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BLS PUBLICATIONS
1886-1971
Bulletin 1749

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

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D a y t o n & M ontgom ery

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Public Library
SECOND A N N U A L REPORT

JAN 3 1973

PRODUCTIVITY
in the
RAILROAD
INDUSTRY

Employee
Compensation
and Payroll
Hours

COMMISSIONER OF LABOR,

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C O N V IC T

COLLECTION

LABOR.

WASHINOTOK:
ftNII ENT PRINTING OFFIOS.
1887.

A B R IE F

HISTORY
OF THE

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LABOR
MOVEMENT

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Attainment of Workers,
March 1969,1970

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EDITION

Fore. H«por1125
December 1970

PRODUCTIVITY
and the

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BLS PUBLICATIONS

1886-1971
— Numerical Listings
— Annotations
— Subject Index
Bulletin 1749
U.S. DEPA RTM ENT OF LABOR
James D. Hodgson, Secretary
Bureau o f L abo r Statistics
G e o ffre y H . M o o re , C om m issioner

1972

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $1.50
Stock Number 2901-0931




Preface
This bulletin provides in one volume a complete catalogue of the major publications of
the Bureau of Labor Statistics: numbered bulletins, numbered reports, and periodicals. It
contains a numerical listing of all bulletins issued since their publication began in 1886; a
numerical listing of reports from their first issuance in 1953; a list of current periodicals;
and a subject index of bulletins and reports. Also included is a list of BLS publications
which do not fall into the stated categories but which may be of interest to users of this
catalogue.
The numerical listing of bulletins begins on p. 1. Publication dates are shown in
parentheses and prices are given for those still in print. Annotations are provided for those
bulletins which analyze major economic or labor developments, explain phases of the Bu­
reau’s statistical program or survey techniques, or present the latest data for a historical
series.
Reports are listed beginning on p. 98 with their publication dates. Reports have not
been annotated. Current periodicals are listed alphabetically on p. 110 with their frequency
of publication and price if they are for sale. Other publications of general interest are listed
on p. I l l by major BLS statistical program.
The subject index (pp. 112-184) lists all bulletins published since 1915 (Nos. 174
through 1724) and all of the reports. (Bulletin 174 contains a subject index for Bulletins
1 through 173.) Cross references are provided. Annotated bulletins are identified in the
subject index by an asterisk (*) .
Periodicals are not included in the subject index. Subject indexes for the Monthly
Labor Review through 1960 are provided in Bulletins 695, 696, 1080, and 1335; indexes
also are provided in the December issues of the Review. Semiannually, the Bureau publishes
an annotated catalogue of bulletins, reports, press releases, and three periodicals ( Monthly
Labor Review, Employment and Earnings, and Occupational Outlook Quarterly).
Numbered bulletins and some numbered reports are for sale. Four BLS periodicals are
for sale by the copy and by subscription: Monthly Labor Review, Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, Employment and Earnings, and Current Wage Developments. Publications for
sale can be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or from any of the BLS regional offices listed on the
inside back cover of this bulletin. Free periodicals and reports are available at the time of
publication from the Bureau and its regional offices. Bulletins, reports, and periodicals can
be found at most large public libraries and at most university and college libraries.
This publication replaces BLS Bulletin 1567. It was prepared in the Office of Publica­
tions, Division of Special Publications, by Rosalie Epstein, under the direction of Tommy
C. Ishee.







Contents
Page

Numerical listing of bulletins and selected annotations ..............................

1

Numerical listing of r e p o r t s ...................................................................................

98

Current periodicals ....................................................................................................

110

Other publications of general in te r e s t....................................................................

Ill

Subject index of bulletins and r e p o r t s .................................................................




112




Numerical Listing of Bulletins
And Selected Annotations

Industrial Depressions, March, 1886, The
First Annual Report of the Commis­
sioner of Labor (1886).
Convict Labor, 1886, Second Annual R e­
port of the Commissioner of Labor
(1887).

1

2

3
4
5

6

7

Strikes and Lockouts, 1887, Third An­
nual R eport of the Commissioner of
Labor (1888).
Working Women in Large Cities, 1888,
Fourth Annual Report of the Commis­
sioner of Labor (1889).

Strikes and Lockouts in the United States
from January 1, 1881, to June 30, 1894 [sum­
mary of Third and Tenth Annual Reports];
Private and Public Debt in the United States;
Employer and Employee under the Common
Law (1 8 9 5 ).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation
on work stoppages (strikes and lockouts).
The Poor Colonies of Holland; The Industrial
Revolution in Japan; Notes Concerning the
Money of the United States and Other Coun­
tries; The Wealth and Receipts and Expenses
of the United States (1896).
Industrial Communities: Coal Mining Co. of
Anzin, France (1 8 9 6 ).
Industrial Communities: Coal Mining Co. of
Blanzy, France. The Sweating System (1896).
Convict Labor; Industrial Communities; Iron
and Steel Works of Friedrich Krupp, Essen,
Germany (1 8 96).
Industrial Communities; Familistere Society
of Guise, France. Cooperative Distribution
(1896).
Industrial Communities: Other Communities;
Rates of Wages Paid Under Public and Pri­
vate Contract (1896).




8

9

10

11

12

13

14

Conciliation and Arbitration in the Boot and
Shoe Industry; Railway Relief Department
(1897).
The Padrone System and Padrone Banks;
The Dutch Society for General Welfare
(1897).
Work and Wages of Men, Women, and Chil­
dren [summary of Eleventh Annual Report];
Condition of the Negro in Various Cities;
Building and Loan Associations (1897).
Workers at Gainful Occupations at the Fed­
eral Censuses of 1870, 1880, and 1890; Pub­
lic Baths in Europe (1897).
The Inspection of Factories and Workshops
in the United States; Mutual Rights and
Duties of Parents and Children, Guardian­
ship, etc., Under the Law; The Municipal or
Cooperative Restaurant of Grenoble, France
(1897).
The Italians in Chicago [summary of Ninth
Special Report]. The Anthracite Mine L a­
borers (1897).
The Negroes of Farmville, Va.: A Social
Study; Income, Wages, and Rents in M on­
treal (1898).
1

15
16

17

18
19

20
21
22

23

24
25
26

27

28

29

30

31

Boarding Homes and Clubs for Working
Women; The Trade-Union Label (1898).
The Alaskan Gold Fields and the Oppor­
tunities They Offer for Capital and Labor
(1898).
Economic Aspects of the Liquor Problem
[summary of Twelfth Annual Report];
Brotherhood Relief and Insurance of Rail­
way Employees; The Nations of Antwerp
(1898) .
Wages in the United States and Europe, 1870
to 1898 (1898).
The Alaskan Gold Fields and the Opportuni­
ties They Offer for Capital and Labor; Mu­
tual Relief and Benefit Associations in the
Printing Trade (1898).
Condition of Railway Labor in Europe
(1899) .
Pawnbroking in Europe and the United
States (1899).
Benefit Features of American Trade Unions;
The Negro in the Black Belt; Some Social
Sketches; Wages in Lyons, France, 1870 to
1896 (1899).
The Attitude of Women’s Clubs and Associa­
tions Toward Social Economics; The Produc­
tion of Paper and Pulp in the United States,
from January 1 to June 30, 1898 (1899).
Statistics of Cities (1899).
Foreign Labor Laws: Great Britain and
France (1899).
Protection of Workmen in Their Employ­

ment; Foreign Labor Laws: Belgium and
Switzerland (1900).
Wholesale Prices: 1890 to 1899; Foreign
Labor Laws: Germany (1900).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation
on wholesale prices.
Voluntary Conciliation and Arbitration in
Great Britain; System of Adjusting Scale of
Wages, etc., in Certain Rolling Mills; For­
eign Labor Laws: Austria (1900).
Trusts and Industrial Combinations; The
Yukon and Nome Gold Regions; Labor Day
(1900) .
Trend of Wages from 1891 to 1900; Statistics
of Cities; Foreign Labor Laws: Russia, The
Netherlands, Italy, Norway, Sweden, and
Denmark (1900).
The Betterment of Industrial Conditions;
Present Status of Employers’ Liability in the

2



32

33

34

35

36
37

38

39

40

41
42

43

44
45

United States; Condition of Railway Labor
in Italy (1900).
Accidents to Labor as Regulated by Law in
the United States; Prices of Commodities
and Rates of Wages in Manila; The Negroes
of Sandy Spring, M d .: A Social Study; The
British Workmen’s Compensation Act and
Its Operation (1901).
Foreign Labor Laws: Australasia and Can­
ada; The British Conspiracy and Protection
of Property Act and Its Operation (1901).
Labor Conditions in Puerto Rico; Social Eco­
nomics at the Paris Exposition; The W ork­
men’s Compensation Act of Holland (1901).
Cooperative Communities in the United
States; The Negro Landholder of Georgia
(1 9 0 1 ) .
Statistics of Cities; Statistics of Honolulu,
Hawaii (1901).
Railway Employees in the United States;
The Negroes of Litwalton, Va.: A Social
Study of the “Oyster Negro” (1 9 0 1 ).
Labor Conditions in Mexico; The Negroes of
Sinclare Central Factory and Calumet Plan­
tation, La.; Charts Exhibited at the Pan
American Exposition; The Quebec Trade
Disputes Act (1902).
Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1901
(1 9 0 2 ) .
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Present Condition of the Handworking and
Domestic Industries of Germany; Workmen’s
Compensation Acts of Foreign Countries;
Working of Compulsory Conciliation and
Arbitration Laws in New Zealand and Vic­
toria; the Compulsory Arbitration Act of New
South Wales (1902).
Labor Conditions in Cuba; Beef Prices; The
True Reformers (1902).
Statistics of Cities; Labor Conditions in
Cuba [Amendatory of Article in Bull. 41]
(1902).
R eport to the President on Anthracite Coal
Strike; Italian Bureau of Labor Statistics
(1 9 0 2 ) .
Factory Sanitation and Labor Protection
(1 9 0 3 ) .
Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1902
(1903).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.

46
47

48

49

50

51

52
53
54

55

56
57

Report of the Anthracite Coal Strike Com­
mission (1903).
Report of the Commissioner of Labor on
Hawaii [Reprint of Second Report of the
Commissioner of Labor on Hawaii, S. Doc.
181, 57th Cong., 2d Sess.] (1903).
Farm Colonies of the Salvation Army; The
Negroes of Xenia, Ohio: A Social Study
(1903) .
Cost of Living [Summary of Eighteenth An­
nual Report]; Labor Conditions in New Zea­
land; Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act of New Zealand (1903).
Labor Unions and British Industry; Land
Values and Ownership in Philadelphia
(1904) .
Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1903;
The Union Movement Among Coal-Mine
Workers (1904).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation
on wholesale prices.
Child Labor in the United States (1904).
Wages and Cost of Living (1904).
The Working of the United States Bureau of
Labor: Bureaus of Statistics of Labor; Bu­
reaus of Statistics of Labor in Foreign Coun­
tries; Value and Influence of Labor Statistics;
Strikes and Lockouts in the United States,
1881 to 1900; Wages in the United States and
in Europe, 1890 to 1903; Cost of Living and
Retail Prices in the United States; Wholesale
Prices in the United States, 1890 to 1903;
Housing of the Working People in the United
States by Employers; Public Baths in the
United States; Trade and Technical Educa­
tion in the United States; Hand and Machine
Labor in the United States; Labor Legisla­
tion in the United States; Labor Conditions
in Hawaii (1904).
For annotation on wholesale prices, see
Bull. 1513, this listing; and on work stop­
pages (strikes and lockouts), Bull. 1687.
Building and Loan Associations in the United
States; The Revival of Handicrafts in Amer­
ica (1904).
Influence of Trade Unions on Immigrants;
Labor Conditions in Australia (1905).
Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1904;
Street Railway Employment in the United
States; The State Cooperative Accident In­
surance Fund of Maryland (1905).




58

59

60

61

62

63

64
65

66

67

68

69
70

71

72

73

See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation
on wholesale prices.
Labor Conditions in the Philippines, Labor
Conditions in Java; The New Russian W ork­
ingmen’s Compensation Act (1905).
Wages and Hours of Labor in M anufactur­
ing Industries, 1890 to 1904; Retail Prices of
Food, 1890 to 1904; Laws Relating to Child
Labor in European Countries (1905).
Government Industrial Arbitration; The
Eight-Hour Law and Enforced Labor Con­
tracts in the Panam a Canal Zone (1905).
Labor Conditions in Puerto Rico; A Docu­
mentary History of the Early Organizations
of Printers (1905).
Municipal Ownership in Great Britain;
Conciliation in the Stove Industry; Laws
Relating to the Employment of Children in
the United States (1906).
Course of Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1905
(1 9 0 6 ) .
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Conditions of Living Among the Poor; Bene­
fit Features of British Trade Unions (1906).
Wages and Hours of Labor in M anufactur­
ing Industries, 1890 to 1905; Retail Prices of
Food, 1890 to 1905 (1906).
Third Report of the Commissioner of Labor
on Hawaii [Reprint of H. Doc. 580, 59th
Cong., 1st sess.] (1906).
Conditions of Entrance to the Principal
Trades; Cost of Industrial Insurance in the
District of Columbia (1906).
Free Public Employment Offices in the
United States; Laws of Foreign Countries
Relating to Employees on Railroads (1907).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1906 (1907).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
The Italian on the Land: A Study in Im ­
migration; A Short History of Labor Legisla­
tion in Great Britain; British W orkmen’s
Compensation Acts (1907).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Manufacturing
Industries, 1890 to 1906; Retail Prices of
Food, 1890 to 1906 (1907).
Italian, Slavic, and Hungarian Unskilled Im ­
migrant Laborers in the United States; Eco­
nomic Condition of the Jews in Russia
(1 9 0 7 ) .
Laws Relating to the Employment of Women
and Children; Laws Relating to Factory In-

3

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

81
82

83

84

85

spection and the Health and Safety of Em ­
ployees (1 9 0 7 ).
The Legal Liability of Employers for In­
juries to Their Employees, in the United
States; Summary of Foreign Workmen’s
Compensation Acts; British W orkmen’s
Compensation Act of 1906; Canadian In­
dustrial Disputes Investigation Act of 1907;
British Trade Disputes Act of 1906 (1908).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1907; Industrial
Hygiene (1 9 0 8 ).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation
on wholesale prices.
Canadian Industrial Disputes Investigation
Act of 1907; What is Done for the Unem­
ployed in European Countries (1908).
Wages and Hours of Labor in M anufactur­
ing Industries, 1890 to 1907; Retail Prices of
Food, 1890 to 1907; Compensation for In­
juries of Artisans and Laborers in the Service
of the United States; Cost of Living of the
Working Classes in the Principal Industrial
Towns of Great Britain (1908).
Industrial Accidents; Mexican Labor in the
United States; Cost of Living of the W ork­
ing Classes in the Principal Industrial Towns
of the German Empire; British Old-Age Pen­
sions Act of 1908 (19 0 8 ).
See Bull. 490 this listing for annotation on
industrial accidents.
The Mortality from Consumption in Dusty
Trades; Charity Relief and Wage Earnings
(1908).
Women and Child Wage Earners in Great
Britain; Minimum Wage Act, 1908, New
South Wales (1907).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1908 (1909).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Mortality from Consumption in Occupations
Exposing to Municipal and General Organic
Dust (1 9 0 9 ).
The Women’s Trade-Union Movement in
Great Britain; Cost of Living of the Work­
ing Classes in the Principal Industrial Towns
of France; Earnings and Hours of Labor in
British Textile Industries (1909).
Accidents to Railroad Employees in New
Jersey, 1888 to 1907; The Minnesota Iron
Ranges (1 909).
Review of Labor Legislation of 1908 and
1909; Laws of Various States Relating to

4



86

87

88

89
90

91

92

Labor, Enacted Since January 1, 1908
(1 9 0 9 ) .
Canadian Industrial Disputes Investigation
Act of 1907; Phosphorus Poisoning in the
Match Industry in the United States; List of
Industrial Poisons; International Associa­
tion for Labor Legislation and Its Publica­
tions; British Trade Boards Act, 1909; E arn­
ings and Hours of Labor in British Clothing
Industries (1910).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to M arch 1910;
Wages and Hours of Labor of Union Car­
penters in the United States and in EnglishSpeaking Foreign Countries; Prices of Wheat,
Bread, etc., in Milan, Italy, 1801 to 1908;
Cost of Living of the Working Classes in
the Principal Industrial Towns of Bel­
gium; Earnings and Hours of Labor in
British Building and Woodworking Indus­
tries (1910).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation
on wholesale prices.
Cost of Living of Families of M oderate In­
come in Germany in 1907-08; Trend of
Wages in Germany, 1898 to 1907; Wages and
Hours of Labor in German Woodworking In­
dustries in 1906; Wages and Hours of Labor
in Austria, 1906 and 1907 (1 9 1 0 ).
Child-Labor Legislation in Europe (1910).
Fatal Accidents in Coal Mining; Recent Ac­
tion Relating to Employers’ Liability and
W orkmen’s Compensation; Essential Fea­
tures of a Compensation Law; Chicago Con­
ference of November 1910; Summary of F or­
eign Workmen’s Compensation Acts; Cost of
Employers’ Liability and W orkmen’s Com­
pensation Acts; Cost of Employers’ Liability
and Workmen’s Compensation Insurance
(1 9 1 0 ) .
Working Hours of Wage-Earning Women in
Selected Industries in Chicago; Labor Laws
Declared Unconstitutional; Old-Age and In­
validity Pension Laws of Germany, France,
and Australia; Review of Labor Legislation
of 1910; Laws of Various States Relating to
Labor Enacted Since J anuary 1, 1910(1910).
Industrial Accidents and Loss of Earning
Power: Germ an Experience in 1897 and
1907; W orkmen’s Compensation and Insur­
ance; Laws and Bills, 1911; Resolutions of
the Sixth Delegates’ Meeting of the Interna­

93

94
95

96

97

98

tional Association for Labor Legislation; R e­
port of Illinois Commission on Occupational
Diseases (1 9 1 1 ).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1910; Report of
British Board of Trade on Cost of Living in
the Principal Industrial Cities of the United
States; Reports of British Board of Trade on
Cost of Living in England and Wales, Ger­
many, France, Belgium, and the United
States; Hours of Labor of Men, Women, and
Children Employed in Factories in Austria
(1911).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation
on wholesale prices.
Fourth Report of the Commissioner of Labor
on Hawaii (1 911).
Industrial Lead Poisoning, with Descriptions
of Lead Processes in Certain Industries in
Great Britain and the Western States of
Europe; White Lead Industry in the United
States, with an Appendix on the Lead-O xide
Industry; Deaths from Industrial Lead Poi­
soning (Actually R eported) in New York
State in 1909 and 1910; Laws Enacted D ur­
ing 1911 Requiring the R eport of Occupa­
tional Diseases (19 1 1 ).
Working Hours, Earnings, and Duration of
Employment of Women Workers in Selected
Industries of M aryland and of California;
Employment of Children in Maryland In­
dustries; Attitude of Massachusetts M anu­
facturers Toward the Health of Their Em ­
ployees; The W orkmen’s Insurance Code of
July 19, 1911, of Germany (1911).
Review of Labor Legislation of 1911; Laws
of Various States Relating to Labor Enacted
Since January, 1911 (1911).
Mediation and Arbitration of Railway Labor
Disputes in the United States; Canadian In­
dustrial Disputes Investigation Act of 1907;
Conciliation and Arbitration of Railway La­
bor Disputes in Great Britain (Conciliation
and Arbitration Agreement of 1907); Con­
ciliation and Arbitration in Great Britain
(Conciliation Act of 1896); Attitude of Em ­
ploying Interests Toward Conciliation and
Arbitration in Great Britain; Attitude of
Labor Toward Conciliation and Arbitration
in Great Britain; Conciliation, Arbitration,
and Sanitation in the Cloak, Suit, and Skirt




99

100

101
102
103
104

105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114

Industry in New York City; Industrial Courts
in France, Germany, and Switzerland (1912).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1911; Wholesale
Prices in Canada, 1890 to 1911 (1912).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
List of Industrial Poisons and Other Sub­
stances Injurious to Health Found in Indus­
trial Processes; Act Providing for a Tax on
White Phosphorus Matches and for Prohibit­
ing Their Import or Export (1912).
Care of Tuberculous Wage Earners in Ger­
many (1912).
British National Insurance Act, 1911 (1912).
Sickness and Accident Insurance Law of
Switzerland (1912).
Lead Poisoning in Potteries, Tile Works, and
Porcelain Enameled Sanitary Ware Factories
(1912).
Retail Prices, 1890 to 1911, Pts. I and II
(1912) .
Retail Prices, 1890 to June, 1912, Pts. I and
II (1912).
Law Relating to Insurance of Salaried Em­
ployees in Germany (1913).
Retail Prices, 1890 to August, 1912 (1912).
Statistics of Unemployment and the Work of
Employment Offices (1913).
Retail Prices, 1890 to October, 1912(1912).
Labor Legislation of 1912 (1913).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1912 (1913).
Retail Prices, 1890 to December, 1912
(1913) .
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1912 (1913).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.

115

Retail Prices, 1890 to February, 1913 (1913).

116

Hours, Earnings, and Duration of Employ­
ment of Wage-Earning Women in Selected
Industries in the District of Columbia
(1913).
Prohibition of Night Work of Young Persons
(1913).
Ten-Hour Maximum Working-Day for
Women and Young Persons (1913).
Working Hours of Women in the Pea Can­
neries of Wisconsin (1913).
Hygiene of the Painters’ Trade (1913).
Sugar Prices, From Refiner to Consumer
(1913).
Employment of Women in Power Laundries
in Milwaukee. A Study of Working Condi­

117
118
119
120
121
122

5

tions and of the Physical Demands of the
Various Laundry Occupations (1913).
123
Employers’ Welfare Work (1913).
124
Conciliation and Arbitration in the Building
Trades of Greater New York (1913).
125
Retail Prices, 1890 to April, 1913 (1913).
126
Workmen’s Compensation Laws of the
United States and Foreign Countries (1914).
127
Dangers to Workers From Dusts and Fumes
and Methods of Protection (1913).
128
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cotton,
Woolen, and Silk Industries, 1890 to 1912
(1913) .
129
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber,
Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1890 to
1912 (1913).
130
Wheat and Flour Prices, From Farmer to
Consumer (1914).
131
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
1907 to 1912 (1913).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1709 (building) and 1707 (print­
ing), this listing.
132
Retail Prices, 1890 to June, 1913 (1913).
133
Report of the Industrial Council of the Brit­
ish Board of Trade on its Inquiry into Indus­
trial Agreements (1913).
134
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe and Hosiery and Knit Goods Industries,
1890 to 1912 (1913).
135
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cigar and
Clothing Industries, 1911 and 1912 (1913).
136
Retail Prices, 1890 to August, 1913 (1913).
137
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Building
and Repairing of Steam Railroad Cars, 1890
to 1912 (1914).
13 8 Retail Prices, 1890 to October, 1913(1913).
139
Michigan Copper District Strike (1914).
140
Retail Prices, 1890 to December, 1913
(19 1 4 ) .
141
Lead Poisoning in the Smelting and Refining
of Lead (1914).
142
Administration of Labor Laws and Factory
Inspection in Certain European Countries
(1914).
143
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1913 (1914).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
6



144
145

146

147

148

149
150

151

152
153

154

155

156
157
158

159
160

161

see Bulls. 1709 (building) and 1707 (print­
ing), this listing.
Industrial Court of the Cloak, Suit, and Skirt
Industry of New York City (1914).
Conciliation, Arbitration, and Sanitation in
the Dress and Waist Industry of New York
City (1 9 1 4 ).
Wages and Regularity of Employment and
Standardization of Piece Rates in the Dress
and Waist Industry: New York City (1914).
Wages and Regularity of Employment in the
Cloak, Suit, and Skirt Industry with Plans
for Apprenticeship for Cutters and the Edu­
cation of Workers in the Industry (1915).
Labor Laws of the United States, with Deci­
sions of Courts Relating Thereto, Pts. I and
II (19 1 4 ).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1913 (1 9 1 4 ).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cotton,
Woolen, and Silk Industries, 1907 to 1913
(1 9 1 4 ) .
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry in the United States, 1907 to
1912 (1914).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1913 (1 9 1 4 ).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber,
Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1907 to
1913 (1 9 1 4 ).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe and Hosiery and Underwear Industries,
1907 to 1913 (1 9 1 4 ).
Compensation for Accidents to Employees of
the United States. R eport of Operations U n­
der the Act of May 30, 1908 (1914).
Retail Prices, 1907 to December, 1914
(1 9 1 5 ) .
Industrial Accident Statistics (1 9 1 5 ).
See Bull. 490 this listing for annotation.
Government Aid to Home Owning and Hous­
ing of Working People in Foreign Countries
(1915).
Short-Unit Courses for Wage Earners and a
Factory School Experiment (1915).
Hours, Earnings, and Conditions of Labor of
Women in Indiana Mercantile Establish­
ments and Garm ent Factories (1 9 1 4 ).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Clothing
and Cigar Industries, 1911 to 1913 (1 9 1 5 ).

162
163

164
165
166
167

168
169
170
171

172

173

174

175

Vocational Education Survey of Richmond,
Va. (1 9 1 5 ).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Building
and Repairing of Steam Railroad Cars, 1907
to 1913 (1 9 1 5).
Butter Prices, From Producer to Consumer
(1915).
Lead Poisoning in the Manufacture of Stor­
age Batteries (19 1 5 ).
Labor Legislation of 1914 (1915).
Minimum Wage Legislation in the United
States and Foreign Countries (1915).
Supplemented by Bull. 285.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1907 to 1913 (1 9 1 5 ).
Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor, 1914
(1915).
Foreign Food Prices as Affected by the W ar
(1915).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 1, 1914 (1 9 1 5 ).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1709 (building), 1708 (m otortruck
drivers and helpers), and 1707 (printing),
this listing.
Unemployment in New York City, New York
(1915).
See Bull. 195 this listing for annotation.
Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in the
United States and Foreign Countries (19 1 5 ).
Replaced by Bull. 284. See this listing for
annotation.
Subject Index of the Publications of the
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics up
to May 1, 1915 (1915).
Lists, numerically and by subject, bulle­
tins and reports published by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics of the U.S. Departm ent of
Labor since its organization in January 1885
as the Bureau of Labor, to May 1, 1915.
Summary of the R eport on Condition of
Woman and Child Wage Earners in the
United States (1916).
This 19-volume report resulted from an
investigation (1 9 0 7 -0 9 ) confined “almost
wholly” to States east of the Mississippi. The
report covered women and children employed
in the cotton, glass, men’s ready-made gar­
ments, and silk industries, and in miscellane­
ous factory industries; women in stores,




176
177

178
179
180
181
182

183
184
185
186
187
188

189
190

191
192

193

factories, and metal trades; child-labor prob­
lems; history of child-labor legislation, of
women in industry, and of trade unionism
among women; questions of health; family
budgets of cotton-mill workers; connection
between occupation and criminality among
women; and the enforcement of labor laws
and laws concerning factory inspection in the
States visited.
Effect of Minimum-Wage Determinations in
Oregon (1915).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery
and Underwear Industry, 1907 to 1914
(1 9 1 5 ) .
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1907 to 1914 (1915).
Industrial Poisons Used in the Rubber In­
dustry (1915).
The Boot and Shoe Industry in Massachu­
setts as a Vocation for Women (1 9 1 5 ).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1914 (1915).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Unemployment Among Women in D epart­
ment and Other Retail Stores of Boston
(1 9 1 6 ) .
Regularity of Employment in the Women’s
Ready-to-W ear Garment Industries (1916).
Retail Prices, 1907 to June, 1915 (1 9 1 6 ).
Compensation Legislation of 1914 and 1915
(1 9 1 5 ) .
Labor Legislation of 1915 (19 1 6 ).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the M en’s
Clothing Industry, 1911 to 1914 (1916).
R eport of British Departmental Committee
on the Danger in the Use of Lead in the
Painting of Buildings (1916).
Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor: 1915
(1 9 1 6 ) .
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cotton,
Woolen, and Silk Industries, 1907 to 1914
(1916).
Collective Bargaining in the Anthracite Coal
Industry (1916).
Proceedings of the American Association of
Public Employment Offices, Annual Meet­
ings: First— Chicago, Dec. 19 and 20, 1913.
Second— Indianapolis, Sept. 24 and 25, 1914.
Third— Detroit, July 1 and 2, 1915 (1916).
Dressmaking as a Trade for Women in Mas­
sachusetts (1916).

7

194

195

196

197
198
199
200
201

202

203

204
205
206
207

208

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 1, 1915 (1916).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1709 (building), 1708 (m otortruck
drivers and helpers), and 1707 (printing),
this listing.
Unemployment in the United States (1916).
Presents second, third, and fourth surveys
in a series of investigations conducted during
M arch-September 1915 in 39 cities in East,
Middle West, Rocky Mountain, and Pacific
Coast States. See Bull. 172 for the results of
these unemployment surveys in New York
City only.
Proceedings of Employment M anagers’ Con­
ference. Held Under the Auspices of the N a­
tional Society for the Promotion of Industrial
Education and the Minneapolis Civic and
Commerce Association, January 19 and 20,
1916 (1 9 1 6 ).
Retail Prices, 1907 to December, 1915
(1916).
Collective Agreements in the M en’s Clothing
Industry (1 9 1 6).
Vocational Education Survey of Minneapolis,
Minn. (1 9 1 7 ).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1915 (1916).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Report of Committee on Statistics and Com­
pensation Insurance Cost of the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions (19 1 6 ).
Proceedings of the Conference of Employ­
ment Managers’ Association of Boston,
Mass.: Held May 10, 1916 (1916).
Workmen’s Compensation Laws of the
United States and Foreign Countries (1917).
Supplemented by Bull. 243.
Street Railway Employment in the United
States (1 9 1 7 ).
Anthrax as an Occupational Disease (1 9 1 7 ).
Replaced by Bull. 267.
The British System of Labor Exchanges
(1916).
Causes of Death by Occupation. Occupa­
tional Mortality Experience of the M etro­
politan Life Insurance Co. Industrial D epart­
ment, 1911-1913 (1917).
See Bull. 507 for later data.
Profit Sharing in the United States (1917).

8



209
210

211
212

213
214

215
216

217

218
219
220

221

222

223

224

Hygiene of the Printing Trades (1917).
Proceedings of the Third Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions, Held at
Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28, 1916 (1 9 1 7 ).
Labor Laws and Their Administration in the
Pacific States (19 1 7 ).
Proceedings of the Conference on Social In­
surance Called by the International Associa­
tion of Industrial Accident Boards and Com­
missions, Washington, D.C., December 5 to
9, 1916 (1917).
Labor Legislation of 1916 (1 9 1 7 ).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1916 (1917).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1709 (building), 1708 (m otortruck
drivers and helpers), and 1707 (printing),
this listing.
Industrial Experience of Trade-School Girls
in Massachusetts (1917).
Accidents and Accident Prevention in M a­
chine Building (1 9 1 7 ).
Replaced by Bull. 256. See Bull. 1237 this
listing for annotation.
Effect of W orkmen’s Compensation Laws in
Diminishing the Necessity of Industrial Em ­
ployment of Women and Children (1918).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry: 1907 to 1915 (1 9 1 7 ).
Industrial Poisons Used or Produced in the
Manufacture of Explosives (1 9 1 7 ).
Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Meeting
of the American Association of Public Em ­
ployment Offices, Buffalo, N.Y., July 20 and
21, 1916 (1917).
Hours, Fatigue, and Health in British Muni­
tion Factories. Reprints of the M emoranda
of the British Health of Munition Workers
Committee (19 1 7 ).
Welfare Work in British Munition Factories.
Reprints of the M emoranda of the British
Health of Munition Workers Committee
(1917).
Employment of Women and Juveniles in
Great Britain During the War. Reprints of
the M em oranda of the British Health of
Munition Workers Committee (1 9 1 7 ).
Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor, 1916
(1917).

225

226
227

228
229

230

231
232
233
234

235
236
237

238
239
240

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber,
Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1915
(1918).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1916 (1917).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Proceedings of the Employment Managers’
Conference, Philadelphia, Pa., April 2 and 3,
1917 (1 9 1 7 ).
Retail Prices, 1907 to December, 1916
(1917).
Wage-Payment Legislation in the United
States (1918).
Includes broad discussions of the labor
contract in English and American law and
of the attitude of the courts and public opin­
ion toward freedom of contract.
Industrial Efficiency and Fatigue in British
Munition Factories. Reprints of Interim R e­
port and Memoranda of the British Health
of Munition Workers Committee (1917).
Mortality from Respiratory Diseases in
Dusty Trades (Inorganic Dusts) (1918).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1907 to 1916 (1918).
Operation of the Industrial Disputes Investi­
gation Act of Canada (1918).
The Safety Movement in the Iron and Steel
Industry, 1907 to 1917 (1918).
Reviews briefly the course of accidents
from 1907 to 1917 in the iron and steel indus­
try, emphasizing the effects of World W ar I.
Discusses where and why accidents occur,
their seriousness, and by what means acci­
dents may be prevented.
Employment System of the Lake Carriers’
Association (1918).
Effect of the Air Hammer on the Hands of
Stonecutters (1918).
Industrial Unrest in Great Britain. Reprints
of the— (1 ) Reports of the Commission of
Inquiry into Industrial Unrest, (2 ) Interim
R eport of the Reconstruction Committee on
Joint Standing Industrial Councils (1917).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1916 (1918).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton Goods
Manufacturing and Finishing, 1916 (1918).
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation
Laws of the United States up to December
31, 1917 (1 9 18).
Replaced by Bull. 275.




241

242
243

244
245

246
247

248

249

250
251
252
253
254
255

256

257
258

Public Employment Offices in the United
States (1918).
Includes section on semipublic employment
offices.
Food Situation in Central Europe, 1917
(1918).
W orkmen’s Compensation Legislation of the
United States and Foreign Countries, 1917
and 1918 (1918).
Supplements Bull. 203.
Labor Legislation of 1917 (1918).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1917 (1919).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1709 (building), 1708 (m otortruck
drivers and helpers), and 1707 (printing),
this listing.
Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor, 1917
(1918).
Proceedings of the Employment M anagers’
Conference, Rochester, N.Y., May 9, 10, and
11, 1918 (1919).
Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at
Boston, Mass., August 21-25, 1917 (1919).
Industrial Health and Efficiency. Final Re­
port of the British Health of Munition W ork­
ers Committee (1919).
Welfare Work for Employees in Industrial
Establishments in the United States (1919).
Preventable Death in Cotton Manufacturing
Industry (1919).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughter­
ing and Meat-Packing Industry, 1917 (1919).
Women in the Lead Industries (1919).
International Labor Legislation and the So­
ciety of Nations (1919).
Joint Industrial Councils in Great Britain.
Reports of Committee on Relations Between
Employers and Employed, and Other Official
Documents (1919).
Accidents and Accident Prevention in M a­
chine Building (1920).
Replaces Bull. 216. See Bull. 1237 this list­
ing for annotation.
Labor Legislation of 1918 (1919).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1918 (1920).

9

259

260
261
262
263

264

265

266

267
268

269

Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1918 (1919).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1709 (building), 1708 (motortruck
drivers and helpers), and 1707 (printing),
this listing.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1907 to 1918 (1919).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1918 (1919).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing and Finishing, 1918 (1919).
Housing by Employers in the United States
(1 9 2 0 ) .
Surveys action by employers to provide
housing for their employees in manufacturing
towns, including cotton-mill towns of New
England and the South; steel towns of Penn­
sylvania, Ohio, Alabama, and Minnesota;
and coal mining, and iron and other metal
mining towns.
Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at
Madison, Wis., September 24-27, 1918
(1919).
Industrial Survey in Selected Industries in
the United States, 1919 (1920).
Summary report on wages and hours of
work in 28 selected industries.
Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Conven­
tion of the Association of Governmental L a­
bor Officials of the United States and Canada.
Held at Seattle, Wash., July 12-15, 1920
(1 9 2 1 ) .
Anthrax as an Occupational Disease (1920).
Replaces Bull. 205.
Historical Survey of International Action
Affecting Labor (1920).
Briefly describes the international political
labor movement; the international trade
union movement; and the international orga­
nizations of social reformers interested in
labor problems. Recounts efforts of govern­
mental conferences to arrive at agreements
for the control of labor conditions, and ana­
lyzes treaties and conventions entered into
by the various governments.
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1919 (1920).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.

10



270
271

272

273

274

275

276

277
278
279

280
281

Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1919
(1921).
Adult Working-Class Education in Great
Britain and the United States. A study of
Recent Developments (1920).
Reports the results achieved by adult
working-class educational movements, in­
cluding such movements as the W orkers’
Educational Association of G reat Britain;
the W orkers’ University maintained by the
International Ladies’ Garm ent W orkers’
Union (A F L ); and the Rand School of So­
cial Science in New York.
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the
United States and Canada (1 9 2 1 ).
Supplemented by Bull. 332.
Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at
Toronto, Canada, September 23-26, 1919
(1920).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1919 (1920).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1709 (building), 1708 (m otortruck
drivers and helpers), and 1707 (printing),
this listing.
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation
Laws of the United States and Canada up to
January 1, 1920 (1920).
Replaces Bull. 240.
Standardization of Industrial Accident Sta­
tistics. Reports of the Committee on Statis­
tics and Compensation Insurance Cost of the
International Association of Industrial Acci­
dent Boards and Commissions, 1915-1919
(1920).
Replaced by Bull. 667.
Labor Legislation of 1919 (1921).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1907 to 1920 (1921).
Hours and Earnings in Anthracite and Bitu­
minous Coal Mining. Anthracite— 1919 and
1920. Bituminous— 1919 (1921).
Industrial Poisoning in Making Coal-Tar
Dyes and Dye Intermediates (1921).
Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at

282
283
284

285

286

287

San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24,
1920 (1 9 2 1 ).
Mutual Relief Associations Among Govern­
ment Employees in Washington, D.C. (1921).
History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjust­
ment Board, 1917 to 1919 (1921).
Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in the
United States and Foreign Countries, Pts. I
and II (1921).
Replaces Bull. 173, Pt. I reprinted as Bull.
656.
Pt. I includes a critical analysis of the vari­
ous methods employed to measure price level
changes, and examines advantages and de­
fects of these methods. Discusses uses of index
numbers, reasons for discrepancies between
two series or more for the same time and
country, and necessary safeguards in com­
paring different series. Provides an appraisal
of index numbers as measures of price fluc­
tuations. Pt. II is a detailed description of the
leading series of index numbers of wholesale
prices compiled by official bureaus, financial
journals, and private investigators. The his­
tory of each series, sources of price data,
number and kinds of commodities included,
and methods used in averaging prices are
included. See also Bull. 1513.
Minimum-Wage Laws of the United States:
Construction and Operation (1921).
Supplements Bull. 167.
Discusses provisions of the State minimumwage laws in effect in 1920, as well as the
orders issued under them and the judicial
determinations upholding and construing the
laws. Gives some account of operations and
of methods of administration, based on official
reports and a general survey made by the
Bureau.
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1920 (1 9 2 1 ).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1709 (building), 1708 (m otortruck
drivers and helpers), and 1709 (printing),
this listing.
National War Labor Board. A History of Its
Formation and Activities, Together with Its
Awards and the Documents of Importance in
the Record of Its Development (1922).




288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295

296
297
298

299

300
301
302

303

Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing, 1920 (1921).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1920 (1921).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1919-1920 (1922).
Carbon-Monoxide Poisoning (1922).
Labor Legislation of 1920 (1922).
The Problem of Dust Phthisis in the GraniteStone Industry (1922).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughter­
ing and Meat-Packing Industry, 1921 (1922).
Building Operations in Representative Cities,
1920 (1922).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1920 (1922).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Petroleum
Industry, 1920 (1922).
Causes and Prevention of Accidents in the
Iron and Steel Industry, 1910-1919 (1922).
Includes a record of the accident experience
in this industry. Describes the preparation
and use of accident rates and statistical
methods.
See also Bull. 1237 this listing.
Personnel Research Agencies. A Guide to
Organized Research in Employment Manage­
ment, Industrial Relations Training, and
Working Conditions (1921).
Replaced by Bull. 518.
Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1920
(1922).
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation
Insurance and Administration (1922).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1921 (1922).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing), 1708 (m otortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing), this listing.
Use of Federal Power in Settlement of Rail­
way Labor Disputes (1922).
Examines methods used by the Federal
Government in the settlement of railway la­
bor disputes as reflected in legislation. Details
events leading to passage of five laws provid­
ing for Federal intervention in such disputes,
the operation of these laws, and the attitude
of the interests affected thereby. Railway labor

11

304

305
306

307

308
309
310

311

312
313

314

315

problems engendered during the period of
World War I administration of railroads are
treated briefly. The constitutional issues in­
volved in Government action for prevention
and settlement of railway labor disputes are
examined, and the texts of the five laws regu­
lating these disputes are set forth in two
appendixes.
Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at
Chicago, 111., September 19-23, 1921 (1922).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1907 to 1920 (1922).
Occupation Hazards and Diagnostic Signs.
A Guide to Impairments to be looked for in
Hazardous Occupations (1922).
Replaced by Bull. 582.
Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Conven­
tion of the Association of Governmental La­
bor Officials of the United States and Canada.
Held at New Orleans, La., May 2-6, 1921
(1922) .
Labor Legislation of 1921 (1922).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1921 (1922).
Industrial Unemployment: A Statistical Study
of Its Extent and Causes (1922).
Coordinates and interprets available infor­
mation regarding trends in industrial unem­
ployment.
Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Public Em­
ployment Services. Held at Buffalo, N.Y.,
September 7-9, 1921 (1922).
National Health Insurance in Great Britain,
1911 to 1921 (1923).
Consumers’ Cooperative Societies in the
United States in 1920 (1923).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Cooperative Credit Societies (Credit Unions)
in America and in Foreign Countries (1922).
Reviews international development of the
credit union movement. Examines principal
provisions of credit union laws, the charac­
teristics and experience of credit unions, and
the attitudes of labor unions toward credit
unions in the United States. Includes a com­
prehensive bibliography.
Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1921
(1923) .

12




316

317
318

319

320
321

322

323

324
325

Hours and Earnings in Anthracite and Bi­
tuminous Coal Mining. Anthracite— Janu­
ary, 1922. Bituminous—Winter of 1921-22
(1922) .
Wages and Hours of Labor in Lumber Man­
ufacturing, 1921 (1923).
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1921 (1923).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics: United States
Department of Labor. Its History, Activities,
and Organization (1922).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1921 (1922).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Un­
constitutional (1922).
A compilation covering about 300 separate
labor statutes whose constitutionality had
been successfully challenged in the State
Courts of last resort or the Supreme Court of
the United States. Includes some laws of
general application which also affect em­
ployer-employee relations. The statutes con­
sidered are classified under appropriate sub­
ject headings. The decisions are reviewed and
a number of contrasting and illustrative cases
are presented.
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations (1923).
Reproduces the provisions of the 1920
Kansas State law which created a Court of
Industrial Relations and of related 1921
Kansas statutes. Draws on the first two an­
nual reports (applying, respectively, to the
periods Feb. 1-Nov. 30, 1920, and the year
1921) for a synopsis of cases, an account of
the legal proceedings, and comments on the
functions and influence of the Court.
Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Convention
of the Association of Governmental Labor
Officials of the United States and Canada.
Held at Harrisburg, Pa., May 22-26, 1922
(1923) .
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1907 to 1922 (1923).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1922 (1923).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing), 1708 (motortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing), this listing.

326

327
328
329
330
331

332

333

334
335
336
337

338

339

340
341
342
343
344
345
346

Methods of Procuring and Computing Sta­
tistical Information of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics (1 9 2 3).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1922 (1923).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery
and Underwear Industry, 1922 (1923).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s
Clothing Industry, 1911 to 1922 (1923).
Labor Legislation of 1922 (1923).
Code of Lighting: Factories, Mills, and Other
Work Places (1923 ).
Replaced by Bull. 556.
W orkmen’s Compensation Legislation of the
United States and Canada, 1920 to 1922
(1923).
Supplements Bull. 272.
Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at
Baltimore, Md., October 9-13, 1922 (1923).
Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1922
(1923).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1922 (1923).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Safety Code for the Protection of Industrial
Workers in Foundries (1 9 2 3 ).
Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Public
Employment Services. Held at Washington,
D.C., September 11-13, 1922 (1923).
Safety Code for the Use, Care, and Protec­
tion of Abrasive Wheels (1923).
Replaced by Bull. 527.
Statistics of Industrial Accidents in the United
States (1 9 2 3 ).
See Bull. 490 this listing for annotation.
Chinese Migrations, with Special Reference
to Labor Conditions (1923).
Trade Agreement in the Silk-Ribbon Indus­
try of New York City (1 9 2 3 ).
International Seamen’s Union of America. A
Study of Its History and Problems (1 9 2 3 ).
Laws Providing for Bureaus of Labor Statis­
tics, etc. (1 9 2 3 ).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1922 (1923).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing, 1922 (1923).
Humanity in Government (1923).
Describes the early activities of the U.S.




347

348
349

350
351
352

353
354

355

Department of Labor in promoting the wel­
fare of wage earners, children, and other
groups under its jurisdiction. Also briefly
summarizes work of the U.S. Housing Cor­
poration and the Federal Board for Voca­
tional Education.
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1922 (1923).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Automobile
Industry, 1922 (1923).
Industrial Relations in the West Coast Lum­
ber Industry (1924).
A study of the extent and causes of labor
unrest in the industry. Shows how the shift
of lumber production made possible the de­
velopment of the great lumber industry on
the West Coast. Analyzes the internal finan­
cial structure of the industry to determine
the ability of the employers to grant reason­
able wage demands of employees. Technology
of the industry is examined to see what de­
mands it makes upon employees. Discusses
hours, wage rates, and working and living
conditions. Describes development of em­
ployee psychology as conditioned by environ­
ment of the lumber industry. Gives history
of employee protests and employer reactions.
Bibliography is provided.
Rules Governing the Approval of Head
Lighting Devices for Motor Vehicles (1923).
Safety Code for the Construction, Care, and
Use of Ladders (1923).
Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention
of the Association of Governmental Labor
Officials of the United States and Canada.
Held at Richmond, Va., May 1-4, 1923
(1923).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1907 to 1922 (1924).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1923 (1924).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing) 1708 (motortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing), this listing.
Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Public
Employment Services. Held at Toronto, Can­
ada, September 4-7, 1923 (1924).
13

356
357
358
359

360
361
362
363
364

365
366
367
368

369

370

Productivity Costs in Common-Brick Indus­
try (1924).
Cost of Living in the United States (1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Automobile
Tire Industry, 1923 (1924).
Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Meeting of
the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at
St. Paul, Minn., September 24-26, 1923
(1924) .
Time and Labor Costs in Manufacturing 100
Pairs of Shoes, 1923 (1924).
Labor Relations in the Fairmont, West Vir­
ginia Bituminous Coal Field (1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and
Machine Shops, 1923 (1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Lumber Man­
ufacturing, 1923 (1924).
Safety Code for Mechanical Power-Trans­
mission Apparatus (1924).
Replaced by Bull. 463.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Paper and
Pulp Industry, 1923 (1925).
Retail Prices, 1913 to December, 1923
(1925) .
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1923 (1925).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1923 (1925).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
The Use of Cost-of-Living Figures in Wage
Adjustments (1925).
Describes instances in which cost-of-living
data have been used by some Federal boards
and commissions, principally in the adjust­
ments of wages, and the use of cost-of-living
statistics by State and municipal agencies in
the adjustment of employees’ salaries. Ana­
lyzes the recognition given to cost-of-living
data in the settlement of wage disputes by
State and industrial arbitration boards. Re­
views methods used by individual companies
in computing their own cost-of-living data,
or in applying available data to wage ad­
justments. Shows the effect of Federal costof-living data on the budgets adopted by
State minimum-wage boards. Cites wage
adjustment provisions tied to cost-of-living
changes in collective bargaining agreements.
Labor Laws of the United States with De­
cisions of Courts Relating Thereto (1925).

14



371
372
373
374
375
376

377
378
379

380
381
382
383
384
385

386
387
388

389

390

Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing, 1924 (1925).
Convict Labor in 1923 (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughter­
ing and Meat-Packing Industry, 1923 (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1907 to 1924 (1 9 2 5 ).
Safety Code for Laundry Machinery and
Operations (1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery
and Underwear Industry, 1907 to 1924
(1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1924 (1925).
Safety Code for Woodworking Plants (1925 ).
Replaced by Bull. 519.
Comparison of W orkmen’s Compensation
Laws of the United States as of January 1,
1925 (1925).
Postwar Labor Conditions in Germany
(1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1907 to 1924 (1925).
Code of Lighting School Buildings (1925).
Works Council Movement in Germany
(1925).
Labor Conditions in the Shoe Industry in
Massachusetts, 1920-1924 (1925).
Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at
Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924
(1925).
The Cost of American Almshouses (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the M en’s
Clothing Industry, 1911 to 1924 (1925).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1924 (19 2 5 ).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing), 1708 (m otortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing) this listing.
Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Conven­
tion of the Association of Governmental L a­
bor Officials of the United States and Canada.
Held at Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924
(1925).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1924 (1925).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.

391
392
393
394
395

396
397

398

399
400

401
402

403
404

405

406

407

Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor: 19231924 (1925).
Survey of Hygienic Conditions in the Print­
ing Trades (1925).
Trade Agreements in 1923 and 1924 (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Metalliferous
Mines, 1924 (1925).
Index to Proceedings of International Asso­
ciation of Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions, 1914-1924 (1925).
Retail Prices, 1890 to 1924 (1925).
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1924 (1925).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Growth of Legal Aid Work in the United
States. A Study of Our Administration of
Justice Primarily as It Affects the Wage
Earner and of the Agencies Designed to Im­
prove His Position Before the Law (1926).
Replaced by Bull. 607.
Labor Relations in the Lace and Lace-Cur­
tain Industries in the United States (1925).
Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Public
Employment Services. Held at Chicago, 111.,
May 19-23, 1924 (1925).
Family Allowances in Foreign Countries
(1926).
Collective Bargaining by Actors. A Study
of Trade Unionism Among Performers of the
English-Speaking Legitimate Stage in Amer­
ica (1926).
Labor Legislation of 1925 (1926).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1925 (1926).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing), 1708 (motortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing), this listing.
Phosphorus Necrosis in the Manufacture of
Fireworks and in the Preparation of Phos­
phorus (1926).
Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at
Salt Lake City, Utah, August 17-20, 1925
(1926).
Labor Cost of Production and Wages and
Hours of Labor in the Paper Box-Board In­
dustry (1926).




408
409
410
411

412
413
414

415
416

417
418
419
420

421
422
423

424

425

426
427
428

429

Laws Relating to Payment of Wages (1926).
Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to
1925 (1926).
Safety Code for Paper and Pulp Mills
(1926).
Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Conven­
tion of the Association of Governmental
Labor Officials of the United States and Can­
ada. Held at Salt Lake City, Utah, August
13-15, 1925 (1926).
Wages, Hours, and Productivity in the Pot­
tery Industry, 1925 (19 2 6 ).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber
Industry in the United States, 1925 (1926).
Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Meet­
ing of the International Association of Public
Employment Services. Held at Rochester,
N.Y., September 15-17, 1925 (1926).
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1925 (1926).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Hours and Earnings in Anthracite and Bi­
tuminous Coal Mining, 1922 and 1924
(1926).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1925 (1926).
Retail Prices, 1890 to 1925 (1926).
Trade Agreements, 1925 (1926).
Handbook of American Trade Unions (1926).
Replaced by Bull. 618. See this listing for
annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughter­
ing and M eat-Packing Industry, 1925 (1927).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and
Machine Shops, 1925 (1927).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the
United States and Canada as of July 1, 1926
(1926).
Supplemented by Bull. 496.
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1925 (1926).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Record of Industrial Accidents in the United
States to 1925 (1927).
See Bull. 490 this listing for annotation.
Deaths from Lead Poisoning (1927).
Health Survey of the Printing Trades, 1922
to 1925 (1 9 2 7 ).
Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Pre­
vention Conference. Held at Washington,
D.C., July 14-16, 1926 (1926).
Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Con­

15

430
431

432

433

434
435
436

437

438
439

440
441
442
443

444
445
446
447

vention of the Association of Governmental
Labor Officials of the United States and
Canada. Held at Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10,
1926 (1 9 27).
Safety Code for Power Presses and Foot and
Hand Presses (1 9 2 6 ).
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1926 (1 9 2 7 ).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing), 1708 (m otortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing), this listing.
Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Meet­
ing of the International Association of Indus­
trial Accident Boards and Commissions. Held
at Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926
(1927).
Safety Codes for the Prevention of Dust Ex­
plosions (1 9 2 7).
Replaced by Bulls. 562 and 617.
Labor Legislation of 1926 (1927).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the M en’s
Clothing Industry, 1911 to 1926 (19 2 7 ).
Safety Code for the Use, Care, and Protec­
tion of Abrasive Wheels (1927).
Replaced by Bull. 527.
Cooperative Movement in the United States
in 1925 (O ther Than Agricultural) (1927).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the M otor
Vehicle Industry, 1925 (1927).
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1924-1926
(1927).
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Wholesale Prices, 1890 to 1926 (1927).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Productivity of Labor in the Glass Industry
(1927).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1907 to 1926 (1927).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1910 to 1926
(1927).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1926 (1927).
Retail Prices, 1890 to 1926 (1927).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing, 1910 to 1926 (1927).
Safety Code for R ubber Mills and Calenders
(1927).

16



448
449

450
451
452

453

454
455

456

457

458
459
460

461
462
463

464
465

Trade Agreements, 1926 (1927).
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1926 (1927).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1907 to 1926 (1927).
Safety Code for Forging and Hot Metal
Stamping (1927).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery
and Underwear Industries, 1907 to 1926
(1927) .
Revised Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices,
1923 to July 1927 (1927).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Hours and Earnings in Bituminous Coal
Mining, 1922, 1924, and 1926 (1927).
Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual Con­
vention of the Association of Governmental
Labor Officials of the United States and Can­
ada. Held at Paterson, N.J., May 31-June 3,
1927 (1927).
Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual Meet­
ing of the International Association of Acci­
dent Boards and Commissions. Held at At­
lanta, Ga., September 27-29, 1927 (1928).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1927 (1928).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
Supplemented by Bull. 476. For annota­
tions on selected union scales, see Bulls. 1706
(local-transit), 1709 (building), 1708 (mo­
tortruck drivers and helpers), and 1707
(printing), this listing.
Health and Recreation Activities in Indus­
trial Establishments, 1926 (1928).
Apprenticeship in Building Construction
(1928) .
A New Test for Industrial Lead Poisoning:
The Presence of Basophilic Red Cells in Lead
Poisoning and Lead Absorption (1928).
Labor Organization in Chile (1928 ).
Park Recreation Areas in the United States
(1928).
Safety Code for Mechanical Power-Trans­
mission Apparatus. First revision (1928).
Replaces Bull. 364.
Retail Prices, 1890 to 1927 (1928).
Beneficial Activities of American TradeUnions (1928).
A study of the early extension of national
and international trade union activities be-

466
467

468
469

470
471
472
473
474
475
476

yond their traditional interests in improving
wages, hours, and working conditions into
such broader areas as general employee wel­
fare, housing for union members, union busi­
ness enterprises and investments, and eco­
nomic and industrial problems. Included
among the employee welfare activities dis­
cussed are the provisions made by labor
organizations for unemployment, disability,
and death benefits; care of the aged; health
services; and recreational activities. Efforts
by unions to prevent and to relieve the effects
of unemployment, union-management co­
operation in industrial matters of mutual
concern, and economic and statistical re­
search are also examined as expressions of
unions’ expanded interests.
Settlement for Accidents to American Sea­
men (1928).
Minimum Wage Legislation in Various Coun­
tries (1928).
Summarizes the development and principal
features of minimum wage legislation in the
United States and various foreign countries,
including Australia, New Zealand, Great
Britain, and Italy. Discusses the considera­
tions underlying wage fixation, the adminis­
tration of such legislation, enforcement prob­
lems, and beneficial results. Cites the effect
of minimum wage legislation on the em­
ployees, on industry, and on the general wage
level.
Trade Agreements, 1927 (1928).
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1927 (1928).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Labor Legislation of 1927 (1928).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and
Machine Shops, 1927 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughter­
ing and Meat-Packing Industry, 1927 (1929).
Wholesale Prices, 1913 to 1927 (1929).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Productivity of Labor in M erchant Blast
Furnaces (1 9 29).
Productivity of Labor in Newspaper Print­
ing (1 9 29).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
1927-1928 (1929).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
Supplements Bull. 457. For annotations of




477
478

479
480

481
482

483
484
485

486
487

488
489
490

selected union scales, see Bulls. 1706 (localtransit), 1709 (building), 1708 (m otortruck
drivers and helpers), and 1707 (printing),
this listing.
Public Service Retirement Systems: United
States, Canada, and Europe (1929).
Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Meet­
ing of the International Association of Public
Employment Services. Held at Detroit,
Mich., October 25-28, 1927 (1928).
Activities and Functions of a State D epart­
ment of Labor (1928).
Association of Governmental Officials in In­
dustry of the United States and Canada.
[Formerly Association of Governmental La­
bor Officials.] Fifteenth Annual Convention,
New Orleans, L a , May 21-24, 1928 (1929).
Joint Industrial Control in the Book and
Job Printing Industry (1928).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1928 (1929).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing), 1708 (motortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing), this listing.
Conditions in the Shoe Industry in Haverhill,
M ass, 1928 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor: Common Street
Laborers, 1928 (1929).
Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Meet­
ing of the International Association of In­
dustrial Accident Boards and Commissions.
Held at Paterson, N .J , September 11-14,
1928 (1929).
Labor Legislation of 1928 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1910 to 1928
(1929).
Deaths from Lead Poisoning, 1925-1927
(1929).
Care of Aged Persons in the United States
(1929).
Statistics of Industrial Accidents in the
United States to the End of 1927 (1929).
Presents available work accident statistics
for various States and industries from 1907
to 1927. Four earlier bulletins, the first of
which was published in 1908, bring together
the important records of industrial accidents
throughout the country. D ata for the first

17

491

492
493
494
495

496

497
498
499

500

501

502
503
504

505

506

507

three of these bulletins were based largely
upon State and other official published re­
ports, but the fourth, in addition, included
results of the first attempt to collect data
directly from States and industry. Earlier
bulletins were: 78, 157, 339, and 425.
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1929 edition
(1929).
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing, 1910 to 1928 (1929).
Wholesale Prices, 1913 to 1928 (1929).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Labor Legislation of Uruguay (1929).
Retail Prices, 1890 to 1928 (1929).
D ata on food prices replaced by Bull. 635.
See this listing for annotation.
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the
United States and Canada as of January 1,
1929, with Text of Legislation Enacted in
1927 and 1928 (1 9 2 9 ).
Supplements Bull. 423.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber
Industry in the United States, 1928 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1910 to 1928 (1929).
History of Wages in the United States from
Colonial Times to 1928 (1929).
See Bull. 604 this listing for annotation.
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1928 (1929).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Public
Employment Services. Held at Cleveland,
Ohio, September 18-21, 1928 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the MotorVehicle Industry, 1928 (1930).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s
Clothing Industry, 1911 to 1928 (1929).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery
and Underwear Industries, 1907 to 1928
(1929).
Directory of Homes for the Aged in the
United States (1929).
Replaced by Bull. 677.
Handbook of American Trade Unions (1929).
Replaced by Bull. 618. See this listing for
annotation.
Causes of Death by Occupation. Occupa­
tional Mortality Experience of the M etro­

18



508

509
510
511

512
513
514

515

516
517
518

519

520
521
522
523
524

525

politan Life Insurance Company, Industrial
Department, 1922-1924 (1930).
See Bull. 207 for earlier data.
Association of Governmental Officials in In­
dustry of the United States and Canada.
[Formerly Association of Governmental L a­
bor Officials] Sixteenth Annual Convention,
Toronto, Canada, June 4 -7 , 1929 (1 9 3 0 ).
Textile Safety Code (1930).
Labor Legislation of Argentina (1930).
Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Meeting
of the International Association of Industrial
Accident Boards and Commissions. Held at
Buffalo, N.Y., October 8-11, 1929 (1930).
Code for Identification of Gas-Mask Can­
isters (1930).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1929 (1930).
Pennsylvania Railroad Wage Data. From
Report of Joint Factfinding Committee in
Wage Negotiations, 1927 (1930).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1929 (1930).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing), 1708 (m otortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing), this listing.
Hours and Earnings in Bituminous Coal
Mining, 1929 (1930).
Decisions of the Court and Opinions Affect­
ing Labor, 1927, 1928 (1930).
Personnel Research Agencies, 1930 edition
(1930).
Replaces Bull. 299.
Safety Code for Woodworking Plants, as
revised, 1930 (1930).
Replaces Bull. 378.
Social and Economic Character of Unem­
ployment in Philadelphia, April 1929 (1930).
Wholesale Prices, 1929 (1930).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries
and Machine Shops, 1929 (1930).
Wages and Hours in the Manufacture of Air­
planes and Aircraft Engines, 1929 (1930).
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1929 (1930).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Portland
Cement Industry, 1929 (1931).

526
527

528
529
530

531

532
533

534

535
536

537
538

539
540

541

542

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Furniture
Industry, 1910 to 1929 (1931).
Safety Code for the Use, Care, and Protec­
tion of Abrasive Wheels (1930).
Replaces Bulls. 338 and 436.
Labor Legislation, 1929 (1931).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the
Latin American Countries (1930).
Association of Governmental Officials in In­
dustry of the United States and Canada.
Seventeenth Annual Convention, Louisville,
Ky., May 20-23, 1930 (1930).
Consumers’, Credit, and Productive Coopera­
tive Societies, 1929 (1931).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cigarette
Manufacturing Industry, 1930 (1931).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1910 to 1930
(1931).
Labor Conditions in the Territory of Hawaii,
1929-1930 (1931).
See Bull. 926 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughter­
ing and M eat-Packing Industry, 1929 (1931).
Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Meet­
ing of the International Association of Indus­
trial Accident Boards and Commissions. Held
at Wilmington, Del., September 22-26, 1930
(1931).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Dyeing
and Finishing of Textiles, 1930 (1931).
International Association of Public Employ­
ment Services. Seventeenth Annual Meeting,
Philadelphia, Pa., September 24-27, 1929.
Eighteenth Annual Meeting, Toronto, Can­
ada, September 9-12, 1930 (1931).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing, 1910 to 1930 (1931).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1930 (1931).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing), 1708 (m otortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing), this listing.
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1931 edition
(1931).
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Report of the Advisory Committee on Em ­
ployment Statistics (1931).




543
544

545

546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554

Recommendations to the President of the
United States on methods for improving the
measurement of employment and unemploy­
ment, and on meeting the problems of tech­
nological unemployment.
Wholesale Prices, 1930 (1931).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Unemployment-Benefit Plans in the United
States and Unemployment Insurance in For­
eign Countries (1931).
Surveys company and union unemploy­
ment benefit and guaranteed employment
plans for the protection of employees against
unemployment. Includes a summary of the
character, significance, and operating ex­
perience of the plans surveyed, as well as a
detailed account of each plan. See also Bulls.
906, 907, and 925 this listing.
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of
the United States in 1930 (1932).
Previous bulletins in this series were: 295,
318, 347, 368, 397, 424, 449, 469, 500, and
524. Other comprehensive information on
building construction activities and trends
based on building permit reports is provided
in Bulls. 650, 668, 689, 693, 713, and 1243.
Bulletins in the building permit series cov­
ering principal cities show data on the num­
ber of buildings and cost (in terms of permit
valuations). These data cover the number of
family dwelling units provided in new resi­
dential buildings; the number and estimated
cost of new nonresidential buildings, by in­
tended use; the volume of additions, altera­
tions, and repairs; and aggregate figures for
all building construction.
Wages and Hours in Rayon and Other Syn­
thetic Yarn Manufacturing, 1930 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cane-Sugar
Refining Industry, 1930 (1931).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1929-1930 (1931).
Labor Legislation of Venezuela (1931).
Cargo Handling and Longshore Labor Con­
ditions (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1910 to 1930 (1932).
Labor Legislation, 1930 (1931).
Fluctuation in Employment in Ohio, 1914 to
1929 (1932).
Labor Legislation of Paraguay (1931).

19

555
556

557
558
559
560
561

562

563

564

565
566

567

Social and Economic Character of Unem­
ployment in Philadelphia, April 1930 (1932).
Code of Lighting: Factories, Mills, and Other
Work Places. Revision of 1930 (1931).
Replaces Bull. 331.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s
Clothing Industry, 1911 to 1930 (1932).
Labor Conditions of Women and Children in
Japan (1 9 3 1 ).
Labor Legislation of Ecuador (1931).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber
Industry in the United States, 1930 (1932).
Public Old-Age Pensions and Insurance in
the United States and in Foreign Countries
(1932).
Provides a brief history and comparative
analysis of old-age pension legislation in the
United States; an analysis of the individual
pension laws; the text of these laws in 17
States and Alaska, and the results of the
Bureau’s studies on the operation of these
laws. Also presents descriptive reports of
public old-age pension and insurance systems
in 39 foreign countries, by U.S. consular rep­
resentatives, and a comparative analysis of
those systems.
Safety Codes for the Prevention of Dust Ex­
plosions (1 9 3 2).
Replaces Bull. 433. Supplemented by Bull.
617.
Association of Governmental Officials in In­
dustry of the United States and Canada.
[Formerly Association of Governmental La­
bor Officials] Eighteenth Annual Convention,
Boston, Mass., May 18-22, 1931 (1932).
Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Meet­
ing of the International Association of In­
dustrial Accident Boards and Commissions.
Held at Richmond, Va., October 5-8 , 1931
(1932).
Park Recreation Areas in the United States,
1930 (1932).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
May 15, 1931 (1932).
See Bull. 600 this listing for annotation.
For annotations on selected union scales,
see Bulls. 1706 (local-transit), 1709 (build­
ing), 1708 (m otortruck drivers and helpers),
and 1707 (printing), this listing.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and
Steel Industry, 1931 (1933).

20



568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577

578

579
580

581

582

583

584
585
586
587

588

Wages and Hours of Labor in the M anufac­
ture of Silk and Rayon Goods, 1931 (1 9 3 2 ).
Labor Legislation of Mexico (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and
Machine Shops, 1931 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Furniture
Industry, 1910 to 1931 (1932).
Wholesale Prices, 1931 (1933).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Metalliferous
Mining, 1924 and 1931 (1933).
Technological Changes and Employment in
the United States Postal Service (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Air Transpor­
tation, 1931 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughter­
ing and Meat-Packing Industry, 1931 (1933).
Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Meet­
ing of the International Association of Indus­
trial Accident Boards and Commissions. Held
at Columbus, Ohio, September 26-29, 1932
(1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Gasoline Fill­
ing Stations and Motor-Vehicle Repair G a­
rages, 1931 (1 9 3 3 ).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and
Shoe Industry, 1910 to 1932 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Bakery
Industry— Bread and Cake Departments,
1931 (1933).
Laws Relating to Employment Agencies in
the United States as of January 1, 1933
(1933).
Occupation Hazards and Diagnostic Signs. A
Guide to Impairments to be Looked for in
Hazardous Occupations (1933).
Replaces Bull. 306.
Proceedings of the National Conference for
Labor Legislation. Held at Washington, D.C.,
February 14 and 15, 1934 (1934).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and
Worsted Goods Manufacturing, 1932 (1933).
Labor Productivity in the Automobile Tire
Industry (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lum ber
Industry in the United States, 1932 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Rayon and
Other Synthetic Y am Manufacturing, 1932
(1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Dyeing
and Finishing of Textiles, 1932 (1933).

589
590
591
592
593
594
595

596

597

598

599

600

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Leather
Industry, 1932 (1933).
Labor Legislation, 1931 and 1932 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery
and Underwear Industries, 1932 (1933).
Decisions of Courts and Opinions Affecting
Labor, 1931 and 1932 (1933).
Technological Changes and Employment in
the Electric-Lamp Industry (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s
Clothing Industry, 1932 (1 9 3 3 ).
Prison Labor in the United States, 1932
(1933).
See also Bull. 596.
Laws Relating to Prison Labor in the United
States as of July 1, 1933 (1933).
Companion volume to Bull. 595.
Labor Through the Century— 1833-1933
(1933).
See Bull. 605 this listing for annotation.
[Bull. 605 is a reprint of Bull. 597 with some
additional material.]
Organization and Management of Consum­
ers’ Cooperative Associations and Clubs
(With Model Bylaws) (19 3 4 ).
Replaced by Bull. 1024.
W hat are Labor Statistics for? A series of
pictorial charts prepared by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics for the U.S. Department of
Labor exhibit at the Century of Progress
Exposition, Chicago, 1933 (1933).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
M ay 15, 1933 (1934).
Presents data on union scales of wages and
hours in 72 trades in 67 important industrial
cities. Between 1912 and 1933, the Bureau
published results of its surveys of organized
trades each year, with data back to 1907. The
first such bulletin was published in 1913.
Some data have appeared in the Monthly
Labor Review and in serial reports, rather
than in bulletin form. D ata on five selected
trades only were published annually, be­
tween 1933 and 1952; data on four trades
only since 1953.
For annotations on union scales in these
latter four selected trades, see Bulls. 1706
(local-transit), 1709 (building), 1708 (m o­
tortruck drivers and helpers), and 1707
(printing), this listing.




601
602

603

604

605

606

607

608

609

Wages and Hours of Labor in BituminousCoal Mining, 1933 (1934).
Discussions of Industrial Accidents and Dis­
eases. At the 1933 Meeting of the Interna­
tional Association of Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions, Chicago, 111.
(1934).
Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for
the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
South Carolina, Tennessee (1933).
History of Wages in the United States from
Colonial Times to 1928. [Revision of Bull.
499 with Supplement, 1929-1933] (1934).
A picture of American wages in representa­
tive occupations and industries from early
colonial times to 1933. Pt. 1, largely text,
deals with the period prior to 1840. Methods
of wage payments as well as the wages paid
during these years are interpreted against
the background of customs, system of labor
(indenture and redem ption), and working
conditions peculiar to colonization. Pt. 2,
which covers the period 1840 to 1933, is en­
tirely statistical in presentation.
Labor Through the Century, 1833-1933
(1934).
Illustrated account of the history of Amer­
ican labor. Reprint of a booklet published by
the Bureau for distribution at the Century
of Progress Exposition in Chicago in 1933,
(Bull. 597) with additional review of changes
to May 1934.
Organization and Management of Coopera­
tive Gasoline and Oil Associations (W ith
Model Bylaws) (1934).
Growth of Legal Aid Work in the United
States. A Study of Our Administration of
Justice Primarily as It Affects the Wage
Earner and of the Agencies Designed To Im ­
prove His Position Before the Law (1936).
Replaces Bull. 398.
Organization and Management of Coopera­
tive Housing Associations (W ith Model By­
laws) (19 3 4 ).
Replaced by Bull. 858.
Discussions of Labor Laws and Their Ad­
ministration at the 1933 Convention of the
Association of Governmental Officials in In­
dustry of the United States and Canada.
Chicago, 111. (1934).

21

610
611

612

613
614

615

616

617

618

619

620

621

622
623
624

Revised Indexes of Factory Employment and
Pay Rolls, 1919 to 1933 (1935).
Unemployment Insurance and Reserves in
the United States. A Selected List of Recent
References (1 935).
Consumers’, Credit, and Productive Coopera­
tion in 1933 (1935).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Average Annual Wage and Salary Payments
in Ohio, 1916 to 1932 (1935).
Bulletins and Articles Published by Bureau
of Labor Statistics: A Selected List of Refer­
ences (1 9 3 5 ).
The Massachusetts System of Savings-Bank
Life Insurance (19 3 5 ).
Replaced by Bull. 688.
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1936 edition
(1936).
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Safety Codes for the Prevention of Dust Ex­
plosions (1 9 3 6 ).
Supplements Bull. 562.
Handbook of American Trade Unions (1936).
Replaces Bulls. 420 and 506.
Provides general information covering
American national and international trade
unions, their relation to the AFL, date of
each organization’s founding, its historical
development, and the essential facts of its
structure and functions.
This edition also includes a brief review
of the outstanding changes and developments
that have occurred within the American labor
movement since 1929, when the preceding
edition of the Handbook was published.
Labor Laws and Their Administration. Pro­
ceedings of the Twenty-first Convention of
the International Association of Govern­
mental Labor Officials, Asheville, N.C., Octo­
ber 1935 (1 9 36).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
the Folding-Paper-Box Industry, 1933, 1934,
and 1935 (1 9 37).
Labor Offices in the United States arid in
Canada (1 9 3 6).
Replaced by Bureau of Labor Standards
Bull. 177.
Wage Executions for Debt (1936).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
the Bread-Baking Industry, 1934 (1937).
A Selected List of the Publications of the

22



625

626

627

628
629

630
631.

632

633

634

635

Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1936 edition
(1 9 3 6 ) .
Occupational Disease Legislation in the
United States, 1936 (1937).
Reprinted as Bull. 652 with appendix con­
taining laws enacted in 1937.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the
Building Trades, May 15, 1936 (1937).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Entrance Rates and Full-time Hours of Com­
mon Laborers Employed by Cities, Septem­
ber 1935 (1937).
Changes in Retail Prices of Gas, 1923-36
(1 9 3 7 ) .
Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1936.
Proceedings of the Twenty-second Conven­
tion of the International Association of Gov­
ernmental Labor Officials, Topeka, Kans.,
September 1936 (1937).
Laws Relating to Employment Agencies in
the United States as of July 1, 1937 (1937).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the
Printing Trades, May 15, 1936 (1937).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Labor Offices in the United States and Can­
ada (1 9 3 8 ).
Replaced by Bureau of Labor Standards
Bull. 177.
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
the Set-Up Paper-Box Industry, 1933, 1934,
and 1935 (1 9 3 7 ).
Characteristics of Company Unions, 1935
(1 9 3 8 ) .
A quantitative study of the various types
of employer-employee dealings and the char­
acteristics of “company unions,” as well as
a detailed analysis of the structure and func­
tioning of “company unions.” (The term
“company union” is used in this report in its
generic sense as an organization of workers
confined to a particular plant or company
and having for its purpose the representation
of employees in their dealings with manage­
m ent.)
Retail Prices of Food, 1923-36 (1938).
Replaces report on food prices and costs
included in Bull. 495.
Presents a comprehensive revision of the
Bureau’s series of food-cost indexes for the
period 1923-36, inclusive, to reflect modifica­
tions in merchandising practices, increased

636

637

638

639

640

641

642

consumer interest, and advances in statistical
methods. Contains a detailed statement de­
scribing changes in methods, including modi­
fications in consumption weights, introduction
of population weights, and a shift of the base
period to 1923-25.
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in Eight Cities in the East
North Central Region, 1934-36 (1940).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in the North Atlantic R e­
gion, 1934-36.
Vol. I. New York City (1939).
Vol. II. Eleven Cities (1939).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers, 1934-36. Summary Vol­
ume (1 941).
Nationwide survey providing a general
picture of the standards of living available
to moderate-income urban families in 42
cities with populations exceeding 50,000, as
reflected by sources of their incomes, kinds
of goods and services they bought within a
12-month consecutive period, and kinds of
dwellings they occupied. Detailed data from
this study by region and by city were pre­
sented in other bulletins. See Bulls. 636, 637,
639, 640, 641-649, and 691 this listing. Ap­
pendixes provide a comprehensive description
of the survey methods.
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in Five Cities in the Pacific
Region, 1934-36 (19 3 9 ).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Money Disbursements of Employed Wage
Earners and Clerical Workers in Twelve
Cities of the South, 1934-36 (1941).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in Five Cities in the West
North Central-Mountain Region, 1934-36
(1939).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Family Income and Expenditure in Chicago,
1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1939).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.




643

644

645

646

647

648

649

650

Family Income and Expenditure in New York
City, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1941).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1939).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Family Income and Expenditure in Nine
Cities of the East Central Region, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (19 4 1 ).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Family Income and Expenditure in Five New
England Cities, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1 9 4 1 ).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Family Income and Expenditure in Selected
Urban Communities of the West CentralRocky M ountain Region, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1939).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1940).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Family Income and Expenditure in the
Southeastern Region, 1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (19 3 9 ).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1940).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Family Expenditures in Selected Cities,
1935-36.
Housing (19 4 1 ).
Vol. I.
Food (1940).
Vol. II.
Vol. III.
Clothing and Personal Care
(1 9 4 1 ).
Furnishings and Equipment
Vol. IV.
(1941).
Vol. V.
Medical Care (1 9 4 0 ).
Vol. VI.
Travel and Transportation
(1 9 4 0 ).
Vol. VII. Recreation, Reading, Form al
Education, Tobacco, Contri­
butions, and Personal Taxes
(1941).
Vol. V III. Changes in Assets and Liabili­
ties (1 9 4 1 ).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Family Income and Expenditure in Four
Urban Communities of the Pacific Northwest,
1935-36.
Vol. I. Family Income (1 9 3 9 ).
Vol. II. Family Expenditure (1940).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Statistics of Building Construction, 1920 to

23

651

652

653

654
655

656

657

658

1937 as Shown by Building Permits Issued:
Pt. I— General Trend in Construction. Pt. II
— Residential Building Construction, 1929 to
1935 (1 9 3 8 ). Pt. I l l — Building Construction,
1936 and 1937 (1938).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Strikes in the United States, 1880 to 1936
(1938).
Presents the major statistical data avail­
able on strikes and lockouts from the earliest
recorded date through 1936. However, the
principal portion of this bulletin covers dis­
putes during the period 1927-36.
Descriptive materials include definitions of
the various types of work stoppages, prob­
lems in their statistical measurement, and an
analysis of trends in strike statistics. (See also
annotation for Bull. 1687.) Includes appendix
on labor disputes in foreign countries.
Occupational Disease Legislation in the
United States, 1936 (W ith Appendix for
1937) (1 9 3 8 ).
Reprint of Bull. 625 with appendix con­
taining laws enacted in 1937.
Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1937.
Proceedings of the Twenty-third Convention
of the International Association of Govern­
mental Labor Officials, Toronto, Canada,
September 1937 (1938).
State Labor Legislation, 1937, Including
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation (1938).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the
Printing Trades, May 15, 1937 (1938).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
The Making and Using of Index Numbers
(1938).
Reprint of Pt. 1 of Bull. 284. See this list­
ing for annotation.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the
Building Trades in 70 Cities, May 15, 1937
(1938).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
P.W.A. and Industry. A Four-Year Study of
Regenerative Employment (1938).
A 4-year study intended to gage the
amount of indirect employment provided by
each major type of public works construction
authorized by the Federal Emergency A d­
ministration of Public Works from m id-1933
to mid-1937.

24



659

660
661
662
663

664
665

666

667

Consumers’ Cooperation in the United States,
1936 (1 9 3 9 ).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Mechanization and Productivity of Labor in
the Cigar Manufacturing Industry (19 3 9 ).
A Selected List of the Publications of the Bu­
reau of Labor Statistics, 1938 Edition (1939).
Productivity of Labor in the Cotton-Garm ent
Industry (1939).
Wages in Cotton-Goods Manufacturing
(1938).
Detailed analysis of average and individ­
ual hourly earnings data in the industry. The
analysis is preceded by a comprehensive ex­
amination of the economic setting, including
a description of the industry, the competitive
character of the cotton textile m arket and
plant capacity, balancing of equipment and
demand, profits and cost, mill margins, pro­
ductivity and equipment, foreign trade, and
demand for cotton goods.
Changes in Retail Prices of Electricity, 192338 (1939).
Organization and Management of Consum­
ers’ Cooperatives and Buying Clubs (1941).
Replaced by Bull. 1024.
Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1938.
Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth Conven­
tion of the International Association of Gov­
ernmental Labor Officials, Charleston, S.C.,
September 1938 (1939).
Manual on Industrial Injury Statistics
(1940).
Replaces Bull. 276.
Makes available to administrators of State
workmen’s compensation laws suggested
methods for preparing adequate statistical
reports of industrial injuries. The material is
organized around three focal points: (1 )
Facts concerning the efficiency of administra­
tion, e.g., volume, type and disposition of
cases handled, processing time, and difficulties
which cause operating delays; (2 ) practical
functioning of medical and benefit provisions
of the law, i.e., how the law affects the in­
jured workers; and (3 ) the incidence and
causes of accidents. Suggestions are given on
the type of statistical tables to be developed,
the codes to be used for this purpose, and
useful means of classifying accident-cause
data.

668

669

670

671
672

673
674

675

676

677
678

679

680

Building Construction 1921 to 1938 (1940).
Replaced by Bull. 713. See Bull. 545 this
listing for annotation.
The Wage and Hour Structure of the Furni­
ture-M anufacturing Industry, October 1937
(1940).
Earnings and Hours in Shoe and Allied In­
dustries During First Quarter of 1939. Boots
and Shoes, Cut Stock and Findings, Shoe
Patterns (1 9 3 9).
Earnings and Hours in the H at Industries,
1939 (1 9 39).
Problems of Workmen’s Compensation Ad­
ministration in the United States and Canada
(1940).
Analysis of State experiences in adminis­
tering workmen’s compensation laws, includ­
ing experience with those provisions affecting
the persons and employments covered, in­
juries and diseases covered, adequacy of
benefit payments, medical aid provisions, and
claims administration. The variety of the
patterns followed by individual States is ex­
amined to show the effectiveness of different
policies and procedures.
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
Union Bakeries, June 1, 1939 (1940).
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Condi­
tions in the Building Trades, June 1, 1939
(1940).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Condi­
tions in the Printing Trades, June 1, 1939
(1940).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Condi­
tions of M otortruck Drivers, June 1, 1939
(1 9 4 0 ) .
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Homes for Aged in the United States (1941).
Replaces Bull. 505
Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1939.
Proceedings of the Twenty-fifth Convention
of the International Association of Govern­
mental Labor Officials, Tulsa, Okla., Sep­
tember 1939 (1940).
Earnings and Hours in the Leather and
Leather Belting and Packing Industries, 1939
(1 9 4 1 ) .
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Condi-




681

682
683

684

685

686
687

tions in the Building Trades, June 1, 1941
(1942).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Labor Offices in the United States and in
Canada, 1941 (1941).
Replaced by Bureau of Labor Standards
Bull. 177.
Employment and Earnings in the Engineer­
ing Profession, 1929 to 1934 (1941).
A Selected List of the Publications of the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1940 edition
(1941).
Supplemented by Bull. 747.
Salaries and Hours of Labor in Municipal
Fire Departments, July 1, 1938.
Vol. I.
New England Cities (1940).
Vol. II.
Middle Atlantic Cities (1941).
Vol. III. East North Central Cities
(1941).
Vol. IV. West North Central Cities
(1941).
Vol. V. South Atlantic Cities (1941).
Vol. VI. East South Central Cities
(1941).
Vol. VII. West South Central Cities
(1941).
Vol. V III. Mountain
Division
Cities
(1940).
Vol. IX.
Pacific Cities (1 9 4 0 -4 1 ).
Salaries and Hours of Labor in Municipal
Police Departments, July 1, 1938.
Vol. I.
New England Cities (1941).
Vol. II.
Middle Atlantic Cities (1941).
Vol. III. East North Central Cities
(1941).
Vol. IV. West North Central Cities
(1941).
Vol. V.
South Atlantic Cities (1941).
Vol. VI. East
South Central Cities
(1941).
Vol. VII. West
South Central Cities
(1941).
Vol. V III. Mountain
Division
Cities
(1941).
Vol. IX.
Pacific Cities (1941).
Union Agreement Provisions (1942).
Replaced by Bull. 908 to 908-19, inclusive.
Labor in the Territory of Hawaii, 1939
(1940).
See Bull. 926 this listing for annotation.

25

688

689

690

691

692

693

694

695

696

697

Operation of Savings-Bank Life Insurance in
Massachusetts and New York (1941).
Replaces Bull. 615.
Building Permit Survey, 1939.
Vol. I.
New England Cities (1941).
Vol. II. Middle
Atlantic
Division
(1942).
Vol. III. East North Central Cities
(1 9 4 2 ).
Vol. IV. West North Central Cities
(1942).
Vol. V. South Atlantic Cities (1942).
Vol. VI. East South Central Cities
(1941).
Vol. VII. West South Central Cities
(1 9 4 1 ) .
Vol. V III. Mountain
Division
Cities
(1 9 4 2 ) .
Vol. IX.
Pacific Cities (1 9 4 1 -4 2 ).
See Bull. 545 this listing for annotation.
Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1940.
Proceedings of the Twenty-sixth Convention
of the International Association of Govern­
mental Labor Officials, New York City, Sep­
tember 1940 (1941).
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers in Thirteen Small Cities,
1933-35 (1 9 42).
See Bull. 638 this listing for annotation.
Earnings and Hours in the Paperboard In­
dustry (1941).
Embraces essentially the same class of es­
tablishments covered by Bull. 407.
Building Construction, 1940 (1941).
Replaced by Bull. 713. See Bull. 545 this
listing for annotation.
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1941.
Vol. I. All Topics Except Wages (1942).
Vol. II. Wages and Wage Regulation
(1942).
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Subject Index to the Monthly Labor Review.
Vols. 1 to 11, July 1915 to December 1920
(1941).
Subject Index to the Monthly Labor Review.
Vols. 12 to 51. January 1921 to December
1940 (1942).
Hours and Earnings in the United States,
1932-40 with Supplement for 1941 (1942).
Primarily a statistical presentation of
hours and earnings averages in m anufactur­

26



698
699

700
701

702
703
704
705

706

707
708

ing and nonmanufacturing industries by
month and year, from 1932-40. (Similar data
by month for 1941 are presented in the sup­
plem ent.) Also compares the averages for
1932 and 1940, outlines the general move­
ments during 1932-40, and details changes in
these averages in selected industries and in­
dustry groups. A comprehensive explanation
of the scope and methods utilized in prepar­
ing these data is provided.
Prison Labor in the United States, 1940
(1941).
Changes in Cost of Living in Large Cities in
the United States, 1913-41 (1 9 4 1 ).
Presents new indexes of changes in the cost
of living of wage earners and clerical work­
ers in large cities in the United States from
1913 to June 1941. Expenditure weights are
derived from a 1934-36 Bureau of Labor
Statistics study showing customary consump­
tion patterns of these groups.
See also Bulls. 710, 966, 1039, 1165, 1256,
1517, 1554, and 1647.
Industrial-Injury Statistics by States (1942).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions of
Union Street-Railway Employees, June 1,
1941 (1942).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours in the Glove Industry,
1941 (1942).
Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1941 (1942).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Wage Rates in the California Airframe In­
dustry, 1941 (1942).
Wages and Hours of Union M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, June 1, 1941 (1942).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Wage Structure of the Motor-Vehicle Indus­
try (1942).
Presents the results of a survey of the
motor-vehicle industry immediately before
its complete transition to wartime production
and provides a summary of the industry’s
characteristics. In addition to statistical data
on earnings and hours, the bulletin includes
a discussion of the trends in employment, pay­
rolls, earnings, and hours in the industry from
1923 to 1941.
Retail Prices of Food and Coal, 1941 (1942).
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Condi-

709
710

711

712
713

714

715

tions in the Printing Trades, June 1, 1941
(1942).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Collective Bargaining in Paper and Allied
Products Industry (1942).
Cost of Living in 1941 (1 9 4 2 ).
This bulletin gives cost-of-living indexes
in large cities from the first outbreak of war
in Europe, in the fall of 1939, through United
States entry into the war in December 1941.
See also Bulls. 699,966, 1039, 1165, 1256,
1517, 1554, and 1647.
Strikes in 1941 and Strikes Affecting Defense
Production (1 9 4 2 ).
In addition to an analysis of strikes that
occurred during 1941, contains a report on
strikes that interfered with or delayed de­
fense production during the 18-month period
from June 1940, when the first emergency
legislation was enacted, to December 7, 1941.
See also Bull. 1687 this listing.
Earnings in the Grain-Mill Products Indus­
tries, 1941 (1 9 4 2 ).
Building Construction, 1941 (1942).
Replaces Bulls. 668 and 693. See Bull. 545
this listing for annotation.
R eport on the W ork of the National Defense
M ediation Board, M arch 19, 1941-January
12, 1942 (1 9 42).
R eport prepared by the staff of the NDMB
of the methods used and the results attained
in the handling of the most difficult labor dis­
putes in the period of active preparation for
national defense. In addition to a discussion
of the powers, organization, and practice of
the NDMB, includes a brief report on each
of the 118 cases handled, together with the
full text of all recommendations. An appen­
dix supplied by the Bureau consists of the
applicable Executive orders and other deci­
sions reached after the NDM B’s work in
these cases was completed. For those con­
cerned with the collective bargaining process
and the relation of government thereto, this
report provides a perceptive account of the
practical problems raised by the combination
of mediatory and recommendatory power of
a vaguely compulsory nature in a tripartite
body without specific statutory authority.
Labor Aspects of the Chicago Milk Industry
(1942).




716
717
718
719

720
720
-A
-B
721

722

723
724
725

726
727
728
729
730

731

732

733

Collective Bargaining in the Chemical Indus­
try, May 1942 (1942).
Incentive-Wage Plans and Collective Bar­
gaining (1 9 4 2 ).
Wholesale Prices, January-June 1942 (1943).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Earnings and Hours in M en’s Cotton-Gar­
ment Industries and in Plants M anufacturing
Single Pants Other than Cotton, 1939 and
1941 (1942).
Earnings in the Manufacture of Industrial
Machinery, 1942 (1942).
Earnings in the M anufacture of Industrial
Machinery, 1942 (Pt. 2) (1943).
Earnings in the Manufacture of Industrial
Machinery, 1942 (Pt. 3) (19 4 3 ).
Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1941.
Proceedings of the Twenty-seventh Conven­
tion of the International Association of Gov­
ernmental Labor Officials, St. Louis, Septem­
ber 1941 (1943).
Shipyard Injuries and Their Causes, 1941
(1943).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Spending and Saving of the N ation’s Families
in Wartime (1942).
Income and Spending and Saving of City
Families in Wartime (1942).
Consumers’ Cooperation in the United States
in 1941 (1943).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Earnings and Hours in Book and Job Print­
ing, January 1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
Hourly Earnings in Private Shipyards, 1942
(1943).
Earnings in Eastern and Midwestern Air­
frame Plants, 1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
Wage Structure of the Nonferrous Metals
Industry, 1941-42 (1943).
Union Wages and Hours in the Building
Trades, July 1, 1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Wage Rates of Union Street-Railway Em ­
ployees, June 1, 1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Wages and Hours of Union M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, June 1, 1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Hourly Entrance Rates Paid to Common L a­
borers, 1942 (19 4 3 ).

27

734
735
736

737
738

739

740
741
742
743
744
745
746
747

748
749

750

751

Absenteeism in Commercial Shipyards
(1943).
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking In­
dustry, June 1, 1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
Wholesale Prices, July-Decem ber and Year
1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Wages in Rubber M anufacturing Industry,
August 1942 (1943).
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperation in
1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing
Trades, June 1, 1942 (19 4 3 ).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Student Cooperatives in the United States,
1941 (1 9 4 3 ).
Strikes in 1942 (1943).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Effect of Incentive Payments on Hourly
Earnings (1 9 4 3 ).
Vacation and Holiday Provisions in Union
Agreements, January 1943 (19 4 3 ).
Earnings in Aircraft-Parts Plants, November
1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
Union Membership and Collective Bargain­
ing by Forem en (1 9 4 3 ).
Wage Stabilization in California Airframe
Industry, 1943 (1 9 4 3 ).
Selected List of the Publications of the Bu­
reau of Labor Statistics. 1943 Supplement to
1940 Edition (1943).
Supplements Bull. 683.
Pay Differentials for Night Work Under
Union Agreements (1943).
Wartime Prices— Pt. I, August 1939 to Pearl
H arbor (1 9 4 4 ). (Only Pt. I has been pub­
lished.)
History of prices in wholesale (prim ary)
markets in the United States during the de­
fense period from August 1939 (invasion of
Poland) to December 1941 (Pearl H arbor).
Includes a discussion of factors causing price
advances in this period, the operation of
selective price controls, and a comparison of
price rises in World Wars I and II.
Directory of Consumers’ Cooperatives in the
United States (1 9 4 3 ). Revised 1947.
Replaced by Bull. 959.
Hours and Earnings in the Fertilizer Indus­
try, January 1943 (19 4 3 ).

28



752
753
754

755
756
757

758

759
760
761
762
763
764

765
766

767

768

769
770

Earnings in Ship Construction Yards, Fall of
1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
Maintenance-of-Membership Awards of N a­
tional War Labor Board (1943).
Family Allowances in Various Countries
(1943).
Supplemented by Bull. 803.
Wartime Labor Conditions in India (1943).
Wages in M anufacturing Industries in W ar­
time (19 4 3 ).
Activities of Consumers’ Cooperatives in
1942 (19 4 3 ).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Industrial Injuries in the United States D ur­
ing 1942 (1 9 4 3 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Wholesale Prices, January-June 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Union Agreements in the Aluminum-Fabri­
cation Industry (1944).
Union Agreements in Agricultural-Machinery
Industry, 1943 (1944).
Earnings in Southwestern Petroleum Indus­
try, April 1943 (1 9 4 4 ).
Hourly Earnings in Private Ship-Repair
Yards, Spring 1943 (1 9 4 4 ).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Long­
shore Industry, 1942 (1 9 4 4 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Wages in the Nonferrous-Metals Industry,
June 1943 (1944).
Union Wage Rates of City Streetcar and Bus
Operators, July 1, 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours in the Building
Trades, July 1, 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Developments in the Cooperative Movement
in 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Spendable Earnings of Factory Workers,
1941-43 (1 9 4 4 ).
Cooperative Associations in Europe and
Their Possibilities for Post-W ar Reconstruc­
tion (1 9 4 4 ).
Discusses the development and extent in
Europe of various types of cooperatives—
consumers’, workers’ productive and labor
associations, credit associations, housing as­
sociations, agricultural associations, etc.—

771

772

773
774
775

776
Ill
778
779

and their potential role in post-World War
II reconstruction.
Part I provides a comparative analysis of
the cooperative movement in European
countries, including the types of cooperatives,
extent of development, the importance of co­
operatives in the national economy, and the
development of international cooperative or­
ganizations. Part II deals with the formation,
growth, and activities of the cooperative
movement in individual countries. It pro­
vides, in most cases, some historical back­
ground showing how the economic events of
the time, as well as changes in governments
and national boundaries, affected the cooper­
ative movement and helped to speed or retard
its development or alter its direction.
Supplemented by Bull. 942.
Union Wages and Hours of M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Accident Record Manual for Industrial
Plants (1 9 4 4 ).
Assists plants in establishing and using
effective accident records by suggesting sim­
ple and useful methods of accident recording
and the uses of such data for accident pre­
vention.
Installment Buying by City Consumers in
1941 (1 9 4 4 ).
Earnings of Bank Employees, Spring and
Summer of 1943 (1 9 4 4 ).
Hourly Entrance Rates of Common Laborers
in Large Cities, Spring and Summer of 1943
(1944).
Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union
Status, January 1944 (1 9 4 4 ).
Union Agreements in the Leather-Tanning
Industry, 1943 (19 4 4 ).
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1943 (1944).
Post-W ar Capacity and Characteristics of
the Construction Industry (1944).
The productive capacity of the construc­
tion industry in the post-World War II
period is projected in terms of its ability to
meet accumulating wartime demands. Four
types of supply factors governing the indus­
try’s physical capacity for resuming postwar
activities are analyzed: Organization and




780
781

782
783
784
785

786

787
788
789
790
791

791
-A
792
793
794
795

methods of operation of the industry, its
plant facilities, supplies of building materials
and related products, and availability of
construction labor.
Arbitration Provisions in Union Agreement
(1944).
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing
Trades, July 1, 1943 (1 9 4 4 ).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Strikes in 1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Trend of Earnings Among White-Collar
Workers During the W ar (1 9 4 4 ).
Demobilization of Manpower, 1918-19
(1944).
Wholesale Prices, July-Decem ber and Year
1943 (1944).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
The Construction Industry in the United
States (1 9 4 4 ).
Analysis of trends in the construction in­
dustry— expenditures, 1915-43; employment,
1929-43; volume of Federal construction,
1935-43; building construction (257 cities),
1921-43; nonfarm dwelling units, 1910-43;
and private building construction costs,
1934-43.
Wages in Iron Mining, October 1943 (19 4 4 ).
Wartime Earnings and Spending in Hono­
lulu, 1943 (1944).
Cost of Clothing for Moderate-Income Fam ­
ilies, 1935-44 (1944).
Average Hourly Earnings in the Airframe
Industry, 1943 (1944).
Studies of the Effects of Long Working
Hours, Pt. 1 (1944).
See Bull. 917 this listing for annotation.
Studies of the Effects of Long Working
Hours, Pt. 2 (1944).
See Bull. 917 this listing for annotation.
Union Agreements in the Airframe Industry,
1944 (1 9 4 4 ).
Intercity Variations in Wage Levels (19 4 4 ).
Union Agreements in the Canned Fruit and
Vegetable Industry (1944).
Labor Laws and Their Administration, 1943.
Proceedings of the Twenty-eighth Conven­
tion of the International Association of Gov­
ernmental Labor Officials, Chicago, October
1943 (19 4 5 ).

29

796

797
798
799
800
801

802

803

804
805

806
807
808
809
810
811
812

813
814

815

816
817

Operations of Consumers’ Cooperatives in
1943 (1 9 4 4 ).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Activities of Credit Unions in 1943 (1944).
Earnings in Cotton-Goods M anufacture
During the War Years (1944).
Retail Prices of Food, 1942 and 1943 (1945).
Wartime Development of the Aircraft Indus­
try (1 9 4 4 ).
Wages in Departm ent and Clothing Stores,
Large Cities, Spring and Summer, 1943
(1944) .
Work Injuries in the United States During
1943 (1 9 4 4 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Mid-War Developments in Civilian Family
Allowances (1 9 4 4 ).
Supplements Bull. 754.
Reconversion Problems in the Buffalo In­
dustrial A rea (1 9 4 5 ).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Foundry
Industry, 1942 (1 9 4 5 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Wages in the Rayon Industry, May 1944
(1 9 4 5 ) .
Improvement of Labor-Utilization Procedures
(1945).
Dismissal Pay Provisions in Union Agree­
ments, December 1944 (1945).
Trends in U rban Wage Rates, A pril-O ctober
1944 (1 9 4 5 ).
Wages in Petroleum Drilling and Production
in the Southwest, April 1944 (1945).
Paid Vacations in American Industry, 1943
and 1944 (1 9 45).
Union Wages and Hours of M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1944 (19 4 5 ).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Employment Opportunities for Diesel-En­
gine Mechanics (1 9 4 5 ).
Union Wage Rates of City Streetcar and Bus
Operators, July 1, 1944 (1945).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours in the Building
Trades, July 1, 1944 (19 4 5 ).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1944 (1945).
Occupational Data for Counselors. A H and­
book of Census Information Selected for Use
in Guidance (1 9 4 5 ).

30



818
819
820

821

822
823
824
825
826
827
828

829
830
831

832
833
834
835
836

Effect of W ar-Contract Cut-Backs on Selected
Plants (19 4 5 ).
Average Hourly Earnings in the Explosives
Industry, June 1944 (1945).
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing
Trades, July 1, 1944 (1 9 4 5 ).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperative
Movement in 1944 (1 9 4 5 ).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Family Spending and Saving in Wartime
(1945).
Union Agreements in the Petroleum-Refining
Industry in Effect in 1944 (1 9 4 5 ).
Wartime Employment, Production, and Con­
ditions of Work in Shipyards (19 4 5 ).
Probable Volume of Postwar Construction
(1945).
Impact of the War on Employment in 181
Centers of W ar Activity (1945).
Hourly Earnings in the Ammunition-Loading
Industry, 1944 (1945).
Guaranteed-Employment and Annual-Wage
Provisions in Union Agreements, Effective
January 1945 (1945).
Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union
Status, January 1945 (1945).
Annual and Hourly Earnings, Philadelphia
Knitted-Outerwear Industry, 1943 (1945).
Fact Finding Activities of the Bureau of La­
bor Statistics (1 9 4 5 ).
The BLS has compiled and made available
a substantial volume of materials on employ­
ment, wages, working conditions, prices, and
other subjects which are directly pertinent to
many of the N ation’s economic problems.
This bulletin describes the more im portant
types of information compiled by the Bureau,
their characteristics, uses and limitations,
and the forms in which they are available.
Sick-Leave Provisions in Union Agreements
(1945).
Strikes and Lockouts in 1944 (1945).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Shipyard Injuries, 1944 (1 9 4 5 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Postwar Employment Prospects for Women
in the Hosiery Industry (1 9 4 5 ).
Labor Unionism in American Agriculture
(1945).
A graphic study of the origin, development,

problems, and accomplishments of agricul­
tural unionism in the United States. Analyzes
the combination of circumstances that gave
rise to organized labor-employer conflicts in
agriculture; the types of farming and the
changes in farm structure and labor relations
that tended to generate such conflict; the is­
sues in farm labor disputes; the tactics of
group pressure and combat employed by con­
tending groups; reactions of community
groups to farm labor unions and strikes and
the degree to which their reactions were in­
fluenced or determined by economic, cultural,
social, and politico-legal considerations.
837
-1

-2

838
839

840
841

842
843

844
845
846
847
848
849

Employment Opportunities in Aviation Oc­
cupations, Pt. 1. Postwar Employment Out­
look (1 9 4 5 ).
Employment Opportunities in Aviation Oc­
cupations, Pt. 2. Duties, Qualifications,
Earnings, and Working Conditions (1947).
Wartime Food Purchases (1945).
Fatal W ork Injuries in Shipyards, 1943 and
1944 (1 9 4 5 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Wages in the Basic Lum ber Industry in the
F ar West, 1944 (1945).
Health-Benefit Programs Established Through
Collective Bargaining, 1945 (1945).
Description of provisions in some of the
more representative types of collectively bar­
gained health-benefit plans in various indus­
tries. See also Bull. 900 this listing.
Employment Outlook for Automobile Me­
chanics (1 9 4 5 ).
Operations of Consumers’ Cooperatives in
1944 (1 9 4 5 ).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Employment Opportunities for Welders
(1945).
Income From Wages and Salaries in the
Postwar Period (19 4 5 ).
Trends in Urban Wage Rates, October 1944
to April 1945 (1 9 4 5 ).
Union Agreements in the Tobacco Industry,
January 1945 (19 4 5 ).
Earnings and Wage Practices in Municipal
Governments of 15 Cities, 1944 (1945).
Work Injuries in the United States During
1944 (1 9 4 5 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.




850
851
852
853
854
855

856

857
858

859

860
861
862

863
864
865
866
867
868
869
870
871
872

Activities of Credit Unions in 1944 (1945).
Wartime Prices, Price Control, and Ration­
ing in Foreign Countries (1946).
W ar and Postwar Wages, Prices, and Hours,
1914-23 and 1939-44 (19 4 6 ).
Family Allowances in Various Countries,
1944-45 (1 9 4 6 ).
Wages in the Basic Lum ber Industry, 1944
(1946).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Slaugh­
tering and M eat-Packing Industry, 1943
(1946).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Union Wage Rates of City Streetcar and Bus
Operators, July 1, 1945 (1 9 4 6 ).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Impaired Workers in Industry (1 9 4 6 ).
Organization and Management of Coopera­
tive and Mutual Housing Associations
(1946).
Replaces Bull. 608.
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperative
Movement in 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Trends in U rban Wage Rates, April to Octo­
ber 1945 (1 9 4 6 ).
Wage Structure in the Machinery Industries,
January 1946 (1946).
Union Wages and Hours in the Building
Trades, July 1, 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Postwar Outlook for Physicians (1946).
Employment Situation in Certain Foreign
Countries (1946).
Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union
Recognition, 1945 (1 9 4 6 ).
Wage Structure of the Fabricated StructuralSteel Industry, January 1945 (1946).
Wage Structure in Bituminous-Coal Mining,
Fall of 1945 (19 4 6 ).
Wage Structure of the Machine-Tool Acces­
sories Industry, January 1945 (19 4 6 ).
W orkmen’s Compensation and the Protection
of Seamen (19 4 6 ).
Wholesale Prices, 1944 (19 4 7 ).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1945 (1946).
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing
Trades, July 1, 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.

31

873
874

875
876
877
878

879
880
881
882
883
884

885
886
887

Price Trends and Price Control in Foreign
Countries Since VE-Day (1 9 4 6 ).
Union Wages and Hours of M otortruck
Drivers and Helpers, July 1, 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Wage Structure of Electroplating and Polish­
ing Industry, January 1945 (1946).
W orkers’ Experiences During First Phase of
Reconversion (19 4 6 ).
Wholesale Prices, 1945 (1947).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-M anage­
ment Disputes in 1945 (1946).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
The General Maximum Price Regulation
(1 9 4 6 ) .
Employment Outlook in Foundry Occupa­
tions (1 9 4 6 ).
Factors Affecting Earnings in Chemistry and
Chemical Engineering (1 9 4 6 ).
The Changing Status of Bituminous Coal
Miners, 1937-46 (1946).
Wartime Wages, Income, and Wage Regula­
tion in Agriculture (1946).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Brewing
Industry, 1944 (19 4 6 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Union Agreements in the Cotton Textile In­
dustry (1 9 47).
Wages of Office Workers in Metalworking
Industries, January 1945 (1946).
Employment and Earnings in the Philadel­
phia Knitted-Outerwear Industry, 1944 and
1945 (1 9 4 7 ).

892
893
894
895
896
897
898

888

-1
-2

-3
889

890

891

Labor Requirements for Construction M ate­
rials. Pt. I— Portland Cement (19 4 7 ).
Labor Requirements for Construction M a­
terials. Pt. II— Concrete Masonry Units
(1 9 4 7 ) .
Labor Requirements for Construction M ate­
rials. Pt. I l l — Concrete Pipe (1947).
Work Injuries in the United States During
1945 (1 9 4 7 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Operations of Consumers’ Cooperatives in
1945 (1 9 4 7 ).
See Bull. 1249 this listing for annotation.
Trends in Urban Wage Rates, April 1946
(1946).

32



899
900

901

Employment Outlook for BusinessMachine
Servicemen (1947).
State and Regional Variations in Prospective
Labor Supply (1947).
Activities of Credit Unions in 1945 (1 9 4 7 ).
Employment Outlook in Machine Shop Oc­
cupations (1947).
Nonprofit Housing Projects in the United
States (1947).
Collective Bargaining With Associations and
Groups of Employers (1 9 4 7 ).
Labor in the South (1 9 4 7 ).
An analysis of selected basic factors af­
fecting labor in Southern States. Key popu­
lation, migration, and labor force character­
istics and the rise of industry in the South
are examined to provide a broad base for
understanding the position of labor in the
region. Income trends and levels, wage levels
and wage differentials, and changes in con­
sumer prices are analyzed to provide insight
into the relative economic position of the
Southern industrial workers and of other seg­
ments of the Southern population. Efforts by
Southern workers to improve their economic
position are traced in the development of the
trade union and consumers’ cooperative
movements in the South. In addition, the
study appraises the impact of the Fair Labor
Standards Act on Southern industries and
workers, describes the operation of the oldage and survivors insurance and unemploy­
ment insurance programs of the Social Se­
curity Act, and presents principal provisions
of protective labor legislation enacted in
Southern States.
Retail Prices of Food, 1944 and 1945 (1947).
Union Health and Welfare Plans (1947).
Describes (1 ) development and interest in,
and outlook for, health and welfare plans
and (2 ) experience of the International L a­
dies’ Garm ent W orkers’ Union (A F L ). Sam­
ple welfare clauses provided in specific
agreements and a description of trade unions’
historical interest in health and welfare plans
also are included. See also Bull. 841 this
listing.
Directory of Labor Unions in the United
States, 1947 (1947).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.

902
903

904

905
906

907

908

908
-2
-3

-4
-5

Employment Outlook in Printing Occupa­
tions (1 9 4 7 ).
Union Wages and Hours of Local-Transit
Operating Employees, July 1, 1946 (1947).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperative
Movement in 1946 (19 4 7 ).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook in Hotel Occupations
(1947).
Appendix C. Guaranteed Wage or Employ­
ment Plans (1947).
See also Bulls. 544, 907, and 925 this
listing.
Appendix F. Economic Analysis of Guaran­
teed Wages (1947).
Economic analysis of the potential effects
of guaranteed wage plans on the economy,
and the relation of guaranteed wages to eco­
nomic security, business cycles, and the use
of resources. The analysis, which was de­
signed to supplement the description of guar­
anteed wage plans in Bull. 906, was prepared
as a supplement to the Guaranteed Wage
Study Staff’s Final R eport to the Advisory
Board of the Office of W ar Mobilization and
Reconversion. Comments on the analysis by
other eminent economists are included.
See also Bulls. 544, 906, and 925 this list­
ing.
Union-Security Provisions in Collective Bar­
gaining (1 9 4 7 ).
Replaces Bull. 686.
This bulletin and those that follow (9 0 8 -2
to 908-19, incl.) reproduce a variety of sam­
ple union-management agreement provisions,
each stressing a m ajor area or significant
problem in collective bargaining. Bull. 9 0 8 17 includes texts of selected health, welfare,
and pension plans in addition to sample
clauses concerning these subjects.
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Vacations;
Holidays and W eek-End Work (1 9 4 8 ).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Incentive
Wage Provisions; Time Studies and Stand­
ards of Production (1948 ).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Appren­
tices and Learners (1948).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Discharge,




-6
-7

-8
-9
-1 0

-1 1
-1 2

-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6
-1 7
-1 8

-1 9

909
910

911

912

913

Discipline, and Quits; Dismissal Pay Provi­
sions (1948).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Leave of
Absence; Military Service Leave (1 9 4 8 ).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Promotion,
Transfer, and Assignment; Lay-off, WorkSharing, Reemployment (1948).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. General
Wage Provisions (1948).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Wage Ad­
justment Plans (1948).
Collective
Bargaining Provisions. UnionManagement Cooperation, Plant Efficiency,
and Technological Change (1 9 4 9 ).
Collective
Bargaining Provisions. Seniority
(1 9 4 9 ) .
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Union and
Management Functions, Rights, and Respon­
sibilities (1949).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Strikes and
Lock-Outs; Contract Enforcement (1 9 4 9 ).
Collective
Bargaining Provisions. Safety,
Health, and Sanitation (1949).
Collective
Bargaining Provisions. G uaran­
teed Employment and Wage Plans (1950).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Grievance
and Arbitration Provisions (1950).
Collecting Bargaining Provisions. Health, In­
surance, and Pensions (1950).
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Hours of
Work; Overtime Pay; Shift Operations
(1 9 5 0 ) .
Collective Bargaining Provisions. Preamble,
Scope of Bargaining Unit. Duration of
Agreements (1950).
Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union
Recognition, 1946 (1 9 4 7 ).
Union Wages and Hours in the Building
Trades, July 1, 1946 (1947).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours of M otortruck
Drivers and Helpers, July 1, 1946 (1948).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing
Trades, July 1, 1946 (19 4 7 ).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Summary of Proceedings of Conference on
Productivity, October 28-29, 1946 (1 9 4 7 ).
Summarizes and evaluates a conference on
productivity held in Washington, D.C., on
October 28 and 29, 1946, under the auspices
33

914
915

916

917

918

919
920
921

922

923

of the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the
Division of Statistical Standards of the U.S.
Bureau of the Budget. The conference was
convened as a forum for the exchange of
views on productivity concepts and measure­
ments by participants from labor, industry,
private research groups, and government
agencies.
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1946 (1948).
Construction in the W ar Years, 1942-45.
Employment, Expenditures, and Building
Volume (1 9 4 8).
Shows trends in construction activity, par­
ticularly during the 4 years of World War II.
In addition to an analysis of the effects of
war on the construction industry, this report
resumes the annual publication of a statisti­
cal bulletin (on construction expenditures,
employment, and building volum e), inter­
rupted in 1944 by wartime pressures.
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1947 Edition
(1948).
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Hours of Work and O utput (1 9 4 8 ).
A comprehensive report, based on 78 plant
case studies, showing the effects of working
schedules longer than 8 hours a day or 40
hours a week on absenteeism, efficiency, workinjuries, and output. Includes study of the
effects of the introduction of wage incentives
on output and a comparison of worker per­
formance before, during, and after World
War II. The description of the case studies
in this report is limited to statements of es­
sentials only.
Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-M anage­
ment Disputes in 1946 (1 9 4 7 ).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Labor Requirements to Produce Home In­
sulation (1 9 4 7).
Wholesale Prices, 1946 (1948).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Work Injuries in the United States During
1946 (1 9 4 8 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Consumers’ Cooperatives and Credit Unions:
Operations in 1946 (19 4 8 ).
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
The Performance of Physically Impaired
Workers in Manufacturing Industries (1948).

34



924

925

926

927

928

929
930

931
932

933

934
935

Injuries and Accident Causes in the Pulpwood-Logging Industry, 1943 and 1944
(1948).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Guaranteed Wage Plans in the United States
(1948).
Exhaustive study of guaranteed wage and
employment plans in the United States, in­
cluding their historical development, extent,
and characteristics; detailed analysis of ex­
periences under a selected group of 62 repre­
sentative plans; and compilation of sample
guarantee provisions found in guarantee
plans or union agreements. M ajor portions of
this report appeared as Bull. 906. See also
Bulls. 544, 906, and 907 this listing.
The Economy of Hawaii in 1947 (1 9 4 8 ).
Report on the economy of Hawaii and the
effect of World W ar II on the economic de­
velopment of the territory. To reflect transi­
tion from primitive self-sufficient economy to
modern specialized economy, a detailed anal­
ysis is presented of major industries in the
Islands, including sugar, pineapple, and tour­
ism. F or similar studies covering earlier pe­
riods, see Bulls. 47, 534, and 687.
W orkers’ Budgets in the United States: City
Families and Single Persons, 1946 and 1947
(1948).
See Bull. 1570-1 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1947 (1948).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook in the Plastics Industry
(1948).
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1947 (1948).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
The Economic Status of Registered Profes­
sional Nurses, 1946-47 (1948).
Developments in the Consumers’ Cooperative
Movement in 1947 (1948).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, October 1, 1947 (1 9 4 8 ).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Wage Trends and Wage Policies: Various
Foreign Countries (19 4 8 ).
Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-M anage­
ment Disputes in 1947 (1948).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.

936
937

938
939

940
941

942

943
944
945

946
947
948

Union Wages and Hours: The Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1947 (1948).
Directory of Labor Unions in the United
States, 1948 (1 9 4 8 ).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Retail Prices of Food, 1946 and 1947 (1949).
Supplementary Wage Practices in American
Industry, 1945-46 (1 9 4 8 ).
Presents summary information on each of
six types of supplementary wage practices
(vacation and sick leave plans, shift differ­
entials, nonproduction bonuses, incentive
methods of pay, insurance and pension plans,
and wage-rate structure) in the m anufactur­
ing and nonmanufacturing industries sur­
veyed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics dur­
ing 1945-46.
Occupational Outlook Handbook (1949).
See Bull. 1700 this listing for annotation.
Construction and Housing, 1946-47 (1948).
An account of the post-World War II re­
vival of the construction industry, presented
through an analysis of data showing the
shifts and trends in construction activity and
employment in this period and a brief inter­
pretation of the factors underlying these de­
velopments. The text deals in some detail
with the progress of postwar housing con­
struction, relating the developments in activ­
ity to economic and regulatory changes.
Cooperatives in Postwar Europe. Survey of
Developments in Scandinavian Countries
and Eastern, Central, and Western Europe
(1 9 4 8 ) .
Brings information in Bull. 770 up to 1945
(and to 1946 for some countries).
Salaries of Office Workers in Selected Large
Cities (1 9 4 9 ).
Employment Outlook in Electric Light and
Power Occupations (1 9 4 9 ).
W ork Injuries in the United States During
1947 (1 9 4 9 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Employee Benefit Plans Under Collective
Bargaining (1 9 4 9 ).
Wholesale Prices, 1947 (1949).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Consumers’ Cooperatives: Operations in 1947
(1 9 4 9 ) .
See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.




949

950

951

952
953

954
955

956

957

958
959

960
-1

-2

-3

-4

961

Injuries and Accident Causes in Fertilizer
Manufacturing (1949).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Residential Heating Fuels. Retail Prices,
1941-48. D ata for Nine Locally Im portant
Fuels in 55 Cities (1 9 4 9 ).
Union Wages and Hours in the Building
Trades, July 1, 1948 (1 9 4 9 ).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Wage Structure— Metalworking Industries,
1945 (1949).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, September 1947-Septem ber
1948 (1949).
Union Wages and Hours: The Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1948 (1949).
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1948 (1949).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings
in 1945. Birmingham, Ala., Indianapolis,
Ind., and Portland, Oreg. (1949).
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, October 1, 1948 (1 9 4 9 ).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook in Radio and Tele­
vision Broadcasting Occupations (1949).
Directory of Consumers’ Cooperatives in the
United States (19 4 9 ).
Replaces Bull. 750.
Contains a key to the kinds of business ac­
tivities conducted by the individual consumer
cooperative associations as well as a list, by
States and cities, of the names and addresses
of the various associations.
Salaries of Office Workers in Large Cities,
1949. Pt. I. Hartford, Los Angeles, New O r­
leans, Philadelphia, St. Louis (1949).
Salaries of Office Workers in Large Cities,
1949. Pt. II. Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, New
York, Seattle (1 9 4 9 ).
Salaries of Office Workers in Large Cities,
1949. Part III. Cleveland, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Portland, Oreg., Richmond (1 9 4 9 ).
Salaries of Office W orkers in Large Cities,
1949. Pt. IV. Cincinnati, Dallas, Washington,
D.C. (1950).
Employment Outlook in Railroad Occupa­
tions (1949).
35

962

963

964

965
966

967
968
969

970

970
-2

971

Injuries and Accident Causes in Textile Dye­
ing and Finishing (1949).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-M anage­
ment Disputes in 1948 (1 9 4 9 ).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Developments in Consumers’ Co-ops in 1948
(1949).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Retail Prices of Food, 1948 (1949).
Consumers’ Prices in the United States,
1942-48 (1 9 4 9 ).
Detailed compilation of retail price data
collected for the Consumer Price Index in
the period 1942-48, as well as historical price
data back to 1935. Analyzes price movements
at the consumer level during World War II
and up to 1948, with particular reference to
the effects of price controls. Compares price
changes in large cities with those in small
cities and discusses price movements for
major commodity groups. Contains a detailed
account of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’
wartime price-reporting policies and of the
revisions in its pricing techniques necessitated
by the war, as well as of certain postwar ad­
justments in procedures. See also Bulls. 699,
710, 1039, 1165, 1256, 1517, 1554, and
1647.
Employment Outlook in the Building Trades
(1949).
Employment Outlook for Engineers (1950).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, September
1948-January
1949
(1 9 4 9 ).
The Wage Chronology Series, Vol. I. Ameri­
can Woolen Co., 1939-48; Northern Cotton
Textile Associations, 1943-48; United States
Steel Corp., 1937-48; Bituminous-Coal
Mines, 1933-48; Chrysler Corp., 1939-48;
Arm our and Co., 1941-48; Swift & Co.,
1942-48; Full-Fashioned Hosiery, 1941-48
(1949).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.

972
973
974
975

976

977
978

979

980

981

982

983
984
985
986

987
The Wage Chronology Series, Vol. II. Gen­
eral Motors Corp., 1939-40 (1949).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Consumers’ Cooperatives: Operations in
1948. A R eport on Membership, Business,
and Operating Results (1949).

36



988

989

See Bull. 1049 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook for Elementary and
Secondary School Teachers (1 9 4 9 ).
Wholesale Prices, 1948 (1950).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, June-D ecem ber 1947 (1949).
W ork Injuries in the United States During
1948 (1950).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1949 (1 9 5 0 ).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: The Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1949 (1 9 5 0 ).
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1949 (1 9 5 0 ).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
January 2, 1948, and July 1, 1949 (19 5 0 ).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Directory of Labor Unions in the United
States, 1950 (1950).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit
Operating Employees, October 1, 1949
(1950).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Public Social Security Programs in the United
States, 1940-50 (1950).
Summary information on the operations of
the public social security programs. De­
scribes provisions, operating experience, fi­
nancing, and other aspects of old-age and
survivors insurance, unemployment insur­
ance, and public-assistance programs.
Glossary of Currently Used Wage Terms
(1950).
Construction, 1948 in Review (1950).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, November 1949 (1950).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. Atlanta, Ga., Janu­
ary 1950 (1950).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. Indianapolis, Ind.,
January 1950 (1950).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. Memphis, Tenn.,
February 1950 (1 9 5 0 ).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,

990

991
992

993

994
995

996
997

998
999

1000

1001

Supplementary Benefits. Oklahoma City,
Okla., February 1950 (1950).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. Milwaukee, Wis.,
January 1950 (1950).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York, January 1950 (1950).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. Boston, Mass., Janu­
ary 1950 (1 9 50).
Techniques of Preparing M ajor BLS Statis­
tical Series (1950).
Replaced by Bull. 1168.
Employment Outlook in Petroleum Produc­
tion and Refining (1950).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. Chicago, 111., Feb­
ruary 1950 (1 950).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1950 (1950).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. New York, N.Y.,
February 1950 (1950).
Occupational Outlook Handbook (1951).
See Bull. 1700 this listing for annotation.
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. Detroit, Mich.,
April 1950 (1 9 5 0 ).
Brief History of the American Labor Move­
ment, 1957 edition (1 9 5 7 ); 1964 edition
(1964); 1970 edition (1970) $1.
A pocket-sized history of the American
labor movement. Summarizes the develop­
ment of the early organizations of labor and
the modern organized labor movement
(American Federation of Labor and the Con­
gress of Industrial Organizations) and traces
the course of labor events during World War
I, the “open shop” era of the twenties, the
depressed thirties, and through World War II
and postwar labor-management conflict and
readjustment. A special feature is a chronol­
ogy of events of importance to labor, 17781969.
Tables of Working Life. Length of Working
Life for Men (1950).
A study of the length and pattern of work­
ing life of men in the United States. The
report describes a significant and pioneering
development in the techniques for analyzing
the dynamics of the labor force. It contains




1002

1003

1004

1005
1006

1007
1008
1009

1010
1011

1012

1013

a brief description of the pattern of working
life, differentials by color and residence, and
the application of the tables to analysis of
old-age dependency, labor force, and occupa­
tional outlook data.
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. Los Angeles, Calif.,
March 1950 (1950).
Analysis of Work Stoppages During 1949
(1950).
See Bull. 1684 this listing for annotation.
Work Injuries in Construction, 1948-49
(1950).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, April 1949 to November 1949 (1950).
Office Workers. Salaries, Hours of Work,
Supplementary Benefits. Providence, R.I.,
June 1950 (1950).
Wholesale Prices, 1949 (1951).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, May 1950 (1950).
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement
and Wage Stabilization During World War II
(1950).
An appraisal of major policy decisions
made by the Government to meet the threat
to production involved in industrial disputes
and skyrocketing wage levels, from the time
the Nation began to arm in 1940 until the
end of general price and wage controls in
1947. Analyzes the operations of the National
Defense Mediation Board, the National War
Labor Board, and the National Wage Sta­
bilization Board. The problems encountered
and objectives sought by these agencies are
reviewed in the light of the equally im portant
problems of efficient manpower allocation.
Employment Outlook in M en’s Tailored
Clothing Industry (1951).
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1950 (1951).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1950 (1951).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1949: Opera­
tions and Developments (1 9 5 1 ).
See Bulls. 1049 and 1211 this listing for
annotation.

37

1014
1015

1016

1017
1018

1019

1020
1021

1022

1023

1024

Union Wages and Hours: The Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1950 (1951).
Wage Structure, M otor Vehicles and Parts,
1950. Hourly Earnings and Supplementary
Wage Practices (1 9 5 1 ).
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed.
(1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Employee-Benefit Plans Under Collective
Bargaining, M id-1950 (1 9 5 1 ).
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Indus­
try, July 1, 1950 (1951).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit
Operating Employees, October 1, 1950
(1951).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook in Department Stores
(1951).
Family Budget of City Workers, October
1950 (1 9 5 1 ).
Presents estimated dollar costs of a hypo­
thetical budget for urban families in 34 cities
in October 1949 and October 1950. The
budget was designed to describe a modest but
adequate standard of living for an urban
worker’s family of four persons. Compares
estimated costs of the budget in 1949 and
1950 with the cost in June 1947. For esti­
mates of total budget costs and costs of sub­
groups of items at M arch 1946 and June
1947 price levels, see Bull. 927. See also
Bulls. 1570-1 through 1570-6 this listing.
Labor-M anagement Contract Provisions,
1949-50. Prevalence and Characteristics of
Selected Collective Bargaining Clauses
(1951).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the M anu­
facture of Clay Construction Products
(1951).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Organization and Management of Consumers’
Cooperatives (1951).
Replaces Bulls. 598 and 665.
Suggests appropriate methods and proce­
dures and the basic information necessary
for successful organization and management
of consumers’ cooperative associations and
buying clubs. The report includes discussions
of preliminary organization efforts, content
of charter and bylaws, considerations involv­

38



ing membership and the election of directors
and officers, business methods and practices,
financial requirements, and accounting prac­
tices.
For special reports on organization and
management of gasoline and oil and housing
associations, see Subject Index under Coop­
eratives, consumer.
See also annotations for Bulls. 1049 and

1211.
1025

1026

1027
1028
1029
1030

1031
1032
1033
1034

Work Injuries in the United States During
1949 (1951).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Elements of Soviet Labor Law (1 9 5 1 ).
A significant contribution to critical anal­
ysis of the Soviet economy, relating to the
period between 1920 and 1951. Through
textual use of laws, decrees, and official pro­
nouncements, this study (1 ) demonstrates
the punitive character of Soviet labor law as
it applied to the Soviet equivalent of “free”
labor, and (2 ) describes the creation of con­
ditions for industrial conflict through pres­
sures on management and workers, the de­
terioration of the trade unions, and the
collapse of collective bargaining. It also in­
cludes an account of Soviet labor policies
that (1 ) have caused loss of freedom on the
job; (2 ) subjected the determination of
wages and hours of work to severe govern­
ment restriction; (3 ) provided for financial
responsibility of workers for damages to the
employer caused by the workers; and (4 )
established conscript labor of youth.
Employment, Education, and Earnings of
American Men of Science (1951).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, Calif., January 1951 (1951).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, January 1951 (1951).
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperatives in
1950 (19 5 1 ).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
M arch 1951 (1 9 5 1 ).
Retail Prices of Food, 1949 (1951).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massa­
chusetts, M arch 1951 (1 9 5 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1951 (19 5 1 ).

1935

1036

1037
1038
1039

1040
1041
1042
1043
1044
1045
1046

Analysis of Work Stoppages During 1950
(1951).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the M anu­
facture of Pulp and Paper (1952).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1951 (1 9 5 1 ).
Labor-M anagement Relations in Scandi­
navia (1952).
Interim Adjustment of Consumers’ Price In­
dex (1 9 52).
Detailed description of the interim im­
provements in the Consumers’ Price Index
(in advance of the comprehensive 3-year pro­
gram for modernization of the Index com­
pleted in January 1953). Interim improve­
ments included revision of city population
and commodity weights, correction of the
new unit bias in the rent index, and addition
of new items. See also Bulls. 699, 710, 966,
1165, 1256, 1517, 1554, and 1647.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, January 1950 to January 1951 (1951).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio,
June 1951 (1 951).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Ore­
gon, June 1951 (1951).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
June 1951 (1 951).
Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Con­
necticut, June 1951 (1951).
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
Maryland, June 1951 (19 5 2 ).
Productivity Trends in Selected Industries,
Indexes Through 1950 (1951).
Summarizes the statistics presented in in­
dividual industry productivity reports issued
regularly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(The individual reports contain analyses of
the factors causing changes in output per
man-hour and unit m an-hour requirements,
as well as more detailed statistics and infor­
mation on the methods used in computing
these indexes.) In addition to current changes
in productivity, historical trends covering the
last decade are presented for most industries.
Technical notes explaining the methods used
in computing the indexes are included for
each of the 35 industries and industry groups
covered in this report. The report contains 95




1047

1048
1049

1050
1951

1052

1053

series on output per worker and per man­
hour, as well as many series on production,
employment, man-hours, and labor require­
ments per unit of output.
Construction. Annual Review, 1950 (1951).
Incorporates comprehensive listings of ref­
ence aids in the field of construction, in­
cluding: (1 ) articles describing methods of
preparing the statistical series appearing in
the Bureau’s monthly publication, Construc­
tion; (2 ) features articles in Construction,
1949-50; and (3 ) published sources of con­
tinuous historical data on construction, cov­
ering leading series compiled by the Bureau
of Labor Statistics and the Bureau of A p­
prenticeship.
Employment Outlook in Accounting (1952).
Consumers’ Cooperatives: Operations in 1950
(1952).
A report on membership, business, and
operating results of consumer cooperatives
in 1950, by the various types of cooperatives.
Earlier bulletins in this series (313, 437, 531,
612, 659, 725, 757, 796, 843, 890, 922, 948,
971, and 1013) contain similar information.
The information presented includes esti­
mates of membership and business of the
consumer cooperatives by type of associa­
tion, local and federated. The report also
shows the amount of distributive and service
business, earnings, and patronage refunds of
cooperative wholesales; operating expenses
of farm and nonfarm consumers’ coopera­
tives; the value of goods produced by the
productive associations; and employment
and earnings in local and central coopera­
tives.
See also Bulls. 1024 and 1211 this listing.
For special reports on operations of Credit
Unions, see Subject Index under Coopera­
tives, consumer.
Employment Outlook for E arth Scientists
(1952).
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1951 (19 5 2 ).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1951 (1952).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: The Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1951 (1952).

39

1054
1055
1056
1057
1058
1059
1060
1061

1062

1063
1064
1065

1066
1067
1068
1069
1070
1071
1072
1073

1074
1075

Employment Outlook in the M erchant M a­
rine (1 9 5 2 ).
Retail Prices of Food, 1950 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
October 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash­
ington, September 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Richmond, Vir­
ginia, October 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Con­
necticut, October 1951 (19 5 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, October 1951 (1952).
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, October 1, 1951 (1952).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1951 (1 9 5 2 ).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Collective Bargaining in the Meat-Packing
Industry (1 9 5 2).
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City,
Missouri, October 1951 (1952).
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in
10 Cities. 1946: Savannah, Ga., Scranton,
Pa., Milwaukee, Wis.; 1947: Manchester,
N.H., Richmond, Va., Washington, D.C.;
1948: Denver, Colo., Detroit, Mich., Hous­
ton, Tex.; 1949: Memphis, Tenn. (1952).
See also Bull. 1097.
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, November 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, November 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, November 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City,
Utah, December 1951 (1 9 5 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, October 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence,
Rhode Island, December 1951 (1952).
Employment Outlook in Electronics M anu­
facturing (1952).
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperatives in
1951 (1 9 5 2 ).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, December 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, In­
diana, December 1951 (1952).

40



1076
1077
1078
1079

1080

1081
1082
1083
1084
1085
1086
1087
1088

1089
1090

1091

1092

1093
1094
1095
1096

Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1952 (1 9 5 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, M as­
sachusetts, January 1952 (19 5 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Penn­
sylvania, December 1951 (1 9 5 2 ).
Injuries and Accident Causes in Plumbing
Operations (1952).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Subject Index of Volumes 52-71, Monthly
Labor Review, January 1941 to December
1950 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey
City, New Jersey, November 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, November 1951 (1 9 5 2 ).
Wholesale Prices, 1950 (1952).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Texas,
January 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York, January 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Mich­
igan, December 1951 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Rochester, New
York, January 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, N orfolk-Portsmouth (H am pton R oads), Virginia, February
1952 (1952).
Collective Bargaining, Radio, Television, and
Electronics Industry (1952).
Analysis of Work Stoppages During 1951
(1952).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Labor-M anagement Contract Provisions,
1950-51. Prevalence and Characteristics of
Selected Collective Bargaining Clauses
(1952).
Employment and Economic Status of Older
Men and Women (1952).
Revised by Bull. 1213. See this listing for
annotation.
Cooperative Housing in the United States,
1949 and 1950 (1 9 5 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles,
California, January 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mis­
souri, January 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, Ohio,
February 1952 (1952).

1097

1098

1099

1100

1101
1102
1103
1104
1105
1106
1107
1108
1109

1110
1111

1112
1113

1114

Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings
in 1950, Revised June 1953 (1953).
Replaces earlier bulletin of same number.
W ork Injuries in the United States During
1950 (1 9 5 2 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, M arch 1952 (1952).
Labor and the Savannah River AEC Project.
I. Manpower and Wages; II. Unionization
and Industrial Relations; III. Housing and
Changes in Population; IV. Community
Facilities and Social Changes (1952).
An examination of the effects upon the sur­
rounding communities of the construction of
the Savannah River atomic energy ( “Hbom b” ) project in South Carolina. The study
assesses the impact on the communities of the
sudden influx of a new labor force.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, January 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
March 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Ari­
zona, March 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, New
Jersey, M arch 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
March 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massa­
chusetts, April 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham,
Alabama, April 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M arch 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio,
April 1952 (1 952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville,
Florida, May 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, A llentownBethlehem -Easton, Pennsylvania, May 1952
(1952).
Occupational Wage Survey, Louisville, Ken­
tucky, May 1952 (1952).
Wages and Related Benefits. 40 Labor M ar­
kets, 1951-52 (19 5 2 ).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Case Studies in Union Leadership Training,
1951-52 (1 9 52).
Presents 5 case studies of union-sponsored




1115

1116

1116
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
—
9
-1 0
-1 1
-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6

educational programs as an aid to under­
standing the directions toward which orga­
nized labor is moving. The particular labor
organizations studied— A FL Ladies’ G ar­
ment Workers; A FL papermaking unions;
White-Collar Workshop of the American L a­
bor Education Service; A FL Machinists;
and the CIO— were found to be attempting
to train the members of their organizations
for positions of leadership in the labor move­
ment of the future.
New Housing in Metropolitan Areas, 194951 (1952).
See also Bull. 1231.
Wages and Related Benefits, 20 Labor M ar­
kets, 1952-53 (1953).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Occupational Wage Survey. Dallas, Texas,
August 1952 (1952).
Occupational Wage Survey. Portland, Ore­
gon, September 1952 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Cleveland, Ohio,
October 1952 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Kansas City,
Missouri, October 1952 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, October 1952 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Baltimore,
Maryland, October 1952 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, November 1952 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Denver, Colo­
rado, November 1952 (1 9 5 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey. San Francisco—
Oakland, California, January 1953 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Providence,
Rhode Island, December 1952 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Newark-Jersey
City, New Jersey, November 1952 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. St. Louis, Mis­
souri, December 1952 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Memphis, Ten­
nessee, January 1953 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Los Angeles,
California, February 1953 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. Chicago, Illinois,
M arch 1953 (1953).
Occupational Wage Survey. New York, New
York, February 1953 (1953).

41

-1 7
-1 8
-1 9
-2 0

1117
1118

1119

1120

1121

1122
1123
1124

1125

Occupational Wage Survey. Boston, Massa­
chusetts, M arch 1953 (1 9 5 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey. Atlanta, Georgia,
M arch 1953 (1 9 5 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey. Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, April 1953 (1 9 5 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey. Buffalo, New
York (Erie and Niagara Counties), April
1953 (1 9 5 3 ).
Federal White-Collar Workers— Their Occu­
pations and Salaries, June 1951 (1 9 5 3 ).
Injuries and Accident Causes in Carpentry
Operations (1 953).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Negroes in the United States: Their Em ­
ployment and Economic Status (1953).
A description of recent national trends in
the employment and income status of Negro
men and women in relation to that of whites.
Comprehensive data, selected from a wide
variety of sources, present pertinent back­
ground facts concerning birth and mortality
rates, life expectancy, education, school en­
rollment, and population changes. In addi­
tion, detailed information is provided about
labor force participation and unemployment,
the industries and occupations in which Ne­
groes are employed, work-life expectancy,
family income and wages, and insurance pro­
tection under the social security program. An
annotated bibliography is included.
See also Bull. 1511 this listing.
The Mobility of Tool and Die Makers, 194051. A Survey of the Work Experience, Train­
ing, and Personal Characteristics of Workers
in a Critical Occupation (1953).
See Bull. 1162 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Mobility of Scientists— A
Study of Chemists, Biologists, and Physicists
with Ph. D. Degrees (1953).
See Bull. 1162 this listing for annotation.
Construction. Annual Review, 1951 (1 9 5 3 ).
Union Wages and Hours: The Baking In­
dustry, July 1, 1952 (1953).
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1952 (1 9 5 3 ).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck
Drivers and Helpers, July 1, 1952 (1 9 5 3 ).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.

42



1126
1127

1128
1129
1130
1131

1132

1133

1134

1135
1136

1137

1138
1139

1140

Employment Outlook in Printing Occupa­
tions (1 9 5 3 ).
Directory of Labor Unions in the United
States, 1953 (1953).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook for Air Transportation
(1953).
Employment Outlook for Mechanics and R e­
pairmen (1953).
Employment Outlook in Metalworking Oc­
cupations (1 9 5 3 ).
Employment Outlook for Technicians. A R e­
port on Draftsmen, Engineering Aids, Lab­
oratory Technicians, and Electronic Tech­
nicians (19 5 3 ).
Manpower Resources in Chemistry and
Chemical Engineering (19 5 3 ).
Provides information on current and pros­
pective manpower resources in chemistry and
chemical engineering by field of specializa­
tion, level of education, age, and military
status of the scientists, engineers, and grad­
uate students. Other subjects include the
relative number of chemists and chemical
engineers employed in different industries,
functions performed, incomes received, and
employment trends. Where possible, separate
information is given for women scientists.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit
Operating Employees, October 1, 1952
(1953).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1952 (1953).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Wage Differentials and Rate Structures
Among 40 Labor Markets, 1951-52 (1 9 5 3 ).
Analysis of W ork Stoppages During 1952
(1953).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Work Injuries in the United States During
1951 (1953).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook in the Automobile In­
dustry (1 9 5 3 ).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the M anu­
facture of Paperboard Containers (1953).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
The Consumer Price Index, A Laym an’s
Guide (1 9 5 3 ).
A popular description of the content, com­

1141
1142
1143
1144
1145

1146

1147

1148

pilation, uses, and limitations of the Bureau’s
Consumer Price Index.
Retail Prices of Food, 1951 and 1952 (1953).
Labor-M anagement Contract Provisions,
1952 (1 953).
Wholesale Prices, 1951 and 1952 (1953).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook for Physicists (1953).
American Labor and the American Spirit.
Unions, Labor-M anagement Relations, and
Productivity (1954).
Describes the development of the labor
movement in terms of historical and philo­
sophical influences. Prepared originally to
provide productivity teams visiting this coun­
try with background and insight into various
aspects of the American trade union move­
ment, the study has substantial interest for
others concerned with industrial relations.
Covers historical background and present
status of labor unions; types of unions and
their interrelations; collective bargaining;
new attitudes in labor-management relations;
collateral activities of unions, government,
and labor; and labor productivity.
Construction During Five Decades. Histori­
cal Statistics, 1907-52 (1954).
Handbook of construction statistics through
1952, covering the complete historical span
of each of the statistical series on construc­
tion developed in the U.S. Department of
Labor. D ata are shown from the earliest
years available and, for several of the series,
cover a span of 35 to 40 years. The bulletin
also includes a historical summary of con­
struction trends and a selected bibliography
providing additional or current information
concerning the statistical series.
Pension Plans under Collective Bargaining
(1953).
See Bull. 1259 this listing for annotation.
Scientific Research and Development in
American Industry (1953).
A final report on the findings of a nation­
wide survey of industrial research and devel­
opment conducted by the U.S. Departm ent of
Defense, Research and Development Board,
in mid-1952. Covers about 2,000 private
companies and nonprofit industrial research
agencies. Included in the information pro­
vided are the number of research engineers




1149
1150

1151
1152

1153

1154

1155

1156
1157
-1

-2

-3

and scientists employed; employment of sup­
porting personnel; cost of research per­
formed; relationship of research cost to value
of sales; average cost of research per em­
ployee; turnover rates among research en­
gineers and scientists; and potential effects of
military calls of such employees. Information
is presented for different industries and for
companies of different sizes.
W orkmen’s Compensation in the United
States (1954).
The Mobility of Electronic Technicians,
1940-52— The Work Experience, Training,
and Personal Characteristics of Workers in
a New Skilled Occupation (1 9 5 4 ).
See Bull. 1162 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook in the Industrial
Chemical Industry (1954).
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
M y 1, 1953 (1953).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, M y 1, 1953 (1954).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, M y 1, 1953 (1 9 5 4 ).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
M y 1, 1953 (1954).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Employment Outlook in Banking Occupa­
tions (1954).
Wages and Related Benefits. Major Labor
Markets, 1953-1954. Pt. I. Dallas, Tex., De­
troit, Mich., Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.,
New Orleans, La., Philadelphia, Pa., Port­
land, Oreg. (1 9 5 4 ).
Wages and Related Benefits. M ajor Labor
Markets, 1953-1954. Pt. II. Denver, Colo.,
Memphis, Tenn., New ark-Jersey City, N.J.,
St. Louis, Mo., San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.
(1954).
Wages and Related Benefits. M ajor Labor
Markets, 1953-1954. Pt. III. Atlanta, Ga.,
Boston, Mass., Chicago, 111., Los Angeles,
Calif., Milwaukee, Wis., New York, N.Y.
(1954).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.

43

1158

1159

1160

1161

1162

1163
1164

1165

1166

Consumer Cooperatives in the United States
— Recent Developments (1 9 5 4 ).
See Bull. 1211 this listing for annotation.
Arbitration of Labor-M anagement Griev­
ances— Bethlehem Steel Cdmpany and
United Steelworkers of America, 1942-52
(1954).
A study of 10 years of grievance arbitra­
tion under the collective bargaining agree­
ments of the company and the union. An­
alyzes approximately 1,000 decisions by
mutually appointed arbitrators and illus­
trates standards of employer-employee rela­
tionships at the plant level.
Wages and Related Benefits in the Machin­
ery Industries. Postwar Wage Trends, Survey
of 20 Labor Markets, 1953-54 (1954).
Military Manpower Requirements and Sup­
ply, 1954-60 (1954).
See Bull. 1262 this listing for annotation.
Mobility of Molders and Coremakers, 19401952 (1 9 5 4 ).
Third in a series of pilot studies covering
the work experience, mobility, training, and
personal characteristics of workers in occupa­
tions vital in defense mobilization. The re­
port evaluates the findings of the study in
terms of their significance for manpower
planning in a mobilization period. It was
prepared as part of a general program of the
Department of the Air Force to develop
systematic methods of determining the man­
power feasibility of military programs. The
two preceding studies in this series relate to
electronics technicians (Bull. 1150) and
tool-and-die makers (Bull. 1120). For
studies of the occupational mobility of scien­
tists (chemists, biologists, and physicists with
Ph. D .’s), see Bull. 1121, and of profes­
sional engineers, see Bull. 968.
Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1953 (1954).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Work Injuries in the United States During
1952 (1 9 54).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Consumer Prices in the United States, 194952 (1 9 5 4 ).
See also Bulls. 699, 710, 966, 1039, 1256,
1517, 1554, and 1647.
Labor-M anagem ent Contract Provisions,
1953. Prevalence and Characteristics of Se­

44




1167

1168

1169

1170

1171

lected Collective-Bargaining Clauses (1 9 5 4 ).
Employment Outlook in the Social Sciences
(1954).
F or a related study of personnel in the
social sciences, see Bull. 1169.
Techniques of Preparing M ajor BLS Statis­
tical Series (1955).
Replaces Bull. 993.
For each m ajor series, presents a compre­
hensive description of the historical back­
ground; methods and scope; concepts and
definitions; sources; sampling and estimat­
ing methods; uses and limitations; and avail­
able measures of reliability. A description of
the similarities and differences in methods
of these series and a selected bibliography
for each series also are provided.
Personnel Resources in the Social Sciences
and Humanities (1954).
This report is based on information re­
ported by approximately 25,000 social scien­
tists and humanists in 14 fields of specializa­
tion, in response to a questionnaire survey
conducted in 1952 by the American Council
of Learned Societies. The report presents
detailed information on specialization, age,
and educational backgrounds of the respond­
ents in each m ajor social science and hu­
manistic field as well as the specialties in
which they were employed, the functions they
were performing, and the types of employing
organizations. Whenever possible, separate
data are given for graduate students and
women. Salaries and supplementary profes­
sional income of the respondents employed
full time also are discussed.
Structure of the Residential Building Indus­
try in 1949 (1954).
Presents and interprets the final and com­
plete results from a nationwide study of the
organization and scale of residential builders’
operations. In the absence of precise statis­
tics, the report analyzes the direction of
organizational changes in the residential
building industry since 1949, on the basis
of an interpretation of historical develop­
ments.
Fact Book on Manpower, September 1954
(1954).
Description and compilation of selected
data for appraising manpower supply in

1172

1172
-1

-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-1 0
-1 1
-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6
-1 7
1173
1174

relation to requirements. Presents significant
facts relating to current and prospective man­
power resources, data on population, labor
force, employment, occupations, education
and training, labor mobility, and military
manpower.
Wages and Related Benefits— 17 Labor M ar­
kets, 1954-55 (1956).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York (Erie and Niagara Counties), Septem­
ber 1954 (1 955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
October 1954 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
September 1954 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, November 1954 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, November 1954 (1954).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, December 1954 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey
City, New Jersey, December 1954 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, February 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mis­
souri, February 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
M arch 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles,
California, M arch 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, M arch 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1955 (1 9 5 5 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
M aryland, April 1955 (1955).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Ore­
gon, April 1955 (1 9 5 5 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massa­
chusetts, April 1955 (1955).
Wage Differences and Establishment Prac­
tices. 17 Labor Markets, 1953-54 (1955).
Injuries and Accident Causes in Warehous­
ing Operations (1 9 5 5 ).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.




1175

1176

1177

1178

1179

1180

1181

1182

1183
1184
1185

1186

1187
1188

1188
-1
-2
-3

Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1954 (1955).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1954 (1955).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit
Operating Employees, July 1, 1954 (1955).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours of M otortruck
Drivers and Helpers, July 1, 1954 (1955).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Factory W orkers’ Earnings. Distributions by
Straight-Time Hourly Earnings, April 1954
(1955).
See Bull. 1275 this listing for annotation.
Digest of One Hundred Health and Insur­
ance Plans Under Collective Bargaining,
1954 (1955).
Revised by Bull. 1236.
Labor-M anagement Contract Provisions,
1954. Prevalence and Characteristics of Se­
lected Collective Bargaining Clauses (1955).
Average Retail Prices, 1953-54. Collection
and Calculation, Techniques and Problems
(1955).
See Bull. 1197 this listing for annotation.
Retail Prices of Food, 1953-54 (1955).
Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1954 (1955).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Directory of National and International La­
bor Unions in the United States, 1955 (1955).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Problems in Measurement of Expenditures
on Selected Items of Supplementary Em ­
ployee Remuneration, Manufacturing Estab­
lishments, 1953 (1956).
Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans in
Union Contracts (1955).
Wages and Related Benefits, 17 Labor M ar­
kets, 1955-56 (1956).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
October 1955 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michi­
gan, October 1955 (19 5 6 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, November 1955 (1956).

45

-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-1 0
-11

-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6
-1 7
-1 8
1189
1190
1191
1192

1193

1194

1195

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, November 1955 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, November 1955 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Coloradio, December 1955 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1956 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, M inneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, December 1955 (1 9 5 6 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mis­
souri, February 1956 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey
City, New Jersey, December 1955 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Lawrence, Mas­
sachusetts, February 1956 (1956).
This bulletin includes information on the
construction industry.
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, February 1956 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los AngelesLong Beach, California, March 1956 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence,
Rhode Island, M arch 1956 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1956 (1 956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Ore­
gon, April 1956 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1956 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
April 1956 (1 956).
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Layoff, R e­
call, and Work-Sharing Procedures (1956).
Woodworking Circular-Saw Accidents (1956).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska,
Hawaii (1956).
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1955 (1956).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit
Operating Employees, July 1, 1955 (1956).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1955 (1 9 5 6 ).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1955 (1956).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.

46



1196
1197

1198
1199
-1

-2

1200
1201

1202

-1
-2

Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1955 (1 9 5 6 ).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Average Retail Prices, 1955 (1956).
Presents retail prices for approximately
150 commodities and services in certain ma­
jor expenditure categories for the 20 largest
cities surveyed regularly by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics for the Consumer Price In­
dex. These data, covering the last quarter
1954 through 1955, include im portant items
in all m ajor index groups except food and
fuels, which are published separately, and
rents and certain homeownership costs, which
involve unique problems. The first bulletin to
present average retail prices for items other
than foods and fuels was published in 1955
as Bull. 1182. For a listing of BLS retail
price bulletins, by item, see Subject Index
under Prices, retail. For current indexes on
items covered in these bulletins other than
food, see the Monthly Labor Review and
other BLS publications.
Automatic Technology and Its Implications
— A Selected Annotated Bibliography (1956).
Older Workers Under Collective Bargaining,
Pt. I. Hiring, Retention, Job Termination
(1956).
Older Workers Under Collective Bargaining,
Pt. II. Health and Insurance Plans, Pension
Plans (1956).
M an-Hours Per Unit of Output in the Basic
Steel Industry, 1939-55 (1956).
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Labor-M an­
agement Safety, Production, and Industry
Stabilization Committees (1957).
A report based on the study of collective
agreements covering more than 7 million
workers. Presents the structure, function, and
procedures of labor-management committees
created by formal contract provisions to deal
with problems of safety, production, and in­
dustry stabilization. Sample provisions relat­
ing to the committees are presented.
Wages and Related Benefits, 17 Labor M ar­
kets, 1956-57 (19 5 7 ).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash­
ington, August 1956 (1956).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New

-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-1 0
-1 1
-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6
-1 7
1203

1204

1205

1206

York (Erie and Niagara C ounties), Septem­
ber 1956 (1 9 57).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
October 1956 (1 9 5 7 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massa­
chusetts, September 1956 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
October 1956 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City,
Missouri, December 1956 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennnsylvania, November 1956 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1957 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, December 1956 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham,
Alabama, January 1957 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los AngelesLong Beach, California, M arch 1957 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Ore­
gon, April 1957 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, February 1957 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, M inneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, M arch 1957 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1957 (1 957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Geor­
gia, April 1957 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1957 (1957).
Job Performance and Age: A Study in
M easurement (1956).
A pilot study intended to guide future
programs for the investigation and solution
of employment problems of older workers.
(See also annotations for Bulls. 1223 and
1273 this listing.)
Tables of Working Life for Women, 1950
(1957).
A study of the pattern and work life ex­
pectancy of women. Provides a basis for
analyzing the factors that affect the work
careers of women— marriage, children, wid­
owhood, and divorce.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1956 (1957).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1956 (1957).




1207

1208

1209

See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1956 (1957).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1956 (1957).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Analysis of Layoff, Recall, and Work-Shar­
ing Procedures in Union Contracts (1957).
This study, the first of its kind by the Bu­
reau, analyzes the ways in which all major
collective bargaining agreements deal with
layoff, recall, and work-sharing procedures.
Essentially, it is a prevalence study, and
covers formal written policy rather than ac­
tual practice.

1210
-1

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, St. Louis, Missouri, June 1956 (1957).
One of 16 studies which the Bureau under­
took in selected communities (see also Bulls.
1210-2 through 1210-16), covering earnings
and related benefits of nurses and other work­
ers in hospitals having at least 51 employees.
- 2 Earnings
and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Portland, Oregon, May and July
1956 (1957).
- 3 Earnings
and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Buffalo, New York, June 1956
(1957).
- 4 Earnings
and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland, June 1956
(1957).
- 5 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Chicago, Illinois, August 1956
(1957).
- 6 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Boston, Massachusetts, August
1956 (1957).
- 7 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Cleveland, Ohio, November 1956
(1957).
- 8 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Dallas, Texas, November 1956
(1957).
- 9 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Cincinnati, Ohio, September 1956
(1957).
-1 0 Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July
1956 (1957).

47

-1 1

-1 2

-1 3

-1 4

-1 5

-1 6

1211

1212

1213

Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Atlanta, Georgia, September 1956
(1957).
Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Memphis, Tennessee, December
1956 (1957).
Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, San Francisco-Oakland, Califor­
nia, November 1956 (1 9 5 7 ).
Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Los Angeles-Long Beach, Cali­
fornia, January 1957 (1 9 5 7 ).
Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota,
M arch 1957 (1957).
Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in
Hospitals, New York, New York, February
1957 (1957).
Consumer Cooperatives (1957).
Last in a series of reports on developments
affecting the various types of consumer co­
operatives in the United States, including
credit union, housing, farm supply, medicalcare, student insurance, electricity, telephone,
and retail- and wholesale-trade cooperatives.
These reports include summaries of develop­
ments in Federal and State legislation, court
decisions, and the functions of the Coopera­
tive League of the U.S.A. in sponsoring edu­
cational and recreational activities. Some
bulletins in this series review international
developments and the relationship between
cooperatives and labor, farm, government
agencies, and other groups. Earlier bulletins
in this series (703, 738, 768, 821, 859, 904,
932, 964, 1013, 1030, 1073, and 1158) con­
tain similar information on developments.
See also Bulls. 1024 and 1049 this listing.
New England Labor and Labor Problems
(1957).
Contains articles on labor and industrial
relations and general economic area and in­
dustry problems in New England.
Employment and Economic Status of Older
Men and Women (1 9 5 7 ).
Replaces Bull. 1092.
Provides historical data from a wide vari­
ety of authoritative sources on population
and labor force trends, work-life expectancy,
income, retirement, pension programs, and
job experience of older workers. D ata are

48



1214

1215

1216

1217
1218
1219

1220
-1

-2

-3

-4

-5

-6

-7

1221

presented separately for men and women,
wherever possible, in order to reveal signifi­
cant similarities and differences in their eco­
nomic status and employment experience.
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1954-56
(1957).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1957 Edi­
tion (1957).
See Bull. 1700 this listing for annotation.
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Dismissal
Pay (1957).
A report on the prevalence of dismissal pay
provisions in collective bargaining agree­
ments, the amounts provided, the conditions
under which laid-off workers qualify for ben­
efits, and related factors. Excerpts from
agreements are provided.
Retail Prices of Food, 1955-56 (19 5 7 ).
Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1956 (1957).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
W ork Injuries and W ork Injury Rates in
Hospitals (1958).
See Bull. 1237 this listing for annotation.
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Octo­
ber 1956, Summary Report (1958).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Octo­
ber 1956, Building Materials and Farm
Equipment Dealers (1957).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Octo­
ber 1956, General Merchandise Stores, De­
partm ent Stores, Variety Stores (1957).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Octo­
ber 1956, Food Stores; Grocery Stores
(1957).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Octo­
ber 1956, Automotive Dealers and Gasoline
Service Stations; Franchised M otor Vehicle
Dealers, Gasoline Service Stations (1 9 5 7 ).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Octo­
ber 1956, Apparel and Accessories Stores,
M en’s and Boys’ Clothing Stores, W omen’s
Ready-to-W ear Stores, Shoe Stores (1957).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Octo­
ber 1956, Furniture, Home Furnishings, and
Appliance Stores (1957).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade in Octo­
ber 1956, Drug Stores and Proprietary Stores
(1957).
Analysis of Health and Insurance Plans U n­
der Collective Bargaining, Late 1955 (1957).

1222

1223

1224
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8

Presents detailed statistics on the provi­
sions of 300 selected health and insurance
plans under collective bargaining. Types of
benefits included life insurance, accidental
death and dismemberment, accident and sick­
ness (excluding sick leave, State workmen’s
compensation, and temporary disability pay­
m ents), and hospital, surgical, and medical
care. Special benefits, such as those provided
for poliomyelitis and accidental injury, and
during extended periods of illness, are treated
separately, as are provisions applying to m a­
ternity cases.
Directory of National and International L a­
bor Unions in the United States, 1957 (1957).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Comparative Job Performance by Age:
Large Plants in the M en’s Footwear and
Household Furniture Industries (1957).
This bulletin continues earlier work on the
relationship between age and work perform­
ance (Bull. 1203), and compares actual
on-the-job performance of older production
workers with the performance of younger
workers. The extensive data provided enable
the reader to draw more definitive conclu­
sions than were possible from the pilot study.
This later study is focused on the measure
of the relationship between age and the
three aspects of job performance: output per
man-hour, attendance, and continuity of serv­
ice. (See also annotation for Bull. 1273 this
listing.)
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash­
ington, August 1957 (1957).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massa­
chusetts, September 1957 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
Maryland, August 1957 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
October 1957 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mis­
souri, November 1957 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, October 1957 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, December 1957 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1958 (1958).




-9
-1 0
-1 1
-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6
-1 7
-1 8
-1 9
-2 0

1225

-1

-2

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, January 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, February 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey
City, New Jersey, December 1957 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los AngelesLong Beach, California, M arch 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Ore­
gon, April 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Geor­
gia, May 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, May 1958 (1958).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
June 1958 (1958).
Wages and Related Benefits, 19 Labor M ar­
kets, 1957-58 (1959).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in
the United States (1958).
Designed primarily for use by visiting
trade unionists and management representa­
tives of other countries, the study provides
brief descriptions and explanations of various
facets of union activity and labor-manage­
ment relations. Includes 31 reports divided
into (1 ) trade union activities; (2 ) collective
bargaining; (3 ) labor-management relations
in selected industries; and (4 ) general. The
Guide is prepared in loose-leaf form and ad­
ditional reports will be issued from time to
time. See also Bulls. 1225-1 and 1225-2.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in
the United States. Supp. 1 (1959).
Supplements the information in Bull. 1225.
Includes a brief report on trade union activi­
ties, three reports on collective bargaining,
and a bibliography.
A Guide to Labor-M anagement Relations in
the United States. Supp. 2 (1959).
A second supplement to Bull. 1225, con­
taining three brief reports which pertain,
respectively, to trade union activities, collec­

49

1226
1227

1228

1229

1230

1231

1232

1233

tive bargaining, and labor-management re­
lations in selected industries. Provides a
glossary of industrial relations terms and a
bibliography.
Productivity: A Bibliography (1958).
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1957 (1958).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1957 (1958).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1957 (1958).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1957 (1958).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
New Housing and Its Materials, 194CK-56
(1958).
Presents data on selected characteristics of
1-family houses authorized by building per­
mit in 1954-56, in cities of 25,000 popula­
tion and over and, in lesser detail, data on
characteristics of 2- to 4-family and 5-ormore-family structures. The introductory
analysis of trends during 1954-56 includes
comparisons with 1940 and 1950 data from
the Federal Housing Administration regard­
ing new 1-family housing processed by the
FH A for mortgage insurance under the
National Housing Act. These trend data
cover the general plan and size of houses;
walls, floors, roofing, insulation, and rain­
carrying equipment; windows, screens, and
storm windows; heating facilities and fuel;
electrical services; and kitchen, laundry, and
other equipment. Among other comparisons,
the data are distributed by selling-price class,
region, and metropolitan or nonmetropolitan
area.
Digest of One Hundred Selected Pension
Plans Under Collective Bargaining, Winter
1957-58 (1 9 5 8 ).
Revised by Bull. 1307.
Paid Vacation Provisions in M ajor Union
Contracts, 1957 (1958).
Represents a comprehensive study of paid
vacation practices under collective bargain­
ing. Provides a detailed analysis of the preva­
lence and types of vacation plans, length of
vacation, service and work requirements,

50



1234
1235

1236

1237

1238

1239

vacation patterns, and vacation pay. The
analysis also covers various administrative
aspects of vacation plans; for example, pay
in lieu of time off, scheduling of vacations,
and vacation rights for military service per­
sonnel or upon termination of employment.
Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1957 (1958).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1957
(1958).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Digest of One Hundred Selected Health and
Insurance Plans Under Collective Bargain­
ing, Early 1958 (1958).
Revision of Bull. 1180.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Boilershop-Products Industry (1958).
Part of a series of work injury and accident
statistics bulletins. Annual bulletins present
summary statistics on disabling work injuries
for each of the major industries in the United
States. Other bulletins present detailed
breakdowns of injuries and accident causes
in selected industries, occupations, or activi­
ties during specified periods of time. Sufficient
information is collected to make estimates of
the num ber of work injuries occurring each
year, the resulting total economic loss ex­
pressed in man-days of work, and the varying
degrees of hazards existing in specific indus­
tries. The general purpose of these surveys
is use in accident prevention work. For some
years, statistics were published in other than
bulletin form; for example, in the Monthly
Labor Review and serial reprints, and re­
cently as reports. See under Accidents in
Subject Index.
The Earnings and Employment of Seamen on
U.S. Flag Ships (1958).
A report prepared at the request of and in
cooperation with the Federal Maritime Board
and the Maritime Administration, U.S. De­
partm ent of Commerce. It analyzes the
employment experience, daily and annual
earnings, and fringe benefits of seamen on
U.S. flag ships. Included are brief summaries
on the operations of the American M erchant
Marine and on the history of collective bar­
gaining in the maritime industry.
Union Constitution Provisions: Election and

Tenure of National and International Union
Officers, 1958 (1958).
Analyzes the rules in union constitutions
which govern the qualifications, election, and
terms of union officers, and those providing
for the remuneration and the removal of
union presidents. The bulletin is basically a
summary of the union rules effective in 1958,
and does not include any analysis of union
practices. Rules governing the election of
A F L -C IO officers are summarized in the
appendix.
1240
-1
-2
-3

-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-1 0
-1 1
-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6
-1 7
-1 8

Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash­
ington, August 1958 (1958)
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
Maryland, August 1958 (1 9 5 8 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York (Erie and Niagara Counties), Septem­
ber 1958 (1 9 59).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mis­
souri, October 1958 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
October 1958 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massa­
chusetts, October 1958 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, December 1958 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, November 1958 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey
City, New Jersey, December 1958 (1959),
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, January 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michi­
gan, January 1959 (19 5 9 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1959 (1 9 5 9 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, February 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los AngelesLong Beach, California, March 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, April 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1959 (1959).




-1 9
-2 0
-2 1
-2 2

1241

1242

1243

1244

1245

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Geor­
gia, May 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Ore­
gon, April 1959 (19 5 9 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Lawrence, M as­
sachusetts, May 1959 (1959).
Wages and Related Benefits, 20 Labor M ar­
kets, 1958-59 (1959).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Automation and Employment Opportunities
for Officeworkers (1958).
Designed primarily for use in vocational
guidance, discusses the development and use
of electronic computers and their effect on
the employment of clerical workers. Provides
a description of programing and outlines
the qualifications and employment prospects
for programers.
Population and Labor Force Projections for
the United States, 1960 to 1975 (1959).
Briefly reviews population growth in the
United States from 1900 to 1955 and ana­
lyzes some effects of population change. In­
cludes population and labor force projections
to 1975, and a description of the methods
used in preparing the projections. Points up
the increasing labor force participation of
women and the trend toward more part-time
employment.
Trends in Building Permit Activity (1959).
Presents monthly building permit statistics
for 1954-56 on a national basis and annual
figures from 1949-58 for cities of 100,000
population and over. Includes selected tabu­
lations on metropolitan-nonmetropolitan and
central city-suburban building during 195758. Describes the characteristics and limita­
tions of the data, and explains the shift from
the “old series” on “urban building author­
ized” (1 920-June 1954) to the “new series”
on “building permit activity” (January 19541958). A selected reference list is appended.
See also Bull. 545 this listing.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1958 (1959).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1958 (1959).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.

51

1246

1247

1248
1249

1250

1251
1252

Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1958 (1959).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1958 (1 9 5 9 ).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Paid Holiday Provisions in M ajor Union
Contracts, 1958 (1959).
Trends in Output per M an-Hour in the Pri­
vate Economy, 1909-1958 (1960).
Presents indexes and average rates of
change in output per man-hour in the private
economy for the post-World War II period,
1947-58, and for the long-term period,
1909-58. Discusses the factors affecting the
long-term increase in output per man-hour,
such as technological innovation, capital in­
vestment, the role of Federal, State, and local
government investment in services and facil­
ities, and the skillful use of human resources.
Summarizes the major elements in deriving
the estimates of real product and man-hours,
and compares the Bureau’s m an-hour meas­
ures in the total private economy with those
of the Bureau of the Census. Includes discus­
sions of the problems of comparing real
product and man-hour estimates, and of the
limitations and qualifications of output per
man-hour measures. An appendix includes
a detailed discussion of the methods and
sources used in estimating output per m an­
hour.
Health and Insurance Plans Under Collective
Bargaining. Accident and Sickness Benefits,
Fall 1958 (1 9 59).
Analyzes the key features of accident and
sickness benefits and the extent of the pro­
visions for such benefits in 300 selected plans
under collective bargaining in the fall of
1958. This is the first in a series of bulletins
dealing separately with specific health and
insurance benefits. A section on maternity
benefits is included.
See also annotations for Bulls. 1274, 1280,
1293, and 1296 this listing.
Premium Pay for Night, Weekend, and Over­
time W ork in M ajor Union Contracts (1959).
Factory W orkers’ Earnings, May 1958
(1959).
See Bull. 1275 this listing for annotation.

52



1253
1254
1255

1256

1257

1258
1259

1260

Earnings in Wholesale Trade, June 1958
(1959).
Retail Prices of Food, 1957-58. Indexes and
Average Prices (1959).
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1959 Edi­
tion (1959).
See Bull. 1700 this listing for annotation.
Consumer Prices in the United States, Price
Trends and Indexes, 1953-58 (1 9 5 9 ).
Presents the history, scope, and meaning
of the Consumer Price Index; traces adjust­
ments in the series and compares movements
of the old and the adjusted series. Discusses
the comprehensive revision which resulted in
the introduction of the revised Index in Jan­
uary 1953, and the uses of the Index. Tables
of indexes and related data for earlier years
are included.
See Bulls. 699, 710, 966, 1039, 1165,
1517, 1554, and 1647 for analyses of price
changes and for Index methods used in other
periods. See also Bull. 1140.
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1958
(1959).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1958 (1 9 5 9 ).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Pension Plans U nder Collective Bargaining.
Pt. I. Vesting Provisions and Require­
ments for Early Retirement;
Pt. II. Involuntary Retirement Provisions,
Late 1958 (1959).
Analyzes provisions concerning vesting,
benefits, and eligibility contained in selected
pension plans under collective bargaining.
This bulletin, which deals with 300 plans in
late 1958, is the first in a new series of pen­
sion plan studies; it does not include infor­
mation on disability retirement provisions.
Bull. 1147 contains similar information on
300 plans in the fall of 1952. See also anno­
tations for Bulls. 1284 and 1334 this listing.
Nonfarm Housing Starts, 1889-1958 (1959).
Presents estimates of new permanent non­
farm dwelling units started during 18891958. Includes distributions from 1920 by
type of structure (1 -family, etc.), ownership
(private, public), and location (urban, rural
nonfarm ); by years from 1920; and by
months from 1939 or 1940. Presents data for
20 selected States in 1954-58, by ownership.

1261

1262

1263

This bulletin, which also includes an analysis
of the historical series and selected references,
represents a final report of the work done by
the Division of Construction Statistics of
the U.S. Departm ent of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics, in the development of the
nonfarm housing starts series. See also anno­
tations for Bulls. 915 and 941 this listing.
Labor Supply and Mobility in a Newly In­
dustrialized A rea (1960).
Provides information on the character of
the labor supply attracted to manufacturing
employment in the chronically depressed
rural area of Ravenswood, W. Va., near
which the Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical
Corp. established a mill. Analyzes work his­
tories of employees of the mill and a small
sample of unaccepted applicants; their geo­
graphical and occupational mobility; their
age, sex, marital status, and education. The
study examines the standards for employ­
ment established by the company and points
out that only by employing persons who lived
considerable distances from the plant, and
by transferring professional employees from
other plants, was the company able to meet
those standards.
Military Manpower Requirements and Sup­
ply, 1959-63 (1959).
Analyzes military manpower requirements
and supply in the United States from the
standpoint of the military manpower situa­
tion and the size and characteristics (age and
sources of supply) of the military manpower
pool. Indicates underlying assumptions and
guiding principles. Bull. 1262 provides esti­
mates for 1958 through 1963, and an earlier
bulletin (1161) provides estimates for 1954
through 1960.
Union Constitution Provisions: Trusteeship
(1959).
Analyzes the formal rules stipulated in
union constitutions governing the establish­
ment of trusteeships, the grounds for such
action, hearing requirements, the status of
the local unions and their officers during
trusteeship, and the provisions applying to
termination and appeal. The bulletin does not
extend to union practices, and is essentially
a summary of union laws in effect before
enactment of the Labor-M anagement Re­




1264
1265
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-1 0
-1 1
-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5

-1 6
-1 7
-1 8
-1 9
-2 0
-2 1
-2 2

porting and Disclosure Act of 1959. The
section in this act covering trusteeships is
reproduced in appendix B.
Impact on Workers and Community of a
Plant Shutdown in a Depressed Area (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
September 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash­
ington, August 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
October 1959 (1959).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York, October 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Mis­
souri, October 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Miami, Florida,
December 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
Maryland, September 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massa­
chusetts, October 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio,
December 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Canton, Ohio,
December 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, December 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Maine,
November 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Fort Worth,
Texas, November 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville,
Florida, December 1959 (19 6 0 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, San B ernardinoRiverside-Ontario, California, November
1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, November 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Washington,
D .C .-M d.-V a., December 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, January 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, December 1959 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, M inneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis,
Indiana, January 1960 (1960).

53

-2 3
-2 4
-2 5
-2 6
-2 7
-2 8

-2 9
-3 0
-3 1
-3 2
-3 3

-3 4

-3 5
-3 6
-3 7
-3 8
-3 9
-4 0

-4 1
-4 2
-4 3
-4 4
-4 5

Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City,
M issouri-Kansas, January 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Richmond, Vir­
ginia, February 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michi­
gan, January 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jackson, Missis­
sippi, February 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, York, Pennsyl­
vania, February 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark and
Jersey City, New Jersey, February 1960
(1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Sioux Falls,
South Dakota, February 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Des Moines,
Iowa, February 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey,
Cincinnati,
Ohio-Kentucky, February 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, February 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, A llentownBethlehem -Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jer­
sey, M arch 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence,
Rhode Island-M assachusetts, M arch 1960
(1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los AngelesLong Beach, California, April 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Waterbury,
Connecticut, M arch 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham,
Alabama, M arch 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, South Bend, In­
diana, April 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Charlotte, North
Carolina, April 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M arch 1960
(1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Haven,
Connecticut, February 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, A ri­
zona, April 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee,
Wisconsin, April 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1960 (1960).

54



-4 6
-4 7
-4 8
-4 9
-5 0

-5 1
-5 2
-5 3
-5 4
-5 5

-5 6
-5 7

-5 8
-5 9
-6 0
-6 1
-6 2

1266

1267

1268

1269

Occupational Wage Survey, Greenville, South
Carolina, May 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Rockford, Illi­
nois, April 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Charleston,
West Virginia, April 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon-W ashington, May 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, New Jersey (Bergen and Pas­
saic C ounties), May 1960 (19 6 0 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Lubbock, Texas,
June 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mas­
sachusetts, June 1960 (1 9 6 0 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Savannah, Geor­
gia, June 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albuquerque,
New Mexico, M ay 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, M uskegonMuskegon Heights, Michigan, May 1960
(1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Texas,
June 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Law rence-H averhill, M assachusetts-New Hampshire, June
1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, B eaum ont-Port
Arthur, Texas, May 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Akron, Ohio,
June 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Geor­
gia, June 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boise, Idaho,
June 1960 (1960).
Wages and Related Benefits, 60 Labor M ar­
kets, 1959-60 (1961).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Company
Pay for Time Spent on Union Business
(1959).
Directory of National and International La­
bor Unions in the United States, 1959 (1960).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1959 (1960).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1959 (1960).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.

1270

1271

1272
1273

1274

1275

Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1959 (1960).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1959 (1960).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Union Security and Checkoff Provisions in
M ajor Union Contracts, 1958-59 (1960).
Comparative Job Performance by Age: Office
Workers (1960).
This bulletin continues work on the rela­
tionship between age and work performance
(Bulls. 1203 and 1223), compares actual onthe-job performances of older office workers
with the performances of younger workers.
The study focused on the measure of the
relationship of age and job experience to out­
put per man-hour, and age and skill level to
output per man-hour.
Health and Insurance Plans Under Collective
Bargaining. Hospital Benefits, Early 1959
(1960).
Analyzes the key features of hospital ben­
efits in 300 selected plans under collective
bargaining in the early part of 1959. This is
the second in a series of bulletins dealing
separately with specific health and insurance
benefits. See also annotations for Bulls.
1250, 1280, 1293, and 1296 this listing.
Factory W orkers’ Earnings in Selected M an­
ufacturing Industries, June 1959 (1960).
This study was part of a broad program
initiated by the U.S. Departm ent of Labor
to study the economic effects of the $1 Fed­
eral minimum wage. Bull. 1275 analyzes the
manufacturing wage structure, in June 1959,
on the basis of a 17-industry survey of the
straight-time hourly earnings (exclusive of
premium pay for overtime and work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts) of fac­
tory workers in the United States. Levels
and distributions of wages of production and
related workers are set forth, by selected in­
dustries, for the United States as a whole,
major regions, and metropolitan and non­
metropolitan areas. Changes between April
1954 and June 1959 are summarized.
For earlier studies of factory workers’
earnings in relation to minimum wage legis­
lation, see Bulls. 1179 and 1252.




1276
1277

1278
1279

1280

1281
1282
1283
1284

1285
-1
-2
-3
-4

Adjustments to the Introduction of Office
Autom ation (1960).
School and Early Employment Experience of
Youth. A Report on Seven Communities,
1952-57 (1960).
Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1959 (1960).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Rest Periods, Washup, W ork Clothing, and
Military Leave Provisions in M ajor Union
Contracts (1961).
Health and Insurance Plans Under Collective
Bargaining. Surgical and Medical Benefits,
Late Summer 1959 (1960).
Analyzes the principal features of surgical
and medical benefits and the extent of the
provisions for such benefits in 300 selected
plans under collective bargaining in the late
summer of 1959. This bulletin is the third in
a series dealing with specific health and in­
surance benefits. See also annotations for
Bulls. 1250, 1274, 1293, and 1296 this
listing.
Subject Index of Bulletins Published by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1915-59 (1960).
Paid Sick Leave Provisions in M ajor Union
Contracts, 1959 (1960).
Composition of Payroll Hours in M anufac­
turing, 1958 (1960).
Pension Plans Under Collective Bargaining.
Normal Retirement, Early and Disability
Retirement, Fall 1959 (1961).
Analyzes the principal features of normal,
early, and disability retirement provisions of
300 selected pension plans under collective
bargaining. Covers 4.7 million workers, or
half of the estimated num ber covered by all
pension plans, under collective bargaining in
the United States. Bull. 1284 is the second in
a series of pension plan studies. See also an­
notations for Bulls. 1259 and 1334 this
listing.
Occupational Wage Survey, Manchester,
New Hampshire, August 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Green Bay,
Wisconsin, August 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, August 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, San B ernardinoRiverside-Ontario, California, September
1960 (1960).

55

-5
-6

-7
-8
-9
-1 0
-1 1
-1 2

-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6

-1 7
-1 8
-1 9
-2 0
-2 1
-2 2
-2 3
-2 4
-2 5
-2 6
-2 7
-2 8

Occupational Wage Survey, Raleigh, North
Carolina, September 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Little R ockNorth Little Rock, Arkansas, August 1960
(1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash­
ington, August 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Penn­
sylvania, August 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Wichita, Kan­
sas, September 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois, October 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
September 1960 (1 9 6 0 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Wilmington,
Delaware-New Jersey, September 1960
(1960) .
Occupational Wage Survey, Omaha, Nebrasbraska-Iow a, October 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chattanooga,
Tennessee-Georgia, September 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, M assa­
chusetts, October 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, D avenport-R ock
Island-M oline, Iowa-Illinois, October 1960
(1961) .
Occupational Wage Survey, Sioux Falls,
South Dakota, November 1960 (1960).
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City,
M issouri-Kansas, November 1960 (1 9 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Maine,
November 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Waterloo, Iowa,
November 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
November 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey,
Washington,
D .C .-M d.-V a., November 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, F ort Worth,
Texas, November 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey,
Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, November 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, New
Jersey, December 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Richmond, Vir­
ginia, December 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, December 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, In­
diana, December 1960 (19 6 1 ).

56



-2 9
-3 0
-3 1
-3 2
-3 3
-3 4
-3 5
-3 6
-3 7
-3 8
-3 9
-4 0

-4 1
-4 2
-4 3
-4 4
-4 5
-4 6
-4 7

-4 8
-4 9
-5 0
-5 1
-5 2

Occupational Wage Survey, Canton, Ohio,
December 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville,
Florida, December 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York, December 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City,
Utah, December 1960 (19 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Miami, Florida,
December 1960 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
Maryland, December 1960 (1 9 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, January 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michi­
gan, January 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio,
January 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark and
Jersey City, New Jersey, February 1961
(1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio,
January 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jackson, Missis­
sippi, February 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Des Moines,
Iowa, February 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, January 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, York, Pennsyl­
vania, February 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Haven,
Connecticut, February 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem -Easton, Pennsylvania-New J ersey,
February 1961 (1 9 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, M arch 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana, February 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Toledo, Ohio,
M arch 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M arch 1961 (1 9 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los AngelesLong Beach, California, M arch 1961 (1961).

-5 3
-5 4
-5 5
-5 6
-5 7
-5 8
-5 9
-6 0
-6 1
-6 2
-6 3
-6 4
-6 5
-6 6
-6 7
-6 8
-6 9
-7 0

-7 1
-7 2
-7 3
-7 4
-7 5
-7 6
-7 7

Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham,
Alabama, April 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, South Bend, In­
diana, M arch 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Ari­
zona, M arch 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Waterbury, Con­
necticut, M arch 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Burlington, Ver­
mont, M arch 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Charlotte, North
Carolina, April 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati,
Ohio-Kentucky, M arch 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Charleston, West
Virginia, April 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albuquerque,
New Mexico, May 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boise, Idaho,
M ay 1961 (1 961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Greenville, South
Carolina, April 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, April 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1961 (19 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1961 (1 961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Lubbock, Texas,
M ay 1961 (1 961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Rockford, Illi­
nois, May 1961 (1 9 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, M uskegon-M uskegon Heights, Michigan, May 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, ProvidencePawtucket, Rhode Island-M assachusetts,
May 1961 (1 9 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, San Antonio,
Texas, May 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon-W ashington, M ay 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Geor­
gia, May 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, New Jersey, May 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, B eaum ont-Port
Arthur, Texas, May 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Savannah, Geor­
gia, May 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Spokane, W ash­
ington, May 1961 (1961).




-7 8
-7 9

-8 0
-8 1
-8 2

-8 3

-8 4

1286

1287
1288

1289

1290

1291

1292

1293

Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Texas,
May 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Law renceHaverhill, M assachusetts-New Hampshire,
June 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, M as­
sachusetts, June 1961 (1 9 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Akron, Ohio,
June 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, N orfolk-Portsm outh-N ew port News, Virginia, June 1961
(1961).
Wages and Related Benefits, 82 Labor M ar­
kets, 1960-61 (1962).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Wages and Related Benefits, M etropolitan
Areas, United States and Regional Sum­
maries, 1960-61 (1962).
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
National Survey of Professional, Adminis­
trative, Technical, and Clerical Pay, Winter
1959-60 (1961).
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.
Im pact of Automation (1960).
Factory Jobs: Employment Outlook for
Workers in Jobs Requiring Little or No
Experience or Specialized Training (1961).
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1960 (1961).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1960 (1961).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1960 (1961).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Indus­
try, July 1, 1960 (1961).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Health and Insurance Plans Under Collec­
tive Bargaining. M ajor Medical Expense
Benefits, Fall 1960 (1961).
Analyzes the key features of m ajor medi­
cal or catastrophic illness benefits and the
extent of the provisions for such benefits in
300 selected plans under collective bargain­
ing in the fall of 1960. This is the fourth in
a series of bulletins dealing with specific
health and insurance benefits. See also anno­

57

1294
1295

1296

1297
1298
1299
1300

1301
1302
1303
-1

-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9

tations for Bulls. 1250, 1274, 1280, and
1296 this listing.
Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hos­
pitals, M id-1960 (1 9 6 1 ).
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1959
(1961).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Health and Insurance Plans Under Collec­
tive Bargaining. Life Insurance and Acci­
dental Death and Dismemberment Benefits,
Early Summer 1960 (1961).
Analyzes the principal features of life
insurance and accidental death and dismem­
berment benefits and the extent of the pro­
visions for such benefits in 300 selected plans
under collective bargaining in the early sum­
mer of 1960. This bulletin is the last in the
series concerning specific health and insur­
ance benefits. See also annotations for Bulls.
1250, 1274, 1280, and 1293 this listing.
Employment in the Atomic Energy Field,
A 1960 Occupational Survey (19 6 1 ).
The Dimensions of M ajor W ork Stoppages,
1947-59 (1 9 61).
Labor Requirements for School Construction
(1961).
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1961 Edi­
tion (1 9 6 1 ).
See Bull. 1700 this listing for annotation.
Retail Prices of Food, 1959-60 (1961).
Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1960 (1961).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Wage Survey, Little R o ck North Little Rock, Arkansas, August 1961
(1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Green Bay, Wis­
consin, August 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Manchester,
New Hampshire, August 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chattanooga,
Tennessee-Georgia, September 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, August 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash­
ington, August 1961 (1 9 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Wichita, Kan­
sas, September 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Penn­
sylvania, August 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Wilmington,

58



-1 0
-1 1

-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6
-1 7

-1 8
-1 9
-2 0
-2 1
-2 2
-2 3
-2 4
-2 5
-2 6
-2 7
-2 8
-2 9
-3 0
-3 1
-3 2
-3 3

Delaware-New Jersey, August 1961 (1 9 6 1 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Raleigh, North
Carolina, September 1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, San B ernardinoRiverside-O ntario, California, September
1961 (1961).
Occupational Wage Survey, Washington,
D .C .-M d.-V a., October 1961 (19 6 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
September 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Omaha, Nebraska-Iow a, October 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Sioux Falls,
South Dakota, November 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, M assa­
chusetts, October 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, D avenportRock Island-M oline, Iowa-Illinois, October
1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois, October 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, F ort Worth,
Texas, November 1961 (19 6 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
November 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville,
Florida, November 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Richmond, V ir­
ginia, November 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Waterloo, Iowa,
November 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City,
M issouri-Kansas, November 1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania, November 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Maine,
November 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis,
Indiana, December 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
Maryland, November 1961 (19 6 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York, December 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, New
Jersey, December 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Miami, Florida,
December 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City,
Utah, December 1961 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, December 1961 (1 9 6 2 ).

-3 4
-3 5
-3 6
-3 7
-3 8
-3 9
-4 0
-4 1
-4 2
-4 3
-4 4
-4 5
-4 6

-4 7
-4 8
-4 9
-5 0
—
51
-5 2
-5 3
-5 4
-5 5
-5 6
-5 7
-5 8

Occupational Wage Survey, New Haven,
Connecticut, January 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, January 1962 (19 6 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michi­
gan, January 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio,
January 1962 (1 9 6 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, January 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio,
February 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Des Moines,
Iowa, February 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, February 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jackson, Missis­
sippi, February 1962 (1 9 6 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark and Jer­
sey City, New Jersey, February 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem -Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey,
February 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Toledo, Ohio,
M arch 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, W aterbury, Con­
necticut, M arch 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, York, Pennsyl­
vania, February 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Burlington, V er­
mont, M arch 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana, February 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, South Bend, In­
diana, M arch 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los A ngelesLong Beach, California, M arch 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, A ri­
zona, M arch 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati,
Ohio-Kentucky, M arch 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M arch 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, April 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1962 (1962).




-5 9
-6 0
-6 1
-6 2
-6 3
-6 4
-6 5
-6 6

-6 7
-6 8
-6 9
-7 0
-7 1
-7 2
-7 3
-7 4
-7 5

-7 6

-7 7
-7 8
-7 9
-8 0
-8 1
-8 2

Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham,
Alabama, April 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Charlotte, North
Carolina, April 1962 (1 9 6 2 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Charleston, West
Virginia, April 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Canton, Ohio,
May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, San Antonio,
Texas, May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Geor­
gia, May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, ProvidencePawtucket, Rhode Island-M assachusetts,
May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albuquerque,
New Mexico, May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, M uskegon-M uskegon Heights, Michigan, May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Rockford, Illi­
nois, April 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Greenville, South
Carolina, May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, New Jersey, May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon-W ashington, May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Spokane, Wash­
ington, May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Lubbock, Texas,
June 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, N orfolk-Portsmouth and Newport N ews-Ham pton, V ir­
ginia, June 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Law renceHaverhill, M assachusetts-New Hampshire,
June 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boise, Idaho,
May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, B eaum ont-Port
Arthur, Texas, May 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Texas,
June 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Savannah, Geor­
gia, June 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Akron, Ohio,
June 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mas­
sachusetts, June 1962 (1962).

59

-8 3

-8 3

1304
1305

1306
1307

1308

1309
1310

1311
1312
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
1313

Wages and Related Benefits, Part I: 82
Labor Markets, 1961-62 (1962).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Wages and Related Benefits, Part II: M etro­
politan Areas, United States and Regional
Summaries, 1961-62 (1 9 6 2 ).
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
Subcontracting Clauses in M ajor Collective
Bargaining Agreements (1961).
Technological Change and Productivity in
the Bituminous Coal Industry, 1920-60
(1961).
Industry Wage Survey, Communications,
October 1960 (1961).
Digest of One Hundred Selected Pension
Plans Under Collective Bargaining, Spring
1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
Revision of Bull. 1232. Revised by Bull.
1435.
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supple­
mentary Rem uneration Practices for Produc­
tion Workers in M anufacturing Industries,
1959 (1 9 6 2 ).
See Bull. 1428 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Machinery M anu­
facturing, M arch-M ay 1961 (1961).
National Survey of Professional, Adminis­
trative, Technical, and Clerical Pay, Winter
1960-61 (1 9 61).
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Textile Dyeing and
Finishing, A pril-M ay 1961 (1961).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the
United States, 1909-60 (1961).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the
United States, 1909-62 (1 9 6 3 ).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the
United States, 1909-64 (1964).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the
United States, 1909-65 (1 9 6 6 ).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the
United States, 1909-66 (1966).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the
United States, 1909-67 (1967).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the
United States, 1909-68 (19 6 8 ).
Employment and Earnings, United States,
1909-70 (1 9 71). $4.25.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit

60



1314

1315

1316

1317
1318
1319

-1

1320

1321
1322
1323

1324
1325

Operating Employees, July 1, 1961 (1962).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Indus­
try, July 1, 1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1961 (1962).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Cigar M anufactur­
ing, A pril-M ay 1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
Industry Wage Survey, Paints and Varnishes,
May 1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
Implications of Automation and Other Tech­
nological Developments— Selected Annotated
Bibliography (1962).
Implications of Autom ation and Other Tech­
nological Developments— Selected Annotated
Bibliography (1 9 6 4 ).
Directory of National and International
Labor Unions in the United States, 1961
(1962).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, W ork Clothing,
M ay-June 1961 (1962).
Salaries for Selected Occupations in Services
for the Blind, May 1961 (1962).
Industry Wage Survey, M en’s and Boys’
Shirts (Except W ork Shirts) and Nightwear,
M ay-June 1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
Industry Wage Survey, Life Insurance, M ayJuly 1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
Digest of Profit-Sharing, Savings, and Stock
Purchase Plans, W inter 1961-62 (20 Se­
lected Plans) (1962).
In response to inquiries received from in­
dividuals and organizations at home and
abroad, this bulletin describes the principal
features of 20 selected profit-sharing, savings,
and stock purchase plans in effect in the
United States in the winter of 1961-62. Not
presented as typical or model plans, or as a
representative sample. Most of the plans are
well known, although others were selected
because they represent different ways of
providing benefits to workers. Covers pro­
duction and related workers or nonsupervisory workers; some also cover salaried and
supervisory employees.

1326

1327
1328
1329
1330

1331
1332

1333
1334

1335

1336
1337
1338
-1

Multiemployer Pension Plans Under Collec­
tive Bargaining, Spring 1960 (1962).
The Bureau of Labor Statistics, in co­
operation with the Bureau of Labor Stand­
ards, undertook this comprehensive study of
the characteristics, types of benefits, and
administrative features of multiemployer
pension plans under collective bargaining.
Practically all such plans covering more
than 25 workers and in effect in spring 1960
are taken into account.
Industry Wage Survey, Contract Cleaning
Services, Summer 1961 (1962).
Industry Wage Survey, Hotels and Motels,
June 1961 (1962).
Industry Wage Survey, Eating and Drinking
Places, June 1961 (1962).
Digest of One Hundred Selected Health and
Insurance Plans Under Collective Bargain­
ing, Winter 1961-62 (1962).
Revision of Bull. 1236.
Labor Requirements for Federal Office Build­
ing Construction (1962).
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supple­
mentary Remuneration Practices for Produc­
tion Workers in Mining Industries, 1960
(1963).
See Bull. 1428 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Power Laundries and
Cleaning Services, June 1961 (1962).
Pension Plans Under Collective Bargaining.
Benefits for Survivors, Winter 1960-61
(1962).
Analyzes the principal forms of survivor
protection, including death benefits, the re­
turn of worker contributions, and survivor
options, in 300 selected pension plans under
collective bargaining. This bulletin com­
pletes the series on pension plans under col­
lective bargaining. See also annotations for
Bulls. 1259 and 1284 this listing.
Index of Volumes 72-83, Monthly Labor R e­
view, January 1951 to December 1960
(1962).
Antidiscrimination Provisions in M ajor Con­
tracts, 1961 (1962).
Industry Wage Survey, Flour and Other
Grain Mill Products, November 1961 (1962).
Employee Earnings at Retail Building M a­




-2
-3
-4

-5
-6

-7
-8
1339
1340
1341
1342
1343
1344

1345
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7

-8
-9

terials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment
Dealers, June 1961 (1962).
Employee Earnings in Retail General M er­
chandise Stores, June 1961 (1962).
Employee Earnings in Retail Food Stores,
June 1961 (1963).
Employee Earnings at Retail Automotive
Dealers and in Gasoline Service Stations,
June 1961 (1963).
Employee Earnings in Retail Apparel and
Accessory Stores, June 1961 (1962).
Employee Earnings in Retail Furniture,
Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance
Stores, June 1961 (1963).
Employee Earnings in Miscellaneous Retail
Stores, June 1961 (1963).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade, June
1961 (1 9 6 3 ).
Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1961 (1962).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Labor Requirements for Hospital Construc­
tion (1962).
Industry Wage Survey, Pulp, Paper, and
Paperboard Mills, January 1962 (1962).
Paid Leave Provisions in M ajor Contracts,
1961 (1 9 6 2 ).
Industry Wage Survey, Communications,
1961 (1962).
Employment and Changing Occupational
Patterns in the Railroad Industry, 1947-60
(1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Raleigh, North
Carolina, September 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Manchester,
New Hampshire, August 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Green Bay, Wis­
consin, August 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, W ash­
ington, August 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Penn­
sylvania, August 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, August 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Little R o ck N orth Little Rock, Arkansas, August 1962
(1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chattanooga,
Tennessee-Georgia, September 1962 (1962).
Occupational Wage Survey, San B ernardino-

61

-1 0
-1 1
-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6
-1 7
-1 8

-1 9
-2 0
-2 1
-2 2
-2 3
-2 4
-2 5
-2 6
-2 7
-2 8
-2 9
-3 0
-3 1

-3 2

Riverside-Ontario, California, September
1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, San Diego, Cali­
fornia, September 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Wichita, Kan­
sas, October 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Omaha, Nebraska-Iow a, October 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Sioux Falls,
South Dakota, October 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
September 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, M assa­
chusetts, October 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Washington,
D .C .-M d.-V a., October 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois, October 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, D avenportRock Island-M oline, Iowa-Illinois, October
1962 (1 963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Richmond, Vir­
ginia, November 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Waterloo, Iowa,
November 1962 (19 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
November 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City,
M issouri-Kansas, November 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
Maryland, November 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Maine,
November 1962 (1 9 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City,
Utah, December 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, In­
diana, December 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Fort Worth,
Texas, November 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio,
December 1962 (1 9 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, New
Jersey, December 1962 (1 9 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York, December 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania-New Jersey, November 1962
(1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, December 1962 (1963).

62



-3 3
-3 4
-3 5
-3 6
-3 7
-3 8
-3 9
-4 0
-4 1
-4 2
-4 3
-4 4
-4 5

-4 6
-4 7
-4 8
-4 9
-5 0
-5 1
-5 2
-5 3
-5 4
-5 5
-5 6
-5 7

Occupational Wage Survey, Miami, Florida,
December 1962 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio,
January 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, January 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Haven,
Connecticut, January 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, M inneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville,
Florida, January 1963 (19 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, January 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, York, Pennsyl­
vania, February 1963 (19 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Des Moines,
Iowa, February 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jackson, Missis­
sippi, February 1963 (1 9 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, February 1963 (1 9 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem -Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey,
February 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark and Jer­
sey City, New Jersey, February 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michi­
gan, January 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana, February 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, W aterbury, Con­
necticut, M arch 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Burlington, V er­
mont, M arch 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Toledo, Ohio,
February 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, South Bend, In­
diana, M arch 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M arch 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati,
Ohio-Kentucky, M arch 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Rockford, Illi­
nois, April 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham,
Alabama, April 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, A ri­
zona, M arch 1963 (1963).

-5 8
-5 9
-6 0
-6 1
-6 2
-6 3
-6 4
-6 5
-6 6
-6 7
-6 8
-6 9
-7 0

-7 1
-7 2
-7 3
-7 4
—
75

-7 6
-7 7

-7 8
-7 9
-8 0
-8 1

Occupational Wage Survey, Charlotte, North
Carolina, April 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, April 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Savannah, Geor­
gia, May 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Charleston, West
Virginia, April 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los AngelesLong Beach, California, M arch 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albuquerque,
New Mexico, April 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Canton, Ohio,
April 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Spokane, Wash­
ington, May 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, B eaum ont-Port
Arthur, Texas, May 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Greenville, South
Carolina, May 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, M uskegon-M uskegon Heights, Michigan, May 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, ProvidencePawtucket, Rhode Island-M assachusetts,
May 1963 (1 963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Geor­
gia, May 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Lubbock, Texas,
June 1963 (1 963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon-W ashington, May 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Boise, Idaho,
May 1963 (1 963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk—
Ports­
mouth and Newport News-Ham pton, V ir­
ginia, June 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, New Jersey, May 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Law renceHaverhill, M assachusetts-New Hampshire,
June 1963 (1 963).
Occupational Wage Survey, San Antonio,
Texas, June 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mas­
sachusetts, June 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Akron, Ohio,
June 1963 (1 963).




-8 2
-8 3

-8 3

1346

1347

1348
1349
1350
1351
-1
1352
1353
1354

1355

1356

Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Texas,
June 1963 (1963).
Wages and Related Benefits, Part I: 82 L a­
bor Markets, 1962-63 (1964).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Wages and Related Benefits, Part II: M etro­
politan Areas, United States and Regional
Summaries, 1962-63 (1964).
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
National Survey of Professional, Adminis­
trative, Technical, and Clerical Pay, Winter
1961-62 (1962).
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.
Im pact of Technological Change and Auto­
mation in the Pulp and Paper Industry
(1962).
Examines some implications of automa­
tion and other technological advances in the
pulp and paper industry. Analyzes trends
and outlook for the industry as a whole;
presents illustrative case studies of adjust­
ments to technological changes in three
plants. The study is part of the Bureau of
Labor Statistics program on the progress,
outlook, and implications of technological
change.
Unaffiliated Local and Single-Employer
Unions in the United States, 1961 (1962).
Industry Wage Survey, Hosiery, February
1962 (1963).
Disciplinary Powers and Procedures in
Union Constitutions (1963).
Prices: A Chartbook, 1953-62 (1963).
Prices: A Chartbook, 1953-62 (September
1963 Supplement) (1963).
Industry Wage Survey, Machinery M anu­
facturing, M arch-June 1963 (1963).
M ajor Union Contracts in the United States,
1961 (1962).
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1962 (1963).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1962 (1963).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1962 (1963).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
63

1357

1358
1359
1360
1361
1362
1363

1364

1365
1366
1367

1368

1369

1370

Union Wages and Hours: Printing Indus­
try, July 1, 1962 (1963).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Basic Iron and Steel,
M arch 1962 (1963).
Private Pension Plans and Manpower Pol­
icy (1 963).
Industry Wage Survey, Footwear, April 1962
(1963) .
Industry Wage Survey, Southern Sawmills
and Planing Mills, June 1962 (1963).
Industry Wage Survey, Fertilizer M anufac­
turing, April 1962 (1963).
Employment Outlook and Changing Occupa­
tional Structure in Electronics M anufactur­
ing (1 963).
Presents estimates of electronics manufac­
turing employment for the period 1958-61
and projections of this industry’s manpower
requirements for 1970, classified by major
product categories. Designed to assist in edu­
cational training and vocational counseling
and to improve employment statistics and
projection techniques for this industry.
Im pact of Office Automation in the Internal
Revenue Service: A Study of the M an­
power Implications During the First Stages
of the Changeover (1963).
Describes the impact on manpower of the
introduction of a large-scale computer sys­
tem in the IRS. Provides useful knowledge
for planning such a conversion. The study
is a part of the U.S. Departm ent of Labor’s
activities in carrying out the objectives of
the M anpower Development and Training
Act of 1962.
Digest of Nine Supplemental Unemployment
Benefit Plans, Early 1963 (1 9 6 3 ).
Seasonal Factors, Consumer Price Index, Se­
lected Series, June 1953-M ay 1961 (1963).
Employment Requirements and Changing
Occupational Structure in Civil Aviation
(1964) .
Industrial Retraining Programs for Techno­
logical Change, A Study of the Performance
of Older Workers (1 9 6 3 ).
Industry Wage Survey, Wood Household
Furniture, Except Upholstered, July 1962
(1963).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for
States and Areas, 1939-62 (19 6 3 ).

64



-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
1371
1372
1373

1374
1375

1376

1377

1378
1379
1380
-1

-2
-3
-4

Employment and Earnings Statistics for
States and Areas, 1939-63 (1964).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for States
and Areas, 1939-64 (1965).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for States
and Areas, 1939-65 (1966).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for States
and Areas, 1939-66 (1 9 6 7 ).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for States
and Areas, 1939-67 (1 9 6 8 ).
Employment and Earnings: States and Areas,
1939-68 (1969).
Employment and Earnings: States and Areas,
1939-69 (1 9 7 0 ).
Employment and Earnings: States and Areas,
1939-70 (1971). $4.50.
Industry Wage Survey, Women’s and Misses’
Coats and Suits, August 1962 (1 9 6 3 ).
Industry Wage Survey, Wool Textiles, June
1962 (1963).
Digest of 50 Selected Pension Plans for
Salaried Employees, Spring 1963 (1963).
Revised by Bull. 1477.
Industry Wage Survey, Electric and Gas
Utilities, July 1962 (1 9 6 3 ).
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1963-64
Edition (1963).
See Bull. 1700 this listing for annotation.
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1960
(1 9 6 3 ) .
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Digest of 50 Selected Health and Insurance
Plans for Salaried Employees, Spring 1963
(1 9 6 4 ) .
Industry Wage Survey, Leather Tanning and
Finishing, M arch 1963 (1963).
Seasonal Adjustment Factors, Wholesale
Price Index: Selected Series, 1948-61 (1963).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade, June
1962 (1963).
Employee Earnings at Retail Building M a­
terials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment
Dealers, June 1962 (19 6 4 ).
Employee Earnings in Retail General M er­
chandise Stores, June 1962 (1964).
Employee Earnings in Retail Food Stores,
June 1962 (1964).
Employee Earnings at Retail Automotive
Dealers and in Gasoline Service Stations,
June 1962 (1964).

-5
-6

-7
1381
1382

1383
1384
1385
-1
-2
-3

-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9

-1 0
-1 1
-1 2

-1 3
-1 4
-1 5

Employee Earnings in Retail Apparel and
Accessory Stores, June 1962 (1964).
Employee Earnings in Retail Furniture,
Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance
Stores, June 1962 (1964).
Employee Earnings in Miscellaneous Stores,
June 1962 (1 9 6 4 ).
Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1962 (1 9 6 3 ).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1961
(1 9 6 4 ).
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Bituminous Coal
Mining, November 1962 (1963).
Economic Forces in the United States, In
Facts and Figures (1963).

-1 6
-1 7
-1 8
-1 9
-2 0
-2 1
-2 2
-2 3
-2 4

Occupational Wage Survey, Manchester,
New Hampshire, August 1963 (19 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, August 1963 (19 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Little R o ck North Little Rock, Arkansas, August 1963
(1 9 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Green Bay, Wis­
consin, August 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Chattanooga,
Tennessee-Georgia, September 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Wichita, Kansas,
September 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Raleigh, North
Carolina, September 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Penn­
sylvania, August 1963 (1 9 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, San Bernardino—
Riverside-O ntario, California, September
1963 (1 9 6 3 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash­
ington, September 1963 (1963).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
September 1963 (19 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, D avenportRock Island-M oline, Iowa-Illinois, October
1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, San Diego, Cali­
fornia, September 1963 (19 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Omaha, Nebraska-Iow a, October 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
November 1963 (1964).




-2 5
-2 6
-2 7
-2 8
-2 9
-3 0
-3 1

-3 2
-3 3
-3 4
-3 5
-3 6
-3 7
-3 8
-3 9
-4 0

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massa­
chusetts, October 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Washington,
D .C .-M d.-V a., October 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Waterloo, Iowa,
November 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Fort Worth,
Texas, November 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Sioux Falls,
South Dakota, October 1963 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois, October 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Maine,
November 1963 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Richmond, Vir­
ginia, November 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
Maryland, November 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio,
November 1963 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City,
Missouri-Kansas, November 1963 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, New
Jersey, December 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City,
Utah, December 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Miami, Florida,
December 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, In­
diana, December 1963 (19 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania-New Jersey, November 1963
(1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville,
Florida, January 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York, December 1963 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, December 1963 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, January 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Haven,
Connecticut, January 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, January 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio,
January 1964 (1964).

65

-4 1
-4 2
-4 3
-4 4
-4 5
-4 6
-4 7
-4 8
-4 9

-5 0
-5 1
-5 2
-5 3

-5 4
-5 5
-5 6
-5 7
-5 8
-5 9
-6 0
-6 1
-6 2
-6 3
-6 4
-6 5

Occupational Wage Survey, Jackson, Missis­
sippi, February 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, February 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michi­
gan, January 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Des Moines,
Iowa, February 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, York, Pennsyl­
vania, February 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Toledo, Ohio,
February 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Burlington, Ver­
mont, M arch 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Waterbury, Con­
necticut, M arch 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark and
Jersey City, New Jersey, February 1964
(1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana, February 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, South Bend, In­
diana, M arch 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M arch 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem -Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey,
February 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Ari­
zona, M arch 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Charlotte, North
Carolina, April 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, April 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Charleston, West
Virginia, April 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati, O hioKentucky, M arch 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Los AngelesLong Beach, California, March 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Rockford, Illi­
nois, April 1964 (19 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albuquerque,
New Mexico, April 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, New Jersey, May 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham,
Alabama, April 1964 (1964).
Occupational Wage Survey, Canton, Ohio,
April 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence-

66



Pawtucket, Rhode Island-M assachusetts,
May 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-6 6 Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1964 (1964).
-6 7 Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon-W ashington, M ay 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-6 8 Occupational Wage Survey, Greenville,
South Carolina, May 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-6 9 Occupational Wage Survey, Savannah, Geor­
gia, May 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-7 0 Occupational Wage Survey, B eaum ont-Port
Arthur, Texas, May 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-71 Occupational Wage Survey, M uskegon-M uskegon Heights, Michigan, May 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-7 2 Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-7 3 Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Geor­
gia, May 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-7 4 Occupational Wage Survey, San Antonio,
Texas, June 1964 (1964).
-7 5 Occupational Wage Survey, Lubbock, Texas,
June 1964 (19 6 4 ).
-7 6 Occupational Wage Survey, Law rence-H averhill, M assachusetts-New Hampshire, June
1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-7 7 Occupational Wage Survey, N orfolk-Portsmouth and Newport N ew s-H am pton, V ir­
ginia, June 1964 (19 6 4 ).
-7 8 Occupational Wage Survey, Spokane, W ash­
ington, May 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-7 9 Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mas­
sachusetts, June 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-8 0 Occupational Wage Survey, Akron, Ohio,
June 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-8 1 Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Texas,
June 1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
-8 2 Wages and Related Benefits, P art I: 80
M etropolitan Areas, 1963-64 (19 6 4 ).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
-8 2 Wages and Related Benefits, Part II. M etro­
politan Areas, United States and Regional
Summaries, 1963-64 (1965).
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
1386 Industry Wage Survey, Iron and Steel Foun­
dries, November 1962 (1 9 6 3 ).
1387 National Survey of Professional, Administra­
tive, Technical, and Clerical Pay, F ebruaryM arch 1963 (1963).
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.

1388
1389
1390
1391
1392
1393
1394
1395
1396
1397
1398
1399
1400
1401
1402
1403
1404
1405
1406
1407

Industry Wage Survey, Machinery Manu­
facturing, March-May 1963 (1964).
Industry Wage Survey, Communications,
1962 (1964).
Labor and Material Requirements for Civil
Works Construction by the Corps of En­
gineers (1964).
Industry Wage Survey, Women’s and Misses’
Dresses, March-April 1963 (1964).
Salaries of White-Collar Workers in Hawaii,
Puerto Rico, and Alaska, May-June 1963
(1964).
Industry Wage Survey, Part I: Motor Ve­
hicles, Part II: Motor Vehicle Parts, April
1963 (1964).
Unfunded Private Pension Plans (1964).
Directory of National and International La­
bor Unions in the United States, 1963 (1964).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit
Operating Employees, July 1, 1963 (1964).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1963 (1964).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1963 (1964).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1963 (1964).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Eating and Drinking
Places, June 1963 (1964).
Industry Wage Survey, Laundries and Clean­
ing Services, June 1963 (1964).
Labor and Material Requirements for Public
Housing Construction, May 1964 (1964).
Withdrawn from publication.
Labor and Material Requirements for Pri­
vate One-Family House Construction (1964).
Health and Insurance Benefits and Pension
Plans for Salaried Employees, Spring 1963
(1964).
Industry Wage Survey, Hotels and Motels,
June 1963 (1964).
Labor Mobility and Private Pension Plans:
A Study of Vesting, Early Retirement, Port­
ability Provisions (1964).
Describes the private pension structure—
prevalence of plans, types of plans, and
types and characteristics of benefits provided,




1408
1409
1410
1411
1412
1413

1414
1415
1416

1417
1418
1419

as well as implications for labor mobility
inherent in the provisions and practices thus
accounted for. The study concentrates on
the vesting and early retirement provisions
of pension plans. The pension credit portabil­
ity provided by multiemployer plans and, to
a limited extent, the age and service require­
ments for normal retirement are discussed.
This bulletin is a part of a series undertaken,
under the Manpower Development and
Training Act of 1962, to “establish a program
of factual studies of practices of employers
and unions which tend to impede the mobility
of workers or which facilitate mobility.” See
also Bull. 1462 this listing.
Case Studies of Displaced Workers, Experi­
ences of Workers After Layoff (1964).
Industry Wage Survey, Hospitals, Mid-1963
(1964) .
Industry Wage Survey, Cotton Textiles, May
1963 (1964).
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1962
(1965) .
See Bull. 1513 this listing for annotation.
Employment of Scientific and Technical Per­
sonnel in State Government Agencies, 1962
(1964).
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supple­
mentary Compensation Practices for Produc­
tion and Related Workers, Meatpacking and
Processing Industries, 1962 (1964).
See Bull. 1428 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Synthetic Textiles,
May 1963 (1964).
Industry Wage Survey, Meat Products:
Part I: Meatpacking, Part II: Prepared Meat
Products, November 1963 (1964).
Employee Earnings in Nonmetropolitan Areas
of the South and North Central Regions,
June 1962 (1964).
Se also Bulls. 1533 and 1552.
Salary Structure Characteristics in Large
Firms, 1963 (1964).
Employment of Scientific and Technical Per­
sonnel in Industry, 1962 (1964).
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supple­
mentary Remuneration Practices: Finance,
Insurance, and Real Estate Industries, 1961
(1964).
See Bull. 1428 this listing for annotation.
67

1420 Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1963 (1964).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
1421 Counselor’s Guide to Occupational and Other
Manpower Information (1965).
1422 National Survey of Professional, Administra­
tive, Technical, and Clerical Pay, FebruaryMarch 1964 (1964).
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.
1423 Industry Wage Survey, Pressed or Blown
Glass and Glassware, May 1964 (1964).
1424 Industry Wage Survey, Men’s and Boys’
Suits and Coats, October 1963 (1965).
1425
-1 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Grievance Procedures (1964).
-2 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Severance Pay and Layoff Benefit Plans
(1965).
-3 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Supplemental Unemployment Benefit Plans
and Wage-Employment Guarantees (1965).
-4 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Deferred Wage Increase and Escalator
Clauses (1966).
-5 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Management Rights and Union-Management
Cooperation (1966).
-6 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Arbitration Procedures (1966).
-7 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Training and Retraining Provisions (1969).
-8 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Subcontracting (1969).
-9 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Paid Vacation and Holiday Provisions (1969).
-10 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Plant Movement, Transfer, and Relocation
Allowances (1969).
-11 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Seniority in Promotion and Transfer Pro­
visions (1970).
-12 Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Administration of Negotiated Pension,
Health, and Insurance Plans (1970).
A comprehensive series of studies survey­
ing the entire scope of the collective bargain­
ing agreement. Emphasis is placed on preva­
lent practices, specific problems handled by
negotiators, and interrelationships of agree­
ment provisions. Quoted agreement clauses
are identified by the company and union sig­
68



1426
1427

1428

1429

natories and by the date of agreement ex­
piration. The studies are based on virtually all
agreements in the United States covering
1,000 workers or more, exclusive of railroad,
airline, and government agreements.
Industry Wage Survey, Communications,
1963 (1964).
Wage Indexes: Long-Term Trend Data for
Selected Occupations and Metropolitan Areas
(1965).
See also Bull. 1505.
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supple­
mentary Compensation Practices for Produc­
tion and Related Workers; Composition of
Payroll Hours: Manufacturing" Industries,
1962 (1965).
Replaces Bull. 1308.
Latest in a series of bulletins based on the
Bureau of Labor Statistics program of sur­
veys on the magnitude of employer expendi­
tures for supplementary employee remuner­
ation practices. The program provides for
surveys in manufacturing industries every 3
years and in selected nonmanufacturing in­
dustries in the intervening 2 years. This bul­
letin contains a section on composition of
payroll hours. For related data on the meat­
packing and processing industry, see Bull.
1413. For related data on selected nonmanu­
facturing industries (mining, and finance,
insurance, and real estate), see Bulls. 1332
and 1419.
Industry Wage Survey, Machinery Manufac­
turing, March-May 1964 (1965).

1430
-1 Occupational Wage Survey, Boise City, Idaho,
July 1964 (1964).
-2 Occupational Wage Survey, Scranton, Penn­
sylvania, August 1964 (1964).
-3 Occupational Wage Survey, Green Bay, Wis­
consin, August 1964 (1964).
-4 Occupational Wage Survey, Manchester, New
Hampshire, August 1964 (1964).
-5 Occupational Wage Survey, Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, August 1964 (1964).
-6 Occupational Wage Survey, Raleigh, North
Carolina, September 1964 (1964).
-7 Occupational Wage Survey, Little RockNorth Little Rock, Arkansas, August 1964
(1964).
-8 Occupational Wage Survey, San Bernardino-

Riverside-Ontario, California, September
1964 (1964).
-9 Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash­
ington, September 1964 (1964).
-10
Occupational Wage Survey, Chattanooga,
Tennessee-Georgia, September 1964 (1964).
-11 Occupational Wage Survey, Wichita, Kansas,
September 1964 (1964).
-12 Occupational Wage Survey, San Diego, Cali­
fornia, September 1964 (1964).
-13 Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio,
September 1964 (1964).
-14
Occupational Wage Survey, Washington,
D.C.-Md.-Va, October 1964 (1964).
-15
Occupational Wage Survey, Sioux Falls,
South Dakota, October 1964 (1964).
-16 Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Massa­
chusetts, October 1964 (1964).
-17
Occupational Wage Survey, Omaha, Nebraska-Iowa, October 1964 (1964).
-18 Occupational Wage Survey, Columbus, Ohio,
October 1964 (1964).
-19 Occupational Wage Survey, Richmond, Vir­
ginia, November 1964 (1964).
-20 Occupational Wage Survey, Davenport-Rock
Island-Moline, Iowa-Illinois, October 1964
(1964) .
-21 Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Maine,
November 1964 (1964).
-22 Occupational Wage Survey, St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois, October 1964 (1965).
-23 Occupational Wage Survey, Waterloo, Iowa,
November 1964 (1965).
-24 Occupational Wage Survey, Fort Worth,
Texas, November 1964 (1965).
-25 Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Texas,
November 1964 (1965).
-26 Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City,
Missouri-Kansas, November 1964 (1965).
-27 Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore,
Maryland, November 1964 (1965).
-28 Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania-New Jersey, November 1964
(1965) .
-29 Occupational Wage Survey, Miami, Florida,
December 1964 (1965).
-30 Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis,
Indiana, December 1964 (1965).
-31 Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio,
January 1965 (1965).




-32
-33
-34
-35
-36
-37
-38
-39
-40
-41
-42
-43
-44
-45
-46
-47
-48
-49
-50
-51
-52
-53
-54
-55

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo­
rado, December 1964 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City,
Utah, December 1964 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Haven,
Connecticut, January 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Trenton, New
Jersey, December 1964 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, New
York, December 1964 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, San FranciscoOakland, California, January 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jacksonville,
Florida, January 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, January 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Ten­
nessee, January 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, January 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana, February 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Michi­
gan, January 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Jackson, Missis­
sippi, February 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark and
Jersey City, New Jersey, February 1965
(1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, York, Pennsyl­
vania, February 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Des Moines,
Iowa, February 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem—
Easton, Pennsylvania—
New Jersey,
February 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Waterbury,
Connecticut, March 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Toledo, Ohio,
February 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Burlington, Ver­
mont, March 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, April 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans,
Louisiana, February 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, South Bend, In­
diana, March 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Cincinnati,
Ohio-Kentucky, March 1965 (1965).
69

-56 Occupational Wage Survey, Phoenix, Ari­
zona, March 1965 (1965).
-57 Occupational Wage Survey, Los AngelesLong Beach, California, March 1965 (1965).
■
58 Occupational Wage Survey, Milwaukee,
Wisconsin, April 1965 (1965).
■59 Occupational Wage Survey, Canton, Ohio,
April 1965 (1965).
■60 Occupational Wage Survey, Birmingham,
Alabama, April 1965 (1965).
-61 Occupational Wage Survey, Charlotte, North
Carolina, April 1965 (1965).
-62 Occupational Wage Survey, Albuquerque,
New Mexico, April 1965 (1965).
-63 Occupational Wage Survey, Rockford, Illi­
nois, May 1965 (1965).
-64 Occupational Wage Survey, Savannah, Geor­
gia, May 1965 (1965).
-65 Occupational Wage Survey, Charleston, West
Virginia, April 1965 (1965).
-66 Occupational Wage Survey, Beaumont-Port
Arthur, Texas, May 1965 (1965).
-67 Occupational Wage Survey, ProvidencePawtucket, Rhode Island-Massachusetts,
May 1965 (1965).
-68 Occupational Wage Survey, MuskegonMuskegon Heights, Michigan, May 1965
(1965).
-69 Occupational Wage Survey, Greenville, South
Carolina, May 1965 (1965).
-70 Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oregon-Washington, May 1965 (1965).
-71 Occupational Wage Survey, Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, New Jersey, May 1965 (1965).
-72 Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, Illinois,
April 1965 (1965).
-73 Occupational Wage Survey, Lubbock, Texas,
June 1965 (1965).
-74 Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia,
May 1965 (1965).
-75 Occupational Wage Survey, Lawrence-Haverhill, Massachusetts-New Hampshire, June
1965 (1965).
-76 Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mas­
sachusetts, June 1965 (1965).
-77 Occupational Wage Survey, Norfolk-Portsmouth and Newport News-Hampton, Vir­
ginia, June 1965 (1965).
-78 Occupational Wage Survey, Akron, Ohio,
June 1965 (1965).
70



-79
-80
-81
-82
-83

-83

1431
1432
1433
1434
1435
1436
1437

1438
1439
1440
1441

Occupational Wage Survey, Spokane, Wash­
ington, June 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New
York, April 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, San Antonio,
Texas, June 1965 (1965).
Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Texas,
June 1965 (1965).
Wages and Related Benefits, Part I: 80
Metropolitan Areas, 1964-65 (1965).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Wages and Related Benefits, Part II. Metro­
politan Areas, United States and Regional
Summaries, 1964-65 (1966).
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit
Operating Employees, July 1, 1964 (1965).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1964 (1965).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1964 (1965).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1964 (1965).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Digest of 100 Selected Pension Plans Under
Collective Bargaining, Late 1964 (1965).
Revision of Bull. 1307.
Industry Wage Survey, Cigar Manufacturing,
April-May 1964 (1965).
Outlook for Numerical Control of Machine
Tools: A Study of a Key Technological De­
velopment in Metalworking Industries (1965).
Analyzes the trend toward increased use
of numerical control of machines by the
metalworking industries. Discusses the impact
of numerical control on productivity, occupa­
tional requirements, training programs, and
employment.
Glossary of Current Industrial Relations and
Wage Terms (1965).
Industry Wage Survey, Miscellaneous Plas­
tics Products, June 1964 (1965).
Industry Wage Survey, Work Clothing, MayJune 1964 (1965).
Labor and Material Requirements for College
Housing Construction (1965).

1442 Wage Chronology: Federal Classification Act
Employees, 1924-64 (1965).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
1443 Wage Chronology: A.T.&T., Long Lines De­
partment, 1940-64 (1965).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
1444 Salary Trends: Federal Classified Employees,
1939-64 (1965).
1445 Salary Trends: Firemen and Policemen,
1924- 64 (1965).
1446 Retail Prices of Food, 1961-63, Indexes and
Average Prices (1965).
1447 Wage Chronology: Sinclair Oil Companies,
1941-64 (1965).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
1448 Salary Trends: City Public School Teachers,
1925- 63 (1965).
1449 Wage Chronology: Martin-Marietta Corpora­
tion, 1944-64 (1965).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
1450 Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1966-67
Edition (1965).
See Bull. 1700 this listing for annotation.
1451 Collective Bargaining Agreements in the Fed­
eral Service, Late Summer 1964 (1965).
Presents a detailed picture of the early
results of bargaining in the Federal service,
as reflected in written agreements. Though it
may soon have historical significance only,
it will serve as a base upon which changes
in collective bargaining can be measured. The
scope of bargaining with individual agencies
is not as wide as in private industry, since
the major terms of compensation and supple­
mentary benefits for Federal workers are
established by Congress.
1452 Industry Wage Survey, Auto Dealer Repair
Shops, August-October 1964 (1965).
1453 Wage Chronology: New York Laundries,
1945-64 (1965).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
1454 Wage Chronology: Bethlehem Atlantic Ship­
yards, 1941-65 (1965).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
1455 Industry Wage Survey, West Coast Sawmill­
ing, June 1964 (1965).
1456 Industry Wage Survey, Hosiery, SeptemberOctober 1964 (1965).
1457 Industry Wage Survey, Men’s and Boys’
Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear,
April-June 1964 (1965).




1458

1459
1460
1461
1462

1463
1464
1465
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7

BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and
Studies (1966).
Contains a statement about the creation
and purpose of each major data collection
program carried out by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. The statements describe how data
are put into final form, tell how the results
may be used, and state the limitations to be
remembered when one is using the data.
Industry Wage Survey, Structural Clay Prod­
ucts, July-August 1964 (1965).
Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1964 (1965).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Wage Chronology: Bituminous Coal Mines,
1933-66 (1965).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
The Operation of Severance Pay Plans and
Their Implications for Labor Mobility (1966).
Summarizes the aspects of severance pay
plans and their attendant circumstances that
bear upon manpower and mobility issues.
Five case studies of severance pay plans in
operation are included in the discussion. The
bulletin is the second in a series of studies
developed under the Manpower Development
and Training Act of 1962. See also Bull. 1407
this listing.
Industry Wage Survey, Fabricated Structural
Steel, October-November 1964 (1965).
Industry Wage Survey, Fluid Milk, September-October 1964 (1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Boise City, Idaho,
Metropolitan Area, July 1965 (1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Manchester, New
Hampshire, Metropolitan Area, August 1965
(1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Scranton, Pennsyl­
vania, Metropolitan Area, August 1965
(1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Green Bay, Wiscon­
sin, Metropolitan Area, August 1965 (1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, Metropolitan Area, August 1965
(1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Little Rock-North
Little Rock, Arkansas, Metropolitan Area,
August 1965 (1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia, Metropolitan Area, Septem­
ber 1965 (1965).
71

-8
-9

-1 0

-1 1
-1 2

-1 3

-1 4

-1 5
-1 6

-1 7

-1 8
-1 9
-2 0

-2 1

-2 2

-2 3
-2 4
-2 5

-2 6
-2 7

Area Wage Survey, The Cleveland, Ohio,
M etropolitan Area, September 1965 (1 9 6 5 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Seattle-Everett,
Washington, Metropolitan Area, October
1965 (1 9 6 5 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Raleigh, North Caro­
lina, M etropolitan Area, September 1965
(1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Wichita, Kansas,
M etropolitan Area, October 1965 (1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Boston, Massachu­
setts, M etropolitan Area, October 1965
(1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Omaha, N ebraskaIowa, M etropolitan Area, October 1965
(1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Washington, D .C .M d.-V a., M etropolitan Area, October 1965
(1965).
Area Wage Survey, The Columbus, Ohio,
Metropolitan Area, October 1965 (1965).
Area Wage Survey, The D avenport-R ock
Island-M oline, Iowa-Illinois, Metropolitan
Area, October 1965 (1 9 6 5 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Sioux Falls, South
Dakota, M etropolitan Area, October 1965
(1 9 6 5 ) .
Area Wage Survey, The Waterloo, Iowa,
M etropolitan Area, November 1965 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The San Jose, California,
Metropolitan Area, September 1965 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The San B ernardinoRiverside-Ontario, California, M etropolitan
Area, September 1965 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The San Diego, Califor­
nia, Metropolitan Area, November 1965
(1 9 6 6 ) .
Area Wage Survey, The St. Louis, M issouriIllinois, M etropolitan Area, October 1965
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Portland, Maine,
M etropolitan Area, November 1965 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Dallas, Texas,
Metropolitan Area, November 1965 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Youngstown-W ar­
ren, Ohio, M etropolitan Area, November
1965 (1 966).
Area Wage Survey, The Fort Worth, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, November 1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Kansas City, Mis­

72



-2 8
-2 9
-3 0
-31

-3 2

-3 3
-3 4

-3 5

-3 6
-3 7

-3 8

-3 9
-4 0
-4 1
-4 2

-4 3

-4 4
-4 5
-4 6

-4 7

souri-Kansas, M etropolitan Area, November
1965 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Richmond, Virginia,
M etropolitan Area, November 1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Baltimore, Maryland,
M etropolitan Area, November 1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
A rea Wage Survey, The Miami, Florida,
M etropolitan Area, December 1965 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Indianapolis, Indi­
ana, Metropolitan Area, December 1965
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Salt Lake City,
Utah, Metropolitan Area, December 1965
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Denver, Colorado,
M etropolitan Area, December 1965 (19 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Trenton, New Jer­
sey, M etropolitan Area, December 1965
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania-New Jersey, M etropolitan Area,
November 1965 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Buffalo, New York,
M etropolitan Area, January 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The New Haven, Con­
necticut, Metropolitan Area, January 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, M etropolitan Area, Janu­
ary 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Dayton, Ohio, M etro­
politan Area, January 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The York, Pennsylvania,
M etropolitan Area, February 1966 (19 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Jacksonville, Florida,
M etropolitan Area, January 1966 (19 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Memphis, Tennes­
see-Arkansas, M etropolitan Area, January
1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The San Francisco-O akland, California, Metropolitan Area, January
1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Jackson, Mississippi,
M etropolitan Area, February 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Detroit, Michigan,
M etropolitan Area, January 1966 (1966).
A rea Wage Survey, The Pittsburgh, Penn­
sylvania, M etropolitan Area, January 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The New Orleans, Louisi­

-4 8
-4 9

-5 0

-5 1

-5 2

-5 3

-5 4
-5 5
-5 6
-5 7

-5 8
-5 9

-6 0

-6 1
-6 2
-6 3

-6 4

-6 5

ana, M etropolitan Area, February 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Des Moines, Iowa,
M etropolitan Area, February 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Toledo, Ohio-M ichigan, M etropolitan Area, February 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Newark and Jersey
City, New Jersey, M etropolitan Area, Febru­
ary 1966 (1 966).
A rea Wage Survey, The Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana, M etropolitan Area, February
1966 (1 966).
Area Wage Survey, The Waterbury, Connec­
ticut, M etropolitan Area, March 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Allentown-Bethlehem -Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey, M et­
ropolitan Area, February 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Burlington, Vermont,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The South Bend, Indiana,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1966 (19 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Birmingham, Ala­
bama, M etropolitan Area, April 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Cincinnati, O hioKentucky-Indiana, M etropolitan Area, March
1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Canton, Ohio, M et­
ropolitan Area, April 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Los Angeles-Long
Beach and A naheim -Santa A na-G arden
Grove, California, M etropolitan Area, M arch
1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Albany-Schenectady-T roy, New York, M etropolitan Area,
April 1966 (1 966).
Area Wage Survey, The Milwaukee, Wiscon­
sin, M etropolitan Area, April 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Phoenix, Arizona,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The B eaum ont-Port
A rthur-O range, Texas, M etropolitan Area,
May 1966 (1 9 66).
A rea Wage Survey, The Albuquerque, New
Mexico, M etropolitan Area, April 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Providence-Pawtucket-W arwick, Rhode Island-M assachusetts, M etropolitan Area, May 1966 (19 6 6 ).




-6 6
-6 7

-6 8
-6 9
-7 0

-71
-7 2

-7 3

-7 4

-7 5
-7 6

-7 7

-7 8
-7 9
—
80

-8 1
-8 2
-8 3

-8 4
-8 5
-8 6

Area Wage Survey, The Rockford, Illinois,
M etropolitan Area, May 1966 (1966).
A rea Wage Survey, The Charlotte, North
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, April 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Chicago, Illinois,
M etropolitan Area, April 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Savannah, Georgia,
M etropolitan Area, May 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Charleston, West
Virginia, M etropolitan Area, April 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Atlanta, Georgia,
M etropolitan Area, May 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The M uskegon-M uskegon Heights, Michigan, M etropolitan Area,
May 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Portland, O regonWashington, M etropolitan Area, May 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Greenville, South
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, May 1966
(1966).
A rea Wage Survey, The Spokane, Washing­
ton, Metropolitan Area, June 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
A rea Wage Survey, The P aterson-C liftonPassaic, New Jersey, M etropolitan Area,
May 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
A rea Wage Survey, The Norfolk-Portsm outh
and Newport N ews-Ham pton, Virginia,
M etropolitan Area, June 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The San Antonio, Texas,
Metropolitan Area, June 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Lubbock, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, June 1966 (19 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Lawrence—
Haverhill,
M assachusetts-New Hampshire, Metropoli­
tan Area, June 1966 (19 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Akron, Ohio, M etro­
politan Area, June 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The New York, New
York, M etropolitan Area, April 1966 (1966).
A rea Wage Survey, The Worcester, Massa­
chusetts, M etropolitan Area, June 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The M idland and Odessa,
Texas, Metropolitan Area, June 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Houston, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, June 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Wages and Related Benefits, Part I: 84 M et­
ropolitan Areas, 1965-66 (19 6 6 ).

73

-8 6

1466
1467
1468
1469

1470
1471

1472
1473
1474

1475

1476
1477

1478
1479

1480

See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Wages and Related Benefits, Part II: M etro­
politan Areas, United States and Regional
Summaries, 1965-66 (1967).
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
Industry Wage Survey, Banking, N ovem berDecember 1964 (1965).
Industry Wage Survey, Communications,
1964 (1 9 6 5 ).
Impact of Office Automation in the Insurance
Industry (1 9 6 6).
National Survey of Professional, Administra­
tive, Technical, and Clerical Pay, F ebruaryMarch 1965 (1 9 6 5 ).
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.
Supplementary Compensation for Nonpro­
duction Workers, 1963 (1966).
Wage Chronology: Massachusetts Shoe
Manufacturing, 1945-66 (1 9 6 6 ).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Cigarette M anufac­
turing, July-August 1965 (1965).
Bibliography on Labor in Africa, 1960-64
(1965).
Technological Trends in M ajor American
Industries (1 9 66).
Presents a detailed study of the technologi­
cal changes in 40 American industries for
the period 1947-64. Analyzes, by industry,
the impact of changes in technology on pro­
duction, productivity, occupational require­
ments, and employment. Projects trends
through 1970, particularly trends for employ­
ment and occupational requirements.
Wage Chronology: Berkshire Hathaway, Inc.,
1943-66 (1 9 65).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Machinery M anufac­
turing, A pril-June 1965 (1965).
Digest of 50 Selected Pension Plans for Sal­
aried Employees, Summer 1965 (1966).
Revision of Bull. 1373.
Industry Wage Survey, Paperboard Contain­
ers and Boxes, November 1964 (1966).
Wage Chronology: International Shoe Com­
pany, 1945-66 (1966).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Premium Pay Provisions for Weekend Work

74



1481

1482

1483
1484

1485

1486

1487

1488

1489

1490
1491

1492
1493

1494

in Seven Continuous-Process Industries, 1966
(1966).
Wage Chronology: Armour and Company,
1941-67 (1 9 6 6 ).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
National Emergency Disputes Under the
Labor Management Relations (Taft-H artley) Act, 1947-65 (1 9 6 6 ).
See Bull. 1633 this listing for annotation.
Financing Supplemental Unemployment Bene­
fit Plans (1966).
Wage Chronology: Firestone Tire and R ub­
ber Co. and B. F. Goodrich Co. (A kron
Plants), 1937-66 (1 9 6 7 ).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Private Pension Plan Benefits (1 9 6 6 ).
Analyzes the types and levels of benefits
available for normal, disability, and early
retirement under private pension plans in
the United States. Also covered are vesting
provisions, supplementary pension plans, and
death benefits. F or an analysis of the impli­
cations for labor mobility of vesting, early
retirement, and portability provisions, see
Bull. 1407 this listing.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit
Operating Employees, July 1, 1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1965 (1966).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1965 (1966).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Labor and Material Requirements for Sewer
Works Construction (1966).
Wage Chronology: Pacific Longshore Indus­
try, 1934-65 (19 6 6 ).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Nursing Homes and
Related Facilities, April 1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
Directory of National and International L a­
bor Unions in the United States, 1965 (1966).
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Wage Chronology: Anthracite Mining Indus­
try, 1930-66 (1966).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.

1495

1496

1497

1498
1499

1500
1501
-1

-2
-3
—
4

-5

-6

-7
1502

Wage Chronology: Dan River Mills, 194365 (1 9 6 6 ).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Wood Household
Furniture, Except Upholstered, M ay-June
1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
Labor Digests on Countries in Europe
(1966).
Made up of digests on labor conditions in
29 European countries. The digests appearing
are: Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria,
Cyprus, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Finland,
France, East Germany, Federal Republic of
Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy,
Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway,
Poland, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, Sweden,
Switzerland, U.S.S.R., United Kingdom, and
Yugoslavia.
Industry Wage Survey, Nonferrous Foun­
dries, June-July 1965 (1966).
Wage Chronology: Pacific Gas and Electric
Co., 1943-66 (19 6 6 ).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Salaries for Selected Occupations in Services
for the Blind, January 1966 (1966).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail
Trade, June 1965 (1967).
Employee Earnings and Hours at Retail
Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm
Equipment Dealers, June 1965 (1966).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Gen­
eral M erchandise Stores, June 1965 (1966).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail
Food Stores, June 1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
Employee Earnings and Hours at Retail
Automotive Dealers and in Gasoline Service
Stations, June 1965 (1966).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail
Apparel and Accessory Stores, June 1965
(1966).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household
Appliance Stores, June 1965 (1966).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Miscellane­
ous Retail Stores, June 1965 (1966).
Digest of 100 Selected Health and Insurance
Plans Under Collective Bargaining, Early
1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Revision of Bull. 1330. See also Bull. 1629
this listing.




1503
1504
1505

1506
1507
1508
1509
1510
1511

1512

1513

Industry Wage Survey, Footwear, April 1965
(1966).
Salary Trends: City Public School Teachers,
1925-65 (1966).
Wage Indexes: Long-Term Trend D ata for
Selected Occupations and M etropolitan
Areas, 1907-66 (1966).
See also Bull. 1427.
Industry Wage Survey, Cotton
Textiles,
September 1965 (1966).
Industry Wage Survey, Contract Cleaning
Services, Summer 1965 (1966).
Industry Wage Survey, Women’s and Misses’
Coats and Suits, August 1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
Industry Wage Survey, Synthetic Textiles,
September 1965 (1966).
Price Trends, March 1966 (1966).
The Negroes in the United States: Their
Economic and Social Situation (1966).
Presents a comprehensive discussion of the
economic and social situation of the Negroes
— employment and unemployment, education,
and living conditions, such as health and
housing. Suggests some elements that may be
retarding the progress of Negroes toward
economic security. This bulletin updates
“Economic Status of the Negro,” which was
prepared at the request of the Planning Ses­
sion for the White House Conference “To
Fulfill These Rights,” held November 17-18,
1965. The sourcebook of tabulations used by
working staff in advance of the conference
has been included in this bulletin.
See Bull. 1119 this listing. See also Rpts.
347 and 375, and see Bull. 1699 this listing
for annotation.
Technician Manpower: Requirements, R e­
sources, and Training Needs (1 9 6 6 ).
See Bull. 1639 this listing for annotation.
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes, 1963
(1966).
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting
primary m arket prices and index numbers
(relative prices) dating back to 1890. The
first bulletin in this series, published in 1900,
was designed to bring up to date as nearly
as practicable the record of prices in a report
of the United States Committee on Finance
for 1840 to 1891 (S. Rept. No. 1394, 52d
Cong., 2d Sess.). Bulletins have been pub­
lished annually through 1931 (except for the
75

1514
1515

1516

1517

1518
1519
1520

1521
1522

1523

1524
1525
1526
1527
1528
1529
1530
-1

war years 1917 and 1918) and again begin­
ning in 1942.
Productivity: A Bibliography, July 1966
(1966).
Wage Chronology: Chrysler Corporation,
1939-66 (1 9 6 7 ).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Weathering Layoffs in a Small Community:
Case Studies of Displaced Pottery and C ar­
pet-Mill Workers (19 6 6 ).
The Consumer Price Index: History and
Techniques (1966).
See also Bulls. 699, 710, 966, 1039, 1165,
1256, 1554, and 1647.
Unit Labor Cost in Manufacturing: Trends
in Nine Countries, 1950-65 (1966).
Industry Wage Survey, Southern Sawmills
and Planing Mills, October 1965 (1966).
Industry Wage Survey, Candy and Other
Confectionery Products, September 1965
(1966).
Industry Wage Survey, Communications,
1965 (1 9 6 7 ).
Wage
Chronology:
Lockheed-Califomia
Company (a Division of Lockheed Aircraft
C orp.), 1937-67 (1 9 6 7 ).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Job Redesign for Older Workers: Ten Case
Studies (1 9 6 7 ).
Presents various techniques industry is
using to help older workers meet the require­
ments of new jobs. Job redesign is attracting
more interest than formerly, since 40 percent
of the labor force is composed of workers 45
years of age and older.
Industry Wage Survey, Paints and Varnishes,
November 1965 (1966).
Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1965 (1966).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Petroleum Refining,
December 1965 (19 6 6 ).
Industry Wage Survey, Textile Dyeing and
Finishing, Winter 1965-66 (19 6 6 ).
Compensation Expenditures and Payroll
Hours, Pipelines, 1964 (1967).
Industry Wage Survey, Industrial Chemicals,
November 1965 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Little R ock-N orth
Little Rock, Arkansas, M etropolitan Area,
August 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).

76



-2
-3

-4

-5

-6

-7

-8

-9

-1 0
-1 1
-1 2

-1 3
-1 4

-1 5

-1 6

-1 7
-1 8

-1 9

-2 0

A rea Wage Survey, The Boise City, Idaho,
M etropolitan Area, July 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Scranton, Pennsyl­
vania, M etropolitan Area, August 1966
(1966).
A rea Wage Survey, The M anchester, New
Hampshire, M etropolitan Area, August 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Green Bay, Wis­
consin, Metropolitan Area, August 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, Metropolitan Area, August 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Raleigh, N orth
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, September
1966 (1966).
A rea Wage Survey, The Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia, M etropolitan Area, Septem­
ber 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
A rea Wage Survey, The Tam pa-St. Peters­
burg, Florida, M etropolitan Area, September
1966 (19 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The San Jose, California,
M etropolitan Area, September 1966 (1966).
A rea Wage Survey, The Wichita, Kansas,
M etropolitan Area, October 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Sioux Falls, South
Dakota, M etropolitan Area, October 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Cleveland, Ohio,
Metropolitan Area, September 1966 (1 9 6 6 ).
Area Wage Survey, The San B em ardinoRiverside-O ntario, California, M etropolitan
Area, September 1966 (1966).
A rea Wage Survey, The Washington, D .C .M d.-V a., M etropolitan Area, October 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Boston, Massachu­
setts, Metropolitan Area, October 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Portland, Maine,
M etropolitan Area, November 1966 (1966).
Area Wage Survey, The Omaha, N ebraskaIowa, M etropolitan Area, October 1966
(1966).
Area Wage Survey, The D avenport-R ock
Island-M oline, Iowa-Illinois, Metropolitan
Area, October 1966 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Columbus, Ohio,
M etropolitan Area, October 1966 (1 9 6 7 ).

-2 1
-2 2

-2 3
-2 4

-2 5
-2 6

-2 7

-2 8
-2 9

-3 0

-3 1
-3 2
-3 3

-3 4

-3 5

-3 6

-3 7

-3 8
-3 9
-4 0

Area Wage Survey, The Waterloo, Iowa,
M etropolitan Area, November 1966 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Seattle-Everett,
Washington, M etropolitan Area, October
1966 (1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Richmond, Virginia,
M etropolitan Area, November 1966 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The San Diego, Califor­
nia, M etropolitan Area, November 1966
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Dallas, Texas, Met­
ropolitan Area, November 1966 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas, M etropolitan Area, November
1966 (1 9 6 7 ).
A rea Wage Survey, The St. Louis, M issouriIllinois, M etropolitan Area, October 1966
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Fort Worth, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, November 1966 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Youngstown-W arren, Ohio, M etropolitan Area, November
1966 (1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Baltimore, M ary­
land, M etropolitan Area, November 1966
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Miami, Florida,
M etropolitan Area, December 1966 (1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Denver, Colorado,
M etropolitan Area, December 1966 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Salt Lake City,
Utah, M etropolitan Area, December 1966
(1967).
A rea Wage Survey, The Trenton, New Jer­
sey, M etropolitan Area, December 1966
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania-New Jersey, M etropolitan Area,
November 1966 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The San Francisco-O akland, California, M etropolitan Area, Janu­
ary 1967 (1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Indianapolis, In­
diana, M etropolitan Area, December 1966
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Buffalo, New York,
M etropolitan Area, December 1966 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Jacksonville, Flor­
ida, M etropolitan Area, January 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Memphis, Tennes­




-4 1

-4 2

-4 3
-4 4
-4 5
-4 6

-4 7
-4 8
-4 9

-5 0

-51

-5 2

-5 3

-5 4

-5 5

-5 6

-5 7

-5 8

see-Arkansas, Metropolitan Area, January
1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The New Haven, Con­
necticut, M etropolitan Area, January 1967
(1967).
A rea Wage Survey, The Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, M etropolitan Area, Janu­
ary 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Jackson, Mississippi,
M etropolitan Area, February 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Des Moines, Iowa,
M etropolitan Area, February 1967 (19 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Dayton, Ohio, Met­
ropolitan Area, January 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Pittsburgh, Penn­
sylvania, Metropolitan Area, January 1967
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The York, Pennsylvania,
Metropolitan Area, February 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Detroit, Michigan,
M etropolitan Area, January 1967 (19 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana, Metropolitan Area, February
1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Toledo, Ohio-M ichigan, Metropolitan Area, February 1967
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The New Orleans, Louisi­
ana, M etropolitan Area, February 1967
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Burlington, V er­
mont, Metropolitan Area, M arch 1967
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Allentown-Bethlehem -Easton,
Pennsylvania-New
Jersey,
M etropolitan Area, February 1967 (1967).
A rea Wage Survey, The Waterbury, Connec­
ticut, M etropolitan Area, M arch 1967
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Newark and Jersey
City, New Jersey, Metropolitan Area, Feb­
ruary 1967 (1967).
Area
Wage
Survey,
The
Cincinnati,
O hio-K entucky-Indiana, M etropolitan Area,
March 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The South Bend, In­
diana, M etropolitan Area, March 1967
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Canton, Ohio, M et­
ropolitan Area, April 1967 (1 9 6 7 ).

77

-59
-60

-61

-62

-63
-64

-65

-66

-67

-68
-69
■70

-71
-72

-73
■74

-75
-76

•77

Area Wage Survey, The Phoenix, Arizona,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Albuquerque, New
Mexico,
M etropolitan Area, April 1967
(1 967).
Area Wage Survey, The Charleston, West
Virginia,
M etropolitan Area, April 1967
(1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M etropolitan Area,
April 1967 (1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Birmingham, Ala­
bama, M etropolitan Area, April 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Charlotte, North
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, April 1967
(1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Los Angeles-Long
Beach and Anaheim -Santa A na-G arden
Grove, California, M etropolitan Area, M arch
1967 (1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Greenville, South
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, May 1967
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Paterson-C liftonPassaic, New Jersey, Metropolitan Area,
May 1967 (1 967).
Area Wage Survey, The Rockford, Illinois,
M etropolitan Area, May 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Savannah, Georgia,
M etropolitan Area, May 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Providence-Pawtucket—
Warwick, Rhode Island—
Massachu­
setts, M etropolitan Area, May 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Atlanta, Georgia,
Metropolitan Area, May 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The M uskegon-M uskegon Heights, Michigan, M etropolitan Area,
May 1967 (1 967).
Area Wage Survey, The Chicago, Illinois,
M etropolitan Area, April 1967 (19 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The B eaum ont-Port A r­
thur-O range, Texas, M etropolitan Area, May
1967 (1 9 67).
Area Wage Survey, The Lubbock, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, June 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Milwaukee, Wis­
consin, M etropolitan Area, April 1967
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Law rence-Haverhill, M assachusetts-New Hampshire, M etro­
politan Area, June 1967 (1967).

78



-7 8
-7 9
-8 0
-81

-8 2

-8 3
-8 4
-8 5
-8 6
-8 7

-8 7

1531
1532

1533

1534

1535

1536

A rea Wage Survey, The M idland and Odessa,
Texas, M etropolitan Area, June 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Portland, Oregon,
M etropolitan Area, May 1967 (1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Spokane, Washing­
ton, M etropolitan Area, June 1967 (1 9 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Worcester, Massa­
chusetts, M etropolitan Area, June 1967
(1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Norfolk-Portsm outh
and Newport N ews-Ham pton, Virginia, M et­
ropolitan Area, June 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The New York, New
York, M etropolitan Area, April 1967 (1967).
A rea Wage Survey, The San Antonio, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, June 1967 (1967).
Area Wage Survey, The Houston, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, June 1967 (19 6 7 ).
Area Wage Survey, The Akron, Ohio, M etro­
politan Area, June 1967 (1967).
Wages and Related Benefits, Part I: 85
M etropolitan Areas, 1966-67 (1 9 6 7 ).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Wages and Related Benefits, Part II: M etro­
politan Areas, United States, and Regional
Summaries, 1966-67 (1 9 6 8 ).
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
Industry Wage Survey, Fertilizer M anufac­
turing, M arch-A pril 1966 (1967).
Wage Chronology: General Motors Corp.,
1939-66 (1966).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight M et­
ropolitan Areas of the South, June 1965
(1 9 6 6 ) .
See also Bulls. 1416 and 1552.
Wage Chronology: International Paper Com­
pany, Southern Kraft Division, 1937-67
(1 9 6 7 ) .
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
National Survey of Professional, Administra­
tive, Technical, and Clerical Pay, F ebruaryMarch 1966 (1966).
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.
Projections 1970: Interindustry Relation­
ships, Potential Demand, Employment
(1966).
Presents 1970 projections of potential de­
mand, interindustry relationships, and em­

1537
1538
1539

1540
1541

1542
1543
1544
1545

1546

1547

1548

ployment under alternative assumptions
regarding rates and patterns of growth. In­
cludes a comprehensive study of the frame­
work for the projections. Potential output
in 1970 is projected and distributed among
categories of final demand. Final demand is
shown in a detailed “bill of goods.” The
interindustry employment table is used to
convert the projections of final demand for
goods and services into estimates of industry
employment requirements. The projections
contained in this bulletin are not forecasts,
but provide detailed and consistent projec­
tions of what the economy may look like
in 1970. See also Bull. 1673 this listing.
Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour, Selected
Industries, 1939 and 1947-65 (1966).
Industry Wage Survey, Women’s and Misses’
Dresses, March 1966 (1967).
Labor Digests on Countries in Africa (1966).
Contains digests on labor conditions in 51
African countries. Each digest includes a
brief statement concerning the political, eco­
nomic, and social conditions of the country.
Information is presented on employment
and unemployment; productivity; labor leg­
islation; wages, hours, prices, and level of
living; employer organizations; and labor
management relations.
Industry Wage Survey, Synthetic Fibers,
February-A pril 1966 (1967).
Wage Chronology: Berkshire Hathaway,
Inc., 1943-69 (1 9 6 7 ).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Motion Picture
Theaters, April 1966 (1967).
Price Perspective, 1965, 1966, 1967 (1968).
Industry Wage Survey, Laundry and Clean­
ing Services, M id-1966 (1967).
Wage Chronology: Western Union Tele­
graph Co., 1943-67 (1967).
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1966 (1967).
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1966 (1967).
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1966 (1967).
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.




1549

1550

1551
1552

1553
1554

1555
1556

1557

1558

1559

1560

1561

Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1966 (1967).
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1968-69
Edition (1968).
See Bull. 1700 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey, Wool Textiles, No­
vember 1966 (1967).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetro­
politan Areas of the South and North Central
Regions, June 1965 (1 9 6 7 ).
See also Bulls. 1416 and 1533.
Industry Wage Survey, Hospitals, July 1966
(1967).
The Consumer Price Index: Technical
Notes, 1959-63 (1967).
Contains a summary of technical changes
made in the Consumer Price Index data col­
lection and calculation procedures during
the period from 1959 through 1963. These
changes include rebasing from 1947-49 =
100 to 1957-59 = 100; improvements in
price collection through expansion of the out­
let samples; and improvements in the meas­
urement of the effects of quality changes. The
bulletin also includes tables of indexes for
the U.S. city average and for individual cities.
See also Bulls. 699, 710, 966, 1039, 1165,
1256, 1517, and 1647.
Handbook of Labor Statistics 1967 (1967).
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Clothing for Urban Families: Expenditures
per Member, by Sex and Age, 1960-61
(1967). 750.
Review of Occupational Employment Statis­
tics: Employment of Scientific, Professional,
and Technical Personnel in State Govern­
ments, January 1964 (1 9 6 7 ). 250.
Wage Chronology: Bituminous Coal Mines,
1933-68 (1967). 250.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Wage Chronology: Aluminum Co. of
America, 1939-67 (1 9 6 7 ). 300.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Wage Chronology: American Viscose, 194567 (1 9 6 7 ). 200.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Compensation Expenditures and Payroll
Hours: M otor Passenger Transportation In­
dustries, 1964 (1967). 400.

79

1562
1563
1564

1565

1566

1567

1568

1569
1570
-1

-2

-3

Industry Wage Survey: Hosiery, September
1967 (1 9 6 8 ). 70$.
Industry Wage Survey: Machinery M anufac­
turing, M id-1966 (1967). 700.
Wage Chronology: North American Avia­
tion, Inc., 1941-67 (1 9 6 7 ). 250.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Wage Chronology: The Boeing Co. (W ash­
ington Plants) 1936-70 (1967). 250.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey: Crude Petroleum and
Natural Gas Production, August 1967
(1968). 300.
Publications of the Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics, 1886-1967 (1 9 6 8 ).
This bulletin replaces Bull. 1281. Con­
tains an annotated list of all numbered BLS
bulletins from 1886 to 1967, a complete nu­
merical listing of BLS reports, and a sub­
ject index of bulletins and reports from 1915
to 1967. Also listed are major periodicals
and other publications of general interest.
Replaced by this bulletin.
Wage Chronology: Pacific Longshore Indus­
try, 1934-70 (1 9 6 8 ). 350.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey: Life Insurance, October-Novem ber 1966 (1967). 300.
City W orker’s Family Budget for a M oder­
ate Living Standard, Autumn 1966 (1967).
Presents living costs for a family of four
persons: an employed husband, age 38; a
wife not employed; and two children, a girl
age 8 and a boy 13. The level of living is
described as moderate; it provides for main­
tenance of health and social well-being, the
nurture of children, and participation in com­
munity activities.
Revised Equivalence Scale: For Estimating
Equivalent Incomes or Budget Costs, by
Family Type (19 6 8 ).
Family equivalence scales are measures
to determine the relative income required by
families differing in composition to maintain
equivalent levels of consumption. The scales
in this bulletin may be applied to the base,
or moderate, level described for a family of
four in Bull. 1570-1.
City W orker’s Family Budget: Pricing, Pro­

80



-4

-5

-6

1571
1572
1573
1574

1575
-1

-2

-3
-4

cedures, Specifications, and Average Prices,
Autum n 1966 (1 9 6 8 ).
Retired Couple’s Budget for a M oderate Liv­
ing Standard, Autumn 1966 (1 9 6 8 ).
The cost estimates in this study are for an
urban family of two persons: a husband age
65 or over and his wife. They are assumed
to be self-supporting and living independ­
ently. The budget specifies that both husband
and wife are in reasonably good health and
able to take care of themselves, and that each
is covered by hospital and medical insurance
under the Federal medicare program. Twothirds of the families are homeowners, living
in mortgage-free houses.
Three Standards of Living for an Urban Fam ­
ily of Four Persons, Spring 1967 (1969).
Presents moderate, lower, and higher bud­
gets for the family of four persons specified
in Bull. 1570-1. The lower budget specifies
a lower proportion of homeownership and
the higher budget a greater percentage of
homeownership than the m oderate budget.
Three Budgets for a Retired Couple in Urban
Areas of the United States, 1967-68 (1 9 7 0 );
Supp., 1969-70 (19 7 1 ).
Presents budgets for lower, intermediate,
and higher levels of consumption for the re­
tired couple described in Bull. 1570-4.
Compensation Expenditures and Payroll
Hours: Air Transportation, 1964 (1967).
Indexes of Output per M an-Hour: Selected
Industries, 1939 and 1947-66 (1967).
Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1966 (1968).
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Manpower Planning for Technological
Change: Case Studies of Telephone O pera­
tors (1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Manchester, New
Hampshire, M etropolitan Area, July 1967
(1967). 200.
Area Wage Survey, The Little R ock-N orth
Little Rock, Arkansas, M etropolitan Area,
July 1967 (1 9 6 7 ). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Boise City, Idaho,
M etropolitan Area, July 1967 (1 9 6 7 ). 200.
Area Wage Survey, The Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, M etropolitan Area, July 1967
(1967). 200.

-5
-6

-7

-8

-9

-1 0

-1 1

-1 2

-1 3

-1 4

-1 5

-1 6

-1 7

-1 8

-1 9

-2 0
-2 1

-2 2

A rea Wage Survey, The Green Bay, Wisconsin,
Metropolitan Area, July 1967 (19 6 7 ). 200.
Area Wage Survey, The Raleigh, North
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, August 1967
(1967). 25$.
^
Area Wage Survey, The Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia, Metropolitan Area, August
1967 (1 9 6 7 ). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Tam pa-St. Peters­
burg, Florida, Metropolitan Area, August
1967 (1 9 6 7 ). 250.
A rea Wage Survey, The Scranton, Pennsyl­
vania, Metropolitan Area, July 1967 (1 9 6 7 ).
250.
Area Wage Survey, The San B em ardinoRiverside-Ontario, California, Metropolitan
Area, August 1967 (1967). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Washington, D .C .M d.-V a., M etropolitan Area, September
1967 (1 9 67). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The D avenport-R ock
Island-M oline, Iowa-Illinois, Metropolitan
Area, October 1967 (1 9 6 7 ). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Boston, Massachu­
setts, M etropolitan Area, September 1967
(1 9 6 7 ) . 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Cleveland, Ohio,
M etropolitan Area, September 1967 (1967).
250.
A rea Wage Survey, The San Jose, California,
M etropolitan Area, September 1967 (1968).
250.
Area Wage Survey, The Portland, Maine,
M etropolitan Area, November 1967 (1968).
250.
Area Wage Survey, The Sioux Falls, South
Dakota, M etropolitan Area, October 1967
(1 9 6 8 ) . 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Baltimore, M ary­
land, M etropolitan Area, October 1967
(1968). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The San Diego, Cali­
fornia, M etropolitan Area, November 1967
(1968). 200.
Area Wage Survey, The Dallas, Texas, M etro­
politan Area, November 1967 (1968). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Omaha, N ebraskaIowa, M etropolitan Area, October 1967
(1968). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The F ort Worth, Texas,




-2 3

-2 4

-2 5

-2 6

M etropolitan Area, November 1967 (1968).
250.
A rea Wage Survey, The Columbus, Ohio,
M etropolitan Area, October 1967 (1968).
250.
Area Wage Survey, The Trenton, New Jer­
sey, M etropolitan Area, November 1967
(1968). 200.
Area Wage Survey, The Youngstown-W arren, Ohio, Metropolitan Area, November
1967 (1 9 6 8 ). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Waterloo, Iowa,
M etropolitan Area, November 1967 (1968).

200.
-2 7

-2 8

-2 9

-3 0

-3 1

Area Wage Survey, The Richmond, Virginia,
Metropolitan Area, November 1967 (19 6 8 ).
250.
A rea Wage Survey, The Miami, Florida,
M etropolitan Area, December 1967 (1 9 6 8 ).
250.
Area Wage Survey, The Seattle-Everett,
Washington, M etropolitan Area, November
1967 (1 9 6 8 ). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas, M etropolitan Area, Novem­
ber 1967 (1968). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Witchita, Kansas
Metropolitan Area, December 1967 (1968).

200.
-3 2

-3 3

Area Wage Survey, The Memphis,
see-Arkansas, Metropolitan Area,
1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Jacksonville,
M etropolitan Area, January 1968

TennesJanuary
Florida,
(1 9 6 8 ).

200.
-3 4

-3 5

Area Wage Survey, The New Haven, Con­
necticut, Metropolitan Area, January 1968
(1968). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Salt Lake City, Utah,
Metropolitan Area, December 1967 (1968).

200.
-3 6

-3 7

-3 8

-39

Area Wage Survey, The Indianapolis, In­
diana, M etropolitan Area, December 1967
(1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The San FranciscoOakland, California, M etropolitan Area,
January 1968 (1968). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Denver, Colorado,
M etropolitan Area, December 1967 (1968).
250.

Area Wage Survey, The St. Louis, Missouri81

-4 0

-41

-4 2

-4 3

-4 4

-4 5

-4 6

-4 7

-4 8

-4 9

-5 0

-51
-5 2

-5 3

-5 4

-5 5

-5 6

Illinois, M etropolitan Area, January 1968
(1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania-New Jersey, M etropolitan Area, No­
vember 1967 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Buffalo, New York,
M etropolitan Area, December 1967 (1968).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The York, Pennsylvania,
M etropolitan Area, February 1968 (1968).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Toledo, O hioMichigan, M etropolitan Area, February
1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Pittsburgh, Penn­
sylvania, M etropolitan Area, January 1968
(1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Detroit, Michigan,
M etropolitan Area, January 1968 (1968).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The New Orleans,
Louisiana, M etropolitan Area, February
1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The M inneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, M etropolitan Area, Janu­
ary 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Burlington, V er­
mont, M etropolitan Area, March 1968
(1 9 6 8 ). 200.
Area Wage Survey, The Jackson, Mississippi,
M etropolitan Area, February 1968 (1968).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Louisville, Ken­
tucky—
Indiana, M etropolitan Area, Febru­
ary 1968 (1 9 68). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Dayton, Ohio, M etro­
politan Area, January 1968 (1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Des Moines, Iowa,
M etropolitan Area, February 1968 (1 9 6 8 ),
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Waterbury, Con­
necticut, M etropolitan Area, April 1968
(1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Newark and Jersey
City, New Jersey, Metropolitan Area, Feb­
ruary 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Phoenix, Arizona,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1968 (1968).
300.

Area Wage Survey, The South Bend, In­

82



-5 7

-5 8

-5 9

-6 0

-6 1

-6 2

-6 3

-6 4

-6 5
-6 6

-6 7

-6 8

-6 9
-7 0
-7 1
-7 2

-7 3
-7 4

diana, M etropolitan Area, M arch 1968
(19 6 8 ). 300.
A rea Wage Survey, The Charlotte, N orth
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, April 1968
(19 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Albuquerque, New
Mexico, M etropolitan Area, April 1968
(1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Birmingham, Ala­
bama, M etropolitan Area, April 1968
(1968). 300.
A rea Wage Survey, The M uskegon-M uskegon Heights, Michigan, M etropolitan Area,
May 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Providence-Pawtucket-W arwick, Rhode Island-M assachusetts, M etropolitan Area, May 1968 (1 9 6 8 ).
300.
A rea Wage Survey, The Cincinnati, O hioK entucky-Indiana,
M etropolitan
Area,
March 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Charleston, West
Virginia, M etropolitan Area, April 1968
(1968). 300.
A rea Wage Survey, The Los Angeles-Long
Beach and A naheim -Santa A na-G arden
Grove, California, M etropolitan Area, M arch
1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Canton, Ohio, M et­
ropolitan Area, June 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Greenville, South
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, May 1968
(1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Milwaukee, Wiscon­
sin, Metropolitan Area, April 1968 (1968).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M etropolitan Area,
April 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The San Antonio, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, June 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Rockford, Illinois,
M etropolitan Area, May 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Atlanta, Georgia,
M etropolitan Area, May 1968 (19 6 8 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Midland and Odessa,
Texas, M etropolitan Area, June 1968 (1968).
300.
A rea Wage Survey, The Savannah, Georgia,
Metropolitan Area, May 1968 (19 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Law rence-H aver-

-7 5

-7 6

-7 7
-7 8

-7 9

-8 0

-8 1
-8 2
-8 3

-8 4
-8 5

-8 6

-8 7

-8 7

1576

1577

hill, M assachusetts-New Hampshire, M etro­
politan Area, June 1968 (1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The B eaum ont-Port A r­
thur-O range, Texas, Metropolitan Area,
May 1968 (1 968). 300,
Area Wage Survey, The Worcester, Massa­
chusetts, M etropolitan Area, June 1968
(1 9 6 8 ). 30^.
Area Wage Survey, The Lubbock, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, June 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The New York, New
York, M etropolitan Area, April 1968 (1968).
500.
Area Wage Survey, The Spokane, Washing­
ton, Metropolitan Area, June 1968 (1968).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Portland, O regonWashington, Metropolitan Area, May 1968
(1968). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Chicago, Illinois,
Metropolitan Area, April 1968 (1968). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Houston, Texas,
Metropolitan Area, June 1968 (1968). 450.
Area Wage Survey, The Paterson-C liftonPassaic, New Jersey, Metropolitan Area, May
1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Akron, Ohio, M etro­
politan Area, July 1968 (1968). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Norfolk-Portsmouth and Newport News-Ham pton, Vir­
ginia, M etropolitan Area, June 1968 (1968).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Allentown-Bethlehem -Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey, Met­
ropolitan Area, June 1968 (1968). 400.
Wages and Related Benefits: Part I, 85
M etropolitan Areas, 1967-68 (1 9 6 9 ). $1.
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annotion.
Wages and Related Benefits: Part II. M etro­
politan Areas, United States and Regional
Summaries, 1967-68 (19 6 9 ). $1.25.
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
Industry Wage Survey: Flour and Other
Grain Mill Products, February 1967 (1967).
250.
Compensation Expenditures and Payroll
Hours: Water Transportation, 1964 (1968).
400.




1578
1579
1580

1581
1582
1583

1584
-1
-1

-2

-3
-4

-5

-6

Technology and Manpower in the Textile
Industry of the 1970’s (1968). 600.
Occupational Employment Statistics, 196066 (1968). 250.
An International Comparison of Unit Labor
Cost in the Iron and Steel Industry, 1964:
United States, France, Germany, United
Kingdom (1968). 400.
Industry Wage Survey: Cigar Manufacturing,
March 1967 (1967). 250.
Industry Wage Survey: Communications,
1966 (1968). 200.
Industry Wage Survey: Bituminous Coal
Mining— Part I, Underground Mines; Part
II, Surface Mines, January 1967 (1968).
500.
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail
Trade, June 1966 (1 9 6 8 ). $1.
Employee Earnings and Hours at Retail
Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm
Equipment Dealers, June 1966 (1968). 300.
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail
General Merchandise Stores, June 1966
(1968). 550.
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail
Food Stores, June 1966 (1 9 6 8 ). 600.
Employee Earnings and Hours at Retail
Automotive Dealers and in Gasoline Service
Stations, June 1966 (1968). 500.
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Ap­
parel and Accessory Stores, June 1966
(1968). 550,
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail
F u rn itu re , H o m e F u rn ish in g s, a n d H o u seh o ld

-7

1585

1586
1587
1588

Appliance Stores, June 1966 (1968). 500.
Employee Earnings and Hours in Miscel­
laneous Retail Stores, June 1966 (1968).
650.
National Survey of Professional, Administra­
tive, Technical, and Clerical Pay, June 1967
(1968). 500,
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.
Labor and Material Requirements for School
Construction (1968). 300.
Industry Wage Survey: Hotels and Motels,
October 1966 and April 1967 (1968). 400.
Industry Wage Survey: Eating and Drinking
Places, October 1966 and April 1967 (1968).
400.

83

1589

1590

1591

1592

1593
1594
1595

1596

1597

Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1967 (1968). 150.
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1967 (1968). 400.
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Drivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1967 (19 6 8 ). 350.
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1967 (1 9 6 8 ). 450.
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Wage Calendar, 1968 (1968). 450.
See Bull. 1724 this listing for annotation;
Industry Wage Survey: M en’s and Boys’ Suits
and Coats, April 1967 (1968). 750.
Wage Chronology: Western Greyhound
Lines, 1945-67 (1 9 6 8 ). 450.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Directory of National and International La­
bor Unions in the United States, 1967
(1 9 6 8 ) . 600.
See Bull. 1665 this listing for annotation.
Digest of 100 Selected Pension Plans under
Collective Bargaining, Spring 1968 (19 6 9 ).

1608

1609
1610
1611

1612
1613

1614

1615
1616

1617

$ 1.

1598
1599
1600

1601
1602
1603

1604

1605

1606

1607

Counselor’s Guide to Manpower Informa­
tion (1 9 6 8 ). $1.
Occupational Employment Patterns for 1960
and 1975 (1 968). $2.25.
Handbook of Labor Statistics 1968 (1968).
$2.50.
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Capital Flow Matrix, 1958 (1968). 700.
Industry Wage Survey: Basic Iron and Steel,
September 1967 (1 9 6 8 ). 550.
Wage Chronology: United States Steel Corp.,
1937-67 (1 9 6 8 ). 400.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Wage Chronology: Federal Classification
Act Employees, 1924-68 (1968). 700.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Wage Chronology: Pacific Coast Shipbuild­
ing, 1941-67 (1 9 6 8 ). 350.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Tomorrow’s Manpower Needs: Volume I
(1969) $1; Volume II (1969) $1.25; Vol­
ume III (1969) 550; Volume IV (1969) $2;
Supp. 1 (1 9 6 9 ); Supp. 2 (1970).
Wage Chronology: Bethlehem Atlantic Ship­
yards, 1941-68 (1 9 6 8 ). 350.

84



1618
1619
1620

1621

1622

1623

1624
1625
-1

-2

See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey: Pulp, Paper, and
Paperboard Mills, October 1967 (1 9 6 8 ).
600.
Scientific and Technical Personnel in Indus­
try, 1961-66 (1 9 6 8 ). $1.
On-the-Job Training and W age-Hour Stand­
ards in Foreign Countries (1 9 6 8 ). 600.
Analysis of W ork Stoppages, 1967 (1969).
600.
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Indexes of Output per M an-Hour: Selected
Industries, 1939 and 1947-67 (1 9 6 8 ). $1.
Indexes of Output per M an-Hour: M otor
Vehicles and Equipment Industry, 1957-66
(1 9 6 8 ) . 450.
Industry Wage Survey: Electric and Gas
Utilities, October-Novem ber 1967 (1969).
700.
Industry Wage Survey: Communications,
1967 (1969). 300.
Summary of Manufacturing Production
W orkers’ Earnings Series, 1939-68 (1969).
300.
National Survey of Professional, Administra­
tive, Technical, and Clerical Pay, June 1968
(1 9 6 9 ) . 750.
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey: Leather Tanning and
Finishing, January 1968 (1 9 6 9 ). 550.
Wage Calendar, 1969 (19 6 9 ). 650.
See Bull. 1724 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1968 (1969). 250.
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1968 (1 9 6 9 ). 550.
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: M otortruck Driv­
ers and Helpers, July 1, 1968 (1969). 500.
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1968 (1 9 6 9 ). 650.
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey: Work Clothing, Feb­
ruary 1968 (1 9 6 9 ). 500.
A rea Wage Survey, The U tica-Rom e, New
York, M etropolitan Area, July 1968 (1968).
350.

Area Wage Survey, The Rochester, New

York, Metropolitan Area, July 1968 (1968).
350.
-3
-4

-5
-6
-7

-8

-9

-1 0

-1 1

-1 2

-1 3

-1 4

-1 5

-1 6

-1 7

-1 8

-1 9

-2 0

Area Wage Survey, Binghamton, New York,
July 1968 (1 9 68). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Manchester, New
Hampshire, M etropolitan Area, July 1968
(1 9 6 8 ) . 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Syracuse, New York,
M etropolitan Area, July 1968 (1968). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Boise City, Idaho,
M etropolitan Area, July 1968 (1968). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Green Bay, Wiscon­
sin, M etropolitan Area, July 1968 (1968).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Baltimore, M ary­
land, M etropolitan Area, September 1968
(1 9 6 9 ) . 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, M etropolitan Area, July 1968
(1968). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Tam pa-St. Peters­
burg, Florida, Metropolitan Area, August
1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Little R ock-N orth
Little Rock, Arkansas, M etropolitan Area,
July 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Scranton, Pennsyl­
vania, M etropolitan Area, July 1968 (1968).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Raleigh, North
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, August 1968
(1 9 6 8 ) . 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia, M etropolitan Area, Septem­
ber 1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Boston, Massachu­
setts, M etropolitan Area, September 1968
(1 9 6 9 ) . 500.
Area Wage Survey, The D avenport-R ock Island-M oline, Iowa-Illinois, Metropolitan
Area, October 1968 (1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas, Metropolitan Area, Septem­
ber 1968 (1 9 69). 450.
Area Wage Survey, The Trenton, New Jer­
sey, M etropolitan Area, October 1968
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Cleveland, Ohio,
M etropolitan Area, September 1968 (1969).
500.

Area Wage Survey, The Portland, Maine,




-21

-2 2

-2 3

-2 4

-2 5

-2 6

-2 7

-2 8
-2 9

-3 0

-31

-3 2

-3 3

-3 4

-3 5

-3 6

-3 7

M etropolitan Area, November 1968 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The San Jose, California,
M etropolitan Area, September 1968 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Washington, D .C .M d.-V a., Metropolitan Area, September
1968 (19 6 9 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Sioux Falls, South
Dakota, Metropolitan Area, October 1968
(1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Columbus, Ohio,
M etropolitan Area, October 1968 (1969).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The San B ernardinoRiverside-O ntario, California, Metropolitan
Area, October 1968 (1969). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Omaha, N ebraskaIowa, M etropolitan Area, October 1968
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The F ort Worth, Texas,
Metropolitan Area, November 1968 (1969).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Dallas, Texas, M et­
ropolitan Area, November 1968 (1969). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Miami, Florida,
M etropolitan Area, December 1968 (1969).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Memphis, Tennessee-Arkansas, Metropolitan Area, Novem­
ber 1968 (1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Waterloo, Iowa,
Metropolitan Area, November 1968 (1969).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The San Diego, Cali­
fornia, M etropolitan Area, November 1968
(1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana, Metropolitan Area, Novem­
ber 1968 (1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Youngstown-W arren, Ohio, Metropolitan Area, November
1968 (1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Buffalo, New York,
M etropolitan Area, November 1968 (1969).
500.
Area Wage Survey, The Salt Lake City,
Utah, M etropolitan Area, December 1968
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Jacksonville, Florida,

85

Metropolitan Area, January 1969 (1969).
350.
-3 8

-3 9

-4 0

-4 1

-4 2
-4 3

-4 4

-4 5

-4 6

-4 7

-4 8

-4 9

-5 0

-5 1

-5 2

-5 3

-5 4

Area Wage Survey, The New Haven, Con­
necticut, M etropolitan Area, January 1969
(1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Denver, Colorado,
M etropolitan Area, December 1968 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Indianapolis, Indi­
ana, M etropolitan Area, December 1968
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Witchita, Kansas,
M etropolitan Area, December 1968 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Dayton, Ohio, Met­
ropolitan Area, January 1969 (1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Seattle-Everett,
Washington, M etropolitan Area, November
1968 (1 9 6 9 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The San FranciscoOakland, California, Metropolitan Area,
October 1968 (19 6 9 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Jackson, Mississippi,
M etropolitan Area, February 1969 (1969).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Newark and Jersey
City, New Jersey, Metropolitan Area, Janu­
ary 1969 (1 9 6 9 ). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, M etropolitan Area, Janu­
ary 1969 (1 969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania-New Jersey, Metropolitan Area,
November 1968 (1 9 6 9 ). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Midland and Odessa,
Texas, M etropolitan Area, March 1969
(1969). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Waterbury, Connec­
ticut, M etropolitan Area, M arch 1969 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The New Orleans, Louisi­
ana, M etropolitan Area, February 1969
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The York, Pennsylvania,
M etropolitan Area, February 1969 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Lubbock, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1969 (1969).
300.

Area Wage Survey, The Burlington, Ver­

86



-5 5

-5 6

-5 7

-5 8

-5 9

-6 0

-6 1

-6 2

-6 3

-6 4

-6 5

-6 6

-6 7

-6 8
-6 9

-7 0

-7 1

mont, M etropolitan Area, March 1969
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The South Bend, Indi­
ana, M etropolitan Area, M arch 1969 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M etropolitan Area,
March 1969 (1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Toledo, O hioMichigan, M etropolitan Area, February
1969 (1 9 6 9 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Detroit, Michigan,
M etropolitan Area, January 1969 (1969).
500.
Area Wage Survey, The Pittsburgh, Penn­
sylvania, M etropolitan Area, January 1969
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Phoenix, Arizona,
Metropolitan Area, M arch 1969 (1 9 6 9 ).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Charlotte, North
Carolina, Metropolitan Area, March 1969
(1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Des Moines, Iowa,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1969 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Cincinnati, O hioK entucky-Indiana,
Metropolitan
Area,
M arch 1969 (1969). 450.
Area Wage Survey, The St. Louis, M issouriIllinois, Metropolitan Area, M arch 1969
(1969). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Birmingham, Ala­
bama, M etropolitan Area, April 1969
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Milwaukee, Wiscon­
sin, Metropolitan Area, April 1969 (1969).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Albuquerque, New
Mexico, Metropolitan Area, April 1969
(1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Savannah, Georgia,
M etropolitan Area, May 1969 (1 9 6 9 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Richmond, Virginia,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1969 (1 9 6 9 ).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Greenville, South
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, May 1969
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Charleston, West

Virginia, M etropolitan Area, April 1969
(1969). 300.
-72 Area Wage Survey, The Rockford, Illinois,
Metropolitan Area, May 1969 (1969). 300.
-73 Area Wage Survey, The Canton, Ohio, M et­
ropolitan Area, May 1969 (1969). 300.
-74 Area Wage Survey, The Providence-Pawtucket-W arwick, Rhode Island-M assachusetts, Metropolitan Area, May 1969 (1969).
350.
-75 A rea Wage Survey, The Beaum ont-Port A r­
thur-O range, Texas, M etropolitan Area,
May 1969 (1 969). 350.
-76 Area Wage Survey, The Portland, O regonWashington, Metropolitan Area, May 1969
(1969). 300.
-77 Area Wage Survey, The Atlanta, Georgia,
Metropolitan Area, May 1969 (1969). 350.
-78 Area Wage Survey, The Los Angeles-Long
Beach and A naheim -Santa A na-G arden
Grove, California, M etropolitan Area, March
1969 (1 969). 500.
-79 Area Wage Survey, The Lawrence-Haverhill, M assachusetts-New Hampshire, M etro­
politan Area, June 1969 (1969). 300.
-80 Area Wage Survey, The M uskegon-M uskegon Heights, Michigan, M etropolitan Area,
May 1969 (1 969). 300.
-81 Area Wage Survey, The Spokane, Washing­
ton, Metropolitan Area, June 1969 (1969).
300.
-82 Area Wage Survey, The Chicago, Illinois,
M etropolitan Area, April 1969 (1969). 650.
-83 Area Wage Survey, The Houston, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, May 1969 (1969). 450.
-84 Area Wage Survey, The Worcester, Massa­
chusetts, M etropolitan Area, May 1969
(1969). 300.
-85 Area Wage Survey, The San Antonio, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, June 1969 (1969). 350.
-86 Area Wage Survey, The Allentown-Bethlehem -Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey, M et­
ropolitan Area, May 1969 (1969). 300.
-87 Area Wage Survey, The Paterson-C liftonPassaic, New Jersey, Metropolitan Area,
May 1969 (1 969). 350.
88 Area Wage Survey, The New York, New
York, M etropolitan Area, April 1969 (1969).
600.
•89 Area Wage Survey, The Akron, Ohio, M etro­
politan Area, July 1969 (1 9 6 9 ). 350.




-9 0

-91

1626
1627
1628

1629

1630

1631

1632
1633

1634
1635
1636

1637

Area Wage Surveys, Selected Metropolitan
Areas, 1968-69 (19 7 0 ). $1.
An annual summary of the results of the
individual area wage surveys conducted dur­
ing the past July-June period. Covers occu­
pational earnings, establishment practices,
and supplementary wage provisions.
Area Wage Surveys, M etropolitan Areas,
United States and Regional Summaries,
1968-69 (1970). $1.
Projects occupational earnings data from
the individual wage surveys conducted dur­
ing the past July-June period to all metro­
politan areas combined. Presents U.S. sum­
maries by industry and region and provides
analyses of wage trends and wage differences.
Industry Wage Survey: Iron and Steel Foun­
dries, November 1967 (19 6 9 ). $1.
Employee Compensation in the Private Non­
farm Economy, 1966 (19 6 9 ). 600.
Summaries of Manpower Surveys and R e­
ports for Developing Countries, 1958-68
(1969). $1.75.
Digest of 50 Health and Insurance Plans for
Salaried Employees, Early 1969 (1969).
$1.25.
Handbook of Labor Statistics 1969 (19 6 9 ).
$3.75.
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Planning and Administrative Personnel in
Local Governments: A Pilot Study, June
1969 (19 6 9 ). 450.
Retail Prices of Food, 1964-68, Indexes and
Average Prices (1969). 650.
National Emergency Disputes: L abor-M an­
agement Relations (T aft-H artley) Act,
1947-68 (1969). $1.
Covers the actions of all Taft-Hartley
emergency boards, 1947-68. A selected bib­
liography on national emergency disputes is
included.
Industry Wage Survey: Footwear, M arch
1968 (19 6 9 ). 750.
Labor in the Textile and Apparel Industries
(1969). $1.
Indexes of Output per M an-H our: Gray
Iron Foundries Industry, 1954-66 (1969).
350.
Industry Wage Survey: Cotton and ManMade Fiber Textiles, September 1968 (1969).
$ 1.

87

1638

1639

1640
1641

1642
1643
1644
1645

1646

1647

1648
1649
1650

1651

Industry Wage Survey: Nursing Homes and
Related Facilities, October 1967 and April
1968 (1 9 6 9 ). 750.
Technician Manpower, 1966-80 (1970).
350.
Presents information on projected require­
ments for and supply of engineering and sci­
ence technicians to 1980, by occupation,
industry, and source of training. Identifies
problems in the study of technician man­
power needs and suggests areas for further
research. Supersedes Bull. 1512.
Unaffiliated Intrastate and Single-Employer
Unions, 1967 (1 9 6 9 ). 350.
Indexes of Output per M an-Hour: Corru­
gated and Solid Fiber Boxes Industry, 195866 (1 9 6 9 ). 350.
Seasonality and Manpower in Construction
(1970). $1.25.
Occupational Employment Statistics, 196067 (1 9 7 0 ). 500.
Industry Wage Survey: Contract Cleaning
Services, July 1968 (1969). 550.
Industry Wage Survey: Laundry and Clean­
ing Services, April 1967 and April 1968
(1 9 6 9 ) . 750.
Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1968 (1970).
650.
See Bull. 1687 this listing for annotation.
Consumer Prices in the United States, 1959—
68: Trends and Indexes (1970). 700.
Analyzes the trend of consumer prices for
the 10-year period 1959-68. Includes tables
of indexes and related data for the years
1964-68 and technical notes describing
changes made in index pricing and calcula­
tion procedures since the completion of the
comprehensive revision in January 1964.
See Bulls. 699, 966, 1165, 1256, and 1554
for data for earlier periods and for discussion
of technical changes.
Ph. D. Scientists and Engineers in Private
Industry, 1968-80 (1970). 300.
Industry Wage Survey: Women’s and Misses’
Dresses, August 1968 (1 9 6 9 ). 450.
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1970-71
edition (1 9 7 0 ). $6.25.
See Bull. 1700 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey: Wood Household
Furniture, Except Upholstered, October 1968
(1 9 7 0 ) . 600.

88




1652
1653
1654

1655

1656
1657
1658

1659

1660
-1

-2

-3

-4

-5
-6

-7

-8

-9

-1 0

Indexes of Output per M an-Hour: Selected
Industries, 1939 and 1947-68 (1 9 6 9 ). $1.
Wage Calendar, 1970 (1970). 500.
See Bull. 1724 this listing for annotation.
National Survey of Professional, Administra­
tive, Technical, and Clerical Pay, June 1969
(1970). 750.
See Bull. 1693 this listing for annotation.
Pilots and Mechanics in Civil Aviation,
1967-77: A Study of Manpower Require­
ments (Published jointly with the Manpower
Administration, 1970). $1.
Compensation in the Construction Industry
(1970). $1.
Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages
(1970). $1.50.
Outlook for Computer Process Control:
Manpower Implications in Process Industries
(1970). 700.
Industry Wage Survey: M en’s and Boys’
Shirts (except Work Shirts) and Nightwear,
October 1968 (1970). 650.
Area Wage Survey, The U tica-Rom e, New
York, Metropolitan Area, July 1969 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Little R ock-N orth
Little Rock, Arkansas, M etropolitan Area,
July 1969 (1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Manchester, New
Hampshire, M etropolitan Area, July 1969
(1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Rochester, New
York, Metropolitan Area, July 1969 (1 9 6 9 ).
300.
Area Wage Survey, Binghamton, New York,
July 1969 (1 9 6 9 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Raleigh, North Caro­
lina, M etropolitan Area, August 1969 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Tam pa-St. Peters­
burg, Florida, M etropolitan Area, August
1969 (1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Green Bay, Wiscon­
sin, M etropolitan Area, July 1969 (1 9 6 9 ).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia, M etropolitan Area, Septem­
ber 1969 (1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Kansas City, Mis­

-1 1

-1 2

-1 3
-1 4

-1 5

-1 6

-1 7

-1 8

-1 9

-2 0

-2 1

-2 2

-2 3
-2 4

-2 5

-2 6

-2 7

souri-Kansas, M etropolitan Area, September
1969 (1 9 6 9 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Baltimore, M ary­
land, M etropolitan Area, August 1969
(1969). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Omaha, N ebraskaIowa, Metropolitan Area, September 1969
(1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Syracuse, New York,
M etropolitan Area, July 1969 (1969). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Sioux Falls, South
Dakota, M etropolitan’Area, September 1969
(1 9 6 9 ) . 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Scranton, Pennsyl­
vania, Metropolitan Area, July 1969 (1969).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Boston, Massachu­
setts, Metropolitan Area, August 1969
(1 9 7 0 ) . 450.
Area Wage Survey, The Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, M etropolitan Area, July 1969
(1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Fort Worth, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, October 1969 (1970).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Washington, D .C .M d.-V a., M etropolitan Area, September
1969 (1 9 7 0 ). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The D avenport-R ock
Island-M oline, Iowa-Illinois, Metropolitan
Area, October 1969 (1 9 7 0 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Trenton, New Jer­
sey, M etropolitan Area, September 1969
(1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Cleveland, Ohio,
M etropolitan Area, September 1969 (1970).
400.
A rea Wage Survey, The Dallas, Texas, M et­
ropolitan Area, October 1969 (1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The San Jose, California,
M etropolitan Area, September 1969 (1970).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Indianapolis, Indi­
ana, M etropolitan Area, October 1969
(1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Portland, Maine,
M etropolitan Area, November 1969 (1970).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Columbus, Ohio,
M etropolitan Area, October 1969 (1970).
300.




-2 8

-2 9

-3 0

-31

-3 2

-3 3

-3 4

-3 5

-3 6

-3 7
-3 8

-3 9

-4 0

-41

-4 2

-4 3

-4 4

-4 5

Area Wage Survey, The Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana, M etropolitan Area, Novem­
ber 1969 (1970). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Buffalo, New York,
M etropolitan Area, October 1969 (1970).
450.
Area Wage Survey, The Salt Lake City, Utah,
Metropolitan Area, November 1969 (1970).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Memphis, Tennessee-Arkansas, Metropolitan Area, Novem­
ber 1969 (1970). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Miami, Florida,
Metropolitan Area, November 1969 (19 7 0 ).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The San Francisco-O akland, California, Metropolitan Area, October
1969 (19 7 0 ). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Boise City, Idaho,
M etropolitan Area, November 1969 (1970).
250.
Area Wage Survey, The Jacksonville, Florida,
M etropolitan Area, December 1969 (1970).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The San Diego, Cali­
fornia, M etropolitan Area, November 1969
(1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Dayton, Ohio, Met­
ropolitan Area, December 1969 (1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Youngstown-W ar­
ren, Ohio, Metropolitan Area, November
1969 (1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Jackson, Mississippi,
M etropolitan Area, January 1970 (19 7 0 ).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The New Haven, Con­
necticut, M etropolitan Area, January 1970
(1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Denver, Colorado,
M etropolitan Area, December 1969 (1970).
400.
Area Wage Survey, The New Orleans, Louisi­
ana, M etropolitan Area, January 1970
(1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The San B ernardinoRiverside-O ntario, California, Metropolitan
Area, December 1969 (19 7 0 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The M idland and Odessa,
Texas, M etropolitan Areas, January 1970
(1970). 350.
A rea Wage Survey, The Waterloo, Iowa,
89

-4 6

-4 7

-4 8

-4 9

-5 0

-5 1

-5 2

-5 3

-5 4

-5 5

-5 6

-5 7

-5 8

-5 9

-6 0

-61

-6 2

M etropolitan Area, January 1970 (1970).
30$.
Area Wage Survey, The Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, M etropolitan Area, Janu­
ary 1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Newark and Jersey
City, New Jersey, Metropolitan Areas, Janu­
ary 1970 (1 9 70). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania-New Jersey, Metropolitan Area, No­
vember 1969 (1 9 7 0 ). 600.
Area Wage Survey, The Cincinnati, O hioKentucky-Indiana, M etropolitan Area, Feb­
ruary 1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Lubbock, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1970 (1970).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, M etropolitan Area,
February 1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Seattle-Everett,
Washington, M etropolitan Area, January
1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Burlington, Ver­
mont, M etropolitan Area, M arch 1970
(1970). 250.
Area Wage Survey, The Waterbury, Con­
necticut, M etropolitan Area, March 1970
(1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Albuquerque, New
Mexico, M etropolitan Area, March 1970
(1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Toledo, Ohio-M ichigan, M etropolitan Area, February 1970
(1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Birmingham, Ala­
bama, M etropolitan Area, M arch 1970
(1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Detroit, Michigan,
M etropolitan Area, February 1970 (1970).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Norfolk-Portsm outh
and Newport News-Ham pton, Virginia, M et­
ropolitan Areas, January 1970 (1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Pittsburgh, Pennsyl­
vania, M etropolitan Area, January 1970
(1970). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Charlotte, North
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, March 1970
(1970). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The South Bend, Indiana,

90



-6 3

-6 4

-6 5

-6 6

-6 7
-6 8

-6 9
-7 0

-7 1
-7 2

—
73
-7 4

-7 5
-7 6
-7 7

-7 8

-7 9

-8 0

Metropolitan Area, March 1970 (1 9 7 0 ).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The York, Pennsylvania,
M etropolitan Area, February 1970 (1 9 7 0 ).
350.
A rea Wage Survey, The Los Angeles-Long
Beach and A naheim -Santa A na-G arden
Grove, California, M etropolitan Areas, March
1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 450.
Area Wage Survey, The Richmond, Virginia,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1970 (1970).
400.
Area Wage Survey, The St. Louis, M issouriIllinois, Metropolitan Area, M arch 1970
(1970). 400.
A rea Wage Survey, The Houston, Texas,
M etropolitan Area, April 1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Charleston, West
Virginia, M etropolitan Area, April 1970
(1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Witchita, Kansas,
M etropolitan Area, April 1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Phoenix, Arizona,
M etropolitan Area, M arch 1970 (1 9 7 0 ).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The San Antonio, Texas,
Metropolitan Area, May 1970 (19 7 0 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Providence-Paw tucket-W arwick, Rhode Island-M assachusetts, Metropolitan Area, May 1970 (1970).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Des Moines, Iowa,
Metropolitan Area, May 1970 (1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Milwaukee, Wiscon­
sin, Metropolitan Area, May 1970 (1970).
500.
Area Wage Survey, The Rockford, Illinois,
M etropolitan Area, May 1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Atlanta, Georgia,
Metropolitan Area, May 1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Portland, O regonWashington, M etropolitan Area, May 1970
(1970). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Worcester, Massa­
chusetts, M etropolitan Area, May 1970
(1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Greenville, South
Carolina, M etropolitan Area, May 1970
(1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Savannah, Georgia,
M etropolitan Area, May 1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 350.

-8 1
-8 2

-8 3

-8 4

-8 5

-8 6

-8 7

-8 8
-8 9

-9 0
-9 1

-9 2

1661
1662
1663
1664

1665

Area Wage Survey, The Canton, Ohio, Met­
ropolitan Area, May 1970 (1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Law rence-Haverhill, M assachusetts-New Hampshire, Metro­
politan Area, June 1970 (1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Allentown-Bethlehem -Easton,
Pennsylvania-New
Jersey,
M etropolitan Area, May 1970 (1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Beaum ont-Port A r­
thur-O range, Texas, Metropolitan Area, May
1970 (1 9 7 0 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Muskegon-M uskegon Heights, Michigan, Metropolitan Area,
June 1970 (1 970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Spokane, Washing­
ton, M etropolitan Area, June 1970 (1970).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Pater son-C liftonPassaic, New Jersey, Metropolitan Area,
June 1970 (1 970). 450.
A rea Wage Survey, The Akron, Ohio, M etro­
politan Area, July 1970 (19 7 0 ). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The New York, New
York, M etropolitan Area, April 1970 (1970).
750.
Area Wage Survey, The Chicago, Illinois,
Metropolitan Area, June 1970 (1970). 600.
Area Wage Surveys, Selected Metropolitan
Areas, 1969-70 (1971). $1.
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
Area Wage Surveys, Metropolitan Areas,
United States and Regional Summaries,
1969-70 (in process).
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
Negotiation Impasse, Grievance, and Arbi­
tration in Federal Agreements (1970). 750.
Industry Wage Survey: Communications,
1968 (1 9 7 0 ). 300.
Federal Spending and Scientist and Engineer
Employment (1970). 500.
Industry Wage Survey: Machinery M anufac­
turing, September-November 1968 (1970).
650.
Directory of National and International La­
bor Unions in the United States, 1969
(1 9 7 0 ) . $1.25; Supp. 1 (1 9 7 0 ); Supp. 2
(1 9 7 1 ) .
Provides current general information con­
cerning the structure and activities of the




1666

1667

1668

1669

1670

1671

1672

1673

1674
1675

American labor movement and lists and gives
details about all known national and inter­
national unions and State labor bodies. In­
formation assembled from responses by
unions relates to the number of members
and local union affiliates of the organizations
listed, the number of women who are union
members, and information on union conven­
tions and publications. Headquarters ad­
dresses and names of principal officers of
national and international unions also are
listed.
Handbook of Labor Statistics 1970 (1970).
$3.50.
See Bull. 1705 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1969 (1970). 250.
See Bull. 1706 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1969 (1970). 550.
See Bull. 1709 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Local Truckdrivers
and Helpers, July 1, 1969 (1970). 500.
See Bull. 1708 this listing for annotation.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1969 (1970). 650.
See Bull. 1707 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey: Educational Institu­
tions: Nonteaching Employees, October 1968
and M arch 1969 (19 7 0 ). 500.
Patterns of U.S. Economic Growth (1970).
$1.25.
Presents projections for 1980 of gross na­
tional product (G N P) and final demand
components, and output and employment by
industry. Discuss the assumptions underlying
each of four alternative models. Appendixes
include a detailed statement of methods
and an annotated bibliography of BLS pub­
lications on economic projections.
The U.S. Economy in 1980: A Summary of
BLS Projections (1970). 650.
Summarizes BLS projections of gross na­
tional product in 1980 by major industry
sectors and occupational groups. Appendix
tables present detail on the labor force, par­
ticipation rates, output, and employment in
over 250 industries and occupations.
Scientific and Technical Personnel in Indus­
try, 1967 (1970). 600.
Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns
91

1676
1677
1678

1679
1680
1681
1682

1683
1684

1685
-1

-2

-3

-4

-5

-6
-7

of Private Nonagricultural Employees, 1965
(1970). 700.
College Educated Workers, 1968-80 (1970).
350.
Industry Wage Survey: Meat Products, Janu­
ary 1969 (1970). $1.
Wage Chronology: International Harvester
Co., 1946-70 (1972). 650.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Industry Wage Survey: Motor Vehicles and
Parts, April 1969 (1971). 750.
Indexes of Output per Man-Hour: Selected
Industries, 1939 and 1947-69 (1970). $1.
Occupational Outlook for College Graduates,
1970-71 edition (1971). $2.
Wage Chronology: Armour and Co., 1941—
72 (1971). 500.
See Bull. 1718 this listing for annotation.
Airline Experience under the Railway Labor
Act (1971). 550.
Consumer Expenditures and Income: Survey
Guidelines (1971). $1.75.
This bulletin documents the planning, op­
eration, and evaluation of the Survey of Con­
sumer Expenditures, 1960-61, and lays the
foundation for planning future surveys. It
contains information on sampling and other
errors, presents comparisons of survey find­
ings with data from other sources, and in­
cludes facsimiles of all questionnaires and
forms used in interviewing families.

-8
-9

-1 0

-11

-1 2

-13

-1 4

-15

-1 6

-17

-18
Area Wage Survey, The Little Rock-North
Little Rock, Arkansas, Metropolitan Area,
July 1970 (1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Manchester, New
Hampshire, Metropolitan Area, July 1970
(1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Scranton, Pennsyl­
vania, Metropolitan Area, July 1970 (1970).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Green Bay, Wiscon­
sin, Metropolitan Area, July 1970 (1970).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma, Metropolitan Area, July 1970
(1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, Binghamton, New York,
July 1970 (1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Rochester, New

92



-19

-2 0

-21

-22
-23

-2 4

York, Metropolitan Area, August 1970
(1970) . 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Syracuse, New York,
Metropolitan Area, July 1970 (1970). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Utica-Rome, New
York, Metropolitan Area, July 1970 (1970).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia, Metropolitan Area, Septem­
ber 1970 (1970). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Boston, Massachu­
setts, Metropolitan Area, August 1970
(1971) . 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Raleigh, North Caro­
lina, Metropolitan Area, August 1970 (1970).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The San Jose, California,
Metropolitan Area, August 1970 (1970).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Omaha, NebraskaIowa, Metropolitan Area, September 1970
(1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Trenton, New Jer­
sey, Metropolitan Area, September 1970
(1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas, Metropolitan Area, Septem­
ber 1970 (1971). 450.
Area Wage Survey, The Tampa-St. Peters­
burg, Florida, Metropolitan Area, November
1970 (1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Baltimore, Mary­
land, Metropolitan Area, August 1970
(1971). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Portland, Maine,
Metropolitan Area, November 1970 (1971).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The San Diego, Cali­
fornia, Metropolitan Area, November 1970
(1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Boise City, Idaho,
Metropolitan Area, November 1970 (1971).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Dallas, Texas, Met­
ropolitan Area, October 1970 (1971). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The San Francisco-Oakland, California, Metropolitan Area, October
1970 (1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Youngstown-Warren, Ohio, Metropolitan Area, November
1970 (1971). 300.

-25

-2 6

-27

-28

-29

-3 0

-31

-32

-33

-3 4

-35

-3 6

-37

-38

-39

-4 0

-41

Area Wage Survey, The Fort Worth, Texas,
Metropolitan Area, October 1970 (1971).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Salt Lake City,
Utah, Metropolitan Area, November 1970
(1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Louisville, Kentucky,
Metropolitan Area, November 1970 (1971).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Cleveland, Ohio,
Metropolitan Area, September 1970 (1971).
500.
Area Wage Survey, The Miami, Florida,
Metropolitan Area, November 1970 (1971).
400.
Area Wage Survey, The Memphis, Tennessee-Arkansas, Metropolitan Area, November
1970 (1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Indianapolis, Indi­
ana, Metropolitan Area, October 1970
(1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Waterloo, Iowa,
Metropolitan Area, November 1970 (1971).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Columbus, Ohio,
Metropolitan Area, October 1970 (1971).
400.
Area Wage Survey, The Philadelphia, Penn­
sylvania-New Jersey, Metropolitan Area,
November 1970 (1971). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The New Haven, Con­
necticut, Metropolitan Area, January 1971
(1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The New Orleans, Louisi­
ana, Metropolitan Area, January 1971
(1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Jacksonville, Flor­
ida, Metropolitan Area, December 1970
(1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Sioux Falls, South
Dakota, Metropolitan Area, December 1970
(1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Jackson, Mississippi,
Metropolitan Area, January 1971 (1971).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Midland and Odessa,
Texas, Metropolitan Areas, January 1971
(1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Denver, Colorado,
Metropolitan Area, December 1970 (1971).
350.




-4 2

-43

-4 4

-45
-46

-4 7

-48

-4 9

-50

-51

-52

-53

-5 4

-55

-5 6

-57

-58

Area Wage Survey, The San BernardinoRiverside-Ontario, California, Metropolitan
Area, December 1970 (1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Buffalo, New York,
Metropolitan Area, October 1970 (1971).
500.
Area Wage Survey, The Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota, Metropolitan Area, Janu­
ary 1971 (1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Dayton, Ohio, Met­
ropolitan Area, December 1970 (1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Norfolk-Portsmouth
and Newport News-Hampton, Virginia, Met­
ropolitan Areas, January 1971 (1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Newark and Jersey
City, New Jersey, Metropolitan Area, Janu­
ary 1971 (1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Charlotte, North
Carolina, Metropolitan Area, January 1971
(1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Pittsburgh, Penn­
sylvania, Metropolitan Area, January 1971
(1971). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The York, Pennsylvania,
Metropolitan Area, February 1971 (1971).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Davenport-Rock
Island-Moline, Iowa-Illinois, Metropolitan
Area, February 1971 (1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Seattle-Everett,
Washington, Metropolitan Area, January
1971 (1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Cincinnati, OhioKentucky-Indiana, Metropolitan Area, Feb­
ruary 1971 (1971). 450.
Area Wage Survey, The Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, Metropolitan Area,
March 1971 (1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Waterbury, Con­
necticut, Metropolitan Area, March 1971
(1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Washington, D .C .M d.-Va., Metropolitan Area, April 1971
(1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Charleston, West
Virginia, Metropolitan Area, March 1971
(1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Albuquerque, New
Mexico, Metropolitan Area, March 1971
(1971). 300.
93

-5 9
-6 0

-61

-6 2

-63

-6 4
-65

-66

-6 7
-68

-69
-70
-71
-7 2
-73

-74

-75

-7 6

-77

Area Wage Survey, The Burlington, Vermont
Area, March 1971 (1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Lubbock, Texas,
Metropolitan Area, March 1971 (1971).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The South Bend, Indi­
ana, Metropolitan Area, March 1971 (1971).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Richmond, Virginia,
Metropolitan Area, March 1971 (1971).
300.
Area Wage Survey, The Birmingham, Ala­
bama, Metropolitan Area, March 1971
(1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Witchita, Kansas,
Metropolitan Area, April 1971 (1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois, Metropolitan Area, March
1971 (1971). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Los Angeles-Long
Beach and Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden
Grove, California, Metropolitan Areas,
March 1971 (1971). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Houston, Texas,
Metropolitan Area, April 1971 (1971). 500.
Area Wage Survey, The Beaumont-Port Ar­
thur-Orange, Texas, Metropolitan Area,
May 1971 (1971). 350.
Area Wage Survey, The Atlanta, Georgia,
Metropolitan Area, May 1971 (1971). 400.
Area Wage Survey, The Des Moines, Iowa,
Metropolitan Area, May 1971 (1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Canton, Ohio, Met­
ropolitan Area, May 1971 (1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Savannah, Georgia,
Metropolitan Area, May 1971 (1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Worcester, Massa­
chusetts, Metropolitan Area, May 1971
(1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Toledo, Ohio-Michigan, Metropolitan Area, April 1971 (1971).
400.
Area Wage Survey, The Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton,
Pennsylvania-New
Jersey,
Metropolitan Area, May 1971 (1971). 300.
Area Wage Survey, The Milwaukee, Wiscon­
sin, Metropolitan Area, May 1971 (1971).
350.
Area Wage Survey, The Detroit, Michigan,
Metropolitan Area, February 1971 (1971).
500.

94



-78

Area Wage Survey, The Greenville, South
Carolina, Metropolitan Area, May 1971
(1971). 350.
-79 Area Wage Survey, The Rockford, Illinois,
Metropolitan Area, May 1971 (1971). 300.
-8 0 Area Wage Survey, The Providence-Pawtucket-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts, Metropolitan Area, May 1971 (1971).
400.
-81 Area Wage Survey, The San Antonio,
Texas, Metropolitan Area, May 1971 (1971).
350.
-8 2 Area Wage Survey, The Muskegon-Muskegon Heights, Michigan, Metropolitan Area,
June 1971 (1971). 300.
-83 Area Wage Survey, The Lawrence-Haverhill, Massachusetts-New Hampshire, Metro­
politan Area, June 1971 (1971). 300.
-8 4 Area Wage Survey, The Paterson-CliftonPassaic, New Jersey, Metropolitan Area,
June 1971 (1971). 350.
-85 Area Wage Survey, The Portland, OregonWashington, Metropolitan Area, May 1971
(1971). 350.
-8 6 Area Wage Survey, The Phoenix, Arizona,
Metropolitan Area, June 1971 (1971). 300.
-8 7 Area Wage Survey, The Akron, Ohio, Metro­
politan Area, July 1971 (1971). 400.
-8 8 Area Wage Survey, The Spokane, Washing­
ton, Metropolitan Area, June 1971 (1971).
300.
-89 Area Wage Survey, The New York, New
York, Metropolitan Area, April 1971 (1971).
650.
-9 0 Area’ Wage Survey, The Chicago, Illinois,
Metropolitan Area, June 1971 (1972). 700.
-91 Area Wage Surveys, Selected Metropolitan
Areas, 1970-71 (in process).
See Bull. 1625-90 this listing for annota­
tion.
-9 2 Area Wage Surveys, Metropolitan Areas,
United States and Regional Summaries,
1970-71 (in process).
See Bull. 1625-91 this listing for annota­
tion.
1686 Characteristics of Agreements Covering
5,000 Workers or More (1970). 700.
1687 Analysis of Work Stoppages, 1969 (1971).
650.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting
information on strikes and lockouts in the

1688
1689
1690
1691

1692
1693

1694

1695
1696
1697
1698
1699

United States. Statistics are presented by
State and industry group on the number of
work stoppages beginning in the year, work­
ers involved, and total man-days of idleness.
In addition, data are presented concerning
unions involved; major issues, duration, and
results of the strikes; and methods used in
their termination. Data have been collected
by the Bureau for many years, but have been
published in other than bulletin form for
some of the years. See also annotation for
Bull. 651 this listing.
Industry Wage Survey: Hospitals, March
1969 (1971). $1.
Industry Wage Survey: Auto Dealer Repair
Shops, August 1969 (1971). 500.
Industry Wage Survey: Miscellaneous Plas­
tics Products (1971). 600.
Labor and Material Requirements for Hos­
pital and Nursing Home Construction (1971).
600.
Indexes of Output per Man-Hour: Selected
Industries, 1939 and 1947-70 (1971) $1.25.
National Survey of Professional, Adminis­
trative, Technical, and Clerical Pay, June
1970 (1971). $1.
Presents the results of the latest in a series
of annual nationwide surveys of compensa­
tion for selected professional, administrative,
technical, and clerical occupations in private
industry. The data were obtained by per­
sonal visits of Bureau field economists to
representative establishments in U.S. industry.
These data are used by the Congress to set
pay levels for Federal classified employees.
Industry Wage Survey: Southern Sawmills
and Planing Mills, October 1969 (1971).
500.
Industry Wage Survey: Fabricated Structural
Steel, October 1969 (1971). 500.
Industry Wage Survey: Communications,
1969 (1971). 300.
Industry Wage Survey: Structural Clay Prod­
ucts, September 1969 (1971). 650.
Wage Calendar, 1971 (1971). 600.
See Bull. 1724 this listing for annotation.
Black Americans: A Chartbook (1971).
$1.25.
Presents 54 charts, with brief accompany­
ing text and tables, containing information
about the progress and problems of black




1700

1701
1702
1703
1704
1705

Americans in recent years. Subjects covered
include migration and population; employ­
ment and unemployment; income; health,
education, housing; and crime. Trends in la­
bor force participation and educational at­
tainment are projected to 1980.
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1972-73
edition (1972). $6.25.
This edition of the H a n d b o o k assesses the
employment outlook for 10 years in the future
for more than 800 occupations and 30 ma­
jor industries. It is designed for use in
vocational guidance and educational and
economic planning. Occupations covered in­
clude professional, managerial, and technical;
clerical, sales, and service; skilled trades;
and semiskilled and unskilled jobs. Each
occupational report describes the nature of
the work; principal employers; education,
training, and other qualifications required for
entry; earnings, working conditions, and ad­
vancement opportunities; and sources of
further information. The H a n d b o o k also
evaluates the effects of automation, technol­
ogy, and recent economic developments on
the occupational and industrial manpower
requirements in the decade ahead. The first
chapter, Looking Ahead to a Career, pro­
vides data on trends in population, the labor
force, and employment to 1980, as well as
an analysis of factors affecting growth in the
broad industrial and occupational groups.
(Reprints of individual occupations and
industries covered are available in the Oc­
cupational Outlook Reprint Series as Bulls.
1700-1 to 1700-141.)
Occupational Manpower and Training Needs
(1971). 750.
Municipal Public Employee Associations
(1971). 500.
Industry Wage Survey: Banking, November
1969 (1971). 650.
Industry Wage Survey: West Coast Sawmill­
ing and Logging, October 1969 (1971). 450.
Handbook of Labor Statistics 1971 (1971).
$3.25.
Collects in one volume major BLS his­
torical series from the beginning of the series
to the past year. Monthly data are shown for
the last 2 years. Data also include series
from other offices of the Department of La­
95

1706

1707

1708

bor, other Departments of the government,
and foreign governments. Short statements of
methods used and limitations of each series
of tables are included.
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Op­
erating Employees, July 1, 1970 (1971). 250.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting
union wages and hours of operating em­
ployees in the local-transit industry. This bul­
letin presents the results of an annual Bureau
survey and is based on union scales in effect
on July 1, 1970. The first bulletin in this
series was printed in 1922 and presented
wage scales as of May 15, 1921. Surveys
have been made for all ensuing years, but
from 1932 to 1940, inclusive, the results
were printed in the M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w
and serial reprints, rather than in bulletin
form. Hours of work were not included in
some of the earlier bulletins because of their
irregularity. The BLS first surveyed col­
lectively bargained insurance and pension
plans in 1954, and the results for the localtransit industry were first published in Bull.
1177. See also annotation for Bull. 600 this
listing.
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry,
July 1, 1970 (1971). 650.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting
wages and hours in the printing industry. In
this bulletin, information is based on union
scales in effect on July 1, 1970. The first
bulletin in this series was published in 1913
and presents wage and hour data back to
1907. The Bureau first surveyed collectively
bargained insurance and pension plans in
1954, and the results for the printing indus­
try were first published in Bull. 1176. See
also annotation for Bull. 600, this listing.
Union Wages and Hours: Local Truckdrivers and Helpers, July 1, 1970 (1971). 500.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting
union wage scales for motortruck drivers and
helpers. This bulletin presents information
based on union scales in effect on July 1,
1970, and covers approximately 320,000 driv­
ers and 35,000 helpers in 68 cities of 100,000
inhabitants or more. The first bulletin in this
series was published in 1915 and presented
union wage scales in effect as of 1913 and

96




1709

1710

1914; however, the majority of quotations
for the early years are for teamsters rather
than for motortruck drivers. Data have been
published in bulletin form for most of the
ensuing years. The Bureau first surveyed
collectively bargained insurance and pen­
sion plans in 1954, and the results for motor­
truck drivers and helpers were first pub­
lished in Bull. 1178. See also annotation for
Bull. 600, this listing.
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades,
July 1, 1970 (1971). 550.
Latest in a series of bulletins presenting
union wages in effect for building trades
workers. The first bulletin in this series was
published in 1913 and presents wage and
hour data back to 1907. Data have been pub­
lished for most ensuing years. The Bureau
first surveyed collectively bargained insur­
ance and pension plans in 1954, and the re­
sults for the building trades were first pub­
lished in Bull. 1175. See also annotation for
Bull. 600, this listing.
Productivity and the Economy (1971). 500.
This chartbook describes how productiv­
ity changes are related to incomes, costs,
prices, and employment. It traces productivity
trends in the period 1950-70 for the total
private economy, major sectors, and selected
industries; compares trends in the United
States with those in other countries; and pre­

1711

1712
1713
1714
1715

sents projections of productivity changes in
the United States to 1980.
BLS Handbook of Methods (1971). $2.
Contains a statement about the creation
and purpose of each major data collection
program carried out by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. The statements describe how data
are put into final form, tell how the results
may be used, and state the limitations to be
remembered when one is using the data.
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels,
March 1970 (1971). 600.
Industry Wage Survey: Pressed or Blown
Glass and Glassware, May 1970 (1971). 500.
The Meaning and Measurement of Produc­
tivity (1971). 300.
Improving Productivity: Labor and Manage­
ment Approaches (1971). 450.

1716
1717
1718

1719

Industry Wage Survey: M en’s and Boys’
Suits and Coats, April 1970 (1972) $1.
Railroad Technology and Manpower in the
1970’s (1 9 7 2 ). $1.
Wage Chronology: International Shoe Co.,
1945_74 (1 9 72). 300.
The most recent in a series of publications
tracing changes in wage scales and related
benefits negotiated by individual employers
or groups of employers with a union or group
of unions in selected collective bargaining
situations. Benefits introduced unilaterally by
an employer generally are included. Refer­
ences to job security, grievance procedure,
methods of piece-rate adjustment, and
similar matters are omitted.
Industry Wage Survey: Paperboard Con­




1720

1721
1722
1723
1724

tainers and Boxes, March 1970 (1971).
$1.25.
Municipal Labor-M anagement Relations:
Chronology of Compensation Developments
in Milwaukee, 1960-70 (1971). $1.25.
The Employment Problems of Older W ork­
ers (1 9 7 1 ). 500.
Employee Compensation in the Private Non­
farm Economy, 1968 (1 9 7 2 ). 600.
Scientific and Technical Personnel in In­
dustry, 1969 (1971). 450.
Wage Calendar, 1972 (1 9 7 2 ). 500.
An annual summary of expiration, reopen­
ing, and wage-adjustment provisions of col­
lective bargaining agreements covering 1,000
workers or more. D ata are tabulated for the
coming year by month and industry.

97

Numerical Listing of Reports
1
2

3

4

5

6
7

8

9

10

11

12
13

14
15

16

98

Collective Bargaining Structures: The Em ­
ployer Bargaining Unit (1953).
New and M aintenance Construction: Con­
struction in the 1947 Interindustry Relations
Study (1 9 5 3 ).
New Nonfarm Residential Construction: A
Segment of Construction Activity in the 1947
Interindustry Relations Study (1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Factory
Performance: Men’s Winter Suits and Top­
coats (1 9 5 3 ).
Employment in Metalworking Industries by
Size of Firm, October 1951 to October 1952
(1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Factory
Performance: Beet Sugar Refining (1953).
Wage Structure: West Coast Sawmilling,
1952 (1 9 5 3 ).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Processed Foods— Canned
Vegetables (1 9 5 3 ).
Industry Reports: General Explanations.
The 1947 Interindustry Relations Study
(1953).
Industry Reports: Manufacturing M ethod­
ology. The 1947 Interindustry Relations Study
(1953).
Work Stoppages: Collection and Compila­
tion of Work Stoppage Statistics (1953).
Wage Structure: Electric and Gas Utilities,
July 1952 (1 953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Combines [Harvesterthreshers] (1 9 54).
Capital Requirements and Operating R a­
tios: The Electric M otor Industry (1954).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Dry Electrolytic Capac­
itors (1 9 5 3 ).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Coarse Cotton Gray
Goods (1 9 53).




17

18
19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26
27

28
29

30

Collective Bargaining Agreements: Expira­
tion, Reopening, and Wage Adjustment Pro­
visions of Major Agreements (1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Wood Furniture (1954).
New Nonfarm Nonresidential Construction.
Part I: New Industrial Building Construc­
tion; Part II: All Other New Nonfarm Non­
residential Building Construction. Two Seg­
ments of Construction Activity in the 1947
Interindustry Relations Study (1 9 5 3 ).
Farm Construction: A Segment of Construc­
tion Activity in the 1947 Interindustry R ela­
tions Study (1953).
Industry Reports: Methodology for Agricul­
tural Sectors. The 1947 Interindustry Rela­
tions Study (1 9 5 3 ).
Industry Reports: The Alkalies and Chlo­
rine Industry. A Manufacturing Sector in the
1947 Interindustry Relations Study (1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Fractional Horsepower
Motors (1953).
Capital Requirements and Operating Ratios:
The Coarse Paper Industry, 1949 and 1950
(1953).
Capital Requirements and Operating Ratios:
The Agricultural Machinery Industry, 1950
and 1951 (1954).
Capital Requirements and Operating Ratios:
The Work Clothing Industry, 1950-51 (1953).
Capital Requirements and Operating Ratios:
The Paperboard Industry, 1949 and 1950
(1953).
Injury Rate Variations in the BoilershopProducts Industry, 1951 (1953).
Industry Reports: The Drugs and Medicines
Industry. A M anufacturing Sector in the 1947
Interindustry Relations Study (19 5 3 ).
Industry Reports: The Plastics Materials
Industry. A M anufacturing Sector in the 1947
Interindustry Relations Study (1953).

31

32

33

34
35

36

37

38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

48
49
50
51

Industry Reports: The Inorganic Chemicals
Industry. A Manufacturing Sector in the 1947
Interindustry Relations Study (1953).
Employment in Metalworking Industries by
Size of Firm: Quarterly Employment in Selected Metalworking Industries by Size Class
of Establishment, January 1952 to January
1953 (1953).
General Explanations of the 200 Sector
Tables: The 1947 Interindustry Relations
Study (1 9 5 3 ).
Wage Structure: Hosiery, November 1952
(1953).
Industry Reports: The Organic Chemicals
Industry. A M anufacturing Sector in the 1947
Interindustry Relations Study (1953).
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries
and Areas. Studies Between M arch 1951 and
May 1952 (1 954).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Veneer and Plywood
(1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Farm Tractors (1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: H and Tools (1953).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Performance: Knit Outerwear (1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Factory Performance: Knit Underwear (1953).
Employment in Metalworking Industries by
Size of Firm, April 1952 to April 1953 (1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Brick and Tile (1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Seamless Hosiery (1953).
Wage Structure: Southern Lum ber Industry,
April 1953 (1953).
Wage Structure: Footwear, M arch 1953
(1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Cold Form ed Machine
Bolts and Hexagon Nuts (1953).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Factory Performance: Aluminum Ware (1 9 5 4 ).
Earnings of Communications Workers, October 1952 (1953).
Cotton and Synthetic Textiles, Wage Trends,
1950-53 (1 9 54).
Wage Structure: Work Clothing, July 1953
(no date).




52
53
54
55

56
57

58

59

60

61

62
63
64

65

66

67

68
69
70
71

Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Farm Implements (1954).
Plant Operation R eport on a Small Gray Iron
Foundry (1954).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Fork Lift Trucks (1954).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: 5-Horsepower Induction
Motors (1954).
Wage Structure: Miscellaneous Textile Indus­
tries, October 1953 (1954).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Fac­
tory Perform ance: Processed Foods— Pre­
serves, Jams, and Jellies (1954).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Fine Cotton Gray Goods
(1954).
Capital Requirements and Operating Ratios:
The M en’s Shoe Industry, 1950 and 1951
(1954).
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries
and Areas. Studies Between M id-1952 and
M id-1953 (1954).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Irons, Hot Plates, and
Space Heaters (1954).
W ork-Injury Rates in the Fluid-Milk Indus­
try, 1952 (1954).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Fertilizer (1954).
Employment in Metalworking Industries by
Size of Firm, Summary Report, July 1951 to
July 1953 (1955).
Collective Bargaining Agreements: Hours
and Premium Pay Provisions in the Indus­
trial Chemicals Industry, 1953 (1954).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Cotton Textile Dyeing and
Finishing (1954).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: 3-Pole Circuit Breakers,
Circuit Interrupters, and Safety Switches
(1954).
Plant Operation Report for the Manufacture
of Plows (1954).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Centrifugal Pumps (1954).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Glass Containers (1954).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Metal Containers (1954).

99

72
73

74
75

76
77
78

79
80
81

82
83
84
85

86
87
88

89
90
91
92
93
94

Earnings of Communications Workers, Octo­
ber 1953 (1 9 5 4).
Construction Cost Indexes: Annual Indexes,
1915-1953; Monthly Indexes, January 1949July 1954 (1 9 54).
Wage Structure: M en’s and Boys’ Dress
Shirts and Nightwear, May 1954 (1954).
Collective Bargaining Agreements: Expira­
tion, Reopening, and Wage Adjustment Pro­
visions of M ajor Agreements, October 1954
(1 9 5 4 ) .
Wage Structure: Household Furniture, 1954
(1 9 5 5 ) .
Wage Structure: Structural Clay Products,
May 1954 (1 954).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Coal-Burning Space H eat­
ers (1 955).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Paint and Varnish (1955).
Wage Structure: Leather Tanning and Finish­
ing, May 1954 (1954).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Copper Tube and Brass
Rod (1 9 55).
Wage Structure: Cotton Textiles, November
1954 (1955).
Injuries and Injury Rates in Water-Supply
Utilities, 1953 (1 9 5 5 ).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Women’s Dresses (1955).
Case Study D ata on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Five Small Gray Iron
Foundries (1 9 55).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Fac­
tory Performance: Diesel Engines (1955).
Wage Structure: Synthetic Textiles, Novem­
ber 1954 (1955).
Plant Operation R eport for the Manufacture
of Concrete Pipe and Block (1955).
Plant Operation R eport for Meat Processing
(1955).
Plant Operation R eport for the Manufacture
of Fish Netting (1955).
Plant Operation Report for the Manufacture
of Rubber Sole Fabric Shoes (1955).
Work Stoppages, Basic Steel Industry (1955).
Wage Structure: Machinery Industries, Win­
ter 1954-55 (1 955).
Im pact of a Full Mobilization Program on
the Occupational Composition of the Air­

100



95
96
97
98

99
100

101
102

103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111

112

113

craft Engine and Parts Industry: Techniques
for Projecting Employment and Occupational
Patterns (1955).
Work Stoppages: Bituminous-Coal Mining In­
dustry (1955).
Earnings of Communications Workers, Octo­
ber 1954 (1955).
Wage Structure: Cigar Manufacturing, April
1955 (1955).
Women Production Workers in the Machinery
Industries: Employment Distribution; Earn­
ings, W inter 1952-53 (1956).
Wage Chronology: Ford Motor Co., 1941-55
(1 9 5 6 ) ; 1941-64 (Revised 1965).
Trends in Output Per M an-Hour and ManHours Per Unit of Output— Manufacturing,
1939-53 (1955).
Work Injuries in the Canning and Preserv­
ing Industry (1956).
Collective Bargaining Activity in 1956: A
Timetable of Expiration, Reopening, and
Wage Adjustment Provisions of Major Agree­
ments (1957).
Wage Structure: Industrial Chemicals, August
1955 (1 9 5 6 ).
Injuries and Injury Rates in the Bottled SoftDrink Industry (1 9 5 6 ).
Trends in Output Per M an-Hour, 1935-55:
Selected Nonmanufacturing Industries (1956).
Wage Chronology: United States Steel Corp.,
1937-55 (1957).
Wage Structure: Machinery Manufacturing,
Winter 1955-56 (1956).
Earnings of Communications Workers, Octo­
ber 1955 (1 9 5 7 ).
Studies of Automatic Technology: A Case
Study of a Large Mechanized Bakery (1956).
Wage Structure: Textile Dyeing and Finish­
ing, April 1956 (1956).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure: Fertilizer M anufac­
turing, Part I— Nationwide Earnings, April
1956; Part II— Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage in the South, April 1955 and April 1956
(1 9 5 7 ) .
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure: Seamless Hosiery,
Part I— Nationwide Earnings, April 1956;
Part II— Effects of the $1 Minimum Wage,
February, April, and August 1956 (1957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum

Wage. Wage Structure: Southern Sawmills,
October-Decem ber 1955 and April 1956
(1957).
114
-1

-2

-3

-4

-5

-6

-7

-8

-9

-1 0

115

116

117

118

Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Burlington, Vermont, February and
April 1956 (1 957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Millville, New Jersey, February and
April 1956 (1 957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Athens, Georgia, February and April
1956 (1 9 5 7 ).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Dalton, Georgia, February and April
1956 (1 9 5 7 ).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage:
Sunbury-Sham okin-M t.
Carmel,
Pennsylvania, February and April 1956
(1957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Dothan, Alabama, February and April
1956 (1 9 5 7 ).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Hickory, North Carolina, February and
April 1956 (1 9 57).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Fort Smith, Arkansas, February and
April 1956 (1 9 57).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Meridian, Mississippi, February and
April 1956 (1 9 5 7 ).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Spartanburg, South Carolina, Febru­
ary and April 1956 (1957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure (in Selected A re a s):
Footwear, Processed Waste, Wooden Contain­
ers, Work Shirts, August 1955, February 1956,
and April 1956 (1957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure: M en’s and Boys’
Shirts (except W ork Shirts) and Nightwear,
February, April, and October 1956 (1957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure (in Selected A re a s):
Cigars, Canning and Freezing, Raw Sugar,
Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1955 and
1956 (1 9 5 8 ).
Factory W orkers’ Earnings in 5 Industry




119
120

121
122
123
124

125

126

127
-1

-2

-3

-4

-5

-6

-7

128

129

Groups: Food, Textiles, Apparel, Furniture,
Leather, April 1956 (1 9 5 7 ).
Initial Report: Employee Earnings in Retail
Trade, October 1956 (1957).
Studies of Automatic Technology: A Case
Study of a Modernized Petroleum Refinery
(1 9 5 7 ) .
Earnings of Communications Workers, Octo­
ber 1956 (1957).
Wage Structure: Women’s and Misses’ Coats
and Suits, February 1957 (1 9 5 8 ).
Wage Structure: Fabricated Structural Steel,
M arch 1957 (1958).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure (in Selected A re a s ):
Processed Waste, Work Shirts, April 1957
(1 9 5 8 ) .
Injuries and Injury Rates in the Fabricated
Structural Steel and Ornamental Metalwork
Industry, 1954 (1957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure: Wooden Containers,
April 1957 (1958).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage:
Sunbury-Sham okin-M t.
Carmel,
Pennsylvania, February and April 1956 and
April 1957 (1958).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Athens, Georgia, February and April
1956 and April 1957 (1958).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Hickory, North Carolina, February
and April 1956 and April 1957 (1958).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Dalton, Georgia, February and April
1956 and April 1957 (1957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Dothan, Alabama, February and
April 1956 and April 1957 (1957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Fort Smith, Arkansas, February and
April 1956 and April 1957 (1957).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage: Meridian, Mississippi, February and
April 1956 and April 1957 (1958).
Wage Structure: Part I— M otor Vehicles,
Part II— M otor Vehicle Parts, July 1957
(1958).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure: Seamless Hosiery—
101

130

131
132

133
134
135
136

137

138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150

M en’s Seamless Hosiery, Nationwide; Chil­
dren’s Seamless Hosiery, Southeast, April 1957
(1958).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure: Southern Sawmills,
April 1957 (1 958).
Daily Indexes and Spot M arket Prices, Janu­
ary 1, 1954-Decem ber 31, 1956 (1958).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure: Fertilizer Manufac­
turing, South, April 1957 (1958).
Wage Structure: Footwear Industry, April
1957 (1 958).
Wage Structure: Wool Textiles, September
1957 (1 9 5 8 ).
Wage Structure: Electric and Gas Utilities,
September 1957 (1 9 5 8 ).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum
Wage. Wage Structure (in Selected A re a s):
Canning and Freezing, Raw Sugar, Tobacco
Stemming and Redrying, 1957 (1958).
Studies of Automatic Technology: A Case
Study of an Automatic Airline Reservation
System (1 9 5 8 ).
Earnings of Communications Workers, Octo­
ber 1957 (1 9 5 8).
Wage Structure: Machinery Manufacturing,
Winter 1957-58 (1958).
Wage Structure: M en’s and Boys’ Suits and
Coats, March 1958 (1959).
Wage Structure: Auto Dealer Repair Shops,
Summer 1958 (1959).
Frequency of Change in Wholesale Prices: A
Study of Price Flexibility (1958).
Wage Structure: Synthetic Fibers, October
1958 (1959).
Initial Report: Factory W orkers’ Earnings,
May 1958 (1 9 59).
Work Injuries and Injury Rates in the M anu­
facture of Cooperage (1959).
Work Injuries and Injury Rates in Sawmills
and Planing Mills (1959).
Wage Structure: Machinery Manufacturing,
Winter 1958-59 (1959).
Work Stoppages: M otor Vehicles and Motor
Vehicle Equipment Industry, 1927-58 (1959).
Earnings of Communications Workers, Octo­
ber 1958 (1 9 5 9).
Wage Structure: Leather Tanning and Finish­
ing, May 1959 (1959).

102



151
152
153

154
155
-1

-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
156
157
158
159
160

161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169

Wage Structure: Gray Iron Foundries, A prilJune 1959 (1 9 5 9 ).
Wage Structure: Wood Household Furniture,
Except Upholstered, A pril-M ay 1959 (1960).
W ork Injuries and W ork-Injury Rates in the
Concrete Brick and Block Industry, 1957
(1959) .
W ork Injuries and W ork-Injury Rates in Log­
ging Operations, 1955 (1960).
Minimum Wage Effects Studies: SunburySham okin-M ount Carmel, Pennsylvania, June
1959 (1959).
Minimum Wage Effects Studies: Athens,
Georgia, June 1959 (1960).
Minimum Wage Effects Studies: Dothan, Ala­
bama, June 1959 (1960).
Minimum Wage Effects Studies: Dalton, Geor­
gia, June 1959 (1960).
Minimum Wage Effects Studies: Fort Smith,
Arkansas, June 1959 (1960).
Minimum Wage Effects Studies: Meridian,
Mississippi, June 1959 (1960).
Wage Structure: West Coast Sawmilling, July
1959 (1960).
Daily Spot M arket: Price Indexes and Prices,
January 1, 1957-Decem ber 31, 1959 (19 6 1 ).
Wage Structure: Petroleum Refining, July
1959 (1960).
W ork Injuries and W ork-Injury Rates in
School Lunchrooms, 1958 (1960).
Wage Chronology: Western Union Telegraph
Co., 1945-53 (1 9 6 0 ); 1943-63 (Revised
1964).
Wage Chronology: Chrysler Corp., 1939-53
(1 9 6 0 ) .
Wage Chronology: International Harvester
C o , 1946-57 (1960).
Wage Chronology: North American Aviation,
1941-57 (1960).
Wage Chronology: General Motors C o rp ,
1939-55 (1960).
Wage Chronology: Arm our and C o , 1941-58
(1960).
Injuries and Accident Causes in Water-Supply
Utilities (19 6 0 ).
Wage Structure: Cigarette Manufacturing
May 1960 (1960).
Wage Structure: Miscellaneous Plastics Prod­
ucts, January-February 1960 (1 9 6 0 ).
National Emergency Disputes Under the La-

170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195

bor Management Relations (Taft-Hartley)
Act, 1947-O ctober 1960 (1 9 6 1 ); 1947-61
(Revised 1962); 1947-62 (Revised 1963).
Wage Structure: Machinery Manufacturing,
Winter 1959-60 (1960).
Earnings of Communications Workers, Octo­
ber 1959 (1 9 60).
Wage Structure: Structural Clay Products,
A pril-June 1960 (1961).
Wage Structure: Hotels, M arch-June 1960
(1961).
Wage Structure: Fluid Milk Industry, A prilJune 1960 (1 9 61).
Work Stoppages, Aircraft and Parts Industry,
1927-59 (1 9 6 1).
Work Stoppages, W ater Transportation In­
dustry, 1927-59 (1961).
Wage Structure: Pressed or Blown Glass and
Glassware, May 1960 (1961).
Wage Structure: Power Laundries and Dry
Cleaners, A pril-July 1960 (1961).
Wage Structure: Banking Industry, Mid1960 (1 9 6 1 ).
Wage Structure: Nonferrous Foundries, May
1960 (1 9 6 1 ).
Wage Structure: Crude Petroleum and N at­
ural Gas Production, M ay-June 1960 (1961).
Labor in the Sudan (1961).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Canning
of Fruits and Vegetables (1961).
Wage Structure: Cotton Textiles, August 1960
(1961).
Wage Chronology: General Motors Corp.,
1939-60 (1 9 6 1 ); 1939-63 (Revised 1964).
Wage Chronology: United States Steel Corp.,
1937-60 (1 9 6 1 ); 1937-64 (Revised 1965).
Wage Chronology: Arm our and Co., 1941-60
(1961); 1941-63 (Revised 1963).
Labor in India (1961).
Labor Law and Practice in Honduras (1961).
Wages in Nonmetropolitan Areas, South and
North Central Regions, October 1960 (1961).
Labor in Brazil (1962).
Wage Structure: Synthetic Textiles, August
1960 (1 9 61).
Wage Structure: Women’s and Misses’
Dresses, August 1960 (1961).
Salary Trends: City Public School Teachers,
1925-59 (1 961).
Wage Structure: Candy and Other Confec­




196
197
198
199
200

201
202
203
204
205

206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220

tionery Products, November-Decem ber 1960
(1961).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the FluidMilk Industry (1961).
Wage Chronology: The Anaconda Co., 194158 (1961).
Wage Chronology: Chrysler Corp., 1939-60
(1 9 6 1 ) ; 1939-64 (Revised 1964).
Wage Chronology: Federal Classification Act
Employees, 1924-60 (1961).
Salary Trends: Federal Classified Employees,
1939-60 (1 9 6 1 ); Supp. 1, July 1960-July
1961 (not dated).
Wage Chronology: Chicago Newspaper Pub­
lishers’ Assn., 1939-61 (1962).
Wage Chronology: International Harvester
C o , 1946-61 (1961).
Wage Chronology: North American Avia­
tion, 1941-64 (1965).
Wage Chronology: The Boeing Co. (W ash­
ington Plants), 1936-64 (1965).
Wage Chronology: Commonwealth Edison
Co. of Chicago, 1945-61 (1 9 6 2 ); 1945-63
(Revised 1964).
W ork Stoppages: Basic Steel Industry, 1901—
60 (1961).
Work Stoppages: Contract Construction In­
dustry, 1927-60 (1962).
Wage Chronology: Railroads— Nonoperating
Employees, 1920-62 (Revised 1963).
Wage Chronology: Massachusetts Shoe M anu­
facturing, 1945-64 (Revised 1964).
Principal Current Soviet Labor Legislation
(1 9 6 2 ) .
Wage Chronology: International Shoe C o ,
1945_64 (Revised 1963).
Labor Law and Practice in Venezuela (1962).
Work Stoppages: Electrical Machinery Equip­
ment, and Supplies Industry, 1927-60 (1962).
W ork Stoppages: M eat Products Industry,
1927-60 (1962).
Wage Chronology: Franklin Assn, of Chicago,
1939-61 (1962).
Wage Chronology: Bethlehem Atlantic Ship­
yards, 1941-62 (1962).
Labor Law and Practice in Colombia (1962).
Labor Law and Practice in Bolivia (1962).
Wage Chronology: Aluminum Co. of America,
1939-61 (1962).
Labor Law and Practice in Costa Rica (1962).
103

221
222
223
224
225
226

227
228
229

230
231

232
233
234
235
236
237
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9

Labor Law and Practice in Iraq (1 9 6 3 ).
Labor in Colombia (1962).
Labor Law and Practice in Guatemala (1963).
Labor in Chile (1962).
Wage Chronology: Sinclair Oil Companies,
1941-61 (1 9 6 2 ); 1941-63 (Revised 1964).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Fabrica­
tion of Structural Steel and Architectural
Metalwork (1 9 62).
Labor Law and Practice in Ceylon (1963).
Health and Insurance and Pension Plan Cov­
erage in Union Contracts, Late 1960 (1962).
Summary of Manufacturing Earnings Series,
1939-M arch 1965 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 1, June
1965 (1 9 6 5 ); 1939-65 (Revised 1966).
Work Injuries and W ork-Injury Rates in
Hotels (1 962).
Wage Chronology: Lockheed Aircraft Corp.
(California Com pany), 1937-61 (1 9 6 2 );
1937-64 (Revised 1964).
Wage Chronology: M artin-M arietta Corp.
(Baltimore P lant), 1944-61 (1963).
Salary Trends: Firemen and Policemen, 192461 (1 9 62).
W’age Chronology: North Atlantic Longshoring, 1934-61 (1962).
Deferred Wage Increases and Escalator
Clauses, 1952-63 (1963).
Work Stoppages: M etropolitan Areas, 195261 (1 9 6 3 ); 1952-62 (Revised 1963).
Consumer Expenditures and Income Surveys:
Detroit, Michigan, 1960 (1 9 6 2 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
San Francisco, California, 1960 (1 9 6 2 ); Supp.
1 (1 9 6 3 ).
Washington, D.C., 1960 (1962; Revised 1963);
Supp. 1 (1 9 63).
New York, New York, 1960 (1 9 6 2 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Chicago, Illinois, 1960 (1 9 6 2 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Atlanta, Georgia, 1960 (1 9 6 2 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Boston, Massachusetts, 1960 (1 9 6 2 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1960 (1 9 6 3 );
Supp. 1 (1 9 63).
Seattle, Washington, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).

104



—
10
-1 1
-1 2
-1 3
—
14
-1 5
-1 6
-1 7
-1 8
-1 9
-2 0
-21
-2 2
-2 3
-2 4
-2 5
-2 6
-2 7
-2 8
-2 9
-3 0
-3 1
-3 2
-3 2
-3 4

-3 5
-3 6
-3 7

Indianapolis, Indiana, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp.
1 (1 9 6 3 ).
Austin, Texas, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1 (1 9 6 3 ).
Northern New Jersey, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Portland Maine, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
St. Louis, Missouri, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Baltimore, Maryland, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Buffalo, New York, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Orlando, Florida, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Dallas, Texas, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1 (1 9 6 3 ).
Cleveland, Ohio, 1960 (1963); Supp. 1 (1963).
Los Angeles, California, 1960 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp.
1 (1963).
Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, 1960 (1 9 6 3 );
Supp. 1 (1963).
Small Cities in the Northeastern Region, 1960
(1963).
Small Cities in the Southern Region, 1960
(1963).
Small Cities in the Western Region, 1960
(1963).
Small Cities in the North Central Region, 1960
(1963).
Cincinnati, Ohio, 1959 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1 9 6 3 ) .
Anchorage, Alaska, 1959 (1963).
Fairbanks, Alaska, 1959 (1963).
Ketchikan, Alaska, 1960 (1963).
Juneau, Alaska, 1960 (1963).
Las Vegas, Nevada, 1962 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 1
(1 9 6 4 ) .
Urban Places in the Northeastern Region,
1960-61 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 2, Part A (1 9 6 4 );
Supp. 3, Part A (1964).
Urban Places in the North Central Region,
1960-61 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 2, Part A (1964).
Urban Places in the Southern Region, 196061 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 2, Part A (1964).
Urban Places in the Western Region, 1960-61
(1964); Supp. 2, Part A (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 3, Part
A (1964).

-3 8

-3 9 -5 0
-5 1
-5 2
-5 3
-5 4
-5 5
-5 6
-5 7
-5 8
-5 9
-6 0
-6 1
-6 2
-6 3
-6 4
-6 5
-6 6
-6 7
-6 8
-6 9
-7 0
-7 1
-7 2
-7 3
-7 4
-7 5
-7 6
-7 7
-7 8
-7 9

Urban United States, 1960-61 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp.
1 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 2, Part A (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 3,
Part A (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 3, Part B (1 9 6 4 );
Supp. 3, Part C (1964).

-8 0
-81
-8 2

Numbers withdrawn.
Detroit, Michigan, 1960-61 (1963).
San Francisco, California, 1960-61 (1964).
Washington, D.C., 1960-61 (1964).
New York, New York, 1960-61 (1963).
Chicago, Illinois, 1960-61 (1963).
Nashville, Tennessee, 1961 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Boston, Massachusetts, 1960-61 (1964).
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1960-61 (1964).
Denver, Colorado, 1961 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Dayton, Ohio, 1961 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1 (1963).
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1960-61 (1964).
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1961 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp.
1 (1 9 6 4 ).
Northern New Jersey, 1960-61 (1963).
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 1961 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp.
1 (1 9 6 3 ).
St. Louis, Missouri, 1960-61 (1964).
Baltimore, Maryland, 1960-61 (1964).
Wichita, Kansas, 1961 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Hartford, Connecticut, 1961 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Durham, North Carolina, 1961 (1 9 6 3 );
Supp. 1. (1 9 6 3 ).
Bakersfield, California, 1961 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp.
1 (1 9 6 4 ).
Cleveland, Ohio, 1960-61 (1964).
Los Angeles, California, 1960-61 (1964).
Green Bay, Wisconsin, 1961 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1 9 6 3 ) .
Small Cities in the Northeastern Region, 1961
(1 9 6 4 ) .
Small Cities in the Southern Region, 1961
(1964).
Small Cities in the Western Region, 1961
(1964).
Small Cities in the North Central Region, 1961
(1964).
Honolulu, Hawaii, 1961 (1 9 6 3 ); Supp. 1
(1963).
Kansas City, Missouri-KansaS, 1963 (1 9 6 5 );
Supp. 1 (1 9 6 5 ).




-8 3
-8 4

-8 5

-8 6

-8 7

-8 8
-8 9

-9 0

-9 1

-9 2

-9 3

238
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1963 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 1
(1965).
Minneapolis-St.
Paul, Minnesota,
1963
( 1 9 6 5 ) ;Supp. 1 (1965).
San Diego, California, 1963 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp.
1 (1965).
Houston, Texas, 1963 (1965).
Rural Nonfarm Areas in Northeastern Region,
1961 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 2 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 3
(1965).
Rural Nonfarm Areas in North Central R e­
gion, 1961 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 2 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 3
(1965).
Rural Nonfarm Areas inSouthern Region,
1961 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 2 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 3
(1965).
Rural Nonfarm Areas in Western Region,
1961 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 2
(1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 3
(1 9 6 5 ) .
Rural Nonfarm Areas in United States, 1961
(1964); Supp. 1 (1 9 6 4 ); Supp. 3 (1965).
Total Northeastern Region, Urban and Rural,
1960-61 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 1 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 2
(1 9 6 6 ) ; Supp. 3, Part A (1966).
Total North Central Region, Urban and R u­
ral, 1960-61 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 1 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp.
2 (1 9 6 6 ); Supp. 3, Part A (1966).
Total Southern Region, Urban and Rural,
1960-61 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 1 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 2
(1966); Supp. 3, Part A (1966).
Total Western Region, Urban and Rural,
1960-61 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 1 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 2
(1966); Supp, 3, Part A (1966).
Total United States, Urban and Rural, 196061 (1 9 6 5 ); Supp. 2 (1 9 6 6 ); Supp. 3, Part A
(1966).
Survey of Consumer Expenditures, 1960-61:
W orkers’ Wealth and Family Living Stand­
ards (1963).
The Impact of Rising Prices on Younger and
Older Consumers (1963).
Changing Patterns of Consumer Expenditures,
1950-1960 (1964).
Economics and Public Welfare (1963).
Changing Patterns of Consumer Expenditures
(1964).
Consumer Expenditures and Income, with Em ­
phasis on Low-Income Families (1964).
Expanding Ownership of Household Equip­
ment (1964).
105

-8

-9
-1 0
-1 1
-1 2
-1 3
-1 4
-1 5
-1 6
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257

258

Contrasts in Spending by Urban Families:
Trends Since 1950 and Variations in 1960-61
(1965).
Food Expenditures of Urban Families, 1950
to 1960-61 (1 965).
Expenditure Patterns of Low Consumption
Families (1 9 6 5 ).
Changing Consumption Patterns, 1960-61
(1965).
Levels of Living Among the Poor (1965).
Uses of Family Expenditure D ata (1965).
Spending and Saving in Urban and Rural
Areas (1 9 6 9 ).
Marketing Uses of Consumer Expenditure
Survey D ata (1 968).
Clothing the U rban American Family: How
Much for Whom? (1 9 6 8 ).
Labor Law and Practice in Turkey (1963).
Labor Law and Practice in Mexico (1 9 6 3 ).
Labor Law and Practice in Austria (1963).
Labor Law and Practice in Ecuador (1963).
Labor in Cyprus (1963).
Labor Law and Practice in Haiti (1963).
Wage Chronology: Western Greyhound Lines,
1945-63 (1 9 6 4).
Labor in Indonesia (1963).
Work Stoppages: Government Employees,
1942-61 (1 963).
The Forecasting of M anpower Requirements
(1963).
Injuries and Accident Causes in Sawmills
(1963).
Labor Law and Practice in Yugoslavia (1963).
Labor in Mexico (1963).
Injuries and Accident Causes in Logging Op­
erations (1963).
Labor Law and Practice in the Philippines
(1963).
Wage Chronology: Pacific Coast Shipbuilding,
1941-64 (1 965).
Wage Chronology: Anthracite Mining Indus­
try, 1930-59 (1963).
Work Stoppages: Fifty States and the District
of Columbia, 1927-62 (1963).
Work Injuries and W ork-Injury Rates in the
Highway and Street Construction Industry,
1961 (1 963).
Labor Law and Practice in the Trust Territory
of New Guinea Under Australian Administra­
tion (1 964).

106



259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279

280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289

Wage Chronology: Carolina Coach Co.,
1947-63 (1963).
Wage Chronology: Swift and Co., 1942-63
(Revised 1964).
Labor in Nigeria (1963).
Labor in Peru (1964).
Conducting a Labor Force Survey in Develop­
ing Countries (1964).
Labor Law and Practice in the Union of
Burma (1964).
Labor Law and Practice in Nicaragua (1 9 6 4 ).
Recent Collective Bargaining and Technolog­
ical Change (1964).
Labor Law and Practice in Thailand (1 9 6 4 ).
Labor Law and Practice in Taiwan (Form osa)
(1964).
Labor Law and Practice in Saudi A rabia
(1964).
Labor Law and Practice in the U.S.S.R.
(1964).
Labor Law and Practice in Pakistan (1 9 6 4 ).
W ithdrawn from publication.
Withdrawn from publication.
Labor Law and Practice in Malaysia and
Singapore (1965).
Labor Law and Practice in the United Arab
Republic (Egypt) (1965).
Labor Law and Practice in Iran (1964).
Wage Chronology: American Viscose, 194563 (1964).
Injury Rates by Industry, 1958, 1959, and
1960 (1964).
Concepts and Methods Used in Household
Statistics on Employment and Unemployment
from the Current Population Survey (1964).
Labor Law and Practice in El Salvador
(1964).
Wage Chronology: Berkshire Hathaway, Inc.,
1943-64 (1964).
Labor Law and Practice in Morocco (1 9 6 5 ).
Computation of Cost-of-Living Indexes in
Developing Countries (1964).
Withdrawn from publication.
Labor Law and Practice in Sweden (1 9 6 4 ).
Recent Price Developments, January-A ugust
1964 (1 9 6 4 ).
How the Government Measures Unemploy­
ment (1964).
Injury Rates by Industry, 1961 and 1962
(1964).
Labor Law and Practice in Spain (1965).

290
291
292
293
294
295
296

297
298
299

300
301
302

303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313

314

315
316

Labor Law and Practice in the Kingdom of
Laos (1 9 6 5 ).
Prices, 1964 (1965).
Labor Developments Abroad, Cumulative In­
dex, 1956-63 (1965).
Manpower Planning to Adapt to New Tech­
nology at an Electric and Gas Utility (1965).
Labor Law and Practice in Tunisia (1965).
Injury Rates by Industry, 1963 (1965).
Work Injuries and W ork-Injury Rates in the
Street and Highway Department Industry
(1 9 6 5 ) .
Labor Law and Practice in the Kingdom of
Libya (1 966).
Labor Law and Practice in the Empire of
Ethiopia (1 9 66).
Labor and Material Requirements for Con­
struction of Federally Aided Highways, 1958,
1961, and 1964 (1966).
Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour, Concrete
Products Industry, 1947-63 (1965).
Indexes of Output Per M an-Hour, Selected
Industries, 1939 and 1947-63 (1965).
How to Establish Current Reporting of Em ­
ployment, Hours, and Earnings in Developing
Countries (1 9 6 6).
L abor Law and Practice in India (1966).
Labor Law and Practice in Lebanon (1966).
Occupational Employment Statistics: Sources
and D ata (1 9 6 6).
Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour, Steel In­
dustry, 1947-65 (1966).
Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour, Hosiery
Industry, 1947-64 (1966).
Indexes of Output Per Employee, Air Trans­
portation Industry,, 1947-64 (1966).
Labor Law and Practice in Brazil (1967).
Labor Productivity of the Steel Industry in
the United States (1966).
Labor Developments in the U.S.S.R. (1966).
How the Government Measures Unemploy­
ment (1 9 6 7 ).
Concepts and Methods Used in Manpower
Statistics from the Current Population Sur­
vey (1 9 6 7 ).
Indexes of Output per M an-Hour: Aluminum
Rolling and Drawing Industry, 1958-65
(1 9 6 6 ) .
Labor Law and Practice in Israel (1967). 600.
Work Injuries and Accident Causes in School
Lunchrooms (1967).




317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330

331

332
333
334
335
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7

W ork Injuries and Accident Causes in the Con­
crete Brick and Block Industry (1967).
Work Injuries and Work Injury Rates in the
Heavy Construction Industry (1967).
Labor Law and Practice in Trinidad and To­
bago (1967). 400.
Labor Law and Practice in Jam aica (1967).
400.
Labor Law and Practice in New Zealand
(1967). 600.
Labor Law and Practice in the Hashemite
Kingdom of Jordan (1967). 450.
Health Manpower, 1966-75 (1967).
Labor Law and Practice in Guyana (1967).
350.
Labor Law and Practice in the Kingdom of
Greece (1968). 700.
1970 Input-Output Coefficients (1967).
Labor Law and Practice in the Republic of
Viet-Nam (South Viet-Nam) (19 6 8 ). 500.
Labor Law and Practice in Australia (1967).
450.
Work Injuries and Accident Causes in Hotels
(1967).
Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns,
Private Nonagricultural Employment, 1964
(1969).
How to Make an Inventory of High-Level
and Skilled Manpower in Developing Coun­
tries (1968).
Social and Economic Conditions of Negroes
in the United States (1967). 550.
Employment Characteristics of Atomic Energy
Work, 1967 (1968).
Work-Injury Experience in Atomic Energy,
1965 and 1966 (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Cotton and Synthetic Textiles, 1965 (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
M en’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1965 (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Railroads, 1965 (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Basic Steel, 1965 (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Glass Containers, 1965 (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Gas and Electric Utilities, 1965 (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Metal Cans, 1965 (1968).

107

-8

-9

-10
-11

336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347

348
349
350

351
352
353
354
355

356
357

Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Hydraulic Cement, 1965 (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Building Construction, 1965, (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Wholesale Groceries, 1965 (1968).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Trucking, 1965 (1 9 6 8 ).
Labor Law and Practice in Indonesia (1968).
500.
Labor Law and Practice in Botswana (1968).
400.
Labor Law and Practice in Peru (1 9 6 8 ). 750.
Labor Law and Practice in Chile (1969). 700.
Work Injuries and Work Injury Rates in Hos­
pitals (1 9 6 8 ).
Work Injuries and Accident Causes in Hos­
pitals (1 9 68).
Injury Rates by Industry, 1964 and 1965
(1968).
Labor Law and Practice in the Dominican Republic (1 9 6 8 ). 500.
Labor Law and Practice in Argentina (1969).
650.
Labor in the Central American Common M ar­
ket Countries (1968).
Work Stoppages in Contract Construction,
1946-66 (1 9 68). 350.
Recent Trends in Social and Economic Conditions of Negroes in the United States, July
1968 (1 9 6 8 ). 350.
Work Stoppages in Government, 1958-68
(1970).
Industrial Chemicals Price Trends (1968).
Indexes of Output per M an-Hour: Radio and
Television Receiving SetsIndustry, 1958-66
(1968).
Sources of Information on Labor in Japan
(1968).
Employee Compensation in Selected Indus­
tries, 1966 (1968).
Changes in Urban America (1969).
Pilot and Experimental Program on Urban
Employment Surveys (1969).
Capital Stocks, Production Functions, and Investment Functions for Selected Input-Output
Sectors (1 9 7 0).
Labor Law and Practice in Panam a (1970).
650.
Labor Law and Practice in Afghanistan
(1969). 350.

108



358
359
360
361
362
363

364

365

366
367

368

369
370

371
372
373
374
375

376
377
378
379
380
381
382

Labor in the U.S.S.R.: Reprints from Labor
Developments Abroad (1969).
Work Injuries in Atomic Energy, 1967 (1969).
Injury Rates by Industry, 1966 and 1967
(1969).
Labor Law and Practice in the Republic of
Korea (1969). 500.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Banks, 1967 (1969).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Commercial Research and Development Lab­
oratories, 1967 (1969).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Confectionery and Related Products M anu­
facturing, 1967 (1969).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Fabricated Structural Steel Manufacturing,
1967 (1969).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Hotels and Motels, 1967 (19 6 9 ).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Laundries and Cleaning and Dyeing Plants,
1967 (1969).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
M en’s and Boys’ Shirt Manufacturing, 1967
(1969).
Characteristics of Terminated Retirement
Plans, 1955-65 (1969).
Urban Employment Survey: Employment
Situation in Poverty Areas of Six Cities, July
1968-June 1969 (1969).
Labor Law and Practice in Iceland (1970).
500.
Labor Law and Practice in Belgium (1970).
$ 1.
The Anatomy of Inflation (1969).
W ork Stoppages: Electrical Machinery In­
dustry, 1927-68 (1970).
The Social and Economic Status of Negroes
in the United States, 1969 (Published jointly
with the U.S. Department of Commerce,
1970). $1.
Labor Law and Practice in Japan (1970). 650.
Productivity in the Railroad Industry (1970).
Work Injuries in Atomic Energy, 1968 (1970).
Injury Rates by Industry, 1968 (1970).
Employment in Perspective (19 7 0 ).
Labor Law and Practice in the Kingdom of
Laos (1970). 600.
Labor Law and Practice in the Trust Terri­
tory of the Pacific Islands (1 9 7 1 ). 400.

383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393

Employment in Perspective: Youth Job Situa­
tion in Summer 1970 (1970).
The Cyclical Behavior of Prices (1971).
Work Injuries in Atomic Energy, 1969 (1971).
Labor Law and Practice in Venezuela (1972).
70$.
Labor Law and Practice in Norway (1972). $1.
Characteristics of Workers in Large States and
SMSA’s, 1970 (1 9 7 1 ).
Injury Rates by Industry, 1969 (1971).
Labor Law and Practice in Denmark (in
process).
Employment in Perspective: The Negro Em ­
ployment Situation (1971).
Labor Law and Practice in Uruguay (1972).
$ 1.
Labor Law and Practice in The Republic of
Zaire (1972). $1.




394

395
396

397
398
399
400

The Social and Economic Status of Negroes
in the United States, 1970 (Published jointly
with the U.S. Departm ent of Commerce,
1971). $1.25.
Employment in Perspective: Regional Aspects
of Unemployment, 1969-70 (1971).
Employment in Perspective: Discouraged
Workers and Recent Changes in Labor Force
Growth (1971).
Employment in Perspective: Summer Job Sit­
uation for Youth, 1971 (1971).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Women’s Hoisery Manufacturing, 1969 (1971).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1969 (1971).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Basic Steel Manufacturing, 1969 (1972).

109

Current Periodicals
Consumer Price Index (detailed report) (monthly).
Current Wage Developments (m onthly) (450 a copy; $4.50 for yearly subscrip­
tion; $5.75 for foreign mailing).
Employm ent and Earnings (m onthly) ($1 a copy; $10 for yearly subscription;
$12.50 for foreign mailing).
M onthly Labor Review (750 a copy; $9 for yearly subscription; $11.25 for for­
eign mailing).
Occupational Outlook Quarterly (450 a copy; $1.50 for yearly subscription; $2
for foreign mailing).
Productivity, Wages, and Prices (quarterly).
Publications of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (semiannual).
Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes (detailed report) (monthly).

110




O ther Publications of General Interest

G eneral Economic Studies

The B L S Seasonal Factor M ethod (1966). Free.
Issues in Financing Old-Age and Survivors Insurance, BLS Staff Paper 1 (1968). Free.
A Micro-Model of Labor Supply, BLS Staff Paper 4 (1970). $1.

M a n p o w e r and Employment

Jobs for the 1970's (set of color slides and narrative). 1971. $10.
Occupational Outlook Reprint Series (reprints from the Occupational Outlook H andbook). Biennial. Price
varies.

Prices and Living Conditions

The Consumer Price Index: A Short Description (1 9 7 0 ). Free.
The Consumer Price Index: Technical Notes, 1959-63 (1967). 500.
The Consumer Price Index: Conversion Factor to and from the 1967 Base (1 9 7 1 ). Free.
The Theory of Hedonic Quality Measurement and its Use in Price Indexes, BLS Staff Paper 6 (1 9 7 1 ). 350.

W ages and Industrial Relations

Digest of Selected Pension Plans, 1970 Edition (1 9 7 1 ). Subscription, $5 a year; supplements issued periodi­
cally.
Nineteenth Century Wage Trends, BLS Staff Paper 2 (1970). 250.
Postwar Trends in Labor Compensation (1 9 7 0 ). 400.
The Influence of Selected Industry Characteristics on Negotiated Settlements, BLS Staff Paper 5 (1971).
250.

Productivity and Technology

Productivity Analysis in Manufacturing Plants, BLS Staff Paper 3 (1 9 7 0 ). 500.

Publications

Major Programs 1971: Bureau of Labor Statistics (1 9 7 1 ). (Out of print.)



Ill

Accidents

Absenteeism

Subject Index of Bulletins and Reports
[Asterisks refer to annotated bulletins]

A
Absenteeism. (See also Productivity, general— Effects of
long hours.)
Absenteeism in Commercial Shipyards, Bull. 734 (1943).
Improvement of Labor-Utilization Procedures, Bull. 807
(1945).
Accident and sickness benefits. See under Collective bar­
gaining, general— Health and welfare insurance.
Accident compensation or insurance. See Workmen’s com­
pensation.
Accident prevention. See Accidents— Rates, types, causes,
and prevention, by industry or occupation; Conventions,
meetings, etc.—Industrial Accident (etc.); and Safety—
Codes.
Accidents. (See also Conventions, meetings, etc.— Indus­
trial Accident Boards and Commissions; Safety—Codes;
and Workmen’s compensation.)
Frequency and severity rates, by years.
1907-21. Statistics of Industrial Accidents in the
United States, Bull. 339 (1923).*
1907-25. Record of Industrial Accidents in the
United States to 1925, Bull. 425
(1927).*
1907-27. Statistics of Industrial Accidents in the
United States to the End of 1927,
Bull. 490 (1929).*
1926-50. Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull.
1016, 1950 ed. (1951); and 1951
supp. (1953).*
1940. Industrial-Injury Statistics, by States, Bull.
700 (1942).
1942. Industrial Injuries in the United States
During 1942, Bull. 758 (1943).*
1943. Work Injuries in the United States During
1943, Bull. 802 (1944).*
1944. Work Injuries in the United States During
1944, Bull. 849 (1945).*
1945. Work Injuries in the United States During
1945, Bull. 889 (1947).*
1946. Work Injuries in the United States During
1946, Bull. 921 (1948).*
1947. Work Injuries in the United States During
1947, Bull. 945 (1949).*
1948. Work Injuries in the United States During
1948, Bull. 975 (1950).*
1949. Work Injuries in the United States During
1949, Bull. 1025 (1951).*
1950. Work Injuries in the United States During
1950, Bull. 1098 (1952).*
112



1951. Work Injuries in the United States During
1951, Bull. 1137 (1953).*
1952. Work Injuries in the United States During
1952, Bull. 1164 (1954).*
1958-65. Handbook of Labor Statistics 1967,
Bull. 1555 (1967).*
1958-67. Handbook of Labor Statistics 1969,
Bull. 1630 (1969).*
1958-68. Handbook of Labor Statistics 1970,
Bull. 1666 (1970).*
1958-69. Handbook of Labor Statistics 1971,
Bull. 1705 (1971).*
Methods.
Accident Record Manual for Industrial Plants,
Bull. 772 (1944).*
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and Stud­
ies, Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711 (1971).*
Manual on Industrial-Injury Statistics, Bull. 667
(1940).*
Report of Committee on Statistics and Compensa­
tion Insurance Cost of the International Asso­
ciation of Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions, Bull. 201 (1916).
Standardization of Industrial Accident Statistics,
Bull. 276 (1920). See Bull. 667.*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Rates, types, causes, and prevention, by industry or
occupation.
Atomic energy.
Work Injuries in Atomic Energy: 1967, Rpt.
359 (1969); 1968, Rpt. 378 (1970); 1969,
Rpt. 385 (1971).
Work-Injury Experience in Atomic Energy,
1965 and 1966, Rpt. 334 (1968).
Boilershop-products.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Boilershop-Products Industry, 1951, Bull. 1237
(1958).*
Injury Rate Variations in the BoilershopProducts Industry, 1951, Rpt. 28 (1953).
Bottled soft drink industry.
Injuries and Injury Rates in the Bottled SoftDrink Industry, Rpt. 104 (1956).
Breweries.
Injuries and Accidents in the Brewing Indus­
try, 1944, Bull. 884 (1946).*
Canning and preserving industry.
Work Injuries in the Canning and Preserving
Industry, Rpt. 101 (1956).
Canning of fruits and vegetables.

Accidents
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Canning
of Fruits and Vegetables, Rpt. 183 (1961).
Carpenters.
Injuries and Accident Causes [1948-49] in
Carpentry Operations, Bull. 1118 (1953).*
Clay construction products.
Injuries and Accident Causes [1948] in the
Manufacture of Clay Construction Prod­
ucts, Bull. 1023 (1951).*
Concrete brick and block industry.
Work Injuries and Accident Causes in the
Concrete Brick and Block Industry, Rpt.
317 (1967).
Work Injuries and Work-Injury Rates in the
Concrete Brick and Block Industry, 1957,
Rpt. 153 (1959).
Construction.
Work Injuries and Work-Injury Rates in the
Heavy Construction Industry, Rpt. 318
(1967).
Work Injuries in Construction, 1948-49, Bull.
1004 (1950).*
Cooperage manufacture.
Work Injuries and Injury Rates in the Manu­
facture of Cooperage, Rpt. 145 (1959).
Fabricated structural steel.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Fabrica­
tion of Structural Steel and Architectural
Metalwork, Rpt. 226 (1962).
Injuries and Injury Rates in the Fabricated
Structural Steel and Ornamental Metalwork
Industry, 1954, Rpt. 125 (1957).
Fertilizer.
Injuries and Accident Causes [1946] in Fer­
tilizer Manufacturing, Bull. 949 (1949).*
Fluid milk.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the FluidMilk Industry, Rpt. 196 (1961).
Work-Injury Rates in the Fluid-Milk Industry,
1952, Rpt. 62 (1954).
Foundries.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Foundry
Industry, 1942, Bull. 805 (1945).*
Highway and street construction.
Work Injuries and Work-Injury Rates in the
Highway and Street Construction Industry,
1961, Rpt. 257 (1963).
Hospitals.
Work Injuries and Accident Causes in Hos­
pitals, Rpt. 341 (1968).
Work Injuries and Work-Injury Rates in Hos­
pitals, Bull. 1219 (1958);* May 1968, Rpt.
340 (1968).
Hotels.
Work Injuries and Accident Causes in Hotels,
Rpt. 329 (1967).
Work Injuries and Work-Injury Rates in Ho­
tels, Rpt. 230 (1962).
Industrial.
Injury Rates by Industry, 1958, 1959, and



Accidents
1960, Rpt. 278 (1964); 1961 and 1962,
Rpt. 288 (1964); 1963, Rpt. 295 (1965);
1964 and 1965, Rpt. 342 (1968); 1966 and
1967, Rpt. 360 (1969); 1968, Rpt. 379
(1970); 1969, Rpt. 389 (1971).
Iron and steel.
Causes and Prevention of Accidents in the
Iron and Steel Industry, 1910-1919, Bull.
298 (1922).*
The Safety Movement in the Iron and Steel
Industry, 1907 to 1917, Bull. 234 (1918).*
Logging.
Injuries and Accident Causes in Logging Op­
erations, Rpt. 252 (1963).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Pulpwood-Logging Industry, 1943 and 1944,
Bull. 924 (1948).*
Work Injuries and Work-Injury Rates in Log­
ging Operations, 1955, Rpt. 154 (1960).
Longshoring.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Long­
shore Industry, 1942, Bull. 764 (1944).*
Machine building.
Accidents and Accident Prevention in Ma­
chine Building, Bulls. 216 (1917)* and 256
(1920).*
Meatpacking.
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Slaugh­
tering and Meat-Packing Industry, 1943,
Bull. 855 (1946).*
Paper and paper products.
Injuries and Accident Causes [1950-51] in the
Manufacture of Paperboard Containers,
Bull. 1139 (1953).*
Injuries and Accident Causes [1948-49] in the
Manufacture of Pulp and Paper, Bull. 1036
(1952).*
Plumbers.
Injuries and Accident Causes [1948-49] in
Plumbing Operations, Bull. 1079 (1952).*
Sawmills and planing mills.
Injuries and Accident Causes in Sawmills,
Rpt. 249 (1963).
Work Injuries and Work-Injury Rates in Saw­
mills and Planing Mills, Rpt. 146 (1959).
School lunchrooms.
Work Injuries and Accident Causes in School
Lunchrooms, Rpt. 316 (1967).
Work Injuries and Work Injury Rates in
School Lunchrooms, 1958, Rpt. 159 (1960).
Shipyards.
Fatal Work Injuries in Shipyards, 1943 and
1944, Bull. 839 (1945).*
Shipyard Injuries, 1944, Bull. 834 (1945).*
Shipyard Injuries and Their Causes, 1941,
Bull. 722 (1943).*
Steel. See Iron and steel, this section.
Street and highway department industry.
Work Injuries and Work-Injury Rates in the
Street and Highway Department Industry,
1961, Rpt. 296 (1965).
113

Accountants
Textile dyeing and finishing.
Injuries and Accident Causes [1945] in Tex­
tile Dyeing and Finishing, Bull. 962 (1949).*
Warehousing.
Injuries and Accident Causes [1950] in Ware­
housing Operations, Bull. 1174 (1955).*
Utilities, water-supply.
Injuries and Accident Causes in Water-Supply
Utilities, Rpt. 166 (1960).
Injuries and Injury Rates in Water-Supply
Utilities, 1953, Rpt. 83 (1955).
Woodworking circular saw.
Woodworking Circular-Saw Accidents, Bull.
1190 (1956).*
Seamen. See under Workmen’s compensation.
Accountants. See Wages and hours—White-collar work­
ers and Employment outlook—Accounting.
Actors. (See also under Wages and hours.)
Collective Bargaining by Actors, Bull. 402 (1926).
Adult education. See Workers’ education.
Afghanistan.
Labor Law and Practice in Afghanistan, Rpt. 357
(1969).
Africa. (See also specific country.)
Bibliography on Labor in Africa, 1960-64, Bull. 1473
(1965) .
Labor Digests on Countries in Africa, Bull. 1539
(1966) .*
Aged persons, care and assistance. See Old-age care and
assistance.
Agricultural machinery. (See also Wages and hours— Ma­
chinery manufacture.)
Union Agreements in Agricultural-Machinery Industry,
1943, Bull. 761 (1944).
Agricultural occupations. See under Employment outlook
—Agriculture.
Agriculture.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Labor Unionism in American Agriculture, Bull. 836
(1945).*
Wartime Wages, Income, and Wage Regulation in Agri­
culture, Bull. 883 (1946).
Air transportation. See under Collective bargaining, by
industry or occupation; under Employment outlook; and
under Wages and hours.
Air-conditioning mechanics. See under Employment out­
look.
Aircraft manufacture. (See also under Employment out­
look, and specific branch of manufacture under Wages
and hours.)
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212
(1957).*
Union Agreements in the Airframe Industry, 1944,
Bull. 792 (1944).
Wage Stabilization in California Airframe Industry,
1943, Bull. 746 (1943).
Wartime Development of the Aircraft Industry, Bull.
800 (1944).
Alaska.
Salaries of White-Collar Workers in Hawaii, Puerto

114


Atomic Energy
Rico, and Alaska, May-June 1963, Bull. 1392
(1964).
The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska, Hawaii,
Bull. 1191 (1956).
Almshouses.
The Cost of American Almshouses, Bull. 386 (1925).
See also Bull. 489 (1929).
Aluminum-fabrication industry.
Union Agreements in the Aluminum-Fabrication In­
dustry, Bull. 760 (1944).
Wage Chronology: Aluminum Co. of America, 1939—
61, Rpt. 219 (1962); 1939-67, Bull. 1559 (1967).*
American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial
Organizations. See Labor organizations and Labor move­
ment.
Ammunition-loading industry. See under Wages and hours.
Amusements. See under Wages and hours.
Annual wage plans. See Guaranteed employment and wage
plans.
Anthracite mining. See under Collective bargaining, by in­
dustry or occupation, and under Wages and hours—
Mining.
Anthrax. See under Occupational diseases.
Apparel and accessories stores. See under Wages and hours
— Stores, retail, and Retail trade.
Apparel industry. (See also under Wages and hours.)
Labor in the Textile and Apparel Industries, Bull. 1635
(1969).
Appliance stores. See under Wages and hours— Retail
trade.
Apprentices and learners. (See also Legislation— Labor—
Text, summaries, and reviews of laws, beginning with
Bull. 370 (1925).)
Apprenticeship in Building Construction, Bull. 459
(1928).
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Apprentices and
Learners, Bull. 908-4 (1948).
Labor-management training programs. A Guide to
Labor-Management Relations in the United States,
Bull. 1225-1 (1959).*
Apprentices and learners, foreign countries.
On-the-Job Training and Wage-Hour Standards in For­
eign Countries, Bull. 1610 (1968).
Arbitration and conciliation. See under Collective bargain­
ing, general, and by industry or occupation; also see
Labor-management disputes; and Legislation—Labor.
Arbitration and conciliation, foreign countries. See Labor
conditions and industrial relations, foreign countries—
Great Britain.
Architects. See under Employment outlook.
Argentina.
Labor Law and Practice in Argentina, Rpt. 344 (1969).
Labor Legislation of Argentina, Bull. 510 (1930).
Artists, commercial. See under Employment outlook.
Assignment. See under Collective bargaining, general.
Assignment of wages. (See also Legislation—Labor—Text,
summaries, and reviews of laws.)
Wage Executions for Debt, Bull. 622 (1936).
Atomic energy. (See also under Accidents— Rates, types,
causes (etc.); and under Employment outlook.)

Atomic Energy Commission
Employment Characteristics of Atomic Energy Work,
1967, Rpt. 333 (1968).
Employment in the Atomic Energy Field, A 1960 Oc­
cupational Survey, Bull. 1297 (1961).
Atomic Energy Commission.
Labor and the Savannah River AEC Project, Bull. 1100
(1952).*
Australia.
Labor Law and Practice in Australia, Rpt. 328 (1967).
Austria.
Labor Law and Practice in Austria, Rpt. 241 (1963).
Automation.
Adjustments to the Introduction of Office Automation,
Bull. 1276 (1960).
Automatic Technology and Its Implications—A Se­
lected Annotated Bibliography, Bull. 1198 (1956).
Automation and Employment Opportunities for Officeworkers, Bull. 1241 (1958).*
Impact of Automation, Bull. 1287 (1960).
Impact of Office Automation in the Insurance Industry,
Bull. 1468 (1966).
Impact of Office Automation in the Internal Revenue
Service: A Study of the Manpower Implications Dur­
ing the First Stages of the Changeover, Bull. 1364
(1963).*
Impact of Technological Change and Automation in
the Pulp and Paper Industry, Bull. 1347 (1962).*
Implications of Automation and Other Technological
Developments— Selected Annotated Bibliography,
Bulls. 1319 (1962) and 1319-1 (1964).
Manpower Planning to Adapt to New Technology at
an Electric and Gas Utility, Rpt. 293 (1965).
Studies of Automatic Technology:
A Case Study of an Automatic Airline Reserva­
tion System, Rpt. 137 (1959).
A Case Study of a Large Mechanized Bakery, Rpt.
109 (1957).
A Case Study of a Modernized Refinery, Rpt. 120
(1957).
Automobile and other motor vehicle (and parts) manufac­
turing. See under Wages and hours, and see Tire in­
dustry.
Automobile industry. (See also Employment outlook—
Motor vehicle and equipment manufacturing.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Automobile mechanics. See Employment outlook— Me­
chanics and repairmen.
Automobile repair garages and shops. See under Wages
and hours.
Automotive dealers. See under Wages and hours— Retail
trade.
Aviation occupations. (See also under Employment out­
look—Air transportation, and under Wages and hours.)
Pilots and Mechanics in Civil Aviation, 1967-77: A
Study of Manpower Requirements, Bull. 1655 (1970).

B

Baking industry. See under Collective bargaining, by in­
dustry or occupation, under Employment outlook, and
under Wages and hours.



Building Construction
Banking. See under Employment outlook and under Wages
and hours.
Banking societies and banks, labor. See Cooperatives—
Consumer— Credit unions.
Barbers. See under Employment outlook and under Wages
and hours.
Bargaining unit. See under Collective bargaining, general.
Belgium.
Labor Law and Practice in Belgium, Rpt. 372 (1970).
Benefit associations, sickness and death benefits.
Mutual Relief Associations Among Government Em­
ployees in Washington, D.C., Bull. 282 (1921).
Benefits and benefit funds. See specific benefits under Col­
lective bargaining, general.
Bibliographies. See specific subjects.
Biologists. See Scientists.
Bituminous coal mining. See under Mining; see also under
Wages and hours— Mining.
Black Americans. (See also Negroes.)
Black Americans: A Chartbook, Bull. 1699 (1971).*
Blacksmiths. See under Employment outlook.
Boilermaking occupations. See under Employment outlook.
Boilershop products industry.
Wage Structure— Metalworking Industries, 1945, Bull.
952 (1949).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Boilershop-Products Industry [1951], Bull. 1237 (1958).*
Bolivia.
Labor Law and Practice in Bolivia, Rpt. 218 (1962).
Bonuses. See Collective bargaining, by industry or occu­
pation; Wages and hours— specific industry; and Related
wage benefits.
Bookkeepers. See under Employment outlook, and see
Office workers.
Boot and shoe industry. See Shoe industry.
Botswana.
Labor Law and Practice in Botswana, Rpt. 337 (1968).
Bottling-house and brewery workers. See under Wages and
hours.
Brazil.
Labor in Brazil, Rpt. 191 (1962).
Brewing industry. See under Accidents— Rates, types,
causes (etc.).
Brick industry. See under Productivity, by industry.
Budgets. See Income and expenditures, consumer.
Building construction. (See also Construction; Housing; and
Labor requirements.)
Apprenticeship in Building Construction, Bull. 459
(1928).
Building Construction, 1921 to 1938, Bull. 668 (1940).*
Building Construction, 1940, Bull. 693 (1941).*
Building Construction, 1941, Bull. 713 (1942).*
Building Operations in Representative Cities, 1920,
Bull. 295 (1922).*
Building Permit Survey, 1939: Vol. I, New England
Cities (1941); Vol. II, Middle Atlantic Division
(1942); Vol. Ill, East North Central Cities (1942);
Vol. IV, West North Central Cities (1942); Vol. V,
South Atlantic Cities (1942); Vol. VI, East South
Central Cities (1941); Vol. VII, West South Central
Cities (1941); Vol. VIII, Mountain Division Cities
115

Building Trades
(1942); Vol. IX, Pacific Cities (1941-42), Bull. 689.
Building Permits in the Principal Cities of the United
States in:
1921, Bull. 318 (1923).*
1922, Bull. 347 (1923).*
1923, Bull. 368 (1925).*
1924, Bull. 397 (1925).*
1925, Bull. 424 (1926).*
1926, Bull. 449 (1927).*
1927, Bull. 469 (1928).*
1928, Bull. 500 (1929).*
1929, Bull. 524 (1930).*
1930, Bull. 545 (1932).*
Statistics of Building Construction, 1920 to 1937, Bull.
650 (1938).*
Structure of the Residential Building Industry in 1949,
Bull. 1170 (1954).*
Trends in Building Permit Activity, Bull. 1243 (1959).*
Building trades. See Construction; and see under Collec­
tive bargaining, by industry or occupation; Employment
outlook; and Wages and hours.
Building materials and farm equipment dealers. See under
Wages and hours— Retail trade.
Bureau of Labor Statistics (U.S. Government).
Fact-Finding Activities of the Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics, Bull. 831 (1945).*
Publications, indexes to and lists of. See under that
title.
Statistics. See under that title.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Depart­
ment of Labor: Its History, Activities, and Organiza­
tion, Bull. 319 (1922).
Bureaus of Labor Statistics (State). For directories 1936-3841, see Labor (and related) offices, Federal and State. See
also Legislation-Labor.
Burma.
Labor Law and Practice in the Union of Burma, Rpt.
264 (1964).
Busdrivers. See under Collective bargaining, by industry
or occupation, and under Wages and hours—Transit in­
dustry, local.
Business machine servicemen. See under Employment
outlook.

c

Callback pay. See under Collective bargaining, general.
Canada. See under Legislation, foreign countries; Work­
men’s compensation; and under other specific subjects.
Canning (fruit and vegetable) industry. See under Acci­
dents— Rates, types, causes, (etc.), and under Collective
bargaining, by industry or occupation.
Capital flow matrix.
Capital Flow Matrix, 1958, Bull. 1601 (1968).
Capital requirements and operating ratios.
Capital Requirements and Operating Ratios:
The Agricultural Machinery Industry, 1950 and
1951, Rpt. 25 (1954).
The Coarse Paper Industry, 1949 and 1950, Rpt.
24 (1953).

116


Clay Workers
The Electric Motor Industry [1950-51], Rpt. 14
(1954).
The Men’s Shoe Industry, 1950 and 1951, Rpt. 59
(1954).
The Paperboard Industry, 1949 and 1950, Rpt. 27
(1953).
The Work Clothing Industry, 1950-51, Rpt. 26
(1953).
Capital stocks.
Capital Stocks, Production Functions, and Investment
Functions for Selected Input-Output Sectors, Rpt. 355
(1970).
Carbon-monoxide poisoning.
Carbon-Monoxide Poisoning, Bull. 291 (1922).
Cargoes, ship, loading and unloading. See Longshore in­
dustry.
Carpentry. See Accidents— Rates, types, causes, (etc.).
Cement industry, portland.
Labor Requirements for Construction Materials (Part I
—Portland Cement), Bull. 888-1 (1947).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Portland Cement
Industry, (1929). Bull. 525 (1931).
Central America. (See also specific country.)
Labor in the Central American Common Market Coun­
tries, Rpt. 345 (1968).
Chauffeurs, and teamsters and drivers. See Wages and hours
— General trades, and Truckdrivers and helpers.
Checkoff arrangements. See Collective bargaining, general—
Union security.
Chemical industry. See under Collective bargaining, by
industry or occupation; Employment outlook; and under
Wages and hours.
Chemists and chemical engineers. See under Scientists, and
Wages and hours.
Child labor. (See also Legislation—Labor, and Minimum
wage.)
Effect of Workmen’s Compensation Laws in Diminish­
ing the Necessity of Industrial Employment of
Women and Children, Bull. 217 (1918).
Employment of Women and Juveniles in Great Britain
During the War, Bull. 223 (1917).
Labor Conditions of Women and Children in Japan,
Bull. 558 (1931).
Summary of the Report on Condition of Woman and
Child Wage Earners in the United States, Bull. 175
(1916).*
Chile.
Labor in Chile, Rpt. 224 (1962).
Labor Law and Practice in Chile, Rpt. 339 (1969).
Labor Organizations in Chile, Bull. 461 (1928).
Chinese migrants.
Chinese Migrations, with Special Reference to Labor
Conditions, Bull. 340 (1923).
Cigar and cigarette manufacturing. See under Tobacco in­
dustry, and Wages and hours—Tobacco industry.
Civil rights of employees. See Legislation— Employee
rights, civil.
Clay construction products industry. See under Accidents
— rates, types, causes, and prevention, by industry or
occupation.
Clay workers. See Wages and hours— Clay, stone, and
glass industries.

Cleaners, Dyers, and Pressers

Cleaners, dyers, and pressers. See under Wages and hours.
Cleanup time. See under Collective bargaining, general.
Clerical workers. See under Wages and hours, and see
specific occupation and industry under Employment
outlook.
Closed shop. See Collective bargaining, general—Union
security.
Clothes-change time. See Collective bargaining, general—
Cleanup.
Clothing industry. See under Wages and hours.
Coal industry. See Mining, and Wages and hours—Mining.
Collective agreements, provisions of. See Collective bar­
gaining, general, and by industry or occupation.
Collective bargaining, general. (See also Collective bar­
gaining, by industry or occupation; Labor and industrial
relations; Labor-management relations.)
Accident and sickness benefits. See Health and welfare
insurance, this section.
Administration of pension, health, and insurance plans.
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Adminis­
tration of Negotiated Pension, Health, and Insur­
ance Plans, Bull. 1425-12 (1970).*
Annual wage plans. See Guaranteed employment and
wage plans, this section.
Antidiscrimination clauses.
Antidiscrimination Provisions in Major Contracts,
1961, Bull. 1336 (1962).
Apprentices.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Apprentices and
Learners, Bull. 908-4 (1948).
Arbitration. (See also Grievances, this section.)
Analysis of agreements.
Arbitration Provisions in Union Agreements,
Bull. 780 (1944).
Extent and characteristics of provisions.
Labor-Management
Contract
Provisions :
1949-50 and 1952, Bulls. 1022 (1951) and
1142 (1953), respectively.
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Ar­
bitration Procedures, Bull. 1425-6 (1966).*
Assignment. See Promotion, transfer, and assignment,
this section.
Bargaining structure. See Bargaining unit, scope of,
and Negotiations, methods of, this section.
Bargaining unit, scope of.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Preamble, Scope
of Bargaining Unit, Duration of Agreements,
Bull. 908-19 (1950).
Collective Bargaining Structures: The Employer
Bargaining Unit. A Study in Industrial Rela­
tions, Rpt. 1 (1953).
Collective Bargaining with Associations and
Groups of Employers, Bull. 897 (1947).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1949-50,
Bull. 1022 (1951).
Benefit plans. See specific plans, this section.
Callback pay.
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1954,
Bull. 1181 (1955).
Checkoff arrangements. See Union security, this sec­
tion.



Collective Bargaining, General

Clauses. See Sample agreements and clauses, this
section.
Cleanup and clothes-change time.
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1953,
Bull. 1166 (1954).
Rest Periods, Washup, Work Clothing, and Mili­
tary Leave Provisions in Major Union Contracts,
Bull. 1279 (1961).
Clothing. See Work clothing, this section.
Company unions.
Characteristics of Company Unions, 1935, Bull.
634 (1938).*
Contract.
Characteristics.
Characteristics of Agreements Covering 5,000
Workers or More, Bull. 1686 (1970).
Duration.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Preamble,
Scope of Bargaining Unit, Duration of
Agreements, Bull. 908-19 (1950).
Enforcement.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Strike and
Lockouts; Contract Enforcement, Bull.
908-13 (1949).
General.
Major Union Contracts in the United States,
1961, Bull. 1353 (1962).
Death benefits. See Health and welfare insurance, this
section.
Deferred wages.
Deferred Wage Increases and Escalator Clauses,
1952-63, Rpt. 235 (1963).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Deferred
Wage Increase and Escalator Clauses, Bull.
1425-4 (1966).*
Denmark. See Scandinavia, this section.
Disability benefits. See Health and welfare insurance,
this section.
Discharge, discipline, and quits. See Severance pay,
this section.
Dismissal pay. See Severance pay, this section.
Employer associations and groups. See Bargaining
unit, scope of, this section.
Employment stabilization. See Guaranteed employ­
ment and wage plans, and Labor-management co­
operation, this section.
Equal job opportunity.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225-2 (1959).*
Equal pay for equal work.
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1950-51,
Bull. 1091 (1952).
Escalation clauses.
Deferred Wage Increases and Escalator Clauses,
1952-63, Rpt. 235 (1963).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Deferred
Wage Increase and Escalator Clauses, Bull.
1425-4 (1966).*
Expiration.
Collective Bargaining Activity in 1956: A Time­
table of Expiration, Reopening, and Wage Ad­

117

Collective Bargaining, General

Collective Bargaining, General

justment Provisions of Major Agreements, Rpt.
102 (1957).
Collective Bargaining Agreements: Expiration, Re­
opening, and Wage Adjustment Provisions of
Major Agreements, Rpt. 17 (1954) and October
1954, Rpt. 75 (1954).
Wage Calendar, 1968, Bull. 1593 (1968);* 1969,
Bull. 1619 (1969);* 1970, Bull. 1653 (1970);*
1971, Bull. 1698 (1971);* 1972, Bull. 1724
(1972).*
Federal service.
Collective Bargaining Agreements in the Federal
Service, Late Summer 1964, Bull. 1451 (1965).*
Foremen and supervisors.
Union Membership and Collective Bargaining by
Foremen, Bull. 745 (1943).
Fringe benefits. (See also Health and welfare insur­
ance, Pensions, and specific benefit, this section.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Grievances. (See also Arbitration and Labor-manage­
ment cooperation, this section.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Grievances and
Arbitration Provisions, Bull. 908-16 (1950).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1950-51,
Bull. 1091 (1952).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Griev­
ance Procedures, Bull. 1425-1 (1964).*
Negotiation Impasse, Grievance, and Arbitration
in Federal Agreements, Bull. 1661 (1970).
Guaranteed employment and wage plans.
Historical development.
Guaranteed-Employment and Annual-Wage
Provisions in Union Agreements, Effective
January 1945, Bull. 828 (1945).
Guaranteed Wage Plans in the United States,
Bull. 925 (1948).*
Labor-Management
Contract
Provisions,
1950-51, Bull. 1091 (1952).
Sample clauses.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Guaran­
teed Employment and Wage Plans, Bull.
908-15 (1950). See also Bulls. 828 and
925.*
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Supplementary
Unemployment
Benefit
Plans, and Wage-Employment Guarantees,
Bull. 1425-3 (1965).*
Health and welfare insurance.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225-1 (1959).*
Analysis of Health and Insurance Plans Under
Collective Bargaining, Late 1955, Bull. 1221
(1957).*
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Health, Insur­
ance, and Pensions, Bull. 908-17 (1950).
Digest of One Hundred Selected Health and In­
surance Plans Under Collective Bargaining,
1954, Bull. 1180 (1955); Early 1958, Bull. 1236

118



(1958); Winter 1961-62, Bull. 1330 (1962);
and Early 1966, Bull. 1502 (1966).
Employee Benefit Plans Under Collective Bargain­
ing, Bull. 946 (1949).
Employee-Benefit Plans Under Collective Bar­
gaining, Mid-1950, Bull. 1017 (1951).
Health and Insurance and Pension Plan Coverage
in Union Contracts, Late 1960, Rpt. 228 (1962).
Health and Insurance Plans Under Collective Bar­
gaining:
Accident and Sickness Benefits, Fall 1958, Bull.
1250 (1959).*
Hospital Benefits, Early 1959, Bull. 1274
(I960).*
Life Insurance and Accidental Death and Dis­
memberment Benefits, Early Summer 1960,
Bull. 1296 (1961).*
Major Medical Expense Benefits, Fall 1960, Bull.
1293 (1961).*
Surgical and Medical Benefits, Late Summer
1959, Bull. 1280 (I960).*
Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans in Union
Contracts, Bull. 1187 (1955).
Health-Benefit Programs Established Through Col­
lective Bargaining, 1945, Bull. 841 (1945).*
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1949-50,
Bull. 1022 (1951).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Admin­
istration of Negotiated Pension, Health, and
Insurance Plans, Bull. 1425-12 (1970).*
Older Workers Under Collective Bargaining, Part
II: Health and Insurance Plans, Pension Plans,
Bull. 1199-2 (1956).
Union Health and Welfare Plans, Bull. 900
(1947).*
H e a lt h s t a n d a r d s .

Collective Bargaining Provisions—Safety, Health,
and Sanitation, Bull. 908-14 (1949).
Holidays.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Vacation; Holi­
days and Week-End Work, Bull. 908-2 (1948).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1949-50,
Bull. 1022 (1951); and 1953, Bull. 1166 (1954).
Paid Holiday Provisions in Major Union Con­
tracts, 1958, Bull. 1248 (1959).
Vacation and Holiday Provisions in Union Agree­
ments, January 1943, Bull. 743 (1943).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Paid
Vacation and Holiday Provisions, Bull. 1425-9
(1969).*
Hours of work. See Premium pay, and Shift differen­
tials and operations, this section.
Impasse.
Negotiation Impasse, Grievance, and Arbitration
in Federal Agreements, Bull. 1661 (1970).
Incentive-wage plans. See Wage-incentive plans, this
section.
Industry stabilization committees. See Labor-manage­
ment cooperation, this section.
Insurance plans. See Health and welfare insurance, this
section.
Jury leave. See Leave, with and without pay, this sec­
tion.

Collective Bargaining, General

Labor and management rights.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Union and
Management Functions, Rights, and Responsi­
bilities, Bull. 908-12 (1949).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Manage­
ment Rights and Union-Management Coopera­
tion, Bull. 1425-5 (1966).*
Labor-management cooperation. (See also Safety, this
section.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Labor-Management
Safety, Production, and Industry Stabilization
Committees, Bull. 1201 (1957).*
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Union-Manage­
ment Cooperation, Plant Efficiency, and Tech­
nological Change, Bull. 908-10 (1949).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Manage­
ment Rights and Union-Management Coopera­
tion, Bull. 1425-5 (1966).*
Layoff. (See also Severance pay, this section.)
Analysis of Layoff, Recall, and Work-Sharing Pro­
cedures in Union Contracts, Bull. 1209 (1957).*
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Layoff, Recall, and
Work-Sharing Procedures, Bull. 1189 (1956).
Collective
Bargaining Provisions—Promotion,
Transfer, and Assignment; Layoff, Work-Shar­
ing, and Reemployment, Bull. 908-7 (1948).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Sever­
ance Pay and Layoff Benefit Plans, Bull. 1425-2
(1965).*
Leave, with and without pay. (See also Sick leave, and
Vacations, this section.)
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Leave of Ab­
sence; Military Service Leave, Bull. 908-6
(1948).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1954,
Bull. 1181 (1955).
Paid Leave Provisions in Major Contracts, 1961,
Bull. 1342 (1962).
Length of service. See Service, length of, this section.
Lockouts. See Strikes, this section.
Maintenance-of-membership. See Union security, this
section.
Management. See Labor and management rights, this
section.
Methods.
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and Stud­
ies, Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711 (1971).*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Military service.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Leave of Ab­
sence; Military Service Leave, Bull. 908-6
(1948).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1954,
Bull. 1181 (1955).
Rest Periods, Washup, Work Clothing, and Mili­
tary Leave Provisions in Major Union Contracts,
Bull. 1279 (1961).



Collective Bargaining, General

Negotiations, methods of. (See also Bargaining unit,
scope of, this section.)
Union Agreement Provisions, Bull. 686 (1942).
Nightwork. See Premium pay, and Shift differentials
and operations, this section.
Norway. See Scandinavia, this section.
Older workers.
Older Workers Under Collective Bargaining, Bulls.
1199-1 and -2 (1956).
Overtime, and pay for. See Premium pay, and Shift
differentials and operations, this section.
Pensions.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Health, Insur­
ance, and Pensions, Bull. 908-17 (1950).
Digest of One Hundred Selected Pension Plans
Under Collective Bargaining: Winter 1957-58,
Bull. 1232 (1958); Spring 1961, Bull. 1307
(1962); Late 1964, Bull. 1435 (1965); Spring
1968, Bull. 1597 (1969).
Employee-Benefit Plans Under Collective Bargain­
ing, Mid-1950, Bull. 1017 (1951).
Health and Insurance and Pension Plans Coverage
in Union Contracts, Late 1960, Rpt. 228 (1962).
Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans in Union
Contracts, Bull. 1187 (1955).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Admin­
istration of Negotiated Pension, Health, and In­
surance Plans, Bull. 1425-12 (1970).*
Multiemployer Pension Plans Under Collective
Bargaining, Spring 1960, Bull. 1326 (1962).*
Pension Plans Under Collective Bargaining: Bull.
1147 (1953);*
Benefits for Survivors, Winter 1960-61, Bull.
1334 (1962);*
Normal Retirement, Early and Disability Retire­
ment, Fall 1959, Bull. 1284 (1961);*
Vesting Provisions and Requirements for Early
Retirement, and Involuntary Retirement Pro­
visions, Late 1958, Bull. 1259 (1959).*
Plant efficiency. See Labor-management cooperation,
this section; also see Safety, this section.
Plant movement.
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Plant
Movement, Transfer, and Relocation Allow­
ances, Bull. 1425-10 (1969).*
Premium pay. (See also Shift differentials and opera­
tions, this section.)
Collective Bargaining Agreements; Hours and Pre­
mium Pay Provisions in the Industrial Chemicals
Industry, 1953, Rpt. 65 (1954).
Collective Bargaining Provisions:
Hours of Work, Overtime Pay, Shift Operations,
Bull. 908-18 (1950).
Vacations; Holidays and Week-End Work, Bull.
908-2 (1948).
(See also Bull. 1248 (1959) for clauses relating
to premium pay on holidays.)
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1950-51,
Bull. 1091 (1952); and 1953, Bull. 1166 (1954).
Paid Holiday Provisions in Major Union Contracts,
1958, Bull. 1248 (1959).

119

Collective Bargaining, General

Premium Pay for Night, Weekend, and Overtime
Work in Major Union Contracts, Bull. 1251
(1959).
Premium Pay Practices for Weekend Work in
Seven Continuous-Process Industries, 1966, Bull.
1480 (1966).
Production standards. See Labor-management coopera­
tion, and Wage-incentive plans, this section.
Promotion, transfer, and assignment.
Collective
Bargaining Provisions—Promotion,
Transfer, and Assignment; Layoff, Work-Shar­
ing, and Reemployment, Bull. 908-7 (1948).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Plant
Movement, Transfer, and Relocation Allow­
ances, Bull. 1425-10 (1969).*
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Seniority
in Promotion and Transfer Provisions, Bull.
1425-11 (1970).*
Provisions, sample. (See also specific subject, this sec­
tion.)
Collective Bargaining Provisions, Bulls. 908 to
908-19 incl. *
Union Agreement Provisions, Bull. 686 (1942).
Quits. See Severance pay, this section.
Recall. See Layoff, this section.
Reemployment. See Layoff, and Military service, this
section.
Relocation. See Transfer and relocation, this section.
Reopening provisions.
Collective Bargaining Activity in 1956: A Time­
table of Expiration, Reopening, and Wage Ad­
justment Provisions of Major Agreements, Rpt.
102 (1957).
Collective Bargaining Agreements: Expiration, Re­
opening, and Wage Adjustment Provisions of
Major Agreements, Rpt. 17 (1954); and October
1954, Rpt. 75 (1954).
Reporting and callback pay. See Callback pay, this
section.
Rest periods.
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1953,
Bull. 1166 (1954).
Rest Periods, Washup, Work Clothing, and Mili­
tary Leave Provisions in Major Union Contracts,
Bull. 1279 (1961).
Retirement. See Pensions, this section.
Retraining. See Training and retraining, this section.
Russia.
Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull. 1026 (1951).*
Principal Current Soviet Labor Legislation, Rpt.
210 (1962).
Safety. (See also Labor-management cooperation, this
section.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1949-50,
Bull. 1022 (1951).
Safety and sanitation standards. See Health standards,
and Labor-management cooperation, this section.
Sample agreements and clauses. (See also specific sub­
jects, this section.)

120



Collective Bargaining, General

Collective Bargaining Provisions, Bulls. 908 to
908-19 incl.*
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Company Pay for
Time Spent on Union Business, Bull. 1266
(1959).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements, Bulls.
1425-1 to 1425-12.*
Union Agreement Provisions, Bull. 686 (1942).
Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden).
Labor-Management Relations in Scandinavia, Bull.
1038 (1952).
Seniority. See Service, length of, this section.
Service, length of. (See also Promotion, transfer, and
assignment, this section.)
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Seniority, Bull.
908-11(1949).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1950-51,
Bull. 1091 (1952).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Senior­
ity in Promotion and Transfer Provisions, Bull.
1425-11 (1970).*
Severance pay. (See also Layoff, this section.)
Collective Bargaining Clauses: Dismissal Pay,
Bull. 1216 (1957).*
Collective Bargaining Provisions: Discharge, Dis­
cipline, and Quits; Dismissal Pay Provisions,
Bull. 908-5 (1948).
Dismissal-Pay Provisions in Union Agreements,
December 1944, Bull. 808 (1945).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1949-50,
Bull. 1022 (1951).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Sever­
ance Pay and Layoff Benefit Plans, Bull. 1425-2
(1965).*
Shift differentials and operations. (See also Premium
pay, this section and Collective bargaining, by in­
dustry or occupation.)
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Hours of Work,
Overtime Pay, Shift Operations, Bull. 908-18
(1950).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1952,
Bull. 1142 (1953).
Pay Differentials for Night Work Under Union
Agreements, Bull. 748 (1943).
Premium Pay for Night, Weekend, and Overtime
Work in Major Union Contracts, Bull. 1251
(1959).
Sick leave, paid and unpaid.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Leave of Ab­
sence; Military Service Leave, Bull. 908-6
(1948) .
Paid Sick Leave Provisions in Major Union Con­
tracts, 1959, Bull. 1282 (1960).
Sick-Leave Provisions In Union Agreements, Bull.
832 (1945).
Sickness and accident benefits. See Health and welfare
insurance, this section.
Strikes.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Strikes and
Lock-Outs; Contract Enforcement, Bull. 908-13
(1949) .

Collective Bargaining, General

Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1950-51,
Bull. 1091 (1952).
Subcontracting.
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Subconcontracting, Bull. 1425-8 (1969).*
Subcontracting Clauses in Major Collective Bar­
gaining Agreements, Bull. 1304 (1961).
Supervisors. See Foremen and supervisors, this section.
Sweden. See Scandinavia, this section.
Technological change. See Labor-management coop­
eration, this section.
Technological change, impact of.
Recent Collective Bargaining and Technological
Change, Rpt. 266 (1964).
Time studies. See Wage-incentive plans, this section.
Training and retraining.
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Training
and Retraining Provisions, Bull. 1425-7 (1969).*
Transfer and relocation.
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Plant
Movement, Transfer, and Relocation Allow­
ances, Bull. 1425-10 (1969).*
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Seniority
in Promotion and Transfer Provisions, Bull.
1425-11 (1970).*
Unemployment benefits.
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Supple­
mental Unemployment Benefit Plans and WageEmployment Guarantees, Bull. 1425-3 (1965).*
Unemployment-Benefit Plans in the United States
and Unemployment Insurance in Foreign Coun­
tries, Bull. 544 (1931).*
Union and management rights. See Labor and manage­
ment rights, this section.
Union-management cooperation. See Labor-manage­
ment cooperation, this section.
Union security.
Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union Rec­
ognition, 1945, Bull. 865 (1946), and 1946,
Bull. 909 (1947).
Extent of Collective Bargaining and Union Status,
January 1944, Bull. 776 (1944); January 1945,
Bull. 829 (1945).
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1949-50,
Bull. 1022 (1951); 1950-51, Bull. 1091 (1952);
and 1952, Bull. 1142 (1953).
Union Security and Checkoff Provisions in Major
Union Contracts, 1958-59, Bull. 1272 (1960).
Union Security Provisions in Collective Bargain­
ing, Bull. 908 (1947).*
Vacations.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Vacations; Holi­
days and Week-End Work, Bull. 908-2 (1948).
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Paid
Vacation and Holiday Provisions, Bull. 1425-9
(1969).*
Paid Vacation Provisions in Major Union Con­
tracts, 1957, Bull. 1233 (1958).*
Paid Vacations in American Industry, 1943 and
1944, Bull. 811 (1945).



Collective Bargaining, by Industry or Occupation

Vacation and Holiday Provisions in Union Agree­
ments, January 1943, Bull. 743 (1943).
See also Bulls. 1022 (1951) and 1142 (1953).
Wage adjustment.
Extent and characteristics of agreement provisions.
Labor-Management
Contract
Provisions,
1950-51, Bull. 1091 (1952).
General.
Collective Bargaining Activity in 1956: A
Timetable of Expiration, Reopening, and
Wage Adjustment Provisions of Major
Agreements, Rpt. 102 (1957).
Collective Bargaining Agreements: Expira­
tion, Reopening, and Wage Adjustment
Provisions of Major Agreements, Rpt. 17
(1954)
and October 1954, Rpt. 75 (195
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Wage Ad­
justment Plans, Bull. 908-9 (1948).
Wage-incentive plans.
General.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Incentive
Wage Provisions; Time Studies; and Stand­
ards of Production, Bull. 908-3 (1948).
Worker attitudes toward and procedures for han­
dling.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in
the United States, Bull. 1225-2 (1959).*
Incentive-Wage Plans and Collective Bargain­
ing, Bull. 717 (1942).
Wage provisions, general.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—General Wage
Provisions, Bull. 908-8 (1948).
Wage reopening. See Reopening provisions, and Wage
adjustment, this section.
Washup, cleanup, and clothes-change time.
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1953,
Bull. 1166 (1954).
Rest Periods, Washup, Work Clothing, and Mili­
tary Leave Provisions in Major Union Con­
tracts, Bull. 1279 (1961).
Weekend work. See Premium pay, this section.
Welfare plans and programs. See Health and welfare
insurance, this section.
Work clothing.
Rest Periods, Washup, Work Clothing, and Mili­
tary Leave Provisions in Major Union Contracts,
Bull. 1279 (1961).
Work stoppages. See Strikes, this section.
Worksharing. See Layoff, this section.
Collective bargaining, by industry or occupation. (See also
Collective bargaining, general; Labor and industrial rela­
tions; Labor-management relations.)
Actors.
Collective Bargaining by Actors, Bull. 402 (1926).
Agricultural machinery. See Machinery, this section.
Air transportation.
Airline Experience under the Railway Labor Act,
Bull. 1683 (1971).
Airframe.
Union Agreements in the Airframe Industry, 1944,
Bull. 792 (1944).

121

Collective Bargaining, by Industry or Occupation

Aluminum fabrication.
Union Agreements in the Aluminum-Fabrication
Industry, Bull. 760 (1944).
Anthracite mining. See Mining, this section.
Baking.
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in Union
Bakeries, June 1, 1939, Bull. 673 (1940).
Building trades.
Union Wages, Hours and Working Conditions in
the Building Trades: June 1, 1939, Bull. 674
(1940);* and June 1, 1941, Bull. 680 (1942).*
Canning (fruit and vegetable).
Union Agreements in the Canned Fruit and Vege­
table Industry, Bull. 794 (1944).
Chemical.
Collective Bargaining in the Chemical Industry,
May 1942, Bull. 716 (1942).
Chemical, industrial.
Collective Bargaining Agreement: Hours and Pre­
mium Pay Provisions in the Industrial Chemicals
Industry, 1953 (1954).
Clothing, men’s.
Collective Agreements in the Men’s Clothing In­
dustry, Bull. 198 (1916).
Cotton textiles.
Union Agreements in the Cotton-Textile Industry,
Bull. 885 (1947).
Electronics.
Collective Bargaining— Radio, Television, and
Electronics Industry, Bull. 1089 (1952).
Fruits and vegetables, canned. See Canning, this sec­
tion.
Government, Federal.
Negotiation Impasse, Grievance, and Arbitration
in Federal Agreements, Bull. 1661 (1970).
Government, local.
Municipal Labor-Management Relations: Chro­
nology of Compensation Developments in Mil­
waukee, 1960-70, Bull. 1720 (1971).
Municipal Public Employee Associations, Bull.
1702 (1971).
Leading industries and occupations.
Trade Agreements in:
1923 and 1924, Bull. 393 (1925).
1925, Bull. 419 (1926).
1926, Bull. 448 (1927).
1927, Bull. 468 (1928).
Leather tanning.
Union Agreements in the Leather-Tanning Indus­
try, 1943, Bull. 777 (1944).
Machinery.
Union Agreements in Agricultural-Machinery In­
dustry, 1943, Bull. 761 (1944).
Maritime industry.
The Earnings and Employment of Seamen on U.S.
Flag Ships, Bull. 1238 (1958).*
Meatpacking.
Collective Bargaining in the Meat-Packing Indus­
try, Bull. 1063 (1952).
122



Company Unions

Mining.
Collective Bargaining in the Anthracite Coal In­
dustry, Bull. 191 (1916).
Motortruck drivers. See Truckdrivers, this section.
Paper and allied products industry.
Collective Bargaining in Paper and Allied Prod­
ucts Industry, Bull. 709 (1942).
Petroleum refining.
Union Agreements in the Petroleum-Refining In­
dustry in Effect in 1944, Bull. 823 (1945).
Printing trades.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the Printing
Trades, May 15, 1936, Bull. 631 (1937).
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
the Printing Trades: June 1, 1939, Bull. 675
(1940);* June 1, 1941, Bull. 708 (1942).* See
also Bull. 481 (1928).
Radio. See Electronics, this section.
Seamen. See Maritime industry, this section.
Shoe industry. See Labor and industrial conditions—
Shoe industry.
Silk ribbon.
Trade Agreement in the Silk-Ribbon Industry of
New York City, Bull. 341 (1923).
Steel.
Arbitration of Labor-Management Grievances:
Bethlehem Steel Company and United Steel­
workers of America, 1942-52, Bull. 1159
(1954).*
Television. See Electronics, this section.
Textiles, cotton. See Cotton textiles, this section.
Tobacco.
Union Agreements in the Tobacco Industry, Janu­
ary 1945, Bull. 847 (1945).
Transit, local.
Street Railway Employment in the United States,
Bull. 204 (1917).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions of Union
Street-Railway Employees, June 1, 1941, Bull.
701 (1942).*
Truckdrivers.
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions of
Motortruck Drivers, June 1, 1939, Bull. 676
(1940).*
College-educated workers.
College Educated Workers, 1968-80, Bull. 1676 (1970).
Colombia.
Labor Law and Practice in Colombia, Rpt. 217 (1962).
Commercial artists. See under Employment outlook.
Common labor. See under Wages and hours— Municipal
employees.
Common market, Central American.
Labor in the Central American Common Market Coun­
tries, Rpt. 345 (1968).
Community wage surveys. See Wages and hours— Area
Wage Surveys.
Company housing.
Housing by Employers in the United States, Bull. 263
(1920).*
Company unions.
Characteristics of Company Unions, 1935, Bull. 634
(1938).*

Compensation, employee

Compensation, employee. See Wages and Hours— Manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries, and specific
industries under Wages and hours.
Conciliation. (See also Labor-management disputes.)
Collective Agreements in the Men’s Clothing Indus­
try, Bull. 198 (1916). (Hart, Schaffner & Marx and
United Garment Workers of America.)
Collective Bargaining in the Anthracite Coal Industry,
Bull. 191 (1916).
Concrete industry. See under Labor requirements.
Conferences. See Conventions, meetings, etc.
Congress of Industrial Organizations. See Labor organiza­
tions, and Labor movement.
Construction, general. (See also Building construction.)
Estimating expenditures and labor for new construction.
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Injuries.
Work Injuries in Construction, 1948-49, Bull.
1004 (1950).*
Labor-management relations.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Manpower.
Seasonality and Manpower in Construction, Bull.
1642 (1970).
Materials, man-hours required to produce and transport.
See Labor requirements.
Post-World War II.
Post-War Capacity and Characteristics of the
Construction Industry, Bull. 779 (1944).*
Public Works Administration.
P.W.A. and Industry: A 4 Year Study of Regen­
erative Employment, Bull. 658 (1938).*
Statistics. (See also Building construction— Building
permits.)
Construction During Five Decades, 1907-52, Bull.
1146 (1954).*
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull.
1016 (1951) and 1951 supp. (1953).*
Nonfarm Housing Starts 1889-1958, Bull. 1260
(1959).*
Construction, building and nonbuilding. (See also Build­
ing construction, and Housing.)
Construction— 1948 in Review, Bull. 984 (1950).
Construction and Housing, 1946-47, Bull. 941 (1948).*
Construction, Annual Review, 1950, Bull. 1047 (1951).*
Construction, Annual Review, 1951, Bull. 1122 (1953).
Construction During Five Decades, 1907-52, Bull.
1146 (1954).*
Construction in the War Years, 1942-45, Bull. 915
(1948).*
Probable Volume of Postwar Construction, Bull. 825
(1945).
Seasonality and Manpower in Construction, Bull. 1642
(1970).
The Construction Industry in the United States, Bull. 786
(1944).*
Consumer expenditures. See Income and expenditures,
consumer.
Consumer Price Index. See under Prices.



Conventions, Meetings, etc.

Consumers’ cooperative associations, clubs, and societies.
See Cooperatives, consumer.
Contract. See under Collective bargaining, general; Em­
ployment—Contract of; Expiration of collective agree­
ments; Legislation—Wage payment; and War contracts.
Conventions, meetings, etc.
Accident prevention, industrial. (See also Industrial Ac­
cident Boards and Commissions, International Asso­
ciation of, this section.)
Proceedings of conference July 1926, Washington,
D.C., Bull. 428 (1926).
Employment managers.
Proceedings of conferences:
January 1916, Minneapolis, Minn., Bull. 196
(1916) .
May 1916, Boston, Mass., Bull. 202 (1916).
April 1917, Philadelphia, Pa., Bull. 227
(1917) .
May 1918, Rochester, N.Y., Bull. 247 (1919).
Employment Offices, Public, American Association of.
Proceedings of annual meetings:
1st, Chicago, 111., December 1913, Bull. 192
(1916).
2d, Indianapolis, Ind., September 1914, Bull.
192 (1916).
3d, Detroit, Mich., July 1915, Bull. 192
(1916) .
4th, Buffalo, N.Y., July 1916, Bull. 220
(1917) .
Employment Services, Public, International Association
of.
Proceedings of annual meetings:
9th, Buffalo, N.Y., September 1921, Bull. 311
(1922).
10th, Washington, D.C., September 1922, Bull.
337 (1923).
11th, Toronto, Canada, September 1923, Bull.
355 (1924).
12th, Chicago, 111., May 1924, Bull. 400
(1925).
13th, Rochester, N.Y., September 1925, Bull.
414 (1926).
15th, Detroit, Mich., October 1927, Bull. 478
(1928).
16th, Cleveland, Ohio, September 1928, Bull.
501 (1929).
17th, Philadelphia, Pa., September 1929, Bull.
538 (1931).
18th, Toronto, Canada, September 1930, Bull.
538 (1931).
Government Labor Officials of the United States and
Canada, Association of. See Government Labor Offi­
cials, International Association of, this section.
Governmental Labor Officials, International Associa­
tion of.
Proceedings of annual conventions:
7th, Seattle, Wash., July 1920, Bull. 266
(1921) .
8th, New Orleans, La., May 1921, Bull. 307
(1922) .
123

Conventions, Meetings, etc.

9th, Harrisburg, Pa., May 1922, Bull. 323
(1923).
10th, Richmond, Va., May 1923, Bull. 352
(1923).
11th, Chicago, 111., May 1924, Bull. 389
(1925).
12th, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 1925, Bull.
411 (1926).
13th, Columbus, Ohio, June 1926, Bull. 429
(1927).
14th, Paterson, N.J., May-June 1927, Bull.
455 (1927).
15th, New Orleans, La., May 1928, Bull. 480
(1929) .
16th, Toronto, Canada, June 1929, Bull. 508
(1930) .
17th, Louisville, Ky., May 1930, Bull. 530
(1930).
18th, Boston, Mass., May 1931, Bull. 563
(1932).
19th, Chicago, 111., September 1933, Bull. 609
(1934).
21st, Asheville, N.C., October 1935, Bull. 619
(1936).
22d, Topeka, Kans., September 1936, Bull.
629 (1937).
23d, Toronto, Canada, September 1937, Bull.
653 (1938).
24th, Charleston, S.C., September 1938, Bull.
666 (1939).
25th, Tulsa, Okla., September 1939, Bull. 678
(1940).
26th, New York City, September 1940, Bull.
690 (1941).
27th, St. Louis, Mo., September 1941, Bull.
721 (1943).
28th, Chicago, 111., October 1943, Bull. 795
(1945).
Governmental Officials in Industry of the United States
and Canada, Association of. See Governmental Labor
Officials, International Association of, this section.
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Interna­
tional Association of. (See also Social insurance, this
section.)
Proceedings of annual meetings:
3rd, Columbus, Ohio, April 1916, Bull. 210
(1917).
4th, Boston, Mass., August 1917, Bull. 248
(1919).
5th, Madison, Wis., September 1918, Bull.
264 (1919).
6th, Toronto, Canada, September 1919, Bull.
273 (1920).
7th, San Francisco, Calif., September 1920,
Bull. 281 (1921).
8th, Chicago, 111., September 1921, Bull. 304
(1922) .
9th, Baltimore, Md., October 1922, Bull. 333
(1923) .
10th, St. Paul, Minn., September 1923, Bull.
359 (1924).
124




Cooperatives, Consumer

11th, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 1924,
Bull. 385 (1925).
12th, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 1925, Bull.
406 (1926).
13th, Hartford, Conn., September 1926, Bull.
432 (1927).
14th, Atlanta, Ga., September 1927, Bull. 456
(1928).
15th, Paterson, N.J., September 1928, Bull.
485 (1929).
16th, Buffalo, N.Y., October 1929, Bull. 511
(1930).
17th, Wilmington, Del., September 1930, Bull.
536 (1931).
18th, Richmond, Va., October 1931, Bull.
564 (1932).
19th, Columbus, Ohio, September 1932, Bull.
577 (1933).
20th, Chicago, 111., September 1933, Bull. 602
(1934).
Index to proceedings, 1914-24, by subject and
name, Bull. 395 (1925).
Industrial accident prevention.
Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention
Conference. Held at Washington, D.C., July
14-16, 1926, Bull. 428 (1926).
Labor legislation.
Proceedings of the National Conference for Labor
Legislation. Held at Washington, D.C., Febru­
ary 14 and 15, 1934, Bull. 583 (1934).
Labor officials, governmental. See Governmental Labor
Officials, International Association of, this section.
Productivity.
Summary of Proceedings of Conference on Pro­
ductivity, October 28-29, 1946, Bull. 913
(1947).*
Social insurance.
Proceedings of the Conference on Social Insur­
ance Called by the International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions,
Washington, D.C., December 5 to 9, 1916, Bull.
212 (1917).
Convict labor. See Prison labor, and Legislation— Prison
labor.
Cooperative banking and credit societies. See Cooperatives,
consumer—Credit unions.
Cooperative housing. See Cooperatives, consumer— Hous­
ing.
Cooperatives, consumer. [Note: For information on the
various types and groups of cooperatives, see Develop­
ments and Operations, this section.]
Credit unions. (See also Developments and Operations,
this section, and see under Legislation— Cooperatives,
consumer.)
Activities of Credit Unions in 1943, 1944, and
1945, Bulls. 797 (1944), 850 (1945), and 894
(1947), respectively.
Consumers’ Cooperatives and Credit Unions: Op­
erations in 1946, Bull. 922 (1948).*
Consumers’, Credit, and Productive Cooperation in
1933, Bull. 612 (1935).*

Cooperatives, Consumer

Consumers’, Credit, and Productive Cooperative
Societies, 1929, Bull. 531 (1931).*
Cooperative Credit Societies (Credit Unions) in
America and in Foreign Countries, Bull. 314
(1922).*
Cooperative Movement in the United States in
1925 (Other Than Agricultural), Bull. 437
(1927).*
Developments.
Consumer Cooperatives, Bull. 1211 (1957).*
Consumer Cooperatives in the United States— Re­
cent Developments, Bull. 1158 (1954).*
Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1941, Bull. 703
(1942).*
Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1949: Operations and
Developments, Bull. 1013 (1951).*
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperation in 1942,
Bull. 738 (1943).*
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperative Move­
ment in 1944, 1945, 1946, and 1947, Bulls. 821
(1945),* 859 (1946),* 904 (1947),* and 932
(1948),* respectively.
Developments in Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1950,
1951, Bulls. 1030 (1951)* and 1073 (1952),*
respectively.
Developments in Consumers’ Co-ops in 1948, Bull.
964 (1949).*
Developments in the Cooperative Movement in
1943, Bull. 768 (1944).*
Directory of Consumers’ Cooperatives in the United
States, Bulls. 750 (1943, revised 1947) and 959
(1949).*
Gasoline and oil associations.
Organization and Management of Cooperative
Gasoline and Oil Associations (With Model By­
laws), Bull. 606 (1934).
Housing. (See also Developments and Operations, this
section.)
Cooperative Housing in the United States, 1949
and 1950, Bull. 1093 (1952).
Nonprofit Housing Projects in the United States,
Bull. 896 (1947).
Organization and Management of Cooperative and
Mutual Housing Associations, Bull. 858 (1946).
Organization and Management of Cooperative
Housing Associations (With Model Bylaws), Bull.
608 (1934).
Legal status.
Consumers’ Cooperation in the United States,
1936, Bull. 659 (1939).*
Legislation affecting. See under Legislation; also see
Developments, this section.
Operations.
Activities of Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1942,
Bull. 757 (1943).*
Consumers’ Cooperation in the United States,
1936, Bull. 659 (1939).*
Consumers’ Cooperation in the United States in
1941, Bull. 725 (1943).*
Consumers’ Cooperative Societies in the United
States in 1920, Bull. 313 (1923).*



Costa Rica

Consumers’ Cooperatives and Credit Unions: Op­
erations in 1946, Bull. 922 (1948).*
Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1949, Operations and
Developments, Bull. 1013 (1951).*
Consumers’ Cooperatives: Operations in 1947,
Bull. 948 (1949).*
Consumers’ Cooperatives: Operations in 1948,
Bull. 971 (1949).*
Consumers’ Cooperatives: Operations in 1950,
Bull. 1049 (1952).*
Consumers’, Credit, and Productive Cooperation in
1933, Bull. 612 (1935).*
Consumers’, Credit, and Productive Cooperative
Societies, 1929, Bull. 531 (1931).*
Cooperative Movement in the United States in
1925 (Other Than Agricultural), Bull. 437
(1927).*
Operations of Consumers’ Cooperatives in 1943,
1944, 1945, Bulls. 796 (1944),* 843 (1945),*
and 890 (1947),* respectively.
Organization and Management of Consumers’ Cooper­
ative Associations and Clubs (with model bylaws),
Bull. 598 (1934).
Organization and Management of Consumers’ Cooper­
atives and Buying Clubs, Bull. 665 (1941).
Organization and Management of Consumers’ Cooper­
atives, Bull. 1024 (1951).*
Personnel policies.
Consumers’ Cooperation in the United States,
1936, Bull. 659 (1939).*
Southern States, developments in.
Statistics.
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull. 1016
(1951).*
Student. (See also Developments and Operations, this
section.)
Student Cooperatives in the United States, 1941,
Bull. 740 (1943).
Cooperatives, foreign countries.
Consumer Cooperatives, Bull. 1211 (1957).*
Consumer Cooperatives in the United States [includes
data on foreign countries], Bull. 1158 (1954).*
Cooperative Associations in Europe and Their Possi­
bilities for Post-War Reconstruction, Bull. 770
(1944).*
Cooperative Credit Societies (Credit Unions) in Amer­
ica and in Foreign Countries, Bull. 314 (1922).*
Cooperatives in Post-War Europe— Survey of Develop­
ments in Scandinavian Countries and Eastern, Cen­
tral, and Western Europe, Bull. 942 (1948).*
Coremakers.
Mobility of Molders and Coremakers, 1940-1952, Bull.
1162 (1954).*
Cost of living. See Income and expenditures, consumer;
and Prices.
Costa Rica.
Labor in the Central American Common Market Coun­
tries, Rpt. 345 (1968).
Labor Law and Practice in Costa Rica, Rpt. 220
(1962).
125

Cotton Industries

Cotton industries. See under Accidents; Collective bargain­
ing, by industry or occupation; Productivity; see under
Wages and hours, and Wages and hours—Wage chro­
nologies.
Court decisions. (See also Legislation.)
Decisions of Courts Affecting Labor:
1915, Bull. 189 (1916).
1916, Bull. 224 (1917).
1917, Bull. 246 (1918).
1918, Bull. 258 (1920).
1919-20, Bull. 290 (1922).
1921, Bull. 309 (1922).
1922, Bull. 344 (1923).
1923-24, Bull. 391 (1925).
1925, Bull. 417 (1926).
1926, Bull. 444 (1927).
1927-28, Bull. 517 (1930).
1929-30, Bull. 548 (1931).
1931-32, Bull. 592 (1933).
Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions of
Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925). (Com­
pilation of laws through 1924).
Laws Relating to Employment Agencies in the United
States as of July 1, 1937, Bull. 630 (1937).
Craft wage scales. See Wages and hours.
Credit societies. See Cooperatives, consumer— Credit unions.
Credit unions. See under Cooperatives, consumer.
Cutbacks. See War contracts.
Cyprus.
Labor in Cyprus, Rpt. 243 (1963).

D
Dangerous occupations. See Accidents; Occupational dis­
eases; Poisons, industrial; and Safety—Codes.
Death benefits. See specific benefit under Collective bar­
gaining, general.
Deaths, causes of. See Mortality statistics.
Demobilization. See Wartime.
Denmark. (See also Scandinavia.)
Labor Law and Practice in Denmark, Rpt. 390 (1972).
Department stores. See Stores, retail, and Wages and hours
—Stores, retail.
Depressed areas. See under Unemployment.
Developing countries. (See also specific country.)
How to Make an Inventory of High-Level and Skilled
Manpower in Developing Countries, Rpt. 331
(1968).
Summaries of Manpower Surveys and Reports for De­
veloping Countries, 1958-68, Bull. 1628 (1969).
Diesel-engine mechanics. See under Employment outlook.
Dietitians and home economists. See under Employment
outlook.
Digests. See specific subject.
Directories. See specific subject.
Disability benefits. See specific benefit under Collective
bargaining, general.
Discharge, discipline, and quits. See Collective bargaining,
general—Severance pay.
Diseases, industrial. See Occupational diseases.
126




Electronic Technicians

Dismissal compensation. See Collective bargaining, gen­
eral— Severance pay.
Disputes, industrial. See Labor-management disputes.
Dominican Republic.
Labor Law and Practice in the Dominican Republic,
Rpt. 343 (1968).
Draftsmen. See under Employment outlook.
Dressmaking. See Women workers.
Drivers. See Wages and hours— General trades, and Truckdrivers and helpers.
Drivers, bus. See Wages and hours—Transit industry—
local.
Drug stores and proprietary stores. See under Wages and
hours— Retail trade.
Dust phthisis and dusty trades. See Mortality statistics—
Dusty trades; also Hygiene, industrial— Printing trades.
Dyeing and finishing textiles. See under Accidents— Rates,
types, causes, (etc.); and under Wages and hours.
Dyers. See Wages and hours—Cleaners, dyers, and
pressers.

E
Earnings. See Wages and hours; also specific industry or
occupation under Employment outlook.
Earth scientists. See under Employment outlook.
Economic conditions. (See also Labor and industrial con­
ditions; Unemployment; and specific industry.)
Economic Forces in the United States, in Facts and
Figures, Bull. 1384 (1963).
Economic growth.
Patterns of U.S. Economic Growth, Bull. 1672 (1970).*
The U.S. Economy in 1980: A Summary of BLS Pro­
jections, Bull. 1673 (1970).*
Economic status. See Income.
Ecuador.
Labor Law and Practice in Ecuador, Rpt. 242 (1963).
Labor Legislation of Ecuador, Bull. 559 (1931).
Education. See Employment outlook; Vocational educa­
tion and training; and Workers’ education; also specific
occupation, profession, industry, or trade.
Efficiency, industrial. See Munition factories, Great Britain,
World War I; Plant management; Productivity.
Egypt. See United Arab Republic.
El Salvador.
Labor in the Central American Common Market Coun­
tries, Rpt. 345 (1968).
Labor Law and Practice in El Salvador, Rpt. 280
(1964).
Electric and gas utilities. See under Wages and hours—
Utilities.
Electric lamp industry. See under Technological change.
Electric light and power occupations. See under Employ­
ment outlook.
Electricians, maintenance. See under Employment outlook.
Electricity, prices of. See under Prices— Retail.
Electronic technicians. See under Employment outlook,
and Occupational mobility.

Electronics Manufacturing

Electronics manufacturing. See under Collective bargain­
in g , by industry or occupation; and under Employment
outlook.
Electroplaters. See under Employment outlook.
Electroplating and polishing industry. See under Wages
and hours.
Emigrant agents. See Legislation— Employment agencies,
public and private.
Employee-benefit plans. See specific benefit under Collec­
tive bargaining, general.
Employee representation, foreign countries. See Labor
conditions and industrial relations, foreign countries.
Employee rights, civil. See under Legislation.
Employee welfare. See Health, recreation, and welfare
conditions.
Employer associations and groups. See under Collective
bargaining, general— Bargaining unit, scope of.
Employer housing.
Housing by Employers in the United States, Bull. 263
(1920).*
Employers’ liability. See Workmen’s compensation; also see
Court decisions affecting labor; and under Legislation.
Employment. (See also Employment outlook; Employment
statistics; Unemployment; and specific occupations, pro­
fessions, industries, or trades.)
Atomic energy.
Employment Characteristics of Atomic Energy
Work, 1967, Rpt. 333 (1968).
Automation affecting.
Adjustments to the Introduction of Office Automa­
tion, Bull. 1276 (1960).
Automation and Employment Opportunities for
Office Workers, Bull. 1241 (1958).*
Children. See Child labor.
Clothing industry, women’s.
Regularity of Employment in the Women’s Readyto-Wear Garment Industries, Bull. 183 (1916).
Construction industry.
The Construction Industry in the United States,
Bull. 786 (1944). See also Bull. 658 (1938).*
Contract of. See Wage payment under Legislation. See
also Legislation—Labor—Text, summaries, and re­
views of laws, Bulls. 186 (1916)— 330 (1923), inclu­
sive, listed thereunder; Bull. 321 (1922), Labor Laws
That Have Been Declared Unconstitutional; and
Collective bargaining, general—Contract.
Cutbacks in war contracts affecting. See Reconversion.
Discouraged workers.
Employment in Perspective: Discouraged Workers
and Recent Changes in Labor Force Growth,
Rpt. 396 (1971).
Discrimination.
State Labor Legislation, 1937, Including Work­
men’s Compensation Legislation, Bull. 654
(1938).
Electric-lamp industry.
Technological Changes and Employment in the
Electric Lamp Industry, Bull. 593 (1933).
Engineers, professional. See that title.
Guaranteed. See Guaranteed employment and wage
plans.



Employment

Measurement, methods of.
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and Stud­
ies, Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711 (1971).*
Concepts and Methods Used in Household Statis­
tics on Employment and Unemployment from
the Current Population Survey, Rpt. 279 (1964).
Occupational Employment Statistics: Sources and
Data, Rpt. 305 (1966).
Report of the Advisory Committee on Employ­
ment Statistics, Bull. 542 (1931).*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
Machinery industry.
Women Production Workers in the Machinery In­
dustries: Employment Distribution; Earnings,
Winter 1952-53, Rpt. 98 (1956).
Metalworking industries.
Employment in Metalworking industries by Size
of Firm, October 1951 to October 1952, Rpt. 5
(1953); January 1952 to January 1953, Rpt. 32
(1953); April 1952 to April 1953, Rpt. 42
(1953); and Summary Report, July 1951 to
July 1953, Rpt. 64 (1955).
Minors. See Child labor.
Negroes. (See also Black Americans.)
Employment in Perspective: The Negro Employ­
ment Situation, Rpt. 391 (1971).
Negroes in the United States: Their Employment
and Economic Status, Bull. 1119 (1953).*
The Negroes in the United States: Their Economic
and Social Situation, Bull. 1511 (1966).*
New England.
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull.
1212 (1957).*
Older workers. See that title.
Part-time, increase in.
Population and Labor Force Projections for the
United States, 1960 to 1975, Bull. 1242 (1959).*
Postal Service.
Technological Changes and Employment in the
United States Postal Service, Bull. 574 (1932).
Poverty neighborhoods.
Urban Employment Survey: Employment Situa­
tion in Poverty Areas of Six Cities, July 1968June 1969, Rpt. 370 (1969).
Public works programs.
P.W.A. and Industry: A Four-Year Study of Re­
generative Employment, Bull. 658 (1938).*
Railroads.
Employment and Changing Occupational Patterns
in the Railroad Industry, 1947-60, Bull. 1344
(1963) .
Reconversion. See that title.
Scientific and technical personnel.
Employment of Scientific and Technical Personnel
in Industry, 1962, Bull. 1418 (1964).
Employment of Scientific and Technical Personnel
in State Government Agencies, 1962, Bull. 1412
(1964) .
Review of Occupational Employment Statistics:
Employment of Scientific, Professional, and
127

Employment Outlook

Technical Personnel in State Governments,
January 1964, Bull. 1557 (1967).
Scientific and Technical Personnel in Industry,
1961-66, Bull. 1609 (1968); 1967, Bull. 1674
(1970); 1969, Bull. 1723 (1971).
Technician Manpower, 1966-80, Bull. 1639 (1970).*
Seamen. See Merchant seamen.
Seamen, Great Lakes District. See Merchant seamen.
Shipyards.
Wartime Employment, Production, and Conditions
of Work in Shipyards, Bull. 824 (1945).
Southern States.
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947) .*
Statistics. See Employment statistics.
Summer.
Employment in Perspective: Summer Job Situa­
tion for Youth, 1971, Rpt. 397 (1971).
Employment in Perspective: Youth Job Situation
in Summer 1970, Rpt. 383 (1970).
Trends.
Employment in Perspective, Rpt. 380 (1970).
Urban areas.
Pilot and Experimental Program on Urban Em­
ployment Surveys, Rpt. 354 (1969).
Youth.
Employment in Perspective: Summer Job Situa­
tion for Youth, 1971, Rpt. 397 (1971).
Employment in Perspective: Youth Job Situation
in Summer 1970, Rpt. 383 (1970).
Employment outlook. [Note: The listing here includes the
Occupational Outlook Reprint Series, Bulls. 1700-1 to
1700-141. These reprints will be published in 1972 and
1973. For complete listings of earlier reprint series, see
Bulls. 1215 (1957), 1225 (1959), 1300 (1961), 1375
(1963), 1450 (1965), 1550 (1968), and 1650 (1970).*]
Accounting.
Bulls. 1048 (1952) and 1700-2.
Actuaries.
Bull. 1700-39.
Advertising, marketing research, and public relations.
Bull. 1700-3.
Agriculture.
Bull. 1700-114.
Air conditioning, refrigeration, and heating mechanics.
Bull. 1700-85.
Air transportation.
Bulls. 837-1 (1945), 837-2 (1947), and 1700-129.
Employment Requirements and Changing Occu­
pational Structure in Civil Aviation, Bull. 1367
(1964).
Pilots and Mechanics in Civil Aviation, 1967-77:
A Study of Manpower Requirements, Bull. 1655
(1970).
Aircraft mechanics. See Air transportation, this sec­
tion.
Aircraft, missile, and spacecraft manufacturing.
Bull. 1700-116.
Aluminum.
Bull. 1700-117.
Apparel.
Bulls. 1010 (1951) and 1700-118.
128




Employment Outlook

Appliance servicemen.
Bull. 1700-86.
Architects.
Bull. 1700-29.
Artists, commercial. See Commercial artists, this sec­
tion.
Asbestos and insulating workers.
Bull. 1700-73.
Atomic energy.
Bull. 1700-119.
Employment in the Atomic Energy Field, a 1960
Occupational Survey, Bull. 1297 (1961).
Automobile salesmen.
Bull. 1700-59.
Automobile service occupations.
Bulls. 842 (1945), 1129 (1953), and 1700-84.
Baking.
Bull. 1550-100.
Banking.
Bulls. 1156 (1954), 1700-120, and 1700-137.
Barbers and cosmetologists.
Bull. 1700-64.
Bartenders.
Bull. 1700-66.
Blacksmiths.
Bull. 1700-97.
Boilermaking.
Bull. 1700-98.
Bookkeepers. (See also Banking, this section.)
Bull. 1700-51.
Bowling-pin-machine mechanics.
Bull. 1700-87.
Bricklayers, stonemasons, marble and tile setters, and
terrazzo workers.
Bull. 1700-74.
Building custodians.
Bull. 1700-65.
Building trades.
Bulls. 967 (1949) and 1700-73 through 1700-83.
Business machine servicemen.
Bulls. 892 (1947), 1129 (1953), and 1700-88.
Carpenters, painters, paperhangers, and glaziers.
Bull. 1700-75.
Cashiers.
Bull. 1700-52.
Cement masons, lathers, and plasterers.
Bull. 1700-76.
Chemical industry, industrial.
Bull. 1151 (1954) and 1700-124.
Chiropractors.
Bull. 1700-13.
City managers.
Bull. 1700-30.
Civil aviation. See Air transportation, this section.
Clergymen.
Bull. 1700-31.
Clerical workers. (See also specific industry, this sec­
tion.)
Bulls. 1700-51 through 1700-58.
College graduates. (See also Handbooks, this section.)
College Educated Workers, 1968-80, Bull. 1676
(1970).

Employment Outlook

Commercial artists.
Bull. 1700-32.
Conservation occupations (foresters, forestry aides, and
range managers).
Bull. 1700-33.
Cooks and chefs.
Bull. 1700-66.
Counseling and placement occupations.
Bull. 1700-34.
Dental hygienists, dental assistants, and dental labora­
tory technicians.
Bull. 1700-8.
Dentists.
Bull. 1700-7.
Department stores. See Stores, department, this section.
Diesel (engine) and farm equipment mechanics.
Bulls. 813 (1945), 1129 (1953), and 1700-89.
Dietitians.
Bull. 1700-20.
Draftsmen. See Technicians, this section.
Drivers.
Bull. 1700-100.
Drug industry.
Bull. 1700-121.
Earth or environmental scientists (geologists, geophysi­
cists, meteorologists, and oceanographers).
Bulls. 1050 (1952) and 1700-25.
Electric light and power.
Bulls. 944 (1949) and 1700-130.
Electric sign servicemen.
Bull. 1700-90.
Electricians, construction.
Bull. 1700-78.
Electricians, maintenance.
Bull. 1700-91.
Electronic computer operating personnel.
Bull. 1700-42.
Electronic technicians. See Technicians, this section.
Electronics manufacturing.
Bulls. 1072 (1952) and 1700-122.

Employment Outlook and Changing Occupational
Structure in Electronics Manufacturing, Bull.
1363 (1963).*
Electroplaters. See Factory operatives, this section.
Elevator constructors.
Bull. 1700-79.
Engineers, professional.
Bulls. 968 (1950), and 1700-24.
Factory operatives.
Bull. 1700-101.
Factory Jobs: Employment Outlook for Workers
in Jobs Requiring Little or No Experience or
Specialized Training, Bull. 1288 (1961).
FBI special agents.
Bull. 1700-67.
File clerks.
Bull. 1700-53.
Firefighters.
Bull. 1700-68.
Floor covering installers.
Bull. 1700-80.



Employment Outlook

Foremen.
Bull. 1700-103.
Foresters. See Conservation occupations, this section.
Forge shop occupations.
Bull. 1700-102.
Foundries.
Bulls. 880 (1946) and 1700-123.
Furniture upholsterers.
Bull. 1700-104.
Government, except Post Office.
Bull. 1700-141.
Guards and watchmen.
Bull. 1700-69.
Handbooks.
Counselor’s Guide to Occupational and Other
Manpower Information, Bull. 1421 (1965).
Occupational Data for Counselors: A Handbook
of Census Information Selected for Use in
Guidance, Bull. 817 (1945).
Occupational Outlook for College Graduates,
1970-71 edition, Bull. 1681 (1971).
Occupational Outlook Handbook, Bulls. 940
(1949),* 998 (1951),* 1215 (1957),* 1255
(1959),* 1300 (1961),* 1375 (1963),* 1450
(1965),* 1550 (1967),* 1650 (1970),* 1700
(1972).*
Health service occupations.
Bulls. 1700-6 through 1700-23.
Home economists.
Bull. 1700-35.
Hospital administrators.
Bull. 1700-21.
Hotels.
Bulls. 905 (1947) and 1700-139.
Household workers, private.
Bull. 1700-72.
Industrial chemical industry. See Chemical industry,
industrial, this section.
Industrial designers.
Bull. 1700-32.
Industrial machinery repairmen. (See also Mechanics
and repairmen, this section.)
Bull. 1700-91.
Industrial traffic managers.
Bull. 1700-5.
Instrument makers, mechanical.
Bull. 1700-105.
Instrument repairmen.
Bull. 1700-93.
Insurance agents and brokers.
Bull. 1700-60.
Insurance claim adjusters, claim examiners, and under­
writers.
Bull. 1700-138.
Interior designers and decorators.
Bull. 1700-32.
Iron and steel industry.
Bull. 1700-125.
Ironworkers.
Bull. 1700-79.
129

Employment Outlook

Jewelers and jewelry repairmen.
Bull. 1700-94
Laborers, construction, and hod carriers.
Bull. 1700-77.
Landscape architects.
Bull. 1700-36.
Laundry and drycleaning plants.
Bull. 1700-140.
Lawyers.
Bull. 1700-37.
Librarians and library technicians.
Bull. 1700-38.
Life scientists, biochemists.
Bull. 1700-26.
Machine movers.
Bull. 1700-79.
Machining occupations.
Bulls. 895 (1947), 1130 (1953), and 1700-105.
Maintenance electricians. See Electricians, maintenance,
this section.
Mathematics and related fields.
Bull. 1700-39.
Meat cutters.
Bull. 1700-106.
Mechanics and repairmen. (See also specific occupa­
tional field or industry, this section.)
Bull. 1129 (1953).
Medical assistants and technicians.
Bull. 1700-16.
Medical laboratory workers.
Bull. 1700-17.
Medical record librarians.
Bull. 1700-19.
Men’s tailored clothing industry.
Bull. 1010 (1951).
Merchant marine.
Bull. 1700-131.

Metalworking. (See also specific occupational group,
this section.)
Bulls. 1130 (1953) and 1700-105.
Millwrights.
Bull. 1700-91.
Models.
Bull. 1700-70.
Motion picture projectionists.
Bull. 1700-107.
Motorcycle mechanics.
Bull. 1700-92.
Motor vehicle and equipment manufacturing.
Bulls. 1138 (1953) and 1700-126.
Newspaper reporters.
Bull. 1700-50.
Occupational therapists, physical therapists, and assist­
ants.
Bull. 1700-14.
Office machine and computer manufacturing.
Bull. 1700-127.
Office workers. See specific occupation or industry, this
section.
Operating engineers, construction.
Bull. 1700-81.
130




Employment Outlook

Opticians and optical mechanics.
Bull. 1700-99.
Optometrists, optometric assistants.
Bull. 1700-10.
Oxygen cutters. See Welders, this section.
Paper and allied products industries.
Bull. 1700-128.
Parking lot attendants.
Bull. 1700-108.
Performing arts occupations.
Bull. 1700-40.
Personnel workers.
Bull. 1700-4.
Petroleum and natural gas.
Bulls. 994 (1950) and 1700-115.
Pharmacists.
Bull. 1700-11.
Photographers, photographic laboratory occupations.
Bull. 1700-41.
Physical scientists (chemists, physicists, astronomers,
food scientists).
Bull. 1700-27.
Physicians and osteopathic physicians.
Bull. 1700-6.
Postwar Outlook for Physicians, Bull. 863 (1946).
Physicists.
Bulls. 1144 (1953) and 1700-27.
Pilots. (See also Air transportation, this section.)
Bull. 1700-129.
Plastics products.
Bull. 929 (1948).
Plumbers and pipefitters.
Bull. 1700-82.
Podiatrists.
Bull. 1700-12.
Police officers, State police officers.
Bull. 1700-71.
Post Office.
Bull. 1650-128.
Printing occupations.
Bulls. 902 (1947), 1126 (1953), and 1700-109.
Programers.
Bull. 1700-42.
Psychologists.
Bull. 1700-43.
Purchasing agents.
Bull. 1700-5.
Radio and television broadcasting.
Bulls. 958 (1949) and 1700-132.
Radio and television manufacturing. See Electronics
manufacturing, this section.
Radio service technicians.
Bull. 1700-95.
Radiologic technologists.
Bull. 1700-18.
Railroads.
Bulls. 961 (1949) and 1700-133.
Real estate salesmen and brokers.
Bull. 1700-62.
Receptionists.
Bull. 1700-54.

Employment Outlook

Recreation workers.
Bull. 1700-44.
Registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and hos­
pital attendants.
Bull. 1700-9.
Repairmen. See Mechanics and repairmen, and specific
occupational field or industry, this section.
Reporters, newspaper.
Bull. 1700-50.
Restaurants.
Bull. 1700-136.
Riggers.
Bull. 1700-79.
Roofers.
Bull. 1700-83.
Salesworkers, retail trade, wholesale trade, and manu­
facturing.
Bull. 1700-61.
Sanitarians.
Bull. 1700-22.
School teachers. See Teachers, this section.
Scientists. See Earth or environmental, Life, Physical,
and Social scientists, this section.
Seamen, merchant. See Merchant marine, this section.
Securities salesmen.
Bull. 1700-63.
Sheet-metal workers.
Bull. 1700-83.
Shipping and receiving clerks.
Bull. 1700-55.
Shoe repairmen.
Bull. 1700-110.
Social scientists (anthropologists, economists, geogra­
phers, historians, political scientists, and sociologists).
Bulls. 1167 and 1700-45.
Social workers and social service aides.
Bull. 1700-46.
Speech pathologists and audiologists.
Bull. 1700-15.
Stationary engineers and stationary firemen (boiler).
Bull. 1700-111.
Statisticians.
Bulls. 1167 (1954) and 1700-39.
Steel industry. See Iron and steel industry, this section.
Stenographers and secretaries. (See also specific indus­
try, this section.)
Bull. 1700-56.
Stock clerks.
Bull. 1700-57.
Stores, department.
Bulls. 1020 (1951) and 1700-61.
Surveyors.
Bull. 1700-47.
Systems analysts.
Bull. 1700-42.
Teachers.
Bulls. 972 (1949) and 1700-48.
Technicians. (See also specific occupation or industry,
this section.)
Bulls. 1131 (1953) and 1700-28.



Employment Statistics

Technician Manpower: Requirements, Resources,
and Training Needs, Bull. 1512 (1966).*
Technician Manpower, 1966-80, Bull. 1639
(1970).*
Telephone industry.
Bull. 1700-134.
Telephone operators.
Bull. 1700-58.
Television broadcasting.
Bulls. 958 (1949) and 1700-132.
Television manufacturing. See Electronics manufactur­
ing, this section.
Television service technicians.
Bull. 1700-95.
Tomorrow’s jobs.
Bull. 1700-1.
Trucking industry.
Bull. 1700-135.
Typists.
Bull. 1700-56.
Urban planners.
Bull. 1700-49.
Vending machine mechanics.
Bull. 1700-96.
Veterinarians.
Bull. 1700-23.
Waiters and waitresses.
Bull. 1700-66.
Waste water treatment plant operators.
Bull. 1700-112.
Watch repairmen.
Bull. 1700-94.
Welders, oxygen and arc cutters.
Bulls. 844 (1945), 1130 (1953), and 1700-113.
Writing occupations.
Bull. 1700-50.
Employment projections. See Projections.
Employment stabilization. See guaranteed employment and
wage plans.
Employment statistics. (See also Employment, and Unem­
ployment. )
Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns of Private
Nonagricultural Employees, 1965, Bull. 1675 (1970).
Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns, Private
Nonagricultural Employment, 1964, Rpt. 330 (1969).
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and Studies,
Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711 (1971).*
Employment and Earnings Statistics for States and
Areas, 1939-62, Bull. 1370 (1963); 1939-63, Bull.
1370-1 (1964); 1939-64, Bull. 1370-2 (1965);
1939-65, Bull. 1370-3 (1966); 1939-66, Bull. 1370-4
(1967); 1939-67, Bull. 1370-5 (1968); 1939-68,
Bull. 1370-6 (1969); 1939-69, Bull. 1370-7 (1970);
1939-70, Bull. 1370-8 (1971).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the United
States, 1909-60, Bull. 1312 (1961); 1909-62, Bull.
1312-1 (1963); 1909-64, Bull. 1312-2 (1964);
1909-65, Bull. 1312-3 (1966); Bull. 1312-4 (1966);
1909-67, Bull. 1312-5 (1967); 1909-68, Bull.
1312-6 (1968); 1909-70, Bull. 1312-7 (1971).
131

Food

Engineers, Professional

Fluctuation in Employment in Ohio, 1914 to 1929,
Bull. 553 (1923). See also Bull. 613 (1935).
Handbook of Labor Statistics, Bull. 1016, 1950 ed.
(1951); 1951 supp. (1953);* 1967, Bull. 1555
(1967);* 1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969, Bull.
1630 (1969);* 1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);* 1971, Bull.
1705 (1971).*
Impact of the War on Employment in 181 Centers of
War Activity, Bull. 826 (1945).
Occupational Data for Counselors: A Handbook of
Census Information Selected for Use in Guidance,
Bull. 817 (1945).
Occupational Employment Patterns for 1960 and 1975,
Bull. 1599 (1968).
Occupational Employment Statistics, 1960-66, Bull.
1579 (1968); 1960-67, Bull. 1643 (1970).
Occupational Employment Statistics: Sources and Data,
Rpt. 305 (1966).
Pilot and Experimental Program on Urban Employ­
ment Surveys, Rpt. 354 (1969).
Report of the Advisory Committee on Employment
Statistics, Bull. 542 (1931).*
Revised Indexes of Factory Employment and Pay
Rolls, 1919 to 1933, Bull. 610 (1935).
Street Railway Employment in the United States, Bull.
204 (1917).
Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925, Bull.
409 (1926).
Engineers, professional. (See also under Wages and Hours.)
Employment and Earnings in the Engineering Pro­
fession, 1929 to 1934, Bull. 682 (1941). See also
Bull. 1027 (1951).
Employment Outlook for Engineers, Bulls. 968 (1950)
and 1550-33 (no date).
Federal Spending and Scientist and Engineer Employ­
ment, Bull. 1663 (1970).
Manpower Resources in Chemistry and Chemical En­
gineering, Bull. 1132 (1953).*
Ph.D. Scientists and Engineers in Private Industry,
1968-80, Bull. 1648 (1970).
Scientific and Technical Personnel in Industry, 19611966, Bull. 1609 (1968); 1967, Bull. 1674 (1970);
1969, Bull. 1723 (1971).
Scientific Research and Development in American In­
dustry, Bull. 1148 (1953).*
Equal pay for equal work.
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1950-51,
Bull. 1091 (1952).
Escalation clauses. See Collective bargaining, general—
Escalation clauses.
Ethiopia.
Labor Law and Practice in the Empire of Ethiopia,
Rpt. 298 (1966).
Europe. (See also specific country or specific subject.)
Labor Digests on Countries in Europe, Bull. 1497
(1966).*
Examining and licensing of workmen. See Legislation—
Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews of laws.
Expenditures. See Income and expenditures, consumer.
Expiration of collective agreements. (See also Collective
bargaining, general— Expiration.)
132



Wage Calendar, 1968, Bull. 1593 (1968);* 1969, Bull.
1619 (1969);* 1970, Bull. 1653 (1970);* 1971, Bull.
1698 (1971);* 1972, Bull. 1724 (1972).*
Explosives industry. (See also Munition factories, Great
Britain, World War I.)
Average Hourly Earnings in the Explosives Industry,
June 1944, Bull. 819 (1945).
Industrial Poisons Used or Produced in the Manufac­
ture of Explosives, Bull. 219 (1917).
Extra pay, specific industries. See Shift differentials and
operations.

F

Fabricated structural-steel industry. See Wages and hours—
Iron and steel industry.
Factfinding boards.
Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-Management Dis­
putes in 1948, Bull. 963 (1949).*
Factory workers. See under Wages and hours.
Fair Labor Standards Act. See under Legislation.
Family allowances. (See also Public assistance.)
Family Allowances in Foreign Countries, Bull. 401
(1926).
Family Allowances in Various Countries, Bull. 754
(1943).
Family Allowances in Various Countries, 1944-45,
Bull. 853 (1946).
Mid-War Developments in Civilian Family Allowances,
Bull. 803 (1944).
Family budgets. See Income and expenditures, consumer;
and Prices.
Family— expenditure—income. See Income and expendi­
tures, consumer.
Farm equipment dealers. See under Wages and hours—
Retail trade.
Farm labor. See Agriculture.
Fatalities, caused by accidents and injuries. See Accidents.
Fatigue, industrial. See Munition factories, Great Britain,
World War I.
Federal employees. (See also under Wages and hoursWhite-collar workers, and specific occupation or profes­
sion. )
Mutual Relief Associations Among Government Em­
ployees in Washington, D. C., Bull. 282 (1921).
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States, Can­
ada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Federal expenditures.
Federal Spending and Scientist and Engineer Employ­
ment, Bull. 1663 (1970).
Fertilizer industry. See under Accidents— Rates, types,
causes, (etc.); and Wages and hours.
Fire departments and firemen. See Wages and hours—
Municipal employees.
Fireworks industry.
Phosphorus Necrosis in the Manufacture of Fireworks
and in the Preparation of Phosphorus, Bull. 405
(1926).
Fishermen and fishing. See Wages and hours—Fishermen.
Food. (See also under Prices—Retail, and under Wages
and hours—Groceries, wholesale and Retail trade.)

Footwear Manufacturing

Food Situation in Central Europe, 1917, Bull. 242
(1918).
Wartime Food Purchases, Bull. 838 (1945).
Footwear manufacturing. See Shoe industry; also Shoe in­
dustry under Labor and industrial conditions, and under
Wages and hours.
Foremen. See under Collective bargaining, general.
Foresters. See Employment outlook— Conservation occu­
pations.
Forge shop occupations. See under Employment outlook.
Formosa. See Taiwan.
Foundries. See under Accident— Rates, types, causes, (etc.);
Safety—Codes; and Wages and hours.
Foundry occupations. See under Employment outlook.
Freight handlers. See under Wages and hours—General
trades.
Fringe benefits. See under Collective bargaining, general.
See also Employment outlook; Health, insurance, and pen­
sion plans, extent of; Related wage benefits; specific indus­
try or occupation; and Wages and hours, particularly
Hospital employees, selected cities, Area Wage Surveys,
Office workers, and bulletins entitled “Hourly Earnings,”
etc.
Fruit and vegetable industry, canned. See Accidents—
Rates, types, causes, (etc.); and under Collective bargain­
ing, by industry or occupation.
Fuels, prices of. See under Prices— Retail.
Furniture, homefumishings, and appliance stores. See under
Wages and hours— Retail trade, and Stores, retail.
Furniture industry. See Older Workers and under Wages
and hours.

G
Garages, repair. See Wages and hours—Automobile repair
garages and shops, and Service stations.
Garnishments.
Wage Executions for Debt, Bull. 622 (1936).
Gas utilities. See Wages and hours— Utilities.
Gasoline filling stations. See Wages and hours—Service sta­
tions.
General merchandise stores. See Stores, retail, and under
Wages and hours— Retail trade.
Germany.
Postwar Labor Conditions in Germany, Bull. 380
(1925).
Works Council Movement in Germany, Bull. 383
(1925).
Glass, clay, and stone workers. See Wages and hours—
Clay, stone, and glass industries.
Glass industry. See under Productivity, and under Wages
and hours—Clay, stone, and glass industries.
Glassware and glass-container industries. See under Wages
and hours.
Glossaries.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Glossary of Current Industrial Relations and Wage
Terms, Bull. 1438 (1965).



Guyana

Glossary of Currently Used Wage Terms. Bull. 983
(1950).
Glove industry. See under Wages and hours.
Government employees. (See also Employment statistics;
Federal employees; and Wages and hours— Municipal
employees, and White-collar workers.)
Planning and Administrative Personnel in Local Gov­
ernments: A Pilot Study, June 1969, Bull. 1631
(1969).
Government Labor Officials of the United States and Can­
ada, Association of, and Governmental Officials in Indus­
try of the United States and Canada, Association of. See
Conventions, meetings, etc.— Governmental Labor Offi­
cials, International Association of.
Governmental Labor Officials, International Association of.
See under Conventions, meetings, etc.
Grain-mill products industries. See under Wages and hours.
Granite and stone trades. See under Mortality statistics—
Dusty trades; and see Wages and hours— General trades.
Great Britain. See specific subjects.
Greece.
Labor Law and Practice in the Kingdom of Greece,
Rpt. 325 (1968).
Grievances. See under Collective bargaining, general; and
Collective bargaining, by industry or occupation.
Groceries, wholesale. See under Wages and hours.
Guaranteed employment and wage plans. (See also under
Collective bargaining, general.)
Appendix C— Guaranteed Wage or Employment Plans,
Bull. 906 (1947).
Appendix F— Economic Analysis of Guaranteed Wages,
Bull. 907 (1947).*
Collective Bargaining in the Meat-Packing Industry,
Bull. 1063 (1952).
Digest of Nine Supplemental Unemployment Benefit
Plans, Early 1963, Bull. 1365 (1963).
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supplementary
Compensation Practices for Production and Related
Workers; Composition of Payroll Hours: Manufac­
turing Industries, 1962, Bull. 1428 (1965).*
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supplementary
Compensation Practices for Production and Related
Workers, Meatpacking and Processing Industries,
1962, Bull. 1413 (1964).*
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supplementary Re­
muneration Practices: Finance, Insurance, and Real
Estate Industries, 1961, Bull. 1419 (1964).*
Financing Supplemental Unemployment Benefit Plans,
Bull. 1483 (1966).
Guaranteed Wage Plans in the United States, Bull. 925
(1948).*
Unemployment-Benefit Plans in the United States and
Unemployment Insurance in Foreign Countries, Bull.
544 (1931).*
Guatemala.
Labor Law and Practice in Guatemala, Rpt. 223 (1963).
Labor in the Central American Common’Market Coun­
tries, Rpt. 345 (1968).
Guyana.
Labor Law and Practice in Guyana, Rpt. 324 (1967).
133

Haiti

H
Haiti.
Labor Law and Practice in Haiti, Rpt. 244 (1963).
Handbooks. See specific subjects.
Handicapped workers.
Impaired Workers in Industry, Bull. 857 (1946).
The Performance of Physically Impaired Workers in
Manufacturing Industries, Bull. 923 (1948).
Hat industries. See under Wages and hours.
Hawaii.
Salaries of White-Collar Workers in Hawaii, Puerto
Rico, and Alaska, May-June 1963, Bull. 1392 (1964).
The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska, Hawaii,
Bull. 1191 (1956).
Hazardous occupations. See under Occupational diseases.
See also Accidents; Mortality statistics; Poisons, indus­
trial; and Safety.
Health. See Health, recreation, and welfare conditions;
Occupational diseases; Poisons, industrial. See also Legis­
lation—Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews of laws.
Health and welfare benefit plans, collectively bargained.
See Collective bargaining, general—Health and welfare
insurance.
Health insurance. See Collective bargaining, general—
Health and welfare insurance.
Health insurance, Great Britain.
National Health Insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to
1921, Bull. 312 (1923).
Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of. (See also
Collective bargaining, general— Health and welfare insur­
ance, and Pensions; Collective bargaining, by industry or
occupation; Wages and hours— specific industry or occu­
pation; Related wage benefits.)
Characteristics of Terminated Retirement Plans, 195565, Rpt. 369 (1969).
Digest of 50 Selected Health and Insurance Plans for
Salaried Employees, Spring 1963, Bull. 1377 (1964);
Early 1969, Bull. 1629 (1969).
Health and Insurance Benefits and Pension Plans for
Salaried Employees, Spring 1963, Bull. 1405 (1964).
Health, recreation, and welfare conditions. (See also
Parks.)
Beneficial Activities of American Trade-Unions, Bull.
465 (1928).*
Health and Recreation Activities in Industrial Estab­
lishments, 1926, Bull. 458 (1928).
Welfare Work for Employees in Industrial Establish­
ments in the United States, Bull. 250 (1919).
Health service occupations. See under Employment out­
look, and under Wages and hours—Hospitals.
Health standards.
Collective Bargaining Provisions— Safety, Health, and
Sanitation, Bull. 908-14 (1949).
Health workers.
Health Manpower, 1966-75, Rpt. 323 (1967).
Holidays. See under Collective bargaining, general, and
by industry or occupation. Also see Employment outlook;
Wages and hours—Area Wage Surveys, Office workers,
134



Hygiene, Industrial

and bulletins entitled “Hourly Earnings,” etc. For legis­
lation concerning, see Legislation— Labor—Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws.
Home economists. See under Employment outlook.
Home industries. See Homeworkers.
Home insulation (heat) materials. See under Labor require­
ments.
Homes for the aged. See under Old-age care and assistance.
Homeworkers. See Legislation—Labor.
Homeworkers, foreign countries.
Minimum Wage Legislation in Various Countries, Bull.
467 (1928).*
Honduras.
Labor in the Central American Common Market Coun­
tries, Rpt. 345 (1968).
Labor Law and Practice in Honduras, Rpt. 189 (1961).
Hosiery and underwear manufacture. See under Wages and
hours.
Hosiery manufacture. See under Wages and hours—Hosiery
manufacturing and Wage chronologies; also see Women
workers.
Hospital employees. See under Accidents— Rates, types,
causes, and prevention, by industry or occupation; under
Wages and hours.
Hospitalization benefits, collectively bargained. See Collec­
tive bargaining, general— Health and welfare insurance.
Hotel and restaurant workers. See Wages and hours—Ho­
tels, motels, and restaurants.
Hotel occupations. See under Employment outlook.
Hours and earnings. See Wages and hours.
Hours of work. (See also under Collective bargaining, gen­
eral, and by industry or occupation; specific industry or
occupation under Employment outlook; Munition fac­
tories, Great Britain, World War I; and Wages and hours.)
Hours of Work and Output, Bull. 917 (1948).*
Studies of the Effects of Long Working Hours, Bulls.
791, Part 1 (1944)* and 791-A, Part 2 (1944).*
Housing. (See also under Building construction; Construc­
tion— Building and nonbuilding; Construction, general;
under Cooperatives, consumer; and under Legislation.)
Housing by Employers in the United States, Bull. 263
(1920).*
New Housing and Its Materials, 1940-56, Bull. 1231
(1958).*
New Housing in Metropolitan Areas, 1949-51, Bull.
1115 (1952).
Structure of the Residential Building Industry in 1949,
Bull. 1170 (1954).*
Humanities.
Personnel Resources in the Social Sciences and Hu­
manities, Bull. 1169 (1954).*
Hygiene, industrial. (See also Occupational diseases; Poi­
sons, industrial; Safety; Legislation— Labor— Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws; Munition factories, Great
Britain, World War I.)
Health Survey of the Printing Trades, 1922 to 1925,
Bull. 427 (1927).
Hygiene of the Printing Trades, Bull. 209 (1917).
Survey of Hygienic Conditions in the Printing Trades,
Bull. 392 (1925).

Iceland

i
Iceland.
Labor Law and Practice in Iceland, Rpt. 371 (1970).
Impaired workers. See Handicapped workers.
Incentive-wage plans. See Wage-incentive plans; also Col­
lective bargaining, general—Wage-incentive plans.
Income. See Income and expenditures, consumer; Negroes;
Older workers; Southern States; and Wartime.
Income, national.
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull. 1016
(1951), 1951 Supp. (1953);* 1967, Bull. 1555
(1967);* 1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969, Bull. 1630
(1969);* 1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);* 1971, Bull. 1705
(1971).*
Income and expenditures, consumer. (See also Prices—
Consumer Price Index.)
Changing Consumption Patterns, 1960-61, Rpt. 238-11
(1965).
Changing Patterns of Consumer Expenditures, 1950-60,
Rpt. 238-3 (1964); and 1960-61, Rpt. 238-5 (1964).
City Worker’s Family Budget for a Moderate Living
Standard, Autumn 1966, Bull. 1570-1 (1967).*
City Worker’s Family Budget: Pricing, Procedures,
Specifications, and Average Prices, Autumn 1966,
Bull. 1570-3 (1968).
Clothing for Urban Families: Expenditures per Mem­
ber, by Sex and Age, 1960-61, Bull. 1556 (1967).
Consumer Expenditures and Income: Survey Guide­
lines, Bull. 1684 (1971).*
Consumer Expenditures and Income Survey:
Anchorage, Alaska, 1959, Rpt. 237-29 (1963).
Atlanta, Georgia, 1960, Rpt. 237-6 (1962); Supp.
1 (1963).
Austin, Texas, 1960, Rpt. 237-12 (1963); Supp. 1
(1963) .
Bakersfield, California, 1961, Rpt. 237-70 (1964);
Supp. 1 (1964).
Baltimore, Maryland, 1960, Rpt. 237-16 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-66 (1964).
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1961, Rpt. 237-62
(1964) ; Supp.1 (1964).
Boston, Massachusetts, 1960, Rpt. 237-7 (1962);
Supp. 1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-57 (1964).
Buffalo, New York, 1960, Rpt. 237-18 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963).
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1960, Rpt. 237-17 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963).
Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, 1960, Rpt. 237-23
(1963 );Supp. 1 (1963).
Chicago, Illinois, 1960, Rpt. 237-5 (1962); Supp.
1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-55 (1963).
Cincinnati, Ohio, 1959, Rpt. 237-28 (1963); Supp.
1 (1963).
Cleveland, Ohio, 1960, Rpt. 237-21 (1963); Supp.
1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-71 (1964).
Dallas, Texas, 1960, Rpt. 237-20 (1963); Supp. 1
(1963).
Dayton, Ohio, 1961, Rpt. 237-60 (1963); Supp. 1
(1963).



Income and Expenditures, Consumer

Denver, Colorado, 1961, Rpt. 237-59 (1963);
Supp.1 (1963).
Detroit, Michigan, 1960, Rpt. 237-1 (1962); Supp.
1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-51 (1963).
Durham, North Carolina, 1961, Rpt. 237-69
(1963); Supp.1 (1963).
Fairbanks, Alaska, 1959, Rpt. 237-30 (1963).
Green Bay, Wisconsin, 1961, Rpt. 237-73 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963).
Hartford, Connecticut, 1961, Rpt. 237-68 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963).
Honolulu, Hawaii, 1961, Rpt. 237-78 (1963);
Supp.1 (1963).
Houston, Texas, 1963, Rpt. 237-83 (1965).
Indianapolis, Indiana, 1960, Rpt. 237-10 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963).
Juneau, Alaska, 1960, Rpt. 237-32 (1963).
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas, 1963, Rpt. 237-79
(1965); Supp.1 (1965).
Ketchikan, Alaska, 1960, Rpt. 237-31 (1963).
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 1961, Rpt. 237-64
(1963); Supp. 1 (1963).
Las Vegas, Nevada, 1962, Rpt. 237-33 (1964);
Supp. 1 (1964).
Los Angeles, California, 1960, Rpt. 237-22 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-72 (1964).
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1963, Rpt. 237-80 (1965);
Supp. 1 (1965).
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, 1963, Rpt. 23781 (1965); Supp.1 (1965).
Nashville, Tennessee, 1961, Rpt. 237-56 (1963);
Supp.1 (1963).
New York, New York, 1960, Rpt. 237-4 (1962);
Supp. 1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-54 (1963).
Northern New Jersey, 1960, Rpt. 237-13 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-63 (1963).
Orlando, Florida, 1960, Rpt. 237-19 (1963); Supp.
1 (1963).
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1960, Rpt. 237-8
(1963) ; Supp. 1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-58
(1964) .
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1960, Rpt. 237-11
(1963) ; Supp. 1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-61
(1964) .
Portland, Maine, 1960, Rpt. 237-14 (1963); Supp.
1 (1963).
Rural Nonfarm Areas in North Central Region,
1961, Rpt. 237-85 (1964); Supp. 2 (1965);
Supp. 3 (1965).
Rural Nonfarm Areas in Northeastern Region,
1961, Rpt. 237-84 (1964); Supp. 2 (1965);
Supp. 3 (1965).
Rural Nonfarm Areas in Southern Region, 1961,
Rpt. 237-86 (1964); Supp. 2 (1965); Supp. 3
(1965) .
Rural Nonfarm Areas in United States, 1961, Rpt.
237-88 (1964); Supp. 1 (1964); Supp. 3 (1965).
Rural Nonfarm Areas in Western Region, 1961,
Rpt. 237-87 (1964); Supp. 2 (1965); Supp. 3
(1965).
135

Income and Expenditures, Consumer

San Diego, California, 1963, Rpt. 237-82 (1965);
Supp. 1 (1965).
San Francisco, California, 1960, Rpt. 237-2
(1962); Supp. 1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-52
(1964).
Seattle, Washington, 1960, Rpt. 237-9 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963).
Small Cities in the North Central Region, 1960,
Rpt. 237-27 (1963); 1961, Rpt. 237-77 (1964).
Small Cities in the Northeastern Region, 1960,
Rpt. 237-24 (1963); 1961, Rpt. 237-74 (1964).
Small Cities in the Southern Region, 1960, Rpt.
237-25 (1963); 1961, Rpt. 237-75 (1964).
Small Cities in the Western Region, 1960, Rpt.
237-26 (1963); 1961, Rpt. 237-76 (1964).
St. Louis, Missouri, 1960, Rpt. 237-15 (1963);
Supp. 1 (1963); 1960-61, Rpt. 237-65 (1964).
Total North Central Region, Urban and Rural,
1960-61, Rpt. 237-90 (1965); Supp. 1 (1965);
Supp. 2 (1966); Supp. 3, Part A (1966).
Total Northeastern Region, Urban and Rural,
1960-61, Rpt. 237-89 (1965); Supp. 1 (1965);
Supp. 2 (1966); Supp. 3, Part A (1966).
Total Southern Region, Urban and Rural, 1960-61,
Rpt. 237-91 (1965); Supp. 1 (1965); Supp. 2
(1966); Supp. 3, Part A (1966).
Total United States, Urban and Rural, 1960-61,
Rpt. 237-93 (1965); Supp. 2 (1966); Supp. 3,
Part A (1966).
Total Western Region, Urban and Rural, 1960-61,
Rpt. 237-92 (1965); Supp. 1 (1965); Supp. 2
(1966); Supp. 3, Part A (1966).
Urban Places in the North Central Region, 196061, Rpt. 237-35 (1964); Supp. 2, Part A (1965).
Urban Places in the Northeastern Region, 1960-61,
Rpt. 237-34 (1964); Supp. 2, Part A (1964);
Supp. 3, Part A (1964).
Urban Places in the Southern Region, 1960-61,
Rpt. 237-36 (1964); Supp. 2, Part A (1964).
Urban Places in the Western Region, 1960-61, Rpt.
237-37 (1964); Supp. 2, Part A (1964); Supp.
3, Part A (1964).
Urban United States, 1960-61, Rpt. 237-38 (1964);
Supp. 1 (1964); Supp. 2, Part A (1964); Supp.
3, Part A (1964); Supp. 3, Part B (1964); Supp.
3, PartC (1964).
Washington, D.C., 1960, Rpt. 237-3 (1962) (Re­
vised 1963); Supp. 1 (1963); 1960^61, Rpt.
237-53 (1964).
Wichita, Kansas, 1961, Rpt. 237-67 (1963); Supp.
1 (1963).
Family Expenditures in Selected Cities, 1935-36, Bull.
648: Vol. I (1941), Housing; Vol. II (1940), Food;
Vol. Ill (1941), Clothing and Personal Care; Vol.
IV (1941), Furnishings and Equipment; Vol. V
(1940), Medical Care; Vol. VI (1940), Travel and
Transportation; Vol. VII (1941), Recreation, Read­
ing, Formal Education, Tobacco, Contributions, and
Personal Taxes; Vol. VIII (1941), Assets and Lia­
bilities, Changes in.
Family Income and Expenditure, 1935-36:—Vol. I,
136




Income and Expenditures, Consumer

Family Income; Vol. II, Family Expenditure:
Chicago, Bull. 642 (1939).
East Central Region, Bull. 644 (1939 and 1941).
New England, Bull. 645 (1939 and 1941).
New York City, Bull. 643 (1941 and 1939).
Pacific Northwest, Bull. 649 (1939 and 1940).
Southeastern Region, Bull. 647 (1939 and 1940).
West Central-Rocky Mountain Region, Bull. 646
(1939 and 1940).
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in 1945,
Bull. 956 (1949); in 1950, Bull. 1097 (Revised
1953).
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in 10 Cities,
Bull. 1065 (1952).
Family Spending and Saving in Wartime, Bull. 822
(1945).
Income and Spending and Savings of City Families in
Wartime, Bull. 724 (1942).
Installment Buying by City Consumers in 1941, Bull.
773 (1944).
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and Clerical
Workers, 1934-36:
East North Central Region, Bull. 636 (1940).*
North Atlantic Region: New York City, Bull. 637,
Vol. I (1939);* Eleven Cities, Bull. 637, Vol.
II (1939).*
Pacific Region, Bull. 639 (1939).*
Southern Cities, Bull. 640 (1941).*
Summary Volume, Bull. 638 (1941).*
West North Central-Mountain Region, Bull. 641
(1939).*
Money Disbursements of Wage Earners and Clerical
Workers in Thirteen Small Cities, 1933-35, Bull. 691
(1942).*
Retired Couple’s Budget for a Moderate Living Stand­
ard, Autumn 1966, Bull. 1570-4 (1968).*
Revised Equivalence Scale: For Estimating Equivalent
Incomes or Budget Costs, by Family Type, Bull.
1570-2 (1968).*
Spending and Saving of the Nation’s Families in War­
time, Bull. 723 (1942).
Survey of Consumer Expenditures, 1960-61:
Changing Consumption Patterns, 1960-61, Rpt.
238-11 (1965).
Changing Patterns of Consumer Expenditures, Rpt.
238-5 (1964).
Changing Patterns of Consumer Expenditures,
1950-1960, Rpt. 238-3 (1964).
Clothing the Urban American Family: How Much
for Whom? Rpt. 238-16 (1968).
Consumer Expenditures and Income, with Em­
phasis on Low-Income Families, Rpt. 238-6
(1964).
Consumer Expenditures and Income: Survey
Guidelines, Bull. 1684 (1971).*
Contrasts in Spending by Urban Families: Trends
Since 1950 and Variations in 1960-61, Rpt.
238-8 (1965).
Economics and Public Welfare, Rpt. 238-4 (1963).
Expanding Ownership of Household Equipment,
Rpt. 238-7 (1964).

Interindustry Relations

Indexes

Expenditure Patterns of Low Consumption Fami­
lies, Rpt. 238-10 (1965).
Food Expenditures of Urban Families, 1950 to
1960-61, Rpt. 238-9 (1965).
Levels of Living Among the Poor, Rpt. 238-12
(1965).
Marketing Uses of Consumer Expenditure Survey
Data, Rpt. 238-15 (1968).
Spending and Saving in Urban and Rural Areas,
Rpt. 238-14 (1969).
The Impact of Rising Prices on Younger and
Older Consumers, Rpt. 238-2 (1963).
Uses of Family Expenditures Data, Rpt. 238-13
(1965).
Workers’ Wealth and Family Living Standards,
Rpt. 238-1 (1963).
Three Budgets for a Retired Couple in Urban Areas of
the United States, 1967-68, Bull. 1570-6 (1970) and
Supp. (1971).*
Three Standards of Living for an Urban Family of
Four Persons, Spring 1967, Bull. 1570-5 (1969).*
Wartime Earnings and Spending in Honolulu, 1943,
Bull. 788 (1944).
Wartime Food Purchases, Bull. 838 (1945).
Workers’ Budgets in the United States, City Families
and Single Persons, 1946 and 1947, Bull. 927
(1948).*
In d e x e s .
(See also Prices, Productivity, general—Trends;
and Wages and hours—Indexes.)
Revised Indexes of Factory Employment and Pay Rolls,
1919 to 1933, Bull. 610 (1935).
The Making and Using of Index Numbers, Bull. 656
(1938).*
I n d e x e s t o ( a n d lis ts o f ) p u b l i c a t i o n s .
See Publications, in­
dexes to and lists of.
In d ia .

Labor in India, Rpt. 188 (1961).
Labor Law and Practice in India, Rpt. 303 (1966).
Wartime Labor Conditions in India, Bull. 755 (1943).
I n d o n e s ia .

Labor in Indonesia, Rpt. 246 (1963).
Labor Law and Practice in Indonesia, Rpt. 336 (1968).
I n d u s tr ia l a c c id e n t b o a r d s
and
c o m m is s io n s .
See under
Conventions, meetings, etc. See also Safety—Codes; and
Workmen’s compensation.
I n d u s t r i a l a c c id e n ts a n d in ju r ie s .
See Accidents; Workmen’s
compensation; also Conventions, meetings, etc.—Indus­
trial Accident Boards and Commissions; Poisons, indus­
trial.
In d u s tr ia l c h e m ic a l in d u s t r y .
See Chemical industry.
I n d u s t r i a l c la s s ific a tio n .

Report of Committee on Statistics and Compensation
Insurance Cost of the International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Bull.
201 (1916).
In d u s tr ia l c o n d itio n s .
See Labor and industrial conditions.
In d u s tr ia l c o u n c ils , fo r e ig n c o u n tr ie s .
See Labor conditions
and industrial relations, foreign countries.
I n d u s t r i a l d is e a s e s .
See Occupational diseases.
I n d u s t r ia l d is p u te s .
See Labor-management disputes.
In d u s tr ia l D is p u te s In v e s tig a tio n A c t , C a n a d a .




Operation of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act
of Canada, Bull. 233 (1918).
In d u s tr ia l e ffic ie n c y .
See Munition factories, Great Britain,
World War I; Plant management; Productivity.
In d u s tria l e m p lo y m e n t.
See Employment; and Employment
statistics.
In d u s tr ia l e n g in e e rin g .

A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225-2 (1959).*
In d u s tria l m a c h in e r y .
See Wages and hours—Machinery
manufacture.
In d u s tr ia l m a c h in e r y r e p a ir m e n .
See under Employment
outlook.
In d u s tr ia l p o is o n in g .
See Poisons, industrial.
In d u s tria l re la tio n s .
See Labor and industrial relations;
Labor-management relations; Labor and industrial condi­
tions; and Labor-management disputes.
In d u s tria l s u rv e y s .
See Wages and hours—Manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries, Area Wage Surveys,
and specific industry.
In d u s tria l u n e m p lo y m e n t.
See Unemployment.
In d u s tria l u n re s t.
See Labor and industrial relations.
I n d u s t r i a l w a g e s c a le s .
See Wages and hours.
In d u s tria liza tio n .

Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
s ta b iliz a tio n c o m m itte e s .
See Collective bargain­
ing, general—Labor-management cooperation.

In d u s try

In fla tio n .

The Anatomy of Inflation, Rpt. 373 (1969).
in d u s tr ia l.
See Accidents; Workmen’s compensa­
tion; Conventions, meetings, etc.—Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions; and Poisons, industrial.
In p u t-o u tp u t fu n c tio n s .
(See also Interindustry relations.)
Capital Stocks, Production Functions, and Investment
Functions for Selected Input-Output Sectors, Rpt.
355 (1970).
1970 Input-Output Coefficients, Rpt. 326 (1967).
In ju r ie s ,

In s ta llm e n t b u y in g .

Installment Buying by City Consumers in 1941, Bull.
773 (1944).
In s tru m e n t m a k e rs .
See under Employment outlook.
In s u la tio n (h e a t) m a te r ia ls .
See under Labor requirements.
In s u ra n c e .
See specific type of.
In s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s .
See under Employment outlook.
In s u ra n c e
p la n s .
See Collective bargaining, general—
Health and welfare insurance, and Pensions; Collective
bargaining, by industry or occupation; Health, insurance,
and pension plans, extent of; Wages and hours—specific
industry or occupation; Related wage benefits.
In te r in d u s tr y re la tio n s .

Capital Flow Matrix, Bull. 1601 (1968).
Farm Construction: A Segment of Construction Activ­
ity in the 1947 Interindustry Relations Study, Rpt.
20 (1953).
General Explanations of the 200 Sector Tables: The
1947 Interindustry Relations Study, Rpt. 33 (1953).
Industry Reports:
General Explanations. The 1947 Interindustry Re­
lations Study, Rpt. 9 (1953).
Manufacturing Methodology. The 1947 Interindus­
try Relations Study, Rpt. 10 (1953).

137

Labor and Industrial Conditions

Interior Designers and Decorators

Methodology for Agricultural Sectors. The 1947
Interindustry Relations Study, Rpt. 21 (1953).
The Alkalies and Chlorine Industry. A Manufac­
turing Sector in the 1947 Interindustry Relations
Study, Rpt. 22 (1953).
The Drugs and Medicines Industry. A Manufac­
turing Sector in the 1947 Interindustry Relations
Study, Rpt. 29 (1953).
The Inorganic Chemicals Industry. A Manufac­
turing Sector in the 1947 Interindustry Relations
Study, Rpt. 31 (1953)
The Organic Chemicals Industry. A Manufactur­
ing Sector in the 1947 Interindustry Relations
Study, Rpt 35 (1953).
The Plastics Materials Industry. A Manufacturing
Sector in the 1947 Interindustry Relations Study,
Rpt. 30 (1953).
New and Maintenance Construction: Construction in
the 1947 Interindustry Relations Study, Rpt. 2 (1953).
New Nonfarm Nonresidential Construction. Part I:
New Industrial Building Construction; Part II: All
Other New Nonfarm Nonresidential Building Con­
struction. Two Segments of Construction Activity in
the 1947 Interindustry Relations Study, Rpt. 19
(1953).
New Nonfarm Residential Construction: A Segment
of Construction Activity in the 1947 Interindustry
Relations Study, Rpt. 3 (1953).
Projections 1970: Interindustry Relationships, Poten­
tial Demand, Employment, Bull. 1536 (1966).*
I n t e r i o r d e s ig n e rs a n d d e c o r a to r s .
See under Employment
outlook.
In te rn a tio n a l

A s s o c ia tio n

of

G o v e r n m e n ta l

Lab o r

O ffic ia ls .

See Conventions, meetings, etc.—Governmental Labor
Officials, International Association of.
International labor movement. See International labor reg­
ulation.
In te rn a tio n a l

la b o r

j
Ja m a ic a .

Labor Law and Practice in Jamaica, Rpt. 320 (1967).
Ja p a n .

Labor Conditions of Women and Children in Japan,
Bull. 558 (1931).
Labor Law and Practice in Japan, Rpt. 376 (1970).
Sources of Information on Labor in Japan, Rpt. 351
(1968).
Je w e le rs a n d je w e lr y r e p a ir m e n .
See under Employment
outlook.
J o b e v a lu a tio n , u n io n a ttitu d e s t o w a r d .

A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225-2 (1959).*
J o b r e d e s ig n .

Job Redesign for Older Workers: Ten Case Studies,
Bull. 1523 (1967).*
J o b tr a in in g .
See Apprentices and learners; Vocational edu­
cation and training; Workers’ education.
J o i n t in d u s tr ia l c o u n c ils .
See Labor conditions and indus­
trial relations, foreign countries.
Jo rd a n .

Labor Law and Practice in the Hashemite Kingdom of
Jordan, Rpt. 322 (1967).
J u r y le a v e .
See u n d e r Collective bargaining, g e n e r a l .
Ju v e n ile s .
See Child labor.

K
Bull. 322 (1923).*
(Congo). (See Zaire, Republic of.)
K n it g oo ds in d u s try .
See under Wages and hours.
K n itte d -o u te rw e a r in d u s try .
See under Wages a n d hours.
K a n s a s C o u r t o f In d u s tria l R e la tio n s ,
K in s h a s a .

K o re a .

Labor Law and Practice in the Republic of Korea, Rpt.
361 (1969).

r e g u la tio n .

Historical Survey of International Action Affecting
Labor, Bull. 268 (1920).*
International Labor Legislation and the Society of
Nations, Bull. 254 (1919).
In te r n a tio n a l S e a m e n ’s U n io n .
See Labor organizations—
Seamen’s union, international.
In to x ic a n ts .
See under Legislation.
In v e s tm e n t fu n c tio n s .

Capital Stocks, Production Functions, and Investment
Functions for Selected Input-Output Sectors, Rpt.
355 (1970).
Ira n .

Labor Law and Practice in Iran, Rpt. 276 (1964).
Ira q .

Labor Law and Practice in Iraq, Rpt. 221 (1963).
a n d s te e l i n d u s t r y .
See under Accidents—Rates, types,
causes, (etc.); under Employment outlook; under Pro­
ductivity, by industry; and under Wages and hours.
Ir o n -o r e m in in g .
See under Wages and hours—Mining.

Iro n

Is r a e l.

Labor in Israel, Rpt. 284 (no date).
Labor Law and Practice in Israel, Rpt. 315 (1967).

138



L
See Legislation—Employment agencies, pub­
lic and private.
L a b o r a g r e e m e n ts .
See Collective bargaining, general, and
by industry or occupation.
L a b o r a n d in d u s tr ia l c o n d itio n s .
(See also Labor and in­
dustrial relations.)
Alaska.
The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska, Ha­
waii, Bull. 1191 (1956).
Child wage earners. See Child labor.
Hawaii.
Labor Conditions in the Territory of Hawaii,
1929-1930, Bull. 534 (1931).*
Labor in the Territory of Hawaii, 1939, Bull. 687
(1940).*
The Economy of Hawaii in 1947, Bull. 926
(1948).*
The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska, Ha­
waii, Bull. 1191 (1956).

L a b o r a g e n ts .

Labor, U.S. Department of

Labor and Industrial Relations

History.
History of Wages in the United States from Co­
lonial Times to 1928, Bull. 604 (1934).* (Part
I of bulletin.)
Longshore industry.
Cargo Handling and Longshore Labor Conditions,
Bull. 550 (1932).
New England.
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull.
1212 (1957).*
Puerto Rico.
The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska, Ha­
waii, Bull. 1191 (1956).
Shoe industry.
Conditions in the Shoe Industry in Haverhill,
Mass., 1928, Bull. 483 (1929).
Labor Conditions in the Shoe Industry in Massa­
chusetts, 1920-1924, Bull. 384 (1925).
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull.
1212 (1957).*
The Boot and Shoe Industry in Massachusetts as a
Vocation for Women, Bull. 180 (1915).
Southern States.
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Women workers. See that title.
L a b o r a n d in d u s tria l re la tio n s .
(See also Collective bar­
gaining, general, and by industry or occupation; Labor
and industrial conditions; Labor-management relations;
Labor movement; and Labor organizations—Seamen’s
union, international.)
Glossary of Current Industrial Relations and Wage
Terms, Bull. 1438 (1965).
Industrial Relations in the West Coast Lumber Indus­
try, Bull. 349 (1924).*
Joint Industrial Control in the Book and Job Printing
Industry, Bull. 481 (1928).
Labor Relations in the Fairmont, West Virginia Bitu­
minous Coal Field, Bull. 361 (1924).
Labor Relations in the Lace and Lace-Curtain Indus­
tries in the United States, Bull. 399 (1925).
The Changing Status of Bituminous-Coal Miners, 193746, Bull. 882 (1946).
L a b o r c h ro n o lo g y .
See Labor movement.
La b o r

c o n d itio n s

and

in d u s tria l r e la tio n s , fo r e ig n

c o u n tr ie s .

(See also Legislation, foreign countries.)
Africa.
Bibliography on Labor in Africa, 1960-64, Bull.
1473 (1965).
Labor Digests on Countries in Africa, Bull. 1539
(1966).*
Brazil.
Labor in Brazil, Rpt. 191 (1962).
Chile.
Labor in Chile, Rpt. 224 (1962).
Chinese migrants.
Chinese Migrations, with Special Reference to
Labor Conditions, Bull. 340 (1923).
Colombia.
Labor in Colombia, Rpt. 222 (1962).
Cyprus.
Labor in Cyprus, Rpt. 243 (1963).



Europe.
Labor Digests on Countries in Europe, Bull. 1497
(1966).*
Germany.
Postwar Labor Conditions in Germany, Bull. 380
(1925).
Works Council Movement in Germany, Bull. 383
(1925).
Great Britain.
Industrial Unrest in Great Britain, Bull. 237
(1917).
Joint Industrial Control in the Book and Job
Printing Industry, Bull. 481 (1928). (Note:
Section on Great Britain includes newspaper
branch of industry.)
Joint Industrial Councils in Great Britain, Bull.
255 (1919).
India.
Labor in India, Rpt. 188 (1961).
Wartime Labor Conditions in India, Bull. 755
(1943).
Indonesia.
Labor in Indonesia, Rpt. 246 (1963).
Japan.
Labor Conditions of Women and Children in
Japan, Bull. 558 (1931).
Manpower surveys.
Summaries of Manpower Surveys and Reports for
Developing Countries, 1958-68, Bull. 1628
(1969).
Methods.
Computation of Cost-of-Living Indexes in Devel­
oping Countries, Rpt. 283 (1964).
Forecasting of Manpower Requirements, Rpt. 248
(1963).
How to Establish Current Reporting, Rpt. 302
(1966).
Conducting a Labor Force Survey in Developing
Countries, Rpt. 263 (1964).
Mexico.
Labor in Mexico, Rpt. 251 (1963).
Nigeria.
Labor in Nigeria, Rpt. 261 (1963).
Peru.
Labor in Peru, Rpt. 262 (1964).
Sudan.
Labor in Sudan, Rpt. 182 (1961).
U.S.S.R.
Labor in the U.S.S.R.: Reprints from Labor De­
velopments Abroad, Rpt. 358 (1969).
L a b o r c o n tra c ts .
See Collective bargaining, general, and by
industry or occupation.
L a b o r c o s ts .
See Productivity.
L a b o r c o u rts .

Kansas Court of Industrial Relations, Bull. 322
(1923).*
L a b o r , S ta te d e p a rtm e n ts a n d b u re a u s o f .
See Labor (and
related) offices, Federal and State.
L a b o r , U.S. D e p a r t m e n t o f .
(See also Bureau of Labor
Statistics.)
Humanity in Government, Bull. 346 (1923).*

139

Labor Disputes

See Labor-management disputes.
See Labor supply; Manpower; Negroes; Ocpational mobility; Older workers; Statistics; Wartime; and
specific industries and occupations.
L a b o r In fo r m a tio n B u lle tin .
See Publications, indexes to
and lists of.
L a b o r la w s a n d le g is la tio n .
See Legislation.
L a b o r -m a n a g e m e n t c o n tra c ts .
See Collective bargaining,
general, and by industry or occupation.
L a b o r -m a n a g e m e n t c o o p e r a tio n .
(See also under Collective
bargaining, general.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bulls. 1225 (1958)* and 1225-1 (1959).*
Beneficial Activities of American Trade-Unions, Bull.
465 (1928).*
Major Collective Bargaining Agreements: Management
Rights and Union-Management Cooperation, Bull.
1425-5 (1966).*
La b o r-m a n a g e m e n t
c o o p e r a tio n ,
fo r e ig n
c o u n tr ie s .
See
Labor conditions and industrial relations, foreign coun­
tries.
L a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t d is p u te s .
(See also Collective bargain­
ing, by industry or occupation; Labor and industrial con­
ditions; Labor and industrial relations; Labor-management
relations; and Legislation—Labor.)
Federal intervention.
History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment
Board, 1917 to 1919, Bull. 283 (1921).
National War Labor Board, Bull. 287 (1922).
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement and
Wage Stabilization During World War II, Bull.
1009 (1950).*
Report on the Work of the National Defense Me­
diation Board, March 19, 1941-January 12,
1942, Bull. 714 (1942).*
Use of Federal Power in Settlement of Railway
Labor Disputes, Bull. 303 (1922).*
Lockouts. See Strikes, this section.
National emergency.
National Emergency Disputes Under the LaborManagement Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act,
1947-October 1960, Rpt. 169 (1961); 1947-61,
Rpt. 169 (Revised 1962); 1947-62, Rpt. 169
(Revised 1963); 1947-65, Bull. 1482 (1966);*
1947-68, Bull. 1633 (1969).*
Railroads. See Federal intervention, this section.
Strikes. [Note: The term “strike” includes all stop­
pages of work due to labor disputes whether ini­
tiated by the employer (lockout) or by the em­
ployees.]
Analysis of Work Stoppages:
1949, Bull. 1003 (1950).*
1950, Bull. 1035 (1951).*
1951, Bull. 1090 (1952).*
1952, Bull. 1136 (1953).*
1953, Bull. 1163 (1954).*
1954, Bull. 1184 (1955).*
1955, Bull. 1196 (1956).*
1956, Bull. 1218 (1957).*
1957, Bull. 1234 (1958).*
1958, Bull. 1258 (1959).*
L a b o r d is p u te s .
La b o r

fo rc e .

140



Labor-Management Disputes

1959, Bull. 1278 (I960).*
1960, Bull. 1302 (1961).*
1961, Bull. 1339 (1962).*
1962, Bull. 1381 (1963).*
1963, Bull. 1420 (1964).*
1964, Bull. 1460 (1965).*
1965, Bull. 1525 (1966).*
1966, Bull. 1575 (1968).*
1967, Bull. 1611 (1969).*
1968, Bull. 1646 (1970).*
1969, Bull. 1687 (1971).*
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and Stud­
ies, Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711 (1971).*
Collective Bargaining Provisions: Strikes and Lock­
outs; Contract Enforcement, Bull. 908-13
(1949).
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull. 1016
(1951) and 1951 Supp. (1953);* 1967, Bull.
1555 (1967);* 1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969,
Bull. 1630 (1969);* 1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);*
1971, Bull. 1705 (1971).*
Labor Unionism in American Agriculture, Bull.
836 (1945).*
Labor-Management Contract Provisions, 1950-51,
Bull. 1091 (1952).
Strikes and Lockouts in 1944, Bull. 833 (1945).*
Strikes in 1941 and Strikes Affecting Defense Pro­
duction, Bull. 711 (1942).*
Strikes in 1942, Bull. 741 (1943).*
Strikes in 1943, Bull. 782 (1944).*
Strikes in the United States, 1880-1936, Bull. 651
(1938).*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
The Dimensions of Major Work Stoppages, 194759, Bull. 1298 (1961).
Work Stoppages :
Aircraft and Parts Industry, 1927-59, Rpt.
175 (1961).
Basic Steel Industry, Rpt. 92 (1955); and
1901-60, Rpt. 206 (1961).
Bituminous-Coal Mining Industry, Rpt. 95
(1955).
Collection and Compilation of Work Stop­
pages Statistics, Rpt. 11 (1953).
Contract Construction (Industry), 1927-60,
Rpt. 207 (1962); 1946-66, Rpt. 346
(1968).
Electrical Machinery, Equipment, and Sup­
plies Industry, 1927-60, Rpt. 213 (1962).
Electrical Machinery Industry, 1927-68, Rpt.
374 (1970).
Fifty States and the District of Columbia,
1927-62, Rpt. 256 (1963).
Government, 1958-68, Rpt. 348 (1970).
Government Employees, 1942-61, Rpt. 247
(1963).
Meat Products Industry, 1927-60, Rpt. 214
(1962) .
Metropolitan Areas, 1952-61, Rpt. 236
(1963) ; 1952-62, Rpt. 236 (Revised 1963).

Labor Organizations

Labor-Management Disputes, Foreign Countries

Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Equip­
ment Industry, 1927-58, Rpt. 148 (1959).
Water Transportation Industry, 1927-59, Rpt.
176 (1961).
Work Stoppages Caused by Labor-Management
Disputes in:
1945, Bull. 878 (1946).*
1946, Bull. 918 (1947).*
1947, Bull. 935 (1948).*
1948, Bull. 963 (1949).*
Work Stoppages: Collection and Compilation of
Work Stoppage Statistics, Rpt. 11 (1953).
Work stoppages. See Strikes, this section.
World Wars I and II. See Federal intervention, this
section.
L a b o r-m a n a g e m e n t

d is p u te s , fo r e ig n

c o u n tr ie s .

Operation of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act
of Canada, Bull. 233 (1918).
Strikes in the United States, 1880-1936, Bull. 651
(1938).* (Includes some data on foreign countries.)
L a b o r -m a n a g e m e n t g rie v a n c e s .
See Collective bargaining,
general—Grievances, and by industry or occupation;
Labor-management disputes.
L a b o r -m a n a g e m e n t re la tio n s .
(See also Collective bargain­
ing, general, and by industry or occupation; Company
unions; Labor and industrial conditions; Labor and in­
dustrial relations; Labor-management cooperation; Labormanagement disputes; Labor organizations; and Scandi­
navia. )
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bulls. 1225 (1958);* 1225-1 (1959);* and
1225-2 (1959).*
L a b o r -M a n a g e m e n t R e la tio n s A c t o f 1 9 4 7 .
(See also Labormanagement disputes—Strikes, bulletins beginning with
1947.)
National Emergency Disputes Under the Labor Man­
agement Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act, 1947-October
1960, Rpt. 169 (1961); 1947-61, Rpt. 169 (Revised
1962); 1947-62, Rpt. 169 (Revised 1963); 1947-65,
Bull. 1482 (1966);* 1947-68, Bull. 1633 (1969).*
L a b o r -M a n a g e m e n t R e p o r tin g

and

D is c lo s u re

A ct

of

19 5 9 ,

Title III.
Union Constitution Provisions: Trusteeship, Bull. 1263
(1959).*
La b o r
m a rk e ts ,
m a jo r — c o m m u n ity
w age
su rve ys.
See
Wages and hours—Area Wage Surveys.
L a b o r m o b ility .

Labor Mobility and Private Pension Plans: A Study of
Vesting, Early Retirement, Portability Provisons,
Bull. 1407 (1964).*
Private Pension Plans and Manpower Policy, Bull. 1359
(1963).
The Operation of Severance Pay Plans and Their Im­
plication for Labor Mobility, Bull. 1462 (1966).*
L a b o r m o v e m e n t.
(See also Labor organizations.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
American Labor and the American Spirit, Bull. 1145
(1954).*
Brief History of the American Labor Movement, Bull.
1000 (1951); (1957); (1964); (1970).*



Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Labor Through the Century, 1833-1933, Bull. 597
(1933),* and 1934, Bull. 605 (1934).*
Labor Unionism in American Agriculture, Bull. 836
(1945).*
Lab o r
m o v e m e n t, in te r n a tio n a l.
See International labor
regulation.
L a b o r (a n d r e la t e d ) o ffic e s , F e d e r a l a n d S ta te

(a n d p rin c ip a l

C a n a d i a n o f f i c e s .)

Activities and Functions of a State [New York] De­
partment of Labor, Bull. 479 (1928).
Labor Offices in the United States and in Canada, Bulls.
621 (1936), 632 (1938), and 681 (1941).
Laws Providing for Bureaus of Labor Statistics, etc.,
Bull. 343 (1923).
L a b o r o r g a n iza tio n s .
(See also Labor movement; and Leg­
islation—Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews of laws.)
Activities.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bulls. 1225 (1958),* 1225-1
(1959),* and 1225-2 (1959).*
American Labor and the American Spirit, Bull.
1145 (1954).*
Beneficial Activities of American Trade-Unions,
Bull. 465 (1928).*
Directories. (See also Handbooks, this section.)
Directory of Labor Unions in the United States:
1947, Bull. 901 (1947).*
1948, Bull. 937 (1948).*
1950, Bull. 980 (1950).*
1953, Bull. 1127 (1953).*
Directory of National and International Labor
Unions in the United States:
1955, Bull. 1185 (1955).*
1957, Bull. 1222 (1957).*
1959, Bull. 1267 (I960).*
1961, Bull. 1320 (1962).*
1963, Bull. 1395 (1964).*
1965, Bull. 1493 (1966).*
1967, Bull. 1596 (1968).*
1969, Bull. 1665 (1970).*
Handbooks. (See also Directories, this section.)
Handbook of American Trade-Unions 1926, 1929,
and 1936, Bulls. 420 (1926),* 506 (1929),* and
618 (1936),* respectively.
Leadership, workers’ education for.
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the
United States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Case Studies in Union Leadership Training, 1951—
52, Bull. 1114 (1952).*
Membership statistics. (See also Directories and Hand­
books, this section.)
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull.
1016, (1951) and Supp. (1953);* 1967, Bull.
1555 (1967);* 1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969,
Bull. 1630 (1969);* 1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);*
1971, Bull. 1705 (1971).*
Officers, rules governing.
Union Constitution Provisions: Election and Ten­
ure of National and International Union Offi­
cers, 1958, Bull. 1239 (1958).*

141

Legislation

Labor Organizations, Foreign Countries

Rights and responsibilities.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Union and
Management Functions, Rights, and Responsi­
bilities, Bull. 908-12 (1949).
Seamen’s union, international.
Employment System of the Lake Carriers’ Asso­
ciation, Bull. 235 (1918).
International Seamen’s Union of America: A Study
of its History and Problems, Bull. 342 (1923).
State. See Directories, this section.
Trusteeships.
Union Constitution Provisions: Trusteeship, Bull.
1263 (1959).*
Unaffiliated unions.
Unaffiliated Intrastate
and Single-Employer
Unions, 1967, Bull. 1640 (1969).
Unaffiliated Local and Single-Employer Unions in
the United States, 1961, Bull. 1348 (1962).
Labor organizations, foreign countries. (See also Labor
conditions and industrial relations, foreign countries and
specific countries.)
Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull. 1026 (1951).*
Labor Organizations in Chile, Bull. 461 (1928).
Labor problems. See Labor-management disputes.
Labor productivity. See Productivity, general.
Labor relations. See Labor and industrial relations; Labormanagement relations; and Labor-management disputes.
Labor requirements. (See also Productivity.)
Cement industry.
Labor Requirements for Construction Materials,
Bull. 888-1 (1947).
Civil works construction.
Labor and Material Requirements for Civil Works
Construction by the Corps of Engineers, Bull.
1390 (1964).
College housing construction.
Labor and Material Requirements for College
Housing Construction, Bull. 1441 (1965).
Concrete industry.
Labor Requirements for Construction Materials,
Bulls. 888-2 and 888-3 (1947).
Federally aided highways.
Labor and Material Requirements for Construction
of Federally Aided Highways, 1958, 1961, and
1964, Rpt. 299 (1966).
Federal office building construction.
Labor Requirements for Federal Office Building
Construction, Bull. 1331 (1962).
Hospital construction.
Labor and Material Requirements: Hospital and
Nursing Home Construction, Bull. 1691 (1971).
Labor Requirements for Hospital Construction,
Bull. 1340 (1962).
Insulation (heat) materials.
Labor Requirements to Produce Home Insulation,
Bull. 919 (1947).
Private housing construction.
Labor and Material Requirements for Private OneFamily House Construction, Bull. 1404 (1964).

142



Public housing construction.
Labor and Material Requirements for Public Hous­
ing Construction, May 1964, Bull. 1402 (1964).
School construction.
Labor and Material Requirements for School Con­
struction, Bull. 1586 (1968).
Labor Requirements for School Construction, Bull.
1299 (1961).
Sewer works construction.
Labor and Material Requirements for Sewer
Works Construction, Bull. 1490 (1966).
Labor statistics. See Statistics, and specific subject.
Labor Statistics, Bureau of. See Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Labor statistics, State bureaus of. See Labor (and related)
offices, Federal and State.
Labor supply. (See also Manpower; and Occupational mo­
bility.)
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Labor Supply and Mobility in a Newly Industrialized
Area (Ravenswood, W. Va.), Bull. 1261 (I960).*
Population and Labor Force Projections for the United
States, 1960 to 1975, Bull. 1242 (1959).*
State and Regional Variations in Prospective Labor
Supply, Bull. 893 (1947).
Labor turnover. (See also Employment statistics.)
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212
(1957).*
Labor unions. See Labor organizations; and Labor move­
ment.

Labor utilization, procedures.

Improvement of Labor-Utilization Procedures, Bull.
807 (1945).
Laboratories, commercial research and development. See
under Wages and hours.
Lace industries. See Labor and industrial relations.

Laos.

Labor Law and Practice in the Kingdom of Laos, Rpt.
290 (1965); Rpt. 381 (1970).
Latin America. See under Legislation, foreign countries;
and see specific country.
Laundries, power. See under Wages and hours.
Laundry workers. See Wages and hours—General trades,
beginning with Bull. 259 (1919).
Lawyers. See under Employment outlook.
Layoff. See under Collective bargaining, general.
Lead poisoning. See under Poisons, industrial.
Learners. See Apprentices and learners; and under Col­
lective bargaining, general.
Leather and leather products industries. See under Collec­
tive bargaining, by industry or occupation; and under
Wages and hours.
Leave. See Collective *bargaining, general—Leave, with
and without pay.

Lebanon.

Labor Law and Practice in Lebanon, Rpt. 304 (1966).

Legal aid.

Growth of Legal Aid Work in the United States, Bulls.
398 (1926) and 607 (1936).

Legislation.

Apprentices. See Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews
of laws, this section.

Legislation

Arbitration. See Labor, this section.
Bureaus of labor statistics, State. See Labor (and re­
lated) offices, State, this section.
Child labor. See Labor, and Minimum wage, this sec­
tion.
Civil rights of employees. See Employee rights, civil,
this section.
Cooperatives, consumer. (See also Labor—Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws, this section.)
Activities of Credit Unions in 1945, Bull. 894
(1947).
Consumers’ Cooperatives and Credit Unions: Op­
erations in 1946, Bull. 922 (1948).*
Consumers’ Credit, and Productive Cooperative
Societies, 1929, Bull. 531 (1931).*
Organization and Management of Consumers* Co­
operatives, Bull. 1024 (1951).*
Defense, State councils of.
Labor Legislation of:
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
Employee rights, civil. (See also Labor—Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws, this section.)
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull 321. (1922).*
Employers’ liability. (See also Workmen’s compensa­
tion.)
Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions
of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925).
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Labor Legislation of:
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
1919, Bull. 277 (1921).
1920, Bull. 292 (1922).
1922, Bull. 330 (1923).
1927, Bull. 470 (1928).
Employment agencies, public and private. (See also
Labor, this section.)
Laws Relating to Employment Agencies in the
United States: as of January 1, 1933, Bull. 581
(1933); as of July 1, 1937, Bull. 630 (1937).
Employment contract. (See also Labor—Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws, this section.)
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconstitu­
tional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Examining and licensing of workmen. (See also Labor
—Text, summaries, and reviews of laws, this section.)
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Fair Labor Standards Act.
Guaranteed Wage Plans in the United States, Bull.
925 (1948).*
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Health. (See also Labor—Text, summaries, and re­
views of laws, this section.)
Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Bull. 603 (1933).



Legislation

Labor Laws and Their Administration in the Pa­
cific States, Bull. 211 (1917).
Holidays. See Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews of
laws, this section.
Homework.
State Labor Legislation, 1937, Including Work­
men’s Compensation, Bull. 654 (1938).
Hours of work. See Labor, this section.
Housing.
Labor Legislation of:
1920, Bull. 292 (1922).
1921, Bull. 308 (1922).
Hygiene and safety. See Labor, this section.
Intoxicants.
Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions
of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925).
Labor Legislation of 1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
Kansas.
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations, Bull. 322
(1923).*
Labor. (See also Conventions, meetings, etc.; and Inter­
national labor regulation.)
Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Bull. 603 (1933).
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Labor Laws and Their Administration in the Pa­
cific States, Bull. 211 (1917).
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Text, summaries, and reviews of laws.
Labor Laws of the United States with Deci­
sions of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370
(1925).
Labor Legislation of:
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
1919, Bull. 277 (1921).
1920, Bull. 292 (1922).
1921, Bull. 308 (1922).
1922, Bull. 330 (1923).
1925, Bull. 403 (1926).
1926, Bull. 434 (1927).
1927, Bull. 470 (1928).
1928, Bull. 486 (1929).
1929, Bull. 528 (1931).
1930, Bull. 552 (1931).
1931-32, Bull. 590 (1933).
State Labor Legislation, 1937, Including Work­
men’s Compensation Legislation, Bull. 654
(1938).
Labor-management disputes. See Labor, this section.
Labor (and related) offices, State. (See also Labor—
Text, summaries, and reviews of laws, this section.)
Laws Providing for Bureaus of Labor Statistics,
etc., Bull. 343 (1923).
Labor Laws and Their Administration in the Pa­
cific States, Bull. 211 (1917).

143

Legislation

Legislation

Labor organizations. (See also Labor—Text, summaries,
and reviews of laws, this section.)
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Mechanics’ liens. See Labor—Text, summaries, and
reviews of laws, this section.
Minimum wage. (See also Wage payment, this section.)
Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Bull. 603 (1933).
Minimum Wage Legislation in Various Countries,
Bull. 467 (1928).*
Minimum-Wage Laws of the United States: Con­
struction and Operation, Bull. 285 (1921).*
Mining regulations.
Labor Legislation of:
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
Occupational disease. See Workmen’s compensation—
Legislation.
Pensions. (See also Labor—Text, summaries, and re­
views of laws, this section.)
Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Bull. 603 (1933).
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Public Old-Age Pensions and Insurance in the
United States and Foreign Countries, Bull. 561
(1932) .*
Police. See Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews of
laws, this section.
Printing, public.
Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions

of Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925).

Labor Legislation, 1931 and 1932, Bull. 590
(1933) .
Prison labor. (See also Labor—Text, summaries, and
reviews of laws, this section.)
Convict Labor in 1923, Bull. 372 (1925).
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Laws Relating to Prison Labor in the United
States as of July 1, 1933, Bull. 596 (1933).
Prison Labor in the United States, 1932, Bull. 595
(1933).
Protection of local labor. See Public works, this sec­
tion.
Public works.
Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions of
Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925).
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Labor Legislation of:
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1925, Bull. 403 (1926).
1927, Bull. 470 (1928).
1928, Bull. 486 (1929).
1929, Bull. 528 (1931).
1931-32, Bull. 590 (1933).

144



Railroads.
Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions of
Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925).
Labor Legislation of:
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1931-32, Bull. 590 (1933).
Use of Federal Power in Settlement of Railway
Labor Disputes, Bull. 303 (1922).*
Sabotage. See Syndicalism and sabotage, this section.
Safety. See Labor, this section.
Seamen.
International Seamen’s Union of America: A Study
of Its History and Problems, Bull. 342 (1923).
Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions of
Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925).
Seamen, disabled. See under Workmen’s compensation.
Social insurance.
Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Bull. 603 (1933).
Labor Legislation of 1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
State Labor Legislation, 1937, Including Work­
men’s Compensation Legislation, Bull. 654
(1938).
State conduct of business.
Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions of
Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925).
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Labor Legislation of 1925, Bull. 403 (1926).
Sunday labor. (See also Labor—Text, summaries, and
reviews of laws, this section.)
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*
Syndicalism and sabotage.
Labor Laws of the United States with Decisions of
Courts Relating Thereto, Bull. 370 (1925).
Labor Legislation of:
1919, Bull. 277 (1921).
1920, Bull. 292 (1922).
1925, Bull. 403 (1926).
Transit industry, local.
Labor Legislation of 1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
Trusteeship.
Union Constitution Provisions: Trusteeship, Bull.
1263 (1959).*
Unemployment compensation or insurance. See Social
insurance, this section.
Vocational education and vocational rehabilitation. (See
also Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews of laws,
this section.)
Comparative Digest of Labor Legislation for the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Bull. 603 (1933).
Voting rights. See Employee rights, civil, this section.
Wage assignment. (See also Labor—Text, summaries,
and reviews of laws, this section.)
Labor Laws That Have Been Declared Unconsti­
tutional, Bull. 321 (1922).*

Legislation, foreign countries

Wage payment. (See also Labor, and Minimum wage,
this section.)
Laws Relating to Payment of Wages, Bull. 408
(1926).
Wage-Payment Legislation in the United States,
Bull. 229 (1918).*
Wages and hours. See Labor; Minimum wage; and
Wage payment, this section.
Wartime (World War I), industrial control.
Labor Legislation of:
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
Water transportation.
Labor Legislation of 1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
Women workers. See that title, and see Labor and Mini­
mum wage, this section.
Working conditions.
Labor Legislation of:
1915, Bull. 186 (1916).
1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
Workmen’s compensation. See that title, and see Labor,
this section.
Legislation, foreign countries. (See also Workmen’s com­
pensation, foreign countries.)
Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull. 1026 (1951).*
Labor Law and Practice in:
Afghanistan, Rpt. 357 (1969).
Argentina, Rpt. 344 (1969).
Australia, Rpt. 328 (1967).
Austria, Rpt. 241 (1963).
Belgium, Rpt. 372 (1970).
Bolivia, Rpt. 218 (1962).
Botswana, Rpt. 337 (1968).
Brazil, Rpt. 309 (1966).
Burma, the Union of, Rpt. 264 (1964).
Ceylon, Rpt. 227 (1963).
Chile, Rpt. 339 (1969).
Colombia, Rpt. 217 (1962).
Costa Rica, Rpt. 220 (1962).
Denmark, Rpt. 390 (1972).
Dominican Republic, Rpt. 343 (1968).
Ecuador, Rpt. 242 (1963).
El Salvador, Rpt. 280 (1964).
Ethiopia, the Empire of, Rpt. 298 (1966).
Greece, the Kingdom of, Rpt. 325 (1968).
Guatemala, Rpt. 223 (1963).
Guyana, Rpt. 324 (1967).
Haiti, Rpt. 244 (1963).
Honduras, Rpt. 189 (1961).
Iceland, Rpt. 371 (1970).
Indonesia, Rpt. 336 (1968).
Iran, Rpt. 276 (1964).
Iraq, Rpt. 221 (1963).
Israel, Rpt. 315 (1967).
Jamaica, Rpt. 320 (1967).
Japan, Rpt. 376 (1970).
Jordan, the Hashemite Kingdom of, Rpt. 322
(1967).
Korea, the Republic of, Rpt. 361 (1969).
Laos, the Kingdom of, Rpt. 290 (1965); Rpt. 381
(1970).



Life Insurance, State-Sponsored

Lebanon, Rpt. 304 (1966).
Libya, the Kingdom of, Rpt. 297 (1966).
Malaysia and Singapore, Rpt. 274 (1965).
Mexico, Rpt. 240 (1963).
Morocco, Rpt. 282 (1965).
New Guinea, Trust Territory under Australian
Administration, Rpt. 258 (1964).
New Zealand, Rpt. 321 (1967).
Nicaragua, Rpt. 265 (1964).
Norway, Rpt. 387 (1972).
Pacific Islands, Trust Territory of, Rpt. 382 (1971).
Pakistan, Rpt. 271 (1964).
Panama, Rpt. 356 (1970).
Peru, Rpt. 338 (1968).
Philippines, Rpt. 253 (1963).
Saudi Arabia, Rpt. 269 (1964).
Spain, Rpt. 289 (1965).
Sweden, Rpt. 285 (1965).
Taiwan (Formosa), Rpt. 268 (1964).
Thailand, Rpt. 267 (1964).
Trinidad and Tobago, Rpt. 319 (1967).
Tunisia, Rpt. 294 (1965).
Turkey, Rpt. 239 (1963).
United Arab Republic (Egypt), Rpt. 275 (1965).
Uruguay, Rpt. 392 (1972).
U.S.S.R., Rpt. 270 (1964).
Venezuela, Rpt. 212 (1962); Rpt. 386 (1971).
Vietnam, the Republic of (South Vietnam), Rpt.
327 (1968).
Yugoslavia, Rpt. 250 (1963).
Zaire, Republic of, Rpt. 393 (1972).
Labor Legislation of:
Argentina, Bull. 510 (1930).
Ecuador, Bull. 559 (1931).
Mexico, Bull. 569 (1932).
Paraguay, Bull. 554 (1931).
Uruguay, Bull. 494 (1929).
Venezuela, Bull. 549 (1931).
Minimum Wage Legislation in Various Countries, Bull.
467 (1928).*
Operation of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act
of Canada, Bull. 233 (1918).
Principal Current Soviet Labor Legislation, Rpt. 210
(1962).
Public Old-Age Pensions and Insurance in the United
States and in Foreign Countries, Bull. 561 (1932).*
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the Latin
American Countries, Bull. 529 (1930).
Legislation, international. See International labor regula­
tion.
Librarians. See under Employment outlook.

Libya.

Labor Law and Practice in Libya, the Kingdom of,
Rpt. 297 (1966).
Life insurance, industrial establishments. See Collective
bargaining, general—Health and welfare insurance; and
Related wage benefits.

Life insurance, State-sponsored.

Operation of Savings-Bank Life Insurance in Massachu­
setts and New York, Bull. 688 (1941).

145

Linemen

Mediation

The Massachusetts System of Savings-Bank Life Insur­
ance, Bull. 615 (1935).
Linemen. See Wages and hours—General trades, begin­
ning with Bull. 302 (1922).
Living conditions. See Labor and industrial conditions;
Wartime; and Women workers.
Living costs. See Income and expenditures, consumer; and
Prices.
Living standards. See Income and expenditures, consumer.
Local government employees. See under Municipal em­
ployees.
Local-transit employees. See Wages and hours—Transit
industry—local.
Lockouts. See Labor-management disputes—Strikes.
Logging. See Lumber industry.
Longshore industry. (See also Wages and hours—General
trades, beginning with Bull. 431 [1927].)
Cargo Handling and Longshore Labor Conditions, Bull.
550 (1932).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Longshore Indus­
try, 1942, Bull. 764 (1944).*
Lumber industry. See Accidents—Rates, types, causes,
(etc.); Labor and industrial relations; Productivity, by
industry or occupation; and Wages and hours.

M
Machine-shop occupations.

See under Employment out­

look.

Machine shops.

See Wages and hours—Foundries and

machine shops.

Machine-tool accessories industry.

See under Wages and

hours.

Machine-tool industry.

See Wages and hours—Machinery

manufacture.

Machinery manufacture. See under Wages and hours.
Machinery manufacture, agricultural. See under Collective
bargaining, by industry or occupation.
See Employment outlook—Mechan­
ics and repairmen.
Maintenance electricians. See Employment outlook— Elec­
tricians.
Maintenance-of-union-membership. See Collective bargain­
ing, general—Union security; and National War LaborBoard.

Machinery repairmen.

Malaysia.

Labor Law and Practice in Malaysia and Singapore,
Rpt. 274 (1965).
Management rights and responsibilities. See Collective bar­
gaining, general—Labor and management rights.
Man-hour requirements. See Labor requirements; Produc­
tivity.
Manpower. (See also Labor force; Labor supply; Occupa­
tional mobility.)
College Educated Workers, 1968-80, Bull. 1676 (1970).
Counselor’s Guide to Manpower Information, Bull.
1598 (1968).
Demobilization of Manpower, 1918-19, Bull. 784
(1944).

146


Fact Book on Manpower, September 1954, Bull. 1171
(1954).*
Health Manpower, 1966-75, Rpt. 323 (1967).
Improvement of Labor-Utilization Procedures, Bull.
807 (1945).
Labor in the Textile and Apparel Industries, Bull. 1635
(1969).
Manpower Resources in Chemistry and Chemical En­
gineering, Bull. 1132 (1953).*
Military Manpower Requirements and Supply: 195460, Bull. 1161 (1954)* and 1959-63, Bull. 1262
(1959).*
Occupational Employment Patterns for 1960 and 1975,
Bull. 1599 (1968).
Occupational Manpower and Training Needs, Bull. 1701
(1971).
Personnel Resources in the Social Sciences and Hu­
manities, Bull. 1169 (1954).*
Pilots and Mechanics in Civil Aviation, 1967-77: A
Study of Manpower Requirements, Bull. 1655 (1970).
Planning and Administrative Personnel in Local Gov­
ernments: A Pilot Study, June 1969, Bull. 1631
(1969) .
Railroad Technology and Manpower in the 1970’s,
Bull. 1717 (1972).
Scientific Research and Development in American In­
dustry, Bull. 1148 (1953).*
Seasonality and Manpower in Construction, Bull. 1642
(1970) .
Technician Manpower, 1966-80, Bull. 1639 (1970).
Tomorrow’s Manpower Needs, Vols. I-IV, Bull. 1606
(1969).

Manpower, foreign countries.

How to Make an Inventory of High-Level and Skilled
Manpower in Developing Countries, Rpt. 331
(1968).
Labor in the Central American Common Market Coun­
tries, Rpt. 345 (1968).
Summaries of Manpower Surveys and Reports for De­
veloping Countries, 1958-68, Bull. 1628 (1969).
Manufacturing industries. See under Wages and hours—
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries; also
specific subject or industry.
Marine workers. See Wages and hours—Water transpor­
tation.
Maritime industry. See Merchant seamen.
Maritime law. See Legislation—Seamen.
Massachusetts. See specific subjects.
Matrix, capital flow. See Capital flow matrix.
Meatcutters and butchers. See under Wages and hours.
Meatpacking industry. See Accidents—Rates, types, (etc.);
Collective bargaining, by industry or occupation; and
Wages and hours.
Mechanics and repairmen. See under Employment outlook.
Mechanics’ liens. See Legislation—Labor—Text, summa­
ries, and reviews of laws, beginning with Bull. 370 (1925).
Mechanization. See Productivity.
Mediation. (See also Labor-management disputes.)
Collective Agreements in the Men’s Clothing Industry,
Bull. 198 (1916).
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement and Wage

Medical-Service Plans

Stabilization During World War II, Bull. 1009
(1950).*
Report on the Work of the National Defense Media­
tion Board, March 19, 1941-January 12, 1942, Bull.
714 (1942).*
Medical-service plans. See Collective bargaining, general—
Health and welfare insurance.
Meetings. See Conventions, meetings, etc.
Men’s clothing industry. See Wages and hours—Clothing
industry—Men’s.
Merchandise stores, general. See Stores, retail; and Wages
and hours—Retail trade.
Merchant seamen. (See also Labor organizations—Sea­
men’s union, international; Wages and hours—Water
transportation; and Workmen’s compensation—Seamen.)
The Earnings and Employment of Seamen on U.S. Flag
Ships, Bull. 1238 (1958).*
Employment Outlook in the Merchant Marine, Bull.
1054 (1952).
Metal trades. See under Wages and hours.
Metalliferous mining. See Wages and hours—Mining.
Metalworking industries. See specific branch of industry
under Wages and hours.
Metalworking occupations. See under Employment outlook.
Methods. (See also Statistics; and individual BLS bulletins
for scope and method of survey and for technical notes,
where applicable.)
Average Retail Prices: Collection and Calculation,
Techniques and Problems, Bull. 1182 (1955).
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and Studies,
Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711 (1971).*
City Worker’s Family Budget: Pricing, Procedures,
Specifications, and Average Prices, Autumn 1966,
Bull. 1570-3 (1968).
Concepts and Methods Used in Household Statistics on
Employment and Unemployment from the Current
Population Survey, Rpt. 279 (1964).
Concepts and Methods Used in Manpower Statistics
from the Current Population Survey, Rpt. 313
(1967).
Consumer Expenditures and Income: Survey Guide­
lines, Bull. 1684 (1971).*
How the Government Measures Unemployment, Rpt.
287 (1964); Rpt. 312 (1967).
How to Make an Inventory of High-Level and Skilled
Manpower in Developing Countries, Rpt. 331 (1968).
Job Performance and Age: A Study in Measurement,
Bull. 1203 (1956).*
Pilot and Experimental Program on Urban Employ­
ment Surveys, Rpt. 354 (1969).
Problems in Measurement of Expenditures on Selected
Items of Supplementary Employee Remuneration,
Bull. 1186 (1956).
Productivity in the Railroad Industry, Rpt. 377 (1970).
Revised Equivalence Scale: For Estimating Equivalent
Incomes or Budget Costs, by Family Type, Bull.
1570-2 (1968).*
The Consumer Price Index, A Layman’s Guide, Bull.
1140 (1953).*
Tomorrow’s Manpower Needs, Vols. I-IV, Bull. 1606
(1969).



Minimum Wage, Effects of

Work Stoppages: Collection and Compilation of Work
Stoppage Statistics, Rpt. 11 (1953).
Mexico.
Labor in Mexico, Rpt. 251 (1963).
Labor Law and Practice in Mexico, Rpt. 240 (1963).
Labor Legislation of Mexico, Bull. 569 (1932).
Migrations.
Chinese Migrations, with Special Reference to Labor
Conditions, Bull. 340 (1923).
Military manpower. See under Manpower.
Military service. See Collective bargaining, general—Leave,
with and without pay.
Milk industry, Chicago.
Labor Aspects of the Chicago Milk Industry, Bull. 715
(1942).
Millwork. See under Wages and hours.
Millwrights. See under Employment outlook.
Minimum wage, effects of.
Effect of Minimum-Wage Determinations in Oregon,
Bull. 176 (1915).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage Areas,
January 1950 to January 1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Minimum Wage Effects Studies:
Athens, Georgia, June 1959, Rpt. 155-2 (1960).
Dalton, Georgia, June 1959, Rpt. 155-4 (1960).
Dothan, Alabama, June 1959, Rpt. 155-3 (1960).
Fort Smith, Arkansas, June 1959, Rpt. 155-5
(1960).
Meridian, Mississippi, June 1959, Rpt. 155-6
(1960).
Sunbury-Shamokin-Mount Carmel, Pennsylvania,
June 1959, Rpt. 155-1 (1959).
Studies of the Effects of the $1 Minimum Wage:
Athens, Georgia, February and April 1956, Rpt.
114-3 (1957) and February and April 1956
and April 1957, Rpt. 127-2 (1958).
Burlington, Vermont, February and April 1956,
Rpt. 114-1 (1957).
Dalton, Georgia, February and April 1956, Rpt.
114-4 (1957) and February and April 1956 and
April 1957, Rpt. 127-4 (1957).
Dothan, Alabama, February and April 1956, Rpt.
114-6 (1957) and February and April 1956
and April 1957, Rpt. 127-5 (1957).
Fort Smith, Arkansas, February and April 1956,
Rpt. 114-8 (1957) and February and April
1956 and April 1957, Rpt. 127-6 (1957).
Hickory, North Carolina, February and April
1956, Rpt. 114-7 (1957) and February and
April 1956 and April 1957, Rpt. 127-3 (1958).
Meridian, Mississippi, February and April 1956,
Rpt. 114-9 (1957) and February and April
1956 and April 1957, Rpt. 127-7 (1958).
Millville, New Jersey, February and April 1956,
Rpt. 114-2 (1957).
Spartanburg, South Carolina, February and April
1956, Rpt. 114-10 (1957).
Sunbury-Shamokin-Mount Carmel, Pennsylvania,
February and April, 1956, Rpt. 114-5 (1957)
and February and April 1956 and April 1957,
Rpt. 127-1 (1958).

147

Mining

Wage Structure: Canning and Freezing, Raw
Sugar, Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1957,
Rpt. 136 (1958).
Wage Structure: Cigars, Canning and Freezing,
Raw Sugar, Tobacco Stemming and Redrying,
1955 and 1956, Rpt. 117 (1958).
Wage Structure: Fertilizer Manufacturing, Part I
—Nationwide Earnings, April 1956, Part II—
Effects of the $1 Minimum Wage in the South,
April 1955 and April 1956, Rpt. I l l (1957).
Wage Structure: Fertilizer Manufacturing, South,
April 1957, Rpt. 132 (1958).
Wage Structure: Footwear, Processed Waste,
Wooden Containers, Work Shirts, August 1955,
February 1956, and April 1956, Rpt. 115 (1957).
Wage Structure: Men’s and Boys’ Shirts (except
Work Shirts) and Nightwear, February, April,
and October 1956, Rpt. 116 (1957).
Wage Structure: Processed Waste, Work Shirts,
April 1957, Rpt. 124 (1958).
Wage Structure: Seamless Hosiery—Men’s Seam­
less Hosiery, Nationwide; Children’s Seamless
Hosiery, Southeast, April 1957, Rpt. 129 (1958).
Wage Structure: Seamless Hosiery, Part I—Na­
tionwide Earnings, April 1956, Part II—Effects
of the $1 Minimum Wage, August 1955, Feb­
ruary 1956, and April 1956, Rpt. 112 (1957).
Wage Structure: Southern Sawmills, OctoberDecember 1955 and April 1956, Rpt. 113
(1957); April 1957, Rpt. 130 (1958).
Wage Structure: Wooden Containers, April 1957,
Rpt. 126 (1958).
Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages, Bull.
1657 (1970).
Mining. See under Legislation; and Wages and hours.
Minors, employment of. See Child labor.
Mobility. See Occupational mobility.
Mobilization, effects of.
Impact of a Full Mobilization Program on the Occu­
pational Composition of the Aircraft Engine and
Parts Industry: Techniques for Projecting Employ­
ment and Occupational Patterns, Rpt. 94 (1955).
Molders. See Occupational mobility.
Money disbursements. See Income and expenditures, con­
sumer.
Monthly Labor Review, subject indexes to. See under Pub­
lications, indexes to and lists of.
Morocco.
Labor Law and Practice in Morocco, Rpt. 282 (1065).
Mortality statistics.
Deaths from Lead Poisoning, Bull. 426 (1927); 19251927, Bull. 488 (1929).
Health Survey of the Printing Trades, 1922 to 1925,
Bull. 427 (1927).
Mortality from Respiratory Diseases in Dusty Trades
(Inorganic Dusts), Bull. 231 (1918).
Occupational Mortality Experience of the Metropolitan
Life Insurance Company, 1911-1913, Bull. 207
(1917); 1922-24, Bull. 507 (1930).
Preventable Death in Cotton Manufacturing Industry,
Bull. 251 (1919).

148


Necrosis, Phosphorus

The Problem of Dust Phthisis in the Granite-Stone
Industry, Bull. 293 (1922).
Motion-picture machine operators. See Wages and hours—
Amusements.
Motortruck drivers and helpers. See Wages and hours—
Truckdrivers and helpers.
Motor vehicle (and parts) manufacturing. See Wages and
hours—Automobile and other motor vehicle (and parts)
manufacturing.
Motor vehicle repair garages and shops. See Wages and
hours—Automobile repair garages and shops.
Municipal employees. (See also under Legislation—Labor
—Text, summaries, and reviews of laws; and under Wages
and hours.)
Municipal Labor-Management Relations: Chronology
of Compensation Developments in Milwaukee,
1960-70, Bull. 1720 (1971).
Municipal Public Employee Associations, Bull. 1702
(1971).
Planning and Administrative Personnel in Local Gov­
ernments: A Pilot Study, June 1969, Bull. 1631
(1969).
Munition factories, Great Britain, World War I.
Employment of Women and Juveniles in Great Britain
During the War, Bull. 223 (1917).
Hours, Fatigue, and Health in British Munition Fac­
tories, Bull. 221 (1917).
Industrial Efficiency and Fatigue in British Munition
Factories, Bull. 230 (1917).
Industrial Health and Efficiency, Bull. 249 (1919).
Welfare Work in British Munition Factories, Bull. 222
(1917).
Musicians. See Wages and hours—Amusements.
Mutual relief associations.
Mutual Relief Associations Among Government Em­
ployees in Washington, D.C., Bull. 282 (1921).

N
National Defense Mediation Board.
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement and Wage
Stabilization During World War II, Bull. 1009
(1950).*
Report on the Work of the National Defense Media­
tion Board, March 19, 1941-January 12, 1942, Bull.
714 (1942).*
National Wage Stabilization Board. Bull. 1009 (1950),*
entitled above.
National War Labor Board. (See also Labor-management
disputes—Strikes, for specified years.)
Maintenance-of-Membership Awards of National War
Labor Board, Bull. 753 (1943).
National War Labor Board, Bull. 287 (1922).
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement and Wage
Stabilization During World War II, Bull. 1009
(1950).*
Wage Stabilization in California Airframe Industry,
1943, Bull. 746 (1943).
Necrosis, phosphorus. See under Occupational diseases.

Negroes

Negroes. (See also Black Americans.)
Employment in Perspective: The Negro Employment
Situation, Rpt. 391 (1971).
Negroes in the United States—Their Employment and
Economic Status, Bull. 1119 (1953).*
Recent Trends in Social and Economic Conditions of
Negroes in the United States, July 1968, Rpt. 347
(1968).
Social and Economic Conditions of Negroes in the
United States, Rpt. 332 (1967).
The Negroes in the United States: Their Economic and
Social Situation, Bull. 1511 (1966).*
The Social and Economic Status of Negroes in the
United States, 1969, Rpt. 375 (1970); 1970, Rpt.
394 (1971).
New England. See specific subjects.
New Guinea.
Labor Law and Practice in New Guinea, Trust Terri­
tory under Australian Administration, Rpt. 258
(1964).
New York State. See specific subjects.
New Zealand.
Labor Law and Practice in New Zealand, Rpt. 321
(1967).
Newspaper industry. See Printing and publishing.
Newspaper reporters. See under Employment outlook.
Nicaragua.
Labor in the Central American Common Market Coun­
tries, Rpt. 345 (1968).
Labor Law and Practice in Nicaragua, Rpt. 265 (1964).
Nigeria.
Labor in Nigeria, Rpt. 261 (1963).
Nightwork. See Collective bargaining, general—Premium
pay, and Shift differentials and operations.
Nonferrous metals industry. (See also under Wages and
hours.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Norway. (See also Scandinavia.)
Labor Law and Practice in Norway, Rpt. 387 (1972).
Numerical control.
Outlook for Numerical Control of Machine Tools: A
Study of a Key Technological Development in
Metalworking Industries, Bull. 1437 (1965).*
Nurses, registered professional. See under Wages and hours
and see Employment Outlook—Registered nurses, etc.

o

Occupational diseases. (See also Mortality statistics; Poi­
sons, industrial; Workmen’s compensation.)
Anthrax.
Anthrax as an Occupational Disease, Bulls. 205
(1917) and 267 (1920).
Hazardous occupations.
Occupation Hazards and Diagnostic Signs: A
Guide to Impairments to be Looked for in
Hazardous Occupations, Bulls. 306 (1922) and
582 (1933).
Necrosis, phosphorus.
Phosphorus Necrosis in the Manufacture of Fire­



Old-Age Care and Assistance, Foreign Countries

works and in the Preparation of Phosphorus,
Bull. 405 (1926).
Printing trades. See under Hygiene, industrial, and
Mortality statistics.
Respiratory. See Mortality statistics, and Hygiene, in­
dustrial—Printing trades.
Stonecutters. (See also Mortality statistics.)
Effect of the Air Hammer on the Hands of Stone­
cutters, Bull. 236 (1918).
Tuberculosis. See Mortality statistics, and Hygiene, in­
dustrial—Printing trades.
Occupational mobility.
Coremakers. See Molders and coremakers, this section.
Depressed rural area.
Labor Supply and Mobility in a Newly Indus­
trialized Area (Ravenswood, W.Va.), Bull.
1261 (I960).*
Electronic technicians.
The Mobility of Electronic Technicians, 1940-52,
Bull. 1150 (1954).*
Molders and coremakers.
Mobility of Molders and Coremakers, 1940-1952,
Bull. 1162 (1954).*
Scientists.
Occupational Mobility of Scientists, Bull. 1121
(1953).*
Tool-and-die makers.
The Mobility of Tool and Die Makers, 1940-1951,
Bull. 1120 (1953).*
Occupational outlook. See Employment outlook.
Occupational wage surveys. See Wages and hours—Area
Wage Surveys.
Occupations. See Accidents—Rates, types, causes, (etc.);
Employment outlook; Mortality statistics; Occupational
diseases; Poisons, industrial; Safety; Wages and hours;
Working conditions; and specific occupation.
Office-building service employees.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage Areas,
April 1949 to November 1949, Bull. 1005 (1950).
Office workers. See under Wages and hours; and see spe­
cific occupation or industry under Employment outlook.
Old-age and survivors insurance. See under Old-age care
and assistance.
Old-age benefits. See Old-age care and assistance.
Old-age care and assistance. (See also Public assistance.)
Beneficial Activities of American Trade-Unions, Bull.
465 (1928).*
Care of Aged Persons in the United States, Bull. 489
(1929).
Directory of Homes for the Aged in the United States,
Bull. 505 (1929).
Homes for Aged in the United States, Bull. 677 (1941).
Public Old-Age Pensions and Insurance in the United
States and Foreign Countries, Bull. 561 (1932)* and
Bull. 489 (1929).
Public Social Security Programs in the United States,
1949-50, Bull. 982 (1950).*
Old-age care and assistance, foreign countries.
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States,
Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929). See also
Bull. 561 (1932),* entitled in above section.

149

Old-Age Pensions, Extent of

Old-age pensions, extent of. See Health, insurance, and
pension plans, extent of.
Older workers.
Comparative Job Performance by Age: Large Plants in
the Men’s Footwear and Household Furniture Indus­
tries, Bull. 1223 (1957).*
Comparative Job Performance by Age: Office Work­
ers, Bull. 1273 (I960).*
Employment and Economic Status of Older Men and
Women, Bull. 1213 (1957).*
Employment and Economic Status of Older Men and
Women, May 1952, Bull. 1092 (1952).*
Industrial Retraining Programs for Technological
Change: A Study of the Performance of Older
Workers, Bull. 1368 (1963).
Job Performance and Age: A Study in Measurement,
Bull. 1203 (1956).*
Job Redesign for Older Workers: Ten Case Studies,
Bull. 1523 (1967).*
Older Workers Under Collective Bargaining: Part I,
Hiring, Retention, Job Termination, Bull. 1199-1
(1956); Part II, Health and Insurance Plans, Pension
Plans, Bull. 1199-2 (1956).
The Employment Problems of Older Workers, Bull.
1721 (1971).
Operating ratios. See Capital requirements and operating
ratios.
Opinions, legal. See Court decisions affecting labor.
Opticians and optical mechanics. See under Employment
outlook.
Output per man-hour. See Productivity.
Overtime, and compensation for. See Collective bargain­
ing, general—Premium pay, and Shift differentials and
operations.
Oxygen cutters. See Employment outlook—Welders.

p
Pacific Islands, Trust Territory of.
Labor Law and Practice in the Trust Territory of the
Pacific Islands, Rpt. 382 (1971).
Paint and varnish industry. See under Wages and hours.
Painters, exposure to lead poisoning.
Report of British Departmental Committee on the Dan­
ger in the Use of Lead in the Painting of Buildings,
Bull. 188 (1916).
Pakistan.
Labor Law and Practice in Pakistan, Rpt. 271 (1964).
Panama.
Labor Law and Practice in Panama, Rpt. 356 (1970).
Paper and paper products industries. See under Accidents—
Rates, types, (etc.); Collective bargaining, by industry or
occupation; and Wages and hours.
Paraguay.
Labor Legislation of Paraguay, Bull. 554 (1931).
Parks.
Park Recreation Areas in the United States, Bulls. 462
(1928) and 565 (1932).
Payroll statistics. See Indexes; and specific industry.
Pensions. (See also Collective bargaining, general—Pen­

150




Poisons, Industrial

sions; Health, insurance, and pension plans, extent of; and
Older workers.)
Digest of 50 Selected Pension Plans for Salaried Em­
ployees, Spring 1963, Bull. 1373 (1963) and Sum­
mer 1965, Bull. 1477 (1966).
Health and Insurance Benefits and Pension Plans for
Salaried Employees, Spring 1963, Bull. 1405 (1964).
Labor Legislation, 1931 and 1932, Bull. 590 (1933).
Labor Mobility and Private Pension Plans: A Study
of Vesting, Early Retirement, Portability Provisions,
Bull. 1407 (1964).*
Private Pension Plan Benefits, Bull. 1485 (1966).*
Private Pension Plans and Manpower Policy, Bull. 1359
(1963).
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States, Can­
ada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Unfunded Private Pension Plans, Bull. 1394 (1964).
Permits, building. See Building construction.
Personnel research agencies.
Personnel Research Agencies, Bulls. 299 (1921) and
518 (1930).
Personnel resources. See Manpower.
Personnel workers. See under Employment outlook.
Peru.
Labor in Peru, Rpt. 262 (1964).
Labor Law and Practice in Peru, Rpt. 338 (1968).
Petroleum industry. See under Collective bargaining, by
industry or occupation; Employment outlook; and Wages
and hours.
Philippines.
Labor Law and Practice in the Philippines, Rpt. 253
(1963).
Physical and earth scientists. See under Employment out­
look.
Physicians. See under Employment outlook.
Physicists. See Scientists and under Employment outlook.
Pineapple industry, Hawaii. See Hawaii.
Plant management. (See also Collective bargaining, gen­
eral—Labor-management cooperation.)
Improvement of Labor-Utilization Procedures, Bull.
807 (1945).
Plant operations.
Plant Operation Report for (the):
Manufacture of Concrete Pipe and Block, Rpt. 88
(1955).
Manufacture of Fish Netting, Rpt. 90 (1955).
Manufacture of Rubber Sole Fabric Shoes, Rpt. 91
(1955).
Manufacture of Plows, Rpt. 68 (1954).
Meat Processing, Rpt. 89 (1955).
Plant Operation Report on a Small Gray Iron Foundry,
Rpt. 53 (1954).
Plastics products industry. See under Employment outlook.
Plumbing. See under Accidents—Rates, types, (etc.).
Poisons, industrial. (See also Mortality statistics, and Hy­
giene, industrial.)
A New Test for Industrial Lead Poisoning, Bull. 460
(1928).
Carbon-Monoxide Poisoning, Bull. 291 (1922).
Industrial Poisoning in Making Coal-Tar Dyes and Dye
Intermediates, Bull. 280 (1921).

Police

Industrial Poisons Used in the Rubber Industry, Bull.
179 (1915).
Industrial Poisons Used or Produced in the Manufac­
ture of Explosives, Bull. 219 (1917). See also Bulls.
221 (1917) and 249 (1919).
Phosphorus Necrosis in the Manufacture of Fireworks
and in the Preparation of Phosphorus, Bull. 405
(1926).
Report of British Departmental Committee on the Dan­
ger in the Use of Lead in the Painting of Buildings,
Bull. 188 (1916).
Women in the Lead Industries, Bull. 253 (1919).
Police. (See also Legislation—Labor—Text, summaries,
and reviews of laws; and Wages and hours—Municipal
employees.)
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States, Can­
ada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Population forecasts.
Population and Labor Force Projections for the United
States, 1960 to 1975, Bull. 1242 (1959).*
Portland cement industry. See Cement industry, portland.
Postal Service.
Technological Changes and Employment in the United
States Postal Service, Bull. 574 (1932).
Pottery industry. See under Wages and hours.
Poverty neighborhoods.
Urban Employment Survey: Employment Situation in
Poverty Areas of Six Cities, July 1968-June 1969,
Rpt. 370 (1969).
Power laundries. See Wages and hours—Laundries, power.
Premium pay. See under Collective bargaining, general;
and see Wages and hours—specific industry.
Price control. See Wartime.
Prices. [Note: Bulletins showing retail and wholesale
prices in particular periods frequently include data for
earlier years and for foreign countries.] (See also Income
and expenditures, consumer.)
Clothing costs.
Cost of Clothing for Moderate-Income Families,
1935-44, Bull. 789 (1944).
Construction costs.
Construction Cost Indexes: Annual Indexes, 1915—
1953; Monthly Indexes, January 1949-July 1954,
Rpt. 73 (1954).
Consumer Price Index.
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and Stud­
ies, Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711 (1971).*
Consumer Prices in the United States, 1949-52,
Bull. 1165 (1954);* 1953-58, Bull. 1256
(1959).*
Consumer Prices in the United States, 1959-68:
Trends and Indexes, Bull. 1647 (1970).*
Consumers’ Prices in the United States, 1942-48,
Bull. 966 (1949).*
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull. 1016
(1951); 1951 Supp. (1953);* 1967, Bull. 1555
(1967);* 1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969, Bull.
1630 (1969);* 1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);* 1971,
Bull. 1705 (1971).*
Interim Adjustment of Consumers’ Price Index,
Bull. 1039 (1952).*



Prices

Price Trends, March 1966, Bull. 1510 (1966).
Prices: A Chartbook, 1953-62, Bull. 1351 (1963);
and September 1963 Supp., Bull. 1351-1 (1963).
Seasonal Factors, Consumer Price Index, Selected
Series, June 1953-May 1961, Bull. 1366 (1963).
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
The Consumer Price Index: A Layman’s Guide,
Bull. 1140 (1943).*
The Consumer Price Index: History and Tech­
niques, Bull. 1517 (1966).
The Consumer Price Index: Technical Notes,
1959-63, Bull. 1554 (1967).*
Cost of living.
Changes in Cost of Living in Large Cities in the
United States, 1913-41, Bull. 699 (1941).*
Cost of Living in 1941, Bull. 710 (1942).*
Cost of Living in the United States, Bull. 357
(1924).
Cycles.
The Cyclical Behavior of Prices, Rpt. 384 (1971).
Retail.
Coal. (See also bulletins for specified years under
Prices—Retail—Various commodities.)
Residential Heating Fuels, Retail Prices,
1941-48, Bull. 950 (1949).
Retail Prices of Food and Coal, 1941, Bull.
707 (1942).
Dry goods. See bulletins for years from 1907 to
1923, listed below under Various commodities.
Electricity. [See also Bulls. 418 (1926), 445 (1927),
464 (1928), 495 (1929), and 1950 (1949).]
Changes in Retail Prices of Electricity, 1923—
38, Bull. 664 (1939).
Food, indexes.
Methods.
Retail Prices of Food, 1923-36, Bull.
635 (1938).*
Retail Prices of Food, 1951 and 1952,
Bull. 1141 (1953); 1953-54, Bull.
1183 (1955).
The Consumer Price Index, A Layman’s
Guide, Bull. 1140 (1953).*
Yearly.
Retail Prices of Food:
1923-36, Bull. 635 (1938).*
1941, Bull. 707 (1942).
1942 and 1943, Bull. 799 (1945).
1944 and 1945, Bull. 899 (1947).
1946 and 1947, Bull. 938 (1949).
1948, Bull. 965 (1949).
1949, Bull. 1032 (1951).
1950, Bull. 1055 (1952).
1951-52, Bull. 1141 (1953).
1953-54, Bull. 1183 (1955).
1955-56, Bull. 1217 (1957).
1957-58, Bull. 1254 (1959).
1959-60, Bull. 1301 (1961).
1961-63, Bull. 1446 (1965).
1964-68, Indexes and Average
Prices, Bull. 1632 (1969).

151

Prices

Prices

Fuels. (See also specific fuel and specified years
listed below under Various commodities.)
Residential Heating Fuels, Retail Prices,
1941-48, Bull. 950 (1949).
Gas. (See also Fuels, under Retail, this section.)
Changes of Retail Prices of Gas, 1923-36,
Bull. 628 (1937).
Handbooks.
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and
Studies, Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711
(1971).*
Consumer Expenditures and Income: Survey
Guidelines, Bull. 1684 (1971).*
Handbook of Labor Statistics 1967, Bull. 1555
(1967);* 1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969,
Bull. 1630 (1969);* 1970, Bull. 1666
(1970);* 1971, Bull. 1705 (1971).*
History.
Average Retail Prices, 1953-54: Collection
and Calculation, Techniques and Problems,
Bull. 1182 (1955).*
Price Perspective 1965, 1966, 1967, Bull.
1543 (1968).
Price Trends, March 1966, Bull. 1510 (1966).
Prices, 1964, Rpt. 291 (1965).
Prices: A Chartbook, 1953-62, Bull. 1351;
and September 1963 Supp., Bull. 1351-1
(1963).
Recent Price Developments, January-August
1964, Rpt. 286 (1965).
Retail Prices, 1890 to 1924, Bull. 396 (1925).
Various commodities.
1907 to June 1915, Bull. 184 (1916).
1907 to December 1915, Bull. 197 (1916).
1907 to December 1916, Bull. 228 (1917).
1913 to December 1919, Bull. 270 (1921).

1913 to December 1920, Bull. 300 (1922).
1913 to December 1921, Bull. 315 (1923).
1913 to December 1922, Bull. 334 (1923).
1913 to December 1923, Bull. 366 (1925).
1890 to 1924, Bull. 396 (1925).
1890 to 1925, Bull. 418 (1926).
1890 to 1926, Bull. 445 (1927).
1890 to 1927, Bull. 464 (1928).
1890 to 1928, Bull. 495 (1929).
1953-54, Average Retail Prices: Collec­
tion and Calculation, Techniques and
Problems, Bull. 1182 (1955).*
1955, Average Retail Prices 1955, Bull.
1197 (1956).*
Wartime. (See also bulletins for war years under
Retail, and Wholesale Price Index, this section.)
Consumers’ Prices in the United States, 194248, Bull. 966 (1949).*
The General Maximum Price Regulation,
Bull. 879 (1946).
War and Postwar Wages, Prices, and Hours,
1914-23 and 1939-44, Bull. 852 (1946).
Wartime Prices, Part I—August 1939 to
Pearl Harbor, Bull. 749 (1944).*
152




Wholesale Price Index.
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and
Studies, Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711
(1971).*
Daily Indexes and Spot Market Prices, Jan­
uary 1, 1954-December 31, 1956, Rpt. 131
(1958).
Daily Spot Market: Price Indexes and Prices,
January 1, 1957-December 31, 1959, Rpt.
157 (1961).
Frequency of Change in Wholesale Prices: A
Study of Price Flexibility, Rpt. 142 (1958).
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed.,
Bull. 1016 (1951); 1951 Supp. (1953);*
1967, Bull. 1555 (1967);* 1968, Bull. 1600
(1968);* 1969, Bull. 1630 (1969);* 1970,
Bull. 1666 (1970);* 1971, Bull. 1705
(1971).*
Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in the
United States and Foreign Countries, Bull.
284 (1921).* [Part I reprinted as Bull. 656
(1938).]
Industrial Chemicals Price Trends, Rpt. 349
(1968).
Price Perspective 1965, 1966, 1967, Bull. 1543
(1968).
Price Trends, March 1966, Bull. 1510 (1966).
Prices: A Chartbook, 1953-62, Bull. 1351
(1963); and September 1963 Supp., Bull.
1351-1 (1963).
Revised Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices,
1923 to July 1927, Bull. 453 (1927).*
Seasonal Adjustment Factors, Wholesale Price
Index: Selected Series, 1948-61, Bull. 1379
(1963).
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statisti­
cal Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).* See also
Bulls. 947 (1949),* 1083 (1952),* 1214
(1957),* 1235 (1958),* 1257 (1959),*
1411 (1965),* and 1513 (1966).*
Various commodities.
1890 to 1914, Bull. 181 (1915).*
1890 to 1915, Bull. 200 (1916).*
1890 to 1916, Bull. 226 (1917).*
1890 to 1919, Bull. 269 (1920).*
1890 to 1920, Bull. 296 (1922).*
1890 to 1921, Bull. 320 (1922).*
1890 to 1922, Bull. 335 (1923).*
1890 to 1923, Bull. 367 (1925).*
1890 to 1924, Bull. 390 (1925).*
1890 to 1925, Bull. 415 (1926).*
1890 to 1926, Bull. 440 (1927).*
1913 to 1927, Bull. 473 (1929).*
1913 to 1928, Bull. 493 (1929).*
1929, Bull. 521 (1930).*
1930, Bull. 543 (1931).*
1931, Bull. 572 (1933).*
1939 (August) to 1941 (December),
Bull. 749 (1944).*
January-June 1942, Bull. 718 (1943).*

Prices, Foreign Countries

Productivity, General

July-December and Year 1942, Bull. 736
(1943) .*
January-June 1943, Bull. 759 (1944).*
July-December and Year 1943, Bull. 785
(1944) .*
1944, Bull. 870 (1947).*
1945, Bull. 877 (1947).*
1946, Bull. 920 (1948).*
1947, Bull. 947 (1949).*
1948, Bull. 973 (1950).*
1949, Bull. 1007 (1951).*
1950, Bull. 1083 (1952).*
1951-52, Bull. 1143 (1953).*
1954-56, Bull. 1214 (1957).*
1957, Bull. 1235 (1958).*
1958, Bull. 1257 (1959).*
1959, Bull. 1295 (1961).*
1960, Bull. 1376 (1963).*
1961, Bull. 1382 (1964).*
1962, Bull. 1411 (1965).*
1963, Bull. 1513 (1966).*
P r ic e s , fo r e ig n c o u n tr ie s .
(See also Prices; and Wartime,
foreign countries.)
Handbook of Labor Statistics 1967, Bull. 1555 (1967);*
1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969, Bull. 1630 (1969);*
1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);* 1971, Bull. 1705 (1971).*
Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in the United
States and Foreign Countries, Bull. 284 (1921).*
Wage Trends and Wage Policies: Various Foreign
Countries, Bull. 934 (1948).
P r in t in g (tra d e s ) a n d p u b lis h in g .
(See also under Collective
bargaining, by industry or occupation; Employment out­
look; Hygiene, industrial; Productivity; Wages and hours.)
P u b lic p r in tin g .
See Legislation—Printing, public.
P r is o n la b o r .
(See also under Legislation.)
Convict Labor in 1923, Bull. 372 (1925).
Prison Labor in the United States, 1932, Bull. 595
(1933).
Prison Labor in the United States, 1940, Bull. 698
(1941).
P r is o n -m a d e g o o d s .

See Prison labor.

P r o d u c tio n fu n c tio n s .

Capital Stocks, Production Functions, and Investment
Functions for Selected Input-Output Sectors, Rpt.
355 (1970).
Productivity in the Railroad Industry, Rpt. 377 (1970).
P r o d u c tio n s ta n d a rd s .
See Collective bargaining, general—
Labor-management cooperation; Productivity; Wage in­
centive plans.
P r o d u c t io n s ta tis tic s .

Handbook
(1951);
(1967);*
(1969);*
(1971).*

of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull.
1951 Supp. (1953);* 1967, Bull.
1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969, Bull.
1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);* 1971, Bull.

1016
1555
1630
1705

(See also Conventions, meetings, etc.;
Labor requirements; Older workers; Productivity, by in­
dustry; and Technological changes.)
Bibliographies.
Productivity: A Bibliography, Bull. 1226 (1958);
and July 1966, Bull. 1514 (1966).

P r o d u c t iv it y , g e n e ra l.




Effects of long hours.
Hours of Work and Output, Bull. 917 (1948).*
Studies of the Effects of Long Working Hours,
Bulls. 791 and 791-A (1944).*
Improvement of.
Improving Productivity: Labor and Management
Approaches, Bull. 1715 (1971).
Indexes. See Trends, this section, and specific industry
under Productivity, by industry.
International comparisons.
An International Comparison of Unit Labor Cost
In the Iron and Steel Industry, 1964; United
States, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Bull.
1580 (1968).
Productivity and the Economy, Bull. 1710 (1971).*
Unit Labor Cost in Manufacturing: Trends in Nine
Countries, 1960-65, Bull. 1518 (1966).
Measurement of.
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and Stud­
ies, Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711 (1971).*
Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical
Series, Bull. 1168 (1955).*
The Meaning and Measurement of Productivity,
Bull. 1714 (1971).
Projections.
Patterns of U.S. Economic Growth, Bull. 1672
(1970).*
Productivity and the Economy, Bull. 1710 (1971).*
Projections 1970: Interindustry Relationships, Po­
tential Demand, Employment, Bull. 1536
(1966).*
The U.S. Economy in 1980: A Summary of BLS
Projections, Bull. 1673 (1970).*
Statistics. (See also Trends, this section, and specific
industry under Productivity, by industry.)
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull.
1016 (1951); 1951 Supp. (1953);* 1967, Bull.
1555 (1967);* 1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969,
Bull. 1630 (1969);* 1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);*
1971, Bull. 1705 (1971).*
Time studies and production standards.
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Incentive Wage
Provisions: Time Studies and Standards of Pro­
duction, Bull. 908-3 (1948).
Trends. (See also specific industry under Productivity, by
industry.)
Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour, Selected Indus­
tries, 1939 and 1947-63, Rpt. 301 (1965); 1939
and 1947-65, Bull. 1537 (1966); 1939 and
1947-66, Bull. 1572 (1967); 1939 and 1947-67,
Bull. 1612 (1968); 1939 and 1947-68, Bull.
1652 (1969); 1939 and 1947-69, Bull. 1680
(1970); 1939 and 1947-70, Bull. 1692 (1971).
Productivity and the Economy, Bull. 1710 (1971).
Productivity Trends in Selected Industries, Indexes
Through 1950, Bull. 1046 (1951).*
Trends in Output Per Man-Hour, 1935-55: Se­
lected Nonmanufacturing Industries, Rpt. 105
(1956).
Trends in Output Per Man-Hour and Man-Hours
153

Productivity, By Industry

Per Unit of Output—Manufacturing, 1939-53,
Rpt. 100 (1955).
Trends in Output Per Man-Hour in the Private
Economy, 1909-58, Bull. 1249 (I960).*
Unit Labor Cost in Manufacturing: Trends in Nine
Countries, 1950-65, Bull. 1518 (1966).
Unit labor cost, international comparison. See Interna­
tional comparisons, this section.
P r o d u c tiv ity , b y in d u s try .

Air transportation.
Indexes of Output Per Employee, Air Transporta­
tion Industry, 1947-64, Rpt. 308 (1966).
Aluminum.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Aluminum Ware, Rpt. 48 (1954).
Indexes of Output per Man-Hour: Aluminum
Rolling and Drawing Industry, 1958-65, Rpt.
314 (1966).
Beet sugar refining.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory
Performance: Beet Sugar Refining, Rpt. 6
(1953).
Brick.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Brick and Tile, Rpt. 43 (1953).
Productivity Costs in Common-Brick Industry,
Bull. 356 (1924).
Capacitors.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Dry Electrolytic Capacitors, Rpt. 15
(1953).
Cargo handling. See Longshoremen, this section.
Centrifugal pumps.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Centrifugal Pumps, Rpt. 69 (1954).
Cigars.
Mechanization and Productivity of Labor in the
Cigar-Manufacturing Industry, Bull. 660 (1939).
Circuit breakers.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: 3-Pole Circuit Breakers, Circuit In­
terrupters, and Safety Switches, Rpt. 67 (1954).
Clothing.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Men’s Winter Suits and Topcoats,
Rpt. 4 (1953).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Women’s Dresses, Rpt. 84 (1955).
Productivity of Labor in the Cotton-Garment In­
dustry, Bull. 662 (1939).
Coal, bituminous.
Technological Change and Productivity in the
Bituminous Coal Industry, 1920-60, Bull. 1305
(1961).
Combines.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Combines (Harvester-threshers), Rpt.
13 (1954).
Concrete products.
Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour, Concrete Prod­
ucts Industry, 1947-63, Rpt. 300 (1965).
154




Productivity, By Industry

Copper tube and brass rod.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Copper Tube and Brass Rod, Rpt.
81 (1955).
Cotton goods.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Coarse Cotton Gray Goods, Rpt. 16
(1953) .
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Fine Cotton Gray Goods, Rpt. 58
(1954) .
Dyeing and finishing, cotton.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Cotton Textile Dyeing and Finishing,
Rpt. 66 (1954).
Electric lamps.
Technological Changes and Employment in the
Electric-Lamp Industry, Bull. 593 (1933).
Engines and motors.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Diesel Engines, Rpt. 86 (1955).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: 5-Horsepower Induction Motors, Rpt.
55 (1954).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Fractional Horsepower Motors, Rpt.
23 (1953).
Farm equipment.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Farm Implements, Rpt. 52 (1954).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Farm Tractors, Rpt. 38 (1953).
Fertilizer.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Fertilizer, Rpt. 63 (1954).
Fork lift trucks.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Fork Lift Trucks, Rpt. 54 (1954).
Foundries.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Five Small Gray Iron Foundries, Rpt.
85 (1955).
Indexes of Output per Man-Hour: Gray Iron
Foundries Industry, 1954-66, Bull. 1636 (1969).
Furniture.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Wood Furniture, Rpt. 18 (1954).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber, Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1915, Bull. 225
(1918).
Glass.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Glass Containers, Rpt. 70 (1954).
Productivity of Labor in the Glass Industry, Bull.
441 (1927).
Hand tools.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Hand Tools, Rpt. 39 (1953).
Heaters, irons, and hot plates.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­

Psychologists

Productivity, By Industry

formance: Coal-Burning Space Heaters, Rpt. 78
(1955).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Irons, Hot Plates, and Space Heaters,
Rpt. 61 (1954).
Hosiery.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Seamless Hosiery, Rpt. 44 (1953).
Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour, Hosiery Indus­
try, 1947-64, Rpt. 307 (1966).
Iron and steel.
An International Comparison of Unit Labor Cost
in the Iron and Steel Industry, 1964: United
States, France, Germany, United Kingdom,
Bull. 1580 (1968).
Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour, Steel Industry,
1947-65, Rpt. 306 (1966).
Labor Productivity in the Steel Industry in the
United States, Rpt. 310 (1966).
Man-Hours Per Unit of Output in the Basic Steel
Industry, 1939-55, Bull. 1200 (1956).
Productivity of Labor in Merchant Blast Furnaces,
Bull. 474 (1929).
Knitwear.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Knit Outerwear, Rpt. 40 (1953).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Knit Underwear, Rpt. 41 (1953).
Longshoremen.
Cargo Handling and Longshore Labor Conditions,
Bull. 550 (1932).
Lumber. See Furniture, this section.
Machine bolts.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Cold Formed Machine Bolts and
Hexagon Nuts, Rpt. 47 (1953).
Metal containers.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Metal Containers, Rpt. 71 (1954).
Motor vehicles and equipment.
Indexes of Output per Man-Hour: Motor Vehicles
and Equipment Industry, 1957-66, Bull. 1613
(1968) .
Newspaper printing.
Productivity of Labor in Newspaper Printing, Bull.
475 (1929).
Paint and varnish.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Paint and Varnish, Rpt. 79 (1955).
Paper and paper products.
Indexes of Output per Man-Hour: Corrugated and
Solid Fiber Boxes Industry, 1958-66, Bull. 1641
(1969) .
Labor Cost of Production and Wages and Hours
of Labor in the Paper Box-Board Industry, Bull.
407 (1926).
Plywood and veneer.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Veneer and Plywood, Rpt. 37 (1953).



Pottery.
Wages, Hours, and Productivity in the Pottery
Industry, 1925, Bull. 412 (1926).
Processed foods.
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Processed Foods—Canned Vege­
tables, Rpt. 8 (1953).
Case Study Data on Productivity and Factory Per­
formance: Processed Foods—Preserves, Jams,
and Jellies, Rpt. 57 (1954).
Radio and television sets.
Indexes of Output per Man-hour: Radio and Tele­
vision Receiving Sets Industry, 1958-66, Rpt.
350 (1968).
Railroads.
Productivity in the Railroad Industry, Rpt. 377
(1970).
Railroad Technology and Manpower in the 1970’s,
Bull. 1717 (1972).
Shoes.
Time and Labor Costs in Manufacturing 100 Pairs
of Shoes, 1923, Bull. 360 (1924).
Steel. See Iron and steel, this section.
Tires.
Labor Productivity in the Automobile Tire Indus­
try, Bull. 585 (1933).
Tobacco. See Cigars, this section.
P ro fe s s io n a l w o rk e rs .
See Federal employees, Scientists,
White-collar workers, and specific profession.
P r o fit s h a rin g .

Digest of Profit-Sharing, Savings, and Stock Purchase
Plans, Winter 1961-62 (20 Selected Plans), Bull.
1325 (1962).*
Profit Sharing in the United States, Bull. 208 (1917).
P ro g ra m e rs .
(See also under Employment outlook.)
Automation and Employment Opportunities for Officeworkers, Bull. 1241 (1958).*
P r o je c tio n s .

College Educated Workers, 1968-80, Bull. 1676 (1970).
Health Manpower, 1966-75, Rpt. 323 (1967).
Occupational Employment Patterns for 1960 and 1975,
Bull. 1599 (1968).
Occupational Manpower and Training Needs, Bull.
1701 (1971).
Patterns of U.S. Economic Growth, Bull. 1672 (1970).*
Ph.D. Scientists and Engineers in Private Industry,
1968-80, Bull. 1648 (1970).
Pilots and Mechanics in Civil Aviation, 1967-77: A
Study of Manpower Requirements, Bull. 1655 (1970).
Population and Labor Force Projections for the United
States, 1960 to 1975, Bull. 1242 (1959).*
Technician Manpower, 1966-80, Bull. 1639 (1970).*
The U.S. Economy in 1980: A Summary of BLS Pro­
jections, Bull. 1673 (1970).*
P r o m o t io n , tr a n s fe r , a n d

a s s ig n m e n t.

Collective Bargaining Provisions—Promotion, Transfer,
and Assignment; Lay-off, Work Sharing, and Reem­
ployment, Bull. 908-7 (1948).
P ro te c tio n o f w o rk e rs .
See Safety; and Safety—Codes. See
also Accidents—Rates, types, causes, (etc.).
P s y c h o lo g is ts .
See under Employment outlook.
155

Related Wage Benefits

Public Assistance
a s s is ta n c e .
(See also Family allowances; Old-age
care and assistance.)
Public Social Security Programs in the United States,
1949-50, Bull. 982 (1950).*
The Cost of American Almshouses, Bull. 386 (1925).
P u b l i c e m p lo y m e n t o ffic e s .
See Employment agencies.
P u b lic s e rv ic e .
(See also Federal workers; Legislation—
Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews of laws; and Mu­
nicipal employees.)
Retirement systems.
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States,
Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Teachers. See under Employment outlook.
P u b lic w e lfa r e .
See Public assistance.
P u b lic w o r k s .
See under Legislation.

P u b lic

P u b lic W o r k s A d m in is tr a tio n .

P.W.A. and Industry: A Four-Year Study of Regen­
erative Employment, Bull. 658 (1938).* See also
Bull. 786 (1944).
P u b l i c a t i o n s , in d e x e s t o a n d lis ts o f .

A Selected List of the Publications of the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, 1936 ed., Bull. 624 (1936); 1938
ed., Bull. 661 (1939); 1940 ed., Bull. 683 (1941);
Supp. to 1940 ed., Bull. 747 (1943).
Bulletins and Articles Published by Bureau of Labor
Statistics: A Selected List of References, Bull. 614
(1935).
Index of Volumes 72-83, Monthly Labor Review, Jan­
uary 1951 to December 1960, Bull. 1335 (1962).
Index to Proceedings of International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, 19141924, Bull. 395 (1925).
Labor Developments Abroad: Cumulative Index, 195663, Rpt. 292 (1965).
Publications of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1886—
1967, Bull. 1567 (1968).*
Subject Index of Bulletins Published by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, 1915-59, with Annotated Listing of
Bulletins, 1895-1959, Bull. 1281 (I960).*
Subject Index of the Publications of the United States
Bureau of Labor Statistics up to May 1, 1915, Bull.
174 (1915).*
Subject Index to the Monthly Labor Review:
Volumes 1 to 11, July 1915 to December 1920,
Bull. 695 (1941).
Volumes 12 to 51, January 1921 to December
1940, Bull. 696 (1942).
Volumes 52 to 71, January 1941 to December
1950, Bull. 1080 (1953). For later numbers, see
Bull. 1335, entitled above, this listing.
P u e rto R ic o .

Salaries of White-Collar Workers in Hawaii, Puerto
Rico, and Alaska, May-June 1963, Bull. 1392 (1964).
The Status of Labor in Puerto Rico, Alaska, Hawaii,
Bull. 1191 (1956).
P u lp a n d p a p e r in d u s tr y .
See Paper and paper products
industries.
P u lp w o o d lo g g in g in d u s t r y .

Injuries and Accident Causes in the Pulpwood-Logging
Industry, 1943 and 1944, Bull. 924 (1948).*
156




Q

Q u its .

See Collective bargaining, general—Severance pay.

R
R a d io

a n d te le v is io n

b ro a d c a s tin g .

See under Employment

outlook.
m a n u fa c tu re .
See under Collective bargaining, by
industry or occupation. See Employment outlook—Elec­
tronics manufacturing and Technicians; and under Wages
and hours.
R a ilro a d s .
(See also under Employment outlook; Legisla­
tion; and Wages and hours.)
Pennsylvania Railroad Wage Data, Bull. 514 (1930).
Railroad Technology and Manpower in the 1970’s,
Bull. 1717 (1972).
Railway Labor Act.
Airline Experience under the Railway Labor Act,
Bull. 1683 (1971).
Use of Federal Power in Settlement of Railway Labor
Disputes, Bull. 303 (1922).*

R a d io

R a t io n in g , fo r e ig n c o u n tr ie s , W o r l d W a r I I .

Wartime Prices, Price Control, and Rationing in For­
eign Countries, Bull. 851 (1946).
R a y o n in d u s tr y .
See under Wages and hours.
R e c a ll.
See Collective bargaining, general—Layoff.
R e c o n s tru c tio n , p o s tw a r, E u r o p e .

Cooperative Associations in Europe and Their Possi­
bilities for Post-War Reconstruction, Bull. 770
(1944).*
R e c o n v e rs io n .

Demobilization of Manpower, 1918-19, Bull. 784
(1944).
Effects of War-Contract Cut-Backs on Selected Plants,
Bull. 818 (1945).
Reconversion Problems in the Buffalo Industrial Area,
Bull. 804 (1945).
Workers’ Experiences During First Phase of Reconver­
sion, Bull. 876 (1946).
R e c re a tio n .
See Parks; and Health, recreation, and welfare
conditions.
R e e m p lo y m e n t.
See Collective bargaining, general—L a y o f f ,
and Military service.
R e l a t e d w a g e b e n e fits .
(See also Collective bargaining, gen­
eral—specific benefit—and by industry or occupation;
Employment outlook; Health, insurance, and pension
plans, extent of; and Wages and hours—Area Wage Sur­
veys, and Wage chronologies.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supplementary
Remuneration Practices for Production Workers in
Manufacturing Industries, 1959, Bull. 1308 (1962).*
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supplementary Re­
muneration Practices for Production Workers in
Mining Industries, 1960, Bull. 1332 (1963).*
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212
(1957).*

Repairmen

Problems in Measurement of Expenditures on Selected
Items of Supplementary Employee Remuneration,
Bull. 1186 (1956).*
Supplementary Compensation for Nonproduction Work­
ers, 1963, Bull. 1470 (1966).
Supplementary Wage Practices in American Industry,
1945_46, Bull. 939 (1948).*
Repairmen. See Employment outlook—Mechanics and re­
pairmen.
Reporters, newspaper. See Employment outlook—News­
paper reporters.
Reporting pay. See Collective bargaining, general—Call­
back pay.
Research and development, industrial.

Scientific Research and Development in American In­
dustry, Bull. 1148 (1953).*
Respiratory diseases. See Mortality statistics; and Hygiene,
industrial—Printing trades.
Rest periods. See under Collective bargaining, general.
Restaurants. See under Employment outlook, and see
Wages and hours—Hotels, motels, and restaurants.
Retail prices. See Prices, retail.
Retail stores. See Stores, retail.
Retail trade. See under Wages and hours.
Retirement. (See also Collective bargaining, general—
Health and welfare insurance, and Pensions; Health, in­
surance, and pension plans, extent of; Legislation—Labor
—Text, summaries, and reviews of laws; and Older
workers.)
Characteristics of Terminated Retirement Plans, 1955—
65, Rpt. 369 (1969).
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States, Can­
ada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).

Retraining.

Industrial Retraining Programs for Technological
Change: A Study of the Performance of Older Work­
ers, Bull. 1368 (1963).
Job Redesign for Older Workers: Ten Case Studies,
Bull. 1523 (1967).*
Rubber industry. See under Wages and hours; and see
Poisons, industrial, and Tire industry.
Russia. See U.S.S.R.

s

Sabotage. See Legislation—Syndicalism and
Safety. (See also Accidents—Rates, types,

sabotage.
causes, (etc.);
Conventions, meetings, etc.—Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions; and Legislation—Labor—Text, sum­
maries, and reviews of laws.)
Codes.
Code for Identification of Gas-Mask Canisters,
Bull. 512 (1930).
Code of Lighting: Factories, Mills, and Other
Work Places, Bulls. 331 (1923) and 556 (1931).
Code of Lighting School Buildings, Bull. 382
(1925).
Injuries and Accident Causes in the Longshore In­
dustry, 1942, Bull. 764 (1944).*




Saws

Rules Governing the Approval of Headlighting
Devices for Motor Vehicles, Bull. 350 (1923).
Safety Code for Forging and Hot Metal Stamping,
Bull. 451 (1927).
Safety Code for Laundry Machinery and Opera­
tions, Bull. 375 (1924).
Safety Code for Mechanical Power-Transmission
Apparatus, Bulls. 364 (1924) and 463 (1928).
Safety Code for Paper and Pulp Mills, Bull. 410
(1926).
Safety Code for Power Presses and Foot and Hand
Presses, Bull. 430 (1926).
Safety Code for Rubber Mills and Calenders, Bull.
447 (1927).
Safety Code for the Construction, Care, and Use
of Ladders, Bull. 351 (1923).
Safety Code for the Protection of Industrial Work­
ers in Foundries, Bull. 336 (1923).
Safety Code for the Use, Care, and Protection of
Abrasive Wheels, Bulls. 338 (1923), 436 (1927),
and 527 (1930).
Safety Code for Woodworking Plants, Bulls. 378
(1925) and (revision) 519 (1930).
Safety Codes for the Prevention of Dust Explosions,
Bulls. 433 (1927), 562 (1932), and 617 (1936).
Textile Safety Code, Bull. 509 (1930).
Iron and steel industry.
The Safety Movement in the Iron and Steel In­
dustry, 1907 to 1917, Bull. 234 (1918).*
Salaries. See Wages and hours.
Sanitation. See Collective bargaining, general—Health
standards, and Labor-management cooperation.
Saudi Arabia.

Labor Law and Practice in Saudi Arabia, Rpt. 269
(1964).

Savannah River AEC project.

Labor and the Savannah River AEC Project, Bull. 1100
(1952).*
Savings-bank life insurance. See under Life insurance,
State-sponsored.
Savings, consumer. (See also Income and expenditures,
consumer.)
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in 1945,
Bull. 956 (1949); in 1950, Bull. 1097 (1953).
Family Income, Expenditures, and Savings in 10 Cities,
Bull. 1065 (1952).
Family Spending and Saving in Wartime, Bull. 822
(1945).
Income and Spending and Saving of City Families in
Wartime, Bull. 724 (1942).
Spending and Saving of the Nation’s Families in War­
time, Bull. 723 (1942).
Savings plans.

Digest of Profit-Sharing, Savings, and Stock Purchase
Plans, Winter 1961-62 (20 Selected Plans), Bull.
1325 (1962).*
Sawmill operations. See Lumber industry.
Saws.

Woodworking Circular-Saw Accidents, Bull. 1190
(1956).*
157

Statistics

Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden)

(See also
specific country.)
Labor-Management Relations in Scandinavia, Bull.
1038 (1952).
Scientific and technical personnel. (See also Federal em­
ployees; Scientists; Technicians; Wages and hours—Sci­
entists; and specific profession.)
Employment of Scientific and Technical Personnel in
Industry, 1962, Bull. 1418 (1964).
Employment of Scientific and Technical Personnel in
State Government Agencies, 1962, Bull. 1412 (1964).
Review of Occupational Employment Statistics: Em­
ployment of Scientific, Professional, and Technical
Personnel in State Governments, January 1964, Bull.
1557 (1967).
Scientific and Technical Personnel in Industry, 1961—
1966, Bull. 1609 (1968); 1967, Bull. 1674 (1970);
1969, Bull. 1723 (1971).
Technician Manpower, 1966-80, Bull. 1639 (1970).*
Scientists. (See also specific profession or branch of sci­
ence; under Employment outlook; and Wages and hours—
Scientists.)
Employment, Education, and Earnings of American
Men of Science, Bull. 1027 (1951).
Federal Spending and Scientist and Engineer Employ­
ment, Bull. 1663 (1970).
Occupational Mobility of Scientists, Bull. 1121 (1953).*
Ph.D. Scientists and Engineers in Private Industry,
1968-80, Bull. 1648 (1970).
Scientific Research and Development in American In­
dustry, Bull. 1148 (1953).*
Seamen. See Merchant seamen; and under Legislation. See
also Labor organizations—Seamen’s union, international;
and Wages and hours—Water transportation.
Seamen, disabled. See under Workmen’s compensation.
Seamen’s union, international. See under Labor organiza­
tions.
Secretaries. See Employment outlook—Stenographers and
secretaries; Office workers.
Seniority. See Collective bargaining, general—Service,
length of.
Service stations. See under Wages and hours.
Severance pay. (See also under Collective bargaining, gen­
eral. )
The Operation of Severance Pay Plans and Their Im­
plication for Labor Mobility, Bull. 1462 (1966).*
Sheet-metal industry. See under Wages and hours.
Shift differentials and operations. See under Collective bar­
gaining, general; and see Related wage benefits; and
Wages and hours.
Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden).

Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board.

History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board,
1917 to 1919, Bull. 283 (1921).
Shipyards. (See also Absenteeism; under Accidents—Rates,
types, causes, etc.; and under Wages and hours.)
Wartime Employment, Production, and Conditions of
Work in Shipyards, Bull. 824 (1945).
Shoe industry. See Labor and industrial conditions; Older
workers; and Wages and hours.
Sick leave, paid and unpaid. See under Collective bargain­
ing, general; and see Related wage benefits.
158




See Collective bargaining,
general—Health and welfare insurance.
Silk industry. See under Wages and hours.
Slaughtering industry. See Meatpacking industry; and
Wages and hours—Meatpacking industry.
Small-arms industry. See under Wages and hours.
Social insurance. See Conventions, meetings, etc.; Legis­
lation; Old-age care and assistance; and Social security.
Social scientists. (See also under Employment outlook.)
Personnel Resources in the Social Sciences and Hu­
manities, Bull. 1169 (1954).*
Sickness and accident benefits.

Social security.

Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull. 1016
(1951); 1951 Supp. (1953);* 1967, Bull. 1555
(1967);* 1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969, Bull. 1630
(1969);* 1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);* 1971, Bull. 1705
(1971).*
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Public Social Security Programs in the United States,
1949-50, Bull. 982 (1950).*
Social workers. See under Employment outlook.
Soft-drink establishment employees. See Wages and hours
—Bottling-house and brewery workers.
Soviet Union. See U.S.S.R.
Spain.

Labor Law and Practice in Spain, Rpt. 289 (1965).
and expenditures, consumer.

Spending, family. See Income
State Government employees.

Employment of Scientific and Technical Personnel in
State Government Agencies, 1962, Bull. 1412 (1964).
Public Service Retirement Systems: United States,
Canada, and Europe, Bull. 477 (1929).
Review of Occupational Employment Statistics: Em­
ployment of Scientific, Professional, and Technical
Personnel in State Governments, January 1964, Bull.
1557 (1967).
Statisticians. See under Employment outlook.
Statistics. (See also specific subject.)
BLS Handbook of Methods for Surveys and Studies,
Bull. 1458 (1966);* Bull. 1711 (1971).*
Economic Forces in the United States, in Facts and
Figures, Bull. 1384 (1963).
Fact-Finding Activities of the Bureau of Labor Statis­
tics, Bull. 831 (1945).*
Handbook of Labor Statistics:
1924-26 ed., Bull. 439 (1927).*
1929 ed., Bull. 491 (1929).*
1931 ed., Bull. 541 (1931).*
1936 ed., Bull. 616 (1936).*
1941 ed., Bull. 694, Vols. I and II (1942).*
1947 ed., Bull. 916 (1948).*
1950 ed., Bull. 1016 (1951).*
1951 Supp., Bull. 1016 (1953).*
1967 ed., Bull. 1555 (1967).*
1968 ed., Bull. 1600 (1968).*
1969 ed., Bull. 1630 (1969).*
1970 ed., Bull. 1666 (1970).*
1971 ed., Bull. 1705 (1971).*
Methods of Procuring and Computing Statistical Infor­
mation of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bull. 326
(1923).

Steel Industry

Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical Series,
Bulls. 993 (1950) and 1168 (1955).*
Tomorrow’s Manpower Needs, Vols. I-IV, Bull. 1606
(1969).
What are Labor Statistics for? Bull. 599 (1933).
Steel industry. See Iron and steel industry under Accidents
—Rates, types, causes, etc.; under Employment outlook;
Productivity, by industry; and Wages and hours.
Stenographers. See under Employment outlook; Office
workers.
Stevedoring. See Longshore industry.
Stock purchase plans.

Digest of Profit-Sharing, Savings, and Stock Purchase
Plans, Winter 1961-62, Bull. 1325 (1962).*
Stone—cutters, industries, trades, workers. See Wages and
hours—General trades.
Stonecutters, health of. See Occupational diseases.
Stores, retail. See Employment outlook—Stores, depart­
ment; Unemployment; and under Wages and hours.
Street laborers, unskilled. See Wages and hours—Munici­
pal employees.
Street railways. See Transit industry—local; under Collec­
tive bargaining, by industry or occupation; and under
Wages and hours.
Strikes. See under Labor-management disputes.
Sudan.

Labor in the Sudan, Rpt. 182 (1961).
See Labor and industrial conditions—Ha­
waii; and under Wages and hours.
Sunday labor. See Legislation—Labor—Text, summaries,
and reviews of laws.
Sugar industry.

Supervisors.

Union Membership and Collective Bargaining by Fore­
men, Bull. 745 (1943).
Supplementary wage practices. See Related wage benefits.
See also Collective bargaining, general—specific benefit—
and by industry or occupation; Employment outlook; and
Wages and hours, particularly Hospitals, Area Wage Sur­
veys, Office workers, and bulletins entitled “Hourly Earn­
ings,” etc.
Sweden.

Labor-Management Relations in Scandinavia, Bull.
1038 (1952).
Labor Law and Practice in Sweden, Rpt. 285 (1965).
Syndicalism. See Legislation—Syndicalism and sabotage.

T

(See also Labor-management disputes—
Strikes, bulletins beginning with 1947.)
National Emergency Disputes: Labor-Management Re­
lations (Taft-Hartley) Act, 1947-68, Bull. 1633
(1969).*
National Emergency Disputes Under the Labor Man­
agement Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act, 1947-65,
Bull. 1482 (1966).* See also Rpt. 169 (1961).

Taft-Hartley Act.

Taiwan.

Labor Law and Practice in Taiwan (Formosa), Rpt.
268 (1964).




Television Service Technicians

See under Employment outlook; and see Wages
and hours—Municipal employees.
Teamsters. See Wages and hours—General trades, and
Truckdrivers and helpers.
Technical notes. See Methods.
Technicians. (See also under Employment outlook; and
under Occupational mobility.)
Scientific and Technical Personnel in Industry, 1961—
1966, Bull. 1609 (1968); 1967, Bull. 1674 (1970).
Technician Manpower, 1966-80, Bull. 1639 (1970).*
Technician Manpower: Requirements, Resources, and
Training Needs, Bull. 1512 (1966).*
Technological change. (See also Automation; and Produc­
tivity. )
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Collective Bargaining Provisions—Union-Management
Cooperation, Plant Efficiency, and Technological
Change, Bull. 908-10 (1949).
Impact of Technological Change and Automation in
the Pulp and Paper Industry, Bull. 1347 (1962).*
Impact on Workers and Community of a Plant Shut­
down in a Depressed Area, Bull. 1264 (1960).
Manpower Planning for Technological Change: Case
Studies of Telephone Operators, Bull. 1574 (1968).
Manpower Planning to Adapt to New Technology at
an Electric and Gas Utility, Rpt. 293 (1965).
Outlook for Computer Process Control: Manpower
Implications in Process Industries, Bull. 1658 (1970).
Outlook for Numerical Control of Machine Tools: A
Study of a Key Technological Development in Metal­
working Industries, Bull. 1437 (1965).*
Railroad Technology and Manpower in the 1970’s,
Bull. 1717 (1972).
Report of the Advisory Committee on Employment
Statistics, Bull. 542 (1931).*
Studies of Automatic Technology:
A Case Study of an Automatic Airline Reservation
System, Rpt. 137 (1959).
A Case Study of a Large Mechanized Bakery, Rpt.
109 (1957).
A Case Study of a Modernized Petroleum Refinery,
Rpt. 120 (1957).
Technological Change and Productivity in the Bitumi­
nous Coal Industry, 1920-60, Bull. 1305 (1961).
Technological Changes and Employment in the Elec­
tric-Lamp Industry, Bull. 593 (1933).
Technological Changes and Employment in the United
States Postal Service, Bull. 574 (1932).
Technological Trends in Major American Industries,
Bull. 1474 (1966).*
Technology and Manpower in the Textile Industry of
the 1970’s, Bull. 1578 (1968).
Telephone industry. See under Employment outlook.
Telephone operators. See under Employment outlook.
Television broadcasting. See under Employment outlook.
Television manufacture. See Collective bargaining, by in­
dustry or occupation—Electronics; Employment outlook
—Electronics manufacturing.
Television service technicians. See under Employment out­
look.
Teachers.

159

Textile Industry

(See also specific branch of industry un­
der Wages and hours.)
Labor in the Textile and Apparel Industries, Bull. 1635
(1969).
Technology and Manpower in the Textile Industry of
the 1970’s, Bull. 1578 (1968).

Textile industry.

Thailand.

Labor Law and Practice in Thailand, Rpt. 267 (1964).
and hours.

Theatrical employment. See under Wages
Time study. See Productivity, general.
Tire industry.

Labor Productivity in the Automobile Tire Industry,
Bull. 585 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Automobile Tire In­
dustry, 1923, Bull. 358 (1924).
Tobacco industry. (See also under Wages and hours.)
Mechanization and Productivity of Labor in the CigarManufacturing Industry, Bull. 660 (1939).
Union Agreements in the Tobacco Industry, January
1945, Bull. 847 (1945).
Tool-and-die-makers. See under Occupational mobility.
Trade, retail. See Stores, retail; and Wages and hours—
Retail trade.
Trade schools, girls.

Industrial Experience of Trade-School Girls in Massa­
chusetts, Bull. 215 (1917).
Trade unions. See Labor organizations; and Labor move­
ment.
Trade, wholesale. See Wages and hours—Wholesale trade.
Training. See Apprentices and learners; Vocational educa­
tion and training; and Workers’ education.
Training, foreign countries. See Apprentices and learners,
foreign countries.
Training requirements.

Occupational Manpower and Training Needs, Bull.
1701 (1971).

Transfer and assignment.

Collective Bargaining Provisions—Promotion, Transfer,
and Assignment; Layoff, Work-Sharing, and Reem­
ployment, Bull. 908-7 (1948).
Transit industry, local. See under Collective bargaining,
by industry or occupation; Wages and hours; also see
Related wage benefits.
Transportation. See specific type of; and Wages and hours
—specific type of transportation.
Treaties and conventions, international.

Historical Survey of International Action Affecting
Labor, Bull. 268 (1920).*

Trinidad and Tobago.

Labor Law and Practice in Trinidad and Tobago, Rpt.
319 (1967).
Truckdrivers and helpers. See under Wages and hours.
Trusteeships, labor organizations.
Union Constitution Provisions: Trusteeship, Bull. 1263
(1959).*
Tuberculosis. See Mortality statistics; and Hygiene, indus­
trial.
Tunisia.

Labor Law and Practice in Tunisia, Rpt. 294 (1965).

Turkey.

Labor Law and Practice in Turkey, Rpt. 239 (1963).
See under Employment outlook; Office workers.

Typists.

160



Union Security

u

See Wages and hours—Hosiery and
underwear manufacture.
Unemployment. (See also Employment; and Employment
statistics.)
Beneficial Activities of American Trade-Unions, Bull.
465 (1928).*
Case Studies of Displaced Workers: Experiences of
Workers After Layoff, Bull. 1408 (1964).
Employment and Earnings in the Engineering Profes­
sion, 1929 to 1934, Bull. 682 (1941).
Employment in Perspective: Regional Aspects of Unployment, 1969-70, Rpt. 395 (1971).
How the Government Measures Unemployment, Rpt.
287 (1964); Rpt. 312 (1967).
Industrial Unemployment: A Statistical Study of Its
Extent and Causes, Bull. 310 (1922).*
Labor Supply and Mobility in a Newly Industrialized
Area (Ravenswood, W. Va.), Bull. 1261 (I960).*
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull. 1212
(1957).*
Report of the Advisory Committee on Employment
Statistics, Bull. 542 (1931).*
Social and Economic Character of Unemployment in
Philadelphia, April 1929, Bull. 520 (1930), and
April 1930, Bull. 555 (1932).
Unemployment Among Women in Department and
Other Retail Stores of Boston, Bull. 182 (1916).
Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925, Bull.
409 (1926). See also Bull. 553 (1932).
Unemployment in the United States, Bull. 195 (1916).*
Weathering Layoffs in a Small Community: Case Stud­
ies of Displaced Pottery and Carpet-Mill Workers,
Bull. 1516 (1966).
Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages, Bull. 1657
(1970).
Unemployment-benefit plans. See Guaranteed employment
and wage plans.
Unemployment insurance. See Social security.
Underwear industry.

Unemployment insurance, foreign countries.

Unemployment-Benefit Plans in the United States and
Unemployment Insurance in Foreign Countries, Bull.
544 (1931).*

Unemployment insurance and reserve funds, bibliography.

Unemployment Insurance and Reserves in the United
States, Bull. 611 (1935).
Union agreements and contracts. See Collective bargaining,
general, and by industry or occupation.
Union constitutions, disciplinary powers and procedures.

Disciplinary Powers and Procedures in Union Consti­
tutions, Bull. 1350 (1963).
Union leadership. See Labor organizations—Leadership,
workers’ education for.
Union-management cooperation. See Labor-management
cooperation.
Union membership. See Union security.
Union security. (See also under Collective bargaining,
general.)

Union Shop

Maintenance-of-Membership Awards of National War
Labor Board, Bull. 753 (1943).
Union Membership and Collective Bargaining by Fore­
men, Bull. 745 (1943).
Union Security and Checkoff Provisions in Major Union
Contracts, 1958-59, Bull. 1272 (1960).
Union shop. See Union security.
Union wage scales. See Wages and hours.
Unions, company. See Company unions.
Unions, labor. See Labor organizations; also Labor move­
ment.
Unit labor costs. See Productivity, general—Unit labor cost,
international comparison of.
United Arab Republic.

Labor Law and Practice in the United Arab Republic
(Egypt), Rpt. 275 (1965).
United States Government agencies. See specific agency.
Upholsterers. See under Wages and hours.

Urban areas.

Changes in Urban America, Rpt. 353 (1969).
Pilot and Experimental Program in Urban Employment
Surveys, Rpt. 354 (1969).
Urban Employment Survey: Employment Situation in
Poverty Areas of Six Cities, July 1968-June 1969,
Rpt. 370 (1969).

Uruguay.

Labor Law and Practice in Uruguay, Rpt. 392 (1972).
Labor Legislation of Uruguay, Bull. 494 (1929).

U.S.S.R.

Elements of Soviet Labor Law, Bull. 1026 (1951).*
Labor Developments in the U.S.S.R., Rept. 311 (1966).
Labor in the U.S.S.R.: Reprints from Labor Develop­
ments Abroad, Rpt. 358 (1969).
Labor Law and Practice in the U.S.S.R., Rpt. 270
(1964).
Principal Current Soviet Labor Legislation, Rpt. 210
(1962).
Utilities. See under Wages and hours.

v

See under Collective bargaining, general. Also
see Employment outlook; Related wage benefits; and
Wages and hours, particularly Hospitals, selected cities,
Area Wage Surveys, Office workers, and bulletins en­
titled “Hourly Earnings,” etc.
Vegetable (and fruit) industry, canned. See Accidents—
Rates, types, etc.; and Collective bargaining, by industry
or occupation.

Vacations.

Venezuela.

Labor Law and Practice in Venezuela, Rpt. 212 (1962);
Rpt. 386 (1972).
Labor Legislation of Venezuela, Bull. 549 (1931).
Veterans’ rights. See Collective bargaining, general—
Leave, with and without pay.

Vietnam.

Labor Law and Practice in the Republic of Vietnam
(South Vietnam), Rpt. 327 (1968).
Vital statistics. See Mortality statistics.
Vocational education and training. (See also Workers’ edu­



Wage Terminology

cation; and Legislation—Labor—Text, summaries, and
reviews of laws.)
Apprenticeship in Building Construction, Bull. 459
(1928).
Industrial Experience of Trade-School Girls in Massa­
chusetts, Bull. 215 (1917).
Vocational Education Survey of Minneapolis, Minn.,
Bull. 199 (1917).
Vocational rehabilitation. See Legislation—Labor—Text,
summaries, and reviews of laws.
Vocational training. See Vocational education and train­
ing.
Voting. See Legislation—Employee rights, civil.

w

(See also under Collective bargaining,
general.)
The Use of Cost-of-Living Figures in Wage Adjust­
ments, Bull. 369 (1925).*

Wage adjustment.

Wage Adjustment Board for the Building Construction In­
dustry (U.S. Government).

Union Wages and Hours in the Building Trades, July 1,
1946, Bull. 910 (1947).
Wage assignments. See Garnishments.
Wage calendar. See Expiration of collective agreements.
Wage chronologies. See under Wages and hours.
Wage control. (See also Wages and hours—bulletins pub­
lished in wartime years.)
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement and Wage
Stabilization During World War II, Bull. 1009
(1950).*
Wartime Wages, Income, and Wage Regulation in Agri­
culture, Bull. 883 (1946).
Wage differentials. See under Wages and hours; and see
Shift differentials and operations.
Wage escalation. See Collective bargaining, general—Wage
adjustment.
Wage executions. See Garnishments.
Wage-incentive plans. (See also under Collective bargain­
ing, general.)
Effect of Incentive Payments on Hourly Earnings, Bull.
742 (1943).
Hours of Work and Output, Bull. 917 (1948).*
Supplementary Wage Practices in American Industry,
1945-46, Bull. 939 (1948).*
Wage-payment legislation. See under Legislation.
Wage plans, guaranteed. See Guaranteed employment and
wage plans.
Wage policies, foreign countries.

Wage Trends and Wage Policies: Various Foreign
Countries, Bull. 934 (1948).
Wage practices, related. See Related wage benefits.
Wage scales. See Wages and hours.
Wage stabilization. See Wage control.
Wage structure. See Collective bargaining, general—Wageincentive plans, and Wage provisions, general; and see
Wages and hours.
Wage terminology.

Glossary of Current Industrial Relations and Wage
Terms, Bull. 1438 (1965).
161

Wages

Glossary of Currently Used Wage Terms, Bull. 983
(1950).
Wages. See Legislation—Labor, Minimum wage, and Wage
payment; and Wages and hours.
Wages and hours. [Note: Bulletins showing union scales
of wages and hours in particular years also include com­
parative and other relevant data for earlier years. Union
wage scales—For occupations and trades not specified,
see miscellaneous sections in Bulls. 476, 515, 540, and
566. For data on specific firms see Wage chronologies,
this section. For recent data on wages and hours under
collective bargaining, see BLS periodical, Current Wage
Developments.]
Accountants. See White-collar workers, this section.
Actors.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Administrative personnel.
National Survey of Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay:
Winter 1959-60, Bull. 1286 (1961).*
Winter 1960-61, Bull. 1310 (1961).*
Winter 1961-62, Bull. 1346 (1962).*
February-March 1963, Bull. 1376 (1963).*
February-March 1964, Bull. 1422 (1964).*
February-March 1965, Bull. 1469 (1965).*
February-March 1966, Bull. 1535 (1966).*
June 1967, Bull 1585 (1968).*
June 1968, Bull. 1617 (1969).*
June 1969, Bull. 1654 (1970).*
June 1970, Bull. 1693 (1971).*
Agricultural machinery industry. See Machinery manu­
facture, this section.
Air transportation.
Compensation Expenditures and Payroll Hours:
Air Transportation, 1964, Bull. 1571 (1967).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Air Transportation,
1931, Bull. 575 (1933).
Aircraft manufacture.
Aircraft parts.
Earnings in Aircraft-Parts Plants, November
1942, Bull. 744 (1943).
Airframe.
Average Hourly Earnings in the Airframe
Industry, 1943, Bull. 790 (1944).
Earnings in Eastern and Midwestern Airframe
Plants, 1942, Bull. 728 (1943).
Wage Rates in the California Airframe In­
dustry, 1941, Bull. 704 (1942).
Wage Stabilization in California Airframe
Industry, 1943, Bull. 746 (1943).
Airplanes and aircraft engines.
Wage Chronology:
Lockheed Aircraft Corp. (California
Company), 1937-64, Rpt. 231 (1964).
Lockheed-California Co. (A Division of
Lockheed Aircraft Corp.), 1937-67,
Bull. 1522 (1967).*
Martin-Marietta Corp., 1944-61, Rpt.

162




Wages and Hours

232 (1963); and 1944-64, Bull. 1449
(1965).
North American Aviation, 1941-57, Rpt.
163 (1960); 1941-64, Rpt. 203 (1965);
1941-67, Bull. 1564 (1967).*
The Boeing Co., 1936-64, Rpt. 204
(1965); 1936-67, Bull. 1565 (1967).*
Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries,
1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Wages and Hours in the Manufacture of Air­
planes and Aircraft Engines, 1929, Bull.
523 (1930).
Glider industry.
Average Hourly Earnings in the Airframe In­
dustry, 1943, Bull. 790 (1944).
Alaska.
The Salaries of White-Collar Workers in Hawaii,
Puerto Rico, and Alaska, May-June 1963, Bull.
1392 (1964).
Aluminum industry.
Wage Chronology: Aluminum Co. of America,
1939-61, Rpt. 219 (1962); 1939-67, Bull. 1559
(1967).*
Ammunition-loading industry.
Hourly Earnings in the Ammunition-loading In­
dustry, 1944, Bull. 827 (1945).
Amusements.
Industry Wage Survey, Motion Picture Theaters,
April 1966, Bull. 1542 (1967).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-28, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Anthracite coal mining. See under Mining, this section.
Apparel and accessories stores. See under Retail trade,
this section.
Apparel industry. See Clothing industry, this section.
Appliance stores. See Furniture, etc., under Retail trade,
this section.
Area Wage Surveys. (Before the Bull. 1465 series
(1965-66), these were called Occupational Wage
Surveys. Both titles are combined in the listing by
metropolitan area below. The surveys have been
published annually since 1950, but not all of the
areas have been surveyed every year. For dates of
publication, see the Numerical Listing of Bulletins
in this volume.)
Akron, Ohio: Bulls. 1265-59, 1285-81, 1303-81,
1345-81, 1385-80, 1430-78, 1465-81, 1530-86,
1575-84, 1625-89, 1660-88, 1685-87.
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York: Bulls. 1108,
1265-40, 1285-51, 1303-56, 1345-53, 1385-52,
1430-52, 1465-60, 1530-62, 1575-68, 1625-56,
1660-51, 1685-54.
Albuquerque, New Mexico: Bulls. 1265-54, 128561, 1303-67, 1345-63, 1385-61, 1430-62, 146564, 1530-60, 1575-58, 1625-67, 1660-55, 168558.
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania: Bulls.
1111, 1265-33, 1285-47, 1303-46, 1345-45,

Wages and Hours

1385-53, 1430-48, 1465-53, 1530-53, 1575-86,
1625-86, 1660-83, 1685-75.
Atlanta, Georgia: Bulls. 1031, 1102, 1116-18,
1157-3, 1172-11, 1188-18, 1202-16, 1224-17,
1240-19, 1265-60, 1285-73, 1303-65, 1345-71,
1385-73, 1430-74, 1465-71, 1530-71, 1575-71,
1625-77, 1660-76, 1685-69.
Baltimore, Maryland: Bulls. 1045, 1116-6, 117215, 1224-3, 1240-2, 1265-7, 1285-34, 1303-28,
1345-23, 1385-24, 1430-27, 1465-29, 1530-30,
1575-28, 1625-8, 1660-11, 1685-18.
B eaum ont-Port A rthur-O range, Texas: Bulls.
1265-58, 1285-75, 1303-78, 1345-67, 1385-70,
1430-66, 1465-63, 1530-74, 1575-75, 1625-75,
1660-84, 1685-68.
Binghamton, New York: Bulls. 1625-3, 1660-5,
1685-6.
Birmingham, Alabama: Bulls. 1107, 1202-10,
1265-37, 1285-53, 1303-59, 1345-56, 1385-63,
1430-60, 1465-56, 1530-63, 1575-59, 1625-65,
1660-57, 1685-63.
Boise, Idaho: Bulls. 1265-61, 1285-62, 1303-77,
1345-74.
Boise City, Idaho: Bulls. 1430-1, 1465-1, 1530-2,
1575-3, 1625-6, 1660-34, 1685-21.
Boston, Massachusetts: Bulls. 1033, 1106, 1116-17,
1157-3, 1172-17, 1202-4, 1224-2, 1240-6,
1265-8, 1285-15, 1303-16, 1345-15, 1385-16,
1430-16, 1465-12, 1530-16, 1575-13, 1625-15,
1660-16, 1685-11.
Bridgeport, Connecticut: Bull. 1044.
Buffalo, New York: Bulls. 991, 1085, 1116-20,
1172-1, 1202-2, 1240-3, 1265-4, 1285-31,
1303-29, 1345-30, 1385-33, 1430-36, 1465-36,
1530-38, 1575-41, 1625-35, 1660-29, 1685-43.
Burlington, Vermont: Bulls. 1285-57, 1303-50,
1345-50, 1385-47, 1430-51, 1465-54, 1530-52,
1575-48, 1625-54, 1660-53, 1685-59.
Canton, Ohio: Bulls. 1265-10, 1285-29, 1303-62,
1345-64, 1385-64, 1430-59, 1465-58, 1530-58,
1575-65, 1625-73, 1660-81, 1685-71.
Charleston, West Virginia: Bulls. 1265-48, 1285—
60, 1303-61, 1345-61, 1385-57, 1430-65, 146570, 1530-61, 1575-63, 1625-71, 1660-68, 168557.
Charlotte, North Carolina: Bulls. 1265-39, 1285—
58, 1303-60, 1345-58, 1385-55, 1430-61, 146567, 1530-64, 1575-57, 1625-61, 1660-61, 168548.
Chattanooga, Tennessee: Bulls. 1285-14, 1303-4,
1345-8, 1385-5, 1430-10, 1465-7, 1530-8,
1575-7, 1625-14, 1660-9, 1685-10.
Chicago, Illinois: Bulls. 1034, 1105, 1116-15,
1157-3, 1172-14, 1188-15, 1202-15, 1224-14,
1240-18, 1265-45, 1285-66, 1303-64, 1345-65,
1385-66, 1430-72, 1465-68, 1530-73, 1575-81,
1625-82, 1660-90, 1685-90.
Cincinnati, Ohio: Bulls. 1096, 1265-31, 1285-59,
1303-55, 1345-54, 1385-58, 1430-55, 1465-57,
1530-56, 1575-62, 1625-63, 1660-49, 1685-53.
Cleveland, Ohio: Bulls. 1056, 1116-3, 1172-2,



Wages and Hours

1202-3, 1224-19, 1265-1, 1285-11, 1303-13,
1345-14, 1385-11, 1430-13, 1465-8, 1530-13,
1575-14, 1625-19, 1660-22, 1685-28.
Columbus, Ohio: Bulls. 1109, 1285-38, 1303-41,
1345-28, 1385-25, 1430-18, 1465-15, 1530-20,
1575-23, 1625-24, 1660-27, 1685-33.
Dallas, Texas: Bulls. 1043, 1116-1, 1157-1, 1172—
3, 1188-1, 1202-5, 1224-4, 1240-5, 1265-3,
1285-21, 1303-20, 1345-21, 1385-15, 1430-25,
1465-24, 1530-25, 1575-20, 1625-28, 1660-23,
1685-22.
Davenport-Rock Island-Moline, Iowa: Bulls. 128516, 1303-17, 1345-18, 1385-12, 1430-20,
1465-16, 1530-19, 1575-12, 1625-16, 1660-20,
1685-51.
Dayton, Ohio: Bulls. 1041, 1265-9, 1285-41, 130339, 1345-35, 1385-40, 1430-31, 1465-39, 153045, 1575-51, 1625-42, 1660-37, 1685-45.
Denver, Colorado: Bulls. 985, 1029, 1066, 1116-8,
1157-2, 1172-6, 1188-6, 1224-7, 1240-7, 126511, 1285-27, 1303-33, 1345-32, 1385-34, 143032, 1465-33, 1530-32, 1575-38, 1625-39, 166041, 1685-41.
Des Moines, Iowa: Bulls. 1265-30, 1285-43, 130342, 1345-42, 1385-44, 1430-47, 1465-48, 153044, 1575-52, 1625-62, 1660-73, 1685-70.
Detroit, Michigan: Bulls. 1086, 1157-1, 1188-2,
1240-12, 1265-25, 1285-37, 1303-38, 1345-47,
1385-43, 1430-43, 1465-45, 1530-48, 1575-45,
1625-58, 1660-58, 1685-77.
Fort Worth, Texas: Bulls. 1265-13, 1285-23, 130319, 1345-27, 1385-19, 1430-24, 1465-26, 153028, 1575-22, 1625-27, 1660-18, 1685-25.
Green Bay, Wisconsin: Bulls. 1285-2, 1303-2,
1345-3, 1385-4, 1430-3, 1465-4, 1530-5, 15755, 1625-7, 1660-8, 1685-4.
Greenville, South Carolina: Bulls. 1265-46, 128563, 1303-70, 1345-68, 1385-68, 1430-69, 146574, 1530-66, 1575-66, 1625-70, 1660-79, 168578.
Hartford, Connecticut: Bull. 1059.
Houston, Texas: Bulls. 1084, 1265-56, 1285-78,
1303-79, 1345-82, 1385-81, 1430-82, 1465-85,
1530-85, 1575-82, 1625-83, 1660-67, 1685-67.
Indianapolis, Indiana: Bulls. 1075, 1265-22, 128528, 1303-27, 1345-26, 1385-30, 1430-30, 146531, 1530-37, 1575-36, 1625-40, 1660-25, 168531.
Jackson, Mississippi: Bulls. 1265-26, 1285-42,
1303-44, 1345-43, 1385-41, 1430-44, 1465-44,
1530-43, 1575-49, 1625-45, 1660-39, 1685-39.
Jacksonville, Florida: Bulls. 1110, 1265-14, 128530, 1303-21, 1345-39, 1385-32, 1430-38, 146541, 1530-39, 1575-33, 1625-37, 1660-35, 168537.
Kansas City, Missouri: Bulls. 1064, 1116-4, 12026, 1265-23, 1285-18, 1303-24, 1345-22, 138526, 1430-26, 1465-27, 1530-26, 1575-30, 162517, 1660-10, 1685-16.
Lawrence, Massachusetts: Bulls. 1188-11, 1240-21.
Lawrence-Haverhill, Massachusetts: Bulls. 1265-

163

Wages and Hours

57, 1285-79, 1303-76, 1345-77, 1385-76, 143075, 1465-80, 1530-77, 1575-74, 1625-79, 166082, 1685-83.
Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas: Bulls.
1285-6, 1303-1, 1345-7, 1385-3, 1430-7, 14656, 1530-1, 1575-2, 1625-11, 1660-2, 1685-1.
Los Angeles, California: Bulls. 1094, 1116-14,
1157-3, 1172-12.
Los Angeles-Long Beach, California: Bulls. 1188—
13, 1202-11, 1224-13, 1240-15, 1265-35, 128552, 1303-53, 1345-62, 1385-59, 1430-57.
Los Angeles-Long Beach and Anaheim-Santa AnaGarden Grove, California: Bulls. 1465-59, 153065, 1575-64, 1625-78, 1660-64, 1685-66.
Louisville, Kentucky: Bulls. 1112, 1285-49, 1303—
51, 1345-48, 1385-50, 1430-42, 1465-51, 153049, 1575-50, 1625-33, 1660-28, 1685-27.
Lubbock, Texas: Bulls. 1265-51, 1285-67, 130374, 1345-72, 1385-75, 1430-73, 1465-79, 153075, 1575-77, 1625-53, 1660-50, 1685-60.
Manchester, New Hampshire: Bulls. 1285-1, 1303—
3, 1345-2, 1385-1, 1430-4, 1465-2, 1530-4,
1575-1, 1625-4, 1660-3, 1685-2.
Memphis, Tennessee: Bulls. 1067, 1116-13, 11572, 1172-9, 1188-12, 1202-13, 1224-9, 1240-10,
1265-19, 1285-35, 1303-40, 1345-36, 1385-35,
1430-40, 1465-42, 1530-40, 1575-32, 1625-30,
1660-31, 1685-30.
Metropolitan areas, summaries. (For more de­
tailed information, see specific area, this sec­
tion.): Bulls. 1113, 1116, 1157-1, 1157-2, 11573, 1172, 1188, 1202, 1224-20, 1240-22, 126562, 1285-83, 1285-84, 1303-83, 1345-83, 138582, 1430-83, 1465-86, 1530-87, 1575-87, 162590,* 1625-91,* 1660-91, 1660-92, 1685-91,
1685-92.
Miami, Florida: Bulls. 1265-6, 1285-33, 1303-31,
1345-33, 1385-29, 1430-29, 1465-30, 1530-31,
1575-28, 1625-29, 1660-32, 1685-29.
Midland and Odessa, Texas: Bulls. 1465-84, 153078, 1575-72 1625-49, 1660-44, 1685-40.
Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Bulls. 1099, 1116-19,
1157-3, 1188-3, 1224-18, 1240-16, 1265-43,
1285-64, 1303-57, 1345-59, 1385-56, 1430-58,
1465-61, 1530-76, 1575-67, 1625-66, 1660-74,
1685-76.
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota: Bulls. 1068,
1116-7, 1157-1, 1172-5, 1188-8, 1202-14,
1224-10, 1240-11, 1265-21, 1285-39, 1303-36,
1345-38, 1385-39, 1430-39, 1465-38, 1530-42,
1575-47, 1625-47, 1660-46, 1685-44.
Muskegon-Muskegon Heights, Michigan: Bulls.
1265-55, 1285-69, 1303-68, 1345-69, 1385-71,
1430-68, 1465-72, 1530-72, 1575-60, 1625-80,
1660-85, 1685-82.
New Haven, Connecticut: Bulls. 1265-41, 128546, 1303-34, 1345-37, 1385-37, 1430-34, 146537, 1530-41, 1575-34, 1625-38, 1660-40, 168535.
New Orleans, Louisiana: Bulls. 1074, 1157-1,
1188-5, 1224-11, 1240-14, 1265-32, 1285-48,

164




Wages and Hours

1303-43, 1345-44, 1385-42, 1430-53, 1465-47,
1530-51, 1575-46, 1625-51, 1660-42, 1685-36.
New York, New York: Bulls. 1037, 1101, 1116-16,
1157-3, 1172-13, 1188-17, 1202-17, 1224-15,
1240-17, 1265-44, 1285-65, 1303-58, 1345-79,
1385-72, 1430-80, 1465-82, 1530-83, 1575-78,
1625-88, 1660-89, 1685-89.
Newark and Jersey City, New Jersey: Bulls. 1081,
1116-11, 1157-2, 1172-8, 1188-10, 1224-12,
1240-9, 1265-28, 1285-40, 1303-45, 1345-46,
1385-49, 1430-45, 1465-50, 1530-55, 1575-54,
1625-46, 1660-47, 1685-47.
Norfolk-Portsmouth (Hampton Roads), Virginia:
Bull. 1088.
Norfolk-Portsmouth and Newport News-Hampton, Virginia: Bulls. 1285-82, 1303-75, 1345-75,
1385-77, 1430-77, 1465-77, 1530-82, 1575-85,
1660-59, 1685-46.
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: Bulls. 1070, 1285-3,
1303-5, 1345-6, 1385-2, 1430-5, 1465-5, 15306, 1575-4, 1625-9, 1660-17, 1685-5.
Omaha, Nebraska: Bulls. 1285-13, 1303-14, 134512, 1385-14, 1430-17, 1465-13, 1530-18, 157521, 1625-26, 1660-12, 1685-14.
Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, New Jersey: Bulls. 126550, 1285-74, 1303-71, 1345-76, 1385-62, 143071, 1465-76, 1530-67, 1575-83, 1625-87, 166087, 1685-84.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Bulls. 1008, 1060,
1116-5, 1157-1, 1172-4, 1188-4, 1202-7, 12246, 1240-8, 1265-16, 1285-24, 1303-25, 134531, 1385-31, 1430-28, 1465-35, 1530-35, 157540, 1625-48, 1660-48, 1685-34.
Phoenix, Arizona: Bulls. 1103, 1265-42, 1285-55,
1303-54, 1345-57, 1385-54, 1430-56, 1465-62,
1530-59, 1575-55, 1625-60, 1660-70, 1685-86.
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Bulls. 1082, 1202-9,
1265-20, 1285-44, 1303-35, 1345-40, 1385-38,
1430-41, 1465-46, 1530-46, 1575-44, 1625-59,
1660-60, 1685-49.
Portland, Maine: Bulls. 1265-12, 1285-19, 130326, 1345-24, 1385-22, 1430-21, 1465-23, 153017, 1575-16, 1625-20, 1660-26, 1685-19.
Portland, Oregon: Bulls. 1042, 1116-2, 1157-1,
1172-16, 1188-16, 1202-12, 1224-16, 1240-20,
1265-49, 1285-72, 1303-72, 1345-73, 1385-67,
1430-70, 1465-73, 1530-79, 1575-80, 1625-76,
1660-77, 1685-85.
Providence, Rhode Island: Bulls. 1071, 1116-10,
1188-14, 1265-34.
Providence-Pawtucket, Rhode Island: Bulls. 128570, 1303-66, 1345-70, 1385-65, 1430-67.
Providence-Pawtucket-Warwick, Rhode Island:
Bulls. 1465-65, 1530-70, 1575-61, 1625-74,
1660-72, 1685-80.
Raleigh, North Carolina: Bulls. 1285-5, 1303-10,
1345-1, 1385-7, 1430-6, 1465-10, 1530-7,
1575-6, 1625-13, 1660-6, 1685-12.
Richmond, Virginia: Bulls. 1058, 1265-24, 128526, 1303-22, 1345-19, 1385-23, 1430-19, 1465-

Wages and Hours

28, 1530-23, 1575-27, 1625-69, 1660-65, 168562.
Rochester, New York: Bulls. 1087, 1625-2, 16604, 1685-7.
Rockford, Illinois: Bulls. 1265-47, 1285-68, 130369, 1345-55, 1385-60, 1430-63, 1465-66, 153068, 1575-70, 1625-72, 1660-75, 1685-79.
St. Louis, Missouri: Bulls. 1095, 1116-12, 1157-2,
1172-10, 1188-9, 1224-5, 1240-4, 1265-5, 128510, 1303-18, 1345-17, 1385-21, 1430-22, 146522, 1530-27, 1575-39, 1625-64, 1660-66, 168565.
Salt Lake City, Utah: Bulls. 1069, 1285-32, 130332, 1345-25, 1385-28, 1430-33, 1465-32, 153033, 1575-35, 1625-36, 1660-30, 1685-26.
San Antonio, Texas: Bulls. 1285-71, 1303-63,
1345-78, 1385-74, 1430-81, 1465-78, 1530-84,
1575-69, 1625-85, 1660-71, 1685-81.
San B ernardino-R iverside-O ntario, California:
Bulls. 1265-15, 1285-4, 1303-11, 1345-9, 13859, 1430-8, 1465-20, 1530-14, 1575-10, 162525, 1660-43, 1685-42.
San Diego, California: Bulls. 1345-10, 1385-13,
1430-12, 1465-21, 1530-24, 1575-19, 1625-32,
1660-36, 1685-20.
San Francisco-Oakland, California: Bulls. 996,
1028, 1076, 1116-9, 1157-2, 1172-7, 1188-7,
1202-8, 1224-8, 1240-13, 1265-17, 1285-36,
1303-37, 1345-34, 1385-36, 1430-37, 1465-43,
1530-36, 1575-37, 1625-44, 1660-33, 1685-23.
San Jose, California: Bulls. 1465-19, 1530-10,
1575-15, 1625-21, 1660-24, 1685-13.
Savannah, Georgia: Bulls. 1265-53, 1285-76,
1303-80, 1345-60, 1385-69, 1430-64, 1465-69,
1530-69, 1575-73, 1625-68, 1660-80, 1685-72.
Scranton, Pennsylvania: Bulls. 1078, 1285-8, 1303—
8, 1345-5, 1385-8, 1430-2, 1465-3, 1530-3,
1575-9, 1625-12, 1660-15, 1685-3.
Seattle, Washington: Bulls. 1057, 1202-1, 1224-1,
1240-1, 1265-2, 1285-7, 1303-6, 1345-4, 138510, 1430-9.
Seattle-Everett, Washington: Bulls. 1465-9, 1530—
22, 1575-29, 1625-43, 1660-52, 1685-52.
Sioux Falls, South Dakota: Bulls. 1265-29, 128517, 1303-15, 1345-13, 1385-20, 1430-15, 146517, 1530-12, 1575-17, 1625-23, 1660-14, 168538.
South Bend, Indiana: Bulls. 1265-38, 1285-54,
1303-52, 1345-52, 1385-51, 1430-54, 1465-55,
1530-57, 1575-56, 1625-55, 1660-62, 1685-61.
Spokane, Washington: Bulls. 1285-77, 1303-73,
1345-66, 1385-78, 1430-79, 1465-75, 1530-80,
1575-79, 1625-81, 1660-86, 1685-88.
Syracuse, New York: Bulls. 1625-5, 1660-13,
1685-8.
Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida: Bulls. 1530-9,
1575-8, 1625-10, 1660-7, 1685-17.
Toledo, Ohio: Bulls. 1285-50, 1303-47, 1345-51,
1385-46, 1430-50, 1465-49, 1530-50, 1575-43,
1625-57, 1660-56, 1685-74.
Trenton, New Jersey: Bulls. 1104, 1285-25, 1303—



Wages and Hours

30, 1345-29, 1385-27, 1430-35, 1465-34, 153034, 1575-24, 1625-18, 1660-21, 1685-15.
Utica-Rome, New York: Bulls. 1625-1, 1660-1,
1685-9.
Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va.: Bulls. 1265-18, 128522, 1303-12, 1345-16, 1385-17, 1430-14, 146514, 1530-15, 1575-11, 1625-22, 1660-19, 168556.
Waterbury, Connecticut: Bulls. 1265-36, 1285-56,
1303-48, 1345-49, 1385-48, 1430-49, 1465-52,
1530-54, 1575-53, 1625-50, 1660-54, 1685-55.
Waterloo, Iowa: Bulls. 1285-20, 1303-23, 134520, 1385-18, 1430-23, 1465-18, 1530-21, 157526, 1625-31, 1660-45, 1685-32.
Wichita, Kansas: Bulls. 1285-9, 1303-7, 1345-11,
1385-6, 1430-11, 1465-11, 1530-11, 1575-31,
1625-41, 1660-69, 1685-64.
Wilmington, Delaware: Bulls. 1285-12, 1303-9.
Worcester, Massachusetts: Bulls. 1077, 1265-52,
1285-80, 1303-82, 1345-80, 1385-79, 1430-76,
1465-83, 1530-81, 1575-76, 1625-84, 1660-78,
1685-73.
York, Pennsylvania: Bulls. 1265-27, 1285-45,
1303-49, 1345-41, 1385-45, 1430-46, 1465-40,
1530-47, 1575-42, 1625-52, 1660-63, 1685-50.
Youngstown-Warren, Ohio: Bulls. 1465-25, 153029, 1575-25, 1625-34, 1660-38, 1685-24.
Auditors. See White-collar workers, this section.
Automobile and other motor vehicle (and parts) manu­
facturing.
Industry Wage Survey: Motor Vehicles and Parts,
April 1969 (1971).
Industry Wage Survey, Part I: Motor Vehicles,
Part II: Motor Vehicle Parts, April 1963, Bull.
1393 (1964).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Chronology:
Carolina Coach Co., 1947-63, Rpt. 259
(1963).
Chrysler Corp., 1939-48, Bull. 970 (1949);*
1939-53, Rpt. 161 (1960); 1939-60, Rpt.
198 (1961); 1939-64, Rpt. 198 (Revised
1964); and 1939-66, Bull. 1515 (1967).*
Ford Motor Co., 1941-55, Rpt. 99 (1956).
General Motors Corp., 1939-49, Bull. 970-2
(1949);* 1939-55, Rpt. 164 (1960); 193960, Rpt. 185 (1961); 1939-63, Rpt. 185
(Revised 1964); and 1939-66, Bull. 1532
(1966).*
Wage Structure of the Motor Vehicle Industry,
Bull. 706 (1942).*
Wage Structure—Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1950,
Bull. 1015 (1951).
Wage Structure: Part I—Motor Vehicles, Part II—
Motor Vehicle Parts, July 1957, Rpt. 128
(1958).

165

Wages and Hours

Wages and Hours of Labor in the Automobile In­
dustry, 1922, Bull. 348 (1923).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Motor Vehicle
Industry, 1925, Bull. 438 (1927); 1928, Bull.
502 (1930).
Automobile repair garages and shops.
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Auto Dealer Repair Shops,
August-October 1964, Bull. 1452 (1965); Au­
gust 1969, Bull. 1689 (1971).
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954); Studies Between Mid1952 and Mid-1953, Rpt. 60 (1954).
Wage Structure: Auto Dealer Repair Shops, Sum­
mer 1958, Rpt. 141 (1959).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Gasoline Filling
Stations and Motor-Vehicle Repair Garages,
1931, Bull. 578 (1933). See also Bulls. 540
(1931) and 566 (1932).
Automotive dealers. See under Retail trade, this section.
Baking industry. (See also General trades, this section,
for union scales of wages and hours of labor, 1915—
1933.)
Union Wages and Hours in the Baking Industry:
June 1, 1942, Bull. 735 (1943).
July 1, 1943, Bull. 778 (1944).
July 1, 1944, Bull. 816 (1945).
July 1, 1945, Bull. 871 (1946).
July 1, 1946, Bull. 914 (1948).
July 1, 1947, Bull. 936 (1948).
July 1, 1948, Bull. 954 (1949).
July 1, 1949, Bull. 977 (1950).
July 1, 1950, Bull. 1014 (1951).
July 1, 1951, Bull. 1053 (1952).
July 1, 1952, Bull. 1123 (1953).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Bakery Industry
—Bread and Cake Departments, 1931, Bull. 580
(1933).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in the
Bread-Baking Industry, 1934, Bull. 623 (1937).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in Union
Bakeries, June 1, 1939, Bull. 673 (1940).
Banking industry.
Earnings of Bank Employees, Spring and Summer
of 1943, Bull. 774 (1944).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Banks, 1967, Rpt. 362 (1969).
Industry Wage Survey, Banking, NovemberDecember 1964, Bull. 1466 (1965); November
1969, Bull. 1703 (1971).
Wage Structure: Banking Industry, Mid-1960, Rpt.
179 (1961).
Barbers.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 15, 1927, Bull. 457 (1928).
May 15, 1928, Bull. 482 (1929).

166



Wages and Hours

May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Bituminous coal mining. See under Mining, and under
Wage chronologies, this section.
Boilershop products industry.
Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Boot and shoe industry. See Shoe industry, this section.
Bottling-house and brewery workers.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 1, 1915, Bull. 194 (1916).
May 15, 1916, Bull. 214 (1917).
May 15, 1917, Bull. 245 (1919).
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Brass manufacturing.
Wage Chronology: The Anaconda Co., 1941-58,
Rpt. 197 (1961).
Brick industry.
Productivity Cost in Common-Brick Industry, Bull.
356 (1924).
Building materials and farm equipment dealers. See un­
der Retail trade, this section.
Building trades. (See also General trades, this section,
for union scales of wages and hours of labor, 1915—
33; Construction industry, this section.)
Union Wages and Hours: Building Trades.
May 15, 1936, Bull. 626 (1937).*
May 15, 1937, Bull. 657 (1938).*
June 1, 1939, Bull. 674 (1940).*
June 1, 1941, Bull. 680 (1942).*
July 1, 1942, Bull. 730 (1943).*
July 1, 1943, Bull. 767 (1944).*
July 1, 1944, Bull. 815 (1945).*
July 1, 1945, Bull. 862 (1946).*
July 1, 1946, Bull. 910 (1947).*
July 1, 1947, Bull. 930 (1948).*
July 1, 1948, Bull. 951 (1949).*
July 1, 1949, Bull. 976 (1950).*
July 1, 1950, Bull. 1011 (1951).*
July 1, 1951, Bull. 1051 (1952).*
July 1, 1952, Bull. 1124 (1953).*
July 1, 1953, Bull. 1152 (1954).*
July 1, 1954, Bull. 1175 (1955).*
July 1, 1955, Bull. 1192 (1956).*
July 1, 1956, Bull. 1205 (1957).*
July 1, 1957, Bull. 1227 (1958).*
July 1, 1958, Bull. 1245 (1959).*
July 1, 1959, Bull. 1269 (I960).*
July 1, 1960, Bull. 1290 (1961).*
July 1, 1961, Bull. 1316 (1962).*
July 1, 1962, Bull. 1355 (1963).*
July 1, 1963, Bull. 1397 (1964).*
July 1, 1964, Bull. 1432 (1965).*
July 1, 1965, Bull. 1487 (1966).*
July 1, 1966, Bull. 1547 (1967).*
July 1, 1967, Bull. 1590 (1968).*
July 1, 1968, Bull. 1621 (1969).*

Wages and Hours

July 1, 1969, Bull. 1668 (1970).*
July 1, 1970, Bull. 1709 (1971).*
Bus companies, interstate.
Compensation and Payroll Hours: Motor Passen­
ger Transportation Industries, 1964, Bull. 1561
(1967) .
Wage Chronology: Western Greyhound Lines,
1945-63, Rpt. 245 (1964); 1945-67, Bull. 1595
(1968) .*
Busdrivers. See Transit industry—local, this section;
also General trades, this section, beginning with Bull.
457.
Butchers. See Meatcutters and butchers, this section.
Candy and confectionery industry.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Con­
fectionery and Related Products Manufacturing,
1967, Rpt. 364 (1969).
Industry Wage Survey, Candy and Other Confec­
tionery Products, September 1965, Bull. 1520
(1966).
Wage Structure: Candy and Other ConfectioneryProducts, November-December 1960, Rpt. 195
(1961).
Cement industry.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Hy­
draulic Cement, 1965, Rpt. 335-8 (1968).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Portland Ce­
ment Industry, 1929, Bull. 525 (1931).
Chauffeurs, and teamsters and drivers. See General
trades, this section, for union scales, 1915-53. For
later bulletins, see Truckdrivers and helpers, this
section.
Chemical industry, industrial.
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Industrial Chemicals, No­
vember 1965, Bull. 1529 (1966).
Wage Structure: Industrial Chemicals, August
1955, Rpt. 103 (1956).
Chemists and chemical engineers, income.
Factors Affecting Earnings in Chemistry and
Chemical Engineering, Bull. 881 (1946).
Manpower Resources in Chemistry and Chemical
Engineering, Bull. 1132 (1953).*
Cigar manufacturing. See under Tobacco industry, this
section.
Cigarette manufacturing. See under Tobacco industry,
this section.
Clay, stone, and glass industries. (See also Glassware
and glass container industries, this section.)
Industry Wage Survey, Structural Clay Products,
July-August 1964, Bull. 1459 (1965); September
1969, Bull. 1697 (1971).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Structure: Structural Clay Products, May



Wages and Hours

1954, Rpt. 77 (1954); and April-June 1960,
Rpt. 172 (1961).
Cleaners, dyers, and pressers.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Clerical workers. See Area Wage Surveys; Banking in­
dustry; Office workers; and White-collar workers,
this section.
Clothing industry.
Men’s clothing.
Earnings and Hours in Men’s Cotton-Garment
Industries, and in Plants Manufacturing
Single Pants other Than Cotton, 1939 and
1941, Bull. 719 (1942).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Men’s and Boys’ Shirt Manufacturing,
1967, Rpt. 368 (1969).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1965,
Rpt. 335-2 (1968).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, September 1947-September
1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Men’s and Boys’ Shirts
(Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, MayJune 1961, Bull. 1323 (1962); April-June
1964, Bull. 1457 (1965); October 1968,
Bull. 1659 (1970).
Industry Wage Survey, Men’s and Boys’ Suits
and Coats, October 1963, Bull. 1424 (1965);
April 1967, Bull. 1594 (1968); April 1970,
Bull. 1716 (1972).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Structure: Men’s and Boys’ Dress Shirts
and Nightwear, May 1954, Rpt. 74 (1954).
Wage Structure: Men’s and Boys’ Suits and
Coats, March 1958, Rpt. 140 (1959).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Men’s
Clothing Industry:
1911 to 1914, Bull. 187 (1916).
1911 to 1922, Bull. 329 (1923).
1911 to 1924, Bull. 387 (1925).
1911 to 1926, Bull. 435 (1927).
1911 to 1928, Bull. 503 (1929).
1911 to 1930, Bull. 557 (1932).
1932, Bull. 594 (1933).
Women’s clothing.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, April 1949 to November 1949, Bull.
1005 (1950); and January 1950 to January
1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, September 1947-September
1948, Bull. 953 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Women’s and Misses’
167

Wages and Hours

Wages and Hours

Coats and Suits, August 1962, Bull. 1371
(1963); and August 1965, Bull. 1508
(1966).
Industry Wage Survey, Women’s and Misses’
Dresses, March-April 1963, Bull. 1391
(1964) ; March 1966, Bull. 1538 (1967);
August 1968, Bull. 1649 (1969).
Wage Structure: Women’s and Misses’ Coats
and Suits, February 1957, Rpt. 122 (1958).
Wage Structure: Women’s and Misses’
Dresses, August 1960, Rpt. 193 (1961).
Work clothing.
Industry Wage Survey, Work Clothing, MayJune 1961, Bull. 1321 (1962); May-June
1964, Bull. 1440 (1965); February 1968,
Bull. 1624 (1969).
Wage Structure: Work Clothing, July 1953,
Rpt. 51 (1954).
Coal mining. See Mining, this section.
Common labor.
Hourly Entrance Rates of Common Laborers in
Large Cities, Spring and Summer of 1943, Bull.
775 (1944).
Hourly Entrance Rates Paid to Common Laborers,
1942, Bull. 733 (1943).
Communications.
Earnings of Communications Workers:
October 1952, Rpt. 49 (1953).
October 1953, Rpt. 72 (1954).
October 1954, Rpt. 96 (1955).
October 1955, Rpt. 108 (1957).
October 1956, Rpt. 121 (1957).
October 1957, Rpt. 138 (1958).
October 1958, Rpt. 149 (1959).
October 1959, Rpt. 171 (1960).
Industry Wage Survey, Communications:
October 1960, Bull. 1306 (1961).
1961, Bull. 1343 (1962).
1962, Bull. 1389 (1964).
1963, Bull. 1426 (1964).
1964, Bull. 1467 (1965).
1965, Bull. 1521 (1967).
1966, Bull. 1582 (1968).
1967, Bull. 1615 (1969).
1968, Bull. 1662 (1970).
1969, Bull. 1696 (1971).
Wage Chronology:
A. T. and T., Long Lines Department, 194064, Bull. 1443 (1965).*
Western Union Telegraph Co., 1945-53, Rpt.
160 (1960); 1943-63, Rpt. 160 (Rev.
1964); 1943-67, Bull. 1545 (1967).*
Community wage surveys. See Area Wage Surveys,
this section.
Construction industry.
Compensation in the Construction Industry, Bull.
1656 (1970).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Build­
ing Construction, 1965, Rpt. 335-9 (1968).
Containers, metal.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Metal
Cans, 1965, Rpt. 335-7 (1968).
168




Contract cleaning.
Industry Wage Survey, Contract Cleaning Services,
Summer 1961, Bull. 1327 (1962); Summer 1965,
Bull. 1507 (1966); July 1968, Bull. 1644 (1969).
Copper. See Mining, this section.
Copper wire industry.
Wage Chronology: The Anaconda Co., 1941-58,
Rpt. 197 (1961).
Cotton textiles.
Cotton and Synthetic Textiles, Wage Trends, 195053, Rpt. 50 (1954).
Earnings in Cotton-Goods Manufacture During
the War Years, Bull. 798 (1944).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Cot­
ton and Synthetic Textiles, 1965, Rpt. 335-1
(1968) .
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage Areas,
April 1949 to November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950); January 1950 to January 1951, Bull.
1040 (1951).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey: Cotton and Man-Made
Fiber Textiles, September 1968, Bull. 1637
(1969) .
Industry Wage Survey, Cotton Textiles, May 1963,
Bull. 1410 (1964); September 1965, Bull. 1506
(1966).
Wage Chronology:
Berkshire Hathaway Inc., 1943-64, Rpt. 281
(1964); 1943-66, Bull. 1475 (1965);*
1943-69, Bull. 1541 (1967).* For earlier
years, see Northern Cotton Textile Assns.,
this listing.
Dan River
(1966).*

Mills,

1943-65,

Bull.

1495

Northern Cotton Textile Assns., 1943-48,
Bull. 970 (1949).*
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods
Manufacturing :
1920, Bull. 288 (1921).
1922, Bull. 345 (1923).
1924, Bull. 371 (1925).
1910 to 1926, Bull. 446 (1927).
1910 to 1928, Bull. 492 (1929).
1910 to 1930, Bull. 539 (1931).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cotton-Goods Man­
ufacturing and Finishing, 1916, Bull. 239
(1918); 1918, Bull. 262 (1919).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cotton, Woolen,
and Silk Industries, 1907 to 1914, Bull. 190
(1916).
Wages in Cotton-Goods Manufacturing, Bull. 663
(1938).*
Wage Structure: Cotton Textiles, November 1954,
Rpt. 82 (1955); August 1960, Rpt. 184 (1961).
Cotton industries, New England mill.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor,
1927-28, Bull. 476 (1929).
Cutlery, handtools, and general hardware industries.

Wages and Hours

Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954); Studies Between Mid1952 and Mid-1953, Rpt. 60 (1954).
Department stores. See Stores, retail, and Retail trade,
this section.
Draftsmen. See White-collar workers, this section.
Drug and proprietary stores. See under Retail trade,
this section.
Dry cleaning. See Laundries, power, this section.
Dyeing and finishing of textiles.
Industry Wage Survey, Textile Dyeing and Fin­
ishing, April-May 1961, Bull. 1311 (1961);
Winter 1965-66, Bull. 1527 (1966).
Wage Structure: Textile Dyeing and Finishing,
April 1956, Rpt. 110 (1956).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Dyeing and
Finishing of Textiles, 1930, Bull. 537 (1931);
1932, Bull. 588 (1933).
Dyers. See Cleaners, dyers, and pressers, this section.
Eating and drinking places. (See also Hotels, motels,
and restaurants, this section.)
Industry Wage Survey, Eating and Drinking Places,
June 1961, Bull. 1329 (1962); June 1963, Bull.
1400 (1964); October 1966 and April 1967,
Bull. 1588 (1968).
Educational institutions.
Industry Wage Survey: Educational Institutions—
Nonteaching Employees, October 1968 and
March 1969, Bull. 1671 (1970).
Electric generating and distribution equipment.
Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Electroplating and polishing industry.
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954).
Wage Structure of Electroplating and Polishing
Industry, January 1945, Bull. 875 (1946). See
also Bull. 952 (1949), entitled above.
Engineers, professional.
Employment and Earnings in the Engineering
Profession, 1929 to 1934, Bull. 682 (1941).
National Survey of Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay:
Winter 1959-60, Bull. 1286 (1961).*
Winter 1960-61, Bull. 1310 (1961.)*
Winter 1961-62, Bull. 1346 (1962).*
February-March 1963, Bull. 1387 (1963).*
February-March 1964, Bull. 1422 (1964).*
February-March 1965, Bull. 1469 (1965).*
February-March 1966, Bull. 1535 (1966).*
June 1967, Bull. 1585 (1968).*
June 1968, Bull. 1617 (1969).*
June 1969, Bull. 1654 (1970).*
June 1970, Bull. 1693 (1971).*
Explosives industry.
Average Hourly Earnings in the Explosives In­
dustry, June 1944, Bull. 81 9 (1945).
Fabricated structural steel. See Iron and steel industry,
this section.



Wages and Hours

Factory workers. (See also Manufacturing and non­
manufacturing industries, specific industry, and War­
time, this section.)
Factory Workers’ Earnings, May 1958, Bull. 1252
(1959).*
Factory Workers’ Earnings: Distribution by
Straight-Time Hourly Earnings, April 1954, Bull.
1179 (1955).*
Factory Workers’ Earnings in 5 Industry Groups:
Food, Textiles, Apparel, Furniture, Leather,
April 1956, Rpt. 118 (1957).
Factory Workers’ Earnings in Selected Manufac­
turing Industries, June 1959, Bull. 1275 (I960).*
Initial Report: Factory Workers’ Earnings, May
1958, Rpt. 144 (1959).
Spendable Earnings of Factory Workers, 1941-43,
Bull. 769 (1944).
Farm equipment dealers. See Retail trade, this section.
Farm workers. See Wartime, this section.
Federal employees. See White-collar workers, this
section.
Fertilizer industry.
Hours and Earnings in the Fertilizer Industry,
January 1943, Bull. 751 (1943).
Industry Wage Survey, Fertilizer Manufacturing,
April 1962, Bull. 1362 (1963); March-April
1966, Bull. 1531 (1967).
Fire department employees. See Municipal employees,
this section.
Fishermen.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Flour and other grain mill products. See Grain mill
products, this section.
Food stores. See under Retail trade; and see Groceries,
wholesale, this section.
Footwear manufacturing. See Shoe industry, this
section.
Foundries.
Ferrous.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, April 1949 to November 1949, Bull.
1005 (1950); January 1950 to January
1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected
Wage Areas, June-December 1947, Bull.
974 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Iron and Steel Found­
ries, November 1962, Bull. 1386 (1963);
November 1967, Bull. 1626 (1969).
Wage Structure: Gray Iron Foundries, AprilJune 1959, Rpt. 151 (1959).
Nonferrous.
Industry Wage Survey, Nonferrous Foundries,
June-July 1965, Bull. 1498 (1966).
Wage Structure: Nonferrous Foundries, May
1960, Rpt. 180 (1961).
169

Wages and Hours

Nonferrous and ferrous.
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries
and Areas. Studies Between March 1951
and May 1952, Rpt. 366 (1954).
Wage Structure: Metalworking Industries,
1945, Bull. 952 (1949).
Foundries and machine shops.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Foundries and Ma­
chine Shops:
1923, Bull. 362 (1924).
1924, Bull. 422 (1927).
1927, Bull. 471 (1929).
1929, Bull. 522 (1930).
1931, Bull. 570 (1932).
Freight handlers. See General trades, this section for
union scales of wages and hours of labor, 1915-25,
inc.
Furniture, homefurnishings, and appliance stores. See
under Retail trade, this section.
Furniture industry. (See also Millwork, this section.)
Hourly Earnings, by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas:
June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969
(1949) .
April 1949 to November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950) .
January 1950 to January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951) .
Industry Survey, Wood Household Furniture, Ex­
cept Upholstered, July 1962, Bull. 1369 (1963);
May-June 1965, Bull. 1496 (1966); October
1968, Bull. 1651 (1970).
The Wage and Hour Structure of the FurnitureManufacturing Industry, October 1937, Bull.
669 (1940).
Wage Structure:
Household Furniture, 1954, Rpt. 76 (1955).
Wood Household Furniture, Except Up­
holstered, April-May 1959, Rpt. 152
(1960).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Furniture In­
dustry, 1910 to 1929, Bull. 526 (1931); 1910 to
1931, Bull. 571 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber, Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1915, Bull. 225
(1918).
Garages, repair. See Automobile repair garages and
shops, this section.
Gas, natural. See Petroleum industry, this section.
Gasoline filling stations. See Service stations, this
section.
General merchandise stores. See under Retail trade,
this section.
General trades.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 1, 1915, Bull. 194 (1916).*
May 15, 1916, Bull. 214 (1917).*
May 15, 1917, Bull. 245 (1919).*
May 15, 1918, Bull. 259 (1919).*
May 15, 1919, Bull. 274 (1920).*
170



Wages and Hours

May 15, 1920, Bull. 286 (1921).*
May 15, 1921, Bull. 302 (1922).*
May 15, 1922, Bull. 325 (1923).*
May 15, 1923, Bull. 354 (1924).*
May 15, 1924, Bull. 388 (1925).*
May 15, 1925, Bull. 404 (1926).*
May 15, 1926, Bull. 431 (1927).*
May 15, 1927, Bull. 457 (1928).*
May 15, 1928, Bull. 482 (1929).*
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).*
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).*
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).*
May 15, 1933, Bull. 600 (1934).*
Glass, clay, and stone workers. See Clay, stone, and
glass industries, this section.
Glassware and glass container industries.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Glass
Containers, 1965, Rpt. 335-5 (1968).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage Areas:
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969
(1949).
January 1950 to January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951).
Industry Wage Survey, Pressed or Blown Glass
and Glassware, May 1964, Bull. 1423 (1964);
May 1970, Bull. 1713 (1971).
Wage Structure: Pressed or Blown Glass and
Glassware, May 1960, Rpt. 177 (1961).
Glove industry.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wages and Hours in the Glove Industry, 1941,
Bull. 702 (1942).
Grain-mill products industries.
Earnings in the Grain-Mill Products Industries,
1941, Bull. 712 (1942).
Industry Wage Survey, Flour and Other Grain Mill
Products, November 1961, Bull. 1337 (1962);
February 1967, Bull. 1576 (1967).
Granite and stone trades. See General trades, this
section.
Groceries, wholesale.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Wholesale Groceries, 1965, Rpt. 335-10 (1968).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
Hat industries.
Earnings and Hours in the Hat Industries, 1939,
Bull. 671 (1939).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).

Wages and Hours

Hawaii. (See also Labor and industrial conditions.)
Salaries of White-Collar Workers in Hawaii, Puerto
Rico, and Alaska, May-June 1963, Bull. 1392
(1964).
Heating apparatus.
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954).
History of wages.
History of Wages in the United States from
Colonial Times to 1928, Bull. 499 (1929);* with
Supplement, 1929-33, Bull. 604 (1934).*
Hosiery and underwear manufacture.
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Hosiery and
Underwear Industry-(ies):
1907 to 1914, Bull. 177 (1915).
1922, Bull. 328 (1923).
1907 to 1924, Bull. 376 (1925).
1907 to 1926, Bull. 452 (1927).
1907 to 1928, Bull. 504 (1929).
1932, Bull. 591 (1933).
Hosiery manufacturing. (See also Wage chronologies,
this section.)
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Women’s Hosiery manufacturing, 1969, Rpt. 398
(1971).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas:
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969
(1949) .
April 1949 to November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950) .
January 1950 to January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951) .
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Hosiery, February 1962,
Bull. 1349 (1963); September-October 1964,
Bull. 1456 (1965); September 1967, Bull. 1562
(1968).

Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Structure: Hosiery, November 1952, Rpt.
34 (1953).
Hospitals.
Earnings and Supplementary Benefits in Hospitals:
Atlanta, Georgia, September 1956, Bull. 1210—
11 (1957).*
Baltimore, Maryland, June 1956, Bull. 1210—
4 (1957).*
Boston, Massachusetts, August 1956, Bull.
1210-6 (1957).*
Buffalo, New York, June 1956, Bull. 1210-3
(1957).*
Chicago, Illinois, August 1956, Bull. 1210-5
(1957).*
Cincinnati, Ohio, September 1956, Bull. 1210—
9 (1957).*



Wages and Hours

Cleveland, Ohio, November 1956, Bull. 12107 (1957).*
Dallas, Texas, November 1956, Bull. 1210-8
(1957).*
Los Angeles-Long Beach, California, January
1957, Bull. 1210-14 (1957).*
Memphis, Tennessee, December 1956, Bull.
1210-12 (1957).*
Mid-1960, Bull. 1294 (1961).*
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, March
1957, Bull. 1210-15 (1957).*
New York, New York, February 1957, Bull.
1210-6 (1957).*
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 1956, Bull.
1210-10 (1957).*
Portland, Oregon, May and July 1956, Bull.
1210-2 (1957).*
St. Louis, Missouri, June 1956, Bull. 1210-1
(1957).*
San Francisco, California, November 1956,
Bull. 1210-13 (1957).*
Industry Wage Survey, Hospitals, Mid-1963, Bull.
1409 (1964); July 1966, Bull. 1553 (1967);
March 1969, Bull. 1688 (1971).
Hotels, motels, and restaurants.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Hotels and Motels, 1967, Rpt. 366 (1969).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Hotels and Motels, June
1961, Bull. 1328 (1962); June 1963, Bull. 1406
(1964); October 1966 and April 1967, Bull.
1587 (1968).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Structure: Hotels, March-June 1960, Rpt.
173 (1961).
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, March
1970, Bull. 1712 (1971).
Indexes.
Wage Indexes: Long-Term Trend Data for Se­
lected Occupations and Metropolitan Areas,
Bull. 1427 (1965).
Wage Indexes: Long-Term Trend Data for Se­
lected Occupations and Metropolitan Areas,
1907-66, Bull. 1505 (1966).
Industrial chemical industry. See Chemical industry,
industrial, this section.
Industrial machinery. See Machinery manufacture, this
section.
Iron and steel forging.
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954).
171

Wages and Hours

Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Iron and steel industry.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Basic
Steel, 1965, Rpt. 335-4 (1968); 1969, Rpt. 400
(1972).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Fabricated Structural Steel Manufacturing, 1967,
Rpt. 365 (1969).
Industry Wage Survey, Basic Iron and Steel,
March 1962, Bull. 1358 (1963); September
1967, Bull. 1602 (1968).
Industry Wage Survey, Fabricated Structural Steel,
October-November 1964, Bull. 1463 (1965);
October 1969, Bull. 1695 (1971).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
Wage Chronology: United States Steel Corp.,
1937-48, Bull. 970 (1949);* 1937-55, Rpt. 106
(1957); 1937-60, Rpt. 186 (1961); 1937-64,
Rpt. 186 (Revised 1965); 1937-67, Bull. 1603
(1968).*
Wage Structure: Fabricated Structural Steel, March
1957, Rpt. 123 (1958).
Wage Structure of the Fabricated Structural Steel
Industry, January 1945, Bull. 866 (1946).
Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Iron and Steel
Industry:
1907 to 1915, Bull. 218 (1917).
1907 to 1920, Bull. 305 (1922).
1907 to 1922, Bull. 353 (1924).
1907 to 1924, Bull. 381 (1925).
1907 to 1926, Bull. 442 (1927).
1929, Bull. 513 (1930).

1931, Bull. 567 (1933).
Iron-ore mining. See under Mining, this section.
Knit-goods industry. See Hosiery and underwear manu­
facture; and Knitted-outerwear industry, this section.
Knitted-outerwear industry.
Annual and Hourly Earnings, Philadelphia KnittedOuterwear Industry, 1943, Bull. 830 (1945).
Employment and Earnings in the Philadelphia
Knitted-Outerwear Industry, 1944 and 1945,
Bull. 887 (1947).
Laboratories, commercial research and development.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Com­
mercial Research and Development ‘Labora­
tories, 1967, Rpt. 363 (1969).
Laundries, power.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Laundries and Cleaning and Dyeing Plants,
1967, Rpt. 367 (1969).
Hourly Earnings, Selected Wage Areas:
June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
September 1947-September 1948, Bull. 953
(1949) .
April 1949-November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950) .
172




Wages and Hours

Industry Wage Survey, Power Laundries and Clean­
ing Services, June 1961, Bull. 1333 (1962).
Industry Wage Survey, Laundry-(ies) and Cleaning
Services, June 1963, Bull. 1401 (1964); Mid1966, Bull. 1544 (1967); April 1967 and April
1968, Bull. 1645 (1969).
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954); Studies Between Mid1952 and Mid-1953, Rpt. 60 (1954).
Wage Chronology: New York Laundries, 1945-64,
Bull. 1453 (1965).*
Wage Structure: Power Laundries and Dry Clean­
ers, April-July 1960, Rpt. 178 (1961).
Laundry workers, union scales. See General trades, this
section, beginning with Bull. 259 (1919).
Leather and leather products industries.
Earnings and Hours in the Leather and Leather
Belting and Packing Industries, 1939, Bull. 679
(1941).
Industry Wage Survey, Leather Tanning and Fin­
ishing, March 1963, Bull. 1378 (1963); January
1968, Bull. 1618 (1969).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Structure: Leather Tanning and Finishing,
May 1954, Rpt. 80 (1954); May 1959, Rpt. 150
(1959).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Leather Industry,
1932, Bull. 589 (1933).
Legislation concerning. See Labor, Minimum wage, and
Wage payment under Legislation.
Life insurance.
Industry Wage Survey, Life Insurance, May-July
1961, Bull. 1324 (1962); October-November
1966, Bull. 1569 (1967).
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954).
Linemen, union scales. See General trades, this section,
beginning with Bull. 302 (1922).
Logging.
Industry Wage Survey: West Coast Sawmilling
and Logging, October 1969, Bull. 1704 (1971).
Longshore industry. (See also General trades, this sec­
tion, beginning with Bull. 431 [1927]).
Cargo Handling and Longshore Labor Conditions,
Bull. 550 (1932).
Wage Chronology:
North Atlantic Longshoring, 1934-61, Rpt.
234 (1962).
Pacific Longshore Industry, 1934-65, Bull.
1491 (1966);* 1934-70, Bull. 1568
(1968).*
Lumber industry.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, 19271928, Bull. 476 (1929).

Wages and Hours

Wage Structure: Southern Lumber Industry, April
1953, Rpt. 45 (1953).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Lumber Manufac­
turing, 1921, Bull. 317 (1923); 1923, Bull. 363
(1924).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber Indus­
try in the United States:
1925, Bull. 413 (1926).
1928, Bull. 497 (1932).
1930, Bull. 560 (1932).
1932, Bull. 586 (1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Lumber, Millwork, and Furniture Industries, 1915, Bull. 225
(1918).
Wages in the Basic Lumber Industry, 1944, Bull.
854 (1946).
Wages in the Basic Lumber Industry in the Far
West, 1944, Bull. 840 (1945).
Machine shops. See Foundries and machine shops, this
section.
Machine-tool accessories industry. (See also Machinery
manufacture, this section, for additional data on
earnings and fringe benefits.)
Wage Structure of the Machine-Tool Accessories
Industry, January 1945, Bull. 868 (1946).
Machine-tool industry. See Machinery manufacture,
this section.
Machinery manufacture.
Earnings in the Manufacture of Industrial Machin­
ery, 1942, Bull. 720, Part I (1942); 720-A,
Part II (1943); and 720-B, Part III (1943).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas:
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969
(1949) .
April 1949 to November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950) .
January 1950 to January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951) .
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Machinery Manufacturing:
March-May 1961, Bull. 1309 (1961).
March-June 1962, Bull. 1352 (1963).
March-May 1963, Bull. 1388 (1964).
March-May 1964, Bull. 1429 (1965).
April-June 1965, Bull. 1476 (1965).
Mid-1966, Bull. 1563 (1967).
September-November 1968, Bull. 1664 (1970).
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954).
Wage Chronology: International Harvester Co.,
1946-57, Rpt. 162 (1960); 1946-61, Rpt. 202
(1961); 1946-70, Bull. 1678 (1972).*
Wage Structure in the Machinery Industries, Janu­
ary 1945, Bull. 861 (1946).
Wage Structure: Machinery Industries, Winter
1954-55, Rpt. 93 (1955).
Wage Structure: Machinery Manufacturing:
Winter 1955-56, Rpt. 107 (1956).



Wages and Hours

Winter 1957-58, Rpt. 139 (1958).
Winter 1958-59, Rpt. 147 (1959).
Winter 1959-60, Rpt. 170 (1960).
Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Wages and Related Benefits in the Machinery In­
dustries, Bull. 1160 (1954).
Women Production Workers in the Machinery In­
dustries: Employment Distribution; Earnings,
Winter 1952-53, Rpt. 98 (1956).
Manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. (See
also Factory workers, Southern States, specific in­
dustry, and Wartime, this section.)
Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns of
Private Nonagricultural Employees, 1965, Bull.
1675 (1970).
Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns, Pri­
vate Nonagricultural Employment, 1964, Rpt.
330 (1969).
Composition of Payroll Hours in Manufacturing,
1958, Bull. 1283 (1960).
Employee Compensation in Selected Industries,
1966, Rpt. 352 (1968).
Employee Compensation in the Private Nonfarm
Economy, 1966, Bull. 1627 (1969); 1968, Bull.
1722 (1972).
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supplemen­
tary Compensation Practices for Production and
Related Workers; Composition of Payroll
Hours: Manufacturing Industries, 1962, Bull.
1428 (1965).*
Employer Expenditures for Selected Supplementary
Remuneration Practices for Production Workers
in Manufacturing Industries, 1959, Bull. 1308
(1962).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for States and
Areas:
1939-62, Bull. 1370 (1963).
1939-63, Bull. 1370-1 (1964).
1939-64, Bull. 1370-2 (1965).
1939-65, Bull. 1370-3 (1966).
1939-66, Bull. 1370-4 (1967).
1939-67, Bull. 1370-5 (1968).
1939-68, Bull. 1370-6 (1969).
1939-69, Bull. 1370-7 (1970).
1939-70, Bull. 1370-8 (1971).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the United
States:
1909-60, Bull. 1312 (1961).
1909-62, Bull. 1312-1 (1963).
1909-64, Bull. 1312-2 (1964).
1909-65, Bull. 1312-3 (1966).
1909-66, Bull. 1312-4 (1966).
1909-67, Bull. 1312-5 (1967).
1909-68, Bull. 1312-6 (1968).
1909-70, Bull. 1312-7 (1971).
Handbook of Labor Statistics:
1950 edition, Bull. 1016 (1951); 1951 Supp.
(1953).*
1967, Bull. 1555 (1967).*
1968, Bull. 1600 (1968).*
173

Wages and Hours

1969, Bull. 1630 (1969).*
1970, Bull. 1666 (1970).*
1971, Bull. 1705 (1971).*
History of Wages in the United States from Co­
lonial Times to 1928, Bull. 499 (1929);* with
Supplement, 1929-33, Bull. 604 (1934).*
Hours and Earnings in the United States, 1932-40,
with Supplement for 1941, Bull. 697 (1942).*
Industrial Survey in Selected Industries in the
United States, 1919, Bull. 265 (1920).*
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954); Studies Between Mid1952 and Mid-1953, Rpt. 60 (1954).
Summary of Manufacturing Production Workers’
Earnings Series, 1939-68, Bull. 1616 (1969);
1969, Supp. 2 (1969); January 1969-June 1970,
Supp. 3 (1971).
Meatcutters and butchers.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Meatpacking industry.
Industry Wage Survey, Meat Products; Part I:
Meatpacking; Part II: Prepared Meat Products,
November 1963, Bull. 1415 (1964); January
1969, Bull. 1677 (1970).
Wage Chronology:
Armour and Co., 1941-48, Bull. 970 (1949);*
1941-58, Rpt. 165 (1960); 1941-60, Rpt.
187 (1961); 1941-63, Rpt. 187 (Revised
1963); 1941-67, Bull. 1481 (1966);*
1941- 72, Bull. 1682 (1971).*
Swift and Co., 1942-48, Bull. 970 (1949);*

1942- 63, Rpt. 260 (Rev. 1964).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Slaughtering
and Meat-Packing Industry:
1917, Bull. 252 (1919).
1921, Bull. 294 (1922).
1923, Bull. 373 (1925).
1925, Bull. 421 (1927).
1927, Bull. 472 (1929).
1929, Bull. 535 (1931).
1931, Bull. 576 (1933).
Men’s clothing industry. See under Clothing industry,
this section.
Metal trades. See General trades, this section, for union
scales, 1915-24.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Metalliferous mining. See under Mining, this section.
Metalworking industries. See specific branch, this sec­
tion.
Metropolitan areas. (See also under Area Wage Sur­
veys, this section.)
174



Wages and Hours

Trends in Urban Wage Rates:
April-October 1944, Bull. 809 (1945).
October 1944 to April 1945, Bull. 846 (1945).
April to October 1945, Bull. 860 (1946).
April 1946, Bull. 891 (1946).
Wage Indexes: Long-Term Trend Data for Se­
lected Occupations and Metropolitan Areas,
Bull. 1427 (1965).
Wage Indexes: Long-Term Trend Data for Se­
lected Occupations and Metropolitan Areas,
1907-66, Bull. 1505 (1966).
Milk industry.
Industry Wage Survey, Fluid Milk, SeptemberOctober 1964, Bull. 1464 (1965).
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954).
Wage Structure: Fluid Milk Industry, April-June
1960, Rpt. 174 (1961).
Millinery workers. See Hat industries, this section.
Millwork. (See also Furniture industry, this section.)
For the years 1915-24, see bulletins listed for those
years under General trades, this section.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Mining.
Anthracite and bituminous coal. (See also under
Wage chronologies, this section.)
Hours and Earnings in Anthracite and Bitu­
minous Coal Mining:
Anthracite— 1919 and 1920; Bituminous
— 1919, Bull. 279 (1921).
Anthracite—January 1922; Bituminous—
Winter of 1921-22, Bull. 316 (1922).
1922 and 1924, Bull. 416 (1926).
Wage Chronology: Anthracite Mining Indus­
try, 1930-59, Rpt. 255 (1963); 1930-66,
Bull. 1494 (1966).*
Bituminous coal. (See also under Wage chronol­
ogies, this section.)
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1969, Rpt. 399
(1971).
Hours and Earnings in Bituminous Coal Min­
ing, 1929, Bull. 516 (1930).
Hours and Earnings in Bituminous Coal Min­
ing, 1922, 1924, and 1926, Bull. 454 (1927).
See also Bulls. 279, 316, and 416, listed
above.
Industry Wage Survey, Bituminous Coal Min­
ing, November 1962, Bull. 1383 (1963);
January 1967, Part I—Underground Mines,
Part II—Surface Mines, Bull. 1583 (1968).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Chronology: Bituminous Coal Mines,

Wages and Hours

1933-48, Bull. 970 (1949);* 1933-66,
Bull. 1461 (1965);* 1933-68, Bull. 1558
(1967).*
Wage Structure in Bituminous-Coal Mining,
Fall of 1945, Bull. 867 (1946).
Wages and Hours of Labor in BituminousCoal Mining, 1933, Bull. 601 (1934).
Iron ore.
Wages in Iron Mining, October 1943, Bull.
787 (1944).
Metalliferous mining.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Metalliferous
Mines, 1924, Bull. 394 (1925).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Metalliferous
Mining, 1924 and 1931, Bull. 573 (1933).
Nonferrous metals.
Wage Chronology: The Anaconda Co., 1941—
58, Rpt. 197 (1961).
Wage Structure of the Nonferrous Metals In­
dustry, 1941-42, Bull. 729 (1943).
Wages in the Nonferrous-Metals Industry,
June 1943, Bull. 765 (1944).
Motion picture theaters. See Amusements, this section.
Motormen and conductors. See Transit industry—local,
this section.
Motortruck drivers and helpers. See Truckdrivers and
helpers, this section.
Motor vehicle industry. See Automobile and other mo­
tor vehicle manufacturing, this section.
Motor vehicle repair garages and shops. See Automobile
repair garages and shops, this section.
Municipal employees.
Earnings and Wages Practices in Municipal Gov­
ernments of 15 Cities, 1944, Bull. 848 (1945).
Entrance Rates and Full-Time Hours of Common
Laborers Employed by Cities, September 1935,
Bull. 627 (1937).
Municipal Labor-Management Relations: Chronol­
ogy of Compensation Developments in Mil­
waukee, 1960-70, Bull. 1720 (1971).
Salaries and Hours of Labor in Municipal Fire
Departments, July 1, 1938, Bull. 684 (1940-41).
Salaries and Hours of Labor in Municipal Police
Departments, July 1, 1938, Bull. 685 (1941).
Salary Trends: City Public School Teachers, 192559, Rpt. 194 (1961); 1925-63, Bull. 1448
(1965); 1925-65, Bull. 1504 (1966).
Salary Trends: Firemen and Policemen, 1924-61,
Rpt. 233 (1962); 1924-64, Bull. 1445 (1965).
Wages and Hours of Labor: Common Street La­
borers, 1928, Bull. 484 (1929).
Musicians. See Amusements, this section.
Natural gas production.
Industry Wage Survey : Crude Petroleum and Nat­
ural Gas Production, August 1967, Bull. 1566
(1968).
Nonferrous metals industry. See Mining, this section.
Nonoperating employees, railroads. See Railroad in­
dustry, this section.
North Central region.
Employee Earnings in Nonmetropolitan Areas of



Wages and Hours

the South and North Central Regions, June
1962, Bull. 1416 (1964).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetropolitan
Areas of the South and North Central Regions,
June 1965, Bull. 1552 (1967).
Wages in Nonmetropolitan Areas, South and North
Central Regions, October 1960, Rpt. 190 (1961).
Nurses, registered. (See also Hospitals, this section.)
The Economic Status of Registered Professional
Nurses, 1946-47, Bull. 931 (1948).
Nursing homes.
Industry Wage Survey, Nursing Homes and Re­
lated Facilities, April 1965, Bull. 1492 (1966);
October 1967 and April 1968, Bull. 1638 (1969).
Occupational wage surveys. See Area Wage Surveys,
this section.
Ohio.
Average Annual Wage and Salary Payments in
Ohio, 1916 to 1932, Bull. 613 (1935).
Paint and varnish industry.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage Areas,
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969 (1949);
and January 1950 to January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951).
Hourly Earnings in 11 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, June-December 1947, Bull. 974 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Paints and Varnishes, May
1961, Bull. 1318 (1962); November 1965, Bull.
1524 (1966).
Paper and paper products industries.
Earnings and Hours in the Paperboard Industry,
Bull. 692 (1941).
Industry Wage Survey, Paperboard Containers and
Boxes, November 1964, Bull. 1478 (1966);
March 1970, Bull. 1719 (1971).
Industry Wage Survey, Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, January 1962, Bull. 1341 (1962);
October 1967, Bull. 1608 (1968).
Labor Cost of Production and Wages and Hours
of Labor in the Paper Box-Board Industry, Bull.
407 (1926).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, 192728, Bull. 476 (1929). See also Bull. 540 (1931).
Wage Chronology: International Paper Company,
Southern Kraft Division, 1937-67, Bull. 1534
(1967) .*
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Paper and Pulp
Industry, 1923, Bull. 365 (1925).
Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions, 1933,
1934, and 1935, in the Paper-Box Industry:
Folding, Bull. 620 (1937).
Set-up, Bull. 633 (1937).
Pavers and curb setters.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, 192728, Bull. 476 (1929).
Petroleum industry.
Earnings in Southwestern Petroleum Industry,
April 1943, Bull. 762 (1944).
Industry Wage Survey: Crude Petroleum and Nat­
ural Gas Production, August 1967, Bull. 1566
(1968) .
175

Wages and Hours

Industry Wage Survey, Petroleum Refining, De­
cember 1965, Bull. 1526 (1966).
Wage Chronology: Sinclair Oil Companies, 1941—
63, Rpt. 225 (1964); 1941-64, Bull. 1447
(1965).*
Wage Structure: Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas
Production, May-June 1960, Rpt. 181 (1961).
Wage Structure: Petroleum Refining, July 1959,
Rpt. 158 (1960).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Petroleum In­
dustry, 1920, Bull. 297 (1922).
Wages in Petroleum Drilling and Production in the
Southwest, April 1944, Bull. 810 (1945).
Pipelines industry.
Compensation Expenditures and Payroll Hours,
Pipelines, 1964, Bull. 1528 (1967).
Plastics industry.
Industry Wage Survey, Miscellaneous Plastics
Products, June 1964, Bull. 1439 (1965); Bull.
1690 (1971).
Wage Structure: Miscellaneous Plastics Products,
January-February 1960, Rpt. 168 (1960).
Police departments. See Municipal employees, this sec­
tion.
Portland cement. See Cement industry, this section.
Pottery industry.
Wages, Hours, and Productivity in the Pottery
Industry, 1925, Bull. 412 (1926).
Printing and publishing.
Earnings and Hours in Book and Job Printing,
January 1942, Bull. 726 (1943).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours in the Printing
Trades:
May 15, 1936, Bull. 631 (1937).*
May 15, 1937, Bull. 655 (1938).*
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, May
1, 1915-May 15, 1933. See General trades, this
section.
Union Wages and Hours in the Printing Trades:
June 1, 1942, Bull. 739 (1943).*
July 1, 1943, Bull. 781 (1944).*
July 1, 1944, Bull. 820 (1945).*
July 1, 1945, Bull. 872 (1946).*
July 1, 1946, Bull. 912 (1947).*
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry:
January 2, 1948 and July 1, 1949, Bull. 979
(1950).*
July 1, 1950, Bull. 1018 (1951).*
July 1, 1951, Bull. 1062 (1952).*
July 1, 1952, Bull. 1134 (1953).*
July 1, 1953, Bull. 1155 (1954).*
July 1, 1954, Bull. 1176 (1955).*
July 1, 1955, Bull. 1194 (1956).*
July 1, 1956, Bull. 1207 (1957).*
July 1, 1957, Bull. 1228 (1958).*
July 1, 1958, Bull. 1247 (1959).*
July 1, 1959, Bull. 1271 (I960).*
July 1, 1960, Bull. 1292 (1961).*
July 1, 1961, Bull. 1315 (1962).*
July 1, 1962, Bull. 1357 (1963).*
July 1, 1963, Bull. 1399 (1964).*
176



Wages and Hours

July 1, 1964, Bull. 1434 (1965).*
July 1, 1965, Bull. 1489 (1966).*
July 1, 1966, Bull. 1549 (1967).*
July 1, 1967, Bull. 1592 (1968).*
July 1, 1968, Bull. 1623 (1969).*
July 1, 1969, Bull. 1670 (1970).*
July 1, 1970, Bull. 1707 (1971).*
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions in
the Printing Trades:
June 1, 1939, Bull. 675 (1940).*
June 1, 1941, Bull. 708 (1942).*
Professionals.
National Survey of Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay:
Winter 1959-60, Bull. 1286 (1961).*
Winter 1960-61, Bull. 1310 (1961).*
Winter 1961-62, Bull. 1346 (1962).*
February-March 1963, Bull. 1387 (1963).*
February-March 1964, Bull. 1422 (1964).*
February-March 1965, Bull. 1469 (1965).*
February-March 1966, Bull. 1535 (1966).*
June 1967, Bull. 1585 (1968).*
June 1968, Bull. 1617 (1969).*
June 1969, Bull. 1654 (1970).*
June 1970, Bull. 1693 (1971).*
Puerto Rico.
Salaries of White-Collar Workers in Hawaii,
Puerto Rico, and Alaska, May-June 1963, Bull.
1392 (1964).
Radio (including phonograph) manufacture.
Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Railroads.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Rail­
roads, 1965, Rpt. 335-3 (1968).
Pennsylvania Railroad Wage Data, Bull. 514
(1930).

Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-28, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Chronology: Railroads—Nonoperating Em­
ployees, 1920-62, Rpt. 208 (1963).
Rayon industry.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage Areas,
April 1949 to November 1949, Bull. 1005
(1950); January 1950 to January 1951, Bull.
1040 (1951).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Wage Chronology: American Viscose, 1945-63,
Rpt. 277 (1964); 1945-67, Bull. 1560 (1967).*
Wages and Hours in Rayon and Other Synthetic
Yarn Manufacturing, 1930, Bull. 546 (1932).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Rayon and Other
Synthetic Yarn Manufacturing, 1932, Bull. 587
(1933).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Manufacture of
Silk and Rayon Goods, 1931, Bull. 568 (1932).

Wages and Hours

Wages in the Rayon Industry, May 1944, Bull.
806 (1945).
Ready-to-wear, women’s stores. See Stores, retail, this
section.
Reconversion period.
Workers’ Experiences During First Phase of Re­
conversion, Bull. 876 (1946).
Restaurant workers. See Hotels, motels, and restaurants,
this section.
Retail trade.
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade:
Apparel and Accessories Stores, Bulls. 1220-5
(1957), 1338-5 (1962), and 1380-5 (1964).
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Sta­
tions, Bulls. 1220-4 (1957), 1338-4 (1963),
and 1380-4 (1964).
Building Materials and Farm Equipment Deal­
ers, Bulls. 1220-1 (1957), 1338-1 (1962),
and 1380-1 (1964).
Drug Stores and Proprietary Stores, Bull.
1220-7 (1957).
Food Stores, Bulls. 1220-3 (1957), 1338-3
(1963), and 1380-3 (1964).
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Appliance
Stores, Bulls. 1220-6 (1957), 1338-6 (1963),
and 1380-6 (1964).
General Merchandise Stores, Bulls. 1220-2
(1957), 1338-2 (1962), and 1380-2 (1964).
Miscellaneous Stores, Bulls. 1338-7 (1963)
and 1380-7 (1964).
Summary Report, Bulls. 1220 (1958), 1338-8
(1963), and 1380 (1964).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Trade:
Apparel and Accessory Stores, Bull. 1501-5
(1966); June 1966, Bull. 1584-5 (1968).
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Sta­
tions, Bull. 1501-4 (1966); June 1966, Bull.
1584-4 (1968).
Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm
Equipment Dealers, Bull. 1501-1 (1966);
June 1966, Bull. 1584-1 (1968).
Food Stores, Bull. 1501-3 (1966); June 3966,
Bull. 1584-3 (1968).
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household
Appliance Stores, Bull. 1501-6 (1966);
June 1966, Bull. 1584-6 (1968).
General Merchandise Stores, Bull. 1501-2
(1966); June 1966, Bull. 1584-2 (1968).
Miscellaneous Stores, Bull. 1501-7 (1966);
June 1966, Bull. 1584-7 (1968).
Summary Report, Bull. 1501 (1967); June
1966, Bull. 1584 (1968).
Initial Report: Employee Earnings in Retail Trade,
October 1956, Rpt. 119 (1957).
Rubber industry.
Wage Chronology: Firestone Tire and Rubber Co.
and B.F. Goodrich Co. (Akron Plants), 193766, Bull. 1484 (1967).*
Wages in Rubber Manufacturing Industry, August
1942, Bull. 737 (1943).



Wages and Hours

Salary structure.
Salary Structure Characteristics in Large Firms,
1963, Bull. 1417 (1964).
Sawmills and planing mills.
Industry Wage Survey, Southern Sawmills and
Planing Mills, June 1962, Bull. 1361 (1963);
October 1965, Bull. 1519 (1966); October 1969,
Bull. 1694 (1971).
Industry Wage Survey, West Coast Sawmilling
(and Logging), June 1964, Bull. 1455 (1965);
October 1969, Bull. 1704 (1971).
Wage Structure: West Coast Sawmilling, 1952,
Rpt. 7 (1953); July 1959, Rpt. 156 (1960).
Scientists. (See also Chemists and chemical engineers,
and Engineers, professional, this section.)
Employment, Education, and Earnings of Ameri­
can Men of Science, Bull. 1027 (1951).
National Survey of Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay:
Winter 1959-60, Bull. 1286 (1961).*
Winter 1960-61, Bull. 1310 (1961).*
Winter 1961-62, Bull. 1346 (1962).*
February-March 1963, Bull. 1387 (1963).*
February-March 1964, Bull. 1422 (1964).*
February-March 1965, Bull. 1469 (1965).*
February-March 1966, Bull. 1535 (1966).*
June 1967, Bull. 1585 (1968).*
June 1968, Bull. 1617 (1969).*
June 1969, Bull. 1654 (1970).*
June 1970, Bull. 1693 (1971).*
Seamen. (See also Water transportation, this section.)
The Earnings and Employment of Seamen on U.S.
Flag Ships, Bull. 1238 (1958).*
Service stations. (See also Retail trade, this section.)
Wages and Hours of Labor in Gasoline Filling Sta­
tions and Motor Vehicle Repair Garages, 1931,
Bull. 578 (1933).
Services for the blind.
Salaries for Selected Occupations in Services for
the Blind, May 1961, Bull. 1322 (1962); Janu­
ary 1966, Bull. 1500 (1966).
Sheet metal industry.
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954); Studies Between Mid1952 and Mid-1953, Rpt. 60 (1954).
Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Shipyards.
Earnings in Ship Construction Yards, Fall of 1942,
Bull. 752 (1943).
Hourly Earnings in Private Ship-Repair Yards,
Spring 1943, Bull. 763 (1944).
Hourly Earnings in Private Shipyards, 1942, Bull.
727 (1943).
Wage Chronology:
Bethlehem Atlantic Shipyards, 1941-62, Rpt.
216 (1962); 1941-65, Bull. 1454 (1965);*
1941-68, Bull. 1607 (1968).*
Pacific Coast Shipbuilding, 1941-64, Rpt. 254
(1965); 1941-67, Bull. 1605 (1968).*

177

Wages and Hours

Shoe industry.
Earnings and Hours in Shoe and Allied Industries
During First Quarter of 1939, Boots and Shoes,
Cut Stock and Findings, Shoe Patterns, Bull.
670 (1939).
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas:
September 1948-January 1949, Bull. 969
(1949).
April 1949-November 1949, Bull. 1005 (1950).
January 1950-January 1951, Bull. 1040 (1951).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Industry Wage Survey, Footwear, April 1962, Bull.
1360 (1963); April 1965, Bull. 1503 (1966);
March 1968, Bull. 1634 (1969).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Chronology: International Shoe Co., 194564, Rpt. 211 (1963); 1945-66, Bull. 1479
(1966);* 1945-74, Bull. 1718 (1972).*
Wage Chronology: Massachusetts Shoe Manufac­
turing, 1945-64, Rpt. 209 (1964); 1945-66, Bull.
1471 (1966).*
Wage Structure: Footwear, March 1953, Rpt. 46
(1953).
Wage Structure: Footwear Industry, April 1957,
Rpt. 133 (1958).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Boot and Shoe
Industry:
1907 to 1914, Bull. 178 (1915).
1907 to 1916, Bull. 232 (1918).
1907 to 1918, Bull. 260 (1919).
1907 to 1920, Bull. 278 (1921).
1907 to 1922, Bull. 324 (1923).
1907 to 1924, Bull. 374 (1925).
1907 to 1926, Bull. 450 (1927).
1910 to 1928, Bull. 498 (1929).
1910 to 1930, Bull. 551 (1932).
1910 to 1932, Bull. 579 (1933).
Silk industry.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage Areas,
April 1949-November 1949, Bull. 1005 (1950).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cotton, Woolen,
and Silk Industries, 1907 to 1914, Bull. 190
(1916).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Manufacture of
Silk and Rayon Goods, 1931, Bull. 568 (1932).
Slaughtering industry. See Meatpacking industry, this
section.
Small-arms industry.
Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).

178


Wages and Hours

Soft drink establishments. See Bottling-house and brew­
ery workers, this section.
Southern States.
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight Metropoli­
tan Areas of the South, June 1965, Bull. 1533
(1966) .
Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetropolitan
Areas of the South and North Central Regions,
June 1965, Bull. 1552 (1967).
Employee Earnings in Nonmetropolitan Areas of
the South and North Central Regions, June
1962, Bull. 1416 (1964).
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
Wages in Nonmetropolitan Areas, South and North
Central Regions, October 1960, Rpt. 190 (1961).
Stamped and pressed metal products.
Occupational Earnings: Selected Industries and
Areas. Studies Between March 1951 and May
1952, Rpt. 36 (1954); Studies Between Mid1952 and Mid-1953, Rpt. 60 (1954).
Statistics.
Employment and Earnings Statistics for States and
Areas:
1939-62, Bull. 1370 (1963).
1939-63, Bull. 1370-1 (1964).
1939-64, Bull. 1370-2 (1965).
1939-65, Bull. 1370-3 (1966).
1939-66, Bull. 1370-4 (1967).
1939-67, Bull. 1370-5 (1968).
1939-68, Bull. 1370-6 (1969).
1939-69, Bull. 1370-7 (1970).
1939-70, Bull. 1370-8 (1971).
Employment and Earnings Statistics for the United
States:
1909-60, Bull. 1312 (1961).
1909-62, Bull. 1312-1 (1963).
1909-64, Bull. 1312-2 (1964).
1909-65, Bull. 1312-3 (1966).
1909-66, Bull. 1312-4 (1966).
1909-67, Bull. 1312-5 (1967).
1909-68, Bull. 1312-6 (1968).
1909-70, Bull. 1312-7 (1971).
Handbook of Labor Statistics, 1950 ed., Bull. 1016
(1951); 1951 Supp. (1953);* 1967, Bull. 1555
(1967) ;* 1968, Bull. 1600 (1968);* 1969, Bull.
1630 (1969);* 1970, Bull. 1666 (1970);* 1971,
Bull. 1705 (1971).*
Steel industry. See Iron and steel industry, this section.
Stone workers. See Clay, stone, and glass industries,
this section.
Stores, retail. (See also Retail trade, this section.)
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, January 1950-January 1951, Bull. 1040
(1951).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Wages in Department and Clothing Stores, Large
Cities, Spring and Summer 1943, Bull. 801
(1944).

Wages and Hours

Street laborers, unskilled. See Municipal employees, this
section.
Street-railway employees. See Transit industry—local,
this section.
Sugar industry.
Wages and Hours of Labor in Cane-Sugar Refining
Industry, 1930, Bull. 547 (1931).
Synthetic textiles and fibers.
Cotton and Synthetic Textiles, Wage Trends, 195053, Rpt. 50 (1954).
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Cot­
ton and Synthetic Textiles, 1965, Rpt. 335-1
(1968) .
Industry Wage Survey: Cotton and Man-Made
Fiber Textiles, September 1968, Bull. 1637
(1969) .
Industry Wage Survey, Synthetic Fibers, FebruaryApril 1966, Bull. 1540 (1967).
Industry Wage Survey, Synthetic Textiles, May
1963, Bull. 1414 (1964); September 1965, Bull.
1509 (1966).
Wage Chronology: American Viscose, 1945-63,
Rpt. 277 (1964); 1945-67, Bull. 1560 (1967).*
Wage Structure: Synthetic Fibers, October 1958,
Rpt. 143 (1959).
Wage Structure: Synthetic Textiles, November
1954, Rpt. 87 (1955); August 1960, Rpt. 192
(1961).
Teachers, public schools. See Municipal employees, this
section.
Teamsters. For union scales, 1915-33, see General
trades, this section. For later bulletins, see Truckdrivers and helpers, this section.
Textiles. (See also specific branch of industry, this sec­
tion.)
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-28, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Structure: Miscellaneous Textile Industries,
October 1953, Rpt. 56 (1954).
Theatrical employment.
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 15, 1918, Bull. 259 (1919).
May 15, 1919, Bull. 274 (1920).
May 15, 1920, Bull. 286 (1921).
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Tire industry.
Wage Chronology: Firestone Tire and Rubber Co.
and B.F. Goodrich Co. (Akron Plants), 1937—
66, Bull. 1484 (1967).*
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Automobile Tire
Industry, 1923, Bull. 358 (1924).
Tobacco industry.
Cigar manufacturing.
Industry Wage Survey, Cigar Manufacturing,
April-May, 1961, Bull. 1317 (1962); April


Wages and Hours

May 1964, Bull. 1436 (1965); March 1967,
Bull. 1581 (1967).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wage Structure: Cigar Manufacturing, April
1955, Rpt. 97 (1955).
Cigarette manufacturing.
Industry Wage Survey, Cigarette Manufac­
turing, July-August 1965, Bull. 1472 (1965).
Wage Structure: Cigarette Manufacturing,
May 1960, Rpt. 167 (1960).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cigarette
Manufacturing Industry, 1930, Bull. 532
(1931).
Transit industry—local.
Compensation Expenditures and Payroll Hours:
Motor Passenger Transportation Industries,
1964, Bull. 1561 (1967).
Street Railway Employment in the United States,
Bull. 204 (1917).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor, 1921—
31, inc. See bulletins listed for those years under
General trades, this section, and Bull. 476
(1929).
Union Wage Rates of City Streetcar and Bus Op­
erators :
July 1, 1943, Bull. 766 (1944).*
July 1, 1944, Bull. 814 (1945).*
July 1, 1945, Bull. 856 (1946).*
Union Wages and Hours: Local-Transit Operating
Employees:
July 1, 1946, Bull. 903 (1947).*
October 1, 1947, Bull. 933 (1948).*
October 1, 1948, Bull. 957 (1949).*
October 1, 1949, Bull. 981 (1950).*
October 1, 1950, Bull. 1019 (1951).*
October 1, 1951, Bull. 1061 (1952).*
October 1, 1952, Bull. 1133 (1953).*
July 1, 1953, Bull. 1153 (1954).*
July 1, 1954, Bull. 1177 (1955).*
July 1, 1955, Bull. 1193 (1956).*
July 1, 1956, Bull. 1208 (1957).*
July 1, 1957, Bull. 1229 (1958).*
July 1, 1958, Bull. 1244 (1959).*
July 1, 1959, Bull. 1268 (I960).*
July 1, 1960, Bull. 1289 (1961).*
July 1, 1961, Bull. 1313 (1962).*
July 1, 1962, Bull. 1354 (1963).*
July 1, 1963, Bull. 1396 (1964).*
July 1, 1964, Bull. 1431 (1965).*
July 1, 1965, Bull. 1486 (1966).*
July 1, 1966, Bull. 1546 (1967).*
July 1, 1967, Bull. 1589 (1968).*
July 1, 1968, Bull. 1620 (1969).*
July 1, 1969, Bull. 1667 (1970).*
July 1, 1970, Bull. 1706 (1971).*
Wage Rates of Union Street-Railway Employees,
June 1, 1942, Bull. 731 (1943).*

179

Wages and Hours

Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions of Union
Street-Railway Employees, June 1, 1941, Bull.
701 (1942).*
Transportation. See specific type of, this section.
Truckdrivers and helpers. (See also General trades, this
section, for union scales, 1915-33.)
Union Wages and Hours: Motortruck Drivers and
Helpers:
July 1, 1943, Bull. 771 (1944).*
July 1, 1944, Bull. 812 (1945).*
July 1, 1945, Bull. 874 (1946).*
July 1, 1946, Bull. 911 (1948).*
July 1, 1947, Bull. 928 (1948).*
July 1, 1948, Bull. 955 (1949).*
July 1, 1949, Bull. 978 (1950).*
July 1, 1950, Bull. 1012 (1951).*
July 1, 1951, Bull. 1052 (1952).*
July 1, 1952, Bull. 1125 (1953).*
July 1, 1953, Bull. 1154 (1954).*
July 1, 1954, Bull. 1178 (1955).*
July 1, 1955, Bull. 1195 (1956).*
July 1, 1956, Bull. 1206 (1957).*
July 1, 1957, Bull. 1230 (1958).*
July 1, 1958, Bull. 1246 (1959).*
July 1, 1959, Bull. 1270 (I960).*
July 1, 1960, Bull. 1291 (1961).*
July 1, 1961, Bull. 1314 (1962).*
July 1, 1962, Bull. 1356 (1963).*
July 1, 1963, Bull. 1398 (1964).*
July 1, 1964, Bull. 1433 (1965).*
July 1, 1965, Bull. 1488 (1966).*
July 1, 1966, Bull. 1548 (1967).*
July 1, 1967, Bull. 1591 (1968).*
July 1, 1968, Bull. 1622 (1969).*
July 1, 1969, Bull. 1669 (1970).*
July 1, 1970, Bull. 1708 (1971).*
Union Wages, Hours, and Working Conditions of
Motortruck Drivers, June 1, 1939, Bull. 676
(1940).*
Wages and Hours of Union Motortruck Drivers
and Helpers:
June 1, 1941, Bull. 705 (1942).*
June 1, 1942, Bull. 732 (1943).*
Trucking industry.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours:
Trucking, 1965, Rpt. 335-11 (1968).
Underwear industry. See Hosiery and underwear manu­
facture, this section.
Union scales. See General trades, and specific industry
or trade, this section.
Upholsterers. (See also Furniture industry, this sec­
tion.)
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 530 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Urban rates. See Metropolitan areas, this section.
Utilities.
Employee Compensation and Payroll Hours: Gas
and Electric Utilities, 1965, Rpt. 335-6 (1968).

180



Wages and Hours

Industry Wage Survey, Electric and Gas Utilities,
July 1962, Bull. 1374 (1963); October-November 1967, Bull. 1614 (1969).
Wage Chronology: Commonwealth Edison Co. of
Chicago, 1945-63, Rpt. 205 (1964).
Wage Chronology: Pacific Gas and Electric Co.,
1943-66, Bull. 1499 (1966).*
Wage Structure: Electric and Gas Utilities, July
1952, Rpt. 12 (1953); September 1957, Rpt.
135 (1958).
Wage chronologies (Changes in wage rates and related
practices.):
Aluminum Co. of America, 1939-61, Rpt. 219
(1962) ; 1939-67, Bull. 1559 (1967).*
American Viscose, 1945-63, Rpt. 277 (1964);
1945-67, Bull. 1560 (1967).*
American Woolen Co., 1939-48, Bull. 970
(1949).*
Anthracite Mining Industry, 1930-59, Rpt. 255
(1963) ; 1930-66, Bull. 1494 (1966).*
Armour and Co., 1941-48, Bull. 970 (1949);*
1941-58, Rpt. 165 (1960); 1941-60, Rpt. 187
(1961) ; 1941-64, Rpt. 187 (Revised 1965);
1941-67, Bull. 1481 (1966);* 1941-72, Bull.
1682 (1971).*
A. T. & T., Long Lines Department, 1940-64, Bull.
1443 (1965).*
Berkshire Hathaway Inc., 1943-64, Rpt. 281
(1964) ; 1943-66, Bull. 1475 (1965);* 1943-67,
Bull. 1541 (1967).* For earlier years, see North­
ern Cotton Textile Assns., this listing.
Bethlehem Atlantic Shipyards, 1941-62, Rpt. 216
(1962) ; 1941-65, Bull. 1454 (1965);* 1941-68,
Bull. 1607 (1968).*
Bituminous Coal Mines, 1933-48, Bull. 970
(1949);* 1933-66, Bull. 1461 (1965);* 193368, Bull. 1558 (1967).*
Carolina Coach Co., 1947-63, Rpt. 259 (1963).
Chicago Newspaper Publishers’ Assn., 1939-61,
Rpt. 201 (1962).
Chrysler Corp., 1939-48, Bull. 970 (1949);* 193953, Rpt. 161 (1960); 1939-60, Rpt. 198 (1961);
1939-64, Rpt. 198 (Revised 1964); 1939-66,
Bull. 1515 (1967).*
Commonwealth Edison Co. of Chicago, 1945-63,
Rpt. 205 (1964).
Dan River Mills, 1943-65, Bull. 1495 (1966).*
Federal Classification Act Employees, 1924-60,
Rpt. 199 (1961); 1924-64, Bull. 1442 (1965);*
1924-68, Bull. 1604 (1968).*
Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. and B. F. Goodrich
Co. (Akron Plants), 1937-66, Bull. 1484
(1967).*
Ford Motor Co., 1941-55, Rpt. 99 (1956).
Franklin Assn, of Chicago, 1939-61, Rpt. 215
(1962).
Full-Fashioned Hosiery, 1941-48, Bull. 970
(1949).* *
General Motors Corp., 1939-49, Bull. 970-2
(1949);* 1939-55, Rpt. 164 (1960); 1939-60,

Wages and Hours

Rpt. 185 (1961); 1939-63, Rpt. 185 (Revised
1964)
; 1939-66, Bull. 1532 (1966).*
International Harvester Co., 1946-57, Rpt. 162
(1960); 1946-61, Rpt. 202 (1961); 1946-70,
Bull. 1678 (1972).*
International Paper Co., Southern Kraft Division,
1937-67, Bull. 1534 (1967).*
International Shoe Co., 1945-64, Rpt. 211 (1963);
1945-66, Bull. 1479 (1966);* 1945-74, Bull.
1718 (1972).*
Lockheed Aircraft Corp. (California Company),
1937-64, Rpt. 231 (1964).
Lockheed-California Co. (A Division of Lockheed
Aircraft Corp.), 1937-67, Bull. 1522 (1967).*
Martin-Marietta Corp. (Baltimore Plant), 194461, Rpt. 232 (1963); 1944-64, Bull. 1449
(1965).*
Massachusetts Shoe Manufacturing, 1945-64, Rpt.
209 (1964); 1945-66, Bull. 1471 (1966).*
New York Laundries, 1945-64, Bull. 1453
(1965).*
North American Aviation, 1941-57, Rpt. 163
(1960); 1941-64, Rpt. 203 (1965); 1941-67,
Bull. 1564 (1967).*
North Atlantic Longshoring, 1934-61, Rpt. 234
(1962).
Northern Cotton Textiles Assns., 1943-48, Bull.
970 (1949).* See also Berkshire Hathaway, Inc.,
this listing.
Pacific Coast Shipbuilding, 1941-64, Rpt. 254
(1965) ; 1941-67, Bull. 1605 (1968).*
Pacific Gas and Electric Co., 1943-66, Bull. 1499
(1966) .*
Pacific Longshore Industry, 1934-65, Bull. 1491
(1966);* 1934-70, Bull. 1568 (1968).*
Railroads-Nonoperating Employees, 1920-62, Rpt.
208 (1963).
Sinclair Oil Companies, 1941-63, Rpt. 225 (1964);
1941-64, Bull. 1447 (1965).*
Swift and Co., 1942-48, Bull. 970 (1949);* 194263, Rpt. 260 (Revised 1964).
The Anaconda Co., 1941-58, Rpt. 197 (1961).
The Boeing Co. (Washington Plants), 1936-64,
Rpt. 204 (1965); 1936-67, Bull. 1565 (1967).*
United States Steel Corp., 1937-48, Bull. 970
(1940);* 1937-55, Rept. 106 (1957); 1937-60,
Rpt. 186 (1961); 1937-64, Rpt. 186 (Revised
1965) ; 1937-67, Bull. 1603 (1968).*
Western Greyhound Lines, 1945-63, Rpt. 245
(1964); 1945-67, Bull. 1595 (1968).*
Western Union Telegraph Co., 1945-53, Rpt. 160
(1960); 1943-63, Rpt. 160 (Revised 1964);
1943-67, Bull. 1545 (1967).*
Wage differentials. (See also Shift differentials and op­
erations. )
Intercity Variations in Wage Levels, Bull. 793
(1944).
Labor in the South, Bull. 898 (1947).*
New England Labor and Labor Problems, Bull.
1212 (1957).*



Wages and Hours

Wage Differences and Establishment Practices,
Bull. 1173 (1955).
Wage Differentials and Rate Structures Among 40
Labor Markets, 1951-52, Bull. 1135 (1953).
Wages and related benefits. See Area Wage Surveys—
Metropolitan areas, this section.
Waiters.
Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labor:
May 15, 1918, Bull. 259 (1919).
May 15, 1919, Bull. 274 (1920).
May 15, 1920, Bull. 286 (1921).
Water transportation.
Compensation Expenditures and Payroll Hours:
Water Transportation, 1964, Bull. 1577 (1968).
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).
May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
White-collar workers. (See also Bank employees, Area
Wage Surveys, and Office workers, this section. See
also specific profession.)
Federal White-Collar Workers, Bull. 1117 (1953).
National Survey of Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay:
Winter 1959-60, Bull. 1286 (1961).*
Winter 1960-61, Bull. 1310 (1961).*
Winter 1961-62, Bull. 1346 (1962).*
February-March 1963, Bull. 1387 (1963).*
February-March 1964, Bull. 1422 (1964).*
February-March 1965, Bull. 1469 (1965).*
February-March 1966, Bull. 1535 (1966).*
June 1967, Bull. 1585 (1968).*
June 1968, Bull. 1617 (1969).*
June 1969, Bull. 1654 (1970).*
June 1970, Bull. 1693 (1971).*
Salaries of White-Collar Workers in Hawaii,
Puerto Rico, and Alaska, May-June 1963, Bull.
1392 (1964).
Salary Trends: Federal Classified Employees,
1939-60 and July 1960-July 1961 (supp.), Rpt.
200 (1961); and 1939-64, Bull. 1444 (1965).
Trend of Earnings Among White-Collar Workers
During the War, Bull. 783 (1944).
Wage Chronology: Federal Classification Act Em­
ployees, 1924-60, Rpt. 199 (1961); 1924-64,
Bull. 1442 (1965);* 1924-68, Bull. 1604
(1968).*
Wages of Office Workers in Metalworking Indus­
tries, January 1945, Bull. 886 (1946).
Wholesale trade. (See also Groceries, wholesale, this
section.)
Earnings in Wholesale Trade, June 1958, Bull.
1253 (1959).
Women’s clothing industry. See Clothing industry, this
section.
Woodworkers. (See also Furniture industry, and Millwork, this section.)
Union Scales of Wages and Hours of Labor:
1927-1928, Bull. 476 (1929).

181

Wages and Hours, Foreign Countries

May 15, 1929, Bull. 515 (1930).
May 15, 1930, Bull. 540 (1931).
May 15, 1931, Bull. 566 (1932).
Wool textiles.
Industry Wage Survey, Wool Textiles, June 1962,
Bull. 1372 (1963); and November 1966, Bull.
1551 (1967).
Wage Structure: Wool Textiles, September 1957,
Rpt. 134 (1958).
Woolen and worsted goods manufacturing.
Hourly Earnings by Industry, Selected Wage
Areas, April 1949 to November 1949, Bull.
1005 (1950); January 1950 to January 1951,
Bull. 1040 (1951).
Hourly Earnings in 10 Industries, Selected Wage
Areas, September 1947-September 1948, Bull.
953 (1949).
Wages and Hours of Labor in the Cotton, Woolen,
and Silk Industries, 1907 to 1914, Bull. 190
(1916).
Wages and Hours of Labor in Woolen and Worsted
Goods Manufacturing:
1916, Bull. 238 (1918).
1918, Bull. 261 (1919).
1920, Bull. 289 (1921).
1922, Bull. 327 (1923).
1924, Bull. 377 (1925).
1910 to 1926, Bull. 443 (1927).
1910 to 1928, Bull. 487 (1929).
1910 to 1930, Bull. 533 (1931).
1932, Bull. 584 (1933).
Work clothing. See Clothing industry, this section.
World War II. (See also other bulletins for wartime
years, this section.)
Earnings in Cotton-Goods Manufacture During
the War Years, Bull. 798 (1944).
The Changing Status of Bituminous-Coal Miners,
1937-46, Bull. 882 (1946).
Wage Structure—Metalworking Industries, 1945,
Bull. 952 (1949).
Wages in Manufacturing Industries in Wartime,
Bull. 756 (1943).
War and Postwar Wages, Prices, and Hours, 1914—
23 and 1939-44, Bull. 852 (1946).
Wartime Wages, Income, and Wage Regulation in
Agriculture, Bull. 883 (1946).
Zinc. See Mining—nonferrous metals.
Wages and hours, foreign countries. See Labor conditions
and industrial relations, foreign countries—Labor in—
specific countries; Labor Law and Practice—specific coun­
tries; Labor Legislation—specific countries; see also Wage
policies, foreign countries.
Waiters. See under Employment outlook and under Wages
and hours.
War contracts cutbacks.
Effect of War-Contract Cut-Backs on Selected Plants,
Bull. 818 (1945).
War Labor Board, National. See National War Labor
Board.
War workers. See Munition factories, Great Britain, World
War I; also Aircraft manufacture; Reconversion; Bull.

182



Women Workers

819 (1945) Explosives industry; and Wages and hours—
Ammunition-loading industry.
Warehousing operations. See under Accidents—Rates types,
causes (etc.).
Wartime.
Consumers’ Prices in the United States, 1942-48, Bull.
966 (1949).*
Demobilization of Manpower, 1918-19, Bull. 784
(1944).
History of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board,
1917 to 1919, Bull. 283 (1921).
Labor Legislation of:
1917, Bull. 244 (1918).
1918, Bull. 257 (1919).
National War Labor Board, Bull. 287 (1922).
Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement and Wage
Stabilization During World War II, Bull. 1009
(1950).*
The General Maximum Price Regulation, Bull. 879
(1946).
Wartime Prices, Part I, August 1939 to Pearl Harbor,
Bull. 749 (1944).* (Only Part I has been published.)
Wartime Wages, Income, and Wage Regulation in
Agriculture, Bull. 883 (1946).
Wartime, foreign countries.
Employment Situation in Certain Foreign Countries,
Bull. 864 (1946).
Food Situation in Central Europe, 1917, Bull. 242
(1918).
Price Trends and Price Control in Foreign Countries
Since VE-Day, Bull. 873 (1946).
Wartime Prices, Price Control, and Rationing in For­
eign Countries, Bull. 851 (1946).
Washup time. See Collective bargaining, general—Washup,
cleanup, and clothes-change time.
W a tc h re p a ir m e n . See under Employment outlook.
Water transportation. See under Wages and hours.
Weekend work. See Collective bargaining, general—Pre­
mium pay.
Welders. See under Employment outlook.
Welfare plans, collectively bargained. See Collective bar­
gaining, general—Health and welfare insurance.
Welfare work. See Health, recreation, and welfare condi­
tions.
White-collar workers. See Employment outlook—Banking,
Office workers, specific occupations; and under Wages and
hours.
Wholesale prices. See Prices, wholesale.
Wholesale trade. See under Wages and hours.
Women workers. (See also specific subjects.)
Dressmaking as a Trade for Women in Massachusetts,
Bull. 193 (1916).
Effect of Minimum-Wage Determination in Oregon,
Bull. 176 (1915).
Effect of Workmen’s Compensation Laws in Diminish­
ing the Necessity of Industrial Employment of
Women and Children, Bull. 217 (1918).
Industrial Experiences of Trade-School Girls in Massa­
chusetts, Bull. 215 (1917).
Postwar Employment Prospects for Women in the
Hosiery Industry, Bull. 835 (1945).

Women Workers, Foreign Countries

Tables of Working Life for Women, 1950, Bull. 1204
(1957).*
The Boot and Shoe Industry in Massachusetts as a Vo­
cation for Women, Bull. 180 (1915).
Women in the Lead Industries, Bull. 253 (1919).
Women Production Workers in the Machinery Indus­
tries: Employment Distribution; Earnings, Winter
1952-53, Rpt. 98 (1956).
Women workers, foreign countries. See specific country.
Woodworkers. See under Wages and hours.
Woolen and worsted goods manufacturing. See under
Wages and hours.
Work injuries. See Accidents; Workmen’s compensation.
See also Conventions, meetings, etc.—Industrial Accident
Boards and Commissions; Poisons, industrial.
Work stoppages. See Labor-management disputes—Strikes.
Worker characteristics.
Characteristics of Workers in Large States and SMSA’s,
1970, Rpt. 388 (1971).
Worker mobility. See Occupational mobility.
Workers’ education. (See also Vocational education and
training.)
A Guide to Labor-Management Relations in the United
States, Bull. 1225 (1958).*
Adult Working-Class Education in Great Britain and
the United States, Bull. 271 (1920).*
Case Studies in Union Leadership Training, 1951-52,
Bull. 1114 (1952).*
Workers’ representation, foreign countries. See Labor con­
ditions and industrial relations, foreign countries.
Working conditions. See Child labor; Collective bargain­
ing, by industry or occupation; Employment outlook;
Hygiene, industrial; Labor and industrial conditions—
Hawaii; Legislation; Munition factories, Great Britain,
World War I; Shoe industry; Shipbuilding and repair;
U.S.S.R.; Wages and hours—specific industry or occupa­
tion; and Women workers.
Working life, length and pattern of. (See also Labor supply-)
Tables of Working Life for Women, 1950, Bull. 1204
(1957).*
Tables of Working Life, Length of Working Life for
Men, Bull. 1001 (1950).*
Workmen’s compensation. (See also Accidents; Conven­
tions, meetings, etc.,—Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions.)
Administration.
Problems of Workmen’s Compensation Adminis­
tration in the United States and Canada, Bull.
672 (1940).*
Workmen’s Compensation in the United States,
Bull. 1149 (1954). See also Bull. 301, entitled
below, and Legislation, this section.
Court decisions. See Court decisions affecting labor.
Insurance systems.
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Insur­
ance and Administration, Bull. 301 (1922).
Lead poisoning.
Deaths from Lead Poisoning, 1925-1927, Bull.
488 (1929).
Legislation. (See also Administration, this section; and



Workmen’s Compensation, Foreign Countries

Legislation—Labor—Text, summaries, and reviews
of laws.)
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Laws of
the United States and Canada up to January 1,
1920, Bull. 275 (1920).
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Laws of
the United States as of January 1, 1925, Bull.
379 (1925).
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Laws of
the United States up to December 31, 1917,
Bull. 240 (1918).
Compensation Legislation of 1914 and 1915, Bull.
185 (1915).
Labor Legislation of 1916, Bull. 213 (1917).
Occupational-Disease Legislation in the United
States, 1936, Bulls. 625 (1937) and 652 (1938).
State Labor Legislation, 1937, Including Work­
men’s Compensation Legislation, Bull. 654
(1938).
Workmen’s Compensation Laws of the United
States and Foreign Countries, Bull. 203 (1917).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Canada, Bull. 272 (1921).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Canada, 1920-1922, Bull. 332 (1923).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Canada as of July 1, 1926, Bull. 423
(1926).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Canada as of January 1, 1929, Bull.
496 (1929).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Foreign Countries, 1917 and 1918,
Bull. 243 (1918).
Seamen.
Settlement for Accidents to American Seamen,
Bull. 466 (1928).
Workmen’s Compensation and the Protection of
Seamen, Bull. 869 (1946).
Statistics. See Accidents—Methods.
Women and children.
Effect of Workmen’s Compensation Laws in Di­
minishing the Necessity of Industrial Employ­
ment of Women and Children, Bull. 217 (1918).
Workmen’s compensation, foreign countries. (See also spe­
cific country.)
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Insurance
and Administration, Bull. 301 (1922). (British Co­
lumbia and Ontario.)
Comparison of Workmen’s Compensation Laws of the
United States and Canada, up to January 1, 1920,
Bull. 275 (1920).
Problems of Workmen’s Compensation Administration
in the United States and Canada, Bull 672 (1940).*
Workmen’s Compensation and the Protection of Sea­
men, Bull. 869 (1946).
Workmen’s Compensation Laws of the United States
and Foreign Countries, Bull. 203 (1917).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the Latin
American Countries, Bull. 529 (1930).

183

Worksharing

Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Canada, Bull. 272 (1921).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Canada, 1920-1922, Bull. 332 (1923).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Canada as of July 1, 1926, Bull. 423
(1926).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Canada as of January 1, 1929, Bull. 496
(1929).
Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United
States and Foreign Countries, 1917 and 1918, Bull.
243 (1918).
Worksharing. See Collective bargaining, general—Layoff.
Workweek, length of. See specific industry or occupation
under Employment outlook; and Wages and hours.

Y
Youth.
Employment in Perspective: Summer Job Situation for
Youth, 1971, Rpt. 397 (1971).

Zaire, Republic of

Employment in Perspective: Youth Job Situation in
Summer 1970, Rpt. 383 (1970).
School and Early Employment Experience of Youth.
A Report on Seven Communities, 1952-57, Bull.
1277 (1960).
Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages, Bull.
1657 (1970).
Yugoslavia.
Labor Law and Practice in Yugoslavia, Rpt. 250
(1963).

z
Zaire, Republic of.
Labor Law and Practice in the Republic of Zaire, Rpt.
393 (1972).

than 25 workers, and in effect in spring 1960,

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U .S .

GOVERNM ENT

PRIN TING

O FFICE:

1972 0 - 4 6 7 - 7 1 6


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102