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Analysis of
Work Stoppages
1965

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Bulletin No. 1525

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M Ross, Commissioner
.




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES

Analysis of
Work Stoppages
1965

Bulletin No. 1525

Trends

•

Size and Duration

Industries and Localities Affected

•

•

Issues

Details of Major Stoppages

Chronology of National Emergency Dispute

'_53L'

October 1966

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTIC S
A r th u r M. Ross, C o m m is s io n e r

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 35 cents










P r e fa c e
This bulletin presents a detailed statistical analy­
sis of work stoppages in 1965, continuing an annual feature
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics program in the field of
industrial relations.
Preliminary monthly estimates of
the level of strike (or lockout) activity for the United States
as a whole are issued about 30 days after the end of the
month of reference and are available on request.
Pre­
liminary estimates for the entire year are available at the
year's end; selected final tabulations are issued in the
spring of the following year.
The methods used in preparing work stoppage
statistics are described in appendix B.
The Bureau wishes to acknowledge the cooperation
of employers and employer associations, labor unions, the
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and various
State agencies in furnishing information on work stoppages.
This bulletin was prepared by Edward D. Onanian
in the Bureau's Division of Industrial and Labor Relations,
Joseph W. Bloch, Chief, under the general direction of
L. R. Linsenmayer, Assistant Commissioner for Wages
and Industrial Relations.

Hi




Contents
Page
Summary____ _______________________________________________________________________
Trends in work stoppages_________________________________________________________
Contract status_____________________________________________________________________
Size of stoppages___________________________________________________________________
Type of employer unit_____________________________________________________________
Duration____________________________________________________________________________
Major issu e s_______________________________________________________________________
Industries affected_________________________________________________________________
Stoppages by location______________________________________________________________
Regions__________________________________________________________________________
States____________________________________________________________________________
Metropolitan a r e a s_____________________________________________________________
Monthly trends_____________________________________________________________________
Unions involved_____________________________________________________________________
M ediation__________________________________________________________________________
Settlement__________________________________________________________________________
Procedure for handling unsettled issu e s_________________________________________
Tables:
Work stoppages—
1. In the United States, 1927—
65___________________________________________
2. Involving 10,000 workers or more, selected periods________________
3. By month, 1964— 5 ______________________________________________________
6
4. By contract status and major issues, 1965____________________________
5. By major issu e s, 1965---------------------------------------------------------------------------6. By industry group, 1965________________________________________________
7. By region, 1965 and 1964_______________________________________________
8. By State, 1965-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------9. By metropolitan area, 1965____________________________________________
10. By affiliation of unions involved, 1965_________________________________
11. By contract status and size of stoppage, 1965_________________________
12. By number of establishments involved, 1965_________
13. Involving 10,000 workers or more beginning in 1965_________________
14. Ending in 1965, by duration and contract status______________________
15. Mediation in work stoppages ending in 1965, by contract status________
16. Settlement of stoppages ending in 1965, by contract status_____________
17. Procedure for handling unsettled issues in work stoppages
ending in 1965, by contract status_______________________________________
Chart.

Trends in work stoppages, 1965_________________________________________

1

1
2
3
3
4
4
5
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
8
8

9
10
10
11
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
24
25
26
27
2

Appendixes:
A.

B.

Tables— Work stoppages:
A - 1. By industry, 1965___________________________________________________
A -2 . By industry group and major issues, 1965-----------------------------------A - 3. In States having 25 stoppages or more by industry
group, 1965 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------A -4 . By industry group and contract status, 1965----------------------------------

35
41

Scope, methods, and definitions----------------------------------------------------------------

43




v

28
31




Analysis o f W o r k

Stoppages, 1965
More than four-fifths of the year's
strikes occurred in situations where a col­
lective bargaining relationship was already
in existence; 46 percent of the stoppages oc­
curred during the renegotiation of an agree­
ment, while 35 percent arose during the term
of a contract. Demands for general wage
changes and/or supplementary benefits were
the major issues in more than two-fifths of
the year's stoppages, and in more than fourfifths of those arising during the renegotiation
of an agreement.

Summary
In 1965 the number of work stoppages
beginning in a single year reached its highest
level since 1955. However, both the number
of workers involved in these stoppages and
the idleness resulting from all strikes in
effect during the year were below the aver­
ages for the previous decade. 1 A total of
3,963 work stoppages, involving 1, 550, 000
workers, began in 1965. Idleness resulting
from strikes which were in effect during the
year totaled 23.3 million man-days, or 0.18
percent of the estimated total working time
of the nonagricultural work force (exclusive
of government). Strikes ending during the
year averaged 25 days in duration, compared
with 22.9 days in 1964.

The increase in work stoppages dur­
ing 1965 was concentrated among manufac­
turing industries, which accounted for 2, 080
of the year's stoppages, compared with 1,794
in 1964. Idleness resulting from manufac­
turing stoppages was, however, less than in
the previous year.
Among industries, the
construction industry sustained the greatest
volume of idleness in 1965 (4.6 million mandays); more than two-fifths of the time lost
in this industry resulted from four major
stoppages, the shortest of w h i c h was of
24 days' duration.

The relatively high level of strike
idleness, which had characterized the closing
months of 1964, continued through the first
three quarters of 1965.
Eighteen of the
21 major stoppages (those involving 10,000
workers or more) started during this period
and accounted for a significant proportion of
the worker and idleness totals. The Atlantic
and Gulf Coast longshoremen’ s strike, which
began in 1964, was also in effect during this
period. 2 Seven major stoppages were in
progress in July when monthly strike idleness
reached its peak for the year, 3.7 million
man-days.

Trends in Work Stoppages
In 1965, as in 1964, the number of
strikes beginning in the year exceeded that
of the previous year. Work stoppages begin­
ning in 1965 which involved as many as six
workers, and lasted a full day or shift, or
longer, totaled 3, 963; this was 8 percent
more than the 1964 total, and 18 percent
above the relatively low level recorded in
1963 (table 1). The strikes which began in
1965, however, i n v o l v e d fewer workers
(1, 550, 000) and represented a smaller pro­
portion (3.1 percent) of the total nonagricul­
tural work force (exclusive of government)
than in 1964. Since I960, the latter measure
has not exceeded 3.4 percent. In the earlier
postwar period, the proportion of the work
force directly affected by strikes was less
than 4 percent only in 1954 and 1957.

None of the stoppages beginning or
threatened in 1965 was deemed a serious
enough threat to national health or safety to
warrant the utilization of the national emer­
gency provisions of the Taft—
Hartley Act,
but high-level Government mediation was re­
quired to settle several strikes and to avert
a nationwide stoppage in the basic steel
industry.
Strikes in 1965 tended to involve
more workers than in recent years. Approxi­
mately 46 percent of the 1965 stoppages in­
volved 100 workers or more, compared with
41.7 percent in 1964. Of the larger strikes,
268 directly affected at least 1,000 workers—
the highest incidence since 1958.

Strike idleness in 1965 amounted to
23.3 million man-days, or 0.18 percent of e s­
timated total working time in nonagricultural
establishments (exclusive of government).
The idleness total was slightly greater in
absolute terms than that recorded in 1964,
but represented the same proportion of total
1
The terms "work stoppage" and "strike" are used inter­
working time. Thus, for the sixth consecutive
changeably in this bulletin. Strikes, in this special use, would
year, idleness resulting from strikes ac­
thus include lockouts.
counted for less than two-tenths of 1 percent
A chronology o f this dispute appears in Analysis o f Work
of estimated total working time, a record
Stoppages, 1964 (BLS Bulletin 1460, 1965) and in National Emer­
unparalleled in the 39 years during which
gency Disputes Under the Labor-Management Relations (Taft—
Hartley) A ct, 1947-65 (BLS Bulletin 1482, 1966).
such measurements have been made.




1

2

Chart.




Trends in Work Stoppages, 1965
[Semilog scale]

Contract Status
Continuing the p a t t e r n of recent
years, the largest proportion (46 percent) of
the work stoppages beginning in 1965 were
renegotiation disputes. Strikes arising during
the t e r m of an agreement accounted for
35 percent of the year's t o t a l .
Eighteen
percent of the stoppages occurred during the
negotiation of the initial agreement or in the
union's quest for recognition. The proportions
of stoppages and idleness, by contract status,
in the 1963—
65 period appear in the following
tabulation:
____________ Percent o f—

__________

Man-days
Stoppages_________ o f idleness
1965 1964 1963 1965 1964 1963
A ll stoppages--------------Negotiation of first
agreement or union
recognition----------------------Renegotiation o f agree­
ment (expiration or
reopening)-----------------------During term o f agree­
ment (negotiation of
new agreement not
involved)-------------------------O th er--------------------------------Insufficient information
to classify------------------------

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

17.7

18. 1

7 ,9

45 .5 44.1

4 3 .4

80 .0

34 .7 36.0 35.8
1.7
1.6
1.9

11.6
.2

9.9
.3

11. 1
.2

.2

.1

.1

17.5

.7

.5

.9

6.5

7 .0

83.2 81.6

NOTE: Because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may
not equal totals.

In both absolute and relative terms,
the number of workers participating in re­
negotiation strikes and the amount of result­
ant idleness declined from the levels of the
previous year. Renegotiation stoppages in­
volved 64 percent of all strikers and were
responsible for 80 percent of total strike
idleness (table 4). As in recent years, more
than four-fifths of these stoppages resulted
from disputes over general wage changes
and/or supplementary benefits. A consid­
erably smaller proportion (7 percent) of the
renegotiation strikes developed out of dis­
putes over plant administration or job secu­
rity matters; these accounted, however, for
nearly one-fifth of the total idleness from
such stoppages, largely because four of the
major strikes were included in this category.
Agreement renewal strikes accounted f o r
nearly three-fifths of all stoppages in manu­
facturing industries, and for one-third of the
strikes arising in the nonmanufacturing sector
(table A -4).
The number of workers involved in
strikes which occurred during the term of
an agreement was only slightly larger in 1965

3
than in 1964, but the idleness resulting from
these stoppages was nearly a fifth greater
than the year before. Strikes of this type
which lasted 30 days or longer affected a
larger number of workers than those of like
duration in 1964, thus accounting in part for
the higher level of idleness.
In general,
these disputes were resolved promptly, with
46 percent ending in 3 days or less. Plant
administration and job security disputes ac­
counted for more than two-fifths of the strikes
which occurred during the term of an agree­
ment, and interunion and intraunion conflicts
for another third. Industrially, these strikes
occurred with greatest frequency in construc­
tion and mining, accounting for 66 and 81 per­
cent, respectively, of all stoppages in these
industries.
The stoppages which occurred during
the establishment of a collective bargaining
relationship were generally small in size and
frequently long in duration. More than fourfifths of these strikes directly affected fewer
than 100 workers each, and only 10 involved
as many as 1, 000 workers— two were strikes
by taxicab drivers in New York City. Only
1 out of 5 stoppages of this type was settled
in less than a week; on the other hand,
44 percent lasted a month or longer. Disputes
over union organization and security matters
led to 66 percent of these stoppages, while
demands for general wage changes and/or
supplementary benefits accounted for another
24 percent of the total. The largest number
of these strikes (105) occurred in wholesale
and retail trade, where they accounted for
nearly one-third of the year's stoppages.

Twenty-one work stoppages beginning
in 1965 involved as many as 10, 000 workers
each, compared with 18 in 1964 (table 2).
These strikes directly idled 387, 000 workers,
and, combined with the idleness accruing in
1965 from the Atlantic and Gulf Coast long­
shoremen's strike, resulted in approximately
6 million man-days of idleness. The largest
stoppage started during th e year was an
11-day interstate strike against the Glass
Container Manufacturers Institute involving
40, 000 workers; the longest of the major stop­
pages was an 89-day construction strike in
upstate New York (table 13). Other major
stoppages included a strike-lockout involving
the New York City Publishers Association; an
interstate bituminous coal s t r i k e ; and a
78-day strike involving the maritime industry
along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.
Although significant in number, stop­
pages involving fewer than 100 workers each
accounted for less than 6 percent of the year's
strike idleness. Strikes of this size accounted
for two-thirds or more of the stoppages in
each of the following industry groups: Ap­
parel, construction, finance, printing, servvices, and trade.
Single establishment s t r i k e s con­
tinued to constitute nearly four-fifths of all
stoppages (table 12). This group, however,
was responsible for a larger proportion of
the worker and idleness totals than in 1964.
Of the multiestablishment strikes, those af­
fecting 11 establishments or more were about
as numerous as in 1964, but accounted for
a smaller proportion of total idleness than
in the previous year.

Size of Stoppages
Work stoppages among groups of 100
workers or more occurred with greater f re­
quency in 1965 than in recent years. Approxi­
mately 46 percent of the 1965 stoppages were
of this size (table 11) compared with 41.7
percent in 1964 and an average of 41.4 per­
cent during the 1960— period. The increase
64
in the incidence of strike activity in 1965 was
concentrated in this group, rather than among
stoppages of smaller size. Indeed, the number
of stoppages of the smallest size (those in­
volving fewer than 20 workers) was less in
1965 (686) than in 1964 (718).
Of the larger strikes, 268 directly
affected as many as 1, 000 workers— the high­
est incidence since 1958. These stoppages
accounted for 7 percent of all strikes in 1965,
and involved nearly two-thirds of the workers
participating in new strikes. Including those
continued from 1964, stoppages of this magni­
tude were responsible for nearly two-thirds of
the year's total strike idleness. Slightly more
than three-fifths of these large stoppages
were renegotiation disputes, while about a
third occurred during the term of agreements.



Type of Employer Unit
As

in d ica ted

in

the

tab u la tio n

that

follows, 7 out of every 8 strikes beginning
in 1965 involved a single employer operating
one establishment or more. Less numerous,
but generally larger in size, were the 490
multiemployer stoppages; this group, which
included 281 stoppages involving employer
associations, accounted for 33 percent of the
workers involved and 38 percent of the year's
idleness total.
Stoppages involving employer asso­
ciations in 1965 presented much the same
characteristics as in 1964.
In more than
9 out of 10 cases, these strikes occurred
during the renegotiation of an agreement.
Demands for general wage changes and/or
supplementary benefits were the major issues
in more than four-fifths of the association
stoppages. In terms of size, a relatively
large proportion (20 percent) involved at least
1, 000 workers each. Industrially, more than
three-fifths of these s t r i k e s occurred in
construction.

4
Stoppages beginning
in 1965_______

Type o f em ployer unit
A ll stoppages----------------Single establishment or more
than 1 but under the same
ownership or m anagem ent-2 employers or more— no
indication of a formal
association or join t­
bargaining arrangement-----2 employers or more in a
formal association-------------

Number

Workers
involved

Man-days idle
during 1965
(a ll stoppages)

3,963

1,550,000

23,300,000

3,473

1,040,000

14,500,000

Major Issues
209

125,000

1,350,000

281

385,000

7,450,000

NOTE: Because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may
not equal totals.

Duration
Since 1959, the average duration of
work stoppages has been high, relative to
earlier postwar experience. In 1965, the
average duration reached its highest level
since 1947; strikes ending during the year
averaged 25 calendar days, compared with an
average of 22.9 days in 1964, and an average
of 20 days during the 1948—
58 period. The
median duration of strikes ending in 1965, at
9 days, was significantly below the mean; in
both 1963 and 1964, the median duration was
8 days.
One out of every three workers af­
fected by a strike ending in 1965 was idle
for less than a week (table 14). On the other
hand, a fourth of the strikers were idle for
periods of 30 days or longer. Workers in­
volved in five major strikes were included
in the latter group, which accounted for nearly
two-thirds of total idleness.
As the increase in average duration
indicates, there was a greater number of
stoppages lasting a month or longer in 1965
than in 1964. The 938 strikes of such length
which ended in 1965 constituted the highest
total for any year since 1953, Included among
the long stoppages were 221 which lasted
90 days or longer and accounted for slightly
less than a fifth of total idleness. More than
three-fifths of the strikes lasting 90 days or
longer occurred in manufacturing industries;
the largest number (37), however, occurred
in wholesale and retail trade.
The length of a strike depends on
many factors, not the least important of which
is the principal issue in dispute. As in other
y e a r s , significant variations occurred in
average duration according to the issues in­
volved. Stoppages arising from disputes over
union organization and security were the
longest on the average (45 days). At the other
extreme were strikes over interunion and
intraunion matters which averaged 10 days



in length; nearly three-fifths of these were
settled in less than a week. Strikes over job
security matters and those resulting from
demands for general wage changes and/or
supplementary b e n e f i t s averaged 24 and
28 days, respectively. Disputes over plant
administration matters, nearly half of which
were resolved in 1 to 3 d a y s , averaged
13 days in length in 1965.

Whereas the distribution of the num­
ber of work stoppages by major issues devi­
ated little from the 1964 pattern, differences
did appear in the allocation of workers and
idleness among the various issues; the most
significant changes developed among disputes
over plant administration and job security
matters. Largely as a consequence of the
General Motors strike, plant administration
stoppages accounted for 36 percent of total
idleness in 1964; in 1965, such disputes led
to only 8 percent of the year's idleness
(table 5). On the other hand, job security
disputes accounted for 16 percent of total
idleness in 1965, compared with 6 percent in
the previous year.
Among the stoppages involving 1, 000
workers or more, a slightly smaller pro­
portion (48.2 percent) than in 1964 (52.5 per­
cent) occurred primarily over economic is ­
sues— wages and supplementary b e n e f i t s .
The percent distribution of issues in the 268
strikes beginning in 1965 and involving 1, 000
workers or more is shown in the tabulation
that follows:

Major issue
A ll large strikes----------------------------------------------------General wage chan ges-------------------------------------------------Supplementary benefits; no general
wage chan ge----------------------------------------------------------Wage adjustments-----------------------------------------------------Hours of work------------------------------------------------------------Other contractual m atters----------------------------------------Union organization and secu rity -------------------------------Job secu rity --------------------------------------------------------------Plant administration-----------------------------------------------------Other working conditions------------------------------------------Interunion or intraunion matters
(generally involves 2 un ions)---------------------------------Not reported--------------------------------- ----------------------------

Percent
of
stoppages
100.
40. 7
3 .0
4 .5
.4
3 .0
7. 5
9 .3
25. 4
2 .2
4. 1

NOTE: Because o f rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal totals.

Demands for general wage changes
and/or supplementary benefits were the major
issues in more than two-fifths of the year's
stoppages. These disputes involved 46 per­
cent of the workers participating in strikes,
and accounted for 54 percent of total idleness.

0

5
In each of five industry groups, strikes over
these issues resulted in more than 1 million
man-days of idleness— the greatest volume
(2.3 million man-days) occurred in the con­
tract construction industry (table A -2).
The number of disputes over plant
administration matters declined slightly from
the previous year and involved not quite half
as many workers as in 1964. The General
Motors strike of 1964 accounted for the sig­
nificantly higher workers' total in that year.
On an industry basis, two groups, contract
construction and mining, experienced more
than one-fourth of these disputes; in the latter
industry, these stoppages accounted for twofifths of the year's total.
Job security issues led to 5 percent
of all stoppages which began in 1965 and
accounted for approximately one-tenth of the
workers involved in those disputes; these
proportions were below the 1964 le v e ls.3
However, because this group included the
1964—
65 longshoremen's strike as well as
three of the major strikes beginning in 1965,
idleness resulting from job security strikes
was more than twice as great as in the pre­
vious year. More than two-fifths of the idle­
ness resulting from strikes over these issues
occurred in the transportation and communi­
cation industries group.
The number of disputes over union
organization and security matters was only
slightly higher than in 1964, but the worker
and idleness totals for such strikes were
significantly greater than in the previous
year. Three of the year's major stoppages
developed over such issues and contributed
greatly to the higher worker and idleness
totals. For the most part, however, strikes
over these issues were small in size; ap­
proximately three-fourths of these disputes
involved fewer than 100 workers each. Stop­
pages over these issues occurred with the
greatest frequency in the contract construc­
tion and trade industries.
Strikes over interunion and intra­
union matters increased in number for the
third consecutive year. These stoppages, the
large majority of which were jurisdictional
disputes, represented one-eighth of the year's
total, but accounted for only 5 and 2 percent,
respectively, of the worker and idleness
totals in 1965. Most strikes of this type are
small in size; nearly three-fourths of the
total involved fewer than 100 workers each.
The contract construction industry once again
accounted for more than four-fifths of these
strikes.

^ Since the longshoremen's strike began in October 1964,
the workers involved are included in the workers' total for 1964,
rather than for 1965.




Industries Affected
The increase in strike incidence in
1965 was concentrated among manufacturing
industries, which accounted for 2, 080 of the
year's stoppages, compared with 1, 794 in
1964 (table 6). Idleness resulting from manu­
facturing strikes was, however, less than in
the previous year; on the other hand, the time
lost from nonmanufacturing stoppages rose to
its highest level since 1959. The number of
workers involved in strikes declined from
the 1964 level in both manufacturing and nonmanufacturing, but the greater decline oc­
curred in the manufacturing sector.
Significant increases in i d l e n e s s
over 1964 levels were recorded in several
manufacturing industries, including the paper,
chemicals, leather, machinery, and stone,
clay, and glass products industries.
The
paper industry experienced its greatest re­
corded level of idleness; more than one-fifth
of the time lost resulted from a 22-day major
stoppage at the International Paper Company.
Nearly a third of the idleness in the chem­
icals industry was attributable to a 222-day
strike at the Wyandotte Chemical Company;
two-fifths of the time lost in the leather in­
dustry resulted from a 3-month strike at
plants of the Acme Boot Company. An 11-day
major stoppage involving the Glass Container
Manufacturers Institute accounted for slightly
more than a third of the idleness in the stone,
clay, and glass products industry. The higher
level of time lost in the machinery industry
was largely attributable to a marked increase
in the number of strikes, several of which
were of long duration.
Though recording a marked decline
in idleness from the 1964 level, the trans­
portation equipment industry nonetheless ex­
perienced the highest volume of idleness
among manufacturing industries. The pre­
vious year's idleness in this group had been
concentrated in the motor vehicles and parts
industry, but more than a third of the 1965
idleness occurred in the aircraft and parts
industry; another fourth accrued from strikes
at firms engaged in th e construction and
repair of ships. In the printing, rubber, and
fabricated metal products industries, strike
idleness declined slightly from 1964 levels,
but, as in the transportation equipment in­
dustry, the lost time ratio in each case
remained substantially above the national
average.
Among nonmanufacturing industries,
substantial increases in idleness were re­
corded in contract construction, transportation
and communication, and government.
The
construction industry sustained the greatest
volume of idleness recorded during 1965 (4.6

6
million man-days); two-fifths of the time lost
resulted from four major stoppages, the
shortest of which was of 24 days' duration.
Both the idleness from construction strikes
and the number of workers involved in these
disputes reached th e highest levels since
1958.
In the transportation and communi­
cation industries, which experienced their
highest level of idleness since 1955, threefifths of the time lost was attributable to
seven major stoppages, the largest of which
was the longshoremen's strike. Government
employees experienced their highest recorded
level of strike idleness; a 28-day stoppage
by welfare workers in New York City ac­
counted for three-fourths of the total idleness.
On the other hand, idleness in the
mining and trade industries declined markedly
from the prior year's level. In mining, the
number of strikes increased by more than
a fifth, but idleness was only slightly more
than half as great as in 1964. The number
of stoppages in wholesale and retail trade
was also higher than in 1964, but the level of
idleness was less than half as great as in
the previous year.
Stoppages by Location
Regions. Strike idleness in all but
two regions increased by one-fourth or more
over the prior year's level, with the greatest
increase (154 percent) occurring in the West
South Central States (table 7). On the other
hand, in the East North Central States, which
once again experienced the greatest regional
concentration of idleness, the time lost de­
clined by 40 percent from the 1964 level; in
the South Atlantic region, a 15-percent decline
was recorded. T he heavily industrialized
East North Central and Middle Atlantic States
ranked first and second, respectively, in the
number of strikers, and together accounted
for slightly less than half of all the workers
participating in strikes in 1965.
States. New York, which was af­
fected directly by nine of the major stoppages
in progress during the year, led all States
in strike idleness (2.9 million man-days) in
1965 (table 8). California ranked second (2.3
million man-days); slightly more than half of
the time lost in this State resulted from con­
struction strikes.
Four other States each
experienced more than 1 million man-days
of idleness in 1965, but the time lost in three
of these States was less than that recorded
in 1964. In Pennsylvania, however, where
the time lost from strikes had been on the
decline for 5 consecutive years, idleness rose
to its highest level since 1961.



While experiencing less idleness than
those noted above, several States, including
Arizona, Louisiana, Nevada, and Washington,
nonetheless sustained a percentage loss in
total estimated working time which was sig­
nificantly greater than the national average.
In Arizona, the high percent of working time
lost (0.78 percent) was attributable mainly to
the 76-day major strike in the construction
industry which accounted for nine-tenths of
the State's idleness. A lengthy construction
s t r i k e in Louisiana was responsible for
slightly more than half of the idleness in that
State, while two prolonged strikes in the
same industry accounted for a similar pro­
portion of the total idleness in Nevada. Two
strikes in the transportation equipment in­
dustry, which accounted for more than seventenths of the State's idleness, were respon­
sible for the high percent of working time
lost in Washington.
New York and California, which led
all States in strike idleness, also ranked first
and second, respectively, in the number of
workers involved in stoppages. The number
of strikers in New York (186, 000) increased
by 17 percent over the previous year's level,
while in California, the 150, 000 workers rep­
resented a 63-percent increase over the 1964
level. Construction strikes, which contributed
significantly to California's strike idleness,
accounted for approximately half of the work­
ers participating in strikes in that State.
Other States with large numbers of strik­
ers w e r e Pennsylvania (132,000), Illinois
(102, 000), Ohio (97, 000), and M i c h i g a n
(82, 000), but the number involved in all but
the first of these States was less than in 1964.
Thirteen S t a t e s experienced 100
stoppages or more each in 1965, with Penn­
sylvania and New York ranking first and
second, respectively, in strike incidence.
Despite its high ranking, the number of stop­
pages in New York (397) was at its lowest
level since 1945.
On the other hand, in
California, which ranked fourth in strike
incidence, the number of stoppages reached
its highest level since 1941. Among States
experiencing fewer than 100 stoppages each,
records were either established or equaled
in Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Mississippi, Nevada,
and North Dakota. The lowest incidence of
strike activity occurred in the District of
Columbia, Alaska, South Dakota, Vermont,
and Wyoming, each of which experienced
10 or fewer stoppages in 1965.
Metropolitan Areas. In New York,
which sustained the g r e a t e s t i d l e n e s s
(1, 880, 000 man-days) of any metropolitan
area in 1965 (table 9), the idleness total was
nearly three times as great as the relatively

7
low level recorded in 1964. Seven of the
year's major stoppages directly affected the
New York area, and accounted for more than
half of its idleness. Ranking second in idle­
ness was Los Angeles, where slightly more
than half of the idleness resulted from a
33-day major strike of operating engineers,
and another fifth from a 140-day stoppage at
the Harvey Aluminum Company.
A major strike accounted for twofifths or more of the idleness in 2 of the
8 other areas experiencing more than 500, 000
man-days of idleness in 1965. In the Albany
area, which sustained a significantly greater
volume of idleness than in recent years,
approximately seven-eighths of the total re­
sulted from an 89-day construction strike.
The 19-day stoppage at the Boeing Company
accounted for 46 percent of the idleness in
the Seattle area. A lengthy strike in the
shipbuilding industry also accounted for a
substantial proportion of the idleness in
Seattle.
As would be expected, the metro­
politan areas sustaining the greatest levels
of idleness were also those with the largest
number of strikers. Leading all areas was
New York, where 120, 000 workers w e r e
directly affected by new strikes. Each of
eight other areas had 30,000 workers or more
participating in strikes, but in none of these
did the total exceed 50, 000 strikers.
For the s i x t h consecutive year,
New York (247) and Philadelphia (133) ranked
first and second, respectively, in s t r i k e
incidence. Two o t h e r areas, Detroit and
San Francisco, also experienced 100 stop­
pages or more each in 1965.
Monthly Trends
The relatively high level of strike
idleness which had characterized the closing
months of 1964 continued through the first
three quarters of 1965. Strikes during this
period accounted for 19.2 million man-days
of idleness, compared with 13.6 million during
the s a m e period in 1964 (table 3). After
reaching its peak in July (3.7 million mandays), strike idleness declined continuously
in each successive month of 1965.
The 702 stoppages in effect during
July represented not only the highest monthly
level for the year, but also the largest num­
ber in effect in any month since June 1959.
New strikes reached their peak (450) in May;
this total was also the highest since June
1959. Both measures declined continuously
from their respective peaks in each of the
succeeding months of the year.



As n o t e d earlier, the number of
strikes involving 1,000 workers or more (268)
reached its highest level since 1958. Nearly
two-thirds of these stoppages, including 15 of
the major strikes, began during the second
and third quarters of the year. Of the large
stoppages beginning in 1965, only five con­
tinued into 1966. However, a major strike
by transit workers in New York City was
only a few hours from reality as the year
ended. The tabulation that follows presents
for 1963—
65 the monthly distribution of new
strikes involving 1, 000 workers or more.

1965
January---February-March-----A pril-------M a y -------Ju n e-------July---------A ugust---September
October
Move mber
Decem ber

1964

1963

14
9
24
34
24
44
32
19
22
19
24
3

8
18
13
31
46
23
23
12
20
28
17
7

13
13
6
16
23
16
23
14
17
18
17
5

Unions Involved
Unions affiliated with the AFL—
CIO
participated in nearly four-fifths of the strikes
beginning in 1965, and accounted for slightly
higher proportions of the year's worker and
idleness totals (table 10). Strikes involving
unaffiliated unions, which accounted for al­
most a fifth of the year's total, occurred
with greatest frequency in the mining, trade,
and trucking industries. Strikes involving
only nonunion workers accounted for 1 percent
of the year's stoppages.

Mediati on
Government mediators assisted in
the termination of 1 out of every 2 strikes
ending during 1965 (table 15). One percent
of the year's strikes were terminated solely
with the assistance of private mediators,
while no mediation was reported in the re­
maining 49 percent of those strikes ending
during the year. Stoppages settled with the
assistance of government mediators were
generally larger in size and/or longer in
duration than those settled without a third
party, as is evidenced by the fact that strikes
in the former category involved nearly threefourths of all workers and accounted for
nine-tenths of total idleness.

8
Renegotiation of agreement strikes
were once again those in which mediative
assistance was most often utilized. Govern­
ment mediation was reported in 84 percent
of these strikes ending in 1965, compared
with 82 percent in each of the 2 previous
y ea rs.4 At the other extreme, government
mediators were present in only 9 percent of
the strikes arising during the term of an
agreement, a slightly smaller proportion than
in recent years.
As in 1964, mediative
assistance was provided in nearly half of the
stoppages occurring during efforts to estab­
lish a collective bargaining relationship.

Settlement
In 9 1 percent of the stoppages ending
in 1965, the parties either reached a formal
settlement or agreed on a procedure for re­
solving their differences (table 16). Another
8 percent of the year's strikes were term i­
nated without a formal settlement, as em ­
ployers resumed operations either with new
employees or with returning strikers. Less
than 1 percent of the stoppages ended with
the employer's decision to discontinue opera­
tions; all but eight of these strikes involved
fewer than 100 workers each.
Settlements are reached with greater
frequency in situations where a collective
bargaining relationship is already in existence
than in those where such a relationship is in
the process of being established. A settlement
was reached in 1965 in 96 and 95 percent,

4 Renegotiation strikes terminated in 1965 without m edi­
ative assistance were generally small in size; 70 percent involved
fewer than 100 workers each.

Stoppages

respectively, of those stoppages a r i s i n g
during contract renegotiations or during the
life of an agreement. On the other hand,
a settlement terminated only 74 percent of
those strikes which occurred during either
the union's quest for recognition or its effort
to negotiate an initial agreement.

Procedure for Handling Unsettled Issues
In many instances, strikes are ter­
minated with the understanding that certain
unsettled issues will be resolved following the
resumption of normal operations. Information
was available on the manner in which such
issues would be resolved in 566 strikes end­
ing in 1965 (table 17). The parties agreed
to continue negotiations in a fifth of these
situations, and to submit the dispute to arbi­
tration in another sixth of these cases. In
7 percent of these strikes, the issues were
to be referred to a government agency.
Various other devices were to be utilized to
resolve outstanding issues in slightly more
than half of these cases.
Of the 99 strikes which ended with
the decision to arbitrate unresolved issues,
55 occurred during the term of an agreement.
This device was also chosen in 27 renego­
tiation strikes, and in 16 stoppages which
occurred during efforts to establish a collec­
tive bargaining relationship.
The issues most often remaining to
be settled following the return to work related
to interunion matters, as shown in the follow­
ing tabulation. In the larger strikes, however,
the unsettled issues generally involved union
organization and working conditions.

Workers involved__________________Man-days idle

Number

Percent
* of
total

Total stoppages cov ered --------

566

100.0

286,000

100.0

2, 740, 000

100.0

Wages and hours---------------------------Fringe ben efits-----------------------------Union organization-----------------------Working con d ition s---------------------Interunion matters-----------------------Combination--------------------------------Other--------------- -----------------------------

45
18
55
102
311
16
19

8 .0
3 .2
9 .7
18.0
54.9
2 .8
3 .4

13,800
4,360
64,600
126,000
30,900
42,000
3,550

4 .8
1. 5
2 2 .6
44. 2
10.8
14 .7
1 .2

144,000
20,200
841,000
1,2 6 0 ,0 0 0
132,000
311,000
26, 500

5 .3
.7
3 0 .7
46. 1
4 .8
11. 4
1 .0

NOTE:

Number

Because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may not equal totals.




Percent
of
total

Number

Percent
of
total

9

Table 1. Work Stoppages in the United States, 1927—65 1
Work stoppages
Year
Number

Average
duration
(calendar
days)3

26.
27.
22.
22.

Workers involved1
2
Number
(thousands)

Percent
of
total
employed

Man-days idle during year
Number
(thousands)

Percent of
estimated
total
working
time

Per
worker
involved

5
6
6
3

330
314
289
183

1 .4
1. 3
1. 2
.8

2 6 ,2 0 0
1 2,600
5, 350
3, 320

810
841
1 ,695
1,856
2, 014

18. 8
19 .6
1 6 .9
19. 5
23. 8

342
324
1, 170
1 ,470
1, 120

1 .6
1. 8
6 .3
7. 2
5. 2

6 ,8 9 0
1 0,500
1 6,900
1 9,600
1 5,500

. 11
. 23
. 36
. 38
.2 9

20. 2
3 2 .4
1 4 .4
1 3 .4
13. 8

1936---------------------------------------------------------------------------1937_________________________________________________
1938---------------------------------------------------------------------------1939---------------------------------------------------------------------------1940_________________________________________________

2,
4,
2,
2,
2.

172
740
772
613
508

23. 3
20. 3
23. 6
2 3 .4
2 0 .9

789
1 ,860
688
1, 170
577

3.
7.
2.
4.
2.

1
2
8
7
3

13,9 0 0
2 8 ,4 0 0
9, 150
1 7,800
6 ,7 0 0

. 21
.4 3
. 15
. 28
. 10

17. 6
15. 3
13. 3
15. 2
1 1 .6

1941_________________________________________________
1942_________________________________________________
1943- -----------------------------------------------------------------------1944---------------------------------------------------------------------------1945- ------------------------------------------------------------------------

4,
2,
3,
4.
4,

288
968
752
956
750

18. 3
11. 7
5. 0
5. 6
9 .9

2, 360
840
1 ,980
2, 120
3 ,4 7 0

8 .4
2 .8
6 .9
7. 0
12. 2

2 3 ,0 0 0
4, 180
1 3,500
8 ,7 2 0
3 8 ,0 0 0

. 32
. 05
. 15
.0 9
.4 7

9 .8
5 .0
6 .8
4. 1
11. 0

1946 -------------------------------------------------------------------------1947----------------------------------------------------------------------- — 1948---------------------------------------------------------------------------1949---------------------------------------------------------------------------1950----------- -------------------------------------------------------- -----

4, 985
3, 693
3 ,4 1 9
3, 606
4, 843

24. 2
25. 6
2 1 .8
22. 5
1 9 .2

4, 600
2, 170
1 ,960
3, 030
2 ,4 1 0

14. 5
6. 5
5. 5
9 .0
6 .9

116,000
3 4 ,6 0 0
3 4 ,1 0 0
5 0 ,5 0 0
3 8 ,8 0 0

1 .4 3
.4 1
. 37
.5 9
.4 4

2 5 .2
1 5 .9
1 7 .4
16 .7
16. 1

1951---------------------------------------------------------------------------1952- -----------------------------------------------------------------------1953---------------------------------------------------------------------------1954---------------------------------------------------------------------------1955----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4 ,7 3 7
5, 117
5, 091
3 ,4 6 8
4 , 320

1 7 .4
19.6
20. 3
22. 5
18. 5

2, 220
3, 540
2 ,4 0 0
1 ,530
2, 650

5. 5
8. 8
5. 6
3. 7
6 .2

2 2 ,9 0 0
5 9 ,1 0 0
2 8 ,3 0 0
2 2 ,6 0 0
2 8 ,2 0 0

. 23
. 57
. 26
. 21
. 26

10. 3
16. 7
1 1 .8
14. 7
10. 7

1956_________________________________________________
1957____________________________ ___________________
1958......................................................... .................................
1959---------------------------------------------------------------------------1960_________________________________________________

3,
3,
3,
3,
3,

825
673
694
708
333

18. 9
19 .2
19 .7
24. 6
2 3 .4

1 ,900
1,390
2 ,0 6 0
1, 880
1,320

4.
3.
4.
4.
3.

3
1
8
3
0

3 3 ,1 0 0
1 6,500
2 3 ,9 0 0
6 9 ,0 0 0
19,1 0 0

.2 9
. 14
. 22
.6 1
. 17

1 7 .4
1 1 .4
1 1 .6
36. 7
14. 5

1961---------------------------------------------------------------------------1962---------------------------------------------------------------------------1963--------------------------------------- -----------------------------------1964 -------------------------------------------------------------------------1965------------------------------------------------------------------------ —

3,
3,
3,
3,
3,

367
614
362
655
963

23.
24.
23.
22.
25.

1,450
1,230
941
1 ,640
1, 550

3. 2
2. 7
2. 0
3 .4
3. 1

1 6,300
1 8,600
16,1 0 0
2 2 ,9 0 0
2 3 ,3 0 0

.
.
.
.
.

11.
15.
17.
14.
15.

1927---------------------------------------------------------------------------1928_________________________________________________
1929---------------------------------------------------------------------------1930______________________________ __________________

707
604
921
637

1931---------------------------------------------------------------------------1932---------------------------------------------------------------------------1933---------------------------------------------------------------------------1934________________________________________________
1935----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7
6
0
9
0

0.
.
.
.

37
17
07
05

14
16
13
18
18

79.
4 0.
18.
18.

5
2
5
1

2
0
1
0
1

1 The number of stoppages and workers relate to those stoppages beginning in the year; average duration, to those ending
in the year.
Man-days of idleness include all stoppages in effect.
Available information for earlier periods appears in Handbook of Labor Statistics, BLS Bulletin 1016 (1951), table E -2 .
For a discussion of the procedures involved in the collection and compilation of work stoppage statistics, see BLS Handbook of
Methods for Surveys and Studies, BLS Bulletin 1458 (1966), ch. 19.
Bulletin 1458 contains a revision of ch. 12 in Techniques
of Preparing Major BLS Statistical S e rie s, BLS Bulletin 1168 (1955).
2 In these tables, workers are counted m ore than once if they were involved in m ore than 1 stoppage during the year.
3 Figures are simple averages; each stoppage is given equal weight regardless of its size.




10
Table 2.

Work Stoppages Involving 10,000 Workers or More, Selected Periods
Man-days idle

Workers involved
Number

Period

1935—39 ( a v e r a g e ) .--------------- ---------------------------1947— (average)----------------------- ----------------------49
1945_________________________________________________
1946_________________________________________________
1947_________________________________________________
1948________________________________________ ______
1949--------------------------------------------------------------------------1950--------------------------------------------------------------------------1951_________________________________________________
1952_________________________________________________
1953_________________________________________________
1954_________________________________________________
1955________________________________________________
1956— . ___________________________________________
1957_________________________________________________
1958_________________________________________________
1959_________________________________________________
1960_________________________________________________
1961_________________________________________________
1962_________________________________________________
1963_________________________________________________
1964_________________________________________________
1965_________________________________________________

Number
(thousands)

11
18
42
31
15
20
18
22
19
35
28
18
26
12
13
21
20
17
14
16
7
18
21

Percent of
total for
period

Number
(thousands)1

32. 4
53. 4
38. 9
63. 6
47. 5
44. 5
63. 2
30. 7
20. 6
47. 8
27. 1
28. 5
45. 6
3 9 .9
2 0 .4
40. 0
45. 0
2 9 .2
41. 4
25. 8
10. 8
37. 0
25. 0

365
270
350
920
030
870
1, 920
738
457
1, 690
650
437
1, 210
758
283
823
845
384
601
318
102
607
387

1,
1,
2,
1,

Percent of
total for
period
3 1 .2
5 9 .9
5 0 .7
57. 2
5 1 .2
55. 3
6 9 .0
56. 0
24. 8
6 2 .6
2 5 .7
33. 3
43. 4
59. 1
18. 5
44. 2
7 3 .7
3 7 .4
3 0 .4
25. 8
2 2 .0
3 4 .8
2 6 .0

5, 290
23, 800
1 9,300
6 6 ,4 0 0
1 7,700
18, 900
3 4 ,9 0 0
21, 700
5, 680
3 6 ,9 0 0
7, 270
7, 520
12, 300
19,6 0 0
3, 050
10,6 0 0
5 0 ,8 0 0
7, 140
4, 950
4, 800
3, 540
7 ,9 9 0
6, 070

1 Includes idleness in stoppages beginning in earlier yea rs.

Table 3. Work Stoppages by Month, 1964—65
Number of stoppages
Month

Beginning
in
month

In effect
during
month

211
233
241
364
442
376
416
306
336
346
238
146

375
375
399
529
651
586
639
556
574
584
469
346

244
208
329
390
450
425
416
388
345
321
289
158

404
393
511
603
669
677
702
685
631
570
505
371

W orkers involved
in stoppages

M an-days idle
during month

In effect
during
month
(thousands)

Number
(thousands)

53
81
79
140
192
124
126
73
374
214
141
42

91
116
123
187
249
222
195
133
432
549
274
149

898
1, 040
816
1, 170
2, 400
1, 900
1, 740
1, 200
2, 390
6, 590
1, 730
1, 060

0. 09
. 11
. 08
. 11
.2 4
. 18
. 15
. 12
. 23
. 61
. 17
. 10

99
45
180
141
127
268
156
109
155
101
140
24

183
149
274
194
201
354
334
229
250
209
192
76

1, 740
1, 440
1, 770
1, 840
1, 850
2, 590
3, 670
2, 230
2, 110
1 ,7 7 0
1 ,380
907

. 18
. 15
. 16
. 17
. 19
. 23
. 34
.2 0
. 20
. 16
. 13
. 08

Beginning
in month
(thousands)

Percent of
estimated
total
working time

1964
J anuary___________________
______________________
February
.. .
M arch___ _____
_________________ ______________
April_______ _____
_ _____ _ _ ______________
M ay------------------------------------ --------------- ---------------June----------------- ----------- ---------------------------------------July---------------------------- ----------------------------------- August_____________
_ ____ _______ __________
September_______
_______________________________
O ctober____________________________________________
Novem ber_____ ______
________________________
D ecem b er------ _ ____
______
_____________
1965
J anuary____________________________________________
F ebruary_________ ______________________________
M arch----------------------------------------------------------------------April__________ __ ____ _____
_________________
M ay--------------------------------------------------------------------------June---------------- ------ -------------- --------------------------J u ly

August---------—
-------------- ---------------------- --.September
_
O ctober_______________________________ ___________
N ovem ber-------------- ----------------------------------------------D ecem b er________________ ________________________




11
Table 4.

Work Stoppages by Contract Status and Major Issues, 1965
Stoppages beginning in 1965

Contract status and m ajor issue

Workers involved
Number

Man-dciys idle,
1965 (all stoppages)

Percent
Number

Percent

Number

Percent

All stoppages-------------------------- ---------------------------

3 ,9 6 3

100. 0

1, 550, 000

100. 0

2 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

Negotiation of first agreem ent---------------------------------General wage changes and supplementary
benefits-----------------------------------------------------------------Wage adjustments--------------------------------------------------Hours of work__ _______ ___ _______________________
Union organization and secu rity-------------------------Job security and plant administration___________
Interunion or intraunion m a tte rs------------------------Othe r ------------------------------------------------------------------------

692

17. 5

7 6 ,6 0 0

5. 0

1, 840, 000

7. 9

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration
or reopening)-------------------------------------------------------------General wage changes and supplementary
benefits-----------------------------------------------------------------Wage adjustments--------------------------------------------------Hours of work---------------------------------------------------------Union organization and security-------------------------Job security and plant administration----------------Interunion or intraunion m a tte rs------------------------Other -----------------------------------------------------------------------During term of agreement (negotiation of
new agreement not involved)----------------------------------General wage changes and supplementary
benefits-----------------------------------------------------------------Wage adjustments_________________________________
Hours of work---------------------------------------------------------Union organization and security-------------------------Job security and plant administration___________
Interunion or intraunion m a tte rs------------------------Othe r _______________________________________________

1, 802

No information on contract status-----------------------------

26

64. 4

3 4 .7

4 6 3 ,0 0 0

1 8 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0

30. 0

2 ,7 1 0 ,0 0 0

-

36
9

8, 610

1 62,000
1, 090
8 3 ,8 0 0
1 ,8 8 0 ,0 0 0
4 1 2 ,0 0 0
168,000
.6

4
13
2
5

-

no

1, 750

.2

1, 050
1 1,200
650
1 0 ,600

1, 240
.7

55,9 0 0
2 0 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,500

3, 300
2, 850
140
970

-

11 .6

-

35, 700
1, 090
1 9,800
299, 0 0 0
78, 400
29,000
1.7

80. 0

1 2 ,3 0 0 , 000
4 1 8 ,0 0 0
50 9 ,0 0 0
1 ,4 5 0 ,0 0 0
3 ,5 1 0 ,0 0 0
4, 880
4 5 7 ,0 0 0

6 9 1 ,0 0 0
5 9 ,3 0 0
1 3,300
7 4 ,8 0 0
129,000
940
2 7 ,0 0 0

138
3
83
608
453
89
69

Because of rounding,

9 9 6 ,0 0 0

-

No contract or other contract statu s----------------------General wage changes and supplementary
benefits----------------------------------------------------------------Wage adjustments— _____________________________
Hours of work---------------------------------------------------------Union organization and security-------------------------Job security and plant administration___________
Interunion or intraunion m a tte rs------------------------O ther_______________________________________________

NOTE:

45. 5

1,497
44
10
53
130
3
65

1, 374

3 3 2 ,0 0 0
1, 530
400
1 ,4 4 0 , 000
3 9 ,7 0 0
1 9,300
7, 910

1 2 ,600
190
70
4 8 ,9 0 0
2, 500
11,1 0 0
1, 330

169
4
1
454
38
17
9

-1

4 1 ,6 0 0 |

.2

sums of individual items may not equal totals.

Table 5.

W ork Stoppages by Major Issues, 1965
Stoppages beginning in 1965
Workersi involved

Major issue
Number

Man-days idle,
1965 (all stoppages)

Percent
Number

Percent

Number

Percent

All is s u e s --------------------------------------------------------------

3, 963

100. 0

1, 550, 000

100. 0

2 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

General wage changes-----------------------------------------------General wage in cre a se -----------------------------------------General wage increase plus
supplementary benefits--------------------------------------General wage increase, hour decrease ----------General wage decrease-----------------------------------------General wage increase and escalation--------------Wages and working conditions--------- — --------------

1, 597
542

40. 3

6 5 9 .0 0 0
105.000

42. 6

1 2 ,0 0 0 , 000
1 ,7 1 0 ,0 0 0

5 1 .4




848
30
3
4
170

4 2 8 .0 0 0
2 5 ,9 0 0
40
1, 770
9 8 ,0 0 0

8, 160, 000
2 3 9 ,0 0 0
1, 810
2 1 ,3 0 0
1, 830, 000

12
Table 5. Work Stoppages by Major Issues, 1965— Continued
Stoppages beginning in 1965
Workers involved

Major issue
Number

Man-days idle,
1965 (all stoppages)

Percent
Number
2. 9

49, 500

Percent

711, 000

Percent
3. 0

Supplementary benefits— ------- ------------------------------Pensions, insurance, other welfare
program s_________________________________________
Severance or dism issal pay; other
payments on layoff or separation— - ----------Premium pay------------------------------------------- ------------Othe r _______________________ ______________________

114

Wage adjustments__________ __________________________
Incentive pay rates or administration___________
Job classification or r a te s --------- ----------------------Downgrading-----------------------------------------------------------Retroactivity______________________________________
Method of computing pay---------------------------------------

198
62
80
2
3
51

5. 0

98, 100
17, 700
68, 500
650
470
10, 900

6. 3

Hours of work--------------------------------------------------------------In crea se------------------------------------------------------------------D e c re a se ------------------------------------------------------------------

14
1
13

4

14, 500
650
13, 800

Other contractual m atters-----------------------------------------Duration of contract______________________________
Unspecified________________________________________

60
15
45

1. 5

Union organization and security------------------------------Recognition (certification)---------- ------- ------------Recognition and job security is s u e s ----- _ ------Recognition and economic issu e s— — ------------Strengthening bargaining position or
union shop and economic is s u e s ----------------------Union security—
---------- ---------------------------------Refusal to sign agreement------ --------------------------Other union organization m atters — ------------------

594
249
9
161

15. 0

Job secu rity-------------------------------------------------- ------------Seniority and/or la y o ff-----------------------------------------Division of work-----------------------------------------------------Subcontracting--------------------------------------------------------New machinery or other technological
is s u e s -------------------------------------------------------------------Job transfers, bumping, etc--------------------------------Transfer of operations or prefabricated
goods---------------------------------------------------------------------Othe r — ------------------------------------------------------------------

203
94
4
35

Plant adm inistration--------------------------------------------------Physical facilities, surroundings, etc--------------Safety m easures, dangerous equipment, etc----Supervision----------------------------------------------- ----------Shift w ork__________________________________________
Work assignm ents________________________________
Speedup (workload)------------------------------------------------Work rules--------------------------------------------------------------Overtime work_____________________________________
Discharge and discipline------------- ----------------------Othe r ------------------------------------------------------------------------

589
17
41
20
28
49
53
28
11
224
118

14.. 9

287,
7,
17,
6,
6,
21,
20,
26,
2,
147,
31,

000
730
200
930
300
700
200
300
180
000
700

18. 6

Other working conditions____________________________
Arbitration_— _______ __________ ______ __________
Grievance procedures------------------------------------------Unspecified contract violation s---------------------------

67
17
36
14

1.. 7

30,
5,
16,
8,

600
650
300
620

2. 0

298,
137,
75,
85,

000
000
100
700

1 .3

Interunion or intraunion m a tte rs-----------------------------Union rivalry 1-------------------------------------------------------Jurisdiction— representation of
workers 2--------------------------------------------------------------Jurisdictional— work assignment------------------------Union adm inistration3------------------------------------------Sympathy___________________________________________

47 5
13

12.. 0

80, 500
1 , 530

5. 2

438, 000
14, 800

1 .9

Not reported__________________________________________

3. 2

Number

59

27, 100

475, 000

9
6
40

2, 000
1, 150
19, 300

27, 700
29, 500
178, 000

63
27
6
79

000
000
000
840
120
700

2. 5

.9

510, 000
650
510, 000

2. 2

19, 300
9, 150
10, 200

1 .2

251, 000
113, 000
138, 000

1. 1

154, 000
36, 900
620
16, 700

9 .9

77,
3,
1,
16,
5., 1

9 .4

2,, 980,
606,
40,
683,

000
000
600
000

1 ,, 430,
131,
3,
82,

300
530
800
700

145, 000
71, 300
730
15, 300

594,
163,
378,
1,
5,
45,

000
000
150
400

3,, 630,
1 ,, 320,
25,
136,

000
000
100
000

13
11

37, 500
3, 370
290
16, 300

15. 6

2,, 020, 000
15, 500

4
42

12. 8

4, 970
n o , 000

14
392
6
49
1
52

1,
39,
3,
34,

1.. 3

480
600
150
700
80

8, 890

1,, 890, 000
48, 600
78, 600
31, 100
35,, 800
161,, 000
222,, 000
140, 000
5, 49 0
839, 000
332, 000

13,
174,
8,
230,

.6

8. 1

100
000
700
000
80

32,, 100

. 1

1 Includes disputes between unions of different affiliation, such as those between A F L —
CIO affiliates and independent
organizations.
2 Includes disputes between unions, usually of the same affiliation or 2 locals of the same union, over representation of
w orkers.
3 Includes disputes within a union over the administration of union affairs or regulations.
NOTE:




Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal totals.

13
Table 6.

Work Stoppages by Industry Group, 1965
Stoppages beginning
in !
1965

Industry group

M an-days idle,
1965 (all stoppages)
Percent of
estimated total
working time

Number

Workers
involved

Number

A ll in dustries-------------------------------------------------

1 3 ,9 6 3

1 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0

2 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

0. 18

Manufacturing---------------------------------------------------

1 2 ,0 8 0

913 ,0 0 0

1 4 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

0. 31

Ordnance and accessories ----------------------------------Food and kindred products------------------------------------Tobacco manufactures--------------------------------------------Textile m ill products --------------------------------------- Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m a te ria ls-----------------Lumber and wood products, except
furniture-----------------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtures--------------------------------------------Paper and allied products-------------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries. ----Chemicals and allied products-----------------------------Petroleum refining and related industries---------Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products-----------------------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products--------------------------------Stone, clay, and glass products-—----------------------P rim ary m etal industries — --------------------------------Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment------Machinery, except electrical--------------------------------E lectrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies----------------------------------------------------------Transportation equipment_ ---------------------------------P rofessional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks----------------------------------Miscellaneous manufacturing in dustries-------------

12
227

10,300
5 7 ,3 0 0

121,000
9 2 8 ,0 0 0

-

-

-

44

2 1 ,3 0 0

174,000

0. 20
. 21
. 07

100

9 ,7 6 0

1 99,000

. 06

46
69
91
33
102
12

13,100
10,200
3 9 ,2 0 0
2 4 ,5 0 0
2 8 ,9 0 0
1 ,450

204 ,0 0 0
194,000
9 3 1 ,0 0 0
7 8 0 ,0 0 0
7 3 7 ,0 0 0
3 2 ,7 0 0

.
.
.
.
.
.

93
36
139
206

5 5 ,2 0 0
2 0 ,4 0 0
7 0 ,7 0 0
8 8 ,0 0 0

4 4 3 ,0 0 0
3 1 2 ,0 0 0
8 3 6 ,0 0 0
1 ,3 9 0 ,0 0 0

. 38
. 35
. 53
.4 3

269
266

8 6 ,8 0 0
113,000

1 ,4 3 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,8 7 0 ,0 0 0

.4 5
.4 3

137
140

5 1 ,8 0 0
196,000

7 9 5 ,0 0 0
2 ,6 3 0 ,0 0 0

. 19
.6 0

28
54

7, 590
7 ,4 7 0

1 09,000
1 64,000

. 11
. 15

Nonmanufacturing--------------------------------------------

1 1 ,8 8 6

633 ,0 0 0

9 ,0 2 0 ,0 0 0

2 .1 1

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries------------------Mining-----------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction ------------------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services---------------------------------Wholesale and retail tra d e------------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate — -------------S e rv ic e s---------------------------------------------------------------- Government---------------------------------------------------------------

21
188
943

4, 300
7 1 ,6 0 0
3 0 1 ,000

6 0 ,3 0 0
4 3 1 ,0 0 0
4 ,6 3 0 ,0 0 0

(1
3)
2
. 27
. 57

216
336
16
126
42

185,000
4 2 ,6 0 0
550
16,000
11,900

3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
5 7 0 ,0 0 0
5, 510
177,000
146,000

.2 9
. 02
(4 )
.0 1
. 01

13
18
57
31
32
07

1 Stoppages extending into 2 industry groups or m ore have been counted in each industry affected; workers involved and
m an-days idle were allocated to the respective groups.
2 Excludes government and agriculture.
3 Not available.
4 L ess than 0. 005 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding,




sums of individual items may not equal totals.

14

Table 7.

Region

Work Stoppages by Region,1 1965 and 1964

Stoppages
beginning in—

Workers involved
in stoppages
beginning in—

Man-days idle
(all stoppages)

Percent of
estimated total
working time

1965

1964

1965

1964

1965

1964

United S tates------------------------------

23, 963

23, 655

1, 550, 000

1, 640, 000

23, 300, 000

2 2 ,9 0 0 ,0 0 0

0. 18

0. 18

New England____ ________ _________
Middle A tlantic________
______ —
East North C entral--------------- --------W est North Central—
_ --------------South A tlantic----------------- -------------------------East South Central— -------West South C entral----- ___
_____
Mountain----- ----- __ ______ __
___
P a c ific ____________
____
___

293
1, 012
1, 091
317
423
283
238
179
466

273
1, 051
987
253
397
239
188
172
365

106, 000
363, 000
387,000
100,000
128, 000
108,000
7 8 ,7 0 0
60,6 0 0
213, 000

6 3 ,9 0 0
354, 000
671 ,0 0 0
63, 500
151,000
7 4 ,8 0 0
6 0 ,9 0 0
6 9 ,4 0 0
132,000

1, 250, 000
5, 310, 000
5, 840, 000
1, 180, 000
2 ,0 6 0 ,0 0 0
1, 760, 000
1, 590, 000
1, 100, 000
3, 220, 000

712, 000
4, 090, 000
9, 880, 000
925, 000
2, 420, 000
1, 150, 000
6 2 7 ,0 0 0
7 7 6 ,0 0 0
2, 350, 000

0. 14
. 19
. 21
. 12
. 12
. 26
. 16
. 26
.2 1

0. 08
. 15
. 37
. 10
. 14
. 18
. 06
. 19
. 16

1965

1964

1 The regions are defined as follow s: New England— Connecticut, Maine, M assachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,
and Verm ont; Middle Atlantic— New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; East North Central-— Illinois, Indiana, Michigan,
Ohio, and W isconsin; W est North Central— Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, M issouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; South
Atlantic— Delaware, D istrict of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West
Virginia; East South Central— Alabama, Kentucky, M ississippi, and Tennessee; West South Central— Arkansas, Louisiana,
Oklahoma, and Texas; Mountain— Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming; and Pacific—
Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington.
2 Stoppages extending across State lines have been counted in each State affected; workers involved and m an-days idle were
allocated among the States.
NOTE: Because of rounding,




sums of individual items may not equal totals.

15
Table 8.

Work Stoppages by State, 19651
Stoppagesi beginning
in 1965

State1
Number

United States_________________________________

Workers
involved

Man-days idle,
1965 (all stoppages)
Number

Percent of
estimated total
working time

3,9 6 3

1 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0

2 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

A labam a___________________________________________
Alaska______________________________________________
A rizo n a ____________________________________________
A rk a n sas-------------------------------------------------------------- _
C alifornia__________________________________ _____

70
10
22
31
341

3 1 ,500
970
2 2 ,1 0 0
4, 720
150,000

3 2 8 ,000
1 4,800
6 1 4 ,0 0 0
112,000
2 ,3 4 0 ,0 0 0

0.
.
.
.
.

18
14
78
12
20

__ ______
____
___
Colorado_____
Connecticut________________________________________
D elaw are___________________________________________
D istrict of Colum bia______________________________
Florida_____________________________________________

33
68
16
7
121

6, 170
3 7,700
5 ,4 9 0
790
39,800

5 1 ,6 0 0
4 9 6 ,0 0 0
4 6 ,9 0 0
16,500
7 2 7 ,0 0 0

.
.
.
.
.

05
21
12
02
22

G eorg ia_____________________ _____________________
Hawaii______________________________________________
Idaho________________________________________________
Illin o is_____________________________________________
Indiana_____________________________________________

61
24
23
248
159

2 1,700
8 ,4 4 0
4 ,0 8 0
102,000
6 9 ,0 0 0

385,000
4 5 ,1 0 0
2 0 ,7 0 0
1 ,3 7 0 ,0 0 0
9 9 7 ,0 0 0

.
.
.
.
.

15
11
06
16
28

Iowa_________________________________________________
K an sa s_____________________________________________
Kentucky___________________________________________
Louisiana___________________________________________
Maine_______________________________________________

71
30
99
53
17

11,900
18,900
2 9 ,6 0 0
2 3 ,9 0 0
3, 690

144,000
131,000
295 ,0 0 0
7 1 9 ,0 0 0
4 1 ,2 0 0

.0 9
. 11
. 19
. 39
. 07

M aryland--------- -----------------------------------------------------M assachusetts_____________________________________
Michigan___________________________ ______________
M innesota__________________________________________
M issis s ip p i________________________________________

44
157
229
53
35

14,600
5 0 ,7 0 0
8 2 ,0 0 0
14,200
17,500

3 4 9 ,000
5 3 3 ,0 0 0
1 ,5 6 0 ,0 0 0
134,000
3 15,000

. 16
. 12
. 27
.0 6
. 33

M issou ri_______________________ ________ _ _____
Montana_______ ________________________ _________
N eb rask a. ___ _ ________________________________
Nevada____ __ _____ ___ ______ ______________
New Hampshire________________ _____________ —

120
18
21
36
16

4 6 ,5 0 0
3, 520
7, 700
12,400
4 ,8 4 0

5 7 5 ,0 0 0
19,200
187,000
2 6 8 ,0 0 0
30,9 0 0

. 18
.0 6
. 23
. 83
. 06

N ew T p r s p y

New M exico________________________________________
New York___________________________________________
North Carolina__________ _________________ ______
North Dakota______________________________________

211
21
397
25
15

4 5 ,5 0 0
6 ,4 7 0
186,000
4, 200
930

8 0 5 ,0 0 0
4 5 ,1 0 0
2 ,8 6 0 ,0 0 0
8 4 ,3 0 0
8 ,9 9 0

.
.
.
.
.

16
09
20
03
03

Ohio______________________________________________ _
Oklahoma____________________________ ____________
O regon_____________________________________________
P e n n s y l v a n i a _- _______________ — ___ ________________
Rhode Island_______________________________________

369
44
39
404
26

9 6 ,6 0 0
8 ,4 2 0
12,400
132,000
8, 170

1 ,4 6 0 ,0 0 0
9 9 ,0 0 0
145,000
1 ,6 4 0 ,0 0 0
131,000

.
.
.
.
.

20
08
12
19
19

South Carolina____________________________________
South Dakota____________________________ _________
Tennessee__________________________________________
T exas____________________________________ - _________
Utah________________________ ________________________

15
7
79
110
17

3,900
330
2 9 ,5 0 0
4 1 ,7 0 0
5 ,5 5 0

5 6 ,0 0 0
1,620
8 2 1 ,0 0 0
6 6 1 ,0 0 0
7 2 ,6 0 0

.
.
.
.
.

04
01
35
11
13

V erm on t___________________________________________
Virginia_______________________________ ___________
Washington__________________________ ______________
W est V irgin ia_ ______________________________ __
W isconsin__________________________________________
Wyoming___________________________________________

9
32
52
102
86
9

1, 230
8, 310
4 2 ,0 0 0
2 9 ,1 0 0
3 7,200
340

14,500
169,000
6 7 6 ,0 0 0
2 2 4 ,0 0 0
4 5 6 ,0 0 0
6, 220

.
.
.
.
.
.

06
07
38
22
16
03

0. 18

1 Stoppages extending across State lines have been counted separately in each State affected; w orkers involved and m an-days
idle were allocated among the States.
NOTE:

Because of rounding,




sums of individual items may not equal totals,

16

Table 9.

Work Stoppages by Metropolitan Area, 19651

Stoppages
Man-days
beginning in
idle, 1965
1965
Num­ Workers (all stoppages)
ber involved

Metropolitan area

Allentown—
Bethlehem—
Easton,
Pa — T
M.
Altoona, P a________________________

A m arillo, T e x _____________________
Anaheim-Santa Ana—
Garden
Grove, Calif______________________
Anderson, Ind______________________
Ann A rb or, Mich__i________________
Atlanta, G a _________________________

Bakersfield, C a lif_________________
Baton Rouge, L a __________________

Birmingham, A la __________________
Bridgeport, Conn__________________

33

10,000

119,000

26
7

21,2 0 0
2, 610

512 ,0 0 0
6, 330

28
5

Akron, Ohio________________________
Albany—
Schenectady—
T roy, N. Y ________________________

4, 580
* 770

4 0 ,5 0 0
9 ,2 6 0

6

360

1, 910

14
6
10
27

6, 840
1, 560
1,600
12,300

117,000
15,900
2 6 ,5 0 0
2 0 7,000

5
11
27
7
5

1, 000
2 ,5 6 0
11,100
10', 700
380

12,700
37,900
302,000
4 0 8 ,0 0 0
12,500

15
6
22
58
14

2, 270
1,570
10,700
24,1 0 0
3 ,9 0 0

2 1 ,4 0 0
10,900
152,000
316,000
5 7 ,0 0 0

Brockton, M a s s ___________________
Buffalo, N. Y — ____________________
Buttp., Mnnt
____
Gantnn, Ohio
Charleston, W . V a ________________

8
44
5
16
10

1, 530
9 ,4 8 0
780
5, 840
2, 340

15,800
171,000
1,400
104,000
2 1 ,3 0 0

r.Viaf|-annng3 Tftrvn —
Ha
C.hftyPi'm*1 AA
Ayn
____
Ghiragn, Til _
O i in— \t — -nl
V
K
Tr
Cleveland, Ohio_____________ ____

13
6
87
50
62

3, 980
230
4 0 ,3 0 0
8, 720
14,200

39,100
3, 320
6 0 3 ,000
170,000
374,000

Colorado Springs, C o lo ___________________

5
17
11

710
2, 080
10,200

4 ,9 8 0
5 0 ,0 0 0
137,000

15
16

10,300
1, 830

1 1 1 ,000
29,000

15
23
15
100
7

11,300
4, 060
2, 860
4 1 ,4 0 0
420

161,000
3 6,300
16,100
764 ,0 0 0
2 ,7 7 0

7
9
8
16
23

1, 830
1,670
1, 170
2, 830
1,990

11,900
24,0 0 0
8, 100
15,700
17,000

13
11
19
10

4 ,4 0 0
5, 100
1, 170
2,4 1 0

93, 200
5 1 ,3 0 0
14,600
59,8 0 0

24

11,100
2,4 6 0
660
180
1,540
3, 650

127,000
6, 390
2 ,6 8 0
10, 100
5 1 ,6 0 0

Stoppages
Man-days
beginning in
idle, 1965
1965
Num­ W orkers (all stoppages)
ber involved

Honolulu, Hawaii_________________
Houston, Tex--------------------------------Huntington—
Ashland,
W_ V a ,-K y .-O h in .
_ ... _
Indianapolis, Ind_________________
Jackson, M ic h ___________________

13
35

4 ,4 3 0
10,800

2 9 ,6 0 0
2 3 1 ,000

23
27
6

8, 500
7, 120
2, 700

8 3 ,5 0 0
105,000
2 0 ,9 0 0

Jacksonville, F la ------------------------Jersey City, N. J_________________
Johnstown, P a ___________________
Kalamazoo, M ic h ________________
Kansas City, M o .—
Kans_________

14
27
9
6
39

2, 390
6,920
200
5, 060
15,700

108,000
155,000
2 ,4 5 0
4 5 ,8 0 0
158,000

Kenosha, W i s ------------------------------Kingston—
Newburgh—
Poughkeepsie, N. Y ------------------Knoxville, Tenn
__ _______
Lake Charles, La------------------------Lancaster, P a _______________ __

5

17,900

167,000

11
8
7
7

2 ,4 4 0
1 ,7 30
700
2, 820

10, 100
2 9 ,0 0 0
17,900
43, 700

Lansing, M ic h ___________________
Las V ega s, N e v __________________
Law r enc e—
Have rh ill,
M ass — T P
■
N
. .
Lim a, O hio_______________________
Little Rock—
North Little
Rnrk, Ark
_ _

12
20

3, 730
8, 060

11,500
251 ,0 0 0

8
5

5, 070
1,800

17,600
11,600

10

570

2 0 ,8 0 0

Lo r a in— ly r ia , O hio____________
E
Los Angeles—
Long
Beach, Calif____________________
Louisville , Ky. —
Ind_____________
Macon, G a ____________ _________
M anchester, N. H ________________

6

1,070

8 4 ,2 0 0

98
21
5
6

4 5 ,3 0 0
14,700
920
1,670

9 1 9 ,0 0 0
9 3 ,8 0 0
13,000
1 3 ,400

M emphis, T en n .—
Ark-----------------M iam i, F la _______________________
Milwaukee, W i s __________________
Minneapolis—
St. Paul, M inn-----M obile, Ala

10
16
31
39
6

1,030
6, 370
9 ,8 9 0
12,200
1,400

8 ,0 6 0
213 ,0 0 0
134,000
9 8 ,8 0 0
32,5 0 0

Muncie, Ind_______________________
Muskegon—
Muskegon
Heights 9 Mich___________________
,
O
N ashville, Tenn__________________
New Bedford, M a s s _____ __________
New Haven, Conn________________

8

3, 830

36,4 0 0

7
15
6
12

1 ,800
12,300
2, 610
2, 740

4, 560
8 9 ,3 0 0
9, 370
2 6 ,9 0 0

New London-Groton—
Norwich, Conn______________________________
New Orleans, La -------------------------------------------New York, N. Y ________________________________
Newark, N. J _____________________
Norfolk—
Portsmouth, V a ----------------------

7
21
247
59
7

16,400
6, 200
120,000
9 ,5 1 0
810

2 3 0 ,000
2 3 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,8 8 0 ,0 0 0
186,000
68, 100

259,000

14
8
5
9
12

Metropolitan area

r io li^ r n K n «

1l a q rp py
Davenport—
Rock Island— oline,
M
T tya— 1
m
T1
Dayton, Ohio_______________________
TAa

Decatur, 111----------------------------------------------------------------Denver, Colo _______________________________________
Des M oines, Iowa_______________________________
Duluth—
Supe rio r , Minn.
F .lr p i r a

N

Y

—

W is ------------_

_

f t r i e
Pa
Eugene, O re g ----------------------------------

H GTr * 11 ^

TrjH

Fall

—

M q c c

—P

T

Flint, M ich _________________________
R n p j;

[n H

F resno, C a lif______________________
Galveston—
Texas City, T e x ---------Gar y—
Hammond— st
Ea
Chicago, Ind---------------------------------------------------------Grand Rapids, Mich_______________
Grest Fall® , M r|t
^n
Greensboro—
High Point, N. C ------------H im iltnn_^ 4 p f n t i r p O b 1 n
P a r f-fn

t*H

f .r m n

See footnote at end of table.




Ogden, U tah______________________
Oklahoma City, Okla____________
Omaha, Nebr. —
Iowa_____________
Paterson—
Clifton—
P a s s a ic , N. J_____________ ____
P eoria, 111________________________

5
9
7

410
1, 310
5, 850

2 0 ,5 0 0
3 ,9 9 0
146,000

41
29

8, 200
5, 100

120,000
3 5 ,5 0 0

Philadelphia, Pa. — N. J --------------Phoenix, A r iz ____________________
Pittsburgh, P a___________________
Pittsfield, M a ss-------------------- -----Portland, Maine__________________

133
10
96
9
6

4 1 ,1 0 0
11, 100
33,000
1,850
1,010

60 9 ,0 0 0
345,000
5 2 7 ,0 0 0
2 2 ,9 0 0
13,100

Portland, O r e g .— ash -------------------------W
Providence—
Pawtucket—
Warwick, R. I. — M a s s -------------------------Reading , P a ---------------------------------------------------------Re.no, Nev
Richmond, V a____________________

21

5 ,4 9 0

9 6 ,3 0 0

24
13
9
5

7 ,9 8 0
2, 600
830
1,540

128,000
30,9 0 0
5 ,2 3 0
3 4,500

17

Table 9. Work Stoppages by Metropolitan Area, 1965 1— Continued
Stoppages
Man-days
beginning in
idle, 1965
1965
Num­ Workers (all stoppages)
ber involved

Metropolitan area

12
6
21
8

2 ,6 5 0
2, 360
7 ,0 7 0
1,650

2 6 ,0 0 0
10,500
139,000
62*400

St. Louis, M o .—
Ill_________________
Salt l.aWp City, Utah
ip An|nr»in 'T 'V
'A

7
81
9
6

1,860
4 7 ,4 0 0
2, 080
260

11,100
654 ,0 0 0
16,900
12,400

San Bernardino—
Riverside—
Ontario Oalif
San Diego, Calif----- ---------------------San Francisco—
Oakland, Calif-----San Jose, C a lif_________ -__________

22
14
105
19

9 ,9 3 0
1,630
4 8 ,4 0 0
2 ,9 6 0

103,000
2 4 ,9 0 0
6 6 3 ,0 0 0
5 4 ,0 0 0

Q nf a p a rKa ra C.a 11f
a
Sava nnah, Ga_______________________
ra nfnn P a
Seattle—
Everett, Wash____________

6
10
12
18

630
1,210
1,770
33,900

10,000
3 8,200
4 1 ,4 0 0
573, 000

Sioux City, Iowa—
Nebr------------------Soi^th RpnH } T
nd
Springfield—
Chicopee—
Holyoke,
M ass. —
Conn______________________
Springfield, Mo-------------------------------

7
12

520
7, 120

5, 150
8 8 ,6 0 0

20
5

6, 800
250

8 4 ,8 0 0
4, 290

Rochester, N. Y -----------------------------Rockford, 111_______________________

Stoppages
Man-days
beginning in
idle, 1965
1965
Num­ (Workers (all stoppages)
ber involved

Metropolitan area

Stamford, Conn___________________
Steubenville—
Weirton,
Ohio-W.Va.___.....
_ _
Storkton, Calif
Syracuse, N. Y____________________
Ta roma , Wa sh

6

1,480

19,100

7
22
14
6

1, 170
1 ,540
10,700
780

2 5 ,9 0 0
16,600
17,400
8 ,6 7 0

TampaHSt. Petersburg,7 F la _____
r
o
Toledo, Ohio— ich _______________
M
Trenton, N. J---------------------------------Tucson, A riz ______________________
Tulsa, Okla________________________

24
28
6
6
17

3, 240
9, 670
1,460
4, 170
2, 200

5 9 ,3 0 0
8 4 ,5 0 0
32,900
130,000
2 6 ,8 0 0

Utica—
Rome, N. Y _________________
W aco, T e x ________________________
Washington, D. C. —
Md. — a --------V
Waterbury, Conn__________________

6
6
13
8

1,700
3, 820
2, 160
7, 300

2 8 ,4 0 0
3 0 ,000
5 0 ,2 0 0
6 0 ,5 0 0

W aterloo, Iowa___________________
West Palm Beach, F la ----------------Wheeling, W. V a. —
Ohio___________
Wichita, Kans_____________________

8
12
8
7

940
5, 670
1,760
6, 300

2 1 ,0 0 0
4 5 ,4 0 0
2 3 ,8 0 0
7 6 ,4 0 0

W ilk es-B arre—
Hazleton, P a ------Wilmington, D e l.— J .—
N.
Md-------W orcester, M a s s _________________
Youngstown— arren, O hio---------W

22
15
9
35

3, 390
6, 630
1,420
8 ,0 2 0

19,900
5 4 ,6 0 0
13, 100
122,000

1 Includes data for each of the metropolitan areas in which 5 stoppages or more began in 1965.
Some metropolitan areas include counties in more than 1 State, and hence, an area total may equal or exceed the total
for the State in which the m ajor city is located.
Stoppages in the mining and logging industries are excluded.
Intermetropolitan area stoppages are counted separately in each area affected; the workers involved and m an-days idle
were allocated to the respective areas.

Table 10.

W ork Stoppages by Affiliation o f Unions Involved, 1965
Stoppages beginning in 1965

Affiliation

Workers involved
Number

Percent
Number

Total

___

...

__




Number

Percent

100. 0

1 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

2 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

3, 120
732
12
50
49

78.
18.
.
1.
1.

1 ,2 8 0 ,0 0 0
182,000
11,700
70,7 0 0
6, 590

82.
11.
.
4.
.

1 9 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,6 6 0 ,0 0 0
7 1 ,7 0 0
1 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 6,600

85.
7.
.
7.
.

7
5
3
3
2

1 Includes work stoppages involving unions of different affiliations— either
and 1 unaffiliated union or m ore, or 2 unaffiliated unions or m ore.
Because of rounding,

Percent

3 ,9 6 3

A F L -C IO ___________________________________ ___________
Unaffiliated unions____________________________________
Single firm unions—
_ _
___
Different affiliations 1
No union involved
_
__ .

NOTE:

Man-days idle,
1965 (all stoppages)

sums of individual items may not equal totals.

5
8
8
6
4

1 union or more

1
1
3
3
2

affiliated with A F L -C IO

18
Table 11.

Work Stoppages by Contract Status and Size of Stoppage, 1965
Stoppages beginning in 1965

Contract status and size of stoppage
(number of workers involved)

Workers; involved
Number

1965 (all stoppages)

Percent
Number

Percent

Number

Percent

A ll stoppages--------------------------------------------------------

3 ,9 6 3

100. 0

1 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

2 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

6 and under 20 - -------------------------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 ____________________________________
100 and under 250— -------------------------------------------------250 and under 500— --------------------------------------------------500 and under 1 ,0 0 0 — ----------------------------------- ------1 ,0 0 0 and under 5, 000-----------------------------------------------5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 ---------------------------------------------10, 000 and o v e r -----------------------------------------------------------

686
1,4 5 2
815
483
259
221
26
21

17. 3
36. 6
20. 6
12. 2
6. 5
5. 6
.7
.5

8, 070
6 9 ,2 0 0
128,000
165,000
176,000
4 3 4 ,0 0 0
178,000
3 8 7 ,000

0. 5
4. 5
8. 3
10. 7
11 .4
28. 1
11. 5
25. 0

167,000
1 ,2 1 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,0 9 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,3 8 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,3 2 0 ,0 0 0
6 ,5 7 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0
6 ,0 7 0 ,0 0 0

0. 7
5 .2
9 .0
10. 2
10. 0
28. 2
10. 7
26. 0

Negotiation of first agreement or
union recognition-------------------------------------------------- —
6 and under 2 0 -------------------------------------------------------20 and under 100 — -------------------------------------------100 and under 250- ----------------------------------------------250 and under 500------ -------------------------------------- 500 and under 1 ,0 0 0 ------------- ------------------------------1 ,0 0 0 and under 5 ,0 0 0 - ------- ----------------------------5, 000 and under 1 0 ,0 0 0 -------------------------------------10, 000 and o v e r ---------------------------------------------------

692
232
326
91
27
6
8
1
1

17. 5
5 .9
8. 2
2. 3
.7
.2
.2
(M
(M

7 6 ,6 0 0
2, 660
14,600
14,500
8 ,4 9 0
3, 700
1 3,600
9 ,0 0 0
10,000

5. 0
.2
.9
.9
.5
.2
.9
.6
.6

1 ,8 4 0 ,0 0 0
8 1 ,2 0 0
4 6 5 ,0 0 0
5 4 1 ,000
2 5 8 ,0 0 0
7 8 ,4 0 0
3 5 0 ,0 0 0
9, 000
6 0 ,0 0 0

7 .9
.3
2. 0
2. 3
1. 1
.3
1. 5

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration or
reopening)— -------------------------------------------------------------6 and under 2 0 --------- -----------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 ---------------------------------------------------100 and under 250--------------------------------------------------250 and under 500- — ----------------------------------------500 and under 1 ,0 0 0 -------------------------------------------1,0 0 0 and under 5, 000------ ---------------------------------5, 000 and under 10, 000 _ -----------------------------------1 0,000 and o v e r ------------------------------------------------------

1 ,802
189
630
424
244
151
130
18
16

45. 5
4 .8
15 .9
10. 7
6 .2
3 .8
3. 3
.5
.4

996 ,0 0 0
2, 370
31,0 0 0
6 6 ,7 0 0
8 3 ,1 0 0
103,000
262 ,0 0 0
120,000
327,000

6 4 .4
.2
2. 0
4. 3
5 .4
6. 7
17. 0
7. 8
21. 1

1 8 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0
6 0 ,3 0 0
5 6 5 ,0 0 0
1 ,2 8 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,8 4 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,8 5 0 ,0 0 0
5, 2 1 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,1 7 0 ,0 0 0
5 ,6 8 0 ,0 0 0

80. 0
.3
2 .4
5. 5
7 .9
7 .9
2 2 .4
9 .3
2 4 .4

During term of agreement (negotiation
of new agreement not involved) _ -------------------------6 and under 2 0 --------------------------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 -------------------------------------------------100 and under 250— ------------------- ----------------------250 and under 500- ----------------------------------------------500 and under 1 ,0 0 0 ----------------------------------------------1 ,0 0 0 and under 5, 000------------------------------------------5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 ---------------------------------------10, 000 and o v e r ------------------------------------------------------

1,3 7 4
238
459
279
204
101
82
7
4

34. 7
6. 0
11.6
7. 0
5. 1
2. 5
2. 1
.2
.1

4 6 3 ,0 0 0
2 ,7 6 0
22,1 0 0
4 3 ,9 0 0
7 0 ,9 0 0
6 8 ,8 0 0
156,000
4 8 ,1 0 0
5 0,300

30. 0
.2
1 .4
2 .8
4. 6
4. 5
10. 1
3. 1
3. 3

2 ,7 1 0 ,0 0 0
19,4 0 0
162,000
2 1 9 ,0 0 0
26 8 ,0 0 0
39 4 ,0 0 0
9 9 8 ,0 0 0
32 1 ,0 0 0
32 8 ,0 0 0

11. 6
. 1
.7
.9
1 .2
1.7
4. 3
1 .4
1 .4

No contract or other contract statu s----------------------6 and under 2 0 _____________________________________
20 and under 1 0 0 --------------- ---------------------------------100 and under 250--------------------------------------------------250 and under 500--------------------------------------------------500 and under 1 ,0 0 0 — -----------------------------------------1 ,000 and under 5, 000------------------------------------------5, 000 and under 1 0 ,0 0 0 --------- ----------------------------10, 000 and o v e r ------------------------------------------------------

69
17
27
17
6
1
1

1. 7
.4
.7
.4
.2
(M
n

8, 610
180
1, 160
2, 590
1,790
700
2, 200

.6
(M
.1
.2
. 1
(*)
.1

.2
(M

-

-

5 5 ,9 0 0
1,9 8 0
10,9 0 0
2 6 ,4 0 0
5, 550
1 ,400
9, 800
-

No information on contract status---------------------------6 and under 2 0 -------------------------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 -------------------------------------------------100 and under 250---------------------------------------------- —
250 and under 500— -------------------------------------------500 and under 1 ,0 0 0 ----------------------------------------------1, 000 and under 5, 000----------------------- ----------------5, 000 and under 1 0 ,0 0 0 - ----- ------------------ ------10, 000 and o v e r ------------------------------------------------------

26
10
10
4
2

.
.
.
.
.

-

-

-

7
3
3
1
1




Because of rounding,

-

1 ,750
110
300
550
800

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 Less than 0. 05 percent.
NOTE:

-

sums of individual items may not equal totals.

. 1
(')
0
C )

.i
~

4 1 ,6 0 0
3, 900
6 ,4 5 0
2 7 ,8 0 0
3 ,4 9 0

C )

.3

(l )

. 1
C )
(')
n

.2
(l )
C )

. 1
(M

-

-

-

-

Table 12.

Work Stoppages by Number of Establishments Involved, 1965
Stoppages beginning in 1965

Number of establishments
involved 1

Workers involved
Number

Man-days idle,
1965 (all stoppages)

Percent
Number

Percent

Number

Percent

-----------------------------------------------------------

3, 963

100. 0

1, 550, 000

100. 0

2 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

1 establishment__________ ___
____ ____ ______
2 to 5 establishm ents-------------- ------- _ _ _____ ___
__________
______ _
6 to 10 establishments- ___
11 establishments or m ore_______
________________
11 to 49 establishm ents_____________ ____ ___
_ _ ___ __ _
50 to 99 establishm ents----------100 establishments or m o r e — ________
____
Exact number not known2__ ___________
______
Not reported_____
___
______________ ____ ____ _

3, 123
461
111
152
106
24
17
5
116

78. 8
11.6
2. 8
3. 8
2. 7
.6
.4
.1
2 .9

6 3 4 ,0 0 0
220, 000
68, 600
527,000
197,000
151,000
127,000
52, 400
95, 800

41. 1
14. 2
4 .4
34. 1
12. 7
9. 8
8. 2
3. 4
6. 2

9, 100, 000
3, 620, 000
1, 340, 000
7 ,6 9 0 ,0 0 0
2, 260, 000
1, 780, 000
2, 500, 000
1, 150, 000
1, 560, 000

39. 0
15. 6
5. 7
33. 0
9 .7
7. 6
10. 7
4 .9
6. 7

Total--------

An establishment is defined as a single physical location where business is conducted, or where services or industrial
operations are perform ed; for example, a factory, m ill, store, mine, or farm .
A stoppage may involve 1 or 2 establishments
or m ore of a single employer, or it may involve different employers.
2 Information available indicates more than 11 establishments involved in each of these stoppages.
NOTE:

Because of rounding,




sums of individual items may not equal totals.

20
Table 13.

Beginning
date

Approx­
imate
duration
(calendar
d ay s)1

Mar. 1

23

Work Stoppages Involving 10,000 Workers or More Beginning in 1965

E sta b lish m e n ts)
and location

Am erican Can Co.
and Continental
Can C o., in ter­
state.

Union(s)
involved 2

United
Steelworkers.

Approx­
imate
number of
workers
involved 2
3 1 ,000

Major term s of settlem ent3

4 0 -month contracts were concluded with each company.
The agreements, which are generally sim ilar, provide
for an average wage increase of 12 cents an hour, re t­
roactive to Oct. 1, 1964, and an average wage increase
of 8.25 cents an hour, effective Dec. 1, 1966; in cor­
poration of 2 3 -cent cost-of-livin g allowance into stand­
ard rates and elimination of the escalator clause.
Increased pension benefits, effective Dec. 1, 1965; a
maximum of 730 days' hospitalization (form erly, 365
days) for employees with 10 years' service and their
dependents, effective Dec. 1, 1966; SUB and sickness
and accident programs merged into "Job and Income
Security P r o g r a m ," effective Dec. 1, 1965, with 15cent hourly company payment and 2 -cent contingent
liability (prior cost for both estimated at 8 cents per
hour); employees with 2 years' service, who are tra n s­
ferred to lower rated jobs, are guaranteed 95 percent
of previous earnings, effective Apr. 1, 1965.

M ar. 18

11

G lass Container
Manufacturers
Institute, in ter­
state.

Glass Bottle
Blowers
Association.

4 0 ,0 0 0

3-year contract providing for a wage increase of 10
cents per hour, retroactive to Feb. 1, 1965, an addi­
tional 4 cents effective M ar. 1, 1966, and 10 cents e f­
fective Mar. 1, 1967; an eighth paid holiday, Dec. 26,
effective 1967; fourth week of vacation after 20 years'
service effective 1966; 17z -cent-p er-hour increase in
minimum company contribution to group life, accident,
m ajor-m ed ical, and health insurance program; 50
minutes' relief time (including lunch) on 8 -hour shifts
and 35 minutes on 6 -hour shifts for employees on con­
tinuous machine-paced jobs (the latter not previously
specified in the contract).
$3 monthly pension (was $2.50) for each ye a r's service,
effective Mar. 1, 1966, for employees retiring on or
after Feb. 1, 1965; disability retirement at any age
(was age 50) after 15 years, effective M ar. 1, 1966;
vesting established after 15 years at age 50, or at age
40, effective M ar. 1, 1966, for employees terminated
because of a shutdown or curtailment through automa­
tion an d transfers to another company under th e
agreement.

Pan Am erican
World Airways,
systemwide.

International
Air Line
Pilots
Association.

Eastern New York
Construction
Employers A sso c ia ­
tion, upstate
New York.

Building
trades'
unions.

Textile converting
and distributing
companies,
metropolitan
New York area.

Retail,
Wholesale
and
Department
Store Union.

17,000

2-year
active
fringe
ing a

contract providing for salary in creases, re tr o ­
in part to Jan. 1, 1964, and improvements in
benefits; changes in working conditions, includ­
reduction in duty hours.

5 10,000

5 -year agreements, all but two of which provided for
a graduated reduction in the workweek (from 40 hours
to 35 hours), and a total increase of $1.40 an hour
in wages and fringe benefits.

o
o
o
o

11

Mar. 31

3 -year agreements generally providing for an annual
increase of $5 in weekly wages, improved fringe bene­
fits, and a clause guaranteeing equal employment and
promotional opportunities for all w orkers.

22,0 0 0

2-year contract providing for an hourly wage increase
of 7.5 cents at 5 tire plants, and 6.5 cents at 12 of the
13 nontire plants; also an additional 9 cents effective
June 6, 1966, and 7 cents toward inequity adjustment
for skilled tradesmen; ninth paid holiday; 4 weeks'
vacation after 15 years (was 22) and 5 weeks after
25 y e a r s ; liberalized supplemental unemployment
benefits. 7

May 1

4 89

May 3

15

June 2

6

United States
Rubber C o.,
interstate.

United Rubber,
Cork, Lino­
leum and
Plastic
W orkers.

June 7

2

New England
Telephone and T e le ­
graph C o ., M a ss.,
Maine, N .H ., R .I.,
and Vt.

International
Brotherhood
of Telephone
Workers
(Ind.).

12,000

W orkers returned to their jobs after a 2-day protest
against the suspension of a local union official.

June 8

76

Construction indus­
try, statewide,
Arizona.

Building
trades'
unions.

8 16,000

5 -year agreements generally providing for a 5 -percent
annual increase in wages and fringe benefits.

See footnotes at end of table.




21
Table B.

Beginning
date

Approx­
imate
duration
(calendar
days) 1

Work Stoppages Involving 10,000 Workers or More Beginning in 1965—Continued

Establishm ent s )
and location

Union(s)
involved 2

June 11

22

International Paper
C o., Southern
Kraft D iv ., A la .,
A rk., F la ., L a.,
M iss., and S.C.

International
Brotherhood
of E lectrical
W orkers;
International
Brotherhood
of Pulp,
Sulphite and
Paper M ill
W orkers;
United
Papermakers
and Paper w orkers.

June 16

78

Maritime industry,
Atlantic and Gulf
Coasts.

Am erican
Radio
Association;
National
Marine
Engineers’
Beneficial
Association;
International
Organization
of M asters,
Mates and
Pilots.

Construction
industry, southern
California.

International
Union of
Operating
Engineers.

6

Trucking industry,
Philadelphia, Pa.,
area.

7

June 17

33

June 20

June 28

July 1

24

Approx­
imate
number of
workers
involved 2

Major term s of settlem ent3

13,000

2 -year contract providing for a 10 .5 -cent hourly wage
increase, retroactive to June 1; an additional 3 .5 percent wage increase, effective in 1966; 4 weeks' v a ­
cation after 15 years' service (was 20), and, effective
in 1966, 5 weeks after 25 years (was 30) and 6 weeks
after 30 years; improvements in the pension plan, in ­
cluding full retirement at age 62 after 20 years (was
age 65).

9 10,000

4-year agreements providing in each case for an annual
increase in wages and/or fringe benefits of 3.2 p e r­
cent, of the total hourly employment costs (exclusive
of payroll taxes) to be allocated at the union's option.
The agreement with the Marine Engineers' Beneficial
Association authorized Secretary of Labor W. W illard
W irtz, A F L —
CIO President George Meany, a n d a
3-m em ber panel to develop effective procedures for the
resolution of manning and related disputes arising from
the mechanization and retrofitting of ships.

1 35, 000
0

4 -year agreement providing for an immediate hourly
wage increase of 35.5 cents, and an annual increase
of 30 cents, to be divided between wages and fringe
benefits in each of the remaining years. The contract
provides for the establishment of a bipartite Permanent
Labor Relations Committee and the joint selection of
a permanent arbitrator. A special committee was also
established to resolve the existing differences regard­
ing the status of ow ner-operator s.

International
Brotherhood
of T eam ­
sters,
Chauffeurs,
W arehouse­
men and
Helpers
(Ind.).

10,000

The stoppage, which resulted from a dispute over the
d ism issa l of four w orkers, ended without a form al
agreement.

Taxicab companies,
New York City.

Taxi D rivers
Organizing
Comm ittee.

10,000

Stoppage ended with the appointment of a temporary a r ­
bitrator, who was empowered to resolve all grievances
occurring between June 28 and July 21. An NLRB
representation election was scheduled for the latter
date at 38 garages.

General Dynamics
Corp., Electric
Boat Division,
Groton, Conn.

Metal Trades
Council.

16,000

3 -year agreement providing for
of 8 cents per hour effective
tional 7 cents, effective July
day (day after Thanksgiving);
20 years; improvements in
program s.

a general wage increase
July 1966, and an addi­
1967; a ninth paid h o li­
4 weeks' vacation after
pension an d insurance

The contract now stipulates that any work shifted to the
firm 's Quincy, M a s s ., yard will be considered sub­
contracting.

Aug. 23

20

Am erican Motors
C orp., Kenosha,
W is.

See footnotes at end of table.




International
Union,
United
Automobile,
Aerospace
and A g r i­
cultural
Implement
W orkers.

11,000

Stoppage occurred when the parties were unable to con­
clude agreement on a number of grievances, many of
which involved production standards and disciplinary
actions. Work was resumed following agreement on
the items at issue.

22
Table 13. Work Stoppages Involving 10,000 Workers or More Beginning in 1965— Continued

Beginning
date

Approx­
imate
duration
(calendar
days) 1

E sta b lish m e n ts)
and location

Union(s)
involved 2

Approx­
imate
number of
workers
involved2

Major terms of settlem ent3

Sept. 7

20

Bituminous coal
m ines, Ohio, Pa.,
and W. Va.

United Mine
Workers
(Ind.).

1 17, 000
1

Stoppages resulted from the m iners' refusal to cross
picket lines established to protest the discharge of
6 workers at a W. Va. mine. Work was resumed with
the understanding that the grievance of the dischargees
would be submitted for resolution under the p roce­
dures set forth in the National Bituminous Coal Wage
Agreement.

Sept. 16

25

Publishers A sso c ia ­
tion of New York
City. 1
2

Am erican
Newspaper
Guild.

1 17, 000
2

2-year agreement provided that the New York Times
give notice of automation 6 months prior to the intro­
duction of automated equipment and afford protection
against job loss due to automation in t h e case of
present employees and for future employees having a
year or more of service. It stipulated that the Times
would not enter into any agreement with another union
which would adversely affect the Guild's jurisdiction.
Other term s:
extension of the union shop; companyadministered pension plan to be replaced by jointlyadministered plan.

Sept. 16

19

The Boeing C o.,
interstate.

International
Association
of Machinists
and A e r o ­
space
W orkers.

2 8 ,0 0 0

3 -year agreement providing 8-cent hourly wage increase
in each year; an additional 5 cents to employees in top
labor grades; 8-cent current cost-o f-liv in g allowance
incorporated into base rates; escalator clause revised
to a quarterly basis (was annual) and the 3-cent
annual limit continued; 1 cent per hour to be paid
into job inequity fund in each year; ninth paid h oli­
day (Good Friday at m ost locations); improvements
in pension and h o sp ital-m ed ical-surgical insurance
programs.

Negotiations are to continue for a 6 -month period on the
company's performance analysis system of rating e m ­
ployees for promotions and layoffs.

Oct. 1

24

Nov. 8

1 10
3

Construction industry,
A r iz ., C a lif.,
Idaho, N e v .,
O reg., Utah, and
Wash.

International
Brotherhood
of B o ile r­
m akers, Iron
Shipbuilders,
Blacksm iths,
F orgers and
Helpers.

16,000

3 -year agreement providing for an immediate 2 0 -cent
hourly wage increase, and additional increases of 30
cents and 25 cents on Oct. 1, 1966, and Oct. 1, 1967,
respectively; increases in employer contributions to
the pension, vacation, and welfare funds; higher m ile ­
age and subsistence allowances.

McDonnell Aircraft
C o rp ., C a lif., F la.,
M o., N. M e x ., S.C.

International
Association
of Machinists
and A e r o ­
space
W orkers.

17,000

3 -year agreement providing for a 9 -cent hourly wage
increase retroactive to Nov. 8; an additional 9 cents
effective Nov. 7, 1966, and Nov. 6, 1967; current 11cent c ost-of-livin g allowance incorporated into base
rates and the escalation clause revised; 3 - to 6 -cent
classification adjustment for 8 ,2 5 0 employees, and
deferred classification adjustment of like amount for
an additional 2, 800 employees.

Ninth paid holiday (day after Thanksgiving); 2 weeks' va­
cation (was 1 week) after 1 yea r's service and 4 weeks
after 20 years; company assum es employee con­
tribution to pension plan (2 percent on first $3, 000
annual earnings); increases in insurance and sick leave
benefits; $100 supplemental layoff benefit (was $75) for
each year's service to 15 (was 10); up to 3 days' paid
funeral leave established.

See footnotes at end of table.




23
Table 13. Work Stoppages Involving 10,000 Workers or More Beginning in 1965--- Continued

Beginning
date

Nov. 18

Approx­
imate
duration
(calendar
days) 1
1

E sta b lish m e n ts)
and location

Atchison, Topeka
and Santa Fe R ail­
way, systemwide.

Union(s)
involved 1
2

Brotherhood
of Railway
and Steam ­
ship C lerks,
Freight
Handlers,
Express and
Station
Em ployees.

Approx­
imate
number of
workers
involved 2
2 9 ,0 0 0

Major term s of settlem ent3
3
2
0
1
9
8
7
6
5
4

Work was resumed following agreement to
issues in dispute to mediation.

submit the

1 Includes nonworkdays, such as Saturdays, Sundays, and established holidays.
2 The unions listed are those directly involved in the dispute, but the number of workers involved may include m em bers
of other unions or nonunion workers idled by disputes in the same establishments.
Number of workers involved is the maximum number made idle for 1 shift or longer in establishments directly involved
in a stoppage.
This figure does not measure the indirect or secondary effects on other establishments or industries whose
employees are made idle as a result of m aterial or service shortages.
i
Adapted largely from Current Wage Developments, published monthly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
4 Workers returned to their jobs on May 19, but resumed the strike on June 7.
5 Peak idleness occurred during portions of May and July.
6 Peak idleness occurred on May 3 and 4 ; the number idle declined continuously thereafter, as individual firm s and e m ­
ployer associations reached agreement.'
7 Employees at the nontire plant in Providence, R .I ., accepted an immediate 7 .5 -cent decrease in hourly wages, and
agreed to forego the deferred wage increase effective in 1966, in return for the Company's guarantee to maintain operations
at the plant for 5 years. Workers at this plant, however, are to receive the fringe benefit increases negotiated in the m aster
contract.
8 The highest levels of idleness occurred during the June 28—
August 15 period.
9 The number of vessels idled reached its peak during the July 5— period.
9
1 Peak idleness occurred during the July 1—19 period.
0
1 Peak idleness occurred during the September 20—24 period.
1
1 Six newspapers suspended publication shortly after a strike began at the New York T im e s. One of these papers, the
2
New York Herald Tribune, resigned from the Association on Sept. 25, 1965, and resumed publication 2 days later.
1 Workers returned to their jobs on November 12, but resumed the strike on November 19.
3




24

Table 14. Work Stoppages Ending in 1965, by Duration and Contract Status 1
Stoppages
Duration and contract status

^

Workers involved

Number

stoppages_________________________________

Percent

3 ,9 7 2

100. 0

Number

Man-days idle

Percent

Number

1, 600, 000

100.0

2 3 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

Percent

1 day_______________________________ ______________
2 to 3 d a y s--------------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d ay s________________ _______________ _________
7 to 14 days-------------------------------------------------------------15 to 29 day s----------------------------------------------------------30 to 59 d ay s----------------------------------------------------------60 to 89 day s---------- ---------------------------------------------90 days and o v e r------------------------------------------ -------

447
565
558
822
642
476
241
221

11.
14.
14.
20.
lb.
12.
6.
5.

3
2
0
7
2
0
1
6

179,000
158,000
196,000
28 5 ,0 0 0
38 3 ,0 0 0
200,000
170,000
3 4 ,4 0 0

11. 1
9 -8
12. 2
1 7 .8
23. 8
12. 5
10. 6
2. 1

179,000
3 2 8 ,0 0 0
7 0 2 ,0 0 0
1, 950, 000
5, 080, 000
5, 140, 000
6 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0
4 ,3 4 0 ,0 0 0

0. 7
.1.4
2 .9
8. 2
21. 3
2 1 .6
25. 6
18. 2

Negotiation of first agreement or
union recognition-------------------------------------------------1 day-------------------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d ay s___ __________________________________
4 to 6 d a y s________________ ____________________
7 to 14 days— ________________________________
15 to 29 d ay s---------------------------------------------- ..-----30 to 59 d ay s--------- -----------------------------------------60 to 89 d ay s-----------------------------------------------------90 days and o v e r -----------------------------------------------

7 03
35
50
60
132
120
113
93
100

17.7
.9
1. 3
1. 5
3. 3
3. 0
2. 8
2. 3
2. 5

75, 400
12,900
6, 150
3, 140
2 0 ,0 0 0
10,200
7, 930
6, 060
8, 970

4. 7
.8
.4
.2
1 .2
.b
.5
.4
.6

1 , b 9 0 ,000
12,900
15,3 0 0
12,900
129,000
154,000
227 ,0 0 0
330 ,0 0 0
8 0 6 ,0 0 0

7. 1
. 1
. 1
. 1
.5
.b
1. 0
1. 4
3. 4

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration
or reopening)-------------------------------------------------------1 day____________________________________________
2 to 3 day s_____________________________________
4 to 6 d ay s---------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days--------------------------------------------------------15 to 29 d ay s___________________________________
30 to 59 d ay s-----------------------------------------------------60 to 89 d ay s___________________________________
90 days and o v e r -----------------------------------------------

1,801
98
163
204
405
390
306
135
100

45. 3
2. 5
4. 1
5. 1
10. 2
9 .8
7. 7
3. 4
2. 5

1 ,0 6 0 ,0 0 0
7 3 ,5 0 0
4 4 ,5 0 0
9 1 ,7 0 0
193,000
300 ,0 0 0
180,000
152,000
2 3 ,4 0 0

66. 0
4 .6
2. 8
5. 7
12. 0
18. 7
1 1 .2
9. 5
1. 5

1 9 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
7 3 ,5 0 0
8 3 ,7 0 0
3 3 7 ,0 0 0
1 ,4 3 0 ,0 0 0
4, 110, 000
4 ,6 3 0 ,0 0 0
5, 410, 000
3 ,3 6 0 ,0 0 0

81. 5
.3
.4
1 .4
6. 0
17. 2
19. 4
22. 7
14. 1

During term of agreement (negotiation of
new agreement not involved)-----------------------------1 day_____._______________________________________
2 to 3 d ay s---------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s---------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days-------------------------------------------------------15 to 29 d ay s-----------------------------------------------------30 to 59 d ay s-----------------------------------------------------60 to 89 d ay s___ ______ _____ ____ ________ _____
90 days and o v e r -----------------------------------------------

1, 372
300
331
275
266
123
52
11
14

34. 5
7. 6
8. 3
6 .9
6. 7
3. 1
1. 3
.3
.4

460 ,0 0 0
9 1 ,4 0 0
105, 000
99, 200
70, 700
70, 000
11,400
11,600
1, 690

28. 7
5. 7
6. 5
6. 2
4. 4
4. 4
.7
.7
. 1

2, 630, 000
91, 400
224, 000
345, 000
3 8 7 ,0 0 0
8 0 1 ,0 0 0
2 8 5 ,0 0 0
3 6 3 ,0 0 0
132,000

11. 0
.4
.9
1 .4
1. 6
3. 4
1. 2
1. 5
.6

No contract or other contract status-----------------1 day-------------------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 day s---------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d ay s---------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days____________________________________
15 to 29 day s-----------------------------------------------------30 to 59 day s-----------------------------------------------------60 to 89 day s-----------------------------------------------------90 days and o v e r -----------------------------------------------

70
11
17
14
15
6
3

1 .8
.3
.4
.4
.4
.2
. 1

8, 490
670
2, 510
1, 130
1, 100
2, 630
260

.5
(1
2)
.2
. 1
. 1
.2
(2)

5 7 ,3 0 0
670
5, 310
4, 080
6, 320
1 6,700
3, 050

No information on contract status----------------------1 day-------------------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 d ay s---------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d ay s_____________________________________
7 to 14 days-------------------------------------------------------15 to 29 d ay s___________________________________
30 to 59 d ay s___________________________________
60 to 89 d ay s-----------------------------------------------------90 days and o v e r -----------------------------------------------

-

-

-

4

. 1

190

26
3
4
5
4
3
2
2
3

.7
. 1
. 1
.1
. 1
. 1
. 1
. 1
. 1

1, 540
40
180
680
360
20
50
70
140

-

(2)
. 1

()
*
0
(?)
(?)

()
()
()
(2)




Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal totals.

( )
( )

(
2)
. 1
(2)

-

2 1 ,2 0 0
2 7 ,8 0 0
40
330
2, 830
1, 900
360
1, 750
3, 350
1 7 ,200

1 The totals in this table differ from those in preceding tables as these (like the average duration figures
table 1) relate to stoppages ending during the year, and thus include idleness occurring in prior years.
2 L ess than 0 .0 5 percent.
NOTE:

.2

0

. 1
. 1
(?)

0

0
0

()
(?)
(2)
. 1

shown in

25

Table 15. Mediation in Work Stoppages Ending in 1965, by Contract Status
Stoppages
Mediation agency and
contract status

Workers involved

Man-days idle

Numbe r

Percent

A ll stoppages__________________________________

3, 972

100. 0

1, 600, 000

100. 0

2 3 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

Government mediation1
____________________________
F e d e ra l---------------------------------------------------------------State _____________________________________________
Federal and State mediation combined----------O ther-------------------------------------------------------------------Private mediation__________________________________
No mediation reported_____________________________
No information----------------------------------------------------------

1,992
1, 370
247
313
62
43
1, 936
1

50. 2
34. 5
6. 2
7 .9
1 .6
1. 1
48. 8
(1
2)

1, 170, 000
878 ,0 0 0
4 7 ,6 0 0
186,000
6 1 ,0 0 0
4, 180
4 2 8 ,0 0 0
30

73. 1
54. 7
3. 0
1 1 .6
3. 8
.3
2 6 .7
(2)

21, 400. 000
15, 100, 000
4 7 1 ,0 0 0
5, 060, 000
7 4 4 ,0 0 0
3 4 ,7 0 0
2 ,3 9 0 ,0 0 0
1, 380

89. 8
63. 5
2. 0
21. 2
3. 1
. 1
10. 0
(2 )

Negotiation of first agreem ent-----------------------------Government mediation--------------------------------------F ede r a l_______________________________ _______
State __________________________________________
Federal and State mediation combined____
O ther_________________________________________
Private mediation_______________________________
No mediation reported--------------------------------------No information-----------------------------------------------------

703
344
234
56
40
14
11
348
-

17. 7
8. 7
5 .9
1 .4
1 .0
.4
.3
8. 8
-

75, 400
52, 000
2 4 ,6 0 0
1 1,500
3, 020
12,900
270
2 3 ,1 0 0
-

4 .7
3. 2
1. 5
.7
.2
.8
(2)
1 .4
-

1 ,6 9 0 ,0 0 0
1, 220, 000
9 6 5 ,0 0 0
5 2 ,9 0 0
118,000
85, 100
5, 100
4 6 1 ,0 0 0

7. 1
5. 1
4. 0
.2
.5
.4
(2)
1 .9
-

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration
or reopening)_____________________________________
Government mediation---------------------------------------F e d e ral----------------------------------------------------------State---------------------------------------------------------------Federal and State mediation combined-----O ther--------------------------------------------------------------Private mediation----------------------------------------------No mediation reported--------------------------------------No information-----------------------------------------------------

1, 801
1, 513
1 ,0 7 5
154
257
27
3
285
-

45. 3
38. 1
27. 1
3 .9
6. 5
.7
. 1
7. 2
-

1 ,0 6 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
7 8 8 ,0 0 0
2 8 ,3 0 0
154,000
2 9 ,2 0 0
260
58,6 0 0
-

66. 0
62. 3
49. 1
1. 8
9 .6
1 .8
(2)
3. 7
-

1 9 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 3 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 7 9 ,0 0 0
4, 520, 000
4 3 4 ,0 0 0
3, 150
4 1 2 ,0 0 0
-

81. 5
79. 8
57. 4
1 .6
19. 0
1 .8
(2 )
1 .7
-

During term of agreement (negotiation of
new agreement not involved)------------------------------Government mediation--------------------------------- —
F e d e ra l----------------------------------------------------------State __________________________________________
Federal and State mediation combined-----Othe r _________________________________________
Private m ediation---------------------------------------------No mediation reported--------------------------------------No information-----------------------------------------------------

1, 372
127
60
32
16
19
26
1, 219
-

34. 5
3. 2
1. 5
.8
.4
.5
.7
30. 7
-

4 6 0 ,0 0 0
120,000
6 4 ,8 0 0
7, 620
2 8 ,8 0 0
18,800
3, 380
337 ,0 0 0
-

28. 7
7. 5
4. 0
.5
1 .8
1. 2
.2
2 1 .0
-

2 ,6 3 0 ,0 0 0
1, 170, 000
4 8 4 ,0 0 0
3 8 ,3 0 0
4 2 3 ,0 0 0
2 2 3 ,0 0 0
2 5 ,9 0 0
1 ,4 3 0 ,0 0 0
-

11. 0
4 .9
2. 0
.2
1. 8
.9
. 1
6. 0
-

No contract or other contract status------------------Government mediation--------------------------------------F e d e ra l______________ _________ ____ _________
State ----------------------------------------------------------------Federal and State mediation combined-----Othe r _________________________________________
Private mediation----------------------------------------------No mediation reported--------------------------------------No information-----------------------------------------------------

70
5
3
_
2
1
64
-

1 .8
.1
. 1
. 1
(2)
1. 6
-

8, 490
260
100
170
130
8, 100
-

.5
(2)
(2)
-

5 7 ,3 0 0
2, 800
310
2, 490
250
5 4 ,2 0 0
-

.2
(2)
(2 )
(2)
(2)
.2
-

No information on contract status------------------------Government mediation--------------------------------------F e d e ral----------------------------------------------------------State__________________________________________
Federal and State mediation combined-----O ther--------------------------------------------------------------Private mediation----------------------------------------------No mediation reported--------------------------------------No information-----------------------------------------------------

26
3
1
2
2
20
1

.7
. 1
(2)
. 1
. 1
.5
(2)

1, 540
330
310
20
140
1, 060
30

Number

1 Includes 13 stoppages, involving 4, 040 w orkers, in which private mediation,
2 Less than 0 .0 5 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding,




sums of individual items may not equal totals.

Percent

0

(2)
.5
. 1
0

( )
(2)
(2)
. 1
(2)

also,

Number

2 7 ,8 0 0
1, 670
1, 530
140
340
2 4 ,4 0 0
1, 380

was employed.

Percent

. 1
0

()
(2)
(2)
. 1
(2)

26

Table 16.

Settlement o f Stoppages Ending in 1965, by Contract Status
Stoppages

Workers involved

Man-days idle

Contract status and settlement
Number

A ll stoppages

_

__

___

_

____

Settlement reached1 _____________________________
No form al settlement— work resumed
(with old or new w o rk e rs)_____________________
Employer out of busin ess. _____________________
No information_______ _______ __________________

Percent

3,9 7 2

100. 0

1, 600, 000

100. 0

2 3 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

3, 624

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

91. 2

1 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0

96. 4

2 1 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

89. 3

314
33
1

7 .9
.8
2
(1 )

5 4 ,7 0 0
2, 730
30

3 .4
.2
( 2)

2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
138,000
1, 320

10. 1
.6
(2)

Negotiation of first agreement or union
recognition_______________________________________
Settlement reached______ _________________
No form al settlem ent ____ ________________
Employer out of business ___ ______________

703
523
164
16

17. 7
13. 2
4. 1
.4

7 5 ,4 0 0
63, 100
11,600
690

4. 7
3 .9
.7
(2)

1 ,6 9 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0
567 ,0 0 0
18,600

7. 1
4. 6
2. 4
. 1

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration
or reopening) __________ ___________________
Settlement reached _________________________
No form al settlem ent _____________________
Employer out of business _________________

1,801
1, 729
59
13

45. 3
43. 5
1. 5
3

1 ,0 6 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 4 0 ,0 0 0
13,800
1,670

66. 0
65. 0
.9
. 1

1 9 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 7 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,6 7 0 ,0 0 0
9 9 ,6 0 0

81. 5
74. 1
7. 0
.4

During term of agreement (negotiation of
new agreement not involved)----------- ----------Settlement reached _______ ________________
No form al settlem ent _______________________
Employer out of business ___________________

1, 372
1, 300
69
3

34. 5
32. 7
1. 7
. 1

4 6 0 ,0 0 0
4 3 2 ,0 0 0
2 8 ,2 0 0
330

28. 7
2 6 .9
1. 8
(2)

2 ,6 3 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,4 6 0 ,0 0 0
146,000
19,000

11. 0
10. 3
.6
. 1

No contract or other contract status __________
Settlement reached _________________________
No form al settlem ent -------- ----------------------Employer out of business __________ ______

70
50
19
1

1. 8
1. 3
.5
(2)

8 ,4 9 0
7, 370
1,070
50

.5
.5
. 1

5 7 ,3 0 0
3 6,600
2 0 ,0 0 0
740

.2
.2
. 1

26
22

.7
.6
. 1

1,540
1,460
50
30

No information on contract status _____________
Settlement reached _________________________
No form al settlem ent _______________________
Employer out of business____________________
No information________________________________

3

1

.

(2)

( 2)

. 1
. 1
(2)

2 7 ,8 0 0
2 5 ,9 0 0
550

(2)

1, 320

-

-

1 The parties either reached a form al settlement or agreed on a procedure for resolving their differences.
2 L e ss than 0 .0 5 percent.
NOTE:




Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal totals.

(2)

. 1
. 1
(2)

-

(2)

27

Table 17.

Procedure for Handling Unsettled Issues in Work Stoppages Ending in 1965, by Contract Status
Workers involved

Stoppages
Procedure for handling unsettled
issues and contract status

Number

Percent

Number

Pe rcent

A ll stoppages covered 1----------------------------------

566

100. 0

28 6 ,0 0 0

Arbitration--------------------------------------------------------------D irect negotiations-------------------------------------------- R eferral to a government agency------------------------Other m eans------------------------------------------------------------

99
116
42
309

17. 5
20. 5
7 .4
54. 6

Negotiation of first agreement or union
recognition-----------------------------------------------------------Arbitration---------------------------------------------------------Direct negotiations------------------------------------------R eferral to a government agency------------------Other m eans----------------------------------------------------

70
16
22
28
4

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration
or reopening)-------------------------------------------------------Arbitration------------------------------------------------ -----Direct negotiations------------------------------------------R eferral to a government agency------------------Other m ean s-------------------------------------------------------

Man-days idle
Number

Percent

100. 0

2 ,7 4 0 ,0 0 0

1 0 0.0

52,6 0 0
140,000
2 2 ,3 0 0
7 0 ,7 0 0

1 8 .4
49. 0
7. 8
24. 8

6 1 7 ,0 0 0
8 8 3 ,0 0 0
1 05,000
1 ,1 3 0 ,0 0 0

22. 6
32. 3
3 .8
4 1 .3

1 2 .4
2. 8
3 .9
4 .9
.7

2 7 ,8 0 0
11,600
14,000
2, 100
120

9. 7
4. 1
4 .9
.7
(1
2)

193,000
9 7 ,7 0 0
5 9 ,8 0 0
3 1 ,9 0 0
4 ,0 8 0

7. 1
3 .6
2. 2
1. 2

78
27
42
7
2

13. 8
4. 8
7 .4
1 .2
.4

134,000
10,800
7 5 ,5 0 0
2, 670
4 5 ,0 0 0

46. 9
3 .8
26. 5
.9
15 .8

1 ,9 7 0 ,0 0 0
2 8 2 ,0 0 0
6 4 2 ,0 0 0
3 2 ,1 0 0
1 ,0 1 0 ,0 0 0

7 1 .9
10. 3
23. 5
1. 2
36. 9

During term of agreement (negotiation of
new agreement not involved)-----------------------------Arbitration---------------------------------------------------------Direct negotiations - --------------------------------------R eferral to a government agency------------------Other m eans-------------------------------------------------------

413
55
48
7
303

73. 0
9 .7
8. 5
1 .2
53. 5

123,000
3 0 ,1 0 0
50,1 0 0
1 7,500
2 5 ,5 0 0

43. 2
10. 5
17. 5
6. 1
8 .9

57 4 ,0 0 0
2 3 7 ,0 0 0
179,000
4 1 ,2 0 0
1 16,000

21. 0
8 .7
6 .6
1. 5
4. 3

No contract or other contract statu s-----------------Arbitration------------------------------------------------------Direct negotiations------------------------------------------R eferral to a government agency------------------Other m eans-------------------------------------------------------

4
1
3
-

.7
.2
.5
-

440
50
400
-

.2
(2)
. 1
-

1 ,8 8 0
180
1,7 0 0
-

.1
(2)
•1
-

No information on contract status----------------------Arbitration---------------------------------------------------------Direct negotiations------------------------------------------R eferral to a government agency------------------Other m eans-------------------------------------------------------

1
1
-

.2
.2
-

10
10
-

(2)
(2)
-

130
130
-

•1

(2)
(2)
-

1 Excludes stoppages on which there was no information on issues unsettled or no agreement on procedure for handling.
2 Less than 0. 05 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding,




sums of individual items may not equal totals.

28

Appendix A. Tables— Work Stoppages
Table A-l.

Industry-

A ll in du stries _

W ork Stoppages by Industry, 1965

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
Num ber
involved

1 3, 963

1 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0

M an -d ays
id le ,
1965
(all
stopp ages)

2 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

1 2 ,0 8 0

913, 000

14, 300, 000

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s —
A m m unition, except for
sm a ll a r m s --------------------Tanks and tank com ponents Sighting and fir e control
equipment Sm all a r m s am m unition------------------------Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s , not
elsew h ere c la s s if ie d ----------------------------

12

10, 300

1 2 1 ,0 0 0

8
1

6, 270
1 ,0 0 0

6 6 ,0 0 0
2, 010

1
1

500
2, 360

2, 000
4 9 ,5 0 0

1

150

1 ,4 5 0

Food and kindred p r o d u c ts ------------------------M eat products------------------------------------------D airy produ cts-----------------------------------------Canning and p reservin g fr u its,
ve g eta b les, and se a fo o d s ------------------Grain m ill p ro d u c ts-------------------------------B ak ery products--------------------------------------C onfection ery and related
p ro d u c ts_________________________________
B everage in d u strie s-------------------------------M iscellan e ou s food preparations
and kindred produ cts----------------------------

227
46
19

5 7 ,3 0 0
1 0 ,6 0 0
3, 280

9 2 8 ,0 0 0
2 0 2 ,0 0 0
2 3 ,1 0 0

24
18
46

7, 920
2, 350
19, 700

35, 700
88, 700
2 2 2 ,0 0 0

9
47

1, 970
9, 690

2 7 ,5 0 0
301, 000

18

1, 870

2 7 ,3 0 0

T extile m ill products _
Broadwoven fab ric m ills , c otton -------Broadwoven fabric m ills , manm ade
fib er and silk-----------------------------------------Broadwoven fab ric m ills , wool:
Including dyeing and fin ish in g ----------N arrow fa b rics and other sm a ll w ares m ills : Cotton, w ool,
silk , and m anm ade fib e r --------------------Knitting m ills Dyeing and finishing te x tile s, except
wool fa b r ics and k n itgood s----------------F lo or coverin g m il ls ------------------------------Y arn and thread m i l l s ---------------------------M iscellan eou s textile g o o d s -

44
4

2 1 ,3 0 0
1 0 ,4 0 0

174, 000
59, 300

4

440

4, 640

5

3 ,4 7 0

2 7 ,6 0 0

2
7

300
1, 800

4, 450
44, 800

4
3
3
12

1 ,0 0 0
870
620
2, 430

7, 550
2, 040
1, 790
2 2 ,3 0 0

100

9, 760

1 9 9 ,0 0 0

3

140

1, 100

M anufacturing—

A p parel and other finished products
m ade fr o m fab rics and sim ila r
m a te r ia ls -----------------------------------------------M e n 's, you th s', and b oys' su its,
co a ts, and o v e rc o a ts-------------------M e n 's, you th s', and b oys'
furn ishin gs, w ork clothing,
and allied g a r m e n ts ---------------------W o m e n 's, m i s s e s ', and ju n iors'
o u te rw e a r---------------------------------------W o m e n 's, m i s s e s ', c h ild r e n 's,
and infants' u n d e r g a r m e n ts-------H ats, c ap s, and m illin e r y ------------G ir ls ', c h ild r e n 's, and infants'
ou te rw e a r ---------------------------------------Fur goods _
M iscellan eou s apparel and
a c c e s s o r ie s -----------------------------------M iscellan eou s fab ricated textile
p r o d u c ts____________________________
Lum ber and wood products, except
furn itu re-----------------------------------------------Saw m ills and planing m il ls -----------M illw o rk , v e n ee r, plywood, and
prefab ricated stru ctu ral wood
p r o d u c ts------------------------------------------Wooden containers--------------------------M iscellan eou s wood produ cts-------Furniture and fix tu r e s—
Household furniture O ffice furniture Public building and related
furn itu re----------------------------------------------P artition s, shelving, lo c k e r s , and
office and store fix t u r e s -----------------M iscellan e ou s furniture and
fix t u r e s ------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table.




14

2, 370

31, 100

44

4, 050

2 3 ,1 0 0

12
1

1, 140
250

7, 090
28, 600

2
3

50
60

1 ,3 4 0
450

9

710

8 6 ,5 0 0

12

1 ,0 2 0

1 9 ,9 0 0

46
10

1 3 ,1 0 0
4, 570

204, 000
6 1 ,9 0 0

25
3
8

7, 350
230
980

129 , 0 0 0
2 ,9 9 0
10, 600

1 69
41
7

1 0 ,2 0 0
5, 510
1, 150

1 9 4 ,0 0 0
1 2 2 ,0 0 0
14, 700

5

2, 570

3 4 ,5 0 0

15

940

2 2 ,5 0 0

2

20

310

Industry

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N u m ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
1965
(all
stoppages)

M anufacturing— Continued
P aper and a llied p r o d u c ts --------------P u lp m ills P a p e r m ills, except building
P aperboard m i l l s ___________________
C onverted paper and paperboard
products, except containers
and b o x e s ----------------------------------------P aperboard containers and boxes _
Building paper and building
board m i l l s --------------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied
in du stries _
N ew spap ers: Publishing,
publishing and printing —
P e r io d ic a ls: P ublishing,
publishing and printing —
B ook s-------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l printing—
M anifold b u sin ess fo r m s
m anufacturing—
Bookbinding and related
in d u s tr ie s -----------------------S ervice in du stries for the
printing t r a d e -------------------C h e m icals and allied p r o d u c ts-----------Industrial inorganic and
organic ch e m ica ls _
P la stic s m a teria ls and synthetic
r e s in s , synthetic rub b er,
synthetic and other m anm ade
fib e r s , except g la s s ---------------------D ru gs—
Soap, detergents and cleaning
p rep aration s, p erfu m es,
c o s m e tic s , and other toilet
p rep aration s----------------------------------P aints, v a r n ish e s, la c q u e r s,
en a m e ls, and allied produ cts---Gum and wood c h e m ic a ls -------------A gricu ltu ral c h e m ic a ls -----------------M iscellan e ou s ch em ica l
p r o d u c ts -----------------------------------------P etroleu m refining and related
in d u s tr ie s ------------------------------------P etroleu m r e fin in g _____________
Paving and roofing m a t e r ia l s M iscellan eou s products of
p etroleu m and c o a l----------------Rubber and m isc ellan e ou s p la stics
products _
T ir e s and inner tu b es---------------------Rubber footw ear--------------------------Fab ricated rubber p rodu cts, not
elsew h ere c la s s if ie d -------------------M iscellan e ou s p la stics p rodu cts—
.
L eath er and leath er produ cts—
Leath er tanning and finish ing—
F ootw ear, except r u b b e r ______
Leath er gloves and m it te n s ----Luggage----------------------------------------Handbags and other p erson al
leather good s___________________
Stone, cla y , and g la ss p r o d u c tsF lat g la ss .
G lass and g la ssw a r e , p r e sse d or
b lo w n -------------------------------------------------G lass p rodu cts, m ade of
purchased g l a s s — ---------C em ent, h ydrau lic------------Structural clay products P ottery and related p r o d u c ts----------C on c rete, gypsum , and p laster
p r o d u c ts---------------------------------------------Cut stone and stone p r o d u c ts----------A b r a siv e , a sb e sto s, and
m isc ella n e o u s nonm etallic
m in era l produ cts____________________

91
3

39, 200
2, 660

9 3 1 ,0 0 0
1 1 ,8 0 0

11
10

7, 540
1 ,7 2 0

143, 000
4 2 ,4 0 0

30
28

3 ,4 2 0
8, 220

48 , 400
231, 000

9

1 5 ,7 0 0

4 5 5 , 000

33

2 4 ,5 0 0

7 8 0 , 000

13

23, 100

4 0 0 ,0 0 0

_

_

2
11

380
840

2 1 ,8 8 0
3 33 5, 000
33, 700

1

100

4, 020

1

30

230

5

80

4 , 580

1 102

2 8 ,9 0 0

7 3 7 ,0 0 0

42

1 4 ,0 0 0

4 3 9 ,0 0 0

18
5

6, 390
2, 440

9 6 , 500
73 , 500

9

1, 040

5, 980

9
2
10

2, 390
270
1, 020

72 , 900
1 4 ,4 0 0
16, 800

8

1, 280

1 7 ,4 0 0

12
7
3

1 ,4 5 0
1, 210
210

32, 700
31, 400
1, 030

2

30

310

1 93
26
2

5 5 ,2 0 0
32, 100
7, 820

4 4 3 ,0 0 0
20 8, 000
3 4 ,3 0 0

28
39

9, 270
5, 990

8 9 ,3 0 0
1 1 1 ,000

36
5
24
1
2

2 0 ,4 0 0
1, 160
1 5 ,4 0 0
3, 000
430

3 1 2 ,0 0 0
2 6 ,9 0 0
192, 000
66, 000
1 7 ,6 0 0

4

420

9 ,7 1 0

1 139
3

7 0 ,7 0 0
5, 030

8 3 6 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,5 0 0

12

44 , 200

3 2 1 ,0 0 0

8
14
17
5

760
3, 950
2, 540
1, 120

16, 100
32, 300
1 1 1 , 000
7, 730

53
2

5, 270
1, 570

9 3 ,2 0 0
43, 600

26

6, 330

1 9 3 ,0 0 0

29

Table A-l
Industry

W ork Stoppages by Industry, 1965— Continued

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
Num ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
1965
(all
stoppages)

Industry

Manufacturing— Continued

M iscellan eou s p rim a ry m etal
in d u str ie s------------------------------------------------

F ab ricated m etal produ cts, except
ord nan ce, m achinery, and
transportation equ ipm en t-------------------------M etal c a n s ----------------- ----------------------------C u tlery, handtools, and general

*20 6

88, 000

1, 39 0, 000

70
53

2 7 ,3 0 0
2 5 ,4 0 0

3 4 2 ,0 0 0
513, 000

8

4, 420

51, 600

6

1, 060

1 0 ,1 0 0

2 4 ,6 0 0
2 , 130

3 8 1 ,0 0 0
4 5 , 500

15

3, 060

5 0 ,8 0 0

1 269
6

8 6 ,8 0 0
3 0 ,8 0 0

1 ,4 3 0 , 000
4 9 1 ,0 0 0

28
Heating apparatus (except e lec tric )
and plumbing fix tu r e s--------------------------Fab ricated stru ctu ral m etal
p r o d u c ts--------------------------------------------------Screw m achine products, and b olts,
nuts, sc r e w s, r iv ets,
M etal stam p ings------------- ------------------ —
Coating, engraving, and allied
s e r v i c e s _________________________________
M iscellan eou s fab ricated w ire
p r o d u c ts--------------------------------------------------M iscellan eou s fab ricated m etal
p r o d u c ts--------------------------------------------------M achin ery, except e le c tr ic a l---------------------Engines and turbines--------- ------------------F a r m m achinery and equ ipm en t---------Construction, m ining, and
m a teria ls handling m achinery
and equipment--------- ----------------------------Metalw orking m achinery and
pqnipmpnf;
.....................
Special industry m achinery, except
m etalw orking m achinery___________ _
G eneral industrial m achinery
and equipment_______________________ —
O ffice, computing, and accounting
m achines
_
S ervice industry m a c h in e s _______ ____
M iscellan eou s m achinery, except
electrical
E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipm ent,
and su p p lie s----------------- — ------------- -----E le c tr ic a l tra n sm issio n and
distribution equipment--------------- -------E le c tr ic a l in du strial ap p a ra tu s-----------Household a p p lia n c e s-------- — — -----E le ctric lighting and w iring
equipm ent-------------------- ------------------------Radio and tele vision receivin g
se ts, except com m unication
typ e s---------------------------------------------------------Com m unication equipm ent — ------------E lectron ic components and
a c c e s s o r ie s ____ _________ __ ------------M iscellan eou s e le c tr ic a l m achinery,
equipment and su pp lies— — __ -------T ran sportation equ ipm en t--------------------------M otor v e h icles and m otor vehicle
equipm ent-----------------------------------------------A ir c r a ft and p a r t s -----------------------------------Ship and boat building and
repairing
_
R ailroad equipment---------------------------------M o to r c y c le s, b ic y c le s, and p a rts-------M iscellan eou s transportation
equipm ent------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table.




M an -d ays
id le,
1965
(alt
stoppages)

Manufacturing— Continued

35
22

P r im a r y m etal in du stries — --------- -------B last fu rn aces, steelw ork s, and
rollin g and finishing m ills ____________
Iron and steel fou nd ries-------------------------P r im a r y sm elting and refining of
nonferrous m e t a l s --------------- -------- —
Secondary sm elting and refining of
nonferrous m e ta ls and a llo y s ------------R olling, drawing and extruding of

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W orke rs
N um ber
involved

9, 220

8 7 ,9 0 0

20

4 , 680

7 9 ,5 0 0

108

2 3 ,0 0 0

37 4, 000

10
29

1, 640
4 , 920

72 , 400
50, 300

14

910

1 6 ,8 0 0

12

1, 260

28, 600

56

1 0 ,3 0 0
1 1 3 ,0 0 0
2 2 ,2 0 0
1 3 ,1 0 0

1, 87 0, 000
125, 000
8 0 ,9 0 0

43

1 8 ,3 0 0

M iscellan eou s manufacturing
indn strip s
.
.
.. .
Jew elry, silv e r w a r e , and
plated w a r e _____________________________
M u sical in stru m en ts and p a r ts________
T o y s, am u sem en t, sporting and
athletic g o o d s _________________ _______
P en s, p en cils, and other office
and a r tists' m a t e r ia l s C ostum e je w e lr y , costu m e
n ovelties, buttons, and
m isc ella n e o u s notions, except
p reciou s m e ta l--------------------------------------M iscellan eou s manufacturing
in d u s tr ie s -----------------------------------------------

1 28

7, 590

1 0 9 ,ooo

4

640

1 ,4 2 0

10
2

5, 360
140

72, 100
7, 820

9
2

1, 220
20

1 9 ,1 0 0
1, 010

1

210

6, 970

1

10

190

54

7, 470

1 6 4 ,0 0 0

2
5

320
490

8, 300
16, 600

14

3, 300

8 6 ,1 0 0

4

750

11, 700

3

70

1, 260

26

2, 540

4 0 , 200

Nonm anufacturing--------------------------------- 4 , 8 8 6

6 3 3 ,0 0 0

9, 020, 000

2 2 8 ,0 0 0

1 266
17
19

P ro fe ssio n a l, sc ie n tific , and
controlling in stru m en ts;
photographic and optical goods;
w atches and c lo c k s -----------------------------------Engineering, lab oratory, and
scien tific and r e se a r c h
in stru m en ts and asso c ia te d
eq u ipm en t----------------- ---------------------------Instrum ents for m easu rin g,
c ontrollin g, and indicating
physical r h a r a r tp r istir s .. .
Optical instrnm pnfs and lpnsps
S urgical, m e d ic a l, and dental
in stru m en ts and su p p lie s------------------Ophthalmic goods — — ___ ___________
Photographic equipment and
su pp lies--------------------------- -------------------W atch es, c lo c k s, clockw ork
operated d e v ic e s, and p a r t s -------------

295, 000

A gricu ltu re , f o r e s tr y , and
f is h e r ie s — --------------------------------------------------

53

1 2 ,6 0 0

33

6, 870

1 0 2 ,0 0 0

59

2 1 ,6 0 0

4 6 3 ,0 0 0

5
30

4, 900
8, 660
4, 730

5 7 ,7 0 0

1 137

5 1 ,8 0 0

79 5, 000

32
21
15

9, 230
7, 240
1 5 ,3 0 0

1 4 7 ,0 0 0
1 1 9 , ooo
1 7 8 ,0 0 0

18

3, 220

68, 300

4 , 300

60, 300

188
12
3
145
4

71, 600
7, 180
280
6 2 ,6 0 0
110

4 3 1 ,0 0 0
1 2 6 ,0 0 0
1, 650
2 5 8 ,0 0 0
850

24

1, 430

44 , 800

rnntTart rnnatnirtinn ...

943

3 0 1 ,0 0 0

4, 6 3 0, 000

216
19

185, 000
4 6 ,8 0 0

3, 00 0, 000
4 2 9 ,0 0 0

190,000

22

21

M ining--------- -------------------------------------------------Metal ... .. __ _ _
.
..............
A nthracite-------------------------------------------------Bituminous coal and lig n ite ___________
Crude petroleu m and natural g a s-------Mining and quarrying of
nonm etallic m in e r a ls,
PYPppt fuels

379, 000

1 7 7 ,0 0 0

5
12

890
7, 590

2, 310
1 8 9 ,0 0 0

20

4 , 890

35, 700

15

3 ,4 9 0

Tran sportation, com m unication, e le c ­
tric , g a s, and sanitary s e r v i c e s — —
R ailroad tra n sp o rta tio n ------------------------L ocal and suburban transit
and interurban p assen ger
transp ortation ---------------------------------------Motor freigh t transportation
and w arehousing_______________________
Water transportation------------------------------T ran sportation by a ir ----------------------------Tran sportation s e r v i c e s _______________
C om m u n ication ---------------------------------------E le c tr ic , gas, and sanitary
s e r v i c e s --------------------------------------------------

45

3 1 ,7 0 0

2 5 1 ,0 0 0

78
32
7
3
17

28, 700
2 4 ,5 0 0
1 7 ,7 0 0
510
2 3 ,9 0 0

2 9 3 ,0 0 0
1, 6 3 0, 000
174, 000
9, 860
4 5 ,4 0 0

55, 700

1 140

1 9 6 ,0 0 0

2, 63 0, 000

84
22

70, 900
74, 900
37, 100
9, 240
2, 940

6 5 3 ,0 0 0
70, 900 j
84, 100

7

730

10, 600 I

15

1 0 ,9 0 0

172, 000

1 336
181
156

4 2 ,6 0 0
1 6 ,5 0 0
2 6 ,2 0 0

5 7 0 ,0 0 0
210, 000
3 6 0 ,0 0 0

16

550

5, 510

2
1
13

30
50
470

180
600
4, 730

8 6 8 ,0 0 0
946, 000

16
11
3

W h olesale and retail t r a d e ------------------------W h olesale t r a d e _________________________
R etail tra d e_______________________________

Finance, in suran ce, and r ea l
esta te

Credit agencies other
than banks----------------------------------------------Insurance c a r r i e r s --------------------------------Real estate

30

Table A-l

W ork Stoppages by Industry, 1965— Continued

stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
Num ber
involved

Industry

M an -d ays
id le,
1965
(all
stopp ages)

------

126

16, 000

1 7 7 ,0 0 0

—

13
24

3, 570
1, 790

4 2 ,6 0 0
3 9 ,6 0 0

28

5, 970

2 9 ,9 0 0

14
13
4

360
520
430

5, 180
7, 660
4, 600

9

2, 200

1 4 ,6 0 0

------

M i s r p lla n p n n s r p p a i r s p r v i r p a

Motion p ictures
— ----------------A m u sem ent and rec reation
s e r v ic e s , except m otion
pirtnrpc

NOTE:

S erv ic es— Continued
M edical and other health
s e r v i c e s _________________________________
Educational s e r v ic e s ____________________
M u seu m s, art g a lle r ie s ,
botanical and zoo lo g ic a l
gardens _ _______________________________
Nonprofit m e m b ersh ip
organ ization s----------------------------------------M i srpill a nftfin s s p r v i r p s

G overnm ent---------------------------------------------------State governm ent------------------------------------T ,nral g n v p rn m p .n t

13
4

590
140

2 4 ,7 0 0
620

1

50

260

2
1

320
40

7, 010
330

42
42

1 1 ,9 0 0
1 1 ,9 0 0

1 4 6 ,0 0 0
2 1, 280
145, 000

in du stries or industry groups or m ore have been counted in each industry or group affected; w ork ers involved
to the resp ec tive in d u strie s.
fr o m a stoppage that began in 1964.
1965 id len ess resu lted fr o m a strike that began p rior to 1965.

B ecause of rounding,




M a n -d ays
id le,
1965
(all
stoppages)

Nonmanufacturing— Continued

Nonmanufacturing — Continued
S erv ic es
—
H otels, room ing h ou ses,
c a m p s, and other lodging
pi a r p q
P erson al se r v ic e s
_ ___
M iscellan e ou s b u sin ess
Qprvirps
Autom obile r e p a ir , autom obile
s e r v ic e s , and g a r a g e s—
------

1 Stoppages extending into 2
and m an -d a y s idle w ere allocated
2 Id leness in 1965 resu lting
3 A large proportion of the

Industry

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N u m ber
involved

su m s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.

31
Table A-2.

W ork Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1965
Total

Industry group

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
Num ber
involved

G en eral wage changes
M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
Num ber
involved

M a n -d ays
id le ,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Supplem entary benefits
Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

M a n -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

A ll in d u str ie s ________________________________

‘ 3 ,9 6 3

1 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0

23, 300, 000

‘ 1 ,5 9 7

6 5 9 ,0 0 0

1 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

114

4 9 ,5 0 0

71 1, 000

M anufacturing__________________________________

12, 080

91 3, 000

1 4 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

11 ,0 1 1

3 9 6 ,0 0 0

7 ,9 5 0 ,0 0 0

83

3 9 ,7 0 0

6 0 3 ,0 0 0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _
_
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts ________________________
T ob acco m an ufactures_______ ________ _
T e xtile m ill p r o d u c ts_______________________________

12
227
_
44

1 0 ,3 0 0
5 7 ,3 0 0

1 2 1 ,0 0 0
9 2 8 ,0 0 0
1 7 4 ,0 0 0

3
109
_
22

2, 630
3 2 ,4 0 0
_
8, 070

5 4 ,3 0 0
5 7 4 ,0 0 0
_

13

1 ,2 7 0

1 7 ,7 0 0

5 9 ,2 0 0

-

-

-

A p p a r e l, etc. 2_______________________________________
L u m b er and wood p rod u cts, except
furn itu re____________________________________________
Furniture and fix tu r e s______________________________
P ap er and allied p r o d u c ts _________________________

100

9 , 760

1 9 9 ,0 0 0

19

1 ,9 2 0

9 7 ,7 0 0

3

100

1 ,2 2 0

46
69
91

13, 100
1 0 ,2 0 0
3 9 ,2 0 0

2 0 4 ,0 0 0
1 9 4 ,0 0 0
9 3 1 ,0 0 0

19
33
44

4 , 140
4 , 670
1 6 ,0 0 0

6 2 ,9 0 0
9 3 ,9 0 0
5 9 3, 000

2
_
6

220
_
1 5 ,2 0 0

3, 710
_
2 5 0 ,0 0 0

33
102

2 4 ,5 0 0
2 8 ,9 0 0

7 8 0 ,0 0 0
7 3 7 , 000

14
57

630
1 4 ,7 0 0

3 7 3 ,0 0 0
5 2 4 ,0 0 0

_

_

6

2, 060

3 5 ,8 2 0
5 0 ,3 0 0

P rin tin g, publishing, and allied
in d u str ie s___________________________________________
C h e m ic a ls and allied p r o d u c ts____________________
P etro leu m refining and related
in d u str ie s___________________________________________
Rubber and m isc ella n e o u s p la stic s
p r o d u c ts_____________________________________ __

-

21, 300

_

_

_

12

1 ,4 5 0

3 2 ,7 0 0

9

1 ,0 5 0

4 ,4 2 0

1

20

1 ,7 3 0

93

5 5 ,2 0 0

4 4 3 , 000

41

1 0 ,9 0 0

1 4 9 ,0 0 0

4

210

4 , 030

L eath er and leather produ cts__________________ —
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts __________________
P r im a r y m e tal in d u str ie s _________________________
Fab ricated m e tal p ro d u c ts4_______________________

36
139
206
269

2 0 ,4 0 0
7 0 ,7 0 0
8 8 ,0 0 0
8 6 ,8 0 0

3 1 2 ,0 0 0
8 3 6 ,0 0 0

2, 290
5 7 ,2 0 0
4 3 , 500
6 1 ,6 0 0

4 1 ,7 0 0
6 5 9 ,0 0 0
7 8 1 ,0 0 0

1 ,4 3 0 , 000

12
82
106
145

1, 0 9 0 ,0 0 0

3
6
10
8

9 , 340
620
2 ,0 0 0
2, 270

8 4 ,7 0 0
1 5 ,1 0 0
72 , 300
4 1 ,1 0 0

M ach in ery, except e lec tric a l______________________
E le c t r ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su pp lies--------------------------------------------------------------------T ran sportation equ ipm en t_________________________
In stru m ents, etc. 5 --------------------------------------------------M isc ella n e o u s manufacturing in d u str ie s ________

266

113, 000

1 ,8 7 0 ,0 0 0

145

4 9 ,2 0 0

1 ,1 2 0 ,0 0 0

13

•4,400

4 2 ,3 0 0

137
140
28
54

51, 800

7 9 5 ,0 0 0
2, 63 0, 000

2 2 ,8 0 0
5 4 ,6 0 0
2 ,9 4 0
4 , 700

3 9 7 ,0 0 0
1 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0
4 5 ,0 0 0
1 2 7 ,0 0 0

1
4

150
1, 340

2, 280
4 , 650

N onmanufa ctur ing______________________________

1, 3 9 0 ,0 0 0

7, 590
7 ,4 7 0

1 0 9 ,0 0 0

1 6 4 ,0 0 0

74
53
16
31

11, 886

63 3, 000

9 ,0 2 0 ,0 0 0

*587

26 3, 000

A g r ic u ltu r e , fo r e s tr y , and fis h e r ie s _________ _
M ining____________________________________________
C ontract construction_______________________________
T ran sportation, com m u nication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and sanitary s e r v ic e s ______________ ______

21
188
943

4 , 300
7 1 ,6 0 0
3 0 1 ,0 0 0

6 0 ,3 0 0
4 3 1 ,0 0 0
4 , 6 3 0 ,0 0 0

9
21
212

216

1 8 5 ,0 0 0

3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

W h olesale and reta il t r a d e ________________________
F in ance, in suran ce, and r ea l e s t a t e ____________
S e r v ic e s ____________ __ __________ _______ _____
G overnm en t___________________________________________

336
16
126
42

4 2 ,6 0 0
550
1 6 ,0 0 0

5 7 0 ,0 0 0
5, 510
1 7 7 ,0 0 0
1 4 6 ,0 0 0

See footnotes at end of table.




1 9 6 ,0 0 0

1 1 ,9 0 0

_

_

_

3

520

6, 190

4 , 0 2 0 ,0 0 0

31

9 , 880

1 0 7 ,0 0 0

1, 090
2, 600
1 3 7 ,0 0 0

2 5 ,3 0 0
133, 000
2 ,2 3 0 ,0 0 0

2
14

220
5, 320

1 ,8 6 0
8 7 ,4 0 0

75

7 7 ,8 0 0

1 ,0 1 0 ,0 0 0

8

3 ,6 2 0

1 5 ,9 0 0

187
10
52
23

2 6 ,9 0 0
280
7, 710
9 , 570

4 2 6 ,0 0 0
2, 760
6 1 ,1 0 0
1 2 6 ,0 0 0

4

250

1 ,4 9 0

_

_

_

2

220
250

250
500

1

32
Table A-2.

W ork Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1965— Continued
W age adjustm ents

Industry group

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
Num ber
involved

H ours of w ork

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

Other contractual m atters

M a n -d ays
id le ,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
N um ber
involved

M a n -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

198

9 8 ,1 0 0

5 9 4 ,0 0 0

14

1 4 ,5 0 0

5 1 0 ,0 0 0

60

1 9 ,3 0 0

2 5 1 ,0 0 0

x120

8 2 ,8 0 0

5 4 9 ,0 0 0

9

4 , 040

51, 800

38

1 2 ,2 0 0

1 2 2 ,0 0 0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ___________________ ___
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts __________________ ___
T ob acco m an ufactures_____________________________
T e xtile m ill p r o d u c ts__________ __________________

2
3
5

620
520
470

2, 120
3, 850
4 , 050

3
-

1 ,7 7 0
-

3 1 ,8 0 0
-

-

-

-

6
1

1, 220
90

2, 390
5, 240

A p p a r e l, etc. 2______________________________________
L u m ber and wood p rod u cts, except
furn itu re____________________________________________
Furniture and fix tu r e s_____________________________
P a p er and allied p r o d u c ts ________________________

13

1 ,5 6 0

8 ,4 1 0

-

-

-

6

430

1 ,7 8 0

4 , 360
3 7 ,8 0 0
1 0 ,5 0 0

1

800

7, 200

1
_
3

20
410

600
_
1 0 ,2 0 0

-

A ll in d u str ie s________________________________

M anufacturing_________________________________

P rin tin g, p ublishing, and allied
in d u str ie s ________________________________________
C h e m icals and a llied p r o d u c ts___________________
P etr o leu m refining and related
in d u str ie s__________________________________________
Rubber and m isc ellan e ou s p la stics
p r o d u c ts____________________________________________

2
5
4

300
1 ,6 3 0
560

■

-

-

2

1 ,9 0 0

6, 840

“

7

2 2 ,5 0 0

1 1 5 ,0 0 0

-

Leather and leather p rodu cts_____________________
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts _____________ __
P r im a r y m e tal in d u str ie s ________________________
F ab ricated m e tal p rod u cts4___________________ __

8
2
11
13

3, 900
940
6 ,6 6 0
3, 270

3 2 ,3 0 0
2 ,9 3 0
7 1 ,7 0 0
2 9 ,9 0 0

1
2

M ach in ery, except e le c tr ic a l_____________________
E le c t r ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su pp lies____________________________________________
T ran sportation equipm ent________________________
In stru m ents, etc. 5_________________________________
M isc ellan e ou s manufacturing in d u str ie s_______

20

1 4 ,9 0 0

5 1 ,0 0 0

-

-

-

3

1, 350

1 2 ,0 0 0

9
11

910

-

-

3

2 1 ,8 0 0
470

7 ,0 5 0
1 5 7 ,0 0 0
4 ,4 7 0

2, 320
70
530
70

5 2 ,9 0 0
150
1, 600
530

Nonm anufacturing_____________________________

78

15, 300

14
46

A g r icu ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , and f is h e r ie s ___________
M ining________________________________________________
C ontract construction ______________________________
T ran sportation , com m u nication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and sanitary s e r v ic e s _____________________

-

3
-

380

1 1 ,7 0 0

-

-

"

-

-

“

"

_

-

1

20

60

-

-

4

4 , 830

2 7 ,3 0 0

1
1
2
3

230
10
170
440

450
70
350
6, 010

_
390
700

.
390
700

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
1
1
1

4 5 ,5 0 0

5

1 0 ,4 0 0

4 5 9 ,0 0 0

22

7, 140

12 9 , 0 0 0

3, 520
2, 940

6, 600
2 2 ,2 0 0

-

-

8

3, 240

3 140
9 4 ,2 0 0

8

8, 160

1 1 ,8 0 0

6
1
2
1

570
100
20
10

3, 240
200
100
1 ,3 2 0

-

2

-

-

1 0 ,2 0 0

4 5 7 ,0 0 0

See footnotes at end of table.




2
1

"

-

3

2 ,4 8 0

1 7 ,4 0 0

230

570
_
1, 540

6
1
4

1 ,0 7 0
70
290

7 ,9 7 0
70
9 , 700

'

W h olesale and reta il t r a d e _______________________
F in ance, in suran ce, and r ea l e s t a t e ___________
S e r v ic e s _____________________________________________
G overnm en t__________________________________________

'

-

10

33
Table A-2.

W ork Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1965— Continued
Union o rganization and secu rity
Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

Industry group

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Job secu rity
Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
Num ber
involved

Plant ad m in istration

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
N um ber
involved

M a n -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

_____

594

1 5 4 ,0 0 0

2 ,9 8 0 ,0 0 0

*203

1 4 5 ,0 0 0

3 ,6 3 0 ,0 0 0

*589

2 8 7 ,0 0 0

1 ,8 9 0 ,0 0 0

M anufacturing---------------------------------------------------

284

4 2 ,9 0 0

1 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0

113

1 0 5 ,0 0 0

1 ,7 8 0 ,0 0 0

330

1 9 2 ,0 0 0

1, 5 1 0 ,0 0 0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ________________________
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts_______________________
T ob acco m anufactures ____________________________
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts______________________________

1
40
9

50
3, 260
1 0 ,7 0 0

2, 260
103, 000
9 4 ,8 0 0

2
11
2

4 ,6 8 0
3 ,6 8 0
380

5 5 ,3 0 0
4 7 ,5 0 0
6 ,4 8 0

3
33
4

1, 300
9 ,4 5 0
1, 330

4 ,9 1 0
1 2 4 ,0 0 0
4 ,0 2 0

A p p a r e l, etc. 2___________________________ _________
L u m b er and wood p rodu cts, except
fu r n itu r e _______________________________________ __
Furniture and fix tu r e s_____________________________
P a p er and allied p r o d u c ts ____
----------------------

30

1 ,8 9 0

7 0 ,3 0 0

6

820

2, 690

11

1 ,4 1 0

1 2 ,6 0 0

13
16
13

1, 330
1, 040
1, 020

7 3 , 700
4 3 ,5 0 0
2 8 ,0 0 0

2
3
2

1 ,0 0 0
570
2, 170

2 4 ,0 0 0
2, 890
1 6 ,8 0 0

4
8
17

2 ,4 7 0
1 ,4 5 0
3 ,4 5 0

1 9 ,4 0 0
8, n o
21, 100

8
10

2, 580
850

1 0 9 ,0 0 0
5, 820

3
7

1 8 ,9 0 0
3, 470

2 7 1 ,0 0 0
6 8 ,0 0 0

6
15

2 , 020
5, 550

8 ,8 8 0
8 0 ,5 0 0

A ll in d u str ie s ________________________

P rin tin g, publishing, and a llied
in d u str ie s__________________________________________
C h e m ic als and a llied p r o d u c ts___________________
P etro leu m refining and related
in d u s tr ie s ------------------------------ -----------------------------Rubber and m iscellan e ou s p la stics
p r o d u c ts __________________________________ _______

-

"

32 , 640

"

-

32 0 , 600

1

360

3, 240

9

1, 280

3 8 ,2 0 0

8

3, 830

4 7 ,5 0 0

17

1 0 ,4 0 0

5 9 ,2 0 0

4
13
9
40

800
980
2, 570
2 ,7 6 0

2 1 ,5 0 0
7 8 ,8 0 0
2 0 2 ,0 0 0
1 1 9 , ooo

1
9
6
19

1 ,9 8 0
2, 180
1 ,7 6 0
5, 110

1 2 7 ,0 0 0
2 4 ,9 0 0
3 0 ,6 0 0
7 0 ,9 0 0

18
54
26

370
2, 050
2 9 ,9 0 0

8, 000

1 ,4 0 0
23, 000
2 2 5 ,0 0 0
4 5 ,1 0 0

M ach in ery, except e le c tr ic a l------------------------------E le c t r ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su p p lie s____________________________________________
T ran sportation equipm ent________________________
In stru m en ts, e t c . 5 ________________________________
M iscellan e ou s manufacturing
in d u str ie s___________________________________ ____

30

4 , 940

2 1 8 ,0 0 0

13

8, 370

2 2 7 ,0 0 0

35

2 8 ,7 0 0

1 9 5 ,0 0 0

14
11

2 4 ,1 0 0
1 1 4 ,0 0 0
3 5 ,6 0 0

7
9
2

2, 270
4 3 , 800
220

7 5 ,8 0 0
6 6 4 ,0 0 0
1 ,6 2 0

24

5

660
3, 320
2, 570

44
2

2 1 ,4 0 0
6 0 ,3 0 0
1, 210

1 7 6 ,0 0 0
4 6 8 ,0 0 0
23, 600

9

400

1 2 ,3 0 0

1

70

140

5

950

2, 300

Nonm anufacturing--------------------------------------------

310

1 1 1 ,000

1 ,5 8 0 ,0 0 0

91

3 9 ,5 0 0

1 ,8 5 0 ,0 0 0

260

9 5 ,3 0 0

3 8 7 ,0 0 0

A g r ic u ltu r e , fo r e s t r y , and f is h e r ie s ----------------M ining________________________________________________
C ontract construction______________________________
T ran sportation , com m u nication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and san itary s e r v ic e s _____________________

8
6
126

2, 730
990
7 1 ,7 0 0

3 4 ,2 0 0
8, 500
1 ,2 1 0 ,0 0 0

23

360
9 , 160
1 0 ,5 0 0

720
2 7 ,3 0 0
2 6 0 ,0 0 0

2

26

83
92

110
4 5 ,2 0 0
1 0 ,6 0 0

110
2 1 4 ,0 0 0
4 6 ,0 0 0

41

2 5 ,7 0 0

1 5 9 ,0 0 0

21

1 7 ,2 0 0

1, 55 0, 000

47

3 2 ,1 0 0

93 , 200

W h olesale and retail t r a d e -----------------------------------F in an ce, in suran ce, and re a l estate____________
S e r v ic e s _____________________________________________
G overnm en t__________________________________________

76
1
40
12

6, 690
50
2, 030
850

9 9 ,7 0 0
600
5 8 ,2 0 0
1 1 ,5 0 0

10
2
6

1 ,7 6 0
30
400
80

1 1 ,0 0 0
520
740
80

26
9
1

4 , 150
3, 130
10

1 0 ,2 0 0
23, 400
50

L eath er and leath er p rodu cts_____________________
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts_________________
P r im a r y m e ta l in d u str ie s ------------------------------------Fab ricated m e ta l p rod u cts4______________________

See footnotes at end of table.




2

1

3

34
Table A-2.

W ork Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1965— Continued
Other w orking conditions
Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
Num ber
involved

Industry group

Interunion or intraunion m atters

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stop;pages
begin:ning in
If>65
W o rk ers
Num ber
involved

M a n -d ays
id le ,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Not reported
Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
N um ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

A ll in d u str ie s_________________________________

67

3 0 ,6 0 0

2 9 8 ,0 0 0

475

8 0 ,5 0 0

4 3 8 ,0 0 0

52

8, 890

3 2 ,1 0 0

-------------------------------------

49

2 8 ,6 0 0

2 8 9 ,0 0 0

26

7 ,0 9 0

2 4 ,5 0 0

17

1 ,9 9 0

1 3 ,0 0 0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _________________________
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts________________________
Tob acco m an ufactures_______ _____________________
T e xtile m ill p r o d u c ts_______________________________

1, 550
-

2, 130
-

2, 010
6 ,4 2 0
-

2
-

110
-

8 ,7 9 0
-

290

7 ,4 1 0
570

1
2
-

1,000

5
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

610

2, 060

5

590

1 ,4 6 0

4

440

940

3
1

3, 660
280

1 5 ,5 0 0
_
1 ,6 5 0

2
1

30
140

130
270

1

10

80

1

110

320

-

1, 380

-

-

1

500

1 ,5 0 0

3
5
7

1 ,0 0 0
6, 580
960
2, 140

2, 300
3 1 ,1 0 0
1 1 ,2 0 0
2 4 ,5 0 0

4

680

3, 870

-

M anufacturing------------

A p p a re l, etc. 2___________________________ __________
Lu m ber and wood p rod u cts, except
furn itu re-------------------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fix tu r e s______________________________
P ap er and allied p r o d u c ts_________________________
P rinting, publishing, and allied
in d u str ie s ------------- --------------------------------------------------C h e m icals and allied p r o d u c ts___ ________________
P etro leu m refining and related
in d u str ie s___________________________________ _____
Rubber and m isc ellan e ou s p la stics
p r o d u c ts_____________________________________________
Leath er and leather p rodu cts___________________ _
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts____ _________ P r im a r y m e tal industries _ ______________________
Fab ricated m e ta l p r o d u c ts4 ______________________
M ach in ery, except e le c tr ic a l_____________________
E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su pp lies_____________________________________________
T ran sportation eq u ipm en t_________________________
In stru m ents, etc. 5 _________________________________
M isc ellan e ou s m anufacturing in d u str ie s ________

Nonm anufacturing________

____________________

A g r icu ltu r e , fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s ____________
M ining-------------- -----------------------------------------------------------C ontract construction_______________________________
T ran sportation , com m u nication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and sanitary s e r v ic e s --------------------------- —
W h olesale and reta il t r a d e ________________________
pinan rp, irisiiranrp., and r sa l p.statp.
. _
..
S e r v ic e s ______________________________________________
G overnm en t___________________________________________

-

190

"

“

“

-

2

700

1, 710

-

-

_
100
140
310

1, 300
140
3, 850

-

6

_
2
1

3

1, 140
8, 810
40
290

5 6 ,5 0 0
1 1 8 ,0 0 0
1, 160
1 1 ,2 0 0

2

1
1

18

1 ,9 6 0

5
4

3
4

_

-

“

1
1
-

3

530
60
190

1, 130
60
660

3

410

1 ,0 5 0

1
1

170
70

170
70

~

”

2
-

260
1 ,5 1 0
-

"

”

2, 640
3, 170
"

8 ,9 1 0

449

73, 500

4 1 4 ,0 0 0

35

6 ,9 0 0

1 9 ,1 0 0

1 ,0 1 0
70

2 ,7 8 0
540

11
409

2 ,9 6 0
4 9 ,8 0 0

2 4 ,9 0 0
2 2 0 ,0 0 0

20
7

6 ,0 0 0
340

1 1 ,9 0 0

5

630

1 ,6 0 0

8

1 7 ,2 0 0

1 3 9 ,0 0 0

-

-

■

3

160

760

12

840

7, 810

i

90

3, 240

7
2

1 ,7 0 0
980

1 5 ,8 0 0
6, 160

50
30
380
130

1, 120
1, 380
2, 9 1 0
250

_

_

_

_

_

4
1
2
11

1 Stoppages affecting m o re than 1 industry group have been counted in each group affected ; w o rk ers involved and
allocated to the r esp ective grou ps.
2 Includes other finished products made fro m fa b rics and sim ila r m a te r ia ls.
3 Idleness in 1965 resu ltin g from a stoppage that began in 1964.
4 E xcludes ordnance, m ach in ery, and transp ortation equipm ent.
5 Includes p r o fe ssio n a l, sc ie n tific , and controllin g in stru m en ts; photographic and op tical goods; w atches and c lo c k s.
NOTE:

B ecause of rounding,




-

3

sum s of individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls.

m an -d a y s

1 ,5 4 0

idle

w ere

35
Table A-3.

W ork Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 1965 1
A lab am a

Industry group

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
N um ber
involved

A r k a n sas
M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
Num ber
involved

C alifornia
M an -d ays
id le ,
1Q/.E \aii
X7 O /all
D
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
Num ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
lQ ic \cill
I 7 D /all
D
stoppages)

A ll in d u str ie s________________________________

70

3 1 ,5 0 0

3 2 8 ,0 0 0

31

4 , 720

1 1 2 ,0 0 0

2 341

1 5 0 ,0 0 0

2 ,3 4 0 ,0 0 0

M anufacturing__________________________________

41

2 5 ,3 0 0

2 7 7 ,0 0 0

15

4 , 260

103, 000

2161

4 7 , 100

8 7 1 ,0 0 0

1

70

1

3
_
-

900

_
_

880
1 5 ,1 0 0
.
3 2 ,3 0 0

1
_
-

50
_
_

3 ,9 6 0
_
_

16
_
_

150
1, 110
_
_

2 , 000
1 2 ,0 0 0
_
3 230

_

_

_

_

_

_

8

230

6, 160

1
1
1
1
2
7
13

_
150
2, 500
270
150
380
_
1 ,5 0 0
1 3 ,3 0 0

_
2, 250
4 0 ,0 0 0
3 1 ,7 8 0
1 4 ,5 0 0
300
1 ,6 0 0
_
1 5 ,5 0 0
112,"000

_
2
2
_
1
1

_
300
2, 020
_
30
190

_
1 2 ,0 0 0
3 5 ,9 0 0
_
_
_
_
50
_
3 ,2 0 0

6
12
7
4
10
.
15
1
15
11

4 , 200
400
1, 810
1 ,2 5 0
570
_
4 , no
320
2, 380
3 ,4 5 0

4 1 ,1 0 0
6, 130
4 5 ,2 0 0
2, 200
9, 070
3 2 ,6 4 0
2 8 ,7 0 0
1 4 ,5 0 0
4 9 ,5 0 0
1 9 5 ,0 0 0

3
2

360
670

8, 080
1 2 ,3 0 0

3
3

320
590

9 ,9 3 0
2 7 ,5 0 0

25
11

1 2 ,2 0 0
2 ,9 9 0

1 5 0 ,0 0 0
4 2 ,0 0 0

3
3

640
4 , 390

1 0 ,2 0 0
4 0 ,2 0 0

2

780

-

-

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _________________________
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts ________________________
Tob acco m an ufactures______________________________
T e xtile m ill p r o d u c ts_______________________________
A p p a re l and other finished products made
fr o m fa b r ics and s im ila r m a teria ls
L u m b er and wood p rodu cts, except
furniture____________________________________________
Furniture and fix tu r e s______________________________
P ap er and allied products _________________ _______
P rin tin g, publishing, and a llied in d u strie s_____
C h e m ic als and allied p r o d u c ts____________________
P etro leu m refining and related in d u strie s______
Rubber and m iscellan e ou s p la stics produ cts___
Leath er and leather p rodu cts_____________________
Stone, c la y , and g la ss products
P r im a r y m etal in d u str ie s_________________________
Fab ricated m e tal p rodu cts, except ordnance,
m ach in ery, and transportation equ ipm en t____
M ach in ery, except e le c tr ic a l_____________________
E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su pp lies_____________________________________________
T ran sportation equipm ent_________________________
P r o fe s s io n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
goods; w atches and c lo c k s _______________________
M isc ella n e o u s m anufacturing in d u str ie s ________

-

-

-

1 0 ,8 0 0
-

11
13

1, 250
1 0 ,2 0 0

2 4 4 ,0 0 0

-

-

-

"

-

-

5
3

300
220

3, 840
5 ,6 0 0

5 1 ,6 0 0

16

460

8, 830

2 182

103, 000

1 ,4 7 0 , 000

.
14

_
420

12
7, 880

89

3, 180
2 ,4 8 0
7 4 ,2 0 0

4 9 ,2 0 0
2 2 ,5 0 0
1 ,2 0 0 ,0 0 0

1
1

20
20
-

750
200
_

22
41
2
10
2

1 4 ,3 0 0
7 ,4 3 0
70
570
300

7 1 ,5 0 0
1 0 8 ,0 0 0
700
1 8 ,3 0 0
680

-

Nonm anufacturing______________________________

29

6 , 190

A g r ic u ltu r e , fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s ____________
M ining........................................................................ .................
C ontract construction_______________________________
T ran sp ortation , com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and sanitary s e r v ic e s ______________________
W h olesale and r etail t r a d e ________________________
F in ance, in suran ce, and r ea l e s t a t e ____________
S e r v ic e s ______________________________________________
G overnm ent___________________________________________

_

.

11
9

2 ,9 8 0
1 ,8 9 0

1 0 ,6 0 0
4 , 730

6

1 ,2 8 0
50

3 3 ,5 0 0
2, 730

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

"

3
-

-

C olorado

-

6

Connecticut

1 0 ,9 0 0

Flo rid a

A ll in d u str ie s ________________________________

33

6, 170

5 1 ,6 0 0

68

3 7 ,7 0 0

4 9 6 ,0 0 0

121

3 9 ,8 0 0

7 2 7 ,0 0 0

Manufacturing__________________________________

11

1 ,6 2 0

2 3 ,0 0 0

2 33

3 0 ,3 0 0

3 5 7 ,0 0 0

2 30

5, 830

7 6 ,7 0 0

1
4

140
620

1 ,7 8 0
1 ,6 5 0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _________________________
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts____________ ______ _____
T ob acco m an ufactures______________________________
T e xtile m ill p r o d u c ts ______________________________________
A p p a re l and other finished products made
fr o m fa b rics and s im ila r m a t e r ia ls _______ - ___
L u m b er and wood p rodu cts, except
furniture _
__ ___ ____ __________________
Furniture and fix tu res _____________________________________
P ap er and allied p r o d u c ts _______________________________
P rin tin g, publishing, and allied in du stries ---------C h e m ic a ls and allied p r o d u c ts _________________________
P e tr o le u m refining and related in d u stries _______
Rubber and m iscellan e ou s p la stics p rodu cts ____
L eath er and leath er p rodu cts ___________________________
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts ----------------------------------P r im a r y m e tal in d u str ie s _________________________
F ab ricated m etal p r o d u c ts , except ordnance,
m ach in ery, and transportation equ ipm en t _____
M ac h in ery, except e le c tr ic a l ___________________________
E le c t r ic a l m achinery, equipm ent, and
su p p lies --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Tran sportation equ ipm en t ________________________________
P r o fe s s io n a l, sc ien tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and op tical
goods; w atches and c lo c k s _____________________________
M isc ella n e o u s manufacturing in d u str ie s __________
Nonm anufacturing ---------------------------------------------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , and fis h e r ie s ____________
M ining------------------------------------------------------------------ ----C ontract construction_______________________________
T ran sp ortation , com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and sanitary s e r v i c e s ..------------------------------W h olesale and reta il t r a d e ________________________
Fin an ce, in suran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ____________
S e r v ic e s ______________________________________________
G overnm en t_______ _________________________________

See footnotes at end of table.




4

110

580

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

340

1 ,9 1 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

90

310

-

-

-

-

-

-

40
160

140
2, 670

-

-

-

5

-

310

4, 460

-

1
1

-

-

220

3, 300

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

450
500

9 ,4 5 0
3, 690

1

120
10

2, 000

5

1

40

6

70

1

-

2
-

-

-

1 ,6 8 0

8 , 200

2
3
2

1 ,4 6 0
250
380

.

2 2 ,7 0 0
650
12, 100

-

-

-

-

-

3

5, 250

190

3, 760

200

-

-

-

80
1 ,6 6 0

1 8 ,6 0 0
600
1 ,0 5 0
4 3 , 800

4

1

1, 140
270

6, 790
1 ,0 6 0

1 ,0 5 0
2 ,8 1 0

1 6 ,3 0 0
38, 100

1, 030
30

23, 800
720

-

1 7 ,0 0 0

3 280
2 2 5 ,0 0 0

1

6

4
1

3

1

1

10

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

20

20

2 8 ,6 0 0

35

7 ,4 1 0

1 3 8 ,0 0 0

91

3 4 ,0 0 0

6 5 0 ,0 0 0

22

_

4 , 550
_

_

90
2, 320

90
1 8 ,1 0 0

1, 330
780
30

1 ,4 0 0
8, 570
470

_

_

-

"

-

"

2

10
3

6
1

-

_
23

4
6
1
1

_
6, 150
1 ,0 8 0
150

20
20
-

_
-

9 2 ,9 0 0

4 2 , 300

2, 690
110
150

1

2

_
68

40

210

_
-

2 6 ,3 0 0

10
6
1

6, 550
280

3
3

150
680

10

300
1 ,

120

_
1 1 4 ,0 0 0
5 1 9 ,0 0 0

9, 800
40
4 ,7 0 0
2, 550

36
Table A-3.

W ork Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 19651— Continued
Illinois

Georg:ia
Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
N um ber
involved

Industry group

A ll in d u str ie s_________________________________
M anufacturing__________________________________
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _________________________
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts________________________
Tobacco m an ufactures______________________________
T extile m ill p r o d u c ts----------------------------------------------A p parel and other finished products made
fr o m fa b r ics and sim ila r m a t e r ia ls ___________
Lum ber and wood p rodu cts, except
furn itu re_____________________________________________
Furniture and fix tu r e s__ _________________________
P aper and allied p r o d u c ts_________________________
P rinting, publishing, and allied in d u strie s_____
C h em icals and allied p r o d u c ts____________________
P etroleu m refining and related in d u strie s--------Rubber and m isc ella n e o u s p la stics produ cts___
Leather and leather produ cts_____________________
Stone, cla y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts__________________
P r im a r y m etal in d u str ie s_________________________
Fab ricated m e tal p rodu cts, except ordnance,
m achinery, and transportation equ ipm en t-----M achin ery, except e le c tr ic a l______________________
E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su pp lies_____________________________________________
T ran sportation equipm ent_________________________
P r o fe ssio n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
good s; w atches and c lo c k s _______________________
M iscellan eou s manufacturing in d u s tr ie s ________
Nonm anufacturing______________________________
A g ricu ltu re , fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s ____________
Mining_________________________________________________
C ontract construction----------------------------------------------Tran sportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s, and san itary s e r v ic e s ______________________
W h olesale and reta il t r a d e ________________________
Fin ance, in suran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ____________
S e r v ic e s ______________________________________________
G overnm ent___________________________________________

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
Num ber
involved

Indiana
M an -d ays
id le ,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
lQA'i fall
1 / OD ^ali
stoppages)

61

2 1 ,7 0 0

3 8 5 ,0 0 0

248

1 0 2 ,0 0 0

1 ,3 7 0 ,0 0 0

159

6 9 ,0 0 0

9 9 7 ,0 0 0

34

9, 240

2 2 2 ,0 0 0

2 144

73 , 500

1, 1 5 0 ,0 0 0

2 96

4 8 ,8 0 0

6 5 2 ,0 0 0

1
19
2

2, 360
5, 140
150

4 9 ,5 0 0
1 0 6 ,0 0 0
270

2
8
-

1 ,2 0 0
2, 240
-

4 ,6 8 0
1 1 ,6 0 0
-

6
1

1, 230
600

1 8 ,7 0 0
1, 200

2

70

5, 280

3

730

6 4 ,9 0 0

3

260

9, 160

1
2
1
2
1
_
5
2

30
760
80
90
130
_
2, 060
270

340
3 9 ,1 0 0
1 ,9 2 0
5, 140
1 0 ,0 0 0
_
3 6 ,5 0 0
1 4 ,6 0 0

2
3
6
2
8
2
4
3
8
16

270
1 ,2 0 0
2 ,4 5 0
20
1 ,8 4 0
60
1 ,8 0 0
450
8, 860
8, 720

4 , 150
1 0 ,8 0 0
8 0 ,9 0 0
4 1 5 ,8 0 0
2 0 ,7 0 0
1 ,8 0 0
1 8 ,6 0 0
550
6 8 ,2 0 0
1 0 8 ,0 0 0

4
4
1
2
3
_
8
11
12

300
1 ,0 3 0
180
40
180
9, 050
8, 360
7, 780

8, 810
1 6 ,6 0 0
8, 280
5 35, 700
1, 370
6 9 ,5 0 0
9 6 ,2 0 0
1 1 3 ,0 0 0

3
2

500
120

1 4 ,8 0 0
1, 300

20
26

1 0 ,7 0 0
1 8 ,7 0 0

2 1 9 ,0 0 0
2 3 8 ,0 0 0

12
10

3, 700
4 , 140

9 9 ,3 0 0
6 7 ,0 0 0

4
2

1 ,4 6 0
1 ,8 6 0

6 0 ,3 0 0
8, 980

8
7

1 ,9 6 0
6 , 960

6 4 ,7 0 0
4 4 ,4 0 0

8
7

2, 390
7, 820

2 9 ,4 0 0
8 1 ,3 0 0

-

-

3 3, 500

1
4

210
840

1, 590
2 7 ,8 0 0

1
1

70
60

70
120

1 2 ,5 0 0

1 6 3 ,0 0 0

104

2 8 ,3 0 0

2 2 1 ,0 0 0

63

2 0 ,2 0 0

3 4 4 ,0 0 0

_
3
32

_
780
1 6 ,3 0 0

1, 300
3 1 0 ,0 0 0

10
8
8
2

1, 160
1 ,0 8 0
490
330

7, 060
1 4 ,9 0 0
_
9 ,7 9 0
1 ,3 5 0

27

_
18

1 1 ,1 0 0

_
1 3 1 ,0 0 0

17
38

6, 520
4, 370

3 700
2 2 ,5 0 0
2 6 ,4 0 0

7

890
470
10

3 1 ,5 0 0
1 ,2 3 0
40

22
16
1
7
3

1 3 ,4 0 0
3, 540
30 ,
340
190

1 3 0 ,0 0 0
3 4 ,3 0 0
1, 380
4, 050
1 ,9 1 0

1
1

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

71

1 1 ,9 0 0

1 4 4 ,0 0 0

30

1 8 ,9 0 0

1 3 1 ,0 0 0

99

2 9 ,6 0 0

2 9 5 ,0 0 0

____

38

8, 470

1 2 0 ,0 0 0

11

7, 350

9 3 , 000

40

1 7 ,9 0 0

2 0 7 ,0 0 0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _________________________
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts ________________________
Tobacco m an ufactures______________________________
Textile m ill p r o d u c ts_______________________________
A p parel and other finished products made
fro m fa b r ics and sim ila r m a t e r ia l s ----------------Lum ber and wood p rodu cts, except
furn itu re____ ______________________________________
Furniture and fix tu r e s . ----------------------------------------Paper and allied p r o d u c ts______________ _________
P rinting, publishing, and allied in d u strie s_____
C h e m ic als and allied p r o d u c ts____________________
P etroleu m refining and related in d u strie s______
Rubber and m isc ellan e ou s p la stics p rodu cts----Leather and leather produ cts--------- -------------------Stone, clay, and g la ss p r o d u c ts__________________
P r im a r y m etal in d u s tr ie s -------------------------------------Fab ricated m etal p rodu cts, except ordnance,
m achinery, and transportation equipm ent -------M achin ery, except e le c tr ic a l_____________________
E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipm ent, and
su pp lies ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------T ran sportation equ ipm en t -----------------------------------------------P r o fe ssio n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
good s; w atches and c lo c k s _________ ___________
M isc ellan e ou s manufacturing in d u s tr ie s ---------------

2
10
-

680
1 ,4 4 0
-

2, 260
3 5 ,3 0 0
-

-

_
-

_
-

6
_
-

600
_
-

1 4 ,3 0 0
_
-

-

-

-

1

20

310

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1
2
6
2

120
100
1 ,9 0 0
630
390

730
700
9, 440
1 5 ,0 0 0
2, 830

1
1
1
-

250
120
40
-

1 ,7 5 0
500
4 ,4 5 0

1
2
3
1
5
2
1
3

-

4

280
120
650.
10
1 ,5 2 0
_
640
160
120
3, 000

2 4 ,3 0 0
2, 270
2, 460
190
3, 880
_
3 4 ,4 0 0
980
1 4 ,4 0 0
2 4 ,4 0 0

2
9

240
1 ,9 1 0

5 ,0 6 0
3 2 ,7 0 0

1

4

30
1 ,0 9 0

470
1 0 ,0 0 0

3
3

260
550

1 ,4 7 0
2 0 ,7 0 0

1
1

580
500

7, 480
8, 530

2

3
2

9 , 600
210

4 8 ,9 0 0
7, 700

-

-

-

-

"

33

3, 450

A ll in d u s tr ie s _________________________________
Manufacturing____________________________

Nonm anufacturing ___

________________________________

A g r icu ltu r e , fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s _______________
M ining ______________________________________________________________
C ontract construction -----------------------------------------------------------T ran sportation, com m u nication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and san itary s e r v ic e s ____________________________
W h olesale and reta il trade __ --------------------------------- —
F in ance, in su ran ce, and re a l e s t a t e ________________
S e r v ic e s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Governm ent -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table.




_

_

_

-

-

5, 800

7 5 ,5 0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 3 ,8 0 0

-

-

-

1

200

6 ,8 3 0

19

1 1 ,6 0 0

3 8 ,3 0 0

59

1 1 ,7 0 0

8 8 ,0 0 0

_

.

_

31
17

8, 300
2, 800

4 6 ,8 0 0
2 6 ,3 0 0
1 ,3 8 0
6, 500

_

_

-

-

-

14

1, 250

6, 920

9

120
870

1 , 200
5 ,4 3 0

7
10

1 ,5 5 0
480

6, 650
4 ,4 9 0

4
4

9, 700
880

1 0 ,4 0 0
2 0 ,8 0 0

5
3

260
140

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

160

5, 770

1

30

430

1

-

-

-

"

-

2

40
140

3, 270
3, 750

2

1

-

37
Table A-3.

W ork Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 19651 — Continued
Louisiana

Industry group

A ll in d u str ie s________________________________
M anufacturing_________________________________
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ------------------------------------Food and kindred p r o d u c ts _______________________
Tob acco m an ufactures_____________________________
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts _____________________________
A p p a re l and other finished products made
fr o m fa b rics and sim ila r m a t e r ia ls __________
L u m ber and wood p rodu cts, except
furn itu re____________________________________________
Furniture and fix tu res_____________________________
P ap er and allied p r o d u c ts________________________
P rin tin g, publishing, and a llied in du stries__ _
C h e m ic als and a llied p r o d u c ts___________________
P etr o leu m refining and related in d u stries_____
Rubber and m isc ella n e o u s p la stics p r o d u c ts ...
Leath er and leather p rodu cts_____________________
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts_________________
P r im a r y m e tal in d u str ie s________________________
Fab ricated m e tal p rodu cts, except ordnance,
m ach in ery, and transportation equ ipm en t___
M ach in ery, except e le c tr ic a l_____________________
E le c t r ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su p p lies_____________________________________________
T ran sportation equ ipm en t________________________
P r o fe s s io n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
goods; w atches and c lo c k s______________________
M isc ella n e o u s manufacturing in d u str ie s _______
Nonm anufacturing_____________________________
A g r ic u ltu r e , fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s ___________
M ining________________________________________________
C ontract construction______________________________
T ran sportation , com m u nication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and san itary s e r v ic e s ______________________
W h olesale and r etail t r a d e _______________________
Fin an ce, in suran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ___________
S e r v ic e s _____________________________________________
G overnm en t__________________________________________

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
Num ber
involved

M aryland
M an -d ays
id le,
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
Number
involved

A ll in d u str ie s________________________________

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ________________________
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts_______________________
T ob acco m an ufactures_____________ _______________
T e xtile m ill p r o d u c ts______________________________
A p p are l and other finished products made
fr o m fa b rics and sim ila r m a t e r ia ls ---------------L u m b er and wood p rodu cts, except
furn itu re___________________________________________
Furniture and fixtu res_____________________________
P ap er and allied p r o d u c ts________________________
P rin tin g, publishing, and a llied in du stries-----C h e m icals and a llied products ..................................
P etr o leu m refining and related in d u strie s-------Rubber and m isc ellan e ou s p la stics p rodu cts—
L eath er and leather produ cts_____________________
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts_________________
P r im a r y m etal in d u str ie s________________________
Fab ricated m etal p rodu cts, except ordnance,
m ach in ery, and transp oration equ ipm en t-----M ach in ery, except electrica]-------------------------------E le c t r ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su pp lies_____________________________________________
Tran sportation equ ipm en t----- ------------------------------P r o fe s s io n a l, sc ien tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and op tical
good s; w atches and c lo c k s ______________________
M isc ella n e o u s m anufacturing in d u str ie s---------Nonm anufacturing______________ - ....................—
A g r ic u ltu r e , fo r e s tr y , and fis h e r ie s ----------------M ining------------------- --------- -------------------------------------------C ontract construction______________________________
T ran sp ortation , com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and sanitary s e r v ic e s ------------------------------ —
W h o lesa le and reta il t r a d e _______________________
Fin an ce, in suran ce, and real e s t a t e ___________
S e r v ic e s _____________________________________________
G overnm en t__________________________________________

See footnotes at end of table.




Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
Number
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stopp ages)

53

2 3 ,9 0 0

7 1 9 ,0 0 0

44

1 4 ,6 0 0

3 4 9 ,0 0 0

157

5 0 ,7 0 0

53 3, 000

11

7 ,6 6 0

1 2 2 ,0 0 0

2 21

1 0 ,1 0 0

178, 000

88

3 3 ,2 0 0

3 8 4 ,0 0 0

2
1
_

1, 360
80
-

1 7 ,2 0 0
80
-

5
-

580
-

1 6 ,1 0 0
-

10
7

1, 140
3, 200

1 2 ,6 0 0
1 5 ,9 0 0

-

-

-

1

70

4 , 380

8

570

6, 240

_
2
2

-

_
5 4 ,6 0 0
320
2 9 ,6 0 0

250
2, 470
140
2, 260
1 ,7 4 0
-

_
2, 720
7 1 ,4 0 0
5, 150
2 3 ,4 0 0
1 3 ,8 0 0
-

1
2
4
1
2
3
8
2
7

300
440
780
250
430
1 ,8 5 0
8, 120
120
1 ,9 7 0

1, 800
1 ,6 8 0
4 ,4 6 0
730
1 4 ,5 0 0
8, 250
3 4 ,0 0 0
400
2 8 ,1 0 0

1
1

130
30

350

_
2
2
1
3
5
-

1
-

1, 180
-

1 8 ,8 0 0
-

2
-

2, 470
-

3 8 ,8 0 0
-

12
9

1 ,9 9 0
2 ,0 5 °

3 6 ,6 0 0
33, 000

1

160

470

1
-

150
-

2, 280
-

9
1

1 ,0 7 0
8, 500

6, 230
1 6 6 ,0 0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

210
250

6 ,9 7 0
7 ,0 0 0

5 9 7 ,0 0 0

23

4 ,4 6 0

1 7 1 ,0 0 0

69

1 7 ,5 0 0

1 4 8 ,0 0 0

_

_

1
37

40
6, 190

840
73 , 600

13
15
1
2

1 0 ,5 0 0
730
20
30

6 3 ,9 0 0
9 ,4 3 0
460
80

“

“

-

3 ,4 9 0
1 ,2 3 0
-

42

1 6 ,3 0 0

-

900

1
25

20
1 3 ,3 0 0

40
3 8 3 ,0 0 0

8

1, 840

3 4 ,2 0 0

11
2
_

2, 430
20
-

2 1 2 ,0 0 0
1, 390

6
5

2, 150
220

1 3 1 ,0 0 0
3, 170

-

-

no

1 ,4 9 0
710

-

3

-

-

-

-

510

990

3
1

140

"

M is s is s ip p i

M innesota

M ichigan

M anufacturing_________________________________

M assa c h u setts
M an -d ays
id le,
l n £ c van
lyob /all
stoppages)

229

8 2 ,0 0 0

1 ,5 6 0 ,0 0 0

53

1 4 ,2 0 0

1 3 4 ,0 0 0

35

1 7 ,5 0 0

3 1 5 ,0 0 0

151

63 , 300

1 ,2 9 0 , 000

32

1 3 ,0 0 0

9 3 , 700

11

1 4 ,5 0 0

3 0 4 ,0 0 0

.

_

.

12
-

3 ,9 9 0
-

3 5 ,1 0 0
-

7
1

6 ,7 3 0
880

3 0 ,3 0 0
5, 250

2
-

1

20

480

-

-

-

2
3
3
3
1

-

80
380
430
1 ,0 3 0
30

680
790
1 1 ,6 0 0
6, 790
1, 300

1
2
1
1
-

_
90
220
2 ,8 8 0 .
810
150
-

_
3, 940
7, 310
1 9 8 ,0 0 0
810
1, 030
-

2
6
3
3
7
1
8
21

1 ,2 5 0
5 ,4 5 0
1 ,5 3 0
3 ,4 7 0
5 ,2 5 0
50
2, 470
3, 860

2 4 ,5 0 0
5 5 ,3 0 0
2 ,1 3 0
3 0 2 ,0 0 0
2 9 ,4 0 0
500
2 1 ,8 0 0
6 7 ,8 0 0

23
32

3 ,7 4 0
1 1 ,8 0 0

5 4 ,5 0 0
3 6 8 ,0 0 0

2
6

900
1 ,9 8 0

1 0 ,3 0 0
1 6 ,0 0 0

1

70

1 ,2 6 0

5
24

3 ,9 2 0
1 6 ,0 0 0

7 8 ,6 0 0
2 3 4 ,0 0 0

2
2

100
430

3, 380
7, 310

2

1 0 ,2 0 0

8 9 ,7 0 0

2
1

210

4 ,9 6 0
1 1 ,2 0 0

-

290

-

-

"

1

120

1 ,2 0 0

78

1 8 ,8 0 0

2 7 4 ,0 0 0

21

1, 230

3 9 ,9 0 0

24

2, 960

11, 100

1
5
40

10
1 ,4 6 0
1 1 ,4 0 0

60
7 2 ,2 0 0
143, 000

200
2 ,4 0 0

1, 370
4 , 640

6
17
1
7
1

460
2, 560
10
2 ,7 6 0
120

2, 060
4 1 ,9 0 0
80
1 4 ,5 0 0
480

200
160

4 , 900
160

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

1
7

20
300

180
3, 740

1
19

5

440
440
30

3 0 ,6 0 0
4 , 900
470

3
1

7
1

“

'

_1

38
Table A-3.

W ork Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 19651 Continued
—
Nevada

M isso u r i
Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

Industry group

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W orkers
N um ber
involved

New J e r se y
M an -d ays
id le ,
1965 (all
stopp ages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
170 J
AQA5 fall
stoppages)

120

4 6 ,5 0 0

575, 000

36

1 2 ,4 0 0

2 6 8 ,0 0 0

211

4 5 , 500

8 0 5 ,0 0 0

51

3 2 ,5 0 0

4 1 3 ,0 0 0

3

920

3 3 ,4 0 0

2 121

3 6 ,8 0 0

6 1 1 ,0 0 0

.

.

.

_

_

3
-

350
-

8 ,9 8 0
-

-

-

-

12
8

2 ,8 7 0
830

3 5 ,6 0 0
9 ,9 3 0

4

490

7, 770

-

-

-

8

350

1 1 ,4 0 0

1
1
1
2
1
2
1
5

50
130
130
570
70
580
10
1 ,2 1 0

1 ,0 4 0
8, 550
630
3 ,4 6 0
730
6 ,9 6 0
30
3, 380

1
1

130
680

2, 380
3 0 ,5 0 0

1
10
1
12
2
8
11
6

30
2, 140
120
2 ,7 0 0
60
1 ,9 4 0
8 , 550
1, 540

590
5 0 ,5 0 0
2, 280
7 7 ,1 0 0
5 2 1 , 500
1 0 ,6 0 0
7 4 ,6 0 0
66, 700

10
7

4 , 230
2, 510

8 9 ,7 0 0
2 7 ,7 0 0

-

-

-

11
12

5, 380
4 , 140

80, 800
8 4 ,4 0 0

4
6

1 ,7 1 0
2 0 ,2 0 0

3 1 ,1 0 0
2 1 5 ,0 0 0

1
-

120
-

480
-

8
3

530
2 ,7 8 0

4 3 ,7 0 0
4 ,7 7 0

3

270

7, 340

-

-

-

"

"

-

4
6

1 ,3 1 0
1, 550

1 4 ,9 0 0
2 2 ,2 0 0

-----------------------------------------

69

1 4 ,0 0 0

1 6 3 ,0 0 0

33

1 1 ,5 0 0

2 3 4 ,0 0 0

90

8, 650

1 9 3 ,0 0 0

A g ricu ltu re , fo r e s t r y , and f is h e r ie s ------------------M ining--------------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction ----------------------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ------------------------------W h olesale and retail tr a d e --------- __ ------ ------------Finance, in suran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ------------------S e r v ic e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------G overnm en t-----------------------------------------------------------------

_
1
36

40
4 ,4 0 0

_
430
3 2 ,0 0 0

16
8
2
4
2

6, 950
2, 180
100
150
140

7 7 ,0 0 0
4 7 ,4 0 0
1, 170
4 , 220
460

A ll in d u s tr ie s --------------------------------------------------

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s -------------------------------------Food and kindred products
--------------------------------Tob acco m a n u factu res- ----------------------------------------T e xtile m ill products _____________________________
A p p are l and other finished products m ade
fro m fab rics and sim ila r m a t e r ia l s -----------------Lum ber and wood p rodu cts, except
fu rn itu re- ---------------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fix tu r e s---------------------------------------------P aper and a llied products
-----------------------------P rinting, p ublishing, and a llied in d u strie s-------C h em icals and a llied products ------------- ----------P etro leu m refining and related in d u str ie s- ----Rubber and m isc ella n e o u s p la stic s p rod u cts------------------------------Leath er and leather products
Stone, c la y , and g la ss products — -------------------P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s tr ie s -------- -----------------------F ab ricated m e ta l p rodu cts, except ordnance,
m ach in ery, and transp ortation equ ipm en t-----M achin ery, except e l e c t r i c a l -------------------------------E le c t r ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su p p lies— ---------------------------------------------------------------T ran sportation equipment - ---------------------------------P r o fe ssio n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
goods; w atches and clocks ------ ----------------------M iscellan eou s m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s -----------Nonmanufacturing

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

_

20

8 ,0 6 0

1 7 1 ,0 0 0

2
32

470
2, 300

1 0 ,1 0 0
2 9 ,0 0 0

3
3
1
6

430
140
100
2, 700

5 2 ,9 0 0
1, 510
200
9, 060
"

20
22
1
8
5

3, 210
1, 170
40
360
1 ,0 8 0

1 2 9 ,0 0 0
7, 580
360
1 4 ,5 0 0
3, 010

~

"
North C arolin a

New Y ork

Ohio

A ll in d u s tr ie s --------------------------------------------------

397

1 8 6 ,0 0 0

2 , 8 6 0 ,0 0 0

25

4 , 200

8 4 ,3 0 0

369

9 6 ,6 0 0

1 ,4 6 0 ,0 0 0

M anufacturing______________________________ ____

212

8 9 ,8 0 0

1 ,2 2 0 ,0 0 0

14

2, 020

5 4 ,3 0 0

250

75, 900

1 .2 5 0 ,0 0 0

17
7

5 ,4 3 0
11, 100

2 4 7 ,0 0 0
6 7 ,1 0 0

3
3

310
800

1 ,6 8 0
3 7 ,8 0 0

1
19
2

2, 750
2 ,7 6 0
370

3 0 ,3 0 0
3 3 ,3 0 0
4 ,7 7 0

20

910

1 0 ,1 0 0

-

-

-

3

320

1, 520

4
10
17
6
11

410
1 ,3 5 0
760
1 7 ,8 0 0
2, 730

2, 780
1 7 ,3 0 0
1 2 ,5 0 0
2 6 9 ,0 0 0
5 1 ,1 0 0

1
2
1

90
100
40

7 ,6 7 0
3, 260
320
-

3
2
12
3
12
1
15

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s
--------------------------Food and kindred p r o d u c ts --------------------------- --------T ob acco m an ufactures--------------------------------------------T e xtile m ill p r o d u c ts--------------- ----------------------------A p p are l and other finished products made
from fab rics and sim ila r m a t e r ia l s ----------------L u m ber and wood p rodu cts, except
furn itu re-------------------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fix tu r e s--------------------------------------------P aper and allied p r o d u c ts -------------------------------------P rinting, publishing, and allied in d u strie s-------C h em icals and allied p r o d u c ts-----------------------------P etroleu m refining and related in d u strie s--------Rubber and m iscellan e ou s p la stics p rodu cts----Leather and leather p rodu cts--------------------------------Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts--------------------------P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s tr ie s -------------------------------------F ab ricated m e tal p rodu cts, except ordnance,
m ach in ery, and transp ortation equ ipm en t-----M achin ery, except e le c tr ic a l -----------------------------E le c t r ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su p p lie s--------------------------------------------------------------------T ran sportation equipment
--------------------------------P r o fe ssio n a l, sc ien tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
goods; w atches and c lo c k s-----------------------------------M iscellan eou s m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s ------------

60
170
2, 720.
390
3 ,2 5 0
10
6, 700

-

-

-

-

1
6
10
18

30
5, 830
2, 680
3, 800

1 ,2 5 0
8 1 ,1 0 0
2 5 ,9 0 0
4 8 ,3 0 0

-

-

-

270
-

1 ,8 7 0
-

-

1
-

16
29

9, 010
9 ,9 2 0

830
3, 300
7 4 ,3 0 0
3 6 ,4 0 0
8 6 ,4 0 0
60
5 1 ,3 0 0
1 2 6 ,0 0 0
9 9 ,2 0 0

28
19

3 ,6 1 0
1 9 ,8 0 0

4 3 ,1 0 0
1 3 2 ,0 0 0

1

30

60

46
44

8, 790
1 4 ,1 0 0

1 2 6 ,0 0 0
33 5, 000

21
5

1 1 ,3 0 0
1 ,7 6 0

1 9 5 ,0 0 0
6, 170

2
-

380
-

1 ,7 2 0
-

10
21

3 ,4 7 0
9 ,4 6 0

3 2 ,8 0 0
1 5 6 ,0 0 0

3
9

190
290

2, 240
6, 600

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
9

210
1 ,4 3 0

7 ,4 0 0
3 9 ,8 0 0

------------

185

9 6 ,2 0 0

1 ,6 4 0 ,0 0 0

11

2, 190

3 0 ,0 0 0

119

2 0 ,7 0 0

2 1 0 ,0 0 0

A g r icu ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , and fis h e r ie s ------------------M in in g ------------------------------------------------------------------------C ontract construction ----------------------------------------------Tran sportation , com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s, and san itary s e r v ic e s ---------------------------------W h olesale and re ta il t r a d e ------------------------------------Fin ance, in suran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ------------------S e r v ic e s -------------------------- ----------------------------------------Governm ent---------------------------------------- -------------------

_

_

3
51

170
2 2 ,2 0 0

1 ,2 4 0
6 1 5 ,0 0 0

2

350

760

41
55
4
27
4

5 1 ,6 0 0
1 1 ,3 0 0
140
3, 940
6, 820

7 7 9 ,0 0 0
9 7 ,6 0 0
560
3 1 ,9 0 0
1 1 8 ,0 0 0

6
2
-

1 ,6 1 0
70
-

5 ,4 0 0

Nonm anufacturing------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table.




-

_

-

_

-

1

_

150

_

_

_

_

18
46

7, 730
6, 370

4 8 ,6 0 0
6 5 ,2 0 0

2 3 ,2 0 0
620

23
25

5, 000
1, 150

-

-

-

7 7 ,3 0 0
1 7 ,7 0 0
_
1 ,0 8 0
40

6
1

450
10

39
Table A-3

W ork Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 1965 1 Continued
—
Oklahoma

Industry group

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

Oregon

M a n -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
N um ber
involved

P en nsylvania
M an -d ays
id le ,
1Q65^11
1 7 od tail
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le ,
loAe ^ail
X7 O /all
D
stoppages)

A ll in d u str ie s _______________________________

44

8 ,4 2 0

9 9 ,0 0 0

39

1 2 ,4 0 0

1 4 5 ,0 0 0

404

1 3 2 ,0 0 0

1 ,6 4 0 , 000

M anufacturing_________________________________

20

5 ,4 5 0

7 5 ,4 0 0

17

8 ,4 3 0

1 2 1 ,0 0 0

2 253

7 8 ,3 0 0

1 ,2 5 0 ,0 0 0

1

3
-

280
_
_

2 ,4 9 0
_
_

1

650
_
_

6 , 500

_
_

_
_

26
_
4

150
4 ,9 6 0
_
440

1 ,4 5 0
6 6 ,8 0 0
_
5, 030

1

60

330

_

_

_

26

3, 320

9, 040

-

_
1 ,6 2 0
270
2, 850
2 4 ,4 0 0
1 0 ,2 0 0

8
1

_
_
_
_
1

4 , 060
30
_
_
10

3 2 ,8 0 0
60
_
_
_
_
_
30

_

_
1, 500
3, 590
140
780

1 3 2 ,0 0 0
6 , 020
2 4 ,6 0 0

10

120

3
19
36

3, 2 9 0
290
9 ,2 9 0
1 4 ,3 0 0

4 3 ,4 0 0

6
1

_
270
140
1 ,4 2 0
_
1 ,8 6 0
460

9 9 ,7 0 0
2 6 7 ,0 0 0

1
3

200
620

8, 080
1 5 ,8 0 0

2
1

20
2 ,4 0 0

160
3 1 ,2 0 0

33
29

1 1 ,0 0 0
9 ,4 1 0

1 6 1 ,0 0 0
153, 000

-

-

-

1
1

30
1, 100

1 ,5 3 0
4 4 ,8 0 0

20

7, 280
4 , 100

1 0 4 ,0 0 0
9 6 ,9 0 0

2

150

9, 350

-

-

1

130

3, 510

3
7

3, 680

-

900

3 2 ,7 0 0
1 0 ,0 0 0

24

2 ,9 6 0

23, 600

22

3 ,9 3 0

2 4 ,6 0 0

151

53 , 700

3 9 2 ,0 0 0

.

.

.

14

1, 150

31 ,4 9 0
1 3 ,7 0 0

8

2, no

1 0 ,6 0 0

1
41
46

350
2 0 ,4 0 0
9 , 100

7, 000
7 7 , 300
83, 600

4
4
1
1

1 ,6 5 0
120
_
30
20

6 ,7 4 0
1 ,4 6 0
160
80

5
8
_
1

750
960
no

3, 850
7, 040
3, 080

24
27
12

2 0 ,1 0 0
2, 850
890

1 6 7 ,0 0 0
2 7 ,9 0 0
2 9 ,6 0 0

“

"

"

“

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ________________________
Food and kindred p r o d u c ts _______________________
T ob acco m an ufactures_____________________________
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts______________________________
A p p a re l and other finished products made
fr o m fa b rics and s im ila r m a t e r ia ls __________
L u m b er and wood p rodu cts, except
furniture
_
_
....
Furniture and fix tu r e s_____________________________
P ap er and allied p r o d u c ts ________________________
P rin tin g, publishing, and allied in du stries____
C h e m ic a ls and allied products _
_
_ _
P etr o leu m refining and related in du stries_____
Rubber and m iscellan e ou s p la stics p rodu cts__
L eath er and leather p rodu cts____________________
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts _________________
P r im a r y m e tal in d u str ie s ________________________
F ab ricated m etal p rod u cts, except ordnance,
m ach in ery, and transp ortation equ ipm en t___
M ach in ery, except e le c tr ic a l____________________
E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su pp lies____________________________________________
T ran sportation equ ipm en t________________________
P r o fe s s io n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling
in stru m en ts; photographic and optical
good s; w atches and c lo c k s ______________________
M isc ella n e o u s manufacturing in d u str ie s _______
Nonm anufacturing--------------------- ---------------------A g r ic u ltu r e , fo r e s t r y , and f is h e r ie s ___________
M ining________________________________________________
C ontract construction ______________________________
T ran sp ortation , com m u nication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s , and san itary s e r v ic e s _____________________
W h olesale and r etail t r a d e _______________________
Fin an ce, in suran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ___________
S e r v ic e s _____________________________________________
G overnm en t__________________________________________

1
1
1

_

_

_

-

10
8
2

5
1
11

10

26

A ll in d u str ie s -------------------------------------------------Manufacturing?____________________________________________________________________________
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s __________________________
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts-------------------------------------Tob acco m an ufactures______________________________
T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts_______________________________
A p p are l and other finished products m ade fro m fab rics
and sim ila r m a t e r ia ls ------------------------------------------L u m b er and wood p rodu cts, except furn itu re—
Furniture and fix tu res______________________________
P a p er and allied p r o d u c ts__________________________
P rin tin g, publishing, and allied in du stries_____
C h em icals and allied p r o d u c ts____________________
P e tr o le u m refining and related in du stries---------Rubber and m iscellan eou s p la stics p rodu cts___
L eath er and leather produ cts______________________
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c ts ---------------------------P r im a r y m etal in d u str ie s__________________________
F ab ricated m etal p rodu cts, except ordnance, machinery t, and
transportation equ ipm en t_________________________
M ach in ery, except e le c tr ic a l--------------------------------E le c t r ic a l m achinery, equipm ent, and supplies
T ran sportation equ ipm en t__________________________
P r o fe s s io n a l, sc ie n tific , and controlling in stru m en ts;
photographic and optical goods; w atches
and c lo c k s___________________________________________
M isc ella n e o u s m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s ________

See footnotes at end of table.

8, 170

1 3 1 ,0 0 0

79

2 9 ,5 0 0

8 2 1 ,0 0 0

13

5, 070

1 0 9 ,0 0 0

60

2 7 ,7 0 0

8 0 7 ,0 0 0

650
860

5, 850
2, 740

1
6
1

130
1 ,0 4 0
30

3, 380
3 2 ,6 0 0
80

410
1 ,9 0 0

-

4
2
4
2
4
2
2
3
3

830
no
460
130
3, 060
300
2, 330
830
1 ,0 6 0

1 8 ,2 0 0
3, 560
1 1 ,8 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
63 3 0 , 000
1 3 ,4 0 0
23, 700
1 2 8 ,0 0 0
7 ,0 8 0
2 4 ,2 0 0

1
3
-

2
2

-

2 2 ,2 0 0
-

1
1

20
970

7, 000
930
5 7 ,5 0 0

2
1
-

220
40
-

1 2 ,7 0 0
550
-

7
3
1
10

3, 390
850
30
1 1 ,5 0 0

2 8 ,1 0 0
1 8 ,0 0 0
180
1 3 1 ,0 0 0

"

"

2
3

1 ,0 5 0
630

2 3 ,4 0 0
9 ,6 1 0

13

3, 100

2 2 ,0 0 0

19

1 ,8 3 0

13, 900

4

520

3, 530

1
11

120
740

460
8, 710

6
1
2

1 ,6 4 0
560
380

1 2 ,3 0 0
2, 240
3, 940

4
2
1

900
50
20

1 ,6 4 0
2 ,9 7 0

-

_________________

Nonmanufactur ing _____________________________




1 9 ,1 0 0

T e n n essee

Rhode Island

A g r ic u ltu r e , fo r e s tr y , and fis h e r ie s ------------------M ining_________________________________________________
C ontract construction_______________________________
T ran sp ortation , com m unication, e le c tr ic , g a s, and
san itary s e r v i c e s __________________________________
W h olesale and reta il t r a d e ------------------------------------F in an ce, in suran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ------------------S e r v ic e s _______________________________________________
G overnm en t___________________________________________

_
2 0 ,1 0 0

_________ _______

.......................
------- ------------------

-

-

140

40
Table A-3.

Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 19651 Continued
—
Texas
Stoppages
beginning in
1965
Workers
Number
involved

Industry group

Virginia
Man-days
idle,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
■
W orkers
Number
involved

Washington
Man-days
idle,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1965 (all
stoppages)

A ll in du stries_______________________________

110

4 1 ,7 0 0

66 1 ,0 0 0

32

8, 310

169,000

52

4 2 ,0 0 0

67 6 ,0 0 0

___________ _________

40

13,200

21 6 ,0 0 0

12

4, 410

7 0 ,5 0 0

2 20

33 ,5 0 0

58 4,00 0

8
_
_

2 ,9 2 0
_
.

3 9 ,400
_
_

1
_
1

170
_
420

2, 160
_
1,2 50

_
_
1

_
_
20

3 260
_
620

Manufacturing________

Ordnance and accessories
_ ____ _ _____
Food and kindred products __ __
__ ________
Tobacco manufactures
Textile m ill products_____________________________
Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m a te r ia ls___________
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture__________________________________________
Furniture and fixtures____________________________
Paper and allied products ------- ---------- ---------Printing, publishing, and allied industries_____
Chemicals and allied products__________________
Petroleum refining and related industries_____
Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics products___
Leather and leather products
Stone, clay, and glass produ cts. _ ____________
Prim ary metal industries __
_______ ________
Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment____
Machinery, except electrical____________________
E lectrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies_____ ________________ __________________
Transportation equipment. _____________________
Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks. _________ __ ___
Miscellaneous manufacturing in du stries_______

1

260

12,800

1

250

28 ,4 0 0

-

_

3 1,1 50

_
1
2
2
2
2
1
4
4

_
10
770
660
660
2, 360
220
1,250
1, 570

_
20
26 ,1 0 0
5, 360
3, 540
16,500
8, 180
18,900
14,100

_
_
.
2
.
2

_
_
_
150
_
_
1,7 90

_
_
_
.
1,0 60
_
_
_
_
13,500

5
_
1
1
1

890
_
20
_
20
_
_
70

17,500
_
20
160
_
590

5
2

1,720
120

38 ,9 0 0
9, 780

2
-

150
_

21, 200
_

4
4

1,5 90
2, 290

17,900
2 3 ,0 0 0

3
3

70
670

2, 440
19,600

3
_

1, 490
_

2, 840
_

3

2 8 ,5 0 0

5 2 1,00 0

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

1
3

10
70

80
1, 190

___

70

28 ,400

4 4 5,00 0

20

3, 900

9 8 ,4 0 0

32

8, 550

9 1 ,6 0 0

Agriculture, forestry, and fish e ries_____ ____
Mining________________ ____________________________
Contract construction__________ _
__
_______
Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services__ ___ ____________
Wholesale and retail tra d e_______________________
Finance, insurance, and real e sta te . _________
Services _
Government___ ___________________________________

.
1
51

_
10
20 ,4 0 0

.
70
22 9,00 0

.
4
5

.
1, 570
710

_
1,950
19,600

_
15

_
5, 570

.
62, 500

10
4
_
4

7 ,5 1 0
90
420

21 1,00 0
3,6 9 0
.
1, 140
2 20

8
1
2
"

1,550
50
20

6 9 ,0 0 0
7, 760
170

6
11
_
-

1,8 30
1, 150
_
_

13,200
15,800
_
_

"

-

"

Nonmanufacturing _

__

_

West Virginia
A ll in du stries____________

_________________

Wisconsin

102

2 9 ,1 0 0

224,00 0

86

37 ,200

4 5 6 ,0 0 0

__________________________________________________

21

10,100

120,000

62

3 5 ,100

4 4 0 ,0 0 0

Ordnance and acce sso ries________ __ __________
Food and kindred products . _______ ____________
Tobacco manufactures_____________________________
.
_
Textile m ill products____________ _ _______ _
Apparel and other finished products made from fabric? and
sim ilar m aterials. ________ ____________ _____
Lumber and wood products, except furniture___
Furniture and fixtures_____________________________
Paper and allied products__ _______________ ___
___ _______ ___________ ____
Printing, publishing, and allied industries__ _
Chemi als and allied products____________________ __________ ___________ ________________
Petroleum refining and related in du stries---------Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics products____
_______________
Leather and leather products.
_____ __________
________________
Stone, clay, and glass products __ _ ____________
Prim ary metal industries____ ___ _______ __ ___ __________
Fabricated metal products, except ordnance, machinery , and
transportation equipment_____________ ________ ______ __
Machinery, except electrical_____________________
E lectrical machinery, equipment, and supplies .
Transportation equipment_________________________
Professional, scientific, and controlling instruments;
photographic and optical goods; watches

1
.
_

1, 000
-

2, 010
_
_

6
.
_

820
_
_

18,300
_
_

.

.
980
3 ,6 2 0
1, 230

.
_
_
_
1,950
_
3 4 ,9 4 0
30 ,9 0 0
2 2 ,3 0 0

_
3
1
3
1
1
1
2
3
4

.
390
10
530
_
80
20
2, 000
630
210
1,7 80

_
4, 180
80
2 5 ,1 0 0
_
480
60
8, 000
11,100
5, 870
14,900

1, 210
970
1, 140

2 7 ,4 0 0
25 ,4 0 0

9
16
4
5

2, 670
5 ,6 7 0
1 ,4 60
18,700

4 0 ,4 0 0
9 6 ,9 0 0
45, 100
169,00 0

Manufacturing____________________

Miscellaneous manufacturing in du stries______
Nonmanufacturing. __ _______________________

No work stoppages were
Stoppages affecting more
to the respective groups.
Idleness in 1965 resulting
A large proportion of the
A large proportion of the
Idleness in 1965 resulting

NOTE:

2

-

5 ,6 4 0

-

_______
____

-

-

3

140

470

18,900

103,000

24

2, 120

15,400

.
40
25

.
15,100
2, 330

_
6 7 ,0 0 0
8, 970

_

_

_

12

1,420

12,700

5
3

4
•4

140
180
100

840
1, 160
_
400
300

680
140

6, 300
8, 410

-

-

-

-

5

230
450

11, 200
1,5 60

2
2

3

290

recorded during 1465 tor the industry groups for which no data are presented,
than 1 industry grout- h*ve been counted in each group affected; workers involved and man-days idle were
from
1965
1965
from

Because of rounding,




5
4

81

.

A griculture, forestry, and fish e r ie s. __________ ________.... ____________
M i n i n g ............ .... ..
.
.
........ .............._________
Contract construction---------------------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric, gas, and
sanitary s e r v ic e s _________ _______ ____________ __________ _____
Wholesale and retail tra d e________________________
Finance, insurance, and real estate _ ---------------S e r v ic e s____________ _____ ____________
______
Government. ____________ ___________
_________
1
2
allocated
3
4
5
6

-

.
3
3
3

a stoppage that began i-. ] 464.
idleness resulted L o m
l stoppages that began in 1964.
idleness resulted irom
a stoppage that beganin 1964.
2 stoppages that began prior to 1965.

sums of individual items may not equal totals.

41
Table A -4.

W ork Stoppages by Industry Group and Contract Status, 1965
Negotiation of fir s t agreem en t
or union recognition

T otal
Stop pages
begin ning in
1 ?65
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

Industry group

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Renegotiation o f agreem ent
(expiration or reopening)

M a n -d a y s
id le ,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
N u m ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

1 3, 963

1 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0

2 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

692

7 6 ,6 0 0

1 ,8 4 0 ,0 0 0

1 1 ,8 0 2

9 9 6 ,0 0 0

1 8 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0

---------------

* 2 ,0 8 0

9 1 3 ,0 0 0

1 4 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

383

35, 200

1 ,3 8 0 ,0 0 0

1 1 ,1 8 3

6 1 7 ,0 0 0

1 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s
_ -------------------Food and kindred products _ ------------------ ----------Tob acco m an ufactures--------------------------------------------T e x tile m ill products
-----------------------------------------

12
227

10 ,300
5 7 ,300

1 2 1 ,0 0 0
9 2 8 ,0 0 0

2
48

170
4 , 060

5 ,6 3 0
1 2 5 ,0 0 0

6
131

-

-

-

-

-

-

44

2 1 ,3 0 0

1 7 4 ,0 0 0

9

680

3 8 ,9 0 0

24

8, 250
3 7 ,8 0 0
1 8 ,5 0 0

1 1 0 ,0 0 0
6 5 2 ,0 0 0
1 2 9 ,0 0 0

A p p a re l, e t c . 2 — ----------------- ------------------Lu m ber and wood p rodu cts, except
fu rn itu re- ---------------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fix tu r e s--------------------------------------------P ap er and allied products _
-----------------------------

100

9 ,7 6 0

1 9 9 ,0 0 0

29

1 ,6 6 0

7 8 ,6 0 0

29

2 ,8 4 0

1 0 2 ,0 0 0

46
69
91

13,100
10 ,200
3 9 ,2 0 0

2 0 4 ,0 0 0
1 9 4 ,0 0 0
931,, 000

16
19
16

1, 150
1 ,5 9 0
840

6 0 ,9 0 0
7 8 ,8 0 0
2 7 ,6 0 0

20
39
55

5, 540
6 , 570
3 2 ,4 0 0

1 0 5 ,0 0 0
8 7 ,5 0 0
8 8 7 ,0 0 0

33
102

2 4 ,5 0 0
2 8 ,9 0 0

7 8 0 ,0 0 0
7 3 7 ,0 0 0

14
17

610
1 ,3 6 0

4 8 ,5 0 0
2 3 ,3 0 0

16
66

2 1 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,3 0 0

7 2 9 ,0 0 0
6 9 3 ,0 0 0

A ll in du stries

M anufacturing

--------------------------------------------

-

--------------------------

P rin tin g, publishing, and allied
in du stries ----------------------------------------------------------C h e m ic a ls and allied products --------------------------P etro leu m refining and related
in du stries
------------------------------------------------------Rubber and m isc ella n e o u s p la stics
products -------------------------------------------------------

-

12

1,450

3 2 ,7 0 0

2

50

790

10

1 ,4 1 0

3 1 ,9 0 0

93

5 5 ,2 0 0

4 4 3 ,0 0 0

14

910

35 , 500

58

4 3 ,3 0 0

3 5 9 ,0 0 0

L eath er and leath er p rodu cts--------------------------------Stone, c la y , and g la ss products - ----------------------P r im a r y m e ta l in du stries --------------------------------F ab ricate d m e ta l products 3------------------------------------

36
139
206
269

2 0 ,4 0 0
7 0 ,7 0 0
8 8 ,0 0 0
8 6 ,8 0 0

3 1 2 ,0 0 0
8 3 6 ,0 0 0
1 ,3 9 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,4 3 0 ,0 0 0

2
22
18
58

230
1 ,8 5 0
3 ,6 2 0
4 ,2 7 0

1 3 ,0 0 0
9 7 ,1 0 0
2 2 7 ,0 0 0
1 6 3 ,0 0 0

14
97
124
157

1 3 ,6 0 0
6 6 ,5 0 0
5 8 ,0 0 0
6 6 ,8 0 0

2 6 8 ,0 0 0
7 3 1 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 5 0 ,0 0 0
1, 1 7 0 ,0 0 0

M ach in ery, except e le c tr ic a l
E le c t r ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
su p p lie s------------------------ ----------------------------------------------------Tran sportation equipment —
In stru m en ts, e t c .4---------------------------------------------------M isc ella n e o u s manufacturing industries ------

266

113,00 0

1 ,8 7 0 ,0 0 0

38

4 ,0 2 0

1 3 3 ,0 0 0

174

6 2 ,9 0 0

1 ,3 4 0 ,0 0 0

137
140
28
54

51 ,8 0 0
19 6,00 0
7 ,5 9 0
7 ,4 7 0

7 9 5 ,0 0 0
2 ,6 3 0 ,0 0 0
1 0 9 ,0 0 0
1 6 4 ,0 0 0

20
19
7
13

1 ,3 3 0
3 ,7 7 0
2, 380
670

2 7 ,7 0 0
1 3 0 ,0 0 0
4 6 ,0 0 0
2 0 ,4 0 0

79
59
17
32

2 5 ,0 0 0
1 1 6 ,0 0 0
4 , 250
5 ,3 1 0

5 0 8 ,0 0 0
1 ,9 0 0 ,0 0 0
5 6 ,9 0 0
1 3 7 ,0 0 0

Nonm anufacturing---------------------------------------------

1 1 ,8 8 6

6 3 3 ,0 0 0

9 ,0 2 0 ,0 0 0

309

4 1 ,4 0 0

4 6 2 ,0 0 0

1 622

3 7 8 ,0 0 0

7 ,6 2 0 ,0 0 0

A g r icu ltu r e , f o r e s tr y , and fish e r ie s ----------- —
M ining-------------------------------------------------------------------------C ontract construction — ------------ ---------------T ran sportation , com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s, and san itary s e r v ic e s ------ ----------------------

21
188
943

4 ,3 0 0
7 1 ,6 0 0
30 1 ,0 0 0

6 0 ,3 0 0
4 3 1 ,0 0 0
4 ,6 3 0 , 0 0 0

11
8
72

2 ,8 7 0
240
5, 510

3 5 ,3 0 0
7 , 100
8 8 ,8 0 0

3
22
245

42 0
3 ,4 4 0
2 1 5 ,0 0 0

2 1 ,6 0 0
1 4 3 ,0 0 0
4 , 1 8 0 ,0 0 0

216

18 5,00 0

3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

42

2 5 ,4 0 0

1 6 1 ,0 0 0

101

1 0 9 ,0 0 0

2 , 6 0 0 ,0 0 0

W h olesale and reta il trade ----------------------------Finance, in suran ce, and r e a l estate ------------S e r v ic e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------G overnm ent------------------------------------------------------------- -

336
16
126
42

4 2 ,6 0 0
550
16,000
11,900

5 7 0 ,0 0 0
5, 510
1 7 7 ,0 0 0
1 4 6 ,0 0 0

105
4
55
12

3, 360
110
2 ,8 8 0
1 ,0 0 0

8 0 ,8 0 0
1 ,0 3 0
7 2 ,6 0 0
1 5 ,6 0 0

187
8
49
9

3 3 ,5 0 0
260
8 , 070
8 ,4 2 0

4 7 1 ,0 0 0
2 ,0 9 0
8 3 ,6 0 0
1 1 7 ,0 0 0

See footnotes at end of table.




42
Table A-4.

W ork Stoppages by Industry Group and Contract Status, 1965— Continued
During te r m o f agreem ent
(negotiation of new agreem ent
not involved)
Stoppages
M an -d ays
beginning in
id le,
1965
1965 (all
W o rk ers
Num ber
stoppages)
involved

Industry group

No contract or other
contract status
Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved

No in form ation on
contract status

M a n -d ays
id le ,
1965 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
1965
W ork ers
N um ber
involved

M an -d ays
id le,
1965 (all
stoppages)

—

---------------------- —

1 ,3 7 4

4 6 3 ,0 0 0

2 ,7 1 0 ,0 0 0

69

8 ,6 1 0

5 5 ,9 0 0

26

1 ,7 5 0

4 1 ,6 0 0

------------

-----------------------------

479

25 5, 000

1 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0

21

4 ,7 1 0

2 8 ,8 0 0

14

990

3 6 ,0 0 0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s — ------------------------ -------Food and kindred products _ -----------------------------T ob acco m an u factu res- ------------------------------------- T e x tile m ill products
------------------------------------ -

4
44

1 ,8 5 0
1 5 ,3 0 0

5, 010
1 4 0 ,0 0 0

3

240

8 ,7 1 0

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

20
-

1, 160
-

8

1, 520

4 , 540

3

590

1, 980

-

-

A p p a re l, e t c . 2 --------------------------------- — -----------Lum ber and wood p rodu cts, except
furn itu re— —
— ----------------------------------------Furniture and fix tu r e s --------------------------------------------P aper and a llied products — ---------------------------------

38

5, 160

1 7 ,8 0 0

-

-

-

4

110

310

8
10
19

6, 380
2, 030
5 ,8 1 0

3 5 ,7 0 0
2 7 ,2 0 0
15, 800

1
1

30

340
1, 200

1
1

40
10

1, 970
80

200

3
17

2 ,9 0 0
6, 100

2 ,9 0 0
1 9 ,6 0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

2

120

700

■

-

19

1 1 ,0 0 0

4 7 ,5 0 0

1

20

20

1

40

1, 160

Leather and leather products
--------------------------Stone, c la y , and g la ss products ----- -----------P r im a r y m e ta l in du stries — ---------------------F ab ricated m e ta l p r o d u c ts3
----— -

13
20
63
49

3, 280
2 ,4 2 0
2 6 ,4 0 0
1 5 ,1 0 0

1 6 ,5 0 0
8, 090
1 2 2 ,0 0 0
8 3 ,1 0 0

7

3, 350

-

-

M achin ery, except e le c tr ic a l- — -------- ----E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
supplies
------------------------------------------------------------T ran sportation equipm ent
—
----- -------------------------- In stru m en ts, e t c .4
M iscellan e ou s m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s ------------

52

4 5 ,7 0 0

38
62
4
8

2 5 ,5 0 0
75 , 900
950
1 ,4 8 0

Nonm anufacturing---------------------------------------------

895

2 0 9 ,0 0 0

A g r icu ltu r e , fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s ------------------M ining--------------------------------------------------------------------------C ontract con stru ction - -------------------------------------T ran sp ortation , com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
g a s, and san itary s e r v ic e s -------------------------

4
153
618

W h olesale and re ta il trade
-----------------------------F in ance, in su ran ce, and r e a l estate - — —
S e r v ic e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------G overnm ent-----------------------------------------------------------------

A ll in du stries

M anufacturing

—

P rin tin g, publishing, and allied
in du stries — ---------------- — -----------------------------C h e m icals and allied p r o d u c ts-----------------------------P etroleu m refining and related
in du stries ----------------------------------------------------------------Rubber and m isc ellan e ou s p la stics
products — ----- -----------------------------------------------

"

-

-

■

-

_

_

-

-

_
-

-

3

450

1 5 ,4 0 0

1
2

90
150

1 5 ,0 0 0
90
1 ,3 6 0

3 8 1 ,0 0 0

1

30

60

1

220

1 3 ,3 0 0

2 5 9 ,0 0 0
6 0 7 ,0 0 0
3 ,8 0 0
6, 890

1

20

20

-

-

5 1 ,8 7 0

“

-

9 0 5 ,0 0 0

48

3, 900

2 7 ,2 0 0

12

750

5, 650

470
6 7 ,7 0 0
8 0 ,3 0 0

830
2 7 7 ,0 0 0
3 5 7 ,0 0 0

3
3
6

530
230
200

2 ,6 3 0
2, 340
6, 020

2
2

50
40

1, 390
60

65

4 9 ,5 0 0

2 3 2 ,0 0 0

8

710

3, 700

-

35
1
17
2

5, 660
20
4 , 860
20

1 7 ,7 0 0
460
2 0 ,2 0 0
190

5
1
4
18

100
40
160
1 ,9 3 0

280
360
550
1 1 ,3 0 0

4
2
1
1

-

-

30
130
20
490

640
1, 580
30
1, 960

1 Stoppages affecting more than 1 industry group have been counted in each group affected; workers involved and man-days idle were
allocated to the respective groups.
2 Includes other finished products made from fabrics and similar materials.
3

E xcludes ordnance,

m ac h in ery ,

and transp ortation equipm ent.

4 Includes professional, scientific, and controlling instruments; photographic and optical goods; watches and clocks.
5 Idleness in 1965 resulting from a stoppage that began in 1964.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




Appendix B. Scope, Methods, and Definitions1
Work Stoppage Statistics
The Bureau's statistics are intended to include all work stoppages occurring in the
United States involving as many as six workers and lasting the equivalent of a full day or
shift or longer.
Definitions
Strike or Lockout. A strike is defined as a temporary stoppage of work by a group
of employees (not necessarily members of a union) to express a grievance or enforce a
demand. A lockout is a temporary withholding of work from a group of employees by an
employer (or group of employers) in order to induce the employees to accept the employer's
terms. Because of the complexities involved in most labor-management disputes, the Bureau
makes no effort to determine whether the stoppages are initiated by the workers or the
employers. The terms "strik e" and "work stoppage" are used interchangeably in this bulletin.
Workers and Idleness. Figures on "workers involved" and "man-days idle" include
all workers made idle for one shift or longer in establishments directly involved in a stop­
page. * They do not measure secondary idleness— that is, the effects of a stoppage on other
2
establishments or industries whose employees may be made idle as a result of material or
service shortages.
The total number of workers involved in strikes in a given year includes workers
counted more than once if they were involved in more than one stoppage during that year.
(Thus, in 1949, 365,000 to 400,000 coal miners struck on three different occasions; they
accounted for 1.15 million of the year's total of 3.03 million workers.)
In some prolonged stoppages, it is necessary to estimate in part the total man-days
of idleness if the exact number of workers idle each day is not known. Significant changes
in the number of workers idle are secured from the parties for use in computing man-days
of idleness.
Idleness as Percent of Total Working Time. In computing the number of workers
involved in strikes as a percent of total employment and idleness as a percent of total
working time, the following figures for total employment have been used;
From 1927 to 1950, all employees were counted, except those in occupations and
professions in which little, if any, union organization existed or in which stoppages
rarely, if ever, occurred. In most industries, all wage and salary workers were in­
cluded except those in executive, managerial, or high supervisory positions, or those
performing professional work the nature of which made union organization or group
action unlikely. The figure excluded all self-employed persons; domestic workers;
workers on farms employing fewer than six persons; all Federal and State Government
employees; and officials, both elected and appointed, in local governments.
Beginning in 1951, the Bureau's estimates
establishments, exclusive of government, have
basis of nonagricultural employment (exclusive
than one-tenth of a percentage point from that

of total employment in nonagricultural
been used. Idleness computed on the
of government) usually differs by less
obtained by the former method, while

More detailed information is available in BLS Handbook o f Methods for Surveys and Studies, BLS Bulletin 1458 (1966), ch. 19.
This bulletin contains a revision o f ch. 12 in Techniques o f Preparing M ajor BLS Statistical Series, BLS Bulletin 1168, (1955).
2 Aggregate figures on workers and strike idleness are rounded to three significant digits. Figures to the right o f the third
significant digit appear as zeros; the last digit is always rounded to zero. To illustrate: an unrounded figure o f 5 ,0 1 4 ,0 0 0 man-days
would appear as 5,0 1 0 ,0 0 0 ; an unrounded total o f 26,457 would be presented as 26,500; and a figure o f 493 workers would appear
as 490.
Totals and percentages, however, are computed from unrounded figures.




43

44
the percentage of workers idle (compared with total employment) differs by about 0.5
of a point. For example, the percentage of workers idle during 1950 computed on the
same base as the figures for earlier years was 6.9# and the percent of idleness was
0.44, compared with 6.3 and 0.40, respectively, computed on the new base.
"Estimated working time" is computed by multiplying the average number of workers
employed during the year by the number of days typically worked by most employees.
In the computations, Saturdays (when customarily not worked), Sundays, and established
holidays as provided in most union contracts are excluded.
Duration. Although only workdays are used in computing man-days of total idleness,
duration is expressed in terms of calendar days, including nonworkdays.
State Data. Stoppages occurring in more than one State are listed separately in
each State affected. The workers and man-days of idleness are allocated among each of
the affected States. 3 The procedures outlined on the preceding page have also been used in
preparing estimates of idleness by State.
Metropolitan Area Data. Information is tabulated separately for the areas that cur­
rently comprise the list of standard metropolitan areas issued by the Bureau of the Budget
in addition to a few communities historically included in the strike series before the standard
metropolitan area list was compiled. The areas to which the strike statistics apply are
those established by the Bureau of the Budget. Information is published only for those areas
in which at least five stoppages were recorded during the year.
Some metropolitan areas include counties in more than one State, and, hence, sta­
tistics for an area may occasionally equal or exceed the total for the State in which the
major city is located. Stoppages in the mining and logging industries are excluded from
metropolitan area data.
Unions Involved. Information includes the union(s) directly participating in the dis­
pute, although the count of workers includes all who are made idle for one shift or longer
in establishments directly involved in the dispute, including members of other unions and
nonunion workers.
Sources of Information
Occurrence of Strikes. Information as to actual or probable existence of work
stoppages is collected from a number of sources. Clippings on labor disputes are obtained
from a comprehensive coverage of daily and weekly newspapers throughout the country. In­
formation is received regularly from the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. Other
sources of information include State boards of mediation and arbitration; research divisions
of State labor departments; local offices of State employment security agencies, channeled
through the Bureau of Employment Security of the U.S. Department of Labor; and trade and
union journals. Some employer associations, companies, and unions also furnish the Bureau
with work stoppage information on a voluntary cooperative basis either as stoppages occur
or periodically.
Respondents to Questionnaire. A questionnaire is mailed to the parties reported as
involved in work stoppages to obtain information on the number of workers involved, duration,
major issues, location, method of settlement, and other pertinent information.
Limitations of Data. Although the Bureau seeks to obtain complete coverage, i.e.,
a "census" of all strikes involving six workers or more and lasting a full shift or more,
information is undoubtedly missing on some of the smaller strikes. Presumably, allowance
for these missing strikes would not substantially affect the figures for number of workers
and man-days of idleness.

The same procedure is follow ed in allocating data on stoppages occurring in more than one industry, industry group, or
metropolitan area.




45
In its efforts to improve the completeness of the count of stoppages, the Bureau has
sought to develop new sources of information as to the probable existence of such stoppages.
Over the years, these sources have probably increased the number of strikes recorded, but
have had little effect on the number of workers or total idleness.
Beginning in m id -1950, a new source of strike "lead s"'w as added through a coop­
erative arrangement with the Bureau of Employment Security of the U.S. Department of
Labor by which local offices of State employment security agencies supply monthly reports
on work stoppages coming to their attention. It is estimated that this increased the number
of strikes reported in 1950 by about 5 percent, and in 1951 and 1952, by approximately
10 percent. Since most of these stoppages were small, they increased the number of workers
involved and man-days of idleness by less than 2 percent in 1950 and by less than 3 percent
in 1951 and 1952. Tests of the effect of this added source of information have not been
made since 1952.
As new local agencies having knowledge of the existence of work stoppages are
established or changes are made in their collection methods, every effort is made to e s­
tablish cooperative arrangements with them.




* U.S. GOt

IINTING OFFICE : IM G O— 23G-S27

Recent Work Stoppage Studies
Analysis of Work Stoppages,

1964 (BLS Bulletin 1460, 1965), price 40 cents.

Analysis of Work Stoppages,

1963 (BLS Bulletin 1420, 1964), price 35 cents.

Analysis of Work Stoppages,

1962 (BLS Bulletin 1381, 1963), price 40 cents.

Analysis of Work Stoppages,

1961 (BLS Bulletin 1339, 1962), price 35 cents.

Analysis of Work Stoppages,

I960 (BLS Bulletin 1302, 1961), price 30 cents.

Analysis of Work Stoppages,

1959 (BLS Bulletin 1278, I960), price 40 cents.

The Dimensions of Major Work Stoppages, 1947— (BLS Bulletin 1298, 1961), price 30 cents.
59
National Emergency Disputes Under the Labor-Management Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act,
1947— (BLS Bulletin 1482, 1966), price 40 cents.
65
Work Stoppages: Aircraft and Parts Industry, 1927— (BLS Report 175, 1961), free.
59
Work Stoppages: Basic Steel Industry, 1901— (BLS Report 206, 1961), free.
60
Work Stoppages: Water Transportation Industry, 1927— (BLS Report 176, 1961), free.
59
Work Stoppages: Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Equipment Industry, 1927—
58
(BLS Report 148, 1959), free.
Work Stoppages by States, 1927— (BLS Report 256, 1963), free.
62
Work Stoppages: Contract Construction Industry, 1927— (BLS Report 207, 1962), free.
60
Work Stoppages: Meat Products Industry, 1927— (BLS Report 214, 1962), free.
60
Work Stoppages: Electrical Machinery, Equipment, and Supplies Industry, 1927—
60
(BLS Report 213, 1962), free.
Work Stoppages: Metropolitan Areas, 1952— (BLS Report 236, revised May 1963), free.
62
Work Stoppages: Government Employees, 1942— (BLS Report 247, 1963), free.
61

(For a listing o f other industrial relations studies, write for

A Directory of BLS Studies in Industrial Relations, 1954—
65)





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