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ANALYSIS OF WORK
STOPPAGES, 1968
Bulletin 1646
U. S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B ureau of Labor S ta tistic s




Dayton & Montgomery Co.
Public Library
MAR

3 01970

D O C U M E N T C O L L E C T IO N




ANALYSIS OF WORK
STOPPAGES, 1968
Bulletin 1646
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
G eo r g e P. S h u ltz, S ecreta ry
B ureau of Labor S ta tistic s
G eoffrey H. M oore, C o m m ission er

'H2LT
January 1970

For Sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Price 65 cents.






PREFACE
This bulletin, continuing an annual feature of the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the
field of industrial relations since 1941, presents a detailed statistical analysis of work
stoppages in 1968. Two tabulations, which appear in appendix A, have been added to
expand the scope of the analysis: A breakdown of stoppages by industry group and
duration for 1968, and a historical record by industry group for the period 1937-68.
Also included for the first time is a chapter analyzing major strikes in 1968, which
covered 10,000 workers or more.
Preliminary monthly estimates of the level of strike (or lockout) activity for the
United States as a whole are issued about 30 days after the end of the month of
reference and are available on request. Preliminary estimates for the entire year are
available at the year's end; selected final tabulations are issued in the summer of the
following year.
The methods used to prepare work stoppage statistics are described in appendix B.
The Bureau wishes to acknowledge the cooperation of employers and employer
associations, labor unions, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and various
State agencies which furnished information for this program.
This bulletin was prepared in the Division of Industrial Relations by Howard N.
Fullerton. The chapter on Major Strikes in 1968 was written by Michael Tighe. The
analysis of the individual work stoppages was prepared by William F. Aden and Alroy E.
D e r r , u n d e r t h e d i r e c t s u p e r v i s i o n o f J a m e s T . H a ll , Jr.




iii




Contents

Page
Summary . . . .......................................................................................................................................
Trends in work stoppages...................................................................................................................
Annual .........................................................................................................................................
Monthly.........................................................................................................................................
Contract status ................................................................................................................................
Major issues ....................................................................................................................................
Duration .........................................................................................................................................
Size of stoppages................................................................................................................................
Industries affected ............................................................................................................................
Stoppages by location........................................................................................................................
Region ....................................................................................................................................
States .........................................................................................................................................
Metropolitan areas ........................................................................................................................
Establishment and employer units.......................................................................................................
Affiliation of unions involved ...........................................................................................................
Mediation .........................................................................................................................................
Settlement.........................................................................................................................................
Procedures for handling unsettled issues..............................................................................................

9

Major strikes in 1968 ............................................................................................................................
Issues.................................................................................................................................................
Industries affected ............................................................................................................................
Size .................................................................................................................................................
Trends .............................................................................................................................................

9
10
11
12
12

Tables:
Work stoppages:
1. In the United States, 1916-68 ..............................................................................................
2. Involving 10,000 workers or more, 1945-68.............................................................................
3. By month, 1967-68 ...........................................................
4. By contract status and major issues, 1968 .............................................................................
5. By major issues, 1968 ...........................................................................................................
6 . Ending in 1968 by duration and major issues.........................................................................
7. Ending in 1968 by duration and contract status ....................................................................
8 . By contract status and size of stoppage, 1968 .........................................................................
9. Involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1968 ...........................
10. By industry group, 1968 .......................................................................................................
11. By region, 1967-68 ...............................................................................................................
12. By State, 1968
13. By metropolitan area, 1968 ..................................................................................................
14. By number of establishments involved, 1968 .........................................................................
15. By affiliation of unions involved, 1968 .................................................................................
16. Mediation in work stoppages ending in 1968 by contract status...................................................
17. Settlement of stoppages ending in 1968 by contract status ..........................................................
18. Procedure for handling unsettled issues in work stoppaged ending in 1968 by contract
status....................................................................................................................................
19. Major work stoppages by industry division, 1963-67 average and 1968
20. Major work stoppages by size, 1963-68 .....................................................................................



v

2
4
5
5
6

7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8

13
14
14
15
16
17
19
20
21
24
25
26
27
29
29
30
31
32
33
33

Contents-Continued

Page

Charts:
1.
2.
3.

Number of work stoppages and workers involved, 1916-68 ...................................................
Man-days idle in work stoppages, 1927-68 .............................................................................
Comparison between total idleness and man-days last in major stoppages, 1945-68 .................

Appendixes:
A. Tables:
Work stoppages—
A-l. By
industry, 1968 ...........................................................................................
A-2. By
industry group and major issues, 1968 .........................................................
A-3. InStates having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1968 ...............................................
A-4. By
industry group and contract status, 1968
A-5. By
industry group and duration, 1968
A-6 . By
industry group, 1937-68 ...............................................
B. Scope, definitions, and methods ..................................................................................................




vi

2
3
10

34
37
41
47
49

52
59

ANALYSIS OF WORK STOPPAGES, 1968
Summary
arose during the term of agreements and did not involve
negotiations of new contract terms. Strikes over
economic issues accounted for three-quarters of the
id leness; on e -ten th were attributable to plant
administration disputes, and almost another tenth to
union organization and security matters.
For the third year, one-half of all stoppages
involved 100 workers or more; in earlier years, 1954-65,
smaller stoppages were dominant. Although the number
of strikes involving 1,000 workers or more increased
from 1967 (381 to 392), the number of workers directly
affected declined. The idleness attributable to large
stoppages continued to account for most of total time
lost (73 percent), about the same proportion as in 1967.
Workers involved in strikes in the manufacturing
sector, and the resulting idleness, declined 14 percent
from 1967. Idleness accruing from stoppages in the
nonmanufacturing sector increased 75 percent; the
h i g h e s t n u m b e r s w e r e in t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ,
communications, and utilities (9.3 million man-days),
f ol l o w e d by c o n tr a c t construction (8.7 million
man-days).

The 49.0 million man-days of idleness resulting
from work stoppages in 1968 exceeded the previous
year's level by 16 percent and represented the highest
level since 1959. As a percent of estimated total working
tim e, idleness increased slightly - to 0.28 percent,
compared with 0.25 the previous year. Recorded
strikes1 totaled 5,045 and involved 2.6 million workers;
in 1967, fewer stoppages idled a slightly larger number
of workers. Average duration, at 24.5 calendar days, was
up sharply from the 22.8 days in 1967.
A protracted copper strike, stoppages associated
w ith th e c o m p le tio n o f a u to m o b ile industry
negotiations, and 10 other major stoppages involving
1 0 ,0 0 0 workers or more, were largely responsible for the
highest level of idleness recorded in a first calendar
quarter of the year (10.5 million man-days) since 1950
(15.2 million). The first nationwide telephone strike
since 1945, four other major telephone disputes, and six
major stoppages in other industries were in effect in the
second quarter of 1968 when idleness reached its peak
(18.7 million) for the year. A total of 32 major strikes
began during the year and accounted for almost
two-fifths of the workers idled and about the same
proportion of the idleness.
Two stoppages during the year, both affecting
transportation, were considered sufficiently serious to
receive special attention. A lengthy stoppage in the
stevedoring industry strike on the East and Gulf Coasts
by the International Longshoremen's Association was
halted temporarily when the national emergency
provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act were invoked on
October 2, 1968.2 In December, an emergency board
was appointed under the provisions of the Railway
Labor Act to settle the other dispute, affecting the
Louisville and Nashville Railroad, the Illinois Central
R ailroad , the Belt Railway of Chicago, and the
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen.
More than one-half of the strikes and almost
n in e -te n th s o f the idleness occurred during the
renegotiation of contracts. One-third of the stoppages

Trends in work stoppages
Annual. 1968 was the eighth year of economic
expansion that began in 1961. During the year the
unemployment rate fell to its lowest level since 1953,
while the number of employed workers reached new
records and corporate profits increased significantly.
Because of these conditions, a continually tightening
labor market, and rising Consumer Price Index (CPI)
workers and unions were inclined to press for high wage
increases and liberalization of many contract provisions.
Reflecting the collective bargaining climate of
1968, the number of strikes increased 10 percent over
the previous year (table 1, chart 1). Although this rate of
increase was the sharpest in the past 6 years, it was well
below the rise after the 1948-49 (34 percent) and
1953-54 (25 percent) recessions. With 5,045 stoppages,
1968 tallied the highest level of strikes since 1953, and
was only the third year since 1916 the number of labor
disputes exceeded 5,000.
Although the number of workers involved in strikes
in 1968 declined almost 8 percent from the previous
year, the 2.6 million workers involved represented the

iThe terms “work stoppage” and “strike” are used inter­
changeably in this bulletin and include lockouts.
^For a chronological account of this dispute, see National
Emergency Disputes under the Labor Management Relations
(Taft-Hartley) Act, 1947-68 (BLS Bulletin 1633).




1

2

eighth highest level recorded since 1916. The number of
workers on strike was at the level of the immediate post
World War II period, but the percent of total employed
involved in stoppages, at 3.8 percent, is well below each
of the years in the middle and late forties, because of the
35 percent expansion of the work force.
Despite the decrease in the number of workers
involved, strike idleness, at 49 million man-days, or 0.28
percent of estimated total working time, reached the
highest annual level recorded since 1939 except for
1946, 1949, 1952, and 1959, which experienced
industrywide steel stoppages (chart 2). The increase over
the previous year, 16 percent, was sharply down from
the 66 percent recorded in 1967 In the post-war years,
perioas of economic expansion have experienced a sharp
increase in idleness before the peak, followed by a sharp
o
decrease during the husiness contraction.
M onthly. Peak idleness during the year was
reached earlier than usual, in May (table 3), when
736,200 workers on strike caused 7.4 million man-days
of inactivity. These levels of idleness were the highest for
any month since 1959, and the largest for May since
1952. Eight major stoppages in effect during the month,
including five in the telephone industry and two in




construction, accounted for more than one-half of the
workers, and almost that proportion of the idleness in
the month. Idleness declined over the remainder of the
year, except for the upturn that is characteristic of
October. At 23 percent of the May level, idleness in
December reached the low point for the year. Over the
past decade, the lowest month has averaged 22 percent
of the highest month, ranging from 9 percent in 1959, to
43 percent in 1963.
Although idleness usually does not peak in the fifth
month, the number of strikes is generally highest in May
or June. The 610 stoppages that started in May 1968
were exceeded only by 614 that began in March 1937;
the 930 strikes in effect during the month were the
highest level since August 1946.
Workers involved in strikes also peaked in May,
primarily because of the major telephone strikes that
started in the previous month. After July, the number of
workers involved decreased each month, except for
October; December was well below December 1967. The

^Andrew R. Weintraub, “Prosperity Versus Strikes: An
Empirical Approach,” Industrial and Labor R elations Review,
Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 231-238.




3

CHART 2. MAN-DAYS IDLE IN WORK STOPPAGES, 1927-68

4
primary reason for the lower number of workers
involved in the last half of the year was the decline in
the number of large stoppages (1,000 workers or more).
As the year ended, only six large strikes were in effect.
T h e f o llo w in g tabulation presents the monthly
distribution of new strikes involving 1,000 workers or
more for 1966-68.

Month

January ...................
February ...................
March..........................
April . . ....................
May .........................
June ..........................
July ..........................
August ...................
September .............
O ctob er...................
November .............
December...................
Total . . .

1968
29
31
33
52
50
35
40
32
27
34
21
8
392

1967
22
21
22
36
53
43
33
20
36
34
42
19
381

1966

21
14
18
30
42
33
39
29
28
33
24
10
321

Contract status
For the first time since the contract status of the
parties involved in a stoppage has been tabulated, more
than half of all strikes have occurred during the
renegotiation or reopening of an agreement. Since 1961
the number of all stoppages has increased 50 percent,
and the number of renegotiation disputes 76 percent.
Idleness attributable to all disputes has tripled, mainly
because the idleness attached to renegotiation disputes
has more than tripled. However, the workers involved in
these disputes have not increased at the same rate as for
other stoppages.
The number of workers in 1968 covered by the
larger collective bargaining agreements (1,000 workers or
more) that expired or were subject to reopening was not

1968

below the level of the previous year. Some 600,000
fewer workers were affected.4 However, negotiations
took place in several key industries and of these only
aircraft-aerospace settled on a new agreement without a
stoppage. In 1968, strikes occurring during renegotiation
or reopening of an agreement accounted for 67 percent
of the workers involved and 86 percent of the idleness
(table 4). Three-quarters of this idleness arose over
economic issues. As the 1967 copper industry strike
continued in effect during the early part of the year,
demands for recognition or union security accounted for
the second highest level of idleness in renegotiation
disputes. Renegotiation disputes are typically larger than
the other categories; in 1968, they averaged 664 workers
per stoppage, compared with 457 per strike during the
term of the agreement. Twenty-four of the 32 major
strikes occurred during renegotiation.
Strikes during the term of the agreement (when tne
negotiation of a new agreement is not involved) ranked
second in frequency. The number of these strikes
increased only slightly from 1967, but remained below
the 1966 level. Almost one-third of all workers were
involved in disputes taking place during the term of the
agreem ent. These stoppages may be regarded as
grievance stoppages, as almost two-fifths were concerned
with administration issues (and involved 53 percent of
the workers); more than a quarter were over interunion
matters. As many contracts specify arbitration or other
procedures for resolving such issues, this category of
stoppage is generally of shorter duration, 6.7 man-days
idle per worker compared with 18.5 for all stoppages.
T w o industries, mining and contract construction,
accounted for almost one-half of the strikes in this
classification. Over half of all construction strikes and 86
percent of all mining stoppages, including a 12-day

^Cordelia Ward and William Davis, “The Wage Calendar for
1968,” M onthly Labor R eview, January 1968, pp. 20-21.
Stoppages

1967

________ Percent of____________________
Man-days idle

1961




1967

1961

100.0
3.1

100.0
4.8

100.0
6.0

86.0

87.6

81.3

9.9
.9

7.3
.3

11.6
.3
.8

n oo

100.0
100.0
100.0
All stoppages ....................................................
15.2
13.4
16.0
Negotiation of first agreement or union recognition . .
Renegotiation of agreement (expiration or
45.1
46.9
52.9
reopening) .......................................................................
During term of agreement (negotiation of new
32.2
31.4
33.9
agreement not involved) ..............................................
1.7
2.7
1.8
O ther.........................................................................................
5.8
.5
.5
Insufficient information to classify..................................
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

1968

5
sympathy strike in January, took place during the term
of the contract. To end this pattern in the soft coal
industry, during renegotiations in the autumn the
B itu m in o u s Coal Operators Association offered a
Christmas bonus which included features to discourage
wildcat strikes. Four other major stoppages occurred
during the term of the agreement.
Idleness accruing from stoppages that occurred
during attempts to establish a collective bargaining
relationship declined a half-million man-days from 1967
and reduced the proportion of idleness to the lowest
level recorded since World War II. These low levels of
activity reflected both a decline in the number of
stoppages, and their shorter duration. Man-days idle per
worker involved in strikes for union recognition are
typically greater than the figure for all stoppages (24.5
in 1967 compared with 14.7 for all strikes) whereas in
1968, the measure was lower (16.7 against 18.5).
Because most certifications by the N L R B are bargaining
units at the lower end of the size scale, most strikes
involved a relatively small number of workers. In 1968
more than one-fourth directly affected fewer than 20
workers.
Major issues
Over the past 4 years, as the rate of consumer price
increases has accelerated, the proportion of idleness
incurred by economic disputes rose 16 percentage
points. In absolute terms, this represented an additional
23 million man-days between 1965 and 1968. The
proportions of man-days lost by major issues appears in
the following tabulation.
Economic demands caused more than one-half of
the strikes in 1968, and three-quarters of the idleness
(table 5).
Twenty-one of the 32 major stoppages
(page 9 ), and 230 of the 392 strikes involving 1,000
workers or more were over this issue. Despite increasing
prices in the past several years, the demand for an
escalator clause was a dominant factor in only 14 of the
5,045 stoppages.

Major issue

1968

Economic issues..............................................
Union organization and security...............
Plant administration ..................................
Working conditions........................................
Interunion or intraunion ............................

75.1
8.5
9.2
5.7
1.4

Slightly less than 10 percent of the idleness in the
year was a ttrib u ta b le to stoppages over plant
administration matters which encompasses issues such as
physical facilities, safety, and work rules. Frequently
professional government employees, particulary public
school teachers, strike over these issues; in 1968
three-eighths of the idleness in this category was
attributable to stoppages by public employees. In the
private sector, stoppages over plant administration
generally occur during the term of the contract (in 1968,
m ore than four-fifths of the strikes). More than
three-quarters were terminated in 2 weeks or less.
Idleness attributable to interunion or intraunion
disputes declined almost 200,000 man-days from 1967.
A s in past years, most of these disputes (80 percent)
occurred in the contract construction industry (table
A -2 ). Despite sizable declines in idleness in the
construction and in manufacturing industries in 1968,
sympathy strikes in the coal industry and in the
telephone industry kept total idleness attributable to
this issue above the* average for the sixties although it
was below the levels of the previous 2 years. Over
two-thirds of these strikes involved fewer than 100
workers, and three-fifths were resolved in less than a
week (table 6).
Stoppages over job security and other work rules
remained at the low level of the previous year, possibly
because of the high employment levels. Railroad
m a n n in g disputes and longshoring stoppages over
containerization accounted for over half of this idleness.
Duration
All measures of strike duration indicate that
stoppages were longer in 1968 than in earlier years. A s a
result, idleness during the year was above the 1967 level
despite a decline in the number of workers involved.
Mean duration increased to 24.5 man-days, almost 1 day
above the 23.7 average for the decade. When the
duration was weighted by the workers involved, the
mean duration was even higher, 30.0 days, and indicated

Percent of man-days of idleness
1966
1967
74.5
15.3
3.9
4.2
2.1

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




70.4
12.4
7.3
8.0
1.8

1965
59.1
12.8
8.1
16.0
1.9

6
that the larger stoppages were longer than those
involving smaller numbers of workers. Median duration
increased from 9 days, the level for the past 3 years, to
10 days, the highest measure during the 15 years for
w h ic h this measure has been computed. As the
tabulation below indicates, the number of prolonged
strikes (those lasting 90 days or more) increased for the
second year. Only 1946, which had 303 such stoppages,
had more prolonged strikes. Man-days idle per worker
involved reached its highest level since 1959, and the
third highest in the postwar period.
A significantly greater proportion of workers were
involved in longer stoppages; in 1968, 42 percent were
affected by strikes extending beyond 30 days, compared
with 32 percent in 1967 (table 6). Most of the increase
was recorded in the 30 to 59-day grouping which
increased from 570 in 1967 to 690 this year. Although
the percentage increase of workers striking 90 days or
more was small, there the resulting idleness increased 10
million man-days. Some 63 percent of the prolonged
disputes were over economic issues, while demands for
union organization and security accounted for 24
percent of the total. One-third of the prolonged disputes
occurred during the attempts to negotiate an initial
contract (table 7).
A s the median (10 days) implies, a large proportion
of the stoppages were of short duration; in 1968, almost
three-fifths ended in 2 weeks or less. Stoppages of less
than a week affected 15 percent fewer workers in 1968

Mean
duration

Year
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968

.................................................
.................................................
.................................................
.................................................
.................................................
.............................................. ...
.................................................
.................................................
.................................................
.................................................
.................................................
.................................................
.................................................
.................................................
.................................................

1 E x t e n d in g 9 0 d a y s o r longer.




............
............
............
............
............
............
............
............
............
............
............
............
............
............
............

22.5
18.5
18.9
19.2
19.7
24.6
23.4
23.7
24.6
23.0
22.9
25.0
22.2
22.8
24.5

than in 1967 Three-fifths of these shorter strikes
occurred during the term of the agreement. Five major
sto p p a g e s — in c lu d in g tw o teachers' strikes—were
terminated in less than a week.

Size of stoppages
T h e n u m b e r of workers involved in strikes
decreased 8 percent from the 1967 level, but at 2.6
million, was the second highest level for the past decade.
Workers in stoppages directly affecting 5,000 workers or
more declined 368,000 or 24 percent. The number of
strikes in 1968, however, increased; the largest rise was
concentrated in the 100 to 499-size group (table 8). As a
result, median size, at 104 workers, exceeded 100 for
the first time since the early fifties. A s has been
indicated above, the disputes that involved fewer
workers than the median occur during the term of the
agreement, over grievances or interunion matters. As
such, most are settled rather promptly. Other small
disputes involve union organization or security (15
percent), and may be prolonged.
Strikes that directly affected a larger number of
employees (1,000 or more each), accounted for 70
percent of the workers involved in 1968, and almost the
same proportion of idleness. Sixty-four percent of these
stoppages occurred during renegotiations, while 32
percent took place during the term of the agreement.
The most important issues in large stoppages by far were

All stoppages ending
during year
Man-days
idle per
worker
Median
duration
involved
6
8
8
8
8
10
10
9
9
8
8
9
9
9
10

14.7
10.7
17.4
11.4
11.6
36.7
14.5
11.2
15.0
17.1
14.0
15.1
12;9
14.7
18.5

Number
of
prolonged
strikes 1
172
137
132
124
133
221
201
191
224
203
189
221
210
232
261

7
economic, followed by plant administration disputes, as
the following distribution shows:

Major issue
All large stoppages^

Percent
of
idleness

.........................

100.0

Economic issues.......................................................
Union organization and security.........................
Plant administration ...........................................
Other working conditions.....................................
Interunion or intraunion.....................................

75.5
8.3
9.8
5.4
1.0

1|n stoppages involving 10,000 workers or more.
Thirty-two stoppages in 1968 involved as many as
10,000 workers (tables 2 and 9), and accounted for
about two-fifths of the workers and a slightly greater
p r o p o r t io n of the idleness. (For more extensive
information see page 9.)

In the manufacturing division, idleness attributable
to the primary metals industry increased 18 percent. The
extensive copper strike and a lengthy stoppage at smaller
basic steel firms also contributed to the idleness in this
industry. A s a result of these large, long strikes, average
duration was 3 weeks longer for the primary metals
industry than for manufacturing. However, of all
industries, printing and publishing recorded the highest
average duration, 87 days. Two of the more prominent
stoppages affected the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner,
and the Detroit newspapers. As a result of the high
average duration, idleness in this industry increased
fourfold. Other manufacturing industries sustaining
idleness levels above 0.47 percent of estimated total
w o rk in g tim e were tobacco manufacturing (0.77
p e rcen t), stone, clay, and glass products (1.30),
fabricated metal products (0.57 percent), machinery
(0.79 percent), and transportation equipment (0.58
percent). Idleness in electrical machinery decreased for
the first time in 2 years.

Industries affected
Stoppages by location
Between 1967 and 1968, idleness attributable to
strikes in nonmanufacturing increased 75 percent while
that in manufacturing decreased 14 percent. Despite the
decline, manufacturing idleness remained considerably
higher than the levels of each year from 1960 through
1 9 6 6 ( t a b l e A - 6 ). A v e r a g e d u r a t io n fo r
nonmanufacturing stoppages were 1 Vi days shorter than
those in the manufacturing division (30.9 days). Both
se cto rs shared in the increase in stoppages
(manufacturing 75 percent), while the workers involved
in manufacturing disputes decreased proportionately
more (77 percent of the decrease).
A s a result of six major stoppages, including a
sy ste m w id e strik e ag ain st Bell syste m units,
communications, electric, gas and sanitary services
sustained the most idleness of any industry this year (7
million man-days), and its highest idleness level since
1947, the year of the last systemwide telephone
stoppage. (See tables 10 and A- 6 .) The contract
construction industry, which had the next highest level
of idleness, sustained the greatest idleness level recorded
for that industry. There were five major construction
strikes (table 19). Mining, which experienced two major
strikes, and the continuation of a third had less idleness
(2.6 million man-days) than in 1967, but the highest
percentage of work time lost of any industry in 1968.
Government, which had 2.5 million man-days idle had
twice the idleness recorded in 1967.



Region. The East North Central Region ranked
first in idleness in 1968 (table 11) with 0.62 percent of
estimated total working time, considerably more than
that of the next highest area. Second in the array, the
Mountain Region with 0.46 percent, continued to
experience the effects of the 316-day copper strike that
started in 1967. However, idleness in 1968 did decline
below that of the previous year in the Mountain States,
as well as the West North Central and West South
Central Regions.
States. Eight major strikes were responsible for
the 7.8 million man-days of idleness that occurred in
Michigan in 1968, the highest level for any State in that
year (table 12). New York, which had the second highest
idleness level, was affected by two major government
employee strikes, and two stoppages by longshoremen.
Idleness attributable to work stoppages in soft coal, the
telephone industry, and two other major disputes caused
Ohio to have the third highest idleness level, followed by
Illinois and Pennsylvania. Nine other States had more
than 1 million man-days of idleness each.
In addition to the States having high idleness totals,
several others had a level of idleness as a percent of
estimated total private, nonagricultural working time
substantially above the national figure of 0.32. The
copper strike continued to contribute to high idleness
ratios in Montana (1.35), Arizona and Utah (0.77 for

8
both States), though each was well below the same
measure for the previous year. West Virginia (0.81
percent) experienced two major coal strikes in 1968;
w h ile W ash in gton was the scene of two major
construction strikes and a 109-day strike against the
Washington Metal Trades Association.
Metropolitan areas. The New York area, which
sustained the highest idleness level (3.8 million man-days
or 0.31 percent of estimated total working time) of any
metropolitan area in 1968, experienced two major
stevedoring strikes, a teachers strike, a taxicab drivers
walkout, and one by sanitation workers (table 13).
Detroit, which was second in the absolute level of
idleness, experienced a higher relative level, 0.99
percent. Am ong the larger disputes were a major
construction strike, as well as the telephone stoppage.
Two other areas, Chicago (0.29 percent) and St. Louis
(0.44 percent) had more than 1 million man-days of
idleness each in 1968.
New York which had 296 strikes, ranked first in
the in c id e n c e o f stop p ages, followed by San
Francisco-Oakland (152) and Detroit (148). Philadelphia
(127), which had experienced the second highest level
for 8 years, dropped to fourth. Four other areas,
Pittsburgh, Chicago, Los Angeles-Long Beach, and St.
Louis, sustained more than 100 stoppages each in 1968.

1968, and accounted for a slightly higher proportion of
the id le n e ss (table 15). In 1966, the A F L -C IO
represented 85 percent of all union workers and 67
percent of the national unions. National unaffiliated
unions accounted for slightly more than one-fifth of the
strikes and lower proportions of the workers and
man-days involved. The number of workers involved in
strikes by professional employee associations increased
fivefold.
Mediation
Slightly more than one-half the stoppages ending in
1968 used the services of mediators (table 16). Because
the proportion of workers involved (68 percent) was
greater, mediators participated in negotiations to end
strikes involving large numbers of workers. Federal
mediators5 were involved in 86 percent of the disputes
employing mediation, or 43 percent of all strikes. These
disputes accounted for 82 percent of the idleness
incurred during 1968.
Slightly more than four-fifths of the stoppages in
w h ich m e d ia tio n was required occurred during
renegotiation. The 2,189 stoppages involving Federal
mediation amounted to 83 percent of all renegotiation
disputes that ended during the year. Mediation was used
in slightly more than 45 percent of the strikes resulting
from attempts to establish collective bargaining.

Establishment and employer units
A s in 1 9 6 7 , sin g le establishment disputes
constituted over three-fourths of the strikes in 1968
(table 14). The proportion of all workers involved in
these disputes increased, but remained below the 1966
level. Stoppages affecting more than 10 establishments
accounted for two-fifths of the workers involved and
man-days idle during the year, a 10 -percent decline from
1967.
The proportion of stoppages confined to a single
employer operating one plant or more has continued at
slightly under 90 percent. However, strikes involving two
employers or more were larger and involved 28.5 percent
of the workers. Nine-tenths of the multiemployer strikes
occurred during renegotiation. All but 2 percent of the
strikes occurring during the term of the contract
affected a single employer.

Affiliation of unions involved
Unions affiliated with the A F L -C IO were involved
in about three-fourths of the stoppages beginning in



Settlement
As in recent years, almost nine-tenths of the
stoppages that ended in 1968 were terminated by a
settlement or by an agreement for a procedure to resolve
the issues remaining in the dispute (table 17). Eleven
p ercent ended without a formal agreement and
e m p lo y e rs resum ed operations either with new
employees or with returning strikers. Less than 10
percent of all workers involved in stoppages were in this
group.
Settlements yvere reached in 75 percent of those
stoppages occurring during attempts to establish a
collective bargaining relationship. On the other hand,
settlements were concluded in 96 percent of the

^Two agencies, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation
Service and the National Mediation Board, conduct most of the
mediation on the Federal level. Occasionally officials of the
Department of Labor, or other persons designated by the
President are directly involved in mediation. Several States also
have mediation agencies.

9

Stoppages beginning
_________________ in 1968
Number

2,649

49,018

1,894.3

31,163.6

194

122.1

4,133.6

399

Single establishment or more than 1
but under the same ownership or
management.....................................
2 or more employers—no indication
of a formal association or joint
bargaining arrangement..................
2 or more employers in a formal
association .....................................

Man-days
idle during 1968
(all stoppages)
(in thousands)

4,452

..................

Workers
involved
(in
thousands)

5,045

Type of employer unit
All stoppages

__

632.4

13,720.4

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.
stoppages occurring during the renegotiation of a
contract and 81 percent of the stoppages during the
term of the agreement.

Interunion (or intraunion) matters accounted for
three-fifths of the issues remaining, as the tabulation
shows.
Major Strikes in 1968

Procedures for handling unsettled issues
In some instances, stoppages were terminated by an
agreement to resolve unsettled issues after work had
been resumed. Information was available for 536 strikes
in 1968 (table 18). In about one-fifth of the cases, the
parties agreed to submit all unresolved issues to final and
binding arbitration; 16 percent were to be settled by
direct negotiations. In 5 percent of the disputes, the
issues were submitted to government agencies.
Stoppages occurring during the term of the
agreement accounted for 57 percent of all those
submitted to arbitration. About two-fifths of the
referrals to government agencies were cases involving the
negotiation of the initial contract.

Thirty-two work stoppages (table 2), defined as
those involving 10,000 workers or more, represented a
moderate increase over the 28 in 1967, but constituted
less than 1 percent of all stoppages in 1968. However, as
in the past, these major stoppages contributed an
impressive proportion of the total number of workers
affected and man-days of idleness in the year.
Approximately 2.6 million workers who participated in
5,045 strikes lost an estimated 49.0 million man-days of
work last year, or more than in any year since 1959.
Because major strikes accounted for about two-fifths of
all the workers who struck during the year (chart 3) and
about the same proportion of all man-days of idleness,
the impact of these stoppages is particularly significant.

Workers
involved

Stoppages
1/

Total stoppages covered . . .

Man-days idle

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

519

100.0

173.5

100.0

983.2

100.0

228.4
17.1
27.0
15.6
89
Wages and hours .....................................
.8
.5
4.0
10
Fringe b en efits...........................................
1.9
Union organization.....................................
19.3
19
3.7
3.3
1.9
414.1
74
14.3
92.3
53.1
Working conditions.....................................
18.1
177.2
Interunion .................................................
309
59.5
31.3
66.4
6.7
11.6
Combinations ...........................................
5
1.0
4.1
74.0
7.1
O ther.............................................................
13
2.5
Excludes stoppages for which there was no information on issues remaining or no agreement for issues remaining.

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.



23.2
.4
2.0
42.2
18.0
6.7
7.5

10

CHART 3. COMPARISON BETW TOTAL IDLENESS AND MAN-DAYS LOST IN M STOPPAGES, 1945-68
EEN
AJOR

45 46 47 48 49 50 51
INVOLVING 10,000 W
ORKERS O MORE
R
In 1968 major strikes exceeded those In the
previous year by four, but affected 346,000 fewer
workers (table 2). Strike idleness decreased almost
890,000 man-days. Thus, the number of workers
engaged in major strikes in 1968 constituted 38 percent
of the total as compared with 47 percent in 1967, and
42 percent of all man-days of idleness in the current
compared with 51 percent in the earlier year. The
significantly higher proportions in 1967 reflect the
e f f e c t s o f t h r e e large and p r o l o n g e d
s to p p a g e s -n a tio n w id e over-the-road trucking and
railroad stoppages and a Ford Motor Company walkout,
each involving more than 100,000 workers.
Issues
Work stoppages may result (1) from disputes during
the term of the agreement, (2 ) from jurisdictional
rivalries, or (3) from renegotiating, when parties are
unable to agree on one or a combination of contract
changes under consideration. Economic issues, which




67 68

include wages as well as supplementary benefits such as
company-paid pensions, insurance coverage, and paid
leave, figured in three-quarters (25) of the major
disputes. A relatively small number (6 ) of these disputes
were confined soley to wage issues. In this respect, the
cause of 1968 major strikes deviated somewhat from the
pattern found in stoppages generally, where about 50
percent relate to wages and other economic issues. In
one important stoppage, Consolidated Edison in New
York, agreement had been reached on general wage
increases and other matters, but not until the workers
had been out for 14 days were the parties able to settle
their differences on fringe benefits. The demands of
unions in the public sector sometimes provide complex
and unusual problems. Public school teacher strikes in
Florida and Oklahoma arose from wage demands that
were accompanied by a public policy issue—greater State
assistance to local educational systems.
Issu e s related to job security and working
conditions were predominant in most of the remaining
seven major walkouts. Again in the public sector, the

11
most publicized of these was the 54-day strike of New
York City school teachers during the term of the
agreement. Educators in the school system left their
classrooms to protest the alleged arbitrary transfer of
union members by a local school board during a
decentralization experiment. The dispute was resolved
when teachers were guaranteed a hearing and the State
appointed trustees to oversee operations of the school
district.
Job security questions were also prominent in the
Atlantic and Gulf Coast longshoring strike, which
continued into 1969. A key roadblock to settlement was
the contention of the International Longshoremen's
Association (ILA ) that the use of containers in shipping
would substantially lower labor requirements in many
ports. To cushion the effects of this change on
dockworkers, the union demanded the right to unpack
and repack containers assembled by freight forwarders in
each port area, guaranteed minimum annual earnings,
and a reduction in the retirement age. This stoppage
continued well into February 1969 in all ports despite
agreement by some local stevedoring associations and
union leaders.
Issues of job security and working conditions were
commingled in the year's two major railroad strikes: A
February stoppage of the Missouri Pacific Railroad,
Seaboard Coast Line Railroad, and other lines, and in
Novem ber of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad
Company. Both stoppages stemmed from demands for
increases in the size of train crews, which had been
reduced by a 1964 arbitration award. A settlement was
reached in the February dispute when the struck
railroads agreed to increase the size of some crews.
Negotiations at the Louisville & Nashville continued into
1969.6

Industries affected
Major strikes occurred in almost all of the principal
sectors of the economy in 1968. Nine stoppages in
manufacturing industries accounted for more than
one-sixth of all workers involved in major disputes and
one-fifth of total man-days of idleness. However, less
time was lost and fewer workers were involved in
manufacturing strikes in 1968 than the average for the
preceding 5 years (table 19). During that period, the

^The strike ended in February 1969 when the railroad
agreed to add a trainman-helper to 250 of the 500 crews where
they had been eliminated since 1964. The size of the remaining
250 crews was to be determined by future union-management
evaluations.



proportion of workers involved and man-days lost were
also considerably higher than 1968 levels; 37 percent
and 56 percent, respectively. Notable among 1968's
major manufacturing stoppages was a walkout of 50,000
workers in the glass container manufacturing industry.
The strike, which affected about 90 percent of the
Nation's bottle producers, began in the East in February
and spread to the West Coast a month later. Settlement
was reached in April when workers accepted a 3-year
contract. Although a threatened nationwide steel
stoppage was averted by the signing of a new agreement
in the final days of the old contract, walkouts involving
14,000 workers started on August 1 at seven smaller
steel companies over local issues. The last of these strikes
was not settled until the end of September.
In contrast with the situation in manufacturing,
major strike activity in most other industries was higher
in 1 9 6 8 than in 1963-67. This dissimilarity was
especially true in communications and utilities, where
man-days lost rose from less than 1 percent of the total
during the previous 5 years to more than one-third in
1968. A walkout of 257,000 workers at American
Telephone and Telegraph operating companies in May
1968 was chiefly responsible for this substantial rise.
The strike, the first on a nationwide scale in 21 years,
ended when the Communications Workers of America
and Bell system units agreed on a 3-year contract.
More than twice as many man-days of idleness in
the construction industry were reported in 1968 than
for the average of the 5 preceding years. Statewide
stoppages in Missouri and Michigan were the major
contributors to the higher 1968 levels. Effects of a
Michigan strike by construction unions were intensified
when many contractors not involved in the dispute
locked out their workers. In the past, construction
management has felt itself handicapped in negotiations
by the availability of work for strikers at nearby sites
not involved in the local dispute. The statewide Michigan
lockout, called to counter this situation, closed an
estimated 95 percent of construction activity in the
State.
Man-days lost because of major stoppages in the
mining industry were well above the long-term level.
Chiefly responsible were strikes led by the United Steel
Workers against copper producers, which began in July
1967 but were not settled until March and April 1968. A
week-long, nationwide bituminous coal stoppage also
contributed to the high 1968 total.
The level of strike idleness declined one-quarter in
transportation from 1967 but rose 2/4 times in
government. In the former, although dislocation because

12
of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast longshore strike and
other stoppages was great, man-days lost did not
approach the totals in years such as 1967, when
nationwide trucking and rail stoppages occurred. In
government. Strike statistics were greatly affected by
four statewide teacher walkouts. Over 40 percent of
Florida's public school teachers resigned in February to
protest the State's educational spending policies. The
teachers returned after 3 weeks when new legislation was
passed. On March 4, 20,000 Pennsylvania teachers took
a "professional d a y " to demonstrate in support of
teachers' pay legislation pending in the State legislature.
T e a ch e rs in O k la h o m a also participated in a
"professional holiday" not previously scheduled by the
administration. The New York teachers dispute was
discussed previously.

Size
Because of the size distribution of bargaining units
in the economy, most of these disputes developed in the
smaller size classes (table 20). In 1968, only about 30
percent of the walkouts occurred in bargaining units
which exceeded 25,000 workers; in all but one of the
years from 1963 through 1967 the proportion of major
strikes which have more than 25,000 workers was lower
than the 1968 level.
The impact of the major strikes was consistently
m ore pronounced in workers involved. In 1968,
stoppages of firms hiring over 25,000 employees
accounted for two-thirds of all workers idled by major
strikes. This ratio varied widely in the earlier years and
ranged from three-fifths in 1964 to two-fifths in 1965.
From 1963 through 1967, only five walkouts of
100.000 workers or more occurred. But these five—two
railroad strikes, a trucking stoppage, and two automotive
disputes—idled 1.2 million workers compared with 1.1
million involved in the 74 stoppages of from 10,000 to
25.000 workers during the same years.

Trends
Although the number of major strikes in only two
of the past 24 years exceeded those in 1968 (table 2)
this measure alone does not indicate the total impact of
these stoppages. The importance of strike levels must




also be measured by the number of workers involved and
the man-days of labor that have been lost.
The annual number of major strikes since 1945 has
varied and ranged from a low of seven in 1963 to a high
of 42 in the first year of the post-war period. The level
of major strikes in 1945 heralded the first of two
sweeping major wage movements in the post-war
reconversion period while the second highest number, in
1952, occurred during the Korean conflict. In the past
decade the number of major strikes in any given year has
been in flu e n ce d b y the existence of long-term
agreements, particularly in large collective bargaining
situations. This widespread practice has resulted in
"heavy" and "ligh t" bargaining years and thus has a
direct influence on the number of strikes in any year.
In 1968 the economy was faced with the third
highest number of major strikes recorded in 24 years,
but in w o rk e rs affected the year ranked eighth.
Considerably fewer workers participated in major work
stoppages last year than in either of the first two
post-war years, or in 1949, 1952, 1955, and 1967. More
workers were involved in major strikes in 1947, but the
difference between the 2 years was small—less than 4
percent. Not only was the absolute measure higher in
each of the 7 years but the workers involved in major
strikes also constituted a larger proportion of the total
than in 1968. In 1946 and 1949, for example, workers
affected by major stoppages composed over three-fifths
of all strikers, while in 1968 less than two-fifths were
attributable to major strikes.
Man-days lost in major stoppages have exceeded the
almost 21 million level for 1968 in one-fourth of the
years under consideration. The peak year, 1946, reflects
the efforts of organized labor to maintain wartime
take-home pay and bolster purchasing power. The
somewhat lower, but substantial, man-days of idleness in
1959 is accounted for largely by a 116-day strike of steel
workers against the country's major producers.
Another measure of the importance of major
strikes, and probably the most revealing, is the ratio of
man-days of idleness resulting from these stoppages to
the total. In 10 of the 24 years under consideration, 50
percent or more of the man-days lost because of
industrial disputes were contributed by major stoppages.
Man-days attributable to major strikes composed less
than 25 percent of the total in only 2 years— 1957 and
1963.

13

Table 1. Work Stoppages in the United States, 1916—681
Year

1916............................ —
1917..................................
1 9 1 8 ................................—
1919_____________
1920----------------------------1921......................................
1922......................................
1923..................................
1924___________________
1925___________________
1926_________________
1927___________________
1928___________________
1929------------------ -------1930----------------------------1931___________________
1932
. ..
1933 ...................................
1934------- ------------------1935......................................
1936- ________________
1937_______ _________
1938___________________
1939----------------------------1940 ___________ _____
19 4 1__________________
1942 ___ _ ____
1 9 4 3 -.............................. 1944 __________________
1945.......................................
1946................................
1947___________________
1948___________________
1949----------------------------1950___________________
1951___________________
1952...................................
1953......................................
1954__________________ _
1955___ __
_____
1 9 5 6 ___________________
1957 ............................
1958___________________
1959— .................................
I960__________ _______
1961....... ..............................
1962___________________
196 3-_______ ______ ___
1964___________________
1965____ ____ __ __
1966...................................
1967___________________
1968 ............................

Work stoppages
Average
duration
Numbe r
(calendar
d ays) 3
3, 789
4 ,450
3, 353
3, 630
3, 411
2, 385
1,112
1,553
1,249
1, 301
1,035
707
604
921
637
810
841
1,695
1, 856
2, 014
2, 172
4, 740
2, 772
2,613
2, 508
4, 288
2, 968
3, 752
4, 956
4, 750
4, 985
3, 693
3, 419
3, 606
4, 843
4, 737
5, 117
5, 091
3,468
4, 320
3,825
3, 673
3, 694
3, 708
3, 333
3, 367
3, 614
3, 362
3, 655
3, 963
4,405
4, 595
5, 045

26. 5
27. 6
22. 6
22. 3
18. 8
19. 6
16. 9
19. 5
23. 8
23. 3
20. 3
23. 6
23. 4
20. 9
18. 3
11. 7
5. 0
5. 6
9. 9
24. 2
25. 6
21 .8
22. 5
19. 2
17. 4
19. 6
20. 3
22. 5
18. 5
18. 9
19. 2
19. 7
24. 6
23. 4
23. 7
24. 6
23. 0
22. 9
25. 0
22. 2
22. 8
24. 5

W orkers in volved 2
P ercent
Number
of
(in
thousands) emtotal
ployed
1,600
1,227
1, 240
4, 160
1,463
1,099
1,613
757
655
428
330
330
314
289
183
342
324
1, 170
1,470
1, 120
789
1,860
688
1, 170
577
2, 360
840
1, 980
2, 120
3,470
4, 600
2, 170
1, 960
3, 030
2, 410
2, 220
3, 540
2, 400
1, 530
2, 650
1, 900
1, 390
2, 060
1, 880
1, 320
1, 450
1, 230
941
1,640
1, 550
1, 960
2, 870
2, 649

8. 4
6. 3
6. 2
20. 8
7. 2
6. 4
8. 7
3. 5
3. 1
2. 0
1. 5
1.4
1. 3
1.2
.8
1.6
1.8
6. 3
7. 2
5. 2
3. 1
7. 2
2. 8
3. 5
1. 7
6. 1
2. 0
4. 6
4. 8
8. 2
10. 5
4. 7
4. 2
6. 7
5. 1
4. 5
7. 3
4. 7
3. 1
5. 2
3. 6
2. 6
3. 9
3. 3
2. 4
2. 6
2. 2
1. 1
2. 7
2. 5
3. 0
4. 3
3. 8

M an-days idle during year
P ercent of estim ated
Number
total working tim e
(in
Total
Private
thousands) econom y
nonfarm

26,200
12,600
5, 350
3, 320
6, 890
10,500
16,900
19,600
15,500
13,900
28,400
9, 150
17,800
6, 700
23, 000
4, 180
13,500
8, 720
38,000
116,000
34,600
34,100
50,500
38,800
22,900
59,100
28, 300
22, 600
28,200
33,100
16,500
23,900
69,000
1 9 , 100
16,300
18,600
16,100
22,900
23,300
25,400
42,100
49,018

(4 )
(4)
(4 )
(4 )
(4 )
(4 )
(4 )
(4)
(4 )
(4 )
(4 )
(4 )
0.21
. 08
. 23
. 04
• IQ
. 07
. 31
1. 04
. 30
. 28
. 44
. 33
. 18
. 48
. 22
. 18
. 22
. 24
. 12
. 18
. 50
. 14
. 11
. 13
. 11
. 15
. 15
. 15
. 25
. 28

0. 37
. 17
. 07
. 05
. 11
. 23
. 36
. 38
. 29
.21
. 43
. 15
. 28
. 10
. 32
. 05
. 15
. 09
. 47
1.43
.41
. 37
. 59
. 40
. 21
. 57
. 26
. 19
. 26
. 29
. 14
. 22
.61
. 17
. 12
. 16
. 13
. 18
. 18
. 18
. 30
. 32

Per
worker
involved

79. 5
40. 2
18. 5
18. 1
20. 2
32. 4
14. 4
13.4
13. 8
17. 6
15. 3
13. 3
15. 2
11. 6
9. 8
5. 0
6. 8
4.1
11.0

25. 2
15. 9
17. 4
16. 7
16. 1
10. 3
16. 7
11. 8
14. 7
10. 7
17. 4
11. 4
11. 6
36. 7
14. 5
1 1. 2
15. 0
17. 1
14. 0
15. 1
12. 9
14. 7
18. 5

1 The number of stoppages and w orkers relate to those stoppages beginning in the year; average duration not computed
until 1927, relates to stoppages ending in the year. M an-days of id len ess, also not computed until 1927, include all stoppages
in effect.
Available inform ation for earlier periods appears in Handbook of Labor S tatistics, BLS Bulletin 1600 (1968), tables 130—
135. For a d iscu ssion of the procedures involved in the collection and com pilation of work stoppage sta tistic s, see BLS Hand­
book of M ethods for Surveys and Stu dies, BLS Bulletin 1458 (1966), ch. 19. A gricultural and governm ent em ployees are in ­
cluded in the total em ployed. The number of w orkers involved in som e strikes which occurred between 1916 and 1927 is not
known, how ever, the m issin g inform ation is for the sm aller disputes and it is believed that the total is fairly accurate.
2 In these tables, w orkers are counted m ore than once if they w ere involved in m ore than 1 stoppage during the year.
3 F igu res are sim ple averages; each stoppage is given equal weight regard less of its siz e.
4 Not available.



14
Table 2. Work Stoppages Involving 10,000 Workers or More, 1945—68
P eriod

Number

1945______________________________________
1946______________________________________
1947----------------------------------------------------------1948_______________________ _________ _____
1949----------------------------------------------------------1950--------------------------- ----------------------------1951______________________________________
1952________ _____________________________
1953______________________________________
1954______________________________________
1955______________________________________
1956______________________________________
1957.............................................................................
1958______________________________________
1959----------------------------------------------------------I960______________________________________
1961______________________________________
1962______________________________________
1963 _____________________________________
1964______________________________________
1965----------------------------------------------------------1966----------------------------------------------------------1967..........................................................................
1968______________________________________

42
31
15
20
18
22
19
35
28
18
26
12
13
21
20
17
14
16
7
18
21
26
28
32

W orkers involved
Number
P ercent of
total for
(in
year
thousands)
1, 350
2, 920
1, 030
870
1, 920
738
457
1,690
650
437
1,210
758
283
823
845
384
601
318
102
607
387
600
1, 340
994

38. 9
63.6
47. 5
44. 5
63. 2
30. 7
20. 6
47. 8
27. 1
28. 5
45. 6
39. 9
20. 4
40. 0
45. 0
29. 2
4 1 .4
25. 8
10. 8
37. 0
25. 0
30. 7
46. 5
37. 5

Number
(in
thousands)
19,300
66,400
17,700
18,900
34,900
21,700
5,680
36,900
7, 270
7, 520
12,300
19,600
3, 050
10,600
50,800
7, 140
4, 950
4, 800
3, 540
7, 990
6, 070
7, 290
21,400
20,514

M an-days idle
P ercent of P ercent of e s ­
total idlen ess tim ated total
for year
working tim e
50. 7
57. 2
51.2
55. 3
69. 0
56. 0
24. 8
62. 6
25. 7
33. 3
43. 4
59. 1
18. 5
44. 2
73. 7
37. 4
30. 4
25. 8
22. 0
34. 8
26. 0
28. 7
50. 7
4 1 .8

0. 24
. 82
.21
. 20
.41
. 25
. 57
. 36
. 07
. 07
. 11
. 17
. 26
. 10
. 45
. 06
. 04
. 04
. 03
. 06
. 05
. 05
. 15
. 12

1 Includes idlen ess in stoppages beginning in earlier years.

Table 3. Work Stoppages by Month, 1967—68
Month
1967
J anuary__________________________________
F eb ru ary_________________________________
M arch------------------------------------------------------A pril- — ------------------------------------------------M ay----------------------------------------------------------June______________________________________
J u ly ----------------------------------------------------------August------------------------------------------------------Septem ber________________________________
O ctob er__________________________________
N ovem ber________________________________
D ecem b er------------------------------------------------1968
J anuary__________________________________
F eb u rary_________________________________
M arch- _________________________________
A p r il_____________________________________
M ay- ---------------------------- ------------ — —
June______________________________________
J u ly ______________________________________
August____________________________________
Septem ber________________________________
O ctob er__________ _____________________
N ovem ber________________________________
D ecem b er______________________________




Number of stoppages
Beginning
In effect
during
in
month
month

W orkers involved
Beginning
In effect
in month
during month
(in thousands) (in thousands)

M an-days idle
P ercent of e s ­
Number
tim ated total
working tim e

286
292
368
462
528
472
389
392
415
449
360
82

443
485
545
638
769
759
682
689
681
727
653
445

94. 4
104. 1
129. 9
397. 6
277. 8
211. 8
664. 6
91. 3
372. 8
178. 8
277. 1
74. 4

163. 5
159. 2
195. 4
438. 8
584. 9
405. 0
865. 5
233. 1
473. 6
458. 7
559. 5
209. 5

1,247. 9
1, 275. 8
1,507. 8
2, 544. 8
4 ,4 0 6 .4
4 ,9 2 7 .4
4, 328.7
2, 859. 5
6 ,1 5 9 .8
7, 105.6
3, 213. 2
2 ,5 4 6 .5

0. 09
. 10
. 10
. 19
. 30
. 33
. 32
. 18
. 45
.47
. 22
. 18

314
357
381
505
610
500
520
466
448
434
327
183

483
569
618
748
930
810
880
821
738
741
617
408

187. 8
275. 0
174. 5
537. 2
307. 3
168. 5
202. 0
153. 8
169. 8
279. 0
129. 9
64. 1

275. 7
451. 3
368. 7
656. 9
736. 2
399. 9
465. 1
359. 6
349. 0
414. 5
306. 1
189. 2

2, 668. 5
4, 104. 1
3, 682. 0
5, 677. 4
7, 452. 2
5, 576. 8
4, 611. 9
4, 048. 9
3, 081. 1*
3 ,9 9 1 .7
2, 430. 5
1,692. 5

. 18
. 29
. 26
. 38
.49
. 40
. 30
. 26
. 22
. 25
. 17
. 11

15
Table 4. Work Stoppages by Contract Status and Major Issues, 1968
Contract status and m ajor issu e

Number

Stoppages beginning in year
W orkers involved
P ercen t
Number
(in thousands) P ercent
2, 649
100. 0
100. 0

A ll stop pages------------------------------------

5,045

N egotiation of first ag reem en t----------------G eneral wage changes -------------------------Supplem entary b en efits------------------------Wage adjustm ents--------------------------------Hours of work -------------------------------------Other contractual m a tter s-------------------Union organization and se c u r ity ---------Job s e c u r ity -----------------------------------------Plant adm in istration ---------------------------Other working co n d ition s--------------------Interunion or intraunion m a tte r s--------Not rep orted-----------------------------------------Renegotiation of agreem ent (expiration
or reopening)------------------------------------------G eneral wage ch a n g es-------------------------Supplem entary benefits ----------------------Wage adjustm ents -------------------------------Hours of work -------------------------------------Other contractual m a tter s-------------------Union organization and se c u r ity ---------Job se c u r ity -----------------------------------------Plant adm in istration ---------------------------Other working con d ition s--------------------Interunion or intraunion m a tte r s-------Not rep orted-----------------------------------------During term of agreem ent (negotiation of
new agreem ent not involved) ----------------G eneral wage ch a n g es-------------------------Supplem entary b en efits-----------------------Wage adjustm ents--------------------------------Hours of work -------------------------------------Other contractual m a tter s------------------Union organization and se c u r ity ---------Job se c u r ity -----------------------------------------Plant ad m in istration ---------------------------Other working co n d ition s-------------------Interunion or intraunion m atters -------Not reported ---------------------------------------No contract or other contract sta tu s------G eneral wag.e c h a n g es------------------------Supplem entary b en efits-----------------------Wage adjustm ents--------------------------------Hours of work -------------------------------------Other contractual m a tter s------------------Union organization and se c u r ity --------Job se c u r ity ----------------------------------------Plant adm in istration ---------------------------Other working co n d ition s-------------------Interunion or intraunion m a tte r s -------Not reported ---------------------------------------No inform ation on contract sta tu s------------

677
199
15
6
1
2
40 2
7
30
15

13. 4
-

2, 667
2, 292
78
23
5
85
64
40
58
12
9
1

52. 9
-

1,585
215
43
128
616
129
448
6
92
50
4
1
4
5
22
1
3
2
24

95. 7
26. 2
1. 2
.5
.2
(*)
63. 1
.5
2. 7
1. 3

3. 6
-

1 ,5 2 5 .0
538. 7
27. 2
6. 8
2. 1
.6
814. 8
11.7
110. 4
12. 6

1,7 7 0 .1
1,4 7 5 .1
38. 4
6. 6
.5
48. 1
23. 7
93. 6
75. 4
6. 5
2. 4
(l )

66. 8
-

4 2 ,1 5 1 .4
3 4 ,8 7 9 .5
460. 1
180.9
3. 7
759. 0
3 ,1 5 4 .9
1,412. 2
1 ,0 5 9 .5
218. 9
22. 6
(l )

86. 0
--

31.4

724. 2

27. 3

4 ,8 7 5 .8

9 .9

1.8
-

78. 9

1.6
-

324. 7

.9
-

-

-

-

“

-

.5

1 L ess than 100 w orkers or m an-days.
2 L ess than 0. 05 percent.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals.




M an-days idle
during year
Number
(in thousands) P ercent
49,018
100. 0

24. 6
44. 7
380. 4
6 1 .4
132. 5
1.6
43. 3
34. 8
.2
(M
.2
4. 6
3. 1
(*)
.1
.2
15. 5

-

"

-

.6

179. 6
141.2
3 ,3 2 2 .9
241.4
661.7
4. 3
442. 2
419. 3
.4
(M
1. 6
5. 0
14. 6
.2
.5
.5
23. 2

3. 1
- .
-

-

-

(2)

16

Table 5. Work Stoppages by Major Issues, 1968
Major issu e
A ll issu es
G eneral wage changes _______________________________
G eneral wage in crease ______ __________________
G eneral wage in crease plus
supplem entary benefits
G eneral wage in crea se, hour decrease
G eneral wage decrease
E scalation c o st-o f-liv in g in c r e a s e ___ _ _ ____
G eneral wage in crease and escalation
W ages and working conditions
Supplem entary benefits
P en sion s, insu rance, other w elfare program s ...
Severance or d ism issa l pay; other
paym ents on layoff or separation
P rem ium pay
Other
Wage adjustm ents
Incentive pay rates or adm inistration
Job cla ssifica tio n or r a te s .. _______ ________ ____
Downgrading
R etroactivity ______ ________ __________________
Method of computing pay
Hours of work ______________________________________
Increase
D e c r e a se __________________________________________
Other contractual m atters ______________________ ...
Duration of contract ____________________________
U nspecified _______________________________________
Union organization and security
............
R ecognition (certification) ________________________
R ecognition and job security issu e s _____________
R ecognition and econom ic issu e s ________________
Strengthening bargaining position or
union shop and econom ic issu e s _______________
Union security
. .
R efusal to sign a g r e e m e n t_____ _________________
Other union organization m atters
Job security _________________________________________
Seniority and/or layoff ___________________________
D ivision of work _________________________________
Subcontracting ____________________________________
New m achinery or other technological issu es
Job tr a n sfe r s, bumping, etc ____________________
T ransfer of operations or prefabricated g o o d s__
Other ____ _________________________________________
Plant adm inistration . __ ______ ___________________
P hysical fa c ilitie s, surroundings, etc . .........
Safety m e a su r e s, dangerous equipm ent, etc
Supervision
Shift work ________________________________________
Work assign m en ts
Speedup (workload) ______ _________________________
Work rules
O vertim e work ________ __________________________
D ischarge and discipline
Other _____________________________________________
Other working c o n d itio n s__________________ _______
A rbitration _______________________________________
G rievance procedures
.....
U nspecified contract violations _____ ________
Tnterunion or intraunion m atters
Union riv a lr y 3____________ ________________________
Jurisd iction— representation of w o r k e r s4
Jurisdictional— work assignm ent ________ ______
Union adm inistration 5 ____________________________
Sympathy _ ________________________________________
Other
Not reported

Stoppages beginning in year
M an-days
idle during year
W orkers involved
(all stoppages)
Number
Percent
Number
Number
P ercent (in thousands) Percent
(in thousands)
5, 045
100. 0
100. 0
100. 0
2, 649
49,018
2, 544
50. 4
58. 5
3 5 ,8 5 1 .6
73. 1
1 ,5 4 9 .8
848
422. 9
1 0 ,8 8 8 .3
“
1,410
2 1 ,9 0 4 .3
1 ,0 0 9 .4
33
185. 2
9. 1
2
.1
2. 3
11
3. 8
74. 2
3
4. 8
179. 5
237
2 ,6 1 7 .8
99. 7
93
1. 8
1. 5
39. 6
487. 3
1. 0
44
27. 6
' 310. 1
"
1. 3
9
29. 5
11
4. 1
91.7
6. 6
56. 0
29
248
86. 1
3. 3
512. 8
4. 9
1. 0
83
24. 5
209. 4
_
58
14. 8
151.4
5
.8
1. 9
5
.1
.7
97
45. 8
149. 4
.1
6
.6
5. 8
(*)
(*)
1
.8
(2)
5
5. 0
.6
1. 8
48. 2
760. 1
1. 8
1.6
89
11
5. 5
179. 6
78
42. 7
580. 5
513
10. 2
4. 2
4 ,1 5 0 .9
111. 7
8. 5
21. 1
192
352. 6
2
1. 3
(2)
152
36. 3
349. 4
“
85
24. 0
3, 140. 1
32
23. 7
254. 1
11
1. 9
29. 3
4. 5
24. 0
39
180
3. 6
143. 4
5. 4
1,570. 1
3. 2
_
102
50. 8
817. 3
1
1. 5
(2)
_
13
12. 0
108. 9
512. 7
9
49. 1
11
7. 8
11. 8
3
.4
3. 4
41
23. 3
114. 5
726
14. 4
461. 4
17. 4
4 ,5 0 7 .5
9. 2
56
54. 9
471.6
52
27. 7
105. 6
30
23. 7
9. 5
10. 4
27
50. 5
58
184. 8
21. 9
48
71.6
532. 1
28
37. 5
258. 7
_
_
16
3. 4
38. 0
_
275
170. 6
2, 381. 5
136
53. 9
461. 0
142
2. 8
67. 9
2. 6
460. 5
.9
12
5. 5
69. 9
54
33. 6
269. 8
76
120. 7
28. 9
136. 4
475
9 .4
5. 2
697. 4
1.4
15
27. 6
1. 7
13
1. 1
8. 6
43. 9
379
258. 3
_
_
16
6. 8
48. 3
52
83. 0
354. 7
3. 5
.1
. 6
13. 7
29
(*)
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 L ess than 0. 05 percent.
2 L ess than 100 w orkers.
3 Includes disputes between unions of different affiliation, such as those between AFL-CIO a ffiliates and independent
organizations.
4 Includes disputes between unions, usually of the sam e affiliation or 2 locals of the sam e union, over representation of
w orkers.
5 Includes disputes within a union over adm inistration of union affairs or regulations.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals.



17

Table 6. Work Stoppages Ending in 1968 by Duration and Major Issues1
Stoppages

W orkers involved

D uration and m a jo r is s u e s
Num ber

P erc en t

Num ber
(in
thousands)

P erc en t

M an-days idle
Num ber
(in
P erc en t
thousands)

100. 0

53, 575

100.0

3
7
3
3
9
6
2
1

7. 6
9 .4
10. 7
19. 2
10. 8
28. 4
6. 7
7. 2

202. 3
510. 5
945. 8
3 ,4 8 6 .0
4 ,1 5 0 .6
1 7 ,0 1 1 .7
8 ,1 4 7 .6
1 9 ,1 2 0 .8

0. 4
1.0
1 .8
6. 5
7. 7
3 1.8
15. 2
35. 7

50. 1
1 .8
3. 6
4. 7
11.8
1 1.6
9 .9
3. 7
3. 0

1 ,5 6 1 .0
49. 0
57. 5
74. 3
256. 8
198.9
648. 8
144. 2
131.6

58. 7
1 .8
2. 2
2. 8
9. 7
7. 5
24. 4
5. 4
5. 0

3 6 ,3 1 5 .3
49. 0
125. 1
262. 8
1 ,8 7 1 .8
2 ,9 6 8 .6
1 3 ,7 9 0 .8
6 ,8 3 9 .6
1 0 ,4 0 7 .5

67. 8
.1
.2
.5
3. 5
5. 5
25. 7
12. 8
19. 4

95
8
12
6
25
18
18
3

5

1.9
.2
.2
.1
.5
.4
.4
.1
.1

42. 3
1.7
2. 8
.3
26. 6
4. 1
5. 8
.7
.4

1. 6
.1
.1
(2)
1.0
.2
.2
(2)
(2)

537. 9
1.7
6. 0
1 .4
242. 9
57. 1
152. 1
43. 9
32. 8

1.0
(2)
(2 )
(2 )
.5
.1
.3
.1
.1

Wage a d ju stm e n ts-----------------1 d a y ------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s ----------------------4 to 6 d a y s ----------------------7 to 14 d a y s -------------------1 5 to 29 d a y s -------------------30 to 59 d a y s -------------------60 to 89 d a y s -------------------90 d ays and o v e r ---------------

251
55
64
55
42
12
10
5
8

5 .0
1. 1
1. 3
1. 1
.8
.2
.2
.1
.2

86. 4
19. 6
22. 0
18. 7
17. 0
1.7
4. 3
2. 2
.8

3. 3
.7
.8
.7
.6
.1
.2
.1
(2)

484.
19.
44.
57.
102.
25.
97.
75.
62.

6
6
1
2
8
7
7
3
2

.9
(2)
.1
.1
.2
(2)
.2
.1
.1

H ours of work ---------------------1 day -----------------------------2 to 3 d a y s ----------------------4 to 6 d a y s ----------------------7 to 14 d a y s ---------------------15 to 29 d a y s -------------------30 to 59 d a y s -------------------60 to 89 d a y s -------------------90 days and over ---------------

6
1
-

.1
(2)
-

.6
.3

(2)
(2)

_

_

_

5. 8
.3
-

(2)
(2)
-

1
3
1

(2)
.1
(2)

-

-

(3)
.3
(3)
-

(2)
(2)
(2)
-

.3
4. 5
.8
-

(2)
(2)
(2)
-

Other co n tractu al m a t t e r s ------1 d a y ------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s ----------------------4 to 6 d a y s ----------------------7 to 14 d a y s ---------------------15 to 29 d a y s -------------------30 to 59 d a y s -------------------60 to 89 d a y s -------------------90 d ays and o v e r ---------------

86
20
14
11
7
13
9
7
5

1. 7
.4
.3
.2
.1
.3
.2
.1
.1

47. 3
10. 3
3. 4
7. 1
.8
1. 2
5. 6
18. 3
.7

1.8
.4
.1
.3
(2)
(2)
.2
.7
(2)

720.
10.
7.
19.
5.
18.
101.
499.
58.

9
3
5
5
5
2
8
4
7

1. 3
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
.2
.9
.1

Union organ ization and se cu rity
1 day -----------------------------2 to 3 d a y s ----------------------4 to 6 d a y s ----------------------7 to 14 d a y s ---------------------15 to 29 d a y s -------------------30 to 59 d a y s -------------------60 to 89 d a y s -------------------90 days and o v e r ---------------

525
33
58
43
114
90
77
48
62

10. 4
.7
1. 1
.9
2. 3
1 .8
1 .5
1.0
1. 2

151.7
23. 5
7. 6
12. 6
32. 6
10. 5
13. 7
4. 4
46. 8

5. 7
.9
.3
.5
1. 2
.4
.5
.2
1 .8

8 ,6 7 2 .5
23. 5
16. 6
42. 1
246. 1
160. 5
377. 6
225. 2
7 ,5 8 0 .8

16. 2
(2)
(2)
.1
.5
.3
.7
.4
14. 1

5 ,0 4 5

100. 0

1 day ----------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s --------------------------4 to 6 d a y s ------------------------7 to 14 d a y s -----------------------15 to 29 d a y s -----------------------30 to 59 d a y s ------------------------60 to 89 d a y s ------------------------90 days and o v e r -------------------

540
685
692
1,047
847
690
283
261

10.7
13. 6
13. 7
20. 8
16. 8
13. 7
5. 6
5. 2

202.
250.
284.
511.
285.
753.
179.
190.

G en eral w age c h a n g e s-----------1 day ------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s ----------------------4 to 6 d a y s ----------------------7 to 14 d a y s -------------------15 to 29 d a y s -------------------30 to 59 d a y s -------------------60 to 89 d a y s -------------------90 d ays and o v e r ---------------

2,529
93
180
236
593
586
500
189
152

Supplem entary b e n e fits----------1 day ------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s ----------------------4 to 6 d a y s ----------------------7 to 14 d a y s -------------------1 5 to 29 d a y s -------------------30 to 59 d a y s -------------------60 to 89 d a y s -------------------90 d ay s and o v e r ---------------

All sto ppages

See footnotes at end of table.




_

2, 657

_

_

18

Table 6. Work Stoppages Ending in 1968 by Duration and Major Issues1 Continued
—
Stoppages

W orkers involved

D uration and m ajo r is s u e s
Number

P erc en t

Num ber
(in
thousands)

P erc en t

M an-days idle
N um ber
(in
thousands)

P ercen t

Jo b s e c u r i t y ----------------------------------------------------1 d a y ----------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s --------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------7 to 14 d a y s ----------------------------------------------15 to 29 d a y s --------------------------------------------30 to 59 d a y s -----------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s -----------------------------------------------90 d ays and o v e r -------------------------------------------

183
51
33
35
25
12
12
7
8

3. 6
1.0
.7
.7
.5
.2
.2
.1
.2

98.
14.
25.
16.
12.
15.
5.
3.
4.

6
9
6
1
6
8
4
5
5

3. 7
.6
1.0
.6
.5
.6
.2
.1
.2

1 ,223. 1
14. 9
49. 5
51. 3
52. 0
221.7
147. 3
199.0
487. 3

2. 3
(2)
.1
.1
.1
.4
.3
.4
.9

P lan t a d m in istr a tio n -----------------------------------------1 d a y ----------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s --------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------7 to 14 d a y s -------------------------------------------------15 to 29 d a y s -----------------------------------------------30 to 59 d a y s -----------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s -----------------------------------------------90 d ays and over -------------------------------------------

722
156
174
169
104
49
38
17
15

14. 3
3. 1
3. 4
3. 3
2. 1
1 .0
.8
.3
.3

460. 4
43. 3
96. 0
131.9
85. 1
29. 9
66. 1
4. 3
3. 8

17. 3
1. 6
3. 6
5. 0
3. 2
1. 1
2. 5
.2
.1

4 ,4 2 5 .7
43. 3
192. 1
440. 9
630. 0
389. 6
2 ,2 2 0 .6
190.9
318. 3

8. 3
.1
.4
.8
1 .2
.7
4. 1
.4
.6

Other working co n d itio n s-----------------------------------1 day ---------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s --------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------7 to 14 d a y s -------------------------------------------------15 to 29 d a y s -----------------------------------------------30 to 59 d a y s -----------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s -----------------------------------------------90 d ays and o v e r -------------------------------------------

144
46
42
19
10
13
7
3
4

2. 9
.9
.8
.4
.2
.3
.1
.1
.1

68. 1
27. 1
18. 0
6. 2
3. 5
8 .9
3. 0
.2
1 .2

2. 6
1.0
.7
.2
.1
.3
.1
(2)
(2)

466.
27.
34.
19.
29.
127.
91.
11.
126.

4
1
4
0
0
9
1
6
2

.9
.1
.1
(2)
.1
.2
.2
(2)
.2

Interunion o r intraunion m a t t e r s -------------------------1 d a y ----------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s --------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------7 to 14 d a y s ------------------------------- 1----------------15 to 29 d a y s -----------------------------------------------30 to 59 d a y s -----------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s -----------------------------------------------90 d ays and o v e r -------------------------------------------

475
73
100
113
120
47
17
3
2

9 .4
1 .4
2. 0
2. 2
2. 4
.9
.3
.1
(2)

137. 5
12. 1
16. 3
16. 0
76. 0
14. 4
.9
1. 3
.4

5. 2
.5
.6
.6
2 .9
.5
(2)
.1
(2)

709. 6
12. 1
32. 1
47. 7
303. 6
173. 8
31. 3
6 1 .8
47. 1

1. 3
(2)
.1
.1
.6
.3
.1
.1
.1

29
4
8
5
6
4
1
1
”

.6
.1
.2
.1
.1
.1
(2)

3. 5
.5
1.5
1. 0
.3
.2
(3)
M

.1
(2)
.1
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

13. 7
.5
3. 1
3.9
2. 0
2. 9
.5
.8

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

'

'

"

*

'

1 day ---------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s --------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------15
30
60
90

to 29
to 59
to 89
days

1
table 1)
2
3

d a y s -----------------------------------------------d a y s -----------------------------------------------d a y s -----------------------------------------------and over ------------------------------------------

_

The to ta ls in this tab le d iffer fro m those in precedin g tab les b e cau se th ese (like the av e rag e duration fig u re s shown in
rela te to sto p p age s ending during the y e a r and thus include id le n e ss occu rrin g in p r io r y e a r s .
L e s s than 0. 05 percen t.
L e s s than 100 w o rk ers.

NOTE: B e ca u se of rounding, su m s of individual item s m ay not equal to tals.




19
Table 7. Work Stoppages Ending in 1968 by Duration and Contract Status
Stoppages
Duration and co n tract statu s

Number

W orkers involved

P ercen t

Num ber
(in
th o u san d s)
2, 657

P ercen t

M an -days idle
Number
(in
th o u san d s)

P ercen t

100. 0

53, 575

100. 0

6
5
1
8
5
5
8
3
3

3. 7
.9
.3
.5
.8
.5
.3
.1
.3

1,718. 7
23. 5
20. 2
43. 2
132. 8
201. 2
212. 2
173.4
912. 3

3. 2
(*)
(*)
.1
.2
.4
.4
.3
1. 7

52. 5
2. 2
3 .9
4. 7
12. 0
12. 0
10. 6
4. 0
3. 2

1, 775. 3
45. 3
9 4 .9
85. 1
311.6
200. 7
686. 8
170. 6
180. 3

66. 8
1. 7
3. 6
3. 2
11. 7
7. 6
25. 8
6 .4
6. 8

4 6 ,4 9 4 .4
45. 3
201. 7
293. 9
2, 312. 0
3, 066. 8
1 4 ,8 2 5 .8
7 ,7 7 1 .5
1 7 ,9 7 7 .5

86. 8
. 1
.4
.5
4. 3
5. 7
27. 7
14. 5
33 .6

1, 588
370
392
376
261
110
51
16
12

3 1.5
7. 3
7. 8
7. 5
5. 2
2. 2
1. 0
.3
.2

725.
110.
143.
183.
176.
45.
60.
3.
2.

2
5
0
2
7
7
0
9
3

27. 3
4. 2
5. 4
6. 9
6. 7
1. 7
2. 3
.1
.1

4, 898.
110.
280.
601.
1, 027.
551.
1, 972.
145.
209.

No co n tract or other co n tract s t a t u s ---1 d ay.
. 2 to 3 days
-- ------------------------4 to 6 d a y s __________________ ______
7 to 14 days _________________________
15 to 29 d a y s —
___
. __
30 to. 59 d a y s — _ ---------- -----60 to 89 days
90 days and o v e r ____________________

92
22
26
16
20
3
1
2
2

1. 8
.4
.5
.3
.4
. 1
(M
(*)
(*)

43. 7
9. 3
3. 0
1. 7
2. 2
25. 8
(2 )
1. 5
.3

1.6
.3
. 1
. 1
. 1
1. 0
(*)
. 1
(*)

441. 1
9. 3
6. 7
5. 1
12. 1
328. 6
.6
56. 8
2 1 .8

No inform ation on co n tract sta tu s______
1 day__________________ -____________
2 to 3 d a y s _____ — _____ ____________ _
4 to 6 d a y s __________________________
7 to 14 d ay s---------------------------------15 to 29 d a y s ________________________
30 to 59 d a y s ________________________
60 to 89 days
_____________________
90 d ays and o v e r ---------------------------

24
4
7
2
6
3
1
1

.5
.1
. 1
(*)
. 1
. 1
(*)
(M

15. 5
13. 8
.7
.4
.3
.2
(2 )
(2 )

.6
.5
(M
(*)
(*)
(*)
(*)
(*)

23. 2
13. 8
1. 5
1. 9
2. 0
2. 7
.5
.8

A ll sto p p a g e s_____________________

5, 045

100. 0

N egotiation of f ir s t agreem en t or
union recognition _____________________
1 d ay. - --------- — -------- ----- _ . . __ ___
2 to 3 days — . — _
4 to 6 d a y s ____________________ ___
7 to 14 d a y s_____— ------- . . — . . . .
—
15 to 29 d a y s ___ _. . . ___
30 to 59 days - ______________ __ 60 to 89 d a y s _______________________
90 d ays and over __ ______________

691
34
65
61
156
126
103
60
86

13. 7
.7
1. 3
1. 2
3. 1
2. 5
2. 0
1. 2
1. 7

97.
23.
9.
13.
20.
13.
6.
3.
7.

Renegotiation of agreem en t (expiration
or r e o p e n in g )________________________
1 day
2 to 3 days — _________ ______ ___
4 to 6 days — —
— ___ _____________ ____
7 to 14 days .
_
_
___
15 to 29 d a y s ________________________
30 to 59 days
_
_
60 to 89 d a y s ________________________
90 days and o v e r ____________________

2 ,6 5 0
110
195
237
604
605
534
204
161

During term of agreem en t (negotiation
of new agreem en t not involved)_______
1 day____ ___________ __________ ___«.
2 to 3 days
4 to 6 d a y s ____ __________________ ___
7 to 14 d ay s_ _ . ---------- ------_
15 to 29 d a y s ________________________
30 to 59 d a y s ____ ________________ .
60 to 89 d a y s ________________________
90 days and o v e r .. _________ ______

1 L e s s than 0. 05 percen t.
2 L e s s than 100 w o rk ers.
N OTE: B e ca u se of rounding, su m s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.




0
5
5
7
2
3
7
1
2

9. 1
.2
.5
1. 1
1.9
1. 0
3. 7
.3
.4
.8
C)

(*)
(*)
(*)
.6
(*) .
. 1
(*)
(*)
(l )
(*)
(‘ )
(*)
(*)
(‘ )
(*)

20

Table 8. Work Stoppages by Contract Status and Size of Stoppage, 1968
Stoppages beginning in year
C on tract statu s and siz e of stoppage
(number of w o rk ers involved)

Number

P ercen t

W orkers involved
Number
(in
P ercen t
th o u san d s)

5, 045

100. 0

6 and under 2 0 _____ _________________
20 and under 100_______ ______________
100 and under 250— ___________________
250 and under 500 ______________________
500 and under 1,000____________________
1, 000 and under 5, 000_______________ —
5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 ________________
10, 000 and o v e r ______ ___
__ ___ ___

603
1,805
1, 142
695
408
330
30
32

12. 0
35. 8
22. 6
13. 8
8. 1
6. 5
.6
.6

N egotiation of f ir s t agreem en t or
union r e c o g n itio n _____________________
6 and under 2 0 _____ ________________ 20 and under 100- ___________ ____ __
100 and under 250 _____________________
250 and under 500______________________
500 and under 1, 000____________________
1, 000 and under 5 ,0 0 0 __________________
5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 ---- --------------10, 000 and o v e r ________________________

677
188
304
115
39
20
10
1

13. 4
3. 7
6. 0
2. 3
.8
.4
.2
( ')

Renegotiation of agreem en t
(expiration o r r e o p e n in g )_______ ____
6 and under 2 0 _________________________
20 and under 100_______________________
100 and under 250______________________
250 and under 500 ______________________
500 and under 1 ,0 0 0 ____________________
1, 000 and under 5, 000 _________________
5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 ____________ _
_
10, 000 and o v e r ________________________

2, 667
183
976
635
382
242
203
22
24

52. 9
3. 6
19. 3
12. 6
7. 6
4. 8
4. 0
.4
.5

1 ,770.
2.
50.
98.
130.
168.
418.
146.
753.

During term of ag reem en t
(negotiation of new ag reem en t)________
6 and unde r 2 0 _________________________
20 and under 1 0 0 . _________________ —
100 and under 250______________________
250 and under 500______________________
500 and under 1 ,0 0 0 ____________________
1, 000 and under 5 ,0 0 0 __________________
5, 000 and under 1 0 ,0 0 0 ________________
10, 000 and o v e r ________________________

1,585
201
482
369
263
144
113
8
5

31 .4
4. 0
9. 6
7. 3
5. 2
2. 9
2. 2
.2
. 1

724.
2.
24.
57.
91.
97.
220.
49.
181.

No co n tract or other co n tract s t a t u s ---6 and under 2 0 _________________________
2 0 and under 100_______________________
100 and under 250______________________
250 and under 500______________________
500 and under 1, 000_________ ____ _
_
1, 000 and under 5, 000__________________
5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 ________________
10, 000 and o v e r ________________________

92
24
35
16
10
2
4
1

No inform ation on co n tract sta tu s______
6 and unde r 2 0 _________________________
20 and under 1 0 0 _______________________
100 and under 250 _____________________
250 and under 500______________________
500 and under 1, 000____________________
1,000 and under 5, 000__________________
5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0________________
10, 000 and o v e r ________________________

24
7
8
7
1
1

All sto p p a g e s_____________________

Number
(in
thous a n d s)

P ercen t

100. 0

49,018

100. 0

3
8
0
2
3
9
1
1

0. 3
3 .4
6. 7
9. 0
10. 6
25. 1
7. 4
37. 5

141. 0
1 ,6 2 2 .6
3, 061. 4
3, 675. 8
4, 949. 4
1 0 ,9 8 8 .6
4 ,0 6 5 .2
20, 513. 5

0. 3
3. 3
6. 2
7. 5
10. 1
22. 4
8. 3
41. 8

95. 7
2. 4
13. 8
17. 0
12. 7
13. 1
16. 7
20. 0

3. 6
. 1
.5
.6
.5
.5
.6
.8

1, 525. 0
69. 8
412. 4
434. 5
293. 8
215. 8
78. 7
20. 0

3. 1
.1
.8
.9
.6
.4
.2
n

1
3
9
3
9
6
9
3
9

66. 8
. i
1. 9
3. 7
4. 9
6. 4
15. 8
5. 5
28. 5

42, 151.4
49. 9
1, 045. 5
2 ,2 7 7 .4
2 ,9 4 1 . 1
4 ,3 2 6 .2
9, 879. 0
3 ,7 9 6 .2
1 7 ,8 3 6 .0

86. 0
.1
2. 1
4 .6
6. 0
8. 8
20. 2
7. 7
3 6.4

2
3
1
9
1
0
9
8
0

27. 3
. 1
.9
2. 2
3. 4
3. 7
8. 3
1. 9
6. 8

4, 875. 8
17. 9
154. 3
329. 2
413. 6
402. 3
972. 7
269. 0
2, 316.7

9. 9
(‘ )
.3
.7
.8
.8
2. 0
.5
4. 7

1. 8
.5
.7
.3
.2
( ')
. 1
(*)

43. 3
.3
1. 6
2. 5
3. 3
1. 6
8. 3
25. 7

1.6
(*)
. 1
.1
.1
. 1
.3
1. 0

442. 2
2. 2
8. 7
14. 1
26. 7
5. 1
58. 1
327. 3

.9
(*)
(‘ )
(*)
. 1
(*)
.1
.7

.5
. 1
.2
. 1
C)
(*)

15. 5
(2 )
.3
1. 3
.3
13. 5

.6
(M
t1)
.i

23. 2
1. 1
1. 8
6. 2
.5
13. 5

(M
(*)
(*)
(M
n

2, 649
7.
90.
177.
238.
280.
664.
196.
994.

1 L e s s than 0 .0 5 percent.
2 L e s s than 100 w o rk ers.
N O TE: B e ca u se of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal to tals.




M an-days idle during year
(all sto p p ages)

n
-

.5

_
(*)

21

Table 9. Work Stoppages Involving 10,000 Workers or More, Beginning in 1968
A pp rox­
im ate
Beginning
duration
date
(calen d ar
d ay s)1

E s t a b lis h m e n t s )
and location

Union(s)
involved 2

A p p rox­
im ate
num ber of
w ork ers
involved 2

M ajor te rm s of se ttle m e n t3

T ax icab ind u stry,
New York, N. Y.

New Y ork City
T ax i D riv e rs
Union.

10,000

3 -y ear co n tract providing: 2 p ercen t in c re a se in d r iv e r 's
sh are of fa re in y e a r, additional 1 percen t a fte r 18m onths;
50-cent-an-hou r in c r e a s e , to $ 2 , in breakdown pay; for
fu ll-tim e d riv e rs with 10 y e a r s ' se rv ic e and la s t 3 y e a rs
with one fleet— 3 w eek s' paid vacation; for a ll other fu ll­
tim e d r iv e r s with 3 y e a r s ' se rv ic e — 2 w eek s' paid vacation.

12

Bitum inous C oal
industry, in te rstate .

United Mine
W orkers (Ind. ).

59,000

5-State sto ppage, protestin g a r r e s t s of pick ets by State
police at newly ce rtifie d mine in P en n sylvan ia, settled
when union ag re ed to c e a se picketing in retu rn for with­
d raw al fro m the a r e a of a ll but a sm all police contingent.

F eb . 1

56

G la ss Container
M an u factu rers,
in te rstate .

The G la ss
Bottle B low ers
A sso ciatio n .

50,000

3 -y ear co n tract providing: 20-cen t-an -h ou r g en eral wage
in c r e a s e , additional 10 cents for sk ille d w o rk e rs, the
f ir s t y e ar, and 4 p ercen t each in M arch 1969 and 1970;
uniform industryw ide wage r a te s; new e sc a la to r c lau se ;
2-cen t-an -h ou r in c re a s e in sh ift d iffe re n tia ls; 2-cent-anhour in c re a se in em ployer contribution to health and w el­
fa re fund; higher pension ben efits; and low er r e t i r e ­
ment age.

F eb . 2

8

Departm ent of
Sanitation,
New York, N. Y.

Uniform ed
Sanitation
M en's
A s so c ia tion
(affiliated
with the
T e a m ste rs,
C h au ffeu rs,
Wareh ou sem en ,
and H e lp ers—
Ind. ).

10,000

A greem en t fo r binding a rb itratio n by the C hairm an of the
New Y ork State M ediation B oard . 4

Feb. 5

5

M isso u ri P a c ific ,
Seab o ard C oast
Line and T e x as and
P a c ific R a ilr o a d s,
in te rsta te .

Brotherhood of
R ailro ad
T rainm en .

39,000

Stoppage, afte r expiration of an arb itratio n aw ard that
reduced siz e of c re w s, se ttled by ag reem en t to in c re a se
siz e of one-half the r o a d 's crew s and siz e of the r e ­
m aining crew s to be determ ined by union-m anagem ent
ev alu atio n s.

F eb . 13

2

G en eral M otors C o rp .,
F lin t, Mich.

United Auto
Wo rker s.

11,000

Dispute reso lv e d by ag re em en t on job c la s sific a tio n and
other lo c a l is s u e s .

F eb . 15

7

C onstruction industry,
Se attle, Spokane,
and T acom a, W ash.

United
Brotherhood of
C arp e n ters
and Jo in e r s
of A m e rica.

14,000

40-m onth ag reem en t providing $1.42 in w ages and 10 cents
fo r health and w elfare .

F eb . 19

19

Public Sch ools,
State of F lo rid a .

N ational
Education
A sso ciatio n .

26,000

Stoppage ended by new tax law providing an av erag e
annual sa la r y in c re a se of $ 1,000 for each te ac h e r, new
textbooks, additional teaching a id s, and sm a lle r c l a s s ­
room s .
T e a c h e rs left c la s sr o o m s to d em on strate support of pend­
ing leg isla tio n to r a is e s a la r i e s and in c re a se State su b ­
sid ie s to lo c a l school b o ard s.

Ja n . 16

1

Ja n . 29

M ar. 4

1

Public Sch ools,
State of P en n sylvan ia.

N ational
Education
A sso ciatio n .

20,000

M ar. 6

1

Public Sch o o ls,
State of O klahom a.

N ational
Education
A sso ciatio n .

14,000

A "p ro fe s sio n a l holiday" w as called to allow te a c h e rs and
State o ffic ia ls in Oklahoma City to d isc u ss a proposed
sa la r y in c re a se .

M ar. 18

11

Stevedoring indu stry,
N orth A tlantic P o rts.

International
Long shore m en 1s A s so c iation.

19,000

The sto ppage, over plan s to h ire new men in the New
J e r s e y a r e a of the P o rt of New York, w as term inated
by a New Y ork State Suprem e C ourt re strain in g o rd er.

A pr. 1

14

C onstruction
industry,
Spokane, W ash.

L ab o rers'
International
Union.

12,000

39-month co n tract providing a package in c re a se of $ 1. 47
an hour.

A pr. 4

109

W ashington M etal
T r a d e s, I n c .,
Se attle— v e re tt, W ash.
E

M etal T r a d e s
Council and
the T e a m ste r s
(Ind. ).

10,000

3 -y ear co n tract providing: G en eral wage in c r e a s e s v aried
by occupation; new dental c a r e plan; in c re a se d shift p r e ­
m iu m s; and overtim e pay. 5

New Je r s e y B ell
Telephone Company,
New J e r s e y .

International
Brotherhood
of E le c tr ic a l
Wo r k e r s .

19,000

3-y ear co n tract providing: Weekly in c r e a s e s of $ 4 —
$ 1 2 .5 0 effective May 1968, $ 3 . 50— 6 .5 0 in 1969, and
$
$ 3. 50— 7 in 1970; su pplem en tary benefits sim ila r to
$
indu stry pattern .

A pr. 15

47

See footnotes at end of table.




22

Table 9. Work Stoppages Involving 10,000 Workers or More, Beginning in 1968----Continued
App r o x im ate
Beginning
duration
date
(calen d ar
d a y s)1

E sta b lish m e n t s)
and location

Union(s)
involved 2

A pr. 16

14

The Bendix C orp. ,
in te rsta te .

United Auto
Wo r k e r s.

A pr. 18

34

A m e rican Telephone
and T e leg rap h C o.,
in te rsta te .

C om m u nica­
tions W orkers
of A m e rica.

A pr. 19

26

B e ll Telephone Co. of
P en n sylvan ia,
statew id e.

A pr. 26

127

New England Telephone
and T e leg rap h C o .,
M a s s ., M aine, N. H. ,
R. I. , and Vt.
C onstruction in d u stry,
State of M ichigan.

A pp rox­
im ate
num ber of
w o rk ers
involved 2

M ajor te rm s of se ttle m e n t3

19,000

3-y ear co n tract providing: G en eral wage in c r e a s e s for
sk ille d w o rk e rs— 45 cents an hour, o th e rs— 15 cen ts,
additional 7— cen ts effective in 1969 and 1970; 12 paid
16
holidays (was 9); in c re a s e in m axim um vacation pay to
7 p ercen t of annual earn in g s; higher pension; im proved
life , sic k n e ss and accid en t, and h o sp ita l-m e d ic a l-su r g ic a l
plan; new p re sc rip tio n drug plan; SU B benefits equal to
75 percen t of stra ig h t-tim e earn in g s.

257,000

3-y ear co n tract providing; Weekly in c r e a s e s to c r a f t s ­
m en in top 2 le v e ls, $12 in f ir s t y e a r, $ 6 in M ay 1969
and 1970; cra ftsm e n in 3d le v e l, $ 8 in f ir s t y e a r, $6 in
second and third y e a r s ; plant c ra ftsm e n in p ro g r e ssio n ,
$4— 8 in f ir s t y e a r, $ 5 .5 0 in subsequent y e a rs ; o p e r a ­
$
to r s and c le r ic a l em p lo y ees, $4— 8 f i r s t y e a r, $ 3 .5 0
$
in subsequent y e a r s .
C on tract, in f ir s t y e a r, a lso in­
c r e a s e d holiday pay to dou ble-tim e and one-half and e m ­
p lo y ers sh are of h o sp ita l-m e d ic a l-su r g ic a l and life in ­
su ran ce. In second y ear in c re a se d night d ifferen tial
10 percen t, in third y ear changed overtim e to double
re g u la r rate for weekly hou rs over 49.

F ede ration
of Telephone
W orkers of
P enn s y1van ia
(Ind. ).
Inte rnational
Brotherhood
of E le c tr ic a l
W ork ers,
P enn s y1van ia
Telephone
Guild (in d .).

19,000

3-y ear co n tract providing: W eekly in c r e a s e s , over the
life of the co n tract, in m inim um s a la r i e s of $11—
$18,
in m axim um s a la r i e s of $16—
$26; su pplem en tary benefits
s im ila r to industry pattern.

International
B rotherhood of
T elephone
W orkers (Ind. ).

18,000

3 -y ear co n tract providing: Weekly in c r e a s e s , for plant
and engineering departm ent em p loy ees, of $ 7— 14 in
$
f ir s t y e a r, $ 3. 50— 6 in 1969, and $ 3 . 50—
$
$7 in 1970;
su pplem entary ben efits s im ila r to in d u stry pattern .

Building
T rad es
U n ions.

50,000

2-y ear co n tracts providing: C a rp e n te rs— $1. 90 in w ages
and ben efits; operating en g in e ers and b r ic k la y e r s— $1. 92
in w ag es and b e n efits.

M ay 1

73

M ay 8

138

Illin o is B e ll Telephone
Co. , Illin o is and
N orthern Indiana.

Inte rnational
Brotherhood of
E le c tr ic a l
Wo r k e r s.

25,000

3 -y ear co n tract providing: Weekly in c r e a s e s of $ 7—
$ 1 4 .5 0 in f ir s t y e a r, $ 6— 7 in 1969 and 1970; su p p le­
$
m entary ben efits s im ila r to indu stry pattern .

M ay 16

33

H eavy and Highway
C onstruction in d u stry,
M is so u ri.

International
Union of
O perating
E n g in eers.

10,000

3-y ear co n tract providing: Im m ediate in c re a se of 60
cents an hour; 25 cents in 1969; 75 cents in 1969; 85
cents in 1970; upgrading of sp e cifie d job c la s sific a tio n s.

June 1

107

Alum inum Co. of
A m e ric a , Reynolds
M etal C o., in te rsta te .

Aluminum
W orkers of
A m e rica;
International
A sso c ia tio n of
M a c h in ists;
O ffice and
P ro fe ss io n a l
E m p lo y e es;
International
Brotherhood of
F ire m e n and
O ile rs; and
Building
T ra d e s
C oun cils.

17,000

3-y ear ag reem en t providing: G en eral wage in c r e a s e s of
22 cents an hour the f i r s t y e a r, 8 cents the second, and
10 cen ts in the third y ear; higher in crem en ts between
jo b c l a s s e s ; higher pension b en efits; lib e ra liz e d holiday
pay, m ed ical in su ran ce , and SU B benefit p ro v isio n s. ”

Ju ly 19

50

C onstruction in d u stry,
M ilw aukee, W is.

L ab o rers'
In ternational
Union.

15,000

2 -y ear co n tract providing: Im m ediate in c re a se of 25
cents an hour; 20 cents in 1968, and 25 cents June and
D ecem b er of 1969; in c re a s e in em ployer paym ents to
pen sion, health and w e lfa re , and vacation funds.

Ju ly 31

61

7 sm a lle r b a sic ste e l
co m pan ies.

United S t e e l­
w o rk e rs.

14,000

M ajo r new co n tract fe a tu re s w ere g en erally sim ila r to
those of Ju ly co n tract between United Steel W orkers and
11 m ajo r ste e l p ro d u c e rs. 6 New co n tracts a ls o in c o r ­
porated ag re em en ts on lo c a l i s s u e s .

See footnotes at end of tab le.




23
Table 9. Work Stoppages Involving 10,000 Workers or More, Beginning in 1968— Continued
A pp rox­
im ate
Beginning
duration
date
(calen d ar
d ay s)1
Sept. 9

7 55

Oct. 1

E s t a b lis h m e n t s )
and location

Union(s)
involved 2

A p p rox­
im ate
num ber of
w o rk ers
involved 2

M ajor te rm s of se ttle m e n t5

P ublic Sch ools,
New Y ork, N. Y.

A m e rican
F ede ration
of T e a c h e r s.

47, 000

A greem en t between the city and union provided for re in ­
statem en t of A F T m em b ers d ism isse d fro m their p o sts
in the Ocean H ill-B ro w n sv ille d ecen tralizatio n d istr ic t
and estab lish m e n t of a c o m m issio n to a r b itr a te te a c h e r s'
com plain ts in sch ools throughout the city. A greem en t
a ls o e stab lish e d a State tru ste e sh ip to o v e r se e operation s
of the O cean H ill-B ro w n sv ille d istr ic t.

31

Bitum inous Coal
in d u stry, in te rsta te .

United Mine
W orkers (Ind. ).

66, 000

3 -y ear co n tract providing: G en eral w age in c r e a s e s of
$ 3 a day re tro activ e to O ctober 1, $ 2 in 1969 and 1970;
elim ination of A lab am a and w estern Kentucky w age d if­
fe re n tia ls; additional day paid vacation for each y e a r 's
se rv ic e fro m 10 to 19, $120 C h ristm as bonus, with p r o ­
v isio n for reductions if w ildcat s tr ik e s occu r.

Oct. 1

8 116

Stevedoring indu stry
on the A tlantic and
G ulf C o a sts.

International
L o n g sh o re ­
m en 's
A sso ciatio n .

4 6 ,000

3-y ear co n tracts providing: G en eral w age in c r e a s e s of
38 cen ts an hour the f ir s t y e a r, 25 cen ts in 1969 and
35 cen ts in 1970; higher em ployer contributions to pen­
sion and w elfare funds; im proved vacation and holiday
b e n efits; new o r im proved gu aran teed annual incom e
p lan s; and lim ited u se of co n tain ers. 9

Oct. 7

20

Olin - Mathie s on
C hem ical C o.,
L o u isv ille , Ky. , and
C harlestow n, Ind.

In ternational
C hem ical
W orkers.

14,000

2 -y ear co n tract providing: G en eral w age in c re a se of
20 cents an hou r, 15 cen ts the second y ear; $ 35 a month
in c re a s e to sa la r ie d em p loy ees; higher shift d ifferen tia ls
and se v eran ce pay; 10th paid holiday; and im proved pen­
sion ben efits and in su ran ce co v erag e.

Oct. 16

13

G en eral M otors C orp.,
F lin t, Mich.

United Auto
W orker s (Ind.).

18,000

Stoppage w as term in ated a fte r adju stm en t of d isp u tes
over production stan d ard s.

Nov. 6

2

L o u isv ille and
N ash ville R ailro ad ,
system w ide.

Brotherhood
of R ailro ad
T rainm en .

14,000

Stoppage, afte r expiration of an a rb itratio n aw ard that
reduced siz e of c re w s, h alted a fte r 1 day by P re sid e n tia l
appointm ent of em ergen cy b o ard under the Railw ay L ab or
A ct.
F e b ru a ry 1969 settlem en t, reach ed after a 1-day
str ik e in Ja n u a ry , in c re a se d siz e of on e-h alf of ro a d 's
crew and siz e of the rem aining crew s to be determ ined
by union-m anagem ent evalu ation s.

Nov. 18

30

N ational C ash
R e g iste r C o.,
Dayton, Ohio.

N ational C ash
R e g iste r
E m ployees
Union (ind. ).

15, 000

New co n tract providing:
frin ge ben efits.

D ec. 1

13

C onsolidated
E d ison C o.,
New Y ork, N. Y.

U tility
W orkers
Union of
A m e rica.

20,000

27-month co n tract providing: G en eral wage in c re a se of
9 p ercen t im m ed iately , 6 percen t in 1970; im proved job
p r o g r e s sio n pay s c a le s ; lib e ra liz e d pay p erio d s on Sunday
and h olid ays, m e al allow an ce, and health and w elfare
b e n e fits.

Wage in c r e a s e s and im proved

1 In cludes nonw orkdays, such a s S atu rd ay s, Sundays, and e stab lish e d h olid ays.
2 The unions liste d a r e those d ire ctly involved in the dispu te, but the num ber of w o rk ers involved m ay include m e m ­
b e r s of other unions or nonunion w o rk e rs id led by d isp u tes in the sam e e stab lish m e n ts.
The unions a r e a ffiliate d with the
A F L -C IO , except w here they a re noted a s independent (Ind. ).
N um ber of w ork ers involved i s the m axim um num ber m ade idle for 1 shift or lon ger in e stab lish m e n ts d ire ctly involved
in
a sto ppage.
This figu re does not m e a su re the in d irect or secon d ary e ffe cts on other e stab lish m e n ts or in d u strie s whose
em ployees a r e m ade idle a s a r e su lt of m a te r ia l or se rv ic e sh o rta g e s.
2 Adapted la r g e ly from C urren t Wage D evelopm en ts, published monthly by the B u reau of L ab o r S t a tis tic s .
4 F o r te rm s of the aw ard, se e C urrent Wage D evelopm en ts, No. 243, M ar. 1, 1968.
5 Ibid, No. 246, June 4, 1968.
6 Ibid.
7 In struction w as resu m ed Sept. 11, 12, and from Sept. 30 through Oct. 13.
8 2-day stoppage beginning Oct. 1 was term in ated by a 10-day F e d e r a l Court restrain in g o rd e r. The stoppage w as r e ­
sum ed Dec. 20 following the expiration of the 80-day injunction.
F o r additional d e ta ils, see N ational E m ergen cy D ispu tes
Under the L ab o r M anagem ent R elation s A c t, 1947—
68, Bulletin 1633.
9 Op. cit. , No. 255, M ar. 1, 1969.




24

Table 10. Work Stoppages by Industry Group, 1968
M an-days
idle during y ear

Stoppages beginning in y ear
Industry group
Number

A verage
duration 1

W orkers
P ercen t of
Number
involved
(in thousands) estim ated total
(in thousands)
working tim e

A ll in d u strie s __________________ _______________

2 5,045

30. 0

2, 649

49,018

0. 28

M anufacturing _____________________________________

z 2 , 664

30. 9

1, 178

23,978

0. 47

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s
Food and kindred products
T o bacco m an u factu re s
T e x tile m ill products
A p p arel and other fin ish ed products m ade from
fa b r ic s and sim ila r m a te r ia ls
L u m ber and wood p rod u cts, except
f u r n itu r e ____________________________________________
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ________________________________
P a p er and a llie d products ____________________________
P rin tin g, publishing, and allied
in d u strie s
C h e m icals and a llie d products
P etroleu m refining and related
in d u strie s ___________________ _______________________
Rubber and m isc e lla n e o u s p la stic s
prod ucts _
_ _ _______ ___________________________
_
L e ath er and leath er products _ _______ ______________
_
Stone, cla y , and g la s s products ___ __________________
P rim a r y m eta l in d u strie s ____________ _______________
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u cts, except
ordnance, m ach in ery , and
tra n sp o rta tio n equipm ent ___________________________
M ach inery, except e l e c t r i c a l _________________________
E le c t r ic a l m ach in ery , equipm ent, and
su p p lies ____________________________________________
T ra n sp o rta tio n equipm ent ____________________________
P ro fe ss io n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
good s; w atches and clo ck s ___________________________
M iscella n eo u s m anufacturing in d u stries ______________

20
209
3
48

14. 9
26. 6
26. 2
4 1 .9

31. 3
68. 1
9. 1
14. 4

333. 7
1 ,1 7 1 .4
170. 4
403. 6

0. 38
. 26
. 77
. 16

82

23. 5

13. 1

204. 7

. 06

61
77
95

36. 1
36. 6
28. 7

10. 2
18. 0
24. 2

217. 7
393. 0
456. 0

. 14
. 32
. 26

56
134

87. 0
33. 5

20. 0
32.4

1 ,2 6 6 .8
904. 3

. 47
. 34

19

48. 6

1.9

61. 6

. 13

87
20
133
282

23. 5
21.9
47. 0
5 2.4

24.
5.
72.
137.

5
1
0
2

392. 6
73. 9
2 ,1 2 0 .4
4 ,7 9 3 .0

. 27
. 08
1. 30
1. 44

349
414

37. 2
32. 1

78. 4
179. 7

2, 035. 9
3, 936. 4

. 57
. 79

234
241

19. 0
17. 2

159. 6
255. 2

1 ,7 5 6 .4
2 ,9 8 5 . 1

. 35
. 58

37
63

8. 6
39. 1

13. 2
10. 5

84. 4
216. 4

. 07
. 19

N onm anufacturing _____ ___________________________

2 2, 396

29. 4

1,471

2 5 ,040

0. 20

A g ricu ltu re , f o r e s tr y , and fis h e r ie s ______________ _
M in in g _________________________________ : ______________
C ontract construction ______ _____ _____ ______________
T ra n sp o rta tio n , com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and sa n ita ry s e r v ic e s _________ __________ ____
W holesale and r e ta il trad e ____________________________
F in an c e, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e state __________________
S e r v ic e s
____ ______________________________________
G overn m en t3
.......... .
. ...... ..
State ___________ __________________________________
L o c a l _____________________________________________

17
301
912

30. 4
17. 1
35. 9

6. 7
212. 9
364. 2

147. 0
2, 551. 7
8 ,7 2 2 .9

0. 04
1. 60
1. 05

303
417
17
175
254
16
235

34. 4
23. 6
66. 3
2 1.5
19. 2
-

570.
75.
8.
31.
201.
9.
190.

9 ,3 0 9 .4
971. 7
360. 3
431. 6
2 ,5 4 5 .2
42. 8
2 ,4 9 2 . 8

. 84
. 03
. 04
. 02
. 08
-

8
1
0
2
8
3
9

1 Stoppages extending into 2 or m ore d iv isio n s have been counted-in each m ajo r industry group affected ; the d ivision to tals
have been ad ju sted to elim inate duplication. W orkers involved and m an -d ay s idle w ere allo c ated to the re sp e c tiv e g rou p s.
2 Weighted by m ultiplying the duration of each stoppage by the w o rk ers involved.
T h is m e a su r e r e fe r s to sto p p ages ending
during the y e a r.
3 Includes 3 sto p p ages by F e d e r a l em p lo y ees, affecting 1,680 w o rk e rs, resu ltin g in 9,6 0 0 m an -d ay s of id le n e ss.
N OTE: B e c a u se of rounding, su m s of individual item s




m ay not equal to ta ls.

25
Table 11. Work Stoppages by Region,1 1967—68
Region

Stoppages
beginning in—

W orkers
(in thousands)
involved in sto ppages
beginning in—

1968

United S t a t e s ------------------New E n g la n d _____________________
Middle A tla n tic_
_ _______ _____
E a s t North C e n tr a l_____ ________
W est North C e n t r a l______________
South A tla n tic____________________
E a s t South C en tral_____________ W est South C e n tr a l_______________
M ou n tain --------------------------------P a c i f i c _________ _
_ _________

1967

1968

2 5, 045

2 4 ,5 9 5

32,649

346
1, 177
1, 603
372
601
343
280
154
506

332
1, 178
1, 383
369
577
304
279
147
474

134. 1
625. 6
876. 0
152. 4
320. 8
160. 5
123. 3
36. 4
217. 5

M an -days idle,
all sto ppages
(in thousands)
1968

1967
4 2, 875
136.
603.
1, 062.
243.
252.
152.
133.
87.
198.

2
2
6
9
8
2
5
7
5

1967

P ercen t of
estim ate d total
w orking tim e
1968

1967

349, 018

4 42, 123

0. 32

0. 30

3, 510. 1
9 ,6 2 7 .3
19,427. 3
2 ,2 7 6 .7
3, 420. 5
2, 387. 7
1, 896.2
2, 155. 9
4, 26 2 .4

2, 318. 8
7, 321.5
1 7 ,2 1 6 .9
2 ,7 4 3 .8
2, 052. 7
2, 199. 1
2, 141.4
3, 476. 6
2 ,6 4 6 .4

0. 36
. 26
. 62
.21
. 15
. 30
. 16
.46
. 23

0 .2 4
. 22
. 56
. 26
. 10
. 30
. 19
. 79
. 15

1 The regio n s are defined as follow s: New E ngland— Connecticut, M aine, M a s sa c h u se tts, New H am psh ire, Rhode Islan d ,
and V erm ont; Middle Atlantic— New J e r s e y , New Y ork, and P en n sylvan ia; E a s t North C en tral— Illin o is, Indiana, M ichigan,
Ohio, and W isconsin; West North C en tral— Iowa, K a n sa s, M innesota, M isso u ri, N eb rask a, North D akota, and South Dakota;
South A tlantic— D elaw are, D istric t of C olum bia, F lo rid a , G eo rg ia, M aryland, North C aro lin a, South C aro lin a, V irg in ia, and
W est V irg in ia; E a s t South C en tral— A lab am a, Kentucky, M is s is s ip p i, and T e n n e sse e ; W est South C e n tral— A rk a n sa s, L o u isian a,
O klahom a, and T e x a s; Mountain— A rizon a, C olorad o, Idaho, Montana, N evada, New M exico, Utah, and Wyoming; and P a c ific —
A la sk a , C alifo rn ia, H aw aii, O regon, and W ashington.
2 Stoppages extending a c r o s s State lin es have been counted in each State affected ; w o rk ers involved and m an -d ay s idle
w ere allo c a ted among the S ta te s.
3 It w as not p o ssib le to se cu re the inform ation n e c e ss a r y to allo cate w ork ers and id le n e ss am ong region s in a stoppage
involving T e a m ste r s and a m otor freig h t company in s e v e r a l S tate s.
4 It w as not p o ssib le to se cu re the inform ation n e c e ss a r y to allo cate w ork ers and id le n e ss among regio n s in 2 sto p p ages,
1 involving the garm en t w o rk ers and ap p arel m an u fac tu re rs.
NOTE: B e cau se of rounding, su m s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.




26

Table 12. Work Stoppages by State, 19681
Stoppage s beginning in y ear
State

Num ber

A verage
duration 2

United S t a t e s ------------

5,045

A la b a m a -------------------------A la s k a ----------------------------A r iz o n a --------------------------A r k a n s a s ------------------------C a lifo r n ia ------------------------

75
13
21
34
354

38.
12.
197.
14.
33.

C o lo rad o -------------------------C o n n ecticu t---------------------D elaw are -----------------------D is tr ic t of C o lu m b ia ---------F lo r id a ----------------------------

45
100
22
20
93

G e o rg ia --------------------------H aw aii ---------------------------Idaho------------------------------I l l in o i s ---------------------------Indiana ---------------------------Iowa -------------------------------

M an-days idle during y ear

involved (in
thousands)

30. 0

(in
thousands)

P erc en t of
estim ated total
working tim e,
p riv ate nonfarm

2 ,6 4 9

4 9 ,0 1 8

0. 32

5
1
3
6
9

32. 1
2. 1
4. 4
11.0
134. 8

646. 2
25. 8
707. 1
133. 5
2 ,4 0 3 .8

0. 32
. 21
. 77
. 12
. 17

31.
38.
19.
9.
20.

5
6
4
2
0

9.
49.
9.
19.
55.

3
0
6
2
6

153. 6
1 ,2 8 0 .5
104. 2
89. 6
672. 2

. 12
. 48
. 23
. 10
. 08

73
14
7
317
236

19.
43.
49.
43.
27.

2
0
3
6
0

36.
8.
3.
186.
114.

9
2
5
0
6

477. 8
251. 6
87. 8
4 ,0 0 1 .9
1 ,7 2 5 .8

. 16
. 32
. 23
. 42
. 44

Kentucky ------------------------L o u isia n a -----------------------M ain e------------------------------

88
36
148
62
15

27. 2
19.9
18. 0
15.9
76. 3

29.
6.
76.
31.
2.

9
1
7
3
4

4 5 1 .2
78. 6
649. 7
293. 7
107. 3

. 25
. 06
. 37
. 14
. 16

M aryland -----------------------M a s s a c h u s e t t s -----------------M ichigan -----------------------M in n e so ta -----------------------M i s s i s s i p p i ----------------------

64
169
354
61
28

32.
42.
46.
27.
24.

4
2
2
6
3

33.
69.
261.
18.
8.

3
3
1
3
1

530. 3
1,7 0 3 . 7
7 ,7 5 2 .7
297. 7
115. 0

. 20
. 35
1 .22
. 11
. 11

M isso u ri -----------------------M ontana -------------------------N e b ra sk a -----------------------N e v a d a ---------------------------New H a m p sh ire -----------------

147
26
20
22
17

22.
167.
26.
97.
46.

3
6
0
1
9

76. 6
4. 7
15.9
2. 8
4. 6

1, 186.
487.
194.
115.
133.

7
9
1
0
5

.
1.
.
.
.

New J e r s e y ---------------------New M e x ico ---------------------New Y ork -----------------------N orth C aro lin a ----------------North D a k o ta --------------------

217
18
488
44
10

36.
64.
26.
19.
34.

2
8
8
8
2

97. 3
5. 3
329.9
15. 1
2. 5

2 ,0 0 3 .
124.
4 ,9 5 3 .
168.
33.

1
7
5
7
2

. 36
. 22
. 21
. 05
. 12

Ohio ------------------------------O klahom a -----------------------O re g o n ---------------------------P e n n sy lv a n ia -------------------Rhode Island --------------------

573
35
51
472
34

29.
13.
27.
23.
58.

6
0
1
1
6

253.
20.
15.
198.
6.

2
7
2
5
4

4, 593. 2
179.9
242. 8
2 ,6 7 0 .7
214. 6

. 55
. 12
. 18
. 28
. 28

South C a r o lin a -----------------South D akota -------------------T e n n essee ----------------------T e x a s ----------------------------Utah -------------------------------

23
10
92
149
9

34.
27.
29.
34.
170.

2
2
6
5
4

8.
3.
43.
60.
4.

7
1
6
4
5

186. 5
35. 2
976. 9
1 ,2 8 9 .1
467. 3

. 11
. 10
. 33
. 18
. 77

V e rm o n t-------------------------V irg in ia -------------------------W ashington----------------------W est V ir g in ia ------------------W isc o n sin -----------------------Wyoming ------------------------

11
92
74
170
123
6

46.
16.
39.
18.
36.
13.

7
1
6
1
2
6

2. 4
46. 7
57. 2
95. 7
6 1 .2
2. 0

70. 6
329. 1
1 ,3 3 8 .5
862. 2
1 ,353. 6
12. 6

. 24
. 12
. 60
. 81
. 43
.0 7

34
35
21
32
24

1 Stoppages extending a c r o s s State lin es have been counted se p a ra te ly in each State affected ; w ork ers involved and m and ays id le w ere allo cated among the S ta te s.
It w as not p o ss ib le to se c u re the inform ation n e c e ss a r y to m ake such allo catio n s in a stoppage involving T e a m ste r s and
a m otor freig h t com pany in se v e r a l S ta te s.
2 Weighted by m ultiplying the duration of each stoppage by the w ork ers involved.
N OTE: B e c a u se of rounding, su m s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.




27
Table 13. Work Stoppages by Metropolitan Area, 19681
M etropolitan a r e a s

Akron, O hio------------------------Albany- Schenectady— roy,
T
N. Y ....................................................
A lbuquerque, N. M e x -----------Allentown- Bethlehem - E asto n ,
P a . — J ---------- ----------------N.
Anaheim —
Santa Ana- G arden
G rove, C a l i f ---------------------A n derson, Ind ---------------------Ann A rb o r, M ic h -----------------A tlanta, G a -------------------------A tlantic C ity, N. J ----------------A u gu sta, G a .- S. C ----------------A ustin, T e x -------------------------

Stoppages
beginning in y ear
W orkers
involved
Num­
b er
(in
th ou san d s)
26

0

73. 3

48
7

16. 5
4. 2

7 1.6
28. 9

47
5

9.
.

149. 3
18. 1

12

9
14
27
7
10
6

13
41
10

Beaum ont- P o rt A rthur, T e x --B illin g s, M ont---------------------B irm in gh am , A la ------------------

16
26
5
26
6

B oston , M a s s ----------------------B rid g e p o rt, Conn-----------------B rockton, M a s s -------------------R uffalo N Y
Canton, O hio-----------------------C ed ar R ap id s, Iow a--------------Cham paign- U rbana, 111---------C h arlesto n , S. C ------------------C hattanooga, T enn.- G a ---------C hicago, 111.-N orthwestern
In d ----------------------------------Cincinnati, Ohio- K y .— n d ------I
C olorado S p rin g s, C olo ---------C olum bia, S. C --------------------C olum bus, Ohio ------------------C orpus C h risti, T e x -------------D a lla s, T e x ------------------------DavenporlMRock Island- M oline,
Iowa- 111-----------------------------

63
15
6

63
26
10

7
10

13
n
16
117
158
63
75
6

5
28
8

26

8
9

2. 6
2. 0
4. 7
16. 4
1. 0
2. 3
1. 4
1. 6
20. 5
2. 8
4. 4
5. 2
1. 3
5. 0
2. 4
32. 7
3. 2
1. 6
16. 9
15. 5
1. 9
1. 6
1.9
5. 0
2. 3
10. 0
9 1 .3

106. 8
24. 8
31 .4
1. 0
.7
10. 9
2 .9
10. 2

30. 6
6 1 .4
229. 8
303. 7
28. 4
22. 7
16. 6
32. 6
335. 9
18. 8
98. 5
34. 3
6. 2
105. 6
39. 2
823. 3
4 9 .9
40. 4
285. 0
439. 7
47. 4
36. 6
10. 0
238. 6
19. 2
345. 7
2 , 181.4
2,

269. 1
486. 6
563. 9
12. 6
,2 1 . 0
211.0

138. 2
249. 3

12

D es M oin es, Io w a ----------------D etro it, M ich ----------------------Duluth- S u p e rio r, M inn.Wis - - Durham , N. C -----------------------E lm ir a , N. Y
E ugen e, O re g -----------------------F a ll R iv e r, M a s s .- R. I ---------F a r g o - M oorhead, N. D ak .M inn---------------------------------Fitch b u rg- L e o m in ste r, M a ss —

24
54

6

.

M an-days
idle during
y e a r (in
thousands)

10. 1
3Q. 8
3. 3

27
148

10. 4
106. 4

105. 8
3, 638. 5

13

2. 1
2. 0

21.8

8
11
19
7
17

10

5

8

24

F o r t L au d erd ale- Hollywood,
F la
F o r t Wayne, In d -------------------

9

8

30. 2
7 3 .0
98. 9
11 . 0

101.0
28.

2

.4
33. 9
339. 0

1 .4
.7

13. 3
7. 3
70. 5
131.4
28. 4
4. 0

41
30

15. 5
15. 5

G reat F a lls , M ont---------------G reen B ay , W is------------------G reen sb oro- High P o in ts
W inston-Salem , N. C ---------H am ilton—
Middletown, O h io --H a rr isb u r g , P a ------------------Honolulu, H a w a ii----------------Houston, Tex ---------------------Huntington- Ashland, W. V a .—
K y .—
Ohio -----------------------H un tsville, A la -------------------In dian apolis, In d-----------------Ja c k so n , M ich --------------------Ja c k so n , M i s s ---------------------

L a C r o s s e , W is-------------------L afay e tte- W est L afay e tte,
In d ----------------------------------L a n c a ste r, P a --------------------L an sin g , M ich --------------------L a s V e g as, N e v ------------------Law rence- H averh ill, M a s s .N H -__

8

L im a, O hio------------------------L orain - E ly r ia , O hio------------L o s A n geles- Long B each ,
T alif
L o u isv ille , K y .— d-------------In
Low ell, M a s s ---------------------M acon, G a -------------------------M adison, W is---------------------M an ch ester, N. H ----------------M an sfield , Ohio -----------------M em phis, T enn.- A r k -----------

M inneapolis- St. P au l, M inn--M obile, A l a -----------------------M ontgom ery, A la ----------------M uskegon- M uskegon H eights,
N ashua, N .H __
N ash v ille, Tenn-------------------

122. 2
22.8

6
22

1. 1
4. 4
2. 2
9. 0
4. 0
8 .8

20.
64.
44.
153.
138.
133.

9
29
6

39

Y ork, N Y SMSA 3
New York City 4 -------------------

O rlando, F l a -----------------------P ate r s on- C lif ton- P a s s a i c ,
N T 3

0
5
1

34
5

137. 8
12. 1
196. 5
115.4
30. 8
77. 9
140. 8
80. 8
124. 5
75. 2

16
18
n

2 .9
4. 9
1. 5

127. 4
75. 2
32. 9

6

3. 2

101. 9
18. 1
35. 8
304. 0
23. 1

8
6

16
32

7
8

14
11

9

1.8

2 .9
.5
1. 4

8

7. 6
.8

112. 0

1. 1

1. 5
.2

24. 9
28. 2
34. 5

27
5
33

4 1 .4
52. 6
1.4
2. 2
2. 8
1.4
3. 4
9. 8
.4
13. 7

836. 3
513. 1
28. 1
2 1.5
121. 9
19. 0
39. 2
152. 8
4. 2
177. 1

33
14
5
13

12.
7.
1.
7.

5
4
3
1

172. 1
50. 1
22. 6
4 1 .4

18
5
19
7
18

7. 6
.7
8. 5
23. 2
1. 4
6. 8

207. 5
22. 2
196. 2
489. 6
27. 6
68. 0

16
27

17. 2
15. 7

395. 0
136. 9

456
296
191
14
7
9
17
n

284. 0
236. 8
204. 4
5. 1
1 .4
2. 6
10. 4
2. 1

4 ,6 9 8 .8
3 ' 763. 6
3, 269. 9
45. 7
28. 3
56. 8
128. 4
32. 0

41

8. 1

193.4

9
7
12

116
61
8

9
8

7
8

New York- N orth eastern
N pw

7
3
8

5. 0
1. 8
15. 5
2. 9
2. 7
7. 6
7. 2
2. 7
18. 5
.3

13
5
34

66

New B edford , M a s s -------------New H aven, Conn----------------New London- Groton- N orwich,
Conn---------------------------------

21.2

87. 8
464. 2

1. 0
2. 2

6

L ittle Rock-N orth L ittle

M an-days
idle during
y e a r (in
thousands)

7
9

12

K enosha, W is---------------------King s ton- N ewbur gh—
P ough keepsie, N .Y ------------

868

.3
3. 1
38. 3

10

See footnotes a t end of tab le.




1.2

4. 9
5. 5
1 .4
.6
3. 3

21
12
11
6

G ary- Hammond- E a s t C hicago,
Ind 2 ---------------------------------

4. 5
6. 3
.6
9. 9

205. 5
.4
65. 4

M etropolitan a r e a s

Stoppages
beginning in y e a r
W orkers
Num­
involved
b er
(in
thousands)

2

4. 5

28
Table 13. Work Stoppages by Metropolitan Area, 19681----Continued
M etropolitan a r e a s

P e n sa c o la , F l a --------------------P e o r ia , 111 -------------------------P erth Amboy, N. J 3 ------------P hilad elph ia, P a . — J ----------N.

Stoppages
Man- days
beginning in y ear
idle during
W orkers
involved
y e a r (in
Num­
th ou san d s)
ber
(in
th o u san d s)
7
30
21

127
8

P ittsb u rg h , P a ---------------------P ittsfie ld , M a ss ------------------P ortlan d , M a in e ------------------P ortlan d , O r e g .— ash----------W
P rovid en ce—
PawtucketrW arwick, R. I . — a s s ----------M
R acin e, W is------------------------Reading, P a -------------------------Reno, N e v ---------------------------Richm ond, V a ---------------------R o c h e ste r, N . Y -----------------------------R ockford, 111------------------------S acram e n to , C a lif ----------------Saginaw , M ich ---------------------St. Jo se p h , M o----------------------

121

13
6

32

2. 8

9

5. 5

21
11

7. 2
3. 3

54. 5
52. 0

152
35

47. 8
7. 7
.4
3. 2
3. 0
23. 8
2. 2

916. 3
122. 4
7. 7

13
14
19
17
5

8
6

Scran ton , P a ------------------------Se a ttle- E v e re tt, W a sh ----------S h rev ep o rt, L a ----------------------

5. 4
2. 8
1. 7
.8
4. 7
2. 0
5. 4
7. 6
10. 8
1. 9
58. 7

6

8
11

9
9

San F r a n c isc o —
Oakland,
C a lif — .................................... — —
San J o s e , C a lif ---------------------

58. 4
.7
35. 7
2. 1
1. 1
12. 0

28. 6
90. 8
111.4
775. 8
9. 5
765. 4
8. 7
45. 6
200. 6
163. 1
34. 3
26. 1
14.4
63. 9
37. 0
169. 4
134. 0
223. 9
36. 2
1,006. 3
13.8
3. 3
74. 9
72. 1

29
9
13

112

S a lt Lake City, U tah -------------San Antonio, T e x -----------------San B ern ard in o- R iv e rsid e —
O ntario, C a l i f ---------------------

2. 3
6. 7
8. 8

27
33
9

6

.5

M entropolitan a r e a s

South Bend, In d ------ -----------Spokane, Wash -----------------Sp rin gfield , 111-------------------Sprin gfield — hicopee—
C
Sp rin gfield , M o ------------------Sp rin gfield , O h io -------- -----Stam ford , C on n ------------------Steubenville— eirton,
W
Ohio—
W. V a ---------------------Stockton, C a l i f -------------------S y ra c u se , N. Y -------------------T acom a, W a sh -------------------Tam pa—
St. P e te r sb u r g , F l a --T e rr e H aute, In d ----------------Toledo, Ohio— ich --------------M
Trenton, N . J ---------------------Tucson, A r i z ---------------------T u lsa , O k la -----------------------U tica- Rom e, N. Y-----------------

W aterbury, C on n ----------------W aterloo, Iow a-------------------West P alm B each , F l a ---------Wheeling, W. V a .— h io ------O
W ilkes - B a r re- H azelton,
P a -----------------------------------W ilmington, D e l.— d .—
M
N J -

21.8

42. 6
846. 9
19. 1

Y ork, P a ..........................................
Youngstown— arren,
W
O h io ---------------------------------

Stoppages
beginning in y ear
W orkers
Num­
involved
b er
(in
th o u san d s)

Man- days
idle during
y e a r (in
thousands)

16

10. 7

11
8

11. 0
6.4

67. 8
105. 6
76. 7

23

7. 2
.6
4. 6
2. 2

224. 0
12. 1
163. 6
33. 6

3. 1

82. 4
30. 1
65. 5
106. 8
131.9
22. 2
934. 8
82. 7
7. 6
5 1.8
13. 9
12.7
87 8
174. 8
127.4 '
23. 3
3 1.0
63. 6
10. 3

6

14
10

15
16
33
9
22

13
46
18
7
10

9
5
9
30
9
8
11

15
5

1.8

25. 4
7 .4
9. 8
2. 8
27. 5
4. 6
.5
2. 5
1. 7
2. 0
1. 7
28. 8
3. 5
1. 1
3. 1
2. 5
.5

27

4. 3

58. 4

23
12
10

10. 7
2. 6
2. 7

146 6
8 1.5
43. 6

59

29. 4

286. 3

1 Includes data fo r each m etropolitan a r e a in which 5 sto p p ages or m ore began in 1968.
Som e m etropolitan a r e a s include counties in m ore than 1 State, and hence, an a r e a total m ay equal or exceed the total
for the State in which the m a jo r city is located . Stoppages in the mining and logging in d u stries a r e excluded.
In term etropolitan
a r e a sto ppages a r e counted se p a ra te ly in each a r e a affec ted ; the w ork ers involved and m an -d ay s idle w ere allo c ated to the
re sp e c tiv e a r e a s .
2 Included in the C hicago, 111. — orthw estern Indiana Standard C onsolidated A rea.
N
3 Included in the New York— o rth eastern New J e r s e y Standard C onsolidated A rea.
N
4 Included in the New York SMS A.




29
Table 14. Work Stoppages by Number of Establishments Involved, 1968
M an -days idle
during y ear
(all sto ppages)

Stoppages beginning in y ear
Num ber of estab lish m e n ts in v o lv e d 1

T o t a l ------------------------------------1 e sta b lish m e n t— --------------------------2 to 5 e s ta b lish m e n ts_________________
6 to 1 0 e sta b lish m e n ts______ __ - ___
1 1 estab lish m e n ts or m o re _____________
11 to 49 e s ta b lish m e n ts_____________
50 to 99 e sta b lish m e n ts_____________
1 0 0 estab lish m e n ts or m o r e _________
E x a c t num ber not known 2____________
Not rep o rted __ ______
____________

W orkers involved
Number

P ercen t

5, 045

100. 0

3, 850
586
175
348
188
19
34
107

76. 3
11. 6
3. 5
6. 9
3. 7
.4
.7
2. 1
1. 7

86

Number
(in
th ou san d s)
2

, 649

1, 0 2 0 . 0

256.
82.
1,049.
233.
28.
703.
84.
240.

9
1

2
4
2

5
2
6

P ercen t

Number
(in
th ou san d s)
49,018

100. 0

15, 403. 9
5 ,0 2 5 .9
1,479. 0
20, 010. 5
3, 226. 0
2 ,8 1 6 .5
11, 9 6 6 . 9
2, 001. 1
7 ,0 9 8 .3

3 1 .4
10. 3
3. 0
40. 8

100. 0

38. 5
9. 7
3. 1
39. 6
8. 8
1. 1
2 6.6
3. 2
9. 1

P ercen t

6.6

5.
24.
4.
14.

7
4
1
5

1 An estab lish m en t is defined a s a sin gle p h y sical location where b u sin e ss is conducted, or where s e r v ic e s or in d u strial
operation s a re p erfo rm ed ; for exam p le, a facto ry , m ill, sto re , m ine, or fa rm .
A stoppage m ay involve 1 or 2 e s ta b lish ­
m ents o r m ore of a single em p loy er, or it m ay involve d ifferen t em p lo y ers.
2 Inform ation availab le in d icates that m ore than 11 estab lish m e n ts w ere involved in each of these sto p p age s.

N O TE: B e ca u se of rounding, su m s of individual item s m ay not equal to tals.

Table 15. Work Stoppages by Affiliation of Unions Involved, 1968
Stoppages beginning in y ear
A ffiliation

T o t a l ______

_________ _________

A F L -C IO _______________________________
U naffiliated unions______________________
Single firm u n io n s_______________
D ifferen t affiliatio n s 1____ __________ _
P ro fe ssio n a l em ployee a s s o c ia tio n _____
No union in volved ______________________

1

Wo rk e rs involved
Number

P ercen t

Number
(in
th ou san d s)

P ercen t

M an-days idle
during year
(all sto ppages)
Number
(in
thousands)

5, 045

100. 0

2, 649

100. 0

49,018

3, 723
1,103

73. 8
21. 9
1. 2
1. 0

1, 964. 8
502. 2
31.4
65. 5
72. 4
12. 4

74. 2
19. 0

3 7 ,0 1 1 .0
6 ,5 3 2 .4
520. 9
4 ,4 5 8 .5
415. 4
79. 4

60

51
47
61

.9

1. 2

1.2

2. 5
2. 7
.5

P ercen t

100. 0

75. 5
13. 3
1. 1
9. 1
.8
.2

1 Includes w ork sto p p ages involving unions of d ifferen t a ffiliatio n s— eith er 1 union or m ore affiliated with A F L -C IO and
unaffiliated union or m o re , or 2 u n affiliated unions or m o re.

N O TE: B e ca u se of rounding, su m s of individual item s m ay not equal to tals.




30

Table 16. Mediation in Work Stoppages Ending in 1968 by Contract Status
Stoppages
M ediation agency and co n tract statu s

A ll sto p p ages _______________________________

W orkers involved

Number

P ercen t

Number
(in thousands)

P ercen t

P ercen t

5, 045

100. 0

2, 657

53, 575

100. 0

Governm ent m ediation ____________________________
F e d e r a l ___ ___ _ __________________
______
State ____________________________________________
F e d e r a l and State m ediation c o m b in e d __________
Other ___________________________________________
P riv a te m ediation ............ . .
No m ediation rep o rted ____________________________
No in fo rm a tio n ___________________ _______________

2, 544
1,856
309
333
44
67
2,4 3 4
-

50. 4
36. 8
6. 1
6. 6
.9
1. 3
48. 2
-

1 ,811. 9
1 ,225. 1
217. 9
336. 0
32. 8
23. 1
822. 3
-

.2
46. 1
8. 2
12. 6
1. 2
.9
30. 9
-

4 7 ,8 8 2 .0
2 6 ,1 3 6 .5
3 ,4 5 1 .2
1 7 ,9 7 6 . 6
317.4
272. 3
5 ,4 2 1 . 1
-

8 9.4
48. 8
6.4
33. 6
.6
.5
10. 1
-

N egotiation of f ir s t agreem en t _____________________
Governm ent m e d ia tio n _
_ __ __________________
F e d e r a l ______________________________________
State ________________________________________
F e d e r a l and State m ediation co m b in e d _______
Other
......
..
.....................
P riv a te m ediation ______________________________
No m ediation rep o rted _________________ ______
No in fo rm a tio n __________________________________

691
317
227

13. 7
6. 3
4. 5
1. 3
.4
.1
.4
7. 0
-

97. 6
37. 8
24. 4
9. 5
1. 3
2. 6
6. 8
53. 0
-

3. 7
1. 4
.9
.4

1 ,7 1 8 .7
1, 110. 1
960. 0
93. 1
42. 2
14. 8
31.4
577. 3
-

52. 5
41. 2
30. 7
4. 0
6. 0
.5
.5
10. 8
-

1 ,7 7 5 .3
1 ,5 3 5 .2
1 , 126. 6
63. 9
323. 2
2 1.4
13. 0
227. 1
(2)

5 7.8
42. 4
2 .4
12. 2
.8
.5
8. 5
-

4 6 ,4 9 4 .4
43, 763.6
2 4 ,5 6 9 . 6
1, 121. 6
1 7 ,8 0 0 .8
271. 3
226. 5
2 ,5 0 4 .3
.4

86. 8
8 1 .7
45. 9
2. 1
33. 2
.5
.4
4. 7
-

31. 5
2. 6
1. 5

725. 2
209. 5
72. 2
117. 8
11. 6
7. 9
3. 3
512. 4
-

27. 3
7. 9
2. 7
4. 4
.4
.3
.1
19. 3
-

4 ,8 9 8 .0
2 ,6 2 0 .8
554. 9
1 ,9 0 5 .7
133. 6
26. 6
14. 3
2, 262. 9
-

9. 1
4. 9
1. 0
3. 6
.2
(J)
4. 2
-

.3
(*>
.2
. 1
. 1
1.4
-

43. 7
29. 2
1. 8
26. 6
.8
(2 )
14. 4
-

1. 6
1. l
.1
1. 0

441. 1
387. 0
52. 0
330. 2
4. 7
.2
53. 9
-

.8
.7
. 1
.6
(*)
( )
.1
-

.5
( *)

15. 5
.2

.6
(*)
(*)
.6

23. 2
.5

R enegotiation of agreem en t (expiration
or reopening) . . . . __________________________________
Governm ent m e d ia tio n __________________________
F e d e r a l _____________________________________
State _________________________________________
F e d e r a l and State m ediation co m b in e d _______
Other _______________________________________
P riv ate m e d ia tio n ______________________________
No m ediation r e p o r t e d __________________________
No in fo rm a tio n ________________________________
During term of ag reem en t (negotiation of
new a g reem en t not in v o lv e d )_______ _____________
Governm ent m e d ia tio n _________ ___ ____________
F e d e r a l __ ___ _________________________ .
S t a t e ______ ________________________________
F e d e r a l and State m ediation co m b in e d _______
Other ________________________________________
P riv a te m e d ia tio n _______________________________
No m ediation rep o rted _________________________
No i n f o r m a t i o n _________________________________

66

19
5
19
355
2, 650
2 , 079
1,551
202

301
23
24
547
2

1,588
129
76
28
13
12
20

1,439
-

No co n tract or other con tract statu s _______________
Governm ent m ediation _________ ____ ____ ___
F e d e r a l _________________________ __________
State ____________________________ ___________
F e d e r a l and State m ediation co m b in e d _______
Other
. . .
P riv ate m ediation ___ ________________ ________
No m ediation rep o rted _________________________
No inform ation _________________________________

92
17

No inform ation on co n tract s t a t u s __________________
Governm ent m ediation _________________________
F e d e r a l __________________________ __________
State _________________________________________
F e d e r a l and State m ediation c o m b in e d _______
Other ________________________________________
P riv a te m e d ia tio n _______________________________
No m ediation r e p o r t e d _________________________
No inform ation _________________________________

24

1
2

2
11

4
4
71
2

2
22

.6

.3
.2
.4
28. 5
1. 8

-

-

n
.4

.2
15. 3

-

-

“

"

L e s s than 0. 05 percen t.
L e s s than 100 w o rk ers.

N O TE: B e ca u se of rounding, su m s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.




100. 0

M an-days idle
Number
(in thousands)

68

C)

.1
.3
2. 0
66.8

(M
(*)
.5
-

-

.5
22. 6

-

-

-

'

'

'

3. 2
.1
1. 8
.2
. 1
(M
.i

2

1.1

-

C)

C)
C)
-

(*)
(*)
-

-

31

Table 17. Settlement of Stoppages Ending in 1968 by Contract Status

A ll sto p p ages _______________________________
Settlem ent reach ed 1 ____________________________ —
No fo rm a l settlem en t— work resu m ed
(with old or new w o r k e r s ) __ ____________________
E m ployer out of b u sin e ss _________________________
No in fo rm a tio n _____________________________________
N egotiation of f ir s t agreem en t or
union re c o g n itio n _________________________________
Settlem ent reach ed ____________________________
No fo rm a l settlem en t ________________________ ..
E m ployer out of b u sin e ss ______________________
No inform ation
R enegotiation of agreem en t
(expiration or reopening) _________________________
Settlem ent reach ed __________________ _________
No fo rm a l settlem en t _________ ____ _____________
E m ployer out of b u sin e ss ______________________
No inform ation _________________________________
During term of agreem en t (negotiation
of new ag reem en t not involved) _________ ________
Settlem ent reach ed _____________________________
No fo rm a l settlem en t . . __
_______
E m ployer out of b u sin e ss
No inform ation _________________________________
No co n tract or other co n tract statu s _______________
Settlem ent reach ed
No fo rm a l settlem en t
E m ployer out of b u sin e ss ______________________
No inform ation
...
_
No inform ation on con tract statu s
Settlem ent reach ed _________________ __________
No fo rm a l settlem en t ___________________________
E m ployer out of b u sin e ss ______________________
No in fo rm a tio n _____________________ __________
1
2
3

Number

P ercen t

5, 045

100. 0

4 ,4 5 2

.

Number
(in thousands)
2, 657

96. 4
3. 1
.5
(2)

3. 7
2. 5
1. 2
(*>
(2 )

1 ,7 1 8 .7
1,336. 2
351. 3
23. 9
7 .4

3. 2
2. 5
.7
(2)
(2 )

66. 8

6 5.4
1. 2
.2
-

4 6 ,4 9 4 .4
4 5 ,5 2 7 .2
733. 7
233. 5
-

27. 3
.0
5. 3
(2)
(2)

4 ,8 9 8 .0
4, 364. 1
532. 1
1. 7
. 1

43. 7
42. 4
1. 3
-

1. 6
1. 6

441. 1
4 3 0 .4
10. 7
-

15. 5
1. 7
13. 8
(3)
“

.6
. 1
.5
(2 )
“

13. 7
10. 3
3. 2
.2
.1

97.

2,650
2, 552
76

52. 5
50. 6
1. 5
.4
-

1,775. 3
1,739. 1
31. 8
4 .4
-

298
2
1

31. 5
25. 5
5 .9
(2)
(2 )

725. 2
58 3. 7
141.4
(3 )
. 1

92
75
17
-

1. 8
1. 5
.3
-

.5
.4
. 1
(2)
"

1,588
1,287

24
20

3
1

"

100. 0

1,642. 0
260. 0
7. 5

691
518
161
9
3

-

53, 575
5 1 ,6 6 5 .9

219. 3
4. 7
.2

.7
. 1

100. 0

6
66.2

31. 1
.3
(3)

91.

6

22

(2 )
-

23. 2
8. 1
14. 2
.8

The p a r tie s either reached a fo rm al settlem en t or a g re e d on a proced u re for reso lv in g th eir d ifferen c es.
L e s s than 0 .0 5 percent.
L e s s than 100 w o rk ers.

N OTE: B e ca u se of rounding, su m s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.




P ercen t

.3
.2
(2 )

2 ,4 3 3 . 1

11. 0

88

P ercen t

Number
(in thousands)

8

2

555
34
4

22

M an-day s idle

W orkers involved

Stoppages
C ontract statu s and settlem en t

86.8

85. 0
1.4
.4
9. 1

8. 1
1. 0

(2)
(2 )

.8
.8
(2)
(2)
(2 )
(2)
(2)
“

32

Table 18. Procedure for Handling Unsettled Issues in Work Stoppages
Ending in 1968 by Contract Status
P r o c e d u r e fo r h a n d lin g u n s e t tle d
is s u e s and c o n t r a c t s ta tu s

S to p p a g e s
N um ber

P ercent

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d
N um ber
(in
P ercent
th o u s a n d s )

M a n -d a y id le
N um ber
(in
P ercent
th o u s a n d s )

A ll s to p p a g e s c o v e r e d 1 ------------------------------

536

100 . 0

188. 3

100 . 0

1 ,0 2 5 .1

100 . 0

A r b it r a tio n ----------------------------------------------------------------D ir e c t n e g o t ia t i o n s -------------------------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c y -----------------------O th e r m e a n s --------------------------------------------------------------

115

21 . 5

66 . 7

462. 7
3 0 9 .9
48. 0
204. 6

45. 1
30. 2
4. 7
20 . 0

49. 5
30. 3
8. 3
6. 1
4. 7

4. 8
3. 0
.8
.6
.5

N e g o tia tio n o f f i r s t a g r e e m e n t o r u n io n
r e c o g n it io n -------------------------------------------------------------A r b it r a tio n ----------------------------------------------------------D ir e c t n e g o t ia tio n s -------------------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c y ----------------O th e r m e a n s --------------------------------------------------------R e n e g o tia tio n o f a g r e e m e n t
( e x p ir a tio n o r r e o p e n i n g ) -----------------------------------A r b it r a tio n ----------------------------------------------------------D ir e c t n e g o t ia t i o n s -------------------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c y ----------------O th e r m e a n s -------------------------------------------------------D u r in g te r m o f a g r e e m e n t (n e g o tia tio n o f n e w
a g r e e m e n t n o t in v o lv e d ) ------------------------------------A r b it r a tio n ----------------------------------------------------------D ir e c t n e g o t ia tio n s -------------------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c y -----------------O th e r m e a n s --------------------------------------------------------

86

16 . 0
5. 2
57. 3

69. 5
15. 8
36. 3

35 . 4
36 . 9
8. 4
19 . 3

41
15

7. 6
2. 8
2. 2
2. 1
.6

7. 7
4. 6
1 .5
.3
1. 3

4. 1
2. 4
.8
.2
.7

12 . 1

47. 9
25. 7
7. 5
13. 9
.9

25. 4
13 . 6
4. 0
7. 4
.5

228.
134.
39.
35.
18.

5
9
9
5
2

69. 8
19 . 1
3 1 .8
.8
18 . 1

744. 2
296. 8
260. 7
6. 0
180. 8

72. 6
29. 0
25 . 4
.6
17. 6

1. 2

.6
.3
.4

3. 1

.3
.1
.2

.2

(3 )
-

28
307

12
11

3

65
30
23

10
2

418

5. 6
4. 3
1 .9
.4

44
7
301

78. 0
12 . 3
8. 2
1. 3
56 . 2

N o c o n t r a c t o r o th e r c o n t r a c t s t a t u s ----------------A r b it r a tio n ---------------------------------------------------------D ir e c t n e g o t ia t i o n s -------------------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c y ---------------O th e r m e a n s --------------------------------------------------------

12

2. 2

1

.7
1. 3
_
.2

N o in fo r m a t io n o n c o n t r a c t s t a t u s ----------------------A r b it r a tio n ----------------------------------------------------------D ir e c t n e g o t ia t i o n s -------------------------------------------R e f e r r a l to a g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c y ----------------O th e r m e a n s --------------------------------------------------------

"
-

-

66

4
7
_

131.
35.
59.
1.
34.

.5
.7
_
(2 )
-

_

(3 )
-

3
4
1
9
8

22.
13.
3.
3.

1.8

1. 1
1. 7
_
-

1 E x c lu d e s s to p p a g e s o n w h ic h th e r e w a s n o in fo r m a tio n o n is s u e s u n s e t tle d o r n o a g r e e m e n t on p r o c e d u r e fo r h a n d lin g .
2 L e s s th a n 100 w o r k e r s .
3 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
N O T E : B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a ls .




3
1
8
5

_

33

Table 19. Major Work Stoppages by Industry Division,1 1963—67 Average and 1968
W o r k e r s in v o lv e d
(in th o u s a n d s )
A nnual
average
1968
1 9 6 3 -6 7

N um ber
I n d u s tr y g r o u p

A nnual
average
1 9 6 3 -6 7

M a n u fa c t u r in g -----------------------------------------------M in in g --------- — ------------------- ---------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s t r u c t io n ______________________
T r a n s p o r t a t io n _______________________________
C o m m u n ic a tio n s an d u t ilit ie s ______________
W h o le s a le an d r e t a il t r a d e ________________
G o v e r n m e n t _____ ___ _________________
C r o s s - in d u s t r y _____________ __________________

1968

7. 8
.8
5. 0
2. 8
1. 4
.6
.8
•6
19. 8

T o t a l _________________________________

5
5
6

227

9

2

M a n -d a y s id le
(in th o u s a n d s )
A nnual
average
1968
1 9 6 3 -6 7

168
124

2 3, 024

116
-

82
94
169
2 68

2 , 066

994

9 , 242

2 0 ,5 1 4

126
358

5
32

606

-

4 , 304

5, 195
987
1 ,4 3 5

22
83
212
24
8
20
10

101

3 , 220
778
7, 121

1,012

-

-

-

1 In v o lv in g 1 0 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s o r m o r e .
2 M a n -d a y s id le in c lu d e th o s e o f th e c o p p e r s tr ik e w h ic h b e g a n in 1967 an d c o n tin u e d in to 1 9 6 8 .
N O T E : B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a ls .

Table 20. Major Work Stoppages by Size,1 1963—68
Y ear

19 6 8 ----------1967_______
19 6 6 _______
19 6 5 _______
1964_______
1963_______

T o ta l
W ork ers
in v o lv e d
N um ber
(in th o u san d s)

32
28
26

9 94
1, 340
600
387
607

21

18
7

102

10 ,0 0 0 - 2 4 ,9 9 9
N um ber

22
18
21
16
13

6

W ork ers
in v o lv e d
(in th o u san d s)

330
2 94
313
224
228
73

2 5 ,0 0 0 - 4 9 ,9 9 9
W ork ers
in v o lv e d
N um ber
(in th o u san d s)
N um ber
5

6

183
181

1

5 0 ,0 0 0 - 9 9 ,9 9 9
W ork ers
in v o lv e d
N um ber
(in th o u san d s)

163
50
29

100

3
5
3

100,000 an d o v e r
N um ber

W ork ers
in v o lv e d
(in th o u san d s)

3

257
811
116

-

53
-

1
1
1

-

275
-

13
4
4

23
4

11

3

9

6

26
61
19
45

4

1
1
1

2 24
51
71

-

-

P ercent
1968 _______
19 6 7 _______
1966 _______
19 6 5 ----------1964 _______
1963. -. .

100
100
100
100
100
100

1 In v o lv in g

1 00
100
100
100
100
100

69
64
81
76
72

86

33

22

52
58
38
72

16
21
12
24
17
14

18
14
17
42

8

28

10, 0 00 w o r k e r s o r m o r e .

N O T E : B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a ls .




-

6

12

4
-

A ppendix A. Tables
Table A -l.

Industry

A ll in d u stries _____________________ 1 5, 045
M an u factu rin g________________________
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ______________
Guns, h o w itzers, m o rta r s, and
related equipm ent
A m m unition, except for sm all
arm s ________________________________
Tanks and tank com ponents ____
Sighting and fire control
equipm ent ___________________________
Sm all a rm s _____ _____________________
Sm all a rm s am m unition
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ,
not e lsew h ere c la ssifie d ___________
Food and kindred products
M eat p r o d u c ts ________________________
D airy products
Canned and p reserv ed fru its,
v e g e ta b le s, and sea foods __ _
G rain m ill products
B akery p r o d u c ts_________ ___________ _
S u gar____________________ ______________
C on fection ery and related
products ........................... .............. ...............
B ev era g es ____________________________
M iscellan eou s food preparations
and kindred products _ _____ _
T obacco m anufactures
_
C igarettes _
C igars
___ _ ____ _
T extile m ill products ___
B roadw oven fab ric m ills , cotton __
B roadw oven fab ric m ills , m an-m ade
fiber and silk __
B roadw oven fab ric m ills , wool:
Including dyeing and finishin g
N arrow fa b rics and other sm a llw ares m ills: C otton, w ool,
silk , and m an-m ade fib er __ _
Knitting m ills
Dyeing and fin ish in g te x tile s,
except w ool fa b rics and
knit goods
F loor coverin g m ills
Yarn and thread m ills
M iscellan eou s te x tile goods _____ ___
A pparel and other finished products
m ade from fab rics and sim ila r
m a te r ia ls _
M en's, y o u th s', and b o y s ' su its,
co a ts, and o v ercoats ____ __ _ _
M en's , youths' , and boys' fu rn ish ­
in gs, work clothing and allied
garm ents
W om en's, m is s e s ', and juniors'
ou terw ear
__
W om en's, m is s e s ' , ch ild ren 's, and
infants' under garm ents
H ats, ca p s, and m illin ery
G irls^ , c h ild ren 's, and infants '
outerw ear
Fur goods _______ ____________________
M iscellan eou s apparel and
a c c e s s o r ie s ________________________
M iscellan eou s fab ricated tex tile
products ___________ ________________
Lum ber and wood prod ucts, except
furniture _______________________________
Logging cam ps and logging
con tra ctors ___ ____________________
S aw m ills and planing m ills
M illw ork, v e n e e r , plywood, and
prefab ricated stru ctu ral wood
products
_
W ooden con tain ers
M iscella n eo u s wood
products ____________________________

W o rk Stoppages by Industry, 1968

(W orkers and m an -d ays in thousands)
Stoppages
M an-days
beginning in
id le,
year
during year
IndustryW orkers
(all
Num ber involved stop pages)
49, 018

M anufacturing— Continued

1, 178
31. 3
2. 2
28. 7
.3

23, 978
333. 7
4. 4
325. 7
.6

.2
68. 1
11.2
2. 0
16. 5
3. 7
10. 3
.9
2. 2
11.4
10. 0
9. 1
8. 8
.3
14. 4
-

3. 0
1 ,1 7 1 .4
161. 8
27. 1
477. 0
95. 4
116. 5
.9
26. 8
123. 4
142. 4
170. 4
169. 3
1. 1
403. 6
-

2
5

.3
1.4

14. 1
30. 2

4
13

.4
2. 2

2. 7
100. 7

5
4
3
12

1. 1
1. 7
4. 8
2 .4

5. 8
16. 8
188. 9
44. 4

82
6

13. 1
1.9

204. 7
17. 3

17
29
6
-

2. 0
2. 6
1.0
-

20. 9
87. 4
15. 5
-

3
1
8
12

.5
1. 3
2. 9
.9

4. 0
3. 9
34. 0
21. 8

61
1
12

10. 2

217.7
4
57. 4

25
6
17

4. 7
.8
2. 1

F urniture and fix tu r e s ________________
H ousehold furniture _______________
O ffice fu r n itu r e ____________________
P ublic building and related
furniture _________________________
P a rtitio n s, sh elvin g, lo c k er s and
office and store fixtu res _________
M iscellan eou s furniture and
fixtu res __________________________
P aper and a llied products ____________
Pulp m i l l s __________________________
Pulp m ills , except building
paper m ills _______________________
Paperboard m ills __________________
C onverted paper and paperboard
prod ucts, except con tain ers and
boxes ______ _______________________
Paperboard con tain ers and
boxes _____________________________
Building paper and building
board m ills _______________________
P rin tin g, publishing, and allied
in d u stries ____________________________
N ew papers: P ublishing and
printing ___________________________
P erio d ica ls: Publishing and
printing ___________________________
B ooks _______________________________
M iscellan eou s publishing _________
C om m ercial printing ______________
M anifold b u sin ess f o r m s __________
G reeting card p u b lish in g __________
B lankbooks, lo o se lea f b in d ers,
and bookbinding w ork ____________
S ervice in d u stries for the p rin t­
ing trade __________________________
C hem icals and a llied products _______
Industrial inorganic and
organic c h em ica ls _______________
P la stic s m a te r ia ls and synthetic
r e sin s, synthetic rubber, and
other m an-m ade fib e r s, except
g l a s s ______________________________
D rugs________________________________
Soap, d etergen ts, and cleaning
prep aration s, perfu m es and other
to ilet p r e p a ra tio n s_______________
P ain ts, v a r n ish e s, lacq u ers,
en a m els, and a llied p r o d u c ts___
Gum and wood c h em ica ls _________
A gricu ltu ral c h e m ic a ls ____________
M iscellan eou s ch em ica l products __
P etroleu m refining and related
products _____________________________
P etroleu m refining ________________
P aving and roofing m a te r ia ls _____
M iscellan eou s products of
petroleu m and coal ______________
Rubber and m iscella n eo u s p la stic s
products _____________________________
T ir e s and inner t u b e s ______________
Rubber footw ear _____ _____________
R eclaim ed r u b b e r __________________
F abricated rubber prod ucts, not
elsew h ere c la s sifie d _____________
M iscellan eou s p la stic s p r o d u c ts__
L eather and leath er p r o d u c ts_________
L eather tanning and fin is h in g _____
Industrial leath er belting and
p a ck in g _______ _____ _______ ______ _
Boot and shoe cut stock and
findings ___________________________
F ootw ear, except rubber __________
L eather glo v es and m itten s _______
Luggage .................................................... .
Handbags and other p erson al
leath er goods ____________________
L eather good s, not elsew h ere
c la s sifie d _________________________

‘ 2,6 6 4
20
1
17
1
1
209
40
16
21
15
31
3
5
49
29
3
2
1
48
-

2r, 649.

0

(2 )
2. 5

87. 9
22. 8
49. 2

See footnotes at end of table.




Stoppages
M an-days
beginning in
id le,
year
during year
(all
Num ber W orke rs stoppages)
involved

34

77
37
6
4

18. 0
9 .4
3. 2
.4

18
12
95

2. 8
2. 3
24. 2

393. 0
152. 0
77. 1
14. 4
53. 8
95. 6
456. 0

19
10

12. 1
1. 7

228. 9
14. 0

25
31
10

2. 8
5. 7
1.8

70. 6

56

20. 0
9 .4
1.3
3. 2
3. 7
1. 3
.3

19
1
7
18
2
1
5
3
134
54

.8
.1
32.4
16. 3

121.9
20. 7
1,266 . 8
1, 113. 6
6. 3
21. 3
54. 6
45. 0
3. 3
17. 6
5. 1
904. 3
526. 9

24
10

8. 2
1. 5

118. 2
69. 5

15
11
2
6
12

1. 7
.8
.4
2. 2
1. 3

24. 3
5. 2
15. 6
112. 3
32.4

19
6
12
1

1. 9
1. 1
.8

61. 6
50. 8
10. 7

(2 >

(2 )

8.7
16
1
1
24
45
20
1
1

24. 5
7. 4
.5
(2)
8 .4
8. 1
5. 1
.4

392. 6
102. 4
6. 4
.6
140. 6
142. 7
73. 9
4. 6
.2

2
11
2
2
1

(2)
(2)
4. 2
.2
.2
(2)

.6
50. 4
17.4
.6
.1

35

Table A-l.
Industry

Work Stoppages by Industry, 1968— Continued

(W orkers and m an -d ays in thousands)
'J '■
Stoppages ' 1 T M an-days
beginning in
id le,
year
during year
Industry
(all
Num ber W orkers sto p p a g es)
involved

Manufac tu r ing— C ont inue d
Stone, cla y , g la s s , and concrete
products _____________________________
133
72. 0
5
5. 6
G la ss and g la ssw a r e, p r essed
8
51. 9
G lass prod ucts, m ade of
4
.4
C em ent, h y d r a u lic __________________
2
.1
Structural clay products
2. 3
19
P ottery and related products ___ .
7
1. 1
C on crete, gypsum , and
6.4
60
p laster p r o d u c ts__________________
.1
Cut stone and stone products ..............
3
A b ra siv e, a sb e sto s, and m is ­
cellan eou s n onm etallic m in eral
4. 0
25
products ___________________ _______
P rim ary m eta l in d u stries _____________ 1282
137. 2
B last fu rn an ces, ste e l w orks, and
47. 8
rollin g and finishin g m i l l s ________
79
Iron and ste e l fo u n d r ie s ____________
84
40. 5
P rim ary sm eltin g and refining of
11
7. 9
Secondary sm elting and refining of
4
.3
R olling, draw ing, and extruding
30. 7
50
of n onferrous m eta ls ______ _______
N onferrous fou nd ries ______________
24
3.2
M iscellan eou s prim ary m etal
products ___________________________
31
6. 7
F abricated m etal products, except
ordnance, m ach inery, and tran sportation equipm ent ..................................
78. 4
1 349
14
2. 1
C utlery, h andtools, and
10. 4
29
H eating apparatus (except e le c tr ic )
products ______ ____________________
Screw m achine products,
b o lts, nuts, scr e w s, and
r iv ets _____________________________
Coating, engraving, and allied
M iscellan eou s fab ricated w ire
products ___________________________
M iscellan eou s fab ricated m etal
products _____________________ _____
M achinery, except e le c t r ic a l_________
E ngines and tu rbin es _______________
F arm m ach inery and
equipm ent _________________________
C onstruction, m inin g, and m a terial
handling m ach inery and
equipm ent _________________________
M etalw orking m ach inery and
equipm ent _________________________
Sp ecial industry m ach in ery,
except m etalw orking _____________
G eneral in d u strial m ach inery
and equipm ent ____________________
O ffice, com puting, and
accounting m ach in es _____________
M iscellan eou s m a ch in ery, except
e le c tr ic a l _________________________
E le c tr ic a l m a ch in ery, equipm ent,
E lectric tra n sm issio n and
distribution equipm ent
E le c tr ic a l in dustrial ap p aratu s____
E lectric lighting and w iring
equipm ent _________________________
Radio and te le v isio n receiv in g
s e ts , except com m unication

See footnotes at end of table.




2,120.4
28. 7
1,742.6
43. 5
4. 7
42. 2
9. 7
169. 5
1. 5
78. 0
4,793.0
1,040.8
665. 5
915. 0
106. 7
1,591.0
279. 7
194. 3

18
149

5. 4
35. 6

2,035.9
83. 8
426. 6
68. 2
789. 5

12
30
19
23
61
‘414
21
25

1. 6
5. 5
1.2
6. 3
10. 5
179. 7
14. 4
18. 0

63. 8
152. 1
19. 3
196. 8
235. 8
3, 936. 4
130. 9
107. 7

68
83
43
79
13
40
45

23. 5
26. 1
9. 2
30. 5
23.4
24. 8
9. 8

576. 4
826. 6
335. 1
840. 9
460. 7
391. 7

2 34
48
48
34

1,756.4
110. 2
256. 3
342. 5

24

159. 6
24. 7
14. 3
39. 4
9. 1

5

.9

10. 6

266. 2

71.6

M anufacturing— Continued
E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent,
and sup plies— Continued
E lectron ic com ponents and
M iscellan eou s e le c tr ic a l m achinery,
T ransportation equipm ent _____________
M otor v e h ic le s and m otor
v eh icle equipm ent
A ircraft and a ircra ft parts _________
Ship and boat building
and repairin g _____________________
R ailroad eq u ip m en t__________________
M o to rcy cles, b ic y c le s, and
M iscellan eou s tran sp ortation
equipm ent __________________________
P ro fe ssio n a l, s cien tific , and con tro lling in stru m en ts; photographic and
op tical goods; w atch es and c lo c k s ___
E ngineering, lab oratory, and
scien tific and r e se a r c h in equipm ent _________________________
Instrum ents for m easu rin g, con tro l­
lin g, and indicating ph ysical
c h a r a c te r istic s ___________________
O ptical in stru m en ts and le n se s ___
S u rgical, m ed ica l, and dental
in stru m en ts and s u p p lie s _________
Ophthalm ic goods ___________________
P hotographic equipm ent and
W atches, c lo c k s, clockw ork op er-

Stoppages
M an-days
beginning in
id le,
year
during year
Num ber Worke rs stop(all
involved
pages)

31
20
24
‘ 241
144
46
16
14
3
20

48. 4
6. 6
16. 3
255. 2
166. 9
45. 5
30. 0
9. 1
.8
2. 9

346. 2
276. 0
342. 9
2,985. 1
1,624.6
594. 3
418. 5
282. 9
12. 4
52. 4

37

13. 2

84. 4

5

3. 3

18. 5

12
2
6
2
4
6

3. 0
.3
1. 5
4. 6

28. 8
6.9
8. 5
.4
10. 6
10. 7

10. 5
1. 7
1. 2
2. 0
1. 5

216. 4
30. 1
17. 5
48.4
7. 0

.2
3. 9
1, 471

2. 0
111.5
25,040

6. 7
212. 9
3. 2
1. 1
206. 4

912

2. 1
364. 2

147. 0
2, 551. 7
1,548.0
4. 2
956. 6
3. 0
40. 0
8,722. 9

30 3
19

570. 8
63. 9

9,309.4
318. 7

61
91
28

10

34. 1
19. 5
85.9
3. 8

4
51
39

326. 8
36. 5

300. 8
528. 1
663. 0
75. 3
7. 2
6, 746. 4
669.9

M iscellan eou s m anufacturing
63
J ew elry, silv e r w a r e, and
plated w are .............................. ..................
5
M usical in stru m en ts ________________
8
T oys, am u sem en t, sporting and
14
P en s, p e n cils, and other office
C ostum e je w elry , costum e n o veltie s , buttons, and m iscella n eo u s
notion s, except preciou s m etal ___
2
M iscellan eou s m anufacturing
in d u stries __________________________
28
N on m an ufacturing________________ *2.396
A gricu ltu re, fo r e str y , and
fish e r ie s ______________________________
17
M ining __________________________________
301
M etal _________________________________
9
A nthracite ___________________________
2
B itum inous coal and lign ite ________
266
Crude petroleum and natural g a s ___
3
M ining and quarrying of nonm eta llic m in e r a ls, except fu els _____
21
T ransportation , com m un ication s, e le c R ailroad tran sp ortation _____________
L ocal and suburban tran sit and
interurban highway p assen ger
M otor freigh t tran sp ortation
and w arehousing __________________
W ater tran sp ortation _______________
P ip elin e tran sp ortation
T ransportation s e r v ic e s .......................
E le c tr ic , g a s, and sanitary

(2)
.4

.2

.2

36

Table A-l. Work Stoppages by Industry, 1968— Continued
Industry
Nonm anufacturing— Continued
W holesale trade _______________________
Building m a te r ia ls, hardw are,
and farm equipm ent d ea lers
A utom otive d e a ler s and
gasolin e se r v ic e stations
A pparel and a c c e ss o r ie s
F urniture, hom e furnishing,
and equipm ent sto r e s ____________
M iscellan eou s r eta il sto r e s
F in an ce, in su ra n ce, and real esta te __
C redit a g e n cies other than
b a n k s______________________________
Security and com m odity b rok ers,
d e a le r s, exch an ges, and
s e r v ic e s __________________________
Insurance ag en ts, b ro k ers, and
R eal estate _________________________
Com bination of r ea l estate
in su ra n ce, loan s,
law offic e s ___________________ ;___

(W orkers and m an -d ays in thousands)
M an-days
Stoppages
beginning in
id le,
during year
year
Industry
(all
Num ber W orkers sto p p a g es)
involved
223
194
21
28
34
47
5
15
34
10
17
2
i

10. 0
4. 1
3. 7
8. 0
.4

597. 0
374. 7
20. 7
73. 9
64. 8
125. 0
3. 9
22. 7
41. 7
22. 0
360. 3
.4

(2)

.5

3

7. 1

-

351. 4

11

.6

8. 1

-

46. 4
28. 7
.9
4. 9
8. 3
5. 3

Nonm anufacturing— Continued
Holding and other in vestm ent
S e r v ic e s _________________________________
H otels, room ing h o u ses, cam p s,
M iscellan eou s b u sin e ss s e r v i c e s __
A utom obile rep air, autom obile
s e r v ic e s , and garages
M otion p ictu res ______________________
A m usem ent and recreation s e r v ic e s ,
M edical and other health
s e r v ic e s ____________________________
E ducational s e r v i c e s __________ ____ _
M useum s, art g a lle r ie s,
botanical and zoo lo g ica l
gardens _____________ ______________
Nonprofit m em b ersh ip
P riv ate households __________________
G overnm ent 3___________________ _________
State __________________________________
L ocal _________________________________

Stoppages
M an-days
beginning in
id le,
year
during year
(all
Num ber W orke rs stoppages)
involved

175
11
13
43
19
10
2
19
28
18
1
7
4
254
16
235

31. 2
1. 1
.9
8. 3
5. 8
.7
.4
4. 1
6. 0
2. 5

431. 6
74. 5
12. 6
100. 4
44. 2
22. 5
59. 4
29. 7
59. 5
18. 8

(2)
.3

.3
2. 8

.9
20 1 .8
9. 3
190. 9

6. 9
2, 545. 2
42. 8
2, 492. 8

1 The num ber of stoppages reported for a m ajor in dustry group or d ivision m ay not equal the sum of its com ponents b ecau se individual
stop pages occu rrin g in 2 or m ore industry groups have been counted in each. The m ajor industry group and d ivision to ta ls have been adjusted
to elim in ate duplication. W orkers involved and m an -d ays idle have been allo cated am ong the r e sp ec tiv e industry groups.
2 L e ss than 100 w ork ers.
3 Includes 3 stoppages of F ed era l em p lo y ees, affecting 1,680 w o rk ers, resu ltin g in 9 ,6 0 0 m a n -d ays of id le n e ss.




37
Table A-2. Work Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1968
^Vorke^^an^man-daysinthous^nd^
Total
Industry group

Stoppages
M an-days
beginning in
id le during
year
y ear (all
W orkers stoppages)
Num ber
involved

A ll in d u s tr ie s------------------------------------------- - *5,045
2,649
M anufacturing ________________________________ 1 2, 664
1. 178
20
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s --------------------------------31. 3
Food and kindred products _____________________
68. 1
209
3
T obacco m anufactures ------------------------------------9. 1
T extile m ill p r o d u c ts____________________________
48
14. 4
A pparel and other finished products m ade
from fa b rics and sim ila r m a te r ia ls __________
82
13. 1
Lum ber and wood prod ucts, except furniture —
10. 2
61
F urniture and fixtu res ---------------------------------------77
18. 0
P aper and a llied p ro d u cts--- ---------------------------95
24. 2
P rin tin g, publishing, and a llied in d u stries____
56
20. 0
C hem icals and a llied p ro d u cts__________________
134
3 2 .4
P etro leu m refin ing and related in d u s tr ie s _____
19
1. 9
24. 5
Rubber and m iscella n eo u s p la stic s p ro d u cts---87
20
L eather and leath er products ---------------------------5. 1
133
72. 0
Stone, cla y , and g la ss p ro d u cts-----------------------1 282
P rim ary m etal in d u s tr ie s ------ -------------------------137. 2
F abricated m etal products, except
ordnance, m ach inery, and tran sp ortation
equipm ent ----------------------- ------------------------------1349
78. 4
M achinery, except e le c t r ic a l---------------------------14 14
179. 7
E le c tr ic a l m ach inery, equipm ent, and
sup plies ________________________________________
234
159. 6
*241
T ransportation eq u ipm ent------------ -------------------255. 2
P ro fe ssio n a l, s cien tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
13. 2
goods; w atches and clock s ____________________
37
10. 5
M iscellan eou s m anufacturing in d u stries ----------63
N onm anufacturing ____________________________ '2 , 396 1, 471. 0
A gricu ltu re, fo r e str y , and fish e r ie s ---------------17
6. 7
301
M in in g ____ _____________________ ______________
212. 9
912
364. 2
C ontract c o n str u ctio n ___________________________
T ransportation , com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
570. 8
g a s, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ___________________
303
W h olesale and r e ta il trade -------------------------------417
75. 1
F inan ce, in su ra n ce, and r ea l e s t a te ----------------17
8. 0
175
31. 2
S e r v ices _________________________________________
254
201. 8
G o v ern m en t______________________________________
See footnotes at end of tab le.




49,01 8
23,97 8
333. 7
1, 171.4
170.4
403. 6

G en eral w age changes
Stoppages
M an-days
beginning in
id le during
year
year (all
stoppages)
Num ber W orkers
involved
2, 571 1,549 . 8
35, 851. 6
632. 4
1, 512
16, 879. 7
8
8. 1
75. 6
132
42. 9
768. 3
1
83.4
5. 4
23
8. 9
289. 8

204. 7
217. 7
393. 0
456. 0
1, 266. 8
904. 3
61. 6
392. 6
73. 9
2, 120.4
4, 793.0

13
27
56
61

39
10
91
149

2, 035. 9
3, 936.4
1, 756. 4
2, 985. 1

233
260
103
103

54. 3
1 17. 1

84. 4
216.4
2 5 ,0 4 0 .0
147. 0
2, 551. 7
8, 722. 9
9, 309. 4
971. 7
360. 3
431. 6
2, 545. 2

25
46

6. 3
6. 7
917. 4
3. 4
69. 1
288. 1
361. 6
63. 6

39
82
12

1, 059
5
25
357
148
283
15
90
135

5. 0
5. 5
12. 4
18. 4
15. 2
19. 3
.9
10. 9
3. 8
65. 3
62. 7

69. 0
94. 6

7. 9
26. 2
97. 3

Supplem entary ben efits
Stoppages
M an-days
beginning in
id le during
year
year (all
Num ber W orkers stoppages)
involved
93
39. 6
487. 3
246.4
68
14. 7
_
81. 3
11
3. 4
-

31, 149. 9
633. 2
10.4
260. 4
46. 1
2, 014. 4
2, 841. 1

1
5
1
1
2
6
5
2
6

.2
.5
(2)
(2)
(2)
1. 1
1. 3
.2
1. 3

1. 5
5. 3
.5
2. 0
.4
14. 8
'
14. 2
2. 3
17. 2

1,465 . 7
3, 225. 2
1, 274. 8
1, 740. 1

5
12
3
5

.5
4. 3
1. 0
.3

3. 8
77. 7
14. 3
7. 6

63. 0
134. 0

1
2
25

(2)
.6
24. 9

.1
3 .4
240. 9

44. 9
141. 6
241.5
398. 5

18, 971. 9
123. 0
822. 6
8, 094. 5
7, 754.8
803. 3
360. 0
262. 1
729. 5

_

_

_

5
8
10

2. 7
20. 1
2. 0

0. 6
15. 6
195. 6
26. 9

1
1

(2)
(2)

2. 0
.3

_

_

_

38
Table A-2. Work Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1968— Continued
(W orkers and m an-d ays in thousands)
W age adjustm ents
Hours of work
Stoppages
beginning in
year
Num ber W orkers
involved
A ll in dustrie s _____________________________
248
86. 1
60. 4
M anufacturing _______________________________
173
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s -------------------------------Food and kindred products ------------------------------4
1. 9
T obacco m anufactures -----------------------------------3
T extile m ill p ro d u c ts___________________________
.6
A pparel and other fin ish ed products m ade
23
3. 0
from fa b rics and sim ila r m a te r ia ls ------------Lum ber and wood prod ucts, except fu rn itu re..
4
.6
F urniture and fixtu res _________________________
1
(2)
P aper and a llied p r o d u c ts______________________
P rin tin g, publishing, and a llied in d u s tr ie s___
C hem icals and a llied p ro d u c ts________ ______
4
.4
P etro leu m refining and related in d u s tr ie s ____
Rubber and m iscella n eo u s p la stic s p rod u cts-—
11
3. 7
1
L eather and leath er products __________________
(2)
Stone, clay, and g la ss p ro d u cts_______________
4
.6
P rim ary m etal in d u s tr ie s ______________________
28
10. 0
F ab ricated m etal prod ucts, except
ordnance, m ach inery, and tran sp ortation
14
3. 2
equipm ent _________ ________ ________________
10. 5
M achinery, excep t e le c tr ic a l __________________
19
E le c tr ic a l m a ch in ery, equipm ent, and
sup plies _____________________ — --------- — -----37
18. 0
T ransportation eq u ip m en t ______________ ______
18
7. 7
P r o fe ssio n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
goods; w atch es and clock s ___________________
2
M iscella n eo u s m anufacturing in d u stries _____
. 2
Nonm anufacturing ___________________________
75
25. 7
1
A gricu ltu re, fo r e str y , and fish e r ie s -----------------0. 3
M ining ______________________ ___________________
18
6. 8
C ontract c o n str u c tio n ------------------------------------------------22
1. 9
T ransportation , com m un ication , e le c tr ic ,
14
3. 4
g a s, and san itary s e r v i c e s ___________________
W h olesale and r e ta il trade _____ _____________
7
. 3
.
F inan ce, in su ra n ce, and re a l e s t a te ------------------S e r v ices ________________________________________
4
. 2
G o v ern m en t ---------------------------------------------------------------------9
12. 9
Industry group

See footnotes at end of tab le.




M an-days
id le during
year (all
stoppages)
512. 8
444. 1
6. 9
1. 8

Stoppages
beginning in
year
Num ber W orkers
involved
6
0. 6
3
(2 )
2
-

12. 7
2 1 .0
.9
-

-

-

_

3. 8
18. 0
.2
3. 1
71. 1
64. 0
8 5 .4
106. 9
4 7. 8
-

-

Other contractual m a tters

M an-days
id le during
year (all
stoppages)

89
50

48. 2
28. 3

760. 1
454. 3

(2)

1.0

2
1

0. 6
_
.4

1. 5
_
1.4

-

-

.6
_
(2)
.2

-

_

6
1
2
1
2
1
1
4
6

1. 9
.3
.3
.3
5. 6
.3
.2
_
4. 5
327. 1

-

-

.3
-

(2)
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0. 6

4. 6

1

0. 2

2. 1

11. 0

“

_

6. 5
27. 2

1
-

_
-

1

.

-

3

_
.

.

-

3

.

1

-

2. 2

5. 6

-

-

3

7. 5
1. 4

(2)
.2
(2)
(2)
.7
15. 4

10
4
2
7

5
68. 7
0. 8
14. 3
.

M an-days
id le during
year (all
stoppages)

5. 8
1. 2

1
-

_

Stoppages
beginning in
year
Num ber W orkers
involved

-

-

39

1. 4
1. 9
1. 1

34. 3
16. 7
15. 4
44. 5
-

20. 0

305. 8

3. 6
8. 7

2
17
5
10

5. 9
. 3

32. 9
213. 1
44. 7
3. 9

3
2

. 1
1. 4

5. 5
5. 7

_

_

_

39

Table A-2.

Work Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 15)68---- Continued
(W orkers and m a n -d ays in thousands)
Union organ ization and secu rity
Job secu rity

Stoppages
beginning in
year
Num ber W orkers
involved
A ll in d u s tr ie s ____________________________
513
111. 7
M anufacturing _______________________________
223
37. 2
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ______________ ____
12
8. 5
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts_____________________
T obacco m anufactures __________ ___________
1
.3
8
T extile m ill p ro d u cts___________________________
1. 9
A pparel and other finished products m ade
from fa b rics and sim ila r m a te r ia ls _________
27
2. 7
12
Lum ber and wood prod ucts, except furniture —
1. 6
Furniture and fixtu res _________________________
8
1. 1
P aper and a llied p ro d u cts______________________
.3
8
P rin tin g, publishing, and a llied in d u stries____
4
.2
C hem icals and a llied p ro d u cts_________________
14
1. 1
P etro leu m refining and related in d u stries____
10
Rubber and m iscella n eo u s p la stic s p ro d u cts__
2. 0
L eather and leath er products __________________
3
.4
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p ro d u cts_______________
14
1. 7
P rim a ry m etal in d u s tr ie s ______________________
14
4. 8
F abricated m etal products, except
ordnance, m ach inery, and transportation
equipm ent _
_________ — ________ ____
33
2. 2
M achinery, except e le c t r ic a l__________________
2. 5
29
E le c tr ic a l m ach inery, equipm ent, and
sup plies ______ _______________________________
8
2. 2
15
3. 0
T ransportation eq u ipm ent----------------------- ------P ro fe ssio n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
2
.3
goods; w atches and clock s ___________________
1
.7
M iscellan eou s m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s--------290
74. 5
N onm anufacturing ----------------------------------------A gricu ltu re, fo r e str y , and fish e r ie s _________
6
1. 7
M in in g ______ ____________________________________
16
5. 3
C ontract constru ction __________________________
57
5. 4
T ransportation , com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
37
g a s, and sanitary s e r v ic e s __________________
23. 2
62
W holesale and re ta il trade _ ___ __ -------------2. 9
_
_
F inan ce, in su ra n ce, and real e s t a te ------------ _
52
2. 3
S e r v ices ------------------ --------------------------------------60
33. 6
G o v ern m en t-------------------------------------------------------Industry group

See footnotes at end of table.




M an-days
id le during
y ear (all
stoppages)
4, 150. 9
2, 258. 7
221. 5
1. 1
99. 3

Stoppages
beginning in
year
Num ber W orkers
involved
180
143.4
57. 2
91
2
14.4
.8
9
1
3 .4
2
.2

121. 9
24. 7
58. 4
20. 8
7. 4
42. 3
26. 1
20. 1
75. 5
3 1, 126. 6

1
2
2
4
3
5
3
3
11

.3
.4
.4
1.4
1. 1
2. 8
1. 7
.4
5. 9

54. 6

9
9
13
7

4. 5
2. 7
9 .0
6. 2

2
3

1. 1
.4
86. 2
0. 7
20. 1
2. 8
61. 7
.6
.1
.1
(2) .

89. 0
171. 0
35. 3
.5
62. 5
1,892 . 2
21. 2
3 1, 324. 9
59. 6
240. 4
89. 0
_

67. 0
90. 1

89
2
58
8
12
3
2
2
2

P lant ad m in istration

M an-days
id le during
y ear (all
stoppages)
1,570 . 1
1,006 . 7
206. 5
4. 1
85. 9
1. 8

Stoppages
beginning in
year
Num ber W orkers
involved
726
461. 4
280. 0
425
7
4. 5
30
8. 2
7
1. 3

M an-days
idle during
year (all
stoppages)
4, 507. 5
2, 162. 9
14. 6
66. 8
5 .4

6
9
6
17
5
14
5
14
1
15
51

.6
1. 5
3. 6
3. 2
2. 6
4. 3
1. 0
4. 6
.3
2. 7
29. 0

13. 0
13. 9
76. 2
23. 1
8. 7
88.4
50. 5
46. 1
.3
16. 9
299. 8

3
7
3
5

43
60
50
71

12. 1
33. 1
36. 3
124. 0

142. 8
258. 2
124. 1
890. 0

3. 1
2. 4
563. 3
1. 1
49. 9
18. 6
442. 2
1. 1
.3
50. 0
.2

6
8
301

5. 3
1. 9
181. 5
0. 6
34. 1
8. 5
79. 8
4. 1

10. 9
13. 2
2, 344 .6
1.0
95. 1
38. 8
470. 3
39. 0

.8
10. 7
14. 5
3. 2
98. 3
83. 3
25. 5
4 3. 0
5. 1
31. 8
286.
23.
24.
92.

3
119
44
59
31
_

12
33

_

1. 2
53. 2

_

16. 1
1, 684. 2

40
Table A-2.

W o rk

Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1968— Continued

jW orkers_and m an-d ays in thousands)
Other working conditions
Interunion or intraunion m a tters
Industry group

A ll in d u s tr ie s _____________________________
M anufacturing _______________________________
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _____________________
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts-------------------------------T obacco m anufactures -----------------------------------T extile m ill p ro d u cts___________________________
A pparel and other fin ish ed products made
from fab rics and sim ila r m a teria ls ------------Lum ber and wood prod ucts, except furniture —
F urniture and f ix tu r e s -------------------------------------P aper and a llied p ro d u c ts______________________
P rin tin g, publishing, and a llied in d u str ie s____
C hem icals and a llied p ro d u c ts_________________
P etro leu m refining and related in d u s tr ie s -----Rubber and m iscella n eo u s p la stic s products —
L eather and leath er products --------------------------Stone, clay, and g la ss p r o d u c ts_______________
P rim ary m etal in d u s tr ie s ______________________
F abricated m etal prod ucts, except
ordnance, m a ch in ery, and transportation
eq u ip m en t______________________________________
M achinery, excep t e le c t r ic a l__________________
E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ---- ---------------------------------------------------T ransportation equipm ent -------------------------------P ro fe ssio n a l, sc ie n tific , and controllin g
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
goods; w atch es and clo ck s ___________________
M iscellan eou s m anufacturing in d u stries ____
N onm anufacturing ___________________________
A gricu ltu re, fo r e str y , and fish e r ie s -------------M ining ___________________________________________
C ontract c o n str u c tio n ---------------------------------------T ransportation , com m un ication , e le c tr ic ,
g a s, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ---------------------------W h olesale and re ta il tr a d e _____________________
F inan ce, in su ra n ce, and r ea l esta te -------------S e r v ic e s ------------------------------------------------------------G o v ern m en t------------- -------------------------------- ----

Stoppages
beginning in
year
Numb e r W orkers
involved

M an-days
id le during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
year
Num ber W orkers
involved

142
85
1
2
1

67. 9
57. 0
0. 2
1.4
.8

460. 5
431. 6
0. 5
15. 7
1. 6

475
33
1
5
-

136.4

3
1
1
2
1
3
3
2
14

.4
(2)
.1
.5
.8
2. 8
.1
.5
7. 0

4. 7
(2)
.3
8. 1
1. 6
32. 0
1. 9
.9
73. 7

2
18
15
14

(2)
6. 3
22. 6
13. 1

1. 9
134. 0
24. 5
123. 0

1
1
57

.3
(2)
11. 0

39
4
5
4

_

8. 8

_

.3
1. 3
(2)

_

6. 8
.5
28. 9
_
17. 4
4. 7
3. 7
1. 3

.2
.2

1. 3
.5

2
3

_

_

M an-days
id le during
y ear (all
stop pages)

N ot reported
Stoppages
M an-days
beginning in
idle during
year
year (all
Num ber W orkers stoppages)
involved

8. 9
3. 5
.5
-

697. 4
80. 5
35. 0
4. 5
-

29
12
1
3

2
1
1
3
1
_
3

.4
(2)
.4
_
.4
(2)
_
.9

3. 4
.4
.4
_
.6
.4
_
3. 8

6
5

.6
26. 2

3

.3
1. 1
.5
.8

.9
4. 2

442

127. 5

616. 9

2

.

21
392

.

6

64. 8
45. 0
13. 1
1. 3

5

.6
2. 7

10
_
8

_

3. 5
1. 9
0. 7
.4

13. 7
7. 6
1.4
2. 5

1
1
3
1

(2)
-

"
.1
.4
.2

(2)
-

.4
2. 0
.9

_
1
1

_

_

-

(2)
(2)
-

.2
.1
-

17

1. 6

6. 0

5
0
2
8

2
6
4
1

0. 2
.7
.5
(2)

0. 5
3. 0
1. 6
(2)

2. 5
4. 9

i
3

(2)
.2

.5
.3

.

191.
264.
148.
5.

_

_

_

_

_

1 The num ber of stoppages reported for a m ajor in dustry group or d ivision m ay not equal the sum of its com ponents becau se individual
stoppages occurring in 2 or m ore industry groups have been counted in each. The m ajor industry group and d iv isio n totals have been ad­
ju sted to elim in ate duplication. W orkers involved and m an-d ays id le have been allocated am ong the r e sp ectiv e industry group s.
2 L e ss than 100 w ork ers.
3 A large proportion of the 1968 id le n e ss resu lted from a stoppage that began in 1967.
4 Id len ess in 1968 resu ltin g from stoppages that began in 1967.
NOTE: B eca u se of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals.




41
Table A-3.

W ork Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry, 1968'

Industry group

A ll in d u s tr ie s ---------------------------- -----------M anufacturing _______________________________
Ordnance and a c c e ss o r ie s -------------------------------Food and kindred p ro d u cts-------------------------------T obacco m anufactures _________________________
T extile m ill p ro d u c ts___________________________
A pparel and other finished products m ade
from fa b rics and sim ila r m a te r ia ls -------------Lum ber and wood products, except
furniture ------------------ ------------------------------------F urniture and fixtu res — -------------------------------P aper and allied p ro d u c ts--------------------------------P rin tin g, publishing, and allied in d u s tr ie s ---C hem icals and a llied products . ---------------------P etroleu m refining and related in d u s tr ie s ___
Rubber and m iscella n eo u s p la stic s products —
L eather and leath er products --------------------------Stone, c la y , and g la ss p ro d u cts----------------------P rim ary m etal in d u s tr ie s ______________________
F abricated m etal products, except ordnance,
m ach inery, and tran sp ortation eq u ip m en t---M achinery, except e le c t r ic a l__________________
E le c tr ic a l m ach inery, equipm ent,
and s u p p lie s ----------------------------------------------------T ransportation equ ipm ent--------------------- --------P ro fe ssio n a l, s cien tific , and controlling in strum ents; photographic and op tical goods;
w atches and c lo c k s ____________________________
M iscellan eou s m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s --------Nonm anufacturing ----------------------------------------A gricu ltu re, fo r e str y , and fish e r ie s _________
M ining ----------------------------------------------------------------Contract constru ction --------------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s, and sanitary se r v ic e s ---------------------------W holesale and re ta il tr a d e -------------------------------F inan ce, in su ra n ce, and real e s t a te ---------------S e r v ic e s ---- -----------------------------------------------------G ov ern m en t_____________________________________

(W orkers and m an-d ays in thousands)
Alabam a
A rkansas
Stoppages
Stoppages
M an-days
M an-days
beginning in
beginning in
id le during
id le during
year
year
y ear (all
year (all
Num ber W orkers stoppages) Num ber W orkers stop pages)
involved
involved
11.0
32. 1
646. 2
34
133. 5
76
52. 7
13. 3
473. 0
15
3. 1
39
1
1
0. 4
2. 8
0. 7
1.4
1
20. 0
2. 0
6
1. 0
( 2)
1
26. 0
.9
1
.2
3. 5
1
2
.3
8. 1
(2)
(2)
2
20. 5
2
11.3
.6
.6
1
77. 0
2
.2
.7
1. 4
.2
1. 2
2
1
.3
1. 2
.2
1
(2)
2
.5
15. 5
4
5. 5
236. 2
12
3
2

1. 2
1.0
.4

4 1 .2
30. 0
1. 2

4
1
-

.8
.4
-

24. 2
1. 2
-

1
37

(2)
18. 8

.2
173. 3

19

7. 9

80. 8

2. 2
5. 2
.2
(2)
.3

44. 6

10
8
8
5
4
2

4. 0
2. 7
9. 8
.4
.3
1. 5

.

26. 3
4 1. 5
87. 8
4. 5
3. 6
9. 6

.

9
3
4
1
2

See footnotes at end of table.




_

29. 8
2. 3
.4
3. 7

355
188
1
10
1
1
8
5
10
3
7
2
7
1
19
13
37
20
17
19
1
6
167
4
49
28
35
3
30
18 •

Connecticut

Colorado
A ll in d u s tr ie s --- ------- --------------------------M anufacturing ----------------- --------------------------Ordnance and a c c e ss o r ie s -------------------------------Food and kindred p ro d u cts_____________________
T obacco m anufactures _________________________
T extile m ill products ______ ______ _____________
A pparel and other fin ish ed products m ade
from fa b rics and sim ila r m a te r ia ls _________
Lum ber and wood products, except
furniture ---------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtu res ____________________ ____
P aper and a llied p ro d u c ts--------------------------------P rin tin g, publishing, and a llied in d u s tr ie s ____
C hem icals and a llied p ro d u cts-------------------------P etro leu m refining and related industrie s ____
Rubber and m iscella n eo u s p la stics prod ucts__
Leather and leath er products --------------------------Stone, cla y , and g la ss p ro d u cts----------------------P rim ary m etal in d u s tr ie s --------------------------------Fabricated m etal products, except ordnance,
m ach inery, and tran sp ortation eq u ip m en t---M achinery, except e le c t r ic a l__________________
E le c tr ic a l m ach inery, equipm ent,
and su p p lie s ___________________________________
T ransportation equ ipm ent ------------------- -----------------P ro fe ssio n a l, scien tific , and controlling instrum ents; photographic and op tical goods;
w atches and c lo c k s ____________________________
M iscellan eou s m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s -----------Nonm anufacturing --------------------------------------------------A gricu ltu re, fo r e str y , and fish e r ie s -----------------M ining -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Contract constru ction ------------------------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary se r v ic e s ----------------------------------W holesale and r e ta il tr a d e _____________________
F inan ce, in su ra n ce, and real e s t a te ---------------S ervice s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------G overnm ent -------------------------------------------------------------------

.

C alifornia
Stoppages
M an-days
beginning in
id le during
year
Num ber W orkers stop p ages)
involved
134. 8
57. 0
0. 5
3. 2
.1
(2)
1. 5
1.4
1. 7
3. 0
1. 7
.4
1. 1
(2)
7. 5
2. 4
10. 2
2. 3
8. 6
10. 5
(2)
1. 1
77. 8
2. 4
9 .4
44. 6
8. 1
.5
7. 2
5. 6

2 .4 0 3 . 8
1,477. 0
12. 5
91. 5
5. 5
.3
43. 0
13. 7
17. 5
426. 9
49. 9
1. 7
6. 6
.1
154. 8
71. 7
252. 8
52. 6
195. 0
66. 8
3. 1
11.3
926. 8
43. 2
93. 6
518. 1
113. 8
25. 7
118. 6
13. 9

F lorida

46
10

9. 3
1. 2

153. 6
47. 5

100
37

49. 0
27. 7

1,280. 5
1. 022. 9

94
28

55. 6
5. 3

672. 2
112. 7

3
-

10. 4
-

2. 9
-

-

-

1
1
2
2
2
2
1
4
8
5
5
4

0. 1
-

-

0. 3
-

(2)
.2
.4
.2
.3
.8
1.0
4. 9
4 .4
.4
15. 0

(2)
4. 8
6. 2
2. 9
2. 0
29. 0
231. 6
293. 2
65. 5
15. 3
369. 5

6
1
1
5
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
-

1. 9
.3
(2)
.2
.1
.7
(2)
(2)
.6
.2
1. 0
-

2
1

(2)
. 1

16. 3
1.1
(2)
9. 7
1. 1
3. 5
.5
.7
3. 0
2. 8
36. 6
1.0
13. 6

-

-

-

-

2
1

.4
(2)

8. 3
3 6. 4

-

-

-

3
1

-

-

36
1
2
17
7
6
1
2
"

.5

(2)
-

-

8. 0
(2)
1. 0
2. 8
2. 7
1. 3
(2)
(2)
'

19. 5
2. 9
-

-

106. 1
0. 7
4. 1
59. 6
28. 2
12. 9
(2)
. 7
"

63

21. 3

-

257. 5

-

-

4 22. 6

-

1
66

(2)
50. 3

3
559. 5
.

.
-

26
9
10
1
3
14

-

6. 2
8. 9
. 9
. 3
1. 0
4. 0

-

120. 7
91. 9
12. 7
14. 2
5. 4
12. 5

-

32
12
10
2
4
6

.

-

-

5. 2
14. 5
2. 1

(2)
1. 2
27. 2

67. 0
102. 4
28. 6
2. 1
5. 2
354. 2

42

Table A-3. Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry, 19681---- Continued
I n d u s try g ro u p

(W o rk e rs an d m a n -d a y s in th o u sa n d s)
Illin o is
G e o rg ia
S to p p a g e s
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
id le d u rin g
year
year
y e a r (a ll
o rk
o rk
N u m b e r W v o lveers
s to p p a g e s ) N u m b e r W v o lveers
s to p p a g e s )
in
d
in
d

In d ia n a
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
year
o rk
N u m b e r W v o lveers s to p p a g e s )
in
d

A ll i n d u s t r i e s _______________________________

74

36. 9

4 7 7. 8

317

186. 0

4, 001. 9

238

114. 5

1, 725. 9

M a n u fa c tu rin g — ------- ----------------------------------

42
_
2
3

18. 4

345. 8

167

81. 0

1, 723. 5

148

82. 3

1, 373. 5

3
12
-

15. 1
3 .4
-

210. 0
50. 3
-

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r ie s ---------------------------------F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s ___________________________
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e
fro m f a b r ic s a n d s im ila r m a te r i a ls --------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e --------- --------------------------------------------- —
F u r n itu r e an d f ix tu r e s ---------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s tr i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------------------P e tr o le u m re fin in g a n d r e la t e d in d u s trie s _____
R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d u c ts —
L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ----------------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s ------------------------P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s tr ie s ---------------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e ,
m a c h in e r y , an d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t---M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ----------------------------E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p lie s ______________________________________
T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t----------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s ______________________________
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ---------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ------------------------------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , an d f is h e r i e s --------------M in in g --------------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n ----------------- ---------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s -----------------------------W h o le sa le a n d r e ta i l t r a d e --- --------------------------F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ----------------S e r v i c e s ______________________________ ____________
G o v e r n m e n t________________________________________

.

0. 3
.8

.

1. 2
16. 3

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ---------- ----------------------------------O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r ie s ---------------------------------F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s ----------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p ro d u c ts -----------------------------------------A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e
fro m f a b r ic s a n d s im ila r m a t e r i a l s --------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u r n itu r e ----------------------------------------- -----------------F u r n itu r e a n d f ix tu r e s ----------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ________________________
P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------------------P e tr o le u m re fin in g a n d r e la t e d in d u s tr i e s -------R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p r o d u c ts __
L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ------------------ ------S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s __________ „_____
P r i m a r y m e ta l in d u s tr ie s ---------------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , a n d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t___
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ___________________
E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t,
an d s u p p lie s _______ _____ — ---------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t__ ____________ _ —
P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , an d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s a n d c l o c k s ______________________________
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s tr ie s ------N o n m a n u f a c tu r in g --- ------------------------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , a n d f is h e r i e s __________
M in in g --------------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n ----- ---------------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s -----------------------------W h o le sa le an d r e ta i l t r a d e _______________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ----------------S e r v i c e s ____________________________________________
G o v e r n m e n t-------------------------------------- ----------------S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d o f ta b le .



113. 1
1. 7

2

.4

4. 4

-

-

2
1
i
1
4
2
3
3

1. 2
.1
.2
(2 )
.4
(2 )
1. 6
1. 3

15. 3
7. 1
1. 5
.4
1. 9
2. 6
49. 7
90. 9

2
3
2
12
2
2
1
6
30

.5
.4
.5
1. 4
.3
(2 )
.1
8. 6
17. 6

3. 3
2. 2
3. 6
21. 0
3. 5
.6
16. 0
258. 0
4 9 9. 7

8
2
1
2
2
4
8
20

2. 7
.3
.3
.2
(2 )
.6
6. 1
8. 5

51. 6
11. 0
3. 3
1. 0
.5
2. 9
214. 1
306. 5

2
1

.3
.1

2. 2
1. 3

17
31

3. 0
15. 7

112. 1
35 2. 0

23
20

6. 7
7. 0

9 5 .4
4 7. 2

9
6

4. 8
6. 7

38. 0
1 12. 9

7
17

5. 8
11. 6

73. 1
231. 6

16
19

14. 1
15. 5

215. 6
88. 9

32

1 8 .4

132. 1

3
5

3. 3
.5

17. 8
14. 0

1
7

.1
1. 7

.4
74. 9

151

105. 0

2, 278. 4

90

32. 2

3 5 2 .4

3
18

0. 9
5. 1

6. 3
43. 6

21
51

16. 1
10. 2

78. 0
128. 3

50

7

1 .4
15. 9

6. 8
185. 0

7
2
2

10. 5
1. 0
1. 0

66. 3
9. 4
6. 6

22
26
1
7
23

61. 6
4. 5
.7
1. 5
10. 5

13
9
1
2
8

12. 0
1. 1
(2 )
.2
1. 4

118. 0
18. 8
3. 8
6. 9
13. 0

Iow a
M a n u fa c tu rin g --------------------------------------------------

10. 8
.9
-

25
2
-

-

1, 907.
49.
35.
19.
59.

2
7
7
7
8

-

K e n tu c k y

K an sas

89
60

29. 9
20. 7

451. 2

37

6. 1

78. 6

342. 0

13

3. 3

39. 2

149
78

35. 6

649. 7
4 3 3. 3

13
-

4. 2
-

103. 7
-

1
2
-

(2 )
0. 1
-

(2 )
4. 2
-

5
2
-

0. 3
4. 6
-

2. 3
103. 2
-

76. 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

.3

1. 8

1
1
2
1
1
2
2

(2 )
.1
1. 3
(2)
1. 2
.1
2. 9

.4
1. 3
6. 8
1. 6
1. 2
.9
96. 0

1
2
2

.2
1. 2
.3

1. 5
14. 0
4. 3

3
4
i
i
7
i
i
3
6

.6
.7
(2 ) .
1. 1
2. 3
(2)
.3
.2
2 .4

10. 1
4. 6
3. 5
11. 0
20. 9
1. 7
11. 1
10. 7
46. 8

5
22

.6
7. 4

12. 1
65. 4

1
3

(2)
1. 4

.5
11. 0

5
9

1. 1
2. 8

25. 9
30. 1

2
6

.4
1. 3

1. 4
35. 2

1

(2)

3. 5

21
5

17. 3
1. 0

130. 5
15. 1

2
29

1. 2
9. 2

16. 0
109. 3

24

2. 9

39. 4

2
1

3. 0
1. 1

71

.3
(2)
41. 1

216. 3

17

4. 8

59. 0

1
9

(2)
0. 5

0. 2
13. 5

34
23

28. 0
5. 4

112. 7
62. 5

1
7
1

3. 5
.7
(2)
.2

42. 0
6. 4
1. 4

5
4

1. 6
.4

14. 8
5. 4

3

-

-

-

5
1

6. 7
.4
(2)

2

(2)

28. 0
5. 5
2. 7
4. 5
.4

-

3

-

.5

3
2

.2
(2)

5. 2

.3

3

.3

43
Table A-3.

Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry, 19681---- Continued

In d u s try g ro u p

^ W o rk e ^ s ^ L n d jrn a n ^ d a ^ s ^ n th a u s a n ^
L o u is ia n a
M a ry la n d
S to p p a g e s
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
id le d u rin g
year
year
y e a r (a ll
o rk
o rk
N u m b e r W v o lveers
sto p p a g e s ) N u m b e r W v o lveers
sto p p a g e s )
in
d
in
d

M a s s a c h u s e tts
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
year
o rk
N u m b e r W v o lveers s to p p a g e s )
in
d

A ll i n d u s t r i e s _______________________________

63

31. 3

293. 7

64

33. 3

530. 3

170

69. 3

1, 703. 7

M a n u fa c tu rin g --------------------------------------------------

17

7. 4

81. 4

32

12. 3

316. 5

96

42. 1

4 7 1. 3

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r ie s ---------------------------------F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s _______________________
T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s _________________ _______
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e
fro m f a b r ic s a n d s im ila r m a t e r i a l s --------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u r n itu r e _ _______________________________________
F u r n itu r e an d f ix tu r e s ---------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s _______________________
P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s tr i e s _____
C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------------------P e tr o le u m re fin in g an d r e la te d in d u s tr i e s _____
R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d u c ts __
L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ___________________
S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s -----------------------P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s _______________________
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , a n d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t__
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ___________________
E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t,
an d s u p p lie s ------------------------- ----------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t________________________
P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s ______________________________
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ----------

1
-

3. 6
-

46. 8
-

1
7
4

0. 3
.8
.8

0. 6
8. 4
5. 2

1

(2)
.3
.3
1 .4
(2)
(2)
.3
1. 1

~

1

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ------------------------------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , a n d f i s h e r i e s __________
M in in g ______________________________________________
C o n tr a c t c o n s tru c tio n ____________________________
T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s ____________________
W h o le sa le a n d r e t a i l tr a d e ______________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ___________
S e r v i c e s -----------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t________________________________________

6
1

1.4
2. 4

21. 8
100. 0

5. 5

2

2. 0

17. 2

16. 5

2
1
1
2
2
1
3

(2)
.1
(2)
.2
1. 2
1. 7
1. 2

.3
2. 7
.2
2. 3
3. 1
63. 8
385. 2

9
2
2
6
3
3
4
4
3
4

.7

3. 3
3. 1
6. 2
.3
(2)
8. 2
2. 9

.7
.2
2. 6
1. 1
.3
2. 1
1. 2
.3
.8

23. 8
2. 3
26. 6
2. 0
5. 8
26. 3
17. 9
13. 5
3. 6

.1

4. 6
.7

5
1

.5
.2

8. 7
.8

4
11

.8
3. 5

15. 6
65. 5

1

.2

3. 8

1
2

.1
.5

2. 7
4. 7

15
11

10. 2
13. 7

120. 1
1 14. 1

46

23. 9

212. 3

2

.5

3. 0

32

20. 9

213. 8

3
74

2. 1
27. 2

3. 7
1, 232. 4

(2)
(2)
1. 1

30

5. 4

92. 0

13. 5
.7
.5
.1
5. 0

(2)
0 .4
19. 6
1 4 2.4
4 .4
22. 3
2. 6
22. 2

11
23
1
• 5
4

16. 9
3. 4
.3
.4
.9

1 ,0 6 6 . 6
48. 0
16. 8
7. 4
1. 5

2
2
-

3
1
1
2
2

1
25

0. 4
5. 1

7. 0
49. 0

1
1
7

9
5
-

16. 1
.8
.4
1. 1

1 2 8.4
13. 3
10. 0
4. 5

8
8
2
2
3

2

4

M ic h ig an

M in n e so ta

M is s is s ip p i

A ll i n d u s t r i e s _______________________________

355

261. 1

7, 752. 7

62

18. 3

297. 7

29

8. 1

115. 0

M a n u fa c tu rin g _________________________________

207

138. 7

3, 027. 6

34

6. 9

147. 7

17

2. 7

60. 9

24. 1
-

1
7
-

2. 2
1. 4
-

4. 4
37. 0
-

-

-

-

1

0. 2

2. 3

2
2
1
1

6. 0
9. 6
(2)
2. 8
-

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r ie s _______________________
F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s ----------------------------- __
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c tu r e s -----------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e
fro m f a b r ic s a n d s im ila r m a t e r i a l s __________
L u m b e r an d w ood p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u rn itu r e -------------------------------------------------------------F u r n itu r e an d f i x t u r e s -----1---------------------------------P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s _______________________
P rin tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s tr i e s ------C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------------------P e tr o le u m re fin in g an d r e la te d in d u s tr i e s ______
R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p r o d u c t s __
L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p r o d u c t s ___________________
S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s ------------------------P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , an d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t___
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ----------------------------E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t,
an d s u p p lie s ______________________________________
T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t---------- ---------------------P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s an d c lo c k s ______________________________
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s tr ie s ------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ------------------------------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , an d f is h e r i e s --------------M in in g --------------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c tio n -----------------------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s -----------------------------W h o le sa le a n d r e t a i l tr a d e --------------------------------F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e ---------------S e rv ic e s ____________________________________________
G o v e r n m e n t________________________________________
S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d of ta b le .



11
-

1. 1
-

2

.3

2
8
5
2
4
2

.2
1. 5
1. 5
(2)
1. 7

-

-

50. 3

1
1
3
-

.4
(2)
(2)
-

-

-

-

6. 0

3
25

.8
16. 6

62. 9
543. 6

3
2

.4
.1

28
49

4. 1
19. 2

93. 4
554. 7

4
8

.6
1. 3

1. 8
1. 8
.7
1 1. 8
2. 9
34. 0
38. 2

13
45

12. 1
78. 1

254. 1
633. 3

1
3

.3
(2)

3
5

.6
.5

5. 3
5. 9

148
_
3
38

122. 4

4, 725. 1

28

1. 2
86. 1

127. 1
3, 918. 8

3

13
38
3
11
42

18. 5
5. 7
.5
.9
9. 6

4 6 3. 6
108. 1
15. 4
23. 1
69. 0

9
13
3

-

.5

_

4.
100.
12.
579.
96.

5
7
5
9
3

-

_

_

-

(2)
.4
(2)
.3
-

-

-

2
1

-

16. 7
1. 1

3
2

.6
(2)
.5
.2

11. 6
3. 6

2

.3

10. 1

11. 4
_
0. 4

150. 0
_
4. 2

12
_
6

5. 5
3. 8

54. 1
_
36. 6

7. 3
3. 4
.2
"

81. 7
6 0 .4
3. 7

_

7. 8
4. 4

3
1

1. 2
.3

12. 9
3. 2

-

-

-

-

-

2

.2

1 .4

44

Table A-3.

Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry, 19681---- Continued

In d u s try g ro u p

^ V o rk e r^ s ^ n d ^ m a n ^ la ^ s ^ n ^ h o u s a rid s j^
M is s o u ri
M o n ta n a
S to p p a g e s
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
id le d u rin g
year
year
y e a r (a ll
o rk
o rk s
N u m b e r W v o lveers
sto p p a g e s ) N u m b e r W v o lveer d
sto p p a g e s )
in
d
in

N ew J e r s e y
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
year
o rk
N u m b e r W v o lveers s to p p a g e s )
in
d

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------------------

148

76. 6

1, 186. 7

26

4. 7

4 8 7. 9

218

97. 3

2, 00 3. 1

M a n u fa c tu rin g ----------------------------- ------------------

85

50. 2

700. 3

3

0. 3

197. 5

142

59. 0

1, 145. 8

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r ie s _______________________
F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s ----------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s _____________________________
A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e
fro m f a b r ic s a n d s im ila r m a t e r i a l s --------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u r n itu r e -------------------------------------------------------------F u r n itu r e an d f ix tu r e s ----------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------- ----------P e tr o le u m re fin in g an d r e la te d i n d u s t r i e s ------R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d u c ts ___
L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ----------------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s -----------------------P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ________________________
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , a n d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t---M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ----------------------------E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p lie s --------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t----------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s a n d c l o c k s --------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ----------

2
7
2
-

2. 9
9. 0
.3

10. 2
68. 7
1. 1

(2)
-

3. 2
-

6
4

4. 3
.5

92. 5
5. 0

-

-

1
-

-

2
5
2
6
3
1
1
5

(2)
.5
.3
1. 8
.5
.3
(2)
1. 5

13. 2
20. 1
11. 5
59. 5
20. 1
.3
.1
5 1 .7

1
-

(2)
-

4
13
1
22
2
4
11
11

(2)
4. 0
(2)
3. 9
.4
.3
7. 6
2. 9

.3
103. 7
3. 9
83. 4
47. 4
1. 9
266. 9
238. 0

10
19

3. 1
6. 6

62. 0
142. 7

1
-

0. 2

15
25

1. 0
6. 5

13. 9
62. 4

6
11

.8
22. 3

27. 0
210. 3

-

-

13
5

12. 5
14. 0

103. 2
108. 5

1
2

(2)
.1

.3
.9

3
3

.7
.4

4. 8
10. 2

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g _____________________________

63

2 6 .4

4 8 6. 4

23

_

_

76
_
1
15

38. 3
_
(2)
1 .6

857. 3

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , a n d f is h e r i e s --------------M in in g ---- ------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n ---- ---------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n ,' c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s -----------------------------W h o le sa le an d r e t a i l t r a d e _______________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ----------------S e r v i c e s _______________ ________________ ________
G o v e r n m e n t-----------------------------------------------------------

23
17
1
9
10

29. 6
1. 5
.8
1. 5
3. 3

750.
23.
38.
9.
7.

_

2
24

1. 0
12. 3

32. 9
295. 2

11
11
1
8
6

8 .4
2. 7
.3
.7
.9

77. 3
4 8. 8
16. 7
9. 1
6. 4

_

2
11
1
5
-

3
1

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------------------------------O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r ie s ---------------------------------F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s ----------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin s ih e d p ro d u c ts m a d e
fro m f a b r ic s a n d s im ila r m a t e r i a l s --------------L u m b e r a n d w o o d p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u r n itu r e -------------------------------------------------------------F u r n itu r e an d f ix tu r e s ---------------------------------------P a p e r an d a llie d p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------P rin tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s tr i e s ------C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------------------P e tr o le u m re fin in g a n d r e la te d in d u s tr i e s -------R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d u c ts ---L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ---------------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s -----------------------P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , a n d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t-----M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ---------------------------E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t,
an d s u p p lie s -------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t----------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , an d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s --------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ----------

491
268

329. 9
90. 5

-

-

-

4. 3
_
0. 2
3. 1

-

290. 4

_

3 244. 3
26. 9

(2)
.9
.1
(2)

4, 953. 5

46

15. 1

1, 317. 6

23

9. 0

.3

14. 9

21

3. 2

48. 3

2

.4

4
6
9
12
10
2
4
2
13
22

.2
1. 2
.6
1. 2
4. 2
(2)
.2
.1
2. 9
7. 9

1. 4
52. 9
5. 7
85. 7
69. 9
1. 5
1. 9
1. 3
74. 4
273. 5

-

-

23
43

6. 1
14. 9

147. 9
332. 4

49
13

36. 5
4. 3

7
7

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g --------------------------------- -------

223

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , a n d f is h e r i e s --------------M in in g --------------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s tru c tio n ------------------------------------- —
T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s -----------------------------W h o le sa le a n d r e ta i l t r a d e ------------------------------F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ------ ------S e rv ic e s -----------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t________________________________________

2
1
46
58
49
3
41
23

S ee fo o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b le .

.4

-

1
3




(2)
4 193. 8

1. 5
16. 7
-

.9
.2

N o rth C a ro lin a

N ew Y o rk
M a n u fa c tu rin g --------------------------------------------------

-

168. 7
122. 6

__

...

...

5 74
345

253. 2

4, 593. 2

171. 2

3, 025. 9

3
16

1. 2
5. 6

4. 6
62. 6
36. 9

3. 2

16. 5

-

-

-

2. 6
.6

40. 8
2. 7
8. 7

1

.9
.3

(2)
2. 8
4. 7
-

3
5
14
5
13
26
19
58

.4
2. 5
2. 6
2. 7
3. 2
10. 0
9. 3
30. 1

4

1
2
2
1
2
1

1
8
8
9
8

O hio

17

-

.

0. 2
26. 7

-

3

-

11. 4
2. 4
70. 7
15. 4
59. 7
63. 5

2

(2)
.4
1. 6
(2 )
.5
(2)
.3

6. 7
.2
16. 6
(2)
15. 6

48
69

11. 6
55. 0

172. 6
143. 5
559. 9
214. 5
1, 235. 4

148. 0
32. 2

5
-

2. 4
-

26. 7
-

29
25

12. 6
22. 3

183. 9
175. 0

2. 8
.8

4. 6
4. 6

1

.1

2
6

.4
.6

8. 9
5. 0

239. 4

3, 635. 8

23

6. 1

.9
46. 2

(2)
(2)
19. 2

.

.

.

8 1 .9
0. 4
18. 9
28. 9

1, 567. 3

0. 4
.7
268. 6

3. 5
80. 8
1, 086. 6

127. 7
1 3 .4
1. 6
9. 2
68. 1

1, 375. 9
95. 4
77. 3
61. 9
1, 755. 8

23. 3
2. 9
.3
1. 2
6. 1

290. 6
44. 3
13. 3
29. 0
19. 4

-

4

0. 8

1. 9

229
2
41
93

5

7

3. 5
1. 0

-

-

29. 2
1 1. 0
1. 8
2. 3

28
26
1
14
24

3
4

.2
.6

-

45
Table A-3. Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry, 19681— Continued

In d u s try g ro u p

(W o rk e rs an d m a n -d a y s in th o u sa n d s)
O k la h o m a
O re g o n
S to p p a g e s
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
year
year
y e a r (a ll
W o rk e rs
o rk
N u m b e r in v o lv e d
s to p p a g e s ) N u m b e r W v o lveers
in
d

A ll i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------------------

35

20. 7

M a n u fa c tu rin g _________________________________

11

1. 9

O rd n a n c e an d a c c e s s o r ie s -------------------------------F o o d a n d k in d re d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s ___________________________
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e
fro m f a b r ic s a n d s im ila r m a t e r i a l s -------------L u m b e r an d w ood p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t
fu rn itu r e _________________________________________
F u r n itu r e an d f ix tu r e s ---------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s tr i e s ------C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------------------P e tr o le u m re fin in g a n d r e la te d in d u s tr i e s -------R u b b e r an d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d u c ts —
L e a th e r an d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ---------------------------S to n e , c la y , an d g la s s p r o d u c t s -----------------------P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , an d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t---M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ----------------------------E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t,
an d s u p p lie s -------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t----------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s an d c lo c k s _____________________________
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ---------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ------------------------------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , an d f is h e r i e s --------------M in in g ______________________________________________
C o n tr a c t c o n s tru c tio n ____________________________
T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s -----------------------------W h o le sa le an d r e t a i l t r a d e ______________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ---------------S e r v i c e s -----------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t-----------------------------------------------------------

179. 9
73. 1

M a n -d a y s
id le d u rin g
y e a r (a ll
s to p p a g e s )

P e n n s y lv a n ia
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
year
o rk
N u m b e r W v o lveers sto p p a g e s )
in
d

52

15. 2

242. 8

473

198. 5

2. 670. 7

21

5. 7

123. 6

304

92. 3

1, 516. 0

5. 6
-

2
15
12

0. 5
1. 7
2. 6

1. 8
12. 1
21. 3

2. 6
-

-

0. 2
-

-

-

-

-

20

2. 4

19. 7

1
1
-

.2
.9
-

(a) n
10. 0
33. 0
2 2. 8

7
1
1
1
1

1. 4
.8
.1
.4
(2)

1 1. 5
5. 3
1. 5
7. 0
2. 2

1
13
3
5
8
1
5
3
18
52

(2)
2. 6
1.4
2. 3
.9
(2)
.6
.4
7. 8
22. 2

2. 6
25. 3
72. 4
4. 1
20. 9
(2 )
20. 8
9. 8
261. 6
294. 1

3
1

20. 1
.1

1
3

(2)
1. 3

.3
87. 3

129. 2
324. 1

4. 4
-

1

.1

.3

49
39
26
26

6. 3
11. 8

1
-

.5
(2)
.1
-

10. 5
16. 3

110. 3
158. 7

24

18. 8

106. 9

2

.1

2. 7

1
5

.6
1. 3

.6
26. 4

31

9. 4

119. 1

170

106. 2

1, 154. 7

4
-

3
-

1. 5
-

.

.

17

3 .4

66. 1

2
8

(2)
2. 5

0. 6
39. 5

31
51

38. 1
10. 9

241. 6
208. 0

4
2

1.4
.5
-

18. 4
8. 9

6
15
-

5. 0
1. 8
-

1

13. 5

13. 5

53. 1
25. 9
-

20
45
3
7
13

28. 6
3. 0
1. 3
2. 6
2 1 .7

4 8 9. 1
47. 7
57. 1
80. 9
30. 4

-

-

-

-

-

R h o d e Is la n d

T ennessee

34

O rd n a n c e an d a c c e s s o r ie s ________________________
F o o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u c ts _______________________
T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s _____________________________
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ______________________________
A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e fro m f a b r ic s an d
s im ila r m a te r i a ls ________________________________
L u m b e r an d w o o d p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t
fu rn itu r e ___________________________________________
F u r n itu r e an d f ix tu r e s _____________________________
P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s _________________________
P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s tr ie s _____
C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ____________________
P e tr o le u m re fin in g an d r e la te d in d u s tr ie s
R u b b e r an d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p r o d u c t s ___
L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ___________________
S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s --------------------------P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e ry
an d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t___________________
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l _____________________
E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t,
an d s u p p lie s ________________________________________
T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t_________________________
P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ;
p h o to g ra p h ic an d o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s
an d c lo c k s _________________________________________
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s ________ —
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g _______________________________
A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , an d f is h e r i e s ____________
M in in g ________________________________________________
C o n tr a c t c o n s tru c tio n -------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c , g a s , an d
s a n ita r y s e r v i c e s _________________________________
W h o le sa le an d r e ta i l tr a d e _______________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e _____________
S e rv ic e s _____________________________________________
G o v e r n m e n t_________________________________________ —
S ee fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .



6. 4

214. 6

93

4 3. 6

976. 9

18

3. 1

65. 0

"
0. 2
.4

0. 7
1. 3

58
2
6
2

29. 1
0. 4
.8
.6

795. 3
3. 6
56. 3
90. 1

4

.2
.1
(2)
.5
"
"
.1

23. 7
.7
1. 4
6 .4
1. 0

1
1
5
1
2
3
2
2
5

-

1
1
1
1
1

.3
.2
2. 0
(2)
1. 0
.9
2. 1
.7
2. 1

2. 4
4. 4
18. 4
3. 7
13. 0
28. 0
20. 3
23. 2
188. 2

4

.8

7. 5

7
4

7. 2
.7

1 5 1.5
2. 7

"

A ll i n d u s t r i e s __________________________ ______

-

-

5
5

4. 3
4. 5

20. 9
151. 9

1
1

(2)
.8

.2
22. 1

1
4

.5
.8

1. 6
15. 2

16

3. 3

149. 6

14. 5

181. 6

_

.

0. 6
4. 8

6. 6
28. 5

5 .4
.7
(2)
3. 1

46. 3
8. 3

_

3

—

_

_

5

0. 6

12. 2

35
.
3
16

4
1
i
i
4

1. 9
(2)
.2
(2)
.6

122. 3
1. 5
10. 2
.5
2. 9

5
3
1
I-

.

.

-

-

1. 3
90. 5

46

Table A-3. Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry, 1968*---- Continued

I n d u s try g ro u p

(W o rk e rs a n d
T exas
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
o rk
N u m b e r W v o lveers
in
d

m a n -d a y s in th o u sa n d s)
M a n -d a y s
id le d u rin g
y e a r (a ll
sto p p a g e s )

V irg in ia
S to p p a g e s
b e g in n in g in
year
o rk s
N u m b e r W v o lveer d
in

M a n -d a y s
id le d u rin g
y e a r (a ll
s to p p a g e s )

W a sh in g to n
S to p p a g e s
M a n -d a y s
b e g in n in g in
id le d u rin g
year
o rk
N u m b e r W v o lveers s to p p a g e s )
in
d

A ll i n d u s t r i e s -------------- -----------------------------

150

6 0 .4

1, 289. 1

93

46. 7

329. 1

90

57. 2

1, 338. 5

M a n u fa c tu rin g --------------------------------------------------

46

14. 0

622. 2

23

10. 4

98. 8

44

17. 9

972. 4

6
-

2. 0
-

61. 6
-

2
1
1

0. 1
1. 6
.3

2. 5
25. 3
.6

4
-

2. 2
-

-

-

3

1. 4

-

-

1
2
2
2
2
1
1
6
5

.4
.2
(2)
.9
(2)
(2)
.2
2 .4
3. 6

26. 5
.9
15. 8
6. 1
75. 5
1. 8
(2 )
4. 0
79. 3
292. 8

1
5

1. 0
2. 2

9. 7
"
7. 7
28. 8

63. 0
-

3
1
1
1
1
2

.9
.4
.2
.6
.5
1. 5

6. 8
2. 5
4. 0
5. 5
9. 9
136. 5

8
2

.4
.6

4. 1
3. 6

3
2

.6
.6

7. 2
4. 5

11
10

2. 9
3. 6

182. 7
223. 1

1
5

.1
2. 7

6. 0
36. 5

4
-

2. 6
-

12. 3

4

4. 8

324. 2

1
1

6. 8
1. 1

(2)
36. 2

.2
230. 3

(2)
.3

.7
13. 7

666. 8
.
0. 5
4 4 2. 6

1
70

1
5

104
_
2
71

.3
(2)
46. 4
.
(2)
25. 4

1
49
10

(2 )
23. 1
1. 2

(2)
109. 4
11. 6

46
.
1
17

39. 2
.
(2)
28. 6

366. 0
.
1. 8
244. 8

14
9

18. 6
1. 7

200. 1
18. 7

7
3

9. 3
2. 6

77. 8
3 1 .4

-

-

-

-

7
12
2
6
1

6. 1
3. 5
.4
.1
.5

76. 4
35. 8
1. 5
3. 6
2. 1

O rd n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r ie s ---------------------------------F o o d an d k in d re d p ro d u c ts ______________________
T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s ---------------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e
fr o m f a b r ic s a n d s im ila r m a te r i a ls -------------L u m b e r a n d w ood p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e -------------------------------------------------------------F u r n itu r e an d f ix tu r e s ---------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , an d a llie d i n d u s t r i e s -----C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s --------------------------P e tr o le u m re fin in g a n d r e la te d in d u s tr i e s -------R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d u c ts ---L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ----------------------------S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s ------------------------P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e ,
m a c h in e ry , an d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t---M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ----- -----------------E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p lie s ______________________________________
T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t----------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , a n d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic a n d o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a tc h e s an d c lo c k s ------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g i n d u s t r i e s -------N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ------------------------------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , a n d f is h e r i e s --------------M in in g --------------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c tio n -----------------------------------------T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s -----------------------------W h o le sa le an d r e ta i l tr a d e --------------- ---------------F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ----------------S e r v ic e s ___________________________________________
G o v e r n m e n t-----------------------------------------------------------

4
4

.1
.5

-

-

2. 7
2. 3

-

"

-

"

W is c o n s in

W e st V irg in ia
A ll i n d u s t r i e s ________________________________

170

95. 7

862. 2

124

61. 2

1, 353. 6

M a n u fa c tu rin g ___________________________________

24

9. 6

358. 7

76

27. 7

571. 0

2
_
1
_
_
_
_
_
4
_
i

(2)
0. 2
_
_
_
-

2. 1

2. 7

1. 7
_
. 1

182. 3

6
1

3. 8
(2)
1. 0

124. 4
1 .4

8
1
3
2
5
3
1
1
4
2
10
2

.2
.8
.2
3. 9
2. 2
(2) .
.3
. 2
. 6
1. 6
. 6

41. 6
.5
23. 6
.5
74. 6
19. 2
2. 5
2. 0
8. 3
3. 7
87. 0
J 86. 1

8
14
3
6

1. 5
8. 0
. 6
3. 3

40. 5
102. 0
43. 7
26. 3

1
8

6. 1
3. 0

33. 5

782. 6

O rd n a n c e an d a c c e s s o r ie s ----------------------------- ----___
F o o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u c ts ________________________
T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s ------------------------------------------- .
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s _______________________________
_ _ _______ .
A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts m a d e fro m f a b r ic s an d s im ila r m a t e r i a l s __
_____ . _ .
L u m b e r a n d w o o d p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t f u r n itu r e —
F u r n itu r e an d f ix tu r e s _____________________________
P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s _________________________ __________
P r in tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s tr ie s _____
__
C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ____________________
...
P e tr o le u m re fin in g a n d r e la te d i n d u s t r i e s ______
R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p r o d u c t s ___ _________ ___________ ______________
L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts _________ __________
S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c t s _________________
_____________
P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s _________________________
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts , e x c e p t o rd n a n c e , m a c h in e ry
____________
a n d tr a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t___ _______
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l __________________
........................ _____________
E l e c tr ic a l m a c h in e ry , e q u ip m e n t, a n d s u p p lie s —
_____________
T r a n s p o r ta tio n e q u ip m e n t_________________________
P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tif ic , an d c o n tro llin g in s tr u m e n ts ; p h o to g ra p h ic an d
o p tic a l g o o d s; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s _____________
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s tr ie s _______
—
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

_____________________________

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , a n d f is h e r i e s --------------------M in in g ____________________________________________
C o n tr a c t c o n s tru c tio n ____________________________ ________ ___________ ____________
T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e le c tr i c , g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s _________
W h o le sa le an d r e ta i l tr a d e ----------------------------------------F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ----------------------S e r v ic e s ____________________ ____________________
—
G o v e r n m e n t -------------------------------- --------- --------- ------------ —
--------------

_

4
_

-

_

-

-

1. 3
4. 7
_
4 2. 0
-

.
-

3

30. 1
-

3
2

2. 5
. 1

9. 6
4. 6

_

_

-

146
1
99
19
9
6
1

4

7

86. 1

503. 5

(2)
75. 5
3. 5
5. 6
. 3
(2)
. 7
. 5

0. 2
34 1. 7
63. 8
87. 6
3. 3
1. 8
2. 0
3. 0

1
2
48

.
-

28
6
9
2
1
2

-

.
.

_
-

24. 3
8 .4
. 3
(2)
(2)
. 4

_

671. 4
100. 0

6. 5
. 5
. 5
3. 8

1 N o w o rk s to p p a g e s w e re r e c o r d e d d u rin g 1968 fo r th e in d u s tr y g ro u p s fo r w h ic h no d a ta a r e p re s e n te d .
S to p p a g e s a ffe c tin g m o re th a n 1 in d u s try g ro u p h a v e b e e n c o u n te d in e a c h g ro u p a ffe c te d ; w o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d m a n -d a y s id le w e re a ll o ­
c a te d to th e r e s p e c tiv e g ro u p s .
2 L e s s th a n 100 w o r k e r s .
5 A la r g e p ro p o r tio n o f th e 1968 id le n e s s r e s u lte d fro m a sto p p a g e th a t b e g a n in 1967.
4 Id le n e s s in 1968 r e s u ltin g fro m a sto p p a g e th a t b e g a n in 1967.
NOTE
: B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls .


47
Table A-4.

W o rk

Stoppages by Industry Group and Contract Status, 1968

^Workejjjs^jmdjriar^^
Total

Industry group
All industries _ _______________________
Manufacturing ____________________________
Ordnance and accessories ___________________
Food and kindred products --------------------- ---Tobacco manufactures ______________________
Textile m ill products ______ — ____ __
Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m aterials________
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture ----------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtures -------------------------------—
Paper and allied products-----------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied
industries---------------------------------------------------Chemicals and allied products----------------------Petroleum refining and related
industries---------------------------------------- -------Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products----------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products -----------------------Stone, clay, and glass products_________ __
Primary metal industries------------------Fabricated metal products, except
ordnance, machinery, and transportation
equipment__________________________________
Machinery, except e lec tric a l-------- ------ ---Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies ___________________________________
Transportation equipment-----—---------------------Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks --------------------------Miscellaneous manufacturing industries-------Nonmanufacturing — --------------- ------------Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries ------------Mining ________ — ------ --------------------------Contract construction-----------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services ------------------------Wholesale and retail trade----------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate-------------S ervices-------------------------------------------------------Government-------------------------------------------------See footnotes at end of table.




Stoppages
Man-days
beginning in
idle during
year
year (all
Number Workers stoppages)
involved
‘ 5,045 2,649.0 49, 018. 0
1 2, 664 1, 178. 0 23, 978.0
20
31. 3
333. 7
1, 171. 4
68. 1
209
170.4
3
9. 1
48
14. 4
403. 6

Negotiation of first agreement
Renegotiation of agreement
or union recognition
(expiration or reopening)
Stoppages
Stoppages
Man-days
Man-days
beginning in
beginning in
idle during
idle during
year
year
year (all
year (all
Number Workers stoppages) Number Workers stoppages)
involved
involved
677
95. 7
1, 525. 0
2, 694 1, 770. 1 42 151. 4
311
28. 6
1, 007. 2
1, 665
797. 8 21,278. 0
1
0. 2
3. 0
22. 3
9
279. 1
30
52. 8
932. 4
3. 3
165. 2
136
1
.3
1. 1
2
8. 8
169. 3
287. 4
2. 1
103. 7
22
8. 9
9

82
61
77
95

13. 1
10. 2
18. 0
24. 2

204. 7
217. 7
393. 0
456. 0

27
16
6
13

2. 2
.9
.5
1. 0

99. 7
28. 0
22. 8
31. 2

23
31
61
61

7. 9
7. 3
15. 3
18.4

88. 1
172. 3
355. 0
400. 9

56
134
19

20. 0
32.4
1. 9

1,266. 8
904. 3
61. 6

9
16
4

.2
1. 8
.5

13. 1
33. 6
51. 7

42
98
13

16. 3
22. 8
.9

1,245. 9
819. 5
8. 7

87
20
133
*282

24. 5
5. 1
72. 0
137. 2

392. 6
73. 9
2, 120. 4
4, 793. 0

12
3
17
15

.6
.4
1. 8
2. 7

15. 0
16. 3
46.4
53. 8

48
12
91
176

14. 3
3. 9
66. 2
101. 3

317. 8
55. 1
2, 056. 0
4, 545. 4

*349
‘4 14
234
‘ 241

78.4
179. 7
159. 6
255. 2

2,035. 9
3,936. 4
1, 756. 4
2, 985. 1

43
46
14
22

2. 4
3. 8
1.0
2. 5

80. 0
150. 5
16. 7
68. 6

248
277
108
133

61. 6
130. 1
73. 8
149. 9

1,863. 4
3,586. 7
1,471. 9
2, 356. 8

13. 2
37
63
10. 5
‘ 2, 396 1, 471.0
17
6. 7
301
212. 9
9
12 364. 2
303 570. 8
417
75. 1
17
8. 0
31.2
175
254 201. 8

84. 4
216. 4
25, 040.0
147. 0
2, 551. 7
8, 722. 9
9, 309. 4
971. 7
360. 3
431. 6
2, 545. 2

4
3
366
7
12
40
50
98
3
71
85

.2
.4
67. 0
1. 9
4. 1
3. 6
5. 7
3. 3
(2)
4. 1
44. 3

3. 7
2. 9
517. 8
22. 0
20. 6
45. 1
100. 3
98. 1
.5
88. 3
142. 9

26
48
1,029
5
29
384
158
284
13
77
79

7. 2
7. 8
972. 3
3.4
75. 8
303. 2
448. 9
67. 1
8. 0
24. 6
41. 3

67. 3
199. 2
20,873.4
123. 0
2, 170. 3
8, 352. 0
8,453. 4
840. 9
359. 8
316. 8
257. 1

48
Table A - 4 .

W ork Stoppages by Industry Group and Contract Status, 1968— Continued

Industry group
All industries ____________________________
Manufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------Ordnance and accessories ---------------------------------------Food and kindred products -------------------------------------Tobacco manufactures ---------------------------------------------Textile m ill products ___________________________
Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m aterials -----------------Lumber and wood products, except
furniture _______________________________________
Furniture and fixtures ----------------------------------------------Paper and allied products ______________________
Printing, publishing, and allied
industries --------------------------------------------------------------------Chemicals and allied products _________________
Petroleum refining and related
industries ----------------------------------------------------------------------Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products ___________ __________________________
Leather and leather products __________________
Stone, d ay, and glass products ----------------------------Primary metal industries ______________________
Fabricated metal products, except
ordnance, machinery, and transportation
equipment ____ ___________ — --------- — —
Machinery, except e lec tric a l___________ __
Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies ____________________________________
Transportation equipment ----------------------------Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks --------------------------M iscellaneous manufacturing industries-------Nonmanufacturing ------------------------------------Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries ------------Mining ---------------------------------------------------------Contract construction-----------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services -------------------------- ----Wholesale and retail trade ---------------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate ------------------Services --------------------------- ---------------------------------- ----Governm ent _____________________________________

(Workers and man-days in thousands)
During term of agreement
No information on
No contract or other
(negotiation of new agreement
contract status
contract status
not involved)
Stoppages
Stoppages
Stoppages
Man-days
Man-days
Man-days
beginning in
beginning in
beginning in
idle during
idle during
idle during
year
year
year
year (all
year (all
year (all
Workers stoppages) Number Workers stoppages) Number Workers stoppages)
Number involved
involved
involved
92
1,585
724. 2
4, 875. 8
4 3. 3
442. 2
24
15. 5
23. 2
675 345. 1
1, 673. 1
18
6. 0
0. 5
15. 9
7
3. 7
10
51. 6
8. 9
40
11. 7
65. 9
3
0.4
7. 9
12
2. 7
9.4
3
. 5
2
0. 2
2. 2
1. 1
31
14
10
21

3. 0
2. 0
2. 2
4. 7

16. 9
17. 4
15. 2
24. 0

4
20
2

3. 4
7. 9
. 5

7. 8
51. 3
1. 2

27
3
23
87

9. 5
. 7
3. 9
32. 7

59. 9
2. 1
17. 8
191. 2

64
92
111
87

14. 5
45. 7
84. 8
98. 31

92. 5
198. 8
267. 7
555. 3

7
10
910

5
259
478
89
32
16
31

5. »
2. 2
379. 0
1. 3
132. 9
56. 5
115. 8
4. 3
1. 8

66. 4

13. 4
14. 0
3, 202. 8
2. 1
360. 6
321. 1
754. 3
31. 8
23. 8
1, 709. 1

1
-

-

(2)

(2)

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

(2)

(2)

"

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

"
-

1
2
4

(*)
(2)
. 3

.

1
1
1. 7

-

1
1

(2)
. 2

1

(2)

*
(2)

-

1
1

(2)
(2)

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

2
. 9

.

.2
. 1

1

4. 5

4. 5

2
74

(2)
37.4

.3
426. 3

17

15. 0

19.4

1.6
(2)
. 9
(2)
1. 7
422. 0

1
6

0. 2
. 7
. 3

0. 2
3. 0
1. 2

.

.

4

0. 1

2
3
1
9
55

(2)
.4
(2)
. 7
36. 1

-

-

-

4
-

2

4

-

-

(2)
13.8

-

-

.9
14. 1

1 The number of stoppages reported for a major industry group or division may not equal the sum of its components because individual
stoppages occurring in 2 or more industry groups have been counted in each. The major industry group and division totals have been adjusted
to eliminate duplication. Workers involved and man-days idle have been allocated among the respective industry groups.
2 Less than 100 workers.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal totals.




49
Table A-5.

Industry
Total __________________________
Manufacturing ____________________
Ordnance and accessories ___________
Food and kindred products ____________
Tobacco m anufactures________________
Textile m ill products
Apparel and other finished products
made from fabrics and similar
materials __________________________
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture____________________________
Furniture and fixtures ____ ___
Paper and allied products ____________
Printing, publishing, and allied
industries ___________ _______________
Chemicals and allied products _____ __
Petroleum refining and related
industries __________________________
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics
products ____________________________
Leather and leather products_________
Stone, clay, and glass products ______
Primary metal industries ____________
Fabricated metal products, except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment _ _________
Machinery, except electrica l__ jc_____
Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies ________________________
Transportation equipment __ _________
Professional, scientific, and control­
ling instruments; photographic and
optical goods; watches and c lo ck s___
Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries __________________________
Nonmanufacturing _________________
Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries ___
Mining _______________________________
Contract construction ________________
Transportation, communications,
electric, gas, and sanitary serv ices__
Wholesale and retail trade ___________
Finance, insurance, and real estate---Services --------------------------------------------Government __________________________
See footnotes at end of table.




W o rk Stoppages by Industry Group and

Duration,1 1968

Total

1
day

2-3
days

Number of stoppages
4-6
7-14
15-29
days
days
days

30-59
days

60-89
days

90 days
and over

2 5, 073
22 ,669
20
209
3
51

540
219

685
310
7
27
1
13

692
322
3
26
9

1,051
551
5
46
10

847
477
3
36
1
6

692
421
2
30
1
2

284
168

282
201

11
_
4

14
5

81
60
77
95

11
4
6

12
4
5
10

11
7
9
8

17
15
21
28

11
15
17
18

7
8
8
16

4
3
8
2

8
8
5
7

61
132
18

5
6
2

7
10
-

5
14
2

13
32
7

8
30
2

8
20
3

2
12
1

13
8
1

90
20
133
294

6
i
7
23

9
1
9
29

13
4
15
45

26
4
28
52

14
6
27
43

9
1
23
45

6
12
20

7
3
12
37

337
409
232
242

19
29
41
33

33
46
37
40

27
44 ■
46
21

65
73
35

46

77
74
28
40

70
81
26

21
35
14
10

25
27
5
8

38
67
2 2,404
18
306
911
307
414
17
173
258

3
2
321
2
105
83
47
16
2
14
52

5
5
375

7
6
370
2
60
148
34
60
1
17
48

9
19
500
5
25
231
45
91
1
45
57

6
15
370
1
18
161
40
88
6
31
25

5
12
271
3
7
109
47

1
2
116
1
4
37

81

26

21

3

1

19
2

4

78
128
47
39
1
16
62

44

66
4
25
10

30
2
13

2

6
_

9
14
24
"
12

50
Table A-5. W o rk

Industry
Total ___________________________
Manufacturing_______________________
Ordnance and accessories ____________
Food and kindred products ____________
Tobacco manufactures ________________
Textile m ill products __________________
Apparel and other finished products
made from fabrics and similar
m aterials ___________________________
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture ___________________________
Furniture and fixtures
Paper and allied products ____________
Printing, publishing, and allied
industries ___________________________
Chemicals and allied products ________
Petroleum refining and related
industries ___________________________
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products ____________________________
Leather and leather products_________
Stone, clay, and glass products
Primary metal industries ____________
Fabricated metal products, except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment___________
Machinery, except electrical _________
Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies _________________________
Transportation equipment _____________
Professional, scientific, and control­
ling instruments; photographic and
optical goods; watches and clocks
M iscellaneous manufacturing
industries
Nonmanufacturing _________________
Agriculture, forestry, and fish e rie s__
M ining_________________________________
Contract construction _________________
Transportation, communications,
electric, gas, and sanitary services ___
Wholesale and retail trade ____________
Finance, insurance, and real estate___
Services ____________________ _____
Government___________________________
See footnotes at end of table.




Stoppages by Industry Group and

Duration,1 1968----- Continued

Workers involved (in thousands)
7-14
4-6
15-29
days
days
days

1
day

2-3
days

2,657
1, 206
31. 3
67.4
9. 1
15. 5

202. 3
86. 5

250. 7
156. 9
5.4
8. 7
.3
2. 7

284. 3
140. 6
2. 1
3. 8
_
2.7

511. 3
234. 6
5. 1
14. 3
_
1.7

285. 9
146. 7
17. 8
13.9
5.4
.5

753. 6
271.4
.9
14. 6
3.4
1. 0

179. 2
66. 9

190. 1
102. 8

5. 0
_
4.9

2. 0
_
1. 8

12. 9
10. 0
18. 2
23. 9

.9
.1
.8

2. 2
.3
1. 3
2. 7

1.8
.3
1. 9
1. 0

4. 8
3. 6
6. 6
6. 1

1. 1
2. 0
2.4
3. 1

.8
1. 8
1. 1
8.4

.4
(3)
3. 2
.2

.9
1. 9
1. 5
1. 8

25.9
30. 1
1.8

2. 3
2. 0
.3

4. 4
2. 1

.9
3. 6
.2

4. 1
6. 8
.5

2. 4
5. 4
.2

4.9
2. 7
.2

(3)
3.9
(3)

6.8
3. 6
.3

26. 1
5. 3
72. 2
155. 8

1.9
.3
1.4
4. 5

3. 4
(3)
2. 1
9. 8

3. 1
2. 6
1. 7
18. 6

6. 7
.7
7. 1
28. 8

3.4
.5
3. 8
11. 5

4. 1
.7
53. 0
16. 1

2. 5
_
.7
19.9

1. 0
.5
2.4
46. 7

75. 2
185. 8
160. 0
255. 2

2. 5
9.8
25. 3
24. 0

3. 6
32. 6
21. 3
51. 0

8. 6
15. 0
37. 1
31. 5

15.4
19. 3
24. 5
73. 8

11. 0
23. 1
8.0
28. 6

20. 0
67. 0
30. 2
37. 1

4. 3
9. 6
8.4
3. 5

9.9
9.4
5. 2
5. 7

13. 3
11.2
1, 451
6. 7
235. 9
364. 7
528. 6
74. 3
7. 7
30. 8
202. 4

4. 5
.6
115. 8
. .5
22. 9
13. 2
23. 6
1. 2
(3)
1. 1
53. 2

2. 7
.2
93. 8
1. 2
18. 7
19. 6
31. 9
4. 0
.1
3. 5
14. 8

2. 4
1. 5
143. 7
.2
21. 0
26. 7
61. 5
12. 2
(3)
2. 3
19. 8

1. 2
3. 5
276. 6
.5
73. 8
81. 7
57. 4
13. 9
(3)
16. 1
33. 2

1.2
1.4
139. 2
1. 5
7. 6
50. 1
37. 2
8. 4
.5
3. 2
30. 7

1. 0 •
2. 4
482. 2
.6
66.8
70. 9
260. 1
32. 4
.1
2. 4
48. 9

.1
.2
112. 3
2. 2
.1
89. 3
10. 4
1. 3
6. 8
.6
1. 5

(3)
1.4
87.4

Total .

5. 2
.2

30-59
days

60-89
days

90 days
and over

.

25. 0
13. 2
46. 7
.8
1. 5
.3

51
Table A-5.

Industry
Total ___________________________
Manufacturing______________________
Ordnance and a cc e sso r ies_____________
Food and kindred products _____^______
Tobacco m anufactures_________________
Textile m ill products _________________
Apparel and other finished products
made from fabrics and similar
materials ___________________________
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture_____________________________
Furniture and fixtures ________________
Paper and allied products _____________
Printing, publishing, and allied
industries ___________________________
Chemicals and allied products ________
Petroleum refining and related
industries ___________________________
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products _____________________________
Leather and leather products _________
StnnpJ clay, and glass products ,
Primary metal industries _____________
Fabricated metal products, except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment ------------------Machinery, except electrical _________
Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies _________________________
Transportation equipment _____________
Professional, scientific, and control­
ling instruments; photographic and
optical goods; watches and clo c k s____
Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries ___ ________________________
Nonmanufacturing _________________
Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries __
M ining___________________________ _____
Contract construction_________________
Transportation, communications,
electric, gas, and sanitary serv ices__
Wholesale and retail trade __ _ _
Finance, insurance, and real estate __
Services ______________________________
Government __________________________

W o rk

Stoppages by Industry Group and Duration,1 1968— Continued

Man-days idle (in thousands)
7-14
4-6
15-29
days
days
days

60-89
days

90 days
and over

17, O il. 7
8, 095. 2
23. 0
406. 1
85. 9
28. 3

8, 147. 6
2,827.4

19,120.8
10,559.0

234. 9
199. 2

180. 3
214. 5

13.9
24. 9
36. 9
42. 0

19.9
54. 5
36. 5
194.8

23. 1
4. 0
134. 2
7. 6

105.4
114.0
181.9
153. 7

31.4
53. 3
3. 6

29.4
93. 0
2.4

160. 2
89.4
5. 4

1. 8 4 1, 166. 3
275. 4
192. 2
47. 3
.8

9. 1
10. 3
6.6
63. 1

50. 1
5. 7
40. 6
219. 4

45.9
7.9
61. 9
154. 7

90. 0
13. 3
1,771.7
519.9

111.6
36. 0
607. 3

99.7
44. 6
4 173. 8
5,224.7

8.4
57. 3
42. 7
101. 5

33. 1
51. 7
100. 0
79. 3

99. 6
146. 9
158. 1
593. 6

175.9
375.9
134. 3
410. 8

634. 5
2,070. 2
618. 3
1, 174.8

217. 9
517. 4
342. 6
181. 5

689.8
952. 0
354. 6
399. 3

5. 5
.6
193. 7
2. 2
31. 8
42. 7
68. 0
7. 2
.3
7. 6
33. 9

9. 2
5. 6
504. 0
0. 5
50. 9
92.9
237. 8
42. 8
.1
8.8
70. 2

9. 3
20. 6
1,752.9
4. 2
231. 3
590.9
519. 0
101.4
.2
104. 9
201. 0

19. 3
20. 6
1,959. 6
19. 5
60. 0
700. 2
582. 3
136. 3
6. 3
47. 4
407. 6

26. 7
71.8
8,916. 5
24. 1
618. 5
2,132.8
3,867.6
504. 7
3.9
63. 3
1,701. 7

6. 1
9. 1
5,320.2
96. 1
5.9
4, 163. 4
538. 3
76. 9
348. 7
33. 5
57.4

5. 1
176. 5
8, 561. 8

Total

1
day

2-3
days

53, 575
26,251
333. 7
1, 167. 2
170.4
479.4

202. 3
86. 5

510. 5
316. 8
11. 1
20. 2
1. 1
6.4

945. 8
441. 8
9. 9
15.8
11.8

3,486.0
1,733. 1
43. 9
99.4
12. 1

4,150.6
2, 191. 0
245. 8
205. 4
83. 4
6. 8

210. 3
220. 5
447. 3
449. 9

.9
.1
.8

6. 0
.8
2. 3
5. 6

6. 1
1.1
7. 6
3.9

34. 9
21. 3
47. 7
41. 6

1,407. 8
721. 7
60.8

2. 3
2. 0
.3

12.4
3. 9
-

4. 0
12.4
1. 0

415. 4
82. 2
2,096. 1
6,813.2

1.9
.3
1. 4
4. 5

7. 0
(3)
4. 2
19. 6

1,861. 7
4, 181. 3
1, 775. 9
2, 964. 8

2. 5
9. 8
25. 3
24. 0

85. 9
305. 3
27, 325
147. 1
5,184.3
8, 732. 9
8,928. 1
959.4
359. 6
467. 4
2, 545. 8

4. 5
.6
115. 8
0. 5
22. 9
13. 2
23. 6
1. 2
(3)
1. 1
53. 2

5. 2
.2

30-59
days

.

.

4, 163. 0
996.8
3,091.5
88. 9
_
200. 8
20.8

1 The totals in this table differ from those in preceding tables as these relate to stoppages ending during the year, and thus may include
idleness occuring in prior years.
2 Stoppages extending into 2 industries or industry groups or more have been counted in each industry or group affected; workers involved
and man-days idle were allocated to the respective industries.
3 Less than 100 workers.
4 A large proportion of the 1968 idleness resulted from a stoppage that began in 1967.
NOTE: Because of rounding sums of individual item s may not equal totals.




52
Table A-6. Work Stoppages by Industry Group, 1937—68

Year

Man-days idle Stoppages beginning Man-days idle Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
during year
during year
during year
in year
in year
(all stoppages)
(all stoppages)
(all stoppages)
Percent of
Percent of
Percent of
stimated
stimated
Number Workers Number e working Number Workers Number e working Number Worke rs Number estimated
involved
involved
involved
working
time
time
time
Manufacturing
Ordnance and accessories 1
Food and kindred products

Stoppages beginning
in year

1937_________________
1938....................................
1939 ................................
1940....................................
1941--------------------------1942....................................
1943_________________
1944_________________
1945--------------------------1946__________________
1947_________________
1948__________________
1949--------------------------1950__________________
1951 ................................
1952__________________
1953__________________
1954--------------------------195 5 --- -- -- -T1. 1 - I.- , , ._
19 6 ____________
5 —__
1957__________________
1958_________________
19 ....................................
59
1980______ -__________
196 1_________________
1962__________________
196 3_________________
1964____________ ___
1965--------------------------1966______________-___
1967 .................................
1968....................................

2,779

1,436
1,389
1,410
2,652
1,879
2,491
3, 257
3, 185
2, 887
1, 993
1,675
1,661
2,705
2, 548
2, 665
2,612
1,703
2,406
1, 986
1, 965
1, 955
2, 043
1,598
1, 677
1,789
1,685
1,794
2, 080
2, 296
2, 328
2,664

1,230
410
394
352
1,270
616
1,220
1,680
2,510
2, 210
801
959
1,220
1,450
1, 370
1, 880
1,320
772
2, 000
1, 360
778
1,490
1,280
7 07
897
638
555
994
913
922
1,350
1, 180

2 ,0 0
00

5, 820
7, 180
4,400
12,500
2, 680
3, 430
6, 150
28, 800
81,700
15, 700
17, 600
24,200
22, 900
17, 500
42, 300
15, 600
13, 700
18, 800
12, 700
9, 390
15, 400
55, 500
11, 200
9, 780
10, 100
10,400
15,700
14,300
13, 700
27,800
24,000

0.79

. 27
. 31
. 17
.49
. 08
. 07
. 14
. 78
2. 42
. 43
. 46
.7
3
.66
. 43
1. 03
. 36
. 33
. 45
. 63
. 22
. 39
1. 34
. 27
. 24
. 24
. 24
. 35
. 31
. 28
. 57
. 47

7
2
0
3
7

27
3
1
1
1
2
6
30
23
11
13
15
11
12
13
3
6
7
9
8
12
13
15
20

30
9
4

9
10
9
1
6
1
9
2
2

5.0

3
2
1

8. 5
3. 6
24. 9
7. 1
15. 8
4. 2
9. 6
.6
.9
2. 9
1.6
1. 3
.5
.1
.3
.8
.2
.3
.9
2. 2
1. 0
1. 6
.6

5
3

6.6
9. 1

14
9
3
4

5
5
5
4
2
3
4
1
4
1
2
_
_

See footnotes at end of table.




10. 2
2. 6
4. 8

_

197. 0
147. 0
73. 7
78. 8
106. 0
25. 1
91. 2
59. 5
284. 0
255. 0
195. 0
4. 3
13. 0
33. 0
14. 1
53. 2
20. 8
.1
1. 2
20. 6
.4
2. 2
6. 3
11. 3
20. 6
8. 6
1.7
_
84.6
170. 0

8.9
19. 8
83. 8
236. 0
27. 6
.3
.2
9.2
6.2
15. 5
245. 0
164. 0
57. 8
140. 0
90. 7
121. 0
94. 7
125. 0
136. 0
51.4
202. 0
25.4
154. 0
121. 0
62. 5
224. 0
334. 0

()
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 16
. 11
. 13
1.23
. 32
. 13
. 42
. 27
. 38
. 29
. 34
. 36
. 10
. 37
. 04
. 23
. 20
. 10
. 30
. 38

Textile m ill products 4

Tobacco manufactures
1937__________________
1938__________________
1939...............................—
1940__________________
1941— 1942.................................
1943__________________
1944__________________
1945 .................................
1946_________ ________
1947__________________
1948__________________
19 9
4 --------------------------1950....................................
1951__________________
1952_________________
1953--------------------------1954.................... ...............
1955....................................
1956....................................
1957__________________
1958- _____________
19 --------------------------59
19 0
8 _________________
19 1__ ______________
6
1962
....
196 3__________________
1964--------------------------1985__
1966........ ...........................
1967 _______________
1968__________________

3. 4
7. 9
30. 5
14. 3
.2
.1
.1
.5
.5
2. 0
18. 3
21.4
4. 3
10. 8
11.2
7. 7
12. 8
8. 3
9. 5
6. 2
29. 9
8. 7
6. 8
10. 3
8. 7
18. 8
31. 3

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 10
. 38
. 21
1. 12
1. 02
. 78
. 02
. 06
. 16
. 06
. 23
. 08
(3)
(3)
. 08
(3 )
(3 )
. 02
. 05
. 09
. 04
. 01
-

. 39
. 77

231
108
92
91
198
198
177
184
187
188
82
82
85
147
121
95
88
65
96
70
47
51
70
30
35
50
36
37

44
56
54
48

89. 7
41. 0
30. 5
26. 2
82. 0
93. 5
54. 4
55. 3
107. 0
50. 7
35.5
21.2
26. 5
48. 4
153. 0
36. 5
26.6
28. 4
47. 8
18. 2
14. 0
6. 4
23. 5
4. 8
6. 0
7. 0
13. 0
8.4
21.3
25. 7
15. 9
14. 4

1,660. 0
661. 0
606. 0
273. 0
874. 0
464. 0
306. 0
471. 0
1,460. 0
1, 360. 0
976. 0
719. 0
419. 0
686. 0
3, 490. 0
1, 070. 0
593. 0
573. 0
1,400. 0
426. 0
212. 0
111.0
229. 0
34. 0
39. 1
99. 9
193. 0
124. 0
174. 0
195. 0
328. 0
404. 0

266
168
148
152
261
178
135
160
212
278
183
162
199
185
197
206
213
157
169
160
155
176
169
184
177
206
158
186
227
187
187
209

52. 4
55. 5
29. 6
16. 9
69. 8
29. 6
26. 6
36. 0
83. 9
167. 0
54. 2
133. 0
50. 8
57. 0
77. 5
127. 0
98. 4
73. 8
40. 4
71.3
47. 9
60.6
80. 0
65. 7
80. 0
54. 5
53. 1
54. 9
57. 3
46.6
63. 7
68. 1

673. 0
670. 0
395. 0
155. 0
988. 0
210. 0
98. 6
178. 0
959. 0
2, 220. 0
648. 0
4, 720. 0
1,490. 0
691. 0
819. 0
1, 250. 0
1,210. 0
694. 0
974. 0
513. 0
574. 0
661. 0
1, 720. 0
651. 0
589. 0
6 14. 0
444. 0
866. 0
928. 0
528. 0
770. 0
1, 170. 0

(2)
(*-)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 08
. 03
. 05
. 30
. 70
. 19
1. 27
. 42
. 19
.21
. 32
. 30
. 18
. 25
. 13
. 15
. 18
. 45
. 17
. 13
. 14
. 10
. 19
. 21
. 12
. 17
. 26

Apparel and other finished products5
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 14
. 10
. 13
. 44
. 39
. 28
. 19
. 15
. 23
1. 07
. 34
. 19
.21
. 51
. 16
. 08
. 05
. 09
. 01
. 02
. 04
. 09
. 05
. 07
. 08
. 14
. 16

449
428
447
257
309
175
142
100
118
173
131
131
162
187
210
201
193
135
139
129
128
126
122
87
112
95
109
106
100
100
96
82

137. 0 2, 190. 0
68. 3 764. 0
60. 2 715. 0
51. 0 406. 0
62. 8
810. 0
25. 7
193. 0
54. 5
175. 0
14. 5
70. 5
15. 4
177. 0
24. 3 574. 0
10. 7
199. 0
23. 8 267. 0
173. 0
1 1. 3
17. 9 228. 0
54. 0
354. 0
17. 6
213. 0
35. 6
296. 0
12. 2
145. 0
15. 0
136. 0
13. 8
173. 0
16. 4
215. 0
152. 0 1, 100. 0
19. 1 253.0
12. 1 134. 0
15. 1 146. 0
23. 6
130. 0
22. 3 210. 0
24. 7
225. 0
9. 8
199. 0
11. 8
263. 0
21.2
238. 0
13. 1 205. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 08
. 08
. 02
. 07
. 19
. 06
. 08
. 07
. 08
. 12
. 07
. 08
. 05
. 04
. 06
. 07
. 37
. 08
. 04
. 05
. 04
. 06
. 07
. 06
. 07
. 07
. 06

53
Table A-6. Work Stoppages by Industry Group, 1937—68— Continued

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
__
_
_
-

_

168
75
103
119
181
88
72
81
67
61
109
100
84
119
118
131
125
70
81
47
66
69
58
39
75
72
64
56
46
48
60
61

50. 1
15. 1
22. 9
40. 1
50. 2
17. 6
11. 4
43. 5
57. 6
16. 4
23. 9
24. 6
20. 0
23. 6
22. 8
64. 5
19. 8
87. 3
11. 8
4. 9
12. 2
18. 2
14. 1
5. 0
12. 5
13. 1
41.4
7. 1
13. 1
10. 3
11. 7
10. 2

1, 340. 0
598. 0
655. 0
572. 0
1, 010. 0
115. 0
55. 7
299. 0
2, 230. 0
959. 0
850. 0
493. 0
703. 0
700. 0
251. 0
1,240. 0
512. 0
4, 200. 0
277. 0
82. 4
290. 0
282. 0
210. 0
103. 0
234. 0
488. 0
1, 290. 0
96. 9
204. 0
253. 0
273. 0
218. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 08
. 04
. 19
1. 61
. 60
(2)
(2)
.41
. 38
. 12
. 65
. 26
2. 25
. 12
. 04
. 17
. 18
. 12
. 06
. 15
.29
. 86
. 06
. 13
. 16
. 18
. 14

Printing, publishing, and
allied industries 9
62
1937 ______________
30
1938 ______________
21
1939 --------------------27
1940 ______________
45
1941 --------------------34
1942 ______________
23
1943 ______________
1 944---------------------23
47
1945 ______________
67
1946 ____ ___________ ___________
66
1947 ______________
43
1948 ______________
53
1949 --------------------54
1950 --------------------27
1951 ______________
32
1952 ______________
44
30
1954 --------------------1955 ______________
29
31
1956 ______________
52
1957 ______________
46
1958 --------------------58
1959 --------------------38
196 0----------------50
53
1962----------------58
50
1964 ______________
33
1965 ______________
66
1966 ______________
58
1967 ______________
56
1968 _________

See footnotes at end of table




11.2
9.4
.8
2. 1
5. 9
8. 0
2. 0
2.4
13. 2
14. 2
9. 5
10. 9'
5. 7
10. 4
1.2
4. 1
21.3
6. 0
7. 7
6. 0
21.6
22. 3
24. 4
4. 9
8. 9
45. 2
14. 2
8. 7
24. 5
19. 5
18. 1
20. 0

278. 0
97. 3
51.5
20. 8
133. 0
61.2
8. 0
9. 8
221.0
326. 0
171. 0
587. 0
212. 0
240. 0
29. 5
92. 4
245. 0
103. 0
176. 0
105. 0
199. 0
324. 0
352. 0
186. 0
93. 5
694. 0
1, 700. 0
801.0
780. 0
621. 0
286. 0
1,270. 0

158
67
67
92
105
92
66
86
90
208
84
63
71
106
99
108
134
70
121
96
79
74
101
81
70
61
68
60
69
81
76
77

26. 9
7. 0
8. 2
12. 2
17. 6
16. 0
11. 1
16. 9
20. 8
44. 9
12. 5
12. 1
8. 4
15. 8
22. 7
23. 0
25. 1
10. 9
26. 0
21.0
18. 1
13. 8
16. 0
13. 4
12. 5
12. 3
9. 5
6.9
10. 2
16. 8
16. 1
18. 0

461.0
185. 0
144. 0
235. 0
315. 0
145. 0
46. 2
81. 3
363. 0
1, 550. 0
292. 0
156.'0
160. 0
315. 0
309. 0
386. 0
269. 0
139. 0
287. 0
245. 0
175. 0
254. 0
422. 0
183. 0
256. 0
298. 0
146. 0
145. 0
194. 0
199. 0
361. 0
393. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 15
. 04
. 07
. 36
1. 36
(2)
(2)
. 22
. 38
. 35
. 43
. 28
. 16
.31
. 26
. 18
. 28
. 43
. 18
. 28
. 31
. 15
. 14
. 18
. 17
. 31
. 32

99
43
37
56
92
44
38
49
92
76
37
40
46
76
54
73
45
37
67
51
55
60
59
52
62
63
54
79
91
92
109
95

59
35
36
35
83
67
76
116
120
122
94
73
72
96
67
100
107
77
105
92
97
100
97
91
94
103
105
94
102
151
124
134

9. 5
2. 9
13. 2
13. 9
19. 9
31.2
21. 3
26. 1
43. 6
48. 1
30. 8
21.4
20. 0
39. 2
20. 0
30. 4
36. 5
18. 2
40. 0
37. 5
25. 0
20. 3
19. 6
21.6
14. 1
29. 4
20. 7
21.0
28. 9
44. 6
36. 7
32.4

262. 0
52. 2
36. 0
182. 0
308. 0
103. 0
68. 0
116. 0
427. 0
1, 190. 0
439. 0
538. 0
358. 0
795. 0
201. 0
621.0
825. 0
159. 0
634. 0
399. 0
381.0
318. 0
422. 0
314. 0
441. 0
767. 0
482. 6
337. 0
737. 0
727. 0
1, 100. 0
904. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 07
. 03
. 06
. 25
. 77
. 27
. 31
. 23
. 50
. 11
. 32
. 43
. 08
. 31
. 19
. 18
. 15
. 19
. 14
.21
. 35
. 22
. 15
. 32
. 30
. 44
. 34

15. 3
18. 8
9.4
38. 9
39. 2
26.2
37. 2
24. 2

203. 0
144. 0
130. 0
88.7
192. 0
78. 8
95. 4
123. 0
354. 0
606. 0
187. 0
142. 0
458. 0
360. 0
494. 0
815. 0
222. 0
77. 0
197. 0
233. 0
256. 0
252. 0
442. 0
136. 0
324. 0
436. 0
146. 0
580. 0
931. 0
336. 0
776. 0
456. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 10
. 10
. 12
. 36
. 57
. 17
. 12
. 44
. 33
. 39
.65
. 16
. 06
. 14
. 16
. 17
. 18
. 30
. 09
. 22
. 28
. 09
. 36
. 57
. 20
. 45
. 26

Petroleum refining and
related industries 11

Chemicals and allied products 10
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 07
. 01
. 01
. 22
. 28
. 14
.46
. 12
. 14
. 02
. 05
. 12
. 05
. 08
. 05
. 09
. 15
. 15
. 08
. 04
. 29
. 33
. 33
. 31
. 24
. 11
. 47

14. 1
4. 4
4. 3
5. 8
13. 6
14. 1
21.3
16. 4
27. 7
21. 5
7. 6
9.7
11.9
18. 9
20. 6
22. 0
15.4
10. 0
13. 6
15. 2
15. 3
18. 1
18. 7
oo

1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968

vO

Year

Man-days idle Stoppages beginning Man-days idle Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
during year
during year
during year
in year
in year
(all stoppages)
(all stoppages)
(all stoppages)
Percent of
Percent of
Percent of
Number Workers Number estimated Number Workers Number estimated Number Workers Number estimated
involved
working
involved
working
involved
working
time
time
time
Furniture and fixtures
Lumber and wood products 8
Paper and allied products 8

Stoppages beginning
in year

7
3
3
1
5
8
29
42
38
21
14
13
16
22
19
22
19
16
18
19
23
16
18
12
17
10
14
22
12
14
23
19

48. 2
1. 8
1. 1
25. 9
.5
75. 6
1. 5
9. 8
7. 9
1.5
3. 7
11. 1
4. 0
14. 8
25. 1
9. 3
50. 0 450. 0
4. 3
108. 0
310. 0
9. 6
21.3 ' 752. 0
4. 2
85. 5
16.4
792. 0
55. 5
5. 2
58. 8 1, 110. 0
2. D
105. 0
2. 2
50. 6
3. 2
51. 0
8. 5
174. 0
7.6
233. 0
141. 0
8. 1
550. 0
18. 0
2. 4
79. 8
316. 0
15. 0
522. 0
6. 9
338. 0
1. 8
5. 3
164. 0
32. 7
1. 5
1.2
13. 5
116. 0
9. 6
61.0
1. 9

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 03
. 04
. 06
1. 07
. 24
.67
1. 54. 15
1. 39
. 08
1. 59
. 16
. 08
. 08
. 27
. 36
. 23
. 92
. 14
.61
1. 05
.71
. 34
. 07
. 03
. 24
. 13

54
Table A-6. Work Stoppages by Industry Group, 1937—68---- Continued

Year

(Workers and man-days idle in thousands)
Man-days idle Stoppages beginning Man-days idle Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
during year
during year
during year
in year
in year
(all stoppages)
(all stoppages)
(all stoppages)'
Percent of
Percent of
Percent of
Number Workers Number estimated Number Wo r ke r s Number estimated Number Workers Number estimated
involved
working
involved
working
involved
working
time
time
time
Rubber and miscellane ous
Leather and leather products
Stone clay, and glass products
plastics products 1
2

Stoppages beginning
in year

1937....................................
1938_________________
1939
..........................
1Q40__________________
1941...................................
1942____________
1943....................................
1944 .............................
1945 ..................................
1946_________________
1947_________________
1948_________________
1949 ............................
1950.............
1951__________________
1952....................................
IQ**
1954—,----------------------19 __________________
55
1956___
1957__________________
1958__________________
1959--------------------------I960__________________
1961___
________
1962_______________
1963
1964
1965 .
19 6
6 _________________
1Q87___ ________

53. 8
25. 6
9. 7
85
.
39. 2
15. 6
89. 3
39. 5
258. 0
99.4
47. 0
72. 3
84. 7
136. 0
137. 0
154. 0
141. 0
108. 0
124. 0
81. 3
47. 5
23. 8
76. 8
29. 6
2.6
2
14. 8
32. 0
30. 0
55. 2
27. 3
101.0
24. 5

39
29
19
18
42
28
73
77
123
89
41
48
54
136
156
129
10
2
83
105
55
54
58
62
53
65
43
81
67
93
83
94
87

674. 0
166. 0
73. 9
97. 2
155. 0
33. 3
260. 0
114. 0
1,520. 0
813. 0
382. 0
524. 0
714. 0
385. 0
700. 0
912. 0
493. 0
1,620. 0
490. 0
580. 0
420. 0
147. 0
1,930. 0
261. 0
215. 0
159. 0
1, 10 . 0
0
452. 0
443. 0
433. 0
3, 730. 0
393. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
<2)
(2)
0 08
.
. 44
. 18
2.61
1. 26
. 59
. 90
1. 30

.66
1. 0
1
1. 31
.71

2 49
.

. 69
. 83
. 62
. 24
2. 9
0
. 40
. 24
.1
6
1. 06
.41
. 38
. 33
2. 85
. 27

1938 ...............................
1939...............................
194 0__________________
1941__________________
1942....................................
1943.................................
1944--------------------------.........................
1945
1946
1947 ...............................
1948....................................
1949........ ...........................
1Q5 0__________________
195 1__________________
1952.
195 3__________________
1954.................................
1955.
1956_________________
1957__________________
1958 ................................
1959--------------------------1980__________________
196 1
__________________
19 2
6.
1963__________________
1964....................................
1965__________________
19 6
6 _______ ___ _
19 7__________________
6
1968-

81
45
65
84
78
65
48
36
50
54
56
41
38
32
25
32
38
34
36
32
30

2
0

630. 0
159. 0
184. 0
125. 0
200
2.
241. 0
148. 0
116. 0
248. 0
434. 0
223. 0
215. 0
499. 0
157. 0
221. 0
139. 0
99. 1
53. 3
542. 0
74. 0
99. 7
78. 9
53. 3
64. 1
70. 4
58. 1
101.0
67. 3
312. 0
99. 2
109. 0
73. 9

(2)
<>
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 25
. 17
. 11
. 25
. 42
.21
. 19
. 55
. 17
. 23
. 14
. 10
. 06
. 56
. 08
.1
0
. 09
. 05
. 07
. 08
. 06
. 11
. 07
. 35
. 11
. 12
. 08

188
168
147
309
308
288
312
158
279
238
232
167
236
158
126
176
131
173
206
219
215
282

10 . 0 1, 130. 0
2
56. 7 1,450. 0
497. 0 12, 2 0
0 .0
142. 0 1, 180. 0
214. 0 1,630. 0
622. 0 23,000. 0
2 2 0 1, 510. 0
0.
952. 0
80.4
535. 0 1, 570. 0
573. 0 12, 700. 0
118. 0 1, 150. 0
10 . 0 711.0
2
575. 0 39, 0 0 0
0.
94. 3 1,880. 0
74. 4
665. 0
84. 8 872. 0
55. 4
637. 0
10
87. 7 1, 0 . 0
8 . 0 1, 390. 0
8
98. 6 1,540. 0
118. 0 4, 070. 0
137. 0 4, 790. 0

(2)
(2)
4. 74
.41
. 48
7. 07
. 45
. 31
. 47
3. 81
. 35
. 25
1 13. 77
4
.62
. 23
.29
.21
. 32
.43
.46
1.23
1.44

218
151
134
278
242
282
291
175
282
229
237
256
276
195
191
20
2
193
228
269
277
274
349

51. 3
37. 0
54. 0
85. 8
84. 2
111. 0
10 . 0
2
42. 0
131.0
87. 7
58. 5
147. 0
10 . 0
0
44. 2
96.6
42. 5
40. 8
79. 9
8. 8
6
76. 1
107. 0
78. 4

883. 0
496. 0
1,050. 0
969. 0
1, 300. 0
2,430. 0
1, 6 0 0
9.
1, 2 0 0
0.
1, 590. 0
1,420. 0
713. 0
1, 2 0 0
2.
3, 150. 0
597. 0
1, 130. 0
651. 0
516. 0
1, 550. 0
1,430. 0
1, 290. 0
2, 270. 0
2, 040. 0

10
6

42
53
65
136
116
109

12
2
104
136
94
90
63
132
132
154
128
106

110

113
106
117
165
98
130
113
118
117
139
142
157
133

24. 2
80
.
11.4

612. 0
250. 0
137. 0
12.6
206. 0
656. 0
39. 7
33. 4
227. 0
27. 0
145. 0
204. 0
37. 9
60.4 1, 2 0 0
0.
32. 0 1, 180. 0
27. 1
563. 0
22. 3
365. 0
13. 3
114. 0
44. 6
652. 0
231. 0
19. 0
63. 3
810. 0
316. 0
19. 4
20. 7
300. 0
32.6
495. 0
76. 4
994. 0
32. 3
614. 0
44. 9 1, 2 0 0
0.
50. 8 1,230. 0
18. 2
228. 0
24. 4
458. 0
15. 6
318. 0
20. 3
459. 0
412. 0
22. 8
70. 7
836. 0
31. 6
594. 0
621. 0
29. 0
72. 8 2, 12 . 0
0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 24
. 13
. 18
1. 19
1. 0
2
. 46
. 27
.1
0
. 55
. 16
. 59
. 23
. 23
. 35
.69
. 44
. 91
. 87
. 16
. 32
.2
2
. 30
. 26
. 53
. 36
. 39
1. 30

Machinery, except electrical 1
6

,

See footnotes at end of table.




111
10
0

41.6
14. 3
9. 5
7. 0
27. 9
27. 8
27. 5
24. 0
50.6
29. 0
24. 9
9. 8
18. 1
25. 3
22. 6
16. 7
11. 9
5. 6
40. 4
89
.
11. 3
7. 7
5.6
5. 7
18. 2
7. 6
23. 9
6. 1
20. 4
82
.
11.7
5. 1

Fabricated metal products,
except ordance, machinery,
and transportation equipment 1
5

Primary metal 1
3

19 __________________
37

142
59
46
39
92
87
93
95

(2)
(2)
0. 52
. 45
. 51
. 95
. 57
.45
. 57
. 50
. 25
. 46
1. 14

.21

.41
. 23
. 18
. 50
. 45
. 37
.66
. 57

175
55
63
87
199
87
2
10
311
335
324
252
189
176
317
268
323
286
175
306
211
231
223
217
144
176
196
171
191
266
301
20
6
414

48. 3
13. 9
20. 4
24. 3
10 . 0
2
46. 8
6. 1
2
141. 0
228. 0
244. 0
1 14. 0
152. 0
116. 0
224. 0
158. 0
167. 0
126. 0
64. 0
230. 0
113. 0
89. 9
152. 0
82. 7
6.5
8
89. 1
63. 3
58. 5
12 . 0
0
113. 0
136. 0
177. 0
180. 0

546. 0
333. 0
337. 0
396. 0
1,680. 0
104. 0
139. 0
508. 0
2, 970. 0
13, 700. 0
2, 910. 0
2, 090. 0
2, 720. 0
4,410. 0
3, 370.0
3,990. 0
2, 150. 0
1,350. 0
3, 800. 0
2,630. 0
1, 380. 0
2, 760. 0
2, 820. 0
1,240. 0
1,240. 0
1, 2 0 0
0.
845. 0
1, 140. 0
1,870. 0
2, 440. 0
4, 010. 0
3, 940. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
( )
(2)
0. 04
. 13
.91
4. 51
. 59
. 59
. 89
1. 40
. 83
. 96
. 50
. 34
. 95
. 83
. 32
. 72
.6
8
. 30
. 34
. 32
.2
2
. 27
.43
.51
. 80
.79

55
Table A-6. Work Stoppages by Industry Group, 1937—68— Continued
______ (Wo rke r and man-days idle m thousands)_______
Man-days idle Stoppages beginning Man-days idle Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
during year
during year
during year
in year
in year
(all stoppages)
(all stoppages)
(all stop Page
‘g ercent of
Percent of
Percent of
Perci
Workers
estimated
Workers
estimated Number Workers Number estimated
working
involved
working
involved
working
involved
time
time
time
Professional, scientific, and controlling
Electrical machinery,
Transportation equipment1
instruments; photographic and optical
equipment, and supplies

Stoppages beginning
in year

19371938193919401941194219431944194519461947194819491950195119521953195419551956195719581959-

8
6
30
2
2

43
87
46
6
1
80
96
134
80
64
67

16
8

136
12
2
137

116

147
106
10
0
93
96

196019611962-

10
2

114
99
109
105
137
189
207
234

1963196419651966 19671968-

43. 4
7. 2
4. 7
11.3
26. 9
2.2
0
33. 2
35. 3

121.0

232. 0
36. 1
31.0
27. 1
132. 0
104. 0
10 . 0
0
76. 6
57. 1
2 20
0.
62. 7
44. 9
10 . 0
2
48. 1
9.6
6
67. 1
64. 2
44. 3
62. 7
51.8
168. 0
191.0

16 .0
0

798. 0
247. 0
96. 5
414. 0
532. 0
53. 0
95. 0
112. 0
1,390.0
10,800.0
611.0
402. 0
352. 0
1,420.0
1,040.0
1,180.0
1,620.0
1, 0 .0
10
3,300.0
3, 050. 0
785. 0
1,030. 0
820. 0
1,260.0
716. 0
631.0
835. 0
859. 0
795. 0
2,410.0
2,630.0
1,760 .0

(!)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0. 03
.04
.05
. 74
7. 31
. 37
. 25
.2
0
. 73
. 44
. 47
. 53
. 35
1.15
.99
. 25
. 36
. 25
. 38
.2
0
. 16
.2
1
.2
1
. 19
. 50
. 54
. 35

165
49
56
51
185
115
345
549
407
193
10
6
107
89
171
194
199
179
84

20
0
145
154
108

2
10
12
2
98
10
0
10
1
12
0

140
16
2
165
241

372. 0 4,720.0
82. 7
318. 0
134. 0 2,660.0
49. 6 270. 0
394. 0 2, 2 0 0
9.
211.0
97. 1
341.0
823. 0
6 .0
752.0 2, 2 0
834. 0 9,740.0
2 2 0 17,300.0
2.
171.0 4,200.0
278. 0 3,170.0
230.0 2,190.0
368.0 8,540.0
230.0 2,600.0
216. 1 2,230.0
300.0 2,730. 0
107. 0
656.0
440.0 1, 910
.0
123. 0 1,800.0
167. 0 1, 170. 0
551.0 4,310.0
76. 5 1,390 .0
18 .0 3,550.0
9
297. 0 2,500.0
81.5 1,410.0
71. 5
678. 0
386.0 6,410.0
196.0 2,630.0
150.0 1,330.0
347.0 5,530.0
255. 0 2,990.0

(2>
(>
(2)
<*>
(2)
(*>
(*)
(2>
(?)
(2)
1. 18
.89
. 78
2. 8
8
.6
8
. 53
. 55
. 15
. 40
. 40
. 24
1.06
. 32
. 85
. 65
. 34
. 16
1. 53
. 60
. 27
1.13
. 58

32
31
14
26
26
23
41
24
30
33
25
27
26
29
19
38
28
23
28
37
24
37

Mis cellaneous manufacturing1
1937-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1938-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1939-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1940-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1941-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1942-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1943---------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------1944-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1945-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1946-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1947-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1948-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1949-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1950-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1951-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1952-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1953-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1954-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------— ---- ---------------------- --------------- ----I 9 5 ____
5
1955___________________________________________________________
1957-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1958-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1959-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------I960-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1961-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1962-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1963-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1965-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1967-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1968------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table.




1,336
1,224

1,0
98

6
8

54
56
54
47
49
54
48
56
63

5. 3
5.9
3. 5
15. 4
12. 7
16. 0
15. 3
9. 9
18. 6
12. 7
13. 2
21.0
14. 2
14. 3
16. 2
15. 0
83
.
11.3
4. 7
10. 4
7. 4
7.9
9.0
7. 5
85
.
83
.
10. 5

60. 5
42. 1
15. 2
418. 0
346. 0
403. 0
339. 0
166. 0
237. 0
195. 0
224. 0
280. 0
186. 0
191. 0
295. 0
20
1.0
141.0
179. 0
74. 4
125. 0
178. 0
95. 2
146. 0
164. 0
181.0
240. 0
216. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
<2)
(2)
(2)
0. 17
.2
2
. 16
. 18
.2
2
. 15
. 16
. 23
. 16
. 12
. 14
.06
. 13
. 18
.09
. 14
. 15
. 16
. 22
. 19

97. 0
146.0

110.0

158.0
127.0
297. 0
246. 0
145. 0
694. 0
134.0
2 20
0.
233. 0
158.0
94. 8
170. 0
418. 0
122. 0
170.0
109.0
148. 0
51. 2
84. 4

(*)

(2)
02
. 0
. 27
. 17
. 35
. 29
. 18
. 87
. 15
. 23
. 29
. 18

.11

. 19
.46
. 13
. 18
. 11
. 14
. 04
. 07

Nonmanufacturing 21

1,961
45
34
29
52
8
6
92
72
69
96
92
94
105
85
99
89
80
58

81
.
5. 7
4. 1
23. 1
10 2
.
12. 6
11.4
18. 7
34. 0
7.0
7. 2
14. 3
87
.
64
.
12. 5
15. 1
4. 8
68
.
7. 6
5.9
2. 7
13. 2

1,642
1,089
1,261
1,700
1,569
2, 108
1,700
1,744
1,945
2,138
2, 189
2,452
2, 479
1,762
1,913
1,856
1,711
1,7 39
1,672
1,740
1,694
1,825
1,678
1,865

1,886
2, 110

2,267
2, 396

663
278
777
225
1,0 0
9
224
763
434
958
2, 360
1, 370
996
1,820
959
844
1,660
1,090
761
646
544
610
574

60
0

610
555
596
386
646
633
1,040
1,530
1,470

8,450. 0
3,330.0
10,600.0
2,300.0
10,600.0
1,500.0
10 10 .0
, 0
2,570.0
9,270.0
34,100.0
18,900.0
16,500.0
26,300.0
15,900.0
5,470.0
16, 8 0
0 .0
12,700. 0
8,900.0
9,390.0
6, 0 0 0
2.
7,080.0
8,520. 0
13, 500. 0
7,900.0
6,500.0
8,460.0
5,730.0
7,210.0
9 ,020.0
11,700.0
14, 300.0
25,000.0

0
.20

. 08
. 25
. 05
. 23
.03
.2
1
.05
.2
1
. 72
. 39
. 31
. 39
. 30
. 11
. 27
. 19
. 14
. 14
.09
. 10
. 12
. 19
. 11
.08
. 11
.07
.09
. 11
. 14
. 15
.2
0

56
Table A-6. Work Stoppages by Industry Group, 1937—68----Continued

See footnotes at end of table.




57
Table A-6.

W ork

Stoppages by Industry Group, 1937— 68— Continued

(W orkers and m an-d ays id le in thousands)
M an-days idle
M an-days idle
M an-days idle
Stoppages beginning
Stoppages beginning
during year
during year
during year
in year
in year
(a ll stoppages)
(a ll stoppages)
(all stoppages)
P ercen t of
P ercen t of
P ercen t of
Num ber W orkers Num ber estim ated Num ber W orkers Num ber estim ated Num ber W orkers Num ber estim ated
working
working
involved
involved
involved
working
tim e
tim e
tim e
S e r v ices 2
4
F inan ce, insurance and rea' estate 2
Gove rnm en t 2
6
5

Stoppages beginning
in year
Year

i 9 37-----------------------------1938-----------------------------1939-----------------------------1940-----------------------------1941-----------------------------1942-----------------------------1943----------------------------1944-----------------------------1945-----------------------------1946-----------------------------1947-----------------------------1948----------------------------1949----------------------------1950-----------------------------1951----------------------------1952-----------------------------1953-----------------------------1954----------------------------1955----------------------------1956----------------------------1957----------------------------1958----------------------------1959----------------------------I 960----------------------------1961-----------------------------1962----------------------------1963----------------------------1964----------------------------1965----------------------------1966----------------------------1967----------------------------1968-----------------------------

130
114
96
97
206
147
150
130
182
179
132
145
104

121
125
122
102
128
138
103

121
121
125
126
159
154
175

20. 4
14. 1

11.8

18. 4
54. 7
20.7
15. 0
13. 9
21. 3
14. 0
14. 4
8. 0
17.8
10. 7
9 .0
14. 1
12. 7
17. 6
9. 1
12. 7
12. 5
20. 9
16. 0
21.0
15. 2
31. 2

20. 2

190. 0
74. 0
552. 0
924. 0
723. 0
306. 0
249. 0

122. 0

161.0

329. 0
193. 0
202. 0
82. 9
488. 0
226. 0
146. 0
196. 0
190. 0
304. 0
173.0
145. 0
148. 0
245. 0
177.0
358. 0
266. 0
432. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2>
0. 0
1

.01
.01
.0
1
. 02

23
26
15
23
29
38
18

2
2
31

2
1
16
13
10
8
16
10
8
11
6
4
11
13
17

16

14
19
17

5. 9
3. 1
1. 0
15. 7
2. 1
2. 6
1. 9
1. 8
13. 0
14. 3
4. 2
1. 0

6
6
9
1. 0
6
8
6. 0
2
1. 4
13
8
6
17
10 7
80

20. 8
15. 1
11.0
80. 0

14. 7
46. 9
46. 3
23. 3
52. 5
208. 0
300.0
21.6
13.9
27. 3
39. 2
22. 7
4. 6
4. 3
7. 2
3. 0
15. 1
30.8
10.4
5. 5
27. 6
9 1 .8
360. 0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2>
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0
(?)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(>
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
0.01
. 04

39
51
36
32
62
14
25
7
28
36
49
30

6.0
10. 2

17
27
12
15
25
36
28
28
29
41
42
142
181
254

1. 5
3. 5
.8
1.7
2. 1
28. 6
6. 6
31. 1
4. 8
22. 7
11.9
105. 0
132. 0
202. 0

10

5. 7
3. 4
9. 7
1. 1
1. 4
2.9
4. 0
4. 9
8. 1
6. 3

1.8

23. 7
48. 5
65. 7

20.0

51.0
7. 3
8. 8
10. 3
32.7
28. 8
33. 4
53. 4
10. 4
7. 2
11.1
4. 4
7. 5
10. 5
58. 4
15. 3
79. 1
15. 4
70. 8
146. q
455. 0
1 ,2 5 0 .0
2 ,5 5 0 .0

( >
(*)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(*>
(2)
(2)
0
(2>
(?)
(2)
(2>
(>
(?)
(?)
(2)
(2)
(?)
(2)
(2)
(3)

0.01
. 02
. 04
. 08

1 Inform ation for y ears p rio r to 1942 not available. The period 1942—46 w as published as part of the industry group iron and ste e l and
their products.
’N
2 Not available.
3 L ess than 0. 05 percent.
4 The period 19 37— appeared in e a r lie r publications as te x tile s and th eir products: F ab rics.
41
5 The period 1937— appeared in e a r lie r publications as te x tile s and their products: W earing apparel.
41
6 The period 1937— exclud es furniture which had been included in this group when published in annual reports for those y e a r s.
41
7 The period 1937—41 appeared in e a r lie r publications as part of the lum ber and allied products industry.
8 The period 1937—41 appeared in e a r lie r publications under the group— paper and printing. T hese figu res are for b o xes, paper; paper
and pulp; oth ers appear under that group.
9 The period 1937—41 appeared in e a r lie r publications under the group— paper and printing. T hese figu res are for printing and publishing;
book and job, and new spap ers and p e rio d ica ls.
10 The period 1937—41 exclud es petroleu m refining which had been included in this group when published
in annual reports for th ose y ea rs.
11 P rio r to 1942, petroleu m refining w as included under the group------ch em ica ls and allied products.
Beginning with 1958, estab lish m en ts p rim arily engaged in producing coke and b y p r o d u c t s w ere included in the group— prim ary m etal
in d u str ie s.
12 P rio r to 1958, m iscellan eou s p la stic s products w ere included under the group— m iscella n eo u s m anufacturing in d u stries.
13 I n d u s t r y groups which include som e of the com ponents of the prim ary m etal in d u stries group are not en tirely com parable in years
p rior to 1947. See iron and ste e l and th eir products and nonferrous m etals and their products in annual bu lletins for the e a r lie r y e a r s .
M an-days idle in the prim ary m etals industry group during the ste e l strik e have been com puted on the b a sis of average em ploym ent
throughout the affected m onths, rather than on the usual b a sis of em ploym ent in the pay period ending n ea rest to the 15th of each month. If
the percentage of tim e lo st was calculated on the b a sis of ratio of tim e lo st to tim e worked plus tim e lo s t, it would have been 12. 12 for the
prim ary m etal industry group.
Industry groups which include som e of the com ponents of the fabricated m etal products group are not en tirely com parable in years
p rior to 1947. See iron and ste e l and th eir products and nonferrous m etals and th eir products in annual bu lletins for e a r lie r y ea rs.
16 F or the period 1937—41, e le c tr ic a l m a ch in ery, apparatus and supplies and radios and phonographs w ere included in the published figures
for the m ach inery group. In this table th ese 2 in d u stries have been excluded from 1937—41 to m ake the figu res com parable with subsequent y e a r s.
17 F or the period 1937—41, radios and phonographs w ere added to the published figu res for e le c tr ic a l m ach inery, equipm ent, and su p p lies,
to m ake th ose years com parable with subsequent y e a r s.
18 F or the period 1942—46, tran sp ortation equipm ent (except autom obiles) and autom obiles and autom obile equipm ent have been com bined.
19 Inform ation for y ears prior to 1947 is not com parable. Som e of the com ponents of this group w ere included in nonferrous m etals and
th eir prod ucts, m a ch in ery, except e le c tr ic a l, and m iscella n eo u s m anufacturing in d u stries.
Inform ation for y ears prior to 1942 not available. For the period 1942— p ro fessio n a l in stru m en ts, etc. , w as om itted to m ake co m ­
46,
parable with subsequent y e a r s.
2 Id len ess as a percent of estim a ted working tim e does not include governm ent w ork ers.
1
22 F rom 1937— the title was extraction of m in era ls.
41
23 The period 1937—41 in cludes e le c tr ic ligh t, pow er, and m anufactured gas which w as published in th ose y ea rs under m iscella n eo u s m anu­
facturing in d u stries. For the 1937—58 p eriod , the group in cludes m u nicip ally operated u tilitie s.
24 Data for the period 1937—41 is not en tirely com parable with subsequent y ears and has been om itted for this reason .
25 Inform ation for y ea rs prior to 1942 not available.
2 Inform ation for y ea rs prior to 1942 not available. During the period 1937—41, governm ent strik es w ere included in the group— other
nonm anufacturing in d u stries.
NOTE: The num ber of stoppages reported for a m ajor industry group or d ivision m ay not equal the sum of its com ponents becau se in ­
dividual stoppages occurring in 2 or m ore industry groups have been counted in each. The m ajor industry group and d ivision totals have been
adjusted to elim inate duplication. W orkers involved and m an-d ays idle have been allocated am ong the resp ectiv e industry groups.
B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals.







Appendix B. Scope, Definitions, and Methods 1

Work stoppage statistics
It is the purpose of this statistical series to report all work stoppages in the United States that involve six workers
or more and last the equivalent of a full day or shift or longer.
Definitions
Strike or lockout. A strike is defined as a temporary stoppage of work by a group of employees (not necessarily
members of a union) to express a grievance or enforce a demand. A lockout is a temporary withholding or denial of
employment during a labor dispute to enforce terms of employment upon a group of employees. Because of the
complexity of most labor-management disputes, the Bureau makes no attempt to distinguish between strikes and
lockouts in its statistics; both types are included in the term "w ork stoppage" and are used interchangeably.
Workers and idleness. The figures on the numb’ of "workers involved" and "man-days idle" include all
er
workers made idle for one shift or longer in establishments directly involved in a stoppage. They do not account for
secondary idleness—that is, the effects of a stoppage on other establishments or industries whose employees may be
made idle as a result of material or service shortages.
The total number of workers involved in strikes in a given year may include double counting of individual
workers if they were involved in more than one stoppage during that year. (Thus, in 1949, 365,000 to 400,000 coal
miners struck on three different occasions; they accounted for 1.15 million of the year's total of 3.03 million
workers.)
In some prolonged stoppages, the total man-days of idleness are estimated if the number of workers idle each day
is not known. Significant changes in the number of workers idle are secured from the parties for use in computing
man-days of idleness.
The relative measures. In computing the number of workers involved in strikes as a percent of total
employment and idleness as a percent of total working time, the following employment figures have been used:
Old Series
From 1927 to 1950, all employed workers were included in the base, except those in occupations and
professions in which little, if any, union organization existed or in which stoppages rarely, if ever, occurred. In most
industries, all wage and salary workers were included in total employment except those in executive, managerial, or
high supervisory positions, or those performing professional work the nature of which made union organization or
group action unlikely. The total employed also excluded all self-employed persons; domestic workers; workers on
farms employing fewer than six persons; all Federal and State Government employees; and officials, both elected and
appointed, in local governments.
From 1951 to 1966, the Bureau's estimates of total employment in nonagricultural establishments, exclusive of
government, were used as a base. Man-days of idleness computed on the basis of nonagricultural employment
(exclusive of government) usually differed by less than one-tenth of a percentage point from that obtained by the
former method, while the percentage of workers idle (compared with total employment) differs by about 0.5 of a
point. For example, the percentage of workers idle during 1950 computed on the base used for the earlier years was
6.9, and the percent of man-days of idleness was 0.44, compared with 6.3 and 0.40, respectively, computed on the
new base.

1 More detailed information is available in BLS H andbook o f M ethods fo r Surveys and Studies,



59

BLS Bulletin 1458 (1966), ch. 19.

60

New Series 2
Beginning with 1967, two estimates of employment have been used—one based on the wage and salary workers
in the civilian work force, and the other on those in the private nonfarm sector. The new private nonfarm series
closely approximates the former B L S series which, as noted, excluded government and agricultural workers from
employment totals, but accounted for time lost by such workers while on strike. In recent years, the old method has
resulted in an increasingly distorted measure of the severity of strikes; with the likely growth of strike activity among
the two groups, it may distort the measure even more in the future. The new "total econom y" measure of strike
idleness will include government and agricultural workers in its employment count as well as in the computation of
idleness ratios. On the other hand, data for the private nonfarm sector will henceforth exclude agricultural and
government workers from employment totals, and these groups will also be removed from strike figures in arriving at a
percentage of working time lost. To facilitate comparisons over time, the private nonfarm series has been recalculated
for all years beginning with 1950, while the figure for the total economy has been carried back to 1939. The
differences resulting from the use of the new methods are illustrated in table 1 ; the various components of each series
and the methods of computation are set forth in the tabulation.

Old series

Components and method

Total economy

Private sector

Employment...........................................

Establishment series
plus wage and
salaried farm workers.

Establishment series
less government.

Establishment series
less government.

Working time

Above employment times
working days.

Above employment times
working days.

Above employment
times working
days.

Total idleness

Total idleness
less farm
and government

Total idleness

.....................................

Man-days of idleness as a percent
of estimated total
working time ............................

Above working
time

x 100

Above working
time

x 100

x 100
Above working
time

"Estimated working tim e" is computed by multiplying the total employed for the year by the number of days
typically worked by most employed during that year. In these computations, Saturdays (when customarily not
worked), Sundays, and established holidays as provided in most union contracts are excluded .3
Duration. Although only workdays are used in computing man-days of total idleness, duration is expressed in
calendar days, including nonworkdays.

State Data. Stoppages occurring in more than one State are listed separately in each State affected. The workers
and man-days of idleness are allocated among each of the affected States.4 The procedures outlined on the preceding
page also have been used in preparing estimates of idleness by State.

2

For further information, see “ ‘Total Economy’ Measure of Strike Idleness,” M onthly Labor R eview, October 1968, pp. 54-56.
For example, the total economy figure for 1968 was computed by multiplying the average employment for the year by the
number of working days (69,430,000 x 256 = 17,774,080,000) and dividing this figure into the total number of man-days lost because
of strikes for the year (49,018,000) to give a percent of total working time lost of 0.28. States and industries are in a similar manner.
4
The same procedure is followed in allocating data on stoppages occurring in more than one industry, industry group, or metro­

politan area.
3



61

Metropolitan area data. Information is tabulated separately for the areas that currently comprise the list of
standard metropolitan statistical areas issued by the Bureau of the Budget in addition to a few communities
historically included in the strike series before the current list of standard metropolitan areas was compiled. The
counties or other political districts include in each S M S A to which the strike statistics apply are those established by
the Bureau of the Budget. Information is published only for those areas in which at least five stoppages were recorded
during the year.
Some metropolitan areas include counties in more than one State, and, hence, statistics for an area may
occasionally equal or exceed the total for the State in which the major city is located. Stoppages in the mining and
logging industries are excluded from metropolitan area data, but are reported by industry and State.
Unions involved. For this purpose, the union is the organization whose contract was involved or which has
taken active leadership in the stoppage. Disputes involving more than one union are classified as jurisdictional or rival
union disputes or as involving cooperating unions. If unorganized workers strike, a separate classification is used.
However, the tabulations of "workers involved" includes all who are made idle for one shift or longer in
establishments directly involved in the dispute, including members of other unions and nonunion workers. For
publication purposes, union information is presented by major affiliation of the union, i.e., A F L-C IO , or
nonaffiliation such as "independent," "single firm ," or "n o union."
Sources of information
Occurrence of strikes. Information on the actual or probable existence of work stoppages is collected from a
number of sources. Clippings on labor disputes are obtained from a comprehensive coverage of daily and weekly
newspapers throughout the country. Information also is received regularly from the Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service. Other sources of information include State boards of mediation and arbitration; research
divisions of State labor departments; local offices of State employment security agencies, channeled through the
Manpower Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor; and trade and union journals. Some employer
associations, companies, and unions also furnish the Bureau with work stoppage information on a voluntary
cooperative basis, either as stoppages occur or periodically.
Respondents to questionnaire. A questionnaire is mailed to each of the parties reported as involved in work
stoppages to obtain information on the number of workers involved, duration, major issues, location, method of
settlement, and other pertinent information.
Limitations of data. Although the Bureau seeks to obtain complete coverage, i.e., a "census" of all strikes
involving six workers of more and lasting a full shift or more, information is undoubtedly missing on some strikes
involving small numbers of workers. Presumably, these missing strikes do not substantially affect the number of
workers and man-days of idleness reported.
To improve the completeness of the count of stoppages, the Bureau has constantly sought to develop new
sources of information on the probable existence of stoppages. Over the years, these sources have probably increased
the number of strikes recorded, but have had little effect on the number of workers or total idleness.
Beginning in mid-1950, local offices of State employment security agencies would report5 monthly on work
stoppages coming to their attention. It is estimated that this additional source increased the number of strikes
reported in 1950 about 5 percent, and in 1951 and 1952, approximately 10 percent. Because most of these stoppages
were small, they increased the number of workers involved and man-days of idleness less than 2 percent in 1950 and
less than 3 percent in 1951 and 1952. In 1966, State employment security agencies were the sole source of
information for 17 percent of the strikes recorded.
A s new local agencies having knowledge of the existence of work stoppages are established or changes are made
in their collection methods, every effort is made to cooperate.

^Until 1969, the compilation of these reports was directed by the Bureau of Employment Security.




Recent Publications in Industrial Relations

A n a ly s is o f W o rk S to p p a g e s , 1 9 6 7 (B L S B u lle tin 1 6 1 1 , 1 9 6 9 ) , p ric e 6 0 c e n ts .
A n a ly s is o f W o rk S to p p a g e s , 1 9 6 6 (B L S B u lle tin 1 5 7 3 , 1 9 6 8 ) , p ric e 3 5 c e n ts .
W o rk S to p p a g e s in C o n t r a c t C o n s t r u c ti o n , 1 9 4 6 -6 6 (B L S R e p o r t 3 4 6 , 1 9 6 8 ) , p ric e
3 5 c e n ts .
D ir e c to r y o f N a tio n a l a n d I n t e r n a ti o n a l L a b o r U n io n s in th e U n ite d S ta te s (B L S
B u lle tin 1 5 9 6 , 1 9 6 8 ) , p ric e 6 0 c e n ts .
N a tio n a l E m e rg e n c y D is p u te s U n d e r t h e L a b o r-M a n a g e m e n t R e la tio n s ( T a f t- H a r tle y ) A c t,
1 9 4 7 -6 8 (B L S B u lle tin 1 6 3 3 , 1 9 6 9 ) , p ric e $ 1 .
M a jo r C o lle c tiv e B a rg a in in g A g re e m e n ts :
G rie v a n c e P r o c e d u r e s (B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 -1 , 1 9 6 4 ) , p ric e 4 5 c e n ts .
S e v e ra n c e P a y a n d L a y o f f B e n e fit P la n s (B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 -2 , 1 9 6 5 ) , p ric e 6 0 c e n ts .
S u p p le m e n ta l U n e m p lo y m e n t B e n e fit P la n s a n d W a g e -E m p lo y m e n t G u a r a n te e s
(B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 -3 , 1 9 6 5 ) , p ric e 7 0 c e n ts .
D e f e r r e d W age In c re a s e a n d E s c a la to r C la u s e s (B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 -4 , 1 9 6 6 ) , p ric e
4 0 c e n ts .
M a n a g e m e n t R ig h ts a n d U n io n -M a n a g e m e n t C o o p e r a tio n (B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 -5 ,
1 9 6 6 ) , p ric e 6 0 c e n ts .
A r b itr a tio n P r o c e d u r e s (B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 -6 , 1 9 6 6 ) , p ric e $ 1 .
T ra in in g a n d R e tr a in in g P ro v is io n s (B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 -7 , 1 9 6 9 ) , p ric e 5 0 c e n ts .
S u b c o n tr a c tin g (B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 -8 , 1 9 6 9 ) , p ric e 5 5 c e n ts .
P a id V a c a tio n a n d H o lid a y P ro v is io n s (B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 -9 , 1 9 6 9 ) , p ric e $ 1 .2 5 .
P la n t M o v e m e n t, T r a n s fe r , a n d R e lo c a tio n A llo w a n c e s (B L S B u lle tin 1 4 2 5 - 1 0 , 1 9 6 9 ) ,
p r ic e $ 1 .2 5 .




☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1970 O - 374-497

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S

ALASKA

0OS

r e g io n v j
MOW
*

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Ph ilade'P"

Chicago

REGION II

KANS
U.S. BR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS

OKLA
Atlanta
D a ll a s

R E G IO N VI

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-

PUERTO RICO

Region II
Region I
341 Ninth Ave.
1603-B Federal Building
New York, N. Y. 10001
Government Center
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region VI
Region V
219 South Dearborn St.
337 Mayflower Building
411 North Akard St.
Chicago, 111. 60604
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312) Dallas, Tex. 75201
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St. , 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

* Regions VII and VIII w ill be serviced by Kansas City.
** Regions IX and X w ill be serviced by San Francisco.




U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
W ASH INGTO N, D.C.

20212

O F F I C I A L BU SINESS




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