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TABLE

k
k

OF

CONTENTS

*
Mr. Hamilton on Public Credit
by
by Mr. Hamilton on a National Bank by Mr. Hamilton on M a n u f a c t u r e s
by Mr. Hamilton on Establishing a Mintt
by M r . Hamilton on Public Credit
by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
by M r . Gallatin on the Finance*
by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
Report by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
* ^ R e p o r t by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
Report by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
Report by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
" ^ R e p o r t by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
^ R e p o r t by M r . Gallatin on the Finance?
^Report
J ^ Report
J. Report
^^Report
^wieport
^Report
' IT7
J Report
Report
-}• Report
^Report
V, Report

-

-

-

Report by M r . Gallatin on the Finances
. . R e p o r t by W i l l i a m Jones, (Acting Secretary

P^ Report by W i l l i a m Jones, (Acting Secretary

° R e p o r t by G. W . Campbell on the Finances
<0

VOL. I . — 1

CM




-

the Fiuances
the Finances
-

January,
December,
December,
May,
January,
December,
December,
October,
November,
December,
December,
November,
December,
June,
December,
December,
November,
December,
June,
December,
December,

17.90
1790
1791
1791
1795
1801
1802
1303
1S04
1305
1806
1807
1808
1809
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1813
1811

Fag<?.
3
54
78
133
157
216
252
£62
285
297
331
356
373
391
398
421
443
468
488
499
523

REPORTS OF THE

356

[1S07.

REPORT ON T H E FIN ANCES.
NOVEMBER, 1807.

In obedience to the directions of the act supplementary to the act entitled
An act to establish the Treasury Department," the Secretary of the Treasury respectfully submits the following report and estimates
u

REVENUE AND R E C E I P T S .

The nett revenue arising from duties on merchandise and tonnage, which
accrued during the year lb05, amounted to - $1 j.135,158
And that which accrued during the year 1806, amounted,
is will appear by the statement (A.) to

16,576,454

The same revenue, after deducting that jiortion which arose
from the duty on salt, and from the additional duties constituting the Mediterranean fund, amounted, during the year
8
1805, vo
.
.
.
.
' . 12,520,532
And during the year 1806, to
.
.
.
.
14,809,758
It is ascei»aincd that the nett revenue, which has accrued during the
first three quarters of the year 1807, exceeds that of the corresponding
quarters of the year 1806; and that branch of the revenue may. exclusively of the duty on salt, and of the Mediterranean fund, both of which expire on the 1st day of January next, be safely estimated for the present,
and if no change takes place in the relations of the United States with
foreign nations, at fourteen millions of dollars.
The statement (B) exhibits in detail the several species of merchandise,
and other sources, from which that revenue was collected during the vear
1806.
It appears by the statement (C) that the sales of the public lands have,
during the year ending on the 30th September, 1807, exceeded 284,000
acres. Some returns are net yet received: and the proceeds of sales in the
Mississippi Territory, being, .fter deducting the surveying and other incid e n ^ x p e n s e s , appropriated * the first place to the payment of a sum of
1,250,000 dollars to the State oi Georgia, have not l>een included, but are
distinctly stated. The actual payments by purchasers have, d u r i n g the
same period, exceeded 6S0,000 dollars; and the receipts into the Treasury
from that source may, after deducting charges, and the five per cent, reserved for roads, be estimated for the ensuing year a t five hundred t h o u s a n d
6 3
dollars.



1807.] SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

357

The receipts arising from the permanent revenue of the United States
may, therefore, without including the duties on postage, and other incidental
branches, be computed, for the year 1808, at
- $14,500,000
And the payments into the Treasury during the same year,
on account of the salt and Mediterranean duties previously
accrued, are estimated at
.
.
.
.
.
1,300,000
Making in the whole an aggregate of
L A S T Q U A R T E R OF T H E

YEAR

-

-

§15,800,000

1807.

The balance in the Treasury, which, on the 30th day of September, 1806,
amounted to $5.496,9J9 77, "did, on the 30th day of September, 1807,
amount to
$8,530,000
The receipts into the Treasury from the 1st of October to
the 31st of December. 1807, arc estimated at
4,000,000
$12,530,000
T i e expenses during the same period, for all objects whatever, (the public
debt excepted/) and including 686,076 dollars for the extraordinary expenditures of the Navy Department, of which the estimate has been transmitted,
are estimated at
$1,700,000
The ordinary payments on account of the public debt, including the provision for the interest on the Louisiana and
1,700,000
Dutch debt, to the 1st July, 1803. are estimated at
A farther sum of about 1,600,000 dollars should also be
paid during this quarter, in order to complete the annual appropriation of 8,000,000 of dollars. If the whole of this sum
which is applicable to the purchase of the eight per cent, stock
cannot be expended this year, the unexpended balance will
form an additional expenditure for the year 1808 ; charging,
1,500,000
however, the whole to this quarter Makes an .aggregate of And will leave in the Treasury at the closc of the year, a
balance of about seven million six huudred thousand dollars.

4,900,000
7,630,000
$12,530,000

E X P E N D I T U R E S OF T H E Y E A R

180S.

The permanent expenses, calculated on a peace establishment, are estimated at 11.600,000 dollars, and consist of the following items, viz:
1st. For the civil department, and all domestic expenses
°f a civil nature, including invalid pensions, the light-house
•and mint establishments, the expeuses of surveying public
Jands and the seacoast, the fifth instalment of the loan due to
Maryland, and a sum of 100,000 dollars, to meet such miscellaneous appropriations, not included in the estimates, as may
he made by Congress
1,100,000



36a

REPORTS OF T H E

2d. For expenses incident to the intercourse with foreign
nations, including the permauent appropriation for Algiers 3d. For the military and Indian departments, including
trading-houses, and the permanent appropriations for certain
Indian tribes
4th. For the naval establishment
.
.
.
5th. The annual appropriation of eight millions of dollars
for the payment of the principal and interest of the public
debt, of which sum not more than 3,400,000 dollars will
for the year 1808 be applicable to the payment of interest

[1807.
$200,000
1,280,(00
1:0*0,0C0

8,000,0C0
$11,600,000

T o the permanent expenses mnst he added for the year 1808,
a sum of about 800,000 dollars, necessary, in addition to the
annual appropriation of ei^ht millions of dollars, to complete,
on the 1st January, 1809. the reimbursement of the eight per
cent, stock .
And for paying the balance of American claims assumed
by the French convention Making altogether, for the expenses of that year The receipts of that year having been estimated
at
§15,800,000
And the probable balance in the Treasury on
the 1st January next, at
7,630,000
Making altogether

800,000
200,000
$12,600,000

$23,430,000

Would therefore, probably, leave in the Treasury on the 1st
January, 1S09, a balance of near eleven miliion.s of dollars

10,830000
$23,430,000

PUBLIC

DEBT.

It appears by the statement (T),) that the payments on account of the principal ofthe public debt have, during the year ending on the 30th day of September, 1S07, exceeded four million six hundred thousand dHlars ; making
the total of public debt reimbursed from the 1st of Ai ril, 1S01, to the 1st
of October, 1S07, about twenty-five million eight hundred and eighty
thousand dollars, exclusively of more than six millions which have been
paid during the same period in conformity with the provisions of the treaty
and convention with Great Britain, and of the Louisiana convention.
Of the twelve millions of dollars, which, according to ihe preceding estimates may be paid on account of the public debt between the 30th Septem
her, 180,, and the 1st January, IS09, about eight millions will be on account
of the principal. It must, how ver, be observed, that the unascertained result of the proposition made to the public creditors for a modification ofthe
debt, may affect the amount payable during the year lb08, on account of
both principal and interest.




1807.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

359

On the 1st day of January, 1809, the principal of the debt will, if the
proposed modification be not assented to by the public creditors, amount to
near fifty-seven million and five hundred thousand dollars: the subsequent
annual payments thereon, on account of principal and interest, will not, exclusively of occasional purchases, exceed 4,600,000 dollars; and the whole
of the debt (the nineteen millions three per cent, stock only excepted) will
be reimbursed in sixteen years.
A general subscription would reduce the capital to about fifty-one millions
of dollars; the payments would amount to eight millions of dollars annually
during six years, and average less than three millions during the seven following; at the end of which period the whole debt would be extinguished.
An annual unappropriated surplus of at least three millions of dollars may
henceforth be relied upon with great confidence. The receipts of the year
1808 have been estimated at 15,800.000, and the expenses at 12,60U,000
dollars. The permanent revenue has been computed at 14,500,000 dollars;
and the permanent expenses predicated on au annual payment of eight millions of dollars on account of the debt, have been stated at 11.600,000 dollars. And as these would, if no modification of the debt shall take place,
be reduced to less than 8,500,000, the annual surplus would then amount to
six millions of dollars. Nor are the seven millions and a half of dollars
which will remain in the Treasury at the end of the present year, included
in the calculation.
c
What portion of that surplus may be wanted for necessary measures ot
security and defence: what portion should be applied to internal improvements, which, while increasing and diffusing the national wealth, will
strengthen the bonds of union; are subjects which do not fall within the
province of the Treasury Department. But it is not improbable that, after
making ample provision for both those objects, considerable surphrses, and
which can no longer lie applied to the redemption of the debt, may still
accumulate in the Treasury.
.
A previous accumulation of treasure in time of peace, might, in a great
degree, defray the extraordinary expenses of war, and dimmish the necessity of either loans or additional taxes. It would provide, during periods
of prosperity for those adverse events to which every nation is exposed,
instead of increasing the burdens of the people at a time when they are
least able to bear them, or of impairing by anticipations the resources ot
ensuing generations. And the public moneys of the United States not
being locked up and withdrawn from the general circulation, but, on the
contrary, deposited iu banks, and continuing to form a part of the circulating medium, the most formidable objection to that system, which has
nevertheless been at times adopted with considerable success an other countries, is thereby altogether removed. It is also believed that the renewal of
the charter of the Bank of the United States may, amougst other advantages, afford to Government an opportunity of obtaining interest on the public depositcs, whenever they shall exceed a certain amount Should the
United States, contrary to their expectation and desire, be involved in a war,
it is believed that the 'receipts of the year 1808 will not be materially affected by the event, inasmuch as they will principally arise f r o m the revenue
accrued during the present year. The amount of outstanding bonds due by
importers, after deducting the debentures issued on account of reexportations, exceeds at this time sixteen millions of dollars. The deductions to
be made from there, o'i account of subsequent re-exportations, would, in case



300

REPORTS OF T H E [1S07.

of war, be less than usual; for exportations will then be checked as well
as importations; and, in proportion as these will decrease, a greater home
demand will be creatcd for the stock on hand, and the necessity of re-exporting be diminished.
It has already been stated that the specie in the Treasury at the end ot
this year, together with the surplus of the year 1808, will amount to near
eleven millions of dollars: a sum probably adequate to meet the extraordinary expenses of a war for that year. It will also be recollected, that, in
the estimated expenses of the year 1808, a reimbursement of near five millions and a half of the principal of the debt is included. The only provision
therefore, wTiich may, under any contingency, lie necessary for the extraordinary service of that year, in order to cover any deficiency of revenue or
increase of expenditure beyond what has hecn estimated, will be an authority to borrow a sum equal to that reimbursement.
That the revenue of the United States will, in subsequent years, be considerably impaired by a war, neither can nor ought to be concealed. It is,
on the contrary, necessary, in order to be prepared for the crisis, to take an
eaTly view of the subject, and to examine the resources which should be
selected for supplying the deficiency and defrayinir the extraordinary expenses.
There are no data from which the extent of the defalcation can a: this moment be calculated, or even estimated. It will be sufficient to state, lst.
That it appears necessary to provide a revenue at least equal to the annual
expenses on a peace establishment, the interest of the existing debt, and the
interest on the loans which may lie raised. 2dly. That thovc expenses, together with the interest of the debt, will, after the vonr 1808. amount to a
sum less than seven millions of dollars; aniL therefore, that if the present
revenue of 14.500,000 dollnrs shall not be diminished more than one-half
by a war, it will still be adequate to that object, leaving only the interest of
war-loans to be provided for.
Whether taxes should lie raised to a greater amount, or loans lie altogether
relied on, for defraying the expenses ot the war, is the next subject of consideration.
Taxes are paid by the great mass of the citizens, and immediately affect
almost every individual of the community: loans are supplied by capitals
previously accumulated by a few individuals. In a country where the resources oi individuals are not generally and materially affected by the war,
it is practicable and wise to raise by taxes the greater part, at least, of the annual supplies. The credit of a nation may also, from various circumstances,
be at times so far impaired as to leave no resource but taxation. In both
respects, the situation of the failed States is totally dissimilar
A maritime war will, m the United States, generally and deeply affect,
whilst it continues, the resources of individuals; as not only commercial
profits will be curtailed, but principally because a great portion of the surphis of agricultural produce necessarily requires a foreign market. The
reduced price of the principal articles exported from the United States, will
operate more heavily than any contemplated tax. And without inquiring
whether a similar cause may not still more deeply and permanently aflect a
nation a t war with the United State*, it seems to follow that, so far a s relates
to America, the losses and privations caused by the war should not be a*grayated by taxes beyond what is strictly necessary. An addition to the
debt is doubtless an evil; but experience having now shown with what rapid



1807.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

361

progress the revenue of the Union increases in time of peace ; with
what facility the debt, formerly contracted, has in a few years been reduced;
a hope may confidently be entertained that all the evils of the war
will be temporary and easily repaired; and that the return of peace will,
without any effort, afford ample resources for reimbursing whatever may
have been borrowed during the war.
x
The credit of the United States is also unimpaired, either at home or
abroad ; and it is believed that loans to a reasonable amount may be obtained on eligible terms. Measures have been taken to ascertain to what extent
this may be effected abroad. And it will be sufficient here to suggest, that
the several banks of the United States may find it convenient, after the ensuing year, and as the diminished commerce of the couutry may require
less capital, to loan to Government a considerable portion of their capital
stock, now computed at about forty millions of dollars.
It might be premature to enter into a particular detail of the several
branches of revenue which may be selected in order to provide for the interest of war-loaus, and to cover deficiencies in case the existing revenue
should fall below seven millions of dollars. A general enumeration seems
at present sufficient.
1. Not only the duty on salt and the Mediterranean duties may be immediately revived, but the duties on importation generally, may, in case of
war, be considerably increased—perhaps doubled—with less inconvenience
than would arise from any other mode of taxation. Without resorting to
the example of other nations, experience has proven that this source o( revenue is, in the United States, the most productive, the easiest to collect,
and the least burdensome to the great mass of the people. In time of war,
the danger of smuggling is diminished ; the scarcity of foreign articles prevents the duty ever "falling on tho importer; the consumers are precisely
those members of the community who are best able to pay the duty; and
the increase of d o m e s t i c manufactures, which may be indirectly effected, is
in itself a desirable object.
2 Indirect taxes, however ineligible, will doubtless be cheerfully paid
as irar taxes, if necessary. Several modifications of the system formerly
adopted, might, however, be introduced, both in order to diminish some of
the inconveniences which were experienced, and particularly to insure the
collection of the duties.
3. Direct taxes are liable to a particular objection, arising from the unavoidable inequality produced by the general rule of the constitution. W hatever difference may exist between the relative wealth, and consequent ability
of paying, of the several States, still the tax must necessarily be raised in
proportion to their relative population. Should it, however, become necessary to resort to that resource, it is believed that a tax raised upon that
species of property in each State, which by the State laws is liable to taxation, as had originally been contemplated by Congress, would be preferable
to a general assessment, laid uniformly on the same species of property in
all the States, as was ultimately adopted.
All which is respectfully submitted.
ALBERT GALLATIN,
Secretary of the Treasury.
TREASURY

DEPARTMENT,

November 5. 1807.



A.
SI

3
tc

\ f hMENT
exhibiting the amount of duties which accrued on merchandise, tonnage, passports, and clearances; of
debentures issued on the exportation of foreign merchandise ; of payments for bounties and allowances, and for expenses of collection, during the years 1805 and 1806.
DUTIES ON
YEARS.

Passports and
clearances.

Merchandise.

1805
1806

Tonnage.

823,601,709 56
9 6 , 9 9 6 , 0 5 6 47

8215,731 20
219,329 37

a

818,951 00
20,318 00

Debentures
issued.

Bounties and
allowances.

8 8 , 9 5 5 , 7 4 5 00
9 , 1 4 6 , 8 7 5 00

8190,674 01
198,751 02

Grass revenue fur the year 1806
Deduct interest and storage

Gross revenue.

Expenses of
collection.

Nett revenue.

8 1 4 , 6 8 9 , 9 7 5 72
a 17,189,076 82

8554,836 76
612,622 13

814,135,138 96
16,576,454 69

PC
H
w

o

817,189,076 82
18,796 92
17,170,279 90

Gross rerenae, per statement B

w
O
H

A STATEMENT

of the amount

of American and foreign tonnage employed in foreign
taken from the records of the
Treasury.

tradttfor

the year 1806, as

Tons

American tonnage in foreign trade
Foreign tonnage
Total amount of tonnage employed in the foreign trade of the United States

.

.

.

.

1,134,990

.

6.8 to 100

Proportion of foreign tonnage to the whole amount of tonnage employed in the foreign trade of the United States
TRF.
A B V H Y D E P A R T M E N T , Register's


Office, November

1,014,005
90,985

4, 1807.
JOSEPH

NOURSE,

Register.

r.

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

1807.]

363

B

.4 ST A TEMENT
exhibiting the value and quantities, respectively, of
merchandise on which duties actually accrued during the year 1806.
[consisting of the difference between articles paying duty, imported,
and those entitled to drawback, re-exported :) and, also, of the nett revenue which accrued, during that year, from duties on merchandise,
tonnage, passports, and clearances.
OOOIM

r*viNO Dcnrji

35,844,748 dollars, at
8,372,52N
do.
570,203 do.
Additional

AD VALOREM.

12* per cent.
15
do.
20
do.
duty on $44,782,413, at 24 per ct.

84,480,593
1,965,879
114,040
1,119,560

50
20
60
32A

44,787,473

6,970,073 62

a Spirit*,
10,479.093
b Sugar.
73,318,619
c Salt,
3,184,099
d Wines,
l,:wti,K38
t Teas
4,750,881
Ceffee,
17,345,188
Molasses, 8,533,590
f All other articles

3,074,398
1,843,199
636,819
521,527
966,686
867.259
426,679
1,014,841

gallons, at
lbs.
at
bushels, at
gallons, at
lbs.
at
lbs.
at
gallons, at

29 Scents average
1S> cents average
20 cents
37.6cents average
20.3cents average
5 cents
5 cents

19
84
80
02
11
40
50
30

16,321,184 78
Deduct duties refunded, after deducting therefrom duties
collected on merchandise, the particulars of which
could not be ascertained, and difference in calculation

17,400 69

3 | per cent, retained on drawbacks
Extra duty of 10 per cent, on merchandise imported in
foreign vessels Nett amount of duties on merchandise
Duties on tonnage
Light money
-

-

Duties on passports and clearances
Sundry accounts not yet received, estimated at -

S16,304,084 09
334,247 39
196,301 05
16,834,632 53

166,798 31
52,531 06
219,329 37
20,318 00
96,000 00

Grow revenue, as per statement A
Deduct expenses of collection
-

17,170,279 90
612,622 13

Nett revenue

16,557,657 77

-




364

REPORTS OF T H E [1S07.
Explanatory

Statements

and

Notes.

A Additional duty of 2* per cent.
.
.
.
.
.
34 per cent, retained on drawback
.
.
.
.
.
Eitra duly of 10 per cent, on merchandise imported ia foreign vcjocla

Spirits—
Grain,

1st proof,
2d
do.
3d
do.
4th do.
Wi do.
Other materials, 1st and 2d proof,
3d
do.
4ih
do.
5th
do
fch
do

1,068,977 gallons, at 28 certs
15,253
do.
do.
12,346
do.
do.
126,469
do.
do
1,746
da
do.
1,684,99*
do.
do.
3,005,857
do.
do
do.
4,531,285
do.
do.
ll,9i*
do.
do.
do.
174
10,479,093

Sugar, brown,
71,271,927 pounds, at 2* cents
white, clayed 2,016,722
do.
3 do.
73.318.W9
-t

Salt, imported, bushels of 56 pounds
Exported
.
.
Amount of bounties and allowances, 8198,751 02, reduced
into bushels at the present
"

4 26° 701
81,860 '

993,755
1,078,605

faying duty, bnshcls of 56 pounds
d

Wines, Madeira, lst qoalitv
2d do.
Sherry and St. Lucar
Lisbon and Oporto
Burgundy and Champagne
Teneriflip. Faral.and Malaga
Other, in bottles
ua casks

-

3,184,099 at 20 els.

289,431 gallons, at 58 cents
23,249
do.
50 do
312,122
«k>.
40 do.
472,722
do.
30 do.
6,315
do
45 do.
70,554
do.
28 do.
22,511
do
3ft do.
179,904
do.
23 do
1,386,838

Teas, Bohea
8ouchon?
Hyson
Other green -

393,990 pounds, at 12
1,534,115
do.
18
645,872
do.
32
2,176,974
do.
90

cents
do
do.
do.

4,750,881
E u r a duty on teas imported from other places than India




Explanatory

Statements

and

Notes—Continued.

Quantities.
f

All other articles, via:

gallon*
tiounds
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
Fig*
do.
Raisins in jars, and Muscatel
do.
all uther
do.
Candles, tallow
do.
wax
do.
Cheese
do.
Soap
do.
Tallow
do.
Mace
.
.
.
do.
Nutmegs
do.
Cinnamon
do.
Cloves
- .
do.
Pepper
do.
Pimento do.
Chinese cassia
do.
Tobacco, manufactured, other than snuff and cisrars
do.
Snuff
da
Indigo

Beer, ale, and porter
Cocoa
.
.
.
Chocolate
Sugar candy
loaf
other refined, nnd lump
Almonds
Currants
Prunes and plums




Excess of im-1Excels of exportation over ; portaiionover
exportation. ; importation.

itt.

181,m:>
1,418,232
2,117
I.6TJ
3,180
97(1
282,517
372,097
60,470
408,110
773,308
'2,41*2,'2*21
173,8*20
6,254
862,846
819,241
1,755,841

2,620
173
9,149
24,318
1,818,617
468,008
181,802
6,638
16,562
964,163

Hate of
duly.

8
2
3
Hi
y
6J
2
o
2
2
9
11
2
6
7
2
11
125
50
20
20
6
4
4

6

10
25

Excess of
duties over
drawback.

811,545
28,361
63
1«0
8W»
63
5,65<>
7,411
1,989
8.16H
15,467
36,183
3,516
375
18,399
16,384
26,337

_
86
_
_

110,917
18,720
7,272
398
1,656
66,040

Excess of
drawback
overdutie*.

20
61 .
51 |
89 !
20
44
31
94
58 1
98
96
31
40
21 .
22
82
6-2
S3 275 00
50
1 829 80
4 863 60
02
32
08
28
20
75 |

Explanatory

Statements and

Notes—Continued.

Quantities
f

All other articles—continued, v u :

Cotton
Powder, hair
gun
Starch
Glue
Pewter plates and dishes
Anchors and sheet iron
Slit and hoop iron
Nails
.
Spikes
Quicksilver
Ochre, yellow, in oil
dry
Spanish brown
w h i t e and red lead
Lead, and manufactures
Seines
Cordage, tarred untarred
T w i n e and packthread
Glauber sails
Coal
Fish, dried
pickled salmon
mackerel
other
Digitized Cables
for FRASER



Excess of im- Excess of exportation over portation over
exportation I importation.

lead

pounds
do.
do
do.
do
do.
do.
da
do.
do.
do
do.
do.
do
do.
da
do.
do.
do.
cwt.
do.
bushels
quintals
barrels
do.
do.
pounds

185,378
5,511
804,898
14,565
105,611
78,200
589,836
971,063
3,069,520
407,936
51,606
92,079
1I9.H3I
619,710
8,648,981
3,513,351
10 ,».:»l
206,096
47,291
3,361
103
311,146
919,319
6,868
14,756
16,971
30,512

Kate of
duty.

Cls.
3

31
400
200
5
50
100
60

40
9

Excess of duExcess of
ties over
drawback over
drawback.
duties.

823,561
990
8,192
436
4,224
3.12H
8,733
9,710
61,190
4,079
3,096
331
1,198
6,197
59,979
35,133
426
4,121

34
56
88
95
48
00
54
63
58
36
36
19
54
10
62
51
04
92

I,184 77
13,444 00
206 00

15,557
109,674
6,889
II,853
6,508

30
50
00
60
40

610 81

Total.

JO
n
50

O
•fl
aS
n

Steel
Hemp
.
.
.
Glass, black quart bottles window, not above 8 by 10
10 by 19
all above 10 by 19
Cigars
Lime
Boots
Shoes, silk •
kid, morocco, Ac.
all other
Cards, wool and cotton
playing

cwt.
do.
gross

100 mj ft.
do!
M.
casks
pairs
do.
do.
do.
dozens
packs

116,101
20,273
22,546
3,985
4,243
22,909
339
3,817
6,913
45,758
5,374
4
11,627

100
100
60
160
175
225
200
50
75
$5
15
10
50
25

19,998
116,101
12,163
36,073
6,973
9,546
45,938
169
2.862
1,798
6.863
637
2
2,906

00
00
80
60
75
75
00
50
75
96
70
40
00
75

81,024,809 70

F

TREASURY

to
n
o
73
M
H
89,968 40

81,014,841 30
O
73

DEPARTMENT,




Register's

Office, November A, 1807.
JOSEPH

NOUR8E,

Register.

M
-3
73
P3
&
a
js

<

C
O
OS

c.

STATEMENT
of the lands sold in the districts of Marietta, Zanesville, Steubenville, Chillicothe, Cincinnati, and Vincennes, from 1st October, 1800, /o 30M September, 1807 ; showing, also, the amount of receipts from individuals, and payments made by receivers, during the same time, with the beilances due, both on October I, 1800, and October 1, 1807.
l.AN Da SOLO.

In the hands
of receivers,
October I,
18(H)

orrtcM.
Purchase
money.

Acres.
Marietta
Zanesville
SteubenviUe
Chillicothe
Cincinnati
Vincennes

<168.1*51
37,258.851
36,525.67
40,178 111
191,284 01
45,265.3d

$3,190
71,517
74,971
99,907
250,510
92,913

51J
711
34
ot;
01
011

y m . i f l o «f>
orncti.
From individuals. By receivers'.

-

#91,489
179,530
436,616
36-1,415
1,08*,060
60,169

73J
67J
9I|
68|
471
911

2,103,306 121

$1,554
8,791
61,SOI
59,778
112,357
26,507

41
98
30
56
86i
I3|

273,791 9 0

35*
36}
101
4I|
32

$1,495
37,980
205,076
116,382
260,583
27,013

134
104
524
82
4H
071

$302
173
925
631
0,591
419

2,215,557 58f 1 680,661 44|

141
65|
2I|
241
33|
08

2 127,100 671

25
754
90
30
004
06

7,313 27

$9,801 544
35,981 594
11 • ;1
169,057 134
217,136 (Ml
901 991
• 34

« 607,781 00J

$736
1,150
6,990
4,609
6,180
951

Repayments.

964
95
814
994
134
991

$117 06
2X1 42
5,802 60

520,923 451

6,260 08

K
2
S
3
C
O
C

Paid into Treasury, in stock transferred to the United States
• 85,i>55 81
Paid in specie, by warranto on receivers:
For payments made by themselves .
- {1627,015 23
For payments made by individuals .
.
.
22.908 47
-619,923 70
Payments by receivers, to be covered by warrants
. 43.929 991
c.H; h
Moners paid by individuals to Treasurer of Untied Slates, in I he year
ending Sept. 30.1*07, included in the above amount of warrants'* for
payments made by individuals," but not yet stated in the accounts of
receivers
1,121 03
697,781 001

Total sales of land, from the opening of the land offices to 30th September, 1806
Amount s »ld since, as above stated
.
.




PAYMENTS BY RECEIVER".

On ac't of pur- On account of Into Treasury. The part for
chnse money.
forfeitures.
expenses.

Total balance
due October 1,
1807.
$26,037
1*8,322
498,451
424,191
1,198,418
91,677

RECE1ITS BY RECEIVERS I'KOM INPIVIOUAtJI.

I, 1806.

57
$22,487
111
142,293
Oil
560,752
99*
417,891
991 1,096,133

289,630 62

IALANC* D K ON ocTonsa 1, 1807.
C

Marietta
Zanesville
Steubeaville
Chillicothe
Cincmnati
Vineennes

$9,558
7,302
91,160
89,101
99,481

Due by individuals, Oct.

Total

•

Acres.
2,38u.Hi:t 961
284,180.29

Purchnse money.
$-1,959,255 511
5HH.610 2HJ

•

9,609,994.954

5,517,865 83

C
O
o

S T A T E M E N T C—Continued.
ESTIMA
o

r

oo
o

TE showing when the instalments which compose the balance due by individuals
Remaining due
in 1807.

Offices

Becoming due
in 1809

Becoming d o e
in 1808

Becoming due
in 1810.

will become payable.

Becoming due
in 1811.

Total.

8872
12,731
8,696
12,750
99,4®
23,053

821,482
179,530
136,616
364,415
1,086,060
65,169

GO
-

Marietta
Zanesville
8teubenville
Chillicothe
Cincinnati
Yincennes

.
*
•
-

.

.

.

.
1

-

-

-.

-

>4,5-14
12,534
32,679
27,865
237,G*H

«n
54*
09|
171
4t>|

P3

"

87,775
57,368
200,140
162,781
272,238

81,889
61,251
115,432
116,423
286,415
19,063

09i
l'.>|
12)
07
101

i
315,312 12J

700,606 83

57|
4I{
70
03
451
431

4
633,475 611

83,100
35,644
49,398
44,592
190,293
23,053

59
92
8-|
53t
25|

346,384 05

63)
35|
071
58
91
25|

157,527 80f

734
671
911
68J
471
94|

O
J»
K
H
>

7S

2 , 1 5 3 , 3 0 6 421
H

Note.—The latest r e t a i n s of sales «t Cincinnati is to 3 | s t August, 1807.
TREASURY

X
F3

DEPARTMENT,

Register's




Office, November 5, 1807.
JOSEPH NOURSE, Register.

&
ts
c

s

to

3

C 2.

o

STATEMENT
of lands sold in the Mississippi Territory, from the opening of the land offices to the latest returns
received at the Treasury ; showing, also, the amount of receipts from individuals, and payments made by receivers
during the same time, with the balance due.
Lands sold.

Receipts by receivers.

Offices.
Acres.

West of Pearl river East of Pearl river -

Balance due.

On account On account Into the Trea- The part By receivers. From indiviwhich was for
of purchase of forfeit
duals.
sury. •
ures.
expenses.
money.

70,7(V>.50| $141,413 01
4,12500
8,950 00
74,831.80*

EST!MA

Purchase
money.

Payments by receivers.

115,663 01

-

$35,687 01
9,062 50

810,050 92f
~
176 56

|

37,719 51

10,227 4 8 | ( « )

TE shotting when the instalments which compose the balance
due front individuals wilt become payable.

81,619 78
176 56
1,796 34

Total balance Pate of
due.
latest returns.

1807.
825,-636 081 8105,726 00 $131,362 08| July 31
I , » M 91
8,073 41 Feb. 28
6,187 50
27,522 021

1114)13 50

139,435 521

( « ) Paid into the Treasury by warrant on receiver 84 ,395 6;>
Amount to be covcrrd by warrants
•
5,n3I 791
10,297 48|

Offices.

West of Pearl river East of Pearl river -

O
po
w

"T
a

Becominrdne in Been"'"" due in Becoming due in Total balance.
1811.
I-10
1H09
$35,019 191
31,062 50

835,353 251
2,062 50

$35,353 251
9,062 50

37,081 991

37,415 751

37,415 751

 S V R Y D C P A R T M U T ,
TRKA
Office, November
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ Hegiater's
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

6, 1 8 0 7 .

$106,796 00
6,187 50
111,913 50
1

JOSEPH

NOURSE,

Register.

CD
O

1807.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

371

D.

Total principal
redeemed, from 1st
April, 1801, t« 30th
September, 1807.

Redemption from 1st of
April, 1801, to 30ih
Sept., 1806, per the
Secretary's report of
5th December, 1806.

Redemption from 1st of
October, 1806, to 30th
September, 1807.

AN ESTIMA TE of the principal redeemed of the debt of the United
States, from the 1st October, 1806, to the 3Oth September, 1807, inclusively; showing" the redemption of the principal of the said debt, from
the 1st April, 1301, to the 30th September, 1807.

OV ACCOUNT or THE DOMESTIC DEBT.

The amount of warrants issued on the Treasurer of the United Stales, on account of
the interest of the domestic debt, of the
retmbntsement of the old six per cent,
aod deferred stock?, and of purchases
of the eight per cent, and exchanged six
per cent, stocks, from 1st October, 1806,
to 30th September, 1«07, exclusive of
$36,93! 49 repaid into the Treasury, and
82,499 63 commissions to agents purchasing slock, was
- £5,834,423 03
Deduct interest which accrued during the same period, calculated quarteryearly
- 32,923,195 87
And loss on
the purchase
of stock
b 15,078 20
2,938,275 07
Reimbursement of the navy six per cent.
stock
Reimbursement of the five and a half per cent.
stock
Reimbursement of the four and a half per ecnt.
stock
Payments made in certificates of the debt of
the United States, on account of lands
Payments made to foreign officers, and for
certain pans of the domestic debt Payments on account of domestic loans

52,896,147 96a $6,479,745 84

89,375,893 8 )

711,700 00

711,700 00

1,847,500 00

1,847,500 00

176,000 00

176,000 C
O

Funds having previously been provided in
Europe, the warrant* issued on the Treasurer of the United States for that object,
from 1st October, 1803, to 30th September,
1807, were less than the amount of interest
arising: the difference, therefore, forms a
deduction.




262,018 16

267,229 36

2,146 36

74,331 50
3,440,000 00

76,477 86
3,440,000 00

10,236,108 05

10,236,108 05

4,927,005 52 21,203,903 55

ON ACCOUNT O r THE FOREIGN DEBT

5,211 20

26,130,909 07

[1£07.

REPORTS OK T H E

372

S T A T E M E N T D—Continued
T h e interest accruing from 1st October. 1806,
to 30th September, 1807, was, oo the
Dutch debt, including commissions and
charges
*
$66,632 60
On the Louisiana stock, including commissions
6, t .666 47
744,299 07
Amount of warrants, exclusive
of $24,614 71 repaid into
the Treasury, and $1,992 66
commissions to agents par.
chasing bills of exchange,
v.-as - $186,058 13
Add gain on exchange
9,427 58
495,485 71
$348,813 36

$24*.813 36

91,903,903 55

25,883,095 71

On account of annual reimbursement
.
.
.
.
.
Eight per cent, and exchanged six per cent stocks purchased •
Moneys in the hands of agents purchasing stock
.
.
.
Moneys in the hands of the Treasurer of the United States, as agent
to the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund
.
.
.
.

81,504.106 61
1,006,005 00
193*<60 80

Dollars

a 1.
2.
3.
4.

4,678,199 16

191,815 55
$2,896,147 96

b The amount of eight per cent, purchased
Exchanged six per cent purchased

«716,0n0 cost
960,005
$1.006,006
Loss

767,231 25
253,851 95
1,021,083 90
1,006,005 00
815,078 20

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, November 5, 1807.




JOSEPH

NOURSE,

Register

I N D E X .
A.
Agriculture, the effect of funding the public debt on, 6.
productiveness of, contrasted with manufactures, 78.
promoted by manufactures, 88, 92, 104.
Alloy, proportion of, used in gold and silver coinage, 135, 141.
Why it is used in coinage, 142.
Annuity proposed, as a plan for funding the public debt, 17, 43, 99.
Army expenses of 1802, estimated, 222.
of 1803,
do
253.
of 1804,
do
263.
of 1805,
do
286.
of 1806,
do
298.
from 1st April, 1801, to 31st March, 1805, 326.
of 1807, estimated, 331.
of 1808,
do
358.
paid, 374.
of 1809, estimated, 375, 392.
paid, 399. . (to
J«
from 1802 to 1807,420.
of 1810, estimated, 400.
paid, 421.
of 1811, estimated, 423.
paid, 443, 466.
of 1812, estimated, 444.
paid, 46S, 484.
of 1813. estimated, 470, 489.
paid, 490, 492, 499.
of 1814, estimated, 500.
paid, 523, 532.
of 1815, estimated, 530.
B.
Balances in the Treasury, in 1801,
1802,
1803,
1804,
1805,
1806,
1807,
1808,
1809,
1810,
1811,
1812,
1813,
1814,




223, 224.
255.
263.
287.
298.
332.
357.
374.
391, 399.
422.
443.
468.
488, 499.
525.

554

INDEX.

Bank, plan of a national, proposed, 54, 72.
capital stock, of what a i u o u u t , and bow composed, 72.
the United States may be a stockholder, 75.
Bank of the United States, a renewal of the charter of; recommended, 3o9.
Bank shares, dividends on, ill 1901, 221.
sold, 254.
proceeds of, 317.
Banks, benefits resulting from, 55, 97.
number of, in the United States ill 1790, 65.
objections to, considered, 57.
stock of, how composed, 59.
favor the increase of the precious metals, 61.
tend to lower the rate of interest, 67.
•
_
Bounties considered as a mean of encouraging manufactures, 110, 130.
C.
Claims of American citizens against Prance, amount of, assumed and paid,
264, 266, 288.
Coffee, additional duty on, proposed, 22.
imported and consumed from 1790 to 1798, quantity of, 241.—See
Merchandise imported
Coins, foreign, comparative vnlue of, 135. 142.
circulation of, to be prohibited, 155.
Coins of the United States, of what to be compow>d,tind how denominated,
152.
Commercial restrictions, effects of, on the revenue in 1807-8, 398, 409.
Commerce, benefited by funding the public debt, 5.
promoted by manufactures, 90, 104.
how affected by the French and British decrees, 376.
Compensation of officers of Government in 1790,45.
Connecticut, claim of, in 1789, 35.
Creditors of the United States, not expedient to discriminate between the
classes of the, 7.
Credit.—See Public Credit.
Customs, where paid, and the amount, from 1st April, 1801, to 31st Marcn,
1805, 319.
,

-

it

Debt, amount of interert on the domestic, from 1776 to 1791, 33.
Debt.—See Public Debt.
Debts due to States, to be assumed by the United States, 10, 28.
suppositious account of the, 30.
statement of the, 35.
provision for liquidating, 164.
Direct taxes, collected in 1901, 221.
arrears of, in 1803, 263.
receipts from, in 1801 to 1805, 317.
receipts from, in 1814, 524, 526.
an increase of the. recommended, 531.—See Revenue,




^nvds

f*

555

INDEX.

Drawback of duties, considered in reference to the encouragement of manufactures, 114.
amount of, from 1790 to 1799,239.
system of, proposed to be modified, 378.—See Merchandise imported.
Dlilies, additional, proposed on wines, spirits, teas, and coffee, 22.
Duties on imports, tariifof, proposed to be modified, 218,227.
cost of collecting the, 218, 227.
an increase of, proposed, 219,242, 378, 401, 424,448.
Duties on imports and tonnage, estimated for 1790, 53.
^
for 1795.170.
Duties.—See Internal Duties, Protecting Duties, Imports, Merchandise.
Dutch debt, created in 1790, 166.
amount of, in 1794, 206.
amount of, in 1802, 225.
instalments payable to 1809, 250.
difficulties in remitting instalments of the, 254, <2b0.
amount of the, in 1803,276.
R

Embargo, its effects upon the revenue considered, 377, 503.
Estimates of receipts and expenditures for 1791, 45, 53.
1795,170,18o,2l4.
1801-2, 222.
1802-3, 253.
1803-4. 263.
1804-5, 286.
1805-6, 298.
1806-7, 331.
1807-8, 357.
1808-9, 375.
1809-10, 399.
1810-11, 422.
1811-12,444,448.
1812-13, 469.
1813-14,488, 500.
1814-15, 526, 530.
Exemption of nujeriajs ^ manmawun»
materials for
^
Expenditures.—See Receipts and Expenditures.
Exportation.—Sec Re-exportation.

^

<

F

Finances, ,he effects of a nationalbauk in administering.be, centered, 54.
Finances, state of the. in 1801,
1 erK>
1802,
1803,
1804,
1805,
1806,
1807,
1^08,
1809;




21b.
in'2.
252.
262.
285.
297.
331.
356.
373.
(June,) 391.

556

INDEX.

Finances, state of the, in 1809, (December.) 398.
1810, 421.
1811, 443.
1812,468.
1813, (June,) 48$.
1813, (December,) 499.
1814, 523.
Fisheries, benefited by manufactures, 107.
Florida, imports and exports to and from, for tho years 1799 to ISO2.20a,
281 to 284.
Foreign intercourse, expenses of, from 1801 to 1805, 325 — See Receipts
and Expenditure*.
Foreign officers, provision made in 1792, for paying certam, 166.
France, claims against, assumed by the United Stales, and paid, 264 6,288.
Frauds on the revenue, how prevented, 23.
Funding system established in 1790, 165.
G.
Gold and silver, amount of, increased by establishing banks, 55.
proportion of, in the United Stales, in 1790, esumated. 141.
1.

Imported articles, and the duty on each.—See Merchandise imported.
Imports from Great Britain in 1810, duties accrued on, 456.
a table of duties chargeablo on, in 1801, 227.
Imports, value and quantity of, from 1790 to 1800, 229 to 238.
amount of duties accrued on, from 1790 to 1799, 239.
_
quantity of consumed in the United States from 1790 to
duties accrued on, from October 1800, to October 1802, 259, 268.
duties accrued on, in the years 1802 and 1803, 290.
1801 to 1804,297.302,311.
1804 and 1805, 337.
1805 and 1806,362.
1806 and 1807,379.
1807 and 1808,403.
1808 and 1WI9, 426.
1809 and 1810, 451.
1810 and 1811, 47S.
1811 and 1812, 505.
1812 and 1 8 1 3 , 5 4 4 . — c h a n
dise imported.

Incidental revenues received from lst April, 1801, to 31st March, lbuo, o
—See Revenue.
Internal duties created in 1794,159.
Internal duties, receipts from in 1800, 218, 243.
cost of collection, 219.
receipts from, in 1801 to 1805,317.
outstanding, amount of in 1803, 263
proposed to be increased, 531.—See R»v*nvr .
Internal improvements, surplus revenue maybe applnxl to, 359.
Inventions and discoveries promote manufactures, 114.



„

INDEX.

557

L.

I^ands.—See Public Lands.
Laws creating revenue, and providing for the public debt, reviewed 157
Limitation act, passed in 1793, 167.
Loan recommended to supply a deficiency in the receipts. 392, 400 423
418, 471, 491.
'
'
'
'
Loans, foreign, amount of on 31st December, 1789, 31.
Loans preferred to taxes to meet the exigencies of a war, 377, 401.
Loans, amount received from, in 1810, 443.
1812, 468, 486.
1813, 488, 492. 499, 516.
1814, 524, 527.—See Revenue.
I*oans, term3 on which they were obtained, 441, 491, 492 to 49S; 519 to
522, 528 ; 535 to 540.
l»uisiana, provision for the purchase of, 264.
imports and exports to and from, for the years 1796 to 1802,
265, 281 to 284.
M.

Manufactures benefited by funding the public debt, 6.
expediency of encouraging, 78.
advantages of, 85.
encourage emigration, 87.
effects of, on commerce and agriculture, 90.
objections to encouraging, considered, 91, 103, 107.
progress of, in the United States, 102.
necessary to the independence of a country, 106.
sectional jealousies on the subject of, considered, 107.
how to be protected, 109.
materials for. exempted from duty, effect of, 113.
articles of, requiring particular encouragement, 118.
Massachusetts, amount due to, in 1789, 35.
Mediterranean fund, created, and estimated product of the, for 1805, 286.
duties constituting the, cease 1st January, 1809, 356.
a continuation of the, recommended, 378,401,424,448.
annual amount of.—See Merchandise imported, and
Revenue.
Merchandise imported and consumed, from 1790 to 1S00, 237, 241.
(paving ad valorem duties) in 1795 to 1800, 234.
(the quantity re-exported deducted) in 1801, 312.
1
1
1802,270.
1803, 291.
1804, 303.
1805, 338.
1806, 368.
1807, 380.
1808, 404.
re-exported in 1807 and 1808, 409.
imported, (the quantity reexported deducted,) in 1809, 427.




1811', 474.
1812, 506.
1813, 545.

152

INDEX.

Mint, plan for the establishment of a, 133.
expenses of a, how defrayed, 143, 150.
Molasws^np^rted and" consumed from 1790 U 1793, quantity of, 211.
>
See Merchandise imjxjrled.
N.

National bank proposed to be established, 54.
Navy expenses of 1802, estimated, 222.
1803,
do
253.
1804.
do
263.
1S05,
do
2S6.
1806,
do
298.
from 1st April. 1801, to 31st Maxell, 1S05, 327.
of 1807, estimated, 331.
1808,
do
358.
paid, 374.
1S09, estimated, 375, 392.
paid, 399.
from 1802 to 1807, 420.
of 1810, estimated. 400.
paid, 421.
1811, estimated. 423.
paid, 443, 466.
1812, estimated, 441.
paid, 468, 484.
1813, estimated, 470, 489.
paid, 490, 492, 499.
1814, estimated, 500.
paid, 523, 532.
1815, estimated, 530.
New Jersey, claim of, in 1789, 35.
New York, claim of, in 1789, 35.
Non-importation act, modification of the, proposed. 425.
O.

I
Officers of Government, compensation allowed to the, in 1790, 45.
P.
Paper money, the expediency of emitting, considered, 64.
Passports and clearances, amount of revenue derived from, in 1790
1798, 241—See Merchandise imported.
Penalties and forfeitures for infractions ofthe revenue laws, to be distrimted to informers and custom-house officers, 425.—See Revenue.
Postage of letters, receipts from, in 1901 to 1805, 317.--See Revenue.
Post Office, revenue derived from the, to be applied to the sinking fond,
review ofthe law establishing the, 159.
Premiums, effect of granung, on agriculture and manufactures, 113.



INDEX.

559

Protecting duties on imports considered as a bounty on domestic fabrics, 109.
the constitutional power to levy considered, 112.
Prohibitions of imports and exports may be resorted to for the encouragement and protection of manufactures, 109.
Public credit, plans for the support of, 3, 157,172.
a national bank necessary to the support of, 54.
essential to the prosperity of the nation, 197.
defined, 198.
Public debt, advantages of funding the, 5, 98.
nature of the provisions for funding the, 7,161.
of what it consists, 14, 168, 347.
plans for funding the, 17, 43, 45, 161.
plans for redeeming the, 22, 27, 165.
may constitute a part of the capital of a national bank, 72, 75,
157.
laws relating to the, reviewed, 157.
plan for completing the system for liquidating the, 173.
revenues pledged for the payment of the, 168.
amount of foreigu and domestic, in 1790, 14, 22, 31, 33.
1795, 169, 201 to 210.
1802, 223, 248, 250, 279.
when it may be redeemed, estimated, 172, 225, 251, 354.
amount paid, in 1802, 254.
1803, 264, 276.
1804,288,296.
1805. 299, 310.
from Apr. 1.1801, to March 31,1805,328,329,333.
in 1806, 333, 345.
plan for consolidating the, proposed, 333,347 to 3oo.
amount of the, in 1806, 349.
K
Q94 0 f ; i QK
estimated amount that maybe paid, m 1809 to 1824,354,3^.
amount paid in 1807, 358, 371.

in 1811, 445,461.
from April 1, 1801, to January 1,1812, 463.
amount on Januan; 1, 1812, 446, 464.
amount paid m 1812, 468,480. ^
1814, 534.

tt^^TT^Jl

p „ a.,
u,

j S ^ f f i f f i S S
1795 and 4801,
1 f i 219 244
proceeds of the, pledged for the public debt, 163.
S d t o l 8 0 1 , 220, 246.
intrusions on the, to be prevented, 221.
sold in 1802, 252, 257.



560

INDEX.

Public lands, sold in 1S03, 262, 274.
1904, 285, 291, 315.
1905, 297, 309.
receipts from, in f W l to 1905, 31 / .
sold in 1806, 331, 34s.
1907, 356. 368.
1908. 373, 385.
1809.398, 411.
sold from 1800 to 18(0, 421, 432.
sold in 1811,448.
,
tI .
JJO
may be applied as & bounty to soldiers enlisting, 448.
sold in 1812, 478.
1813, 511.
lbl-1,550.
*
m
Public vessels sold, 222.

I ]

3

|

R.

Receipts and expenditures, estimated for 1790, 45, 53.
1795, 170.
comparative view of the, for 1795, 214.
in 1801, 216.
1802, 252.
1803. 262.
1804,285.
^
from April 'l, 1801, to March 31, 1805, 317 to
330.
in 1806, 331.
1807, 356.
1808.373.
1809. 391, 395, 398, 419.
1810, 421, 438.
1811,443. 466.
1812, 468, 482, 486.
1813, 488, 492, 499, 616, 532.
1814, 523, 533.
Re-exportation of foreign merchandise in 1807 and 1908, 409.
Revenue, frauds of the, how to be prevented, 23.
plan for increasing the, 24.
laws relating to, reviewed, 157.
for what purposes pledg*»d, 168.
how to be increased in the event of war, 361, 378.
an increase of, proposed, 219, 242, 378, 401, 424, 448, W4from what sources derived, and the amount m 1795,
*




1801,216-

'

s

„lT

1901 to 1806,317,

322.
1808,395.
1809, 419.
1810, 438.
1811, 466.

v

INDEX.

561

Revenue, from what sources derived, and the amount in 1812,482,492.
1813, 492, 516, 518.
1814, 532-3.
See Receipts and expenditures.
S.
Salt imported and exported from 1790 to 1800, 233.
and consumed from 1790 to 1798, quantity of, 241.—See
Merchandise imported.
Salt duty expires lst January, 1808,356.
a renewal of the, recommended, 449, 490.—See Merchandise
imported.
Sinking fund, plan of a, proposed, 27.
established in 1790, 165, 171.
made permanent in 1792, 166, 169.
operations ofof the, in 1802, 260. 1795, 167, 1/1, -411.
proceedings the, to lst January,
state of the, in 1806, 346.
in 1810, 440.
in 1813, 498.
South Carolina, claim of, in 1789, 36.
Specie increased by the operation of banks, 55.
Si>ecie payments suspended by banks, 529.
S & 3

mortal

o ' W - S e e

Merchandise imported.
Snirits foreign and domestic, additional duties proposed on, M.
Stampdutiesexpire 4th March 1803 218, 2 2 1 . - ^ / ^ ,
State debts, ought to be assumed by the Union, 14, 28, 30.
amount of; estimated, So, fb.
provision for liquidating the, 164.

S ^ i ^ E S

S S S r E S b T l W

S u r p K ^ y C f t *

'o — '

quantity of, 2 4 , - S ,

- P —

S

'

359

'

T.
J K I I P 449. 490.—See Direct taxes.
O ^H W
Taxes, internal, proposed to be hmea

- S e e Merchandise >mPorlJ r - f r o m 1 7 9 0 to 1799, 240.
Tonnage, amount of American and foreign, from 17W to ^
^


Tot, i.—36


in 1803, 290.
1804, 302.
1805, 337.
1806, 362.
1807, 379.
1808, 394, 403.

INDEX.
Tonnage, amount of American and foreign, in 1909, 426.
181 li 473.
1812, 605.
1813, 544.
Tontine, proposed as a plan for funding the public debt, 20, 45.
Treasury notes, amount authorized in 1812, 469, 492.

treasury u

1813,492.499,518.

1814, 525. 529, 532, 541-2.
in circulation in 1914, 529.
an increase of the rate of interest on, proposed. 530.
y.

Virginia, claims of, in 1789. 36.
W.

Wines, additional duties proposed on, 22.
imported and consumed, quantity of, from 1790 to 1799, 241.Maxhandisc imported.




END OF T H E F I R S T VOLVME.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102