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DENVER, COLORADO
November 1952

Bulletin N o . 1116-8

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner







DENVER, C O L O R A D O
November

1952

Bulletin No. 1116-8
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 2J0 cents




Contents
Page

Letter of Transmittal
INTRODUCTION..........................

1

THE DENVER METROPOLITAN A R E A .............

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ................................

1

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s ,
W ashington, D. C ., March 20, 1953o

The S e cretary of Laborl
I have the honor to tran sm it herew ith a re p o rt on
o ccu p atio n al wages and re la te d b e n e fits in Denver, C o lo ., dur­
ing November 1952. S im ilar stu d ie s are being conducted in a
number o f o th er la rg e labornnarket areas during the f i s c a l year
1953* These s tu d ie s have been designed to meet a v a rie ty of
governm ental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-w ide
earn in g s in fo rm atio n fo r many occupations common to most manu­
fa c tu rin g and nonm anufacturing in d u s trie s , as w ell as summaries
of se le c te d supplem entary wage b e n e fits . Whenever p o ss ib le ,
sep arate d a ta have been presented fo r in d iv id u a l major in d u stry
d iv is io n s .
This re p o rt was prepared in the Bureau1^ re g io n a l of­
fic e in San F ra n c isc o , C a lif ., by John L. Dana, R egional Wage
and In d u s tr ia l R e latio n s A nalyst. The planning and c e n tra l
d ir e c tio n of th e program was c a rrie d on in the Bureau1s D ivision
of Wages and I n d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s.
Ewan Clague, Commissioner.
Hon. M artin P. D urkin,
S e c re ta ry of Labor.




TABLES 1
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupa t i o n s .... • •.................. .
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .......
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ......
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occup a t i o n s ..............
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis B-35
Machinery industries
.............. ••••••••.
B-7211 Power laundries ..........
Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction.........
C-205
Bakeries ...............
C-27
Printing ..................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees •••.••.••••.
C-42
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s ........ 0....o.
Wage practices D—1
Shift differential provisions ••••••••••••....
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours ..........
D-3
Paid holidays 0.......... .••••••••....... .
D-4
Paid vacations .................
D-5
Insurance and pension plans ..............

3

5
6

7

9
10

11

11
11

12
12

13
13
14
14.

16

APPENDIX 1
Scope and method of survey ••••.•••........ .

17

INDEX ........ ........ ................................. .....

19




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY - DENVER, COLO
T o tal wage and s a la ry employees (excluding a g ric u ltu ra l
and government w orkers) numbered 190,900 in November 1952. Of th e se ,
98,700 were employed in tra d e , fin an ce, and serv ic e s; 62,900 were
in w holesale and r e t a i l, tr a d e ; 11,U00 were employed in fin a n c ia l
in s titu tio n s inclu d ing insurance c a r r ie r s and re a l e s ta te o p erato rs;
and 2U,lf00 were in th e serv ice in d u s trie s . Approximately ^5>700
w orkers were employed in m anufacturing; 27,000 in tra n s p o rta tio n ,
communication, and o th er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ; 18,300 in c o n tract con­
s tru c tio n ; and 1,200 in m ining.
Union o rg an izatio n in Denver is p ro p o rtio n ate ly le s s than
in th e la rg e West Coast c i t ie s and most E astern and Midwestern in ­
d u s tr ia l a re a s. Like S a lt Lake C ity and Phoenix, Denver is more
c lo se ly a lin e d w ith c i t ie s o f th e South in term s o f the ex ten t of
union o rg an iz atio n . Among th e in d u s trie s and estab lish m en t-size
groups stu d ie d , about tw o -th ird s o f th e Denver p la n t workers were
employed in estab lish m en ts having w ritte n co n tra c ts w ith lab o r
o rg an iz atio n s in November 1952. Nine o f every 10 p la n t workers in
th e p u b lic u t i l i t i e s group o f in d u s trie s surveyed were employed
under u n io n -co n tract term s. In m anufacturing, th re e -fo u rth s o f the
p la n t w orkers were in organized estab lish m en ts. In th e tra d e ,
fin an ce, and serv ice in d u s trie s , considered as a group, le s s than
h a lf were covered by c o n tra c t p ro v isio n s; although in w holesale
tra d e , taken s e p a ra te ly , th re e -fo u rth s o f th e p la n t workers were in
union e stab lish m en ts.
Only in m anufacturing was u n io n izatio n of o ffic e workers
found to any ap p reciab le e x te n t and h ere th e p ro p ortio n of workers
in organized estab lish m en ts was le s s than a f i f t h of th e t o t a l .
In surveys conducted in 1951-52, th e p ay -lev el p o sitio n
o f th e Denver a re a in r e la tio n to o th er la rg e U. S. lab o r markets
was found to be g e n e ra lly under th e h ig h ly in d u s tria liz e d c itie s of
th e E ast and th e M idwest, under th e h ig h ly union organized c itie s
o f th e West. C oast, b u t somewhat above th e tra d e -fin a n c e -se rv ic e in ­
dustry-dom inated c i t ie s o f th e South. 2/

Introduction
The Denver a rea is one o f sev eral im portant in d u s tria l
c e n te rs in which th e Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s is c u rre n tly con­
d u ctin g o ccu p atio n al wage surveys. In such su rv ey s, occupations
common to a v a rie ty o f m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing in d u s trie s
are stu d ie d on a community-wide b a s is , l / C ro ss-in d u stry methods of
sam pling a re th u s u tiliz e d in com piling earn in g s d a ta fo r th e f o l ­
low ing ty p es o f occupations: (a) o ffic e ; (b) p ro fe ssio n a l and te c h ­
n ic a l; (c) m aintenance and power p la n t; and (d) c u s to d ia l, w are­
ho usin g , and sh ip p in g . In p resen tin g earnings inform ation fo r such
jobs (ta b le s A -l through A - l) , sep arate d ata a re provided wherever
p o ssib le fo r in d iv id u a l broad in d u stry d iv is io n s .
E arnings inform ation fo r c h a ra c te r is tic occupations in
c e rta in more narrow ly defin ed in d u s trie s is p resen ted in s e rie s B
ta b le s . Union s c a le s (s e rie s C ta b le s ) are p resen ted fo r se le c te d
occu p atio n s in se v e ra l in d u s trie s or tra d e s in which th e g re a t ma­
j o r it y o f th e w orkers are employed under term s o f c o lle c t iv e -b a r­
g ainin g agreem ents, and th e c o n tra c t or minimum ra te s are b elie v ed
to be in d ic a tiv e o f p re v a ilin g pay p ra c tic e s .
D ata a re c o lle c te d and summarized on s h if t o p eratio n s and
d if f e r e n t ia ls , hours o f work, and supplem entary b e n e fits such as
v a c a tio n allow ances, paid h o lid ay s, and insurance and pension p la n s.

The Denver Metropolitan Area
The b u sin ess economy o f the Denver M etrop o litan Area
(Adams, A rapahoe, Denver, and Jefferso n C ounties) is la rg e ly de­
pendent on a c t i v it i e s in tra d e , fin an ce, and s e rv ic e s . These th re e
in d u s try groups accounted fo r a l it t le more th an h a lf th e t o t a l wage
and s a la ry employment (excluding a g ric u ltu ra l and government em­
ploym ent) in th e a re a in November 1952. T ra d itio n a lly drawing on
th e in d u s tr ia l E ast and Midwest fo r a g reat v a rie ty o f m anufactured
p ro d u c ts, Denver has rem ained a commercial and fin a n c ia l c e n te r in
th e Rocky M ountain West fo r alm ost a cen tu ry . Although a meatpack­
ing c e n te r and an im portant producer of rubber goods, m ining ma­
c h in e ry , luggage and le a th e r p ro d ucts, le s s th an a q u a rte r o f th e
w orkers in Denver in d u s trie s were employed in m anufacturing.

Occupational Wage Structure
O bservations on earn in g s o f p la n t workers in c h a ra c te r­
i s t i c in d ire c t jobs and o ffic e workers in typiccp. subsupervisory
c la s s if ic a tio n s give in s ig h t to th e f u l l range of occupational r e ­
la tio n s h ip s in a community.

l / See appendix fo r d iscu ssio n of scope and method o f survey.
D ifferen ces between th e scope of the survey and th e l a s t previous
survey (November 1951) are in d ic a te d in th e appendix ta b le .




2/ Toivo P. Kanninen, "Wage D ifferen ces Among
k e ts , M onthly Labor Review, December 1952 (p . 620).

a )

Labor Mar-

2

Among Denver p la n t w orkers in in d ire c t jobs surveyed,
those c la s s ifie d in most o f th e s k ille d m aintenance occupations
averaged more than $1.85 an hour. Averages fo r c a rp e n te rs, e le c ­
t r ic ia n s , and m ach in ists were a t o r near $ 1 .90 . For to o l-a n d -d ie
makers the average was $2 .05 , and fo r p a in te rs and mechanics (au to ­
motive and o th ers) they were a t o r near $ 1 .80 . S k ille d craftsm en
as a group h eld about a 20 p ercen t advantage in pay over th e le s s
s k ille d h elp ers who averaged $1.53 an hour. In o th er jobs re q u irin g
s k il l comparable to th a t of th e m aintenance tra d e s h e lp e r, o ile r s
had an hourly average o f $1.57 and s ta tio n a ry b o ile r firem en $1.59*
The h ig h est s k il l s stu d ied had a 35 p ercen t advantage over th e
low est, excluding c u sto d ia l w orkers. R ep resen tativ e of occupations
re q u irin g l i t t l e or no tra in in g are m a te ria l handling la b o re rs who
averaged $1 . 36, and men packers on ro u tin e ta sk s who averaged $1.31In th e c u sto d ia l group, men ja n ito r s , p o rte rs , and c lean ers had a
$1.12 hourly average and watchmen receiv ed $1 .10 .
Average s a la rie s in most womens o ffic e c la s s ific a tio n s
stu d ied were above $1*5 a week. Women earned about 25 p ercen t more
in occupations demanding co n sid erable re s p o n s ib ility and a wide
knowledge o f o ffic e procedures than in jobs o f a ro u tin e n atu re r e ­
q u irin g no sp e c ia l a b i l i t i e s . S e c re ta rie s averaged $ 6 l a week,
p a y ro ll c le rk s $52, and o rd er c le rk s $1*9 . 50. At th e o th er end of
th e s c a le , o ffic e g ir ls averaged $37.50, ro u tin e f i l e c le rk s $1*0,
and copy ty p is ts $1*3.50.
Follow ing th e g en eral p a tte rn in th e la rg e r la b o r markets,
Denver pay in m anufacturing in d u s trie s is g e n e ra lly h ig h er than in
nonm anufacturing. Of 18 p la n t occupations p e rm ittin g comparisons
in November 1952, average earn in g s in m anufacturing were h ig h er by
6 to 36 cen ts an hour in 13 c a se s. In 10 o f 13 womens o ffic e
c la s s if ic a tio n s , average s a la rie s in m anufacturing were h ig h er by
$1 to $7 a week.
Comparison o f th e Denver o ccupational wage s tru c tu re in
November 1952 w ith d ata from a s im ila r survey made 3 years e a r lie r
in d ic a te s s u b s ta n tia l gains in money wages. T h ree-fo u rth s o f th e
p la n t jobs fo r which d ir e c t com parisons could be made on an a l l in d u stry b a s is showed average earn in g s in c reases o f 20 p ercen t or
more. S k ille d craftsm en in th e e a r l i e r p erio d were a t a $1.50 to
$1.60 ho urly le v e l, tra d e s h elp e rs averaged $1 . 25, and m a te ria l
handling la b o re rs were a t $ 1 .15 . In creases between th e two p erio ds
fo r tw o -th ird s of th e women o ffic e occupations a ls o amounted to 20
p ercen t or more. In November 192*9 , average s a la rie s in most women




o ffic e c la s s ific a tio n s were le s s than $2*0 a week. S e c re ta rie s had
a $2*9 weekly average, p a y ro ll c le rk s $2*2.50, and o rd er c le rk s $2*0.50.
O ffice g ir ls were paid $32, ro u tin e f i l e c le rk s $31.50, and copy
ty p is ts $35.50.
Wages o f p la n t w orkers in Denver were la rg e ly determ ined
on the b a s is o f form alized wage s tru c tu re s in la t e 1952. A pproxi­
m ately fo u r - f if th s of th e t o t a l p la n t w orkers were employed a t tim era te d jo b s. Wages of h a lf th ese w orkers were based on form alized
p lans p ro v id in g a sin g le ra te fo r in d iv id u a l o ccu p atio n s; another
s u b s ta n tia l p ro p ortio n worked under ra n g e -o f-ra te p la n s - pay fo r
only a te n th was based on in d iv id u al d eterm in atio n . Workers on in ­
cen tiv e system s o f pay accounted fo r approxim ately 20 p ercen t of
th e t o t a l p la n t workers and were employed c h ie fly in m anufacturing
and r e t a i l tra d e .
Almost tw o -th ird s o f Denver o ffic e w orkers were re p o rte d
in firm s which had esta b lish e d form al s a la ry ranges fbr each c l a s s i ­
f ic a tio n . For most o f th e o th e rs, s a la rie s were determ ined on an
in d iv id u a l b a s is .
The increase in employment in D enver's expanding manufac­
tu rin g in d u s trie s (2*0 p ercen t employment in c re a se in 3 y ears) is
re fle c te d in th e increased numbers o f l a t e - s h i f t w orkers. In Novem­
b er 1952, one o f every 5 w orkers was e ith e r on a second o r a th ir d
s h if t and was p aid ty p ic a lly a d if f e r e n tia l ran g ing from 5 to 8
cen ts Over d a y -s h ift r a te s . Three y ears e a r l i e r , only 15 p ercen t
o f th e fa c to ry la b o r fo rce were on l a t e - s h i f t work and th e d i f f e r ­
e n tia l was u su a lly under 5 ce n ts.
The workweek in Denver was 2*o hours fo r a m a jo rity o f
p la n t w orkers a t the tim e o f th e survey. A s u b s ta n tia l p ro p o rtio n
were on a lo n g er schedule, however, p rin c ip a lly in m anufacturing
and r e t a i l tra d e a t 2*8 ho urs. About f o u r - f if th s o f women o ffic e
w orkers were scheduled to work a l*0-hour week.
Among nonwage b e n e fits which in re c e n t y ears have become
thoroughly e sta b lish e d as im portant fe a tu re s o f wage and s a la ry ad­
m in is tra tio n , v ir tu a lly a l l Denver w orkers o f th e in d u stry groups
surveyed enjoyed paid v a catio n s; a l l b u t a sma l l percen tag e were
employed in estab lish m en ts g ran tin g p aid h o lid a y s; and f o u r - f if th s
worked fo r firm s th a t provided insurance o r pension p la n s p aid fo r
w holly o r in p a rt by management.

AvCross-Indusiry Occupations
T ab le A - l :

(jtficm ChcHftatiOHi

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., by industry division, November 1952)

Average
S e x , o c c u p a t io n , and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W E E K L Y EARNINGS OF—
$

Weekly

Weekly

Under

(Standard) (Standard) $

30.00

40.00

$
4 2 .5 0

$
45.0 0

$
s
4 7 .5 0 50.00

$
5 2 .5 0

$
5 5 .0 0

4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0

4 5 .0 0

4 7 .5 0

50.00 5 2 .5 0

55.00

5 7 .5 0

$
35 .0 0

$

30.00

$
3 2 .5 0

u n§er
32 .5 0

35.0 0

3 7 .5 0

$

3 7 .5 0

$

$

$

$

5 7 .5 0 60.00

62.50

65.00

60.00 62.50

65.00

6 7 .5 0

$
$
$
6 7 .5 0
70 .0 0 7 2 .5 0
70 .0 0

7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0

s
7 5 .0 0
80.00

$
$
$
80.00 85.00 90.00
and
85.00 90.00 o ver

Men

|

C le r k s , o r d e r .......................................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ........................................................
N o n m an u factu rin g ..........................................................

173
77
96

C l e r k s . p a y r o l l ..................................................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g .................................................................
N o n m an u factu rin g ..........................................................

67
35
32

O f f i c e b o y s ........................................ ...................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ..........................................................

120

$
5 9 .50
59.00

""

6 3 .5 0
6 1.0 0

40.5*
4 0 .0
4 1 .0

-

60.00

40 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i 3 9 .5 0
! 3 9 .5 0

33

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

|

B i l l e r s , m achine ( b i l l i n g m achine) .........................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ...................................... ..........................
N onm anufactu ring ..........................................................
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ...............................................

166
38
12 8
50

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

4 6 .0 0
4 7 .0 0
4 5 .5 0
4 4 .5 0

B i l l e r s , m achine (b o o k k e e p in g m achine) ................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g .................... .....................................

68

4 0 .0
40 .0

B ook k ee pin g-m ac h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B . . . . . . . .
M a n u fa c tu r in g .................................................................
N onm anufactu ring ..........................................................
R e t a i l tr a d e .............................................................

349
63
286

40.0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 2 .0

4 7 .0 0
5 1 .5 0
4 6 .5 0

3 9 .5
40 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .5

4 9 .5 0
54.00
4 8 .5 0
4 7 .5 0

40.0
4 0 .0

40 .0
40 .0
40.0

40.00
4 3 .5 0
3 9 .5 0
37 .0 0

_ 19_____1 Z _ ___ 2fe_
_
19
17
19

4 6 .5 0
4 6 .5 0

50

____L _
3
—

-

“

7

5
4

6

17
16

61.00
5 9 .50

10
10

9
9

-

-

_

1

6

-

-

-

_

1

6

-

-

-

-

7

6
1

12
2
10

3
3

**

4 7 .0 0
4 6 .5 0

T a b u l a t in g - o a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ......................................
N on m an ufactu rin g ..........................................................

-

-

66.00

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

106

-

-

18

16

2
2

17

4

5

1

—

6
1

21
9

15
7

4
-

2
2

5

12

8

4

**

9
5
4

1
1

8

2
11

3
3

26
18

13

8
9

4
i r

11
5
2 --------T

8

3
3

8
_

4

5

—

3

~

-

4

9
4

3

1

_

1
1

8

4

3
5

*

2

**

2
2

-

8
8

4
4

2
2

19

15

11

6

10

8
1

1
1

_

4

_

3

“

5
5

27
3
24

2

_

_
_

*

—

*

“

“

“

-

*

1
1

1
1

-

-

_
_

_

_

~

•

“

“

...
_

3

~

3
1

8

~

11
6

_

~

2
2i

_

Women

_

_

10 ; ___ 5_ _■ 3 1
_
2
6
10
25
3
4
1
15

9
31
14

10
2
8
2

40

13

7

-

g

1

11
11

~

~

8

4
4

5

4

1

11

i
61

51

3

4
4

14
14

23
16

9
9

5

42

52

29
4
25
3

60
11

43

35

18

31

16

14

8

19
16

5
13
7

5
26

3
13
7

7
7
3

_
_

_

_

“

-

-

27

9

8

2

11
8

-

-

____

4
-

2_

1
4

5

42

-

50.00

.
-

-

1

1

-

—
_

14
-

16
_

51
7

49

35

12

-

30

80
9
71
26

106

28

19
87
39

4
24
15

3
3

4

6
6

10

~

_

_

•

_

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

1

2

_
_

_
_
_

_

C a l c u l a t in g -m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s (Com ptom eter
AM
64

t y p e ) ......................... ...........................................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................... .....................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ............................................... ...........
R e t a i l t r a d e ............................................................

380
150

C le r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A ......................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ..........................................................

68

C le r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B .....................................................
ita im fa c tu r in g ............................................................ ..
N onm anufactu ring ..........................................................

1

t r a d e ________t .................

T- . r. Tt rt

77

383
55
345
59

4 0 .5

“

14

16

8

8

62
26

2
2

6
6

27
27

135

6?
17
48

28

17

6
22
7

1
16

5

35

65

2

5
-

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public /utilities,




62
-

3
25

____L _ ____ 3_
5
3

4

28

11

.

3
62
21

33
19

13 5

7

5

3
27

8

11
5

11
1
10

2

16

4
-

19
3

7

3

4
4
_

1

2

1

1

—

-

“

“

-

2

~

2
2

3
3

—

2
2

-

”

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

.

_
_

22
4

3

2

4

4

26
4

12

-

-

.
-

•
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT Q LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

?

Table A - i:

O

ffic e

C h c 4 4 fu U

io * U - C

o n t in u e d

(Average s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e ekly h o u rs and e a rn in g s 1 / f o r se le c te d o ccu p a tio n s st u d ie d on an are a
b a s i s i n D enver, C o lo . , b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , November 1952)

Average
Number
of
workers

S e x , o c c u p a t io n , and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

N U M B E R OF WOR K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W E E K L Y EARNINGS OF—

Weekly
Weekly
Under
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)
30 .00

$
and

$

$

$

$

4 7 .5 0

50.00

5 2 .5 0 55.00

5 7 .5 0

60.00

62.50

65.00

6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0

7 2 .5 0

7 5 .0 0

4 7 .5 0

50.00

52 .5 0

55.00 5 7 .5 0

60.00

62.50

6 5 .0 0

6 7 .5 0

7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0

7 5 .0 0

8 0.00

21
8

14

-

20
8
12

_

-

-

_

-

“

**

$
3 5 .0 0

$
3 7 .5 0

$
$
40.00 4 2 .5 0

$
4 5 .0 0

3 5 .0 0

30.00

$
3 2 .5 0

3 7 .5 0

40.00

4 2 .5 0 4 5.00

$

$

$

$

$

$

s

$

$
$
s
8 0.00 85.00 90 .0 0
and
90.00 o v e r
8 5 .0 0

Women - C o n tin u ed

%
C le r k s , o r d e r ......................................................................
M a n u fac tu rin g ................................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g .........................................................
R e t a i l tr a d e ...........................................................

144
34
n o
42

4 1 .0
4 0 .0
4 1 .0

C le r ic s, p a y r o l l ..................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ...............................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g .........................................................
P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s * ..............................................
R e t a i l tr a d e ...........................................................

234
74
160
51
38

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

37

4 0 .0

151
50

4 0 .0

101

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

40 .0
4 0 .0

|
!

_

_

4 4 .5 0
i
!
i
! 4 8 .5 0
53.0 0
4 6 .0 0
4 6 .0 0

D u p lic a tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s

...................................

Key-punch o p e r a to r s . .......................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ................................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g .........................................................
P11M 1 1 iiH 11 H a « * ,
»

O f f i c e g i r l s ........................................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g .........................................................

40

108
—

e T ~

4 9 .5 0

50.00

4 2 .5

40.0

—

-

-

-

5 2 .0 0
5 2.00

52.00
5 0 .50
48 .0 0

3 7 .5 0
3 7 .0 0

6 1.0 0
6 1 .5 0
60.50

S e c r e t a r i e s ..........................................................................
M a n u fac tu rin g ................................................................
Nonm anufacturing .........................................................
P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s * ..............................................
R e t a i l tr a d e ...........................................................

639
164
4 75
106

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

62

4 0 .5

S te n o g r a p h e r s, g e n e r a l ...................................................
M a n u fac tu rin g ................................................................
Nonm anufacturing .........................................................
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ..............................................
R e t a i l tr a d e ...........................................................

901

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
40 .0
4 0 .5

5 1 .5 0
5 0.50

174
115

201

S w itch b o ard o p e r a to r s .....................................................
M a n u fac tu rin g ................................................................
N onm anufacturing .........................................................
PtiKI 4m nf 4
4m ^
m
R e t a i l tr a d e

27
174

...........................................................

S w itch b o ard o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t i o n i s t s ........................
M a n u fac tu rin g ................................................................
N onm anufacturing .........................................................
R e t a i l tr a d e ............................................................

61

—

247
71
176
45

4 1 .5
4 0 .0
4 1 .5
Li n
'

65.00

52.00
5 3 .5 0
4 9 .0 0

4 5 .0 0
5 1.0 0
4 4 .0 0

.

8

-

8
8

11
n

3
3

20

-

___ n _ ____ 3_

-

5
15
n

8

10

23
3

13
9

4

20

30

25
13

3

28
14
14
7
5

3

4

6

~

8
8

-

-

2

-

-

3

2

19
5
7

4

1_.
-

25

6

1

-

2

.
~

3

16

6

13

18

29

1

3
3

16

6

1
12
6

5
13

28

10

10

1
1

2
2

14

12

6

7

___ 26_ ___ 32_ ___ 16_
38
10
15

8
2

13
17

8

4

n

___ 13_ _ 1 L _
_

55.0 0

199
702

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

-

49.00
U . 00

10
10

-

13
-

n
-

”

-

~

1

3

4

1

9

5A
n

7:
32

12 6
26

100

-

-

_
-

-

9
-

43
5

43
8

-

—

“

1‘

4

10

14

2

___ 12 _ ___

8

6

-

-

8

6

1

17

4 0 .5

4 3 .0 0

-

-

-

12

4 0 .0
4 6 .0 '
4 0 .0
4 3 .0

4 7 .0 0
48 .0 0
4 6 .5 0
4 4 .5 0

-

-

-

14
14

2 fi_ ____ L

16

2
2

3
13

28

16

1 6 ___
4

12
7

4
2

5
31
17

6

17

6
n
3
4

2

4

27
16

17
13
4

10

6

5
5

4

-

5

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

4
_

14
5
9
-

.
-

3
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

”

1

~

1

“

**

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1

•

81
26

30
7
23

_
_

“

“

—

•

**

66
10

55
17
38

40
9
31
14

1

-

3

1

11
5

4
4

71

56

57

21 i

1°
46
7
13

21

12 8
18

116
24
92

50 |
12 !
12 |

25
22

21
7

16

24
28

33

30
2
28

21

17

9

12

6
11

12

4

36
7

6

8

93
31
62

1

32
2

8

11

4

34
3
31

40
18

2

7

33
18
15
7

22

2

2

126
32
94
26

1

9
7
3

_
_

1

2

5
5
-

~

-

-

2

n

-

7
4

32
7
25
14

24

-

1

n

—

12

24
-

110

7

10

6
1
5

55
7
4

80

10
70
18
2

5
3
2
2

88
25
63

12
2

43
2
a
27

56
5
7

2

16

21

6
10
6

5
16
4

8
-

*“

3

33
13

3

20
8

14
4

2
1
1

*'
■

~

_
-

-

-

—

“

-

-

-

-

3

8
8

14

1

6
1

17
4
13
5

~

5

15
8
7

*
■

-

-

-

1

“

3

3

3

3

-

3

2

13
3

10
-

1
1

18

17
4
13

10

10

-

1

1

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

29

11

3

-

-

4
4

_

—
-

-

-

-

-

'

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities




5
Table A-i:

O

ffic e

O c c ifp n t ia M

A - G n A t /f a f c e i f

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., by industry division, November 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W E E K L Y EARN!INGS OF-

A verage
Sex, occupation, a n d i n d u s t r y di v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

$

$
$
$
40.00 4 2.50 45.00

32.50

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) $
un d e r
30.00 32.50

$
35.00

$
37.50

35.00

$
Under 30.00

37.50

40.00

4 2 .50

2
2

6
6

2
2

24
24

19
15

6
6

11
3
8

18
2
16

27
9
18

45
19
26

5
3

3

3

4

8

13

8

104
10
94

93
19
74
16
26

S

$
$
$
47 . 5 0
50.00 52.50

a
11
2

4 5 .00 4 7 .50

$

$

$

$

%

$

t

57.50

60.00

62.50 65 . 0 0

67.50

7 0.00

7 2.50

57.50

60.00

62.50

65.00 67.50

70.00

7 2.50

75.00

2

-

-

-

-

-

22
2
20

11
2

-

4
7

2
~

2

-

-

4

-

-

9

9
9
1

2
2
-

_

$
$
s
75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
_
and
80.00 85.00 90.00 over

11

~

1

52.50 55.00

50.00

$

55.00

Women - Continued
i
$
49.00
47.00

Transcribin v - m a c h i n e operators, g e n e r a l ...... .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ...............................

122
86

40.0
40.0

Typists, class A ...... ............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ...............................
P u b l i c utilities * .........................
Reta i l trade ..........................................................

295
61
234
59
62

40.0
40.0
40. 0
40.0
41.0

50.00
47.00

i
!
|
1

.
-

i

!
i

_
-

5 1 .0 0

_

-

■

_

- !
- ;
~ j

-

51.00
49.00

i

*

-

~

11
23
17 ------

14
8

32

57
13
44
6
18

¥\

39

3
29

39
18

5
4

-

8
-----5“

21
2
19

5

-

-

-

_
-

.
_ i
-

_
_
-

_
_

-

_

1

4

-

-

_
- |
-

_
-

_
_

1

1
1

1
1

~

|
Typists, class B ...............................................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............................................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................................................
Public u t ilities * .............................................

469
84

385
68

Befall ^v»a/4m

91

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5

43.50
! 46.50
42.50
45.50
40.00

!
i
i

6

41

6

-

41

53

-

2

-

12
17

18

1
1/
*

____53_

*
3

6

-

- j

58

64
23

j______

4
3
1
1

29
10

19
39

19

11
4

11

-

-

-|
-i

t

-

-

-

i
______

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Table A-2: P t o fe & U O H o l G * t d

^ G c /v U o c U

O c C H fu U iO H d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

A ge
vera

Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$

Under
$
50.00

50.00

s

s

$

$

s

$

s

$

$

$

s

$

$

# ! 5

s

$

$

$

$

s

s

$

52.50

55.00 57.50

60.00

62.50

6 5.00

67.50 70.00

72.50

75.00

8 0.00 85.00

90.00

95.00 100 . 0 0 105.00 110.00 L15.00 120.00 125.00 130.00

55.00

57.50 60.00

62.50

65.00

67 . 5 0

70.00 7 2 .50

75.00

80.00

85.00 90.00

.ilQ Q

100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 L20.00 125.00 130.00 135.00

and

Men

Draftsmen, chief .............................

Draftsmen ...................................
Manufacturing ..............................................................

57

280
~

*
113.00

40.0

40.0

88.00
7T.-50-

92--- “ 4070

4

1
~

~

7

3

*

!

9

4

19 !
10 j

6
2

12
!

10

15
14

3
2

38
29

15
5

1

8

8

5

30

36

3

-

26
6

50

4

~

i

Draftsmen, junior..... ...........................
Manufacturing ..................................
Nonmanufacturing .........................

121
67
54

40.0
40.0
40.0

69.50
69.0b
71.00

9
7
2

62.50

|

2

i

2

|

2

12

9

11
7

~

5
7

6

1

3

4

3

2

2

4

3

1
!

I

6 ____ 1 1
6

19
12

1

4

-

4

10

5
5

7

1

2

9

4

2

U

_

14-

o

3
3

-

8

*
•

|

1/

29

40.0

!

4

2

! ---------

1

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,




18

10

2

3

-

-

-

-

8
1

-

-

-

_

_

~

“

~

~

-

i

Women

Nurses, industrial (registered) ..............

-

3

_

[—

~1

_

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6

McUtUeHGHGe G

Table A -3:

4 fd P o 4 A J& l

PldtU

C h C 4 4 fU iiu m d >

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Carpenters, maintenance ..................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

Number
o
f
Work r
es

102
55
47

Aeae
vrg
hul
ory
erig
anns

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 $
1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 *2.30 2.35 2.40
and
$
under
1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2 .3 0 2.35 2.40 2.45

*
1.89
1.97

1.90
1.89
1.90

Engineers, stationary ....................
Manufacturing ........................
.................
Nonmanufacturing .... '

193
126
67

1.86
1.92
1.74

Firemen, stationary boiler ................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

96
59
37

1.59
1.64
1.50

Helpers, trades, maintenance ..............
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * ..................

346
102
244
239

1.53
1.51
1.53
1.54

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

'

120
Electricians, maintenance .................
Manufacturing ........................ --- 79—
Nonmanufacturing ......................
41

8
g

3
-

'

-

6

2

6
6

2

-

4
4

-

'
Machinists, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing .........................

191
177

467
441
425

1.82
1.82
1.82

Mechanics, maintenance ...................
Manufacturing .........................

165
136

1.78
1.79

~

Oilers .................................
Manufacturing ........................

47
47

1.57
1.57

56
42

1.80
1.84

“

Tool-and-die makers ......................
Manufacturing............... .........

48
47

-

1

-

-

10

-

“

8 .- .X L .
8
6
8
8
6

2.05
2.08

1/
*

-

~

-

-

1

___ L.

6
4
2

2
2

7
7

-

7
4
3

20
7
13
9

113
35
78
78

4

_
“

5

4

-

-

___4_
4

-

61
19
42
42

~

~

-

3

8
8
”

1

-

1

2

1

2

-

6

4
4

-

-

-

6

10

16

13

7

1

1

6

5

13

7

-

1

1

-

-

5
3
2

15
12
3

1?
16
3

24
24
—

23
1
22

6
4
2

-

3
3

1
1

-

8
_
8

8
1
7

18
16
2

40
35
5

_
“

17
17

3
3
“

40
40
”

8
_
8

~

1
1
—

-

-

-

12

“

5

14
8
6
6

85
1
84
84

28
28

9
9
*

13

—

8
8

16
16

“

-

7
7

5
5

“

-

-

1
1
1

1
1
1

-

-

*
*

-

“

3
3

~

~

“

-

3
3

3
3

-

-

L

ii

7

y

~

8
6

85
85
85

7
1
6
6

1
1

-

2
2

12

13

1
-

1

11
11

42
42

31
31

59
57

12
4

11
11

“

1
-

14
11
n

17
15
15

108
108
94

86
78
77

_

108
108
108

8
1

_

_

—

~

—

1
1
1

12
12

2
2

11
8

57
57

“

,~

~

-

1
-

2
2

6
6

“

"

-

“

-

1

~

5
5

20
20

7
4

2
2

“

6
6

2
2

5
5

9
8

16
16

35
32
32

-

3
3

_

9
9

—

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,




1

8
7
1

-

3
3

-

6
5

‘

1

7 ___ 2L
7
7
*

21
IQ
X7
2

'

“

Painters, maintenance ....................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

-

1.89
1.89

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ........
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * .................

-

'

6 __ ie_

-

*

1

3

$
2.45
and
over

3
3

16
16

44
19

14
14

2
2

1?
15

3
3

3
2

5

-

7
2

”

14
14

-

“

~

“

“

4
4

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

7

Table A-4:

G u & io d u U , % C r te JtC M 4 4 ^ ,Q * u l S lU p fU tU f 0 cC 4 4 f2 x U iQ *tl

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Wor e s
kr

$
$
$
$
Aeae
vrg
hul
o r y Under 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0
erig *
anns
and
0.85 under
.90
.95 1 .0 0 1.05

Crane operators, electric bridge
(under 20 tons) ........................
Manufacturing .........................

80
80

100
... B T
36

1.43
1.56
1.20

-

1.094
360
734
1ii
t
323

1 .12
1.27
1.05
1.17
.99

86
86
9
47

27
4
23
1
22

268
29
239
33

1.06
1.15
1.05
1.00

16
4
12
2

9

7

9

9
5

7
4

9
1

14
2
12
6

Laborers, material handling 2/ ............
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Public utilities * ..................
Retail trade .......................

1,951
526
1,425
594
427

1.36
1.29
1.38
1.47
1.33

20
20
20

22
2
20
20

25
21
4
4

3
2
1
1

Order fillers...........................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Retail trade .......................

701
169
532
112

1.42
1.48
1.41
1.11

—

7
7
7

10
10
10

21
21
21

Packers, class A (men) ...................
ng
-i
i i
.....
VAVimftmifaml
na

119
40
79

1.43
1.61
1.34

Packers, class B (men) ...................
Uanii
vm
i

217

- IS7
-

1.31
1.39
1.22
1.11

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .00 2.05 2.10
and
1 .10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .00 2.05 2.10 over

*
1.58
1.58

Guards ..................................
Manufacturing .........................

%

Janitors, porters, and
cleaners (awn) .........................
Manufacturing........ ................
Nonmanufacturing......................
PijhHf*
*
..............
Retail trade .......................

Janitors, porters, and
cleaners (women) ........................
,
r1 ,..
,,
r*r ^fo
|
Retail trade .......................

n o

Retail trade .......................

Packers, class B (women) ................ ..

45

374
lOI
xy x

1.11
i n
1*11

8
8

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

L

-

-

10

9

57

C
J

Tran s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, and o t her public utilities,




6
6

_

_

-

-

-

"

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30
25
5
5
~

22
1
21
5
"

10
3
7
4
3

17
1
16
16
~

3

5
1
4
4
-

-

-

—

-

-

-

”

46
78
10 ~ 5 * T
22
36
6
—

26
1
25
”

7
5
2
“

3
~

-

-

-

-

9
9

2
2

-

7
5
2

2
2

2
2

-

-

n
9
2

-

88
204
52 * 15
152
73
g
n
11
74

40
22
18
4
7

35
16
19
2
7

69
43
26
11
10

38

27
17
2

56
18
38
28
4

61
53
8
2
4

79
70
9

15
15
-

_
_
-

-

-

163
3
160
12

10
9
1

18
2
16
3

4

9
4
3

4

3
3

44
16
28
28

29
2
27
16

209
66
143
38

82
43
39
6
15

102
55
47
12
18

32
6
26
8

203
97
106
32

244
34
210
185
1

250
93
157
84
53

57
31
26
9

275
24
251
1
166

267
3
264
231
33

14
14
14

16
16
16

10
10
6

13
8
5
5

31
4
27
7

27
17
10
10

8
8

58
5
53
1

32
15
17
4

119
31
88
-

175
17
158
5

18
4
14

-

-

31
31

_

_
~

16
16

5

_

2
2

4

_

-

3

11

9
2
7
6

89

70
Xl

15
1c
12

~

21
17
*
Xf

6

10

6

8

24

9

6

10

6

4
4

24

9

15

8

28
15
13
7

37
20
17
2

25
12
13

5
4
1

g
8

96

oo
7*

6

n o

10

5
c
7

4

6

2
2

3
3

43
43

23
3
20

5
5

6

2

6
6

14
14

3

-

75 __ 5 .162
k.
11
5
25
70
137
43
3
1
39
46
70
19

See f o otnotes a t e n d o f table.
*

-

n

10
1

20
5
15

n

11

21
21

28
28

-

3
3

-

-

-

3
-

~

-

-

1
1

28
28

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table

A-At ( Z u d /c d u il,T i/o /ie & C V td ir tf,G S td S U iflfU H I f O c C M flx U lO H ^ C o ^ lliH U e d
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., by industry division, November 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
Workers

Occupation a nd indus t r y divis i o n

Receiving clerks ...................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Retail trade ................................

143

122
56

Average
hourly
earnings

$
1.4 0
1. 3 8
1.32

$

$

$

0.90
U n der 0.85
and
$
under
.90
0.85
.95

-

-

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1 .0 0

1.05

1 .1 0

1.15

1 .2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

$
1.40

$

0.95

1.45

1 .5 0

1.55

1. 6 0

1.65

1.70

1.75

1 .0 0

1.05

1 .1 0

1.15

1 .2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1. 7 0

1.75

1.80

5
5
3

27

-

11
8
6

6

-

4
4

24
3

4
4
4

1
1
1

13
9

31
30

205
82

Nonmanufacturing ...............................
Ret a i l trade ................................

123
37

Shinning-and-receiving clerks ...................
Manufacturing ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Retail trade ................................

180

68
11 2
60

1.49
1.53
1.47
1.41

1.51
1.53
1.49
1.38

“

......................................................................

Truckers, power (other tha n
fork-lift)
Manufacturing

........................................................................................
.............................................................................

.................................................................................................
.............................................................................
.....................................................................
P*+ a 4 1 + wa /4*
«

Watchmen
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing

1/

~

1.49

295
681
4 18

Af

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ...................
Manufacturing ............................ .
Nonmanufacturing

1 .2 0

976

Truck drivers, m e d i u m (l£ t o a n d
including 4 tons)...'............................
Manufacturing ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
B 11
KI
ii+414 + 4** *

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer true) ...................................
Nonmanufacturing ...............................
DiiK14#% ii+4 14+4*« «

1.35
1.45
1.33

_

107
414
114

1.57
1.46
1.46

521

1 71

15
15

11

~

-

9
-

2

3

1

9

2
2

~

“

'

-

-

'

1
1

'

. 12
.
-

3
3

?

■»

-

14

_

7

13

-

35
35

-

14
14

-

6
1

5

_

_

-

-

-

3
9

1

4
4
3

10
-

10

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

9

72

-------67

202

— H 5~
87
38

1.56

_

-

_

10

1 .1 2

-

1.0 8

10

1 .1 1

20
--- 5“
14

11

5

-

-

-

-

-

_

- .

_

-

-

8
8

1

-

32
24

15

8

15

2

26

7

5

5

3

5
2

2
2

31

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

2
2

18

6

3

1

1
1

-

66

10
8

4

9
59

8
6

19
5
14
9

22
14

8
8

2
2

$
1.90

1.85

1.9 0

-

s

$

1.95

2 .0 0

$
2.05

1.95

2 .0 0

2.05

2 .1 0

over

-

-

-

-

-

*

'

-

-

-

*1

4

$

2 .1 0

12
-

7

-

6

—

~

28
7

21
3

32

22
10
. 2

23

17

219

61

12
207

31
30

43
5
38

“

17
4

26

3

2

18

24

297

47

83

39

14
4

6

16

22

2 97
207

13
34
33

67

17

18
18

4
4

14
14

18

4

9
9

33

1
32
18

16

18
18
18

44
44

6

9

6

16
12
4

29
20

-

1

32
28

33

9

1

4

27

3

-

1

13
4

-

_

8

9
9
-

-

3

16

4

7

1

7
9

-

2

2
1

7

1

-

_
-

-

“ :

~

6

“

~

—

”

-

-

-

9
7

4
3

-

6
6

~

-

13
13

5
4

-

1

8
3

i
9
9

-

.

-

-

1
‘

23

17
17

8

26
26
-

-

10

?

24
20

3

8
-

3
3

1 .5 7 “

1.10

4
4
4

-

-

1.85

'

1 .5 8
1 .5 5

1.4 7
1.44
1.52

21
10
11
11

8
-

8

_
-

12

'

3
3

-

10
8
2
2

____1 _

'

2/ Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
2/ Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous studies.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




12
12

-

1.58

m ~~
71
199
123
76

—

-

6
6
5

____1 _
'

Truck drivers, light (under
1 ^ tons) .........................................
Manufacturing ......... ........................
Nonraanufacturing ..............................
Retail trade ................ ...............

-

$

'

-

8
8

4
-

$

$
1. 8 0

‘

*
‘

S h inning c l e r k s ......... ........................ .
Manufacturing ..................................

$

and

7

-

$

1

8

9
9

-

-

42
42
-

6
-

1
1

_
-

1
1

_

_
_
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

328

40

49

9

3

116
212
126

24
16
16

39

3

3

1
1

12
12

1
1

10
10

8
8

14
14

_
-

_
-

3
3

_
-

52
21

_

-

7

3
3

_

_

-

“

-

_
-

-

5

49
47
47

-

6

'

7

_

_

-

6
2
2 ----

8

-

_
-

_

_

-

-

_

~

_

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

_

---- 0T

F

31

38
35

“

-

4

8

3
3

-

2

3

~

"

4

5
3

-

-

6
6

2

6
6

1
1

-

-

9

B : Characteristic

Table B -35:

of
Workers

hourly
earnings

2/

81
72

M cu JtU l& U f

25
22
54
64
44

1.41
1.86

M a c h i n e - t o o l operators, p r o duction,
c l a s s A 4 b / , 6 / ..................... ..........
Eng i n e - l a t h e operators, cl a s s A 4 b / .......
Mill i n g - m a c h i n e o p erators, c l a s s A 4 b / ....

244
42
39

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

%

$
1.3 0

$
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.6 0

$
1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

$
1.90

$
1.95

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1.30

1,35

1*40

1.45

■lag

1*55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1*75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

8

10

2

4

-

-

3

1

5

8

12
2

18
-

-

2
2

8

-

14
4

9
18

-

3

-

-

5
7

4

3
10

-

6

5
5

8

38
6

2

33
14
7

13

28

12

1

p

1*15

37

1.93
1^70

73
136

1.43
1.83

M a c h i n e - t o o l operators, p r o duction,
c l a s s B £a/ , 6 / ................................
D r i l l - p r e s s operators, r a d ial,
Eng i n e - l a t h e operators, cl a s s B 4 a / .......
M a c h i n e - t o o l operators, production,
c lass C 4 a / ........... .........................
Mach i n i s t s , p r o d u c t i o n 4 a / .....................

1.89
1.35
1.36

2 .0 0

$

2 .1 0

$

2 .2 0

$
2.3 0

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2.30

2. 4 0

5

3
-

5
3

4
3

5
1

8
1

3
-

1
-

1
1

2
_

2
.

7
10

3
29

-

4

4

-

1

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

7
5
-

3
' 1

5
1
1

14
6
1

22
3
2

23
2
8

28
6

23
2

•
-

3

7
1
2

3
_

4

18
2
6

2

5

9

8

9

11

4

2

-

-

-

-

0

4

i

j
•¥

-

2

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

$
$
$
$
$
2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
and

1.71

30

L&/

$

and
under

2.09
2. 0 6

243

1/

$
1.25

$
1.15

1 .1 0

$
1.98
1.68

A s s emblers, c l ass A 4 * / .........................
A ssemblers, class B
.........................
A s s e m blers, c l ass C 4 a / .........................
Ele c t r i c i a n s , ma i n t e n a n c e 4 a / ..................
Inspectors, class A 4 a / .........................
J a nitors, porters, a n d c l e a n e r s 4 a / ...........
Laborers, m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g 4a/. £ / ...... .

Occupations

1 .2 0

$
Occupation 2 /

Industry

3
4

1

2.24

—

21

-

1

57

50

13

6

25

12

-

4

-

-

-

11

13

29

2 .6 0

2.70

2.80

over

18

33

”

2.50

13

4

2

2

14

1

1

1

1

-

46

-

-

31

54

£

1

1

1

1 / T h e s t u d y c overed e s t ablishments e m p l o y i n g mo r e than 2 0 workers in the. manu f a c t u r e of n o nelectrical mach i n e r y (Group 35) as de f i n e d i n t he Standard Industrial Classi f i c a t i o n Manual (194-5 edition) prepared b y the Bur e a u
o f the Budget; establ i s h m e n t s m a n u f a c t u r i n g mac h i n e - t o o l accessories with 8 or more employees were als o included.
2 / D a t a limited to m e n workers.
Occupational Wag e Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1952
E x cludes p r e m i u m p a y f o r over t i m e
n i g h t work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
I n s u f ficient d a t a to p e r m i t p r e s e n t a t i o n of separate averages b y method of wa g e payment.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(a)
All or p r e d o m i n a n t l y tim e workers.
(b)
A l l or p r e d o m i n a n t l y inc e n t i v e workers.
£/
Ti t l e change only, f r o m " S tock h a ndlers a nd truckers, hand," as reported in previous studies.
6/
Includes d a t a f o r o p e r ators of o t h e r m a c h i n e tools in addition to those s h own separately.

jj




10

Table B-7211:

P o w y i Jfccu au t/u el y

1/ The study covered establishments employing more than 20 vorkers in the power laundries industry (Grouo 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget. Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1952
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Data limited to men workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
5/ Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings),
o/ Includes 30 routemen on a 5^-day workweek.

y
y




11

O

U n io n

W a g e

S c a le s

(Minimum wage r a t e s and maximum s t r a i g h t - t i m e hours p er week ag reed upon through c o l l e c t i v e b a rg a in in g
between employers and tra d e u n io n s. R a te s and hours a r e th o se in e f f e c t on d a te s i n d ic a te d . A d d itio n a l
in fo rm atio n i s a v a ila b le in r e p o r t s issu e d s e p a r a t e l y f o r th e s e in d iv id u a l i n d u s tr ie s o r t r a d e s . )

Table C -15*

Building Con&fouatioH

T able C -2 0 5 «

Ja n u a ry 2 , 1 9 5 3
C la s s ific a tio n

Bricklayers
Carpenters

...........................................
............. ..............................

E l e c t r i c i a n s (in s id e wiremen) and
f i x t u r e h an gers ..............................................................
P a i n t e r s .......... ................................ .....................................
P l a s t e r e r s .................................................................. ..

Hours
p er
week

♦3.450

40

2.625

40

2.900

40

2.390

40

3.300

40

2.820

40

B u ild in g l a b o r e r s .............................................................

1.725

40

Table C -2 0 5 :
J u ly 1 , 1952
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Dough mixers, ovenmen ...................
Bench hands ............................

♦1.620
1.530
1.480

48
48
48

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
F o r e m e n ..... ...........................
Dough mixers, spongers, ove n m e n ........
Bench hands, machine operators .........

1.620
1.530
1.480

40
40
40

Hebrew baking - Cake and pastry:
F o r e m e n ....... ..................... .
Dough mixers, spongers, ovenmen ........
Bench hands, machine operators ..........

1.620
1.530
1.480

40
40
40

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Foremen

..................................... .

Crackers and cookies:
Agreement A:
Machine captains ..................
Head sponge and sweet mixers ......
Bakers ............................
Mixers, rollermen, drawmen ........
Mixers* helpers ...................
Stackers ................ ...........
General helpers (men) .............
Packing and icing departments:
Icing mixers ...................




Table 2 7 :

~

J u l y 1 , 1952

J u ly 1 , 1952
R ate
p er
hour

P l u m b e r s 1..............................................

Classification

B o h e /u e d

1.590
1.530
1.495
1.475
1.365
1.365
1.365
1.475

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

C la s s ific a tio n

C rack ers and co o k ie s - Continued
Agreement A - Continued
Packing and i c i n g
dep artm ents - Continued
Wrapping-machine se t-u p men ..........
F lo o r m e n .......................................................
Women em ployees:
Working s u p e r v i s o r s ....................,
Sponge p a c k e r s .................................
B u n d lers, machine o p e r a to r s ,
hand b u n d le rs, s e e d e rs , and
w eighers ..........................................
Agreement B:
Baking dep artm en t:
Machinemen, sponge .............................
Machinemen, sw eet ................................
P e e l e r s , ovenmen,, s p o n g e .............
Ovenmen (s w e e t), sponge
r e l i e f men ............................................
Dough m ix e rs , ro lle rm e n .................
Dough f e e d e r s ..........................................
M ixers* h e lp e rs .....................................
Sponge ovenmen*s h e l p e r s ...............
Pan g r e a s e r s ............................................
I c in g room:
Machinemen; J e l l y , cream , and
i c i n g m i x e r s .......... ............................
J e l l y , cream ,and i c i n g m ixers*
h e lp e rs ..............................................
Packing dep artm en t:
Wrapping, and la b e lin g -m a ch in e
m e n .................................. .....................
W rapping- and lab e lin g -m a ch in e
h e lp e rs ..............................................
G eneral h e lp e rs (women):
F i r s t month ..........................................
Next 2 months .....................................
Second 3 months ................................
Third 3 months ........................... ..
T h e r e a f te r ............................................
G eneral h e lp e rs (m en):
F i r s t month .........................................
Next 2 months .....................................
Second 3 months ................................
T hird 3 months ..................................
T h e r e a f te r ............................................

R ate
p er
hour

Hours
p er
week

C la ssifica tio n

R ate
per
hour

Sours
1
per
l.reek

Book and jo b sh op s:

♦ 1 .4 2 0
1 .3 1 0

40
40

1 .2 4 5

40

1.190

40

1 .1 6 0

40

1.490

40

1.470

40

1.430

40

1.260

40

1 .2 3 0

40

1.230

40

1 .3 6 0

40

1 .2 1 0

40

1.430

40

1.260

40

.9 0 0

40

.940

40

.9 8 0
1 .0 2 0
1 .0 6 0

40

1 .0 1 0
1 .0 6 0
1 .1 0 0

40

40
40
40
40
40
40
36 2 /3
37 1 / 2

1 .8 3 4
1 .0 9 6
2 .3 5 8
2 .1 7 3
2 .5 9 3

40
40
40
40
40

2 .7 6 8
2 .8 9 1

36 2 / 3
36 2 /3

2 .7 6 8
2 .8 9 1

36 2 /3
36 2 / 3

2 .7 6 8
2 .8 9 1

36 2 / 3
36 2 /3

2 .2 4 0
2 .3 6 0

37 1 /2
37 1 /2

2 .8 0 0
2 .9 3 3

37 1 /2
37 1 /2

2 .5 9 3
2 .7 9 2

37 1 /2
35

2 .6 6 6
2 .8 7 1

37 1 / 2
35

2 .7 8 6
2 .9 8 5

37 1 / 2
35

2 .5 9 2
2 .7 0 1

37 1 /2
37 1 /2

40

1 .3 6 0
1 .2 9 0

♦ 1 .2 7 5
2 .1 9 0
2 .3 5 8
2.4-70
2 .3 5 8
2 .4 3 3
2 .3 8 7
2 .5 8 6

40

1.410

Bindery w om en...............................................................
Bookbinders ....................................................................
C om positors, hand .....................................................
E l e c tr o t y p e r s ...............................................................
Machine o p e r a to r s .....................................................
Machine te n d e rs (m a c h in is ts ) ...........................
M a ile rs .............................................................................
P h oto en g rav ers ............................................................
P r e s s a s s i s t a n t s and f e e d e r s :
C ylin d er p r e s s .....................................................
P la te n p r e s s ..........................................................
Pressm en, c y lin d e r ...................................................
Pressm en, p la te n ........................................................
S te r e o ty p e rs .................................................................
Newspapers:

40

40
40

40
40

1.140

40

1 .1 9 0

40

C om positors, hand:
Day work ....................................................................
N ight work ...............................................................
Machine o p e r a t o r s :
Day work ....................................................................
N ight w o r k ................................................ .............
Machine te n d e rs ( m a c h in is ts ):
Day work ....................................................................
Night w o r k .......... ....................................................
M a ile r s :
Day work ....................................................................
N ight work ...............................................................
P h o to e n g ra v e rs:
Day work ....................................................................
N ight work ...............................................................
Pressm en, web p r e s s e s :
Day work ....................................................................
N ight work ...............................................................
O ffsid e c o l o r men:
D a y ........................................................................
Night ....................................................................
P re ss m e n -in -ch a rg e :
Day work ....................................................................
Night work ...............................................................
S te r e o t y p e r s :
Day work ....................................................................
Night work ...............................................................

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Surv e y , D e nver, Colo., N o v e m b e r 1952
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F LABOR
B u r e a u o f Labor Sta t i s t i c s

1
2

Table C -lil:

JH o C o l

Table C-l»2:

A fo t o b fa ic A

T ab le C-U2t

2 )4 n te 4 < l

a n d o tfelp eM - -Q on / t'n u ed
October 1, 19$2
Classification

1-man cars, busses, and trolley coaches:
First 3 months .........................
4
12 months ..........................
13 - 18 months .........................
19 months .........................
After 2 years ..........................

-

2
k

Table C-U2;

M o t & U b tic A

$1,430
1.U0
1.450
1.460
1.470

Hours
per
week

48
48
48
48
48

3 y t ia & ld

Ju ly l , 1952
Classification

Bakery:
Retail - chain store ...................
Wholesale:
First month ........................
After 1 month .......................
Biscuit:
Agreement A .........................
Agreement B ........................... .................................
Yeast:
First 3 months ......................
Thereafter ..........................
Beer:
Breweries ....................... T,
Distributors ...........................
Helpers .................. ..........TT,,
Building:
Construction:
Dump trucks:
Less than 6 yards ................
6 yards or more ..................
Euclid, Koehring, lumber carriers,
semivater tanks, semitrailer,
and similar trucks to 13 yards ....
Over 13 yards ....................
Fla’
U-rack service truck .............
Ix>w-boy trucks ......................
Helpers .............................
Pickup trucks .......................
Tandem Euclid - and similar
equipment ................... ......
Concrete mixer:
To 5 cuDic yards................
Over 5 cubic yards.. .




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,410

40

1.063
1.260

48
48

1.510
1.340

48
40

1.358
1.524

44
44

1.550
1.670
1.500

JO
40
AO

1.850
1.950

40
40

1.950
2.050
1.850
2.050
1.750
1.750

40
40
40
40
40
40

2.200

40

1.950
2.050

40
40

C la s s ific a tio n

o t o t fo u c A
-G

& U a & ld

o d d in t t c d

Ju ly 1 , 1 9 5 2

J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 2
Rate
per
hour

M

a n d

Rate
per
hour

B u ild in g - Continued
M a te ria l:
B r ic k :
F i r s t 3 0 days ................................................... $ 1 ,2 5 0
1 .3 7 0
T h e r e a f te r ..........................................................
B uild ing m a te r ia l d r i v e r s :
F i r s t 3 0 days ................................................... 1 .4 7 0
1 .5 7 0
T h e r e a f te r ..........................................................
Sand, g r a v e l , and read y -m ix
c o n c re te :
M ixertru ck d r i v e r s :
Under 5 y a rd s ..................................... 1 .7 7 0
Over 5 y a rd s ....................................... 1 .9 2 0
Sand, g r a v e l , and m ortar
(under 15 t o n s ) :
F i r s t 30 days ............................................ 1 .4 7 0
T h e r e a f te r ................................................... 1 .5 7 0
S t r u c tu r a l s t e e l and i r o n :
1 .3 4 0
F i r s t 3 months .........................................
Second 3 .months ....................................... 1 .3 9 0
T h e r e a f te r ................................................... 1 .5 1 0
Lumber d e a l e r s :
Truck d r i v e r s ........................
1 .3 2 5
1 .1 0 0
H elpers ..........................................................
Paper - w h o le sa le :
F i r s t 3 months ....................... 1 .2 0 0
Second 3 months ....................................... 1 .3 0 0
1 .4 5 0
T h e r e a f te r ............................
Plumbing s u p p lie s :
F i r s t 3 months ..................... . 1 .1 7 5
A f te r 3 months .........................................
1 .3 2 5
C h e e s e ........................... .
1 .4 7 0
1 .1 4 0
C lean ers and d y ers .................................
F is h ( a f t e r 9 0 d a y s) ........................................................ 1 .4 0 0
F u rn itu re - R e t a i l :
Agreement A:
F i r s t 6 months ........................................................ 1 .3 5 0
1 .2 3 0
H elpers .................................................................
A fte r 6 months ........................................................ 1.440
H elpers ............................. ...................................
1 .2 9 0
1 .1 9 0
Agreement B ......................................................................
H elpers ........................................................................ 1 .0 4 0
G e n e ra l:
F re ig h t:
L ocal pickup and d e liv e r y .............................
1 .4 3 0
S h o r t - l i n e o r l o c a l runs ................................ 1 .4 3 0
Winch tr u c k s ............................................................
1 .5 7 0
Package d e l i v e r y :
F u rn itu re .................................................................... 1 .2 8 0
H elpers .................................................................
1 .1 5 0
Panel d r i v e r s .......................................................... 1 .3 1 0

Hours
per
week

C la s s ific a tio n

G rocery and c o f f e e :
40
40
40
40

Agreement B:
W h o le sa le :

Household g oo d s:
Van d r i v e r s :

40
40

40
40
Meat - W h o le sa le :
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
60
44
40

40
40
40
40
44
44

48
48
48
40
40
40

*f+ o 1 m o n th s ..... .............. ............................
-r>
M ilk:
W holesale r e l i e f salesm en :
W wet. TAflr
1 veu* .........................
T - rrV
A cf
nl HaI I tta tv _____ . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Heavy s p e c i a l d e l i v e r y ••#•••••••••••••••
Route salesm en s e l l i n g t o
Government rflpftm rations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P ro d u ce :
F i r s t 9 0 days .......... ................ .. ................................
Q H
O avr t o 1 v e a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A f te r 1 y e a r ...................... ..........................................
R ailw ay e x p r e s s :
T pI vpt*r ( l-i* »
V
"tons ) .................
H I p e rs .......................................................................
a
T ran sfer:
L o ca l c a r t a g e :
Less th an 4 m onths:
Under 2 to n s .............. . . . . • • ................ ..
2 t o n p a n d o v e r ............................................
H elpers ........................... ................ ..
A f te r 4 m onths:
U n d e r 2 t o n s ............... ..................................
2 t o n s a n d o v e r .................................. ..
H e l p e r s ...................................
Wine and l i q u o r :
FI r e t 4 m o n t h s ......................... ..
Second 4 months . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T h e r e a f te r .......................................................................

R ate
p er
hour

to
1 u rs
per
reek
1

$ 1 ,5 5 8

44

1 .2 3 0
1 .2 9 0
1 .4 6 0

40
40
40

1 .4 1 0
1 .2 1 0
1 .4 7 0
1 .3 2 0
1 .5 2 0
1 .4 2 0
1 .3 7 0
1 .5 0 0

48
48
48
48
48
48
40
40

1 .4 0 0
1 .4 6 0
1 .5 1 0
1 .5 7 5

40
40
40
40

1 .1 9 5
1 .3 8 7
1 .2 5 0
1 .3 0 0

54
54
40
40

1 .1 6 9

54

1 .1 0 0
1 .2 0 0
1 .3 2 0

40
40
40

1 .7 9 5
1 .7 0 7

40
40

1 .2 1 0
1 .2 6 0
1 .1 1 0

48
48
48

1 .3 7 0
1 .4 2 0
1 .2 7 0

48
48
48

1 .2 8 0
1 .3 4 0
1 .4 0 0

40
40
40

13

D : Supplementary W age Practices
T able D -l

:S h ift ?bifte*e*%tial fieeuiiioHi V
P e r c e n t o f t o t a l p la n t employment -

(a )
(b )
By e sta b lis h m e n t p o lic y in
A c tu a lly working on e x t r a s h i f t s in
A ll m anufactu ring
A ll m anufactu ring
M achinery i n d u s t r i e s
M achinery in d u s t r i e s
|
i n d u s tr ie s 2 /
in d u s t r i e s 2 /
2d s h i f t
2d s h i f t
3d o r o th e r
3d o r o th e r |
3d o r
3d o r
2d s h i f t
2d s h i f t
s h i f t work
work
work
s h i f t work |
o th e r s h i f t
o th e r s h i f t

a n u t a m e re n u ia j.

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers in e sta b lis h m e n ts having
p r o v is io n s f o r l a t e s h i f t s ....................................

8 1 .3

6 5 .0

8 2 .3

With s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l .........................................
Uniform c e n ts (p er hour) ................................
Under 5 c e n ts ...................................................
5 c e n ts ....................................... .........................
5^ c e n ts ..............................................................
6 c e n ts ................................................................
7 o r 7 i c e n ts ...................................................
c e n ts ...............................................................
8 o r 9 c e n ts .....................................................
1 0 c e n ts ...............................................................
12 o r 12-i c e n t s ..............................................
12-£ c e n ts ............................................................
Over 12-£ c e n t s ................................................
Uniform p e rce n ta g e ..............................................
O ther ............................................................................
With no s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ..................................

8 1 .3
6 4 .1
7 .5
1 4 .3
5 .9
U .S
1 1 .4
5 .9
2 .5
1 .8
1 7 .2
-

6 5 .0
6 0 .0
2 0 .3
4 .9
1 .0
9 .1
'1 3 . 0
1 .8
9 .9
5 .0
-

Workers in e sta b lis h m e n ts having
no p r o v is io n s f o r l a t e s h i f t s .............................

1 8 .7

3 5 .0

A ll w ork ers .................................................................... ..

I

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

6 4 .2

1 5 .3

5 .5

2 1 .2

3 .6

8 2 .3
8 2 .3
U .8
3 .4
5 4 .0
1 0 .1
-

6 4 .2
6 4 .2
•
4 .9
5 3 .9
5 .4
-

1 5 .3
1 1 .4
1 .1
3 .5
.9
2 .4
1 .9
.8
.7
.1
3 .9
-

5 .5
4 .9
4 .0
-

2 1 .2
2 1 .2
-

3 .6
3 .6
_
.2
3 .4
-

1 7 .7

3 5 .8

XXX

XXX

a/)
.5
(2/)
.4
.6
-

2 .3
1 5 .6
3 .3
-

-

XXX

XXX

1 / S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l d a ta a r e p resen ted in term s o f ( a ) e sta b lis h m e n t p o lic y and (b ) w orkers a c t u a l l y employed on l a t e s h i f t s a t th e tim e o f th e
su rv e y . An esta b lis h m e n t was co n sid ered a s having a p o lic y i f i t met any o f th e fo llo w in g c o n d i t io n s : ( l ) o p e ra te d l a t e s h i f t s a t th e tim e o f th e
su rv e y , (2 ) had u n io n -c o n tr a c t p ro v is io n s co v e rin g l a t e s h i f t s , o r ( 3 ) had o p e ra te d l a t e s h i f t s w ith in 6 months p r i o r t o th e su rv e y .
2 / In clu d e s d a ta f o r m achinery in d u s tr ie s a l s o shown s e p a r a t e l y .
L e ss th an 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t.
y

Table D -2 :

Scheduled Weekly dfoufti

P e rc e n t o f o f f i c e w orkers l / employed in Weekly hours

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s 2 /

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l tr a d e

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

3 7 £ h o u rs o r l e s s ..............................................
Over 3 7 £ and under 4 0 h o u r s ......................
4 0 h o u r s ....................................................................
Over 4 0 and under 4 4 hours .........................
4 4 hour8 ....................................................................
Over 4 4 and under 4 8 h o u r s ...............
4 8 hours ....................................................................
Over 4 8 hours ........................................................

4 .1
6 .2
7 9 .6
1 .7
5 .7
2 .2
.5
“

0 .8
8 6 .4
2 .8
8 .0
1 .7
.3

8 9 .0
7 .3
3 .7
-

3 .5
7 7 .2
3 .2
1 0 .6
3 .8
1 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 .6

A ll w orkers .................................. .........................

4 .3
6 0 .5
1 .5
1 3 .1
6 .8
1 1 .7
2 .1

6 1 .5
8 .7
7 .1
1 5 .8
6 .9

-

5 5 .8
2 .2
8 .8
5 .8
1 9 .7
5 .1

-

R e t a i l tr a d e

1 0 0 .0

5 1 .3
1 .5
3 .3
3 3 .5
1 0 .4

D ata r e l a t e to women w o rk ers.
In clu d e s d a ta f o r w holesale t r a d e ; f in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s in a d d itio n t o th o se in d u stry d i v is io n s shown s e p a r a t e l y .
iJ
In clu d e s d a ta f o r w holesale t r a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s in a d d itio n t o th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a t e l y .
*
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (exclu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
O ccu p atio n al Wage Su rv ey , D enver, C o l o ., November 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
248598 0 - 5 3 - 2
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




1/
2/

P e r c e n t o f p la n t wcjrk e rs employed in A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s t r i e s 2 /

lU

T able D -3 :

P a id d to lid a tfi

P e r c e n t o f o f f i c e w orkers employed in Number o f p aid h o lid a y s

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s trie s l /

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

P e rce n t o f p la n t w orkers employed i n -

R e t a i l tr a d e

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s 2 /

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e ta il tra d e

A ll w orkers .............................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

W orkers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
p aid h o lid a y s ...................................................

9 9 .A

9 8 .5

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .3

8 9 .2

9 0 .2

8 5 .2

9 1 .7

-

5 days o r l e s s ..............................................
6 d a y s ............... ..................................................
7 d a y s ........................... .....................................
8 days ..................................................................
9 o r 10 days .............................................. ..
11 days ...............................................................

.3
5 4 .5
1 4 .2
1 5 .8
2 .4
1 2 .2

.6

1 .3
9 8 .0
-

3 .3
7 1 .2
6 .2
8 .5
-

7 6 .5
2 .8
1 0 .9
•

8 .7
2 5 .2
2 5 .4
2 5 .9
-

3 .4
8 8 .3
-

1 0 .8

9 .8

1 4 .8

8 .3

1 .5

l/
2/
*

-

.7

8 9 .4
1 .6
7 .5
-

Workers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p aid h o lid a y s ............................................

1 8 .3
3 6 .8
4 4 .9
-

In clu d es d a ta f o r w h o lesale t r a d e ; f in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s in a d d itio n to th o se in d u stry d i v i s i o n s shown s e p a r a t e l y .
In clu d es d a ta f o r w holesale t r a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s in a d d itio n to th o se in d u stry d i v i s i o n s shown s e p a r a t e l y .
T ra n s p o rta tio n (e x clu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .

T ab le D -4 :

P a id

V a C a ti0 4 fA , t y o t M

o l P A O V M O n i)

P ercen t o f o f f ic e w
c>rkers employed in V a c a tio n p o lic y

A ll w orkers .............................................................

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s t r i e s l /

P e rce n t o f p la n t w ork ers employed in -

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l tr a d e

A ll
M anufacturing
i n d u s tr ie s 2 /

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l tr a d e

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 3 .7
5 6 .0
.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 0 .5
6 8 .4
1 .1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 7 .5
4 2 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
1 6 .3
-

9 9 .4
9 9 .4
8 7 .5
1 1 .2
.7

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
9 2 .8
4 .7
1 .1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
7 7 .8
2 2 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 6 .2
1 3 .8
■ -

.6

1 .4

9 9 .4
9 9 .4
5 6 .1
3 7 .4
5 .9

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
7 7 .0
1 4 .7
6 .9

•6

1 .4

A f te r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
W orkers in esta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
p aid v a c a tio n s .................................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...........................
1 week ..........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................
O ther .............................................................
W orkers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p aid v a c a tio n s ..........................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

A f te r 2 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
Workers in esta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
p aid v a c a tio n s .................................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...........................
1 week ...........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................
O t h e r ...................... ......................................
Workers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p aid v a c a tio n s ..........................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .0
8 2 .2
1 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 4 .6
8 2 .3
3 .1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
9 8 .3
.4

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 6 .7
7 3 .3
-

“

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 0 .7
6 3 .0
1 6 .3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 5 .6
5 4 .4
■
■

See f o o tn o te s a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (ex clu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




O ccu p atio n al Wage S u rvey, D enver, C o l o ., November 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B ureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

15

T able D -4 :

Paid. VacaiiatU (rf&unal PAox/UUmift -3oxUi*u d
tm
P e r c e n t o f o f f i c e w orkers employed in -

V a c a tio n p o lic y

A ll w ork ers ............................................................

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s 1 /

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

P e r c e n t o f p la n t w orkers employed in -

R e t a i l tr a d e

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 .9
9 2 .7
•A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 .3
9 2 .6
1 .1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
9 8 .3
.A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 1 .A
8 8 .6
-

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s t r i e s 2 /
- 1 0 0 .0

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l tr a d e

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

A f te r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
W orkers in e sta b lis h m e n ts pro vid in g
p aid v a c a tio n s .................................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...........................
1 w e e k ..................................................... ..
2 weeks • •• • • • .............. .......................
O ther ............................................................
W orkers in e sta b lis h m e n ts provid ing
no p aid v a c a t i o n s .......... ........................... ..

-

-

■

9 9 .A
99 .A
A l.A
5 1 .9
6 .1

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
6 5 .8
2A .9
7 .9

.6

l .A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 0 .7
6 3 .0
1 6 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 7 .5
8 2 .5
-

A f te r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
W orkers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p rovid ing
p a id v a c a tio n s .................................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...........................
1 w e e k .........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................
3 weeks .......................................................
O t h e r ..................................... ......................
W orkers in e sta b lis h m e n ts pro vid in g
no p aid v a c a tio n s .........................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .2
9 5 .6
.5
1 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 7 .7
2 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.5
9 9 .5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 .A
8 6 .9
3 .7
-

-

*

9 9 .A
9 9 .A
9 .0
8 7 .1
1 .1
2 .2
.6

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
2 .A
9 2 .6
3 .6
l .A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
95.A
A .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .1
80 .A
3 .5
-

A f te r 1 0 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
W orkers in e sta b lis h m e n ts provid ing
p a id v a c a tio n s .................................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...........................
1 week ..........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................
3 weeks ........................................................
O t h e r ............... ............................................
W orkers in e sta b lis h m e n ts pro vid in g
no p aid v a c a tio n s .........................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .2
8A.5
1 0 .3
3 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 3 .3
5 .6
1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.5
9 2 .3
7 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 .A
8 3 .7
6 .9
-

-

99.A
99.A
9 .0
8 5 .9
3 .6
.9
.6

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
2 .A
9 0 .7
5 .5
l .A

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 A .1
5 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .1
80.A
3 .5
-

A f te r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
W orkers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts pro vid in g
p a id v a c a t i o n s ........................... .....................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...........................
1 week ..........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................
3 weeks ........................................................
O ther .............................................................
W orkers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p rovid ing
no p aid v a c a tio n s .........................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .2
A 9.6
A 7.9
.3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 2 .6
A 6 .3
T .l
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.5
AA.7
5A .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9.A
3 0 .2
6 0 .A
-

-

9 9 .A
9 9 .A
9 .0
5 2 .0
3 7 .7
.7

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
2.A
5 1 .0
A A .l
1 .1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 5 .9
3A .1
-

.6

1.A

9 9 .A
9 9 .A
9 .0
5 1 .1
3 7 .6
.1
1 .6

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
2 .A
A 8 .8
A 3 .7
.A
3 .3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 5 .9
3A .1
-

.6

1.A

—

“

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .1
AO.O
A 3 .9
-

A f te r 2 0 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
W orkers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p rovid ing
p a id v a c a tio n s .................................................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...........................
1 week ...........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................
3 weeks ........................................................
A weeks and o v e r ..................................
O ther .............................................................
W orkers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts pro vid in g
no p aid v a c a t i o n s .........................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .2
A 9.6
A 5.3
2 .6
.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
5 2 .6
A 2.5
3 .8
1 .1

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.5
AA.7
5A .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9.A
3 0 .2
6 0 .A
-

*

See. f o o tn o te s a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (exclu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .1
AO.O
A 3 .9
*

Table D-4

P a id V a ca tio n ^ ty o tm a l P A a u iiiotu l)-(? o*tfiH M td
P e rce n t o f p la n t w orkers employed in -

P e rc e n t o f o f f i c e w orkers employed in V acatio n p o lic y

A ll w orkers .............................................................

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s t r i e s 1 /

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l tr a d e

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s 2 /

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e t a i l tr a d e

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .2
IS . 2
3 9 .9
9 .4
.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.5
4 4 .7
5 4 .8

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 .4
2 5 .6
3 5 .1
2 9 .9
-

9 9 .4
9 9 .4
9 .0
4 7 .9
3 5 .1
5 .8
1 .6

9 8 .6
9 8 .6
2 .4
4 4 .5
4 8 .0
.4
3 .3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 6 .1
3 6 .5
2 9 .1
1 8 .3

.6

1 .4

A f te r 2 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
Workers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
p aid v a c a tio n s ...................... ..........................
L e n g th -o f-tim e payment ...........................
1 week .............................................. ............
2 weeks ........................... ..................
3 w e e k s ........................................................
4 weeks and o v er ..................................
Other .............................................................
Workers in e sta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no p aid v a c a tio n s ..........................................

1/
2/
*

-

5 2 .6
4 2 .5
3 .8
1 .1

-

-

-

6 5 .9
3 4 .1
-

-

-

In clu d es d a ta f o r w h o lesale t r a d e ; f in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s in a d d itio n t o th o se in d u stry d i v i s i o n s shown s e p a r a te ly *
In clu d es d a ta f o r w h o lesale t r a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s in a d d itio n t o th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly *
T ra n s p o rta tio n (e x clu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s *

T able D -$ :

O tS U and P**UiaH piatti
ttU ltM M

P e r c e n t o f o f f i c e w orkers employed in Type o f p la n

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s t r i e s 1 /

P e rce n t o f p la n t w ork ers employed i n -

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

R e ta il tra d e

A ll
M anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s 2 /

P u b lic
u tilitie s «

R e ta il tra d e

A ll w orkers .............................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

W orkers in e sta b lis h m e n ts having
in su ran ce o r p en sion p lan s 2 / ••••••

8 6 .7

9 0 .2

9 3 .9

6 9 .7

7 8 .4

8 5 .8

8 2 .9

7 3 .8

In su ran ce p lan s 2 / •••..............................
L i f e ...............................................................
A c cid e n ta l d eath and
dismemberment .....................................
S ick n ess and a c c id e n t .......................
H o s p ita liz a tio n .....................................
S u r g ic a l ......................................................
M edical ........................................................
R etirem en t pen sion p l a n ............... ..

8 4 .3
7 3 .5

9 0 .2
5 9 .5

9 3 .9
8 9 .6

5 5 .4
4 5 .4 '

7 4 .1
5 9 .3

8 5 .8
5 9 .5

8 2 .9
8 1 .2

6 0 .9
5 3 .6

2 0 .6
2 6 .4
4 3 .2
3 6 .6
2 6 .2
4 5 .7

2 0 .9
3 5 .4
5 7 .7
5 5 .4
4 7 .4
3 5 .2

5 3 .6
5 9 .2
3 7 .9
3 7 .5
3 2 .7
7 3 .1

-

1 5 .8
2 6 .4
1 8 .0
1 5 .8
3 4 .0

1 4 .2
3 9 .6
4 3 .4
4 0 .2
2 7 .7
3 0 .2

1 6 .2
5 5 .7
5 6 .6
5 5 .7
3 7 .1
2 4 .5

4 1 .3
4 6 .7
4 1 .7
4 0 .7
3 1 .2
4 8 .9

2 2 .5
3 2 .5
2 5 .3
2 1 .5
3 7 .3

Workers in e sta b lis h m e n ts having
no in su ran ce o r pen sion p lan s .............

1 2 .9

8 .4

6 .1

3 0 .3

2 1 .0

1 2 .8

1 7 .1

2 6 .2

.4

1 .4

-

.6

1 .4

In form ation n o t a v a ila b le ...........................

1/
2/
2/
*




-

-

-

-

In clu d es d a ta f o r w h o lesale t r a d e ; f in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s in a d d itio n t o th o se in d u s try d i v i s i o n s shown s e p a r a te ly *
In clu d es d a ta f o r w h o lesale t r a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s in a d d itio n t o th o se in d u stry d i v is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly *
Unduplicated t o t a l *
T ra n s p o rta tio n (e x clu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
O ccu p atio n al Wage S u rv ey , D enver, C o l o ., November 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B ureau o f Lab or S t a t i s t i c s

17

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey

The Bur e a u ’s occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a rnayiinmn of useful and reliable information with avail­
able resources*
In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community.
Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure,
earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.

such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation.
Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work.
Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons,
are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations,
reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid;
average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents 9 The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment’s full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau’s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and
(d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping
(tables A-l
through A - 4 ) . The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade;
retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services.
Information on wcrk schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions.
As indicated in
the following table,
only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to war­
rant inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry
(see following
table).
Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources.
Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term office workers” referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional,
and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded.
Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries,
these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries.
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey.
Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

18

in term s o f t o t a l p la n t employment, v h ereas p ro p o rtio n s in th e sec­
ond ta b u la tio n re p re s e n t only th o se w orkers a c tu a lly employed on
th e s p e c ifie d l a t e s h if t .
In fo rm atio n on wage p ra c tic e s o th e r th an s h if t d if f e r ­
e n tia ls re f e r s to a l l o ffic e and p la n t w orkers as s p e c ifie d in th e
in d iv id u a l ta b le s . I t i s p resen ted in term s o f th e p ro p o rtio n o f
a l l w orkers employed in o ffic e s (o r p la n t departm ents) th a t observe
th e p ra c tic e in q u e stio n , ex cept in th e s e c tio n r e la tin g to women

o ffic e w orkers of th e ta b le summ arizing scheduled weekly h o u rs.
Because o f e l i g i b i l i t y req u irem en ts, th e p ro p o rtio n a c tu a lly re ­
ceiv in g th e s p e c ific b e n e fits may be sm a lle r.
The summary of v a c a tio n p la n s i s lim ite d to form al a r ­
rangem ents. I t excludes inform al p la n s whereby tim e o ff w ith pay
i s g ran ted a t th e d is c re tio n o f th e em ployer o r o th e r su p e rv iso r.
T ab u latio n s o f insu ran ce and pension p la n s have been confined to
th o se fo r w hich a t le a s t a p a r t o f th e c o s t i s borne by th e employer.

E stab lish m en ts and Workers in Major In d u stry D iv isio n s and in S e lec ted In d u strie s in Denver, C o lo ., l /
and Number S tudied by th e Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s , November 1952

Item

In d u stry d iv is io n s in w hich o ccupations
were surveyed on an a re a b a s is
A ll d iv is io n s . .......................................................... ..............
M anufacturing ....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................................................
T ran sp o rtatio n (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) ,
comm unication, and o th e r p u b lic
u t i l i t i e s ..................................................................
W holesale tra d e ........................................................
R e tail tra d e ...............................................................
Finance, in su ran ce , and r e a l e s ta te ..........
S erv ices 2 / .................................................................
In d u strie s in which o ccupations were
surveyed on an in d u s try b a sis U
Machinery in d u s trie s ..........................................................
Power la u n d rie s ......................................................................

Minimum number
o f w orkers in
estab lish m en ts
stu d ied
2/

Numbe r o f
e s ta b li shments
E stim ated
to ta l
Studied
w ith in
scope o f
study

E stim ated
to ta l
w ith in
scope o f
study

Employment
In estab l Li shments
stu<lie d
T o tal
O ffice

51
51
51

468
149
319

136
43
93

93,300
33,700
59,600

54,630
19,700
34,930

10,800
2,710
8,090

51
51
51
51
51

42
70
124
39
44

18
15
35
12
13

16,400
9,500
23,000
4,900
5,800

13,230
2 ,6 20
14,300
2 ,1 7 0
2 ,6 10

3,640
880
1,620
1,650
300

5 / 21
21

33
17

16
11

3,769
1,512

3,121
1,176

287
66

1 / Denver M etro p o litan Area (Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, and J e ffe rso n C o u n ties).
2 / T o tal estab lish m en t employment. The minimum s iz e o f estab lish m en t stu d ie d in a l l d iv is io n s in th e November 1951 survey was
21 w orkers.
/
2 / H o tels; p erso n al s e rv ic e s ; b u sin ess s e rv ic e s ; autom obile re p a ir shops; ra d io b ro ad castin g and te le v is io n ; m otion p ic tu re s ;
n o n p ro fit membership o rg a n iz a tio n s; and en g in eerin g and a rc h ite c tu r a l s e rv ic e s .
i j In d u s trie s a re d efin ed in fo o tn o te s to wage ta b le s .
2 / E stab lish m en ts m anufacturing m ach in e-to o l a c c e sso rie s w ith 8 o r more w orkers were a ls o in clu d ed .




19

Index
A ssem bler (m achinery), 9
Bench hand (b a k e rie s ), 11
B i l le r , m achine, 3
Bookbinder (p r in tin g ) , 11
Bookkeeping-m achine o p e ra to r, 3
B ric k la y e r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
C alcu latin g -m ach ine o p e ra to r, 3
C arp en ter (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
C a rp e n te r, m aintenance, 6
C lean er, 7
C lerk , f i l e , 3
C le rk , o rd e r, 3, A
C le rk , p a y ro ll, 3 , 4C le rk , r e t a i l re c e iv in g (power
la u n d rie s ), 10
C om positor, hand ( p rin tin g ), 11
Crane o p e ra to r, e le c tr ic b rid g e , 7
D raftsm an, 5
D r ill- p r e s s o p e ra to r (m achinery), 9
D uplicating-m achine o p e ra to r, U
E le c tr ic ia n (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
E le c tr ic ia n , m aintenance, 6
E le c tr ic ia n , m aintenance (m achinery), 9
E le c tro ty p e r (p rin tin g ), 11
E n g in e -la th e o p erato r (m achinery), 9
E n g in eer, s ta tio n a ry , 6
E x tra c to r o p e ra to r (power la u n d rie s ), 10
F in is h e r , fla tw o rk (power la u n d rie s ), 10
Firem an, s ta tio n a ry b o ile r , 6
Firem an, s ta tio n a ry b o ile r (power
la u n d rie s ), 10
G uard, 7




P acker, 7
Packer (b a k e rie s ), 11
P a in te r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
P a in te r, m aintenance, 6
Photoengraver (p rin tin g ), 11
P la s te r e r (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
Plumber (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
P o rte r, 7
P ress a s s is ta n t (p rin tin g ), 11
P ress fe e d e r (p rin tin g ), 11
P re s s e r, m achine, s h ir ts (power
la u n d rie s ), 10
Pressm an ( p r in tin g ) , 11
R eceiving c le rk , 3
Routeman (d riv er-salesm an ) (power
la u n d rie s ), 10

H elper (b a k e rie s ), 11
H elper, m otortruck d riv e r, 12
H elper, tra d e s , m aintenance, 6
I d e n tif ie r (power la u n d rie s ), 10
In sp e c to r (m achinery), 9
J a n ito r , 7
J a n ito r (m achinery), 9
Key-punch o p e ra to r, U
Laborer (b u ild in g c o n s tru c tio n ), 11
L aborer, m a te ria l h an d lin g , 7
L aborer, m a te ria l han d lin g
(m achinery), 9
Machine o p e ra to r (p r in tin g ) , 11
Machine ten d e r ( p r in tin g ) , 11
M achine-tool o p e ra to r, p ro d uctio n
(m achinery), 9
M ach in ist, m aintenance, 6
M ach in ist, p ro d u c tio n (m achinery), 9
M ailer (p rin tin g ), 11
Marker (power la u n d rie s ), 10
M echanic, autom otive (m aintenance), 6
M echanic, m aintenance, 6
M illing-m achine o p e ra to r (m achinery), 9
Mixer (b a k e rie s ), 11
M otortruck d r iv e r , 12

S e c re ta ry , U
Shipping c le rk , 3
S h ip p in g -an d -receiv in g c le rk , 3
S ten o g rap h er, U
S te re o ty p e r ( p r in tin g ) , 11
Sw itchboard o p e ra to r, U
Sw itchboard o p e ra to r-re c e p tio n is t,

U

T abulating-m achine o p e ra to r, 3
T o ol-an d -d ie m aker, 6
T ranscribing-m achine
o p e ra to r, 5
Truck d r iv e r , 3
T ru ck er, power, 8
T y p is t, 5

N urse, in d u s tr ia l (r e g is te r e d ) , 5
O ffice boy, 3
O ffice g i r l , U
O ile r, 6
O perator (lo c a l t r a n s i t ) , 12
O rder f i l l e r , 7
Ovenman (b a k e rie s ), 11

M asher, machine (power la u n d rie s ), 10
Watchman, 8
Wrapper (b a k e rie s ), 11
W rapper, bundle (power la u n d rie s ), 10

☆

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0— 1953







T his report w a s p r e p a r e d in the B u r e a u ' s
C o m m u n i c a t i o n s m a y be a d d r e s s e d t o :
M a x D.

Western

Regional Office*

Kossoris, Regional Director

Bureau of Labor Statistics
870 M arket Street
Room 1074
San F r a n c i s c o 2,
The services of the

California

Bureau

of

Labor Statistics'

regional offices

are available for consultation on statistics relati n g to w a ges and
relations, employment,
prices,
construction and housing*

labor turnover,

productivity,

The Western R e gi o n includes the f o llowing States:
Arizona
California
Colorado
Idaho
Nevada

New Mexico
Oregon
Utah
Washington
Wyoming

industrial

work injuries,


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102