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Occupational n
Injuries
and Illnesses
by Industry
July 1 - December 31,1971
Bulletin 1798
U.S. DEPARTM ENT OF LABO R
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1973




^

1

Occupational
Injuries
and Illnesses
by Industry
July 1 - December 31,1971
B ulletin 1798
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Peter J. Brennan, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

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Preface
The William-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health A ct o f 1970 effected a new system
o f recording and reporting work-related injuries and illnesses. Survey reports are based on
employers’ records o f recordable cases which resulted in death, illness, or injury other than
minor first aid or which involved actual loss o f time from work. Data were collected
under the new legislation for a 6-month period from July 1 through December 31, 1971,
but the incidence rates reflect the relative level o f injuries and illnesses for all o f 1971.
Estimates in the future will cover the entire year.
This bulletin was prepared in the Office o f the Assistant Commissioner for Occupa­
tional Safety and Health Statistics, Thomas J. McArdle. The buUetin was prepared by the
staff o f the Division o f Periodic Surveys, under the general direction o f William Mead.
Collection and tabulation o f the data were directed by Jimmie Petersen o f the Office o f
Statistical Operations and Procedures, with cooperation o f the Regional Offices o f the
Bureau o f Labor Statistics.




hi




Contents
Page
Results o f survey o f occupational injuries and illnesses

................................ ......................................................

1

Incidence r a te s .................................................................................................................................................
Number o f injuries and illnesses .....................................................................................................................
Time lost due to occupational injuries and illnesses .........................................................................................

1
2
2

Tables
1. Recordable occupational injury and illness incidence rates, private nonfarm sector, by industry..............

10

2.

Recordable occupational injury and illness incidence rates, private nonfarm sector, by size
o f employment and industry division .......................................................................................................

11

3.

Average lost workdays per lost workday case, private nonfarm sector, by in du stry...................................

12

4a. Recordable occupational injuries and illnesses, and lost workdays, private nonfarm sector,
by industry division and extent o f case .....................................................................................................
4b. Recordable occupational injuries, and lost workdays, private nonfarm sector, by industry

13

division and extent o f case ..................................................
4c. Recordable occupational illnesses, and lost workdays, private nonfarm sector, by industry

13

division and extent o f ca s e .........................................................................................................................
Recordable occupational illnesses, and lost workdays, private nonfarm sector, by type

5.

14

and extent o f case ......................................................................................................................................... 14
Charts
1.

Percentage o f reporting units solicited, by in du stry....................................................................................

2.

Percentage o f reporting units solicited, by number o f employees

.............................. * ............................

3

3.
4.

Incidence rates o f recordable injuries and illnesses, by type and industry .................................................
Incidence rates o f recordable injuries and illnesses, by type o f manufacturing activity........ ......................

3

5.

Number o f injuries and illnesses, by type and industry .............................................................................

4
5
6

6.
7.

Distribution o f employment, occupational injuries and illnesses, and deaths, by in du stry........................
Lost workday cases and lost workdays, by industry .................................................................................

7
8

8.

Distribution o f illnesses, by type

9

.............................................................................................................

State data on occupational injuries and illnesses..................................................................................................... 15
Iowa: Recordable occupational injury and illness incidence rates, and average lost workdays
per lost workday case, contract construction and manufacturing ............................................................. 16
Oklahoma: Recordable occupational injury and illness incidence rates, and average lost
workdays per lost workday case, manufacturing, and medical and other health services............................ 16
South Carolina: Recordable occupational injury and illness incidence rates by industry, and
average lost workdays per lost workday case, manufacturing....................................................................... 17
Wyoming: Recordable occupational injury and illness incidence rates, and average lost workdays
per lost workday case, by industry

.............................................................................................................

17

Appendixes
A. Background o f the recordkeeping and reporting systems promulgated under the
Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act o f 1970 ...................................................................
B.

18

Scope o f the survey and technical notes

20

...................................................................................................

C.

OSH A No. 103 report and instructions .....................................................................................................

21

D.

Statistical grant agencies participating in the 1971 s u rv e y .........................................................................

26

E.

Glossary o f terms for the Occupational Safety and Health S u rvey.............................................................

29




v




Results of Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses
Incidence rates

which has characterized this industry since 1958 has con­
tinued and was primarily responsible for its selection by

For all recordable cases in the private nonfarm sector,

the Occupational Safety and Health Administration

the incidence rate, which is calculated on the number o f

(O SH A) as one o f the five target industries. (The Target

injuries and illnesses per 100 man-years o f work, was
12.1. This means that if injuries and illnesses occurred
during the first half o f 1971 at the same rate as the last
half o f the year, then, on the average, one injury or illness

Industry Program is designed to make an immediate im­
pact on safety and health problems by concentrating ef­
forts on five industries having the highest injury-frequency
rates over the years. Besides lumber and wood products,

would have occurred for every 9 man-years worked. Inci­
dence rates by industry division ranged from 2.9 in fi­
nance, insurance, and real estate to 22.4 for contract
construction. (See table 1.) The incidence rate for lost
workday cases also ranged from 1.0 in finance, insurance,
and real estate to 6.8 in contract construction. This rate

these industries are roofing and sheet metal; meat and
meat products; miscellaneous transportation equipment;
and marine cargo handling.)
Among the 21 major industry groups within the divi­
sion, 11 had incidence rates below the level for all manu­
facturing. O f these, the ordnance industry, which includes
activities usually regarded as extremely hazardous, had
one o f the lowest rates— 8.1. Ten industries, on the
other hand, had rates higher than the total manufacturing
level— lumber and wood products; furniture and fixtures;

reflects themore serious injury and illness cases. Incidence
rates for nonfatal cases without lost workdays were more
than twice the rate for lost workday cases. For the pri­
vate nonfarm sector, for example, the rate for nonfatal
cases without lost workdays was 8.4, whereas the rate for

stone, clay, and glass products; primary metal industries;
fabricated metal products; machinery except electrical;
transportation equipment; food and kindred products;
paper and allied products; and rubber and plastic prod­
ucts, n.e.c. (See chart 4.) For the manufacturing sector,
as a whole, the incidence rate o f nonfatal cases without
lost workdays was nearly 3 times as high as the rate for
lost workday cases.

lost workday cases was only 3.7; in manufacturing, the
rates were 12.4 and 4.3, respectively; in finance, insur­
ance, and real estate, the rates were 1.8 and 1.0. Differ­
ence in incidence rates by employment size was evident.
Generally, the highest rates occurred in reporting units
having between 100 and 249 employees. Rates tended to
decrease as employment size became larger than 249 or
fewer than 100. (See table 2.)
The incidence rate for all recordable injuries and ill­
nesses in the contract construction industry was 22.4 per
100 man-years worked, or about one injury or illness for

Selected nonmanufacturing industry divisions had
lower rates than contract construction and manufactur­
ing. Transportation and public utilities had a rate o f 12.1
per 100 man-years worked, followed by wholesale and
retail trade (8.7), services (7.3), and finance, insurance,
and real estate (2.9). O f the 2-digit nonmanufacturing
industry groups for which incidence rates are published,
only nine had rates above the rate o f 12.1 for all indus­

about every 5 man-years worked. General building con­
tractors had the highest rate, 24.7 per 100 man-years
worked, and special trade contractors the lowest, 21.1;
the rate for heavy construction contractors was 22.1. In
all these major groups, the incidence rate o f nonfatal
cases without lost time was more then twice as high as
the rate for lost workday cases.

tries surveyed— water transportation with 23.1; trucking

Recordable injuries and illnesses in manufacturing in­

and warehousing with 19.3; agricultural services, forestry,
and fisheries with 16.9; oil and gas extraction with 14.8;

dustries occurred at a rate o f 16.7 per 100 man-years

building materials and farm equipment with 14.6; mis­

worked, almost 30 percent higher than the rate o f 12.1

cellaneous repair services with 14.5; transportation by

for the total private nonfarm sector surveyed. Overall

air with 13.6; food stores with 13.5; and electric, gas, and

incidence rates for the major industry groups (2-digit

sanitary services with 12.4. Among these groups, the in­

SIC) within manufacturing ranged from 7.6 in apparel

cidence o f occupational injuries and illnesses ranged from

and other textile products to 27.6 in lumber and wood

one occurrence for each 200 man-years worked in legal

products. The high rate for lumber and wood products

services to one occurrence for each 4 man-years worked




1

in water transportation. The group showing the highest
incidence rate, water transportation, includes one o f the
target industries— marine cargo handling.
Incidence rates for nonfatal cases without lost work­
days in nonmanufacturing were frequently 2 to 3 times

cent o f which were in trucking and warehousing. In fin­
ance, insurance, and real estate, more than 80 percent o f
the nearly 250 deaths were in the real estate industry.
Occupational injuries accounted for 95 percent o f all
recordable cases; the other 5 percent were occupational

the rate for lost workday cases. For example, in miscel­
laneous repair services, the rate for nonfatal cases with­

illnesses. (See tables 4b and 4c.) Over one-third o f the ill­
nesses were occupational skin diseases and disorders. (See

out lost workdays was 10.7, whereas the rate for lost

table 5.) It is believed that some illnesses o f occupational

workday cases was only 3.8. Differences in incidence

origin may not be recognized and therefore may not be re­
flected in the statistics.

rates also were apparent between employers who have
different size work forces. In general, however, incidence
rates were lowest in reporting units having fewer than 50

Time lost due to occupational injuries and illnesses

or more than 1,000 employees.
Lost workdays for the survey period totaled 12.2 mil­

Number of injuries and illnesses

lion, not counting fatalities, or about 50,000 equivalent

During the last half o f 1971, an estimated 3.1 million
recordable occupational injuries and illnesses occurred
in the private nonfarm sector; nearly 4,200 o f these re­

man-years o f work. Contract construction and manufac­
turing activities accounted for over 50 percent o f the lost
workdays among the industries surveyed. For all indus­

sulted in fatalities. More than 900,000 cases involved
lost workdays. (See table 4a.) Over 360,000 cases oc­

tries surveyed, the average number o f lost workdays per

curred in contract construction. Estimates show almost

categories o f occupational illnesses, the average lost work­
days per lost workday case ranged from 8 for disorders

lost workday case was 13. (See table 3.) Among the seven

800 job-related deaths and close to one-half o f these
were in the heavy construction industry. Construction

due to physical agents to 29 for disorders due to repeated

industries accounted for about 19 percent o f the fatalities

trauma. (See table 8.)

and nearly 12 percent o f the injuries and illnesses but

In contract construction, an estimated 1.5 million

only 6 percent o f the employment in the private nonfarm

workdays were lost during the 6-month reporting period.
The average number o f lost workdays for each lost work­

sector during the survey period. Within construction,

ployment, manufacturing employers experienced almost

day case was 13 in special trade construction, 14 in gen­
eral building construction, and 15 in heavy construction.
For all construction, the average was 14 per lost workday
case, only slightly higher than that for all industries sur­
veyed, where the average was 13.

50 percent o f all recordable occupational injuries and
illnesses in the private nonfarm sector during the last
half o f 1971. O f the total estimate o f nearly 1.5 million
recordable cases in manufacturing, about one in 1,700
was fatal. These 800 deaths constituted almost 20 percent
o f the total for the private n'onfarm sector surveyed. O f
these, almost 95 percent were deaths due to injury. Four
out o f the 21 industries accounted for about 50 percent
o f the job-related deaths in manufacturing. These were

During the same period, nearly 5 million workdays
were lost in the manufacturing industry, or nearly 20,000
equivalent man-years o f work. Over 25 percent o f the re­
cordable occupational injuries and illnesses resulted in
lost time;eachcase averaged 13 lost workdays, about the
same as for the total private nonfarm sector. The average
for the major industry groups ranged from a high o f 19 in
the petroleum and coal products industry to a low o f 10
in both the apparel and other textile products and the

the food and kindred products, lumber and wood prod­

miscellaneous manufacturing industries.

special trade contractors had almost one-half o f the re­
cordable cases, general building construction one-third,
and heavy construction one-sixth.
Although constituting less than 33 percent o f the em­

ucts, chemicals and allied products, and the primary

An estimated 2.4 million workdays were lost in whole­

metal industries.
More than 1.2 million occupational injuries and ill­

sale and retail trade, 1.3 million in transportation and

nesses occurred in industries other than contract construc­

in finance,insurance, and real estate. The average number

public utilities, 1.6 million in services, and over 200,000

tion and manufacturing. O f these, over 2,500 resulted in

o f lost workdays for each lost workday case varied by in­

deaths. Over one-half o f the 1,000 deaths in wholesale

dustry division from a low o f 12 in wholesale and retail

and retail trade occurred in the automotive dealers and

trade to a high o f 15 in transportation and public utilities.

service stations industry. During the same period, over

Among major industry groups within the nonmanufactur­

600 deaths were estimated for services; over one-third

ing divisions, the average number o f lost workdays varied

the cases occurred in automobile repair services and

widely. For example, in transportation and public utili­

garages. Transportation and public utilities accounted for

ties, the average ranged from 9 in transportation by air

an estimated 500 work-related fatalities, about 40 per­

to 28 days in water transportation.




2

Chart 1.

Percentage of Reporting Units Solicited, by Industry

and public utilities

Chart 2.

Percentage of Reporting Units Solicited, by Number of Employees




100-249

3

Chart 3.

Incidence Rates of Recordable Injuries and Illnesses, by Type and Industry
Rate per 100 man-years worked
40
L o s t w o rkd ay cases
N o nfatal cases w ith o u t
| lost w o rkd ays

30

20

Ail industries




Construction

Manu­
facturing

Transpor­
tation and
public
utilities

4

Wholesale
and retail
trade

Finance,
insurance
and real
estate

Services

Chart 4

Incidence Rates o f Recordable Injuries and Illnesses, by Type o f
M anu factu ring A ctiv ity

5

Incidence rate per 100 man-years worked
10
15
20

25

Manufacturing
Apparel and other textile products
Printing and publishing £
Instruments and related products
Ordnance and accessories
Tobacco manufacturers
R eco rd ab le Illnesses

Electrical equipment and supplies

R eco rd able in juries
R eco rd able injuries and iilnesses

Chemicals and allied products
Petroleum and coal products
Textile mill products
Leather and leather products
Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries

Ed

Paper and allied products
Machinery except electrical
Rubber and plastics products N.E.C.
Food and kindred products
Stone, clay and glass products
Transportation equipment
Furniture and fixtures
Primary metal products
Fabricated metal products
Lumber and wood products




5

30

Chart 5.

Number of Injuries and Illnesses, by Type and Industry
Number in thousands




L o s t w o rkd ay cases
and fatalities

I
I

6

N onfatal w ith o u t
lost w o rkd ay cases

Chart 6.

Distribution of Employment, Occupational Injuries and Illnesses,
and Deaths, by Industry
Percent
50

Manufacturing




Wholesale
and retail
trade

Services

Transportation
and public
utilities

7

Finance,
insurance and
real estate

Contract
construction

Chart 7.

Lost Workday Cases and Lost Workdays, by Industry
Number in thousands

All industry
Construction
Manufacturing
Transportation and
public utilities
Wholesale and
retail trade
Finance, insurance
and real estate
Services




HH
1

1
a __________
i

n
L o s t w o rkd ay cases
L o st w o rkd ays

i
............. i

b
I

1

8

Chart 8.

Distribution of Illnesses, by Type

Category of Illness

40

Dust diseases of the lungs |
Poisoning
Respiratory condition - toxic agents
Disorders due to repeated trauma
Disorders due to physical agents
Skin diseases or disorders
All other illnesses




9

50

Tab le 1. Recordable o ccu p atio n al injury and illn e ss in cid e n ce rates, private nonfarm se cto r, by industry
Incidence rates per 100 m a n -yea rs w orked3

Industry

1971 Annual
SIC a vera g e e m ­
co d e 1 ploym ent (in
thousands)2

56,817.0

P riv a te nonfarm s e c to r5___________
O il and gas extraction --------------------------

L ost
T otal
recordable workday
ca ses4
cases

3. 7

12. 1

In ju ries

Illn esses

Nonfatal
L o st
T otal
cases
record ab le w orkday
without
ca s e s 4
cases
lost
w orkdays

Nonfatal
Total
L o st
case s
record ab le workday
without
case s
c a ses4
lost
workdays

8. 4

11. 5

3. 5

8. 0

0. 6

0. 2

Nonfatal
cases
without
lost
workdays
0. 4

M an u factu rin g______________________________

14. 8

6. 6

8. 1

14. 4

6. 4

7. 9

.4

.2

.2

22. 4

6. 8

15. 5

21. 6

6. 5

15. 0

.8

.3

.5

1,007. 7
716. 2
1,687. 2

24. 7
22. 1
21. 1

7. 3
6. 4
6. 7

17. 3
15. 6
14. 4

24. 0
21. 1
20. 3

7. 0
6. 1
6. 3

16. 9
14. 9
14. 0

.7
1. 0
.8

.3
.3
.4

.4
.7
.4

18,529.0

15
16
17

262. 4
3, 411. 0

13

Contract co n s tru c tio n _____________________
G eneral building con tractors _________
H eavy construction c o n tr a c to r s ______
Special trade c o n tr a c to r s -----------------

In ju ries and illn e s s e s

16. 7

4. 3

12. 4

15. 9

4. 1

11. 8

.8

.2

.6

7.
27.
20.
1922.
24.
17.
10.
20.
7.

1.
9.
5.
5.
5.
6.
3.
2.
3.
1.

6.
17.
15.
14.
17.
18.
13.
7.
16.
6.

1
8
4
3
5
4
6
9
5
0

.6
.5
.7
1. 1
.8
1. 0
.6
.7
1. 1
.5

. 1
. 1
. 1
.3
. 1
.2
. 1
.2
.2
.1

.5
.4
.6
.8
.7
.8
.5
.5
.9
.4

9. 5

.8

.2

.6

Durable goods
Ordnance and a c c e s s o rie s ____________
Lu m ber and wood products____________
Fu rniture and fix t u r e s _______ ____ _____
Stone, clay and glass products________
P r im a r y m etal in d u s trie s _____________
F ab ricated m etal p ro d u cts ____________
M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l _________
E le c tr ic a l equipment and su p p lies ____
Tran sportation equipm ent_____________
Instrum ents and rela ted p rod u cts____
M iscellan eou s m anufacturing
industries _____________________________

19
24
25
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

192. 1
580. 8
458. 5
633. 7
1,227. 4
1, 328.2
1,805. 3
1,768.5
1, 723. 9
437. 0

8. 1
27. 6
21.6
21. 0
23. 6
25. 6
17. 8
10. 7
21. 5
8. 1

1. 5
9. 4
5. 6
5. 9
5.4
6. 4
3. 7
2. 3
4. 1
1. 7

6.
18.
16.
15.
18.
19.
14.
8.
17.
6.

6
2
0
1
2
2
1
4
4
4

5
1
9
9
8
6
2
0
4
6

4
3
5
6
3
2
6
1
9
6

39

409. 6

13. 9

3. 8

10. 1

13. 1

3. 6

20
21
22
23
26
27
28
29

1,758.3
76. 3
957. 0
1,335.7
683. 6
1,071. 2
1,008.2
190. 6

20.
8.
11.
7.
17.
7.
10.
10.

7.
2.
2.
2.
4.
2.
2.
2.

13.
6.
9.
5.
13.
5.
8.
8.

198.
11.
7.
16.
7.
9.
10.

2
3
3
2
7
5
6
2

6. 6
2. 3
2. 4
1.8
3. 9
2. 3
2. 6
2. 3

12.
6.
8.
5.
12.
5.
7.
7.

6
0
9
4
8
2
0
9

1. 0
.2
•. 5
.4
.5
.4
1. 3
.7

.4
(* )
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
. 1

.6
.2
.3
.2
.3
.2
1. 0
.6

30
31

580. 9
302. 4

19. 3
12. 9

6. 1
3. 7

13. 2
9. 2

18. 3
12. 1

5. 8
3. 5

12. 5
8. 6

1. 0
.8

.3
.2

.7
.6

3, 843. 0

12. 1

4. 8

7. 3

11. 7

4. 6

7. 1

.4

. 1

.3

274. 0
1,077. 1
199. 3
343. 2
18. 0
109. 0
1,124.2

9.
19.
23.
13.
6.
8.
3.

4. 9
8. 2
8. 2
6. 9
1. 5
2. 9
•9

9.
18.
22.
13.
5.
7.
3.

4. 8
8. 0
7. 9
6. 6
1. 5
2. 8
.9

2
7
2
3
3
0
8

.3
.5
1. 0
.6
.2
.2
. 1

. 1
.2
.3
.3
.1
(* )

.2
.3
.7
.3
.2
. 1
. 1

Nondurable goods
Food and kindred products ___________
T obacco m anufacturers _______________
T e x tile m ill products _________________
A p p a rel and other te x tile p r o d u c ts ___
P a p er and a llied p rod u cts_____________
P rin tin g and p u b lish in g ________________
Chem icals and a llied products _______
P etro leu m and coal p rod u cts__________
Rubber and plastics products,
n. e. c. _________________________________
Leath er and leath er p ro d u c ts _________
Tran sportation and public u tilitie s 6 _____
L o c a l and interurban passenger
tran sit ________________________________
Trucking and w a re h o u s in g ____________
W ater tra n s p o rta tio n __________________
Tran sportation by a ir _________________
P ip elin e tra n s p o rta tio n ________________
Tran sportation s e rv ic e s ______________
C om m unication ____ ____________________
E le c tric , gas, and sanitary
s e rv ic e s _______________________________

41
42
44
45
46
47
48

3
3
1
6
0
0
8

4.
11.
14.
6.
4.
5.
2.

2
2
2
6
1
4
0
5

4
0
9
6
5
1
9

0
8
1
0
8
8
7

4.
10.
14.
6.
4.
5.
2.

-

12. 4

3. 5

8. 9

11. 9

3. 4

8. 5

.5

. 1

.4

8. 7

2. 9

5. 8

8. 4

2. 8

5. 6

.3

.1

.2

50

3,809.0

10. 2

3. 3

6. 9

9. 9

3. 2

6. 7

.3

. 1

.2

52
53
54

553. 2
2,351.8
1,756.9

14. 6
7. 8
13. 5

4. 3
2. 5
4. 4

10. 3
5. 3
9. 1

14. 2
7. 6
13. 2

4. 2
2. 4
4. 3

10. 0
5. 2
8. 9

.4
.2
.3

. 1
. 1
. 1

.3
.1
.2

55
56

1,628.9
748. 8

9. 7
2. 3

3. 1
.8

6. 4
1. 5

9. 1
1. 9

2.9
.7

6. 0
1. 2

.6
.4

.2
. 1

.4
.3

57
58
59

455. 6
2,569. 1
1,268.8

6. 4
6. 5
4. 1

2. 5
2. 5
1. 6

3. 9
4. 0
2. 5

6. 1
6. 2
3. 8

2. 4
2. 4
1. 5

3. 7
3. 8
2. 3

.3
.3
.3

. 1
. 1
.2

.2
.2
. 1

See footnotes at end of table.




0
3
6
0
1
5
9
4

15,142.0

49

W holesale and r e ta il trade _______________
W holesale trade ________________________
Building m a te ria ls and farm
equipm ent______________________________
R eta il gen eral m e rc h a n d is e ___________
Food stores _____________________________
Autom otive d ea lers and
s e rv ic e stations ______________________
A p p a rel and a c c e s s o ry stores
Furniture and home furnishings
stores _________________________________
Eating and drinking p la c e s ____________
M iscellan eou s re ta il s t o r e s ___________

698. 1

2
5
8
6
2
9
9
9

10

T ab le 1. Recordable o ccu patio nal injury and illness incide nce rates, private nonfarm se cto r, by in d u s try —Co n tin ue d
Incidence rates per 100 m a n -y ea rs w ork ed 3
1971 Annual
SIC a v e ra g e e m ­
co d e 1 ploym ent (in
thousands)2

Industry

Finance, insurance and r e a l estate______

Injurie s and illn e sses

In ju ries

N on­
fa ta l
L ost
T otal
T o ta l
L o st
cases
record a b le w orkdays
record a b le workday
without
ca ses4
cases
cases 4
cases
lost
workdays

Illn esses
N on­
N on­
fa ta l
fatal
L o st
T o ta l
cases
cases
record a b le workday
without
without
c a ses4
cases
lost
lost
workdays
workdays

3,796.0

2. 9

1. 0

1. 8

2. 7

1. 0

1. 7

.2

(* )

60
61

1,073. 4
368. 2

1.6
1. 1

.6
.6

1. 0
.5

1.6
1. 0

.6
.5

1. 0
.5

(* )
. 1

(* )
. 1

(* )
(* )

62
63

196. 4
1,081. 1

.9
2. 1

.2
.6

.7
1. 4

.9
1. 9

.2
.6

.7
1. 3

(* )
.2

(* )
(* )

(* )
. 1

64
65

B an king__________________________________
C red it a gen cies other than b a n k s _____
Security com m odity b ro k ers and
s e r v ic e s _______________________________
Insurance c a r r i e r s _____ _______________
Insurance agents, b ro k ers and
s e r v ic e s ---------- -------- -------------------R eal e s t a t e ______________________________
Com binations o f re a l estate,
insurance, loans, law o ffic e s _______
Holding and other investm ent
c o m p a n ie s -------------------------------------

279. 7
709. 3

.9
8. 4

.2
3. 3

.7
5. 1

.8
8. 0

.2
3. 2

.6
4. 7

. 1
.4

(* )
(* )

. 1
.4

.1

66

36. 1

.8

.4

.4

.6

.3

.3

.2

. 1

67

51. 0

2. 7

-9

1. 8

2. 5

.7

1. 8

.2

.2

11,833. 6

7. 3

2. 7

4. 6

6. 7

2. 4

4. 3

.4

•2

.2

S e r v ic e s 7 --------------------------------------------A g ric u ltu ra l s e rv ic e s , fo r e s tr y
and f is h e r ie s __________________________
H otels, room ing houses, cam ps,
and other lodging places ____________
P e rs o n a l s e r v ic e s _____________________
M iscellan eou s business s e rv ic e s
Autom obile re p a ir, autom obile
s e rv ic e s and g a r a g e s _________________
M iscellan eou s re p a ir s e r v ic e s _______
M otion pictu res ________________________
Am usem ent and recrea tio n
s e rv ic e s , except m otion p ic tu r e s ___
M ed ical and other health s e rv ic e s
L e g a l s e r v i c e s _________________________
Educational s e r v i c e s __________________
M iscellan eou s s e r v ic e s _______________

0709

. 1
(* )

201. 6

16.9

7. 1

9. 7

15. 3

6. 6

8. 6

1. 6

.5

1. 1

70
72
73

793. 1
935. 1
1, 585.4

8. 5
3. 8
5. 9

2. 9
1. 8
2. 2

5. 6
2. 0
3. 7

8. 1
3. 5
5. 6

2. 8
1. 6
2. 1

5. 3
1. 9
3. 5

.4
.3
.3

. 1
.2
. 1

.3
. 1
.2

75
76
78

376. 4
184. 7
197. 4

11. 0
14. 5
5. 1

3. 7
3. 8
1. 1

7. 1
10. 7
4. 0

10. 4
13. 8
4. 8

3. 5
3. 6
1. 0

6. 9
10. 2
•3. 8

.6
.7
.3

.2
.2
. 1

.2
.5
.2

79
80
81
82
89

477. 0
3,256.8
245. 8
1,138.4
668. 5

7. 0
8. 3
.4
3. 8
2. 6

2. 5
2. 3
.2
1. 5
.9

4. 5
6. 0
.2
2. 3
1. 7

6. 7
7. 9
.4
3. 5
2. 4

2. 4
2. 1
.2
1. 3
.8

4. 3
5. 8
.2
2. 2
1.6

.3
.4
(* )
.3
.2

. 1
.2
(* )
.2
. 1

.2
.2
(* )
. 1
. 1

1 Standard Industrial C la ssifica tio n M anual.
1967 Edition.
2 U. S. Departm ent of L a b o r, Bureau of L a b or S tatistics Em ploym ent and Earnings su rvey.
3 The incidence rates a re calcu lated as: N/MH x 200,000, w here
N = number of in ju ries and/or illn e s s e s
MH = total hours w orked by a ll em p loyees during re fe re n c e p eriod
200,000 = base fo r 100 fu ll-tim e equivalent w o rk ers (w orkin g 40 hours per week, 50 w eeks p er y ea r).
4 Includes fa ta litie s in addition to lost w orkday cases and nonfatal cases without lo st w orkdays.
5 Does not include ra ilro a d and m ine a c tiv itie s .
6 Data fo r ra ilro a d tran sportation (SIC 40) are excluded.
7 Includes data fo r the fo llow in g in du stries which a re not shown sep arately: Museum s, a rt g a lle r ie s , botanical and z o o lo g ic a l gardens (SIC 84)
and n on -profit m em b ersh ip organ ization s (SIC 86).
NOTE:

SOURCE:

A s te ris k s

indicate an incidence rate of fe w e r than .05 per 100 m a n -yea rs worked.

Bureau of L a b or S tatistics,

U. S.

Dashes indicate that no data w e re rep orted .

Departm ent of Lab or.

Table 2. Recordable occupational injury and illness incidence rates, private nonfarm sector,
by size of unit and industry division
R ates p er 100 m an -years w orked 1
Num ber of em ployees

R eportin g units - ----------1 to 19 -----------------------------------------20 to 4 9 ----------------------------------------50 to 9 9 ----------------------------------------100 to 249 -------------------------------------2 50 to 499 -----------------------------------500 to 999 -------------------------------------1,000 to 2,499 ------------------------------2,500 and o v e r ------------------------------

P riv a te
nonfarm
s e c to r2

C ontract
construction

12. 1

22.4

16. 7

6. 8
12. 1
15. 5
16. 5
15. 3
13. 0
11.2
10. 8

15.4
24. 2
26. 6
30. 3
27. 8
25. 9
4 19. 2

13. 6
18.7
21.8
21.3
18. 3
15. 0
12. 2
13. 1

Manufac turing

W holesale
and re ta il
trade

Finance,
insurance,
and rea l
estate

12. 1

8. 7

2.9

10. 9
14.9
16. 8
16.0
14. 8
13. 7
10. 2
7.0

4. 9
9.4
12.0
12. 3
11.5
11.5
12. 6
11.5

3.0
2.9
3.0
3.4
2.4
2. 7
2. 7
1.8

Tran sp or­
tation and
public
u tilities

1 The incidence rates are calculated as: N/MH x 200,000, w here
N = number of in ju ries and/or illn esses
MH = total hours w orked by all em ployees during refe re n c e p eriod
200,000 = base fo r 100 fu ll-tim e equivalent w ork ers (working 40 hours p e r week, 50 weeks p e r y e a r).
2 Includes o il and gas extraction (SIC 13), but excludes railroad s and other m ine a c tiv itie s .
3 Includes agricu ltu ra l s e r v ic e s , fo r e s tr y , and fis h e rie s (SIC 07-09).
4 Rate fo r units with 1,000 or m ore em ployees.

SO U RC E:

B u r e a u of L a b o r S ta tis tic s,




U . S.

D e p artm en t of L a b o r .

11

S e rv ic e s 3

7. 3
4.
6.
8.
8.
10.
9.
9.
5.

8
5
8
8
1
8
8
8

T a b le 3. A verage lost w orkdays per lost w o rkd ay c a se , p rivate nonfarm se cto r, by in d u stry
A v e r a g e lo s t w o rk d a y s fo r —
S IC
code1
2

In d u s try

Illn e s s e s

13

14

18

18

17

14

14

11

14
15
13

14
16
13

11

13

13

11

15
14
12
14
15
13
12
14
12
11
10

13
13
11
10
12
13
12

39

15
14
12
14
15
13
12
14
12
11
10

20
21
22
23
26
27
28

12
14
15
10
16
13
14

12
14
16
10
17
13
14

12

29
30
31

19
14
13

19
14
13

15

15

10

18
15

37

13

__________________________________________________

C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t io n

In ju rie s

13
O i l an d g a s e x t r a c t io n

T o ta l
r e c o r d a b le
cases

------------------------------------------------------------------------15
16
17

G e n e r a l b u i l d i n g c o n t r a c t o r s ----------------------------------------------------H e a v y c o n s t r u c t i o n c o n t r a c t o r s __________________________________
S p e c i a l t r a d e c o n t r a c t o r s _________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _______________________________________________________________

9
12

D u ra b le goods
O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s _________________________________________
L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------------------------F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ______________________________________________
S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------------------------M a c h i n e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ----------------------------------------------------E l e c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t a n d s u p p l i e s ______________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ----------------------------------------------------------I n s t r u m e n t s a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------

19
24
25
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

11
9
6
11

N o n d u ra b le go o ds
F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ---------------- -------------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e r s _____________________________________________
T e x t i l e m i l l p r o d u c t s __________ ___________________________________
A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s ______________________________
P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------------ ------------P r i n t i n g a n d p u b l i s h i n g ----------------------------------------------------------------C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------------------P e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------------------R u b b e r a n d p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s , n . e . c . ----------------------------------L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s _____________________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n an d p u b lic u t ilit ie s

_________________________________
41
42
44
45
46
47
48

L o c a l a n d i n t e r u r b a n p a s s e n g e r t r a n s i t -------------------------------T r u c k i n g a n d w a r e h o u s i n g ----------------------------------------------------------W a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ________________________________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n b y a i r ________________________________________________
P i p e l i n e t r a n s p o r t a t i o n -----------------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n s e r v i c e s ____________________________________________
C o m m u n i c a t i o n --------------------------------------------------------------------------------E l e c t r i c , g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s __________________________
W h o le s a le an d r e t a il tra d e

49

in s u ra n c e ,

an d r e a l e state

59

9

9

14

13

11
12
11
11
26
15

11
12
11
11
27
15

21
11
8

66
67

17
11

16
9

19
19

NOTE:

SOURCE:

D a sh es

in d ic a te

n o n -p r o fit

th a t

no

B u r e a u of L a b o r S ta tis tic s,




d a ta

U .S .

m e m b e r s h ip
w ere

9
10
21

13

13

20

0 7 -0 9

11

10

18

70
72
73

13
16
12

13
16
12

12
20

75
76
78

16
10
12

16
10
14

29
14
7

79
80
81
82

15
14
4
18
10

15
12
4

29
-

19
9

5
17

____________________________________________

an d

19
9
11
14
6
50
8

9

89

S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l , 1967 E d i t i o n .
D o e s n o t i n c lu d e r a i l r o a d a n d m i n e a c t i v i t i e s .
I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r th e f o l l o w i n g i n d u s t r i e s w h i c h a r e n o t
84)

34

60
61
62
63
64
65

E d u c a t i o n a l s e r v i c e s _________________________________________________
M i s c e l l a n e o u s s e r v i c e s ----------------------------------------------------------------

(S IC

18

10
12
10
11
15
16
10
15

14

A m u s e m e n t an d r e c r e a t io n s e r v i c e s , e x c e p t
m o t i o n p i c t u r e s _________ _______________________________ _________
M e d i c a l a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s -----------------------------------------L e g a l s e r v i c e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------'-------

z o o lo g ic a l g a r d e n s

12

11
12
10
11
15
14
11
15

_____________ - ________________

A g r i c u l t u r a l s e r v i c e s , f o r e s t r y a n d f i s h e r i e s ------------------H o t e ls , r o o m in g h o u s e s , c a m p s , an d o th e r
l o d g i n g p l a c e s _ ___- _________________________________________________
P e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s _____________________________________________________
M i s c e l l a n e o u s b u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s ---------------------------------------------A u t o m o b ile r e p a i r , a u t o m o b ile s e r v i c e s
a n d g a r a g e s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s r e p a i r s e r v i c e s -------------------------------------------------M o t i o n p i c t u r e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1
2
3

8
18
11
10
6
5

12
50
52
53
54
55
56
57
58

B a n k i n g ____________________ _____________________________________________
C r e d i t a g e n c i e s o t h e r t h a n b a n k s --------------------------------------------S e c u r i t y c o m m o d i t y b r o k e r s a n d s e r v i c e s --------------------------I n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r s ___________________________________________________
I n s u r a n c e a g e n t s , b r o k e r s a n d s e r v i c e s ______________________
R e a l e s t a t e __________________________________ __________________________
C o m b in a tio n s o f r e a l e s t a t e , in s u r a n c e , lo a n s , an d
l a w o f f i c e s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------H o ld in g a n d o t h e r i n v e s t m e n t c o m p a n i e s -----------------------------S e r v i c e s 3 _______________________

9

29
9
20
12
15
14

9
20
11
15
14

_____________________________________________

W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ------------------------------------------------------------------------------B u i l d i n g m a t e r i a l s a n d f a r m e q u i p m e n t -------------------------------R e t a i l g e n e r a l m e r c h a n d i s e _______________________________________
F o o d s t o r e s ____ ________________________________________________________
A u t o m o t i v e d e a l e r s a n d s e r v i c e s t a t io n s -----------------------------A p p a r e l a n d a c c e s s o r y s t o r e s -------------------------------------------------F u r n i t u r e a n d h o m e f u r n i s h i n g s t o r e s ----------------------------------E a t i n g a n d d r i n k i n g p l a c e s ---------------------------------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s r e t a i l s t o r e s -------------------------------------------------------F in a n c e ,

18
15
28

9
7
6
12
14
8
15
10

show n

o rg a n iz a tio n s

rep o rted

or

d a ta w e r e

D e p artm en t o f L a b o r .

12

s e p a r a t e ly :

(S IC

M u seu m s,

art

9

4

g a lle rie s ,

8 6 ).

in s u ffic ie n t

to w a r r a n t

p re s e n ta tio n .

b o ta n ic a l

an d

Tab le 4a. Recordab le o ccu p a tio n a l injuries and illnesses, and lost w orkdays, private no n farm se cto r, by industry
d ivisio n and e xtent of case
R ecordable occupational injurees and illn e s s e s resulting in--Num ber
(in thou­
sands)
s ands)

P e rc e n t
Pe rcent

P riv a te nonfarm s e c t o r 1------

3, 067. 5

Contract c o n s tru c tio n -----------------M anufacturing ----------------------------T ran sp ortation and public
u t ilit ie s ------------------------------------W holesale and re ta il t r a d e -----------Finance, insurance, and rea l
estate -------- ------ -----------------S e rvices 2 ------------------------------------

361.0
1,479.4

Industry

Deaths

L o st
workday
cases
Num ber .
(in thou­
P ercen t
sands)

L ost
workdays

Nonfatal cases
without lo st
workdays
Numbe r
(in thou­
P ercen t
sands)

Number
(in thou­
sands)

Number
(in thou­
sands)

P ercen t

100.0

4. 2

100. 0

925. 0

100.0

2,138.3

11. 8
48. 2

.8
.8

19. 1
19. 9

110. 1
379. 3

11.9
41.0

250. 1
1, 099. 3

11. 7
51.4

1,500.7
4,943. 1

12. 3
40. 6

225. 5
606. 6

7. 4
19. 8

.5
1.0

12. 1
25. 5

87. 7
203.4

9.5
22. 0

137. 3
402. 2

6.4
18. 8

1, 328. 5
2, 438. 5

10. 9
20. 0

46. 8
368. 2

1. 5
10. 7

.2
.6

6. 0
15. 2

17. 1
118. 7

1.8
12. 8

29. 5
208. 9

1.4
9. 8

237.0
1, 615.3

1.9
13. 3

12,164.0

100. 0

P ercen t
100. 0

See footnotes at end of Table 4c.

Table 4b. Recordable occupational injuries, and lost workdays, private nonfarm sector, by industry division
and extent of case
R ecordable occupational in ju ries resulting m
Num ber
(in thou­
sands)

Industry

f

t

2,934.4

1

Contract construction -----------------Manufacturing ---------------------------Tran sp ortation and public
u t ilit ie s ------------------------------W holesale and re ta il t r a d e ----------Finance, insurance, and rea l
estate -----------------------------S e rv ic e s --------------------------

P e rcent
P ercen t

100. 0

Deaths
Number
(in thou­
sands)

Pe rcent

3. 6

100. 0

881.9

Nonfatal cases
without lo st
workdays
Num ber
P ercen t
(in thou­
sands)

*

Lost
workdLays
Number
(in thou­
sands)

P ercen t

100. 0

2, 048.9

100. 0

1 1, 568.7

100. 0

242.4
1,049.2

11.8
51.2

1.440.2
4.7 5 1 .2

12.4
41. 1

11.9
48. 1

.7
.8

19. 5
22. 2

104. 8
361. 1

11.9
41.0

217. 8
582. 9

7. 4
19. 9

.5
1.0

13. 9
27. 8

84. 9
194. 9

9. 6
22. 1

132.4
387.0

6. 5
18. 9

1,299. 1
2,290.4

11.2
19. 8

44.4
310. 9

1. 5
10. 6

.2
.3

5. 6
8. 3

16.6
11. 0

1.9
12.6

27. 6
199. 6

1.3
9. 7

229. 2
1.461.2

2. 0
12. 1

347.9
1,411.1

See footnotes at end of T able 4c.




Lost
workday
cases
Num ber
Pe rcent
(in thou­
sands)

13

T ab le 4 c . R e co rd ab le o ccu p atio n al illn e sse s, and lost w o rk d a ys, private nonfarm se c to r, by in d u stry
divisio n and e xte n t of ca se
R ecordable < ccupational illn e s s e s resulting in—
o

Industry

Num ber
(in thou­
sands)

Deaths

P e rc e n t

Number
(in thou­
sands)

P ercen t

Lost
workday
cases
Num ber
(in thouP ercen t
s and s)

Nonfatal cases
without lo st
workdays
Num ber
P erc e n t
(in thou­
sands)

Lost
workdays
Num ber
(in thou­
sands)

P erc e n t

P riv a te nonfarm s e c t o r 1------

133. 1

100. 0

0. 6

100.0

43. 1

100. 0

89.4

100. 0

595. 3

100. 0

C ontract c o n s tru c tio n -----------------M anufacturing ----------------------------Tran sp ortation and public
u t ilit ie s ------------------------------------W holesale and re ta il t r a d e -----------Finance, insurance, and rea l
e s ta te ---------------------------------------S erv ic e s 2 ------------------------------------

13. 1
68. 3

9. 8
51.3

. 1
(* )

23. 7
9.4

5. 3
18. 2

12. 3
42. 2

7. 7
50. 1

8. 6
56. 0

60. 5
191.9

10. 2
32. 2

7. 7
23. 7

5. 8
17. 8

(* )
(* )

1. 8
5. 3

2. 8
8. 5

6. 5
19. 7

4.9
15. 2

5. 5
17. 0

29.4
148. 1

4 .9
24. 9

2. 4
17. 3

1. 8
13. 0

(* )
.3

. 1
59. 5

.5
7. 7

1. 3
17.9

1.9
9.3

2. 1
10.4

7. 8
154. 1

1.3
25. 9

.

1 T otal fo r p riva te nonfarm s ecto r includes data fo r o il and gas extraction (SIC 13).
2 Includes a gricu ltu ra l s e r v ic e s , fo r e s tr y , and fis h e rie s (SIC 07-09).
N O TE :

SOURCE:

A ste ris k s indicate fe w e r than 100 cases w ere estim ated.

Bureau of L a b or S tatistics,

U .S .

P ercen ta ges w e re computed fro m the estim ates b e fo re rounding.

Departm ent of Labor.

Table 5. Recordable occupational illnesses, and lost workdays, private nonfarm sector, by type
and extent of case
R ecordable occupational illn e s s e s resulting in—
Type o f illn e s s

Total ---------------------------------------Occupational skin d iseases and
d is o r d e r s ----------------------------------------Dust diseases of the lungs -----------------R e s p ira to ry conditions due to
toxic agents ------------------------------------P o is o n in g -----------------------------------------D is o rd e rs due to physical agen ts--------D is o rd e rs due to repeated tra u m a ------A ll other occupational illn e s s e s ----------

Num ber
(in thou­
sand)

Deaths
P erc e n t

Num ber
(in thou­
sands)

P erc e n t

Lost
w orkday
cases
Num ber
(in thou­
P erc e n t
sands)

Nonfatal cases
without lost
workdays
Num ber
(in thou­ P e rc e n t
sands)

Lost
workdays
Num ber
(in thou­
sands)

Pe rcent

A v e ra g e
lo s t
workdays
per lo st
workday
case 1

133. 1

100.0

0. 5

100. 0

43. 1

100. 0

89. 5

100. 0

595.3

100. 0

14

45. 1
.7

33.9
.5

(*)

.4

10. 3
.3

23. 9
.8

34. 8
.4

38. 9
.4

91.4
5. 9

15.4
1.0

9
18

6. 1
4 .4
21.8
13. 1
41.9

4. 6
3. 3
16.4
9. 8
31.5

(* )
(* )
(* )
(*)
.5

5. 5
1. 2
2. 5
.7
89. 7

1.9
2. 1
6. 1
4. 8
17. 6

4. 5
4.9
14. 1
11.0
40. 8

4.
2.
15.
8.
23.

4. 6
2. 6
17.6
9.3
26. 6

17. 6
21.6
49.4
138. 9
270. 5

3. 0
3. 6
8. 3
23. 3
45.4

9
10
8
29
15

-

_

2
3
7
3
8

A v e ra g e lost workdays w ere computed fro m the estim ates b efo re rounding.
N O TE .
A sterisk s indicate less than 100 cases w ere estim ated.
estim ates b efo re rounding.

SOURCE:

Bureau of L a b or Statistics




Dashes indicate no data w ere reported.

Departm ent of Labor.

14

P ercen ta ges w ere computed fro m the

State Data on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses
New York, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Virginia, West

The 1971 survey was conducted in cooperation with
State statistical grant agencies. Forty-eight States, the
District o f Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin

Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Islands took part; 41 agencies collected and processed
national sample data. Ten statistical grant agencies col­

Estimates for Iowa, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and
Wyoming were available for inclusion in this report. Data

lected additional reports so that State estimates could be
made. These State agencies were in Georgia, Iowa, Maine,

these States.




on the following pages were extracted from reports o f

15

Iow a: R e co rd ab le o cc u p a tio n a l injury and illn e ss in c id e n c e rate s, and a ve rage lo st w o rk d a y s
per lost w o rkd ay c a s e , c o n tra c t co n stru ctio n and m a n u fa ctu rin g

In d u stry

S IC c o d e 1

C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n --------------------------------------------G e n e r a l b u ild in g c o n s t r u c t io n H e a v y c o n s t r u c t i o n -------------------------------------S p e c i a l t r a d e c o n s t r u c t i o n ---------------- —
M a n u fa c tu rin g 5 -

------------

39. 8
12. 4
9. 4
18. 0

23. 9
27. 7
24. 2

209. 2

20. 5

115. 8

-----------------------

22. 3
26. 7

5.
7.
6.
6.
8.
4.
2.
6.
2.

—

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s --------------------F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s -----------------------------S to n e , c l a y a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ---------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ---------- --------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s --------------------M a c h i n e r y e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -----------------E l e c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t a n d s u p p l i e s ----T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---------------------I n s t r u m e n t s a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c t u r in g
i n d u s t r i e s --------------------— --------------- —

24
25
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

4
5

4.
4.
6.
7.
13.
42.
20.
6.

5
1
4
6
0
8
4
3

1. 9

29.
19.
26.
30.
24.
10.
34.
13.

9
4
9
8
2
9
8
2

6.
6.
6.
6.

6
3
6
8

18.
17.
21.
17.

4
6
0
3

13
15
13
12

5. 7

14. 8

11

4. 9

17. 4

10

20.
23.
12.
20.

8
0
8
7

10
13
12
10

22.
19.
8.
2 8.
10.

4
3
8
4
5

9
11
12
10
5

9
0
6
1
4
9
1
4
7

4. 8

13. 2

3. 1

10. 1

11

93. 4

18. 2

6. 6

11. 6

11

55. 1

21.
10.
16.
8.
12.
18.

8.
1.
2.
3.
2.
7.

13.
9.
14.
4.

11

39

goods

F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s ----P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------P r i n t i n g a n d p u b l i s h i n g ----------------------------C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s — ------R u b b e r a n d p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s n. e. c

1
2
3

25. 1

15
16
17

D u r a b le go o ds

N o n d u ra b le

1971 a n n u a l
I n c i d e n c e r a t e s p e r 100 m a n - y e a r s w o r k e d 3 A v e r a g e lo s t
av e rage
w o rk d a y s p e r
Lost
N o n fa ta l c a s e s
T o ta l
e m p lo y m e n t
lo s t w o rk d a y
r e c o r d a b le
w ith o u t lo s t
w o rk d a y
(in t h o u s a n d s )2
case
cases4
cases
w o rk d a y s

20
23
26
27
28
30

3.
3.
13.
7.
8.

9
7
6
2
2

7
9
1
0
4
8

1
5
1
5
6
9

Io w a

B u re au

of

9
15
9
9
13

9. 8
10. 9

S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l , 1967 E d i t i o n .
U . S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r , B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s E m p lo y m e n t an d E a r n in g s S u rv e y .
T h e in c id e n c e r a t e s a r e c a lc u la t e d a s :
N / M H x 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 , w h e r e
N = n u m b e r o f in ju r ie s a n d / o r illn e s s e s
M H = to ta l h o u r s w o rk e d b y a l l e m p lo y e e s d u r in g r e f e r e n c e p e r io d
2 0 0 , 0 0 0 = b a s e f o r 100 f u l l - t i m e e q u i v a le n t w o r k e r s ( w o r k i n g 40 h o u r s p e r w e e k , 50 w e e k s
I n c lu d e s f a t a l i t i e s in a d d i t i o n to l o s t w o r k d a y c a s e s a n d n o n f a t a l c a s e s w it h o u t l o s t w o r k d a y s .
I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r i n d u s t r i e s n o t s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .

SOURCE:

6
4
0
5

per

y e a r ).

L abor.

Oklahoma: Recordable occupational injury and illness incidence rates, and average lost workdays
per lost workday case, m anufacturing, and medical and other health services
S IC
code1

In d u s try

----------------------------------------------------------M a n u fa c t u rin g 5

1971 a n n u a l
I n c i d e n c e r a t e s p e r 100 m a n - y e a r s w o r k e d 3 A v e r a g e lo s t
ave rage
w o rk d a y s p e r
T o ta l
N o n fa ta l c a s e s
e m p lo y m e n t
lo s t w o rk d a y
L o st w o rk d a y
r e c o r d a b le
w it h o u t lo s t
(in t h o u s a n d s )2
cases
case
cases4
w o rk d a y s
1 3 1. 3

21. 1

5. 2

1 5 .9

76. 6

24. 0

5. 2

18. 8

12

2. 4

7. 7
9. 7
6. 0
1 1 .2
6. 5
4. 3
1 .7
5. 7
3. 3

1 5 .8
24. 3
15. 4
24. 0
3 1 .7
20. 2
5. 0
15. 1
16. 9

20
10
14
13
10
13
10
11

(*)

23. 5
34. 0
2 1 .4
35. 3
3 8 .3
24. 5
6. 7
20. 8
20. 1

54 . 7

16. 7

5. 0

1 1 .7

12

20
22
23
26
27

16. 2

22. 5

R u b b e r a n d p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s , n . e . c . ---------

29
30

(*)
5 .9

2 2 .9
1 3 .8
20. 6
8. 3
6 .8

14. 4
15. 5

13

(* )
9 .9

29. 3

8. 1
7. 4
3. 0
4. 4
1 .7
1 .7
8. 2

M e d i c a l a n d o t h e r h e a lt h s e r v i c e s -------------------

80

40. 6

6. 4

D u ra b le goods
L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ----------------------------F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s -----------------------------------S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s --------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s ---------------------------M a c h i n e r y e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ------------------------E l e c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t a n d s u p p l i e s ------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t -----------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c t u r in g in d u s t r ie s —

24
25
32
33
34
35
36
37
39

N o n d u ra b le go o ds
F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ----------------------------T e x t i l e m i l l p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s ------------P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s -----------------------------P r i n t i n g a n d p u b l i s h i n g ----------------------------------P e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l p r o d u c t s ------■
-----------------

1
2
3

4
5

(*)
8 .9
4. 1
15. 3
18. 5
12. 4
10. 6

(*)
8. 3

1 .9

SOURCE:

A s t e r is k s

in d ic a t e

d a ta

do

n o t m e e t p u b lic a t io n

c r ite ria .

O k lah o m a State D e p a rtm e n t o f H ealth.




16

19

1 0 .8
16. 3
6 .6
5. 1
21. 1

9
12
15
12
17
11

4. 5

13

S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l , 1967 E d i t i o n .
U . S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r , B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s E m p lo y m e n t an d E a r n in g s S u rv e y .
T h e in c id e n c e r a t e s a r e c a lc u la t e d a s :
N / M H x 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 , w h e r e
N ■ n u m b e r of in ju r ie s a n d / o r illn e s s e s
M H = to ta l h o u r s w o rk e d b y a l l e m p lo y e e s d u rin g r e f e r e n c e p e r io d
2 0 0 , 000 = b a s e f o r 100 f u l l - t i m e e q u i v a le n t w o r k e r s ( w o r k i n g 40 h o u r s p e r w e e k , 50 w e e k s
I n c lu d e s f a t a l i t i e s in a d d i t i o n to l o s t w o r k d a y c a s e s a n d n o n f a t a l c a s e s w i t h o u t l o s t w o r k d a y s .
I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r i n d u s t r i e s n o t s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .

NOTE:

12

per

y e a r ).

So u th Carolina: Recordable o ccu p atio n al injury and illness incide nce rates by industry, and average
lost w orkdays per lost w orkday case, m an ufactu ring
In d u s try

S IC c o d e 1

1971 a n n u a l
I n c i d e n c e r a t e s p e r 100 m a n - - y e a r s w o r k e d 3 A v e r a g e lo s t
av e rage
T o ta l
L o st
N o n fa ta l c a se s
e m p lo y m e n t
lo s t w o rk d a y
r e c o r d a b le
w o rk d a y
w i t h o u t lo s t
(in t h o u s a n d s )2
case
cases4
cases
w o rk d a y s

M a n u fa c t u rin g 5
------------------------------------------------------

3 3 7. 3

11. 9

2. 4

21.
22.
14.
23.
26.
22.
10.

9. 4
6. 8
4. 1

15

9. 6

D u ra b le goods
24
25

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s --------------------F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s -----------------------------S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s -----------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s -----------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s --------------M a c h i n e r y e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -----------------E l e c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t a n d s u p p l i e s -----T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---------------------I n s t r u m e n t s a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ------M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g
i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------------------

13. 8
4. 7
10. 3

32
33
34
35
36
37
38

0
6
5
9
0
5
7

11.
15.
10.
17.
18.
19.
9.
16.
6.

4
8
2
0
9
5
1
8
3

11
8
17

(*)
2. 9

21. 0
7. 8

6 .9
7. 1
3. 0
1. 6
4. 2
1. 5

(*)

13. 7

3. 4

10. 2

11

20

14. 3

21
22
23
26
27
28
30
31

(*)
147. 6
44. 6
12. 3
5. 2

16. 9
14. 1

5.
4.
1.
1.
2.
1.

11.
10.
8.
5.
13.
6.
5.
11.
13.

10
14
20

(* )
7. 7
16. 4
12. 3

39

19
13
14
15
13
3

N o n d u ra b le goods
F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ----------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e r s --------------------------T e x t i l e m i l l p r o d u c t s -------------------------------A p p a r e l a n d o t h e r t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s ----P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ------------P r i n t i n g a n d p u b l i s h i n g --------------------C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ------R u b b e r a n d p l a s t i c s p r o d u c t s n. e . c —
L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ---------------

27. 1
(*)
(*)

9.
7.
15.
7.
7.
13.
18.

8
2
4
8
0
8
4

3
0
4
3
1
4

1. 4
2. 5
5. 0

6
1
5
9
3
4
6
2
4

9
20
14
11
14
8

1
2

Labor

S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l . 1967 E d i t i o n .
E s t i m a t e s w e r e p r e p a r e d b y th e S o u t h C a r o l i n a E m p l o y m e n t S e c u r i t y C o m m i s s i o n in c o o p e r a t i o n w i t h th e B u r e a u o f
S ta tis tic s .
3 T h e in c id e n c e r a t e s a r e c a lc u la t e d a s :
N / M H x 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 , w h e r e
N s n u m b e r of in ju r ie s a n d / o r illn e s s e s
M H = to ta l h o u r s w o rk e d b y a l l e m p lo y e e s d u r in g r e f e r e n c e p e r io d
2 0 0 , 0 0 0 - b a s e f o r 100 f u l l - t i m e e q u i v a le n t w o r k e r s ( w o r k i n g 40 h o u r s p e r w e e k , 50 w e e k s p e r y e a r ) .
4 I n c lu d e s f a t a l i t i e s in a d d i t i o n to l o s t w o r k d a y c a s e s a n d n o n f a t a l c a s e s w i t h o u t l o s t w o r k d a y s .
5 I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r i n d u s t r i e s n o t s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
NOTE:

SOURCE:

A s t e r is k s

S ou th

in d ic a te

C a ro lin a

d a ta

do

D e p artm en t

not m e e t p u b lic a t io n

of

c r ite ria .

L abor.

W yoming: Recordable occupational injury and illness incidence rates, and average lost workdays
per io si workday case, by industry
S IC
code1

In d u s try

P r iv a t e n o n fa rm

-------------------------------------------

A v e r a g e lo s t
w o rk d a y s p e r
lo s t w o rk d a y
case

73. 8

s e c t o r 5 --------------------------

O il an d g a s e x t r a c t io n

In c i d e n c e r a t e p e r 100 m a n - y e a r s w o r k e d 3
1971 a n n u a l
ave rage
N o n fa ta l c a s e s
T o ta l
L o s t w o rk d a y
e m p lo y m e n t
w ith o u t lo s t
cases
(in t h o u s a n d s ) 2 r e c o r d a b l e
w o rk d a y s
cases4

13

12. 4

3. 5

8. 8

15

6. 0

22. 1

7. 8

14. 1

18

C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n --------------------------------------------

7. 9

24. 5

5. 9

18. 6

16

M a n u fa c t u rin g

----------------------------------------------------------

7. 4

20. 3

6. 1

14. 1

14

D u r a b le go o d s

3. 2

30. 2

9. 4

20. 7

18

1. 2

42. 2

18. 1

23. 9

19

4. 2

12. 7

3. 6

9- 1

6

29

1. 3
1. 8

26. 2
8. 8

7. 3
2. 5

18. 9
6. 2

9

7. 1

9- 1

2. 6

6. 3

16

W h o l e s a l e a n d r e t a i l t r a d e --------------------------------W h o l e s a l e t r a d e -------------------------------------------------

50

24. 9
3. 9

8. 2
10. 3

2. 3
3. 0

5. 9
7. 1

12
13

F o o d s t o r e s ---------------------------------------------------------A u t o m o t i v e d e a l e r s a n d s e r v i c e s t a t io n s __

54
55

2 .4
4 .8

12. 2
9 .4

2. 6
3 .4

9. 6
6. 0

15
11

. 1

20

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------

24

N o n d u ra b le go o d s
F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s --------------------------P e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l p r o d u c t s ----------------------

20

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n a n d p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s -------------—

F in a n c e ,

in s u ra n c e ,

a n d r e a l e s t a t e ---------------

3 .6

S e r v i c e s 6 -------------------------------------------------------------------

16. 9

8 .8

2. 3

6 .5

10. 1

2. 3

7. 7

9

1. 2

1. 0

. 2

35

H o t e l s a n d o t h e r l o d g i n g p l a c e s _____________

70

4 .9

P e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ----------------------------------------------

72

1. 5

1
2
3

4
5
6

. 2

. 1

5

S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l , 1967 E d i t i o n .
E m p lo y m e n t S e c u r it y C o m m is s io n C u r r e n t E m p lo y m e n t S t a t is t ic s S u rv e y .
T h e i n c id e n c e r a t e s a r e c a l c u l a t e d a s :
N / M H x 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 , w h e r e
N a n u m b e r o f in ju r ie s a n d / o r illn e s s e s
M H a t o ta l h o u r s w o r k e d b y a l l e m p lo y e e s d u r in g r e f e r e n c e p e r io d
2 0 0 , 000 » b a s e f o r 100 f u l l - t i m e e q u i v a le n t w o r k e r s ( w o r k i n g 4 0 h o u r s p e r w e e k , 50 w e e k s
I n c lu d e s f a t a l i t i e s in a d d i t i o n to l o s t w o r k d a y c a s e s a n d n o n f a t a l c a s e s w i t h o u t l o s t w o r k d a y s .
In c lu d e s d a ta fo r in d u s t r ie s n o t s h o w n s e p a r a t e ly .
S e r v i c e s i n c lu d e a g r i c u l t u r a l s e r v i c e s , f o r e s t r y a n d f i s h e r i e s ( S I C 0 7 - 0 9 ) .

SOURCE:

W y o m in g




D e p artm en t

of

Labor

an d S ta tis tic s .

17

per

13

y e a r ).

Appendix A.

Background o f the Recordkeeping and

Reporting Systems Promulgated under the W illiam sSteiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970
Introduction

would be subject to the proposed legislation. An informal
conference called by the Institute concluded that there
was cause to believe that the Z 16.1 standard was inappro­
priate for the proposed use and recommended that a
study group be formed to consider the matter further
and, i f necessary, develop a simple method o f reporting
injuries. This recommendation was based on a belief that
the Z16.1 standard had grown too complex, through ef­
forts to make it equitable, to form a basis for a manda­
tory national reporting system; did not adequately reflect

On December 29, 1970, the president signed into law
the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act
of

1970, which became effective April 28, 1971.
Passage o f the act (Public Law 91-596) marked a major

departure in the collection o f safety and health statistics.
The act provides that every place o f employment subject
to the act shall be free from recognized hazards which are
likely to cause death or serious physical harm. To assist in
attaining this goal, the act provides for uniform record­
keeping and reporting procedures which will identify the

trends in injury experience for employers with good

seriousness o f on-the-job accidents and job-related ill­

safety records; and was not adequate for recording health

nesses.
The Bureau o f Labor Statistics was delegated the sta­
tistical responsibility under Section 24 (a) o f the act.
Section 24, moreover, encourages the Federal govern­
ment to enlist the aid o f States in developing and con­
ducting statistical programs to meet data needs o f the
States as well as its own.
The Bureau has been concerned for many years with
standardizing the methods for compiling work-injury sta­
tistics. As early as 1911 the Bureau called a formal con­
ference to discuss the matter. The International Associa­
tion o f Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions
continued the work o f the conference and published the

experience.
A study group, formed by the Institute, concluded
that a new simple method for recording and reporting
occupational injuries and illnesses was needed. The study
group’s proposal was published by the Institute in De­
cember 1970. The recordkeeping regulations which have
been issued by the Secretary draw heavily on the pro­
posals o f the study group.

Recordkeeping system
The Occupational Safety and Health A ct o f 1970
(O SH A) directs the Secretary o f Labor to issue regula­
tions which require all employers subject to the act to
maintain accurate records o f work-related deaths, ill­
nesses, and injuries, other than those requiring only minor

first standardized procedures in 1920. In 1937, the first
work-injury standard was published by the American
Standards Association, now the American National Stand­

first aid. The regulations concerned with recording o f
occupational injuries and illnesses (29 CFR Part 1904)
became effective on July 1, 1971.

ards Institute. The most recent revision was the Standard
Method o f Recording and Measuring Work Injury Experi­
ence (Z16.1), 1967.

The recordkeeping system stipulated under OSHA is
designed to obtain reliable, current, and uniform infor­
mation about occupational injuries and illnesses at the
workplace. It is the basic source o f data for the statistical
program. Three forms are used to record work-related
injuries and illnesses: A Log o f Occupational Injuries and
illnesses (O SH A No. 100), a Supplementary Record o f
Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (O SH A No. 101 or its
equivalent), and a Summary o f Occupational Injuries and
Illnesses (O SH A No. 102).None is a report form— all are

In December 1969, while Congress was considering
comprehensive safety and health legislation, former sec­
retary o f Labor J. D. Hodgson (then Under Secretary o f
Labor) noted in a letter to the American National Stand­
ards Institute that the proposed legislation included a
national system for the collection o f safety and health
statistics. He

requested that the

Institute evaluate

whether the standard method contained in Z16.1-1967
was appropriate for the broad universe o f employers who




18

to remain at the workplace to be available at reasonable
times for examination by representatives o f the Depart­
ment o f Labor or the Department o f Health, Eduction,
and Welfare, or States accorded jurisdiction under the
act. These records are to be retained at the workplace
for 5 years following the end o f the year to which they
relate.
Ordinarily an employer must enter an occupational in­

be appended to one o f these alternate forms to make

jury or illness on the log within 6 working days after no­

them acceptable.
Records covering employees who do not report to
any fixed establishment regularly but who are subject to
common supervision may be maintained in an established
central place as long as records are available during busi­
ness hours. An employer who has seven or fewer em­
ployees is exempt from recordkeeping requirements un­
less he has been selected to participate in a statistical

tification o f the case. However, any employer may main­

survey. In that event, he will be required to maintain a log

tain the log at another location or by data processing

o f all occupational injuries or illnesses for that year. The

equipment if information for the log, current to within

act exempted from recordkeeping coverage household

6 days, is available at the other location and a copy o f the

domestics, farm family workers, and church and religious
employees when directly engaged in religious services.

log current to within 45 days is available at the estab­
lishment location. This form contains columns for the

Reporting system

date o f injury (or initial diagnosis o f illness), occupation
o f injured or ill employee, department to which employee

The Secretary o f Labor, in consultation with the HEW

was assigned, nature o f injury or illness, and part o f body

Secretary, is required to develop and maintain an effec­
tive program o f collection, compilation, and analysis o f

affected. Each case is classified either as an injury or as
one o f seven classes o f illnesses. For a fatality, the date o f
death is entered also.
Lost workdays (but not death) are entered; nonfatal
cases without lost workdays (fo r example, temporary loss
o f consciousness) also are indicated. It is hoped this break­
down will eliminate the problem o f losing track o f acci­
dents which result when employees transfer or terminate
employment.

statistics on work injuries and illnesses. In so doing he
may make private grants or contracts and grants to States
or political subdivisions. The Secretary may also require
employers to file such reports o f work injuries and ill­
nesses as he shall deem necessary.
The new statistical series differs conceptually from
the old series in two ways. First, the base for reporting
injuries and illnesses is equivalent to a year’s work for

The log provides substantial information about each
recordable case and should assist Federal and State com­
pliance officers. A quick examination o f the log will tell,
for example, what occupations or departments are in­
curring injuries and illnesses and will indicate areas to be
checked during safety inspections.

100 full-time employees rather than to the million em­
ployee hours worked. Second, as a result o f changes in
recordable injury and illness classification, Z16.1 meas­
ures o f injury severity and average days charged per case
will no longer be available. In their place will be a series
o f measures including not only incidence rates for occu­

The log also acts as a worksheet to organize informa­
tion for the summary (O S H A N o . 102). This form con­
taining all log entries for a calendar year must be posted

pational injuries and illnesses but also separate incidence
rates for fatalities, lost workday cases, and nonfatal cases
without lost workdays. In late 1971, the Federal Register

by February 1 and remain in place until March 1 in a lo­
cation where the employer customarily posts notices to
his employees.

published regulations for reporting requirements and the
report form (29 CFR 1904.20-.22).
The survey questionnaire requested data on job-related
deaths, lost workday cases, and nonfatal cases without
lost workdays, The reported lost workday cases include
days in which the employee was absent from his job
because o f a work-related injury or illness and days in
which an employee was restricted from performing all the

In addition to items on the log, additional information
must be recorded within 6 days on a supplementary
record. Such information chiefly concerns the accident or
exposure which resulted in injury or illness. Although
form OSHA No. 101 is not mandatory, all information
on the supplementary record must be available in some

duties o f his job. Reported nonfatal cases without lost

form in the establishment. These items usually are found

workdays are those which result in transfer to another

on workmen’s compensation or insurance forms which

job, termination o f employment, medical treatment, or

may be used as long as they contain all the information

involve loss o f consciousness and restriction o f work or

required on the supplementary record. Missing items can

motion.




19

Appendix B. Scope of the Survey and Technical Notes
Scope of survey

to economic levels o f industry; thus, the more digits in an
SIC code, the more specialized the industry.

The survey relates to most nonfarm employers in the
following industries: Agricultural services, forestry, and

Sampling and estimating procedures

fisheries, SIC 07-09; oil and gas extraction, SIC 13; con­
tract construction, SIC 15-17; manufacturing, SIC 19-39;
transportation and public utilities, SIC 41-49; wholesale
and retail trade, SIC 50-59; finance, insurance, and real
estate, SIC 60-67;and services, SIC 70-89, except SIC 88.
Excluded were self-employed individuals; farm and
railroad employers; employers covered by the Coal Mine
Health and Safety Act and the Metallic and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Acts; and Federal, State, and

The sample was selected utilizing procedures estab­
lished for optimum allocation sampling. A ll employer
establishments within the scope o f the survey were strat­
ified by industry and size o f employment. The sampling
ratios at the various employment size classes ranged from
all units above a certain size class selected with certainty
through declining proportions in each smaller employ­
ment size class. Data for the sample unit were then
weighted by the inverse o f the sampling ratio for the size
class from which it was selected. To illustrate the proce­

local government units. In a separate reporting system,
agencies o f the Federal government are filling reports
comparable to those o f private industry with the
Secretary o f Labor.
Data were collected by questionnaries mailed to nearly
60,000 employer establishments. (See charts 1 and 2.)

dure, where one establishment out o f four was selected,
it was given a weight o f four to represent itself plus three
others. Data were then benchmarked to the appropriate
industry employment estimates.

Second mailings and telephone calls to nonrespondents
resultedin a 90.7 percent overall response rate. The 1971
occupational injury and illness estimates included reports
from more than 17,800 manufacturing reporting units
and from over 32,700 nonmanufacturing reporting

Nature of data collected
The survey questionnaire requested information on the

units.

average number o f employees; total number o f hours
worked; type o f business activity; type o f medical serv­

The survey was designed to produce occupational in­
jury and illness incidence rates at most o f the 2-digit
industry levels, as defined by the 1967 edition o f the
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC ) Manual, for the

ice provided by the employer; injuries and seven cate­
gories o f occupational illnesses by fatalities, lost workday
cases, and nonfatal cases without lost workdays; and the
number o f employees who were transferred or terminated

country as a whole. SIC levels are numerical assignments

as a result o f a job-related injury or illness.




20

INSTRUCTIONS FOR OSHA NO. 103

I am writing this letter to inform you that your establishment has been selected for inclusion
in the nationwide Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Survey for the reporting period July
1, 1971 to December 31, 1971.

SURVEY R E P O R T IN G R EG U LA TIO N S
Tide 29, Part 1904.20-22 of the Code of Federal Regulation requires that:

The 1971 Survey in which your establishment is included requires completion of the en­
closed reporting sheet which largely involves transfer of information from OSHA Form No.
102 which you already maintain. Therefore, enclosed with this letter are: (1) ReportForm
OSHA No. 103 to be completed and returned within three weeks of receipt; (2) Instructions
for completing the form and an extra copy for your files; (3) An addressed, post-paid re­
turn envelope.

1.

Each employer shall return the completed survey form, OSHA 103, within 3 weeks
of receipt in accordance with the instructions shown below.

2.

Your report is mandatory under Public Law 91-596, the Williams-Steiger Occupational
Safety and Health Act of 1970. The Bureau of Labor Statistics is charged with responsi­
bility for the collection, compilation and analysis of work injury and illness data for the
U.S. Department of Labor.

Failure to comply with the reporting requirements may result in the issuance of
citations and assessment of penalties.

SEC TIO N I - SPECIAL IN S T R U C T IO N S F O R M U LTI-ESTABLISHM ENT
U N IT S O N L Y
(If the "unit designation” shown below your mailing address on the report form refers to
only one establishment, disregard the instructions in this box and proceed to the instructions
below.)

As you know, the Occupational Safety and Health Art of 1970 requires the Secretary of
Labor, in consultation with the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, to develop
and maintain an effective program of collection, compilation and analysis of statistics on
work illnesses and injuries in American industry. This is a Federal-State cooperative pro­
gram under which certain States have received Federal grants for collection and compilation
of these data.

The enclosed OSHA 103 report form should be completed on a consolidated basis to include
data for all establishments (see definidon below) in the "unit designation." Do not indude
data for any establishment outside the ’’unit designation." Sections II, III, IV, and VI should
be the sum of the separate establishment figures. Section VIII should be prepared by adding
the data from all OSHA 102 forms for the establishments included in the ’’unit designation.”
Section V (l) and V(2) should reflect the combined data for all such establishments. Do not
complete Section V (3).

The survey collection agency for your establishment report is indicated on Report Form
OSHA No. 103 and on. the enclosed return envelope. Should you have any questions or
problems concerning this survey, please do not hesitate to contact the agency indicated.

You will also be required to complete a separate OSHA No. 103 report form for each of
these establishments. Enter the number of establishments in Section I so that a separate
supply of OSHA No. 103 report forms can be sent to you as soon as your consolidated re­
port is received by the collecting agency identified on the return envelope.

Thank you for your cooperation in this important survey.
Sincerely,

&
GEORGE C. GUENTHER
Assistant Secretary of Labor




—

An ESTABLISHMENT is defined as - a single physical location where business is conducted
or where services or industrial operations are performed. (For example: a factory, mill,
store, hotel, restaurant, movie theater, farm, ranch, bank, sales office, warehouse, or central
administrative office.) W here distinctly separate acitivities are performed at a single location
(such as contract construction activities operated from the same physical location as a lumber
yard), each activity shall'be treated as a separate establishment.
For firms engaged in activities such as agriculture, construction, transportation, communi­
cations, and electric, gas and sanitary services, which may be physically dispersed, reports
should cover the place to which employees report each day.

Appendix C- OSHA No. 103 Report and Instructions

1971 O C C U PA T IO N A L IN JU R IE S A N D ILLNESSES SURVEY
Ju ly 1-Decem ber 31,1971

Gentlemen:

Reports for personnel who do not primarily report or work at a single establishment, such as trav­
eling salesmen, technicians, engineers, etc., should cover the location from which they are paid
or the base from which personnel operate to carry out their activities.

Change of O w n ership - W hen there has been a change of ownership during the report period,
the records o f the current owner and the preserved records of the previous owner are to be in­
corporated in the report. Explain fully under "Comments.”

P artia l-Y ear R eporting - For establishments which were not in existence for the entire report
period, the report should cover the portion of the period during which the establishment was in
existence. Explain fully under "Comments.”

SECTION V - NATURE OF BUSINESS
In order to assign the appropriate nature of business classification to this report, we must have in­
formation about the economic activity of your establishment. Item 1 will provide, in general terms,
the principal activity while Item 2 will provide, in detail, the specific products or activities.

Item 1 - Enter the principal type of activity of this establishment. Describe in general terms, such
as manufacturing, retail trade, contract constructions, etc.

Item 2 - List in order of importance the specific products, lines of trade, services, or other economic
activities. Opposite each entry, please indicate the approximate percentage of 1971 annual dollar
income, sales value, or receipts accounted for by each activity. Reliable estimates are acceptable.
Please describe each product or activity fully.

SEC TIO N 11 - AVERAGE E M P L O Y M E N T

^

Enter in Section II the average number of full and part-time employees during the report period
(July 1, 1971-December 31, 1971). Include all classes of employees in the total (i.e., administra­
tive, supervisory, clerical, professional, technical, sales, delivery, installation, construction, and
service personnel, as well as operating and related workers). For example, if you have a monthly
payroll, the average number of employees will be the average of the six monthly employment
figures. If you have part of your employees on a monthly payroll and part on a weekly payroll,
the average figure in Section I should be the sum of the six-month average plus the 26-week
average.

Item 3 - If the principal activity of your establishment is providing services, it is necessary to know
whether the services are provided to other units of your company or are provided to establishments
outside your company on a contract or fee basis. If you check "Yes,” please indicate the nature
of the service provided to the other units of your company.

SEC TIO N V I - MEDICAL SERVICES
Item 1 - An "industrial hygienist” is defined as:

SEC TIO N I II - H O U R S W O R K E D
Enter in Section III the total hours worked by all employees during the report period (July 1,
1971-December 31, 1971). Include all time on duty, but exclude vacation, holiday, sick leave,
and all other non-work time even though paid. The hours reported should be obtained from pay­
roll or other time records.

If actual hours worked are not available for employees paid on commission, salary, by the mile,
etc., hours worked may be estimated on the basis of scheduled hours or 8 hours per workday.
(Example - If a group of 10 salaried employees worked an average of 8 hours per day, 5 days a
week, for 25' weeks of the report period the total hours worked for this group would be
10x8x5x2 5 = 1 0 ,000 hours for the report period.)

"A person having a college degree or equivalent experience plus special
studies and training which enables him to identify, measure, and evaluate
hazards in the work environment and to plan measures to eliminate, control,
or reduce such hazards.”
"Yes, based in the establishment” means that an industrial hygienist is employed by this establish­
ment. "Yes, based elsewhere” means that services are available from an industrial hygienist based
outside this establishment. He may be a company employee, based in company headquarters, or
may be a consultant from outside the company.

Item 2 - If you answer "Yes,” also enter the number of Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical
Nurses separately.
SEC TIO N IV - O P E R A T IO N S
Items 1-3 - If total hours worked, reported in Section III, averaged less than 750 or more than
1250 per employee, or if operations were seasonal and varied widely, indicate the approximate
number of employees, the regular hours worked per employee per week, and the number of weeks
during periods of peak, normal, and slack operations.




Item 3 - "Formal first aid training” - Certified Red Cross training or other formal first aid train­
ing which would qualify an employee to provide emergency first aid treatment.

Item 4 - "Yes, employed full-time" means that at least one physician is employed full-time to
provide medical care to the employees of the establishment. "Yes, employed part-time" means
that a physician devotes sorAe of his time on a regular basis to providing medical care to the em­
ployees of the establishment. "Yes, on call” means that there exists an arrangement between the
company and a physician to provide medical services. "Yes, at a clinic" means that there exists
an arrangement between the company and a clinic (not company owned or operated) to provide
medical services.

S EC TIO N V II
Check the appropriate box and go to the reverse side of the report form. Please note that Section
IX must always be completed whether or not you had any recordable injuries or illnesses.

SE C T IO N V III - IN JU R Y A N D ILLNESS SUMMARY
10
^

This section can be completed quickly and easily by copying the data already entered on your form
"Summary of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses” (OSHA No. 102) which was to have been
completed and posted by February 1. However, you should first make sure that the OSHA
No. 102 form has been correctly prepared.

The OSHA No. 102 form is the summary of cases which have been entered
on the "Log o f Occupational Injuries and Illnesses" (OSHA No. 100) during
the period July 1-December 31, 1971. Please review the "Log” to make
sure that all entires are correct and complete. Each case should be included
in only one of the three types: Fatalities (Log column 8); Lost Workday
Cases (Log columns 9 and 10); or Nonfatal Cases W ithout Lost Workdays
(Log columns 11 and 12).

The "Summary” (OSHA No. 102) should have been completed by summa­
rizing, separately, occupational injuries (code 10) and the seven categories
of occupational illnesses (code 21 through 29) according to instructions on the
back of the "Summary” form. Please remember that, if an employee’s loss
of workdays is still continuing at the time the Summary is completed, you
should estimate the number of future workdays he will lose and add this
estimate to the actual workdays already lost.
*




SECTION IX
Please complete all parts, including telephone number. Then return the OSHA No. 103 form
(but N O T your file copy) in the self-addressed envelope.

St.

Sch. #

Ck. Suf.

Emp.

1971 OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES AND ILLNESSES SURVEY
(covering the period July 1-December 31, 1971)

SIC

III.

10
*

W t.

COMPLETE THIS REPORT WHETHER OR NOT THERE WERE
ANY RECORDABLE OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES OR ILLNESSES.
SEE SEPARATE DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS.
VI.
V.

N A T U R E O F BUSINESS
1. Principal type of activity of this establishment (i.e.,
manufacturing, wholesale, retail, construction, public
utility, etc.):__________________________________ _

AVERAGE E M PL O Y M E N T :
Enter the average number of employees during the period
July 1-December 31. Include all classes of employees.

Enter in order of
importance the prin­
cipal products manu­
factured,
lines
of
trade, specific serv­
ices, or other activi-

H O I JR S W O R K E D :
Enteir the total hours worked by all employees during the
period July 1-December 31. Exclude all non-work time
even though paid. (Vacation, sick leave, holidays, etc.)

Approximate
percent of
total annual
sales volume
or receipts,
1971

(2 )
(3)
O P E R A T IO N S :
If hours average less than 750 or more than 1250 per
employee, please supply the following:
July 1-December 31, 1971
Average
Employment
1. Peak Operations
2. Normal Operations
3. Slack Operations

UNIT DESIGNATION-




Weekly Number of
Hours
Weeks

MEDICAL SERVICES
1. Does your establishment have the services of an in­
dustrial hygienist?
(Check one)
No
(1
)
Yes, based in the establishment
( 2)
Yes, based elsewhere
(3)
2. Do you have one or more nurses at this establishment
to provide care for employees?
(1) □
No
(2) □
Yes
If yes, enter the number of:__________
A. Registered Nurses I
I
B. Licensed Practical Nurses |
|
3. Do you have employees at this establishment with
formal first-aid training (other than doctors or nurses)
who have been designated to provide emergency treat­
____
ment?
(1)
No
(2) □
Yes
If yes, how many? |
|
4. Do you employ or have an arrangement with a physi­
cian, or clinic to give your employees medical care?
(Check all that apply)

CZH

( 1)

FV.

Complete and return only THIS report
in the enclosed envelope within 3 weeks
of receipt. Do N O T send OSHA Form
No. 102, "Summary."

Edit

SIC
Cd.

If the unit designated below your mailing address at the
bottom of this page includes more than one establishment.
enter the number of establishments here
and
read the special instructions on page 1 before proceed­
ing.
II.

OMB APPROVAL NO. 44-S71036

THIS REPORT IS MANDATORY UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-596

OSHANo. 103
U S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
for the Occupational Safety
and Health Administration
Washington, D.C. 20212

(4)

(1) □

(5)

(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)

(6 )
3. Is the establishment primarily engaged in performing
services for other units of the company?
(1 )Q N o
(2)[~~1 Yes
If yes, indicate nature of activity of this establishment:
(1) |
| Central administrative office
(2) |
1 Research, development, or testing
(3) I
I Storage (warehouse)
(4) I
I Other-Specify

V II.

no

I
I Yes,
i
\ Yes,
I------ 1Yes,
i
I Yes,

employed full-time
employed part-time
on call
at a clinic

Did you have any recordable injuries or illnesses during
the period July 1 - December 31?
(Check one)
( ! ) □
No-turn page and complete Section IX
(2) I
I Yes-turn page and complete Sections V III
and IX.

VIII.

INJURY AND ILLNESS SUMMARY (covering the period July 1-December 31, 1971)

IN S T R U C T IO N S :

* This section may be completed by copying data from OSHA Form No. 102 "Summary, Occupational Injuries and Illnesses” which you are required to complete and
post in your establishment.
• Leave Section VIII blank if there were no recordable injuries or illnesses during the period July 1-December 31, 1971.
• Code 30 - Add all Occupational Illnesses (Code 21+ 2 2 + 2 3 + 24+25 + 26 + 29) and enter on this line for each column (3) through (8).
• Code 31 - Add total Occupational Injuries (code 10) and total Occupational Illnesses (code 30) and enter on this line for each column (3) through (8).

NONFATAL CASES W ITHOUT
LOST W ORKDAYS*

LOST W ORKDAY CASES

FATALITIES

Number
of
Cases
Code

a)

Category
(2)

10

26

30

Sum O f All Occupational Illnesses
(Add Codes 21-29)

31

(8)

All O ther Occupational Illnesses

B .i

(7)

Disorders Due to Repeated Trauma

29

(6)

Disorders Due to Physical Agents
(Other Than Toxic Materials)

1
L
L
N
E
S

(5)

Poisoning
(Systemic Effects of Toxic Materials)

25

(4)

Respiratory Conditions Due To Toxic Agents

24

Number of Cases
Involving Transfer
to Another Job
or Termination
of Employment

Dust Diseases of the Lungs
(Pneumoconioses)

23

Number
of
Cases

Occupational Skin Diseases or Disorders

22

Number
of
Lost
Workdays

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES

21

Number of Cases
Invovling Permanent
Transfer to Another
Job or Termination
of Employment

Sum O f All Occupational Injuries And
Illnesses (Add Codes 10+30)

A.
0
C
C
U
P
A
T
1
0
N
A
L

10

0
1

S

c.

(3)

* Nonfatal Cases W ithout Lost Workdays - Cases resulting in: Medical treatement beyond first aid, diagnosis of occupational illness, loss of consciousness, restriction of work or motion,
or transfer to another job (without lost workdays).
COMMENTS:.

Tide:




Area Code and Phone:

Appendix D. Statistical Grant Agencies
Participating in the 1971 Survey

Alaska

Florida

Department o f Labor

Department o f Commerce
Division o f Labor and Employment Opportunities

P. 0. Box 1149
Juneau, Alaska 99801

Caldwell Building
Tallahassee, Fla. 32301

Arizona
Georgia

Office o f the Governor
1700 W. Washington Street

Board o f Workmen’s Compensation
Office o f Occupational Safety and Health
1182 W. Peachtree Street
Suite 315
Atlanta, Ga. 30309

Phoenix, Ariz. 85007

Arkansas
Department o f Labor
Capitol Hill Building
Little Rock, Ark. 72201

Hawaii
California

Department o f Labor and Industrial Relations

Department o f Industrial Relations

825 Mililani Street
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813

455 Golden Gate Avenue
San Francisco, Calif. 94101

Idaho
Colorado

Industrial Commission
317 Main Street

Department o f Labor and Employment
200 East Ninth Avenue
Denver, Colo. 80203

Boise, Idaho 83702

Illinois
Connecticut

Illinois Industrial Commission

Department o f Labor

160 North LaSalle Street

200 Folly Brook Boulevard

Chicago, 1 1 60601
1.

Wethersfield, Conn. 06109

Indiana
Washington, D. C.

Division o f Labor

Minimum Wage and Industrial Safety Board

1013 State Office Building

Industrial Safety Division

100 Senate Avenue

615 Eye Street N. W.

Indianapolis, Ind. 46204

Washington, D. C. 20001

Iowa
Delaware

Bureau o f Labor

Department o f Labor

State House
East 7th and Court Avenue
Des Moines, Iowa 50319

801 West Street
Wilmington, Del.

19899




26

Kansas

Montana

Department o f Health
State Office Building
Topeka, Kans. 66612

Department o f Labor and Industry
Workmen’s Compensation Division
815 Front Street
Helena, Mont. 59601

Kentucky
Department o f Labor
Capital Plaza Tower
Frankfort, Ky. 40601

Nebraska
Workmen’s Compensation Court
13th Floor
Capitol Building

Louisiana

Lincoln, Nebr. 68509

Department o f Labor
P. 0. Box 44063

Nevada

205 Capitol Annex
Baton Rouge, La. 70804

Industrial Commission
Department o f Industrial Safety
515 East Musser Street

Maine

Carson City, Nev. 89701

Department o f Manpower Affairs
Bureau o f Labor and Industry
Division o f Research and Statistics
Augusta, Maine 04330

New Hampshire
Department o f Labor
1 Pillsbury Street
Concord, N. H. 03301

Maryland
Department o f Licensing and Regulation

New Jersey

Division o f Labor and Industry
203 E. Baltimore Street
Baltimore, Md, 21202

Department o f Labor and Industry
John Fitch Plaza
Trenton, N. J. 08625

Massachusetts

New Mexico

Department o f Labor and Industries

Environmental Improvement Agency

Saltonstall State Office Building

P. O. Box 2348
Santa Fe, N. Mex. 87501

100 Cambridge Street
Boston, Mass. 02202

New York

Michigan

Department o f Labor

Department o f Labor

Division o f Research and Statistics

300 E. Michigan Avenue
Lansing, Mich. 48913

80 Centre Street
New York, N. Y.

10007

Minnesota
Department o f Labor and Industry

North Carolina

110 State Office Building
St. Paul, Minn. 55101

Department o f Labor
Edenton and Salisbury Streets
Raleigh, N. C. 27602

Mississippi
Board o f Health

North Dakota

2423 North State Street

Workmen’s Compensation Bureau

Jackson, Miss. 39205

State Capitol
Bismarck, N. Dak. 58501

Missouri
Department o f Labor and Industrial Relations
Division o f Workmen’s Compensation

Oklahoma

Box 58
Jefferson City , Mo. 65101

3400 North Eastern Avenue
Oklahoma City, Okla. 73105




Department o f Health

27

Oregon

Utah

Workmen’s Compensation Board
Labor and Industries Building
Salem, Oreg. 97310

Industrial Commission
Room 438, State Capitol Building
Salt Lake City, Utah 84114

Pennsylvania

Vermont

Department o f Labor and Industry
7th and Forster Streets
Harrisburg, Pa. 17121

Department o f Labor and Industry
State Office Building
Montpelier, Vt. 05602

Puerto Rico

Virgin Islands

Department o f Labor
Bureau o f Work Accident Prevention
414 Barbosa Avenue
Hato Rey, P. R. 00917

Department o f Labor
P. O. Box 708
Christiansted
St. Croix, V. I. 00820

Rhode Island

Virginia

Department o f Labor
235 Promenade Street

Department o f Labor and Industry
P. O. Box 1814
Ninth Street Office Building

Providence, R. I. 02908

Richmond, Va. 23214

South Carolina
Department o f Labor

Washington

1710 Gervais Street

Department o f Labor and Industries
General Administration Building

P. O. Box 11329
Columbia, S. C. 29211

Olympia, Wash. 98504

West Virginia
South Dakota

Workmen’s Compensation Fund

Department o f Health
State Health Officer

Division o f Labor Statistics
112 California Avenue

Pierre, S. Dak. 57501

Charleston, W. Va. 25305

Tennessee

Wisconsin

Department o f Labor
Cl-100 Cordell Hull Building
Nashville, Tenn. 37219

Department o f Industry, Labor and Human Relations
310 Price Place
P. O. Box 2209
Madison, Wis. 53705

Texas
Department o f Health

Wyoming

Division o f Occupational Safety
110 West 49th Street

304 Capitol Building

Austin, Tex. 78756

Cheyenne, Wyo. 82001




Department o f Labor and Statistics

28

Appendix E: Glossary of Terms for the
Occupational Safety and Health Survey
Auxiliary Unit

An

auxiliary

unit is an establishment which performs

services for other units o f the same company, such as a
warehouse for a steel pipe manufacturing plant. It carries
the same SIC code as the unit which it serves.

Average Employment

Average employment is the average number o f full and
part-time employees during the report period. It includes
all classes o f employees in the total (i.e., administrative,
supervisory, clerical, professional, technical, sales, delivery,
installation, construction, and service personnel, as well
as operating and related workers.)

Cooperative Program

A

program jointly conducted by the States and the

Federal Government to collect occupational injury and
illness statistics.

Employment Size Group

A grouping o f establishments with a specified range o f
employment.

Establishment

A single physical location where business is conducted or
where services or industrial operations are performed.
(For example: a factory, mill, store, hotel, restaurant,
movie theater, farm, ranch, bank, sales office, warehouse,
or central administrative office.) Where distinctly separate
activities are performed at a single physical location
(such as contract construction activities operated from
the same physical location as a lumber yard), each
activity shall be treated as a separate establishment.
For firms engaged in activities such as agriculture, con­
struction, transportation, communications, and electric,
gas and sanitary services, which may be physically dispersed,
records may be maintained at a place to which employees
report each day.
Records for personnel who do not primarily report or work
at a single establishment, such as traveling salesmen,
technicians, engineers, etc., shall be maintained at the
location from which they are paid or the base from which
personnel operate to carry out their activities.

Hours Worked




Total hours worked by all employees during the report
period. Includes all time on duty, but not vacation, holiday,
sick leave, and all other nonwork time even though
paid.

29

Incidence Rate

Numbet o f injuries and illnesses for 100 full-time employees.
The rate is calculated as:
^ - x 200,000
MH
where
N = number o f occupational injuries and illnesses
MH = total hours worked by all employees during
reference year

200,000 = base for 100 full-time equivalent workers
(working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year).

Industrial Hygienist

A person having a college degree or equivalent experience
plus special studies and training which enables him to
identify, measure, and evaluate hazards in the work
environment and to plan measures to eliminate, control,
or reduce such hazards.

Lost Workdays

The number o f days (consecutive or not) on which, because
o f the injury or illness:
( 1)

the employee would have worked but could not, or

( 2)

the employee was assigned to a temporary job, or

(3 )

the employee worked at a permanent job less than
full time, or

(4 )

the employee worked at a permanently assigned
job but could not perform all duties normally
assigned to it.

Medical Treatment

Includes treatment administered by a physician or by
registered professional personnel under the standing orders
o f a physician. Medical treatment does N O T include
first aid treatment (one-time treatment and subsequent
observation o f minor scratches, cuts, burns, splinters,
and so forth, which do not ordinarily require medical
care) even though provided by a physician or registered
professional personnel.

Occupational Illness




Any abnormal condition or disorder, other than one
resulting from an occupational injury, caused by exposure
to environmental factors associated with his employment.
It includes acute and chronic illnesses or diseases which
may be caused by inhalation, absorption, ingestion, or
direct contact, and which can be included in the categories
listed below.
The following categories were used by employers to classify
recordable occupational illnesses.
(21) Occupational Skin Diseases or Disorders
Examples: Contact dermatitis, eczema, or rash
caused by primary irritants and sensitizers or
poisonous plants; oil acne; chrome ulcers; chemi­
cal burns or inflammations; etc.
(22) Dust Diseases o f
Examples:

the

Silicosis,

Lung (Pneumoconioses)
asbestosis,

coal worker’s

pneumoconiosis, byssinosis, and other pneumo­
conioses.

30

(23) Respiratory Conditions Due to Toxic Agents
Examples: Pneumonitis, pharyngitis, rhinitis or
acute congestion due to chemicals, dusts, gases or
fumes; farmer’s lung; etc.
(24) Poisoning (Systemic Effects o f Toxic Materials)
Examples: Poisoning by lead, mercury, cadmium,
arsenic, or other metals, poisoning by carbon
monoxide, hydrogen sulfide or other gases;
poisoning by benzol, carbon tetrachloride, or
other organic solvents; poisoning by insecticide
sprays such as parathion, lead arsenate; poisoning
by other chemicals such as formaldehyde, plastics,
and resins, etc.
(25) Disorders Due to Physical Agents (Other Than
Toxic Materials)
Examples: Heatstroke, sunstroke, heat exhaustion
and other effects o f environmental heat; freezing,
frostbite and effects o f exposure to low tem­
peratures; caisson disease; effects o f ionizing
radiation (isotopes, X-rays, radium); effects o f
nonionizing radiation (welding flash, ultraviolet
rays, microwaves, sunburn), etc.
(26) Disorders Due to Repeated Trauma
Examples: Noise-induced hearing loss; synovitis,
tenosynovitis, and bursitis; Raynaud’s phenomena;
and other conditions due to repeated motion,
vibration, or pressure.
(29) All Other Occupational Illnesses
Examples: Anthrax, brucellosis, infectious hepa­
titis, malignant and benign tumors, food poi­
soning, histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, etc.

Occupational Injury

Any injury such as a cut, fracture, sprain, amputation,
etc., which results from a work accident or from exposure
in the work environment.

Recordable Occupational
Injuries and Illnesses

Any occupational injuries or illnesses which result in:
(1 )

FA TA LITIE S, regardless o f the time between
the injury and death, or the length o f the illness; or

(2 )

LOST W O R K D A Y CASES, other than fatalities
that result in lost workdays; or

(3 )

N O N F A T A L CASES W ITHOUT LOST W O RK­
D AYS, which result in transfer to another job or
termination o f employment, or require medical
treatment, or involve loss o f consciousness

or

restriction o f work or motion. This category also
includes any diagnosed occupational illnesses
which are reported to the employer but are not
classified as fatalities or lost workday cases.

Report Form




Refers to form OSHA No. 103 which is completed and
returned by the selected sample establishment.

31

Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC)

The Standard Industrial Classification is prepared by the
Office o f Statistical Standards, Executive Office o f the
President/Office o f Management and Budget. Each estab­
lishment is assigned an industry code for its major
activity which is determined by the product or group o f
products

or services rendered. Establishments may be

classified as two-digit, three-digit, or four-digit industries,
according to the degree o f information available.

Unit Designation

The last line in the address that specifies the particular
“ unit(s)” (i.e., the city, county, division, o f the company,
etc.) for which data are requested.

Work Environment




The physical location, equipment, materials processed or
used, and the kinds o f operations performed by an
employee in the performance o f his work, whether on or
o ff the employer’s premises.

32

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B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S

Region I
1603 JF K Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)

Region II
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region VI
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Region III
P. O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)

Regions VII and VIII *
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St., NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Regions IX and X **
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)




**

Regions VII and VIII are serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco.

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W ASHIN G TO N , D. C. 20212

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L A B ' 441


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