View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

M EM PH IS, TENNESSEE
January

1 9 5 3

Bulletin N o . 1116-13

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey
M E M P H IS , T E N N E S S E E




January

1953

B ulletin N o. 1116-13
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clagut - Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents




Contents

INTRODUCTION....*.... ................. *****..... .
THE MEMPHIS METROPOLITAN A R E A ............... *......

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE........... ....... ..... *

Letter of Transmittal

1
1

TABLES:

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s ,
Washington, D. C*, A pril 24, 1953*

The S ecretary o f Labor!
I hare the honor to transm it herewith a rep o rt on
occupational wages and re la te d b en efits in Memphis, Tenn., du r­
ing January 1953* S im ilar stu dies are being conducted in a
number o f o th er larg e labor-m arket areas during the f is c a l year
1953* These stu d ie s have been designed to meet a v a rie ty of
governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide
earnings inform ation fo r many occupations common to most manu­
factu rin g and nonmanufaoturing in d u strie s, as w ell as summaries
o f selected supplementary wage benefits* Whenever p o ssib le,
separate d ata have been presented fo r individual major in du stry
divisions*
This rep o rt was prepared in the Bureau’s regional of­
fic e in A tlan ta, Ga*, by Louis B* Woytych, Regional Wage and
In d u s tria l R elations Analyst* The planning and cen tral d irec­
tio n o f th e program was carried on in the Bureau’s D ivision of
Wages and In d u s tria l Relations*
Ewan Clague, Commissioner*
Hon* M artin P* Durkin,
S ecretary o f Labor*




Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-i
Office occupations •*••••****«.**••*••••••*••
A-2
Professional and technical occupations •••••
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ••••
A—4
. Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations •••••••••*•••••**•••••*•••••••

3
4
5
6

Average earnings for occupations studied on an industry
basis * Union wage
C-15
C-205
C-27
C-41
C-42

scales for selected occupations Building construction •••••••♦••••••••••••**
Bakeries....... *.......... *..........
Printing.......... *.... *....... *......
Local transit operating employees •••••••*••
Motortruck drivers and helpers *•••••*•••••*

7
7
7
7
7

Supplementary wage practices D-l
Shift differential provisions ••*•*•••••••••
8
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours *••••••••••••••*•••••
8
D-3
Paid holidays ••••••••••••••••••••••••••«•**
9
D-4
Paid vacations •••••**••••••••*••****••••**•
9
D-5
Insurance and pension plans •••••••••••••••« 12
APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey *•••••••••*••*•••••••••• 13
INDEX....*.................... *********...... ***** 15

* NOTE: Earnings data fo r occupations th a t
are c h a ra c te ristic of p a rtic u la r lo cal in ­
d u strie s are presented, when studied, in
S eries B tables* This ad d itio n al cover­
age, however, was om itted from the survey
o f the Memphis, Texm*, area* An occupa­
tio n a l earnings rep o rt is a v ailab le, on
request, fo r power laundries (June 1952)*




O CCU PATIO NAL W AGE SU RVEY - MEMPHIS. TENN

Introduction

Wholesale and retail trade establishments accounted for 50,000
workers, and the services industries had 22,500 employees# Trans­
portation, communication, and other public utilities employed an­
other 15,500, and finance, insurance, and real estate firms ac­
counted for §,000 workers#

The Memphis area is one of several important industrial
centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics conducted occupa­
tional wage surveys during late 1952 and early 1953# In such sur­
veys, occupations common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanu­
facturing industries are studied on a community-wide basis# 2/
Cross-industry methods of sampling are thus utilized in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupationst (a) office;
(b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant;
and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping# In presenting earn­
ings information for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate
data are provided wherever possible for individual broad industry
divisions#

Approximately 42,000 workers were employed in the area’s
highly diversified manufacturing industries, the most important of
which are the lumber, machinery, metal products, food products,
rubber, and chemicals industries#

Earnings information for characteristic occupations in
certain more narrowly defined industries is presented, when studied,
in series B tables# This supplemental coverage was omitted in the
survey in the Memphis area# Union scales {series C tables) are
presented for selected occupations in several industries or trades
in which the majority of the workers are employed under teims of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates
are believed to be indicative of prevailing pay practices#
Data are collected and summarized on shift operations and
differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as
vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension plans0

More than half the plant workers in the industries and
establishment-size groups within scope of the Bureau’s study in the
Memphis area were employed by firms having written agreements with
labor unions# In manufacturing, establishments employing nearly
three-fourths of the plant workers had union agreements# Virtually
all plant workers in the public-utilities group of industries, as
compared with less than a tenth in retail trade, were employed tinder
the terms of labor-management agreements# Less than a tenth of
the office workers in the area were employed under the provisions
of collective-bargaining agreements in January 1953# Among the
industry groups studied, the highest proportion of office workers
covered by labor-management contracts was in the transportation
(except railroads), communication, and other public-utilities group#
Approximately a fourth of the office workers in this industry group
were employed under the terms of union contracts#

Occupational Wage Structure

Nearly 170,000 nonagricultural wage and salary workers
were employed in the metropolitan area in January 1953, representing
a gain of 15 percent during the last 5 years# 2J Approximately
127,000 workers were employed in nonmanufacturing industries#

Wage and salary levels in the Memphis area rose somewhat
in the period between the Bureau’s last survey (November 1951) and
January 1953# Based on an analysis of the larger firms in the area
(those employing 200 or more workers), approximately two-thirds of
the plant workers received at least one general wage increase during
this period# General increases for plant workers were, usually
granted on a cents-per-hour basis— generally ranging from 4 to 10
cents# General increases in office workers’ salaries were less
prevalent, although office employees of large manufacturing estab­
lishments frequently received raises comparable to those given to
plant workers#

2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey#
Differences between the scope of this survey and the last previous
survey (November 1951) are indicated in the appendix table#
2J Source: Tennessee Department of Employment Security in
cooperation with the U# S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor
Statistics, The Labor Market in Memphisf January 1953#

Formalized (i«e#, established) wage structures were re­
ported in establishments employing more than three-fourths of all
plant (nonoffice) workers, and were common in each of the broad
industry groups within the scope of the survey# Approximately half
the time—rated plant workers were employed under plans which pro­
vided a single or flat rate for each job classification. Wage plans
providing a range of rates for individual classifications were in
effect in establishments employing more than a fourth of all time—

The Memphis Metropolitan Area
The Memphis Metropolitan Area (Shelby County, Term#) has
an estimated population of a half million inhabitants, more than
four-fifths of whom reside within the city limits of Memphis#




(1)

2

rated workers. Rates for tne remaining time workers were determined
individually. Among the industry groups studied, single rates for
individual jobs were typical of manufacturing and services. Piecerate or bonus-incentive payment plans covered plant jobs in which
more than a fifth of the workers in manufacturing establishments
were employed. With the exception of retail trade, incentive wage
payment plans were either nonexistent or relatively insignificant
among the nonmanufacturing industries studied.
Almost half the office workers were employed in estab­
lishments that determined salaries on an individual basis. Nearly
all formal wage plans reported for office occupations provided a
range of salaries for each job.
Established minimum entrance rates for plant employees
with no previous work experience were a part of the formalized rate
structures of Memphis firms employing virtually all plant workers.
Three-fourths were employed in firms with minimums ranging from 70
cents to $1.4.0an hour. Minimum entrance rates of less than 75 cents
an hour were not reported for any establishment in the manufactur­
ing or public-utilities industry group.
Salaries and wages were substantially higher among the
manufacturing industries than among the nonmanufacturing industries
for most occupations permitting comparisons. Average weekly earn­




ings of office workers were higher in manufacturing than in non­
manufacturing for 11 of the 12 comparable occupations.
Average
hourly earnings for plant jobs revealed the same tendency, 14- of
the 20 comparable occupations showing higher rates in manufacturing.
Approximately a fifth of the workers in manufacturing
plants in the Memphis area were employed on late shifts. For night
work, a majority of these workers received an additional payment,
most frequently expressed in terms of a uniform cents-per-hour dif­
ferential over established day rates.
The 4,0-hour week was predominant among plant workers,
with three-fifths working 40 hours. Nearly all of the remaining
plant workers were scheduled for a longer workweek. More than
three-fourtns of the women office workers were on a 40-hour work­
week schedule in January 1953.
Almost all office workers and nine-tenths of the plant
workers included in the survey were eligible for paid vacations
after a year of service. Provisions were more liberal generally
for office workers than for plant workers. Three-fourths of the
office workers were eligible for a paid vacation of 2 weeks after
2 years1 service; the majority of the plant workers, on the other
hand, were provided only 1 week!s vacation after a similar period
of service.

3

A' Crosi-lndustry Occupations
Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Memphis, Tenn., by industry division, January-1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
$
s
$
j
s
$
s
5
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 Uo.ooU2 . o l5 .oo U7.S0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0
*

Weekly
Weekly
#.00
e r i g Under
anns
hus
or
(tnad (tnad
Sadr) Sadr)
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00
3 7 .5 0

U0 . 0 0

U2 .5 o 11 5 0
* .0

U7.50 5 0 .0 0

s
$
$
s
s
*
*
s
55.00 *57.50 6 0 .0 0 62.50 6 5 .0 0 67.50 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 75.00 80.00
and
over
57.50 6 0 .0 0 62.50 65.00 6 7 .5 0 70.00 72.50 75.00 8 0 .0 0

5 2 .5 0 5 5 ,0 0

|

Men
BookkeeDins-machine operators. class B .....

36

1*0.0

$
1*9.00

Clerics, order............. ..............
Manufacturing... .....................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

105
36"
71

UO.O
1*0.0
1*0.0

62.00
58.00
6U.00

-

_

_

1
+

-

-

-

-

Clerks, payroll..........................

38

Ui.5

65.50

_

_

_

Office bovs .............................
Nonmanufacturing......................

60
10
*

1*1.0
1*1.0

38.00
37.00

5
5

2
2

18
11

1*0.0
1*0.0

67.5°
66.00

_

Nonmanufacturing..... ................

16
*
25

—

_

7

8
U 1
- --- T — i r
"
_
_
_
i ....
1
"
2
11
2
7
_

_

121
58
63

1* . 5
0
1*0.0
1*1.0

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) .....
Nonmanufacturing.... .................

67
52

1*0.0
Uo.o

Manufacturing ................... .....
Nonmanufacturing ......................

uis
5U
36U

1 0.5
*
Uolo
1*0.5

m

1*6.00
Ufl.oC
UU.oo
j
|U2.50
:E.So
!
l*6.5o
1UU.oo

_
-

-

10
10

-

_
-

_
-

12
5
7

_

_
-

1
1

2
2

6
6

5
5

9
7

-

_

_

_
-

13
+

-

20
20

65

-

3

U3

59

7

39

39.5
Uo.o
39.5

:U8.00
;56.50
!U6.00

_ x
- |

Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) ........ .
Nonmanufacturing ......................

57
U9

UO.O
uo.o

U0.00
1*0.00

•- !
-

Clerksr file, class A ........... ....... .

36

Uo.o

U5.50

_ |

Clerics. file, class B ....................
Manufacturing..... ............. .
Nonmanufacturing ......................
P t I4r i+41 H 4 a « * .
iK
i.

297
3
258
oo

Uo.o
uo.o
Uo.o
oq n

37.50
U3.50
36.50
1*2.00

5

3

9

6

1

5

1

6

5

;

-

6
_
6

5

9

6

13 !
13 ;
_

7
7

2
2

1

_

9

67
1
66

i

?

55

35
3
32

6
U9

3

1
+

Clerks, order ...........................

61

Uo.o

U7.50

Clerks, payroll........... ..............
Manufacturing.........................
Nonmanufacturing......................

168
53
85

Uo.o
T*oTo
Ud .5

52.00
1*6.50

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1

Duplicatinc-machine operators .............

26

Uo.o

U6 .0 0

_

_

_

_

Kev-ounch operators . .
. ....................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing......................

112

Uo.o
uolo
Uo.o

U6.50
1*8.50
UU.oo

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
_
2

7

52

Office girls ............................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

58
UU

Uo.o
Uo.o

35.50
35.00

-

-

1
1

25
18

Secretaries....... ......................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturir^......................
Public utilities
........„.........

U2U
121
303
63

Uo.5
Uo.o
Uo.5
Ui.5

55.00
59.50
53.00
59.00

_

_

-

-

%

60

39

16
8 |
8

1

u

1

2

1
3

_

3

3

2

_

_

_

_

_

7

7

32

10

7

6

1

6
1

7

28

10

7

8

2
2
-

_

_

9

5

6

3

3

3

2

—r
-

2

6

3
2
1

_

3

-

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

_

_

1

3

-

-

6
3

5
u

U
u

_

-

6
U

-

3
-

12
6

U
1

1+
1
10
U

8
8

3
3
-

6
5

2
2
-

_
_
-

1
1
-

_
-

_
_
-

_

_
-

3
3

1

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

u

_

_

_
-

_
-

u

1

1

_

_
_
_
-

_
_
-

12
1 |
*
|
8
-

1

36
20
16

8
U

17
15

2
2

1
1

11
ir

6?
12
57

?+
1
1
53

19
*
12
37

29
29

25
7
18

17
9
8

18
2
16

10
_
10

26
2
2U

38
38

18
8
10

UU
3
la

21
8
13

23
2
21

21
16 —
5

U
2

3
3

_
-

-

6
1
*

10
6

2
2

10

u

10

29
la
5 r 6"
2U
35
7
16
*

—T
9

_ !

10
11
1 --- 8~
10
2

3U

28

1

|
i

1
1

2

3

1

2
1

1

2

-

1

11
1
*
7

1
1

-

-

2

6
6
6

16
--- T
10
5

2

2

2

2

10

5

20

10

5

1

u

9

8

7
5
2

13
6
7

32
7
25

20
18
2

12
3
9

_

7

_

1

8

6

_

7

_
-

11
1
*
7

9
U
5

22
13
'9

18
8
10

6
6

5
U

2
2

8
8

3
2

8
3

_
_
_
-

7

2

7

2
-

20
.6
1U
-

28
U
2U
1

77
6
71
10

2
2
-

1

10
2

3

_
-

li

9
r

-

u

2
2
-

u
3

2
2
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

1

_

9

9

3

See footnote a t end o f ta b le •
# Transportation (excluding ra ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t il i t i e s *




1

2

2

_

1

3

1
318
63
255

*

_
11
7

_

2

-

1

!

Billers, machine (billing machine) .........
Manufacturing.........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

(

2
1
1

5

9

_

_

Women

Calculating-machine operators
Comn-fcamatai* tVPe) .....................
Manufacturing.........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

1

2

_
-

1
-

-

-

1
1
1
-

-

u

2
2

1
1
-

■ “
_

-

-

-

-

1
_
1

1
1
-

1
.
1

_

_

_
-

-

-

3

2

lU
11
3

6
6
-

17
7
10

U
1
*
-

5
r —
-

5
r
-

3
3
-

__

3

_

1

_

_

_

_

8
r
-

2
2
-

U
2 —
2

1

7
3
U

-

2
1
1

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

«
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30
9
21
2

■53
12

18
5
13
U

30
16
1U
U

23

ie
+
15
33
15

1U
1

9
1
*
5
2

6
1
*
2
-

11
3
8
6

10
9
1

10

8
15
8

28
10
18
2

13
9 —
U

_

_

ui
2

7
r

2

13

7

_
9
1
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tenn., January 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Memphis, Tenn., by industry division, January 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W EEK LY EARNINGS O F -

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

$ _
W
eekly
W
eekly Under 25.00 27.50
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) *
25.00
27.50 30.00

Women - Continued
786
279
507
36

ItO.O
1(0.0
ItO.O
ItO.O

1*7.5°
U9.5o
U6.00
lt7.00

-

Switchboard operators....................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

130
118

-.1*2.5
i*3.o

37.50
36.00

-

17
17

Switchboard operator-receptionists.....................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................................

_ 17h
60
lilt

Uo.o
hit. 00
he. oo
1*0.0
ItO.O i h2.00

_
- 1

Transcribing-machine operators, general...........
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................

116

ItO.O
1*3.50
ItO.O | h3.50

_
_

Typists, class A ...........................................................
Manufacturing.......................................... ................
Nonmanufacturing......................

271
57
21it

ItO.O ! U5 cO
O
ItO.O , he.oo
ItO.O I hh.5o

B ......................... .................................
Manufacturing .........................

h99
116
383
33

ito.o
ItO.O
li0.5
Uo.5

.
-

1
1
-

Monmanufacturing ........................
.
PuhUrs ut’ili'fciftB * ..___T. ........ .

32.50

35.00

*

Stenographers, general ....................
Manufacturing........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Public utilities * ..................

Typists. class

!$
$
$
$
$
$
r—
,
$
$
i
$
$
$
$
s
ho.oo h2.5o 15.00 h7.50 50.00 52.S0 55.oo 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00
and
37.50 hO.OO h2.50 h5.00 h7.5o 50.00 52.50 55.00 6 7.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 over

$ „ $„
$
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50

:
I
!
|

12
2
10 j

19
19
2

67
A
59
-

10 !
10

_
-

!
i
j
!

2 !
2

26

2h
” 1h

15
13

11
9

3
3

25
8
17

30
30

22
2
20

22
2
20

22
21
1

!h
8

10
1

28
1?

_
-

12

_

_
-

_
-

- j
"

2

38.00
39.50
38.00
hh.50

-

-

-

2

8h I
1*3
le “ I F
h9
25
6
1

8
8

-

i
5 !
5

8
8 .

38
38

_ i
- ;

9
9

18
18

32

i
69 j

28

95
32
63
3

6h
h
60
1

11
h7

11
1
50 : h7
20
23
30
2h
5
8

26
3
23
10

32
lh
18
1

r

6

1
1

-

13
9
h

3
3

7
7

1
1

39
" s i —
31

51
18
33
7

h
3
1

3
2 —

52

‘ |
70 ! ioo
< ~17“
>
6h
83

i

123
95
30 “ i r
65
65
2
1

1y
ho
69
lh

&

11

10
10

k
r

—

13 !
8
5 !
2 :

1

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

_
-

_
-

-

2
2

1
1

_

1
1

-

_

1
1

2
2
“
2 1
1 j
1

- |

9
_

11
3
8

..
h
It

_

_
_
_

, 5
’ 3
2
1

_ !

1

_

j

_

_

1

!
_ :

_
_
_

_
-

-

_
_
_

_
_
_
-

1

_
-

-

5

_

_
_

_

1
1
_
_
r- -

1
_
_

-

1

_
_
_

1

i

______ i
1/
*

2
1
1
-

9

6
1
5

7
h
3*

5
0
J

2
2
_
-

11
9
2
-

-

lh
r

26 ! h2
f ------ 1~1 12
26 | 30
h

6
6
_
-

13
7
6
-

6

9

2k
2
22

36
9
27
2

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Table A-2:

P t a fa d A iO t u U

G * u i ^ T e c /u U C t U

O c C H fu U iO H d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Msmphis, Tenn., by industry division, January 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY

A
verage

$
$
$
$
$
h2.50 U5.oc $h7.5o 5o.oo 52.5o 55.oo 57.50

W eekly
W eekly
hours
earnings Under
(Standard) (Standard)
lt2.50 16.00

106
"7 5 —

ho.o
ho.o

1
1$
i 79.00
79.00

-

-

-

36
31

ho.o
ho.o

57.50 60.00 62.50
i
1
1
!

-

s

-

lh !

-

1

1 I
-

59.50
59.50

—

1
n !
—

1
1~
'

13

1

2
2

3
2

65.00

h

1

'
1/

52.50 55.00

i

W en
om
Nurses, in d u strial (reg istered ) ..........................
Manufacturing .........................................................

50.00

j

Men
Draftsmen .......................................................................
Manufacturing........................... .............................

h7.5o

$
$
$
s
60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50

1
1

67.50

h
-

it

1
1

5

h

70.00

13
13

8 .R
O C
M
f- r—

Sex, occupation, and industry div ision

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

EARNINGS

OF-

$
72.50

$
$
s
%
$
$
Is
$
75.00 8 0.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.0c 115.00

75.00

80.00 85.00

90.00

95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 1 1 5 .O 120.00
C

5
r
---------- 1

1
1

26
22

16
11

10
10

5

2
2

15
13

1
“

~

“

~

5
—

h
r

-

-

-

2
2

1
1

-

h
h

-

_______i

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Tenn., January 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

5

M ain ten an ce an d P ow e* P lan t Q ccuptU ianl

Table A-3:

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Memphis, Term., by industry division, January 1953)

•Occupation and industry d iv ision

of
W
orkers

$
hourly Under 0.80
earnings 1
0.80
.85

Cam enters. maintenance ...........................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................

120
61
59

$
1.72
1.62
1.84

E le c tr ic ia n s . maintenance .......................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................

143
133

2.01
2.04

_

Engineers. stationary ...............................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................
Nonmanufacturing.............................. .....................

135
79
56

1.80
1.82
1.78

_

155
119

1.11
1.15

12
8

Manufacturing .........................................................

-

*
_

$
0.85

$
0 .90

$
0.95

$
1.00

$
1.05

$
1.10

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.80

.90

.95

1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

-

1
1

4
4

2
2

-

**

1
1

1

_

_

_

'
_

..

_

_

~

“

8
8

10
-

17
17

Hele e r s , tra d es, maintenance ................................
Manufacturing ................................................. ..
Nonmanufacturing...........................................

161
90
71

1.08
1.11
1.05

8
8

8
8

M achinists, msintenance ...........................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................

152
H5

2.00
2.00

-

“

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ..................
Manufacturing .............................. ...........................
Nonmanufacturing............... ...................................
D..W
I
41 4+4a s *

uo
57
353
236

1.49
1.61
1.47
1.53

_

_

_

-

-

-

Mechanics, maintenance .................................... ..
M anufacturing............... ..........................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................

345
296
49

1.79
1.86
1.42

Millwrights ....................................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................

157
155

1.91
1.91

O i l e r s .................................... ..........................................
Manufacturing .........................................................

86
84

1.55
1.57

2

P a in te rs, maintenance ...............................................
Manufacturing .........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................

124
52
72

1.69
1 .8 3 “
1.59

_

1

_

1

93

39
33

_

_

~

~

_

-

21
14

-

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.80

1.90

4
4
—

15
15

7
7

11
11

“

6
5
1

7
5
2

2
2
“

1
1
~

"

2
2

3
3
~

6
4
2

2
1
1

18
13
5

25

1
1
-

1

1

1
1

1
1

6
5
4 ----- ST

3
2

-

7
7

3
3

17
15

23
22

49
49

14
13

11
10

4

4

4

4

1
1

_
11
- — Tl
3

3
1
2

3
3
~

1
1
~

14
14
“

5
2
3

26
13
13

10
10
“

13
10
3

-

-

-

-

7
7

4
4

1
1

1
1

2
2

-

-

2

_

1

2

-

1

2
5
2 — r

-

2

1

-

4

Tool-and-die m ak ers...................................................
Manufacturing ...................................................

l/
2/
*

----41
4l

2.18
2.18

3
3

-

2

16
5
11

5
5

8
8

8
3

_

6

-

-

6




15
14
1

_
-

_

_

13

_

-

-

13

-

51
8
43

26
6
20

1
1
”

28
12
16
10

96
9
87
87

1
1

_

7
7

10
10

4
4

10
10
a
0

8
2
6
f
4

4
4
-

11
8
3
3

8
7
1

1
_
1

_

_
_

_
-

_
-

18
18
1
*
►

52
1
51
45

73
73

12
12
_

27
24
3

11
11
-

26
24
2

39
37
2

15
15
“

38
38
-

90
89
1

_

14
14

4
4

.

9
-----g -

u
13

2
2

19
19

54
54

17
17

-

-

22
22

-

-

-

-

-

13
13

30
7
23

6
6
-

1
_
1

3

6
57
57 -----b

1
1

-

11
11

9
9

2
2

tj

9
9

_
-

2
2

11
11

_

_
~

8
8

3
3

9
9

3
3

1
1

-

-

1
1

8
8

4
4

7
7

10
10

_

8

1

_

_
-

8

1

2
2

8
8

_

2
2
-

~

~

13
4
9

10
2
8

2
2
_

_
-

.
-

2
2
“

_
-

3

5

"

-

_

•

"

-

2
2

“

2

6

8

2

6

8

_

15
12

_

_

_

25
25

_

4
4

_

23
23

2
2

_

”

-

_

_

_

_

_
4
- — 2T

_

_

_

_

2
2

5
8
4
1 2/ 8

22
22

10
4
6

_

-

5
5

11
11
“

-

2

15
12

17
4
13

-

2

6
6

5
2
3

-

25

8
7

22
16
6

_

_

2
5
— r — iri

9
3
6

-

2
“ ---- T~
_

8
8

-

13
6
7

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Workers were distributed as follows: 6 at $2.AO to $2.50; 1 at $2.50 to $2.60; 1 at $2.60 to $2.70.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
253072 0 - 5 3 - 2

31
11
20

-

-

“

13
9
4

-

-

2
2

9
9

2
2

-

-

9
8
1

-

“

_

10
7
3

_

-

_
~

24
15
9

_

8
8
-

2.03
— srer-

P ip e fitte r s , maintenance .........................................
Manufacturing .........................................................

-

15
8
7

12
5
7

1.30

1.25

1
-

s
$
$
$
$
$
1.90 2 .0 0 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
and
2 .00 2 .1 0 2.20 2.30 2.40 over

T~ — 5“

-

_

_

_

1
— r~

9
9

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Term., January 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6
6

~
2
-----T "
1
1

10

9
9

3

6

G u& todtiU , 7i/ci/imUoi4A44U j.,G 4ul S iU pfU H f 0cC44f2&Uo*U

T a ble A-4:

2/

(Average hourly earnings
f°r selected occupations £/ studied on an area
basis in Memphis, Term., by industry division, January 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
Workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
hourly
earnings

$
Under 0.55
$
0.55

.6 0

Guards .......... ,................................
Manufacturing ................................

129

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ........
Manufacturing ................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................

1,456
683
773

108

433
73

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ......
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................

360

$
0.65

$
0.70

$
0.75

$

0 .8 0

$
0.85

$
0.90

$
0.95

.92
1.09
.77

.71
.97
•65

3,795

1 .1 0

1,575

.95

Order fillers ...................... .............
Manufacturing ................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .............................

7 U
22§
513

1 .1 8
1 .2 0
1 .1 8

Packers, class B (men) .........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ......... ...................

389
209
180

Packers, class B (women) .......................
Manufacturing ................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .............................

1,209
1,128

Receiving clerks ................................
Manufacturing ................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................

168
58

1 .0 0

.65

.70

.75

.80

.85

.90

.95

1 .0 0

-

9
4

76

18

3b
38
18

11
7

105
55
50

1

2

8
3

10
10

4
4

14
-

-

21
214
-

9
-

26

2/214

9

26
1

175
-

(Jl 75
i
-

-

4

24

4
,

10

4
-

10

-

.

3
-

3

111
17
94

13
13

1

498

-

163
335
154

1

16

18

2

7

-

12

2

18

H

2

11

2
2

243
182
61

106

222

248

358

70
36

79
143

247
204
43

444

368

180

327
?G 8

529
346
183
154

76

68

133
225
?ir>

88
21

37
5
32

46

127
69
58

47
46
7

14
-

37
-

14

49
17
32

6
6

24

-

39
4
35

21
20
1

281
281

133
132

21

9

9

-

1

12

5

a 5

88

-

16

4

67

12

23

5
7

12
11
I4 6

10

-

-

-

-

5

10

10

-

-

-

.97
795
1.14

_
-

_
-

5
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

271
262
9

59
58

5

1

-

47
47
-

1.44
1.70
1.30

3
-

_

1

_
-

-

8

-

4
-

1

-

«
•

-

1
1

2

3

-

1

-

5
5

4

-

1

8

-

3

227
ISO
127

1 .4 8
1.52

•
-

_

-

_

_

.

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

4
-

1.45

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

4

ShioDinv-and-receiving clerks ............... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................
Nonmanufacturing ................ ............
D»iK 14* n+414+4** f
t

151

1.46

66

1.43
1.49

Truck drivers, light (under 1 + tons) .........
Manufacturing .................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................

1 87
42
145

Truck drivers, m e d i u m (l£ to and
Including 4 t o n s ) ...... ......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................
Nonmanufacturing ................... ..........
PiiKl 4 / 11+414 + 4*0 f
*
t

899
324
575
216

1 .1 0
1 .1 6

288

1.2 8

43
245

1.14
1.31

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ....................
Manufacturing ................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................

U3
347

66

1.37
1.44
1.03

W a tchmen ...........................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...........................................................
Nonnanufacturing ....................................................

446
227
219
99

.92
1.03
.80
•82

Truck drivers, h e avy (over 4 tons,
trailer type) ................................ .
Manufacturing ................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................

P 411+ 414 +.4*c ft
n)\1

2/
2/
2/
2/
2/
*

. ..

1.14

-

-

-

-

146

-

-

6
40

—

35
27

$
1.90

$

2 .0 0

_

_

-

-

-

_

-

17
14
3

54
25
29

24
24
-

39
39
-

27
27
-

43
25

86
86

18

-

77
77
-

4
4
-

75
75
-

-

5
4

58

15

36

6

34
14

32

6

42
-

16

4
54

-

-

14
14

7

30

42

20

14

32

20
12
8

-

-

-

12
12

2

56

-

-

2

56

4
4
-

1
1

-

7
7
-

-

-

7
7
-

_

-

_
-

12
12

.
_

_

-

12

_

22
1

4
-

5
7

-

17
17

-

-

4
4
-

28
22
6

4

5

168

8
1

3

20
20

-

-

4
-

14
-

11

17

21

8

11

9

5
16

2
1

11

13
13

-

7
7

-

-

“

42
13
29

31
---24
24

26

1

19
7

-

3
3

2

3

128

1

5

13
5

3

-

-

-

-

8

1
2

-

2

17
5
5" r ^ r
14
-

14

17
17

8
2
6

2
2

2

.

1

3

8

6
6

6
6

1
-

4
-

6
2

-

-

1

4

4

1
1

—

1
-

18
4~

12
10
2

-

1

-

-

1

1

-

31
7
24

80
80

55
23
32

11 0

11
11

72
32
40

187
170
17

4
4
-

-

9
5
4

5
5
-

-

-

-

-

54
-

6
6

-

-

-

14
14
~

-

16
16

4
-

2
2

-

”

“

4

“

“

78
78

18
18

35
33

9
9

4

1

4

2

35
30
5

14
10

“

35
34
1

4

-

-

21
21

27
27

8

-

2
2

2

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

“

54

-

“

-

_

_

18

8

-

8

-

10

5
3

10
10

28

-

7
7

71
31
40
25

35
19
16
10

100
37
63
60

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

16

3

6

_

5

16

2
2

1

-

-

-

-

6

-

1.38

-

2

10

_

3

-

6

45
33
12

3

4
24
29
10

H

19

14
1

-

2

2

_

6
6

—

5.
5
_

_

.

40

r

-

_

3

1
2

-

14

10
2
8

3

4

21

10

-

1

27
27
-

4

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

4
2

.
-

-

1

23

-

-

_

9
9

-

25
85

-

_

2
2

_

12
12

5

13

_

-

2
2

7

5
-

-

1

7
-

-

l

over

6

5

-

1?

-

6

_
-

2 .0 0

1
1

-

-

_
-

1.90

34
34

10

-

"

1.80

8

4
8

“

-

20

1.70

3
3

1

5

11

1.60

8
8

18

-

7
1

Excludes premium pay for overtime a n d night work.
O c c u p ational Wage Survey, Memphis, T e r m . , Ja n u a r y 1953
Data limited to m e n workers except where otherwise indicated.
U.S. DEP A R T M E N T CF L A B ®
Workers were distributed as follows:
1 at $0.30 to $0.35; 35 a t $0.35 to $0.40; 26 at $ 0 .40 to $0.45; 2 4 a t $0.45 to $0.50; 128 a t $0.50 to $0.55.
Workers were distributed as follows:
3 at $0.35 to $0.40; 8 at $0.40 to
$0.45; 33 at $0.45 to $0.50; 131
a t $0.50 to $0.55.
Title change only, fro m "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous study.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




1 .8 0

32
32
-

12

33
-

1.55

37

4

---

1.50

-

35
4
31

35

19

f
1.70

68
68

33

35
-

19

$
1.60

40
15
25

Y~

9
9
-

_

4
4

-

-

$
1.55

14

20

10

7
7

$
1.50

14

20
2

3

5
-

-

10

5
3

-

-

26

29
17

-

a
a

“

9

12
8

_

1

12
7

53
59

6

1

1.45

3

6

165

1

1.40

40

29

1.13
1.13
1.14

.8 8

$
1.45

4

3

6

33

5

-

$
1.40

1.35

85
76

112

-

-

$
1.35

28
22

85
73

171

9

4
-

-

$
1.30

1.30

12 6
86

29
-

-

24
-

-

$
1.25

1.25

147
99
48

33
-

-

1.14
.81

1 .2 0

1 .2 0

-

85

$

1.15

-

—

$
1.15

2
2

-

Shinning clerks ..................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................

1 .1 0

1 .1 0

-

11 0

$

1.05

5
-

81

$
1.05

23

1.04

2 ,2 2 0

$

a nd

$
1.45
1.48

88
Laborers, material handling i / ................
Manufacturing ................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............................ .

$
O.bO

4
4
-

198
1 98
198

23
----5 ~
15
17
17

-

T

_

7

2

15
13

20

4

14

2

6

4
-

7
7

23
15

2
2

15
7

-

8

-

8

11

2

8

_

2

4
4
4

15
4

1

11
6

-

-

11

—
-

5“
5

1
1

2
2

-

-

1
1

7
4
3

2
-

2

2

2

-

3
3
-

24
-

48

24

48

34
34
-

-

51
-

5
*

-

42

-

-

11
7

-

_

-

16

_

.

-

_
-

_

-

-

“

16

-

14
14

93
93

10
10

9
9

6

-

-

-

_

_

_
•

_
_

51

-

“

-

6

-

33
33

23

1

3
3

23

-

-

-

6

6
6

1
1

21
21

_
-

6
6

3

-

-

9

B u r e a u of

La b o r Statistics

7

O Union .Wage Scales
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated. Additional
information is available in reports issued separately for these individual industries cr trades.)

Table C-15S

BmldUnp Q oniif
U4oUoH

Table

Classification

c -2 o *> i

BoAe/Ued.-Ca*f<H€€ect

Table C-27* P d d h t id U f

July 1, 1952

April 1, 1953
Bate
per
hour

Bricklayers .................................... $3,150
Carpenters
2.375
...................................
2.825
Painters ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2.313
Plantersra .....................................
3.000
Plumbers .......................................
2.925
1.250
Building laborers............................
IlMtrlaltna

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classification

July 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Machine shops - Continued
Agreement B - Continued
Cake:
Ovenmen ............................ $1,260
Benohmen ............................
1.205
Helpers:
.810
Under 3 months ...................
.850
3 - 9 months.....................
After 9 months ...................
.910
Wrappers ............................
.910

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40

Table C-205: /Z o Jl& U e d

Newspapers - Continued
Stereotypera:
$2,520
Day work
Might work .......................... 2.653

Table C-Ul* JH o OcU

Hours
per
week

S3

* 7 * < i4 * u t

Op&uUutf Cmplo^eed
___________ October 1, 1952________

July 1, 1952
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Table C-27*

Hours
per
week

$1,500
1.550
1.600

40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

_______ July lt 1952
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread:
Foremen............................. $1,840
1.560
Mixers, ovenmen, and leadmen .........
Divider operators, bun-machine
operators ......................... 1.450
Molder operators, bench hands, oven
helpers, wrapping-machine
operators........................ . 1.400
1.370
Checkers and order fillers ..........
Bread rackers .......................
1.260
Helpers:
1.050
First 3 months ...................
1.100
4 - 9 months ••••.................
1.150
After 9 m o nths...................
Cake:
Foremen ••••......................... 1.680
1.560
Leadmen...... ..... ........... .
Mixers ................................ 1.540
Ovenmen ............................. 1.480
1.460
Doughnut-machine operators ...........
Ingredient soalers ................... 1.360
Scaling-machine operators,
henchmen .......................... 1.330
1.310
Checkers............... .... .......
1.260
Leadwomen .................... .......
Icing-machine operators .............
1.190
1.130
Wrapping-machine operators ...........
Helpers:
1.050
First 3 mo n t h s.............. .
1.100
4 - 9 m o nths.....................
1.150
After 9 months •••................
Female helpers:
.970
First 3 m o n t h s .............. .
4 - 9 mon t h s..... ................ 1.020
1.070
After 9 m o n t h s...................
Agreement B:
Bread:
Working foremen ...................... 1.605
Mixers, ovenmen (first) .............
1.345
Ovenmen (second) ..................... 1.260
Dividermen, bun-machine
operators ............. ............ 1.240
Moldermen, benohmen ............... .
1.205
1.170
Wrapping-machine operators ...........
Helpers:
.870
Under 3 m o n t h s....... .
.910
3 ^ 9 months .................
.970
After 9 m o n t h s .................. .




C lassification
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
weak

1-man oars and busses:
First year ........ ...... .
Second year

....-«

Af t e r 2 years

Book and job shops:
Bindery women............................................................... $1,043
Bookbinders .................................................. ..
2.085
Compositors, hand ....................................................... 2.275
Electrotypers .......................................... .................... 2.592
Machine operators ....................................................... 2.275
Machine tenders ........................................................... 2.275
Photoengravers ............................................................. 2.720
Press a ssistan ts and feeders:
Cylinder feeders ................................................... 1.485
Platen feeders, men ............................................ 1.200
Platen feeders,.women ........................................ 1.043
Pressmen, cylinder .................................................... 2.125
2 -co lo r, over 25 x 38 i n c h e s ..................... ..
2.175
Offset presses:
17 x 22 inches and up to
22 x 3U inches ............................................ 2.100
2.150
22 x 3U in c h e s ..................... ..................
Over 22 x 3U in c h e s ..................... ..
2.175
2.225
Pressmen, platen
........... ........................ ............ 1.800
Pressmen, K elly 's, Miehle V erticals and
M illers ....................................................................... 2.100
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day work ................................................ ....... . . . . .
Night work ...............................................................
Machine operators:
Day work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TTTT____ . . .
Night w ork............................................................. ..
Maohine tenders (m achinists):
Day work . r r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Night work ...............................................................
Mailers:
Day work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Night work ...............................................................
Photoengravers:
Day work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Night work ...............................................................
Pressmen, web presses:
Day work ____. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Night work ...............................................................
Pressmen-in-oharge:
Day work
Night work ...............................................................

40
40
40
37*
40
40
37*
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

2.633
2.766

37*
37*

2.633
2.766

37*
37*

2.633
2.766
2.273
2.393

S3
S3

2.833
3.060

37*
37*

2.54-0
2.673

37*
37*

2.793
2.947

37*
37*

Table C-U2:

A fo t o ^ U ic A

and atfelpjeAA
_______________ July 1, 1952

G lassification

Bakery:
Agreement A •••••..................................... ............ $1,155
1.290
.950
.838
Building - Construction:
Up t a 1* tons ........... ••••••«..............•••••••• 1.000
1.250
1* - 2* tons, or 2* - U y a r d s ................. .
3 - 5 tons, or U - 6 yards ••••••••........... .. 1.500
5 tons and over, or 6 yards
and over . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.750
Furniture:
.970
Drivers, other than c ity •••«.•••••••.........
Drivers, c ity .......................................... ........... .. 1.020
.91:0
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grocery - Wholesale:
F irs t 6 months......... ..................................... .
.965
•800
After 6 months .............
Hardware:
F irs t 6 months •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
.965
.990
6 - 1 2 months....................................
After 12 months .....................••••••.................. 1.01:0
Helpers:
.91*0
F i r s t 6 months •••••••••••••••...............
.990
After 6 months ......................... ......................
Meat - Packing h o u se................................ ................ 1.365
Newspaper*
Agreement A ..................... .................... •••••.••• 1.051
1.051
Agreement B .... .................. .
Pick-up and delivery firms*
Under 3 months •••••••...........•••••••••••»•• 1.370
Over 3 months ............................•••••••••••••• 1.370
1.690
1.690
Money

60
U8
U0
1*0
Uo
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
U5
U5
U0
Uo

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis* Term., January 1953
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8




0 s Supplementary Wage Practices
Table D-ii

S U i^ t

Pdaoddiastd 1/
Percent of t o t a l plant employment By establishm ent
p o licy in -

S h ift d if f e r e n tia l

fb)
A ctually working on e x tr a
s h ifts in -

A ll manufacturing in d u stries
2d s h if t
work
A ll workers ............................................................................
Workers in establishm ents having provisions
fo r la te s h ifts ...............................................................
With s h if t d if f e r e n tia l ...........................................
Uniform cen ts (per hour) ..................................
3 cen ts .................................................................
5 cen ts ..................................................................
7 or 9 cen ts ......................................................
10 cen ts ...............................................................
Over 10 cen ts ....................................................
Uniform percentage ................................................
5 percent ............................................................
6 percent .............................................................
7£ percent ..........................................................
10 p e r c e n t ..........................................................
Over 10 percent ................................................
F u ll d a y '8 pay f o r reduced hours ................
With no s h if t d if f e r e n tia l .....................................
Workers in establishm ents having no provisions
fo r la te s h i f t s ..............................................................

3d or other
s h i f t work

2d s h ift

3d or o ther
s h ift

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

XXX

XXX

6 5 .8
5 1 .8
3 5 .7
1 2 .9
19 .A
.8
1 .1
1 .5
1 4 .7
3 .8
2 .3
8 .6
1 .4
1 4 .0

6 4 .1
5 3 .0
3 6 .1
1 2 .9
1 3 .8
2 .1
5 .8
1 .5
1 4 .7
3 .8
8 .6
2 .3
2 .2
1 1 .1

1 3 .5
1 1 .8
8 .8
4 .5
4 .1

3 4 .2

3 5 .9

XXX

-

.2
3 .0
.2
2 .8
1 .7

7 .4
6 .6
5 .9
3 .2
.4
.2
1 .1
1 .0
.7
( 2 /)
.7
-

.8
XXX

l / S h ift d if f e r e n t i a l data are presented in terms of (a) establishm ent policy and (b) workers a ctu a lly employed
on la te s h if ts a t the1 time of the survey. An establishm ent was considered as having a p o licy i f i t met any of the
following conditions * ( l ) Operated la t e s h if ts a t the time of the survey, (2 ) had un ion -contract provisions covering
l a t e s h i f t s , or (3) had operated la te s h if ts within s ix months p rio r to the survey.
2 / Less than 0 .0 5 p e rce n t.

Table d-2 : S c h e d u le d 'IV eeJzly d fo u k i
Percent of office 1/ workers employed in Weekly hours

All workers ................................
Under 37^ hours ............................
37£ hours ..................................
Over 3T& and under 40 hours .................
40 hours ..................................
Over 40 and under 45 hours ..................
45 hours ..................................
Over 45 and under 48 hours ..................
48 hours ..................................
Over 48 hours ..............................

All
industries 2/
100.0
(£/)
4.1
1.8
77.8
10.7
2.3
1.5
1.8

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

_
92.9
2.5
4.6
-

.3
41.3
33.5
15.9
9.0
—

Percent of plant workers employed in All
industries 2/
100.0

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

1.5
76.8
6.7
15.0

_
64.1
16.0
19.4
.5

_
.8
62.5
5.2
6.5
1.3
19.8
3.9

Public
utilities *

1 / Data r e la te to women workers.
2 / Includes data fo r wholesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; fin an ce, insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s
shown se p a ra te ly .
2 / Includes data fo r wholesale tra d e ; r e t a i l tra d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in addition to those industry div isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
£ / Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
*
T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Term ., January 1953
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s




9

Table D-3*

P a id J t o lid a ifl
Percent o f p lan t workers employed in -

Percent o f o ff ic e workers employed in Number of paid holidays

A ll
in d u strie s 1 /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

A ll
in d u strie s 2 /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .2
1 .9
5 .6 '

9 7 .8
1 .7

11.5
2 8 .0
7 .6
1 .7
1 2 .9

3 1 .9
A0.9
1 6 .2
3 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
3 3 .8
4.6.9
1 9 .3
-

8 2 .9
5 .2
9 .4
2 9 .3
3 2 .1
5 .0
1 .9
-

8 8 .0
2 .9
7 .5
1 9 .8
4 7 .8
7 .9
2 .1
-

7 0 .0
1 9 .6
4 4 .3
6 .1
-

.8

2 .2

1 7 .1

1 2 .0

3 0 .0

Workers in establishm ents providing
paid holidays ...................................................................
Older A days ...................................................................

Workers in establishm ents providing

A .l

l / I n c i t e s data fo r wholesale tra d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; fin a n ce , insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in addition those industry d iv isio n s
shown se p a ra te ly .
2 / Includes data fo r wholesale trad e; r e t a i l tr a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in add ition to those industry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
*
T ransportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .

Table D-4.1

P a id V a c a tio n ^ ty o tm a l P ^ o v id ia n l)
Percent of office workers employed in -

Vacation policy

All
industries 1/

All workers ...............................

Manufacturing

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Public
utilities *

All
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.3
97.0
46.5

99.6
98.5
54.6

95.0
95.0
56.1
26.6
12.3

90.9
77.1
73.8
.9
2.4

79.6
79.6
71.0

-

90.3
82.3
68.2
1.7
12.4
_
8.0
7.9
.1

5.0

9.7

After 1 year of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ...........................
Length-of-time payment........ ..........
1 w e e k ...............................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..............
2 weeks ..............................
Over 2 weeks .........................
Percentage payment i j .................. .
2 percent ............................
Over 2 percent.................. .
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ........................

(2/)

-

49.2
1.3
2.3
.3
2.0

43.9

.7

.4

-

1.1
1.1
-

See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .
*
T ransp ortation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .

NOIEs

-

13.8
13.8

8.6
_
_

9.1

20.4

Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Term., January 1953
u .S . D
EPARTM T OF LABOR
EN
Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s

Estim ates are provided se p a ra te ly , according to employer p r a c tic e in
computing v acatio n payments (len g th -o f-tim e or percentage); percentage
payments were converted to equivalent time periods in the e a r l i e r study.

10




Tabls D-4*

P a id

V a c a t io s U

W a 'U M a l P A o v & ia n i} - Q o * d i *tu a d

Percent of o ff ic e workers employed in Vacation p o licy

A ll workers .............................................................................

A ll
in d u strie s 1 /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

Percent of plan t workers employed in A ll
. in d u strie s 2 /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .8
9 7 .5
1 8 .0
7 6 .5
3 .0
2 .3
.3
2 .0

9 9 .6
9 8 .5
3 0 .7
6 7 .8
•
1 .1
1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 3 .3
5 4 .4
1 2 .3
-

9 2 .0
8 4 .0
5 4 .6
1 .3
2 7 .9
.2
8 .0
7 .4
•6

9 1 .9
7 8 .1
6 3 .6
.9
1 3 .6
1 3 .8
1 2 .9
.9

8 4 .0
8 4 .0
2 7 .8
.
5 6 .2
-

.2

.4

8 .0

8 .1

1 6 .0

9 9 .8
9 7 .5
9 .9
8 4 .6
3 .0
2 .3
2 .3

9 9 .6
9 8 .5
13^1
8 5 .4
1 .1
1 .1

9 2 .0
8 4 .0
3 3 .8
7 .9
4 0 .1
2 .2
8 .0
7 .0
1 .0

9 1 .9
7 8 .1
3 2 .4
1 2 .5
2 9 .5
3 .7
1 3 .8
1 2 .9
.9

8 4 .0
8 4 .0
1 1 .8
7 2 .2
-

.2

.4

8 .0

8 .1

1 6 .0

9 9 .8
9 7 .5
4 .1
8 9 .4

9 9 .6
9 8 .5
.5

4 .0
2 .3
2 .3

1 .1
1 .1

9 1 .9
7 8 .1
5 .7
6 7 .1
5 .3
1 3 .8
1 3 .8

8 4 .0
8 4 .0
4 .0

9 6 .0

9 2 .0
8 4 .0
1 5 .5
.8
6 3 .5
4 .2
8 .0
8 .0

.2

.4

8 .0

8 .1

1 6 .0

9 9 .8
9 7 .5
4 .1
8 4 .2
3 .4
4 .4
1 .4

9 9 .6
9 8 .5
.5

9 2 .0
8 4 .0
1 6 .3
6 1 .3
.5
5 .9

9 1 .9
7 8 .1
5 .7
6 6 .0

8 .0
8 .0

5 .5
1 3 .8
1 3 .8

8 4 .0
8 4 .0
4 .0
8 0 .0
-

8 .0

8 .1

1 6 .0

A fter 2 y ears o f se rv ice
Workers In establishm ents providing
paid v acatio n s ..................................................................
Length-of-tim e payment .............................................
1 week ...........................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..................................
2 w e e k s.................................................... ..
Over 2 weeks .............................................................
Percentage payment Q ................................................
2 percen t .................................................... ...............
Over 2 p e r c e n t ........................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ...........................................................

-

A fter 3 y ears o f se rv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v acatio n s .................................................................
Length-of-tim e payment .................................. ...........
1 week ...........................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..................................
2 weeks ...................................................................... ..
Over 2 weeks .............................................................
Percentage payment i j ................................................
2 percent ....................................................................
Over 2 p e r c e n t .................................... ...................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s ...........................................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 1 .3
7 6 .4
1 2 .3
-

A fter 5 y ears o f serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v a c a t i o n s ................ .................................................
Length-of-tim e paym ent.............................................
1 week ...........................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..................................
2 weeks ........................................................................
Over 2 weeks .............................................................
Percentage payment i j ................................................
4 percent ....................................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s ...........................................................

-

2 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1

-

8 5 .2
1 3 .7 .
-

-

8 0 .0

-

-

A fter 10 years of serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid vacatio n s ..................................................................
Length-of-tim e payment ..............................................
Under 2 weeks ...........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...................i .............
3 weeks ........................................................................
Over 3 weeks .............................................................
Percentage payment i j ................................................
A percent and over ................................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid vacatio n s ...........................................................

9 2 .9

2 .3
2 .3

5 .1
1 .1
1 .1

.2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1
8 5 .2
1 3 .7
-

.4

See footnotes at end of table,
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

“

-

.9




n

Table d -a :

P a id V cuxU ia*U (@ o 4m al P A a v id ia tU )G o tU itu ie d
Percen t of p lan t workers employed in -

Percent of o f f ic e workers employed in Vacation p o licy

A ll workers ............................................................................

A ll
in d u strie s l /

Manufacturing

A ll
in d u strie s 2 /

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .8
9 7 .5
A .l
5 2 .3
3.A
3 6 .3
l.A
2 .3
.3
2 .0

9 9 .6
9 8 .5
.5
6 3 .3
3A.7
1 .1
1 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1
2 7 .5
5 7 .7
1 3 .7
-

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 2 .0
8A.0
i 6 .3
3 9 .2
.5
2 8 .0
8 .0
.9
7 .1

9 1 .9
7 8 .1
5 .7
AA.2
.9
2 7 .3
1 3 .8
.9
1 2 .9

8A.0
8A.0
A.O
2A .6
5 5 .A
-

8 .0

8 .1

1 6 .0

9 2 .0
8A.0
1 6 .3
3 8 .8
.5
28.A
8 .0

9 1 .9
7 8 .1
5 .7
AA.2
.9
2 7 .3
1 3 .8

8A.0
8A.0
A.O
2A .6

8 .0

8 .1

1 6 .0

9 2 .0
8A.0
1 6 .3
3 5 .6
.5
2 8 .A
3 .2
8 .0
.9
7 .1

9 1 .9
7 8 .1
5 .7
AA.2
.9
2 6 .5
.8
1 3 .8
.9
1 2 .9

8A.0
8A.0
A.O
2A.6

8 .0

8 .1

1 6 .0

A fter 15 y ears of serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v acatio n s .............................................................. ..
Length-of-tim e payment .............................................
Under 2 weeks ..........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................................
3 weeks ........................................................................
Over 3 weeks .............................................................
Percentage payment i j . .............................................
A percent ...................................................................
6 percent and over ...............................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s ..........................................................

.2

.A

9 9 .8
9 7 .5
A .l
5 2 .3

9 9 .6
9 8 .5
.5
6 3 .3

3 9 .7
l.A
2 .3

3A.7
1 .1

.2

.A

9 9 .8
9 7 .5
A .l
A5.8
3 6 .8
1 0 .8
2 .3
.3
2 .0

9 9 .6
9 8 .5
.5
6 3 .3
3 1 .9
2 .8
1 .1
1 .1
-

.2

.A

-

I

A fter 20 y ears of serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v acatio n s .................................................................
Length-of-tim e payment .............................................
Under 2 weeks ..........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................................
3 w e e k s................................................. ......................
Over 3 weeks .............................................................
Percentage payment £ / ...............................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ..........................................................

-

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1
2 7 .5
5 7 .7
1 3 .7
-

*

-

55.A
-

A fter 25 y ears of serv ice
Workers in establishm ents providing
paid v a c a t i o n s ......................... .......................................
Length-of-tim e payment .............................................
Under 2 w e e k s........................... ..............................
2 weeks ........................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................................
3 w e e k s........................................................................
A weeks and over ....................................................
Percentage payment £ / .............................................
A p e r c e n t ................................................. .................
6 percen t and over ...............................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acatio n s ...........................................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .1
2 7 .5

-

5 7 .7
1 3 .7
-

-

5 5 .A
-

1 / Includes data fo r wholesale tra d e ) r e t a i l tra d e ) fin a n ce , insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e ) and se rv ice s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s
shown se p a ra te ly .
2 / Includes data fo r wholesale tra d e ) r e t a i l tr a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ) and se rv ice s in add ition to those industry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
2 / Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
y
Percent o f annual earn in g s.
*
T ransp ortation (excluding r a i l r o a d s ) , co n cu rica tio n , and o ther public u t i l i t i e s .

12




Table D-5*

fa U t t O

H C e

O H c t P e S v t i& H

fil&

Percent of office workers employed in Type of plan

All workers'............. ................

Workers in establishments having insurance
or pension plans J j .......................
Insurance plans 2 / ....... .......... .....
Life .................................
Accidental death and dismemberment .....
Sickness and accident .................
Hospitalization ......... ..............
Surgical.......................... .
Medical....... ......................
Retirement-pension plan ...... ............
Workers in establishments having no Insurance
or pension plans ........ ................

All
industries 1/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

n i

Percent of plant workers employed in All
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100*0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

93.5
88.8
86.3
13.5
36.5
71.1
37.5
20.8
50.1

93.8
92.8
87.0
16.3
51.7
75.1
54.4
29.2
34,8

100.0
100.0
98.5
66.8
57.9
50.9
1.4
64.1

78.8
73.9
70.7
15.2
38.0
57.7
40.5
19.6
35.7

81.0
78.9
78.7
23.7
48.5
65.7
48.3
20.1
40.7

99.4
84.0
70.2
50.3
48.8
43.4
2.9
66.4

6.5

6.2

21.2

19.0

.6

-

l /
Includes data for wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions
shown separately*
2/ Includes data for wholesale trade; retail trade; real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2/ Unduplicated total
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Occupational Wage Survey, Memphis, Term., January 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1 3

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau*a occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources. In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community. Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.
Because of the great variation in occupational structure,
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.
With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau *s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-l}-). The industry groupings surveyed are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) fcr which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment *s full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.
The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel.
"Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing indus­
tries, these work categories are included as plant workers in non­
manufacturing industriesi
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey. Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a uni on-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift*

office workers of- the table summarizing scheduled
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller*

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables* It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

weekly hours.
actually re­

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions in Memphis, Term., l/ and Number Studied by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, January 1953

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied*

2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
8cope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

6 ,7 9 0
1 ,6 7 0
5 ,1 2 0

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions .................................
Manufacturing............. ................
Nonmanufacturing............... ...........
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities •*••••••............ ........
Wholesale trade •••....... ••••»••.......
Retail trade .............. ..............
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Services 3 / ............ ................

51
51
51
51
51
51
51
51

1^3
•161
282

120

8 3 ,1 0 0
3 9 ,6 0 0
^ 3 ,5 0 0

^ 5 ,^ 9 0

b6
7b

45

17
17
20
9
11

9 ,7 0 0
9 ,3 0 0
1 ^ ,6 0 0
3 ,9 0 0
6 ,0 0 0

6 ,^ 3 0
2 ,5 8 0
7 ,9 5 0
2 ,2 6 0
3 ,^ 0

84
95

28
30

2 2 ,8 1 0
2 2 ,6 8 0

890
730
l,5*t0

1 ,6 6 0
300

1/ Memphis Metropolitan Area (Shelby County).
2/ Total establishment employment. The minimum size of establishment studied in all divisions in the November 1951 survey Was 21
workers.
3/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




15

Index

Bench hand (bakeries), 7
Biller, machine, 3
Bookbinder (printing), 7
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3
Bricklayer (building construction), 7
Calculating-machine operator, 3
Carpenter (building construction), 7
Carpenter, maintenance, S
Cleaner, 6
Clerk, file, 3
Clerk, order, 3
Clerk, payroll, 3
Compositor, hand (printing), 7
Draftsman, k
Duplicating-machine operator, 3

Janitor, 6
Key-punch operator, 3
Laborer (building construction), 7
Laborer, material handling, 6

Machine operator (printing), 7
Machine tender (printing), 7
Mailer (printing), 7
Machinist, maintenance, 5
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 5
Mechanic, maintenance, 5
Millwright, 5
Motortruck driver, 7
Nurse, industrial (registered), U

Electrician (building construction), 7
Electrician, maintenance, 5
Engineer, stationary, 5

Guard, 6

Office boy, 3
Office girl, 3
Oiler, 5
Operator (local transit), 7
Order filler, 6
Overman (bakeries), 7

Helper (bakeries), 7
Helper, motortruck driver, 7
Helper, trades, maintenance, 5

Packer, 6
Painter (building construction), 7
Painter, maintenance, 5

Fireman, stationary boiler, 5




Photoengraver (printing), 7
Pipefitter, maintenance, 5
Pla,sterer (building construction), 7
Plumber (building construction), 7
Porter, 6
Press assistant (printing), 7
Press feeder (printing), 7
Pressman (printing), 7
Receiving clerk, 6
Secretary, 3
Shipping clerk, 6
Shipping-and-receiving clerk, 6
Stenographer, U
Stereotyper (printing), 7
Switchboard operator, 4
Switchboard operator-receptionist, ^

Tabulating-machine operator, 3
Tool-and-die maker, 5
Transcribing-machine operator, b
Truck driver, 6
Trucker, power, 6
Typist, b
Watchman, 6
Wrapper (bakeries), 7
# U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : O — 1953







This report was prepared in the Bureau's Southern Regional O ffice .
Communications may be addressed to i
Brunswick A. Bagdon, R egional D irector
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s
50 Seventh S tr e e t, N. W
0
Room 664 .
A tlanta 5 , Georgia
The serv ices o f the Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s ' region al o ffic e s
are a v a ila b le for con su ltatio n on s t a t i s t ic s r e la tin g to wages and in d u stria l
r e la tio n s , employment, p r ic e s, labor turnover, p ro d u ctiv ity , work in ju r ie s,
con stru ction and housing.'

The Southern Region includes the

Alabama
Arkansas
D is tr ic t o f Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Louisiana
Maryland
M ississip p i

follow in g S ta te s:
North Caroline.
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
V irgin ia
West V irg in ia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102