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Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
2200 N. PEARL ST.
DALLAS, TX 75201-2272

March 24, 2005
Notice 05-17
TO: The Chief Executive Officer of each state member
bank, holding company and others concerned
in the Eleventh Federal Reserve District
SUBJECT
Interagency FAQs on the Agencies’ Appraisal Regulations and
Interagency Statement on Independence of Appraisal and
Evaluation Functions
DETAILS
In response to questions from regulated institutions about the agencies’ real estate
appraisal regulations, the Federal Reserve and the other federal banking agencies have issued a
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) document. The FAQs address common questions on the
requirements of the appraisal regulations and the October 2003 Interagency Statement on
Independence of Appraisal and Evaluation Functions.
ATTACHMENTS
Copies of the Board’s SR letter 05-5 dated March 22, 2005, and the interagency document are attached.
MORE INFORMATION
For more information, please contact Gary Krumm, Banking Supervision Department,
(214) 922-6218. Paper copies of this notice or previous Federal Reserve Bank notices can be
printed from our web site at www.dallasfed.org/banking/notices/index.html.

For additional copies, bankers and others are encouraged to use one of the following toll-free numbers in contacting the Federal
Reserve Bank of Dallas: Dallas Office (800) 333-4460; El Paso Branch Intrastate (800) 592-1631, Interstate (800) 351-1012;
Houston Branch Intrastate (800) 392-4162, Interstate (800) 221-0363; San Antonio Branch Intrastate (800) 292-5810.

BOARD OF GOVERNORS
OF THE
FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20551
DIVISION OF
BANKING
SUPERVISION AND
REGULATION

SR 05-5
March 22, 2005
TO THE OFFICER IN CHARGE OF SUPERVISION AND APPROPRIATE
SUPERVISORY AND EXAMINATION STAFF AT EACH FEDERAL
RESERVE BANK AND TO BANKING ORGANIZATIONS SUPERVISED
BY THE FEDERAL RESERVE
SUBJECT:

Interagency FAQs on the Agencies' Appraisal Regulations and
Interagency Statement on Independence of Appraisal and
Evaluation Functions

In response to questions from regulated institutions about the agencies'
real estate appraisal regulations, the Federal Reserve and the other federal banking
agencies are issuing the attached Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) document.
The FAQs address common questions on the requirements of the appraisal
regulations and the October 2003 Interagency Statement on Independence of
Appraisal and Evaluation Functions.1 The FAQ topics include:
Selecting an appraiser
Ordering an appraisal
Accepting a transferred appraisal
Reviewing appraisals
Evaluation and other appraisal topics
Reserve Banks are asked to provide a copy of this letter and the FAQs
to the state member banks and bank holding companies in their districts and to
appropriate supervision staff. Questions concerning the Federal Reserve's appraisal
regulation and related guidance should be directed to Ms. Virginia Gibbs, Senior
Supervisory Financial Analyst, at 202-452-2521.
Richard Spillenkothen
Director

Attachment
Cross References: SR letters 94-55 and 03-18
Notes:
1.
Regulated institutions should refer to the Board's appraisal regulations

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(12 CFR 208 subpart E and 12 CFR 225 subpart G) and related guidance,
including: SR letter 94-55, Interagency Appraisal and Evaluation Guidelines
– October 1994,
(http://www.federalreserve.gov/boarddocs/SRLETTERS/1994/SR9455.HTM)
and SR letter 03-18, Interagency Statement on Independent Appraisal and
Evaluation Functions,
(http://www.federalreserve.gov/boarddocs/SRLETTERS/2003/sr0318.htm)

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Office of the Comptroller of the Currency
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Office of Thrift Supervision
National Credit Union Administration
Frequently Asked Questions on the Appraisal Regulations
and the Interagency Statement 1 on
Independent Appraisal and Evaluation Functions
March 22, 2005
The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the Board of Governors of the Federal
Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Office of Thrift Supervision and
the National Credit Union Administration (the agencies) prepared this document in response to
questions from federally regulated institutions (regulated institutions) on existing standards for
selecting appraisers, ordering appraisals, accepting transferred appraisals, and other related
topics. It should be reviewed in conjunction with the agencies’ appraisal regulations, the
“Interagency Appraisal and Evaluation Guidelines” (interagency guidelines), dated October 27,
1994, and the joint statement “Independent Appraisal and Evaluation Functions” (independence
statement), dated October 28, 2003.
SELECTING AN APPRAISER AND ORDERING AN APPRAISAL
1. Do the interagency guidelines and independence statement apply for ordering and reviewing
appraisals if the collateral property is residential (mortgage or home equity) rather than
commercial?
Answer: The agencies’ guidance applies to both commercial and residential transactions.
While the guidance does not differentiate between commercial and residential transactions, a
regulated institution’s appraisal policy and practices may differ for certain transactions. The
regulated institution needs to consider the type of transaction when ordering appraisals,
selecting appraisers, and reviewing appraisals. The transaction type should influence the
type of appraisal that the regulated institution orders and whether the appraisal is eligible for
a compliance review or should receive a comprehensive, analytical review prior to the credit
decision. Moreover, for all lending activity, a regulated institution should ensure that
independence is maintained when selecting appraisers, ordering appraisals, and reviewing
appraisals.
2.

A regulated institution plans to make a construction loan to a tract developer to build
10 homes. Is it permissible for the developer to order appraisals on the properties and use
them to support the construction loan request? Could the developer select an appraiser from

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See OCC: AL 2003-9; FRB: SR letter 03-18; FDIC: FIL-84-2003; OTS: CEO letter 184; and
NCUA: LTCU 03-CU-17.
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the lender’s approved appraiser list and in turn submit the appraiser’s name to potential
permanent lenders?
Answer: No, the regulated institution may not accept a borrower-ordered appraisal and may
not allow the borrower to select an appraiser from its approved appraiser list.
3. Who should be considered the loan production staff for purposes of achieving appraiser
independence? Could loan production staff select an appraiser?
Answer: The loan production staff consists of those responsible for generating loan volume
or approving loans, as well as their subordinates. This would include any employee whose
compensation is based on loan volume. Employees responsible for the credit administration
function or credit risk management are not considered loan production staff.
Loan production staff should not select appraisers. However, in a small or rural institution or
branch, the only individual qualified to analyze the real estate collateral may also be a loan
officer, other officer, or director of the institution. To ensure their independence, such
lending officials, officers, and directors should abstain from any vote or approval involving
loans for which they engaged the appraiser, reviewed the appraisal, or performed an
evaluation.
4. What information should the regulated institution provide to the appraiser upon
engagement?
Answer: The regulated institution should provide the property’s address, its description, and
any other relevant information. The regulated institution may also provide a copy of the
sales contract for purchase transactions. However, the information provided by the regulated
institution should not unduly influence the appraiser or in any way suggest the property’s
value. The regulated institution and the appraiser should agree on the scope of the appraisal
in advance, consistent with the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice
(USPAP) and the agencies’ appraisal regulations and interagency guidelines.
5. When selecting residential appraisers, may loan production staff use a revolving preapproved appraiser list, provided the list is not under their control?
Answer: Yes, loan production staff may use a revolving, board-approved list to select a
residential appraiser, provided the development and maintenance of the list is not under their
control. Staff responsible for the development and maintenance of the list should be
independent of the loan production process. In developing the list, a regulated institution
should consider the knowledge and expertise of the selected appraiser for a given assignment.
For example, the list should indicate the qualifications of the appraiser to perform appraisals
in particular markets and on various types of residential property transactions. If the next
available name on the list is not selected, the departure should be properly documented in the
credit file. The administrative procedures should include a process for qualifying an
appraiser for initial placement on the list as well as for periodic monitoring of the appraiser’s
performance to assess whether to retain an appraiser on the list. Further, there should be
periodic internal review of the appraiser selection process to ensure that appropriate
procedures are being followed and that controls exist to ensure independence.
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6. Must the individual appraiser, rather than the appraisal firm, sign and accept the terms of an
engagement letter for it to be considered valid?
Answer: The agencies have no specific requirements with respect to who signs and accepts
the engagement letter. The appraiser, however, must sign the certification page of the
appraisal report.
7. Are appraisers required to disclose whether they have been engaged to appraise a given
property in the past or is this information confidential?
Answer: The agencies’ appraisal regulations do not require that the regulated institution
obtain information from appraisers as to whether they have previously appraised a given
property. However, the regulations do require when engaging a fee appraiser that the
regulated institution ensures that the appraiser has no direct or indirect interest, financial or
otherwise, in the property or the transaction. The regulated institution should ask relevant
questions of an appraiser to ensure that the appraiser is independent of the transaction and
capable of rendering an unbiased opinion.
8. When ordering appraisals, can a staff appraiser or an appraisal company affiliated with the
regulated institution be considered independent since the regulated institution compensates
them?
Answer: Yes, if a staff appraiser prepares an appraisal, that appraiser must be independent
of the lending, investment, and collections functions and not involved in the approval of the
transaction. When fee appraisers from an affiliated appraisal company prepare appraisals,
similar independence standards apply.

ACCEPTING A TRANSFERRED APPRAISAL
9. Can a regulated institution accept an appraisal from a prospective borrower and determine
its acceptability based on a review?
Answer: No, a regulated institution cannot accept a borrower-ordered appraisal.
10. Can an appraisal be transferred from one lender to another and, if so, under what
circumstances?
Answer: A regulated institution may accept an appraisal transferred from another regulated
institution or from a financial services institution (that is, a non-regulated institution),
provided 1) the appraiser is engaged directly by the institution transferring the appraisal,
2) the appraiser has no direct or indirect interest in the property or transaction, 3) the existing
appraisal or evaluation remains valid, and 4) the regulated institution determines that the
appraisal conforms to the agencies’ appraisal requirements and interagency guidelines and is
otherwise appropriate. (A financial services institution describes entities that provide
services in connection with real estate lending transactions on an ongoing basis.)
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Regulated institutions are expected to perform a more thorough review when accepting an
appraisal from another financial services institution to confirm that the appraisal complies
with the regulation and has sufficient information to support the lending decision. Moreover,
the regulated institution accepting the appraisal should determine whether appropriate
documentation is available to confirm that the financial services institution (not the borrower)
ordered the appraisal.
11. Can a regulated institution accept an appraisal prepared by an appraiser who was engaged
by a loan broker?
Answer: The agencies’ appraisal regulations allow a regulated institution to accept an
appraisal prepared by an appraiser engaged by another financial services institution,
including a loan broker. This is allowed as long as the regulated institution has appropriate
controls in place to ensure that the appraiser is acting on behalf of the financial services
institution, the appraisal conforms to the requirements of the regulation and is otherwise
acceptable, and the appraiser is independent from the borrower. Regulated institutions
should review broker-ordered appraisals thoroughly to ensure that the appraisal complies
with the regulation and meets the quality standards required by the institution’s appraisal
policies.
12. May an appraisal be readdressed to a regulated institution from the borrower or another
institution?
Answer: A regulated institution cannot accept an appraisal that has been readdressed or
altered by the appraiser with the intent to conceal that the original client was the borrower.
Readdressing appraisals to conceal the original client, whether the client is a borrower or
another financial services institution, is misleading and violates the agencies’ regulations and
USPAP.
13. May an appraisal be routed from one lender to a regulated institution via the borrower?
Answer: A regulated institution cannot accept an appraisal from the borrower unless the
regulated institution can confirm that the appraisal was in fact ordered by another regulated
institution or financial services institution. In accepting the appraisal, the regulated
institution must also confirm that the appraiser is independent of the transaction and that the
appraisal conforms to the agencies’ appraisal regulations and is otherwise acceptable.
14. Can a borrower pay the appraiser directly for an appraisal that is ordered by the lender?
Answer: Since the regulated institution has engaged the appraiser for its services, the
regulated institution should be the party to remit payment to the appraiser. The regulated
institution may seek reimbursement from the borrower for the cost of the appraisal.
However, the borrower may not recommend an appraiser to the institution or select the
appraiser.

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15. Can an appraiser deliver an appraisal report to more than one lender assuming the
appraisal has been ordered by one of the lenders?
Answer: The agencies’ appraisal regulations do not address whether an appraiser can
deliver an appraisal report to more than one lender. The case may depend upon the
provisions of the engagement letter. For example, the lender may specify in the engagement
letter that the appraisal may be provided to another financial institution if the lender decides
not to go forward on the loan. In the case of a syndicated loan, a lead lender is usually
responsible for engaging the appraiser and providing copies of the appraisal to the other
participating financial institutions. With regard to standards of confidentiality, USPAP
directs an appraiser to be aware of, and comply with, all confidentiality and privacy laws and
regulations applicable in an assignment.
16. Can the regulated institution accept an appraisal prepared by an appraiser who is a family
member of the loan broker who engaged him/her?
Answer: The agencies’ appraisal regulations do not address family relationships between
the appraiser and the person who engages the appraiser. However, the agencies’ appraisal
regulations do not permit a regulated institution to accept an appraisal in which the appraiser
has a direct or indirect interest, financial or otherwise, in the property or the transaction.
Therefore, the regulated institution should review appraisals where a potential conflict of
independence may exist and should accept the appraisal only if it can determine that the
appraiser is independent of the transaction.
17. Can the regulated institution accept an appraisal prepared by an appraiser who is engaged
by a financial services institution with whom the appraiser has an affiliated business
relationship?
Answer: The business relationship between the financial services institution and the
appraiser may not necessarily violate the independence requirement of the agencies’
appraisal regulations. However, the agencies’ appraisal regulations do not permit a regulated
institution to accept an appraisal in which the appraiser has a direct or indirect interest,
financial or otherwise, in the property or the transaction. The regulated institution should
evaluate the financial services institution’s controls to ensure independence and that there is
appropriate separation of responsibilities and reporting lines between the appraiser and the
financial services institution’s lending function.
18. How can a regulated institution ensure appraiser independence when accepting an appraisal
prepared for a financial services institution?
Answer: Documentation (that is, an engagement letter) should be available to indicate that
the financial services institution (not the borrower) ordered the appraisal and that the
appraiser has no direct or indirect interest, financial or otherwise, in the property or the
transaction. The original lender’s engagement letter to the appraiser should be made part of
the appraisal report to provide additional information on the identity of the client in order to
ensure independence in the appraisal process.

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REVIEWING APPRAISALS

19. Should all appraisals undergo a compliance review?
Answer: Yes, prior to a final credit decision, regulated institutions should perform a
compliance review on all appraisals to confirm that they comply with the minimum appraisal
standards as outlined in the agencies’ appraisal regulations, the interagency guidelines, and
the independence statement. Loan administration files should document this compliance
review, which may be in checklist or narrative format. In addition, certain appraisals should
be reviewed more comprehensively to assess the technical quality of the appraiser’s analysis
prior to making a final credit decision. The regulated institution should establish guidelines
for a more detailed, technical review based on transaction risk, transaction size, or other
criteria. (See “Program Compliance” in the interagency guidelines.)
20. Can a regulated institution approve a loan subject to receipt and review of an appraisal, or
must the appraisal be obtained and reviewed prior to making the final decision?
Answer: A regulated institution may grant conditional approvals to prospective borrowers
before obtaining an appraisal. However, a final credit decision or action should only occur
after the regulated institution receives, reviews, and accepts the appraisal.
21. What qualifications would constitute a “qualified and adequately trained individual” for the
purpose of conducting appraisal reviews?
Answer: Individuals who review appraisals as part of a regulated institution’s internal
compliance function should be independent of the transaction and possess the requisite
education, expertise, and competence to perform the review commensurate with the
complexity of the transaction.

EVALUATION AND OTHER APPRAISAL TOPICS

22. Can an otherwise qualified individual prepare an evaluation of a property securing a loan
that will be approved by his/her direct supervisor? Can one officer perform an evaluation
for another if they are both members of a loan committee, provided the evaluating officer
abstains from voting? Could the lending officer or branch manager in a small, regulated
institution perform the evaluation if he/she abstains from the final loan approval?
Answer: To maintain independence, the individual preparing an evaluation should not
directly report to someone involved in loan production. In a small, regulated institution
where absolute lines of independence cannot be achieved, one officer may perform an
evaluation for another as long as the evaluating officer abstains from the lending decision.

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23. Do the interagency guidelines apply only to loans in excess of $250,000? Is the $250,000
threshold the loan amount or the property value?
Answer: The interagency guidelines apply to all real-estate-related financial transactions
regardless of size or whether loans are for a regulated institution’s own portfolio, held for
sale, or held in asset-backed conduits. However, the agencies’ appraisal regulations allow
regulated institutions to use an appropriate evaluation of the real estate in lieu of an appraisal
for transactions with a value of $250,000 or less, business loans $1 million or less, or
subsequent transactions (transactions involving an existing extension of credit at the lending
institution). The regulations define transaction value as the amount of the loan or extension
of credit, not the value of the property. The interagency guidelines contain minimum
standards for evaluation content and address the qualifications of individuals performing
evaluations.
[Note: NCUA’s business loan evaluation threshold is $250,000 or less. (12 CFR Part
722.3(b)(2)]
24. Should a regulated institution comply with the independence requirements if an appraisal is
not required by the agencies’ appraisal regulations?
Answer: A regulated institution should ensure independence in the ordering process for an
appraisal even if the appraisal was not required under the agencies’ appraisal regulations.
Regulated institutions should also maintain independence for evaluations.
25. Does a tax-assessment value from the local taxing authority constitute an evaluation? Can a
loan officer who approves and/or recommends a loan conduct an evaluation if the market
value that the officer develops in the evaluation does not exceed the tax-assessment value?
Answer: A value from the taxing authority alone is insufficient to be considered an
evaluation. An evaluation report should include calculations, supporting assumptions, and, if
utilized, a discussion of comparable sales. If tax assessment information is used as part of an
evaluation, the regulated institution should document the facts and analysis used to
demonstrate that there is a valid correlation between the assessed values of the taxing
authority and the property’s market value. In addition, an evaluation should describe the real
estate collateral, its condition, and its current and projected use.
A regulated institution should ensure that an individual who performs an evaluation is
independent of the loan production function. Simply restricting the size of a transaction to
less than the tax-assessed value alone does not comply with the agencies’ appraisal
regulations or the interagency guidelines, which address standards of independence. (See
“Independence of the Appraisal and Evaluation Function” in the interagency guidelines.)

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26. The work-out plan on a $5 million problem loan calls for a regulated institution to receive an
assignment of a $2 million note from the borrower’s relative secured by a deed of trust on a
different property. Is this financial transaction considered real-estate-related and is an
appraisal required on the collateral property?
Answer: Yes, this is considered a real-estate-related financial transaction. The agencies’
appraisal regulations and interagency guidelines allow for an evaluation in lieu of an
appraisal on new real estate collateral in certain loan workout situations depending on loan
quality, collateral quality, and validity of an existing appraisal or evaluation. (See
“Renewals, Refinancings and Other Subsequent Transactions” in the interagency guidelines.)
27. What is the useful life of an appraisal?
Answer: The useful life of an appraisal varies with market conditions and property type.
The agencies allow a regulated institution to use an existing appraisal to support a subsequent
transaction if the institution documents that the existing value estimate remains valid.
Factors which could impact the value include the passage of time; the volatility of the local
market; the availability of financing; the inventory of competing properties; improvements
to, or lack of maintenance of, the subject property or competing surrounding properties;
changes in zoning; or environmental contamination. (See “Valid Appraisals and
Evaluations” in the interagency guidelines.)
28. Can a regulated institution advance new funds without a new appraisal if the value of the
total loan continues to be supported by an existing appraisal and is consistent with
supervisory LTV limits? Does the age of the appraisal matter if the physical condition of the
property and the market conditions have not changed?
Answer: A regulated institution may use an existing appraisal or evaluation to support a
subsequent transaction, as long as the credit file documents the facts and analysis that support
the institution’s conclusion that the appraisal or evaluation remains valid. Criteria for
determining whether an existing appraisal or evaluation remains valid will vary depending
upon the condition of the property and the marketplace and the nature of any subsequent
transaction.

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102