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ka.3; I Z H Z
Annual Earnings and Employment
Patterns of Private Nonagricultural
Employees, 1970
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1975
Bulletin 1842




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Annual Earnings
and Employment Patterns
of Private Nonagricultural
Employees, 1970
U.S. Department of Labor
John T. Dunlop, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1975
Bulletin 1842

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, GPO Bookstores, or
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Catalog Number L 2.3:1842






Preface
This bulletin presents statistics on annual earnings and employment in the United
States in 1970. The Bureau of Labor Statistics developed the data from a 1-percent
random sample of the records of the Social Security Administration and the Railroad
Retirement Board. The data provide a more accurate picture of annual earnings and
employment patterns by industry than is available from any other source.
Previous BLS bulletins covering annual earnings and employment patterns were for
the years 1964, 1965, and the 2-year period 1966-67. The Bureau has accelerated
publication of the 1970 data to shorten the time lag between the reference year and
date of publication, and to take advantage of speeded-up delivery of data by the
Social Security Administration. The BLS also is storing 1968-69 data on tapes to be
available for future processing and time series analysis.
This bulletin was prepared in the Bureau’s Division of General Compensation
Structures by Franz A. Groemping, under the general direction of Alvin Bauman.
Melvin D. Eggleston contributed the section on the Gini Index.




m




Contents
Page
In tro d u ctio n ..........................................................................................................................................................................
1
Annual earnings and employment p a tte rn s .......................................................................................................................
3
Technical note ................................................................................................................................................................... 14
Tables:
1. Median annual earnings of four-quarter workers, ranked by major industry division, 1970 ..........................
2. Percent changes in median earnings by major industry divisions, 1967-70 ...................................................
3. Black-white ratios of median annual earnings of four-quarter workers in their industry of
major earnings, 1970
4. Female-male earnings ratio of four-quarter workers, by race, 1970 ..................................................................
5. Cumulative distribution of earners and earnings at estimated mean levels,1970 ..............................................
6. Gini indexes ............................................................................................
7. Gini ratio variations for selected industries, 1970 ...............................................................................................
8. Workers having major proportion of earnings in each industry division and percent
change, 1967 and 1970
9. Changes in the number of workers employed in their industry of major earnings in selected
manufacturing industries, 1967-70 ....................................................................................................................
10. Employment of women workers by industry division of major earnings, 1970 ..............................................
11. Employment of black workers by industry division Of major earnings, 1970 ...................................................
12. Percent distributions of workers by sex and race among the major industry divisions, 1970 ........................
13. Percent changes in employment of workers by race and sex, and industry divisions of
major earnings, 1967-70 ......................................................................................................................................
14. Percent distribution of employment of four-quarter workers by major region,1967-70 .................................
15. Hypothetical worker’s employment and earnings by industry and quarters worked ......................................
16. Rough approximation of sampling variability of estimated number of persons
...........................................
17. Rough, approximation to sampling variability of estimated percentages ...........................................

3
3

4
5
10
11
11
11
12
12
13
13
15
17
17

Charts: Lorenz Curves—
1. Earnings from major industry of employment for workers with earnings in any quarter
of the year ...............................................................................................................................................................
2. Earnings from major industry of employment for workers with earnings in 4 quarters
of the year ...............................................................................................................................................................
Detailed tables:
Earnings and employment patterns in 2-digit industry divisions
A-l.
A-2.

Median annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
of major earnings and race, 1970 ................................................................................................................ 21
Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry
of major earnings and race, 1970 ................................................................................................................ 23




6
7

Contents—Continued
Page
Detailed tables— Continued
A-3.
A-4.
A-5.
A-6.
A-7.
A-8.
A-9.
A-10.
A-l 1.
A-12.
A-13.
A-14.

Median annual earnings from all wage and salary employment of workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region of major earnings, 1970 . ...................................
Average annual earnings from all wage and salary employment of workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region of major earnings, 1970 ........................................
Distribution of workers by annual earnings from all wage and salary employment by
industry of major earnings, 1970 ..............................................................................................................
Distribution of workers by annual earnings in the industry of major earnings, 1970 ...............................
Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in all wage and salary employment and by industry of major earnings, 1970 .............
Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1970 .................................................................................
Industry employment, 1970 .......................... ' ...............................................................................................
Industry employment by race and sex, 1970 ...............................................................................................
Quarters of work, 1970 ................................... . ............................................................................................
Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and industry
of major earnings, 1970 ................................... . ................................................................. . . . . . .............
Single and multi-industry employment of all workers by number of four quarters, major industry
employers, 1970 .............................................................................................................................................
Regional distribution of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by industry,
of major earnings, 1970 ......................................................................................................... .....................

25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47

Earnings and employment patterns in 3-digit industry divisions
B -l.
B-2.
B-3.
B-4.
B-5.
B-6.
B-7.
B-8.
B-9.
B-10.
B-l 1.
B -l2.
B-l3.
B-l4.

Median annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by
industry of major earnings and race, 1970...................................................................................................
Average annual earnings of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by
industry of major earnings and race, 1 970...................................................................................................
Median annual earnings from all wage and salary#employment of workers employed in
any quarter and in four quarters by industry and region of major earnings, 1970 .................................
Average annual earnings from all wage and salary employment of workers employed in any
quarter and in four quarters by industry and region of major earnings, 1970 ........................................
Distribution of workers by annual earnings from all wage and salary employment
by industry of major earnings, 1970 ............................................................................................................
Distribution of workers by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1970 ......................................
Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment by
annual earnings in all wage and salary employment and by industry of major earnings, 1970 .............
Distribution of workers with four quarters of earnings in all wage and salary employment
by annual earnings in industry of major earnings, 1970 ...........................................................................
Industry employment, 1970 ............... •..........................................................................................................
Industry employment by race and sex, 1970 ..............................................................................................
Quarters of work, 1970 ..................................................................................................................................
Workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by race, sex, and industry of
major earnings, 1970 ....................................................................................................................................
Single and multi-industry employment of all workers by number of major industry employers, 1970 . .
Regional distribution of workers employed in any quarter and in four quarters by
industry of major earnings, 1970 ..................................................................................................... ..........




51
54
57
60
63
66
69
72
75
78
81
84
87
90

In tr o d u c tio n
The Bureau initiated its program of annual earnings
and employment data collection in the 1960’s to fill
the gap in knowledge of annual wage and salary earnings
from private nonagricultural employment. Hourly and
weekly earnings data reported in fither studies1 cannot
be converted to annual earnings estimates with any
degree of precision because annual earnings are deter­
mined by the interaction of variables such as straighttime rates of pay, number of hours worked, and hours
worked at premium rates. These, in turn, depend on
other variables such as occupation, union status, industry,
and area. Moreover, some* workers move into and out
of the labor force during the year. In addition, a
substantial portion work for more than one employer
in the same industry or for one or more employers
in different industries.
The first study in this series covered 1964,2 and
was limited to wage and salary earnings subject to
social security taxation only. The second study3 covered
1965 and the third,4 1966 and 1967. These last two
studies included data on wage and salary earnings
defined under either the Social Security Act or the
Railroad Retirement Act.
The 1970 study has the same scope as the 1965 and
1966-67 studies, and contains the most recent data
available.
The major statistical data in this bulletin have been
divided into two sections. Tables A-l to A-14 provide
information for all private nonagricultural industries
and each major (2-digit) industry group (as defined in
the Standard Industrial Classification Manual). Instead
of being treated in their usual combined form, transpor­
tation, communication, and public utilities are handled
as separate divisions, as are wholesale and retail trade.
Data have been tabulated by quarter years of employ­
ment, as well as by industry, race, sex, and region.




Separate data also show earnings in the worker’s
industry of greatest earnings combined with his earnings
in other employment. Tables B-l to B-14 provide data
for selected 3-digit industry groups, and for purposes
of ready reference, also provide totals for each division
and for all private nonagricultural industries as a whole.
Workers are counted in each industry in which they
had any ‘earnings. Consequently, employment data
for 3-digit industries do not add to the total for
individual 2-digit industry groups, and data at the 2digit level do not add to the total at the division level.
Nevertheless, data for all major earners at any level of
industry classification (e.g. division) do, except for
rounding, add to the total for the private nonagricultural
economy.
The data are unique because, unlike annual earnings
data from other sources, they permit an analysis of the
distribution of wage and salary earnings and employment
patterns of workers by industry and quarters of employ­
ment. If an inter-departmental effort to obtain data
on the occupational group of individual workers in the
social security sample is successful, data in this series
will take on an added dimension and be even more
useful. Attention is directed to explanations and defi­
nition of differences in these methods given in the
technical notes.

For a description of the relationship of this series to
other annual earnings and employment studies, see page 18).
^ Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns, Private Non­
agricultural Employment, 1964 (BLS Report 330, 1969).
3 Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns o f Private
Nonagricultural Employees, 1965 (BLS Bulletin 1675, 1970).
4 Annual Earnings and Employment Patterns o f Private
Nonagricultural Employees, 1966-1967 (BLS Bulletin 1765,
1973).




A n n u a l E arn in g s and E m p l o y m e n t P a t t e r n s
Earnings

Median annual earnings of $6,452 and mean annual
earnings of $7,501 in 1970 were recorded by workers
in the private nonagricultural sector of the United
States, who had been employed in all four quarters
of the year (about two-thirds of all workers). (See
tables A-l and A-2.) The median earnings of all
workers— including those employed fewer than four
quarters in 1970 were $4,250 and their mean earnings,
$5,473. (See tables A-l and A-2.)
Median annual earnings in all employment of workers
with four quarters in the industry of major earnings
were highest in public utilities, and lowest in retail
trade. This same relationship held for 1967 and 1970
as shown in table 1. The increase for workers who

services, whose earnings were lower than those in
any other industry except retail trade, made the
greatest gains in real earnings; four-quarter workers
real earnings rose nearly 7 percent, any-quarter workers
nearly 11 percent. In retail trade real earnings of
four-quarter workers barely increased (0.1 percent),
those of any-quarter workers showed the greatest
decrease among the divisions (1.8 percent).
Earnings distribution. In 1970, the proportion of fourquarter workers whose earnings were below the “low
income level” (sometimes called the poverty level)
was one-fourth, virtually unchanged from 1967.1 The
earnings from all wage and salary employment of
approximately half of the four-quarter workers in the
Table 2. Percent changes in median earnings by

Table 1. Median annual earnings of four-quarter
workers, ranked by major industry
division, 1970

major industry divisions, 1967-1970
Four-quarter
workers

Median earnings

Industry
Dollar
earnings

Industry
1970

Private nonagricultural
industries......................................
Public u tilitie s ......................................
Contract construction........................
Transportation ....................................
M in in g ....................................................
Wholesale t r a d e ....................................
M anufacturing......................................
Comm unications.................................
Finance, insurance, and
real estate.............................................
Services..................................................
Retail t r a d e ...........................................

1967
Private nonagricultural
industries...................

$6,452

$5,372

9,379
9,043
9,008
8,853
7,906
7,429
7,405

7,802
7,316
7,352
7,323
6,667
6,352
6,044

6,320
5,213
4,202

5,251
4,207
3,617

worked in four quarters was 20.1 percent while the
increase for any quarter workers was only 17.6 percent
(Table 2). Since the purchasing power of the dollar, as
measured by the BLS Consumer Price Index, declined by
14 percent during this period, real earnings of fourquarter workers increased about 3 percent, those of
any quarter workers about 1 percent. Workers in




Any-quarter
workers

M in in g ..........................
Contract
construction..............
M anufacturing............
Transportation............
Communication..........
Public u tilitie s ............
Wholesale trad e,..........
Retail tr a d e .................
Finance, insurance,
and real e s ta te ..........
Services........................

Real
earnings

Dollar
earnings

Real
earnings

20.1

3.3

17.6

1.1

20.9

4.0

21.3

4.4

23.6
17.0
22.5
22.5
20.2
18.6
16.2

6.3
.6
5.4
5.4
3.4
2.0
.1

20.1
15.7
17.4
17.6
19.9
17.9
14.2

3.3
-.5
1.0
1.1
3.1
1.3
-1 .8

20.4
23.9

3.5
6.6

20.0
28.7

3.2
10.7

The low-income threshold for nonfarm families was
$3,410 in 1967; owing to the increase in consumer prices, it
rose to $3,968 in 1970. The Jow-income level is based on the
definition developed by the Social Security Administration in
1964, and revised by a Federal Interagency Committee in
1969. For a detailed description of the low-income concept,
see the Census Bureau’s Current Population Reports, Series
P-60, No. 86, December 1972, “Characteristics of the LowIncome Population 1971,” pp. 17-19.

industry division having the lowest earnings level,
retail trade, were at the poverty level in 1970, while only
5 percent of public utility workers, the division having
the highest earnings, had earnings at or below that level.
(See table A-7.)
The proportions of workers at selected levels of
earnings in 1967 and 1970 and percentage point
changes were:
Percent
Level o f earnings
Under $ 3 ,6 0 0 ..........................
$3,600 and under
$ 7 ,2 0 0 ...............................
$7,200 and over.....................

1967

1970

28.3

21.7

40.5
31.2

34.8
43.5

Change
1967-70
-

6.6

- 5 .7
+12.3

Earnings by race. Among four-quarter workers, median
annual earnings of blacks were 70.3 percent of the
earnings of whites (see table 3). The ratio ranged from
.62 in contract construction to .93 in retail trade as
shown below. The ratio of earnings of black men to
Table 3. Black-white ratios of median annual
earnings of four-quarter workers in their industry
of major earnings, 1970
Private nonagricultural
industries

Private nonagricultural
industries......................................
M in in g .............................................
Contract construction.................
Manufacturing .............................
Transportation .............................
Comm unication.........................
Public u tilitie s ...............................
Wholesale t r a d e .............................
Retail t r a d e ....................................
Finance, insurance, and
real estate......................................
Services...........................................

All
workers

Men

Women

.70

.69

.83

.79
.62
.75
.81
.70
.72
.71
.93

.79
.60
.74
.78
.71
.72
.65
.72

.84
.71
.88
1.00
*.87
.84
.87

.79
.66

.59
.61

.93
.73

1.06

those of white men was .69; the low for men was .59
in finance, insurance, and real estate, the high .79
in mining. The black-white earnings ratio was higher
for women than for men in the entire sector (.83) and
for each of the major industry divisions. This ratio was
lowest in contract construction (.71), but reflected
equality in transportation (1.00), and a higher median
for black than for white women in retail trade (1.06).
Annual earnings of black workers increased more
than those of white workers from 1967 to 1970.
The median earnings of black four-quarter workers
increased 27 percent; those of white workers 17 percent.




As a result, the ratio of median earnings of blacks to
those of whites from all employment in four quarters
increased from .65 to .70 for the entire private nonfarm
sector. This ratio increased in every industry division,
except in-manufacturing, where it remained unchanged
at .75, and in communications, where it decreased from
.76 to .70. This decrease largely reflects a decrease in
the ratio from .78 to .71 in the telephone industry,
which dominates employment in this major group. A
large influx in recent years of new black workers at
entrance level pay rates may account for the decrease.
Although the overall black-white earnings ratio in
manufacturing remained unchanged from 1967 to 1970,
some of these industries showed substantial decreases:
Ordnance, .78 to .67; tobacco, .92 to .86; trans­
portation equipment, .87 to .82; and paper, .82 to .79.
Increases occurred in chemicals, .77 to .80; and food,
.73 to .74. In ordnance, where the drop in the blackwhite earnings ratio was greatest, employment dropped
nearly a third for both whites and blacks and median
earnings increased 18 percent for whites, but only 2
percent for blacks.
As in 1967, the highest black-white earnings ratio
in 1970 was in retail trade (.93), followed by trans­
portation (.82); the lowest ratios were in construction
(.62) and services (.66).
Earnings by sex. Female workers had lower median
earnings than male workers in all major industry
divisions in 1970. The female-male rati© of median
annual earnings of four-quarter workers was .52 for
white workers, and .62 for black workers. As shown
in table 4, this ratio ranged from .48 in retail trade to
.67 in transportation for^ white workers, and from .64 in
manufacturing to .85 in transportation for black workers.
Table 4. Female-male earnings ratio of four-quarter
workers, by race, 1970
Industry

Private nonagricultural
industries...........................................
M in in g ..................................................
Contract construction......................
Manufacturing .................................
Transportation .................................
Communication.................................
Public u tilitie s ....................................
Wholesale t r a d e .................................
Retail t r a d e .........................................
Finance, insurance, and
real estate...........................................
Services...............................................

White

Black

.52

.62

.65
.55
.54
.67
.54
.63
.56
.48

.70
.66
.64
.85
.67
.74
.76
.70

.54
.55

. .84
.66

Median annual earnings in industries that employed
a high percent of women were lower than in industries
employing mostly men. The four industry divisions
(services; retail trade; finance, insurance and real estate;
and communications) with the highest percentages of
women employees (49 to 61) had the lowest annual
earnings. Conversely, in manufacturing, where women
constituted only 32 percent of the workers, earnings
were higher than in the private sector as a whole.
Among major manufacturing industries, as shown in
the following tabulation, the two with the highest
percentages of women (apparel and textiles) had earn­
ings much below the industry division level, while two
others (electrical equipment and food) had earnings
close to the division level.
Median annual
earnings o f all
four-quarter
workers

Women as a
percent o f all
workers
All manufacturing. .
A p p a re l..........................
Textiles............................
Electrical
equipm ent...................
Food ............................

32
80
49

$7,345
3,917
4,953

41
31

7,302
7,406

Earnings by region. Median earnings of four-quarter
workers in 1970 in the major regions of the United
States and their ratios to the overall median in 1970
and in 1967 were:
_
Earnings

Percent o f U.S,
earnings—

1970
United S ta te s ..........
Northeast........................
South...............................
North Central ..............
West ...............................

1970
100.0
105.5
84.3
109.4
106.4

100.0
105.9
82.9
112.3
112.2

The earnings rank order of the regions was
changed from 1967, but the difference among the
regions decreased slightly.
Median annual earnings increased proportionately
more in the South than in any other region from 1967
to 1970, although the dollar gains were smaller thaq
in any other region except the West:
Dollar
increase
United S ta te s .....................
Northeast.......................... ___
South................................. ____
North Central...................
West .................................

$1,080
1,115
984
1,029
841

Percent
increase
20.1
19.6
22.1
17.1
14.0

The South led in percent gains in these industry
divisions: Manufacturing, transportation, public utilities,
wholesale and retail trade, and services.




Table 5. Cumulative distribution of earners and
earnings at estimated mean levels, 1970

1967

$6,452
6,805
5,436
7,061
6,867

Equality o f earnings distributions. The most widely
accepted method of evaluating the equality of earnings
or income distribution is through the use of the
Gini index. This index measures the cumulative percent
of total income received by cumulative population
percentiles. The graphic representation of this relation­
ship, a Lorenz curve, provides the concept from which
the index is derived. When a situation of complete
income equality exists (all units receiving the same
income), the Lorenz curve for the distribution becomes
a straight line (line of equality). This indicates that any
percentage of the total population, as plotted on the
X-axis, receives a like percentage of total income. An
actual income distribution results in a curve with the
same end points but lying beneath this straight line.
Chart 2 shows this relationship with the hypothetical
line of equality AB and the actual curve of the
distribution. The Gini index is the proportion of the
area bounded by the Lorenz curve and the line of
equality to the area of the triangle formed by this
line and the X-axis. The less equally distributed the
income the greater will be the area between the line of
equality and the Lorenz curve, and consequently the
larger the Gini index.
Table 5 gives the distribution by earnings of private
nonfarm wage and salary earners having earnings in

Cumulative percent
Earnings
Earners

Under $600 ...........................................
Under $ 1 ,200 ......................................
Under $1,800 ......................................
Under $2,400 ......................................
Under $ 3 ,000 ......................................
Under $3,600 ......................................
Under $4,200 .......................... .......
Under $4,800 ......................................
Under $5,400 ......................................
Under $6,000 ......................................
Under $6,600 ......................................
Under $7,200 ......................................
Under $7,800 ......................................
Under $8,400 ......................................
Under $9,000 ......................................
Under $9,600 ......................................
Under $10,200 ....................................
Under $10,800 ....................................
Under $11,400 ....................................
Under $12,000 ....................................
T o t a l .......................................................

14.1
22.7
29.6
35.0
39.8
44.6
49.7
54.4
58.9
63.1
67.1
70.8
74.3
78.4
81.3
83.9
86.2
88.5
90.1
91.4
100.0

Earnings

.8
2.2
4.1
6.2
8.6
11.5
15.1
19.0
23.2
27.6
32.2
36.9
41.7
47.8
52.4
56.8
61.0
65.4
68.6
71.4
100.0

Chart 1.

Lorenz Curves, Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Earners, 1966 and 1970
Earnings from major industry of employment for workers with
earnings in any quarter of the year

Y-axis
percent of earnings




b

percent of workers

Chart 2.

Lorenz Curves, Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Earners, 1966 and 1970
Earnings from major industry of employment for workers with
earnings in 4 quarters of the year

Y-axis
percent of earnings




X-axis
percent of workers

any quarter of 1970. A comparison of the Gini
indexes and Lorenz curves for any quarter workers
in 1966 and 1970 indicates minor changes. The Lorenz
curves indicate a slight decrease in the equality of
earnings distribution in 1970 over 1966 (chart 1).
Similarly, the Gini indexes of the 2-digit SIC industries,
compared for the same 2 years, increase (indicating a
decrease in equality of earnings distribution) in approxi­
mately 78 percent of the cases. (See table 6.)
The Lorenz curves and Gini indexes for workers
with earnings in four quarters of the year indicate a
slightly larger change in the 2 years than that experienced
by any quarter workers. Chart 2 shows the Lorenz

curves for the private nonfarm sector. Changes in Gini
indexes for 89 percent of the two-digit SIC industries
indicate a decrease in the equality of earnings for
four-quarter workers between 1966 and 1970.
In all industries observed, earnings were more equally
distributed for four-quarter workers than for any quarter
workers. The average Gini index for four-quarter workers
in 1970 was .333, while that of any quarter workers
was .448. The indexes for such workers in 1966 were
.323 and .436 respectively. Industry divisions with
irregular employ rfient, such as retail trade and services,
generally had higher ratios than industries with regular,
year-round employment.

Table 6. Gini indexes
Workers with earnings in
Any quarter

Industry

1966

Four quarters
1970

1966

1970

Metal m in in g ............................................................................>............
Anthracite m in in g .................................................................. .............
Bituminous coal and lignite m in in g ..................................................
Oil and gas e x tra c tio n ..........................................................................
Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels ..................................................

.2870
.3793
.3029
.3909
.3776

.2974
.3135
.2968
.4230
.3917

.1952
.3006
.2138
.2865
.2916

.1961
.2311
.2086
.3115
.3007

General building contractors..............................................................
Heavy construction contractors.........................................................
Special trade contractors.....................................................................

.4610
.4408
.4381

.4768
.4447
.4483

.3080
.3059
.3025

.3238
.3124
.3113

Ordnance and accessories ...................................................................
Food and kindred products................................................................
Tobacco manufacturers.......................................................................
Textile mill products............................................................................
Apparel and other textile p ro d u cts ..................................................
Lumber and wood products ..............................................................
Furniture and fix tu re s ..........................................................................
Paper and allied products.....................................................................
Printing and publishing.......................................................................
Chemicals and allied p roducts...........................................................
Petroleum and coal products..............................................................
Rubber and plastic products, nec ....................................................
Leather and leather products..............................................................
Stone, clay and glass products...........................................................
Primary metal industries........................................................... ..
Fabricated metal products...................................................................
Machinery, except electrical ..............................................................
Electrical equipment and supplies....................................................
Transportation equipm ent...................................................................
Instruments and related products ....................................................
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries...........................................

.3378
.4626
.4631
.3743
.4438
.4514
.4238
.3551
.4471
.3592
.3029
.4108
.4302
.3615
.2930
.3868
.3415
.3949
.3123
.4048
.4889

.3464
.4687
.4666
.3885
.4520
.4523
.4176
.3619
.4564
.3635
.3155
.4204
.4399
.3779
.3099
.3877
.3485
.3953
.3332
.4064
.4877

.2572
.3004
.2933
.2780
.3296
.3251
.3011
.2580
.3332
.2883
.2424
.2844
.3110
.2700
.2181
.2873
*.2576
.2964
.2363
.3210
.3556

.2589
.3096
.2890
.2895
.3360
.3171
.3036
.2732
.3469
.2907
.2451
.2918
.3208
.2782
.2312
.2851
.2731
.3070
.2548
.3277

Railroad transportation.......................................................................
Local and interurban passenger transit ...........................................
Trucking and warehousing...................................................................
Water transportation............................................................................
Transportation by a ir ............................................................................

.2098
.3899
.3942
.4110
.3610

.2158
.4402
.3934
.4394
.3616

.1457

.1462
.1231
.2647
.3182'
.2976




.2760
.2679
.2980
.2946

.3563

Table 6. Gini indexes— Continued
Workers with earnings in
Industry

Any quarter
1966

Four quarters
1970

1966

1970

Pipe line transportation........................................ ..........................
Transportation services.......................................................................
Communication.....................................................................................
Electric, gas and sanitary services......................................................

.2096
.4163
.3785
.2875

.2299
.4292
.3790
.2879

.1612
.3104
.2916
.2177

.1499
.3144
.2993
.2217

Wholesale t r a d e .....................................................................................
Building materials and farm equipm ent...........................................
Retail general merchandise ................................................................
Food sto res............................................................................................
Automotive dealers and service stations...........................................
Apparel and accessory stores..............................................................
Furniture and home furnishing s to re s .............................................
Eating and drinking places..................................................................
Miscellaneous retail stores..................................................................

.4661
.4722
.5762
.5304
.5024
.5806
.4975
.5786
.5729

.4745
.4825
.5632
.5369
.5196
.5875
.5080
.5961
.5730

.3555
.3277
.3996
.3683
.3531
.4199
.3626
.3899
.4257

.3660
.3515
.4050
.3839
.3725
.4431
.3858
.4282
.4317

Banking....................................................................... ............................
Credit agencies and other banks.........................................................
Security, commodity brokers and services......................................
Insurance carriers .................................................................................
Insurance agents, brokers and service...............................................
Real estate...............................................................................................
Combined real estate, insurance, e t c ...............................................
Holding and other investment companies ......................................

.4073
.4378
.5137
.4202
.4864
.5289
.5504
.5717

.4064
.4268
.4947
.4189
.5129
.5462
.5344
.6033

.3279
.3524
.4485
.3417
.3991
.4011
.4412
.4685

.3343
.3410
.4377
.3409
.4330
.4133
.4418
.4840

Hotels and other lodging places.........................................................
Personal services ...................................................................................
Miscellaneous business services .........................................................
Auto repair, services, and garages.................................................... *.
Miscellaneous repair services..............................................................
Motion pictures.....................................................................................
Amusement and recreation services, nec...........................................
Medical and other health services......................................................
Legal services..........................................................................................
Educational services..............................................................................
Museums, botanical, zoological gardens...........................................
Nonprofit membership organizations................................................
Private households.................................................................................
Miscellaneous services............................................................................

.5549
.4943
.5975
.5082
.4504
.6761
.6365
.4641
.4229
.4657
.5118
5938
.4648
.4686

.5601
.5072
.6136
.5099
.4548
.6659

.3697
.3571
.4297
.3335
.3063
.5159
.4479
.3371
.3143
.3285
.3252
.4150
.3781
.3402

.3813
.3687
.4484
.3456
.3136
.5108
.4761
.3500
.3641
.3588
.3658
.4253
.3997
.3514

Gini indexes also indicate a considerable amount of
variation in the equality of earnings distribution by
sex and race. In 1970, the mean indexes for black wage
earners employed in any quarter was .432, while that
of blacks employed in four quarters was .278. The
mean indexes for white workers for the same period
were .463 and .345 respectively. The wages of women
workers tended to be the most equally distributed
having an average Gini index of .407 for any quarter
workers and .263 for four-quarter workers.




.6649
.4586
.4520
.4936
.5431
.6059
.4786
.4680

The wide variation in Gini indexes is indicated in table
7 by showing low and high ratios for various categories
of workers.
Upon request, the Bureau will furnish copies of
Gini tables of annual employment, by industry, single
and multiple employer, quarters of work, region, sex
and race for 1970.
Employment by industry. The total number of workers
having some earnings in 1970 was 79,326,000. Nearly

Table 7. Gini ratio variations for selected industries, 1970
Workers having earnings in any quarter
Gini ratios for
selected categories

High

Low

1ndustry

T o t a l .............................

W h ite .....................

B la c k .....................

Men

.............................

W h ite ......................

Black........................

Gini

Motion
pictures

.6658

Motion
pictures

.6712

Combined
real estate,
insurance,
etc.

Amusement
and recreat ion
services,
nec
Amusement
and recre­
ation
services,
nec
Nonprofit
member­

.6443

W h ite .....................

B la c k ................... ..

Railroad
transportation
Railroad
transportation
Railroad
transportation

Gini

1ndustry

Gini

.2158

Motion
pictures

.5108

.2095

Motion
pictures

.5180

.2434

Amusement
and recre­
ation
services,
nec

.4214

1ndustry

Railroad
transpor­
tation
Railroad
transpor­
tation
Bituminous
coal and
lignite
mining

Gini

.1462

.1420

.1442

.2131

Motion
pictures

.4834

Pipe line
transpor­
tation

.1366

.6529

Railroad
transpor­
tation

.2059

Motion
pictures

.4884

Pipe line
transpor­
tation

.1366

.6759

.6203

Motion
pictures

.6267

.5918

Bituminous
coal and
lignite
mining
Railroad
transpor­
tation
Railroad
transpor­
tation
Railroad
transpor­
tation

three-fourths of these had their major earnings in
manufacturing (30.3 percent of total), services (24.4
percent) and retail trade (19.5 percent). The overall
increase in employment from 1967 to 1970 was 7.3
percent. While there was an increase in all industry
divisions, its magnitude ranged from 0.2 percent in.
manufacturing to fractionally more than 14 percent
each in communications; services; and finance, insurance,
and real estate. (See table 8.)
Although the number of workers whose major
earnings were in manufacturing increased slightly from




Low

Railroad
transportation

Motion
pictures

Building
materials
and farm
equipment

Industry

High

.6482

ship orga­
nization
Women ........................

Workers having earnings in four quarters

.3151

Nonprofit
member­
ship orga­
nization

.4357

.2034

Motion
pictures

.4393

.2054

Motion
pictures

.4496

.1669

Building
materials
and farm
equipment

.4162

Bituminous
coal and
lignite
mining
Railroad
transpor­
tation
Railroad
transpor­
tation
Security
commodity
brokers
and ser­
vice

.1442

.1250

.1246

.1115

1967 to 1970, the share of manufacturing in total
employment decreased from 32.4 percent to 30.3
percent. Another major change occurred in services,
whose share of total employment increased from 22.9
percent to 24.4 percent. (See table 8.)
The apparent dormancy of manufacturing employ­
ment masks large losses in employment in some industries,
especially ordnance and accessories, electrical equip­
ment, and smaller gains in other industries. (See table 9.)
In services, the second largest division, the greatest
increases were reported for business services (25.6

Table 8. Workers having major proportion of earnings in each industry division
and percent change, 1967 and 19701
1967
Employees
(in
thousands)

Industry division

Private nonfarm sector ......................................
M in in g ................... .................................................
Contract construction........................................
M anufacturing.......................................................
Transportation.......................................................
Comm unication....................................................
Public u tilitie s .......................................................
Wholesale t r a d e ....................................................
Retail t r a d e ........................................ ..................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .................
Services...................................................................

73,906
713
4,505
23,995
3,247
1,138
789
4,594
14,090
3,936
16,901

1970
Percent of
total
100.0
1.0
6.1
32.5
4.4
1.5
1.1
6.2
19.1
5.3
22.9

Employees
(in
thousands)
79,326
745
4,805
24,054
3,349
1,307
846
4,921
15,458
4,495
19,347

Percent of
total

Percent
increase
1967-1970

100.0
.9
6.1
30.3
4.2
1.7
1.1
6.2
19.5
5.7
24.4

7.3
4.2
6.7
.2
3.1
14.9
7.2
7.1
9.7
14.2
14.5

Although the numbers of workers differ from those in Employment and Earnings— United States, 1909-72, BLS Bulletin
1312-9, the percent changes generally agree with those for the sector and the industry divisions from the Employment and
Earnings data.

Table 9. Changes in the number of workers employed
in their industry of major earnings in selected
manufacturing industries, 1967-70

Industry

Change
Industry

Ordnance and accessories. . . .
Electrical e q u ip m e n t..............
Machinery, except
electrical....................................
Fabricated metals.....................
Paper and allied products . . . .
Leather and leather
products .................................

Number of
workers

- 3 3 .0
- 4.3

69,000
68,000
63,000

3.0
4.2
7.9

51,000

-1 1 .1

percent), medical and other health services (21.2 percent),
and educational services (20.2 percent). Decreases were
reported for private households (19.3 percent), and
personal services (5.9 percent).
Employment by sex. The 32,196,000 women employed
in 1970 constituted 40.6 percent of all workers in the
private nonagricultural economy. (See table 10.) In
terms of industry of major earnings the greatest number
of women were employed in services (11,789,000),
manufacturing (7,578,000), and retail trade (7,552,000).
Industries in which women constituted the highest
percentage of major earners were services (60.9); finance,
insurance, and real estate; (52.9); communications (also
52.9); and retail trade (48.9). (See table 10.) Those
having the lowest percentages of women were contract
construction (6.2), and mining (7.5).




Number of
employees
(thousands)

Percent
distribution

Percent

-1 5 7 ,0 0 0
-1 0 2 ,0 0 0

-

Table 10. Employment of women workers by
industry division of major earnings, 1970

Private nonfarm sector............
M in in g ........................................
Contract construction............
M anufacturing..........................
Transportation..........................
Comm unication........................
Public u tilitie s ..........................
Wholesale t r a d e ........................
Retail tr a d e ...............................
Finance, insurance, and
real estate.................................
Services......................................

32,196
56
299
7,578
440
692
133
1,279
7,552

100.0
.2
.9
23.5
1.4
2.1
.4
4.0
23.5

2,378
11,78>9

7.4
36.6

Percent
increase
1967-70

Private nonfarm sector............
Mining ......................................
Contract construction............
M anufacturing..........................
Transportation ........................
Comm unication........................
Public u tilitie s ..........................
Wholesale t r a d e ........................
Retail t r a d e ...............................
Finance, insurance, and . . . .
real estate.................................
Services......................................

10.2
9.8
16.3
1.7

Percent of
total
employment

40.6
7.5
6.2
31.5
13.1
52.9
15.7

16.1
13.3
9.9
10.0
10.1

26.0
48.9

16.1
14.7

52.9
60.9

More men had their major earnings from manufac­
turing (16,476,000) than the two next largest employers
of men combined, retail trade (7,906,000) and services
(7,559,000).
Employment by race. The number of black workers in
private nonagricultural industries in 1970 was 8,708,000,
an increase of 8.8 percent over 1967. Of the total, 3
million (34.6 percent) had their major earnings in
services, and 2.5 million (29.5 percent) in manufacturing.
The largest percentages of white workers were in
manufacturing(30.4 percent)and services (23.1 percent).
Employment increased relatively more for black workers
th^n for white workers in every industry division
except contract construction and mining. Employment
of black workers doubled from 1967 to 1970 in
communications; increased one-third in finance, insur­
ance, and real estate, and in public utilities; and onefifth in mining. (See table 11.)

When race and sex are considered together, some­
what different relationships emerge. (See table 12.)
Table 12. Percent distributions of workers by sex
and race among the major industry divisions, 1970
Men
Industry
White

Private nonfarm sector............
M in in g ........................................
Contract construction............
M anufacturing..........................
Transportation..........................
Comm unication........................
Public u tilitie s ..........................
Wholesale trade
..............
Retail t r a d e ...............................
Finance, insurance, and
real e s ta te ...............................
Services......................................

Black

100.0
1.6
9.5
34.8
6.1
1.4
1.6
7.9
17.1

100.0
.5
9.8
36.0
6.9
.7
1.1
6.7
14.0

4.6
15.5

3.7
20.6

Table 11. Employment of black workers by industry

Women

division of major earnings, 1970
White
Industry

Private nonfarm sector ..........
M in in g ........................................
Contract construction............
Manufacturing ........................
Transportation ........................
Comm unication........................
Public u tilitie s ..........................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail tr a d e ...............................
Finance, insurance, and
real estate ...............................
Services......................................

Number of
employees
(thousands)

8,708
30
499
2,567
368
125
61
417
1,267

100.0
.3
5.7
29.5
4.2
1.4
.7
4.8
14.5

364
3,010

4.2
34.6

Percent
increase
1967-70

Private nonfarm sector ..........
M in in g ........................................
Contract construction............
M anufacturing..........................
Transportation ........................
Communication........................
Public u tilitie s ..........................
Wholesale t r a d e ........................
Retail t r a d e ...............................
Finance, insurance, and
real estate ...............................
Services......................................




Percent
distribution

Percent of
total
employment

8.8
20.0
1.0
9.0
5.1
101.6
32.6
9.4
3.7

11.0
4.0
10.4
10.7
11.0
9.6
7.3
8.5
8.2

36.8
7.3

8.1
15.6

Private nonfarm sector........... .
M in in g ........................................
Contract construction............
M anufacturing..........................
Transportation ........................
Comm unication........................
Public u tilitie s ..........................
Wholesale tr a d e .....................
Retail t r a d e ...............................
Finance, insurance, and
real estate .............................'.
Services......................................

Black

100.0
.2
1.0
23.9
1.4
2.1
.4
4.2
24.6

100.0

7.7
34.5

4.9
52.7

-

.4
21.0
.8
2.4
.3
2.3
15.2

For example, the heavy conpentration of women in
services was much more striking among black women,
53 percent of whom were in services, than among
white women, only 35 percent of whom were employed
in that industry. About 25 percent of the white women
were in retail trade but among black women, black men,
and white men, the proportions ranged from 14 to 17
percent.
Changes in employment also showed different re­
lationships. (See table 13.) For example, in finance,
insurance, and real estate, where black employment
increased 37 percent between 1967-70, black women
accounted for 72 percent of the change. Similarly, the
number of women in manufacturing rose only 1.7
percent, but among black women the increase was
16.5 percent, compared with 0.3 percent for white
women.

Table 13. Percent changes in employment of workers by race and sex, and industry divisions
of major earnings, 1967-70
White

Black

1ndustry
Men

Private nonfarm sector .............................................
Mining ..........................................................................
Contract construction................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Transportation ............................................................
Communication............................................................
Public u tilitie s ..............................................................
Wholesale tr a d e ............................................................
Retail t r a d e ...................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ........................
Services..........................................................................

Women

5.4
3.6
6.7
-1 .1
1.3
14.1
5.4
6.0
10.4
11.6
14.9

9.9
8.0
16.9
.3
1 4 .2
6.2
5.1
9.7
10.1
13.4
16.6

Employment by region. The North Central region
led in four-quarter employment, as it did in 1967,
although its percent of total employment decreased
slightly. (See table 14.) The Northeast, which was
second in four-quarter employment in 1967, was in
third place in 1970, while the South changed from
third to second place. This shift was due mostly
to increases in manufacturing (9 percent), and in
transportation (8 percent) in the South and losses
in manufacturing (5 percent) and in services (3.5
percent) in the Northeast.




Men

Women

12.7
100.0
6.7
16.5
47.6
100.0
150.0
14.3
9.9
62.8
6.4

6.0
17.4
.6
5.9
2.7
100.0
23.8
8.2
-1 .0
18.3
9.3

Table 14. Percent distribution o f employment of
four-quarter workers by major region, 1967-70
Region

1967

1970

United S ta te s ...................

100.0

100.0

Northeast ...............................
South ......................................
North Central ........................
West .........................................
O th e rs ......................................

27.8
26.8
30.0
14.7
.7

27.1
27.9
29.4
14.8
.8

T e c h n ic a l N o te
Sources of data

Data for this study were developed by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics from the individual employer and
employee records maintained by the Social Security
Administration and the Railroad Retirement Board.
Under the Social Security Act, each employer is required
to report the industry, place of employment, and
amount of wages or salary paid during a calendar
quarter to the maximum annual limit of $7,800 in 1970.
Each applicant furnishes demographic information (date
of birth, sex and race) for a social security number.
Under the Railroad Retirement system, each employer
reports the occupation and monthly earnings of each
worker to a maximum limit of $650 a month in 1970.

even earnings reported at the maximum level for each
month may be substantially lower than total earnings.
The Railroad Retirement Board, however, collects in­
formation from employer records about the total
annual earnings of a sample of workers covered by
the Act. To raise creditable compensation to total
railroad earnings, total earnings data for individuals
collected in the special study are compared with the
aggregated monthly earnings data for the same individuals.
The incremental factors for workers in the same broad
occupational categories are then averaged. The resulting
factors, developed by the Railroad Retirement Board,
are applied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics to the
credited monthly earnings of each individual in this
study according to his occupational category.

Estimation of earnings

As actual earnings of employees may be substantially
greater than the “taxable limit” earnings reportable
under the Social Security Act ($7,800 annually in
1970) and the Railroad Retirement Act ($650 a month
in 1970), the Social Security Administration (SSA)
and the Railroad Retirement Board have devised pro­
cedures for estimating the total earnings of covered
employees. These estimated total quarterly and annual
earnings are used in this report.
The SSA in its procedure determines the quarter in
which the taxable limit is reached (“limit quarter”).
If wages in the prior quarter are equal to or greater than
the “limit quarter” wages, they are substituted for
those in the “limit quarter” and in all subsequent
quarters. lim it quarter earnings, however, are used to
estimate earnings in the limit and subsequent quarters,
if limit quarter earnings were higher than earnings
in previous quarters. After these substitutions, the sum
of the quarterly wages becomes the estimated annual
total unless the taxable limit is reached in the first
quarter. Then $51,000 for men and $45,000 for
women was used by the Social Security Administration
as the estimated total for 1970.
Employers covered by the Railroad Retirement Act
are required to provide information about the monthly
earnings of each employee up to the maximum creditable
limit subject to Railroad Retirement Act taxes. Hence,




Definition of terms and method
of classification

Terms used in this report and the methods used to
classify employees by industry and region of major
earnings are described briefly below.
Annual earnings. For this study, annual earnings are
defined as gross wages, salaries, and other payments
(such as bonuses) received by employees, before de­
ductions of any type, in employment covered under
the Social Security Act or the Railroad Retirement
Act. Such payments may be received in cash, cash
equivalents, or goods or services.
Earnings and employment data, for work covered
under the Acts, in agriculture, governmental functions,
military service, and self-employment, as well as for
work not covered, have been excluded from this study.
Also excluded from earnings are most payments made
by employers to or on behalf of employees, or for
employees and their dependents for retirement, death,
sickness, accidental disability, or medical and hospi­
talization expense under the provisions of a plan or
system meeting certain general criteria, and employer
payments to a trust fund, such as a pension trust,
exempt from tax under the Internal Revenue Code.
Workers with some earnings in the industry. All workers
who had at least $1 in earnings in an industry during

the year are counted in each industry in which they
had any earnings. For example, a worker who had
some earnings in each of five 3-digit industries, as
defined in the Standard Industrial Gassification Manual,
is counted in each of these industries as well as in
each 2-digit industry and in each division of which the
3-digit industries are a part. Because a worker is counted
in each 3-digit industry, each 2-digit industry, and in
each division in which he had $1 in covered wage and
salary earnings or more, the aggregate count of workers
at each level (3-digit, 2-digit, or division) is greater
than the total number at each broader industry level
(2-digit, division, private nonagricultural economy).
Industry of major earnings

The industry of major earnings, in this study, is
the industry in which a worker earned more of his
annual wages and salary than in any other industry.
As many workers have earnings in several industry
divisions or at several levels of one industry group,
determination of a worker’s industry of major earnings
involves a plurality eatnings test which is applied
separately to earnings at each industry level.
The employment and quarterly earnings pattern of a
hypothetical worker who shifts employment several
times a year is illustrated in table 15.
In table 15 the worker had greater earnings at the
3-digit level in industry 412 than in any other 3-digit
industry; at the 2-digit level he had greater earnings
in industry 53 than in either 41, 61, or 63, and at the
division level he earned more in division G than in
either E or F. Therefore, applying the plurality earnings,
concept, this worker’s industry of major earnings was

industry group 412 at the 3-digit level, major industry
group 53 at the 2-digit level, and G at the industry
division level.
Quarters o f work. For social security coverage, a
quarter of work is defined as a calendar quarter in
which a worker earned any pay in covered employment;
household workers must earn at least $50. Workers who
reach their maximum taxable earnings limits in a single
employment before the fourth quarter of the year are
considered to have worked in each quarter, although
earnings above the maximum are not reported.
Employer. An employer is defined here as an individual,
partnership, or corporation recognized as a separate
legal entity meeting certain criteria. However, since a
firm may incorporate separately each of its locations
and each corporation may be considered to be a
separate employer, a worker transferred by his firm
from one location to another that is separately in­
corporated may be classified as having more than one
employer in the same yeaf even though he continued
to work for the same firm.
Industrial classification. The employment and earnings
data presented in this report, which are based on the
Social Security Administration’s data file, are classi­
fied according to the Administration’s industrial classi­
fication system, which differs slightly from that developed
by the U.S. Bureau of the Budget and published in the
Standard Industrial Gassification Manual, 1967 (SIC),
and employed in most other statistical series. The
major difference is in the assignment of industry
codes to nonpolicymaking governmental units. All sepa-

Table 15. Hypothetical worker's employment and earnings by industry and quarters worked.
Quarters
Industry
No.
Private nonagricultural economy

..........................

Total
-

1st

2d

3d

4th

$2,650

$400

$650

$750

$850

_

300
300
300

450
450
450

—

Division .......................................................................
2-digit group .........................................................
3-digit group .........................................................

E
41
412

750
750
750

—

D ivision.........................................................................
2-digit group .........................................................
3-digit group .........................................................
3-digit group .........................................................

F
53
531
533

900
900
650
250

300
300
50
250

250
250
250

Division.........................................................................
2-digit group...........................................................
3-digit group...........................................................
2-digit group...........................................................
3-digit group...........................................................

G
61
612
63
633

1,000
500
500
500
500

100
100
100
-

100
100
100
-

300
300
300
-

—

—

—




-

—

—
—

_

350
350
350
—
500
500
500

rable nonpolicymaking units are assigned nongovern­
mental SSA industry classifications appropriate to their
activity. Employment and earnings dat^ presented in this
report which are based on the Railroad Retirement
Board’s data file are classified into the following
industries as defined in the SIC Manual; railroads,
SIC 401; sleeping car companies, SIC 402; express
companies, SIC 404; rental of rail cars companies,
SIC 474; and other companies performing services in
railroad transportation and certain railway labor organi­
zations, SIC 861 and 863. A worker is assigned on the
basis of the industrial classification of his last employer
under the Railroad Retirement Act.
Single and multi-industry workers. At each level of
industry classification (i.e., 3-digit, 2-digit, and division)
the employment experience of each sample member
was examined to see if all of his earnings during the
year were in one industry or in more than one industry.
Those with earnings in more than one industry were
classified as multi-industry workers. This conceptual
approach may be seen for a worker who was employed
by an employer in each of two 3-digit industries within
the same 2-digit industry. At the 3-digit level, the worker
is classified as a multi-industry worker. However, at
the 2-digit and at the divisional level he is classified as a
single industry worker. This classification is assigned
because both 3-digit industries in which he was em­
ployed are part of the same 2-digit industry and
therefore, he worked in only one industry division.
Regions. In this study, the United States and other
areas are divided into five regions. Four regions covering
the 50 States and the District of Columbia are:
Northeast— Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New
Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, and Vermont; South— Alabama, Arkansas, Dela­
ware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Okla­
homa, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and
West Virginia; North Central— Illinois, Indiana, Iowa,
Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North
Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin; and West—
Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho,
Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Wash­
ington, and Wyoming. The fifth region includes all
employment covered under the provisions of the Acts
in U.S. territories, on foreign soil, or aboard ocean-going
vessels.
Because the data file for this study does not indicate
the location of the work covered by the Railroad
Retirement Act, a convention was adopted ascribing
all employment covered under the Railroad Retirement




Act to the North Central region where many railroads
and related organizations have headquarters.
Race. All workers in this study have been divided into
two groups by race: “white” and “black.” The white
category includes all workers, except Negroes. Other
non-white minorities, for whom the sample was not
large enough to permit separate presentation of data,
have been assigned to the white category; this minimizes
their effect in the distribution of data by race.
Median annual earnings in this study were computed
from data grouped into $250 intervals. Minor differences
in medians for the same grouping of workers as shown
on different tables result from rounding and from
minor differences among the methods of entering
the data at various stages of processing into the
computer file.
Average (mean) annual earnings were computed by
summing the earnings of each worker in the entire
distribution and dividing the sum by the number
of workers in the distribution.
Sample design

The sample used for this series of studies was selected
on the basis of a multistage systematic cluster sampling
procedure. It includes 1 percent of all social security
numbers. Any individual, once selected, remains per­
manently in the sample and is identified by his social
security number.1 To preserve confidentiality and fa­
cilitate statistical processing, the Social Security Ad­
ministration combines data from various employments
and assigns each individual and employer a permanent
control number, different from his social security and
employee identification numbers.
Sampling variability2

Estimates based on samples can be expected to
differ because of sampling variability from figures
that would have been obtained had all rather than
* For a detailed discussion of the sampling procedure,
reporting criteria, and coverage under the social security and
railroad retirement systems, see U.S. Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare, Social Security Administration, Workers
Under Social Security, 1960 (1968) and Social Security Handbook; also see Handbook on Railroad Retirement and Un­
employment Insurance Systems.
2 The discussions on Sampling and Nonsampling Variability
have been taken from Earnings Distribution in the United
States 1967, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Social Security Administration, Office of Research
and Statistics, pp. 317-18; Government Printing Office, Wash­
ington: 1971.

specified samples of the records been used for the
compilations. The standard error is a measure of
sampling variability. The chances are about 68 out of
100 that the difference due to sampling variability
between a sample estimate and the figure that would
have been obtained from a compilation of all records
is less than the standard error. The chances are 95 out
of 100 that the difference is less than twice the standard
error and about 99 out of 100 that it is less than
2H times the standard error. The standard error of an
estimate depends on the sample design elements such
as the method of sampling, the sample size, and on the
estimation process.
No exact calculation of standard errors of estimates
based on the stratified cluster continuous work history
samples has been carried out. However, approximate
standard errors of estimates utilizing the assumption
of simple random sampling are likely to be reasonably
close to those for the actual sample design used for
many attribute statistics. While the actual method 6f
selection (stratified cluster sampling) differs from simple
random sampling, there is evidence that, for most
statistics, the several factors affecting the sampling
variability give a joint factor close to unity relative
to the sampling variability of simple random sampling.
Sampling variability o f estimated number o f persons. For the convenience of the reader, table 16 provides
Table 16. Rough approximation of sampling
variability of estimated number of persons
(Range of 95 chances out of 100)

500
800
1,000
3,000
5,000
8,000
10,000
30,000
50,000
80,000
100,000
300,000
500,000
800,000
1,000,000
3,000,000
5,000,000
8,000,000
10,000,000
30,000,000
50,000,000
80,000,000
100,000,000




500
600
700
1,100
1,400
1,800
2,000
3,300
4,500
5,600
6,300
10,800
14,000
17,600
20,000
33,000
44,000
55,500
63,000
108,000
110,000
112,000
115,000

approximate estimates of sampling variability (95 percent
confidence level) for estimates of the number of persons
with given characteristics. The estimates and approxi­
mate sampling variability shown are for data which
have been inflated by 100. Linear interpolation may
be used for estimated numbers not shown in the table.
Sampling variability o f estimated percentage o f persons. The reliability of an estimated percentage depends on
both the size of the percentage and on the size of the
total upon which the percentage is based. Table 17
shows the approximate sampling variability (95 percent
confidence level) for percentages (of persons with a
given characteristic). The body of the table is expressed
in percentage points. The bases shown are expressed in
terms of data inflated by 100. Linear interpolation
may be used for percentages and base figures' not
shown in table 17.
Table 17. Rough approximation to sampling
variability of estimated percentages
Range of 95 chances out of 100
Base of
percentage
(inflated
sample)

Estimated percentage
2
or
98

500 ............................................. 12.5
1 ,0 0 0 ...........................................
8.9
5 ,0 0 0 ...........................................
4.0
2.8
1 0 ,0 0 0 ........................................
.9
1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ......................................
1,000,000 .................................
.3
.1
10,000,000 . ; ...........................
100,000,000 .............................
t1)

5
or
95

10
or
90

25
or
75

50

19.5
13.8
6.2
4.4
1.4
.5
.2
.1

26.8
19.0
8.5
5.9
1.9
.6
.2
.1

38.7
27.4
12.2
8.8
2.7
.9
.3
.1

44.7
31.6
14.1
10.0
3.1
1.0
.3
.1

Less than 0.05.

Sampling variability o f estimated mean earnings.-A
rough approximation to the standard error of an
estimated mean can be calculated from the distribution
from which it was obtained. The formula can be found
in elementary statistics texts (for example, Applied
General Statistics, by Groxton and Cowden, Prentice
Hall, 2nd Ed. 1955, p. 218).
Nonsampling variability

Because of the nature of the OASDHI program and
the manner in which it is administered, certain aspects
of the program led to variability that would be present
in a complete compilation of records as well as in a
sample. For example, the data relate to covered employ-

ment rather than people (minimized by use of precise
definition), changes in earnings records may not be
reflected promptly because of time-lag in posting and
processing cutoff date, and errors in* classification
and compilation. These problems are byproducts of the
administrative processes .and the errors introduced are
probably negligible.
In this context, the factors contributing to the
nonsampling variability are: (1) the scope of covered
employment; (2) duplication in the estimation of
workers because of persons receiving wage credits
from different employers on more than one account
number; (3) the extent to which covered earnings are
reported, taxed, and credited; and (4) the distribution
of workers and aggregate wages above the maximum
earnings base.

Relation to other studies. Data presented in this bulletin
have been developed, as previously described, from
information reported by employers about the earnings




of individuals up to an earnings limit and estimates
of earnings higher than this limit. Although annual
earnings and employment data are available in the
Current Population Reports of the Bureau of the
Census, they are based on a different concept of
industry attachment (i.e., industry of longest job,
rather than industry of major earnings, as used in the
AEE system), and provide only for the industry division
data, while AEE data cover industry divisions, major
2-digit SIC groups, and the most importand 3-digit
groups. Moreover, other differences in methods or
approach may result in important differences in sampling
and nonsampling variances between this and other
studies. For example, CPS data are based on household
interviews, whereas the AEE data are based on employer
tax returns. Furthermore, CPS data for recent years are
not comparable with data for years prior to 1967
because of changes in methodology in the CPS. There­
fore, caution must be exercised in using the data
presented in this bulletin in conjunction with other
annual earnings and employment patterns data.




D etailed Tables

Earnings and employment patterns in 2-digit industry divisions




INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKEO IN THE INDUSTRY

INOUSTRY
A N Y
ALL
WORKERS
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .....

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WHITE11 NEGRO

FOtJR QUARTERS
ALL
R A C E
WORKERS WHITE * | NEGRO

$ A.250 * 4,374 % 2,959 S 6,452 « 6,685 % 4,697

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WH IT E11 NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS W H I T E 1! NEGRO

S 4,250 * 4,374 * 2,959 % 6,452 $ 6,685 S 4,697

........................................

7,363

7,472

5,187

8,785

8,869

6,958

7,624

7,731

5,285

8,853

8,927 ’ 7,027

METAL m i n i n g ................ ..............
a n t h r a c i t e m i n i n g .........................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LIGNITE MINING ......
OIL ANC GAS EXTRACTION ....................
NCNKETALLIC MINERALS. EXCEPT F U E L S ......

7,771
6,124
8,359
6,769
6,372

7,784
6,124
8,369
6,914
6,549

5,624
8,124
2,958
4,937

8,641
6,708
9,161
8,922
8,133

8,650
6,708
9, 188
9,008
8*335

6,249
8,624
5,937
6,196

7,857
6,562
8,431
7,117
6,778

7,870
6,562
8,442
7,217
7,018

5,624
8, 149
3,812
5,089

8,719
6,796
9,222
8,963
8,208

8,730
6,796
9,252
9,044
8,431

pining

6,499
8,624
6,312
6,229

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .......................

5,335

5,716

3,103

8,835

9,206

5,662

5,709

6,103

3,429

9,043

9,399

5,782

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS .............
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ..........
SPECIAL TRACE CONTRACTORS ................

4,372
4,992
5,479

4,670
5,385
5,883

2,766
3,032
2,808

8,438
8,602
9,190

8,792
9,069
9,484

5,892
5,670
5,477

5,153
5,658
6,101

5,471
6,053
6,502

3,444
3,557
3,281

8,968
8,884
9,474

9,302
9,329
9,821

6,249
5,852
5,792

5,586

5,842

3,986

7,345

7,563

5,654

5,752

5,988

4, 138

7,429

7,632

5,762

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .................
FCOC AND KINCRED PRODUCTS ................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ....................
t e x t i l e m i l l PRODUCTS ....... .............
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ......
LUMBER ANC WOOD PRODUCTS .................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES ...................
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ................
PRINTING ANC PUBLISHING ..................
CHEMICALS ANC ALLIED PRODUCTS ...........
PETRCLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ..............
RUBBER ANC PLASTIC PRODUCTS* NEC ........
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PROOUCTS ............
STONE. CLAY. AND GLASS PRODUCTS .........
PRIMARY METAL I N D U S T R I E S ......... .......
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ................
MACHINERY. EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ............
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .......
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .................
INSTRUMENTS ANC RELATEC PRODUCTS ........
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ..

7,377
4,310
3,728
4,092
3,036
3,622
4,217
6,522
5,421
7,610
9, 103
4,975
3,357
5,869
7,600
5,977
7,171
5,715
7,435
5,998
3,553

7,669
4,614
4,624
4,177
3,068
4, 120
4,393
6,787
5,599
7,847
9,364
5,146
3,399
6, 147
7,839
6,170
7,306
5,898
7,655
6,221
3,699

5,074
3,045
1,324
3,511
2,780
2,377
3,346
4,745
3,731
5,435
6,187
3,609
2,624
4,199
6,376
4,494
5,040
4,100
5,827
3,795
2,828

8,753
7,406
6,360
4,953
3,917
5,876
5,535
7,900
7,898
8,760
10,015
7,040
4,497
7,665
8,546
7,714
8,278
7,302
8,457
7,592
5,485

8,963
7,692
6,512
5,034
3,954
6,480
5,709
8,047
7,996
8,971
10,185
7, 170
4,523
7,850
8,770
7,829
8,386
7,475
8,708
7,743
5,644

5,921
5,648
5,464
4,535
3,693
3,691
4,466
6,293
5,816
6,985
7,787
5,781
4,283
5,829
7,385
6,313
6,732
5,604
7,075
5,538
4,316

7,604
4,600
3,871
4,212
3,108
3,856
4,413
6,739
5,617
7,777
9,226
5,184
3,474
6,135
7,765
6,241
7,402
5,913
7,676
6,240
3,798

7,871
4,905
4,833
4,290
3,138
4,411
4,602
7,003
5,798
7,948
9*470
5 *-350
3,512
6,415
7,970
6,441
7,538
6,100
7,839
6,463
3,910

5,267
3,416
1,556
3,742
2,897
2,635
3,624
5,064
4,026
5,661
6,499
3,839
2,887
4, 551
6,556
4,755
5,407
4,285
6,030
4,083
3,004

8,864
7,510
6,408
4,985
3,939
5,962
5,614
7,962
7,957
8,849
10,081
7, 159
4.541
7,746
8,675
7,820
8,402
7,447
8,615
7,707
5,569

9, 101
7,776
6,564
5,064
3,975
6,550
5,778
8,133
8,105
9,051
10,235
7,284
4,565
7,901
8,887
7,920
8,508
7,621
8,845
7,811
5,721

6,107
5,749
5,649
4,618
3.723
3,721
4,576
6,458
5,892
7,199
7,812
6,044
4,299
5,962
7,550
6,442
6,971
5,762
7,267
5,568
4,464

TRANSPORTATION ...............................

7,392

7,674

5,415

8,867

9,081

7,385

7,623

7,842

5,744

9,008

9,215

7,539

RAILRCAC TRANSPORTATION ..................
LOCAL ANO INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ..
TRUCKING ANC WAREHOUSING .................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ......................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR ....................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTATION .................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ..................

8,645
4,743
6, 303
6, 387
8,621
9, 124
5,249

8,764
4,456
6,725
6,772
8,820
9, 166
5,467

6,749
6,124
3,880
4,765
7,474
249
3,446

9,512
7,447
8,718
9,031
9,967
10,107
7,453

9,612
7,212
8,933
9,495
10,129
10,107
7,578

7,331
8,327
6,687
7,174
7,943

8,932
4,700
7,142
7,332
8,948
9,349
5,855

6,908
6,538
4,286
5,395
7,569
249
4,312

9,581
7,565
8,851
9,465
10,068
10,124
7,574

9,680
7,321
9,056
9,859
10,219
10,124
7,671

7,444
8,431
6,846
7,687
8,028

6,249

8,718
5,070
6,780
6,962
8,769
9,299
5,612

COMMUNICATION ................................

5,947

6, 168

3,958

7,323

7,648

5,374

6,035

6,250

4, 124

7,405

7,721

5,411

PUBLIC UTILITIES .............................

8,409

8,629

5,374

9,275

9,440

6,823

8,526

8,745

5,703

9,379

9,535

6,984

WHOLESALE TRACE ..............................

5,544

5,828

3,323

7,838

7,952

5,606

5,871

6,154

3,729

7,906

8,064

5,736

MANUFACTURING ...............................




_

6,583

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE ANO SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INOUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY .

INOUSTRY
A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C E '
W H I T E 1! NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
AL L
R A C E
WORKERS
W H ITE 1 | NEGRO

A N Y
AL L
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
W H ITE 1 f NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
------- R A C E -------x
ALL
WORKERS
WHITE * NEGRO j
J

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY-- C ontinued
RETAIL TRADE ............................... .

S 1,702 * 1,760 % 1,557 $ 4,138 % 4,167 * 3,884

S 1,861

t 1,891

4,803
4,105
4,528
5,136
3,662
4,152
3,196
4,229

3,869
2,053
2,222
3,334
1,779
3,691
1,026
2,066

3,930
2,078
2,240
3,382
1,774
3,836
1,017
2,068

3,537
1,876
2,035
2,903
1,648
3,351
908
1,857

3,589
1,903
2,061
2,951
1,649
3,470
906
1,860

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ......

4,693

4,831

B A N K I N G ...... .............................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS .......
SECURITY, COMMODITY BROKERS ANO SERVICES
INSURANCE CARRIERS .......................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERVICE ..
REAL ESTATE ...............................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC ...
HOLDING ANC OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .

4,820
4,627
6,787
5,311
4,600
2,599
3,666
3,440

4,875
4,680
6,909
5,462
4,660
2,686
3,772
3,830

2,688

2,894

1,321
2,239
2, 164
2,870
4,249
1,329
1,099
3,337
4,489
3,991
2,046
1,371
915
5,713

1,297
2,235
2,455
2,938
4,468
1*281
1,074
3,372
4,564
4,205
2,071
1,583
870
5,880

BUILCING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ..
RETAIL g e n e r a l m e r c h a n d i s e ..............
FCOC STORES .............................. .
AUTOMOTIVE CEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS
APPAREL ANC ACCESSORY S T O R E S .......... .
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ..
EATING AND DRINKING PLACES ............. .
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES .......
FINANCE,

SERVICES .....................................
HOTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES .......
PERSGNAL SERVICES .......................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES .......
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES ....
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES .........
MOTION PICTURES ............. ............
AMUSEMENT ANC RECREATION SERVICES, NEC
MEDICAL ANC OTHER HEALTH SERVICES .....
LEGAL SERVICES ..........................
ECUCATICNAL SERVICES ....................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS
NONPROFIT. MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ....
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ......................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .................
In clu d es w o r k e r s o f a l l ra c e s other than N e g r o .




6,145
3,973
4,907
6,430
3,698
6,017
2,723
4,342

6,248
3,959
4,936
6,556
3,701
6,193
2,661
4,356

3,227

6,231

6,379

5,006

4,857

4,146
3,295
5,187
3,814
2,062
2, 153
1,249
1,687

5,767
6,071
8,360
7,015
6, 168
5,617
5,587
7,916

5,834
6,136
8,573
7, 191
6,223
5,914
5,599
8,111

5,163
4,924
6,374
5,193
4,062
4,300
4,374
4,499

4,921
4,802
7,020
5,503
4,817
2,979
3,923
4,043

1,821

5, 157

5,555

3,637

2,835

1,437
2,268
1,077
2,531
2,083
1,874
1,490
3,202
1,718
2,953
1,937
710
953
2,732

3,569
3,869
6,272
6,556
7,352
5,740
4,716
4,676
6,096
6,878
5,874
4,653
1,317
9,018

3,656
3,981
6,694
6,780
7,470
5,999
4,871
4,762
6,139
7,069
6,312
4, 760
1,446
9,205

3,353
3,534
4,073
5,249
5,749
4,687
3,857
4,299
4,749
5,210
5,124
4,177
1,256
5,781

1,490
2,388
2,521
3,371
4,759
1,491
1,240
3,421
4,744
4,161
2,343
1,508
953
6,107

2,796
1,565
1,724
2,404
1,610
2,349
984
1,817

% 1,721 4 4,202 » 4,229

t 3,948

3,224
1,790
2,015
2,866
1,840
2,699
1, 138
2,048

6,212
4,012
4,977
6,527
3,752
6,110
2,808
4*429

6,312 ~ 4,839
4,182
3,992
4,624
5,009
6,641
5,193
3,756
3,702
6,304
4,258
2,741
3,272
4,359
4,437

4,975

3,582

6,320

6,448

5,106

4,965
4,853
7,139
5,660
4,868
3,084
3,999
4,303

4,420
3,714
5,374
4,068
2,687
2,554
1,499
2,062

5,836
6,170
8,534
7, .118
6,265
5,755
5,624
8,031

5,899
6,214
8,702
7,284
6,317
6,051
5,636
8,249

5,264
5,145
6,562
5,343
4,166
4,397
4,374
4,749

3,061

1,932

5,213

5,613

3,677

1,457
2,375
2,855
3,436
4,918
1,453
1,211
3,457
4,810
4,373
2,312
1,704
903
6,303

1,628
2,440
1,264
2,924
2,749
2,062
1,687
3,303
2,074
3, 104
2,541
794
990
3,249

3,657
3,907
6,437
6,675
7,435
6,040
4,903
4,715
6, 158
6,971
6, 124
4,733
1,356
9, 164

3,752
4,010
6,856
6,923
7,556
6,136
5,046
4,797
6,200
7,159
6,458
4,843
1,485
9,315

3,403
3,589
4,296
5,472
6,049
5,291
3,977
4,371
4,749
5,342
5,249
4,247
1,295
6,062

N O T E : A dash ( - ) in dicates e ith e r the s am p le did not include any w o r k e r s with
th ese c h a ra c t e ris tic s , o r that the data did not meet* the B u r e a u 's publications c r it e r ia .

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKEO IN THE INDUSTRY

INOUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .................

ANY
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WH I T E 1 NEGRO

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

FOUR QUARTERS
ALL
R A C E
WORKERS WHITE1 NEGRO

$ 5,473 $ 5,704 $ 3,601 % 7,501 t 7,760 $ 5,177

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WHITE 1 NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WH I T E 1 NEGRO

$ 5,473 t 5,704 % 3,601 $ 7,501 t 7,760 t 5,177

MINING ............................................ ........

7,508

7,604

5,159

9,769

9,884

6,839

7,771

7,869

5, 392

9,893

10,009

6,965

METAL MINING ...........................................
ANTHRACITE m i n i n g .....................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LIGNITE MINING ..................
CIL ANC GAS EXTRACTION ................................
NCNMET ALL FC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS ..................

7,359
6, A 13
8, 164
7,431
7,031

7,387
6,413
8,182
7,535
7,222

5,237
7,630
4,056
4,936

9,266
7,500
9,919
LO,145
9,384

9,292
7*500
9,960
10,255
9,660

7,140
8,749
6,043
6,382

7,568
6,718
8,399
7,713
7,408

7,595
6,718
8,419
7,817
7,611

5,473
_
7,754
4, 340
5, 189

9,335
7,637
10,027
10,291
9,573

9,358
7,637
10,071
10,399
9,853

7,448
_
8,767
6,202
6,515

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ...................................

6,457

6,760

3,843

9,647

9,990

6,154

6,731

7,042

4,052

9,826

10,174

6,287

GENERAL 8UILCING CONTRACTORS ........... .............
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ......................
SPECIAL TRACE CONTRACTORS ............... .............

5,750
6,090
6,618

6,009
6,441
6,901

3,711
3,647
3,652

9,428
9,605
9,872

9,768
10,027
10,156

6,361
6,179
6,034

6,301
6,609
7,045

6,579
6,980
7,335

4, 116
4,026
4,009

9, 818
9,899
10,147

10,169
10,332
10,433

6,654
6,397
6,297

MANUFACTURING ............................................

-

6,401

6,653

4,291

8,275

8,514

5,969

6,542

6,792

4,452

8,365

8,600

6,097

ORDNANCE ANC ACCESSORIES .......................... .
FCCD AND KINORED PRODUCTS ............................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS .................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS .................................
APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE PROCLCTS ..................
LUMBER ANO WCOD PRODUCTS .............................
FURNITURE ANC FIXTURES .............................. .
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .................. ..........
PRINTING ANC PUBLISHING ..............................
CHEMICALS ANC ALLIED PRODUCTS ........................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS .......... ...............
RUBBER ANC PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC ....................
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS .........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PROOUCTS .....................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES .............................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ...................... .....
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL .........................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .............................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ....................
m i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s .............

8, C73
5,223
4,443
4,499
3,588
4,489
4,790
6,890
6,613
8,365
9, 126
5,602
3, 890
6, 384
7,664
6,528
7,692
6,713
7,898
7,302
4,577

8, 368
5,467
5,291
4,680
3,690
4,915
5,006
7, 134
6,781
8,697
9,442
5,776
3,959
6,659
7,969
6,748
7,855
6,932
8, 199
7,523
4,777

4,844
3,693
2,577
3,389
2,802
2,623
3,309
4,649
4,172
5,236
5,833
4,012
2,899
4,284
5,982
4,574
4,974
4,277
5,487
4,002
2,932

LO,122
7,938
6,700
5,890
5,028
6,595
6,646
8,690
8,951
10,165
10,862
7,868
5,508
8,451
9,215
8,641
9,468
8,632
9,642
9,213
6,899

10,382
8,222
7,047
6,062
5, 146
7,155
6,879
8,903
9,099
10,431
11,094
8,004
5,563
8,706
9,499
8,837
9,603
8,827
9,924
9,380
7, 120

6,648
5,933
5,352
4,674
4,033
3,931
4,820
6,421
6,317
7,115
7,804
6,282
4,524
6,160
7,516
6,605
6,742
5,997
7,113
5,938
4,724

8,310
5,421
4,587
4,652
3,678
4,673
5,001
7,118
6,794
8,587
9,369
5,823
4,033
6,639
7,887
6,807
7,953
6,940
8,154
7,533
4,786

8,604
5,663
5,428
4,826
3,778
5,107
5,218
7,360
6,960
8,915
9,677
5,992
4,100
6,905
8,182
7,031
8,113
7, 158
8,450-'
7,755
4,985

5,092
3,905
2, 737
3, 586
2,900
2,769
3,519
4,890
4,396
5, 501
6, 152
4,275
3,067
4,612
6,259
4,827
5, 299
4, 529
5, 784
4,216
3, 149

10,252
8,056
6,816
5,958
5,076
6,675
6,740
8,804
9,066
10,292
10,995
7,991
5,576
8,548
9,357
8,794
9,606
8,763
9,794
9,330
7,006

10,511
8,337
7,150
6, 125
5, 194
7,236
6,973
9,013
9,213
10,553
11.225
8, 121
5,630
8,794
9,629
8,990
9,737
8,953
10,067
9,494
7,222

6,787
6,073
5,519
4,774
4,083
4,006
4,914
6,568
6,467
7,287
7,974
6,469
4,604
6,334
7,728
6,753
6,953
6, 187
7,349
6,080
4,888

TRANSPORTATION ...........................................

7,205

7,435

5,349

9,275

9,492

7,314

7,434

7,661

5, 594

9,420

9,632

7,490

RAILROAC TRANSPORTATION ..............................
LCCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT .............
TRUCKING ANC WAREHOUSING .......... ................. .
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR .................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTATION .............................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ............... ...............

8,278
5,380
6,447
7,227
9,841
8,583
5,985

8,455
5,218
6,697
7,631
.0,030
8,650
6,226

6,201
6,130
4,389
5,259
6,931
2,866
3,840

9,399
7,407
8,833
10,045
11,827
10,384
8,402

9,542
7,250
9,065
10,589
12,060
10,384
8,586

7,513
8,111
6,596
7,294
6,264

8,61.4
5,422
6,982
8,061
10,231
9,051
6,621

6, 435
6,409
4, 652
5, 700
7, 176
2,892
4,297

9,514
7,576
8,986
10,435
11.933
10,508
8,689

9,653
7,419
9,220
10,952
12,159
10,508
8,861

7,680
8,282
6,735
7,826
8,482

6,259

8,442
5,598
6*729
7,658
10,044
8,980
6,386

6,684

............................................

6,942

7,228

4,199

8,642

8,856

5,939

7,084

7,367

4, 366

8,720

8,933

6,034

.........................................

8,381

8,609

5,485

9,664

9,830

7,118

8,546

8 j766

5, 747

9,760

9,920

7,305

..........................................

6,877

7,167

3,742

9,588

9,860

5,873

7,131

7,420

4,004

9,732

10,003

6,043

communication

public

utilities

wholesale

trace




_

-

E A R NINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SAL A R Y E M P L O Y M E N T OF
W O R KERS WHOSE MAJOR EAR N I N G S WERE FROM THIS
I NOUSTRY BY QUARTERS W O R K E D IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INOUS T R Y
A N Y
ALL
' WORKERS
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL
R E TAIL

TRACE

Q U A F T E R
I
R A C E
W H I T E 1 NEGRO

........................................................

4, 185

4,452

2,737

2,309
3, 101
4,590
4 ,204
5, 112
3,960
2,735
4,085
5,459
5,188
3,817
3, C22
1,282
7,219

2,379
3,231
4,968
4,346
5,261
4,040
2,739
4,207
5,557
5, 352
3,901
3,269
1,375
7,389

2,005
2,499
2,144
3,275
3,279
2,781
2,681
3,398
3,049
3,923
3,119
2,096
1,210
3,933




6,887
5, 348
5,794
7,527
5, 155
7,234
3,820
5, 913

6,996
5,411
5, 833
7,660
5,245
7,421
3,839
5,996

8, 144

8, 353

5,2 80

6,213

6,420

3,853

8 , 246

8,450

5,440

7,342
7,420
13,529
8,611
8,849
6,866
7,748
11,589

7,469
7,503
13,774
8,782
8,946
7,260
7,752
11,964

5,405
5,103
6,513
5,931
3,963
4, 6 3 0
7 , 554
5,993

5,979
5,804
10,739
6,882
6,778
4,515
5,537
7, 134

6,106
5,888
0,980
7,074
6,869
4 ,748
5,631
7,550

4 ,343
3,906
5,026
4,451
3,011
3, 186
3, 195
3,281

7,434
7 , 513
13,691
8, 714
9,018
7,076
7,964
12,004

7, 556
7,591
13,927
8,879
9,115
7,477
7,973
12,384

5,567
5,340
6,901
6,116
4, 147
4,801
7 , 554
6 , 323

6,452

6,844

4 ,225

4,292

4,564

2,818

6,530

6,924

4,291

4 , 390
4, 7 8 7
8,506
7, 1 3 0
7,638
7,600
6 ,227
5,712
7,459
7,449
6,505
5,627
1,693
0,322

4,582
5,011
8,955
7,385
7,741
7, 774
6,328
5,882
7,568
7,647
6, 772
5,793
2,017
10,470

3,614
3,748
4,562
5,460
5,912
4 ,943
5,176
4 ,722
4,363
5,843
4,659*
4,747
1,503
6,5 79

2,487
3,213
4,874
4,498
5,405
4,221
2,959
4, 186
5,642
5,314
4 ,026
3,175
1,330
7,545

2,567
3,341
5,260
4,645
5,554
4,292
2,963
4,303
5,740
5,478
4 , 093
3,428
1,427
7,714

2, 144
2,615
2,375
3, 536
3, 569
3, 178
2,910
3, 529
3,229
4 , 051
3,472
2,225
1,254
4, 273

4,547
4, 858
8,756
7 ,300
7,770
7,917
6, 516
5,769
7,557
7, 558
6,691
5,760
1,732
10,527

4 ,749
5,080
9, 198
7,554
7,869
8,086
6, 623
5,933
7,666
7,754
6,932
5,923
2 ,058
10,676

3,729
3,830
4,862
5,635
6,116
5,330
5,409
4 , 810
4, 4 5 7
5,968
5,011
4,892
1,541
6, 770

3,621

H O T E L S ANC OTHER L O D G I N G P L A C E S ........................
PER S O N A L S E R V I C E S ..........................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S B U S INESS S E R V I C E S ........................
AUTO REPAIR, S ERVICES, AND G A R A G E S ....................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S REPAIR S E R V I C E S ...........................
MOT I O N P I C T U R E S ............................................
A M U S E M E N T ANC R E C R E A T I O N SERV I C E S , NEC ...............
ME D I C A L ANC OTHER H E A L T H S E R V I C E S ......................
LEGAL SER V I C E S ..............................................
E D U C A T I O N A L S ERVICES ......................................
M USEUMS, B O T ANICAL, Z O O L O G I C A L G A R D E N S ................
N O N P R O F I T M E M B E R S H I P O R G A N I Z A T I O N S ....................
P R I VATE H O U S E H O L D S .........................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S S ERVICES ....................................
other than N e g r o .

$ 5,506

3,458
2, 501
3,025
3, 482
2, 321
3, 140
1, 859
2, 783

4,062
3,575
4,588
4,166
2,7 54
2,953
2,969
2,8 74

5,816
5,588
10,457
6,670
6,518
4,231
5,295
6,624

of a l l ra c e s

i
i 2,525

4,856
3,320
3,681
4 ,797
3,193
5,125
1,950
3,677

5,951
5,678
10,705
6,867
6,609
4,455
5,388
7,029

6,034

Includ es w o r k e r s

$ 3,392

4,773
3,251
3,638
4,702
3, 126
4,974
1,941
3,617

6,246

......................

ESTA T E

i
* 5,591 ! 4,412

t 3,321

4,938
4,404
5,019
5,493
3,833
4, 5 7 7
3,550
4 ,539

6,786
5,282
5,708
7,407
5,076
7,119
3,719
5,820

B A N KING ....................................................
CREC I T A G E N C I E S OTHER THAN B ANKS .......................
SECUR I T Y , C O M M O D I T Y BROK E R S AND S E R V I C E S .............
I N S URANCE C A R R I E R S .........................................
I N S URANCE AGENTS, BRO K E R S ANC S E R VICE .................
REAL ESTATE ..................................................
C C M B I N E C REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC ..................
H O L D I N G ANC OTHER I N V E S T M E N T C O M P A N I E S ...............
SERVICES

FOUR QUA R T E R S
k A Ufc
ALL
WHITE i N E GRO
W ORKERS

6, 893
5, 349
5, 749
7,541
5, 168
7,306
3,740
5,903

3,248
2,357
2,857
3,243
2,188
2,936
1,732
2,621

4,642
3,205
3,553
4,568
3,075
4,907
1,836
3,526

AND REAL

Q U A F T E R
t
R AI T
W H I T E 1 NEGRO

i
$ 5,517 1 4,317

$ 3,286 1 2,400 $ 5,431
i

A, 559
3, 132
3,507
4,472
3, C06
4,758
1,825
3,466

INSURANCE,

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

E C O N O M Y - Con tin ued
-

................................................... $ 3,213

B U I L C I N G M A T E R I A L S ANC FARM E Q L I P M E N T .............. .
RETA I L G E N ERAL M E R C H A N D I S E ..............................
FCOC STORES .................................................
A U T O M O T I V E DEALERS ANC SE R V I C E S T A T I O N S ..............
A P P AREL ANC A C C E S S O R Y S TORES ............................
F U R N I T U R E ANC HOME F U R N I S H I N G S STOR E S ................
EATING ANC C R I N K I N G PLA C E S ...............................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S RETAIL S TORES .............................
FINANCE,

FOUR QUA R T E R S
R A X t
ALL
WHITE i NEGRO
WORK E R S

5,023
4 ,527
5, 122
5,617
3,938
4 , 699
3,656
4,638

N O T E : A d ash ( - ) in dicates eith er the sam p le did not in clu de any -w o rk ers with
these c h a ra c t e ris tic s , o r that the data did not m eet the b u r e a u 's p u b licatio n s c r it e r ia .

INDUSTRY

UNITED
STATES

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ......... ........ ’ $4,250
.

HIRING
EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO ‘WORKED IN AN Y WAGE AND SALARY EMIPLOYMENT I
Q U A P T E R S
I
F O U R
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
NORTH
NORTH­
UNITED
NORTH- 1
NORTH
CENTRAL
SOUTH
EAST
STATES
WEST
EAST 1 SOUTH
CENTRAL
$4,725

$3,621

$4 ,*800

$4,127

$6,452

$6,805

$5,436

$7,061

WEST
$6,867

MINING .......................................................

7,623

7,918

7,297

7,461

7,996

8,531

8,724

8,342

8,439

8,926

METAL MINING .............................................
ANTHRACITE MINING ........................................
BITUMINCUS COAL AND LIGNITE MINING ....................
OIL ANC GAS EXTRACTION ..................................
NCNMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FLELS .......* ............

7,855
6,,562
8,430
7,115
6,775

7,812
6,562
8,849
6,749
7,099

7,249

8,112

8,527
6,812
8,999
8,559
7,897

8,583
6,812
9,386
8,049
8,499

7,799

8,090

8,721

_

_

8,154
7,148
5,847

7,338
4,999
9,805
5,305
7,321

10,299
7,071
8,211

8,749
9,104
9,187

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ................................... .

-

-

7,999
7,911
7,824

_

8,672
8,494
7,057

5,709

7, 161

4,278

6,914

6,823

8,409

9,517

6,704

9,747

9,523

GENERAL 8UILCING CONTRACTORS ...........................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS .........................
SPECIAL TRACE CONTRACTORS ..............................

5,153
5,657
6,101

6,891
7,349
7,201

3,726
4,554
4,435

6,504
6,309
7,542

6,441
7,189
6,879

8,069
8,011
8,806

9,374
9,879
9,509 •

6,499
6,518
6,999

9,266
9,175
10,195

9,435
9,678
9,488

.,............................................

5,752

5,836

4,700

6,651

6,173

7,227

7,262

5,897

7,842

8,050

7,602
4,600
3,867
4,212
3,108
3,855
4,413
6,739
5,617
7,777
9,226
5,184
3,474
6, 135
7,765
6,241
7,402
5,913
7,676
6,240
3,798

6,470
5,740
3,727
4,216
3,325
3,863
4,762
6,249
5,993
7,837
9,249
4,817
3,485
6,566
7,833
6,322
7,590
6, 127
7,786
7, 129
3,799

5,992
3,962
4,346
4,245
3,033
3,083
4,057
6,794
5,133
7,778
9,096
5,040
3,333
5,461
7,523
5,332
6,065
5,359
7,200
4,480
3,631

6,816
5,648
4,499
4,249
3,485
3,867
5, 119
6,861
5,685
7,662
9,799
5,778
3,893
6,499
7,827
6,604
7,691
5,904
7,609
5,999
4,222

9,020
3,131
9,749
3,749
2,688
6,031
4,958
7,855
5,358
6,949
9,083
4,761
4,063
6,654
7,661
6,499
7,122
6,523
8,211
6,274
3,223

8,617
7,061
6,211
4,865
3,871
5,667
5,432
7,761
7,701
8 , 553‘
9,834
6,742
4,390
7,393
8,451
7,540
8,147
7,146
8,354
7,435
5,270

7,367
7,464
4,392
5,126
4,107
5,516
5,991
7,264
7,904
8,727
0,049
6,411
4,400
7,773
8,427
7,463
8,215
7,480
8,052
7,974
5,276

7,174
5,783
6,492
4,818
3,642
4,237
4,701
7,687
6,830
8,355
9,544
6,236
4,124
6,418
8,072
6,432
7,016
6,312
8,090
5,192
4,578

7,846
7,863
5,499
5,365
4,307
5,511
6,199
7,892
7,768
8,726
10,291
7,258
4,833
7,703
8,601
7,834
8,358
7,128
8,276
7, 166
5,706

10,206
7,321
9,749
4,974
4,110
7,475
6,619
8,583
8,274
8,466
9,631
7,041
5,624
8,033
8,597
8,093
8,522
7,833
9,200
7,759
5,484

7,623

7,582

5,867

8,340

7-039

8,695

8,886

7,587

9,081

8,903

_

4,166
6,874
7,666
8,440
8,749
5,249

9,485
7,206
6,423
9,025
9,728
9,861
7,148

7,919
8,987
9,955
0,052
9,249
7,346

5,887
7,299
7,390
9,276
9,749
5,874

9 485
,
7,261
8,921
8,312
9,949
10,333
7,764

6,374
9,231
9,699
9,592
9,999
7,045

manufacturing

ORONANCE ANC ACCESSORIES ................................
FCOD ANC KINCRED PRODUCTS ..............................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ...................................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS ...................................
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ....................
LUMBER ANC WCOD PRODUCTS ................................
FURNITURE ANC FIXTURES ................................ .
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ...............................
PRINTING ANC PUBLISHING .................................
CHEMICALS ANC ALLIED PRODUCTS ..........................
PETRCLEUM ANC COAL PRODUCTS ................... .........
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC ......................
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS ...........................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS ........................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ..............................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ...........................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .....................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS ......................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ................
TRANSPORTATION .............................................

_

_

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION .................................
LCCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ................
TRUCKING ANC WAREHOUSING ................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ....................................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR ...................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTATION
.............................
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n s e r v i c e s ............................. .

8,718
5,070
6,779
6,962
8,769
9,299
5,612

6,080
7,646
8,531
9,312
7,499
6,078

4,391
5,368
5,642
8,379
8,999
4,035

8, 718
4,749
7,677
4,718
8,272
9,749
6,499

COMMUNICATION ...............................................

6,035

6,309

5,555

6, 148

6,297

7,019

7,632

6,267

7,065

7,383

PUBLIC UTILITIES ...........................................

8,526

9,388

7,572

9, 134

8,716

9,175

9,945

8,207

9,612

9,361

WHOLESALE TRACE ............................................

5,871

6,403

5,149

6,317

5,852

7,610

7,882

6,742

7,812

7.965




______________ EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
: F O U R
Q U A R T E R S
UNITED
NORTH- I
I NORTH
I
I UNITED l NORTH- I
| NUKIH
STATES
EAST
l SOUTH l CENTRAL l
WEST
| STATES I EAST I
SOUTH | CENTRAL

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY

WEST

ontinued

RETAIL TRAQE ............................... ,

$1,861

$1,975

$1,806

$1,817

$1,925

$4,046

$4,214

$3,857

$3,894

$4,533

BUILCING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT .
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE ..............
FCCC STORES ..............................
AUTOMOTIVE CEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS
APPAREL ANC ACCESSORY STORES ......... .
FURNITURE ANC HOME FURNISHINGS STORES .
EATING ANC CRINKING PLACES .............
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ...........

3,869
2,053
2,222
3,334
1,779
'3,690
1,026
2,065

4,624
1,994
1,987
4,019
1,975
3,809
1,241
2,441

3,639
1,896
2,142
3,172
1,626
3,738
950
1,967

3,802
2,214
2, 171
3,401
1,810
3,702
893
1,931

4,116
2,109
3,033
3,088
1,686
3,630
1,118
1,982

5,867
3,855
4,534
5,896
3,597
5,703
2,638
4,143

6,597
3,834
4,394
6,368
3,838
6,049
3,036
4,786

5,211
3,679
4,153
5,257
3,355
5,351
2,509
3,917

6,046
3,896
4, 117
6,218
3,503
6,041
2,297
3,913

6,397
4,227
6,303
6,379
3,886
6,106
3,003
4,368

4,857

5,416

4,459

4,785

4,872

6,063

6,608

5,528

5,939

6,055

5,046
4,979
6,649
5,597
4,734
2,627
3,624
3,312

5,645
5,816
8,107
6,712
6,033
5,438
5,321
7,019

6,304
5,985
8,282
6,895
6,428
6,116
5,249
8,874

5,111
5,666
7,791
6,696
5,482
4,731
4,999
5,214

5,429
5,734
7,999
6,565
6,062
5,526
4,999
6,299

5,687
6,117
7.795
6,662
6,274
5,459
5.499
7,124

FINANCE*

INSURANCE* ANC REAL ESTATE ......

BANKING ...................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS .......
SECURITY*.COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES
INSURANCE CARRIERS .......................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS ANO SERVICE ..
REAL ESTATE ...............................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC ...
HOLDING ANC OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .

4,921
4,801
7,018
5,502
4,817
2,979
3,923
4,037

5,455
5, 109
7,249
5,652
5,344
4,043
4,249
4,649

4,570
4,723
6,333
5,465
4,389
2,543
3,999
3,527

4,736
4, 757
6,812
5,335
4,794
3,051
3,249
4,437

SERVICES ......................................

2,835

3,442

2,488

2,710

2,870

5,055

5,913

4,280

4,899

5,435

HOTELS AND CTHER LODGING PLACES ........ .
PERSONAL SERVICES ........................ .
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ........
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES .....
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR S E R V I C E S .......... .
MOTION PICTURES .......................... .
AMUSEMENT ANC RECREATION SERVICES, NEC .,
MEDICAL ANC OTHER HEALTH S E R V I C E S ...... .
LEGAL SERVICES .............................
ECUCATIONAL SERVICES ......................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ..
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ......
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ....................... .
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .................. .

1,490
2, 388
2,520
3,370
4,759
1,491
1,239
3,421
4,742
4, 161
2,312
1.508
953
6, 107

1,355
2,625
3,144
4, 107
6, 173
2,722
1,342
3,860
5,339
5,119
4,062
1,990
1,331
6,692

1,555
2,284
2,337
3,175
4,222
940
1,151
3,252
4,119
3,590.
1,499
1,287
870
5,200

1,312
2,240
2,090
3,416
4,910
966
1,016
3,307
4,705
4, 145
1,799
1,309
913
6,465

1,619
2,592
2,271
2,999
4,277
1,722
1,614
3,562
5,035
4,230
2,124
1,569
931
5,955

3,461
3,812
5,895
6,189
6,982
5.321
4,260
4,580
5,936
6,756
5,749
4,501
1,370
8,484

3,881
4,061
6,432
6,649
7,611
6,270
5,093
5,271
6,437
7,674
6,312
5,266
1,859
9,035

3, 166
3,393
5,301
5,435
i, 217
2,874
3,949
4,076
5,339
5,989
4,749
3,855
l, 192
7,898

3,115
3,822
5,322
6,333
6,799
2,437
3,527
4,347
5,589
6,996
5,749
4,364
1,386
8,335

3,976
4,139
6,461
6,749
7,249
7,531
4,874
5,043
6,480
6,691
4,187
4,692
1,685
8,788

1 F o r p u rp o s e s of this study, and b e c a u s e in fo rm atio n about th eir actual place
of em p lo y m en t w as not a v a ila b le in the file s studied, em p lo y ees of r a ilr o a d s and r a i l ­
ro ad re la t e d o rg a n iz a tio n s c o v e r e d b y the R a i lr o a d A c t w e re c o n sid ered to have been
em p lo y ed in the N o rth C e n tr a ] R eg io n .




N O T E : A dash ( - ) in dicates eith er the sam p le did not in clu de any w o r k e r s with
these c h a ra c t e ris tic s , o r that the data did not m eet the B u r e a u 's p u b licatio n s c r it e r ia .

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE ANO SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q L A R
— --------- -------------------------------F O U R
Q U A R
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH­
NORTH
SOUTH
CENTRAL
WEST
STATES
EAST
SOUTH
CENTRAL

UNITED
STATES
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY

NORTH­
EAST

$5,474

$5,982

$4,690

$5,836

$5,453

$7,502

WEST

$8,009

$6,517

$7,818

$7,862

MINING ................................ ,

7,772

8, 150

7,448

7,894

8,003

9,436

9,525

9, 132

9,557

9,750

.......................
ANTHRACITE MINING ................. ,
BITUMINOUS COAL ANO LIGNITE MINING
OIL ANC GAS EXTRACTION ............
NCNMETALLIC MINERALS* EXCEPT FUELS

7,568
6,718
8,399
7,714
7,409

8.562
6,747
8,653
8,176
7,749

6,648

7,791

10,047
7,632
9,936
9,493
9,358

8,364

9,146

-

-

_

9,024
8,190
8,007

8,944
7,632
9,695
9,711
9,072

7,766

7,803
7,613
6,327

6,934
4,806
10*079
5,699
8,305

9, 171
9,555
7,777

11,038
7,528
10,204

9,967
10,431
9,888

6,732

7,907

5,318

7,676

7,450

9,250

10,322

7,624

10,301

10,081

6,301
6,610
7,046

7,711
8,100
7,930

4,929
5,337
5,544

7,231
7,090
8,160

7,104
8,030
7,345

8,992
9,026
9,491

10,301
10,609
10,234

7,463
7,440
7,826

9,785
10,018
10,652

9,923
10,537
9,917

metal

mining

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ..........
GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS .
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS
SPECIAL TRACE CONTRACTORS ....

. -

................................ ,

6,543

6,782

5,512

7,145

6,807

8,135

8,355

6,889

8,691

8,979

ORDNANCE ANC ACCESSORIES ...............
FCOC AND KINDRED PRODUCTS ............
TCBACCC MANUFACTURERS ................. .
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS ................. .
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PROOUCTS ....
LUMBER ANC WCOD PRODUCTS ..............
FURNITURE ANC FIXTURES ................ .
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .............
PRINTING ANC PUBLISHING ............... .
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ........
PETRCLEUM ANC COAL PRODUCTS ..........
RUBBER AND PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC .....
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS .........
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS P R O D U C T S .......
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ...............
FABRICATED METAL PROCUCTS ............
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ......... .
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ....
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..............
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED P R O D U C T S ......
MISCELLANECUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

8,311
5,421
4,587
4,653
3,678
4,673
5,002
7, 118
6,795
8,588
9,369
5,823
4,033
6,640
7,887
6,808
7,953
6,941
8, 154
7,534
4,787

7,345
6,308
4,386
5,017
4,214
4,708
5,353
6,754
7,341
9,207
10,476
5,429
4,094
7,222
8,097
6,883
8,157
7,348
8,235
8,461
4,813

6,987
4,654
4,726
4,526
3,171
3,636
4,308
7,024
6,085
8,138
8,805
5,390
3,372
5,827
7,573
5,790
6,734
6,342
7,623
5,261
4,262

6,839
6,112
6,019
5,746
4, 102
4,628
5,686
7, 370
6, 845
8,713
9,865
6,380
4,556
6,867
7,919
7,103
8,148
6,619
8, 143
6,974
5,228

9,984
4,687
11,138
4,378
3,338
5,990
5,630
7,659
6,448
7,502
8,686
5,701
4,873
6,943
7,643
7,156
8,060
7,707
8,784
7,353
4,527

9,937
7,609
6,558
5,746
4,949
6,382
6,430
8,424
8,681
9,907
10,598
7,580
5,346
8,127
9,045
8,384
9,229
8,413
9,449
8,964
6,649

8, 777
8,181
5,821
6,436
5,563
6,609
7,028
8,061
9,241
10,689
11,765
7,343
5,467
8,778
9,177
8,388
9,359
8,846
9,282
9,832
6,691

8,472
6,458
6,829
5,486
4,226
5,001
5,392
8,213
7,818
9,095
9,847
6,798
4,498
7,103
8,537
7, 190
7,882
7,629
8,959
6,482
5,684

8,245
8,330
6,661
7,522
5,472
6,293
7,234
8,764
8,585
10,113
11,025
8,014
5,827
8,358
9,130
8,702
9,394
8, 102
9,386
8,350
7, 140

11,760
7,610
11,i38
5,790
5,140
8,054
7,821
8,870
8,854
9,539
9,847
7,988
6,714
8,725
9,183
9,104
9,843
9,348
10,446
9,152
6,800

TRANSPORTAT ICN ........................... .

7,434

7,658

6,306

7,841

7,434

9,063

9,383

7,985

9,156

9,610

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ............... ,
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT
TRUCKING ANC WAREHOUSING ...............
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR ................. .
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTATION ..............
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ...............

8,443
5,598
6,730
7,659
0,045
8,980
6, 386

_

_

8 , 443

6,231
7,216
8,888
10,774
8,492
7,360

4,760
5,739
6,335
9,494
9,122
4,831

5, 358
7,314
6,004
9, 178
8, 865
6,478

COMMUNICATICN

7,085

7,690

6,326

PUBLIC UTILITIES

8, 546

9,272

WHOLESALE TRACE

7, 131

8,003

MANUFACTURING

IO

-




_
4,927
6,879
7,571
10,350
8,751
5,939

9,334
7,274
8,531
9,899
11,471
10,126
8,164

7,888
8,982
10,748
12,038
10,177
9,037

6,189
7,394
8, 191
10,744
10,224
6,762

7,030
8,984
9,220
11,013
9,975
7,939

6,847
9,216
9,868
11,759
9,897
7,933

7, 100

7,298

8,380

9, 199

7,486

8,255

8,646

7,700

9, 103

8,588

9,511

10,225

8,615

9,958

9,739

6,309

7,284

6,875

9,193

10,050

8,244

9, 173

9,368

9, 334

INDUSTRY

UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKEO IN ANY WAGE ANO SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
A N Y
Q U A R T E R
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
NORTH­
NORTH
NORTH
NORTH- 1
UNITED
SOUTH
EAST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
WEST
STATES
EAST
CENTRAL

WEST

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY-- Continued
RETAIL TRADE ..............................................

$3,321

$3,568

$3,040

$3,348

$3,433

$5,320

$5,554

$4,935

$5,293

$5,706

BUILCING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ...............
r e t a i l g e n e r a l MERCHANDISE ...........................
FCOC STORES ............................................
AUTOMOTIVE CEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS ............
APPAREL ANC ACCESSORY STORES .........................
FURNITURE ANC HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ...............
EATING ANC CRINKING PLACES ......................... .
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ..........................

A ,774
3,251
3,639
4,703
3, 126
4,974
1,941
3,618

5,523
3,384
3,510
5,260
3,442
5,211
2,341
4,268

4,276
2,940
3,215
4,274
2,676
4,810
1,748
3,252

4, 846
3,461
3,665
4,938
3,273
5,228
1,718
3,498

4,846
3,230
4,492
4,651
3,155
4,731
2,069
3,552

6,525
5,108
5,485
6,923
4,907
6,826
3,619
5,579

7, 185
5,307
5,343
7,445
5,244
7,119
4,075
6,285

5,951
4,746
4,897
6, 297
4,311
6,461
3,351
5, 153

6,555
5,201
-5,406
7,187
4,978
7,151
3,236
5,319

6,912
5,241
6,776
7,160
5,262
6,831
3,957
5,692

6,213

6,891

5,609

6,239

5,998

7,891

8,520

7,277

7,825

7,794

5,980
5,805
0,739
6,882
6,779
4,516
5,538
7,135

6,608
6, 147
10,585
7,007
7,464
5,173
5,666
9,267

5,397
5,671
10,802
6,862
5,953
3,954
5,552
4,927

5,877
5,873
10,967
6,868
7, 120
4,722
4,802
6,438

5,797
5,735
11,047
6,721
6,551
4,464
6,194
7,066

7,164
7,140
12,915
8,301
8,574
6,694
7,502
10,604

7,867
7,498
12,775
8,350
8,992
7, 111
7,320
14,393

6,504
6,998
13,144
8,261
7,632
6, 120
7,445
7,134

7,080
7,035
13,087
8,321
8,901
6,877
6,651
8,805

6,868
7,367
13,050
8,221
8,881
6,922
8,850
10,944

4,293

4,983

3,698

4,214

4,345

6,351

7,229

5,432

6,244

6,668

2,488
3,213
4,875
4,499
5,406
4,222
2,959
4,187
5,642
5,314
4,027
3, 175
1,330
7,545

2,553
3,501
5,595
5,082
6,137
5,500
3,320
4,656
6,298
6,181
4,827
3,662
1,792
8,025

2,392
2,936
4,335
4,049
4,872
2,488
2,669
3,768
4,914
4,605
3,225
2,774
1,092
6,650

2, 186
3,252
4,296
4,480
5,651
2, 783
2,542
4,081
5,544
5, 353
3,599
3,072
1,291
7,897

2,763
3,326
4,881
4,515
5,103
5,084
3,390
4,325
5,798
5,185
3,317
3,325
1,474
7,533

4,293
4,713
8,082
6,747
7,356
7,314
5,884
5,589
7,224
7,351
6,372
5,500
1,754
9,951

4,636
5,106
8,810
7,258
7,844
8,541
6,741
6,190
7,929
8,318
7,151
6,045
2,324
10,350

4,015
4,211
7,136
6,007
6,805
4,817
5,398
4,953
6,5 39
6,419
6,214
4,992
1,405
9,129

3,837
4,835
7,319
6,580
7,311
4,779
5,229
5,425
6,931
7,485
5,793
5,353
1,734
9,939

4,741
5,037
8,679
7,343
7,530
9,027
6,248
6,004
7,398
7,187
5,109
5,744
2,214
10,220

FINANCE,

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ...................

BANKING .................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS .....................
SECURITY, COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES ...........
INSURANCE CARRIERS ...................... ...... .......
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS ANO SERVICE ...............
REAL ESTATE ............................................
c o m b i n e c r e a l e s t a t e , i n s u r a n c e , ETC ................
HOLDING ANC OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ..............
SERVICES ..................................................
HOTELS ANC OTHER LODGING PLACES ......................
PERSONAL SERVICES ......................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ......................
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES ..................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ........................
MOTION PICTURES ........................................
AMUSEMENT ANC RECREATION SERVICES, NEC ..............
MEDICAL ANC OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ...................
LEGAL SERVICES .........................................
ECUCATICNAL SERVICES ..................................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ..............
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ....... ...........
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ....................................
m i s c e l l a n e o u s SERVICES ................................

1 F o r p u rp o s e s of this study, and b e c a u s e in fo rm atio n about th eir actual place
of em p lo y m ent w as not a v a ila b le in the file s studied, em p lo y ees of ra ilro a d s and r a i l ro a d re la t e d o rga n iz atio n s c o v e r e d by the R a ilr o a d A c t w e re c o n sid ered to have been
em p lo y ed in the N o rth C e n tr a l R eg io n .




N O T E : A dash ( - ) in dicates eith er the s am p le did not include any w o r k e r s with
these c h a ra c t e ris tic s , o r that the data did not m eet the B u re a u 1s p ublicatio ns c r it e r ia ,

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
_______ ,
______ ,
______ ______ _______
WAS LESS THAN______

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY
MINING ....................................................
m e t a l m i n i n g .......................................... .
a n t h r a c i t e m i n i n g .....................................

BITUMINOUS COAL AND LIGNITE MINING ..................
GIL ANC GAS EXTRACTION ................................
NCNMETALL IC MINERALS# EXCEPT F U E L S .....*............
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ..........

29.5

34.9

39.7

44.6

49.6

54.3

58.8

63.0

66.9

70.6

74.2

o
o
*
■
0
0
*

$1800 $2400 $3000 $3600 $4200 $4800 $5400 $6000 $6600 $7200 $7800

78.2

$9000 $10000 $11000
81.2

85.3

88.9

14.0

17.3

20.2

23.2

26.1

29.3

33.4

37.5

41.9

46.3

51.8

59.9

66.2

a
74.3 80.7

10.5
10.3
9.4
17.9
14.3

14.4
11.8
11.4
21.9
17.3

17.3
16.2
13.8
24.8
20.5

19.2
16.2
16.6
28.0
24.2

21.5
19.1
18.5
31.2
28.0

23.9
20.6
20.7
34.5
32.6

27.3
29.4
23.4
39.0
37.8

30.9
41.2
27.0
42.7
43.0

35.6
51.5
30.4
46.5
48.8

41.2
69.1
33.7
50.6
53.6

48.4
73.5
38.4
55.0
60.5

58.2
82.4
49.6
61.4
67.4

67.1
88.2
58.7
66.5
71.6

77.5
94.1
69.6
73.6
77.3

86.1
97.1
76.1
79.3
83.8

23.3

28.0

32.1

36.0

39.9

43.7

47.8

51.9

55.8

59.5

63.2

66.9

69.9

75.0

80.1

26.5
21.9
22.3

31.5
26.3
26.8

35.7
30.6
30.8

39.9
34.4
34.6

43.8
39.0
38.1

47.7
43.3
41.7

51.7
48.0
45.5

55.5
52.7
49.3

59.2
57.2
53.1

62.9
61.4
56.6

66.6
65.4
60.1

70.2
69.0
63.9

72.9
72.1
67.0

78.0
77.2
72.1

82.6
82.2
77.4

MANUFACTURING ..............................

17.6

21.9

26.2

31.0

36.3

41.7

46.9

52. 1

57.1

61.9

66.7

72.1

76.1

81.8

86.4

ORDNANCE ANC ACCESSORIES ...............
FCOC ANC KINDRED PRODUCTS .............
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ..?...............
TEXTILE MILL PROCUCTS ..................
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ....
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS .............. .
FURNITURE ANC FIXTURES ................ .
PAPER ANC ALLIED PRODUCTS .............
PRINTING ANC PUBLISHING ............... .
CHEMICALS ANC ALLIED P R O D U C T S ........ .
PETROLEUM ANC COAL PRODUCTS .......... .
RUBBER ANC PLASTIC PRODUCTS# NEC ......
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS ......... .
STONE# CLAY# AND GLASS PRODUCTS .......
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES .............. .
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ..............
MACHINERY# EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ......... .
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ....
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ...............
INSTRUMENTS ANC RELATED P R O D U C T S ......
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

9.1
29.1
30.5
19.9
29.9
28.3
22.1
13.3
21.7
9.8
7.6
21.4
27.4
15.3
9.3
15.8
10.0
13.6
9. 1
12.8
29.4

12.2
34.2
37.0
25.5
37.9
34.1
27.3
16.4
26.2
12.5
10.1
26.2
34.0
18.9
11.9
19.6
12.9
17.6
11.7
16.2
35.4

14.7
38.4
41.7
31.5
47.9
40.3
32.4
19.7
30.0
14.7
12.0
3C.5
42.4
22.7
14.5
23.3
15.7
21.5
14.5
19.6
41.1

17.2
42.5
47.0
39. 3
60.5
47. 1
38.6
23.2
33.7
17.5
14. 3
35.3
52.5
26.9
16.9
26.9
18.6
26. 1
17.4
23.7
47.6

20.2
47.0
53.1
49.7
71.7
53.7
47.0
27.5
38.6
20.4
16.1
40.6
62.5
31.4
19.6
31.4
21.8
31.8
20.4
28.5
55.2

24.4
51.4
57.9
61.0
79.7
59.5
55.3
31.9
43.6
23.8
19.4
46.1
71.3
36.2
22.9
36.5
25.9
38.2
23.5
35.3
62.0

29.2
55.6
62.1
70.9
84.7
64.4
63.5
36.9
48.4
28.3
22.5
52.2
78.1
42.1
27.1
41.9
30.6
44.6
27.4
41.1
67.8

34.7
59.9
65.8
77.7
88.1
69.3
70.7
42.8
52.7
33.3.
25.9
57.5
83.0
48.6
31.6
47.6
36.1
50.9
32.4
48.0
72.7

40.0
64.0
72.2
82.7
90.5
74.0
76.3
48.6
56.4
38.6
28.3
63.1
86.5
54.6
37.0
53.5
42.0
56.4
38.4
52.8
76.7

46.2
68.1
77.8
86.3
92.1
78.8
80.6
54.3
60.4
44.5
32.4
67.6
89.3
60.3
43.6
58.9
47.8
61.6
44.3
57.9
79.7

51.8
72.2
82.4
89.1
93.2
82.4
84.3
60.4
64.0
50.2
36.4
72.2
91.6
65.7
50.4
64.3
54.2
66.3
51.5
63.0
83.0

59. 1
77.0
86.3
91.6
94.3
86.0
87.9
67.5
68.4
57.2
41.5
76.9
93.5
71.7
57.8
70.7
61.8
71.1
59.5
68.9
86.2

64.7
80.5
88.7
93.3
95.0
88.3
89.9
73.0
72.0
62.5
47.5
80.5
94.8
76.3
64.5
75.4
67.6
74.7
65.2
72.8
88.4

71.4
85.9
92.7
95.1
96.0
91.4
92.8
80.7
77.7
70.7
59.2
85.4
96.0
83.0
74.6
81.2
75.5
79.8
73.2
78.1
91.0

76.9
90.6
95.3
96.2
96.6
94.2
94.5
86.9
83.0
78.1
71.6
89.8
96.8
88.2
82.2
85.7
80.9
83.9
79.3
82.7
92.8

TRANSPORTATION ........................... .

16.4

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS .
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS
SPECIAL TRACE CONTRACTORS ....

19.6

22.5

25.3

28.4

31.5

34.9

38.4

42.3

46.6

51.5

58.0

64.0

73.8

83.7

5.9
7.5
28.0 , 32.7
20.0 23.9
20.6 23.6
6.7
8.9
7.6
8.1
20.9 24.7

9.1
36.7
27.4
26.6
11.0
8.7
28.7

10.8
40.4
30.5
29.5
13.4
8.7
32.0

12.6
44.3
34.0
32.9
16.0
10.5
36.8

14.3
48.4
37.5
36.6
18.7
11.6'
41.9

16.3
52.2
41.3
40.2
21.5
15.7
47.8

18.3
56.2
45. 1
43.9
25.5
19.2
53.4

21.9 27.0
60.4 64.1
48.9 52.8
47.8 51.5
29.8 34.4
20.3 *24.4
58.3. 64.1

33.4
68.2
57.0
56.0
39.9
27.9
69.4

42.4
73.2
62.9
60.4
47.1
37.8
74.6

53.3
77.3
67.9
64.0
51.7
45.9
78.3

69.6
83.3
76.7
70.9
60.5
61.0
83.8

87.2
88.9
85.0
77.0
71.2
75.0
88.0

12.2

16.0

20.3

24.4

29.0

35.5

41.9

49.5

56.5

61.2

64.8

68.3

71.3

76.5

82.4

PUBLIC UTILITIES

8.1

10.3

12.0

14.0

16.4

19.4

22.9

26.5

30.7

35.6

41.2

48.5

54.9

64.8

75.7

WHOLESALE TRACE

21.6

25.7

29.3

32.9

37.2

41.7

46.3

51.0

55.5

60.1

64.8

70.1

73.6

78.7

83.5

RAILRCAC TRANSPORTATION ...............
LOCAL ANC INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT
TRUCKING ANC WAREHOUSING ..............
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR .................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTATION ..............
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES .............
COMMUNICATION




o
o

|4 6 6 0 o | 4 7 2 0 0 j 4 7 8 0 o ] 4 8 4 0 0 j

. _
iQ

j 46000

o
o

4 1 8 0 Q 4 2 4 0 o | $ 3 0 0 o | 4 36001 $ 4 2 C o ] $4 8 0 o | 4 5 4 0 0

- 8

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
WAS LESS THAN

IN0USTRY-

411000

RETAIL TRADE ........................................................

4 9.0

56.2

6 2 .2

6 7.7

7 2 .6

76.4

7 9.7

82.4

8 4.9

8 7.0

8 9.0

91.1

92.5

94.3

9 5.8

BUILDING MATERIALS ANO FARM EQUIPMENT .........................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE .....................................
FCCD STORES .......................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS ......................
a p p a r e l AND ACCESSORY STORES .......................... ........
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES .........................
EATING AND CRINKING PLACES .....................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ....................................

31.7
4 6.7
44.7
35.6
50.4
31.5
66.1
46.6

37.8
54.1
5 2.0
41.8
5 7.4
3 8.2
74.1
5 3.8

42.8
6 0 .6
58.1
47.3
63.7
4 4.0
79.9
5 9.5

4 7.5
6 7.9
63.2
52. 1
70.5
4 9.3
8 4.4
65.0

5 2.6
7 4.3
6 7 .6
5 6.4
77.0
5 4.4
8 8.0
70.5

57.2
7 8.9
71.1
61.1
8 1.2
5 9 .3
9 0 .4
7 4.4

6 2.5
8 2.5
7 4.2
6 5.8
8 4 .6
6 3 .6
92.2
77.9

67.1
8 5 .3
77.2
6 9.7
86.8
6 8.1
93.6
80.9

7 2.4
8 7.4
80.1
73.5
8 8.8
72.0
9 4 .8
8 3.5

76.8
89.2
83.0
77.1
90.2
7 5.3
9 5.7
85.7

81.1
90.9
8 5 .6
80.4
9 1 .7
7 8.7
96.5
8 7.6

85.8
92.6
88.5
8 3.6
93.5
82.8
9 7 .2
8 9.7

8 8 .6
93.8
9 0.4
86.1
9 4 .5
85.1
97.7
9 0 .9

9 2 .0
9 5.3
9 3.2
8 9 .4
9 5 .6
8 9 .0
9 8.3
92.7

9 4.5
9 6.4
9 5 .6
9 2 .0
9 6 .5
92.1
98.7
94.2

21.1

26.2

3 0 .9

3 5.6

4 1.9

49.2

5 6.3

62.3

67.5

71.7

75.2

79.1

81.5

8 4 .9

8 7.9

15.2
18.9
9.8
14.5
2 2.4
38.5
30.5
32.7

20.4
2 3.9
13.3
19.0
27.3
4 4.8
38.2
38.1

2 5 .4
28.3
16.8
23.2
31.8
50.1
4 2.8
4 1.7

30.4
33.5
20.2
2 7.7
3 6.7
5 5.0
4 6.6
4 6.4

38.1
41.2
2 4.1
3 3.7
43.5
60.2
53.1
5 1.2

47.9
50.1
2 8.8
41.1
49.6
6 4 .4
60.6
56.1

57.3
57.1
35.1
48.7
56.3
6 8 .8
6 5.1
6 0.0

6 4 .6
63.6
4 0 .4
55.0
6 1.8
73.3
7 0.7
63.5

7 0.5
69.0
4 6 .5
5 9.9
6 7 .3
77.4
75.0
6 6 .9

75.0
73.9
51.7
6 4.4
70.6
8 0.9
77.9
69.5

7 8.6
7 8 .0
55.5
6 8 .4
7 4 .3
8 3.5
8 0 .0
71.9

8 2.8
8 1.4
6 2.1
7 2.4
77.7
8 6 .4
8 2 .0
74.5

8 5 .0
83.8
6 5.3
75.5
79.7
8 8.3
8 2.9
76.6

8 8 .0
87.0
70.1
8 0.3
8 3 .0
90.5
8 5.6
7 8.8

90.1
9 0.4
73.7
8 4.9
85.8
9 2.7
88.7
ai.o

3 9.4

4 5 .7

51.5

57.0

62.3

6 7 .0

7 1.0

74.6

77.9

80.8

8 3.5

8 6.4

8 8 .4

9 0.8

9 2.7

55.4
41.9
4 3.5
36.6
2 8.4
54.1
59.5
29.3
2 2.1
30.8
4 4 .3
53.6
75.6
21.4

63.0
50.2
49.1
4 2.4
34.1
59.3
66.1
3 6.1
2 8.3
36.7
5 0.5
58.7
8 4.8
26.1

69.7
5 8 .5
53.7
4 7.5
3 8.9
6 3.0
7 0 .8
43.6
3 3.6
41.7
5 4.5
63.3
90.4
2 9 .8

76.2
66.4
57.7
51.7
42.1
65.8
74.6
52.4
38.5
4 6.2
58.2
67.7
9 3.8
33.5

81.6
7 3.9
62.1
5 6.4
4 6.2
6 8 .3
77.9
6 1.0
4 4.5
5C.2
6 1.2
7 2.0
9 6.1
3 7.0

85.5
7 9.2
6 5 .8
6 0 .6
5 0 .4
70.6
80.6
6 8 .4
5C.7
54.2
6 6.8
7 5.8
97.3
40.8

8 8.5
8 3.2
6 9.4
6 4 .7
54.7
7 2 .9
8 3.1
7 4.6
5 7 .9
57.9
69.5
79.2
98.3
4 5.0

9 0 .8
86.4
7 2.6
6 8 .9
59.0
75.1
8 5.5
79.5
6 4.2
6 1 .7
73.8
8 2.1
9 8 .7
4 9 .4

9 2 .7
8 8.7
75.4
72.9
6 3 .4
77.8
8 7.3
8 3 .4
7 0.4
6 5 .7
77.2
8 4.9
9 9 .3
53.2

94.0
9 0 .7
77.9
7 6.8
67.7
80.0
8 9.1
86.2
75.5
69.8
79.4
8 7.2
99.5
56.8

95.1
9 2.3
80,1
8 0 .4
72.4
8 2 .0
90.6
88.6
7 9 .6
7 4.3
82.5
8 9 .2
99.7
6 0 .3

96.2
9 4.1
8 2 .5
84.8
7 7 .4
8 4.5
9 2 .5
9 1.2
84.9
7 9.1
87.7
9 0 .9
99.7
64.6

9 6.8
9 5 .3
84.2
8 7.0
8 1.3
86.0
9 3 .4
92.9
86.2
8 2.3
8 9.2
92.4
9 9 .8
6 7 .2

9 7 .6
9 6 .7
86.5
9 1.0
8 6.6
8 8 .5
94.7
95.0
88.6
8 6.2
9 2.6
94.0

98.3
97.5
88.5
9 4.1
90.8
9 0.4
9 5.7
96.4
9 0.3
8 9.0
9 5.4
95.1

99.9

99.9

71.5

75.6

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY— Continued

FINANCE.

INSURANCE. AND REAL ESTATE .............................

BANKING ...........................................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ...............................
SECURITY. COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES .....................
INSURANCE CARRIERS ...............................................
INSURANCE AGENTS. BROKERS AND SERVICE .........................
REAL ESTATE ................................. .....................
COMBINEC REAL ESTATE. INSURANCE, ETC ..........................
HOLDING AND OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ........................
SERVICES ............................................................
HCTELS AND OTHER LODGING PLACES ................................
PERSONAL SERVICES ................................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES .......................... .....
AUTO REPAIR. SERVICES. AND GARAGES ............., ..............
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ............... ..................
MOTION PICTURES ..................................................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES. NEC ........................
MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ......................... .
LEGAL SERVICES ...................................................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ............................................
MUSEUMS. BOTANICAL. ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ........................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ............................
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ..........................................




INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY OF
MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAN
$1800 $2400 $3000 $3600 $4200 $4800 $5400 $6000 $6600 $7200 $7800 $8400 $9000 $1C00C $ 1 1 0 0 0

PRIVATE .NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .............................

29.5

M I N I N G ....... .........................................................
METAL MINING
.................................................
ANTHRACITE M I N I N G ..................................................
BITUMINOUS COAL AND LIGNITE MINING ..............................
OIL ANC GAS EXTRACTION ............................................
NCNMETALLIC MINERALS♦ EXCEPT FUELS ..............................
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ...............................................
GENERAL BUILCING CONTRACTORS .......................... ..........
h e a v y c o n s t r u c t i o n c o n t r a c t o r s ...................................
SPECIAL TRACE CONTRACTORS ........................................
manufacturing

........................................................

ORDNANCE ANC ACCESSORIES .........................................
FOOD ANC KINDRED PROCUCTS ........................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS .............................................
t e x t i l e m i l l p r o d u c t s ............... .......... •.................
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ..............................
LUMBER ANC MOOD PRODUCTS .........................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES ............................................
PAPER ANC ALLIEO PROCUCTS ........................................
PRINTING ANC PUBLISHING ...........................................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ....................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ......................................
RUBBER ANC PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC ................................
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS .....................................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS .................................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES .........................................
FABRICATED METAL PROCUCTS ........................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL .....................................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...............................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..........................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATEC PRODUCTS ................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ..........................
TRANSPORTATION .......................................................
RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ...........................................
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT ..........................
TRUCKING ANC WAREHOUSING ..........................................
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..............................................
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n b y a i r .............................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTATION .........................................
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ...........................................

34.9

39.7

44.6

49.6

16.0

19.6

22.7

26.0

29.1

13.3
10.3

19.6
17.6
15.5
27.6
24.3

2 2 .1

24.2
23.5

16.3

16.4
13.2
13.C
24.6
20.5

25.5

30.5

34.8

29.9
25.2
25.3

35.4
30.7
30.0

40.2
35.1
34.3

18.9

23.3

27.7

10.4
31.5
32.4
22.3
31.7
31.0
25.7
15.3
23.6
11.3
9.3
23.9
30.2
17.8
10.7
18.0
11.7
15.5

14.2
36.7
38.7
28.2
39.7
37.3
30.7
18.7
28.3
14.2

16.8
40.9
43.6
34.2
49.3
43.4
35.9

10 .8
2 0 .1

12 .1

22.2

32.0
16.8
13.7
33.4
44.7
26.2
16.6
26.0
17.8
23.9
16.6

58.8

63.0

66.9

70.6

32.4

36.2

40. 1

44.4

34.7
32.2

26.4
25.0
23.3
38.0
36.9

30.0
32.4
26.3
41.5
41.7

33.1
47.1
29.6
45.1
46.8

37.7
58.8
33.0
48.9
52.4

38. 7

42.6

46.5

50.4

54.3

44. 5
39.2
38.2

48.8
43.8
42.0

52.9
48.4
45.6

56.9
53.1
49.4

60.8
57.9
53.1

32.4

37.7

43.1

48.3

53.4

19.6
44.8
48. 8
41.8
61.8
49. 7
41.7
25.7
35.8
19.6
16. 1
37.8
54. 3
30.4
19. 1
29. 8

22.5
49.2
54.7
52.1
72.6
56.1
49.7
30.0
40.7

31.5
57.4
63.2
72.3
85.3

37.0
61.5
66.7
78.7

6 6 .1
6 6 .1

34.4
24.5
34.2
22.7
31.3
57.5

26.6
53.3
59.2
62.8
80.3
61.4
57.9
34.4
45.3
26.1
21.4
48.2
72.5
39.7
25.0
39.5
28.8
40.4
26.1
37.3
64.1

19. 1
18.6
31.4
28.2

20.6

2 2.6

18.3
43.0
64.1
34.7

54.3

85.3

88.9

67.4

75.4

81.5

6 8.8

78.5
95.6
70.7
74.8
78.7

86.7
97. 1
76.6
80.2
84.8

74.2

78.2

81.2

48.6

53.7

61.4

42.6
73.5
36.0
52.6
57.4

50.4
77.9
40.4
56.7
63.3

60.4
85.3
50.9
62.7
69.8

91.2
60. 1
67.4
73.5

58.1

61.8

65.4

6 8.8

71.6

76.4

81.2

64.5
62.1
56.8

6 8.2

66.3
60.3

71.8
69.9
63.8

74.8
72.8
67.4

77. 1
75.5
70.0

81.0
79.9
74.7

85.0
84.4
79.6

58.4

63.2

67.9

73. 1

77.0

82.5

86.9

39.3
49.9
30.5
24.1
54.2
79.1
45.1
29. 1
44.7
33.5
46.7
3G.0
43.0
69.7

48.5
69.5
78.8
87.0
92.5
80.0
81.9
56.2
61.5
46.4
34.5
69.3
90.2
62.4
45.5
61.3
50.3
63.7
47.2
60.1
81.2

54.1
73.5
83.7
89.8
93.5
83.3
85.4
62.0
64.9
51.9
38.3
73.6
92.3
67.5
52.4

60.8
78.0
87.9
92.1
94.6
86.7
88.7
69.0
69.5
58.5
43.0
78.1
94.2
73. 1
59.7
72.8
64.0
72.6
61.8
70.4
87.2

6 6.2

71.0
72.5
44.9
54.0
35.5
28.0
59.3
83.9
51.4
33.6
50.2
38.8
52.9
35.0
50.0
74.5

42.3
65.5
72.9
83.6
91.0
75.5
77.7
50.6
57.6
40.6
30.4
64.7
87.4
57.0
38.9
56.0
44.5
58.5
41.0
54.7
78.2

81.4
90.1
93.7
95.2
88.9
90.7
74.3
73.0
63.8
48.8
81.7
95.2
77.3
66.3
77.2
69.5
76.0
67.0
74.0
89.2

72.7
8 6 .7
93.4
95.4
96. 1
91.6
93.3
81.7
78.5
71.8
60.4

78.0
91.2
95.6
96.3
96.7
94.4
94.8
87.4
83.7
79.0
72.7
90.5
96.9

8 8.6

14.6
32.3

28.9
37.2
21.9
13.7
22.3
14.9
19.8
13.6
18.4
38.3

44.2

28.4
19.7
26.4
50. 5

18. 1

2 1.6

24.6

27.6

30.7

33.9

37.1

40.6

44.3

48.5

53.3

59.7

65.5

75.1

84.8

6 .6

8.5
35.3
26.8
25.9
10.4

.8
42.6
33.8
32. 8
15.6
10.5
36.6

13.5
46.4
37.3
36.2
18.6

17.6
54.0
44.5
43.5
24.0
19.2
51.3

19.6
57.9
48. 1
47.2
27.6
25.0
56.3

23.3
61.7
51.7
51.2
31.5
28.5
61.3

43.9
74.5
64.9
64.4
48. 1
42.4
77.0

55.1
78.4
69.6
67.8
52.8
48.3
80.8

71.5
84.6
77.8
73.8
61.6
62.2

6 6.6

34.7
69.3
59.3
59.6
41.5
38.4
71.9

88.8

40.8

15.4
50.3
40.9
39.8
21.3
14.5
46.1

28.3
65.3
55.3
55.4
35.8
33.7

28.2

1C.3
38.8
30.4
29.3
12.9
1 C.5
32.2

8 6.1

90.0
85.8
79.3
72.1
77.3
89.7

10 .6

30.3
2 2.6

22.5
7.8
7.6
23.4

8 .1

2 2.1

2 1.0

11

21.6

11.6

66.8

56.7
6 8 .2

54.4
65.0
84.1

8 6.2

96.2
83.8
76. 1
82.6
76.7
80.7
74.7
79.2
91.6

8 8.8

83.5
86.7
81.6
84.7
80.2
83.5
93.2

........................................................

13.7

17.9

2 2.1

26. 3

30.8

36.9

43.1

50.6

57.4

62.0

65.5

69.0

71.9

77.0

82.9

PUBLIC UTILITIES .....................................................

9.2

11.7

13.7

15.6

17.9

2 1.0

24.5

28.1

32.2

36.8

42.4

49.9

56.2

65.9

76.8

WHOLESALE TRACE ......................................................

23.8

28.1

32.1

35.8

39.9

44.3

48.8

53.4

57.8

62.1

66.7

71.7

74.9

79.6

84.2

communication




INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY OF
MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAN
$ 1800 $2400 $3000 $3600 $4200 $4800 $5400 $6000 $6600 $7200 $7800 $8400 $9000 $1000C $ 1 1 0 0 0

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY-- Continued
ETAIL TRADE ..........................................................

50.8

57.9

63.7

69. 1

73.9

77.5

80.6

83.2

85.5

87.6

89.5

91.5

92.8

94.6

96.0

34.7
49.0
47.1
39.2
52.6
34.6

45.9
62.4
59.8
5C.7
65.6
46.5
81.4
61.8

50.4
69.4
64. 7
55. 3
72. 1
52.1
85. 7
67.0

55.2
75.5

59.6
79.9
72.1
63.7
82.2
61.5
91.2
75.9

64.9
83.4
75.1

69.2

74.1

78.0
89.8
83.7
78.4
90.6
77.0
96.1
86.4

82.1
91.4

89.4
94. 1
90.9
86.7
94.7

8 8.2

86.7
93.1
89.0
84.5
93.7
84.0
97.5
90.2

92.6
95.5
93.6
89.8
95.8
89.6
98.5
92.9

94.9
96.5
95.9
92.3
96.7
92.4
98.8
94.4

AUTOMOTIVE CEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS .........................
APPAREL ANC ACCESSORY STORES ......................................
FURNITURE ANC HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ........................
EATING AND CRINKING PLACES ........................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES .......................................

49.3

40.8
56.2
54.1
45.5
59.4
40.9
76.1
56.4

FINANCE, INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE ................................

23.0

28.3

33.2

38.0

44.1

51.1

58.0

63.9

68.9

72.9

76.3

79.9

82.1

85.4

88.3

17.1

2 2.6

32.8
37.4
23.4
30.7
39.5
58. 1
49.5
50.8

40.1
44.6
26.9
36.7
46.1
63.1
55.5
54.6

49.6
52.5
31.3
43.8
52.1
67.3
63.0
58.9

58.9
59.1
37.5
51.1
59.0
71.3

6 6.1

71.7
70.5
48.6
61.7
69.2
79.7
75.7
69.4

76.0
75.1
53.8
65.9
72.6
82.8
79.1
71.6

79.4
79.0
57.7
69.7
76.0
85.3
81.3
73.7

83.5
82.4
64.0
73.3
78.9
87.9
83.2
76.6

85.5
84.6

88.4
87.6
71.2
80.9
83.9
91.3

90.3
90.8
74.4
85.4
86.4
93.3
88.9
82.8

BUILCING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ...........................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE ............* ...........................

68.6

68 .8

59.6
78.3
57.1
89.0
72.2

6 8.0

85.2
65.9
92.9
79.1

8 6 .1

8 8.0

78.0
71.6
87.4
70.0
94.2
81.9

80.9
75.0
89.2
73.9
95.2
84.4

8 6.1

81.4
92.0
80.2
96.8

8 6.0

97.9
91.3

INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS ANO SERVICE ...........................
CCMBINEC REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC ............................
HCLCiNG ANC OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ..........................

HOTELS ANC OTHER LODGING PLACES •••«••»••••••••••••••••••••*•*•
PERSONAL SERVICES •••••.•••••••••••••••••••••»•».... .
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ....................... ...... .
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ....................................
MOTION PICTURES •«•••••»•••«••••••••••••••••••»••••••••••••••••
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES, NEC ««•».••»».»•••••••••••••
MEDICAL ANC OTHER HEALTH SERVICES ••»•«••••••••»••••••••••••••• •
LEGAL SERVICES •••••»«•*»••«••••••••••••»••••••••••••••••••••••
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
MUSEUMS, BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ••••••••••••••••«••.»•«•
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS'..............................
p r i v a t e h o u s e h o l d s •••»•••»•»•••»•»••«••••••«••••••••••••••••••
MISCELLANECLS SERVICES
*




11.5
16.5
24.0
41.7
33.4
36.1

26.9
15.9
21.5
29.8
47.8
40.9
42.0

40.7

CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS .................................
SECURITY, COMMODITY BROKERS ANC SERVICES ........................

27.7
32.0
19.8
26.2
34.8
53.4
45.4
46.6

47.1

52.8

58.2

63.4

67.9

71.9

75.4

78.6

81.4

84.1

87.0

8 8.8

91.2

92.9

58.4
43.8
46.4
40.2
31.2
56.3
62.8
31.0
24.0
31.9
47.1
55.4
77.1
23.3

65.9
52.2
52.1
46.0
36.8
61.3

72.3
60. 1
56.6
5C.8
41.4
64.7
73.4
45.2
36.3
43.2
56.9
65.3
91.0
32.5

78.4
67. 8
60. 5
54.9
45.5
67.7
76.6
53. 8
41.2
47.5
60.6
69.5
94.2
36.2

83.5
75.2
64.8
59.6
49.6
70.3
79.7
62.1
46.7
51.4
64.3
73.6
96.5
39.6

87.2
80.3
68.5
63.9
53.6
72.5
82.2
69.3
53.0
55.2
68.9
77.3
97.6
43.6

90.0
84.2
71.8
67.8
58.0
75.0
84.6
75.5
59.8
58.9
72.3
80.5
98.4
47.7

92.0
87. 1
74.7
72.0
62.3
76.7

93.7
89.3
77.2
75.7

94.8
91.2
79.6
79.4
70.1
81.5
90.1
86.7
76.5
70.7
81.8

95.7
92.8
81.7
82.8
74.5
83.5
91.6
89.0
80.4
75.2
84.0
90.0
99.7
62.8

96.6
94.5
83.8
86.7
79.4
85.7
93.1
91.5
85.6
80.0
88.9
91.6
99.8
66.4

97.2
95.6
85.3
88.4
82.7
87.3
94.0
93.2
86.9
83.1
90.5
92.9
99.8
68.9

97.9
96.9
87.4
91.8
87.7
89.4
95.2
95.2
89.3
86.9
93.8
94.4
99.9
72.7

98.4
97.6
89.3
94.6
91.7
91.4
96.2
96.6
90.8
89.4
95.7
95.4
99.9
76.7

21.2

68.8

37.9
30.4
38.1
53.2
60.6
85.9
28.4

66.6

62.5

65.3
42.9
57.1
63.9
75.5
71.4
66.3

8 6.8

80.3
65.8
62.5
76.0
83.3
'98.8
52.1

6 6.2

79.6
88.5
84.0
71.5
66.6

79.1
85.9
99.3
55.8

8 8.2

99.6
59.2

66.8

76.3
80.8
89.3
84.1
78.4

8 6 .1

80.3

INDUSTRY

CUMU LATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL
EMPLOYMENT WAS LESS THAN
$1800 $2400 $3000 $3600 $4200 $4800 $5400 $6 ooa $6600 $7200 $7800 $8400 $9000 $ 1 0 0 0 0 $ 1 1 0 0 0

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .............................

7.7
1.8

3.0

4.6

METAL MINING .......................................................

0.7

1.8

3.3

BITUMINOUS COAL AND LIGNITE M I N I N G ................ '•.............
OIL ANC GAS EXTRACTION . . . ............... .........................
NCNMETALLIC MINERALS » EXCEPT FUELS ..............................

o

1.2

3 .4
2 .2

1.8

4.6
3.1

6.3
5.2

11.8

o.o
.b
I
2.9

16.3

21.7

27.9

34.0

40.0

45.7

51.3

6 .6

8.9

11.9

16.0

20.5

25.6

31.0

4.0

7.0
6 .8

9.4
17.2
9.2

8 .8

7.7

5.0
6.9
4.9
11.7
11.0

14.9
15.4

20.0
2 1.2

13.5
31.0
12.9
24.3
26.6

19.3
43.1
16.429.0
33.4

25.8
63.8
19.9
34.2
39.4

3 .4

3.7

56.5

61.6

67.5

71.9> 78.1

83.5

3T.7

48.1

56.2! 6 6 . 8

75.1

34.7
69 .0
25.3
39.9
47.9

47.0
79.3
39.0
48.2
56.9

58.4

71.6• 82.5

50. C1 63.2! 71*0
55.C> 64.7' 72.2
62.2! 69.8l 78.5

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .............................................. .

3. A

5.8

8 .6

11.-9

15.9

20 .0

24.6

29.6

34.6

39.6

44.6

49.9

54.3l 61.91 69.5

GENERAL BUILCING CONTRACTORS .....................................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS ...................................
SPECIAL TRACE CONTRACTORS .........................................

4.0
3.5

13.3
10.5
11.9

17.8
15.3
15.3

20.0

6 .0

9.7
7.4
8.7

21.9

2 .8

6.5
4.9

19.1

26.7
25.5
23.2

31.5
31.3
27.7

36.4
37.1
32.5

41.6
42.6
37.1

47.0
47.8
41.7

52.6
53.1
46.9

56.81 64.6» 72.1
72.7
57.7' 65.1
51.4t 58.81 6 6 . 6

2.4

4.5

7.7

12.4

18.3

24.6

30.9

37.2

43.5

49.7

55.8

62.9

68.3l 75.81 81.9

0 .2

C.6
7.9
7.7
6.2
11.8
8.9
5.5
2.7
7.9
1.8
1.5
4.4
9.5
3.4
1.6
3.2
2.3
2.5
1.5
2.3
8.8

1.5
11.5
12.5
11.6
24.1
15.3
9.8
5.0
10.7
2.8
2.4
7.5
18.8
5.6
2.8
5.3
3.6
4.9
2.5
4.3
14.6

2.5
15.9
19.2
20.7
42.0
23.6
16.8
7.7
14.2
4.7
3.6
12.7
32. 1
8.8
4. 3
8.3
5.5
8.7
4. 3
7.8
22.4

4.2
21.6
27.8
33.8
58.3
32.1
27.6
12.1
19.6
7.2
4.6
18.7
45.9
13.2
6.4
12.9
8.2
14.8
6.5
13.2
33.2

7.0
27.6
35.2
48.5
70.0
40.2
38.5
16.9
25.4
10.4
7.7
25.6
58.4
18.7
9.4
18.6
12.1
22.2
9.3
20.8
43.0

11.8

33.3
41.4
61.4
77.5
47.0
49.6
22.4
31.3
15.1
10.5
33.6
68.2
25.5
13.7
24.9
16.8
29.6
13.2
27.6
51.6

17.7
39.3
47.1
70.3
82.4
54.0
59.3
29.3
36.5
20.6
13.8
40.8
75.3
33.3
18.6
31.9
22.6
37.3
18.5
35.4
58.9

23.8
45.2
57.0
77.1
85.9
60.9
67.0
36.1
41.2
26.6
16.1
48.4
80.5
40.7
24.7
39.3
29.5
44.1
25.3
41.2
64.8

31.2
51.3
65.5
81.8
88.2
67.8
T2.8
43.1
46.3
33.4
20.8
54.6
84.5
48.0
32.3
46.1
36.3
50.6
32.3
47.5
69.2

37.9
57.4
72.7
85.5
89.8
73.3
77.9
50.6
50.9
40.0
25.2
60.7
87.7
55.0
40.3
53.0
43.8
56.4
40.8
53.7
74.1

47.4
64.6
78.8
88.8
91.5
78.8
82.9
59.3
57.0
48.4
31.2
67.5
90.5
62.9
49.2
61.5
53.1
62.6
50.5
61.0
78.9

54.5
70.Cl
82.4
91.C1
92.5>
82.3l
85.9i
66.2
61.9>
54.81
38.2!
72.6.
92.3l
68.9i
57.3l
67.6.
60.3t
67.2
57.5
65.8l
82.3l

ORDNANCE ANC ACCESSORIES ........ .................................
FCOC AND KINDRED PRODUCTS .........................................
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS .............................................

63.2!
78.31
88.7
93.5i
93.9(
86.9l
89.9i
75.9i
69.5i
64.7r
51.9>
79.5i
94.1
77.6•
69.5>
75.3l
69.9l
73.81
67.3l
72.5i
86.2

70.2
85.5
92.7
94.9
94.9
91.2
92.3
83.6
76.8
73.6
66.6
85.7
95.3
84.4
78.6
81.2
76.6
79.2
74.6
78.3
89.0

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PROOUCTS ..................................
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ..........................................
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ........................................
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL .....................................
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...............................
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..........................................
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .................................
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES ..........................

4.6
3.9
2.7
5.6
5.0
2.7
1.6
5.1
1.1
0.7
2.0
4.8
1.9
0.8
1.8
1.2
1. 1
0.7
1.1
4,9
3.2

4.9

6.8

8.8

11.5

14.5

17.8

21.5

26.1

31.3

37.3

45.6

53.3

66.01 78.9

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION .................................. '
........
LOCAL ANC INTERUR 8 AN PASSENGER TRANSIT ..........................
t r u c k i n g a n c w a r e h o u s i n g ............................... ...........
WATER TRANSPORTATION ......................... .....................
TRANSPORTATION BY AIR ..............................................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTATION ..........................................
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n s e r v i c e s ...........................................

0.4
9.5
3.7
3.7
0.7
0.7
4.4

0.6
13.1
5.8
5.8
1.3
0.7
6.6

1.2
17.1
8.5
8.1
1.9
0.7
8.8

1.9
20.9
11.0
10.3
3.0
0.7
12. 1

2.8
25.4
14.6
13.2
4.5
1.4
16.0

3.8
30.1
18.2
16.7
6.5
1.4
21.8

5.1
34.6
22.4
20.8
8.6
3.5
29.6

6.7
39.5
26.7
24.5
12.5
4.2
36.7

10.5
44.9
31.3
29.3
17.0
5.6
42.9

16.1
49.9
36.2
33.8
21.9
9.1
50.5

23.2
55.6
41.6
39.3
28.1
13.3
57.7

33.5
62.6
49.6
45.0
36.5
25.2
65.0

46.1
68.3
56.4
49.7
42.1
35.0l
70.2

64.8l
76.7
68.4
59.1
52.6.
53.1
77.9>

85.2
84.5
79.6
67.8
65.4
69.9
83.8

1.6

3.1

5.5

8 .9

13 4

20 6

28 •2

37.2

45 8

51 5

55 9

60 3

1.2

1.9

2.7

3.9

5.9

8.6

12.2

16.0

20.7

26.0

32.3

40.8

48.1

59.5

72.1

4.3

6.6

9.4

12.6

17.2

22.4

28.0

33.9

39.8

45.9

51.9

59.0

63.8

70.7

77.3

APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ..............................
LUMBER ANC WOOD PRODUCTS ..........................................
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES ............................................
CHEMICALS ANC ALLIED PRODUCTS ....................................
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS ......................................
RUBBER ANC PLASTIC PROOUCTS, NEC .............................. •

rru Miik i i r i T t n b

________________________________ ____________

WHOLESALE TRACE ............... .......................................




INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL
EMPLOYMENT WAS LESS THAN
H 8 0 0 $2400 $3000 $3600 $4200 $4800 $5400

$6000 $6600

$7200 |$7800 $8400 $900ojlnooco| $11000

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL e c o n o m y
RETAIL TRADE ..............................
BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE ...........
FCOD STORES .............................
AUTOMOTIVE CEALERS AND SERVICE STATIONS .
APPAREL ANC ACCESSORY STORES .............
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ...
EATING ANO CRINKING PLACES ...............
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ..............

17.9

26.8

35.2

43.8

51.9

58.3

63.9

68.5

72.7

76.5

80.0

83.8

86.3

89.7

92.4

9.3
14.8
15.9
9.3
20.7
10.3
31.6
17.9

14.6
24.0
24.6
14.4
3C.0
15.2
45.3
26.3

19.4
33.4
33.0
20.2
38.9
21.1
56.2
34.0

24.8
45.2
40. 3
25.6
49.7
27.4
65.5
42. 3

31.3
55.7
47.0
31.4
60.4
34.0
73.0
50.8

37.6
63.5
52.3
38.1
67.5
40.6
78.2
57.2

45. 0
69.6
57.1
45.2
73.2
46.9
82.3
62.9

51.3
74.4
61.9
51.0
77.0
52.7
85.3
67.5

58.8
78.0
66.7
56.8
80.4
58.3
87.9
71.7

65.3
81.1
71.4
62.7
82.9
63.1
89.9
75.5

71.4
83.9
75.6
67.7
85.5
68.1
91.7
78.7

78.5
87.0
80.5
73.0
88.6
74.2
93.5
82.2

82.9
89.0
83.8
77.1
90.3
77.6
94.5
84.3

88.0
91.7
88.5
82.6
92.3
83.4
96.0
87.3

91.7
93.7
92.6
86. 8
93.9
88.2
97.0
90.0

FINANCE* INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE .......

5.2

8.0

11.4

15.9

23.3

32.3

41.5

49.2

56.0

61.6

66.2

71.4

74.7

79.3

83.5

BANKING .....................................
CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ........
SECURITY* COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES
INSURANCE CARRIERS ........................
INSURANCE AGENTS. BROKERS ANC SERVICE ...
REAL ESTATE ................................
COMBINED REAL ESTATE. INSURANCE. ETC ....
HOLDING ANC OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES ..

3.0
5.0
1.1
2.9
6.6
13.2
9.5
9.2

5.6
7.5
1.8
4.6
9.8
18.7
16.4
12.0

9.0
10.6
3.3
7.1
13.7
24.2
20.1
15.6

13.5
15.4
5.4
10.8
18.4
30.4
25.5
21.1

22.4
24.2
8.9
17.2
26.4
37.2
35.0
27.5

34.4
35.2
13.7
26.0
33.9
43.0
44.5
32.8

46.0
44.1
20.9
35.2
42.5
49. 3
50.0
38.4

55.0
52.3
27.0
42.7
49.6
56.1
58.0
43.0

62.5
59.3
33.8
48.8
56.6
62.9
63.5
47.9

68.1
65.5
39.7
54.5
61.0
68.4
66.8
51.3

72.5
70.9
43.9
59.5
65.7
72.5
70.1
55.1

77.9
75.4
52.3
64.6
70.2
77.3
73.0
59.3

80.7
78.5
56.3
68.5
72.9
80.4
74.5
62:6

84.5
82.7
62.4
74.6
77.2
84. 1
78.5
65.9

87.2
87.2
66.8
80.6
81.0
87.8
83.2
69.5

SERVICES ......................................
HCTELS ANO CTHER LODGING PLACES .........
PERSONAL SERVICES .........................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES .........
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES ......
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES ............
MOTION PICTURES ............................
AMUSEMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES, NEC ..
MEDICAL ANC OTHER HEALTH SERVICES .......
LEGAL SERVICES .............................
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ......................
MUSEUMS* BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS ..
NONPROFIT m e m b e r s h i p ORGANIZATIONS ......
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ........................
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES ....................




13.8

19.8

26.2

33.3

40. 7

47.4

53.4

58.8

63.8

68.4

72.6

77.5

80.7

84.8

87.8

19.4
14.1
11.4
9.8
7.8
24.3
21.8
8.1
7.1
9.7
13.8
20.7
64.7
5.0

29.5
22.7
16.7
14.6
11.6
30.7
30.1
13.5
10.9
14.9
19.9
26.6
77.4
7.6

40.6
33.8
22.0
19.6
15.4
35.4
37.0
21.0
14.8'
19.6
25.4
33.0
85.3
9.7

52.6
45.6
27.4
24.2
18. 1
38.8
43.3
31.9
19.0
24. 1
29.3
39.5
90.4
12.7

63.0
57.5
33.9
30.1
23.1
42.8
49.5
43.3
25.9
28.8
34.8
46.8
93.8
16.2

70.6
65.9
39.9
35.5
27.9
46.7
55.1
53.7
33.2
33.4
41.4
53.6
95.7
20.1

76.6
72.3
45.6
41.6
33.6
50.4
60.4
62. 5
42.3
38.0
45.9
59.7
97.3
25.0

81.2
77.3
50.9
48.0
39.3
53.9
65.8
69.6
50.8
42.9
53.0
65.0
98.0
30.1

85.0
81. 1
55.6
54.7
45.7
58.6
69.8
75.2
58.8
48.5
59.1
70.2
98.8
34.6

87.7
84.4
59.9
60.8
51.9
62.4
73.8
79.4
65.7
54.4
63.0
74.8
99.2
39.3

89.9
87.2
63.6
66.6
58.3
65.6
77.4
82.9
71.3
60.8
68.5
78.5
99.4
43.6

92.1
90.2
68.0
73.9
66.0
70.4
81.8
86.8
78.5
68.1
77.9
81.8
99.6
49.4

93.3
92. 1
71.0
77.7
71.8
73.3
84.1
89.4
80.4
73.0
80.7
84.8
99.7
53.0

95. 1
94.4
75.3
84.6
79.9
78.1
87.2
92.5
83.8
79.0
86.7
87.9
99.8
59.2

96.5
95.7
79.0
89.9
86.2
81.8
89.8
94.7
86.3
83.2
91.7
90.0
99.8
65.1

INOUSTRY

CUMU L A T I V E P E R C E N T D I S T R I B U T I O N OF F OUR QU A R T E R W O R K E R S WHOSE ANN U A L E A R N I N G S
I N D U S T R Y OF M A JOR E A R N I N G S WAS LESS THAN
(1800 (2400 (3000 (3600 (4200

PR I V A T E N O N A G R I C U L T U R A L

E C O NOMY ..................... ........

(4800

21.7

27.9

34.0

7.7

11.8

16.3

(5400 (6000 (6600

(7200

51.3

56.5

61.6

40. 0

45. 7

IN THEIR

(7800 (8400 (9000 (lOGOoj( 1 1000
67.5

71.9

78.1

83.5

M I N I N G .................. * .................................... * ............

3.2

5.3

7.2

9.7

12.3

15.5

19.4

23.7

28.8

33.8

40.2

50.1

57.8

68.1

76.0

METAL M I N I N G ............... ...........................................
A N T H R A C I T E M I N I N G .....................................................
B I T U M I N O U S C O A L AND L I G N I T E M I N I N G ...............................
OIL AND GAS E X T R A C T I O N ..............................................
N C N M E T A L L I C MIN E R A L S * E X C E P T F UELS ...............................

2.5
0.0
1.9

3.7
0.0
2.5
7.4
6.6

5.3
3.4
3.4
9.4
9.6

6.5
5.2
5.7
12.8
12.2

7.9
10.3
7.4
15.9
15.6

9.7
12.1
9.7
19.4
20.3

12.6
20.7
12.3
23.2
25.6

16.2
37.9
15.9
27.5
31.2

21.8
51.7
19.5
32.2
37.8

27.6
69.0
22.7
36.9
44.1

37.2
74.1
27.8
42.2
51.3

4 9.9
82.8
40.6
50.0
59.9

60.5
89.7
51.7
56.3
64.6

72.9
94.8
64.5
66.2
71.6

83.3
96.6
71.7
73.5
79.7

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

4.4
3.3

..................................................

5.3

8.3

11.7

15.2

19.4

23.7

28.1

33.0

37.9

42.9

47.8

52.8

56.9

64.0

71.2

G E N E R A L B U I L D I N G C O N T R A C T O R S .......................................
H E A V Y C O N S T R U C T I O N C O N T R A C T O R S ....................................
S P E C I A L T R A C E C O N T R A C T O R S ..........................................

7.1
5.7
6.0

10.7
9.2
9.0

15.0
12.7
12.5

19.0
16.5
16. 1

24.1
21.5
20.0

29.0
27.1
23.9

34.1
32.7
28.3

39.3
38.8
32.8

44.5
44.3
37.7

49.9
49.9
42.4

55.1
54.7
47.0

59.7
59.0
51.9

63.3
62.8
55.8

69.5
69.3
62.6

75.8
76.1
69.7

3.4

5.9

9.3

14. 1

20.0

26.3

32.5

38.9

45.1

51.3

57.3

64.2

69.4

76.8

82.6

0.9
6.9
5.2
5.0
7.4
7.6
5.9
3.2
6.8
2.0
1.9
4.3
8.1
3.7
1.8
3.4
2.4
2.5
1.6
2.4
7.9

2.1
10.9
9.9
9.3
14.2
12.7
9.3
5.0
9.9
3.3
3.1
7.5
13.7
6.1
3.2
5.8
3.9
4.7
2.9

3.2
14.7
15.1
15.0
26.1
19.1
14.2
7.6
12.9
4.8
3.8
11.2
22.1
9.3
4.9
8.2
5.6
7.5
4.5
6.8
18.7

4.9
19. 1
21.6
24.0
43. 8
27.2
2C.9
1C.6
16.7
6.8
5.2
16.0
34.5
12.9
6.6
11.5
8. 1
11.3
6.6
11.0
26.6

6.9
24.6
30.0
36.9
59.7
35.6
31.2
15.0
22.0
9.6
6.9
22.0
48.1
17.1
8.7
16.4
11.2
17.6
9.0
16.3
36.5

9.8
30.3
36.9
50.7
71.0
43.0
42.2
19.8
27.6
13.1
9.8
28.4
60.1
22.8
11.7
22.2
15.4
24.8
12.2
23.0
46.1

14.5
36.0
43.0
63.3
78.3
49. 4
53.0
25.3
33.2
17.6
12.3
36.4
6 9.7
29.3
15.9
28.4
20.1
32.3
16.1
29.8
54.5

20.5
41.8
48.5
71.7
83.1
56.6
61.9
31.9
38.2
23.2
16.2
43.2
76.5
36.8
20.9
35.1
25.8
39.9
21.6
37.9
61.5

26.7
47.6
58.1
78.3
86.6
63.2
69.0
38.6
42.9
28.9
18.6
50.7
81.7
43.9
26.9
42.5
32.5
46.7
28.4
43.5
67.6

34.1
53.4
67.1
82.8
88.8
69.6
74.6
45.3
47.8
35.6
23.3
56.9
85.8
50.8
34.6
49.2
39.3
53.2
35.7
50.1
71.4

40.9
59.3
74.6
86.3
90.2
74.7
79.5
52.5
52.2
42.0
27.4
62.8
88.7
57.4
42.7
56.2
46.8
58.9
44.3
56.1
75.7

49. 6
66.3
81.3
89.5
91.8
79.7
84.2
61.2
58.4
50.0
33.0
69.2
91.5
64.7
51.4
64.2
55.8
64. 5
53.2
62.9
80.4

56.5
71.4
84.7
91.6
92.8
83.1
86.9
67.9
63.2
56.3
39.8
74.2
93.0
70.2
59.5
69.9
62.5
68.9
59.6
67.4
83.5

64.8
79.5
89.7
93.8
94. 1
87.3
90.6
77.1
70.7
66.0
53.4
80.6
94.4
78.8
71.2
77.1
71.4
75.0
69.0
73.9
87.1

71.5
86.6
93.2
95.1
95.0
91.5
92.7
84.3
77.8
74.7
67.9
86.6
95.5
85.2
80.2
82.4
77.6
80.2
75.8
79.3
89.7

...........................................................

4.5

6.7

8.9

11.4

14.2

17.2

20.5

24.2

28.6

33.6

39.6

47.8

55.3

67.7

80.3

R A I L R O A D T R A N S P O R T A T I O N .............................................
LOCAL ANO IISTERURBAN P A S S E N G E R T R A N S I T ..........................
T R U C K I N G ANC W A R E H O U S I N G ............................................
W A T E R T R A N S P O R T A T I O N .................................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N BY AIR ...............................................
PIPE LINE T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ............................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N S E R V I C E S .............................................

0.8
11.5
5.8
5.6
1.3
0.7
6.4

1.5
16.0
8.7
8. 1
2.3
0.7
9.8

2.3
19.6
11.8
10.9
3.4
2.8
12.9

2.9
23.7
14.9
13.8
5.0
2.8
17.8

3.8
28.0
18.6
17.2
7.1
2.8
21.5

5.0
32.7
22.5
20.5
9.3
4.9
27.4

6 .5
37.0
26.5
24.9
11.3
34.0

8.2
41.8
30.7
28.7
15.0
11.2
40.3

12.1
46.8
35.1
33.5
18.9
15.4
46.8

17.5
51.6
39.5
38.9
23.5
20.3
53.7

24.7
57.2
44.7
44.0
29.9
25.9
61.0

35.3
64.4
52.3
50.3
37.8
30.8
68.2

48. 1
69.9
58.6
54.9
43.4
37.8
73.5

67.1
78.4
69.8
63.2
53.9
54.5
81.C

87. 1
85.9
80.7
71.0
66.5
72.7
86.0

2.7

4.8

7.5

1C.9

15.5

22.2

29.7

38.6

46. 9

52.6

56.8

61.1

64.8

71.2

78.5

................... .................................. .

1.9

2.8

4.1

5.5

7.4

10.3

14.1

17.9

22.4

27.4

33.7

42.3

49.6

60.8

73.3

........ .................................................

6.1

9.0

12.4

16.0

20.5

25.7

31.3

37.1

42.8

48.6

54.4

61. 1

65.5

72.0

78.3

MANUFACTURING

............................................................

35

O R D N A N C E a n c a c c e s s o r i e s ............................................
F O O D AND K I N D R E D P R O D U C T S ..........................................
T C B A C C C M A N U F A C T U R E R S ................................................
T E X T I L E M I L L P R O D U C T S ................................................
A P P A R E L AND O T H E R T E X T I L E P R O D U C T S ...............................
L U M B E R AND W O O D P R O D U C T S ................................... ........
F U R N I T U R E AN D F I X T U R E S ..............................................
PA P E R AND A L L I E O P R O D U C T S ..........................................
p r i n t i n g a n c p u b l i s h i n g ................ ............................
C H E M I C A L S AND A L L I E D P R O D U C T S .....................................
P E T R O L E U M AND C O A L P R O D U C T S ........................................
R U B B E R ANC P L A STIC P R O D U C T S , NEC ..................................
L E A T H E R ANC L E A T H E R P R O D U C T S .......................................
STONE, C LAY, AND G L A S S P R O D U C T S ...................................
P R I M A R Y ME T A L INDU S T R I E S ............................................
F A B R I C A T E D METAL P R O D U C T S ........................................ .
M A C H I N E R Y , EXCE P T E L E C T R I C A L .......................................
E L E C T R I C A L E Q U I P M E N T AND S U P P L I E S ................................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N E Q U I P M E N T ...........................................
I N S T R U M E N T S ANO R E L A T E D P R O D U C T S ..................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S M A N U F A C T U R I N G I NDUSTRIES ..........................
TRANSPORTATION

COMMUNICATION

.............................................................

P UBLIC U T I L I T I E S
WHOLESALE

trace




4.4
12.6

7.7

INOUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THEIR
INOUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAN
$1800 S2A00 $3000 $3600 $A2C0 $A800 |$5A00 |$6000 |$6600 |$7200 $7800 ]$ 8 4 0 0 |$900o|$ ioooc|$ 1 1 0 0 0

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL EC ONOMY-- Continued

RETAIL TRADE .......................................................
BUILDING MATERIALS AND FARM EQUIPMENT ........................
RETAIL GENERAL MERCHANDISE ....................................
FCOC STORES ......................................................
AUTOMOTIVE CEALERS ANC SERVICE STATIONS .....................
APPAREL ANC ACCESSORY STORES ..................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS STORES ........................
EATING ANC CRINKING PLACES ....................................
MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL STORES ...................................
FINANCE,

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ............................

CREDIT AGENCIES OTHER THAN BANKS ..............................
SECURITY, .COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVICES ....................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERVICE ........................

2 0 .2

29.A

37.8

A6.2

5A.0

60.1

65.5

86.9

90.1

92.7

73.0
84.8
76.6
69.3

84.0
89.6
8A.7
78.0
90.7
79.0
95.0
8A.9

8 8.8

59.A
81.2
61.3
89.0
73.3

67.2
82.0
72.5
6A.7
83.7
65.7
90.9
76.7

79.9
87.8
81.A
74.A
89.0
76.0
9A.1
83.1

92.0
89.2
83.2
92.7
84.3
96.3
87.7

92.3
93.9
93.1
87.3
94.2

61.3
79.1

28.6
A7.6
A2.7
30.5
52. A
31.2
6 8 .2
A5.5

3A.8
57.7
A8.9
36.3
62.6
37.8
75.3
53.6

AO.9
65.2
53.9
A2.2
69.3
A3.7
80.1
59.7

A 8 .A
71.1
58.6
A8 .6
7A.3
50.0
83.8
6A.9

54.3
75.7
63.2
53.9
78.1
55.6

6 .8

10 .2

IA.2

18.9

26.1

3A.8

A3.8

51.4

57.9

63.2

67.6

72.5

75.6

80.0

84.0

A.5
6.9

11.6

8 .0

12.6

l'6.7

22.7
19.3
16.7

16.A
20. A
8.9
14.4
21.9
3A.9
29.6
26.9

25.0
28.5

A.A

7.8
10.7
3.9
7.0

29.7
A l.5
38.3
32.1

36.5
38.3
16.6
29.3
37.1
A7.5
A7.8
36.6

A8.1
A6.7
23.8
38.1
A5.9
53.A
51.8
A1.6

56.9
54.5
30.0
45.4
52.4
59.9
58.8
46.9

63.9
61.2
36.3
51.1
59.3

69.A
67.2
42.4
56.3
63.7
71.7

73.6
72.1
46.7
61.1
67.9
75.5
71.9
58.0

78.7
76.7
5A.7
65.7
71.9
79.8
74. 8
62.6

81.4
79.7
58.2
69.6
74.3
82.2
76.3
65.2

85.0
83.5
63.8
75.5
78.5
85.6
79.2
6 8 .A

87.5
87.8
67.8
81.2
81.8
88.9
83.6
72.5

2 1.2

2 .1

15.0
6 .2
1 0 .A

17.1
28.8
2A.1
21.5

12 .2
20.8

15.2

2 1.6

28.0

35.0

A2.3

A8.9

5A.8

HOTELS ANC OTHER LODGING PLACES ................... ...........
PERSONAL SERVICES ...............................................
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS SERVICES ...............................
AUTO REPAIR, SERVICES, AND GARAGES ............................
MISCELLANEOUS REPAIR SERVICES .................................

2A . 1
16.A
15.0
13.6

3A.3
25.5

A5.A
36.3
26.5
23.9
18.6
38.0
A2.1
23.2
18.0
2 1 .A
28.7
36.3

56.7
A8.0
31.9
28. 8

66.5
59.5
38.5
3A.8
27.7
A6.2
53.6
A5.0
29.0
30.3
39.8
A9.8
9A.5
19.5

73.9
67.7
AA.3
AO.9
32.5
A9.9
58.8
55.0
36.A
3A.9
A5.3
56.4
96.2
23.7

79.7
73.9
A9.6
A6.9
38.3
5A.2
63.9
63.8
AA.9
39.4
50.8
62.3
97.6
28.5




84.5

77.5

23.A
36.2
35.6
25.2
A2.0
2A.A
59.5
37.6

12.8
11.8

MUSEUMS* BOTANICAL, ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS .......................
NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS ...........................
PRIVATE HOUSEHOLDS ..................... ............ ............
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES .........................................

80.8

73.9

17.9
27.3
27.6
19.3
33.1
18.3
A9.2
30.1

.1 2 . 1
17.8
19.0
13.A
23.9
13.1
36.2

COMBINED REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC .........................
HCLCING ANC OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANIES .......................

AMUSEMENT ANC RECREATION SERVICES, NEC .......................
MEDICAL ANC OTHER HEALTH SERVICES .............. ..............
LEGAL SERVICES ..................................................

69.8

10 .2

27.5
27.3
9.9
8 .8
10 .8

16.0
23.2
66.9
6.7

2 1.0

19.1
1A.7
33.5
35.1
15.7
13.3
16.5
23.2
29.5
79.0
9.9

8 6.2
12.8

22.6

A?.2
A7.8
33.9
22.5
25.8
33.7
A2.7
91. 1
15.9

8 6.6

69.2

6 8.0

66.6
6A.6

68 .6

8 6.0

70.3
92.5
79.7

8 8.6

97.2
90.2

51.5

5A.6

60.1

65.0

69.5

73.7

78.3

81.4

85.A

88.3

83.7
78.5
54.4
53.1
AA.3
57.0
69.0
70.7
53.0
AA. 1
56.9
67.2
98.2
33.6

87.1
82.1
58.9
59.3
50.0
61.9
72.6
76.1
60.3
A9.8
62.A
72.2
99.0
38.3

89.3
85.3
63.0
65.A
55.5
65.2
76.2
80.1
67.2
55.8
67.4
76.6
99.3
A2.6

91.1
87.8

93.0
90.7
70.3
77.2
69.0
72.7
83.A
87.2
79.6
69.5
80.1
83.1
99.7
52.0

94.1
92.6
73.1
80.1
73.9
75.7
85.5
89.8
81.4
74.3
82.9
85.8
99.8
55.5

95.6
94.8
76.8

96.7
96.0
80.3
90.8
87.6
83.7
90.9
94.9

6 6.6

70.6
61.5
6 8 .A

79.9
83.5
72.5
62.2
71.3
80.1
99.6
A7.0

8 6.1

81.5
79.8
88.4
92.9
84.7
8 0 .0

89.0
88.7
99.9
61.0

8 6.8

83.8
92.3
90.7
99.9
66.7

Table A -9 .

Industry em ploym ent, 1970

(N u m b e r in th ou sand s)______.
W o r k e r s who had
M a j o r p r o po r ti on of thier e a r n in g s in this indust ry

So me ear n in g s in i ndu st r y

INDUSTRY
N umbe r

Percen t

N u m be r

Percen t

P e r c e n t of
w o r k e r s wh<
had s ome
ear n in g s in
the indust ry

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY

79, 326
873

100. 0
I. 1

79, 326

100. 0

100. 0

MINING ................................ .

873

1. 1

745

.9

85. 3

.2

. 1

(2
)
.2
. 5
. 3

112
7
160
299
169

( 3)
.2
.4
.2

92. 4
95. 8
93.2
81.2
79- 5

METAL MINING .......................
ANTHRACITE MINING ................. ,
BITUMINOUS CCAL AND LIGNITE MINING
OIL ANC GAS EXTRACTION ...........
nc nm eta lli c m i n e r a l s , except fuels
CONTRACT CONSTRUCT ION ..........
GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS .
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS
SPECIAL TRACE CONTRACTORS ....
manufacturing

.............................

ORDNANCE ANC ACCESSORIES ..............
FCOC ANC KINCRED PRODUCTS ............ .
TCBACCC m a n u f a c t u r e r s ................. .
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS ..................
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ....
LUMBER ANC WCCO PRODUCTS ...............
FURNITURE ANC FIXTURES ................ .
PAPER AND ALLIED PROCUCTS ............ .
PRINTING ANC PUBLISHING ................
CHEMICALS ANC ALLIED PROCUCTS ........
PETROLEUM ANC COAL PRODUCTS .......... .
RUBBER ANC PLASTIC PROCUCTS, NEC .... .
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS ......... .
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS .......
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ..............
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS ............
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL .........
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ....
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..............
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .....
MISCELLANECUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
TRANSPORTATION ...........................
RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ...............
LOCAL AND INTERURBAN PASSENGER TRANSIT
TRUCKING ANC WAREHOUSING ..............
WATER TRANSPORTATION ..................
TRANSPORT AT ICN BY AIR .................
PIPE LINE TRANSPORTATION ..............
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES ...............
COMMUNICATION
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRACE

Se e footnotes at end of table,




121
7
173
368
212

5, 843

7. 4

4, 850

6. 1

82. 2

2, 057
1, 697
3, 094

2. 6
2. 1
3. 9

1, 371
1, 177
2, 249

1. 7
1. 5
2. 8

66. 6
69. 4
72. 7

25, 320

31. 9

24 ,054

3 0. 3

95. 0

3 58
032
143
366
103
936
704
995
511
374
256
895
486
988
645
099
661
534
494
560
750

. 5
3.8
.2
1. 7
2. 7
1.2
. 9
1. 3
1. 9
1. 7
. 3
1. 1
. 6
1. 2
2. 1
2. 6
3. 4
3. 2
3. 1
. 7
. 9

325
2, 456
114
1.215
1, 884
734
541
857
1. 312
1. 252
225
719
407
792
1, 508
1, 687
2, 351
2, 297
2, 269
500
588

.4
3. 1
. 1
1. 5
2.4
. 9
. 7
1. 1
1. 7
1. 6
. 3
. 9
. 5
1. 0
I. 9
2. 1
3. 0
2. 9
2. 9
. 6
.7

90.
81.
79.
88.
8 978.
76.
8 6.
86.
91.
87.
8 0.
83.
8 0.
91.
80.
88.
90.
91.
8 9.
78.

4, 04 5

5. 1

3, 349

4. 2

82.8

739
596
1, 800
377
418
16
221

.
.
2.
.
.

.
.
1.
.
.

(2
)
. 3

733
440
1, 324
292
399
16
151

(2
)
. 2

99.2
73. 9
73. 6
77, 6
95. 4
101. 8
68. 4

1, 369

1.7

1. 307

1. 7

95. 4

1. 1

96. 2

6.2

8 0. 1

3,
1.
2,

1,
1,

1,
2,
2,
2,
2,

9
8
3
5
5

879

1. 1

846

6, 141

7. 7

4, 921

9
6
7
4
5

6
0
9
9
6
4
8
2
8
1
8
4
9
1
7
4
4
6
0
3
3

( N u m b e r in thousands)
W o r k e r s that had
Some ear n in g s in indust ry

M a j o r p r opo rt io n o f their e a r n in g s in this i ndu st ry

IN DUSTRY
N umb e r

PRI VATE N O N A G R I C U L T U R A L

Percent

N umbe r

Percent

P e r c e n t of
w o r k e r s who
had s ome
e a r ni n gs in
the i ndu st ry

E C O N O M Y ---- Continued

...................................................

23. 7

15, 458

7 94
208
911
942
509
747
271
240

1. 0
5. 3
3. 7
3. 7
1. 9
• •99
6. 6
2. 8

592
194
327
060
140
553
899
680

5, 239

•6 6
.

4, 49 5

5. 7

8 5. 8

1, 2 98
491
247
1, 2 70
386
1, 375
49
184

1. 6
. 6
. 3
1. 7
. 5
1. 7
. 1
.2

1. 238
404
221
1, 218
32 9
962
40
95

1.
.
.
1.
.
1.
.
.

95.
82.
89.
88.
85.
7 0.
82.
51.

........................................................

22, 165

27. 9

19, 348

24. 4

87. 3

HCT ELS ANC CTHER L ODG IN G PLACES ........................
PER SONAL SERVI CES ..........................................
MI S CE LL A NE OU S BUS IN ES S SERV ICE S ........................
AUTC REPAIR, SER VICES, AND G AR AG ES ....................
M I SC EL L AN EO U S REPAIR SERVI CES ...........................
MOTION PIC TURES .............................................
AMUSEME NT ANC REC R EA TI O N SERVICES, NEC ...............
MED ICAL ANC OTHER HE A L TH SERV ICE S ......................
LEGAL SERVIC ES ..............................................
ED U CAT IO NAL SER VICES ......................................
MUSEUMS, BOTANICA L, ZO OLO GI CAL GA R D EN S ...............
NO NP ROF IT MEM BE RS HI P O R G A N I ZA TI O NS ....................
PRI VATE HO US EHO LD S .........................................
M IS CE LL AN E OU S SERVI CE S ..........................■
'
.........

1, 806
1, 555
3, 549
750
352
397
1, 167
4, 428
345
5, 326
36
2, 396
895
948

2. 3
2. 0
4. 5
1. 0
. 5
. 5
1. 5
5. 6
. 5
6. 7
(1
2
)
3. 0
1. 1
1. 2

1, 279
1. 299
2 . 2 04
484
251
266
758
4, 151
303
4, 949
32
1. 778
825
763

1. 6
1. 6
2. 8
. 6
. 3
. 3
1. 0
5. 2
.4
6. 2
(2
)
2. 2
1. 0
1. 0

70. 8
83. 5
62. 1
64. 6
7 1.4
67. 2
65. 0
93. 7
87. 6
92. 9
86. 9
74. 2
92. 2
8 0. 5

trade

BUILD ING

EQ UI P ME NT ................
retail general merchandise
..............................
FCCC STORES ..................................................
AU T OMO TI VE CEALER S AND SERVICE S TA TIO NS ..............
APPAREL AND ACC ES SO RY STORES ............................
FU RNI TUR E ANC HOME FU RN IS H IN GS STORES ................
EATING AND CRI NK IN G PLACES ..............................
M I S C E LL A NE OU S RETAIL STORES .............................
FIN ANCE.

MA TER IAL S

INSURANCE.

AND FARM

AND REAL ESTATE

.....................

BANK ING .......................................................
CREDIT AGE NCIES OTHER THAN BANKS .......................
SECURITY, C C MM OC I TY BRO KER S AND SERV ICE S .............
INS URANCE CAR RI ER S .........................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, B ROK ER S ANC SERVICE ..............................
REAL ESTATE ..................................................
COM BIN ED REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC ..................
HO LD ING ANC OTHER INVE STM EN T C O MP A NI ES ...............
SE RV ICE S

4,
2,
2,
1,
5,
2,

1 W o r k e r s who had s o m e e a r ni n g s in m o r e than 1 i ndu st ry gr oup and in m o r e
than 1 i n d u st r y d i vi si on , a r e incl ude d in the count of those with s ome e ar ni ngs in each
such i n d u st r y gr oup and d iv is i on .
Thus s o me w r o k e r s a r e counted m o re than once and,
t h e r e f o r e , detai l does not add to total.
2 The n u m b e r of w o r k e r s who r e c e i v e d the m a j o r p r opo rt io n of their ear ni ngs in
each i n du s t r y gr ou p is an un dupl icated count of w o r k e r s ,
as is the count of m a j o r
e a r n e r s at the d i v is i on a l l e v e l .
T h e r e f o r e , detai l by i ndu st r y gr ou p and detail by d i v i ­




3,
2,
2,
1.
3,
1.

19. 5

82. 2

18, 800

retail

.
4.
2.
2.
1.
.
4.
2.

8
0
9
6
4
7
9
1

6
5
3
5
4
2
1
1

74.
7 5.
80.
7 0.
75.
73.
74.
75.

5
9
0
0
6
9
0
0

4
2
4
9
1
0
1
5

sion do ( excep t f o r rounding) equal the total f o r the p ri va te n o na g r i c ul t u r a l economy.
H ow e v e r , b ec a us e the test us e d to a s s i g n w o r k e r s to an in du st r y in appl ied i ndep end ­
ently at each l e v e l of i n du st r y c l as s if i c a t i o n ( e . g . , i n du st r y g r ou p o r d ivisi on) the n u m ­
b e r of w o r k e r s in the m a j o r in du st r y g rou ps that c o m p r i s e a d iv is ion m a y not equal the
total f o r the d ivis ion.
3 L e s s than 0. 05 perce nt.

Workers
Some

IN DUSTRY

White
Total

PRI VATE NO N A G R I C U L T U R A L

e ar ni ngs in the i ndu st r y

Men

that had
M a j o r por ti on of their e a r n in g s in this in du st r y

N eg ro
W o me n

T otal

M en

White
Women

To tal

M en

Negro
Women

T otal

M en

W o me n

ECONOMY ..........

70,618

42 ,214

28,404

B, 708

4, 91 7

3, 792

70,618

42 ,214

28,404

8, 708

4, 917

3, 792

.................................................

837

775

61

37

35

2

716

661

54

30

27

2

1 19
7
167
356
194

113
7
163
319
181

6

2

2

2

2

5
12
18

5
11
18

2
1

106
7
152
257
143

6

5
37
13

1 11
7
1.56
290
155

4
34
12

5
9
14

5
8
13

1

5, 186

4, 837

349

657

633

24

4, 305

4, 024

283

499

482

16

1, 791
1,472
2, 780

1,671
1,407
2, 609

120
66
171

267
225
314

257
220
304

11
5
11

1, 216
1, 029
2, 053

1, 126
975
1,916

90 •
55
138

155
148
196

150
144
188

5
4
8

.........................................

22 ,.508

15,523

6, 985

2, 812

1,958

852

21 ,488

14,707

6, 781

2, 567

1, 769

797

OR C NA NC E ANC A C C E S S OR IE S ........................
FOOD AND KI NC RE O P RO DU C TS .......................
TOBAC CO MA N U F A C T U R E R S ............................
TEXTILE MILL PR ODU CT S ............................
AP PAR EL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PROD LCT S ...........
LUM BER AND WCCC PR O DU CT S ........................
FUR NI TU RE ANC FI X TU RE S ..........................
PAPER ANC ALLIED P RO CU C TS .......................
PR IN TI NG ANC P U BL I SH IN G .........................
C H EM IC A LS ANC ALL I EC P R OD U CT S .................
PET RO LE UM AND COAL PR O C UC TS ....................
RUBBER ANC PLA STIC P ROC UC TS, NEC ..............
LE ATH ER ANC LE ATH ER PR OD U CT S ...................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLAS S P RO DU CTS ...............
PRIM ARY METAL IN DU STR IE S ........................
F A e R I C A T E C METAL P RO DU C T S .......................
MAC HIN ERY , EXCEPT EL E C TR IC A L ...................
EL EC TRI CA L EQ UIP MEN T AND SU PPLIES .............
T R A N S PO R TA TI O N E Q U I PM EN T ........................
IN S TR UM ENT S ANC REL A TE D P RO DUC TS ..............
M I S C E LL A NE OU S MA N U F A C T U R I N G INDUSTRIES ......

326
2, 579
93
1, 163
1,846
759
609
885
1, 398
1,224
232
796
449
860
1, 386
1,873
2, 501
2, 310
2, 212
522
663

245
1,812
54
615
414
673
465
682
868
926
200
515
196
712
1,259
1, 508
2, 072
1, 378
1,910
312
365

81
767
39
548
1,432
86
144
202
530
298
32
281
253
147
127
365
429
932
302
209
298

33
454
51
204
258
177
95
111
113
150
25
99
37
128
259
226
160
224
282
38
87

22
321
31
127
61
159
74
85
66
122
22
62
17
113
246
187
132
112
250
17
44

11
132
20
77
196
18
20
25
47
29
3
37
20
14
13
37
28
111
31
21
43

298
2, 118
79
1,044
1,669
598
472
7 74
1, 227
1, 132
205
649
381
700
1, 276
1, 516
2, 21 8
2, 106
2, 017
468
524

220
1,460
42
529
334
252
351
593
766
856
176
415
152
566
1, 160
1, 197
1, 823
1, 237
1, 738
277
273

78
658
37
515
1, 335
73
121
180
461
276
28
233
230
134
116
320
394
871
279
192
251

27
338
36
170
215
136
69
85
85
120
19
71
27
91
232
171
134
190
252
32
63

18
228
19
102
42
121
53
63
48
95
17
44
10
80
219
140
110
90
222
13
29

10
111
16
68
173
15
16
20
37
25
2
27
17
13
13
31
24
100
30
18
35

.......................................

3, 555

3, 091

464

490

454

37

2,981

2, 572

409

368

338

31

RA IL RCA C TR A NS P O R T A T I O N .........................
LOCAL AND INT ERU RBA N P AS SE N GE R TRANSIT ......
TRU CK IN G ANC WA R EH O U S I N G ........................
WATER TR A NS PO R T A T I O N .............................
T R A N SP OR T AT IO N BY AIR ............................
PIPE LINE TR A NS P O R T A T I O N ........................
TR A NS P O R T A T I O N SE R VI CE S ........ .................

679
493
1, 576
302
392
16
189

637
430
1,415
280
282
15
118

41
63
160
23
111
1
72

61
103
224
75
26

58
93
212
72
21

3
11
12
3
6
4

42
53
132
20
107
1
56

55
70
135
48
19

27

632
308
1,049
222
268
15
81

58
79
143
50
24

31

676
362
1, 181
243
375
16
135

15

12

3

1, 233

613

620

136

39

97

1, 183

582

601

123

34

90

.....................................

806

680

126

72

61

11

784

660

123

61

52

10

......................................

5, 547

4, 137

1,410

595

482

112

4, 504

3, 314

1, 191

417

329

88

MIN ING

METAL MINING .......................................
A N TH RA C IT E MININ G .................................
BIT UM IN OU S COAL AND L IGN IT E MINING ...........
OIL AND GAS EXT RA CT IO N ...........................
NCNMET ALL IC MINER AL S, ExCEPT FUELS ...........
C O NT RA C T CO N ST R U C T I O N

..............................

GEN ER AL BU IL CI NG C ON T R A C T O R S ...................
HEAV Y C O N S TR UC TI O N C O N T RA CT O RS ................
SP ECI AL TRACE C O N T R A C T O R S .......................
MA N U F A C T U R I N G

transportation

C O M M U NI C AT IO N

.........................................

PUBLIC UT I LI TI E S
W H OL ES A LE

TRACE




3
9
10
2
6

( N u m j^

W orker s

INOUSTRY

that had
M a j o r por ti on of their e ar n in g s in this i ndu st r y

Some e ar ni ngs in the i ndu st r y

Negro

Negro

White
|

White

Men

T otal

M en

Women

T o ta l

j

Women

W o me n

M en

T otal

Men

Women

T o ta l

7, 905

1, 699

713

14,192

7, 216

6, 975

1, 266

577

9, 197

985

690

17, 102

52

557

1,052
510
3, 479
1, 569

443
900
1, 293
1, 675
322
343
1,437
795

1 14
2, 022
884
236
730
167
2, 044
774

36
272
151
148
82
42
420

11
1

33
97
103
135
32
30
190
70

3
174
48
13
57
12
230
4!

4 , 13 1

1,938

2, 194

364

181

184

1, 149
386
211
1, 129
321
819
38
86

397
158
138
551
117
525
13
45

752
229
74
578
204
294
25
40

17
9
89

28
9
5
30

61
9
4
60

6, 548

9, 791

451
347
1,080
365
191
152
450
617
72
1,634
14
593
44
471

588
723
829
55
41
98
252
2, 908
219
2, 679
13
810
318
255

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL EC ON OM Y ---- Continued
RETAI L

TRACE

BUILC ING m a t e r i a l s a n c f a r m E Q UI P ME NT ......
RETAIL GENER AL M E R C HA ND I SE ....................
FCCL STORES ........................................
AUT OMO TIV E CEALERS ANC SERVI CE ST ATI ON S ....
APPAREL ANC ACC E S SO RY STORES ..................
FURN ITU RE ANC HOME F U RN I SH IN G S STORES ......
EATING ANC CR IN KI NG PL ACE S ....................
M I S C E LL A NE OU S RE TAI L STORE S ...................
FINANCE,

INSURANCE,

A n C REAL

ESTATE

BANKIN G .............................................
CRECIT AG E NCI ES OTHER THAN BANKS .............
SECURITY, C O M M OC IT Y BR OKERS ANC SERV ICE S ...
INSURANCE C A RR IE RS ...............................
INSURANCE AGENTS, BROK ERS ANC SERVICE ......
REAL e s t a t e ........................................
CCMEINE C REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC ........
HCLL ING ANC CTH ER INVESTM ENT C OM P A N I E S .....

738
3,812
2,702
2, 716
1, 386
682
4, 677
2, 069

602
1, 321
1, 647
2, 416
465
475
2, 110
1, 102

136
2, 492
1, 056
301
921
208
2, 567
968

56
396
209
226
122
64
595
171

145
209
49
48
301
113

5
235
63
18
73
16
294
58

4, 75 2

2, 363

2, 390

486

272

214




1,476
1,278
2, 977
639
322
369
1,073
3, 735
328
4, 692
33
1,930
402
891

414
200
148
635
138
777
15
104

782
285
86
626
236
3 84
30
60

10-2
27
12
110
12
213
3
21

36
15
7
43
4
157
15

66
12
6
67
8
57
1
6

8,331

1, 196
465
234
1, 261
375
1, 162
46
163

SERVIC ES
HOTEL S ANC CTH ER LO D G IN G PL ACE S ......
PERSO NAL SER VI C ES .............. .........
MI S CE LL A NE OU S B US IN ESS SE RVI CE S ......
AUTO REPAIR, SE RVICES, AND GA R A GE S ...
M IS CE LL AN E OU S REPA IR SE RVI CE S .........
MC TI CN PI C TUR ES ...........................
AMU SEMENT ANC R E C R EA TI O N SE RVICES, NEC
MECICA L ANC CT H ER HE AL T H SE RVI CE S ....
LEGAL SER VIC ES ............................
EC U CA TI CNA L SERV IC ES .....................
MUSEUMS, BOTANIC AL, Z OO LO CIC AL GA R D EN S
NONPR OFI T MEM BE R SH IP O RG AN I Z A T I O N S ...
PRIVAT E HO U SE HO L DS .......................
MI S CE LL A NE OU S SERV ICE S ..................

160

10,390

3,444

1, 377

2, 086

684
446
1,776
565
268
230
721
718
77
1,925
17
957
57
570

793
832
1,202
74
54
139
353
3, 017
251
2, 767
15
973
346
324

2

331
278
572

138
92
380

30
28
93
694
17
635
4
466
493
59

26
18
68
170

11
1

10
0
6
243
3
233
34
31

192
185
192
11
5
10
24
524
12
391
1
233
459
27

2,92 2

2, 176
1,912

16,338
1, 039
1,069
1,90.9
420
233
250
700
3, 525
291
4, 380
28
1,403
361
725

8

2

6

143

103

40

6

4

2
10

3, 010
241
230
295
64
19
17
57
627
12
569
4
374
464
37

1

1,011
89

66
176
57
16

1
1

40
131
3
204
3

168
26

20

1

1, 999
152
163
119

6
3
7
16
496
9
365

1

206
438
17

H
INDUSTRY
ANY
GTR
100.0

10.0

11.5

11.8

....................................

100.c

1 9.A

15.0

PETA L MINING ..........................
AN TH RAC IT E PIN IN G ...................
BIT UPI NC US CCAL AND LIG NIT E PINING
CIL ANC GAS EXT RA C T IO N .............
NCN PE TA LL IC MINE RA LS, EX CEPT FUELS

100.c
100.0
100.0
IOC .0
100.0

15.7
12.6
14.6
23.0
22.2

14.4
11.2
10.2
16.3
17.2

100.0

23.3

100.0
100.c
100.0

32.3
31.3
28.0

PRIVATE NO N A G R I C U L T U R A L
PINING

ccntract

construction

ECCNCMY

........ ..

GEN ER AL BUI LDI NG CO N T R A C T O R S .
HEAV Y C O N S TR UC T IO N C O N T RA CT O RS
SPECIAL TRACE CO N T R A C T O R S ....

MANUFACTURING .............................

U

SOME E A RNI NG S IN THIS
INDUSTRY DURING
—
FOUR
TWO
THREE
ONE
QTRS
QTRS
QTRS
QTR

ENT

o T — w fl ft K r r § ---- TH A u l
M

MAJOR P R OPO RT ION OF THEIR EA RNINGS
IN ANY IN DUSTRY OURING
ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

66.5

ICO.O

10.0

9.8

55.6

1C0.0

8.2
2.8
8.9
9.5
12.2

61.6
73.2
66. 1
51.0
48.2

100.0
100.0
1C0.0
1C0.0
1C0.0

18.5

13. 8

44.2

22.9
22. 1
19.4

13. 7
14.7
12.6

30.9
31.7
39.8

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

J

IN THIS INDUSTRY AND WORKED
I
IN THIS ! NDUSTRY OURING
ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

66.5

100.0

10.0

11.5

11.8

66.5

11.5

11.8

5.8

7.9

9.5

76.7

10 0. C

8.2

11.8

11.2

68.7

4.3
4.4
5.2
7. L
5.0

8.3
5.8
5.2
9. 3
7.7

3.8
4.4
7.2
9.2
13.0

78.4
85.2
82.3
74.2
74.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

7.6
7.3
6.8
9.9
7.8

12.1
7.3
8.5
13.4
12.7

9.0
4.4
9.5
10.8
15.2

71.1
80.8
75.0
65.7
64. 1

100.0

9.3

11.9

14.3

64.4

100.0

12.0

15.5

15.9

56.5

100.0
100.0
1C0.0

10.1
8.8
9. 1

13.6
12.0
10.8

14.6
16.5
12.9

61.6
62.5
67.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

14.6
12.9
12.3

19.4
19.2
15.3

1 7.5
19.6
15.3

48.4
48.1
56.9

75.0

100.0

8.0

10.3

1G . 9

70.6

77.2
64.9
64.4
74.6
66.0
65. 1
70.8
79.8
73.1
82.8
84.6
7C.6
67.9
75.7
82.9
75.6
81.3
77.0'
81.6
79.4
64.8

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
10 0. c
100.0
100.0
10 0. c
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.C
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

8.4
14.4
15.6
8.5
11.7
13. 1
11.3
7.4
9.3
5.9
5.2
11.6
12.5
8.6
5.6
8.8
6.0
7.4
6.2
7.6
13.5

9.4
15.8
15.3
11.5
12.9
15.4
13.8
10.5
12.2
8.8
8.9
13.3
12.5
12.3
8.5
11.8
9.0
10.8
8.6
9.5
15.5

1C.5
12.1
9.2
12.2
13.4
13.6
12.1
9.5
11.0
e.5
7.5
12.2
13.9
12.3
8.6
11.9
10.8
11.6
10.0
10.3
14.0

71.5
57.5
59.7
67. 7
61.8
57.7
62.6
72.4
67.3
76.6
78.2
62.8
60.9
66.6
77.2
67.3
74.0
70.0
75.0
72.5
56.8

100.c

13.6

12.4

IC.4

63.4

100.0

6.6

8.3

9.9

ORCNANCE ANC ACCESSORIES ...............
FCCC AND KINCRED PRODUCTS ............ .
TCBACCC MANUFACTURERS .................
TEXTILE MILL PROOUCTS ................. .
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ....
LUMBER ANC WCCC PRODUCTS ...............
FURNITURE ANC FIXTURES ................ .
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .............
PRINTING ANC PUBLISHING ............... .
CHEMICALS ANC ALL IEC PRODUCTS ........ .
PETROLEUM ANC COAL PRCCUCTS .......... .
RUBBER ANC PLASTIC PRCCUCTS, N E C ......
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS ......... .
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PROCUCTS .......
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ...............
FABRICATEC PETAL PRODUCTS ............ .
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ......... .
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ....
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..............
INSTRUMENTS ANC RELATEC PRODUCTS .....
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

100.c
100.c
100.C
100. c
100 . c
100.c
100.c
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.c
100.C
100.c
100.0
100.c
100.0

17.7
27.4
29.1
18. 1
20.4
27.2
27.6
19.5 .
19.3
14.8
17.6
26.1
25. 1
23.5
14.0
23.0
15.6
16.0
14.8
16.9
28.1

11.4
17.9
17.4
14.2
14.9
18.2
17.3
13.2
14.5
11.6
10.6
16.2
14.9
15.4
10.9
15.4
12.5
13.3
11.3
12.2
18.2

9.4
10.2
7.8
10. 8
12 . C
11. 1
9.6
8.2
10. 1
7.7
6.7
9.7
12.C
10. 1
7.9
1C.C
9.8
10.5
9.0
9.2
11. 1

61.2
44.3
45.5
56.7
52.5
43.3
45. 3
58.9
55.8
65.7
64.9
47.8
47.9
50.8
67.0
51.4
62.0
60. 1
64.7
61.4
42.4

100.0
100.0
1C0.C
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
1C0.C
100.0
1CC.0
100.0
100.0
1CC.0
1CC.0
100.0
1CC.0
ICO.O
1CC.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0

6.3
11.0
13.1
6.1
9.7
9.9
8.1
4.9
7.3
4.2
3.6
8.5
9.6
5.8
4 .C
6.0
4. 1
5.5
4.3
5.3
10.2

7.1
12.4
12.9
8.4
10.9
11.8
9.6
7. 1
9.3
6.0
5.3
9.6
9.9
8.0
5.7
8.1
6.0
7.4
5.8
6.9
11.3

9.2
11.5
9.4
10.7
13.2
12.9
11.3
8.0
10.2
6.8
6.2
11.0
12.5
10.3
7.2
10.1
8.3
10.0
8.1
8.2
13.5

.............................. .

1C0.C

19.6

14.0

10.0

56.3

100.0

6.2

7.6

9.3

76.7

100.0

8. 1

10.5

10.8

70.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.c
100.0
100.c

7.6
22.9
26.5
26.6
10.2
8.2
28.0

7.9
17. 1
16. 1
14.6
10.9
14.2
19.3

6.7
10.8
10.6
12.5
9. 1
1C.6
10.5

77.6
49.C
46.6
46.0
69.5
66.8
42.0

100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O
ICO.O
ICO.O
100.0
100.0

2.9
8.0
7.5
9.3
3.3
2.9
8.0

4.6
10.2
8.4
9.1
5.6
7.5
10. 1

6.0
10.4
10.6
12. 1
6.3
10.4

86.4
71.2
73.3
69.3
83.2
83.1
71.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.8
10.4
10.2
11.6
4.4
4.0
10.9

6.5
12.9
12.3
12.5
9.1
13.9
15.0

6.7
11.3
12.3
14.5
9.2
1 1.0
12.7

82.7
65.2
65.0
61.2
77.2
70.9
61.2

C C P P U M C A T ICN

100.0

11.8

11.2

10. 1

66.8

100.0

4.5

6. 7

9.0

79.7

100.0

6.2

9.4

10.5

73.7

PUBLIC UTI LI TI ES

100.0

9.8

9.3

6.5

74.3

ICO.O

2.9

4.7

5.7

86.5

100.0

4.2

7.1

6.5

81.9

100.0

23.9

16.2

10. 3

49.4

ICO.O

8.0

9.2

10.2

72.4

100.0

10.7

12.6

12.1

64.4

TRA N SP OR T AT IO N

RAI LR CA O T R A N SP OR T AT I ON ................
LOCAL ANC INTERUR BA N P ASS EN GER TRANSIT
TRU CK IN G a n c w a r e h o u s i n g ..............
WATE R TR A NS P O R T A T I O N ....................
TR A NS PO R T A T I O N BY AIR ...................
PIPE LINE TR A NS PO R T A T I O N ...............
T R A N S PO R TA TI O N SE R VI CE S ................




7.7

h A D
T H A r
W O R K
0 F
E R S
E
MAJOR P R O P O R T I O N OF THEIR ! AR N I N G S IN THIS INO U S T R Y AND W ORKED
IN ANY IND U S T R Y OUR 1NG
IN THIS IND U S T R Y O U R I N G

P E R C 1 N T
E
SOME EARNINGS IN THIS
INDUSTRY DURING

INDUSTRY

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

13.9

AO.2

100.0

15.2

15.6

1A . 6

5 A .A

100 . c

17.2

17.5

15.A

A 9 .7

11.2
10. A
12.7
12.7
11. 1
1C. 7
lA. 8
11.9

A 1.8
37.5
AO.8
35.1
36.8
A l .6
26.5
37.2

1CC.0
1C0.0
1C0.0
ICO.O
ICC.O
ICO.O
ICO.O
100.0

10.2
16.7
12.0
11.8
16.A
10.9
19.2
lA . 5

11.5
13.8
lA . 2
13.5
l A .A
11.7
20.9
1A . 5

12.2
12.8
1A.7
lA . 5
12.6
11.6
17.8
13.9

65.9
56.A
58.9
60.0
56.3
65.6
A2.0
56.9

100.0
100.c
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0

13.2
20. 1
15.1
15.7
19.8
1A. 3
22.5
18.0

15.A
16.5
17.7
18.0
16.9
15.A
23.9
17.6

13.8
12.6
1A .6
15.8
13.1
12.9
17.9
1A . 3

57.A
50.5
52.5
50.3
50. 1
57.1
35.5
A 9.9

100.0

7.2

9.3

10.6

72.6

100.0

9. A

12.2

12. 1

66.1

100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
ICC.O
ICO.O
ICO.O
ICO.O

A.6
6.5
A.2
5.2
7.0
13.3
9.3
IA. 1

7.8
8.0
7.8
7.5
9.5
lA . 3
9.8
11.7

9.9
10.2
9. A
9.5
9. A
13.8
1A . 9
12. 1

77.6
75. 1
78. A
77.7
7A .0
58. A
65.8
61.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0

6.3
9.0
6.1
7. A
9.2
17.2
11.2
19. 1

1C.7
11.3
11.6
10.7
12.1
18.5
1A .6
16.2

11.6
13.2
11.1
11.7
12.2
1A . 5
15.1
16.0

71.3
66.2
71.0
70.0
66.2
A9.6
58.8
A8.5

1A . 5

16.3

13.A

55.6

23. 3
15.7
20.6
17.3
13.9
19.7
23.8
10.9
9.7
12. A
15.3
22.3
13.A
11.8

21.8
15.7
19. 1
18.3
16.1
19.8
27.6
1A . 8
1A .A
16.0
22.1
20.7
13.9
1A . 7

15.5
1A . 3
1A. 7
17.0
1A.2
16.2
16.6
13. 7
1A. 1
10.0
13.5
13.2
13.8
12.6

39.2
5A . 1
A5. A
A 7.2
55.6
A A ,0
31.8
60.5
61.6
61. A
A 8.9
A3.6
58. 7
60. 7

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

25.8

19.9

28.3
33.5
26.1
30.7
32 . A
29.3
33.A
30.6

18.A
18.A
20.3
21.3
19.A
18.3
25.1
20.1

TWO
QTRS

THREE
GTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

ANY
GTR

ONE
QTR

..............................................

100.0

B U I L C I N G M A T E R I A L S ANC F ARM E Q U I P M E N T ...........
R E T A I L GEN E R A L M E R C H A N D I S E .........................
FCOC STORES .............. ..............................
A U T O M O T I V E CE A L E R S ANC S ERVICE S T A T I O N S .........
A PPAREL ANC A C C E S S O R Y STORES ..................
F U R N I T U R E ANC HOME F U R N I S H I N G S STORES ...........
EATING ANC C R I N K I N G P LACES .........................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S RETA I L STORES ........................

100.0
100.C
100.0
100.C
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.c
100.0

19.3

1A. 8

10.8

5A.9

ICO.C
10C.C
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.0
ICO.C
100.0

11.6
20.5
lA .0
15.6
17.9
3 2.7
19.9
A 8.5

12.5
1A.7
1A . 7
13.A
15.5
20.5
19.3
16.9

10.8
11.3
1C.3
10.6
1 l. 1
11.3
13. 6
8.9

6A.9
53.3
60.8
60.2
55.A
35.3
A 7 .1
25.6

...................................................

100.0

21.8

18.A

12.5

A7.2

100.0

12.8

1A .5

13.'0

59.5

100.0

HOT E L S AND CTHER L O D G I N G P L A C E S ...................
P ERSONAL S E R V I C E S .....................................
M I S C E L L A N E O U S BUSI N E S S S E R V I C E S ...................
ALTC REPAIR, SERVICES, AND G A R A G E S ...............
M I S C E L L A N E O U S REPAIR S E R V I C E S ......................
M OTION PIC T U R E S .......................................
A M U S E M E N T ANC R E C R E A T I O N S ERVICES, NEC ..........
M EDICAL ANC C T HER H E A L T H SER V I C E S ................
LEGAL SER V I C E S .........................................
ECUC A T I O N A L S E R VICES .................................
MUSEUMS, B O T ANICAL, Z O C L O G I C A L G A R D E N S ..........
N O N P R O F I T M E M B E R S H I P O R G A N I Z A T I O N S ...............
private hclsehclcs
................................ .
M I S C E L L A N E O U S S E R V I C E S ...............................

10C.C
100.0
ICO.C
100.c
10C.0
10C.C
100.C
100.c
10C.C
100.c
100.c
ICO.C
100.c
100.c

37.1
25.5
39. 1
35.3
31.2
31.9
36.9
16.7
18.8
1 7.A
25.A
30.6
17.A
23.6

22.9
17.8
21.3
2 1.A
19.1
22.0
27.2
16.A
16.6
18.0
21.9
21.8
1A. 7
18.1

12.3
12.7
11.2
12.6
11. 1
1A . C
13. A
12.8
12.3
9.8
11.7
11.9
13.A
10.8

27.5
A3.9
28.1
30.A
38. A
31.9
22.3
53.9
52.1
5A.6
AO.9
35.5
5A.2
A7.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICC.O
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O

18.1
13.A
16.9
12.8
10.3
15.A
19.1
8.9
7.3
10.7
11.3
18.8
12.2
9.0

18.5
13.2
15. A
13.7
11.2
16.5
22.7
12. A
11.7
13.6
20.0
18.3
13.3
11.3

16.0
1A . 2
13.8
15.1
12.5
16.5
18.2
13.2
12.1
10.5
12.9
13.3
13.A
10.5

A7.2
59.0
53.8
58.2
65.8
51 .A
39.9
65.3
68.7
65.0
55.6
A9.5
61.0
69.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.0
ICO.C
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.c
100.0

I

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
Q TRS

FOUR
QTRS

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY - Continued
retail

TRADE

FINANCE,

INSURANCE,

ANC REAL

E STATE

................

BAN K I N G ..................................................
C R E C I T A G E N C I E S O T HER THAN BANKS ..................
SECURITY, C O M M O D I T Y BR O K E R S ANC S E R VICES ........
INSURANCE C A R R I E R S ....................................
INSURANCE AGENTS, B R O KERS AND S E R VICE ...........
REAL ESTATE ............................................
C C M B I N E C REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, ETC .............
HCL C I N G ANC O T HER I N V ESTMENT C O M P A N I E S ..........
SER V I C E S




0 F

P E R C E NT

I

N

D

U

S

T

R

Y

1 0 R K ‘E R S
*
t

R A C E
W H I T E 1
N E G R n
ALL
WORKERS MEN | WOMEN 1 MEM 1 WOMEN
P R I VATE N C N A G R I C U L T U R A L
MINING

ECONOMY

100.C

.....................................

CONSTRUCTION

35.8

6.2

4.8

66.6

38.2

21.7

3.9

100 . C,

88.8

7.3

3.7

.3

76.7

68.5

5.3

0 1 R I N G
U

94.0
95.6
94. 3
85.9
84.8

4.7
4.4
2.6
11.1
6.8

1.3
3.0
2.6
7.9

.1
.4
.5

78.5
85.3
82.3
74. 3
74.1

74.4
82.4
77.5
63.8
63.3

3.2
2.9
2. 1
8.4
4.5

2.7

.9
2.7
1.7
5.9

66. 6

.2

2.8

100.C
10C.C
100 . C
10C.C
IOC .C

METAL M I N I N G .........................
A N T H R A C I T E M I N I N G ...................
B I T U M I N C U S CCAL AND LI G N I T E MINING
CIL ANC GAS E X T R A C T I O N .............
N C N M E T A L L I C MI N E R A L S , EXCEPT FUELS
CONTRACT

53.2

E M P L C Y E D

U
F 0 U R
Q 1 A R T E R S
IN ALL WAGE AND SALARY E M P L O Y M E N T
IN THIS I N D USTRY ONLY
R A C E
R A C • E
W H IH T T 1
N E G R C
W H I T E l
N E G R 0
MEN j W OMEN | MEN | W O MEN
TOTAL
TOTAL
MEN | WOMEN
MEN
|WOMEN

Q U A R T E R

A N Y

68.7
71.2
80.9
75.1
65.7
64.2

_
-

.3
.3

21.7

3.9

2.7

61.4

4.7

2.4

.2

67.4
77.9
70.7
56.8
54.7

2.9
2.9
1.8
7.3
4.1

.9
2.6
1.4
5.1

.

38.2

_
.3
.3

............

10C.C

83. 7

5.9

1C.C

.3

64.4

54.9

3.5

5.8

.2

56.5

48.3

3.1

4.9

.1

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS .
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS
SPEC I A L TRACE C O N T R A C T O R S ....

IOC .c
1 00.c
1 00.c

82.1
82.8
85.2

6.6
4.6
6. 1

1C.9
12.3
8.4

.4
.3
.4

61.6
62.6
67. 1

51.2
52.7
58.3

3.8
2.8
3.8

6.4
6.9
4.8

.2
.2
.2

48.4
48.1
56.9

40.3
40.4
49.7

3.3
2.4
3.3

4.7
5.1
3.8

.1
.1
.2

...........................................................

100.0

61.1

28.2

7.4

3. 3

75.0

49.0

18.7

5.3

1.9

70.6

46.3

17.7

4.8

1.8

ORDNANCE ANC ACCESSORI ES ............................
FCCC ANC KI NDRED PRODUCTS .........................
TCeACCC MANUFACTURERS .................' . ...............
TEXTI LE MI LL PROCUCTS ...................................
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTI LE PRODUCTS . . .
LUMBER ANC WCCC PROCUCTS ............................
FURNI TURE ANC FI XTURES ................................
PAPER AND ALLI ED PROCUCTS .........................
PRI NTI NG ANC PUBLI SHI NG ..............................
CHEMI CALS ANC ALL I EC PRODUCTS ................
PETROLEUM ANC COAL PRODUCTS .....................
RUEBER ANC PLASTI C PRODUCTS, NEC ...........
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS ...................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PROCUCTS ............
PRIMARY METAL I NDUSTRI ES ............................
r A BR ICATEC METAL PROCUCTS .........................
MACHI NERY, EXCEPT ELECTRI CAL .................. .
ELECTRI CAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLI ES . . . .
TRANSPORTATI ON EQUIPMENT ............................
INSTRUMENTS ANC RELATED PRODUCTS ..........
MI SCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURI NG I NDUSTRI ES

100.c
10C.C
100.c
ICO.C
100. c
100.c
100.c
10C.C
100 . c
10C.C
10C.C
100 . c
100.c
100.c
100 . c
100.c
100 . c
100 . c
100.c
ICO.C
100 . c

67.8
59.4
3 7. 1
43.6
l 7.8
71.4
64.9
69.2
58.4
68.4
78.3
57.7
37. 3
71.6
76.9
70.9
77.6
53.8
76.6
55.3
46.4

23.8
26.8
31.6
42.4
70.8
10.0
22.4
21.0
35.2
22.0
13.0
32.4
56.3
16.9

2.8
4.5
14.2
5.6
9.2
2.0
3.0
2.4
2.8
2.0
.9
3.7
4.1
1.5
.8
1.8

77.2
64.9
64.5
74.7
66.0
65.2
70.8
79.9
73.1
82.9
84.6
70.7
67.9
75.8
83.0
75.7
81.4
0
77.0
81.7
3
79.5
64.8

55.9
42.6
26.2
34.4
12.8
47.2
47.5
57.9
45.9
59.2
67.7
45.0
27.2
56.1
65.0
56.0
65.2
45.4
64.4
47.7
33.0

15.7
13.9
24.1
30.6
46.1
6.4
15.1
14.9
23.0
16.7
10.4
19.7
36.9
11.4
5.7
12.7
12.0
26.1
8.9
27.7
25.7

4.1
6. 1
9. 1
6. 1
1.4
10.5
6.3
5.6
2.6
5.8
5.7
4.2
1.6
7.3
11.7
6.0
3.5
2.9
7.5
2.0
3.0

1.6
2.3
4.9
3.6
5.8
1.0
2.0
1.4
1.6
1.2
.7
1.8
2.3

71.5
57.6
59.8
67.7
61.8
57.8
62.7
72.4
67.4
76.6
78.3
62.8
61.0
66.7
77.2
67.4
74.0
70.1
75.1
72.5
56.9

51.7
38.0
24.5
31.0
11.6
42.0
42. 1
52.5
43. 1
55.4
63.7
40.3
24.0
49.7
61.1
50. 1
59.8
41.6
59.4
43.8
28.8

14.8
12.4
23.1
28.4
43.7
5.7
13.5
13.7
20.7
15.1
9. 1
17.6
33.8
10.3
5.1
11.3
10.8
23.7
8.1
25.3
22.8

3.5
5.1
8.1
5.2
1.2
9.2
5.3
4.9
2.2
5.2
4.8
3.4
1.3
5.9
10.6

1.5
2.0
4.1
3.2
5.4
.9
1.8
1.2
1.4
1.0
.7
1.6
1.9

18.9
16.7
37.9
12.3
38.4
42.7

5.5
9.3
17.1
8.4
2.3
16.5
9.7
7.4
3.7
7.6
7.8
6.2
2.4
10.1
14.5
7
8.3
4.7
3.9
9.8
2.7
4.9

100 . c

76.8

12.2

10. 1

.

9

76.8

60.3

8.6

7.3

.5

5.8
12.0

7.5'
15.9
9
10. 1

.

4

75.4
50.5
59.7
53.5
57.6
78.5
39.0

4.7
7.5
6.4
4.7
20. 7
4. 7
25.8

6.0
12. 1
6.9
10.7
4.2

1 2.0

86.4
71.3
73.4
.
69.4
83.3
83. 1
71.3

MANUFACTURING

TRANSPORTATION

...............................

R A I L R O A D T R A N S P O R T A T I O N .................
L CCAL ANC I N T E R U R B A N P A S S E N G E R TRANSIT
T R U C K I N G ANC W A R E H O U S I N G ...............
w a
t t e r r
a
n
s
p . . o . . r . t.
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N b y a i r ...................
PIPE LINE T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ...............
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N S E R V I C E S .................

.

a.

.

t

10C.C
86.4
70.2
100 . c
79.2
10C.C
. i 1.0C.C . n . 76.0 .
. o.
.
100.c
67.3
93.0
ICO.C
1 0 0 . c
53.2

.

C C M M U N ICAT ION

P
W

U

B
H

L
O

ICO.C

I
L

C
E

U
S

A

L

T
E

See footnotes at end of table.




I

L
T

I
R

T
A

7

I
C

0 S

78.1
0

E1

0

67.3 .
0

. 6.9.
.

.

. 1.

1

.

4.3

1

.

3.6
5.9

1.9

.6 .

.

7
.5
. . .6 .

.

9
5

9

2.0
3.1

5

.
.
.

3.0
2.5
6.7
1.7
2.4

01

.

70.5

55.8

7

.

7 6.5

72.6
46.5
53.3
47.0
54.2
68.0
34.3

4

.

45

6.8
5.6
4.1
18.4
2.9
22.1

10.9
5.8
9.7
3.9

4 1.1

82.8
65.2
65.0
61.3
77.3
70.9
61.3

4.2

.6

73.8

36.9

31.5

1.6

3.8

.
1.2

.
.

3
4
4

5 .
1
.
.

.

2.5

6.9

79. 7

39.C

34.6

1.8

4.3

14.6
c

6.2

1.1

86.5

69.0

11.9

4.8

.

9

82.0

65.9

11.1

4.3

.8

c
24.2

6.7

1.8

72.4

5

15.75
.

4.3

.

9

64.4

46.3

13.7

3.6

.8

1

5

.8

.

5

0

.5

.

46.0

.

7
5
.

2.3
.8
1.8
2.8

4.8
1.2

8

1.3

.
.

1.1
.6
2.7

26.6
5.8
36.6

44.6

1 E

9

.

.8

3
.

0
3
4

p E R C E N T
A N Y

INDUSTRY

Q U A R T

»
\ 0

0 F
E R

R K 1 R S
E

1
I N ALL

R A C F
W H I T E ‘
N E G R 0
ALL
WOMEN | MEN J WOMEN
WORKERS MEN

TOTAL

E M P L C Y E D

D U R I N G

Q U A R T
E R S
F 0 U R
IN THIS INDUSTRY ONLY
WAGE AND SALARY’ EMPLOYMENT
R A c E
R A C E
W H I T E1
N E G R 0
W H I T E1
N E G R 0
TOTAL
MEN | WOMEN | MEN | WOMEN
MEN [ WOMEN
MFN | WOMEN
1
1

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL EC ON OM Y ---- Conti nued
RETAI L

TRADE

..............................................................

10C. C

46.7

45. 1

4. 5

3. 7

54. 4

27. 3

23.0

2. 4

1. 7

49.8

24.7

21. 6

2. 0

IOC. C
100. C
1CC.C
ICO. C
100. C
100. c
100. 0
100. c

74 . 8
28. 2
55. 6
81. 3
28.2
62. 2
36. 8
47 . 3

19. 3
63. 3
38. 0
11. 5
64. 1
30. 3
52. 4
46. 1

5. 5
3. 1
4. 4
6. 5
2. 8
5. 4
4. 9
4. 2

.4
5. 4
2. 1
.7
4.9
2. 2
5. 9
2, 4

65.9
56. 5
58. 9
60. 1
56. 4
65. 7
42.0
57. 0

50. 0
17. 8
34. 5
49. 1
17. 8
42. 5
15. 7
28. 7

12. 0
34 . 4
20.9
6.9
34. 6
18. 5
21. 7
24. 7

3. 7
1. 7
2. 4
3. 7
1. 4
3. 4

57. 5
50. 6
52. 5
50. 4
50. 1
57. 2
35. 6
49.9

43.5
15. 4
3C. 9
41.2
15. 5
37 . 0
13. 0
25. 1

10. 9
31 . 6
18. 7
5. 9
31 . 2
16. 3
18. 8
21. 8

3. 0
1. 4
2. 0
3. 0
1. 2
2. 9
1. 6

2. 4

.2
2. 5
1. 1
.3
2. 5
1. 2
2. 6
1. 2

2.0

2. 2
.9
.3
2. 2
1. 0
2. 2
1. 0

............

100. c

43. 1

48. 8

4. C

BANKING ........................................................................
CRECI T AGENCI ES OTHER THAN BANKS ..............
SECURI TY, COMMODITY BROKERS AND SERVI CES
I NSURANCE CARRI ERS ...............................................
I NSURANCE AGENTS, BROKERS AND SERVI CE . .
REAL ESTATE ...............................................................
CCMEINEC REAL ESTATE, I NSURANCE, ETC . . .
HCLCI NC ANC OTHER INVESTMENT COMPANI ES .

100. 0
100. c
I CO. C
100. c
IOC. C
100. c
ICO. C
1 0 0 . c

32. 1
39. 1
62. 6
45. 2
35. 7
54. 5
32. 9
47. 8

60. 8
56. 7
33. 3
47. 5
61. 9
30. 6
63. 2
42. 4

2. 3
2. C
2. 1
2. 4
.6
1C. 7
1. 9
5. 8

......................................................................

IOC. C

33. 8

50. 6

5. 2

HOTELS ANC OTHER LODGI NG PLACES ............
PERSONAL SERVI CES ............................................
MI SCELLANEOUS BUSI NESS SERVI CES ............
ALTO REPAI R, SERVI CES, AND GARAGES . . .
MI SCELLANEOUS REPAI R SERVI CES .................
MOTION PI CTURES .................................................
AMUSEMENT ANC RECREATI ON SERVI CES, NEC
MEDICAL ANC OTHER HEALTH SERVI CES . . . .
LEGAL SERVI CES ...................................................
ECUCATI ONAL SERVI CES .....................................
MUSEUMS, B CT A MCA U , ZCOUOGI CAL GARDENS
NONPROFI T MEMBERSHIP ORGANI ZATI ONS . . .
PRI VATE HOUSEHOLDS ..........................................
MI SCELLANEOUS SERVI CES .................................

100. c
100. 0
100. 0
I CO. C
100. c
100. c
100. c
100. c
100. c
100. 0
100. 0
100. c
100. c
I CO. C

35 . 2
26.7
49. 0
75. 4
76. 0
57. 0
59. 3
14. 9
23. 8
34 . 4
46. 2
33. 3
5. 3
61. 7

45. 9
55. 7
37. 6
11. 3
16. 5
36. 7
33. 2
70. 1
72. 2
54. 1
43. 1
45. 6
38. 5
33. 4

7. 0
5. 1
8. C
12.C
6. 4
3. 8
5. 3
3. 2

B l I L C I N G MATERI ALS AND FARM EQUI PMENT .
RETAI L g e n e r a l MERCHANDISE ..........................
FCCC STORES ............................................................
AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS AND SERVI CE STATI ONS
APPAREL AND ACCESSORY STORES .....................
F L RMT L RE AND HOME FURNI SHI NGS STORES .
EATI NG AND DRI NKI NG PLACES ..........................
MI SCELLANEOUS RETAI L STORES .......................

FI NANCE*

A

SERVI CES

I NSURANCE,

AND REAL

I ncl udes w o r k e r s




of al l

ESTATE

races

other than Ne g r o .

1.0
4. 1
7. 7
9. 5
3. 1
2. 6

2.1

1. 6
.!

4. 1

72 . 7

33 . 0

34.4

2. 7

2. 6

66. 2

30. 5

31. 2

2. 3

2. 2

4. 9
2. 2
1. 9
4. 9
1. 8
4. 2
1. 9
4.0

77 . 6
75. 1
78 . 5
77. 7
74. 0
58. 4
65. 9
61. 9

26. 8
31 . 5
51. 4
38. 4
29. 5
32. 3
23 . 1
32. 1

45.6
40. 7
24. 2
34 . 4
43.0
17. 3
41. 3
25. 1

1. 7
1. 6
1. 5
1. 8
.4
6. 6
.5
2. 7

3. 4
1. 3
1. 4
3. 2
2. 2
1. 0
2. 0

71. 4
66. 3
71 . 0
70. 0
66.3
49. 6
58. 9
48. 5

25. 3
28. 2
48. 2
35. 5
27. 4
27. 2
21. 2
26.5

41. 6
35. 8
20. 4
30. 4
37. 6
15. 0
36. 5
19. 0

1. 5
1. 4
1. 2
1. 5
.4
5. 6
.5
1. 9

2. 9
1. 0
1. 2
2. 7
.8
1. 9
. 7
1. 1

10. 3

59. 5

21 .C

29. 7

2. 8

6. 1

55. 7

19. 2

28 . 1

2. 5

5. 9

11. 9
12 . 6
5. 4
1. 3
1. 1
2. 6
2. 2
11. 9
2.9
7. 4
3. 1
11. 6
53. 1
2. 3

47. 2
59. 1
53. 8
58. 2
65. 9
51. 4
39 . 9
65.4
68. 8
65.0
55.7
49.5
61.0
69. 1

17. 4
18 . 2
30. 0
44.4
52. 0
31 . 9
24. 0
9. 7
14. 9
24. 1
28. 3
17. 1
2.7
45. 2

20. 7
30 . 3
18. 1
6. 1
9. 8
16. 1
12 . 4
46.0
51. 5
33. 7
20. 6
24.4
20. 2
21.0

3. 6
3. 3
3. 5
7. 1
3. 5
2. 1
2.. 5
2. 0
.4
2. 6
4. 9
3. 2
2. 2
1. 6

5. 5
7. 2
2. 1
.6
.5
1. 3

39. 3
54 . 1
45.4
47.2
55 . 7
44. 1
31. 8
60. 5
61. 6
61. 5
48.9
43. 6
58. 8
60. 7

14. 1
16. 5
25. 7
36. 0
43. 6
27. 9
19. 1
8. 7
14. 3
22. 8
25. 2
15. 1
2. 4
40.5

17. 4
28. 0
15. 1
4. 9
8. 9
13. 5
9. 9
43. 0
45. 3
31. 9
17. 5
21. 6
19. 3
17. 9

3. 0
2. 9
2. 9
5. 9
2. 6
1. 7
2. 0
1. 7
.4
2. 3
4.6
2. 6
2. 1
1. 4

4. 8
6. 7
1. 7
.4
.5

l.l

1.0
7. 7
2. 0
4. 7
1. 8
4. 8
36. 0
1. 2

1.0
.8
7. 1
1. 7
4.4
1. 5
4. 3
35. 0
.9

N O T E : A das h ( - ) indi cates e i t h e r the s a m p l e did not i ncl ude a n y w o r k e r s with
these c ha r c a t e r i s t i c s , or that the data did not me e t the B u r e a u ' s publ i cat i ons cr i t e r i a .

ALL
WRKRS TOTAL

P E R CENT OF WORKERS E M P L O Y E D IN THEIR INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EAR N I N G D U R I N G —
F 0 U R
Q U A R T E R S
Q U A R T E R
A N Y
M U L T I - I N D U S T R Y W ORKERS
SINGLE INDUSTRY W ORKERS
M U L T I - I N D U S T R Y WORKERS
INDUSTRY W ORKERS
N UMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF
NUMBER OF MAJOR
N U MBER OF
EMPLOYERS
INDUSTRY E M P L O Y E R S
I NDUSTRY EM P L O Y E R S
EMPLOYERS
j MCRE
MORE
MORE
MORE
THAN
THAN
THAN
ALL
THAN
1
TWO
CNE
TWC 1 TWO
WRKRS TOTAL
TWO
ONE j TWO
TWO
TOTAL
TWO
ONE
TOTAL
ONE
TWO
|

100.0

100.0

71.0

18.5

10.5

•c

100.G

77.4

70.4

5.1

1.9

100.C
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

77.6
80.9
82.8
75. 1
73.3

75.9
76.5
74.6
64.9
71 .2

1.5
2.9
7.2
6.5
2.0

.3
1.5
1.1
3.7
.0

100.c

72.8

52.4

11.1

9.3

100.0
loo. e
100.0

59.8
61.7
67.0

51.2
53.5
52.8

6.4
6.3
8.5

2.2
2.0
5.7

100.0

83.4

74.6

7.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

81.3
76.8
79.8
79.5
85.4
76.8
74.C
78.C
79.8
80.6
81.1
75.C
78.8
75.2
79.2
74.1
77.7
78.5
77.9
78.7
75.3

80.9
72.5
77.7
73.8
76.3
69.8
68.3
76.3
73.5
79.4
80.6
72.6
74.2
73.5
77.7
71.6
74.5
76.0
75.8
76.4
72.3

.4
3.8
1.8
4.9
7.3
5.8
5.1
1.7
5.1
1.2
.5
2.3
4.2
1.7
1.5
2.4
2.9
2.3
1.9
2.3
2.7

100.0

77.4

68.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.0
100.0
100.0

85.1
77.5
72.6
60.2
80.4
77.9
70.8

82.7
66.7
63.8
44.3
77.4
76.2
66.8

100.0

82.C

100.0
100.0

SINGLE
I N D USTRY

P RIVATE N O N A G R I C U L T U R A L
PINI N G

ECCNCMY

....................................

METAL MINI N G .................. .......
A N T H R A C I T E P I N I N G ...................
8 1 TUP INCUS CCAL AND LIGN I T E PINING
GIL ANC GAS E X T R A C T I O N .............
N CNPET ALL IC MI N E R A L S , E X C E P T FLELS
CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

............

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS .
H EAVY C O N S T R U C T I O N C O N T R A C T O R S
SPEC I A L TRACE C O N T R A C T O R S ....

MANUFACTURING ..............................
ORDNANCE ANC ACCESSORIES ...............
FCOC ANC KINCRED PRODUCTS .............
TCEACCC MANUFACTURERS ..................
TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS ..................
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS ....
LUMBER ANC WOOD PRODUCTS ..............
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES .................
PAPER ANC ALLIED PRODUCTS ............ .
PRINTING ANC PUBLISHING ................
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ........ .
PETRCLEUM ANC COAL PRODUCTS .......... .
RUBBER ANC PLASTIC PRODUCTS, NEC .... .
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS ......... .
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS .......
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ...............
FABRICATED PETAL PRODUCTS ............ .
MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL ......... .
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ....
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT ..............
INSTRUMENTS ANC RELATED PRODUCTS .....
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
transportation

..............................

R A I L R O A D T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ................
LOCAL AND IN T E R U R B A n P A S S E N G E R TRANSIT
T R U C K I N G ANC W A R E H O U S I N G ...............
W ATER T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ....................
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N BY AIR ...................
PIPE LINE T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ...............
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N S E R V I C E S ................
C C P P U N I C A T ION
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S




71.2

17.6

11.2

89.0

81.0

5.7

2.2

88.2
87.3
92.3
87.6
87.2

86.4
81.8
83.7
75.6
84.9

1.8
3.6
7.6
7.4
2.3

.0
1.8
1.0
4.6
.0

ICO.O

82.5

56.6

12.8

13.1

17.5

6. 7

3.3

7.5

100.0
ICO.O
100.0

72.7
78.2
78.1

60.6
67.2
58.8

8.7
8.0
10.9

3.4
3.0
8.4

27.3
21.8
21.9

12.8
12.9
10.0

6.2
4.7
4.6

8.3
4.3
7.3

100.0

89.6

80.9

7.1

1.7

10.4

7.8

1.6

.9

.0 ICO.O
.5 100.0
. 2 100.0
.9 100.0
.8 100.0
.7 ICO.O
.6 100.0
.1 100.0
.5 ICO.O
.0 100.0
.0 100.0
. 1 100.0
.4 100.0
.2 100.0
. 1 100.0
.4 100.0
.3 100.0
.1 100 . c
.3 1 0 0 . C
.0 100.0
.2 100.0

89.0
87.7
86.4
89.8
92.8
88.9
86.4
88.7
88.0
89.1
90.3
86.2
89.2
87.9
86.6
85.6
86.6
87.7
86.1
88.0
88.2

88.5
82.7
84.0
83.3
82.8
80.9
•79.2
86.7
80.4
87.8
89.7
83.5
83.4
85.7
85. 1
82.7
83.0
85.0
84.0
85.4
84.6

.5
4.4
2.0
5.6
8.C
6.7
6.2
2.C
5.9
1.2
.6
2.7
5.4
2.2
1.4
2.8
3.3
2.5
2.0
2.6
3.2

.0
.5
.4
.9
2.1
1.4
.9
.1
1.7
.1
.0
.0
.4
.1
.1
.2
.4
.2
.1
.0
.4

11.0
12.3
13.6
10.2
7.2
11.1
13.6
11.3
12.0
10.9
9.7
13.8
10.8
12.1
13.4
14.4
13.4
12.3
13.9
12.0
11.8

10.8
10.7
13.3
8.0
5.5
8.9
11.5
1G.7
10.1
10.6
9.6
12.9
9.2
11.1
12.8
12.7
12.1
11.6
12.9
11.6
10.6

.2
1.2
.1
1.5
1.1
1.5
1.5
.5
1.3
.3
. 1
.7
1.2
.8
.5
1.4
1.1
.7
.8
.4
1.0

.0
.4
.1
.7
.6
.7
.6
. 1
.5
.0
.0
.1
.4
.1
.1
.3
.2
.0
.2
.0
.2

85.3

75.9

6.7

2.6

14.7

9.8

2.3

2.6

90.2
85.2
83.4
63. 1
87.7
89.3
82.0

87.6
73.9
72.5
47.2
84.4
86.9
76.8

2.5
9.3
7.8
7.4
3.2
2.5
4.8

.1
2.0
3.1
8.5
.1
.0
.4

9.8
'14.8
16.6
36.9
12.3
10.7
18.0

9.4
12.1
1 1 .0
12.3
11.6
10.7
15.3

.3
2.1
3.4
5.9
.7
.0
1.4

.0
.6
2.3
18.7
.1
.0
1.4

90. 1

87.6

2.3

.3

9.9

9.2

.5

.2

100.0

89.5

87.9

1.5

.0

10.5

10.2

.3

.c

.4 ICO.O

87.5

82.5

4.5

.4

12.5

10.6

1.6

.4

.0

.0

22.6

18.2

2.6

1.7

100.0

22.4
19. 1
17.2
24.9
26.7

21.4
17.6
14.0
17.1
25.2

.9
1.5
2.6
3.9
1.3

.2
.0
.5
4.0
.?

100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0

27.2

14.8

5.5

6.8

40.2
38.3
33.C

24.9
26.7
20.1

8.2
7.2
6.4

7.1
4.4
6.5

1.7

16.6

12.5

2.9

1.2

.0
.5
.3
.8
1.8
1.2
.6
.1
1.3
.1
.0
.0
.4
.0
.1
.2
.3
.2
.1

18.5
20.6
18.8
17.2
12.1
20.1
23.2
20.9
18.0
18.9
18.7
23.5
19.1
23.2
19.7
23.4
20.4
20.2
19.9
20.6
22.9

.2
2.2
1.3
2.4
1.8
2.4
2.2
1.0
1.6
.5
.2
1.4
1.8
1.4

.3

18.7
23.2
20.2
20. 5
14.6
23.2
26.C
22.C
20.2
19.4
18.9
25.0
21.2
24.8
20.8
25.9
22.3
21.5
22.1
21.3
24.7

6.4

2.5

22.6

16.8

3.2

2.6

100.0

2.3
8.9
6.4
8.2
2.9
1.7
3.8

.1
1.9
2.4
7.8
.1
.0
.3

14.9
22.5
27.4
39.8
19.6
22. 1
29.2

14.5
18.5
20.6
17.4
18.6
22.1
26.4

.4
3.3
4.4
7. 1

.0
.7
2.4
15.2
.1
.0
1.1

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

79.9

1.9

.2

18.0

17.0

.8

.2 ICO.O

83.3

81.9

1.4

.0

16.7

16.4

.3

.0

76.2

72.2

3.7

.3

23.8

20.9

2.4

.0

1.0

2.0
1.7
1.2
1.9
.7
1.6

1.0

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1.7

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ic c .o

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.0

.0

.0

11.0

8.5

1.3

1.3

11.8
12.7
7.7
12.4
12.8

11.2
12.7
6.6
7.3
11.7

.5
.0
.8
2.0
.9

.1
.0
.3
3.1
.2

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PERCENT OF W O R KERS THAT E A R N E D MAJOR P R O P O R T I O N OF T H EIR E A R NINGS
N Y

I N D USTRY

UNITED N O R T H
STATES EAST
PRIVATE

NCNAGRICULTURAL

E CONOMY

Q U A

NORTH
SOUTH C E N TRAL

i o c 'o
.

26.3

28.5

.................................... .

IOO. C

io

METAL M I N I N G ...........................
A N T H R A C I T E M I N I N G ................... .
B I T U M I N O U S COAL AND L I G N I T E M I NING
OIL ANC GAS E X T R A C T I O N ............. .

10C.0
100.0
100.C
1CO.C
10C.C

MINING

ncnmetallic

CONTRACT

minerals,

CONSTRUCTION

EXCEPT FUELS

28.5.

IN THIS

F O U R

R T E R
WEST

Q U A
ALL WAGE AND S ALARY EMPLOY M E N T
NCRTH
U N I T E D NORTH
SOUTH CENT R A L WEST
STAT E S EAST

15.8

1CO.O

27.1

27.9

29 . A

1A.8

INDUSTRY AND REGI O N DURI N G

R T E R
T
UNITED
STATES

S
I N
H I s
I N D U S T R Y
N ORTH
NORTH 1
SOUTH c e n t r a l I WEST
EAST
_____ _ 1

100.0

27.1

27.9

29.A

1A.8

.q

50.2

18.9

19.3

100.0

11.A

A9.9

18.7

19.2

100.0

11.7

A9.7

18.9

18.8’

7.7
•*98.5
18.6
3.9
1 A .6

A.8
61.2
69.9
36.9

29. 1
1.5
18.1
8.5
31.9

58. 1
2.1
16.6
15.7

ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0

8.0
100.0
18.6
A.3
1A.6

5.0
59.8
70. 1
37.2

28.3

58.5
2.1
16.A
15.7

8. A
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0 ■ 18.9
100.0
A.2
100.0
15.3

A.9
59.6
70.3
36.8

29.3
_
19.5
7.6
31.8

57.2
_
1.9
16.2
15.0

-

19.5
7.7
31.5

-

............

100.C

20.9

37.2

2A . 1

16.2

ICO.O

21.8

35.7

2A.7

16.5

100.0

22.2

3A.8

25.0

16.7

GENERAL BUILCING CONTRACTORS .
H E AVY C O N S T R U C T I O N C O N T R A C T O R S
SPE C I A L T R ACE C O N T R A C T O R S ....

100.0
1 00.c
100.c

20.0
16.6
23.7

36.9
A3.8
33.9

23.2
21. A
25.9

16.3
16.8
15.7

ICO.O
ICO.O
I C O.O

21.5
16.5
2A.6

3A.A
A A .6
32.0

2A.9
19.6
27.0

16.6
18.1
15.7

100.0
100.0
100.0

22.5
16.3
25.2

32.8
AA.8
30.9

25.8
18.8
27.5

16.3
18.9
15.9

1C0.C

28.5

26.0

32. 1

12.6

ICO.O

28.9

25.8

33.0

11.7

100.0

29.1

25.5

33.2

11.5

100.c
100. c
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.G
100.0
100 . c
100.c
100 .c
100.0
100 . c
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.0
100.c
100.c

l A .9
19.3
13.9
2A.3
A 1.2
11.2
19. 3
29.9
32.5
33.9
23.3
30.6
52.0
26.7
31.6
26.5
28.7
32.0
16.A
50.6
A8.7

15.A
28.2
77.2
7C.0
38.0
AO.9
A 3.0
25. A
20.A
33.2
37.2
17.7
19. 1
28.6
17.0
18.2
12.9
18.9
21.0
10. A
13.6

25.9
31.6
2.0
3 .C
10. A
15. 1
2A.9
35.3
33 . A
25.5
21.1
AO.6
22.0
30.7
A2.3
AA .5
A7.9
3 A. 6
A6.A
26.2
2A. 7

A3.7
19.8
.5
1.5
7.6
32.7
12.2
9.2
13.A
6.8
15.5
10.6
A .0
12.7
9.0
10.6
10.3
1A . 0
16.2
11.2
12.0

100 . c

100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1 00.0
1CC.0
100.0
100.o
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
1CC.0
100.0
ICO.O

15.1
21.A
15.0
23.3
A2.5
10.8
18.8
29.A
33.2
33.8
23.5
29.0
52.0
26.8
32.2
26.9
29.2
32 . A
17.1
52.2
A8.7

15.2
28.A
77.1
71.6
37.8
AO.7
A A .3
25.9
20. 3
3A.A
37.8
18.1
18.3
28.8
17.A
18.0
12.8
19. 1
20.5
9.8
1A. 1

2A.7
33. 1
2.7
2.8
10.7
15.3
25.A
35.0
3A.2
25.A
21.6
A2.8
23. 1
31.1
A2.0
AA.9
A8.2
3A.1
A6.8
26.0
25.2

AA.9
16.1
.8
1. A
6. A
33.2
11.1
9.5
,12.2
6.0
15.A
9.6
3.7
12.2
8.A
10.1
9.7
13.9
15.7
10.5
11.0

100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0

lA .6
21.7
15.0
23.A
A3.2
10.7
18.5
29.3
33.2
3A.0
23.7
28.9
52.2
27.2
32.7
27.0
29.5
32.7
16.6
53.0
A9.5

1A . 9
27.9
76.6
71.8
37.3
AO.5
A A .6
26.2
20.0
3A.6
37.7
17.7
17.3
28.2
16.9
17.2
12.3
18.7
20.0
9.1
13.8

2A.2
33.5
2.8
2.6
10.7
15.2
25.5
3A.9
3A.6
25.3
22.0
A3.7
23.7
31.8
A2.1
A5.7
A8.9
3A.5
A7.7
26.0
25.A

A6.2
15.7
.8
1.3
6.2
33.5
11.0
9.A
12.1
5.6
1A . 9
9.3
3.7
11.7
8.2
9.8
9.2
13.7
15.7
10 . A
10.3

........................... .

100.c

22.9

20.9

AO.7

12.7

ICO.O

22.9

20.0

A2.9

11.9

100.0

23.1

19.2

A3.9

11.6

R A I L R O A D T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ................
L CCAL ANC INT E R U R B A N P A S S E N G E R TRANSIT
T R U C K I N G ANC W A R E H O U S I N G ............... .
WATER T R A N S P O R T A T I O N .................... .
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N BY AIR ................... .
PIPE LINE T R A N S P O R T A T I O N ............... .
T R A N S P O R T A T I O N S E R V I C E S ................. .

100.c
100.0
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.c
100 . c

A6.8
23.9
23.5
29.2
6. A
AO.O

17.3
30 . A
25.3
27.6
58. 7
18.A

100, 0
22.7
3C.C
9.6
17.9
2A.A
22. A

12.7
15.2
lA . 8
2A.0
10.5
17.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
100.0

A9.0
2A.5
26.1
30.1
6.3
A 1.3

16.8
29.8
26.7
27.8
58.7
16.8

100. 0
22.2
31.2
7.6
16.5
.25.2
23.9

11.5
1A. 1
15.5
2A.A
9.8
16.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100 . c
100.0
100.0

A9.7
25.2
26.1
30.A
7.A
A2.8

16.2
28.7
27.0
28.1
55.7
15.A

100. 0
22.3
32.0
6.8
16.2
27.9
2A.2

11.2
13.9
16.0
2A.I
9.0
16.7

C OMMUN ICAT ION

100.c

27.8

27.2

2A. 3

20.2

100.0

27.6

27. 1

2A.8

2C.0

100.0

27. A

27.2

25.0

20.1

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

1 00.c

22.7

32.6

26.6

16.7

100.0

23.1

32.A

27.2

16.3

100.0

23 . A

32.0

27.2

16.3

100.c

27.0

28.3

27.C

17.0

ICO.O

27.9

27.8

27.7

15.9

100.0

28.1

27.6

27.9

15.8

MANUFACTURI NG

..........................................................

ORDNANCE ANC ACCESSORI ES ............................
FCCC AND KI NCRED PRODUCTS .............. ..
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS ...................................
TEXTI LE MI LL PRODUCTS ...................................
APPAREL ANC OTHER TEXTI LE PRODUCTS . . .
LUMBER ANC WCCC PRODUCTS ............................
FURNI TURE ANC FI XTURES .................................
PAPER ANC ALLI ED PRODUCTS .........................
PRI NTI NG ANC PUBLI SHI NG ..............................
CHEMI CALS AND ALLI ED PRODUCTS ................
PETROLEUM ANC COAL PRODUCTS .....................
RUBBER AND PLASTI C PRODUCTS, NEC ..........
LEATHER ANC LEATHER PRODUCTS ...................
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS ............
PRIMARY METAL I NDUSTRI ES ............................
FABRI CATED METAL PRODUCTS ..........................
MACHI NERY, EXCEPT ELECTRI CAL ....................
ELECTRI CAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLI ES . . . . .
TRANSPORTATI ON EQUIPMENT ............................
INSTRUMENTS ANC RELATED PRODUCTS ...........
MI SCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURI NG I NDUSTRI ES

transportation




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1 F o r p ur p o s e s of this study, and b e c a us e i nf or mat i on about their actual pl ace
of e mp l o y me nt w a s not av ai l a b l e in the f i l es studi ed, emp l o y e e s of r a i l r o a d s and r a i l r o a d r e l at ed or ga ni z at i ons c o v e r e d b y the R a i l r o a d Ac t w e r e cons i der ed to have been
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N O T E : A das h ( - ) i ndi cates ei ther the s ampl e did not i ncl ude any w o r k e r s with
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D e ta ile d Tables

Earnings and employment patterns in 3-digit industry divisions




INDUSTRY E A R N I N G S OF WORKERS BY
QUAR T E R S WORK E D IN THE I NDUSTRY

E A R N I N G S FRO M ALL WAG E AN D SALA R Y E M P L O Y M E N T OF
WO R K E R S W HOSE MAJOR EARN I N G S WERE FROM THIS
INDU S T R Y BY Q U A R T E R S W O R K E D IN THE INDUSTRY

I N D USTRY
A N Y
ALL
WORKERS
PR I V A T E N O N A G R I C U L T U R A L
MINING

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WHITE 1 | NE G R O

FOUR Q U A R T E R S
ALL
R A. C E
WO R K E R S
WHI TE1 | NEGRO

ECONOMY ......... $ 4,250 t 4,374 $ 2,959 $ 6,452

$ 6,685

A N Y
ALL
WORK E R S

( 4,697

$ 4,250

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
W H I T E 1 | NE G R O
$ 4 ,374

$ 2,959

FOUR Q U A R T E R S
R A C. F
ALL
|_
WO R K E R S [ WHITE1 | NEG R O
$ 6 ,452 $ 6,685

$ 4 ,697

................................................

7,363

7,472

5,187

8,785

8,869

6,958

7,624

7,731

5,285

8,853

8,927

7,027

C R U D E P E TROLEUM, N A T U R A L GAS ANO LIQUIDS....
OIL AND GAS FI E L D SER V I C E S ....................

8, 137
4,519

8,259
4,638

4,874
1,666

9 , 275
8,352

9,355
8,434

6, 3 3 3
4 ,874

8,219
5,226

8,353
5,308

4, 9 3 7
1, 874

9 ,330
8, 488

9 , 419
8,595

6,499
5,062

.............................

5,335

5,716

3, 103

8,835

9,206

5 ,662

5,709

6 ,103

3,429

9,043

9,399

5,782

H I G H W A Y AND STR E E T C O N S T R U C T I O N ..............
H E A V Y C O N S T R U C T I O N , NEC ........................
P LUMBING, H E A T I N G , AIR C O N D I T I O N I N G .........
P AINTING, PAPER HANGING, DEC O R A T I N G .........
E L E C T R I C A L WORK ..................................
M ASONRY, S T O N E W O R K , AND PLASTE R I N G ..........
C A R P E N T E R I N G AND F L O O R I N G .....................
R O O F I N G AND SHEET M ETAL WORK .................
C O N C R E T E WOR K ....................................

4,763
5, C40
6,682
3,446
7,863
4, 112
3,401
3,924
3,669

5,092
5,509
7,158
3,547
7,976
4 ,659
3,458
4,316
3,934

3,119
2,774
2,578
2,437
3, 145
2, 788
2,624
2, 374
3,035

7,632
9,773
10,005
7,586
10,737
7,768
7,888
8, C24
7,923

7,983
10,281
10,206
7 , 690
10,823
8,379
7,962
8,558
8,487

5 ,249
6,191
5 ,812
4, 4 3 7
6,874
5,468
6 ,124
4,571
5,249

5,336
6,118
7,689
3,953
8,287
4 ,832
4, 132
4,432
4 ,629

5,656
6 ,612
7,898
4, 108
8,508
5,460
4,241
4 ,867
5,085

3, 633
3,486
3,208
3,041
4, 145
3, 361
3,187
2 , 687
3,449

7,846
10,159
10,417
7, 776
10,898
8, 181
8,205
8, 303
8, 541

8,242
10,634
10,583
7,870
10,989
8,819
8,349
8, 806
9, 147

5,357
6 ,548
5,979
4,562
7, 187
5,924
6,208
4 ,649
5,687

.............. - .......................

5,586

5,842

3,986

7 ,345

7,563

5,654

5,752

5,988

4, 138

7,429

7,632

5,762

7,440
4,482
5,655
1,458
6, 391
5,624
6,243
4,549
4,455
3,374
3,821
3,848
2,997
2,957
2,850
2,791
3, 566
4,592
3, 935
7,935
5,457
5, 524
5,848
8,961
7,274
7,352
5,783
9,602
8,327
5,265
3,416
5,866
5,600
8, 358
6,651
7, C7 1
5,653
6,022
6, 157
6,505
7,548
6,660
7,523

7, 794
5,061
5,774
1,490
6,774
5,785
6,658
4,758
4,608
3,423
3,897
3,925
3,062
2,959
2,857
2,769
4, 108
5,080
4,075
8,056
5,617
5,697
6,058
9 ,132
7,428
7,618
6,214
9, 778
8,480
5,440
3,442
5,953
5,981
8,559
6,908
7,205
5,880
6,257
6,241
6,824
7,636
6,870
7,683

5,026
3,233
4,699
1,225
3,803
4,781
3, 778
3,631
3,562
2,977
3,401
3,548
2,490
2,949
2,767
2,888
2,720
2,437
3,315
6,031
4,482
3,531
4,238
6,933
6,024
5, 174
3, 524
6,593
6,357
3,924
2,424
4,749
3,916
7, 156
5,937
5,041
3,892
4,392
5,124
5,112
6, 124
4,937
6,013

8,987
7,813
7,6 4 0
5,643
7,922
7,599
8,265
5,226
5, 137
4,221
4,671
4 ,693
3,824
3,852
3,714
3,688
5, 777
6, 7 4 7
5,167
8,701
6,883
7,981
8,193
9, 6 4 9
8,117
8,508
8,093
10,263
9 ,215
6 ,706
4,391
7,305
7,862
9,C9l
7 ,727
8, C94
6 ,980
7,820
7,827
8,319
8,189
8,187
8,300

9,220
8, 192
7,749
5, 836
8,021
7, 833
8,511
5,389
5,213
4,233
4, 722
4,754
3,876
3, 863
3,727
3, 704
6, 557
7,010
5,332
8,801
7,052
8,063
8, 396
9, 833
8,265
8,812
8,658
10,388
9,331
6, 756
4,404
7,463
8,183
9,262
8, 105
8,205
7, 108
7,939
7, 855
8,524
8,268
8, 288
8, 380

5,897
5,011
6, 2 4 9
4,522
6 ,749
6,491
6,028
4 ,607
4,666
4,086
4, 4 3 7
4,145
3,422
3,760
3,499
3,562
3,592
4 ,302
4 ,366
7,232
6,086
5 ,499
6 , 329
7,816
7,087
7,187
5,499
8,249
7,949
6,124
4 ,145
6,354
5,388
7,991
7,043
7,031
5,392
5,989
6,958
7,474
7,553
6,687
7,349

7,739
4, 8 0 7
6 ,002
1,645
6 ,601
5,8 7 4
6,509
4 ,650
4 ,622
3,485
4,004
3,934
3,086
3,051
2,938
2,933
3,792
4, 9 5 6
4, 110
8,077
5,676
5,760
6,185
9,055
7,415
7 ,575
6, 0 6 6
9 , 707
8,438
5,434
3,534
5,940
6,0 4 9
8 ,483
6,821
7,312
5,800
6, 4 2 6
6 ,410
6,788
7, 7 4 6
7,014
7,761

7,981
5,429
6,107
1,674
6,950
6,050
6 , 903
4,843
4,740
3,517
4 ,062
4,031
3,140
3,055
2,940
2,928
4 ,364
5,453
4,251
8, 2 1 4
5,821
5,913
6,412
9,220
7,600
7,767
6,489
9 ,884
8,690
5,603
3,560
6 ,023
6 , 504
8,668
7,085
7,543
6,005
6,654
6,510
7,076
7,804
7, 114
7,838

5, 197
3,466
4,791
1,427
4,031
5,033
4, 0 8 7
3,928
4, 0 3 4
3, 261
3, 693
3, 606
2.722
3,024
2,921
2,954
2, 874
2,968
3, 592
6, 194
4,931
3, 839
4 ,817
7, 284
6 ,072
5,437
3, 824
6, 8 1 2
6 , 428
4, 140
2, 541
5, 149
4, 291
7, 299
6, 157
5.656
4, 166
4, 638
5, 249
5,520
6, 624
5, 156
6,270

9, 124
7,880
7, 760
5, 703
7,976
7,712
8, 339
5,272
5, 173
4, 249
4, 718
4, 723
3, 848
3, 880
3, 720
3,709
5, 872
6,816
5,241
8,786
7,020
8,069
8, 364
9 ,713
8, 176
8,645
8, 316
10,323
9, 300
6,817
4,425
7,336
7,946
9, 195
7,834
8,255
7,042
7,937
7,916
8,447
8,387
8, 249
8,433

9, 374
8,302
7,822
5,915
8, 152
7,898
8,602
5,410
5,247
4, 265
4, 761
4, 798
3,899
3, 888
3, 733
3,728
6 ,597
7,075
5,401
8,900
7, 137
8, 156
8,540
9,928
8,323
8,934
8,763
10,438
9,423
6,878
4 , 439
7,503
8,280
9, 354
8,184
8,349
7, 163
8, 104
7,951
8,676
8, 464
8, 358
8,512

6,074
5,156
6,416
4,583
6 ,937
6,712
6,114
4,720
4 , 687
4 ,124
4,479
4,159
3,430
3,812
3,499
3,583
3,638
4, 4 4 7
4,422
7,453
6,281
5,666
6,437
7,896
7,112
7,593
5,749
8,333
7,958
6, 2 2 4
4 ,145
6,424
5,571
8,165
7,121
7,270
5,649
6,093
7,124
7,587
7, 791
7,093
7,446

CONTRACT

CONSTRUCTION

manufacturing

AMM U N I T I O N , E X C E P T FOR SMALL ARMS ...........
MEAT P R O D U C T S ....................................
DAI R Y P R O D U C T S ...................................
C ANNED, C URED, AND F R O Z E N FOODS ..............
G R A I N MILL P R O D U C T S .............................
B A KERY P R O D U C T S ..................................
B E V E R A G E S .........................................
W E A V I N G MILLS, C O T T O N ..........................
W E A V I N G MILLS, S Y N T H E T I C S .....................
K N I T T I N G MI L L S ...................................
YAR N AND T H R E A D M I L L S ..........................
MEN * S AND B O Y S ’ SU I T S AND COATS ..............
M E N ’S AND B O Y S ’ F U R N I S H I N G S ...................
W O M E N ' S AND M I S S E S ’ O U T E R W E A R .................
W O M E N ’S AND C H I L D R E N ’S U N D E R G A R M E N T S ........
C H I L D R E N ' S O U T E R W E A R ...........................
S A W M I L L S AND P L A N I N G MILLS ....................
M I L LWORK, P L Y W O O D AND R E L ATED P RODUCTS .....
H O U S E H O L D F U R N I T U R E ...........................
PULP AND PAPER MI L L S ...........................
P A P E R B O A R D C O N T A I N E R S AND BOXES ..............
N E W S P A P E R S ........................................
C O M M E R C I A L P R I N T I N G .............................
IND U S T R I A L C H E M I C A L S ...........................
P L A S T I C S M A T E R I A L S AND SYNTH E T I C S ...........
DRU G S ...............................................
SOAP, CLEA N E R S , AND TOI L E T GOODS .............
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G ..............................
TIRES AND INNER TU B E S ..........................
O T H E R R U B B E R P R O D U C T S ..........................
FOOT W E A R , E XCEPT R U B B E R ........................
G L ASS AND G L A S S W A R E , PR E S S E D OR BLOWN ......
CONC R E T E , GYPSUM, AND P LASTER P R O D U C T S .....
BLAST FU R N A C E AND BASIC STEEL P R O DUCTS .....
IRON AND STEEL F O U N D R I E S ......................
N C N F E R R O U S R O L L I N G ANO D RAWING ...............
C UTLERY, H A N D TOOLS, AND H A R DWARE ...........
F A B R I C A T E D S T R U C T U R A L METAL PRODU C T S .......
SC R E W M A C H I N E PR O C U C T S , BOLTS, ETC ..........
M ETAL S T A M P I N G S ..................................
ENGI N E S ANO T U R B I N E S ............................
FARM M A C H I N E R Y ...................................
C O N S T R U C T I O N AND R E L A T E D M A C HINERY ..........




INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL E C O N O M Y —
Continued

A NY
ALL--WORKERS

Q U A R T E R

------n r r e ----WHITE1 | NEGRO

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE. AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WH I T E 1 1 NEGRO

6,874
5,791
6,966
6,446
6,062
5,799
5,854
5,687
5,607
4,687
6,635
4,736
7,024
7,508
6,652
5,724
4,722

%7,834

$ 7,902 $ 5,124
7,382
4,874
7,561
5,824
8,037
4, 224
6,446
4,803
6,337
4, 839
6,227
4,479
4, 549
6,046
5,316
4,390
3, 374
4,523
7,682
5, 181
5,132
3, 886
7,627
6,040
8,759
6, 757
7,045
5,015
4,824
6,591
4,307
2, 874

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE1 | NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE1 | NEGRO

-

METAL WORKING MACHINERY ...................... S
INDUSTRY MACHINERY ..................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ...............
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT ...
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL A P P A R A T U S ....... .
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES .........................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .....
RA0I0 AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ............
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ......................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ......
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ...........................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING .......
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ...
OTHER MANUFACTURING ..........................

special

TRANSPORTATION ..................................
RAILROADS ......................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ..........
TAXICABS .......................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ...........
AIR TRANSPORTATION ...........................

S

7,563 $ 7,668 $ 4,374 $
7, C37
7,154
4,607
5,479
7, 392
7.287
7,646
4,024
7,831
5,9 92
6,137
4,520
5,994
4,574
5,806
4,324
6,014
5,903
5,719
5,879
4,449
5,081
5,176
4,203
3,099
4, 142
4,356
7,414
7, 193
5,034
4, 796
4,921
3,692
7,218
7,420
5,8781
8, 377
8,559
6,351
6,326
4,6 74
6,637
6,229
4,774
6,374
3,887
2,714
4,050

8,828 $ 8,925
7,977
8,076
8,052
8, 165
9,346
9,521
7,579
7,455
7,447
7,647
7,329
7,228
7,010
7, 151
6,277
6,422
5,706
5,913
8,746
8,998
6,354
6,557
8,C07
8,267
9,602
9,445
7,986
8, 346
7,434
7,560
5,865
6,016

7, 392

7,674

5,415

8,867

9,081

7,385

7,623

7,842

8,681
7,932
1,874
6,645
9,070

8,864
7,767
1,854
6,994
9, 194

6,746
8,729
1,999
4,149
7,739

9,554
8,881
4,164
8,860
10,199

9,658
8,631
4,208
9,040
10.327

7,314
9,493
4,015
6,985
8,104

8,766
8,083
2,211
7,091
9,164

9,036
7,856
2, 189
7,407
9,291

7,286
7,457
7,882
6,333
6,163
6, 128
5,901
5,241
4,330
7,442
5,008
7,419
8,592
6,687
6,426
4,123

%8,992

8, 109
8,201
9,470
7,531
7,562
7,406
7,202
6,387
5,773
8,874
6,462
8, 195
9,580
8, 176
7,535
5,940

* 9,105
8,192
8,295
9,626
7,652
7,741
7,488
7, 294
6,520
5,968
9,093
6,671
8,442
9, 718
8,436
7,638
6,089

% 7,024

5, 744

9,008

9,215

7,539

6,905
8,906
2,305
4, 545
7,830

9,620
9,042
4,278
8,982
10,286

9,722
8,791
4,342
9, 152
10,396

7,424
9,679
4,097
7,130
8,211

6,281
7,124
6,531
6,458
5,999
6,024
5,949
5,783
4,749
6,718
4,888
7,201
7,786
6,910
5,843
4,799

COMMUNICATION ...................................

5,947

6,168

3,958

7,323

7,648

5,374

6,035

6,250

4, 124

7,405

7, 721

5,411

TELEPHONE C O M M U N I C A T I O N ........ .............
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING ..........

5,901
6,081

6, 129
6,302

3,896
3,593.

7,063
8,494

7,377
8,666

5,262
6,541

5.968
6,431

6,191
6,697

4,085
3,874

7, 128
8,757

7,441
8,966

5,294
6,708

PUBLIC UTILITIES ................................

8,409

8,629

5,374

9,275

9,440

6,823

8,526

8,745

5, 703

9,379

9,535

6,984

WHOLESALE TRADE .................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ....
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ......
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ........................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..............
ELECTRICAL GOODS ..............................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ...
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ..........
RETAIL TRADE ....................................
STORES ............................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ............................
VARIETY STORES .................. — ...........
GROCERY STORES ................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ........................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS ..,
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ......................J
SHOE STORES .................................. FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS .............
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES .........
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .........................

department




5,544

5,828

3,323

7,838

7,952

5,606

5,871

6, 154

3, 729

7,906

8,064

5,736

5,658
6, 329
4,662
4, 160
6,086
5,756
6,923

5,767
6,558
4,906
4,501
6,253
6,035
7,138

4,291
3, 374
3,083
2,567
3,910
3,562
4,199

7,504
8,154
7,245
7,562
7,831
7,673
8,726

7,621
8, 355
7,749
7,810
7,928
7,780
8,892

6,196
5,999
5,140
5,234
6,214
5,152
6,137

6,077
6,646
4,889
4,620
6,364
6,095
7,256

6,198
6,910
5,151
4,907
6,522
6,350
7,444

4, 693
4, 104
3,464
3,006
4,424
4,074
4,615

7,636
8,340
7,370
7,678
7,908
7,812
8,890

7,735
8,534
7,801
7,879
7,997
7,878
9,032

6,359
6,249
5,203
5,406
6,333
5,232
6,343

1,702

1,760

1,557

4, 138

4, 167

3,884

1,861

1,891

1,721

4,202

4,229

3,948

2,020
3, 181
1,293
2,260
5, 369
2, 142
1,535
1,467
1,870
3,402
1,694
4,858

2,062
3,423
1.321
2,299
5,550
2,147
1,532
1,487
1,910
3,529
1,703
4,889

1,571
2,192
1,020
1,749
3,770
2,107
1,587
1,177
1,482
2,447
1,558
3,999

4,042
5,535
3,459
5, 133
7,581
4,624
3,427
3,429
4,516
5,969
3,760
6,629

4,038
5,728
3,455
5, 181
7,770
4, 709
3,437
3,392
4, 585
6,194
3.719
6, 702

4,075
5,177
3,524
4,485
5,517
4,124
3,351
3,812
3,999
4,249
4,318
5,812

2,195
3,417
1,444
2,438
5,669
2,338
1,659
1,611
2,132
3,720
1,840
5,099

2,235
3,632
1,465
2,470
5,870
2,342
1,646
1,629
2,164
3,886
1,844
5, 138

1,782
2,449
1, 184
2,061
3,999
2,299
1,848
1,387
1,687
2,802
1, 770
4,499

4,086
5,582
3,486
5,210
7,698
4,685
3,464
3,470
4,692
6,067
3,802
6,694

4,080
5, 768
3,478
5,259
7,833
4,762
3,476
3,433
4,770
6,307
3,759
6,764

4,140
5,197
3,590
4,574
5,607
4,249
3,367
3,916
3,999
4,277
4,449
5,812

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY

AN Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
:
WHITE1 | NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
:
R A ( E
ALL
W(3RKERS WHITE1 | NEGRO

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A i
SL_E______
WHITE1 NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A 1
ALL
EL_E_______
WORKERS WHITE1 1 NEGRO

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY-Continued
FINANCE*

1
INSURANCE. AND REAL ESTATE ..... % A,693 $ A,831 : 3,227 * 6,231 * 6,379 $ 5,006

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ....
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS .........
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ..........
LIFE INSURANCE ..........................
FIRE. MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ..
SERVICES ...................................
HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ...
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ....
MOTION PICTURES .........................
HOSPITALS ................................




A, 791
4,774
A, 327
5, A30
5,267

A, 8A0
A,816
A,372
5,579
5.A21

2,688

2,89A

1,372
2,265
9A7
3,72A

1,378
2, 197
919
3,776

A,099
3,937
3, 12A
3,908
3,609

$ 4,857 $ 4,975 $ 3,582 S 6,320 $ 6,448 S 5,106

5,697
5.8AA
5,862
7, 196
7,031

5,750
5,914
5,901
7,401
7, 193

5,124
4,906
5,062
5,398
4,802

4,895
4,904
4,596
5,691
5,432

4,935
4,931
4,626
5,870
5.579

1,821

5,157

5,555

3,637

2,835

3,061

1,932

1,3A3
2.A26
1,71A
3,572

3,6A8
3,717
3,687
A ,941

3,776
3, 798
3,579
5,034

3,331
3,589
4,541
4,585

1,558
2,438
1,073
3,845 -

1,563
2,357
1,037
3,881

1,540
2,596
1,916
3,708

4, 387
4, 374
3, 499
4, 136
3,989

5,816
5,955
6,017
7,519
7,274

5,246
5,156
5,624
5,624
4,852

5,213

5,613

3,677

3,754
3, 761
3,982
4,993

3,906
3,828
3,883
5,082

3,389
3,647
4,812
4,659

5,762
5,917
5,990
7,322
7,126

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKEO IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY

AN Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
R A C E
WHITE 1 |
.NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE1
NEGRO

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ........ $ 5, A 7 3 t 5,70A $ 3,601 $ 7,501 $ 7,760 $ 5,177

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS
% 5,A73

FOUR QUARTERS
Q U A R T E R
R A C ~ E ___
ALL
.-.
R. A_“L E _____
W H IT E1 | NEGRO WORKERS WHITE1 | NEGRO
% 5,70A

$ 3,601 % 7,501 $ 7,760 i 5,177

MINING ............... ............................

7,508

7,60 A

5, 159

9,769

9,88A

6,839

7,771

7,869

5,392

9,893

10,009

6,965

CRUOE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND LIQUIDS....
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ..................

8,809
5,969

8,970
6,031

A, A32
3,512

10,6A3
9,505

10,781
9,582

5,91A
6,27A

9,052
6,372

9,209
6, A38

A, 767
3, 722

10,795
9,685

10,933
9,763

6,085
6, A 12

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ..........................

6 ,A 57

6,760

3,8A3

9,6A7

9, 990

6,15A

6,731

7,0A2

A,052

9,826

10,17A

6,287

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ............
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ......................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ........
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ........
ELECTRICAL WORK ...............................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING .........
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ...................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ................
CONCRETE WORK .................................

5,576
6, A 37
7, 7A0
A, 703
8,718
5, 181
A, 711
5,338
A,986

5,867
6,839
7, 9A8
A, 792
8,871
5,608
A,793
5,633
5,273

3,533
3,665
3, AA8
2,936
A,517
3,652
3,5A8
2,851
3,856

8,639
10,61A
10,656
8,195
11,A3A
8,112
8,178
8,717
8,771

8,995
11,102
10,796
8,327
11,536
8, 66A
8, 28A
9,136
9, 398

5,67A
6,671
6,237
A,991
7,A2A
5,886
6,526
A,751
6,A2A

6,02A
7, 182
8,273
5,038
9,073
5,681
5,178
5,733
5,676

6,326
7,620
8.A89
5,131
9,227
6,133
5,252
6 ,OA 3
5,985

3,905
A, 157
3. 815
3, 19A
A,851
A,060
A, 126
3, 121
A ,A60

8,850
11,0A5
10,9A9
8,392
11,653
8, A79
8, A79
8,9A0
9,315

9,208
11,553
11,093
8,529
11,757
9,038
8,568
9,365
9,961

5,668
6,938
6,390
5,096
7,526
6,229
7,096
A,918
6,896

6, AO 1

6,653

A,291

8,275

8,51A

5,969

6,5A 2

6,792

A, A52

8, 365

8,600

6,097

8, 139
5, A52
5,9 A 1
3,085
6,701
5.8A5
6,5 A8
A ,8 AO
A, 7A5
3, 796
3,896
A, 557
3, 187
3,667
3,272
3, 168
A ,A 15
5,310
A ,A 1 7
8, 1 1A
5,8 2 A
6, 291
7, 110
9,7 3 A
7,652
8,837
7, C95
9,77A
8, 3A2
5,699
3,763
6, 225
6, 161
8,273
6,637
7, 368
6,267
6, A A3
6 , 8 1A
7, 2A9
7, 7A6
7,069
7,753

8, A58
5,8 A3
6,021
3,203
7,038
6,0A2
6,87A
5, 193
A ,9 6A
3,882
A,026
A,696
3,280
3,736
3,319
3, 2 A3
A,833
5,658
A ,62C
8,291
6,039
6, 386
7,306
9,989
7,839
9,235
7, A99
9,996
8,563
5,876
3,80A
6,387
6,508
8,515
7,0A 5
7,595
6,508
6,6 A 7
6,936
7,5A2
7,888
7,216
7,901

A , 809
3,873
A, 675
2,306
A, 3 29
A, 595
A, 175
3, 370
3, A35
3,016
3,183
3,571
2, A88
3,006
2,800
2,705
2,697
2,869
3,189
5,597
A, 395
A, 2 17
A,623
6,619
5,621
5, IA9
3,833
6, 331
6,38A
A, 176
2,767
A,656
A,027
6, 7A5
5,526
5,202
3,92A
A, 310
5,078
5,312
6,018
A,953
5,609

10,319
7,981
8,051
6,553
8,816
7,907
8.833
6, 099
6,058
5. 173
5,272
5,832
A, A85
5, 1A5
A,610
A,580
6,322
7,652
6, 179
9,600
7,676
8,367
9,515
11,053
8,9 A3
10,699
9,7A5
11,218
9,650
7,525
5,212
8,205
8,560
9, 55A
8,3 7A
9 » OA1
8,006
8,720
8,935
9,338
9,019
9,091
9,277

10,588
8, A29
8, lA3
6, 8 1A
9,017
8, 122
9,111
6, 359
6, 220
5,256
5,386
5, 982
A,588
5,238
A, 686
A, 671
6, 9AA
8,007
6, A 19
9,729
7,862
8, A39
9,705
11,270
9,09A
11,01A
10, 122
11,373
9, 79A
7,602
5, 2A3
8,3 A 1
8,9A7
9,779
8, 8A2
9,222
8, 177
8,927
9,019
9, 598
9, 1A2
9,250
9, 388

6,782
5 ,9A8
6,518
A,826
6,957
6, A29
6,318
A, 719
A , 807
A,350
A,530
A,726
3,615
A,229
3,817
A,021
3,780
A,562
A,575
7,395
6,231
6,39A
6,722
8, OA5
7,062
7,11A
5,832
8,203
8,110
6,531
A,312
6,610
5,868
8,0A1
7,056
7,018
5,816
6,282
7,AAA
7,35A
7,355
6 ,A56
7,336

8,381
5,6^5A
6,220
3 »22A
6,9A7
6,087
6 , 80A
5,006
A,962
3,9A0
A, 106
A,687
3,291
3,778
3,362
3,290
A,591
5,590
A,606
8,363
6,080
6 ,AA7
7,368
9,936
7,858
9,079
7,378
9,991
8,538
5,092
3,903
6,393
6,555
8, A52
6,887
7,652
6 ,A9 1
6,8A0
7,056
7, A68
7,998
7,29A
8,0A7

8,698
6,0A7
6,301
3,3A1
7,278
6,277
7,125
5,335
5, 170
A,022
4,228
A,832
3,381
3,8A8
3, AO 7
3,365
5,020
5,939
A,805
8,5A 1
6,285
6,537
7,566
10,188
8,0A5
9, A76
7,781
10,206
8,757
6,055
3.9A7
6,5A6
6,902
8,68A
7,275
7,875
6,727
7,057
7, 176
7,761
8,136
7, A35
8,188

5,070
A,072
A,933
2, A5A
A, 625
A,883
A, A72
3,632
3, 719
3, 198
3, AA3
3,663
2,615
3, 105
2,897
2, 820
2,827
3, 1A 1
3, 399
5, 8A6
A, 722
A, A80
A, 855
6, 8A6
5,837
5, A05
A, 135
6, 66A
6, 600
A, A8A
2,832
A, 90A
A, A29
6,989
5,829
5, 531
A, 197
A, 579
5,357
5,532
6,323
5, 252
5,993

10,AA8
8,081
8,229
6,657
8,957
8,0A8
8,968
6, 181
6,138
5,23A
5,3A9
5,910
A,529
5,206
A,653
A, 620
6, A05
7,753
6, 267
9, 721
7,809
8, A63
9, 688
11,156
9,0A7
10,862
9,929
11,33A
9, 7A3
7, 63A
5,278
8, 251
8, 736
9,681
8,511
9, 189
8,126
8,917
9,066
9, A63
9,200
9, 211
9, A 2 7
.

10,717
8,52A
8, 319
6,917
9, 152
8,253
9,2A6
6, A25
6,305
5, 316
5, A58
6,062
A, 631
5,301
A, 727
A, 709
7,030
8, 10A
6, 507
9,851
7,986
8, 530
9,876
11.373
9, 196
11, 1 70
10,297
11,A85
9, 893
7, 703
5,311
8,386
9, 116
9,895
8,951
9, 361
8,293
9, 128
9, 15A
9,718
9, 313
9, 370
9,535

6,908
6,065
6,732
A,932
7, lAA
6,637
6, AA3
A,885
A.8A9
A, A30
A, 6A5
A,785
3,667
A,266
3,870
A,071
3,851
A,703
A,661
7,501
6, A3 A
6,62A
6,938
8, 1A9
7,190
7,357
6,099
8, AOO
8,1A2
6,738
A,339
6,66A
6,089
8,2AA
7,275
7,270
6,005
6, A32
7,511
7,515
7,656
6,566
7,528

MANUFACTURING ...................................
AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ..........
MEAT PRODUCTS .................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ............
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ..........................
b a k e r y PROCUCTS ...............................
BEVERAGES ......................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ........................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ...................
k n i t t i n g MILLS ................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ........................
MFN'S AND BOYS* SUITS AND COATS .............
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS .................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ...............
WOMAN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS .......
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR .........................
SAWMILLS ANC PLANING MILLS ..................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS .....
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ..........................
PULP ANO PAPER MILLS .........................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ............
NEWSPAPERS .....................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ..........................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ........................ .
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ..........
DRUGS ..........................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ...........
PETROLEUM REFINING ............... ............
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ........................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ........................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ......................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN ......
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .....
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS .....
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES .....................
NCNFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ..............
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ..........
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS .......
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC .........
METAL STAMPINGS ...............................
ENGINES ANC TURBINES .........................
FARM MACHINERY ................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY .........




INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS BY
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY

ANY
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
f A f F
t
WHITE | NEGRO

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

FOUR QUARTERS
Al I
I
R A f F
.
WORKERS | WH I T E 1 | NEGRG

A N Y
Q U A R T E R
ALL
1
R A C E
WORKERS | WHITE1 | NEGRO

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C F
ALL
WORKERS W H IT E1 I NEGRO

private n cn ag r iCultural eco nomy —
Continued

$ 8,310 $ 8,448 $ 4,661 410,254 410,351 4 6,812
7,727
4,678
7,577
9,090
6,029
9,230
7,766
7,935
9,450
6,811
5,260
9,308
10,429 10,581
8,684
4,680
6,771
8,468
6,680
8,465
4,232
6,501
8,622
5,980
6,699
4,479
6,032
6,507
8,350
8,549
8,226
8,310
6,102
6,606
6,729
4,200
6, 171
6, 375
4,258
8 ,C47
8,232
6,036
5,685
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ....
5,855
4,188
7,395
7,570
5,669
7,676
5,178
5, C77
5,361
7,397
3,310
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ..........
8,540
8,293
5, 123 10,118 10,307
6,999
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ....................
3,859
8,167
6,076
6,252
8,358
5,416
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ....
5,614
7,684
9, 158
7,099
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ..............
8,033
9,471
9,246
5,955
9,468
10,862
7,657
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ..........................
11,040
SHIP ANO BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ......
6, 374
6,696
8,556
4,582
8,852
6,690
4,424
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL OEVICES ..
6,611
6,972
8,344
8,468
6,117
4,886
5,086
7, 188
3,062
7, 375
5,093

METAL WORKING MACHINERY ....................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY .................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ...............
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .............
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ..................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT ..
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ...........

$ 8,608 $
7,865
8,023
8,772
6,842
6,791
6,881
6,428
5,906
5,322
8,544
6,334
7,915
9,520
6,690
7,035
5,131

8,743 $ 5,006 $10,395 $10,492 $ 6,954
8,006
5, 140
9,258
9,385
6,480
8,186
9,434
5,602
7,002
9,573
4,893
10,577 10,731
8,993
6,881
7,007
4, 753
8,602
8,751
6,246
6,979
4,812
8,474
8,669
6,204
4,464
7,004
8,491
6,272
8,406
6,626
4,573
8,247
8,418
6,393
6,072
4,450
7,522
7,691
5,855
5,489
7,831
5,602
3,582
7,570
10,241
10,429
5,395
7,129
8,789
6,514
4,060
8,302
8,495
5,516
9,314
5,856
9,618
8,262
7,306
9,729
6,415
11,007 11,175
7,989
7,007
4,927
8, 725
9,002
6,978
7, 194
4, 668
8,569
8,451
6,328
5,339
3, 246
7,311
7,493
5,265

7,205

Ol
Ol

7,435

5,349

9,275

9,492

7,314

7,434

7,661

5, 594

9,420

9,632

7,490

RAILROADS ....................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .........
TAXICABS .....................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE .........
AIR TRANSPORTATION ...................... .

8, 304
7,580
2,814
6,622
10,327

8,487
7, 355
2,842
6,845
10,516

6,204
8,3 39
2,667
4,59C
7,273

9,437
9,008
4,643
8,938
12,192

9,587
8,841
4,706
9, 139
12,419

7,506
9,560
4,299
6,796
8,533

8,467
7,830
3,029
6,911
10,526

8,643
7,587
3,063
7,136
10,712

6,441
8,651
2,850
4, 859
7, 540

9,550
9, 193
4,846
9,094
12,296

9,695
9,026
4,921
9,297
12,516

7,670
9,746
4,433
6,936
8,758

COMMUNICATION ..................................

6,942

7,228

4, 199

8,642

8,856

5,939

7,084

7,367

4, 366

8,720

8,933

6,034

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ....................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING .........

6,731
8, 135

7,027
8, 351

4,046
5,226

8,285
10,956

8,495
11,157

5,701
7,787

6,847
8,445

7,138
8,669

4,214
5,427

8, 338
11,213

8,546
11,417

5,779
7,993

PUBLIC UTILITIES ..............................

8,381

8,609

5,485

9,664

9,830

7,118

8,546

8,766

5, 747

9,760

9,920

7,305

WHOLESALE TRADE ...............................

6,877

7, 167

3,742

9,588

9, 860

5,873

7,131

7,420

4,004

9,732

10,003

6,043

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ...
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ANO ALLIED PRODUCTS ....
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ......................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ............
ELECTRICAL GOODS ............................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ..
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .........

6,513
7,794
7,054
5,339
7,666
7,228
8,390

6,676
8,084
7,503
5,585
7,911
7,491
8,615

4,195
3,909
3,330
3,410
4, 174
3,538
4,473

8,859
10,223
10,357
8,253
10,131
9,695
10,973

9,019
10,430
10,823
8,559
10,345
9,900
11,160

6,130
6,318
5,392
5,538
6,262
5,677
6,692

6,823
8,095
7,356
5,594
7,959
7,556
8,697

6,978
8,384
7,812
5,839
8,198
7,817
8,919

4,614
4,214
3,574
3, 672
4, 551
3,902
4,841

8,994
10,407
10,550
8,395
10,276
9,867
11,131

9, 147
10,612
11,027
8,701
10,484
10,068
11,314

6,392
6,536
5,482
5,684
6,524
5,922
6,935

RETAIL TRADE ...................................

3,213

3,286

2,400

5,431

5,517

4,317

3,321

3,392

2,525

5,506

5,591

4,412

3, 175
4,378
2,539
3,693
6, 370
3,880
2,586
2,571
3,558
4,850
3,335
5,427

3,250
4,735
2,595
3,749
6,544
3,992
2,636
2,626
3,645
5,028
3, 387
5,498

2,357
2,917
1,765
2,912
4,222
2,547
2,042
1,954
2,324
3,032
2,601
4, 186

5,219
6,949
4,800
5,852
8,710
6,331
4,416
4,447
6,122
7, 181
5,591
7,274

5,285
7,243
4,854
5,902
8,898
6,482
4,499
4,509
6,200
7,417
5,635
7,377

4,361
5,338
3,777
5,022
6,089
4,280
3,469
3,624
4,609
4,541
4,848
5,536

3,293
4,534
2,642
3,827
6,614
4,042
2,694
2,691
3,740
5,073
3,456
5,634

3,366
4,893
2,693
3,881
6,787
4, 154
2,743
2,744
3,827
5,254
3,505
5,704

2,496
3,064
1,942
3,079
4,476
2, 704
2, 163
2,087
2,503
3,231
2, 762
4,396

5,283
7,039
4, 850
5,937
8,825
6,444
4,473
4, 512
6,241
7,288
5,669
7,340

5, 344
7, 325
4,899
5,987
9,011
6,594
4,556
4,569
6,317
7,527
5,711
7,442

4,487
5,467
3,91*
5,116
6,228
4,405
3,529
3,773
4,749
4,622
4,969
5,629

DEPARTMENT STORES ...........................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ...........................
VARIETY STORES ..............................
GROCERY STORES ..............................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ......................
ME N ’S AND BO YS’ CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS ..
WOMEN'S REACY-TO-WEAR STORES ............. .
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ........... .........
SHOE STORES ..................................
f u r n i t u r e a n d h o m e f u r n i s h i n g s ............
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ........
FUEL AND ICE D E A L E R S ........ ...............




INDUSTRY EARNINGS OF WORKERS 8Y
QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL EC O N O M Y -Continued
INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ...........

FINANCE,

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
C
R A i E
WHITE1 | NEGRO

EARNINGS FROM ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT OF
WORKERS WHOSE MAJOR EARNINGS WERE FROM THIS
INDUSTRY BY QUARTERS WORKED IN THE INDUSTRY

FOUR QUARTERS
R A C E
ALL
WORKERS WHITE1 | NEGRO

« 6,C34 I 6,246 S 3,621 » 8,144 $ 8,353 i 5,280

A N Y
ALL
WORKERS

Q U A R T E R
A C E
( h i t e 1 | NEGRO
w

1 R

FOUR QUARTERS
C
ALL
R Ai E
WORKERS |WHITE1 | NEGRO

1

t 6,213 S 6,420 S 3,853 % 8,246 % 8,450 % 5,440

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ..........
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS .................
LIFE INSURANCE .................................
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ........

5,765
5,899
4,978
6,994
6,460

5,890
5,983
5,030
7,208
6,602

4,011
4,095
3,615
4,518
3,576

7,270
7,540
6,727
9,012
8,286

7, 387
7,646
6,780
9,206
8, 398

5,354
5,177
5,183
6,340
5,149

5,930
6,074
5,251
7,240
6,657

6,049
6, 153
5,301
7,450
6,795

4,277
4,381
3,934
4,809
3,851

7, 361
7,637
6,852
9, 128
8,385

7,473
7,731
6,903
9,316
8,496

5,521
5,568
5,348
6,538
5,282

SERVICES ..........................................

4, 185

4,452

2,737

6,452

6, 844

4,225

4,292

4,564

2,818

6,530

6,924

4,291

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS .........
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ...........
MOTION PICTURES ................................
HOSPITALS .......................................

2,384
2,990
2,662
4,294

2,489
3, 154
2,665
4,403

1,964
2,550
2,624
3,752

4,510
4,652
5,257
5,771

4, 736
4,968
5, 309
5,925

3,626
3,814
4,557
4,983

2,580
3,120
2,864
4,427

2,700
3,285
2,864
4,530

2,097
2,677
2,870
3,913

4,683
4,737
5,513
5,847

4,925
5,052
5,564
5,996

3,731
3,901
4,837
5,084




UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE ANO SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
A N Y
Q U A R TER
F O U R
Q U A R T E R S
NORTH­
NORTH
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH­
SOUTH
EAST
CENTRAL
WEST
SOUTH
STATES
EAST
CENTRAL

$4,250

$4,725

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .........

$3,621

$4,800

$4,127

$6,452

$6,805

$5,436

$7,061

WEST
$6,867

MINING ............................................

7,623

7,918

7,297

7,461

7,996

8,531

8,724

8,342

8,439

8,926

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND LIQUIDS....
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ...................

8/219
5, 223

6,999
5,999

8,347
5,124

5, 899
4,749

8,699
5,749

9,070
7,830

8,124
7,999

9, 161
7,749

7,499
6,249

9,285
8,899

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .................... ......

5,709

7,161

4,278

6,914

6,823

8,409

9,517

6,704

9,747

9,523

HIGHWAY ANO STREET CONSTRUCTION .............
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC .......................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING .........
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING .........
ELECTRICAL WORK ................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ..........
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ....................
ROOFING ANC SHEET METAL WORK .................
CONCRETE WCRK ..................................

5, 336
6, 116
7,687
3,949
8,287
4,829
4, 124
4,426
4,624

6,815
7,839
8,387
4,472
8,958
5,968
6,104
4,972
7,583

4,465
4,687
5,683
2,849
6,829
3,257
2,549
3,035
2,666

5, 857
6,776
9,299
5,527
9, 852
6,649
4, 833
5,916
4,899

6,783
7,632
8,590
4,687
9,066
6,099
4,843
5,571
5,458

7,249
8,964
9,722
7,187
10,499
7,561
7,511
7,566
7,624

9,324
10,249
10,499
7,041
10,923
8,574
8,349
8,099
9,749

6,031
7,233
7,571
5,791
8,907
5,593
5,449
5,499
5,374

8,383
10,099
11,179
$8,062
11,909
8,923
8,321
8,749
8, 124

8,984
10,328
10,846
8,708
10,899
8,678
7,999
8,499
7,749

MANUFACTURING ....................................

5,752

5,836

4,700

6,651

6,173

7,227

7,262

5,897

7,842

8,050

7,736
4,807
5,999
1,644
6,601
5,873
6,507
4,650
4,620
3,485
4,004
3,934
3,086
3,051
2,937
2,933
3,792
4,956
4,109
8,077
5,676
5,760
6,185
9,054
7,414
7,575
6,062
9,705
8,438
5,434
3,533
5,940
6,049
8,483
6,821
7,309
5,798
6,425
6,410
6,788
7,744
7,014
7,760

5,749
5,968
6,416
3,281
6,874
5,892
7,472
4,899
4,461
3,610
3,821
4, 164
3,650
3, 147
3,249
3, 131
3,214
5, 333
4,214
7,880
5,249
7,071
6,359
8,999
7,549
7,904
5,449
9,749
7,949
5,445
3,539
5,916
7,424
8,424
6,649
7, 169
5,870
7,078
6,437
6,412
7,955
8,749
7,562

5,916
3,523
5,407
1,653
4,863
5,403
5,394
4,641
4,638
3,513
4,061
3,519
3,032
2,887
3,254
2,712
3,096
3,916
4,014
8,129
5,361
4,902
5,513
9,077
7,338
5,099
6,062
9,573
7,730
4,368
3,506
6,083
4,916
8,507
5,724
6,349
4,611
5,597
5,583
4,499
5,999
5,249
6,952

6,529
7,416
6,499
1,230
7,282
6, 159
7, 302
1,499
5, 166
3,642
2,249
4,208
3,229
3, 717
3,249
3,749
3,571
4,949
4,512
8,024
5,868
5,349
6,683
9, 128
8, 111
7,912
6, 716
10,381
9,062
6,118
3,896
5,843
6,722
8,472
7,235
7, 807
6, 185
6,614
6,433
7, 324
7,557
7, 299
8,011

8,927
5,524
5,749
1 ,534
6,833
6,660
7,124
1,499
$249
3,249
2,249
3,666
2,576
2,638
2,906
1 ,449
6,342
6,549
4,285
8,977
7,222
6,156
5,392
8,874
4,999
6,062
6,062
9,365
8,874
6,374
3,149
5,833
7,437
8,803
6,049
7,549
5,374
7,411
7,666
5,562
7,749
5,499
7,549

8,849
7,436
7,399
5,173
7,767
7,354
7,881
5,143
5,055
4,160
4,587
4,647
3,742
3,796
3,654
3,640
5,495
6,491
5,052
8,613
6,670
7,842
7,964
9,527
7,969
8,296
7,864
10,161
9,062
6,539
4,304
6,972
7,522
9,067
7,568
7,990
6,839
7,664
7,642
8,088
8,210
8,036
8,201

6,749
7, 399
7,588
6,339
7,999
7,618
8,888
5,749
4,857
4,573
4,562
4,797
4,211
3,894
3,956
3,762
4,699
6,624
5,458
8,360
6,289
8,583
8, 166
9,721
8, 191
8,867
7,410
10,230
8,392
6,595
4,281
7,499
8,374
8,907
7,374
7,929
6,772
7,951
7,611
7,562
8,624
9,499
7,970

7,249
4,739
6,514
4, 326
6,499
6,590
6,709
5,118
5,069
4,067
4,614
4, 329
3,616
3,502
3,749
3,506
4, 105
4,990
4,606
8,657
6,224
6,862
6,999
9, 398
7,816
6,107
7, 333
9,954
8,318
5,249
4, 140
6,769
5,974
9,006
6,455
7,636
5,449
6,624
6, 187
5,437
7,499
6,208
7,532

7,266
9,111
7,775
5,637
7,993
7,579
8,365
6,749
5,249
4,249
3,666
5,020
3,731
4,423
3,958
4,062
4,659
6,266
5,801
8,620
6,999
7,782
8,346
9, 583
8,777
8,576
8,549
10,597
9,637
7,043
4,724
6,671
8,099
9, 182
8,013
8,201
7,289
7,805
7,683
8,465
8, 146
8,225
8,519

10,133
8,562
7,958
5, 137
8,399
7,999
8,774
8,499

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR'SMALL ARMS ...........
MEAT PRODUCTS ..................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS .................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS .............
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ...........................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ................................
BEVERAGES .......................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON .........................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ....................
KNITTING m i l l s .................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS .........................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS .............
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ..................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ................
WOMEN'S ANC CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ........
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ..........................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ...................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ......
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ...........................
PULP AND PApER MILLS ..........................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES .............
NEWSPAPERS .....................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ...........................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ..........................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .......... •
DRUGS ...........................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ............
PETROLEUM REFINING ......................... .
TIRES ANO INNER TUBES ............ ............
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS .........................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ......................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN .......
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ......
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ......
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES .....................
NCNFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ...............
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ...........
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ........
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ..........
METAL STAMPINGS ................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ..........................
FARM MACHINERY .................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ..........




4,437
3,499
4,374
4,265
3,920
3,849
3,874
7, 399
7,676
6,346
9,424
7,977
8,687
8,444
9,583
7,749
7, 166
7,999
9,680
9,374
8,083
5,249
7,799
8,714
9,380
7,599
8,624
6,833
8,874
9,321
7,249
7,949
6,749
8,531

INDUSTRY

UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
Q U A R T E R
AN Y
NORTH
NORTH­
UNITED
NORTH
NORTH­
SOUTH
CENTRAL
EAST
STATES
WEST
CENTRAL
EAST
SOUTH

WEST

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL E C CN CM Y -Continued
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ....................... $7,834
7,286
SPECIAL INOUSTRY MACHINERY ...................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ................. 7,457
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ................ 7,882
6,331
SERVICE INOUSTRY MACHINES ....................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT .... 6, 160
6,126
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS .............
5,899
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ..........................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ...... 5,239
4,328
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ............
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ....................... 7,441
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ....... 5,008
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ................. 7,419
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ............................
8,592
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ........ 6,687
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES .... 6,426
OTHER MANUFACTURING ...........................
4, 121

$7,760
7,170
7,654
7,928
6,526
6,476
6,796
5,573
5, 131
4,921
7,912
5,111
7,076
7,975
7,611
6,972
4,128

$5,666
5,937
6,599
7,312
4,984
5,903
4,578
5,580
4,485
3,795
6,793
5,018
A , 141
8,740
6,447
4,699
3,711

$8,124
7,985
7,457
7,977
6,833
5,499
6,399
6,377
5,534
4*457
6,908
4, 325
7,690
8, 136
5, 124
6, 149
4,657

$6,199
7,562
7,527
7,782
5,999
6,803
6,571
5,583
5,499
4,593
7,970
5,548
6,617
9,295
6,727
6,437
3,833

$8,680
7,917
7,984
9,053
7,213
7,255
7,109
6,777
6,166
5,585
8,469
6,143
7,976
9,282
7,879
7,273
5,603

$8,399
7,877
7,984
9,053
7,636
7,768
7,674
6,295
5,999
7,041
9, 131
6,208
7,653
8,353
8,323
7,779
5,796

$6,374
6,646
7,140
8,249
5,794
7,049
5,333
6,242
5,468
4,357
7,791
5,558
6,833
9,445
7,717
5,499
4,666

$9,063
8,312
8, 166
9,105
7,454
6,884
7,324
7,471
6,559
5,721
7,829
5,865
8,309
8,877
7,099
7, 178
5,859

$8,874
8,706
8,781
9,365
7,049
7,749
7,687
6,249
6,666
5,999
9,444
6,727
7,576
10,127
8,166
7,249
5,692

TRANSPORTATION1...................................

7,623

7,582

5,867

8, 340

7,039

8,695

8,886

7,587

9,081

8,903

RAILROADS1 ....................... ...............
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ...........
TAXICABS ........................................
TRUCKING* LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ...........
AIR TRANSPORTATION ............................

8,766
8,083
2,208
7,091
9, 164

3,499
8,759
1,888
7,820
9,546

1,249
6,416
2,249
5,825
9,120

8,771
8,069
2,406
7,819
8,699

6,499
6,499
2,874
7*034
8,930

9,535
8,799
4,047
8,579
9,984

3,499
9,381
3,896
9,090
10,171

6,249
7, 142
3,499
7,617
9,709

9,537
8,670
4,678
9,033
10,142

6,499
8,249
4,527
9,383
9,749

COMMUNICATION ....................................

6,035

6,309

5,555

6, 148

6,297

7,019

7,632

6,267

7,065

7,383

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .......................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING ...........

5,968
6,424

6,111
7,916

5,537
5,249

6, 135
6,249

6,272
6,499

6,788
8,124

7,222
10,249

6, 125
7, 145

6,911
7,888

7,110
9,249

PUBLIC UTILITIES .................................

8,526

9,388

7,572

9,134

8,716

9,175

9,945

8,207

9,612

9,361

5,871

6,403

5, 149

6,317

5,852

7,610

7,882

6,742

7,812

7,965

6,076
6,643
4,889
4,620
6, 363
6,095
7,256

6,237
6,826
5,305
5,935
6,354
6,583
7,549

5,416
5,930
4,249
3,954
6,384
5,583
6,839

6,691
6,892
4,444
5, 888
6,416
6,338
7, 379

6,035
7,374
4,861
2,863
6,354
6,527
7,348

7,272
7,897
6,918
7,237
7,605
7,445
8,377

7,619
8,153
7,323
7,736
7,738
7,784
8,727

6,485
7,090
6, 149
6,010
7,416
6,645
7,917

7,586
8, 321
6, 107
7,883
7,455
7,759
8,561

7,615
8,318
6,708
7,749
7,867
7,849
8,475

WHOLESALE TRACE ..................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT .....
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .......
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .........................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ...............
ELECTRICAL GOODS ...............................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ....
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ...........
RETAIL TRADE .....................................
DEPARTMENT STORES ..............................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ..............................
VARIETY STORES .................................
GROCERY STORES .................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS .........................
MEN'S ANO BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS ....
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES .................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ............... ........
SHOE STORES ....................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ...............
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ..........
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ..........................




1,861

1,975

1,806

1,817

1,925

4,046

4,214

3,857

3,894

4,533

2,195
3,414
1,444
2,438
5,668
2,338
1,659
1,611
2,132
3,718
1,840
5,094

2,067
2,638
1,676
2,183
6,131
2,812
1,763
1,733
2,272
3,907
1,794
6,437

2,046
3,865
1,262
2,257
4,944
2,174
1,605
1,392
1,716
3,715
1,697
4,208

2,317
3,567
1,553
2,426
6,240
1,949
1,662
1, 759
2,249
3,803
1,749
4,999

2,480
3,599
1,196
3,482
6,195
2,124
1,484
1,596
2,357
3,589
2,382
4,999

3,908
5,336
3,331
4,731
7,253
4,451
3,359
3,348
4,268
5,664
3,572
6,527

3,741
4,964
3,577
4,552
7,508
4,724
3,634
3,410
4,472
6,016
3,441
7,681

3,787
4,909
3,269
4,260
6,296
4, 149
3,216
3,183
3,788
5,368
3,479
5,326

3,895
5,579
3, 102
4,396
7,607
3,874
3, 179
3,437
4,474
5,937
3,306
6, 138

4,390
5,571
3,349
6,660
8,124
4,999
3,517
3,593
4,437
5,999
4,369
6,749

UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
Q U A R T E R
A N Y
NORTH
NORTH­
UNITED
NORTH
NORTH­
EAST
south
CENTRAL
STATES
WEST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
EAST

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ...........

$4,857

$5,416

$4,459

$4,785

$4,872

$6,063

$6,608

$5,528

$5,939

$6,055

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ..........
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS .................
LIFE INSURANCE .................................
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ........

$4,894
*4,902
$4,595
*5,691
$5,431

$5,423
$5,111
$4,749
$5,938
$5,374

$4,548
$4,649
$4,607
$5,720
$5,355

$4,730
$4,749
$4,672
$5,459
$5,439

$5,039
$5,361
$4,374
$5,531
$5,659

$5,586
$5,756
$5,611
$6,911
$6,633

$6,218
$5,999
$5,749
$7,083
$6,718

$5,095
$5,474
$5,487
$6,999
$6,596

$5,412
$5,552
$5,749
$6,766
$6,583

$5,656
$6,107
$5,774
$6,618
$6,649

SERVICES ..........................................

$2,835

$3,442

$2,488

$2,710

$2,870

$5,055

$5,913

$4,280

$4,899

$5,435

, HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS .........
LAUNORIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ...........
MOTION PICTURES ................................
HOSPITALS ................................... .

$1,558
*2,438
*1,072
$3,845

$1,600
$2,674
,$1,874
$4,330

$1,561
$2,360
$776
$3,478

$1,249
$2,309
- $767
$3,737

$1,708
$2,540
$1,111
$4,266

$3,517
$3,654
$3,324
$4,843

$3,999
$4,064
$5,099
$5,637

$3,166
$3,227
$2,285
$4,204

$3,113
$3,644
$1,916
$4,605

$4,096
$3,999
$4,812
$5,325

INDUSTRY

WEST

PRIVATE NCNAGR ICULTURAL E C CN CM Y-Continued
FINANCE,

1 F o r p u rp o s e s of this study, and b eca u se in fo rm atio n about th e ir actu al p la c e
of em p loym ent w a s not a v a ila b le in the file s studied, em p lo y ees of r a ilr o a d s and
r a il r o a d re la t e d o rg a n iz a tio n s c o v ered by the R a ilr o a d R etirem en t A ct w e r e co n s id e re d to have been em p lo y ed in the N orth C e n tra l Region.




N O T E : A d ash ( “ ) in dicate s eith er the s am p le did not in clu de any w o rk e rs
‘with th ese c h a r a c t e r is t ic s , o r that the data did not m eet the B u r e a u 's p ublicatio n
c r it e r ia ,

UNITED
STATES

INDUSTRY

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .......
MINING ..........................................
crude

petroleum, natural

gas

and

l i q u i d s ...

OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES .................

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
Q U A R T E R S
Q U A R TE R
F O U R
AN Y
NORTH
NORTH­
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH­
EAST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
SCLTH
WEST
STATES
EAST
CENTRAL^

$5,474

$5,982

$4,690

$5,836

$5,453

$7,502

$8,009

$6,517

$7,818

WEST
$7,862

7,772

8, 150

7,448

7,894

8,003

9,436

9,525

9, 132

9,557

9, 75C

9,052
6,37 7*

9,047
7,460

9,087
6, 143

6,211
5,040

9,315
7,186

10,428
8,796

10,129
8,906

10,292
8,583

7,967
6,899

10,970
9,866

6,732

7,907

5,318

7,676

7,450

9,250

10,322

7,624

10,301

10,081

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ...........
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ....................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIK CUNUllIuNING .......
PAINTING, PAPER HANG ING, DECORAT ING .......
ELECTRICAL WORK .............................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ........
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ..................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ...............
CONCRETE W O R K ................................

6,025
7, 182
8,274
5,038
9,074
5,681
5,178
5,733
5,676

7, 364
8,709
S, 866
5, 339
10,131
6,532
6,427
6,461
7,997

4,923
5,779
6,355
3,804
7,749
4,315
3,578
4,377
3,751

6, 399
7, 771
9, 753
5,977
10,139
6,813
5,688
6,666
5,938

7,625
8,414
9,084
5,882
9,027
6,545
5,810
6,195
5,763

8,176
9,816
10,316
7,741
11,135
7,902
7,725
8,214
8,405

9,852
11.105
10,930
7,928
12,221
8,603
8,529
9,083
10,625

6,770
8, 178
8,248
.6,264
9,722
6,300
5,862
6,633
5,981

9,136
10,767
11,627
8,549
12,129
9,058
8,483
9,265
9, 141

9,935
11,081
11,350
8,955
11,044
9,139
8,424
8,460
8,251

MANUFACTURING ................. ................

6,543

6,782

5,512

7, 145

6,807

8,135

8, 355

6,889

8,691

8,979

8,382
5,655
6, 220
3,225
6,948
6,088
6,805
5,006
4,962
3,941
4, 107
4,688
3,292
3,779
3, 362
3,290
4,591
5,591
4,607
8,364
6,081
6,447
7, 369
9,936
7,858
9,080
7, 378
9,991
8,539
5,893
3,904
6,394
6,556
8,452
6,887
7,653
6,491
6,841
7,056
7,469
7,998
7, 294
8,047

6,093
6,506
6,590
4,523
7,097
6,396
7,618
5,749
5,887
4,232
4,115
5,225
4,205
4,066
3,999
3,730
3,876
6,006
4,825
8,008
5,848
7,312
7,878
10,716
8,220
9,466
7,130
11,253
8,122
5,743
3,912
6,816
7,778
8,560
7,080
7,667
6,539
7,404
6,955
7,281
8,358
9,204
7,856

7,052
4,106
5,465
2,807
5,353
5,487
5,909
4,972
4,734
3,798
4,130
3,683
3,096
3,063
3,239
2,893
3,649
4,433
4,238
8,368
5,538
5,703
6,469
9,374
7,721
5,967
7,039
9,464
7,515
4,616
3,434
6,210
5,416
8,493
5,785
6,842
4,735
6,025
5,188
5,266
7,879
6,056
7,037

6,509
6,979
6, 8C3
3,064
7, 730
6,188
7, 307
4,585
5,056
5, 338
3, 382
4, 894
3,2C0
4,625
3,324
3,253
3,985
5, 705
5, 195
8,561
6,352
6,444
7,602
9, 805
8, 369
1C,081
7,679
10,405
9,172
6,569
4,511
6,065
6, 779
8, 331
7,288
7,959
6, 911
6,944
7,066
7, 739
7,766
7,482
8,453

9,724
5,759
5,910
3,098
6,959
6,649
6,954
4,965
56
3,801
2,560
4,171
3,020
3,443
4,032
2,436
6,040
6,476
5,038
8,617
7,297
6,341
6,888
9,025
5,819
6,943
7,682
9,118
8,392
6,599
4,045
6,456
7,568
8,566
6,046
8,091
6,240
7,614
8,548
7,102
8,751
5,907
8,157

10,113
7,651
7,858
6,141
8,466
7,628
8,415
5,964
5,873
5,046
5,173
5,776
4,381
5,039
4,515
4,465
6,133
7,318
5,970
9,428
7,404
8,14 3
9,247
10,867
8,763
10,454
9,401
11,002
9,448
7,319
5,083
7,868
8,185
9,470
8,104
8,821
7,876
8,417
8,600
9,050
8,946
8,858
9,055

7,517
8,322
8,058
7,096
jB,579
8,064
9,278
7,274
6,732
5,614
5,488
6,304
5,306
5,296
5,533
4,905
5,582
7,957
6,392
9,064
7, 195
8,988
9,745
11,826
9,440
10,805
9,384
12,314
9, 187
7,230
5,107
8,601
9,294
9,486
8,276
8,917
7,805
8,904
8,418
8,711
9, 165
10,046
9,012

8,685
5,741
6,787
5,005
6,862
6,777
7, 350
5,903
5,661
4,719
5, 120
4,612
4,113
4,119
4, 199
3,967
4,928
5,821
5,258
9,253
6,702
7, 381
8,066
10,078
8,466
7,074
8,821
10,321
8,507
5, 849
4,504
7,329
6,857
9,308
6,737
8,047
6,072
7,479
6,071
6,434
9,073
7,513
8,034

7,786
9, 124
8,458
6,444
9,118
7,735
8,880
7,138
5,411
7,249
5,098
6, 144
4,160
5,900
4,490
3,989
5,285
7,494
6,910
9,802
7,781
7,962
9,335
10,823
9, 189
11,270
9,341
11,345
9,986
7,868
5,653
7,467
8,576
9,478
8,565
8,844
8,272
8,560
8,667
9, 368
8, 762
9,033
9,358

11,631
8,086
7,965
6,334
8, 734
8,389
8,942
8,460

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .........................

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS .........
MEAT PRODUCTS .............'
..................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ...............................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ...........
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS .........................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ..............................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON .......................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ..................
KNITTING MILLS ...............................
YARN ANJD THREAD MILLS .......................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ...........
MEN'S ANO BOYS' FURNISHINGS ..............
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ..............
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ......
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ........................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS .................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ....
h o u s e h o l d f u r n i t u r e .........................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ........................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ...........
n e w s p a p e r s ...................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING .........................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ........................
PLASTICS MATERIALS ANO SYNTHETICS .........
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ..........
PETROLEUM REFINING ...........................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES .......................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS .......................
FGOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ....................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN ....
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ....
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ....
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ...................
NCNFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING ............
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE .........
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ......
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ........
METAL STAMPINGS ..............................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ........................
FARM MACHINERY ...............................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ........




5,236
3,696
5,266
4,995
5,221
5,644
4,249
7,832
8,425
7,375
9,481
8,548
8,267
9,799
10,041
8,409
9,044
10,448
10,091
9,209
8>285
6,461
8,231
9,293
9,724
7,613
9,691
8,003
9,467
10,529
9,260
9,660
8,232
9,512

INDUSTRY

private

n c n a g r ic u l t u r a l

Continued

UNITED
STATES
economy

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
A N Y
Q U A R TE R
Q U A R T E R S
F O U R
NORTH­
NORTH
NCR TH
NORTH­
UNITED
SOUTH
SOUTH
EAST
EAST
WEST
STATES
CENTRAL
CENTRAL

METAL WORKING MACHINERY .....................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ..................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ..............
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT ...
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ............
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES .........................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .....
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ...........
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT .....................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ......
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ...........................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING .......
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ...
OTHER MANUFACTURING ..........................

$8,608
7, B65
8*024
8,772
6,843
6,792
6,881
6,428
5,907
5,322
8,544
6,335
7,916
9,520
6,691
7,035
5,132

$8,270
7,844
8,010
8,897
7.480
7*063
7,432
6, 139
5,740
6,867
9,066
6,629
7,426
9,162
7,907
7, 339
5,132

TRANSPORTATION1 ..................................

7,434

RAILROADS1 ......................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ..........

8,468
7,831
3,029
6,912
10,527

COMMUNICATION ...................................

7,085

7,690

6,326

7,100

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .....................
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING ..........

6,848
8,445

7,210
10,433

6,239
6,811

6,955
8,188

PUBLIC UTILITIES ................................

8,546

9,272

7,700

9, 103

8,588

WHOLESALE TRADE .................................

7,131

8,003

6,309

7,284

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ....
ORUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ......
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .......................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS .............
ELECTRICAL GOODS .............................
HAROWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ...
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ..........

6,824
8,095
7,356
5,594
7,959
7,557
8,697

7,220
8,915
7,945
6,587
8, 157
8,497
9,385

6,089
7,114
6,220
4,717
7,968
6,907
8,167

7,261
7,892
7,056
6,506
7,891
7,332
8,645

3,321

3,568

3,040

3,293
4,535
2,642
3,828
6,615
4,042
2,695
2,692
3,740
5,074
3,457
5,634

3,320
4,207
3,217
3,685
7, 158
4,232
3,068
3,032
4,017
5,206
3,646
6,627

3,03C
4,422
2,338
3,324
5,811
3,817
2,414
2,353
2,880
4,934
3,054
4,464

TRUCKING* LOCAL ANO LONG DISTANCE ..........
AIR TRANSPORTATION ...........................

RETAIL TRADE ....................................
DEPARTMENT STORES ......................... .
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ............................
VARIETY STORES ................................
GROCERY STORES ................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS .......................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING ANO FURNISHINGS ...
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES .......... .
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ......................
SHOE STORES ...................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS .............
DRUG STORES ANO PROPRIETARY STORES .........
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .........................
See footnote at end of ta ble.




WEST

—
$6,223
6,925
7,221
7,824
5,673
6,515
5,046
6,028
4,880
4,029
7,874
6,476
6 j479
9,397
6,571
5,072
4,411

$9,099
8,378
8,062
8,650
6,972
6,232
7, 152
6,820
6,413
5, 177
7,637
5,467
8,269
8,858
5,219
7, 195
5,641

$ 7,871
8,228
8,835
9,123
6,593
7,832
7,167
6,040
5,797
5,336
9,550
6,604
6,507
10,268
6,382
6,931
4,927

$9,983
8,949
9,110
10,143
8,067
8,120
8,086
7,818
7,243
7,229
9,866
7,909
9,053
10,642
8,299
8,192
6,890

$9,656
9,019
8,936
10,153
8,968
8,414
8,708
7,703
7,053
9,312
10,418
8,116
8,449
10,018
9,240
8,220
6,962

$7,570
7,780
8,194
8,976
6,718
7,814
6,229
7,293
6,058
5, 387
8,985
7,628
7,510
10,520
7.956
6,417
5,848

$10,373
9,279
9,243
10,085
8,085
7,664
8.233
8,268
7,740
7,091
8,891
7,419
9,408
10,099
7,328
8,425
7,344

$10,211
10,107
10,434
10,718
8, 162
8,965
8,573
7,3C7
7,383
6,876
11,116
8,280
7,877
11,528
8,345
8,636
6,950

7,658

6,306

7,841

7,434

9,063

9,383

7,985

9, 156

9,610

6, 106
8,597
2,646
7,343
11,060

6,069
6,345
2,803
6, CCO
10,235

8,473
7,566
3, 805
7,439
9,536

6,621
6,174
3,272
7,027
10,820

9,365
8,903
4,584
8,650
11,850

6,767
9,5C9
4,148
9,054
2,264

8,492
7,435
3,862
7,582
11,336

9, 370
8,527
5,685
9,057
11,319

6,621
7,931
4,991
9,310
12,071

7,298

8,380

9,199

7,486

8,255

8,646

7,062
8,885

8,019
10,584

8,582
12,961

7, 284
8,693

8,042
9,811

8,252
11,320

9,511

10,225

8,615

9,958

9,739

6,875

9,193

10,050

8,244

9, 173

9,368

6,629
8,018
6,403
4,906
7,611
7,701
8,643

8,421
9,824
9,867
7,886
9,691
9,302
10,462

8,917
10,874
10,580
8,501
9,998
10,416
11,195

7,525
8,604
8,320
6,725
9,382
8,567
9,766

8,747
9,460
9,661
8,532
9,429
8,966
10,413

8.496
9,892
8,769
8, 194
9,862
9,511
10,577

3,348

3,433

5,320

5,554

4,935

5,293

5,706

3,455
4,625
2,641
3,906
6,982
4,118
2,580
2,906
4,263
5, 329
3,469
5,231

3,382
4,803
2,202
4,791
6,941
3,950
2,668
2,780
3,886
4,959
4,020
4,892

5,044
6,676
4,544
5,623
8,328
6,107
4,276
4,311
5,746
6,881
5,309
7,096

5,095
6,661
5,255
5,479
8,665
6,077
4,822
4,567
5,878
6,897
5,456
8,051

4,818
5,994
4,204
4,968
7,367
5,921
3,784
4,027
4,633
6,584
4,879
5,879

5,074
6,830
4,235
5,574
8,625
6,138
3,965
4,385
6,426
7,246
5,269
6,541

5,219
7,209
4,306
7,005
8,962
6,595
4,607
4,544
6,146
7,244
6,026
6,661

'

INDUSTRY

UNITED
STATES

EARNINGS OF WORKERS WHO WORKED IN ANY WAGE ANO SALARY EMPLOYMENT DURING
A N Y
Q U A f T E R
I
F O U R
Q U A R T E R S
NORTH­
NORTH
UNITED
NORTH­
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
CENTRAL
WEST
EAST
STATES
SOUTH
CENTRAL

WEST

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL E C O N O M Y -Continued
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ............

$6,213

$6,891

$5,609

$6,239

$5,998

$7,891

$8,520

$7,277

$7,825

$7,794

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ...........
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS .................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ..................
LIFE INSURANCE ..................................
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE .........

5,931
6,<m
5,252
7,241
6,657

6,503
6,548
5,403
7,360
6,616

5,405
5,610
5,200
7,199
6,499

5,881
6,081
5,636
7,333
6, 712

5,806
6,241
4,762
6,813
6,844

7,090
7,375
6,498
8,686
7,954

7,699
7,983
6,574
8,674
7,938

6,524
7,080
6,409
8,679
7,670

7,085
7, 124
6,803
8,819
8,069

6,855
7,602
6,300
8,423
8,142

SERVICES ............................................

4,293

4,983

3,698

4,214

4,345

6,351

7,229

5,432

6,244

6,668

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ..........
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ............
MOTION PICTURES .................................
HOSPITALS ........................................

2,580
3,120
2,865
• 4,428

2,790
3,363
4,949
5,021

2,408
2,848
1,885
3,895

2, 183
3, 134
2,067
4,202

2,879
3,341
3,320
4,711

4,401
4,565
5,130
5,663

4,794
4,962
6,361
6.462

4,035
4,043
3,764
4,951

3,926
4,569
3,679
5,352

4,913
5,225
6,024
6,061

1 F o r p u rp o s e s of th is study, and beca u se in fo rm atio n about th eir actu al
p la c e of em p lo y m ent w a s not a v a ila b le in the file s studied, em ployees o f r a i l ro a d s and r a ilr o a d r e la t e d o rg a n iz a tio n s c o v ered by the R a ilr o a d R etirem en t A ct
w e r e c o n s id e r e d to have been em p lo y ed in the N orth C e n tra l Region.




N O T E : A dash ( - ) in dicates eith er the s am p le did not in clu de any w o rk e rs
with th ese c h a r a c t e r is t ic s , o r that the data did not m eet the B u r e a u 's p u b lic a tion c r it e r ia ,

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION CF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL EMPLOYMENT
-WAS LESS THAN

INDUSTRY

$1800 $2400 $3000 $3600 $4200 $4800 $5400 $6000|$6600 $7200 $7800 $8400 $900a$10C00 $11000
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ... .... •• -

29.5

34.9

39.7

44.6

49.6

14.0

17.3

2C.2

23.2

26.1

29.3

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND LIQUIDS... . . .... . . . 10.9
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ............ . ... •• ... ... ** ** 25.0

13.3
30.5

16.2
33.4

17. 8
38.2

20.1
42.3

22.7
46.2

- -

M I N I N G .....................................

CONTRACT C O N S T R U C T I O N ....................

58.8

63.0

66.9

70.6

33.4

37.5

41.9

26.4
51.5

29.9
55.5

34.4
58.8

88.9

74.2

78.2

81.2

85.3

46.3

51.8

59.9

66.2

74.3

80.7

38.3
63.0

43.8
66.4

51.7
71.1

57.6
75.4

67.0
80.3

73.6
84.9

23.3

28.0

32.1

36.0

39.9

43.7

47.8

51.9

55.8

59.5

63.2

66.9

69.9

75.0

80. 1

. . •... . . . 22.5
. . ... . . . 21.2
. . ... . .
17.4
. ... .. • .
30.7
14.2
. ... .. . .. . 25.5
. •.. . .
30.9
.... .. . .
29.8
28.4

26.9
25.7
21.1
36.9
17.3
31.3
36.6
34.7
34. 1

31.0
3C. 1
24.1
42.2
20.2
36.5
41.2
39.4
39.0

34.9
33.7
26. 7
47.2
22.5
41.6
46.4
44. 0
43. 5

40.2
37.7
29.9
51.6
25.5
45.2
50.2
48.9
46.9

45.2
41.4
32.8
55.1
28.8
49.8
53.8
52.2
51.2

50.5
45.4
36.3
60.4
31.9
53.7
58.0
56.3
55.4

56.2
49.3
39.7
64.8
35.8
58.1
62.2
59.8
58.5

61.3
53.1
43.5
69.2
39.8
61.7
65.9
62.6
64.0

66.0
56.9
47.1
72.3
43.6
65.5
69.4
66.0
67.5

70.1
60.7
51.0
76.1
46.8
69.4
72.5
69.0
71.1

74.0
64. 1
55.2
79.1
50.6
73.0
76.2
72.5
74.5

77.3
67.0
58.2
82.2
53.5
76.4
78.8
74.9
77.1

82.3
72.2
63.7
85.8
59.2
81.2
84.0
79.9
82.1

86.9
77.7
69.2
90. 7
65.0
87.4
87.8
85. 1
85.8

17.6

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ....... . . ..
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ................ ....
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ... . . .•
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ... . . ..
e l e c t r i c a l WORK .........................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING .... . . ..
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ............. . ...
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK .......... . ...
CONCRETE WORK ................... .......

21.9

26.2

31.0

36.3

41.7

46.9

52. 1

57.1

61.9

66.7

72.1

76.1

81.8

86.4

9.4
24.8
20.7
52.3
17.5
19.7
18.1
17.2
16.3
24.6
21.6
19.3
29.6
30.0
31.5
31.2
27.9
22.0
23.6
8.2
16.6
24.5
19.0
5.1
6.9
9.3
17.8
5.1
6.3
17.0
26.0
13.2
17.3
7.1
12.2
9.0
15.5
15.5
15.4
13.8
6.1
12.5
7.9

12.6
30.3
25.0
58.8
21.C
24.0
22.0
21.3
20.7
32.5
26.5
25.5
37.6
38.2
40 . 1
39.5
33.7
26.2
29.3
10.3
20.0
28.5
23.2
6.7
9.4
11.9
22.4
7.4
8.3
21.1
32.1
16.5
21.0
9.3
15.1
12.2
18.6
19.4
18.9
17.5
8.4
16.4
11.0

15.0 17.5
34.9 39.4
28.3 31.7
63.3 67. 7
25.0 28.5
32.0
28.3
29. 2
25.5
25.5 31.3
24.7
30. 8
41.3 52.4
32.3 40. 9
32.8 43. 1
47.9 62.9
48.9 61.6
51.2 65. 1
51.3 65.6
4C.6 47.8
31.4 36.6
35.0 41.9
14.4
12.2
24.5 29.0
35.6
32.2
26.8 30.6
7.7
9. 3
11.4
14. 5
14.4
17. 1
26.3 '30. 1
10.6
8.9
10.5
12. 1
25.1
30. 1
40.3 51.6
2C.6 25.6
24.9 29.0
11.3
13. 1
18.9 22. 1
14.9 17.8
21.7 26.0
23.3 26. 8
22.6 25.4
25. 0
21.1
11.8
10.3
19.1 22. 3
12.7 15. 1

20.3
44.9
35.8
71.9
32.1
36.7
33.2
40.5
40.7
64.9
54.5
54.2
75.7
72.2
75.9
78.4
54.6
42.3
51.3
16.6
34.9
40.1
35.9
10.8
17.2
20.7
35.1
12.0
13.9
36.1
63.2
29.4
34.0
14.9
25.8
21.1
32.0
30.7
29.4
29 •4
14.5
25.6
17.7

24.5 29.6
50.0 54.0
39.9 44.9
75.4 78.9
36.2 40.1
41.2 45.5
37.2 . 41.0
53.2 65.1
54.8 67.6
74.1 81.1
67.7 77.1
64.7 72.3
84.5 89.4
79.8 84.6
83.0 88.3
84.3 89.2
60.2 64.7
48.0 53.8
60.5 68.9
19.2 21.8
40.7 46.6
44.3 48.1
40.3 44.9
12.8 16.1
20.0 25.5
24.5 29.6
39.7 44.7
16.9
14.4
16.5
19.8
42.4 49.7
73.0 80.6
34.3 41.0
38.6 43.9
17.4 20.4
29.8 35.5
30.9
25.1
38.3 45.7
35.5 40.5
34.7 40.4
33.5 38.6
17.9 23.4
30.2 35.6
21.4 25.2

34.8
58.2,
50.0
81.7
44.4
51.1
45.7
73.4
74.5
85.6
H 3.1
78.3
92.6
87.4
91.2
92. 7
68.8
59.4
76.1
26.4
53.7
51.6
49.0
20.0
32.1
35.0
49.5
19.7
23.6
56.1
85.3
51.1
49.6
24.1
41.5
35.7
52.3
46.3
45.8
43.0
28.9
42.5
30.2

39.6
61.8
55.4
84.1
49.9
56.0
50.6
79.7
81.7
88.8
R7.6
83.2
94. 1
89.7
93.2
93.6
73.7
65.7
81.2
32.0
60.5
54.9
52.6
24.1
39.5
40.8
54.1
21.8
29.9
63. 1
88.7
59.2
54.9
29.3
47.1
42.0
58.8
51.8
51.4
49.0
35.8
47.4
36.3

45.7
64.8
61.5
86.4
55.3
61.1
55.7
84.7
85.7
90.7
91.0
86.9
95.5
91.3
94.2
94.1
78.5
71.7
84.9
37.7
67.1
58.4
56.8
29.4
47.2
46.8
58.2
25.5
35.5
68.6
91.4
65.4
60.1
35.1
55.0
48.8
65.1
57.7
57.5
52.9
42.9
52.3
42.6

50.4
68.3
66.3
88.6
61.2
67.0
60.8
88.0
88.6
92.4
93.1
89.2
96.3
92.2
95.0
94.5
82.5
76.1
88.3
44.9
72.3
61.9
60.4
35.1
54.5
52.1
62.3
29.0
42.2
73.9
93.6
70.8
65.2
41.9
62.7
54.9
70.3
63.2
62.9
57.8
50.6
58.5
50.5

58.0
73.0
72.5
90.7
68.2
72.9
66.1
91.0
91.2
94.1
95.2
91.1
97.1
93.3
95.8
95.7
86.3
81.1
91.2
54.6
77.8

63.0
77.0
77. 1
92.1
74.0
77.1
71.0
92.9
93. 1
95.2
96.3
92.6
97.6
94.0
96.2
96.4
88.5
84.5
92.8
62.4
82.4
70.5
69.3
49.3
69.0
63.0
70. 1
40 • 3
55.8
82.8
96.3
81.3
75.4
56.4
75.7
70.6
79.2
74.6
74.1
67.4
68.5
72.0
67.5

70.2
83.1
84. 1
94.3
80. 1
84.C
78.7
94.9
95.9
96.3
97.2
94.3
98.0
95.1
96.9
97.3
91.8
88.0
95. 1
73.6
87.9
7 7.0
75.2
60.4
77.8
68.7
75.0
53.6
66.7
87. 3
97. 1
86.3
82.2
68.5
83.5
79.0i
83.8i
80.8
81.2
74.0
7 8.8
78.5
76.9•

75.2
90.2
90.5
95.9
85.1
89.3
85.6
95.9
96.7
97.1
98. 1
95.5
98.2
95.8
97.6
97.6
94.7
91.1
96.3
82.6
91.7
82.6
81.1
71.1
85.0
75.1
80.1
67.6
77.7
91.8
97.7
90.2
87.5
78.8
87.5
84.2
87.5
85.5
86.2
78.8
84.9
84.4
83.3

MANUFACTURING ........................... .
AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS .... . ... .. ... ...... . .
MEAT PRODUCTS ...........................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ..........................
.. .. .
c a n n e d , c u r e d , a n d f r o z e n f o o d s ....... . . .. . .. . .
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ....................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .........................
BEVERAGES ................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ..................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ............. . ... . .. • • .. .. .. .
KNITTING MILLS ..........................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ..................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ....... .... . .. . . .. .. .. .
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ........... .... . .. .. .. .. .. .
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ......... .... . .. . ... .. .. .
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ... . .. . .. . ... . . .. .
.
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ...................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ............ ..... . .. . ... . . .
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS . ... . .. . ... .. .. .
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE .................... .. . .. . .. . ... . . .
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ...................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS ANO BOXES ............ . .... .. . . .
NEWSPAPERS ............................ .
COMMERCIAL PRINTING .................... .. . .. . . . .. .. ... . .
INDtlSTRIAl THEMTCAl S -_ _________ .....
_
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .... ..... , .... .. .. .
DRUGS ....................................
.. . . .. .
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ..... .. ... . .
PFTROLFUM REFINING ..........____ . . . . .
TIRES AND INNER TUBES .................... ... . . . . . .. .. .
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS .................. .. ... . .. .. .. .. ...
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER .................... . .. . ... .• ...
.... . .. .. .. .. ...
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN .
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS . . .. . .. . ... .. ...
BLAST FURNACE ANO BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS . ... . .. . ... .. ...
. .. . ... .. .. .
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ..............
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND O R A W I N G ....... ..... . .... .. .• •..
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ......... . .. .. .. . . .. .
. .... .. . . ,
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS .,
SCREW MACHINE PROOUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ........ . .. .. .. .. .. .
MFTAI C T A M P I M G ^ ....... ........ ........
ENGINES AND TURBINES .............. .
FARM MAGHINFRV ............................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ........ •• ...... ... ..




54.3

..

..

64.9
42.7
62.3
59.2
66.6
33.6
49.3
79.2
95.4
77.5
70.6
48.8
69.8
63.9
75.5
69.8
69.4
63.4
60.2
66.6
59.8

CUMULATIVE

PERCENT D I S TR IB UT IO N

OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL
WAS LESS THAN

EARNINGS

FROM ALL

EMPLOYMENT

INDUSTRY
$1800 $2400
PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

METAL WORKING M A C H I N E R Y .......... , ......................................................
SPECI AL INCUSTRY MACHINERY ............................................................
GENERAL I NDUSTRI AL MACHINERY .......................................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .....................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES .......................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND D I S T R I B UT I N G EQUIPMENT ............................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES .........................................................................
ELECTRIC L IG HT IN G AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ................................
RADIO AND TV REC EI VI NG EQUIPMENT ..............................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ..................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ..................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT .......................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ..............................................................................
S HI P AND BOAT B UI L DI N G AND R EP AI RI NG ....................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ............................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ............................................................................

TRANSPORTATION

$3000

$3600

$4200

$4800

$5400

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

$8400

56.6
64 .0
62 .6
54.7
73.9
70 .9
72.2
76 .4
80.7
82.6
58.6
75 .7
62.5
47 .6
68.1
71.0
83 .6

61.8
69 .8
69 .4
58.6
78.8
75.1
76 .4
80.9
84.2
84 .7
62. 1
78.3
67 .6
54.4
74 .0
75.2
85.8

$9000 $10000 $11000

ECONOMY---- Continued

............................................................................................

RAILROADS ................................................................................................... '
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ...........................................
TAXICABS .....................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ...........................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION ..............................................................................

10 .0
9. 1
8.0
8.3
1 0 .7
12 .2
11.1
1 4. 2
1 5. 2
2 4 .2
8 .1
16 .9
8.6
5. 1
16.1
11.6
28.9

12 .5
11 .4
1C. 7
1C. 8
14 .8
16 .3
1 4. 5
ie .o
19 .1
29.9
11 .2
21.5
10.8
7.0
1 9 .7
13 .6
34 .2

15 .1
1 4 .4
1 3 .5
13.9
1 8 .3
21.2
1 8 .5
21.6
24.1
34.8
1 3 .8
26.2
13.5
9.1
22.8
17.0
38.5

17. 7
16. 8
16. 5
17.2
22. 3
2 5 .0
22.6
26. 2
29. 7
40.6
17. 1
32. 3
16.5
11. 2
26.7
2 1 .8
44. 3

20.5
2 0 .1
19.9
21 .1
26.6
30.9
28.4
3 1 .3
36.4
48 .4
20 .9
39.7
1 9. 6
1 3. 0
30.5
25.5
50.8

24.1
23 .9
23.3
25 .3
33.2
37.5
35.4
37. 1
44 .3
57.5
25 .4
47 .5
22.9
1 5. 3
34.3
30.7
57 .0

28 .6
29.0
28.2
29.2
39.7
43 .4
42 .0
43.4
52.3
64 .4
30.9
54 .8
27.0
1 8 .2
38.4
36.9
63 .0

3 3 .6
35.8
33.4
34.4
46.3
48.7
48 .5
51.3
60.2
69 .9
37.0
61 .2
3 3. 1
21.4
43 .2
45 .3
68.4

38.7
42.7
39.9
39.3
53.3
54.4
54.6
59.6
66.0
73.5
42 .4
65.3
40.1
25.7
49.4
51 .6
72.5

43.8
4 9. 1
46.5
44.4
60.3
60.3
60.2
65.5
71.9
7 7. 3
47.7
68.9
47.0
30 .7
54.9
58.6
75.9

49 .4
55.8
54.6
48.5
67 .4
65 .3
66 .7
71 .1
76.2
8 0 .1
53.0
72.3
5 5 .1
37.4
61 .0
64 .2
80.1

16.4

19 .6

22 .5

25. 3

28 .4

31.5

34.9

38 .4

42 .3

46.6

51.5

58.0

5.9
11.6
45.4
18.8
5. 2

7.5
13.2
51.9
22.5
6.9

9.2
15.2
57.7
25 .9
•9.0

10. 8
17. 1
64.6
28. 9
11.2

1 2. 5
19.7
71.3
32.3
13 .6

1 4. 3
22.3
78.5
35.6
1 6 .0

1 6 .2
25.2
84.5
39.3
18.6

18 .2
29.2
89.2
43 .0
22.3

21.8
3 4 .5
92 .4
46 .7
26.5

26.9
39.2
94.5
50.7
3 0 .9

33.3
45 .4
95.9
55.0
36.2

41 .9
53.5
97 .0
61.1
43.4

69.3
7 8. 1
7 7 . 6i
65.6
84.4
80.8
81.8
8 6 . 0i
88. 3
88.0
68.6
82. 1
75 .3
6 3 . 9i
8 2 .01
8 1 .0l
8 8 .7

74.8
83.6
82.9
71.5
8 8 .2
84.9
86.4
90.2
90 .8
90 .6
7 4 .1
85 .6
81 .7
70.4
87. 1
85.5
91.1

64 .0

73.8

83.7

52.5
60.2
97 .8
66 .3
48 .2

6 8 . 9»
71 .6i
9 7 . 9i
7 5. 5
5 7 .7

86 .9
80.9
98 .4
84.4
69 .0

............................................................ .................................

12.2

16.C

2 C .3

24.4

29.0

3 5 .5

41 .9

49.5

56.5

61.2

64 .8

68 .3

7 1 .3

7 6. 5

82.4

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ..................................................................
RADIO AND T EL EV I SI ON BROADCASTING ................................ ..

11. I
18.8

15.0
22.7

1 9. 4
26 .4

23. 7
31.0

28.5
34.3

35.3
38 .4

42. 1
43 .4

50.4
47.4

58.0
50.5

62.5
55.0

65.9
59.1

69 .3
63.7

72.3
66.4

77.4
71.2

83.6
74.8

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S .......................... ^
............................................................

8. 1

10.3

12.0

14.0

1 6 .4

19 .4

22 .9

26.5

30.7

35.6

41.2

48.5

54.9

64.8

75.7

COMMUNICATION

2 1. 6
MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ..............................
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND A LL IE D PRODUCTS ..................................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .......................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..................................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ..................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ............................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND S U PP LI E S ............................................

RETAIL

TRADE

................................................................................................

DEPARTMENT STORES ................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ................................................................................
VARIETY STORES .......................................................................................
GROCERY STORES .......................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS .......................................................................
MEN' S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNI SHI NGS ............................
WOMEN'S REACY-TO-WEAR STORES .......................................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES .....................................................................
SHOE STORES ..............................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FU RNISHINGS . . . ' ............................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES .........................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .........................................................................




25.7

29.3

32. 9

37.2

41 .7

46 .3

51.0

55.5

60.1

64.8

70.1

73.6

78.7

83.5

17.5
16.9
23.9
| 30 .5
16.0
17.7
13.7

21.8
19.8
2 8 .4
3 5. 7
19 .5
20.8
17 .3

25 .9
23.0
32.6
39.6
22 .8
23 .7
20 .5

29. 7
25. 7
37. 8
43. 2
26. 3
27. 7
23.4

34.2
3 0. 1
43 .0
47.4
30.7
32.2
27.2

38.6
35.6
48 .8
51.1
35.3
38. 1
31.6

43 .7
40 .0
54.0
55.3
40 .7
43 .3
36.0

49 .3
44 .3
58.2
59.3
46 .5
49. 3
40.5

55.0
49.8
62.1
62 .9
52.2
54.5
44.9

6 1 .1
54.3
66.4
66.8
57.6
59.3
49.5

66.9
58.9
69.6
71.3
62 .3
64 .3
55 .4

74.9
64.2
73.8
76.0
67.5
69 .9
60.8

78 .6
67.7
75.8
79 .3
71 .0
73 .7
64 .8

83.3
72.9
78.5
84.4
75.9
78.9
70 .9

87.2
78.2
81.7
89.5
81.1
83 . 1
76 .6

49.0

56.2

62 .2

67. 7

72.6

76.4

79.7

82.4

84.9

87.0

89.0

91.1

92 .5

94.3

95 .8

44.8
34 .5
5 6 .0
42.0
19 .7
43.9
5 2 .6
53 .7
46.6
30 .6
49.3
2 2 .7

52.6
4 0 .1
63.0
49.5
2 4 .1
50.9
5 9 .8
6 1 .2
5 3 .0
37 .3
5 7 .4
2 8. 1

59.1
46 .0
69 .4
55 .7
28.3
56.3
66 .5
67.3
59.0
43 .2
63 .7
31.4

66.4
51.4
77.4
6C. 9
3 2 .4
61.4
74. 5
7 4 .7
64. 3
48 .9
69. 7
36. 2

73.0
57.6
84.0
65.4
37.2
67.6
81.8
81.7
69.5
54.0
75.4
42 .7

78.1
63.3
87.6
69. 1
.
42 .5
71.7
86 .6
85.4
73 .6
58.6
79.5
4 6 .4

82 .0
69 .5
89 .9
72 .3
47 .7
76 .0
89 .8
88 .2
76.7
63.5
82 .0
52.6

84.9
75.2
91 .7
75.5
52.5
78.8
91.8
90.2
79.3
67 .9
84.1
57.0

87.0
79.8
92 .9
78.7
57.5
81.6
93.1
91 .9
82.5
71.8
85.4
63 .7

88.8
83.0
94.2
81.8
62.4
83.4
94.2
92 .8
8 5 .1
75 .1
87.0
69.3

90.6
85.1
95 .2
84.5
67.1
85.7
94.9
94.2
87.5
78.6
88.1
74.3

92.4
87 .8
96 .2
87.6
71.9
88.8
95.9
95 .7
90 .0
82.6
89.2
80.3

93 .6
89.7
96 .9
89 .7
75.7
90 .5
96 .4
96 .4
91 .8
84 .6
90 .0
83 .4

95.2
91.5
97.5
92.7
81.0
92 .8
97 .0
96 .9
93 .9
8 8 .1
91.2
87 .7

96 .4
92 .5
9 7 .9
95 .3
85.4
94 .0
97 .6
97 .5
95 .7
91.2
92 .5
91.5

INDUSTRY

DF
CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY i
MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAN
$10000 $11000

o
o
o
O
'

$ 1800 $2AOO $3000 $3600|1A200 $A8C0 $5A00 $6000 $6600 $7200 $7800 $8A00
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY-- Continued
INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ...................

21.1

26.2

3C.9

35.6

A 1.9

A9.2

56.3

62.3

67.5

71.7

75.2

79.1

81.5

8A.9

87.9

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ..................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ........................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS .........................
LIFE INSURANCE ........................................
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ................

15.0
18.0
19.9
15.1
12.8

20.3
22.8
25.3
19.7
17.0

25.3
27.2
30.A
23.5
21.5

30. A
32. 6
35.6
27.6
26.2

38.2
39.9
AA.A
33.1
33.2

A8.3
A 8.7
53.2
39.7
A l. 7

57.9
56.2
59. B
A6.6
A9.7

65.A
6A . 1
66.0
52.7
55.9

71.1
69.A
71.5
57.8
60. A

75.5
7 A .0
76.0
62.7
6A.2

78.9
78.2
80.2
66.9
68.2

83.1
81.7
83.A
70.7
72.3

85.3
83.6
86. 1
73.8
75.6

88.2
86.C
89.6
78. 1
81.A

90.2
89.0
93. 1
82.6
86.7

SERVICES ..................................................

39.A

A5.7

51.5

57. 0

62.3

67.0

71.0

7 A .6

77.9

80.8

83.5

86.A

88. A

90.8

92.7

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS .................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ...................
MOTION PICTURES .......................................
HOSPITALS ..............................................

5A. 1
A 1.6
62.3
23.8

61.8
A9.6
68.5
30.0

68.7
58.9
72.A
37.3

75. 1
68. 3
75. 1
A6.2

80.A
76.3
77.3
55.5

8A .6
81.2
79.1
63.8

87.7
8A.6
81.3
70.5

90. 1
87.2
83. 1
76.2

92.0
88.9
85.5
80. A

93.A
90 .8
87.0
83.6

9A.6
92.3
88.6
86.5

95.7
9A . 1
90.5
89.6

96. A
95.A
91.9
91.9

97.A
96.9
93.8
9 A .6

98.1
97.7
95.2
96.5

FINANCE,




INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKFRS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY OF
MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAN
$1800 $2400 $3000 $3600 $42C0 $4800 $5400 $6000 $6600 $7200 $7800 $8400 $9000 $ 1 0 0 0 0 $ 1 1 0 0 0

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAl ECONOMY ...................

29.5

34.9

39.7

44.6

49.6

MINING .......................................................

16.0

19.6

22.7

26.0

29.1

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND LIQUIDS...............
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES .............................

II . 8
28.5

14.9
34.9

18.0
37.9

19. 8
43.8

22.5
47.9

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .....................................

70.6

74.2

78.2

81.2

85.3

88.9

58.8

63.0

66.9

32.4

36.2

40. 1

44.4

48.6

53.7

61.4

67.4

75.4

81.5

25.4
51.6

28.5
55.4

32.0
59.3

36.6
62.3

4C.4
65.9

45.2
69.2

52.6
73.8

58.6
77.0

6 8.0

81.9

74.6
8 6.0

54.3

25.5

30.5

34.8

38. 7

42.6

46.5

50.4

54.3

58. 1

61.8

65.4

68.8

71.6

76.4

81.2

26.0
25.2
19.9
34.6
16. 1
29.8
35.8
33.1
33.7

31.2
31.1
23.8
40.8
19.4
35.5
41.2
37.9
39.6

35.5
35.6
27.0
46.0

40.0
39. 8
30. 1
51.2
25.2
46. 3
51.5
47. 5
49. 5

45.4
43.8
33.5
56.3
28.3
50.7
55.2
51 .9
53.9

50.2
48.4
36.8
59.2
31.9
5*.3
58.2
55.3
57.9

55.5
52.4
40.7
63.9
34.7
59.1
62.9
59.4
62.1

61.1
56.6
44.4
6 8 .C
38.3
63.1

65.8
60.0
48.2
72.0
42.3

70.4
63.9
51.9
75.1
46.2
70.4
73.6
69.7
72.3

73.9
67.3
56.1
78.8
49.5
74.0
76.4
72.6
76.3

76.8
70.0
59.7
81.7
53.2
76.9
79.9
75.8
79.7

79.5
72.5
62.4
83.8
55.9
79.8
82.2
77.7
81.6

64. 1
76 . 6
6 7.7
87. 1
61.4
84. 1
86.5
82.C
85.5

6 6.2

MANUFACTURING ...............................................

18.9

23.3

27.7

32.4

37.7

43.1

48.3

53.4

58.4

63.2

67.9

73. 1

7 7.0

82.5

86.9

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL A R M S ........ .............
MEAT PRODUCTS ............................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ...........................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ........................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS .....................................
BAKERY PROCUCTS ..........................................
BEVERAGES .................................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ...................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ..............................
KNITTING MILLS ...........................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ...................................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS .................. .....
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ............................
WOMEN'S AND MI SS ES’ OUTERWEAR ..........................
WOMEN'S ANC CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ..................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ....................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS .............................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE .....................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ....................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ........................
NEWSPAPERS ................................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING .....................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ....................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .....................
DRUGS .....................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ......................
PETROLEUM REFINING ......................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ...................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ...................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER .................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN .................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ........................... .
NCNFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING .........................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE .....................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PROOUCTS ..................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ....................
METAL STAMPINGS ..........................................
ENGINES ANO TURBINES ....................................
FARM MACHINERY ...........................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ....................

10.7
27.6
23.1
55.0

14.6
32.9
27.6
61.0
24.7
26.7
25.2
24.0
23.8
35.7
3C.6
27.4
40.5
40.7
42.4
43.1
36.7
30.9
33.1

17.1
37.3
31.0
65.2
28.3
31.2
28.7
28.7
28.9
43.9
36.8
35.2
50.0
5C.8
52.7
53.6
43.5
35.8
38.4
13.7
28.3
34.2
28.6
8»9
13.7
16.1
29.1
1C.1

2C.0
41.8
34. 7
69. 2
31.2
35. 1
32. 1
34.4
35.6
54.4
45.2
45.0
64. 3
63.2
6 6 .2
67. 3
50.4
41.0
44. 8
16. 1
32.6
37.6
32.8
10. 9
16. 7
18. 8
32.9
1 2 .1
14. 3
32.5
53. 5
28. 1
34. 3
14.5
25.2
2C.4
28. 3
3C. 7
27. 8
27.4
13.8
24. 7
18.0

22.7
47.4
38.6
73.0
35.3
39.5
35.7
43.1
45.0
66.9
57.8
55.7
76.7
73.3
76.6
79.5
56.7
46.3
53.8
18.8
38.0
41.7
38.0

27.0
52.4
42.4
76.3
39.1
43.6
39.4
55.3
57.6
75.5
70.1
65.6
85.1
80.5
83.5
84.9
61.8
51.7
62.8
21.5
43.7
45.7
42.4
15.0

32.1
56.2
47.8
79.6
42.9
47.9
43.5

37.0
60.0
52.7
82.3
46.9
53.1
48.1
74.6
75.8

42.0
63.2
58.1
84.8
51.6
58.3
52.7
80.5
B2 . 8
89.4

47.9

52.8
69.6
68.4
89.2
62.8

59.7
74. 1
74.3
91.2
69.3
74.8
67.3
91.5
9 1.6
94.5
95.7
91.7
97.2
93.6
96.0
96.2
87.1
82.1
91.7
56.7
79.6
67.8

64.6
78.0
78.6
92.4
75.2
78.6
72.C
93.4
93.3
95.5
96.9
93.1
97.7
94.2
96.4
96.7
89.0
85.3
93.2
64.4
83.4
71.7
71.0
50.4
70.2
64.5
71.3
41.7
57.1
84.1
96.5
81.5
77.1
58.0
77.3
73.0
80.8
77.3
75.8

71.4
84. 1
85.4
94.6
81.0
85.2
79. 7
95.3
96.2
96.5
97.6
94.6
98. 1
95.3
97.0
97.6
92. 1
88.4
95.3
75.1
8 8 .7
77.9
76.6
61.5
78.9
70.2
75.9
55.0

76.3
90.9
91.6
96.1
85.8
90.3
86.7
96.0
96.8
97.2
98.2
95.8
98.3
95.9
97.6
97.8
95. 1
91.5
96.4
83.4
92.1
83.5
82.3
71.9
85.7
76.6
80.8
68.9
78.9
92.3
97. 7
90.5
88.7
80.3
88.7
85.3
88.3
87.1




20.2

21.9
20 .8

19.3
19.5
27.7
24.6
2 1.2

31.9
32.3
33.3
34.6
30.4
25,4
27.6
9.6
19.4
26.2
20.8
6 .0

8.4
10.4
19.9
6.4
7.6
19.0
28.5
15.4
20.4
8 .2

14.2
10.7
17.5
18.2
17.8
15.7
7. 3
14.1
9.9

11.8

23.5
30.7
25.2
7.6
ii.i
13.4
25.2
9 .C
1 C.5
23.5
35.2
19.7
25.1
10.3
18.2
14.3
20.8

23.2
2 1.6

19.fi
10.5
18.8
12.9

22.8

41.0
46.4
43.6
44.4

12.8

28.3
43.0
23.8
3C.0
12.6

21.9
17.9
24.1
27.1
24.8
23.2
12 .1
21.6

15.3

12.8

19.5
22.5
38.0
14.0
16.2
38.3
64.8
32.2
38.7
16.3
28.6
24.0
34.5
35.0
32.2
31.4
16.7
29.C
2C.9

2 2.2

27.0
42.7
16.1
18.3
44.2
74.1
37.0
43.2
19.0
32.4
27.9
40.5
39.7
37.5
35.8
20.5
32.8
24.6

6 6.8

69.9
82.3
78.9
73.4
90.0
85.1
88.8

89.6
66.3
56.9
70.9
24.5
49. 1
49.4
46.7
18.1
27.8
31.6
47.5
18.3
2 1.8

51.7
81.5
43.2
47.9
22.0

37.6
33.7
47.2
44.5
42.5
40.9
25.9
38.7
28.5

6 6.2

62.9
65.2

8 6.2

84.5
79.3
93.0
87.9
91.7
92.9
70.3
62.8
77.5
29.0
55.9
52.9
50.9
22.1

34.3
37.3
51.8
21.7
25.4
58.1
8 6.0

52. 1
53.9
25.5
43.7
38.8
53.7
49.8
48.3
45.1
32.1
45.4
33.2

66.6

70.1
6 6.2

69.4

88.8

84.2
94.5
90.1
93.6
94.0
75.2
6 8.0

82.3
34.5
62.7
56.1
54.6
26.3
41.4
42.8
55.8
23.8
31.4
64.8
89.5
60.0
58.6
30.7
49.3
44.9
60.1
55.3
53.7
50.8
37.8
49.8
39.1

6 6 .1

63.7
87.1
56.7
63.3
57.6
85.3
86.3
91.2
92.1
88.0

95.8
91.6
94.6
94,5
79.5
73.9
85.8
40.0
69.2
59.4
58.6
31.7
49.1
48.7
60.2
27.5
37.4
69.9
92.2
6 6.2

63.0
36.6
57.2
51.8
66.7
6 i.r
59.2
54.6
45.4
54.5
45.4

6 8.8

62.6
88.7
89.3
92.8
94.0
90.2
96.4
92.5
95.2
95.0
83.5
78.0
88.9
47.1
74.0
62.6
62.4
36.9
55.9
53.9
64.2
30.9
43.8
75.1
94.1
71.1
67.7
43.5
64.8
58.1
72.2
66.9
64.8
59.6
53.4
60.3
53.1

66.8

44.0
63.5
60.6
6 8 .1

35.3
50.8
80.5
95.8
77.9
72.7
50.4
71.3
66.7
77.4
72.7
71.1
64.9
63. 3
67.8
62.5

68.8

70.5
73.2
00

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ........................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC .................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ...................
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ...................
ELECTRICAL WORK ..........................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ....................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ..............................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ...........................
CONCRETE WORK .............................................

6 8 .2
8 8.0

97. 3
8 6.6

83.6
70.C
84.8
80.8
85.4
82.9
82.2
75. 1
80.5
79.6
78.6

81.2
72.7
91.2
67.0
89.4
89.9
8 6.6

88.7

86.8

79. 7
85.9
64.9
84.6

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY OF
MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAN

INDUSTRY

$1800 $2A00 $3000 $3600 $A2C0 $A800 $5A00 $6000 $6600 $7200 $7800 $ 8A00 $9000 $ 1 0 0 0 0 $ 1 1 0 0 0
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY-- Continued
METAL WORKING MACHINERY ......................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ................. . .
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ............... . .
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ............. . .
SERVICE INOUSTRY MACHINES .................. . .
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT .. . .
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ........... . .
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ........................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .... . .
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT .......... . .
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT .................... . .
e l e c t r o n i c c o m p o n e n t s a n d a c c e s s o r i e s .... . .
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ............... . .
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ..........................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING ANO REPAIRING ...... . .
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES .. . .
OTHER MANUFACTURING .........................

27.3
27.1
26.A
28.2
37.A
AO. 8
38.0
39.2
A6.2
59.7
27.8
50.3
25.2
17.9
38.6
32.9
59.A

31.8
32.3
31.3
32.1
A3.9
A6 . 6
AA.6
A5.7
5A.8

A2.A
39.A
65.2

36.9
39.0
36.0
37.0
50.1
51.8
51.0
53.7
62. 1
71.9
39.0
63.5
35.5
2A.A
A6.7
A 7 .A
70.A

A2.2
A5.7
A2.A
A 1 .7
56.3
57.2
57.0
61.6

26.0
19.A
A 1. 8

18.1

2 1.6

2A.6

27.6

30.7

33.9

37.1

AO. 6

AA. 3

A 8 .5

53.3

59.7

75.1

8 A .8

6 .6

8.5
15.2
55.7
25.5

11. 7
19. 1
67. 7
32.2
13. 1

13.A
2 1 .A
7A.0
35.6
15.8

15.3
2A.3
80.5
39.2
18.5

17.5
27.3
85.7
A2.6

8 .1

C. 2
16.9
61.2
28.9
10.5

19.5
31.2
90.3
A6.2
2A.7

23.2
36.5
92.8
A9.8
28.3

28.2
A l. 1
9A.7
53.3
32.5

3A . 6
A 7 .1
96.1
57.A
38.0

A3.A 5A. 1
55.9 62.1
97.1 .97.8
63. 1 67.9'
AA. A A9.2

70.9
7A.0
98.0
76.5
58.8

83.1
98.6
85.1
69.9

13.7

17.9

2 2.1

26. 3

30.8

36.9

A3.1

50.6

57.A

62.0

65.5

69.0

71.91

77.0

82.9

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ................. ,.. . .. .. .. . . . . . 12.7
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING ......... * ** .. .. ... ** 20.9

16.9
25.1

21.3
28.8

25. 5
32. 6

30.1
36.8

36.6
AO.9

A3.2
A5.8

51.3
A9.5

58.7
52.7

63.2
56.9

6 6 .A

61.3

69.8
65.3

72.7
6 8 .1

77.8 8A.0
72.5* 76.0

9.2

11.7

13.7

15.6

17.9

2 1.0

2A.5

28.1

3 2.2

36.8

A2.A

A9.9

56.2

65.91

76.8

23.8

28.1

32.1

35. 8

39.9

A A .3

A8 . 8

53.A

57.8

62.1

66.7

71.7

7A.9

79.6

8A.2

20 .6

29.3
25.9
35.6
A2.5
26.A
27.1
23.5

33. 5
28.7
AC.9
A6.2
30.0
31. A
26. 8

37.7
33.0
A6.0
50.2
3A.3
35.7
30.A

A2.0
38.5
51.2
5A.0
38.8
A l. 3
3A.8

A7.2
A 3.0
56.2
57.8
A3.8
A 6 .A
39.1

53. 1
A 7.1
60.7
61.5
A9.2
52.0
A3.5

58.8
52.5
6A.3
65.0
5 A .9
57.A
A7.7

6A.9
57.1
68.3
68.7
59.7
61.9
52.0

69.9
61.0
71.3
72.9
6A.3
66.9
58.0

77.0

19.0
26.0
32.9
18.2
19.7
16.1

25.2
22.3
30.9
38.2
22.3
23.7
19.9

75.3
77.6
69.3
71.9
62.9

79.91
69.3
77.Ci
80.6i
72.6
75.A
6 6.6 -

8A.0'
73.9
79.3
85.5
77. 1
80. 1
72.0i

87.6
79. 1
82.3
90.3
81.7
8A.2
77. A

50.8

57.9

63.7

69. 1

73.9

77.5

80.6

83.2

85.5

87.6

89.5

91.5

92.8

9A.6. 96.0

A7 . 1
37.3
58.A
AA.5
2 2 .A
A6.0
5A.8
56.2
A9. A
3A.0
51.6
25.6

5A.7
A2.8
65.C
51.6
27.0
53.1
61.7
63.3
56.A
AC.2
59.6
30.7

60.9
A8.3
7C.9
57.5
31.5
58.3
6 8 .A
69.1
61.9
A5.9
65.A
35.0

67. 9
53. 1
78. 6
62.5
35.8
63.6
76. 2
76. A
66.9
51. 7
71.2
38. 8

7A.1
59.0
85.2

79.0
6A.8
88.5
70.1
A5.A
73.2
87.2

82.8
70.8
90.5
73.3
50.2
77.0
90.3
89.1
78.1
65.9
82.8
55.3

85.6
76.3
92.2
76.A
5A .8
79.7
92.2
91.0
80.A
69.9
8 A .8
59.9

87.7
80.A
93.3
79.5
59.6
82.2
93.3
92. A
83.2
73.7

89.A
83.7
9A.A
82.5
6A.2
8 A .1
9A.A
93.5
85.7
76.7
87.3
71.7

91.2
85.9
95.A
85.1

92.9
88.9
96.3

9A.0i
90.3i
97.C'
90.2
76.6i
91.0
96.6i
96.6
92.0i
85. A
90.1
85.C'

95.5
91.7
97.5.
93. 1
81.6.
93.1
97.2
97. 1
9A. 1
88.7
91.3
88.5

. . .. . . .. .
. . .. .
. . .. . . .. .
. . .. . . .. .
. . .. ,

....

__

10 .8

9.7
9.8
13.6
1A . 3
13.0
16.A
17.7
27.2
9.6
19.0
9.8
6 .0

.... . . . . . 18.1
. . .. . . . . . 13.A
31.9

TRANSPORTATION .................................
RAILROADS ....................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ......... . .• .. ..

... • •

12.9
A8.9
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ......... . .. . . .. . . .. . 21.3
AIR TRANSPORTATION ..........................
5.9
COMMUNICATION ..................................

PUBLIC UTILITIES ..............................

WHOLESALE TRADE ................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ... . . . . .. . . . . .
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS .... . . . . .. . . .. .
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ......................
GROCERIES ANO RELATED PRODUCTS ............ . .
. . .• •
ELECTRICAL GOODS ............................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING ANO HEATING EQUIPMENT .. . . . . .. . . .. .
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ......... *•
... * *

....

RETAIL TRADE ...................................
DEPARTMENT STORES ...........................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ...........................
VARIETY STORES ..............................
GROCERY STORES ..............................
MOTOR VEHICLE OEALERS ......................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS .. . ... . ..
..
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES .............. • •• .... .. .. •
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ..................... • •• . . .. .. . • •
SHOE STORES
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS ............ . ... . .. . . .
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ........ • •• . . . ... .• •
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS




12 .8

17.8
19.A
17.A
2 C. 6
21.9
32.6
12.9
23.9
1 2 .A
8.3
2 2.0

17.1
16.7
15.7
15.9

23.3
23.1
22.7
23.3
31.2
3A.0
31.5
33.A
38.9
50.9
23.6
A2.A
2 1 .A
15.A
3A.7
28.2
52.9

15.8
37.2

....

11.5

1A.7
13.6
12.7

2C.0
19.7
19.2
19.5
26.8
28. 1
25.8
28. 8
32.2
A3. 3
19. A
3A. 7
18.2
13.2
30. 7
2A. 7
A7.5

. . .. . . .. .
. . .. . . .. .
. . .. .
. . .. . . .. .
.... . . .. .
. . .. . . .. .

22.0

2 A .3
21.3
2 A.9
26.8
37.A
16.0
29.1
15.3
10 .8

1

66.6

AO.5
69.3
83.0
82.9
72.0
56.6
76.6
A 5.2

86.6

75.6
60.8
80.5
A 9.0

6 6 .1

32.9
57.2
29.6
20.8

2 1.0

6 8.2

75.8
AA.5
67.6
A2.6
28.7
52.7
53.7
7A.2

86.0
6 6 .A

A7.0
51.9
A8.9
A6.9
63.1
62.9
62.7
67.5
7A.1
79.3
50.0
71.1
A9.7
3A.0
58.0
60.6
77.7

52.7
58.3
57.0
51.A
70.1
67.8
68.7
73.0
77.7
81.9
55.3
7A.3
57.8
A1.0
6A.0
6 6.2

81.A

6 8.6

86.5
95.1
9A.6
87.9
79.8
8 8 .A
76.2

59.5
66.3
65.0
57.0
76.2
72.9
73.9
77.9
81.9
8A.2
60.2
77.1
6 A .7
50.1
70.6
72.8
8 A .9

6A.3
71.6
71.2
60.5
80.9
77.0
77.8
82.5
85.3

65.5

6 6.2

8 8.2

73.2
89.3
96.0
96. 1
90.3
83.6
89.5
81.8

70.9
79.1
78.8
67.A
85.5
82.1
83.2
87.0

8 6.0

8 8.8
8 8.8

63.6
79.6
69. 3
:
56.6i
75.9'
76.6i
86.9'

69. 7
83.1
76.7
65.5
83.3
82.2
89.8

75.8
8 A.A
83.A
72.9
89.3
85.8
87.A
91.0
91.1
91.A
75.0
8 6 .A
82.5
71.6
8 8.0

86.5
91.9

8 8.6

96.5
92.7
98.0
95.6
85.9
9A .3
97.7
97.5
95.9
91.6
92.6
91.8

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THE INDUSTRY OF
MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAN
o
o
o
o

$1800 $2400 $3000 $3600 $4200 $4800 $5400 $6000 $6600 $7200 $7800 $8400 $9000

$11000

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL EC ON OM Y-- Continued
INSURANCE» AND REAL ESTATE ...................

23.0

28.3

33.2

38.0

44.1

51.1

58.0

63.9

68.9

72.9

76.3

79.9

82. 1

85.4

88.3

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ..................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ........................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS .........................
LIFE INSURANCE .........................................
FIRE* MARINE* AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ................

16.9
19.6

2 2.6

25.1
29.1
22.4
19.4

27.7
29.8
34.8
26.5
24.7

32. 8
35.9
40.2
30. 8
29. 4

40.4
42.1
48.3
36.6
35.9

50.1
50.4
56.3
43.0
44.0

59.6
58.2
62.6
49.6
51.4

66.9
65.2
68.7
55.5
57.3

72.3
70.3
73.9
60.1
61.7

76.5
74.7
77.9
64.4
65.6

79.8
78.8
81.7
68.3
69.3

83.7
82.4
84.8
71.9
73.0

85.8
84.4
87. 1
74.8
76.3

8 8.6
8 6.6

90.5
89.4
93.7
83.2
87. 3

FINANCE,

22.6

17.A
14.4

90.2
78.8
81.9

SERVICES ..................................................

40.7

47.1

52.8

58. 2

63.4

67.9

71.9

75.4

78.6

81.4

84.1

87.0

88.8

91.2

92.9

HOTELS* TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS .................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ...................
MOTION PICTURES ........................................
HOSPITALS ...............................................

57.3
43.8
64.8
25.6

64.8
52.0
7C.4
32.0

71.4
60.8
73.8
39.3

77.4
69.9
76.5
48. 0

82.5
77.6
78.6
57.2

86.4
82.5
80.7
65.3

89.4
85.7
83.1
71.9

91.5
87.9
84.7
77.2

93.2
89.6
87.0
81.4

94.3
91.3

95.3
92.8
90.0
87.2

96.2
94.5
91.4
90.2

96.8
95.8
92.9
92.4

97.6
97.1
94.3
95.0

98.2
97.8
95.8
96.8




8 8.6

84.4

INDUSTRY

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS FROM ALL
EMPLOYMENT WAS LESS THAN
$18(30 12A00 $?CC0 $3600 $A2 CO $A800 S5A00 $6000 $6600 $7200 $7800 $8A00 $900C $1CC0C $ 1 1 0 0 0

MINING .................................................. .
CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND LIQUIDS................
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ..............................

7.7

16.3

21.7

27.9

3A.0

A5.7

i.e

3.0

A. 6

6 .6

8.9

11.9

16.0

20.5

25.6

31.0

37.7

A8.1

56.2

6 6.8

75.1

2 .2

3.1

13.0
28.8

16.7
3A • 1

26.3
AA .3

32.6
A9.2

A2.0
56.3

A9. 1
62.5

60.A
70.1

6 8 .A

8 .8

7.A
17.1

2 1.6

6 .6

5.5
13.0

9.5

3.8

A.3

69.5

11.8

21.8

51.3

38.6

56.5

61.6

67.5

71.9

o
o

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ....................

78.1

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ......................... .............

3.A

5.8

8 .6

11.9

15.9

20.0

2A.6

29.6

3A.6

39,6

AA. 6

A9.9

5A.3

61.9

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION .........................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC .................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING ....................
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING ....................
ELECTRICAL WORK ...........................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, ANO PLASTERING .....................
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ...............................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK ............................

2.7

A. 8
A.9
5.0

7.A
7.A
7.1

1C. 7
10 .1
9. 1
16.0
6.1
17.A
17.6
18.3
16.0

16.7
13.9

29.2

36.A
26.6

18.6
31.2
lA . 7
30.5
31.2
33.1
29.2

22.2

38.1
18.7
36.1
37.A
38.1
33.5

A3 • 1
31.5
26.7
A5.3
23.2
A1.0
A2.A
Al.8
AO. 8

A9.A
36.2
31.1
50.0
27.8
A6.3
A7.8
A6.9
A5.9

5A.9
A1.2
35.5
56.3
31.A
52.0
52.7
51.1
51.5

60.6
A6.0
AO.9
61.2
36.1
57.6
58.6
56.6
56.1

65.8
50.3
AA.8
67. 1
39.7
62.9
63.0
60.5
60.6

73.0
57.8
52.0
73.7
A6.9
70.3
72.0

20.0

22.5
17.6
1A.9
2A.5
11.7
25.8
25.7
28.1
2A.6

MANUFACTURING .............. .................................
'
AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ......................
MEAT PROOUCTS .............................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ............................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ........................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ........ .............................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .............. ............................

2 .8

3.1
5.A
1.8

A.7
12.3
13.0
13.A
1C . 8

8.9

79.9
6 6 .1

59.2
82.7
5A.5
80. 1
78.6
76.3
75.1

9.9
7.A

.A

A.5

7.7

12

.A

18.3

2A.6

30.9

37.2

A3.5

A9.7

55.8

62.9

68.3

75.8

81.9

0 .6

1.1

2.3
15.5
11.7
29. A
1C.7
12.9

3.9

6.3
29.A

11.3
3A.3
26.9
52.6
23.6
28.2
2A.I
56.0
59.5
73.6
68.3
63.3
8 A.A
77.6
82.5
83.7
A8 .8
35.2
56.A
9.7
31.A
32.1
28.2
7.A
1A .5
16.7
26.3
6.9
8.9
33.A
72.3
21.7
26.2
8.7
20.9
16.9
30.5
23.2
2A.0

16.8
39.3
33.2
58.8
28.9
35.1
29.A
66.5

22.3
AA .0
AO.O
63.9
36.0
A 1 .5
35.6
7A.A
77.1
8 A.A
82.7
77.6
91.A
8A.9
89.8
90.2
61.6
51.A
73.6
20.3
A9.0
AO.A
37.5
1A.8
30.2
29.3
38.3
1 1 .A
19.8
50.8
83.8
AA. A
39.9
17.9
3A.7
29.7
A7.1
37.1
37.2
3A.8
2A.3
30.8
25.A

29.8
A8.2
A7.9
69.1
A2.9
A8.0
A2.1
80.8
82.2
87.0
87.3
82.6
93.3
87.2
91.3
90.9
68.3
59.6
78.7
26.8
57.3
AA .6
A2.7
20.5
38.7
36.A
A3.7
15.5
26.2
57.6
87.6
52.8
A6.7
2A.3
AA .2
38.0
55.2
AA. 6
AA .9
39.7
32.8
36.8
32.7

35.5
53.0
5A.A
73.9
50.1
55.6
A8 . 6
8A.9
85.7
89.3
90.3
85.6
9A.5
88.5
92.5
91.6
7A.3
65.8
83.A
35.3
63.9
A9.2
A7.3
26.6
A7.1
A2.7
A8.9
19.3
33.7
6A .6
90.8
60.1
53.5
32.1
53.6
A5.2
61.7
51.5
51.8
A5.7
A 1 .5
AA. 8
A l.7

A5.3
59.9
62.8
78.7
59.2
63.6
55.A

51.8
65.8
68.9
81.9
66.7
69.3
61.8
91.1
91.3
93.2
9A.8
90.2
96.3
91.1
9A.2
9A.A
83.1
77.8
89.7
55.7
77.0
60.6
59. 1
A2.6
63.9
55.6
59.A
32.1
A9.2
76.7
9A.6
7A.A
67.1
A9.0
69.7
6A.3
73.2
66.5
66.5
58.1
62.7
62.8
61.8

61.1
7A.9
78.A
87.0
7A.6
78.6
72.0
93.6
9A.9
9A.8
96.0
92.A
97.0
92.7
95.A
95.7
87.9
82.7
93.0
68.9
8A.3
69.3
66.9
55.2
7A.2
62.A

67.5
85.5
87. 1
90.7
81.1
85.7
81.1
9A.8
95.9
95.9
97.3
9A.0
97.3
93.7
96.3
96.3
92.3
87.3
9A.7
79.5
89.2
76.7
7A.8
67.3
82.5
70.1
72.9
63.2
7A.A

2

0.1

3.2
A.3
9.6
2 .A
3.9
3.0
2.3
3.6
2.3
3.3
A.5
7. 1
5.8
5.6
6 .1
2.3
3.0

COMMERCIAL PRINTING ..................... ....... ........
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS .....................................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ......................

A.A
0 .A
0.7

2 .2

0.8

1.9
8 .0




11.2

3.C
7.7

22.0

77.1

A.2
5.7
5.A
3.5

WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ...................................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ................................
KNITTING MILLS ............ ................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ....................................
MEN'S AND BOYS* SUITS AND COATS .........................
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS .............................
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ...........................
WOMEN'S.AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ...................
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR .....................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ..............................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD ANO RELATED PROOUCTS .................
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ......................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS .....................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES .........................

SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ........................
PETROLEUM REFINING .......................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ....................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ....................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ..................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN ..................
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .................
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS .................
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ................................
NCNFERROUS ROLLING ANO DRAWING ..........................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ......................
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ...................
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC .....................
METAL STAMPINGS ...........................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES .....................................
FARM MACHINERY ............................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY .....................

8 .2

12.0
2 0 .A

83.5

1.2
2 .1
0 .2

8 .8

6.9
6.5
15.7
A.3
6.5
5.3
A. 6
A.5
10 .1

A.7
6 .8

1C.A
13.3
1 A•1
1 2 .A
1C.2
3.8
6.5
1 •A
3.A
1C.9
6 .6

0.7
1.1
1.8

3.5

10.7
8 .6

21.7
7.3
9.7
7.7
7.9
7.A
19.9
9.9
13.7
23.5
26.8

28.6
26.7
17.7
7.8
11.6

2.5
6 .8

13.'9
9.3

11.0

1A.5
1A.3
3A.2
19.5
25. 8
A5. 1
AA. 5
A8 . 6
A 8 .A
26.3
13.5
19.9
3.5
10.7
17.5
12.6

1.1
2 .0
2 .8
6 .1

1.7
3.9
A. 7
1C. 3
2 .2
2 .8
11.0

0.3

0.8
0.8

1.6

3.0

A.2
1.5
2.3
O.A

8 .1
2 .A

1.3
1.7
5.7
17.3
3.7

A .1
0.9

6 .2
1.8

2 .1

A.5

2 .8
6 .8

1.7
2.9
3.2
3.1
2.9
C.9

2 .6

A.5

A.5
5.A
5.6
A. 8

8 .2
8 .A
8.1
8 .0

1.1
1.0

1.5
1.8
2 .2

1.5
O.A
1.1

0.9

2 .0
2 .1

32.0
6 .6

9. 5

2 1.1
2 1 .A

23.9

22.6

16.0
37.7
1A . 3
17.6
1A.8
25.6
26.1
51.5
37.1
39.8
6A .0
59.7
6A.5
67.5
35.1
2 0 .0

32.A
5.2
17.A
2 2 .A
17.9
2.7
5.9
8.3
15.1
2.9
3.7
16.9
A7.7
9.7
1A.A
3.9
10 .2

7.6
IA.A
12 .0

11.9
12 .1

1.8

3. 1

3.6

6 .6

5.0
9.9

2 .8

A. C

6 .2

20.8

A5.1
18.9
22.9
19.7
A 1 .1
A3.A
6A.0
55.3
53.3
77.1
70.7
7A.8
76.3
A2.8
27.5
AA.7
7.2
2A.5
27.5
22.9
A.A
8 .6

11.7
20.3
A.9
5.6
2A.5
61.5
1A.9
19.9
5.9
IA.A
10.9
21.5
17.6
17.3
16.5
6 .8

2 2.2
11.2

1A.3
9.7

19.2
13.3

6 8 .2

79.8
76.5
71.2
89.0
81.6
86.9
88.7
5A.7
A3.0
66.3
1A.3
AO. 5
36.3
33.0
11.1
2 1.8

22.7
32.3
9.A
12.8
A 1. 6

78.8
33.6
33.3
1 2 .A
28.0
22.3
38.7
30.2
30.3
27.5
16.5
2A.9
18.5

8 8.6

89.0
91.7
93.2
8 8.2

95.6
90.1
93.6
93.3
79.8
72.9
87.5
A6 . 6
71.0
55.8
53.2
35.1
56.1
51.0
5A.6
2A.6
Al. 8
71.8
93.3
69.3
60.7
AO. 1
62.A
56.1
6 8 .A
60.2
60.3
53.0
52.8
55.6
52.7

6 8 .2
6 8.8

66.0

A7.3
61.8
82.8
95.9
81.2
76.2
63.1
79.5
7A.5
79.2
7A.6
75.7
66.5
75.0
71.5
72.8

88.8

96.6
86.7
83.2
75.2
8A.5
80.9
83.8
80.9
82.3
72.8
82.2
79.3
80.A

PERCENT DISTRI BUT ION

$1800
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL

$ 24C0 $ 3CC0 $3600

$42C0

OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL
EMPLOYMENT WAS LESS THAN

S48C0

$54 CO S6C00

$6600

$7200

EARNINGS FROM ALL

$7800

$8400

$9000

o
o
o
o

CUMULATIVE
INDUSTRY

$11000

ECONOMY-----Continued

METAL WORKING MACHINERY .......................................................................
SP ECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ................................................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ...........................................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .........................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ....................... ..........................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND D I S TR IB UT I NG EQUIPMENT ................................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS .................................................. ..
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES .
.......................................................................
ELECTRIC LI GH TI NG AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ....................................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ................................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ......................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ......................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ...........................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ..................................................................................
SHIP AND BOAT B UI LDI NG AND RE PAIRING .........................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVI CES ................................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ................................................................................

1. 3
1. 0
0.7
0.7
1. 3
1.1
0.7
1.2
1.1
2.2
0.4
1. 6
0.6
0.2
1 .7
1. 0
6.5

2 .3
1. 8
1. 4
1. 5
3. 0
2.2
1. 7
2.4
2.7
4.7
1. 3
3.6
1 .2
C. 6
3.2
1 .7
1C.6

3 .6
3.2
2.8
2.6
4.6
4.9
3.9
4.2
6.2
8.3
2.3
7 .2
2.5
C. 9
4.5
3 .6
1 4 .8

5.2
4.7
4. 7
4. 6
7. 5
8.2
7. 4
8.4
11 .0
14. 0
4. 2
13. 1
4.4
1. 7
7 .4
7.4
21 .4

7.3
7.6
7 .6
7.5
11.1
14 .3
13 .3
1 4. 2
18.C
24.9
7.3
21.7
6.9
2.7
11.0
11.2
30.2

1 0. 7
11.4
1 0 .9
11 .7
1 7 .8
22 .0
21.1
2C. 7
27.9
37.9
1 1 .8
3 1 .5
9.8
4.3
15 .0
1 6. 9
38.6

15.2
16.9
1 5 .9
15 .5
24.9
29.1
28.8
27.5
3 7. 8
47 .6
1 7 .5
40 .6
14 .0
6.6
19 .5
23.6
47.1

2 0 .3
24.3
21.6
21.3
32 .7
35 .5
36 .6
3 6 .9
47. 7
5 5 .5
2 4 .2
48 .7
20.5
9.6
25.3
3 3 .5
5 4 .8

26.2
32.1
29.0
27.0
41.3
42 .4
43 .9
47 .3
55.2
60.7
30.5
53.9
28.4
13 .9
33.1
40.8
60.4

31.9
39 .7
36 .6
32 .7
49.6
49.6
50.6
54.8
62.7
66.2
3 6 .9
58.4
3 6. 4
19 .4 1
40.3
49.3
6 5 .1

38.3
47.5
45.8
3 7 .2
58.6
55.7
58.5
61 .8
68.2
70.3
43 .0
62 .7
46.0
26.9
48 .0
55.9
71.2

47 .0
57 .3
55.4
44 .7
66.8
62 .7
65 .3
68 .8
7 4 .2
74.1
49.7
67.3
54.9
38.6
57.4
64.2
76.3

................................................................................................

3.2

4.9

6.8

8 .8

11 .5

1 4. 5

17 .8

2 1 .5

26.1

3 1. 3

37.3

45 .6

53.3l

66.C
!

78.9

RAILROADS .......................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ................................................
TAXICABS .........................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ................................................
AIR TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................

0.4
3.0
7. I
3.4
0.5

C. 6
3.7
23 .1
5.5
0.8

1. 2
4.9
30. 7
8. 1
1.2

1. 8
6. 1
41.2
1C. 4
2.2

2.7
8.3
52 .1
13 .7
3.3

3 .8
10 .4
63.2
17.1
4.9

4.9
13 .1
72.7
21.0
6.7

6.6
16.8 80.6
2 5. 1
10 .3

1 0. 3
22.5
86 .4
29.6
1 4. 5

15.9
27.8
90.1
3 4. 5
19 .0

2 3 .0
35.0
92.7
39.9
24.9

32.9
44 .6
94 .6
4 7 .9
33. 3

45 .C
l
52 .7’
I
96.C
54 .5i
38 .5>

6 4 .1
6 6 .2'
9 6. 2!
67 . 1
5C. 2'

8 4 .9
77 .2
97.2
79.0
63.5

69.2
80.5
79.6
65.2
85.0
80.7
83. 1
87.0
8 7 .6
86.0
68.6
8 0. 6
78.0
65.3
8 2 .8
8 2. 1
87. 1

..................................................................................................

1.6

3. 1

5.5

8. 9

1 3 .4

20.6

28.2

3 7 .2

45 .8

51.5

55.9

60 .3

64 . 1

70 .6i

7 7 .9

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ......................................................................
RADIO AND TELE VI SI ON BROADCASTING ................................................

I.I
5.3

2.5
7.8

5.0
1C. 8

8. 3
14. 5

13 .2
17 .3

21.0
2 1 .4

29.0
27 . 1

3 8 .8
31 .8

48 .0
35.6

53.6
40 .9

57.7
45 .8

61 .9
51.8

6 5 .6.
55 .4-

72.C
l
6 1. 81

79.7
66.5

...........................................................................................

1 .2

1 .9

2.7

5.9

8.6

1 2 .2

16 .0

20.7

26.0

32.3

4 8. 1

59 .5■

72. 1

WHOLESALE TRADE ..............................................................................................

4.3

6.6

9.4

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ..................................
ORUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALL IE D PRODUCTS ......................................
DRY GOODS ANO APPAREL ..................... .....................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ......................................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ......................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ................................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND S UPP LI ES ................................................

3.3
3.8
4.1
6.4
2.5
3.2
2.5

5.8
5.2
6.1
10.2
4.2
4.8
4.1

8.6
7. 4
9.2
1 4. 0
6.3
6.9
6 .1

17. <
5

26 .8

14.2
5.6
2 0 .6
14.5
4.5
16 .3
2 2 .0
23.2
18.0
1 0. 4
21.3
7 .3

2 3 .8
9.7
3 1. 0
23.C
6.9
24.3
3 1. 8
33.6
25.9
15 .5
3 1 .5
1C .9

PUBLIC

RETAIL

U T IL IT IE S

TRADE

.................................; .................................................................

DEPARTMENT STORES ....................................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ....................................................................................
VARIETY STORES ...........................................................................................
GROCERY STORES ...........................................................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ...........................................................................
MEN' S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNI SHINGS ................................
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ...........................................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES .........................................................................
SHOE STORES ..................................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS .......................................................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES .............................................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .............................................................................




3.9

CD

COMMUNICATION

62.5
74.C
73 .3>
58.C
80.2
7 5. 4
77.3
81.5
8 4. 3
82. 1
61.9
7 5. 9
7C.3i
57 .7'
75.5i
7 6. 6i
83 .7'

o

TRANSPORTATION

5 3 . 3.
6 4 .1
63.4
49.5•
7 3. 1
68 . 1
70.6
74.7
7 8 .9'
77.2
54.0>
7 0. 8,
6 1 .1
4 6 .7’
65. 3
l
6 9. 4i
79.5

12.6

17 .2

22.4

28.0

3 3 .9

39.8

45.9

5 .9
1.

59.0

63 .81

70.7’

77.3

11.8
9. 3
15. 1
17.6
9.4
IC.4
8.4

1 6. 4
1 3 .9
21.6
22.7
13 .6
14 .8
12.1

21.2
20 .0
28.9
27.7
1 8 .9
21.9
16 .7

27.4
25.2
35.9
33.0
25.1
27.9
21.6

3 4 .3
30.2
41.1
38.6
3 2 .3
3 5 .0
26.6

41.4
36.9
46.4
43.8
39 .4
41 .5
31.9

4 9 .1
42.3
5 2 .5
49.6
46 .1
47.6
37.4

56.6
67 .0
47 .9
54.6
56.8
62 .7
56.1 • 63.2
'
51 .9
58.4
53.8
61.1
43 .5
5 0. 1

71.5i
5 9. 1
6 5 .6.
6 8 .3;
6 2 .9>
66.0i
55.3

78. 1
6 5. 6i
6 9 .4
76.G
i
6 9 .2
72.7
62.9

8 3 .2
7 2 .3
73.9
83.8
75.8
7 8 .0
7C. 2

3 5 .2

43.8

51.9

58.3

63 .9

68.5

72.7

76.5

80 .0

83.8

86.3

89. 7

92.4

32.9
16 .9
41 .9
31.3
1C.0
31.3
41.7
42.8
34.0
2 1 .2
4C.6
13 .5

44. 2
23. 8
56. 7
3 8 .6
13 .5
38.9
55. 1
55. 3
41.4
27.9
5C. 1
1 7 .6

54.7
32.3
69.3
45.1
1 8. 6
47.6
67.8
67.3
49.3
3 4 .2
59.2
24.4

63.2
41 .3
76.3
50.6
24 .6
54.0
7 6. 1
74.1
55.7
40 .6
66 .0
28.8

69.5
50.8
80.8
55.5
31.0
60.5
81 .9
79.0
60 .7
47 .2
7 0. 1
36.7

7 4 .4
6 0 .1
83.9
60 .4
36.8
64.9
85.5
82.6
65 . 1
53.0
73.4
42.3

77 .9
6 7 .2
86.2
65 .4
4 3 .2
69.6
87.8
85.5
70.4
58.6
75.5
51.1

80.9
72.3
88.6
70.3
49.5
7 2. 4
89.7
87. 1
7 4 .8
63.5
77.9
5 8 .0

83.9
75.8
90.5
74.7
55.5
7 6 .1
90.9
89 .6
78.8
68.3
79.7
64.8

87.0
80 .0
92 .5
79.7
61 .9
81 .4
92.7
92 .3
83.0
74.2
81.6
73.0

89.0
83. 1
93.8i
83. 1
67.C
1
8 4 .2
93.6
9 3 . 6>
86.0
77.1
82.8
77.4

91.8
86. 1
i
95.C
8 8 .0
7 4. 2
88.1
94.7
94.5
8 9 .6.
82.3
85.C
83. 1

93.fi
87.7
95.8
92 .3
80.2
90.2
95.7
9 5 .5
92.8
87.0
8 7. 1
88.4

CUMULATIVE
INDUSTRY
$1800

PRIVATE
FI NANCE*

NONAGRICUITURAL

INSURANCE.

PERCENT D IS T RI B U T I O N OF WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL. EARNINGS
MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAii

$2AOO $3000

$3600

$A2C0

$A8C0

$ 5 4 0 0 |$6000

$6600

$7200

IN THE

INDUSTRY OF

$7800 $ 846 0 $9000 $10000 $11000

ECONOMY---- Continued

AND REAL ESTATE .......................................

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ....................................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ...............................................
PERSONAL CREDIT IN ST ITU TI ONS ..................................................
L I F E INSURANCE .................................................................................
F I RE * MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ................................

71 .4

74.7

79.3

83.5

73.0

78.3

81 . 1

8A . 8

87.4

71.8
73.2
57 .9
59.4

76.2
77.5
62.8
64 .6

78.8
81.1
66 .7
68 .7

81.7
85 .9
72.2
76.2

85 .6
90.6
77.9
83.0

5.2

8.0

11.A

15 .9

23.3

3 2 .3

A 1.5

A9.2

56 .0

61 .6

66 .2

3.0
5. 1
5.6
A .2
1.6

5 .6
7 .A
8.3
6 .1
2.9

9.0
1 0 .6
12.1
8.5
5.3

1 3. 6
15. 6
17 .0
12. 1
9. 3

22.8
23.5
27.A
17 .7
16.9

35 .0
3A . 6
38.A
25.2
2 7 .1

A6.8
AA . 2
A6.7
33.A
36.7

56 .0

63 .2

68 .7

54.0
5A . 5
AO.A
AA.2

60.8
61 .6
4 6 .7
49.7

66.7
67.6
52.8
54.6

....................................................................................................

13.8

19.8

26.2

33. 3

AC.7

A 7. A

5 3 .4

58.8

63.8

68.4

72.6

77.5

80 .7

8A.8

87.8

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ..................................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ..................................
MOTION PICTURES ................................ ..............................................
HOSPITALS .............................. ..............................................................

18. A
13.0
33.0
5.9

28.8
21'. A
A 2. 0
10 .2

39.9
3A . 0
A7.6
1 6. 6

51. A
A8.7
51. 8
26. 8

61.3 61.A
55.6
38.3

69.3
69.2
59.0
A9.3

75.5
74.5
62 .9
58 .4

80 .2
78.7
66 .4
66.1

84.0
81.6
70.9
72.0

86.7
84.7
73.8
7 6 .4

89 .0
87.3
76.6
80 .4

91.3
90 .2
80.7
84.9

92 .7
92.A
83.A
88 .2

94.6
94 .8
87.3
92.2

96.1
96.1
90.1
94 .9

SERVICES




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CUMULATIVE
INDUSTRY
$1800
PRIVATE

NONAGRICULTURAL

$3CC0

$3600

$A2 CO $A800

$5A00

$6000

$6600

$7200

$7800

EARNINGS

$ 8A00

IN

THEIR

$ 9000|$ 1C00C S11CC0

ECONOMY---- Continued

METAL WORKING MACHINERY ....................................................................
S PECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY .............................................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ........................................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ......................................................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...............................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DI ST RI BUTI NG EQUIPMENT ..............................
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ..................................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ..........................................................................
ELECTRIC L I GH TI NG AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ..................................
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT ...............................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ....................................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ....................................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ........................................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ...............................................................................
SHI P AND BOAT B UI L DI NG AND REPAIRING .......................................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ..............................
OTHER MANUFACTURING ............................................................................

TRANSPORTATION

$2ACC

PERCENT D I S TRI BUT ION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL
INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAN

............................................................................................

RAILROADS ....................................................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .............................................
taxicabs
......................................................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE .......................................... . .
AIR TRANSPORTATION ...............................................................................

5.6
5.3
5. 1
A. 3
8.2
8. 1
6.7
7.8
9.2
11 .8
A .5
1C. 7
A.2
2.3
8.3
5.9
1 8 .9

7. 7
7.6
7.3
7. 1
12 .5
11 .6
10. 9
1 1. 5
1 3. 9
17. 7
6. 7
16. 1
6. 2
3.6
12. 1
IC.7
25.8

IC .A
10.9
1 0. 3
10 .1
1 6. 6
17.9
1 7 .0
1 6 .8
20 .8
28.A
1C. 2
2A . 9
8.8
5.0
1 6 .2
IA .3
33.2

l A. A
15 .0
1A . 3
15 .0
22.8
25.9
2 A. 3
23.A
30 .1
A l. 1
1A. 5
3A. 8
12.A
7 .0
20.3
19.3
A 1. 9

18.9
20 .7
19. A
1 8. 8
30.0
32.8
3 2 .0 '
30.6
A 1.0
50.2
1 9 .9
A3.8
1 6 .9
9.A
2A. A
26.7
50 .2

2A .1
28.0
2A .A
2A. 3
37.A
3 9 .1
3 9 .7
AO . 0
50. 1
58.5
26.6
51.7
23.3
12 .9
29.7
35 .9
57.5

3 0. 3
35.7
3 1 .9
29.9
A5.0
A5.7
A6.7
A 9. 9
57.9
6 A. 1
33.0
5 6 .8
3 1. A
17 .2
37.3
A3.3
62.8

35.9
A 3. 0
39.A
3 5 .7
5 3 .1
52.7
53.6
57.A
65 .5
69 .2
39.6
61.3
39.7
23.1
A A. 2
51.7
67.9

6.7

8.9

11. A

1A . 2

1 7. 2

20.5

2A. 2

28.6

1 .5
5.A
28.6
8.3
1 .5

2.2
6.5
36.3
11 .3
2.A

2.8
8. 1
A 6. 3
1A. 2
3 .7

3.7
9.9
56 .3
1 7 .7
5.5

A .8
12.6
66 . A
21.A
7.6

6.A
15 .5
7A .8
25.2
9.A

8.1
19.1
82.5
29. A
13 .0

11 .9
2 A. 8
8 7. 1
33.6
16 .6

2.A
2.2
1.7
1. 6
3.8
2.8
1 .9
3. 1
3.2
A. A
1.3
3.6
I •A
0.7
3.3
2.2
9.8

A. 0
3.5
3 .1
3.0
5.8
5.2
A .3
5 .1
5.6
7 .6
2.7
6.3
2.6
1. 3
5.6
3.5
1A.A

A .5
0.8
A .2
20 .8
5.5
0.9

6A. A
75. 1
7A. 7
6 C. 2
81.6
77. 1
79 .0
82.8
85.0
83.3
63.2
77 .3
72.0
59.6
7 7 .7
78.1
85 . 1

A2.3
50 .6
A8.6
AO.7
62 .0
58.8
61 .0
6A .A
70.3
7 3. 1
A5.7
65 .5
A9.2
30.9
52 .0
58.5
73.2

50.5
60 .0
58.2
A7. A
69 .7
65.3
67.A
70.8
7 5 .8
76.5
51.7
69 .2
57.5
A 1.6
60 .6
66 .5
78.2

33.6

39.6

A7.8

55.3

67.7

80.3

17.A
3C .0
90.5
37.9
21.0

2A . 5
37.0
93.1
A3.0
27.1

3A. 6
A7.5
9A.8
50.6
3A. 5

A7.0
5A . 9
96 .0
57.0
AO. 1

66.3
69.0
96.3
68 .6
51.A

86.8
7 9. 8
97. A
80 .1
6A .5

56 .3
66 ,3
65.5
51.8
75.7
70.5
72.3
76 .9
80 .3
79. 1
55 .7
72.5
63.1
A9.2
67 .7
71.2
81.1

70.A
81.5
8 0 .2
66.9
86.5
81.9
8 A. 3
88.1
88. 1
8 7 .2
69.7
81.7
7 9 .0
66.7
83.9
8 3 .3
8 8 .3

...............................................................................................

2.7

A .8

7.5

1 0. 9

15 .5

2 2 .2

29.7

38.6

A6.9

52.6

56.8

61.1

6A . 8

71.2

7 8 .5

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ....................................................................
RADIO AND T ELE VI SI ON BROADCASTING .............................................

2. A
6.6

A .3
1C. 0

7.0
1 3 .0

1C.5
16. 3

15 .2
20.3

22.A
2A. A

30.3
30.2

39.9
3A . 6

A8.9
3 8 .5

5 A. 5
A3.A

58.A
A8 .7

62.5
5A. 0

66.1
57.6

72.A
63.5

80.2
68. 1

1.9

2.8

5. 5

7.A

10.3

l A. 1

1 7 .9

22.A

27.A

33.7

A2.3

A9.6

60.8

73.3

COMMUNICATION

PUBLIC

UTILITIES

WHOLESALE TRACE

............................................................................... ..
..........................................................................................

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ................................
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ....................................
d r y g o o o s a n o APPAREL ........................................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ....................................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ...................................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ..............................
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .............................................

RETAI L

TRADE

.................................................................................................

12.A

16. C

20.5

25.7

31.3

37. 1

A2.8

A8.6

5A . A

6 1 .1

65.5

72.C

7 8. 3

5.8
5.6
5.6
8.8
A.A
A .8
A .3

9.0
7 .6
8.5
13.1
6.9
7.7
6.5

12 .2
10 .6
12.8
17 .5
10. 1
10 .8
9 .A

16. 1
12. 8
18. 7
2 1 .6
13. A
1A. 7
12.2

20.5
17.A
25.2
26.5
17.9
1 8 .9
15.9

25.3
23.6
3 1 .9
3 1 .7
23.2
25.8
20.A

31.8
28.9
38 .8
36.7
28.9
31.7
25 .3

39 .1
33.6
AA.6
A 1. 9
3 5 .6
38.2
30.3

A6.3
AO. 1
A9.5
A6.9
A2.7
A 5. 0
3 5 .3

5A.1
A5.8
55.1
52.5
A8.8
50.9
A O.5

60 .5
50.6
59 .2
58.5
5 A. 5
57.2
A6.8

69.8
5 7 .1
6A.7
65.6
60.8
63 .6
52.9

73.7
61.1
67 .2
7 0 .3
6 5 .0
68 .0
57.6

79.1
66.9
7 0 .5
77.7
7 0. 8
7A.2
6A . A

83 . 8
7 3 .5
7A. 7
85. 1
7 6 .6
79.A
71.2

20.2

29.A

37.8

A6. 2

5A.0

60.1

65.5

69.8

73.9

77.5

80.8

8A.5

86 .9

90 . 1

92.7

2 7 .0
13 .8
3 A. 7
25.9
9.9
27.3
3A. 9
3 6 .9
31 .C
18.8
3A. 7
13 .2

35.7
2C. A
AA . 5
3A . 0
1 3 .8
3 A. 2
A 5.0
A5.9
38.7
2A . 7
A3.3
16.9

A6.6
26. A
58.9
Al. 1
17 .6
A l. 9
58. 1
58. 1
A5. 6
31.7
5 2 .5
2C. 5

56.5
3 A. 6
7 1 .5
A6.9
22 .7
50.2
69 .9
69.5
53.3
3 7 .7
61.2
27.7

6A .6
A3.8
77.9
5 2 .2
28.A
5 6 .5
7 7. 2
7 6. 2
59. 1
A3.7
67.7
32.1

71 .0
52 .9
81 .8
57.0
3A .2
62. 1
82.7
80.5
63.1
50.7
71 .3
AO.2

75.6
61 .7
8A . 8
61.7
39.8
66.5
8 6 .1
8A . 0
66 .9
56.0
7A . 5
A 6.2

79.1
68 .3
87.0
66 .7
A 6.1
70 .6
88.2
86.5
71.6
61.5
76. A
5A . 6

82.0
73 .5
89.0
71.A
52.0
73.6
90.0
es.3
75.8
65.8
78.5
61 .3

8 A. 9
77.0
90 .8
75.6
57.5
77.5
91.3
90 .3
79.5
70.2
80.3
67.5

87.8
81.9
92 .7
80.6
63 .6
82.3
92.9
92 .9
83.6
75.7
82.0
75. 1

89.6
8A . 2
9A . 0
8A. 0
68 .2
85. 1
93.9
9A.0
86. A
78.3
83.1
79.5

92.2
86.5
95 . 1
88.8
75 . 0
88.7
9A. 9
9A. 8
90.0
83.2
85.2
8A . 2

9A . 1
88 .1
96.0
92.8
80.9
90.7
95.9
95.6
93.0
87.6
87 . 3
88.7

6. 1

DEPARTMENT STORES ................................................................................. 1 7 .2
8.7
MAIL ORDER HOUSES .................................................................................
VARIETY STORES ........................................................................................ 2 A. 5
GROCERY STORES ........................................................................................ 17 .5
6.8
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ........................................................................
MEN* S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS .............................. 1 8 .5
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ............................. .......................... 2 5 . A
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ...................................................................... 2 6 . 5
SHOE STORES ............................................................................................... 2 1 . 8
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS .................................................... 1 3 .5
Dr u g s t o r e s a n d p r o p r i e t a r y s t o r e s ........................................... 2 A . 3
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .......................................................................... 1 0 .0




A. 1

9. C

$1800 $2 4 0 0 |$3000 $3600 $420 0|$4800 $5400 |$6000 $6600 $7200 $7800 $8400

<o

CUMULATIVE PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR QUARTER WORKERS WHOSE ANNUAL EARNINGS IN THEIR
INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNINGS WAS LESS THAN
o
o

INDUSTRY

$10000 $ 110 0 0

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL EC ON OM Y ------ Continued
FINANCE,

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE .........................

6.8

10.2

14 .2

18. 9

26. 1

34.8

43.8

5 1.4

57.9

63.2

67.6

72.5

75 .6

80. 0

84.0

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ........................
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS .............................
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ..............................
LIFE INSURANCE ..............................................
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE .....................

4.6
6.4
8.0
5.8
2.8

7.9
9.9
12.5
8 .7
5.3

1
1
1
1

16. 6
19 .7
22.9
15.6
13.2

25.4
26.4
32.5
2 1.6
20.3

37.2
36.8
42.5
29.1
29.9

49
4 6
50
37
39

.0
.7
.4
.0
.0

57.9
55.5
58.1
44.0
46.1

6
6
6
4
5

4 .7
2.0
4.8
9 .7
1.5

70.0
6 7 .7
70.1
55.0
56.3

74 .1
72.6
75.2
5 9.7
60.8

79 .
7 7 .
79 .
64.
65.

8 1
79
82
68
6 9

.7
.8
.5
.0
.7

85.3
82.6
86.7
73.0
76 .9

8 7 .7
86. 1
9 1.4
78.6
8 3.7

15.2

21.6

28.0

35. 0

42.3

48.9

54.8

60.1

65.0

69.5

73 .7

78 .3

8 1.4

85.4

88.3

23.6
15.6
37.2
7 .7

33.9
24 .7
45.2
12.6

45.0
37.0
50.0
19 .2

55. 8
51.2
54. 5
29.2

65.3
63.5
58.1
4C.6

7
7
6
5

79 .0
76 .4
66.7
6C.2

8
8
6
6

86.2
82.8
74 .0
73.2

88.5
85.6
76.9
77 .5

90
88
79
8 1

9
9
8
8

93.5
93.0
85.5
88.9

95. 1
95.2
88.2
92.8

96.4
96.4
91.5
95.3

^FftyirFs

. . ......................................................................................................................... r .....................................................

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS .......................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .........................
M D f I DM

PIPTIJHFS

____________________________________ ____ _______ ______. . . . .

HOSPITALS ....................................................




1 .7
3 .7
7 .3
1 .8
9 .1

2.9
1 .4
2.1
1.3

2.9
0.0
9.7
7.6

.4
.0
.6
.4

1
1
3
2
5

2.3
0.9
2.5
5 .7

So me e ar n i n g s in in du st r y

I

N

D

U

S

T

R

Pe rcent

Numbe r

P
M

R

I
C
O

N
R

O
H
H
P
P
E
M
C
R
C

I
E
L
A
A
O
O

A
L

A
U
S
R
O
N

A

N
D

T

T
H
I
E

G

W

Y

A

N

C

P
F

T ..
N
R
E
N
I
N
R . E.

N

.

.

E

.
T

D
C.

Y
I

T
C

N

A

B

N

.
P

R

V
M
O

E

E
A

N
G

V

I
U
L

I

C

I

.

G

I
R.
Y
T
G
.T .

A
. N.
,

.O

G
N
. I.
,

G
.C .
E

E.

.

,
A.

..R .
A .
. .

.

R

. T . . . . . . . . C. . .
C

O
.

.

A

A
.

L

G

.

.

E

.

.N .

N . .O . . .
. S . . T . R.
H
E
P
. L . . . .
S
.T . O .
I. . N . . G .
.N . D . . .
W. . O . . R .

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ....
MEAT PRODUCTS ...........................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ..........................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS .......
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ....................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .........................
BEVERAGES ................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON ..................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ..............
KNITTING MILLS ..........................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ..................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS .......
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ............
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ........ .
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ..
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ...................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ............
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE .................... .
PULP AND PAPER MILLS .................. .
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND B O X E S .......
n e w s p a p e r s ...............................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ................... .
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS .................. .
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .....
DRUGS ........................ ............
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET G O O D S ......
PETROLEUM REFINING ......................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ................. .
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ................. .
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ...... ...... .
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ...............
NCNFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING .......
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, ANO HARDWARE .....
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS .
,
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ...
METAL STAMPINGS ........................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ..................
FARM MACHINERY .........................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ...

.

.S .

.S .
. U.
A
A
W. .
. N .
. .
. S.
K. .

.

.

E
.

T. . R .
. C . .T
T
I
P
E
O . R. .
.E . W
.A . N.
. H . .E
. . .

.

873

.

.

R.

L
.

.E .
. I.
N
R
K . .
O
.D .
. E.
. .

D
.U

.

843
974,
.
681
256
H
489
. .
471
,
. 248
F .
. 267
.
. 239
.

T
.N
.

R
K
. .
.T .
. .

,

25, 320
235
553
335
711
198
424
394
320
116
3 84
208
194
572
644
195
130
349
279
486
307
326
486
499
404
251
193
190
180
125
259
308
177
355
745
320
247
230
683
148
321
135
186
401

T

.

.

.

.

T

.

E

.I

. O

L

. 1. . 1 .

.
R

U

S
.

N u m b e j-

R100.0
A

U

.

A

. 5, .843 . T
C .

E
.O .
G
.

L

168
N
213

,

I
.T

79,326
C
U

I

M

F
.

R

U

S
.O

MANUFACTURING ..................... ........




N

O

M a j o r p r o po r ti o n of t he ir e a r ni n gs i n this i n du s t r y

Y

. A2
.3
V

N

E
.

.

.

.

C
.

A

.

O

N.

.

.

I

G
C

E

.3
. 7
.4
.9
.2
.5
.5
.4
. 1
.5
.3
.2
. 7
.8
.2
.2
.4
.4
.6
.4
.4
.6
.6
.5
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
. 3•
.4
.2
.4
.9
.4
.3
.3
.9
.2
.4
.2
.2
.5

.

.

S

O
.

149
S
150

A

.

.

.

A
.

.

Y 100. 0

M
.

.

N

.

.

.

.

C

T
D
D
.

A
R

.

E
.

.

K

S
.

574
I
600
498
I
184 C
401
299
T
148
166
117
.

100.0

.9
.

.

.2
.2
.

D
.

4, 805

I

31.9

N

74. 5

.

7 .4

R

L

1. 1 T
N
S
R
U
. E . C1.2
.9
R
C
O
N
A
N
G
I
N . 3“G
,
. . . . . . . .. 6 . . . . . .
A
N
D .6
P
L
.L . O . . O
R
I.3 N
G
M
E
T
A
L .3
W
O
. . . . . . . .. 3. . . . . .

.

79,326
O

C

P e r c e n t of
w o r k e r s who had
s o me e ar n i n g s in
the i n du st r y

Percen t

.

.

.

L
.

.

.

I

.

.

.

Q

.

.

.

.

U
.

.

.

6. 1

O

N

T

I

O

O
E
.

N

R
R

I

A
I

T
N

.7
..7
.6
. 2I
.5
.4
G
.2
.2
.2

24, 054

30. 3

215
433
275
553
160
334
311
296
99
335
170
175
496
558
170
106
273
209
378
283
262
415
423
394
235
181
160
173
121
219
2 66
155
256
725
271
220
194
502
122
271
130
161
341

.3
.5
.3
. 7
.2
.4
.4
.4
. 1
.4
.2
.2
.6
.7
.2
. 1
.3
.3
.5
.4
. 3
.5
.5
.5
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
.3
.2
.3
.9
.3
.3
.2
.6
.2
.3
.2
.2
.4

85.3 .
.

.

88. 7 D
I
70. 2
. .

.

.

S
.

.

.

82. 2

N

G
N

.
G

6 8. 0
61.5
73. 1
.
. 72.2
.
81 .9
63 .5
59 .5
62 .4
48. 7

95 . 0
91. 1
78. 2
82.0
77. 7
8 0. 6
7 9. 0
79.0
89 .4
85. 6
87. 3
82.2
89 .9
86. 7
86.6
87. 1
81.2
78.3
74 .9
77 .6
9 2. 2
80. 5
85 .3
84.7
9 7. 5
93. 8
93 .3
83. 7
96. 1
97 .3
84. 6
86. 3
87. 6
71.9
97 .5
84. 7
88. 9
84. 3
73 .4
82. 8
84. 7
95. 7
86. 5
85. 3

.

.
.

.

.

So me ear ni ngs in i n du st r y

M a j o r p ro po r ti on o f t heir e a r ni n gs in this i n du st r y

INDUSTRY
N u m be r

Pe rcent

N u m be r

Percent

P e r c e n t of
w o r k e r s who had
s o me e a r ni n gs in
the i n du st r y

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL. E C ON OM Y-- Continued
METAL WORKING MACHINERY .................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ..............
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ............
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ..........
SERVICE INOUSTRY MACHINES ...............
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ........
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES .....................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT .......
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT .................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ..
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ............
AIRCRAFT ANC PARTS .......................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ...
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES
OTHER MANUFACTURING ......................
TRANSPORTATION
RAILROADS ......................... .
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION
TAXICABS .......................... .
TRUCKING* LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE
AIR TRANSPORTATION ............... .
COMMUNICATION ....................... ,
TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ........ .
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
WHOLESALE TRADE
MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ..
DRY GOODS ANO APPAREL ....................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS .........
ELECTRICAL GOODS .........................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ......
RETAIL TRADE ................................
DEPARTMENT STORES ........................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ........................
VARIETY STORES ............................
GROCERY STORES ............................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ....................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ............
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ...................
SHOE STORES ...............................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS .........
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES .....
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS .....................




.4
.3
.4
.4
.2
.3
.3
.3
.3
.2
.7
.5
1.3
1.0
.3
.2
.3

86. 9
87.2
88. 1
93. 8
83. 1
90. 1
91 .2
90 .4
84.0
82. 1
93 . 4
86. 2
93 .7
95 . 9
76 .6
91.2
75. 7

400
264
390
374
220
250
268
258
274
212
635
502
1, 136
802
274
132
300

.5
.3
.5
.5
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.8
.6
1. 4
1. 0
.3
.2
.4

347
231
343
351
182
226
244
233
230
175
594
432
1,064
770
209
120
227

4, 045

5. 1

3, 349

718
221
‘ 239
1,633
365

.9
.3
.3
2. 1
.5

714
192 '
142
1, 207
357

.9
.3
.2
1.5
.5

99 .5
87. 1
59.3
73.9
98 .0

1,369

1. 7

1, 307

1. 6

95 .4

1,099
198

1.4
.2

1,091
154

1.4
.2

99. 1
77.9

4.2

82.8

879

1. 1

846

1. 1

96 .2

6, 141

7. 7

4, 921

6. 2

80. 1

632323
254
1,005
394
251
1,073

.8
.4
.3
1.3
.5
.3
1. 4

494
262
200
761
324
192
887

.6
.3
.3
. 1
.4
.2
1. 1

78. 1
81.2
78.9
75. 7
82. 3
76. 6
82. 7

18,800

23. 7

15,458

19. 5

82. 2

2, 522
249
641
2, 540
1, 088
267
549
283
299
471
758
150

3. 2
.3
.8
3. 2
1. 4
.3
. 7
.4
.4
.6
1.0
.2

1,867
198
484
2, 044
890
191
416
208
208
344
591
113

2.4
.2
.6
2. 6
1. 1
.2
.5
.3
.3
.4
.7
. 1

74 .0
79.5
75. 5
80. 5
81 . 8
71 .7
75. 8
73. 1
69.7
73.0
77. 9
75.3

W o r k e r s that had
M a j o r p ro po r ti on of t hei r e a r ni n gs in this i n du st r y

S om e e ar n i n g s in i n d u st r y

INDUSTRY
N u mb e r

Pe rcent

N u m be r

j
]

Pe rcen t
_________________________________

P e r c e n t of
w o r k e r s who had
s o me e ar n in g s in
the i ndu st r y

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ---- Continued

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE
COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ......
PERSONAL CREOIT INSTITUTIONS .......
LIFE I N S U R A N C E .......................
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE

5, 239

6.6

4, 495

5., 7

85. 8

1,206
44
135
249
706
479

1.5
. 1
.2
.3
.9
.6

1,

150
40
123
199
618
449

1..4
,1
,2
.3
,8
.6

9 5 .4
90. 6
9 1. 0
80 .0
87.5
9 3 .6

87.3

SERVICES ............................... .

22,165

27 .9

19, 347

24.,4

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .
MOTION PICTURES .....................
HOSPITALS ............................

1, 484
810
296
2, 738

1.9
1.0
.4
3. 5

036
650
194
2,, 578

1., 3
,8
,2
3,. 2




1,

69 .8
80. 1
65 .5
94. 2

M a j o r por ti on o f their e a r n in g s in this in du st r y

So me ear nings in the i ndu st r y

T otal

Men

Wome n

Total

Men

Women

T otal

Men

3, 792

661

54

29

27

2

119
137

25
9

6
4

4
4

-

4, 306

024

283

499

482

16

472
500
435
167
356
223
129
139
89

30
24
39
8
31
11
9
10
9

71
76
23
9
14
65
10
17
29

69
74
22
8
12
64
10
17
23

2
2
1
1
1
1

1
1

502
524
475
176
386
233
138
149
93

852

21, 488

14, 707

6, 781

2, 567

1, 769

797

196
347
258
479
140
289
273
231
86
302
144
153
437
505
155
90
220
183
324
264
228
397
392
3 64
215
163
141
162
109
197
256
140
219
626
198
199
176
457
114
235
120
151
318

147
246
205
248
114
207
229
133
52
91
72
43
74
84
21
12
203
155
232
230
167
267
270
313
168
97
84
138
96
125
89
89
204
588
184
166
113
401
87
181
102
132
282

49
101
54
232
26
83
44
98
34
210
72
110
363
422
133
79
16
28
92
35
61
130
122
51
47
65
59
23
12
72
166
51
15
39
13
33
64
58
27
56
18
19
37

8, 708

4 ,91 7

3, 792

70,618

42, 214

M I N I N G ............................................

837

775

61

37

35

2

716

C RUDE PETROL E U M , N A T U R A L GAS AND L I Q U I D S
OIL AND GAS F I ELD S E R V I C E S ...............

161
209

135
196

26
12

7
5

6
5

1

144
146

5, 186

4, 837

349

657

633

24

728
848
635
241
466
365
233
235
186

694
817
586
230
430
351
221
222
180

36
31
49
11
37
14
12
13
7

114
127
46
14
23
106
15
32
54

112
124
44
13
19
104
15
31
53

2
2
2
1
2
2

22,508

15,523

6, 985

2, 812

1,958

214
441
311
610
171
357
338
254
97
341
176
168
502
579
176
111
280
240
415
285
278
461
458
370
228
173
167
168
111
229
294
160
301
640
235
222
208
619
138
277
125
173
3-75

163
319
247
338
152
257
287
151
61
113
93
50
95
104
26
16
259
208
306
248
208
316
313
318
179
105
100
142
98
148
115
107
283
600
220
186
140
551
107
214
107
152
334

51
122
64
273
29
101
51
103
36
229
83
118
407
476
150
94
20
33
110
37
70
145
144
52
49
68
67
25
13
81
179
53
18
39
16
37
67
68
31
62
18
22
40

22
112
23
101
28
66
55
66
19
42
32
26
70
65
19
18
69
38
71
22
48
24
41
35
23
20
23
12
13
31
14
17
55
106
85
25
22
64
10
44
11
13
25

...................

H I G H W A Y AND STREET C O N S T R U C T I O N .........
H E A V Y C O N S T R U C T I O N , NEC ...................
PLUMBING, H EATING, AIR C O N D I T I O N I N G ....
P A I NTING, PAPER H ANGING, D E C O R A T I N G ....
E L E C T R I C A L WORK .............................
MASONRY, STO N E W O R K , AND P L A S T E R I N G .....
C A R P E N T E R I N G AND F L O O R I N G .................
R O O F I N G AND SHEET METAL WORK .............
C O N C R E T E W O R K ................................
MANUFACTURING

■J
n
00

..........................................................

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS . . . .
MEAT PRODUCTS .....................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ................................................... .
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ............ .
GRAIN M ILL PRODUCTS ........................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .................................................
BEVERAGES ..........................................................
WEAVING M I L L S , COTTON ................................... .
WEAVING M I LL S , SYNTHETICS ..........................
K NITTI NG MILLS ...................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ....................................
MEN' S AND BOYS' S UI TS AND C O A T S ............ .
MEN' S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS .....................
WOMEN'S AND M I S S E S ' OUTERWEAR ..................
WOMEN'S AND C HI L DR EN 'S UNDERGARMENTS .,
C HI L DRE N' S OUTERWEAR ................................... ..
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MI LLS .......................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ........................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ..................................... .
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND B O X E S ............ .
NEWSPAPERS ............................................................ .
COMMERCIAL PR INT IN G ....................................... .
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ..................................... .
PLASTI CS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS . . . . .
DRUGS .........................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ...........
PETROLEUM RE FI NI NG .......................................... .
T IRES AND INNER TUBES ................................... .
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ................................... .
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER .............................. .
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN ,
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ............................ .
NCNFERROUS ROLLING AND D R A W I N G .............. .
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE . . . . .
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS .,
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC . . . .
METAL STAMPINGS ................................................. .
ENGINES AND TURBINES ..................................... .
FARM MACHINERY ................................................... .
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY . . . .




15
74
20
53
24
50
51
45
13
16
18
8
13
14
3
2
67
33
54
19
37
18
26
32
17
13
14
10
12
21
6
11
53
101
83
20
15
59
8
37
10
12
24

Women

4, 917

28,404

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

Men

To tal

8, 708

42, 214

ECONOMY

Women

28, 404

70,618

PR I V A T E N O N A G R I C U L T U R A L

Negro

White

Negro

White

_

7
39
4
48
8
16
4
21
6
26
14
19
57
51
16
16
3
6
17
3
11
7
15
3
5
7
9
2
1
10
9
6
2
4
2
5
7
7
2
8
2
2
2

19
86
16
73
20
46
37
56
14
34
27
22
59
53
15
14
54
•'26
54
18
35
18
31
30
20
17
17
11
12
23
11
14
36
100
73
21
18
44
8
35
10
11
22

12
522
13
36
17
33
35
37
10
12
13
5
9
12
2
2
51
22
39
16
26
12
19
27
15
12
11
9
12
15
3
9
35
95
71
16
12
38
7
30
9
10
20

1

-

1
1

7
35
3
37
2
12
3
19
5
21
12
16
50
41
13
13
2
5
13
2
8
6
12
3
5
6
8
2
1
8
8
6
1
4
2
5
6
6
1
6
1
1
2

Wo rke rs that had
So me ea r ni n gs in the i n du st r y

M a j o r p or ti on of their e ar ni ngs in this i n du st r y

INDUSTRY
White
Total
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL

M en

Neg ro
Women

T otal

M en

White
Women

To tal

Men

N eg ro
Women

T o ta l

M en

Wome n

ECONOMY---- Continued

385
250
364
353
204
228
254
232
242
183
586
462
970
749
232
123
266

328
215
299
247
168
146
166
166
137
90
374
216
846
626
213
76
168

58
35
65
105
36
82
87
65
105
91
212
246
125
124
18
47
98

15
14
26
22
16
22
14
26
32
31
49
39
165 '
53
43
9
34

12
12
22
12
14
14
9
17
18
12
22
12
148
42
40
5
20

2
2
4
10
2
8
5
9
13
18
28
27
17
11
2
4
12

334
219
322
332
169
206
233
210
207
151
551
401
94
722
178
112
205

283
188
361
233
138
130
150
151
113
72
349
182
793
603
162
67
122

52
31
61
99
32
76
83
61
92
79
202
219
118
117
15
46
83

12
12
22
19
13
19
12
22
24
24
43
32
154
49
32
8
22

11
10
18
11
12
12
7
14
13
9
18
9
136
38
30
4
12

2
2
4
9
2
8
5
9
11
15
25
23
16
10
2
4
10

..............................................................................

3, 555

3, 091

464

490

454

37

2, 981

2, 572

409

368

338

31

RAILROADS ................................................... .................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ..............................

659
176
197
1,446
343

619
160
181
1,316
238

40
16
15
130
105

59
45
43
186
22

57
41
40
179
16

2
5
3
8
5

657
148
119
1, 088
336

616
135
107
981
234

41
13
12
107
102

57
44
23
119
21

55
39
21
113
16

3
5
1
6
5

METAL WORKING MACHINERY ....................................................
SPECI AL INDUSTRY MACHINERY .............................................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY .........................................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .......................................
SERVICE INOUSTRY MACHINES ................................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DI S TR IB UT IN G EQUIPMENT ..............
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ..................................
HOUSEHOLD APPLI ANCES ...........................................................
ELECTRIC L I GH TI NG AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ..................
RADIO AND TV REC EI VI NG EQUIPMENT ................................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ....................................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES .....................
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT .........................................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ................................................................
SHI P AND BOAT B UI LDI NG AND REPAIRI NG .......................
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES ..............
OTHER MANUFACTURING .............................................................

TRANSPORTATION

TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ..............................
AIR TRANSPORTATION ................................................................

................................................................................

1, 233

613

620

136

39

97

1, 183

582

601

123

34

90

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION ....................................................
RADIO AND T EL EV I SI ON BROADCASTING ..............................

988
184

432
135

551
48

116
14

26
11

90
4

982
143

435
108

547
36

109
11

24
8

84
3

806

680

126

72

61

4

784

660

123

62

52

10

5, 547

4, 137

1,410

595

482

112

4, 504

3, 314

1, 191

417

329

88

584
296
224
876
365
230
1,006

477
203
124
648
252
174
768

108
93
100
229
113
56
238

48
27
30
129
29
21
67

45
19
16
104
20
18
56

4
7
13
25
8
3
12

461
244
179
675
303
180
839

371
161
99
489
209
134
638

91
83
80
185
93
46
202

33
18
21
86
21
12
48

29
12
11
66
14
11
39

3
6
11
19
7
3
9

17, 102

9, 197

7, 905

1, 699

985

713

14,191

7, 216

6, 975

1, 266

690

577

2, 282
199
591
2, 351
996
245
501
260
279
423
702
138

778
74
141
1,513
862
151
63
76
163
294
287
112

1, 504
125
450
838
135
94
437
184
115
129
416
26

240
50
50
188
91
22
49
23
20
48
56
12

97
17
17
134
86
13
12
10
13
37
31
11

143
33
33
55
5
9
37
13
7
12
26
1

1, 709
160
451
1,906
823
177
381
190
194
313
553
108

514
57
97
1, 196
709
106
40
50
108
109
219
85

195
102
354
710
114
71
341
141
86
104
333
23

158
38
32
137
66
14
35
17
13
31
38
6

57
12
11
95
63
9
7
7
9
22
20
6

101
28
23
42
4
7
28
11
6
9
18
1

COMMUNICATION

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S
WHOLESALE TRADE

.........................................................................
...........................................................................

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT ................
ORUGS, CHEMI CALS, AND A LL IE D PRODUCTS .....................
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .........................................................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PROOUCTS ....................................
ELECTRICAL GOODS ....................................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT ..............
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SU PP LI E S ..............................

RETAIL

TRADE

..................................................................................

DEPARTMENT STORES ..................................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ..................................................................
VARIETY STORES .........................................................................
GROCERY STORES ................... ......................................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS .........................................................
MEN* S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND F U R N I S H I N G S .............. *
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES .........................................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES .......................................................
SHOE STORES ................................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNI SHINGS ....................................
DRUG STORES ANO PROPRIETARY STORES ...........................
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ...........................................................




W o r k e r s that had
M a j o r por ti on o f th ei r e a r n in g s in this i n d u st r y

So me e ar ni ngs in the i n du st r y
INDUSTRY

W om e n

Total

Men

214

4, 132

2, 938

31
5
6
27
5

58
3
5
30
20

1 ’ 073
117
192
569
428

3, 444

1, 377

2, 068

16,338

288
215
19
471

126
64
13
127

162
151
6
344

828
473
183
2, 148

Men

..............................

4, 752

2, 363

2, 390

486

272

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ............................
SAVINGS AND LOAN A SS OCI AT ION S ........................................
PERSONAL CREDIT I N ST I T U T I O N S ..........................................
L I F E INSURANCE ............................................... ...........................
F I R E , MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE .......................

1, 118
127
238
650
454

381
39
1-13
384
186

736
88
125
265
267

88
8
11
57
26

.............................................................................................

18,728

8, 331

10,390

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ..........................
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ..............................
MOTION PICTURES ........................................................................
HOSPITALS ................................... ..................................................

1, 195
595
277
2, 267

577
220
168
487

619
375
109
1,780

PRIVATE

FI NANCE*

SERVICES

NONAGRICULTURAL

INSURANCE,




AND REAL

To tal

Men

To tal

Negro

White

Negro

White

Women

W o me n

To tal

Men

Women

ECONOMY---- C on ti nued

ESTATE

194

364

181

183

708
81
104
241
251

77
6
8
49
21

25
3
3
22
4

52
3
5
27
17

6, 548

9, 790

3, 009

1,011

1, 998

381
163
108
426

448
309
75
723

208
177
12
430

81
44
8
100

127
133
4
330

365
37
88
32fT
177

T
SOME E A R N I N G S IN THIS
I NDUSTRY D URING

INDUSTRY
ANY
QTR
PR I V A T E N O N A G R I C U L T U R A L

ECONOMY .....

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTR S

100.0

10.0

11.5

11.8

T

H

FOUR
QTRS
66.5

n r r — 0 F
W O R K T T s
T H A 1
i
—
Fn\ u
M AJOR P R O P O R T I O N OF T HEIR E A R N I N G S IN THI S I N D USTRY AND WORK E D
IN ANY I N D U S T R Y D U R I N G
IN THIS I N D USTRY D U R I N G
ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

100.0

10.0

11.5

11.8

FOUR
QTRS
66.5

ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

100.0

10.0

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTR S

FOUP
QTRi

11.5

11.8

66.5

............................................

100.0

19.4

15.0

9.8

55. 6

100.0

5.8

7.9

9. 5

76.7

100.0

8.2

11.8

11.2

68.7

C R U D E P E T ROLEUM, N A T U R A L GAS AND LIQUIDS.
OIL AND GAS F I E L D SER V I C E S ................

100.0
100.0

14.4
32.3

13.6
20.1

5 .9
12.2

6 5.9
35. 2

100.0

100.0

4.5
9.6

7.1
11.6

5.2
13.2

83.0
65.4

100.0
100.0

5.6
14.6

10.6
16.9

6.5
16.0

77.1
52.3

100.0

23.3

18.5

13.8

44.2

100.0

9.3

11.9

14.3

64.4

100.0

12.0

15.5

15.9

56.5

H I G H W A Y AND S T R E E T C O N S T R U C T I O N .......... 100.0
H E A V Y C O N S T R U C T I O N , NEC .................... 100.0
P L U MBING, H E A TING, AIR C O N D I T I O N I N G ..... 100.0
P A I NTING, PA P E R H A N GING, D E C O R A T I N G ..... 100.0
E L E C T R I C A L WORK .............................. 100.0
M ASONRY, S T O N E W O R K , ,A N D PLASTE R I N G ...... 100.0
C A R P E N T E R I N G AND F L O O R I N G .................. 100.0
R O O F I N G AND S H E E T M E TAL WORK .............. 100.0
C O N C R E T E W O R K ................................. 100.0

33.1
36.2
27.0
32.3
21.0
35.6
41.4
40.5
44.1

21.4
23.5
17.7
22.4
14.7
20.4
21. 1
18.9
21.9

14.9
13.1
10. 7
14.8
lu.l
12.7
11.4
10.6
13.7

30.4
27.0
44.4
30.2
54.0
31.2
25. 3
29.9
2 0.0

100.0

12.0
11.9
8.4
15.4
8.0
12.0
13.1
13.6
12.7

18. 1
14.9
10.0
18.2
9.4
15.0
15.9
11.8
18.9

60.9
64.1
74.9
53.7
76.3
62.6
56.9
62.6
56.4

100.0

10 0 . 0

8.8
8.9
6.6
12.5
6. 1
10.1
13.9
11.7
11.8

13.0
14.0
9.9
16.5
8.4
13.9
18.6
17.9
16.9

19.0
21.1
13.2
20.8
11.1
17.3
19. 7
16.5
19.6

20.7
18.8
13.1
19.1
11.4
17.7
17.5
14.7
22.7

47.2
45.9
63. 6
4 3.3
68.8
50.9
44.0
50.7
40.5

100.0

13.6

12.4

10.4

63.4

100.0

6.6

8.3

9.9

75.0

100.0

8.0

10.3

10.9

70.6

AMMU N I T I O N , E X C E P T FOR SMALL ARMS ........ 100.0
MEAT P R O D U C T S ................................. 100.0
DA I R Y P R O D U C T S ................................ 1 0 0 . 0
CANN E D , C URED, ANO F R O Z E N FOODS .......... 100.0
G R A I N MILL P R O D U C T S ......................... 100.0
B A K E R Y P R O D U C T S ............ .................. 100.0
B E V E R A G E S ...................................... 100.0
W E A V I N G MILLS, C O T T O N ....................... 100.0
W E A V I N G MILLS, S Y N T H E T I C S .................. 100.0
100.0
Y A R N AND T H R E A D M I L L S ................ ..... 100.0
ME N ' S AND BOYS' S U ITS AND C OATS .......... 100.0
M E N ' S AND BOYS' F U R N I S H I N G S ............... 100.0
W O M E N ' S AND M I S SES' O U T E R W E A R ............. 100.0
W O M E N ' S AND C H I L D R E N ' S U N D E R G A R M E N T S .... 100.0
C H I L D R E N ' S O U T E R W E A R ........................ 100.0
S A W M I L L S AND P L A N I N G MILLS ................ 100.0
MILL W O R K , P L Y W O O D A N D RE L A T E D PRODU C T S .. 100.0
H O U S E H O L D F U R N I T U R E ......................... 100.0
PULP AND P APER MIL L S ........................ 100.0
P A P E R B O A R D C O N T A I N E R S AND BOXES .......... 1 0 0 . 0
newspapers
....................................
100.0
C O M M E R C I A L P R I N T I N G ......................... 1 0 0 . 0
INDUST R I A L C H E M I C A L S ........................ 1 0 0 . 0
P L A S T I C S M A T E R I A L S AND SYNTH E T I C S ........ 100.0
DR U G S ........................................... 100.0
SOAP, CLEAN E R S , AND TOILET GOODS ......... 100.0
P E T R O L E U M R E F I N I N G ..........................
100.0
TI R E S AND INNER TUBES ....................... 100.0
O T H E R RUB B E R P R O D U C T S ......................
100.0
FOOTW E A R , EXCE P T R U B B E R .................... 100.0
GL A S S AND GLAS S W A R E , P R E SSED OR B L OWN ... 100.0
c o n c r e t e , g y p s u m , AND P LASTER PRODU C T S .. 100.0
B LAST F U R N A C E AND BASIC STEEL PRODU C T S .. 100.0
IRON AND STEEL F O U N D R I E S ................... 100.0
N C N F E R R O U S R O L L I N G AND D RAWING ........... 100.0
C U T LERY, H A N D TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ........ loo.o
F A B R I C A T E D S T R U C T U R A L METAL PRO D U C T S .... 100.0
S C R E W M A C H I N E PR O D U C T S , BOLTS, ETC ...... 100.0
m e t a l s t a m p i n g s ..............................
100.0
EN G I N E S AND T U R B I N E S ........................ 100.0
FARM M A C H I N E R Y ...............................
100.0
C O N S T R U C T I O N AND R E L A T E D MACHI N E R Y ...... 100.0

18.7
28.8
20.8
38.1
25.3
26.0
24.1
16.6
17.8
21.2
24.3
17.7
22.2
21.8
22.0
26.5
26.4
29.1
27.6
13.0
25.3
17.6
19.4
8.6
11.8
14.1
23.0
10.6
10.3
21.3
23.2
19.6
28.9
9.2
20.5
15.9
20.4
27.8
21.7
19.7
10.2
19.5
18.2

11.8
16.0
17.0
24.1
14.1
15. 1
16.3
12.9
15.5
15.6
15.7
11.5
15.9
15.6
16.4
17.0
17.3
19.1
17.3
11.5
14.7
13. 7
15.2
8.6
11.4
9.8
15.5
8.2
10.1
13.8
14.1
15.0
18.0
8.3
13. 1
12.9
13.1
17. 1
14.1
14.7
10. 1
12.9
12.0

8.9
10.6
10.5
10.2
6.2
9.4
9.4
9.6
9.8
10.6
12.0
11.1
12.2
12.2
11.4
11.5
11.1
9.2
9.0
7.5
8.2
10.2
10.6
6.5
6.7
8.3
9.2
6.7
5.8
10.9
12.4
10.3
10.3
7.0
8.9
8.2
9.4
9.8
10.1
8.0
8.0
11.6
7.5

60.5
44.4
51.5
27. 4
32.2
49.3
50. 0
60. 7
56. 8
52.5
47. 2
59. 5
4 9.5
50.3
50.0
4 4.8
45.0
42.5
45.9
67.9
51. 7
5.8.3
54.6
76.0
6 9.8
6 7.6
32.1
74.2
73.7
53. 7
50. 1
34. 9
42.4
73.2
57.3
62.8
36.9
4 5.1
54.0
56. 7
71.3
55.8
62.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

7.2
10.2
6.4
20.2
7.2
7.8
5.6
4.8
4.5
8.0
6.7
6.1
9.3
9.6
9.2
11.5
9.6
8.4
8.5
3. 7
5.6
7.2
5.9
2.3
3.0
3.9
8.2
3.0
2.8
6.2
8.8
5.5
6. 1
3.3
4.6
3.9
5.6
5.9
5.6
4.8
3.0
7.0
3.8

7.7
10.0
9.8
21.6
8.3
8.4
8.2
6.8
7.3
10.4
8.5
8.2
10.8
10.9
12.0
9.6
10.3
10.5
10.0
4.9
8.6
8.1
9.1
3.9
5.3
5.9
8.9
4.0
4.4
8.3
9.1
8.7
8.8
4.6
6.8
6.5
6.7
8.6
7.8
8.3
5.7
7.0
5.3

8. 6
12.5
9.8
14.5
8.2
9.2
10.1
9.4
8.3
10.8
13.4
10.7
13.3
12.7
12.2
14.7
12.3
11.5
11.0
6.4
9. 1
9.8
10.0
5.4
5.6
6.9
9.2
5.4
5.6
12.0
12.7
12.9
10.8
6.5
8.2
7. 5
10.2
9. 7
9. 7
8.9
6.9
10.9
5.8

76.3
67.2
73.8
43.5
76.2
74.4
75.9
78.9
79.7
70.7
71.2
74.8
66.3
66.7
66.3
63.9
67.7
69.3
70.2
84.7
76.5
74.7
74.7
88.3
85.9
83.1
73.5
87.5
87.0
73.3
69.2
72.7
74.2
85.4
80.2
81.9
77.3
75.6
76.7
77.7
84.2
74.9
84.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

9.3
13.6
8.4
25.5
10.5
10. 1
9.2
7. 0
6.9
10.6
10.0
7.8
11.6
11.9
11.5
14.2
12.1
11.8
11.8
5.2
9.6
8.8
8.2
3.3
4.5
5.8
10.9
3.9
4.6
8. 1
11.7
8.7
9.6
4.3
7.3
6.0
7.9
9.4
9.1
7.5
4.5
9.8
5.9

9.9
13.6
13.9
24.4
11.1
12.7
12. 5
10.0
11.4
13.3
13.0
9.6
13. 6
12.6
14.0
14. 1
14. 1
16.5
14.2
8.4
12.4
11.1
12.2
6.3
8.4
7.9
12.0
6.9
7.6
11.3
11.7
13.3
14.9
6.7
10.3
9.8
9.6
13.6
10.9
11.5
8.1
8.8
8.3

10. 1
13.1
11.9
12.8
10.2
11.2
11.3
10.9
11.0
12.5
14.9
12.1
14. 3
13.9
13.0
14. 1
13.2
12.2
11.1
8.1
10. 1
10.4
11.6
6.9
7.3
9.1
11.1
7.0
6.2
13. 3
14.3
12.2
13.7
7.2
10.2
9.9
11.4
12.5
11.2
9.7
8.3
13.0
8.6

70.4
59.6
6 5.6
37. 1
67. 9
65.8
66.8
71.9
70.4
63.4
61.8
70.2
60.3
61.3
61.3
57.4
60.4
59.3
62.6
7 8.1
67.7
69.5
67.9
83.3
79. 6
76.9
65.9
82.1
81.3
66.5
62.2
65.6
61.7
81.6
72.0
74. 1
70.9
64.4
68.7
71.2
78.9
66.2
76.9

MINING

contract

construction

MANUFACTURING

.........................

...................................

See footnote at end of table.




100.0

100.0
too.o
100.0
100.0
100.0
loo.o

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0 ,
100.0 ‘

100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100'. 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
10 0 .c
100.0
100.0
100.0

----------- (5 e V
"

c" e
:

SOME EARNINGS IN THIS
INDUSTRY DURING

INDUSTRY
ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

W O R K fc R S
N T
0 F
H A U
T H A 1
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THI S INDUSTRY AND WORKED
IN ANY INDUSTRY DURING
IN THI S INDUSTRY DURING
ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

ONE
| QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

__________L

PRI VATE NCNAGRICULTURAL
C on ti nued

ECCNCMY----

6.2

7.6

9.3

7 6 .7

10 0 .0

8.1

1 0 .5

1 0

. e

70.5

2.9
4.0
12.9
7.1
2.9

4.6
5.9
15.8
7.9
5.1

6.0
6.1
15.6
1 0 .3
7.2

86.3
83.9
55.5
7 4. 5
84.7

10 0 .0
1 0 0. 0
100.0
100.0
100. 0

3.9
5.9
1 6 .9
9.7
3.8

6.5
8.2
1 8. 9
11.7
8.3

6.7
7.7
16.C
12 . 2
8.8

82 .7
78.2
48.1
66 .2
78.9

10 .1

06 .8

1 00. 0

4.5

6.7

9.0

79.7

1 0 0. 0

6.2

9.4

1 0 .5

73 .7

9.9
1 1. 2

69 .8
32 .9

1 00. 0
10 0 .0

4.0
7.0

6.5
7.3

8.8
10. 4

80.5
75 .1

100.0
100.0

5.7
8.9

9.2
11.2

10.3
1 1 .7

74.7
6 7 .9

9 .3

0.5

74.3

1 0 0. 0

2.9

4.7

5.7

86.5

1 0 0. 0

4.2

7.1

6.5

81 .9

23.9

16 .2

10.3

49.4

10 0 .0

8.0

9.2

10.2

72.4

1 0 0. 0

10. 7

12.6

12 . 1

64 .4

24 .2
2 3 .1
26.4
31.0
2 0. 5
26 .2
20.7

16.3
13.0
17.1
17.8
15.8
15.3
14.4

lo.o
*.l
9.6
1 0 .3
9.0
10 .0
1 0 .9

48 . 7
54 .5
40 .6
4 0 .6
54 .5
48.4
5 4 .3

10 0 .0
10 0. 0
1 0 0. 0
10 0 .0
10 0. 0
1 0 0. 0
100. 0

6.5
6.2
7.7
11.7
6.1
6.0
5.0

7.9
7.3
1 0 .7
1 1 .7
7.7
7.4
7.2

9.6
7.8
1 1 .9
11.4
8.3
10. 1
9.5

75.8
78 .5
69.5
65 .0
77.6
7 6 .3
7 8 .1

10 0 .0
1 0 0. 0
100.0
1 0 0. 0
100.0
100.0
1 0 0. 0

9.7
8.4
12.0
15.5
8.5
9.2
7.4

12.3
10.6
15.0
15.0
11.9
11.2
1 1 .1

13.0
1 0 .9
11 . 9
12.9
10.5
12.6
1 2 .2

64.8
69 .9
6 0 .9
56 .3
68 .9
66 .9
69.1

10 0 .0

25.8

19.9

13.9

40.2

10 0. 0

1 5 .2

15.6

14.6

54.4

100.0

17.2

17.5

15.4

49.7

10 0 .0
10 0. 0
1 00. 0
1 0 0. 0
100. 0
1 00. 0
10 0. 0
10 0. 0
10 0 .0
10 0. 0
100.0
1U0. 0

3 4 .6
32 .2
3 6 .0
2 5 .3
2 1 .3
33 .8
3 4 .0
3 7 .0
3 1 .9
29.7
27 .4
2 3 .9

17.1
17 .6
21 .8
19.7
16.9
18.4
19. 1
17.9
2 2 .6
18.1
2 0 .8
17.2

1 0 .0
6.1
10.1
1 2 .5
11.0
1 0 .5
10.7
10.9
11 .2
10.4
12.1
10. o

36. 1
41 .9
31 .9
4 2 .4
5 0 .6
37. 1
3 6 .0
3 4 .0
34 .2
41.7
39 .6
48 .1

10 0 .0
1 00. 0
1 0 0. 0
10 0 .0
100. 0
1 00. 0
1 0 0. 0
10 0. 0
1 0 0. 0

1 6 .3
13.9
1 8 .7
11 .2
6.6
14.9
1 7 .9
1 7. 8
13.3
10.0
1 2. 9
8.7

12.9
1 3 .2
1 6. 7
13 .5
9.1
12.8
14.3
1 4 .1
15.1
11.6
1 4 .8
8.2

12.3
11.4
14.0
14.3
10.9
12.6
12.4
12.7
12.8
11.8
14. 1
10.9

58.3
61.3
5 0 .5
60.7
73 .2
59.4
55.2
55.1
58.6
66 .4
58 .0
72 .1

1 0 0. 0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
10 0 .0
1 0 0. 0
1 0 0. 0
100.0
1 0 0. 0
100.0
100.0

20.0
19 . 2
23.2
14 . 2
9. 1
1 9. 1
21 .4
21 .6
17.7
13.9
16.3
1 1 .3

15.5
15 .6
19.9
17.0
13.1
15.3
17.0
16.9
19.0
1 5 .5
18.3
11.4

12 .1
9.9
12.8
14.3
12.8
1 2 .8
12.6
12 .9
13.8
12.6
14.0
12.2

52 .2
55.1
43 .9
54 .3
64 .7
52 .6
48 .8
48.4
49 .4
57 .8
51 .3
64 .9

19.6

14 .0

10 .0

100. 0
10 0. 0
10 0. 0
1 0 0. 0
io o . o

7.6
14.7
3 3. 1
2 5. 8
8.4

7 .9
11.5
21 .6
15.9
10.0

6.6
7.0
13.2
10.5
8.6

......................* ........................... .............

1 00. 0

11.8

11.2

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .....................................
RADIO AND T EL EV I SI ON BROADCASTING ..............

1 00. 0
100. 0

9. 7
2 1 .0

10.4
14.7

10 0 .0

9.8

10 0 .0
100. 0
100. 0
100. 0
1 00. 0
100. 0
1 00. 0
1 00. 0

...................................................................

DEPARTMENT STORES ...................................................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ...................................................
VARIETY STORES ..........................................................
GROCERY STORES ..........................................................
MCTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ..........................................
MEN' S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ..................... ..
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ........................................
SHOE STORES .................................................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS .....................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ............
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ............................................

PUBLIC

UTILITIES
tr ad e

..........................................................

TRADE




10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0. 0
10 0 .0
1 0 0. 0
10 0 .0
1 00. 0
1 00. 0
io o .o

io o .o

............................................................

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT .
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND A LL IE D PRODUCTS . . .
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL ..........................................
GROCERIES ANO RELATED PRODUCTS .....................
ELECTRICAL GOODS .....................................................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT ANO SU PP LI E S ..............

RETAIL

73.8
77 .3
76 .7
73.5
66 .3
69 .2
73.1
67 .4
68 .0
59 .2
75.1
65 .2
77 .6
78 .4
65 .7
74.4
59 .0

10 0. 0

100. 0

wholesale

11.t
9.0
10.0
12.2
1 4 .8
12.0
10.4
1 3 .5
11.8
12.4
10.4
13.0
9.2
9.3
12. 5
9.9
13.5

,100.0
1 00. 0
1 00. 0
10 0 .0
100.0

60 . 7
04.0
6 4 .0
o4 . 7
52 .5
50. 7
o2.8
57.4
54.2
40.2
0 6 . 1
53.8
66 .8
7 1 .1
48 .1
63. 7
42.4

communication

8.7
8.5
9.0
9.2
11.3
12.4
9.6
11 . 5
12.3
1 5 .3
9.0
12.0
7.4
7. 4
1 2 .2
8.0
13.9

1 0 0. 0
100.0

77.7
66.0
31 .d
47 .6
72.6

lu.4
8.2
6.7
1 1. 2
1 2 .4
1 0 .8
9.2
11.9
10.0
1 0 .7
9.5
11.o
6.6
0.4
10.3
9.1
10.6

....................................................... • • •

1 0 0. 0
1 0 0. 0
IOO. O
100.0
10 0 .0
100.0
10 0 .0
1 0 0. 0
1 0 0. 0
1 0 0. 0
1 0 0. 0
1 0 0. 0
100.0
10 0 .0

5.7
5.0
4.1
4.9
7.4
6.3
6.8
7. 4
7.6
12 . 9
5.3
9.6
5.6
4.8
9.4
7.6
1 3 .4

81.7
84.1
83.5
81.8
78.4
78.0
79.9
75 .4
74.7
66 .9
82 .1
7 3. 9
83.0
85 .3
7 4. 7
8 1. 1
68.4

5o.3

12.5
12.3
12 .5
11.9
14 .8
14. 8
11.9
13.8
14 .5
16. 5
12. 1
15.0
9. 7
9. 5
16.3
10 .0
17 .1

RAILROADS .....................................................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ..............
TAXICABS ........................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ..............
AI R TRANSPORTATION ................................................ :

8.7
6.8
8.0
8.6
10.2
9.4
9.2
10.9
12.2
11.9
8.2
10.5
7. 7
6.5
1 0 .5
7.3
12. 1

1 0 0. 0
100 .0
100. 0
100.0
10 0. 0

16.3
15.3
14.6
12.0
20. i
15 .8
15 .9
1 6. 7
21.1
2 6. 5
12-1
1 9. 4
12.8
10.7
25.2
17.1
2 9 .6

TRANSPORTATION

5.1
5.2
5.4
6.1
7.1
8.0
6.0
8.2
7.7
1 1 .1
5.8
8.3
5.1
4.9
8.2
6.1
9.5

4. 3
3.6
2.8
3.3
4. 1
4.4
4.7
5.3
5. 1
9.9
3.7
7 .1
4.0
3.2
6.4
5.3
9.9

1 00. 0
100. 0
10 0 .0
1 0 0. 0
10 0. 0
10 0 .0
1 0 0. 0
100. 0
10 0 .0
1 00. 0
1 00. 0
10 0 .0
10 0. 0
1 00. 0
10 0. 0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0

METAL WORKING MACHINERY .....................................
S PECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ..............................
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ..........................
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES .......................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES .................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND D I S T R I B UT I N G EQUIPMENT
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRI AL APPARATUS ...................
HOUSEHOLD A PPLIANCES ............................................
ELECTRIC L I GH TI NG AND WIRING EQUIPMENT . .
RADIO AND TV REC EI VI NG EQUIPMENT .................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT .....................................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES . . .
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ..........................
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS .................................................
Sh i p a nd b o a t b u i l o i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g . . . .
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES
OTHER MANUFACTURING ..............................................

io o .o

10 0. 0
1 0 0. 0

P E

SOME EARNINGS IN THIS
INDUSTRY DURING
INDUSTRY

ANY
JTR

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

T H A T
R C E N T
0 F
H A U
:
W U R K E R S
1
MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNING! IN THIS INDUSTRY AND WORKED
IN ANY INDUSTRY DURING
IN THIS INDUSTRY DURING

FUUR
wTRS

ANY
QTR

ONE
QTR

TWO
QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

ANY
QTR

GNE
QTR

TWO
1 QTRS

THREE
QTRS

FOUR
QTRS

1

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL EC ON OM Y ----Continued
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE .....
COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ....
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS .........
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ..........
LIFE INSURANCE ..........................
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ..
SERVICES ...................................
HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ...
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .....
MOTION PICTURES .........................
HOSPITALS ................................




1 0 .6

72.6

10 0 .0

9.4

12 .2

12. 1

66 . 1

7.7
8.4
7.9
7.0
7.6

1 0 .0
1 0. 1
1 0. 8
9.4
9.3

77.7
76.7
73.8
78 .6
7 8 .1

10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0

6.2
6.5
9.7
7. 1
7. 1

10 .6
10 .7
12.1
10.4
11 .2

11.8
1 1 .9

11.5

71.2
70.7
62 .9
70.4
70.0

1 2 .8

14.5

1 3 .0

59.5

10 0 .0

14.5

1 6. 3

1 3. 4

55.6

1 6 .8
13 .1
1 5 .6
7.0

18.4
13.6
18 .1
11.6

1 6 .4
13.3
17.4
12.7

48 .2
59.8
48 .7
68.5

10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
1 00. 0

21.6
15 .9
19.5
9.0

22.4
1 6. 6
21.7
14 .3

16.0
1 3. 4
16.8
1 3 .8

39.7
53.8
41 .8

19.3

1 4. 8

10 .8

54.9

100.0

7.2

. 100. 0
1 0 0 . c1
1 0 0 . c1
1 0 0 . c!
1 0 0 . c
'

11.5
14.6
20 .8
15.0
13.6

12.4
1 3. 2
1 5 .7
13 .5
1 3 .4

1 1. 1
11.C
12 .8
1 0. 8
1 0. 5

64.8
61 .0
50.<
60 . <
62.2

)
100.C
100.0
100.0
ico.c)
100.0

4.5
4.6
7.3
4.9
4.9

1 0 0 . c1

21 .8

18.4

12 .5

47.2 )

100.0

10 0.c
1 0 0 . c1
1 0 0 . c1
10 0.c

36 .3
28 .0
31.9
14.7 ,

23.5
1 8 .7
24.0
16 .2

1 2. 5

27.«
41.1 f
29.9
56.0

10 0.0

100. 0

11.4
14.C
12 .9

ICO.CJ
100.0
1 0 C. 0

9.3

15.1
11.9

62.7

p E R C E N T
A N Y

V 0 R K E R S
i

0 F

0 U A R T E R

INDUSTRY
R A F E
W H I T E1
N E G R 0
ALL
MEN | WOMEN
WORKERS MEN | WOMEN
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY

..........

100.0

53 .2

35 .8

E M P L C Y E D

D U R I N G

A R T F R S
F C U R ____Q l
IN THIS INDUSTRY ONLY
I N ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT
R A C 6
R A C E
W H I T E1
N E G R Q
N E G R C
W H 1 T E1
[
J
MEN | WOMEN
MEN y WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN
TCTAL
MEN | WOMEN
TOTAL

6.2

4.8

66.6

38.2

21 .7

3.9

2.7

66 .6

3 8 .2

2 1 .7

3.9

2.7

............................ ....................................................

100.c

88.8

7.3

3 .7

.3

76 .7

68 .5

5.3

2.8

.2

6 8 .7

61 .4

4.7

2.4

.2

CRUOE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND L I Q U I D S .
OIL a nd GAS FI ELD SERVICES ..............................

100.c
10 0.c

80.1
91.8

1 6 .4
5.8

2.8
2.3

.7
. 1

8 3 .1
65 .4

67 .7
59.9

12.7
4.1

2. 1
1.3

.6
.1

77.2
52 .3

64. 1
47.6

10 .9
3.5

1. 7
1.2

.5
.1

MINI NG

100.c

83 .7

5.9

1C.C

.3

64 .4

54 .9

3.5

5.8

.2

56.5

48 .3

3. 1

4.9

. 1

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ................... 100. 0
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ..................................... 100. 0
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR C ONDI TI ON ING .......... 1 0 0 . c
P A I N T I N G , PAPER HANGING, DECORATING .......... 1 0 0 . c
ELECTRICAL WORK ........................................................ 1 0 0 . c
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ............ 1 00. 0
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ................................. 100. 0
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK .......................... 100. 0
CONCRETE WORK ............................................................ 1 0 0 . c

82 .3
83 .3
87.4
90.8
88.8
74.6
87.4
83.4
76.1

5.2
4.0
8.0
4.4
7.7
3.6
6.0
5.9
3.6

12.1
1 2 .4
4.4
4.3
3.2
21.4
6.4
10 .2
19 .8

.3
.3
.3
.5
.3
.4
.3
.4
.5

61 .0
64.1
74.9
53.8
76.4
62 .7
56 .9
62 .7
56 .5

50.7
54 .6
67 .5
49 .3
68 .9
47 .5
49 .8
52.7
42 .9

3.4
2.3
4.e
2.2
5.3
2.2
3.1
3.7
2.1

6.7
7.1
2.6
1 .9
1.9
1 2 .7
3.9
5.9
11 .3

.2
.2
.1
.4
.2
.3
.1
.3
.2

47 .2
45 .9
63.6
43 .4
68 .9
50 .9
44 .0
50.7
40 .6

3 9 .1
39.0
57.5
3 9 .8
62 .3
38.8
39.0
42 .9
30. 1

3.0
1.9
4.2
1.9
4.9
2.0
2.4
3.0
1.9

4.9
4.9
1.9
1.4
1. 5
9.9
2.5
4.7
8.4

.2
. 1
.1
.3
.2
.2
. 1
.2
.2

3.3

75 .0

49.C

18.7

5.3

1 .9

70.6

46 .3

17.7

4.8

1.8

3.0
7.9
1.2
6.8
1 .4
3.8
1. 1
6.6
4.8
6.3
7.6
9.4
1 0 .0
7.4
7.8
1 2 .3
.8
2.1
3.6
. 7
3. 1
1.3
2.7
.6
2.1
3 .4
4. 7
.9
.7
3.3
2.7
3.7
.3
.5
.8
2.1
3.1
1.1

76 .3
67 .2
73.8
43.6
76.2
74.4
76.0
79.0
79.7
70.7
71 .3
74 .9
66 .4
66.7
66.4
64 .0
67 .7
69 .4
70 .3
84.8
76.6
74.8
74.8
88.3
85.9
83. 1
73.6
87.6
87 . 1
73.4
69 .2
72.8
74.2
85 .4
80.3
82.0
7 7 .4
75 .6
76.7
77.8
84.2
75.0
84.9

55.3
41 .3
57 .2
23.4
56 .6
48 .7
58 .0
38.7
42.4
20.3
31.5
20.0
1 0. 6
10.7
10.0
7.5
50.0
5,2.6
44 .6
70.4
50 .9
50.8
51.0
71.5
63 .4
47 .9
42.5
7 2 .1
70. 1
45 .8
25 .2
43 .7
60 .0
70.0
55.1
63 .9
49 .2
62.1
56 .9
55.3
67.0
62.6
71.0

15. 1
13.2
1 2 .4
1 4 .2
1 1 .5
1 6 .0
9.6
26 .7
26 .6
43.8
29.5
46 .0
48 .3
49.9
50 .5
47 .5
4.4
9. 1
16 .2
9.5
16.4
21.1
18.9
1 0 .7
15.7
28 .4
24 .5
10.9
8.7
21.6
41 .8
22.8
4.1
4.1
3.8
11.1
22 .4
7.5
1 5 .0
13. 1
11 .5
7.6
8.8

4.3
7.9
3.5
3.3
7.4
7.5
7.7
9.3
7.5
2.7
5.4
2.3
1. 1
1.1

1. 7
4.8
.8
2.7
.8
2.3
.7
4.3
3.2
4.0
4.9
6.5
6.4
5.0
4.9
7.8
.5

70.5
59.6
65 .6
3 7 .1
68 .0
65.8
66 .9
71.9
70.5
63.5
61.9
70.3
60.4
61 .4
61.3
57.5
60.5
59 .3
62 .7
78.1
67.8
69.6
67 .9
83.3
79.6
77.0
66 .0
82.1
81.4
66 .6
62 .3
65 .7
61 .7
81.6
72 .1
7 4. 1
71.0
64.4
68 .7
71.2
79.0
68 .3
77.0

51.2
37. 1
5 1 .1
19 .8
51.0
43.1
51.6
35 . 1
37.2
17 .9
26.7
1 8. 2
9.6
9.6
8.9
6.2
44.5
45 .5
40.0
64 .9
4 5 .1
47-. 8
46 .9
67 .9
59.4
44 .4
3 9. 0
68 .7
66 .2
41 .8
21.9
39 . 8
50.3
67.2
49 .9
58.2
45.0
53. 1
52.0
, 51. 3
63 . 1
57.3
65.0

14.3
11.8
10.8
1 2. 5
1 0. 3
14.4
8.7
25.4
2 5 .2
39.7
26.9
43.7
44.4
46.1
47.1
43.2
4.1
7.7
14 . 5
8.9
14 .9
1 9. 3
1 6. 7
9.8
14 .3
26.4
2 1 .1
9.4
8.2
20. 1
38.3
2 0 .7
3.6
3.9
3.3
9.9
20.8
6.2
13 .0
11 .7
10.5
7. 2
7.8

3.4
6.5
3.1
2.6
6.0
6.3
6.0
7.7
5.8
2.2
4.4
2.2

1. 6
4.2
.6
2.2
.7
2.1
.6
3.7
2.3
3.7
3.9
6.2
5.4
4.7
4.5
7. 1
.4
.8
2.3
.4
1. 4
.7
1. 4
.3
.9
1.9
2.4
. 7
.5
1.2
1. 4
1. 7
. 1
.4
.5

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

..............................................

.................................................................

100. 0

61.1

2 8 .2

7.4

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ..............
MEAT PRODUCTS ............................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ..........................................................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ...................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ..............................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .......................................................
BEVERAGES .....................................................................
WEAVING M I LL S , COTTON ..........................................
WEAVING M I L L S , SYNTHETICS .................................
' KN IT TI NG MILLS ..........................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS ..........................................
MEN' S ANO BOYS' SUITS AND COATS ...................
MEN' S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ............................
WOMEN'S AND M I SS E S ' OUTERWEAR .......................
WOMEN'S AND C HI L DR EN 'S UNDERGARMENTS . . . .
C HI L DR E N' S OUTERWEAR ..........................................'.
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ..............................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS . .
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE ..............................................
PULP AND PAPER MILLS ............................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ...................
NEWSPAPERS ...................................................................
COMMERCIAL PR IN TI N G ..............................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ............................................
PL AST ICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ..............
DRUGS ..............................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ................
PETROLEUM R EFI NI NG .................................................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES ..........................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS ..........................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER .....................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN . . .
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PROOUCTS . .
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS . .
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ...................................
NCNFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING .....................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ..............
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS . . . .
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ............
m e t a l STAMPINGS ........................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ............................................
FARM MACHINERY ..........................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ............

100.c
100. c
1C0.C
100.c
10 0.c
1 00. 0
100. 0
100.c
10 0.c
100. 0
1 00. 0
100. 0
1 00. 0
10C.0
10 0.c
100. 0
10 0.c
100.c
100. 0
1 00. 0
100.c
10 0.c
100. 0
10 0.c
100. 0
10 0.c
100. c
1C0.C
100.c
100. 0
100.c
10 0. 0
10 0.c
10C.C
100. c
100.c
100. 0
100. 0
100.c
100.c
10C.C
1OC.0
10C.0

68 .5
56.9
74.4
44.9
71.5
61 .6
73.6
46 .3
52.1
27.3
42.1
24.8
15 .0
1 5. 0
12.7
11 .2
74. 3
74.0
61.5
81.0
63 .9
64.3
63 .9
79 .6
71.6
53 .9
52.4
80 .3
79 .4
56.8
33.6
57.8
79.9
81.0
68.0
75.6
58.7
79.9
7 1 .5
66 .7
78.2
81.6
8 2 .5

22.8
23.3
19.7
42.0
16.0
24.7
14.3
3 4. 3
3 3. 6
6 2 .8
42.4
62.9
7 3. 3
75.6
78 .3
7 4 .9
6 .1
13 .5
2 4 .4
12.4
2 3 .0
3 1 .3
2 8 .8
12 .9
19 .9
36 .4
3 6. 5
13 .6
10.5
3 2. 8
62.4
3 2. 9
6.1
5.3
5 .1
14.9
3 2. 0
11.3
2 1 .9
20.1
14.1
11.9
11.0

5.7
1 1 .9
4.8
6.3

MANUFACTURING




11.0
9.8
11 .0
12 .8
9.5
3 .6
7.9
3.0
1. 7
2. C
1. 2
1. 6
18 .8
1C.4
1C.5
5.9
10 .0
3. 1
4.6
6.9
6.4
6.4
fc. 3
5.1
9.4
7.0
1. 2
5.7
13 .7
13 .2
26.1
7.4
6.2
7.6
5.5
1l .C
6.6
5.8
5.e

1.1
2.2

1.0
.7
.6

1.0
1. 1
12 .9
6.6
7.0
4.3
7.4
2 .1
3.3
5.8
5.4
4.7
4.0
3.8
7.8
4.6
.7
4.2
9.9
li.O
21.0
5.7
4.0
5.4
4.0
8.2
4.9
4.2
4.8

1.0
2.5
.5
1. 8
.8
1. 5
.4
1. 4
2.2
2.5
.7
.5
1. 4
1. 5
2 .1
. 1
.4
.5
1. 2
1 .9
.6
.8

1. 1
.8
.5
.4

1.0
.9
.8
.9
11 .5
5.3
5.9
3.9
6.4
1. 8
2.9
5.3
5.0
4.3
3.4
3.3
6.5
3.6
.7
3.5
1.7
1C. 2
1 8 .4
5.0
3. 4
4.5
3. 1
7.2
4.6
3. 4
3.8

1.0
1.8
.6
.6

1.0
.8
.5
.3

p € R C E NT
___A._N
INDUSTRY

PRIVATE N C N A G R 1CULTURAL ECCNCMY-Continued
M£TAL w o r k i n g m a c h i n e r y ..................
SPECIAL INCUSTRY MACHINERY ...............
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ............
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ...........
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ................
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS .........
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES .................. .
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT ..
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING E Q U I P M E N T .......
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ..................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ...
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ............
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS ........................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ....
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES
OTHER MANUFACTURING .......................

Cl F

1 0 R K> E R S
p
»

___ Q_JU. A _R T , _B_
_
J

R A p E
W H I T E1
ALL
N E G R 0
WORKERS MEN | WOMEN
MEN ] WOMEN

E M P L C Y E D

D U R I N G

F 0 U R
Q U A R T E R S
IN ALL WAGE i ND SALARY EMPLOYMENT
A
IN THIS INDUSTRY ONLY
R A C E
RAC E
1 W H I T E1
N E G R C
W H I T E1
N E G R 0
TOTAL | MEN | WOMEN
MEN J WOMEN TOTAL
MEN p WOMEN
MEN 1 WOMEN
--- 5--

81.A
81.6
76. 1
66.A
75.5
57.5
61.A
6A.1
A9.5
A 1.2
58.7
A2. 1
7A.5
78.A
77.5
55.7
5A.0

15.0
13.5
17.6
28.2
17.1
33.8
33.8
26.2
AO.3
A5.0
3A.1
50.6
11.1
15.3
7.2
38.0
36. 1

3.C
A. 3
5.2
2.9
6.5
5.5
2.8
6. 1
5.6
A.8
3. 1
2 .C
12.9
5.0
1A. A
3.3
5.6

.6
.6
l.l
2.5
.8
3.2
2.0
3.5
A.6
9. C
A.2
5.3
1.6
1.3
.9
3.0
A.3

81.7
8A.2
83.5
61.8
78.5
78.0
80.C
75.A
7A.8
66.9
82.2
73.9
83.0
85.3
7A.7
81.1
68.A

68.7
70.2
65.6
58.A
60.5
A8.A
52.A
50.5
39.5
32.7
51.8
35.2
63.7
68.8
60.8
A9.0
39.1

TRANSPORTATION ............................... 10C.C

76.8

12.2

10. 1

.9

76.8

60.3

8.6

7.3

.5

70.5

100.c
1CC.C
100.c
100.c
100.c

86.3
70.3
75.2
81.3
65.7

5.7
6.9
8.9
8.8
28.A

7.6
2C.7
15.0
9. A
A.5

.A
2.3
.9
.5
1.3

86.3
8A.0
55.5
7A.5
8A.8

75.3
59.0
A2.3
61.9
57.5

A.6
5.1
A.7
6.0
22.A

6.1
18.2
8.5
6.A
A. 0

.3
1.7
.1
.3

82.7
78.2
A 8 .1
66.2
79.0

COMMUNICATION ................................ 100.c

A A .6

A6.0

2.5

6.9

79.7

39.0

3A.6

1.8

A.3

73.8

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .................. ICC.C
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING ....... 100.c

39.9
69.7

50.1
23.3

2.2
A.9

7. 8
2.1

80.5
75. 1

35.9
55.6

38. 1
15.3

1.6
3.2

A.9
1.0

7A.7
67.9

ICC.C

78. 1

1A .6

6.2

l.l

86.5

69.0

11.9

A.8

.9

82.0

WHOLESALE TRADE .............................. 100.c

67.3

2A.2

6.7

1.8

72.A

51.5

15.7

A.3

.9

10C.C
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.c
ICC.C

73.0
61.6
A9.2
6A.3
6 A. 6
69.6
71.9

18.A
31.A
AO. 0
2A.A
28.8
23.8
22.7

5.9
A.8
5.A
8.7
A.A
5.A 1
A. A

.6
2.2
5.A
2.6
2.1
1.3
1.0

75.8
78.5
69.5
65.0
76.A
78. 1

58.1
51.7
38.1
A5.1
53.1
55.7
59.2

13.2
22.5
2 A.9
12.9
20.3
16.2
15.A

A.2
3.1
3.A
5.7
3.1
3.8
2.9

.3
1.2
3. 1
1.3
1.2
.8

10C.C

A6.7

A5 .1

A.5

3.7

5A.A

27.3

23.0

100.0
100.c
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.c
100.0
10C.C
100.c
10C.0
100.c
100.c

27.5
28.8
20.0
58.5
79.7
55.0
9.7
2A.0
51.9
60.9
37.0
7A.6

6A.0
51.6
73.2
3A.7
12.8
37.3
81.9
67.9
A 1•5
30.2
56.A
20.0

3. 1
5.8
2.1
A.7
7.1

5.A
13.8
A. 7
2.1

A. A

3.3
6.7
5. 1
2.6
2.A
3.0
.A

58.A
61.3
50.6
60.8
73.3
59.5
55.2
55.2
58.7
66.5
58.1
72. 1

17.7
21.3
11.2
36.8
59.1
35.A
5.6
1A.7

36.A
30.3
36. 3
20.2
9.0
20.1
A 5 .2
36.7
21.7
19.0
31.5
13.9

RAILROADS ..................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION .......
TAXICABS ...................................
TRUCKING* LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE .......
AIR TRANSPORTATION ........................

PUBLIC UTILITIES ............................

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT .
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PROOUCTS ...
ORY GOODS AND APPAREL ....................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..........
ELECTRICAL GOODS ..........................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING ANO HEATING EQUIPMENT
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .......
RETAIL T R A D E ....... .........................
DEPARTMENT STORES ................. .......
MAIL ORDER HOUSES .........................
VARIETY STORES .............................
GROCERY STORES ...... ......................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ....................
MEN'S ANO BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ............
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ...................
SHOE STORES ................................
FURNITURE ANO HOME FURNISHINGS ..........
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ......
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ......................




1CC.C
100.C
100.C
10C.0
10C.C
100.C
100.C
100.c
1 0 0 .c
100.0
100.c
1CC.C
100.0
1C0.C
100.c
100.0
100.0

1.6
3.1
A. 0
6.5
3.5
5 .C

.A

77.7

33.8

A 1.9
23.1
5A .1

10.5
10. 1
13. 1
19.9
12.A
23.3
2A.A
18.A
28.3
26.6
25.2
33.7
8.3
11.6
3.6
27.9
23.8

2.2
3.5
A.2
1.9
5.0
A.A
2.1
A.5
A .0
3.2
2.2
1.5
9.9
A .0
9.9
2.6
3.7

.3
.3
.7
1.6
.5
2.0
1.1
2.0
3.0
A.A
2.9
3.A
1.1
.8
.A
1.6
1.9

73.9
77.A
76.8
73.6
66.A
69.2
73.1
67.A
68.1
59.3
75.2
65.3
77.6
78.A
65.8
7A.A
59.0

62.A
6A.7
60.5
53.3
51.9
A2.9
A8.1
A5.6
36.0
28.9
A8.1
31.1
59.8
63.5
53.A
AA.7
33.3

9.5
9.3
12.1
17.A
10.5
20.9
22.2
16.1
25.8
23.8
22.8
29.9
7.7
10.8
3.3
25.8
20.9

1.8
3.1
3.6
1.6
3.6
3.7
1.8
A. 0
3.6
2.6
1.9
1.2
9.2
3.A
8.6
2.A
3.1

55.8

7.7

6.5

.5

72.A
55.3
36.5
55.3
5A.A

A.A
A.8
A.3
5.2
19.9

5.6
16.7
7.3
5.A
3.7

.3
1.5
.l
.2

36.9

31.5

1.6

3.8

3A.3
51.6

3A.8
12.3

1.3
3.1

A.3

65.9

11.1

A.3

.8

6A.A

A6.3

13.7

3.6

.8

.7

6A.8
69.9
61.0
56.3
68.9
67.0
69.1

A9.5
A6.7
3A.3
39.1
A8.0
A9.6
53.2

11.7
19.7
21.A
11.5
17.3
1A.1
13.0

3.3
2.6
2.A
A.6
2.5
2.7
2.3

.3
1.0
2.8
l.l
1.1
.6
.6

2.A

1.7

A9.8

2A.7

21.6

2.0

1.6

1.7
3.A
1.1
2.6
A.8
2.A

2.5
6.A
1.9
1.1

52.3
55.1
AA.O
5A.3
6A.7
52.7
A8.9
A8.5
A9.A
57.8
51.3
6A.9

15.3
18.9
9.3
33.0
52.6
30.9
A.9
12.2
28.2
36.3
20.6
A8.3

33.3

l.A
2.8
.8
2.2
A .1
2.2
.8
1.3
1.5
3.5
1.6
3.5

2.3
5.7

.9

1. A
1.9
A.2
2.0
3.9

.9

.3

1.6
3.6
2.A
1.2
1.5
1 .A
.2

27.7
32.5
18.2
7.8
18.1
AO .0
32.8
18.8
16.8
27.9
13.0

.2
.3
.5
1.3
.A
1.7
1.0
1.7
2.7
A. 0
2.A
3.0
1.0
.7
.A
1.5
1.7

.9

.9

l.A

1.0
.2
l.A
3.2
2.2
.9

1.3
1.3
.2

p E R C E N T
A N Y
INOUSTRY

W 0 R K E R S

OF

Q U A R T E R
IN

R A C E
W H I T E1
ALL
N E G R 0
WORKERS MEN | WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN
PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL
C on ti nued

ALL

TOTAL

E M P L 0 Y E 0
.

D U R I N G

F 0 U R
0 U A R T E R S
WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT
IN THIS INDUSTRY ONLY
R A C : E
R A 1 E
:
W H I T E1
N E G R 0
N E G R 0
W H I T El
MEN j WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN'
MEN
WOMEN
MEN | WOMEN
TOTAL

1

ECONOMY----

............

100.c

A 3. 1

A 8. 8

A. 0

A. 1

72.7

33 .0

3A . A

2.7

2.6

66.2

3 0 .5

31 .2

2.3

2.2

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .........
SAVINGS ANC LOAN A SS OCIATIONS .....................
PERSONAL CREDIT IN ST IT U TI ON S .......................
LI FE INSURANCE .......................................................
F l R Et MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE . . .

10 0.c
I 0C .C
100.c
1C0.C
1 0 0 . c

31.7
29.8
A A. 5
53.0
39.5

61.6
6 5 .8
5 1 .9
39.1
5 5. 8

2.2
2. A
1. 5
3 .6
.7

A .5
2.0
2.1
A. 3
3.9

77.7
7 6 .7
7 3. 8
78.6
78.1

26.6
2A.5
3 5 .3
AA. 3
3 A. 7

A6.3
A9.0
35.8
28 . 7
AO.3

1. 7
2.1
1. 3
2.7
.5

3 .1
1. 1
1. A
2.9
2.6

71.3
70.7
63.C
70.5
70.0

25.0
22.8
30.6
AO. 1
32.9

A 2. 2
AA . 9
3 0. 3
25.6
3A . 8

1.5
2.1
l.C
2.3
.A

2.6
.9
1.1
2.5
2.0

..........................................................................

10 0.c

33.8

5 0. 6

5.2

10.3

59.5

21.0

29. 7

2.8

6. 1

55.7

1 9. 2

28.1

2.5

5.9

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS . . . .
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ............
MOTION PICTURES .....................................................
HOSPITALS ...................................................................

10 0.c
10C.C

36.8
25.1
55.3
1 6. 5

A 3. 2
A 7. 6
38 .5
66.8

7.8
6.8
3 .8
3.9

12 .2
20.5
2.A
12 .8

A8 . 3
59.9
A8.7
68.6

19.A
17.1
29 .6

19. A
26.5
1 5 .8
A6. 1

A. 1
A .3
2.2
2.5

5. A
1 1. 9

39.8
53.9
A 1. 8
62 .7

1 5. 6
15 .2
25.7
9.8

16.1
2A .0
13 .2
A2.6

3 .A
3.8
1.8
2.1

A. 7
10 . 9

FI NANCE,

SERVICES

INSURANCE,

AND REAL

ESTATE

100.c
10C.C

I ncl udes w o r k e r s of al l r a c e s o the r than N e g r o .




11.1

1.1
8.9

1.1
8. 1

SINGLE
INDUSTRY
ALL
WRKRS TOTAL
PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL

ECONOMY . . . .

PERCENT OF WORKERS EMPLOYED IN THE I ft INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNING DURI NGQ U A R T E R S
F C U R
Q U A R T E R
A N Y
SINGLE INDUSTRY WORKERS
MULTI -I NDUSTRY WORKERS
MULTI-I NDUSTRY WORKERS
INDUSTRY WORKERS
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF
NUMBER OF
EMPLOYERS
INDUSTRY EMPLOYERS
EMPLOYERS
INDUSTRY EMPLOYERS
MORE
MORE
MORE
MORE
THAN
THAN
THAN
THAN
ALL
TWO
TWO
TWO
TWO
TWO
TOTAL
WRKRS TCTAL
CNE
TWO
TOTAL
ONE
TWO
TWO
ONE
ONE

100.c

71.0

18 .5

10 .5

.............................................................................. 100. 0

7 7 .4

70 .4

5.1

1.9

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND L IQUI DS 100. 0
OIL AND GAS FIEL D SERVICES ............................ 100. 0

8 2 .3
6 3 .2

78.9
50 .9

3 .3
7.4

.1
4.9

MINI NG

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

100. 0

.0

.0

.0

1 00. 0

22.6

18 .2

2.6

1 .7

17 .7
36.8

1 6. 4
22.1

1. 1
6.8

.2
7.9

. C

17 .6

11 .2

.0

81.0

5.7

2.2

85.3
64.1

3.8
9.6

. 1
7.8

10 0. 0

71.2

1C0. 0

89.0

100. 0
I CO.O

89 .2
81.5

.0

.0

.0

1 1. 0

8.5

1.3

1. 3

10 .8
18.5

9.8
7.2

.9
3.6

.2
7. 7

3.3

7. 5

...........................................

100. 0

72 .8

52 .4

11.1

9.3

27.2

1 4. 8

5.5

6.8

1C0. 0

82.5

56.6

1 2. 8

13.1

17.5

6.7

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION ................
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ..................................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING . . . .
P A I N T I N G , PAPER HANGING, DECORATING . . . .
ELECTRICAL WORK .....................................................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, AND PLASTERING ..........
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ..............................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK .......................
CONCRETE WORK ....................................... .................

10 0.c
100. 0
100. 0
1C0.C
1CC.C
100. 0
100. 0
10C.0
100. 0

63.7
5 4 .3
68.C
66 . 1
73 .4
5 9 .5
61.4
64.C
5 1. 9

58.9
48.7
55.9
53.2
56.6
45.8
56.1
55.9
46 .2

4.2
4.5
7 .6
8.6
8.5
9.0
4.1
5.7
4.8

.7
1. 2
4.5
4.3
8.3
4.8

3 6 .3
45. 7
32.0
33.9
26.6
40.5
3 8 .6
36.C
48.1

29.3
3 3 .9
2 1 .6
2 1 .4
17 .6
24.9
30.1
28.5
35.1

5.4
7.8
5.3
6.2
3.7
7.3
5.6
5.1
7.7

1 .6
4.0
5.1
6.3
5.3
8.3
2.9
2.4
5.3

1 00. 0
10 0. 0
ICO.O
ICO.O
ICO.O
I CO.O
100. 0
1 00. 0
ICO.O

81 .6
72.2
80 .6
78.0
81 .7
68.8
75.0
78 .6
62.9

76 .2
63 .4
63 .9
60.9
60 .3
49.7
66 .3
67 .5
52.3

4.5
7.0
1 0. 3
1 0. 6
10 .4
11 .9
6.6
7.3
8.5

.9
1. 8
6.4
6.5
11 .0
7.2
2.1
3.9
2.0

18 .4
27.8
19 .4
22 .0
18 .3
31 . 2
2 5. 0
21.4
3 7. 1

13.3
17 .8
10.C
10 .0
9.3
14.1
16.4
14 .6
21.9

83 .4

74.6

7.2

1. 7

16 .6

12 .5

2.9

1. 2

ICO.O

89 .6

80 .9

7. 1

1 .7

10 .4

8 1 .8
76.C
75.8
76.6
7 5 .8
75. B
7 3 .8
79. 1
7 7. 1
78 .4
75 .9
82 .9
8 1 .7
82.7
85.C
8 0 .7
77 .3
72.3
74 .6
80 .6
73 .7
7 9 .0
77 .5
83 .8
8 1 .6
78 .8
7 7. 5
84.C
79 .1
77.6
8 0 .4
81.6
6 7 .7
83.C
74.e
7 5 .9
78 .2
69.3
76. 1
77 .3
76 .0
77.7
74 .7

81.6
72.3
73.0
71.7
74.2
73.6
71.7
75.6
75.8
73.2
72.8
8C.6
7 8 .3
74.2
80.1
78.2
73.0
69 .6
68.5
79.5
71.5
73.8
7 4 .0
8 3 .2
81.4
77.4
76.8
83.6
78.7
75.3
75.3
80.3
65.7
82.0
73.0
74.7
76.7
66.8
73.3
76.0
74.5
76.5
73.4

.2
3.5
2. 6
4.3
1. 6
2.0
1. 9
3.2
1. 3
4.8
2.6
1 .9
3. 1
7.0
4.5
2.4
3. 8
2.6
5.5
1.1
2. 1
4.5
3. 1
.6
.2
1. 3
. 7
.4
.4
2.2
4.7
1. 3
2.0
1. 0
1 .6
1.2
1. 5
2.4
2.6
1. 3
1. 5
1.1
1. 3

.0
.2
. 1
.6
.0
.2
.3
.3
. 1
.4
.4
.4
.3
1. 5
.3
. 1
.5
. 1
. 7
.0
.1
.7
.4
.0
.0
.0
.c
.0
.0
.c
.3
.0
.0
.0
.2
.0
.0
.2
.2
.0
. 1
.0
.0

18 .2
24.0
24.2
23.4
24.2
24.2
26.2
20.9
22.9
21.6
24. 1
17.1
18. 3
17 .3
15 .0
19 .3
22. 7
27.7
25.4
19 .4
26.3
21.0
22.5
1 6 .2
18 .4
21.2
22.5
16.C
20 .9
22.4
19 .6
18.4
32.3
17.C
25.2
2 4 .1
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86.5
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87.6
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79.8
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82.7

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7.8
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13 .3
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1 1 .7
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1 2 .4
13 .4
1 8 .9
14 .7
15.8

MANUFACTURING

.............................................................. 10G.0

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS ............
MEAT PRODUCTS .........................................................
DAIRY PRODUCTS ..................................... .................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS ................
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS ...........................................
BAKERY PRODUCTS .....................................................
BEVERAGES ..................................................................
WEAVING M IL LS , COTTON .......................................
WEAVING M I LL S , SYNTHETICS ..............................
K NITTI NG MILLS .......................................................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS .......................................
MEN' S ANO BOYS' SU IT S AND COATS ................
MEN' S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS .........................
WOMEN'S AND M IS S E S ' OUTERWEAR .....................
WOMEN'S AND C HI L DRE N' S UNDERGARMENTS . . .
C HI L DRE N' S OUTERWEAR .........................................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ...........................
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS .
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE .............................. .............
PULP AND PAPER MILLS .........................................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES ................
NEWSPAPERS ................................................................
COMMERCIAL P RI NT IN G ...........................................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS .........................................
PL ASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS ............
DRUGS ............................................................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ..............
PETROLEUM R EFI NI NG ..............................................
TI RES AND INNER TUBES .......................................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS .......................................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ..................................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN . .
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS .
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODuCfS .
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES ................................
n g n f e r r o u s r o l l i n g AND DRAWING ...................
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE ............
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS . . .
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ..........
METAL STAMPINGS .....................................................
ENGINES AND TURBINES .........................................
FARM MACHINERY .......................................................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY .........




1C0.C
100. 0
100. 0
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SINGLE
INDUSTRY
ALL
WRKRS TOTAL
PRI VATE NCNAGRICULTURAL
C o n t in u ed

ECONOMY-----

METAL WORKING MACHINERY .....................................
SP ECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ..............................
GENERAL INDUSTRI AL MACHINERY ..........................
OFFICE ANO COMPUTING MACHINES .......................
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ................................
ELECTRIC TEST AND D IS T R I B U T I N G EQUIPMENT
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRI AL APPARATUS ...................
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ............................................
ELECTRIC L I GH TI NG AND WIRING EQUIPMENT . .
RADIO AND TV RE CEIVING EQUIPMENT .................
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT .................. ..................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES . . .
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ..........................
AIRCRAFT ANC PARTS .................................................
SHI P AND BOAT B UI LDI NG AND RE PA IRI NG . . . .
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES
OTHER MANUFACTURING ..............................................

TRANSPORTATION

PERCENT OF WORKERS EMPLOYED IN THEIR INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNING DURING—
Q U A R T E R S
Q U A R T E R
F C U R
A N Y
SINGLE INDUSTRY WORKERS
MUL TI -I NDU STRY WORKERS
MUL TI-I NDUSTRY WORKERS
INDUSTRY WORKERS
1
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF
NUMBER OF
EMPLOYERS
INDUSTRY EMPLOYERS
INDUSTRY EMPLOYERS
EMPLOYERS
MORE
MORE
MORE
MORE
THAN
THAN
THAN
THAN
ALL
TWO
TWO
TWO
TWO
TWO
TWO
ONE
TWO
WRKRS TOTAL
CNE
ONE
TWO
TOTAL
TOTAL
ONE

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10 0. 0
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1 00. 0
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100. 0
1 00. 0
100. 0
10 0. 0
10 0. 0
10 0 .0
100. 0
100. 0
100. 0
1 00. 0
100. 0

............................................................... 1 00. 0

78.8
7 8 .1
77.7
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75 .8
7 6. 5
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78.7
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76.2
69.2
75.0
74.5
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74.7
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77.9
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22.4
21.3
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27.7
21.3
26.6

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21.9
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28.6
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26.8
23.6
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25.5

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86.6
85.6
86.4
85.5
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84.8
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87 .6
81 .6
53 .9
72 .8
86 .0

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2.3
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5.5
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15.6
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2.3

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9.9

9.2

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TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION .....................................
RADIO AND T E LE VI SI ON BROADCASTING ..............

100. 0
10 0. 0

83 . 1
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81.9
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25.9

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MOTOR VEHI CLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT . I CO.C
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND A LL IE D PRODUCTS . . . 10 0. 0
DRY GOODS AND APPAREL .......................................... 100. 0
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..................... 1 0 0. 0
ELECTRICAL GOODS ..................................................... 10 0. 0
1 00. 0
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND S U PP LI E S .............. 1 0 0 . c

7 2 .3
7 6. 3
7 3 .6
7 3 .8
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87.0
87.8
85.6
87.9
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83 .8
81.8
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85.0

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3.6
2.7
2.8
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21.4
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23.6
21.8
20.2
21.3
27.0
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21.3
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1 8. 4
21.1
19 .8
18 .9
18.7
19 .5
18 .5
20.6
21.4
22.0
1 8 .5
1 9 .4

1.4
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1 .5
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1 .6
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1.9
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90 .9
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89.6
90.4
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89.6
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87 .4
89 .8
85 .6
79.8
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80.2
83 .1
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72.5
83.5
78 .9
84 .6

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9.6
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8.3
8.5
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9.7
8.5
8.7
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1.0
1.4
.8

.1
.0
.1
.6
1.3
.2
.2
.1
1.4
.3
.7
.3

RAILROADS ......................... , .........................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ..............
TAXICABS ........................................................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ..............
AIR TRANSPORTATION .................................................

COMMUNICATION

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S
WHOLESALE TRADE

RETAIL

TRADE

...................................................................

100. 0

83.5

67.6

DEPARTMENT STORES ................................... ...............
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ..................... .............................
VARIETY STORES ..........................................................
GROCERY S T O R E S ............ .............................................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ..........................................
MEN' S AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS
WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR STORES ..........................
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ........................................
SHOE STORES ............................ •
....................................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNI SHINGS .....................
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ............
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ............................................

1 00. 0
10 0 .0
10 0. 0
1 00. 0
100. 0
100.c
1 0 0. 0
100. 0
1 0 0. 0
10 0 .0
10 0 .0
10C.C

80.1
7 8 .3
7 8 .6
7 8 .3
7 6 .4
7 8 .2
79 .8
7 8 .7
73.C
75.7
78.7
78 . 9

77.4
7 7 .5
74.4
72.0
65.6
72.6
7 4 .9
7 7 .5
63.6
7 2 .0
7 1 .2
7 5. 7




12.1
2.6
.8
3. 9
5 .3
8 .3
4.9
4.3
l. 1
6.6
3. 4
6 .3
3. 1

ALL
WRKRS T.0TAL

PERCENT OF WORKERS EMPLOYED IA1 THEIR INDUSTRY OF MAJOR EARNING DURING—
F 0 U R
A N Y
Q U A R T E R S
Q U A R T E R
SINGLE INDUSTRY WORKERS MULTI-INDUSTRY WORKERS
INDUSTRY WORKERS MULTI-INDUSTRY WORKERS
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF MAJOR
NUMBER OF
NUMBER OF
INDUSTRY EMP LOYERS
INDUSTRY EMP LOYERS
EMPLOYERS
EMPLOYERS
MORE
MORE
MORE
MORE
THAN ALL
THAN
THAN
THAN
TWO TOTAL ONE
TWO TOTAL ONE
TWO WRKRS TOTAL ONE
TWO
TWO
TWO
TWO
ONE
TWO

p r i v a t e n o n a g r i c u l t u r a l e c o n o m y -Continued
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ......

100.0

80.5

73.4

6.1

.9

19.5

17.0

2.1

.4 100.0

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS .....
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ..........
PERSONAL CREDIT INSTITUTIONS ...........
LIFE INSURANCE ......................... ..
FIRE, MARINE, AND CASUALTY INSURANCE ...

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.C

81.6
81.1
73.7
77.8'
79.4

78.0
79.8
66.2
75.2
77.4

3.4
1.3
6.3
2.4
2.0

.2
.0
1.2
.2
.1

18.4
18.9
26. 3
22.2
20.6

17.4
18.1
23.6
21.3
19.7

1.0
.7
1.9
.8
.9

.1
.1
.8
.1
.0

SERVICES .....................................

100.0

85.8

72.1

11.1

2.7

14.2

10.2

2.8

1.2 100.0

91.6

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS ....
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS ......
MOTION PICTURES ..........................
HOSPITALS .................................

100.0
100.c
100.0
100.c

70.7
79.4
70.6
82.7

56.6
72.3
62.9
77.5

12.3
5.8
5.6
4.7

1.7
1.2
2.1
.5

29.3
20.6
29.4
17.3

20.3
17.9
24.5
15.7

6.4
2.1
2.4
1.5

2.5
.7
2.5
.2

81.8
89.1
75.6
90.6

SINGLE
INDUSTRY




100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

89.6

81.0

7.5

1.2

10.4

8.5

1.6

.4

90.0
89.6
86.5
87.8
89.7 "

85.7
88.0
76.3
84.6
87.3

4.1
1.6
8.6
3.C
2.3

.2
.0
1.6
.2
.1

10.0
10.4
13.5
12.2
10.3

9.3
9.9
11.3
11.4
9.5

.6
.6
1.6
.8
.8

.1
.0
.6
.1
.1

75.2

12.8

3.6

8.4

5.3

1.9

1.2

61.1
80. 1
62.6
84.5

17.8
7.1
9.0
5.5

2.9
1 .8
4.0
.7

18.2
10.9
24.4
9.4

10.2
9.0
16.7
8.1

4.9
1.5
3.1
1.0

3.1
.4
4.6
.2

PERCENT OF WORKERS THAT EARNED MAJCR PROPCRTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY AND REGION DURING
N Y

INDUSTRY

UNITED NORTH
STATES EAST

NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

Q U A
F C U R
ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOY?4ENT
NORTH 1
UNITED NORTH
SOUTH c e n t r a l |
STATES EAST

28.5

28.5

100.0

27.1

27.9

29.4

14.8

100.0

27.1

27.9

29.4

14.8

Q U A

R T E R

R T E R
T
UNITED
STATES

1

^71

S
I N
H l S- I N D U S T R Y____
NORTH
NORTH^
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST
EAST

PRIVATE NONAGRICULTURAL ECONOMY .....

100.c

26.3

........................................

100.c

10.9

50.2

18.9

19.3

100.0

11.4

49.9

18.7

19.2

100.0

11.7

49.7

18.9

18.8

100.0
10C.C

3.5
A.3

69.8
69.9

9.6
7.4

15.4
17.7

100.0
1C0.0

3.7
5.1

71.2
68.8

8.0
7.4

15.1
17.9

100.0
ICO.O

3.6
5.3

71.4
69.0

7.9
6.6

14.9
18.1

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION .......................

100.c

20.9

37.2

24.1

16.2

100.0

21.8

35.7

24.7

16.5

100.0

22.2

34.8

25.0

16.7

HIGHWAY AND STREET CONSTRUCTION .........
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NEC ..................
PLUMBING, HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING .....
PAINTING, PAPER HANGING, DECORATING .....
ELECTRICAL WORK ............................
MASONRY, STONEWORK, ANO PLASTERING ......
CARPENTERING AND FLOORING ................
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL WORK .............
CONCRETE WORK ..............................

100.0
100.0
100.c
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.0
100. c
100.0

15.6
17.5
23.3
25.2
22.0
23.7
24.7
23.8
21.9

45.3
42.3
33. 3
34.5
34.3
38.4
33. 1
35.4
28.0

21.6
21.3
26.9
23.7
27.2
22.5
25.7
27.0
28.8

16.0
17.6
16.0
16.3
15.5
14.0
16.0
13.6
19.7

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.C
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0

13.9
18.8
23.5
25.9
22.5
25.0
28.5
23.8
24.9

48.4
41.0
31.6
30.6
33.4
36.5
28.2
33.4
26.7

18.7
20.5
28.4
26.3
28.2
23.6
26.2
28.0
25.8

17.7
18.7
16.0
17.0
15.3
14.2
16.7
14.5
21.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

12.6
19.4
24.7
26.8
23.3
24.5
29.8
24.1
23.5

50.6
39.6
29.6
29.8
32.1
35.3
26.9
32.1
26.8

17.0
21.0
29.3
26.7
28.8
24.6
26.0
28. 1
24.3

18.4
19.1
15.9
16.5
15.2
15.0
16.8
15.5
24.1

................................

100.c

28.5

26.0

32. 1

12.6

100.0

28.9

25.8

33.0

11.7

ICO.O

29. 1

25.5

33.2

11.5

100.0
100.c
10C.C
100.c
1C0.0
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.0
LOO .0
1 0 0 .c
100.0
100.c
100.c
10C.C
1CC.C
100.0
1 0 0 .c
100.c
100.0
1 0 0 .c
ICO.C
100.C
100.c
100. c
100.c
100.c
100.c
100.0
100.c
100.c
10C.C
100.c
100.c
100. c
ICO.C
10C.C
10C.C
ICO.C

7.9
11.5
23.5
14.7
8.2.
30.2
21.2
4.4
19.5
33.6
17.2
52.0
19.4
55.8
34.5
51.8
6.6
11.0
16.3
27.4
32.4
24.6
30.2
37.2
21.5
52.8
40.3
21.6
14.1
31.5
49.0
35.4
18.3
37.1
19.0
39.9
35.8
24.4
31.8
21.2
30.2
3.9
12.9

16. 3
40.0
22.2
23.0
25.8
26.8
33.0
95. 3
77.9
57.4
80.9
27.0
64.4
25.2
39.0
39.2
47.8
31.7
5C. 7
25.3
23.9
27.0
19.6
36.7
63.6
8.6
11.3
39.2
25.7
19.7
22.4
27.0
34.8
15.5
18.8
17.7
9.2
31.8
5.8
6.0
3.4
13.3
20.9

19.2
39.C
33.2
23. 1
52.C
29.2
29.6
.2
2.5
3.5
1.3
16.3
8. 3
7.6
5.5
3. C
7.9
23. 1
20.4
38.6
34.4
29.4
3 8.1
2C.4
12.2
3C.C
38. 1
19.7
51.9
38. 7
23.5
28.5
26.5
40.8
55.9
31.2
42.5
30.5
52.9
69.1
61.4
78.5
55.9

56.5
9.4
19.3
38.2
13.6
12.8
14.4
.1
.1
2.1
.2
3.9
5.7
10.4
5.8
'4.0
37.6
34.0
11.8
8.6
9.2
18.6
12.0
5.3
2.2
6.5
10. 1
17.C
8.2
9.3
2.2
8.6
17.4
6.4
6.3
11.1
12.1
12.8
9.4
3.6
5.0
4.2
10.2

100.0
1CC.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
1C0.0
100.0
10C.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
10C.0
1C0.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1C0.0
1C0.0
ICO.O
1CC.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
1CC.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O
ICO.O

7.6
12.5
24.5
19.3
8.6
30.0
21.8
4.2
20.4
32.0
16.1
53.9
21.1
57.3
33.7
54.4
5.9
10.8
15.9
27.0
31.8
25.5
30.9
36.8
21.1
53.4
38.6
21.7
13.8
30.3
49.1
34.2
19.2
37.8
19.3
39.8
36.7
25.2
32.1
21.7
31.2
4.8
12.6

15.9
37.7
22.6
24.7
24.8
27.2
32.4
95.6
76.7
59.8
82.4
25.9
64.0
24.5
40.7
37.7
47. 1
31.7
53.6
25.9
24.1
26.1
19.7
37.3
64.7
8.1
11.6
39.8
24.7
18. 1
21.5
28.9
34.4
16.0
19.2
16. 7
8.5
31.6
6. 1
5.8
3.3
12.7
20.5

19.1
41.0
34.1
21.5
55.5
29.2
30.4
.1
2.9
3.3
l.l
15.9
8.6
8.2
5.5
3.6
7.8
23.3
19.9
38.0
34.2
30.4
39.0
20.3
12.4
31.3
40.4
20.2
53.0
41.9
25. 1
28.4
26.0
39.9
55.8
33.0
43.5
30.3
52.6
69.2
60.2
78.9
57.2

57.3
8.7
17.7
33.2
11.0
12.8
13.7

100.0
100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.C
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.C
100.0
100.0
100.C
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0

7.3
12.3
24.6
20.1
8.9
30.5
21.9
4.1
21.3
32.2
16.8
54.0
21.5
58.6
33.6
55.6
5.7
10.6
16.0
27.1
32.4
25.8
30.9
37.0
20.9
53.7
38.6
21.5
13.2
30.2
49.0
33.9
19.2
38.2
18.9
40.0
36.6
25.2
32.5
21.8
31.2
5.1
13.0

15.2
36.3
22.3
24.5
24.2
26.5
31.3
95.7
77.3
59.7
82.1
26.1
63.8
23. 1
41.0
36.0
47.5
30.9
53.8
26.8
23.2
25.5
19.5
37.6
65.3
7.8
11.4
39.9
24.3
16.9
20.6
29.8
33.6
15.7
18.8
16.2
8.3
31.4
5.8
5.5
3.0
12.6
19.7

18.6
42.4
34.8
21.1
56. 1
29.2
31.3
.1
1.4
3.4
.6
16.0
8.5
8.4
5.5
3.8
7.8
23.2
19.8
36.9
34.4
30.7
39.7
20.2
12.2
31.4
40.8
20.6
54.1
43.2
25.9
28.4
27.2
39.8
56.9
33.5
44.1
31.1
52.5
69.8
60.8
79.0
58.1

58.9
8.7
17.1
32.8
10.5
12.9
13.5

mining

CRUDE PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS AND LIQUIDS.
OIL AND GAS FIELD SERVICES ...............

manufacturing

AMMUNITION, EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS .......
m e a t p r o d u c t s ..............................
DAIRY PRODUCTS .............................
CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS .........
GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS .......................
BAKERY PRODUCTS ...........................
BEVERAGES ..................................
WEAVING MILLS, COTTON .....................
WEAVING MILLS, SYNTHETICS ................
KNITTING MILLS .............................
YARN AND THREAD MILLS .....................
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS .........
MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS ..............
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR ...........
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS ....
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR ......................
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS ...............
MILLWORK, PLYWOOD AND RELATED PRODUCTS ..
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE .......................
PULP ANO PAPER MILLS ......................
PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES .........
NEWSPAPERS .................................
COMMERCIAL PRINTING .......................
INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS ......................
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS .......
DRUGS .......................................
SOAP, CLEANERS, AND TOILET GOODS ........
PETROLEUM REFINING ........................
TIRES AND INNER TUBES .....................
OTHER RUBBER PRODUCTS .....................
FOOTWEAR, EXCEPT RUBBER ..................
GLASS AND GLASSWARE, PRESSED OR BLOWN ...
CONCRETE, GYPSUM, AND PLASTER PRODUCTS ..
BLAST FURNACE AND BASIC STEEL PRODUCTS ..
IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES .................
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND D R A W I N G ...... . . . .
CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, AND HARDWARE .......
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS ....
SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS, BOLTS, ETC ......
m e t a l STAMPINGS ...........................
ENGINES AND TURBINES ......................
FARM MACHINERY .............................
CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY ......




15.8

2.0
.2
3.6
4.4
9.0
5.5
3.0
39.2
33.9
1C.1
9.0
9.6
17.8
IC.2
5.3
1.5
5.3
9.4
16.9
8.3
9.2
1.7
8.0
17.7
6.3
5.7
10.3
11.0
12.6
9.2
3.3
5.3
3.7
9.6

1.8
.2
3.3
4.3
8.9
5.3
3.0
39.0
35. 1
9.9
9. 1
9.7
17. 7
9.7
4.9
1.4
5.0
9.1
16.5
8. 1
9. 1
1.7
7.3
17.3
6.2
5.5
1C.3
10.5
12.0
9.2
2.9
5.0
3.3
9.1

PERCENT OF WORKERS THAT EARNED MAJOR PROPCRTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INOUSTRY AND REGION DURING
N Y

IN DU S TR Y

UNITED NORTH
STATES EAST

Q U A

R T E R

NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

Q U A
F C U R
ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT
NORTH
UNITED NORTH 1
SOUTH ]CENTRAL WEST
STATES EAST

R T E R
T
UNITED
STATES

N
S
I 1
H I S I N D U S T R Y
NORTH
NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST
EAST

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL EC CN CM Y-Continued
61.1
34.5
43.2
29.3
49.9
25.7
49.4
48.0
39.5
53.4
24.8
19.4
75.0
17.4
8.8
39.5
33.9

4.6
7.4
7.6
19.1
8.4
18.3
8.3
3.4
8.1
8.4
17.9
21.7
4.5
3C.4
20.0
11.1
11.5

100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.c
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O

28.7
39.8
40.2
43.6
23.9
31.7
27.3
14.0
43.0
20. 1
36.8
42.2
11.2
22.0
25.8
42.3
38.2

5.5
18.1
9.0
7.7
16.3
22.9
14.1
33.9
8.9
18.0
20.4
16.8
9.0
29.0
46.2
5.9
15.4

61.5
34.8
43.2
30.2
51.7
25.9
50.6
48.6
40.0
54.2
24.9
18.9
75.7
17.6
8.8
39.7
34.7

4.1
7.2
7.4
18.5
7.9
18.6
7.7
3.4
7.6
7.2
17.7
21.5
4.1
31.4
19.1
11.2
ll.O

20.0

42.9

11.9

100.c

23. 1

19.2

43.9

11.6

10.9
20.7
29.3
26. 1

99.8
19.9
24.6
31.7
16.8

9.5
14.4
13.8
24.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

.1
59.7
40.6
25.6
31.9

10.7
19.5
28.1
26.6

99.9
19.4
25.4
32.4
16.5

9.5
14.3
13. 7
23.9

27.6

27. 1

24.8

20.0

100.0

27.4

27.2

25.0

20.1

100.0

27.4
25.5

27. 1
27.5

24.8
27.7

20.4
18.7

100.0
100.0

27.1
25.5

27.1
28.0

25.1
26.8

20.4
18.9

16.7

100.0

23.1

32.4

27.2

16.3

ICO.O

23.4

32.0

27.2

16.3

27.C

17.0

100.0

27.9

27.8

27.7

15.9

100.0

28.1

27.6

27.9

15.8

31.6
26.5
11.9
23.2
24.C
26.3
27.0

17.6
15.5
10.4
22.4
15.4
15.5
16.6

1CC.0
1CC.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0

21.0
29.4
59.2
24.8
34.1
26.9
27.0

29.2
27.0
18.5
30.7
27.0
30.7
29.2

32.9
26.5
11.7
25.2
24.3
26.6
27.0

16.5
15.2
10.2
18.4
14.3
15.4
16.1

100.0
ICO.O
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

20.8
29.8
60.0
24.9
34.3
27.6
27.3

29.3
26.5
18.0
30.5
27.2
30.0
28.9

33.3
26.8
11.5
25.5
24.2
26.4
27.2

16.2
15.1
10.1
18.2
13.9
15.9
15.9

18. 1

10C.0

24.5

29.2

28.4

17.2

ICO.O

24.7

28.9

28.7

17.1

16.5
14.2
13.5
17.3
19.4
16.0
14.6
13.0
14. 3
16.6
1 7.8
8.6

100.0
10C.0
ICO.O

26.8
18.0
30. 1
25.1
20.3
34.8
32.7
23.2
30.5
24. 1
19.8
44.2

25.4
22.2
32.5
29.4
31.6
24.5
28.7
37.5
24.8
34.1
32.0
28.6

31.0
45.7
26.2
26.9
28.8
24.4
24.9
26.0
29.8
25.0
29.0
17.9

16.5
14.1
11.0
18.0
18.8
14.6
13.3
12.8
13.6
15.1
18.3
7.9

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

26.8
17.5
30.0
25.6
20.6
34.8
33. 1
22.6
29.5
23.8
19.7
45.2

24.8
22.3
32.9
28.7
31.2
24.3
28.7
38.1
25.0
33.7
31.9
27.9

31.3
45.8
26.5
27.0
28.8
24.9
25.4
26.3
31.1
26.0
28.8
17.8

16.8
14.3
10.3
18. 1
19.0
14.3
12.5
12.6
13.1
14.7
18.8
7.7

1C0.0
100.0
1C0.0
1CC.C
1C0.0
100.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
ICO.O
1C0.0
100.0
100.0
1CC.0
100.0
lOG-O
100.0

28. 1
39.1
39.7
43.5
24.5
31.3
27.0
14.3
42.7
20.6
36.2
41.4
11.1
23.5
25.1
42.2
37.4

5.9
18.8
9.3
8.1
17. 1
23.6
14.9
34.2
9. 1
17.3
20.8
16.9
9.5
28.7
46. 1
6.2
16.5

12.7

100.c

22.9

10.9
14.3
15.0
24.1

ICO.O
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
ICO.O

.1
58.9
40.2
24.9
31.5

24.3

20.2

100.0

24.4
26. 1

20.5
19.2

100.0

32.6

26.6

27.0

28.3

2 1.0
29.5
58.7
22.5
34.3
26.7
26.6

29.4
26.8
18.6
31.0
25.7
31.3
29. 1

23.7

29.7

27.8

27.1
19.4
28.0
25.5
19.8
32.9
31.9
2 1.8
29.0
23.5
19.4
42.8

26.6
20.2
33.9
30. 1
32.2
25.3
28. 7
40.2
26.6
33.4
33.5
29.5

29.4
46.2
24.2
26.C
28.C
24.2
24.2
24.6
28.6
24.S
28.5
17.9

METAL WORKING MACHINERY .................
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY ..............
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY ...........
OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES ..........
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES ...............
ELECTRIC TEST AND DISTRIBUTING EQUIPMENT
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS ........
HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES ....................
ELECTRIC LIGHTING AND WIRING EQUIPMENT .
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT .......
COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT .................
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES ..
MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ...........
AIRCRAFT AND PARTS .......................
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING ...
MECHANICAL MEASURING AND CONTROL DEVICES
OTHER MANUFACTURING .....................

100. C
1CC.C
100.C
100. c
1C0.C
100.c
100.c
100.c
1C0.C
100.c
100.c
10C.C
100.c
100.c
1CC.C
10C.C
100.c

28.3
6.2
39.7
18.7
3 8.6
9.3
42.4
8. 1
25.6
17.0
31.0 23.5
27.0
16.0
14.9 33.2
9.6
43.5
20.4
17.4
35.9 20.6
40.0
15.7
9.8
11.0
28.8
22.8
23.1 44.7
41.0
6.7
38.2 , 16.4

6C.C
33.2
43.8
29.9
48.4
27.2
48. 1
48.6
37.9
53.4
25. 1
21.7
74.4
17.e
1C. 8
39.3
32.2

5.3
8.2
8.1
19.5
8.8
17.2
8.5
3.3
8.5
8.1
18.1
22.2
4.8
30.6
21.3
12.0
12.3‘

TRANSPORTATION1..............................

1CC.C

22.9

20.9

40.7

RAILROADS1 .................................
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN TRANSPORTATION ......
TAXICABS ..................................
TRUCKING, LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ......
AIR TRANSPORTATION .......................

100.0
100.0
100.c
100. c
100.0

.1
56.7
41.8
24.4
30.8

11.6
21.0
29.6
25.6

99.8
20.C
22.7
30.6
18. 3

COMMUNICATION ............................... 100.c

27.8

27.2

TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION . . ............... 100.c
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING ...... 100.0

27.8
24.8

27.0
28.8

100.c

22.7

100.c
100.0
100.c
100.0
100.0
100.c
100.c
100.c

PUBLIC UTILITIES ...........................

MOTOR VEHICLES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND ALLIED PRODUCTS ..
DRY GOOOS AND APPAREL ...................
GROCERIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS .........
ELECTRICAL GOODS .........................
HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND HEATING EQUIPMENT
MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ......

RETAIL TRADE ................................ 1C0.C
DEPARTMENT STORES ........................
MAIL ORDER HOUSES ........................
VARIETY STORES ...........................
GROCERY STORES ...........................
MOTOR VEHICLE DEALERS ...................
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLUTHING AND FURNISHINGS
WOMEN'S REACY-TO-WEAR STORES ...........
FAMILY CLOTHING STORES ..................
SHOE STORES ...............................
FURNITURE AND HOME FURNISHINGS .........
DRUG STORES AND PROPRIETARY STORES ....
FUEL AND ICE DEALERS ....................




100.c
100.c
100.c
100.c
100'.c
10C.C
10C.C
100.c
10C.C
10C.C
100.0

100.c

100.0

ICO.O
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
100.0
ICO.O
1CC.0
1CC.C

100.0

PERCENT OF WORKERS THAT EARNED MAJOR PROPORTION OF THEIR EARNINGS IN THIS INDUSTRY AND REGION DURING
1 N Y
1

INDUSTRY

UNITED NORTH
STATES EAST

Q U A

R T E R

NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

Q U A
F O U R
ALL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT
NORTH
UNITED NORTH
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST
STATES EAST

R T E R
T
UNITED
STATES
1

___ ____

S
I N
H I S I N 0 U S T R Y
NORTH
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH CENTRAL WEST

PRIVATE NCNAGRICULTURAL E C ON OM Y -Continued

FINANCE* INSURANCE* AND REAL ESTATE ....... 100.c

31.1

26.5

24.2

17.2

100.0

32.2

25.8

24.6

16.7

100.0

32.4

25.5

24.9

16.5

1 0 0 .c

100. c

29.5
18.4
18.4
33.3
35.4

25.7
25.2
35.4
30.2
18.8

25.2
33.1
27.C
24.5
29.4

18.9
22.6
17.7
11.5
16.3

1C0.0
10C.0
1C0.0
100.0
100.0

30.0
18.5
18.7
34.0
35.0

25.2
24.1
35.5
30. 1
19.2

24.8
34.8
2R.4
24.5
29.4

19.3
22.1
16.0
11.1
16.3

100.c
100.0
100.c
100.0
ICO.O

29.8
19.2
18.9
34.3
34.7

25.4
23.7
35.2
29.7
19.4

24.9
34.8
28.9
24.7
29.8

19. 1
21.8
15.4
11.0
16.0

SERVICES ...................................... 10C.C

27.2

29.2

25.6

17.4

ICC.O

28.0

29.2

25.7

16.6

100.0

28.2

29.1

25.8

16.4

21.6
24.7
26.6
29.7

32.8
33.8
26.9
27.5

19.4
26. 1
2C.2
28. 7

24.6
15.0
25.3
13.8

1C0.0
ICO.O
1C0.0
ICO.O

21.3
24.3
31.7
29.3

33.3

18.2
26.5
19.0
28.8

24.9
13.7
25.0
13.9

100.0
100.c
100.0
100.0

21.6
24.5
32.2
29.6

32.3
34.8
23.6
27.7

18.6
26.6
18.6
28.8

24.7
13.7
24.4
13.7

COMMERCIAL AND STOCK SAVINGS BANKS ......
SAVINGS ANO LOAN ASSOCIATIONS ...........
PERSONAL CREOIT INSTITUTIONS .............
LIFE INSURANCE .............................
FIRE, MARINE, ANO CASUALTY INSURANCE ....

☆
u . s GOVERNMENT

HOTELS, TOURISTS COURTS, AND MOTELS .....
LAUNDRIES AND DRY CLEANING PLANTS .......
MOTION PICTURES ...........................
HOSPITALS ..................................

100.0
100.c
100.c

100.0
100.0
100. c

100.c

1 F o r p u rp o s e s of this study, and beca u se in fo rm atio n about th eir actual
p lac e o f em p loym ent w as not a v a ila b le in the file s studied, em p lo y ees of r a i l ­
ro a d s and r a ilr o a d re la t e d o rg a n iz a tio n s co v e re d by the R a ilr o a d R etirem en t A ct
w e r e c o n s id e re d to h ave been em p lo y ed in the N orth C e n tra l R egion.

P R IN T IN G O F F IC E : 1975 O - 583-674 ( 9 9 )




35.2
23.2
27.8

NOTE:
A dash ( - ) in dicate s eith er the s am p le did not in clu de any w o r k e r s
with th ese c h a r a c t e r is t ic s , o r that the data did not met the B u r e a u 's p u b lic a ­
tion c r it e r ia .

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)
Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Region III
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)
Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St., NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)




Region V
9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)
Region VI
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas. Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Regions VII and VIII *
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
Regions IX and X **
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

Regions VII and VIII are serviced by Kansas City
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102