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SAN FRANCISCO- OAKLAND,
CALIFORNIA
January 1951

Bulletin No. I028

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
MAURICE J. TOBIN, SECRETARY




Bureau of Labor Statistics
Ewan Clague, Commissioner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C - Price 50 cents
.




Contents
Page
Number

Page

I N T R O D U C T I O N ...................................................................................

1

T H E S A N FRANCISCO B A Y A R E A ...................................................................
Labor and I n d u s t r y in the B a y A r e a .....................................................

1
1

OCC U P ATIONAL WAGE STRU C T U R E ... *.............................................................
Cross-In d u s t r y O c c u p a t i o n s ................... ...... ........................ ........• •
Office clerical occupations ..................... ................................. • •
P r ofessional and tech n i c a l occupations ........................... • ................
M a i n t e n a n c e and po w e r p lant o c c u p a t i o n s ...... .....................................
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations .................. ............
Characteristic I n d u s t r y O c c u p a t i o n s ..........
Strai g h t - t i m e average earnings ...................................................
Union w a g e scales ..................................
M i n i m u m E n t r a n c e Rates ...................................................................

2
2
2
2
2
2

SUPPLEMENTARY WAG E PRACTICES

................................................................

3

3
4
5
5

TABIES;

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis - continued
15.
16.
17.

Hospitals ........................................................................
Hotels ...........................................................................
Railroads ........................................................................

25
26
26

Union wage scales for selected occupations 18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23o
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29*

Bakeries .........................................................................
Building c o n s t r u c t i o n ..............................................
Malt liquors .........•••••••••••.......... ........................... •••••••••
Canning (fruits and vegetables) ............
Local transit operating employees ••••••••................
Motor truck drivers and helpers ........ ••••••••••................. •••••••••••
Nonalcoholic beverages ............................................
Ocean transport - unlicensed personnel ...............................
Office building service .......
Printing .........................................................................
Stevedoring ......................................................................
Restaurants, cafeterias and l u n c h r o o m s ................. .................. ••••

27
27
27
27
27
28
28
28
29
29
30
30

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis Entrance rates 1*
la.
2.
3*
4*

Office o c c u p a t i o n s .... •.................................... ........... .......
Office occupations in San Franciseo C o u n t y ................ ,..................
Professional and technical occupations .........
Maintenance and power plant o c c u p a t i o n s .............
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ..............................

6
14
15
16
IB

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis 5*

6.
7.
8.
9*
10.
11*
12.
13•
14«

Meat products, independent producers •••••.... ••••••••••••••................ .
Foundries, ferrous .................
Industrial chemicals .......................
Paints and varnishes .........
Fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal work ........................
M a c h i n e r y ........................................................................
B a n k s .................... ......... •••••........ ....................... .
Department and clothing s t o r e s ................. ...................... ••••••••
Power laundries •••••••••.... ........ •••••»...................................
Auto repair shops •••••••..... ...•••...................... ........... ••••••••




21
21
21
22
22
23
23
24
24
25

30.

Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .........

31

Wage practices 31.
32.
33.
34*
35*
36.
37.

Shift differential provisions ............
Scheduled weekly h o u r s .... .........................
Paid h o l i d a y s ....................................................................
Paid vacations ........................................
Paid sick l e a v e .......•••••••..... ................... .......... ...............
Nonproduction bonuses .........
Insurance and pension p l a n s .........

31
32
32
33
34
35
35

APPENDIX:
A - Scope and method of s u r v e y ...... ........... ....................................
B - Descriptions of occupations s t u d i e d ........... ..................................

36
37

I N D E X ......................... ...........................................................

53




Introduction ^

The San Francisco-Oakland area is one of several iinportant industrial centers in
which the Bureau of labor Statistics conducted occupational wage surveys during early 1951* 2/
Occupations common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied
on a community-wide basis. Cross-Industry methods of sampling were thus utilized in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office clerical;
(b) professional
and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping. In
presenting earnings
information for such jobs
(tables 1 through b )
separate data have been
provided wherever possible for individual broad industry divisions. Occupations that are
characteristic of particular, important,
local industries have been studied as heretofore on
an industry basis, within the framework of the community survey. 3 /

Although only a limited amount of such data was compiled in the present survey,
greater detail will be provided for in future studies. Union scales are presented in lieu of
(or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which the great
majority of the workers are employed under terms of collective bargaining agreements, and the
contract or minimum rates are indicative of prevailing pay practice. Data on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits, such as vacation and sick leave
allowances, paid holidays, nonproduction bonuses,
and insurance and pension plans have also
been collected and summarized.

State, county, and municipal agencies in California participated in the study,
eliminating duplication of wage data collection by governmental agencies in the Bay area.
This coordination of survey activity was effected through the Bay Area Salary Survey Committee
and the San Francisco Civil Service Commission. Individual agencies received separate tabu­
lations limited to specified geographic, industrial, and occupational coverage. Data for
several of the locally adopted survey job classifications are presented in the report.

The

San Francisco

Bay A re a

Entering a defense mobilization period late in 1950,
the Bay Area experienced a
moderate upswing in employment and a modest decrease in unenqployment by early 1951. Although
the full impact of expansion in productive capacity was not expected until much later, a brisk
demand for additional workers by private employers and government installations was evident
in January 1951. Wage rates and salaries in almost all employments were the highest on record
and tendencies in a number of industries and government agencies were toward longer workweeks.
The six-county area was also experiencing the highest prices for goods and services within
recent memory.
Labor and Industry in the Bay Area
Offering a wide diversity in sources of livelihood for more than 2,200,000 inhabi­
tants, the Bay Area had about 950,000 persons employed in various enterprises in January 1951>
including manufacturing,
transportation, communication, utilities, trade, finance, services,
construction, and in government. About 1 of every b of these was employed or self-employed
in trade. Manufacturing industries employed 1 of every 5 of these individuals, a like p r o ­
portion was in service industries, and government employed 1 of every 8 . Transportation, co m ­
munication, and utilities had one-tenth of the total; construction, one-twelfth; and finance,
one-twentieth.
In the City of San Francisco, with more than half the total employment in the
area, 2 of every 3 persons were employed in shipping,
trade, finance, or service industries.

Excluding the self-employed, Bay Area manufacturing had about 182,000 employees in
January 1951. Although a fifth of these were in the food industries at the time of the sur­
vey, this proportion normally increases to almost a third at the peak of fruit and vegetable
canning in the summer when several thousand workers are added. Metal fabrication, including
the manufacture of a variety of machinery and structural steel products, largely In Oakland,
employed close to 35>000. Production of chemicals and petroleum products, chiefly in the East
Bay cities of Emeryville and Richmond, accounted for approximately 28,000 workers. There were
15.000 employees
in the printing and publishing industry, most of them in San Francisco.
Women*s apparel, almost wholly in San Francisco, had 8,000 workers.
Ship repair w o r k in pri­
vate shipyards provided employment for ^,500 hut this figure was small compared w ith the
20.000 working in government shipyards. Other manufacturing activities with aggregate e m ­
ployment of approximately 5 0 ,0 0 0 included furniture manufacture;
stone, clay, and glass p r o ­
ducts; basic steel; motor vehicles and other transportation equipment.
Among nonmanufacturing industries, the largest w ork force was employed
in retail
trade. The approximately 120,000 sales people and related distribution employees of retailing
totaled half again the 80,000 workers in wholesale trade. The service industries gave e m ­
ployment to about 100,000 workers and a labor force of more than 70,000 was utilized in trans­
portation, communication, and other public utilities. Financial institutions including insur­
ance carriers and real-estate operators employed an estimated 3 7 ,000.

l/ Prepared in the Bureau*s Division of Wage Statistics by John L. Dana, Regional Wage
Analyst, Region V, San Francisco, California. The planning and central direction of the pro­
gram was the responsibility of Toivo P. Kanninen and Louis E. Badenhoop under the general
supervision of Harry Ober, Chief of the Branch of Industry Wage Studies.
2/
Other areas studied are: Atlanta, Ga.; Boston, Mass.; Chicago, 111.; Denver, Colo.;
and New York, N. Y. Similar studies were conducted in 1950 in Buffalo, N. Y.; Denver, Colo.;
Philadelphia, Pa., and San Franc!sco-Oakland, Calif,
3/ Bee Appendix A for discussion of scope and method of survey.




The Bay Area's building industry, which completed 25,000 new homes during 1950,
provided employment for more than 65,000 in January 1951.
Increased governmental activities,
traceable directly to national defense needs, brought to 1 1 U ,000 the total employment for
city, county, State, and Federal governmental jurisdictions in the six-county area.
Among the industry groups surveyed by the Bureau in January 1951, almost all plant
workers were employed in establishments having written contracts with labor organizations.
Periodic labor-management bargaining for wage rates and working conditions for close to the

2.

entire non-clerical labor force has prevailed in the Bay Area for many years. The proportion
of office workers employed under union contract conditions is substantially less, however. In
all industry groups combined, about 1 in every 6 office workers was employed by a firm having
a written contract with a union representing office workers. With the exception of the rail­
road industry in which all office workers were covered by union contract,
organization was
farthest advanced among office employees in retail trade and the transportation, communica­
tion, and utilities group
(except railroads).

Information for the railroad industry is presented separately in this report and
has not been combined with data in any of the other tables. This has been dene in recognition
of the fact that wages in the railroad industry bear strong imprints of interstate considera­
tions that have evolved over a long period of time. Some of these general considerations
are: Nation-wide minimum rates that affect the entire range of occupational rates; and special
modes of wage payment and related practices.
Cross-Industry Occupations

Occupational W a g e

Structure

Before the outbreak of hostilities in Korea, collective bargaining in early 1950
Bay Area negotiations followed a general pattern established during 1949 which tended toward
relative wage stability. Emphasis on nonwage benefits such^ts^ pensions,
health, and welfare
plans was noticeable,
but such issues were not as predominant as in 1949 negotiations. Mod­
erate wage advances of from 2 to 4 percent were written into most contracts concluded, whereas
many 1949 contracts allowed no changes in scales. Settlements in a number of important situ­
ations were in the nature of long-term agreements with provisions for additional but deferred
wage increases.
Bargaining action increased sharply after July with the acceleration of inflationary
forces and the likelihood of imposition of wage controls. The earlier drive for fringe im­
provements was lost sight of to a large extent by union negotiators. The wage
issue became
paramount and resulted in broad patternmaking settlements based chiefly on rises in living
costs. Agreements completed early in the Fall in petroleum refining and the maritime industry
provided wage advances of approximately 6 percent, and set a pace closely followed by others
including governmental Jurisdictions. Several contracts agreed upon earlier in the year were
reopened with resultant wage increases, bringing workers up to the general pattern established.
At the year* s end a large majority of workers in manufacturing had received raises of from 4
to 7 percent. Cannery workers, with two advances during the year, had scales 12 to 15 percent
over 1949. More than 60,000 construction workers received raises of from 6 to 8 percent.
Contracts concluded in retail trade generally provided 4 to 5 percent increases, as did those
completed in transportation and public utilities. The 6 percent pattern was followed for
40,000 civilian workers in Navy installations in the area, and California State employees r e ­
ceived a 5 percent increase. Upward to 300,000 nonclerical workers in the Bay Area employed
in establishments having written agreements with trade-union had increases in wage rates dur­
ing the year.
Raises of from 5 to 10 percent for office workers during 1950 were most typical.
Adjustment of 19^9 scales for many came late in the year, when it became apparent that wage
and salary stabilization b y government control was imminent.
In the discussion of wages which follows, two main occupational groupings are dis­
tinguished: (1 ) cross-Industry occupations, such a£ office clerical occupations, professional
and technical occupations, maintenance occupations, and custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations; and (2) characteristic industry occupations. The first group of occupations was
studied on a cross-industry basis fro® employer pay roll records. These occupations are
usually found in all or a number of industries. In general, the characteristic industry occu­
pations are peculiar to a specific industry. As indicated below, straight-time average rates
or earnings are shown for some Industries; union scales are shown for others.




Office clerical occupations— Of the 34,000 women classified in the 27 office occu­
pations studied, only 2 ,000, fewer t han 6 percent, were paid at rates less than $ 1*0 weekly.
Average salaries in 22 of these Jobs were $50 or more a week in January 1951 (table 1) • Among
5,000 Bay Area stenographers (general) averaging $55 a week,
3 of every 4 were paid $50 or
more a week. Secretaries averaged $64.50 and experienced copy-typists averaged $ 5 1 . Routine
file clerks and office girls, averaging $ 1 2.50 and $ 1*3 respectively,
*
constituted the lowest
paying office Jobs reported for women. Highest paid women were hand bookkeepers w h o averaged
$ 66 .50 . Among the general clerk categories,
the average for the Junior stage was $1*6; the
intern®dlate, $53.50; and the senior, $61*. Salaries of women in offices of manufacturing in­
dustries were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing. In 22 of 26 Job categories permitting
such a comparison women in manufacturing establishments typically made $3 to $5 more a week.
Within the nonmanufacturing group of industries,
salaries most nearly approached average
scales in manufacturing in tile fie ld s o f wholesale trade and transportation
(excluding rail­
roads), communication, and other public utilities.
Highest average salaries for men office workers were $ 78.50 for senior general
clerks and $ 71* for hand bookkeepers. Office boys were lowest paid w i t h a general average of
$41.50. General clerks at the Junior level averaged $ 53 , and at the
intermediate level,
$63.50. Accounting clerks were at an average weekly scale of $ 67 * as were pay-roll clerks.
Average salaries tended to be higher In nonmanufacturing industries than in manufacturing. A
comparison of salaries of m en and women in similar Jobs generally indicated a wage advantage
for men. This advantage was generally greater in Jobs requiring a substantial amount of
training. Differences in average salaries for me n and women in particular occupations gener­
ally do not reflect differences In rates within the same establishment.
A comparison of average salaries of San Francisco office workers
(table 1-A) with
general area averages Indicated only minor differences in occupational pay levels.
Professional and technical occupations— W o m e n registered nurses employed In indus­
trial establishments, principally manufacturing, averaged $62 a we e k in January 1951 (table 2).
Among other professional and technical occupations selected for study, draftsmen employed
mainly in engineering and architectural service firms received $ 78.50 weekly. Junior drafts­
men averaged $ 60 .50 .
Maintenance and power plant occupations— Among skilled maintenance crafts, hourly
rates typically ranged be'tween $1.90 and $2.10 in early 1951 (table 3). Carpenters, with an
average rate of $ 2 .1 2 per straight-time hour, were highest paid, and general utility main­
tenance men were lowest with a n average of $1.90. The latter were found principally in smaller
establishments where specialization in maintenance wo r k is impractical. Auto mechanics,
electricians, painters, pipe fitters, radio technicians, and sheet-metal workers, along with
carpenters, had rates in excess of $2 an hour. Machinists, the largest skilled group studied,
averaged $ 1 .99 . The general average far helpers to these craftsmen was $1.64 an hour.
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations— Average rates for men custodial
workers ranged from $1.24 an hour for elevator operators to $ 1 .5 9 an hour for garage attend­
ants
(table 4). Guards had an hourly average of $1.49, compared with $1.4l for watchmen.

3
Janitors, porters, and cleaners received $1.30 on an all-industry “
basis, “
but $1.46 for man u ­
facturing taken separately.
In nonmanufacturing,
average pay rates in this category ranged
from $ 1 .2 1 in the service industries to $ 1.3 5 in retail trade.
The largest single group studied in warehousing operations were stock handlers and
hand truckers. Their average rate in manufacturing industries was $1.56 compared with $1.58
for nonmanufacturing. The all-industry average was $1.57* Order fillers were also an Impor­
tant category in wholesaling,
and averaged $ 1 .5 5 in all industries, $ 1.5 8 in manufacturing
and $1.55 in nonmanufacturing. Truck drivers averaged $1.78 w h e n handling light pick-up and
local delivery trucks, $1.89 on medium-size trucks (l^ to 4 tons),
and $1.89 when operating
heavy, trailer-type trucks.
Characteristic Industry Occupations
Straight-time average earnings
Following the practice for the cross-Industry occupations previously discussed, the
wage or salary information for the following 13 industries reflects straight-time earnings
derived from employer pay-roll records.
Meat products,
Independent producers— General cutters in beef cutting and general
butchers in cattle killing averaged straight-time hourly earnings of $ 2.20 in early 1 9 5 1 *
These are important Jobs in meat packing and wholesaling.
In the manufacture of sausages and
other prepared meat products, sausage makers averaged $ 2 .2 7 an hour and women packers in sau­
sage making departments averaged $ 1 .2 6 (table 5 ).
Ferrous foundries--Early in January 1951 average rates of Bay Area foundry workers
ranged from $1.39 an hour for hand truckers to $2.27 for wood patternmakers. Floor moldera
received $ 1 .85 ; hand coremakers,
$1.84;
chlppers and grinders,
$ 1 .53 ; and shake-out men,
$1.46 (table 6 ). A general increase of 12 cents an hour for all classifications was granted
by most establishments in the area late in the month.
Industrial chemicals— Class A chemical operators in the East B a y ’s important indus­
trial chemical industry averaged $1.92 an hour. Class B chemical operators received $1.83 and
the average for operators' helpers was $1.72. These earnings figures relate to me n workers
(table 7 ).
Paints and varnishes— Tinters averaging $1.89 an hour (table 8 ), were the highest
paid men In Jobs studied In the paint and varnish manufacturing industry. Varnish makers and
technicians also earned more than $1.80 an hour. Hand truckers,
at $1.64 were paid less, on
the average, than m en working as
labelers and packers
($1.68) but more than women labelers
and packers ($1 .50 ).
Fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal w o r k — Structural fitters (class A)
had a n average hourly rate of $1.86, exceeded among the plant Jobs studied only by the average
$1.99 paid class A machine welders and the $1.91 paid class A lay-out men. Average rates for
other Jobs in this industry,
closely allied with basic steel, were: electric-bridge crane
operators (10 tons and over), $1.53;
class A pcwer-shear operators, $1.60;
flams-cuttingmachine operators, $1.68; and class A hand welders, $1.76 (table 9)#
Machinery manufacture— General assemblers were numerically the most important Job
group In the machinery industries. They were classified into three subgroups according to
skill ranges and responsibilities required in varied assembly work. T h u s , class A workers
performing work requiring highest skills averaged $1.79 an hour. Class B workers averaged
$1.54, and class C, $1.47. Tool-and-die makers,
the highest paid among the 16 Jobs studied




.

in machinery had an average hourly scale of $2.21. Production machinists averaged $1.84 an
hour. The above figures and the earnings data shown for the
industry in table 10 reflect
pay-roll information as of early January 1951* late in the month, as In the foundry industry,
a wage advance of 12 cents an hour for all Jobs was made effective b y a majority of the firms
In the industry.
B a n k s — Me n commercial tellers with 5 or more years*
service w i t h the establishment
were paid an average of $79 a week. This compared with an average of $ 56.50 for tellers wi t h
less than 5 y e a r s ’ experience. Among women tellers,
the figures were $59.50 for those with
5 or more years*
service, $54.50 for less. Women employed as bookkeeping-machine operators
on routine w ork averaged $46 a w eek (table 1 1 ).
Department and clothing stores— Weekly earnings of sales people employed in depart­
ment and clothing stores reflected commissions paid on sales w h i c h was a usual method of com­
pensation for these workers. Men sales clerks in furniture and bedding departments were the
highest paid. They averaged $ 89.50 weekly. Other weekly averages for men were $89 in m e n ’s
clothing; $71 in w o m e n ’s shoes; and $64.50 in men's furnishings. The highest paid salesladies
were also in furniture and bedding departments. Their average wee k l y pay was $59.50. W o m e n
selling popular-priced dresses in basement departments received $46 compared w i t h a n average
weekly pay of $60 for those selling more expensive dresses in upstairs departments. A similar
but closer relationship existed between pay levels of women selling w o m e n ’s accessories.
In
basement departments they earned $46.50 and in upstairs departments,
$49.50.
In nonselling
categories, men tailors performing alterations on m e n ’s garments averaged $ 66 .50 , w o m e n oper­
ating passenger elevators averaged $49.50,
and women cashier-wrappers were at a $46 weekly
average (table 1 2 ).
Power laundries— Most of the more than 500 w o m e n employed on flatwork finish m a ­
chines in Ba y Area laundries were paid an hourly rate Just under $1. The average for the e n ­
tire group was 99 cents. Women on machine shirt-pressing operations averaged $1.09 and iden­
tifiers, who sort, examine, and list articles in the cleaning operations, averaged $1.17. Men
operating extractor and washing machines received $1.37 and $1.4l a n hour,
respectively
(table 1 3 ).

Auto repair shops--Automotive mechanics (class A) in East Bay auto repair shops and
repair departments of dealer establishments averaged $2.02 an hour in January 1951. This com­
pared with $2.04 for comparable w o r k on the San Francisco side of the Bay. Similarly, East
Bay body repairmen averaged $ 2 .2 1 , West bay $2.23; Bast B a y greasers $ 1 .56 , W e s t bay $1.63
(table 14).
Hospitals - -Average weekly pay for the more than 2,000 registered nurses in B a y Area
hospitals was $57. W o m e n employed in other professional categories were at higher levels.
X-ray technicians averaged $58.50; dieticians,
laboratory technicians, and physiotherapists,
$62.50;
and pharmacists, $93.5°• Average earnings of men in these Jobs were slightly higher
(table 15).
Hotels (San Francisco)--On an average hourly basis, m e n desk clerks in hotels in
the City of San Francisco received $1.25, whereas room clerks received $ 1 .38 . Men and w o m e n
elevator operators averaged $1.08 and $1.07, respectively. Women's earnings in the Jobs
studied ranged from $1.04 for chambermaids to $ 1 .1 5 for cashiers (table 1 6 ).
Railroads--Bates of pay in selected office,
shop maintenance, warehouse, and c u s ­
todial Jobs in the railroad industry of the Bay Area are presented in table 17. Average sal­
aries in railroad offices ranged from $48 fbr office boys to $ 66.50 for m e n accounting clerks.
W o m e n general stenographers averaged $ 60, and men Junior clerks,
$55.50 for a 40-hour week.

4.

Straight-time average hourly
r ates of $1.74 we r e reported
for skilled maintenance
v o r k e r s (electricians, m a c h i n i s t s , a n d s h e e t-metal workers). Helpers to maintenance craftsmen
w e r e p a i d $1.1*5 a n hour.
Sto c k handlers
and hand truckers
averaged $1.39 a n hour. W o r k e r s
p e r f o r m i n g J a n i t o r i a l d u ties a v e r a g e d $1.3 3 .

Union wage scales
The information for the following 12 industries relates to the minimum wage rates
and maximum straight-time hours per w eek agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade unions.
Bakeries--Contract bakery worker scales
in San Francisco hand shops were higher
than those set for Oakland, but rates were the same for both cities in machine shops. In both
cities machine shop wage scales were higher them for hand shops, however. Minimum hourly pay
for San Francisco ovenmen was $1.99 in machine shops, $1.93 in hand shops. For Oakland ovenmen,
the corresponding figures were $1.99 and $1.87. The rate for dividers, molders, and
roll-machine operators in machine shops in both cities was $1,90. Pay for bench machine hel­
pers in San Francisco was set at $1.53 for the first year and $1.6l for the second year of
service. Weekly hours worked in San Francisco hand shops were 38 3 A > In Oakland, 1*2. Weekly
hours worked in machine shops in both cities were 37 1/2 (table 18).
Building construction--The basic hourly wage scales among 7 major construction
trades ranged from $ 1 .5 5 for building laborers to $3 for bricklayers and plasterers in both
Oakland and San Francisco
in early 1951. Minimum rates for all classifications covered with
the exception of electricians were identical in both cities. The San Francisco scale for
this category was $ 2 .63 , the Oakland scale $2.55. A 40-hour week was in effect for all trades
except San Francisco bricklayers and Oakland plasterers, who were paid overtime rates after
30 hours a week, and painters in both cities who had a basic workweek of 35 hours (table 1 9 ).
M a l t l i q u o r s — U n i o n scales in S a n F r a n c i s c o ’s brewing
industry we r e $81.50 w e e k l y
for b r e w e r s o n da y t i m e w o r k ,
$ 83.50 f o r second-shift, and $ 85.50 for third-shift w o r k . B o t ­
tlers and s h i p p i n g a n d r e c e i v i n g clerks wei*e paid $77 > $79>
or $ 8 l according to the
shift
worked.
T h e d a y time rate for truck d r i v e r s w a s $ 80.50 a week.
The 40 -hour w o r k w e e k for all
shifts w a s the p r a c t i c e in the industry (table 20).

Canning, fruits and vegetables--tn the fruit and vegetable canning industry in Oak­
land, union scales for all classifications were determined according to a Job evaluation sys­
tem resulting in 5 Job brackets for me n workers
(table 21). Thus, Bracket I, covering the
highest production skills such as mechanics and painters,
commanded an hourly rate of $ 1.90
and Bracket V with the lowest skills such as equipment attendants atad car loaders called for
$1.3**. Among w o men workers,
floor ladies were paid $1.34 and unassigned wcmen workers were
paid $1.18. Since incentive method of payment for some Job categories is practiced in many
canneries,
a minimum guaranteed hourly rate of $ 1 .1 8
is set for either men or women paid on
the basis of output, regardless of Job classification. Average hourly earnings under such
conditions are determined b y the volume of material processed by the workers. Cannery opera­
tives worked 40-hour weeks.
"Exempt" weeks may be claimed in accordance with Fair Labor
Standards Act provisions
in periods of high seasonal activity. During such "exempt" weeks,
48 hours may be worked before premium overtime rates are effective.
Local transit operating employees— Operators of busses, and motormen and conductors
of bridge trains in Oakland’s local transit system had basic scales of $1.48 hourly for the
first 6 months of service, $1.53 thereafter,
in early 1951. In San Francisco, operators and
conductors of busses,
trackless trolleys, streetcars, and cable cars were at a uniform $ 1.5 3
hourly rate, regardless of service. Hours of work per week were 40 in Oakland and 48 in San
Francisco (table 22).




Motor truck drivers and helpers— In the trucking industry drivers had widely varying
minimum hourly rates ranging from $1.5*5 for those employed in general hauling of loads under
2,500 pounds in San Francisco to $2.51 for night drivers w ith at least 1 year of service d e ­
livering newspapers and periodicals in Oakland. Rates differed according to community, com­
modities transported,
size of truck, and length of service. Petroleum tank truck drivers in
San Francisco with less than 6 months of service received $1.75*
and those with more than 2
years* service were paid $1.93 an hour.
In Oakland, however, the service range was shorter
for such workers and the pay was higher— drivers with less than 6 months*
service receiving
$1.80 and those with more than 1 year, $ 1 .98 . Weekly hours for drivers handling all types of
loads in both cities was 40, with the exception of moving van drivers and helpers in San
Francisco who worked 46 hours before premium pay was effective (table 23 ).
Nonalcoholic beverages— On a 4 0 -hour we e k basis bottlers in the soft drink and car­
bonated waters industry in S an Francisco were paid $ 72.50 as a minimum union scale. Driversalesmen who also had a 40-hour workweek were paid $ 76.50 (table 24).
Ocean transport--Monthly rates of offshore, unlicensed, maritime personnel in deck
and engine-room departments were scaled according to tonnage and type of vessel sailed. Rates
were scaled for the stewards department according to kind of trade,
i.e.,
intercoastal or
offshore ports
(table 25 ). All rates reported included a $7.50 monthly clothing allcvance
(not considered part of the basic seals until recently drawn contracts). Moreover, for deck
and engine-room men not standing watches,
the rates reported Included an allowance of $25 a
month in lieu of work at sea at the Sunday overtime rate
(also, not formerly considered part
of basic scales).
Minimum monthly pay for able bodied seamen standing watches was $248.50, compared
with $206 for ordinary seamen.
In the engine-room, daytime firemen received $267.50; watchstanding firemen, $ 236 . Chief reefer engineers standing watch were paid from $341*50 to $393,
according to type and tonnage of vessel worked. Scales for stewards department ratings ranged
from $214 for messmen and waiters on all types of vessels to $552.50 for chefs on class A
passenger vessels.
Hours of work at sea were 44 a week for day men in the deck and engine-room depart­
ments . For watchstanders in these departments and for all ratings in the stewards department
weekly hours at sea were 56 with overtime pay for 8 hours*
Sunday work.
In port, both deck
and engine-room ratings received overtime pay after 40 hours* w ork a week, but straight-time
hours for the stewards department remained 48, as at sea.
Office building service--In San Francisco office buildings, the minimum hourly rate
for women cleaners was $1.17;
fOr Janitors, watchmen and elevator operators
(both men and
women), $1.25; and for elevator starters, $1.37. This pay compared with rates in Oakland of
$1.08, $1.17, and $1.26 for the same Jobs. Hours of wo r k for these employees were 40 a week
(table 26 ).
Printing--Union scales In the printing trades were identical (table 2 7 ) in both San
Francisco and Oakland. Hourly rates for workers in commercial printing shops were:
electro­
typers $2.73, hand compositors and cylinder pressmen $2.63, and bindery women $1.48. In news­
paper work, rates for day w ork were $ 2 .72 for compositors, $ 2 .6 l for web pressmen, and $2.44
for mailers.
In each of these classifications a differential of 13 cents was paid for night,
work. The scheduled workweek for the printing trades was 3 J ^ hours.
Stevedoring— The straight-time hourly scale for union longshoremen handling general
cargo was $ 1.9 2 in all ports of the Bay Area. Penalty rates
in lieu of the basic general
cargo scale were paid for handling specifically designated commodities. There were many such
penalty rates ranging from $ 2.02 for handling paper and pulp in packages of 300 pounds or
more to $3*74 for handling explosives. Hatch tenders and lift-truck-Jitney drivers had basic

5
rates 10 cents an h o u r more tha n the l o n g s h o reman
rate and p e n a l t y cargo rates, accordingly.
G an g tosses received b o t h the $ 2 . 0 7 w o r k i n g g e neral c a r g o rate and the
scaled p e n alty rates.
U n i o n agreement a l l o w e d a 3° h o u r s traight-time m a x i m u m per w e e k (table 28) *
Restaurants, cafeterias,
and l u n c h r o o m s --Inconveniences
of split-shift w o r k w ere
recognized in S a n Fran c i s c o u n i o n cont r a c t s cov e r i n g
culin a r y w o r k e r s and others emplo y e d in
restaurants,
cafeterias,
a n d lunchrooms.
M i n i m u m dai l y rates for split-shift w o r k e r s w ere
higher in al l classes
t h a n for strai g h t - s h i ft wo r k e r s .
On a
daily-rate basis,
w a i t e r s and
waitresses, w e r e lowest paid, r e c e i v i n g $ 6 .9 5 s t r a i ght-shift and $ 7 . 8 5 split-shift in r e s t a u ­
rants whe r e such w o r k e r s ha n d l e d ca s h pa y m e n ts for meals;
a nd $ 7 . 9 5 straight-shift and $ 8 .8 5
split-shift in cafeterias,
lunchrooms,
a nd other e a t i n g
establishments w h e r e
waiters
and
wait r e s s e s did n o t hand l e cash pa y m e n t for meals.
Cashiers w e r e
p aid $ 9 * 5 0
straight-shift,
$ 1 0 .2 5 split-shift in a l l types of e a t i n g e s tablishments, b u t c o mbination cashiers and c h e c k ­
ers w e r e pai d $11.50 straight-shift, $ 1 2 . 2 5 split-shift in class A restaurants; $ 1 1 straightshift, $ 1 1 . 7 5 split- s h i f t in cafeterias, d a iry lunches a nd soda fountains.
G r atuities r e c e i v e d b y w a i t e r s and w a i t r e s s e s
and the value of free meals for a ll
wor k e r s are not r e p r e s e n t e d in the m i n i m u m u n i o n rates for these employees.
M a x i m u m hours o f
w e r e standard
as the basic w o r k w e e k before paym e n t of p r e m i u m overtime rates w a s e f f e c ­
tive (table 29).

3 li

M i n i m u m E n trance R a t e s
The d e s i g n a t i o n of m i n i m u m e n t rance rates for the employment of plant w o r k e r s w i t h
no previous w o r k experience w a s included in the formalized rate
structure of B a y A r e a e s t a b ­
lishments
e m p l oying ab o u t four-fifths o f the w o r k e r s in all
industries.
The practice w a s
wid e s p r e a d a mong m a n u f a c t u r i n g
est a b l i s h m e n ts and transportation,
communication, and public
utility companies. More t h a n 90 p e r c e n t of the w o r k e r s in these industry groups w e r e e m ployed
b y firms w i t h e s t a b l i s h e d minima.
T o a lesser degree,
p r e s cribed entrance rates w e r e set in
whol e s a l e trade
a n d services.
E s t a b l i s h m e n ts in r e t a i l trade w e r e least formalized in this
respect.
Al t h o u g h entrance rates set b y in dividual establishments in a l l
industries ranged
fro m less t h a n 75 cents to more t h a n $ 1 .7 5 * m a j o r employment w a s in firms spec i f y i n g rates of
$ 1 . 1 0 to $ 1 .^ 5 (table 3 0 ).

Supplementary

W age

Practices

Scheduled W o r k w e e k
T h r ee-quarters of the
of * - hours in January 1951.
40
A
a w e e k of 374 hours w a s typi c a l
The **0 hour w o r k w e e k w a s almost

women
employed in B a y Area offices w e r e on a w e e k l y schedule
longer w o r k w e e k was
uncommon for w o m e n office employees, b u t
for many, particularly in finance, insurance, and re a l estate.
universal practice for plant w o r k e r s (table 32).

P a i d Holidays
Provisions for p aid holidays were in effect for p r a c t i c a l l y a l l office w o r k e r s and
for more t h a n
90 p ercent of the
plant workers.
The mo s t t y p i c a l a r r a n g e m e n t c alled
for 7
paid holidays throughout the year, except in transportation (except railroads), communication,
public utilities, finance, insurance, and real estate.
I n the fi r s t three n amed groups a m a ­
jority of employees,
b o t h office and plant, we r e granted 8 days.
I n the other groups, w h e r e
office work e r s predominated, allowances w ere for 11 and
days for m o s t (table 33).

12

Pa i d V a c a tions
A l l office employees in B a y Area firms we r e allowed p a i d vac a t i o n s a f t e r a year of
service and all
but a negligible number of plant w o r k e r s w e r e a c c o r d e d
the same privilege.
A large major i t y of office w orkers had 2 w eeks after 1 year, b u t 1 w e e k for pla n t w o r k e r s w a s
the general rule.
A f t e r the comp l e t i o n of 2 years* service,
virtually all
office employees
w e r e eligible for vacations
of 2 w e e k s and similar
leave w a s allowable t o p l a n t w o r k e r s in
establishments w i t h nea r l y three-fourths of these w o rkers (table 3*0*
P aid S i c k Leave
Form a l provisions
for paid sick leave
after 1 y e a r of service w e r e
in e f f e c t for
h a l f the office w o r k e r s in a l l industries and a bout a third o f the p l a n t w o r k e r s .
The number
of days of pay
granted for absence due to illness
varied w i d e l y a m o n g
industries a nd a m o n g
establishments w i t h i n industries.
A 10-day a l l i a n c e w a s m o s t c o m m o n for office w o r k e r s , b u t
a 5-day allowance for p lant w o r k e r s was found to a n a p preciable extent.
M o s t libe r a l plans
w e r e in e ffect In the transpo r t a t i o n (except railroads),
communication, a n d p u b l i c u t ilities
g roup w here leave allowances w e r e higher and employee coverage w a s
grea t e r t h a n the gene r a l
average (table 35)•
Nonp r o d u c t i o n B onuses

Shift D ifferentials
A p p r o x i m a t e l y one in e v e r y five w o r k e r s employed in manufa c t u r i n g industries in the
B a y A r e a in e arly 19 5 1 w a s on e x t r a - s h i f t w ork, indicating one of the steps t a k e n to increase
productive capacity there. P r e m i u m p a y for such w o r k e r s w a s general practice.
The industrial
chemical industry w i t h al m o s t 30 p e r c e n t o f employees
on extra shifts (about equa l l y divided
b e t w e e n second- a nd t h i r d-shift operations)
had varied d i f f e rential pay schedules.
The d i f ­
ferential w a s less than
5 cents a n h o u r over day rates for about h a l f
the w o r k e r s o n second
shifts,
and for the rest p r e m i u m p a y r a n g e d fr o m 5 to 10 cents a n hour.
Third-shift workers
in mos t cases rece i v e d 5 cents mo r e th a n
s e cond-shift workers.
In the m a c h i n e r y
and struc­
tural steel f abricating industries, the d i f f er e n t i a l paid second shifts w a s a u n i f o r m 10 p e r ­
cent over day scales.
These ni g h t
operations constituted
10 p e rcent of the
emplo y m e n t in
mach i n e r y m anufacture a n d 1 p e r c e n t of that in structural steel fabrication.
Third-shift e m ­
ployment w a s negligible,
however, in t hese two industries.
Shift e m ployment in the m a n u f a c ­
ture of paints a n d v a r nishes w a s 13 pe r c e n t of the
total employment,
and the differentials
varied.
A bout two-thirds of those on secon d -shift w o r k received 10 cents an
h our a d ditional
w i t h the rest p a i d slig h t l y m o r e or less t h a n this figure.
A m o n g third-shift w o r k e r s ,
a ma­
jority w ere paid more than 10 cents an hou r over d a y rates (table 3 1 )•




T w o of e very 5 B a y A r e a office workers and 1 of every 10 p l a n t w o r k e r s w e r e r e c i p ­
ients of Christmas or year- e n d bonuses at the close of 1950. T his type of n o n p r o d u c t i o n bonus
w a s b y far the m o s t
commo n l y reported.
For office workers,
b onus p a yments w e r e
most w i d e ­
spread In finance, insurance, and r e a l estate; for nonoffice worke r s , the largest p r o p o rtions
recei v i n g bonuses w e r e in w h olesale and retail trade (table 36).
Insurance a nd P e n s i o n Plans

Insurance or pension plans financed wholly or in part by employers were in force in
establishments with 92 percent of Bay Area office employment and 82 percent of plant employ­
ment in January 1951.
In the transportation (except railroads),
communication,
and other
public utilities group, all employees were covered by some such benefit plans. Life-insurance
plans were the most commonly accepted security measures found in all industries, but health
and hospitalization Insurance and retirement pension plans were also reported throughout all
Industries by firms wi t h substantial numbers of enqjloyees (table 37 ).

6
Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
(Average weekly earnings 1 / and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

See footnotes at end of table#
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF L A B ®
Bureau of Labor Statistics

7

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued

1—
1—
*
80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 $
100.00

1

1

CD

Sex, occupation, and industry division

O
.
O
O

Average

*
$
---- 1 —
1
$
j
l
i
*
?—
$
*
i—
*—
?—
1—
Number Weekly
i
*
1?—
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 *40.00 *
45.00 *
42.50 *
47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50
of
sched­ Weekly
and
workers uled earnings
under
hours
32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 *42.50 1*5.00 *
47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72 .50 75.00

vn
j
.
O
O

(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00

and
over

Men - Continued

90
97
88

39.0
39.5
39.0
SO.O
39.5
39.0

$ 53.00
5*1.50
52.50
61.50
50.50
*17.50

Clerks, order ............................................................................
M a n u f a cturing ................ .. .................................................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ..................................... ..............
Wholesale trade ••••••................

1.1*47
251
896
812

1*0.0

70.00

*

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

68.50

Clerks, pay roll •••••••••..........••••••••
M a n ufacturing............................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ....... •••••........ .
Public utilities * ...................
Wholesale trade *,,..,****».•*••.•••**

182
108

Clerks, general, junior .....................
Manufacturing ........................ .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .... ...................................
Public utilities * ...............................................
Wholesale trade .................................................. ....
Finance ** ............... ..

393
92

Duplicating-machine operators 2 / ..... .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ........... ..........
Finance ** ....................................................................
Office boys ................• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ..................
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••.... ••••••••
" i h 1r uhl 11 + 1a r
Pil *
.
• t i i.t ■
Wholesale trade ........... ...... •••••
Pete11 trade t t T ,
T 1rieriee #4 1 t » * » T . T . » i T » » . « . » « . .
P
r
Services • • • • • • • • ...... .. ...... .................
Secretaries

.................. • • • • • • • ...........................................

Nonmanufacturing

..................................... • • • • • • • • •

Tabulating-machine operators ••••••••••....
Manufacturing ••••••..... ...... •••••••••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••.........
Public utilities * ...............................................
Wholesale trade .......................................................
Finance * * ......................................................• • • • •

301

7k

32
18

6k
53
13

676
22 ^
14.52
2^
105

16
l6l
1S 7
S3
30
13
286
27

259
18
83

127

1*0.0
1*0 .0
1*0.0
1*0 .5
“ *
30 5
J7 •/

1
*

_

2

8

-

-

-

-

-

1
*

-

2

8

15
1

-

-

-

1
*

-

2

6
2

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

70.50
69.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

67.00
67.50

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

5
-

66.50
61.0 0

-

_

-

.

_

-

_

-




5
5

12

53

32
1
15

37
1
26

16

10

26
26

31
13
18
18

25
1
2S
2S
IS
8
6
6

.

16 "

_
.

6

-

-

_

6
3

7
S'
3
3

18
10
8
_
_

8

-

2S

12
12
12

10
10
_

2S

-

1
1

-

-

-

39.5
1*0.0
39.0
qq 0

1*1 .5 0

30

115

67
37
30

143.00
141.00
1*1.00
*45.50
1*5.00
1*1.50
37.00

140.0
1 0.0
*

77.50

30
2

-

115
1

15
29
28

85

11
1
*

20
20
1

3
3

-

11
1

-

-

-

11*0
1*6
17 — s r
76
29
5
6
18
3
2
15
1*8
5
3

88

S5
17
28
1

39
*49
7
*
22

7
1
12
1

5
2
20

35
5
30

12

30
S

6

2S
10
6
8

26
16

35
28
7

26

_

26

_

.

_

_

„

_

_

-

_

.

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

52
5
S7
Si

121
S8
73
73

167
27
ISO
13S

83
21
62
62

71
S2
29
29

88
3
85
70

76
9

28
9
19

30
10
20
20

20

19

20
20

19

5
2
3
3

9
8
1
_

19
13
6
_
6

21
12
9
6

IS
13
1
1

16

36
16
20
_

S
2
2
1

2
1
1

.
_

10
-

■5

10

66.50
66.00
66.50
6i* .00
7 S .50
62.50

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

67
67

_

179
2S
155
155

106
26

18
11
7

3
2
1
1

7
1

80
61

.

_

_

_
_

_

_
-

_
_
_

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

82
sr
Sl

11
2
9

17
2
15

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

_

_

-

.

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

7

8

13

_

_

_

_

_

_

IS
20

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

5

9

21

_

-

-

-

5
16

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
3

5
1

9
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

3

1*

7

-

-

-

29

n
-

11

-

-

_

-

13

11

29
1
-

28

-

10
10

11
11
-

_

_

_

_

2

_

-

0
j

_

-

10
6
6

_

-

69*00
-

-

5
5

1
1

1

Ik

_

S7

5
S
S

_

_

71.50

39.5

-

22
22
8

_

28
2

-

71.00

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), cojammication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
949080 0 - 41 -2

1
«
•

-

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
1*0.0
39.0

-

S3
11

26

-

1
1
-

38.0

56
11
S5
2
18

-

SS.00
1* *.50
1

J7

11
36
2
9
25

-

1 5.00
*

39.5

kl

-

39.5
39.5
1*0.0

1 0.0
*

15

22
2
20
2
3
2

1
-

12
1
11
-

2
9

-

2S
1
23
2
7
IS

1

-

S
s

2
1
1

-

6 ____ 5_
6

-

-

2

_

-

-

2
1

-

_

5

S3 ___ 35_ ___ 15_ ___23L ___25_
10
1
7
28
26
33
15
25
2
1
1
3
6
6
20
20
19
8
6
S
6

12

-

-

S

k
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

8
Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations hy industry division)

Average

Number of workers
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 i 0.00 42.50 45.00 4 7.5 0 50.00 52.50
f
sched- Weekly
of
and
workers uled earnings
■under
hours
32.50 35.00 37-?° i 0.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.5 0 55.00
f
$

$

Sex, occupation, and industry division

receiving straight-time weeklyr earn!Lngs of $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
*
*
55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72 .5 0 75.0 0 80.00 8 5 .OO 90.00 95.00 v

100.00

57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 7 2 .5 0 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 ??.oo 100.00

and
over

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) .........
Manufacturing ......... •••••...... ...... .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ......................
Public utilities * ....................
Whole sale trade ......................
Finance * * .............. ...... .......
Services ..tt.t.t.tt1ttttttttttlttlttt

I

us

1

1

j

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) 2/...
Wholesale trade ......................
Petal 1 trade •••••••.... •••••••••••••

723

156
567
167

230
29
129
300

28J~
Uk
Ik k
19

Bookkeepers, hand ••••••••••••..............
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................ ..
Nonmanufacturing ..................... ..
PiihHr* iit.int.1e.il * ...................
Q.t . 1 1

_

....

Finance ** ••••••••••••••........... .
Services ........... ................

336
19
317
l4
7I
1
7*5
1j
33

12 1

39*5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

38.5
i*o.o

$ 5 1 .5 0
57.00

50.00
i 8.00
f
53.00
51.50
i 7.00
f

i 0.0
f
IfO.O
i 0.0
f
I 0.0
f
1*0.0

66.50
65.50
66.50
67.00
^9 ^0
69.00
63.00

j y »y

1*0.0
I.O.O
4
39.0
38.5
ifO.o
39.5
IfO.O

53^55"
55.00
51.50
■ 2.“
5 50

yt- •y'y

2

_

5
78'
1v
87
87

20
20

.

5
5
-

-

12

5

60
22

*
y5

18
2

1

1

-

-

1

1

39.5

60

39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
1 0 .5
*

667
129

39.5
39.5

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

-

3

-

12
1
*

2

29
29

-

10
7
1

8

18
6

i
f
i
f

1

-

.
.
-

-

-

13
3
-

8

3

3

28
28
2i
f
i
f

10

^3
i
f
39

6
30

1

-

i*9

10
2

j

1

_

_

i
f

1

60.00

-

_
-

.
-

_
-

16

-

»
-

59.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

61.00

51.00

16

28
2
26
20

i
f

20

i
f
25
ii
ff
ii
ff

1

-

3

1
2

20
18
1
1

-

-

7

-

20
17
A1

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

239
6
233
12
2
213
3

163
22
lifl
35
n

226
7

215
26

136
20

12if
ii
ff

219

189

116

80

72
8

79
11

33

9*f
1

95
ii
ff

60

ifO
8
30
38

_
-

-

11

5

11

65

-

-

-

-

-

50.00

-

11

5

11

65

53.50
* ^.00
5 w
47.50
51.50

-

-

-

-

-

_

11

5

10

65

“

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, Insurance, and real estate.

16

5
1

35

3
-

1

23

2

20
-

yj

J

30 ___55_

-

1

6
6

31
31

_
_

li
f

11

-

_
.
-

_
-

.
_
.

_
.

_
.
.

-

_

.

_

.

.
.

_
_
.

.
_
.

_
_

2
1
1

-

-

-

/

_

3
3

-

.

-

3

li
f
lif

1
1
_

1

12
2

if3

36

_
_

1
8
8

.

57.50

___ 52L ___13_
10
5
52
3
3
i6
f
2

23
23
.

1

65.50

13
7^
7
63
i
f

i8
f
i8
f
i8
f

.

58.50
6if.oo




20

9
57
9
32

3

39.5
ifO.O

Finance * * ................ ...........
Services ••••••••••••••••.............

-

66 ___

-

69

412

-

9*
f

26
68
20
i6
f

.

Finance ** ............................
Services ••••••••••.... ••••••••.•••••

232
1 ,2 7 6

18
11

133
29
10 i
f
38
23
i
f
*0
J7

152
15
137
5*f
_

-

*1
y57 00

1,508

2
2

if9
l
i8
f
19

_

39 *
yy *y5

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B .....
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ............ .........
Wholesale trade .................. ..
T?*tA 1 1 t.T*AdA ______ _____ ._______
__

-

_

29
'-y

85

-

18

-

351
}

308
118

1
1

.
-

-

3

-

-

64.00

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ....
Manufacturing ................. ..........
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ..... ................
Wholesale trade .......................
D.f.'tl
. . .

k6

2

1

53.50

39.5
IfO.O
39.5
•a r *
c 5

_
-

ii
ff
3

8
21

3

k

ifl

51

ifO
ifO

55

-

10
15
19
I6if
28
136
90

16
25
5

15
-

2l
f

1
-

1

i
f

20
1*
1
15

i*3

35
e

20

15
*

-*-y

6
1
*

8

20

i
f
3

73
5

1

68

49
30
19

-

-

-

_

_

-

1

30
38

19

72
19

20

1

53
ifl
1
11
—

6
ik

25
25
-

y

31
3

28

ix
i
f
13

20
-

_

30
29
1
1

1

-

20
20

_
-

ii
ff
ii
ff

1
20
18

1
1
.

1

8
-

8

2

1
*
1
1

.

_

_

1

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

«

_

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
.

_

1

1

_

_

_

-

.

-

.

_

_

.

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

“

7
*
j

-

i
f
"

.

.

.

_

.

“

”

“

“

•

-

-

_

-

-

9
Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Average
1
*
$
1
*
*
Number Weekly
30 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 35.00 3 7 .5 0 4o.oo 4 2 .5 0 ^ 5 .0 0
of
ached- Weekly
and
workers ulsd earnings
under
hours
32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0 .0 0 42.50 4 5 .0 0 v r .50

Number of workers
r ^ ~ *
*
$
*
*
1—
*
*
*
■*
? -------? ------- 1 --------4 7 .5 0 50 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 55.00 5 7 .5 0 60.00 6 2 .5 0 65.00 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 80 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 95.00 $
100 00
X /v |Vv
V
and
50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 57.50 60 .0 0 62.50 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 70.00 7 2 .5 0 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 90.00 95.00 100.00 over

T

Women - Continued
Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
t TP«) .................................. ..............................................................
Manufacturing.......................................... ...............
Nonmanufacturing............................... ...........t ___
Public u t i l i t i e s * ........................................
Wholesale trade ......... ....................................
R etail trade .......................... ..........................
Finance ** ............................... ..........................
Services ...................... .......................................

1,632
399
1,233
128
503
524
20
58

39.5
39.5
1*0 .0
39.0
1*0.0

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) ................................................ *
Manufacturing .........................................................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ............................................
Finance * * ............................ ................. ..........

101*
1*8
56
20

40 .0
40.0
40 .0
40 .0

5 6 .0 0

53.00
57.00

8

2,133
188
64 9
U
-13
356

39.5
39.5
39.5
40 .0
4 0 .0
1*0 .0
39 .0

5 2 .0 0

8

5 1 .0 0
4 8 .5 0

527

3 9 .5

52.50

Clerks, accou n tin g.............................................. ......
Manufacturing..........................................................
Nonmanufacturing.................................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ............................... ..
Wholesale trade ..............................................
R etail trade .................. ..................................
Finance * *
Services ............................. ................... ..

2 ,5 2 0

W T

39.5
39.5
ftQ.R

Clerks, f i l e , class A ............................... . .............
Manufacturing .........................................................
Nonmanufacturing.................. ................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ........................................
Wholesale trade ............................. ..
R etail trade ••••••............................... ..
Finance ** .............................
Services .......................................... ............ ..

382
71*
308
3l*
90
25
97
62

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
1*0.0
39.0
39.0

Clerks, f i l e , class B .................. ............................
Manufacturing .........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .............
Public utilities * ............. .
Wholesale trade .................... T
Retail trade ............ ...........
Finance * * ........ .................
Services............. .......... ...

1,622
182
1 , 1 1*0
*
191
31*3
91*
618
191*

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
1*0.0
39.0
39.5

3 9 .0

$ 5 ^ .0 0
53.00
5l*.50
53.50
57.00
52.50
1*7.50
53.50

61.50
51.50

-

_
-

2
2
2

.

1
*
-

-

18
18

If
if
26
26

8
_

18
_

26

2
2

1
X

If

16
16

172
72
xuu
V7
•
W
PI
cl
R
R
yy
■
ya
h+
*

5
1
1.

21*0
88
1R
O
1R
xp
dO
d
O
dQ
O
O
2
1

3
2
1
X

**

1*1

2*5
y
32
If

ill
23
88
R
1*6
26
R
y
6

1
*

31

1*1

If

5 6 .0 0

JX

143
36
1AR

ll*
12
3D

31*
1*
5
j-p
31
30
yv

251
11
21*0
■0
1
•O
65
58
R7
y1

1*7

7
1

2

If
90
90
2

125
125
7

I 63
2

259

161

25 I*

258

22
32

17
*51
yJ
-

16
130
10
71
*
28

5

3

88

118

68
*50
yy

328
R
R
yy

2 66
8

2

214
33
yy
181
21
30
yV
**5

59
26

5

163
22
11*1
36
36
13
38
18

o
d rk
y

JO

do

03

■i d
j
XXO
If

3lt
01
*
61

7
f
0

y

89
8
81
17
22
23
18

t(0
L *7ft
d
O
1nn
Ivy
dc
op
0
y

255
59
X90
O
y
oft
30
Td O
Oy
x

99
13
aO
d
O
k
*
*
• l.
a
kn
4U

59
39
O
A
20

0
O
1.
4
Q
O

X

dV

8

8
2

1
1

10
10

16

15
11

1*6
30
lo
X
IO
JJC
O
J

161

6
15 5
0
c
151

O
d

“

d
0
k
4

26

60

2 19
1*1

xy

1*83

10

2
20

36

29
P li7
^4 (
28
61*

1*9
38
27 ----- V 7~
2i
22
If
10

7

251

276

20

5 ^ .5 0
4 9 .0 0

39.00
1*0 .5 0

y(
pi

-

V7 .5 0

42.50

3

18

if

53.50
5^.50

1*9 .5 0
1*1 .5 0
1*6 .0 0
1*1*.50
1*5 .0 0

60

00

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




R
P
R
y

21
3
0
j

*53 00

53.00
51.00
53.50

5

llR 7
4P (

30

1**3
oft
y°

xo

1
,
4

ok “
3
d*ty
P3
dv

82
IQ
xy

275
**7
228
18
It R
**P
IQ
ry

18 7

1*7
lk
XO
^fU
28
TO
XJ
V
3k
J4
*

do
vy

131*
1*1

-

“

1
,

U

0

y

ii7

21*

16

8

1.

13 f
JO7

qr

yy

1 30
xpu

R
P

R
P

1*0

36
10
26
R
p
12
2

37
2

21*
X

33

1*
1
O

or

P3

33
jj

R
18

7
1

10
ll*

16

P3

91
1*1

1*6

0

y
0
y
3
y

so
yv

32
31
*
j

i

30
yv
16
11

yy

Q
y
2

X
/C
0

ll*
10
1
.
4

if
T
X

7
1*
7

122

dry
of
a
y

51
*

r

1*0
O
O

nr

P(

c

P

TO
Xy

dQ
OO

15
10
e
P

32

16

U

3P

16

IO

10

20
1R
xp

XV/

1

-

"

•
•
“

w
m

-

~
“
•

“

*
*

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

"

-

“

*
■
*
—
*

*
“
*

17
15

0
d

X
1
,
4

21

■

d
0

X4

6

1

d

X

4

l.
4
"

"

3

p
1
X

1

1
*

1

OA
dV

"
"

0

1

32

-

“

X

P

33
c
p
28

8

56

h

*
*

X

0
y

31
y JdZ
>

8

"
“

-

1
.

P7

J
11
XX

or

3

-

“

Pi
c-X

8
32
yc.

_
-

4

Q

dry
v(

-

"

51*
21
00
do
X

yy

X

11
u

28
8
20
19
1
’

~

4

260
17

ll*
1
13
5
7

X

0

'

“

y

0
c
X

*

“

10

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations hy Industry division)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number of workers receiving slamlght-time weekly earnings of -

1

1
1
*
*
4
4
4
1
?—
$
$
4
$
4
4
4
—
4---- *
i
4—
4—
Number Weekly30.00 32.50 35.00 3 7.5 0 40.00 4 2.50 45.00 4 7.5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 $
sched­ Weekly
of
100.00
and
workers uled earnings
fud
li
under
hours
over
32.50 3 5 .OO 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 ?2 .50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72
75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 ?5.00 100.00

.po

Wom e n - Continued
Clerks, general, s e n i o r .... ................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..... ...... ....... ........
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ..... ......... ••••••
Public utilities * ..... ...... 1tf____
Wholesale trade ........... .
Retail trade ....................... .
Services ..... ........................
Clerks, general, intermediate ..... ........
Manufacturing ............................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r l n g.........................
Public utilities * ......... •••••••••.
Wholesale trade •••••••.............. .
Retail trade ........... •••••••.......
Finance ** ................. •••••••••••
Services •••.............. ....... •••••

5^7
115

432
48
162

60
78
2,307
407

1,900
151
578
283
424
464

$6^.00
72.50

-

-

62.00

-

-

39.5
39.5
39.5
40.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.0

53.50
56.00
53.00
63.50
53.50

Clerks, general, .junior......... ...........
Manufacturing •••••••••.... ......... ••••
Nonmanufacturing ••••••..................
Public utilities * ....................
Wholesale t r a d e .... •••••••••••••••••
Retail trade •••••.....................
Finance * * ............................
a
._ . .
...

2,181
377
1,804
357
396
275
194

39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.5

Clerks, order ............................ .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................. ........ ..
Nonmanufacturlng 2 / ......................
Wholesale trade ........... ...........
41 + Y * r A
.»»l

295
96
199
133
44

40.0
4o.o
40.0
40.0
40.0

Clerks, pay r o l l ..... ......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............................
Nonmanufacturlng ••••••••••••............
Public utilities * .... •••••••••.....
Wholesale trade •••••.... ...... ••••••
Retail trade •••••............ ........
Finance ** ............................
Services .•••••................. ••••••

738

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
4 o .o
39.0
39.5

582

489
103
148
98
63

77

16

39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
M.O
37.5

19

-

16

_
_

6
-

15

19

4
_
4

22
3
19
I
t

73
11
62
k

30

17

19
10
9

30

71
2

12
1
4

6
1
-

9
2

38
19
1

6
7
17

15
17
22

356
34

279
49

224
64

322

230

160

8
90
43
79
102

18
44
19
81
68

7
44
29
65
15

121
44
77
3
35
8
30
1

151
66
85
8
46
13
18

133
^3
90
5
30
1
12
42

20
3

7^.50
64.00

-

.

-

_
_

66.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
4

70
5
65
40
3
22

230
29
201
3

-

8
8
8
-

181
16

-

28
28
28
-

321
39
282
17
59
94
47
65

60.50

50.00
52.50
51.50
46.00
v r .50

35

94

45.5 0
52.00
47.00
45.5 0
4 1.5 0
44.00

35
.
-

94
_
94

53.50
60.50

35

50.50
50.50
51.50

.
-

-

-

-

1
1

-

55.50
56.00“
55.50
51.50
58.50
54.00
57.00
55.50

165
16
149
87
18
1
43

4
4
-

4
•

See footnotes at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




18
.
18

12
12

-

-

165
.
39
74
9
^3

_

96
8
24
70

138
30
108
10
27
6
57
8

265
53
212
32
39
4
88
*+9

461
70
391
27
90
109
81
84

362
36
326
16
77
96
91
46

146
32
114
1
15
37
61

2
2
-

4
.
4

41
_
4l
32

27

37
10
27
12
15
*

45
18

29

27

29

18
6

24
5

12
12

21
2
19
12
-

41
17
24

110
40
70
22
32

47

5

3

13

-

2

-

6
6
6

120
45
75
15
35
13
12

65
7
58
13
12

6

8
8
2
4

6
-

&

27
20
1
*

6
-

9

4
3

156
30
126
2
82
14
28

51
32
19
7
8
4
-

4
26

66
46

3^
14

20

20

8
4
4
1
*

14
6
-

19
4
15
9
6

28
10
18
12
6

83

91
43
48
4
18
12
13
1

36
16

5

7
6

73
2

29
13
16
1
*
12
_

44
4
40

31
1
30

6
3

27
3

-

16

64
5
59
32
9
-

10
10
-

15
3

43
6
37
31
6
-

107
4
103
103
-

5
5
-

17
17
-

12
12
-

35

49
25
24
4
1

20
2
18
1

6

2
5

57
7
50
27
20
-

3
4
2
1

32
12
20
1
6
-

21
7
14
7
1
7

13
12
2
10
7
3

26
26
2
20
4

87
11
76
48

23
5

63
32
31
26
3
2
-

-

_

18
15
3

2
2
-

1
1

_
-

1
2

.
-

.
1

_
-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

_

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

"

“

"

-

26
20
6
6

1
1
-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

19
4
15
12

-

3

-

5

•

-

-

-

2

4
4
-

-

-

10
1
9
4
-

-

-

2

“

”

3

10
25
1
-

20
3
1

13

-

9
1

17
7
10

1

7

~

29
6
23
21

11,

T able 1 . — OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - C o ntinued
(Average w e e k l y earnings l / a nd w e e k l y scheduled hours for selected occupations b y industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Average
$
$
$
$
$
*
Number Weekly
sched­ Weekly 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 1*2.50 1*5.00
of
and
workers uled earnings
under
hours
*
32.50 35.00 37.50 1 0.00 42.50 1*5.00 1*7.50

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
*
1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 .00 90.00

V

95.00 $

100.00

50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72 .50 7 5 .OO 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 5 .OO 100.00

and
over

Women - Continued

Duplicating-machine operators .............
Manufacturing....... .................
Nonmanufacturing .................. .
Public utilities * ................ .
Wholesale trade ...... .............
Retail trade ........ ...............
Finance ** ........ .......... ...... .
Services ...................

2i
*6
1*2

Key-punch operators ....... ............ .
Manufacturing........... ....... .
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ............... .....
Retail trade ........ ..............
Finance ** ...................
Services ....... ............... •••••

880
I88"1
692
108

Office girls ............ .
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ....................
Wholesale trade ................... .
Retail trade ...................... .
Finance * * ......... ........ .......
Services ...... ..... ..... .........

k7 3
13b

119
56

38.0

Secretaries .............................
Manufacturing ........ ..... ............
Nonmanufacturing *............... .
Public utilities * .................
Wholesale trade ...••••••.....
Retail trade ............
Finance ** ...... .......... .
Services ................... •••••••••

3 ,12 2

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
1*
0.0
39.0
38.5

20 k

19
70
19
36
60

Ik k
k9

330
61

339
111
29

92k

2,198
213
5^2
238

613
592

39.0

$1*8.50

1*
0.0

5 1.0 0
1*
8.00
52.00

39.0
39.0
1 0.0
*
1 0.0
*
38.5
3 7 .5

1*9.00
1*7.00
1*7.00
1*7.00

3 9 .5

52.00

39.5
39.5
1*
0.0
39.5
1*
0,0
39.0
1*
0.0

53.50
51.50
53.50
57.50
53.00
1*
8.00

39.0
39.5
38.5
39.0
1 0.0
*

1*3.00
1*
6,00
1* .5 0
1

.
-

39.0

50.00

6

2

7

19

-

-

1
*

6
1

2
2

1
18

5

-

3
13

25

58

25

12
1*6
8

2

2

13
13
-

Ik

-

l*
l
1*
-

2

10

3
19

-

-

2

38
-

16

62

72

80

-

-

3
59

10
62

l*
l

12

-

27
9
20
5

2

16

1

66
12
1
*
1*1
2

2

15

1C

1

11*
20

68.50
63.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

64.50
64.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
*

1*

^3.50
1 3.00
*
1* 0
1.0
39.50
6 *.50
1

60.50
63.00
62.00

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




3
3
-

i
*
. 1*

1**
1
2
1*2

28

-

20
2
18
1

21

3

6

5
9
7

1

7

13
-

1

9
19
_

5

69
7

91

62
6

1 1*
+

79
15
3
5
55

3

1

Ik

9U
51
^3

37
9

31

28
22

19

9

12

91
27
6*
1
7
3
3
37

12

66
8
58

3
19
3
9
21*

21
11
10
2
6
1
1

-

11*0
10

81

130
13
7

1*2
6
6
1
+
11

16
68
26

16
11

5
3
-

39

15
33
l*
l
19
2

5

3

8

2

8
8
2

-

-

2

2

1*0
1

21*8

137

51
197

1*2

-

39
-

8*
1
5
79
-

-

20

18

16

Ik

1*

15

1*

2

13
1
12

8

39
15

9
1
*

3
38

28

6

20

107

15

95
13
9
10

38
25

12
1
11
8

3
-

119
1**
1
75
6

39
17
13
-

11

3
_
3

7
I
T
3

3

_
_
3

3

59
11
1*8
8
27

11
2
6

l
*
9
-

18

9
9
9
_
-

_
-

199
33

1 71*
*
120

166

31
5*

31

28
61

32
1*0
32
31

55
99
111

-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

1*8

1*1

36

5
*3
7

19

6
2
1
*

20

16

1
1

269
3^
235
35
70
31
3*
i
65

22

36
1^

.
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

203
122
81
1
*
1*2

-

1*
_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

3l
3*
72

205
76
129
15
50

210

179

206

85

88

125

91
3

10
1*8
6

6

27
20

57

23

53
153
9
53
1*
65

1*1

18

22

13
5
1*
-

262

23
68

23
67
81

18

_
1*

17
1*

_

_
_
_
_
-

-

5
21

9

_
_

_
_

_
_
-

_
-

-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
.
-

_
_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
_
_
_
-

85 I

30

1*

1

10k
22

33
52

20
10

1

3

1
*
-

1
1

25
3
25
29

17
3
l*
l
17

6

1

_
-

3

-

_
191
87

1

_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_

_
-

_
_
_
-

_

_
_

12

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Average
Number of workers
$
$
$
&
$
$
$
$
*
Number Weekly
sched- Weekly 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 V2 .5 0 V 5.00 V 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50
of
_
_
_
_
workers uled earnings and
under
hours
35.00 37.50 1 0.00 V2.50 V 5.00 V7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00
32.50
*

receiving straight-time weekly e a m l .ngs of $
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
1
$
55.00 57 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
100.00
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
and
over
60.00 62.50 65.00 6 7.5 0 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
57.50

Wo m e n - Continued

$ 55.00

205

39.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0

1,09^
951

3 9 .5
38 .5

53.00
52.00

1*70

39.5

2^
111
***
61
**5
261

1 0.0
*

57.50
60.50
57.00

Stenographers, general .......................
Manufacturing ........... .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ...... ............ ......
Public utilities * ..... ...............
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade ••••••••........... •••••••
Finance * * .......... ••••••••••••••••••
Services •••••••••••••••••..... .......

i ,98 6
f
1,352
3,63 V
V77
907

Stenographers, t e c h n i c a l ................. .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .... ............. ••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .................. .
Public utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade ........ ••••••.........
Services ......... ••••••••••••••••.....

Switchboard operators ............ ........ .
Manufacturing .............................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g..........................
Public utilities * ..... ••••••........
Wholesale trade •••••..................
Retail trade ........... •••••••••••••••
Finance * * ...... ....... ...... ........
Services ...............................

981
161
820
81
197

Switchboard operator-receptionists ........
Manufacturing .............................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g................. ........
Public utilities * ................... .
Wholesale trade ••••••................ .
Retail trade ......... ••••••...........
Finance ** ........ •••••........ .......
Services ................. .............

97*+
213
761
1*2

106
129
307

311

Ilk

108
186

39.5
1*0.0
39.5
39.0

39.5
39.5
39.5
56.6
1 0.0
*
1 0.0
*

39.0
39.5

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
1*0.5
39.0
39.5

55
367

22
18
1*

1*8

16

-

-

20
1

20
1*

16

-

-

19
-

16

-

-

9
-

25
1*
28
5

72.00
69.00

-

-

-

-

-

53.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6
-

-

5
1

61*
6*
1
1*
1
20
8
7
15

21*7
21*7
18

-

-

10
26
167

112
1
111
15
21
18
l*
l
J*3

5

31*

-

-

-

150
19
131
1*6
26
7
52

230
19
211
121*
25
30
32

5l*.00
52.50

58.00
52.00

50.50

58 .OO
1*9.00
^9.50
52.50
1*9.00

50.50
1 6.00
*

50.00
52.50
1 9.00
*
53.50
1*9.50
1 8.50
*
51.50
1*6.50

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1*22

15
129

20

-

-

7
-

66

11*1*

20

58.00

k
62

2

3
3
-

3*
l
-

6
28

1*1
11"
**

5
5
_
1

26

6*
1
17

623

w
55k

55
65
53

733

172
561
126

515
193

537

112

698
187

322
1* *
1
62
21+
108

1*25

511

106

169

7l*
53
125

132

212

183

81*

62
62
26

32
32
1
-

53
1
52
-

55
2

25

**3

121
12

121
28
OQ

109
2
12
25
22
1*8

127
38
89
5
6
17
22
39

53
6
11
**

50
19

7J

01~->
>

10

1
9

38
13
13
19

151*
1*5
109

10
10
1

ill*

29
85

6

13

60

1*6

18
-

3
19
l
*

25

323
187
136

271

1*1 1*
*

i&cT

95
3**9

21

11

7
37
5
16
26

8
251*

1
*

91

>*9

1*1

102
12

163
27
121
159

56
1*

11
11
1
10

21
2
19
1
15
-

12
11
1
-

50
1*
1

73

23
6
17
5
12
-

196
66

127
8
119
2
-

106

59
10
**9
1
18
10
17
3

39
9
30
5
-

11
8
6

61
1
*

nC
J'-J

52
01L
£-.

5
8
2
12
9

5
10
2
1
*
-

1+
2

57
l*
l
1*3
5
23
15

23
19
5
6
8
-

-

11
1
*
7

5

65
28
37
21*
5

9

1*

1
8

1*
1
*
-

50

_

2

1
*
8

2
6

6

l
*
1
*
1
-

1
1
-

23

13

19
6
13
5
2
2
1
*
-

71

16

10
10
-

-

-

-

-

7

73
52

2
21
15
6

13
1
12
-

12
11
1
1
•

21
21
21
■

1
1
1

.

1
1
-

-

50

1*9
1
-

2
2
~

2
2

1

_
-

1

_
-

_
_
_
.

-

-

-

_
-

_
.

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

-

.

-

_

1

_
_

_

-

-

_
_
_

-

-

1
1
_

_
-

_

1
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

Table 1.--OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations >y industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Average
Number of workers
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Number Weekly
5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50
sched­ Weekly 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 1*2.50 1*
of
workers uled earnings and
under
hours
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 4 2 .50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.0 0

receiving straight-time weekly earnings of $
$
$
$
$
$
r
1
*
*
*
*
*
55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 $
100.00
and
over
57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00

Women - Continued

Tabulating-machine operators .......... .
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ............ .......
Public utilities * ..................
Retail trade ............. ..........
Finance ** .......... .......... .....

185
43

Transcribing-machine operators, general ....
Manufacturing .................... .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .......... .........
Wholesale trade .................. .
Finance ** ................ .

1+71
119
352

Typists, class A
Manufacturing ................ .........
Nonmanufacturing................. .
Public utilities * ..... ......... .
Wholesale trade ......... .
Retail trade ............... ........
Finance * * ........... ...... .......
Services ..................... ••••••

2,330

Typists, class B •••••........... .........
Manufacturing ................... .
Nonmanufacturing.......... ............
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ....... •••••••.......
Retail trade .......... .............
Finance * * ....... ..... ....... •••••
Services ...........................

2,915
295

11*2

35
16

72

165

145

5^5
1,7 8 5
151*
1*18
12 1

637
1*55

2,620

144
610
166
987

713

39.5
40.0
39.5
4o.o
4o.o
39.0

39.5
39.0
39.5
40 .0
38.5

$ 57 .5 0
6 1.0 0
56.50
61.0 0

55.50
54.00

-

-

_
-

4

18

42

40

60

-

1

10

18
12
6

41
27
8

30
9
17

19
4l
24
17

12
26

188
2
186

294
17
277

332
33
299

348
75
273

317
84
233

15

10
62

-

-

-

53.00
51.50
54.50

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 1.0 0

33
33

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20

1

62

28

20

97
64
45
127
193
335 . 55

58
5
73
58

124

195

2
122

1

553
47

194

506

4
51
32

2

9

10

-

-

-

-

18
1

15
4
105

28

48

94

20

60

6

39

70

257
162

201

40

54

375
23
352

32

68
28

16

900
68
832

13
•

2
18

27
31
93

56

-

-

19

5
24
4

16

130

-

-

70

_

4
48
57

~

-

1
8
2

75
19
98
91

-

32
4

29

6

.

11 .50
**
48.00
44.00
45.50
47.00
45.00
42.00
43.00

13
4
9
1
2
6

-

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.0

9

_
3

53.00

5l*.00
1*9.50
55.00
1*
9.00
1*9.50
1*9.50
1*9.00

4
_
4

-

52.00

39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

-

-

21

106

69
83

266

134

52
214

20

114
14
37
7
36
20

26
1

25
4
4
9

97
38
59
39

24
_
24
3
5
14

16
2

50
11

3

7

_
3

26
12

8
1

16

3
3

7
1

12
12

3
4

-

-

36

6

15

39

14

36

6

12

8
6

6

_

30

4

128

72
13
59
14
8

16

3

208

186

96

89
97
19

112
8

18
11

3

11

21

14
4
_
7

166
86
80

17
13

14

47
81
8
1
1

3
1
2

2
2

_

_

_

_
_

_

_
_

_

_

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

_

1

_

1

_

1

_

1

_

_

1

_

1

1

_

_

1

_

3

-

2
1
1

-

1

1

1

1

-

3

44
3
41
15

1

11

2

_

_

_

1

_
_

_
_

„

_

21

1

11
10
1

5

_

15
15

_

_
_

_

2
«.

_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

_

_

_

2

40

43

8

2

28

29

123
15

100
62

20
1

1
1

_

108

19

_
_

_

-

_

.

_

_

_
_

80

33
9
25

20
2
18

9

-

18

_

1

-

-

_

_

_

5

1

2
8

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

.

_

_

18

-

_

_

-

2
1
1

_

_

-

_

.

_
_

-

-

_
.

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

3

_

_
_
_
_

9
48
-

5

_
_
_
_

50
9
42
3

8

_

_
_
_
_

_

_
_

_

-

-

_

_
_

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

3
'

l/ Excludes premium pay for overtime.
2/ Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




u
Table 1-A.--OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - SAN

1RANCISCO COUNTY

(Average weekly earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations)

Average
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Number Weekly
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 42.50 1*5.00
sched- Weekly
of
and
workers uled earnings
under
hours
35.00 37.50 1 0.00 42.50 1*5.00 V7.50
+
32.50

i

Sex and occupation

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of *
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
1
$
*
4 7.5 0 50.00 52 .5 0 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 6 7.5 0 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 .OO 90.00 95.00 $

%

$

%

100.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00

and
over

Men

Bookkeepers, hand ............. ......... ....
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B .....
Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g ................... .
Clerks, file, class B .........
Clerks, general, senior ........ .
Clerks, general, intermediate .... .
Clerks, general, Junior ....................
Clerks, order
.
Clerks, pay r o l l .... ......... .......... .
Office boys ................ ......... .
Tabulating-machine operators .... .

26 l
112
692
81
618

40.0
40.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
1+0.0
39.0
39.5

585

39.5

239
270
299
1,2 2 5

1*0.0

51.50
5^.50

10

1
*

3

3^

19

13
58

16

10

5

3

25
8
1*

13
57

35
^3

58
33

55

26

28

25

3

3
8

15

17

11

$ 73 .50

613

296
9te
93

630
2 17

58.00
66.50

-

_

2
12

2

1*7.00
79.00

_

2
2
13

7

6

8
6

2
15

37
55

3

_

63.00
50.50

3

1
*

2

8

15

^7

70.50
67.50
1*1.50

5

5

29

115

65

^5

132

71*

61*.50

1*2
3

23

109

111*
12

5

82
7

3

70
l*
l
21+

2
7
62

16
1

10

-

^7

29

73

10
1*8

39

65

21

l*
l

79

100
27

1*8
3
26

21

8*
1

56

8

21*
1*8
1*9
T£0

12
11
7
1*1
r71
1

10

21

28

28

21*

lb

35

1

2

26

10
35

68

167

23
16

73

103

112

35

38

1*1

116

* 19

11

1

103

19

30

5

18
81
1

19

50

35

b5

68

33

*0

20

19

_

_

8

122

73

68

125

5

61
1
*

70

9

3

35

8

1

12 -

18

1*2

29

15

5

5

1

10
8
1*1
2
11

28
20

13
11*
29

1
20
20
1

27

1
8

2

1

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1*

_
_

_
_

_

1*8

1

2

_

_

1*

_

2

1

Wom e n

Billers, machine (billing machine) .........
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) .....
Bookkeepers, hand ........ .
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ....
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B •••••
Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) ....................................
Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) ............ ...... .
Clerks, accounting ................... .
Clerks, file, class A ......................
Clerks, file, class B ......................
Clerks, general, senior .................... .
Clerks, general, intermediate
Clerks, general, Junior ....................
Clerks, order ....... ....... ......... ,
C 1 erks, pay roll ...........................
Duplieating-machine operators ..............
Key-punch operators
Of 1 c.e girls
.......................

f

See footnote at end of table




1,26 0
93
1,992
310
1,389

1+16
1,581

1,5 2 8
227
512
192

706
367

39.0
39.5
39.5
39.5

1
-

62.00

-

_
-

52.00

-

11

66.00

_

5l*.00

1*
0.0

57.00

39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
1*0.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.0

53.50
53.00
2
1* .5 0
62.50
52.00
1*6.00
55.50
56.50
1 8.50
*
5 1.5 0
1 3.00
*

_

8

16

88

112

20

12

1
*
68
1*
6
2
1

2
_
_
_
5

_

35

63

3

-

_
-

11

36

170

2

5

1
*
26
2
130

_

28
118

8
12

ll
*
1*

232
16
8

10
1
60
26
210
12
3

35

56

135

6

3

61
18
1
20

185

177

113

_

186

13
91

1+
181+

1
231+

28
181*
18

30
138
19
177

27
72
l
*

159
338

90
-2

15i*

5

2
10

1
16
106

3

1*
11*

15
3^

25
50

35
63

lb

12

62

270
21*
27
18
76
30

21*5
112
28
58
16
62
27

80
36
_

187

2 11

6

_

381
32
83
13
277
136
31*
83
59
111*
l*
l

225

30

20
109
18 1

79

10
238

16
11*1

31
52

23

1*0
15
235

16
11*8
60

30

26
27
1*5
19
71
27

13
52

11
110
13

23
51+
96
21*

28
76
7
53

36
l*
l

121*
33
15
30
77
39
1*
19

22

73

Oc

3
33
^9
30

16

152

12

13

10
1*0

»

_

l*
l

_

57
27

118

5

12
1

57
79

23

26
7

22

12

1*8
3

15

29

31

28

_

6
27
7

31

_
_

51

17

9

10

_

_

lb

_
-

_

1
1*
3

26
11

7

16

23

_
_

1*

_

_

_
_

_

_
_

_

_

_
_

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15

Table 1-A.--OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY - Continued
(Average weekly earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations)

■

Sex and occupation

Average
Number of workers receiving straight-time
$
$
1
$
$
*
$
*
*
*
Number Weekly
+
+
57.50 60.00 62.50
sched­ Weekly 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1 0.00 4 2.50 1 5.00 4 7.5 0 50.00 52.50 u
of
workers uled earnings and
under
hours
+
32.50 35.00 37.50 14-0.00 1 2 .5 0 45.00 4 7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 5 7.5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00

weekly earnings of $
1
*

$

*

*

*

*

65.00 67.50 70.00 72 .5 0 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

$
95.00 100.00
and
over

67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 .OO 90.00 95.00 100.00

Women - Continued

Secretaries ................................ .
Stenographers, general .................... .
Stenographers, technical •••••••............
Switchboard operators .... .............. .
Switchboard operator-receptionists .........
Transcribing-machine operators, general ....
Typists, class A ......... ••••••••..........
Typists, class B ............................

1/

2,545
3,880
335
759
728
391
1,831
2,334

39.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0

$65.00
55.00
58.50
50.50
1+9.50
53.50

51.0 0
1+
1+.50

1
4
10

-

1
+
-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

28

-

68

17

-

119

13
11+0

1
+

1+
1

30

109

-

-

10
335
17

1+60
26

193
573
12
+

105

108

98
11
++
301+
191

91
56
281
117

26

205

80

25

122
35

201
25
261
328

12
11+3

1+07

223
728

70

119
1+30
52
1+0
86
90
ll+l
95

170
1+17
99
56
23
39

11+9
75

37l+

625
1
1+5
25
21+
86
19

215
268
18
50
39
36
119

272

160

15 I
+

233
11
21
8
6
6+
1
18

281
2
10
10
15
35

1+8
1
11
-

152
33
15
1
2
9

-

1
1

187
2
13
-

2

173

163
1
+
37
1

-

80
1

-

-

-

1

1

1

-

-

1
1
-

29
-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime.

Table 2

-PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS

(Average earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
scheduled
hours

Hourly
earnings

Weekly
earnings

40.0
39.5
1 0.0
+

$ 1 .9 6
2.01
1.95

$ 78 .50
79.50

1+
0.0

$0.00 $+2 .5 0 $ * 7.5 0 150.00 $ 55.00 $ $
1+5.00 4
1+
1
52.50
57.50 60.00

$

$

$

Number of workers receiving straight-■time veekly earnings of $
1
4
62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

$

$

95.00
100.00
and
and
under
over
55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
1+2.50 1+5.00 *+7.50 50.00 52.50

Men
D r a f t s m e n .... ..............................
Man u f a c t u r i n g ............. ..............
Nonmanufacturing ............. ...........

227
105
122

Draftsmen, Junior 2/ ........................
107
M a n u f a cturing..... ...................... ------ 55----

39.5

_

_

-

-

78.00

-

-

1.51
T758

60.50
55^30

3
3

_
-

6
6

10
10

62.00
63.00

_

_

_

_

2
2
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

9
81

9
9

3
2

3
1

-

5
1+
1

9
8
1

18
l+
l
1
+

19
7
12

10
2
8

29
12
17

35
18
17

8
r

7
7

10
9

7

12

6

10

3

1

+

1
+
2

3
2

1

5
2

6
6

2
2

8
7

_

1

2
2

61

6
-

51

5
5
-

6

2
2

1
1

_

-

-

1+

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

“

-

-

-

6

10

9
8
1

19
15
1
+

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) 2/ ........
Manufacturing
..........•••..

1/
2

31

1+0.0

1.55

22

1+0.0

1 .5 8

Excludes premium pay for overtime.
for industry divisions not shown separately.

] Includes data
949080 0 51 -3
-




-

“

~

-

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

Table 3 •- -MAINTENANCE AND POWER PLANT OCCUPATIONS
(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations by industry division)

Number of workers receiving straight -time hourly earnings of Occupation and industry division

Number Average
$1.20
of
hourly Under
workers earnings $1.20
1.25

Carpenters, maintenance ........... ........ .
Manufacturing ...................... .
Nonmanufftcturing 2 / .... ..................
Public utilities * .....................
Retail trade ...........................
Finance ** .............. . .....
Services ........ .......................

415
246
167
25
71
19
49

$ 2 .1 2

Electricians, maintenance .................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..... ...... ........ .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .......................
Public utilities * .....................
Retail trade ......... ......... ...... .
Services ........................... .

57^
376

2 .0 5

Engineers, s t a t i o n a r y .............. .........
Manufacturing ...................... .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ........... ......... ..
Retail trade ....... ....................
Finance **.••••«•••••,«,.••••••••••••••
Services ...............................

667
303
361*
36
25
293

Firemen, stationary b o i l e r .......... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............ ......... ...... .
No n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............... ..........

101

Helpers, trades, maintenance
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ......... .............
Public utilities * .....................
Retail trade ...........................
Services ......................
Machinists, maintenance
Manufacturing •••............ ••,•••••••••,
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ............ ..........
Public utilities * ................ .
S e r v i c e s .... ..........................
Maintenance men, general utility ............
Manufacturing ......................*......
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ...................... .
Public utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade ...........................
Services
................. ..

198
143
11
4l

170
69
1,828
89 ! “
937
833

16
24
1,335

1 ,1 8 2
153
84
63

427
189 “
238
56
98
21
35

2.08
2 .1 7

1

-

$ 1 .2 5

$ 1.3 0

$ 1 .3 5

$1.40

$1.45

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .5 5

$ 1.6 0

$ 1 .6 5

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .7 5

$ 1.8 0

$ 1 .8 5

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1 .5 5

1.6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1.8 0

1.8 5

1.9 0

3

_

2
2

_

10

2
g-

3

"

9
---- r

1
1

-

3
2
1

5

-

-

3

2.02

_
-

-

_
-

-

2 .3 5

-

-

-

-

1.9 0

_
-

-

-

_
-

3
-

-

-

-

_

1
1
1

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5
5

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

«
-

1 .6 7

-

-

-

2.02
1.88
1.86

-

-

-

6
6
6
-

-

"

“

1.99
2.40

2 .1 7
1 .9^
2 jd 8
1.99

1.8 9

2.02
1.79
1 .9k

1.9 0
1 .7 6
1.7^
1.81
1.64
1.64
1.73
1.56
1.55
1.52
1.39
1.99
1.99
2.04
1.99
2.14
1.90
1.95
1.86

2
2
9
9
3
6

-

_

_

_

See footnotes at end of table,
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

1
1

-

-

22
20
2
2

-

:
-

-

-

-

10
10

_
-

5
2
3
-

-

8
8
8
-

3

-

3
2
1
1
-

6
6
6

3
-

11
3
8

14
5
9

1
1
1
-

169

-

3

-

_
_

5

-

1

10
10
10
-

29

12
6
6
3
3

-

-

3

2
2
2
-

105

100

5

-

28
72
72

5
-

8
2
6
1
-

3

48
48
48

5

3
3
-

17
2
15

3
-

105
8
97

3

-

29
25
-

24 ____32_
24
4
28
-

_
-

-

8
8
8
~

1
1
1
*
*

137
23
114
102
3
2

585
21
564
561
3
-

49
20

19
12

481
H 63

29
15
7
1

7
-

18

_

12
157
154
-

«
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
11
4
“

3
3
3
-

17
6
11

•
-

-

6
6
2
4

3
3
2
1

12
15
I T ----- 6“
4
6
3
5

-

”

-

252

$ 2 .1 5

1 .9 5

2.0 0

2 .0 5

2 .1 0

2.15

2.2 0

74
67
7

50
37
13

24
24

13
7
6
5
1

147
52
95
1

16

44
33
11
6
_
_

5
---- 2 ~
3
2
1

3

$2.20
and
over

-

4

3

-

-

81
70
11
10
_

108
24
84
84
_

90
86
4
1
_

111
104
7

31
30
1
_

_

_

23

1

-

3

6

-

-

3
20

50
31
19
9

20
10
10
1
_

106

73
67
6
_

78
73
5
5

5

28
2
26
11
15
-

4

5

25

2
4

-

25
21
4

30
3°
-

5
5
-

-

-

-

-

16
7
9
2
3
4

-

-

_

84
84
-

25

29
17
12

48
25
23
14
-

16
2
14
5
2
-

$ 2 .1 0

5

5

15
15
7
6
1
-

$2 .0 5

7

1
-

6
6
-

-

$ 2.0 0

_

_

58
58
-

-

$ 1 .9 5

_
_

247
5
-

8
8
-

$ 1 .9 0

-

7
5

8
17
8
3

-

9

73
33
8
_

69
Q

70

47

_

_
_
_

34
15
19
_

-

19

-

4
4
-

-

-

7
7
_

_

_

_
_

_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

397
339
58
56
2

334
329
5
3
2

192
179
13
-

157
136
21
2

42
42

13

19

-

18
18
-

78
39
39
15
24

42
27
15

25
17
8

180
85
95

12
8
4
4
-

2
2

_

3

-

-

-

-

3
_
_

■

•

-

3

28
8
20
.
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

8

92
2
*
*

9
5

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF I B f S
ACl
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17

Table 3 .--MAINTENANCE AND POWER PIANT OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average hourly earnings l/ far men in selected occupations by industry division)

Number < f workers receiving 1 traight-time hourly earnings of o
s
Occupation and industry division

Number Average
$ 1.2 0
of
hourly Under
workers earnings $ 1.2 0
1.25

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) .........
Manufacturing ••••••»•....................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ .......................
Public utilities * ....................
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••••••••••
Retail trade ...... ....................

959
120
839
430
365
39

$ 2 .0 7
2.04
2.07

Mechanics, maintenance ........ .
Manu f a c t u r i n g ................... .
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ......... ••••••••••••
Public utilities * ••••••••••••••••••..
Services ...............................

820

1.96
1.97
1.90

196
52
29

2 .0 8
2 .0 6
2.07

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .7 5

$ 1.80

$ 1.8 5

$ 1.9 0

$ 1 .9 5

$2.00

$ 2 .0 5

$2.10

$2.15

1.6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1.8 0

1.8 5

1.9 0

1 .9 5

2.0 0

2.05

2 .1 0

2.15

2.20

-

10
10
.

357
21
336
_

-

-

-

-

-

51
22
29
21
6
1

132

2
1
-

12
2

262

-

9
9
_
_

kk

-

9
5

8
8~
-

16
6~
10
10
-

1.40

1 .4 5

1.5 0

1 .5 5

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
20
-

-

-

_

1.8 3
2.00

-

_

_

-

-

Painters, maintenance ........................
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ .......................
Public utilities * .................... .
Retail trade ............ ............ ..
Finance * * ........... ........ ....... ..
Services ..................... .........

329
202
127
22
20
10
67

2 .0 1
2.08
1.89
1.84
2.26
2.10
1.77

-

Pipe fitters, maintenance ...................
Manufacturing ...................... ......
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .... •••••••••••......
Public utilities * ....................

313
287 “

2 .0 5
2 .0 5

26
10

1.99

1.8 9

-

Radio technicians ••••••••..... •••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••............... .
Public utilities * ....................

71
71
71

2 .0 9

_

93

2.01
2.06

r

2

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

«
.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




$ 1 .6 5

1.35

-

1 .6 2
1 .5 8
1 .6 8

1/
2/
*
**

$ 1.6 0

1.30

_

15 1
100
51

k6

♦ 1 .5 5

$ 1 .3 5

6

-

Oilers ........................................
Manufacturing .................... ........
Nonmanufacturing ..........................

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance 2 / .........
Manufacturing ......................... ....

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1.3 0

-

2.09
2.09

$ 1 .4 5

$ 1 .2 5

$i.ifO

5
5
-

7
7
-

29
29
-

_

_

-

_
-

25
21

k

28
28
28

lf
i
8“
6
8
8
1
.
-

k

-

k

k2
1
ifl

2
2

-

“

6
6~
8
2
6
1
.

132

kk
2k
-

10
10

2
2

-

-

_
-

27
10
17

lk

-

19
19

-

_
_

6~
8
8
-

-

-

-

85

188

67“

18 8 ”
-

39
39
_

-

-

_

_

-

-

1
1
-

6

36
36
_
-

12
5
7
1
1
-

39
39
.
.
-

2
1
1
-

20
12
8
8

8
8
-

166
162
i
f
-

75
6if
11
-

7
7
7

27
27
27

12
12
12

-

18

18

kk
kk

18
18
3
3
11
11
5

7

2

-

-

-

-

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

27

k

_

•

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

5

_

_

-

-

-

»
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

5

_

2
-

i*
i
_
8
8
-

336

9
253
216
_
36

82
59~
33
-

73
6 T

15

10

10

lif7
90
57

-

-

51
ifO

11
1
_
7
3

_
_

*_
132

51
26
25

130
_

23

2

_

21
21
_

-

-

_
-

- ■

-

-

-

13
12
1
_
_
1
-

5
2
3
.

8if
56
28

3
-

16
1
11

18
18
-

-

lf
i
lf
i
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

ii
ff
26 “

$2.20
and
over

_

_

-

-

25
25
25

-

Table 4

-CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ by industry division)

Number of workers receiving sitraight-time hourly earnings of Number Average
of
hourly
workers earnings

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, electric bridge (under
20 tons) 3 / ....................... ..........
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............ .

246
243

$ 1 .7 5
1.75

498

1 .2 4

575“
18

1.23

Under
$ 0.95

$ 0 .9 5 $1.00 $ 1 .0 5 $ 1 .1 0 $ 1 . 1 5 $ 1.2 0 $ 1 .2 5 $ 1 .3 0 $ 1 .3 5 $1.40 $ 1 .4 5 $ 1.5 0 $ 1 .5 5 $ 1 .6 0 $ 1 .6 5 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 . 7 5 $ 1.8 0 $ 1 .8 5 $ 1.9 0 $ 1 .9 5 $2.00 $ 2 .0 5 $ 2 .1 0
and
1.0 0 1 .0 5 1.10 1 . 1 5 1.2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1.40 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 . 5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 . 7 5 1.8 0 1 .8 5 1.9 0 1 .9 5 2.00 2.05 2 .1 0 over

25
25

1
1

14
11
1
2
-

_
.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12
3

1.11

-

9

77

-

4
4
_
1

310
12
270
20

11
11
_
11
-

1
_
_
_

225

12
15
_
4
8

29
27

-

1
1
_
-

326

299

4
4
4

77
77

1.2 6
1 .2 7

-

Elevator operators, passenger (women) ........
Nonmanufacturing 3 / ................ .......
Public utilities * ......................
Retail t r a d e ......................... .
Finance * * ..... ...... .
Services ........ ..................... .

262
262“
43
25
68
93

1.2 3
1.2 3

3
3
3

10
10
4
-

53
53
3
15
_

2
2
2
_

31
31
19

2
2
1
_

87
87
_
-

_
_
-

_

35

-

12

63
24

2
8
2 ---- S
_
.
.
_
_

6

1
-

8
8
_
_
_

-

9
9
7
_
2

-

-

Garage attendants ................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....................... .
Nonmanufacturing 3 / .......................
Public utilities * ......................
Retail trade ........... .................
Services ........... ............ ........

551
6?
484

_
-

_
-

.
-

-

_
_
_
.
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
.
_

_
.

28
---- ST
_
20
_
20
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

6

-

-

-

-

6
6

_
_

6
6
6

Elevator operators, passenger (men) 3 / ......
Nonmanufacturing 3/ ........................
Wholesale trade .................. ......
Finance
...............................
Services ......... ............ ..........

**

Groundsmen and g a r d e n e r s .... #

.

209
67
21

1.12
1.17

-

1 .2 6
1 .1 6

_

1.59
I .60
1.59
1.54
1.58
1.52

50
17
33

1.40
1.59

6

-

-

1.3 0

29

1.28

6
6

_

Guards ........ ••••••••••••......... ..........
Manufacturing ......... .......... ••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Finance * * ............. ............ .

259

1 .4 9

189
70
12

1 .2 9
1.4 9

Janitors, porters and cleaners (men) .........
Manufacturing ............. .................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Public utilities * ..... ............ .
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade .......... ............ •••••
Finance ** •••••............ ............
Services .......... ........ .............

5,423
1,1^9
4,274
506
258
635

Nonmanufacturing 3 / ........................
Services .............................. .

691
2,184

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

-

-

2
2
-

1.3 0

100

225

1.46
1.26
1.31
1.31
1.35
1.28
1.21

-

-

100
8
8
84

225

1.57

6
-

219

3
-

5

5
-

31
-

5

31
1

182 - I'D. ___ li. - J 8 3 _ 8 2 _ 1.6 0 9
10
60
7
172
76
376
175
89 1,549
26
14
30
56
15
47
_
20
76
23
22
24
2
1
70
_
574
12
149
14
100
28
361
773

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5
-

4
4
-

-

7
6
32
32
4
10
4
14

-

-

-

-

84
84

6
6

27
24

26
26

8
8

3
3
2
1
-

4
4
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_

-

-

•

15
15

-

98
39
59
36
23

84
_

4

79
--- 4
4
75
4
_
4
4
-

— w

1
1
-

-

5
4
1
1

_
-

_
-

_

_

18
6
12

-

-

9

47
44
3

4
4
2

37
30
7
3

3
1
2
2

16

666

242
90
152
17
72

.334
188
146
108

49

29
9

14

_

-

11

199
18
215

_
_
_

~~W

39
39

-

-

341

215

205

142

136
10
21
20
48
37

73

84
66
18
2
1
1
1

2
2

7
4
3
3

1
1
1

187
137
50

6
4
2

44

31
19

_

.
_

_

_
_

_

-

-

-

_

_
_
_

_
_

.
_
_
_
_
_

_

_
_

_

-

-

-

-

-

72

64

30
30

_
_
_

_

3
3

.
.

_
-

-

-

_

_
-

-

_
_
.
.
.
.

_

-

-

_

-

-

.

_

_

-

-

_
-

_

29

4
r

_

_

-

6

128
-

-

-

-

381
41
46
149
30
115

-

-

96
74
22
-

106
560

-

_

67

568
187

-

-

.
.

_
_

15
9

-

_

.
.
_

_
_
_

96

.

-

.
_
_
_

72
5

15

4
-

39
39

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

14
14

4
4

-

-

-

12
12

13
l
12

_
-

-

«
•

19
19

_
_

-

18
18

«•
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_

_

_

_
_
..
_
_

*

_

32

-

-

-

_
_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

19

Table 4.— CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ by industry dlylslon)

Number of vorkars receiving straight-time hourly earnings of Occupation and industry division

Number Average
of
hourly
■workers earnings

62

$1 .1 1
1
1.10
1 TO

20
*5
2

sc-

1*28
1*21

97
646

1 .1 7
1.0 8

Order fillers .... ................... .........
Manuf a c t u r i n g ........... ...................
Nonmanufacturing 3 / ............... ....... .
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade ••••••••••.......... •••••••

2,295
226
2,069
1,511
557

1,55

1 .5 8
1.55
1.55
1.54

Packers .......................................
Man u f a c t u r i n g ...... ...... .............. ..
Nonmanufacturing 3/ .......................

722

Under
$ 0 .9 5

$ 0 .9 5 $1.00 $ 1 .0 5 $ 1 .1 0 1 1 . 1 5 $ 1.2 0 $ 1 .2 5 $ 1.3 0 $ 1 .3 5 $1.40 $ 1 .4 5 $ 1 .5 0 $ 1 .5 5 $ 1.6 0 $ 1 .6 5 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .7 5 $1.80 $ 1 .8 5 $ 1 .9 0 $ 1 .9 5 $2.00 $2 .0 5 $2.10
and
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1 .2 5 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 I .60 1.6 5 1.70 1.75 1.8 0
1 .8 5 1.90 1.95 2.00 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 over

Janitors, porters and cleaners (women) ......
Nonmanufacturing............. .............

Finance ** ...... ......... •••••..... .
Services ............... ............ .

W V i o Ia

m a

Ia

trad

a

Retail trade ...... •••••.....
Shipping-and»receiving clerks ........... .....
Manufacturing •••••••••.............. ••••••
Nonmanufacturing 3 / ........... ............
Wholesale trade •••••................ .
Retail trade ........................ .

920
-----F T "
877

177
5^5
k6l
4l
673
411

1.70
1.56

302

1 .6 2

99

1.40

5,671

1.57
“X 3 6
1.58
1.70
1.57
1.59
1.42

2,419
487
90

Truck drivers, light (under li tons) .... .

1 ,1 6 8

.......

...

... ............

Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Public utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade ••••••••.... .
Retail trade ..................... .
S e r v i c e s ..................... ..........

200

^7

200

27373
3,298
302

224
944
149
445
91
259

1.78
I .80
1.78
1.80
1.72

1 .6 7
1.8 9

109

325
0
j

8

j0
1

9
2

237
10

7

227
TO

2
.

11 '
90
• —
*
2
90
9
0
2
0

0
y

6
6

11
2
66
58

200

91

118

2

94
108

_

_

13

15

4

21

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
3
1

21
21
-

4
3

-

13
12
1

_

19

20

16

j

2
14

17
11

31

15
15
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

19

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

7

7

-

-

-

-

-

6

3

.

_

_

.

-

_

_

-

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

83

71

41
2
39
33
6

83
50
33
30
3

739
so

390
21
369
360
9

78

291
30
261

112
10
102
100
2

223
18
205
92
113

47

12
1
11

1
1

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

-

6
6
-

-

-

169
76
93
84

1
1

10

_

_

•
•

-

.

.

-

c-yj

-

10

-

-

-

-

-

.

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- _

-

-

-

-

4
-

12
12

1

4

3
36

4

-

4

17

-

-

9

30

10

19
1
18
12
6

42
3
39
32
7

28
21

57
18
39
4
20
10
5

215
146
69
2
57
1
9

23

8

-

30

10

-

-

-

27

9
18
18
1

24

49

8

29

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

24

29

-

-

-

49
3

8

-

8
6

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

6
-

-

2
-

-

2
-

19
5

46
-

6
2
-

13
10

2
15

7

_

_

_

_

-

.

39

_

-

-

-

7

-

.

-

_

-

3

8

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

•

-

_

-

_

-

16

2

_

3

-

-

-

16

-

-

-

3

-

4

-

y

5

1

-

9
Q

*

71
20
51

1

23
7
1

8

83
6
77

-

-

20
20
-

-

-

8
a
J
5

14

58
57
1

7

20

_

-

8

-

-

-

_

8

\

-

_

-

.

23
1
20
2
-

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
-

-

“

”

-

See footnotes at end of table,
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




125

109
7
f

D

1 .6 1

262

Stock handlers and truckers, h a n d ..... .
Manufacturing .............. •••••••.........
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Public utilities * ................... .
Wholesale trade
Retail trade
Services

nrr

1.51
1.54
1.50
1 5R
1.42

52
e
;

7
-

7

659
411
248
254
16

238

60
25
35
12
23

443 2 ,2 16
368
833
75 1,383
-

-

51 1,3 2 2
61
24
-

25

13

4

132
14
118
118

36
17
19
18
1

889
373
516
19
461
36
45
15
30

25

9

-

-

-

-

20
5
-

-

18
12
-

9

68
48
20

261
55
55

22

-

-

22
20
2

-

8
8
-

10

-

127
27 —
100
100
-

5ST
6
6
-

52

482
248
118 ~ S 9 3 “
130
189
72
39
120
30
38
20
-

57
6
51
3
44
1
3

138
39
99
9

-

57
32

25
24
-

-

47
33
14

y

-

8
8

267

23
21
2

144
1
143

1

.

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25

113
1

82
-

2
-

l4o
2
1

327
15
312
135
120

22
6
16

188 - .13.

85

20

103

3
1
2
“

8
2

-

_

30
24
6
6
-

150

-

-

52
25
27
26
1

213

103

-

-

44
4
40
40
-

-

80

-

-

41
26
15
6
9

29
-

3
3

Q

397
70
327
-

151
97
54

-

35

232

34

41

217

34

2 17

-

41

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

57

16

36
181

■

40
1
•

-

~

*

20

Table 4 .— CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ by industry division)

Number of workers receJ ving straight-time1 hourly earnings of Number Average
of
hourly
workers earnings

Occupation and industry division

Truck drivers, medium (l-| to and including
4 tons) .................. ...........
Manufacturing........... ...........
Nonmanufacturing 3 / •••••••••••••••••••
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ........... ..... .
Retail trade ........... ......... .

2,370
TS3“
l,9*+7
553

1,20 8

m

$ 1.8 9
2.00
1.87
1.76
1.93

1 .8 7

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
.............................................................................................

788

1.8 9

Manufacturing .................... ..
Nonmanufacturing j J
.............. .•
Public utilities * .......... .....
Wholesale trade ...... ...........

118

1.9**
1.88
1.90

ty p e)

670
225
285

Trucker8 , power (fork lift)
Manufacturing ....;....
Nonmanufacturing 3 / ••••
Wholesale trade ....

>
Truckers, power (other than fork lift) 3/
Manufacturing......

Watchmen........... .
Manufacturing ........
Nonmanufacturing
.
,
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade •.
,
Retail trade ......
Services ....... .

625

59
180
133

1.6l
1.61

ik i

....

1,0 5 9
310
7^9
39
39
60
587

$ 0 .9 5 $1.00 $ 1 .0 5 $ 1 .1 0 $ 1 . 1 5 $ 1.2 0 $ 1 .2 5 $ 1.3 0 $ 1 .3 5 $1.1+0 $1.1+5 $ 1 .5 0 $ 1 .5 5 $ 1.6 0 $ 1 .6 5 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .7 5 $ 1.8 0
1.00

1.0 5

1 .1 0

1.20

1.30

1

1.35

l.l+o

1.1+5

1.50

1

1.25

1

2

1.6 0

1 .6 5

1.70

1.75

1.8 0

3

3

1.55

6

271+

6
6

23
1
22

315

26
21*8
208

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

1
1

1

2
2

-

l.i+i

iM

1.1+0
1 .1+
2
1.28
1.33
1.1+2

3k

-

3
3

1*0
1

*
*

*
*

•

~

“

-

-

-

-

-

20
1

281
20
21*8
13

81*

-

3
2

-

1*8

-

-

-

1 .8 5

115
**
31
ll*
*l
310
7
28

6

1.8 5 $ 1.9 0 $ 1 .9 5 $ 2.00 $ 2 .0 5 $ 2 .1 0
1.90

1.95

2.00

161
32

63

1*0

129

63

1*0

.

-

-

6
323

-

-

3k

1*0

9

2 .0 5

891*
170
721*
.

721*

2 .1 0

32
23
9

and
over

106
105"
-

-

-

-

-

*
*

“

*
•

9

11

51
11
1*0

13
13

*
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

81*

36
36

-

_

_

_

1

.

-

-

1

-

19
1
*

15

.

.

=

“

-

-

-

2

20

23
7

10

-

-

2

20

16

9
1

5

81
1* —
*
67

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

_

_

12

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

15

6
6
i
*

1

85
sr
21
11

-

Ik

3

1

27

7

k

1

Ip

10

-

~

72

501

2*
1

21
1*80

22
22

11
10

12
12

1*8
1*3

2k

38

Ik

-

-

5
5

-

_

-

-

-

101

1*8

77
7
70
70

1*8

-

l/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
3 / Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), cammunication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1.15

1 .8 9

1.67
1.61+
1.78
1.75

i8*
*i

Under
$ 0 .9 5

-

80
77
3
3

170
156"
21*
21*

110
101
9
6

29

32
32

29
29

7
7

6

16

22
IF

17
17

59

29

1*5
39
6

3
13
6

11
**
33
33 ~ ” 386
6
-

6

6

-

1
58

6

-

1

2

2k

Ik

1*62

12

-

5

-

1

7

57

29

1*03

~ w

n
-

-

35 6
155

72

125

-

72

-

-

1*0

-

-

-

-

“

20

no

31

-

-

_

_

_

_

79

-

-

.

_

-

-

-

20
20

-

-

-

“

.

.

.

.

•

•

•

*

3k

_

k

-

•

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

21

CHARACTERISTIC INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS
(Average earnings in selected occupations in manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries)

Table 5.— MEAT PRODUCTS, INDEPENDENT PRODUCERS l/

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of Average
$1.20 $1.25 $ 1.3 0 $1.35 $1.1+0 $ 1.^ 5 $ 1 .5 0 $ 1 .5 5 $1.60 $1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $ 1 .9 5 $ 2.00 $ 2.0 5 $2.10 $ 2 .1 5 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .2 5 $2 .3 0 $ 2 .3 5
hourly
$2.1+0
and
and
earnings
under
over
1
1.3 0 1.35 1.40 1 A 5 1.5 0 1 .5 5 1.6 0 1.65 1 .7 0 1.75 1.8 0 1.8 5 1.90 1.95 2.00 2 .0 5 2 .10 2.15 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2.40
1.25

Number
of
workers

Occupation 2/

Butchers, general, cattle killing ....... .
Cutters, general, beef c u t t i n g ....... .
Packers, sausage department (women) ..... .
Sausage makers ...... ......... .................
Shacklers, cattle k i l l i n g ..... ...... .

/

*

$2.20
2.20
1.26
2.27
1.73

38
98
1+7

129
9

-

-

1+0

-

-

“

-

-

1
+
“

-

-

.

.

.

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

5

-

-

-

-

“

■

-

-

~

“

•

l/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers In wholesale meat packing (Group 2011), s
i
(Group 50I 7 ) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manuals (l9*+5 and I9I editions) prepared
+
+9
12 establishments with 838 workers were actually studied.
2/ Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

k

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of Average 1
$
$
$
$
1
$
1
$
$
$
1
i
Number
hourly 1.30 1.40 1.5 0 1.6 0 1 .7 0 1.80 1.9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 2.20 2 .3 0 2.1+0 2 .5 0
of
earnings and
workers
under
3/
1 .1+
0 1.50 1.6 0 1.7 0 1.8 0 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 .1+0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0
167

17 !
+
220
30

$ 1 .5 3
1.84

1.8 5
1.8 5

89

1.84

38

2 .2 7

11+0

1.46
1.39

50

33
36
5°

-

81+

133
-

20

1
-

_
_
-

-

_
_
-

151
180
23
67
-

20
35
i
+
22
-

3
2
3
-

-

25

_
_
_
-

_

_
_
-

_
_
-

10
-

3

-

3

l/ The study covered independent foundries with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of castings from
gray iron, malleable iron, or steel. Of the estimated 18 establishments and 2,080 workers in the Industry,
11 establishments with 1,7^1 workers were actually studied. These data relate to July 1950- A follow-up
check Indicated that a 12-cent per hour across-the-board Increase was effective January 29 , 1951; data in the
table have not been adjusted to reflect this Increase.
2/ Data limited to men workers,
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




23
67
1
+3
-

7
6
9
-

3

16

6
13
-

33
“

.

5
3
21

-

10
-

Table 7.— INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS l/

Number of workers recei^ring straight-time
hourly earning;s of Average
Number
hourly $1.60 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
of
earnings and 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1.8 0 1 .8 5 1.90 1 .9 5 2.00
workers
under
1
1,65 1.70 1*75 1.8 0 1 .8 5 1.90 1-95 2.0 0 2 .0 5

r ~

Chippers and grinders...
Coremakers, hand ...... .
Molders, f l o o r .... .
Molders, hand, bench ...
Molders, machine ......
Patternmakers, wood ....
Shake-out m e n ..... ..
Truckers, . h a n d .........

-

.ges and other prepared meat products (Group 2013) and merchant wholesalers of meats and provisions
the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 2 7 establishments and 1,350 workers in these industries,

Table 6 .- -FOUNDRIES , FERROUS 1/

Occupation 2/

_

.

-

Occupation 2/

/

Chemical operators, class A ....
Chemical operators, class B ••••
Chemical operators* helpers ....

199
181+

112

$ 1.9 2

_

_

_

30

1.8 3

18

8

-

32

1.72

“

1+5

36

31

5+
*
1+5

.

24
~

36
-

16
21

99
-

-

l/ The study covered establishments with more than 100 workers in the manufacture of indus­
trial inorganic chemicals (Group 281) and industrial organic chemicals (Group 282), except syn­
thetic rubber (Group 28210 and explosives (Group 2826), as defined In the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual (I9I edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
+5
Of the estimated 10
establishments and 2,800 workers in these industries, 6 establishments with 1 ,9 9 7 workers were
actually studied.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
3 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

22 .
Table

Occupation 2 /

Number
of
workers

Labelers and packers (men) ......... .
Labelers and packers (women) .......... ..
M i x e r s ........ ......... .................. .
Technicians ....... ...................... .
Tinters ......................................
YuinA

127
52
179
69

Varnish makers ............................. .

kk

l/
Bureau
2/
j/

bj

J

Average
hourly
earnings

a

1.81
1.89
1.64

1.8 3

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of $ 1 .6 5 $ 1 .7 0 ¥ 1/75 $ 1.8 0 $ 1 .8 5 ¥ 1^90 ¥ 1 .9 5 $2.00 $ 2 .0 5 ¥ 2 0 0 $2.15 $2.20 P T 25 $ 2 .3 0 $2.35 $2.40 $2.1*5 $2 .5 0

$ 1.^ 5 $ 1 .5 0 $ l 3 5

$1.35
and
under
1.1*0

$i.4o

1 .4 5

1.50

1 .??

1.6 0

1.6 5

1.70

1.7?

1.8 0

1.8 5

I .90

3
1
-

23

12
1
1
-

31
8
7

10
-

3
1
13
6
-

58

13
-

2

1
6
1

63

13

2
1
3
1

23

1

7

b2
2

19

6

$ 1.6 8

1 .5 0
1 .7 5

8 .— PAINTS AND VARNISHES l/

-

23
-

“

69

b

7
1

ei
O

2

3

10

5

2

b

-

1 .??

2.00

2.05

2.10

2 .1 5

2.20

2 .2 5

2.30

g .35

2.1*0

2.45

l
-

1
1
1
6
10

3
1

1
-

1
-

-

1
3
-

1
1
-

1

-

-

-

1

-

1

3

“

~

1

2

5

22

2

"

2 .5 0 _ 2 a2 L
1
»
1
-

1

The study covered establishments with more than 7 veneers in the manufacture of paints and varnishes (Group 2 8 5 1 ) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19^5 edition) prepared by the
of the Budget. Of the estimated 31 establishments and
workers in the industry, 16 establishments with 1,921 workers were actually studied.
Data limited to men vorkers except where otherwise indicated,
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

2,62 0

Table 9• — FABRICATED STRUCTURAL STEEL AND ORNAMENTAL M E T A L W O R K l/

Occupation 2]

Crane operators, electric bridge (under
10 tons) ......................... ..... .
Crane operators, electric bridge (10 tons
and over) ................... ..........
Fitters, structural, class A ............
Flame-cutting-machine operators.... •••••••
Lay-out men, class A .......................
Power-shear operators, class A .......... ..
Welders, hand, class A ..... ...............
Welders, hand, class B ................ .
Weldors, machine, class A ..................

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

$1.1*5
and
under
1.50

bl

$ 1.58

2b

1.53
1.86
1.68
1.9 1
1.60
1.76
1.67
1.99

18
2
-

¥ 1.55

$ 1.60

$1.65

¥ 1.70

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

6
22

-

76
11

2
53
2
-

16

19

102
51
75
51
123
109
bO

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of $ 1.75 $1.80 T O T $ 1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.05 $2.10 $2.15 ¥2.20

$ 1.50

8

6

33
-

¥2.25

¥2.30

¥2.35

$2.40

2.35

2.40

2.45

2.05

2.10

2.15

2.20

2.25

2.30

.
-

-

2

-

2

-

$2.1*5
and
over

20
6
18

.
22

-

-

10
-

6
18
*
81
l
*

b

2

-

61
20

-

8
-

16

b

2
-

b

-

_

_

-

-

2

■
w
6

l/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal wor k (Group 3 ^ 1 ) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
(19^5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 11 establishments and 3,320 workers in these industries, 11 establishments with 2,0 56 vorkers were actually studied.
2 / Data limited to men workers.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Table 10.--MACHINERY INDUSTRIES 1/

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$1.30
and
under
1.35

y
Assemblers, class A ........................
Assemblers, class B ••••.............. ••••••
Assemblers, class C .........................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class A ••••••...... ........ .
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class B ...... ...... .............
Electricians, maintenance ............ .
Engine-lathe operators, class A ............
Grinding-machine operators, class A ........
Grinding-machine operators, class B ••••••••
Inspectors, class A ............ ..••••••••••
Janitors ..... ........ ............ •••••••••

Machinists, production .............. •••••
Milling-machine operators, class A ...... .
Milling-machine operators, class B ........
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing
shops) ••••••••••••••..................
Welders, hand, class A ........... ••••••••••

1*06

$ 1 .3 5

$1.40

$1.45

$ 1.5 0

$ 1 .5 5

1.40

1.45

1.5 0

1 .5 5

1.6 0

305
195

$ 1 .7 9
1.54
1.47

86

1.71

152

1.53
1.94

_

_

.

65

-

-

-

1 .8 5
1.8 3

-

1.62
1.81
1.38
1.84

70

8

-

.

.

“

“

23

Ik l
h9
3k
13b
10k
k€k
10k

1.70

1.65

-

_

-

-

_

_

.

37

1.63

237

2 .2 1
1.8 2

*

1 .8 3

-

6

-

-

-

_

13

21

12

-

-

9

-

83
-

1.8 0

.

kk

116
-

129
195

1.75

.

69

-

-

21k

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earning s of $1.60 $1.65 $ 1 .7 0
$ 1 .7 5 $1.80 $ 1 .8 5 $ 1.90 $ 1.9 5 $2.00

-

-

8

-

-

_

k

-

28
-

-

-

-

-

-

k

5

_

32

-

-

25

_

-

_
7

$2 .2 5

$ 2 .3 0

2 .1 0

2 .1 5

2 .2 0

2 .2 9

-2.30

2.35

k
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

.

_

.

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

k

19

5
-

_

k
-

19
36
32
-

2k

-

k2

$ 2 .2 0

_

_

-

$ 2 .1 5

_

6
-

98
25

2.05

$ 2 .1 0

-

2k

-

_

-

2.00

1 .9 5

ko
_

_

_

-

1.9 0

298
-

10
-

k
30
8

1.85

$ 2 .0 5

-

395

k

20

67

7

-

-

-

_

k
_

30

“

198

3

8

1

_

k5
-

_

_

-

-

_

173

k

~

*
*

_

*

l/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19^5 edition) prepared "by the
Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 59 establishments and 9,910 workers in these industries, 18 establishments with 6,081* workers were actually studied. A 12-cent per hour across-the-board increase, effective
February 1951, is not reflected in the data.
2/ Data limited to m en workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table 11.— BANKS l/

Average
Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

$

Weekly
scheduled
hours

Weekly
earnings
2/

32.50

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earninga of $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
*
*
$
*
35.00 37.50 40.00 4 2.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 6 5 .OO 67.50 70.00 72 .5 0 75.0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00

J

1

and
under
35.00

*
37.50 1 0.00 42.50 45.00 4 7.5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72 .50 75 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 ? 5 .oo 100.00

Men
Tellers, paying or paying and receiving,
commercial..... .......... .............
Under 5 years' service ................
5 or more years' service

_
-

_
-

-

301

k o .o

1*6.00

11

5

10

111
53

k o .o
k o .o
k o .o

57.00
5^.50
59.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

1*0.0

1 0.0
*

_
-

_
-

-

5
5

2
2

52
52

61

31
31

-

-

-

-

33

90

1*8

1*9

3^

1
1
-

•

2
2

3
3

11
10
1

30

-

65
62
3

26
1
*

21
15
6

10
6
1*

5
2
3

13

1
*

1
*

-

_

-

12
7
5

1*0
13
27

20
k
16

7

-

-

-

-

-

1*

2

5

6

11*

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
*

2

5

6

Ik

1
*

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

*

-

-

-

-

‘

_

15
13
2

-

■

k o .o

$ 60.00
56.50
79.00

317
262
55

61

1
*

Women
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B .......
Tellers, paying or paying and receiving,
conmercial..... ............. •••••••••••
Under 5 years' service ..................

58

l/ The study covered banking establishments with more than 100 workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime.

949080 0 51 - 4
-




-

-

7

Of the estimated 17 establishments and 10,01*0 workers in the industry, 10 establishments with 7,797 workers were actually studied.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 12. — DEPARTMENT AND CLOTHING STORES l/

Occupation and sex

Average
Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of Number Weekly Hourly Weekly
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
1
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
Under $
of
sched- earn- earno .oo 4 2 .5 0
4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 55 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00 105D0 11 0.00
$
and
workers uled
ings
1 0 0.00 105.00 110.00 over
6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0
hours
8 0 .0 0 85.OO 9 0 .0 0
4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0
V

40.00

T

4

1

45.00

95.00

72.50 75.00

52.50 55.00 57.50

Men
Sales clerks:
Furniture and bedding, upstairs store .....
Men*s clothing, upstairs store .......
Men's furnishings, upstairs store ....... .
Women's shoes, upstairs store •••••••••••••
Tailors, alteration, men's garments ......

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

77
95
59

116

62

$

2.24
2.23
1 .6 1
1.78

_

-

$ 8 9 .5 0
8 9 .0 0

-

1

64.50

4

1

7 1 .0 0
6 6 .5 0

1 .6 6

-

1

3

3

3
8

1

5

3

1
2
10

1
6
5

2
8

4

1

3
12

15

3

2
6
7
2

4

3

48

1
6
1
3

1
3
1
1
2

5

2
2

2
2

1
3

12

9

3

1

7
14

4

2
8
1

5
1

7

4

2
18
6
1

8
5
7
1

5

6
2
3

2

-

7

1
10
1
1

-

4

5

7
8
2

-

2

3

2
3

-

_

2

7

1

1

1

7

1

6

18
18

1

1

-

_

-

-

Women

4

112

242

1 .1 6

40.0
40.0
40.0
4o .o
4 o .o
4 o .o

417
50

46.00
49.50
59.50
53.50
45.50
49.50
46.50

1.15
1.24
1.49
1.34
1.14
1.24

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
4 o .o

109
110

OJ

Sales clerks:
Furniture and bedding, upstairs store .....
Men's furnishings, upstairs store ........
Notions and trimmings, upstairs store ....
Women's accessories, upstairs store .......
Women's accessories, downstairs store .....
Women's dresses:
Regular or upstairs store, better dress
and salon department .................
Regular or upstairs, popular price
department ...........................
Basement store .........................
Women*s shoes, upstairs store .............
Women's suits and coats, upstairs store ...
Sewers, alteration. women's garments .........

367
1P7
32

0 0
0 0
--

Cfl.shi er-wrappera -T__■ 11,
■
,
Tn/Mm+.m*
nna.AH r . 1
rr

1.50
1.25
1.15
1.44
1.43
1.25

8
20

1

1
10

7
4

31
45
13

6 0 .0 0

3

3

5 0 .0 0

5

21
5

13

46.00
57.50
57.00

1

_

50.00

5
2

72
1t-

25

254

12

4

3
15

3
17
95
9

16
26

16
62

65
13

5

14
29

6

4
15
7
35
1

46
136

2
29

7
2

3

2
4

22
22

2

14

2

2

4

_

3
25

13
27

-

2

1
12

39
24

21
10

13
15

y
*

4
35

9

9
2

3

5

Oil

5
1
20

6

3

5

4

19

8

9

6

2
20
6

22

13

37

1

3

_

14
4

1

2

3

2

12

6

1

1

2

1

2

_

1
8

3
11
_

1
8

_

_

_

12

7

_

3

_

_

2
2

_

_

_

1

_

1

7

_

_

1

_

_

_
_
.

..

2

_

-

_

_
_
_

-

_

2

6

_

-

4

_
_
1

_

Of the estimated 37 establishments and 18,510 workers

1/ The study covered department stores, men's and ■boys* clothing stores, women's ready-to-wear stores and family clothing stores with more than 100 workers.
in these industries, 25 establishments with 13>405 workers were actually studied.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime.

Table 13.— POWER LAUNDRIES l/

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
s/

$0.95
and
under
1.00

$1.00

$ 1.0 5

$ 1 .1 0

$1 .1 5

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1.2 0

Number of workers receiv ing straight-time hourly earnings of $ 1.5 0
$1.20
$1.40
$1.30
$ 1 .5 5
$ 1 .3 5
$1.45
$1.25

1.25

1.30

1.35

i.4o

1.6 0

$ 1 .6 0

$ 1.6 5

$ 1 .7 0

1 .6 5

1.70

1 .7 5

1.45

1.50

1 .5 5 .

5
-

3
2
-

2
3
-

.
8
-

4
-

-

-

$ 1 .75 "

1.80

Men
Extractor operators .................... .
Washers, machine ...... ........ .......... .
Wrappers, bundle

48
68
21

$1.37
1.41
1.20

36
533

1.15
.99
1.17
1.19
1.09
1.20

_
.
1

_

_

.
-

5
3

4
2

12
-

80
89

1
2
1

_
-

.
3

6

4
45

9
4

_

_

2

4
U7
6
_
20
2

_

_

4

34

-

1

42
5

2

_

1

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

4

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

2

_

-

1
-

1
-

-

-

Women
Clerks, retail receiving ......................
Finishers, flatwork, machine ........... .
Identifiers ••••••••.............. ......... .
Markers
Pressers, machine, shirts ••••••.•••••..... .
Wrappers, bundle ••••...... .

l/
2/

87

97

189
23

The study covered power laundries with more than 20 workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




365
_

65
3

92

11
9

4

2

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

Of the estimated 31 establishments and 2,360 workers in the industry, 23 establishments with 2,025 workers were actually studied.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 14. ~ A U T O REPAIR SHOPS l/

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

1/

$1.40

$1.35
and
under
1.40

1.45

r

M M

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earn!.ngs of $ 1.6 0 $ 1 .6 5 $ 1 .7 0 $1.75 $ 1.8 0 $1.85 $1.90 $ 1 .9 5 $ 2.00 $2 .0 5 $2 .1 0 l 2 o T $ 2.2 0 $ 2 .2 5 W T 30

$ 1 .5 0

1.50

l.?5

1.6 0

1.70

1.8 0

1.7?

1.8 5

1.90

1.9?

2.00

_

1 .6 5

_

_

_

5iOo"

2.05

2 .1 0

2.15

2.20

2 .2 5

2 .3 0

2.?5

2.40

2 .4 5

_

6

190

18
10

7

76

24

23

18

4

28

10

_

21

7

$ 2 .5 0
and
over

_

2 .5 0

West bay Area (Marin, San Francisco,
and San Mateo Counties)

30
131

a aATti
Mechanics, automotive, class A ......... .
Washers, automobile ••••••••••••••••••••••••..

_

$ 2 .2 3
2 2^
1J a OJ
2.04
l
JL .OJL

398

Body repairmen, metal ........................

fa
fa

1,038
127

47
*■f
*

^1

32

2.32
1 s6

275
1,232

17

2)02
1 .5^

12 1

Washers, automobile ..... .....................

_
_
17

2 .2 1

380
25

_
_
41

24

-

7
1

-

12

_

_

_
_

_

104

16

14

East Bay Area (Alameda, Contra Costa,
and Solano Counties)
Body repairmen, metal ........................
Electricians, automotive ............ .

*
5

8l

1Q7

,7

6

_
_

_
_

527

172

18 1

_

_
_

17

17

285

_

988
90

81

8
_

24

1

36

2

_

24
_

-

322

7

7

_
_

_

-

_

9
_

7

7

k

l/ The study covered establishments with more than
workers in general automobile repair shops (Group 7538) and. motor vehicle dealer establishments, new and used cars (Group 551) as defined in the Standard
Industrial Classification Manual (l$&9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 317 establishments and 9*320 workers in these industries, 37 establishments with 2,333 workers were actually
studied,
2/ Data limited to men workers.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table 15•— HOSPITALS 1/

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Weekly
sched­
uled
hours

Average
Hourly
earn­
ings

Number of workers receiviniz straig at-time weekly earnings < f o
Weekly $47.50
earn­
and
ings
under

$50.00

$52.50

# 55.00

# 57.50

#60.00

#62.50

#65.00

#67.50

$70.00

# 72.50

$75.0 0

$80.00

$85.00

# 90.00

# 95.00

50.00

5 2 a 50

55.00

57.50

60.00

62.50

65.00

67.50

70.00

72.50

75.0 0

80.00

85.00

90.00

95.00

100.00

2/

2/

$100.00

and
over

Men
Laboratory technicians (clinical) ........
Pharmacists...................... ......
X-ray technicians ...................... .

48
35
32

40.0
40.5
40.0

#1.61
2.38
1.61

#64.50
96.50
64.50

_
-

_
-

1

74
239
2,030
30
50
97

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
40.0
40.0

1.56
1.56
1.43
2.31
1.56
1.46

62.50
62.50
57.00
93.50
62.50
58.50

_

_

62
5

6
134
10

-

4

4

-

-

1

10
3

2

1

11

2
14
65
2
9

9
6
747
3
10

29
62
745
22
31

_
54
174
8
9

34
40
93
-

-

2
-

5
8

20
-

4
19
10
1
3

10
15
3
2

1
-

5

1
-

_
-

_

5
2
-

_
_

_

.
.

-

6
-

9
-

9
-

_

_

6
-

7
-

7
-

1

_
11
-

Women
Dietitians .............. ...............
Laboratory technicians (clinical) ........
Nurses, registered ..........................
Pharmacists .................................
Physiotherapists ............................
X-ray technicians .......................

1/

2/

The study covered hospitals with more than 100 workers,
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




5
18

1
4
—

19
3

—

_
2
3

6
*
*

Of the estimated 34 establishments and 12,820 workers in this service, 14 establishments with 7,058 workers were actually studied.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

26,

Table 16.— HOTELS 1/

Table 17 •— RAILROADS
(Average weekly earnings 1 / and weekly scheduled hours for selected office occupations and
average hourly earnings 2/ for selected maintenance, power plant, custodial,
warehousing and shipping occupations)
Average
Occupation and sex

Number Weekly Weekly
sched­ earnof
workers uled
hours

Occupation

3/

Average
Number
hourly
of
earnings
workers

£/

v

Maintenance and Power Plant
Office

Men

Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g .........
Clerks, general, junior ....
Office boys .................

Stenographers, general .........

72
132
50
35

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

$ 66.50
55.50
48.00
61.00

Electricians, maintenance ...
Tiremen, stationary boiler...
Helpers, trades,
maintenance ...... ....... .
Machinists, maintenance ....
Maintenance men, general
utility ...................
Mechanics, automotive
(maintenance .............
Sheet-metal workers,
maintenance ...............

)

122
17
338
249
90
25
176

$ 1 . 7^
l.w

57
362

1.33
1.39
1.51

1.45
1 . 7^

1.71
*
1.7^
1.7*»

Women
Custodial, Warehousing
and Shipping

l/ The study covered year-round hotels in San Francisco County vith more than 100 workers.
establishments, employing 3>713 workers, in this industry were studied.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




All 11

Calculating-machine opera­
tors (Comptometer type)...
Clerks, general, Junior ....
Key-punch operators ..... .
Stenographers, general .....
Typists, class A ...........
Typists, class B ...........

l/
2/
3/

195
80
51
no
51
51

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
4o.o
40.0

59.00
55.50
58.50
60.00
61.00
57.50

Janitors, porters and
cleaners ........... .......
Stock handlers and truckers,
hand ......... ...... .......
Truck drivers, light (under
tons) ••••••••••••••••••

1^

31

Excludes premium pay for overtime.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OT LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

27
UNION WAGE SCALES

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect January 1951.)
Table 19.— BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

Table IS . — BAKERIES

City and classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1.87
1.71
1.99
1.90

42
42
37 1/2
37 1/2

2.00
1.93
1.84
1.56

38
38
38
38

2.00
1.93
1.84

38 3/4
33 3/4
38 3/4

1.41
1.56
1.41

38 3/4
38 3/4
38 3/4

3/4
3/4
3/4
3/4

2.05
1.99

37 1/2
37 1/2

1.90
1.81

37 1/2
37 1/2

1.53
1.61
1.43

37 1/2
37 1/2
37 1/2

2.05
1.99

37 1/2
37 1/2

1.90

37 1/2

1.53
1.61
1.43

37 1/2
37 1/2
38

1.38
1.30

40
38

Bench macha ne helpers:

Machine shops - cake:
Mixers, icing mixers, overmen ........ .....
Ingredient scalers, scaling-machine operators,
cake dumpers, bench hands, grease-machine
operators, women auxiliary workers ••••••••
Helpers:

Women workers:




Hours
per
week

Bricklayers ................................. •.
Carpenters
Electricians
o......
Painters
Plasterers
Plumbers
Building laborers ....... ...... ..............

$3.00
2.38
2.55
2.28
3.00
2.63
1.55

40
40
40
35
30
40
40

3.00
2.38
2.63
2.28
3.00
2.63
1.55

30
40
40
35
40
40
40

San Francisco

San Francisco
Hand shops - bread:
Foremen
Dough mixers, overmen .................... .
Benchmen
Bench and machine helpers .
........
Hand shops - cake:
Foremen
Mixers, overmen ..... ...............
••••«••
Bench hands ••••••••.......
Helpers:
First y e a r .... ................. ........
After first y e a r ....... .
Pan cleaners ........... ....... ••••••••••••
Machine shops - bread:
Foremen
Dough mixers, overmen ••.•»••••••••••••••••••
Dividermen, molders, roll-machine operators,
ingredientmen, benchmen, bread packers,
pan greasing-machine operators, women

Rate
per
hour

City and classification

Oakland

Oakland
Hand shops:
Foremen and overmen.... ............ .
Bench hands ............................... .
Machine shops:
Foremen, dough mixers, and overmen
Dividers, molders, roll-machine operators ...

Table 21.— CANNING (FRUITS AND VEGETABLES) - OAKLAND

Bricklayers
Carpenters
Electricians
Painters
Plasterers
Plumbers
Building laborers .......... ..................

Men
Bracket I
(Examples: Cannery mechanics, class 1;
printers, labels and forms; and searner
mechanics, class l) .................. ......
Bracket II
(Examples: Cannery mechanics, class 2;
head labeling operators; seamer mechanics,
class 2; and shipping leadermen) ............
Bracket III
(Examples: Cannery mechanics, class 3 ; cooks,
tomatoes; label-machine operators; retort
operators; and syrup makers) ••••••••••••••••
Bracket IV
(Examples: Coil cleaners; feeders, labeling
machine; hand casers; and liner operators)...
Bracket V
(Examples: Can run attendants; can forkers;
car and truck loaders; and labeling
inspectors) .............. ..................
Women
Floorladies ...... .... .............. .
Women workers, except floor ladies ........

Table 20.— MALT LIQUORS - SA . FRANCISCO
?T

Classification

Bottlers:
First shift ........................... .
Second s h i f t .... •••••••........... .......
Third shift .............................
Brewers:
First shift ............. •••••.... .
Second shift ...... ................. .......
Third s h i f t .... ..................... .
Clerks (shipping and receiving) and checkers:
First shift ........................... .
o..
Second shift .............. ...... .
Third s h i f t .... ...... .............. .
Drivers: keg beer, bottle beer, shipping and
special trucks
••••••••.... ..
Helpers: keg beer, bottle beer, and shipping
trucks ..•.•••..••••••••0 ...0 .....••»»».««»..
Night loaders (second shift) ..... ...........
Washers, truck:
First shift .............. ........ ...
Second s h i f t ..... ................... .

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$77.00
79.00
81.00

40
40
40

81.50
83.50
85.50

40
40
40

77.00
79.00
81.00

40
40
40

80.50

40

77.50
82.50

40
40

77.50
79.50

40
40

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Hours
per
week .3/

$1.90

1.73

40

1.55

40

1.42

40

1.34

2j

40

40

1.34
1.18

40
40

1/ The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked per
week except during seasonal operations when "exempt” weeks may
be claimed in accordance with provisions of the Fair Labor
Standards Act. The maximum straight-time hours which may be
worked per "exempt" week are 48.
2/ This rate is also the basic guaranteed hourly rate for all
workers (both men and women) in any job categories which may be
placed on an incentive method of payment.

Table 22.— LOCAL TRANSIT OPERATING EMPLOYEES

City and classification
Oakland
Operators and conductors:
1-man busses and bridge trains:
First 6 m o n t h s .... ........................
After 6 months ....... .....................
■San Francisco
Operators and conductors:
1-man busses and trackless trolleys,
2-man cars, and cable cars ........

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1.48
1.53

40
40

1.53

48

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

28,
UNION WAGE SCALES - Continued
Table 23 •— MOTOR TRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS

City and classification

Rate
per
hour

Table 23.— MOTOR TRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS -

Hours
per
week

$1.63
1.76
1.85
2.23

40
40
40
40

Material:
Drivers , truck:
1.62

8 cubic yards and over •••••••••••••••••.
General:
Drivers, truck:

1.74
1.84
2.21

40
40
40
40

1.69
1.81
1.94
1.71

40
40
40
40

2.13
2.26
2.39

40
40
40

2.25
2.36
2.51

40
40
40

1.80
1.91
1.98

10,500 lbs. and o v e r ............. .
Low bed, dual or more axle t r a i l e r s ..... .

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

San Francisco - Continued

Oakland
Building s
Construction:
Drivers, dump truck: .
4 cubic yards or less ....... ........... .
.
4 to 6 cubic yards ••••••••••••..... ....
.

City and classification

Table 25.— OCEAN TRANSPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL 1/

Continued

Building: - Continued
Material:
Drivers, truck:
Less than 4 cubic yards ............... .
4 to 6 cubic yards ......... .
6 to 8 cubic yards •••••••..........
8 cubic yards and over ••••••••••••••••••
General:
Drivers, truck:
Under 2,500 lbs. ...........................
2,500 to ,500 lbs..........................
1,500 to 6,500 lbs..........................
6,500 to 15,500 lbs.........................
15,500 to 20,500 lbs.......................
Over 20,500 lbs. ........ .
M dv i n g :
Drivers, large vans ........ .
Drivers, 1-ton auto trucks ••••••••••........
H e l p e r s .... ....... ................ •••••••
Piano movers •••••••..... .
Petroleum:
Drivers, truck:
Less than 6 months ••••••••••••••••••••••••
6 to 12 months ........................... .
12 to 18 months ............. ••••••••••••••
18 to 24 months
Over 24 months ...... ••••••••••••••••••••••

A

$1.63
1.76
1.85
2.22

40
40
40
40

1.56
1.63
1.69
1.75
1.81
1.88

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.75
1.75
1.63
2.00

46
46
46
46

1.75
1.79
1.82
1.86
1.93

40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40

Newspapers and periodicals:
Drivers, truck (day):

Drivers, truck (night):

Petroleum:
Drivers, truck:

Table 24-*— NONALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES - SAN FRANCISCO

San Francisco
Building:
Construction:
Drivers, excavating and dump trucks:
Less than 4 cubic yards ..................
6 to 8 cubic yards .......... .............
8 cubic yards and o v e r ............. .




Clas sification
1.61
1.74
1.83
2.20

40
40
40
40

Bottlers
Driver-salesmen

Rate
per
week
$72.50
76.50

Hours
per
week
40
40

Department and classification

Deck department 2 /t
Day men:
A.B* maintenance men ................. ..
Boatswains:
,
Vessels of 15,000-20,000 tons ........
Vessels of 10,000-15,000 tons ........
Vessels under 10,000 tons .......... ..
Carpenters:
Vessels of 15,000-20,000 tons ........
Vessels of 10,000-15,000 tons ....... .
Vessels under 10,000 tons ........... .
Carpenters* mates ................ .
Deck storekeepers .............. .
Watchmen:
Able bodied se a m e n .... ............... .
Boatswains* mates ......................
Ordinary seamen ..................... .
Quartermasters .................. ..... .
Watchmen ••••••..... ............. .
Engine-room department g/:
Day men:
Chief electricians:.
P-2 turbo-electric vessels ••••••.....
P-2 turbine ve s s e l s .... .
C-l, c-2, C-3, Victory Ships, and
CIMAVI vessels ...... ............. .
C-4 vessels ....... .
Deck engineers:
Class A and B passenger vessels •••••••
Freighters •••«..... ............... .
F i r e m e n ................. ..............
Unlicensed juniors ............. .
Wipers ........ •••••.................. .
Watchmen:
Chief reefer engineers:
R-2 refrigerator steam type vessels ...
Freight refrigerator vessels, 52,000
cubic feet and over ............ .
Freight or passenger refrigerator
vessels, less than 52,000 cubic feet
Freight vessels, less than 52,000
cubic f e e t .................. •••••••
Class A passenger vessels with air
conditioning................ ..... .

See footnotes at end of table

Rate
per
month

Hours
per
week

#274.00

44

348.50
332.50
316.50

44
44
44

306.00
300.50
295.00
290.00
279.25

44
44
44
44
44

248.50
274.00
206.00
248.50
248.50

48
48
48
48
48

465.50
440.50

44
44

395.50
411.50
308.00
295.00
267.50
314.50
245.50

44
44
44
44
44
44
44

363.25

48
48

341.50

48

366.50

48

363.25

48

393.00

29

UNION WAGE SCALES - Continued
Table 25.— OCEAN TRANSPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL 1/ - Continued

Department and classification

Engine-room department 2/: - Continued
Watch men: - Continued
F i r e m e n ..... ............................ .
Oilers ........ ............ ...... .... ....
Second electricians:
P-2 turbo-electric vessels
P-2 turbine vessels ............ .
Unlicensed juniors ..... ..................
Watertenders ..................... ........ .
Steward6 department ^/:
Freighters:
Assistant cooks:
Offshore trade ............. .
Alaska trade ...••••••••...... .
Chief cooks:
Offshore trade .......... ...... ........
Alaska trade ......... ........... ......
Chief stewards:
Offshore trade .................. .
Alaska trade ....... •••••••••••••......
Messmen and utility men:
Offshore t r a d e .... ...................
Alaska trade ............ ........... .
Passenger vessels:
Assistant laundrymen:
Class A vessels ........... ••••••••••••
Class B vessels ••••••..... ...........
Chefs, class A vessels ...... ............
Chief cooks, class B vessels .............
Head waiters, class A vessels ..... .
Linenmen:
Class A v e s s e l s .... ...................
Class B vessels ........................
Messmen and waiters:
Class A vessels ................... ..
Class B vessels ............. ..........
Room stewards, class A vessels ...........
Second stewards:
Class A vessels ................. .
Class B vessels ............... ••••••••




Rate
per
month

Hours
per
week

$ 236.00
21*8.50

1*8
1*8

381.00
356.50
283.00
21*8.50

1*8

k8
k8
k8

251.50
251.50

k8
k8

283.00
283.50

k8
b8

312.50
336.50

k8
k8

211*-.00
220.00

k8
k8

352.00
291.00

k8
k8
k8
k8
k8

251.50
220.00

k8
k8

220.00
220,00
552.50

2 1 k .00
2 1 k .00

k8
k8
k8

39k .00

k8
k8

2ll*.00

319.00

Table

25 .— OCEAN TRANSPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL l/ - Continued

Department and classification

Passenger vessels: - Continued
Silvermen:
Class A vessels .........................
Class B vessels •••••...................
Storekeepers:
Class A vessels •••••••••...... ...... .
Class B vessels .................... .
Third stewards:
Class A vessels .......... ............ .
Class B vessels

Rate
per
month

Hours
per
week

$ 2 3 9 .0 0
2 2 6 .5 0

k8
k8

2 7 0 .5 0
2 7 0 .5 0

k8
k8

2 8 6 .5 0
2 6 8 .5 0

k8
k8

Table 26.— OFFICE BUILDING SERVICE

City and classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Oakland
Cleaners (women) ....................... ••••••••••
Elevator service (men and women):
Starters ....................... ...... .
Assistant starters ........ ................... .
Operators .............. •••••••............ .
Janitors, watchmen, and h a n d y m e n ...... .........

$1.08

1*0

1.26
1.20
1.17
1.17

Mo
1*0

1*0
1*0

1.17

1*0

1-37

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

San Francisco
l/ All ratings receive $7*50 per month clothing allowance
which is included in the basic rates shown* All ratings of un­
licensed departments also receive additional payment In accord­
ance with conditions as follows:
1. On vessels carrying explosives in 50-ton lots or over,
10 percent of basic monthly wages is added while such
cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or unloaded*
2. On vessels carrying sulphur in amount of 25 percent
or more of dead weight carrying capacity, $10.00 per
voyage Is added.
3. On vessels operated in described areas of China
coastal waters, 75 percent or 100 percent of daily
basic wages, including allowances in lieu of overtime
for Sunday day men, is added according to degree of
proximity to the China coast and adjacent areas
rendered unsafe by hostilities.
2/ The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked per
week at sea. The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week in port are 1*0 for both day men and watch men. At sea,
the normal workweek for watch men is 56 hours with 8 hours (Sun­
day) being paid at the overtime rate. Day men at sea are compen­
sated at the rate of $25.00 monthly in lieu of Sunday work at
the overtime rate. This allowance is included in the basic
monthly scales shown for day men.
3/ The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked per
week both at sea and in port. At sea, the normal workweek for
members of the stewards department is 56 hours with 8 hours
(Sunday) being paid at the overtime rate.

Cleaners (women) ...... ..........................
Elevator service (men and women):
Starters .....................................
Assistant starters ........................ .
Operators ............. •••••....... •••••••••••
Janitors, watchmen, and handymen ....... •••••••••

1.31
1.25
1.25

Table 27.— PRINTING - SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND

Classification

Book and job shops:
Bindery women •••••....... ...............•••••
Compositors, hand
Electrotypers ..................... ...........
Photoengravers .............. .................
Pressmen, cylinder .............................
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder press .............................
Platen press .............. .......... ......

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1.1*8

2.67
2.63

37i
37?
37?
37?
37?

2.08
1.65

37i
37?

2.63
2.73

30

UNION WAGE SCALES - Continued
Table 2 7 . --PRINTING - SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND - Continued

Classification

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day work ................................
Night w o r k ..... ........................
Mailers:
Day work ........... ......... ...........
Night work ...............
Pressmen, web presses:
Day w o r k ............... .
Night w o r k .... ................. .
Stereotypers:
Day work .•••*•••••.....................
Night work .................. .

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$2 .7 2
2.85

37*
37*

2.W

37*
37*

2.57
2 .6 1

2.7^
2.60

'2.73

37*
37*
37*
37*

Table 28. - -STEVEDORING

Classification

Longshoremen:
General cargo ................... ...........
Paper and pulp in packages of 300 lbs.
or more .................................
Shoveling Jobs ................ .
Phosphate rock in bulk ....... ........... .
Bulk sulphur, soda ash and crude untreated

potash ..................................
Damaged cargo ••••••...•••.......... .
Explosives ............................ ..
Gang bosses, general c a r g o .................. .
Hatch tenders, general cargo .................
Lift-truck-jitney drivers, general cargo ....




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1.92

30

2.02
2 .1 2
2.22

30
30
30

2.37
2.77
3.7^
2.07

30
30
30
30
30
30

2.02
2.02

Table

29.--RESTAURANTS, CAFETERIAS AND LUNCHROOMS - SAN FRANCISCO

Classification

Class A restaurants:
Bus boys and bus girls:
Straight shift ....
Split shift ........
Combination bus boys and dishwashers ......
Cashiers and checkers:
Cashiers:
Straight shift ......................
Split shift ..........................
Checkers:
Straight shift ......................
Split shift ..........................
Combination cashiers and checkers:
Straight shift ........... ....... ••••
Split shift ..........................
Cooks and other kitchen help:
Assistants to any station ..............
Butchers ...... •••••....................
Chicken and fish butchers
Cooks (except pastry):
Chef or head cook in charge .........
Second cook ............. •••••••.....
All other cooks, except night cook ...
Night c o o k ............ ........ ......
Oystermen .............. .
Pantrymen:
First pantryman ........
All other pantrymen .....
Pastry:
Cooks:
First pastry cook ....
All other pastry cooks
Ice cream men ...........
Helpers in pastry shop ..
Waiters and waitresses:
Cash houses:
Straight shift
Split shift ..

Hours
Rate
per
per
day______week

$ 8.55
9.30

37*
37?

9.70

Table 29.--RESTAURANTS, CAFETERIAS AND LUNCHROOMS SAN FRANCISCO - Continued
Rate
per
day

Hours
per
week

7.95
6.95

37*
37*
37*

Bus boys and bus girls:
Straight shift .....
Split shift .......

8.55
9.30

37*
37*

Combination bus boys and dishwashers

9.70

37*

11.20
11.95

37*
37*

9.50
10 .25

37*
37*

10.00

37

Classification

Waiters and waitresses: - Continued
Other than cash houses:
Straight s h i f t ........... .
Split shift ..................
Nightclubs and cocktail lounges

37*

8.85

Cafeterias, dairy lunches, soda fountains:

9.50
10.25

37*
37*

10.50
11.25

37*
37?

11.50
12.25

37*
37?

11.35

37*
37?
37?

Ilf .20

11.10
19.0 0

15*5
I f.20
l
15 .f
I5

37*
37?
37?
37?

11.85

37*

13.15
11.85

37*
37?

15*5
I f.20
l
12.90
IO.85

37*
37?
37*
37?

6.95
7.85

37*
37*

Carvers, salad or sandwich men and women
(when serving the public directly):
Straight shift ........... ............ ,
Split shift ........................... .
Cashiers and checkers:
Cashiers:
Straight shift .....................
Split shift ........................
Food checkers (cafeteria):
Straight shift ....................
Split shift ............. ..........
Combination cashiers and food checkers
(cafeteria):
Straight shift .....................
Split shift .......................

11.00

37*

11.75

37*

Counter, fountain and supply men and women:
Straight shift .................... .
Split shift ............................

9.50
10 .2 5

37*
37*

Dish-up boys and girls (cafeteria):
Straight shift ,....
Split shift ........
Waiters and waitresses:
Straight shift ....
Split shift ........

10.75

8.75
9.50

37*
37*

7.95

37*
37*

8 .85

31

Table 30.— MINIMUM ENTRANCE RATES FOR PLANT WORKERS l/

Minimum rate
(in cents)

Table 31.--SHIFT LUTERENTIAL PROVISIONS

Percent of plant 2 j workers In eeiatilskiaenis with
________
specified minimum rates in -_____________
Manufacturing
All
Whole­
Indus- Establishments with Public
Retail
sale
Services
tries
101-500
501 or more utilities*
trade
trade
workers
workers

Percent of plant workers employed on eack shift in -

Shift differential

if

All establishments..... .

100.0

100.0

80 or under ..............
Over 80 and under 85 •••.•
8 5 .......................
Over 85 and under 90 •••••
90 .......................
Over 90 and under 95 .....
95 .......................
Over 95 and under 100 ....
100 ................... .
Over 100 and under 105 ...
105 ......................
Over 105 and under 110 ...
110 ......................
Over 110 and under 115 ...
115 ......................
Over 115 and under 120 ...
1 2 0 ......................
Over 120 and under 125 ...
125 ......................
Over 125 and under 130 ...
1 3 0 ......................
Over 130 and under 135 ...
135 ..................... .
Over 135 and under l4o ...
1 1 * 0 ......................
Over l&O and under 1^5 •••
1^5 ......................
Over 145 and under 150 ...
150 ......................
Over 150 and under 155 •••
155 ......................
Over 155 and under 160 ...
160 and o v e r .... .

1 .6
1 .0
-

5.3
-

-

2 .1
1 .1

-

2 .2

5.9

Establishments with no
established minimum ....

9.7
.3

3 .6

2 .8

-

2.9
.9
.3

8.3

-

-

5.8
-

1.4
-

2 .1

•5
6.9

12 .2

.3
7.8

.1
4.4
.4
4.5
2.3
3.4

-

-

1 .6
2 .8
1 .1

.1
1 .2
.2
2 .1

100.0

-

1 .0
1.7

-

2 .4
-

6^2
42.8
3.1
2.4
-

-

1 .0
2.9
-

100.0

100.0

1.7
-

1.7

2.7
-

2 .1

-

4.4
-

-

1 .6

1 .2

6 .2

3.3
13.2
3.2
3.5

-

-

.1

2 .2

5.2
-

1.4
1.3

4.5
.9

13.4
12.3
-

-

4.4
2.3

16 .2

3.2
10.3

4.8
1.1
3.9
2 .1
*

.9
3*4
4.6
7.8
4.7
2.2
-

5.3
3.0

1.5
-

22.6

9.5

6.6

8.6

2 .8

100.0

6 .1

-

18 .2

100.0

2 .0
-

1 1 .0

1.7
3.2
-

2 .1
-

_

10 .6
-

8.4
1.4
14.7
3.4
-

2 .6
3.5
4.0
1.3
-

11.8
12.1

.7
6.3
1.4
1.3
5.1
1.6

14.8

59.9

42.2

7.1
12.7
13.6

1 .2

1 .2
-

l/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other
than watchmen.
2/ Other than office workers.
J j j Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Meat
products

Industrial
chemicals

Paints and
varnishes

Receiving shift differ­
entials ...................
Uniform cents (per hour) .
Under 5 cents ..... .
5 cents ...............
Over 5 and under 10
cents ............
10 cents
Over 10 cents .........
Uniform percentage .......
5 percent
Over 5 and under 10
percent ........ .
10 percent ............
Over 10 percent .......
Full day’s pay for reduced
hours ..........
O t h e r .............. .
Receiving no differential ...

l/
2/

Structural
steel

Machinery

______ IL ________
3rd or
3rd or
3rd or
3rd or
3rd or
3rd or
2nd
2nd 1
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
other
other
other
other
other
other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift

16 .0

6.0

°.5

0.3

15.0
6.4
1.7
2.8

5.5
4.6

.5
-

-

-

.1

-

.3
.3
-

.7
.9
.3
6.3
.2

1.5
1.1
1.9
.3

-

-

15

1 3 .6

7.2

6.1

2-5

15.4
15.4
7.1
1.7

1 3 .6
1 3 .6

7.2
6.1

6.1
6.1

3.5

-

2.0

-

6.6
-

7.1
4.5
2.0

_
4.1
-

-

-

.8
5.3

1.1

-

-

-

-

-

1.1
-

-

2.9
1.1
*2.2

2.5
7.1
.7
4.3
-

Percent of workers on extra
shifts, all establishments ...

All
manufacturing
industries

-

.3

? .8

0.2

9.8

-

.2

»
_

_

.
.
.
_

_
_

-

3.5
-

_
-

9.8
-

.2
_

-

3.5
-

-

9.8
-

.2

-

-

-

-

5.1
-

.2
.1

.5
-

_
-

1.5
.8

.2

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.0

.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.5

( |/ )

.4

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than 0.05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

32

Table 32.— SCHEDULED WEEKLY HOURS

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in -

Percent of women office workers employed in Weekly hours

All
industries

Manuf acturing

Public
utilities*

All establishments .......... ...............

100.0

100.0

100.0

35 hours ..............................
Over 35 and under 37J- h o u r s ......... .......
37-J hours ........ ........................0.
Over 3?! and under 4-0 hours .................
40 hours ............ .......................
Over 40 and under 44 hours ..................
44 hours ....................................
Over 44 end under 48 h o u r s ................ .
48 hours ....................................
Over 48 h o u r s .......... ....................

2.9
1.0

3.2

-

i o .c

16.8
4.5
75.5

trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

1/
2/
2/
*
**

8.z
76 .c

-

.4
.i
-

-

5.0

90.1

—

industries

100.0

5.2
2.2
9.1
83.5

-

100.0

100.0

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

1C0.0

100.0

100.0

0.1

100.0

_
1.9

Services

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

1.5
1.9
1.5

Wholesale
trade

1.7

2/

3.0

-

Wholesale

All

12.3

0.3
.3
2.9

-

19.4
21.0
59.5

4.5

94.8

-

-

5.4
5.0
74.3
1.8

5.0

1.8

-

94.9

94.5

-

1.0
-

-

~

-

(2/)
.4

.2

.8

.4
.1

—

.7

96.7

.4

“

1.5

—

100.0

-

-

-

100.0

93.6

91.8

-

_

1.5

—

3.5
2.8

—

.2

-

Other than office workers,
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately,
Less than 0,05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table 33.— PAID H O L H A Y S

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in -

Percent of office workers employed in Number of paid holidays

All

Industr165

Manufacturing

Public

Wholesale

utilities*

trade

All

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

industries

Manufacturing

2/

Public

utiJities*

All establishments .......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments providing paid holidays .....
1 to 5 d a y s ............ ...............
6 days •••••....................... .
7 days ............................... .
8 days ............................... .
9 d a y s .......... ........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
.2

99.5
.6
6.6
62.4
10.6
19.3

92.9
.6
22.8
43.7
13.5
2.3

90.8
.5
39.9
41.3
6.3
2.8

100.0
16.2
18.2
65.6

10 d a y s ............ .................... .
11 days .................................
ll£ d a y s ................................
12 d a y s .... * ............................
.

99.9
.1
12.4
43.6
16.4
4.2
3.2
8.3
1.6
9.6

Establishments providing no paid holidays ...

.1

i/
2/
#
#*

-

40.1
46.8
10.4
1.9
-

.3
-

9.9
25.4
62.0
.1
2.0
.6

6.3
73.7
19.6
.4

4.6
81.C
14.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

4.6
1.4
4.8
11.7
34.1
6.3
3 6.9

-

.5

-

-

-

7.1

9.2

-

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Smnri

npt s

io o . b

100.0

100.0

100.0

95.5

82.8
2.5
7.6
62.9
3.5
6.3

15.0
64.9
18.4
1.7

5.4
75.2
14.9

-

-

-

-

4.5

17.2

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

33

Table 34.— PAID VACATIONS (FORMAL PROVISIONS)

Percent of office workers employed in All
industries

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with paid vacations .......
Under 1 week .........................
1 w e e k ....... |
.... ..................
Over 1 week and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks .......................... .

40.1
35.1
.1
4.9

43.9
43.3
.6
-

20.7
20.7
-

29.1
29.1
-

9.3
9.3
—

69.8
50.8
19.0

29.9
29.9

13.2
1.7
11.5
-

18.1
3.7
14.4
-

Establishments with no paid vacations .....

59.9

56.1

7 9 .3

70.9

90.7

30.2

70.1

86.8

100.0
20.5
1.4
77.7

100.0

100.0
61.0
39.0
-

100.0
14.3
3.3
82.4
-

1C0.0

100.0
.2
99.8
-

100.0
22.4
74.0
.4
3.2

99.3
62.9
3.2
32.5
-

Vacation policy

All establishments .......................

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in -

Finance**

Services

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

17.7
17.7
-

9.5
9.5
-

4.9
4.9
-

6.6
1.3
5.3
-

81.9

82.3

90.5

95.1

93.4

100.0

1C0.0

65.6

67.0

.7

7.2
27.2
-

33.0
-

96.1
51.9
2.3
41.9
-

100.0
80.0
20.0
-

97.9
39.4
53.9
4.6

.7

-

-

3.9

All
Manufacturing
induj^ries

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

6 months of service

—

•
—

1 year of service
Establishments with paid vacations ...... .
1 week ..............................
Over 1 week and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks .................... ........ .
Over 2 weeks and under 3 weeks ...... . •
3 weeks ................... ....... ••••
Establishments with no paid vacations .....

1 4 .1

.4

3.4
82.5
-

-

-

(2/)

-

-

5 1 .1

48.9
-

-

-

-

2.1

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations......
1 week ..............................
Over 1 week and under 2 weeks.........
2 weeks .................. ........... .
Over 2 weeks and under 3 weeks...... ••.
3 weeks ........... ................ •«
Establishments with no paid vacations ......

100.0
1.1
1.5

100.0
1.1

9 6 .8

95.5
-

.2
.4
-

3.4

-

100.0
2.9
4.6
91.1
1.4
-

100.0
100.0
-

100.0
.9
1.1
98.0
-

100.0
100.0
-

100.0
3.7

99.3
17.0
10.8
69.9
.9

.7

92.0

•4

-

3.2

.7

-

-

.7

100.0
3 1.9

20.9
47.2
-

100.0
1.6
4.9
88.5
5.0
-

96.1
5.4
2.4
88.3
3.9

100.0
1.8
5.5

92.7
-

97.9
17.8
1.2
74.3
4.6
2.1

10 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations .......
1 week ..............................
2 weeks ............... ......... .
Over 2 weeks and under 3 weeks
3 weeks ........ ................ .
Over 3 weeks....................... .
Establishments with no paid vacations ••.«••

100.0
.5
82.7
4.3
11.4

100.0
.2
89.2

100.0
2.9
94.0

-

-

-

-

16.8

10.6

3.1
-

2.1

18.7

28.2

-

2.8

-

87.3
1.9
8.0
.8

-

-

-

-

.7

1.1

-

3.1

-

-

-

1/ Other than office workers.
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Less than 0,05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0
.8
97.1

100.0
71.4
.4

100.0
96.9

100.0
6 1 .7

/

99.3
1-3

100.0

.4

89.3
3.7

100.0
1.6
91.5
2.3

96.1
2.9
90.1

100.0
.3
95.2

97.9
3.6
66.5

-

-

-

4.6

3.1
-

4.5
-

27.8
-

-

3.9

-

2.1

6.6

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 35.— PAID SICK LEAVE (FORMAL PROVISIONS)

Percent of plant

Percent of office workers employed in
Provisions for paid sick leave

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

F i nance**

All
M a n u f a cturing
industries

l/

workers employed in -

Public
utili t i e s *

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

2/

100.0 ..

All establishments ................ ....

100.0

100.0

6 months of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
Under 5 days ......................
5 days ............................
6, 7, and 8 days ...................
9 days ....................... .
10 days .................. .........
Over 10 days .......................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

34.1
1.6
6.0
8.6
4.9
8.7
4.3

45.1
6.7
5.8
14.6

22.6

»

-

16.7
1.3

65.9

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................
Under 5 days ......................
5 days .............................
6, 7, and 8 days ...................
10 days ............ ................
12 days ...........................
14, 15, and 16 days ................
18 days ...........................
Over 18 days .................... ...
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................
2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..... -. .e*.., s s ;Under 5 days ......................
5 days ............................
6, 7, and 8 days
10 days ...........................
12 days ...........................
14 and 15 days .....................
18 days ...........................
20 days ...........................
Over 20 d a y s .......... ........ ....
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................
10 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for p_aid sick leave .................
Under 5 days .......................
5 days ............................
6, 7, and 8 d a y s .......... ........
10 days ...........................
12 days ...........................
14 and 15 d a y s .......... ..........
18 d a y s ....... ...................
20 days ...........................
Over 20 d a y s ............... .......
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave
l/
2/
*
**

3.5
2.1
2.5
—
3.9
-

3.1

22.2

-

-

1.8
.6
.7
-

7.0
1.7

1.3
10.0

11.4
1.5
2.4
.9
3.1
3.5

13.5
-

6.2

24.9
4.5
3.6
16.8

23.9

11.1

18.5
.9

100,0... , . 1Q&JCL.

3.1
1.9

12.4
.2

4.3
4.7
14.9
-

2.5
2.9
2.1
3.6

53.4
11.9
11.3
19.0
1.4
9.3

54.9

77.4

76.1

38.9

46.6

81.5

83.6

91.5

96.9

77.3

91.9

75.1

49.3
1.7
9.5
5.4
15.3
4.7
3.9
4.9
3.9

49.3
6.7
2.3
2.4
21.6
2.3
12.2

33.5

46.7
1.1
10.3
4.7
24.9

15.7
2.2
3.0
5.4
2.7
1.3

30.5
.3
6.5
3.6
3.5
11.1
5.5

32.4
1.3
14.1
.6
3.5
6.7
.7

14.5
2.1
5.1
.3
6.7

72.5

43.6

-

-

21.5
14.3

41.2
2.9

-

-

-

-

2.1
4.9
27.7
3.6

.5

.3

50.2

50.7

50.0
1.7
4.2
3.9
14.2
5.1
3.2
4.9
3.6
4.2

ZQ-3

_

1.3

6.7
2.0
1.0
14.3
2.3
7.6

-

5.4
4.6

-

-

1.1

16.5

53.3

34.3

42.1

69.5

67.6

85.5

27.5

56.4

78.5

53.8

37.8

46.7
T
i.i
4.3
4.7
28.6

15.7

56 .6

14.5
2.1
5.1
.3
3.9

n

'i ’
3

76.9

OT- C
*—i9S

-

30.5
.3
6.5
3.0
1.9
10.4
6.9
1.5

33.1

2.2

1 0
*--*
+*•2.8
-

.2
-

_

3.3
5.6
23.5
19.3

_
-

_

-

3.0
5.4
2.7
1.3

5.7
5.6
7.5
2.9

2.8
-

-

1.1
13.3

34.9

5.2
-

1.1

19.0
11.6
4.3

50.0

50.7

12.2

53.3

34.3

43.4

50.2
1.7
4.2
3.3
7.3
4.7
4.6
4.3
3.7
14.9

50.1
6.7
2.1
1.0
4.7
2.3
3.3

87.8

46.7

16.3

56.6

11.9
13.1

49.3

49.9

-

-

5.2

37.3
9.6
25.2
11.2

.2
-

_

-

6.3

57.9
5.7
3.6
9.1
4.2
1.5
19.0
9.3

_

-

-

1.1

3.3
5.5
21.6
16.4
2.2
-

-

4.3
4.7
9.6

2.2
3.0
6.0
2.7
1.3
-

5.7
5.6
6.1
2.9
1.4
19.0

_

12.5
-

-

6.3
.4
6.2
6.3
1.9

-

1.2

42.8
-

13.7
11.0

24.0
1.7
17.9
-

-

-

16.9
11.0
-

A
^
-

22.5
1.3
14.9

4.2
.8

-

14.3
-

-

2.2

5.4

-

1.6
.3

49.0

69.5

66.9

85.5

23.1

56.4

78.5

58.3

30.6
.3
6.5
3.0
1.9
9.8
5.5

33.9
1.3
6.3
•4

16.3

76.9

43.6

21.9

.4
4.2
.8

41.2
2.3
.5
1.6
20.5
3.0
3.6
9.2
58.8

-

5.6
4.2

-

5.1
.3
-

-

-

3.9
-

-

15.3
11.0
1.6
-

-

22.5
1.7
-

17.7
-

-

14.3
-

43.4

69.4

66.1

83.7

23.1

56.4

78.1

83.7

-

2.1

1.7

53.3

-

2.9

-

49.0

12.2

-

-

4.9

1.1

.5
1.7
24.3
6.0

9.7
.5

15.9

38.3

)

4.2
.8

-

2.2

-

—

4.4

.5
12.2

-

-

2.2

.8
2.3

5.2
9.3

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




IQQJ1

100.0

100.0

.

... 1Q0*0 .. .
.

....IQGUfl

100.0

100.0

—

-

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

35

Table 36.— .NONPRODUCTION BONUSES
Percent of'office workers employed in Type of bonus

All
industries

All establishments ...... .....................

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ....................... ...........
Christmas or year-end ..... ............ .
Profit-sharing .............................
O t h e r .................................. .
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ......................... .......... .

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

39.5
37.4
6.7
2.0

20.9
19.5
1.3
-

16.7
16.7
-

29.5
29.5
-

-

33.4
33.1
.8
2.7

76.4
70.3
23.2
5.7

35.1
32.5
2.6
-

10.0
9.4
.3
.3

9.2
8.9
.3
-

60.5

79.1

83.3

66.6

70.5

23.6

64.9

90.0

90.8

Manufacturing

Retail
trade

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in -

1
Finance**

-

Services

All
Manufacturing
induj^ries

Public
utilities*

100.0

-

100.0

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

20.7
16.9
.8
3.1

21.6
21.6
-

3.2
2.8
.4
-

79.3

73.4

96.8

Services

1/ Other than office workers.
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Unduplicated total.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table 37*— INSURANCE AND PENSION PLANS
Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in -

Percent of office workers employed ii All
industries

Manufa6turing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All establishments ........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2/ .........................
Life insurance ........ ............. .
Health insurance ................ ...... .
Hospitalization............. .......... .
Retirement pension ......................
Other.... .................... .

92.1
82.8
51.2
51.3
54.9
-

91.3
82.7
62.3
72.5
47.5
-

100.0
93.8
' 28.0
13.5
91.6
-

94.7
86.1
42.2
39.6
51.2
-

82.1
69.6
37.3
36.7
19.1
-

94.6
89.7
67.2
69.1
73.3
-

83.6
62.7
44.8
42.7
16.0
-

82.0
66.2
46.5
42.5
42.4
-

87.1
75.5
64.7
58.7
48.9
-

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans......... .......... ....... .

7.9

8.7

5.3

17.9

5.4

16.4

18.0

12.9

Type of plan

1/
2/

—

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
y Unduplicated total.
*
Transportation (excluding railroacfe), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




All
Manufacturing
induj^ries

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
88.3
23.3
12.8
83.5
-

81.1
72.0
46.0
38.4
34.9
-

69.6
55.6
35.6
34.2
15.4
-

61.9
23.7
34.5
42.5
13.5
-

18.9

30.4

38.1

“

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco, California, January 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

36.
A p p e n d ix A

ff
- £< & p* and Method o Suluey

With t h e e xce ptio n , o f t h e u n io n s c a l e o f r a te s , in fo rm atio n p r e se n te d in t h i s b u l l e t i n was c o l l e c t e d
by v i s i t s o f f i e l d r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s o f th e
Bureau to r e p r e s e n t a t iv e
e s ta b lis h m e n ts in th e a r e a su rv e y e d .
In
c l a s s i f y i n g w orkers b y o c c u p a tio n , un ifo rm jo b d e s c r ip t io n s were u sed ; t h e y a r e p r e se n te d i n Appendix B.

The e a r n in g s in fo rm a tio n
in th e re p o r t e x c lu d e s premium p ay f o r o ve rtim e and n ig h t work.
Nonprod u c tio n bonuses a r e a l s o e x c lu d e d , b u t in c e n t iv e e a r n in g s , in c lu d in g com m issions f o r s a le s p e r s o n s , h ave been
in c lu d e d for th o se w orkers employed under some form o f in c e n t iv e wage syste m s. Where w eek ly h ours a r e re p o rte d
as f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l , th e y r e f e r to th e work sch e d u le s f o r w hich th e s a l a r i e s a r e p a id rounded t o th e near­
e s t h a lf -h o u r ;
a v e r a g e w ee k ly e a r n in g s f o r t h e s e o c c u p a tio n s have been rounded to th e n e a r e s t 50 c e n t s .
The
number o f w orkers p r e se n te d
r e f e r s to th e e stim a te d t o t a l employment
in a l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts w it h in th e *sc o p e
o f th e s tu d y and not t o t h e number a c t u a l l y s u rve ye d .
D ata a r e shown o n ly f o r f u l l - t i m e w o rk e rs, i . e . , th o se
who were h ir e d t o work th e e s t a b lis h m e n t ’ s f u l l - t i m e sch ed u le o f hours f o r t h e g iv e n o c c u p a tio n a l c l a s s i f i ­
c a t io n .

S i x broad in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n s were co ve re d in c o m p ilin g e arn in gs d a t a f o r t h e fo l lo w i n g t y p e s o f o c­
c u p a t io n s : ( a ) o f f i c e c l e r i c a l , ( b ) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l , ( c ) m aintenance and power p l a n t , and (d ) cus­
t o d i a l , w areh ou sin g and s h ip p in g
( t a b l e s 1 th ro u gh 4 ) .
The covered in d u s tr y g ro u p in g s a r e :
m an u factu rin g;
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c e p t r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ;
w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ;
f i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ;
and s e r v i c e s .
In fo rm a tio n on work sch e d u le s and supplem en tary b e n e f i t s
was
a l s o o b ta in e d in a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e group o f e s ta b lish m e n ts in each o f t h e s e in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n s .
As i n d i ­
c a t e d in t a b l e A , o n ly e s ta b lis h m e n ts above a c e r t a i n s i z e were s tu d ie d .
S m aller e s ta b lis h m e n ts were o m itte d
b e c a u se t h e y fu r n is h e d
i n s u f f i c i e n t employment in th e
o ccu p a tio n s s tu d ie d to w arrant t h e i r in c lu s io n in th e

In fo rm a tio n on wage p r a c t i c e s r e f e r s t o a l l o f f i c e w orkers and to a l l p la n t w orkers a s s p e c i f i e d in
th e in d iv i d u a l t a b l e s . I t i s p r e s e n te d in term s o f th e p ro p o rtio n o f a l l w orkers employed in o f f i c e s (or p la n t
d epartm en ts) t h a t o b se rve th e p r a c t i c e in q u e s tio n , e x c e p t in th e s e c t io n r e l a t i n g t o women o f f i c e w orkers o f
th e t a b l e summarizing
sch ed u led w ee k ly h o u rs.
Because o f e l i g i b i l i t y re q u irem e n ts,
th e p r o p o r tio n a c t u a l l y
r e c e i v i n g th e s p e c i f i c b e n e f i t s
may be s m a lle r .
The summary o f v a c a tio n
and s i c k le a v e p la n s i s l i m it e d to
form al arran gem en ts.
I t e x c lu d e s in fo rm a l p la n s whereby tim e o f f w ith pay i s g r a n te d a t th e d i s c r e t i o n o f
th e em ployer or o th e r s u p e r v is o r .
S ic k le a v e p la n s a r e fu r th e r li m it e d to
t h o s e p r o v id in g f u l l pay f o r a t
l e a s t some amount o f tim e o f f w ith o u t any p r o v is io n f o r a w a i t i n g p e r io d p r e c e d in g th e payment o f b e n e f i t s ,
and e x c lu d e h e a lt h in su ra n ce even though i t i s p a id f o r b y em ployers.
H ea lth in su ra n ce i s in c lu d e d , however,
under t a b u la t i o n s f o r in su ra n ce and p e n s io n p la n s .

s tu d y .
Among th e i n d u s t r i e s in w h ich
c h a r a c t e r i s t i c jo b s were s tu d ie d ,
minimum s i z e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t and
e x t e n t o f th e a r e a co ve re d were d eterm in ed s e p a r a t e ly f o r each in d u s tr y , and a r e
in d ic a t e d in t a b le B.
A l­
though s i z e
li m it s fr e q u e n tly
v a r ie d from th o se
e s t a b li s h e d f o r su rv e y in g
c r o s s - I n d u s tr y o f f i c e and p la n t
j o b s , d a t a f o r t h e s e jo b s were in c lu d e d o n ly f o r firm s which s a t i s f i e d t h e s i z e req u irem en ts o f th e broad in ­
d u stry d iv is io n s .
A g r e a t e r p r o p o r tio n o f l a r g e th a n o f
sm all e sta b lish m e n ts was s tu d ie d in o rd e r to
maximize th e
number o f w orkers su rve ye d w ith a v a i l a b l e r e s o u r c e s . Each group o f e sta b lish m e n ts o f a c e r t a i n s i z e , however,
was g iv e n i t s p ro p e r w e i^ it in th e co m bin atio n o f d a ta b y in d u s tr y and o c c u p a tio n .

T a b le A ._ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN THE SAN FRANCIS CO-OAKLAND AREA AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JANUARY 1951

Item

Number o f e s ta b lish m e n ts
E stim a te d
E stim ated
to ta l
t o t a l in a l l
S tu d ie d
in d u s tr ie s
w ith in sco pe
o f stu d y gj
u

E stim a te d
t o t a l in a l l
in d u s t r ie s
- 1/

T a b le B .— ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN THE SAN FRANCISCOOAKLAND AREA AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF
LABOR STATISTICS, JANUARY 19 51

Employment
E stim a ted
In e s ta b lis h m e n ts
to ta l
s tu d ie d
w ith in scope
T o ta l
O ffic e
o f s tu d y gj

In d u s tr y D i v is i o n
2 .3 17
hi A

kzj

642,800

1 OY
J.C.I

33,5**8

1,9 0 7

300

10 2 ,1 0 0
46 0 ,70 0

1.0 2 9
65

83
10

35

31,566
M a n u f a c t u r in g ................................................... ............ ..
T r a n s p o r ta tio n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , communi­
c a t i o n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ...................
W h olesale tr a d e ................................................................
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ......................
S e r v ic e s :
I n d u s t r ie s c o v e re d 3 / .............................................
I n d u s t r ie s n ot c o v e re d ...........................................

k m .W
-T, V tf
/J

10

4 ,1 1 9

735

15 ,8 7 9
3 , l 6s

231
178

5**
69
3^

5 ,2 4 l
**.047

672

98

-

3 5 2 ,10 0
1 1 6 ,7 0 0

1 8 1 ,7 4 0

56 ,2 4 0
1 2 5 ,5 0 0

235,400

**3.530
7 .1 7 0

5 5.6 0 0
51,0 0 0

9 .7 1 0

1 1 7 ,0 0 0
3 7,0 0 0

44,000
26,400

2 3 ,8 1 0
1 3 .3 6 0

. 3 .7 3 0

79,50 0
5 5 .50 0

44,400

1 9 .9 7 0

2 ,7 2 0

**

-

-

44,650
i4 ,o o o

7 ,8 3 0
5.900
4,460

1 1 ,7 2 0

S iz e o f E sta b lis h m e n t

1 ,0 0 1 and o v e r ........................................................................
501 - 1 ,0 0 0 ...............................................................................
2 51 - 500 ...................................................................................
10 1 - 250 ...................................................................................
5 1 - 100 .....................................................................................
21 - 50 .......................................................................................
1 - ...............................................................................................

3 7,5 66
4s

2 ,3 1 7
48

kzj
k6

68
161

68
161

424

424

51
71
113
56
79

778

2 , 10 s
33.979

337

1,089
( 2/ )

(z/)

642,800

9 9,6 0 0
52,2 0 0
7 5 .1 0 0
73 .6 0 0
55.70 0

90,800
19 5 ,8 0 0

3 52 ,10 0
99,600

1 8 1 ,7 4 0
9 3 . 6 U0

**3.530
2 1 ,7 4 0

5 2,2 0 0

8,530

73 ,6 0 0

3 6 ,6 7 0
26,080
18 ,5 0 0

25,400

4,000

23,600
( 2/ )

2 ,70 0

75.1C O

'

1

( 2/ )

S e l e c t e d i n d u s t r ie s in which
c h a r a c t e r i s t i c jo b s were
su rveyed 1 /

Minimum
s iz e o f
e s ta b ­
lish m en t
stu d ie d

3 6 ,3 6 0

7 S ,4 o o
14 ,2 0 0
7 9 ,10 0

14,000

Number o f
e s ta b lis h m e n ts

7 ,3 0 0
4 ,70 0

720
520
( 2/ )

Meat p r o d u c ts , independent
p ro d u ce rs ............................................
I n d u s t r i a l ch e m ica ls .........................
P a in t s and v a r n is h e s ..........................
F o u n d r ie s, fe r r o u s ..............................
F a b r ic a te d s t r u c t u r a l s t e e l and
ornam ental m eta l w o r k ...................
M achinery in d u s t r ie s .........................
Department and c lo t h in g s to r e s . . .
Banks .........................................................
H o te ls 2/ ................................................
Power l a u n d r i e s ............... ....................
Auto r e p a i r shops:
V e st b a y Area 3/ ............................
E ast B ay Area 4/ ............................
H o s p ita ls .................................... ............

21
10 1
8
21
21
21
10 1
10 1
10 1
21

E stim a te d
to ta l
w it h in
scope o f
s tu d y

27

10
31
18

Bnployment

E stim a te d
to ta l
w ith in
scope o f
s tu d y

S tu d ie d

12
6
16
11

24

2 ,620
2,080

11

59
37
17

1 ,3 5 0
2,800

18

11
31

25

3 ,3 2 0
9 .9 10
.

In c lu d e s e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith 1 o r more w orkers in th e San F ran cisco -O ak la n d M e tr o p o lita n A rea (Alam eda, C on tra C o s ta , M arin, San Fran­

c is c o
San M ateo, and Solano C o u n t ie s ) .
2/ ’ The s u rv e y o f o f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l , m aintenance and power p l a n t , c u s t o d i a l , w areh ousin g and s h ip p in g jo b s re p o r te d in
ta b le s 1
1 - A , 2 , 3 , and 4 was l i m i t e d t o e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith more than 100 w orkers in m an u fa ctu rin g , t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , com m unication, and o th e r
p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ) and r e t a i l t r a d e , and i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith more than 20 w orkers in w h o le s a le t r a d e , f i n a n c e , in s u ra n ce , r e a l e s t a t e , and
s e r v ic e i n d u s t r i e s ; e x c e p t io n s made in i n d u s t r i e s i n w hich c h a r a c t e r i s t i c jo b s were su rveyed a r e in d ic a t e d in t a b l e B.
3/
H o t e ls ; p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v i c e s ; autom obile r e p a ir s e r v i c e s ; ra d io b r o a d c a s tin g and t e l e v i s i o n ; m otion p i c t u r e s ; n o n p r o fit
membership o r g a n i z a t io n s , and e n g in e e r in g and a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .




1/
2/
3/
4/

838
1 ,9 9 7
1 ,9 2 1
1 ,7 4 1

2,056
6,084
13,405

10
11
23

10,040

2 ,36 0

2 ,0 25

4 ,8 70
4 ,4 50
1 2 ,8 2 0

1 ,4 0 3
930

5
5

148

19

169

10 1

3**

18
14

____ ______

\J

1 8 ,5 1 0

In
e sta b ­
lis h ­
ments
stu d ie d

I n d u s tr ie s a r e d e fin e d in fo o t n o t e s to t a b l e s 5 through l 6 .
San F ra n c is c o County h o t e ls o n ly .
M arin , San F r a n c is c o , and San Mateo C o u n tie s .
Alameda, Con tra C o s ta , and Solano C o u n tie s .

3 .7 J 3

7 .7 9 7
3 .7 1 3

7.058

A p p e n d ix B “
The p r i m a r y p u r p o s e o f the B u r e a u ' s Job d e scriptions is to a s s i s t
its field
staff in cl a s s i f y i n g w o r k e r s w h o are e m p l o y e d
u n d e r a v a r i e t y of p a y - r o l l t i tles
and
d i f f erent w o r k a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m e s t a b l i s h m e n t to e s t a b l i s h m e n t a n d f r o m a r e a to area,
into appropriate occu p a t i o n s .
Th i s is e s s e n t i a l in or d e r to p e r m i t the g r o u p i n g of o c ­
cup a t i o n a l w a g e ra t e s r e p r e s e n t i n g co m p a r a ble job content.
Beca u s e of this empha s i s on
interestablishment
a n d inte r a r e a
c o m p a r a b i l i t y of occupa t i o n a l content,
the Bureau's
Job descriptions d i f f e r s i g n i f i c a n t l y f r o m those in use in individual e s t a b l i s h m e n t s or
those prep a r e d for
ot h e r purp o s e s .
I n v i e w of these
special characte r i s t i c s
of
the
Bure a u ' s Job d e s c riptions, t h e i r a d o p t i o n w i t h o u t m o d i f i c a t i o n b y a n y single e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t or for a n y o t h e r p u r p o s e t h a n that
indicated h e r e i n is n ot
recommended. W h e r e
office w o r k e r s r e g u l a r l y p e r f o r m d u t i e s c l a s s i f i e d
in m ore than one occupation,
they
are gene r a l l y c l a s s i f i e d a c c o r d i n g to the m o s t skilled or r e s p o nsible d u ties th a t are a
r e g u l a r par t of th e i r
job a n d t h a t are
s i g n i ficant in d e t e r m i n i n g
t heir v alue to the
firm.

Office

yi

o.£ O ccupation^. S tu died.
Office - Continued
B O O K K E E P I N G - M A C H I N E OPERA T O R

A w o r k e r w h o o p erates a bookk e e p i n g machine (Remington R a n d , E l l i o t t Fisher, S u n d s ­
trand, Burroughs, N a t i o n a l C a s h Register) to keep a reco r d of b u s i n e s s tran s a c t i o n s .
Class A - A w o r k e r w h o uses a bookkeeping m a chine w i t h or w i t h o u t a t y p e w r i t e r k e y ­
b o a r d to keep a set of reco r d s of business
transactions u s u a l l y r e q u i r i n g a k n o w l e d g e o f and
e x perience in b asic b o o k k e e p i n g principles and familiarity w i t h t h e stru c t u r e o f the p a r t i c u ­
lar a c c o u n t i n g
s y s t e m used.
D e t e r m i n e s p r o p e r records a n d
d i s t r i b u t i o n of d e b i t a n d cred i t
items to be u s e d In e a c h p hase of the w ork. M a y prepare c o n s o l i d a t e d repor t s , b a l a n c e sheets,
a n d o ther reco r d s b y hand.
C lass B - A w o r k e r w h o u ses a b o o k k eeping mach i n e w i t h or w i t h o u t a t y p e w r i t e r k e y ­
b o a r d to keep a
r e c o r d o f one or more
phases or sections o f a set o f
re c o r d s p e r t a i n i n g to
busin e s s t r ansactions u s u a l l y r e q u i r i n g some knowledge of b a s i c b o o k k e e p i n g .
P h a s e s or s e c ­
t i o n s include a ccounts payable, p a y rolls,
customers' a c counts (not i n c l u d i n g s imple type of
b i l l i n g des c r i b e d under Bill e r , Machine), c ost distributions, e x pense d i s t r ibutions, inventory
controls, etc. In a d d i t i o n m a y ch e c k o r assist in p r e p a r a t i o n o f t r i a l b a l a n c e s
and
prep a r e
c o n t r o l sheets for the a c c o u n t i n g department.

BILLER, M A C H I N E
CA L C U L A T I N G - M A C H I N E OPERATOR
A worker wh o
p r e p a r e s statements,
bills a n d invoices
o n a m a chine
o t h e r th a n an
ordinary typewriter.
May also
k e e p re c o r d s as
to b i llings or
s h i p p i n g charges
or p e r f o r m
other c l erical w o r k i n c i d e n t a l to b i l l i n g o perations.
S h o u l d be
de s i g n a t e d as w o r k i n g
on
b i l l i n g mach i n e or b o o k k e e p i n g m a c h i n e as d e s c r i b e d below.

A w o r k e r w h o s e p r i m a r y f unction consists of o p e r a t i n g a c a l c u l a t i n g m a c h i n e to p e r ­
f o r m m a t h e m a t i c a l c o m p u t a t i o n s other t h a n a d d i t i o n exclusively.
C o m p t o m e t e r type

B i l l i n g M a c h i n e - A w o r k e r w h o uses a s p e cial b i l l i n g m a c h i n e (Moon Hopkins, E l l i o t t
Fisher, B u rroughs, etc.,
w h i c h are combination typing
a nd a d d i n g m a chines) to p r e p a r e bills
a nd invoices f r o m customers' p u r c h a s e orders, inter n a l l y p r e p a r e d orders, sh i p p i n g memoranda,
etc.
U s u a l l y involves a p p l i c a t i o n o f p r e d e t e r m i n e d d i s c ounts a n d s h i p p i n g charges a n d e ntry
of nece s s a r y extensions,
w h i c h m a y or m a y n o t be co m p u t e d o n the b i l l i n g machine, a n d totals
w h i c h are a u t o m a t i c a l l y a c c u m u l a t e d
b y mach i ne.
T h e o p e r a t i o n u s u a l l y involves a large n u m ­
b e r of ca r b o n copies o f the b i l l b e i n g p r e p a r e d and is oft e n done o n a fan-fold m a c h i n e .
B o o k k e e p i n g M a c h i n e - A w o r k e r w h o uses a b o o k k e e p i n g m a c h i n e (Sundstrand, El l i o t t
Fisher, R e m i n g t o n Rand, etc., w h i c h m a y or m a y not have type w r i t e r keyboard)
to p r epare c u s ­
tomers' bills as p a r t of the a c c o u n t s
r e c e i v a b l e operation.
G e n e r a l l y involves the s i m u l t a ­
neous e n t r y of figures o n a c u s t o m e r ' s l e d g e r record.
The machine
a u t o m a t i c a l l y accumulates
figures
a nu m b e r o f v e r t i c a l co l u m n s a nd computes a n d u s u a l l y prints a u t o m a t i c a l l y the d e b ­
it or cred i t balances.
D o e s n o t involve
a knowledge o f b o okkeeping.
W o r k s f r o m u n i f o r m and
standard types o f sales a n d c r e d i t slips.

on

BOOKKEEPER, HA R D
A w o r k e r w h o k eeps
a s et of b o o k s
for r e c o r d i n g
busin e s s transactions
a n d who s e
w o r k involves m o s t o f t he f o l l o w i n g : p o s t i n g a n d b a l a n c i n g s u b s idiary ledgers, c a s h b o o k s or
journals, Journalizing t r a n s a c t i o n s w h e r e judgment is involved as t o accou n t s affected; p o s t ­
ing gene r a l ledger;
and taking trial
bala n c es.
M a y a l s o prep a r e
a c c o u n t i n g s t atements and
bills; m a y dire c t w o r k o f a s s i s t a n t s or a c c o u n t i n g clerks.




O ther t h a n C o m p t o m e t e r type
CLERK, A C C O U N T I N G
A worker w ho performs
one or more accoun t i n g
op e r a t i o n s s uch as
p r e p a r i n g simple
journal vouchers; accou n t s p ayable vouchers; coding invoices or v o u c h e r s w i t h p r o p e r a c c o u n t ­
ing distributions;
e n t e r i n g vou c h e r s in vo u c h e r registers;
r e c o n c i l i n g b a n k accounts; p o s t ­
ing a nd b a l a n c i n g s u b s i d i a r y ledgers controlled b y g e n eral ledger, e.g., a c c o u n t s receivable,
a c counts payable, s t o c k records,
voucher journals.
M a y a s s i s t in p r e p a r i n g journal entries.
F o r w o r k e r s w h o s e duties Include handl i n g the
general led g e r or a set o f b o o k s see B o o k k e e p ­
er, H a n d .
CLERK, FILE
C lass A - A w o r k e r w h o Is responsible for m a i n t a i n i n g a n e s t a b l i s h e d f i l i n g s y s t e m
a n d classifies a n d indexes correspondence or other material; m a y a l s o f ile this mat e r i a l . M a y
k eep records o f v a r i o u s types in con j u n c t i o n w i t h files or s upervise others In f i l i n g a n d l o ­
c a t i n g m a t e r i a l in t h e files.
M a y p e r f o r m incidental c l e r i c a l duties.
C lass B - A w o r k e r w h o performs routine filing, u s u a l l y o f m a t e r i a l that has al r e a d y
b e e n classified, or locates or assists in locating m a t e r i a l in files.
M a y p e r f o r m Incide n t a l
c l e r i c a l duties.

Office
C L ERK,

- Continued

GENER A L , S E N I O R

A w o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f office
operations a n d w h o s e duties involve most
o f the f o l l o w i n g : k n o w l e d g e of e x t e n s i v e office procedures,
p r actices a n d policies; o r g a n i ­
z a t i o n of o f f i c e r o u t i n e and s e q u e n c e of operations;
reviewing office methods a n d proc e d u r e s
and standards
of p e r f o r m a n c e ;
d e v i s i n g new procedures
and methods;
d e a l i n g w i t h pub l i c in
regard to inquiries,
complaints
a n d adjustments;
and responsibility
for d i r e c t i n g
junior
a n d / o r i n t e r m e d i a t e clerks.

Office

- Continued

K E Y - P U N C H OPERATOR
U n d e r g e n e r a l su p e r v i s i o n and w i t h no super v i s o r y responsibilities, r e c o r d s account­
ing a nd s t a t i s t i c a l d a t a on t a b u l a t i n g cards
b y p u n c h i n g a series o f holes in the cards in a
s p e c ified sequence,
using a numerical
key - p u n c h machine,
f o llowing w r i t t e n
information on
records.
M a y be r e q u i r e d to d u plicate cards
b y u sing the dup l i c a t i n g device attac h e d to m a ­
chine.
K eeps files of p u n c h cards.
May v e r i f y o w n w o r k or w o r k of others.
O FFICE B O Y OR G I R L

CLERK,

G E NERAL,

INTERMEDIATE

A w o r k e r w ho,
u n d e r g e n e r a l supervision,
performs a v a r i e t y of office
operations
and w h o s e d u t i e s involve m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g : knowledge of e x tensive office p r o c e d u r e s and
practices;
c a r r y i n g on a n e s t a b l i s h e d office routine and sequence of operations; o p e r a t i n g a
v a r i e t y o f office m a c h i n e s ;
p r e p a r i n g r eports a nd analyses; deal i n g w i t h p u blic in rega r d to
inquiries, c o m p l a i n t s a n d a d j u s t m e n t s o n the basis of established procedures;
a nd responsibi­
l i t y for d i r e c t i n g one o r mor e ju n i o r clerks,
CLERK,

GENE R A L ,

JUNIOR

A w o r k e r who, u n d e r d i r e c t supervision, performs various r outine office operations.
The w o r k assigned
does not involve r e s p o nsi b i l i t y
for a sequence of r e l a t e d office
opera­
tions.
E a c h ta s k is a s s i g n e d as it occurs a n d the p roduct is subject to detai l e d review.

CLERK,

ORDER

A w o r k e r w h o perfo r m s a v a r i e t y of routine duties s uch as ru n n i n g errands; operating
m i n o r office machines;
such as sealers or mailers;
o p e n i n g a n d d i s t r i b u t i n g mail; and other
minor clerical work.
(Bonded m e s s e n g e r s are exc l u d e d fr o m this classification.)

SECRETARY
A w o r k e r w h o p e rforms sec r e t a r i a l a n d c l erical d uties f or a su p e r i o r in a n a d m i n i s ­
trative or e x ecutive p o s i t i o n a nd w h o s e d u ties involve the following: m a k i n g appointments for
superior;
r e c e i v i n g people
com i n g into office;
ans w e r i n g a n d m a k i n g p hone calls;
handling
p e r s o n a l a n d important or c o n f i d e n t i a l mail, and w r i t i n g r o utine cor r e s p o n d e n c e on own initia­
tive; t a k i n g dictation,
e i t h e r i n shorthand or b y stenotype or simi l a r m a chine (except where
t r a n s c r i b i n g m a c h i n e is used),
and t r a n s c r i b i n g d i c t a t i o n or the r e c o r d e d information r e p r o ­
d u c e d o n a t r a n s c r i b i n g machine.
I n addition,
m a y prepare s p e c i a l
re p o r t s or m e m o r a n d a for
i n f o r m a t i o n of superior.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL

A w o r k e r w h o r e c e i v e s customers* orders for ma t e r i a l or mer c h a n d i s e b y mail, phone,
or p e r s o n a l l y a n d w h o s e d u t i e s involve
a n y c o mbination o f the f o l l o w i n g : q u o t i n g pric e s to
cust o m e r s ,
m a k i n g o ut a n o r d e r s h e e t l i s t i n g the items to make u p the order, ch e c k i n g prices
a n d q u a n t i t i e s cf items o n o r d e r s h e e t , d i s t r i b u t i n g order sheets to r e s p e c t i v e d e partments to
be filled.
M a y a l s o c h e c k w i t h c r e d i t d e p a r t m e n t to determine credit r a t i n g of customer, a c ­
k n o w l e d g e r e c e i p t o f o r ders f r o m cust o m e r s, follow-up orders to see that th e y have b e e n filled,
kee p file o f o r ders r e c e i v e d , a n d c h e c k s h i p p i n g invoices w i t h or i g i n a l orders.

A w o r k e r w h o s e p r i m a r y function is to take d i c t a t i o n f r o m one or mo r e p e r s o n s , either
in shorthand or b y stenotype or s i m ilar machine, involving a n o r m a l routine vocabulary* and to
transcribe this d i c t a t i o n o n a typewriter.
M a y a l s o type f r o m w r i t t e n copy.
M a y al s o set up
a nd keep files in order,
keep simple records,
etc.
D o e s not
include
transcribing-machine
work.
(See T r a n s c r i b i n g - M a c h i n e O p e r a t o r .)

CLERK, P A Y R O L L

S T E NOGRAPHER, T E C H N I C A L

A w o r k e r w h o c o m p u t e s w a g e s o f c o m p a n y employees and
enters the n e c e s s a r y d a t a on
the p a y r o l l shee t s a n d w h o s e d u t i e s involve:
calculating wor k e r ' s earnings b a s e d o n time or
p r o d u c t i o n records;
p o s t i n g c a l c u l a t e d d a t a o h pa y r o l l sheet,
showing i n f o r m a t i o n
such as
w o r k e r ' s name,
w o r k i n g days,
time, rate,
deductions for insurance a n d t otal w a g e s due.
In
a d d ition,
m a y m a k e out p a y c h e c k s a n d a s s i s t the p a y m aster in m a k i n g up a n d d i s t r i b u t i n g the
p a y envelopes.
M a y us e a c a l c u l a t i n g m a c hine.

A worker whose primary
funct i o n is to
take d i c t a t i o n
f r o m one or m o r e persons,
e i t h e r in shor t h a n d o r b y stenotype o r simi l a r machine,
inv o l v i n g a v a r i e d t e c h n i c a l or spe­
cia l i z e d v o c a b u l a r y such as in legal b r i e f s or reports o n scientific
r e s e a r c h a n d to
tran­
scribe this d i c t a t i o n o n a typewriter.
M a y a l s o type f r o m w r i t t e n copy.
M a y a l s o set up and
keep files in order,
keep simple
records, etc.
Does not include transcrib i n g - m a c h i n e work.
(See T r a n s c r i b i n g - M a c h i n e O p e r a t o r .)

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR

S W I T C H B O A R D O PERATOR

Under general
s u p e r v i s i o n a n d w i t h no
supervisory
responsibilities,
reproduces
m u l t i p l e co p i e s o f t y p e w r i t t e n o r
h a n d w r i t t e n matter,
u sing a m i m e o g r a p h
o r d i t t o machine.
M a k e s n e c e s s a r y a d j u s t m e n t suc h a s for ink a n d p a p e r feed counter a nd c y l i n d e r speed.
Is not
r e q u i r e d t o p r e p a r e s t e n c i l o r d i t t o m a s t e r . May keep file of us e d stencils or d i t t o masters.
M a y sort, collate, a n d staple c o m p l e t e d material.

A w o r k e r w h o operates a single or m u l t i p l e p o s i t i o n telephone switchboard, and whose
d uties involve: h a n d l i n g incoming, o u t g o i n g a n d intraplant or office calls.
I n addition, may
r e c o r d t ell calls a n d take messages.
As a m i n o r p a r t o f duties, m a y give infor m a t i o n to p e r ­
sons w h o call in,
or o c c a s i o n a l l y take telephone orders.
For workers
w h o a l s o d o typing or
oth e r stenographic w o r k or act as receptionists, see S w i t c h b o a r d O p e r a t o r - R e c e p t i o n i s t .




39

Office

Pro f e s s i o n a l and T e c h n i c a l

- Continued

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR - R E C E P T I O N I S T

DRAFTSMAN

A w o r k e r w h o in a d d i t i o n to p e r f o r m i n g duties o f operator,
on a single p o s i t i o n or
monito r - t y p e switchboard, act s as r e c e p t i o n i s t a n d / o r per f o r m s t y p i n g o r other r outine c l e r i ­
cal w o r k as part of r e g u l a r duties.
Thi s t y p i n g or c lerical w o r k m a y take the m a j o r pa r t of
this w o r k e r * s time w h i l e at s w i t c hboard.

A w o r k e r w h o p r epares w o r k i n g • plans a nd d e tail
drawings f r o m n otes,
r o u g h or d e ­
tail e d sketches
for engineering,
construction,
or m a n u f a c t u r i n g p u r p o s e s .
The d u t i e s p e r ­
formed involve
a c o m b i n a t i o n of the
f o l l o w i n g : p r e p a r i n g w o r k i n g plans,
detail
drawings,
maps, cross-sections, etc.,
to scale by use of drafting instruments; m a k i n g e n g i n e e r i n g c o m ­
p u t a t i o n s such as those i nvolved in strength of materials, b e a m s a nd trusses;
verifying com­
p l e t e d work,
c h e c k i n g dimensions,
materials to be used,
a n d quantities; w r i t i n g s p e c i f i c a ­
tions;
m a k i n g a d j u s t m e n t s or changes in drawings or specifications.
In a d d i tion, m a y ink in
lines a nd letters
o n p e n c i l drawings,
prepare d e t a i l uni t s
o f com p l e t e drawings,
or trace
drawings. W o r k is freq u e n t l y in a specialized
field such as arc h i t e c t u r a l ,
electrical, m e ­

T A B U M T 3 N G - M A C H I N E OPER A T O R
A w o r k e r w h o operates m a c h i n e that a u t o m a t i c a l l y analy z e s and tran s l a t e s i n formation
punc h e d in groups o f t a b u l a t i n g cards,
and prints translated da t a on forms or a c c o u n t i n g r e ­
cords; sets or a d j usts m a c h i n e to add, subtract, multiply, a n d m ake ot h e r calculations; places
cards to be t abulated
in feed m a g a z i n e
a nd starts machine.
M a y file
cards a f t e r
they are
tabulated.
M a y sort a n d v e r i f y p u n c h e d cards.

chanical,

or s t r u c t u r a l drafting.

D R A F TSMAN, JUNIOR
TRANSC R I B I N G - M A C H I N E OPERATOR,

GENERAL
(Retailer, a s s i s t a n t draftsman)

A w o r k e r w h o s e p r i m a r y f u n c t i o n is to transcribe
d i c t a t i o n involving a n o r m a l r o u ­
tine v o c abulary
from transcribing-machine
records.
M a y a lso type f r o m w r i t t e n c o p y a n d do
simple cler i c a l w ork.
A worker who
takes d i c t a t i o n in s h o r thand
or b y stenotype or similar
mach i n e is classified as a S t e n o g r a p h e r , G e n e r a l .

A w o r k e r w h o details units or parts of drawings p r e p a r e d b y d r a f t s m a n or others for
engineering, construction,
or manu f a c t u r i n g purposes.
U s e s v a r i o u s types
of d r a f t i n g tools
as required.
M a y prep a r e drawi n g s
from single plans or sketches,
a n d p e r f o r m s o t h e r duties
un d e r d i r e c t i o n of a draftsman.

TRANSCRIBIN G - M A C H I N E OPERATOR, T E C H N I C A L
NURSE,
A w o r k e r w h o s e p r i m a r y f u n c t i o n is to transcribe d i c t a t i o n i n volving a v a r i e d t e c h ­
n i c a l or s pecialized
v o c a b u l a r y such as in
l egal briefs or repo r t s o n s c ientific
r esearch
fr o m t r a n s c r ibing-machine
r e c ords.
M a y a l s o type
f r o m w r i t t e n copy a n d d o
simple cleri c a l
work. A w o r k e r w h o t akes d i c t a t i o n in s h o r t h a nd or b y stenotype or simi l a r ma c h i n e Is c l a s s i ­
fied as a S t e n o g r a p h e r , T e c h n i c a l .
TYPIST

INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

A r e g i s t e r e d nurse w h o gives nursing service to e m p l o y e e s or p e r s o n s w h o b e c o m e 111
or s uffer a n a c c i d e n t
o n the p r e m i s e s of a factory
or o t h e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t a nd w h o s e d uties
involve
a l l or m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : g i v i n g first aid t o the ill or injured;
a t t e n d i n g to
subse q u e n t d r e s s i n g o f e m p l o y e e *s injuries;
keeping records o f p a t i e n t s treated; a n d p r e p a r ­
ing a c c i d e n t
repo r t s f o r c o m p e n s a t i o n or other purposes.
May also assist
P h y s i c i a n in e x ­
a m i n i n g applicants, give Instr u c t i o n In h e a l t h e d u c a t i o n a n d illness p r e v e n t i o n , a n d per f o r m s
other r e l a t e d duties.

A w o r k e r w h o us e s a
t y p e w r i t e r to m ake copies
of v arious m a t e r i a l or
to make out
bills aft e r c a l c ulations have b e e n m a d e b y
a n o t h e r person.
M ay operate
a teletype machine.
May, in addition,
d o c l e r i c a l w o r k i n v o l v i n g little spec i a l training, such as k e e p i n g simple
records,
filing r e c o r d s a n d r e p orts,
m a k i n g out bills, or sorting a n d d i s t r i b u t i n g incoming
mail.
C lass A - A w o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s
one or m o r e of the
f o l l o w i n g : t y p i n g m a t e r i a l in
final f o r m f r o m v e r y r o u g h a n d i n v olved draft;
copy i n g f r o m p l a i n or cor r e c t e d c o p y in w h i c h
there is a frequent
a n d v a r i e d use o f t e c h n i c a l a n d
u n u s u a l w o r d s or f r o m
f o reign language
copy; comb i n i n g m a t e r i a l f r o m s e v e r a l sources; or p l a n n i n g lay-out of c o m p l icated stati s t i c a l
tables to m a i n t a i n u n i f o r m i t y a n d b a l a n c e in spacing; t yping tables f r o m r o u g h d r a f t in final
form.
M a y als o type
r o u t i n e f o r m letters,
v a r y i n g details
to suit
circumstances.
M a y in
addition, p e r f o r m c l e r i c a l d u t i e s as ou t l i n e d a b o v e .
Class B - A w o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s
ly clear or typed drafts;
routine typing
ple standard tabulations, or c o p y i n g m o r e
May, in addition, p e r f o r m c l e r i c a l duties




one or mo r e of the f o l l o w i n g : typi n g f r o m r e l a t i v e ­
of forms, insurance policies, etc.; se t t i n g up s i m ­
c o m plex tables
a l r e a d y set up and s p aced properly.
as o u tlined above.

Maintenance a nd Power P l a n t
CARPENTER, M A I N T E N A N C E
A w o r k e r w h o perfo r m s
the carpentry duties n e c e s s a r y t o
c o n s t r u c t a n d m a i n t a i n in
good r e p a i r b u i l d i n g w o o d w o r k a n d e q uipment such as bins, cribs, counters, ben c h e s , partitions,
doors, floors, stairs, casings, t r i m made of w o o d in a n estab l i s h m e n t , a n d w h o s e w o r k Involves
m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : p l a n n i n g and laying out of w o r k f r o m b l u e p r i n t s ,
drawings, m o d e l s or
v e r b a l instructions;
u s i n g a v a r i e t y of carpenters*
h a n d tools,
p o r t a b l e p o w e r tools,
and
stand a r d m e a s u r i n g instruments;
maki n g standard shop c o m p u t a t i o n s
r e l a t i n g to d i m e n s i o n s of
work; a n d s e l e c t i n g m a t e r i a l s n e c e s s a r y for the work.

Maintenance and Payer Plant - Continued
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
A w o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f el e c t r i c a l
trade functions in the installation,
m a i n t e n a n c e or r e p a i r o f
e q u i p m e n t for the generating,
distribution,
a n d / o r u t i l i z a t i o n of
e l e c t r i c e n e r g y In a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t , a n d w h o s e w o r k involves most of the f o H e w i n g : in s t a l l ­
ing or repa i r i n g
a n y of a v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c a l e q u i p m e n t such as generators,
transformers,
swit c h b o a r d s , c o n t r o l l e r s ,
c i r c u i t b r e a k e r s , motors, he a t i n g units, cond u i t systems or other
t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k i n g f r o m b l u e p r i n t s , drawings, layout or o ther specifications; l o ­
c a t i n g a n d d i a g n o s i n g t r o u b l e i n the e l e c t r i c a l s y s t e m or equipment; w o r k i n g stand a r d computa­
t ion s r e l a t i n g t o l o a d r e q u i r e m e n t s o f w i r i n g or ele trical equipment; a nd u s i n g a v a r i e t y of
e l e c t r i c i a n s ' h a n d t ools a n d m e a s u r i n g a n d t est i n g ii struments.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
A w o r k e r w h o operates
a n d m a i n t a i n s a nd/or supervises
the o p e r a t i o n o f stationary
e n g i n e s a n d e q u i p m e n t ( m e c h a n i c a l o r e l e c t r i cal) to s u pply power, heat, r e f r i g e r a t i o n or airc o n d i t i o n i n g a n d w h o s e w o r k involves: o p e r a t i n g and m a i n t a i n i n g a n d / o r su p e r v i s i n g the o p e r a ­
t i o n of s u c h e q u i p m e n t as s t e a m e ngi n e s , a i r compressors,
generators, motors, turbines, v e n ­
tilating and refrigerating
equipment,
s t e a m boilers and boil e r - f e d w a t e r pumps;
m a k i n g or
s u p e r v i s i n g e q u i p m e n t repa i r s ;
a n d k e e p i n g a record o f operation
of machinery, temperature,
a n d fuel comsumption.
This c l a s s i f i c a t i o n does n o t include h ead or c h i e f e n g i neers in e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g m o r e t h a n one e n g i n e e r .
FIRE M A N , S T A T I O N A R Y B O I L E R
A w o r k e r w h o fires s t a t i o n a r y b o i l e r s us e d in a factory,
p o w e r plant, or oth e r e s ­
t a b l i s h m e n t t o f u r n i s h heat,
t o g e n e r a t e po wer, or to supply s t e a m for in d u s t r i a l processes,
a nd whose w o r k involves
f e e d i n g f u e l to fire b y h a n d or operating a
m e c h a n i c a l stoker, gas,
o r o il b urner;
a n d c h e c k i n g w a t e r a n d s a f e t y valves.
I n addition, m a y clean, oil, or a ssist
in r e p a i r i n g b o i l e r r o o m e q u i p m e n t .
HELP E R , T R A D E S , M A I N T E N A N C E
A w o r k e r w h o a s s i s t s a n o t h e r w o r k e r in one of the skilled m a i n t e n a n c e trades, by p e r ­
f o r m i n g s p e c i f i c o r g e n e r a l d u t i e s of l e s s e r skill, such as keeping a w o r k e r s u p p l i e d w i t h m a ­
te r i a l s a n d tools; c l e a n i n g w o r k i n g area, m a c h i n e a n d equipment;
assisting worker by holding
m a t e r i a l s or tools;
a n d p e r f o r m i n g o t h e r u n s k i l l e d tasks as directed b y Journeyman.
I n some
trad e s the t e r m h e l p e r Is
s y n o n y m o u s w i t h apprentice,
since the h e l p e r is e x p e c t e d to learn
the t rade of the w o r k e r h e a s s i s t s .
Th e k i n d of w o r k the h e l p e r is p e r m i t t e d to p e r f o r m also
var i e s f r o m t rade t o trade:
in some t r ades the h e l p e r is confined to supplying,
li f t i n g and
h o l d i n g m a t e r i a l s a n d t ools a n d c l e a n i n g w o r k i n g areas; a n d in others he is p e n a l tted to p e r ­
f o r m specialized machine operations,
or p a r t s of a trade
that are a lso p e r f o r m e d by w o r k e r s
o n a f u l l - t i m e basi s .
MACH I N I S T ,

MAINTENANCE

A w o r k e r w h o p r o d u c e s r e p l a c e m e n t p a r t s a nd n e w parts for m e c h a n i c a l e q u i p m e n t o p e r ­
a t e d in a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t , a n d w h o s e w o r k i n volves m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : i n t e rpreting w r i t t e n
inst r u c t i o n s a n d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ;
p l a n n i n g a n d layout of work; u s i n g a v a r i e t y of machi n i s t ' s
h and tools
a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n s t ruments;
setting up a n d
operating standard
machine




Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued
M A CHINIST, M A I N T E N A N C E - C o n t i n u e d
tools; shap i n g o f m e t a l parts to close tolerances; m a k i n g s t andard shop comput a t i o n s relating
to d i m e nsions of work, tooling,
feeds a n d speeds of machining; knowledge of the w o r k i n g p r o ­
p e r t i e s of the c o m m o n metals;
s e l e c t i n g s t andard materials, parts and e q u i p m e n t required for
his work; and f i t ting a nd as s e m b l i n g parts. I n general, the m a c h i n i s t ' s w o r k n o r m a l l y requires
a r o u n d e d t r aining in m a c h i n e - s h o p practice u s u a l l y acqui r e d through a formal apprenticeship
or e q u i v a l e n t t r a i n i n g a n d experience.
M A I N T E N A N C E MAN, G E N E R A L U T I L I T Y
A w o r k e r w h o keeps the machines, m e c h a n i c a l equ i p m e n t a n d / o r structure o f a n e s t a b ­
l i shment (usually a s m a l l p l a n t w h e r e sp e c i a l i z a t i o n in m a i n t e n a n c e w o r k is impractical) in
repair; w h o s e d uties involve the per f o r m a n c e of operations a n d the u se o f tools a n d equipment
of s e v eral trades,
rather than specialization
in one trade or one type of maint e n a n c e w o r k
only, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves a com b i n a t i o n of the f o l l o w i n g : p l a n n i n g and layout of w o r k r e ­
l ating to r e p a i r o f buildings,
machines,
m e c h a n i c a l a n d / o r e l e c t r i c a l equipment;
repairing
e l e c t r i c a l a n d / o r m e c h a n i c a l equipment; installing, a l i g n i n g a n d b a l a n c i n g new equipment; and
r e p a i r i n g building, floors, stairs as w e l l as m a k i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g bins, cribs, and p a r t i t i o n s .

MECHANIC, A U T O M O T I V E

(MAINTENANCE)

A w o r k e r w h o repairs automobiles, m o t o r trucks a n d tractors of a n establishment, and
w h o s e w o r k involves m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : e x a m i n i n g a u t o motive equ i p m e n t to diagnose source
of trouble;
d i s a s s e m b l i n g equi p m e n t a n d p e r f o r m i n g repairs th a t involve the use of such hand
tools as wre n c h e s , gauges, drills, or spe c i a l i z e d equip m e n t in d i s a s s e m b l i n g or fitting parts;
r e p l a c i n g b r o k e n or defective p arts f r o m stock;
gri n d i n g a n d a d j u s t i n g valves;
reassembling
and / o r installing the various- a s semblies in the vehicle a n d m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y adjustments; and
a l i g n i n g whee l s , a d j u s t i n g bra k e s and lights, or t i g h tening b o d y bolts.
MECHANIC, MAINT E N A N C E
A w o r k e r w h o r e pairs m a c h i n e r y and m e c h a n i c a l e q u i p m e n t of a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t and whose
w o r k involves m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : exam i n i n g m a c h i n e s and m e c h a n i c a l equ i p m e n t to diagnose
source of trouble; d i s m a n t l i n g mac h i n e s and p e r f o r m i n g repairs t h a t m a i n l y involve the use of
h a n d tools in sc r a p i n g a nd f itting parts;
r e p l a c i n g b r o k e n or d e f e ctive parts w i t h items o b ­
t a i n e d f r o m stock; o r d e r i n g the p r o d u c t i o n o f a defective pa r t b y a m a chine shop or sending of
the m a c h i n e to a m a c h i n e shop for m a j o r repairs;
p r e p a r i n g w r i t t e n specifi c a t i o n s
for major
r e p a i r s or for the p r o d u c t i o n of pa r t s ordered f r o m ma c h i n e shop; a n d r e a s s e m b l i n g of machines,
a n d m a k i n g a l l n e c e s s a r y a d j u s tments for operation.

OILER
(Greaser;

lubricator)

A w o r k e r w h o lubricates,
w i t h oil or grease,
o f m e c h a n i c a l e q u i p m e n t found in a n e stablishment.

the m o v i n g p arts or w e a r i n g surfaces

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued
PAINTER, MA I N T E N A N C E

Custodial, Wetrehousing and Shipping
CR A N E OPERATOR, E L E C T R I C B R I D G E

(Painter, repair)

(Overhead-crane operator;

traveling-crane operator)

A w o r k e r w h o p a i n t s a n d r e d e c o r a t e s walls, wood w o r k ,
a n d fixtures of a n e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t a n d w h o s e w o r k i n v olves the following:
k nowledge of surface p e c u l i a r i t i e s
a n d types of
paint r e q u i r e d for d i f f e r e n t app l i c a t i o n s ; m i x i n g colors,
oils, w h i t e lead, a n d o t h e r p a i n t
ingredients to obt a i n p r o p e r c o l o r or consistency; p r e p a r i n g surface for p a i n t i n g b y remov i n g
old f i n i s h or b y p l a c i n g p u t t y or f i l l e r in n a i l holes a n d interstices;
applying paint with
spr a y g u n or brush.

A w o r k e r w h o lifts a n d m o v e s heavy objects w i t h a n e l e c t r i c a l l y p o w e r e d h o i s t w h i c h
is m o u n t e d o n a m e t a l bridge,
a n d runs a l o n g o v erhead rails.
T he w o r k o f the
operator in­
volves:
clos i n g s w i t c h to t u r n on electricity; m o v i n g e l e c t r i c a l c o n t r o l l e r levers a n d b rake
p e d a l to r u n the crane b r i d g e a l o n g overhead rails, to r u n t h e h o i s t i n g t r o l l e y b a c k and f orth
a c r o s s the bridge, and to raise a n d lower the load line a n d a n y t h i n g a t t a c h e d to it. (Motions
o f crane are u s u a l l y
c arried out in response to signals f r o m o t h e r w o r k e r s ,
o n the ground.)

PIPE FITTER, MAI N T E N A N C E

F o r w a g e s tudy purposes,
the B u r e a u of La b o r S t a t i s t i c s cl a s s i f i e s w o r k e r s a c c o r d ­
ing t o type of crane operated, as follows:

A worker who
installs a n d / o r re p a i rs pipe
and pipe fittings in a n
establishment,
and w h o s e w o r k involves m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g : laying out of w o r k a n d / o r m e a s u r i n g t o locate
p o s i t i o n of pipe f r o m d r a w i n g s or o t h e r w r i t t e n specifications; c u t t i n g various sizes of p ipe
to correct
lengths w i t h c h i s e l
a n d h a m m e r o r oxyacetylene
to r c h or p i p e - c u t t i n g
machine;
threading pipe w i t h
stocks a n d dies;
b e n d i n g pipe
b y h a n d - d r i v e n or p o w e r - d r i v e n machines;
assem b l i n g pipe w i t h coup l i n g s a n d f a s t e n i n g pipe to hangers;
making standard
shop c o m p u t a ­
tions r e l a t i n g to p r e s s u r e s ,
flow,
a n d size o f pipe required;
a n d m a k i n g stand a r d tests to
determine w h e t h e r
f i n i s h e d pi p e s m e e t specifications.
Th i s c l a s s i f i c a t i o n does n o t include
wo r k e r s p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in i n s t a l l i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g b u i l d i n g s a n i t a t i o n o r he a t i n g systems.

Crane operators, electric bridge
Crane operators, electric bridge

E L E V A T O R OPERATOR,
RADIO TECHNICIAN *
house,
Builds, assembles, and Installs u l t r a h i g h f requency A. C . and D .C. rad i o receivers,
transmitters and a u x i l i a r i e s u s i n g f r e q u e n c y m o d u l a t i o n and a m p l itude m o d u l a t i o n a c c o r d i n g to
diagrams, drawings,
sketches, or a c c e p t e d practices;
shoots trouble a n d services
radio r e ­
ceivers and transmitters;
m a k e s complete shop overhauls of r e ceivers and t r a n s m i t t e r s (up to
2000 watts); tests circuits, tubes, a nd o t h e r parts, u s i n g va r i o u s t e s t i n g mete r s and devices;
operates a r a d i o transmitter. R e q u i r e s a r a d i o tel e g r a p h operator's license 2nd class, issued
b y the F e d e r a l C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Com m i s s i o n .
SHEET-METALWORKER,

(under 20 tons)
(20 tons a n d over)

PASSENGER

A w o r k e r w h o transports passengers b e t ween floors o f a n o ffice building,
d e p a rtment store, hot e l or similar establishment.

apartment

GARAGE ATTENDANT *
Per f o r m s m a n u a l tasks
confined almost exclu s i v e l y
to the n o n m e c h a n i c a l
servicing
of automotive e q u i p m e n t in shop, garage,
and in the field;
w a s h e s a n d p o l i s h e s autos, b u s e s
or trucks;
supplies a u tomotive
equipment w i t h oil,
water, air,
gasoline;
ch a n g e s oil and,
lubricates a u tomotive equipment; changes tires and tubes; c h e c k s a n d r e p l a c e s batteries, s park
plugs, a nd w i n d s h i e l d w ipers; cleans oil filters.

MAINTENANCE
G R O U N D S M A N A N D GARDENER *

(Tinner;

tinsmith)

A w o r k e r w h o fabricates,
installs,
and m a i n t a i n s
in good r e p a i r
the sheet - m e t a l
equi p m e n t and fixtures
(such as m a c h i n e guards, grease.pans, shelves, lockers, tanks, v e n t i ­
lators,
chutes, ducts, m e t a l roof i n g )
o f a n establishment, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves
m o s t of
the f o l l o w i n g : p l a n n i n g an d lay i n g out a l l types of
sheet - m e t a l m a i n t e n a n c e w o r k fr o m b l u e ­
prints, models, or o t h e r s pecifications;
se t ting up and opera t i n g ail available types of sheetm eta l w o r k i n g machines;
u s i n g a v a r i e t y of hand tools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping,
fitt i n g a nd assembling; a nd i n s t a l l i n g s h e e t - m e t a l articles as required. In general, the w o r k
of the main t e n a n c e s h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r re q u i r e s roiinded t raining and e x perience u s u a l l y a c q u i r ­
ed thro u g h a formal a p p r e n t i c e s h i p or e q u i v a l e n t tr a i n i n g a n d experience.

*3ay Area Salary Survey Committee description.




Cares for lawns, flowers,
and shrubs,
and cleans a n d m a i n t a i n s g r o unds a nd w alks;
sets out p o i s o n and traps;
m ixes a n d applies insecticide a n d sprays;
p aints a nd m a k e s m i n o r
repa i r s to p l u m b i n g a nd s p r i nkler system;
sharpens, cleans, paints,
a n d cares for tools a n d
equipment.
GUARD
A w o r k e r w h o has routine police duties,
e i t h e r a t fix e d p o s t or o n tour, m a i n t a i n ­
ing order, u s i n g a rms or force w h e r e necessary.
This c l a s s i f i c a t i o n includes g a t e m e n w h o are
sta t i o n e d at gate and ch e c k o n identity of employees a nd ot h e r p e r s o n s entering.

*Bay Area Salary Committee description

42

Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping - Continued

Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping - Continued
STOCK HANDLER AND TRUCKER, HAND

JANITOR, PORTER, OB CLEANER
(Day porter, sweeper; charwoman;

(Loader and unloader;
handler and stacker;
helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)

Janitress)

A worker w h o cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and
washrooms, or premises of a n office,
apartment house,
or commercial or other establishment.
The duties performed involve a combination of the following: sweeping, mopping and/or scrub­
bing, and polishing floors; removing chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furni­
ture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings;
providing supplies and minor m ain­
tenance services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, ind rest rooms. This classification does
not include workers w h o specialize in window washing
ORDER FILLER

shelver;

trucker;

stockman or stock

A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store, or other establishment
whose duties involve one or mare of the following: loading and unloading various materials
and Eterchandise on o r from freight cars,
trucks or other transporting devices;
unpacking,
shelving, or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage location;
transporting mate­
rials or merchandise by hand truck, car or wheelbarrow to proper location. May, in addition,
keep a record of materials handled or check items against invoices or other records. This
classification does not include longshoremen, w h o load and unload ships.
TRUCK DRIVER

(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
A worker w h o fills shipping or transfer orders from stored merchandise in accord­
ance wi t h specifications on sales slip, customer orders,
or other instructions. May, in a d ­
dition to filling orders and indicating items filled or omitted,
keep records of outgoing
orders, requisition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other
related duties.
PACKER
A worker w h o prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them in
boxes or other containers,
the specific operations performed being dependent upon the type,
size and number of units to be packed,the type of container employed, and method of shipment.
The w o r k o f the packer involves a combination of the following: knowledge of various items
of stock in order to verify content;-selection of appropriate type and size of container; in­
serting enclosures
in container;
using excelsior or other material to prevent breakage or
damage;
closing and sealing containers;
and applying labels or entering identifying data on
container. This classification does not include packers who also make wooden boxes or crates.

A worker w h o drives a truck w i thin a city or industrial area to transport materi­
als, merchandise,
equipment, or men between various types of establishments such as: manu­
facturing plants, freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and retail establishments and/or b e ­
tween retail establishments and customers* houses or places of business. Duties may also in­
volve loading or unloading truck w ith or without helpers, making minor mechanical repairs,
and keeping truck in good working order. This classification does not include driver-salesmen
or over-the-road drivers.
For wage study purposes,
the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies
according to size and type of equipment operated, as follows:
Truck
Trdok
Truck
Truck

driver,
driver,
driver,
driver,

truck drivers

light (under l£ tons)
medium (l£ to and including k tons)
heavy (over k tons, trailer type)
heavy (over k tons, other than trailer type)

SHIPPING-AND*RECEIVING CLERK
TRUCKER, POWER

A worker who prepares merchandise for shipment,
or who receives and is responsible
for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials. Shipping work involves: a knowledge
of shipping procedures,
practices, routes,
available means of transportation and rates; and
preparing records of the goods shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and ship­
ping charges,
and keeping a file of shipping records. May, in addition, direct or assist in
preparing the merchandise for shipment. Receiving work generally involves: verifying or d i ­
recting others in verifying the correctness of shipments against bills of lading,
invoices,
or other records;
checking for shortages and rejecting damaged goods; routing merchandise or
materials to proper departments: and maintaining necessary records and files.
For wage study purposes, the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies these workers on
the following basis:




Shipping clerk
Receiving clerk
Shipping.rand~receiving clerk

A worker w ho operates a manually-controlled gasoline or electric-powered truck or
tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant
or other establishment.
For wage study purposes,
the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies workers accord­
ing to type of truck operated, as follows:
Truckers, power (fork-lift)
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift)
WATCHMAN
A worker wh o guards premises of plant property, warehouses,
office buildings,
or
banks. Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property against fire, theft, and
Illegal entry.

Meat Products, Independent Producers

Industrial Chemicals - Continued
C H E M I C A L OPERA T O R - C o n t i n u e d

BUTCHER,

GE N E R A L - K I L L I N G D E P A R T M E N T S

A w o rker w h o p e r f o r m s
al l or m o s t of the o p e r ations i n s l a u g h t e r i n g
cattle, hogs,
sheep, or calves.
E m p l o y e d f o r t h e m o s t p a r t in small establis h m e n t s w h e r e s p e c i a l i z a t i o n is
impractical, general b u t c h e r s may, in addition to t heir duties in the k i l l i n g department, also
do me a t cutting.
CUTTER,

G E NERAL - C U T T I N G D E P A R T M E N T S

A wo r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s a l l o r m o s t of the operations
n e c e s s a r y to cut a nd bo n e the
various cuts of meat, g e n e r a l l y b e i n g
e m p l o y e d in a small e s t a b l i s h m e n t w here s p e c i a l i z a t i o n
is impractical.
This c l a s s i f i c a t i o n does n o t include w o r kers
who perform specialized opera­
tions such as h a m t r i m m i n g or r i b - b o n i n g or w o r k e r s w h o do only the initial cutting.

q u a l i t y and q u a n t i t y of the p r o d u c t a nd the. equipment.
M a y al s o co o r d i n a t e the v a r i o u s f u n c ­
tions of other operators a n d he l p e r s to achieve a r e q u i r e d f l o w of work.
Class B - A w o r k e r w h o works at assigned
equi p m e n t or p o s i t i o n of a c h e m i c a l r e a c ­
t i o n process wh e r e the o p erations involve physical and/or c h e m i c a l changes u n d e r h i g h l y c r i t ical pressure, v a c u u m or t e m p erature limits.
The w o r k e r m a y p e r f o r m a n y of the specific duties of the class A op e r a t o r t u t requires guidance in the i n t e r p r e t a t i o n
of t ests a n d o b s e r ­
v a tions in s e t ting a n d r e g u l a t i n g controls a n d in m a k i n g out re p o r t s o n o p e r a t i o n s or
A w o r k e r w h o o p erates prima r i l y

one type

of e q u i p m e n t

under

atmospheric

or l o w

pre s s u r e control w i t h i n r e l a t i v e l y b r o a d l i m i t s .
A w o r k e r m a y d irect one or several helpers.

PACKER,

SAUSAGE
C H E M I C A L OPE R A T O R H E L P E R

A worker who
pac k s s ausage in boxes,
cartons, or other
containers a n d w h o s e w o r k
involves:
setting up p a p e r b o x e s or cartons;
w r a p p i n g sausage in paper; p a c k i n g sausage in
boxes, cartons or oth e r containers; w e i g h i n g packages; a n d a t t a c h i n g labels a n d t ags to p a c k ­
ages.
SAUSAGE M A K E R
A worker who prepares
s ausage meat, a n d who s e w o r k involves m o s t of the following:
w e igh i n g out various meats, spices a n d ot h e r ingredients a c c o r d i n g t o formula; u s i n g
grinder
and chopper in cutt i n g the m e a t to size;
u s i n g a m i x i n g m a c h i n e in b l e n d i n g the ingredients;
a nd cooking sausage meat.

A worker who
perfo r m s a va r i e t y of simple a n d s t a n d a r d
tas k s a s s i g n e d t o h i m b y a
c h emical operator.
The w o r k of the h elper
involves»m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : a s s i s t i n g in the
moving, handling, du m p i n g a n d w e i g h i n g of materials; l o a d i n g equipment; t a k i n g simple r e c o r d ­
ings of
tempe r a t u r e a n d pressure under the d i r e ction of c h e m i c a l operators; c l e a n i n g w o r k i n g
area; r e m o v i n g f i n i s h e d produ c t s f r o m equipment; a nd cle a n i n g or w a s h i n g equipment.
This c l a s s i f i c a t i o n includes all h e l p e r s to chemical equipment operators, r e g a r d l e s s
of w h e t h e r the op e r a t o r is assig n e d to a specific type of a p p a r a t u s o r is e n g a g e d i n c o n t r o l ing the o p e r a t i o n of a Beries of equipment.

SHACKLER - K I L L I N G D E P A R T M E N T S

Paints and V arnishes

A work e r w h o a t taches one e n d of
a s h ackling c h a i n to
a h i n d leg of a nimal
to be
slaughtered
a nd attaches the o t h e r e n d to a h o i s t w h i c h lifts the shack l e d a n i m a l into p o s i ­
tion f o r the sticking operation.
A c o m m o n type of h o i s t i n g e q uipment consists of a rev o l v i n g
drum w h i c h raises the s h a c k l e d a n i m a l to a r a i l conveyor.

L A B E L E R A N D PAC K E R
A worker who pastes
identifying labels o n
cans or o t h e r co n t a i n e r s
b y h a n d or b y
m e a n s of a l a b e l i n g m achine, a n d / o r who packs l abeled c o ntainers into b o x e s or c a r t o n s .
MIXER

I n d u s t r i a l Chemicals
(Batchmaker;

compounder)

CHEMI C A L OPERATOR
A wor k e r w h o
p r o d u c e s f i n a l or intermediate
specifications p r e p a r e d b y a p r o f e s s i o n a l chemist.

c h emical produ c t s

in

acco r d a n c e w i t h

Class A - A w o r k e r w h o o p erates one type of equip m e n t or directs a chemi c a l proc e s s
comprising
several types
of c h e m i c a l e q u i p m e n t where
the r e a c t i o n involves p h y s i c a l a nd/or
chemical changes w i t h i n h i g h l y critical, p ressure, v a c u u m a n d/or tem p e r a t u r e limits a n d w hose
wo r k involves m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g :
d e t e r m i n i n g p r o p e r p r o p o r t i o n s of m a t e r i a l s a c c o r d i n g
to formulae or specifications; m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y st a n d a r d calculations; sett i n g a n d re g u l a t i n g
controls f o r temperature, p r e s s u r e o r f l o w of materials; o b s e r v i n g controls a n d m a k i n g n e c e s ­
sary adjustments;
using measuring and
t e s t i n g instruments
to ch e c k
q u a l i t y of
operation;
keepi n g o p e r ational r e c ords
a n d m a k i n g out reports o n operations; a n d r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the




or solids)

A w o r k e r w h o operates one or m o r e m i x i n g m a c h i n e s in w h i c h c o m p o n e n t p a r t s (liquids
are b l e n d e d or m i x e d in controlled amounts
to p r o d u c e int e r m e d i a t e
or finished

products.
TECHNICIAN
(Assistant chemist)
A w o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s p r edetermined
chemical tests,
f o r example,
to
ascertain
w h e t h e r p u r c h a s e d r a w m a t e r i a l s m e e t plant specifications, or to d e t e r m i n e w h e t h e r p r o c e s s i n g
is b e i n g p e r f o r m e d a c c o r d i n g to p l a n t standards or s p e c i f i c a t i o n s . U s u a l l y is a c o llege g r a d ­
uate in c h e m i s t r y or h as equi v a l e n t training a nd experience.

u

Foundries, Ferrous - Continued

Paints and Varnishes - Continued
TINTER
(Color matcher, enamel maker)

COREMAKER, HAND - Continued

A worker who colors or tints paints, and whose work involves a combination of the
following:
blending basic color pigments in correct proportions to match standard color
sample or according to specifications; using hand paddle or power mixer to mix ingredients
thoroughly;
checking weight and/or viscosity of batch against sample or specifications, and
making necessary additions to mixture to meet requirements.
In addition, may add thinner to
ground paint.

core; packing and ramming core sand solidly ±rto box, using shovels, hands, and tamping tools;
selecting and setting vent wires and reinforcing wires into cores;
determining appropriate
sand blends and moisture content of sand required for a particular core;
removing core box
from core and repairing damage to impressions; baking cores to harden them;
and assembling
cores of more than one section.

TRUCKER, HAM)

MOLDER, FLOOR

A worker who pushes or pulls hand trucks, cars or wheelbarrows used for transport­
ing goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other estab­
lishment,
and usually loads or unloads hand trucks or wheelbarrows. May stack materials in
storage bins, etc., and may keep records of materials moved.

A worker who shapes large molds or mold sections b y hand on the foundry floor or in
a pit, b y ramming or packing sand around a pattern placed in a flask, and whose work involves
most of the following: selecting and assembling appropriate flasks and patterns and position­
ing patterns in flasks for a variety of molds;
determination of appropriate sand blends and
moisture content of sand required for different molds; packing and ramming sand around pattern;
drawing pattern and smoothing mold; selecting and setting in position appropriate cores; deter­
mination of appropriate gating, venting reinforcing and facing required for particular mold;
assembling mold sections into complete mold; using such molder's hand tools as riddles, rammers,
trowels,
slicks, lifters, bellows and mallets in compacting and smoothing of mold; directing
the pouring of the molten metal into mold,
and operation of crane in lifting and moving of
mold or mold sections.

VARNISH MAKER
(Kettleman; oil cooker; varnish cooker)
A worker who cooks necessary ingredients such as resins and gums in kettle to make
various types c f varnishes and oils according to specifications, and whose work involves? regu­
a
lating controls for temperature;
adding ingredients according to formula or other specifica­
tions checking viscosity cf batch and determining when it meets the standard sample.
In addi­
tion, m a y also add thinner to the mixture.
See also definition for Mixer.

Foundries, Ferrous
CHlRREK AND GRINDER
(Air hammerman; bench grinder; chipper; disc grinder; face grinder; portable-grinder
operator; power-chisel operator; shaft grinder; snagger; stand grinder; swing-frame
grinder)
Operates one or more types of chipping or grinding equipment in removing undesirable
projections or surplus metal (fins, burrs, gates, risers, weld seams) from sand- or die-cast­
ings, forgings, or welded units.
The more common types of equipment employed for such oper­
ations include pneumatic chisels, portable grinding tools, stand grinders,
and swing-frame
grinders.
A variety of hand tools including hammers, cold chisels, hand files and saws may
also be utilized b y the operator
in his work.
This classification includes workers who spe­
cialize on either chipping or grinding work, as well as those who perform both types of oper­
ations .
COREMAKER, HAND
A worker who shapes b y hand (on bench or floor) varying cores used in molds to form
hollows andhdLes in metal castings, and whose work requires most of the following: selecting
appropriate
core boxes and work sequence;
cleaning core boxes with compressed air or hand
bellows and dusting parting sand over inside of core box to facilitate removal of finished




MOLDER, HAND, BENCH
A worker who shapes small and medium-sized molds
(or component sections of a mold
that are assembled ±ito complete units) by hand on a bench, b y ramming and packing sand around
patterns placed in flasks, and whose work involves most of the following:
selecting and as­
sembling appropriate flasks and patterns for varying molds; determination of appropriate sand
blends and moisture content of sand required far different types of molds; packing and ramming
green sand, dry sand or loam around patterns; drawing patterns and smoothing molds; selecting
and setting cores in position; determination of the types of gating necessary for the molds;
finishing molds b y performing such operations as facing, venting, and reinforcing; assembling
'mold sections to form complete molds; selecting and using such molder's hand tools as riddles,
trowels, slicks, lifters, bellows and mallets in packing and smoothing of molds or mold sec­
tions; and directing the pouring of the molten metals.
MOLDER, MACHINE
A worker who shapes molds or mold sections on any of several types of molding m a ­
chines, such as roll-over, jarring, and squeeze machines, and whose work involves most of the
following:
selecting and assembling appropriate flasks and patterns and positioning pattern
in flasks; filling flasks with sand and ramming of sand around pattern with ramming tool or
b y mechanical means;
determination of appropriate sand blends and moisture content of sand
required for particular molds;
preparing molds for drawing of patterns, and repairing damage
to mold impressions in sand; selecting and setting in position appropriate cores; determina­
tion of appropriate venting, gating,
reinforcing and facing required;
assembling upper and
lower sections of molds, and guiding or assisting in the pouring of the molten metal into the
mold.

Fabricated Structural Steel and Ornamental Metal W o r k - Continued

Foundries, Ferrous - Continued

FITTER, STRUCTURAL
PATTERNMAKER, WOOD
A worker who builds wooden patterns, core boxes or match plates, and whose work in­
volves most of the following:
planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, or
models; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work; using a variety of
patternmaker’s hand tools such as saws, planes, chisels, gauges, and mallets; operating vari­
ous woodworking machines
such as band saws, circular saws, borers, routers,
lathe planers,
drill presses, senders, and shapers; checking work with calipers, rules, protractors, squares,
straight-edges, and other measuring instruments; assembling patterns and sections of patterns
by gluing, nailing, screwing, and doweling;
working to required tolerances and allowances,
and selecting the materials for the construction of a particular pattern.
May also make
sweeps (templates) for making molds by the sweep-molding method.
In general the work of the
patternmaker requires a rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
SHAKE-OUT MAN

A worker who, working in an establishment, assembles and/or fits up structural steel
shapes used in the fabrication of buildings, towers, bridges and other structures.
The work
includes assembling of processed structural steel members In preparation for riveting or we l d ­
ing operations, and joining parts together to see that they are properly processed for a s ­
sembly by other workers at the construction site.
Class A - A worker who is required to assemble and fit up a variety of types of
structural work; to work from blueprints, drawings or other written specifications; to plan
assembly procedures; and to use hand tools and measuring devices in the performance of his work.
Class B - A worker who is required to assemble structural units requiring little or
no fitting; to do repetitive types of assembling operations according to procedures establish­
ed b y others; and to use hand tools and measuring devices in the performance of his work.
FLAME-CUTTING-MACHINE OPERATOR

A worker who removes castings from the molds in which they were cast, and whose work
involves one or more of the following:
releasing clamps holding sections of flask together,
separating the sections and breaking the sand mold from the castings, using a steel bar or
sledge hammer,
or removing castings from the sand with the aid of metal hooks;
operating a
vibrating shake-out screen In removing sand and castings from flasks; using a pneumatic shaker
which, when attached to the flask,
jars or jolts it until the mold has crumbled; using a
vibratory air-hammer to remove the sand and castings; shaking loosely adhering sand from cast­
ings; and shoveling sand shaken from molds into a pile.

(Acetylene-burning-machine operator; machine-burner operator)
A worker who cuts steel plate into various designs and shapes, using h and guided or
automatic flame-cutting machines,
and whose work involves most of the following:
laying of
template or blueprint of layout on table top adjacent to machine, or making layout of design;
positioning work for operations; adjusting burner tip of cutting torch, regulating flame and
speed of machine according to thickness of metal; and positioning guide wheels of machine
against a template, or tracing course of cutting torch w ith a pantograph In producing desired
cuts.

TRUCKER, HAND
(See Paints and Varnishes, page kk, for description.)

Fabricated Structural Steel and Ornamental Metal W o r k
CRANE OPERATOR, ELECTRIC BRIDGE
(Overhead-crane operator; traveling-crane operator)
A worker who lifts and moves heavy objects with an electrically powered hoist which
is mounted on a metal bridge, and runs along overhead rails.
The work of the operator in­
volves:
closing switch to turn on electricity; moving electrical controller levers and brake
pedal to r u n t * crane bridge along overhead rails, to run the hoisting trolley back and forth
across the bridge, and to raise and lower hie load line and anything attached to it.
(Motions
of crane are usually carried out in response to signals from other workers,
on the ground.)
For wage study purposes, in this industry crane operators are classified as:




Crane operators, electric bridge (under 10 tons)
Crane operators, electric bridge (10 tons and over)

LAY-OUT MAN
A worker who outlines guide marks on structural steel, plate, castings, sheet-metal
or other metal shapes for subsequent processing and fabrication, b y indicating guide lines,
centers, reference points,
dimensions and processing instructions
on the surface of metal
part.
Class A - A lay-out me n whose work involves most of the following: laying out from
blueprints or drawings; making shop computations to locate guide lines,
reference points,
centers of punch marks;
preparing the surface of metal objects for lay-out;
working on a
variety of products of various sizes and shapes;
indicating detailed instructions to p r o ­
cessing workers; end using hand tools and measuring Instruments.
Class B - A lay-out m e n whose work involves any combination of the following: using
templates in indicating reference points or guide lines; working from drawings on repetitive
lay-outs; providing simple instructions to processing workers; and using hand tools end me a s ­
uring instruments.
POWER-SHEAR OPERATOR
A worker who operates one car more types of power shears to cut metal sheets, plates,
bars, rods and other metal shapes to size or length.

Fabricated Structural Steel and Ornamental Metal W o r k - Continued

POWER-SHEAR OPERATOR - Continued

Fabricated Structural Steel and Ornamental Metal W o r k - Continued

WELDER, MACHINE - Continued

Class A - A worker who is required to set up and operate power-shear equipment,
under general supervision only,
and whose work involves most of the following: working from
blueprints or drawings or to material requisition lists; planning and lay-out of work; selec­
ting and utilizing material to avoid excessive scrap;
setting stop gauges, aligning material
and performing shearing operation on machine;
shearing large or heavy material to lay-out or
specified dimensions;
and performing shearing operations involving angular or circular cuts.
Class B - A worker who is required to operate power-shears on straight shearing
operations performed on a repetitive basis where accuracy is not an important consideration
and where
setting up is limited to setting stop gauges for size of stock desired or is done
b y others.

determination of number and spacing of welds; positioning and welding units
fixtures; and using such hand tools as hammers, pliers, files and wrenches.

with or without

Class B - A worker who operates resistance-welding apparatus and whose work involves
the following: performing repetitive welding operations on standard units where current set­
tings and electrodes are prescribed or set b y others; and using fixtures for positioning work
or positioning b y hand small parts requiring simple welding operations.

Machinery Industries
WELDER, HARD
ASSEMBLER
A worker who fuses (welds) metal objects together by means of an oxyacetylene torch
or arc welding apparatus in the fabrication of metal shapes and in repairing broken or cracked
metal objects.
In addition to performing hand welding or brazing operation, he may also lay
out guide lines or marks on metal parts and may cut metal with a cutting torch.
Class A - Worker who performs welding operations requiring most of the following;
planning and laying out of work from drawings, blueprints or other written specifications;
knowledge of welding properties of a variety of metals and alloys; setting up of work and de­
termining operation sequence; welding of high pressure vessels or other objects involving cri­
tical safety and load requirements;
working from a variety of positions; and ability to weld
with gas or arc apparatus.
Class B - Worker who is required to perform either arc or gas welding operations on
t jV i c

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calls mainly for one position welding; and where the layout and planning of the work are p e r ­
formed b y others.
WELDER, MACHINE
(Butt welder; flash welder; seam welder; spot welder)
A worker who operates one or more types of resistance welding apparatus to weld
(bond) together metal objects such as bars, pipes, and plates. Resistance welding is a proc­
ess wherein an electric current is passed through the parts to be welded at the point of con­
tact,
and mechanical pressure is applied forcing the contact surfaces together at the points
to be joined.
Welding machines are generally designated according to type of weld performed
and arrangement of welding surfaces of parts to be joined.
Welds may be made on overlapping
units in the form of one or more spots (spot welding) or lineally b y using a rolling electrode
(seam w e l d i n g ) . Machine welding of units where the edges are brought together without lapping
is referred to as butt welding.
Class A - A worker who operates resistance-welding apparatus end whose work involves
most of the following:
working from lay-out or other specifications;
knowledge of welding
properties of a variety of metals and alloys; selecting and setting up work-holding fixtures
and electrodes; determination of proper pressures, temperatures, timing, and flow of current;




(Bench assembler; floor assembler; jig assembler; line assembler; sub-assembler)
A worker who assembles and/or fits together parts to form complete units or subas­
semblies at a bench, conveyor line, or on the floor, depending upon the size of the units and
the organization of the production process.
The work of the assembler may include processing
operations requiring the use of hand tools in scraping, chipping and filing of parts to obtain
a desired fit as well as power tools and special equipment when punching, riveting, soldering
or welding of parts is necessary.
Workers who perform any of these processing operations ex­
clusively as part of specialized assembling operations are not included in this classification.
Class A - A worker who assembles parts into complete units or subassemblies that r e ­
quire fitting of parts and decisions regarding proper performance of any component part or the
assembled unit, and whose work involves any combination of the following:
assembling from
drawings, blueprints or other written specifications; assembling units composed of a variety
of parts and/or subassemblies; assembling large units requiring careful fitting and adjusting
of parts to obtain specified clearances;
and using a variety of hand and powered tools and
precision measuring instruments.
Class B - A worker who assembles parts
into units or subassemblies in accordance
with standard and prescribed procedures, and whose work involves any combination of the fol­
lowing:
assembling a limited range of standard and familiar products composed of a number of
small or medium-sized parts requiring some fitting or adjusting; assembling large units that
require little or no fitting of component parts; working under conditions where accurate per­
formance and completion of work within set time limits are essential for subsequent assem­
bling operations; and using a limited variety of hand or powered tools.
Class C - A worker who performs short-cycle, repetitive assembling operations, and
whose work does not involve any fitting or making decisions regarding proper performance of
the component parts or assembling procedures.
DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MULTIPLE-SPINDLE
Performs such operations as drilling, reaming, countersinking, counterboring, spot­
facing and tapping on one or more types of single-spindle or multiple-spindle drill presses.

Machinery Industries - Continued

Machinery Industries - Continued

DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MULTIPLE-SPINDLE - Continued
This classification includes operators of all types
radial-drill presses and portable drilling equipment.

ENGINE-LATHE OPERATOR - Continued
of drill presses

other than

Operator m ay be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.

Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine for operations requiring care­
ful positioning, blocking and aligning of units;
to determine speeds, feeds, tooling and op­
eration sequence; and to make all necessary adjustments during operation to achieve requisite
dimensions or

Class B - Operator who is required to maintain operation set up b y others, b y m a k ­
ing all necessary adjustments, where care is essential to achieve very close tolerances or

Operator vho is required to set up machine where speeds, feeds, tooling and opera­
tion sequence are prescribed but whose work involves very difficult operations
such as deep
drilling, or boring to exacting specifications.
Class B - Operator who is required to set up machine on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed;
and to make all necessary ad­
justments during operation or
Operator who is required to maintain set-up made by others,
including making all
necessary adjustments during operation on work requiring considerable care on the part of the
operator to maintain specified tolerances.
Class C - Operator who is required only to operate machine,
on routine and repeti­
tive operations;
to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to
stop the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up m an to correct the operation.
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
(See Maintenance and Bower Plant, page 1*0, for description.)

Operator who is required to set up machine on standard or roughing operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed;
and to make adjustments during
operation.
Operator may be required to recognize
to select proper coolants and cutting oils.

when tools need dressing, to dress tools and

Class C - Operator who is required only to operate machine on routine and repetitive
operations!
to make only minor adjustments during operation; and wh e n trouble occurs to stop
the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.
GRINDING-MACHINE OPERATOR
(Centerless-grinder operator; cylindrical-grinder operator; external-grinder opera­
tor; internal-grinder operator; surface-grinder operator; Universal-grinder operator)
A worker who operates one of several types of precision grinding machines to grind
internal and external surfaces of metal parts to a smooth and even finish and to required
dimensions.
Precision grinding is used primarily as a finishing operation on previously m a ­
chined parts, and consists of applying abrasive wheels rotating at'high speed to the surfaces
to be ground.

ENGINE-LATHE OPERATOR
Operates an engine lathe for shaping external and internal cylindrical surfaces of
metal objects. Tie engine lathe, basically characterized b y a headstock, tailstock, and powerfed tool carriage, is a general-purpose machine tool used primarily for turning.
It is also
commonly used in performing such operations as facing, boring, drilling, and threading; and,
equipped with appropriate attachments,
it may be used for a very wide variety of -special m a ­
chining operations. The stock may be held in position by the lathe "centers” or by various
types of chucks and fixtures.
This classification excludes operators of bench lathes, automatic lathes, automaticscrew machines, and hand-turret lathes and hand-screw machines.
Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds, tool­
ing and operation sequence;
and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve
requisite dimensions or
Operator who is required to set up machine from drawings, blueprints or layout, in
accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence and to make necessary
adjustments during operation where changes in work and set-up are frequent and where care is
essential to achieve very close tolerances.




In addition to the types of grinding machines
indicated above, this classification
includes operators of other production grinding machines such as:
single-purpose grinders,
(drill grinders, broach grinders, saw grinders, gear cutter grinders, thread grinders, etc.),
and automatic and semi-automatic general purpose grinding machines.
Class A - A n operator who is required to set up machine;
to select feeds, speeds,
tooling and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve
requisite dimensions or
A n operator who is required to set up machine from drawings or blueprints or lay-out
in accordance with prescribed feeds,
speeds, tooling and operation sequence and to make n e c ­
essary adjustments during operation where changes in work and set-up are frequent and where
care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - A n operator who is required to set up machine on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are either prescribed or are known from past
experience;
to make adjustments during operation;
and to maintain prescribed tolerances or

Machinery Industries - Continued

Machinery Industries - Continued

GRINDING-MACHINE OPERATOR - Continued

MACHINIST,

A n operator -who is required to maintain operation set up "by others, b y making all
necessary adjustments, 'where considerable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.

tions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist's hand
tools and precision measuring instruments;
setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to di­
mensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds cf machining; understanding of the working proper­
ties of the common metals; and selecting standard materials, parts and equipment needed for
his work.
In general, the m a c hinist’s work normally requires a rounded training in machineshop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience .

Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing,
to select coolants and cutting oils.

to dress tools and

Class C - A n operator who is required only o operate machine on routine and repeti­
tive operations;
to make only minor adjustments dur: ig operation; and when trouble occurs to
stop the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or se“ -up man to correct the operation.

PRODUCTION - Continued

MILLING-MACHINE OPERATOR
INSPECTOR
(Milling-machine operator, automatic; milling-machine operator, hand)
A worker who performs such operations as examining parts or products for flaws and
defects, and checking their dimensions and appearance to determine whether they meet the r e ­
quired standards and specifications.
Class -A - A worker who inspects parts, products, and/or processes with responsi­
bility for~decisions regarding the quality of the product and/or operations,
and whose work
involves any combination of the following:
thorough knowledge of the processing operations
in the branch of work to which he is assigned,
including the use of a variety of precision
measuring instruments;
interpreting drawings and specifications in inspection work on units
composed of a large number of component parts;
examining a variety of products or processing
operations; determining causes of flaws in products and/or processes and suggesting necessary
changes to correct work methods; and devising inspection procedures for new products.
Class B - A worker who inspects parts, products, and/or processes and whose work
involves any combination of the following:
knowledge of processing operations in the branch
of w ork to which he is assigned, limited to familiar products and processes or where perform­
ance
is dependent on past experience;
performing inspection operations on products and/or
processes having rigid specifications, but where the inspection procedures
involving a se­
quence of inspection operations,
including decisions regarding proper fit or performance of
some parts; and using precision measuring instruments.
Class C - A worker who inspects parts, products and/or processes and whose work in­
volves any combination of the following: short-cycle, repetitive inspection operations; using
a standardized, special-purpose measuring instrument repetitively;
and visual examination of
parts or products, rejecting units having obvious deformities or flaws.

Performs a variety of work such as grooving, planing, and shaping metal objects on
a milling machine, which removes material from metal surfaces by the cutting action of multi­
toothed rotating cutters of various sizes and shapes.
Milling-machine types vary from the manually controlled machines employed
production to fully automatic (conveyor-fed) machines found in plants engaged in mass
tion.
This classification includes operators of all types of milling machines except
purpose millers such as thread millers,
duplicators, die sinkers, pantograph millers
graving millers.

in unit
produc­
single­
and en­

Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds, tool­
ing and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve req­
uisite dimensions or
Operator who is required to set up machine from drawings, blueprints, or lay-out in
accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence, and to make neces­
sary adjustments during operation where changes in work and set up are frequent and where con­
siderable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator ma y be required to recognize when tools need dfeasing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - Operator who is required to set up machines on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; to make adjustments during oper­
ation; and to maintain prescribed tolerances or

JANITOR
(Sweeper; cleaner)

Operator who is required to maintain operation set up by others, b y making all n e ­
cessary adjustments, where considerable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.

A worker who sweeps and cleans shop areas, washrooms and offices, and removes waste
and refuse.
May wash floors and windows.

Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting oils.

MACHINIST, PRODUCTION

Class C - Operator who is required to operate only, on routine and repetitive oper­
ations;
to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop m a ­
chine and call on foreman, leadman or set-up man to correct the operation.

A worker who is required to fabricate metal parts involving a series of progressive
operations and whose work involves most of the following:
understanding of written ins true-




Machinery Industries - Continued

Department and Clothing Stores - Continued
SALES C L E R K - C o n t i n u e d

T O OL - A N D - D I E MA K E R
(Die maker;

jig maker;

to o l maker; f i xture maker;

gauge maker)

A work e r w h o c o n s tructs
a n d repa i r s m a c h i n e - s h o p t o o l s , gauges, jigs,
f i x t u r e s or
dies f o r forgings, p u n c h i n g a n d oth e r m e t a l - f o r m i n g work, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves m o s t of the
following:
p l a n n i n g a n d l a y i n g out of w o r k f r o m models,
blueprints, drawings or other oral
a nd w r i t t e n specifications;
u s i n g a v a r i e t y of t o o l - and-die m a k e r ’s h a n d tools a n d p r e c i s i o n
m e a s u r i n g instruments;
u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the w o r k i n g pr o p e r t i e s
of c o m m o n me t a l s a n d alloys;
setting up and o p e r a t i n g of m a c h i n e tools a n d r e l a t e d equipment; m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y shop c o m p u ­
tations relat i n g to d i mensions of work,
speed, feeds, a n d t o o l i n g of machines; h e a t - t r e a t i n g
of m e t a l parts during f a b r i c a t i o n as w e l l as of f i n i s h e d
tools a n d dies
to achieve r e q u i r e d
qualities;
w o r k i n g to close tolerances; f i t t i n g and a s s e m b l i n g of parts to p r e s c r i b e d t o l e r ­
ances and allowances; a n d s e l e c t i n g a p p r o p r i a te materials,
tools a n d processes.
In general,
the t o o l - and-die ma k e r ' s w o r k requ i r e s a r o u n d e d t r a i n i n g in m a c h i n e - s h o p
a nd t o o l r o o m p r a c ­
tice
u s u a l l y ac q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p or e q uivalent t r a i n i n g a n d experience.
F o r wage study purposes,

the B u r e a u of Lab o r Statistics classifies w o rkers b y type

of shop, as follows:
T o o l - a n d - d i e makers,
T o o l - a n d - d i e makers,

jobbing shops
other t h a n jobbing shops

F o r wage s tudy purposes,
the B u r e a u of L abor S t atistics cl a s s i f i e s
department, as follows:
Bedspreads, draperies, blankets
Bl o u s e s a n d neckw e a r
B o y s ’ c l othing
B o y s ’ furnishings
F l o o r coverings
Fu r n i t u r e a nd b e d d i n g
Housew a r e s (except china, glassware and lamps)
M a j o r appliances (refrigerators, stoves, w a shers, e t c . ;
excludes radios and television)
Men's clothing
Men's f u r n i shings
Notions, trimmings
Piece goods (yard goods, u p h o lstery fabrics)
Silverware a n d jewelry (excluding costume jewelry)
Women's a c cessories (hosiery, gloves, handbags)
Women's a n d m i s s e s ’ dresses
W omen's shoes
W o m e n ’s a n d misses' suits a n d coats

sales clerks b y

SEWER, ALTERATION, W O M E N ' S GARMENTS
WELDER,

HAND

(Operator;

seamstress)

(See F a b r i c a t e d S t r u c t u r a l S teel a nd Or n a m e n t a l M e t a l W o r k , page ^6,
for description.)

D e p a r t m e n t a n d Cl o t h i n g Stores

CASHIER - W R A P P E R
A wo r k e r w h o wr a p s a n d re c e i v e s p a ym e n t f o r merchandise.
The duties of this w o r k e r
involve m o s t of the following:
r e c e i v i n g payment,
m e rchandise, a n d sales c h e c k f r o m s ales­
p e r s o n or customer;
reviewing salescheck for
correct computations;
m a k i n g change; checking
salesc h e c k against m e r c h a n d i s e f o r price,
quality, size, color, imperfections; w r a p p i n g m e r ­
chandise; a t t aching addr e s s la b e l if m e r c h a n d i s e is to b e sent.

E L E V A T O R OPERATOR, P A S S E N G E R
(See Custodial, W a r e h o u s i n g a n d S h i p p i n g , p age

^1, f o r description.)

A w o r k e r w ho makes alterations on w o m e n ’s dresses, coats, or suits.
Typical alter­
ations include such items as taking-up hems, shortening sleeves, t a k i n g - i n side seams, c h a n g ­
ing shoulder seams,
a n d felling, in accordance wi t h m arkings on ga r m e n t
or instructions r e ­
c eived f r o m fitter.
The w o r k of the sewer involves most of the f o l l o w i n g :
r i p p i n g seams or
linings;
r e - c u t t i n g fabric; b a s t i n g in p o s i t i o n for sewing;
re-sewing by hand
or machine.
M a y also press n e w seams,
or press garment w i t h ha n d iron or p r e s s i n g
machine wh e n altera­
tions are completed.
TAILOR, ALTERATION,

M E N ' S GARMENTS

A w o r k e r w h o m akes alterations on m en's coats, suits,
t r o u s e r s a n d vests.
Typical
a l terations include
such items as r e m o deling shoulders and necklines, r e - s e t t i n g sleeves a n d
collars,
t a k i n g - i n side seems, and felling,
in accordance w i t h
m a r k i n g s on garm e n t
or i n ­
structions r e c e i v e d f r o m fitter.
The w o r k of the altera t i o n t a i l o r involves m o s t of the f o l ­
lowing:
r i p p i n g seams a n d linings,
re-cutting fabric, b a s t i n g in p o s i t i o n " f o r sewing, ~re^
sewing b y h a n d or machine.
M a y a lso press
n e w seams,
or press garm e n t
w i t h h a n d i r o n or
p r e s s i n g m a c h i n e w h e n alterations are completed.

SALES C L E R K
A w o r k e r w h o sells m e r c h a n d i s e
in a n a s s i g n e d depart m e n t of a
store or i n a store
spe c ializing in one
or a f e w items.
D e t e r m i n e s m e r c h a n d i s e d e s ired b y customer,
assists in
selection, explains a n d d e m o n s t r a t e s va r i o u s qualities of the m e r c h andise,
r e ceives payment,
and m a k e s out salescheck.
M a y a l s o do o w n c a s h i e r i n g a n d w r a p p i n g a n d a s s i s t in s t ocking a n d
displaying merchandise.




Banks

B O O K K E E P I N G - M A C H I N E OPERATOR
( S e e Off i c e , p age

37> for description.)

50.

Hotels - Continued

Banks - Continued

TELLER,

PAYING,

OB P A Y I N G A N D R E C E I V I N G ,

E L E V A T O R OPERATOR,

C O MMER C I A L

C a s h e s c u s t o m e r s 1 p e r s o n a l or o t her checks.
M a y also r e ceive deposits o n c h ecking
a c c o u n t s a n d m a k e e n t r i e s in . c u s t o m e r s 1 a c c o u n t books.
Writes up or signs depo s i t slips to be
u s e d l a t e r in b a l a n c i n g bo o k s .
M a y r e c o r d the dai l y transactions
a n d b a l a n c e accounts.
May
s u p e r v i s e one or m o r e c l erks w h o r e c o r d d e t ails of transactions, such as names, dates, serial
num b e r s , a n d a m o u n t s i n v o l v e d so t h a t p e r t i n e n t data m a y be distr i b u t e d a m o n g the several d e ­
partments for recording,
fi l i n g , a n d clearing.
M a y a lso handle wit h d r a w a l s
a n d deposits on
sav i n g s a c c o unts.
F o r wage study purposes,
t e l l e r s are class .fied
s e r v i c e w i t h the e s t a b l i s h m e n t as follows:

on the b a s i s of th e i r

length

PAS S E N G E R

(See Custodial, W a r e h o u s i n g a n d Shipping, pa g e

k l,

f o r description.)

HOUSEMAN
M oves a n d arranges furniture; pre p a r e s rooms f o r renovations; sets up sample rooms,
m e e t i n g rooms a n d b a n q u e t rooms; obtains a d d i t i o n a l fur n i t u r e a n d fur n i s h i n g s f r o m storage in
respo n s e
to r equests of
guests m a d e
th r o u g h Hou s e k e e p e r or
other supervisor.
In smaller
h o t e l s m a y p e r f o r m h e a v i e r d e e m i n g operations in lob b y a n d halls a n d m a y wa s h windows.

of

U n d e r 5 years* service
5 o r m o r e years* service

MAID,

CHAMBER
(Room maid)

P e rforms r o utine duties, clean i n g a n d servicing of g u e s t ’s r ooms u n d e r close s uper­
v i s i o n of housekeeper.
M a y a l s o c l e a n baths.
Hotels
Po w e r Laundries

CASHIER
Receives m o n e y f r o m customers
or company employees in p a y m e n t
of accounts, bills,
i t e m i z e d lists,
o r sales tickets.
M a k e s nece s s a r y change.
Balances
cash r e c e i v e d a g a inst
ca s h r e g i s t e r
or o t h e r r e c o r d of r eceipts.
M a y issue receipts f o r m o n e y received.
M a y cash
checks.
M a y m a k e a u t h o r i z e d d i s b u r s e m e n t s . M a y make up p a y r o l l or b a n k deposits.
M a y sell
gif t c e r t i f i c a t e s .
I n some h o t e l s ,
m a y a c t as c u s t o d i a n for guest*s valuables
p l a c e d in safe deposit
box e s ,
o r le f t f o r safe keeping.
M a y a l s o p ost charges against g u e s t ’s accounts.
I n some
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , m a y a l s o w r a p pa c k a g e s .
This classification
does n o t include Cashiers
who do g e neral b o o k k e e p i n g
f o r the
establishment,
h e a d c a s h i e r s in c e n t r a l tu be rooms,
a n d sales p e r s o n n e l
w h o ma k e the i r own

CLERK, R E T A I L R E C E I V I N G
A p e r s o n w h o receives w o r k
f r o m r o u t e m e n or f r o m customers over the counter in the
r e c e i v i n g office or store of a dry - c l e a n i n g or la u n d r y es t a b l i s h m e n t
a n d whose wo r k involves
m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : M a i n t a i n i n g a r e c o r d
of articles or bu n d l e s received; returning c o m ­
p l e t e d w o r k to customers w h o call f o r it;
c o l l e c t i n g p a y m e n t a nd m a i n t a i n i n g simple records
of m o n e y received; a n d in e s t a b lishments w h e r e d r y c l e a n i n g is done, f a s t e n i n g a n identifying
m a r k e r to each article,
exam i n i n g a n a r ticle f o r defects s uch as holes, stains or tears, and
m a k i n g a r e c o r d of the ide n t i f i c a t i o n symbol a s s i g n e d to e a c h a rticle w i t h a bri e f description
of the ar t i c l e a n d of any defects noted.
This c l a s s i f i c a t i o n does n ot include store managers.
E X T R A C T O R OPERATOR

change.
(Whizzer operator)
CLERK,

DESK
( R oom clerk,

s m a l l e r hote l s )

Registers
a n d a s s i g n s r o o m s to
incoming guests and
checks out d e p a r t i n g
guests.
Maintains records
of r e s e r v a t i o n s a n d roo m s occupied.
F u r n ishes information,
r e ceives a n d
distributes mail
a n d t e l e g r a m s , a n d issues a n d accepts r oom keys.
May
supervise bellhops,
elevator operators
o r F B X op e r a t o r s .
I n the v e r y small hotels m a y h a n d l e
accounts and r e ­
ceive p a y m e n t f o r rooms.
CLERK, B O O M

ing.

R e n t s and a s s i g n s r o o m s t o p e r s o n s app l y i n g at desk, over the telephone, or i n w r i t ­
A r r a n g e s t r a n s f e r of r e g i s t e r e d gu e s ts to
other rooms.
Checks o ut
guests a n d refers

t h e m to C a s h i e r f o r p a y m e n t of bill.




A w o r k e r w h o removes surplus m o i s t u r e f r o m m a t e r i a l s (such as w et cloth, clothing,
knit goods, and yarn) b y o p e r a t i n g a n e x t r a c t o r a n d w h o s e w o r k involves m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g :
loading material
into p e r f o r a t e d d r u m of m a c h i n e b y h a n d or hoist;
c l o s i n g l i d a nd starting
machine, al l o w i n g it to r u n a p r e d e t e r m i n e d time or u n t i l f l u i d stops f l o w i n g f r o m drain; r e ­
m o v i n g p a r t l y d r i e d materials; and h a n d t r u c k i n g m a t e r i a l s w i t h i n the department.
In addition,
the w o r k e r m a y ass i s t the W a s h e r in loading, operating, o r u n l o a d i n g the w a s h i n g machine.
F I NISHER, FLATWORK, M A C H I N E
A worker
w h o pe r f o r m s f l a t w o r k f i n i s h i n g o p e r ations b y ma c h i n e
a nd w hose w o r k in­
vol v e s one or m o r e of the f o l l o w i n g : shak i n g out the creases
in semi- d r y w a s h i n g to prepare
it f o r the f l a t w o r k ironing machine; f e e d i n g clean,
d amp f l a t w o r k p i e c e s
into the flatw o r k
ironing m a c h i n e b y p l a c i n g the a rticles o n the f e e d e r rollers; a n d ca t c h i n g or r e c e i v i n g a r t i ­
cles as t h e y emerge f r o m the m a c h i n e a n d p a r t i a l l y f o l d i n g them.

51

Auto Repair Service - Continued

Power Laundries - Continued

ELECTRICIAN, A U T O M O T I V E

IDENTIFIER
A w o r k e r w h o sorts s o i l e d b u n d l e s ,
plac e s the contents
into vari o u s b a g s
and by
mean s of flags,
pins o r ot h e r devi c e s iden t i fies the n e t
w i t h a custo m e r tag or ticket.
In
a d d i t i o n m a y weigh, l i s t or co u n t some o r all a r ticles c o n t a i n e d in e a c h bundle.
This c l a s s i ­
f i c a t i o n does not
include w o r k e r s w h o m a r k o r o t herwise i d e n t i f y e a c h i n d i vidual pi e c e c o n ­
tai n e d i n a bundle.

MARKER
A worker who marks or affixes
b y h a n d or m e c h a n i c a l means,
customer
i d e n t ifying
symbols o n soiled garments, linens, o r o t h e r articles.
In a d d i t i o n m a y weigh, list, or count
articles c o n t ained in e a c h b und l e , sort c o ntents of each b u n d l e into groups a c c o r d i n g to t r e a t ­
m e n t to b e received,
or n o t e a n d r e c o r d a n y da m a g e d or st a i n e d
c o n d i t i o n of articles.
This
c l a s s i f i c a t i o n does n o t include w o r k e r s w h o do sorting, examining, or l i s t i n g w i t h o u t m a r k i n g
the v a r i o u s articles.
FRESSER, MACHINE,

SHIRT

A worker who
oper a t e s or te n d s the
o p e r a t i o n of one
or m o r e of
the seve r a l type
m ach i n e s t h a t press shirts,
a n d w h o p e r f o r m such shirt p r e s s i n g o p erations as b o d y pressing,
b o s o m pressing, collar a n d cuff p r e ssing, a n d / o r sleeve pressing.

(Ignition repairman)
R e p a i r s a n d installs ign i t i o n systems,
starters, coils, p a n e l i n s t r u m e n t s , wiring,
a n d o ther el e c t r i c a l systems and e q u i p m e n t o n a utomobiles j p e r f o r m s s uch duties as d i a g n o s i n g
trouble b y v i s u a l
i n s p e c t i o n or b y use of testing devices; a d j u s t i n g timing;
adjusting dis­
t r i b u t o r b r e a k e r - p o i n t gaps w i t h thickness gage;
r e p l a c i n g d e f e c t i v e pa r t s o n starters, g e n ­
erators, a n d distributors; a n d r e p l a c i n g defective ignition a n d l i g h t i n g wires.
M a y te s t a n d
r e p a i r generators.
M a y r e p a i r a n d a d j u s t carburetors.

GREASER
(Lubricating man)
Lubricates,
b y m e a n s of h a n d - o p e r a t e d or compress e d - a i r
operated gre a s e
guns a n d
oil sprays, a l l p arts of a u t o m o b i l e or tru c k w here l u b r i c a t i o n is r equired, u s i n g p r o p e r type
l u b r icant o n the va r i o u s p o i n t s o n chassis or motors; drains old l u b r i c a n t f r o m l u b r i c a n t r e s e r ­
voirs euad r efills w i t h new. M a y p e r f o r m other r e l a t e d duties, s uch as c h e c k i n g r a d i a t o r w a t e r
level, che c k i n g a nd a d d i n g d i s t i l l e d w a t e r to battery, r e p a i r i n g tires, etc.
M a y also perform
duties of washer.

WASHER, M A CHINE
MECHANIC, A U T O M O T I V E
A worker who
o p e rates o ne o r m o r e w a s h i n g m a c h i n e s to
w a s h h o u s e h o l d linens, g a r ­
ments, curtains,
drapes a n d o t h e r a r t i c l e s a n d whose w o r k involves the following:
manipula­
ting valves, switches, a n d levers to s tart a n d stop the m a c h i n e a n d to control the a m o u n t a n d
temperature of w a t e r f o r the s u d s i n g a n d r i n s i n g of ea c h batch; m i x i n g a n d a d d i n g soap, b l u i n g
a n d b l e a c h i n g solutions; a n d l o a d i n g a n d u n l o a d i n g the w a s h i n g machine.
In a d d i t i o n m a y m ake
m i n o r repairs to w a s h i n g machine.
WRAPPER, B U N D L E
A wo r k e r w h o w r a p s p a c k a g e s or f i n i s h e d products, or pac k s articles,
goods, o r m a ­
terials in c ardboard b o x e s a n d secures the p a c k a g e or b o x w i t h twine, ribbon, g u m m e d tape, or
paste. The w o r k e r m a y segregate ar t i c l e s a c c o r d i n g to size or type, or a c c o r d i n g to customer's
order a n d inspect articles f o r defe c t s b e f o r e wrapping.

R e p a i r s autom o b i l e s a n d trucks, p e rforming such duties as d i s a s s e m b l i n g a n d o v e r h a u l ­
ing engines, transmissions, clutches, rear ends, a nd other a s s e m b l i e s o n auto m o b i l e s , r e p l a c ­
ing w o r n or b r o k e n parts,
gri n d i n g valves, a d justing brakes, t i g h t e n i n g b o d y b olts, a l i g n i n g
wheels,
etc.
I n a d d i t i o n to ge n e r a l automotive mechanics, this c l a s s i f i c a t i o n a l s o includes
wo r k e r s w h o s e duties are li m i t e d to repairing a n d o v e r h auling the m otor.
Class A - Repairs,
rebuilds, or overhauls engines,
tra n s m i s s i o n s , clutches,
rear
ends, or o ther assemblies, replaces w o r n or b r o k e n parts, grinds v a lves, b o r e s cylinders, fibs
rings.
In addition, m a y adjust b r a k e s or lights, t i g hten b o d y bolts, a l i g n wheels, etc.
May
rem o v e o r repl a c e motors, tran s m i s s i o n s or other assemblies.
M a y do m a c h i n i n g of parts.
Class B - Ad j u s t s b r a k e s
or lights, tightens
b o d y bolts,
alig n s w heels, or m a k e s
other adj u s t m e n t s or r e pairs of a m i n o r nature; or removes a n d r e p l a c e s moto r s , t r a n s missions,
clutches, re a r ends, etc.,
b u t does n o repairing, rebuilding, or o v e r h a u l i n g of these a s s e m ­
blies.
W o r k e r s who are e m p l o y e d as helpers to Mechanics are e x c l u d e d f r o m this c l a s s ification.

A u t o R e p a i r S hops
B O D Y R EPAIRMAN, M E T A L
(Aut o m o b i l e - c o l l i s i o n serviceman; f e n d e r a n d b o d y repairman; b o d y man)
Re p a i r s da m a g e d
a u t o m o b i l e f e n d e r s a n d bod i e s to
re s t o r e th e i r origi n a l shape and
smoothness of surface b y h a m m e r i n g o ut a n d f i l l i n g dents, a n d b y w e l d i n g b r e a k s in the metal.
M a y remo v e b olts a n d nuts,
take off o l d fenders,
a n d i n stall n e w fenders.
M a y p e r f o r m such
rela t e d tasks
as r e p l a c i n g b r o k e n g lass
a n d r e p a i r i n g d a m aged r a d i a t o r s
a n d woodwork.
May
p a i n t r e p a i r e d surfaces.




WASHER, A U T O M O B I L E
(Car washer; w a s h boy)
W a shes aut o m o b i l e s a n d trucks; sweeps a n d cleans inter i o r of a u tomobile; m a y p o l i s h
auto vehi c l e bodies,
u s i n g p o l i s h i n g compound and a cloth.
V a r i o u s p a r t s of this Job m a y b e
p e r f o r m e d b y indivi d u a l w o r k e r s in automobile laundries p r o d u c t i o n lines.




52

Hospitals*

DIETITIAN
Develops
sults
food
on

with

the

orders

for

contents

sonnel

of

such

Performs

of

fluids,
of

requisitions

the p r e p a r a t i o n

of

diets

for

s e r v e d to patie n t s ;

substitute

need e d supplies

food;

of

special

such diets;

diets

consults

supervises

con­

and prepares
with

activities

doctors
and p e r ­

a n d equipment.

types

of

of b a c t e r i o l o g i c a l

streptomycin,

concentration

usual methods;

makes

and urine

in

and

including virus work,

i n bodjr f l u i d s ,

sputum,

feces,

standard and

analyses

tests

sulfanilamide,

sensitization

and bacteriological

blood,

urine

exudates,

special biochemical

and basal metabolism

tests

tests.

special

tests,

studies
and

jnnocula-

and

quantita­
of a u t o p s y

spinal fluid by

on blood and other body

May

instruct

prepares

patients

as p a t i e n t

charts

and

review work

for,

and assists

laboratory assistants.

N U R SE,

REGISTERED
Does

in,

special
use

the

supervises

on food available

inspects

identifies bacteria

gastric

and

(CLINICAL)

all

determination

diets

and

diets

penicillin,

specimens;
means

diets;

special

TECHNICIAN

t i o n tests,

special

or F o o d A d m i n i s t r a t o r

of w a r d kitchens;

LABORATORY

tive

and plans

Chef

professional

examinations

and

nursing

treatments;

in wards

maintains

a nd clinics;
records

such

and nurses

notes;

changes dressings and administers medications
and treatments prescribed b y physician; s u p e r ­
v ises atte n d a n t s a n d student nur s e s as necessary.
A Registered Nurse
certificate issued by
the

State

of

California

is r e q u i r e d .

PHARMACIST
Compounds
prepared by
ceives,
keeps

and

dispenses

licensed physician;

stores,

records

Certificate

and

dispenses

of m e d i c a l

medicines
compounds,

hospital

and

preparations

supplies;

prescriptions

as

directed by

and packages bulk medicines
maintains

compounded.

i n v e n t o r y of

Requires

prescriptions

and preparations;
drugs

a California

and

State

re­

supplies;
Pharmacist

of R e g i s t r a t i o n .

PHYSIOTHERAPIST
Administers
driatic

treatments,

and makes

physiotherapeutic

electric

therapy,

necessary reports.

Technicians

or t h e

treatments

to

patients

i n a ’h o s p i t a l ,

a n d K e n n y packs;, m a i n t a i n s

R e g i s t r a t i o n w i t h the

American Physiotherapy Association

clinical

American Registry

of

i n c l u d i n g hy-

notes

end records

Physical

Therapy

is r e q u i r e d .

X-RAY TECHNICIAN
Performs- a l l
patients

for

radiographic
w o r k of

therapy

student

equipment

types

radiographic

of r a d i o g r a p h i c w o r k at

examinations

treatments

technicians;

and

Salary

makes X-ray

as p r e s c r i b e d b y a physician;

keeps

records

and makes

used.

*Bay Area

institutions and health

treatments;

Survey Committee

descriptions.

reports

develops
on films

clinics;

exposures;
films;

prepares

gives minor

supervises

taken and

supplies

the
and

53.

Index
Page Number
Description Earnings or rate
A. B. maintenance man (ocean transport) ........................
Assembler (machinery) ............. .............................
Bench and machine helper (oakeries) .................. ..........
Bench hand (bakeries) ................................... .
Benchman (bakeries) ......... ...................................
Biller, machine (billing machine) .............................
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine) ..........................
Bindery woman (printing) ........................................
Boatswain (ocean transport) .....................................
Boatswain's mate (ocean transport) ..............................
Body repairman, metal (auto repair shops) .......................
Bookkeeper, h a n d ................... .......................
Bookkeeping-machine op e r a t o r............. ......................
Bookkeeping-machine operator (banks) ............................
Bottler (malt liquors) ..........................................
Bottler (nonalcoholic beverages) .............. .................
Bread packer (bakeries) ............................. ...........
Brewer (malt liquors) ...........................................
Bricklayer (building construction) ..............................
Building laborer (building construction) ..................
Bus boy (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ................
Bus girl (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ........ ......
Butcher, general, cattle killing (meat products) ..... •«.•••••••
Butcher (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ........ .
Cake dumper (bakeries) ................................... .
Cake -wrapping machine operator (bakeries) ...................
Calculating-machine operator (Comptometer type) ................
Calculating-machine operator (Comptometer type) (railroads) .....
Calculating-machine operator (other than Conqjtometer type) .....
Can forksr (canning) ...................................... .
Can run attendant (canning) ................................ .
Carpenter, maintenance .................. .......................
Carpenter (building construction) ................... ..........
Carpenter (ocean transport) ......................... ..........
Carpenter's mate (ocean transport) .................... ........
Cashier (hotels) ....... ........................................
Cashier (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ............
Cashier-wrapper (department and clothing stores) ..... .........
Checker (malt liquors) ........... .............................
Checker (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ............. .
Chef (ocean transport) .................. ...................
Chef (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ..................
Chemical operator (industrial chemicals) ........................
Chipper and grinder (ferrous foundries) ............ ...........
Cleaner ......... ..............................................
Cleaner (office buildings) ..................... ................
Cleaner (railroads) .......................... ..................
Clerk, accounting............................. .................
Clerk, accounting (railroads) ...................................
Clerk, desk (hotels) .......................................... .
Clerk, file ...................................................
Clerk, general, intermediate ............ ..................... .
Clerk, general, Junior ........... ........................... .
Clerk, general, Junior (railroads) .................. ...........
Clerk, general, senior .........................................
Clerk, order ........ ............................... ...........
Clerk, pay roll ........... ....................................
Clerk, retail, receiving (laundries) ...... ....................
Clerk, room (hotels) .... ......................................
Clerk, shipping and receiving (malt liquors) ..................
Coil cleaner (canning) ...... ..................................
Compositor, hand (printing) ....................................
Conductor (local transit) ........... ..........................
Cook, assistant (ocean transport) ........... ..................
Cook, chief (ocean transport) ........ ••••••••.......
Cook (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ..................
Cook, tomato (canning) ......................... ........ ......
Coremaker, hand (ferrous foundries) .............. .
Crane operator, electric bridge ..... ..........................
Crane operator, electric bridge (fabricated structural steel and
ornamental metal work) .......................................




_

28

k6
-

37
37

23
27
27
27
6, 8
8

-

29

_

28
28

-

51
37
37
19
^
-

k3

25
6 , 8, 1*
1
6 , 8, 1*
1
23
27
28
27
27
27
27
30
30
21

30

-

27

-

27

-

37
37
37
_

39

9,

Ik

26

9, 1*
1
27
27
16

-

27

_

28
28
26

_

50

30
b9
-

^3

kk

12
*
-

12
*

37
37
50
37
38
38
38
38
38
38
50
50
-

2*
1
2?

30
29
30
21
21

18, 19
29
26

6 , 9, Ik
26
26
6 , 9, Ik
6 , 10, ik
7 , 10, l *
i
26
6 , 10, ik
7 , 10, Ik
7 , 10, lk
21*
26

27
27
29, 30
27
29

-

29

-

30
27

11
**
11
*

21
18

^5

22

Description Earnings or rate
Cutter, general, beef cutting (meat products) ..... ...........
Dietitian (hospitals) ............... .........................
Dividerman (bakeries) .................................... .
Dough mixer (bakeries) .......... ............................ .
Draftsman..... .............................................. .
Draftsman, Junior .............. ............................. Drill-press operator, single- and multiplesp indie (machinery) ............. .......................... .
Driver (malt liquors) ............. ............... .......... .
Driver-salesman (nonalcoholic beverages) ........... .
Duplicating-machine operator .................. .............. .
Electrician (building construction) ................. .
Electrician, automotive (auto repair shops) ....... .......... .
Electrician, chief (ocean transport) ........ ......... ...... .
Electrician, maintenance ...................... ......... .
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ......... .......... .
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) ............... .
Electrician, second (ocean transport) .................. .
Electrotyper (printing) ............................. ........
Elevator operator, passenger ........... ..................... .
Elevator operator, passenger (department and clothing stores)
Elevator operator, passenger (hotels) ...................... .
Elevator operator (office buildings) ....................... .
Engineer, chief reefer (ocean transport) ......... ......... .
Engineer, deck (ocean transport) .... ..................... .
Engineer, stationary ......................................... .
Engine -lathe operator (machinery) .................. ......... .
Extractor operator (laundries) ..................... .........
Feeder, labeling-machine (canning) ........................ .
Finisher, flatwork, machine (laundries) ......................
Fireman (ocean transport) ....................................
Fireman, stationary boiler ................................
Fireman, stationary boiler (railroads) ......... .............
Fitter, structural (fabricated structural steel and
ornamental metal work) .....................................
Flame-cutting-machine operator (fabricated structural steel and
ornamental metal work) ..................... ..... ......... .
Floor lady (canning) .................... ................... .
Floorlady (bakeries) ............. ................... .......
Flour dumper (bakeries) ........... .......................... .
Foreman (bakeries) ....... ...................................
Gang boss (stevedoring) .................. ...................
Garage attendant.............. ......................... .
Gardener ..... ............................................
Grease-machine operator (bakeries) ...........................
Greaser (auto repair shops) ..................................
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) .......... ........... .
Groundsman .............................................. .
Guard .......... ............................................. .
Hand caser (canning) ........................ ................
Handyman (office buildings) ..................................
Hatch tender (stevedoring) .................... ...... ........ .
Helper (bakeries) ................ .................. ...... ..
Helper (malt liquors) ........................................
Helper, chemical operator (industrial chemicals) .............
Helper, motor truck driver ...................................
Helper, trades, maintenance ................. ................ .
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ...................... .
Houseman (hotels) ..............................................
Icing mixers (bakeries) ...................................... .
Identifier (laundries) .........................................
Ingredient man (bakeries) ...........................
Ingredient scaler (bakeries) ..............................
Inspector (machinery) ....................... ..... ........... .
Inspector, labeling (canning) .... ..... ........... .
Janitor ........................................
Janitor (machinery) ........................... .
Janitor (office buildings) ......................... .
Janitor (railroads) ............... ................ .
Key-punch operator ....... ...................... .
Key-punch operator (railroads) ........................ ........

^3
52
-

39
39
1*6
-

38
-

51

21

25
27
27
15
15
23
27
28
7, 11, 1^
27

25

1*0

28
16

^7

23

1*0

26

_

-

1*1

19
*
50
_
_

29
29
18
21*
26

29
28
28

1*0

16

17
*
50

23
21*
27
21*

-

50
1*0
1*0

28
16
26

^5

22

_

^5

22

-

27
27
27
27
30

-

1*1

il
*
-

51

kl

1*1
1*1
-

*■
*3
-

1*0
1*0

50
-

51
-

1*8
-

1*2
1*8
-

1*2

38
38

18
18

27
25
23
18
18

27
29
30
27
27
21
28
16
26
26

27
2k

27
27
23

27
18, 19
23
29
26
1 1 , 11*
26

54.

Labeler and packer (paints and varnishes) .......................................................
Labeling operator, head (canning) .................................................................................
Label-machine operator (canning) ...................................................................................
Laboratory technician (clinical) (hospitals) ..........................................................
Laundryman, assistant (ocean transport) ....................................................................
Lay-out man (fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal
work) ....................
L ift-truck-jitney driver (stevedoring) ......................................................................
Linenman (ocean transport) ...............................................................................................
Liner operator (canning) ...................................................................................................
Loader, car and truck (canning) .....................................................................................
Longshoreman (stevedoring) ...............................................................................................
Machinist, maintenance .......................................................................................................
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) ..........................................
Machinist, production (machinery) .................................................................................
Maid, chamber (hotels) .......................................................................................................
Mailer (printing) .................................................................................................................
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y ...................................................................................
Maintenance man, general u tility (railroads) ..........................................................
Marker (laundries) ...............................................................................................................
Mechanic, automotive (auto repair shops) ...................................................................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ...............................................................................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (railroads) ...................................................
Mechanic, maintenance .........................................................................................................
Mechanic, cannery (canning) .............................................................................................
Mechanic, seamer (canning) ...............................................................................................
Messman (ocean transport; .................................................................................................
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ...........................................................................
Mixer (bakeries) ...................................................................................................................
Mixer (paints and varnishes) ...........................................................
Molder (bakeries) .................................................................................................................
Molder, floor (ferrous foundries) .................................................................................
Molder, hand, bench (ferrous foundries) ....................................................................
Molder, machine (ferrous foundries) .............................................................................
Motor truck driver ...............................................................................................................
Night loader (malt liquors) .............................................................................................
Nurse, industrial (registered) .......................................................................................
Nurse, registered (hospitals) .........................................................................................
Office b o y ................................................................................................................................
Office boy (railroads) .......................................................................................................
Office g irl ............................................................................................................................
Oiler ..........................................................................................................................................
Oiler (ocean transport) ..............................................
Operator (local transit) ...................................................................................................
Order f ille r ...........................................................................................................................
Ovenman (bakeries) ................................................
Oysterman (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ..............................................
Packer ...........................................................................
Packer, sausage department (meat products) ..............................................................
Painter, maintenance ..........................................
Painter (building construction) ............................
Pan cleaner (bakeries) ............................................................................................
Pan greaser (bakeries) .......................................................
Pan-greasing machine operator (bakeries) ..................................................................
Pantryman (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ..............................................
Patternmaker, wood (ferrous foundries) ..........................
Pharmacist (hospitals) .......................................................................................................
Photoengraver (printing) ..............................
Physiotherapist (hospitals) ................................
Piano mover (motor truck drivers and helpers) ........................................................
Pipe fitte r , maintenance ..........................................................................
Plasterer (building construction) ..................
Plumber (building construction) .....................................................................................
Porter ............................................................................................... . .....................................
Power-shear operator (fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal
work) ......................................................................................................................................
Press assistant (printing) ...............................................................................................
Press feeder (printing) .....................................................................................................
Presser, machine, shirts (laundries) ..........................
Pressman, cylinder (printing) .........................................................................................
Pressman, web presses (printing) ...................................................................................



Page Number
Description Earnings or rate

Page Number
Description Earnings or rate

43
52
45
40
40
48
50
40
40
51
51
40
40
40
IS
43
44
44
44
39
52
38
38
38
40
42
42
43
41
45
52
52
41
42
45
~
51
-

22
27
27
25
29
22
30
29
27
27
30
16
26
23
26
30
16
26
24
25
17
26
17
27
27
29
23
27
22
27
21
21
21
28
27
15
25
7, 14
26
11, 14
17
29
27
19
27
30
19
21
17
27
27
27
27
30
21
25
29
25
28
17
27
27
18, 19
22
29
29
24
29
30

Printer, label and form (canning) ..................................
Quartermaster (ocean transport) ...................................
Radio technician.................................................
Retort operator (canning) .........................................
Roll-machine operator (bakeries) ...................................
Sales clerk (department and clothing stores) ........................
Sausage maker (meat products) .....................................
Scaling-machine operator (bakeries) ................................
Seaman, able bodied (ocean transport) ....
Seaman, ordinary (ocean transport) .................................
Secretary.......................................................
Sewer, alteration (women's garments) (department stores) ...............
Shackler, cattle killing (meat products) ............................
Shake-out man (ferrous foundries) ..................................
Sheet-metalworker, maintenance ......................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) .........................
Shipping and receiving clerk ......................................
Shipping leaderman (canning) ....................................
Silverman (ocean transport) .......................................
Stenographer, general ............................................
Stenographer, general (railroads) .......
Stenographer, technical..............
Stereotyper (printing) ............................................
Steward, chief (ocean transport) ...................................
Steward, room (ocean transport) ....................................
Steward, second (ocean transport) ..................................
Steward, third (ocean transport) ..................................
Stock handler ...................................................
Stock handler (railroads) .........................................
Storekeeper (ocean transport) ......................................
Storekeeper, deck (ocean transport) ................................
Switchboard operator .............................................
Switchboard operator-receptionist ..................................
Syrup maker (canning) ............................................
Tabulating-machine operator .......................................
Tailor, alteration (men's garments) (department and clothing
stores) .......................................................
Technician (paints and varnishes) ..................................
Teller, paying, or paying and receiving, commercial (banks) ............
Tinter (paints and varnishes) .....................................
Tool and die maker (other than jobbing shops) (machinery) .............
Transcribing-machine operator,general .................
Truck driver ....................................................
Truck driver (railroads) ..........................................
Trucker, hand.................................
Trucker, hand (ferrous foundries) ..................................
Trucker, hand (paints and varnishes) ...............................
Trucker, hand (railroads) .........................................
Trucker, power ..................................................
Typist..........................................................
Typist (railroads) ...............................
Utilityman (ocean transport) ......................................
Varnish maker (paints and varnishes) ...............................
Waiter (ocean transport) ..........................................
Waiter (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ......................
Waiter, head (ocean transport) .....................................
Waitress (restaurants, cafeterias and lunchrooms) ...........
Washer, automobile (auto repair shops) ..............................
Washer, machine (laundries) .......................................
Washer, truck (malt liquors) ......................................
Watchman..........................
Watchman (ocean transport) ........................................
Watchman (office buildings) ......................
Watertender (ocean transport) .....................................
Welder, hand (fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal
work) ......
Welder, hand (machinery) ..........................................
Welder, machine (fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal
work) .........................................................
Wiper (ocean transport) ...........................................
Wrapper, bundle (laundries) .......................................

41
49
43
38
49
43
45
41
41
42
38
38
38
42
42
38
39
39

27
28
17
27
27
24
21
27
28
28
7, 11, 15
24
21
21
17
26
19
27
29
12, 15
26
12, 15
30
29
29
29
29
19
26
29
28
12, 15
12, 15
27
7, 13

49
43
50
44
49
39
42
42
42
45
44
42
42
39
39
44
51
51
42
-

24
22
23
22
23
13, 15
19, 20
26
19
21
22
26
20
13, 15
26
29
22
29
30
29
30
25
24
27
20
28
29
29

46

22

49

23

46

22

51

28
24

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : O — 1951


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102