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Occupational W Survey
age

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

Contents
INTRODUCTION

Page

..............................................................................................

1

T H E A L L E N T O W N - B E T H L E H E M - E A S T O N M E T R O P O L I T A N A R E A ............................................
OCCUPATIONAL WAG E STRUCTURE

1

............................................................................

1

T A B L ES :
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s ................................................
A-2
P r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s ..............................................
A-3

A-k

M a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s .............................................
C u s t o d i a l , w a r e h o u s i n g , a n d s h i p p i n g o c c u p a t i o n s ...........................

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on a n Industry basis B-35
M a c h i n e r y i n d u s t r i e s .................................................................

3
5
6
7

9

U n i o n w age scales for selected occupations C-15
B u i l d i n g c o n s t r u c t i o n ...............................................................
C-205
B a k e r i e s ...........................
C - 2 0 8 2 M a l t l i q u o r s ............
C-27
P r i n t i n g ..................................................................................
C-hi
L o c a l t r a n s i t o p e r a t i n g e m p l o y e e s ....................................................
C-k2
M o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r s a n d h e l p e r s .......................................................
C-5kl
G r o c e r y s t or e s ...........................................................................

10
10
10
10
10
10
10

Entrance rates D-l
M i n i m u m entrance rates for pla n t w orkers

11

...........................................

Wage practices E-l
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l p r o v i s i o n s .........................................................
E-2
S c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s .................................................................
E-3
P a i d h o l i d a y s ............................................................................
1-k
P a i d v a c a t i o n s ...................................................
E-5
P a i d s i c k l e a v e ..........................................................................
E-6
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s ............ , ....................................................
E-7
I n s u r a n c e a n d p e n s i o n p l a n s ...........................................................

11
12
12
13
14.
15
15

APPENDIX:
S c o p e a n d m e t h o d o f s u r v e y .......................................................................

16

INDEX

18




.......................................................................................................

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents
A u g u s t 20, 1 9 5 2

Introduction 1/
The Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton area is 1 of 40 major
labor markets in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is cur­
rently conducting occupational wage surveys* Occupations com­
mon to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufaoturing indus­
tries were studied on a community-wide basis*
Cross-industry
methods of sampling were thus utilized in compiling earnings
data for the following types of occupations: (a) office; (b) pro­
fessional and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant;, (d) cus­
todial, warehousing, and shipping* In presenting earnings
information for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate data
have been provided wherever possible for individual broad indus­
try divisions*
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices*
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton
Metropolitan A re a
The Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton Metropolitan Area (lahigh and Northampton counties, Fa*, and Warren County, N* J.)
had a population of almost 440,000 in 1950. Allentown accounted
for approximately one quarter of the total, with Bethlehem con­
tributing about 68,000 and Easton another 36,000.
The area provided employment to 171,000 wage and sala­
ry workers (excluding agriculture and government) in March 1952*
About three-fifths of these were employed in manufacturing estab­
lishments* Aside from the large steel mill located in the area,
substantial numbers of workers were employed in cement produc­
tion, knitting and weaving mills, and apparel manufacture*
1/ Prepared in the Bureau^ regional office in New lark,
N.Y., by Norman J. Samuels under the direction of Frederick W.
Mueller, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst* The
planning and central direction of the program was carried on in
the Bureau^ Division of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of.survey*




Transportation facilities— including river, rail, and
highway— are well developed, permitting close commercial con­
nections with New York and Philadelphia to the east and with the
Pittsburgh gateway to the west. Transportation, communication,
and public utilities provided employment to a large proportion
of the workers engaged in nonmanufacturing establishments*
Among the industry and establishment-size groups with­
in the scope of the study, three out of every four plant workers
were employed in establishments having written contracts with
labor organizations*
The degree of unionization varied widely
among the industry divisions studied.
About 80 percent of the
workers in manufacturing industries and nearly 95 percent in
public utilities were in unionized firms*
In wholesale trade
nearly half of the workers were in establishments having union
contracts. In the other nonmanufacturing groups, the majority
of the workers were in unorganized firms*
Unionization among office workers was almost exclusive­
ly confined to the public utilities group where approximately
two-thirds of the clerical force was working in establishments
having union contracts*

Occupational W a g e

Structure

The wages of approximately 70 percent of all plant
workers in the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton area were affected by
formal wage adjustments between January 1950, the base date of
the Wage Stabilization Boardf wcatch-upw wage increase formula,
3
and the time of the Bureau1 study in May 1952*
s
During the
first 6 months of 1950, there were few general wage changes*
The second half of the year— the immediate post-Korean period—
was marked by wide general increases*
Since then, general in­
creases have continued but at a diminishing rate*
Formalized rate structures for time workers were in
effect in establishments employing nearly 85 percent of the
area1 plant workers* Of this group, four out of five were em­
s
ployed under plans providing a single rate for each occupation;
the remainder were in firms having a formalized range of rates*
Formal wage plans for two-thirds of the office workers in manu­
facturing establishments provided a formal range of rates; in
nonmanufacturing establishments, a like proportion were in firms
where salaries were individually determined*
However, more
than three-fourths of the clerical employees in the public
utilities group worked under formal wage structures which pre­
dominantly provided for a range of rates*
Established minimum entrance rates for plant workers
without previous work experience were virtually a universal
practice in the area*
Although the established mlninpi ranged

from under 45 cents to over $l#A0anhour, there were significant
concentrations within industry divisions. Nearly half the work­
ers in large manufacturing establishments (251 or more workers)
were employed in firms with a minimum of $1.30 or more. The
largest concentrations of workers in wholesale and retail trade
were in firms with the 75-cent-an-hour minimum. Nearly half the
public utility workers were employed in establishments with
established minima of $1 or more.
In services establishments,
where all firms studied had formal minimum rates, more than half
the employees were in establishments which had minimum rates of
less than 75 cents an hour.
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing. In
11 out of 15 office occupations permitting comparison, average
salaries of workers in manufacturing plants exceeded those of
workers in nonmanufacturing establishments.
Average hourly
earnings of plant workers were higher in manufacturing for 15
of the 18 categories for which comparisons were possible; for
10 of these occupations the differential was more than 10 cents
an hour.
Almost a fourth of the plant workers in manufacturing
were employed on late shifts in May 1952. Virtually all extra­




shift workers were paid a shift premium, usually expressed as a
cents-per-hour differential above day rates.
Premiums of 4
cents an hour were typical for second shift work, and third
shift differentials generally ranged from 6 to 10 cents.
Paid vacations were granted to practically all workers
after 1 year1 service.
s
Vacation programs for plant workers
typically provided far 1 week*s vacation after 1 year of service
and 2 weeks after 5 years. The majority of office workers, how­
ever, received 2 weeks1 vacation after 1 year.
Nearly 70 percent of the women office workers in this
area were working a A0-hour week in May 1952* Chief variants
to this pattern were in retail trade and service organizations
where two out of three employees were working more than 40 hours •
In financial establishments, on the other hand, more than half
the women were working less than 40 hours, with a 35-hour sched­
ule most common.
Among plant workers, the 40-hour week was a
predominant schedule. Here, however, variations were consistent­
ly toward longer hours.
In the trade and services industries,
for example, half of the workers were on scheduled workweeks of
44 hours or more.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-ls

O ffo c * 0 C O U fu M o n i

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., by industry division, May 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Sex, occupation,

a n d indu s t r y division

Number
of
workers

W eekly
hours
(Standard)

Men

W

s
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
*
$
1*7.50 5 oJo o 52.50 5 5 . 0 0 57.50 6 0 .0 0 62.50 6 5 .0 0 67.50 7 0 .0 0 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0
a nd
*
*
32.50 3 5 .0 0 37.50, 1 0 .0 0 1*2.50 1 5 .0 0 1*7.50 5 0 .0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 67.50 7 0 .0 0 72.50 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 ;LOO.00 over

Weekly
earnings
(Standard) u n der

$

Bookkeepers, h a n d ....................................................... .....................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....................................................................
N o n m a nufacturing .................................................

liO.O

75.00

7 8 .0 0

-

_

_

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

m

.

10 .0
*
Uo.5

70.50

class

. .. .

16

liO.O

70.50

Book k e e p i n g mac h i n e operators,

class B . . . .

$

$

m

72
1*5
27

B ookkeeping m a c h i n e operators,

A

s

0
*
3 2 .5 0 35.00 37.50 1* . 0 0 12.50 1 5 . 0 0

-

11

3 9 .5

1* .0 0
8

Clerks, o r d e r .........................................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................. ..............................................................
N o n m a n u facturing ......................... .

82
62

3 9 .5

39.5
39.5

69.50

-

20

6 3 .0 0

-

-

Office bovs ...................................
T|«l T ! g T , , T T 1 T 1 - T 1 I ■ n 1 1 |

33
23

39.0
Uo.o

1*

2

10

3 7 .5

iili.50
1| « 5 0
8
35*50

61
1*2

10 . 0
*

62,00

112

39.5
39.5

1 7 .0 0
*

19

3 9 .0

37*50

10

39.5

li2.50

178
106
72
18
19

51.00

20

1*0.5
39.5
1*1.5
1*1.5
1* . 0
3
1*2.5

B ookkeeping-machine operators, class A . . . .
Manufac t u r i n g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

26

39.0

21

39.5

operators, c l a s s B « . . .

123

. . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

53
70

f

i i i i

-

itit

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................................................................

liO.O

.

6

15

•

-

-

-

-

“

-

3

-

9

1

_

2

3

12
8
1*

2
2

1
*
1*

1
1

1*
1
*

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

12
1
11

*

3

_

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

-

6
2

1
*

1
1

1
1

-

8
8

5
5

26
26

3

_

9

.

1
1

3

10

-

-

-

k

_

l
l

9

1
*

9
-

1
1

27

1
-

1
_

17

3

2
2

k
1*
-

-

3

1*

6
5

5

3

2

3
-

3

1*

2
2

5
5
-

-

-

_

2
2

k

6 1 .0 0

-

IS

h

2
2

9

-

1
*
1
*

2

-

_
-

1*

3

-

_
-

«>

6 8 .0 0

1*

1
1

-

-

18

11

-

3

5

7

9

3

1

3

1
*

3

2
2

7

1*

2
2

9

2

7

-

5
5

1
1

2
2

1
1

3

3
3

1
1

1
*
1*

•

23
18

11

16
16

10
10

1

8

1
1

.

_

1

.

„

8
1
*

2
2

-

-

•

_

■
•

-

-

-

-

.

3

3

„

•

-

-

Women
Billers, m achine (billing machine) .......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................................................................
W nnmanti f nr»+.n
B ille rs .

m a ch in e

rt^r

f l ................1 1 . | | _ . . . T r T 1 I |

f b o o k k e e p in g

m a c h in a l

-------

M a nufacturing .............................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ..........................
W holesale tr a d e .......................
Ret a i l trade 2/......................
Services ............................

Bookkeeping-machine
Manuf a c t u r i n g . . .
Nonmanufacturing
F inance it* . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer tvpa) ......... ...............
M a n u f acturing .............................
Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g .........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............................ .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ......................................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ....................
Who l e s a l e t r ade ................................................................
R e t a i l trade
......................... ...

?J*

F in a n c e

**■

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

131

k2

39.5
39.0
39.5
1*0 . 0

52

39.5

1*5

39.5

353
188

ko.o

165
38
1*9
U9
28

39.5
1*0.5
1* . 0
0
11 .0
*
1*1.5
39.0

1*5.50

2
2

k

13
£

35

30
!

t
2
S

5 0 .0 0

_

_

52.50
57.50
5 l*.oo
50.50

-

-

•

10
10
-

6

i

2
1
1

9
•

-

9

19
9

7
1
l

1*8.50
1*9.50

1
1

5
.

23
U
ll*

10
10

5

l

s
_

5
5

«

1

_
_

k

1
1

8
8

3

1

3

3

1

3

10
9

3

IS

3

5
10

1
1

2
2

3

l
i

3

1
*

16

16

1*

H*

15

3

2
2

1

-

-

22

12
1

8

18

21

1

22

11

37.00

2

22

5

7
3

ll*
1*

13

2

1*5.00
1*6.50

_

6
6

5
1
*

liii.50
1 7 .0 0
*
1*2 .0 0
U3.50
1*
1*.00
1 1 .5 0
*

8
6
2

22
7
15

ii3
13
30

-

-

6

2

•

7
9
6

Hi

5

3

1

8
5

9

5

5

k

3

3

3

5

5

1
*

3

3

1x9

55

21

18

30

36

23
26

20

5

H*

35

16

18
12

22
11*

7

10

2

15

2

31*

11

7

k

9
1

7
U

2

6

15

12
2

3

1 * 0 .0 0

3 6 .0 0

Hi

2

1 x 2 .5 0

!

3

2

“f e f o

-

.

_

•

5
l

_

3

20

6

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6
c
2

5

1*

5

-

6

2
2

k

1

U
1*

-

8
6

2li ‘
22
2
1
-

1

1

2
2

-

•

-

-

l

3

l
i

1

3

-

_
_

•

k

1
1

1
1

2
1
1
1

.
_

_

_

_

•

.

1
3

-

_

•
.

_

_

1

Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B ureau o f Lab o r S t a t i s t i c s

Table A-l

i

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., by industry division, May 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
worker*

Sex, occupation, a n d industry division

9
$
$
t
9
9
9
9
9
9
*
*
Weekly 3 0 .0 0 32.50 3*5-00 3*7.50 1 0 . 0 0 1*2.50 1 5 .0 0 U7.50 5 0 .0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 67.50 7 0 .0 0 7*2.50 75.00 60.00 85.00
Weekly
and
hour*
earnings
under
(Standard) (Standard)
32.50 3 ? .0 0 37.50 Uo.oo 1 2 . 5 0 1 5 .0 0 1*7.50 5 0 .0 0 52.50 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 62.50 6 5 .0 0 6 7 . ? 0 7 0 .0 0 72.50 75.00 8 0.00 85.00 9 0 .0 0
*
*

9

9

9 0 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0
L00.00

and
over

W o m e n - Continued

Clerks, file, class A .......................

27

39.5
39.5

t 7i

Clerks, file, d a a a B .......................

169

liO.O
10 . 0
*
jjo. 0

127
1*2
n
145
8i

Clerks, g e n e r a l ......................... .

3 8 .5
39.5

t
51.00
uU.50
37.50
38.00

3 6 .0 0
3 2 .0 0

1

Ii3
21*
19

9

FI TWV?** * * t t t t t . f f . t u l t l r t r M i t t l

29

38.5
37.0

li9.00
51*50
U9.50

Clerks, o r d e r .................... ........... .
Manufacturing ..................... ...... .

97
93

10 . 0
*
Solo

1*5.50
1 6 .0 0
*

Clerks, payroll ..................... ...... .
Manufacturing ..................... ........
f l g *»tITTTT«>Ttll»lT-Tr»»»

253
231

39.0
39.0

l
i

22

3 9 .5

l l .0 0
ii
1 1*.00
*
1*5 .0 0

ley-punch operators ..........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................ ..........
M o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............... ..........

1 05
79

39.5
£o.O
39.0

1 5 .0 0
*
1 5 .0 0
*
1*6 . 0 0

Uflmi f / + i H
n*.i

na

26

___

1*
l
i

Stenographers, general ......................
M anufacturing .............................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .................... ..
PlT^l 1 * Vtri]
*
g ^ ■iiiisrrrriirrisaa
^jAl
^
( - Ti l
Illllll

2/

i(l_1

Retail trade
........................
F j nmrfi * 4 T_ T - t t t * T. TTT. . . . T T . T f t t
_

39.5
39.5
1*0 . 0
39*0

1* . 0 0
6
1*7 . 0 0
1 3 .0 0
*
1*8 . 5 0
1 2 .5 0
*

1*3.5

3 8 ,6

3 6 .0 0

39.5
39*5

.

...............................

..

117
31

16

L0 . 0
.
liO.O
lil.o
l*o.5

Tabulat-iniMiaRhine operators .....................................
.
Manufacturing ............................................................................

27
25

1*0 . 0

Transcribine-machine operators, general
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................................. ..............................................

79
79

39.5

. . .

1 * 0 .0

6

6

8
7

28
26

3

-

1

2

3
3

20
7

•
-

10
2
8
8

39.5

-

29
12

10

17

8

8

2

10
2
2

_ 13

1

1

1

1
1

5.

31

35.00
35.00

5

21
10

7

7

21

12

9

$
1*
1

2

1

1

10

1
1

1
1

-

1
1

-

-

7
7

1
*
1*

1
1

5
5

5
1*

1
*
1*

12
11

«
»
•

•

•

•

-

2

2
2

1
1

1
1

1
1

.

.

.

-

2

28

31

63

53

27

19

3
•

6

1

1

12

59
i
*

1*9
1
*

-

-

•

3

5

2
2

1

1*9
37

1*1

12
12

13
13

106

88
18

_

3

2

57
1*5

76

12

ll*

62

1
.

3
3

1*

2

-

-

m
-

m

m

m

2

•

-

•

m

•

•

-

•

.

«k

1
*

—

13

1

17

10

6

15

11

2
1

5
5

11*

-

12
6
6

2
2

36

9

1

23

8
8

6
6

6
6

1

-

-

~

21*

-

-

1
1

5

Hi
.
-

9

5

9
-

-

1
1

1
1

-

___ 1 _ ___ Z— |
1
7
-

_

3

5

3
-

5
•

1
1
.

•

r

1

6

1

--------6 “

2
2

7

6
6

11
11

1
1

3

2
2

8
8

1

2,

1

3

3

y

1
*
£

“

11
11

ll*
11*
-

-•
-

$

25

6

18
18

33
29

2
1
1

18
18

1

1

lii

28

35
33

10

u

m

1*7
1*7
-

3

e
n

•
n

2

16
16

21

ll*
7

3

2

3

5

2

5
5

ll*

2

5

3

6

1*0

-

26

j

3U

a

-

17

15

£

1*0

1*3

n

27

18

11

a

20

55

26

3
3

50

8

23

j

-

3

12
12

15

_

32
23
2
5

m

8

3

9
5

j

12

13

38
35

3

9
■
a

11

38.50

1*0.50
1*0.50

5

13
13

9

5

37

5

16

6

1* . 0 0
0

1*7.50
1*8.00

16

17
13

-

10

21

5
3

-

-

5

38

36

-

-

5

3

ll*
y

-

53.00
53*00

39.5

3

15

3 6 .50

22

lli8

UUa I aaaI a ' fi*AriA . . .

51.00
U6.50

596
1*67
129
13
j
50
11*

Stenographers. tech n i c a l .............. ..
Hi
M a n u f a r ^ r i ng T t t * » » t T T t i 1 I T - * T - - i i » T T t t » — n r -

Nonmanufacturing ...................................................................

3 7 .5

1*
2

27

69

51*. 50
55.00

.

2
2

59
c
j

27

39.0

1
1

7

12

2

2

h

15

1

1

3
3

13

18

12

3

a

7li

3li.50

22
26

11
8

16
16

27

31*. 0 0

5 1 .0 0

8
5
3

3

2

16
12

39.?

39.5
39.0
1* . 0
0

5

1

3

5
5

1|

3 9 .5

■ i a r
59

39
31*

y

1*5

25
lil3

M a n u facturing .......................... .
Monmanufacturing ............... ..........
Retail tr a d e 2/« .......................
P*
ititt

2li
17

«
m

li7
* . ....... ...... .... ...

7

-7

21
21

m

3
2
2

2
2
1

1

-

-

2
2

1
1

1
1

1
1
1
1

-

1
1

1
1

_

m
e

'

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate*




Table A-l j
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., by industry division, May 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

W en
om

-

a

N u m ber
of
w o rk e rs

W e e k ly
hou rs
( S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
( S ta n d a r d )

a

a

a

$
$
$
$
$
a
a
a
s
$
a
a
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1+2.50 1*5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 100.00
and
and
35.00 37.50 1*0.00 1
*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52I 50 55100 5 7 ^ 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72750 757oo 8o7oO 857oo 9o7oO 100.00 o v er

Continued
$

T y p ists, c la s s A .....................................................
Manufacturing ............. ..
Mftpaapnfan tu ri rtg

196
165
31

39.5
39.5
39*5

1*6.00
1*6.00
1*6.50

T y p ists, c la s s B ...................... ......
Manufacturing ..................... ..
M
oiwmmufacfr»^w g *••••••.•••••••••••«•••

316
269
U7

UO
.O
1*0.0
39.5

38.50
38.50
37.00

1/
?/

10
10
61
59
2

6
6

H*

9
5
6I1

13
9

— Sri

28

I
t

20
9

69
61
8

“ 56“ ---

2

1+
6
1*
*1

35
33
2

10
6“

68

21*
21
3

11

22

10
10

8

25
25

8

5
5;

1
1

21
1

2

1
1

I
t

“

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Excludes department stores and limited-price variety stores.

P'tajeiAiO H cU a n d ^JeoU nical O ccu p a tio tU

T ab le A -2 :

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Allentoxm-Bethlehem-Easton, Fa., by industry division, May 1952)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

w

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

a

Weekly '
1 0 .0 0
*
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) under

a
a
a
a
a
a
a
$
a
a
%
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
U5 .oo 50.00 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 L30 .0 0 L3 5 . 0 G1 * . 00 iU 5 .oo
J0
and

U0.00 U5 .oo 50.00 5 5 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 70.00 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 . 0 0 :100.00 L0 5 .0 0 L Q.0 0 L1 5 .0 0 L2 0 .0 0 L2 5 .0 0 L3 0 .0 0 135.00 LUO. 00 LU5 .0 0 over
1

Men
*

63

Draftsmen, c h i e f .......................
~ w

~

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

......................

390
31*8

1 0 .0
*
10 . 0"
+

8 0 .5 0
8 0 .5 0

11*2
U ff"

wg

1

1 0 9 .0 0
1 1 0 .5 0

1 0 .0
*

6 2 .0 0
62.5 0

39
38

Solo

1
1

8
8

1*0

2

36

5©
50

UU
Ui

56
56

U2

6

U2

25

37

8
8

9

3
3

3

10
10

2
2

5

9

1U

T

-

10.0
*
10.0
*

18 .0 0
*

iis.00

5

9

13

U0 . 0 UO.O

S7 . S0

2
2

7
7

7
7

3 8 .5

lll .0 0

8

1

38

21

33

6
6

3

3

U9
28

-1 5

15
33

2U

6
5

11
6

6
6

— 5

17
17

15
15

11

11

8
8

5
5

u

U

2

2
1
1

*

u

2
2

•

•

u

5
5

U

9

*■

2

6

2
2

5

u

3

1*6

J _

5
5

Women
Marses. industrial (registered) .........
Manufacturing .......................
Tracers ...............................

2/

___ 32__
38
21*

5 7 .5 0

13

10
9

*

______ 1

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

M aintenance and Powmb P lan t Oasnnaticni

Table A-3:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Allentown-BethTehem-Easton, Pa., by industry division, May 19!?2)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Caroenters. maintenance.................. .
Manufacturing................................

Number
o
f
workom

280
27U

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Averse
h u i Undei 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1 .20 1.25 1.30 1 .35 1.1*0
ory
erig
ann*
*
1 .0 0
1.05 1.10 1*15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1 - t f 1.1*0 i.i£
$
1
1.73
3
3
- 3
3
' 1.73
-

s
$
t
*
$
$
1
s
t
$
t
t
s
$
s
t
s
1.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1 .70 1.75 1 .8 0 1 .85 1 .9 0 1.95 2.00 2 .05 2.10 2.15 2 .20 2.30
and
1.50 1 .? ? 1 .60 1.65 1 .70 1.75 1.80 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 over

265
250

1.72
1.70

Kn<rtn««rs. stationary .................................

83
63
20
283
226
57
2U

1.31
1.3 6
1.07

Helners. trades, maintenance................... ...
n r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ____. . . . ______ . . .
c

53U
89
83

1.1*6
l.ii7
l .l i l
l.ii3

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ........ ..........
VfivmfA^fnw^Mfr
. . . . . . . . . . .......... .................. ......... . . . . . . .

133
133

1.77
1.77

ffa^nt^narice men. general u tility
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . ...... ................. .
Nonmanufacturing.............................
Public u t i l i t i e s *

199
131
68
25

1.68
1.66
1.71
1.1*8

_

-

-

-

-

-

8
3
5
5

5
2

3

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ............. .
Manufacturing.............................................. ..............
Hommnufacturing......................... .
DnKl 4 w+4 T4 +4am # ....... ...... ... .........

169
1*3
126
93

1.6U
1.83
1.57
1*57

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

M«r h y i t r maintenance................ .
.arfM
Manufacturing .................................................... ........................

996
973
23
22

1.68
1.69
1.52
1*53

1

6
6

9
9

20
20

1.50
1.50

92
86

1.69
1.71

Pine f i t t e r s , maintenance ................................... ..................................
Mimif
na . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ^. . . . . . . . . .

165
165

Plumbers, maintenance ..................................................................
Mflmifar+.nt4no . . . . . . .... .............. . . . . . . . . . . . . ______
*

8
8

19
18

59
58

8
8

19
*
1*9

1
1

17
17

2

1

95
95

23
22

32
32

3
3

12
12

13
13

16
16

H*
11*

1
*

2
x
x

10

1
*
1
*
-

16
16
-

.
-

17
17

7

5

6

19
19

5

6

1
x

12
11
1

25
18
7

15
6
9

22
22

21
7
H*

23

7

8
15
it

5

■*0

13
3
10
8

32
32

83
83

1

1.72
1.72

169
169

18
18

1.78
1*85
1*57

Firemen, stationary boiler.......................
Manufacturing ........ ............... ........
Homaimfmaturing ..............................
D i l4a t». 1444a * 4 ...
iW
+4 *
$
... ........

36
33

21

maintenance............ ........... .
Manufacturing ............... .................

16
16

Public utiliti**?

tTTaaaatraiaaaatatTTatTTfafaag

n

Hf>mnprm
pg a TT. T1TTaaaa. 1 T T r t T T a i i r t f f t t a t f a i a
P11K I i n n + .i'H H o s «• ......................... .................................

MUlwriphta ....................... .................. .................. ......................
Uenn

n cr . . . _. . . . . . ___ ___ . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . .

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

3

18
3i* 18
8 18
2/26

I|1
1*1
-

6
6
-

36
35
1

26
20
6

2

11
10
1

2

_

-

3

18
ll*
u
3

5
1

25
n*
11
10

33
31
2
2

-

-

-

-

.
1

7

33
20
13
13
65
35
35

3

9
5
1
*
*

9
8
1

10
8
2

57
1*7
10
10

61*
63
1
1

37
31
6
6

18?
177
5
5

8
8

7

6
6
-

25
13
12
10

26
21*
2

6
6

2

1

3

5
-

1
*
[
i

1

61
61

3
2
1
x

5

i£
11*
?
2

1
1

l

7

v
t
J
l

1
x
6

266 15U
ZL 258 15U
g
10
8
10
31

7

1*

9

x
12
12
-

20
20
-

-

-

9
U
5

.
-

2

£

63

61*
61

f t

■
a
3

3

??8

2 228
x
x

2
2

31
31

1
x

1
*
k

17
17
*1

c;
P

5

21*
21*

17
17

15
15

10
10

13
13

1.63
1.63

1
x

J

3

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance
................. ..
MamifBftt.uring - t t t . T
t t t . t t t t t . tt Tt t t r t . rTttvt

53
53

1.77
1.77

21*
2l*

|
*

Tool-and-die m akers......................... ....................... .....................
Manufacturing.............................................................................

XS6
156

1.96
1.96

u*
n*

3

1

3

1
*

_
-

-

-

-

c
5

8

5

8

2

8
-

5
--

6
-

18

•
-

_
•

•

8
-

.
.

•
•

5
5
-

.
-

3
3
-

.
-

1
1

.

1
1

35
35

3

.

11*
11*

_

-

-

-

8
8

10
10

-

-

3

1
x

1
x

2
2

2
2

8

3

18

3

2
2

8

2
2

1*9
1*9

1
*

1
.
u

1
*
— r
4

C

2
2
it
t

16
16

17
17

22
22

21
21

*
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton,
Workers were distributed as follows: 18 at $.70 to $.75; 5 at $.80 to $.85: 1 at $.85 to $ . 9 0 ; 2 at $ . 9 0 to $.95.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




8
8

6

5

1/

.
-

-

5

3

1.79
1.79

y

.
-

3

10
10

m

#

.
-

2
2

3

.
-

2
2

1
*
3

21*
21*

8
8

.
-

-

26
26

30
30

13
13

32
32

1
*
1
*

1
x

TTT____TTi r »t l TT- - - T- T- TT»I Tr t T- T- TT»»t

1
1

6
6

7

-

3

Paint*™ , maintananr.a ................................................................................

7
7

i
*
1
*

7
l

37

-

2
2

-

7
7

6
6

6

38
38

2
2

X5 IX
11*

_

11

10
10

2
2

-

3
3

xx
11

2
2

3
3

-

3
3

-

x

1

20
20

1
1

.
-

x
8
8

Manufacturing ......................... ..................................................................

1
1

1*3
1*3

25
25

8

3

l
1

7

7

1
1

8

3

1
x

1
x

12
12

3

3

21
21

16
16

'

P a . , May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Custodial, 'kJa'teluuUUuf, and S k ip p in g O ccupation*

Table k - h :

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations £/ studied on an area basis
in AUentown-BethleEem-Easton, Pa., by industry division, May 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, e le c tr ic bridge (under 20 tons) .........
Manufacturing ...................................... .....................................
Jan ito rs, p o rters, and cleaners (m en )........... ..............
Manufacturing............................................... ......................

61*
63
900
707
193

Averse*

hourly
earnings

a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
s
s
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
TJndei 0.75 0 .8 0 0 .85 0 .90 0 .9 5 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 1 .80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00
$
and
0.75
.80 .8 ? .90 •95 1.00 1.05 1 .10 1.15 1 .20 1.25 1 .3 0 1*35 1.1+0 i*i*5 1 .50 i-5 5 1 .6 0 1 .65 1 .7 0 1.75 1 .80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 over

$
1*56
1.56

l+
l*
i*i*
51+

66
39
27

32
12
20

0-1
O
53

1.13
1.20
.90
1.12*
•92
.86
•75

Jan ito rs, p o rters, and cleaners (women)
f __T . . T T f l _ T1 T , ||(T -|-- f*iiiT*i|Tiit

89
57
32

.92
•93
.92

Order f i l l e r s ......... ......................................................................

132

1.3U
1.T9
1.27
1.21*

Packers (men) .................................... .....................................« . . .
ptamifap.tnfjni» r . . . r t . T . t . . . r . . . . f . t f . . t . . . t . t t t . t . r

299
290

1.12
1.11

1
*
1
^

Packers (women) ........................................................................ ..
Ifarmf O +.«t*4 n r r _. . . . . . . . . _____. . . . . ___ . . . . . . . . . ____
A

79
79
17

1.07
1.07

Receiving c l e r k s .............................. ............................................
Manufacturing..................*..................................... ..............
f
Tig t'STITITTTT1TI~lll|tTltailiai| 11

123
105
18

1.1*3
1.U5
1.28

Shipping c l e r k s ..............................................................................
f f a m i r i g . . . . __ . . . . ____ ________T_TT. TrTtT1Tt
fi
TTTTtT * t T- t __ Tit f- tTTIa III Sll Tlf

95
63
32

1.1*9
1.50
1. 1*6

3

Shipping-and-receiving clerk s ........................... ....................
f l a r m ffl
|*i n g I t l f l T I T i a r t T t T T T t l T a i T t T t T - f r a t t l t l T a
N o m a m i t > r turlng , t g f . „ t r . T _T . __ T T T ____ T _____ r T . . T T ,

175
11[3
32
20

1.1*3
1.1*5
1.31*
1.37

1

20
13
7

1
*

57
T7

5SmanAA u M
Q iH as . .
aw

U aI aoal a
K

. . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

............................ ...

.. . . .

^ . T T T T | 1 ___ i i m •i i r r r m t r t r
fw
ar^A . . . . . . __. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

W ho! p s a l p

lt

, , i , ,

t

. . . .

________

■i t m
____ _

nd
1S

5U
18
2
31*
5
5

1
*
1
*

6
p

k

7
3

n
5

1A
37
1
*
3

8

51
26
25
20

67
62
5
5

58
53
5
5

3

90
76

u
*

1
*

12
12

2
2

6
6

7
y

15
H*
1

1
*
1
3

16
1

12
12

12
12

75
75

2
2

12
12

5
3
2

1
1

27
22

1
1

5
5

1

31
31
-

.
-

11
11

-

3
3

5
3
2

1
1

9
9

•

”

"

"

“

•

-

-

-

•

•

-

-

•
-

20
20

3
3

-

-

-

.

.

.

H*
3
n

21
21

-

1*
it

5
2
3
3

1*

1*5
1*5

2
2

■
ja

58
13
1*5
25

12
12

25
25

3
3

28
21*

23
23

15
15

27
27

38
38

2

12
12

-

18
18

12
12

18
9
9

21
21

9
9

9
9

18
2
16

29
29

26
5
21
12

9
1*
ij

2

3
3

5

A
i

6
b

1

5
5
-

8
7

-

7

12
12

3

13
12
1

12
12

3

2

12
12

1

251
21*7
1*
2
2

2
2

18
l6

21
17

59
51
8

11*

3

See footnotes at end of table.
#
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




39
28
11

~

2

9
9

U *

10
ll
It

12
12

7
7

5
3
2

1
*
1
*

5
5

2
2

62
58

7
7

it

Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

m

9

O
7

m

Table A-In

G uAtodial, T4Ja>ieUouliMfr a nd S A ip fU H f OocMfxat iOHl

-

G oni mumd

2/

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis
in Allentown-Bet hieKem-East on, Pa«, by industry”division, May 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

of
w
orker*

Occupation and industry division

Stock handlers and tra ck e rs, hand

1.303
959
31*1*

s
9
$
$
9
9
9
f
s _ 9
t
s
9
9 ,„ s
9
• „ 9
l „ 1
• „ 9
9
9
9
9
hourly Undei 0.75 0 .8 0 0.85 0.90 0 .95 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1 .1 5 1 .20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65; 1.7c >1.75 1 .8 0 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2.00
earning* $
and
0.75 .80
-85 .90 -95 1.00 1 .05 1.10 1-15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.7C 1.75 1 .8 0 1 .85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 over

$
1.31
1.3 1
1.28

?

?

2
2

115
119

l .? 9

l.liOh
563
8I4I
17U
326
290

1.5 0
1-1*7
1.52
1.U3
1.61
1-52

139
7l*

1.32
1.37
1.27

1*80
22?T
252
106
91

1.38
ltu2
1.31*
1.3 6
1.27
X. t(

Track d riv ers, heavy (over 1* tons, tr a ile r
type) ..................... ..............................................................
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nnpmapi^fng

176
39
137

1.82
r
1.9 0

•

Truck d riv ers, heavy (over k tons, other than
t r a ile r type) .......................................... ..
M i fafit.nri ng TT1. t l T- TttlT1, - 1ttT1
am

337
100

1.57
1.1*1

•

t. , .

Trackers, power (f o r k -lif t) ........................................ •••••*
Marnifaptnrlng t . T1T. t . - t . - t . . . TTT, t t l t t T t i l t , . iTt. t

170
157

lit
li*

1.1*9
1*50

Truck drivers:

Total U/ ....................... ..

Pnhi 4 tvMI - Hf*> 4 ...................................................... ..
5K a
neeln f
.....
........................ .. .
R etail trade

Truck d riv ers, lig h t (under l i tons) ..................... ....• •
Moiufacturing
Nnmganufftp+.u• injr TtTT. . t t Tt . rt - u t r i m - t i , , , , , (||)
p

Truckers, power (other than f o r k -lif t) ..............................
Manufacturing .......................................................................

19

X5

]*

•
»

_

_

m

_
_

6
6

m

19
1
16
9
9

m

m

a
m

18

16
8
8

12

2

1*28
363
65
17
19

1-13
1.17
.91
1-00
.8 6

179
128
51
2
k
li5

11

18

20 109
6
36
11* 73
k
1
8
8
2
58

17
17

m

15
1
11*

6

10

6

8

6

6

6

8

m

m

u

2
2
2

\
l

|
*
2
2
2

u

8

11

8
8

n

m

m

•

•

ill
39 M
37 21*3
2 201
91
70
2
1*0

m

m

_

_

_

-

•

_

•

•

10

2
2

•

•

m

m

12
5

101
36
65
8
56
pv

•

_

1
*
k

m

_^5_
15
11

10
10

“

_ J 1 ___ 5
2l*
5
7

20
20

15
20
6
2

Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.

80 J £ _
78
33
2
10
6
2

16
16

51
51

$5
1*6
19
3
1
*
12

80
61
19
5

19
H*
5
5

??i\ 157
1*1 113
183
1*
*1
133
31
100
1*0 12
9 10
1

55 220
35 111
20 109
5
li*

11
11

3
3

38
35
3

150
150

88
63
25
5
1
*
2

li*
Ut

35
29
6

108
93
15

171
11
160

6

8

6

7
7

1
1

m

6

10
10

m

25
25

3
2
1

16
2
11*

29
0
20
6
11*

83
63
20
20

10L
12
92
1*0
8

77
55
22
12

25
19
5

7
7

2

21

2

21

23
18
5

k

56
56

•

6
6

•

2
1

3
3

3
3

1+
0
1*0

53
16

k

30
55
28 "1*5

77
76

12
12

m

m

3
3

6

11*
li*

8
2
6

21

89

21

89

9

3

83

'

29
29

2

•

2
2

8
8

• 160

8
2
6

•

9

m

83

18

6

-

-

33
33

_ 1 0 _ 1L ___1
10
1
17

_ 1_
_
1

6

9
9

160

16
16

12
12

m

3

14
ll*

m

m

li

i* -M l .
33*

1

Excludes department sto res end lim ited-price v ariety sto res.
includes truck drivers not shown sep arately, for idiom size-of-tru ck cla ss ific a tio n was not available.
Transportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ), communication, and other public u tilitie s *




1*3 152
39 129
1
* 23
1
2
20
2
2

6
—
6

m

2 j Study lim ited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
3/
£/
*

8
8

____ b31*3 1I56

Manufacturing ................... .................. ....................... ...
Monmanufacturing........................ ........................... ..
R etail trade J3/ . .................................................. ..
j
Services ......................... ............................................... ..

1/

15
15

2

Truck d riv ers, medium (1^- to and including
M n m i .....................................
W
rvnmovmfor+.utHng ttT __ i i t t __i i i i ‘ i ii- iif i i ia
Uhnl.pala
utTiiirttiitmim m itii m u
5fit.fi-M truuta
- - - - T11-t ■t-T r-r - » r r t 11-t - - •»r it
*
r

31
20
11
8
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-35:

M

a c k iH & u f

9

h

JU

u

& U U

1 /

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
4 ___

Occupation 2/

of
worker*

hourly
earning.
y

Assemblera, class A k/* ...............................................................
Assemblers, class B | / a ..............................................................
E le c tricia n s, maintenance h / a . ..................................................
Inspectors, class A h /a . ...............................................................
Ja n ito rs , p o rters, and cleaners ly 'a ......................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
cla ss A y a, y ............. ..............................................................
D rill-p ress operators, ra d ia l, class A I j / a .................
Engine-lathe operators, class A l / a ......................
Milling-machine operators, class A V a .........................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class A y a ..................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B y a, *> /...........................................................................
D rill-p ress operators, r a d ia l, class B b / * .................
Engine-lathe a e r a t o r s , class B W a ...............................
Machine-tool operators, production,"class C 1 / b .............
Machine-tool operators, toolroom U/a « . . . ...........................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand 1 / a ............................. ....
Tool-and-die makers (other than
tool-and-die jobbing shops) y a .........................................

159
67
23
27
1*2

$
1 .6 7
1 .5 5
1.61*
1 .7 3
1 .1 7

5U2
36
113
71*

1 .7 0
1.61*
1 .6 7
1 .7 7

k
h

9
9
9
9
9 _ 9 ,
9
9
9 _ 9
9
9
9
9
9 „ 9
t _ 9
9
9
l „
9
9
9
9
0 . 8 5 0 . 9 0 0 . 9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 . 1 5 1 . 2 0 1 .2 5 1 . 3 0 1 .3 5 1.1*0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1 . 5 5 1 .6 0 1 . 6 5 1 .7 0 1 . 7 5 1 . 8 0 1 .8 5 1 . 9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5
and
under
.9 0
. 9 5 1 . 0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 . 2 0 1 . 2 5 1 .3 0 1 . 3 5 1.1*0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5 1 . 7 0 1 . 7 5 1 .8 0 1 . 8 5 1 .9 0 1 . 9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0

1
3

1*

-

-

2

8

-

6

10

1*

-

_

_

.

_

_

_

«

_

_

_

3
16
3

9
11

1*

6
1*

2
-

-

1 .7 0

250
11*
5?
37
21
33

1.5U
1.1*3
1 .5 5
1.1*5
1 .6 8
1 .2 8

9

1*7
1
2
8

7
8
9
1*

11
10
2
1

8
2
3
2

6
•

10

_

1
1
_

21
1*
3

86

38
7
11*
5

86
3
2U
6

115
11
8
17

1*7
1
1*
8

99
1
23
29

18
_
1
6
1

k

31*

56
-

3

1 .7 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

2
2

.
-

2

o v er

1*

5

12
9
2

9
2 .1 0
and

10
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

U

2

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

8

6

11

3U
1*
1*
2
2

6

6

9

1*

51

19

51

18

15

9

2

-

1*
1
2

1
2

•

-

-

2

2

-

-

-

2
_

-

-

8
.

1*

1*
1

1
.

2
2

.

-

-

2
.
.

-

-

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

_

_

_

.

1

2

36
6
11
6
1*

1*

10

k

19
7
-

1
1*
1*

18
1

2

-

_

2

2
6

-

1

3
'

'

'

y
The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (191*5
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budgetj machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were also included. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
Data limited to men workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

f

y

Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

C:

Union W age Scales

(M
inimum wage rates and m um straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
axim
employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on M 1, 1952 in the three-county area.)
ay

Ta b l e C-15:

B u ild -U p G o + U fru ic tiO H
n zr

Classification

per
hou r

Bricklayers ..........................
C A r p a n t a n ..................................
Electricians

Painters * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$2,900
2.330
2.685
2.000

Plasterers
Plumbers ••••••■•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Building laborers ..............................

2.1*75
2.500
1.750

Hours
p er
week
1*0
1*0

Uo
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

Rate
p er
hour

Classification

3 m o nths

Af t e r 3 months

$0,965
........................
1.035

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Bread department:
Bake shop helpers:
Agreement A ......................... $1,295
Agreement B ......................... 1.320
Dividers:
Agreement A ......................... 1.1*1*5
Agreement B ......................... 1.1*00
Dough mixers:
Agreement A ......................... 1.1*95
Agreement B ......................... 1.600
Dough mixers' helpers:
Agreement A .... ....................
1.365
Agreement B ............ ............ 1.1*80
Holders:
Agreement A ......................... 1.10*5
1.1*00
Agreement B .... ....................
Ovenmen .................... ......... .
1.1*50
Packers*
Agreement A ......................... 1.1*20
Agreement B ......................... 1.31*0
Packing room helpers:
Agreement A ......................... 1.295
Agreement B ......................... 1.280
Roll boxers (women) ................... . 1.115
Wrapping machine:
Agreement A ......................... 1.1*20
Agreement B .........................
1.1*00
Cake department:
Cake decorators ........................
1.165
Cake decorators' assistants ............ . 1.085
Cake depositors ........................ 1.10*5
Helpers .............................. .. 1.295
Ingredient scalers ..................... 1.1*1*5
Mixers ................................
1.1*95
Ovenmen .................................. 1.10*5




Hours
per
week

U0
U0
U0
U0

Uo
Uo

Rate
p er
week

Hours
per
week

$60.00
62.00

UO
UO

70.00
69.00
69.00

UO
uo
uo

68.00
67.00

uo
uo

Wash-house:
F i rst m e n ..........
A ll other m e n .....

U0
U0
C-27:

UO
U0
uo
uo
uo
uo
uo
uo
Uo
1*0
Uo
Uo
1*0
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

Hours
per
week

First 6 m o n t h s ...........• • • • • • ............
Second 6 m o n t h s • • • • ...................... .
After 1 y e a r ...... ................* .........

$ 1 ,3 5 0
1 .3 8 0
1.U00

UU
U*
UU

Rate
pe r
hour

Hours
per
week

U0
UO

69.00
66.00

Apprentices, brewers*:
F i r s t y e a r ........
S e c o n d y ear ...... .
Bottle house:
F i rst m e n .........
A ll other m e n .....
Brewing department:
F i r s t m e n .........
A l l o t her m e n .....,
Coopers ...............

Table

Rate
per
hour

M & lt JldXfrUOSlA

Classification

lio h & U eA '

Cl a s s i f i c a t i o n

Operators, b u s a n d trolley:

........................

Table 0-2082:

T a ble 2 0 5 1

Hours
per
week

Cake department: - Continued
Wrappers and leers:

F irst

-C & C (U

Op&uUUsp CsHfilofftBd

T a ble C - Al:

Table 205* (Z a h & iie 'L - Q o s U in u m d

Classification

Table C-42:

M < U < V lt> U €ck

C l a s s ification

Construction contractors:
Concrete m i x e r s ...... ... . . • •................ $ 1 , 6 3 0
Dump trailer d r i v e r s ........ .............. .
1.930
Euclid drivers .............................. .
1.930
1. 7 8 0
Truck d r i v e r s ..... .......................... .
Department stores ........................ .
1 .1*30

UO
Uo
UO
UO
UU

P ^ u U iH X f,
Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

Newspapers:
M a c h i n e compositors:
D a y work ............................. .
$80.00 37 1/2
88.00 37 1/2
N i ght w o r k ....... .........................
Machinists, composing room:
D a y wsrk ....... ........................
88*00 37 1/2
Night work ...... ..........................
96.80 37 1/2
Mailers:
D a y w ork ...............................
6U.00 37 1/2
N i g h t work .................................
70. U0 37 1/2
P h o t oengravers:
D a y work ...............................
80.00 37 1/2
Ni g h t wor k ................................
88.00 37 1/2
Pressmen, web presses:
D a y work ...............................
80.00 37 1/2
N i g h t w o r k ................ ...... .
88.00 37 1/2
Stereotypers:
D a y work ...... ............ .
80.00 37 1/2
Ni g h t wor k
88.00 37 1/2

Table C - 5 4 1 :

QA&&CS14J & tofoC 4.

Classif i c a t i o n

Clerks:
First 6 m o n t h s ................................
Second 6 mon t h s ...............................
Third 6 m o n t h s .................... ...........

Rare
per
wee k

Hours
per
week

$U2.00
U5.00
1*9.00
5U.00

U8
U8
U8
U8

70.00
75.00

U8
U8

69.00
7U.00

U8
U8

Department heads:

Produce department:
First 6 m o n t h s ............ ...................

Occupational Wage Survey, Allen t o w n - B e t h l e h e m - E a s t o n , Pa., M a y 1951
U.S. D E P A RTMENT O F LABOR
Bu r e a u of L a bor St a t i s t i c s

D:
Table D-l:

Entrance Rates

M i n i m u m Cubumoe Pat&i

Plant lif&JteAA 1
/

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified minimum rates in -

Minimum rate (in cents)

All establishments .........

All
industries
2/

100.0

Under 4 5 ............ ......
Over IS and Tinder 5 0 .......
Over 50 and under 55 .......
60 ........................
Over 60 and under 65 .......
Over 65 and under 70 .......
70 .........................
75 .........................
Over 75 and under 80 .......
80 .........................
35 .........................
Over 85 and under 90 .......
90 .........................
Over 90 and under 95 .*......
95 ........................
Over 95 and under 100 ......
100 ........................
Over 100 and under 105 .....
105 ........................
Over 105-and under 110 .....
110 ........................
Over 110 and under 115 .....
115 . .
. .................... .
.
Over 115 and under 120 .....
120 ........................
Over 120 and under 125 .....
125 ........................
Over 125 and under 130 .....
130 ................... .
Over 130 and Tinder 1 3 5 .....
135 ........................
Over 135 and under 14-0.....
Over 140 ...................

0.3
.3
.1
.3
.3
.3
.1
22.9
2.5
4.4
3.4
1.9
2.4
1.0
.5
.9
1.7
5.6
.1
1.9
4.9
.3
2.2
3.3
.2
4.2
1.0
.4
5.6
21.8
.2
.2
.2

Establishments with no
established minimum......

4.6




1/
2/
2/
*

Manufacturing
establishments
with 251 or
21-250
more
workers
workers

100.0

0.2
41.9
9.5
8.0
2.4
5.3
1.4
1.3
.3
1.3
4.2
.8
1.3
7.2
.5
-

2.2
_
.4

11.8

100.0

11.4
4.2
1.1
1.6
.3
.7
1.5
10.2
2.1
6.4
2.2
1.3
7.3
1.9
8.8
39.0
-

Public
utilities*

100.0

Wholesale
trade

100.0

Retail
trade

100.0
4.0
21.2
14.8
7.8
7.9
30.3
10.2
3.8

5.7
2.2
2.7
21.4
13.3
7.2
9.0
4.8
4.8
10.8
5.0
4.2
3.4

5.3
17.9
4.9
15.1
-

5.5

2.6

6.9

37.3
7.5
5.7
_
3.2
-

_
_

Supplementary W age Practices

Table E-l:
Services

100.0
4.8
1.0
3.0
6.5
32.5
3.9
3.9
10.1
4.3
8.2
8.7
.8
_
5.4
_
-

E:

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Excludes department stores and limited-price variety stores.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

-

_
_
_
_
_

S t lifft

3 > i^ ^ e 4 ^ u t i a l P A M ittO U A

Shift differential

Percent of plant
workers employed
on each shift in
all manufacturing
industries
2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ................

15.5

7.5

Receiving shift differential .......

13.9

7.2

Uniform cents (per hour) ......
4 cents ....................
5 cents ....................
6 cents ....................
7^ cents ...................
8 cents....................
9 cents ................... .
10 cents ........ ..........

11.3
7.3
2.1
.6

7.0
5.8
.3
.2
.7

Uniform percentage ............
5 percent ..................
10 percent .................
25 percent .................

2.6
.9
1.7

-

1.6

.3

Receiving no differential ........

-

.8
.5

.2
.1
.1

_

.
.
Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., ’ f y 1952
-e
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

ScU&dul&d Wj&eJzlif JloutU

Table E-2*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS

Weekly hours

All establishments .................
Under 35 hours ................. ..
35 hours............... .. ..........
Over 35 and under 3 7 j hours ...........................

3 7 l hmin

T

* T - t - T T ....................... ............... T- T

- - TTTt

Over 3 7 i and under U0 hours..........
U0 hours ..........................
Over L0 and under UU hours..........
UU hours ..........................
Over UU and under U8 hours * ...................................
U8 hours...............................................................................................
Over L8 hours ..............................................................................

1/

2/
y
*
**

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

EMPLOYED IN—

AU
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade
2/

Finance**

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 .3

_

_

_

.2

1.0
2.8
•2
8 .U
6 .U

69.1
8.5
3.U

-

.9
.2
6.8

-

—

2 1.3
-

9.6
UU.2
7.5

8.3
.7

-

-

-

.2

3 3 .1
-

1 U.6

1 6 .0

26.6

•U
7 8 .3

5 .U
7 6 .lt

-

2.1

2 0 .3

-

U8.8
-

33.1
27.U
U.6
-

12.1

-

-

-

-

“

~

”

-

U.2

2 9 .5

-

-

-

-

-

”

“

15.8

-

50.5

|

AU
industries 1/ Manufacturing
100.0

.1

.9
.9

Sendees

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0.0

-

-

_

•

-

1.U
1.9

1.5
8.9
2.9
3.3
2.5

71.3
-

2.8

78.8

_

-

1 .0
1 .0
8 L.2
7.U

19.8
8.9

50.7
-

23.6
9.8
U.2
11.7

_
-

•
.8
1 2.1

28.9
36.0

1.5
12.8

_

U .o
.

3U.3
8 .U
1U.3
7.9
31.1

7.9

Piaid alfolidcupi

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N AU
in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tU itie s*

100.0

100.0

97.U

97.9

1 to 5 d«y« ........................
5 d a y s ............................
6 days .................... ... ................................
6 ^ days ............ ............................................... ....
7 days ............................
7f HaVI ................... .
8 days ............................
8j d a y s ....... ...................
9 days ............................
1? Hays ,........... _____ ___ ...
13 d a y s ...........................

1.5
1.8
70.1
3.5
5.2
«5
9.3
.1
2.U
.6
2.U

1.9
2.U

Establishments providing no
paid holidays....... ...............

2.6

All establishments ....................
Establishments providing paid holidays

*
**

RetaiUpde

.3
-

-

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number of paid holidays

y
y

Wholesale
trade

D a t a r e l a t e to w o m e n workers*
Ex c ludes d e p a r t m e n t stares and limited-price v a r iety stares.
Includes d ata for industries in addition to those shown separately*
T r a n sportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Finance, insurance, and r e a l estate*

Table E-3

y

Public
utilities*

. .

8 u .e

3.2
3.7
1.9
(y >

Wholesale
trade

R eta^ rad e

S e r v io e s

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

6U.3

63.1

91.1

88.3

72.U

29.1

U.U
U.o
U6.7
.1
5.1

U.1
U.6
U9.2

15.6

-

U.9

•
28.7

3.9

1U.1

3U.7
9.8
21.2

2.8

3U.7
26.7

17.7
U.9

U.7
.6

•
-

1.2

1.2
.1

■

-

-

-

-

-

-

U9.6

35.7

36.9

8.9

27.6

70.9

F in a n c e **

S e r v ic e s

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.1

100.0

97.U

99.6

50.L

1.5
59.9
13.7

-

-

-

-

3.0
-

6.5
65.5
21.1

•
•

36.1
11.6
32.1
2.8
7.6
9.8

3.3

-

Ul.0
9.U

9.2
7.2
2.6

19.U
-

M
-

10.2
39.8

-

-

-

-

2.1

3.9

■

2.6

Exc l u d e s d e p a rtment stores and limited-price variety stores.
I ncludes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
L ess than .05 of 1 percent*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other p ublic utilities.
Finance, insurance, a nd real estate*




P u b lic
u t U it ie s *

R e ti^ x a d e

.

30.2
-

.U

.

M a n u fa c tu r in g

W h o le s a le
tra d e

_

AU
in d u s tr ie s £■/

(3/)

-

-

11.7

•

U5.7
16.5

-

•U

_

Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehesn-Easton, Pa., M a y 1952
U.S. DEPAR T M E N T OF LABOR
B u r e a u o f Labor S t a t istics

Table E-4*

Paid V&c<Uia*tl (fyokMol PjuuUlioni)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V a c a tio n p o l i c y

All
industries

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts .....................................................

1 0 0 .0

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Retail^tapade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Services

ah
industries 2 / Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Finanoe**

Retail trade
1/

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith p a id v a c a t io n s .......... ..

9 9 .U

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .6

9 8 .3

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .5

9 8 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .il

9 6 .3

7 5 .8

1 week ...........................................................................
2 weeks .........................................................................

iiii.7
5 ii.7

3 5 .7
6 3 .9

1 0 0 .0

6 9 .6
2 6 .0

8 5 .9
1 2 .ii

1 9 .0
8 0 .6

7 li.8
2 5 .2

9 2 .6
i i.9

9 2 .8
5 .2

1 0 0 .0

7 9 .7
1 7 .7

9 5 .0
1 .3

7 5 .ii
.ii

.6

.i;

li.ii

1 .7

.ii

2 .5

2 .0

2 .6

3 .7

2ii.2

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith p a id v a c a tio n s .............

9 9 . ii

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .6

9 8 .3

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .5

9 8 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .ii

9 6 .3

7 5 .8

1 week ...........................................................................
Over 1 and und er 2 weeks ..............................
2 weeks .........................................................................

2 8 .3
1 .1
7 0 .0

2 7 .9
l .i ;
7 0 .3

1 6 .3

5 0 .7

_

7 ii.8

7 3 .1
1 2 .7
1 2 .2

6 7 .1
3 0 .3

7 2 .0
.9
2 3 .il

7 5 .ii

9 9 .6

7 1 .3
1 1 .3
l i i .9

3 2 .0

iiii.9

6 5 .2
2 .2
3 0 .9

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no p a id v a c a tio n s . . .

.6

.ii

ii.ii

1 .7

.ii

2 .5

2 .0

2 .6

3 .7

2i|.2

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith p a id v a c a t io n s .............

9 9 .h

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .6

9 8 .3

9 9 .6

1 week ............................................................................
Over 1 and un d er 2 weeks ............... ..............
2 weeks .........................................................................
Over 2 and u n d er 3 weeks ..............................
3 weeks ........................................................................

7 .2
.1
9 0 .8
.3
1 .0

U .7

5 .8

2 8 .6

9 ii.9

9U .2

3 0 .9
2 .2
6 5 .2

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no p a id v a c a tio n s . . .

.6

.2i

9 9 . ii

9 9 .6
U .5
7 3 .6

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no p a id v a c a tio n s

...

-

2 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e

8 3 .7

-

-

-

2 5 .2

_

6 8 .0

_

_

.ii

5 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e

-

-

_

-

6 7 .0

9 7 .6

9 8 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .ii

9 6 .3

8 2 .6

1|6.5
-

1 0 0 .0

1 6 .0
.1
8 1 .5

1 3 .5

1 1 .2

i|2.6

iiii.7
.9
5 0 .7

5 7 .6

-

5 3 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 6 .9
5 .1
1 7 .6

ii.ii

1 .7

.ii

1 0 0 .0

9 5 .6

9 8 .3

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

5 .8
2 2 .9

2 8 .6
5 9 .il

3 0 .9
6 1 .1

7 1 .8

i i6 .5
5 3 .5

_

-

7 .6

6 .3

2 7 .8

ii.ii

1 .7

.ii

-

8 ii.5

-

8 8 .8

-

5 ii.8

-

2 5 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 . it

2 .0

2 .6

3 .7

1 7 . ii

9 7 .6

9 8 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .ii

9 6 .3

8 2 .6

1 5 .5
6 9 .3
1 .3
1 1 .5

1 2 .9
7 2 .9
1 .5
1 0 .7

1 1 .2
i|8.ii

i|2.6
3 7 .1

iiii.7
iiii.O

5 7 .6
2 5 .0

2 .ii

2 .0

15 y e a rs o f s e rv ic e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith p a id v a c a tio n s .............
1 week ...........................................................................
2 weeks .........................................................................
Over 2 and und er 3 weeks ..............................
3 weeks ...................................... .......................... ..

7 .1
67.U
2ii.9

2 1 .5

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no p aid v a c a tio n s . . .

.6

.h

1/
2/
*

-

-

_
7 1 .3

Excludes department stores and limited-price variety stores.
Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

-

-

ilO.ii

-

-

1 7 .7

7 .6

2 .6

3 .7

-

1 7 .ii

Occupational Waee Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., May 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Paid SicJz Jl&au<e (fyokmal Pa m M amA)

Table E-5

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N -

P r o v is io n s f o r p aid s i c k le a v e

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts ......................... ...........................

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

RetaU^r*de

Finance**

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

3 2 .0
4 .3
2 .3
.4
2 4 .0

38.2

23.6

6.1

2 1 .9
1 .7
-

-

.1

5 .4
.4
3 2 .0
.4
-

7 .6
5 .9
1 .7
-

6 .4
5 .1
1 .3

2 7 .6
2 7 .6
-

68.0

61.8

7 6 .4

9 3 .9

9 2 .4

9 3 .6

7 2 .4

9 7 .7

3 7 .8

4 4 .5

23.6

1.1
11.0

1 .5

7 .2
7 .6
-

1 6 .3
1 5 .0
1 .3
-

3 3 .1
2 7 .6
5 .5
-

2 .7
-

-

1 .7
1 2 .3
9 .6
-

7 .6
-

14.8

.8

5 5 .5

7 6 .4

9 2 .4

85.2

8 3 .7

6 6 .9

9 7 .3

9 9 .9

4 2 .5

5 0 .1
1.1
10.6

2 9 .3
1 .7
5 .7
1 2 .3
9 .6

7 .6
7 .6

1 4 .8
7 .2
7 .6
_

1 6 .3
1 5 .0
-

3 3 .1

.8
8.2
.6
.2

5 .8
-

2 7 .6
5 .5

.2
.6
.2

3 .4
-

8 3 .7

6 6 .9

1 6 .3
_
-

33 . i

All
industries 2 /

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail^trade

Servioes

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0.0

100.0

2 .3
.4

0.1

3 6 .7
3 3 .5
3 .2
-

1 5 .1
1 5 .1
-

8 .7
7 .4
1 .3
-

8 .4
8 .4
-

9 9 .9

6 3 .3

8 4 .9

9 1 .3

91. 6

.1

3 6 .7
2 4 .7
-

1 7 .7
1 5 .1
2.6

1 7 .3
4 .7
8 .7
3 .9
-

8 .4
8 .4
-

6 3 .3

8 2 .3

8 2 .7

91. 6

4 2 .3
8 .9
-

1 7 .3
4 .7
8 .7
3 .9
-

8 .4
8 .4
-

6 months o f s e r v i c e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm al p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e .............................................
Under 5 days ............................................................
5 days ...........................................................................
6 days ...........................................................................
7 days ...........................................................................
10 days .........................................................................
12 days .........................................................................
20 days .........................................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s ic k le a v e ..............................................

.6

.3

6.1

-

1.2
.2

.3
.2

-

.1

-

1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l o r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e .............................................
Under 5 days ............................................................
5 days ...........................................................................
6 days ................................................. %
......................
7 days ...........................................................................
10 days .........................................................................
12 days .........................................................................
1 5 days .................................................. ......................
16 days .........................................................................
20 d a y s .................... 1 ................................................
Over 2 0 days ............................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm al p r o v is io n s
f o r paid s i c k le a v e .............................................

8 .5
.6
.2

2 .3
.1

2 4 .8
.3
.1
.1

6 2 .2

.4
32.0

6.1

.2
.6
.2
1.0

.5
.2

Q /)

.1

-

12.0

-

2 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm al p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k l e a v e .............................................
Under 5 days ............................................................
‘5 days ...........................................................................
6 days ...........................................................................
7 days ...........................................................................
10 days .........................................................................
12 days .........................................................................
15 days .........................................................................
20 days .........................................................................
Over 2 0 days ............................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm al p r o v is io n s
f o r o a id s ic k l e a v e .............................................

1 .7
.1

.3
1.2

2 9 .4

.3
.4
3 7 .7

5 7 .5

4 9 .9

7 0 .7

9 2 .4

8 5 .2

4 2 .8

5 0 .1
1.1

6 .3
-

3 2 .1
_
_
_

7 .6
_
_
-

14.8

.8

5 .0

1 .3
-

3 .3

2 1 .4

3 .6

12.0

1 7 .7
1 7 .7

9 4 .2

9 6 .6

5 7 .7

8 2 .3

8 2 .7

91. 6

6 .4
-

3 .4
_
_
-

5 7 .9
_
_
-

1 7 .7
-

1 7 .3
4 .7
8 .7
3 .9

8 .4

.3
.1
.8

-

.1

1 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm al p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k l e a v e .............................................
Under 5 days ............................................................
5 days ...........................................................................
6 days ...........................................................................
7 days ...........................................................................
10 days .........................................................................
12 days ........................................ ................................
15 days .........................................................................
20 days .........................................................................
Over 2 0 days ............................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm al p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s ic k le a v e .............................................

1/
2/

2J

**

*

.6
.2
1.1
.1

3 .2

-

.3

1 .7
_
_

-

15.0

2 7 .6
-

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 .3

3 .4

5 4 .7

1 7 .7

9 3 .6

9 6 .6

4 2 .1

8 2 .3

7 .6

5 7 .2

4 9 .9

6 7 .9

9 2 .4

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

85.2

- 1 .3
-

8 3 .7

-

6 6 .9

-

3 .2

-

3 0 .4

_
8 .4

-

-

Excludes department stores and limited-price variety stores.
Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.




-

.2
.6
.2

-

3 1 .7

-

-

|
I

-

4 .3
a /)
3 8 .1

.1

_
7 .2
7 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8 2 .7

91.6

Occupational Wage Survey, Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., May 1952
u * » DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
s
Bureau of Labor Statistics

NanfiA^du^otian RosudA&L

Table E-6

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Type o f bonus

All
industries

All
industries £/ Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Reta^rade

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100. c

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith n o n p ro d u c tio n
b o n u se s
.................................................................

2 7 .0

1 9 .7

5 .8

U 5.2

8 8 .5

9 2 .1

U 8.0

C h ris tm a s o r y e a r - e n d ...................................
P r o f i t - s h a r i n g .....................................................
O t h e r ............................................................................

2 5 .1
1 .0
.9

1 9 .0
-

5 .8

U 5 .2

6 9 .it
1 7 .6
5 .1

U 8.0
-

-

-

.2

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith no
n o n p r o d u c tio n b o n u s e s ................................... ..

7 3 .0

80.3

7 .9

5 2 .0

A l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s ...................................................

y

1/

y

3/
*
**

-

-

-

-

9U .2

.7

8 5 .0
3 .5

5 U .8

1 1 .5

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

RetaiHfade

Servioea

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 8 ,3

1 5 .3

9 .0

33. U

69 .U

33.U

1 8 .1

1 5 .3
-

9 .0

33. U

6 5 .5

33.1*

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

3 .9

-

3 0 .6

6 6 .6

8 !. 7

8U .7

9 1 .0

6 6 .6
1

Exc l u d es dep a r t m e n t stores and limited-price variety stores.
Includes d a t a for industries in addition to those shown separately.
U n d u p l i cated total.
Trans p o rtation (excluding railroads), communication, a n d other public utilities.
F inance, insurance, and r e a l estate.

Table E-7:

9*lA*UA<UU>e OHcl P-ettliO H , PAotU

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type of plan

A l l estab l i s h m ents ........................

All
industries

100.0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

Manufacturing

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

RetaiH^ade

Finance**

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

AH
.,
industries 2/

1
1

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Retai^tpde

Sendees

100.0

100.0

Esta b l i s h m e n t s w i t h insurance or
p e n s i o n p l ans
.........................

88.7

9 0 .5

93.0

81.0

6 9 .5

88.3

38.6

88.1

9 0 .1

91.3

62.3

7U.9

38.U

Lif e i n s u r a n c e .............. ...........
H e a l t h i n s urance .......................
H o s p i t a l i z a t i o n ........................
R e t i r e m e n t pe n s i o n .....................

75.7
63.6
62.9
6U.lt

80.3
75. U
7U.6
6 7 .U

77.9
8.8
8 .8
68. U

6U.9
U9.3
U3.2
U3.5

51.9
50.1
3 5.5
32.9

U8.6
26.3
37.5
70.9

29.1
29.1
38.6

*72.3
82.3
79.U
60. U

5U.3
21.1
21.1
50.3

5 0 .0

33.0
17.9
36.9

6 2.0
5U.U
3U.3
31.1

20.5
38.0
38. U

-

69.9
77.2
73.5
57.2

11.3

9.5

7.0

19.0

30.5

11.7

61. U

11.9

9 .9

8.7

37.7

25.1

61.6

y

Establi s h m e n t s w i t h no insurance
or p e n s i o n p l a n s .................... .

\/
y
y
*
**

E x c l u d e s de p a r t m e n t stores and limited-price v ariety stores.
Includes da t a for industries in addition to those shown separately.
U n d u p l i c a t e d total.
Bur e a u of Labor Statistics
Trans p o rtation (excluding railroads), communication, and other p u blic utilities.
Finance, insurance, and r e a l estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Allentovn-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa., M a y 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF L A BOR

16

Appendix

Scope anc Method of Survey
»

With the exception of the union soale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations * (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying oroes-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




-

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment1* full-time
schedule for the given occupational class if icat ion.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed In
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table sumoarizing scheduled weekly hours • Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements • It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

17

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES
IN ALLENTOWN-BETHLEHEM-EASTON, PA., 1/ AND NUMBER STUDIED
BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MAY 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
eestablishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
21
21
21

169
83
86

1 ) * 800
1.,
97,700
17,100

60,620
51,370
9,250

7,710
5,930
1,780

33
59

16
17

5,1*00
2,500

1*,620
790

9U0
200

21
21
21

U tilitie s

Wholesale trade
Retail trade, except department stores
and limited-price variety stores
Finance, insurance, and real estate .........
Services 3/ * o . . . o . . o c . o . . . . e . o o o . o . . o

781
501
280

21
21

All divisions
Manufacturing • . e » o o » o « « o « o e » » » c o » o 0 o . » o o e * » o o » *
Nonmanufacturing • o e » * « o o o » e » » e « o o o o » » * e » o o 0 « » * o
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public

121*
25
39

27
13
13

6,000
1,300
1,900

2,060
900
880

150
1*30
60

21

28

12

7,862

6,273

1,021*

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis U/
Machinery industries . . o . . . . . . o o . * . * . ..•••• •

5/

l/ Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton Metropolitan Area (Lehigh and Northampton Counties, Pennsylvania, and Warren County, New Jersey)*
S/ Total establishment employment.
5/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures;
nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
h/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
?/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with § or more workers were also included.




18

Index
Page
Assembler (machinery) ......... ...........................
9
Biller, machine
...... ••••••••••••........... •••••••••••
3
Bookkeeper, hand ••«••••••.••••••«•••••••••••••••••••••••••
3
Bookkeeping-machine operator ••••.........................
3
Brewer (malt liquors) ...... ..........••............... ...
10
Bricklayer (building construction) »••••••••••....... • ••••
10
Calculating-machine operator ••••.... .................«...
3
Carpenter (building construction) .........
10
Carpenter, maintenance.... ••••................ ..•••..•••
6
Cleaner ...........................
7
Cleaner (machinery) .................
9
Clerk, accounting ................................................. 3
Clerk, file ......................................
4
Clerk, general ....................... ••••••.........
4
Clerk (grocery stores) ................
10
Clerk, o r d e r ..... ............... ........................
3, 4
Clerk, payroll ........................ •.••••......
4
Compositor, machine (printing) .... .....................
10
Cooper (malt liquors) ••••••«•...... ••....................
10
Crane operator, electric bridge ••••.... ..................
7
Department head (grocery stores) ...... ...............
10
Draftsman ••••••••••..........
5
Drill-press operator (machinery) .........
9
Electrician (building construction) ..... ............. ..
10
Electrician, maintenance ••••••••.......... ••••........ .
6
Electrician, maintenance (machinery)
••••••••••••••••••••••
9
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ............... ••••••••••
9
Engineer, stationary ......................................
6
Fireman, stationary boiler •••••••••••••••••••............
6
Helper (bakeries) ••••••.... ..................... .........
10
Helper, motortruck driver .............»•••••••••••••••••••
10
Helper, trades, maintenance ....................... ........
6
Inspector (machinery) .......
•••••••..••
9
J a n i t o r ............. ....................»•••••••••••.....
7
Janitor (machinery) ••••••......
••••••••••••••••
9
Key-punch oper a t o r ..... ••••••••.......... •••••••••••••••
4
Laborer (building construction) ...... ••••••»••••.........
10
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) •••••••••••••
9
Machine-tool operator, toolroom .................... •••••••
6
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) ••••••••..... .
9
Machinist, composing room (printing) ......................
10
Mailer (printing) ....................................... ..
10
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y .... .....................
6
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) .......................
6
Mechanic, maintenance ............... ..................... .
6
Milling-machine operator (machinery)
•••••••••..
9




P&gg

Millwright .......................
Mixer (bakeries) ..................
Molder (bakeries) •••••........ ..
Motortruck driver .............. ••••
Nurse, industrial (registered) ... .
Office boy ......... .
Office girl....... ..............
Oiler...........................
Operator (local transit) ............
Order filler •••••••..... ..........
Ovenman (bakeries) .....
••••
Packer •••••••••••....••••••••••••••••
Packer (bakeries) .................
Painter (building construction) ......
Painter, maintenance....... •••••••••
Photoengraver (printing) ...........
Pipe fitter, maintenance ••••••••••••••
Plasterer (building construction) •••••
Plumber (building construction) •••••••
Plumber, maintenance ••••••••••••••••••
Porter .......... ....... ..... .
Porter (machinery) ... .............
Pressman (printing) ...............
Receiving clerk........... .......
Secretary.... ...................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance •••••••
Shipping clerk
.... •••••••••••••••
Shipping-and-reoeiving clerk ........
Stenographer...... ...............
Stereotyper (printing) ...... ......
Stock handler
Stock handler (machinery) ..... .
Switchboard operator-receptionist ••••.
Tabulating-maohlne operator .........
Tool-and-die maker •••••••*•••••«•«••••
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ......
Tracer ................ •.... .....
Transcribing-machine operator .......
Truck driver...................
Trucker, hand ...... .....•••••••••••
Trucker, hand (machinery) ••••••.....
Trucker, power....... ..... ......
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery)
Typist... .................. .
Watchman •••••••.... ....... .
Wrapper (bakeries) .................
☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1952 0 —201519

6
10
10
10

5
3
4

6
10
7

10
7

10
10

6
10

6
10
10

6
7
9

10
7
4

6
7
7
4

10

8
9
4

9
5
4
8

8
9

8
9
5

8
10







THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available from the Superin­
tendent of Documents, U.S, Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. for the following communities:
BIS
Bulletin
City

City

Price

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Buffalo, New York
Cincinnati, Ohio
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Detroit, Michigan
Hartford, Connecticut
Houston, Texas
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Los Angeles, California
Memphis, Tennessee
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota

1045
1044
1085
1096
1056
1043
1041
1066
1086
1059
1084
1075
1064
1094
1067
1099
1068

20
15
25
20
25
20
20
20
25
20
20
20
20
25
15
20
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

This report was prepared in the Bureau’s
dressed to:
Robert R.
Bureau of
341 Ninth
New York,

BIS
Bulletin
No-

Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey
New Orleans, Louisiana
Norfolk-Portsmouth, Virginia
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Rochester, New York
Salt Lake City, Utah
St. Louis, Missouri
San Franciseo-Oakland,
California
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, Washington
Worcester, Massachusetts

Middle Atlantic Regional Office.

Price

1081
1074
1088
1070
1060
1082
1042
1071
1058
1087
1069
1095

25
15
15
15
25
20
20
20
15
20
15
25

Gents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1076
1078
1057
1077

25
15
20
20

cents
cents
cents
cents

Communications may be ad­

Behlow, Regional Director
Labor Statistics
Avenue
New York

The services of the Bureau of labor Statistics' regional offices are available for consultation on
statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices, labor tunv-over, productivity, con­
struction and housing, and work injuries.




The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
New Jersey

New. York
Pennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102