1 6 .5

1 ,8 0 2 .8
7 1 8 .1
1 ,0 8 4 .7

B E G I O N I I I ........................................................
D EL A WA RE .......................................................
D I S T R I C T OF
C O L U M B I A .................................................
MARY LA ND .......................................................
P E N N S Y L V A N I A ..........................................
V I R G I N I A .......................................................
WEST V I R G I N I A ........................................

5 ,5 6 9 .1
1 4 0 .5

3 2 2 .4
3 9.3

1 0 6 .9
1 8.6

10 .1

4 ,3 2 9 .3
7 4 .5

8 0 7 .6
590 .9
2 ,8 5 1 .8
28 7 .6
8 9 0 .7

1 .2
2 .3
279 .2
.4

8 8 .0
-

B E G I O N I V ...........................................................
ALABAMA...........................................................
F L O R I D A ...........................................................
G E O R G I A ...........................................................
K E N T UC K Y ........................................................
M I S S I S S I P P I ..............................................
NORTH C A R O L I N A ....................................
S OU TH C A R O L I N A .....................................
T E N N E S S E E .....................................................

2 ,5 1 8 .3
2 3 9 .6
6 3 7 .8
2 5 5 .9
6 6 6 .0
8 7 .8
1 7 2 .6
5 1 .6
4 0 6 .9

2 3 .8
22.6
1.2
-

B E G I O N V ..............................................................
I L L I N O I S ........................................................
I N D I A N A ...........................................................
M I C H I G A N ........................................................
M I N N E S O T A .....................................................
O H I O .....................................................................
W I S C O N S I N ....................................................

7 ,5 6 7 .9
2 ,3 5 1 .3
7 1 8 .5
9 3 4 .6
6 7 2 .1
2 ,2 3 2 .7
65 8 .6

4 92.1
34 6 .5
8 .8
41.1
2 2.0
68 .2
5 .5

R E G I O N V I ...........................................................
A R K A N S A S ........................................................
L O U I S I A N A .....................................................
NEW M E X I C O .................................................
OKLAHOMA........................................................
T E X A S ..................................................................

4 ,5 3 8 .5
8 5 .7
5 3 5 .7
4 7 .0
16 4 .8
3 ,7 0 5 .3

-

R E G I O N V I I ........................................................
I O W A .....................................................................
K A N S A S ..............................................................
M I S S O U R I ........................................................
N B B R A S K A ........................................................

2 ,1 1 7 .7
29 3 .7
114 .7
1 ,6 0 8 .7
1 0 0 .6

-

R E G I O N V I I I .....................................................
C O L O R A D O ........................................................
MONTANA...........................................................
NORTH D A K O T A ..........................................
SO UT H D A KO T A ...........................................
U T A H .....................................................................
WYOMI NG...........................................................

5 4 8 .2
20 4 .7
8 4 .8
3 7 .7
6 7 .5
109 .3
4 4 .1

42.4
12.1
16.6
.2
-

R E G I O N I X ............................................................
A R I Z O N A ...........................................................
C A L I F O R N I A .................................................
H A W A I I ..............................................................
N E V A D A . ...........................................................

1 ,8 9 5 .8
1 3 7 .2
1 ,7 1 3 .0
3 2 .4
1 3 .2

4 5 .9
1.2
43 .2
.5
1 .0

R E G I O N X ..............................................................
A L A S K A ..............................................................
I D A H O ..................................................................
O R E G O N ..............................................................
W A S H I N G T O N .................................................

6 1 9 .0
37 .0
23.1
1 6 6 .2
3 9 2 .7

35.1
1.0
1 4.4
2 .1
1 7 .6

.1

.3

5. 1

1 .2

.4
-

.2
.2

.4

-

-

.8

4.8
2 .8

12 .6
. 2
.6
7 .2
-

.5
.3
1.2

4 .6
(2)

-

3 0 .6
1 .8
1 .6
-

-

1 3.6

27.3
1.2

3.5
.6
. 1
1 .0
1 .7

1.2
-

.5

3 .0

-

.5

2 .3

-

.5
.2
6 .2

32.3
-

5 .6
.6

3 2 .3
-

-

1 .8

5 .0

-

1 .2
3 .8

1 .8

53

.4
~

3 I d le n e s s

.9
~

.9
-

1 ,8 9 8 .7
1 9 9 .3
14 9 .0
2 4 7 .4
605. 1
7 3 .2
1 7 1 .5
51 .6
4 0 1 .6

.3
(2 )
.2
-

9 3 .3

7 0 6 .1
8.1

.3
19 .7
4 4 .2
2 9 .0

2 2 .6
17.2
61 5 .8
.9
4 1 .6

4 5 6 .6
3 .3
44 8 .1
2 .4
-

1 3 7 .3
37 .0
1 7 .9
4.9
60 .3
1 4.7
-

2 .7
4 .1
.3

.2
3 .6

3 ,8 6 5 .8
7 5 .4
4 4 1 .1
36 .9
84.3
3 ,2 2 8 .2

2 .5

6 1 .7
2 6 .5
1.0
9.1
6 .6
14.1
4 .4

7 7 3 .9
2 0 3 .4
6 3 .9
7 5 .0
4 9 .3
2 8 7 .5
9 4 .8

7 .8
4. 1

2 2 .0
-

1 5 .5
1 .9
52.6
2 .0
.8
4 9 .8
(2)

6 0 .7
1 .0
9.3
4 9 .3
1 .1

9 .2
2 .2
6.1
.9

4 9.1
2 1.1
2 1 .9
1 .7
3 .2
1.1

59.0
2 .2
55 .1
1.7

3 1 9 .9
6 .3
3 0 1 .7
9 .6
2 .3

1 7 .4
.9

1 3 1 .6
4 .9
3 .0
13.1
.1 1 0 .6

4 .5
2.1
1 .6

3 .5
.9
2 .7
*

4 4 3 .1
1 6 8 .4
37 .4
3 6 .6
6 5 .3
92.5
4 2 .8

-

.8
.8
-

-

1 ,4 2 1 .7
1 2 6 .0
1 ,2 6 6 .2
2 1 .7
7 .8

1 0 .8
1 .4
9 .0
.4
_
-

428. 1
5 .7
1 4 6 .3
2 4 5 .8

fro m

6 1 0 .6
3 /9 .5
8 8 .5
8 .0
6 3 .3
4 4 6 .3

-

1 ,9 7 9 .0
2 8 8 .8
1 0 2 .5
1 ,5 0 2 .1
85. 6

.1
.1
.3
.7

7 0 6 .9
18 9 .0
5 1 7 .8

-

6 ,2 1 8 .7
1 ,7 7 1 .6
6 4 4 .2
8 0 1 .7
5 9 3 .8
1 ,8 5 3 .5
5 5 3 .8

593
5
214
3

111 .4
9 .9
10 1 .4

~

-

7 7 9 .9
551 .1
1 ,8 2 2 .4
2 5 7 .3
8 4 4 .0

r e s u lt i n g

1 .9
.2
1.7

3 0 .3

-

1 S to p p a g e s e x te n d in g a c r o s s S ta te lin e s a r e co u n te d s e p a r a t e ly in
e a c h S ta te a ffe c te d ; w o r k e r s in v o lv ed and d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d am o n g
th e S ta te s .
2 F e w e r th an 50.




1 ,8 9 1 .6
1 ,0 7 5 .4
-

3 .3
.5
1. 1

-

-

3.7
12.2

5 ,3 8 7 .7

1 7 .8
11.5
.3
2 .4
3 .7
-

~

-

1 .6
1 7.2 N
1 .3

9 0 0 .9

.4

-

6 .2

(2)

1 .6

30 .7

5 1 3 .2
1 94.2
1 2 .5
19 6 .2
16.2
9 1 .4
2 .7

1 0 .6
.6

-

-

-

2 2 ,9 0 0 .4

1 1 .2
-

-

COMBIN A T I O N S

(IN THOUSANDS)

U N I T E D S T A T E S .......................................

126. 1

SERVICB

3 .5
13.1

s to p p a g e (s ) b e g in n in g in p r i o r y e a r ( s ) .

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n o t e q u a l
t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

Table 2a Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry group, 1975
( WO RK E RS

AND

DAYS I D L E

IV

T H O US A N D S )

ALABAMA

INDDSTRI

GROUP

STO PPA G ES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR
NUMBER

A LL

IN D U STR IES

WORKERS
INVOLV ED

ARIZONA

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR
NUMBER

WORKERS
INV OLV ED

C A LIFO RN IA

DAYS
ID L E DURING
Y E AR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES
BEGINNING IN
Y EA R
NUMBER

WORKERS
INVOLVED

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

1 / ...........................................................

63

1 5.1

23 9 .6

27

1 0 .4

13 7 .2

313

9 8 .8

1 ,7 1 3 .0

1 / .....................................................................

30

5 .6

1 6 6 .5

7

3 .1

7 3 .7

136

3 2 .0

1 ,1 1 8 .6

O RD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..................................................
F OO D AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T OB AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

1
2

.3
.2

5 .1
4 .6

2 .2

5 2 .8
-

2
12

1 .7
3 .5

-

5 1 .9
4 6 .5
-

-

MANUFACTURING

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND ROOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E TR O L EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................................•....................
RU BBE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E AT H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R I M A R Y M ET AL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / .....................................
M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M IS C E L L A N E O U S MANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S . .
NON M A N U F A C TU R I NG

1

-

.2

1 .2
-

1
1

-

*

-

_

_

3

.2

4 .7

-

-

-

1 .0
.3
.9

4 7 .3
7 .7
4 0 .8

2 9 .7

1.6

-

.1
.1
.7
.7

1

.6

1 4.3

1
1

.2
.4

4 .8
8 .8

-

6 /1 0 .5

9 .4

33

_

_

MANUFACTURING

1 .7

2 6 .8

3. 4
1 0 .2
.9

6
2
13
1
24

.3
(2)
2 .8
(2)
3 .9

4 .0
.5
4 4 .9
1.4
9 7 .6

_

17

3 .4

1 8 2 .2

-

_
1

. 1

.2

4 .9

7 .2

6 3 .5

177

6 6 .8

59 4 .5

.5

10.2
42. 1

4
1
22

(2)
2.1

3 2 .2
1 3 .7
3 3 .9

5 .1
2 .9

38
42

3 7 .6
6 .9

2 1 0 .5
14 0 .9

3 .3

3
30
37

.5
6 .6
1 2 .5

6 .8
5 7 .6
9 8 .9

_
3
7

5
1

1.7
(2)

33 .3
.6

4
3

_
.1
1.4

_

2 .5
22 .5

-

_

_

12.4
1 .8

_

3 9 .5
4 7 9 .4
1.1
24.7

1

5 .9
.2

3
2

.9
9 .0
(2)
1. 1

20

-

17
5

_

1 .5

6
6
2
5

-

7 3 .1
_

.3
.3
. 1

-

.6
3 .9

. 4
_

_

-

.4

3

CONNECTICUT

DELAWARE

1 / ...........................................................

47

1 5 .2

2 0 4 .7

69

24 .9

1 ,3 0 9 .1

33

1 2 .8

1 / .....................................................................

16

2 .0

6 0 .9

29

1 6 .2

1 ,1 8 4 .8

8

.7

O RD NA NC E AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..................................................
F O O D AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T OB AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ...............................................................
T E X T I L E M I L L P R O D U C T S ................. .........................................
A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND ROOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
R UB BE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R I M A R Y MfeTAL I N D U S T R I E S .................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................
M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T .................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A NU F A C TU RI N G I N D U S T R I E S . .
NONHANUFACTURING

-

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R EA L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G OVE RNME NT 7 / .....................................................................................

-

-

5

.6

-

_

-

2 1 .8
-

-

*

-

_

_

.2

_

_

-

-

*

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

(2)

1.2

-

1

(2)

.1

-

-

1

.9
5 .2

(2)

(2)
-

.9

-

-

*

-

-

1 .6

.1

2

-

.8

1

.3

. 1

-

-

-

1

-

-

(2)

-

-

31

_

-

1 .2

.1

2 .5
.9
1 8.9

13 .2

1 4 3 .9

40

.1
(2)

_
1 3 .7
77 .8

-

2 .6
(2)

3 5 .7
1 .7
_

.1
1.1

.8
14.1

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .

54

3 .2
1 ,0 3 0 . 1
1 .5
1 3 .7

-

2 .2

2
6
_

_
7
15

25

_
-

7 8 .5

1 5 .4
2 9 .4

1 2 .2

_

1 3 3 .9

_
-

6

3.1

6 0 .0

2
6

. 1
1.C
_

.7
5 .7

.2
-

1 2 4 .4

.1
.1

2 .0

.1
-

-

10

.4
-

.2

1
-

3 .4
-

. 1

2

_

-

5
2

8 .8

_

.7
8 .6

.4
10. 1
(2)
.9

.3
-

2 7 .5

1
3
1
3

.7

-

1

3

-

. 1

2

6 .4

.6

_

1
2

-

4 2 .1
64. 6

3
18

-

-

1.1
2 .4

1
1
1

-

-

-

2

4
10

.1

2
-

-

1.6

1

6 .6

_

-

2

*

1
1

_

1 4 0 .5

-

-

1 / ...........................................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C ON T R A C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ............................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COM MUNICA TIO N,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
W H OL ES AL E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................




4 .3
1 3 .3

o

IN D U S T R IE S

.8
.5

1
1
2

CO L OR AD O
ALL

7
6

-

1 .8
4 1 .6
28.1

-

-

3

-

-

11
4
6

-

2
4
6

-

-

-

-

(2)

-

-

-

.3

.8

1
-

6 .3
4 .7

.3
(2)

5
1

3 .9
-

-

-

-

C
M

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
GOV ERN ME NT 7 / .....................................................................................

-

(2)

2

1 / ...........................................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N T R A C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COMMUNICA TION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R Y I C B S . .
W HO LE SA LE AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

-

1
-

.1
1 .8

7. 1
2 2 .2

2
9

(2)
7 .2

_

_

_
.5
4 3 .9

Table 2a Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry group, 1975—Continued
( WORKERS AMD D A I S

ID LE

IM

THOUSANDS)

D ISTRICT

IHDOSTBT

G RO U P

NUHBBfi

ALL

IN D U S T R IE S

HANUFACTU RING

OF COLUHBIA

ST O PP AGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR
WORKERS
INVOLV ED

1 / ...........................................................

31

32 .8

1 / .....................................................................

4

1 .8

O RDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
F OOD AND K I N D B E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T OB AC CO H A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P B O D U C T S ............................................................
A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
L UH BE R AND ROOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R B AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E H I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E T R O L E U H R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
RU BBE R AND H I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ..............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E AT H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R I H A R T H E T A L I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D H ET AL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................
H A C H I N E R T , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R I C A L H A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P H E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P H E N T .................................................
I N S T B U H E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
H IS CE L L A N E O U S HANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S . .
N O N H A NU F A CT U R IN G

_
1

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G OV ER NH E NT 7 / .....................................................................................

DAYS
I D L E DU EIN G
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

IN D U S T R IE S

HANUFACTURING

54

2 1 .5

6 3 7 .8

46

2 0 .6

25 5 .9

9 9 .1

15

2 .5

54. 6

19

3 .9

1 1 7 .3

1
4

.5

(2)
.4

-

-

-

-

*

.2
1 1 .9
-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .6
-

-

-

9 2 .2
-

-

-

.2
-

6 .4
-

"
_

_
-

-

-

-

. 1
1 .4

-

2

.3
-

27

-

3 1 .0

9

2 5 .0

8
4
_

_

_

-

-

39

70 8 .5

5.1
.3
_

6 7 0 .9

_
-

.7

3 .6

. 1
.4
-

.7
5 .6
1 3 .0

.1
3 .2
-

1 6 .6
_
1
10

4 7 2 .3
5 4 .5

. 1
.3
4 .4

.7

(2)

.8
6 .3
.5

_

6 .6
4 .6

-

-

27

3 7 .2

1
5
2

-

.2
.3
.1

-

583. 2

3 .0

1 .3
.4

.1
.4

9 2 .5

-

-

7
2

2 7 .7
8.2

.7

-

3

14.6
-

22

_

4
2

19.0
-

-

3 .5

1
1

2.2
-

-

-

.1

2
1
2

2.0
15.2

.2
-

.9
3.0
-

-

2
-

.2

1

1

1 .8

.1
-

1

-

2
3

-

-

8 .5

-

-

-

1

.6

2

-

-

-

.1

.4
-

1
-

*

2

_
.4

-

2

-

-

_
1

-

1

WORKERS
INV OLV ED

_

(2)
1 3.0

8
2
_

1.4
.4
_

4 .3
118. 5
10 .8
2. 1
_

.1
1 .6

2
4

IN D IA N A

1 3 8 .6

1 .0
1.8

IOWA

1 / ...........................................................

382

1 5 1 .5

2 ,3 5 1 .3

173

3 8 .6

71 8 .5

66

1 5 .7

2 9 3 .7

1 / .....................................................................

127

2 7 .2

9 9 0 .0

108

1 8 .6

5 0 0 .4

32

1 0 .4

23 7 .2

-

-

-

_

-

3 4 .4
-

-

O RD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..................................................
FOOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ...............................................
T OB AC CO H A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

2

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R EA L E S T A T E ..............
S B R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G O VE RN HE NT 7 / .....................................................................................

.5
.2

. 1
16 .2
6 .0

3
4
4

.5
1.0
.6

.9

.8
3 7 .2

3
3

1.1

26.0

5
1
8
11
19

.4
.1
1 .4
2 .0
3 .7

3 0 .4
.2
9 9 .0
1 1 4 .6
16 9 .7

30

1 0 .1

(2)

(2)

8
8
1
1
255

2 .5
.5
1 .3
. 1
1 2 4 .3

.

_
-

-

-

-

_

_

7 .3
1 6 .7
12 .8

-

1 .4
. 1

2

H A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R I C A L H A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P H E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P H E N T .................................................
I N S T B U H E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
H IS C E L L A N E O U S HANUFACTURING I N D U S T R I E S . .
1 / ...........................................................

_

3 .1

1
7

RU BB ER AND H I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ..............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R I H A R Y H E T A L I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D H ET AL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................

N O NH A NU F A C T U R I N G

-

4 2 .7
-

_

.9

10

.3

1
6
3

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E H I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E T R O L E U H R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
H I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N TR A C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C O H H U N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
WH OL ES AL E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

2 .0
-

_

-

13
-

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
L UH BE R AND WOCD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................

-

3

2 6 2 .9

15

3 .5

5
16

.6
4 .1

3 1 .8
8 6 .1
6 /2 .3
9 .2

2

1 ,3 6 1 .3

120
35

51.5
1 5 .3

18
25

12.4
6 .4

65

1 4 3 .0
1 8 7 .2
22 6 .9
4 0 5 .3

.7
3 8 .0

_

.4
32 .8
3 6 5 .6

55

-

-

_

.3
2 0 .0
_

3

18
23

5 .2
8 .3

7
10
_

3 .5
.6
_

1
6

.1
2 .3

1.7
1 4 .6
.6

5 .3
-

1

.1

1.8
6 /8 8 .5

34

5 .3
_

-

4 .2

5
5

.8
.2

3 7 .3
13 .3
3 .0
_

_
2

5 6 .5
_

22

-

5 3 .6
-

-

_
.6
9 .0

16. 2
-

. 1
.5
.1

-

1 3 .1
2 2 .3
_

1 .7
-

2 .3

7

_

1 3 .0
160. 1

-

-

-

3 .4

.2
-

-

1.0
-

-

4
4
3

218. 1
_

.5
. 1

2

1 2 5 .5

15 2 .0
1 2 .0
2 5 .1
.2

5 4.1
-

_

-

-

1 .5
102. 5
35.4

_

(2)

1

-

1 8 .6
-

-

_
1.3

1

-

.3
2 .4
1 .9

-

_
6

-

1 .0

_

2
14
41

*

6. 1
1 .9

3
17
20

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




NUHBEB

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YE AR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

8 0 7 .6

IL L IN O IS
A LL

DAYS
I D L E DU RIN G
Y E AR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

WORKE RS
INVOLVED

(2)
-

GEORGIA
ST O PP AGES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

NUHBEB

-

-

1 / ...........................................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
H I N I N G ............................................................................................................
CO N TR AC T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , CO H H U N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
WH OL ES AL E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

_

FL O R ID A
STOPPAGES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR

. 1

2.9

Table 23. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry group, 1975—Continued
( WO RK ERS

AMD

EATS I D L E

IM

THODSAMPS)

K A NS AS

IND U STRY

G RO U P

ST O PPA G ES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR
NUMBBB

iL L

IH D U ST B IB S

MANUFACTURING

WORKERS
INVOLV ED

K E NT UC KY

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR
NUMBER

WORKERS
INVOLVED

NUMBER

WORKERS
INVOLVED
1 8 .2

1 / ...........................................................

28

3 .4

1 1 4 .7

171

5 7 .3

6 6 6 .0

49

15

1.6

1 0 1 .3

45

1 0 .6

390. 9

21

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E T R O LE U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................' . ...............
RU BBE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................
S T O N E , C L A T , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R I M A R Y M ET AL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................
M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ...............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A NU F A C T U R I N G I N D U S T R I E S . .
NONHANUFACTURING

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R EA L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S ......................................................................................................
G OVE RNME NT 7 / .....................................................................................

-

-

_

5
-

.2
-

_

_

8 .4
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

.3
-

4 .5

1
5

-

-

-

.2
.1
1.0
.5
2 .9

3

.4

1 6 .7

4

.8

.7
.7

3
3
1
1

1 .7
1.1
. 1
.2

113 .7
21. 1
.3
1 .0

1
1

.1
(2)
-

*

_

_

13 .4

126

4 6 .6

_

1 .7

13

_

_

7

.7

8 .6

100
15

2 9 .4
1 2 .4

1
3

.2
.5

1 .4
2 .4

4
3

-

-

_

-

_
1
1

_

_
.1
.9

(2)
.3

6 .7

1 2 2 .0

47

7 .2
.8
-

-

_

-

2
2

.1
.1

1

.1

2 .0

-

.4
-

3
3
-

.9

3

2.2
-

33

1 6 .2

9 .8
14 .9

1
1
-

.1
13. 1

5
2

.3
.2

3 5 .0

9 3 4 .6

105

18 .6

6 7 3 .2

.4
1 .0

_

1
4

.2
.6

.7

11. 5
-

-

-

.2

5. 8

*

-

_

_

_

5 .7
4 .4

-

16. 5
2 0 .2
-

_

.5

.4
2 .8

5
2
6

.4
. 1
1 .4

19 .8
1 .3
13 1 .4

. 1

1 .6
2 .0

2
6

. 1
.6

3 .0
1 1 .0

(2)

-

*

*

.4
.5
.2
.9

9 .2
1 .6
2 3 .3
26. 6
4 3 .8

(2)

-

.5
-

-

.5
1.4
1 .3

1 3 .7
1 7 .8
3 8 .2

3 .8

2 6 4 .4

254. 1

31
4
7
1

.2

3. 2
.1
.8
5 .0

2 0 .8

48 4 .6
_
-

-

21. 4
-

3
10
18

.9
.1
(2)

-

5

8 .5

-

57. 1
9 .9

391. 8

-

62

2 0 2 .6

_

_

8

4 6 8 .8

-

1 1.2

_

1 .3
2 7 9 .7
_

14

6
1
1
2

6 4 .7
-

-

_

-

1 .8
.7

. 1

1
28

6 .6
17. 1

(2)
-

14 .0

_
-

-

-

1.0

MICHIGAN

(2)

1
1
1
3
8

-

N O N H A N U F A C T U R I N G 1 / ............................................................

2

1 2 .8
-

.4

-

-

-

2

1 3 .3

_

~

.5

-

189

2
2

-

_
.1

8 7 6 .4

1
3

.6
1 .7

2

_

34. 1

_

_

C
O

.2

-

25.8

5
2

-

-

2

-

.9

-

1 .5

2
1 .6

.2
-

-

8 8 .6

3

4 5 .8
1 .1

. 3

5
-

3

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AMD A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E TR O L EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R B A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G OVE RNME NT 7 / .....................................................................................

1 .8
.3
-

.7

-

-

MASSACH USETTS

25
1
3

1 .3
73. 4

-

-

4

M A N U F A C T U R I N G 1 / .....................................................................

-

.2
.6

-

_

7 5 .4
151 .4

_
-

-

_

2

275. 1
_

4 .4
. 1

_

1

2 1 .0

109

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
CO NT RA CT C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COMMUNICA TION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
W HO LE SA LE AMD R E T A I L T R A D B ...........................................

.9
. 1
1 7 .8
1 2 .6
13 9 .4

1
1
7
2
8

-

6 /2 .6

3

34 .0
7 .4
2 8 .9

5 9 0 .9

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S MA NU FA CT U RI N G I N D U S T R I E S . .

.2
3 3 .7

-

.5

(2)

.9

1

.2
. 1
.3

2 2 .9

R UB BE R AMD M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AMD G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R I M A R Y ME TA L I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D H BT AL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................

-

1
1
2

58

A P P A R E L , B T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
L UMBER AMD ROCD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................

4 .8
16 .0

-

1 / ...........................................................

O RD NA NC E AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
F OOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ...............................................
T O B A CC O M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

.8
. .2

*

MARYLAND
IN D U STRIES

_

2 3 .9
-

-

-

2
2

5 3 5 .7
2 5 6 .0

-

-

4 .9

.5

DAYS
I D L B D U R IN G
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

_

-

-

-

5. 1

4

3 .3
-

2
-

-

-

. 1
-

_

_

-

2
-

-

1 / ...........................................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N T R A C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ............................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COMMUNICA TION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
W HO LE SA LE AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

3 .0
4 .5
. 3

84
_
-

1 6 .4
_
-

4
4
2
6

1 .7
8 .3
4 .4
/.1

2 6 1 .4
_
-

10

1 0.7

4 1 0 .2

20

2.9

3 7 .0

14

3.9

1 5 5 .0

12
6

2 .6
.3

4 6 .5
5 .4

13
14

4 .2
2 .2

3 1 7 .9
2 9 .4

17
14

3 .0
.6

2 6 .4
1 9 .4

_

_

.2
11.3

1 0 .7
8 9 .6

-

4
1

_
1 .4
1 .3

_
5 .5
1 .3

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




DAYS
ID L E DURING
YEAR (A LL
STOPPAGES)

1 / .....................................................................

O BDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
F OOD AND K I N D R E D P B O D U C T S ..............................................
T OB A C C O M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E M I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

ALL

LOUISIANA
ST O PPA G E S
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

56

3
12

1
10
28

(2)
1 .0
7 .9

. 5
1 8 .8
4 1 .4

Table 2a Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry group, 1975—Continued
(WORKERS AMD EATS IDLE IN THOUSANDS)

MINNESOTA

IND U STRY

G RO U P

STOPP AGES
BE G IN N IN G I N
YEAR

M ISSOURI

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR

NUMBER

ALL

WORKERS
IN VOLVED

1 / ...........................................................

91

41.7

6 7 2 .1

108

31 .4

1 / .....................................................................

40

1 0 .0

2 4 4 .0

54

2 2 .2

INDUSTRIES

M A NU F A CT U R IN G

O RD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..................................................
FOOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T OB AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................
A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................

_

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T .................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A NU F A CT U RI N G I N D U S T R I E S . .
N O N H A NU F A CT U R I N G

9. 1

_
-

-

-

_

-

-

_

M A NU F A CT U RI N G

30

5 .6

8 4 .8

1 ,2 1 8 .6

5

.6

2 4 .1

_

2 2 .5
-

-

1
2

.5
.4

2
2

.3
.1

1 4 .7
4 .0

-

1

.1

1 .5

-

1

4
1

_

_

_

-

-

.2

2 .0
.1

(2)

-

6/3.

4

.9

1
55 .3

1

• - ■

6

.5

1 2 .2

_

_

_

6
7
4

2 .9
14 .7
.4

6 4 .9
9 7 4 .8
1 3 .7

-

-

-

7

2 .3

10 0 .8

.3
.3

1 7 .6
17 .3
.2

51

3 1 .7

4 2 8 .1

54

9 .2

22

2 2 .2

3 8 2 .5

1
1
13

(2)
(2)
1 .0

.8
.4
2 2 .1

7
8

6.4
.5

20. 1
8 .1

12
12

5 .4
.4

3 2 2 .8
1 7 .2

-

1
5
8

.2
9 .5
7 .7

(2)
1 .1
s 1*4

(2)
(2)

-

-

1

.2
-

1

2
7
6

5 .7
.1

(2)

-

-

-

7 .8

.1

-

4 4 .7

(2)

-

.8
.8
1 .7
1 4 .6
3 3 .7

4 .6

1
4
1

-

.1
.5
.9

14

.8
-

-

1 .0

(2)

1

*

1
1
1
3
8

-

9 .4
-

-

9 .8

.2

1

_
.2

-

1 8 .3

.3

-

-

_
1

-

(2)
.5
1 .8
NEW

25

390. 1

1 .0
1 0 .0
1 5 .8

_

5.1
_

1
2

_
.1
. 1

2 .4
3.4

1 .2
. 1

21.0
1 .4

.5
3. 1

6
4
_

8 .1
2 4 .4

_
2
10

YORK

6 0 .7

_

O HIO

1 / ...........................................................

191

6 5 .3

1 ,0 3 9 .7

338

1 6 9 .7

2 ,2 2 7 .6

432

13 0 .3

2 ,2 3 2 .7

1 / .....................................................................

93

1 3 .2

2 2 7 .1

166

3 1 .6

5 7 6 .3

208

5 3 .0

1 ,3 7 0 .3

-

.

1
13

.6
1 .2

5 9 .7
2 4 .4
-

O RDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..................................................
F OOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T OBA CCO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E M I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................
A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND WOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................

-

RUBBER AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ..............................................................................................
L E AT H E R AND L E A TH E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R IM A R Y ME TAL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 7 / .....................................................................................

14

9 .5
-

-

-

3 .2

-

3 9 .9
-

-

-

4

.3

1 .6

3

.2

2. 5

4

.1

.3

10

.5

5 .5

3

.2

.3

.3
5 .3

3
5
7

.4
.6
2 .2

4. 1
13 .4
11 1 .8

2 .5
.6

1 5 .9
5 .0

5
11

1 .0
1.4

4 7 .5
4 7 .3

2

.4

1 9 .9

-

-

2
2

1
14

1 .5
.7

1
4

1.8

.2
4 1 .4

6
6

.1

.9

(2)

4
-

-

-

.2
.1

1

.6
-

7
a
10

(2)

-

8 .4

1
1
10
10
24

.5
2 .3
.7

-

18 .5
5 1 .8
7 .7

.1
. 1.
1 .4
2.7
3 .3

3 .3
1 .5
2 6 .6
44. 4
2 3 6 .3

-

11

1 5 .2

2 .2

6 6 .9

15
19
37

1 .7
1 2 .8
6 .4

4 6 .7
1 3 2 .2
12 2 .9

-

-

-

10

1 .4

2 7 .0

28

4 .5

1 0 3 .8

36

6 .1

3 0 8 .8

7
4
3
2

2 .9

22
20
4
2

7 .4
4 .5

.2
.1

4 5 .8
7 .0
3 .0
1 .9

27 .3
5 2 .2
6 .2
. 4

14
18
5

3

2 .7
6 .9
5 .7
.6

7 1 .9
1 7 6 .8
9 8 .1
2 .8

98

1 / ...............................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ......................................................................................
CO N TR AC T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COMMUNICA TION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
W HO LE SA LE AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

1.5

10

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T .................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A NU F A C T U RI N G I N D U S T R I E S . .
N O N H A N U F AC T U RI N G

-

-

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S .......................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
PE T RO L EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S .......................................................................................

5 2 .2

8 1 2 .6

172

224

77.3

8 6 2 .5

_

_

_

.3

_

_
.3

4
22

2 9 .0

16
23

9 .9

1
10
22

3.6

1 .4
.5
7 .3

4 .5
5 1 2 .1
3 0 .4
1 1 6 .8
8 9 .3
8 .9
50 .7

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




1 ,6 0 8 .7

-

.2
-

NEW J E R S E Y
IND U STR IES

WORKERS
IN VOLVED

-

1
-

6 /2 .3
1 8 .2
3 .0

D AY S
I D L E DURING
YBAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

NUMBER

-

_

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R EA L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G OVE RNME NT 7 / .....................................................................................

A LL

.9

-

ST O PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
T SA R

_

7

-

-

1 / ...........................................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N TR AC T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COM MUNICA TIO N,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
W HO LE SA LE AND R E T A I L T R A D B ...........................................

_

.6

WORKERS
INV OLV ED

-

-

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
R UB BE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ..............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R IM A RY M ET AL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................

_
3

NUMBER

MONTANA

DAYS
I D L E D U R IN G
Y EA R ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

57

_
-

.3
. 1
138. 1

_
-

1 ,6 5 1 .2

_
-

36

2 0 .4

26
34

2 4 .0
8 .2

82
28

4 3 1 .9
3 9 6 .8
2 3 6 .0

3
42
32

.6
7 .4
7 7 .5

4 2 .4
9 5 .5
4 4 8 .6

_

4 4 .4
10. 1

3 4 1 .0
3 0 8 .4

4 .8
1 .0

2 5 .4
2 9 .7

_

_

1 .2
15 .7

65.3
9 2 .6

21
26

_
14
53

Table 23. Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry group, 1975—Continued
(WORKERS AMD M I S IDLE IN THOUSANDS)

IN D U ST RY

G RO U P

NUMBER

ALL

WO RK ERS
INVOLVED

WORKERS
IN VOLVED

3 .9

1 6 4 .8

46

1 2 .9

16 6 .2

654

245. 1

2 ,8 5 1 .8

14

2 .2

11 1 .8

17

5 .6

124 .7

247

6 0 .3

1 ,5 0 2 .1

-

-

-

29. 5
-

-

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E TR OL EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
RUB BE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................
S T O N E , C L A T , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ..........................
P R I M A R Y M ET AL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................
M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T .................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ...............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A N U F AC T U R I N G I N D U S T R I E S . .
NONHANUFACTURING

-

-

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
GO VE RN ME NT 7 / .....................................................................................

-

2

-

-

*

-

4 .8

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

12)

6 2 .2

-

1
3
1

.2

1 .2

-

-

-

1.7

4 .5
1.2

3 6 .8
30 .9

1 .2

(2)

7
-

26. 1
3 9 .8
27 2 .6
1 8 5 .4

21
29
39

1 .4
1 1 .7
1 .3

2 .5
1 0 .5
4.9

1 .3

. 1

26

7 .5

1 8 7 .5

5 .2
9 .3
2 .4
.8

19 1 .8
1 8 2 .2
11 0 .2
1 0 .9
1 ,3 4 9 .7

. 1

. 6

23
13
7
5

29

5 3 .0
_

_
2
6

.1
.6

7. 3

41. 5

407

1 8 4 .8

_

1
130
48

.1
6 0 .5
1 7 .6

. 1
1 7 4 .2
3 1 8 .0

7 .9
10 .6

4 0 .3
1 8 1 .6
6 /. 5
7 2 .6
56 2 .5

_

1 4 .6
8 .1

-

. 1

_
2 .8

5
9

3 .8
.3

_

1 5 .5
2 .1

RHODE

21 .0
7 .2
9. 1
-

-

.1
.7

4
2

3

-

9

9 .0
3 .7

(2)

1
-

.1
.3

-

_

2
1

.9
1 2 6 .0
23 .0

1

-

_

4 5 .5

(2)
2. 1
.8

9
12

-

2

(2)
-

15

3
8
7

"

1 .9
5 .5
3 5 .8

.4

5 .7

17

4 0 .7
4 .5
3 3 .6

-

-

.1
.9

1

3 .6
. 1
.6

~

-

.8

-

1

-

-

2 0 .7
1 1 .7

1.1
-

5

4
1
1

-

1

2
2
5

-

-

.5

16

*

-

-

.7

3

*

1 / ............................................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N T R A CT C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , CO MMUNICATION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
W HO LE SA LE AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

40
59’
-

-

3 .8
.4

.2
. 1

22
107

3 .8
8 4 .4

TENNESSEE

IS L A N D

TEXAS

1 / ...........................................................

49

1 3 .6

3 6 5 .0

73

15 .4

4 0 6 .9

113

7 3 .6

3 ,7 0 5 .3

1 / .....................................................................

16

4 .7

17 4 .2

37

8. 3

330. 8

56

2 7 .0

86 7 .2

IN D U STRIES

O RD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
F OOD AND K I N D B E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T O B AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................
A P P A R E L , E T C . J / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AMD WOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AMD A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND B E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
RU BB ER AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A TH E R. AMD L E AT H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ..........................
P R I M A R Y ME TAL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D H BT A L P R O D U C T S 4 / .....................................
M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AMD
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S MA NU FA CT U RI N G I N D U S T R I E S . .

_

_
3

-

_

.
-

1

.1
.3

.6

-

-

-

-

1.0
-

-

-

6 /. 3
4 9 .2
3 9 .8

4 9 .6

4

.6

-

1
3

.4
1.2

.5

1 / ..................................... ......................

33

8 .9

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C ON T R A C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COM MUNICA TIO N,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AMD S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
W H OL ES AL E AMD R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

1
4

-

2 .8

(2)
1.2
1.1
(2)

36

7. 1

-

-

.3
6.3

-

15 .3

2
16

.4
3 .1

1.5
5 2 .7

1 1 7 .2
(2)

2
4

.5
.1

1
4
________

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .

58

I

(2)
. 1
2 .9

(2)
3 .6
1 3 .3

6 /2 .2
1 2 4 .7

1 4 .3

41 7 .8

1 8 .0
2 2 .8
1 2 5 .5

5
5
6

.6
.5
.7

2

.3

7.1

1
10

.2
6 .2

1

.1

1 0 .9
1 1 6 .0
1 .4

57

4 6 .6

2 ,8 3 8 .0

-

-

-

2 .9
2 .0

1 .4
5 4 .1

2. 1

-

-

76. 1

-

-

3
21

. 1

15.5
8 7 .3
1. 4

-

7

4 8 .3

1

1 9 0 .8

-

1 .4
.7

1.1
-

~

-

6
8

.3
1 9 .5
-

(2)
-

9

-

2.1

3 .7
5 0 .3

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
GOVE RN ME NT 7 / .....................................................................................

-

.3
.1

1

3
1

(2)
6 5 .9

.7
5 7 .2
5 .8

-

-

(2)
2 .7

1
4

.1

2

-

.3
.2

-

-

(2)

-

1

.1
4 .4
1 4 .4

(2)

-

-

-

-

"

1
1
3
1

-

*

1
2
2

_

-

-

. 1
1 .8

-

-

*

1
9

4 .0

.6
-

.3

2

_

4
-

.7

N ON M AN U FA CT U RI N G

_

5 .0

.5
-

1




NUMBER

D AY S
ID L E DURING
YEAR ( AL L
STOPPAGES)

29

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
L UMBER AND HOCD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................

M A NU F A C T U R I N G

NUMBER

DAYS
I D L E DURING
Y EA R ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

STO PPA G ES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

1 / ...........................................................

O RD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
FOOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T OB AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ............................................................

ALL

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

STOPPAGES
B E G IN N IN G IN
YEAR

1 / .....................................................................

IN D U STRIES

MANUFACTURING

WORKERS
INV OLV ED

PE NNSY LVANIA

OREGON

OKLAHOMA
STO PPA G ES
BEGINNING IN
YEAR

-

-

28

4 0 .5

2 ,4 3 6 .8

13
12

5 .0
.8

35 9 .2
36.0

-

4

.3

~

6 .0
*

Table 2& Work stoppages in States having 25 stoppages or more by industry group, 1975—Continued
( WORKERS

AMD DAYS I D L E

IV

THOOSAVDS)

W A S H IN G TO N

V IR G IN IA

IVDOST BY

G RO U P

STOPP AGES
BE G IN N IN G I N
YEAR

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

NUMBER

INVOLV ED
A LL

VIR G IN IA

ST O PPA G ES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YEAR ( A L L
STOPP
WORKE RS NUMBER A G E S )
WORKERS
NUMBER
IN VOLVED

WORKERS
INVO LVED

DA YS
ID L E DURING
YEAR ( A LL
STOPPAGES)

1 / ...........................................................

238

5 4 .3

2 8 7 .6

94

2 5 .5

3 9 2 .7

560

151-6

8 9 0 .7

1 / .....................................................................

15

2.1

5 3 .3

38

1 1 .5

2 1 5 .3

38

6 .2

2 3 5 .8

IN D USTRIES

M A NU F A CT U RI N G

WEST

STOPPAGES
B E G IN N IN G I N
YEAR

ORD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
FO OD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T OBA CCO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

RU BBE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ..............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E AT H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R IM A R Y M ET AL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P RO D U C T S 4 / ....................................
M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ! .................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T .................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A NU F A C TU RI N G I N D U S T R I E S . .

_

(2)
-

-

-

-

-

2
-

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E TR O L EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................

-

-

*

-

1
1
1

-

(2)
.5
.2

3. 4

-

-

_

.1
14.1
1 0.1

-

2 7 .1
-

-

-

_

2

7 3 .2
2 .7
8 7 .3

.2

6/ . 7
8 .0

-

1

_
.7

-

1

-

3

.5

1

.2

1. 1

1
1

.1
. 1

.1
1.2

-

-

2 2 .6

1 .0

-

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C ON T R A C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COM MUNICATIO N,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
WH OL ES AL E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

_

-

198
13

46.6
2 .6

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G OVERNMENT 7 / .....................................................................................

_

2 3 4 .3
-

2.8

-

3
1

14.0
_

12
9

4 .0
4 .4

1 1 .7
1 1 .9
5 4 .4

4 .0
.2

522

14 5 .4
-

5 8 .7
2 3 .8

.1
.3
2 .7

2 6 .9

-

491
13

4 2 .6

9.5
4 .0
20. 2
4 8 .1
51.8

(2)

_

. 2
1 6 .7

2
5
6

.4

_
. 1
2 .5

.7
3 .0

1 .0

4. 6
1 7 7 .4

1
21

_
.1
.1

8

-

112. 1
7 5 .9

_

56

.2
.2
.9
.6
.9

2
1

4 .3
-

. 1

2

"
5 2 .2

8

. 1
-

2 9 .3
S /7 .9

1
1
7
4
5

4 .7
1 .9
.1

19.1
$ /.8
.5

-

2

.5
.1
.2
.1

1
-

(2)

-

3
3
1

1 3 .6
-

_

4

*

(2 )

.2

(2 )

.3
-

_

7 .6
.1
1 .8

2

-

1

_

-

-

_
11
2
5

_

*

-

1 / ...........................................................

1 .1

-

223

N O N H A N U F AC T U RI N G

_

7

.5

.3

3

-

6 5 4 .9
_

142 .2
1.2

6
7

6 2 4 .9
1 3 .4

1 .5
. 1

_

_

4 .8
6 .6
_

3
2

.2
.2

4 .6
. 5

W IS C O N S IN
A LL

IN D U STRIES

M A NU F A C T U R I N G

72

1 / ..............................* . .............................. ......................................................................................................................................................

ORD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ ... ................
FOOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S .......................................................................................................................................................................................................
T OB AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................
T E X T I L E M I L L P R O D U C T S .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................

2 8 .0

6 5 8 .6

35

1 / ........................................................

11 .8

4 9 1 .7

1 .3

22 5 .2

5

_

_

A P P A R E L . E T C . 3 / ................................................................................................................................................................. .......................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ....................................................................................................................................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................................................................................................................... .......................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................................
1
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ............................................................................................................................................... ..................
P ET R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................................
RU BB ER AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...........................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
S T O N E . C L A Y . AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ....................... .......................................................................................................................................
P R I M A R Y METAL I N D U S T R I E S ................................................................................................................................................................................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / .......................................................................................................................................................................................

1 / ........................................................

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . .
H T N I N G ........................................................................................................
C O N TR AC T C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................ ..................................................................................................................................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COMMUNICATION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S .
7
W HO L ES A LE AMD R E T A I L T R A D B ........................................
F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E . . . .
S E R V I C E S ..................................................................................................
G OVE RNME NT 7 / ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1 T he n um b er of sto p p age s re p o rte d fo r a m a jo r in d u stry gro up or
d ivisio n m a y not equal the su m of its com ponents b e c a u s e ind ividu al sto p ­
p a g e s o c c u r r in g in 2 o r m o re gro u p s a r e counted in e a cu . W o r k e r s invo lved
and d ays id le a r e a llo c a te d am ong the r e s p e c tiv e g ro u p s .
2 F e w e r than 50 .
3 In clud es other fin ish ed p ro d u c ts m ad e fr o m f a b r i c s and s im ila r
m a t e r ia ls .
4 E x c lu d e s o rd n an ce, m a c h in e ry , and tra n sp o rta tio n equipm ent.
5 In clu d e s p r o fe s s io n a l, s c ie n t ific , and co n tro llin g in stru m e n ts; photo­




1.3
1.1

6
2

1 7 .8
1 9 .9

.8

( 2)

_

_

_

-

_

_

1
2
6

.1
.4
1.0

1 .2
7 .6
4 1 .5

59

8

6 .0

172. 1

2
2

.2
.4

1 .1
4 .4

37

M A C H I N E R Y . E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ________________ _________
__________________________________________
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AMD
S U P P L I E S ...........................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
T N ST RI I R E N T S - E T C . S / .................................................................................. ...................................................................................................
............
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A NU F A C T U RI N G I N D U S T R I E S .
N ON MA N UF AC TU RI N G

_

16.2

1 6 6 .9

16

4 .9

5 8 .3

5

.7
.1

6 .7
6 .2

-

-

2
7

. 1
1 0 .2

1 .6
9 4 .0

g ra p h ic and o p tica l go o d s; w a tc h e s and c lo c k s .
6 Id le n e ss re s u ltin g fro m sto p p age (s) b egin nin g in p r i o r y e a r ( s ) .
7 The situ a tion s re p o rte d h e re have, fo r s t a t is t ic a l p u r p o se s, been
deem ed to fa ll w ithin the B u r e a u 's definition of a w o rk sto p p age . T h is d e ­
c is io n does not con stitu te a le g a l d ete rm in a tio n that a w o rk sto ppage has
taken p la c e in vio latio n of an y law o r p u b lic p o lic y .
N O T E : B e c a u s e of rounding, su m s of in d ivid u al item s m a y not equal
to ta ls. D ash es (-) denote z e r o s .

Table 24 Work stoppages by State and metropolitan area, 19751
w
{WORKERS AND

ST ATE

DAYS I D L E

III

AND H E T B O P O L I T A N

THOOSANDS

ABEA

STOPPAGES
B E G IN N IN G IN
YE AR
NUMBER

5 ,0 3 1
63
13
11

AN AH E l H - S A NT A A N A - G A R D E N

G R O V E ...

F R E S N O .....................................................................................

RIVERSIDE-SAN

EERNARDINO-ONTARIO.

BARB ARA-SANTA

M A RIA -L O M PO C.

33
29
31
40
31
11
7
54
6
9
7
14
10
14
46
23
13
10
18
382
9

21 .5
4. 8
.9
1 .2
8. 9
.8
2. 5
20.6
14.9
1 .9
1 .7
3 .1
15 1 .5
1.5

140
122
18
12
9

7 0 .0
66. 5
4. 6
4 .8
4 .8
3 8 .6
1.6
1.5
3 .6
3 .5
5 .8
5 .8
15. 7
. 3

1 ,6 5 9 .7
1 ,5 8 0 .5
7 7 .2
6 3 .3
9 3 .9
7 1 8 .5
2 6 .0
26 .0
7 7 .6
7 9 .2
16 3 .7
9 9 .6
293 .7
6 .7

.9

2 0 .2
3 2 .2
8 .3
2 1 .8
21 . 8
11 4 .7
9.9
6 6 6 .0
5 3 .5
2 0 7 .7
2 0 6 .2
1 3 4 .6

13
99
5
51
10
18
12
19

10
7
14
5

23
7

D I S T R I C T O F C OL O M B I A P O R T I O N . • .
HA RYT.A KD P O R T I O N . _______ . . . . . . . . .
V TR OT N T A P O R T I O N _______. . . . . ____ _
F T O R T D A _____ ____ ____ ____ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F O R T I. A n D E R D A L E - H O L L Y W O O D . . . . . . . .
.1ACKSONV T I . I . F ................................................. ...............
T. AKRI. A N D- W TN T ER H A V E N . . . . ___ ____ _
MIAN T .............................................................. ......... . . . . .
O R L A N DO ..............................................................................
T A H P A - S T . P E T E R S B U R G ........................................
OP.OROT A.............................. ......... ......... ................................... ...
A T L A N T A .................................................................................
H A W A I I ...........................................................................................
H O N O L O LU ..............................................................................
I D A H O ................................................. .............................................
I L L I N O I S ................................. ............................ ......................
C H A M P A I G N - 11R RA NA -R A NTODI...................... ...
CHIC AGO NORTBHESTERN IN D IA N A
ST A ND A RD C C N S O L I D A T E D A R E A . . . . .
Ch ic a g o
t T T ___ t T . . r T ________T
P F O R T A . . 7 .................... ............... ............ .........................
R O C K F O R D . _____ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
< 5P R I NO F TR T n ________ _______ _________________
TNDTAN A . . . . . . . ....... ......................................... . . . . .
E V A N S V I L L E , T N - K Y .................................................
TNTVrANA P O R T I O N __________ ______________
F O R T B A Y N E ........................................................................
GARY —HAMMOND—EA S T C H I C A G O 2 / . . . . .
T N m ANAPOT.T
................. ...................................... ...
S OO TH E E N D ........................................................................
TOW A .................................................................................................
r E n f t p ra p i n < ; r __________ T ___________________
D IV E N P O R T -R O C K I S L A N D - M O L I N E ,
T A - T L . __________ ____ _____ . . . ____ . . . . .
nR<5 HOTNR<?_______________. . . . . . . . ____ _
m i R i i Q n p . .................... ......... ............................... . . . . .
« : i o r j x r T T Y f t a - n r t . . t _____ 7 _ ...................
TOW A P O R T I O N .......... ......................... ............... ...
KA N S A S .............. ....................... . . . ____ . . . . . . . . . .
W I C H I T A ..............................................................................
K E N T n C K Y . . . . . . . . . ___ ______ . . . . . . . . . . .
T . FX I N f i l O N - P A Y P I T H . ................ ............................
T.OIJiqV II.f.f!
KY -TH .
_____________
K p p T n P K Y P O R T I O N ....................................... _ .
P AD U C AH ........................... ..................... ................... ...

69
21
11
10
5
5
5
6
33

173
11
9
13
18
22
17
66
5
5
12
6
6
6
28
7
171
7
26
24
7

15. 1
2. 6
1 .2
.2
5.7
.5
1 0 .4
4 .7
4. 1
3 .0
98 .8
4 .6
1 .3
2 .2
32 .4
. 1

3 1 ,2 3 7 .0

15.2
1 .6
10. 1
1 .6
2 4.9
4 .9
.8
2 .0
10.8
10.8
2. 1
1 .5
12. 8
11.3
9.4
32.8
35 .8
3 2 .8
2. 1
. g

18
6
27
19
8
13
313
17

47
5

H A R T F O R D . . . . . . . . ....... ............................... . . . . .
NEW H A V E N - W E S T H AV E N___ . . . . . . . . . .
NEW L O N D O N - N O R W I C H , C T - R T . . . _______
f f l N N F C T T C f l T P O R T I O N ................. ...................
NORWALK. ______________ _____ . . . . . . . . . . .
u AT KR RT1RT . . . ....... ... .......................... ......... ...............
D E L A W A R E . . . . . . . . . _____ _______ . . . . . . . . .
HTT.MTNGTON g P F - H D - N a _____ . . . . ______
I
HRT. A HA Rp P O R T I O N ................ ......... ...................
D T S T R J C T O F C O L U M B I A __________ . . . ____ _
iVA^HTNOTON , t f - M n - V A ........................................

1 ,7 4 5 .6

23 9 .6
87 .9
18.1
1 3 .6
37 .0
5 .2
137 .2
58 .1
6 3 .5
8 5 .7
1 ,7 1 3 .0
1 5 0 .7
1 2.3
2 5 .5
65 5 .5
2 .0
15 6 .3
4 8 .0
1 4.2
16 . 4
2 6 1 .2
15 0 .2
55 .7
34.0
8 .8
7 .0
18.4
2 .8
20 4 .7
15.4
1 0 8 .4
2 1.1
1 ,3 0 9 .1
9 7 .7
2 6 .9
2 3 .6
1 ,0 7 9 .1
1 ,0 7 9 .1
13.1
4 2 .2
14 0 .5
10 9 .9
8 1 .9
8 0 7 .6
8 4 5 .0
80 7 .6
2 3 .6
13 .8
6 3 7 .8
19.4
3 3 .7
9 .5
4 5 4 .1
1 5.4
4 3 .3
25 5 .9
1 18.6
3 2 .4
3 0.6
23.1
2 ,3 5 1 .3
40 .9

20
13
SA NT A

WORKERS
INV OLV ED

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

11.8
1.8
1 .2
4 .2
18. 0
5 .8
1 .4
.8
.3
4 .1

3. 5
5.1
. 4
.4
3 .4
.8
57 .3
2 .5
9 .7
9 .6
7 .2

STATE

AREA

STOPPAGES
B E G IN N IN G IN
YEAR
NUMBER

L O U I S I A N A .................... . .................... ...................... ...
BATON R O U G I .....................................................................
NEB O R L E A N S .....................................................................
S H R E V E P O R T .......................................................................
M A I N E . ...........................................................................................
MARYT AND........................................... ......................... ................
B A L T I M O R E ...........................................................................
M A S S A C H U S E T T S .....................................................................
B O S T O N . ................................. .............................................
B R O C K T O N ....................... ......................................................
F A I L R I V E R , H A - R I ................................. ...
M A S S A C H U S E T T S P O R T I O N . . . . . ..............
L A W R E N C E - H A V E R H I L L , M A - N H . .............. ...
M A S S A C H U S E T T S P O R T I O N ..............................
P I T T S F I E L D ........................................................... ...
SPRINGFIELD-CHICOPEE-HOLYOKE,
M A - C T ....................... . , . ................................................
H A S S A C H U S E T T S P O R T I O N ..............................
W O R C E S T E R ..........................................................................
M I C H I G A N ....................................................................................
ANN A R B O R ............................................................................
B A T T L E C R E E K .................................................................
BAY C I T Y ................. ...................................................
D E T R O I T .................................................................................
f l i n t ........................................................................................
GRAND R A P I D S ................................. ...................... ...
J A C K S O N ..................................................................................
K A L A H A Z O O - P O R T A G E ................................. ...
L A N S I N G - E A S T L A N S I N G . . ..................................
S A G I N A W . ........................................................................... ...
M I N N E S O T A ..................................................................................
D U L U T H - S U P E R I O R , H N - W I ..................................
M I N N E S O T A P O R T I O N ...........................................
W I S C O N S I N P O R T I O N ...........................................
M I N N E A P O L I S - S T . P A U L , H N - N I ..................
M I N N E S O T A P O R T I O N ...........................................
M I S S I S S I P P I .................... ......................................................
B I L O X I - G U L F P O R T ........................................................
J A C K S O N ....................................................... ... ......................
M I S S O U R I ..................................................................... ...
K A N S A S C I T Y , M O - K S ..............................................
M I S S O U R I P O R T I O N ........................................ ...
K A NS AS P O R T I O N .....................................................
S T . J O S E P H .............................................................. .........
S T . L O U I S , MO—I L .....................................................
M I S S O U R I P O R T I O N ........................... ..
I L L I N O I S P O R T I O N ........................................ ...
MO NT AN A........................................................................................
B I L I I N G S ................. .............................................................
G RE AT F A L L S ..................................................................
N E B R A S K A .....................................................................................
O MA HA , N E - I A .................................... .............................
N EB RA SK A P O R T I O N ..............................................
N E VA D A ........................................................................... ...
L A S V E G A S ...........................................................................
NEW H A M P S H I R E .....................................................................
NEW J E R S E Y ...............................................................................
A T L A N T I C C I T Y 3 / ....... .................................. ...
J E R S E Y C I T Y . . 7 ........................................................
LONG B R A N C E - A S B U R Y PA RK 3 / ....................
NEW B R U N S H I C K - P E R T H
A H B O Y - S A Y R E V I L L E j / .....................................
NEWARK 3 / ............................................................................
P A T E R S O N - C L I F T O N —P A S S A T C .................
T R E N T O N ..................................................................................
V IN ELA N D -M ILLV ILLE-BRID G ETO N .. . . .
NEW M E X I C O ........................... ......................... .........................
NEW Y O R K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A L B A N Y - S C H E N E C T A D Y - T R O Y ..............................
R t l F F A I O ............................................................................... ...
K I N G S T O N - N E W B U R G H ..................................................
N A S S A U - S U F F O L K C O U N T I E S 1 / ....................
NEW YORK C T T Y _______ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NEW Y O R K - N O R T H E A S T E R N NEW J E R S E Y
S T AN DA RD C O N S O L I D A T E D A R E A ..............
R O C H E S T E R .............................................. .............................
RO CK LA ND C O U N T Y ........................................................
S Y R A C U S E ...............................................................................
n T T C A - R O N E ...........................................................
W E S T C H E S T E R C O U N T Y ..............................................
NORTH C A R O L I N A . . .............................. .............................
NORTH D A KO T A....... ...................................................
O H I O ....................................... ......................................... ...
A K R C N .......................................................................................
C A N T O N.................... ...................... ..........................................
C I N C I N N A T I , O H - K Y - I N ........................................
O H I O P O R T I O N ...........................................................
K ENT UCKY P O R T I O N ..............................................
C L E V E L A N D ....... ................ ............................ .............. . .
C O L U M B U S .................................................... ................ . . .
D A Y T O N . .......................................... ...................... ...
H A M I L T O N - M I D D L E T O W N ...........................................
L I M A ............................................................................................

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b le .




AND M E T R O P O L I T A N

60

WORKERS
IN VOLVED

49
12
19
5
9
58
40
109
57
9
7
5
9
6
7

18 .2
6 .5
4. 5
.5
,7
2 2 .9
17.4
3 4 .1
23.8
.3
.8
. 5
1 .9
1.2
.4

9
9
14
189
5
7
5
75
8
12
7
8
5
6
91
14
10
5
48
48
18
5
5
108
29
21
8
5

1.9
1 .9
2. 2
3 5 .0
1. 1
.3
.7
15. 4
2. 5
3. 2
.4
1.0
.5
1.2
4 1 .7
4 .3
3. 3
1 .0
1 4 .5
14. 5
2 .9
1.0
.7
3 1 .4
6 .2
5 .0
1. 1
.3
26 .0
2 3 .3
2 .7
5 .6
1.1
1.3
7 .2
6. 4
6 .4
1.8
. 8
1 .6
65. 3
1 .1
2 .6
1.0

DAYS
I D L E DURING
Y EA R ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

76
61
17
30
7
11
17
15
15
17
11
15
191
8
21
9
21
53
35
9
7
13
338
42
41
10
47
122
236
9
5
24
11
20
13
10
432
29
16
38
32
5
56
29
22
6
8

5 3 5 .7
1 4 2 .3
2 8 8 .9
14. 3
12.7
590. 9
554. 7
8 7 6 .4
37 1 .7
3 .6
1 8 .4
15 .4
1 1 0 .3
96. 1
8 .2

1

1
1

1

50. 7
5 0 .7
147. 4
9 3 4 .6
2 4 .9
1 1 .9
1 7 .8
203. 2
9 2 .4
6 6 .5
1 6 .8
18 .0
1 2 .4
4 4 .7
672. 1
7 4 .6
60. 7
1 3 .9
212. 4
212. 4
8 7 .8
18. 1
2 7 .0
,6 0 8 .7
188. 6
14 1 .6
4 7 .0
1 1.1
,465. 0
,3 6 9 .4
9 5 .6
8 4 .8
26. 2
1 7 .8
10 0.6
90. 3
90. 3
1 3 .2
9 .8
2 5 .6
,0 3 9 .7
9. 5
42.4
15. 2

2 .4
1 4 .9
4 .2
.3
. 3
1.8
1 6 9 .7
6. 7
21.1
1. 1
1 0 .8
1 1 1 .9

24. 5
2 4 4 .3
7 3 .6
9 .8
2. 9
4 7 .0
2 ,2 2 7 .6
29. S
48 3 .8
16 .0
1 6 5 .8
1 ,1 2 4 .4

13 5 .9
1.2
1.0
6. 2
1 .0
3 .6
2 .7
1.5
1 3 0 .3
3 .2
3. 4
6.9
6 .4
.5
1 2 .0
8 .0
5 .4
1.3
1 .3

1 ,5 0 9 .3
1 7 4 .5
1 1 .7
46. 9
17 .9
4 2 .2
172.6
37.7
2 ,2 3 2 . 7
1 1 1 .0
50. 8
100. 1
8 3 .8
16 .1
199. 6
1 1 4 .7
2 1 5 .8
3 7 .0
71.0

Table 24, Work stoppages by State and metropolitan area, 19751
—Continued
( WO RK ER S I M P

STA TE

DAYS

ID L E

IN

AMD M E T R O P O L I T A N

THOUSANDS)

AREA

STOPPAGES
B E G IN N IN G IN
YEAR

'

NUHBER

O H IO - CONTINUED
L O R A I N - E L Y R I A ..............................................................

TOLEDO,

O H - M I ..............................................

O RE G ON ...........................................................................................
E U G E N E - S P R I N G F I E L D .....................................
P O R T L A N D , O R - N A ............................................
OREGON P O R T I O N ....................................................
S A L E H ........................................................................................
P E N N S Y L V A N I A ................................................... .. ................
A LL E N T O H N -B E T H L E H E N -E A ST O N ,
P A - N J .............................................................
P E N N S Y L V A N I A P O R T I O N ..........................
A LT OO NA ............................................... .................
E R I E ..................... ....... ...........................................
H A R R I S R U R G .........................................................
J O H N S T O W N ............................................................
N OR TH E AS T P E N N S Y L V A N I A .....................
P H I L A D E L P H I A , P A - N . 1 .................................
P E N N S Y L V A N I A P O R T I O N . . . _________
NEB J E R S E Y P O R T I O N ................................
P I T T S B U R G H .................................................
R E A D I N G ........... .............................................
B I L L I A H S P O B T . ............................... .................
Y ORK ........................................................................
RHODE I S L A N D .........................................................
PR O V ID E N C E -B A R W IC K -P A W T U C K E T ,
R I - H A . ..............................................................
BHODE I S L A N D P O R T I O N ..........................
S OU T H C A R O L I N A ....................................................
SOUTH D A K O T A . ......................................................
S I O U X F A L L S ......................................................

WORKERS
INVOLVED

7
14
10
5
18
15
20

1.8
2 .8

8
10
46
5
24
24
6
6 54
36
32
5
17
7
14
34
134
115
22
140
21

.7
2 .0
1 .5
10.0
1 .4
12.9
1.9
4 .9
4. 9
.3
245.1
7 .9
6. 9
1 .0
2.7
1.5

1.5
7. 3
55.1
45. 3
9 .8
30. 2
3 .8

5

.4

7
49

1.9
1 3.6

42
41
7
11
8

9. 8
9 .6
1 .5

.7
.5

DAYS
I D L E DURING
YEAR ( A L L
ST O PPA G E S)

STATE

AND H B T R O P O L I T A N

AREA

STOPPAGES
BE G IN N IN G IN
YEAR
NUMBER

T E N N E S S E E ..................................................................................
C HA T T A N O O G A , T N - G A ..............................................
5 2.1
T E N N E S S E E P O R T I O N ________________ ____
40 .9
K T N G S P O R T - H R T S T O T . , T N - V A ..........................
19.7
K N O Y V I L L E ..........................................................................
2 1 .3
47 .8
M E M P H I S , T N - M S - A R ..................................................
T E N N E S S E E P O R T I O N ...........................................
4 0 .7
N A S H V T L L E - D A V T D S O N ..............................................
25 6 .5
T E Y A S .................................................................... ... ......................
B E A U M O N T - P O R T A R T H U R - O R A N G E .................
2 5 .7
D A L L A S - F O R T N O R T H ....................... ..........................
2 9 .3
G A L V E S T O N - T E Y A S C I T Y ........................................
1 6 6 .2
H O U S T O N .................................................................
7 .3
U T A H ..............................................................................
8 7 .5
S A L T TAKE C I T Y - O G D E N ................. .................
8 7 .3
2 .2
V E RM O N T........................................................................................
V I R G I N I A .......................................................... ...................
2 ,8 5 1 .8
NORFOLK-VIRGINIA EEACHP O R T S M O U T H , V A - N C ..................................
2 5 0 .4
V I R G I N I A P O R T I O N ........... .........................
21 7 .5
R I C H M O N D ..............................................................
15 . 9
W A S H I N G T O N . . . . ___. . . . . . . . . . . _____. . .
5 1 .7
R I C H L A N D - K E N N E R I C K .....................................
6 .1
S E A T T L E - E V E R E T T . ____ . . . . ___________
18. 1
S P O K A N E .................................. ..............................
1 6 0 .9
TACOMA ....................................................................
7 4 2 .8
B E S T V I R G I N I A ........... ...........................................
6 2 3 .4
11 9 .4
C H A R L E S T O N . . ............................... ..
4 9 8 .4
HU N TIN G TO N -A SH LA N C, B V - K Y - O H . . . . .
WEST V I R G I N I A P O R T I O N ........................
71 .3
K ENT UCKY P O R T I O N . . . .............................
1 0.2
P A RK E RS R U R G - M A R I E T T A , HV-OH..............
1 0 3 .8
3 6 5 .0
WEST V I R G I N I A P O R T I O N . . . ................
B H E E L I N G , W V -O H .............................................
WEST V I R G I N I A P O R T I O N ........................
3 0 2 .9
3 0 1 .8
W I S C O N S I N .................................................................
A P P L E TO N - O S HKOS H .........................................
51 .6
LA C R O S S R . ............. ................................
6 7 .5
M A D I S O N .................................................................
63 .0
M I L W A U K E E ............................................................
R A C I N E ....................................................................
W YO MI NG .........................................................................

73
6
8
5
10
22
21
17
113
25
18
9
30
24
14
7
238
11

WORKERS
INVOLVED
15.4
1.0
1 .0
. 6
3. 7
4. 3
4. 3
4. 1
73. 6
29 .7
2 8 .8
1.7
5. 4
10. 0
4 .9
1. 1
54.3

5

2 .2
2. 2
1. 2
2 5 .5
.3
1 0 .9
. 3

18
560
9
19
12

2 .8
1 5 1 .6
1 .9
2 .4
1 .5

5
7
5
9

1 .2
.9

11.
10
94
7
36

7
72

5
5
14
19

5
8

. 7
.9
. 3
2 8 .0

.5
.3
4 .6
1 1 .8
.6
1 .7

DAYS
I D L E D UR IN G
YEAR ( A L L
STOPPAGES)

40 6 .9
35 .3
35. 3
17. 7
9 7 .9
60. 8
59 .1
12 3 .6
3 ,7 0 5 .3
1 ,4 3 6 .3
1 ,5 5 4 .0
39. 2
213. 3
109. 3
82. 7
6. 5
2 8 7 .6
65.7
65. 7
3 1 .9
392. 7
. 8
152 .1
8. 4
8 4 .3
8 9 0 .7
6 1 .0
46. 5
1 7 .7
2 4 .6
32. 6
24. 4
6 .9
3. 9
65 8 .6
1 2.8
9. 8
28. 6
3 5 4 .2
4 2 .8
44. 1

1
In clud es data fo r e a ch m e tro p o litan a r e a in w h ich 5 sto p p age s o r 2 Included in the C h ica g o , 111. -N o rth w e ste rn Indiana Stan d ard C o n so l­
idated A r e a .
m o re began in 1 9 7 5 . So m e m e tro p o litan a r e a s includ e cou nties in m o re
than 1 S ta te ; hence, an a r e a m a y eq ual o r e x c e e d the to tal fo r the State
3 Included in the N ew Y o rk —N o rth e a ste rn N ew J e r s e y Stan d ard Con so lia te d A r e a .
in w h ich the m a jo r c ity is lo c a te d . Sto p p a ges in the loggin g and m in in g
in d u strie s a r e exclu d ed . Sto p p a ges o c c u r r in g in m o re than 1
m e tro p o l­
itan a r e a a r e counted s e p a r a te ly in e a ch a r e a a ffec ted ; w o r k e r s in vo lved
N O T E : B e c a u s e of rounding, su m s of ind ividu al ite m s m a y not equal
to ta ls .
and d ays id le a r e a llo c a te d to the re s p e c tiv e a r e a s .




61

Table 25. Work stoppages by industry group and duration, 19751
IN D U S T R Y

GROUP

TOTAL

1
DAY

2-3
DAYS

I N D U S T R I E S .................................................................

2 /4 ,9 9 8

936

652

521

739

730

742

325

353

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................................................

2 /1 ,8 9 9

79

137

159

293

346

446

210

229

O RDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..............................................
F OO D AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................
T OBA CCO M A N U F A C T U R E S ...........................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S .......................................................

9
173

_

2
15

1
35

2
26

2
40

22

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / .......................................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E .......................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S .....................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ........................... ...

7-14
DAYS

4-6
DAYS
STO PPA G ES

A LL

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ....................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................
P E TR O L EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ....................................................................................

_

15-29
DAYS

ENDING

IN

30-59
DAYS

60-89
DAYS

9 0 DAYS
AND OV ER

YEAR

_

2
13

4

18

21

1

2

4

4

4

5

1

54

2

9

12

14

7

5

3

2

60
56
70

1
2
“

1
1
3

6
2
3

14
12
7

1C
12
13

12
16
17

2
6
19

14
5
8

46
99

5
5

3
7

6
3

8
9

4
21

7
26

5
11

8
17

-

7

8

8

3

4

9
19
18
42

11
5
32
27
63

19
2
40
34
86

5
12
21
33

6
9
27
40

:

32

-

2

RUBBER AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...........................................................................................
L E AT H E R AND L E AT H E R P R O D U C T S .................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S .......................
P R IM A R Y METAL I N D U S T R I E S ........................... .‘ ...............
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D UC T S 4 / .................................

56
10
132
158
316

1
1
9
12

3
2
10
9
21

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...........................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..............................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ...........................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A NU F A CT U RI N G I N D U S T R I E S .

272

18

17

25

40

43

59

35

35

119
139
36
43

10
7
1

11
13
2
3

20
10
1
6

21
22
5
7

16
27
8
7

21
29
9
9

9
13
4
6

11
18
6
5

N O N H A N U F A C T U B I N G .................................................................

2 /3 ,0 9 9

857

515

362

446

384

296

115

124

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . .
M I N I N G ........................................................................................................
CO N TR AC T C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COMMUNICATION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S .
W HO LE SA LE AND R E T A I L T R A D E ........................................
F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E . . . .
S E R V I C E S .................................................................................................
G OVERNMENT 6 / .................................................................................

2
1
9
13
19

_

_

6
1 ,1 6 6
601

1
676
59

312
65

98
101

258
358

21
11

24
19

28
24

19
218
474

-

-

13
76

15
81

_

_

43
131

26
85
INVOLV ED

3
14
108

10
96

4
27

2
9
14

45
71

_
H O RK E RS

ALL

_

35
85

52
75

24
34

29
39

6
28
29

2
21
3

3
25
3

5

3
43
110

47
87

(IN

THOUSANDS)

I N D U S T R I E S .................................................................

2 /1 ,7 3 1 .8

2 2 3 .3

2 1 7 .0

161 .2

2 6 6 .3

34 8 .4

2 7 9 .3

8 1 .5

1 5 4 .9

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ...........................................................................

2 /4 6 1 .4

2 1 .1

4 2 .5

4 8 .6

6 3 .8

5 4 .6

97.8

4 6 .0

87.0

O RD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..............................................
FOOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................
T OB AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ...........................................................
T E X T I L E M I L L P R O D U C T S ........................................................

6.9
2 7 .9

-

-

1 .9
1.5

(7)
6 .1

.8
2 .9

3 .4
6 .3

3 .9

.8
1.5

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ........................................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S .....................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................

10.0

2.4

17.1
9 .9
11.8

1.0

4 .6
. 1

.8

.3

.5

.4

. 1

.1

1.1

2 .0

5 .3

.8

.4

.2

.1

.1

.2
.1
.4

2 .7
(7)
.6

6. 4
1 .9
.7

1 .0
.7
1.1

2 .5
3 .4
2 .0

.3
2 .3
5 .3

4 .0
1 .3
1 .7

1.0
.7

.4
1 .4

4 .7
.6

2 .7
1.1

.4
4 .3

1 .5
3.0

.9
1.1

.3
4 .4

1.1

3 .6

6 .7

.7

4.0

1 .3
2 .8
6 .3
7 .2

2 .3
.2
3.1
3 .3
7 .3

3 .7
.3
4 .7
7.1
1 2 .7

(7)

(7)
“

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ....................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................
P ET R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................................

2 0.7

RUBBER AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...........................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S .......................
P R IM A R Y METAL I N D U S T R I E S ..............................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / ..........................

1 0.4
1.1
17 .4
4 1 .9
48 .2

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S , .......................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..............................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ...........................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S MAN UF AC TU RI NG I N D U S T R I E S .

7 4 .4

9 .8

2 .2

8 .1

7 .9

7 .1

3 4 .0
8 0 .7
11 .2
6.8

3 .2
.7
.3

6 .2
6 .5
4 .9
.2

3 .7
7 .3
.1
1.0

5 .1
5 .9
.7
.9

2 .5
8 .9
2 .2
1 .4

1 7 4 .6

1 1 2 .5

2 0 2 .5

2 9 3 .8

1 2.0
16 .6

4 .5

2 .1
.6
2 .4
.9
3 .6

(7)
.1
2 .8
1.3

N O N H A N U F A C T U R I N G ..................................................................

2 /1 ,2 7 0 .5

2 0 2 .3

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . .
M I N I N G ........................................................................................................
C O NT RA CT C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COMMUN ICA TIO N,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S .
WHOLES ALE AND R E T A I L T R A D E ........................................

.6
3 9 1 .8
31 0 .2

.1
13 8 .4
10 .6

16 1 .0
6 2 .6

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E . . . .
S E R V I C E S ..................................................................................................
GOVERNMENT 6 / .................................................................................

3.0
2 9 .4
3 1 1 .8

-

. 1
. 1
1.5
10 .4
1.6

-

_

-

8 2 .4
11 .1

40.1
1 6 .5

27.5
.7

5 4 .9
2 .4

_
3 .6
2 1 .3

.5
-

.4
-

2 .0
6 .6
7.1

.9
4 .5
7 .4

2 0 .9

6.1

1 2.4

6 .6
1 0 .4
.9
.9

2 .1
5 .6
.6
.7

4 .6
3 5 .5
1.6
1.6

1 8 1 .5

3 5 .5

6 7 .9

_

_

23.0
5 7 .6

.3
2 7 .3
71 .9

7 7 .5
7 7 .7

.7
2 4 .5

.3
2 .4
4 0 .3

5 .5
6 .3

7 .7
5 .5

3 6 .7
3 1 .7

9 .4
4 .6

3 .5
4 .3

1 5 .7
7 .1

-

-

1 .0
2 2 .7

9.1
3 4 .9

.5
4 .0
1 04.2

.2
6 .0
1 1 9 .7

.1
3 .7
8 .5

1 .5
.8
.2

.7
1.1
.2

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




-

-

62

Table 25 . Work stoppages by industry group and duration, 19751
—Continued
IN DUST RY

G ROUP

TOTAL

1
DAY

2-3
DAYS

DAYS
A LL

7-14
DAYS

4-6
DAYS
ID L E

(IN

15-29
D AY S

30-59
DAYS

60-89
DAYS

9 0 DAYS
AND OVER

THOUSANDS)

I N D U S T R I E S .................................................................

2 /2 9 ,6 0 4 .3

2 2 3 .3

4 1 1 .9

497 .1

1 ,7 7 6 .5

3 ,8 9 2 .9

6 ,3 7 6 .3

3 ,8 8 0 .6

1 2 ,5 4 5 .5

HA N O F A C T U R I N G ...........................................................................

2 /1 3 ,9 6 6 .7

21 .1

7 7 .3

1 5 5 .8

4 3 6 .7

8 1 2 .7

2 ,7 7 8 .6

2 ,2 7 1 .3

7 ,4 1 3 .3

ORDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S ..............................................
F OOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................
T OB AC CO B A N U F A C T U R E S ...........................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ........................................................

1 9 3 .7
5 5 3 .3
3 0 .7

6 .4

7 .5
5 .3

.2
35.0
-

1 6 .2
45.6
-

9 3 .6
13 2 .7
-

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ........................................................................
L U B BE R AND NOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S .....................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ...........................................

81 .5
2 6 8 .8
3 2 4 .9
56 8 .9

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ....................................................................................
C H E H I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................
P E T R O L E U B R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ....................................................................................

6 1 6 .5

RU BB ER AND H I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...........................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S .......................
P R I H A R Y B E T A L I N D U S T R I E S ..............................................
F A B R I C A T E D B E T A L P R O D U C T S 4 / .................................

22 3 .3
1 1.0
3 8 8 .3
1 ,1 4 4 .4
1 ,6 8 8 .9

_
1 .0
-

-

-

_
1 8 6 .9
-

7 6 .2
1 4 0 .4
-

.4

2 .7

. 8

8 .9

1 2 .4

5 .4

.1

2 .4

7 .5

3 3 .2

1 0.1

8 .7

11 .4

8 .2

.1

.5
.2
.6

1 1 .8
.1
1.9

39 .0
11.1
6 .0

1 3 .8
11 .0
1 5 .2

5 9 .3
10 5 .8
5 7 .4

12 .3
1 05.9
2 7 1 .4

1 32.1
9 0 .7
2 1 6 .4

1.0
.7

1 .0
2 .5

14.1
2 .3

1 8 .6
8 .9

6 .3
74.1

3 5 .5
9 7 .3

39.0
5 1 .8

4 3 .8
40 1 .2

7 .6

5 5 .5

22 3 .0

3 5 .4

29 0 .3

8 .4

3 6 .7
3.1
4 5 .8
52 .3
10 9 .3

1 02.4
6 .0
133 .7
209 .1
3 7 1 .1

2 5 .8
-

4 3 .5
-

8 7 .2
30 2 .1
3 4 6 .9

9 3 .0
5 0 0 .0
7 9 9 .7

(7)

(7)
-

15 9 .3
6 3 8 .9

4 .6

-

6 .2
1 .7
5 .0
2.1
6 .0

(7)
.1
2 .8
1.3

.2
.2
5.1
2 6 .5
5 .5

18.3
4 9 .5
49 .0

*

H A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .................................
E L E C T R I C A L H A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P H E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...........................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P H E N T ..............................................
I N S T R U H E N T S , E T C . 5 / ...........................................................
H I S C E L L A N E O U S H A N U F A C T UR I N G I N D U S T R I E S .

2 ,1 8 6 .1

9.8

4 .2

2 7 .2

58 .0

9 8 .9

6 0 8 .8

3 2 7 .9

1 ,0 5 1 .4

8 1 4 .9
3 ,5 2 9 .5
28 9 .7
25 4 .2

3 .2
.7
.3

15 .4
1 2 .9
4 .9
.5

1 0 .7
2 4 .0
.5
2 .7

3 8 .4
4 0 .8
6 .4
7 .4

37.6
11 4 .5
3 6 .1
2 1 .7

1 72.9
2 9 5 .7
2 7 .2
2 6 .0

1 0 4 .5
2 9 4 .2
2 8 .9
3 4.1

43 2 .3
2 ,7 4 6 .7
1 8 5 .3
16 1 .8

N O N A A N U F A C T U R I N G .................................................................

2 /1 5 ,6 3 7 .6

202 .3

3 3 4 .6

3 4 1 .3

1 ,3 3 9 .9

3 ,0 8 0 .2

3 ,5 9 7 .7

1 ,6 0 9 .4

5 , 13 2 .3

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . .
H I N I N G ........................................................................................................
C ON TR AC T C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , C O H H U N IC A T IO N ,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S .
H H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E .......................................

3 3 .0
1 ,6 5 8 .9
7 ,4 0 4 .2

.1
13 8 .4
10.6

_

_

_

1 6 1 .5
2 5 .5

113 .2
57 .3

106 .4
435. 1

3 .1
15 6 .6
1 ,0 4 2 .6

8 2 2 .3
2 ,0 6 1 .5

3 9 .0
1 ,0 7 2 .8

2 9 .8
1 2 1 .4
2 ,6 9 8 .8

2 ,4 8 7 .6
1 ,3 6 5 .8

2 7 .5
.7

8 8 .9
6 .2

16.2
1 3.2

68. 1
3 8 .3

3 8 2 .8
3 7 7 .6

25 0 .6
1 27.4

15 7 .5
1 9 7 .8

1 ,4 9 5 .9
6 0 4 .7

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R E A L E S T A T E . . . .
S E R V I C E S ..................................................................................................
GOVE RN HBN T 6 / .................................................................................

15 4 .6
4 2 8 .0
2 , 10 5 .6

-

-

3 .6
2 1 .3

5 0 .2

2 .7
29. 3
6 6 0 .1

2 .5
9 2 .9
1, 0 2 2 .1

3 .8
1 08.1
224 .0

9 2 .6
3 9 .4
10 .3

5 2 .9
11 3 .9
14 .8

-

_

_

2 .2

1 T o ta ls in t h i s ta b le d if f e r f r o m th o s e in ta b le s 1 an d 2 an d 6-24
b e c a u s e t h e s e s to p p a g e s e n d e d d u rin g th e y e a r , and th u s in c lu d e i d le n e s s
o c c u r r i n g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 T he n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s r e p o r t e d f o r a m a jo r in d u s tr y g ro u p o r
d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m of i ts c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e in d iv id u a l s to p ­
p a g e s o c c u r r i n g in 2 o r m o r e g ro u p s a r e co u n te d in e a c h . W o r k e r s i n ­
v o lv ed an d d a y s id le a r e a llo c a te d a m o n g th e r e s p e c t i v e g ro u p s .
3 In c lu d e s o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e f r o m f a b r i c s and s i m i l a r
m a te r ia ls .
4 E x c lu d e s o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e ry , an d t r a n s p o r ta t io n e q u ip m e n t.




_

63

3 8 .5
1 0 2 .7

5 In c lu d e s p r o f e s s i o n a l , s c ie n tif ic , and c o n tro llin g i n s tr u m e n ts ; p h o ­
t o g ra p h ic an d o p tic a l go o d s; w a tc h e s and c lo c k s .
6 T he s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h av e , f o r s t a t i s t i c a l p u r p o s e s , b ee n
d e e m e d to fa ll w ith in th e B u r e a u 's d e fin itio n of a w o rk s to p p a g e . T h is d e ­
c is io n d o e s n o t c o n s titu te a l e g a l d e te r m in a tio n th a t a w o rk sto p p a g e h a s
ta k e n p la c e in v io la tio n of an y law o r p u b lic p o lic y .
F e w e r th a n 50.
N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l
t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

Table 26. Work stoppage by major issue and duration, 1975
MAJOR

TOTAL

1
DAT

4-6
D A TS

2-3
D A TS

7-14
D A TS

STOPPAGES
A LL

ISSU E

15-29
D AT S

ENDING

IN

30-59
D A TS

60-89
DATS

9 0 D AT S
AND OVER

T E AR

S T O P P A G E S .................... ..........................................................

4 ,9 9 8

936

652

521

739

730

742

325

353

G EN E B A L WAGE C H A N G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E H E N T A B I B E N E P I T S ........................................................
WAGE A D J U S T H E N T S ...........................................................................
HOUBS OF WOBK.....................................................................................
OT HE fi C O N T B A C T U A L H A T T B B S ..............................................
U N I O N O B G A N I Z A T I O N AND S E C U B I T T ...........................
J O B S E C U B I T T ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D H I N I S T B A T I O N ..............................................................
O TH Ef i W O R KI N G C O N D I T I O N S .................................................
I N T E B U N I O N OB I N T B A U N I O H H A T T E B S .......................
NOT B E P O B T E D ........................................................................................

2 ,604
54
120
6
75
270
246
1 ,1 4 4
135
314
30

77
3
38
1
8
25
61
572
59
89
3

144
10
32
1
4
14
36
297
37
75
2

223
4
13
15
18
18
130
20
76
4

519
9
17
12
32
28
64
7
45
6

574
12
7
1
8
44
29
34
3
13
5

589
7
8
2
12
50
33
19
4
13
5

239
8
3
1
4
33
22
10
2
1
2

239
1
2
-

S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

1 ,7 3 1 .8

2 2 3 .3

2 1 7 .0

G E N E B A L WAGE C H A N G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E M E N T A R Y B E N E F I T S ........................................................
WAGE A D J U S T H E N T S ...........................................................................
HOUBS O F WOBK...........................................,........................................
O T HE B C O N T B A C T U A L H A T T E B S ..............................................
U NI O N O R G A N I Z A T I O N AND S E C U B I T T ...........................
J O B S E C U R I T T ........................................................................................
P L A N T A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..............................................................
O TH EB W OR KI NG C O N D I T I O N S ........................................... . .
I N T E B U N I O N OR I N T R A U N I O N M A T T E R S .......................
NOT B E P O B T E D ........................................................................................

7 9 3 .5
2 3 .7
3 6 .5
.2
2 4 .2
9 3 .1
2 0 7 .0
43 4 .1
39.3
77.8
2.5

18 .7
2 .4
6 .2
(2 )
1. 1
4 .5
37 .7
121.1
12 .6
18 .7
.4

3 0 .9
1 0 .7
7 .6
(2 )
1 .5
1 .6
9. 3
1 1 4 .7
1 4 .2
2 6 .4
. 1

WORKERS
A LL

61 .1
.8
6 .5
7 .1
2 .5
1 0 .2
5 5 .8
5 .9
1 0 .6
.6
DATS

ALL

INV OLV ED

1 6 1 .2

IDLE

S T O P P A G E S ..............................................................................

2 9 ,6 0 4 .3

2 2 3 .3

4 1 1 .9

497. 1

G E N E B A L WAGE C H A N G E S ..............................................................
S U P P L E M E N T A R T B E N E F I T S ........................................................
WAGE A D J U S T H E N T S ...........................................................................
HOUBS O F WO RK .....................................................................................
O TH EB C O N T R A C T U A L H A T T E B S ..............................................
U N I O N O B G A N I Z A T I O N AND S E C U R I T T ...........................
J O B S E C U R I T T ........................................................................................
P LA N T A D M I N I S T R A T I O N ..............................................................
O TH Ef i WO RK IN G C O N D I T I O N S ..................................................
I N T E B U N I O N OB I N T R A U N I O N M A T T E R S .......................
NOT R E P O R T E D ........................................................................................

2 0 ,7 3 7 .2
30 3 .1
263 .9
6 .5
4 2 2 .2
1 ,4 9 8 .0
3 ,1 0 7 .1
2 ,9 2 1 .0
1 1 2 .7
1 9 7 .7
34 .9

1 8.7
2 .4
6 .2
(2)
1 .1
4. 5
3 7 .7
121.1
1 2 .6
18 .7
.4

64 .8
3 1 .0
13.2
. 1
3 .0
3. 3
1 8 .8
196 .0
2 6 .0
55. 4
.3

2 0 7 .9
3 .9
1 7 .5
21 .1
9 .7
1 9 .5
17 4 .0
1 2 .2
2 9 .0
2 .5

1 T o ta ls in th is ta b le d if f e r f r o m th o s e in ta b le s 1 and 2 an d 6-24
b e c a u s e t h e s e s to p p a g e s e n d e d d u rin g th e y e a r , and th u s in c lu d e i d le n e s s
o c c u r r i n g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 F e w e r th a n 50.




(IN

THOUSANDS)

2 6 6 .3

34 8 .4

27 9 .3

8 1 .5

1 5 4 .9

12 7 .5
1. 2
8 .7
6.9
3.9
19. 1
8 2 .7
6 .2
9.8
. 2

2 0 4 .1
3 .9
2 .7
. 1
1 .2
7 .9
100 .1
15 .8
. 1
1 1 .9
.5

172 .4
2 .4
3.9
.1
1 .5
6 4 .9
5 .4
2 7 .7
.1
.4
.5

6 4 .6
2 .1
.5
.1
.7
2 .6
9 .6
1.0
.1
.1
(2 )

1 1 4 .1
.1
.2
-

3 ,8 9 2 .9

6 ,3 7 6 .3

3 ,8 8 0 .6

1 2 ,5 4 5 .5

2 ,8 0 5 .C
66 .0
1 5 .5
1 .3
1 9 .7
1 0 3 .2
7 0 5 .C
14 0 .2
1 .6
2 6 .9
8 .5

4 ,7 4 5 .5
71.2
1 2 2 .4
1 .7
3 7 .6
6 4 2 .6
1 2 8 .2
60 1 .3
2 .7
9 .6
1 3.5

3 ,0 1 9 .4
111 .5
1 9 .7
3 .4
3 4 .8
1 3 1 .7
4 9 4 .0
5 4 .8
6.0
3 .7
1.7

8 ,9 2 9 .0
9 .2
15 .2
-

(IN

4 .2
5.1
15.7
15.3
.1
( 2)
.1

THOUSANDS)

1 ,7 7 6 .5
9 4 6 .9
7 .9
54. 1
5 1 .7
2 3 .3
113 .2
4 8 8 .4
3 6 .6
52.4
1 .9

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,
t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

64

12
54
19
18
3
2
3

2 5 3 .3
5 7 9 .7
1 ,5 9 0 .7
1 ,1 4 5 .2
1 5 .0
2 .0
6 .2

s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l

Table 27. Work stoppages by contract status and duration, 1975
STOPPAGES ENDING IN TEAR
WORKERS
CO NT RA CT

STATUS

NUMBER

A LL

INV OLV ED

DATS

ID LE

AND D U R A T I O N
PE RCEN T

NUMBER
(IN
THOUSANDS)

PERCENT

NUMBER
(IN
THOUSANDS)

PERCENT

1 0 0 .0

S T O P P A G E S ...............................................................................

4,9 9 8

1 0 0 .0

2 9 ,6 0 4 .3

10 0 .0

1 D A T ..............................................................................................................
2 TO 3 D A T S ...........................................................................................
4 T O 6 D A T S ...........................................................................................
7 TO 1 4 D A T S ........................................................................................
1 5 T C 2 9 D A T S .....................................................................................
3 0 TO 5 9 D A T S .....................................................................................
6 0 T O 8 9 D A T S .....................................................................................
9 0 DATS AND O V E R ...........................................................................

936
652
521
739
730
742
325
353

18 .7
1 3 .0
10 .4
14.8
1 4 .6
14 .8
6 .5
7 .1

223. 3
2 1 7 .0
1 6 1 .2
2 6 6 .3
3 4 8 .4
27 9 .3
8 1 .5
1 54.9

1 2 .9
1 2 .5
9 .3
15 .4
20. 1
1 6 .1
4 .7
8 .9

2 2 3 .3
4 1 1 .9
497 .1
1 ,7 7 6 .5
3 ,8 9 2 .9
6 ,3 7 6 .3
3 ,8 8 0 .6
1 2 ,5 4 5 .5

.8
1 .4
1 .7
6 .0
13.1
2 1 .5
1 3.1
4 2 ,4

N E G O T I A T I O N O F F I R S T A GR EE ME NT O B U N I O N
R E C O G N I T I O N .....................................................................................
1 D A T ........................................................................................................
2 TO 3 D A T S .....................................................................................
4 TO 6 D A T S .....................................................................................
7 TO 1 4 D A T S ..................................................................................
1 5 TO 2 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
3 0 TO 5 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
6 0 TO 8 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
9 0 DATS AND O V E R ....................................................................

435
26
23
28
60
72
84
50
92

8 .7
.5
.5
.6
1 .2
1 .4
1 .7
1.0
1 .8

4 3 .3
3 .4
1 .8
6 .6
6 .2
10. 1
4 .9
4 .7
5 .5

2 .5
.2
. 1
.4
.4
.6
.3
.3
.3

1 ,2 6 2 .7
3.4
4 .3
2 2 .0
46.7
18 3 .9
1 5 1.1
188 .0
6 6 3 .2

4 .3
(2 )
(2)
.1
.2
.6
.5
.6
2 .2

R E N E G O T IA T IO N OF AGREEHENT ( E X P I R A T I O N
OR R E O P E N I N G ) ..............................................................................
1 B A T .......................................................................................................
2 TO 3 D A T S .....................................................................................
4 TO 6 D A T S .....................................................................................
7 TO 1 4 D A T S ..................................................................................
1 5 T O 2 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
3 0 TO 5 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
6 0 T O 8 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
9 0 D AT S AND O V E R .....................................................................

2 ,647
85
142
224
512
587
595
261
241

5 3 .0
1 .7
2 .8
4 .5
10 .2
1 1 .7
1 1 .9
5 .2
4 .8

1 ,0 7 1 .1
4 6 .9
4 5 .0
5 9 .9
2 0 8 .5
3 0 4 .8
185 .3
7 5 .3
1 4 5 .5

6 1 .8
2 .7
2 .6
3 .5
1 2 .0
1 7 .6
1 0 .7
4 .3
8 .4

2 5 ,7 2 1 .0
4 6 .9
10 4 .5
2 0 6 .9
1 ,4 3 8 .4
3 ,4 7 1 .8
5 ,1 0 8 .0
3 ,6 3 0 .6
1 1 ,7 1 4 .0

8 6 .9
.2
.4
.7
4 .9
1 1 .7
17.3
1 2.3
3 9 .6

D U R I N G TERM O F AG RE E ME NT ( N E G O T I A T I O N
O F NEff A G R E E M E N T S NOT I N V O L V E D ) .....................
1 D A T ........................................................................................................
2 TO 3 D A T S .....................................................................................
4 T O 6 D A T S .....................................................................................
7 TO 1 4 D A T S ..................................................................................
1 5 TO 2 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
3 0 TO 5 9 D A T S ...............................................................................
6 0 TO 8 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
9 0 D A TS AND O V E R .....................................................................

1 ,7 3 5
811
460
241
128
41
35
6
13

3 4 .7
16 .2
9 .2
4 .8
2 .6
.8
.7
.1
.3

5 9 2 .9
17 1 .9
167 .8
89 .9
4 7 .3
28 .7
8 3 .1
.5
3 .6

3 4 .2
9 .9
9 .7
5 .2
2 .7
1 .7
4 .8
(2)
.2

2 ,2 7 4 .3
171.9
2 98.1
2 5 3 .1
2 6 0 .7
1 6 4 .2
9 5 8 .9
1 9 .4
1 4 8 .0

7 .7
.6
1.0
.9
.9
.6
3 .2
.1
.5

1 6 .7
.5
1 .0
3 .6
3 .0
3 .6
4. 1
.7
. 1

1 .0
(2)
.1
.2
.2
.2
.2
(2 )
(2)

2 3 9 .6
.5
2 .6
10 .5
2 1 .6
57 .2
10 2 .7
32.1
1 2 .5

.8
(2)
(2)
(2)
.1
.2
.3
. 1
(2)

7 .9
.6
1 .3
1. 1
1.4
1. 1
1 .9
.2
.1

.5
(2)
. 1
.1
. 1
. 1
.1
( 2)
(2 )

10 6 .8
.6
2 .6
4 .6
9.1
1 5.8
5 5 .6
10 .6
7 .9

.4
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
.1
.2
(2 )
(2)

NO C O N TR AC T OR O T H ER C O N TR A C T S T A T U S . . . .
1 B A T ........................................................................................................
2 T O 3 D A T S .....................................................................................
4 T O 6 D A T S . ..................................................................................
7 T O 1 4 D A T S ..................................................................................
1 5 TO 2 9 D A T S ...............................................................................
3 0 T O 5 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
6 0 T O 8 9 D A T S ...............................................................................
9 0 D A T S AND O V E R .....................................................................

91
7
15
18
19
14 '
12
3
3

1 .8
.1
.3
.4
.4
.3
.2
.1
.1

HO I N F O R M A T I O N ON C O N T R A C T S T A T U S ....................
1 B A T ........................................................................................................
2 T O 3 D A T S .....................................................................................
4 T O 6 D A T S .....................................................................................
7 TO 1 4 D A T S ..................................................................................
1 5 T O 2 9 D A T S ..............................................................................
3 0 TO 5 9 D A T S ...............................................................................
6 0 T O 8 9 D A T S ...............................................................................
9 0 D AT S AND O V E R .....................................................................

90
7
12
10
20
16
16
5
4

1 .8
.1
.2
.2
.4
.3
.3
. 1
.1

1 T o ta ls in t h is ta b le d i f f e r f r o m th o s e in t a b le s 1 an d 2
an d 6-24 b e c a u s e t h e s e s to p p a g e s e n d e d d u rin g th e y e a r , an d
th u s in c lu d e id le n e s s o c c u r r in g in p r i o r y e a r s .
1 L e s s th an 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .




1 ,7 3 1 .8

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,
m ay not equal to ta ls ,

65

s u m s of

in d iv id u a l

ite m s

Table 28b Work stoppages by contract status and mediation, 19751
STOPPAGES ENDING IN YEAR
NORKERS INVOLVED

DAYS IDLE

COBTBACT STATUS AND MEDIATION AGENCY
NUMBER

PERCENT

NUMBER
(IH
THOUSANDS)

PERCENT

NUMBER
(IN
THOUSANDS)

PEBCENT

ALL STOPPAGES.................................................................

4 ,9 9 8

1 0 0 .0

1 ,7 3 1 .8

1 0 0 .0

2 9 ,6 0 4 .3

1 0 0 .0

GOVERNMENT MEDIATION 2 / ............................................
FEDEHAL MEDIATION.......................................................
STATE MEDIATION............................................................
FEDERAL AND STATE MEDIATION COM BINED...
OTHER MEDIATION............................................................
PRIVATE MEDIATION............................................................
NO MEDIATION REPORTED..................................................
NO INFORMATION....................................................................

2 ,2 2 6
1 ,7 1 7
331
88
101
2 ,4 9 7
174

4 4 .5
3 4 .4
6 .6
1 .8
1 .8
2 .0
5 0 .0
3 .5

9 5 6 .0
6 2 3 .4
2 1 1 .6
6 0 .6
6 0 .4
1 5 .7
7 3 5 .8
2 4 .3

5 5 .2
3 6 .0
1 2 .2
3 .5
3 .5
.9
4 2 .5
1 .4

2 3 ,4 7 2 .2
1 8 ,4 8 8 .7
2 ,1 4 8 . 9
2 ,1 6 8 .0
6 6 6 .6
3 0 8 .3
4 ,9 1 9 .0
9 0 4 .8

7 9 .3
6 2 .5
7 .3
7 .3
2 .3
1 .0
1 6 .6
3 .1

NEGOTIATION OF F IR ST AGREEMENT.........................
GOVERNMENT MEDIATION 2 / .......................................
FEDERAL MEDIATION.................................................
STATE MEDIATION.......................................................
FEDERAL AND STATE MEDIATION COMBINED.
OTHER MEDIATION.......................................................
PRIVATE MEDIATION......................................................
NO MEDIATION REPORTED.............................................
NO INFORMATION...............................................................

435
198
161
23
7
7
16
189
32

8 .7
4 .0
3 .2
.5
. 1
.1
.3
3 .8
.6

4 3 .3
2 8 .3
1 7 .8
2 .9
6 .2
1 .4
.5
1 3 .2
1 .4

2 .5
1 .6
1 .0
.2
.4
. 1
(3)
.8
. 1

1 ,2 6 2 .7
8 5 1 .0
6 8 7 .1
4 1 .2
6 0 .5
6 2 .1
9 .4
3 3 6 .8
6 5 .5

4 .3
2 .9
2 .3
.1
.2
.2
(3)
1 .1
.2

RENEGOTIATION OF AGREEMENT (EXPIRATION
OR REOPENING).................................................................
GOVERNMENT MEDIATION 2 / ...........' . .........................
FEDERAL MEDIATION . . 7 ......................................
STATE MEDIATION.......................................................
FEDERAL AMD STATE MEDIATION COMBINED.
OTHER MEDIATION.......................................................
PRIVATE MEDIATION.......................................................
NO MEDIATION REPORTED............................................
NO INFORMATION...............................................................

2 ,6 4 7
1 ,8 9 3
1 ,4 7 7
281
78
57
58
598
98

5 3 .0
3 7 .9
2 9 .6
5 .6
1 .6
1 .1
1 .2
1 2 .0
2 .0

1 ,0 7 1 .1
8 7 8 .3
5 7 2 .8
1 9 9 .9
54. 1
5 1 .5
1 2 .8
164. 8
1 5 .3

6 1 .8
5 0 .7
33. 1
1 1 .5
3. 1
3 .0
.7
9 .5
.9

2 5 ,7 2 1 .0
2 2 ,1 8 8 .8
1 7 ,4 3 6 .5
2 ,0 8 1 .1
2 , 1 0 5 .2
5 6 6 .0
2 7 7 .9
2 ,4 6 2 .5
7 9 1 .7

DURING TERM OF AGREEMENT (NEGOTIATION
OF NEN AGREEMENT NOT INVOLVED).....................
GOVERNMENT MEDIATION 2 / .......................................
FEDERAL MEDIATION. . 7 ..........................................
STATE MEDIATION.......................................................
FEDERAL AND STATE MEDIATION COMBINED.
OTHER MEDIATION.......................................................
PRIVATE MEDIATION.......................................................
NO MEDIATION REPORTED............................................
NO INFORMATION...............................................................

1 ,7 3 5
67
26
17
3
21
19
1 ,6 3 2
17

3 4 .7
1 .3
.5
.3
.1
.4
.4
3 2 .7
.3

5 9 2 .9
4 0 .6
2 5 .5
8 .0
.3
6 .7
2 .2
5 4 6 .4
3 .7

3 4 .2
2 .3
1 .5
.5
(3)
.4
. 1
3 1 .5
.2

2 ,2 7 4 .3
3 2 4 .2
2 6 5 .7
2 1 .2
2 .3
3 4 .9
1 7 .6
1 ,9 1 8 .4
1 4 .1

91
15
9
2
4
8
65
3

1 .8
.3
.2
(3)
.1
.2
1 .3
. 1

1 6 .7
4 .5
3 .8
. 1
.7
. 3
1 0 .3
1 .6

1 .0
.3
.2
(3)
(3 )
(3 )
.6
. 1

2 3 9 .6
4 4 .0
4 0 .5
.2
3 .3
3 .5
1 8 8 .9
3 .2

90
53

1 .8
1 .1

.5
.3

44

.9

7 .9
4 .3
3 .5
.7

(3)

1 0 6 .8
6 4 .3
5 8 .9
5 .2
-

.2

(3)

NO CONTRACT OR OTHER CONTRACT STATUS...........
GOVERNMENT MEDIATION 2 / .......................................
FEDERAL M E D IA T IO N ..?..........................................
STATE MEDIATION.......................................................
FEDERAL AND STATE MEDIATION COMBINED.
OTHER MEDIATION.......................................................
PRIVATE MEDIATION.......................................................
NO MEDIATION REPORTED.............................................
NO INFORMATION...............................................................
NO INFORMATION ON CONTRACT STATUS...................
GOVERNMENT MEDIATION 2 / .......................................
FEDERAL MEDIATION.................................................
STATE MEDIATION.......................................................
FEDERAL AND STATE MEDIATION COMBINED.
OTHER MEDIATION.......................................................
PRIVATE MEDIATION.......................................................
NO MEDIATION REPORTED.............................................
NO INFORMATION...............................................................

90

-

8

.2
-

1

(3)

-

13
24

T o ta ls in th is ta b le d if f e r f r o m th o s e in t a b le s 1 and
2 an d 6-24 b e c a u s e th e s e s to p p a g e s en d e d d u rin g th e y e a r , and
th u s in c lu d e id le n e s s o c c u r r in g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 In c lu d e s s to p p a g e s in w h ich p r i v a t e m e d ia tio n w a s a ls o
e m p lo y e d .




.3
.5

1

3

-

-

.2

1 .2
2 .3

.1
.1

7 .7
1 .1
.9
.1
(3)
.1
.1
6 .5
(3)
.8
. 1
. 1
(3)
(3)
(3)
.6
<3|
.4

.2
.2
(3)

-

.3

(3)

1 2 .2
3 0 .3

(3)

. 1

L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .

N O T E: B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l
n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

66

8 6 .9
7 5 .0
5 8 .9
7 .0
7. 1
1 .9
.9
8 .3
2 .7

ite m s

m ay

Table 29. Work stoppages by contract status and type of settlement, 1975
STOPPAGES ENDING IN TEAB
HORKEBS INVOLVED

DAYS IDLE

CONTRACT STATUS AND SETTLEMENT
NUMBER

ALL STOPPAGES......................................................................................
FORMAL SETTLEMENT REACHED, ALL ISSUES RESOLVED,
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING UNRESOLVED IS S U E S ................
NO FORMAL SETTLEMENT, SHORT PROTEST OR SYMPATHY
STRIKE.......................................................................................................
STRIKE BROKEN......................................................... .................................
W
ORK RESUMED UNDER COURT INJUNCTION..................................
EMPLOYER OUT OF BUSINESS...............................................................
M INFORMATION........................................................................................
O
NEGOTIATION OF FIRST AGREEMENT OR UNION
RECOGNITION...........................................................................................
FORMAL SETTLEMENT REACHED, ALL ISSUES RESOLVED,
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING UNRESOLVED IS S U E S ...........
NO FORMAL SETTLEMENT, SHORT PROTEST OR SYMPATHY
STRIKE..................................................................................................
STRIKB BROKEN......................................................................................
HORK RESUMED UNDER COURT INJUNCTION.............................
EMPLOYER OUT OF BUSINESS.........................................................
NO INFORMATION...................................................................................
RENEGOTIATION OF AGREEMENT (EXPIRATION OR
REOPENING).............................................................................................
FORMAL SETTLEMENT REACHED, ALL ISSUES RESOLVED,
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING UNRESOLVED IS S U E S ...........
NO FORMAL SETTLEMENT, SHORT PROTEST OB SYMPATHY
STRIKE..................................................................................................
STRIKE BROKEN.................................................................... .................
HORK RESUMED UNDER COURT INJUNCTION.............................
EMPLOYER OUT OF BUSINESS.........................................................
NO INFORMATION...................................................................................
DURING TERM OF AGREEMENT (NEGOTIATION OF HER
AGREEMENT NOT INVOLVED) ............................................................
FORMAL SETTLEMENT REACHED, ALL ISSUES RESOLVED,
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING UNRESOLVED IS S U E S ...........
NO FOBHAL SETTLEMENT, SHORT PROTEST OR SYMPATHY
STRIKE..................................................................................................
STRIKE BROKEN......................................................................................
HORK RESUMED UNDER COURT INJUNCTION.............................
EMPLOYER OUT OF BUSINESS.........................................................
NO INFORMATION...................................................................................

PERCENT

NUMBER
(IN
THOUSANDS)

PERCENT

NUMBER
(IN
THOUSANDS)

PERCENT

4 ,9 9 8

1 0 0 .0

1 ,7 3 1 .8

1 0 0 .0

2 9 ,6 0 4 .3

1 0 0 .0

3 ,8 5 2

7 7 .1

1 ,3 2 7 .0

7 6 .6

2 7 ,2 1 4 .1

9 1 .9

677
191
168
28
82

1 3 .5
3 .8
3 .4
.6
1 .6

1 5 2 .7
2 0 .8
2 1 7 .4
2 .4
1 1 .5

8 .8
1 .2
1 2 .6
.1
.7

2 3 7 .4
6 1 9 .0
1 ,0 2 1 .3
8 0 .2
4 3 2 .2

.8
2 .1
3 .4
.3
1 .5

435

8 .7

4 3 .3

2 .5

1 ,2 6 2 .7

4 .3

340

6 .8

3 7 .0

2 .1

9 5 7 .6

3 .2

4
70
5
4
12

.1
1 .4
.1
.1
.2

.6
3 .2
2. 1
.1
.4

(2)
.2
. 1
(2 )
(2)

.6
2 7 4 .3
6 .3
1 .9
2 2 .0

(2)
.9
(2)
(2)
.1

2 ,6 4 7

5 3 .0

1 ,0 7 1 .1

6 1 .8

2 5 ,7 2 1 .0

8 6 .9

2 ,4 7 8

4 9 .6

1 ,0 0 6 .9

58. 1

2 4 ,8 4 1 .7

8 3 .9

15
66
35
19
34

.3
1 .3
.7
.4
.7

6 .1
5 .0
4 5 .4
2 .2
5 .4

.4
.3
2 .6
. 1
.3

6 .5
234. 5
1 9 8 .7
7 3 .1
3 6 6 .4

(2)
.8
.7
.2
1 .2

1 ,7 3 5

3 4 .7

910

1 8 .2

655
35
124
4
7

5 9 2 .9

3 4 .2

2 ,2 7 4 .3

7 .7

2 6 6 .0

1 5 .4

1 , 1 4 5 .4

3 .9

1 3 .1
.7
2 .5
.1
.1

1 4 5 .5
1 1 .8
1 6 7 .9
.1
1 .5

8 .4
.7
9 .7
(2)
. 1

2 2 9 .3
9 4 .5
7 9 1 .9
5 .1
8 .1

.8
.3
2 .7
(2)
(2)
.8

|

NO CONTRACT OR OTHER CONTRACT STATUS................................
FORMAL SETTLEMENT REACHED, ALL ISSUES RESOLVED,
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING UNRBSOLVED ISSU ES...........
NO FORMAL SETTLEMENT, SHORT PROTEST OR SYMPATHY
STRIKE.........................................................................
..................
STRIKE BROKEN......................................................................................
HORK RESUMED UNDER COURT INJUNCTION.............................
EMPLOYER OUT OF B USINESS.........................................................
NO INFORMATION...................................................................................

91

1 .8

1 6 .7

1 .0

2 3 9 .6

70

1 .4

1 2 .2

.7

2 0 4 .2

.7

3
12
3
1
2

.1
.2
.1
(2)
(2)

.5
.5
1 .9
(3)
1 .6

(2)
(2)
. 1
(2)
.1

1 .0
7 .7
2 3 .8
.2
2 .7

(2)
(2)
. 1
(2)
(2)

NO INFORMATION ON CONTRACT STATUS.......................................
FORMAL SETTLEMENT REACHED, ALL ISSUES RESOLVED,
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING UNRESOLVED IS S U E S ...........
NO FORMAL SETTLEMENT, SHORT PROTEST OR SYMPATHY
STR IK E..................................................................................................
STRIKE BROKEN......................................................................................
HORK RESUMED UNDER COURT INJUNCTION.............................
EMPLOYER OUT OF BUSINESS.........................................................
NO INFORMATION...................................................................................

90

1 .8

7 .9

.5

1 0 6 .8

.4

54

1 .1

4 .8

.3

6 5 .3

.2

_

_

_

_

_
.2
(2)

27

T o ta ls in th is ta b le d if f e r f r o m th o s e in ta b le s 1 an d 2 and
6-24 b e c a u s e t h e s e s to p p a g e s en d e d d u rin g th e y e a r , and th u s in c lu d e
i d le n e s s o c c u r r i n g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 L e s s th an 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .

(2)
(2)

-

-

-

-

.1

3 3 .0

.1

.5
3

1




(3)

-

8
1
-

_
.4
2 .6

(2)
(2)

F e w e r th a n 50.

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s
n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

67

8 .0
.5

of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y

Table 30. Work)stoppages by mqjor issue and type of settlement, 19751
FORHAL
SETTLEMENT REACHED
HAJOB ISSUE

TOTAL

NO FORHAL
SETTLEHENT REACHED

PROCEDURE
SHORT
ALL ISSUES
FOR
PROTEST OR
RESOLVED
HANDLING
SYMPATHY
UNRESOLVED
STRIKE
ISSUES

STRIKE
BROKEN

HORK
RESUHED
UNDER
COURT
INJUNCTION

STOPPAGES ENDING IN YEAR
677
191

EMPLOYER
OUT OF
BUSINESS

NO INFOR­
MATION

ALL STOPPAGES..............................................................

4 , yys

3 ,2 6 9

583

GEHEBAL BAGS CHANGES..................................................
SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFITS............................................
WAGE ADJUSTMENTS............................................................
HOURS OF HORN....................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL HATTERS.....................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY.....................
JOB SECURITY.................................................... .................
PLANT ADHINISTBATION..................................................
OTHER NORKING CONDITIONS.......................................
INTERUNION OB INTRAUNION HATTERS...................
NOT REPORTED......................................................................

2 ,6 0 4
54
120
6
75
270
246
1 ,1 4 4
135
314
30

2 ,2 5 5
50
63
2
54
153
159
386
55
78
14

160
3
17
2
7
33
24
158
21
158
-

ALL STOPPAGES..............................................................

1 ,7 3 1 .8

1 ,1 4 4 .2

1 8 2 .8

1 5 2 .7

2 0 .8

2 1 7 .4

2 .4

11. 5

GENERAL HAGE CHANGES..................................................
SUPPLEHENTARY BENEFITS............................................
NAGE ADJUSTMENTS............................................................
HOURS OF WORK....................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL HATTERS.....................................
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY.....................
JOB SECURITY......................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION..................................................
OTHER NORKING CONDITIONS.......................................
INTERUNION OR INTRAUNION HATTERS...................
NOT REPORTED......................................................................

7 9 3 .5
2 3 .7
3 6 .5
.2
2 4 .2
9 3 .1
2 0 7 .0
4 3 4 .1
3 9 .3
7 7 .8
2 .5

6 8 4 .2
2 2 .0
1 9 .5
.1
1 9 .4
1 7 .7
1 6 1 .1
1 9 6 .8
1 3 .9
8 .2
1 .3

6 8 .4
1. 1
7 .6
. 1
2 .8
6 .2
7 .5
5 3 .0
9 .3
2 6 .9
*

3 .3

4 .7

1 .9

7. 4

.6
.9
1 1 .5
9 7 .9
9 .3
2 4 .0
.3

1 .4
(2 )
.3
3 .0
1 .3
9 .5
.4
(2)
.1

2 3 .7
. 6
2 .9
(2)

ALL STOPPAGES...............................................................

2 9 ,6 0 4 .3

2 5 ,3 3 4 .2

1 ,8 7 9 .9

GENERAL HAGE CHANGES..................................................
SUPPLEHENTARY BENEFITS.............................................
HAGE ADJUSTMENTS............................................................
HOURS OF HORK....................................................................
OTHER CONTRACTUAL HATTERS......................„ ............
UNION ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY.....................
JOB SECURITY......................................................................
PLANT ADMINISTRATION..................................................
OTHER HORKING CONDITIONS.......................................
INTERUNION OR INTRAUNION HATTERS...................
NOT REPORTED......................................................................

2 0 ,7 3 7 .2
3 0 3 .1
2 6 3 .9
6 .5
4 2 2 .2
1 ,4 9 8 .0
3 ,1 0 7 .1
2 ,9 2 1 .0
1 1 2 .7
1 9 7 .7
3 4 .9

ll,8 1 9 .1
2 8 8 .3
2 2 5 .8
1 .4
3 1 4 .9
5 7 7 .0
2 ,9 8 9 .9
2 ,0 0 7 .7
6 2 .8
3 0 .4
1 7 .0

1 ,1 3 0 .1
1 .8
1 8 .7
4 .8
3 6 .8
83. 1
3 5 .2
4 8 C .5
1 3 .9
75. 1
~

8
28

168

28

82

37
1
5
1

21

49

74
_
5
1
3
59
15
24
5
1
4

-

6
9
40
473
44
67
2

_
_

2

1
2

7
7
92
9
9

4
7
1
8

3
1

1
10

-

HORKERS INVOLVED (IN THOUSANDS)

_
4
_ .9

DAYS IDLE

1 T o ta ls in th is t a b le d if f e r f r o m th o s e in ta b le s 1 an d 2 and 6-24
b e c a u s e th e s e s to p p a g e s en d e d d u rin g th e y e a r , and th u s in c lu d e i d le n e s s
o c c u r r i n g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 F e w e r th a n 50.




. 1
.3

6 4 .9
2 5 .3
7 5 .5
6 .3
1 8 .2

.8
. 2
.3
1 .3

(2)
. 1
(2)

. 5
.9

-

(IN THOUSANDS)

2 3 7 .4

6 1 9 .0

1 ,0 2 1 .3

8 0 .2

4 3 2 .2

3 .4

2 2 9 .4

5 7 .7

3 3 1 .2

7
_ .2

5 .1
.3
2 .4
2 7 1 .6
1 2 .4
8 3 .0
8 .8
.1
6 .0

1 6 6 .4
1 3 .0
7 .0
(2)

-

.6
1 .1
1 9 .6
1 4 5 .2
1 2 .1
4 7 .7
.5

_

5 5 8 .8
3 2 .2
1 8 8 .0
1 4 .0
4 2 .0

N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s
e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

68

_
_

_
_
1 5 .9
1 .6
3 .9
1. 1
-

of in d iv id u a l ite m s

.2
5 1 .6
4 .8
1 7 .8
1 2 .7
2 .4
11. 5
m ay

not

Table 31 Work stoppages by industry group and type of settlement, 1975
FORMAL
S E T T L E M E N T R EA CH ED
IHD OSTHY GROUP

TOTAL
A LL I S S U E S
RESOLVED

NO FORMAL
S E T T L E M E N T R E A C HE D

PROCEDURE
F OR
H A N D L I NG
U N RE S O L V E D
ISSU ES

S H OR T
P R O T E S T OR
S YMPATHY
STRIKE

STOPPAGES

STRIKE
BROKEN

ENDING

IN

WORK
R ESUMED
UNDER
C OU R T
IN JU N C T IO N

E MP L O Y E R
OUT OF
BUSINESS

HO I N F O R ­
M A T I ON

YEAR

I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................

1 /4 ,9 9 8

3 ,2 6 9

583

677

191

168

28

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..............................................................................

i/1 ,8 9 9

1 ,6 2 2

112

13

73

17

20

42

9
173
-

8
146
-

1
12
-

_

_

_

_

_

-

21

15

3

-

ALL

O RD NA NCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
F OO D AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T O B A CC O M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E M I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................
A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND WOCD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P E TR O L EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
RUB BE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E AT H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ..........................
P R I M A R Y METAL I N D U S T R I E S .................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / .....................................

1

8

4

-

_
1

10
3
2
3

32
88

6
8

32

26

5

-

-

-

3

-

2
1
8
6
13

4

272

240

11

1

13

119
139
36
43

99
118
30
36

9
7
1
2

2
1

4
5
2
1

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G .....................................................................

2 /3 ,0 9 9

1 ,6 4 7

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N TR AC T C O N S T R U C T I O N ........................................................ ...
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , CO MMUNICATION,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
W HO LE SA LE AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

6
1,1 6 6
601

3
286
406

258
358

188
301

28
20

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND RE AL E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G OVE RNME NT 6 / .....................................................................................

19
218
474

16
157
290

-

3
26
86

-

471

664

_

_

146
163

624
2

1

1

4

2
-

2
1
2

5
4
2
2

151

8

-

89
7

_

9
5

-

3
15
6
1

_

6
8

_

1
40

25
25
(IN

40

_

_

INVOLVED

1
1
3
5
9

1
5
3

2
-

16
23

33

-

-

3
18
8

5

3
1

-

1
4
2

118

-

WORKERS
ALL

-

1
-

5
5
7

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ..............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A NU F A C T U RI N G I N D U S T R I E S . .

-

1

1

49
8
114
133
278

_

-

-

3
2

56
10
132
158
316

1

1

-

-

1
_

1

_

3
3
3

-

46
99

5

1
1

36
54
50
63

1
-

-

2

54
60
56
70

82

-

_
1

8
-

THOUSANDS)

I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................

2 /1 ,7 3 1 .8

1 ,1 4 4 .2

18 2 .8

15 2 .7

2 0 .8

2 1 7 .4

2 .4

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..............................................................................

2 /4 6 1 .4

3 8 4 .8

4 2 .9

5 .4

5 .5

1 4 .4

2 .1

O RDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
F OOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................
T O B AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

6.9
2 7.9
-

5.1
2 3 .1
-

1 .8
3 .1

2 .4

2 .1

.3

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ...........................................................................
LUMBER AND HOCD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S ........................................................
P A P E R AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S ..............................................

10.0

7 .4

1.9

17.1
9 .9
11.8

1 6.7
9 .2
10 .6

.3
.4
.4

12.0
16.6

7 .7
14.7

1 .0
1 .2

-

2 0 .7

1 4 .9

5 .7

"

-

P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P ET RO L EU M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
RUB BE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ..............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ..........................
P R I M A R Y M E TA L I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / .....................................

_

_
.3
-

10. 4
1.1
1 7.4
4 1.9
4 8 .2

9 .8
1.0
1 4 .3
3 2 .4
4 2 .3

.1
.1
1.0
5.3
3 .8

. 1

. 5

.5

.1
.2
.3

(7)

.3

.2

3 4.0
8 0.7
11.2
6 .8

3 0 .6
6 9 .5
6 .2
4 .9

2 .6
6 .3
4 .8
.5

.1

1 3 9 .8

7 5 9 .5
.1
8 9 .4
2 5 4 .3

1 6 1 .0
62 .6

8 0 .7
5 7 .0

2 1 .9
3 .1

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND R EA L E S T A T E ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G OVE RNME NT £ / .....................................................................................

3 .0
2 9 .4
3 1 1 .8

2 .9
25 .1
2 4 9 .9

.1
2.1
2 9 .5

_
3 9 .9
4 3 .2

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a b le .




69

_

(7)

-

_
-

-

-

-

*

2.9

.2
.7

(7)

-

1 5 .3

_

.4
-

1 0 .3

3 .8
-

.4
1 .0
.1
1.1

.2
(7)
.2

2 0 3 .0

_
5 4 .9
1 .0

.3

_

5 .2

_

-

.9
1 .4
.2

1 .9
.3

(7)

_
1 .0
2 .7

.6

(7)

3.3
-

1 1 8 .3
8 .9

_

.1
.1
.3
.6
.9

.3
1 .1
.2

-

.9
1 .1

(7)

_
-

.1
-

.5
6.7
2 .4

1 3 6 .7

-

.7
1 .8
.5

.9
.2
.4
. 1
.1

1 4 7 .4

-

.8
.6
.4

4 .4

.6
3 9 1 .8
3 1 0 .2

_

-

-

2 .4

2 /1 ,2 7 0 .5

(7)
(7)

(7)

62 .3

N O N H A N U F A C T U R I N G .....................................................................

(7)
(7)

.2
(7)

7 4.4

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AMD F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N T RA C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COM MUNICA TIO N,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
W HO LE SA LE AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

1 .3
-

. 1

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L .....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ..............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A N U F A C TU R I NG I N D U S T R I E S . .

6 .3

_

_

(7)

-

1 1.5

_

.3
19 .5

-

_
.1

.8
-

Table 31 Work stoppages by industry group and type of settlement, 19751
—Continued
FORMAL
S E T T L E M E N T RE AC HE D
IND U STRY

GROUP

TOTAL
ALL I S S U E S
RESOLVED

NO FORMAL
S E T T L E M E N T R EA C H ED

S HO RT
PROCEDURE
P R O T E S T OR
F OR
HANDLING
S YMPAT HY
STRIKE
UNRESOLVED
ISSU E S
DAYS

ID LE

(IN

STRIK E
BROKEN

HORK
R ESUME D
UNDER
CO U RT
IN JUNCTION

ENPLOYBB
OU T OF
BUSINESS

NO I N F O R ­
MATION

THOUSANDS)

A L L I N D U S T R I E S .....................................................................

2 /2 9 ,6 0 4 .3

2 5 ,3 3 4 .2

1 ,8 7 9 .9

2 3 7 .4

61 9 .0

1 ,0 2 1 .3

8 0 .2

4 3 2 .2

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ..............................................................................

J / 1 3 , 9 6 6 .7

1 2 ,6 8 7 .1

4 1 6 .8

6 .7

3 8 6 .6

4 1 .6

62 .2

3 6 5 .6

O RDNANCE AND A C C E S S O R I E S .................................................
F OOD AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S . . . . * . ...........................
T O B AC CO M A N U F A C T U R E S ..............................................................
T E X T I L E H I L L P R O D U C T S ...........................................................

193.7
553.3
3 0 .7

A P P A R E L , E T C . 3 / ..........................................................................
LUMBER AND HOOD P R O D U C T S , E X C E P T
F U R N I T U R E ...........................................................................................
F U R N I T U R E AND F I X T U R E S .......................................................
PAPER AND A L L I E D PR O D U C T S ..........................................
P R I N T I N G , P U B L I S H I N G , AND A L L I E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
C H E H I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .................................
P ET R O L E U M R E F I N I N G AND R E L A T E D
I N D U S T R I E S ........................................................................................
RU BBE R AND M I S C E L L A N E O U S P L A S T I C S
P R O D U C T S ...............................................................................................
L E A T H E R AND L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S ....................................
S T O N E , C L A Y , AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...........................
P R I M A R Y M ET AL I N D U S T R I E S ..................................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S 4 / ....................................

186. 5
4 9 5 .9
2 9 .7

7 .2
2 8 .0
.5

8 1 .5

5 9 .6

11.9

2 6 8 .8
3 24.9
5 68.9

2 5 6 .2
3 0 9 .2
5 1 5 .3

8 .7
12.8
4 .1

1 59.3
6 3 8 .9

112 .4
5 7 8 .5

3 .9
1 1 .5

6 1 6 .5

5 6 1 .6

2 5 .5
-

(7)

.3

(7)
1 .4

-

1 3 .7
1.6

"

21 0 .6
9 .0
3 3 7 .2
9 2 5 .7
1 ,5 0 0 .9

.9
.1
15.3
36 .8
10 1 .6

.3

2 ,1 8 6 .1

2 ,0 9 5 .1

2 6 .5

814 .9
3 ,5 2 9 .5
2 8 9 .7
25 4 .2

7 2 1 .6
3 ,3 9 0 .4
2 5 9 .3
132 .5

29 .3
52 .0
4 .8
6 .0

N O N H A N U F A C T U R I N G .....................................................................

2 /1 5 ,6 3 7 .6

1 2 ,6 4 7 . 1

1 ,4 6 3 .1

A G R I C U L T U R E , F O R E S T R Y , AND F I S H E R I E S . . . .
M I N I N G ............................................................................................................
C O N T R A C T C O N S T R U C T I O N ...........................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N , COM MUNICA TIO N,
E L E C T R I C , G A S , AND S A N I T A R Y S E R V I C E S . .
H H O L E S A L E AND R E T A I L T R A D E ...........................................

3 3 .0
1 ,6 5 8 .9
7 ,4 0 4 .2

1 .2
5 7 6 .7
6 ,6 5 6 .5

_

_

1 07.6
6 4 0 .8

2 1 9 .0
(7)

2 ,4 8 7 .6
1 ,3 6 5 .8

1 ,8 9 9 .9
1 ,2 6 2 .0

4 5 5 .9
29 .9

1.1

F I N A N C E , I N S U R A N C E , AND RE AL E S T A T B ..............
S E R V I C E S .....................................................................................................
G OVERNMENT £ / ....................................................................................

154.6
42 8 .0
2 , 1 05.6

14 8 .2
3 3 3 .6
1 ,7 6 9 .1

6 .4
4 0 .4
1 82.1




_
_

8 .7

.4
_

.1

2 0 .2
4 7 .3

-

-

-

M A C H I N E R Y , E X C E P T E L E C T R I C A L ....................................
E L E C T R I C A L M A C H I N E R Y , E Q U I P M E N T , AND
S U P P L I E S ...............................................................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ..................................................
I N S T R U M E N T S , E T C . 5 / ...............................................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A N U F A C T U R IN G I N D U S T R I E S . .

70

1 .2
_
-

-

-

-

12. 1
8 C. 0
4 9 .7

1.5
14 .9
1 .9

2 .8
3 4 .5
5. 1

4 .0

4 .4
.2
. 1
2 3 0 .7

2 7 .3
5 3 .7
30. 1
1 9 .5
5 .9
23 2 .4

4 .4

2 8 .2

9 .2
.8
3 .0

10 .2
4 0.1
5 .2
10 6 .8

_
7 .6

9 7 9 .7

3 .3
2 .0
1 9.5
5 2 .6
29.4

.4

4 .2
-

1 8.0

6 6 .6

_

_

_

-

5 .4
2 7 .5

3 1 .8
38.0
8 .9

71 2 .2
70.4

40 .0
61 .4

7 5 .4
2 .9

10.2
.2

_

_

_

_

-

2 4 .2
2 8 .0

10 .4

.9
_

n •)
t \

-

-

2 2 3 .3
11.0
38 8 .3
1 ,1 4 4 .4
1 ,6 8 8 .9

.4
_

8 .6
3 .8
2 .8
4 8 .1

-

5 4 .8

1 T o ta ls in th is tab le d iffe r f r o m tho se in ta b le s 1 and 2 and 6 -2 4
b e c a u s e th e se sto p p age s ended d u rin g the y e a r , and thus includ e id le n e ss
o c c u r r in g in p r i o r y e a r s .
2 T he n um b er of sto p p age s re p o rte d fo r a m a jo r in d u stry gro up o r
d iv isio n m a y not equal the su m of its com ponents b e c a u s e in d ivid u al sto p ­
p a g e s o c c u r r in g in 2 o r m o re gro u p s a r e counted in ea ch . W o r k e r s in ­
v o lv e d and d ays idle a r e a llo c a te d am on g the r e s p e c tiv e gro u p s.
3 In clu d e s other fin ish ed p ro d u c ts m ade fr o m f a b r i c s and s im ila r
m a t e r ia ls .
4 E x c lu d e s o rd n an ce,
m a c h in e ry ,
and tra n sp o rta tio n eq uipm ent.

2 .6
-

. 3

3 .0
1 1 5 .9

5.1
9 .4
_

7 .6

1 9.1

5 In clud es p r o fe s s io n a l,
s c ie n t ific ,
and co n tro llin g in stru m e n ts;
p h o to gra p h ic and o p tica l good s; w a tc h e s and c lo c k s .
6 T h e situ a tio n s re p o rte d h e re have, fo r s t a t is t ic a l p u r p o se s,
been
d eem ed to fa ll w ithin the B u r e a u 's d efinition of a w o rk sto p p age . T h is
d e c isio n do es not c o n stitu te a le g a l d e te rm in a tio n that a w o rk stoppage
has taken p la c e in v io latio n of any la w o r p u b lic p o lic y .
7 F e w e r than 50 .
N O TE:
equal to ta ls.

B e c a u s e of rounding,
su m s
D a sh e s (-) denote z e r o s .

of ind ividu al ite m s m a y

not

Table 32 Work stoppages by contract status and procedure for handling unsettled issues, 1975
ST O PPA G E S

ENDING

WORKERS
PROCEDORE

A LL

C ON T R A C T S T A T U S AND
F OR H A N D L I N G U N S E T T L E D

STOPP AGES

ISS U E S

NUHBER

PERC EN T

NUMBER
(IN
. THOUSANDS)

IN

YEAR
DAYS

IN VOLVED

PE RCENT

NUMBER
(IN
T H O U S A ND S )

ID L E

PERCENT

....................................................................

499

1 0 0 .0

1 98.8

1 0 0 .0

1 ,1 6 5 .0

1 0 0 .0

A R B I T R A T I O N ...........................................................................................
D I R E C T N E G O T I A T I O N S .................................................................
R E F E R R A L TO A G O VE RN ME NT A GE N CY ...........................
O T H ER M E AN S ...........................................................................................

58
229
137
75

1 1 .6
4 5 .9
2 7 .5
15 .0

3 5 .6
7 4 .7
7 8 .6
9 .9

17.9
3 7 .6
3 9 .5
5 .0

2 7 8 .6
6 7 6 .0
16 0 .7
4 9 .6

23 .9
5 8.0
1 3.8
4 .3

N E G O T I A T I O N O F F I R S T AGRE EME NT OR U N I O N
R E C O G N I T I O N ....................................................................................
A R B I T R A T I O N .....................................................................................
D I R E C T N E G O T I A T I O N S ..........................................................
R E F E R R A L TO A G OVE RNME NT A G EN C Y ....................
O TH ER ME AN S....................................................................................

27
4
11
12

5 .4
.8
2 .2
2 .4

3 .7
.7
2.5
.6

1 .9
.3
1 .2
.3

4 1 .5
7 .7
17 .7
16.1

3 .6
.7
1 .5
1 .4

-

-

R E N E G O T I A T I O N O F A GRE E ME N T ( E X P I R A T I O N
OR R E O P E N I N G ) ..............................................................................
A R B I T R A T I O N .....................................................................................
D I R E C T N E G O T I A T I O N S ...........................................................
R E F E R R A L TO A G OV ER NM E NT A G E N C Y....................
O TH ER M EA NS .....................................................................................

120
30
60
10
20

2 4 .0
6 .0
1 2 .0
2 .0
4 .0

6 7 .3
1 6 .0
2 1 .8
2 3 .9
5 .6

D U R I N G TERM OF AG RE E ME NT ( N E G O T I A T I O N OF
NEW AG RE E ME NT NOT I N V O L V E D ) .................................
A R B I T R A T I O N .....................................................................................
D I R E C T N E G O T I A T I O N S ...........................................................
R E F E R R A L TO A GO VE RN ME NT A G E N C Y ....................
O TH ER M EA NS .....................................................................................

347
24
156
115
52

6 9 .5
4 .8
3 1 .3
2 3 .0
1 0 .4

5

1 .0
-

2

.4
.6

NO C O N TR A C T OR O T H E R C O N TR A C T S T A T U S . . . .
A R B I T R A T I O N .....................................................................................
D I R E C T N E G O T I A T I O N S ...........................................................
R E F E R R A L TO A GOVE RN ME NT A G E N C Y ....................
O TH ER ME A NS .....................................................................................
NO I N F O R M A T I O N

ON

CO N TR AC T

S T A T U S ....................

3
-




3 3 .9
8 .0
1 1 .0
1 2 .0
2 .8

79 9 .4
1 78.1
5 4 2 .9
41 .3
37 .1

6 8 .6
1 5.3
4 6 .6
3 .5
3 .2

1 2 7 .0
1 8.9
5 0 .3
54 .0
3 .7

6 3 .9
9 .5
25. 3
2 7 .2
1 .9

32 1 .4
92 .8
115.1
1 0 3 .4
1 0 .1

2 7 .6
8 .0
9 .9
8 .9
.9

.7

71

. 4
-

.2

. 1
-

.6

.3

-

-

1 T o ta ls in th is t a b le d if f e r f r o m th o s e in t a b le s 1 an d 2
an d 6-24 b e c a u s e th e s e s to p p a g e s en d e d d u rin g th e y e a r , and
th u s in c lu d e i d le n e s s o c c u r r i n g in p r i o r y e a r s . E x c lu d e s s to p ­
p a g e s on w h ic h t h e r e w a s no i n fo rm a tio n on u n s e ttle d i s s u e s o r
no a g r e e m e n t on & p r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g t h e s e i s s u e s .
.

-

-

2 .7

.2
-

.3

( 2)

2 .4
-

.2
-

2 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
N O T E : B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y
n o t e q u a l t o t a l s . D a s h e s (-) d e n o te z e r o s .

Appendix A,
Work stoppages by industry group, 1937-75
^W o r k e r s a n d d a y s

id le in th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g
in y e a r

D a y s id le
S to p p a g e s
D a y s id l e
D a y s id le
S to p p a g e s
d u rin g y e a r
b e g in n in g
d u rin g y e a r
d u rin g y e a r
b e g in n in g
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
in y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s)
in y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
P e rc e n t
P e rc e n t
P e rc e n t
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
W o rk ers
W o rk e rs
W o rk e rs
N um ber
N u m b e r m a te d
N um ber
N u m b e r m a te d
N um ber
N u m b e r m a te d
in v o lv e d
i n v o lv e d
i n v o lv e d
w o rk in g s
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
tim e
tim e
tim e

Y ear

M a n u fa c tu rin g

and a c c e s s o r ie s 1

O rd n a n c e

F o o d an d k in d re d

p ro d u c ts

2, 779
1 ,4 3 6
1, 389

1 ,2 3 0
410
3 94

2 0 ,0 0 0
5, 820
7, 180

0. 79
. 27
.3 1

(2)
( 2)
( 2)

('2)
('2)
2)
(■

(2)
:)
(2
(2
')

0
(2)
(2)

2 66
168
148

52. 4
55. 5
2 9. 6

673. 0
670. 0
395. 0

1940 ------------------------------------------------------------------1941 ------------------------------------------------------------------1942 ------------------------------------------------------------------1943----------------------------------------------------------1944 ----------------------------------------------------------1945----------------------------------------------------------1946----------------------------------------------------------1947----------------------------------------------------------1948----------------------------------------------------------1949------------------------------------------.----------------

1 ,4 1 0
2, 652
1, 879
2 ,4 9 1
3 ,2 5 7

3 52
1, 270
616
1 ,2 2 0
1, 680

4, 400
1 2 ,5 0 0
2, 680
3 ,4 3 0
6, 150

. 17
.4 9
. 08
. 07
. 14

( 2)
(2)
7
20
37

('2)
( 2)

(2
:)

( 2)

3. 4
7. 9
30. 5

(2)
'■
8. 9
19. 8
83. 8

(2)
()
0
(2)

152
261
178
135
160

16.
69.
2 9.
26.
36.

155.
988.
210.
98.
178.

3,
2,
1,
1,
1,

185
887
993
675
661

2, 510
2 ,2 1 0
801
959
1 ,2 2 0

28 , 800
81, 700
1 5 ,7 0 0
1 7 ,6 0 0
2 4 ,2 0 0

. 78
2 .4 2
.4 3
.4 6
. 73

27
3
1
1
1

14. 3
2
1
1
5

236. 0
27. 6
3
2
9. 2

(2)
0
( )
(2)
0. 16

212
278
183
162
199

1950----------------------------------------------------------1951----------------------------------------------------------1952----------------------------------------------------------1953----------------------------------------------------------1954----------------------------------------------------------1955 ----------------------------------------------------------1956----------------------------------------------------------1957 --------------- -------------- ------------- --------1958 ----------------------------------------------------------1959 -------------------------------------------------------------------

2, 705
2, 548
2 ,6 6 5
2, 612
1, 703

1 ,4 5 0
1 ,3 7 0
1, 880
1 ,3 2 0
772

2 2 ,9 0 0
1 7 ,5 0 0
4 2 ,3 0 0
1 5 ,6 0 0
1 3 ,7 0 0

. 66
.4 3
1.03
. 36
. 33

2
6
30
23
11

5
2. 0
18. 3
2 1. 4
4. 3

6.
15.
245.
164.
57.

2
5
0
0
8

. 11
. 13
1.23
.3 2
. 13

2 ,4 0 6
1, 986
1, 965
1, 955
2, 043

2, 000
1 ,3 6 0
778
1 ,4 9 0
1,2 8 0

1 8 ,8 0 0
27, 100
9 ,3 9 0
1 5 ,4 0 0
5 5 ,5 0 0

.4 5
. 63
. 22
.3 9
1 .3 4

13
15
11
12
13

10.
11.
7.
12.
8.

8
2
7
8
3

140.
90.
12 1.
94.
125.

0
7
0
7
0

I9 6 0 ------------------------------------------------------------------1961 -------------------------------------------------------------------1962 ------------------------------------------------------------------1963...................- - -- --------------------------------- 1964- .................................. - - ---------------- -------------

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,

598
677
789
685
794

707
897
638
555
994

11, 200
9, 7 80
1 0 ,1 0 0
10 ,4 0 0
15 ,7 0 0

. 27
.2 4
.2 4
. 24
.3 5

3
6
7
9
8

9.
6.
29.
8.
6.

5
2
9
7
8

136.
51.
202.
25.
154.

1965----------------------------------------------------------1966----------------------------- ------------- -------- 1967_______________________________________
1968------------------------------------------------------ 1969-----------------------------------------------------------

2, 080
2 ,2 9 6
2 ,3 2 8
2, 664
2 ,8 2 2

913
922
1, 350
1, 180
1 ,3 0 8

14 ,3 0 0
1 3 ,7 0 0
2 7 ,8 0 0
2 4 ,0 0 0
24, 107

.3 1
. 28
. 57
.4 7
.4 7

12
13
15
20
18

10. 3
8. 7
18. 8
3 1., 3
19. 3

1970----------------------------------------------------------1971- - .................... ..............
.........
1972- - ---------------- -------------- --------1 9 7 3 - ------------ -------- -----1974------ - - - - - - - - - -

2 ,4 8 1
2 ,3 9 1
2, 056
2 ,2 82
2, 823

1, 128
863
646
963
1, 145

38, 006
1 8,485
12,283
14, 319
2 3 ,5 9 9

. 77
.3 9
. 26
. 29
.4 7

8
5
6
5
6

7.,4
2., 7
8. 3
4.,4
2.,4

197 5 ......................... - -

1, 897

464

1 4 ,8 7 6

. 32

9

6.,9

1937 ------------------------------------------------------------------1938 ------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 3 9 -------------------------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

- -

-

T e x tile m ill

T o b acco m a n u fa c tu re s

(2)
(2)
0. 08
. 03
. 05

83.
167.
54.
133.
50.

9
959. 0
0 2 ,2 2 0 . 0
2
648. 0
0 4 ,7 2 0 . 0
8 1,490. 0

.3 0
. 70
. 19
1 .2 7
.4 2

185
197
206
213
157

57.
77.
127.
98.
73.

0
691. 0
5
819. 0
0 1,250. 0
4 1,210. 0
694. 0
8

. 19
.2 1
. 32
.3 0
. 18

.4 2
. 27
.3 8
.2 9
. 34

169
160
155
176
169

40.
71.
47.
60.
80.

4
974.
513.
3
574.
9
661.
6
0 1,720.

0
0
0
0
0

. 25
. 13
. 15
. 18
.4 5

0
4
0
4
0

.3 6
. 10
.3 7
. 04
.2 3

184
177
206
158
186

65.
80.
54.
53.
54.

7
0
5
1
9

0
0
0
0
0

.
.
.
.

121.
62.
224.
334.
480.

0
5
0
0
9

. 20
. 10
. 30
. 38
. 57

227
187
187
209
222

57.
46.
63.
68.
74.

3
92 8. 0
52 8. 0
6
7
770. 0
1 1,170. 0
0 1,516. 7

• 19
.2 1
. 12
. 17
.2 6
.3 3

103.
41.
266.
222.
153.

6
6
8
2
2

. 16
. 08
. 56
.4 6
. 33

2 12
215
190
186
265

985. 5
50. 8
868. 0
85. 4
75. 0 1,282. 9
69. 5 1,007. 9
68 . 2 1,539. 1

.2 2
. 19
.2 9
. 23
.3 5

193. 7

.4 5

166

2 9. 1

.2 0

30
9
4

10. 2
2. 6
4. 8

197. 0
147. 0
73. 7

( 2)
( 2)
(2)

231
108
92

89. 7
41., 0
30., 5

1,660. 0
661. 0
606. 0

1940----------------------------------------------------------1941- - - - - - ------- - - ...........
1942----- - - -................. - - - 1943- - - -...................- - 1944-----------------------------------------------------------

9
10
9
16
19

5.
8.
3.
24.
7.

0
5
6
9
1

78. 8
106. 0
25. 1
9 1 .2
59. 5

( 2)
(2)
0. 10
.3 8
.2 1

91
198
198
177
184

26.,2
82., 0
93., 5
54,, 4
55.,3

1945----------------------------------------------------------1946- - ----------- --------------- ---------1947------ - - - - - ------- - 1 9 4 8 - .................... - ................................. ..............
1949 ------------------------------------------------------------------1950 ------------------------------------------------------------------1951 --------------------------------------- ----- - -- ----------1952- - - - - - - - - ................. —
1953- - - ------- - - - - - - - 1954- ................ - - - - - - -

22
14
9
3
4

15. 8
4 .2
9. 6
.6
. 9

1.
1.
.
.

12
02
78
02
. 06

187
188
82
82
85

5
5
5
4
2

2. 9
1. 6
1.3
.5
. 1

2 84. 0
255. 0
195. 0
4 .3
13. 0
33. 0
14. 1
53. 2
20. 8
. 1

. 16
. 06
. 23

1955- - - - - - - ..............- 1956— -------- ---------------------- ---- ------------------1957— ............... - - - -.................
- 1958- - -------------- -------------------- -....................
1959--------------- -------------- --------—
-

3
4
1
4
1

.3
.8
.2
.3
.9

1. 2
2 0. 6
.4
2 .2
6 .3

I9 6 0 ----------------------------------------------------------1961- - -- ---------------- ---------------------1962 ------------------------------------------------------------------1963-...................- ...................................
1964 ------------------------------------------------- -----1965--------- ---- ---------- ----------1966------------- -----------------------------1 9 6 7 - ............... .....................................—
------1 9 6 8 - ............................................. - 1969- - - .................................- -....................

2
3
2
1
_
5
3
2

2 .2
1. 0
1. 6
. 6
_
6. 6
9. 1
4. 1

11. 3
20. 6
8. 6
1. 7
_
84. 6
170. 0
8. 5

1970----------------------------------------------------------1971----------------------------------------------------------1972- ---------- --------- --------- --------------1973.................................................. ....................
1974-----------------------------------------------------------

3
5
2
_
3

3 .7
9 .2
. 1
6. 0

15. 5
347. 6
1. 8
68. 2

651.
589.
614.
444.
866.

838. 4

17
13
14
10

A p p a r e l a n d o th e
fin is h e d p ro d u c ts *

p ro d u c ts 3

1937----------------------------------------------------------1938----------------------------------------------------------1939-----------------------------------------------------------

137. 0 2,1 9 0 . 0
764. 0
68. 3
715. 0
60. 2

(2)
(2)
(2)

449
428
447

273. 0
874. 0
464., 0
306., 0
471. 0

(2)
(2)
0. 14
. 10
. 13

257
309
175
142
100

51. 0
62. 8
25., 7
54., 5
14., 5

406. 0
810. 0
193., 0
175., 0
70., 5

(2)
(2)
0. 08
. 08
. 02

107., 0
50. 7
35., 5
21,.2
26,. 5

1 ,4 6 0 . , 0
1,3 6 0 . , 0
976., 0
719., 0
419. , 0

.4 4
.3 9
. 28
. 19
. 15

118
173
13 1
131
162

15., 4
24., 3
10., 7
23,, 8
11., 3

177., 0
574., 0
199., 0
267., 0
173., 0

. 07
. 19
. 06
. 08
. 07

48.,4
153,. 0
36., 5
26., 6
28.,4

686., 0
3 ,4 9 0 . , 0
1 ,070. , 0
593., 0
573., 0

. 23
1. 07
. 34
. 19
.2 1

187
2 10
201
193
135

17., 9
54,. 0
17., 6
35., 6
12..2

228., 0
354., 0
213., 0
296., 0
145., 0

. 08
. 12

. 08
(5)

147
121
95
88
65

. 07
. 08
. 05

( 5)
. 08
(5)
(5)
. 02

96
70
47
51
70

47,, 8
18., 2
14,. 0
6,. 4
23.. 5

1,4 0 0 ., 0
426. , 0
2 12., 0
111., 0
229. 0

.
.
.
.
.

15., 0
136., 0
13., 8
173., 0
215., 0
16,.4
152.. 0 1,100., 0
253., 0
19., 1

. 04
. 06
. 07
.3 7
. 08

. 05
. 09
. 04
. 01

30
35
50
36
37

4,. 8
6,. 0
7,. 0
13,. 0
8,.4

34., 0
3 9., 1
99.. 9
193.. 0
124.. 0

.
.
.
.

_
.3 9
. 77
. 04

44
56
54
48
41

21,.3
25,. 7
15,. 9
14,.4
17,. 5

. 08
1. 85
. 01

43
36
47
46
45
21

-

. 35

1975----------------------------------------------------------S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




)
( 2)

0
0
0
6
0

9
8
6
6
0

72

(2)
( )
(2)

51
16
08
05
09

139
129
128
126
122

. 01
02
04
09
05

87
112
95
109
106

12,, 1
15,. 1
23,. 6
22,.3
24., 7

134., 0
146., 0
130., 0
210.. 0
225., 0

.
.
.
.

174., 0
195,. 0
328,. 0
404,. 0
138,. 5

.
.
.
.
.

07
08
14
16
06

100
100
96
82
102

9.. 8
11,. 8
21,.2
13,. 1
19,. 1

199., 0
263.. 0
238., 0
205.. 0
165,. 0

.
.
.
.
.

8,.2
5,. 0
13,. 8
9..4
22,. 7

151,. 2
70,, 3
107,. 0
268,. 0
756..4

. 06
. 03
. 04
. 10
.3 0

80
75
70
45
66

8,. 7
19.. 3
12,. 0
11,.2
100,. 8

162,. 6
197., 4
69 4 . o
999.,4
893,, 2

. 05
. 06
.2 1
.3 0
.2 6

2 .2

27,. 3

. 01

55

10,. 0

109,, 5

. 04

04
05
04
06
. 07
06
07
07
06
05

Work stoppages by industry group, 1937-75—Continued
j^VorlcerjS_i^md_dji^s_J^ne_i n _th o u >
J
sand>
s]_

S to p p a g es
b eg in n in g
m p ea r

Y ear

D ays id le
S to p p a g es
lia y s id le
S to p p a g es
D ays - ia is —
d u rin g y e a r
b eg in n in g
d u rin g y e a r
b eg in n in g
d u rin g y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
in y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
in y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
P e rc e n t
P e rc e n t
P e rc e n t
of e s t i ­
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
W o r k e rs
N um ber
N u m b er m a te d N u m b ei W o r k e rs N u m b e r m a te d N u m b e r W o r k e rs N u m b e r m a te d
in v o lv e d
in v o lv e d
in v o lv e d
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
tim e
tim e
tim e
L u m b e r an d w ood p r o d u c ts 6

19371939-

168
75
103

50. 1
15. 1
22 .9

1, 3 4 0 . 0
598. 0
655. 0

19401941194219431944-

11 9
18 1
88
72
81

40. 1
50 .2
17. 6
11 .4
43.5

572.
1, 010.
115.
55.
299.

19451946194719481949-

67
61
109
100
84

57. 6
16.4
23. 9
24. 6
2 0 .0

2

19501951195219531954-

119
118
131
125
70

23. 6
22.8
64. 5
19.8
87.3

700. 0
251. 0
1,2 4 0 .0
512. 0
4 ,200. 0

19551956195719581959-

81
47
66
69
58

11.8
4 .9
12.2
18.2
14. 1

1 960 -

39
75
72
64
56

F u r n i tu r e a n d f i x t u r e s 7

(2)
(2)
(2)

158
67
67

26. 9
7 .0
8.2

461. 0
185. 0
144. 0

0
b

92
105
92
66
86

12.2
17. 6
16 .0
11. 1
16.9

23 5 .0
315.0
145. 0
4 6.2
81. 3

1. 61
. 60

.41

90
208
84
63
71

20. 8
44. 9
12.5
12. 1
8 .4

.38
. 12
. 65
.2 6
2 .25

106
99
108
134
70

277. 0
82.4
290. 0
282. 0
210. 0

. 12
. 04
. 17
. 18
. 12

5 .0
12.5
13. 1
4 1.4
7. 1

103. 0
234. 0
488. 0
1, 2 9 0 . 0
9 6.9

1969—

46
48
60
61
76

13. 1
10.3
11. 7
10.2
15.4

19701971 —
19721973 1974-

63
66
76
65
87

1975-

61

1938-

1961 —
1962 -

1963196419651966-

19671 968 -

0
0
0
7
0

0 . 08
. 04
. 19

,230. 0

. 57
. 17
. 12
.33
.3 9
. 65
. 16
.0 6

121
96
79
74
101

26 .0
2 1 .0
18. 1
13.8
16 .0

287. 0
2 45.0
17 5 .0
254. 0
422. 0

.3 1
.2 6
. 18
.2 8
.43

67
51
55
60
59

13. 6
15.2
15.3
18. 1
18.7

19 7 .0
2 3 3 .0
256 .0
2 5 2 .0
-4 4 2 . 0

.
.
.
.

.0 6
. 15
.2 9
. 86
. 06

81
70
61
68
60

13.4
12. 5
12.3
9.5
6.9

183. 0
256. 0
298. 0
146. 0
145.0

. 18
.2 8
.31
. 15
. 14

52
62
63
54
79

8 .9
15.3
18. 8
9 .4
3 8 .9

136.0
3 2 4 .0
43 6 .0
146. 0
5 80.0

.0 9
.22
.2 8
.0 9
.36

204. 0
253. 0
273. 0
2 1 8.0
296.4

.
.
.
.
.

13
16
18
14
19

69
81
76
77
82

10.2
16.8
16. 1
18.0
17.7

194. 0
19 9 .0
361. 0
3 9 3 .0
3 50.5

.
.

18
17
.3 1
.32
.28

91
92
109
95
126

3 9.2
26.2
3 7.2
2 4.2
35. 8

931.0
336. 0
776.0
456. 0
473. 9

. 57
.20
.4 5
.2 6
.2 6

8. 8
7.3
13.9
16. 8
19.5

306.3
194. 8
211. 1
248. 6
332.4

.2 1
13
14
16
.2 1

85
73
76
82
88

22. 6
10. 9
14.3
14.7
20 .0

40 9 .2
316.2
2 2 9 .4
29 0 .9
309. 0

.3 5
.2 7
18
.22
.23

129
98
74
98
136

37.
34. 9
14.5
23 .9
35. 8

763. 5
1, 0 0 6 . 2
2 73.3
410.3
685.2

.4 2
.58
16
.2 3
.38

17.2

282. 6

.2 0

57

11. 6

35 4 .4

.3 1

68

12.2

622.2

.3 8

278. 0
97.3
51. 5

19501951195219531954-

54
27
32
44
30

10.4
1.2
4. 1
21.3
6.0

240. 0
2 9 .5
92.4
245. 0
103. 0

29

7.7
6 .0
2 1 .6
22.3
24.4

176. 0
105. 0
199.0
324. 0
352. 0

4. 9
8 .9
4 5.2
14.2
8. 7

11.2
9.4
.8

(!)
(2)

.
.
.

20. 8
133. 0
61.2
8. 0
9.8
0
0
0
0
0

(2)
(2)

.

C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p r o d u c ts 10

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0 . 07
. 01
. 01

59
35
36

9.5
2 .9
13.2

262. 0
5 2.2
36. 0

35
83
67
76
116

13 .9
19 .9
31.2
21.3
26. 1

182. 0
3 0 8 .0
103. 0
68. 0
116. 0

.2 2
.2 8
14
.46
. 12

120
122
94
73
72

4 3.6
48. 1
30 .8
2 1 .4
20 .0

. 14
. 02
. 05
. 12
. 05
. 08
. 05

96
67
100
107
77

.

.3 6

.4 4

14
16
17
18
.3 0

.

P e t r o l e u m r e fin in g and
r e la t e d i n d u s t r i e s 11

J

1.8
1. 1
.5

4 8.2
2 5 .9
75. 6

(?
(2)

.03
.06

1
5
8
29
42

1. 5
1.5
3 .7
4. 0
9.3

9.8
7 .9
11. 1
14. 8
25. 1

0.03
.0 4
.06

427. 0
1, 1 9 0 .0
439. 0
538. 0
358. 0

.2 5
. 77
.2 7
.3 1
.23

38
21
14
13
16

5 0 .0
4 .3
9 .6
21.3
4.2

45 0 .0
10 8 .0
310. 0
752. 0
8 5.5

1.07
.2 4
. 67
1. 54
. 15

39.2
20 .0
30 .4
3 6 .5
18.2

.

7
3
3

795. 0
201. 0
621. 0
825.0
159. 0

. 50
. 11
.3 2
.43
.0 8

22
19
22
19
16

16 .4
5.2
58. 8
2 .6
2.2

792. 0
55.5
1, 110. 0
10 5 .0
50. 6

1.39
.0 8
1.59
. 16
.0 8

4 0 .0
3 7 .5
25 .0
20.3
19.6

634. 0
3 9 9 .0
381. 0
3 1 8 .0
422 .0

.3 1
19
18
15
19

18
19
23
16
18

3.2
8. 5
7. 6
8. 1
18. 0

51.0
17 4 .0
2 3 3 .0
1 4 1.0
550. 0

.0 8
.2 7
.36
.23
. 92

. 14
.6 1
1.05
. 71
.34

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0 . 07

(J

(2)

.09
. 15
. 15

105
92
97
100
97

186. 0
9 3.5
694. 0
1, 700. 0
801. 0

.0 8
.0 4
.2 9
.33
.3 3

91
94
103
105
94

21 .6
14. 1
29.4
20. 7
2 1 .0

314. 0
4 4 1 .0
767. 0
482. 0
337. 0

14
.2 1
.3 5
.2 2
. 15

12
17
10
14
22

2 .4
15.0
6.9
1. 8
5.3

79. 8
31 6 .0
522.0
338. 0
1 6 4.0

24.5
19.5
18. 1
2.0
43. 5

780.
621.
286.
1, 2 7 0 .
464.

0
0
0
0
1

.31
.24
11
.4 7
. 17

102
151
124
134
156

2 8 .9
44. 6
36 .7
3 2 .4
4 9 .8

737. 0
727. 0
1, 100. 0
904. 0
1, 3 5 5 .5

.32
.3 0
.44
.3 4
.51

12
14
23
19
32

1.5
1.2
9. 6
1. 9
44. 5

32. 7
13 .5
116. 0
61.0
0 34.9

07
03
.2 4
. 13
2 .2 1

414.
793.
271.
281.
545.

5
7
7
1
0

.

15
.2 9
. 10
. 10
. 19

150
132
98
132
156

38 .0
21.3
19. 6
32. 1
41 .5

1, 3 3 6 . 5
687.5
726. 6
501. 1
1, 599. 8

. 50
.2 7
.2 9
. 19
. 60

17
13
11
15
25

1. 7
7. 6
4 .5
9. 1
5 .5

2 7.3
9 9.9
126. 8
5 36.8
148. 1

.0 6
.2 1
.2 6
1 . 14
.3 0

237. 6

.0 9

109

17. 7

.2 9

30

613.3

1.23

1 968 -

33
66
58
56

1969-

89

19701971 —
1972197319 7 4 -

92
81
83
69

22. 8
28. 7
13.3
2 3.2
23.5

1975-

47

13.5

.

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




354. 0
606. 0
187. 0
14 2 .0
458. 0

b

3 6 0 .0
494.0
81 5 .0
222. 0
77.0

221.
326.
171.
587.
212.

65

27. 7
2 1 .5
7. 6
9.7
11.9

b

0 . 10
. 10
. 12

18. 9
20. 6
2 2 .0
15 .4
10.0

13.2
14.2
9.5
10. 9
5. 7

1967-

88.7
192. 0
78. 8
95.4
123. 0

76
54
73
45
37

47
67
66
43
53

1 966 -

5 .8
13. 6
14. 1
2 1.3
16.4

(2)

.22

19451946194719481949-

50

56
92
44
38
49

(*)
(2)

.3 8
.35
.43
.2 8
. 16

2. 1
5 .9
8 .0
2. 0
2.4

58

203. 0
144. 0
130.0

315. 0
3 09.0
386. 0
269. 0
139. 0

27
45
34
23
23

1965-

14. 1
4 .4
4.3

15.8
22. 7
23 .0
25. 1
10. 9

194019411942 19431944-

38
50
53

b

0 . 15
. 04
. 07

99
43
37

92
76
37
40
46

62
30
21

52
46
58

( 2)

.3 6
1.3 6

193719381939-

31

0

0
0
0
0
0

959.0
850. 0
493. 0
703. 0

P r i n tin g , p u b li s h in g , and
a llie d i n d u s t r i e s 9

1955195619571958 —
195919601961 —
1962 19631964-

363.
1, 5 5 0 .
292.
156.
160.

P a p e r an d a l l i e d p r o d u c ts 8
( 2)

73

.

747.4

.
.
.
.
.

2 0 .4

l

,

.
.

Work stoppages by industry group, 1937-75—Continued
^W o r k e r s and d a ys i dle in thousands)
D a y s idle
St oppa ges
Da y s i dle
Stop] sages
D a y s i dle
d uri ng y e a r
beginning
duri ng y e a r
begi nning
d uri ng y e a r
(al l s toppage s)
( al l sto apages)
in y e a r
in if e ar
( al l s to pp age s)
Per cen t
P er cen t
Per cen t
of e s t i ­
of e s t i ­
of e s t i ­
Workers
Wo rk er s
Workers
Nu mb er
N u m b e r mat ed
Number
N u m b e r ma t ed
Number
N u m b e r mat ed
i nvol vec
i nv ol ve d
i nv ol ve d
w or k i n g
w or ki ng
w or k i n g
t ime
t i me
t i me
St op pa ges
begi nni ng
in y e a r

R u b be r and m i s c e l l a n e o u s
p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s 12

L e a t h e r and l e a t h er p ro duc t s

193719381939-

39
29
19

53.8
25. 6
9.7

6 74. 0
1 66 . 0
73. 9

(2)
( 2)
(2)

1 42
59
46

41. 6
14.3
9. 5

63 0. 0
159. 0
1 8 4. 0

19401941194219431944-

18
42
28
73
77

8. 5
39.2
15. 6
89.3
39.5

97.2
155 . 0
33 . 3
2 60 . 0
114. 0

(2)
( 2)
0. 08
. 44
. 18

39
92
87
93
95

7. 0
27.9
27. 8
27.5
24. 0

125.
220.
241.
1 4 8.
116.

0
0
0
0
0

19451946194719481949-

123
89
41
48
54

258 . 0
99.4
47. 0
72.3
84. 7

1, 5 2 0 .
813.
38 2.
524.
714.

0
0
0
0
0

2 . 61
1.26
. 59
. 90
1.30

111
100
81
45
65

5 0. 6
29.0
24. 9
9. 8
18. 1

248.
434 .
223.
215.
4 9 9.

19501951 —
19 5219531954-

13 6
156
129
102
83

13 6.
137.
154.
141.
1 08.

0
0
0
0
0

385.
700.
912 .
493.
1 , 620.

0
0
0
0
0

. 66
1. 0 1
1.31
. 71
2 .49

84
78
65
48
36

2 5.3
22. 6
1 6. 7
11. 9
5. 6

15 7.
221.
1 3 9.
99.
53.

19551956195719581959-

1 05
55
54
58
62

124. 0
81.3
47 . 5
23. 8
7 6. 8

49 0.
5 80 .
420.
147.
1, 930.

0
0
0
0
0

. 69
. 83
. 62
.24
2 . 90

50
54
56
41
38

53
65
43
81
67

29.
22.
14.
32.
30.

261. 0
215. 0
159. 0
1, 100.0
45 2 . 0

. 40
. 24
. 16
1 . 06
.41

1960

-

1961 —
1 9 62 19631964-

6
6
8

0
0

2 4.2
8. 0
11.4

612. 0
250. 0
137. 0

(2)
0.25
. 17
. 11

0

65
13 6
116
1 09
122

12. 6
39.7
33.4
27. 0
37. 9

206.
6 56 .
227.
145 .
204.

0
0
0
0
0

( 2)
0.24
. 13
. 18

0
0
0
0
0

.25
.42
.21
. 19
. 55

1 04
13 6
94
90
63

60.4
32. 0
27. 1
22.3
13.3

1,200.
1, 1 8 0.
563.
365.
114.

0
0
0
0
0

1. 19
1. 02
.46
. 27
. 10

0
0
0
1
3

.
.
.
.
.

17
23
14
10
06

132
132
154
128
1 06

44. 6
1 9. 0
63.3
19.4
20. 7

652.
2 3 1.
810.
3 1 6.
300.

0
0
0
0
0

. 55
. 16
. 59
.23
.23

40. 4
8.9
11.3
7. 7
5. 6

542. 0
74. 0
99. 7
78 . 9
53.3

.
.
.
.
.

56
08
10
09
05

110
113
1 06
117
1 65

32. 6
76.4
32.3
44. 9
50 . 8

495 .
994.
61 4.
l , 2 0 0.
1,230.

0
0
0
0
0

.35
. 69
.44
. 91
. 87

32
25
32
38
34

5. 7
18.2
7. 6
23. 9
6. 1

64. 1
70.4
5 8. 1
10 1. 0
67.3

.
.
.
.
.

07
08
06
11
07

98
130
113
118
117

18.2
24.4
15 . 6
20.3
22. 8

2 28 .
458 .
318.
45 9.
412.

0
0
0
0
0

. 16
. 32
.22
.30
.26

3 12. 0
99.2
1 09. 0
73. 9
63 . 1

.35
. 11
. 12
. 08
. 07

139
1 42
157
133
1 94

70 . 7
31.6
29. 0
72. 8
46.2

836.
594.
62 1.
2 , 1 2 0.
6 79.

0
0
0
0
1

. 53
.36
.39
1.30
.40

59.
95.
45.
22.
122.

.
.
.
.
.

07
12
06
03
17

1 64
156
1 40
1 76
167

32. 8
29. 9
23.2
28. 5
35.3

83 0. 0
544. 9
37 6. 0
. 62 9 . 5
1, 0 0 3 . 9

. 51
.34
.23
.36
. 58

. 01

140

17. 6

484. 3

.31

1969 -

55.2
27.3
10 1. 0
24. 5
32 . 0

443 .
433.
3 , 73 0.
39 3.
353.

0
0
0
0
3

.38
.33
2 . 85
.27
. 24

36
32
30
20
24

2 0. 4
8.2
11. 7
5. 1
4. 7

19701971 —
197219731974-

132
88
95
143
126

81.3
27. 9
23.4
102.3
38.2

2 ,322,7
42 6 . 4
272.4
1,743.0
97 1. 1

1. 60
.29
. 17
1. 01
. 57

21
16
14
10
15

4.
6.
2.
2.
6.

57

10.4

238. 1

. 16

1966-

1967-

1968 -

1975-

9

8
5
9
1
0

1. 0

8
6
8
7
8

9.3

F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d uc t s,
e x c e p t o rd na n ce , m a c h i n e r y ,
and t r a n sp o rt a t i on equi pment

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s 13

and g l a s s p ro duc t s

1 06
42
53

93
83
94
87
112

1965-

S t on e , c l a y ,

0
0
(2)

Mach in ery,

0
0
(2)

0

e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l 15

193719381939-

( 13)
( 13)
( 13)

( 13)
( 13)
( 13)

( 13)
( 13)
( 13)

( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

( 14)
(M)
(H)

n
(M)

( 14)
( 14)

( 14)

n

( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

1 75
55
63

48.3
13. 9
20.4

1940194119421943 1944-

( 13)
( 13)
( 13)
( 13)
n

( 13)
( 13)
C 3)
( 13)
( 13)

( 13)
( 13)
( 13)
( 13)
( 13)

( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

( H)
( H)
( 14)
( 14)
( 14)

( 14)
( 14)
( 14)

( 14)
( 14)
(H)

(2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)
( 2)

87
1 99
87
210
311

24.3
102. 0
46. 8
62 . 1
141. 0

19451946194719481949-

( l3)
( 13)
1 88
168
147

( 13)
( 13)
( 13)
( 13)
1 0 2. 0 1, 1 3 0 . 0
5 6. 7 1 , 4 5 0 . 0
497. 0 12,200. 0

( 2)
( 2)
0
(2)
4. 74

( 14)

( 2)

218
151
13 4

335
32 4
2 52
1 89
176

19 50-

309

142. 0

.4 1

278

85. 8

224. 0

4 ,4 10 . 0

1. 40

2 1 4 . 0 1, 63 0.
622. 0 23,000.
2 0 2 . 0 1, 5 1 0 .
952.
80.4

0
0
0
0

. 48
7. 07
.45
.31

242
2 82
291
175

84.2
111. 0
1 0 2. 0
42 . 0

0
0
0
0
0

3 17

308
288
3 12
158

969.
1,300.
2,430.
1, 690.
1,200.

. 45

1951 —
19521953 —
1954-

. 51
. 95
. 57
.45

268
323
286
1 75

158.
167.
126.
64.

0
0
0
0

3,370. 0
3,990.0
2, 150. 0
1,350. 0

. 83
. 96
. 50
.34

19551956195719581959-

279
238
232
167
236

53 5.
573.
118.
1 0 2.
575.

.47
0
0
3 . 81
0
. 35
0
.25
0 161 3 . 7 7

2 82
2 29
237
256
276

13 1.
87.
58.
147.
100.

1,590. 0
1,420. 0
713. 0
1,220. 0
3, 1 5 0 .0 -

. 57
. 50
. 25
.46
1. 14

306
211
23 1
223
217

230.
113.
89.
152.
82 .

0
0
9
0
7

3,800.
2 , 63 0.
1,380.
2,760.
2 , 8 20 .

0
0
0
0
0

.
.
.
.
.

19601961 —

158
126
176
131
173

94.3
74.4
84. 8
55.4
87. 7

0
0
0
0
0

. 62
.23
.29
.21
. 32

195
191
220
1 93
228

44.2
96 .6
42 . 5
40. 8
7 9. 9

.21
.41
.23
. 18
. 50

144
176
196
171
191

68.5
89. 1
63.3
5 8. 5
1 2 0. 0

1,240.
1,240.
1, 2 00 .
845.
1, 140.

0
0
0
0
0

.30
.34
. 32
.22
. 27

1969—

206
219
215
2 82
241

88. 0
98. 6
118. 0
137. 0
106.8

1,390. 0
1, 5 40 . 0
4 , 070. 0
4,79 0.0
1, 6 6 3 . 2

.43
.46
1.23
1.44
.48

269
277
2 74
34 9
381

86.8
76 . 1
107. 0
78 .4
73 . 6

1,430. 0
1,290. 0
2 ,270. 0
2, 040 .0
1,377. 5

.45
.37
. 66
. 57
.37

266
301
2 60
414
361

113. 0
136.0
177. 0
1 80. 0
147 . 9

1, 87 0 . 0
2,44 0 . 0
4, 010. 0
3,940. 0
3,167.6

.43
. 51
. 80
. 79
. 62

19701971 —
197219731974-

2 14
235
165
171
225

81. 0
1 00. 9
53 . 0
56. 6
73.3

2,30 0 .3
2 ,6 22 .6
1,310. 9
7 60. 5
1, 5 8 5 . 9

. 69
. 84
.42
. 23
.47

323
35 0
286
2 95
42 3

117. 5
95.2
51. 1
7 6. 7
87. 6

3, 4 4 4 . 2
2 ,0 28. 2
1, 1 2 2 . 4
1,239. 9
2, 10 1. 9

. 97
. 60
. 32
.34
. 56

2 92
332
281
323
401

118. 5
124. 1
79 .9
167.0
170.4

3,602.9
3,29 3.2
2,287. 8
2 ,0 0 6 .4
3,026. 1

. 72
. 72
.49
.39
. 55

1975-

161

42.6

1, 1 6 8 . 9

.39

309

48. 6

1, 7 7 9 . 3

. 53

2 74

74 .4

2,370 . 8

.45

196. 2 -

196319641965-

1966 —
1967-

1968 -

1, 18 0 .0

0 1, 5 7 0 .
0 12,7 00.
0 1, 1 5 0 .
0
711.
0 39,000.
1, 880.
6 65.
872.
63 7.
1, 0 1 0 .

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




74

n

n
n
n
n
51.3
37. 0
54.0

0
7
5
0
0

( U)
( U)
(*4)
(H)
883. 0
496. 0
1,050. 0

597 .
1, 1 3 0 .
651 .
516.
1,550.

0‘
0
0
0
0

0

(2)
( 2)
0. 52

546. 0
333. 0
337. 0
396.
1 , 680.
1 04.
139.
5 08.

(2)
(2)
(2)

0
0
0
0
0

(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 04
. 13

228. 0 2 , 9 7 0 . 0
2 4 4 . 0 1 3 , 70 0. 0
114. 0 2 ,9 1 0 . 0
• 1 5 2 . 0 2,0 9 0 . 0
116.0 2,720. 0

. 91
4. 51
.59
. 59
• 89

95
83
32
72
68

W o rk stoppages by industry group, 1 9 3 7 -7 5 —Continued
(W o rk e r s an d d ay s id le i n th o u s a n d s )
S to p p a g es
b eg in n in g
in y e a r
W o rk ers
In v o lv ed

D ays id le
d u rin g y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )
P e rc e n t
of e s t i ­
m a te d
w o rk in g
tim e

E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y ,
e q u ip m e n t, and s u p p l ie s 1
193719381939-

.2 0

834. 0
222. 0
171. 0
278. 0
230.0

9, 740. 0
17 , 3 0 0 . 0
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. 73
.4 4
. 47
. 53
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171
194
199
179
84

368.
230.
216.
300.
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0
0
1
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2,
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540.
600.
230.
730.
656.

0
0
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0

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1. 15
. 99
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200
145
154
210
108

440.
123.
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551.
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0 1, 910.
0 1, 800.
0 1, 170.
0 4 ,310.
5 1, 3 9 0 .

.3 8

4 14.
532.
53.
95.

19451946194719481949-

96
134
80
64
67

1 ,3 9 0 . 0
232. 0 10, 800. 0
611. 0
36. 1
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4 02. 0
27. 1
352. 0

. 74
7 .3 1
. 37
.2 5

19501951 —
195219531954-

168
136

132. 0
104. 0

122

100. 0
76. 6

1 ,4 2 0 . 0
1, 040. 0
1 , 180. 0
1 , 620. 0
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19551956195719581959-

147
106

1960 1961 —

102

100 .

93
96

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9

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785.
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0
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202. 0

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0

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407
193
106
107
89

26. 9
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137
116

270. 0
6
0 2 ,290. 0
1
211. 0
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341.
752.

11.3

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80

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87
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189.
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.

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M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g 20

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1,0 9 8
1, 642
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225
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434

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569
108
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744
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9,270
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.21
. 72
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.22
16
18
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2 , 138
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2,452
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. 30
. 11

1, 913
1, 856
1, 711

646
544
610
574
600

9 ,3 9 0
6 , 020
7 , 080
8 , 520

1945 —
1946 —
1947 —
W a­
r n 9—

15.4
12. 7
16. 0
15.3

418. 0
346. 0
403. 0
339. 0
1 6 6.0

1950 —
1951 —
1952 —
1953 —
1954 —

96
92
94
105
85

18. 6
12. 7
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21. 0
14.2

237.
195.
224.
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186.

99

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191. 0
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54
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7
7
0
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7

305. 5
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209. 7

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255. 6

54
47

1965 —
1966—
1967—
1968—
1969 —
1970 —
1971 —
1972 —
1973 —
1974 —

44
44
43
69

1975-

37

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




75

0
0
0
0
0

N o n m a n u f a c tu r in g 21
8 ,450
3, 330
1 0 ,600

52
86
92
72
69

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11
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45
34
29

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(2)

0
0
0
0
0

o

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0 .20

1, 961
1,336
1,224

1940 —
1941 —
1942 —
1943 —
1944 —

54
56

0

694.
134.
202.
233.
158.

133.2 6 ,2 0 8 . 1
109. 1 1, 5 4 9 .4
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89
80
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68

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34 .0
7. 0
7.2
14.3
8.7

191
174
161
173

1955 —
1956 —
1957 —
1958 —
1959 —
1 960 —
1961—
1962 —
1963 —
1964 —

0

30
33
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27
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19701971 —
197219731974-

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263.

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1938 —
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1937 —

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158. 0
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. 19
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1965 —
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196719681969-

8
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51
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115
345
549

19401941194219431944-

121. 0

W o r k e rs
in v o lv ed

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d u rin g y e a r
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, 7 2 0.0
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22

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165
49
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Work stoppages by industry group, 1937-75—Continued
^ W o rk e rs ^ n d ^ a ^ id le _ jn _ titio u s a n d ^ ] _
S to p p a g es
b eg in n in g
in y e a r

D ays id le
d u rin g y e a r
( a ll s to p p a g e s )

Y ear
N um ber

W o r k e rs
in v o lv e d

Stopp a g e s
b eg ir m ing
in v e a r

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S to p p a g es
D ays id le
d u rin g y e a r
b eg in n in g
d u rin g y e a r
(a ll s to p p a g e s )
(a ll s to p p a g e s )
in y e a r
P e rc e n t
P e rc e n t
of e s ti­
of e s ti­
W o r k e rs
N u m b e r Wo r k e r s N u m b e r m a te d N u m b e r
N u m b e r m a te d
in v o lv ed
in v o lv e d
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
tim e
tim e

A g r ic lu t u r e , f o r e s t r y ,
an d f i s h e r ie s
40
48
39
24
32

19371938193919401941194219431944-

21

16
18

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320

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395
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188
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217. 0 3 ,4 9 0 . 0
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248. 0 2, 790. 0

. 63
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19501951195219531954-

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22

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23
24

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152. 0
3 4 8 .0
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20

14
14
10

19551956195719581959-

11
6
6
6

1960-

81
31
16
25
18

10

19611962 1963 196419651966196719681969-

21
20

19701971197219731974-

27
7

18
17
16

12
11

13
7

1975

C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c tio n

7 .7
2 4 .3
3 6 .8

12
21

----

1945
1946
1947
1948
1949

M in in g 22

670
570
478
614
476
( 2)

( )
()
( 2)
( 2)

2 .0
1. 9
4 .0
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1 0 .4
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21. 5

508
622
650
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248
343
321
198

168
187

0
0
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114. 0 1 , 080. 0
129. 0 1 ,3 2 0 . 0
5 6 .3
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700.
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.

88

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , com m uni[.cation,
e l e c t r i c , g a s , an d
s a n i t a r y s e r v ic e s
13 8 . 0 1 , 8 9 0 . 0
379
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73 0. 0
216
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867. 0
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256
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5 9 6 .0
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193719381939194019411942 1943194419451946194719481949-

342
479
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293
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195019511952 1953 1954-

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W h o le sa le an d r e t a i l t r a d e 24
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19551956195719581959-

275
243
209
242
233

253.
130.
169.
132.
140.

0 4 ,8 6 0 .0
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409
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558.
654.
942.
570.

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19601961 —

266
243
213
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257

200. 0
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. 18
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19671968 1969-

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19701971 —
197219731974-

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1975-

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1962 -

1963 19641965..
19 6 6 -

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




76

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Work stoppages by industry group, 1937-75—Continued
(W o rk e r s and d a y s id le in th o u s a n d s )
S top pages
b e g i nning
in / e a r

Y ear

Stop]pages
D ays id le
Stop]pages
D ays id le
t)a y s id le
b eg i nning
d u rin g y e a r
b eg i nning
d u rin g y e a r
d u rin g y e a r
(a ll s to p p a g e s )
in if e a r
(a ll s to p p a g e s )
in ’y ea r
(a ll s to p p a g e s )
P e rc e n t
P e rc e n t
P e rc e n t
of e s ti­
of e s t i ­
of e s t i ­
N u m b e r W o r k e rs N u m b e r m a te d N u m b e r W o rk e rs N u m b e r m a te d N u m b e r W o r k e rs N u m b e r m a te d
in v o lv e d
in v o lv e d
in v o lv e d
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
w o rk in g
tim e
tim e
tim e
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and
r e a l e sta te

1 9 3 7 ---------------------------------------------------------

1938--------------------------------------------------------1939--------------------------------------------------------1940--------------------------------------------------------1941......................................- ........................... 1 9 4 2 ---------------------------- ---------------------------I 9 4 3 --------------------------------------------------------1944- -........................................I 9 4 5 --------------------------------------------------------1946- .................................................................
1 9 4 7 - ....... .......................................
.........
1948--------------- -------------- ---------1949...................- ................................................
1950--------------------------------------------------------1951--------------- --------- ------------------- -------1952--------------------------------------------------------1953— ......................-......................................... 1954--------------------------------------------------------1955--------------------------------------------------------1956--------------------------------------------------------1957- - - - — .................... - - — 1958..............
...................... .................
1959--------------------------------------------------------I9 6 0 --------------------------------------------------------1961--------------------------------------------------------1962.............................................. - - 1963------------------- ------------- ----------- 1 9 6 4 - ---------------------------------------- ------1965--------------------------------------------------------.......
1966------....................
1967............ ....................................................
1 9 6 8 -------------- -------------- - .....................
1969--------------------------------------------------------1970--------------------------------------------------------1971--------------------------------------------------------1972--------------------------------------------------------1973--------------------------------------------------------I 9 7 4 --------------------------------------------------------1975---------------------------------------------------------

.

S e r v i c e s 24
(2)

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(2)
(2)

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23
26
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130
114
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206
147
150
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300. 0
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179
132
145
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27
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16
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19
17

G o v e rn m e n t 25
(25)

(24)
(24)
(24)
(24)
(24)

n

n

0

1 D a ta f o r 1942-46 w e r e o r ig in a lly p u b lis h e d a s p a r t of th e i n ­
d u s t r y g ro u p " I r o n an d s t e e l an d t h e i r p r o d u c t s ."
2 N ot a v a ila b le .
3 D a ta f o r 1937-41 w e r e o r ig in a lly p u b lis h e d u n d e r " T e x t i l e s
an d t h e i r p r o d u c ts : F a b r i c s . "
4 D a ta f o r 1937-41 w e r e o r ig in a lly p u b lis h e d u n d e r " T e x tile s
a n d t h e i r p r o d u c ts : W e a rin g a p p a r e l ."
5 L e s s th a n 0 .0 0 5 p e r c e n t .
6 D a ta f o r 1937-41 e x c lu d e f u r n it u r e w h ic h h ad b e e n in c lu d e d
in th is g ro u p w hen p u b lis h e d in a n n u a l r e p o r t s f o r th o s e y e a r s .
7 D a ta f o r 1937-41 w e r e o r ig in a lly p u b lis h e d a s p a r t of th e
lu m b e r an d a l lie d p r o d u c ts i n d u s tr y .
8 D a ta f o r 1937-41 a p p e a r e d in e a r l i e r p u b lic a tio n s u n d e r " P a ­
p e r an d p r i n t i n g ." T h e s e f i g u r e s a r e f o r b o x e s , p a p e r ; p a p e r and
p u lp .
9 D a ta f o r 1937-41 w e r e o r ig in a lly p u b lis h e d u n d e r " P a p e r and
p r i n t i n g ." T h e s e f i g u r e s a r e f o r p r i n t i n g an d p u b lish in g ; b o o k and
job, an d n e w s p a p e r s an d p e r io d i c a l s .
10 D a ta f o r 1937-41 e x c lu d e p e t r o l e u m re fin in g w h ich h ad b e e n
in c lu d e d in th is g ro u p w hen p u b lis h e d in a n n u a l r e p o r t s f o r th o s e
y e a rs.
11 P r i o r
to 1942, p e t r o l e u m r e fin in g w a s in c lu d e d u n d e r
" C h e m ic a ls an d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ." B eg in n in g w ith 1958, e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n ts p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in p ro d u c in g co k e an d by p r o d u c ts w e re
in c lu d e d in " P r i m a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s . "
12 P r i o r to 1958, m is c e lla n e o u s p l a s t i c s p r o d u c ts w e re
in ­
c lu d e d u n d e r " M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ."
13 In d u s tr y g ro u p s w h ic h in c lu d e s o m e of th e co m p o n e n ts of th e
p r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s tr i e s g ro u p a r e n o t e n t i r e ly c o m p a ra b le in y e a r s
p r i o r to 1947. S ee " I r o n an d s t e e l an d t h e i r p ro d u c ts " an d " N o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s an d t h e i r p r o d u c ts " in a n n u a l b u lle tin s f o r th e e a r l i e r
y ea rs.
14 In d u s tr y g ro u p s w h ic h in c lu d e s o m e of th e co m p o n e n ts of th e
f a b r i c a te d m e t a l p r o d u c ts g ro u p a r e n o t e n t i r e ly c o m p a ra b le in y e a r s
p r i o r to 1947. S ee " I r o n a n d s t e e l an d t h e i r p r o d u c ts " and " N o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s an d t h e i r p r o d u c ts " in a n n u a l b u lle tin s f o r e a r l i e r
y e a rs.
15 F o r th e p e r io d 1937-41,
e l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , a p p a r a t u s ,
an d s u p p lie s , r a d io s , an d p h o n o g ra p h s w e re in c lu d e d in th e p u b ­
l is h e d f ig u r e s f o r th e m a c h in e r y g ro u p . In th is t a b le th e s e 2 i n ­
d u s t r i e s h a v e b e e n e x c lu d e d f r o m 1937-41 to m a k e th e f i g u r e s c o m ­
p a r a b l e w ith s u b s e q u e n t y e a r s .




n
n
n

(2)
(2)
(2)

(3
H

01

06
03
04
07
04

16 D a y s id le in th e p r i m a r y m e t a l s in d u s tr y g ro u p d u rin g th e
s t e e l s t r i k e h av e b e e n co m p u te d on th e b a i s s of a v e r a g e e m p lo y ­
m e n t th ro u g h o u t th e a f fe c te d m o n th s , r a t h e r th a n on th e u s u a l b a s i s
of e m p lo y m e n t in th e p a y p e r io d e n d in g n e a r e s t to th e 15th of e a c h
m o n th , i f th e p e r c e n t a g e of t im e l o s t w a s c a lc u la te d on th e b a s i s of
r a ti o of tim e l o s t to t im e w o rk e d p lu s t im e l o s t, i t w ould h a v e b ee n
1 2 . 1 2 f o r th e p r i m a r y m e ta l in d u s tr y g ro u p .
17 F o r th e p e r io d 1937-41, r a d io s an d p h o n o g ra p h s w e r e a d d e d
to th e p u b lis h e d f i g u r e s f o r e l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t, and
s u p p lie s , to m a k e th o s e y e a r s c o m p a ra b le w ith s u b s e q u e n t y e a r s .
18 F o r th e p e r io d 1942-46,
t r a n s p o r a t i o n e q u ip m e n t (e x c e p t
a u to m o b ile s ) and a u to m o b ile s an d a u to m o b ile e q u ip m e n t h a v e b e e n
c o m b in e d .
19 In f o rm a tio n f o r y e a r s p r i o r to 1947 is n o t c o m p a r a b le w ith
l a t e r y e a r s . S o m e of th e c o m p o n e n ts of th is g ro u p w e r e in c lu d e d
in " N o n fe rro u s m e t a l s an d t h e i r p r o d u c ts , " " M a c h in e ry ,
except
e l e c t r i c a l, " an d " M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s tr i e s . " " I n s t r u ­
m e n ts , e t c . " in c lu d e s p r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , an d c o n tro llin g i n ­
s t r u m e n t s ; p h o to g ra p h ic an d o p tic a l go o d s; w a tc h e s an d c lo c k s .
20 F o r th e p e r io d 1942-46, p r o f e s s i o n a l in s tr u m e n t s , e t c . , w a s
o m itte d to m a k e th e d a ta c o m p a r a b le w ith s u b s e q u e n t y e a r s .
21 I d le n e s s a s a p e r c e n t of e s t i m a t e d w o rk in g ti m e d o e s
not
in c lu d e g o v e r n m e n t w o r k e r s .
22 F o r 1937-41 th e t i tl e w a s " E x t r a c t io n of m i n e r a l s . "
23 D a ta f o r 1937-41 in c lu d e e l e c t r i c lig h t, p o w e r,
an d m a n u ­
f a c t u r e d g a s w h ich w a s p u b lis h e d in th o s e y e a r s u n d e r " M i s c e l l a ­
n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s . " F o r th e 1937-58 p e r io d , th e g ro u p
in c lu d e s m u n ic ip a lly o p e r a te d u t i l i t i e s .
24 D a ta f o r 1937-41 a r e n o t e n t i r e ly c o m p a ra b le w ith s u b s e ­
q u e n t y e a r s an d h a v e b e e n o m itte d f o r th is r e a s o n .
2 D u rin g th e p e r io d 1937-41, g o v e r n m e n t s t r i k e s w e r e
in c lu d e d
in " O th e r n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s . "

N O T E : T he n u m b e r of s to p p a g e s r e p o r t e d f o r a m a j o r in d u s tr y
g ro u p o r d iv is io n m a y n o t e q u a l th e s u m of it s c o m p o n e n ts b e c a u s e
in d iv id u a l s to p p a g e s o c c u r r i n g in 2 o r m o r e in d u s tr y g ro u p s h av e
b e e n co u n te d in e a c h . T he m a j o r i n d u s tr y g ro u p an d d iv is io n to t a l s
h a v e b e e n a d ju s te d to e l im in a te d u p lic a tio n . W o r k e r s in v o lv e d and
d ay s id le h av e b e e n a llo c a te d am o n g th e r e s p e c t i v e in d u s tr y g ro u p s .
to ta ls .

77

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t eq u a l
D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

Appendix B. Scope, Definitions, and Methods

Methods

F rom 1 9 2 7 to 1 9 5 0 y all employed workers were in­
cluded in the base, except those in occupations and
professions in which little, if any, union organization
existed or in which stoppages rarely, if ever, occurred. In
most industries, all wage and salary workers were included
in total employment except those in executive, managerial,
or high supervisory positions, or those performing profes­
sional work the nature of which made union organization
or group action unlikely. This measure of employment also
excluded all self-employed persons; domestic workers;
workers on farms employing fewer than six persons; all
Federal and State government employees; and officials,
both elected and appointed, in local government.
F rom 1 9 5 1 to 1 9 6 6 , the Bureau’s estimates of total
employment in nonagricultural establishments, exclusive of
government, were used as a base. Days of idleness com­
puted on the basis of nonagricultural employment (exclu­
sive of government) usually differed by less than one-tenth
of a percentage point from that obtained by the former
method, while the percentage of workers idle (compared
with total employment) differed by about 0.5 of a point.
For example, the percentage of workers idle during 1950
computed on the base used for the earlier years was 6.9,
and the percentage for days of idleness was 0.44, compared
with 6.3 and 0.40, respectively, computed on the new base.
F rom 1 9 6 7 to 1 9 7 3 , two estimates of employment were
used, one based on the wage and salary workers in the
civilian work force, and the other on those in the private
nonfarm sector.1 The new private nonfarm series closely
approximated the former BLS series which, as noted,
excluded government and agricultural workers from em­
ployment totals, but accounted for idleness by such
workers while on strike. The old method had resulted in an
increasingly distorted measure of the severity of strikes; the
likely growth of strike activity among government and
farmworkers would have distorted the measure even more
in the future. The “total economy” measure of strike
idleness now included government and agricultural workers
in its employment count as well as in the computation of
idleness ratios, but excluded forestry, fishery, and private
household workers from the base. To facilitate comparisons
over time, the figure for the total economy had been carried
back to 1939 (see table 1). The “private nonagricultural”

The rela tive m easures. In computing the number of workers
involved in strikes as a percent of total employment and
idleness as a percent of total working time, the following
employment figures have been used:

For further information, see “ ‘Total Economy’ Measure of
Strike I d le n e s s M o n th ly L a b o r R eview , October 1968, pp. 54-56.

Scope

It is the purpose of this statistical series to report all
work stoppages in the United States that involve six workers
or more and continue for the equivalent of a full day or
shift or longer.
Definitions
o r lo c k o u t. A strike is defined as a temporary
stoppage of work by a group of employees (not necessarily
members of a union) to express a grievance or enforce a
demand. A lockout is a temporary withholding or denial of
employment during a labor dispute to enforce terms of
employment upon a group of employees. Because of the
complexity of most labor-management disputes, the Bureau
makes no attempt to distinguish between strikes and
lockouts in its statistics; both types are included in the term
“work stoppage” and are used interchangeably. The terms
“dispute” , “labor-management dispute,” and “walkout”
are also used interchangeably.
S trik e

The figures on the number of
“workers involved” and “days idle” include all workers
made idle for one shift or longer in establishments directly
involved in a stoppage. They do not account for secondary
idleness—
that is, the effects of a stoppage on other
establishments or industries whose employees may be made
idle as a result of material or service shortages.
The total number of workers involved in strikes in a
given year may include double counting of individual
workers if they were involved in more than one stoppage
during that year. (Thus, in 1974, the Bureau recorded some
460,000 bituminous coal and lignite mining workers as
participating in strikes, while 165,000 workers were em­
ployed in the industry.)
In some prolonged stoppages, the total days of idleness
are estimated if the number of workers idle each day is not
known. Significant changes in the number of workers idle
are secured from the parties for use in computing days of
idleness.
Workers a n d idleness.




78

Table B-1. Methods of computing relative measures of idleness
Component

Employment

.................................

Estimated working time

..............

Days of idleness as a percent
of estimated total
working t i m e .............................

Total economy
measure

Nonagricultural sector
measure

Establishment series plus wage
and salaried farm workers.
Above employment times
working days.

Above employment times
working days.

Total idleness
Above working time

Total idleness less farm w „ ^
ai
..
X 100
Above working time

measure excluded agricultural and government workers
from employment totals and these groups were also
removed from strike figures in arriving at a percentage of
nonagricultural working time idle.

Establishment series.

Private nonagricultural sector
measure
Establishment series less
government.
Above employment times
working days.

Total idleness less farm
and government
Above working time

^ 100

industries are excluded from metropolitan area data but are
reported by industry and State.
Unions in volved. For this purpose, the union is the
organization whose contract was involved or which has
taken active leadership in the stoppage. Disputes involving
more than one union are classified as jurisdictional or rival
union disputes or as involving cooperating unions. If
unorganized workers strike, a separate classification is used.
However, the tabulations of “workers involved” include all
who are made idle for one shift or longer in establishments
directly involved in the dispute, including members of other
unions and nonunion workers. Information is presented by
major affiliation of the union, i.e., AFL-CIO, or, if there is
no affiliation, by the designations “independent,” “single
firm,” or “no union.”

B eginning in 1 9 7 4 , government workers have been added
to employment and idleness ratios. (See table 21.)
The differences in the various measures are illustrated in
table B-1 in which the components of each measure and the
methods of computation are set forth.
“Estimated working time” is computed by multiplying
the average employment for the year by the number of
days typically worked by most employed workers during
that year. In these computations, Saturdays (when custom­
arily not worked), Sundays, and established Federal holi­
days are excluded.2
D uration. Although only workdays are used in computing

Sources of information

total days of idleness, duration is expressed in calendar
days, including nonworkdays.

o f strikes. Information on the actual or
probable existence of work stoppages is collected from a
number of sources. Clippings on labor disputes are obtained
from a comprehensive coverage of daily and weekly
newspapers throughout the country. Information also is
received regularly from the Federal Mediation and Concilia­
tion Service. Other sources of information include State
boards of mediation and arbitration; research divisions of
State labor departments; local offices of State employment
security agencies; and trade and union journals. Some
employer associations, companies, and unions also furnish
the Bureau with work stoppage information on a voluntary
cooperative basis, either as stoppages occur or periodically.
O ccurrence

S ta te data. Stoppages occurring in more than one State are

listed separately in each State affected. The workers and
days of idleness are allocated among each of the affected
State.3 The procedures outlined in the section on relative
measures also have been used in preparing estimates of
idleness by State.
M etropolitan area data. Information is tabulated separately

for the areas that currently comprise the list of Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSA’s) as defined by the
Office of Management and Budget and, in addition, for a
few communities historically included in the strike series
before the current list of areas was compiled. Information is
published only for those areas in which at least five
stoppages were recorded during the year.
Some metropolitan areas include counties in more than
one State, and hence, statistics for an area may occasion­
ally equal or exceed totals for the State in which the major
city is located. Stoppages in the mining and logging




2

For example, the total economy figure for 1974 was
computed by multiplying the average employment for the year by
the number of working days (79,683,000x252=20,080,116,000)
and^dividing this figure into the total number of days of idleness.
The same procedure is followed in allocating data on
stoppages occurring in more than one industry, industry group, or
metropolitan area.

79

ing small numbers of workers. Presumably, these missing
strikes do not substantially affect the number of workers
and days of idleness reported.
To improve the completeness of the count of stoppages,
the Bureau has constantly sought to develop new sources of
information on the probable existence of stoppages. Over
the years, these sources have probably increased the
number of strikes recorded, but have had little effect on the
number of workers or total idleness. As new agencies or
organizations having knowledge of the existence of work
stoppages are established or identified, every effort is made
by the Bureau to establish cooperative arrangements.

R esp o n d en ts to questionn aire. A questionnaire is mailed to

each of the parties reported as involved in work stoppages
to obtain information on the number of workers involved,
duration, major issues, location, method of settlement, and
other pertinent information.

L im ita tio n s o f d a ta . Although the Bureau seeks to obtain

complete coverage, i.e., a “census” of all strikes involving
six workers or more and lasting a full shift or more,
information is undoubtedly missing on some strikes involv­




80

Keep up to date with:

MAJOR
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AGREEM
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The Bureau of Labor Statistics has published a series of 16 bulletins dealing with key
issues in collective bargaining. The bulletins are based on analysis of about 1800 major
agreements and show how negotiators in different industries handle specific problems.
The studies are complete with illustrative clauses identified by the company and union
signatories, and detailed tabulations on the prevalence of clauses.
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Management Rights and Union-Management Cooperation. .
Arbitration P rocedures......................................................
Training and Retraining Provisions.....................................
S ubcontracting..........................................................................
Paid Vacation and Holiday Provisions..................................
Plant Movement, Transfer, and Relocation Allowances
Seniority in Promotion and Transfer Provisions.................
Administration of Negotiated Pension, Health, and
Insurance Plans............................................................
Layoff, Recall, and W orksharing Procedures
Administration of Seniority...................
Hours, Overtime and Weekend Work. .
Safety and Health Provisions...............

. . $23.50

Total for all 16 Bulletins.....................................................................

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