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SAN F R A N C ISC O -O A K L A N D ,
CALIFORNIA
J a n u a ry 1 9 5 3

Bulletin N o . 1116-9

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




83d

House

C o n g r e s s , 1st S e s s i o n

Occupational Wage Survey
S A N FRANCISCO - O A K L A N D ,




CA LIF O RN IA
January

1953

Bulletin No. 1116-9
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin E Durkin, S ecretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Ewan Clague, C om m ission er

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 20 cents

Document

No.

117




Contents
Page

Letter of Transmittal

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s ,
W ashington, D. C., March 20, 1953.
The Secretary o f Labor:
I have the honor to transm it herewith a report on occu­
p a tio n a l wages and rela ted b en efits in San Francisco-Oakland,
C a lif., during January 1953. Sim ilar stud ies are being con­
ducted in a number o f other large labor-market areas during the
f is c a l year 1953. These stu d ies have been designed to meet a
v a rie ty o f governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide
area-wide earnings inform ation fo r many occupations common to
most manufacturing and nonmanufacturing in d u stries, as w ell as
summaries o f se lected supplementary wage b e n e fits. Whenever
p o ssib le , separate data have been presented for ind ividu al major
industry d iv isio n s .
This report was prepared in the Bureau*s regional o f­
f ic e in San F rancisco, C a lif., by John L. Dana, Regional Wage and
In d u stria l R elation s A nalyst. The planning and cen tral d irectio n
o f the program was carried on in the Bureau*s D ivision of Wages
and In d u stria l R ela tio n s.
Ewan Clague, Commissioner.
Hon. M artin

D urkin,
S e c re ta ry o f Labor.




INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................
THE SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND METROPOLITAN AREA..............................
OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ...................................................................

1
1
2

TABLES:
Average earnings fo r selected occupations studied on
an area b a sis A-l
O ffice occupations ...........................................................
A-2
P rofession al and tech n ica l occupations .............
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ...........
A-4
C ustodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations .........................

3
6
7
8

Average earnings fo r selected occupations studied on
an industry b asis B-2851 Paints and varnishes .......................................................
B-35 Machinery in d u stries ...................
B-7211 Power laundries ...................................................................
Union wage sca les fo r selected occupations C-15 Building construction .....................................................
C-205 Bakeries ...............................................................................
C-27 P rinting ..........................................................
C-41 Local tr a n sit operating employees .........................
C-42 Motortruck drivers and helpers ................................
Supplementary wage p ractices D -l
S h ift d iffe r e n tia l provision s ..................................
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours ..................................................
D-3
Paid holidays .......................................................................
D-4
Paid vacations .....................................................................
D-5
Insurance and pension plans .......................................
APPENDIX:
Scope and method o f s u r v e y .........................................................
INDEX

10
10
11
12
12
12
13
13
14
15
15
16
18
19
21




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY

Introduction
The San Francis co-Oakland area is one of sev era l im­
portant in d u stria l centers in which the Bureau of Labor S t a t is ­
t ic s is cu rren tly conducting occupational wage surveys. In such
surveys occupations common to a v ariety of manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing in d u stries are studied on a community-wide ba­
s i s . 1 / C ross-industry methods of sampling are thus u tiliz e d
in com piling earnings data fo r the follow ing types of occupa­
tio n s: (a) o ffic e ; (b) p rofession al and tech n ica l; (c) m ainte­
nance and power plant; and (d) cu sto d ia l, warehousing, and
shipping. In presenting earnings inform ation for such jobs
(ta b les A -l through A-*!-), separate data are provided wherever
p o ssib le fo r in d ivid u al broad industry d iv isio n s.
Earnings inform ation for ch a ra cteristic occupations
in certa in more narrowly defined lo c a l in d u stries is presented
in se r ie s B ta b le s . Union sca les (se r ie s C ta b le s) are pre­
sented fo r se le c te d occupations in several in d u stries or trades
in which the great m ajority o f the workers are employed under
terms o f co llectiv e-b a rg a in in g agreements, and the contract or
minimum ra tes are b elieved to be in d ica tiv e of p revailin g pay
p r a c tic e s.
Data are c o lle cted and summarized on s h ift operations
and d iffe r e n t ia ls , hours of work, and supplementary b e n efits
such as vacation allow ances, paid h olid ays, and insurance and
pension p la n s.

The San Francisco-Oakland
Metropolitan Area
Like other large m etropolitan areas of the Far West, 2 /
the San F rancisco Bay Area is marked by a predominance of b u si­
ness a c tiv ity in trad e, fin an ce, and se r v ic e s. Long dependent
on a v a rie ty of manufactured products from the E ast, the 6county area 3 / remains la rg ely the shipping and commercial mart
i t has been h is to r ic a lly . This is e sp e c ia lly true fo r the City
l / See appendix for discu ssion of scope and method of sur­
vey. D ifferen ces between the scope of th is survey and the la s t
previous survey (January 1952) are indicated in the appendix
ta b le .
2 ] Except Los A ngeles.
3 / Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San F rancisco, San Mateo,
and Solano.




SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND, CALIF.
of San F rancisco, where tw o-thirds of the working population are
employed in such en terp rises. Decent years have shown marked
gains in manufactiming in d u stries in Oakland and other East Bay
c i t i e s , however.
T otal wage and salary employees (excluding a g ricu l­
tu ra l workers) numbered more than 900,000 in January 1953. Of
th ese, more than 376,000 were employed in trade, finan ce, and
serv ices; 2 1 5 ,0 0 0 were in w holesale and r e t a il trade; 5^,000
were in fin a n c ia l in s titu tio n s (inclu ding insurance carriers
and r e a l esta te operators); and 107,000 worked in the service
in d u stries. There were about 180,000 workers in manufacturing;
103,000 In tran sp ortation , communication, and other public u t i l ­
i t ie s ; 59,000 in contract construction; and 1 ,5 0 0 in mining.
Among the in d u stries and estab lish m en t-size groups
included in the Bureau’s study, more than 90 percent of Bay
Area plant workers were employed in establishm ents having w rit­
ten contracts w ith labor unions in January 1953. Most of the
plant workers in manufacturing, public u t i l i t i e s , and w holesale
trade were employed under union contract term s. In r e t a il
trade and the serv ice in d u stries, 90 percent were in organized
establish m en ts.
The San Francisco Bay Area tr a d itio n a lly has been one
of the stron gest centers of trade union influence in the United
S ta te s. In recent years i t has become w idely known as a center
of exten sive management organization a ls o . Federations of em­
ployer groups, u su a lly formed along industry lin e s , bargain c o l­
le c tiv e ly w ith the labor groups. This m aster-type arrangement
has emerged as the general pattern in Bay Area in d u stria l r e la ­
tio n s . In ea rly 1953, about th ree-fou rths of a l l union members
in the area worked under the terms of such agreements.
Bate le v e ls of Bay Area plant workers (manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing combined) compare favorably with those in
such areas as D etroit and P ittsburgh, c h ie fly characterized by
heavy industry and high pay. In surveys conducted in 1951-52,
the pay p o sitio n of San Francisco-Oakland plant workers in in ­
d irect jobs was found to exceed the le v e l fo r comparable workers
in both D etroit and P ittsburgh, as w ell as in 37 other large
U. S. labor markets, k j Average earnings for comparable occu­
pations were u su a lly higher in manufacturing than in nonmanu­
factu rin g in these areas. The comparative pay p o sition of Bay
Area workers is thus a l l the more strik in g when the in d u stria l
com position of th is area as described e a r lie r is considered.
k j Toivo P. Kanninen, "Wage D ifferen ces Among * Labor
4-0
Markets," Monthly Labor Beview, December 1952 (p. 620).

2

Occupational Wage Structure
Wages of all but a negligible proportion
of the BayArea plant workers were b a sed on formally- established wage struc­
tures in early 1953*
Three-fourths of all time-rated production
workers were employed in establishments
that determined pay on
a single-rate system.
E x cept for a small number of workers whose
pay was ba s e d on individual determination, the remainder of the
time-rated plant workers were employed under plans providing a
range of rates fo r individual occupations.
Am o n g the industry
groups surveyed, o n l y the public utility group had a p r e p onder­
ance of workers under rate-range structures.
In manufacturing,
9 0 percent
were p aid according to a ingle-rate systems and this
scaled d own thr o u g h other industry groups
to 7 0 percent in r e ­
tail trade.
Incentive-rate systems of p ay were rarely employed
in manufacturing industries, except apparel, and only in retail
trade to any extent in nonmanufacturing.
Skilled plant workers in most of the maintenance jobs
surveyed averaged $2.20 or more a n hour in January 1953.
These
included electricians, machinists, painters,
and
pipe fitters
at averages b e t w e e n $ 2 . 2 0 a nd $ 2 .3 0 ; auto mechanics, carpenters,
and tool-and-die makers averaged somewhat more. These craftsmen
as a group had slightly more t han a 2 0 -percent advantage in pay
over their helpers who averaged $1.81+ a n hour.
In other
jobs
requiring skill b r o a d ly comparable
to that
of the maintenance
trades helper, oilers had an hourly average of $ 1 .8 0 , stationary
boiler f i r emen $ 1 .9 9 > and truck drivers
fro m $ 1 . 9 6 to $ 2 .1 3 ,
depending on t r uck w eight capacity.
Representative of oc c u p a ­
tions requiring little
or no
training are material handling
laborers and m e n packers an routine tasks.
These averaged $1.77
and $1.75, respectively.
In the custodial workers* group,
m en
janitors, porters,
and cleaners had a $ 1 . 5 0 average and w a t c h ­
m e n received $ 1 .5 3 .
A m o n g office workers,
salary structures were f o r m a l ­
ized in establishments employing a little more than two-thirds
of the workers
in the industries surveyed.
F o r a large m a j o r ­
ity,
the systems called for a specified salary range
for each
occupation.
Individual determination was the basis
on w h i c h
pay was fixed for the remainder,
except for a small number on
single-rate systems.
The predominance
of salary-range
plans
was evident in e a c h of the industry groups taken separately e x ­
cept wholesale trade, where pay for a m a j ority of office workers
was set on a n individual basis.




Average salaries
in most w o m e n * s
office cl a s s i f i c a ­
tions studied were more than $ 5 5 a week. In occupations d e m a n d ­
ing considerable responsibility an d a wi d e k n o wledge of office
procedures, women earned almost !+ 0 p e r c e n t m ore t h a n in jobs of
a routine nature requiring no special abilities.
Secretaries
averaged $ 6 9 a week,
payroll clerks
$ 6 2 .5 0 , an d experienced
bookkeeping-machine
operators,
$62.
A t the other end of the
scale, routine file clerks had an average $1*4.50 salary, office
girls $46.50, and copy typists $ 1+9 .
The prevalence
of rate-range systems
in office p ay
and the single-rate system in plant structure p r o b a b l y accounts
in some part for the proportionately w i d e r spread
in average
earnings b e t w e e n high and low skills
a m ong
office workers, as
contrasted w i t h plant workers.

More than 20 percent
of the plant workers
in m a n u ­
facturing were employed on late shifts in J anuary 1953.
Nearly
all these workers received premium rates of pay.
Mo s t common
second-shift differentials were 5 -cents-an-hour
or 1 0 -percent
additions to day rates; third-shift workers t y p ically were paid
hourly shift differentials of 10 or 12 cents.
In the m a c h i n e r y
industry, differentials were on a percentage b a s i s exclusively,
w i t h the second and third shift wor k e r s r e c e i v i n g 1 0 - and 1 5 percent premiums, respectively.

F e w workers in the Bay Area, office or plant, w ere on
a workweek schedule
of more than 1+0 hours.
For nearly threefourths of the women office workers, the schedule was 1+0 hours,
w i t h the remainder on shorter hours.
A l m o s t half the w o m e n e m ­
ployed in financial offices worked less t han 1+ 0 hours
a week.
For plant workers, the general practice wa s 1+0 hours.

Nonwage benefits,
which have b e c o m e increasingly i m ­
portant in recent years as bargaining issues in labor-management
negotiations, are well established in the B a y A r e a wage economy.
A l l workers in the surveyed industry groups ha d paid vacations,
scaled to longer periods
and more pa y w i t h increased service;
a ll b ut a small percentage
of plant workers
were
employed in
establishments granting paid holidays; and more t h a n 9 0 percent
of both plant and office employees w o r k e d for firms
that p r o ­
vided
insurance or pension plans p a i d w h o l l y
or in part b y
management.

3
A :

Cross-Industry

Occupations

0 c C d 4 f2 a /iO 4 U

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., by industry division, January 1953)

F
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O -

Avkkage
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f

1
j

I

Men
Billers, machine (billing machine)..........
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * ..................

82
67
53

t

i

$
$
$
s
$
$
s ^ s
$
$
$
j
$
s
$
$
$
i ' |
s
i
$
s
$
1
Wel
e k y W e l Under 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
eky
eri g
an n s
hus
or
(tnad (tnad $
Sadr) Sadr)
35.00 # & i 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 1 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 !85.00 90.00 195.00 100.00 over

39.5
39.0
40.0

$
68.00
67.50
70.00

-

“

"

-

-

-

~ j

“

";

2
2
2

14
14
~

6
6
6

6
6
6

26
17
17

7
3
3

3
3
3

-

10
r4
8 !

3
3
3

5
5
5
;

~

“|

i
43 !
14 i
29
19

53
30
23
23

8
l
|
7

-

j
Clerks, file, class B ....................
Clerks, order ...........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade ....................

73

39.5

55.00

918
304
614
528

39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0

73.00
75.00
7 2 .0 0

71.50

Clerks, payroll ..........................
Manufacturing........... .............
Nonmanufacturing ..................... .
Public utilities * ..................

140
60
80
30

39.5
39.0
39.5
40.0

72.00
77.00
68.00
72.00

Office boys .............................
Manufacturing... .....................
Nonmanufacturing ........... ...........
Wholesale trade ...... ............ .
Finance ** .........................

488
177
311
52
133

39.0
39.5
38.5
40.0
38.5

45.00
47.50
44.00
48.00
43.50

12 j

_
“

“

-

-

-

“

34
- 1
12
1

21
!
1

-

32
18
14

34 1 21

-

_

74
26
48
6
27

- !
-

“

,

3

62 ;
22
40 i
31 |

4

6

3

_ :
- ;

“ j

96
21
75 !
25 1
38 I

75
49
26
2
9

i
—
!
:
|
!

|
Secretaries .............................
Nonmanufacturing ................. .....
Tabulating-machine operators ........ ......
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ............. ....... .
Finance ** .........................

88
58

40.0
39.5

78.50
75.00

333
57
276
185

39.0 69.50
39.5 71.50
39.0 69.00
38.5 j66.00

552
120
432
183
59

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0

-

- :

“

-

*
*

- j
- :
-

-

\

|
-

10!

11
6

10:
10!

“ ;
45 ;
r
37

12
4 !
i
1
.

- '
- !
1
:

|
j

'
- !
- ,

“

25
12
13
13

-

2

'
1

15 !

4

39 !
10
29
24

47
11 i
36 !
3i

106

67
67 '
61

51
19
32
26 :

35
71
71

74 i
30!
44
38

77
33
44
34

176
127
51 ' 58
125 i 69 |
122
39 j

7
\

4
4
4

|
i

9
9
6

22
19
3

4
4
-

“

-

17
3!
14
“
3
2
1
1
~

r
6

-1
“

-

1
1

-

1

-

“
i I
i

22 !
8
14
14

16
r
13
“

-■
- I
-

1
1
~

-

-

35 !

3
3

j
1
2I
2!

26

20
16
4
3

“ |
22
14

|

!
1
:
|

7 !
5

~j

- ;
*
*

~

2

2

-

•

J
12
-!--- 5“

.

6
6
-

9
9 i
-

_
-

.
-

•

*

~

5

-

23
9
34
*

71 i
24 1
47
32

38
4
34
14

37
n
6
-

6
6
•
-i
1
-

15
_

5
5
“

10
10
-

~

-

-

-

-

~

“

-

.5
.
.
5
-

20
10
10
10

9
9
~

-

-

~

~

12

7
7
-

-

-

—

-

_
~

13

25

6
6;

13
13

25
21

31
11
20
7

29
5
24
23

75 !
5
70 1
37
15

„
6
49 i
211
2|

34
7
27
7
7

92
13
79
66
1

22
10
12
-j
5

9 i
1 !
8 i
3
”

37
37
35

11 !
11
11

18 i
18 !
16

14
14
8!

7!
7
7

6 !
6 '
6

6
6
6 j

40 122
19
23 !
40
19
99
63
“1
U
1
1
|
_
_
! _ 123j_ 106 ! 109
20 i
! 37 I
17
89
89
1 136
19!
24
i 22
11
19
!
9
46 j 35 i
102

69
3
66
42 i

40
17 !
23
14!

25
2 !
23 i
15

i
?7 1
* |
26 !
12
1

96
32
64
37
7
15 !

67
16
51!
38
7
6;

34 i
28
6
4

33
26

"

5
1
1
---- r
r“
4
1 ,
“

15
15 i
1
13 1

6!

13
13

33

i
28 |
1
50 ---- —
_J
8
6

16
4
12
8

13

5
5

I

7 j
3 1
-

83
8
75
23
14

122 i
23
99
23
15

-

-

j

j
;

5

!
- j
-

20
8
12
6i
5

i
9
j
1

-

i
j56>50
!63.00
!55.00
156.00
j53.50

'
12
-1
12 i
“

*

|
-|
-!

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) .........
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade .............. .
Retail trade .......................

_
-

18

11

3

23
23
23

35
35 !
23

7

!
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ..... .
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Retail trade ...................... .

158
157
135

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ......
Manufacturl ng ............. ............
Nonmanufacturing .............. .......
Wholesale trade ....................

406
80
326
173

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ......
Manufacturing.........................
Nonmanufacturing ........ .............
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................
Finance ** .........................

1.328
223
1,105
173
112
775

40.0 15 . 50
5,
40.0 !55.50
40.0 |55.50
1
!
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.0

62^0..
66.50
60.50
61.50

39.5
53.50
39.0 ;61.50
39.5 5 2 .0 0
40.0 !59.50
40.0 53-50
39.0 150.00

-

“ |
- !
- !
-

- |

-

-

-

!
See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




i
i

_
•

~

- ;

'

- !
“

_

“

-

200
182
_ 1 15
52 182 I 185
7
_
8
15 I
52 j 167 ; 170

52

35
35
.
_
35
'

i

i

11
11
”
214
7
207
13
36
145

!

1

20
20
-

1
|
.
9j
1
9j
3
16
14
2
2
-

5

7
7
-

5
5

2
'

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

l
i

OccHfiaidOHl- Continued

Table A-i:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in San Frencisco-Oakland, Calif., by industry division, January 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly Weekly
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

Under

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
i$
$
$
$
$
>
|
5
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 ! 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 ;60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
and

•
35.00

40.00

42.50

45.00 47.50

50.00

52.50

55.00157.50

i

Women - Continued

60.00

62.50 65.00

67.50

70.00

72.50 75.00

85.00

80.00

95.00J100.00

90.00 95.00

100.00

over

|

1

1
Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) ....................... ...........
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................

1.861
547
1,314
136
603
502

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0

*
58.50
60.00
57.50
60.50
58.00
56.50

1
-

_
_
-

_
_
“

_
_
_

2
2
_

-

-

238
102
136;
6
61
60;

41 1 101
!
29
41 i
72
9 ! 13
18 1
3
14
54
!

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) .................. .
Nonmanufacturing ................ ......
Finance ** ..........................

Clerks, file,class A ......................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........... ............
Finance ** .........................

224
167
75

50 5 „
.
56 '
449
33
111
57
225

Clerks, file, class B .....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Public utilities * ...................
Wholesale trade ................... ..
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................

1,982
132
1,850
187
266
84
1,047

Clerks, order............................
Manufacturing ....................... .
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................

307
137
170
101
69

39.5
39.5
39.0

55.00
54.00
50.50

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
38.5

55.50
48.50
54.50

39.5 ..
.
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0

44.50
52.50
44.00
52.50
47.00
47.50
41.00

39.539.5
40.0
40.0
40.0

59.00
61.00
57.50
59.00
55.50

55.50
63.50
54.50

63.00

_

_

“

- :
- {
_
~ :
155
155
155

_
-

____ 6_
6
6

12
12
12

-

____2 ;____ a_
_

212
212
1
_
211

20
20
1
-'

9 !
_
_

3
-

9 i

3

19

293
24
269
2
62
_
205

203
2
201
12
47
17

157
_
157
1
_
_
156

71

i
10 !
9
9
52
52
2
40
10

j
;
|
|
j

33 i
23 1

27:

12 j

15 i

66

82
3
79
20 ,
5!
43 ;

66
1
28
5
26
176
11
165
16
20
26
103

377
21
356
39
74
28
80

27

1 145
!
!
!

8
137
22;
34
71

30

322
201
251
16
66
77
185
245
185
11 1 17
14
91 ! 125 i 91
78
94
55
1

308
58
250
23
122
101

143
76
67 !
8
29 j
18

1
1
-

36
22
3

20
19~
12 1

45
6
39
3
9
27

21 1
_
21
5
9
_ j
.
6

30
25
5
4
_
1

11
9
2
2
_
_

45
22
3

17
17

54
5
49
4
24
2
14

50
10
40
_
3 i
5

36
10 :
26
8
6 !

32

12 1

107
13
94
30
3
5
23

52
7
45
28
9
_
8

29

48
23
25
6
19

21
8
13
6
7

3

5
24
10
10
_
4

52
34
18
6
8
3

75
41
34
10
6
14
1
9
9 '
1

~!

32

i

14
14

!

16
1
2
_
13

10
5
5
_
2 ,
3

_
_j
_
_

_
_
.

- !
_

“j

-

loH---- -1
■
-

26
9
19
14
5

12
10
2
2
-

31
18
13
10
3
~

42
7
35

3

6 i
7 !
1 !
-

_

Clerks, payroll ..........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................

899
398
501
84
170
114
76

39.5
62.50
39.5 , 62.00
39.5 : 63.00
65.00
39.5
64.00
40.0
40.0
59.50
60.50
38.5

- ;
-

-

-

_
_
_
-

-

- !

- ;

- !
- i
_

_

-

-

i
_
- !
_ j
_
!

3

6
_!
-:
_
_
-

6
_
6
!

Duplicating-machine operators ..............
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Key-punch operators .......................
Manufacturing ........ ..... ............
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance * * ..........................

*

189
80
109
1.039
222
817
120
132
519

39.0 | 54.50
40.0
56.50
53.50
38.5
39.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.5
38.5

___ 3_J
3

56.QQ- ___ =_j
59.00
- :
55.00
60.00
59.00
52.50
-

'
!
_____ 1_
i
3
'
_
_
-

See footnote at end of table.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




!

1
i
4j
1
3!

12 1
- !
12
12
“
7 :
1
6
1

22
9
13
6
7

!
!
!
!
!

38 j
9
29 i
9
20

2

52
46
6
3
_
1
-

87
41
46
7
9
24
6

95
34
61
7
14
23
14

14
3
11

8
2
6

44
21
23

29
2
27

20
15
5

"j

6 ___ 4Q_
_
6
40
_
6
6
34

74 j
74 I
74
1

105
26
79
6
3

43
1
42
10
3

26

i

70

94
32
62

7
15
35 1

_
_

-

-

t r

97
33

64
9
9
44|

134

7
127 1
22
17
75

56
37
19
12
7
72
29
43

1!
_

25
-

23
18
5

12
6
6
6
-

6 !
6
6 ;
1

|

117
124 j
39^
78 ! 84 !
12 1
' 7 j
55
45
7 ; 18
4
7
is!
6
12

38 !
15 —
23
19

_
- ■
-

_
-!
-:
_

151
26 !
125

36

1

7
32
72

40
5
35
4
3
26

!
i
:
i

:

_
_
-

-

_
_
_

_
-

-

_|
j
-

_
_
-

-

3

-

*

_
-

_

~

1
1
_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_
_
_ !

-

-

-

_
_
-

_

6

_
_

6
6
_
_
_
_

-

i

1;
- —
-

r
-

-

1
85 !
39 i
46
18
7
4
4

52
21
31

25
11

16
1
14

7
1

12
9
3

1
1
-

-

81
29

39
24
15

18
5
13

7
6

6

lk

Ik

12
5
4

j

90
24
66
11
14

_
-

1

2
1
1

8
1
7

10

_
_
_

!
5
_ 1----- 1 ■ _
_
- !
l\
_
_
5
_
- i
_
_
_|
-

1

49
36
13
2
2
9

-

_

-

21
?!

14

-

_
_
_
_
_

-

4

!
3
3i

_

1
1
_1
_
~

_
- '

Ik

4
_
3;
_
1

—

i
14 j

-

-

8
_ !
“ :

1
_ 1
-------1

23
9
14

9 I

!
i

6
9

30
9 1
21
3
18
!

9
_
3 |
_|
6 |

7
1
6
3
2

!

1

42
14
28
1
25
2

31
15
16
1

23
9
14 !
1 i
4
9

52
30
10
12 |

7

3
_
3

-

-

38
28
10
5
2
1
2

5
2
3

6

-

;

_

-

_
_
_
_
-

5

Table A-i:

\jjice Occtopa/iaHtt- GiuUUmed

(J

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., by industry division, January 1953)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME:WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Avei A E
G
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

i

%

20

38.5
38.5
39.0
39.5
37.5

46.50
50.00
45.00

2
2

20

8
4
4

Finance ** .........................

561
175
386
125
148

44.50

2

13

4

64
1
63
28
25

Secretaries ... .........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................
Finance ** ........................

3.287
702
2,585
270
583
313
1,157

39.0
39.5
38.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
38.0

69.00
74.50
67.50
72.50
69.50
64.50
67.50

-

-

~

"

Stenographers, general ...................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing... ........ .
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................
Finance ** .........................

3.849
1,303
2,546
531
591
188
945

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.0

60.50
65.00
58.50
60.00
60.00
58.50
57.50

7i

_
-

5 :

Stenographers, technical ..................
Nonmanufacturing....................

238
210

39.5
40.0

63.00
62.00

Switchboard operators ........ ...........
Manufacturing ................ .........
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................
Finance ** .........................

943
141
802
99
131
131
239

39.0
40.0
39.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
38.0

55.50
64.00
54.00
59.50
57.00
53.00
i 55.00

-

Switchboard operator-receptionists .........
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * .............. .
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................

641
205
436
46
172
61

39.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.0
39.5

57.00
! 58.50
! 56.50
1 60.00
! 55.00
! 54.50

- !
- ;

Tabulating-machine operators ..............
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * ..................
Finance ** ........................

256
70
186
66
63

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
39.0

! 64.00
1 65.50
' 63.50
! 71.50
i 57.00
i

787
207
580
259
295

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
38.5

, _ 12_
12
12 1
.

113
6
107

12 4

44

25

34
90

3
3
3 i
1
34 |

7
1;
-;
-!
6!

5
2
- '
3

-

34
1
- ;
3 3 ;

-

-

2

2
2
2

8
8
8

: 105’
70
35
17

8
-;
8
-;
6
61
3
58
18
7
33

36
36|
-j
-1
-!
22
164
22

! 142!
! 26:
! 28 !
i
6!
! 54
1

Transcribing-machine operators, general .....
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade ....................
Finance * * .............. ..........

1 56.50
| 57.00
i 56.50
! 58.50
! 54.50

-

2'
-i
-|
-|
2

-!
-1

1

~j

-

j

-

- 1
i

-!
-1
-:
-j
|

- !
|

-

-

-

,
;
;
;
1

7 !
7 !
6 !
1 |
1
2

-

“

-!
-:

1

31 i

68
29

39
35
1
3
3

1

6
6 :
-

-|

1
1!
-

1
1

!
j
- |

_ :
- 1

-

-j
-

- :
- ;

- '
-

-

7
1
7j

-

318
58
260
40
31
34
98

|
•
:
j

31
31

266
444
125
35
231
319
76
64
58
63
15 j 37
100
79
15
15

48
2 2 5 1 141 : 114
9!
9 !
216 141 : 114
39
7
7
14
5j
- ! 14
42
14
18
1 7 1 42
14 1
48 :
14 ! 33 j 27
!
71
11 !
60
28
16

29
15
14

-

-

- |

-

-

-!

-

-

86 1 171 j 119
2 1 4 ! 348
399
209 !
1
1!
61 i £6^
64"
29
—
86
170 l 118 I 185; 284
338
169
18
1 ,
9
31
16 i 21
61
22
48
14 ; 26 ' 30 I
41 ; 42
14 1 15 !
13
74
39 j 49
35
781 150
88
52
174
31 ! 50
522
102
420
65
154
21
173

563
141
422
59
104
20
147

229
196
33
16
11
2
4

115
83
32
11
17
2
2

63 ;
36 !
27
21
6
- !

7

4
4

3
3

16
-

16 ;
16 j

14
14

43
31

16
16 '

65
1
64
9
9
17
23

69
10
59
14
6
16
23

71
29
42
2
18
22

63
16
47
10
10
4 ;
23

36
40
21
16 !
15 i 24
9 i 11 I
6
!
3
1 :
7

13
6
7 i
7 1
-

56
19
20
4 j
36
15 !
2
4
14 i
5
-

19
14

1
1 !

7

35
9
26
5
10
5

16
1
15
9

24
9
1
4
5

30
2
28
2
14

34
11
23
7
11 !

34
20
14
3 1
4

15
2
13
3
2

20
10
10
7
3

49
5
44
16
26

44
9
35
23
11

26
5
21
18
3

23
1
22
6
16

46
1
45
14
30

148
44
104
24
76

w

139 | 110 167
36 1
55
68 i 112
103
42 j 19 ! 92
47
45 j 20
1

1 ____
_

-

133
73
60
24
6
3
27

77
21
56
30
-

19
8
11
3
8

-

215
139
76
20
15
3
32

42
12
30
5
1
7

3

-

305
117
138
46
53
31
45

390
172
213
41
38
14
95

94
31
63
10
23
16

-

-

-

29
192 ; 83
389 24 3
81 - 27"--- IT
117
73
56
17
272 170
111
22
-'
8
44 ! 11 ;
7
36 ! 47
93
2
7 !
7
17
6
117 112
21 : 26

61
1
60
5
27
5

14
14
8

_
-

267 ' 288
185
66 ; 51
64
203 | 222 ! 134
20 ! 49
42
29
71
74
23
5
13
88
50
83

65
37
28
- ;
3
5

-

13

12 :
5
7
4

69
25
44
13
18

2

13 1

-

n

i
1
j

2
2

2
2

:
See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6
6

13
- |
-

!

1

Women - Continued
Office girls ............................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ....................

%

S
>
s
$
$
$
s
1
$
$
$
Wel
eky
W e l Under 35.00 *37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 *47.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 !55.00 57.50 60.00 j
eky
*95.00 1 0 0 .0 0
62.50 65.00 67.50 7 0 .0 0 !72.50 *75.00 80.00 85.00 *90.00 !
e rig
anns
and
- I and
(tnad (tnad *
Sadr) Sadr)
under
95.00 100.00 over
90.00 1
5
4
35.00 37.50 40.00I 2 .50 45.00 47.50 50.00I 2 .50 5 5 .0 0 !57.50 60.00 62.50 165.00 67.50 70.00 !
72.50 175.00 80.00 85.00 j

j
!
1
1

21
11

i
3
1

;
2 1
- |
2 !
35 !
35 ;

~

-1
-1
-1
-j

_

_
~!
_i
-1
-1
-:
-!

18
15
3
3
-

.
-

_

-

25
13
12 1
6!
6

"

20
9
11
4
1

7
7
-

-

-

-

■

“

5
2
3
3
~

23
10
13
10
“

21
1
20
20

1
1
“

3
3
-

_
-

8
7

.
-

-

2
2
2

1
1
-

-

-

-

~

1
1

10

4
6
“

-

5
5

_
- !
9
1

--j
- |
!
- !
|
i
1
-

- ;
-

-!

-

-

-

-

6

Table A-l:

(

CboHfuMoHdrQoHiUHiH&l

J

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., Dy industry division, January 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Avehage
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

|
$
$
$
s
•
s
$
s
$
$
$
I
s
Weekly I Weekly Under 135.00 37.50 40.00 ,42.50 !45.00 47.50 ;50.00 52.50 j55.00 | 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50
h u s |erig
or
anns
i and
( t n a d ;( t n a d *
Sadr! Sadr)
i
under
35.00 37.50 S40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 '52.50 55.00 157.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00

$
1
$
$
|
s
j
s
I
s
I
s
j
s
70.00 172.50 75.00 ' 80.00 85.00 :90.00 ’95.00 100.00
1 and
72.50 75.00 80.00 !85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 over

!
Women - Continued

j

!

104
1,137

39.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.0

$
■■J5.00_
60.00
54.00
59.50
58.00
51.50
53.00

3,182
654
2,528
139
601
107
1,364

39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0

49.00
53.50
47.50
51.00
48.50
50.00
46.50

Typists. class A ..........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * ...................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................

2,362
461
1,901
224

Typists, class B ..........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * ...................
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................

221

.
“

-

18
18
18

'■

-

I
_____J____
i
_

_
-

*

16
16
3
13

84
84
2
82

320
30
290
43
2
24
132

209
9
200
3
20
m

74
74
74

376 ! 813
393
66
47 ; 66
329
747
327
8
22
26
46
198
112
25
44
272143
351 I

231
27
204
1
20
183

370
285
27
46
239
343
20
32
13
33
36
9
190 : 161
470
52
418
27
145
15
162

239
51
188
11
57
3
116

239 ! 271
103 !
76
36
87
184
67
163
16 : 13 1
14
70 ;
30
7 I
_
9
89
95
45

313
254
102
108
211 i 146
14 ! 19
10
55
2
14
70 ! 81

58
57
1
1

87
50 i
37
14
9
7 !
7:

89 1 78 !
40
24
38
65
30 i 19
2
7
_
2
24
17

41
35
6

_

9 1
7 1
2
2

6 |

18
6
12
5

39
20
19
13

1

I

_.
_
- 1
_

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

10
9
1

1
4

1

-

_

37
37

_
_
_
_

_
_

_;
_ :

_

_

_
_

_

”

"1

_

:

_

„
-

“

:

-

-

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), ccnammication, and other public utilities.
*# Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Table A-2:

p JU k jo & U O H tU Q * u i ^ fm o /u U C tU

0 C G H p a / 4 a f§ d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., oy industry division, January 1953)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly Weekly Under
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) $
50.00

s
!
50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50
and
under
52.50 55.00 57.50 160.00

$

1

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
|$
|$
!$
|§
$
i$
$
■S
5
62.50; 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 ?75.00j 80.00 85.00 j 90.00 J 95.00 100.00'305.00
i

S
60.00
62.50

65.00

67.50 70.00 172.50
1

Men

75.00

90.00

80.00185.00

i

!

$

Draftsmen, chief ......................... ..
Manufacturing .............................................................................

197
138

Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * ...................

368
305
63
44

154
Draftsmen, junior ..........................
Manufacturing .......................... --- 51
103
Nonmanufacturing ........................

39.5
39.5

101.00
103.00

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

85.00
85.00
83.00
79.00

39.5
40.6—
39.5

75.50
69.00'
78.50

-

-

•

_
“

~

-

1
1
”

ie

___

2
2
-

~

5

___18_
18
—
*

18
~

13
9
4

- i

- 1

-

- |

_ 1
- s

18
18
- ;
- i
-!
-:

2
2
2

2i
i
i

110.00 115.00 120.00125-00 I
5130.00
and
95.00 100.00 105.00110.00 115.001
120.00 1125.00130.00
over

9
11

j

|

2?
U

|

16 i
9 j

;

35 j
181
j

4
- 1
4 1
4

23 |
18
5
5 |

2
2
“

2?
19 ;
10
10

16

45 _
___ Z i i ..
61
37
io:
8
4
3

18
11
7 j
|

5
1
4 I

24
14
10

17
6
11 1

38
6
32

26
j
- i
26

6?
47 !
18 1

3:

8
7

10
4

37
37

■ 7.
33; ■ 3 . —
33
31
2
4
".
*

22
22

_
____ L.
l
“

18 1
16 1
_
~

_

_;
-

-

3
"1

i

'

_

- !
r

-

7

5;

■
“
_
-

5

-

_

5

2
2
-

- ;

_ 1
- |

.
-

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) .............
Manufacturing ..........................

134
87

40.0
40.0

69.00
69.00

____ 2_;
* 1

*

1
1

___ 15
12 ___
12
19
7 ;

9 _ 15
6
4

7
3

11
11

24
14

2

8
8

1
1

i
i,

Jj

1
■

1/
*

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




'

----- [

'

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

7

Table A-3:

MCUStteStGHCe G+td P<UU&1 PIg+U CfacdifuUiOHl

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area basis
in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., by industry division, January 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Workers

Average
hul
o r y Under
erig
anns
$
1.50

$

$
$
$
1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65
and
under
1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70

$
1.70

$
1.75

$
$
1.80 1.85

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

$
$
$
$
1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05
1.95

2.00 2.05

s
s
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
s
s
2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00

2.10 2.15

2.20 2.25

2.30 2.35

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10
1

2.40

2.45

2.50

34
31
3

1
1

19
13

5

102

11

-

6

5

24
78

11

66

i
.

■ _

12
12

$
419
225
194
52
75

2 .T?

Electricians, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

525
372
153

2.26 _
2.28

6

2.21

6

~

Engineers, stationary ......................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.................... .

617
281
333
84

2.17
2.27
2.09
2,14

-

-

Firemen, stationary boiler .................
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

196
113
83

1.99
2.06
1.89

Helpers, trades, maintenance ...............
Manufacturing ........................ ..

1.939

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ..........
Manufacturing ..........................

113

Machinists, maintenance ...................
Manufacturing ..........................

1.220

Carpenters. maintenance ...................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

1,0&
113
1,129

2.29

2.38

3
-

_

-

-

1 _ 2_
_

6

2.17
2.17

_

933
802
131
97
97

2.19
2.19

Oilers ...................................
Manufacturing ..........................

177
124

Painters, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ................. .

358
147

Pipe fitters, maintenance .................
Manufacturing ..........................

320
295

3

2
1

6
6

6
5

2

-

1
1

14

1

8

1

.
1

8
73

1

51

10
4

47
36

73

1

45
19

6

11

11

20

64

316

39
_

2

*

-

6
6
-

6
6
-

175
17

300
36

57
57

35
32

-

-

-

_

-

-

31

18
15
3

_

_

-

-

-

_
27

_

-

-

-

_

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ......... .
Tool-end-die makers ............. ..........
Manufacturing ..........................

2.32
2.28
2.32
2.33

2.11

-

-

_

-

-

6
6

-

-

3

49
9
40

-

18
-

_
3
3

_

1

-

1

2.20
2.26
2.12

-

2.30

-

50

2.31

_

552
552

2.L*»
2.45

-

-

-

18

-

_

1.80
1.77

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

"

-

"

-

10
10

13
13

60

10

35

19
19

35

32

r

-

87
87
-

26

12

10 ! 26

12

4
.
4

!
—

-

'

25
9
9

1

20

-

65

20

29

22

20

18
4
a

9

7
2
^
66

85
85
-

7
7

<
j>
123

21

122
1

16
5

6
2

44
43

2
2

1

_

10

56

139
38

10

101

113
44
69
37

63
53

12

10
10

39
5

24
17
7

3

325
n s r

59
?
9

18
18

19
19

-

9
9

_

104

_

_

268
263

337
337

11

28

13

12

21
21

17

159
34
125

166
]37

124
48
76
23

320
290

3

5
5
-

35
35
-

-

314
255

30

_

_

3

1

_

-

16
16

“

1?

20

58
56

6

11

-

5

1

46
43
3

16

4
9
3

19

4

2
1

16
5

1

1
1

13

-

_
_

-

51

-

_

-

_

-

6
6

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

1

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

49

2
47

17

24

142

2

11

58
123
54 i r
4
5

54
40
14

111

6

41

99

_

35

12

6

6

, a?
43

?
3

10
10

14
14

_

6
6

325
5

57
57

11

2
9

_

14
14

58
58

-

4
4

"

-

8
1 --- F
6

-

1

_
-

-

-

5
r

-

_

2

-

-

-

-

18
17
17

- —
-

_

2
2

1

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

'

_

r

2

21

34
30
4

50
23
27

19
2

86
85
1

4
4

13
30
3

2
2

2
2
~

49
_ r~ 5 r
26
-

9

20
19

9

17

215

9

2

IS~ 212

1

10
10

“

“

-

1

4

1

4

21

_

_

_

11
11

_

6

]
_

104

79
71

_

6

464
464

12
12

2
-

14
7
7

19

3

-

6

1

3

27
27

91
19
16 * 72
72
16

5

1
_
-

K

2

32
29
3

26
10

10
10

_
30
5 —

27
27

_

6
-

18
9
9
Q
7

“

30
28

2

21
826
35
19 “ S T “ 1 ^

—

-

211

-

_

-

-

2

“

2.30

153
848
571

1

27
9
18
18

1

2.13
2.14

Millwrights ..............................
Manufacturing ..........................

10
10

-

27
-

13

Mechanics, maintenance ....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturli£ .......................

8

6
-

1.84
1.94

1.001

8

3

31
_

2

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ........
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Publie utilities * ... .T.T......... T

-

9

1

2.26 ..
.
.
2.26

-

1

10

3

1

3

29

10

_

13

It

65
65

-

_

-

“

“

“

-

9
9

-

-

"

13

13

_

3

-

-

_

_____ 1
1/
*

E xclu d es premium pay fo r o vertim e and n ig h t work.
T ra n s p o rta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ,




Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table k-U

Gu&toduU,ty/cfteJtfMtdJsUffCLwt SlUpfUn^ 6ccup.cutloHd

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., by industry division, January 1953)

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

Crane operators, electric bridge
Manufacturing .......................

Aeae
vrg
hul
ory
erig
anns

227
215

WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
s
s
I
s
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 1.80 1.85 1.90 1 .9 5 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2 .3 0 2.35 2 .4 0
1and
1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0

$
1.89
1.89

136
136

NUMBER OF
s
$
$
$
$
s
s
$
$
Under 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55
and
under
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60

1.91
1.91

47
47

32
27

—
-

1
1

-

-

3
3

20
20

—
-

-

. “

"

-

-

-

-

6
- --- 5“

23
23

-

-

-

_ i
- |
-

~
_

_

101
94

110
110

20
20

2.35 2.40 !over

2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2 .3 0

Crane operators, electric bridge
Manufacturing .......................

423
230
193

1.60
1.75
1.43

87
Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ......
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

4.774
1,236
3,538

Retail trade ......................

1Of
xo
558
ot
<y

1.50
1.64
1.45
1*h 9
1*54
1I
47
1 *2
LA
X* f

3

7
7

87
87

25
9
16

15

3

15

12
4
8

3

2

3

13

12

7

1

.13 — 3 , . .2S
6 . .6
9
86 269
9
90
33

73
5
73
90
6
16
3

183
9
174
*9

160 1373 • 489
9
31
97
151 1342 392
LA
40
*
90
20
28
29 262
73
1(
X7 801

63
8
55
oc
99

29
6
23
1
,
*
*

178
6
172
8
136

48
6
42
12
5

188
4
184
13
117

30
2
28
20

28
28

11
11

8
8

62
60
2

173
156
17

1
10

2
6

1.49

Guards ................................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ....
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Retail trade ......................

582
76
506
89
J

1.38
1.47
1.37
1.36
1 ^7
i-O l

Laborers, material handling 3 / ........ .
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
4
414^4 A* ^
* £
ruDllC UulllblcS 4 •••*••••••••••••••••«
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................

5.179
2,470
2,709
313
1,684
705

1.77
1.76
1.79
1.95
1.76
1.78

6
-

6
6

_
T
X
15
5
10
10

-

to
4
6
3

34

. 2 L .JA .
.3
6
21
8
3
13

8
8

7
7
7

28

8

7

7

12
2

31
12
19
3
16

55
40
15

28
25
3

18
16
2

58
54
4

15

3

2

4

970
251
719

75
67
8
C
9
2

359
257
102
70
(
7
12

395
280
115
2
1L
X4
40

166
155
11

47
27
20

16
9
7

27
22
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

15

-

5

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

36
57

1

5

28
26

-

19
19

-

5
5

12
12

4
4

-

-

2

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

!
|

2

1
16

1
1

-

14
9
5
5

21

179

-

162
17

21
5
16

3

3
11

19
19

-

46
30
16
1
15

14
4
10
5

2
2
“

4
2
2
-

245 2038
101 928
144 1110
3
36
97 952
122
44

836
398
438

246
177
69
2
60
5

5
5
-

357
81

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

365
90
275
73
59
137

199
26
173
1
8
162

37

219
-

26
2
4
18

11

219
72

118
29

-

-

-1

- 1

_

-

“

-

-

~

~

~

-

-

- 1
-1

-

-

-

-

341
331
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

no
110
110

10

‘j

Order fillers ..........................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
V^a ]Ae^] a f
(
Retail trade ......................

1.919
542
1,377
1,295
77

1.80
1.78
1.81
1.81
1.86

Packers, class A (men) ..................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing ... .................
Wholesale trade ...................
R t o l t.r d ........... ...........
n-l
ae

493
171
322
185
95

1.77
1.80
1.75
1.73
1.69

Packers, class B (men) ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
WhsO Aeol 0 + Ha

372
277
245
897
531

1.57
1.57

-

-

-

-

-

-

47
44
3

14
11
3

71
69
2

25
24
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

2

_

.

_

-

-

_

5

4

25

6

_

5
-

4
4

25
25

6
3

-

5

-

3

13
13
12
1

10
2
8
6
2

11
11
-

”

“

~

. JO .
50

6
6

-225
225

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

312

250
250
'

502
174
328
■?3 a
5

383
44
339
000
997

168
48
120
116

85
43
42
42

4

1

'




66
9
57
57

1

1.75
1.75
1.75

Packers, class B (women) .................
Manufacturing ........................

-

275
183
1f*
t*
Xo9

17

23

71
71
39

353
21
332

-

50
34
16
6
10

3
3
_

44

16
14
1*
*

197
19
178
1C,
/

47
16
31
on
9U

14
14
_

8
36

50

72
36
36
8

49
2
47

_
_

_
-

75
75
-

_
_

-

_
_

4
4
_

_

_

-

_

_

--- Z—

_
|
-

_
_1

2
2
_

‘

-

_
_

„

5

36

_

50
8

24

17

6
6
A
O

_

3
3
3

54
i
Occupational wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1953
U.S. LEr-ArJn-LKT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

9

Table A-4:

G u U odicU, % G A e & Q 4 4 4 * H f , c u n d SlUpfU+uj, QccdtpxjjtiatU -Co+Ut+tuect
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., by industry division, January 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

Occupation and industry division

Receiving clerks ........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

458
228
230

Shipping clerics ........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

462
210
252
57

Shipping-and-receiving clerks .............
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .................... ..

$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aeae
vrg
hul
o r y Under 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2 .0 5 2.10 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2.30 2.35
erig
anns
and
*
under
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2 .2 5 2.30 2.35 2.40
%
3
2
8
4
20 116 138
10
1.85
46
8
26
33
44
_
_
1.85
6
10
12
26
4
3
74
64
29
1.86
16
2
52
21
38
8
3
4
5
64
17
£
L
c\
r
2
4X
O
•O
5
J
1I
2
2
11 *
#9
16
X*
*
XX
1.89 _
1.86
1.92
1.94
i,R9

504
168
336
219
66

1.94
2.03
1.90
1.93
1.87

330
111
219
66

1.96
2.05
1.92
1.94

Truck did.vers, medium (1^ to and including
4 tons) .............................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * .................
.... . .

412
1,954
752
226

Z..
A5
2.08
2.05
2.00
2.00

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer type) ........................
Manufacturing........... ............
Nonmanufacturing .................... .
Retail trade ......................

491
135
356
101

497
179
318
109

2.08
2.07
2.08
2.12

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ..............
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ............. ...... -

1.107
660
447
146
119
714
386
328
50
53

1.53
1.59
1.46
1.38
1.42

-

-

1

1

1

1

1

1
1
-

1
1
-

-

25
20
5
■
j
j

2
2

1.72
1.76

Watchmen ..............................
Manufacturing.......... ............ .
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Retail trade ......................

-

1.91
1.80
2.07

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) .....
Manufacturing ........................

-

2
2
-

10
10

12
10
2

10
4
6
6

98

46
52
>X

2.13 .
2.13
2.12
2.14

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
other than trailer type) ...............
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wy'
ft]
,,,, t t iiiiii-- -it -it i

1
-

Truck drivers, light (under 1^ tons) .......
Manufacturing................ .......
Nonmanufacturing .....................
+rrH~
r
i

T..
..
.

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3
-

23
3
20
20

10

-

51
19
32
6
26

67
17
50
Ei
f

148

53
22
31

22
10
12
10
2

9
9
Q
7

1
14 7
77

31
31
-

19
7
12

40
14
26
26

14

103
60
43
H*

30
2

14
Tj
X4

1
1

15
15

-

-

-

_

_

- _ L_
_

_

2

6

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

6
6

-

1
1

-

4

-

1

-

1

11

-

1
1

-

1*
X}

X^
35

12
23

28
28

5
2
3
0
j

3
3
-

32
32
-

2
2
-

-

-

12
1.
2
-

-

-

16
16
-

36
26
10
-

*0
•
30

2
2
-

3
1
2

1

11
10

30
x?

-

3

_

2

5

14

-

3
3

-

2
2

5
5

14
1A
Xh

4

0

20

14
11
3

82
2
80
7
f

39
28
11

46
10
36
2

16
9
7

6
6
c
?

23
23
23

4
4
L

13
10
3
3

250
83
167
17

273
5
268
221
Jo
.

182
1
181
121
15
x?

228
97
131
2
/o
,

539
48
491
381

20
20
_
-

671
7
664
-

115
115
-

_
-

5
5
5

1
1
-

8
8
-

12

50

_

7
5
5

17
33

_
-

92
30
62
62

15
10
5
5

_
-

-

285
63
222
-

7

_
-

5
5

14
1
13

96
81
15
X?

118
118
12

164
79
85
61

59
13

25

46

0
1

25

_
-

35
35
-

173
35
138

-

-

“

-

_

-

-

-

_
_

-

2

-

20

-

22
22

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

3
3

-

5
5

_
-

3

_

3

-

2
2 1

_
-

3
3

45
45
“

99
99
~

36
36
-

51
51

117

1

95
22

261
139
122

27
19
3

12

3

6

21
21

6
2

33
31

22
22

19
19

33
9
24
3

17
17
-

25
9
16
2

15
5
10
4
2

62
2
60
19

l/

Excludes premium Day for overtime and night work.

Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous studies.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

83
18
65
8
/Q
,
H7

60
35
25
5
2

47
28
19
5

47
44
3
1

76
76
-

71
54
17
1

87
44
43

54
34
20

5
5

19
19
-

;

-

O

-

q
o
7
J

J

7
7

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
"

150
150

~

"

_
_

_
_

-

-

<X
c

24
24

1

11
9
2
2

-

_

22

1
-

2/
2/
*
**




-

95
54
41
26
15
X?

s
2.40
and
over

~

37
34
3

75
72
3

2
-

_

10

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations

Table B-2851:

Poi+tti GJid VakniUtei 1
/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
Workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns

2/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 $ , 2.70 2.30 2.90
2.60
and
under
1.70 la7S_. 1.80 .1.81 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
2*50. laSS 1.60

$
3.00
and
over

Men
Labelers and oackers ....................
Mixers ......................... ......
Stock handlers and truckers, hand .......
Technicians ........... ................
Tinters............................
Varnish makers .........................

136
183
171
70
63
44

%
1.81
1.87
1.74
1.91
2.04
2.06

45

1.62

-

_
2
-

13
1
_

50
1
70
1
_

9
44
27
5

-

-

-

-

12

17

1

9

-

50
2
3
20
3
11

_
2
38
5

1

7
47
13
3
7
1

-

1

2

2
65
2

5

5
9
5
1
24
13

-

-

5
3

1

-

-

1

-

2
3

2
2

_

26

1

3

1

1
3

1
2

3

_
_

1

3
16

_
1

1

1

_

1

_

_
_
1

_
1

1
-

_
_

1
_
1

1

1

_
_
2

-

1
1

1

3
1

_

1

1

Women
labelers and packers ....................

j
-

1

-

-

___ 1
1/ The study covered establishments e r loying 8 or more workers primarily engaged in manufacturing paints, varnishes, lacquers, japans, enamels, and shellac (Group 2851) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classifica­
no
tion Manual ( 9 - edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
145
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all or a majority of workers in each occupation reported were paid on a time basis.
Table B-35t

Occupation 2/

Assemblers, class A .....................
Assemblers, class B .....................
Assemblers, class C .................. .
Electricians, maintenance ................
Inspectors, class A ......... ............
Inspectors, class B .................. .
Inspectors, class C .....................
'
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ...........
............
Laborers, material handling
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A £ / ...........................
Drill-press operators, radial, class A ....
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class A ............
Engine-lathe operators, class A ........
Grinding-machine operators, class A .....
Milling-machine operators, class A ......
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw meehlna), class A
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B £ / ...................... .
Drill-press operators, radial, class B ....
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class B ............
Grinding-machine operators, class B .....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B ..... ....
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C £ / ...........................
Milling-machine operators, class C ......
Machine-tool operators, toolroom ..........
Machinists, production ..................
Tool-and-die makers 6 / ..................
Welders, hand, class A ..................

(
J

1
/
prepared
2/
2/
4/
2/
6/

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

61
2
377
197
47
194

6
6

30
158
197
1,552
124

Muu&f 9uutl&'l
CUMU. *tl>4A /

Aeae
vrg
$
$
hul
ory
e r i g Under i1.50 1.55 ;i.6o i1.65
anns
and
under
1.50 1.55 1 6 1
!1.70
. 0 1.65 i
1
j
_
1 _

1 %
/
%2
20
.
1.76
1.71
2.24
2.04
1.34
1.71

16
.0
1.70

20
.6
1.97

24
175
54
90

1.92

246

1.83
1.83

_
16
-

89
4

7
-

-

-

-

-

,

-

.-

-

-

!

1.75

8

176
15

1.80 1.85 l1.90
.
5

195

2

15
2 i 12
2
32 i 111

2

- j
|

8

- i
-

8

-

-

!

| 71
184 ! 4
33
31
_
8
!
i - 1 37
S 35
!
i 2
-

!
!
!
i

40
8
-

2t06

716
69

4
-

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
j
s
S
$
$
j
s
$
|
$
$
$
S
!
$
$
i
$
.0
.0
1.70 1.75 1.80 !1.35 1.90 1.95 2 0 2.05 *2.10 2.15 | 2 2 ]2.25 2.30 2.35 |2.40 *2.45

20
.8

2.06

2.04

-

164
76

1.78
1.85

-

158

1.84

180
60
74
354

1.71
1.70

306

341

2.16

2.05
2.44

2.06

-

! -

|
-

62

-

-

| -

-

-

j -

-

“

“

| ~

~

i -

\

!
!
[
!

62
-

a

-

-

12

i
- |
-

4

-

4

U

|

' 34
; ; -

i
;
!

65

! 14
!no
: 32
90

-

-

-

9
; 30

i 135
;
-

19
-

-

j -

-

j

! 948 ;243
a

| | : j

93
42

;

24
-

! i •
j ;

| -

22
.0

2.15

i 477
35
! |
i
2
| 118 | 1
j 1 - | : - j |

\8

-

66

i

s
;
I

_
-

16

; 89
3

553

-

1 127 : 12
: 28 | 30 I 2
“
“
i

1

1

2 0 ! 2.05 2 1
.0
.0

1.95

j

3
0

30
| -

|

j 5°

-

-

2
1
2
2

1
6

2
8

-

-

-

222

-

16
-

-

2.25 ‘2.30 ! 2.35 * 2.40 2.45
—
_ |
! _
- j i i - ! ! “
! 4 i 6
- ■ !
- ! i - i - ! _
j - i - j I
!
7
7 ; 12
| Ill
; i
- i ! j *
*
; - ! - i - ;
i i
4
.

2.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_ !
- j
- i

-

-

-

j -

1

|

7
-

i
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

285
301

-

-

-

-

-

-

S
!

-

!

59
f

11
54
13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
7
i 15

-

-

~

: 292
! 1

n

-

;

.

!
j
!

14

Tho «tudv covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Groun 35) ns defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition)
by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) employing more than 7 workers were also included. Data relate to a December 1952 payroll period.
Data limited to men workers. All workers in the occupations reported were paid on a time basis.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1953
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous studies.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Bureau of labor Statistics
Other than tool-and-die jobbing shops.




Table B-7211:

PoiU&l JlcUUul/U&i l/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

4
1.10

4
1.15

1
1.20

4
1.25

4
1.30

1.35

1.20

"
\
1.25

“
1.30

"
1.35

-

6

_
5
-

25
7
1

6
_
a
a

1
i.o5

y

4
1.00
and
under
1.05

61
99
8

%
1.U8
1.50
1.27

“

■-

-

-

Clerks, r e ta il, re c e iv in g .............................................
Fin ish ers, flatv ork, m achine................................... ..
Id en tifiers ................................................. ..................
Markers ..................................................... ..........................
Pressers, machine, sh irts ...........................................
Wrappers, bundle .............................................................

58
658
62
160
256
32

1.2U
1.05
1.20
12i
.l
1.15
1.22

1
U20
-

1
*
120
12
-

l
118
_
78
2

_
_
176

Average
weekly
earnings

4
70.00

1
72.50

4

Occupation y

Number
of
workers

75.00

80.00

85.00

90.00

95.00

1
100.00

10 5.00

110.00

■
72.50

75.00

80.00

85.00

”
90.00

95.00

100.00

10 5.00

110.00

11 5 .0 0

21
18
3

21
12
9

120
5U
66

30
19
11

16

29
21

a

8

13
1C
3

ia
5
9

Occupation and sex

1.10

1.15

4

♦
1.55

i.Uo

1.U5

i.5o

~
i.Uo

1.U5

•
i.5o

a3
56
1

_
a
-

_
_
13

1
_
_
1

_
.
_

_
-

-

-

.

4
1.75

“
1.70

“
1.75

1.80

“
1.85

2
a
-

-

1

%
1.70

“
1.65

■
1.55 _ 1.60

2
.
-

\
1.65

4

1 .6 0

6
13

.
a
-

.
.
-

.
-

_

t

2

1.8 0

Men
Extractor operators ........................................................
Washers, machine .............................................................
Wrappers, bu n dle..............................................................

1

a
6
-

a
7
-

W en
om

-

-

1

3

_

20
50
135
1
19

_

-

_

_

.
-

_

.
_

_

_
.
.

_
.
_

.

_
_
.

-

.

-

-

.
.
_

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAHi!UT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

¥

Routemen, r e t a il (driversalesmen) 5/
..... ........ .
San Francisco routemen, r e t a i l ...........
Oakland routemen, r e t a i l ................

y

Budget.

%

i

33U
168
166

*
83.81
87.08
80.U9

4

4

62.50
and
under
65.00

65.00

1
67.50

“
67.50

70.00

6
6

2U
2*
1

9
9

1

1

1
2

1

4

1
-

a
2
2

a
a

1 1 5 .0 0

l
120.00

"
120.00

125.00

5

8

a

a
a

1

1 ----130.00
and
“
over
130.00

4

125.00

3
1
2

9
5
2

The study covered establishments emoloying more than 20 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19U9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the
Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work* All workers in the occupations shown were paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1953
Data limited to men workers.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABCR
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Bureau of Labor Statistics
All routemen are chi a 5-day workweek.




12

C! Union Wage Scales
(Minimum waste rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated. Additional
information' is available in reports issued separately for these individual industries or trades.)

Table C-15*

Budding GoMdfruicijoH

Table c - 205:

B

a J s e /t fe d .

G

o s t lt H

January 2 t 1953
Rate
per
hour

C ity and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n

Hours
per
week

Oakland

0

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

San Fran cisco

B rick la y e rs . a . e . o . . . e » o o . . . . » e . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carpenters . . . . . . . . . o . . . . . . o o » . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.le r t r i eian s
..........
P ain ters . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • • • • . . . . . o . . .
P la s te re rs •••••••.•••••••..o « e . . . . o o . e « . o . . a
Plumbers
............
Building lab o re rs ....................................................... ..

0

C ity and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n

Table C-27x P * i4 l£ U U f

tte d

0

S 3.250
2.600
2.950
2.600
3.500
2,900
1 .8 5 0

Uo
bo
Uo
35
30
bo
Uo

San Fran cisco
B rick lavers . . . . . . . . .
Carpenters .................... .........................................
......... .............................
E le c tr ic ia n s
P ain ters . . . . . . . . . . . . T. . „ . #ff, Tfl. » r . 1 . . . . . . . . ff
.
P la s te re rs « o » « . . * . . . . . . » . . . . . . o . . . . . . . . . . tea
Pl\imbers o . . . « . . o e . « o o e o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Building lab o re rs . . . .........................

3.250
2.600
3.000
2.600
3.275
2.900
1.8 5 0

35
Uo
Uo
35
Uo
Uo
Uo

Table C-205:

Bread - Hand shops:
Forem en............................................................. ..
Dough m ixers, ovenmen . . o . . . . . . . . . ........... ..
Bench and machine, h e l p e r s .................... ..
Cake - Hand shops:
Foremen ...................... ................... ..............................
M ixers, ovenmen ........................................................
Helpers:
F i r s t year ............................................................
A fter f i r s t year ...............................................
Pan c l e a n e r s .................................................
Bread - Machine shops:
Foremen
Dough m ixers, ovenmen..........................................
Dividermen, m olders, roll-m achine
o p era to rs, ingredientmen, benchmen,
bread ra c k e rs, pan greasing-machine
o p erators, women bench helpers ................ ..
Flour dumpers ............................................................
Bench-machine h elp e rs:
F i r s t year ............................................................
Second year ..........................................................
Pan g reasers ..............................................................

C ity and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n

Hours
per
week

Oakland
Bread - Hand shops:
Foremen, ovenmen .....................................................
Bench hands ...................................... ..................... ..
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Foremen, dough m ixers, ovenmen •••••............
D ividers, m olders, roll-m achine
operators ................................................................




$2,075
l.<?05

Uo
Uo

2.395

37 1/2

2.155

37 1/2

Cake - Machine shops:
Foremen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M ixers, ic in g m ixers,
overmen •••••••ee**oeeee*e«*o*eee«*»eeoo
Ingredient s c a le r s , scaling-m achine
o p erators, cake dumpers, bench hands,
grease-machine o p era to rs, women
a u x ilia r y workers ........................................ ..
H elpers:
F i r s t y e a r ....................................
Second y e a r ...............................................
Women workers:
Cake wrappingmachine operators ....................................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Oakland

$2,158
2.088
1.713

38 3/U
38 3/U
38 3/U

2.158
2.088

38 3/U
38 3/U

1.568
1.718
1.568

38 3/U
33 3/U
38 3/U

2.305
2.2U5

37 1/2
37 1/2

2.155
2.155

37 1/2
37 1/2

1.785
1.865
1.685

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2

Ju ly 1 , 1952
1 Rate’
per
hour

City and classification

2.305

37 1/2

2.155

37 1/2

2.155

37 1/2

1.785
1.865

37 1/2
37 1/2

1.375

38

Book and job shops:
Bindery women ....... ................
Compositors, hand •••••••.»•.......... .
Electrotypers ........ ...............
Photoengravers ............... ....... .
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder press...................
Platen press ............ ........ .
Pressmen:
Cylinder ........ ..................
Platen............. ....... .
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day w o r k ............ ....... ......
Night work .................. ......
Mailers:
Day w o r k .... ......................
Pressmen, web presses:
Day work ....................... .
Night w o r k .................... .
Stereotypers:
Day work .......... ............... .
Night work ............... ........ .

$1 ,6 5 3
2.88U
2.837
3.0U2

37
37
37
35

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.307
1.8U 0

37 1/2
37 1/2

2.88U
2.782

37 1/2
37 1/2

2 .863
2 .9 9 6

37 1/2
37 1/2

2.592

37 1/2

2.757
3.095

37 1/2
35

2.7U5
2.879

37 1/2
37 1/2

1 .6 5 3
2.88U
2.837
3.0U2

37 1/2
37 1/2

2 .2 0 0
1.752

37 1/2
37 1/2

2.7 6 3

37 1/2

2.862
2 .9 9 6

3 ? 1/2
37 1/2

2.592
2 .7 2 0

37 1/2
37 1/2

San Francisco
Book and job shops:
Bindery w o m e n ...... ..... ........ .
Compositors, hand ................ .
Electrotypers .................. .
Photoengravers ................ ..... .
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder press ....................
Platen p ress..... ......
Pressmen:
Cylinder....... ..................
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day work ....... ...... .............
Night work .............
Mailers:
Day work .........................
Night work ................... .

37 1/ 2
35 1/ 2

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-O akland, C a l i f * , January 1953
U .S . DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

13

Table C-27:

~ G o * » tiH

H

Table C-U2:

ed

M

o fo U

to U

ck

Table C-U?:

3 > 4 U te b d

________________ Ju ly 1 , 1952

Ju ly 1 , 1952
Rate
per
hour

C ity and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n

Hours
per
week

San F ran cisco - Continued

$2,7 5 6
2.889

37 1/2
37 1/2

2.7U5
2.879

37 1/2
37 1/2

V ^ U m lU

October 1 , 1952
Rate
per
hour

C ity and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n

Hours
per
week

Oakland

$1,630
1.680

o o
-3-=t

Operators and conductors:
1-man bu sses:
F i r s t 6 months . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After 6 months ...... ............. ,
San Fran cisco
Operators and conductors:
1-man busses and tr a c k le s s t r o l l e y s ,
2-man c a r s , and cab le ca rs . . . . . . . . . . . .

Table C-U2:

A

fo t o b b u t c k




rftaTe
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Oakland - Continued

Newspapers - Continued
Pressmen, web p resses:
Day WOrk . . . . . . . . e .
Night work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S te reo ty p ers:
Day work
Night work .............................................

Table C-Ul: Jio Q c U

City and classification

1.835

^ b ^ A U e/M

U8

A

fo t o t ib u t c k

S tM U A eb d

and atfelpj&U -Go+d&vted

a n d ^elpeM-Gafidi+uted

____________ Ju ly 1 , 1952________________
Sate
C ity and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n
per
hour

Hours
per
week

San Francisco

Building:
Construction:
Dump truck:
U cubic yards or less ............0 $ 1 ,9 5 0
2 .090
U - 6 cubic yards ............
6 - 8 cubic yards ...... ........
2 .1 9 0
8 cubic yards and over ....... .
2 .6 0 0
Concrete-mixer truck:
3 cubic yards or less ....... .
2.075
U - 5 cubic yards...... ...... ..
2.135
Tank or water truck;
1.91:0
U00 gallons or l e s s ............ .
Over U00 gallons ....... ........
2 .0 7 0
Transport, heavy duty ................
2 .3 0 0
Winch truck and "A" frame ........ .
2 .2 5 0
1 .9 8 0
Helpers....... .......... .........
Material:
Dump truck:
1 .8 5 0
U cubic yards or less ....... »...
U - 6 cubic yards............ .
1 .9 9 0
2.ICO
6 - 8 cubic yards ....... .
2 .3 0 0
8 cubic yards and over ...........

Beer ................................................ , ____ , , _____ . . . .
Uo
Uo
Uo
ho
h0
h0
ho
h0
h0
hO
ho

ho
hQ
h0
ho

General:
Drayage for hire:
Furniture (new) ...................
Furniture movers............ ..... .
Less than 1 0 ,5 0 0 pounds ............
1 0 ,5 0 0 pounds and over .............
Low-bed dual or more axle trailer ....

2.063
2 .0 0 0
1.938
2.063
2.188

hO
h6
hO
hO
hO

Grocery:
Retail ........................... .
Wholesale......

2.218
2.1 0 0

Uo
UO

Laundry:
Delivery - Wholesale ............. .

1.875

Uo

Milk - Regular......................... .

2.150

Uo

Newspaper and periodical:
Drivers - Day:
First 6 months............. .
Second 6 months .................. .
After 1 y e a r ..................... .

2.2 6 5
2.3 9 6
2.528

Uo
Uo
Uo

Oil:
Less than 6 months.................
6 months to 1 year ...................
1 - 2 years......i................ .
After 2 years ........................

1.9 5 9
1.9 9 3
2.079
2.151*

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

Bu ilding:
C onstruction:
Excavating and dump tru ck ;
Under U cubic yards ...............................
U - 6 cubic y a r d s ................ ...................
6 - 8 cubic yards ............................. ..
8 cubic yards and o v e r ................
Concrete-m ixer tru ck :
2 cubic yards or le s s ...........................
3 cubic yards ...................................... ..
U cubic y a r d s ..................................
5 cubic yards .............................................
6 cubic y a r d s ........... ................................
M a teria l:
Less than U cubic yards .
U - 6 cubic y a r d s ................
6 - 8 cubic yards ..........................................
8 cubic yards and o v e r ...................... ..
Commission market:
F i r s t 6 months ».
Second 6 months ................................................... ..
A fter 1 year .............................
F u rn itu re:
Agreement A ..................
Agreement B .......................................... ...................
General:
Under 2 ,5 0 0 pounds ..............................................
2 ,5 0 0 - U,500 pounds...................... ............... ....
U,500 - 6 ,5 0 0 poun ds............. ............................
6 ,5 0 0 - 1 5 ,5 0 0 pounds . . . . . . . s . . . . . . . . . . .
1 5 ,5 0 0 - 2 0 ,5 0 0 pounds .................... .................
Over 20,500 pounds ...................................... ..
Moving:
Large van . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 -to n auto t r u c k ............................... ...............
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newspaper - Day:
F i r s t 6 months « . . . ........... « . . . ................... ..
Second 6 months .....................................................
A fter 1 y e a r ........................................
Newspaper - Night:
F i r s t 6 m on th s..............................................., „ .,
Second 6 m on th s.......................................... ..
A fter 1 year ................................. ..........................
S o ft drink:
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shipping d r i v e r s ........................... ...............

$2,170

Uo

1 .9 2 0
2.060
2.160
2.570

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1.9 5 0
2.135
2.180
2.225

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .8 8 0
2.030
2.135
2.560

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1 .8 8 0
1.9 5 0
2.025

Uo
Uo

1.975
2.038

Uo
U5 3/U

1.813
1.875
1.938
2.000
2.063
2.125

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

2.063
2 .0 0 0
1.9 0 0

U6
U6
U6

2.265
2 .^ 6
2 c528

Uo
U
O
Uo

2.390
2.521
2.653

Uo
Uo
Uo

2.100
2 . ICO

uo
Uo

2 , 0h0

Uo

14

D- Supplementary Wage Practices
Table D -l:

S J u ft j b i f o

f n t ia l P ao u M om I

1/

Percent of total plant employment

(a)
By establishment policy in -

Shift differential

industries 2 /

All workers

3d or other
shift work

All manufacturing

Machinery
industries

All manufacturing

2d shift
work

(b)
Actually working on extra shifts

2d

shift
work

industries 2 /

3d or other
shift work

in -

Machinery
industries

3d o r o t h e r
2d

shift

shift

3d o r o t h e r
shift

XXX

2d

XXX

0.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

82.1

78.6

100.0

100.0

16.3

5.2

11.4

.....................

80.7

77.2

100.0

100.0

15.9

4.7

11.4

................

47.2

40.0

_

11.0

19.1

1.9
.9
3 .2

-

4.5

4.3
-

2.4
-

.1
.2

........................................

xxx

shift

XXX

Workers in establishments having provisions
f o r l a t e s h i f t s ..................... ...........
With shift differential
Uniform cents

(per h o u r )

5 c e n t s ............................... .
6 c e n t s ..................................
8 o r 9 c e n t s ...........................
1 0 c e n t s ................................
1 2 c e n t s ............... .................
1 2 £ t o 1 5 c e n t s ...................... .
2 3 , 25, o r 3 5 c e n t s

....................

Uniform

p e r c e n t a g e ........................
5 p e r c e n t .............. .............. . •
7 £ p e r c e n t ..............................
1 0 p e r c e n t ..............................
1 5 p e r c e n t .............. ...............

Other

........................................

With no shift differential

..................

12.5
1.5
6.5
-

24.8
-

21.9
-

1.7
19.1

7.6

12.4

1.4

1.4

-

1.6
-

1.4
1.5

2.5

.3

-

-

-

-

9.9

25.9
4.0
-

-

-

.8

-

-

4.2

.3
-

9.3

67.5
-

4.0

67.5
-

67.5

67.5

-

y

3 2 .5

-

y

32.5
-

.3
-

-

shifts

...................

-

.6
-

-

3.9

.1
-

9.3

-

.2

-

.7

.1

.4

.5

y

.6

2 .1
-

-

Workers in establishments having no
p r o v i s i o n s fo r late

-

-

4.3
4.6

-

_

-

15.2

7.6

.6

_

17.9

21.4

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

1 / Shift differential data are presented in terms of (a) establishment policy and (b) workers actually employed on late shifts at the time of the survey.
An
establishment was considered as having a policy if it met any of the following conditions*
(l) operated late shifts at the time of the survey, (2) had union-contract
provisions covering late shifts, or (3) had operated late shifts within 6 months prior to the survey.
2/
Includes data for machinery industries also shown separately.
2 / Combination of full d a y ’s pay for reduced hours plus percentage.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




15

S c h e d u le d 'U fe e J U tf. J lo u M

Table D-2:

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS 1 /
Week l y hours

All workers

35

37}

1/
y
3/
y

(V)

100.0

5.9
U.0
13.1
23.3
53.7

0.2
.
1
8.3

-

-

-

-

1.5

7.8

2.0

-

-

~

89.7
1.7

90.5
1.7

9U.9
3.1

-

6.2
•
U
91.1
.
1

_

_
9.2
6.8
1.7
82.3

•

7.5
.
8
91.7

Servioes

”

■
*

100.0

Servioes

0.9
“

U.2

•
~

"

93.0
1.9

98.5

D a t a relate t o w o m e n workers.
Inclu d e s d a t a f o r services i n addition to those industry d i v i sions shown separately.
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e a l e s t a t e a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .

*

Less than 0.05 percent.
Transpo r t a t i o n (excluding railroads),

**

Finance,

insurance,

communication,

and other pub l i c utilities.

a n d r e a l est a t e .

P a id J f o l i d a y d

Table D -3*
*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Number o f p a i d h o l i d a y s

All w o r k e r s ...... .......................
Workers in establishments providing
p a i d h o l i d a y s ............... ...... .
2 to 5 d a y s ......................... .
6 d a y s ................. ............. .
7 d a y s ............................... .
8 days .................... ............
9 d a y s ......................... ......
1 0 d a y s ....... ...... ................
d a y s ..............................
} days .............................
} d a y s .................... .
Workers in establishments providing n o
paid holidays ............... .........

11
11
12

A
U
. anufacturing
industries 1 / M

PubU
c
utiUties*

W
holesale
trade

Finanoe**

Servioes

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

l l .U
8 2 .6
U .2
1 .8

2 .7
8 3 .8
1 3 .5

1 0 0 .0
.7
.2
.1
3 .6
1 0 .6
1 2 .7
3 9 .8
2 .9
2 9 .U

9 2 .6
3 .1
1 5 .6
U 9.5
2 2 .9
1 .5

-

-

9 .5
3 8 .8
1 8 .3
5 .2
U.3
1 3 .1
.9
9 .5

2 1 .3
5 2 .1
2U .9
1 .7

8 .7
2U .8
6 3 .9
.3
1 .2
1 .1

-

-

.u

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ser v i c e s i n addition to those industry divisions

-

-

-

Includes d a t a fcr

*
«*

Includes d a t a for real estate and services in addition to those industry divisions
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (exc l u d i n g railroads), communication, and other pub l i c utilities.
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l estate.




Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
A
U
industries y

1 0 0 .0

1/

y

100.0

100.0

2.2

Uo

100.0

100.0

0.5
U.9
11.U
7.6
75.6

h o u r s .......... ..........................
Over
and under
h o u r s ..............
h O h o u r s .................................. • • •

100.0

100.0

U.l
3.8
9.9
9.7
72.5

37}

Retail trade

Finance**

100.0

37}

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

100.0

h o u r s ......................................
Over
and under
h o u r s ..............

Public
utilities *

W
holesale
trade

100.0

35

A
U , .
anufacturing
industries 3 / M

Public
utilities*

A
U
anufacturing
industries 2 / M

..................................

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

EMPLOYED I N -

sh o w n

-

-

separately.
s h o w n se p a r a t e l y *

M
anufacturing

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .2
3 .5
2 0 .U
5 2 .1
1 7 .1
2 .1

PubU
c
utUities*

W
holesale
trade

RetaU trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .1
3.U
U.U
7 3 .7
lU .6

9 5 .U
1 .6
1 2 .U
2 2 .0
59 .U

-

U .o
7 3 .2
2 2 .8

-

•

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

7.U

U .8

U .6

-

3 .9

-

1

Services

-

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey,

-

San Francisco-Oakland,

Calif.,

January

1953

U . S . D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

16

Table D-4:

fta i d fycUUsiuMiA. W J - O b m c U P A X MMAU*4i£l

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy

All workers

A
U _,
anufacturing
industries 1/ M

..................................

Public
utilities*
*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.c

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 4 .2
1 .1
8 4 .7

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 4 .1
1 .8
4 4 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 3 .8
6 6 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 2 .4
3 7 .6

W
holesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
5 6 .4
1 .4
2 5 .9
-

I X .0
I X .0
5 9 .8
1 .5
3 1 .4
7 .3

1 X .0
9 8 .5
7 6 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 1 .6
-

2 2 .5
-

1 8 .4
-

I X .0
9 2 .2
1 5 .6
3 .6
7 1 .1
1 .3
•C
7 .8
1 .7
.9
5 .2

1 X .0
8 3 .7
2 5 .8
5 .1
5 2 .3
.5
1 6 .3
3 .5
2 .1
1 0 .7

I X .0
1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 2 .2
9 .2
2 .4
7 7 .1
1 .3
2 .2
7 .8
1 .7
.9
5 .2

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
1 8 .9
4 .1
5 7 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 2 .2
.7
.3
8 4 .9
1 .4
4 .9
7 .8
1 .7
6 .1

I X .0
8 3 .7
1 .3
.2
7 3 .6
3 .6
1 6 .3
3 .5
1 2 .8

1 0 0.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 3 .2
.5
76*3
-

Public
utilities *

1 0 0 .0
9 2 .2
6 4 .4
.9
2 5 .3
1 .3
•3
7 .8
2 .6
5 .2

Services

Finance**

1 0 0 .0

A
U
.
anufacturing
industries 2 / M

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

Retail trade

After 1 year of service
Workers in establishments providing
p a i d v a c a t i o n s ...........................
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t ................
1 w e e k ................................
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ...... .
2 w e e k s ...............................
Over 2 and u nder 3 weeks
3 weeks

..........

-

-

1 0 0 .0

-

-

-

-

-

...............................

2 /

-

Percentage payment
.................
2
p e r c e n t ...........................
Over 2 b u t less th a n 3 perc e n t

-

-

_
-

_
-

...

1 6 .3
5 .6
1 0 .7

-

1 .5
-

-

1 .5

After 2 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
p a i d v a c a t i o n s ...........................
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t ................
1 w e e k ................................
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ..........
2 w e e k s ...............................
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ..........
3 w e e k s ...............................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
1 .0
9 7 .5
.2

2 /

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .0
9 8 .8
.2

_

O v e r 2 b u t l e s s t h a n 3 p e r c e n t ...
3 p e r c e n t .............................

_

-

Percentage payment
.................
2 p e r c e n t .............................

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
7 .6
9 2 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 .5
9 4 .1
1 .4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

2 .9
8 9 .8
7 .3
_
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .5
5 .5
1 .6
9 1 .4
1 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .4
2 .7
9 5 .9
_
-

1 .5

Aft e r 3 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
p a i d v a c a t i o n s ...........................
Length-of-time payment ..............
1 w e e k ................................
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s .........
2 w e e k s ...............................
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ..........
3 weeks

...............................

2/

Percentage payment
.................
2 p e r c e n t .............................
3 percent
4 percent
After

.............................
.............................

................................

O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ..........
2 w e e k s ................... ............
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ..........
3 w e e k s .............................. .

2/

Percentage payment
.................
2 p e r c e n t .............................
A percent

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.7
.2
8 3 .3
3 .3
7 .0
-

.............................

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads),
**

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.5
9 4 .3

.
2

5 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
9 8 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 .5
9 4 .1
1 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
98.2
1 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 3 .0
4 .3
2 .7
-

2 .9
1 6 .3
3 .5
2 .1
1 0 .7

1 .5
9 1 .2
7 .3
-

I X .0
9 8 .5
1 .6
9 6 .9
1 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .4
9 6 .0
2 .6
-

1 .5

5 y e a r s of service

Workers in establishments providing
p a i d v a c a t i o n s ...........................
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t ........; .......
1 week

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.8
.2
9 5 .0
1 .7
2 .3
-

Finance,

insurance,




~

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 4 .8

.
2
5 .0
~

communication,

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .8
8 6 .7
1 1 .5
—

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 .5
8 5 .0
1 .4
9 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
I X .0
-

8 3 .7
-

3 3 .0
9 .3
2 .7
-

1 1 .3
-

“

Occupational Wage Survey,
and other public utilities.

a n d r e a l e s t ate.

Bureau of

Estimates are provided separately,
computing vacation payments

S an Francisco-Qakland,

a c c o r d i n g to e m p l o y e r

1 .5
3 9 .2
7 .3
2 .0
—

Calif., J a n u a r y 1953
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF LABOR

Labor Statistics

p r a c t i c e in

(length-of-time or percentage); percentage

payments were converted to e q uivalent time periods

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

i n e a r l i e r stud i e s .

I X .0
9 8 .5
9 6 .5
1 .5
.5
1 .5
1 .5

1 0 0 .0
I X .0
8 6 .8
1 3 .2
-

Services

17

T a b l e D -4:

P a id V cU x U lO H d (tf-O /U fu U pA X U U ddJO fti) “ C o * U l* U 4 e d
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V a ca tio n p o l i c y
industries l /

A l l w o r k e r s .........................................................................

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

All
industries

±/

, Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 C .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.7
.2
8 1 .1
2 .3
1 5 .6
.1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 3 .8
6 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .8
8 6 .7
1 0 .3
1 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 .5
8 3 .7
1 .4
1 0 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 8 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 2 .2
.7
.3
8 4 .5
i .4
4 .8

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
1 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_
_

9 6 .4
1 .5
.6
-

8 6 .8
_

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 1 .1
5 8 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .8
1 2 .7
8 4 .3
1 .2
-

A fte r 10 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
W o rk e rs i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
p a i d v a c a t i o n s .............................................................
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p aym en t ....................................
1 w eek ..................................................................... ..
O ver 1 an d u n d e r 2 w eek s .......................
2 w eeks .....................................................................
O ver 2 and u n d e r 3 w eeks .......................
3 w eeks .....................................................................
4 w eeks and o v e r ............................................
P e r c e n t a g e p ay m en t 3 / .......................................
2 p e r c e n t ......................... .....................................
p e r c e n t ...............................................................

A

-

-

-

6 6 .3
6 .4
2 7 .3
-

1 1 .3
-

-

•5
7 .8
i .7
6 .1

7 8 .8
3 .6
1 6 .3
3 .5
1 2 .8

1 .5
8 6 .6
7 .3
2 .6
2 .0
-

1 .5
1 .5

1 3 .2
_
_
-

A fte r 15 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
W o rk e rs i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
p a i d v a c a t i o n s .............................................................
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p ay m en t ....................................
1 w eek ........................................................................
O ver 1 and u n d e r 2 w eek s .......................
2 w eeks ....................................................................
O ver 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ..............
3 w eeks ....................................................... ..
w eek s and o v e r ............................................
P e r c e n t a g e p ay m en t 3 / .......................................
2 p e r c e n t .................................................... ..
p e r c e n t .............. ................................................

A
A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.2
4 9 .1
.7
4 9 .9
.1
-

-

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 8 .9
4 1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 0 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 5 .1
2 .1
4 2 .8
-

1 9 .1
-

-

1 0 0 .0
9 2 .2
.7
.3
5 3 .7
1 .3
3 5 .7
.5
7 .8
1 .7
6 .1

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
1 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
9 2 .6
.7
.3
5 3 .6
1 .3
3 6 .2

1 0 0 .0
8 4 .7
1 .3

4 5 .4
-

3 7 .0
-

1 6 .3
3 .5
1 2 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .5
1 5 .0
7 .3
7 4 .2
2 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_

8 6 .9
-

8 0 .2
_

1 1 .6

1 9 .8

-

-

1 .5

-

-

-

1 .5

-

A fte r 2 0 y e a rs o f s e rv ic e
W o rk e rs i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
p a i d v a c a t i o n s .............................................................
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p ay m en t ....................................
1 w eek .......................................................................
O ver 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s .................
2 w eeks .....................................................................
O ver 2 and u n d e r 3 w eek s ......................
3 w eek s .....................................................................
w eeks and o v e r ............................................
P e r c e n t a g e p ay m en t
......................................
2 p e r c e n t .......................................................... ....
p e r c e n t ...............................................................

A

2/ .

A

1 0 0 o0
1 0 0 o0
.2
3 5 .1
6 1 .9
2 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 0 .0
6 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 6 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

8 4 .3
1 .2
-

4 3 .3
-

1 9 .1
-

7 5 .1
7 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
•
1 .8
1 2 .7

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
l o o '.o
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

-

1 .8
1 2 .7
-

-

-

8 0 .9
-

.

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 7 .0
-

.5
7 .4
1 .7
5 .7

-

4 5 .4
3 8 .0
-

1 5 .3
3 .5
1 1 ,8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_
1 .5
1 5 .0
7 .3
7 4 .2
2 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .5
_

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.
-

8 5 .6
_

8 0 .2
-

1 2 .9
_

1 9 .8
-

1 .5
1 .5

-

A fte r 25 y e a rs o f s e rv ic e
W o rk e rs i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
p a i d v a c a t i o n s .............................................................
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p ay m en t ...................................
1 week ..........................................................................
O ver 1 an d u n d e r 2 w eek s .......................
2 w eeks .....................................................................
O ver 2 an d u n d e r 3 w eek s ......................
3 w eeks .....................................................................
w eeks and o v e r ............................................
P e r c e n t a g e p ay m en t
.......................................
2 p e r c e n t ...............................................................
p e r c e n t ...............................................................

A

2/

A

1/
2/
3/
*

■ **

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.2
3 3 .4
5 7 .0
9 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

3 8 .9
4 9 .9
1 1 .2
-

-

8 4 .3
1 .2

-

5 6 .1
-

3 2 .0
1 1 .9

_

7 6 .1
_

1 7 .9
6 .0

-

1 7 .0
_

7 1 .6
1 1 .4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r s e r v i c e s i n a d d i t i o n to t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e a l e s t a t e a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n to t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
Percent of annu a l earnings.
Transpor t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Finance,

insurance, and real estate.




1 0 0 .0
9 2 .6
.7
.3
5 2 .3
1 .3
2 9 .7
8 .3
7 .4
1 .7
5 .7

1 0 0 .0
8 4 .7
1 .3
_

4 3 .8
-

2 7 .0
1 2 .6
1 5 .3
3 .5
1 1 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_
1 .5
1 5 .0
7 .3
7 4 .2
2 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .5
_

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

_

_

8 4 .1

7 7 .9

_

1 1 .5
2 .9
1 .5
-

1 .5

1 5 .5
6 .6
_
_

Services

18

Table D-5:

U lt& U A Q M C * G 4 id P * H d 4 4 H P l& H i

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type o f plan

A ll workers .............................................................

Workers in establishm ents having
insurance o r pension plans 2 / ..................

industries l /

1 0 0 .0

M
anufacturing

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities*
*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

Services

A
ll
. anufacturing
industries 2 / M

Public
utilities *

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Sendees

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .3

9 6 .9

9 9 .0

9 5 .9

9 3 .3

9 5 .1

9 3 .6

9 0 .5

1 0 0 .0

9 3 .5

9 3 .9

Insurance plans 3 / .........................................
L ife .................................................................
A ccidental death and
dismemberment .........................................
Sickness and accid ent ............................
H o sp italizatio n .........................................
S u rg ical .........................................................
Medical ...........................................................
Retirement pension p l a n ....................... ..

9 3 .8
8 8 .9

9 1 .4
8 1 .0

9 6 .5
9 6 .4

9 5 .0
9 5 .0

9 0 .4
7 6 .5

9 5 .1
9 3 .0

9 0 .0
8 0 .3

8 8 .7
8 4 .9

9 5 .3
9 0 .8

8 7 .1
8 7 .1

8 8 .2
7 0 .2

2 2 .6
1 9 .7
6 1 .1
5 8 .9
4 6 .6
5 8 .8

2 6 .5
2 1 .5
6 2 .7
6 1 .9
4 6 .9
6 2 .5

2 8 .5
2 6 .7
2 6 .7
2 2 .0
2 0 .7
9 1 .0

2 2 .6
2 2 .7
6 4 .7
6 2 .1
5 0 .2
4 6 .2

2 0 .5
1 6 .4
7 2 .4
7 2 .4
6 6 .6
2 9 .3

1 8 .7
1 8 .0
7 4 .9
7 1 .6
5 3 .3
6 0 .0

2 7 .9
2 1 .9
6 3 .7
6 0 .8
5 3 .9
4 2 .4

2 6 .3
1 7 .1
6 9 .5
6 4 .5
5 3 .6
4 2 .2

4 5 .5
4 3 .9
2 2 .9
2 0 .0
1 5 .8
8 6 .8

1 9 .1
1 8 .3
4 7 .1
4 6 .1
4 0 .9
3 1 .7

1 6 .5
2 0 .4
8 1 .3
8 1 .3
7 8 .0
2 3 .2

Workers in establishm ents having
no insurance o r pension plans ...................

3 .7

3 .1

1 .0

4 .1

6 .7

4 .9

6 .4

9 .5

6 .5

6 .1

1/
2/
2/
*
**

Includes data fo r se rv ice s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
Includes data fo r r e a l e s ta te and se rv ice s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep arately ,
Uhduplicatod t o t a l .
Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e .




(£ /)

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-O akland, C a l i f . , January 1953
U.S. D
EPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

19

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey

The Bureau*s occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resourceso
In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community.
Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.

such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation.
Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work.
Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons,
are included.
Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid;
average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment *s full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau*s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of inter establishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request,,
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and
(d) custodial,
warehousing, and shipping
(tables A-l
through A-4).
The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade;
retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services.
Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions# As indicated in
the following table,
only establishments above a certain size were
s tu d ie d .

S m a lle r

in s u ffic ie n t

e s ta b lis h m e n ts

e m p lo y m e n t

in

th e

w ere

o m itte d

b ecau se

they i u r n i s . i e c

o c c u p a tio n s

s tu d ie d

to

w arran t

in ­

c lu s io n *

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry
(see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources.
Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional,
and technical personnel.
"Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional, and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded.
Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries,
these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions:
operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

20

in term s o f to t a l p la n t employment, whereas p ro p o rtio n s in th e sec­
ond ta b u la tio n re p re se n t only th o se w orkers a c tu a lly employed on
the sp e c ifie d l a t e s h if t .
Inform ation on wage p ra c tic e s o th e r than s h if t d if f e r ­
e n tia ls re fe rs to a l l o ffic e and p la n t w orkers as sp e c ifie d in th e
in d iv id u al ta b le s . I t is p resen ted in term s of th e p ro p o rtio n o f
a l l w orkers employed in o ffic e s (or p la n t departm ents) th a t observe
the p ra c tic e in q u estio n , except in th e se c tio n re la tin g to women

o ffic e workers of th e ta b le summarizing scheduled weekly h o u rs.
Because o f e l i g i b i] it y req u irem ents, th e p ro p o rtio n a c tu a lly re ­
ceiv in g th e s p e c ific b e n e fits may be sm a lle r.
The summary of v ac a tio n p la n s i s lim ite d to form al a r ­
rangem ents. I t excludes inform al p lan s whereby tim e o ff w ith pay
i s g ran ted a t the d is c re tio n o f th e em ployer o r o th er su p e rv iso r.
T ab u latio ns of insurance and p ension p lan s have been confined to
tho se fo r which a t le a s t a p a rt o f th e c o st i s borne ty th e employer.

E stab lish m en ts and Workers in Major In d u stry D ivisions and in S elected In d u strie s in San F ran cis co-O akland, C a lif* , 1 /
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s , January 1953

Item

Minimum number
o f w orkers in
e stab lish m en ts
stu d ied
2/

Number of
e s ta b lis h ment3
E stim ated
to ta l
w ith in
Studied
scope of
stu d y

E stim ated
to ta l
w ith in
scope o f
stu d y

Employment
In estab lish m en ts
stu d ied
T o ta l

O ffice

In d u stry d iv is io n s in which occupations
were surveyed on an a re a b a sis
A ll d iv is io n s •• • • • ....• < > .• # • o * * * # . . . * « . . . . o . o o * *
M anufacturing
N onm anufacturing............ ..
T ran sp o rtatio n (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) ,
comm unication, and o th e r p u b lic
u t i l i t i e s ..................... ..
W holesale tra d e • • • • • • • • • • • • .................
R e ta il t r a d e ..............
F inance, in su ra n c e , and r e a l e s td te . . . • • • •
S erv ices 2 t/ ............................................
In d u s trie s in which occupations were
surveyed on an in d u s try b a s is Lf
P ain ts and v arn ish es • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Machinery in d u s trie s ..................................... «,#.............
Power la u n d rie s .......................................................

«.
101
-

1,131
333
798

246
78
168

323,000
122,900
200,100

168,980
55,960
113,020

40,650
9,630
31,020

101
51
101
51
51

72
258
128
174
166

29
35
47
33
24

63,200
33,800
45,800
35,100
22,200

54,820
7,230
27,730
16,880
6,360

9,040
2,580
4,140
14,280
980

8

25
91
46

14
23
23

2,299
13,382
3,028

2,017
6,949
1,916

399
1,426
106

5 / 21
21

1 / San F ran cis co-Oakland M etrop o litan Area (Alameda, Contra C osta, M arin, San F ran cisco , San M ateo, and Solano C ounties)*
2 / T o tal estab lish m en t employment. The minimum s iz e of estab lish m en t stu d ied in the January 1952 survey was 21 w orkers in w holesale
tra d e ; fin a n c e , in su ra n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e rv ic e s , and 101 in th e o th e r major in d u stry d iv isio n s*
2 / H o tels; p erso n al s e rv ic e s ; b u sin ess s e rv ic e s ; autom obile re p a ir shops; ra d io b ro ad castin g and te le v is io n ; m otion p ic tu re s ; non­
p r o f it membership o rg a n iz a tio n s; and en g in eerin g and a r c h ite c tu r a l s e rv ic e s .
l j In d u s trie s are d efin ed in fo o tn o te s to wage ta b le s .
j>/ E stab lish m en ts m anufacturing m achine-tool a c c e sso rie s w ith 8 o r more workers were a ls o in clu d ed .




21

Index
Assembler (m achinery), 10
Bench hand (b a k eries), 12
B ille r , machine, 3
Bookbinder (p r in tin g ), 12
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3
B ricklayer (b u ild in g co n stru ctio n ), 12
Calculating-m achine operator, k
Carpenter (b u ild in g co n stru ctio n ), 12
C a rp en ter, m aintenance, 7
C leaner, 8
C lerk, f i l e , 3, k
C lerk, order, 3, *■
<
C lerk, p a y ro ll, 3, b
Clerk, reta il^ rec eiv in g (power
la u n d ries), 11
Compositor, hand (p r in tin g ), 12
Crane operator, e le c tr ic b rid ge, 8
Draftsman, 6
D r ill-p r e ss operator (m achinery), 10
Duplicating-m achine operator, k
E le c tr ic ia n (b u ild in g co n stru ctio n ), 12
E le c tr ic ia n , m aintenance, 7
E le c tr ic ia n , maintenance (m achinery), 10
E lectrotyp er (p r in tin g ), 12
E ngine-lathe operator (m achinery), 10
E n gin eer, s ta tio n a ry , 7
E xtractor operator (power la u n d ries), 11
F in ish er, fla tv ork (power la u n d ries), 11
Fireman, sta tion a ry b o ile r , 7
Grinding-machine operator (m achinery), 10
Guard, 8
H elper (b a k e rie s ), 12
H elp er, m otortruck d riv e r, 13
H elp er, tra d e s , m aintenance, 7
I d e n tifie r (power la u n d ries), 11
Inspector (m achinery), 10




Plumber (b uild ing co n stru ctio n ), 12
Jan itor, 8
Janitor (m achinery), 10
P orter, 8
Press a ssista n t (p r in tin g ), 12
Key-punch operator, k
Press feeder (p r in tin g ), 12
P resser, machine, sh ir ts (power
Labeler and packer (p ain ts and v a rn ish es), 10
la u n d ries), 11
Laborer (b uild ing co n stru ctio n ), 12
Pressman (p r in tin g ), 12, 13
Laborer, m aterial handling, 8
R eceiving clerk , 9
Laborer, m aterial handling (m achinery), 10
Routeman ( dr iv e r -sa le sman) (power
la u n d ries), 11
M achine-tool operator, production
(m achinery), 10
S e c re ta ry , 3, 5
M achine-tool operator, toolroom , 7
Sheet-m etal w orker, m aintenance, 7
M achine-tool operator, toolroom
Shipping c le rk , 9
(m achinery), 10
S h ip p in g -an d -receiv in g c le rk , 9
M achinist, maintenance, 7
S tenographer, 5
M achinist, production (m achinery), 10
Stereotyper (p rin tin g ), 12, 13
M ailer (p r in tin g ), 12
Stock h an d ler (p a in ts and v a rn is h e s ), 10
Marker (power la u n d ries), 11
Sw itchboard o p e ra to r, 5
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) , 7
Sw itchboard o p e ra to r-re c e p tio n is t, 5
Mechanic, maintenance, 7
M illing-m achine operator (m achinery), 10
M illw right, 7
Tabulating-machine operator, 3> 5
Mixer (b a k eries), 12
Technician (p ain ts and v a rn ish es), 10
Mixer (p ain ts and v a rn ish es), 10
T inter (p ain ts and v a rn ish es), 10
Molder (b a k eries), 12
Tool-and-die maker, 7
Motortruck d riv er, 13
Tool-and-die maker (m achinery), 10
Transcribing-machine operator, 5
Nurse, in d u stria l (r e g iste r e d ), 6
Truck d riv er, 9
Trucker, hand (p ain ts and
v a rn ish es), 10
O ffice boy, 3
O ffice g i r l , 5
Trucker, power, 9
T urret-lathe operator, hand (machinery), 10
O ile r, 7
T y p ist, 6
Operator (lo c a l tr a n s it), 13
Order f i l l e r , 8
Ovenman (b a k eries), 12
Varnish maker (p ain ts and v a rn ish es), 10
Packer, 8
Washer, machine (power la u n d ries), 11
Painter (b uild ing co n stru ctio n ), 12
Watchman, 9
P ain ter, maintenance, 7
Welder, hand (m achinery), 10
Photoengraver (p r in tin g ), 12
Wrapper (b a k eries), 12
Pipe f i t t e r , maintenance, 7
Wrapper, bundle (power la u n d ries), 11
P la sterer (b u ild in g co n stru ctio n ), 12

☆

u. S. G O V E R N M E N T P RIN TING O FF IC E : 1953 0 —249107







This report was prepared in the Bureau's Western Regional Office*
Communications may be addressed to:
Max D. Kossoris, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor S ta tistics
870 Market Street
Roam 1074
San Francisco 2, California
The services of the Bureau of Labor S ta tistics' regional o ffices
are available for consultation on sta tistic s relating to wages and industrial
relations, employment, prices, labor turnover, productivity, work injuries,
construction,and housing.
The Western Region includes the following S tates:
Arizona
New Mexico
Oregon
California
U ta h
Colorado
Washington
Idaho
Nevada
Ityoming


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