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L O S A N G E L E S , C A L IF O R N IA
February 1953

Bulletin N o . 1116-14

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
M artin P. Durkin - Secretary




B U R EA U OF LA BO R STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Com m issioner




Occupational Wage Survey
LOS A N G E L E S , C A L I F O R N IA




February

1953

B ulletin N o. 1 1 1 6 -1 4

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
M artin P. Durkin - Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Com m issioner

F o r sale by the Superintendent o f Docum ents, U. S. Government Printing Office, W ashington 25, D . C . -

P rice 25 cen ts




Contents
Page

Letter of Transmittal

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor S t a t is t ic s ,
Washington, D. C ., May 28, 1953.
The Secretary o f Labor:
I have the honor to transm it herewith a report on
occupational wages and related b en efits in Los A ngeles, C a lif.,
during February 1953. Sim ilar stud ies are being conducted in
a number o f other large labor-market areas during the f is c a l
year 1953. These stu d ies have been designed to meet a v a riety
o f governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide
earnings inform ation for many occupations common to most manu­
factu rin g and nonmanufacturing in d u stries, as w ell as summaries
o f selected supplementary wage b e n efits. Whenever p o ssib le ,
separate data have been presented for individual major industry
d iv isio n s .
This report was prepared in the Bureau's region al o f­
f ic e in Los A ngeles, C a lif., by William P. O'Connor under the
d irec tio n o f John Le Dana, Regional Wage and Ind ustrial Rela­
tio n s A nalyst. The planning and cen tral d irectio n o f the pro­
gram was carried on in the Bureau's D ivision o f Wages and In­
d u str ia l R ela tio n s.
Ewan Clague, Commissioner.
Hon. Martin P. Durkin,
Secretary of Labor.




INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................
THE LOS ANGELES METROPOLITAN AREA.........................
OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ................................................................
TABLESl
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area b a sis A-l
O ffice occupations ..............................
A-2
P rofessional and tech n ica l occupations ...........
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations . . . .
k-U
C ustodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations ..................................................................
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry b asis B-2333 Women's and m isses' d r e s s e s ...................
B-2511 Wood furniture (other than upholstered) . . . .
B-2851 Paints and varnishes ....................................................
B-35
Machinery in d u stries ...................................................
O il f ie ld m achin ery..............................................
M achine-tool a ccesso ries - production
shops ........................................................................
M achine-tool a ccesso ries - jobbing
shops .........................................
B-7211 Power laundries ...............................................................
Union wage sca les fo r selected occupations C-15
Building c o n s tr u c tio n ..................................................
C-205 B a k e r ie s...................
C-27
P r in tin g ...............................................................................
C-41
Local tr a n sit operating em p loyees......................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ............................
Supplementary wage p ra ctices D-l
S h ift d iffe r e n tia l provisions ...............................
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours ...............................................
D-3
Paid holidays ...................................................................
D-4
Paid vacations ............................
D-5
Insurance and pension plans ....................................
APPENDIX:
Scope and method o f survey .............................
INDEX

1
1
2

3
6
1

8
10
11
11
12
13
U
1U

15

16
16
16
16
16
18
19
19
20
23
ZU
26




O CCU PATIO NAL W AGE SU RV EY - LOS ANGELES

T o ta l nonfarm wage and s a la r y workers in th e a re a numbered
1 ,7 5 5 ,0 0 0 . A l i t t l e
more th an a f i f t h — 3 8 5 ,0 0 0 —were employed in
w h olesale and r e t a i l t r a d e ; 2 3 6 ,0 0 0 in th e s e r v ic e s in d u s tr ie s ,
in clu d in g m o tio n -p ic tu re p ro d u ctio n ; 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 in F e d e r a l, S t a t e , and
l o c a l government; 1 2 5 ,0 0 0 in tr a n s p o r t a tio n , communication, and
o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ; 9 9 ,0 0 0 in c o n tr a c t c o n s tr u c tio n ; 7 9 ,0 0 0 in
f i n a n c i a l i n s t i t u t i o n s (in c lu d in g in su ran ce c a r r i e r s and r e a l e s t a t e
o p e r a to r s ); and 1 6 ,0 0 0 in th e e x t r a c t i o n in d u s tr ie s , m ainly crude
petroleum and n a tu r a l g a s .

Introduction
The Loa Angeles a re a i s 1 o f 20 im portant in d u s t r i a l
c e n te r s in which th e Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s conducted occupa­
t i o n a l wage su rv ey s d u rin g l a t e 1 9 5 2 and e a r l y 1 9 5 3 . In such s u r ­
v e y s , o ccu p atio n s common t o a v a r i e t y o f m anufacturing and nonmanu­
f a c t u r in g in d u s tr ie s a r e stu d ie d on a community-vide b a s i s . 1 /
C ros8 -in d u s tr y methods o f sampling a re thus u t i l i z e d in com piling
e arn in g s d a ta f o r th e fo llo w in g ty p es o f o ccu p a tio n s : ( a ) O f f ic e ;
(b ) p r o f e s s io n a l and t e c h n i c a l ;
( c ) m aintenance and power p la n t;
and (d ) c u s t o d i a l , w arehousing, and sh ip p in g . In p re s e n tin g e a rn ­
ings in fo rm a tio n f o r such jobs ( t a b l e s A -l through A-^) s e p a ra te
d a ta a r e p rovid ed w herever p o s s ib le f o r in d iv id u a l broad in d u s try
d iv is io n s .

Although th e re a r e more tr a d e union members (o v e r 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 )
in Los Angeles th an in any o th e r la r g e West C oast a r e a , th e degree
o f employee o rg a n iz a tio n i s p ro p o rtio n a te ly l e s s than in San F ra n ­
c i s c o , P o rtla n d , or S e a t t l e . Among th e in d u s trie s and e s ta b li s h ­
m e n t-siz e groups included in th e B u reau ’ s stu d y , about 80 p ercen t
o f th e Los A ngela8 p la n t workers were employed in estab lish m en ts
h avin g w r itte n c o n tr a c t s w ith la b o r o rg a n iz a tio n s . V i r tu a ll y a l l
p la n t workers in p u b lic u t i l i t i e s and th e m o tio n -p ictu re p rod uction
in d u s try were employed under th e term s o f labor-management a g re e ­
m ents. In m anufacturing and w h olesale tr a d e th e p rop ortion s of
p la n t workers in organ ized estab lish m en ts exceeded th r e e - f o u r th s .

E a rn in g s in fo rm atio n f o r c h a r a c t e r i s t i c o ccu p atio n s in
c e r t a i n more n arro w ly d efin ed in d u s trie s i s p resen ted in S e r ie s B
t a b l e s . Union s c a l e s
(S e r ie s C ta b l e s ) a re p re se n te d f o r s e le c t e d
o ccu p atio n s in s e v e r a l in d u s trie s o r tr a d e s in which th e g r e a t
m a jo rity o f th e w orkers a re employed under term s o f c o l l e c t i v e ­
b a rg a in in g agre e m e n ts, and th e c o n tr a c t o r minimum r a t e s a r e b e ­
lie v e d t o be in d ic a ti v e o f p re v a ilin g pay p r a c t i c e s .

U nlike o th e r p r in c ip a l West C oast a r e a s , where c o l l e c t i v e
b a rg a in in g i s m ainly o f th e m u ltiem ployer, in dustryw ide, m asteragreem ent ty p e , la b o r n e g o tia tio n s in Los Angeles a re conducted
l a r g e l y on a firm by firm b a s i s . In e a r l y 1953 th e m a ste r-a g re e ­
ment typ e o f b a rg a in in g was found in only a sm all number o f s i t u ­
a tio n s .

D ata a r e c o l l e c t e d and summarized on s h i f t o p e ra tio n s and
d i f f e r e n t i a l s , hours o f work, and supplementary b e n e f its such as
v a c a tio n a llo w a n c e s , p aid h o lid a y s , and in su ran ce and pension p la n s .

The p ro p o rtio n o f o f f i c e workers employed under term s of
c o ll e c tiv e -b a r g a i n i n g agreem ents was s u b s ta n tia ll y le s s than th a t
o f p la n t w o rk ers. On an a l l - i n d u s t r i e s b a s is only a fo u rth o f th e
o f f i c e workers were in organ ized e s ta b lis h m e n ts ; however, v i r t u a l l y
a l l employees in th e m o tio n -p ictu re p rod u ction in d u stry and th r e e fo u rth s in p u b lic u t i l i t i e s worked in o f f i c e s which had agreem ents
w ith la b o r unions co v e rin g o f f i c e w ork ers.

The Los Angeles Metropolitan Area
The Los A ngeles M etro p o litan Area (Los Angeles and Orange
C o u n tie s ), w ith a lm o st h a lf o f C a lif o r n i a ’ s nonfarm working popu­
l a t i o n , i s c h a r a c te r iz e d by a wide d iv e r s i ty o f m an u factu ring a c t i v ­
itie s .
Continuous g ain s over th e p a s t two decades in in d u s t r i a l
p ro d u ctio n have b rou ght th e a re a t o a prominent p o s itio n in th e
m anufacture o f a i r c r a f t , au tom ob iles, m achinery, p etroleum p ro d u c ts ,
f u r n i t u r e , and a p p a r e l. Approxim ately 6 1 5 ,0 0 0 wage and s a l a r y work­
e r s , a cco u n tin g f o r about 35 p e rce n t o f th e t o t a l n o n a g r ic u ltu r a l
la b o r f o r c e in th e a r e a , were employed in m anufacturing e s t a b l i s h ­
ments in F eb ru a ry 1 9 5 3 .

In surveys conducted in 1 9 5 1 -5 2 , th e p a y -le v e l p o s itio n
o f Los Angeles a re a p la n t w orkers, as measured by th e average l e v e l
f o r a number o f i n d ir e c t jo b s , was found t o be fo u rth h ig h e st in a
ran k in g o f ^0 m ajor la b o r m ark ets. 2 / Average pay was h igh er only
in San F r a n c is c o , S e a t t l e , and D e t r o i t . Compared w ith s im ila r ly
in d u s tr ia liz e d a re a s o f th e Midwest^and E a s t , Los Angeles was on an
even l e v e l w ith C hicago, somewhat above P itts b u rg h and C levelan d ,
and s u b s ta n tia ll y h ig h er th an P h ila d e lp h ia .

1 / See appendix f o r d is c u s s io n o f scope and method o f su rv e y .
D iffe re n c e s between th e scope o f t h i s survey and th e l a s t p reviou s
su rvey a r e in d ic a te d in th e appendix t a b l e .




CALIF

2/
k e ts ,

(1)

T oivo P . Kanninen, "Wage D iffe re n c e s Among
M 22iW Ly_jAbor_Bev3^, December 1952 (p . 6 2 0 ) .

Labor Mar­

2

Occupational Wage Structure
Over 8 5 p e rce n t o f th e p la n t workers in Los Angeles in
e a r l y 1953 were p aid tim e r a t e s . A m a jo rity o f th e se workers were
employed in e stab lish m e n ts t h a t governed pay a cco rd in g t o wage p ro ­
g ressio n p la n s , which provided payment w ith in s e t minima and maxima
f o r each o ccu p a tio n . N early a l l th e rem aining tim e -ra te d workers
were employed under system s which s tip u la te d a s in g le r a t e f o r in ­
d iv id u a l o ccu p a tio n s. Among th e in d u s try groups su rveyed , b oth th e
m anufacturing and p u b l i c - u t i l i t y groups had a preponderance of
workers under ra te -r a n g e s t r u c t u r e s , but m a jo r itie s o f workers in
o th er in d u stry groups were found under s i n g l e - r a t e sy stem s. V i r ­
t u a l l y a l l workers in m o tio n -p ictu re p ro d u ctio n were covered by
8 in g le - r a te arran gem en ts.

lower s k i l l le v e l re p re s e n ta tiv e of o ccu p atio n s r e q u ir in g l i t t l e or
no t r a i n i n g , m a te ria l h andling la b o re r s and men p ack ers on ro u tin e
ta s k s averaged $ 1 6 5 and $ 1 .6 0 an h ou r, r e s p e c t i v e l y .
In th e c u s ­
t o d i a l group, men j a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c le a n e r s had a $ 1 .3 9
h ourly av erag e and watchmen re c e iv e d $ l A 6 .
Average s a l a r i e s of more th an $ 5 5 a week were reco rd ed f o r
most women's o f f ic e c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s
s tu d ie d . Women employed in
occu p atio n s re q u irin g a high degree o f r e s p o n s i b i l i t y and a v id e
knowledge o f o f f i c e procedures earned about 5 0 p e rce n t more th an
th o se in jobs o f a ro u tin e n atu re
re q u ir in g no s p e c i a l a b i l i t i e s .
S e c r e t a r i e s averaged $ 6 9 -5 0 a w eek, t e c h n i c a l sten o g rap h ers $ 6 9 , and
ex p e rie n ce d bookkeeping-machine o p e ra to rs $ 6 7 .5 0 . At th e o th e r end
o f th e s c a l e ,
o f f ic e g i r l s and ro u tin e f i l e c le r k s had an av erag e
$ 1*6 s a l a r y , and copy t y p i s t s $^ 8 .

More th an f o u r - f i f t h s o f th e Los Angeles o f f i c e workers
were employed in firm s w ith fo rm alized s a la r y s t r u c t u r e s . Systems
which c a ll e d fbr a s p e c if ie d s a la r y range f o r in d iv id u a l occu p atio n s
were in p r a c t i c e fo r th e la r g e m a jo rity o f th e se w o rk ers. A l l o f f i c e
employees in th e mot io n -p ic tu r e in d u s try worked under s a la r y -ra n g e
p la n s. S a la ry -ra n g e plan s predominated among o th e r in d u s try groups,
e x ce p t in s e r v i c e s (e x clu d in g m o tio n -p ictu re p ro d u ctio n ) where pay
f o r alm ost h a lf th e workers was s e t on an in d iv id u a l b a s i s .

Approxim ately a fo u rth of th e m an u factu rin g p la n t workers
were employed on l a t e - s h i f t work in F e b ru a ry 1953* V i r t u a l l y a l l
th e se workers re c e iv e d premium r a t e s o f p ay. The d i f f e r e n t i a l was
t y p i c a l l y 6 t o 8 ce n ts an hour over d a y - s h i f t r a t e s f o r s e c o n d -s h if t
workers
F o r t h i r d - s h i f t workers a f u l l - d a y ’ s pay f o r l e s s th an
re g u la r d a y -s h if t o r s e c o n d -s h ift tim e w ith premium r a t e s added was
a u su al p r a c t i c e .

In c e n tiv e system s o f pay a p p lie d t o 1 0 -1 5 p e rc e n t o f th e
p lan t workers in each o f th e in d u s try groups s tu d ie d . Bonus system s
were found in m anufacturing and s e r v ic e s (e x c lu d in g m o tio n -p ictu re
p ro d u ctio n ); s a le s commissions payment was th e u su a l p r a c t i c e in
p u b lic u t i l i t i e s and r e t a i l t r a d e ; and p i e c e - r a t e payments were
found in w h olesale tr a d e .

Although a m a jo rity of Los A ngeles p la n t workers were on
a workweek schedule o f
h o u rs, co n sid e ra b le numbers were employed
f o r lo n g er weekly p e rio d s . This was th e p r a c t i c e p a r t i c u l a r l y in
m anufacturing in d u s trie s where alm ost 2 0 p e rc e n t were on weekly
sch ed ules o f more than Uo h o u rs. On th e o th e r hand, th e g e n e ra l
p r a c t i c e for women o f f ic e workers was a ^ 0-h ou r week. However, sub­
s t a n t i a l p ro p o rtio n s in th e f i n a n c ia l group and s e r v i c e s (e x c lu d in g
m o tio n -p ictu re p ro d u ctio n ) were on s h o r te r h o u r s .

Among th e in d i r e c t p la n t jobs su rveyed , most o f th e h ig h ly
s k ill e d maintenance occu p atio n s averaged more th an $ 2 . 1 5 an h our.
Average pay f o r e l e c t r i c i a n s , m a c h in is ts , s h e e t-m e ta l
w orkers,
plumbers, and m illw rig h ts approxim ated $2.20 an h o u r. T o o l-a n d -d ie
makers averaged somewhat more. As a group, th e s e cra ftsm e n a v e r ­
aged ap p roxim ately 20 p e rc e n t over the le s s s k ill e d maintenance
h e lp e rs , w ith $1.77. In o th e r jobs re q u irin g s k i l l b ro ad ly compa­
ra b le t o t h a t o f th e m aintenance tr a d e s h e lp e r s , o i l e r s han an
hourly average o f $ 1 . 7 1 , s ta t io n a r y b o i l e r firem en $ 1 . 8 5 , and tr u c k
d riv e r s from $1.80 t o $2, a c c o rd in g t o tr u c k w eight c a p a c ity . At a




As in o th er major la b o r m ark ets, nonwage b e n e f its have
become in c re a s in g ly im portant as b a rg a in in g is s u e s in th e Los
Angeles wage economy
R e f le c tin g gain s in such b e n e f its in r e c e n t
y e a r s , n e a rly a l l workers in the surveyed in d u s try groups in F eb ru ary
1953 v e re employed in e stab lish m en ts t h a t g ran ted p aid h o lid a y s ; a l l
but a n e g lig ib le p ro p o rtio n of p la n t w orkers had p aid v a c a ti o n s , w ith
b e n e f its s c a le d t o in cre a se d p eriod s o f s e r v i c e ; and more th an 9 5
p e rce n t worked f o r firm s th a t provided in su ran ce or pension p lan s
paid w holly o r in p a rt by management.

A 8 C ross-Industry O c c u p a t i o n s

3

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, February 1953)

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

Weekly j^nder
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) 35.00

37.50 *40.00 42.50

45.00

47.50

40.00

42.50 45.00

47.50

50.00

5
s
$
s
s
$
$
$
s
$
$
50.00 52.50 *55.00 *57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
52.50 55.00

57.50

60.00

23

9

62.50 65.00

67.50

70.00 72.50

75.00

80.00

85.00 90.00

i

t
95.00 LOO.00
and
95.00 loaoo over

Men

$
54.50

-

-

6

-

-

1

-

11

11

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

.
-

-

40.0

76.50
81.00
73.50
72.50

-

~

“

~

-

“

“

432
215
217
109

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

78.00
73.50
82.00
89.50

1

_
_

_
_

_
-

Duplicating-machine operators ................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................

60
58

40.0
40.0

65.50
65.50

Office boys ..................................
Manufacturing.............................
Nonmanufacturing..........................
Finance * * .............................
Services (excluding motion pictures) ...
Motion pictures ........................

483
180
303
116
61
53

39.5
40.0
39.0
39.0
38.5
40.0

Secretaries ..................................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................

115
57
58

Tabula ting-mach lne operators .................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Wholesale trade ........................
Finance « * .............................

Clerks. file, class B ........................

71

39.5

Clerks, order ................................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Wholesale trade ........................

1.240
465
775
710

40.0
40.0

Clerks, payroll ..............................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Motion pictures ........................

40.0

8

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

164
50
114

105

85
7
78
76

140
40

153
04
89
89

5

2

4
4

2

_
2

.
2

93

11

105
19

16

-

16

82
82

86
86

13
13
_

15
13
2

2

4
2
2
2

37
35
2
~

28
16
12
-

30
28
2

2

110

8
97
97

21

•

15
6
-

36
9
27
16

100
100

-

-

228

68
59
9
7

20
20

14

21

35

138
90
33

-

57 . . 52
.
35
15
22
37
19
3

50
12
38
24

10
11

2
2

1
1

1
1

8
6
6
22
12
10
10

1
1

35
35

-

2
2

3
3

1
1

12
10

5
5

4
4

7
7

9
9

6
6

3
3

1
1

36
4
32
6
3
14

62
26
36
2
17
5

70
40
30
11
4
5

24
18
6
•
5

26
20
6
_
4

26
11
15
-

14
4
10
_

19
7
12
_

-

-

-

_

-

_
-

-

78
50
4
8

-

-

-

.
-

•
»
-

«
e
-

-

3

3
4

4

“

~

“

“

-

“

“

-

~

_

-

_

_

_

-

~

“

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

•

1
1

-

28
28
~

8
8

7
1
6

42
24
18

20
20

?
3
~

4

_

1
1

13

9

-

-

-

13
-

-

-

-

13

9
2
7

24
2
22
6
15

35
6
29
7
22

72
21
51
9
3

69
36
33
15
9

95
48
47
12
14

95
50
45
18
3

167
125
42
18
13

48
5
43
32
9

13
2
11
4
4

12
12
2

38

100
_
100
47
38

73

45
18
27
_

36
2
34
15
18

2
2

11
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

<
*

-

-

-

-

1
1

“

-

-

-

_
•

-

-

~

48.00
49.50
46.50
42.50
45.50
50,50

_
-

8
8
8
-

28
28
7
21

92
50
42
32
6
4

40.0
40.0
40.0

76.50
73.50
79.50

-

_

-

-

~

_

683
295
388
132
121

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
38.5

72.50
73.50
72.00
72.50
67.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

Billera. machine (billing machine) ..........
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing........... .......... .
Public utilities * ........ ............
Vhnl.an'], fnitta rlTT-T-lr_.ItI.

788
232
556
157
218

39.5
39.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

54.50
56.50
53.50
53.00
56.50

-

1
_
1

8
8

6
_
6

-

-

_

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ......
Nonmanufacturing ..........................

108
82

40.0
40.0

58.00
57.50

-

1

57
41

3
3

-

2
2

-

-

_
_

3

5
5

-

78

-

-

14
14
8
6

1
-T1
1
1

_

_
-

4

6
6
“

10
10
1
*

Women

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A .............
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing..........................
Wholesale trade ....................

294
122
172
74

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

67.50
69.00
66.50
67.50

-

-

-

-

38
25

*

6
6

.

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

yi

113
57
56
14
22

118
36
82
9
9

y

101
61
40
4
14

49
38
11
1
10

*f

40
3
37
6
JA
J

VI

47
4
43
26
16

3
3

10
10

30
30

20
10

8
3

10
2

2
2

-

73
10

c
m
•
-

6

-

-

14
5

6

9

3

16
_
16

3

21
_
21
11

95
34
61
31

3

16
14
2
2

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




NOTE:

Data fear norsnanufacturing do not include information for department stores; the remainder of retail
trade is appropriately represented in data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.
"Motion pictures" refers to motion picture production establishments (Group 7311) as defined in the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.

17
13
4
4

21
10
11
4

36
29
7

15
15

21
5
16
1

30
12
18
15

1

1

_
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4

Table A-li

QjftC* O cQHjiatfoHAr G o nttH H ld

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ far selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, February 1953)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

Weekly

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Weekly

Under
(Standard) (Standard) V
35*00

$
$
s
$
35^0° 37.50 40.00 42.50
and
under
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00
47.50

50.00

52.50 55.00

57.50

60.00 62.50

s

62.50

$
$
s
65.00 67.50 70.00

65.00

67.50

106

55
25
30

27
18
9

12

68
27
26

2
1

8

8

_

$
72.50

t
s
$
75.00 80.00 85.00

75.00

80.00

4

_

23
14
9
_
_

«
.
_

70.00 72.50

85.00 90.00

s
s
s
90.00 95.00 100.00
and
over
95.00 100.00

Women - Continued

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ......
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing .........................
Wholesale trade .......................
Finance «* ............ ................
Services (excluding motion
pictures)............................

2,552
361
2,191
293
1,625

40.0
” 40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

50

2.682

$
51.50
59.00
50.00

8

31

135

270
_

135
_

270

_

31
-

8

31

135

.
269

-

74

-

-

-

61.50
61.00

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
-

25

_
_

-

-

-

-

25
23
-

62
23
17

_

_

70

120

39.0

61.00

_

_

Clerics, file, class A .......................
Manufacturing........................... .
Nonmanufacturing .........................
Wholesale trade .......................

455
152
303
72

39.0
39.5
38.5
39.5

54.00
60.00
51.00

_
_

_
_

_

-

-

-

70
3

Clerks, file, class B .......................
Manufacturing............................
Nonmanufaoturing ................ ..........
Wholesale trade .......................
Finance ** ............................

2.976
2,192
319
1,191

39.0
46.0
39.0
40.0
38.5

52.50
43.50
53.50
39.00

261
261
_
188

262
_
262

2
236

372
16
356
17
310

285
19
248

Clerks, order ................................
Manufacturing ............................

994
305

40.0
40.0

59.50
60.00

-

-

-

1,350
40.0
718 r
-53:6'
632
40.0
192
40.0
108
40.0

1 T .it

63.00

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

127

40.0

61.00

-

-

-

308
116

39.5
39.5
39.5

55.50
56.50
55.00
55.50

_
_

_

-

-

8

-

-

-

6
3

39.5
40.0
39.5

60.50

_
_

6

1

_

-

6

1

40.0

64.50
61.00
52.50
75.00

_

_
•
_

_
_
_

Key-punch operators ...................... .
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing...................
Public utilities * ....................
Wholesale trade ..................... ..
Finance ** ............................
Motion pictures ........................

192
58
1.400
614
786
107

202
242
51

40.0

40.0
38.5
40.0

61.50
56.00
62.00

56.00
46.00

63.00
58.00

_
_
*

37

-

2

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

178
47
131

185
82
103

217
51
166

190
81
109

204

335
133

154
104
50
3

194

310

310

8

40

179
74
105
3
89

9

11

20

12
88

11

53

42

70

26
109

2

8

2

„

9

39

19

15

3

59

17

42
18
24

4

57
23
34

10
8

6

13
3

4

2

8

“

1

“

249
233
16

150
64

103
27
76

15

37

8

22
-

44
44
30
-

15
3
-

37
33
-

73
55

56
46

19

92
9

184
106
78

144

91
78
13
4

— W

2

382

212

30
352
27
87

53
159
27
63

64
24

146
37
109
40
37

58

54
32

188

122
66

4
-

242
176

66
8

2

86

5

“

58
-

51
38

210

73
29

138
3

87
42
45
7

25
17

53

121

21
32

87
34

2

20
6

8
6

8

4

-

15
15
-

13
5

8

2
2

39

2

16

8

8

9

27

14

5
5

38
9
29

30

25
15

52
31

2

9
3

16

-

21
8

6

1

10
8

16

-

72
3l
a
19

18

20
10

-

-

31

120

100

69

120
8
3

IT
85

10

31

128
49
79

94
50
44

141
94
47

1
20

1

1

12

118
85
33

10

8

37
37
—

13
15

23

14

12

8
1

23
15
_

53
IT
38
26

- —

27
*
*

24

58

59
14
37

55

— w

26
7
7

10
*
*

149

— W

W

15

81
50
13

12

11

22

10

_
_

1
1

83

_

_
_

-

-

-

“

47

_
_
_

_
_

43

-

4

_

14

16
83

1

_
_

_
_
_
_

_
-

_
-

“

-

-

_

_

_
.
_
-

_

7
_

_
-

—

-

—
-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

9

8

16

2

_
_

16
_
_

1

5
_

7
5

8

9

3

-

8

-

-

_

—

-

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

28
28
-

5
•
-

_

-

6
1

3
3
-

19

3

-

7
“

_

_
_
-

_
-

-

“

-

20

83
14

7
4

_
_
-

-

_
*

48
23

-

1

_
_
_

_
14
9

_
-

-

2
2

---

38
Yr

5

—

81
87
53" --- 50“--36
47
1
8
9

21

2

1

6

5

4

-

10

-

7
7
-

3
_

7
-

3
3

7
-

120
182
158
108 --- 95" — 86“ —
40
68
74
22
5
7
18
15
23
_
13
8

47
_

5
3

16

6

2
2

2

_

81
--- 5Ti
50
74
18
13
8
15

—

106

1
_
_

7

59
58

8

33
3
30
17

16

1
16
6

22

59
14

202

88

16
15

9

19

1

26

6

38

47

23

8

90

69
78

137
39
98
79

390
228
162
15
136

311

62.00

62.00
56.50

31

104
19
85
34
27

101
103
8

12

2

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




3

“

Calculating-machine operators (other than
— Comptometer type) .... .....................

Duplicating-machine operators .............. .
Manufacturing................... .........
Nonmanufacturing...... .......... .........
Wholesale trade .......................

162

-

1,681
181
825

Clerks, payroll .............................
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturi n g .........................
Public utilities * ....................
Wholesale trade .......................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ............................

190
28

52.00

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

m

175
54

121
2

39.5

8

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
- tipe) .....................................
Manufacturing.................. ..........
Wonmanufacturing .........................
Public utilities * ....................
Wholesale trade .......................

1,0 0 1

354
28
326
35
199

48.00

58.00

_

402
483
_ --- 59
402
414
26
3
366
395

_
_
_

8

39
V
35
25
9
-

1.

41
29"
12

5
_
5

1
_

—

—

.
-

5

Table A-l*

(J^00

OccUptdiQHd,’G o n t i H H e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, February 1953)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Weekly
Weekly
jtader
earnings
hours
w
(Standard) (Standard)
35.00 under
37.50

$
$
$
37.50 40.00 42.50

$
$
$
45.00 47.50 50.00

40.00

47.50

42.50 45.00

$
$
$
*
1
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00

50.00 52.50 i55.00

57.50

s
s
62.50 65.00

60.00 62.50

65.00

67.50

$
s
s
$
$
$
s
$
67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
and
70.00 72,50 .75a PQ 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 over

Women - Continued

Office *irls .................................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing..........................
Wholesale trade ........................

667
268
399
66

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

*
46.00
49.00
44.00
47.50

-

42
12
30
7

100
23
77
1

92
9
83
3

126
48
78
15

81
19
62
23
27

51
39 n
12
1

22
r
6
4

47
36
11
3

51
35
16
-

24
20
4
_

21
8
13
3

6
6
6

3
3
-

1
1
-

_

Secretaries ..................................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing......... .................
Public utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade ........................
Finance ** .............................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ............................
Motion pictures ...................... .

5.435
2,316
3,119
342
604
1,124

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
38.5

69.50
2o.oo
69.50
73.00
70.00
64.50

-

-

-

-

3
3
-

19
19
2

19
19
-

99
8
91
2
8
51

101
14
87
16
37
13

231
30
201
2
3
134

299
64
235
9
25
134

495
146
349
22
96
194

550
194
356
14
100
154

467
230
237
30
34
109

619
411
208
23
42
95

633
416
217
57
40
61

450
405

38.5
40.0

62.50
87.00

_

_

-

-

-

-

17
-

17
-

28
-

17
•

-

48
3

22
-

80
“

42
12

35
7

26

-

3
-

62

-

5

Stenographers, general .......................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Public utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade ........................
Finance ** .............................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) .............................
Motion pictures ........................

6,420
2,453
3,962
355
798
1,606

39.5
46.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.0

59.50
62.00
58.00
61.50
62.00
52.50

18
18
16

15
_

45
11
34
2
28

94
5
89
2
2
69

336
14
4
12
279

302
*4
278
11
48
158

586
102
484
31
51
299

499
118
381
17
69
221

552
218
334
32
57
155

849
367
482
35
76
168

77?
414
365
31
105
150

761
449
312
60
97
38

544
323
221
43
90
11

466

-

271
195
73
37
2

572
325

39.0
40.0

57.00
72.00

-

-

1
“

4

14

25
“

45
*

88
“

70
“

33
7

141
8

36
6

27
34

10
40

42
33

Stenographers. technical .....................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................

278
277

40.0
40.0

69.00
69.00

Switchboard operators ........................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
uinUUs *

1,550
375
1,175
IQO

Wholesale trade ........................
Finance ** .............................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ............................
Motion pictures ........................

199
231

40.5
40.0
40.5
40.0
40.*0
39.5

57.00
63.50
55.00
Co no
77 eUU
58.50
52.50

389
115

43.0
39,5

Switchboard operator-receptionists ..........
Manufacturing .............................
Nonoanufacturing ..........................
Wholesale trade ........................
Finance * * .............................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ............................

1.514
685
829
271
185

Tabulating-machine operators .................
Manufacturing.............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Finance ** ............. ............ .

“

-

2
2

28
28

2
2

115
115

215
215

_
-

_
_

_
_

5
13

25
46

6

28
”

2
“

97
-

30

4

32

-

_

6
6

-

46.50
72.50

-

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0

57.00
58.00
56.00
58.50
51.50

_
-

-

-

-

30
14

4
4

187

40.0

52.00

”

“

16

~

309
131
178
57

39.5
40.0
39.5
38.5

67.00
69.50
65.50
62.00

_
-

_

_

-

-

-




_

-

47
2l
26
4
-

16
16
4
-

7
7
-

-

-

7
33

8
37

13
94

8
14

12

7

“

-

_

_

“

-

”

-

-

_
-

-

-

10

13

5

5

61

10

“

”

-

“

103
56
47
18
4

111
61
50
18

49
17
32
8
-

2

44
8
36
23
-

12
12

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1
-

15
12
3
3
-

20

3

”

“

"

3

”

"

28
5
23
20

34
9
25
2

24
21
3

56
40
16
4

34
30
4

31
18
13
3

3

-

8

3

8

3

2

170
100
70
40
8

46

34

14

26

19

6
6
2

20
_
20
2

7
7
5

17
3
14
9

4

210
46
164
56
-

-

155
83
72
27
-

4
4

146
28
118
4
a
-

-

218
115
103
39
20

6

148
47
101
12
47
-

-

1?6
30
106
47
16

6

16

14
-

231
119
112
42
29

_

76

6

2

1

8

-

~

1

8
144

-

12
2

_

32
49

-

7

-

12
75

22

_

12
“

_

1
10

106

_

-

6

8
-

16
16
-

4

-

9

~

no

10
10

10
11

26
20

56
2
54
13
27
6

71
5
66

77
11

141
42
99
8
37

270
44
226
22
33
4

15
10
5

12
12

61
24
37
15
15

341
102
239
24
49
63

35
16
19

OL

13
~

582
291
291
19
75
60

100
57
43
21

119
83
36

83

525
35o T
165
67
27
44

2
2

112
58
54

136
“

-

21
21

181
70
111
1f
X7

93
9
84
56
4
12

-

27
27

106
42
64

73
15
58
K
3
18
22

-

39
38

i?o
10
120
18
17
50

139
139
c
3
3
48

14 1
14 1

-

14
14

45
45

4
4

-

11
11

31
31

2
2

-

13
13

30
30

-

-

xy\j

-

322

-

-

See footnote at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

2 5 8 5 9 9 0 - 53 - 2

15
12

L
H

-

23..
23

Xj

-

_

17
5
12
1

5

-

_

_

-

-

-

“

~

-

9
9

4
4

-

6
QcCdifMl&OHl-GoH&HUed

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Ins Angeles, Calif., by industry division, February 1953)

Average
Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Weekly
Weekly
Under
hours
earnings
w
(Standard) (Standard)
35.00 under
37.50

$
$
$
37.50 40.00 42.50

$
45.00

40.00

42.50 45.00

47.50

%

$
47.50 50.00

$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
s
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00

50.00 52.50

55.00

57.50

60.00

46
31
9
17
5

30
30
3
12
15

5
5
1
_

358
230
,128
57
59

249
86
163
42
110

62.50 65.00

67.50

4
4

4

64
28
5
21
2

395
272
123
70
30

241
190
51
9
12

70.00 72.50

75.00

80.00

.

1
1

1
1

1

s
$
s
90.00 95.00 100.00
and
85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
over

1

Women - Continued
£
-

-

-

4
4

6
6

42
36

69
65

53
51

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

5

6
30

22
35

6
44

70
56
6
17
33

_

_
-

8
8
8

17
17
8

195
2
193
185

271
271
1
230

245
21
224
5
186

293
89
204
23
164

226
109
117
34
70

Transcribing-machine operators, g e n e r a l .....
Nonmanufacturing .........................
Public utilities * .................. .
Wholesale trade .......................
Finance ** ............................

406
32^
26
112
176

39.0
' 33.5
39.0
40.0
38.0

54.50
53.50
58.00
56.50
51.00

Typists, class A ............................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ................ .........
Wholesale trade .......................
Finance * * ............................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) .... .......................

2,751
1,115
1,636
306
1,062

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
39.0

55.50
59.00
52.50
59.50
49.50

57

38.5

49.50

-

-

-

9

-

16

9

7

3

7

3

1

-

Typists, class B ............................
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Public utilities * ....................
Wholesale t r a d e ................... .
Finance * * ............................
Services (excluding motion
pictures) ...........................

3.600
986
2,614
349
413
1,250

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
38.5

48.00
51.00
47.00
52.50
50.50
43.50

38
38
32

87
87
65

137
11
126
1
88

391
24
367
2
2
335

569
72
497
68
33
285

685
151
534
73
96
233

326
87
239
22
82
101

564
225
339
32
115
100

269
168
101
18
16
11

201
149
52
22
25

115
60
55
31

67
10
57
20
23

82
29
53
25
9

55
35
9

14

307

39.0

47.00

6

22

29

65

80

12

50

4

5

1/
*
**

-

_
13

_

_
_

112
43
69
40

96
55

_
_
_
_

-

_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

1
1

_

_ -

12
1

20
9
11
7

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_
_

12

13

12
8
4
4

2

-

-

55

14

41

_
_

_

10

~

11
11
2
9

_
_
_

_

-

-

_

_

3

11

_

-

_

-

_

-

_

_

_

_
_

_

.

_"L
_

_

_

-

-

..

-

_

Hours refleot the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

P 'fU O ^Q dd4 aH al Q * td *7* c A h £ cc U O c C U fw J iA H d

Table A-2:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, February 1953)

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

A verage
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
Weekly
Weekly leader 57.50
earnings
and
(Standard) (Standard) 57.50 under
60.00

$
$
$
60.00 62.50 65.00

67.50

S
$
s
$
$
$
s
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 L05.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 L25.00 130.00 135.00 140.00

65.00 67.50

70.00

72.50

75.00

62.50

80.00 85.00

90.00

95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00

Men
Draftsmen, chief .............................
Manufacturing .............................

129
91

40.0
40.0

*
116.00
120.56

-

Draftsmen ....................................
Manufacturing .............................

1,377
1,038

40.0
40.0

90.00
87.50

-

Draftsmen, junior ............................
Manufacturing .............................

483
408

40.0
40.0

72.00
69.50

391
--- 52
64

40.0
46.0
40.0

74.50
7V.O075.50

-

-

-

-

“

-

3
3

4
4

19
9

-

-

13
3

6
6

9
9

12
~

20
18

1
“

6
6

_

_

-

-

3
3

9
8

4
4

108
107

50
47

120
110

221
210

24?
200

124
98

80
65

174
70

81
14

130
74

18
18

?
5

5
5

4
1

??
33

34
34

78
69

63
63

53
53

18
18

46
46

58
57

28
17

23
14

4
3

a
-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

4
4

21
17
4

16
12
4

11
5
6

43
41
2

4?
32
13

28
25
3

121
114
7

68
59
9

21
14
7

2
2

-

-

2
2

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

2

13
13

21
20

-

-

-

-

_

-

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) ....... .......
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ..................... .

1/

T

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




NOTE:

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Data for nonmanufacturing do not include information for department stores; the remainder of retail
trade is appropriately represented in data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.
"Motion pictures" refers to motion picture production establishments (Group 7811) as defined in the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.

7
Table A-3:

M

a in t e n a n c e

G * t d P o W & t P l a n t C h C 4 4 fu U U m i

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, February 1953)

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

Occupation and industry division

Aeae
vrg
hul
ory
erig
anns

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90
and
under
1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.65 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 over
$

*
Carpenters, maintenance .................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing.... ................

2.10
2.21

Electricians, maintenance ...............
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing....................
Motion pictures ...................
Engineers, stationary ...................
Manufacturing.......................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Services (excluding motion pictures) .
.

2.05

66

Motion pictures .............. .

1.356
932
424

2.128
1,760
368
168

2.23
2.19
2.45
2.75

12
12

2.07
2.75

854
455“
389
139

_

-

-

_
_
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

2.18
2.17
2.19
2.14

-

-

1.85

_

_

-

•
_

-

_

_

_

41
15
26

7

6
1

1
6
--1

F

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_
-

_

2

38

-

-

8
8

33
15
18

91
52
39

98
82
16

12
121

12
12
217

201

89

105
16

16

13

Firemen, stationary boiler ...............
Manufacturing.... ...................

259
. 155
.

1.86

“

-

-

-

-

Helpers, trades, maintenance .............
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing..... ..............

2.552
1,884

1.77
1.82
1.64

34
15
19

104

81
15

1
1

20

Machine-tool operators, toolroom .........
Manufacturing................ .......

1.187
_ M«'l

2.23

1,161
147
46

-

_
_

3
3

66
32
34
4

124
118

6
2

_
-

21
21

-

-

-

_

19
18

21
21

-

1
1

20
20
20

4
4

19
19

52
9

41
15

117
93
24

83

£6

84
6

17

24

1
1
1

2.43
2.14

P
6
7

Machinists, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * .... ............
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) .... .
Manufacturing ...................................................................
Nonsianufacturing ............................................................
PiiKI 4n
WiAlmaftl* f

*

668

1.982
437
1,545
1 149

2.20

2.10
2.08
2.11

104

_

66

_

_

_

23
3

_

_

_

_

-

Mechanics, maintenance .....................................................
Manufacturing ...................................................................
Nonmanufacturing..................................................

1.917
1,787
130
52

2.04
2.03
2.04

1.98

Millwright.............................
Manufacturing.......................

457
452
369
336

1.71
1.70

_

1,013

2.07
2.05
2.13

261
71

2.01

96
73
23

8? 246
78 210
11 36

339
311
28

13 121
13 “ T O
19
6
-

284
HT
170
7

55

2

53
53
_

1
1

\

_
-

2
2
2

o
_
_

1?
5
8
6

182

20

162

35
24

11

^8
32
16
12

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

62
57
5

K

18
18
-

31
27
4

2

85
84

1

50
50
-

61
52
9
6

-

-

-

.
.
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_
_
-

3
3

15
9

15
15

103
99

_
_

13

-

_
-

-

13

-

60
59
24
24
-

62
61

20
12
8

12
11

13

65

21
20
60

-

47
13

102
37
15

71
3

10

8

5
5

49
35
1?9

-

-

-

341
341

285
285

5

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

-

3

3

-

-

-

_

-

82
74

158
87
71
32

155
115
40

154
144

74
73

2
2

16
1

_

36

-

37
31

127
119

232

-

-

51
45

127

9
9
-

-

-

42
46
42 -

6
&

«.

8
1

1
1
1*

42
42

18
18

21

8
8

-

-

?

-

15
15

~

38

12
31
27 --- X
6
4

_

2.32
2.32

2
2

4
4

27

18

-

1.521
1,512

10
8
2

4

-

-

-

5

_

26

_
-

-

_

12

_

11
1

-

-

27

_

-

_
“

_

2.13

_

11
112

239
228

4
-

"

-

_

146

_

542
524
18

29
3

-

5
90
18
72

_

36
35

_

129

77
-

77

6
6

_

9

_

715
572

92
131
64
40

-

15
15
-

_

17

_

22?

132

54
54
“

-

_

12

_

117
4
4

616
570
46
28

9
9

1

2.18




-

6
6

166

NOTE:

-

-

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance .........
Tool-end-die makers ....................
Manufacturing .......................

-

-

-

21
102

-

14
-

_

4
4
4

298

2.18
2.09
2.43

_
-

_
-

-

19

107

301
219
82

18

27
27
14

2

14
14

Plumbers, maintenance ....... ............
Manufacturing.......................
NonmanufacturLng ....................

14

19

847

2.14

2.20

19
19
-

71

-

190
53
137

28
24

221 51
1ST -- 3*
60 15
22
-

868

28
74

46
28
18

27
_

39
39
-

-

121

27
_

6

19
17

-

159

312
293
19
g

_
“

6?
68
1

_

90
77
13
13

266
43
16

~

40
34

939

_

30
30
-

309

-

29

_

436
436

150
143
7

-

203
14
189
168

42

22
10

-

11

85
85

g

_
-

0

_

61
37
24

129

_
-

6

_

980
979
1

92
459
353
15

_ 20
_
70

66

48 ____ 4

_

51
37
14

158
1
1

?2
10
22

27

-

10

226
204

-

31
31

514
405

iiii

60

15

25
25

Pipefitters, maintenance ................
Manufacturing .......................

VAmifttAfmH np

231
171

18
4

2.18
2.18

Oilers ................................
Manufacturing ..... ..................

15
15

1
1

_

_

%

_

2.08
2.15

Painters, maintenance ...................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
PiiKI 4*
am * f
. .

300

26
25

210

A
m

76

62 220
80
14
2 18

2.22
2.22

1.308

_

_
-

6

15

120

7

298

10
3

232

k
S

174
174

277
277

1

-

-

-

36

2
2

-

4
-

-

-

-

48
48

•
”

_
-

_

15

15

.

-

-

5
5

**

10
9

763
763

166
166

2

s
-~
-

17
17

-

-

U

35

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., February 1953

Data for nonmanufacturing do not include information for department stores; the remainder of retail
trade is appropriately represented in data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.
"Motion pictures" refers to motion picture production establishments (Group 7811) as defined in the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8
G u & ta d u z l, 7 V aAe Jw 4 € 4 4 4 U p ,G *td S A ift fU n f O cC H fu U iO H l

Table A-4:

Iob

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in
Angeles, Calif., by industry division, February 1953)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

A e a e Under
vrg
hul
ory
erig *
anns
0.95

Crane operators, electric bridge
(under 20 tons) .......................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ....................

513
304
209
190

$
1.83
1.82
1.86
1.85

Crane operators, electric bridge
(20 tons and over) ....................
Manufacturing.... ...................

201
200
2,628
1,925
703
95
436

1.74
1.73
1.77
1.44
1.89

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ......
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Pl' I< i+Illt.faa # ,,
ui} • i.
1.t,r.,r (
Wholesale trade ...................
** ........ r...... r.T t
l
Services (excluding motion
pictures) .......................
Motion pictures ...................

9,061
3,950
5,111
580
458
903

1.39
1.50
1.29
i A;
*
1.49
1.15

140
12
128

2,051
317

1.19
1.63

128

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ....
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
VKa ImIoIa
1
(
FI
.... , _T ,
,
Motion pictures................. .

2.623
394
2,229
75
839
84

1.17
1.42
1.13
1.29
1.07
1*63

Laborers, material handling 3/ ............
Manufacturing........................
Nonmanufacturing ............ .........
P i l1< u-MUtla* * __T__t....... t
ih ■
»
T
Wholesale trade ...................

9,792
5,283
4,509
985
1,494

1.65
1.67
1.63
1.67
l’6l
.

Order fillers ..........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ........ ......... .

3,370
831
2,539
1,679

1.70
1.72
1.70
1.65

Packers, class A (men) ...................
Manufacturing ........................

2,001
244

1.63
1.73

Packers, class B (men) ...................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

1.344
851
493
4

1.60
1.62
1.56
1 .;
J cq
-?
7

1.830
1,584

1.58
1.58

% %

$
$
$
$
$
$
t
$
1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
and
1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 over
1

2.06
2.06

Guards ................................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ................... .
Finance * * ........................
Motion pictures ...................

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70
and
under
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75

,
.
.

noI
a.H
nmt

Packers, class B (women) .................
Manufacturing ........................

H
O
S

-

-

-




-

-

_

_

3
3

2
2
2

2
_
2
2

70
39
31
31

11

22
18
4
4

-

64
1
63

-

-

230
12
218

-

450
97
353

_
-

229
35
194

L

268

11
42

63

150

35

101

15
44
37

10

6

10

6

401
3
398

65 1408
2
37
63 1371
■
a
27 310

122
13
109
7
97

_

396

J

11
11

222 1825
25
95
197 1730
7c 0

8
57

_

-

25
13
12
4

68
58
10
10

_
_
_
-

89
74
15
15

27
27
_

10
6
4
4

1
1
_
~

1?
11
2
2

28
22
6
6

64

74
48

26

26

218
123
95
95

10
6
4

~

”

26
26

36
36

26
26

_

498 664
498 “ 564"
_
_
-

51
51
-

-

-

“

“

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

50
10
40
40

16
6
10
-

_
~

15

_
-

34
34

_
_
-

469
28
441
15
408

38
38
-

27
27
-

73
68
5
~

15
15

13

-

87
80
7
3

422 1333
313 790
109
543
1
57
19

654
483
171
17
.
58

869
555
314

185
170
15
_
-

15

723
243
480
67
54

428
416
12
g
4

194
149
45
1
44

62
60
2

100
3

26
11
15

50
50
_

8
8

_
-

-

_

3

15

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

8

-

-

~

231
93
138

/,«
*+00

25
11

318
81
237
3A
37
18

1175

85

144

13

27

-

35

8

42
317

88
11
77

55
23
32
OQ

40

72
40
32

40
40
■
-

59
57
2

97
97
-

62

62

1

4
17

103

98
9
89

369
171
198

X
(O
5

L

40

£

342
251
91
00

5

33

o
x
31

n i *
% o X <+
r +
L
0

70

-

-

-

-

84

55

-

-

4

11

3

4

11

31
31

100
100

57“
28

16
16

-

-

4

24

12

28

16

_
“

-

18
_
18
6

-

8
_
8
8

3

-

W
h22r m 154~
~ r52r\
s
85

4

182
145
37
21
16

173

22

■
a
29

84

211 1371
190 648
21 723
1
3
20 212

809 1130 1787 1285
540 567 328 751
269
563 1459 534
18 157 613 16c
237 257 177 282

7
7

-

14
14

30

83

30

83
19

76
22
54
54

89
22
67
39

110
57
53
53

101
22
79
79

79
33
46
46

178
37
141
141

55
26
29
25

6

-

33

3

50

40

52

10
6

Vf
12

405
3

7
7

260
102
158
x?u

474
403
71
7X
1
f

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12
-

15

-

15

15
15
-

129
129

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
»* Finance, insurance, and real estate.
NOTE:

-

79
78

-

l?
15
15
X?

-

9i
91

120
120

18
18

992
875
117

259
252
7

441
258
183

10
10

220
131
89

83
67
16

_

_

-

-

-

-

25

48

4

17

~

60

-

-

-

"

154
148
6
6

615
132
483
21

136
91
45
36

213
6
207
75

192
45
147
70

-

_
-

_
-

~

75
75

4
4

1
-

..

“

-

-

“

~

3

290
38
252
252

6i6
72
544
544

74
62
12
12

21 1138
21
23

92
84

16

I65
70
95

50
50

253
18
235
193

173
40
133
i-aa

105 1084
105 868

27
152
152

7
0
qc

253
253

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Data far nonmanufacturing do not include information for department stores; the remainder of retail
trade is appropriately represented in data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.
"Motion pictures" refers to motion picture production establishments (Group 7811) as defined in the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.

_

380
250
130

3

3

9

Table A-4:

Q u rio d u U , 7i/G /ieJu U 4A 4H X f,G 4id S A lp fU H f
(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Los Angeles, Calif., by industry division, February 1953)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Wres
okr

Receiving clerks........ ................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ....................

929
399
530
293

ShiDDina clerks .........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ....................

922
570
352
291

Shipping-and-receiving clerks .............
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade ....................
Truck drivers, light (under li tons) .... .
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Motion pictures ... ................
Truck drivers, medium (li to and
_ including 4 tons) ...... ...............
_
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ............ ........
Motion pictures ....................
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer tvoe) .........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
WUaI
a + rm
i
Motion pictures ................... .
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
other than trailer tyne) ...............
Manufacturing.................. ......
VkAlmealm fefWm
*l
....
Motion pictures ....................
Truckers, power (fork-lift) ...............
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) .....
Manufacturing ........................
Watchmen..................... .........
Manufacturing........................
V4mamas 4M
...
Services (excluding motion pictures) ...
Motion pictures ....................
1/
2/
2/
**

1,016
698
318
179
2,173
494
1,679
147

3.414

1,161

2,253
793
115

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
A e a e jjn e $
vrg
d r 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00
hul
ory
erig
anns
and
0.95 under
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10
*
21
2 23
6 17 24 37 89 30 54 96 102 58 36 59 64 113 59
1.73
5
12
1.72
1 33 41
6 28 60 27 50 36 35 19 15 24
_
2 23
6 17 23
98
48
26
8
9
5
36
1.73
4
35
24
75
24
45
2
2 17 23
2
2 15
40
8 35 74
8
10
1.65
4
24
3
3
”

~

1.81

1.86

1.74
1.71
1.77
1.76
1.80
1.87

-

_
-

6
6

1.80

1.66

-

1.84
2.19

“

“

_
-

_
-

.
-

2
2

-

-

-

4
4

2
2
2

-

_
-

_
-

-

15
15

4
4

3
3

4
4

4
4
-

12
-

3
3

16
4
12
12
8
8

-

31
30

1

-

-

14

12
2

- —
-

19
4
15

19
3
16

53
35
18
18
14
r

6
6

16
15

1

41

12

29
29

W

43

14
14

66
32
34

49
34
15
15

34
9
25
4

35
28
7
-

89
72
17
17

104
64
40

109
86
23

54
40
14
14

61
59
2

141
54
87

86

149
55
94

-

6

27
26
1

57
40
17

99
67
32
32

23
19
4
-

11? 200

26
20
16

26

102

-

78
24
24

46

26

119
83
36
26

61

94
19
19

197
3
3

52
19
33
15

50
18
32
27

64
59
5
_

911

227
50
177

5
5
-

52

1
1
2
6

214

46

106

208

121

790

6

61

60
6

2.20 2.30

1.91
1.89
1.91
1.93
2.19

_
-

1.87
1.90
1.87
1.97
2.19

_

_
-

_
-

14
14

_
-

1
1

11
8
3

1
1

-

6
6

-

10
8
2

54
48

6

14
9
5

3
3

62
49
13

32

57
49

8

141
14
127
125

32
30

-

24
24

_ 1065
_
7

266 1013
100 n o
166 903
96
142

143
132
n
-

178
106
72
-

250

2n

244

250
7

170
41

I65
49

116

-

779
401
378
173

$
$
2.30 2.40
and
2.40 over
17
17
17

?
3
_

17
4

3

2

19
19
-

?
3
-

26
17
9
9

17
14
3
3

-

5
5
-

5
5
4

62
22

40

166
166

9
9
-

21

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

48
24
24

_
-

_
_
-

-

-

-

12
4
8

_
_

_
-

-

-

-

-

4?
45
-

-

-

-

-

-

*

_

_
-

-

-.

_
“

_
~

147

464
78
386
227
n5

~

'
2.442
319
2,123
276

61

1.526
371
1,155

870

67
1,996

500
210
1.066
392
• 914
501

2.00
2.03

'

_

•

_

—

_

—

_

_

—

_

_

-

.
.

12
12

_

•

_
-

6

—

1.89

6

M
,
-

55

55

1058

2
2

5

5

1.80
1.77
1.91
1.87

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

_
-

45
45

29
17

1.83
1.71

1.46

413

1.53
1.38

10 1

1 .1 0

82
76

1.35
1.72

24
24

84

11

68

11

16

26
24

3

39
4
35
26
9

2
2

-

16
16
6

_

16

50

-

22

16

28

14

12

15

5
5
4

48
44
4
4

66
35
31
2

3

44
43
1
1

82

6
3

19
19

4o
38

2
2

22
22
114
75
39
4
2

“

3
3
-

101

5

96
96

2.05
2.19

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to m e n workers except where otherwise indicated.
Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous study.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




8
8
8

8
$
2.10 2.20

a
(
O

177
27
A?U

151

102

L
Q

H7
48

22
222

88
64
O.
J

_
-

174
36
1.?o
xTO
135

289
18
271
nft

153
xpj
153

6

10

186
154
32

331
331
-

Q

188
143
45
36

237
214
23

258
245
13
9

208
37
171

143
38
1C5
95

108
15
93
30

49
49

6?
63

34
34

31
31

50
50

86
86

12
12

670

14
“

6
6

8

100

21

-

32
26

99
99

18

35

60
40

21

6

2

~

63
57
&

8
2

97
87

7

22

22

_

-

12
6

_

22

35
_
35

296
39
257
HO
61

602
67
COt
AOt
f
H^O
67

20
20

16

8

16

8

_
_
-

16

8

_

“

10

B: Characteristic Industry Occupations
T&bie B-2333:

llfamett'A a n d Midded' 2>*edded 1
/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

earnings
2/
4

M^n ...........

attested

- ■

4,476
657
3,819

*
0.85

4

4
0.90

0.95

4
1.00 1.05

1.95

1
1
4
r
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25

1.10 1.15 1.29 1.25

.95

1.99

34

88

102

2

4
84

15
87

77
4
73

234
18
216

107

-

5

5
4

5
7

4
4
4

22

3

13

4

8

10

4
4

2.47
1.14
1.94
2.44
1.65

.99

74
14
60

1.66
2.22
1.56

234
105
340
125
215
50
165
518

4
4
0.75 0.80
and
under
.30
*45

7
7

4

8

10

2
2

7

4

32

109

230

2

9
221

154

1.35

1.40

1.45

310
26
284

170
30

167

17/

140

162

169

4

10

1.30

154
4
150

164

4
1.50

$
1.55

*

$

1.60

1.65

$
1.70

1
4
1.95 2.00

2.05

1.50_ 1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05

2.10

K
J

112
«

!
4
*
1
1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45

27

3

8

2
9

10

4
4

9

5

127

122

219
36
183

J

107

5

157
17

i0

140

°7

108

O
<
10b

$
1.75

4
1.80

iyJ
J41
--

/u

2
68

18
190

4
1.85

4
1.90

4

A iy
'S
lO
J
1
l

1AO
18
1O

AC
OP
£
*Q
7
»7

op

ino

^
iP
nt
r

88

14

X
2
12
3
9

2

14

n

60
3

57
2/

QSCWgUoflg

Cutters and markers (227 men and
Inspectors, final (examiners) (women) 3a/ ...
Men

................ '.............

Time ..............................
InftAntiva ...... ............ ......
Sewers, hand (finishers) (3 men, 515 women)..
Time .................................
Insentlyn..... T.... t.............. .
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand
(tailor) system (men «nH women) .........
Men 3] / ..............................
b
Women ............................... .
Time ..............................
Incentive ........................ .
Thread trimmers (cleaners)
imyi st ^ O Y i
t C X ^rmion|
/ ■ ii
ii■
Vnrlr Hls r h i / r i (unman) 3e/ --TtTI-TTT-ITtt
llitif

156

362
1,857
37

1,820
43

2
_

1.20
1.79
1.32

4
3

10

18

10

16

6

55

3
11

34

1.62
1.73

1.11

1.01

27
17

10

25
15

23

8
8

10

16
39

20

25

59

43

63

18

20

57

43

63
l

10

18

20

25
l
24

55

■
Ja

1

1.74
2.04
1.73

204
17

1

8
2
6

14

1.18
1.38

1,777

4
3

1

3
13
4
9
4
5
32
19
13

Ol

16

10

51

23

2

43

6
4

2

62

8
2
6
2

30
19

74

4
73
A
69

70
■
a
67

Ol

1

2

C
J

00
<j£,
/
•¥

*
2.30 2.35

$
2.40

4
2.45

2.50

2.60

4
2.70

2.80

2.A5

2.50

2.60 2.70

2.80

7
f
/
*»
•

2

7

1
30
4

19

17

7

19
4

17

13

26

18

76

80 . 52

69

35

71

2

4

76
i
75

78

48

69

35

77

48

69

35

71
i
70

5

12
18

6
6

13

3
10

2

1

9
1
1

39

85

58

2

4
86
86
•
a

10
1

b

11

6

2

_

50

1

3

1
2

2
59

*
¥

49

2

2

39

83

56

59

50

49

83

37

83

56

59

41

49

3.00

1
1
1
•
*
$
I
3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70

3.80

4

♦
3.90

4
4
1
1
4.00 4.10 4.20 4.30

3.10

2.90

1

8
10
20

7

96
i
95

53
a
50

13

67

17

_
18
1

24

2

46
i
45

1

22
4

n
JL
J
19

96

55

73

18

_
7

24

10
28

16

2
2
13

9
31
7

38

46

2
17

6
7
1
6
11
3
8

10
1

8

11

11

4

_

5
5
5
26
2
3

1

4

4
56
18
38

27

68
68

2
2

6

3.20

3.30

3.ZO

3.50

3.60

3.80

3.90

A.00

A .10 A .20 A.30

and
over

48
24
24

20
10
10

15

22

21
12
9

26
21
5

6

12
6
6

8
4
4

17

6

10
4
6

4

6

4
2

8

_
_

.
2

_
10

_

8

-

-

-

0

9

c
?

1

1

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
4
2.10 2.15
4

2.15

All n fn . onnumMonfli
l lt

.
Total....... . ...
Men .............................

Unman __________ ________ ______

Cutters and markers (227 men and 7 women) 3ft/
Inspectors, final (examiners) (women) 3ft/ •••• ..... ...
PrAAflorfi. hand fmnn onA unman) .......
Wan 3b/ ...............................................

67
9
58

TnnorvMt a ________________ _____....
r
hand
man^ * unmAn|
1

(( iiii

TnnanM v e ______________ .................................

57
5
52

9

40
4
36

4

1

6
6
2
2

1

1

♦

1

$

30

8
4
4

84
44
40

25

41
23
18

34
17
17

2
22

39

1
10

Time ..................................................
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand
avfltAm fmAn « r unman!_________
ni
Men 2 k / ...............................................

2.20

$
2.25

2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35

1
1

Time ............................... ........ .......

*

10

14

15

2

27

5

_
_

1

5
5

1

_
_

14

4
4

18

1
-

4
/

*
•
4

43

-

1
-

1

2
2

24

119
47
72

10
4

-

1

2
2

25
15

22
12

10

32

12

8

11

9

6

6

10
6

6

6

4
4

_
_
_

11
11

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
3
8
2
6

17

4

2

4

4
’

28

4
*
2.90

14
14

51
19
32

4

2

2

12
18

1

4

2

2

Tfa+<
n»n.

...... ... ...___________

Thread trimmers (cleaners) (1 man and 203 women) 2&/ ...
Work distributors (women 3ft/ ........................

y
7
j

2

16

2

-

40

43

26

22

27

16

16

21

35

13

26

14

10

8
43

26

22
3

19

4
12

14

21

35

13

26

34

10

40

43

26

19

19

12

14

21

34

13

26

14

10

2
1

-

-

-

8

6

7

4

16

8

6

1
6

4

16

8

6

6

s

9

2

_

2

_
_

“

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

6

4

2

4

6

6

4

2

4

6

—

6

4

2

4

6

4

1

4

10
.

2

40
Time ............................... ....... ......

7
8

3.70

:

:

2
2

6

4
4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

’

The stidy covered regular (inside) and contract shops employing 8 or mare workers engaged in the manufacture of women's and misses' dresses (Group 2333) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing housedresses, aprons, smocks, hoovers, and nurses* and maids' uniforms (Group 2334) were excluded from the study. Data relate to an August 1952 pay­
roll period.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., February 1953
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT (F LABCR
1/ Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




1
1

Table B-25U:

W ood dfa/uUtuAe* (otJt&i tUan fyspUol&teoad) 1/
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

N u m b er
of
W o rk ers

Occupation and sex

A v erag e
h ou rly
earn in g s

2/
All plant occupations:

Total ...............
M e n .............

2,831
2,673
xpo

*
1.59
1.59
1 lQ
i

$
$
$
Under 1.10 1.15 1.20
and
*
1.10
1.20 1.25

1*
1*

2
2

108
1*0 106
7
2
9

17
*

$
$
$
.*
1.25 1.30 1.35 1 1 0

$

It3Q. 1.35 1.L0

iJ5
.t

21* 231*
21* 220

373
350

8*
1

68

16

Ui
XI*

O

1 .1*5

$

$

$

$

$

1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 *2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 *2.20 *2.25 *2.30 *2.35

1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65
236 11*7 11*2 502
208 11*1 11*0 1 7
*2
3
O
an
26
C

1.70 1*75
151
129
00
cc

172
172

1.80 1.85

and

1.90 1.95

2.00

2.05

2.10

2.15

2.20

2.25

2.30

28
26

63
63

11
11

10
10

12
12

9

9

9

9

-

_

_

_

2

_

138

17
*
17
*

62

200
200

2

3

2

2

2

16

26
2

2
1

2.35 over

2

11*2

6*
1

2
2

8
8

Selected Plant Occupations

M
en
Assemblers, case goods .....................
Cut-off-saw operators •....................

Hi2
Ui
69

I*
f

Maintenance men, general utility...........

32
li
l7

61
91
12U
236

Shaper operators, hand, set-up and operate

. . .

62
TYI

1.65
1.61
1.71

_

_

_

_

_

_

7

1.60

1.89
1.38
1.55
x.57
l.70
1 .L6
1.87
X.

17

3

2

7*
1
O
c

51

10

-

_

-

-

9

2

2
1*
1
,
u
2
3
3

63

3
-

6

-

3
3

8

10

1
,
U

7
3
3

-

3

10

07

0
7

5

1*6
26

53

-

3

17

7*
1
30
7

19

c;

12
16
12
3

12
-

22

2
2

2
n

2
1

3

16
12

_

1*

_

1

3

3

1

-

_

1
10

7

2

-

-

_

1

1

15

l
*

3

22
1**
1

_

_

Women
a.
)

1 .1*6

5

26

0
c

1/ The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of wood household and office furniture (Groups 2511 and 2521) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual (
191*5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Establishments primarily engaged in the manufacture of upholstered furniture, and reed and rattan furniture were excluded from the study. Data relate to a July 1952
payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium p ^ for overtime and night work} all or a majority of workers in each occupation shown were paid on a time basis.

Table B-2851:

P cU *lt& >

Q*ld T gO UUoI
J h

\J

1/ The study covered establishments employing 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of paints, varnishes, lacquers, japans, enamels, and shellac (Group 2851) as defined in the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual (191*5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a June 1$52 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all workers in the occupations reported were paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, Calif., February 1953




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12

Table B-35:

Number
of
Workers

Occupation and sex 2/

Average
hourly
earnings
3/

M a chinery 1*/

$

s

Under 1 .1 $ 1 . 2 0
and
under
1 .2 0 1.25

tw

$

$

$

1.25

1.30

1.35

1 .1*0

$
1.1*5

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$

1.50

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1.55

1 .6 0

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2 *00

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .1*0

2.50

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

250

1,A1

1.30

105

Till

5

1 *1*0

1*1*5

i*5o

2

28
32

33

1*55

1*60

1 *6 $

1 ,7 0

35

26
8

177

182

2

55
1*7

206

121
351
121*
Inspectors, class B ( w o m e n ) ...... *............

22

/ . . ...............................

Machine-tool operators, production,
Class A 6
Automatic-lathe operators, class A *.......
Drill-press operators, radial, class A ....
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class A ........... .
Engine-lathe operators, class A ..••••*••••
Qrinding-machlne operators, class A *•••..*
Milling-machine operatoriij el,sg A t.,r.rrT
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class A ............

/ .................................... ............................................

Machine-tool operators, production,
class
6 ....................................
Drill-press operators, radial, class B ....
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class B ................
Engine-lathe operators, class B ...........
Qrinding-machlne operators, class B .......
_
Milltng-maehins operators, class R . . t . _ T

/

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class

B ....................... .

Machine-tool operators, production,
class
(vcmen) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T. . T
T

B

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 6
.....................
.
Drill-press operators, radial, class C ....
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class C ...... ....... .
Engine-lathe operators, class C ...........
(HrMHn g ^ M f i h i n g operators, class C •••••»•
Milling-machine operators, class C
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class C ••••••••••••

/ ...........

......................

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C (women) ............. .................
Machine-tool operators, toolroom . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M b c K I tvI « + .« j
cm t i m r i t i i t r i - t i t n i i i i
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jchhing *hftp*)
Tool-and-die makers (other than
tnnl . s n H . H ^ m j f t h M « jt ehnpn ) r » r * t t i i i i » n i M
Welders, hand,class A • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • * •
.....................................................
Welders, hand,class

B .

See footnotes at end of table,




................

1.69

6

1*38
2 .2 2
2 ,0 1

17

1

7

21*

21*

37

19
15

H*

13

8

66
10

3

■ JO

1*75

1 .8 0

1*9
l8l
61

131*
15

n

1.85 _ 1.90

1*6
75

2
2

1.51*

-

“

-

2,266
150
118

2*05

-

-

-

-

89
1*96
306
200

1.86
2*05
2.11*
2*07

358

1.77
1.76

202
301*
286
2**
11

1.73
1.79
1.80
1*79

170

1
21
7
28

2

9

16
15

2
2

25
31

0

129

29

15

79
23

21

1*2

38

38
35

-

-

-

1
*

6

7

1.78

33

35

2

2

2.06

1,781*
136

_

27

8
1
5
12

ll*

1.60

It
8

6

26
25

-

3

2 .1 1

1
*
-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

6

7

2

5

-

.

-

-

•

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

17

-

1

3

3

12

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.1*8
1.65
1.57
1.59

-

95

1.66

-

131
227
893

1.53
2,19

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

•
-

7

105

53

29

2
1
*
1

78
2
1

27
2

3
-

1*5

6
-

5

3

2

1
*

8

276
1
*

12

1*0

69

2

1

-

2

-

38

91*

118

5
7

253
9
50

11*1
*

5

1
2
2

2.80

2 ,3 0

79
11

ill
A**
Jt

17

8

11*0

1*9

31

30
2

13
80
29

61

3
38
67

55

12
15
1*7
20

1*3
36
21*
11
**

6
17
8
20

6

65
67
88

3

50

16

23

28

11

3

2

2

2

It

1

95

107
8

128
2

25

1
*
8

52
8
12

.

_
•

_
.

2.80

over

18

2

15

11

12
8

5

33
19
£

•

5

_

_

•

1*0

1

_
-

20

1
*
|
|

■
9a

20

5
2
8
1
10

.

5

.

9
1

2

_

1

_

•

5

3

5

2

-

-

-

5

5

_

_

_

5

_
_
5

-

-

-

2

11
2
12
17

21

2,70

1

60

.

_

6

1
71
10
12

63

11
6
18

„

7
1*0
51*
1*7

36

_

_
_
.

7
185
79

21*

89
1

.

5

31

286
22

10
10

67

7

5

n

183
17

82
10
.

1*6

11
32

270
22

8

3
1

27
31
20
18

399
19

<
7
f

162

5

207
38

1.
u

270
15
2

1*5
7
6

159
10

2 *60

637
59
37

6

65

2 , $0

2

11
JO

2 *l*o

2

51
1
*
6

37
2

10

_

_

-

-

-

-

“

-

1

1
*

7

1

-

2

13

15

12

19

1
*

11

1
*

9

5

2
9
5

25

5
1

6

7

5

27

10

35

9

2

11

32

1

1

9

1
*

.

_

,

1*6

7

7

2.37

2 .3 1

•

1*0

18

11*

ID
5

2 *?o

132

2

2.16

2.05
1.83

7

2 .1 0

3

It

-

11*

193
51
1*7
51*

1,151*
279

/0

6-J
°9

28

-

1.57
1.65

330

95

10

It

19

31*8

77
28

21
2

1.97

1

2

2

2 .0 0

8

„

2
1*
1
100

1
1
20

1*95

5

1.52

1 *56
1 .1* *
1

1*78
269

656

58
58

iJL

5

1,77

2
2
22
1
*

tu
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ...............
Laborers, material handling 5

■»

1.96
1.1*7

$
and

$
$90

B

$

M a c J u H & U f , 9 n d L u l > U & L ±J

12

52

10
13

_
2

12
11*6

11*6
21

9k
22

f
l

sw
2

.
107
AVf
1 79
Aft
9)l
tl*

9t
265
1
*

.
£8

•

•

_

8

JO
00
47

12

97C
tf>

99

£7
Of

IIO
1X7

1,0
1*7

1.9

1v l
lM

13

13

11
,,
Uu
12

*U7
39

^9

*
"

1

1a
10

9

z
1

1

3

Occupational Wage Survey, Loe Angeles, Calif*, February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

13

Table B-35*

See footnotes a t end of tab le




Maclutmtof

-G<\+J<h u b c £

H

Table B-35?

M achinery SnduAUUal 1/ -G a+ J/H ed
u
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex 2/

Number
o
f
Workers

BBT

1.20

$

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

S
1.40

$
1.45

%
1.50

$
1.55

1.60

$
1.65

%
$
1.70 1.75

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

I .65

1.70

1,7?

x

3

2
2

x

1

3
2
1
3

3

1

$
Average
hul
o r y Under 1.15
erig $
anns
and
1.15
y

3

2

2

3

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

$
$
$
S
$
$
1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10

1.80

1,8?

1.90

x
x

x

$

s
s
$
$
t
2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
and

2.00 2.10 2.20 2.10

2.40

2.<50 2.60

10

<

-

10
2
6
2

_

$

2.20 2.30

14

1.95

2.70

2.80

over

Machine-tool Accessories - Production Shops

15

12
13
Machine-tool operators, production,
k ft/
Engine-lathe operators, class A ..........
Orlading-machine operators, class A ......
Milling-machine operators, class A .......
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 6/ ...............................
Engine—lathe nperatm**. nlaaa R ,
f.T.t
Grinding-machine operators, class B _______ r
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), c la s s B r r r , , , , Tt
Machine-tool operators, production,
olass C ............................................................................................

73

%
1 74
1*67
1,53
1.51

8

2.08
2^04
2.15
2.18

114
29
52

1.70
1,81
1.71

9

1.55
2.23

12
10
21

2.38

1

1

4.

1.82

44
18

_
___

15
35

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

-

1

24

6

18

4

2
2

4

6

9

x
6

_
-

2

-

-

-

6

2

4

4.

2
7

-

n
XX

4

_
_

2

_
_

15
3
7

-

1

12
1

14

3

8

_

.

_

5

j

1
4

_

_
X

0
7

X

1
X

15

32

13
x
8

12
x

1

3

-

1

4

7

7

8

1

1

_

e.

13

4

6

2

_
2

_
_

-

-

I

_

-

_

-

_

j

5
3

/

_

2

4

2
2

3

x
x

2

-

/
4

0

8
3

-

g

_

_

_

X

3

_

_
I

“

-

-

-

5

1

0
%
2

Machine-tool Accessories - Jobbing Shops

A ssen h lera . c la s s R (vn utn) r t r r > t ?■ i ■ ■ ■ ■ r rri
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ............ ..
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 6/ ..............................

nAwl it.Vm

4

Grinding-machine operators, class A ...................
Milling-machine operators, class A .....................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 6/ ..............................
Engine-lathe operators, olass B ..........
Grinding-machine operators, olass B ......
Machine-tool operators, toolroom ............

e41V ^ 4* ■ lV 'e
^
U iiT
pI dsi 4

132
34
16

22

50

8
6
39
330

10

1.41

l’31
.

-

2

4

2

-

-

1
1

2.19
2.17
2]l9
2.28

1.73
1.81

1.86

-

r
P

50

1
10

1

1

3

5

7

4

6
1

3

8
1
-

7

1
2
X

O
7

10

*A
1
XO

3

2.34

2,37
2.*08

12

2

4

5

1/
JA
£

3

11

A
2

1

9

4

9

2

_

2

4

4

2

2

1
1
oc

11

Of

8

6

119

49

1

_

16

1 / The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers In nonelectrical machinery industries (Grot?) 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Ma n u a l (194.5 edition) prepared b y the Bu r e a u of the
Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments employing more than 7 workers were also included. Data relate to a January 1953 payroll period.
2 / Data limited to m e n w orkers except where otherwise indicated.
2 / Excludes premium pa y for overtime and night work; all or a majority of workers in each occupation reported were paid on a time basis.
Includes oi l field machinery establishments and machine-tool accessory establishments for which separate data are also presented.
5 / Title change only, f rom "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous studies.
6/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.

tj







15

Table B-7211:

Pow&i JiaundUied, y

16
C : Union

W a g e

Scales

(Minimum wage r a te s and maximum stra ig h t-tim e hours p er week agreed upon through c o lle c tiv e bargaining
between employers and tra d e unions. Rates and hours a re those in e f f e c t on dates in d ica te d . Additional
inform ation i s av a ila b le in re p o rts issu ed s e p a ra te ly f o r these individual in d u stries o r tr a d e s .)

Table C -15:

B m lduup G oH Aibuotum

Table C -27:

Table C -42:

A fo t& U b U c A

^ U a e /M

a n d a t fe lfz e A l

C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
Hours
per
per
hour _ week

B rick lay ers
$ 3 ,1 7 5
2 .5 7 0
Carpenters ....••••••••••••••............
E le c tr ic ia n s (in sid e wiremen)
and f ix tu r e hangers
3 .0 0 0
P ain ters
2 .5 6 0
3 .4 3 8
P la s te r e r s ••••••••............•••••••••••«••••••••
Plumbers .........................................................
2 .9 0 0
Building la b o re rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 .9 4 0

40
A0
40
40
40
40
40

C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
per

Hours
per
JfiSk-

Book and job shops:
Bindery w o m e n
$ 1 ,6 5 1
Bookbinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 .7 5 2
Compositors, hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 .7 5 2
E le c tro ty p e rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 .9 4 6
M a i l e r s .............................. ............................................. 2 .7 1 2
Photoengravers . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . .
_
3 .0 0 0
Press a s s is t a n t s and fe e d e rs:
C ylinder cre sse s - 1 c o l o r .............. ..
2 .3 2 7
Cylinder p resses c o lo r •••••
2 .3 8 0
P la te n p resses .....................................
1 .9 3 0
Pressmen, cy lin d e r ...................•••••••
2 .7 5 2
Pressmen, p laten ..••••..........................
2 .6 1 2
Pressmen, web - f l a t bed .............. ..
2 .7 8 4
S te re o ty p e rs:
Agreement A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 .7 5 2
Agreement B .......................................
2 .7 3 3
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work ............
2 .7 6 5
Compositors, hand - night work . . . .
2 .8 9 2
M ailers - day work ...................................
2 .4 8 9
M ailers - night work •••••••••..........
2 .5 5 6
Photoengravers - day work ...................
2 .9 0 7
Photoengravers - night work •••••••
3 .0 3 2
Pressmen, web presses - day work ••
2 .6 4 0
Pressmen, web p resses - n ight work
2 .8 6 0
Pressm en-in-charge - day w o rk ..........,
2 .8 4 0
Pressm en-in-charge - night work . . .
3 .0 7 1
S tereo typ ers - day w o rk .......... ..
2 .6 1 8
S tereo typ ers - night work . . . . . . . . .
2 .6 8 5

2

Table C-205*
___________J u ly 1 , 1952
Hours
per
W tit ■

C la s s if ic a tio n
Bread - Hand shops :
Working fo rem en .............. ............... ..................
M ixers, overmen ..................... ••••••.............
Benchmen............................................................... .
H e lp e r s ...................................................................
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Working fo rem en .....................................
Overmen, dough m ixers •••••••••••••<
Benchmen ••••••••••••••............ ••••••<
Agreement Bs
Foremen ..................... ......................
Dough m ixers, overmen, doughnut men
Machine and bench hands ............
Dough m ixers1 help ers .............. ..
T w isters, molderaen, oven
dumpers .............. ........................ ............... .
Oven fe e d e rs, ingredientmen
Maohinemen, wrapping ••••••••••••••<
Machine and bench-hand h e lp e rs ,
f lo u r dumpers, bread ra ck e rs . . . . .
Pan washers, g r e a s e r s ................... ..
Hand wrappers ....................... .......................
Conveysrmen, t a i l o r s , bun
s l i c e r s , p a c k e r s ............ .......................
Agreement C*
Foremen .................................................... ..
Overmen, m ixers, icin g m i x e r s ...........
Bench hands ...................................................
Machine o p e ra to rs, d ep o sito rs •••••<
Ingred ient s c a l e r s ............ .......................
Oven help ers « . . . ............ ......................
A u x iliary w o rk e rs .............................. ....
Packers and h e l p e r s ................................ .
Pan washers, unskilled help •••••••<
W
omen employees:
l e e r s ......................... .............................. .
Machine wrappers ..................................
Experienced help ..............................
Inexperienced help .............................




$ 2 ,0 8 9
1 .9 7 9
1 .8 3 8
1 .5 4 3

44
44
44
44

2 .2 4 5
2 .1 4 5
2 .0 5 5

40
40
40

2 .2 4 5
2 .1 4 5
2 .0 5 5
2 .0 5 5

40
40
40
40

2 .0 5 5
2 .0 5 5
1 .8 8 5

40
40
40

1 .7 3 5
1 .7 3 5
1 .7 1 5

40
40
40

1 .6 6 5

40

2 .2 4 5
2.14-5
2 .0 5 5
2 .0 5 5
1 .8 9 5
1 .7 3 5
1 .6 9 5
1 .6 4 5
1 .7 3 5

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1 .4 8 5
1 .4 3 5
1 .3 7 5
1 .2 4 5

40
40
40
40

Table C -41:

J lo o a l Vsu+Hddi

O p je /u U itU f £ # t fU o y e e l

C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
per
hour

1-man c a r s and busses:
Los Angeles T ra n sit Lin es:
F i r s t 6 months •••••••••••••••••••.......... $ 1 ,6 6 0
A fte r 6 months
1 .7 5 0
P a c if ic E l e c t r i c Railway C o .:
F i r s t 6 months ................................................
1 .7 7 0
A fte r 6 m o n th s..................................................... 1 .8 1 0
2-man c a r s :
Los Angeles T ra n sit Lin es:
F i r s t 6 m o n th s...................................... ..
1 .5 4 0
A fte r 6 months •••••••••••••••................... 1 .6 2 0
P a c if ic E l e c t r i c Railway C o .:
F i r s t 6 months •••••............ ............... •••••• 1 .6 7 0
A fte r 6 m o n th s..................................................... 1 .7 1 0
Sin gle t r a c k :
1 .7 2 0
A fte r 6 months ••••••••••••••••••••• 1 .7 6 0

Hours
per
week

40
40
48
48
40
40
48
48
48
48

C la ssifica tio n

Rate
per
hour

A irc ra ft:
D rivers - Day:
F i r s t 3 months ••••.••••••••••••••••••• $ 1 ,6 9 0
A fte r 3 months •••••••............ •••••............. 1 .8 0 0
B uild ing:
M a te ria l:
2 .0 2 0
Under 6 tons
6 - 1 0 tons ••••••............. ..................•••••• 2 .0 4 0
10 - 15 to n s .......................................................... 2 .0 9 0
15 - 2 0 to n s .......................................................... 2 .1 7 0
Sand and g ra v e l:
F l a t tru c k :
Under 5 t o n s ........................................... 1 .7 4 0
1 .8 4 0
5 to n s and over ••••••••............ ..
Truck and t r a i l e r ..................................... .. 1 .9 4 0
C on crete-m ixer t r u c k ................... ..
1 .9 4 0
4-w heel t r u c k ................................................. 1 .7 4 0
6-w heel t r u e k .................••••••••••••••
1 .7 9 0
Lumber:
2 6 ,0 0 0 pounds and under .......................... 1 .7 9 0
2 6 ,0 0 0 - 5 2 ,0 0 0 p o u n d s.......................... .. 1 .8 9 0
Over 5 2 ,0 0 0 pounds
1 .9 9 0
Ross c a r r i e r
1 .9 2 5
General:
F re ig h t:
Local h a u lin g :
1 0 8 -in ch bed o r l e s s ••••••••••••••• 1 .6 9 0
3 a x le s o r l e s s ............................................ 1 .6 9 0
4 a x le s .........................................................
1 .7 6 0
5 a x le s o r more .....................................
1 .7 9 0
H e l p e r s .............................. ...................... ..
1 .6 1 5
T ra n sfe r:
Agreement A ..................................................... 1 .6 5 0
H e l p e r s ................... •••••••••••••••• 1 .6 5 0
Agreement B ............................ ........................ 1 .2 1 0
Agreement C
1 .6 9 0
Grocery:
Wholesale:
Day:
Under 7 £ to n s ••••..........••••............... ..
1 .9 2 8
7 £ - 16 to n s •••••••••................... ..
2 .0 0 3
16 - 22 to n s ................................................... 2 .0 7 8
Over 22 to n s .................................................. 2 .1 7 8
Helpers .............................................. »•••••• 1 .8 2 8
N ight:
7 £ - 16 t o n s ......................................... ..
2 .1 0 3
Home a p p l i a n c e ..........................••••••........... ............... 1 .6 6 5
Helpers •••••••...................
1 .5 6 5
Ice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 .6 3 0
Laundry and lin e n :
F i r s t 30 days •••••.............. .................................... 1 .4 9 0
Second 3 0 days
............ ..
1 .5 4 0
T h e re a fte r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 .6 3 0
H elpers, new (9 0 days) ........................................• 1 .3 3 0
Meat:
Branch house:
T/>naT
1 .8 3 4
S a l e s .............................................................. ..
2 .2 1 0
TAno •«•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1 .8 8 7

Hours
per
week _

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

48
48
48
48
48
40
40
40
48

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Occupational Wage Survey, Los A ngeles, C a l i f ., February 1953
U .S . DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f lab o r S t a t i s t i c s

17

Table C-421

A fo t& U b U c A

a n d c J fe lp &

b l - G a n ilm

Table C -4 2 :

Rate
per
hour

Meat - Continued
Packinghouse:
Agreement A:
Local ••••••«•••••••••................... ..
♦ 1 .8 8 8
E x tr a ..................................................... ............. 2 .0 5 5
S ales ..............................................••••••••• 2 .2 1 0
Student ....................... ...................................... 2 .0 1 6
Agreement B:
L o c a l ..............................................
1 .8 4 0
Country .....................................••••••........... 1 .9 0 0
E x tr a ......................................... ..
1 .8 4 0
P ro v isio n and jobbing
house:
l £ tons o r l e s s .......... ............. ............... •« 1 .8 4 8
Over 1-J- to n s .............................. •••••••..
1 .9 1 1
S ales t r u c k .................................
1 .9 1 1
E x tr a ....................................... ........................... 1 .9 1 1
P o u ltry :
C i t y ...................................................................... 1 .6 0 0
1 .6 5 0
Country
R abbit:
S ales d r iv e rs ••••........................................ 1 .7 6 8
Buying d r iv e rs . . . . . ............ ...................... 1 .7 6 8
H elpers . . . . ............ ...........................•••••• 1 .5 9 9
M iscellan eou s:
Food:
Route salesm en:
Less than 2 months ....................... ..
A f te r 2 months ..........................••••••.••
Moving and sto ra g e ................................................ ..
H elpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O il - Tank tr u c k :
Agreement A:
T r a n s p o r t ................................ ••••••••••.•••
Agreement B :
C ity d e liv e r y - 2 ,0 0 0 g allo n s ...................
Agreement C:
T ransp ort - Over 2 ,0 0 0
g allo n s •«•••••••••••...............•••••••••




S tv U a& M

Table C 4 2 :
-

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1 .8 1 0
1 .9 6 7
1 .7 3 0
1 .5 8 0

45
45
43
48

1 .7 1 0

60

1 .8 5 0

40

2 .1 7 3

40

C la s s if ic a tio n

A fo to b A u tc A

a n d c/felpjetiA QosdtHued

J u ly 1 . 1952

________________J u ly 1 , 1952
C la s s if ic a tio n

A fo fo U U ic A

a n d < Jfe lp & U

te d

________________ Ju ly 1 , 1952___________
Rate
per
hour

O il - Tank tru ck - Continued
Agreement C - Continued
C ity d e liv e ry :
Under 2 ,0 0 0 g a llo n s:
F i r s t 6 months ....................................... ♦ 1 .9 7 9
7 - 1 2 months
2 .0 2 3
13 - 18 months •••••............. •••••• 2 .0 6 0
1 9 - 2 4 months
2 .1 0 3
2 .1 4 6
25 - 30 months ..............................•••
Agreement D:
T ransp ort - Over 2 ,0 0 0 g a llo n s •••••••• 2 .1 5 4
C ity d e liv e r y :
Under 2 ,0 0 0 g a llo n s:
1 .9 3 6
F i r s t 6 months •••••••••............
7 - 1 2 months ......................................... 2 .0 0 4
A fte r 1 y e a r •••••••••••••••••••• 2 .1 5 4
Agreement E :
T ransport - Over 2 ,0 0 0 g a l l o n s ..............
2 .0 9 1
C ity d e liv e r y :
Under 2 ,0 0 0 g a llo n s:
F i r s t 6 m o n th s..........•••..••............. 1 .8 7 8
7 - 1 2 months ••.•••••••••••••••• 1 .9 1 5
13 - 1 8 m o n th s.............. ••••••••••• 1 .9 5 8
1 9 - 2 4 months
1 .9 9 3
2 5 - 30 months ....................... ............... 2 .0 3 4
Agreement F :
Transport - Over 2 ,0 0 0 g a llo n s ................ 2 .2 2 1
C ity d e liv e r y :
Under 2 ,0 0 0 g a llo n s:
F i r s t 6 months ••••••••••••••••.. 1 .9 2 1
1 .9 5 6
7 - 1 2 months ••••••............ ••••••.
13 - 18 m o n th s..........••••••••••••« 2 .0 0 2
1 9 - 2 4 months •••.•••••••••••••• 2 .0 4 2
A fte r 2 y e a r s .............. ............... ..
2 .1 2 9
Agreement G:
C ity d e liv e ry :
Urrier 2 ,0 0 0 g a llo n s:
F i r s t 6 months ....................................... 1 .9 6 2
7 - 1 2 months ..............................••••• 1 .9 9 6
1 3 - 2 4 m on th s............ ................. ..
2 .0 8 3
2 .1 5 8
A fte r 2 y ears ......................... ..

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40

C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Paper:
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ♦ 1 .6 6 0
Box:
1 .8 3 0
Sem itruck, heavy
1 .7 7 0
B o b tail tru ck .•••••••••••••••••••••••• 1 .6 4 0
Stock and supply:
1 .6 6 0
Over 1 08-in ch Bedinen ••••••••......... ..

40

Produce:
Wholesale - General market •.••.••••••••••
Railway e x p r e s s ..................... ................................... ..

1 .8 5 0
1 .7 7 1

40
40

Rendering and red u ctio n :
Plan t d r iv e rs •••.••••••••••••••••••••••••
Buying d riv e rs •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Packinghouse pick-ups .....................••••••••••
E x tra ro u tem en ................ ..........................................
Helpers - F i r s t 3 months ••••••••••••••••.
H elpers, e x p e r ie n c e d ..................................•••••
Hides and wool ...........................................................
Sawdust

1 .9 0 0
2 .0 1 0
1 .9 0 0
1 .7 4 0
1 .6 3 0
1 .8 0 0
1 .8 6 8
1 .6 5 0

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

S o ft drink - Branch d e liv e ry :
Less than 7\ tons
Over ?£■ and l e s s than 16 t o n s ..........•••••••
Over 16 and l e s s than 22 t o n s ............••••••
Over 22 tons
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 .7 7 5
1 .8 5 0
1 .9 0 0
2 .0 2 5
1 .7 2 5

40
40
40
40
40

S te e l:
D rivers - Over Tj- tons •••••••••••••••••••
D rivers - Under ?£■ tons
B o b tail tru ck s - Under 7 £ to n s •••••••••••

1 .9 2 0
1 .7 8 0
1 .7 8 0

40
40
40

2 .1 8 5
2 .5 2 0

40
40

2 .1 8 5
2 .5 2 0

40
40

Studio:
Studio r a t e s :
Chauffeurs and tru ck d r iv e rs ••••••••••
S p ecial equipment .............. «•••••••••••••
Location r a t e s :
Chauffeurs and tru ck d riv e rs
S p ecial equipment ......................................

40
40
40
40

D sSupplementary W age Practices
Table D -lt

S J u ^ t ^ b ilfe t o n t iG l P su M A id Ja n l

1

/

Percen t of t o t a l plan t employment
(a)
By establishm ent p o licy in S h ift d if f e r e n tia l

Machinery
in d u strie s

A ll manufacturing
in d u strie s 2 /
2d s h i f t
work

3d or other
s h i f t work

(b)
A ctually working on e x tr a s h i f t s in -

2d s h i f t
work

A ll man1
ufactu ring
Indus t r i e s 2 /

3d or other
s h i f t work

2d s h i f t

3d or o th er
sh ift

2d s h i f t

3d or o th er
s h ift

A ll workers . . . . . .............................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 ,0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers in establishm ents having provisions
f o r la te s h if ts ...........................................................

9 1 .0

75.3

7 9 .3

4 9 .3

2 0 .5

4 .1

1 7 .1

1 .9

With s h if t d if f e r e n tia l .......................................

9 0 .3

7 4 .6

7 8 .5

4 9 .3

20.5

4.1

1 6 .9

1 .9

Uniform cen ts (per hour) ..............................
Under 5 cen ts ................................................
5 cen ts .............................................................
6 cen ts .............................................................
7 o r Tj- cen ts .............. .................................
8 cen ts .............................................................
9 cen ts ...........................................................
10 cen ts ...........................................................
1 2 , 12 i , 13 or 1 3 i cen ts .......................
15 c e n t s .............. ............................................
Over 15 cen ts ................................................

7 1 .8
3 .5
8 .3
9 .9
2 .1
33#9

5 9 .2
1 .3
.5
1 0 .3

33.8

1 7 .5
1 .0
1 .3
2 .0
.3
9 .6

1 .9
.4
.6
.1

1 2 .2
.3
.2
1 .6

1 .8
_
_

9 .6
3 .3
1 .2
_

2 4 .8
1 .3
*•
3 .5
2 .6
(i/)
1 .5
7 .9
2 .5
3 .3
2 .2

Uniform percentage ...........................................
5 percen t .........................................................
7 £ p ercen t ......................... ............................
10 p ercen t ......................................................
Over 10 percen t ...........................................

9 .9
6 .6
3 .3
**

8 .1
6 .1
1 .1
.9

.7
.7
-

F u ll day’ s pay f o r reduced hours ............

1 .4

1 .6

2 .6

.5

Other .........................................................................

7 .2

4 0 .1

1 6 .0

1 5 .0

With no s h if t d if f e r e n tia l ................................

.7

.7

.8

Workers in establishm ents having no
p rovision s fo r l a te s h if ts ..................................

9 .0

2 4 .7

2 0 .7

1/
ment was
covering
2/
2/

(2 /)

-

5 .2
.8
3 6 .8
1 .0
3 .3
-

-

4 .8
.3
2 .3
4 .8
1 2 .9
-

8 .7
~

_

XXX

(2 /)

1 .7
1 .0
.6

XXX

Machinery
in d u strie s

(2 /)
.2
.3
.1
.1
.1

XXX

-

1 .2
.3
7 .1
.1
1 .4
”

XXX

(2 /)

.1
.3
1 .4

(2 /)

_

(l / )

-

.2
.2
_

~

.1

.1

.5

(2 /)

1 .6

2 .0

4 .0

1 .3
1 .0
-

.3

.1
-

(2 /)
.1

-

.1

-

(2 /)

-

.2

-

5 0 .7

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

S h ift d if f e r e n tia l d ata are presented in terms o f (a ) establishm ent p o licy and (b) workers a c tu a lly employed on l a t e s h i f t s a t th e time o f the survey. An e s ta b lis h ­
considered as having a p o licy i f i t met any o f the follow ing co n d itio n s! ( l ) Operated l a t e s h i f t s a t the time of the survey, (2 ) had u n io n -co n tra ct p ro vision s
l a te s h i f t s , or (3 ) had operated la te s h if ts within 6 months p rio r to the survey,
Includes data fo r machinery in d u stries a lso shown s e p a ra te ly .
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, C a l i f . , February 1953
Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




1
9

Table D -2 :

Scheduled. lOeehlf cM u
a /U

P ercen t o f o f f i c e workers ] / employed in Weekly hours

A ll workers ............................................................................. ..
35 h o u r s ..........................................................................................
Over 35 and under 37^ hours • • • ...• .............................
37^- h o u r s .............................................................. ........................
Over 3?|- and under 40 h o u r s .................
4 0 h o u r s ............ ........................................... ..
Over 40 and under 44 hours ................................ •••••••
44 h o u r s ....................................... .............................................
Over 44 and under 4$ h o u r s ..................................... .••••
48 hours ............................................................ ..
Over 48 and under 52 hours
52 hours and over ....................................................................

P ercen t o f p la n t workers employed in -

S e rv ice s
Manu­
W holesale
P u blic
A ll
(excluding
Motion
Finance ##
tra d e
in d u s tr ie s 2/ fa c tu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
motion
p ic tu re s 2/
p ic tu r e s )
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 .7

0 .2
2 .0

0 .8
1 .6
9 5 .7
1 .4

.
2
8 .3
2 .8
8 3 .0
.2
.6
2 .8
.4
-

.
3
90.0
.1
7.4
-

.5

-

-

1 0 0 .0

1 .6
.5
1 .6
9 2 .6
.9

-

2 .8
-

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

3 .1
.
2 2 .6
9 .4
6 4 .9
-

1 4 .2
.
2 7 .1
_
5 1 .1
1 .5
2 .8
1 .5
1 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
_
1 0 0 .0
_
_
_
-

S erv ices
Manu­
A ll
P u b lic
W holesale (excluding
Motion
in d u s tr ie s j j fa c tu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
trad e
motion
p ic tu re s j j
p ictu re s )
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 .1
.5
1 .9
.1
79.8
1 .0
3 .2

1 .8
.6
2 .9

3 .9

3 .8
1 .9
2 .8

7 6 .3
1 .1
3 .8
5 .7
2 .1
1 .7
4 .0

1 0 0 .0
_
_
8 5 .0
_
_
3 .6
8 .6
2 .8

1G0.0

1 0 0 .0

_
«.
1 .6
8 2 .8
_
9 .8

1 .8
.6
_
7 5 .7
_
_
1 .6
1 9 .9
.4

5.8

_

1 0 0 .0

_

_
_
90.3
_
9 .7
_
-

-

1/
2/

Data r e l a t e to women w o rk ers.
In clu d e s d ata f o r r e t a i l tra d e (except department s to re s ) in a d d itio n to th ose in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
Lim ited to esta b lish m e n ts p rim a rily engaged in th e production o f motion p ic tu r e s (Group 7811) as defin ed in th e Standard In d u s tr ia l C la s s if ic a t io n Manual (194-9 e d itio n ) prepared by the
Bureau o f th e Budget.
lJ
In clu d e s data f o r r e a l e s t a t e ; and r e t a i l trad e (except department s to r e s ) in a d d itio n to th ose in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
*
T ra n sp o rta tio n (exclu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
**
F in a n c e , in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e .
^

T able D -3 *

P a id d to lid c u fi

P ercen t o f o f f i c e workers employed in Number o f paid h o lid a y s

A ll workers ..................................... ...................... ................. ..
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts p rov idin g
p aid h o lid ay s h J •••...................................................••••
Less than 6 days ................... ...• • • « .............................
6 days ..................................... ...................... ..........................
7 d a y s .............. ...................... .................................................
8 days ........................................................ ...............................

P ercen t o f p la n t workers employed in -

S e rv ice s
P u blic
Manu­
W holesale
A ll
Motion
Finance * * (excluding
tra d e
in d u s trie s 3/ fa c tu r in g u t i l i t i e s *
p ic tu r e s 2/
motion
p ic tu r e s )

S e rv ices
W holesale (excluding
Manu­
P u b lic
Motion
A ll
tra d e
in d u s tr ie s 2/ fa ctu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
p ic tu re s 2/
motion
p ic tu re s )

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

.......1QP*0

9 9 .7
1 .0
5 4 .9
1 1 .6
1 2 .9
.4
2 .7
1 5 .6
.6

1 0 0 .0
.1
9 1 .5
5 .8
2 .6

1 0 0 .0
.7
2 0 .4
2 .9
7 5 .6
.4
-

9 9 .8
5 .5
4 1 .4
40.C
1 2 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 .3
1 .4
6 .7
9 .8
1 1 .3
6 6 .9
2 .6

9 7 .5
4 8 .8
2 5 .3
1 6 .0
7 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

9 1 .5
1 .4
6 7 .5
1 4 .4
7 .9
.3
-

9 4 .7
1 .1
8 3 .5
6 .5
3 .6
-

8 0 .6
1 7 .1
9 .1
5 1 .5
2 .9
-

9 5 .1
4 .6
3 9 .7
3 6 .8
3 4 .0
-

8 1 .3
1 0 .4
6 8 .4
2 .1
.4
-

—

2 .5

8 .5

5 .3

1 9 .4

4 .9

1 8 .7

-

-

Workers in esta b lis h m e n ts p rov idin g
.3

“

”

-

.2

... . .1QQ*0 ...

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .C
1 0 0 .0
~

3/ In clu d e s d a ta f o r r e t a i l tra d e (except department s to r e s ) in a d d itio n to th o s e in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
1 /
Lim ited t o esta b lish m e n ts p rim a rily engaged in th e production o f motion p ic tu r e s (Group 7811) a s d efin ed in th e Standard In d u s tr ia l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n Manual (194-9 e d itio n ) prepared by th e
Bureau o f th e Budget.
2/ In clu d es d ata f o r r e a l e s t a t e ; and r e t a i l tra d e (except department s to r e s ) in a d d itio n to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s shown s e p a r a te ly .
l J
Paid h o lid a y s o f l e s s than a f u l l day have been om itted.
*
T ra n s p o rta tio n (ex clu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in a n c e , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e .
O ccupational Wage Survey, Los A ngeles, C a l i f . , February 1953
U .S. DEPARTMENT OF LAB®
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




Table D-4*

P a id 'U a c a tia + U . {ty o tm

a l P A x u d ia * iA )

P ercen t o f o f f i c e workers employed in -

V acation p o lic y

A ll workers ....................................................................................

P e rc en t o f p la n t workers employed in S e r v ic e s
S e r v ic e s
A ll
Manu­
Manu­
(excluding
A ll
Motion
P u b lic
W holesale
P u b lic
W holesale (excludin g
Finance * *
motion
tra d e
in d u s tr ie s l / fa c tu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
p ic tu re s 2/ in d u s tr ie s 2 / fa c tu r in g u t i l i t i e s *
motion
tra d e
p ic tu r e s )
p ic tu r e s )

Motion
p ic tu r e s 2/

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
2 1 .6
1 .1
6 8 .7
.3
7 .8
.2
.2
7 .4
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
1 0 .6
1 .5
7 1 .5
.1
1 6 .3
.5
1 5 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .1
7 9 .2
1 .1
1 7 .8
1 .9
1 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
4 0 .4
2 .7
5 6 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0
.3
9 7 .7
2 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .6
2 0 .5
7 7 .9
1 .2
.4
.4
-

1 0 0 .0
6 5 .6
6 5 .6
3 4 .4
3 4 .4
-

9 8 .9
7 9 .3
5 4 .4
1 .1
2 2 .7
.4
.7
1 9 .6
.7
4 .0
3 .5
1 1 .4
-

9 9 .6
7 4 .8
4 7 .9
1 .2
2 4 .8
.9
2 4 .8
.5
6 .3
4 .3
1 3 .7
-

9 7 .1
8 6 .4
6 8 .1
2 .6
1 5 .7
1 0 .7
3 .6
7 .1
-

9 5 .1
9 5 .1
6 8 .5
1 .6
2 5 .0
-

9 6 .8
9 3 .9
6 4 .6
2 1 .9
7 .4
2 .9
.9
2 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

.8
.3

.4

2 .9

4 .9

3 .2

A fte r 1 y ear o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m e n ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s ....................... ................................................
Len gth-of-tim e payment ................ ...................................
1 week ........................................... .....................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ••••...••.....................
2 w e e k s .............. ............................................ ................. ..
3 weeks and over ...........................................................
O t h e r ...........................................................................
Percentage payment i j .......................................................
Under 2 p ercen t ..............................................................
2 p e rce n t ........................................................... .. ............
Over 2 but l e s s than 4 p e rce n t ............................
4 p ercen t ...........................................................................
O ther-type p ay m en t.............. ...............................................
Workers in estab lish m e n ts providing
no paid v a ca tio n s ..................... ........................................
Inform ation n ot a v a ila b le .....................................................

-

-

-

"

'

-

-

‘

-

-

'

-

"

A fte r 2 y ears o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m e n ts providing
paid v a ca tio n s .........................................................................
Len gth-of-tim e payment ....................................................
1 week .................................. ...............................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .........................................
2 weeks ...............................................................................
3 weeks and over ...........................................................
Other ....................................................................................
Percentage payment 4/ ......................................................
Under 2 p e r c e n t .............................................................
2 p e rce n t ........................................... ...............................
Over 2 but l e s s th an 4 p e rce n t ............................
A percen t ...........................................................................
O ther-type payment ..............................................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v a ca tio n s ..................................................................
Inform ation n ot a v a ila b le .....................................................

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
6 .0
1 .3
8 4 .2
.2
7 .8
.2
.2
_
7 .4
.5
-

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
5 .0
2 .6
7 6 .1
1 6 .3
.5
1 5 .8
-

-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .1
8 .8
1 .6
8 7 .7
1 .9
1 .9
_
_
-

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T ran sp o rtatio n (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in an ce, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e .




NOTE:

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 4 .6
8 5 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0
9 8 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .6
1 4 .3
.2
8 3 .9
1 .2
.4
.4
-

2 .0

-

-

-

1 0 0 .0
6 5 .6
6 5 .6
3 4 .4
3 4 .4
-

_

9 8 .9
7 9 .3
2 4 .6
6 .2
4 8 .0
.4
.1
1 9 .6
.7
2 .6
3 .9
1 2 .4
-

9 9 .6
7 4 .8
2 9 .4
7 .3
3 8 .1
2 4 .8
.5
4 .0
4 .9
1 5 .4
-

9 7 .1
8 6 .4
2 .0
1 1 .2
7 3 .2
1 0 .7
3 .6
7 .1
-

9 5 .1
9 5 .1
3 7 .3
5 7 .8
-

9 6 .8
9 3 .9
3 0 .9
1 0 .0
4 5 .6
7 .4
2 .9
.9
2 .0
-

.8
.3

.4

2 .9

4 .9

3 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

O ccupational Wage Survey, Los A n geles, C a l i f . , February 1953
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

E stim ate s a re provided s e p a r a te ly , according to employer p r a c tic e in computing
v a ca tio n payments (le n g th -o f-tim e , p ercen ta g e, or o th e r ) ; percentage and o th e r type payments were converted to eq u iv a len t tim e p eriod s in e a r l i e r s tu d ie s .

Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

21

P a id

Table D-A*

V a c a t io n ^ t y o t m

a l P ^ a o iiio * t i) - G o * U i* u t e d

P ercen t o f o f f i c e workers employed in V acation p o lic y

A ll w o rk e rs .....................................................................................

P ercen t o f p la n t workers employed in -

S e rv ice s
Services
A ll
A ll
Manu­
Public
Wholesale
Manu­
Motion
(excluding
Public
Wholesale (excluding
Finance **
trad e
motion
in d u stries 1 / fa ctu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
p ic tu re s 2 / in d u strie s 2 / fa ctu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
trad e
motion
p i c tu r e s )
p ic tu re s )
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
1 .5
.9
0 6 .5
2 .6
.2
7 .8
.2
7 .6
.5

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
2 .2
1 .8
7 7 .6
2 .1
1 6 .3
1 6 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .1
2.A
1 .1
8 5 .0
9 .6
1 .9
1 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .7
9 8 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0
9A.5
3 .5
2 .0

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .6
2 .3
9 6 .1
1 .2
.A
•A
-

1 0 0 .0
6 5 .6
6 5 .6
3A.A
3A.A
-

1 0 0 .0

Motion
p ic tu re s 2 /

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6
7A .8
1 3 .1
6 .8
5 3 .1
1 .8
2A .8
.5
2 .5
A .8
1 7 .0
-

9 7 .1
86.A
1 .3
1 1 .2
6 9 .5
A.A
1 0 .7
1 0 .7
-

9 5 .1
9 5 .1
8 .5
8 6 .6
-

9 6 .8
9 3 .9
13 .A
7 3 .1
7.A
2 .9
.9
2 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
_
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
-

.8
.3

.A
-

2 .9

A .9
-

3 .2
-

9 8 .9
7 9 .3
5 .0
6 7 .5
3 .0
2 .8
.6
.A
1 9 .6
.7
1 .1
1A.6
3 .2
-

9 9 .6
7A.8
6 .3
6 1 .2
3.A
3 .2
.7
2A .8
1 .0
1 8 .8
5 .0
-

9 7 .1
8 6 .A
79.A
2 .6
A.A
1 0 .7
1 0 .7
•
-

9 5 .1
9 5 .1
2 .2
8A.7
8 .2
_
.
_
•
-

9 6 .8
9 3 .9
7 .6
7 8 .9
_
A .6
2 .8
_
2 .9
.9
2 .0
_
-

.8
.3

.A
-

- ,
2 .9

A.9
-

3 .2
-

9 8 .9
7 9 .3
5 .0
5 9 .5
3 .9
1 0 .2
.7
1 9 .6
.7
1 .1
1A.6
3 .2
-

9 9 .6
7A.8
6 .3
5A.8
3.A
1 0 .3
2A .8
1 .0
1 8 .8
5 .0
-

9 7 .1
86.A
6 6 .3
1 5 .7
_
A.A
1 0 .7
1 0 .7
-

9 5 .1
9 5 .1
2 .2
6 6 .7
1 .6
2A.6
_
_
_
_
_

9 6 .8
9 3 .9
7 .6
7 8 .9
_
2 .1
5 .3
2 .9
.9
2 .0
_
_
_

.8
.3

.A
-

A.9

3 .2

A fter 3 y ears o f se rv ice
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
paid v acatio n s .............................. ..........................................
Length-of-tiroe payment .....................................................
I week ...................................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks . . . . . . . . . . . .................
2 weeks .......................................................... ......................
3 weeks and over ...........................................................
Other .............................................................................. ..
Percentage payment i j ............................................
Under 2 p e r c e n t .............. .................................... ..
2 p ercen t ............................................................................
Over 2 but le s s than A p ercen t ............................
A p ercen t ............................................................................
O ther-type p ay m en t............ .............................................. ..
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ............ ......................................................
Inform ation not a v a ila b le ....................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9 8 .9
7 9 .3
1 0 .1
5.A
6 1 .8
1 .9
.1
1 9 .6
.A
1 .6
A.2
13.A
-

-

A fter 5 y e a rs o f s e rv ic e
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
paid v a ca tio n s .........................................................................
L en gth -of-tim e payment ..................................... ...............
1 w e e k ............ ...................................... ...............................
2 weeks ....................... ........................... .............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................................
3 w e e k s ................................................................................
A weeks and o v e r ...........................................................
Other ..................................................................................
Percentage payment f j .......................................................
2 p ercen t o r l e s s .......................... ...............................
Over 2 but l e s s than A p e r c e n t ............ ...............
A p ercen t .................................................. ............... ..
Over A but l e s s than 6 p ercen t
O ther-type p ay m en t................................................... ..
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
no paid v a ca tio n s ..................... ...................... ..
Inform ation not av a ila b le .....................................................

3 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
.2
8 1 .5
5 .9
3 .2
.9
7 .8
( 5 /)
.2
7 .6
.5
-

1 0 0 ,0
83*7
.2
7 1 .3
8 .3
3 .9
1 6 .3
1 6 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .1
87.A
1 .1
9 .6
1 .9
1 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
•A
8 9 .2
1 0 .0
.A
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0
9 0 .8
3 .7
3 .5
2 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .6
1 .6
8 6 .5
1 .2
1 0 .3
.A
.A
-

1 0 0 .0
6 5 .6
6 5 .6
3A.A
3A.A
-

1 0 0 .0
•
•
_
1 0 0 .0
•
•
1 0 0 .0
_
_
_
-

A fter 10 y e a rs of s e rv ic e
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
paid v acatio n s ..................................... ...............................
Len gth -of-tim e payment .....................................................
1 w e e k ..................................................................................
2 weeks ..................... ............................. .............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........................................
3 w e e k s ............ ........................................... ........................
A weeks and o v e r .......................... .................................
Percentage payment ( J .......................................................
2 p ercen t or l e s s .........................................................
Over 2 but l e s s than A p e r c e n t .........................
A p e r c e n t ...........................................................................
Over A but le s s than 6 p ercen t ...........................
O ther-type p ay m en t.............................. ...............................
Workers in estab lishm ents providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ...................................................................
Inform ation no t av a ila b le ....................................................

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
.2
7 3 .5
5.A
1 1 .7
.9
7 .8
(5 /)
.2
7 .6
.5
-

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
.2
6 3 .2
8 .7
1 1 .6
1 6 .3
1 6 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .1
8 5 .8
2 .A
.3
9 .6
1 .9
1 .9
-

See fo o tn o tes a t end o f t a b l e ,
*
T ran sp ortatio n (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o th er pu blic u t i l i t i e s ,
* * F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.A
7 7 .8
2 .7
1 9 .1
~

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0
8 3 .7
3 .7
1 0 .6
2 .0
~

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .6
1 .6
7 3 .2
1 .2
2 3 .6
.A
.A
—

1 0 0 .0
6 5 .6
6 5 .6
3A.A
3A.A
-

-

2 .9

1 0 0 .0
•
_
•
_
_
1 0 0 .0
_
_
1 0 0 .0
_
_

-

22

P a id V cuxU io+U tyotom cU P axumAIo+iA ) - C ont i n u e d

Table D-Ai

P ercen t o f o f f i c e workers employed in V acation p o licy

A ll w o rk e rs ....................................................................................

|

P ercen t o f p la n t workers employed in -

S e rv ice s
S erv ices
A ll
Manu­
A ll
Public
Wholesale
(excluding
Manu­
Motion
Pu blic
Wholesale (excluding
Finance **
in d u strie s 1 / f a ctu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
tra d e
motion
p ic tu re s 2 / in d u strie s 2 / fa ctu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
motion
tra d e
n ic tu re s )
p ic tu re s )

Motion
p ic tu re s 2 /

10 0.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100To

100.0

100.0

100.0

10 0. 0

10 0. 0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9 8 .1
2 3 .1

6 5 .6
6 5 .6
3 4 .4
3 4 .4
-

9 9 .6
7 4 .8
5 .8
3 8 .0
3 .4
2 7 .6
2 4 .8

9 7 .1
8 6 .4
1 4 .4
1 1 .2
5 6 .4
4 .4
1 0 .7
1 0 .7

7 .6
.5

5 1 .6
-■
-

9 9 .6
1 .6
7 2 .1
1 .2
2 4 .7
.4
.4
-

9 5 .1
9 5 .1
2 .2
3 6 .4

6 4 .3
9 .6
1 .9
1 .9
-

9 8 .0
7 7 .5
1 7 .0
3 .5
2 .0

9 8 .9
7 9 .3
4 .7
4 1 .6
3 .4
2 8 .9
.7
1 9 .6
.7
1 .1
1 3 .0
3 .2
1 .6
-

-

5 6 .5
-

9 6 .8
9 3 .9
7 .6
7 7 .4
3 .6
5 .3
2 .9
.9
2 .0
-

1 0 0.0

8 3 .7
.2
4 7 .7
8 .7
2 7 .1
1 6 .3
1 6 .3
-

100.0
100.0

100.0

9 1 .7
.2
5 4 .1
4 .1
3 1 .6
1 .7
7 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.8
.3

.4
-

2 .9

4 .9
-

3 .2
-

9 8 .9
7 9 .3
4 .7
4 0 .0
3 .4
2 9 .8
1 .4
1 9 .6
.7
1 .1
1 3 .0
3 .2
1 .6
-

9 9 .6
7 4 .8
5 .8
3 6 .9
3 .4
2 8 .7
2 4 .8
1 .0
1 6 .3
5 .0
2 .5
-

9 7 .1
8 6 .4
7 .1
1 1 .2
6 3 .7
4 .4
1 0 .7
1 0 .7
-

9 5 .1
9 5 .1
2 .2
3 2 .7
5 7 .8
2 .4
-

9 6 .8
9 3 .9
7 .6
7 7 .4
«.
3 .6
5 .3
2 .9
.9
2 .0
-

.8
.3

.4
-

2 .9

4 .9
-

3 .2
-

9 8 .9
7 9 .3
4 .7
3 9 .3
3 .8
2 5 .8
5 .7
1 9 .6
.7
1 .1
1 3 .0
3 .2
1 .6
-

9 9 .6
7 4 .8
5 .8
3 6 .2
4 .1
2 4 .4
4 .3
2 4 .8
1 .0
1 6 .3
5 .0
2 .5
-

9 7 .1
8 6 .4
7 .1
1 1 .2
5 6 .4
1 1 .7
1 0 .7
1 0 .7
-

9 5 .1
9 5 .1
2 .2
2 7 .5
5 4 .0
1 1 .4
-

9 6 .8
9 3 .9
7 .6
7 7 .4
_
3 .6
5 .3
2 .9
.9
2 .0
•
-

.8
.3

.4

2 .9

4 .9

3 .2

A fter 15 y ears of se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid vacatio n s ........................................................................
Length-of-tim e payment .....................................................
1 week ...........................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s.............. ..........................
3 weeks ................................................................................
4 weeks and over •..•••••••••.................................
Percentage payment t j .............. ........................................
2 percent or le s s ••••••••.......................................
Over 2 but le s s than 4 p e r c e n t ............................
4 p e r c e n t ........................................... ...............................
Over 4 but le s s than 6 p e r c e n t ............ ...............
6 percent and over .......................................................
Other-type paym ent........................................................... ..
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s ..................................................................
Information not av ailab le .....................................................

(5/)
.2

1.1

.4

4 8.0

1.0
1 6 .3
5 .0
2 .5
-

-

1 00.0
-

10 0. 0
-

A fter 20 y ears o f se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid vacatio n s .........................................................................
Length-of-tim e paym ent....................................................
1 week ................ ............... ........................ ........................
2 weeks ............................................. .................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..........................................
3 w e e k s...............................................................................
4 weeks and o v e r .................................. ........................
Percentage payment i j ......................................................
2 percent or l e s s .........................................................
Over 2 but l e s s than 4 p e r c e n t ................ ..
4 p e r c e n t .............. ............................................................
Over 4 but l e s s than 6 percent ............................
6 percent and o v e r .............................. ........................
Other-type paym ent.............. ..............................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s ..................................................................
Information not av a ila b le .............. ......................................

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
.2
4 1 .8
4 .1
4 2 .8
2 .8
7 .8
(5 /)
.2
7 .6
.5
-

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
.2
4 6 .1
8 .7
2 8 .7
1 6 .3
1 6 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .1
1 3 .6
1 .1
7 3 .8
9 .6
1 .9
1 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
•4
4 3 .7
5 5 .6
.3
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0
3 3 .7
5 6 .7
7 .6
2 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .6
1 .6
7 2 .1
1 .2
2 4 .7
.4
.4
-

1 0 0 .0
6 5 .6
6 5 .6
3 4 .4
3 4 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
_
.
1 0 0 .0
_

10 0. 0
-

A fter 25 y ears o f se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v acatio n s .........................................................................
Length-of-tim e p aym ent................................ ....................
1 w e e k ................ .................................................................
2 weeks ................................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........................................
3 weeks ...............................................................................
4 weeks and o v e r ..................... .................................
Percentage payment i j .......................................................
2 percent or l e s s ........................................................
Over 2 but l e s s than 4 p e r c e n t ...........................
4 percen t ....................... ....................................................
Over 4 but l e s s than 6 percen t ............................
6 percen t and over ......................................................
Other-type payment .............................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s ............................................................. ..
Information not av ailab le ..............................................

1 0 0 .0
9 1 .7
.2
3 9 .7
4 .1
3 7 .7
1 0 .0
7 .8
<5/>
.2
7 .6
.5
-

1 0 0 .0
8 3 .7
.2
4 5 .7
8 .7
2 6 .4
2 .7
1 6 .3
1 6 .3
—

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .1
1 3 .6
1 .1
6 4 .3
1 9 .1
1 .9
1 .9
_

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.4
3 9 .5
4 3 .7
1 6 .4
->
-

1 0 0 .0
9 8 .0
2 7 .4
5 5 .8
1 4 .8
2 .0

—

—

1 0 0 .0
9 9 .6
1 .6
7 2 .1
1 .2
2 4 .7
.4
.4
-

1 0 0 .0
6 5 .6
6 5 .6
3 4 .4
3 4 .4
-

1 0 0 .0
.
-

_
1 0 0 .0
.
1 0 0 .0
_
.
.
-

l / Includes d ata f o r r e t a i l trad e (excep t department s to r e s ) in ad d itio n to those ind ustry d iv isio n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
2 / Limited to establishm ents p rim arily engaged in th e production o f motion p ic tu re s (Group 7811) as defined in the Standard In d u stria l C la s s if ic a tio n Manual (1949 e d itio n ) prepared by the Bureau
o f the Budget.
2 / Includes d ata f o r r e a l e s t a t e ; and r e t a i l trad e (excep t department s to r e s ) in ad d itio n to those ind ustry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
i j Percent o f annual earn in g s.
2 / Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
*
T ransportation (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .




23

Table d-5i

9n U fA a*tce a n d P a n lio n P la n t,
P ercen t o f p lan t workers employed in -

P ercen t o f o f f i c e workers employed in Type o f plan

Services
Manu­
Public
Wholesale
A ll
Motion
(excluding
Finance **
in d u stries 3 / fa ctu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
trad e
p ic tu re s 2 /
motion
p ic tu re s )

Services
Wholesale (excluding
A ll
Manu­
Public
Motion
tra d e
motion
p ic tu re s 2 /
in d u strie s 2 / fa ctu rin g u t i l i t i e s *
p ictu re s)

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .0

9 8 .4

9 8 .5

9 4 .7

9 4 .1

8 0 .7

9 5 .1

9 5 .6

9 6 .7

9 4 .3

8 7 .2

8 6 .3

1 0 0 .0

9 1 .1
8 8 .5

9 8 .4
9 7 .6

5 3 .1
5 3 .1

9 4 .7
8 9 .1

9 4 .1
9 1 .0

7 4 .3
6 6 .8

9 5 .1
9 5 .1

9 1 .8
8 7 .3

9 6 .1
9 2 .9

6 1 .2
6 1 .2

8 7 .2
8 4 .1

8 6 .3
7 2 .6

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

H o sp ita liz a tio n .....................•••••....................
S u rg ical ..............................................................................
M edical................................................................... ..
R etirem ent-pension plan .................................. ...............

3 3 .6
2 6 .3
7 7 .7
7 7 .0
6 0 .7
5 1 .0

4 2 .1
3 4 .1
9 2 .5
9 3 .2
8 3 .9
4 0 .8

9 .2
2 5 .9
4 3 .2
3 3 .7
4 1 .6
8 7 .4

3 1 .4
3 5 .7
6 7 .1
6 7 .1
5 2 .4
4 3 .0

3 6 .6
1 4 .5
8 0 .9
8 0 .9
4 3 .9
6 6 .1

2 5 .3
1 0 .7
3 4 .6
3 4 .6
2 8 .0
3 2 .6

3 1 .3
9 .0
3 2 .0
3 2 .0
2 0 .3
4 3 ,5

3 0 .5
3 0 .4
8 2 .2
8 1 .4
6 8 .7
3 9 .7

3 6 .8
3 1 .7
8 8 .1
8 7 .5
7 6 .9
4 2 .8

2 3 .0
3 0 .9
4 8 .4
4 8 .4
3 6 .6
7 1 .1

1 8 .7
3 0 .4
6 7 .8
6 9 .7
64.O
4 3 .0

3 4 .0
3 8 .8
6 9 .9
6 8 .0
4 3 .8
1 5 .1

3 5 .4
9 .1
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 7 .8
4 1 .8

Workers in estab lishm ents having
no insurance o r pension p l a n s .......................................

4 .0

1 .6

1 .5

5 .3

5 .9

1 9 .3

4 .9

4 .1

3 .3

2 .8

1 2 .8

1 3 .7

“

Inform ation not a v a ila b le .................................... ...............

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .9

-

-

-

A ll workers ..................................................... ........................

Workers in estab lishm ents having
insurance o r pension plans l J ..................... ..
Insurance plans U .......................................................... ..
L i f e ..................... ...................................... ...........................
A ccidental death and

.3

c

1 / Includes data f o r r e t a i l tra d e (except department s to r e s ) in a d d itio n to those in d u stry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly ,
2 j Lim ited to estab lishm ents p rim arily engaged in the production o f motion p ic tu re s (Group 7811) a s defined in the Standard In d u s tria l C la s s if ic a tio n Manual (1949 e d itio n ) prepared by th e
Bureau o f the Budget.
3 / Includes d ata f o r r e a l e s t a t e ; and r e t a i l trad e (except department s to r e s ) in ad d itio n to those ind ustry d iv isio n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
j j Unduplicated t o t a l .
*
T ran sp ortatio n (exclud ing r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, and o ther pu blic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .
Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, C a l i f ., February 1953
U .S. D
EPARTM T OF LABOR
EN
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




2

U

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau’
s occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources. In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community. Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.
Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest $0 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment's full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau's
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.

The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional,and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, these work categories are included as plant workers in non­
manufacturing industries.

Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) Office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-A). The industry groupings surveyed are: Manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Infoimation on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.

Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey. Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented
in terns of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for
such jobs were included only for firms meeting the size require­
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women
office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller.

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupation.

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.




25

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Los Angeles, Calif*9 2/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 1953

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied

H

Numbe r of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
studv

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
studv

In estab]Lishments
stucLied
Total

Office

Industry division* In which ocoupationa
w r e ,grem y* cm m . area-teals
.

-

1,797
689
1,108

286
104
182

752,393
428,881
323,512

374,971
223,734
151,237

89,872
42,674
47,198

101
51

76
359

21
46

77,297
56,633

57,855
13,942

12,160
4,223

101
51
51
51

192
206
251
24

26
37
41
11

81,890
49,228
40,457
18,007

22,472
27,569
13,643
15,756

2,591
22,680
3,184
2,360

8
21
8
21
21

111
37
64
305
29

37
16
20
68
16

4,895
3,413
2,604
38,096
6,006

2,213
2,062
1,289
19,812
5,342

86
113
291
3,359
1,086

8

34

17

1,464

1,099

71

8
21

19
78

8
23

1,039
6,337

824
3,477

83
223

m
m
101

All divisions •••••«••••••••••••••••••••*»••••••
Manufacturing ................ .
Nonmanufacturing ..........
••*••*
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ........ ................... .
Wholesale trade ...... .
Retail trade (except department
stores) ........................ .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ••••••
Services (except motion pictures) 2/ •♦•••
Motion pictures (J .......... ....... .
Industries in wfaloh occupations wars
gqmygfl to an Infowtar tesla 5J
Women's and misses9 dresses ••••••••••••••••••••
Wood furniture (other than upholstered) •••••••*
Paints and varnishes ••••••*••••••••••••*••••*••
Machinery industries .......... ••••••...... •••
Oil field machinery ............... ...... .
Machine-tool accessories - jobbing
shops ................••*•••••.... *•••••••
Machine-tool accessories - production
shops ••••••«•••••••••••••••**•••••••••••••
Power laundries *...... .

y

2/ Los Angeles Metropolitan Area (Los Angeles and Orange Counties)*
2/ Total establishment employment* The minimum size of establishment studied in the January 1952 survey was 21 workers in wholesale
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services, and 101 in the other major industry divisions*
2 / Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion picture
distribution, service industries and theaters; nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services*
ij Motion picture production*
5/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables*
£ / Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with & or more workers were included*




26

Index
Assembler (machinery), 12. 13, 14
Assembler (wood fu rn itu re), 11
Autom atic-lathe operator
(machinery), 12, 13
Bench hand (b ak eries), 16
B ille r , machine, 3
Bookbinder (p rin tin g ), 16
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3, 4
Bricklayer (building con stru ction ), 16
Calculating-machine operator, 4
Carpenter (building co n stru ctio n ), 16
Carpenter, maintenance, 7
Cleaher, 8
Clerk, f i l e , 3 , 4
Clerk, order, 3, 4
Clerk, p a y ro ll, 3
Clerk, r e t a il receiv in g (power
lau n d ries), 15
Compositor, hand (p rin tin g ), 16
Crane operator, e le c tr ic bridge, 8
C ut-off-saw operator (wood
fu rn itu re), 11
Cutter and marker (women*s and misses*
d r e sse s), 10
Draftsman, 6
D rill-p ress operator (machinery), 12, 13
Duplicating-machine operator, 3, 4
E lectricia n (building co n stru ctio n ), 16
E lectric ia n , maintenance, 7
E lectric ia n , maintenance (machinery), 12, 13
E lectrotyper (p rin tin g ), 16
Engine-lathe operator
(machinery), 12, 13, 14
Engineer, sta tion a ry , 7
Extractor operator (power lau n d ries), 15
F in ish er, flatw ork (power lau n d ries), 15
Fireman, station ary b o ile r , 7
Gluer (wood fu rn itu re), 11
Grinding-machine operator
(machinery), 12, 13, 14
Guard, 8
Helper (b ak eries), 16
Helper, motortruck d riv er, 16
Helper, tra d es, maintenance, 7
Id en tifier (power lau n d ries), 15
Inspector (machinery), 12, 13




Inspector, fin a l (examiner) (women*s
and misses* d r esse s), 10
Ja n ito r, 8
Janitor (machinery), 12, 13, 14
Key-punch operator, 4
Labeler and packer (paints
and v a rn ish es), 11
Laborer (building co n stru ctio n ), 16
Laborer, m aterial handling, 8
Laborer, m aterial handling
(machinery), 12
M achine-tool operator,
production (machinery), 12, 13, 14
M achine-tool operator, toolroom , 7
M achine-tool operator.
toolroom (machinery), 12, 13, 14
M achinist, maintenance, 7
M achinist, production
(machinery), 12, 13
M ailer (p rin tin g ), 16
Marker (power lau n d ries), 15
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 7
Mechanic, maintenance, 7
M illing-m achine operator
(machinery), 12, 13, 14
M illw right, 7
Mixer (b ak eries), 16
Mixer (paints and v a rn ish es), 11
Molder (b ak eries), 16
Motortruck d riv er, 16
Nurse, in d u stria l (reg istered ), 6
O ff-bearer (wood fu rn itu re), 11
O ffice boy, 3
O ffice g ir l, 5
O iler, 7
Operator (lo c a l tr a n s it), 16
Order f i l l e r , 8
Overman (b ak eries), 16
Packer, 8
Packer (b ak eries), 16
Packer (wood fu rn itu re), 11
Painter (building co n stru ctio n ), 16
P ain ter, maintenance, 7
Photoengraver (p rin tin g ), 16
P ip e fitte r , maintenance, 7
P lasterer (building con stru ction ), 16
Plumber (building co n stru ctio n ), 16

Plumber, maintenance, 7
Porter, 8
Press a s sis ta n t (p r in tin g ), 16
Press feeder (p rin tin g ), 16
Presser (women*s and m isses* d r e sse s), 10
P resser, machine, s h ir ts (power
la u n d ries), 15
Pressman (p rin tin g ), 16
Receiving clerk , 9
Routeman (driver-salesm an) (power
la u n d ries), 15
Rubber (wood fu rn itu re), 11
Sander (wood fu rn itu re), 11
Secretary, 3, 5
Sewer, hand (fin ish e r ) (women*s
and m isses* d r e sse s), 10
Sewing-machine operator (women*s
and m isses* d r e sse s), 10
Shaper operator (wood fu rn itu re), 11
Sheet-m etal worker, maintenance, 7
Shipping c le r k , 9
Shipping-and-receiving clerk , 9
Sprayer (wood fu r n itu r e ), 11
Stenographer, 5
Stereotyper (p rin tin g ), 16
Switchboard operator, 5
Switchboard o p era to r-recep tio n ist, 5
Tabulating-machine operator, 3 , 5
Technician (paints and v a rn ish es), 11
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women*s
and m isses* d r e sse s), 10
Tinter (p ain ts and v a rn ish es), 11
Tool-and-die maker, 7
Tool-and-die maker (machinery), 12, 13, 14
Transcribing-machine operator, 6
Truck d riv er, 9
Trucker, power, 9
T urret-lathe operator, hand
(machinery), 12, 13, 14
T ypist, 6
Varnish maker (p ain ts and v a rn ish es), 11
Washer, machine (power la u n d ries), 15
Watchman, 9
Welder, hand (machinery), 12, 13, 14
Work d istrib u to r (women*s
and m isses* d r e sse s), 10
Wrapper (b ak eries), 16
Wrapper, bundle (power la u n d ries), 15
U. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R I N T I N G O F F I C E : O —

1953




This r e p o r t was p repa red in th e Bureau’ s
Com m unications may be a d d ressed t o :

W estern

R eg ion a l O f f ic e .

Max D. K o s s o r is , R eg ion a l D ir e c to r
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s
8 7 0 Market S tr e e t
Room 107-4
San F ra n cisco 2 , C a lifo r n ia
The s e r v ic e s o f th e Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s ' r e g io n a l o f f i c e s
a re a v a ila b le fo r c o n s u lta tio n on s t a t i s t i c s r e la t in g t o wages and in d u s t r ia l
r e la t io n s , employment, p r ic e s , la b o r tu rn o v e r, p r o d u c t iv it y , work in ju r ie s ,
c o n s tr u c tio n and h ou sin g .

The W estern R egion in clu d e s th e fo llo w in g S ta te s :
A rizon a
C a lifo r n ia
C olorad o
Idaho
Nevada

New M exico
Oregon
Utah
W ashington
Wyoming


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102