View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

ANNUAL REPOKT

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY

STATE OF THE FINANCES

FOR

THE YEAR

1870.

WASHINGTOlir.
©OTEENMENX P R I N T I N a OFF.ICE,




1870.




REPORT

SECKETART OF THE TREASURY.







TABLE OF CONTENTS.
[Index by subjects will be found on page 451.]
Page.

I. REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,
Tables acconapanying the rexiort
Liabilities to ludiao tribes
TI. REPORTS OF TREASURY OFFICERS :
Architect, Supervising
1. Public buildings and the cost of sites, construction and repairs up to
1870
2. Appropriations for the erection and repairs of same, showing expenditures for 1870, and balances remaining....3. ExxDenditures for furniture, and repairs of furniture
•
4. Expenditures for rejiairs and preservation of public buildings
5. Expenditures for beating apparatus.. .^
Auditor, First
Auditor, Second
Auditor, Third
Auditor, Fourth
Auditor, Fifth
1. Expenses of foreign missions for year ending June 30, 1870
:. "
2. Consular salaries and fees for year ending Juue 30, 1870
3. Expenditures for relief of American seamen, 1870
4. Number of destitute Ameri can seamen returned to the United States..
5. Amounts refunded to citizens and seamen, 1870
6. Department accounts received and allowed
7. Expenses of collecting the internal revenue taxes, 1870
8. Expenses of assessing the internal revenue taxes
9. Aniounts paid to internal revenue stamp agents
10. Amounts paid for printing internal revenue stamps
11. Accounts of Comnlissioner of Internal Revenue for stamps
12. Miscellaneous expenses of collecting internal revenue taxes, 1870
13. Diawbacks on. merchandise refunded, 1870
Auditor, Sixth
,
Bureau of Statistics
:
Coast Survey
•
Commissioner of Customs
Commissioner of Internal Revenue
Commissioner of Indian Affairs
Comptroller of the Currency
1. Statement showing the amount and kind of bonds held to secure circulation
2. Natioual bank s in hands of receivers
---3. Number and amount of each denomination of bank notes issued and
outstanding
4. Number of national banks in each State, capital, circulation, &c



.si=5.

iii
xvn
400
289
301
305
306
306
306
68'
78
98
122
132
133
137
142
144
144
145
146"
157
168
168
168
170171
176
311
324
60'
3
400'
2:i
3030'
31
32

TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.

IL REPORTS OF TREASURY OFFICERS-Continued.
5.° National banks in voluntary liquidation
6. Statement of the lawful-money reserves required by law
7. Expenditures for the fiscal year.
8. Officers and employes of the Bureau and their compensation
Comptroller, First
Comptroller, Second
Director of the Mint
Light-house Board
Register
Solicitor
Treasurer




_..

33
4
42
43
47
53
419
327
247
283
179

REPORT
OF

THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

December o, 1870.
S I R : The financial condition of the country has improved during the
past 5'ear. The average rate of gold for the year 1869, as shown by
weekly sales, was 32.9 per centuin premium, and for the first eleven
months of the year 1870, 15.2 per centum premium, indicating an improvement in the value of the paper currency of about 17 per centum.
From the 1st day of July, 1869, to the 30th of June, 1870, inclusive, the public debt, as shown by the warrant account, was reduced in
the sum of $101,601,916 88. Froai the 1st day of December, 1869,
to the 30th day of ISTovember, 1870, inclusive, the reduction was
$119,251,240 58, as shown by the monthly statements of the public
debt, and the total reduction, from the 1st of March, 1869, to the
1st of December, 1870; was $191,154,765 36. The consequent reduc»
tion in the interest account is at the rate of more than ten millions of
dollars per annum.
The receipts for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870, were as follows:
From customs
:
$194, 538, 374 44
From internal revenue
,
185,128, 859 37
From sales of public lands
3,350,481 70
From miscellaneous sources
28, 237, 762 06
411,255,477 63
The expenditures for the same period were:
For civil and miscellaneous purposes
For War Department
For Navy Department
For Indians and pensions . . "
:
For interest on the public debt

-..

$69,234,017
57, 655,675
21, 780,229
31, 748,140
129,235,498

16
40
87
32
00

309,653,560 75
This statement exhibits a surplus applicable to the payment of tho
public debt, including the amount pledged to the sinking fund by the
act of February 25, 1862, of $101,601,916 88.
.
^



IV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

The receipts for the first quarter of the present fiscal year were:
From customs .....
'
$57, 729, 473 57
From internal revenue
:
49,147,137 92
From sales of public lands
842,437 67
From miscellaneous sources
7,382,181 59
115,101,230 75
The expenditures for the same period, excluding payments on account
of the sinking fund, were :
For civil and miscellaneous purposes
,
$18,207,242 49
For War Department. ...."
J.,...
10,218,538 36
For Navy Department
4,815,237 58
For Indians and pensions
13, 825,451 89
For interest on the public debt
39,496,450 51
. 86, 562, 920 83
The estimated receipts for the remaining three quarters of the present
year are as follows:
From customs
$128,000,000 00
From internal revenue
98,000,000 00
From sales of public lands
2,000, 000 00
From miscellaneous sources
16,000, 000 00
244,000,000 00

The estimated expenditures for the same period are:
For civil and miscellaneous purposes
.'
$54,000,000 00
For War Department
»
30,000,000 00
For Navy Department
.'
15,000, 000 00
For Indians and pensions
24^ 500,000 00
For interest on the public debt
80,000,000 00
203, 500, 000 00
Showing a balance applicable to the payment of the public debt,
includiug, however, the amount payable on account of the sinking fund,
of $69,038,309 92.
In estimating the expenditures for the next fiscal year, I have included
the sum of $24,500,000, i)roperly chargeable to the current revenue as
an appropriation under the acts of February 25,1862, and July 14,1870,
relating to the sinking fund. Although the language employed in
those acts is not the language commonly used in appropriation bills, it
still has the force and effect of a permanent appropriation, i therefore
so treat ito



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

V

There will be required also the sum of $4,866,933, being the amount
answering to the interest on the capital of the sinking fund as represented upon the books of the Department. This sum I have included in
the estimate of expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1872.
Upon this basis I submit the following estimate of receipts and expenditures for the next fiscal year:
Estimated receipts and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1872.
RECEIPTS.

From
From
From
From

customs
internal revenue
sales of public lands
miscellaneous sources

.
-

$175, 000,000
126,418, 000
3,000, 000
16, 000,000
320, 418, 000

EXPENDITURES.

Legislative establishment
Executive establishment
Judicial establishment
Military establishment
......'.
Naval establishment
,
Indian affairs ..,
Pensions
.,
,
Public w-orks
Postal service
Miscellaneous
1
Permanent appropriations
Sinking fund
Interest upon the capital of the sinking fund

$3,263, 966
17,238,165
2,348, 750
'...
28,488,194
20,045, 417
'
5, 021,569
30, 000, 000
22,338,278
4, 694,383
14,305,428
132, 528,234
'. 24,500, 000
4,866, 933

34
50
00
00
77
03
00
37
00
60
00
00
00

309, 639, 319 61
According to this estimate there will be a surplus applicable to the
payment of the principal of the public debt, in addition to the payments,
made on that account through the sinking fund, of $10,778,680 39.
An analysis of the expenditures develops facts tending to sustain the
opinion that the balance will be considerably larger than appears from
the foregoing estimates.
The sum of $22,338,278 37 is the estimate for public works. The
appropriations for these objects for the present year are less than
$12,000,000, and it is reasonable to presume that the appropriations for
the next year will not much exceed that amount.
I t is believed, also, that the estimates made by the several Departments, for the different branches of the public service, are for the maximum amounts which will be required under any circumstances. I f



VI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

such is the case, there will remain on the 30th of June, 1872, unexpended balances to be covered into the treasury.
I t may, therefore, be reasonably anticipated that the total reduction
of the public debt during the next fiscal year, including payments on
account of the sinking fund, will be about fifty millions of dollars.
It is a noticeable fact that the estimated expenditures for the next
fiscal year, including payments on account of the sinking fund, and for
the interest on the public debt, are so nearly equal to the receipts as to
justify and demand the greatest caution in dealing with the revenues
and business of the country. I t is apparent that a disaster, or even a
serious check to business, would reduce the revenues below our necessary expenditures.
I t is apparent, also, t h a t the prosperous condition-of the country is
largely due to the revenue system inaugurated during the war, by which
manufactures and the mechanic arts have been extended aud^established.
This policy cannot now be rashly abandoned, or suddenly and radically
changed, without great injury to business and labor, and serious consequent losses of revenue.
The war in Europe has rendered it impracticable to refund the
national debt, as authorized by the act approved July 14, 1870. A
portion ofthe paper-has been manufactured, and the preparation ofthe
plates lias been so far advanced that whenever a favorable opportunity
arises the loan may be off'ered and the bonds delivered without delay.
Inasmuch as the war in Europe, and the consequent demand for
money, made it doubtful whether the four and the four and a half
per cent, bonds will be taken, it seems to me wise to authorize the
issue of three hundred millions additional of bonds bearing interest at
the rate of five per cent. The interest can be paid quarterly without
inconvenience, and I therefore respectfully recommend that the loan act
be so modified that the payment of interest may be made quarterly instead of semi:annually. Should these recommendations be approved by
Congress, it is of great importance that an act authorizing the changes
be passed without delay.
Since the 1st of July the currency balance in the treasury has been
unusually, and, for immediate purposes, unnecessarily large.
The act of July 12, 1870, authorizing an increase of national banknotes, imposed uponthe Secretary of the Treasury the duty of providing
for the redemption of equal amounts of three per cent, certificates.
The certain though prospective decrease in the revenues, both of coin
and curreucy, made it my duty to reserve a sum sufficient to enable the
Department to comply with thelaw without resorting to extraordinary
means. Happily, the financial condition of the country has not been
unfavorably affected by the accumulations in the treasury.
During the year ending September 30, 1870, the national banks paid
in interest the sum of $6,486,172 66, It is estimated that of this sum
two millions were paid to private parties. I cannot doubt that the prac


EEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

VII

tice of paying interest, except upon balances due from one bank to
another, is a means by which large amounts of capital are diverted from
the extreme xiortions of the country to the commercial and financial centers, to the injury of business generally. The province of a bank is to
lend money, and its proper duty is, by loans and discounts, to facilitate
and develop business in the neighborhood of its location. As a matter
of fact, under the present system, banks are agencies by which capital
is gathered in and sent away to distant cities, there to be loaned on call
and used for speculative purposes.
Complaints are made from all parts of the country that the bills of
the national banks are worn and defaced to such an extent as to be no
longer fit for circulation. As many new banks are soon to be organized
under the law of the last session of CongTess, I respectfully recommend
that an appropriation be made and authority given for the issue of new
bills, upon such paper and in such form as may be designated by the
Secretary of the Treasury.
The Comptroller of the Currency, in his report for 1869, recommended
the establishment of an agency in the city of New York, under the control of the national banks, for the redemption of their issues. The substance of this recommendation seems to me not only proper but necessary. The expense should be borne by the banks.
^^
Coupled with these recommendations, I take this occasion to say that
the banking system of the country appears to be well managed, and to
answer reasonably the purposes for which it was established. It is no
doubt true that treasury notes representing an equal amount of the
public debt without interest are the most economical circulation for
the Government. But it should be considered that the banking institu-^
' tions of the country are agencies by which business is established and
fostered. Upon the whole, the system of banking should be extended
only for the purpose of meeting the demai d i of business; but when the
demands are urgent the concession should be made, upon the ground
that the prosperity of business is more important than the mere saving
of interest arising from the circulation of treasury notes.
Excluding re-deposits, the amount of gold and silver deposited at
the Mint and its several branches, during the last fiscal year, was
$30,408,788 10; the coinage for the year was $24,636,011 / and the
value of gold and silver bars stamped was $8,748,852 91.
I respectfully ask the attention of Congress to the bill prepared iu
this Department and submitted at the last session, and to the accompanying report, relative to the mints and the coinage system of the
country. The bill was prepared with care, and it has since been submitted to the criticism of a large number of practical and scientific
men, whose views have been published by authority of Congress.
During the year the several branch mints and assay offices have
been visited and examined by Mr. Knox and Dr. Lindermann. The



vm

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

assay officGf at Boise City, Idaho, is nearly completed, audit will require
a small appropriation for the commencement of business.
Provision should be made for the redemption of the bronze and other
tokens issued by the Government.
The report of the Commissioner of Mining Statistics for the year
1869 has been printed since the close of the session in July last, and
that for the year 1870 will be made during the winter. The continuance
of the work appears to be a matter of national importance.
The proportion of American vessels engaged in foreign trade has not
increased relatively during the year, although there has been an actual
increase in the entries of American vessels at the ports of the United
States, amounting, in the aggregate, to about 130,000 tons. The total
tonnage engaged in the foreign trade entered at all of the ports of the
United States has increased from 5,583,000 tons in 1869, to 5,957,000
tons in 1870, but the proportion of American tonnage remains as in 1869
at 36 per cent.
.Without undertaking to specify the means by which it is to be accomplished, I cannot overstate the importance of such legislation as will
secure the revival of American commerce.
The report of the Light-House Board sets forth in detail the difficulties which have arisen in that branch of the public service fromthe
operation of the fifth section of the act of July 12, 1870, making
appropriations for the legislative and executive expenses of the Government for the year ending June 30,1871. The legislation asked for
by the board seems to me to be necessary.
The report of the Superintendent of the Coast Survey gives a brief
but satisfactory stateinent of the progress made during the last surveyng year.
On the 1st day of October last, regulations were issued concerning
the transportation qf merchandise from the ports of importation to
certain other ports in the United States, without appraisement or liquidation of duties at the port of arrival, agreeably to the provisions of
an act entitled ^ An,act to reduce internal taxes, and for other pur^
poses," approved July 14, 1870. A copy of the regulations will be
transuiitted to Congress. In the nature of the case, the regulations
are stringent; but when the railway companies shall have given the bonds
required, and the importing merchants of the interior cities shall have
made arrangements for the importation of goods upon the basis of the
act, I am satisfied that no serious difficulties will arise, either to the
railways, the laerchants, or the Government. Without doubt, the act
increases the opportunity for the introduction of foreign goods into the
country in violation of the revenue laws; but the examination which I
have given to the subject, in the preparation of the regulations, leads
. me to think that the business can be safely conducted.
The appropriation for the expenses of collecting the customs revenue,
under the act approved May 3,18665 is at the rate of $4,200,000 annually.



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

IX

in addition to such sums as may be received from fines, penalties, and
forfeitures, and from storage, cartage, drayage, and labor. Experience
has shown that this amount is insufficient, and a deficiency appropriation
will be needed at each session of Congress until the permanent appropriation is increased. I have instituted a careful supervision in the
Treasury Department over this branch of expenditures, and agents are
emxiloyed in in^^estigating the expenses of the custom-houses of the
countiy, for the xiurpose. of ascertaining whether the modes of business
can be simplified and made more economical, and also whether a reduction of the number of employes or of salaries is practicable. By this
ineans some saving will be effected, but it will even then be impossible
to reduce the expenses within the appropriation. From 1858 to 1866
the permanent appropriation was at the rate of $3,600,000 per annum,
in addition to the receipts before enumerated as axiiDlicable to this branch
of the service. From 1856 to 1860, inclusive, the total receipts from
customs were about $272,000,000, and the exxDcnses of collection were
$15,879,000, or at the rate of more than five and one half per cent.
The receipts for the year ending June 30, 1870, were $194,538,374 44,
and the expenses $5,912,113 63, or not exceeding three and one half per
cent. From 1858 to 1860 the revenue collected did not exceed ^ an
.avera.ge.of $50,000,000 a year; and the temptation to smuggling and
fraud was much, loss under a low system^ of duties than it is at the
Xiresent time. At the x^i'iiicipal importing cities of the country it is
necessary to employ a large force for the x^i'otection of the wharves and
water lines Avithin or near to such cities. It is also necessary to guard
against smuggling, b y t h e presence often of several officers upon and
around the steamers and other vessels importing large quantities of
goods, while engaged in discharging their cargoes. It is also apparent
that the extensive line of coast on the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and
the Gulf of Mexico, everywhere furnishing opportunities for the introduction of goods in violation of the revenue laws, requires the presence
of a large number of skillful and tru^-tworthy persons. The acquisition
of Alaska, the establishment of interior ports of entry, the accommodation of business by railways aiid steamers on the northern frontier, add
materially to the expenses of collecting and guarding the revenue. I
therefore respectfully recom:mend the increase of the permanent axipropriation for collecting the revenue from customs t o the sum of $2,600,000
ibr each half-year from and after the 30th day of June, 1870.
x\.t several of the important ports there are two appraisers, whose
powers are equal. I recommend such an alteration of the law as will
provide for one principal appraiser at each port, who shall be responsible
for the business of the office.
The Treasury Department has the care of one hundred and ten public
buildings that are comxileted, and-of seventeen more that are in the course
of erection, all of which had cost, on the 30th of June last, $3.5,900,998 93.



X

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

The appropriation for the repair and preservation of these buildings
for the current year is $100,000, a sum manifestly inadequate, being
less than one-third of one x^^^* cent. Unless larger annual appropriations are made, the buildings will raxiidly deteriorate in value, and
finally will need much larger rexiairs, or the erection of new ones in their
stead.
With the increase of population in the country, appropriations must
be annually made for the erection of post offices, custom-houses, and
other public buildings. The xiresent mode of inaugurating these works
seems to me unwise. Apxiropriations are often made without sufficient information upon the subject. It is true that, when a proposition is introduced into Congress for the erection of a public building, the subject is reterred to the Treasury Department, and by the
Secretary to the Suxiervising Architect of the Treasury; but it is also
true that the Supervising Architect has only general information upon
the subject, and in answer to a sudden call, and without time for
the preparation of plans and estimates, he cannot give a safe opinion
as to the necessity or the cost of the w^ork. I respectfully recommend
that hereafter, when apxilications are made for the construction of public
buildings, the first step on the xiart of Congress be to instruct the
Treasury Department to make careful inquiry as to the necessity
of the work, and also to prepare estimates to be laid before Congress.
This beiug done, and the work authorized, it would seem to be wise to
make a single approxiriation, sufficient to meet the entire cost, and then
hold the Department and the Supervising Architect responsible for the
speedy completion of the building, substantially upon xilans duly authorized'and within the estimates. I am satisfied that much waste of public
inoney occurs, and much complaint on the part of citizens arises, when
small ax)prox:)riations are made from year to year. The inevitable consequence of the policy is that the public works are injured in the process
of construction and the exxienses are largely increased.
The Supervising Architect of the Treasury states in his report that
the expenditure authorized bylaw for the construction of the post office
in the city bf New York will be inadequate, unless the character of
the work is changed from the original design. I t seems to be due to the
city of New York, for general and apparent reasons, and in consideration of the fact that a most eligible site has been secured, by the
cooperation and in some degree at the expense of the city, that the
building should not only be a fire-proof structure, but also of such
design and workmanship as to rank among the best public buildings of
the country.
A t t h e present time there are twenty-four steamers and ten sailing
vessels attached to the revenue marine service, the number having been
reduced during the year by the sale of two vessels of the latter class.
A t the third session of the fortieth Congress an appropriation of
},000 was made for the construction of four steam revenue-cutters.



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XI

After proposals had been issued and bids received, wliich were rejected
under the impression on my xiart that the public interests did not
require vessels of as large size as those for which proposals had been
issued, I ax^pointed a commission, by letter dated December 16, 1869,
consisting of Captain C. T. Patterson, of the Coast Survey, Captain
Douglass Ottinger and Captain J. H. Merryman, of the Revenue Marine,
and instructed them to consider and report upon the character of the
vessels best adapted to the service. Final action in reference to the
construction of the vessels authorized was delayed for the report of
the commission. That report was made on the 1st day of May, 1870.
(E.xecutive Document No. 93, Senate, second session of the present
Congress.) Upon the comxiletion of the work of the commission, proXiosals were again issued for the construction of the four vessels authorized bylaw. Satisfactory bids were received, and on the 22d of July
and the 22d of August last contracts Avere made./ The construction
given b y t h e Comptroller to the ^fifth section of "The act making
appropriations for the legislative, executive, and judicial expenditures
of the Government for the year ending the 30th of June, 1871,"
rendered the appropriation unavailable, and it therefore became necessary to notify the parties to the contracts that they must be considered as null and void. One of the parties has asked to have his contract formally annulled, Avhich has been done.
I recommend a renewal of the appropriation of $300,000 for the construction of steam revenue-cutters, without limitation as to the number
or specification as to the size of the vessels to be built.
The rexiort of the commission shows that thirteen of the vessels
BOW in use are either old or not adapted to the service. The opinion
entertained by me that the vessels in use were larger than the nature
of the service required, is confirmed by the rexiort of the commission.
They recommend that the number be reduced to thirty-two, and the aggregate tonnage reduced from 9,208 tons to 7,175 tons. They also state
that it will be practicable, upon the proposed basis, to reduce the total
number of officers, pilots, petty officers, and men, from 1,266, the number then in service, to 1,061; and the actual expense of maintaining
the system, not including apxiropriations for the construction of new
vessels, from $1,446,490, to $943,639, making a saving of more than
half a million of dollars a year. The report of the commission is the
result of a careful and comx)rehensive ex^amination of the subject by
competent men, and, while it is the xiresent purpose of the Department
to act upon it, I am of ox)inion that it should receive legislative sanction.
On the 9th of July, 1869, I convened a board of examiners, who
were charged, among other things, with the examination of the officers of
the Revenue Marine. The board is comxiosed of Captains Faun ce and
Slicer, of the Revenue Marine, and Captain Patterson, of the Coast
Survey. The examination has not yet been comxileted, as only a small
number of officers could be detailed for examination at the same time.



XTI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

One hundred ahd ten lieutenants have been examined. Ten first
lieutenants, nine second lieutenants, and six third lieutenants were
reported for removal, and have been removed. The vacancies thus
created in the first and second grades were filled by xiromotions, and
the vacancies in the lowest grade will be filled by qualified persons
selected at large. The examination of the remaining officers will be
continued.
The condition of the marine hospitals has been imxiroved during the
past year. This result is largely due to Dr. J. S. Billings, of the Surgeon GeneraPs Office, who has visited nearly all of them, and through
whose advice many imxDortant changes have been made.
No appointment has yet been made of a suxierintendent under the
act of the last session. The authority therein granted to appoint a
superintendent is desirable, although the salary does not appear to .bo
sufficient. I however recommend such an. alteration of the law as will
permit the President to detail a surgeon of the Army or Navy to perform the duty of superintendent, without any addition to his x)ay other
than his necessar3' traveling expenses. With such authority, the Dexiartment could have the benefit of the services of Dr. Billings, or some
other competent surgeon, with less expense than would be involved in a
regular appointment, even with, the present salary.
Five of the principal ports of the country. New York, New Orleans,
San Francisco, Baltimore, and Philadelphia, are without hosx)ii^al accomjnodation.s, and provision is made for the patients by contract Avith hospitals or private parties. The War Department is in possession of a
very desirable hospital at New Orleans, known as the Sedgwick Hospital,
aiid*I earnestly recommend the passage of an act by which the building
may be transferred to the Treasury Department for a marine hospital,
and an axixiropriation made for the purchase of the land on which it
stands. At the last session the attention of Congress was called to the
subject of transferring David's Island, at New York, from.the War Department to the Treasury Department, for the establishment of a marine
hospital. This recommendation, is now respectfully renewed.
In compliance with the act of July 1, 1870, in reference to the seal
fisheries, xiroposals w^ere issued and bids received for the exclusive right
to the fisheries for the term of twenty years. The x'>hraseology emxiloyed
in the act warranted the interpretation that the contract should be
awarded to the Alaska Commercial Company if their proposition was as
favorable to the Government as that of any other party, and upon that
basis the contract was awarded to that company. A copy of the contract and of the xiapers connected therewith will be transmitted to
Congress.
About eighty-six thousand seal-skins have arrived at San Francisco,
as the product ofthe year 1869, on which the owners have xiaid one dollar each, as required by the sixth section of said act.
I consider it my duty to call the attention of Congress to the



REPORT OP THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XIII

inadequacy and inequality ofthe salaries of the officers in the Treasury
Department, as fixed by law. The offices recently established are
supported by xiroper salaries; but the salaries attached to man3^ of those
created at the organization of the Government are insufficient. As a
temporary means of alleviating the admitted evil. Congress has, from
time to time, and for many years, annually made apxiroxiriations, to
be used at the discretion of the Secretary, for additions to salaries of
officers in the Department. In the nature o f t h e case, this is a disagreeable duty for the Secretary to x^erform, is usually unsatisfactory^ to
the parties interested, and the result has not the sanction and support
incident to a system of specific salaries established by law. At the
Xiresent time the sum of $21,300 is distributed by the Secretary in his
discretion. After a careful examination of the subject, I find that an
additional appropriation, not exceeding $16,000 a year, will be sufficient
to provide adequate salaries for the officers of the Treasury Dex:)artment.
The act of 1853 in regard to the examination of clerks has been
observed by this Department, and with beneficial results. It is worthy
of consideration, however, whether it would not be wise to provide by
law for an examining board, the majority of whose members should not
be officers of the Department to which the clerk is to be assigned, in case
of appointment and approval. This system should also be extended to
the x^rincipal custom-houses and revenue offices of the country. By such
an arrangement, adequate security would be taken for the character and
qualifications of clerks, as far as they can be ascertained or tested
without actual service in the discharge of official duty. It is well understood, however, that no exaraination can furnish security that the person examined will x3rove satisfactoiy upon trial, and there should always
be a speedy and easy method of removing such persons from office. I do
not, therefore, accept the idea that the tenure of office for the clerks and
employes in this Department should be changed. Indeed, I believe that
the x')i''esent tenure of office furnishes the best security which the people
of the country can have that the business of the Government will
be efficiently and properly performed. The work of the Treasury Department does not differ essentially from the business done in banking houses
and raer.chant^s counting rooms; and there is no reason why the tenure
of office should be permanent in one case that does not axix)ly with equal
force in the others. I t does happen practically that there are" in the
Treasury Dexiartment, and in every bureau and office of it, men who have
been connected with the service for several years, and who x^ossess all
the knowledge derived from experience and tradition that is essential to
, the performancccof their duties.
Excluding the employ6s of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing,
. and the messengers and laborers, there were 2,143 officers.and clerks
connected with the Treasury Department at Washington on the 1st day
Of November, 1870; and of these, 1,489 were in office on the 4th day of



XIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

March, 1869, leaving 654 as the total number of appointments made
since that time.
Previous to the war the business of the Department was so small that
on the 1st of March, 1861, only 433 persons were emxiloyed, and of
these fifty-seven are now in the service. One has been in office over
fifty years, two others over forty years, one over thirty-five years, seven
over thirty years, one over twenty-five years, ten over twenty years,
fourteen over fifteen years, and twelve over ten years.
These statements show that the changes in the Department are not so
numerous as to deprive the service of the knowledge derived from
experience. On the other hand, the introduction of new men secures
additional energy and efficiency. Two errors x^revail in the community
in connection with the subject. One is that under a republican government every man has a right to an office. This is in no sense true.
The only right is that of the people to elect and to have appointed to
office persons best qualified to perform the work. The other error is
that offices in the Treasury Department are x^zes which the young men
of the country may wisely seek. Speaking generally, it is a misfortune
to a young man, who possesses even ordinary capacity for business or
labor, to remain x>ermanently in the public offices of this city. It is,
however, true that many of the most valuable clerks in the Treasury are
young men who are i)^ii^s^iing xirofessional studies, or who, having completed the course, remain from one to four years in the Dexiartment with
the purpose, by industry and economy, of securing a small amount of
monej' with which to commence active life elsewhere. A system of life
tenure would exclude all these men from the service, unless they choose
to accex)t it as a x^^Tmanent x^ui'suit, Avhich in the main Avould be an
injury to them and to the country.
I am also fully convinced that any more xiermanent tenure of office
would materially impair the efficiency of the revenue system. There
are many thousand.men eraployed in the customs and internal revenue
service, and, however careful the xireliminary examination might be, the
evils which now imxiair its efficiency AVould undoubtedly exist. No system of examination could exclude all those who are dishonest, or who,
under the pressure of necessity or the offer of sudden wealth, might
yield- to temptation. It often haxipens, and it Avould happen under
any system, that men are found who are honest, temperate, and apparently capable, and yet lack the energy or the courage essential to
the enforcement of the revenue laws—a duty Avhich often requires
sagacity and a kind of intelligence too subtle foi discovery through formal questions. Men who are thus unqualified should be removed from
olfice, and this without an investigation, which, indeed, might furnish
nothing tangible in justification of the act. So, too, in custom-houses or
collection districts, a branch of the service will fail to meet just expectations, although no dishonesty may be traceable to any xierson connected with the office. In such cases the interests of the Government



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XY

demand a change, and a change must be made Avithout a hearing of the
parties concerned.
I may be warranted in saying in this connection that the evil of officeseeking, although great, is probably exaggerated in the public mind. I t
is true that there are more applications.for appointment to office in the
Department than can be inet, but the number of applicants who are
well qualified, and who could pass any proper examination, is not usually
very large. Outside of the Department, and in the several States and
districts of the country, the nuraber of applicants for local offices does
not often exceed three or four to each office, and occasionally there are
not more than two who are really so presented as to be considered in
connection with the appointment.
In justification of the present tenure, and as a proper recognition of
the services of the officers and clerks employed in this Department, I
express the opinion that the business, upon the whole, is not only done
in a satisfactory manner, but that it Avill compare in accuracy and efficiency with the business of the country generally, which is carried on
by corporations or individuals.
In my annual report of December last, I advised the continuance of
the existing system of taxation as an essential condition to the success
of the xiroposed loan. The circumstance that war was declared between
France and Prussia simultaneously with the passage of the loan bill put
it out of the poAver of the Department to make the negotiation as had
been expected. The large revenues, however, of the Government continuing without material abatement until the present time, imx')roved
the credit ofthe country, enabled the Treasury Dexiartment, by weekly
liurchases, to reduce the amount of surxilus bonds offered for sale, and
contributed to depreciate the market value of gold.
I also expressed the oxiinion that the settled policy of the country
should contemplate a reveuue sufficient to meet the ordinary expenses
of the Government, pay the interest on the xmblic debt, and from
twenty-five to fifty millions of dollars of the x^iincipal annually. The
reduction of the public debt since the 30th day of June last has been so
great as to render it certain that the total reduction for the xiresent fiscal
year will exceed sixty millions of dollars. The natural increase of the
business ofthe country during the next eighteen months is likely to be
such as to show a surplus for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1872, of
about forty millions of dollars.
The principal of the pubhc debt on the last day of NoA-^ember, 1870,
not deducting moneys on hand, Avas $2,418,673,044 43. Of this amount
$395,269,237 08 was represented by United States notes and fractional
currency, not bearing interest. The banks of the country, acting within
the authority of existing laws, will require about $393,000,000 of bonds
to be xilaced on deposit as security for their circulation. Should the
present system of furnishing a paper circulation for the country, partly
by the Treasury and partly by the national banks, be continued, or the



XVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

entire circulation be furnished by the Treasury, or by the banks, the
credit of the United States Avill be the security for the redemption of the
notes. From this vicAV of the policy of the country it follows that about
$800,000,000 of the public debt Avill remain unxiaid, existing either in the
form of treasury notes in circulation without interest, or in bonds owned
by the banks and held as security for the redemption of their notes,
and that only about $1,600,000,000 of the principal of the debt is subject
tp xiayment.
The financial prosxiect, although highly faA'orable, is not such as to
warrant iraportant changes in thereA^enue system a t t h e present session
of oCongress; but should the result during the coming year meet my
expectations, it Avill be possible at the December session of the fortysecond Congress to make a A^ery material reduction in the revenues
Avithout imxiairing the ability of the GoA^ernment to raake satisfactory
payments of the public debt The reduction already made has been
advantageous to the countr}- not only in the xiarticulars indicated, but in
other respects hardly less important. There is much CA^dence tending to
show that no other event since the conclusion of the war has contributed
so much to the diffusion of republican opinions in Europe. The spread
ot these opinions stimulates emigration from Europe, and at the same
time X3repares the Avay for the establishment of free institutions on that
continent. Nor can there be any doubt that a policy accepting the debt
as xiermanent would retard emigration from Europe, especially of the
reading and reflecting classes.
Whatever arguments may be adduced, or whatcA^er theories advanced?
the fact must CA^er remain that a public debt is a public evil. I t is
especially burdensome to the laboring classes, and it is, therefore, in their
interest to xirovide for the constant reduction of the existing national
debt. This x^olicy will not xirevent such changes in the reveuue system
from time to time as Avill equalize the inevitable burdens of our present
condition; and Avithin a comparatively short period the taxes may be
removed from many articles of x^rime necessity. It is the occasion of
satisfaction that no other nation ever passed through a great war with
so. slight a shock to industry and business. Specific information, and
general intelligence from various parts of the Uuited States, show that
all classes, and especially the laboring classes, are in the enjoyment of
more than average prosperity, Avhether tested by the experience of this
country, or by the present condition of other nations.
No reason can be fo.und, howcA^er, in the favorable condition of public
and priA^ate affairs, for neglecting any proper means for equalizing and
° diminishing the burden of taxation; but it does justify the statement that
the nation can make provision for the public debt, in the manner recommended, Avithout embarrassing its industry or retarding its progress.
GEO. S. BOUTWELL,
Secretary of ilie Treasury.
Hon.

JAJMES G . B L A I N E ,

Speaker ofthe House of Eepresentatives,



EEPOET OF THE SECEETAEY OF THE TEEASUEY.

XVII

TABLES ACCOMPANYmG THE REPORT.
'TABLE

A.—Stateinent of the net receipts (by tvarra>ntsj for the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1870.

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ending
euding
ending
endii.ig

CUSTOMS.

September 30, 1869
December 31, 1869
Marcb 31, 1870
June 30, 1870

|52, 598, 921
41, 308,147
48,196, 911
52, 434, 394

86
00
16
42
1194,538, 374 44

SALES O F P U B L I C LANDS.

Quarter euding
Quarter endiug
Quarterending
Quarter endiug

September 30, 1869
December 31, 1869
March 31, 1870
:
June 30, 1870

893,864
820, 682
673,888
962, 046

08
96
17
55
3,350,481 76

D I R E C T TAX.

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ending
ending
ending
ending

September 30, 1869
December 31, 1869
Marcb 31, 1870
June 30, 1870

229,102 88
,
229,102 88

INTERNAL R E V E N U E .

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ending
ending
ending
ending

September 30, 1869
December 31, 1869
Marcb 31, 1870
June 30,1870

47, 926, 352
37,264,738
37, 980, 411
61,728,254

51
55
01
42
184,899,756 49

P R E M I U M ON SiULES OE COIN.

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ending
ending
ending
ending

September 30, 1869
December 31, 1869
March 31, 1870
June 30, 1870
'

1
,

3, 243, 583
8,261, 376
2,114, 422
1, 674,754

64
67
27
79

.
15,294,137 37

TAX. ON CIRCULATION, D E P O S I T S , E T C . , O F NATIONAL BANKS.

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ending^September 30, 1869
endiug December 31, 1869
ending March 31, 1870
ending June 30, 1870

2,893, 946
23,884
2, 874,121
52,498

56
86
27
41
5,844,451 10

R E P A Y M E N T O F I N T E R E S T B Y P A C I F I C RAILWAY COMPANIES.

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ending
ending
ending
ending

September 30, 1869
December 31, 1869
March 31, 1870
June 30, 1870

127, 343
204, 557
169, 481.
115,217

'

12
33
33
12
616,598 90

CUSTOMS F I N E S , P E N A L T I E S , AND F E E S .

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ending
ending
ending
ending

September 30, 1869
December 31,1869
March 31, 1870
June 30, 1870

184,142
170,173
290, 685
248,269

"

43
59
09
97 .
—

893,271 08

F E E S — C O N S U L A R , L E T T E R S P A T E N T , STEAMBOAT, AND LAND.

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ending
ending
ending
ending

September 30, 1869
December 31, 1869
March 31, 1870
June 30, 1870

II F



487,138
356, 884
424,576
596,135
./

23
27
79
11
:—

1,864,734 40

XYIII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE_ TREASURY.
MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES.

Quarter
Quarter
Qnarter
Quarter

ending September 30, 1869
ending December 31,1869
ending March 31, 1870
ending June 30, 1870

$476, 329
2, 003, 654
748, 095
496,489

59
94
20
48
$3,724,569 21.

Total receipts ^exclusive of loans
411,255,477 63^
Balance in Treasury June 30, 1869, (including $2,070 73 received from
"Unavailable.")
155,680,340 85
• 1566,935,818 48
TABLE.

B.—Statement of the net expenditures (by ivarrants) for the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1870.
civn..

Congress...."
Executive
Judiciary
Governmeut of Territories
Sub-treasuries
Surveyor General's Office
Inspectors of steam vessels
Mints and assay offices

$6,218,221
' 9,297,053
2,610, 342
240,587
305,075
114,962
124, 060
120,979

74
72
53
33
06^ •
89
59
70

Total civil list

$19,031,283 56'
FOREIGN

INTERCOURSE.

Diplomatic salaries
Salaries of United States consuls
Office rent and other expenses of consulates
Expenses under the neutrality act
Rescuing American citizens from shipAvreck
Relief and protection of American seamen
Expenses under habeas corpus act
Hudson's Bay and Puget Sound Agricultural Company
commission
American and Mexican claims commission
Capitalization of Scheldt d u e s . . . . ,
Consular receipts
Contingent and miscellaneous items
,.......
Total foreign intercourse

473,745
471,744
124,721
30, 488
10,500
5'4,171
2,942
^
8,526
20,981
55,584
7,811
229,558

99
35
48
95
00
34
95
20
03
00
24
72

:

' 1,490,776 25

MISCELLANEOUS.

Mint establishment
Coast Survey
Carrying free mail-matter.-.
Light-house establishment
Refunding excess of deposits for unascertained duties .
Revenue-cutter service
Custom-house buildings
Furniture, fuel, &c., for custom-houses
Repairs and preservation of custom-houses
CoUecting customs revenue
Debentures and drawbacks under customs laws
„
Refunding duties erroneously or iUegally collected
Marine hospital establishment
Distributive shares of fines, penalties^and forfeitures ..
Defending suits for captured and abandoned projierty.
Unclaimed merchandise
Examiners of drugs
Assessing and coUecting internal revenue
Internal revenue allowance and drawbacks



1,067,097
506,479
1,200, 000
2,588, 300
1, 835,375
1,138, 393
569, 392
91,711
176, 606
6,237,137
823,419
226,699
371,213
237,796
40,823
8,847
3,084
7,234,531
507,640

95
06
00
59
45
31
67
53
39
25
54
87
11
86
62
13
24
12
72

R E P O R T OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XIX

Punishing violation of internal revenue laws
$88,115 82
Refunding moneys erroneously covered
2, 932 49
Public buildings and grounds in Washington
243, 010 76
Payment of Texas creditors
10,782 87
Mail steamsliip service
706,250 00
Telegraphic communication between the Atlantic and
Pacific
40,000 02
Mail transportation overland to California
175, 829 21
Deficiencies in revenue of Post Office Department
2,762, 500 00
Court-houses, post offices, &c
„
'
1,293,230 59
Refunding proceeds of captured and abandoned prop• erty
'
'
472,128 02
Patent Office expenses
^..,
565,675 31
Columbian Institute for Deaf and Dumb
45, 000 00
Government Hospital for the Insane
150, 834 68
Capitol extension and dome
125, 000 00
Jail in the District
26, 035 75
Support of sixty transient jDaupers
-.
12, 000 00
Metropolitan Police
,
209, 821 77
Suppression of the vslave trade
4,287 50
Repayment for lands erroneou.sly sold
19,627 97
Refunding excess of deposits for surveying public lands
28,120 99
Proceeds of swamp lands to States
9,255 76
Expenses of eighth and ninth census
24,464 62
Surveys of public lands
641,497 37
Penitentiaries in the Territories
'.
37,656 00
Five per cent, fund to States
35,537 29
Payment under relief acts
37,170 35
Debentures aud other charges under customs laws
53,429 99
Unenumerated items
30,656 21
Total Miscellaneous

|32,715,401 75
INTERIOR DEPARTMENT.

Indiaus
Pensions

3,407,938 15
28,340,202 17

Total Interior Department

"

31, 748,140 32

MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT.

Pay Department
6, 571,159 01
Commissary Department
4, 361,725 40
Quartermaster's Department
20, 892,572 50
Forts and fortifications
556,788 09
Improvement of rivers and harbors
3, 668, 060 34
Military Academy
94,367 04
Medical Department
756,586 06
Freedmen's Bureau
1,449,694 71
Capture of Jefferson Davis
80,783 12
National Asylum for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers
801, 088 20
Bounties to soldiers...
17,106,504 39
Reimbursing States for raising volunteers
1,291,303 32
Expenses uuder reconstruction acts
,
381, 384 80
Horses and other property lost in service
201,072 84
"Washington aud Oregon volunteers in 1855 and 1856 ..
41,908 83
Contingencies of the Army
255,446 08
Payments under relief acts
91, 747 60
Deduct excess of repayments over expenditures
Total Military establishment

58,602,192 33.
946,516 93
57, 655,675 40

NAVAI> E S T A B L I S H M E N T .

Pay and contingent of the Navy
MarineCorps
Yards and Docks
Equipment and Recruiting



6,502,676
1,018,486
2,388,645
2,228,339.

29
95
98
37

XX

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Navigation
Ordnance.-.."
Construction and Repairs
Steam Engineering
Provisions and Clothing
Medicine and Surgery
Payments under relief acts

,

Total Naval establishment
Interest on public debt
Premiums on purchase of bonds

.'

$493,765
639,598
5, 333, 069
1,200, 013
1,570,607
389,813
15,213

1

Total expenditures exclusive of loans
Excess of redemptions over issues of loans and treasury notes
Total net expenditures
Balance in Treasury June 30, 1870




29
72
40
74
80
15
18
$21,780,229 87
129,235,498 00
15,996,555 60
..

309, 653,560 75
107,779,786 13
417,433,346 88
149,502,471 60
566,935, 818 48

TABLE C.—Statement of the redemption and issue of loans and treasury notes, (by ivarrants,) for the fiscalyear ended June 30, 1870.
C h a r a c t e r of loans.

Eedemptions.

T r e a s u r y n o t e s p r i o r to 1846, a c t s of October 12,1837, (5 S t a t u t e s , 201,) M a y 21, 1838, (5 S t a t u t e s , 223,)
M a r c h 31, 1840, (5 S t a t u t e s , 370,) F e b r u a r y 15. 1841, (5 S t a t u t e s , 411,) J a n u a r y 31, 1842, (5 S t a t u t e s ,
469,) A u g u s t 31, 1842, (5 S t a t u t e s , 581,) M a r c h 3, 1843, (5 S t a t u t e s , 614.)
L o a n of 1847 a c t of J a n u a r y 28, 1847 (9 S t a t u t e s 118)
B o u n t y l a n d s c r i p , a c t of F e b r u a r y 11, 1847, section 9, (9 S t a t u t e s , 125)
L o a n of 1848 a c t of M a r c h 31 1848 (9 S t a t u t e s 217)
T e x a n incleninity stock, a c t of S e p t e i n b e r 9 1850, (9 S t a t u t e s , 447)
T r e a s u r y n o t e s bf 1857, a c t of D e c e n i b e r 23,1857, (11 S t a t u t e s , 257)
T r e a s u r v n o t e s of 1861 a c t of M a r c h 2 1861 (12 S t a t u t e s 178)
Old d e m a n d n o t e s , a c t s of J u l y 17, 1861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 261,) A u g u s t 5, 1861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 313.) F e b r u a r y
12, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 338.)
S e v e n - t h i r t i e s of 1861 a c t o f J u l y 17 1863 (12 S t a t u t e s 259)
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t 1861, (i88Ls,) a c t s of J u l y 17,'l861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 259,) A u g u s t 5,1861, (12 Statu t e s , 313.)
L e g a l - t e n d e r n o t e s , a c t s of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 345.) J u l y 11, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 532,) J a n u a r y 17, 1863, (12 S t a t u t e s , 822,) M a r c h 3, 1863, (12 S t a t u t e s , 710.)
T e m p o r a r y loan, a c t s of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 345.) M a r c h 17, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 370,) J u l y
11, 1862,' (12 S t a t u t e s , 532,) J u n e 30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218,)
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862, a c t of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 345)
Certificates of i n d e b t e d n e s s , a c t s of M a r c h 1,1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 352,) M a r c h 17, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 370,).
a n d M a r c h 3,1863, (12 S t a t u t e s , 710.)
F r a c t i o n a l c u r r e n c y , a c t s ot J u l y 17, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 592,) M a r c h 3,1863, (12 S t a t u t e s , 711,) a n d J u u e
30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218.)
Coin certificates a c t of M a r c h 3 1863 section 5 (12 S t a t u t e s , 711)
'.
C o m p o u n d - i n t e r e s t n o t e s , a c t s of M a r c h 3, 1863, (12 S t a t u t e s , 709,) a n d J u n e 30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218).
One-year n o t e s of 1863 a c t of M a r c h 3 1863 (12 S t a t u t e s 709)
.
T w o - y e a r n o t e s of 1863 a c t of M a r c h 3 1863, (12 S t a t u t e s , 709)
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of M a r c h , 1864, a c t of M a r c h 3, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 13)
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e 1864 a c t of J u n e 30 1864 (13 S t a t u t e s . 218)
S e v e n - t h i r t i e s of 1864 a n d 1865, a c t s of J u n e 30,1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218,) a n d M a r o h 3 , 1 8 6 5 , (13 S t a t u t e s , 468)
FiA^e-twenties of 1865, a c t of M a r c h 3, 1865, (13. S t a t u t e s , 468)
Consols of 1865, a c t of M a r c h 3, 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468)
Consols of 1867, a c t of M a r c h 3, 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468)
Consols of 1868. a c t of M a r c h 3, 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468)
T h r e e p e r cent, certificates, a c t s of M a r c h 2, 1867, (14 S t a t u t e s , 558,) J u l y 25, 1868, (15 S t a t u t e s , 183) . . .
Totals

. . .
E x c e s s of r e d e m p t i o n s
E x c e s s of i s s u e s

1250 00




E x c e s s of i s s u e s .

$250 00

hj.

O
24, 000
200
47, 450
10, 000
•
400
450
56, 013

00
00
00
00
00
00
25

24, 000
200
47, 450
10, 000
400
450
56, 013

2, 600 00

00
00
00
00
00
00
25

177,173, 520 00

O

>^
H

W
t^

2, 600 00
••!|700 00

$700 00

177,173, 520 00

9,170 00

cn
o

9,170 00

13,118, 750 00
2, 000 00

13,118, 750 00
2, 000 00

23, 238, 088 88
75, 270,120
701,150
52, 920
30,150
667, 400
14, 843, 800
670, 800
8, 824, 000
45, 342 500
23, 464, 750
2, 788, 800
6, 915, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

76, 731, 060 00

393, 254, 282 13

7, 971, 627 12

31, 209, 716 00

285, 474, 496 00

1, 460, 940 0(j
701,150
52, 920
30,150
667, 400
14, 843, 800
. 670, 800
8, 824, 000
45, 342, 500
23, 445, 250
2, 788, 800
6, 575, 000

119, 500 00
J340 000 00

'....

t Conversion of seven-thiities of 1864 and 1865.

^ ^ -

00
00
00
0()
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

Kj

o
W

CQ

O

Kj

1

N e t e x c e s s of r e d e m p t i o n s c h a r g e d in r e c e i p t s a n d exj)enditui'es '..~.

* Conversion of seven-thirties of 1861.

E x c e s s of redemptions.

Issues.

•

117, 213, 053 25
9, 433, 267 12

9, 433, 267 12

^107, 779, 786 13

t Conversion of compound interest notes.

X

XXII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE D.—Statement of the net receipts (by warrants) for the quarter
ended September 30, 1870.
KECEIPTS.

Customs
....:
Sales of pulic lands
Direct t a x
Internal revenue
Premium on sales of coin
Tax on cii'culation and deposits, &c., of national banks
Repayment of interest by Pacific Railroad companies
Customs fines, penalties, and fees
Consular, letters patent, homestead, and land fees
Miscellaneous

$57,729,473
842, 437
37,260
49,147,137
2, 238,704
2,950,022
147, 510
244,743
509, 538
1,254, 401

57
67
72
92
43
42
07
52
61
82

Total receipts, exclusive of loans
'
115,101,230 75 _
Balance in treasury June 30, 1870, including $516 79 received from
"Unavailable"
149,502,988 39
*Total

$264,604,219 14

TABLE E.—Statement of the net expenditures (by ivarrants J for the quarter
ended September 30, 1870,
C I V I L AND MISCELLANEOUS.

Customs
Internal revenue
Diplomatic service
Judiciary
Interior civil
War civil
Treasury proper
Quarterly salaries
Total miscellaneous ..'.
Indians
:
Pensions.-.
Military establishment
....-•..
Naval establishment
Interest on public debt
Premiums on purchase of bonds

."
•

".

Total expenditures, exclusive of loans
Excess of redemption of loans over receipts
Total net expenditures
Balance in Treasury September 30, 1870




...:....
.'

$4, 628,113
2,592, 386
652,188
479, 595
1,017,655
282,975
6,297,008
132,919

36
12
99
17
51
74
92
53

16,082,843
2,915,914
10,909,537
10,218,538
4, 815, 237
39,496,4.50
2,124, 399

34
52
37
36
58
51
15

86,562,920 83
44, 937, 805 00
131, 500,725 83
133,103, 493 31
$264,604,219-14

TABLE F.—Statement of tive redemptions and issue of loans and In'easwry notes (by ivarrants) for the quarter ended September 30, 1870.
C h a r a c t e r of loans.

L o a n of 1847, a c t of J a n u a r y 28, 1847, (9 S t a t u t e s , 118)
L o a n of 1848, a c t of M a r c h 31, 1848, (9 S t a t u t e s , 217)
T r e a s u r y n o t e s of 1857, a c t of D e c e m b e r 23, 1857, (11 S t a t u t e s , 257)
S e v e n - t h i r t i e s of 1861, a c t of J u l y 17, 1861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 259)
Old d e m a n d notes, a c t s of J u l y 17, 1861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 261,) A u g u s t 5, 1861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 313.) F e b r u a r y 12, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 338).
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862, a c t of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 345)
L e g a l - t e n d e r n o t e s , a c t s of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 345,) J u l y 11, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 532,) J a n u a r y 17,1863, (12 S t a t u t e s ,
822.) M a r c h 3, 1863. (12 S t a t u t e s , 710.)
. c^
T e m p o r a r y loans, a c t s of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 345.) M a r c h 17, 1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 370.) J u l y 11, 18G2, (12 S t a t u t e s ,
532,) J u n e 30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218.)
F r a c t i o n a l c u r r e u c y . a c t s of J u l y 17, 1862. (12 S t a t u t e s . 592,) M a r c h 3. 1863, (12 S t a t u t e s . 711.) J u n e 30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218) . .
One y e a r n o t e s of 1863, a c t of M a r c h 3, 1863, (12 S t a t u t e s , 709)
T w o y e a r n o t e s of 1863, a c t of M a r c h 3, 1863, (12 S t a t u t e s , 709)
1
C o m p o u n d - i n t e r e s t n o t e s , a c t s of M a r c h 3, 1863, (12 S t a t u t e s , 709,) J u n e 30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218)
Coin certificates, a c t of M a r c h 3, 1863, section 5, (12 S t a t u t e s , 711)
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of M a r c h , 1864, a c t of M a r c h 3, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 13)
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e , 1864, a c t of J u n e 30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218)
S e v e n - t h i r t i e s of 1864 a n d 1865, a c t s of J u n e 30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218,) M a r c h 3, 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468)
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865. a c t of M a r c h 3, 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s . 468)
Consols of 1865, a c t of M a r c h 3, 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468)..'
Consols of 1867, a c t o f Marcji 3, 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468)
Consols of 1868, a c t of M a r c h . 3 , 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468)
T h r e e p e r c e n t , certificates, a c t s of M a r c h 2, 1867, (14 Stcatutes, 558,) J u l y 25, 1868, (15 S t a t u t e s , 183)

Redemptions.

110, 000
18, 800
5,100
6, 200
2, 285
2, 070,100
47, 959,192

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00




E x c e s s of r e demptions.
$10, 000
18, 800
5,100
6, 200
2, 285
2, 070,100

00
00
00
00
00
00

$47, 959,192 00

500 00
7, 546, 000
10, 640
6, 600
98, 410
32, 507, 820
1, 000
1, 897, 000
3, 849, 550
59, 950
8, 096, 400
6, 994, 350
91, 600
4.55, 000

I l l , 686, 497 00
ISTet excess of r e d e m p t i o n s c h a r g e d i n r e c e i p t s a n d e x p e n d i t u r e s .

Issues.

b^
hj

O
H
O

500 00
7, 208, 500- 00

11, 532, 000 00

4, 000 00
45," 000'66

337, 500
10, 640
6, 600
98, 410
20, 975, 820
1, 000
1, 897, 000
3, 849, 550
59, 950
8, 096, 400
6, 990, 350
91,600
410, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

Ul

o
H

O

66, 748, 692 00
$44, 937, 805 00

H
t?d
H
W

>
&d

X

XXIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE G.—Statement of tlie principal of the public debt (balances) on the 1st of January
of each year, from 1837 to 1843, and on the 1st day of July of each-year, from 1843 to 1870

Years.

Received from Paid on account
loans during the of .loans during
year.
tlie year.

•.$336, 9.57 83
1836
2,992,989 35
$21,822 91
1837
5, 590, 723 79
12, 716, 820 86
1838
3, 857, 276 21
10, 718,1.53 53
1839 .
5, 589, 547 51
3, 912, 015 79
1840
5, 315, 712 19
13, 659, 317 38
1841
14, 808, 735 64
7, 801, 990 09
1842 ..
12, 479, 708 36
338, 012 64
1843 ... :
11,158, 450 85
1, 877,181 35
1844
7, .536, 349 49
.. N o n e .
1845
375,100 04
.
l!^ one'
1846
5, 596, 067 65
28, 872, 399 45
1847 ...
13, 038, 372 54
21, 256, 700 00
1848... .
'
*233, 075 00
1849
J
12, 804, 823 54
28, 588, 750 00
3, 655, 035 14
4, 045, 950 00
1850
t5, 303, 573 92
1851
1
654, 951 45
203, 400 00
2,151, 754 31
46, 300 00
1852
' 6, 412, 574 01
16, 350 00
1853
|13, 249 48 . 17, 574,144 76
1854
6, 656, 065 -86
800 00
1855
3, 614, 618 66
200 00
1856
3, 900 00
3, 276, 606 05
1857
23, 717, 300 00
7, 505, 250 82
1858 .
28, 287, 500 00
14, 702, 543 15
1859
20, 776, 800 00
14, 431, 350 00
1860
§2, 019, 776 10
1861
i
18,142, 900 00
41, 861, 709 74
96, 096, 922 09
529, 692, 460 50
1862..
776, 682, 361 57 181, 086, 635 07
1863
1,128, 834, 245 97 432, 822, 014 03
1864
1, 472, 224, 740 85 007, 361, 241 68
1865
712, 851, 553 05
620, 263, 249 10
1866
640, 426, 910 29
735, 536, 980 11
1867
111, 000, 000 00
1868
1 625, 111, 433 20 692, 549, 685 88
in,000 00
1869..... 1 238, 678, 081 06 261, 912, 718 31
• 285,474.496 00
393, 254, 282 13
1870

Excess of re- Excess of redemp- Principal of debt
tions over receipts over reat the close of
demptions.
ceipts.
year.

23, 276, 331 80
8,218,327 46-

$336, 957 83
3, 308,124 07.
10, 434, 221 14
3, 573, 343 82.
5, 250, 875 54
13, 594, 480 73
20, 601, 226 28
32, 742, 922 Oa
23, 461, 652 50
15, 925, 303 01
15, 550, 202 97
38, 826, 534 77
47, 044, 862 23

16, 016, 996 46
390, 914 86

63, 061, 858 69
63 452 773 55

$2, 971,166 24
7,126, 097 07
$6, 860, 877 32
1, 677, 531 72
8, 343, 605 19
7, 006, 745 55
12,141, 695 72
9, 281, 269 50
7, .536, 349 49
375,100 04

4, 852, 022 47
2,105,-454 31
6, 396, 224 01
17, 560, 895 28
6, 655, 26;. 86
3, 614, 418 66
3, 272, 706 05
16, 212, 049 18
13, 584, 956 85
6, 345, 450 00
25, 738, 585
433, 595, 538
595, 595, 726
696, 012, 231
864, 863, 499
92, 588, 303

84
41
50
94
17
95

$6, 684, 542, 550'47 4, 203, 870,122 66 2, 836, 557, 776 38

68, 304, 796 02
66,199, 341 71
59,803,117 70
42, 242, 222 42'
35, 586, 956 56
31, 972, 537 90
28, 699, 831 85
44 911 881 03
58, 496, 837 88
64, 842, 287 88

90, 580, 873 72..
524 176 412 13
1,119,772,138 63.
1,815,784,370 57
2, 680 647 869 74^
2, 773, 236,173 69
95,110, 069 82 2,678,126,103 87
66, 438, 252 68

2, 611, 687, 851 19

23, 235, 637 25
107, 779, 786 13

2 588 452 213 94
2, 480, 672, 427 81

356, 222, 306 40

NOTE.—This statement is from warrants, except the additions noted, viz:
* $233, 075 war bounty stock; no issue charged on books.
t $5,000,000 Texan indenuaity bonds; no issue charged on books. $303,573 92, fourth and fifth install.ments Mexican bonds ; no issue charged on books..
I Including $9,900 war bounty stock, a repayment; no expenditures the same year. $51 67 interest OR
old funded debt, a repayment; no expenditures the same year.
'
o
§ $2,019,776 10 discount on bonds of February 8, 1861; not charged to loan.
II $1,000,000 should be charged to Navy Pension Fund.
T $1,000 to be added to redemption of loan of 5-20s, June 30,1864, being a donation of Peters
T




\

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

Amount.

Year.

. .
,
•

..

-

.

TABLE I.-

• .

...

Year.

$75, 463, 476 52 1817
77, 227, 924 66 1818
80, 3.52, 634 04 1819
78, 427, 404 77 1820
80, 747, 587 39 1821
83, 762,172 07 1822
82, 064, 479 33 1823
79, 228, 529 12 1824
78, 408, 669 77 1825
82, 976, 294 35 1826 ...
83, 038, 050 80 1827
80, 712, 632 25 1828
77, 054, 686 30 1829
86, 427,120 88' 1830
82, 312,150 50 1831
75, 723, 270 66 1832
• 69, 218, 398 04 1833
65,196, 317 97 1834
57, 023,192 09 1835
53,173, 217 52 1836
48, 005, 587 76 1837
45, 209, 7.37 90 1838
55, 962, 827 57 Ib39
81, 487, 846 24 1840
99, 833, 660 15 1841
127,334,933 74 1842

Amount.
$123, 491, 965 16
103,466,633 83
95, 529, 648 28
91, 015, 566 15
89, 987, 427 66
93, 546, 676 98
90, 875, 877 28
• 90,269,777 77
83, 788, 432 71
... . 81, 054, 059 99
73, 987, 357 20
67, 475, 043 87
58, 421, 413 67
48, 565, 406 50
39,123,191 68
24, 322, 235 18
7, 001, 698 83
4, 760, 082 08
37 513 05
336, 957 83
3, 308,124 07
10,4.34,221 14
3, 573, 343 82
5, 250, 875 54
13, 594, 480 73
20, 601; 226 28.
...
•.

:

-Statement of outstayiding principal of the.public debt of ihe United States on the
1st of July of each year, from 1843 to 1870, inclusive.
Year.

1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853.
1854
1855
1856

XXV

-Statement of outstanding principal of the public debt of the United States on the
1st of January of each year, from 1791 to 1842, iiiclusive.

TABLE I L -

1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
"3798
179()
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
180^
1810.
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816

TREASURY.

Year.

Amount.

.
.

:




. $32, 742, 922 00
23, 461, 652 50
15, 925, 303 01
15, 550, 202 97
38, 826, 534 77
47, 044, 862 23
63, 061, 858 69
63, 452, 773 55
68, 304, 796 02
66,199, 341 71
• 59, 803,117 70
42, 242, 222 42
35, 586, 956 56
31,972, 537 90

1857
1858
1859
I860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1.867
1868
1869
1870

Amount.

., .
.
•

128, 699, 831 85
44, 911, 881 03
58, 496, 837 88
64, 842, 287 8890, 580, 873 72
524,176, 412 13
1,119, 772,138 63
1, 815, 784, 370 57
2, 680, 647, 869 74
2, 773, 236,173 69
2, 678,126,103 87
2,611,687,851 19
2, 588, 452, 213 94
2, 480, 672, 427 81

XXVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE K.—Statement ofthe receipts of the United States from March 4, 1789, to June 30,

u

Balance in the
treasury at
c o m m e n cement of year.

1791
$973,96.5'75'
1792
783, 444 51
1793
1794
753|661 69
1,151, 924 17
1795
1796
.516, 442 61
1797
888,995 42
1, 021, 899 04
1798
1799
617 451 43
2,16I; 867 77
1800
2, 623, 311 99
1801
1802
3, 295, 391 00
1803
5, 020, 697 64
1804
4, 825, 811 60
1805
4, 037, 005 26
3, 999, 388 99
1806
1807
4, 538,123 80
9, 643, 850 07
1808
9, 941, 809 90
1809
1810
3, 848, 056 78
2, 672, 276 57
1811
1812
3, .502, 305 80
1813 . 3, 862, 217 41
1814
5,196, 542 00
1815
1, 727, 848 63
1816
13,106, 592 88
1817
22, 033, 519 19
1818
14, 989, 465 48
1819
1, 478, 526 74
1820
2, 079, 992 38
1821
1,198, 461 21
1822
1, 681, 592 24
1823
4, 237, 427 55
1824
9, 463, 922 81
1825
1,946,597 13
1826
5, 201, 650 43
1827
6,358,686 18
1828
6, 668, 286 10
1829
5, 972, 435 81
1830 • 5, 755, 704 79
1831
6, 014, 539 75
1832
4, 502, 914 45
1833
2, Oil, 777 55
1834
11, 702, 905 31
1835
8, 892, 858 42
1836
26, 749, 803 96
1837
46, 708, 436 00
37, 327, 252 09
1838
36, 891,196 94
1839
33,1.57, 503 68
1840
1841
29, 963,163 46
28, 685, 111 08
1842
1843* 30, 521, 979 44
1844
39,186, 284 74
1845
36, 742, 829 62
36,194, 274 81
1846
1847
38', 261, 9.59 65
1848
33, 079, 276 43
1849
29, 416; 612 45
1850
32, 827, 082 69
35, 871, 753 31
1851
40,158, 3.53 25
18.52
1853
43, 338, 860 02
1854
.50, 261, 901 09
48, 591, 073 41
1855
1856
47,777,672 13
1857
49,108, 229 80
46, 802, 8.55 00
1858
1859
35,113, 334 22
1860
33,193, 248 60
1861
32, 979, 530 78
1862
30, 963, 857 83
1863
46, 965, 304 87




Customs.

Internal revenue.

Direct tax.

Public lauds. Miscellaneous.

$4, 399, 473 09
3,443,070 85
$268," 942'81"
4, 255, 306 56
337, 705 70
4, 801, 065 28
274, 089 62
337, 755 36
5, 588, 461 26
$4,'836 13'
6, 567, 987 14
475, 289 60
83,540 60
7, 549, 649 65
575, 491 45
7,106, 061 93
644, 357 95'
11,963 11
779,136 44
6, 610, 449 : 1
809, 396 55 '"$734," 223" 97'
9, 080, 932 73
443'75'
167, 726 06
1,048,033-43
.534, 343 38
10, 750, 778 93
12, 438, 235 74
206, 565 44
188, 628 02
621, 898 89
10,479,417 (1
165, 675 69
21.5,179 69
71, 879 20
.50, 941 29
50,198 44
487, 526 79
11, 098, 565 33
21, 882 91
.540,193 80
12, 936, 487 04
21, 747 15
765, 245 73
.55, 763 86
14,667,698 17
20,101 45
34, 732 56
466,163 27
1.5,84.5,521 61
13, 051 40
19,1.59 21
647, 939 06
16, ,363, 550 58
8,190 23
7, 257, 506 62
4, 034 29
7, .517 31
442, 252 33
12, 448 68
8, 583, 309 31
7, 430 63
696, 548 82
7, 666 66 1, 040, 237 53
13, 313, 222 73
2, 295 95
8, 958, 777 53
4, 903 06
859 22
710, 427 78
13, 224, 623 25
4, 755 04
3, 805 52
83.5, 655 14
5, 998, 772 08
1, 662, 984 82 2, 219, 497 36 1,135, 971 09
7, 282, 942 22
4, 678, 059 07 2,162, 673 41 1.9287,-959 28
36, 306, 874 88
5,124, 708 31 4, 253, 635 09 1, 717, 985 03
26, 283, 348 49
2, 678,100 77 1, 834,187 04 1, 991, 226 06
264, 333 36 2, 606, 564 77
17,176, 385 00
955, 270 20
229, 593 63
83, 650 78 3, 274, 422 78
20, 283, 608 76
31, 586 82 1,635,871 61
15,005,612 15
106, 260 53
13, 004, 447 15
29, 349 05 1, 212, 966 46
69,027 63
17, 589, 761 94
67, 665 71
20, 961 56 1, 803, 581 54
19, 088, 433 44
34, 242 17
10, 337 71
916, 523 10
984, 418 15
17, 878, 325 71
34, 663 37
6 201 96
2, 330 85 1, 216, 090 56
20, 098, 713 45
25, 771 35
23,341,331 77
21, 589 93
6, 638 76 1, 393, 785 09
19, 712, 283 29
19, 885 68
2, 626 90 1, 495, 845 26
23. 205, 523 64
17, 451 . 4
5
2, 218 81 1, 018, 308 75
22, 681, 965 91
14, 502 74
• 11,335 05
1, .517,175 13
12,160 62
16, 980 59 2, 329, 356 14
21, 922, 391 39
24, 224, 441 77
10, 506 01 3, 210, 815 48
6, 933 51
28, 465, 237 24
6, 791 13 2, 623, 381 03
11, 630 65
394 12 3, 967, 682 55
29, 032, 508 91
2, 759 00
4,196 09
19 80
4, 857, 600 69
16,214,957 15
4, 263 33 14, 757, 600 75
19, 391, 310 59
^ 10, 459 48
728 79 24, 877,179 86
370 00
23, 409, 940 53
11,169, 290 39
5,493 84
1,687 70
6, 776, 236 52
2, 467 27
16,158,800 36
• 3, 730, 945 66
23,137, 924 81
2, 5.53 32
7, 361, 576 40
755'22'
1, 682 25
3, 411, 818 63
13, 499,'502 17
1, 365, 627 42
3,261 36
14,487,216 74
1, 335, 797 .52495 00
18,187, 908 76
898,158 18
7, 046, 843 91
103 25
26,183, 570 94
1, 777 34
2, 059, 939 80
27, .528,112 70
3, 517 12
2, 077, 022 30
26, 712, 667 87
2, 897 26
2, 694, 452 48
23, 747, 864 66
375 00
2, 498, 355 20
3, 328, 642 56
31,757,070 96
375 00
1, 688, 959 55
28, 346, 738 82
39, 668, 686 42
1, 859, 894 25
49 017 567 92
2, 352, 305 30
47', 339i 326 62
2, 043, 239 58
58,931,865 52
1,667,084 99
64, 224,190 27
8, 470, 798 39
11, 497, 049 07
53, 025, 794 21
64, 022, 863 50
8, 917, 644 93
63, 875, 905 05
3, 829, 486 64
3, 513, 715 87
41, 789, 620 96
1, 756, 687 30
49, 565, 824 38
1,778, .557 71.
53,187, 511 87
870, 658 54
39, 582,125 64
152,203 77
49, 056, 397 62
1,79.5,331 73
167, 617 17
69, 059, 642 40 "'37,'640," 787'95" 1, 485,103 61

.............

$10, 478 10
9,918 65
21, 410 88
53,277 97
28,317 97
1,169, 415 98
399,139 29
58,192 81
86 187 56
152, 712 10
345, 649 15
1, 500, 505 86 i
131, 945 44
139, 075 53
40, 382 30
51,1.21 86
38, 550 42
21, 822 85
62,162 57
84, 476 84
59, 211 22
126,165 17
271,571 00
164, 399 81
285,282 84
273, 782 35
109, 761 08
57, 617 71
iyr, 098 42
61, 338 44
1.52, 589 43 !
452, 9.57 19 !
1.41,129 84
127, 603 60
130, 451 81
94, 588 66
1, 315, 722 83
65,126 49
112, 648 55
73, 227 77
584,124 05
270, 410 61
470, 096 67
480, 812 32
759, 972 13
2, 24.5, 902 23
7, 001, 444 59
6, 410, 348 45
979, 939 86
2, 567,112 28
1,004,054 75
451, 995 97
285, 895 92
1,075,419 70
361,453 68
289,950 13
220, 808 30
612,610 69
68.5, 379 13
2, 064, 308 21
1,185,166 11
464,249 40
988, 081 17
1,105, 352 74
827, 731 40
1,116,190 81
1, 259, 920 88
1, 352, 029 13
1, 454, 596 24
1, 088, 530 25
1, 023, 515 31
915, 327 97
3, 741, 794 38

* For the half year from January

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY^

XXVII

1870, by calendar years to 1843, and by fiscal years (ending June 30j from that time.

Dividends.

$8, 028 00
38, 500 00
303, 472 00
160, 000 00
160, 000 00
80, 960 00
79, 920 00
71, 040 00
71, 040 00
88, 800 00
39, 960 00

Interest.

Premiums.

Eeceipts from loans
and treasury notes.

$361, 391
5,102, 498
1, 797,272
4, 007,950
3, 396,424
320, 000
70, 000
200, 000
5,000, 000
1, 565,229

$4, 800 00
42, 800 00
78, 675 00

"16,125'66

34
45
01
78
00
00
00
00
00
24

2, 750, 000 00

202, 426 30
525, 000 00
675, 000 00
1, 000,000 00
105, 000 00
297, 500 00
350, 000 00
350, 000 00
367, .500 00
402, 500 00
420, 000 00
455, 000 00
490, 000 00
490, 000 00
490, 000 00
490, 000 00
474, 985 00
234, 349 50
506, 480 82
292, 674 67

300 00
85 79
. 11, 541 74
68, 665 16
267, 819 14
412 62

$32,107 64
686 09

40, 000 00

28, 365
37, 080
487, 065
10, 550
4,.264

91
00
48
00
92

22 50

709, 357
10, 008
33, 630
68, 400
602, 345




00
00
00
40
91
45
00
00
13
00

5, 000, 000 00
5, 000, 000 00

71, 700 83
666 60

1, 1843, to June 30, 1843.

12, 837,900
26,184, 135
23, 377,826
35, 220,671
084
9, 425,
466, 723
• 8,353
%291
3, 000,824
5, 000,324

72
00
90
00
44

2, 992, 989 15
12, 716, 820 86
3, 857, 276 21
.5, 589, 547 51
13, 659, 317 38
14, 808, 735 64
12, 479, 708 36
1, 877,181 35
28, 872,399 45
21, 256,700 00
28, 588,750 00
4, 045,950 00
203, 400 00
46, 300 00
16, 350 00
2. 001 67
800 00
200 00
3, 900 00
23, 717,300 00
28, 287,.500 00
20, 776,800 00
41,861, 709 74
.529. 692,460 50
776i 682,361 57

Gross receipts.

$4 771 342 53
8 772 458 76
6 450 195 15
9 439 855 65
9 515 758 59
8 740 329 65
8 758 780 99
8 179 1.70 80
12 546 813 31
12"413 978 34
12 945 455 95
14 995 793 95
11 064 097 63
11 826 307 38
13 560 693 20
15 559 931 07
16 398 019 26
17 060 661 93
7 773 473 12
12 134 214 28
14 422 634 ,09
22 639 032 76
40 .524 844 95
34 559 536 95
50 961 237 60
57 171 421 82
33 833 592 33
21 593 936 66
24 605 665 37
20 881 493 68
19 573 703 72
20 232, 427 94
20 540, 666 26
24 381, 212 79
26 840, 858 02
25 260, 434 21
22 966, 363 96
24 763, 629 23
24 827, 627 38
24 844 116 51
28 .526, 820 82
31 867, 450 66
33 948, 426 25
21 791 935 55
35 430 087 10
50 826, 796 08
27 947, 142 19
39 019, 382 60
35 340, 025 82
25 069, 662 84
30 519, 477 65
34 784, 932 89
20 782, 410 45
31 198, 555 73
29 970, 105 80
29 699, 967 74
55 368, 168 52
56 992 479 2 1
59 796, 892 98
47 649, 388 88
52 762, 704 25
49 893, 115 60
61 603, 404 18
73 802, 343 07
65 351, 374 68
74 056, 899 24
68 969, 212 57
70 372, 665 96
81 773, 965 64
76 841, 407 83
83 371, 640 13
581 680, 121 59
889 379, 652 52

Unavailable.'

$1,889 50

63, 288 35
1, 458, 782 93
37, 469 25
11,188 00
28,251 90

'36,'666 "66

103, 301 37

15, 408 34
11,110 81
6, 000 01

XXVIII REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
TABLE K.—Statement of the receipts of the United States

1

Balance in the
treasury at
c o m m en c ementofyear.

Customs.

Internal revenue.

Direct tax.

Publiciands. Miscellaneous.

1864
1865
1866
1867

$36, 523,
134, 433,
33, 933,
160, 817,

1868
1869
1870

198, 076, 537 09 164, 464, 599 56 191, 087, 589 41 1, 788,145 85 1, 348, 715 41 17, 745, 403 59
158, 936, 082 87 180, 048, 426 63 158,356,460.86
765, 685 61 4, 020, 344 34 13, 997, 338 65
183, 781, 985 76 194, 538, 374 44 184, 899, 756 49
229,102 88 3, 350, 481 76 12, 942,118 30

046
738
657
099

13 $102,'316,152 99 $109,
44 84, 928, 260 60 209,
89 179, 046, 651 58 309,
73 176, 417, 810 88 266,

741,134 10 $475, 648 96 $588, 333 29 $30,
464, 215 25 1, 200, 573 03
996,553 31 25,
226, 813 42 1, 974, 754 12
665, 031 03 29,
027, 537 43 4, 200, 233 70 1,163, 575 76 15,

291, 701 86
441,556 00
036, 314 23
037, 522 15

1,
26, 659, 317 05189, 324, 825 40198, 373, 498 58
2, 774, 990, 382 66 488, 722, 307 70




' This item is an araount hereto.fore credited to the Treasurer

REPORT

OF

THE

SECRETARY

OF

from March 4, 1789, to June 30, 1870, cf-c—Continuecl.

Dividends.

Interest.

Premiums.

s

THE

TREASURY.

XXIX

.

R e c e i p t s from l o a n s
and
treasury
notes.

G-ross r e c e i p t s .

Unavailable.

>>
1864
1865
1866
1867

$1, 393, 461, 017 57
1, 80.5, 9.39, 345 93
1, 270, 884,173 11
1,131, 060, 920 56

29, 203, 629 50
13,755,491 12
15, 295, 643 76

(.

$1,128, 873, 945 36
1, 472, 224, 740 85
712, 851, 553 05
640, 426, 910 29
625, 111, 433 20
238, 678, 081 06
285, 474, 496 00

1, 030, 749, 516 52
609, 621, 828 27
696, 729, 973 63

159,118, 950 34

6, 825, 772, 517 91

$21,174,101 01
11, 683, 446 89
38, 083, 055 68
27, 787, 330 35^

$9,210 40
6 095 11
172,094 29
721, 827 93
2, 675, 918 19

1868
1869
1870
$9, 720,136 29 $485, 224 45

as unavailable and since recovered and charged to his account.




11, 673,167 160 38

*2 070 73
2, 673, 847 46

TABLE L.—Staternent of the expenditures of the United States from March 4, 1789, to June 30, 1870, by calendwr years to 1843, and by fiscal years {ending
June 30) from that time.

Year.

War.

$632, 804 03
1791
1,100, 702 09
1792
1,130, 249 08
1793
2, 639,097 59
1794
2, 480,910 13
1795
1, 260,263 84
1796
1797
1, 039,402.46
2, 009,522 30
1798
2, 466,946 98
1799
2, 560,878 77
1800
1, 672,944 08
1801^
1,179, 148 25.
1802^
822, 055 85
1803
875, 423 93
1804
712, 781 28
1805
1, 224,355 38
1806
1807
1, 288,685 91
2, 900, 834 40
1808
3, 34.5,772 17
1809
2, 294,323 94
1810
2, 032,828 19
1811
1812
11, 817,798 24
1813
19, 652, 013 02
1814
20, 350,806 86
14, 794,294 22
1815
16, 012,096 80
1816
1817
8, 004,236 53
5, 622,715 10
1818
6, 506,300 37
1819
1820
2, 630, 392 31
1821
4, 461,291 78
1822
3, 111,981 48
1823
3, 096,924 43
1824
3, 340,939 85
3, 659,914 18
1825
3, 943,194 37
1826
1827
3, 948,977 88
1828
4,145, 544 56
1829
4, 724,291 07
1830
4, 767,128 88
for FRASER 841, 835 55
1831
4,

Digitized


Navy.

$61, 408 97
410,562 03
274, 784 04
382,631 89
1, 381, 347 76
2, 858, 081 84
3, 448, 716 03
2, 111, 424 00
915, 561 87
1, 215, 230 53
1,189, 832 75
1, 597, 500 00
1,649,641 44
1, 722, 064 47
1, 884, 067 80
2, 427, 758 80
1, 654, 244 20
1, 965, 566 39
3, 959. 365 15
6, 446, 600 10
7, 311, 290 60
8, 660, 000 25
3, 908, 278 30
3, 314, 598 49
2, 953, 695 00
3, 847, 640 42
4, 387, 990 00
3, 31.9, 243 06
2, 224, 458 98
2, 503, 765 83
2, 904, 581 56
3, 049, 083 86
4, 218, 902 45
4, 263, 877 45
3, 918, 786 44
3, 308, 745 47
3, 239, 428 63
3, 856,183 07

Miscellaneous.

Indians.

Pensions.

$27, 000 00
13, 648 85
27, 282 83
13, 042 46
. 23, 475 68
113,563 98
62, 396 58
16, 470 09
20, 302 19
31 22
9, 000 00
94, 000 00
60, 000 00
116, 500 00
196, 500 00
234, 200 00
205, 425 00
213, 575 00
337, 503 84
177, 625 00
151, 875 00
277, 845 00
167, 358 28
167, 394 86
.530, 750 00
274, 512 16
319,463 71
505, 704 27
463,181 39
315, 750 01
477, 005 44
575. 007 41
380, 781 82
429, 987 90
724,106 44
743, 447 83
750,624 88
705, 084 24
576, 344 74
622, 262 47
930, 738 04

$175, 813 88 $1, 083,971 61
664 38
109, 243 15
511, 451 01
80, 087 81
750, 350 74
81, 399 24
378, 920 66
68, 673 22
801, 847 58
100, 843 71
259, 422 62
92, 256 97
139, 524 94
104, 845 33
039, 391 68
95, 444 03
337, 613 22
64,130 73
114, 768 45
73,533 37
462, 929 40
85, 440 39
842. 635 76
62, 902 10
191, 009 43
80, 092 80
768, 598 75
81, 854 59
890, 137 01
81, 875 53
697, 897 51
70, 500 00
423, 285 61
82, 576 04
215, 803 79
87, 833 54
101, 144 98
83, 744 16
367, 291 40
75, 043 88
683, 088 21
91, 402 10
729, 435. 61
86, 989 91
208, 029 .70
90,164 36
898, 870 47
69,656 06
741 17
188, 804 15
936 76
297, 374 43
839 51
890, 719 90
211 41
2, 415, 939 85
021 94
3, 208, 376 31
121 54
242, 817 25
996 24
1, 948,199 40
093 99
1, 780, 588 52
308 81
1, 499, 3-26 59
544 89
1, 308, 810 57
177 79
1, 556, 593 83
476 58
976,138 86
052 64
850, 573 57
234 65
949, 594 47
416 04
1, 363, 297 31
,646 10
1,170, 665 14

Premiums.

Interest.

$1,177, 863 03
2, 373,611 28
2, 097,8 5 17
.9
2, 752,.523 04
2, 947,059 06
3, 239,347 68
3,172, 516 73
2, 955,875 90
2, 815,651 41
3, 402,601 04
4, 411,830 06
4, 239,172 16
3, 949,462 36
4,185, 048 74
2, 657, 114 22
3, 368,968 26
3, 369,578 48
2, 557,074 23
2, 866,074 90
3,163, 671 09
2, 585,435 57
2, 451,272 57
3, 599,455 22
4, 593,239 04
5,990, 090 24
7, 822,923 34
4, 536,282 55
6, 209,954 03
730 56
5, 211,
5,1.51,004 32
5,126,073 79
5,172,788 79
475 40
4, 922,
4, 943,557 93
•4, 366,757 40
3, 975,542 95
3, 486,071 51
3, 098,800 60
2, 542,843 23
1, 912,574 93
1, 373,748 74

Public debt.

$699, 984 23
693,050 25
2, 633, 048 07
2, 743, 771 13
2, 841, 639 37
2, 577,126 01
2,617,250 12
976, 032 09
1, 706, 578 84
1,138, 563 11
2, 879, 876 98
5, 294, 235 24
3, 306, 697 07
3, 977, 206 07
4, 583, 960 63
5, 572, 018 64
2, 938,141 62
7, 701, 288 96
3, .586, 479 26
4, 835, 241 12
•5, 414, 564 43
1, 998, 349 88
7, 508, 668 22
3, 307, 304 90
6, 638, 832 11
17, 048,139 59
20, 886, 753 57
15, 086, 247 59
2, 492,195 73
3, 477, 489 96
3, 241, 019 83
2, 676.160 33
607, 541 01
11., 624, 835 83
7, 728, 587 38
7, 065, 539 24
6, 517, 596 88
9, 064, 637 47
9, 860, 304 77
9, 443,173 29

14, 800, 629 48

Gross expenditures.

X
X

Balance in
treasury at
the end of
the year.

$3, 797, 436 78
$973, 905 75
783, 444 51
8, 962,920 00
753, 661 69
6, 479,977 97
9, 041,593 17 1,151, 924 17
516,442 61
10,1.51,240 15
888, 995 42
776 84
8, 367.
877 37 1, 021, 899 04
8, 625;
618 41
8, 583,
617, 451 43
11, 002, 396 97 2,161, 867 77
11, 952, 534 12 2, 623, 311 99
12, 273, 376 94 3, 295, 391 00
13, 270, 487 31 5, 020, 697 64
11, 258, 983 67 4, 825, 811 60
12, 615, 113 72 4, 037, 005 26
13, .598,309 47 3, 999, 388 99
15, 021,196 26 4, 53*3,123 80
11, 292,292 99
9, 643, 850 07
16, 762, 702 04 9, 941, 809 96
13, 867,226 30 3, 848, 056 78
13, 309,994 49 2, 672, 276 5 7
13, 592, 604 86 3, 502, 305 80
22, 279,121 15 3, 862, 217 41
39,190, 520 36 5,196. 542 00
38, 028,230 32 1, 727, 848 63
39, 582, 493 35 13,106, 592 88
48. 244, 495 51 22, 033, 519 19
40, 877,646 04 14, 989, 465 48
35,104. 875 40 1, 478, 526 74
24, 004;199 73 2, 079. 992 38
21, 763, 024 85 1,198, 461 21
19, 090, 572 69 1, 681, 592 24
17, 676,592 63 4, 237, 427 55
15, 314. 171 00 9, 463, 922 81
31, 898; 538 47 1, 946, 597 13
23, .585,804 72 5, 201, 650 43
24,103, 398 46 6, 358, 686 18
22, 656,764 04 6, 668, 286 10
25, 459, 479 52 5, 972, 435 81
25, 044, 358 40 5, 755, 704 79
24, 585,281 55 6, 014, 539 75
30; 038,446 12 4, 502, 914 45

O
'Pi
H
O

m

o

1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843*
1844
1845
1846
1847
J 848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
18.59
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866

, 446, 034 88 3, 956,370 29
3, 901,
,356 75
, 704, 019 10
3, 956,260 42
, 696,189 38
3, 864,939 06
759,156 89
, 747, 345 25 5, 807,718 23
914 53
682, 730 80
6 646,
,
897, 224 16
6,131, 580 53
916, 995 80
6,182,294 25
095, 267 23
6,113, 896 89
801, 610 24
6, 001,076 97
610, 438 02
8, 397,242 95
908, 671 95
3, 727,711 53
218,183 66
6, 498,199 11
746, 291 28
6, 297,177 89
10, 413, 370 58
6, 455,013 92
7, 900,635 76
35, 840, 030 33
9, 408,476 02
27, 688, 334 21
9, 786,705 92
14, 558, 473 26
7, 904,724 66
9, 687, 024 58
161, 965 11
8, 880,581 38
12,
521,506 19
8, 918,842 10
8, 910, 498 49
0, 722, 282 87 11, 067, 789 53
11, 648, 074 07 10, 790,096 32
13, 327, 095 11
14, 963,160 51
14, 074, 834 64
16, 159,150 87
12, 651,694 61
19, 679,121 63
14, 053,264 64
25, 154, 720 53
14, 690, 927 90
23, 472, 202 72
16, 001, 530 67 1.1, 514,649 83
12, 387,156 52
23, 173, 562 29
42, 640,.353 09
389, 314, 411 82
603, 391, 048 66 63, 261, 235 31
690, 690, 400 06 85, 704, 963 74
1, 030,154, 676 06 122, 617, 434 07
43, 285, 662 00
283,

1, 352,419 75
1,802, 980 93
1, 00.3,953 20
1, 706,444 48
5, 037,022 88
4, 348,036 19
5, .504,191 34
2, 528,917 28
2, 331,794 86
2, 514,837 12
1,199, 099 68
578, 371 00
1, 256,532 39
1, 539,351 35
1, 027,693 64
1, 430,411 30
1, 252,296 81
1, 374,161 55
1, 663,591 47
2, 829,801 77
3, 043,576 04
3, 880,494 12
1, 550,339 55
2, 772, 990 78
2, 644. 263 97
4, 354;418 87
4, • 266 18
3, 490,534 53
2, 991 121 54
2,865, 481 17
37
2, 327,
3,152, 032 70
2, 629,975 97
5, 059,360 71
3,295, 729 32

1,184, 422 40
4, 589,152 40
3, 364,285 30
1, 954,711 32
2, 882,797 96
2, 672,162 45
2,156, 057 29
.3,142, 750 51
2, 603,562 17
2, 388,434 51
1, 378,931 33
839, 041 12
2, 032,008 99
2, 400,788 11
1, 811,097 56
1, 744,883 63
1. 227,496 48
1; 328,867 64
1, 866,886 02
2, 293,377 22
2, 401,858 78
1, 756,306 20
1, 232,665 00
1, 477,612 33
1, 2C6,229 65
1, 310,380 58
1, 219,768 30
1, 222,222 71
1,100, 802 32
1, 034,599 73
852, 170 47
1, 078,513 38
4, 985,473 90
16, 347,621 34
15, 605,549 88

4, 577,141 45
5,716, 245 93
4, 404,728 95
4, 229,698 53
5, 393,279 72
370 27
9, 893,
7,160, 664 76
5, 725,990 89
5, 995,398 96
6, 490,881 45
6, 775,624 61
3, 202,713 00
5, 645.183 86
5, OIL 700 98
$18,231 43
' 6,711,283 89
6, 885,608 35
5, 650,851 25
12, 885,334 24
82, 865 81
16, 043,763 36
17, 888,992 18
69,713 19
17, 504,171 45
170, 063 42
17, 463,068 01
420, 498 64
26, 672,144 68 2, 877, 818 69
24, 090,425 43
872, 047 39
31, 794,038 87
385, 372 90
28, 565,498 77
363, 572 39
26, 400,016 42
574, 443 08
23, 797, 544 40
27, 977,978 30
23, 327,287 69
862 59
2:1., 385,
23,198, 382 37
27, 572,216 87
42, 989, 383 10 1, 717, 900 11
40, 613, 114 17
58, 476 51

772, ,561 50
303, 796 87
202,152 98
57, 863 08
14, 996 48
399, 833 89
174, .598 08
284, 977 55
773, 549 85
523, 583 91
1, 833,452 13
1, 040,458 18
842, 723 27
1,119, 214 72
2, 390, 765 88
3, 565,535 78
3, 782,393 03
3, 696,760 75
4, 000,297 -80
3, 665,832 74
3, 070,926 69
2, 314,464 99
1, 9.53,822 37
1, .593,265 23
1, 652,055 07
2, 637,649 70
3,144, 120 94
4, 034,157 30
13,190, 344 84
24, 729,700 62
53, 685,421 69
77, 395,090 30
133, 067,624 91

17, 067, 747, 79
1, 239, 746 51
5, 974, 412 21
328 20
21, 822 91
590,723 79
718,153 53
912,015 62
315,712 19
801,990 09
338, 012 64
11,158, 450 71
7, 536,349 49
371, 100 04
5, 600,067 65
13, 036,922 54
12, 804,478 54
3, 656,335 14
654, 912 71
2,152, 293 05
6, 412,574 01
17, 556,896 95
6, 662,065 86
3, 614,618 66
3, 276,606 05
7, .505,250 82
14, 685,043 15
13, 854,250 00
18, 737,100 00
96, 097,322 09
181, 081,635 07
430, 572,014 03
609, 616,141 68
620, 263,249 10
5,
10,
3,
5,
7,

3, 568, 638, 312 28 717, 551, 816 39 103, 369, 211 42 119, 607, 656 01 643, 604, 554 33 7, 611, 003 56
t3, 621, 780 07
1718,769 52
177,992 17
t9, 737 87
153,286 61

502, 689, 519 27 2, 374, 677,103 12
t2, 888 48
tlOO 31

3, 572,
95,
123,
78,
57,

502,
143,
140,
130,
129,

260,
224,
246,
501,
655,

092
415
648
990
675

35
63
62
61
40

717,
31,
25,
20,
21,

629,
034,
775,
000,
780,

808
Oil
502
757
229

56
04
72
97
87

103, 422,
4, 642,
4,100,
7, 042,
3, 407,

498
531
682
923
938

03
77
32
06
15

119,
20,
23,
28,
28,

617,
936,
782,
476,
340,

393
551
386
621
202

88
71
78
78
17

644, 323,
51,110,
53, 009,
56, 474,
53, 237,

323
223
867
061
461

85 7, 611, 003 56
72 10, 813, 349 38
67 7, 001,151 04
53 1, 674, 680 05
56 15, 996, 555 60

692,
781,
424,
694,
235,

407
591
045
242
498

75
91
71
80
00

2, 374,
735,
692,
261,
393,

677,
536,
549,
912,
254,

203
980
685
718
282

43
11
88
31
13

2, Oil, 777
34, 356, 698 06
24, 257, 298 49 11, 702, 905
24, 601, 982 44 8, 892, 858
17, 573,141 56 20, 749, 803
30, 858,164 04 46, 708, 436
37, 265, 037 15 37, 327, 252
39, 4.55, 438 35 36, 891, 196
37, 614, 936 15 33.157, 503
28, 226, 533 81 29, 963, 163
31, 797, 530 03 28, 685, 111
32, 936, 876 53 30, 521, 979
12, 118,105 15 39,186, 284
33, 642, 010 85 36, 742, 829
30, 490, 408 71 36,194, 274
27, 632, 282 90 38, 261, 959
60, 520, 851 74 33, 079, 276
60, 6.55,143 19 29, 416, 612
56, 386, 422 74 32, 827, 082
44, 604, 716 26 35, 871, 753
48, 476,104 31 40.158, 353
46, 712, 608 83 43, 338, 860
,
54, 577, 061 74 50, 261, 901
,
75, 473,170 75 48, 591, 073
,
66, 164, 775 96 47, 777, 672
72, 726. 341 57 49,108, 229
,
274, 587 37 46, 802, 855
82 062,186 74 35,113, 334
83,' 678, 642 92 33,193, 248
77, 055,125 65 32, 979, 530
85, 387, 313 08 30, 963, 857
565, 667, 563 74 46, 965, 304
899, 815, 911 25 36, 523, 046
1, 295,541,114 86 134, 433, 738
1, 906,433, 331 37 33, 933, 657
1,139, 344, 081 95 165, 301, 654
:, 037, 749,176 38
•t4, 484, 555 03

H
O

CP

a

O

^

•

14,484,555 03

Ul

* F o r t h e h a l f y e a r from J a n u a r y 1,1843, t o J u n e 30,1843.
t Outstanding warrants.
JN'OTE.—This s t a t e m e n t is m a d e from w a r r a n t s 'paidL b y t h e T r e a s u r e r u p t o J u n e 30,1866. T h e o u t s t a n d i n g w a r r a n t s a r e t h e n a d d e d , a n d t h e s t a t e m e n t is b y w a r r a n t s issued
from t h a t d a t e . T h e b a l a n c e i n t h e t r e a s u r y J u n e 30,1870, b y t h i s s t a t e m e n t , is $177,604,116 51, from w h i c h s h o u l d b e d e d u c t e d t h e a m o u n t deposited w i t h t h e S t a t e s , $28,101,644 91,
l e a v i n g t h e n e t a v a i l a b l e b a l a n c e . J u n e 30,1870,1149,502,471 60.

X
X
X

3,-926, 888, 822 61

816, 220, 310 16




122, 616, 573 33

221,153,156 32

858,154, 938 33 43, 096, 739 63

1, 046, 827, 786 17

4, 457, 930, 869 i

41
27
74
11
88

hj

O

73
09
87
76
51

1867
1B68

• 8,042,233,731
1, 093, 079, 655
1, 069, 889, 970
584, 777, 996
702, 907, 842

55
31
42
96
00
69
94
68
46
08
44
74
62
81
65
43
45
69
31
25
02
09
41
13
80
00
22
60
78
83
87
13
44
89
76

160,
198,
158,
183,
177,

817, 099
076, .537
936, 082
781, 985
604,116

>
>-^

11, 492, 889,196 41

1

ft

•p .

3

1

1
<1

B. ^
^ t£

s

I.S

1

ill

©CM

•

o

Average cost in
gold of total purchases to date.

Date of purchase.

CM H

Average rate of
premiirm on total purchases to
date.

o
o

Currency value of*
interest accrued
on bonds bought
"flat."
1

TABLE M.—Statement of purchases of .bonds from May, 1869, to November 30, 1870, shoioing the cost in currency ftnd gold, the average cost in currency and
gold of each purchase, and the average cost of all purchases made prior to the end of each month.

13Si $1, 000, 000
142
70, 000
. . .
142
1, 000, 000
139J
1,000,000
1, 000, 000
138^
1,000,000
- .
» 1381
1, 000, 000
..
138i
1, 620, 000
137^
1, 000, 000
137*
1, 000, 000
137*
3, 000, 000
137
3, 000, 000
136
3, 000, 000
137^
. . . .
1, 000, 000
137
.
3, 000, 000
135^
3, 000, 000
136*
1, 000, 000
I3.5f
136
2, 000, 000
1.3.5f 2,000,000
1, 000, 000
•
. . 135i133
2, 000, 000
133i. 2, 000, 000
133§
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
133t
2, 000, 000
136
1351
1, 000, 000
.
2, 000, 000
136^
137f
2, 000, 000
141|
1, 000, 000
3, 000, 000
133|
3, 000, 000
1331
2, 000, 000
130
1, 000, 000
131i
*153, 500
131*
!!!.!!!!!.!!!..!
'.




hj
O
H
O

^.

1869.
12
19
19
27
June
3
10
17
23
26
1
July
3
9
14
15
21
28
29
4
11
12
18
25
Qi
f
Sentenibei" i
8
915
22
23
25
29
6
7
7
May

X
X
X

$2, 504 36
$1,155, 070 00
81, 718 00
1,168, 512 10
1,153, 581 50
1.164, 0 ^ 90
711 78
1,161, 967 00
1,152,950 00
1, 870, 402 50
1,158, 228 25
1.158, 098 75
3, 496, 474 00
3, 518, 044 00
3, 607, 622 90
1, 201, 850 00
3, 600, 028 80
3, 604, 859 00
1, 201, 570 .55
2, 431,136 80
2,422,038 27
1,198, 931 70
2,378,781 81
2, 389, 539 01
1,196, 247 80
2, .401, 991 00
. 2, 356, 000 00
1,183, 972 53
2, 369, 639 55
2, 337, 657 62
1.165, 548 50
3, 537,158 16
3, 473, 533 12
2, 319,139 18
1.159, 945 10
178,187 69

$1,152, 565 64
81, 718 00
1,168, .512 10
1,153, 581 50
1.164, 770 68
1,161, 967 00
1,1.52, 950 00
1, 870, 402 50
1,1.58, 228 25
1,1.58, 098 75
3, 496, 474 00
3, 518, 044 00
3, 607, 622 90
1, 201, 850 00
3, 600, 028 80
3, 604, 859 00
1, 201, 570 55
2, 431,136 80
^ 2, 422, 038 27
1,198, 931 70
2,378,781 81
2, 389, 539 01
1,196,247 80
2, 401, 991 00
2, 356, 000 00
1,183, 972 53
2, 369, 639 55
2, 337, 657 62
1.165, 548 50
3, .537,158 16
3, 473, 533 12
2, 319,139 18
1,159, 945 10
178,187 69

83.22
$832,177 36
15.26
82. 21
57, 548 45
16.74
82.29
822, 895 85
16. 85
82.69
826, 940 14
15.36
84.25
842, 510 43
16.48
83.82
838, 208 84 . 16.20
83.40
^ 833, 960 21
15.30
84.20
1, 364, 012 76
15.46
84. 23
842,347 82
15.82
84.22
842, 253 63
15.81
85.07
2, 552, 170 80 . 16.54
2, 586, 797 06
86. 23
17.27
2, 626,113 12
87. 54
20. 25
87.73
877, 262 77
20.18
88.81
2, 664, 221 12
20.00
2, 640, 922 34
20.16
88. 03
20.16
.885,134 84
88.51
2L56
1, 787, 600 59
89.38
21.10 - 89.37
-1,787-482 12
19.89
887, 276 00
88.73
18.94
1, 788, 557 75
89.43
19.43
1, 793, 275 07
89.66
19.63
89.36
893, 555 78
20.10
90.05
1, 800, 930 46
17.80
86.62
1, 732, 352 94
18.40
87.14
871, 368 92
18.48
87.04
1, 740, 782 04
16.88
84. 85
1, 697, 029 12
16.55
82.30
822, 982 17
17.91
88.24
2, 647, 078 14
15.78
86.65
2, 599, 463 51
15.96
89.20
1, 783, 953 22
1.5. 99
88.46
884,610 18
16.08
88.-53
135, 891 47

H

w
15.84

82.72

Ul

o
15.82

83.55

>

^,
O
hj
17.85

85.93

18.48

86.87

P>
Ul

d
18.35

86.90

^

13.
20.
21.
27.
November 3.
4.
4.
5.
5.
10.
17.
17.
24.
December 1.
2.
8.
15.
16.
22.
29..
30.

January

5.
11.
11.
13.
19.
27.
February 10.
11.
24.
24.
March
2.
10.
17.
24..
30..
7..
April
13..
21..
27..
30..
30..
. 5..
May
12..
12..
19..
26..
2..
June
9..




130^
130
130^
130ff
127
126t

mn
126*
126|
1261
127^
127^
126 i
122^
122^
1231
121|
121f
120^
1195
119-5

119.1
122*
122|
121^
1211
121#
1201
120J
117f
117g
116§
111
112
112^

nil
112
1121
11.3^
113^
1141
1145
114^
115i
115i:
114i
114i
1141
113i

2, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
*201, 300
=^433, 000
2, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
3, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000,000
2, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000

2. 000, 000
'^^Sl, 700
*1, 342, 550
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
50, 000
1, 000, 00.0
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1,000, coo
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1,000,000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
*345, 400
*758, 800
2, 000, 000
*1, 850
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1,000,000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, COO

2, 318,883 53
2, 314,079 00
1,153, 000 00
2, 292,600 00
2, 257,255 21
1,126, 843 74
1,129, 090 29
227, 580 43
492, 158 94
2, 259,000 00
2, 256,513 69
1,129, 039 02
3, 382,483 67
2, 206,992 21
1,102, 6.59 61
2, 248,236 56
2, 239,710 90
1,118, 412 34
2, 215,985 83
2, 220,427.12
1 110, 507 80

2, 246,595 03
517, 400 49
1, 539,826 93
1,141, 010 09
• 2,281,555 49
1,142, 872 27
1,126, 500 00
56, 325 00
1,11.5, 764 SO
a, 117,488 85
1,107, 377 50
1, 067,347 35
1, 067,480 27
1, 060,440 34
.1, 069,985 26
1, 070,574 91
1, 073,953 37.
1,078 778 18
1,100, 490 79
390, 847 25
859, 029 25
2, 215,447 70
2,074 31
1,118, 370 86
2, 230,611 87
1,108, 910 71
2, 223,786 41
1,109, 976 64
<

167 43
2, 917 87

32 58

7, 826 85
18, 099 70

2, 313, 883 53
2, 314, 079 00
1,152, 000 00
2, 292, 600 00
2, 257, 255 21
1,126, 843 74
1,129, 090 29
227, 413 00
489,241 07
2, 2.59, 000 00
2, 256, 513 69
1,129, 039 02
3, 382, 483 67
2, 206, 992 21
1,102,- 659 61
2, 248, 236 56
2, 239, 710 90
1,118, 412 34
2, 215, 985 83
2, 220, 427 12
1,110, 507 80

2, 246, 595 03
517, 400 49
1, 539, 794 35
1,141, 010 09
2, 281, 555 49
1,142, 872 27
1,126, 500 00
56, 325 00
1,11.5, 764 80
1,117, 488 85
1,107. 377 50
1, 067, 347 35
1, 067, 480 27
1, 060, 440 34
1, 069, 985 26
1. 070, 574 91
1, 073, 953 37
1,078,778 18
1,100,490 79
383, 020 40
840, 929 55
2, 215, 447 70
2, 070 46
1,118, 370 86
2, 230, 611 87
1,103, 910 71
2, 223, 786 41
1,109, 976 64

1, 782, 043 06
1, 780, 060 77
885, 302 59
1, 761, 844 38
1, 768, 662 26
889, 906 21
891, 680 39
179, 773 12
386, 751 83
1, 780, 492 61
• 1, 775, 035 35
888,132 95
2, 671, 260 54
1, 807,158* 41
901, 971 06
1, 818, 593 78
1, 839, 598 27
919, 557 94
1,844,733 26
1, 852, 285 40
926, 388 15

15.94
15.70
15.20
14.63
12.86
12.68
12.91
12. 97
12. 99
12.95
12.83
12. 90
12.75
10. 35
10.27
12. 41
11. 98
11. 84
10.80
1L02
1L05

12.33
1, 876, 071 01
422, 367 75
14.54
1.256,974 98
14. 09
14.10
' 938,137 79
1, 877, 823 45
14.03
936, 780 55
14.29
932, 919 25
12.65
46, 888 66
12.65
948, 577 94
1L57
950, 043 66 « 1L75
951, 559 61
10.74
961, 574 19
6,73
953,107 39
6.75
942, 613 63
6.04
956, 411 41
7.00
955, 870 46
7.06
954, 625 22
7.39
951, 513 28
7.88
966, 402 45
10.05
333, 423 63
10.89
732, 038 78
10.82
1, 932, 778 80
10.77
1, 794 55
JL92
• 969, 335 52
11.84
1, 943, 888 34
n.53
970, 600 18
10.89
1L19
1, 942,171 53
977, 952 99
ILOO

89.10
89 00
88 53
88.09
88 43
88 99
89 17
89. 31
89 32
89 02
88 75
88 81
89.04
90 36
90. 20
90 93
91 98
91. 96
92 24
92 61
92.64

93 SO
93 51
93 63
93 81
93 89
93.68
93 30
93 78
94 86
95.04
95 16
96 16
95 31
94 26
95.64
95 59
95 46
95 15
96 64
96 53
96.47
96 64
96 47
97 00
97.19
97. 06
97 11
97.79

17.80

87. 20

'
hj

O
16. 97

87.48

o

16.13

88.20

W
o
H
t>
15.94

88.55

15.79

88.55

o
w
15.42

89.04
Ul

15.10

89.36

i4.'96'

89.76

a
w
X
X
X

_Pi

i.
June

16
23
30
July
7 . . .
11
11
14. . .
21
28
August
.4.
11
18
25. .
September 1
8
15
22
29 •
October
6
13
20.
• 27. . .
November 3
3.
3
10.
17... .
25

'

."
•

. .
.....'

..

Total

..

,.

"o

- 1

113J $2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
mi2, 000. 000
l l If
1, ooo; 000
112-1
*090, 400
115^
115^ ^•1,683,1.50
2, 000, 000
1125
1, 000, 000
12li
2, 000, 000
121§
1, 000, 000
121|
2, 000, 000
116*
1, 000, 000
116ii
2, 000, 000
117-5
1, 000, 000
116>J
3, 000, 000
114
114t
2, 000, 000
1135
3 , 000, 0 0 0
1135
2, 000, 000
113
2, 000, 0 0 0
113i
2, 000, OQO
.1125
2, 000, 0 0 9
112
2, 000, 000
11011, 000, 0 0 0
1101
•'•••245, 8 5 0
110;1
*542, 2 5 0
110§
1, 000, 000
113
1, 000, 0 0 0
112
1, 000, 000

$2, 217, 755 94
1,104,6.2 10
2, 218, 005 71
1,107, 000 00
o 753, 7 to 60
1, 848, 423 98
2,182, 332 89
1, 070,136 00
2,162, 085 83
1,085.712 21
2 191 414 93
1, 097, 329 29
2,181, 093 02
1, 091, 038 65
3, 272, 957 77
2,183, .503 11
3, 281, 789 74
2,177, 057 86
2,174, 300 26
2; 170, 465 37
2,170, 236 48
2,165, .529 30
1, 077, 698 19
265,173 81
584, 808 61
1, 072, 263 90
1, 064, 972 36
1, 065, 650 15

161,.589,'750

183, 037, 862 96

$8 Of)

30, 848 92

a .
8

1^
*

$2, 217, 755 94
1,104, 612 10
2, 218, 005 71
1,107,000 00
758, 749 60
• 1, 843, 423 e s
2.182, 332 89
1, 070,136 00
2,162, 085 83
1, 085, 712 21
2,191, 414 93
1, 097, 329 29
2,181, 093 02
1, 091, 038 65
3, 272, 957 77
2.183, 503 11
. 3, 281, 789 74
2,177, 057 86
2,174, 300 26
2,170, 465 37
2,170, 236 48
2,165, 529 30
1, 077, 698 19
265,173 81
584, 800 55
1, 072,263 90
1, 064, 972 36
1, 065, 650 15

$1, 960, 447 24
989, 574 11
1, 987, 015 19
987,290 97
659, 065 88
1, 605, 580 00
1, 933, 406 77
878, 961 81
1, 777, 665 64
891, 755 41
• 1, 885, 088 11
939, 896 61
1, 850, 344 02
937, 519 78
2, 871, 015 53
• 1, 909, 073 76
. 2, 881, 922 93
1, 911, 796 14
1, 924,159 52
1, 906, 006 91
1, 922, 690 12
1, 933, 508 30
973, 090 92
239, 434 59
528, 036 61
971, 473 52
942, 453 42
951, 473 35

183, 007, 014 04

10. 89
10.40
10.90
10. 70
9.90
9.82
9.12
7.01
8.10
8.57
9. ,57
9.73
9.05
9.10
9.10
9.18
9.39
8. 85
8.72
8. .52
8. .51
8.28
7.77
7.86
7.85
7.23
6.50
6.56

SI
0 -H-l

.

b p o <g
;> fc/;o

<

98.02
98.96
99. 35
98. 73
05. 46
95.39
96. 67
87. 90
88.88
89.17
94. 25
93.99
92.52
93. 75
95. 70
9.5. 45
96.06

Average rate of
pr^.mium on total purchases to
date.

'•3

D a t e of p u r c h a s e .

Average rate of
premium on each
purchase.

o
o

X
X
X

from May, 1869, to Noveanher 30, 1870, (|'C.—Continued.
Cnrrency value of
interest accrued
on bondsbought
"Hat."

TABLE M.—Statement of purcliases of bond

O
<1 •

O

147, 674, 893 56

95. .59

96.21
95.30
96.13
96. 63
97.31
97. 39
97.39
97.15
94.25
95.15

14. 65

H

S
Ul

14.29

£0. .52

K
O

14.07

90. 62

>
K!

1.3. 71

90. 93

13.44'

91.24

H
pj
13. 25

NOTE.—The purchases marked ( * ) are "interest purchases," beiug the bonds bought with the proceeds of the iuterest collected on the bonds previously purchased,
recapitulation by loans see Table " P , " iDost page 46.




90. 31

91. 39

CO

a
For

TABI.Y^'N.—Statement of tbe public debt ofthe United States June 30, 1870.
Price at
Length of loan. "When redeemable. Eate of in terest. which sold. Amount author- Amount issued. Amount outstandized.
ing.
Unclaimed dividends upon debt created prior to 1800,
, and the principal and interest of the outstandijig debt
created during the war of 1812, and up to 1837.

5 and 6 per
cent.

On demand .

$57, 665 00

TREASURY NOTES PRIOR TO 1840..

The acts of October 12, 1837, (5 Statutes, 201;) May 21,
1838, (5 Statutes, 223;) March 31,1840, (5 Statutes, 370,)
February 15,1841, (5 Statutes, 411;) Janiiary 31, 1842,
(5 Statutes, 469 ;) August 31,1342, (5 Statutes, 581,-) and
March 3,1843, (5 Statutes, 614,) authorized the issue of
treasury notes in various amounts, and with interest
at rates named therein from 1 mill to 6 per centum per
annum.

1 and 2 years.

1 and 2 years Irom 1 mill to 6 per Par
date. '
cent.

82, 675 35

Ul

LOAN OF 1842. •

The act of July 21,1841, (5 Statutes, 438,) authorized a
loan of $12,000,000, with interest at not exceeding 6 per
centum per annum, reimbursable at the will of the
Secretary of the Treasury, after six months' notice, or
at any time after January 1,1845. The act of April 15,
1842, "(5 Statutes, 473,) authorized an additional sum of
^5,000.000, and made the amount obtained on the loan,
after the passage of the last act, reimbursable, as
should be agTcedupon a t t h e time of issue, either after
six months' no.tice, or at any time not after January
1,1863.

20 years.

January 1,1863.

6 per cent

Par

$17, OCO, 000 00

$8, 000, 000 00.

,000 00

o

>
O
W

TREASURY NOTES OF 1846.

The act of July 22,1846, (9 Statutes, 39,) authorized the
issue of treasury notes in such sums as the exigencies
of the Goverimient might reqiiire; the amount outstanding at any one time not to exceed $10,000,000, to
bear interest at not exceeding 6 per centum per annum, redeemable one year from date. These notes
were receivable in payments of all debts due the United States, including customs duties.

O
H
O

1 year.

1 year from date .. 6 per cent.. .. Par

10, COO, 000 00

6, 000 00

Ul

a

IVIEXICAN INDEMNITY.

A proviso in the civil and diplomatic appropiiation act
of August 10,1846, (9 Statutes, 94,) authorized the payment of the principal and interest of the fourth and
fifth installments of the Mexican indemnities due April
and July 1844, by the issue of stock, with interest at 5
per centum, payable in five years.




5 years.

A.pril and
1849.

July 5 per cent.

Par .

350, 000 00

303, 573 92

1,104 91
X
X
X

<

TABLE N.—Statement of the xmblic debt of the United States June 30,1870—Continued.

X
X
X

Amount outstandPrice at
Length of loan "When redeemable. Eate of interest. which spld. Amount author Amount issued.
ing.
ized.

hj

TREASURY NOTES OF 1847.

The act of January 28,1847, (9 Statutes, 118,) authorized
the issue of $23,000,000 treasury notes, with interest at
not exceeding 6 per centum per annum, or the issue of
stock for any portion of the amount, with interest at 6
per centum per annum. The treasury notes imder
this act were redeemable at the expiration of one or
two years ; and the interest was to cease at the expiration of sixty days' notice. These notes were receivable in payment of allI debts due the United States, indebts
eluding customs dut:

1 and 2 years.

After 60 days' no- 6 percent.
tice.

Par .

$950 00

$23, 000, 000 00

pi
O
W
Ul

W
O

LO^lN OF 1847.
The act of Jauuary 28,1847, (9 Statutes, 118,) authorized .20 years.
the issue of $23,000,000 treasury notes, with interest at
not exceeding 6 per centum per annnm, or the issue of
stock for any portion o.f the amount, with interest at 6
per centum per annum,reimbursable after December 31,
1867. Section 14 authorized the conversion of treasury
notes under this or any preceding act into like stock,
Avhich accounts for the apparent over issue.

January 1,1868..-

per cent..

23, 000,000 00

$28,207, 000 00

12, 350 00

o
w

TEXAN INDEMNITY STOCK.

The act of September 9, 1850, (9 Statutes, 447,)-authorized the issue of $10,000,000 stock, with interest at 5 per
centum per annum, to the State of Texas, in satisfaction of all claiins against the United States Uristng out
of the annexation of the said State. This stock was to
.be redeemable at the end of fourteen years.

14 years.

January 1,1865.

5 per cent.

Par .

10, 000,000 00

5, 000, 000 00

242, 000 00




H
W
P>
GO

a

LOAN OF 1848.
The act of March 31, 1848, (9 Statutes, 217,) authorized a
loan of $16,000,000, with interest at not exceeding 6 per
centum per annum, reimbursable after July 1, 1868.
The Secretary of the Treasury was authorized to pur. chase this stock at any time.

o

20 years ,

JiUy 1,1868 .

6 per cent.

Par.

16, 000, 000 00

16, 000,000 00

43, 700 00

TREASURY NOTES OF 1857.
T h e a c t of D e c e m b e r 23,1857,(11 S t a t u t e s , 257,) a u t h o r i z e d
t h e i s s u e of $20,000,000 i n t r e a s u r y n o t e s , $6,000,000,
w i t h iuterest a t not exceeding 6 per centum per an.
num, and t h e remainder w i t h interest at t h e lowest
r a t e offered b y b i d d e r s , b u t n o t e x c e e d i n g 6 p e r centum per annum. These notes were redeemable at the
e x p i r a t i o n bf o n e y e a r , a n d i u t e r e s t Avas t o c e a s e a t t h e
e x p i r a t i o n of s i x t y d a y s ' n o t i c e a f t e r m a t u r i t y . T h e y
w e r e r e c e i v a b l e i n p a y m e n t of all d e b t s d u e t h e U n i t e d
States, including customs duties.

1 year

60 d a y s ' n o t i c e .

5 a n d 5^ p e r
cent.

Par.

20, 000, 000 00

20, 000, 000 CO

2, 000 00

hj

O

H

LOAN OF 1858.
T h e a c t of J u n e 14, 18.58, (11 S t a t u t e s , 365,) a u t h o r i z e d a
loan of $20,000,000, w i t h i n t e r e s t a t n o t e x c e e d i n g 5 p e r
centum per annum, and redeemable any time alter
J a n u a r y 1, 1874.

15 y e a r s .

J a n u a r y 1,1874.

5 p e r cent-

Par.

, 000, 000 00

20, 000, 000 00

20, 000, 000 00

^

10 y e a r s .

J a n u a r y 1,1871 .

5 per cent.

Par.

21, 000, 000 00

7, 022, 000 00

7, 022, 000 00

W
O

LOAN OF 1860.
T h e a c t of J u n e 22, 1860, (12 S t a t u t e s , 79,) a u t h o r i z e d a
loan'of $21,000,000, (to b e u s e d i n r e d e m p t i o n of t r e a s u r y
notes,) w i t h i n t e r e s t a t n o t e x c e e d i n g 6 p e r c e n t u m p e r
a n n u m , r e d e e m a b l e i n n o t less t h a n t e n n o r m o r e t h a n
• twenty years.

tJ
H

LOAN OF PEBRUARY 1861, (ISSls.)
T h e a c t of F e b r u a r y s , 1861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 129,) a u t h o r i z e d
a loan of $25,000,000, w i t h i n t e r e s t a t n o t e x c e e d i n g 6
p e r centum" p e r a n n u m , r e i m b u r s a b l e i n n o t less t h a n
t e n n o r m o r e t h a n twentj'- y e a r s from t h e d a t e o f t h e act.

10 or 20 y e a r s

J a n u a r y 1,1881.

6 per cent.

Par.

25, 000, 000 00

18, 415, 000 00

18, 415, 000 00

w

TREASURY NOTES OF 1861.
T h e a c t of M a r c h 2, 1861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 178,) a u t h o r i z e d a
loan of $10,000,000, w i t h i n t e r e s t a t n o t e x c e e d i n g 6 p e r
c e n t u m p e r a n n u m , r e d e e m a b l e o n t h r e e m o n t h s ' notice
a f t e r J u l y 1, 1871, a n d p a y a b l e Jul;^ 1, 1881. I f prop o s a l s for t h e l o a n w e r e - n o t satisfactory, a u t h o r i t y
w a s ^ i v e n t o i s s u e t h e Whole a n i o u n t i n t r e a s u r y n o t e s ,
w i t h i n t e r e s t a t n o t e x c e e d i n g 6 p e r c e n t u m p e r an- , 2 y e a r s .
num.
T h e s a m e a c t ^ g a v e a u t h o r i t y t o s u b s t i t u t e ' 60 d a y s .
t r e a s u r y n o t e s for t h e w h o l e or a n y p a r t of l o a n s
a u t h o r i z e d a t t h e t i m e of t h e p a s s a g e of t h i s a c t . T h e s e
n o t e s w e r e to b e r e c e i v e d i n p a y m e n t of all d e b t s d u e
t h e United States, including customs duties, and were
r e d e e m a b l e a t a n y t i m e w i t h i n t w o y e a r s from t h e
d a t e of t h e a c t .




Q

ft!

2 y e a r s after d a t e . ' 6 p e r c e n t .
60 d a y s after d a t e .

Par.

C 22, 468,100 00
\ 12, 896, 350 .00 }

Ul
35, 364, 450 00
3, 200 00

S

X

X
X

TABLE 1^.—Statenient of the public debt ofthe United States, June 30, 1870—Continued.
P r i c e a t A m o u n t author-] A m o i m t i s s u e d . A m o u n t o u t s t a n d L e n g t h of loan. W h e n r e d e e m a b l e . E a t e of i n t e r e s t . w h i c h sold.
ing.
ized.

hj

O

OREGON W A R D E B T .

The act of March 2,1861, (12 Statutes, 198,) appropriated
$2,800,000 for the payment of expenses incurred by the
Territories of Washington and Oregon, in the suppression of Indian hostilities in the years 1855 ana 1856.
Section 4 of the act authorized the payment of these
claims in bonds redeemable tn twenty years, with interest at 6 per centum per annum.

20 y e a r s .

J u l y 1, 1831 .

$2, 800, COO CO

6 per cent.

$1, 090, 850 00

1945, 000 00

>^
H
Ul

LOAN OF J U L Y AND AUGUST 1 8 6 1 , ( 1 8 8 1 s . )

The act of July 17, 1861, (12 Statutes, 259,) authorized
tbe issue of $250,000,000 bonds, with interest at not exceeding 7 per centum per annum, redeemable after
twenty years. The act of August 5, 1861, (12 Statutes,
313,) authorized the issue of bonds with interest at 6
jier centum per annum, payable after twenty years
from date, in exchange for 7-30 notes issued under the
act of July 17, 1861. ITone of such bonds were to be
issued for a sum less than $500, and the whole amount
of them was not to exceed the whole amount of 7-30
notes issued under the above act of July 17. The
amount issued in exchange for 7-30's was $139,318,100.

t-s

O

20 y e a r s .

J u l y 1,1881 .

6 i^er c e n t .

Par.

250, OCO, 000 00

50, 000, 000 00
139, 318,100 00

139, 318,100 00

Par.

60, 000, 000 00

60, 000, 000 00

o

106,256 00

OLD DEMAND NOTES.

T h e a c t of J u l y 17,1861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 259,) a u t h o r i z e d t h e
i s s u e of $50,000,000 t r e a s u r y n o t e s , n o t b e a r i n g i n t e r est, of a less d e n o m i n a t i o n ' t h a n fifty dollars a n d n o t
less t h a n t e n dollars, a n d p a y a b l e on d e m a n d b y t h e
a s s i s t a n t t r e a s u r e r s a t Phi]a.deifphia, E"ew Y o r k , o r B o s t o n . T h e a c t of Aui^ust 5,1861, (12 S t a t u t e s , 313,) aut h o r i z e d t h e i s s u e oi" t h e s e n o t e s i n d e n o m i n a t i o n s of
five d o l l a r s ; i t also a d d e d t h e a s s i s t a n t t r e a s u r e r a t St.
Louis and the designated depositary at Cincinnati to
t h e places w h e r e t h e s e n o t e s w e r e n i a d e p a y a b l e . T h e
a c t of F e b r u a r y 12,1862, (12 S t a t u t e s , 338,) i n c r e a s e d
t h e a m o u n t of d e m a n d n o t e s a u t h o r i s e d $10,000,000.




On d e m a n d .

Ul

SEVEN-THIRTIES OF 1861.
The act of J u l y \ 7 , 1861, (12 Statutes, 259,) authorized a
loan of $250,000^000, part of which was to be in treasury notes with interest at 7 3-10 per centum per annum,
payable three years after date of act.

3 years .

August 19 and Oc- 7 3-10 per cent. P a r .
tober 1,1864.

140, 094, 750 00

140, 094, 750 00

515, 000, C O 00
O

514, 771, 600 00

29, 700 00

FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1862.

The act of February 25, 1862, (12 Statutes, 345.) authorized a loan of $500,000,000. for the purpose of funding
the treasury notes and floating debt of the United
States, and 'the issue of bonds therefor, with interest
at 6 per centum per annum. These bonds were redeemable after five and i)ayable twenty years from
date. The act of March 3, 1864, (13 Statutes, 13,) authorized an additional issue of $11,000,000 of bonds to
nersons Avho subscribed for the loan on or before January 21, 1864. The act of Jauuary 28, 1865, (13 Statutes, 425,) authorized an additional issue of $4,000,000
of these bonds and their sale in the United States or
Europe.

hj
O
5 or 20 years .

M a y l , 1867.

6 per cent..

Par.

499, 707, 900 .00

H
O

Kl
Ul

W

o

LEGAL TENDER NOTES.

The act of February 25,1862, (12 Statutes, 345,) authorized
the issue of $150,000,000 United States notes, not bearing
interest, payable to bearer at tho Treasury ofthe United
States,and bf such denominations as the Secretary ofthe
Treasury might deem expedient, not less than five dollai's; $50,000,O'OO to be in lieu of demand notes authorized
by the act of July 17,-1861; these notes to be a lesal
teiider. The act'of July 11, 1862, (12 Statutes, .532,)
authorized an additional issue Of $150,000,000 United
States treasury notes, of such denominations as tlie
Secretary of the Treasury might deem expedient, but
no such note should be for a fractional part of a dollar,
and not more than $35,000,000 of a lower denomination
than five dollars; these notes to be a legal tender. Tiie
act of March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 710,) authorized an
additional issue of $1^50,000,000 United States notes,
payable to bearer, of such denominations, not less
tha]i one dollar, as the Secretary of the Treasury
might prescribe; which notes were "made a legal ten der.
The same act limited the time at which treasury notes
might be exchanged for United States bonds to July 1,
1863. The amount of notes authorized by this act were
t o b e in lieu of $100,000,000 authorized 'bythe resolution of January 17, 1863, (12 Statutes, 822.')




Par.

450, 000, G O 00
O

356, 000, 000 00

o
H
H

Ul

X
X
X

TABLE N.—Statement of the xmblic debt of the United States June 30, 1870—Continued.
Price at
Length of loan. AVhen redeemable. Eate of iuterest. wluch sold 'Amount authoi- Amount issued. Amount outstandized.

w

TEMPORARY LOAN.

The act of February 25, 1862, (12 Statutes, 346,) authorized temporary loan deposits of $25,000,000, for not
less than thirty days, with interest at 5 per centum
per annum, payable after ten days' notice. The act of
March 17, 1862, (12 Statutes, 370,) authorized the increase of temporary loan deposits $50,000,000. The act
of July 11, 1862, (12 Statutes, 532,) authorized a further
increase of temporary loan deposits to $100,000,000.
The act of June 30, 1864, (13 Statutes, 218,) authorized
a further increase of temporary loan deposits to not
exceeding $150,000,000, and an in'crease of the rate of interest to not exceeding 6 per centum per annum, or a decrease ofthe rate of interest ou ten days'uotice, as the
public interest might require.
CERTIFICATES OF

hj
IsTot less than
30 days..

After 10 days' notice.

$181, 310 00

$150, 000, 000 00

4, 5, and 6 per
cent.

w
H
O

o
H

INDEBTEDNESS.

The act of March 1, 1862, (12 Statutes, 352,) authorized
the issue of certificates of indebtedness to public
creditors who might elect to r«iceive thera, to bear
interest at the rate of 6 per centum per annum, and
payable one year from dale, or earlier, at the option
of "the Government. The act of May 17, 1862, (12
Statutes, 370.) authorized the issue of these certificates in xiayment of disbursing officers' checks. The
act of March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 710,) made the interest payable in lawful money.

1 year.

1 year afterdate..

6 per cent.

Par.

ISTo limit

$561, 753, 241 00

5, 000 00




Kj

O

^^
H

w
H
W

FRACTIONAL CURRENCY.

The act of July 17, 1862, (12 Statutes, 592,) authorized
the use of postal and other stamps as currency, and
made them receivable in payment of all dues to the
Uni ted States less than five dollars. The 4th section of
the act of March 3,1863, (12 Statutes, 711,) authorized
the issue of fractional notes in lieu of postal and otlier
stamps and postal'currency; made them exchangeable
in sums not less than three dollars for United States
notes, and receivable for postage and revenue stamps,
and^ in papnept of dues to the United States, except
duties on imports, less than five dollars; and limited

O

On presentation

Par.

$50, 000, 000 00

39, 878, 684 43
CO

W

the amount to $50,000,000. The 5tli section of the act
of June 30,1864, (13 Statutes, 220,) authorized an issue
of $50,000,000 in fractional currency, and provided that
the whole amount of these notes should not exceed
this sum.
L ^ N OF 1863.
OV
The act of March 3,1863. (12 Statutes, 709,) authorized a
loan of $900,000,000, and the issue of bonds witli interest at not exceeding 6 jier centum per annum, and redeemable in not less than ten nor more than forty
years, principal and interest payable in coin. The act
bf J u n e 30, 1864, (13 Statutes, 219,) repeals so much of
the preceding act as limits the authority thereunder
to the current fiscal year, and also repeals the authority altogether except as relates to $75,000,000 of .bonds
already advertised for.

17 years.

July 1, 1881.

6 per cent.

Premium
of 4.13

75, 000, 000 00

75, 000, 000 00

W
75, 000, 000 00

o
w
H
O

^^
H

m

ONE-YEAR NOTES O F 1 8 6 3 .

The act of March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 710,) authorized
the issue of $400,000,000 treasury notes, with interest
at not exceeding 6 i)er centum per annum, redeemable in not more'than three years, principal and interest payable in lawful money, to be a legal tender for
their face value.

W

hj

1 year.

1 year after d a t e . . 5 per cent.

Ul

156, 367 00

Par .

m

o
H

TAVO-YEAR NOTES O F 1 8 6 3 ,

The act of March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 710,) authorized
the issue of $400,000,000 treasury notes, with interest
at not exceeding 6 per centum per annum, redeemable in not more than three years, princiiDal and interest payable in lawful money, to be a legal tender for
their face value.

2 years

2 years after date. 5 per cent.

Par.

91, 905 00

H

COIN CERTIFICATES.

The Sth section of the act of March 3,1863, (12 Statutes,
711,) authorized the deposit of gold coin and bullion
with the Treasurer or any assistant treasurer, in sums
• not less than $20, and the issue of certificates therefor
in denominations the same as United States notes;
also authorized the issue of these certificates in payment of interest on the public debt. I t limits tlie
amount of them to not more than 20 per centum of
the .amount of coin and bullion in the treasury, and
directs their receipt in payment for duties on imports.




O
hej

On demand .

Par.

Indefinite.

442, 925, 000 00

34, 547,120 00

(>
Ul

PO
Kl

^

TABLE N.—Statanent of the xmblic debt of the United States June 30, 1870—Continued.

X

Price at
Length of loan When redeemable. Eate of interest which sold. Amount author-i Amouut issued. Amount outstandized.
ing..
COMTOUND INTEREST NOTES.

hj

The act of March 3,1863, (12 Statutes, 709,) authorized 3 years.
the issue of $400,000,000 treasury notes, with interest
at not exceeding 6 per centum 'per annum, in lawful
money, payable not more than three years from date,
and tb be a legal tender for their face value. The act
of June 30,1864, (13 Statutes, 218,) authorized the issue
of $200,000,000 treasury notes, of any denomination not
less than $10, payable'not more than three years from
date, or redeemable at any time after three years, with
iaterest at not exceedin'g 7 3-10 per centum, payable
in lawful money at maturity, and made them a'legal
tender for their face to the same extent as United
States notes. $177,045,770 of the amount issued was
in redemption of 5 per cent, notes.

June 10,1867.- and
May 15,1868.

6 p er cent.,
compound.

Par.

'.$400, 000, 000 00

$17, 250, 000 00
177, 045, 770 00
22, 728, 390 00

O
$2,152, 910 00
O

Ul

TEN-FORTIES OF 1864.

The act of March 3, 1864, (13 Statutes, 13,) authorized
the issue of $200,000,000 bonds, at not exceeding 6
per centum per annum, redeemable after five and
payable not more than forty years fi-om date, in coin.

10 or 40 years.

March 1,1874-

5 per cent.

Par.

200, 000, COO 00

196,117, 300 C
O

194, 567, 300 C
O

Kj

O

F l V E - T W E N T l E S OF xMARCH 1 8 6 4 .

The act of March 3, 1864, (13 Statutes, 13,) authorized
the issue of $200,000,000 bonds, at not exceeding 6
per centum i)er annum, redeemable after five and
payable not more than forty years Itom date, in coin.

5 or 20 years.

November 1,1869.

6 per cent.

3, 382, 500 00

3,130,100 00

5 or 20 years.

ISTovember 1,1869.

6 per cent.

125, .561,300 G
O

109,073,150 00

F l V E - T W E N T i E S OF J U N E 1 8 6 4 .

The act of June 30, 1864, (13 Statutes, 218,) authorized
a loan of $400,000,000, and the issue therefor of bonds
redeemable not less than five nor more than thirty
(or forty, if deemed expedient.) years from date, with
interest at not exceeding 6 per centum per aniuim,
payable semi-annually, in coin.




Kl

SE^^EN-THIRTIES OF 1864 AND 1865.
T h e a c t of J u n e 30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 218,) a u t h o r i z e d
t h e i s s u e o f $200,000,000 t r e a s u r y n o t e s , of n o t l e s s t h a n
$10 each, p a y a b l e a t n o t m o r e t h a n t h r e e y e a r s from
d a t e , or r e d e e m a b l e a t a n y t i m e a f t e r t h r e e y e a r s ,
w i t h i n t e r e s t a t n o t e x c e e d i n g 7 3-10 p e r c e n t u m p e r
a n n u m . T h e a c t o f M a r c h 3, 1805, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468.)
a u t h o r i z e d a loan of $600,000,000, a n d t h e i s s u e t h e r e f o r
of b o n d s or t r e a s u r y n o t e s . T h e n o t e s t o b e of den o m i n a t i o n s n o t less t h a n $50, w i t h i n t e r e s t i n lawful
nioney a t n o t m o r e t h a n 7 3-10 p e r c e n t u m p e r a n n u m .

3 years.

( A u g u s t 15,1867.
J u n e 15,1868
( J u l y J5,1868
•

;

7 3-10 p o r c e n t . P a r .

800, 000, 000 00

829, 992, 500 00

631, 300 00

!

O
O

NAVY PENSION FUND.
T h e a c t of J u l y 1,1804, (13 S t a t u t e s , 414,) a u t h o r i z e d t h e
S e c r e t a r y of' t h e jN'avy to i n v e s t i n r o i s t e r e d securit i e s of t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s so m u c h o l ' t h e ISTavy pension fund i n t h e T r e a s u r y J a n u a r y 1 a n d J u l y 1 iu
e a c h y e a r as w o u l d n o t b e r e q u i r e d for t h e i»ayment of
n a v a l ' p e n s i o n s . Section 2 of t h e a c t of J u l y 23, 1868,
(15 S t a t u t e s , 17.0,) m a k e s t h e i n t e r e s t on 'this fund
3 p e r c e n t u m p e r a n n u m i n lawful m.oney, a n d confines i t s u s e t o t h e p a y m e n t of n a v a l jDensions exclusively.

3 per cent.

Indefinite.

Par.

Indefinite.

14, 000, 000 00

14,000,0 0 00

GO

O
H

FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1865.
T h e a c t of M a r c h 3, 1865, (13 S t a t u t e s , 468,) a u t h o r i z e d
t h e i s s u e of $600,000,000 of b o n d s or t r e a s u r y n o t e s i n
addition to amounts previously authorized; the bonds
t o b e for n o t less t h a n $50, p a y a b l e n o t m o r e t h a n f o r t y
y e a r s from d a t e of i s s u e , or after a n y ijeriod n o t less
t h a n five y e a r s ; i n t e r e s t p a y a b l e s e m i - a n n u a l l y , a t n o t
e x c e e d i n g 6 p e r c e n t u m p e r a n n u m , w h e n i n coin, or
7 3-10 p e r c e n t u m p e r a n n u m , Avhen in c u r r e n c y . I n
a d d i t i o n t o t h e a m o u n t of b o n d s a u t h o r i z e d b y t h i s
a c t a u t h o r i t y w a s also g i v e n to c o n v e r t t r e a s u r y n o t e s
or o t h e r i n t e r e s t - b e a r i n g oblisrations i n t o b o n d s aut h o r i z e d b y it. T h e a c t of A p r i l 12, 1866, (14 S t a t u t e s ,
31,) c o n s t r u e d t h e a b o v e a c t to a u t h o r i z e t h e Secret a r y of t h e T r e a s u r y t o r e c e i v e a n y obligation of t h e
U n i t e d S t a t e s , w h e t h e r b e a r i n g i n t e r e s t or not, i n exc h a n g e for a n y b o n d s a u t h o r i z e d b y it, or t o sell a n y
of s u c h b o n d s p r o v i d e d t h e p u b l i c d e b t is n o t i n c r e a s e d
thereby,




5 or 20 y e a r s .

IsTo v e m b e r 1,1870.

6 per cent.

Par.

203, 327, 250 00

203, 327, 250 00

193, 613, 800 00

Kl
O

>

Ul

d

X

TABLE N.—Statement of the pniblic debt of the United States June 30,1870-^Continued.

X

Price at
Length of loan. When redeemable. Eate of interest. which Sold, Amount anthor-] Amonnt issued. I Amount outstandized.
CONSOLS OF 1865.
The act of March 3, 1865, (13 Statutes, 468,) authorized
the issue of $600,000,000 of bonds or treasurynotes in
addition to amounts previously authorized; the bonds
to be for not less than $50, payable not more than forty
years from date of is.sue, or after any period not less
than five j^ears; interest payable semi-annually, at not
exceeding 6 per centum pei- annum, when in coin, or
7 3-10 per centum per annum, when in currency. In
addition to the amount of bonds authorized by this
act authority was also given to convert treasury notes
or other interest-bearing obligations into bonds authorized by it. The act of April 12, 1866, (14 Statutes,
31,) construed the above act to authorize the Secretary of the Treasui'y to receive any obligations of the
c United States, whether bearing interest or not, in exchange for any bonds authorized by it, or to sell any
of such bonds, iDiovided the iJiiblic debt is not increased
thereby.

hj
5 or 20 years .

July 1,1870 .

6 per cent..

Par.

$332, 99S, 950 00

$332, 998, 950 00

$285, 268, 200 00

O

O
W
CO

fc^ •

o
W
H
J>
Hi

CONSOLS OF 1867.
The act of March 3, 1865, (13 Statutes, 468,) authorized 5 or 20 years .
the issue of $600,000,000 of bonds or treasury notes in
addition to amounts previou.sly authorized; the bonds
to be for not less than $50, payable not more than forty
years from date of is.sue, or after any period not less
than five years: interest payable semi-annually, at not
exceeding 6 iier centum per annum, when in coin, or
7 3-10 per centum per annum, when in currency. In
addition to the amount of bonds authorized by this
act authority was also given to convert treasury notes
or other interest-bearing obligations iuto bonds authorized by it. The act of April 12, 1866, (14 Statutes,
31^,) construed the above act to authorize the Secretary of the Treasury to receive any obligation of the
United States, whether bearing interest or not, in exchange for any bonds authorized by it, or to sell any
of such bonds, provided the public debt is not increased j
thereby.




O
July 1,1872 .

6 per cent.

379, 602, 350 00

379, 602, 350 00

350, 665, 700 00

w
H
00

a

CONSOLS OF 1868.
The act of March 3, 1865, (13 Statutes, 468,) authorized
the issue of $600,000,000 of bonds or treasury notes in
addition to amounts previously authorized; the bonds
to be for not less than $50, payable not more than forty
years from date of issue, or after any period not less
than five years; interest payable semi-annually, at not
exceeding 6 per centujn per annum, when in coin, or
7 3-10 per centum per annum, when in currency. In
addition to the amount of bonds authorized by this
act authority was also given to convert treasury notes
or other interest-bearing obligations into bonds authorized by it. The act of April 12,1866, (14 Statutes,
31,) construed the above act to authorize the Secretary of the Treasury to receive any obligation of the
United States, whether bearing interest or not, in exchange Ibr any .bonds authorized by it, or to sell any
of such bonds, provided the public debt is not increased
thereby,

5 or 20 years .. July 1,1873 ,

6 j)er cent.

Par.

42, 539, 350 00

42, 539, 350 00

39, 795, 350 00

hj

O
H

Ul
THREE PER CENT. CERTIFICATES.

The act of March 3, 1867, (14 Statutes, 558,) authorized
the issue of $50,000,000 in temporary loan certificates
of deijosit, with interest at three ner centum per annum, payable in lawful money on demand, to be used
in redemption of comiDound "interest notes. The act
of July 25, 1868, (15 Statutes, 183,) authorized
•$25,000,000 additional of these certificates for the sole
purpose of redeeming compound interest notes.
Total principal of the debt unpaid, June 30,1870..

Indefinite.

On demand .

3 per cent.

Par.

75, 000, 000 00

84, 945, 000 00

45, 545, 000 00 -

H
Kj

O
2, 480, 304, 797 74

JN'OTB.—The outstanding principal of the public debt, July 1, 1870, as appears by the debt statement of that date, is $2,601,675,127 83. The difference is explained by the fact
that the items for " old debt," amounting to $57,665, and for " Mexican indemnity,'' amounting to $1,104 91, are not included in the monthly statement of the pw.blic debt, and the
bonds which have been purchased for the sinking and special funds, amounting to $121,429,100-, were treated as outstanding on the 1st of July last, and were therefore not deducted.
Since that date the act of July 14, 18.70, directed their cancellation and destruction, and the^^ have therefore been deducted from the amount outstanding in this statement.




o
w

w.

>
Ul

d
Kj

X

XLVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

T^U3LE 0.—Statement of the bonds issued to the S6ve)'al Facific Railway companies in aid of
their construction, under acts of July 1, 1862, (12 Statutes, 492,) and July 2, 1864, (13
Statutes, 356.) These bonds are payable thirty years frOm date and bear interest at six
per centum per annum in lawful money, which is paid by the United States.

j ^ a m e of company.

K a n s a s Pacific
S i o u x C i t y a n d Pacific
C e n t r a l Pacific
C e n t r a l B r a n c h U n i o n Pacific.
W e s t e r n Pacific

$27, 075, 000
6, 303, 000
1, 628, 320
25, 881,000
1, 600, 000
1, 970, 000

00'
00
00
00
00
00

64, 457, 320 00

Total

TABLE P . -

I n t e r e s t ac- I n t e r e s t p a i d
A m o u n t out- c r u e d a n d n o t b y U n i t e d
standing.
y e t paid.
"States. •

Balance of
interest paid
by United
States.,

00 $2, 891, 729 85 $1, 289, 576 87
634, 359 12
00 1, 023, 903 09
60
145, 358 29
396 08
78 2,491,744 26
164, 054 17
00
253, 808 26
7, 401 92
40
73, 288 76

1, 926, 761 78

6, 879, 832 51

2,145, .788 16

$1, 602,152
339, 543
144, 962
2, 327, 690
246, 406
73, 288

98
97
21
09
34
76

4, 734, 044 35

-Eecapitulation, by loans, of 5-20 bonds, bought for the sinldng and special funds,
shoioing their total aver-age cost, in currency and in gold, to date.

^-ss
ot^rP

•

1

^.
oil

c3

fl

Is

ISTet cost.

t'is

^a
cc fl

fl
o

§fl«^

?"
^n^^

•11
op<

©"S-fl
f fl o t> 0-3
>

"cD

fl
p^

<

$18, 562, 300
758, 900

$21, 057,107 -65
903, 808 35

$938 14
12 48

$21, 056,169 51
903, 795 87

20, 418, 550

23,178, 318 84

4, 024 32

23,174, 294 52

18, 691, 301 47

14 96 91 54

16,
02,
39,
2,

18, 571, 834
70, 730, 659
45, 245, 845
3, 350, 238

18, .571, 830
70, 705, 675
45, 245,100
3, 350,147

15, 389, 086
.57, 670,142
35, 817, 483
2, 541,181

12
11
13
13

•

.5-20's of 1862 . . .
5-20'sof M a r c h
1864.
5-20's of J u n e
1864.
5-20's of 1865 . . .
Consols of 1865.
Consols of 1867.
Consols of 1868.

o
"S

t3

IP

ri

Loans.

Total

$812,250
189, 090
48, 849
770, 605
43, 000
57, 966

Interest
repaid by
transportation, &c.

527, 800
689, 600
760, 500
872,100

161, 589, 750

o

04
24
89
95

183, 037, 362 96

.^

53
24, 983
744
91

48
68
92
90

56
56
97
05

30, 848 92 483, 007, 014 04

<

<

$16, 894, 301 33 $13 44 $91 01
671, 396 94 19 09 88 47

02
24
84
72

147, 674, 893 56

37
19,
94
30

93
91
90
88

11
99
09
48

13 25 91 39

IISTOTE.—For details see Table M.
TABLE Q.—Eeturns, by award of the United States Court of Claims, of proceeds of property
seized as captured or abandoned, under the act of March 12,1SQ3, ])aid from July 1, 1869,
to June 30,1870.
Amount,

Date.
S e p t e m b e r 20, 1869.
M a r c h 11, 1870
M a r c h 12, 1870
M a r c h 25, 1870
A x u i l 5, 1870
A.pril 5, 1870
A p r i l 5, 1870
A p r i l 20, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
A p r i l 27, 1870
A p r i l 27, 1870
A p r i l 27, 1870
A p r i l 27, 1870
A p r i l 28, 1870
M a y 2, 1870
M a y 2, 1870
M a y 2, 1870
M a y 3,1870
J u n e 4, 1870
J u n e 22, 1870
J u n e 22, 1870
Total.




J o h n E . Holland
H u l d a h L . S t a n t o n , g u a r d i a n ..
jSTelson A n d e r s o n . . . ' .
J.
AVilliam P o l l a r d
'
Charles J, Quinby
'^
;
Philip Hayes
H. Henry'Knee
E d w a r d ITordham
:...
ISTathan Bliin
C a l v i n L . G-ilbert
Henry Wayne
DelaiW Jenks
John Habersham
Morris Kohn
J o s e p h M i n t z a n d Simon P a s s .
C h a r l e s E . Geilfuss
John H, Fain
E d w a r d Padelford
C. B , M i l l e r a n d J . B . F e l l o w s . .
H e n r y Fields
Joseph White

$1,870
51,696
6, 550
9, 934
67, 015
1, 685
1,141
1, 521
4, 558
3, 973
2, 649
496
1, 655
109, 771
1, 395
1, 731
8, 360
107,041
17, 332
827
1, 821

36
16
16
20
02
92
38
84
97
68
12
71
70
20
02
00
00
00
00
85
27

403, 028 56

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XLVII

TABLE R.—Awards of the United States Court of Claims of proceeds of property seized
as captured or abandoned, under act of March 12,1863, decreed but not paid previous to
June 30, 1870.
D a t e of d e c r e e .

M a r c h 1, 1369
M a r c h 16, 1869 . . . .
M a r c h 22, 1869
M a r c h 22, 1869 . . . .
M a r c h 24, 1 8 6 9 . . . .
M a y 24, 1 S 6 9 . . ' . - . .
M a y 26, 1869
D e c e m b e r 6, 1869..
F e b r u a r y 21, 1870 .
M a r c h l i , 1870 . . . .
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 4, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1370
A p r i l 11, 1370
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p n l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1370
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l l l , 1870
A p r i l 11, 1870
A p r i l .11, 1870
A p r i l 18, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
A i ) r i l 25, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
A p r i l 25, 1870
M a y 2, 1870
M a y 2, 1870
M a y 9, 1870
M a y 9, 1870
M a y 9, 1870
M a y 9, 1870
M a y 9, 1870
M a y 9, 1870
M a y 9, 1870
M a y 9, 1870
M a y 9, 1870
M a y 16, 1870
M a y 23, 1.870
M a y 23, 1870
Total.




iN^ame of c l a i m a n t .

T h o m a s G. W . CrusseU
A z a r i a h M i m s , a d m i n i s t r a t o r . ^.
Henry A, Ealer
J o h n 'feilvey
F r e d e r i c k M , Scharfer
Herman Bulwinkle
J o h n A . Klein, admiuistrator —
J a m e s O'Keeffe
Isaac Bernheimer etal
S a m u e l S, Miller
John Burns
,
Dorr6 & Seckendorf
Jolm L , Fenwick
Ellen Higgins
J a c o b Mills
Mary McManus
E a l p h Meldriia
Oeorge Ott
Thomas Price
Tobias Scott
H e n r y Steitz
J . S. 'Sasportas
Leonard W a g n e r
Christian Amine
•
Tobias Brown
H. Chaves, administrator
John Fitzgerald
William Grant
.•
James Heagney
Frederick j a g e r
'.
Ellen.M. Kennedy
Bridget Logan, administratrix..
David Mathews
Margaret Mangen
Catharine Martin
Daniel McSwiney...
M a r t i n 0 . Donnell
William A. Eook „
J a c o b Eosenfeld
Jacob Eosenband
Charles Schwartz
H e n r y Schaben
Thonipson & E o b b
.'..
Moses Y a n d e r h o r s t
A. V a n Dohler
Eobert Williams
Eobert H. Harney
M c h o l a s Cullitoii
•
Mina Berg
Asa Faulkner
Shelden W . W i g h t
M a r y Dallas . . . ,
A n d r e w M. Eoss, administrator..
Fi-ancis P e r r y .
S. A l e x a n d e r - S m i t h
Louis F . Koester
B, Ogle Tayloe
J, C ' and H. B. Tibbetts
E , S, F o s t e r , a d m i n i s t r a t o r
M a r t i n Caulfield
Eiidolph Lobsiger
F u r m a n & Seawright
Ephraim Zacharias
J o h n Spain
Lazarus Kohn
S. A l e x a n d e r Smith.
J a m e s Melvin
Antonio Ponce
W a r r e n M, Benton
A u g u s t Gielfuss
Ferdinand Brown

Amount
awarded.
$26,275 62
719 88
20, 736 00
27, 715 38
1, 705 60
i7, 403 96
125, 300 00
1,904 70
184, 909 79
1, 051 98
134 20
939 40
556 29
8, 065 18
1, 073 60
536 80
7, 491 59
1, 928 63
1, 051 98268 40
3, 351 64
1, 912 35
1,563 40
942 90
3, 506 60
2, 501 44
695 37
536 80
2, 454 62
5, 233 80
231 79
10, 7.33 74
134 20
1, 402 64
350 60
268 40
671 00
2,147 20
3, 506 60
6,757 61
525 99
7, 389 85
2, 459 80
671 00
402 60
7, 013 20
446 88
1, 963 28
11, 922 44
2,301 15
7, 013 20
942 90
9,271 60
269 40
9, 467 82
16, 025 94
11, 379 3i
19, 884 88
13, 023 82
582 48
942 90
10, 421 71
5, 084 57
1,1.58 95
5,337 12
4, 558 58
269 40
5, 898 81
35,965 07
4, 211 20
2, 219 80
669, 202 45

REPORT OF THE COMMISSMER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

1 P







REPORT

THE COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REYENUE.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT^
O F F I C E OF INTERNAL REVENUE^

Washington, October 31,1870.
S I R : I have the honor to transmit herewith the tabular statements
made up from the accounts of this ofiice, which the Secretary of the
Treasury is required to lay before Congress, as follows:
Table A, showing the receipts from each specific source of revenue
and the amounts refunded in each collection district, State, and Territory of the Ilnited States for the fiscal year ending June 30,1870.
Table B, showing the number and value of internal revenue stamps
ordered monthly by the Commissioner, the receipts from the sale of
. stamps and the commissions allowed on the same; also the number and
value of stamps for tobacco, cigars, snuff, distilled spirits, and fermented
liquors, issued monthly to collectors during the fiscal year ending June
30,1870.
Table C, showing the territorial distribution of internal revenue from
various sources in the United States. •
Table D, showing the aggregate receipts from each collection district,
State, and Territory for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1863,1864,
1865, .1866,1867,1868,1869, and 1870.
Table E, showing the total collections from each specific source of
revenue for the fiscal years ending June 30,1863,1864,1865,1866,1867,
1868,1869, and 1870, respectively.
Table F, showing the ratio of receipts from specific sources to the aggregate of all collections for the fiscal years ending June 30,1864,1865,
1866,1867,1868,1869, and 1870," respectively.
Table G, an abstract of reports of district attorneys concerning suits
and prosecutions under the internal revenue laws.
These tables exhibit the full result of the operations of this Bureau
from its orgaDization to the present time.
The estimate submitted in my annual report for 1869, of the probable
receipts from internal revenue sources, exclusive of the direct tax upon
lands and the duty upon, the circulation and deposits of national bankvS,
for the fiscal year 1870, has been more than realized. That estimate was
$175,000,000, and the aggregate receipts, under the then existing laws,
are shown to be $185,235,867 97, an excess of $10,235,867 97 beyond
the estimate. This aggregate includes the sums refunded for taxes
illegally assessed and collected, amounting to $196,809 81, as well as
the amount of commissions of collectors.
Drawbacks bave only been allowed on general inerchandise under
section 171, act of June 30, 1864, limited by the act of March 31, 1868,
to ale and patent medicines, amounting to $5,838 55.



4

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

The amount allowed for the same for 1869 was $377,411 31.
The drawback on rum and alcohol is not considered in this BureaUo
Tlie total receipts for the first six months of 1870 a r e , . $84, 468, 288 57
And for the like period of 1869 were
69,184, 725 13
Being an increase of 22 per cent., or total increase of.

15,283, 563 44

The total receipts for the last six months of 1870 a r e . . $100, 767,579 40
Ai;id for the like period of 1869 were
90, 854, 619 10
Being an increase of 11 per cent., or total increase of..

9, 912, 960 24

A comparative statement is here subinitted from which
it appears that the total receipts for the fiscal year
il870 are- .•
•
.
....'.... $185, 235, 867 97
The total receipts for the fiscal year 1869 were
160,039,344 29
Sliowing a net gain for the present year of.

25,196,523 68

A general increase of the revenue at the rate of 15/o per cent, on the
receipts of last year from all articles and sources.
Comparative statement shmving the aggregate receipts for the fiscal years ending June 30,1869,
' and June 30, 1870 ', also the increase or decrease, and the increase or decrease per cent.

Sources of revenue.
spirits
Tqbacco
Fermented liquors
Bajuks and bankers
1
Gi;oss receipts
:
vSalos
Special taxes not elsewhere enumerated .
Income, including salaries
Lega<;ies
Successions.
Articles in Schedule A .
Passports
Passports
G-as
Sources not elsewhere enumerated .
Penalties
.'
A ahesive stamps
Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Increase
IDCr cent.

Decrease
13er cent.

$10, 555,197 44
7, 920, 000 31
219,247 36
1, 084, 394 61
593, 301 17
630, 5 5 94
.5
819, 505 59
2, 984, 017 78
427, 745 92
229, 480 35
24, 581 36
6, 697 00
197, 411 55
556, 873 63
49,184 07
123, 333 05
25, 809, 278 43

9

43
G

'4-5'of'i
15.7

;The steady and regular increase of the revenue for 1870 is more fullj^
•shown by the following statement *of yearly receipts from the same
sckirces, for the year ending with each month from June 30,1869, to June
30, I87O3 inclusive:




statement showing the receipts from the several general sources of reve)iuefor the year's endingSources of revenue.
Spirits
Tobacco
Fermented liquors
Banks and bankers
Gross receipts
Sales
Special taxes not elsewhere enumerated.
Income, including salaries
Legacies
Successions
Articles in Schedule A.
Passports
'
Gas
Sources not elsewhere enumerated
Penalties
Adhesive stamps

Sources of revenue.
Spirits
Tobacco
Fermented liquors
Banks and bankers
Gross receipts
Sales
Special taxes not elsewhere enumerated.
Income, including salaries
Legacies
:..
Successions
^
Articles in Schedule A .
Passports
Gas
Sources not elsewhere enumerated
Penalties
Adhesive stamps




$45, 026,401 74
23, 430,707 57
6, 099,
879 54
3, 335,516 52
6, 300,
993 82
8, 206,839 03
8, 801,454 67
34, 791,855 84
1, 244,837 01
1,189, 756 22
882, 860 73
29, 453 00
2, 116,005 82
1, 284,978 98
877, 083 79
16, 420, 710 01

A u g . 31,1869.

Sept. 30,1869.

$46, 318,206 37 $45, 6a2,168 94
24, 632, 050 77
25, 810,913 74
6, 046,994 65
6, 054,197 22
3, 512,870 46 = 3,606, 732 16
•
6, 366,686 90
6, 402,907 00
8, 383,564 98
8, 434,278 79
8, 894,557 77
9, 016,185 44
36,054, 554 08
36, 523,227 49
1, 248,264 94
1, 276,960 33
1,180, 402 90
1,181, 131 22
927 00
885,
892, 490 50
• 23,346 00
23, 391 00
2,137, 110 70
2,133, 885 41
836, 164 82
686, 181 76
849
• 771, 47
703, 491 95
16, 545,332 79
16, 643,763 72

$46, 582, 840 67
27, 242,860 98
6, 052,763 70
3, 664,864 20
6, 504,621 36
8, 503,543 69
9,108, 861 58
36, 897,160 77
1, 306,937 25
1, 202,355 19
895, 015 75
23, 371 00
2,165, 728 53
530, 058 19
701, 496 33
16, 735,635 49

J u l y 31,1869.

Jan. 31,1870,

Feb, 28,1870.

Oct. 31,1869.

178,601,209 15

)lec. 31, 1869.

M a r c h 31,1870.

$47, 268,037 13 $49,101, 852 05
28, 395,267 94
29, 258,064 65
6, 015,199 16
6,019, 612 09
3, 686,124 77
3, 747,903 87
6, 527,531 84
6, 589,793 92
8. 587,429 64
8,705 793 26
9, 261,579 30
9,191,729 54
37,151, 424 75 37,9345, 543 61
500 45
1, 457,470 51
1, 447,
• 1,229,829 29
1, 272,292 24
834 46
894,
895, 385 68
25, 114 00
26, 559 00
905 17
2,176,
2, 200,161 46
552, 663 53
527, 638 32
673, 166 61
709, 083 33
16, 638,784 74
16, 772,192 49

$50, 079,629 25
29,181, 133 87
031 98
6, 046,
3, 800,744 83
6, 632,402 96
8, 762,930 10
9, 308,216 19
37, 578, 187 02
1, 526,772 83
1, 327,259 26
895, 350, 96
27, 734 00
2, 216,008 63
448, 080 27
696, 402 01
16, 796,023 57
175, 322, .907 73

April 30,1870.

730, 929 93 $51, 54'9,415 .53 $53,128, 401 07 $53. 005,203 17
•941 09 30; 539,423 97
30, 287,
336, 064 20 29, 886,804 77
061, 921 43
6, 068,641 89
6, 098,814 20
6,140, 193 43
923,134 11
3, 974,893 68
4,104, 204 83
4, 211,499 58
320 29
190 13
692, 517 21
6, 704,
6, 807,466 82
6, 808,
815, 949 90
8, 767,462 85
8, 322,002 59
8, 799,847 88
360.89
886 04
353,123 47
9, 377,
9, 424,
9, 427,854 10
706, 476 19
38, Oil,584 84
37, 960, 792 65
38, 550, 090 50
902 71
433 71
618, 023 32
1,614,
1, 62.5,
1, 642,695 30
394, 796 89
1, 425,058 54
1, 365,472 44
1, 375,771 88
005 62
413 75
894,145 03
893,
892,
893, 876 39
23, 780 00
23, 634 00
25, 000 00
24, 999 00
246 41
348 14
246, 974 00
2, 282,
2, 278,
2, 303,627 27
470, 905 31
619, 477 10
493, 826 81
608, 690 78
692, 565 73
662, 637 22
702 369 84
638, 643 91
16,849, 580 18 16, 827,814 48 10, 677.345' 28 16, 642,779 11
176,810. 887 05

Nov. 30,1369.

170, 461, 543 07 173, 890,-925 78

160, 039, 344 29 163, 837, 884 60 165,121, 906 67

Total

Total

J u n e 30,18

M a y 31,1870.
$54, 752,077.30
31,157, 164 39
6, 214,
,506 -57
4, 251,813 04
6, 343,
909 95
3, 802,039 76
9. 652,
942 71
37, 785,927 01
1, 656,667 16
1, 422,466 17
895, 944 79
22, 736 CO
2, 316,669 32
613, 208 01
817, 093 30
16, 586,422 48

180, 783, 830 93 181, 613, 386 40 183,791,587 96

J u n e 30,1370.
$55, 531,599
31, 350,707
6, 319,126
4, 419,911
799
6, 894,
8, 837,394
9, 620,960
37, 775, 873
1, 672,582
1, 419,242
907, 442
22, 756
2, 313,417
728, 105
" 827,904
16, 544,043

a
o
Ul
Ul
»—1

O

O

H

18
88
90
13
99
97
26
62
93
57
09
00
37
30
72
06.

185, 235, 367 97

On

6 •

.REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

From the foregoing table it appears that there has been a continuous
increase in the receipts from the excise tax from June 30, 1869, to June
30; 1870, aggregating the sum of $25,196,523 68, and averaging for each
month $2,099,710 30. The term '^sources not elsewhere enumerated'^
embraces, among other things, the residuum of taxes uncollected under
previous laws which had been repealed. For the last year this class has
been greatly reduced by the more thorough action of collectors.
The exhibitions of the foregoing table, and the deductions therefrom,
with the general knowledge which experience in administering the
internal revenue laws has furnished, satisfy me that there is no insurmountable difficulty in enforcing our excise laws; and that a proper
regard to the qualifications of revenue officers for ability and integrity is
Avhat is most essential to secure the prompt and certain collection of
internal taxes. The employment of spies and informers, and the policy
of paying moieties, if they were ever useful, are, in my opinion, no longer
.iiei3essar3^ I think the revenue service would be improved by discontinuing such aids. The officers now termed "detectives" should be
continued in the service under the designation of assistant supervisors,
SPIRITS.

The number of distilleries (other than fruit) registered during
the last fiscal year is
Number of fruit distilleries registered
^

Total.

770
2,120
2,890

The spirit-producing capacity of the registered distilleries for each
twenty-four hours, as ascertained by surveys, is as follows:
i

. Gallons,

From grain
Frbm molasses
Fipm fruit
i

Total daily spirit-producing capacity

759, 377
24, 903
126, 271
910, 551

It will be seen that if the distilleries, other than fruit, were operated
to .the full extent of their capacity for a period of ten months, throughout the distilling season in each year, they are capable of producing
203,912,800 gallons. This quantii3y, however, is largely in excess of
ouj:' consumption, which is estimated at from seventy-five to eighty milliqns of gallons.
The best information which this office has been able to iirocure on
this subject induces the belief that the whole number of distilleries
(other than fruit) is operated for about the period of six months only,
and for that period they are not run to the full extent of their produ;cing capacity.
Tlie returns to this office for the last fiscal year show a
. total production in taxable gallons, from material other
than fruit, of
71,337,099
Frbmfruit.
938,254
From fruit, not yet returned, but estimated at
150, 000
Total yearly production



72,425,353

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

/

This may not prove to be absolutely correct, but it is believed to
approximate the quantity actually produced.
The production of spirits from fruit is likely to be largely increased
for the .current year, owing to the extensive crop of fruit growii in
many ]iarts of the United States, and owing to the further reason that
the revised regulations, issued from this office in July last, under section two of the act of July 20, 1868, governing fruit distillation, have
relieved the manufacturers fr5m many o f t h e requirements applicable
to grain distillation, and which,, when applied to fruit, were found so
burdensome as almost to prohibit its distillation.
I consider that much credit is due to the local revenue officers of the
fruit distilling districts for the energy andjudgment they have exercised
in carrying out these regalations.
Gallons.

The quantity of spirits in bond July 1, 1869, Avas..
16, 685,166
The quantity entered in bond for the year ending June 30,
1870, was
71, 337,099
The quantity withdrawn from bond during last period was., 76, 339,807
The quantity remaining in bond June 30,1870, was
11, 682,458
The quantity remaining in bond July 1,1869, as per present
report, in excess of the quantity stated in my report for
1869, shown by corrected reports of collectors received subsequent to the publication of the report for 1869
21, 328
Judging from the information in possession of this office, there is no
reason for believing that there will be any material falling off in the
production of spirits during the current fiscal year.
The plan of surveying distilleries on the basis of a forty-eight hour
fermenting period, for sweet mash, to which attention was called in my
last annual report, has been fully carried out, and its results are highly
satisfactory and advantageous to the Government. It has largely increased the per diem and capacity taxes, and has contributed to produce,
among this class of distilleries, an equal and uniform basis of taxation, as well as security against illicit distillation. It was at first
strenuously opposed by the distillers in some parts of the country, and
occasioned considerable litigation in the courts, in all of which the
Government has been sustained where decisions have been rendered;
and the distillers themselves seem to have generally come to the conclusion that the policy of the Government was just, and that the action
of the Department was beneficial, not only in enhancing and collecting
the revenue, but in promoting the entire distilling interest ofthe country.
I desire to say, also, that as a general rule those now engaged in the
business of distilling seem to be disposed to obey the law and comply
with the orders and regulations of this Bureau. There are exceptions
to this general remark, and in some localities a spirit of insubordination and defiance is still manifest, but I do not think there is anything
like a systematic or organized opposition to the enforcement of the laws
taxing spirits to be found among this class of manufacturers.
SPIRIT METERS.

The "new rules and regulations" for the procurement and use of spirit
meters, which I had the honor to transmit to Congress at its last session,
have been continued in force, but the time for procuring and attaching the
instruments has been extended in order to make perfect tests of the meter
in the few instances where it had been attached under such regulations..
I have been desirous, by these tests, to ascertain, with certainty,
whether the samxile meter, which was all that was preserved by the old



8

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

system, is of sufficient utility to justify this office in requiring its procurement and use by distillers; and I have felt unwilling to enforce it
until I was fully satisfied, by experimental use, of the propriety and
justice of doing so. The few instruments now attached are undergoing
the strictest surveillance, but have not been fully reported upon by the
officers in charge. As soon as such reports are received and considered.
Congress will be informed, through you, of the results, and of the opiuion
of this office as to the propriety of continuing the use of the Tice spirit
meter.
SACCHAROMETERS.

Eecognizing the necessity of adopting and prescribing for use a
standard saccharometer in pursuance of section two.of the act of July
20, 1868, I invited manufacturers of the several varieties to iiresent
samples for examination and test. Several instruments were received
and referred for experiment to the American Union Academy of Literature, Science, and Art of this city. The result was announced in the
reportof the Academy, and printed by direction of Congress iii Ex.
Doc. JSTO. 272,. 2d sess. 41st Congress. In order to reach the most satisfactory results, I invited and received other samples, which, together
with those previously considered, and the evidence relating thereto,
were referred for further examination to a committee of officers connected with this Bureau.
The results of the investigations made are favorable to the selection
of a standard saccharometer, and its use by internaTrevenue officers
. having direct supervision of distilleries and the business of distillation.
The approximation with which the saccharine and alcoholic values of
washes, worts, or beer may be determined by its proper use, its importance to the revenue interests of the Government, and the successful operations of the distiller, have been fully demonstrated.
There is, however, no authority of law for procuring this instrument
for the use of revenue officers at the expense of the Government -, and
as such use will be mainly for the benefit of the Government, I have
not felt warranted in imposing that expense upon distillers under
the authority given me to adopt and prescribe for use such instruments.
I would, therefore, recommend that additional authority by law, be
given to the Commissioner of Internal Kevenue, to procure at the expense of the Government such saccharometers and gauging instruments
as the good of the public service shall require, and that he prescribe
rules and regulations concerning their distribution, use, and the manner in which officers in charge of the same shall account therefor.
,

THE PRESENT LAW AS TO SPIRITS.

The experience of the past year has served to strengthen my previous
opinions as to the impolicy of changing the law taxing spirits, and induces me to repeat the recommendation in my last annual report that
the rate of tax and the manner of its collection be left as they are now
provided lor.
• The receipts from this source for 1870 are $55,581,599 18, already
within four and a half millions of my estimate, " after the present law
siiall have been brought into complete execution with such amendments
as time and experience may demonstrate to be necessary to perfect the
system." Anticipation is almost realized without time ', and experience
seeujs to declare it to be unwise and inexpedient to change the law in
any essential feature.



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

\)

TOBACCO. *

The receipts from tobacco continue to be highly satisfactory. By reference to the second table, it will be seen that the receipts for the last
fiscal year, from this source, are
$31, 350, 707 88
For the preceding year they were
23,430, 707 57
Showing an increase of

7, 920, 000 31

This increase of nearly $8,000,000 has not been spasmodic, but is a
regular monthly increase averaging over $600,000 per month. It is to
be observed, also, that the late crop of tobacco was an inferior one,
owing to a general drought in many of the tobacco-growing districts.
Notwithstanding this favorable exhibit, I desire to direct attention
particularly to some defects in the provisions and operations of the law
taxing tobacco.
The present law imposes two rates of tax on all manufactured tobacco,
one of 16 cents and the other of 32 cents per pound. It seems to have
been the intention to . apply the former rate only in exceptional cases,
while the general rate was to be double the amount. But in practice it
is found that w^hat was to have been but occasional and only exceptional
has come to be too nearly the general and prevailing rate on all tobacco
manufactured and sold as smoking tobacco, while much that is intended
and used for chewing is sold also under the lesser rate.
The law now provides that "on all smoking tobacco, exclusively of
stems, or of leaf with all the stems in, and so sold, the leaf not having
been previously stripped,, butted, or rolled, and from which no part of
the stems have been separated, by sifting, stripping, dressing, or in any
other manner, either before, during, or after the process of manufacturing, a tax of sixteen cents per pound shall be paid."
Under this provision manufacturers claim that they have a right to
manufacture cut or, granulated tobacco, the raw or leaf tobacco even
having been previously submitted to a process of sweetening, and if
the final product contains all or more than all the stems natural to the
leaf, that they are entitled to sell it under the 16-cent tax. They allege
that they do not know, and are not bound to know for what purpose
their goods are bought and used. That the same article may be used,
and frequently is used, by the same persons for both smoking and chew^ing. Long-cut smoking, especially if sweetened, may be used instead
of fine-cut for chewing. The cheapest grades of plug tobacco, although
taxed at 32 cents per pound, are quite as generally used h j the poorer
classes of consumers for smoking as the cut or granulated smoking,
which is taxed but 16 cents a pound, though a very much-higher priced
article as sold in the markets. To make the rate of tax depend on the
process of manufacture unquestionably opens a wide door for fraud.
No one can determine by inspection of the product whether a given
sample of cut or granulated smoking tobacco contains all, or more, or
less than the natural quantity of stems. I t i s believed to be impossible
by any single machine hitherto in use by manufacturers, by a single
process, to reduce ordinary leaf tobacco entirely to even, homogeneous,
and similar particles. This can be accomplished only by two or more
different machines, or by a succession of operations through the same
machine. And these processes enable the manufacturer, from the same
material, and at the same time, to inake different grades of smoking tobacco, containing more or less stems, at.pleasure.
Under the present law great inequalities exist, and necessarily so, for



10

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

nearly all smoking tobacco, however fine the grade, or high-priced the
article, escapes with only the payment of the 16-cent tax, as being made
of leaf with all the stems in. The poorest quality of stem smoking or
leaf, cut with all the stems in, iiays the same tax as the ^ highest priced
smoking tobacco, provided the latter is claimed to have been cut, in the
words of the lA *, "with all the stems in," and at the same time the
a AloAvest and poorest grades of plug and twist tobacco pay double the rate
of tax of smoking tobacco which sells in the markets of the country at
double the price of the plug and twist.
I am satisfied that there is but one remedy for the frauds perpetrated
under this head, and that is to make the tax on all descriptions of tobacco uniform. Less of inequality would then exist under a tax of 32
cents per pound than under the present rates.
There seems to be no good reason why there should be two different
rates of taxation on articles of equal price and value, simply because
one is used for smoking and the other for chewing. Why not reverse
the rule and place the larger tax upon smoking tobacco and the lesser
upon chewing'?
With a uniform tax of 32 cents per pound on all manufactured tobacco, the revenue can be collected with much greater facility than at present. Manufacturers would be at liberty to adopt any modes of manipulating the raw material, or any process of manufacturing it they deemed
fit, without being questioned by the Government. There would be less
inequality in the practical operations of the tax on all classes of consumers, while the receipts of the Treasury would be increased, taking
the last fiscal year as the basis, by at least $4,500,000.
I am satisfied that the honest and larger portion of the tobacco trade
are generally in favor of a uniform rate of tax on' all descriptions and
grades of manufactured tobacco, and while a portion of the trade favor
a tax of 16 cents, a large maj orit}^ are indifferent as to the rate, whether
16 or 32 cents iier pound, provided the tax is uniform, is thoroughly collected, and the manufacturer left free to manipulate his product as he
pleases.
THE SALE OF LEAF TOBACCO TO CONSUMERS.

Thelaw now imposes a tax of 32 cents per pound "on all tobacco
twisted by hand or reduced from leaf into a condition to be consumed
or otherwise prepared without the use of any machine or instrument,
and without being pressed or sweetened." It is not thought to have
been the intention of Congress to impose a tax upon raw or leaf tobacco sold in the condition in which it is ordinarily cured and packed b3^
the farmer or^iilanter for sale, or upon tobacco stemmed and prized for
manufacture or exportation. But without believing it to have been
the intention to tax the raw or leaf tobacco sold directly to consumers
for chewing or smoking, it is very difficult to determine what description or class of tobacco was intended to be reached by a process of preparation involving neither the use of any machine or instrument, nor
any process of pressing or sweetening. If it^was the intention to tax
all tobacco, even the raAV leaf, if sold for immediate consumption, I
would recommend that the law be made so explicit as to remove all
doubts on the subject. But, if under no circumstances a tax is to be
assessed upon raw or leaf tobacco, even when sold directly to consumers,
then I would recommend that an equivalent for the specific tax on
the product be imposed upon the dealer, as a special tax, whenever he
sells directly to consumers. There is reason to believe that a large ma


COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

.

11

jority of all the leaf dealers in the countr}^ are retailing leaf tobacco for
consumption in quantities to suit purchasers, sales being made of one
pound or less. The aggregate amount of such sales may notbe shown,
but they will reach many millions of pounds sold and consumed annually, without producing any revenue to the Government.
Manufacturers who are required to pa}^ not only a special tax for carrying on their business, but a specific tax also on all their iiroducts,
have reason to complain of this traffic so damaging to their interests as
well as to the Government revenue.
EXPORT BONDED WAREHOUSES.

The law authorizes the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue to designate
and establish, at any port of entry in the United States, bonded warehouses, for the storage of manufactured tobacco and snuff' in bond,
intended for exportation, w^hile at the same time it authorizes the collector in charge of exports at such jiorts to issue a permit for the
withdrawal of such tobacco and snuff' for consumption, after the tax has
been paid thereon.
Upon taking charge, of this office, I found that there had been established by my predecessor, under the act of July 20, 1868, fifteen export
bonded warehouses for the storage of tobacco and snuff' intended for
export, to wit: One at Boston, five at New York, four at Philadeljihia,
two at Baltimore, one at Eichmond, one at New Oiieans, and one at
San Francisco.
Eepeated applications have been made for additional warehouses
within the last year and a half, but believing that it w^as the design of
Congress not only to abolish the old system of Class B warehouses for
tobacco and snuff, but to limit the facilities for bonding to such goods
as were in fact intended for exportation, and- also believing that the
distinguishing feature of the present law, and that which made it radically diff'erent from previous laws on the subject of manufactured tobacco,
was the prepayment of the tax by means of stamps before the removal
of the goods from the place of manufacture, I have denied these applications, for the reason that the nuniber of bonded warehouses alreadj^established greatly exceeds that actually required to accommodate the
exiiort trade.
The quantity of tobacco stored in the several exiiort bonded
warehouses during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870,
was, (pounds)
.'
19, 612^, 529
The quantity withdrawn for exportation was, (pounds)...
8,268, 097
The quantity Avithdrawn upon x)ayment of tax was, (pounds)^ 12, 006, 377
This shows that only about two-fifths of the goods bonded are actually
exported, and nearly all of these are exported from New York and
Boston.
It is a fact that a large proportion of the goods stored in export
bonded warehouses was never intended for exportation, the goods
themselA^es being unsuited for foreign markets. They are shipped by
the manufacturer in boiid,^and being stored, are consigned to wholesale
dealers.and jobbers, thus securing to the latter the advantage of placing
the goods upon the market AA^ithout the prepayment of the tax, as the
law requires in all other cases, before the removal of goods from the
manufactory. By shipping these goods in bond the dealers and jobbers
receive, on an aA^erage, from four to five months'credit, and as this
priAdlege can only be enjoyed by dealers and jobbers in the seaport



12

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

tOAvns, where by law these warehouses are authorized to be established,
it creates ah inequality in the trade, preferring one class of dealers over
others, and is the source of much complaint. To remedy this inequality
and correct the evils of this system, I Avould recommend that the law
be so amended as to allow no goods entered fbr export in bonded Avarehouses to be withdrawn therefrom for consumption, upon payment of
tax, until twelve months from the time they were so bonded. By
limiting the time for withdrawal, no goods will be entered except such
as are actually intended for export, and the privilege of withdrawing for
consumption, after twelve months, Avill relieve any parties Avho, having
entered goods for export, fail afterwards to export the same. Should it
be deemed inexpedient to limit the time before AAdiich permits for the
Avithdrawal of goods on the payment of tax are not to be issued by the
collector, then I would suggest that further authority be given to the
Commissioner of Internal Eevenue to establish bonded warehouses at
other jilaces than ports of entry, giving like fiicilities for bonding, and
equal time before payment of taxes, to wholesale dealers and jobbers in
ina,nufactured tobacco in other large cities, as are now enjoyed by those
doing business in the cities nientioned, vv'here export bonded vv'^arehouses
are located.
ACT OF JULY 14, 1870.
I deem it my duty to call the atten tion. of- Congress, through you, to
certain defects, ambiguities, and.contradictions, Avhich, in the hurry of legislation incident to the closing labors of a session, ai)pear in the act of
July 14, 1870. In some instances, alsQ, where the language is clear, the
legal effect is held to be entirely different from Avhat is understood to
have been designed by Congress.
It is belicA^ed to haA^e beeu tlie intention to retain all the taxes
imposed uiion sales of distilled spirits, Avines, and malt liquors, by the
act of July 20,1868, a,nd acts amendatory thereof. Section 2 of the act of
July 14, 1870, iieA^ertheless repeals the tax ux)on sales of malt liquors.
It Avas evidently the purpose of section 5 to empower collectors to
refnit, at any time prior to August 1, 1872, all penalties for issuing in• struinerits unstamped, unless the omission of stamps Avas.with fraudulent
'intent; but owing to a change made in the bill as reported by the
Senate Finance Committee, the letter of the law is such as to postpone
until August 1871, the relief v\'hicli was designed to be immediate.
Section 17 provides that sections 120, 121, and 122 of the act of June
30, 1,864, as amended, shall be construed- to impose the taxes therein
mentioned to August 1, 1870, and no longer.,.
Section 15 provides "that there shall be levied and collected for and
during the year 1871, a tax of two and a half per centum on the amount
of all iuterest or coupons paid, or bonds or other evidences of debt issued
and payable in one or more years after date by any of the corporations
in this section hereinafter mentioned, and the amount of all dividends
of earnings, income, or gains hereinafter declared, by any bank, trust
company, savings institution, insurance company, railroad company,
canal company, turnpike company, canal naAngation company, and slackwater company, Avhenever and Avherever the Same shall be payable, and
to Avhatsoever person the same may be due, including non-residents,
whether citizens or aliens."
It is believed to have been th"e intention to continue the five per cent,
tax until August 1, 1870, and to substitute a tax of tAvo and a half per
cent, therefor on and after that. date. But, owing to the peculiar
language of the statute, no tax can be°withheld from coupons-falling due



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

13

-during the last five calendar months of 1870. According to a recent
decision of the circuit court in the State of Pennsylvania, in the case
of the Philadelphia and Eeading Eailroad Company vs. Barnes, collector,
no tax can be withheld from dividends, coupons, or interest, payable
during the first scA^eii months of 1870; and it is further maintained that
corporations cannot be required to pay any taxes upon the dividends
payable during the remaining five months. The right to Avithhold a
tax from the salaries of persons in the civil, military, or naA^al service of
the United States during the first seven months of 1870, turns also upon
the points im^oh^ed in the case aboA^e named.
The amount.of tax indirectly involved in this question is A^ery little
less than six millions of dollars. I t is of such importance that I have
not felt at liberty to acquiesce in the decision of the circuit court until
it shall hav^e been affirmed by the court of last resort. Steps haA'e been
taken, therefore, to have the opinion of the Supgeme Court of the United
States pronounced upon the questions in issue. Herein I deem it
proper to state that as early as January 4, 1870, I called the attention
of Congress, through its appropriate committee, to the ambiguities of
the law then in force, and the difficulties likely to arise in the collection
of these taxes, and asked for legislation upon the subject.
This request, as apiiears from the records of this office, Avas repeated
February 8, April 7 and 25, and May 26, following, and Avas repeated
orally and in person at several other times. The legislation Avas finally
enacted July 14, but has been declared by the circuit court of Pennsylvania to haA^e been too late to serv-e the purpose desired.
I t i s provided in section 15, that "Avhen any diAideiid'is made or
interest is ]iaid, which includes any part of the surplus or contingent
fund of an}^ corporation wiiich has been assessed and the tax paid
thereon, or which includes any part of the dividends, interest, or coupons receiA^ed from other corporations whose officers are authorized by
law to Avithhold a per centum on the sarae, the amount of tax so
jiaid on that portion of the surplus or contingent fund, and the amount
of tax which has been withheld and paid on dividends, interest, or coupons so received, may be deducted from the tax on such dividend or
interest."
Owing to a change in the rate of taxation from five per cent, to two
and one-half per cent., taxes properly paid upon surplus prior to August
1 may now be again appropriated to the payment of taxes upon
earnings since that date. For example: A dividend of $25,641 03 is
declared on or after August 1, 1870. Included in this dividend, however, and constituting a paTt of it, are $15,641 03, taken from a fund
from which prior to August 1 there was paid, as then required by
laAV, a tax of fiA^e per cent. A tax of two and one-half per cent, upon
the entire diAddend is $641 03; the tax of iive per cent, paid upon the
surplus is $782 05. The law allows the tax paid upon the surplus to be
deducted from the tax assessed upon the diAddend. In the example, the
former exceeds the latter, and consequently earnings since August 1,
to the amount of $10,000 escape taxation entirely. It would have
resulted differently if the laAv had pro Added for a deduction of taxed
surplus from dividends instead of a deduction of ^a^ from tax.
Public resolution No. 75, approved July 13, 1870, relicA^ed insurance
companies from certain taxes, but an act passed the next day restored
them in language so plain as, in my judginent, to operate as a repeal of
the resolution.
'
.
The repeal of the tax upon receipts for money includes, practically, a
repeal of the tax upon demand and sight drafts,, bank checks, &c. A



14

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

person who has money on deposit, instead of drawing by check receives
the money and giA^es his receipt, which is retained by the bank as a
A^oucher. This practice is increasing, and seems likely to become
general. While it is an CA^asion of taxes it is one for which the present
law proAddes no remedy.
The repeal of the special tax upon apothecaries takes effect May 1,
1871. After that time tliej mugt either abandon the dispensing and
sale of Avines and spirits officinal upon physicians' prescriptions or otherwise, or pay special taxes as liquor dealers, unless there shall be additional legislation on the subject. So far as they are concerned the act
of July 14, 1870, increases the taxes.
The defects mentioned are but a part of those already discovered, and
are probably but a small part of those which will eventually be found
to exist. Some of them this office has attempted to reconcile and avoid
by construction. How far this construction will be sanctioned by the
courts remains to be seen.
EXEMPTION FROM STAMP TAXES UNDER SCHEDULE 0.

The act of July 14, 1870, exempted from taxation under Schedule C
canned and preserved fish, leaAdng prepared mustard, sauces, sirups,
iams and jellies still liable to the stamp tax. These articles being either
condiments or conserA^es, and generally of home or culinary production,
never having been a fruitful source of revenue, and the collection of the
tax thereon always attended Avith no inconsiderable amount of trouble
and A^exation, I would recomniend that they hereafter be relicA^ed from
the stamp tax noAv imposed upon them under the clause in Schedule C,
relating to "canned meats," &c. ,
REMISSION OF TAXES ASSESSED ON SHIP-BUILDERS.

By my direction the collection of taxes on ship-builders, assessed
under the 4th section of the act of March 31,1868, was ordered to be
suspended.
I would recommend, through you, that Congress provide by joint
resolution or otherwise, for the remission, of all such taxes assessed but
not collected on the sales of ship-builders.
UNITED STATES DIRECT TAX.

By act of Congress approved August 5,1861, a direct tax of $20,000,000
per annum was apportioned to all of the then existing States and Territories, and the District of Columbia.
This act provided that each State, Territory, and the District of Columbia might pay its own quota, if notice of the intention thereof should
be properly given on or before the second Tuesday of February next
thereafter. Under this provision of law all the States, Territories, and
the District of Columbia formally assumed the payment of the tax, except Delaware, the Territory of Colorado, and the elcA^en insurrectionary States. Provisions Avere made for the collections to be made in
DelaAvare and Colorado by internal revenue officers, and in the eleven
insurrectionary States by the appointment of LTnited States direct-tax
commissioners, under an act of Congress approved June 7, 1862. By
act of Congress approved July 1, 1862, the operations of the act of August 5, 1861, were suspended until April 1,1865, except so far as related
to the collection of the first annual tax of $20,000,000, and by act of



15

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

June 30, 1864, it was further suspended until additional legislation by
Congress was had.
The following States and Territories appear to haA'-e satisfied their
quotas in full: Maine, NCAV Hampshire, Yermont, Massachusetts, Ehode
Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Yirginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Michigan, Iowa, Minnesota, Nevada, Nebraska, New Mexico, Dakota, and the District of
Columbia.
Against New York, Wisconsin, Kansas, California, Delaware, Colorado, and Washington Territories there are balances unsatisfied amounting to about $1,312,000. Oregon and Utah have paid no part of their
quotas..
I herewith submit a table showing the respective quotas, and the approximate amount of taxes uncollected in the late insurrectionary States.
states.
Virginia
Nortli Carolina
South Carohna
Georgia
.
Florida
Louisiana
Texas
'
Arkansas
Tennessee

Quota.
•

..

....
..

.

...
-.

...

.

.

.
. .
:

..

Total

$937,5501
576,194t
363, 570|
584, 367i
77, 522-1
529, 313^
413, 0841
385, 8861
355, ClOf
261, 886
669, 498

5,153, 891. 33^

Uncollected.
$260,396
173,144
140 879
502,167
71, 027
529, 313
343,137
75 022
197,0.55
102,983
266, 654

50
01
70
33
28
33^
61
88
70
74
54

.2, 661, 732 62^

United States direct-tax commissioners were appointed in each of said
States, Avho entered upon their duties and completed the assessment
rolls in several of the States, and collected a portion of the taxes in each
of the insurrectionary States except Alabama, in Avhich no part of her
quota was CA^er collected.
In Yirginia, South Carolina, Florida, Arkansas, and Tennessee, lands
were sold for the non-payment of taxes charged against them.
Lands were bid in at the tax sales by the tax commissioners, and
never haAdng been redeemed are still owned by the United States, as
follows:
In Yirginia, lands valued, according to the assessment of
I860., at
$75, 000
In South Carolina, lands valued by the commissioners at
300, 000
In Florida, lands A^alued by the commissioners at
25, 000
In Tennessee, lands valued by the commissioners at
309, 000
Making a total approximate valuation of

»

709, 000

None of these lands, are now yielding any revenue to the Government except in South Carolina, and a few tracts in Florida. Steps are
being taken, however, toward placing a record of these lands in a condition whereby the Government may control and obtain more rcA^enue
from them.
During the several years in which no control was exercised by the
United States over its direct-tax lands, except in South Carolina, parties took possession, assumed ownership and conveyed formal titles to
manj^ of them. Alleged innocent purchasers are now ordered to surrender possession of them to officers designated tp take charge of and



16

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

collect rents for the use of them. In many cases the alleged innocent
purchasers ha\^e made extensiA^'e improvements on the lands, and made
them their homes.
The sales of lands for non-payment bf the direct taxes in the said
eleven States were suspended by order of the Secretary of the Treasury
in May 1865. The collection of the tax in said States Avas suspended in
August 1866, and by several acts of Congress suspended until January
1, 1869; since Avhich no action has been had by Congress, or by the
Executive authority, nor haA^e the conditions been resumed in any of
the said eleven States.
The scA^eral boards of United States direct-tax commissioners were
dissolA^ed on or before the 30th of April, 1867, except in South Carolina.
This board has been continued in consequence, of additional duties imposed on the commissioners for that State, in connection with the disposal of the direct-tax lands in pursuance of several acts of Congress,
and the instructions of the President dated September 16, 1863. That
board has been discontinued from October 31, 1870.
There is now due to the United States, on account of deferred payments in South Carolina, $150,000, and the time for its payment has
expired. The duties which remain to be performed there are managing
the direct-tax lands, by leasing and selling the same where there is
authority to sell, collecting " special" and "school-farm'^ rents, collecting.deferred payments, and applying the funds arising from the different sources according to laAv.
It appears that a considerable amount of money Avas collected illegally by the direct-tax commissioners, but Congress, by an act approved
February 25,1867, proAdded for refunding such illegal collections by the
Secretary of the Treasury. A large number of claims haA'-e been presented to this office of this character.
I t may be deemed important that Congress should make provision for
the final disposition of all the lands Avhich have been acquired and are
now owned by the United States, under the direct-tax laAvs, at an early
day. And also, that in the adjustment of the uncollected portion of the
direct taxes in the late insurrectionary States, a different system from
thatproAdded in the act of June 7, 1862, should be devised.
ABSTRACT OF OASES COMPROMISED.

For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870, there were 472 cases compromised and settled by the authority of laAv.
In these settlements, the amount of tax received is'
$653, 666 51
The assessed penalty
39,444 52
The specific penalty
233,163 22
Total amount received by compromise

926,274 25

ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF DISTRICT' ATTORNEYS.

Number of proceedings in rem for the fiscal year 1870
Number of indictments
Number of other suits in personam
Whole number commenced .»
Number of judgments recovered in proceedings in rem
Number of convictions on indictments



1,293
3, 552
1, 898
6, 743
788
1,152

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL

Number
Number
Number
Number
Number

17

REVENUE.

of acquittals
^
of suits settled or dismissed
of suits decided against the United States
of suits decided in faA^or of the United States
of suits pending July 1, 1870

263
1, 810
241
2, 555
4,131

Amount of judgments recovered by United States in
suits in personam
:
$1, 296, 254 32
Amount collected and paid into court in suits in personam
441, 973 05
Amount collected and paid into court as proceeds of forfeiture
325, 521 49
ABSTRACT OF SEIZURES.
The seizures by internal revenue officers of iiroperty for frauds practiced in the Adolation of law, and the CA^asion of tax, for the year ending
30th June, 1870, were as follow^s :
762,081.48 gallons distilled spirits, A^alued at
$1, 038, 840 54
10,310.50 barrels fermented liquors, valued at
..
69, 647 28
34,142.50 pounds snuff, valued at
5, 662 21
1,710,619.11 pounds tobacco, A^alued at
284, 071 13
4,010,805 cigars, valued at
110,236 46
Miscellaneous property, A^alued at
1, 888, 414 18
Total value of seizures

-

3, 396, 871 80

On the subject of the seizure and disposition of property for the violation of the reA^enue laAvs, I would suggest that section 63 of the act of
July 13, 1866, be so amended as to make its proAdsions applicable to
property forfeited under any of the internal revenue laws. The limit
in A^alue of the property seized should be extended from $300 to $500,
and the expenses of seizure and custod}^ should be proAdded for as well
as those of appraisement and sale.
As the law UOAV stands the section is nearly useless. It is the common testimony of officers that the effect of this summary disposition of
small quantities of forfeited property is beneficial in promoting compliance with the law5 and, indeed, that it is the only effective mode of
dealing Avith such small values to sell in this Avay. In the courts the
whole value would be absorbed in costs.
<>
From the following statement it will appear that for the last four years
nearly $90,000 worth of iirojierty has been sold in small lots, at an average expense of 32 per cent, of the gross iiroceeds.
Had this amount of property been forfeited in court, the avails to the
United States would have been much less, if anything.
Amounts realized from sales under section 63, act of July 13^ 1866.
Year e n d i n g -

June
June
June
June

30,
30,
30,
30,

1867
1868
1869
1870

Total

2F



G-ross proceeds.

$15, 563
42, 771
21, 941
9,120

93
154341
80

89, 402 23^

Expenses.

$3, 986
13, 252
6, 961
4, 580

47
82
84^38

28, 781 5 1 |

Amount
deposited.

P e r cent, of
expenses.

46
33^
50
42

.25
.30
.31
..50

60, 620 71^

32

$11,
29,
14,
4,

582
518
979
540

18

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

I w^ould further suggest such an^amendment of section 3, act of March
2, 1867, as shall require the clerks of the scA^eral United States courts
to report to this Bureau in cases arising under internal rcA^enue laws, as
they are now required to do in all cases to the Solicitor of the Treasury ; and also a further provision subjecting clerks, as district attorneys
and United States marshals UOAV are, to the proper rules and regulations established in pursuance of law by the Commissioner of Internal
Eevenue.
Estimate of the annual receipts in each State and Territory from internal taxation after the
\
act of July 14,1870, shall be in full force.
s t a t e and Territory.
New York
Ohio
Illinois
Pennsylvania.
'Kentucky
A^irginia!
Missouri
Massachusetts
Indiana
Maryland
Cali,fbrnia
New Jersey ...
Michigan.!
Louisiana
Wisconsin
N o r t h Ca,roliiui
Connecticut...
Tennessee
Iowa
,. ...
W e s t Virginia.
Georgia
Rhode Island..
Delaware
Maine

s t a t e and Territory.
$20, 863,000
16, 062, 000
15, 263, 000
9, 809,000
8, 709, 000
4, 969, 000
4, 482, 000
4, 444, 000
4, 087, 000
3, 757, 000
3, 037, 000
%021, 000
2, 010, 000
1, 902, 000
1, 671,000
1, 198, 000
1, 023, 000
837, 000
806, 000
559,000
554, 000
462, 000
314, 000
261, 000

New Hampshire
Minnesota.
Alabama.
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m h i a
Texas
Sfiuth Carolina
Kansas
Oregon
Mississippi
Arkansas
Nebraska
Vermont
NcA^ada
Florida
Montana
AVashington
Colorado
Idaho
NeAV M e x i c o
Utali
AVyonung
Arizona
Dakota
Total

Amount.
$232,000
228, 000
220, 000
218, 000
174, 000
. 149,000
155, 000
139, 000
122, 000
115, 000
86, 000
86, 000
85, 000
70, 000
53, OQO

41, 000
35, 000
33, 000
28, 000
21, 000
16, 000
8,000
4,000

•

The foregoing table exhibits the amount Avhich it is estimated will be
annually realized from all sources of internal rcA^enue, except stamps,
after the law of July 14, 1870, shall have gone into full operation. The
total amount is $111,418,000. Bstimatin g additional receipts from stamps
at $15,000,000, there Avill be a total of $126,418,000. The table is arranged
according to the revenue A^alue of the States respectively. The total of
this estimate may be increased yearly in proportion to the increase of
population, business, and wealth, but probably not to exceed 5 percent.
On the basis t)f this estimate the States of NCAV York, Ohio, Illinois,
Pennsylvania, and Kentucky, being the largest producers and manufacturers of tobacco and whisky, Avill contribute $70,706,000, or 63 per cent,
of the entire receipts, exclusive of stamps.




19

COMMISSIONER OF INTERN.A.L REVENUE.

Comparative stateinent showing the receipts from the several general sources of revenue from
September 1, 1867, to February 28, 1869, and from March 1, 1869, to August 31,1870 ;
also the aggregate increase, and the increase or decrease from each source.
Receipts.
Sources of revenue.

Spirits
Tobacco
Permented liquors
Gross receipts
Sales
Income, including salaries .
Banks and bankei.'s
Special ta.-ces
Legacies
Successions
Articles in Schedule A
Passports
Gas.
Articles now exempt from tax .
Penalties '.
AdhesiA'C stamps
Total iTom all sources

Krom Sept. 1,
1867, to Feb.
23, 1869—18
months.

Prom March 1,
1869, to A^nn.
31, 1870—18
months.

$41, 673,684 34 $82, 417,419
29, 327,575 20
46, 504,065
10, 054,036
8, 549,416 83
570 20
10, 078,219
9, 455,
962 95
12, 866,660
9, 630,
68, 074,778
41, 980,259 00
6, 973,
819
4, 320,319 10
17,185, 168
10, 994,425 26
367 89
2, 094,
2, 437,842
1, 832,607 93
2,163, 023
.582 68
1, 031,
1, 714,986
31, 634 00
37, 135
933 57
3, 437,045
3. 010,
293
1, 019,
53; 235,310 03
1, 232,934
1, 663,774 88
22, 983,342 06
25, 296,396

241, 820, 765 9i

85
64
41
21
80
32
89
42
70
50
74
00
50
99
41
63

291, 492, 827 01

Increase.

g Decrease.

.$40, 738, 735 51
17,176, 490 44
1, .504, 619 58
022, 649 01
3, 235, 697 35
26, 094, 519 32
2, 653, 500 79
6,190, 743 16
343, 474 81
330, 415 57
683, 404 06
.5, 501 00
426, 111 93
152, 216, 016 04
430, 840 47
2, 313, 0.54 57
102, 318, 917 60

.52, 646, 856 51

From this statement it Avill be seen that the gross receipts from all
sources of internal revenue for the first eighteen months ofthe present administration, compared with those of the last eighteen months of the late
administration, are increased to the amount of $49,672,061 09; and taking the same sources of revenue the excess during the same period of
comparison, in faA^or ofthe iiresent administration, amounts to the sum
of $101,888,077 13.
The plan of organization of this Bureau detailed in my former report
has been successfully carried out for the past year. It has improved
the service, systemized the public business, and lightened the labors
of its officers and employes.
In relinquishing this office, I have the satisfaction of knowing that
its aff'airs are left in a most excellent condition.
Eespectfully, vour obedient servant,
C. DELANO,
Commissioner,
Hon.

G E O R G E S. BOUTAVELL,

Secretary of the Treastiry,




'




REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLKR OF THE CURRENCY.







EEPORT
03?

THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY,
OFFICE OF T H E COMPTROLLER OF T H E CURRENCY,

Washington, November 7, 1870.
SIR : In compliance with the provisions of section 61 of the national
currency act, I have the honor to present, through you, to the Congress
of the United States the following report:
Since my last annual report thirty-seven national banks liav^e been
organized, making the total number organized up to date, scA^enteen
hundred and thirty-one. Of this number,fiA^ebanks, to wit:
The First National Bank of Utah, at Salt Lake City
-,
The First National Bank of Leon, Iowa ;
The First National Bank of Port Henry, New York 5
The Howard National Bank of Burlington, Yermont 5
The Baxter National Bank of Eutland, Yermont -, ^
Avere organized by the surrender of circulating notes for that purpose by existing national banks, and did not increase the aggregate of
bank circulation.
Thirty-one banks have been organized under the act approA^ed July
12, 1870, ]iroviding for the issue of fifty-four millions of additional national bank circulation.
THE NAMES OF THE NEW BANKS ARE AS FOLLOAVS :
(

The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The

Capital.

National Bank of Springfield, Missouri,
$100,000
National Bank of Mays ville, Kentucky
300,000
Merchants and Planters' National Bank of Augusta, G a . . 100,000
People's National Bank of Norfolk, Yirginia
100,000
Farmers' National Bank of Stanford, Kentucky
100,000
Monmouth National Bank, Illinois.
100,000
First National Bank of Gallatin, Tennessee
51,000
Second National Bank of Lebanon, Tennessee
50,000
Corn Exchange National Bank of Chicago, Illinois
.. 250^000
First National Bank of Brodhead, Wisconsin
50,000
First National Bank ,of Shelbina, Missouri
100,000
Moniteau National Bank of California, Missouri
50,000
First National Bank of Columbia, Tennessee. 100,000
National Bank of Menasha, Wisconsin
50,000
Salem National Bank, Illinois
50,000
Citizens' National Bank of Alexandria, Yirginia
125,000
First National Bank of Sterling, Illinois
100,000
First National Bank of Ottawa, Kansas
50,000
Jacksonville National Bank, Illinois
200,000
Fayette National Bank of Lexington, Kentucky
200,000




24

"'

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Capital.

The First National Bank of Watseka, Illinois
. . . . . ' . $50,000
The First National Bank of Decatur, Michigan
75,000
The First National Bank of Tuscola, Illinois
113,000
The First National Bank of Chariton, loAva,
50,000
The First National Bank of Schoolcraft, Michigan
50,000
The Iowa National Bank of Ottumwa, Iowa
100,000
The National Bank of Pulaski, Tennessee
100,000
The First National Bank of Eichmond, Kentucky
250,000
The First National Bank of Evansvalle, Wisconsin
C. 50,000
The Muskegon National Bank, Michigan
100,000
The First National Bank of Lapeer, Michigan
75,000
The aggregate capital of the banks named is $3,239,000, giving an
average to each bank of about $104,500, and distributed among the several States as follows :
Capital.

Illinois, 7 banks
$863, 000
Michigan, 4 banks . . ,
::
300, 000
Wisconsin, 3 banks
i
150, 000
Iowa, 2 banks
150,000
Missouri, 3 banks
250, 000
Kansas, 1 bank
50, 000
Kentucky, 4 banks
850, 000
Tennessee, 4 banks
301, 000
Yirginia, 2 banks
^
225, 000
Georgia, 1 bank
100, 000
There are on file applications for banks in addition to those enumerated—
Estimated
capital.

From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
Frorn^
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From

Alabama, 14 applications
Arkansas, 7 applications.. ^
Colorado, 2 applications
Dakota, 1 application
Florida, 4 applications
Georgia, 7 applications
Illinois, 23 applications
loAva, 21 applications
Indiana, 13 applications
Kansas, 13 applications
Kentucky, 20 applications
Louisiana, 10 applications
Missouri, 17 applications
Mississippi, 2 applications
Minnesota, 7 applications
Michigan, 18 applications
Montana, 2 applications
North Carolina, 3 apiilications.
Nebraska, 3 applications
Nevada, 1 application
New Mexico, 1 application
Ohio, 13 applications
South Carolina, 2 applications
Tennessee, 9 applications
Texas, 4 applications
Utah, 1 application




$2,000, 000
550, 000
200, 000
.^.....
100, 000
400, 000
1,500, 000
2,500, 000
1,300, 000
1,600, 000
900, 000
3, 000, 000
2,500, 000
1, 500, 000
150, 000
500, 000
1,500, 000
150, 000
500, 000
150, 000
300, 000
150, 000
1,200, 000
350, 000
1,000, 000
400, 000
50, 000
:..

•

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

25
Estimated capital.

From
From
From
From

Yirginia;, 7 applications
West Yirginia, 5 applications
Wyoming, 1 application
Wisconsin, 19 applications

$800, 000
300, 000
50, 000
1, 400, 000

The number of these applications is two hundred and fifty, and the
amountof capital required to supply them all would be $27,000,000.
Experience has shown, howcA^er, that a large number of applications
are placed' on file as caveats, to occupy the ground and to deter other
parties from moving. Yery many are speculatiA^e, and some, intended
to be bona fide, fail, because, when brought to the test, the capital is
Avanting. Probably, if all these applications should be granted, not
more than half of them Avould be carried through to a complete organization. The amount of capital in the Western and Southern States,
not permanently iuA^ested or actively employed in business of A^arious
kinds, but immediately available for the purpose of organizing national
banks, cannot be very large, and the impression that many millions of
cash capital Avere awaiting the opportunity of iiiA^estment in national
banking institutions has not been fully sustained. The provision made
by the late act is undoubtedly ample for the supply of those States
which have less than their proportion, and Avould probably suffice to
supply all reasonable demands even if not restricted in its distribution.
The propriet^^ of providing for the remoA^al of such restrictions after the
expiration of one year from the date of the passage of the act is respectfully suggested.
Under the provisions of sections 3, 4, and 5 of the act approA'ed July
12, 1870, authorizing the establishment of national banks for the issue of
circulating notes redeemable in specie, but one bank has yet been established, the Kidder National Gold Bank, of Boston, Massachusetts, with
a capital of $300,000. Information has been received that several other
institutions of this character are in process of organization, or in contemplation, two or three of Avhich are in California. It was not anticipated that specie-paying banks would be established to any considerable extent,' at present, in those sections of the country where a paper
currency, based upon the legal tender issues of the Government, already
prevails; although it Avas, and is still, supposed that one or more gold
banks might be established and successfully conducted in each of those
cities on the Atlantic seaboard where a considerable foreign trade is carried on, and in which a certain amount of business is necessarily transacted upon a specie basis. If all the business of this kind that is carried on in the cities of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore
could be concentrated in one or two banking institutions in each of those
cities, its extent Avould undoubtedly warrant the employment of a A^ery
respectable amount for its exclusiA^e accommodation.
Under the operation of the act of Congress approA^ed July 14,1870, '^ to
require national banks going into liquidation to retire their circulating
notes," tAventy banks, which had been nominally in liquidation for various
periods of time, have deposited in the treasury of the United States
legal-ten der notes for the redemption .of their outstanding circulation,
and taken up the bonds pledged as security therefor. The amount of
such deposits since the date of my last report is $2,401,910,and the
amount of bonds, at their par value, thereby released is $2,756,000. All
banks in liquidation except those in process of consolidation with other
banks have now retired their circulation.



26

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Carefully prepared tables Avill be found in the appendix, as follows:
1st. Statement of amount and dilferent kinds of bonds held to secure
circulation.
2d. Banks in the hands of receiA^ers.
3d. The number and amount of each denomination of bank notes issued, redeemed, and outstanding.
4th. The number of banks, ainount of capital, bonds, and circulation
in each State and Territory.
5th, National banks in liquidation Avhich have deposited lawful money
to redeem their circulation, and taken up their bonds.
6th. National banks in liquidation for the purpose of consolidating
with other banks.
7th. List of expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.
8th. List of clerks employed.
9th. Eeserve tables.
Since the organization of this Bureau to the 1st day of October, ultimo,
circulating notes more or less Avorn and mutilated haA^e been returned by
. the banks, to be destroyed by burning, to the amount of $30,597,518. Of
this sum, $17,048,119, or more than one-half the total amount, Avere returned during the last year. The rapidity with Avhich the national bank
notes are becoming unfit for circulation, and are being returned for destruction in. order that they may be replaced' by new notes, is constantly
increasing, requiring a constantl,y in creasing ,^force of clerks to attend
properly and promptly to the assorting, counting, registration and final
burning of the notes.
In the effort to protect the public from the impositions of counterfeiters, Avhich is being made by the proper authorities, it would be Avell
to throw eyeiy possible difficulty in the way of the circulation of counterfeit notes. For this purpose it is recommended that CA^ery national
bank be required through its officers to stamp the word '^ counterfeit"
upon every false, forged, or counterfeit national bank note that may be
recognized as such on presentation at the counter of the bank.
When the capital of a bank becomes seriously imiiaired by losses or
otherwise, it Avould be desirable for the Comptroller of the Currency to
be clothed Avith sufficient powder to require the bank to be wound up,
or to have its capital made good, within a reasonable time. As the
law stands, he can only prohibit the bank from declaring any dividends
so long as the capital of the bank remains impaired, but the resources
of a bank may be crippled and its usefulness destroyed bej^ond hope of
rejiair, and. yet it may continue to live a sickly existence for years.
In such cases, the bank should be required to make up the losses by an
assessment on its stockholders, or to go into liquidation and be closed.
The operations of the national banks throughout the country during
the last year have been, characterized by prudence and exemption from
disaster to an unusual extent. The profits haA^e not been so large as in
former years, OAving to various causes, among which may be noted
the decline in the premium on gold, a reduction in the amount of transactions in goA'ernment bonds and consequent falling off in commissions,
and the fact that, owdng to the general shrinkage in values which has
taken iilace, the banks generally haA^e realized their losses, and have
charged off' the bulk of their bad debts. The result, howcA'er, may be regarded as, upon the whole, satisfactory. Yery thorough and rigid inves


COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

27

tigati'on has been made by skilled accountants, commissioned as examiners, into the mode of doing business, character of the management,
and the A^alue and condition of the assets of the banks during the year,
and it has been ascertained that the bills and notes discounted are, to
a remarkable extent, based upon bona fide transactions, while the accommodation loans are uniformly safe and Avell secured. The reserves required by laAV to be held, to secure the payment of circulation and
deposits, are, as a rule, kept on hand, and the general aA^erage of such
reserves is ordinarily considerably above the amount required.
The limitation of loans to one-tenth of the paid in capital, a most
wholesome restriction, is, in a la.rge majority of the banks, carefully
obserA^ed, and the loans are almost uniformly Avell distributed. In very
few instances are the directors allowed to monopolize to any considerable extent the facilities offered.
Complaint is made from time to time, and from A^arious localities, that
borrowers are compelled to pay more than the legal rate of interest for
money, and doubtless the complaint is Avell founded. On this subject
there is a practical suggestion or two that ma3' be profitably considered.
If the interest on the boiids deposited to secure circulation, and tbe use
of the circulation and depovsits, at the legal rate of interest, will not
enable banks to pay taxes, expenses, and dividends equal to at least
the current value of money where the bank is doing business, the legal
rate Avill be transcended, or the bank Avill Avincl up. This may safely be
taken for granted. An attempt to coraiiel the institution to keep within
the limits, under such adverse circumstances, Avill result in forcing it
into liquidation. l i m i n e cases out of ten where these complaints are
made, the CAal complained of is caused b}^ the high rate of taxation
imposed by State authority. Taxes enter into the cost of production,
and are paid by the consumer -, this is just as true of money as of any
other commodity. Formerly, when the bank circulation was issued and
the business of the country was transacted by institutions incorporated
by State legislatures, valuable immunities in the Avay of exemption from
taxation Avere granted, in order that the banks might be able to furnish
money to borroAvers at reasonable rates, ancl in most of the States the
legal rate of interest was fixed Avith direct reference to the iirivileges
granted. Capital invested in banks Avas practically exempted from
taxation, in return for which immunity the banks were expected and
required to lend money at certain specified rates of interest, Avhile veiy
frequently individuals Avere allowed by laAv to lend money by special
contract, at much higher rates. The rates established for banks, under
the conditions referred to, still continue, and are sought to be enforced,
but the immunities which enabled them to observe these rates have been
taken, away. The privilege of issuing circulating notes is no more A-aluable as a franchise, under federal authority, than it always has been
under State authority. The profits derived from it are commonly OA-erestimated. A fair estimate of the average percentage of profit on circulation Avill not much exceedfiA^eper cent., and this is just about the
aA^erage rate of taxation paid by national banks; so that the profits
derived from the business of banking depend mainly upon the amount
of deposits, Avliich after all constitute the true basis of banking. Circulation—that is, money or its representatiA^e,is the creature of the Govern-.
ment, and is, to be relied on as a source of profit only in the rudimentary
stages of banking. The history of banking in the older and Avealthier
countries of the Avorld furnishes abundant CAddence as to the truth of
this statement.
*



28

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The reports of 81 joint stock banks of Great Britain* of their operations during a part of the year 1869, illustrate the fact stated. Leaving
out the Bank of England, Avliich furnishes the great bulk of the circulation used in the Unit(^d Kingdom, the banks reported employ an
aggregate capital exceeding £42,000,000, and their net profits for six
months of the year 1869 were somewhat in excess of £3,700,000, or at
the rate of about nine per cent, per annum. Eeports of 62 banks for
the six months succeeding the period embraced in the foregoing statement,t shoAv a capital of OA'er £30,000,000, Avith di\idends aA-eraging
five and three-quarters per cent., and net profits not divided equal to
one per cent. -, together, making the net profits of the ,62 banks, Avhose
reports are published, at the rate of thirteen and a half per cent, per
annuin.
In the United States the accumulation of cash capital is comparatively small. As in. all new countries, nearly the entire capital is required
for the transaction of active business and for the development of t h e
resources ofthe country. The amount of deposits, therefore, or money
at rest, is small in comparison with the actual material Avealth of the
country -, but it is continually on the increase, and by its aid. the
national banks are enabled to bring their earnings up to an aA^erage
that has hitherto proved satisfactory to their stockholders. In view of
all the facts, however, it seems desirable that the old relation between
the rate of interest and the rate of taxation, established and observed
by nearly all the States in. which banks of issue were authorized,,
should not be entirely ignored with regard to national banks, and inasmuch as th.^ power of the States over the national banks, in these two
important particulars, is exercised only with the consent of the General Government, it Avould be a wise precaution for Congress to fix such
limitations as Avould prcA^ent unwise, unfriendly, or otherwise damaging
legislation.
Allusion has been made in former reports to the custom of payings
interest on deposits by national banks. The practice existed long
before any national banks had an existence, and they only continue
to do Avhat their predecessors did before them, and what bankers everywhere consider themselves compelled to clo.
The use of other people's nioney in the shape of deposits, without
interest, or at a low rate of interest, has come to be considered a cardinal necessity of modern banking. There will ahvays be those ready tp
accept its custody, assume all the risks, and iiay interest for its use, for
a margin of profit ranging from one to three per cent. It is not alwaysthe strongest or wealthiest bank or banker Avho is Avilling to pay the
highest rate for this use of other people's money. Ordinarily, judging
of banks as of individuals, the one most in need of money off'ers the
greatest inducements to depositors. In theory the custom is dangerous; in practice it is not always safe, but, nevertheless, it is. so
thoroughly entrenched in its position by long observance, that any
sweeping enactment prohibiting the payment of interest on deposits by
national banks Avould be ev^aded in some Avay, or the banks would lose
their deposits. There are scores of banks and bankers, not subject to
the control of Congress, who woulcl rejoice ov-er such a prohibition as over
the discomfiture of an enexny; yet there is one iioint that should be
guarded. The reserves of the whole country axe held to a large extent
in Boston, NeAV York, Philadelphia, ancl other large cities. These
* Economist, May 21, 1870.



t EcoBomist, Oct. 15, 1870.

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

29

reseiwes should be protected. They should be placed under such
restrictions as would obA^iate all necessity for their use by the depository bank. If the institutions owning these reserves cannot afford to
allow them to remain unemployed, so that they may be in reality Avhat
they are in name, relief should be afforded in some other way. It is
of Adtal importance to the country that no portion of the percentage,
which the laAV requires banks to hold as a reserA^e on circulation and
deposits, should be loaned out, subject to the vicissitudes and fiuctuations
of men and property. There may be prosperous and easy times for
3'ears; but there may come a day when upon the ability of a single
bank in NCAV York City to pay the deposits of its country bank correspondents—their reserA^es—will depencl the safety of the whole country.
The banks of NCAV York City have paid as interest on. deposits, during
the 3^ear ending with the 30tli of September, the sum of $2,546,639 10;
the Boston banks, $588,272 58; the Philadelphia banks, $119,001 47;
Avhile the aggregate sum paid by all the banks that alloAV interest on
deposits is $6,486,172 '66.^ These large sums indicate the wide prcA^alence of the practice under consideration, and the difficulty that Avould
be experienced in any attempt to eff'ect its entire abrogation. If by
any nieans, hoAvever, the moneys held in the large cities, constituting
the resein^es of the country banks, can be exemiit from the operation
of this custom, the main point, and the one in Avhich, above all others,
the entire public is interested, Avill be gained.
'
The further consideration of this subject is submitted to the wisdom
.of Congress.
The necessity for some arrangement by which the notes of national
banks may be assorted and returned to the scA^eral banks of issue for
redemption is becoming more and more apparent, as the difficulty of
dealing " with the worn ancl mutilated notes now in circulation is
exxierienced. The arguments contained in former reports, in faA^or of a
general redeeming agency in the city of NCAV York, will not be repeated
or extended on the present occasion. The conviction is expressed,
hoAvever, that if the banks were authorized to establish an institution
of their own for that purpose, owned, controlled, and managed in their
interest, they would find it greatly to their i)rofit to do so.
Such an institution Avould also seiwe as the custodian of the reserves
kept in New York, thereby exempting them from the risks incident to
funds deposited in the ordinary way and drawing interest, and would
perhaps obviate the necessity of specific legislation upon the subject
of the payment of interest on deposits; while the benefit to the whole
country, arising from a fiscal agency so truly national in its character,
regulating the currency, the exchanges, and the ba-n king interests ofthe
country, beyond the control of any ring or clique—because managed by
all for the benefit of all—would be of the most substantial and enduring
kind.
Eespectfully submitted.
HILAND E. HULBUED,
Comptroller of the Currency,
Hon.

G E O . S. B O U T W E L L ,

Secretary of the Treasury.
"1,064 banks pay interest on deposits and have reported the amount.
540 banks pay no interest on deposits.
6 banks pay interest, bnt cannot report the amonnt.
1,610 total number in active operation when report was called for.



APPENDIX.
Statement shoiving the amounts and kinds of United States, bonds held by the Treasurer of theUnited States to secure the redemjytion of the circulating notes of national banlcs on the ZOth
day of September, 1870.
^
•
Registered bonds, act of June 14, 1858
$640, 000
Registered bonds, act of June 22, 1860 . . „
25,000
Registered bonds, act of February 8, 1861
3, 612, 000
Coupon bonds, act of March 2, 1861
16, 000
Registered bonds, act of July 17, August 5, 1861
59,929,100
Registered bonds, act of Februarv 25, 1862
55, 80.3,150
Registered bonds, act of March 3, 1863...:
33,459,550
Registered bonds, act of March 3, 1864—5 per cent
95,271,550
Coupon bonds, act of March 3, 1864—5 per cent
6, 000
Registered bonds, act of June 30, 1864
33, 974,900
Registered bonds, act of July 1, 1862, and July 2, .1864
: - - . : . 17, 430, 000
Registered bonds, act of March 3,1864—6 per cent
2,738, 500
Registered bonds, act of Match 3, 1865—1st series :
1
24,170,200
Registered bonds, act of March 3, 1865—2d series
10,970, 500
Registered bonds, act' of March 3, 1865—3d series
4,250, 900
Registered bonds, act of March 3, 1865—4th series
536, 500
Total

342, 833,850

1
6

o o
Ul^

P

185, 000 00
Yenango ISTational'Banlc of Franlclin, Pa. ^300, 000
200, 000 $56,666 180, 000 00
Merchants' National Bank of AVashington, D. C.
90, 000 00
100,000
Tennessee National Bank of Memphis,
Tenn.
100, 000
85, 000 00
r i r s t National Bank of Selma, Ala
Eirst National Bauk of New Orleans, L a . . 500, 000 56,'666 1.55, 874 15
100.000 00
National ITnadilla Bank of Unadilla, N. Y. 120, 000
25.3, 900 00
300, 000
Farmers and Citizens' National Bank of
.Brooklyn, N. Y. "
180, 000 00
.200, 000
Croton National Bank of the City of New
York, N. Y.
26, 300 00
• 60, 000
First National Bank of Bethel, Conn
90, 000 00
100, 000
First National Bank of Keoknk, Iowa
25, 500 00
50, 000
National Bank of Vicksburg, Miss
50, 000 37,'66b : 17 475 00
First National Bank of Eockford, B l . . . . .
250, 000 155,000
First National Bank of ^Nevada, at Austin, Nev.




p

b
.$85, 000
180, 000
' 90, 000

Circulation
outstanding.

ISTame imd location of bank.

Circnlation redeemed.

o

Legal tenders
deposited, as
realized from
s.ale of bonds.

Statement showing the national banks in the hands of receivers, their capital, amount of United
States bonds and lawful money deposited to secure circulation, amount of circulation delivered, the amount of circulation redeemed at the Treasury of the United States, and the
amount outstanding on thefirst day of October, 1870.

$78, 628 50 16,371 50
160,319 75 19, 680 2580,194 00

'9, 806 00
50
00
00
50-

71, 302
156, 501
88, 997
215,608

180, 000

156, 559 90 23, 440 10

26,
90,
25,
45,
131,

300
000
500
000
700

18, 8.30
73, 611
17, 204
21, 465
20,657

.50
00
00
50

13, 697
23,499
11, 003
38,291

85, 000
180,000
100, 000
253, 900

00 7, 470
50 16, 388
00 8, 296
00 23,535
25 1 i r 042

.00
50
00
00
7.=i

2, 330 000 292, 000 1, 372, 965 15 1, 472, 400 1,1.59, 878 90,312, 521 10

sCOMPTROLLER

O F T H E CURRENCY.

dl

Statement exhibiiing the number and amount of notes issued, redeemed, and outstanding September 30, 1870.
N o . of n o t e s .
Ones:
Issued . . . .
Hedeemed

.

.

. . . .

10, 729, 327
2, 568, 703

Outstandino-. .
Tens:
Issued
Redeemed

114, 493, 685 00

8,413,244 '
484,135

378, 482
47, 845

..
..

. . .

Outstanding
One h u n d r e d s :
Issued
Redeemed

-.

.

Outstanding
^"

. . • ..

Outstanding
One t h o u s a n d s :
Issued
Redeemed

-•
.

.

.

.

Outstanding

.

.

| 6 , 963, 000 00
A, 976,000 00
4, 987, 000 00

4, 779
3, 263

4, 779, 000 00
3,263,000 00

1, 516

•

24, 086,100 00

9, 974

Fifties:
Issued
Redeemed

28,446,000 00
4, 359, 900 00

13, 926
3,952

Outstanding

16, .531, 850 00

284, 460
43, 599

..
•..

18, 924,100 00
2, 392, 250 00

240, 861

.

44, 817, 420 00

330, 637

.

47, 401,120 00
2, 583, 700 00

2, 240, 871

Twenties:
Issued
Redeemed

79, 291, 090 00

2, 370, 056
129,185

Outstanding

84,132, 440 00
4, 841, .350 00

7, 929,109

..''

1

Five hundreds:
Issued
Redeemed ..

123,183, 600 00
8, 689, 915 00

. 22, 898, 737

,

5, 844, 848'00

24,636,720
1, 737, 983

Fives:
Issued
Redeemed

7,180, 314 00
1, 335, 466 00

2, 922, 424

Outstanding

8,160, 624 00

3, .590,157
667, 733

.•

$10, 729, 327 00
2 568, 803 00

8,160, 624

.

Outstanding
Twos:
Issned
Kedeemed

Amount.

1, 516, 000 00

T o t a l a u i o u n t of all d e n o m i n a t i o n s o u t s t a n d i n g on t h e 30th d a y of Sep t e m b e r , 1 8 7 0 . . . .
A d d for f r a g m e n t s of n o t e s o u t s t a n d i n g , lost, or destroyed, p o r t i o n s of w h i c h h a v e
been redeemed
Total




.-

-

299, 728, 617 00
1, 262 20
299,729,879 20

32

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Statement showing the number of banks, amount of capital, amount of bonds deposited, and
circulation, in each State and Territory, on the 1st day of October, 1870.

Capital
piivil in.

States and Territories.

Total

02
41
42
210
62
83
316
55
205
32
11
6
21
15
138
71
87
43
39
49
18
5
23
18
17
3
2
4
3
10
6
3
3
1
1
4
2
2
1
1

61
41
42
207
62
81
292
54
196
31
11
3
18
14
130
69
84
41
34
43
17
5
20
18
16
2

1,715

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York.'
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Maryland
Delaware.
D i s t r i c t of Columbia
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
Ohio
Indiana
;...
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas
Missouri
•..
Kentucky
Tennessee
Louisiana
-.
Mississipxii
N'ebraska
Colorado
Georgia
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Carolina
Alabama
Nevada
Oregon
Texas
Arkansas
TJtah
Montana
Idaho
Fractional redemptions
reported by the Treasu r e r of t h e U n i t e d
States.

1,627

B o n d s on
deposit.

155, 000 00
835, 000 00
460, 012 50
522, 000 00
364, 800 00
056, 820 00
497, 741 00
690,350 00
360, 390 00
240,202 50
428,185 00
350,000 00
725, 000 00
216, 400 00
304, 700 00
377, 000 00
095, 000 00
785, 010 00
720, 000 00
002, 000 00
840, 000 00
410, 000 00
860,300 00
160, 000 00
081, 300 00
300, 000 00

18, 400, 750
4, 877, 000
6, 732, 500
65, 263, 000
14,198,100
19, 759,100
76, 903, 800
10, 782,1.50
44, 433, 300
30,015,7.50
1, 348, 200
1, 286, 000
2, .527, 000
2, 245, 450
20, 399, 200
12, 839, 350
11, 610, 3.50
4, 552,100
2, 740, 0.50
• 3, 819, 650
1, 798, 200
412, 000
5, 033, 250
3, 042, 200
1, 835, 300
1, 258, 000

500, 000
3.50, 000
1, 815,000
840, 000
1,081, 100
400, 000
250, 000
200, 000
525, 000
200, 000
250, 000
100, 000
100, 000

Circulation
issued.

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

225, 000
297, 000
1, 546, 000
638,600
374, 000
310. 500
155, 000
200, 000
.505. 000
200, 000
.1.50, 000
40, 000
75, 000

436, 478, 311 00

$7, 901, 056
4, 540, 535
6, 269, 900
62. 528, 720
13, 442, 430
18, 849, 745
79, 051, 860
10,193, 065
42,202,030
9, 865, 050
1, 298, 025
1, 379, 000
2, 288, 880
2,131, 200
19, 851, 715
11, 816, 855
10, 839, 080
4, 230, 755
2, 745, 050
3, 831,135
1,687,9.50
428,800
4, 765, 470
2, 573, 560
1, 589, 270
1, 272, 020
66, 000
177,100
264, 300
1, 249, 600
539, 900
333, 000
369, 200
131, 700
88, 500
492, 245
183, 500
171, 500
36, 000
65, 200

342, 833, 850

I n victual circulation.

$7, 505, 441 00
4, 302,535 00
5, 916,270 00
56, 865;830 00
12, 469,680 00
17, 407,181 00
67, 077,668 00
9, 439,065 00
38, 742,491 00
8, 904,310 00
1, 205,225 00
1, 070,639 00
2, 203,280 00
1, 990,500 00
18, 430. 164 00
11, 022, 792 00
10. 079,285 00
3, 943,305 00
2, 510,478 00
3, 448,416 00
1, 578,4.50 00
371. 900 00
4, 398,811 00
2, 429,440 00
1, 449,976 00
1,071, 649 00
46, 804 00
170, 000 00
254, 000 00
1, 230,205 00
530, 900 00
333, 000 00
281, 697 ,00
111, 042 00
83, 500 00
435, 445 00
179, 500 00
135, 000 00
36, 000 00
63, 000 00
5 20

331, 738, 901 299, 729, 879 20

Statement showing the national banlcs in voluntary liquidation, that have deposited lawful money
ivith the Treasurer of the United States to redeem their circulation, withdrawn their bonds,
and been closed under the provisions of section 42 of the act; their capital, circulation issued,
circulation surrendered, circulation redeemed by tlie Treasurer of the United States, and circulation outstanding on the 1st day of October, 1870.
0

N a m e a n d location of b a n k .

Capital.

Is

r-

0
F i r s t National B a n k Columbia Mo
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k , Carondelet, M o
N a t i o n a l Union B a n k , Rocliester, N . Y
Farmers' National Bank, Waukesha, W i s
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k , Bh.ititon, I n d
F i r s t National Bank Jackson Miss
F i r s t National Bank, Skaneateles N. Y
Appleton National Bank, Appleton, W i s
N a t i o n a l B a n k of W h i t e s t o w n , N . Y
...:
Commerci.al N a t i o n a l Bank, C i n c i n u a t i , Ohio
F i r s t National Bank, South Worcester, N. Y




-f 100,
30,
400,
100,
.50,
100,
150,
50,
120,
100,
500,
175,

000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000

$90, 000
25, 500
192, 500
90, 000
45, 000
40, 500
135, 000
45, 000
.44,500
90, 000
34.5, 950
157, 400

3

•II
.21
P

CD

0
$78, 010

"2,'556'
"3,776

M
111
p

CD

.

.'-'-cm
0

$9, 425 00
22, 339 50
55, 306 25
900 00
1, 991 75

""6,.585'
2, 333 00
18, 000
"'4,'500

•3

||,

5, 409 00
30, 876 00
12, 053 00

6
$'^ 565
3,160
189, 950
34, 693
40, 330
38, 508
128, 415
42, 667
44 .500
66 591
315, 074
140, 847

00
50
00
75
00
25
00
00
00
00
00
Oo

33

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

N a m e a n d location of b a n k .

Capital.

Circulation delivered.

Statement shoiving the national banks in voluntary liquidation, ^-c.—Continued.

ll

•

.s"§

ce^

0 (D .

Is

8

O
N a t ' l M e c h a n i c s a n d F a r m e r s ' B a n k , A l b a n y , N . Y $3.50, 000 $314, 950 $46, 090
42, 500
2,200
50, 000
Second National Bank, D e s Moines, I o w a . . . .
3,755
67, 500
Firtjt; T^nt.imi'il Bn.nk Oskaloosa. I o w a
75, 000
184, 7.50 13, 900
M e r c h a n t s a n d M e c h a n i c s ' N a t ' l B a n k , T r o y , N . Y 300, 000
4,017
109, 850
125, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k , M a r i o n , Ohio
135, 000 11, 000
N a t i o n a l B a n k of Lansino'burfii' N . Y
150, 000
333, 000 65, 800
N a t i o n a l B a n k of N o r t h A m e r i c a , N e w Y o r k , N . Y . 1, 000, 000
53, 3.50
2,500
60, 000
F i r s t National Bank Hallowell Maine
'
134, 990
4,715
422, 700
Pacific N a t i o n a l B a n k , N e w Y^ork, N . Y
85, 250 45, 810
300,000
G-rocers' N a t i o n a l B a n k , N e w Y o r k , N . Y
85, 000
100, 000
•Savannah N a t i o n a l B a n k S a v a n n a h G-a
45, 000 " 4,256'
50, 000
F i r s t National Bank Frostburg, M d
42, 500
50, 000
F i r s t National B a n k Vinton, I o w a
885
85, 250
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k D e c a t u r 111
100, 000
3,923
44, 000
50, 000
2,900
135, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k D a y t o n , Ohio
150, 000
90, 000
N a t i o n a l B.a,nk of C h e m u n g E l m i r a N Y
100, 000
179, 990
200, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k , St. L o u i s , M o
5, 507, 700 3, 469, 230 325,160

$666 66
3,75195
3, 923 00
5,127 40
3,140 80
7,179 00
955 00
1, 690 00
1; 695 00
1, 790 00

7, 454 00

$268, 860 00
39, 700 00
59,'993 05
166,927 00
100, 705 60
120, 859 20
260,021 00
49, 895 00
130, 275 00
37, 750 00
83, 305 00
38, 960 00
41, 615 00
85, 250 00
40, 077 00
132,100 00
90, 000 00
.172,536 00

177, 939 65 2, 966,130 35

Statement showing the national banks in liquidation, for the purpose of consolidating with otlier
banks, their capital, bonds deposited to secure circulation, circulation delivered, circulation sur
rendered and destroyed, and circulation outstanding, October 1,1870.
R ca

Name and location of bank.

Capital.

$200, 000
Pittston National Bank, Pittston, Pa
100,000
Fourth National Bank, Indianapolis, Ind
100, 000
Berkshire National Bank, Adams, Mass
50, 000
First National Bank, LeonardsviUe, N. Y
100, 000
Farmers' National Bank, Richmond, A"''a
National Bank of the Metropolis, Washington, D. C.. 200, 000
100, 000
First National Bank, Providence, P a
150, 000
National State Bank, Dubuque, Iowa
National Bank, of Crawford County, Meadville, P a . . . 300, 000
200, 000
Kittanning National Bank, Kittanning, P a
100, 000
City National Bank, Savannah, Ga
500, 000
Ohio National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
.,
60, 000
First National Bank, New Ulm, Minn
200, 000
First National Bank, Kingston, N. Y
200, 000
National Exchange JBank, Richmond, Va
100, 000
First National Bank, Downingtown, Pa
100,000
First National Bank, Titus^aile, Pa..,.100, 000
First National Bank, New Brunswick, N. J
50, 000
First National Bank, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio
100,000
Second National Bank, Waterto^vn, N. Y
1.50, 000
F h s t National Bank, Steubenville, Ohio
100, 000
First ^JsTational Bank, Plumer, Pa
50, 000
First National Bank, Danville, Va
150, 000
Fk'st National Bank, Dorchester, Mass
100, 000
National Savings Bank, Wheeling, W. Va
200, 010
National Insurance Bank, Detroit, Mich
50, 000
First National Bank, Clyde, N. Y
50, 000
First National Bank, La S.alle, 111
100, 000
NTational Bank of Commerce, Georgetown, D. C
150, 000
Miners' National Bank, Salt Lake, Utah
300, 000
JN'ational Exchange Bank, Philadelphia, P a
100, 000
National Union Bank, Owego, N. Y
500, 000
'Central National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio
100, 000
Merchants' National Bank, Milwaukee, Wis
100, 000
Chemung Canal National Bank, Elmira, N, Y
100, 000
Central National Bank, Omaha, Neb

2 <=>

Ox;
V 9
>

'3 ^

if
3g

$91, 500

$85, 700 $4, 200

$81, 500

50, 500
87, 000
180, 000
96, 350
140, 000

45,
85,
180,
90,
127,

45, 000
78, 000
160, 059
86, 250
117, 600

511, 000
56, 700
187, 000
197, 300
96, 000
93,100
96, 700
43, 000
98, 000
150,000
100, 000
44, 000
140, 000
100, 000
92, 000
49, 500
50, 000
86, 000
110, 000
200, 000
100, 000
461, 000
101, 500
100, 000
35, 000

450, 000
54, 000
180,000
180, 000
89, 500
86, 750
, 90, 000
4.5,000
90, 000
135, 000
87,500
45, 000
132, 500
90, 000
85, 000
44, 000
45, 000
90, 000
135, 000
175, 750
88, 250
425, 000
90,000
90, 000

000
000
7,000
000 19, 941
000
3,756
500
9,900

'1,566

433, 400
51, 000
166, 400
177, 500
81, 900
79, 850
85, 900
38, 700
88, 200
135, 000
84,100
39, 200
122, 500
90, 000
77, 500
43, 000
45, 000
77,300
99, 000
167, 350
88,250
393,100
90, 000
88, 500

5, 210, 010 3,943,150 3,636,450 225,391

3, 411, 059

N o circulation.

3 p



16, 600
3,000
13, 600
2,500
7,600
6,900
4,100
6,300
1,800
3, 400
5,800
10, 000
7,500
1,000
12, 700
36, 000
8,400
31, 900

Table of the state of the laivful money reserve of the National Banking Associations of the United States, as shown by the reports of their condition at the close of
business on the 22d o p January, 1870.
"-

States and Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire .
Vermont
'.....
Massachusetts...
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
....
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
Virginia
West Virginia . . .
North Carolina...
South Carolina.-.
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio

Indiana
niinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota ..
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
Colorado
Montana
Idaho
Total .




Percent,
R e s e r v e reNumber Liabilities to
of reserve
quired : 15
be protected
of banks.
per cent, of Reserve held. to IiabiUby reserve.
ties.
liabihties.
61
41
40
160
62
81
232
54
151
11
18
16'
14
6
3
7
2
4
2
12
13
120
69
67
38
29
43

17
10
3
4
1
3
. 1
1

$12, 572,139
6, 397, 874
8,171, 212
52, 737, 425
18, 962, 800
30, 425, 677
76, 711, 223
23, 938, 485
44,171, 310
2, 571, 620
4, 075, 773
5, 494, 449
4, 085, 722
1, 875, 609
1, 556, 667
3, 719, 648
952, 595
1, 415, 224
345, 777
3, 384,187
4, 751, .533
28, 059, 388
19,146, 931
13, 981, 570
6, 785, 933
4, 061, 349
- 7,947,513
3, 727, 056
2, 453,106
669, 966
2, 006, 403
569, 884
1, 052, 309
150, 344
112, 647

$1, 885, 821
959, 681
1, 225, 682
7, 910, 614
2, 844, 420
4, 563, 852
11, 506, 683
3, 590, 773
6, 625, 697
385, 743
6] 1,366
824,167
612, 858
281, 341
233, 500
557, 947
142, 889
212, 284
51, 866
507, 628
. 712,730
4, 208, 908
2, 872, 040
2,-097, 236
1, 017, 890
609, 202
1,192,127
.559, 058
367, 966
100, 495
300,960
85, 483
157, 846
22, 552
f6, 897

399, 041, 348

59, 856, 202

$2, 856, 534
1, 508, 804
1, 774, 564
. 13,131, 499
3, 966, 287
7, 955, 913
18,166, 719
6, 027, 914
9, 876, 621
646, 620
1,121, 460
892, 430
831, 591
473,990
414, 655
1.118, 027
294, 342
653,955
29, 604
919,809
1,285,019
5, 952, 971
3, 530,196
3.119, 426
1, 592, Oil
988, 981
1, 819. 869
625, 958
595, 356
146, 842
610, 502
166, 562
293, 439
22, 632
15, 366
93, 426, 468

22.7
2.3.6
2L7
24.9
20.9
26.1
23.7
25.2
22.4
25.1
27.5
16.2
20.4
25.3
26.6
30.1
30.9
46.2
8.6
27.2
27.0
21.2
18.4
22.3
23.5
24.4
22.9
16.8
24.3
21.9
30.4
29.2
27.9
15.1
13.6

O
O
^^

Funds available for reserve.
Specie.
$90, 376
38, 575
72, 848
475, 466
58, 662
213,185
443, 773
156, 419
122, 747
5, 722
51, 797
93, 015
18, 243
65, 336
39, 799
• 42, 387
37,186
310, 721
529
13, 425
39, 433
125, 036
207, 883
152, 233
22, 242
39, 706
99. 006
17, 406
18, 755
1, 223
11, 228
35, 218
9,078
8,879
8,604
3,146,141

Legal
tenders.

C l e a r i n g - Three per
house cer- - cent, certificates.
tificates.

$1, 062, 525
436, 020
585, 071
4, 096, 837
1, 420, 277
2, 210, 810
5, 579, 259
1,913,096
4, 453, 542
231, 402
504, 453
529, 242
447, 476
226, 957
258, 295
818, 486
453,122
218, 385
11, 417
460, 048
741, 093
2, 991, 052
2, 223,114
1, 592, 710
c848, 261
439, 540
1, 072, 274
338, 253
351, 850
112, 511
224, 654
124,153
160, 621
12, 300
6,762

$10, 000
20, 000
100, 000
225, 000
85, 000
175, 000
935,000
250, 000
705, 000
100, 000
30, OOO
5,000
25, 000

36, 855, 868

3, 370, 000

330,
55,
100,
45,
45,
25,
20,
10,

000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000

D u e from
redeeming
agents.
$1, 693, C33
1, 014, 209
1, 016, 645
8, 334,196
2, 402, 348
5, 356, 918
11, 208, 687
3, 708, 399
4, 595, 332
309, 496
535, 210
265,173
340, 872
181, 697
116, 561
182,154
104, 034
124, 849
17, 658
446, 336
504, 493
2, 506, 883
1, 044,199
1, 274, 483
676, 508
464, 735
623, 589
250, 299
214, 751
33,108
374, 620
7,191
123, 740
1,453

O
O
S5

o
Ul

Table of the state of the laivful m.oney resm-ve—Continued. CITIES, as shown by reports of the 22d of January, 1870.

C i t i e s of r e d e m p t i o n .

Number
of b a n k s .

Liabihties to
be p r o t e c t e d
by reserve.

P e r cent,
R e s e r v e req u i r e d : 25 p e r R e s e r v e held.; of r e s e r v e
t o liabilicent, of liabilties.
ities.

Boston
Albany
Philadelphia.
Pittsburg
Baltimore
Washington .
N e w Orleans.
Louisville
Cincinnati ...
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee ..
St. Louis
Leavenworth

$77, 274, 734
10, 997, 208
^ 8 , 303, 991
14, 926, 823
17, 947, 244
2, 500, 486
2, 974, 955
1, 428, 044
7, 319, 592
5, 251, 524
17, 594, 394
3, 464, 399
2, 479, 297
9, 266, 012
908, 684

$19, 318, 683
2, 749, 302
12, 075, 998
3, .731, 706
4, 486, 811
625,122
743, 739
357, Oil
1, 829, 898
1. 312, 881
4, 398, 598
866,100
619, 824
2, 316, 503
227,171

$24, 547,172
4, 574,126
15, 616, 302
4,138, 944
5, 615, 701
666, 022
1, 285, 057
405, 250
2, 078, 487
1, 561, 374
5, 340, 417
1, 035, 059
796, 004
2, 917, 596
314, 965

31.8
41.6
32.3
27.7
31.3
26.6
43.2
28.4
28.4
29.7
30.4
29.9
32.1
31.5
34.7

Total ..

222, 637, 387

55, 659, 347

70, 892, 476

31.8

New York ...

225,194, 449




56, 298, 612

84, 866, 901

F u n d s a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

Legal
tenders.

5p5, 680, 680
27, 823
1, 308, 437
125, 542
280, 674
65, 891
371, 953
23, 853
123, 221
46, 405
96, 522
2,622
25, 479
127, 016
1,715

$6, 675, 768
1,171, 950
5, 884,162
2, 040, 770
2, 624, 932
275, 593
727, 613
270, 778
1,159, 450
612, 250
2, 768, 835
464, 261
353, 623
1, 240, 944
141,300

8, 307, 833 26, 412, 229
34, 697, 496

22, 844, 405

Clearingh o u s e certificates.

Three per
c e n t , certificates.

$1, 415, 000

$4, 290, 000
355, 000
5, 460, 000
425, 000
900, 000
215, 000

154, 000

27, 000

1, 596, 000

5,000
70, 000
190, 000
390,^000
150, 000
15, 000
500, 000
10, 000

D u e fr o m
redeeming
agents.
$7, 900, 724
3, 019, 353
1, 548, 703
1, 547, 632
1, 656, 095
109, 538
185, 491
105, 619
725,816
685, 719
2, 085, 060
418,176
401, 902
1, 049, 636
161, 9.50

a
o
O

o

21, 601, 414

16, 210, 000

o

O

CO

Table ofthe state of the lawful money reser-ye—Continued. STATES, as shown by repjorts ofthe 2^th of March, 1870

States and Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts ..
Rhode Island . . .
Connecticut
!New Y o r k
New Jersey
Pennsylvania . . .
Delaware
Maryland
Virginia
•...
W e s t Virginia ..
North Carolina..
South Carolina..
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois'.
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouii
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
Colorado...-.
Montana
Utah
Idaho
Total




Number
of b a n k s .

Liabihties to
be protected
b y reserve.

R e s e r v e required : 15
per cent, df Reserve held.
liabilities.

61
41
40
160
62
81
232
54
151
11
18
16
14
6
3
7
2
4
2
12
13
120
69
67
38
29
43
17
10
3
4
1
3
1
1
1

$12, 674,127
6, 290, 3.54
8, 205,124
51, 796, 042
18, 612, 677
31, 276,153
' 75, 385, 802
24, 659, 439
46, 534, 759
2, 599, 388
4,137, 270
5, 950, 452
4, 210, 823
1, 937, 032
1, 729, 364
3, 706, 441
608, 874
1, 419, 493
366, 903
3, 311, 275
5, 211, 889
27, 931, 571
19, 281, 700
15,424,781
6, 603,141
4, 024, 240
/ 8, 739,193
3,762,654
2, 554, 682
683, 217
2, 058, 040
571, 601
1, 089, 814
150, 464
260, 336
114,107

$1, 901,119
943, 553
1, 230, 769
7, 769, 406
2, 791, 901
4, 691, 423
11, 307, 870
3, 698, 915
6, 980, 213
389, 908
620, 590
892, 568
631, 623
290, 555
259, 405
555, 966
91, 331
212, 924
55, 035
496, 691
781, 783
4,189, 736
2, 892, 255
2, 313, 717
990, 471
603, 636
1, 310, 879
564, 397
383, 202
102, 482
308, 706
85, 740
163, 472
22, 570
39, 050

1,397

. 403, 873, 222

60, 580, 977

17,116

Percent,
of r e s e r v e ]
t o liabilities.

oo

F u n d s a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

$2, 871, 838
1, 350, 479
1, 602, 76811, 655, 662
3, 470,269
7, 586, 878
17, 403, 683
5,841,211
11,183, 492
638, 563
1,167, 738
1, "010, 497
842, 773
479, 840
372, 327
1,141, 273
106, 824
704, 443
84,182
909, 840
1, 286, 969
5, 940, 791
3, 717, 947
3, 813, 655
1, 385, 382
931, 910
2,153, 818
755, 934
686, 012
• 129,340
618, 058
125, 922
352, 212
27,116
16,631
17, 478

22.7
21.5
19.5
22.5
18.6
24.3
23.1
23.7
24.0
24.6
28.2
16.9
20.0
24.8
21.5
30.8
17.5
49.6
22.9
27.5
24.7
21.3
19.3
24.7
21.0
23.2
24.6
20.1
26.9
18.9
30.0
22.0
32.3
18.0
6.4
15.3

68, 240
68, 844
583,684
68, 270
212, 462
407, 894
208, 864
152, 880
4,745
28, 579
92, 229
20, 955
34, 317
29, 377
42,126
26, 796
290;553
326
19, 498
50, 647
113,107
236, 379
134, 297
33, 617
45, 804
100, 025
21, 627
58, 300
1,961
9, 788
52, 405
7,054
9,638
1,581
9,205

92, 383, 755

22.9

3, 329, 055

Legal
tenders.
$924, 625
415,106
564, 014
3, 856,135
1, 343, 799
"2,197,306
5, 333, 094
1, 863, 942
4, 564, 897
195; 306
438, 888
557, 724
340, 626
261, 618
246,180
828, 907
68, 564
277, 786
36, 878
471, 820
760, 455
2, 979,157
2, 082, 331
1, 638, 384
688, 880
391, 626
1,132, 961
351, 937
301, 093
71, 092
201, 976
70, 955
174, 237
4,174
15, 050
7, 839
35, 659, 362

Clearingh o u s e certificates.

Three per
cent, certificates.
$10,000
20, 000
95, 000
220, 000
85, 000
175, 000
895, 000
245, 000
705, 000
90, 000
30, 000
5,000
25, 000
75;000

330,
55,
90,
40,
40,
25,

000
000
000
000
000
000

10, 000

Due from
redeeming
agents.
$1, 854, 232
847,133
874, 910
6, 995, 843
1, 973, 200
5, 002,110
10, 767, 695
3, 523, 405
5,760,715
348, 512
670, 271
355, 544
456,192
183, 905
96, 770
195, 240
11, 464
136,104
46,978
418, 522
• 475; 867
2, 518, 527
1, 344, 237
1, 950, 974
622, 885
454, 480
895, 832
382, 370
316, 619
56, 287
406, 294
2,562
170, 921
13, 304
434

3, 265, 000

50,130, 338

o
H
O

a

o
Ul

Table of the state of the lawful money resei've—Continued. CITIES, as shown by reports of the 2ith of March, 1870.

Cities of redemption.

Number Liabilities to
be
of banks. by protected
reserve.

Boston
Albany
Philadelphia.
Pittsbuig
Baltimore.-.Washington .
New Orleans.
Louisville
Cincinnati ...
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee...
St. Louis
Leavenworth

$72, 379, 904
11,124, 210
48, 513, 293
15, 507, 340
19,181, 571
2, 600, 002
3 457, 962
1, 580, 872
7, 759, 470'
5, 082, 545
21, 583, 464
3, 710, 521
2, 480, 314
9, 812, 660
846, 280




54

$18, 094, 976
2, 781, 052
12,128, 323
3, 876, 835
4, 795, 393
650, 000
864, 490
395, 218
1, 939, 867
1, 270, 636
5, 395, 866
927, 630
620, 078
2, 4.53,165
211, 570

$21, 740, 429
4, 850,165
16, 274, 431
4, 243,155
5, 957,177
714, 931
1, 028, 991
496, 799
2, 256, 512
1, 471, 958
6, 612, 402
1, 050, 099
781,122
3,101, 658
301, 894

30.0
43.6
33.5
27.4
31.1
27.5
28.8
31.4
29.1
,28.9
30.6
28.3
31.5
31.6
35.7

225, 620, 408

Total. New York . . .

Per cent.
R e s e r v e reof reserve
quired: 25
per cent, of Reserve held. •to liabili
liabihties.
ties.

56, 405, 099

70, 881, 723

3L4

55, 034, 714

72, 258, 075

Funds available for reserve.
Specie.

Legal
tenders.

$5, 218, 502 $4, 362, 591
1, 295, 793
591
5, 733,126
1, 579,156
195,
1, 828, 801
231, 411
2, 575, 228
60, 453
219, 939
571, 987
295, 875
333, 495
•7, 931
1,112, 078
199, 218
710, 517
45, 670
163, 020"" 3, 698, 076
406, 528
7, 936
347, 343
• 21,430
1, 062, 049
127, 032
791
105, 379
8,183, 010

Clearing- Three l)er D u e f r o m
house cercent, cerredeeming
tificates.
tificates.
agents.
,000
1, 665, 000

" 351,666

$4, 200, 000
345, 000
5, 505, 000
425, 000
900, 000
220, 000
5,000
70,000
190, 000
390, 000
150, 000
15, 000
500, 000
10, 000

24, 362, 930

24, 520, 389 20, 357, 686 17, 775, 000

$7, 869, 336
3,180, 781
1, 792,149
1, 793, 360
1, 899, 538
214, 539
161,129
150, 373
875, 216
525, 771
2, 361, 306
485, 635
397, 349
1, 412, 577
185, 724

O
O
H
O
t
^

o

23, 304, 783
9, 605, 000

O

a

OO'

Table of the state of the lawful money reserve—Continued.

N u m b e r LiabiUties t o
be protected
of b a n k s .
loj r e s e r v e .

States and Territories.

Maine

Rhode Island

Virginia

Texas .

Ohio
Illinois.
Minhlo-an
Iowa

Idaho
Total




-

61
41
40
160
62
81
233
54
151
11
18
16
14
6
3
7
2
4
2
12
. 13
119
69
67
38
28
43
17
10
3
4
1
3
1
1
1
1,396

GO

STATE.S, as shown by repoi^ts of the 9th of June, 1870.

P e r cent,
R e s e r v e req u i r e d : 15 R e s e r v e held. of r e s e r v e
t o liabihp e r cent, of
ties.
liabilities.

$12, 937, 374
6, 502, 576
8, 219, 829
52, 915, 854
19, 288, 945
30, 833,105
74, 799, 4.57
24, 457, 971
45, 675, 210
2, 539, 696
4, 304, 304
5, 942, 548
4, 069, 044
1, 964, 771
1, 596, 900
2,894,962
806, 529
1, 493, 898
426, 373
3, 089, 993
5, 045,153
27, 532, 999
20,181, 976
15, 370, 070
7, 077, 708
3, 914, 851
9,104, 825
4, 340, 707
3, 073, 459
859, 038
2, 273, 689
695, 487
1,343,883
192,304
260, 506
114, 879

$1, 940, 606
975, 386
1, 232, 974
7, 937, 378
2, 893, 342
4, 624, 966
11, 219, 918
3, 668, 696
6, 851, 282
380, 954
645, 646
891, 382
610, 357
294, 716
239, 535
434, 244
120, 979
224, 085
63, 956
463, 499
756, 773
4,129, 950
3, 027, 296
2, 305, 510
1, 061, 656
587, 228
1, 36.5, 724
651,106
461, 019
128, 856
341, 0.53
104, 323
201, 582
28, 846
39, 076
17, 232

| 2 , 850, 510
1, 450, 507
1, 704, 260
11, 527, 607
3, 591, 697
7, 660, 667
16, 412, 776
5, 978, 910
10, 265, 739
494, 982
1, 317,148
1, 075, 995
770, 451
422,044
380, 926
813,379
86, 261
682, 469
83, 750
746, 275
1, 215,182
5, 713, 31 i
4, 213,185
4, 029, 700
1, 591, 609
947, 907
2. 219, 081
1, 080, 212
868, 710
204,147
756, 347
223, 481
' 547, 489
81, 089
9,106
20, 421

22.0
22.3
20.7
21.8
18.6
24.8
2L9
24.4
22.5
19.5
30.6
18.1
18.9
2L5
23.9
28.1
10.7
45.7
19.6
24.2
24.1
20.8
20.9
26. 2
22. 5
24.2
24.4
24.9
28.3
23.8
33. 3
32.1
40.7
42.2
3.5
17.8

406,140, 873

60, 921,131

92, 037, 332

22.7

oo

F u n d s a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

$51, 497
63, 203
40, 918
352, 771
62,143
128, 745
436, 074
200, 212
125, 722
10, 378
27, 820
102, 835
23, 682
22, 240
26, 888
54, 875
6,881
31i; 723
1, 256
10, 246
68, 723
75, 590
259, 313
141, 019
22, 325
45, 544
76, 887
18, 606
42, 969
3,947
• 16,4.58 '
32, 368
19, 607
17, 239
281
11, 290
2, 912,' 275

Legal
tenders.
$1, 021, 733
452, 111
769, 948
4, 032, 415
1, 391, 084
2, 584, 621
5. 911, 915
i; 956, 838
4, 545,129
191, 252
440, 002
565,169
438, 633
237,130
169, 747
568, 301
53, 777
172, 201
54,148
339, 811
677, 543
2, 862, 032
1, 978, 611
1, 651, 9.50
849, 705
387, 790
1,128, 080
468, 093
344, 349
124, 050
220,103
90, 344
233, 528
63, 850
8,825
. 7,922
36, 992, 740

Clearingh o u s e certificates.

Three per
cent, certificates

Due from
redeeming
agents.

$5, 000
20, 000
95, 000
215, 000
80, 000 -^
175, 000
790, 000
240, 000
725, 000
70, 000
30, 000
5,000
25, 000
75, 000

325, 000
3.5, 000
90, 000
40, 000
40, 000
25, 000
10, 000

• •"

$1, 772, 280
915,193
798, 394
6, 927, 421
2, 058, 470
4, 772, 301
9, 274, 787
3, 581, 860
4, 869, 888
223, 352
81P, 326
402, 991
283,136
162, 674
184, 291
115, 203
25, 603
198, 545
28, 346
396, 218
468, 916
2, 450, 691
1, 940, 261
2,146, 731
679, 579
474, 573
989,114
593, 513
471, 392
76,1.50
519, 786
100, 769
294, 354
1,209

•

3,115,000

49, 017, 317

Pi
TJ

o
H
O
H

>
o
Ul

TaUe of the state of the laivful money ?'eser^e—Continued.

Cities of redemption.

Boston
Albany
Philadelphia.
Pittsburg. ...
Baltimore
Washington .
New Orleans.
LouisviUe
Cincinnati...
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee . .
St. Louis
Leavenworth
Total ..
New York...




Number Liabilities to
be protected
of banks.
by reserve.

CITIES, as shown by reports of the 9th of June, 1870L

Per cent.
R e s e r V e reof reserve
quired : 25
per cent, of Reserve held. to liabili
liabilities.
ties.

$74,126, 029
11,110, 200
53, 888, 035
16, 055, 470
20, 649, 591
2, 876, 603
2, 769, 893
1, 462, 881
7, 997, 829
5, 277, 753
23, 548, 604
3, 713, 059
2, 313, 453
10, 298, 946
944, 741

$18, 531, 507
2, 777, 550
13, 472, 009
4, 013, 867
5,162, 398
719,151
692, 473
365, 720
1,999,-457
1, 319, 438
5, 887,151
928, 264
578, 363
2, 574, 736
236,185

$21, 900, 054
4, 992, 221
18, 860, 319
4, 598, 056
6, 508, 757
787, 622
798, 893
404,121
2, 308, 843
1, 450, 583
6, 931, 9.56
1, 235, 377
865,143
3, 344, 890
363, 004

237, 033, 087

59, 258, 269

75, 349, 839

223,133, 254

55, 783, 313

72, 404, 492

Funds available for reserve.
Specie.

Legal
tenders.

29.5 $3, 617, 912 $5, 350, 272
44.9
10, 547 1, 470, 425
35. 0
7, 617, 566
789,143
28.6
127,177
2, 044, 740
31.5
117,815
2, 706, 092
27.4
70, 099
282, 09"
28.8
380,161
222, 498
27.6
219, 602
8,701
28.9
707, 477
217, 648
27.5
634 000
1,851
29.4
128, 068 3, 927, 506
33.3
538, 484
2,491
37.4
299, 723
5, 801
32.5
99, 605 1, 071, 686
38.4
153, 989
578
31.8

5, 419, 934 27, 403, 820
18, 785, 301 26, 314,191

Clearing
house certificates.

Three per
cent, certificates.

$90, 000 $4, 200, 000
345, 000
5, 590, 000
425, 000
900, 000
""393," 666'
225, 000

D u e fr o m
redeeming
agents.

5,000
70, 000
190, 000
420, 000
150, 000
15, 000
500, 000
10, 000

$8, 641, 870
3,166, 249
1, 483, 610
2, 001,139
2, 391, 850
210, 426
196, 234
170, 818
1, 313, 718
624, 732
2, 456, 382
544, 402
544, 619
1, 673, 599
198, 4.37

13, 045, 000

25, 618, 085

3, 380, 000

3,863,000
17, 540, 000

O
O

O

o
Tj
3

9, 765, 000

o

Table of the state of the lawful money reserve—Continued.

States and Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts.
Rhode Island . . .
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania ...
Delaware . . . . . . .
Maryland
Virginia
W e s t Virginia ..
North Carolina.;
South Carolina..
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Hlinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
Colorado
Montana
Utah
Idaho
:
Total




N u m b e r LiabiUties t o
be protected
of b a n k s .
by reserve.

61
41
42
160
62
81
231
54
151
11
18
17
14
6
3

STATES, as shown by reports of the 8th of October, 1870.
F u n d s a v a i l a b l e for r e s e r v e .

R e s e r v e reP e r cent,
q u i r e d : 15
of reserve]
p e r c e n t , of R e s e r v e held, t o liabiliUabilities.
• ties.

13
13
119
69
67
38
28
43
17
11
3
4
1
3
1
1
1

$12, 781, 420
6, 812, 877
8,833,576
54, 740, 385
19, 063, 019
30,157, 602
73, 409, 745
24, 792, 243
44, 689,173
2, 688,195
4, 412, 927
6, 028, 932
4,119, 081
2, 255, 661
1, 413, 576
3, 248, 717
576, 812
1,181, 078
376,129
2, 955, 703
4, 944, 497
27, 674, 292
19, 494, 076
13, 954, 746
6, 673, 875
4,157, 572
8, 770, 217
4, 760, 039
. 3,175, 535
712, 090
2,189, 494
750, 319
1, 921,151
'218,921
271,972
131, 665

$1, 917, 213
1, 021, 932
1, 325, 036
8, 211, 058
2, 859, 453
4, .523, 670
11, Oil, 462
3, 718, 836
• 6,703,376
403, 229
661, 939
904, 340
617, 862
338, 349
212,036
487, 307
-86,522
177,162
56, 419
443, 355
741, 675
4,151,144
2, 924, 111
2, 093, 212
1, 001, 081
623, 636
1, 315, 532
714, 006
476, 330
106, 814
328, 424
112, 548
288,173
32, 838
40, 796
19, 750

$2, 642, 286
1, 508, 686
1, 743, 839
11, 398, 751
3, 789, 960
6, 670, ^75
14, 934, 682
5, 5.50,116
8, 970, 234
619,625
1, 206,146
932, 311
718, 074
514, 643
298, 575
963, 084
103,135
470, 846
39, 632
618, 491
1,105,067
5, 496, 574
3,834,062:
2, 832, 495
1, 307. 685
908,104
1, 887, 949
1,112, 360
695, 331
147, 025
613, 708
181, 415
847, 815
40, 807
36,797
36, 771

20.7
22.1
19.7
20.8
19.9
22.1
20.3
22.4
20.1
23.0
27.3
15.5
17.4
22.8
21.1
29.6
17.9
39.9
10.5
20.9
22.3
19.9
19.7
20.3
19.6
21.8
2L5
23.4
21.9
20.6
28.0
24.1
44.1
18.6
13.5
27:9

1,400

404, 337, 512

60, 650, 626

84, 777, 956

20.9

O

Specie.

-

Legal
tenders.

$32, 334 $1, 077, 246
471, 408
26,872
39,793 ' 712,468
4, 263,150
207,167
1, 348, 229
37, 807
2, 383, 721
116, 045
5, 430, 709
449, 742
1, 862, 041
138, 939
4, 057, 627
98, 320
204, 935
5,422
518, 593
32, 649
495,160
87, 927
409, 564
20,155
242, 084
22, 753
234, 500
17,107
542, 218
86, 996
39, 849
12, 728
159, 351
277, 384
26, .523
1, 670
347, 447
10, 126
568, 597
35, 025
51, 705
2, 993, 940
131, 806
2,106,190
110,405
1, 347. 912
21, 787
753, 901
422, 364
23, 787
1, 020, 681
62, 810
483,113
46, 644
382, 440
15, 614
69, 722
1,328
140, 594
9,845
120,201
13, 309
162, 401
84, 848
7, 450
29, 300
841
5,456
18, 716^
12, 280

2, 357, 856

35, 465, 915

Clearing- T h r e e p e r
h o u s e cercent, certificates.
tificates.
15, 000
20, 000
85, 000
195, 000
75, 000
170, 000
750, 000
22.5,000
695, 000
80, 000
30, 000
25, 000

250,
35,
65,
40,
35,
25,

000
000
000
000
000
000

10, 000

2, 890, 000

Due
from
redeeming
agents.
$1, 527, 706
990,406
906, 578
6, 733, 434
2, 328, 924
4, 001,109
8, 304, 231
3, 324,136
4,119, 287
329, 268
624, 904
349, 224
263, 3.55
249, 806
46, 968
258, 870
50,558
34, 111
11,439
260, 918
501, 445
2, 200, 929
1, .561, 066
1, 309,178
491, 997
426, 953
779, 458
582, 603
2S7, 277
55, 975
463, 269
47. 905
600; 566
4,057
30, 500
5,775
44, 064,185

TJ
O
pi
H

O

w
52!

Q
Ul

Table of the state of the lawful money reserve—Continued.

C i t i e s of r e d e m p t i o n .

li
to
N u m b e r L i a b ip r t iteesc t e d
be
o
of b a n k s .
by reserve.

$72, 900, 450
9, 481, 877
44, 744, 979
15, 346, 989
18, 278; 456
2, 403, 367
2, 597, 649
1, 384, 383
7, 953,177
5, 441, 613
21, 074, 656
3, 963, 333
2, 520, 030
7, 325, 021
947, 944

Boston
Albany
..
Philadelphia.
Pittsburg
Baltimore
Washington .
N e w Orleans.
LouisviUe
Cincinnati . . .
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
M i l w a u k e e ..
St. L o u i s
Leavenworth
Total..
New York ...




161

CITIES, as shown by reports of the Sth of October, 1870.

P e r cent.
R e s e r v e req u i r e d : 25 R e s e r v e held. of r e s e r v e
Eer cent, of
t o UabiUabUities.
ties.

$18, 225,113
• 2,370,469
11,186, 245
3, 836, 747
4, 569, 614
600, 842
649, 412
346, 096
1, 988, 294
1, 360, 403
5, 268, 664
990, 833
630, 008
1, 831, 255
236, 986

$21,
3,
12,
4,
4,

620, 274
700, 468
963, 920
487, 721
774, 702
656, 769
594, 097
443, 048
2, 225, 497
1, 433, 227
6, 469, 387
1, 278, 216
828, 343
1, 986, 534
225, 875

216, 363, 924

54, 090, 981

63, 688, 075

192, 696, 8 9 7

48,174, 223

54, 945, 220

29.6
39.0
28.9
29.2
26.1
27.3
22.9
32.0
27.9
26.3
30.7
32.2
32.9
27.1
23.8

F u n d s avaUable for r e s e r v e .

Specie.

., 872, 792
10, 358
290, 960
162, 506
108, 875
43, 509
132, 811
3,128
95, 747
1,795
117, 856
6,558
8,065
110, 315
1,231

. 4 I 2, 966, 506

Clearingh o u s e certificates.

Three per
cent, certificates.

$6,151, 340
1,1.55, 014
4, 247, 281 $1,620,000
2, 242, 300
1, 945, 341
501,000
232, 481
200, 506
236, 298
1, 221. 710'
709; 500
3, 722, 256
522, 549
313, 593
1, 089, 094
99, 822

$4, 035, 000
• 345, 000
5, 520, 000
375, 000
600, 000
225, 000

Leo'al
tenders.

24, 089, 085

5,000
70, 000
190, 000
395, 000
60, 000
15, 000
455, 000
10, 000

2,121, 000

Due from
redeeming
agents.
$9, 561,139
2,190, 096
1, 285, 679
1, 707, 915
1, 619, 486
155, 779
260, 780
198, 622
838, 040
531,932
2, 234, 275
689,109
491, 685
332,125
114, 822
22, 211, 484

a
o
TJ
H

Pi

o
pi

o
H

28. 5 I 9,141, 643 17, 648, 577 17, 015, 000 11,140, 000

Pi

hl^

42

REPORT

ON T H E FINANCES.

Expenditures of the office of Comptroller of the Currency for the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1870.
Special dies, paper, plates, &c
Salaries

> $54, 091 62
86,940 12

Total

--

141,031 74

Contingent expenses were paid out of tlie general appropriation for contingent
expenses of the Treasuiy Department.
Navies and compensation of officers and of clerks in the office of the Comptroller of the Currency
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.
Class.

Salary.

P e r i o d of service.

$5, 000

12 i n o n t h s

2,500

Name.

12 inonths.

COMPTROLLER.
H i l a n d R. H u l b u r d
DEPUTY COMPTROLLER.
John Jay Knox
CLERKS.
L i n u s M. P r i c e
J . Franklin Bates
E d w a r d Wolcott
J o h n D. Patten, ir
G.C.Williams
L. P . Hulburd
George W. Martin
John W. Magruder
J o h n W . Griffin

Fourth class...
....do
do . . .
....do.....
....do
....do
do . . .
do
..
....do
T h i r d class
. do . . .
....do
....do
do .
..do
....do
do
do - .
...do
....do-.-„..
do .
do
..

1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600

Do.
11 m o n t h s

Second c l a s s . .
do
do
do
..do . . . .
....do
:.... ....do
• do

1,400
1, 400
1,400
1,400
1,400
1,400
1,400
1,400

Do.
Do
Do
Do
Do.
Do.
Do.
3 months.

F i r s t class
....do
do
do
do
....do
....do
do
do . .
do
do
do

1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200
1, 200
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200

12 m o n t h s
Do.
Do
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
5 m o n t h s 18 days.
5 m o n t h s 25 days.
2 months 2 days.
Do
1 month

900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
.900

12 m o n t h s .
Do
Do
Do.
4 m o n t h s 20 d a y s .
1 montli.
4 inonths
1 month
12 m o n t h s .

•.
-

Jolm Burroughs
H e n r y H. Smith
C h a r l e s H . iSTorton
Gurden Perkins
Edward Myers
C . D . F . Kasson
E d w a r d S. P e c k
George H. Wood
Aaron Johns
F e r n a n d o C. Cate
E d w i n C. D e n i g
J o h n S. L a n g w o r t h y
Charles A. J e w e t t
J o h n Joy Edson
C h a r l e s H. C h e r r y
WilUam A . P a g e
CharlesScott
William Cruikshank
J o h n A. Kayser
WUliain H . M U s t e a d
WUliam H. Walton

1,800
1,800
1,800
1,800
1,800
J, 880
1,800
1,800
1,800

'
'

.

. .

. . . .
..

•.

Horatio Nater
J o h n A. Corwin
A. F. McKay
F . A . MiUer
A l b e r t A . MiUer
George McCullough
John J. Patton
Elisha J . Babcock
T. Elwood Major
WiUiamD.Swan
P . T. Snowden
Reuben Smith
Sarah F. Fitzgerald
E t h a E . Poole
Louisa A. Hodges
M a r y A . Blossom
M a r y G u r l e y Smith
H. A. Peters
M a r y C. Rine-ffold
M. H . S h e r w i n . . •..
Sophie C. HaiTison




i

.. .

'

.

...

Female clerk.,
do
do
do
...do
....do
do
do
..-.do

Do.
Do
Do
1 month
Do
Do
Do

Do.
Do
Do
Do.
Do
Do
Do.
Do.
Do
Do

'

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

43

Names and compensation of officers, ^ c , in the office ofthe Comptrollei', <^c.—Continued.
Name.
M. L. McCormick
F. C. Snead
F. M. Anderson . .
K. E. Anderson
Agnes C. Bielaski
A. M. Donaldson
Celia N French
Eliza R. Hyde
AUce C. Ingersoll
Louise W. Knowlton
Annie W. Story
Julia M. Baldwin
C.Hinds
V. MUler
Maggie L. Simpson
M. E. Greer
Alice Wick
S. H. Owen
Josephine Hyde
Clara J. Fenno
Eliza M. Barker
Amelia Stockdale
M. L. Sturgus

:

Female clerk..
•'. ....do - ..
do
do
.do
....do
do
do

...

.

.

...do
....do
do
do
...do
....do
do
do
.do
....do
....do
....do
do
.-..do




..

..

$900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900

Messenger
.do
. . . . d o . . -.

William E. Hughes
Samuel Neill
Ozro N. Hubbard
Philo Burr
Edmund E. Schreiner
Henry Sanders
Charles H. Bryan
Julius E. De Saules

Salary. Period of service.

Class.

.

.

840
840
840

Watchman
. Laborer
....do
....do
....do

720
720
720
720
720

Do
' Do
10 months 11 days.
12 months
12 months
1 month 15 days.
Do
Do
Do
Do.
Do.
5 months
12 months
4 months
11 months.
12 months.
7 months 19 days.
4 months 11 days.
1 month 11 days.
12 months.
Do.
Do.
Do
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.




REPORT OF FIRST COMPTROLLER.







REPORT

FIRST COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Comptroller's Office, October 31, 1870.
SIR : In conformity with your request I furnish herewith a concise
statement, in detail, exhibiting the business of this ofSce for the fiscal
year ending on the SOth of June, 1870.
o
The following Warrants of the Secretary of the Treasury have been
countersigned by me, entered upon blotters, and duly posted in proper
Legers, viz:
Treasury, (proper)
s
Public Debt
Quarterly Salary
Diplomatic
Treasury, (Interior)
Treasury, (Customs)
Treasury, (Internal Revenue)
War, pay, v\^arrants
War, repay, warrants
Navy, pay, warrants
Navy, repay, warrants
Interior, pay, warrants
Interior, re]3ay, warrants
War, civil
Treasury appropriation
Treasury, (Interior appropriation)
Interior
War
Navy
Treasury, (Customs)
Internal Revenue, (covering)
Customs, (covering)
Land, (covering)
Miscellaneous, (covering)
Repay, (covering)
Total

1, 640
253
1,236
2,500
2,916
3, 588
6,490
4,405
1,507
1, 923
471
1,462
107
55
14
20
51
14
11
11
3,286
1, 574
591
3, 783
95

,
-

.,

,.../.

38,003

The following accounts, which have been transmitted to this office by
the First and Fifth Auditors of the Treasury, the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue, and the Commissioner of the General Land Office, have
been revised, and the balances found due thereon certified to the Eegister of the Treasury:
Judiciary, embracing the accounts of the United States marshals for their fees^
and for the expenses of the United States courts in their respective districts,
of the United States attorneys, and of the commissioners and clerks of the
United States courts
1, 554
Diplomatic and Consular, embracing the accounts arising from our intercourse
with foreign nations, expenses of consuls for sick and disabled seamen, and of
our commercial agents in foreign countries
1,929



48

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Land, embracing the accounts of the registers and receivers of laud of&ces, of
surveyors general and their deputies, and of land erroneously sold.'.
Mint and its branches, embracing accounts of gold, silver, and cent coinage, of
bullion, of salaries of the officers, and of the expenses
Fublic Debt, embracing accounts for the redem]ption of United States stock and
notes, interest on the public debt, accounts of t h e U n i t e d States Treasurer and
the assistant treasurers, and matters connected therewith
Fublic printing, embracing accounts for public printtag, for binding, and for
paper
Territorial printing, embracing accounts for the xDrinting, the pai)er, and binding of the territorial legislatures
Congressional, embracing the accounts for the contingent expenses, &.C., of the
United States Senate and liouse of Representatives
Steamboats, embracing accounts for the expenses of the inspection of steamboats, and the salaries of the inspectors
".
Collectors of Internal Revenue, eiubracing their accounts for the collection of
the internal revenue, and -the accounts for disbursements connected with
them..
Commissioner of Internal Bevenue, being the accounts connected with the refanding of taxes illegally collected
Assessors of Internal Bevenue, embracing their accounts for their commissions,
and the e x p o s e s of levying the internal revenue tax
Miscellaneous, (internal Revenue,) embracing alL claims for informers, drawbacks & c . :
Territorial, embracing accounts for the legislative expenses of the several United
States Territories, and the incidental e'xpenses of their goverDment.
Miscellaneous, embracing the salaries of the judges of the United States courts,
and the several officers thereof, &c
Letters written on official business
>
.
,
Receipts of Collectors of Internal Revenue, tax-lists, examined, registered, and
filed
Official bonds examined, registered, indexed, and
filed
The following requisitions have been duly examined, entered, and reported on,,
viz:
Diplomatic and consular
713
United States marshals
205
Collectors of Internal Revenue
2, 885

2, 072
156
1, 051
130
48
61
479
3,288
114
1,134
1,170
265
1, 883
9, 963
3,406
541

3,803

In addition to entering and indexing the letters and references, a
large amount of copying has been done, and attention regularly bestowed upon miscellaneous work, which it would be impossible to particularize.
'•
Accounts have been stated with sundry railroad companies for interest
accrued at the close of the fiscal year, and due by them, respectively,
to the United States on certificates of the public debt loaned these companies by the Government to aid in the construction of the roads.
The following schedule shoAvs the amount of principal of the bonds
loaned to each company, and of the accrued interest:
Railroad companies.
Union Pacific Railroad
Central Railroad
Western Railroad
Sioux City and Pacific Railroad
Kansas Pacific (late Union Pacific, Eastern Division) Railroad
Central Branch Union Pacific Railroad, (late Atlantic and Pacific Railroad) . . .
Total

Amount of bonds. Interest accrued
$27,236,512
25,881, 000
1,970,000
1,628, 320

00
00
00
00

$2, 543,989
3,326,834
137,798
203,470

81
45
9^
14

6,303,000 00

569,261 05

1,600, 000 00

320,210 84

64,618,832 00

7,101,565 25

Letters were addressed to the treasurers of the respective companies
requesting an early payment of this interest, but no one of the compa


FIRST COMPTROLLER.

49

nies has complied with the request, and only two have answered the
letters addressed to them. They both assume and argue that no interest is payable by the companies until the maturity of the bonds, thirty
years after the date of issue, at which time,.unless payment shall be
made more rapidly than heretofore, the interest will be double the principal, and both together wiU probably greatly exceed the value of the
roads.
In conclusion I consider it my duty to the employes of this office to
again commend them for their efficiency in the performance of the
trusts committed to them, and for their punctuality and general fidelity.
Yery respectfully,
E. W. TAYLEE,
Comptroller,
Hon.

GEORGFE S. BOUTWELL,

Secretary of the Treasury,
4 F







%
>

REPORT OF THE SECOND COMPTROLLER.







REPORT
OF

THE SECOND COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second Comptroller's Office, October 1870.
SIR : I have the honor to submit the following detailed statement of
the business operations of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1870:
The aggregate number of accounts of disbursing officers and agents
which have been received, as well as those which have been finally
adjusted, is as follows:
Received.
Proin the Second Auditor
Prom the Third Auditor
Prom the Fourth Auditor

Eevised.

Amount.

3,186
3,346
470

3,023
3,555
474

$175, 843,7.55 00
354, 763, 915 00
42, 035, 001 00

7,002

7,052

572, 642, 671 00

The above accounts have been duly entered, revised, and the balances
found thereon certified.
' ,
Character of account.

Rebeived.

Eevised.

Amount.

FROM T H E SECOND AUDITOR.

Total

40

43

$3,807,41100

1,224

1, 075

155, 403,175 00

296

284

586,157 00

115

114

7, 0.42, 633 00'

646

644

4, 951, 725 oa

.507

505

1, 703, 299 00

16
342

16
342

1, 031, 878 00
587, 729 00
• 729, 748 00

3,186

Accounts of dishursing officers of the War Department,
for collecting, or2;anizing, and drilling volunteers.
Paymasters' accounts, for the pay and rations, &c., of
officers and soldiers of the Army.
Accounts of Army i-ecruittng officers, for clothing, equipments,, and hounty to recruits, &c.
Ordnance, embracing the accounts of dishursing officers of
the Ordnance Department, for arsenals, armories, armaments for fortifications, arming militia, &c.
Indian Department>—accounts of Indian agtmts, expenses
of holding treaties, pay of interpreters, pay of Indian
agents, &c., and the settlement of personal claims for
miscellaneous service of agents and others in connection
with ludian affairs.
Medical and hospital accoimts, including the purchase of
medicines, drugs, surgical instruments, hospital stores.
the claims of private physicians for services, and surgeons employed under contract.
Military Asylum . . . . . .
Contingent expenses of the War Department

3,023

175, 843, 755 00

2,198

2,382

^306, 643, 544 0«

FROM T H E THUiD AUD [TOR.

Q u a r t e r m a s t e r s ' accounts, for t r a n s p o r t a t i o n of t h e A r m y ,
a n d t h e t r a n s p o r t a t i o n of all d e s c r i p t i o n s of A r m y s u p . plies, o r d n a n c e , and for t h e s e t t l e m e n t of p e r s o n a l claims
for services in t h e Q u a r t e r m a s t e r ' s D e p a r t m e n t .




54

REPOKT ON T H E FINANCES,
Revised.

Eeceived.

Character of account.

Amount.

903

908

$8, 953, 847 00

101

109

23, 872, 750 O
O

106

Coinmisearies' accounts, for rations or euhsistence of the
Army, and for the settlement of personal claims for services in the Commissary Department.
Accounts of pension agents, for the payment of military
pensions, including the entries of the'raonthly reports of
new pensioners added to the rolls, and the statements
from the Commissioner of Pensions respecting the
changes arising from deaths, transfers, &c., and lor peneion claims presented for adjustment.
Accounts of the Engineer Department, for military surveys, the construction of fortifications, for river and harhoi? surveys and iinprovements.
Accounts for the relief of freedmen and refugees

115

13,140i 191 0$

38

Total
FROM THE F O U R T H

41

2,133, 583 0&

3, 346

3,555

354,743,915 G
O

4

2

$358, 031 00

AUDITOR.

Quartermasters of the Marine Corps, erahracing accounts
for the expenses of officers' quarters, fuel,, forage for
horses, attendance on courts-martial and courts of inquiry, transportation of oificers and marines, sui}plies of
provisions, clothing, medical stores, and rnilitary stores
for haaracks, and all incidental supplies for marines on
shore.
Accounts of paymasters of the Marine Corps, for pay and
rations of the oificers and marines and servants' hire.
Paymasters of the Navy: accounts lor the pay and rations
of officers and crew of the ship; supplies of ijrovisions,
of clothing, and repairs of vessels on foreign stations.
Paymasters at navy yards: accounts for the pay of otficers
on duty at navy yards, or on leave of absence, and the
pay of "mechanics and laborers on the various works.
Navy agents' accounts, for their advances to paymasters,
purchases of timber, provisions, clothing, and naval
stores.
Navy pension a.gents' accounts, for the payment.of pensions
of oificers and seamen, &c., of the Navy, and officers and
pi'ivates of the Maiine Corps.

2'
207

78

77

142

146

8, 686, 816 00

43

40

281, 466 O
O

470

474

42, 035, 001 00

34, 623
1,671
5,091
21
722
120
18

Total

2
201

35,176
1,665
5,118
21
722
120
18

$5,107, 932 00
246,119 00
140, 880 00
2, 896 00
.
88, 649 00
42, 504 00
1,124, 960 00

181, 264 00^
17, 512,120 00
.

15, 015, 304 00

CLAIMS REVISED DURING T H E YEAR.

Sailors' pay and bounty
Prize money
.
--Contract surgeons
...
Property lost in the military service
Oregon and Washington Teriitory war claims
Of States for eni-oTling, subsisting, clothing, supplying,
arming, equipping, paying, and transporting their trooi)S
in defense of the United States.
Miscellaneous

118

Number
Number
Number
Number

of
of
of
of

43,147

1,993

Eeferred ca^es

307

42, 384

Total.

1,993

6, 753, 940 OO-

settlements for the fiscal year encliiig June 30, 1870
7, 052
accounts on band at tbe commencement of the fiscal year July 1,1869. 1,612 •
accounts on hand at the close of the fiscal year June 30, 1870
1,262 •
letters written on ofiicial business
—
946 ^
Number of requisitions recorded during the year.
Kind of requisition.

Accountable
Refunding
Settlement
Ti'ansi'er
..

A\rar.
1, 070

'




_ >
.

Interior.
603
111

Total.

2, 654
1, 139

1, 240
436
214
234

.594
268

2, 511
3, 462
1 641

6,827

,2,124.

1,576

10, 527

1, 9C4

'

Navy.

2, 913

SECOND COMPTROLLER.
Number of contracts, classified as follows:
Quartermaster's Department
:
Commissary of Subsistence
Navy Department
Eugineer Department
Indian Department
Adjutant General
Freedmen's Bureau
Ordnance
Surgeons
Chai'ter parties
Leases

55

635
323
114
59
46
74
11
5
1
3
2&

„. 1

Total

1,297

Official bonds
Pensioners recorded

filed

:
^

100
16, 512

Eespectfully submitted.
J. M. BEODHEAD,
Comptroller,
Hon.

G E O R G E S. B O U T W E L L ,

Secretary of the Treasury,







REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS.







REPORT

THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Office of Commissioner of Customs, October 11,1870«
SIR : In compliance with your request I have the honor to transmit a
report of the business transacted in this Bureau during the fiscal year
ending SOth June, 1870.
All matters relating to customs having been withdrawn therefrom, it
only remains for me to report the transactions of the past year relating
to receipts from customs, and the accounts of collectors and other officers of the customs, or connected therewith.
The number of acconnts on hand iu this office .July 1, 1869, was
194
There were received from the First Audi tor from July 1, 1869, to Jnne 30, 1870.. 5,704
Number of accounts adjusted during the year
Number of accounts retarued to First Auditor
Number of accounts on hand July 1, 1870

These acconnts involve the follo^^ong receipts:
On account of customs
On account of fines, penalties, and forfeitures
On account of steanibo,at inspection
On account of storage, &c
On acconnt of official fees

5,703
60
135
— 5,898

$194,538,374
.528, 788
208,982
215,167
617,770

44
38
65
00
23

196,109,082 70
And the following expenditures :
On account of expenses of collecting the revenue from customs
$6,237,137 25
On account of light-house establishment
2, 588, 300 59
On account of excess of deposits refunded
1,836, 375 45
On account of expenses^ of revenue cutter service
1,138, 393 31
On account of building'and repairing custom-houses
.
745, 999 06
On account of payment of debentures
823, 419 54
On acconnt of marine hospital establishnient
371, 213 11
On account of distributive share of
fines
237, 796 86
On acconnt of captured and abandoned property
40, 823 62
On account of furniture and repairs of furniture for custoj^^-houses...
49,168 80
Ou account of debentures and other charges
53,429 99
On account of proceeds saies unclaimed goods
9, 009, 01
On account of refunding duties
'
6,524 08
On account of examiner of drugs.'.
3, 084 24
Ou account of tax on salaries...
1, 022 72
On account of fuel and miscellaneous items for custom-houses
:.
42, 542 73
On accouiit of relief R. R. Parrott
12,198 35
On account of miscellaneous
546 58




14,196,985 29

60

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

Number of estimates received
.'.....
Number of requisitions issued
Amount of requisitions issued
Nuniber of letters written
Nlimber of letters received
Number of retnrns received and examined
Amount involved in the above statement
Average number of clerks employed

1,783
1,740
$7,832, 675 30
11, 565
10, 308
"
2, 881
$218,138,743 29
25

WAREHOUSIE AND BOND ACCOUNTS.

During theyear ending June 30, 1870, 888 warehouse and bond accounts have been examined and adjusted; 573 letters have been received, and 148 written in relation to those accounts. A summary of
the wareliouse transactions for the fiscal year ending June 30,1870, cannot be stated, as fhe large ports are yet in arrears in transmitting their
accounts for adjustment. I herewith append a summary of the warehouse transactions in the several districts aiid ports in the United States
for the year ending June 30, 1869.
Yery respectfully, your obedient servant,
]Sr. SAEGENT,
Commissioner of Customs,
Hon.

G E O R G E S. B O U T W E L L ,

Secretary of the Treasury.




Schedule of warehouse transactions at the several districts andports~_of ihe United States for the year ending June 30,1869.
W A R E H O U S E BONDS.
CO <a

i

Districts.

.

' ^ rn
O J3 r; o

C o
O

Albany
Alexaridria
Buffalo C r e e k
Belfast
.
Baiii>"or

•c t
o ?
M

.^

i^atii

$92, 841 61
$1, 964
• 7, 328
8, 417
32, 614
6, 914

'.

Bristol and W a r r e n
Baltimore
"
Barnstable
Boston
Bransvvick
r'hicao'O
Cbamplain
....
Cnyabo^a
Cbarleston
Castine
. . •.
Cincinnati
Cairo
.•
Detroit.
...
Delaware
Dnbnqne
Erie
^Fairfield
Frencbman's Bay
Fall River
Fernandina
•
Genesee
G-loucester
Georgetown, D . C
G e o r g e t o w n , S. C
Huron
Key West KeoknK
Kennebunk
Donisville
Mihvaukee
'.




36
80
17
21
12

$2,
14,
10,
105,

364
655
631
039

75
64
00
95

1, 448, 204 57

14, 342 64
6, 605, 334 69

3, 560, 273 78

12, 017, 883 02

23, 055 88

28,062 72

4,
13,
1,
106,

220
515
710
099

71
99
39
88

3, 975 79
24, 680 67
1, 558 25

3, 333 85

2, 571 83

..

$1,141 '20
116 10
1, 313 92
142, 414 36
8, 212 32
411, 537 85
34, 514
45,168
5, 375
5, 236
.3, 419
346, 015
20, 460
79, 791
59, 064
10,224

32
28
54
07
14
33
59
46
93
20

45, 606 56
49 32

$32 90

2, 421 00

18 57
20

75, 497 64

1, 554 97

413, 967 28
829 48
393,186 63
135, 978-54
3, 403 31
6, 743 70
190, 974 54

810 90
15
199 89
275 99
26 21
2, 014 40

291, 063 85

3, 859 64

56 70
26, 467 44

282 31
6,185 42
46, 501 07

2,663 19
8, 496 55
1, 657 58

217 5G
10, 205 79

30
04
32
26

450,146
29, 013
10,212
27, 071
675
597, 548
6, 470
92, 256
50, 966
868
3,164
26, 467

47
83
10
50
92
62
00
68
20
00
07
44

26, 329
282
2, 053
9, 268
9,094
217
1, 745
3,225
13, 393
55
144, 737
66, 793

65
31
88
29
44
56
70
63
94
04
90
99.

$43, 496 63

590,203 88
• 622, 391 33
829 48
1,908 69
135, 978 54
1,258 70
7, 562 71

14,125 73

75 14
26, 226 78

109, 075 88
12, 918 06

II

©•§

1,234 18
1, 759
730
78, 662
16, 830
8, 330

17
85
46
00
64

io, 856 48
33,917 52

57 08
225 94

$749
1, 639
116
2, 320

13
70
10
50

11.5, 399 38
^6,624 17
805. 653 78

638, 717 26

5 60

2, 468 73

2, 544 95
5, 432 09
509 90

3, 599 25

$1, 089 36

267, 036 09

5 00
274 82
410 03

6, 263 50
684 61

•

2, 385 00
36, 540 56

1,200 .55
55, 657 75
1, 760 56

21,259 01
17,130 .00
550 80

561 70

Co

<1

1, 525 64
26, 329 -65

5, 063
• 50
43, 490
11,649

61
88
78
28
59
99
20
16

II

i , 4 9 9 40

72 68
45
29
97
70

$92, 841
2,125
19, 596
11, 602
32, 280
6, 544
• 12, 035
.5, 712, 432

210, 873 90 10, 250, 940 64

4, 064 07

3,103
2, 026
7, 441
469

it

ll'

•s.2

ti

111

in j ^

f

| | o

ni

>5

© .
'wrri

o
o
12, 203
3, 781
6 996
105, 392
1 783
2 307
1, 853, 881
1 588
4, 296, 832

23
36
71
14
75
44
45
15
82

25
16
5
9,

96
60
44
01
98
63
59
13
73
90
00

100
154
704
674
605
47, 045
13, 990
7, 202
8, 098
9, 412
900

H-*.
•Ul
Ul
M

O

Pi '

a
a
Ul

O

46 44

1, 741 68

2, 540 94
8, 788 77
1,990 22
4, 919 60
18, 483 94
17, 765 96

0:1

Schedule of warehouse transactions at the several districts and ports ofthe United States for the year ending June 30, 1869—Continued.''.

INS

WAEEHOUSE BONDS.

Districts.

Mobile
"
Middletown
.Miami
Mempbis
Marblebead
Minnesota
jSTiagara
New Haven
Iliewport
New London
•jSJ"ewburY]3ort
New Bedford
Norfolk
Nasi ville
Nantucket
New Orleans
Oswego
Oswegatchie
'.
Orego'n
Providence
Passamaquoddy
Portsmoutb
Pbiladelphia
Portland aud Falmoutb.
Pensacola
Petersburg
'...'.'
Plymouth, Mass
Pittsburg
Peoria
Perth Amboy
'.,..
Quincy
Richmond
*. ]
San Francisco
Salem and Beverly
Savannah

St. Louis



Ilo.

^s

2§

'd-.S

II

II

d 3

O

^9,

II:-

O
S80, 508 44
15, 952 35

$160, 245 65

$316 12
9, 674 35

10, 889 41

$609 60
163 05
39, 983 72
8, 966 83

$1, 810 55
81 16

$158,
12,
20,
10,

016 39
735 15
766 55
391 68

$469 35
6, 712 40
19, 217 17

15, 687 70
120, 852 84
7, 502 72
20, 551 72
51, 491 78
1, 398 96
60, 351 46

1, 053, 811 06

2, 617, 587 15
234, 432 11

9, 361 54
6, 942 20
3, 923 23
1, 716,120 74
299, 341 26
476 20
3, 492 58
19, 004 12
8, 316 88

1, 294 20
7, 493 90
2, 080 44
329. 207 64
8; 250 47

45, 596 54
8, 666 47

39, 616 82

4, 780, 376 84
479, 381 39

1, 827 73
588,189 93
70, 733 62

2, 953 60

8, 287 71
4, 237 07
1, 780,175 92
24, 622 19
44, 239 29
122, 646 79

"'3,'739"25

13, 039 47
3, 782, 030 46
58, 382 93
123,127 42

5, 052
32, 321
65, 848
47, 348
6,129

90
70
42
05
90

11, 694
62, 869
3, 079
24, 795
347, 508

90
23
44
15
66

67, 997 31
241, 584 66

53, 282 11
114, 461 88
9,134 56
15, 042 25
1.5, 033 08
12, 867 96
4,172 58
83, 581 90

$36, 419 17

$48, 341 45
6, 342 20
7, 560 66

89 46
24, 624 08
1, 631 84
7, 963 71
4,418 857, 532 50
1, 856 16
1, 687 15

$244 00

CO

11, 948 12
241,182 66
7, 440 33

89 46
2, 767 08
402 00
1, 272 80
611 10

611 10
5, 813 77
2, 296 33
1, 474 29
635 64
856 14
197 25
5, 774 64
5, 971 89
235 98
81, 894 75
468 54
468 54
1, 570, 885 75 13, 853 27 2, 270, 851 60 , 885, 999 62 236,192 59
.8,250 47
181, 864 04
115, 950 26
82, 559 39
2, 397 15
17, 377 05
19, 774 20
35 88
3 12
55, 264 89
7, 566 77
25, 719 17
1, 998 25
43, 433 20
27, 522 93
184 62
44, 607 27
28, 347 70
72, 954 97
362 42
4-, 122 57
8,'335'58'
30, 987 50
67, 828 84
83,177 48 "4i,"362'69' 5, 050, 492 68
,
610, 375 18 ! 029, 889 53
8, 525, 667'96
414 05
594, 328 55
24 46
24 46
17; 346 78
7, 840 00
A, 687 99
32, 677 17
6, 005 77
75, 905 06
2, 077 53
s'ss"
78, 473 83
34,125 78
182 10
6, 362 98
26'48'
28,151 17
28,124 69
773 75
202 47
40, 421 99
17, 058 43
832, 260 33
48, 449 83
521, 684 36 13, 004 03 3, 280, 754 81
23 22
45,379 46
3, 762 03
1,196 23
14, 606 66
949 90
125, 621 93
2, 073 08
3, 778 30
1, 541 08
2, 202 90 1, 565, 917 06
116 50
507 62
1,202,211 49

15,'687'76
26, 041 16
9, 955 74
40, 917 96
3, 557 40
60, 351 46

O

o
H

lH
-

12, 915 87
6 00

1,129, 385 19
19,171 20
7, 227 20
11, 782 42

'

267, 398 57
3, 846 25

49
17, 200
348
8, 749
14

66
16
88
81
80

1,175 53
, 792, 460 09
137, 098 77
476 20
1, 992 30
19, 966 43
343 35
3, 000 00
7, 872 53
4,986 94
1, 981, 098 87
23, 206 98
54, 429 72
108, 013 86

Saluria
Texas
Vicksburg
Vermont
Wilmington
Wheeling
Wiscasset
Waldoboro
Tork
Evansville

97 50
49, 512 67

3, 773 78
75, 559 87

624 77

484 04

26, 330 17
15, 641 85

5, 955 59
22, 720 40
260 70
660, 760 33

32 87
507 80

13, 842 88
9.0, 871 40
260 70

1, 719 17
12, 705 19

15,163 64
16, 055 00

350, 646 78

91 35

347 75
4, 382 51

'.

347 75

4, 382 51

13 86
488 55

2, 526 35

i, 152 63

110 30

5, 464 22
37, 373 73

310,113 55

1, 017 46
22 50

22 50

6, 937 27

3, 672 63

.13 86
605 20

New York

10,597.557 57
20,584;631 71

31,581,023 46
73,238,699 82

3,037,898 97
918,098 57

15,220,754 95
5,563,109 33

295,355 60
653,195 87

31,771,708 92
59,578,599 08

5,007,995 96
3,8|0,652 37

10,910,227 19
7,805,615 58

1,003,579 13
4,052,127 20

12,039,079 35
25,690,741 07

Total

31,182,189 28

104,819,723 28

3,955,997 54

20,783,864 28

948,551 47

91,350,308 00

8,838,648 33

18,715,842 77

5,055,706 33

37,729,820 42




o
o

o
o
o

s

I

0i




REPORT OF THE FIRST AUDITOR.

5F







REPORT
OF

THE FIRST AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMEINTT,

. First Auditorls Office, October 20, 1870.
SIR : I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations
of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870:
Accounts adjusted.

Number of
accounts.

Amount's.

Total

1,460
: 521
~ 1
24
409
12
7
7

$175, 277, 795 58
182, 8-17 35
13, 810 27
64, 285, 3.55 08
434, 646 07
1, 235 73
100 00
508 89

2,441

Collectors.of cnstoms
Collectors under steamboat act
Internal and coastwise intercourse
Mints and assay oifices
Fines, penalties, and Ibrfeitures
Seamen's wages forfeited
•.
Moneys received on account of deceased passengers
Moneys received for services of United States otlicers

240,196, 298 97

DISBURSEMENTS.

Collectors as disbursing agents of tbe Treasury
•
Official emoluments of collectors, naval officers, and surveyors
Excess of deposits for unascertained duties Debentures, drawbacks, bounties ,and allowances
Special examiner of drugs
Superintendents of lights
Agents of inarine hospitals
Accounts for duties illegally exacted, fi):ies remitted, judgments satisfied, and net proceeds of unclaimed merchandise paid
Judiciary accounts
:
Disbursements for revenue cutters
Redemption of the public debt and the payment of interest thereon
Pay of janitors of public buildings
"
California land claims
Inspectors of steam vessels for traveling expenses
Public printing
Insane Asylum, District of Columbia
Columbia Institution for Deaf and Dumb
Columbia Hospital for Women
Providence Hospital
-.
Designated depositories for contingent expenses
Fire and burglar proof vaults for depositories
Construction and repaks of public buildings
Life-saving stations
Compensation and mileage of the members of the Senate and House of
Representatives
Contingent expenses ofthe Senate and House of Representatives, and of
the several Departments of the Government
Mints and assay offices
Territorial accounts
Captured and abandoned property
Salaries of the civil list paid directly from the treasury
Coast Survey
' '.
Disbursing clerks, for paying salaries
Fuel, lights, &c., for public buildings
Additional compensation to collectors, &c
Treasurer of the United States for receipts and expenditures
Distribution of fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Commissioner of Public Buildings
Commissioner of Agriculture
Warehouse aj;ul bond accounts
Miscellaneous
. Total




1,118

793
118
79
48
390
473
197

$6, 713, 383 21
1, 401, 058 33
1, 922, 851 46
624, 443 59
6, 840 78
1, 334, 613 32
381, 324 07

26

92, 216 50
2, 096, 947 02
1, 247, 844 95
398, 611, 447 18
378 47
2, 365 00
42, 493 63
1, 402, 416 51
187, 275 41
47, 535 75
17, 527 23
21, 085 42
6, 359 97
18, 354 62
3, 286, 973 63
15, 872 23

3

2, 718, 636 32

530
144
39
104

1, 479, 075 06
62, 583, 962 90
181,180 91
41,892 14
520, 359 52
535, 928 30
5, 088, 763 41
27, 375 92
670 70
842, 898, 788 97
218, 367 04
320, 896 60
153, 594 87

1,758

383
890
2
•
4
281
72
23
7
8
10
35
21
1,219

1,231

24
351
60
2
4
121
200
35
823
1,004
12, 630

8, 261, 688 47
1, 344, 512, 789 41

68

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Reports and certificates recorded
Letters written
Letters recorded
Powers of attorney registered and
Acknowledgments of acconnts written
Requisitions ausAvered
Jndiciary a'ccoants entered and

•
filed
filed

Total

10,572
2,395
2,395
7,690
8,327
349
528
32,256

The preceding condensed statement of the business of this office gives
so imperfect an idea of the amount of work performed, and the large
responsibilities involved, that for the better understanding of the diversified character ofthe business, aiid its practical working in detail, I submit the following dissection and exhibit, as the most appropriate means
of comprehending its importance and measuring its magnitude.
CUSTOMS DIVISION.

Eeturns are now received from 139 districts and ports. These returns
are distributed as nearly equal as practicable to thirteen different desks.
For the x>ioper examination and adjustment of these accounts, clerks
are required who have a knowledge of the tariff laws, and are also good
practical accountants. The accounts of customs are received and adjusted monthly. These accounts include the duties on imi^orts, marine
hospital dues, and duties on tonuage. The abstracts of duties on imi^orts
in l^ew York, Boston, Philadelphia, and San Francisco, E"ew Orleans,
Baltimore, and Portland, are very large, requiring a great amount of
patient labor in comparing the entries with the tariff schedules, made
up as those schedules are from the various acts of 1861, 1862, and 1864,
and the several ameiidator,y acts. In all the smaller districts, which
have no naval officer to certifj^ the abstracts, the manifest is forwaTded
by the collector for each and every entry of merchandise, amounting, in
districts like Portland, Yermont, Oswego, Detroit, &c., to hundreds, and
even thousands, in a single month. These must all be examined as to
the rate of duty, oath, stamp, &c.,'and compared with the abstract.
After the abstracts are exa.mined and the differences noted, a statement of account is made, and the collector charged with the aggregates
and credited by his deposits as shoAvn h j the covering warrants.
The collectors of customs also render monthly accounts for expenses,
of collecting the revenue, which are adjusted quarterly. In these
accounts a.re included all payments to inspectors, weighers, and gaugers,
appraisers, revenue boatmen, contingent expenses, salary of collectors,
commissions, &c. Youchers for all these pa^aneiits must be compared
with the lists of a.ppoi.iitment for the authority for payment and examined as to correct computation, oath, &c.
ISText comes the account of official emoluments, in which the collector
accounts for his fees, &c., and charges his payment for clerk-hire,
stationer}^, office rent, &c. This account in large ports is rendered
monthly, and in small ones quarterly, and adjusted yearly.
Sepa-rate accounts have also to be stated in many of the districts for
excess of de]30sits refunded, debentures paid, and expenses of the revenuecutter service. These are received monthly, and stated quarterly. In
some cases these are very large.
Monthly accounts are also received from nearly all the districts for
steamboat fees and fines, penalties and forfeitures, Avhich are usually
adjusted quarterly, and in some cases oftener.



FIRST AUDITOR.

69

The collectors of customs also act as disbursing agents for expenses
of marine hospital establishment and the light-house establishment, accounts for which are received monthly and quarterly, and stated quarterly.
There are also many special accounts^ sach as iDayments for the salaries
of janitors, and the distribution of fines and penalties. Also the cases for
the refunded duties exacted in excess, tonnage duty refunded, judgments
satisfied, &c.
JUDICIARY.

This division is highly important, embracing the adjustment of all
judiciary accounts.
First. Accounts of United States marshals for expenses of Ilnited
States courts, aud for their fees for service of process, &c., in all United
States cases under the fee-bill of Febraary 26, 1853, and amendments
thereto. The fee-bill of 1853 is general in its application to all States
and Territories, but the practice of the courts in the different jurisdictions is not uniform, and hence almost every marshal has his own construction of the fee-bill in making charges in his accounts To adjust
these accounts the closest scrutiny and thorough acquaintance with the
usages and decisions of the accounting officers, a fa^miliar acquaintance
with their interpretations of the fee-bill, as also the practice in the several districts, is essentially necessary. The business in the United States
courts has nearly doubled since the passage ofthe internal revenue law,
and the closing of the rebellion. The accounts have assumed largelyincreased xDroportions in comparison with what they were prior to 1863.
Second. Accounts of district attorneys for attendance upon United
States courts and upon commissioners' examinations, for their travel and
fees in all United States cases.
Third. Accounts of clerks of the United States courts for their attendance, and for fees in all United States cases.
Fourth. Accounts of United States commissioners for fees, &c.
In the examination and adjustment of all these accounts, it.is necessary not only to hold the fee-bill in memory, but also to be acquainted
with all of the manjr decisions of the Attorneys General, andof the Secretary of the Interior, adid to be able readily to apply the same to any
charge that may be presented,
REDEMPTION AND INTEREST DIVISION,

To this division is assigned the settlement of accounts of the Treasurer of the United States, assistant treasurers, United States depositaries, and other fiscal agents of the Treasury Bepartment, for the payment of interest on the public debt, Treasury bonds and Government obligations, funded or otherwise, which may be classed as follows:
Registered bonds,—At the close of the fiscal year the amount outstanding of this class of securities, cuiTency and coin, was $904,435,270.
These accounts, payments of which are made semi-annually upon schedules prepared for the several fiscal agents by the Eegister of the Treasury,
are closed and transmitted to this office at the end of sixty days from
the date of payment for settlement. The bonds being .held, principally,
by banking and other corporations, executors^ administrators of estates,
trustees and guardians of minors and non-residents of the country, and
the interest receipted by attorneys and their substitutes, presents at
once an idea of the magnitude of the items involved, and the patience
and critical examination necessary to protect the public interests in their



70

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

proper adjustment. During the year there were sixty-seven coin and
twenty currency accounts of this class examined, adjusted and stated,
involving in the aggregate the sum of $47,791,508 06, to which may be
included, as part of the clerical labors of the office for the same period,
but which does not enter into the statistics of this report, accounts examined but not stated, amounting to $10,965,723. The nuniber of general and permanent powers of attorney and testamentary evidence of
the administration of estates connected with the settlement of registered
interest accounts which have been received, examined, and approved,
registered and filed, and listed for the use of fiscal agents, amounts to
7,690.
Coupon bonds.—The amount outstanding of this class of bonds on the
SOth of June, the interest of which is payable semi-annuall}^ in coin,
amounts to $1,267,972,750.. The change recently made in the rendition
of these accounts, requiring the principal depositaries to make weeldy
and others monthly remittances, involves additional labor upon the office in separating the various issues, and iireiiaring for entry on the
Eegister's books a detailed statement of the amounts of interest paid
and to be charged to each loan, with the number and amount of coupons redeemed. The number of accounts stated of this class during
the year was 281, embracing 4,273,174 vouchers, and amounting to
.$65,672,026 20.
Eedemptio7i of United States stoclcs.—The amount of stock of the loans
of 1847 and 1848, and Texan indemnity bonds, redeemed during the year,
principal and interest, was $81,700. Eight accounts.
JSfaval pension fund.—The araount of this fund, upon which the annual interest of 3 per cent, is paid in July and January, amounts in principal to $14,000,000, and interest to $400,000. Two accounts stated.
The floating debt or currency obligations, consisting of treasuiy notes
of various issues, certificates of indebtedness, and certificates of deposit
for temporary loan, the number of accounts examined and stated of this
class during the year was 235, amounting to $9,293,250 principal, and
$2,461,676 12 interest.
Treasury obligations destroyed.—The number of accounts stated, and of
which certificates were issued in favor of the Treasurer, was 259, amounting in the aggregate to $272,749,078 ^b,
MINT ACCOUNT AND OTHERS.

Condensed statement.—Bullion accounts of the mint of. the United
States and branches and assay office, New York; accounts of ordinary
expenses of the same; accounts of the secretaries of the Territories;
accounts of the governors of the Territories; accounts of supervising
and other agents of the Treasury Department, and of officers of the
Army for captured and abanidoned property; quarterly salary certificates ; accounts for defense of suits in the Court of Claims.
The bullion accounts of the Mint, Philadelphia, branch mint. Sail
Francisco, and assay office^ IsTew York, are voluminous, and the exami-.
nation of the various accounts tedious. The abstract of deposits, in connection with the warrants of the Director or superintendent for payment,
are first examined and checked, then the various accounts of the treasurer, melter and refiner, and coiner, under the folloAving heads: ^'Deposit account," ^ gold bullion,'' ^'silver bullion," '-cent bullion," ''cent
^
deposit account," ''gold coinage," '^silver coinage," ''cent coinage,"
" melter and refiner's gold," " melter and refiner's silver," " melter and refiner's cent bullion," '' coiner's gold," '' coiner's silver," " coiner's five-cent



FIRST AUDITOR.

71

account," " coiner's three-cent account," " coiner's bronze or one and two
cent account," " unpaid depositor's," " gold coins for assay," " silver
coins for assay," " silver profit and loss," " cent profit and loss," " bullion
deposit profit and loss," "profit and loss," "bullion fund," "balances,"
and, finally, all the above are blended in the " summary statement*"
The ordinary expense accounts are for the incidental expenses, wages
of workmen, and salaries of officers and clerks of the Mint and branches;
accounts of the secretaries of the Territories for comxiensation and mileage of members, and incidental exiDcnses ofthe legislative assemblies of
the Territories ; accounts of- the governors of the Territories for contingent expenses of executive officers; quarterly salary certificates for the
salaries of judges of the Suiireme Court, United States district judges,
United States attorneys and marshals, governors and secretaries of the
Territories, supervising and local inspectors of steamboats and vessels;
accounts of supervising and assistant special agents of the Treasuiy Department for the collection of captured and abandoned propert}^, and
officers of the Army who have r«eceived and disposed of property of this
class. These accounts consist of three classes:
First. Money accoimts, showing the-receipts from and disbursements far
and on account of captured and abandoned property.—In the adjustment
of this account careful examinations of all returns of sales, and abstracts.,
of rents received, are made, the abstracts of disbursements are examined to see that no payments are made to agency aids, local or assistant ,
special agents, Avithout the approval of the appointment and rate of
compensation by the Secretary of the Treasury, and that the proceeds of '
no property are released except on proper authority, and that bonds of.
indemnity are filed.
Second. The cotton accoimt.—In this account the agents are charged ij
and credited with all the cotton received by them. The date of the receipt of each lot, from whom received or taken, the marks and number
of bales are given, date of disposal, how disposed of; [if sold, proceeds „,
stated; if transferred to another agent, that agent is charged with it;.,
or if released, the a;gent must file his authority for the release; all the .
vouchers required in the adjustment of a money account are required in,,
this. The number of bales of cotton embraced in accounts of this class.;
adjusted in this office for the last fiscal j^ear was 10,915.
Third. Miscellaneous property accounts.—The agents are charged Avith..>
all property of a miscellaneous character received by them, and the dis-,
position accounted for the same as the cotton accounts; accounts for •
expenses incurred in the defense of suits in the Court of Claims in rela-tion to captured and abandoned property.
WAREHOUSE AND BOND ACCOUNT.

The regulations of 1857, section 564, required that officers of the cus- .
toms should account for the duties entered at their respective districts.,,
for warehousing or re-warehousing, with the same particularity of detail
as they were previously required to account for the duties on goods entered ibr consumption; and they w^ere also required to keep and render •
their warehouse accounts monthly to the First Auditor of the Treasury. .
The latter regulation,, however, Avas, or became, a dead letter; and collectors onl}^ accounted for duties on merchandise warehoused as they
Avere collected. This old regulation was reviA^ed by circular Ko. 27, is- sued under date of October 1, 1867. Under this circular the attention
of officers of the customs was directed to the aboA^e regulation, and they,
were notified to render full and accurate warehouse and bond accounts ;
from July 1, 1867.



72

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The object of these accounts is to trace every importation on which
duties are not immediately paid on arrival, until such duties are paid or
until the goods are exported out of the country. This requires a detailed account of the receipt and cancellation of all Avarehouse, rewarehouse, transportation, and exportation bonds, a full account having
from sixteen to eighteen formal statements. In this manner an importation is traced from the iiort of original entry, through perhaps two or
more other districts o f t h e United States, to thelast port, where, the
duties are paid, the merchandise entered for exportation, or the bond
forfeited and delivered to the district attorney for prosecution.
A division Avas organized in this office on December 1, 1867, and an
immediate examination Avas entered upon of the accounts rendered since
the publication of the aforesaid circular. ScA^enty-seven districts have
rendered accounts; the remainder liaA^e no transactions relating to warehousing, and are required only to render monthly statements of the fact,
Avhich are filed in place of accounts. Many of these accounts, as from
'New York, Boston, San Francisco, I^.ew Oiieans, Philadelphia, Baltimo.re, and Portland, are very large, and the examination requires an
acquaintance Avith the rates of duty assessed by many tariff' acts upon all
articles of merchandise imported, and also Avith the numerous forms and
regulations belonging to the Avarehouse system.
ACCOUNTS OF THE TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES.

The accompanying statement will exhibit the nature of the accounts,
with the amount of moneys involved, audited from J u l y l , 1869, to June
30,1870.
,
The magnitude of the statement will couA^ey some idea of the labor
performed in the adjustment of .the accounts. The accounts of the
Treasurer of the United :Sta;tes for the. general receipts and expenditures
of the GoA^ernment are made up and rendered quarterly. The account
current (a A'^olume of some three hundred iiages) has to be carefuil}^
compared with a certified account received from the Eegister of all Avarrants dralAvn on him, or in his faA^or, during the quarter, the amount re^maining unpaid and outstanding of iireAT.ous quarters, and the amount
of such Avarrants for which he claims credit as being' paid, the amount
of balances in the various depositories, &c. All warrants drawn on the
Treasurer are paid by drafts, and he cannot receive credit for the payment of a single Avarrant unless it is accompanied by its api)ropriate
draft, properly indorsed by the payee. The examination and comparison
of these drafts are intricate andiaborious.
The internal rcA^enue Avarrants at this time fully equal one-half of the
yearly issue of warrants prior to the rebellion, many of which require
the critical examination of from one to over three hundred drafts.
The amount embraced in the accounts of the Treasurer of the United
States, adjusted Avithin the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870, is
$842,898,788-97.
The mileage and compensation of members of the House of Eepresentatives are paid by the Treasurer on certificates of the Speaker of
the House, which are the Treasurer's A^ouchers and upon Avhich he receives credit in the adjustment of his account as agent. This account
has to be carefully compared with the journal of the.Sergeant-at-arms,
Avho keeps the individual accounts of the members, &c.
The account of the Secretary of the Senate is even more intricate,
owing .to the irregular sessions of that body.



FIRST AUDITOR.

16

SALARY ACCOUNTS.

Under this head is embraced the adjustment of the accounts (with
two or three exceptions) of disbursing officers for payment of salaries
to all iiersofis in the departments at Washington who receive a regular
compensation, with some accounts also for temporary and additional
clerk-hire. These accounts include the pay-rolls of the Treasury Department, State, War, Navy, Interior, and Post Office Departments,
and of the Attorney General, (now the Department of Justice;) also,
the accounts of Superintendent of Weights and Measures, Clerk of the
House of Eepresentatives, Secretary of the Senate, Librarian of Congress, Congressional Printer, all offices of assistant treasurers of the
United States and United States depositaries, private secretaries, &c.,
ofthe President ofthe United States, salaries, <&c., of Metropolitan Police, and all accounts ofthe United States Coast Suiwey.
CONTING-ENT ACCOUNTS, ETC.,

includes the contingencies of all the executive departments, Treasury, War, Navy, and Interior; contingencies of the House of Eepresentatives under different appropriations ; all the accounts of the Department of Agriculture, salaries, distribution of seeds, &c., under different appropriations; all the accounts ,of the Commissioner of Public
Buildings and Grounds, embracing repairs and preservation of all the
public works in the city of Washington, about one hundred different
approxiriations; all the accounts of the disbursing agent for new dome,
Capitol extension, new jail, enlargement of .the congressional library,
grading the public grounds around the Capitol, &c.; all the accounts of
the agent, &c., for the library of Congress, botanic garden, &c., fourteen appropriations; expense of the national loan; contingent expenses
of the assistant treasurers of the United States at New York, Boston,
New Orleans, Charleston, DeuA'^er City, San Francisco, &c.; contingent
expenses of the Executive Mansion ; contingent expenses of Congressional Printer; accounts for repairs, &c.; furniture for Treasury Department, act of April 7, 1866.
SEPARATE CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS.

The accounts settled by this division are various, and preclude any
general, classification. During the last fiscal year the whole number of
accounts settled in this office in this branch of its business was 1,683,
involving an expenditure of $5,027,918 25. The number for the present
fiscal year Avill be largely increased.
The following classification embraces the several accounts examined
and settled: Construction and repairs of public buildings, furniture for
public buildings, public printing. Government As^dum, Deaf and Dumb
Asylum, steamboat inspectors, life-saving stations, contingent expenses
of United States depositories, Columbia Hospital, timber agents; many
other accounts of not less importance, that cannot well be classified, are
settled.
In the recording division of the office there are employedfiA^eclerks,
whose duties consist in recording the reports and certificates of the
Auditor to the Comptroller of the Treasury and Commissioner of Customs, on the accounts accruing in the office and the correspondence incident thereto.
There is a large amount of miscellaneous business, much of it of great



74

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

importance, requiring the highest clerical qualifications, which has no
appropriate classification with any of the divisions previously described,
that is dispatched by the chief clerk.
I knoAv of no higher merit of those engaged in the service of government, and more deserAang of commendation and recompense, than the
faithful and efficient performance of the entire range of duty in all its
delicate aind responsible relations. Justice and expediency .may bring
this appropriately Avithin the proAance of legislation as worthy of the
appreciation that honors fidelity, rewards merit, and imparts moral
strength to government.
It is not less a iileasure than a duty to state that the clerks of this
office haA^e performed all their official responsibilities Avith industry, capability, and fidelity.
With great respect, your obedient servant,
T. L. SMITH,
First Auditor,
Hon. G E O R G E S. BOUTAVELL,

Secretary of the Treasury,




REPORT OF THE SECOND AUDITOR,







REPORT

THE SECOND AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second Auditor^s Office, November 1, 1870.
SIR : I haA^e the honor to submit herewith the annual report of this
office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870, sliowing in detail the condition of business in each diAdsion at the commencement of the year,
its progress during the year, and its condition at the end thereof.
BOOK-KEEPERS' DIVISION.

The following statement shows the aniount and nature of the work
performed by this division during the year:
Bequisitions registered, journalized, and xjosted.
On what accoimt drawn.

Number.

Amount.

D E B I T EEQUISITIONS.

; Pay.
77
74
164
15,
12
345
56
23
10
237
219
1
592
3
21
17
18

Advances in favor of Pay Departraent
Advances in favor of Adjutant G-eneral's Department
Advances in favor of Ordnance Department
Advances in favor of Medical Department .
Advances nnder direction of the Secretary of AVar
A dvances in favor of Indian Department
Claims paid under appropriations of Pay Department
Claims paid under appropriations of A(^jutant G-eneral's ilepartment
Claims paid under ap]3rox)riations of Ordnance Department
Claims paid under appropriations of Medical Department
Claims paid under a.pxDropriations in charge of Secretary of AVar
Claims paid under appropriations of Quartermaster's Department
Claims paid under appropriations of Indian Department
Claims paid nnder special acts of relief 1)y Congress
Payments to Treasurer United States, internal revenue fund
Payments to IsTational Asylum for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers
Payments to Soldiers'Home
•
..
Total payments .'.

:

S21, 740, 000 00
258,807 64
2, 454, 931 48
495, 000 00
40, 574 50
2, 920,148 14
156,351 43
772 16
86, 235 14
23,489 18
101, 865 65
47 10
716, 704 76
2, 068 53
153, 586 62
1, 630,172 99
91, 870 77

1,884

30, 872, 626 09

186
415
1

36, 014, 407 04
1, 246, 695 31
1, 245 00

Transfer.
Bequisitions issued for the purpose of adjusting a.ppropriations:
Transferrin<T amoimts from ap]Dro])riations found to be chargeable, to such
as are entitled to credit on the books of the Second Auditor's ofiice
Transferring amounts, as above, to the books of Third Auditor's office
•
Transferring amounts, as aboA'^e, to the books of Pourth Auditor's office >
.

602

Total transfers
_A.fr<Ti'0fT£),t;(5 d e b i t s

,...

-

.

...

37, 262, 347 35

2,486

$68,134, 973 44

25
2
46

$20, 582 21
.241 85
2, 765, 801 41

CliEDIT REQUISITIONS.

Refunding.
Deposits under appropriations of Pay Dej)artment
..
DeiDOsits under appropriations of Adjutant General's Department
Deposits under appropriations of Ordnance Department




78

R E P O R T O N T H E FINANCES.

Bequisitions registered, journalized, andposted—Contiim(:iCl.
ISTumber.

On -what a c c o u n t d r a w n .

22
1
1
33

D e p o s i t s u n d e r ai^propriations of Q u a r t e r m a s t e r ' s I l e p a r t m e n t
D e p o s i t s u n d e r a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of l u d i a n D e p a r t m e n t
T o t a l refundin<^

Amount.

-••

1369, 466 71
75 00
1, 612 75
252, 754 89

130

3, 410, 534 82

185

$36, 014, 407 04

40

304, 200 43

Counter.
B e q u i s i t i o n s i s s u e d lor t h e p u r p o s e of a d j u s t i n g a p p r o p r i a t i o n s :
T r a n s f e r r i n g a m o u n t s t o a p p r o p r i a t i o n s e n t i t l e d t o c r e d i t from appropriat i o n s found to b e c h a r g e a b l e on t h e b o o k s of t h e Second A u d i t o r ' s oftice....
T r a n s f e r r i n g a m o u n t s , a s above, from a.ppropriations o n t h e b o o k s of t h e
T h i r d A u d i t o r ' s office, t o t h e b o o k s of t h e Second A u d i t o r ' s office
T r a n s f e r r i n g a m o u n t s , a s above, from a p p r o p r i a t i o n s on t h e b o o k s of t h e
F o u r t h A u d i t o r ' s office, t o t h e b o o k s of t h e Second A u d i t o r ' s office

41,044 02

1

36, 359, 651 49

226
356

•

39, 770,186 31

2,842

A 2!'<-^re£rate c r e d i t s
Aggregate debits and credits

107, 905,159 75
28, 364, 787 13

D e d u c t i n g t h e c r e d i t s f r o m t h e d e b i t s shoAA'^sthe n e t a m o u n t d r a w n o u t t o b e
Arriion-MATioN WARR^VNTS.

Oreclits.
I n faA'^or of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of A d j u t a n t G e n e r a l ' s D e p a r t m e n t
I n faA^or of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of O r d n a n c e D e p a r t m e n t
I n favor of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of M e d i c a l D e p a i - t m e n t
I n favor of ap-in'oytriations i n cliar'^e of t h e S e c r e t a r y of AVar
I n faA'^or of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of I n d i a n D e p a r t m e n t
I n favor of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of ISTational A s y l u m for D i s a b l e d V o l u n t e e r Soldiers
I n faA^or of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of Soldiers' H o m e
TJnder special a c t s of relief b y OOU'^'TCSS
--.
Total credits

-•

f |32, 276, 690 08
100,000 00
1, 448, 893 20
247, 000 00
[
230,050 12
677,513 30
801,088 20
7, 381 25
2,262 53

<
^
45
1
1
2
56

..

35, 790, 878 68

1

$693,335 67

Debits.
T r a n s f e r from O r d n a n c e D e p a r t m e n t t o E n g i n e e r D e p a r t m e n t , (being for
erection of brid'^e a t B o c k I s l a n d Illinois)
T r a n s f e r from a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of t h e I n t e r i o r D e p a r t m e n t , knoAvn as " I n t e r i o r
p r o p e r , " t o t h o s e knoAvn a s " I n t e r i o r ciA^il"
S u r p l u s fund Avarra.nt, c a r r y i n g b a l a n c e s of v a r i o u s I n d i a n a p p r o p r i a t i o n s
n o t n e e d e d t o siu?plus fund
Total debits

36, 220 00

1

91, 992 33

3

.
*

Aff^reo'ate d e b i t s a u d c r e d i t s

1

.»

..

59

821, 548 00
36, 612, 426 68

SETTLEMENTS MADE.

During the j^ear the following settlements of a miscellaneous character were made by this division :
On Avhat a c c o u n t draAvn.
I n favor of t h e ilSTational A s y l u m for D i s a b l e d V o l u n t e e r Soldiers
I n favor of t h e Soldiers' H o m e
Glossing old a c c o u n t s of d i s b u r s i n g officers, t r a n s f e r r i n g c r e d i t s t o o t h e r
offices, &c

Total




Number.
5
1

Amount.
$1, 367, 811 06
7, 381 25

20
26

1, 375,192 31

SECOND AUDITOR.

79

SETTLEMENTS ENTERED.
Paymasters^
Recruiting
Medical
ludian
Ordnauce
:
Miscellaneous
Special
Claims, war
Claims, Indian

206
326
199
131
80
384
240

: . .^^.

422
526
948

Total number of settlements
Number of letters written

2,520
846

New sets of books have been opened during the last three years, and
the ledgers, in use since the organization of the office in 1817, have been
discontinued. All open accounts have had to be critically examined,
checked, and compared with the settlements on file, preparatory to being
transferred from the old to the new books, which has necessarilj;^ involved a large amount of labor. It will be several years before this
work can be finally completed and the old books entirely closed up.
A new index of all the accounts that haA^e CA^er been opened in the office
has been prepared, and is now ready to be transcribed. The system of
keeping the books and accounts has been greatly simplified and improved. In addition to the work specified aboA^e, much has been done
of a miscellaneous character Avhich cannot be stated in detail.
PAYMASTERS' DIVISION.

The total number of settlements made during the year is 1,930, as
follows:
Paymasters' accounts examined and reiDorted
Old settlements of paymasters' accounts revised
Charges against officers on account of double payments
Credits in favor of officers for overpayments refunded
Miscellaneous
,
Total-...,

1, 083
533
168
13
133
1 930

The amounts involved in the above are as follows:
Paymasters' accounts
$141, 438,680 99
Amount of fines, forfeitures, &c., for the support of the Na,tional Asylum for Disabled A^olunteer Soldiers, ascertained to be due: 1st, in
the current examina,tion of paymasters' accounts, $293,053 46; 2d,
in a special examination by three clerks of this division, Avho commenced in November, 1869, and reported June 30, 1870, $31,299 97;
and 3d, in the adjustment of claims of the heirs of deceased soldiers, $8,182 22. The aggregate amount so found has been paid to
the asylum, care of Major General Benjamin F. Butler, president,
by requisitions on the treasury, in accordance with the act of Congress of March 21, 1866, as follows :
July 7, 1869
$40,091 71
August7, 1869
44,646 56
September 4, 1869
33, 326 98
October 4, 1869
5,244 09
November 2, 1869
23,150 49
December 3, 1869
26,511 96
December 22, 1869
21,718 25
January 4, 1870
14,386 72
February 2, 1870
1....
4,625 44
March 4, 1870
17.870 82
April 4, 1870
31,267 90



80

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

May 4, 1870
June 4, 1870
June 30, 1870

$9,352 54
11,886 73
48,455 46
$332,535 65

Amount of fines, forfeitures, stoppages, &c., for. the,support of the
Soldiers' Home, ascertained to be due in the examination of x^a^ymasters' accounts, and paid to Surgeon C. H . L a u b , United States Army,
secretary and treasurer of said Soldiers' Houie, by requisitions on
the treasury, in accordance with the act of Congress of March 3,
1859, as follows:
October7, 1869
$17,740 77
J a n u a r y s , 1870
.,
15,917 98
April 9. 1870
16,613 69
June 30, 1870
16,729 54
67,001 98
Amount transferred to the Treasurer of the United States on the books
of this office, and turned over to him by requisition for t a x on salaries Avithheld from officers of the Army
Amount transferred from the appropriation for " P a y of the Army" to
that of the " Subsistence Department," x^ursuant to General Orders
, No. 63, dated War Department, June 11, 1867
Amount transferred from the ax^x^i'opriation for " Pay of the Ai-my " to
that for " Ordnance, ordnance stores, &c.," on account of deductions
from the jmy of officers and soldiers for arms, and accoutrements,
in accordance with par. 1380, Revised Army Regulations of 1863...
Amount transferred by requisitions to the books of the Third Auditor
on account of stoppages against officers of the-Army for subsistence
stores, quartermasters' stores, transportation, &c
Amount passed to the credit of paymasters still in service on account
of sums disbursed by them in payment of outstanding checks of
paymasters out of service, and on account of sums due them for
otlier reasons
Amount charged against officers on account of xiaj'ments erroneously
made them, for time during AA^hich they Avere not properly in service, &c
Amount credited to ofiicers on accomit of refundment of erroneous
X^ayments made them
-.,
Amount involved in charges raised against officers on account of pay
drawn a second time for same period
Amount involved in credits to officers for refundment of x^ay draAvn
twice
Total

.-

137,939 21
315,110 60

52, 390 57
4,268 49

112,420 97
2,401 39
3, 300 67
36,745 29
4,070 97

...-

142,506,866 78

Accounts of paymasters on hand June 30, 1869
Accounts of paymasters received during tlie year ending June 30,1870

3, 673
689

Total
Accounts of paymasters audited and reported to the Second Comptroller during
the year ending June 30, 1870

4,362

Accounts of paymasters remaining unsettled June 30, 1870

3,279

Number of letters written

1,083

12,842

ORDNANCE, MEDICAL, AND MISCELLANEOUS DIVISION.

The folloAving statement shows the number of money accounts on
hand in the ordnance, medical, and miscellaneous division at the commencement of the year ending June 30, 1870, the number received and
settled during ibhe year, and the number remaining on hand unsettled
at the end of the year, together Avith the expenditure embraced in the
settlements:
Accounts on hand June 30, 1869
Accounts received during the year ending June 30, 1870
Total



•

937
1, 394
2,331

81

SECOND .AUDITOR.
Accounts settled during the year

1,708

Accounts remaining on hand unsettled June 30, 1870

623

Amount of the accounts settled during the year

$3,571,107 13

The expenditure named in the foregoing statement was made under
the following heads, viz.:
Ordnance Department
$2,267,562 32
Medical Department
321,499 08
Expended by disbursing officers out of the Quartermaster's funds, not
chargeable to said funds, but to certain approx^riations on the books
of this office
..:
751,022 83;
Miscellaneous, v i z :
Contingencies of the Army
Secret service
•.
^...
Providing for the comfort of sick and discharged soldiers
Sick and wouiided soldiers' fund
Medical and Surgical History and Statistics
Expenses of the Commanding General's Office
Contingent expenses of the Adjutant General's Department at
Department headqaarters
Keeping and transxiorting x^risoners of war
Purchase of books of tactics
Exxienses of recruiting,.. ^
Pay of the Army
.\.
^.......
Relief of certain musicians aud soldiers stationed at Fort Sumter,
South Carolina, act of J u l y 24, 1861
Relief of Cax)tain Phelps Paine, act of April 1, 1870

178,688
11,440
•25,971
7, 621
2,161
2,239

01
05
21
73.
64
7B

408 67
62 76
150 OO
120 75
98 00
30 00
,030 30

Total.....

3,571,107 13

Number of letters Avritten .

1,716
RECRUITING DIVISION.

The folloAving shows the operation of the recruiting division for the
year ending June 30, 1870, together with the condition of the diAdsion
both at the commencement and close of the year:
Kegular recruiting.

V o l u n t e e r rerecruiting.

Accounts and
c l a i m s for ret u r n of local

bounty.
o .
so

tt

II.

r II
A c c o u n t s ou h a n d J u n e 30,
1869.
Accounts received during
t h e year.
« • .

§
s •

fl

il

>

•

fl
fl
o
fl

o o

i

1

977

144

215

1,336

487

95

57

639

Total
1,464
A c c o u n t s settled d u r i n g t h e
809
yeiu\

239
1155, 573 81 137

A c c o u n t s on h a n d JTune 30
1870.

655

$2,288:332 67

102

272
53
219

$5,157 16

1,975
999 >?2, 4-19, 063 64
976

The amounts disbursed in the settlements named in the above table
were paid from the following axiproxiriations :
REGULAR

Expenses of recruiting
Bounty to volunteers and regulars
6 F



EECRUITING.

^

$147, 999 01
7, 470 00

82

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Pay of the Army.
Medical and hospital department

$30 00
74 80

Total

155,573 81
VOLUNTEER

RECRUITING.

Collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers
Bounty to volunteers and regulars
Draft and substitute fund
Relief of drafted men
Medical and hospital department

'

$1, 657,925
594,150
24,627
11,100
530

48
00
04
00
15
2,288,332 67

LOCAL B O U N T Y .

Pay of two and three years volunteers

5,157 16

Total....'.

2,449,063 64

Number of letters written

476
INDIAN DIVISION.

General report of the Indian division for the fiscal year ending June
30,1870:
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
l^mnber

of
of
of
of
of
of

disbursing accounts of agents on hand June 30, 1,869
xiroperty accounts of agents on hand June 30,1869
claims on hand J u n e 30, 1869
disbursing accounts of agents received during the year
property accounts received during the year
claims received during the year

Total

,..'

..:

279
349
None.
626
392
635
2,281

Number of disbursing accounts of agents audited during the year
Number of property accounts examined duriug the year
Number of claims settled during the year

537
213
635

Total

1,385

Number of disbursing accounts of agents ou band June 30, 1870
Number of xiroperty accounts ou hand J u u e 30,1870
•
Number of claims on hand June 30, 1870
Total number of accounts, &c., on hand June 30, 1870
Amount involved in disbursing accounts audited
Amount involved in claims settled
Total

368
528
None.
'.

896
$1,726,743 45
1,307,083 96
:^, 033,827 41

Number of letters Avritten

984

There Avas also prepared a report to Congress of receipts and expenditures of the Indian Department during the year.
PAY AND BOUNTY DIVISION.

The folloAving tabular statements exhibit in detail the operations of
the two branches of the pay and bounty division during the year, together with the condition of the business of the division, both at the
commencement and close of the year.
Examining branch.
The three following tables SIIOAV the Avork performed by the examin*
ing branch of this division during the year:



Claims in cases of icMte sqldler&.'
A R R E A R S OF PAY AND ORIGINAL BOUNTY.

ADDITIOXAL BOUNTY ACT, JULY 2 8 , 1 8 6 6 , AND AMENDilENTS.

Oi-iginal claims.
2

ab

fl

§

DATE.

ri

.2
2

o

I
ri
,s
fl
fl

a
o
o

.3%

^ .1
M M.
Ul

fl

^

flns

fl

H

^

%
fl
g

rt

S
{§

^fl

s
fl
fl

u

&fl

•

fl o
o'fl

II

,^
• a

rfl

fl
{^

o

'6

^s

r-

. J25

5

^

fl

0

1

•

'?

fl

u

fl
fl

M
s
fl

^

-2
0

'S

8

3

H

i
fl fl

ri

^

3

n
..."^

0
0

^

i

U

«S
p^

M

,g
^

a

'fl*

0 a

s •

s
'S =
u

^
^
.
M

fl

^

s
\^

241
271
310
317
458779

a

? fl
flo
fl

0
,Q

fl

fl
• CJ
0

flS

""P .

^*
^

0
,0

1

;2;

_fl

ri 0

•ffl

0

'fl

^

a

•

2

fl

fl
^

fl

^

4i
0

-

i

^

fl
0
•-;3

;g

fl

0

rt-ri

S'S

.

"rt

!l

u <iJ

^

^ J
% fl
^ ^

X
0

S..2

rO

O

o

"si

X

i

.2
S
di

.« ©
ra 0

.

03

1

cn
fl

0 '

1

;fl

S u s p e n d e d claims .

O r i g i n a l claims.

S u s p e n d e d claims.

^

•

•

rt

^

<»

^"1

•M^

i^

k^

M

fl

©

a
rt

1
©

?
u
M
fl
fl

1^

©

a

fl
fl

1

H

1
^
^
^

a

fl
^25

•

1869.
259
271
311
318
374
261

226
146
293
221
246
220

2,114
2,131
1,661
1,600
1,762
1,627

516
582
579
585
797
536

1,348
1,509
958
938
939
1,026

250
40
124
78
26
65

3,715
4,061
3,543
3,183
4,216
3,284

3,064
3, 095
3,607
3,447
4,337
2,788

1,830
2,213
1,879
1,571
1, 882
2,716

668
845
642
440
365
459

601
667
. 635
593
768
984

307
106
' 74
"47
• 44
1

31
5
4

1,806
1,110
875
813
646
732

809
442
324
259
178
255

908
568
485
513
395
371

89
100
• 66
41
73
106

2,760
1,469
1,141
939
697
749

2,803
2,336
2,555
3,184
3,633
5,185

2,161
1,783
2,121
3,225
4,108
4,654

324
240
261
289
288
413

845
750
740
1, 534
2,433
2,401

T o t i L . 12, 880 4, 189 4,926 2,373 1,392

16, 877

5, 862

9,958

July

Aueust —

September.
October
jS'oA^ember .
December .

1,601
1,930
1,882
1, 583
2,454
1,657

388
728
846
667
642
636
451
593
810 1,024
510
666

320
430
292
221
291
494

2,022
1,545
J, 661
1, 600
2,086
1,788

574
582
579
585
556
591

928
924
957
937
1, 427
1,033

520
39
125
78
103
164

3, 852
3,758
3,540
3,171
3,968
4,504

3, 065
3,096
3,608
3,447
4,336
5,576

35?
635
557
236
899
221
916
486
867
520
777 1,063

2,931
2, 911
3,773
3,556
3, 120
3,444

888
926
916
754
586
775

1,859
1,985
2,429
2, 216
2,009
2,088

184

5, 092
4,694
5,894
6,781
7 228
8,098

5,607
4,672
5,120
.6, 360
6, 674
5,185

1,058 29, 757 40, 034 30,143 5,234 12, 951 7,027 4,931

30, 437

8,312

18, 792

1870.
January ...
F e b r u a r y ..
March .
April..
May

954
359
266
126
51
17

285
113
95
30
3
16




331
135
93
49
4

428
586
525
581

3,333 60, 580 56, 746

00
00

84

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES,
Claims in cases of colored soldiers, including both arrears of pay and bounties.
Suspended claims

O r i g i n a l claims.

£0

©

o

©

1
Date.

1•

flrr4

i fl
fl l

o

I

i

.«^

ri M

©

©

'^ «,
a-2

rO

rO;r3

^

fl^
'i^iP^

a .
fl

1^
2

&•

a
fl

1869.
July
•-...
A u grist
September .
Oci;ober
November..
Deceinber ..

619
300
192
390
645
496

230
45
8
31
114
93

311
209
138
215
442
328

78
46
46
84
89
75

1'870.
January
Pebruary...
March
April
May
Jrme

665
115
439
317
439
295

58
12
10
6
5
7

555
82
168
172
98
179

52
21
53
35
26
20

Total.....

4, 912

619

2, 897

gs

625

fl

fl-rt-S
^fl-S

rS >

fl s
11 111'^i.aa

^"^

r=i

O
rfl

a

|S^

©

ri

ri

ri-^

^

li
fl
fl

©

r^
S
S3«^©

rQ

^

l i s if^

rfl

1

^

,^;=! ©

•o

Vi'fl
o ©

'fl

1
oa

•1
©

©
rO

3
H

©

fl
^2;

o

T

^

1,584
1,642
1,742
2, 403
1,822
1,332

420
400
470
678
612
493

925
1,115
1,145
1, 617
1,148
741

239
127
127
108
62
98

2, 203
1,942
1,934
2,793
2,467
1,828

1,820
2,000.
1,748
1,949
2,5m
2,@89»

208
104
310
89

1,396
1,699
1,850
2,185
1, 690
1,308

316
405
429
619
293
257

• 1, 003
1, 216
1,324
1, 443
1, 250
1, 052

77
78
97
123
147
59

2,061
1,814
2,289
2,502
2,129
1,663

2,566.
2,207
2,48S
2,413
1,893
. l,72g

771

20, 713

5,392

1,342 25, 625

25, 473'

60

13, 979

SUMMARY.

Original claims.

2

S u s p e n d e d claims.

ci

-2
©

nfl
©

fl

o

fl^

'fl

.2 fl

©

'fl
• fl

%

, ©

•

arc:

§

th

1

©

a
fl

1
rO

o

a

^(
1869.
July. ......
August
September.
October . .
November.
December.

T.ri
^ a
fl
fl
{2;

©

a «^

i

'^O

^

fl
^

525.

•s

'c?
f-i

r ^ . S P^
.o

a.^-s

^

p
)^' f l

fl

%
_©

fl
fl

rO-^.

a

fl^

©-fl

o

c?.

1

© a

So

o

©

a

fl. .

©

OT

'fl ^

-.

©

1

©"^

fl

©

'^

rs fl

©

a
ci
Date.

'fl ©

,o

III ^1
^
p rt OT

% •

'o

S.2
3
fl
fl

^,
_
rt
o
H

o
f-l
rO

|.
^

4,050
4,443
3, 953
3,544
4,981
4,869

1, 286
1,736
1,292
922
1, 289
1, 062

1,640
1,543
1,409
•1,401
2,234
1, 978

578
588
667
719
921
1,115

546
576
585
502
537
714

5, 720
5,318
5, 064
5, 603
5, 670
4,747

1, 510
1, 564
1, 628
1,848
1, 965
1, 620.

3,201 1,009 . 9,770
206
3, 548
9,761
376
3, 060.
9,017
264
3, 49*2
9,147
"191
3,514
10, 651
327
2, 800
9,616

7,949
8,191
8,963
8,843
11, 251
10, 453:

3,780
2,257
2, 826
3f668
. 4, 598
4, 966

667
365
366
325
296
436

1, 731
967
1,001
1, 755
2, 535
2,580

994
684
1,026
998
937
798

388
241
433
• 590
830
1,152

6,133
5,720
6,498
6, 554
5,450
5,544

2,013
1,773
1, 669
li632
1,057
1,287

3, 770
3,709
4,238
4,172
3,654
3,511

'350
9,913
178
7,977
591
9,324
. 750
10, 222
745
10, 054
746 1 10, 510

10, 97G
9,21^
10,163
11, 957
12, 20O
12, 098

Total.. 47, 935

10, 042

20, 774

10, 025

7,094

68, 027

19, 566

42, 729

115, 962

122,259

1870.
January...
February..
March
i^.pril

May
Jmie




5, 733

SECOND

85

AUDITOR.

Settling branch.
The three following tables show the work iierformed by the settling
Fbranch of this diAdsion during the year.
Claims in cases of white soldiers.
ADDITIONAL BOUNTY, ACT JULY 28, 1866.

AKREAliS 0 F " P A Y , &C., ACT JULY 22, 1861.

Number of claims.

Number of claims.
Date.
on

r-^ OT
•© O

Amount involved.

On3
r-^ to
© o

Amount involved.

rfl-S^C*

1869.
July
August.. September
•Octpl^er ..
November
December
1870.
January ..
Pebruary .
.March....
April
.
May ..
•June
..
Total.

963
931
1,215
1,513
1,252

$7.5,166 74
:78,182 68
78, 313 22
103, 742 54
125, 762 32
109,991 pi

953
1,124
1,687
1,537
1,430
3,110

1,208
807
989
1,014
1,147
982

496
387
392
478
419
384

1,704 $190, 3,40 65
127, 275 11
1,194
162,431 90
1,381
I, 492 239, 548 30
157, 362 01
1,566
132,158 33
1,366

141
68
173
92
91
112

1,212
1, 670
1,624
1,091
953
865

101, 674 32
150,843 10
138, 052 71
95, 004 57
81, 842 46
70,-782 00

1,217
1,028
2,760
5,307
3,669
3,930

1, 355
862
1,137
1,070
837
804

521
317
568
533
328
112

178, 516 77
144, 312 33
148, 567 65
178, 639 02
126, 965 43
135, 431 60

12, 785 1,391

14,176

1,749
1,708
1,305
1, 267.
1,592
1,150

789
820
833
i; 099
1,340
1,.166

98
143
98
116
173

199
32
.49
55
45
133

1,071
1, 602
1, 451
999
862
753

9,284

12, 272 4,935

1, 209, 357 67 27, 752

17,207 1, 921, 549 10

Cilaims in cases of colored soldiers, including both arrears of pay and bounties.
Number of claims.
A m p u n t inyolyed.

D.ate.
rfl.Sc*^
(>'fl o

?3

1869.

•July
August
September
-October
November
December
^January
Pebruaxy
March
April
^^Y
"June
Tot.al

---.---

:

570
417
384
308
504

800
187
469
549
456
400

245
180
233
210
.14,6
181

482
521
577
500
471
492

230
545
576
549
482

$140,881 49
31, 452 is
82, 574 42
88,604 74
80, 352 60
70,562 84

555
550
664.
601
501
564

84, 905 08
81, 708 21
111, 362 54
88,004 69
82, 9 0 37
.6
86, 554 47

1870.
.,,

-




4,366

;5, 904

73
29
87
101
30
.72
.781

1, 029, 869 .54

86

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Claims in cases of coloi'ed soldiers, ^-c.—Continuecl.
SUMMARY.
N u m b e r of c l a i m s .

1

Date.

8
©

-2
o

©

«

4i
© .
'~*-fl

<30

A m o u n t involved.

'fl

ri
•

U

^
%
<

0 ®

•"a^
U

©

•

^S

^1

' ^

OT

fli

5? *
^ o o
f4

^

1869.
3 690
3 402
3, 409
3,188
3,330
4,764

•.

2 7.97
1 814
2 291
2,662
2,943
2,548

662
573
566
621
685
552

3
2
2
3
3
3

459
387
857
283
628
100

$406, 388
236, 909
323, 319
: 431, 895
363, 476
312, 712

1,661
1, 240 ,
3,042
5,572
3,860
4,244

July
August
September
October
November
December

2,908
2,985
3,165
2,569
2,170
2,109

735
414
828
726
449
296

3,643
3,399
3,993
3,295
2,619
2,405

365, 096
376, 863
397, 982
361, 648
291, 714
292, 768

30, 961

7,107

38, 068

88
97
54
58
93
18

7,326.
4,50a
4,654
5,066
5,731
6,240

17
64
90
19
26 i
07

6,442.
5, 800
7, 5736, 5685,9.50
5, 839

1870.
January
Pebruary
M a r c h '.
April
May
Juue

41, 402

Total

4,160, 776 31

71,689

Consolidated statenient showing the operations of the entire division for the fiscal year ending
• June 20, 1870.
•
N u m b e r of claims.
Date.
E e c e i v e d . Allowed.
1869.
Jnly
August
September . . .
October
'..
November
December —
1870.
January
Pebruary
March
April
May
June:
Total

Eejected,

AVliole
No. disposed of.

A m o u n t involved.

No. of let- No. of cert e r s writtificatesten.
issued.

3,690
3,402
3, 409
3,188
3, 330
4,764

2,797
1, 814
2, 291
2,662
2, 943
2, 548

2,249
1,367
1,609
1, 604
1, 797
1,994

5, 046
3,181
3, 900
4,266
4,740
4,542

S406, 388
236, 909
323, 319
431, 895
363, 476
312, 712

88
97
54
58
93
18

15,275
12, 691
13, 617
13, 909
16, 982
16, 693

3,1003,010
2,736
4, 042.
3,039
3,445

1,661
1,240
3,042
5,572
3, 860
4, 244

2,908
2,985
3,165
2, 569
2,170
2,109

2,079
1,276
2,445
2,474
2,131
1,840

4,987
4,261
5, 610
5,043
4,301
3, 949

365, 096
376, 863
397, 982
361,648
291, 714
292, 768

17
64
90
19
26
07

17, 418'
15, 015
17, 736
18, 525
18, 150
17, 937

3, 049
2,661
3, 351
3,160
2, 7082,153

41, 402

30, 961

22, 865

4,160, 776 31

193, 948

53, 826

36,454

In addition to the above there have been made in this division
twelve settlements on account of fines, forfeitures, stoppages, &c., against
soldiers of the regular Army, embracing $16,945 94, paid to the treasurer of the Soldiers' Home, in accordance with the act of Congress of
March 3, 1859, making the total number of settlements in this division
30,973, and the total disbursements $4,177,722 25.
Number of claims uncier act of July 28, 1866, (wliite,) on hand June 30, 1869... 18, 363^
Number of claims for arrears of pay and original bounty (white) on hand June
30, 1869...•.
29,650
Number of colored claims on hand June 30,1869
18,173
Total number of claims on hand June 30, 1869

66,186

ISTumber of claims under act of July 28,1866, (white,) on hand June 30, 1870.. IQ, 040
Number of claims for arrears of pay ancl bounty (white) on hand June 30, 1870. 29,835
Number of colored claims on hand June 30, 1870
13,887
Total number of claims on hand June 30, 1870



53,762

87

SECOND AUDITOR.

The following statement shows the condition of the claims on hand at
the close of the year:
Number of claims suspended, awaiting evidence to be filed by claimants or their
attorneys
45,871
Number of claims under the decision of the Supreme Court iu the case of United
States, appellants, vs. Hosmer, awaiting further action of Congress
2,253
Number of claims ready for settlement
3,220
Number of claims unexamined June 30, 1870
2,418
Total

'....,:

53,762

P R O P E R T Y DIVISION.

The following statement shows the condition of business in this division at the commencement of the year, its jirogress during the year,
and its condition at the end of the year :
Number of property returns of officers on hand June 30, 1869
Number of property returns of officers received during the year

88,827
18,637

Total

107,464

Number of property returns of officers examined during the year

43,.689

Number of property returns of officers on hand June 30, 1870

63,775

Number of certificates of non-indebtedness issued to.officers.

696

Amount stopped from the pay of officers for property not accounted for
Number of letters written during the year
Number of letters recorded
:

$2, 061 90

.'

18,992
10,891

DIVISION OP INQUIRIES AND R E P L I E S .

The work performed in the division of inquiries and replies during
the year ending June 30, 1870, is as follows:
Number of inquiries on hand unanswered June 30, 1869
Officers making inquiry.

,

3,495

Number Number
received. answered.

Adjutant Greneral
'...
Paymaster General
0 Quartermaster General
Coraraissary General of Subsistence.
Third Auditor
Pourth Auditor
'
Commissioner of Pensions
Other sources
Total.

Inquiries on hand unanswered June 30, 1870
Corrections of records made by request of the Acljutant General
Rolls and vouchers copied for Adjutant General and Paymaster General.
Rolls copied for preservation in this office
Number of letters written

.4, 998
815
39
• 103
1,023
39
2,588
4,104

8,038
849
39
102
1,002
40
2,666
3,699

13, 709

16, 435

769
1,368
1,704
33
3,762

While the aboA^e figures exhibit a summary of the work of this division, they fail to convey an adequate idea of the research and labor involved in the preparation of tlie proper replies to inquiries, as is shoAvn
by the fact that sometimes a single case requires reference to as many
as one hundred jiaymasters' accounts, and a reply frequently covers
from twenty to thirty pages of foolscap.



88

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
DIVISION FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF FRAUDS.

During the year 3,044 cases have been under examination and investigation in this division. Briefs haA^ebeen prepared in 493 cases; 490
cases have been finally disposed of^ 126 of which were rejected; 112 cases
have been prepared for suit and prosecution through the A^arious United
States courts.
The amounts recovered by suit and otherwise are as follows:
Money recovered by draft, certificate of deposit, and current funds, credited
to the proper appropriations through the Treasurer's and Paymaster General's offices
1'...:
:. $8,930 04
Money recovered and turned over to Paymasters J. L. Hodge and E. H.
Brooke, to be credited to the proper appropriations
4, 568 63
Amount recovered and paid directly to claimants through United States
courts
,
3,206 91
Amount unlawfully withheld by agents, secured to claimants by i'nterposit i o n o f this office..
....1, 940 51
Amount recovered as fines aud costs of prosecution
597 91
Amount of Treasury certificates issued i n fraudulent cases, recovered before payment
„
^
1, 337 59
Amount of paymasters' checks issued in fraudulent cases, recovered before
payment
200 00
Amount of charges raised against paymasters on account of payments upon
forged receipts
,
100 00
Amount secured by offset
93 46
Ainount secured by recovery of Treasury certificates before payment, and
deductions made therefrom on account of overpayments
450 00
Payment stopped on certificates, involving the amount of
885 23
Total......
22,310 28
In addition to the above there has been secured by bond, payable to the
United States in case certain money drawn upon forged receipts and
powers of attorney is not paid over to the rightful claimants
1,700 00
Total amount secured

.

24,010 28

There are n A under examination and investigation 3,370 cases, as
oV
foUows:
Frauduleiit aind contested claims in cases of white soldiers, in Avhich settlements
had been rnade prior to notice of fraud and receipt of adverse claims
984
Fraudulent and contested unsettled clainis in cases of white soldiers
265
Fraudulent and contested claims in cases of colored soldiers, in which settlements had been made prior to notice of fraud and receipt of adverse claims..
'438 ^
Unsettled claims of widows of colored soldiers, involving fraud i n t h e marriage •
'evidence...
---.----289
tlnsettlecl contested claims of widows of colored soldiers
'.
^246
supposed fraudulent unsettled claims filed from Shelby County, Tennessee, in
cases of colored soldiers
1,102
Miscellaneous claims believed to involve fraud
46
Total
Number of claims on hand June 30, 1869
Number of claims received during the year

3,370
2,972
888
.3,860
490

Number of claims finally disposed of during the year
Number of claims on hand June 30, 1870
Number of letters written.




^...

3,370
4, 851

SECOND AUDITOR.

89

DIVISION IN CHARGE OF ARCHIVES.
During the year it has been found necessary to set apart two additional rooms for the temporary deposit of accounts until taken up for
settlement,making the whole numberof rooms noAvoccupied by this division twenty-four.
The following is a statement of the work i3erformed by this diAdsion:
Number of accounts filed in rooms of tem]3orary deposit, awaiting settlement3,685.
Number of accounts temporarily absent from the files, and upon desks of clerks
for settlement.
251
Number of confirmed settlements received from the Second Comptroller, verified, briefed, and transferred to permanent files :
Paymasters'
199
Indian
657 •
Miscellaneous
3,198
4, 054
Number of accounts verified, arranged, and
filed
689
Number of accounte reexamined, rearranged, boarded, and
filed
7,631
Number of accounts withdrawn and returned to
files
6,705
Number of vouchers withdrawn and returned to accounts
75,908
Number of duplicate vouchers examined and attached to originals..
63,756
Number of abstracts of accounts put in book form
1,327
Number of mutilated rolls repaired with tracing muslin
,
. . . . . . . . . 38,958

In addition to the above there has been much work of a general character performed by this division, involved in the care and distribution
of the blank forms used throughout the office, assisting clerks in obtaining needed pa;pers from the files, registering all new accounts received,
and keeping the books -containing the records of payments made to the
A.rmy.
Number of letters written

-^

,

729

REGISTRY DIVISION.

This division Avas organized in October, 1869. Its duties are to keep
a record of the claims, accoimts, A^ouchers, letters, &c., received in the
office; to brief the same, and distribute them to the various divisions to
which they pertain; to record and index letters sent from the office.; to
register licenses of agents; to examine, keep accoimt of and mail all pay,
bounty, and miscellaneous certificates issued; to keep a recor<i of and
forward all matter referred to other of&ces; to attend to miscellaineous
correspondence, &c. These duties were prcAdously discharged in various
parts of the.ofiSce, but gathering them under the charge of asingle diAa. sion has been found very advantageous.
The following is a statement of the work xierformed in th.is division
since its ^organization :
Number of letters received
Number of letters written
Number of letters recorded.
Number of letters referred to other Bureaus
....
Nuraber of dead letters received and registered
r - -.
Number of licenses received and registered
Nuinber of claims received, briefed, and registered
Number of misceljaneous accounts received from other offices and distributed.
Number of miscellaneous vouchers received, briefed, and registered.Number of pay.and bounty certificates examined, registered, and mailed
Number of pay and bounty certificates examined, registered, brieifed, and forwarded to Paymaster General in accordance with joint resolution of April 10,
1869....
:
Number of miscellaneous certificates examined, registered, and mailed

56,663
57,;756
78„ 863
1,158
2!,'648
1,699
41,009
2,248
.28,524
22,416
14,058
5,192

For convenience of reference, I annex the folloAving consolidated statement showing the Awious classes of accoimts settled in the office, the



90

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

number of each class on hand at the beginning of the year, the number
received and disposed of during the year, and the number on hand at
the end of the year; also the amount involved in settlements:
> o

.SS

Description of accounts.

a.a
Paymasters'
Indian agents'
Indian agents', (property)
Indian claims
Ordnance, medical, and miscellaneous
Bounty, arrears of pay, &c
Regular recruitin.^
Volunteer recruiting
Claims for return of local bounty.
Ordnance and Quartermaster's Department, (property)
Soldiers' Home
National Asylum
Total.

3,673
279
349

689
626
392
635

1, 083
537
213
635

3; 279 1142,107, 329 15
1, 726, 743 45
368
528
1, 307, 083 96

12, 842

3, 571,107 13
4,160, 776 31
155, 573 81
2, 288, 332 67
5,157 16

1, 716
193,948

937
66,186
977
144
215

1,394
41, 402
487
95
57

1,708
53, 826
809
137
53

623
53, 762
655
102
219

88, 827

18, 637
17
19

43, 689
17
19

63, 775

64, 450

102, 726

1.23,311

161, 587

1^
984

47G
18, 992

91, 329 17
1, 700, 346 71
157,113, 779 52

Besides the number of letters stated in the above table, there have been
•written 134,598 relating to the miscellaneous business of the office, makin'g
a total of
:
„
Number of claims, &c., received, briefed, and registered
Number of licenses of claim agents received and recorded
Number of letters coi:)ied and indexed
Average number of clerks ^employed during the year

• 228,958

363,556
173,487
2,234
99,864
300

In addition to the foregoing, various statements and reports have beeii
prepared and transmitted from the office, as follows:
Annual report to the Secretary of the Treasury of the transactions of
the office during the fiscal year.'
Annual statement of the recruiting fund, iirepared for the Adjutant
General of the Army.
Annual statement of the contingencies of the Ai'my, x^iepaxed in
duplicate for the Secretary of War.
Annual report of balances on the books of this office remaining unaccounted for more than one year, transmitted to the First Comptroller.
„ Annual report of balances on the books of this office remaining unaccounted for more than three years, transmitted to the First Comptroller.
Annual statement of the clerks and other persons employed in this
ofiace dming the year 1869, or any part thereof, showing the amount
paid to each on account of salary, Avith place of residence, &c., in pursuance of the eleventh section of the act of 26th August, 1842, and
resolution of the House of Eepresentatives of January 13,1846, transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury.
Monthly tabular statement showing the amount of business transacted in the office during the month, and the number of accounts remaining unsettled at the close of the month, transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury.
Monthly report of absence from duties of employes in this office, with
reasons therefor, transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury.
Pay-rolls, upon which payment Avas made to the employes of this
office, prepared semi-monthly, in duplicate.
There has been no new class of claims presented during the year, but
that for bounty under the decision of the Supreme Court of March 14,



SECOND AUDITOR.

91

1870, in favor of soldiers Avho enlisted for three years under the call of
the President of May 3, 1861, for 42,034 volunteers, and who were discharged for disability other than Avounds before serAing two years. Of
this class 2,253 claims haA^e been presented, which are suspended for
congressional action.
By General Order No. 15, of the War Department, of May 4, .1861,
the volunteers called for as above were to be organized into forty
regiments, and each non-commissioned officer and private was promised a bounty of $100 when discharged. As the act of July 22, 1861,
was manifestly intended to apply to all Avho had enlisted, as well as
to those who might thereafter enlist under it, and made it a condition for the payment of bounty to a discharged soldier that " h e
shall have served for a period of two years," no distinction was made
by the accounting officers in the denial of bounty to such as had not
served two years, between those who enlisted prior and those Avho
.enlisted subsequently to thepassage of the law. The Supreme Court,
however, decided that inasmuch as Congress, by the resolution of
August 6, 1861, legalized the proclamation of the President of May
3, 1861, and the orders and acts done under it, the promise of bounty
became a p a r t of the contract of enlistment of the troops then called
for, notwithstanding the terms of the act of July 22, 1861. While the
proclamation of the President and General Orders Nos. 15 and 25 only
contemxDlated the raising of forty regiments, it api)ears that eighty-tivo
regiments were organized and accepted 'jirior to July 22; ami as the
Adjutant General is unable to designate the forty regiments referred to,
the accounting officers Avill not be able to settle any of this class of
claiins until after Congress, by legislation, shall have placed all volunteers enlisting, for three years, prior to July 22,1861, and who were discharged before serving two years, upon the same footing as to bounty.
Many complaints liaA^e been received from claimants in Europe of the
unfaithfulness and extortion of their agents, both at home and in this
country; and I have been led to the conclusion that it w^ould be for the
interest of all foreign claimants and of the Government if all claims
for arrears of pay, bounty, &c., were required by law to be presented
through the United States consuls, and that payment be made through
the same channels. By this method the Government would secure itself
more efiectually against imposition by fraudulent claimants, and at the
same time make sure that its obligations are properly discharged.
Those, claims are generally small, the claimants poor and ignorant of
our laws, and easily imposed upon by persons who are designing and
unscrupulous. I respectfully commend the subject to the consideration
of Congress.
During the past year some changes have been made for the better in
the organization of the office, and the work in all its departments is
progressing in a satisfactory manner. It affords ine great pleasure to
speak of the interest manifested in its business by all the gentlemen
employed, and I commend their general ability, industry, and faithfulness.
For the purpose of doing them an act of justice, and at the same time
to furnish a reply to inquiries frequently made in relation to the character and amount of Avork done in this office, the expenses of the war,.&c.,
I have prepared the folloAving tables.
The first is a condensed statement of all the settlements of money
accoimts and claims from March 4, 1817, when the office was organized^
until June 30, 1861, a period of forty-four years. This time is divided



92

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

into t V periods, so as to show at a glance the amount passed u]ion prior
AO
and subs.equent to the Mexican war.
Prior to the time when I assumed charge of the office the accounts
were not so kept as to leave a record of all the Avork done, and it is
therefore not possible to give a statement beyond that of the money
settlements.
The second table is a condensed statement of the number and amount
of money settlements by the difierent divisions of the office, the number
of property accounts adjusted, the number of claims rejected, the number of examinations and certificates to the Paymaster General and Com-.
missioner of Pensions, and other incidental work performed in each y^ar
during the past nine years:
Muonber of accounts settled from March 4, 1817, to June 30,1861.

® CO

Ordnance, medical, and miscellaneous.
Kecraiting and disbursing oflpLce^rS:
Arrears of pay, &o
V.. 1...
Paymasters
Indian agents
To.tal.




13,232
6, 695
12, 880 6,097
6,283 21, 361
1,427
1,759
3, 254 5,562
37,40.8

41,142

'Total.

19, 927
18,9.77
27,644
3,186
8,-816
78,:^

Statement of accounts settled and amounts involved from June 30, 1861, to June 30, 1870.

Paymasters' accounts.

O r d n a u c e , medical, a n d
miscellaneous.

I n d i a n a g e n t s ' accounts.

B o u n t y , a r r e a r s of
p a y , &.C.

Recruiting- a n d d i s b u r s i n g officers' a c c o u n t s .

Total.

F o r tJie y e a r e n d i n g No.
June
June
Jnne
June
June
June
June
Juue
June
.

30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30
30,

1362 .
1863
1864
1865 .
186G
1867
1863
1869
1870

Amount.

iNTo.

Amount.

IS^o.

Amount.

Aniount.

1^0.

JS^O.

Total

4,017
$4,181,276 33
47, 875, 231 36 11, 802
88, 944, 415 39 15, 988
90, 094, 847 46 22, 059
110. 209, 718 62 7, 228
3, 206
183, 041, 476 09
146, 305, 528 14 1,897
183, 052, 989 40 1,900
1, 708
141, 438, 680 99

$29,128, 526 30
38, 847, 899 20
55, 539, 537 64
42, 647, 077 68
26, 9U2, 784 54
23, 050,181 18
20, 484. 802 13
8, 598, 706 04
3, 571,107 13

616
.590
501
866
448
821
. 962
1,169
1,172

$3, 335, 885 23
2, 099, 257 87
2, 242,154 74
3, 231,449 00
2, 881, 256 33
4, 273, 208 91
5,301,722 89
4, 715, 039 43
3, 033, 827 41

3,328
19,191
80;756
84-, 517
78, 335
59,121
203, 980
85, 279
53, 827

$249,180 64
2, 443, 293 39
10; 970, 528 91
14, 047, 599 35
16,189, 24-7 17
10, 638, 782 78
19, 598, 445 88
8, 355, 618 22
4,160, 776 31

1,504
1, 356
1,880
2,594
4,317
3, 765
2,416
1,478
946

8,066

.'...

141
645
773
738
981
1,451
1, 038
1,216
1,083

995,144,163 84

69, 895

248, 770, 621 84

7,145

31,113, 801 81 668,334

86, 653, 472 65

20, 256

Aniount.

No.

^217, 088 97
398, 785 94
2, 220, 744 15
8,019, 331 56
21, 353,127 68
19, 891, 437 .59
5, 262,140 03
2, 841, 079 24
2, 443, 906 48

Amount.

9,606
33, 584
99, 898
110, 774
91, 309
68, 364
210, 293
91,132
58, 736

$37, 111, 957 47
91,664 467 76
159, 917, 380 83
158, 040, 305 05
177, 536,134 34
240, 895, 086 55
196, 952, 639 67
207, 563, 432 39
154, 648, 298 32

62, 647, 642 24 773,696 1,424,329,702 38

Ul

O
O

Statement of property accounts and miscellaneous worlc'performed in connection with the settlement of above accounts.
JSTO. of

F o r t b e y e a r ending—

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,

1862.
1863
1864.
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870

Total .. -




JSTO. of p r o p e r t y ac-

counts adjusted.

5,
7,
29,
163,
176,
141,
129,
91,
43,

021
368
745
429
263
698
463
322
689

787, 998

N o . of
bounty
claims rejected.

INTO. of l e t t e r s w r i t ten.
-^

822
1,470
2,374
2,210
19, 099
27, 236
41, 217
26,526
22, 866

14, 584
40, 651
108, 373
126, 569
370, 020
478,'477
603,698
405, 745
363, 556

143, 820

2, 511, 673

ISTo. of l e t t e r s , &.c.,
r e c e i ved,briefed,
and registered.

37,
134,
254,
170,
245,
486,
220,
171,
173,

473
816
690
340
903
305
209
931
487

1, 895,154

iTo.of r e q u i s i t i o n s
registered a n d

posted.

certificates

from rolls furnished Paymaster
Genei-al's
a n d o t h e r offices.

5, 589
5,144
5,410
5,995
2,- 698
2,401
1, 868
2, 709
2, 842

38, 904
74,'041
134, 328
320, 408
125, 315
16, 435

34, 656

O

709, 431

05

:94

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

From the establishment of the office in 1817 to the close of the fiscal
year ending Jiine 30, 1847, the number of money accounts settled was
37,408. The average number of clerks employed Avas 15, making a
yearly average of 83 accounts settled by each clerk.
During the fourteen years from June 30, 1847, to June 30, 1861, the
number of money accounts and claims settled was 41,142. The average
number of clerks employed Avas 26, and the average number of settlements by each was 113 for each year.
From the 30th of June, 1861, to the close of the last fiscal year, a
period of nine years, the number of cash accounts allowed and settled
Avas 773,696. To this number I add 143,820 rejected, because every
claim rejected usually involves as much labor and care in the examination as a claim that is allowed and paid, making an aggregate of 917,516.
During this period fhe average number of clerks employed was 286, and
the average number of settlements per clerk was 356 for each year.
Although the records of the office afi'ord no means for definitely determining the number of property accounts settled prior to 1861, a careful
examination, based u]ion such data as can be found, indicates that t h e .
ratio of increase in the number of settlements since the commencement
of the late war is about double Avhat it is in the cash accounts. Assuming this to be the fact, the number of property accounts settled annually
by each clerk, from 1817 to June 30, 1847, was 39, and from 1847 to
1861, 58, while during the last nine years the average has been 306.
The total average of both classes of settlements per man for the three
periods named Avould be: From March 4, 1817, to June 30, 1847, 122;
from June 30, 1847, to June 30,1861, 171 j from June 30, 1861, to June
30, 1870, 662.
It will be found that, including the rejected claims, nearly ttvelve times
as many money accounts and claims have been settled in nine years as
Avere settled in the preceding/or^i/-/oitr; and when it is remembered that
during that long period the military claims were mainly those of the regular Army, settled by rolls and returns prepared by officers thoroughly
educated in their duties, and that but few changes Avere made in ,the
pay, allowances, and emoluments of men and officers, Avhile during the
recent war the Army consisted chiefly of A^olunteers, that the rolls and
returns were necessarily defective, and that the rates of compensation
and the laws relating to bounties were frequently changed, it can easily
be understood that many difficulties have attended the settlement of
claims during the last nine years which were entirely unknown during
the former period, and which imposed additional labor in their iuA^estigation and demanded a larger degree of vigilance, faithfulness, and care.
As very full memoranda accompany the tables, showing the condition
of the business in charge of the several divisions of the office, I have
not deemed it necessary to refer more particulaxly to either of them.
I am, sir, very respectfully,
E. B. FRENCH,
Auditor,
Hon.

G E O R G E S. BOUTAVELL,




Secretary of tlie Treasury, •

REPORT OF THE THIRD AUDITOR.







REPORT
Oii'

THE -THIRD AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Third Auditgr^s Office, October 22, 1870.
SIR : In compliance with instructions from your office, and the reqairements of law, I have the honor to transmit herewith the folloAving report
of the business operations of this ofiice for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1870, and also for the first quarter of the fiscal year ending June 30^
1871.
BOOK-KEEPERS^ DIYISION.

The duties dcA^olving upon this division are, in general, to keep the
appropiiation and money accounts of the office.
Three sets of double-entry books are kept. Into the first are posted
the accounts of disbursing officers and agents of the Quartermaster^s
and Engineer Departments of the Army, and the accounts of the various
loyal States for expenses incurred during the late rebellion; the second
contains the accounts of the Subsistence Department, Bureau of Eefugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, and pension agents of the Government; the third set relates to other appropriations made by Congress
coming under the supervision of the Third Auditor.
^ In addition to the foregoing, debit and credit accounts are kept as
folloAvs: Avith the Second Comptroller,'of all settlements referred to him
for revision; and with the War and Interior Departments, of all reporti^
forwarded to them for requisitions. From the books of this divisioB
are furnished the charges upon which are based the settlements of
money accounts of the various disbursing officers of the Government.
Here also is kept a complete record and fair copy of all requisitions
passing through the office.
.
y
The annexed statement of the financial oi)erations of the office during
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870, also for the first quarter of the
current fiscal year, exhibits the amounts drawn on specific appropriations
except those under direction of the Chief Engineer of the Army, which
are aggregated and entered under the general heading, ^ Engineer De^
partment." I t also shows the repayments into the treasury for the
same period.
The average number of clerks engaged in this division during the
period embraced in this report has been eight, and that number noAv
constitutes the active force of the division.
The number of requisitions draAvn on the Secretary of the Treasury
by the Secretaries of War and Interior for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1870, is 3,773, amounting to $91,107,151 58, as follows:
. On account of appropriations for Quartermaster's Department
Incidental expenses
^
Barracks and quarters
7 P
' . '
•



$13,136,534 61
5,629,227 71
4,440,110 6^

M8

KE:PO.ET ON T H E FINANCES„

.ktmj- transportation
$16,127, 410 09
Horses for cavalry and artillery
4, 060, 814 89
Officers' transportation
505,752 20
Heating and cooking stoves
19, 447 39
Clothing, of tbe Army
5,341,532 80
Signal service
5,199 43
Telegraph for military purposes
:294,556 35
National ceoieteries
-. 433,955 54
Supplying, &c., prisoners of war
22, 570 16
Collecting, drilling, &,c., volunteers
21 94
Gunboats o.n western rivers
'
8,595 90
.Maintenance of stcani-rams
100 00
Pay and supplies of 100-day volunteers
1, 047 54
Minute men, Pennsvlvania, Maryland, Ohio, Indiana, and Kentuckv-2,821 70
Purchase of clocks'^
:
"- - 38 00
Reimbursing Indiana, &.c
477,276 07
Refunding expenses, &c., to the States
•
869, 632 21
Capture of Jefferson Davis
,
80,783 12
Pay AA^^ashington and Oregon volunteers, 1855-'6
'
4, 876 65
Services AVavShington and Oregon. volunteerSj 1855-*6
39, 322 18
Act for the relief of Otis N. Cutler
:
50, 000 00
Repairs of barracks, quarters, and hospitals at forts not occupied
9 60
Twenty per cent, extra compensation
650 54
Horses and other property lost in the military service, act March 3,
1849
".
232, 797 84
Subsistence of the Army
4, 856, 651 38
Pensions, invalid
10,029,760 80
Pensions, widows and others
18,254,282 73
Support of Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands
1, 458,703 91
Commutation of rations to prisoners of war in rebel States
19,000 00
Relief of destitute i)eople in the District of Columbia
22,500 00^
Unclaimed pensions
'.
161 86
Payment of tax on salaries; act March 2, 1867
3 33
.E.ngineer Department
4, 681, 002 42
91,107,151 58

Number of counter requisitions draAvn on sundry persons in fWor of
the Treasurer of the United States during the fiscal year ending June
30, 1870, is 1,505, amounting to $30,403,395 22, as follows:
On accouut of deposits
Second Auditor's drafts, (transfers)...:
Third Auditor's drafts, (transfers)
Fifth Auditor's drafts, (transfers)
• Commissioner of Customs' drafts, (transfers)
Interior Department's drafts, (transfers)
Navy Department's drafts, (transfers)
^Canceled requisitions

-

$1,544,818 26
1,230, 413 92
27,545,223 41
7. 50
242 50
20,766 70
1, 600 00
60, 322 93
30,403,395 22

NOTE.—The amount entered under the geueral head of-^Engineer Department" embraces all the moueys disbursed under the"" direction of the Chief Engineer of the Army,
and covers drafts on a.bout one hundred and seventy-live specific appropriations, which,
for economy of space, are here classed under the above general heading.




99

THIRD AUDITOE.

1^0. of accounts
remaining on
hand June 30,
1869.

•lieport of bus-iness transacted in the Tliird Auditor^s Office, United States D'eoMiry, in the
jiscal year ending June 30, 1870.

I>e»criptioa of a m o u n t s .

o S ^

K u m b e r of a c c o u n t s set- N u m b e r of a c c o u n t s
tled in year ending
u n s e t t l e d J a n e 30,
1870.
J u n e 30, 1870.

{2^

Montlily Montlily Monthly
Monthly
A m o u n t inand
and
A m ' t involved.
and
and
volved.
quarterly.
quarterly. quarterly. quarterly.

Xotal

305
10, 690
2,850
631
220
73
372
5
234

^31,045,231 69

(>;37
88
55
36
3
14

248
668
3,263
714
271
82
368
3
254

23,141

5, 871

15, 380

70, 464, 829 74

5,898
78
863
4,115
12

381
10
118
1, 655
25

748
15
131
1,729
26

$194, 838
269, 393
52, 422
2 '945, 522
1,131,142

43
21
51
06
48

5, 531
73
850
4,041
11

10, 966

Quartermasters' . — Money..
Quartermasters'. - Property..
Commissaries' . . . . . . . M o n e y . .
Pension agents'-.
do-.-.
Engineers'
.......do....
Ref., F . and A . .L
-do..-.
Ref, F . and A. L. P r o p e r t y . . .
vSignal Officers'-..
Money.S i g n a l Officers'
. .Property..

151
20, 858
1,299

2,189

2,649

4, 593, 318 69

10,506

6, 982, 931
25, 596, 876
5,412,543
1, 419, 821
•

13
39
24
41

7, 425 88

94
10, 836
1, 712
720
139
64
32
1
34

%1, 219, 697 66

13, 632

51,862,134 Ci

1, P20, 838
36, 858, 535
3, 980, 095
1, 879, 071

97
73
18
47

3, 895 60

Clainis ff )r—
H o r s e s lost
steamboats destroved
Oi'egon w a r . . .
Miscellaneous
Stfite w a r
-

"

Tot^l

QUARTERMASTERS'

^965,019
. 740, 984
83, 666
2,853,027
1, 695, 025

32
34
36
76
43

6, 337, 723 21

DIYISION.

Tlie accounts of quartermasters cover a wide and varied range of disbursement and property accountability, embracing disbursements for barracks, quarters, hospitals, store-liouse§, offices, stables, storage and
transportation of all army supplies, army clothing, camii and garrison
equipage, the iiurchase of cavalry knd artillery horses, fuel, forage,
straw material for bedding, stationery, hired men, per diem to extra
duty men, postage, expenses of courts-martial, of the pursuit and apprehension of deserters, of the burial of officers and soldiers, of hired
escorts, of exiiresses, interpreters, spies and guides, of veterinary surgeons
and medicines for horses, of supplying posts with water, and generally
the proper and authorized expenses for the movements and operations
of an arm3^ not expressly assigned to any other department. The ^ re^
turns" are an account of the disposition made of all property paid for
by the Quartermaster's Department, (except clothing, camp and garrison equipage, wliich are accounted for to the Second Auditor.)
The tabular statement herewith exhibits in a condensed form the
result of the labors of the force employed in this division.
Unsettled money accounts reinaiuing on hand June 30, 1869, 151
involving
Eeceived during the year ending June 30, 1870, 248, involving
,
Total, 399, involving
Adjusted and reported to the Second jOomptroUer for revision, 305, involving
Leaving on hand unsettled June 30, 1870, 94, involving



$30,110, 017 02
8,154,912 33
38,264,929 35
31, 045,231 69
7,219,697 Q^

100

E E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

Accounts adjusted during the year as above stated^ 305, involving
$31,045,231 69
To which add the number of supplemental settlements made during
t h e y e a r , 1,052, involving
16,282,543 91
Making the aggregate number of money settlements during the year,
lj357, involving
•
Unsettled property returns on hand June 30, 1869
Property returns received durhig the year

47,327,775 6^

:

Total number to be examined
y.
Property returns examined during the year

20, 858
668
,

21,526
10,690

. Leaving on hand unsettled June 30, 1870

10,836

Property returns settled during the year as above stated
To whi-ch add the number of suxiplemental settlements of property returns

10,690
2,509

•Making the aggregate number of property settlements

13,280

Signal accounts remaining on hand June 30, 1869, 3, involviug
Signal accounts received during the year, 3, involving
Total number of signal accounts, 6, involving

$4,664 09
6,657 39
11, 321 48

All of which have been adjusted.
Signal returns on hand June 30, 1869'.
Signal returns received duriug the year
Maldng a total number to be settled
Total number settled
Leaving on hand unsettled June 30,1870




:..

14
254
268
234
34

REOAPITULATIOK.
Supplemental settlements.

Money accounts.
No.
On h a n d p e r l a s t r e p o r t , J u n e 30,1869
R e c e i v e d d u r i n g t h e y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30,
1870
Total
Repoi'ted d u r i n g t h e y e a r
R e m a i n i n g u n s e t t l e d J u n e 30 1870

Total




Amount
involved.

151

^30,110, 017 02

Property
returns.
Property.

Money,

Amount
involved.

Total.

Signal accounts.
Property.
14

20, 858

Amount
involved.

Money.
3

.

ITo..

Amount
involved.

$4, 664 09

21, 026

$30,114, 681 11
24, 444,113 63

254

3

6, 657 39

4, 795

268

6

11, 321 48

25, 821

54,^558, 794 74

16, 282, 543 91

234
S4

6

11, 321 48

14, 857
10, 964

47, 339, 097 08
7,219,697 66

16, 282, 543 91

268

6

11, 321 -48

25, 821

54, 558, 794 74

248

8,154, 912 33

668

2, 570

1,052

1)16,282,543 91

399

38, 264, 929 35

21, 526

2,570

1,052

16, 282, 543 91

305
94 •

31, 045, 231 69
7, 219, 697 66

10, 690
10, 836

2,570

1,052

399

38, 264, 929 35

21, 526

2,570

1,052

•

•

H-l

Cl
H
O

102

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

In obtaining this result, a vast amount of labor was required, as will
appear from the following items, viz :
Number
Number
Numher
Number
Number

of vouchers examined during the y e a r . . . '
of pages of differences and copy of same written
of letters written
of calls for charges against officers
of pages of abstracts furnished

:'.

1,682,107
69,144'
41,049'
10,227
9,600*

Besides a large amount of miscellaneous work connected with the re-^
ceiving, registering,filing,withdrawing,and forwardingof accounts,and
preparing, registering, and filing of personal charges, transcribing registers, &c., which cannot well be exhibited in the tabular report. Through
the section having in charge the collection of balances due the United
States, 246 officers have been notified of the condition of their accounts^
and in 144 cases the sureties of bonded officers have been notified when
the officer himself neglected to settle his accounts: 4 cases have been
reported to the Solicitor of the Treasury for suit; 330 officers, with an
aggregate indebtedness against them of $30,969,768 52, have not yet
taken the necessary steps to obtain a settlement of their accounts.
I t will be observed tha,t the number of accounts and returns on hand
June 30, 1869, was 21,026, and tbe number remaining on hand June 30^
1870, is 10,964; showing a reduction ofthe nuinber on hand at the end
of the fiscal year of 10,062; and, judging from the number of settlements made during the year, it would be reasonable to believe that all
the accounts and returns could be settled during the incoming year.
Such, however, is not the case, asit appears that the accounts of more
than 5,000 officers, and the returns of more than 9,000 officers, are now
in the incorrect files, awaiting ^^corrections^^ and ^^explanations,'^ on
which supplemental settlements can be based; and it is ascertained
that more than 60,000 of the accounts and returns rendered during thelate rebellion are yet in the Quartermaster General's Office awaiting the
administrative scrutiny of that officer, prior to their transmission to this
office for settlement.
It is believed that quite a large number of accounts and returns will
be closed under the provisions of the act ^^to authorize the settlement of
the accounts of officers ofthe Army and iSTavy," approved June 23,1870.
By reason ofthe period which has intervened since the close of the
war, increasingly great difficulty is experienced in obtaining the present
address of those formerly officers of the army, in order to obtain the
necessary data on Avhich to base final settlements of accounts; and as
officers who have in any way become accountable for public nioney or
property cannot obtain the pay due them until a final settlement of
. their accounts has been reached, it will readily be perceived that the
interests of the xmblic service, as well as Justice to those who, in the
hour of their country's peril, rushed to the rescue, demand that all possible expedition should be used to obtain an early adjustment of all
accounts growing out of the war. It would therefore appear to be
desirable that quite as large a clerical force be employed in the adjustment of these accounts during the incoming year as has been employed
during the year just closed.
The force now employed in the quartermasters' division, is 130 clerks.
SUBSISTENCE DIVISION.

This division audits the accounts of all commissaries and acting commissaries of subsistence in the Army, whose duties are to purchase the
provisions and stores necessary for the feeding of the Army, and see to
their proper distribution. These commissaries render monthly money
accounts, with proper vouchers, for disbursements of thefundsintriist^d




THIRD

103"

AUDITOR.

to them, together with a provision return and vouchers showing the
disposition of provisions and stores purchased and received during each
month. These accounts are received monthly through the office of the
Commissary General of Subsistence, and are every six months (or
oftener, if the officer ceases to disburse) examined and audited in this
division, and the money accounts and vouchers, together with a certified statement of their condition, referred to the Second Comiitroller of
the Treasury for his decision thereon. Upon their receipt back from
the Comptroller with the statement approved, the officers are then officially notified of the result of said examinations, and are called upon
by this office to adjust or explain any omissions or errors that may have
beeii discovered. The money and provision accounts, together with all
A^ouchers and papers belonging thereto, are, after exaniination, placed
in the settled files of this division for future reference, and remain permanently in the custody of this office.
There have been received and registered during the year 3,263 money
accounts of officers disbursing in the Subsistence Department, involving
the expenditure of $7,497,015 75. During the same period, 2,850 accounts (containing 49,004 vouchers) were audited and reported to the
Second Comptroller of the Treasury, involving the expenditure of
$§,982,931 13.
In connection with the above, there were received and registered
during the. year 2,799 provision returns; and within the same period
2,750 provision returns (containing 53,432 vouchers) were examined and
adjusted. The total number of vouchers contained in the accounts examined was 102,436.
During the year 828 official letters have been written, 610 pages ot
differences written and copied, and 3,289 queries received and answered.
Average nuinber of clerks engaged upon the division during the
year, 7^.
-No. of Aniount involved.
accounts.
Remaining on hand .June 30, 1869
Received during the vear ending June 30. 1870

1,299 $1, 406, 754 353, 263 7, 497, 015 75

Total
Audited and rex)orted to Second Comptroller during the year

5, 562
2, 850

8, 903, 770 10
6, 982, 931 13

Remaining unsettled June 30, 1870

2,712

1, 920, S38 ST

Provision returns on hand June 30, 1869
Provision returns received during the fiscal year
Total
„
,
Provision returns examined during the year

1,102
2,799
3,901
2,750

-.

Provision returns remaining on hand June 30, 1870

1,151

Money accounts on hand June 30, 1869
Provision returns on hand June 30, 1869

1,299
1,102

Money accounts received diuing the fiscal year
Provision returns received during the fiscal year

3,263
2,799

Total
.-•....
Money accounts audited during the fiscal year
Provision returns examined during the fiscal year

2,850
2,750

2, 401
6,062.'
8,463
5,600.

Total accoimts on hand Jnxie 30,1870.



2, 863

104

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
ENGINEER DIVISION.

This division is employed in the examination of the accounts of engineer officers of, the Army and engineer agents, who, under the direction
of the Chief Engineer of the Army, disburse moneys out of the various
appropriations fbr public works, now 175 in number, made from time to
time by Congress, and which may be classed under the following general heads, viz:
The purchase of sites and materials for, and the construction and repairs of, the various fortifications throughout theUnited States. Construction and'repairs of roads, bridges, bridge-trains, &c., for armies iii
the field. Surveys on the Atlantic and Pat?ific coasts. Purchase of
sites and materials for, and the construction of, seacoast defenses.
Examination and surveys of the northern and western lakes and rivers.
Construction and repairs of breakwaters. Eepairs and improvement
of harbors, both on the sea and lake coasts. Improvement of rivers
and purchase of snag and dredge-boats for the same. And in general
ajl appropriations of a similar nature are disbursed under the direction of the Chief Engineer, and the accounts of the disbursing officers
are examined and adjusted by this division. The average number
of clerks employed in this division for the year ending June 30, 1870,
Avas five.
The following statements show the transactions of this division since
June 30, 1869 :
ACCOUNTS RECEIVED.
Period.
Amount
involved.
Quarters. Months.
J u l y 1869
Au<^ust 1869
S e p t e m b e r 1869
O c t o b e r 1869
N o v e m b e r 1869
D e c e m b e r 1869
J a u u a r y 1870
ITebraary 1870
M a r c h 1870
A p r i l 1870
M a y 1870
J u n e 1870
.

.•

..

.

4
37
17
20
IS
16
20
15
26
15
19
22

i

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

Total

229

4
2
24
12
42

$250, 048
787, 985
199,697
440,167
325, 448
916, 406
600,646
294, 355
1, 504, 604
427, 485
471,729
856, 048

23
89
20
31
56
06
44
80
87
81
44
24

7, 074, 623 85

BUSINESS TRANSACTED.
Period.
Araount
involved.

Total credited.

Quarters. Months.
J u l y 1869
Aiio-ust 1869
Sep'ternher 1869
October 1869 .
N o v e m h e r 1869 . .
D e c e m b e r 1869
J a n u a r v 1870
E e b r u a r y 1870
M a r c h 1870
A p r i l 1870
M a y 1870
J u n e 1870
Total

:

:
•

•




. 27
20
5
29
20
11
4
19
22
9
3
6

• 18
27

U , 247,191 6 8 '
1, 290, 461 68
65,173 68
729.831 11
560, 924 88
103, 610 94
20, 977 75
826, 040 36
292, 213 32
76, 348 91
75, 488 .57
116, 548 34

175

45

5, 404, 811 22

81, 380, 605
1,266,840
120 409
759, 229
645, 491
167, 599
21, 342
819,360
429, 570
78, 858
77, 486
147, 111

00
54
00
02
04
10
76
40
08
25 75
19

5,913,903 73

THIRD

105

AUDITOR.

STATE WAR CLAIMS DIVISION.

The duties of this division embrace the settlement of all claims of the
'Several States for costs, charges, and expenses properly incurred by them
for enrolling, subsisting, clothing, supplying, arming, equipping, paying,
and transporting,its troops employed by the United States in aiding to
suppress the recent insurrection against the United States under the
various acts and resolutions of Congress relating thereto:
Sus],iended accounts.

Original accounts.
Amount.

No.
12
Ou hand Juno 30,1869
Received during the fiscal year . . . . . 25

No.

Araount.

fpl, 095, 454 06 99
1, 707, 641 22

Total
Reported duriug the fiscal year

37
26
11

No. Amount allowed.

$5, 301, 672 45

2, 803, 095 28
1,108, 069 21

On hand June 30, 1870

Special settlements ou
suspended accounts.

1, 695, 026 07 99

38

^^267, 253 39

5, 034, 419 06

CLAIMS DIVISION.

This division is charged with the examination of all claims presented
to this office except pension, back pay, and bounty land clainis of the
war of 1812, and claims by the several. States for reimbursement of expenses incurred in raising troops.
Its duties embrace the settlement of claims of a miscellaneous character arising in the various branches of service in the War Department,
growing out of the purchase or appropriation of supplies and stores for
the army, the purchase, hire, or appropriation of water-craft, railroad
stock, horses, wagons, and other mean^ of transportation, the transportation contracts of the army, the occupation of real estate for camps,
barracks, hospitals, Ibrtifications, &c., the hire of employes, mileage,
court-martial fees, traveling expenses, commutations, &c.; of claims
under the act of March 2, 1861, growing out of the Oregon and
Washington Indian war of 1855 and 1856, and other Indian war claims;
of claims of various descriptions under special acts of Congress; of any
claims not otherwise assigned by law.
The following statements show the business transacted by this division during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870, and the condition oi
its business at the commencement and at the end thereof.
1.—Miscellaneous claims.
No.
On hand July 1, 1869
R,eceived during the year
Total .
Disposed of duriug the year
On hand June 30, 1870

Amouut claimed.

4,115
1,655
.

...

* $2, 495, 580 22
t 3, 302, 969 60

5, 770
1,729

5, 798, 549 82
12, 945, 522 06

4,041

Amouut allowed.

§2,853,027 76

te 124 183 81

* This amount is the aggregate claimed in 2,935 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (1,180) not
heing stated.
t This amount is the aggregate claimed in 1,574 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (81) not
being stated.
I This amount is the aggregate claimed in 1,677 cases, the amoimts claimed in the others (52) not
heing stated.
§ This amount is the aggregate claimed in 2,832 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (1,209) not
being stated




106

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

Tl
There were 1,227 letters written relative to this class of claims during
the year.
2.—Lost vessels, ij-c, (Act March 3, 1849.)
No.

A m o u n t claimed.

On h a n d J u l y 1,1869
Received during the year

78
10

$798,801 86
211, 575 69

Total
Disjxtsed ol' d u r i n g t h e y e a r . .

88
15

1, 010, 377 55
269,393 21

On h a n d J u n e 30, 1870

73

740, 984 34

A m o u n t allowed.

$147, 515 45

There were 75 letters written dunng the year relative to this class of
clainis.
3.—Oregon and Washington Indian war claims.
No.

A m o u n t claimed.

863
118

• *$90,176 84
144,175 03

Total
D i s p o s e d of d u r i n g t h e y e a r

981
131

134,3.51 87
+ 50,685 51

On h a n d J u n e 30, 1870

850

A m o u n t allowed.

§ 83, 666, 36

On h a n d J u l y 1,1869
Received during t h e year

!.

$41,584 15

* This amount is the aggregate claimed in 441 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (422) not heing
stated.
t This amouut is the aggregate claimed in 89 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (29) not heing
stated.
X Tliis amount is the aggregate claimed in 91 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (40) not heing
stated.
§ This amount is the aggregate claimed in 439 cases, the amounts claimed iu the others (411) not heing
stated.
.

There were 240 letters written during the year relative to this class of
claims.
HORSE CLAIMS DIVISION.

The duties of this division embrace the auditing of claims, under the
act of March 3, 1849, and its amendments, of claims for compensation
fbr the loss of horses and equipage while in the inilitary service of the
United States by officers and enlisted men, and for the loss of horses,
mules, oxen, wagons, sleighs, and harness Avhile in the military service of the United States by impressment or contract.
The number of claims received and docketed during the year is 360,
in which the aggregate amount claimed is $62,903 36. The number settled and finally disposed of during the same period (including those received prior to as well as during the year) was 748, in which the aggregate amount claimed was $194,553 43, and on which the aggregate
amount allowed was $67,891 20. There have been during the year 8,169
letters written, and 2,126 received and docketed. Three thousand nine
hundred and sixty-seven claims have been examined and suspended,
and 1,017 briefs made.
The following table presents the condition of the business of this division at the commencement and close of the year, as well as its progress through the year:




THIRD

107

AUDITOR.
No.

Amount.

Claims on hand June 30 1869 .
Received during the year
•

Amount.

No.

*
.

5,898
360
21

Total
Claims allowed during the vear
Rejected on same

457

• $67, 891 20
11, 292 98

Amount claimed
Disallowed diuing the yea,r

291

6,279

1,159, 758 75

748.

.

$1, 093, 351 59
62, 903 3d
3, 503 80

194 553 43

5,531

.

965 205 32

79,184 18
115, 369 25

Deduct as finall y disposed '^f durin*^ the year
^
On hand unsettled July 1, 1870

PENSION DIVISION.

The duties devolving upon this division are keeping an account with
each army pensioner of the United States, recording the name, rate,
date of commencement, noting every increase, reduction, transfer, remarriage, death, and expiration, whether by limitation under existing
laws or on account of the disability having ceased. Also, keeping an
account with each pension agent, (of whom there are 59,) charging him
with all moneys advanced by the Government, under the several appropriations, to pay pensions 5 receive and register the accounts as sent
each month direct to this office by the agents who have disbursed the
money, and properly file them ibr settlement; examine each voucher and
enter the payment made by the agent on the roll-book opposite the pensioner's name.
The number of pensioners on the rolls June 30, 1870, is as follows:
Revolutionary, act Fehruary 2, 1848
Revolutionary, act July 29,1848
Revolutionary, act February 3,1853
War 1812, Floiicla, Mexican, ludian, and other wars
AVar of the rebellion, invalid
War of the rebellion, widows

---->

Making a total (not including children, who receive $2 per nionth)

32
30
66iy
1,286
3(5,187
107,539
195,739

Amount dratvn froyn the treastiry to pay pensioners during the year ending
June 30, 1870.
Invalids
Widows and others

"

$10, 029,760 80
18,254,282 73

Total

- .•

28,284,043 53

The following tabular statement shows the amount of business disposed of by the pension division during the year ending June 30,1870:
Numher.
A c c o u n t s on h a n d J u l y 1, 1869

6Ti

Accounts received during the year

Araount involved.
134, 811, 593 83
27, 743, 819 29
62, 555, 413 12.

Total
Accounts reported during the year
A c c o u n t s r e m a i n i n g u n s e t t l e d J u u e 30, 1870
Total




631
720

25, 596, 876 39
36, 958, 536 73
62, 555, 413 12.

108-

REPORT

ON THE- FINANCES.

The accounts on file unsettled are divided as follows:
Accounts of 1868
Accounts of 1869
Accounts of 1870

,

60
382
278

total

720

Pensions recorded, increased, changes made, including additional for children
of $2 per month
106,131
Pensions transferred
7, 313
Pension vouchers examiued
^
265,621
Payments entered on roll-books
300,106
Pages of difference aud miscellaneous copied
2,620
Letters received and registered
.'
3,089•
Letters written
i
3, 320
Table exhibiting the amount paid at the several agencies to piensioners, the accounts of which
were received during the year ending June 30, 1870.
Agency.

state.
Arkansas
Arkansas
Connecticut
CalitVnnia
•California
District of Columhia...
District of Columbia...
Delaware
India.na
Indiana
Indiana
Indiana
Illinois
Illinois
Illinois
Illinois
Iowa
Iowa
Iowa
Kan?as
Kentucky..:
Kentucky
Kentucky
Douisiana
Maine
,
Maine
Maine
Massachusetts
Massacliusetts
Maryland
Michigan
Michigan
Michigan
Missouri
Missouri
Minnesota
Minnesota
New Hampshire
New Harapshire
New Hampshire
New York
IjTew York
New Yoi'k
New York
New York
New Jersey
North Carolina
Nehraslca
Nebi-aska
New Mexico
New Mexico
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
• Oregon
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
'
.Pennsylvania

Little Rock- —
Fort Gibson...
Hartford
San Erancisco.
...do
AVashington ...
...do
AVilmington..Fort Wayne . .
Indianapolis ..
do
Madison
Chicago
Salem
Quincy
Springfield
Des Moines . . iFairfield
Marion
Topeka
Louisville
do .
Lexington
New Orleans..
Augusta
Bangor
Portland
Boston
...do
Balti Diore
Detroit
...do
Grand Rapids.
Macon City . . .
St. Louis
St.Paul
do .
Concord
Portsmouth
....do
Albany
Canandaigua
New York City.,
—do
Brookl.^ai
Trenton
Raleigh
Omaha
.--.do
Santfi Le
...do
Cincinnati
Cleveland
...do
Columhus
Oregon City
I'hiladelphla
do
...do
'..




Agent.
J. AV. Deraby
N. Clapperton
D. C. Rodman
H. C. Bennett
J. AV. Shanklin . . .
Robert Clarke
AY. T. Collins
E. D. Porter . . . . . .
Hiram Iddings
J. P. AViggins . . . .
C. W. Brouse
Mark Tilton
B. J . Sweet
J.S.Martin.
B. M. Prentiss . . . .
William Jayne
S. Goodrell
D.B. AVilson
J. B. Young
C. B. Lines
E. F . Gallagher...
Samuel McKee
A. H. Adams
F . J . Knapp
H. Boynton
Gideon Mayo
M. A. Blancliard ..
G. C. Trumbull . . .
C.A.Phelps
H. Adreon
H. Barns
A. Kaichen
T. Foote
J. T. Clements . . . .
James .Lindsay . . .
R. B. Galusha
H. C. Rogers
David Cross
•
.
J. H. Shapley.--:.
D. J. Vaughn
S. H . H . Parsons.L. M. Drury
G. M. Van Buren .
AV. H. Lawr ence..
D. W. Haynes . . . .
J. F . Rusiing
C. H. Bel vin
E. A. Allen
S. S. Caldwell
J. L. Collins
E. W. .Little
AV. E. Davis
L. Swift
S. M. Barber
J. A. Norris
Henry Warren
W. T. Forbes
A. R. Calhoun
F. F . Burmeister .

Invalid.

Widows.

^11, 701 94
1, 445 48
123, 400 27
576 15
24,
84 00
1, 521 16
191, 105 74
017
. 22, 45
146, 852 67
2, 555 94
452, 256 51
98, 217 82
365, 153 22
207, 378 88
151, 629 00
214, 800 49
78, .543 80
113, 996 15
105, 249 83
72, 984 67
2 106 54
77] 839 37
54, 676 .57
27, 169 37
134, 927 37
135, 703 46
167, 709 33
31, 293 61
505, 027 68
134, 265 54
14, 909 C6
340, 891 60
72, 800 40
67, 897 93
212, 594 55
46, 481 88
40, 017 98
1.55, 858 78
1, 619 55
36, 783 32
264, 117 62
513, 490 00
352, 947 81

S105, 063 09
14, 357 20
401, 224 14
21, 428 86
1 68
9, 6.52 31
230,135 02
41, 893 98
305, 973 49
4,511 85
998, 055 40
256, 981 16
460, 860 12
698, 590 17
276, 331 96
433, 005 91
179, 069 97
235, 247 21
219, 834 90
113, 873 61
11, 574 82
4.06,.230 28
286,167 33
37,105 45
270, 051 70
263, 056 59
301,433 12
63, 890 64
879, 708 25
217, 969 27
37, 722 70
695, 790 22
145, 986 67
270, 647 70
624, 346 27
94, 361 28
73,148 39
268, 441 22
6, 363 47
78, 720 29
515,201 18
819,664 11
7, 868 67
721, 608 90
188, 956 88
369, 605 77
101, 159 42
1, 310 61.
11, 731 37

81, 155 75
185, 406 36
7, 560 41
1, 336 06
8, 319 56
365 84
1,390 40
410, 834 33
144, 083 95
109, 602 96
251, 519 83
2, 933 79
875 43

4, 297 01
852, 611 09
280, 658 55
189,100 36
542, 942 16
"3,704 41
3, 762 00
1, .594, 652 06
130, 047 09

THIRD AUDITOR.

109

Table exhibiting the amount paid at the several agencies to pensioners, 4^c.—Contiaued.
Agency.

State.
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
Tennessee

Pltf<5lmr)rr

Providence
Knoxville
. . do
Nashville
Rutland
Builington
Vermont
St. J o h u s b t u y
A-^ermont
do .
Richmond
Wheeling...
AVest V i r'niiia
AVisconsin
L a Crosse
Madison
AVisconsin
Milwaukee
do
A^'^ificonsin
AA^ashington I ' e r r i t o r y . V a n c o u v e r

Agent.

Invalid

James McGregor
AV. H . T o w n s e n d
J o h n Caldwell
D. T. Boynton
AV. J . S t o k e s
N . Kellogg
J . L. BarstoAV
E . C. R e d i n g t o n
Stephen T h o m a s . .
J . T . S u t t o n , jr
J . M. D o d d r i d g e
- J . A . Kellogg
:
Thomas Reynolds
M . H . Fitch
E. Ferguson
S. AV. IBrown

:..

$325, 221
47, 395
8, 377
57,170
34,3ri:i
49, 415
37,331
60, 570
48, .591
15, 486
135, 732
43, 849
79, 948
9,195
168, 667
1, 602

Widows..
88
44
70
58
12
21
01
58
49
59
01
52
61
49
68
92

8, 963, 474 99

$578, 233
106, 902
67, 399
440, 050
199, 728
88, 444
65, 920
93, 418
80, 058
,55,483
346,744
111, 429
193, 543
28,163
331, 203
88

2474
32
29
()6
72
46
49
99
14
43
96
91
63
65
66

19,164, 508 68

The force einployed in this division during the year consisted of 22
clerks and 2 copyists.
EOUNTY LAND DIVISION.

During the year ending the 30th of June, 1870, 1,633 bounty land
claims have been examined, underthe several acts of Congress, and returned to the Commissioner of Pensions properly certified.
Sixteen invalid pension claims (war of 1812) have been reported to the
Commissioner of Pensions for his action thereon.
Two hundred and fifty letters haA^e been written on subjects relating
to the Avars of the revolution and 1812 and the subsequent wars lor the
suppression of Indian hostilities.
REEUG-EES, EREEDMEN AND ABANDONED LANDS DIVISION.

The accounts of the agents and officers of the Bureau of Eefugees,
Freedmen and Abandoned Lands settled in this office are for moneys
paid out by the agents and officers of the Bureau for stationery and
printing, quarters and fuel, commissary stores and medical supplies,
transportation, rents, repairs, and building of schools and asylums, and
pay of superintendents of schools, clerks, agents, and officers of the
Bureau, telegraphing and postage, and a few incidental expenses, such
as the necessary employment of colored laborers, with a view to ameliorate their condition.
Money accounts.

N o . of
property
accounts.

No.
On h a n d J u n e 30, 1869
R e c e i v e d d u r i n g t h e fiscal yeiir
Total
R e p o r t e d d u r i n g t h e fiscal yeax
On h a n d J u n e 30 1870




-.-

Amount.

...

55
82

• $665, 329 81
2, 633, 563 07

36
368

-

137
83

3, 298, 892 88
1, 419, 821 41

404
372

54

1,879, 071 47

32

110

REPORT

ON T H E

REGISTRY

FINANCES^

DIVISION,

Description of accounts.

No. of accounts
remaining on
hand June 30.
1870.

The duties of this division are to acknoAvledge, indorse, register, and
file, or transmit, the money accounts, returns of internal revenue tax,
and abstracts of nioney transferred, of all disbursing officers whose accounts are audited in this office; to see to their pronijit rendition; to
report delinquents to the Second Comptroller; and to answer all queries
relatiA^e to the indebtedness of deceased, retired, and other officers.
During the fiscal year there have been received, acknowledged, indorsed, registered, and filed, or transmitted to the proper Bureaus of
the War Department, 8,608 money accounts-current of disbursing officers, to Avit: Commissary, 3,823; quartermasters, 2,993 -, engineers, 1,068:
pension, 737) Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands,
87; returns of internal rcA^enue tax, abstracts of money transferred b y .
disbursing officers, and other miscellaneous papers received, acknowledged, indorsed, recorded, and filed, 4,525; letters received, 198; letters
Avritten to officers, 3.06 ] receipts for money transferred, recorded, 5,190;
queries relatiA^e to the indebtedness of deceased, retired, 4nd other officers answered, 3,308; disbursing officers reported to the Second Comptroller as delinquent in the rendition of their accounts, 220.
In addition to the foregoing report, showing the condition of the
business of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30,1870,1 haA^e the
honor to subjoin a statement showing the condition of the business for
the quarter ending September 30, 1870, as follows:
p

N u m h e r of a c c o u n t s sett l e d in quartei- e n d i n g
S e p t e m b e r 30, 1870.

Monthly Monthly Monthly
and
and
and
quarterly. quarterly. quarterly.

Qua,rtermasters'
Money..
Quartei'inasters' . .Property..
Commissaries'
Money..
Pension agents'
do...
Engineers'
do...
Ret'., F. and A. L
do...
Ref., F. and A. L. .Property..
Signal officers'
Money..
Signal officers'
Property..
Total

94
10, 836
1,712
720
139
54
32
1
34

103
665
727
^ 379
77
15

13, 622

2,125

5, 531
73
850
4,041
11

ICO
38
245
1

124
2
28
174
3

20,
17,
9,
374,
266,

10, 506

384

331

688, 529 25

72
2,950
825
167
94
25

^3, 755, 874 57
1, 090, 385 41
4, 926,187 57
3,307,311 00
29, 940 43

1
158

Claims lor—

4,133

13,109, 699 03

Monthly
and
quarterly.
125
8,551
1, 614
932
121
44
4
1
192
11, 584

A m o u n t involved.

15, 724, 043 66
2, 068, 558 06
34, 463, 751 32
2,122, 840 78
1, 9a3, 967 17
2 880 90
46, 366, 041 89

•

Horses lost...;
Steamboats destroyed
Oregon w a r
Miscellaneous
State w a r
Total

A m ' t involved.

N u m b e r of accoimt.s
unsettled September
30, 1870.

545
722
308
632
319

60
00
97
90
84

5, 507 .
960, 824
71
723, 262
860
82,901
4,112
7, 392, 230
9
1, 430,185
10, 559

90
34
85
18
95

10, 589, 405 28

BOOK-KEEPERS^ DIVISIONo

The number of requisitions drawn on the Secretary of the Treasury
by the Secretaries of War and Interior for the first quarter of the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1871, is 542, amounting to $17,558,894 28.
Quartermaster's Department
Incidental expenses




|1,154,648 30
343, 529 92

T H I R D AUDITOR.
Barracks and quarters
Army transportation
Officers' transportation
Cavalry and artillery horses
Purchase of stoves
Clothing of the Army
National cemeteries
Refunding expenses, &c., to the States
Claims, act March 3,1849
Subsistence of the Army
Pensions, widows and others
Pensions, invalids
Bureau Refugees, Freedmen aud Abandoned Lands
Relief of destitute people in the District of Columbia
Signal service
Pay of Washington and Oregon volunteers, 1855-'6
Services of Washington and Oregon volunteers, 1855-'6
Relief of Mrs. M. A. Laurie, act for
ReKef of Mrs. M. Riddle, act fbr
•
Relief of AA^iUiam Selden, act for
Engineer Dei)artmeu.t
Total

-

Ill
$313,951 93
858,191 01
26,656 94
17,575 00
105 90
22,363 00.
12, 695 42
286, 333 76
17, 546 86
429,248 04
7,121, 8.27 41
4,249,935 68
* 273, 585 59
7,500 00
5,000 00
1, 399 78
8,254 53
2, 000 00
2, 000 00
5, 000 00
2, 399, 545 21
17,558, 894 28

Number of counter requisitions drawn on sundry persons in favor ofthe Treasurer of the United States during the first quarter of the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1871, is 175, amounting to $95S, 657 51.
On account of deposits
Second Auditors drafts, (transfers)
Third Auditor's drafts, (transfers)
Interior Departmeiit's drafts, (transfers)




$471, 848
269,744
215,129
1, 935

14
66
03
68

958, 657 51

QUARTERMASTERS^ DIVISION.

to
Money accounts.

Supplemental

settlements.

Property
returns.
IS^o.

On h a n d p e r r e p o r t of J u n e 30,1870
R e c e i v e d d u r i n g t h e qua.rter ending; S e p t e m b e r
30, 1870

94

P , 219, 697 66

Property.

Money.

Amount
involved.

197

.




9,479,918 23'

11, 501

534,

72
125

Repoi'ted during- t h e q u a r t e r
R e n u i i n i n g u n s e t t l e d S e p t e m b e r 30, 1870

3,755 874 57
5, 724, 043 66

.2,950
8, 551

534

338

[

197

9, 479, 918 23

11, 501

534

2, 260, 220 57

665-

Property.

34

10, 836
338 il2 .=i:^1 088 80
r' '
'
338 2, 531, 088 80

103

Total

Total

A m ' t involved.

534

Total.

Signal accounts.

Money.

1-

Amount
involved.
$2, 880 90

No.

10, 964

A m ' t involved.

| 7 , 219, 697 66

1,799

158

4, 794,190 27

2, 880 90

12, 763

12, 013, 887 93

192
338

192

1
1

2, 880 90

3, 894
8,869

6, 286, 963 37
5, 726. 924 56

192

1

2, 880 90

12, 763

-12, 013, 887 93

2, 531, 088 80
2, 531, 088 80

o
o

o

w

Ul

THIRD

113

AUDITOR.

COMMISSARY DIVISION.

During the quarter ending September 30, 1870, there were received
and registered 727 nioney accounts, involving $1,238,104 50, to wdiich
add 1,712 accounts, involving an expenditure of $1,920,838 97 on hand
June 30,1870, making a total of 2,439 accounts, iriA^olving $3,158,943 47,
of Avhich 825 accounts, involving $1,090,385 41, were audited and reported to the Second Comptroller during the quarter, leaAang unsettled
1,614 accounts, involving $2,068,558 06, as recapitulated below:
Amount involved.
Remaining unsettled June 30,1870 .
Received during the quarter

1,712 ^1, 920, 838 97
727 1,238,104 50
2, 439 3,1.58, 943 47
825 1, 090, 385 41
1,614
2, 068, 558 06

Total

Audited during the quarter .
Remaining on hand Septemher 30,1870.

Provision returns on hand June 30,1870
Provision returns received during the quarter
Total
Provision returns examined during the quarter

1,151
801
1,952
759

:

Provision returns remaining on hand September 30,1870

1,193

Number of letters written during the quarter, 223 ; number of money
A^ouchers examined, 10,636; number of provision vouchers examined,
10,325; total vouchers examined, 20,961.
PENSION DIVISION.
Numher. Am'tinvolved.
Accounts on hand July 1,1870
Accounts received during the quarter.

720
379

Total.

$36, 958, .536 73
2, 431, 402 16
39, 389, 938 89

167
932

Accou.nts reported during the quarter.,
Accounts remaining unsettled
-.
Total.

4, 926,187 57
34, 463, 751 32
39, 389, 938 89

The accounts on file unsettled are divided as follows:
Accounts for 1868
Accounts for 1869
Accounts for 1870

T
>

%

,

Total

36
443
453
932

Amoimt drawn from the treasury to pay pensions during the first quarter qf
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1871.'
Invalids
Widowsand others
Total
8

F




.°

:.

$4,249,935 68
7,121,827 41
11,371,763 09

114

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Pensions recorded, including additional for children of ^2 per month
Pensions transferred
Pensions increased
«
Pensions dropped
Pension vonchers examined
Payments entered on. roll-books
Pages of difference and miscellaneous copied
Letters received and registered
'Letters written

6, 318
1,249
1? 162
443
~ H I , 870
106, 838
1, 006
803
S52

During the first quarter of the fiscal year ending June 30,1871, there
have been added 10 clerks, making in all at the end of the first quarter 1871, 32 clerks and 2 copyists.
. Since the end of the fiscal year 1870, Congress has changed the mode
of paying pensions, (act July 8, 1870,) which nearly doubles the amount
of labor to be performed in this division, and Avill require nearly double
the force formerly employed. The present mode of paying pensions
under the new law requires pensioners to be paid four times a year, instead of semi-annually as heretofore. The pension agent is required
to furnish the pensioner a blank, which is to be executed, and duplicate
receipts to be signed before a magistrate, and upon return of this to
the agent he is required to send a check payable to the pensioner's
order, direct to the address named in the voucher, thus entirely doing
awaj^ with the practice and use of attorneys to collect the aniount due.
During the short time this new pension law has been in operation,
the effect has been Avonderful; fewer complaints haA^e been made in regard to frauds, and it would seem that the pensioners get more and the
attorneys less of the amounts paid for the benefit of these wards ofthe
Government. So far as I am able to learn from those interested,its operations meet with their approbation, and when it becomes fully understood the results Avill be better cippreciated.
.ENGINEERS' DIVISION.
Accounts received.
Period.
"
Quarter.
J u l y 1870
A u g u s t 1870
S e p t e m b e r 1870
Total

.

Amount.

Months.

18
28
17
.

.

.

63

.

Reraainino- on file S e p t e m h e r 30,1870

Accounts

14

14

1,356,210 01

120

.

-

1

2,122, 840 78

$584, 858 86
163 753 45
607^ 597 70

adjusted.
Period.
Araount
involved.

T o t a l credited.

Quarter.
Tuly 1870
A u g u s t 1870 '.
S e p t e m b e r 1870
Total




Months.

14
22
4

54

1313,094 61
2,186, 932 75
807, 283 64

40

^^4

3 307 .-^n nn 1 4, 596, 815 64

'

1

^1, 616, 073 44
2,173, 288 91
807 453 29

THIED

115

AUDITOR.

R E F U G E E S , FREEDMEN AND ABANDONED LANDS DIVISION.
Money accounts.
No.

Amount.

III

54
15

Total
Ou h,and S e n t e m b e r 30 1870

.

32
79

2, 203, 907 65
219, 940 48

111
107

44

-

^1, 879, 071 47
324, 836 18

69
25

On h a n d J u n e 30 1870

1, 983, 967 17

4

CLAIMS DIVISION.
1.—Miscellaneous claims.
Amount
claimed.

No.
4, 041
245

On hand J u l y l , 1870
Eeceived duriug. quarter.
Total

*i$2, 853, 027 76
14,91.3,835 32

, 286
174

Disposed of during quarter...
On hand September 30, 1870.

Amount
allowed.

7, 766, 863 08
^374, 632 90 ^326, 649 69

4,112

^7, 392, 230 18

* This amount is the aggregate claimed in 2,832 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (1,209) not
being- stated.
t This amount is the aggregate claimed in 217 cases, the amounts claimed iu the others (28) not
baing stated.
I Tliis amount is the aggregate claimed in 168 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (6) not being
stated.
§ This aniount is the aggregate claimed in 2,881 cases, the amounts claimed iu the others (1,231) not
heing stated.
2 . - -Oregon and Washington Indian War clainis.
No.

\
On h a n d J u l y 1 1870
Ueceived during quarter

. . .
. . . . .

-

-

--

850
.38

. .. ..

888
28

92, 210 82
+ 9, 308 97
§ 82, 901 85

.
-

.

.

Amount
allowed

* !$83, 666 36
t 8, 544 46

860

. _-

Total
Disposed of duriu'^'' q u a r t e r

Amount
claimed.

On h a n d S e p t e m h e r 30,1870 .

$8 704 36

* This amount is the aggregate claimed in 439 cases, the amounts claiined in the others (4il) not
heing stated.
"
•
^ .
'
t This araount is the aggregate claimed iu 26 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (12) not
heing stated.
X This amount is the aggregate claimed in 18 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (10) not being
stated.
§ This amount is the aggregate claimed in 447 cases, the amounts claimed iri the others (413) not
heing stated.
3.—Lost vessels, cfc, {act March 3, 1849.
No.

Amount
claimed.

On h a n d J u l y 1, 1870
Received during quarter

73

$740, 984 34

Total
D i s p o s e d of d u r i n g q u a r t e r

73
2

740, 984 34
17, 722 00

On h a n d S e p t e i n b e r 30,1870

71

Amount
allowed.

723, 262 34

f 7, 222 22

HORSE CLAIMS DIVISION.

The number of claims received and docketed during the quarter end
ing September 30, 1870, is 97, in which the aggregate amount claimed



116

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

is $15,717 24. The number settled and finally disposed of during the
same period (including those received prior to as well as during tlie
quarter) was 124, in which the aggregate aniount claimed was $20,545 GO,
and. on which the aggregate amount allowed was $12,44.3 09. There
have been during the quarter 1,712 letleis Avritten, and 502 received
and docketed -, 9(i3 claims have been examined and suspended, and 157
briefs made.
The following table presents the condition of the business of this diAision at the commencement and close of the quarter, as well as its
progress through the quarter:
•

•

No.
Claims on h a n d J u n e 30 1870

Amount.

No.

Amount.

5, 531
97,
3

•

Total
C l a i m s allowed d u r i n g t h e q u a r t e r
P,('iected on s a m e
.
-

87
....

981, 370 56

t i 2 , 4 4 3 rg1,824 O
U

37

Disallowed durin^' q u a r t e r

$965, 205 32
15 7L7 24
448 00

5, 631

•

H e c o n s i d e r e d durini'' t h e q u a r t e r

14, 267 09
6, 278 51

D e d u c t as finally disposed of duriii"" t h e q u a r t e r

124

On h a n d u n s e t t l e d October 1,1870

20 545 60
960, 824 96

BOUNTY LAND CLAIMS DWISION.

Pour hundred and sixty-one bounty-land claiins Avere examined and
properly certified to the Commissioner of Pensions; forty-five letters
Avritten on subjects connected with the division; two invalid pension
claims reported to the Commissioner of Pensions for his action.
STATE AVAR CLAIMS DIVISION.
Original accounts.

Suspended accounts.

Special s e t t l e m e n t s on
suspended accounts.

0

JJO.

Amount.

Ne.

Amount

No.

A r a o u n t allowed.

•

On h a n d J u n e 30, 1870
11
Beceived during the q u a r t e r . . 1

$1, 695, 026 07
1, 479 72

12
Total
Reported duringthe quarter.. 3

. 1, 696, 505 79
266, 319 84

9

1, 430, 185 95

On h a n d S e p t e m b e r 30,1870...

99

| 5 , 034, 419 06

99

4, 865, 454 06

2

$168, 965 00

2

168, 965 00

REGISTRY DIVISION.

There have been received, acknoAvledged, indorsed, registered, and
filed 2,059 money accounts and accounts-current, to wit:. 959 commissary ; 646 quartermaster; 266engineer; 173 pension; 13Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands. Eeturns of internal revenue tax.
Abstracts B b, aiid other miscellaneous papers, received, acknowledged,
recorded, and filed, 820. Letters received and filed, 45. Letters written to officers relative to the rendition of their accouuts, 54. Eeceipts
for money transferred by disbursing officers recorded, 712. Queries
relatiA^e to the indebtedness of officers answered, 502. Disbursing officers, A ^ o have received United States funds by transfer and failed to
Ah
account fbr the same Avithin three months after their receipt, reported
C the Second Comptroller, 171.
O



THIRD AUDITOR.

117

THE F I L E S .

An examinati(m of the files of this ofhce shows that the settlements
from its organization in March, 1817, to the xiresent time are contained
in two rooms in the east front of the Treasury building, extending nearly
through the wliole length of it, an aggregate length of 264 feet by a
Avidth of 30 feet. At present the shelving c*apacity is equal to 13,200
lineal feet. An additional room on the third floor is now being fitted
up with shelves for files, and, when completed, will afford 1,940 feet of
shelving, or about one-seventh of the space now in use. The three
rooms, it will be seen, contain nearly three miles of shehang, and it is
estimated that tlie unsettled accpunts and returns now in the office
would completely fill the new room, the others being already filled. The
pension accounts are now A^ery large, comprising nearly 400,000 A^ouchers
per annum, and under the new law will be about double that number,
or 800,000 A^ouchers per annum. Up to January 1865, these accounts
Avere separated from the others, and filed by States and agencies: since
that date they have been kept in numerical order with the commissary
accounts, Avith which they are numbered. I think it practicable, howCA^er, to separate pension accounts from the commissary acccmnts, and
remove them to the new file room. The space thus cleared in the old
rooms would probably suffice until the new room shall be filled with
pension accounts yet to be settled. The rooms now used for files are
A^ery unsuitable for the purpose, especially for those Avhich have to be
constantly referred to, being immediately under the roof, and Avithout
any side windows. They are.A^ery cold in winter and intensely hot in
summer, with scarcely any ventilation, and at all seasons very uncomfortable. As the skj'lights fail to afford sufficient light, the gas which
Ave are compelled to use greatly intensifies the heat. It is suggested
that only old accounts, or such as are seldom required to be examined,
should be kept in these rooms.
The accounts fpr which additional shelving and space are required are
constantly accumulating, cA^ery day adding to their number and bulk.
I have stated above the space which they occupy; and their Aveight is
estimated at 200,000 pounds, or 100 tons. The nuniber and size of the
accounts of quartermasters and commissaries of subsistence to be received in future cannot be computed with, so hear an approach to accurac}^ as the pension accounts; but it is safe to estimate that for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1871, besides the new room above mentioned, an
additional space equal to a room of 50 feet by 15 feet will be required.
It is probable that the space now being made available for files will be
filled in six^ or eight months, after which it Avill be indispensable to have
additional iooni, and timely steps should be taken to see that they are
provided.
In the diAdsion of this Bureau for the auditing of claims filed under
the provisions of the act of March 3, 1849, for the loss of horses, &c.,
Avhile in the military service of the government, many just claims are
rejected because they are not embraced in any of the classes specified.
For example, there is no provision made for the payment of claims for
the loss of horses ridden to death in carrying dispatches or on forced
marches, in obedience to orders, or stolen while picketed, or killed while
being transported on railways, or injured Avhile being so transported,
and abandoned in consequence of such injuries, or lost in consequence of
other accidents, and many other losses that cannot AVCII be specified in
an act. These losses were incident to the service and occurred without
any fault on the part of the owner.



118

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

I would suggest that the act be so amended that payment will be provided for all losses of horses that are incident to the service and without any negligence or fault on the part of the owner and when he was
in the line of his duty.
I fully indorse and would again call attention to the recommendations
of former Auditors as to the necessity of a statute of limitations to all
claims against the government. Each succeeding year proves the urgent necessity of some act of this character which shall ^x. a period
Avlien litigation of such claims shall cease.
I would also renew the suggestion contained in the report of my immediate predecessor, (Hon. E. W. Clarke,) ofthe 15th October, 1869, as
to the importance and necessity for the interests of the government of a
law library for the use of the claims diAdsion of this Bureau, this to be
made up of books needed in this division. I am satisfied that a small
expenditure in this Avay Avould be of great benefit to the public service.
It was eixpected that the amount of business in the quartermasters^
division would have be°en worked off by the end of the present year, so
as to admit of a reduction in the clerical force of the Bureau, but I find
that whatever reduction of force can be made in the quartermasters'
division will be required in the pension division, in consequence of the
act of Congress of July 8, 1870, which changes the method of ])aying
pensions, making them payable quarterly instead of semi-annually, thus
doubling the work of the pension division. On the 1st of August I
transferred ten clerks from the quartermasters' to the pension division,
and think it Avill be necessary to further incre;ase the force employed in
this division, which I propose doing by transferring clerks from other
divisions wdiere their serAdces are not so necessary, and in this way
aA'Oid any increase in the general force of the Bureau.
It is but just to say that the clerks in this Bureau have generally been
attentive to tjieir duties, correct in their deportment, and useful and
diligent in the Avork assigned them. Duiing thefiv<calyear ending June
30, 1870, the female copyists have copied and compared 28,986 pages of
manuscript; copied 7,445 and compared 7,500 letters; indexed 34,712
names; registered 672 money differences and 4,154 property differences. And during the quarter ending September 30, 1870, tliey have
copied and compared 6,061 pages of manuscript; copied 1,266 letters;
compared 2,686 letters; indexed 5,082 names; registered 179 moneydifferences and 1,109 property differences. 1 deem it proper in this connection to ask attention to the fact that.heads of divisions in this office
Avho hold responsible positions do not receive the grade of salary to which
their positions should entitle them. In some other Bureaus clerks who
hold positions of similar grade and responsibility are paid far larger
salaries. In this office heads of divisions are paid salaries of from
$1,600 to $1,800, Avhile in theofficeof the Treasurer of theUnited States
heads of divisions are paid $2,200. There is not, so far as I can see, any
good reason why tliis discrepancy should exist, and I recommend that
the salaries of heads of divisions in this offline, upon AAdiom devolve duties Avhich require sound judginent, a knowledge of theJaws, and a general acquaintance with governmental business, may be increased to a
sum commensurate Avith the grave resiionsibilities Avliich devolve ui)on
them.
Eespectfully subinitted.
ALLAIST EUTHEEFOED,
Auditor,
Hon.

G E O R G E S. BOUTAVELL,




Secretary of the Treasury,

REPORT OF THEFOORTH AUDITOR.







REPORT
OP

THE FOURTH AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT^,

Fourth Audit07'^s Office, October 21, 1870.
S I R : I haA^e the honor to submit for your consideration a synopsis of
the operations of this office for the fiscal year ending the 30th of June,
1870.
The w^ork of the clerical force of the office will be most conveniently
noted and compared by setting it forth in a series of tables, one for each
of the divisions; and such tables are accordingly presented in the following order :
I.—PAYMASTER'S DIVISION, V^IILLAM CONARD, CHIEF.
Statement of accounts received and settled in the Fayniaster'^s Division from July 1, 1869, to
June 30, 1870, with the amount of cash disbursed in those settled, and the number of letters
written in relation to tlw same, including marine, pension, and allotment accounts.
PAYMASTERS' AND MARINE ACCOUNTS.

Date.

Accounts
received.

Accounts
settled.

Letters
written.

Cash disburseraents.

1869,
July
August
September
October
Noveraber
December

30 24
13
21
26
20

:

31
31
30
16
25
36

331
258
208
214
308
216

%% 366, 969 77
2, 351, 579 86
1, 783, 703 20
956, 263 72
1,372,071 85
3,113, 429 28

37
21
24
32
23
23

33
18
36
31
32
40

254
270
230
260
228
163

1,000,174 96
1, 327, 794 44
2,431,667 35
4, 414, 990 64
1, 063, 400 99
3,135, 057 30

1870.
January
Eebrnaiy
Mai-cb .'.
April
^May
June

:
:

Total:

294

25,017,103 36

Number of unsettled accounts on band July 1, 1869, 84; nuraber of unsettled accounts on band Juue .
30, 1870, 19; aver.age nuraber of. clerks eraployed in the division, 17; number of accounts of pension
agents settled, 208 ; cash disbursements, .^374, 076 55.




122

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

Statement shoiving the amount disbursed at the different pension agencies.
PENSION ACCOUNTS.

Invalid.

Location.

Widows and
orphans.

$28, 945 99
15, 952 19
23, 486 03
4, 387 77
3, 189, 88
1, 296 07
1,516 67
4,351 81
684 54
1,068 60

Boston, Massachusetts
Philadelphia. Peunsylvania
Brooklyn, New York
Washington, District of Columbia
Baltimore, Mai-ylaud
Providence, Khode Island
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
Portsmouth, New Harapshire
St. Paul, Minnesota
Louisville, Iventucky
Trenton, New JeI•S€^y
Picbiuond, Virginia
New Orleans, Louisiana
Cincinnati, Ohio
-Milwaukee, Wisconsii.i
St. Louis, Missouri
Portland, Maine
Hartford, Connecticut
Chicago, Illinois
Detroit., Michigan
San EranciscOj'California

612 43
1,026 76
1, 263 75
6, 459 88
1, 780 67
1, 057 60
6, 437 77
848 67
4, 365 24
964 81
987 15
110, 684 28

Total

$67, 718 04
52,715 54
43,182 01
18, 076 06
7, 378 39
5, 232 33
4; 845 33
6 298 70
,
540 00
994 46
4, 367 87
8, 017 00
3, 928 79
11,617 86
2,101 20
2, 550 93
11, 071 81
2, 088 00
5,134 08
3, 529 87
2, 004 00
263, 392 27

ALLOTMENT ACCOUNTS.

Allotments
registered.

Date.

.
July
A ugust
Sei)teraber
October
Nox'^era ber
December

Allotments
discontinued.

1869.
60
46
19
81
128
50

267
110
97
64
93
51

31
99
ICO
141
94
14

:
.

100
97
65
50
42
41

1870.
January
Eebruary
March
April
May
June
Total

c

863

1,077

Statement of unexpired and unreported allotments on the Fourth Auditor's boolcs, with places
where payable.
New York
Boston
.Philadelphia
AVashington
Baltimore
Of the
Of the
Of the
Of the

above
above
above
above

276
226
173
58
35
there
there
there
there

were
were
were
were

Total.




registered
i-egistered
registered
registered

in 1867
in 1868
in 1869
in 1870

Portsmouth
Norlblk
San Francisoo

. . .

:

Total

9
28
16
821

:

18
52
23c
513
821

FOURTH

123

AUDITOR.

IL—RECORD DIVISION, CHARLES COOK, C H I E F .
Statement of the corresxyondence of the Fourth Auditor''s Office for the fiscal year ended June
30, 1870, and 4he work of the Record Division.
o

1
Date.

o
o
SQ
©

o
Hi

o

. 1
• -S

O)

yA

I-l

?o

GJ
^

A

•

tl

I^S
i^§

^

^

Ti

^

>,

ch

%

2 o

1^

r

nj

s
i

rcrd
O O

'Xi

r i xh

.o

S

1.1

£

^
s

© .
— 73
©

©

o

o

©

2^
P

H^

^

Hi

1869.
July
August . ..
September.
October . . .
November.
D e c e m b e r .•

1,474
1,262
1,085
1, 234
1,352
1,302

1,766
1, 550
1, 827
2,004
1,968
1,740

1,804
1,323
1,687
1,418
1, 762
1,743

1,166
830
739
888
968
834

10
10
12
9
36
6

8,114
5, 659
5,439
4,071
8,068
9,377

January...
February..
March
Api'il
May
June

1,318
1, 261
1,393
1, 340
1, .335
1,234

1,922
1, 677
1,770
2,055
1, 483.
1, 893

2,231
1, 860
2,153
1,747
1, 644
1,664

1,025
913
980
872
784
837

8
12
5
9
9
11

11, 750
10, 491
11,237
10, 412
6,321
7, 699

Total....

15, 590

21, 655

21, 036

10, 836

117

98, 638

186, 912

12
13
16
25
37
29

36
114
42
49
61
93

4
3
5
46
183
33

33
29
32
16
15
15

100
109
111
563
287
146

960

20, 934
19, 707
20, 836
20, 317
11,338
15; 730

18
5
5
5
6
7

108
89
63
210

14, 322
10, 362
11,518
10, 173
• 13,979
17, 696

322

272

1,711

56
71
45
267
51

1870.

Average number of clerks emi^loyed in record division during the year, 9|.

IIL—PRIZE MONEY DIVISION, S. M. B. SERVOSS, C H I E F .
Statement of work performed by the Prize Money Division duiing the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1870.

Letters.

Prize lists.
QJ-A

©

©

^1

>
8

PH

- P p>, q

P

cn

cn

•S^

©

Date.

•es

3^
•s.>| S

p;=3

3;=! •

J21

^

S
-tJ

g^

00

fe
Id
^"d

o r^

S

;i

^

Prize '
money.

Claims.

^

cn

a

a

•3

ll

r-

©

^

N

&2
+^

a
-i

P
"A

"-A

>3
•+= o

a

<i

1869.
475
409
328
357
387
377

645
48b
943
1, (54
895
783

100
1,341
487
515
521
545

68
1,273
470
497
480
527

$11,201 56
22, 203 15
23,430 74
14,120 29
12,145 02
5, 298 77

18, 967 26
11, 469 16
4, 312 24

. 364
318
3^2
323
253
300

785
626
692
705
313
783

576
366
275
45
168
. 259

522
345
475
37
141
252

8, 097 64
10, 2.56 76
13, 484 86
18,030 44
7, 588 69
12, 688 35

50,364 19

4,273

8,712

5,198

5,087

158, 546 27

3
2

3
1

$11, 362 17
2, 675 35

24
4

July
August
September
October
November
December

1

1, 578 01

5
5
5

1
6
5

17

1870.
January
Febmary
March

•

Mav
June

14
Total




62

Average number of clerks employed, 3 | .

124

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
IV.—GENERAL CLAIM DIVISION, A. C. ADAMSON, CHIEF.

Annual report ofthe General Claim' Division for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.

Date.

lit

-•2d

0 P O

Onhand July 1,1869.
July
August
September
October
Noveraber
Deceraber

163
1.54
141
134
347
164
144

130
117
322
109
121
166

$10, 349 40
10, 919 56
8, 544 22
10, 052 60
18,118 66
16, 275 02

540
511
460
512
531
450

196
133
159
179
183
129

292
145
145
90
179
1.56

28, 995 06
13,117 18
10,435 19
10, 439 44
30, 576 64
32, 769 90

566
514
587
485
513
638

1870,
January
February
March..'
April
May
June

..•

Total

2, 026 I 1, 772

200, 592 87 6,307

Average number of clerks, 7.

y._NAVY AGENT'S DIVISION, WILLIAM F. STIDHAM, CHIEF.
Annual report of the Navy Agent's Division for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.

Amount involved.

Date.

1869.
July
August
September
October
November
December

66
•59
32
25
30
39

20
23
21
31
21
24

350, 485 78
412, 727 06
3, 498, 877 79
1,183,. 370 88
960, 645 30
2, 030, 816 27

•

1195, 408 01
1, 567, 709 38
1, 052, 959 64
3.52, 301' 34
969,373 94
230,726 35

21
19
54
35
•18
23

1870.
• January
Febmary
March..'
April
May
June
Total

•....,

310

12,805,401 74

Statement of amount paid by navy agents for allotments during the year 1869.'
New York
Boston
,
Philadelphia
AVash in gton
Baltimore



:
1
-.

•
'
.•

$53,547
36, 691
39, 267
18, 554
10,777

00
00
50
00
00

FOURTH
Portsmouth
San Francisco

125

AUDrrOR.
:

$6, 432 50
2,888 00

:

Total

.-.-•

168,157 00

Acconnts remaining on hand June.30, 1870, hooe;* average number of clerks employed, 4^; number of vouchers examined, 29,335.
.
VL—BOOKKEEPER'S DIVISION, PARIS H. FOLSOM, CHIEF.
Stateinent of the work xierformed in the Bookkeeper's Division for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1870.

« d

Date.

l l 1w1
©

Cash p a y r e q u i s i t i o n s . Cash r e p a y r e q u i I n t e r n a l revsitions.
enue
re- H o s p i t a l fund
retiiirned.
turned.
No.
Amount.
No'.
Amouut.

"©

Hi
1869.
79
46
36
78
77
87

July
September.......
Oct(jber
November
December
1870.
January
February
M a r c h .'.
April
May
Juue ...
..

•

190
1.54
150
•155
153
175

107
117
100
S2
93
118

178
133
126
15
122
142

1,020

Total

1,693

$68, 172 37'^-

$15, 628 69*

124
124
125
149
13S
115

$2, 066,160
1, 929, 443
2, 308, 712
2, 389, 981
1,862,618
2, Oil, 651

72
61
27
52
71
53

1
30
8
5
1
60

$210, 000
305, 972
. 5, 376
5, 835
101 000
252 321

00
97
60
72
00
34

106,021 67t

30,464 34t

105
105
107
124
125
139

3,036,910
1,345,105
1, 703, 652
1, 391, 883
2, 214, 502
.. 1,608,870

80
19
27
54'
85
44

32
32
17
31
34
15

497 122
120 808
200, 467
4.59, 600
145, 618
9, 355

95
43
39
83
57
10

70,821 88 +
245, i>15 92

17, 543 78+
63, 636 81

1,474

23, 869, 493 45 1 266 2, 313, 479 90

Average number of clerks employed, 3.
* For the third quarter of 1869.
I For the second quaTter cf 1870.
t For the fourth quarter of 1869, and the first quarter of 1870.

VII.—DISBURSEMENT AND MISCELLANEOUS DIVISION, B. P. DAVIS IN
CHARGE.
Statenient of work performed during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.
Number
Number
Number
Number

of
of
of
of

letters AA^yitten
dead letters registered
licenses registered
checks agaiust accounts ordered

:

-.,

1
1

1

937
272
322
256

In addition to the above, Mr. Davis has made up the various statements and 'reports called for by Congress and the Secretary of the
Treasury 5 kept the record of appointuients, resignations, removals, and
absences; received and distributed t.he stationery used by the ofiice5
and discharged the duties of disbursing clerk.
An inspection of these tables will show a gratifying aniount of work
performed during the last fiscal, year, in proportion .to the nuinber of
clerks employed, notwithstanding an unusual degree of sickness Avhich
lias prevailed.
For the purposes of economy and dispatch of business, as the accumulation occasioned by the war rendered such a step feasible, the allotment division and the pension and marine division have been consolidated Avitli the paymaster's division.
* Although the above statement shoM'S that there were no acuounts remaining on baud in the navy
agent's division June 30, 1870, it is proper to state that there are a large nuraber of per.sonal and other
accounts standing open on the ledgers'. These accounts are not charged as received until they are taken
up and adjusted.
• .




126

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The unadjusted balances of nearly four millions of dollars which. I
mentioned in my annual report of last year, and which had been gradually accumulating for half a century, have now been definitely tra>nsferred to proper ledgers, and many of them collected. Their reimbursement to the government will be sought Avith all possible diligence and
Xiromptitude.
'
IJuring the year I have opened an ^'appropriation adjustment'^ account, which has met with much approbation. In consequence of disbursing otficers being on a cruise, or at a foreign station, they are frequently compelled to expend the money drawn from one appropriation
tor the benefit of sorae other. The general purpose of this account, and
its chief practical feature, is that at any moment.Avheii it ma^^ be required the liabilities between appropriations thus arising can at once
be shown. The manner of consolidating into one account the balances
Avhich Avere before left open in each account settled not only facilitates
the giving all desirable inlormation, but makes a great saving of time
in the A^arious oifices of the departments through Avhich transfer requisitions pass.
The cases of the delinquent nav^y paymasters and navy agents to
which I adverted last year have, in as many instances as possible, been
brought to a conclusion so far as this ofiice is concerned, and the accounts duly made up for suit placed in the hands of the Solicitor of the
Treasury Department. In addition to these civil suits against these
paymasters, the Navy Department is also trying them by court-martial
as criminals. In alluding to these officers again, and as'a degree of
neAvspaper notoriety has been given to the defalcations mentioned, I
take pleasure in renewing the tribute of praise I have heretofore paid
to the paymasters of the Navy as a class, and testif3^ to their ability
and integrity, their courtesy as gentlemen, and their efiiciency as oificers. The settlements of their accounts, Avhich I am constantly making,
justify this indorsement; and it is probably a fact, that no set ot* disbursing officers in any country, or under any circumstances, have expended so much money with ^nore correctness or less loss to the Grovernment than the navy paymasters.
It is not the less true, hovvcA^^er, that defalcations have occurred and
instances of dishonesty taken i)lace. These facts have led me to reexamine the established and current methods of keeping accounts, to institute new modes, and to devise increased means of holding disbursing
otficers to a more frequent and more stringent accountability. The
same thing has been done in regard to the payment of allotments, and
to prevent frauds ih reference to them.
The A^ery large sums of money Avhicli are frequently and necessarily
intrusted to paymasters of the Navy was mentioned by me in my last
annual report, and I recommended Congress to consider the amount
of bonds which should be required by the Government. At present
assistant paymasters give bonds in the amount of $10,000, passed assistant paymas,ters in the sum of $15,000, and paymasters in the sum of
$25,000. There is no month of the year, probably, in Avhich requisitions
do not pass this office putting into the hands ot these A^arious paymasters, with their A'^arying amounts of bond, sums between $50,000 and
$150,000.
The files, correspondence, and Avork of the office are all in a most satisfactory state. Facility of reference and conveidence of operation are
thoroughly established. The Avork is essentially brought up to the current business, and I am consequently, in most instances, enabled to dispatch it as it arises.



FOURTH AUDITOR.

127

It gives nie pleasure to speak in terms of just and cordial commendation of the competent and gentlemanly clerks who compose this office.
Their attention to their work, their accord with each other, their courtesy of deportment, and their dispatch of their duties, are worthy of
high praise. The various chiefs of divisions have all acquitted themselves to my entire satisi'action; and my able and efficient chief clerk,
William B. Moore, esq., during the past year, as during the time before,
has proved himself invaluable.
With the highest esteem, I have the honor to be, very respectfully,
your obedient servant,
<
*
STEPHEN J. W. TABOR,
Auditor,
Hon. GEORaE S. BOUTA\^ELL,

Secretary of the Treasury,




^

'




REPORT OF THE FIFTH AUDITOR.

9 P







REPORT
OF THE

FIFTH AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Fifth Auditor^s Office, October V5, 1870.
SIR : I have the honor to here submit to you the report of the operations of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.
I am compelled to omit a stateinent of the expenses of assessing and
collecting the internal rcA^enue for said fiscal year in consequence of a
portion of the accounts not having reached here. The same cause preA^ented the appearance in my last annual report of the table for thefiscal
year ending June 30, 1869, which is now included in this report.
The amount of official fees collected by our consuls, notwithstanding
the European war, continues to be very satisfactory. I am constrained
to again invite attention to the inadequacy of the compensation of consuls. It would inure greatl^^ to the benefit df the Government were
a number of the consulatCwS, where little or no business is done, discontinued, and a more liberal allowance made to many of the others.
The irregularities in the matter of disbursements for the relief of destitute American seamen still continue, as they undoubtedly will until
broken up by personal investigation and prompt detection by agents
sent out, who, by reason of diplomatic or consular experience, or familiarity with the manner of keeping the accounts at the seat of Government, are qualified for the task. This office is the medium through
which the State Department delivers assets and efiects of naturalized
and native American citizens, dying abroad, to their heirs. Complaint
is from time to time made of the excessive cost of administering abroad
upon these estates, the property of the decedents in many instances
being but little. This subject also requires the attention of efficient
consular agents.
^
During the past year I have been so strongly impressed with the inconvenience of the present system of holding the outgoing collector
responsible for the tax lists delivered to his successor that I take the
liberty to resjiectfully repeat in substance what I said in my last report
upon that subject. IJiion the appointment of a new revenue collector,
under the laiv as it now stands, the uncollected tax lists are delivered to
the incoming collector, but he is not charged with them, or held responsible by the Government for them. The outgoing collector has already
been charged with them, and the Government continues to hold him and
his bondsmen for the amount, until voluntarily accounted for by the UCAV
collector. Millions of dollars are annually involved in this condition.
The system is Avrong in principle, and works badly in every way. The
new collector, having large lists in his possession with Avhich he is not
charged, can, if he chooses, in the first months of his administration,
deposit enough to keep the United States in debt to him, as far as the
books show, and still retain large sums in his possession. Not being
held accountable for these old lists, he has npt sufficient motiA^e to pay



132

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

over promptly, or for collecting the scattered and difficult portions, or
haAdng the AA^orthless items abated and closed out. Large amounts
stand charged to the ex-collector long after they should have been accounted for. The injustice of holding the ex-collector and his sureties
responsible for tax lists delivered by him to his successor, and over which
he has no control or authority Avhatever, must be apparent. Each retiring collector •aj^'pea.rs to be largely in debt to the United States. The
accounting officers cannot determine how much of this indebtedness is
real, and how much nominal, until these old lists are closed, and voluntarily accounted for by each successor, which is usually years after, and
sometimes never. If the indebtedness is real it gix'-es the retiring collector and his bondsmen plenty of time to dispose of their property, if
so inclined, before the United States officers can proceed against them.
Besides, the bondsmen may be released by laches. Any amount found
due the retiring collector for compensation or expenses is necessarily
withheld until the tax lists charged against him are accounted for; and
where the indebtedness proves to have been only nominal, the withholding of the pay for years is unjust. These evils can be remedied by a
provision in the law to the following effect: " When a collector has been
appointed and qualified, all the lists of uncollected taxes of the district
shall be delivered and charged to him. His receipt for said lists shall be
sufficient to authorize the accounting officers of the treasury to carry
the amount to the credit of the ex-collector from whom receiA^ed, but
such, credit shall not discharge said ex-collector, or his sureties, from any
liability incurred before or at the delivery of said tax lists.'^ The language of such a proAdsion should be such as to hold the retiring collector
and his sureties responsible for any loss that may accrue, by his failure
to collect at the proper time, or perform his duty in any manner, before
he delivers the lists, and for any sums that may have been collected and
not credited, notwithstanding the credit for the transfer. This transfer
releases him and his sureties from any accountability for what may happen to the lists after their delivery to his successor. The present law
is inoperatiA^e, for the reason that the Commissioner can not'make the
certificate required. If the xilan here suggested, o^ one similar to it,
could be adopted, the books and reports of the aiccounting officers would
show a much more reputable condition of accounts so far as the retiring
officers of the internal revenue throughout the country are concerned.
The amount collected under thp internal rcA^enue laws for the year
ending on the 30th of June, 1^69, was one hundred and thirty-nine million seven hundred and seven thousand four hundred and seventy-three
dollars a,nd twenty cents, ($139,707,473 20.) For the year ending June
30, 1870, the collections sum up one hundred and eighty-five million two
hundred and thirty-five thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven dollars and ninety-seven cents, ($185,235,867 97.) This last-mentioned
amount exceeds that of any other year, and, as will be seen, is in excess
of the last i:)receding fiscal year fort3^-five million'five hundred and
twenty-eight thousand three hundred and ninety-four dollars and seventy-seven cents, ($45^528,394 77.) This handsome increase in the collections ofthe revenues is undoubtedly to be attributed mainly to the
integrity and increased vigilance of the xiresent revenue officers of the
Government, Avhose care and industry in the several districts is a source
of gratification and pride to those of us making up the record of the
year.
The accounts of collectors and assessors, after their reference to this
office by the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue, have been adjusted
more promptly since the 1st of July last than ever before since our in


133

F I F T H AUDITOR.

ternal re\^enue laws went into effect, thus enabling these officers and
their assistants to receive their compensation with less delay. This I
attribute to the previous much-needed increase of force which Congress
granted this office from the last-men tioned date, and to the close and
studious application of that part of the employes of the office having to
do with these accounts. I am also pleased to report that those haAdng
the work of the diplomatic and consular and other diAdsions of the office
have proved themselves efficient and worthy of the trusts/Confided to
them.
The entire number of accounts settled during the year is 11,986, and
the amounts involved therein $698,378,006 S8. The number of letters
written is 7,256,
I am, very respectfully,
HENEY D. BAEEON,
Auditor,
Hon. G E O R G E S. BOUTAVELL,

Secretary of the Treasury,

A.—Statement of the expenses of all missions abroad for salaries, contingencies, and loss by
exchange, from the 1st of Juiy, 1869, to the SOth of June, 1870, as shown by accounts adjusted
in this office.
Contingencies.

Loss by
exchange.

$251 80

$454 50

364 02

599 59

26, 762 00

615 82

1, 0.54 09

11, 208
862
14, 076
1, 948

79
06
93
35

790 00

28, 096 13

1, 545 56

3, 288 78
7, 582 42

610 71
540 49

10, 871 20

1,151 20

8, 941 09
7, 524 16

751 95
407 92

570 86
754 95

16, 465 25

1,159 87

1, 325 81

47, 703 30
9, 494 50

5. 000 00
251 59

1, 545 47
80 39

57,197 80

Mission.

No.

5, 251 59

1, 625 86

64, 075 25

9, 450 55

777 17

756 09

10, 983 81

17, 702 94
. 978.26
8, 563 19

623 36

801 11

575 76

1, 304 19

27, 244 39

1,199 12

2,105 30

Salary.

'

Total.

ARGENTINE CONFEDERATION.

1
o

$10,
2,
9,
4,

H . Gr. AVortliington l a t e m i n i s t e r
. A s m i n i s t e r to U r n g u a y
R. C. K i r k , m i n i s t e r
A.S m i n i s t e r to U r u g u a y

542
894
048
276

51
02
91 .
56

$28, 431 91

AUSTRIA.

3
4
5
6

H . M . AVatts, l a t e m i n i s t e r
H . S AVatts l a t e s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n
J . Jp, D e l a p l a i n e , s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n
'

7
8

9
10

29 641 69

BELGIUM.

" T S Sanford l a t e m i n i s t e r
F
J E Jones, minister
;

755 56

12, 022 40

BOLIVIA.

J". AV. Caldwell l a t e m i n i s t e r
L. Markbreit, minister

.

.

18, 950 93

BRAZIL.

11
12

J . AV. AVebb, l a t e m i n i s t e r
TT. lllow, m i n i s t e r

...

CHILI.

1 3 " ' jr. K j l p a t r i c k , m i n i s t e r
CHINA.

14
15
16

J. E. Browne late minister
]F. ]F.IJOW m i n i s t e r
.
...
S. W . AVilliams, pliarg6, s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n . .




4

>
30,548 81

134

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
A.—Statement ofthe expenses of all missions abroad, cfc.—Continued.
Contingencies.

Loss b y
exchange.

$576 12
9, 375 00

$114 17
374 35

$56 42
319 66

9, 951 12

• 488 52

376 08

13,125 00

493 81

414 15
1, 919 00

11 48

2, 333 15

Mission.

No.

11 48

Salary.

Total.

COSTA RICA.

17
18

A . M . Baily, l a t e c h a r g 6
J . B . Blair, m i n i s t e r

$10,815 72

.DENMARK.

19

Gr B[ Y e a m a n m i n i s t e r

13 618 81

ECl^ADOR.

'>0
'>1

X). A !Nunn l a t e m i n i s t e r
R u m s e y AVing, m i n i s t e r

2, 344 63

FRANCE.

J" A . D i x l a t e m i n i s t e r
.
J". AV. D i x , l a t e s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n
E . B. AVashburne, m i n i s t e r
AV Hoffman s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n

4, 038 36
346 15
17, 500 00
2, 625 00

601 93

11 00

3,o823 89

55 06
34 52

24, 509 51

4, 425 82

100 58

15, 272
367
3, 617
1,156

59
00
96
54

4, 957 85

20, 414 09

4, 957 85

25, 371 94

10, 219 78

470 94

10, 690 72

3, 750 00
4, 429 94

474 37
146 16

277 57
176 28

8,179 94

620 53

453 85

937 50
8,571 43

222 97

9, 508 93

222 97

11,826 47
618 13

237 67

235 75

12, 444 60

237 67

235 75

24, 826 47
2, 772 01

1, 237 67
26 00

27, 598 48

1, 263 67

15, 000 00
1, 495 60
1,373 03

607 22

86 38

17, 868, 63

607 22

86 38

13, 333 25

594 24

1, 073 84

13, 333 25

22
23
24
25

594 24

1, 073 84

29, 035 91

GREAT BRITAIN.

26
27
28
29

J . L. Motley, minister . .
..
E . C. J o h n s o n , l a t e s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n
B . Moran, s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n
A. Badean, late assistant secretary
GREECE.-

30

C. K . T u c k e r m a n , m i n i s t e r . . . - .
GUATEMALA.

31
32

F . H . AVarren, l a t e m i n i s t e r
S. A . H u d s o n , m i n i s t e r . . :

9, 254 32

H A W A H A N ISLANDS.

33
34

E. Perkins, late charg6
H. A . Peirce, minister

9, 731 90

HAYTL

35
36

G-. H . H o l l i s t e r , l a t e m i n i s t e r
E . 11. B a s s e t t , m i n i s t e r
HONDURAS.

37
38

E. H. Eousseau, late minister
H. Baxter, minister

27, 862 15

ITALY.

39
41
49

G. P . M a r s h , m i n i s t e r . .•
H . P . H a y , l a t e s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n
G. W . AVurts, s e c r e t a r y ' o f l e g a t i o n

.-

12, 918 02

18, 562 23

JAPAN.

43
44
45

E ^ B . V a n Valkenburgh, late minister
C. E . D e L o n g , m i n i s t e r
A . L . C. P o r t m a n , s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n
LIBERL&..

46

J o h n Seya, m i n i s t e r




15, 001 33

FIFTH

135

AUDITOR.

A.—Statement of the expenses of all missions abroad, ^c.—Continued.
Salary.

Mission.

C o n t i n g e n - L o s s b y exchange.
cies.

Total.

SIEXICO.

47
48
49

$3, 000 00
11, 516 48
1, 251 09

1, 999 83

$17, 767 83

7, 500 00

482 51

7, 982 51

3, 750 00
8, 097 53

181 10
514 33

$878 00

11, 847 53

695 43

878 00

4,544 84

412 00

20, 000 00

833 23

1, 244 37

20, 000 00

9

$253 90
1,745 93

15, 767 57

AV. S. E o s e c r a n s , l a t e m i n i s t e r
T . H . Nelson, m i n i s t e r
J . S t . Clair Boal s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n

833 23

1, 244 37

22, 805 70
5, 261 32
1, 875 17
333 33

806
392
44
119

NETHERLANDS.

50

Hugh Ewing, minister
NICARAGUA.

51
•52

A . B . D i c k i n s o n late minister
C. N . R i o t t e , m i n i s t e r

...

........

13, 420 96

PARAGUAY.

53

M. S McMahon late minister .

4, 956 84

PERU.

54
55

A. P . Hovey, minister
H . M . B r e n t , s e c r e t a r y of legation

22, 077 60

PORTUGAL.

56
57
58
59

J. E Harvey late minister
S. Shellabarger, l a t e m i n i s t e r
C. H . L e w i s , m i n i s t e r
H . S. N e a l , c h a r g 6

•

99
85
17
31

30, 275 52

1, 363 32

12, 000 00
4, 608 59

818 52

16, 608 59

818 52

9, 776 51
12, 494 50

255 46
1, 030 05

22, 271 01

1, 285 51

5, 281 91
6, 236 41

87 74
199 66

157 10
18 00

11, 518 32

287 40

175 10

3, 000 00
12, 989 01

652 01
5, 979 13

27 24

15, 989 01

6, 631 14

27 24

1, 229 32
6, 976 92

400 81
600 84

10 26
96 29

8, 206 24

1, 001 65

106 55

• 4, 769 04
•
7, 850 25

208 28
337 58

331 28

12, 619 29

545 86

331 28

9, 375 00
7, 500 00

3, 738 52
2,173 71

228 86

16, 875 00

5, 912 23

228 86

31, 638 84

PRUSSIA.

60
61

Greoro"e B a n c r o f t m i n i s t e r
A B l i s s s e c r e t a r y of legation

17, 427 11

RUSSIA.

62
63
64

A . Gr. C u r t i n , m i n i s t e r
T . J . Coffey, s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n

23, 556 52

SALVADOR.

65
• 66

A . S. AVilliams, l a t e m i n i s t e r .
A . T. A . T o r b e r t j m i n i s t e r

11, 980 82

SPAIN.
•

67
68
69

J . p . Hale, late minister
D . E . Sickles, m i n i s t e r
J o h n H a v s e c r e t a r v of lesration

22, 647 39

SWEDEN.

70
71

J J. Bartlett, late minister
C. C. A n d r e w s , m i n i s t e r

9, 314 44

SWITZERLAND.

72
73

Gr Harrincrton, l a t e m i n i s t e r
H. Rublee, minister

13, 396 43

TURKEY.

74
75

E. J . Morris, minister
J . P . B r o w n , s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n




23,016 09

136

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
A.—Statement of the expenses of all missions abroad, <fc.—Continued.

No.

Mission.

76

P. J . Sullivan late minister

Salary.

Contingen- Loss by exchange.
cies.

Total.

UNITED STATES OF COLOMBIA.

.

.. .

$1, 875 00

$2,105 75

$230 75

URUGUAY.

77

Q

618 36

618 36

VENEZUELA.

78
79

E C Pruvn late charw^
J. R Partridge minister

1,198 57
3, 940 84

606 99
223 92

5,139 41

- .

$54 08

830 91

6, 024 40

ALEXANDRIA, E G Y P T .

80

81

2, 050 42

743 32

i, 252 01

Gr. H. Heap, consnl . .

2,050 42

743 32

Charles Hale, consul general

1, 252 01

TUNIS.

TRIPOLI.

89, "William Porter, late consul
MIXED COURTS.

83
84
85
86

Truman Smith, judge
B. Prinffle, iudere
C. Brainerd, arbitrator
AVillia>m Hackett, "messenger

,...

2, 500 00
2,176 791, 000 00
88 "93

.. . . .

400 00
254 00

5, 765 72

654 00

603, 742 46

54, 631 28

6, 419 72
11,907 83

670, 281 47

UNITED STATES BANKERS, LONDON.

87 Baring Bro's & Co

:

733, 732 67

Grand total

1, 404, 014 24

REMARKS.
1. Salary from July 25, 1868, to June 30, 1869.
2. Inclusive of salary for transit.
3. Salary from June 5, 1868, to June 30, 1869.
5. Transit, and while receiving instructions, included.
7. Balance due minister.
9. Salary from June 13, 1867, to July 25, 1868.
11. Salary from July 1, 1865, to June 21, 1869.
12. Inclusive of salary for transit.
14. Extra allowance by CongTess included.
16. Inclusive of salary as ch'arg6.
19. Salary for three suspended quarters included.
21. Transit, and while receiving instructions.
30. One quarter of last fiscal year included.
34. Transit, and while receiving instructions, included.
37. Entire account 38 months and 24 days.
44. Accounts incomplete.
45. A portion only of account received,
46. Accounts incomplete.
48. Salary for transit included.
51. Balance due late minister.
52. Inclusive of transit and instructions.
55. Accounts incomplete.
56. Suspended account, now authorized by Congress.
62. Inclusive of suspended amounts due to late minister.
63. Inclusive of salary for transit.
66. Receiving instructions and transit included.
68. Receiving instructions included.
69. No accounts received.
71. Inclusive of salary for transit.
72. Two quarters of last year.
75. Salary for 30 months.
80. Contingent account only.
' 81. -Contingent account only.
82. Contingent account only.




FIFTH

137

AUDITOE.

B.—Statement of consular returns of salaries, fees, and loss in exchange for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1870.
Consulates.

$1, 000 00

Amoor River . . .
Algiers
Antwerp
Amsterdam
Aix-la-Chapelle .
Alexandria
Amoy
Apia'
Aux Cayes
Acapulco
Aspinwall

Loss in
exchange.

Salaries.

1, 507
2, 712
1, 000
4, 438
4,151
3, 000
750
403
2, 000
2, 744

02
92
00
46
44
00
00
54
00
00

2, 278
88
2,131
1, 623
750
3, 504
4, 302
2, 571
1, 000
3, 579
4,376
2, 064
1,500
2, 532
3, 502
4,697
2, 499

24
33
57
63
00
68
20
40
00
64
00
01
00
32
44
50
82

2, 076
5, 407
1,000
1,710
3, 000
1,460
1, 000
5, 677
321
1, 500
500
3, 991
2, 008
.3, 668
2, 000
1, 000

08
60
00
17
00
12
00
26
73
00
00
56
15
46
00
00

$64
9
2, 530
982
2, 542
. 65
629
168
204
451
2, 960

79
90
82
25
88
00
28
63
38
57
80

$56 24
17 98
9 15
41 48
485 33
174 44 ,

B.

Belfast
Bay of Islands .
Bordeaux
Barcelona
Batavia
Bremen
Basle.:
Beirut
Bahia
Buenos Ayres .
Bangkok . . . . . .
Brindisi
Boulogne
Bradford
Berlin
Barmen
Birmingham ...
Cork
Calcutta
Cape Town '....
Cadiz
Constantinople.
Canea
Cyprus
Canton
Cape Haytien..
Chemnitz
Carthagena
Callao
Coaticook
Chin-ICiang
Clifton
44 Ceylon.
Dundee
Demerara..
Dresden . . .
Darmstadt.

C.

2, 000 00
2, 000 00
4, 285 66

9, 988 20
6,280 \6
401 08
350 79
3, 829 70
5, 593 50
140 49
1, 000 73
4,641 14
205 11
2 50
72 75
8, 231 06
6, 929 00
10, 278 50
10, 633 53
1,001 08
5, 024 42
247 12
1, 289 28
291 89
1, 176 21
15 00
6, 595 50
561 72
3, 084 27
4, 181 50
1, 061 34
5, 568 00
175 93
6,136 50
2, 085 01
5,195 00

74 25
, 31 88
119 83
26 73
1, 254 20
50 30
52 41

12 63
58 85
27 15
121 08
220 16
65 00
607 51

231 37
"*"3'75
3 63

Elsinore .
Fort Erie
Funchal
Fayal
Foochow
Franklbrt-on-the-Main .

2, 449 45
1, 500 00
475 82
4, 746 83
4, 627 72

6 652 25
,
94 39
335 41
^ 928 70
2, 272 00

Genoa
Glasgow...
Geneva
Guayaquil.
Gibraltar ..
Gaboon
Guayamas .
Goderich...

1,500 00
2, 608 68
1, .500 00
750 00
1,500 00
2, 458 68
1,000 00
1,185 70

1,402 20
8, 555 42
1,130 50
290 00
• 665 95
82 72
952 15
1, 460 00

Havana
Hong-Kong.

7, 808 62
4, 717 35

18, 805 81
6, 761 20




522 08

7 09
27 92
66 03

138

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
B.—Statement of consular returns of salaries, fees, Sf-c.—Continued.

No.

Consulates.

Salaries.

Fees.

Halifax . . .
Hamburg.
Hakodadi.
Honolulu .
Havre
Hankow ..
Hamilton .

$2, 000 00
2, 850 00
00
49
00
89
00

$2, 729 95
7, 003 70
705 11
14, 538 39
5,114 45
1,338 14
4, 637 25

Jerusalem .

2,156 89

16 50

Kingston, Jamaica
Kingston; Canada AVest.
Kanagawa

1, 7.34 64
1,500 00
3, 738 51

Liverpool —
London
Leeds
Lisbon
La Rochelle.
Leipsic
Laguayra...
Lahaina
Leith
Lyons
Leghorn
Lanthala

90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102

Manchester.
Malta
Moscow
Marseilles...
Malaga
Matfinzas . . .
Munich
Messina
Mexico
Montevideo.
Maranham..
Mauritius...
Montreal
Melbourne ..
Matamoras .

103
104
105
106
107
108
109

Odessa
Oporto
Osaka and Hiogo....
Omoa and Truxillo.

114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126

L.




76
00
00
14
00
00
00
.63
53
00
11

898 06
2, 289 23
4, 552 13
37, 887 64
19, 573 39
1, 611 00
.503 11
195 50
6,160 25
345 21
20 36
8, 658 37
10, 486 50
1,521 06

M.

Port Stanley...
Port Mahon
Paso del Norte,
Panama
Pernambuco —
Para.
Payta
Pictou
Palermo
Piraeus
Prescott
Paris
Prince Edward Island .

127 I Quebec

500
948
000
672
238

11, 510
3, 750
2, 000
1,561
1,125
3, 250
1,125
3, 570
7, 037
4, 250
1, 720

Nassau, N. P .
New Castle ..
Nantes
Nice
Nagasaki
Naples
Nurembui-g..

110
111
112
113

2,
8,
6,
7,
3,

3, 682 00
1,177 98
2, 288 93
2, 5U0 00
1, 500 00
5, 500 00
1, 538 03
1, 500 00
250 00
1, 332 42
750 00
2, 500 00
4, 868 14
7, 375 90
1, 327 01

28, 535 50
, 148 66
9 00
3, 476 27
1,153 21
11,123 90
1, 042 45
2, 289 20
227 00
2,225 55
393 88
760 22
6. 207 30
2, 646 69
1, 791 20

2, 233 34
1, 749 30
1, .500 00
1, 500 00
3, 000 00
1, 870 91
3, 765 49

1, 694 39
1, 392 50
341 00
370 00
625 18
1,103 71
6, 045 50

2, 000 00
1, 497 29
3, 000 00
750 00

85 50
191 24
1, 698 79
59 79

1, 630 53
1, 736 40
375 00
3, ,530 00
2, 419 79
750 00
500 00
1,537 09
1, 500 00
1,214 62
1,578 30
7, 619 84
750 00

103 81
40 73
34 50
1,842 49
1,599 16
2, 049 96
426 91
704 40
1, 821 68
10 00
2, 526 97
53,169 25
798 67

0.

|

1, 500 00

Loss in
exchange.

FIFTH AUDITOR.

139

B.—Statenient of consular returns of salaries, fees, fc.—Continued.'
Consulates.

Rotterdam
.
Rio de Janeiro..,
Revel
Rio G r a n d e , B r a z i l .
Rome

Salaries.

$2, 310 84
4, 500 00
1, 505 66
750 00
1,635 96

L o s s in
exchange.

Fees.

$2, 034 70
5, 151 34
479 34
1, 300 00

$27 86
60 20
238 79
49 28

St. J o h n ' s , N . B
,
St. P e t e r s b u r g
St. P a u l de L o a n d o
St. T h o m a s
San D o m i n g o
St. C a t h e r i n e ' s , B r a z i l .
Sonneberg
Singapore
Santiago de C u b a
Sau J u a n , P . R
Santiago, Caije V e r d e ..
Santa Cruz
Stattgai'dt
Spezzia
Srayrna
i..
Swatow
-.
San J u a n del N o r t e . . . .
San J u a n del S u r
Sabanilla
Stettin
Southampton
St. H e l e n a
St. J o h n ' s , C . E
Sarnia
Sheftield
Seychelles
Shanghai

5, 058 28
2, 213 51
750 00
5, 559 00
3, .501 36
1,500 00
3, 823 52
2, 500 01
3, 550 17
1,989 13
750 00
1, 500 00
2, 000 00
1, 500 00
2, 000 00
3, 500 00
2, 000 00
2, 000 00
2.50 00
1,137 35
2.170 33
1, 500 00
728 26
1, .500 00
8, 674 63
1, 530 00
5, 870 00

Tangiers
Trieste
Tampico
T r i i i i d a d de C u b a .
Tripoli
Tunis
Tumbez
Tnhita
Talcahuano
Toroiito
Tamatave
Tunstall
Turk's Island

953 80
2, 000 00
1, 623 63
3,125 00
3, 055 83
3, 000 00
621 20
750 00
1,190 20
4, 000 00
2, 000 00
567 31
2, 456 52

397
320
701
7, 769
190
2, 905
380

Venice
Valparaiso .
Vienna
Valencia...
V e r a Cruz .

993 72
4, 200 82
2, 000 00
1, 500 00
3, 642 98

353 83
2, 877 40
4,966.00
283 60
2, 391 39

AVindsor, C a n a d a .
AVinnepeg

1, 500 00
1, 269 23

2,182 50
29 50

18 98

2, 741 81

18 50

139 55

4,152 53
1, 250 00

4, 730 00
225 78

256 04

Yeddo
Zurich
Zanzibar.

3,796
582
41
2,865
282
266
5,401
1,036
777
971
56
224
3,017
20
1,231
264
298387
438
140
230
691
1. 429
1,702
16, 843
225
4,439

175 82
32 50
36 39
09 43
77 04
9
60
107
528

44
64
34
88

3 80
40 13

50
'62'48

809 98
803 01
1, 304 98

9 31
125 32

68
49
04
54
94
00
06

89 55
49 25

T.

z.

T o t a l fees received, as p e r s e t t l e m e n t s .
Salaries paid out
,
Loss by exchange

$534, 670 79
$451, 030 38
9, 934 21
460, 964 59

E x c e s s of fees over s a l a r i e s a n d loss b y e x c h a n g e




73, 706 20

140

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

REMARKS.
1. Including from April 1, 1869, to March 31, 1870.
3. Including salary of James Riley AVeaver while making transit to his post of duty.
5. Including salary of James Parks and AV. H. Vesey Avhile awaiting exequatur; also salary of
Charles E. Dahinan, consular agent.
6. including salary of George H. Butler while receiving instructions and making transit to his post
of cluty.
8. Including from April 1, 1869, to December 31, 1869.
11. Including salary of A. C. Hyer, consular clerk, from January 1 to March 2, 1870; also salary of
F. AV. Rice while making liis transit home.
12. Including salary of James Rea while making transit to his post of duty and awaiting exequatur.
13. Including salary of James G. AVhite while receiving instructions; returns from consulate incomplete.
15. Including salary of Henry Ruggles while receiving instructions.
16. Second quarter^ 1870, not received.
17. Including Bremerhaven agency and transit salaries.
18. Including returns of agency.
19. Including salary of consular clerk for half year.:
21. Including transit salaries.
22. Including salai-y for instructions and transit period of F. AV. Partridge.
25. Settled per act July 25, 1866.
26. Settled per act July 25, 1866.
27. Including additional salary and fees for self and agencies under act March 30, 1868.
30. Including salary of George H. Butler while receiving instructions.
36. Including salary of E. \V. King while making his transit home.
37. No returns since September 20, 1869.
38. Second quarter, 1870, not received.
42. Including salary of Charles J. Sands while making his transit home.
47. Settled per act July 25, 1866.
48. Returns incomplete.
.52. Including salary of J. C. Cover while making transit to his post of duty; second quarter, 1870,
not received.
53. Including salary of Alfred Allen while making his transit home; also salary of M. M. Delano while
making transit to his post of duty.
54. Including salary of VVilliam P. AVebster while awaiting exequatur.
60. Including salary from July 30, 1861, to November 2, 1862; also salary and fees from July 1 to
August 15, 1868.
,
62. Returns from May 9, 1870, not received.
63. Including salary' of Thomas Biddle while receiving instructions, transit to post of duty, and
awaiting; recognition; also salary of E. L. Plumb, consul general, while awaiting exequatur; also
salary of Jose'ph A. Springer, consular clerk.
64. Including transit salaries.
66. Including salary of James Hand, consular clerk.
68. Including salary of Thomas Adamson, jr., while receiving instructions and making transit to
his post of duty; also including salary of Z. S. Spalding while in charge.
70. Including two fiscal years, instructions', and transit of R. M. Johnson ancl transit of G. H. C .Salter.
71. Approximated; vouchers incomplete fbr second quarter, 1870.
75. Including salary of Lemuel Lyons while receiving instructions.
76. Including consular .agency per act March 30, 1868.
77. Eirst and' second quarters, 1870, not receivecl.
80. Second quarter, 1870, not received.
81. Including salary of consular clerk.
82. Second quarter,' 1870, not received.
83. Including transit salaries.
84. Settled per act July 25, 1806.
85. Including salary of consular clerk and agency per act March 30, 1868.
87. Returns incomplete.
88. Including settlement from April!, 1868, to September 7, 1868, of M. Lord's account.
89. Returns incomplete.
•
. 93. Including consular agencies per act March 30, 1868.
96. Returns incomplete.
97. Including second quarter, 1869.
98. Second, quartei', 1870, not received.
100. Including consular clerk's salary.
101. Includiug transit salaries.
109. Settled per act July 25, 1866; approximated for second quarter, 1870, vouchers incomplete.
113. Second quarter, 1870, not received. .
114. Including salary of A ^ H. Smyley from February 15, 1868, to April 1, 1869; first and second
A.
quarters, 1870, not received.
116. Second quarter, 1870, not received.
118. Including salary of Samuel G. Moffatt while making transit to his post of duty and while
• awaiting exequatur.
119. Second quarter, 1870, not received.
123. Including salary of Robert P. Keep while making transit to his post of duty.
125. Including salary of J. Meredith Read while receiving instructions and transit to-his poist of duty;
also salaries of consular clerks.
'
126. Eirst and second quarters, 1870, not received.
128. Including transit salaries.
129. Salary of incumbent withheld for second quarter, not being a citizen of the TJnited States.
130. Second quarter, 1870, not received.
131. Second quarter, 1870, not received.
133. Settled per act July 25, 1866.
134. Including C. Crosswell's transit home.
-135. Second quarter, 1870, not received.
136. Including transit salaries.
137. Including salary of R. H. Perry while receiving instructions; also additional compensation
allowed per act June 21,1870.




FIFTH

141

AUDITOR.

139. Approximated; vouchers incomplete for last half year.
141. Including instruction and transit salaries.
151. From April 1, 1869, to September. 30, 1869, no further returns received.
• 1.55. No returns from November 11, 1869.
157. Settled per act July 25, 1866. .
159. Including salaries of consular clerks.
160. Including salary of Jesse H. McMath while making his transit home; returns incomplete.
163. Including second quarter, 1869.
167. Second quarter, 1870, not received.
169. Including additional compensation of consul from agencies uuder act March 30, 1863.
171. No returns from October 1, 1869.
172. Including transit salaries.
173. Including instructions aud transit salaries.
174. Including transit salaries.
177. Including salary of S. T. Trowbridge while awaiting exequatur.
179. Returris incomplete:
181. Includiug addition.al compensation from agencies per act March 30, 1868.
182. Including second quarter, 1869.

B 1.—Statement of expenditures and receipts on account of sundry approj)riations, as follows,
from July 1, 1869, to June 30, 1870, as shown by adjustments made in this office.
Appropriations.
Eor interpreters to the consulates in China, Japan, and Siam, including
loss by exchange thereon.
Eor salaries of the marshals for the consular courts in Japan, including
that at Nagasaki, and in China, Siam, and Turkey, including loss hy
exchange thereon.
Eor rent of prisons for American convicts in Japan, China, Siam, and
Turkey, and for wages of the keepers of the same.
Eor repairs of cemetery, fences, and sexton's house, belonging to the
TJnited States in the city of Mexico.
(Baring Brothers & Co., b'ankers at London.) Appropriation for compensation of consuls.
Ainount transferred from this fund to the diplomatic fund ...".
Eor expenses of the consulates iu the Turkish dominions, namely: Interpreters, guards, and other expenses of the consulates at Constantinople, Smyrna, Candia, Alexandria, Jerusalem, and Beirut:
'Constantinople
$810 00
Smyrna
•
:
648 27
. Candia
498 79
Alexandria
(*)
J er usalem .'.
416 64
Beirut
541 38

Expenditures.
$6,. 134 27
9, 655 82
6, 998 63

$337 89

142 27

129 00

8, 249 83

184, 544 06

110, 000 00

* Reported in Statement A ; " Expenses of all missions abroad,'




Receipts.

142

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

C.—Statement showing the amount expended hy the consular officers ofthe United States for the
relief of American seamen abroad, the ainount received by said officers as extra wages of discharged searnen, and the amount of loss in exchange incurred by theni in drawing for balances
due them, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1S70, as appears from the settlements in the
Fifth Auditor^s Office of consular accounts.
D i s b u r s e m e n t s . L o s s in e x c h a n g e .

Consulate.
Apia
A u x Cayes
Aspinwall
Amoy
Acapulco
Antigua
Amsterdam
B(dfast
Barcelona
.. .
Bermuda
Batavia
J
Buenos Ayres
...
Barbadoes
Bangkok
B a y of I s l a n d s
Bahia
Bombay
Bristol j England
Bradford, E n g l a n d
Cardiff' . . .
Curacoa
Cork
Constantinople
Callao
Cadiz
Calcutta
Cape Town
Cape H a y t i e n
Ceylon .'.
;
C a r t h a g e n a , U n i t e d S t a t e s of Colombia
Clifton, C a n a d a
.
Dublin
:
Dundee ...
Eayal
•
Eaimouth, England
Eoochoo
F o r t Erie, Canada
...
Glasgow
:
Guayaquil
Genoa
Gibraltar
Havie
Honolulu
Hong-Kong
Havana
Halifax, N o v a Scotia
Hambui'o;
Hilo....':
Hioga
Kingston, Jamaica
Kanagawa
...
Liverpool
L o n d o n , (first a n d second q u a r t e r s 1870 n o t received)
La Paz
Leipsic
;
Lisbon
Manchester
Marseilles
Montreal
Matanzas
Malaga
M o n t e v i d e o , (second q u a r t e r 1870 n o t received)
Mauritius
Melbourne Australia
Minatitlan
Manila
M a d a g a s c a r '.
Malta
Maranham
Nantes
Nassau, Bahamas
Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Naples
Payta
Piraeus
Palermo
Pernambuco




Receipts.
$12 00

$10
141
121
564
136
18
154
957
1, 416
574
851
66
2, 309

00
00
50
11
32
49
73
05
48
23
41
60
00
41

7
68
3
68
11
24
67
3, 291
401
787
128
225
136
226
8
110
2
8, 353
240

90
70
00
05
50
20
52
50
30.
23
41
90
38
45
17
41
68
63
23

183
101
1,343
13
92
421
6,160
1, 068
799
19
20

12
16
94
61
93
75
39
89
66
25
30

114
678
1, 617
140
62
6
164
15
473

82
50
66
32
86
21
62
97
26

293
3,124
794
1, 024
420
688
1, 022
229
97
535

24
07
80
43
91
00
48
75
93
07

772
76
43
4, 025
9
286
\205

90
08
02
69
39
10
65

/

40 00
126 50
4-84

$93 61

24 30

270
340
833
628
65
372
40

96
98
26
72
34
00
00

40 00
5 40
10 62

2, 373
52
1 428
123
46
164
128

67
20
17
00
15
23
00

1, 368 00
40 00

•

113 69
62 25
278
9, 045
324
264

38
92
00
96

383
256
534
43
677
3, 688

64
00
40
03
97
63

540
340
195
696
364
1, 272

00
19
00
65
40
16

8 66

220 40
38 74
1 93
36 10
15 16
4 07

458 21
8 40
121 00
280 92
.30 00

81
2 32
598 85
1 03
4 75

175 87
139 20

FIFTH AUDITOR.

143

C.—Statenient showing the amount expended by the consular officers, ^c—Continued.
D i s b u r s e m e n t s . L o s s in e x c h a n g e .

Consulate.
Panama
.
Paris'
P i c t o u , N o v a Scotia
P o r t Stanley
Para
.
Paramaribo
R i o d e J a n e i r o , (second q u a r t e r 1870 n o t received)
Rio Grande del Sur
. . . .
Rotterdam
St. P e t e r s b u r g
S a n t i a g o d e C u b a '.
Stockholm
.
St. C a t h a r i n e , Brazil
St. H e l e n a
Seychelles
Santiago, Verde Islands
Singapore
Southampton
'.
,
St. J o h n , N e w f o u n d l a n d
Smyrna
..... .
...
Shanghai
. . .
St. P i e r r e , M i q u e l o n
St. P i e r r e , M a r t i n i q u e
San D o m i n g o C i t y
Swatow
San A n d r e s
Sheffield
S y d n e y , ^^ifstralia
sin, Mfi.rtin, AVe.stTuflies . . .
.
.
St. T h o m a s , AVest I n d i e s .
St. Croix, AVest I n d i e s
.
'.
,
Turk's Island
...
T u m b e z , ^second q u a r t e r 1870 n o t received)
Teneriffe
T a h i t i , (second q u a r t e r 1870 n o t received)
Trieste
Tabasco
T r i n i d a d , (Island)
,
Tampico
Talcahuano
Valencia
Valparaiso
V e r a Cruz
Victoria, Vancouver's Island
Zanzibar
Total

$637
23
14
61
369
41
330
933
41

. -

...

50
16
60
17
72
50
62
36
48

Receipts.
$125 00

6

96 00
290 06
44 04
40 00
1 00

372 09
13 86
689 02
205 21
154 77 ,
717 68
107 82
574 32
24 48
1, 405 80
38 54
540 39
56 75

$5 20
29 00

00
71
9"3
00
13
09

8 58
3 18
3,086 03
1 41
198 61
.32 40

32 65
14 67
54 51
91 41
2, 221 58
350 38
190 38
3, 646 12
398 01
3,291 76
117
18
920
8, 639
11
2, 894

.

36
914
252
108
918
248

732 14
541 00
367 78
39 16
308 77

29
05
14
80
50
04

481
167
168
66

00
65
00
00

•

678 00
391 46
50 00

1, 096 00
179 84

8 75

94 03

80,155 19

-

1, 353 42

39, 038 33

RECAPITULATION.

Total amount of expenditures and loss in exchange....
Amount of extra wages received
Excess of disbursements oyer receipts




,

,
,

$81, 508 61
39, 038 33
,

42, 470 28

144

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

D.—Statement of the number of destitute American seamen sent to the United States, and th
amount paid for their passage, from the following consulates, during the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1870.
fl"
03

B
Coijjsulate.
=H

A
Acapulco
A n t i g u a , B. AV. I :
Aspinwall
Bahia
Belize
Baracoa
Barbadoes
B a y of I s l a n d s
Bermuda
Bristol, E n g l a n d
Bordeanx
Buenos Ayres
Cadiz
'
Callao
Calcutta
C a p e de V e r d e I s l a n d s
Cape Town ...,.•.
Cape Haytien
Cienfuegos
Cardiff
Curacoa
Eayal
Gibraltar
Hamburg
Havana
Hong-Kong
Honolulu
Kanagawa
Kingston, Jaraaica
K i n g George Sound . . .
La Paz
London
Lisbon
Livei'pool
Malaga
Mangoni
Manila
Marseilles
M a r t i n q u o , .,-*.,^^.^,
Manzanilla .....'.

.
p
i

Consulate.

^

25 $250
4
50
34 340
A
402
20*
5
50
2 : 230
:
2
20
58 598
3
30
2
20
2
20
15 150
1
10
5
50
2
20
30
3
1
10
1
10
1
10
10
1
28 500
3
30
10
• 1
35 350
6
60
55 550
10 100
30
• 1
1
10
3
30
10 100
5 121
20 200
^ 10
1
10
1
10
2
2(
4
40
3
30

Matanzas
Mayaguez
Mazatlan
Messina
Minatitlan
Montevideo
•.
Nassau, N. P
Palermo
Panama
Paia
Paramaribo
.^.
Pernambuco
Rio de J a n e i r o
R u a t a n , C. A
Sabanilla
San A n d r e s
:
S a g u a la G r a n d e . . .•
Santiago, C a p e de Verde.
Shanghai
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Sisal
St. C a t h a r i n e s
:
St. H e l e n a
St. J o h n s , N . B
,
St. J o h n s , N . F
St. Louis, M a u r i t i u s
St. M a r t i n
St. H b e s , P o r t u g a l
St. T h o m a s
Talcahuana
.'
Turk's Island
Valencia
Valparaiso ...,
Vancouver's Island
V e r a Cruz
,
A^'ictoria
'.
Yarmouth

$50
10
10
50
90
30
750
20
160
290
10
60
320
40
30
20
100
100
30
30
50
20
40
255
46
240
50
10
30
420
40
150
20
10
80
80
470
180
812

8,570

E.—Statement showing tlie amount refunded citizens, seamen, or their representatives, directly from
the United States treasury, the several sums having been previously paid therein by the consular officers, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.
Otto Scliroder, John Curker, and John Hensman, seamen, ship Gentoo, refunding two months' extra wages
Edward Reed, seaman, ship Old Colony
William Jackson and Joseph Rosso, seaman, ship Thomas Dunham
William Slack, seaman, ship Detroit
•
\ .. .1
James M. Hagar, OAvner of ship Ida Lilly
Henry AVilcox, managing owner hark Governor Carver, refunding hospital
money erroneously collected
Tahor, Gordon & Co., agents, whaling bark Florida, as above
i
Zenas L. Adams, nianaging OAvner wla^ling barlv Hamilton, as above
Paciiic Mail Steamship Comj)any, refunding clearance fees erroneously collected
•.
R. H. Clark, paymaster United States Navy, clothing furnished destitute
merchant seamen
F. P. Gillett, ditto, provisions
F. L. Tullock, jr., ditto, clothiug
.1
John T. Church, seauian, estate of
Carl Damaschke, seaman, estate of
Moses Ennis, seaman, estate of
Charles B. Frederickson, seaman, estate of



|150 00
100 00
46 38
44 19
75 G
O
178 80
89 60
130 20
2,005 09
72 05
36 67
106 97
116 27
74-85
49 08
71 11

FIFTH

145

AUDITOR.

E.—Statement showing the amount refunded citizens, cfc.—Continued.
Anton Gerlach, citizen, estate of
Julius H. Kroehl, citizen, estate of
Pietro Redralle, seaman, estate of
W. B. Preston, citizen, estate of
William Scott, citizen, estate of
George Shay, citizen, estate of
Elvira Summers, citizen, estate of
R. W. Tilton, citizen, estate of

i. :
,..
:...

Total

$195 03
65, 00
410 00
.3, 726 93
65 60
2, 002 72
276 21
v 757 00
10,844 75

F.—Departnient accounts • cfc, received and allowed during the fiscal year ending June 30,1870.

Description.

STATE DEPARTMENT.

$7, 453 30
132,759 17
7,861 33
'49, 300 85
40, 530 66

Contingent expenses of all the missions abroad
Contingent expenses of forc^lgn intercourse.
Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse approved by Secretary of StateOffice rent of consuls, stationery, &c
Blank books, office rent, &cl, of consuls, approved by Secretary of State . . .
E.xpenses Universal Exposition at Paris.
Publisliing laws in pamph let form
Proof-reading ancl packing
Exti-a clerk-iiire
'
Copperplate pi'inting, books, maps, &c
Rescue of American citizens from shipwreck
Expenses undcir the neutrality act
Miscellaneoue items
-. Stationery, furniture, &c.. .•
Bringing'home from foreign countries persons charged with crime

4, 713 24
57, 092 79
2, 984 93
5, 6.58 68
1, 796 CO
4, 066 90
27, 702 52
2, 667 70
3, .500 00
1, 318 28

.53
Caleb Cushing, coraraissioner joint commission of the Hudson's Bay and Puget Sound
Companii'.s' claiuis.
AV. H. Wadsworth, coraraissioner Mexican and TJnited States commission
Archibald Campbell commissioner northwest boundary sui-vey for running northwest boundary line.
R. VV. Gibbs, award of claim from New Granada
Sylvester Mowry, survey of eastern boundary of California

349, 426 35
13, 778 44
7, 285 91
6, 711 29
10, 266 51
902 00
38, 944 15

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT.

Expenses of taking the eighth census
Expenses of taking the ninth census
Taking census in Colorado
Suppression of the slave trade
Preservation o^"collections of exploring expeditions.
Packing and distributing documents.
.'
Miscellaneous expenses of Patent Office. . . :
Taking care of copyrights

• 3, 492 84
12,132 80
50 00
1, 570 00
4, 000 00
6, 274 55
126, 370 23
8 65
153, e^t 47

POST OFFICE DEPAUT.MENT.

Blank books, & c . . :
Paving, grading, and curbing Eighth street.

77, 980 95
2, 950 31
80, 931 26

10 F




-Stateinent showing the expenses of collecting the into^nal revenue taxes in the several collection districts, including the commissions, salaries, and extra
allowances of the collector; the office expenses which are paid out of the commissions and extra allowances; and the assessments and collections jrom July 1,
1H68, to June 30, 1869.
/
'

•
G r o s s compensation.

District.

Tax.

N e t compensation.

Stationery
and blank
. books.

Postage.

Express
and dep.
inoney.

Advertising. •

E x p e n s e s of
Total expense
of collecting.' a d m i n i s t e r i n g
office.

Assessments.

Collections.

ALABAMA.

$13,122 72
8, 904 20
86 54

Total

1173 82
53 36
144

$12, 948 90
8, 850 84
85 10

.$69 33
73 05
107 01

$62 00
146 70

$10 00

$81 00
76 19

$13, 345 05
9, 200 14
193 55

$18, 245 82
9, 352 82

$391, 389 42
245, 694 78
23, 030 86

$257, 888 05
169, 9ii0 52

22,113 46

Eirst district
Second d i s t r i c t
Thii'd d i s t r i c t

228 62

21, 884 84

249 39

208-70

10'00

157 19

22, 738 74

27, 598 64

660,- l i s 06

427,"848 57

ARIZONA.

3, 563 45

75 00

7, 248 52
15,313 L9
• 6, 200 00

40 28
100 OO
75 00

28, 761 61

18, 876
10,125
14, Odb
23, 845
12, 999

Arizona

,

3, 488 45

46 00

3. 609^ 45

1, 063 45

16, 661 03

16 561 12

o
o

ARKANSAS.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Total

.. .

7, 208 24
15, 213 09
6,125 00

66 40
27 19
40.67

56 70
85 11
7 20

408 00

16 .50
-40 50

.• 7,388 12
" 15, rt73 89
6, 247 87

7, 779 88
8, 959 48
3, 7U0 00

111,209 71
104, 673 05
32, 930 34

23, 650 71
82, 247 76
29 636 99

215 28

28, 546 33

134 26

149 01

408 00

57-00

29, 509 88

20, 439 36

248,813 10

135 535 46

195
93
100
125
100

18,
10,
13,
23,
12,

147
492
187
499
560

209
236
99
871
174

19, 247
11, 769
14,903
26, 857
15, 708

14, 829
7, 860
9, 000
10,892
8, 999

.

CALIFORNIA.

Eirst district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Eourth district
Fifth district

38
00
74
02
99

06
75
00
00
00

681
031
988
720
899

32
25
74
02
99

50
13
04
47
39.

80
841
70
422
98
00 1,202
00 •1, 608

50
87
12
35

13
73
105
439
165

67
96
25
70
74

35
29
88
31
47

93
00
00
13
99

6, 0.54, 268
418, 786
206, 994
780, 223
253, 857

40
98
68
51
42

3 364 162
284, 468
160 398
481 363
154, 143

.38
41
18
71
40

79, 935 13

Total

613 81

• 79, 321 32

1, 8H6 53

1, 591 48

4, 274 84

798 32

88, 4r6 30

51, 582 U5

7,714, 130^99

4, 444, 536 08

12, 000 00

75 00

11, 925 00

88 51

89 23

101 80

122 40

12, 401 94

9, 500 00

105, 353 87

60, 999 26

10, 355 54
8, 481 bO
6, 635 52

274 24
105 78
105 60

10, 081 30
8,375 82
6, 529 92 1

55 77 . ,

33 50
24 00
32 79

10, 637 81
8,975 97
6, 869 94

3, 870 76
5,366 98
3, 588 57

1,106, 200 70
672,262 92
423, 350 24

936, .528 89
612 503 22
313, 536 42

COLORADO.

Colorado

'.

• CONNECTICUT.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district




4 4 87

40 38

193 C
O
425 50
161 25

02

2nfi .53

7, 695 28

59 63

415 00.

1

21 50

8, 397 94

2,771-26

475, 917 62

478, 319 34

33, 374 47

692 15

32, 682 32

200 65

1,194 75

1

111 79

34,881 66

1.5, 597 57

2, 677, 731 48

2, 340, 887 87

1,954 15

25 CO

1,929 15

19 05

3 50

11 00

1,989 10

579 85

23, 546 91

15 139 56

7, 223 05

124 38

7, 098 67

• 118 74.

520 53

61 12

7, 923 44

3, 736 62

374,401 58

370, 736 24

6;734 99

' 117 47

6, 617 52

116 43

93 00'

49 75

6,994 17

3,385 53

470,423 70

446,045 18

9, 269 30

58 31

9, 210 99

34 82

17 00

112 25

9, 4.33 37

7, 125 00

68, 020 14

54, 888 30

7 901 81 1

F o u r t h district
Total
DAKOTA.

Dakota

-

. 1 40

DELAWARE.

Delaware

'.

DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA.

D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a . . . . . .

'

FLORIDA.

Florida..
GEORGIA.

9, 540
11,115
9,165
15,121

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Eourth district

00
89
46
83

44, 943 18

Total

ICO
. 68
94
75

00
82
08
00

337 90

9, 440
11, 047
9, 071
15, 046

00
07
38
83

44, 6L-5 28

21
113
637
130

03
29
84
78

902 94

11
183
171
57

00
26
00
13

7 65
122 00.

422 39

129 65

31
39
76
36

00
30
45
87

183 62

9, 603
11,4.59
10,172
15, 346

03
39
75
61

6,
8,
6,
9,

46,581 78

540
450
801
833

39
73
36
12

207, 068 76
289,209 66
222, 682 52

1, 327, 895 60

977 3 6 5 80

306, 629
344,511
397, 986
278 768

00
49
23
75

31, 625 47

2 5 8 344 8 6

d
l-H

IDAHO.

6, 499 26

Idaho
ILLINOIS.

6, 365 98

72 38

60 51

125 25

56 00

6, 813 40

'




'

116,4.37 42

7,115 38

95, 831 38

.

. •

F i r s t district
:
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
...
F o u r t h district
Eifth d i s t r i c t
Sixth district
S e v e n t h clistrict
Eighth d i s t r i c t . . . . . . . . . . . .
N i n t h district
Tenth district
Eleventh district
Twelfth district
Thirteenth district
Total

133 28

o

21, 854
7, 238
8, 7b0
11, .364
13, 837
7, 833
9, .591
10, 402
• 4, 915
6, 647
3, 777
'6,839
2, 963

75
43
35
19
05
65
48
37
42
47
01
09
60

489
172
160
375
488
120
120
225
99
41
25
72
19

94
65
46
42
13
36
31
13
72
64
00
61
37

116, 044 86 2, 410 74

21,364 81
7, 065 78
8, 619 89
10, 988 77
13, 348 92
7,713 29
9,471 17
10, 177 24
4, 815 70
6, 605 83~
3,752 01
6, 766 48
2, 944 23
113, 634 12

243
48
74
37
56
28
1.53
80
58
27
49
64
36

00
48
87
67
86
23
49
07
32
11
57
30
08

958 05

1, 077
192
477
163
333
224
333
372
402
170
251
334
84

92
95
61
50
00
45
03
00
67
98
50
21
00

17 71
11 50
43 85

4, 417 82

74 96

1 90

50 00
69
128
24
12
62
40
40
60
66
183
20

75
00
75
00
60
75
50
50
63
70
50

759 68

23, 243
7,491
9, 446
11, 69S
14, 251
^' 8, 098
10, 140
10, 897
5, 416
6, 906
4,144
7, 421
3,104

38
36
43
30
66
33
60
09
91
06
71
30
18

122, 255 37

11, 055
2, 785
3,126
- 2,856
3, 074
4, 426
6, 185
A, 899
1, 920
4, 383
2, 825
4 549
2, 631

75
52
71
00
42
46
26
63
94
20
00
99
08

54 719 96

75
86
97
92
48
71
89
82
93
66
12

6, 778, 235 34
351 458 17
356,013 01
1 203 113 00
1 591 39l 02
393, 489 98
638, 994 12
788, 384 28
133, 099 90
221, 999 14
75, 229 64

71 o «-,n -r?

380 541 0 7

5, 351, 633
537, 782
466, 025
2, 016,105
2, 231, 864
459, 764
961,913
1,213,315
• 220, 802
309,110
92, 661

135, 223 84

61 054 96

^'' '''^^ '^^'^ ''^

12, 978, 964 23

'

'

1

^^^
-q

G.—Statement showing the expenses of collecting the internal revenue taxes, fc.—Continued.
00
Tax.]

N e t compensation.

$8, 641
5, 639
8, 313
12, 841
4, 780
8, 815
6, 533
5,819
4, 995
4, 607
3, 964

75
04
03
18
66
05
96
40
60
42
40

$208 53
114 96
210 75
446 35
144 01
231 22
152 47
' 103" 88
98 17
82 17
25 00

$8, 433
5, 524
8,102
12, 394
4. 636
8, 583
6, 381
5. 715
4, 896
4, 615
3, 939

75,041 49

District.

G r o s s compensation.

1,818 31

73,223 18

Stationery
and blank
books.

Postage.

Express
a n d dep.
money.

Advertising.

T o t a l exE x p e n s e s of
p e n s e of col- a d m i n i s t e r i n g
lecting.
office.

Assessments.

Collections.

INDIANA.

Third district
F o u r t h district
Eifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district......._._.._.
Ei"lith district
Tenth distiict
Total

22
08
28
83
65
83
49
52"
63
25
40

$69
14
147
132
31
32
32
168
21
38
30

24
27
49
41
62
54
59
26
D3

24
40

718 65

$35
.58
132
360
178
97
25
150
54
20
268

80
00
89
84
35
78
64
00
29
00
97

1, 382 56

$5 20

5 20

$37.00
84 25
31 .30
2 05
.32 00
30 50
50 00
77 75
129 20
50 .50
53 30
577 85

$8, 783
5, 795
8,624
. 13,341
5, 022
8, 975
6, 642
6, 215
5,200
4,806
4,317

79
56
71
68
63
87
19
41
62
16
13

77, 725 75

$3,
2,
2,
2,

471 16
339 66
714 70
800 42
900 00
3,190 .58
2,484,48.
2, 741 72
2, 015 87
2, 053 98
2,115 25

$6.59, 988
239, 258
591, 539
1, 321, 093
129, 997
860,414
605,. 130
424,160
174, 032
119,855
85, 949

07
$513, 467 40
62
213,146 50
96
405,116 91
66
1,189, 295 83
37
127, 558 44
44
621,192 87
4 9 . . . . 295,202 94
90
221,982 33
22
147, 568 46
06
119, 742 07
56
56, 078 65

- 26, 827 76

5, 211, 42L) 35

3, 910, 352 40

3, 537
2, 273
6, 495
1, 970
:S 364
2, 390

621, 092
679, 478
562, 642
166, 523
122, 029
91, 9.55

495, 723
375, 683
399, .527
122, 332
120,129
67, 964

o
O

IOWA.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
T h i r d d i s t r i c t ..,
Eourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district

8, 283
4, 508
7, 682
4,921
5,172
.5,010

16
09
86
05
01
10

35, 577 27

Total

187
78
25
93
27
60

27
32
42
65
00
92

472 58

8,
4,
7,
4.
5,
4,

095
429
657
827
145
949

89
77
44
40
01
18

35, 104 69

139
399
129
138
71
191

06
26
34
61
12
71

1, 069 10

163
159
264
184
80
163

13
86
75
15
75
30

1, 015 94

3
2
117
19

85
00
25
25

515"
147 50

86
63
44
55
39
58

25
62
39
80
40
25

347 71

8. 675
5; 132
8, 238
5,318
5, 363
5, 428

45
83
59
86
28
51

38,157 52

64
83
56
23
02
34

22,031 62

71
20
17
00
39
81

2, 243, 721 28

81
28
64
68
86
76

1, 581, 362 03

KANSAS.

41 67

5, 884 31

156 44

266 57

22
77
43
16
47
51
17
30
73

61'58
101 81
23 25
301 09
154 02
182 1.6
196 15
60 76
326 04

36
136
102
458
155
145
330
130
171

81, 639 76

1, 406 86

24 71

161 05

6, 534 75

2, 585 08

259, 640 90

242, 597 07

KENTUCKY.

Eighth district
JN'iiith d i s t r i c t
Total
FRASER

Digitized for


O

w.
5, 925 98

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Fourth distiict
Eifth district
Sixth district

K

4,564
4, 629
4, 003
9,411
12,944
12, .578
17, 35U
4, 625
• 13, .523

75
58
01
02
31
.5656
70
14

83, 631 63

55
62
32
188
345
330
341
94
540

53 f
81
58
86
84
05
39
40
41

1,991 87

4, 509
4, 566
3, 970
9, 222
12, 598
12, '24B
17,010
4,531
12, 982

67
11
74
53
00
81
00
49
68

1, 667 03

44 08
3 75
372 25
1 15
3 32
424 55-

4 50
51 .=^0
18 50
9
62
10
11

00
50
00
00

,167 00

4, 667
4, 963
4,151
10, 542
13, 253
12,916
17, 940
4, 826
14, 035

50
08
25
89
33
68
21
95
18

87, 297 07

2, 517
2, 373
2, 351
5, 310
5, 027
4,981
6. 442
1, 6.59
300

15
42
37
92
56
96
80
78
00

30, 904 90

180, 005
150, 490
117, 372
788, 309
2, 849,154
2, 759, 033
1, 974, 906
178,446
868,137

11
61
99
52
20
36
29
26
62

9, 865, 855 96

132, 364
109,717
82, 733
333,154
2, 547, 024
2, 198, 780
1, 629, 686
95, 577
479, 980

80
37
72
39
.54
57
44
18
92

7, 609, 619 93

LOUISIANA.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
'Third district

12, 066 81
5, 797 54
178 35

55 91
37 52
2 46

12, 010 90
5, 760 02
175 89

145 00
77 26
138 47

21 00
8 50

260 30
. 12 75

- 12,493 11
5, 896 05
316 82

Total

18, 042 70

95 89 1

17, 946 81

360 73

29 50

273 05

18, 705 98

21, 998 23
5, 286 19
806 00

1,198, 865 18

28 090 42

•

1, 957,150 71
43, 862 01
89,135 19
2, 090,147 91

1, 249, 274 61

331, 514
95, 465
118,431
' 8 8 , 349
63, 514

285, 965
114, 071
122,. 036
83, 865
69, 326

49 409 4 3

1 000 00

MAINE.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
F o u r t h district
Fifth district

.

..

_•---• • - • - -

Total

6, 216
4, 617
4, 720
4, 294
5,215

30
34
37
86
33

74
126
110
81
67

39
38
01
60
10

25, 064 20

79
205
272
149

91
96
36
26
23

24, 604 72

459 48

4, 836
8,260
10,118
5, 768
7,066

6,141
4, 490
4, 610
4, 213
5,148

00
50
73
36
04

79 00
214 57

136 81

634 63

293 57

25
95
175
70
102

178
39
62
75
204

30
20
10
41
33

48
56
45
36
96

.

'

180
166
91
121
' 75

.

23 75
19 75
13 50
69-95
33 86

6, 450
4,824
4, 836
4, 606
5, 572

53
15
05
53 .
76

160 81

26, 290 02

202
36
45
15
45

5, 287
8, 432
10,401
5, 929
7, 419

3, 797
1, 019
1,520
1,.596
8, 267

07
31
00
83
99

16, 201 20

09
79
05
62
10

697, 274 65

81
87
90
04
74

675, 266 36

MARYLAND.

First district
Second d i s t r i c t
T h i r d distric-t .
F o u r t h district
Fifth district

.

10
41
15
81
37

4,
8,
9,
5,
6,

17
14
76
64

83 05

756
055
845
619
983

93
27
39
17
32

36, 049 84

Total

789 76 1

35, 260 08

7,157
7, 841
13, 648
12, 445
8, 626
10.126
8, 403
8, 050
6, 582
7, 708

139
150
236
270
190
228
164
267
192
206

7, 017
7, 691
13, 411
12, 175
8; 435
9, 898
8, 238
7, 782
6, 389
7, 501

85
26
60
19
76

469 66

02
97
60
39
62

45 00

560 60

45 00

78
45
63
00
93

345 79

75
09
98
39
68

37, 470 89

72
63
18
49
67

170, 290 03
674, 783 09
3,11.5,991 98
• 269, 475 14
421, 638 37

117 346
528, 494
2, 474, 053
189 774
285 181

14,418 69

4, 652,178 61

.3, 594, 851 42

403,576
402, 282
4,. 098, 388
2,123,016
646, 945
971,335
610,147
523, 732
.321, 2.51
644, 707

365, 706
468 299
3,198,190
1, 966, 397
593, 648

2,175
3,1.57
3, 924
1, 673
3, 487
.

96
52
37
82
75

2

MASSACHUSETTS.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Eourth district
Eifth district
Sixth district
S e v e n t h dii^trict
E i g h t h district
N i n t h district
T e n t h district

.'"...

... .

Total . -

06
53
51
45
28
85
31
01
43
12

90, 589 55

13
36
81
17
44
39
86
39
50
59

2, 046 64

93
17
70
28
84
46
45
02
93
53

88, 542 91

64
31
208
104
143
153
60
99
• 42
. 118

35
72
57
54
34
96
48
89
84
88

188
316
898
349
200
399
471
332
350
241

55
24
10
00
13
00
42
07
27
50

1, 028 57

3, 746 28

1 4 .529 fifi

188
53
95
17
72
135

206
219
259
90
108370

.50. 447 46

562 55

57 50

ii 25
4 47

4 47

10
55
29
60
63
93

01
50
12
00
,50
80

380 67

7, 467
8, 189
14, 755
12, 910
8, 979
10,739
8, 964
8, 541
7, 039
8,162

46
49
18
24
75
78
33
97
04
30

3, 373
3, 640
7,912
6,041
3, 817
4, 558
4,106
1, 7 J 1
1, 732
2, 676

95, 749 54

88
38
10
95
45
95
10
99
31
20

39, 761 31

90
26
88
02
03
8786
46
90
59

10, 805, 384 77

18
93
73
98
65

H
O

8 5 0 7 0 9 80

580,
5 .9
307,
426,

662
258
802
217

00
54
18
09

9, 275, 893 08

MICHIGAN.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Eourth district ...
Fifth district
Sixth district
Total




10,
9,
8,
5,
3,
14,

364
085
095
307
502
817

36
50
56
22
28
68

51, 172 60 1

213
55
54
52
60
288

44
67
76
43
82
02

10,150
9, 029
8, 040
.5, 254
3, 441

725 14 1
1

92
83
80
79
46

73
94
01
51
11
25

56
09
16
04
32
45

9.44
240 01

48 67

1, 253 62

293 60

236 67

44 15

28
47
82
28

80
35
95
90

10, 788
9, 405
8, 576
5, 443
3,692
15, 612

45
88
83
67
15
06

53, 519 04

.

5,178
6, 855
4, .525
3, 258
1, 627
6, 289

10
14
.52
71
33
25

27, 734 05

15
82
85
24
09
51

1 470 4 2 ^ no

3, 254, 641 66

2, 704, 070 94

2, 029, 188
207, 858
262, 059
171,988
115, 457
468, 089

203
24^)
180
83
515

748
948
721
551
677

93
65
50
29
48
CO

G.—Statement showing the expenses of coUecting the internal revenue taxes, ^-c—Continued.
O
G r o s s compensation.

District.

Tax.

Stationery
N e t compensation. • a n d b l a n k
books.

Postage.

Express
and dep.
money.

A d v e r t i s - T o t a l e x p e n s e E x p e n s e s of
" ing.
of collecting. a d m i n i s t e r i n g
oflice.

Assessments.

Collections.

MINNESOTA.

$8, 400 00
10, 687 .50

- MISSISSIPPI

$8, 350 00
10, 650 00

$85 75
58 83

$191 56
1.28 64

$27 40
1 05

$71 25
63 40

$8, 775 96
10, 939 42

$11, 431 65
7, 600 00

$142,145 18
•322,194 83

$124,109 01
231, 604 07

87 50

19, 000 00

144 58

320 20

28 45

134 65

19, 715 38

19, 030 65

464, 340 01

355,713 08

9, 346 87
12, 000 00
10, 748 64

70 88
100 00
82 15

9, 275 99
11, 900 00
10, 666 49

17 50
161 31
159.74

67 25
37 14 "'"29'o6'
54 38

81 00

9,431 62
12, 3U8 45
10, 962 76

'6,406 94 9, 000 00
6, 899 75

32, 095 51

Total
- -

$50 00
37 50

19, 087 50

F i r s t district
Secoud district

253 03

31, 842 48

338 55

81 00

32, 702 83

22, 30(i 69

1, 022, 735 68

14, 239
8, 059
5, 259
6,331
6,122
11, 896

165
71
168
202
38
148

14, 073
7, 987
5, 090
6, 129
6, 083
11, 747

892
149
24
66
117
234

63
51
107
56
106
190

15, 413
8, 505
5, 616
7, 004
6,964
12, 942

25
46
34
43
87
30

10, 348 14
5, 641 15
764 80
1,290 00
4, 469 36
16, 979 21

3, 099, 709
177, 987
286, 007
^339,976
218,449
• 776, 848

-

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Total
MISSOURL
Eircit d i s t r i c t
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
E o u r t h district
Eifth district

33
00
29
53
33
58

.59
02
73
07
44
72

74
98
56
46
89
86

89
14
85
60
76
52

158 77
217
202
225
185
. 490
620

20
64
20
50
45
70

43 08
364 80
127 78

83
60
00
OJ
55
50

24
11
40
71
63
85

•--

.53,779 59.
657,511 37
64, 577 12

O

775, 868 08

O

2, 334, 342
71,945
230, 509
280, 512
187, 955
465, 960

43
34
63
50
72
67

1-3

5^
1,941 69

535 66

575 48

56, 446 65

39, 492 66

4, 898, 978 94

3, 571, 286 29

74 75

689 93

20 00

11, 819 62

8, 927 80

43, 224 88

73, 842 21

80 25

10, 066 60

6, 050 00

279, 672 90

160, 794 87

4,163 67

218 50

22,152 49

11,916 C2

218,186 03

250,034 90

229 14
83 45
253 00

5 35

53 49
47 35
48 75

5, 9.55 74
6, 431 43
4, 879 28

1, 539 95
. 2, 194 44
1,415 00

271,540 60
370, 486 12
98, 343 75

222, 274 64
309, 3.59 97
102,122 56

565 59

5 35

129 59

17, 266 45

.5, 149 39

740,370 47

633, 757 17

794 57

51, 113 49

11, 0.34 94

.-

51, 908 06

85 54

10,949 40

9, 902 90

Total

29 00

- 19,-610 20
794,015 00
. 209, 110 48

50 00

9, 852 90

52 01

31 44

17, 537 08

125 00

17, 412 08

117 99

115 25

5, 648 46
6, 263 09
4, 521 23

150 42
153 47
105 31

5, 498 04
6, 109 62
4, 415 92

39 30
37 54
56 30

16, 432 78

409 20

16, 023 58

133 14

1,485 76

MONTANA.'

Montana
NEBRASKA.

NEVADA.

Nevada
NEW HAMPSHIRE.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t i i c t
Third district


Total


at

NEW JERSEY.

77
50
65
28
24

5, 911'10
7, 335 00
8, 252 90
8, 403 72
12, 058 42

79
43
1.2
141
125

42, 781 58

820 44

41,961 14

9, 843 98

156 00

9, 687 98

6,'018
7,481
8,419
8, 587
12,274

First district
Secoud d i s t r i c t
Third district
Eourth district
Fifth district
Total

87
50
55
00
66

107
146
166
•183
216

177
600
544
298
1,225

258,101
408, 723
583,911
536,019
1, 904, 892

28
15
17
93
75

01
99
27
46
00

47 61
19 27

36
111
39
71
52

522 38

2, 845 73

66 88

311 27

46, 527 84

23, 902 03

3, 885, 205, 58

3, 691, 648 28

66 10

8 13

42 55

124 50

10, 085 26

3, 295 17

71, 473 12

48, 973 08

21.
33
5
32
67

30
75
60
37
25

6, 311
8, 237
9,183
9,117
13, 677

39
57
88
42
58

2,
3,
4,
3,
9,

863
.551
086
828
572

50
50
57
00
46

202,
438,
619,
459,
2,165,

289
370
608
002
934

35
77
60
39
47

N E W MEXICO.

N e w Mexico
N E W YORK.

F i r s t distinct
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Eourth district
Eifth district
Seventh district
Eighth district
N i n t h district
....
Tenth district
Eleventh district
Twelfth district
Thirteenth district
Eifteenth district'
Sixteenth district
E i g h t e e n t h di.strict
Ninteenth district
Twentieth district
Twenty-first district
Twenty-second district
Twenty-third district
T w e n t y - f o u r t h rlistrict
Twenty-fifth d i s t r i c t
Twenty-sixth district
Twenty-seventh district...
Twenty-eighth district
Twenty-ninth district
Thirtieth district
Thirty-first district
Thirty-second district
Total




,

10, 888 47
10, 956 80
14, 458 46
29, 457 38
9, 457 90
11, 532 31
11, 005 70
21,565 04
12, 793 18
8, 958 17
• 5, 844 35
7.514 34
5, 493 45
10, 832 33
9, 575 37
5, 349 44
4, 290 20
6, 632 80
4,444 10
5, 543 94
9, 422 07
5, 259 98
8, 258 00
7, 903 67
5,911 80
5, 890 95
6, 522 58
9, 450 39
5, 238 88
14, 042 97
3, 840 22
38, 003 33
326, 398 57

165
170
332
200
190
143
250
229
235
113
132
120
57
278
262
92
62
120
91
84
355
114
198
- 185
42
101
95
278
95
338
66
200

12
50
80
00
49
03
32
47
34
33
97
36
21
81
45
13
78
32
56
21
15
35
80
15
49
37
21
12
70
71
69
00

5, 404 94

10, 723.
10,786
14, 125
29, 257
9,267
11,389
10, 755
21, 335
12, 557
8, 844
5,711
7,393
5, 436
10, 553
9, 312
5, 257
4, 227
6, 51 i
4, 352
5, 459
9, 066
5, 145
8, 0.59
7,718
5, 869
5, 789
6, 427
9,172
5,143
13, 704
3, 773
37, 863

35
30
66
38
41
28
38
57
84
84
38
98
24
52
92
31
42
48
54
73
92
63
20
52
31
58
37
27
18
26
53
33

320,993 63

62
366
630
450
143
247
88
354
. 289
296
186
64
87
108
111
111
41
74
3
27
98
89
69
81
57
37
127
67
.52
184
33
1, 590

94
59
94
68
15
59
75
83
54
93
42
56
51
46
03
61
45
42
28
79
54
29
98
95
43
95
29
16
30
31
62
24

6, 238 53

7
187
334
774
150
325
270
338
245
484
185
123

50
00
25
60
00
20
60
96
00
21
60
99

317
662
149
147
238
152
244
208
303
203
312
239
. 100
316
316
163
342
242
1,130

60
30
42
19
65
69
(0
00
86
00
07
27
38
74
76
98
51
64
00

9,217 97

38 35
75
23
• 2
18
2

00
50
00
15

75 05
2 40
. 5 85
13 70
166 00
1 58
2 30
131 85
4 75
7 90
1 40

497 53

23
76
61
1,196

20
06
96
21

308
373
49
44
50
18

45
65
80
50
00
60

43
268
29
43
17
44
47
25
42
36
72
19
19
87
40
36
166
24
323

00
00
20
10
25
74
20
50
00
00
20
95
30
63
25
50
80
50
60

3, 589 15

11,C20
11,586
15, 485
31, 879
9, 751
12, 105
11, 696
22, 634
13, 395
9, 785
6, 266
7, ?96
5, 580
11,301
10,619
5, 645
4, 521
6, 963
4, 658
6, 028
9, 755
5, 6it5
8, 569
8,501
6, 228
6, 053
7, 062
9, 874
5, 493
14, 736
4, 140
41,1.07

46
45
61
62
C5
10
50
98
52
96
37
54
96
39
10
52
94
12
51
93
69
13
28
74
45
33
14
56
06
59
98
17

34.5,941 75

6, 730
6, 650
7, 741
23, 069
4,(348
7, 921
4, 999
15, 620
6, 937
5, 691
2, 184
4,107
3, 349
4, 256
3, 326
2, 167
2, 034
3, 220
1, 761
- 2, 859
1,191
1, 973
3, 370
3, 200
4, 062
2, 863
3, 523
2, 887
2,431
6, 108
1,506
33, 063

04
00
28
60
10
71
32
66
24
59
94
07
.32
44
36
81
66
50
38
79
84
00
92
74
{,7
00
61
94
98
62
43
33

185, 467 29

21
78
19
97
01
71
34
34
95
48
75
67
05
17
16
26
59
52
48
06
25
89
16
36
12
89
87
5.T
03
54
83
34

681, 369 95
2, 090, 7;}1 21
1, 886, 19u 41
3, 248, 846 30
808, 705 51
1,814,038 69
1, 300, 257 85
4, 20s, 414 95
1, 658,-bsl 59
686, 348 (34
234, 435 42
401, 808 33
199, 354 81
1 265, u(36 98
' 816, 914 08
117, 272 31
93,006 82
308,241 bO
109, 462 81
205, 094 42
625,162 60
175, 998 73
557, 336 49
4.52, 896 80
270, 137 19
260, 348 74
280, 587 97
755 583 39
223, 242 21
2, 009, 250 38
103 001 27
7 678 272 49

42, 270, 898 52

35, 532, 090 94

976,105
2, 447, 398
2,687,140
2, 919. 029
1, 191, 675
2,001,290
1, 433, 002
4, 779, 9.50
1,496,424
748, 9.S5
252, 763
490, 581
233, 321
1, 392, .587
924, 444
120, 721
96, 551,
288, 567
120, 038
255, 757
635, 351
201,866
792,575
635, 032
406, 687
306, 586
; 242, 499
817, 988
355, 782
2, 246, 285
119,261
10, 654, 644

H
K

H
O

Ol

G.—Statement showing the expeiises of collecting the internal revenue taxes, cfc.—Continued.

Districts.

G r o s s compensation.

Tax.

N e t compen- Stationery
a n d blank
sation.

Postage.

books.

Express
a n d deix
money.

A d v e r t i s - Tot.al e x p e n s e E x p e n s e s of
administering
of coUectir
office.

CJI

Assessments.

Collections.

NORTH CAROLINA.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
T h i r d disti ict
F o n r t h district
Eifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district
Total. ;...v-.T.V.

$25 00
• 75 00
50 00
40 49
50 00
50 00
16 21

$5, 604 12
7, 425 00
7, 453 00
9, 473 76
10, 250 00
6, 950 00
2, 452 37

306 70

49,608 25

765 94

14,124 49
8,816 73
1.3,281 99
9,631 23
4, 472 96
9,223 12
9, 957 44
4, 103 53
8, 828 55
9, 895 36
8, 883 21
9, 681 46
6,141 98
4, 450 53
4, 630 37
4, 669 97

916
57
174
69
60
117
88
39
55
42
95
47
88
45
.52

48
99
00
23
93
25
32
90
05
62
35
62
87
85
58

4 768 6Q
,
5, 926 28
12,120 46
4, 976 48

305 30
237 22
374 20
275 95
81 19
202 00
218 39
88 60
256 87
292 28
342 45
253 04
85 68
62 16
84 57
98 71
25 00
231 29
101 44

51
76
220
67

18
02
65
54

157, 079 75

3,616 34

$5, 629 12
7, 500 00
7, 5u3 00
9,514^25
10, 300 00
7, 000 CO
2, 468 58
-49, 914 95

$453
102
18
62
.35
44
49

57
38
88
82
14
06
09

$99
132
51
39

00
61
00
35

75 13
45 50

$161 60
41
4
99
3
3

58
75
95
75
75

10
25
25
85

83 50

315 38

$6, 412 39
7, 802 24
7, 624 71
9, 653 02
10, 435 09
7. 206 44
2, 566 92

$4,104 26
4, 980 00
5, 503 00
5, 636 34
5, 500 00
5, 000 00
2, 025 80

$47, 618 88
117,222 71
50, 528 22
201,184 12
33.5, 510 30
14U, 900 .53
25, 636 98

131,485 40
99, 380 07
60, 549 03
143, 2.54 03
286, 047 62
123, 665 87
10, 996 14

51, 700 81

$09
67
10
31

32, 749 40

918,601 74

755, 378 10

OHIO.

Eirst district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Eourth district
Eifth disti ict
Sixth district
Seventh district
Eighth district
N i n t h district
Tenth distiict
Eleventh district
Twelfth district
Thirteenth district
E o u r t e e n t h disti-ict
Fifteenth district
Sixteenth district
Seventeenth district...
Eighteenth district
Nineteenth district....
Total

14, 429 79
9, 0.53 95
13, 6.56 19
9,907 18
4,554 15
9, 425 12
10,175 83
4, 192 13
9, 085 42
10,187 64
9, 230 66
9, 934 '50
6, 227 66
4, 512 69
4, 714 94

5, 901 28
11,889 17
4, 875 04
153, 463 41

2, 367 43

135
98
281
82
94
144
171
93

00
00
69
27
91
10
80
78

204 20
120 .53
1.32 57
139 60
128 03
121 88
129 54
223 47
249 00
289 53
2, 839 87

13
75
43
4-^
21
19
79
19
19 65

35
7 48

69 73

20
40
30
00
00
50
08
50

58
33
22
27
31
50
39
49
23
36

80
00
25
75
50
75
00
GO
25
75

15, 494 47
9, 285 34
14,1.55 18
10.101 68
4, 730 99
9, 705 97
10, 515 03
4, .345 31
9,182 72
10, 493 26
9, 499 19
10,136 94
6, 483 88
4, 718 04
4, 940 15
4, 988 75
6, 282 25
12. 613 36
5, 370 30

686 03

163, 042 81

7, 324 00
3, 641 82
5. 171 90
3; 310 00
2,106 03
4, 384 92
3. 556 42
1,420 08
2, 948 00
3, 342 00
1, 381 .50
3,873 51
3, 513 78
2,269 46
2, 023 40
1, 794 .54
4, 560 00
6, 375 69
1, 947 56
64,944 61

79
75
42
76
24
22
13
35
76
14
78
94
58
15
42
00
30
86
30

$4,143, 834 14
2, 955,401 06.
1,714, 827 74
655, 487 41
153, 900 35
644, 644 68
784, 994 11
80, 323 33
603, 901 10
883, 515 92
587, 792 91
721, 743 22
259. 769 28
101, 268 88
121, 494 84
-124, 444 32
242, 442 62
1,371, 532 07
147, 243 70

21, 782, 998 89

16, 298 566 68

412, 899 76

169, 572 20

5, 466,010
3, 784,596
2, 394,190
774, 994
332, 399
965, 807
1,015, 334
130, 253
741, 194
1, 083,919
708, 110
1, 046,067
337, 086
121, 948
114, 155
144, 606
263, 964
2,170, 319
188, 039

OREGON.

Oregon




14, 902 56

O
H
O

H

PENNSYLV.i\J^IA.

First district
Second district
Third district
Fourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district
ScA^enth district
Eighth district
'^Ninth district
Tenth district
Eleventh distiict
Twelfth district
Thirteenth, district
Fourteenth district
Fifteenth district
Sixteen th district
Seventeentli district . . .
Eighteenth district
Niiieteenth district
Twentieth district
Twenty-first district . . .
Twenty-second district.
Twenty-third district...
Twenty-fourth district .
Total

16, 940 76
11, 923 93
6, 351 56
10, 198 47
9, 325 14
7/390 95
% 071 52
6, 378 42
7,941 35
4,971 17
5,518 20
6, 705 20
4, 558 97
5,661 01
8, 352 73
5, 729 38
4, 813 25
4, 205 73
7, 647 31
6, 593 15
10, 709 63
12, 180 20
9, 233 60
6,198 56

303
255
73
197
218
172
135
177
224
92
77
116
119
120
210
95
55
29
104
83
294
282
184
56

84
12
65
27
30
98
56
67
65
72
35
35
90
24
03
14
16
96
30
69
21
95
95
06

16, 636 92
11, 668 81
6, 277 91
10,001 20
9,106 84
7,217 97
4,935 96
6, 200 75
7, 716 70
4, 878 45
5, 440 85
6,588 85
4, 439 07
5,540 77
8, 142 70
5, 634 24
4, 7.58 09
4, 175 77
7, .543 01
6, .509 46
10,415 42
11, 897 25
9, 048 65
6,142 50

41
136
82
203
80
131
37
26
114
64
103
101
25
32
381
76
68
74
43
54
122
125
42
136

14
36
17
02
99
58
75
00
40
96
76
74
83
38
19
34
62
24
80
92
85
60
08
67

183
113
272
103
107
32
51
28
24

338
276
136
218
50
326
37
195
291
110
207

00
15
59
50
00
17
98
91
85
70
54

1 10
1 50

813 66
223 98
165 00
95 94

208
293
210
207
91
223

48
35
53
18
91
03

56 68

'""'io's-V.

50
00
50
25
00
00

29
24
9
46
23
18
126
18

3 61
1 70

56
87
77
10
95
00
20
50
80

87
28
4
105
253
15

50 00

00
75
25
50
00
OJ
70
00

17,165 46
12,224 15
6 706 50
,
10, 842 59
9, 793 84
7, 692 82
5, 378 97
6, 482 92
8, 406 72
5, 074 11
5, 905 37
7, 126 79
4, 701 10
6,007 68
9, 800 58
6,101 38
5, 075 87
4, 400 66
7, 903 84
6, 987 92
11, 066 01
12, .530 98
9, 494 29
6, 601 11

9, 703 47
7,821 71
4, 170 OJ
4, 458 84
6, 328 28
2, 930 83
1, 320 48
1, 824 83
2, 448 13
2, 116 73
3, 037 56
2, 991 06
1,160 84
2, 256 16
7, 955 22
2, 270 00
3, 557 70
3,009 81
4, 561 28
6, 624 00
3, 825 50
5, 373 00
3, 962 91
4,149 83

193, 476 67

97, 858 22

•

5, 013 040 24
2, 517, 523 11
977, 275 91
1,514,581 48
582,671 61
47,5,804 16
100, 984 94
415, 053 54
618, 661 40
175, 836 70
258, 657 95
501, 985 42
90, 918 02
362, 957 33
466,894 B6
176, 735 .56
154, 050 24
196,111 42
278, 288 04
149,165 75
1.17.3,214 82
2, 239, 998 64
623, 557 83
541, 294 33

4, ICO .547 51
1, 960 919 15
483 284 71
1 246 443 72
631, 839 41
3«9,094 09
130 765 80
2.50 6 5 J 95
462 582 81
146 996 26
2^1, 820 52
257 489 67
103, 326 64
233, 450 34
423 972 80
14 J 445 68
,
103, 432 67
100, 030 94
189, 675 09
191, 196 11
950,030 43
1, 705, 390 84
493, 187 87
282, 71)2 89

184, 600 19

3, 682 05

180, 918 14

2, 308 39

4,777 45

10, 657 53
5, 136 11

165 94
89 40

10, 491 59
.5, 046 71

108 21
51 86

314 00
61 64

62 90
22 50

11,142-64
5,272 11

6, 348 69
2, 348 20

1,140,252 08
175, 002 52

1,122, 782 58
103,610 66,

15, 793 64

255 34

15, 538 30

160 07

375 64

85 40

16,414 75

8, 696 89

1, 315, 314 00

1, 286, 393 24

5,241 63
5,317 64
8, 979 96

62 71
38 84
75 00

5,178 92
5, 278 80
8, 904 90

117 08
32 65
94 16

21 00
94 32
53 33

1 25
1 35

113 17
121 25

19, 539 23

176 55

19, 362 68

243 89

168 65

2 60

234 42

581
42
145
46
73
25

99 50
45 00
103 00

109 25

84 44

1, 706 20

19,611,263 30

15, 179, 276 90

H

RHODE ISLAND.

First district
Second district
Total

H

:

o

SOUTH CAROLINA.

First district
Second district
Tliird district

5, 380 96
5, 557 78
9, 250 05
20,188 79

3,191 08
2, 310 83
6, 479 96

63,531 40
193, 096 00
180, 310 40

36, 674 67
179, 696 87
175, 817 09

11, 981 87

436, 937 80

392,188 63

44,410
118,180
140, 643
163, 894
594,767
151, 280

31, 811
67, 197
99, 478
131,062
402,333
81,014

Total
TENNESSEE.

Eirst district
Second district
Third district
Eourth district
Eifth district
Sixth district




3, 873 63
5, 483 62
8,831 10
9, 000 00
7, 022 39
3, 827 72

39
51
75
75
105
75

56
11
00
00
63
00

3, 834 07
5, 432 51
8, 756 10
8, 925 00
6,916 76
3, 752 72

.52
39
20
77
54
23

10 00

-

116
2
16
10
40

75
00
50
50
75

5,180 65
5, 573 01
9, 095 80
9, 057 27
7, 146 68
3, 852 95

3, 035 39
3, 832 23
5,735 00
6, 500 00
3,909 65
1, 327 72

12
58
65
94
86
82

76
37
93
02
81
87

03

G.-—Statement showing the expenses of collecting the internal revenue taxes, fc.—Continned.
N e t compensation.

Stationery
and b l a n k
books.

$75 C
O
83 30

s$7, 056 53
11, 153 43

$18 36
113 41

$49 84
176 70

56, 406 77

579 60

55, 827 17

1,446 42

484 04

14, 015
10,109
15, 327
15,921

100
93
100
114

13,
10,
15,
15,

G r o s s compensation.

District.

Tax.

Postage.

Express
a n d dep.
money

Advertis
ing.

T o t a l e x p e n s e E x p e n s e s of
of collecting. a d n i i n i s t e r i u g
office.

Assessments

Collections.

TENNESSEE—Continued
Seventh district
Eighth district.

$7,131 58
11, 236 73

. .

Total

.

$32 50
.53 00
$109 25

$7, 232 28
11, 579 84

$4, 631 58
3, 871 24

$88, 289 28
207,690-21

$72, 063 78
292, 552 03

272 00

58, 718 48

32, 842 81 1 1, 569,177 46

1,180,519 57

12
29
223
84

00
75
25
80

14, 291 -43
10, 307 51
21, 9u2 25
10,779 10

TEXAS.

First district
Secoud d i s t r i c t
Third distiict
Eourth distiict

....

00
12
10
98

00
81
00
06

915
015
227
807

00
31
10
92

237
71
98
331

23
37
08
00

25
91
11
35

00
12
80
87

2
6
6, 242
405

20
15
02
45

81
74
00
25

253,
105,
134,
357,

738
379
641
623

13
93
21
46

175, 662
53,002
14(3, 483
286, 697

71
14
32
24

851, 382 73

661,845 41

7,576 00-

77, 589 36

4, 682 79
4, 868 88
4, 844 41

2, 041 60
1, 061 28
1, 978 41

126, 695 95
121, 704 89
134,918 06

97,170 80
108, 944 62
120,494 18

199 70

14, 396 08

5, 081 29

383, 318 9J

326, 609 60

•2, 065
8, 600
11,782
2, 310
4,692
5, 283
7, 563
1,991

1, 737
3,765
4, 588
371
2, 469
3, 385
2, 767
902

407 87

54, 965 33

737 68

163 79

6,-655 82

349 bO

63, 280 29

10, 518 44

75 00

10, 443 44

210 70

84 59

46 37

71 00

10, 931 10

4, 415 03
4, 589 45
4, 704 94

68 67
126 41
86 33

4, 346 36
4, 463 04
4, 618 61

31 76

180 00 .
190 68
79 26

. 56 00
88 75
54 95

13, 709 42

281 41

13, 428 01

37 02

449 94

2, 040
8, 450
11, 242
2,239
4, 557
4, 900
7, 153
1, 958

20
184
282
66
75
25
89
31

2, 029
8,265
10, 960
2,172
4, 481
4, 874
7, 063
1, 926

43,560 80

UTAH.

Dtah

o
^•
H
O
H

63, 743 32

55, 373 20

Total

10, 372
7, 232
9,000
. 16, 955

VERMONT.

F i r s t district
Third district
Total

5 26

VIRGINIA.

Eirst district
^Third district :
F o u r t h district
Eifth district .
Sixth district
Seventh district
E i g h t h district

• ..

Total




81
00
94
10
20
19
08
18

42, 541 50

54
23
70
33
74
72
73
27

776 31

27
77
24
77
46
47
30
91

41, 765 19

11
41
262
44
61
89
116
5

11
79
59
62
11
95
56
40

633 13

00
02
00
00
50
75
50
20

1 70

5 53

8
74
77
5
40
22
55
. 8

816 03

7 23

291 90

4
34
199
22
34
270
238
13

00
45
.50
00
00
50
70
75

62
26
03
72
81
39
90
06

44, 289 79

51
43
92
33
62
75
87
50

-19, 988 93

34, 287
842, 926
1, 676, 169
122, 564
477, 083
15(i;, 659
227, 005
25, 0ci5

15
36
88
26
39
43
49
56

3, 562, 381 52

26, 955
569, 494
1,357,721
47,300
250,183
135,370
191,592
11,548

30
90
18
49
76
12
58
71

2, 590, 167 04

Cl
Ul

WASHINGTON.

121 00

9, 666 18

6, 000 00

113, 939 91

49, 367 43

144 35
46 00
90 41

117 85
51 50
54 50

7, 446 94
5,351 34
3, 169 23

2, 990 00
816 96
1, 369 81

383, 966 34
174, 738 54
51, 590 16

35.5,202 16
153,889 26
64,302 81

280 76

223 85

15,967 51

5,176 77

610, 295 04

573, 394 23

108
60
54
31
10
11

13,
6,
4,
5.
4,
2,

4,132
1,811
2, 658
1, 522
2,465
4,211

9, 000 00

100 00

8, 900 00

293 43

91 78

7, 086 34
5, 142 98
2, 968 51

154 81
166 29
32 37

6, 931 53
4, 976 69
2, 936 14

98 40
110 86
55 81

15, 197 83

"Washington

353 47

14, 844 36

265 07

376
141
50
110
29
20

12,
5,
3,
4,
4,
2,

159 97

W E S T VIRGINIA.

First district
Third district
Total

.. .

WISCONSIN.

12, 810
5, 716
4, 035
4. 733
4,056
2, 807

First district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district . . .
Eourth distiict
Eifth district
Sixth district
Total . . . .

...

.

.

80
00
44
85
10
17

67
34
92
.56
52
81

425
574
984
623
026
7cS6

13
72
.52
29
58
36

34, 150 42

729 82

33, 420 60

295 33

8 36

84
37
51
66
68
37

11
25
13
03
80
16

249
225
130
192
90
33

58
30
00
00
98
50

12 65
1 45
50

00
90
00
50
40
00

243
052
270
023
227
889

49
16
57
38
73
33

77
44
26
60
59
60

'l, 538, 432
224, 575
124, 954
110,554
165, 449
123, 589

40
09
.56
04
29
33

921 36

14 60

286 97

275 80

35, 706 66

16,802 26

2, 287, 554 71

295 33

344 48

204 60

1, 356,
184,
82,
109
92,
51,

909
032
5 9
730
989
645

23
80
11
37
60
89

1, 877, 817 00

9, 564 12

WYOMING.

AVyoming

a
H-l

RECAPITULATION.

Alahama
Arizona
Arkansas
Ca l i f o r n ia
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
Delaware
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a
Elorida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indi.aua
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland




22,113
3,563
28,761
79, 935
12, 000
33, 374
1, 9.54
7, 223
6, 734
9, 269
44,943
6, 499
116, 044
75.041
35, 577
5, 925
83,631
18.042
25, 064
36, 049

46
45
61
13
00
47
15
05
99
30
18
26
86
49
27
98
63
70
20
84

2>8
75
215
613
75
692
25
124
117
58
337
133
2, 410
1,818
472
41
1,991
95
459
789

62
00
28
81
00
15
00
38
47
31
90
28
74
31
58
67
87
89
48
76

21, 884
3, 488
28, 546
79, .321
11,925
32, 682
1, 929
7. 098
6. 617
9,210
44, 605
6, 365
113, 634
73, 223
35, 104
5, 884
81, 639
17,946
24, 604
35. 260

84
45
33
32
00
32
15
67
52
99
28
98
12
18
69
31
76
81
72
08

249 39
134
1, 886
88
200
19
118
116
34
902

26
53
51
65
05
74
43
82
94

72
958
718
1, 069
156
1, 406
360
136
469

38
05
65
10
44
86
73
81
66

H
O

208 70
149 01
1,591 48
89 23
1,194 75
3 50
520 53
93 00
17 00
422 39
60 51
4, 417 82
1,382 56
1, 015 94
266 57
1, 667 03
29 50
634 63
560 60

408 00
4,274 81
101 80
1 40

129
125
74
5
147
24
424

65
25
96
20
50
71
55

293 57
45 00

157
46
57
798
122

19
00
00
32
40

111
11
61
49

79
00
12
75

112
133
56
759
577
347
16;.
107
273
160
345

25
62
00
68
85
71
05
00
05
81
79

22, 738 -74
3, 609 45
29, 509 88
88, 486 30
12,401 94
34, 881 66
1, 989 10
7, 923 44
6,994 1 7
.
9, 433 37
46, 581 78
6,813 40
122, 2.55 37
77, 725 75
38,157 52
6, 534 75
87, 297 07
18, 705 98
26. 2C;0 02
37, 470 89

27, .598 64
1,063 45
20, 439 36
51,582 05
9, .500 00
15, 597 57
579 85
3, 736 62
3, 385 53
7, 125 00
31,625 47
. 7,115 38
54,719 96
26, 827 76
22, 031 62
2, 585 08
30, 964 96
28, 090 42
16, 201 20
14, 418 09

660, 115
16, 661
248, 813
7, 714,130
10.5. 353
2, 677,731'
23, .546
374, 401
470. 423
68, 020
1, 327,895
116, 437
14, 709,056
5,211, 420
2, 243, 721
2.59, 640
9. 865, 855
2, 090, 147
697, 274
4, 652, 178

06
03
10
99
87
48
91
58
70
14
60
42
72
35
28
90
96
91
65
61

427, 848
16, 561
135, 535
4, 444, .536

6), 999
2, 340,887
1.5, 139
370, 736
446, 045
54, 886
977, 365
95, 831
12, 978,964
3, 910,352
1, 581,362
242, 597
7, 609,619
1,249, 274
675, 266
3, 594,851

57
12
46
08
26
87
56
24
18
30
80
38
23
40
03
07
93
61
36
42

Or

G.—Statenient shoiving tlie

of collecting the internal revenue taxes, fc.—Continned.

CJT

EECAPITULATION—Continued.

Gross compensation.

Net compen- Stationery
and blank
sation.
books.

Massachusetts..
Michigan
Minnesota..
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New Y ork
North Carolina.
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania...
Khode Island...
South Carolina..
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
"West Virginia..
- Wisconsin
Wyoming

$90, 589 55 $2, 046 64
725 14
51,172 60
19, C87 50
87 50
32, 095 51
253 03
51, 903 06
794 57
11,034 94
85 54
9, 902 90
59 00
17, 537 08
125 00
16,432 78
409 20
42, 781 58
820 44
9, 843 93
156 00
326, 398 57 5, 404 94
49,914 95
306 70
3, 616 34
157,079 75
140 47
14, 708 33
184, 600 19 3, 682 05
255 34
15, 793 64
19, 539 23
176 55
56, 406 77
579 60
55, 373 20
407 87
10, 518 44
75 00
13, 709 42
281 41
42, .541 50
776 31
100 00
9, 000 00
353 47
15,197 83
729 82
34,150 42
8 36
295 33

$88,542 91
50, 447 46
19, 000 00
31, 842 43
51,113 49
10, 949 40
9, 8.52 90
17, 412 08
16, 023 58
41, 961 14
9, 637 98
320, 993 63
49, 608 25
153, 463 41
14, .507 86
180, 918 14
15, 538 30
19, 362 63
5.5, 327 17
54, 965 33
10, 443 44
13, 428 01
41, 765 19
8, 900 00
14, 844 36
33, 420 60
286 97

Grand total.

2, 009, 364 07 33, 223 79

1, 976,140 28




$1, 028 57
562 55
144 58
338 55
1, 485 76
52 01
117 99
1.33 14
522 38
66 10
6, 238 53
76.5 94
2, 367 43
104 00
2, 308 39
160 07
243 89
1,446 42
737 68
21J 70
37 02
633 13
293 43
265 07
344 48

Postage.

$3, 746 28
1, 2.53 62
320 20
158 77
1, 941 69
74 75
31 44
115 25
565 59

Express
and dep. Advertismoney.
$4 47
293 60
28
29
535
689

45
00
66
93

,163 67
5 35

2, 845 73
66 88
8 13
42 55
9,217 97
497 53
442 59
315 .38
69 73
2, 839 87
40 23
4,777 45
84 44
375 64
168 65
2 60
434 04
109 25
163 79 6, 655 82
84 59
46 37
449 94
816 03
7 23
• 91 78
159 97
280 76
-921 36

$380 67
236 67
134 65
81 00
575 48
20 00
80 25
218 .50
129 .59
311 27
124 50
1 .589 15
,
261 95
686 03
50 00
, 706 20
85 40
234 42
272 00
349 80
71 (0
,
199 70
291 90
121 00
223 85
275 80

Total exExpenses of
pense of col- iidniinisteriuo Assessments.
lecting.
office.
$95,749 54
.53,519 04
19,715 38
32, 702 83
56, 446 65
11,819 62
10,066 60
22,152 49
17,266 45
46, .527 84
10, 085 26
345,941 75
51,700 81
163. 042 81
14, 902 50
193, 476 67
16,414 75
20, 188 79
53, 718 48
63, 280 29
10, 931 10
14, 396 08
44,289 79
9, 666 18
15, 967 51
35, 700 66
295 33

15, 270 16 ; 2,120, 771 84

$39,761 31 $10, 805,384 77
27, 734 05
3, 2.54,641 66
19, 030 65
464, 340 01
1.022, 735 68
22, 306 69
39, 492 66
4, 898,978 94
8, 927 80
43, 224 88
6, 050 00
279, 672 90
11,916 02
218, 186 03
5, 149 39
. 740,370 47
205 58
23, 902 03
3, 88.5,
3,295 17
71 473 12
185, 467'29
42, 270,898 52
32, 749 40
918, 601 74
64,944 61
21, 782.998 89
10, 898 96
412, 899 76
97 8.58 22
263 30
19, 611,
8, 696 89
1, 31.5,314 60
11,981 87
436, 937 80
.32, 842 81
1, 569,177 46
43,560 80
851, 382 73
7, 576 00
77, 589 36
5, 081 29
383, 318 90
19, 988 93
3, 562,381 52
6, 000 00
113. 939 91
.5, 176 77
610, 295 04
16, R02 20
2, 287,•554 71
204 60
9, 564 12
1,132, 585 08

.175, 431,159 66

Collections.

$9, 275,893
2, 704, C70
3.55, 713
775, 868
3, 571,280
73. 842
160, 794
25 J,034
633, 757
3, 691,648
48, 973
35, 532,090
755, 373
16, 298,566
169, 572
1.5,179, 276
286. 393
392, 188
1,180, 519
661, 845
63, 743
326, 609
2, 5i.'0, 107
49, 367
573, 394
1, 877,817

08
94
08
03
29
21
87
90
17
28
08
94
16
68
20
90
24
63
57
41
32
60
04
43
23
00

139, 707, 473 20

O
H
O
H

O
Ul

H.- -Statement showing the expenses of assessing the internal revenue taxes in the several collection districts, including the salaries, commissions, and allowances of
ttie assessors, their contingent expenses, and the compensation of assistant assessors, from July 1, 1863, to June 30. 1869.

District.

G r o s s compensation.

N e t compensation.

Tax.

Printing
C l e r k h i r e . S t a t i o n e r y . a n d advertising.

Postage
a n d express.

R e n t of
assessor.

Compensation of ass i s t a n t assessors.

$275"66

- $24, 332 23
20, 769 23
15, 209 38

$627 33
529 93
387 03

$23, 704 90
20, 239 30
14,822 35

$20 83

71 09

$31, 285 11
25, 850 06
20 484 16

20 83

77, 619 33

Tax.

Net
com- S u r v e y
p e n s a t i o n of distilof assist,
leries.
assessors.

Total.

ALABAMA.

Total

$3,184 11
2,222 32
4, 289 84

$109 25
68 61
163 12

$3,074.86
2,153 71
4, 126 72

.$4,124 95
2, 858 29
1,398 00

$117 55
89 89
10 50

$13150
95 25
55 50

$131 35
117 79

9, 696 27

340 98

9, 355 29

. 8, 331 24

217 94

282 25

249 14

346 09

60, 310 84

1, 544 29

58, 766 55

3,125 00

F i r s t district
Second district

93 75

3,031 25

72 25

110 00

9 99

300 00

3, 091 93

93 01

2, 998 92

6, 522 41

895 08
3, 415 04
2, 734 19

28 04
102 84
82 58

867 04
3, 312 20 .
2,651 61

733 32
3, 023 00
1, 30J 00

5 83
134 20
48 6^

69 75
7 50

15 25
128 60
49 75

305 03
600 00
232 50

2, 853 7012, 364 6(i
8, 813 51

72 43317 02
225 43

2, 781 22
12, 047 64
8, 588 (.8

4 707 66
19, 315 39
12, 878 06

7, 044 31

213 46

6, 830 85

5, 056 32

188 65

77 25

193 60

1,137 .50

24, 031 87

614 93

23, 416 94

36,901 11

ARIZONA.

^

ARKANSAS.

First district
Third district
Total...:--

H
C

CALIFORNIA.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Eourth district
Fifth district
Total..

H

. 4, 801
2,941
4, 166
4, 164
2, 934

03
37
48
65
18

194
97
152
158
96

21
62
14
21
75

4,
2,
4,
4,
2,

606
843
014
006
837

82
75
34
44
43

6,124
1, 800
2,100
2, 600
1,495

12
00
00
00
00

252
242
133
232
184

88
61
50
75
08

13
88
32
182
44

50
06
00
70
00

7
94
134
250
50

35
94
37
00
00

265
354
531
300

00
00
25
00

24, 546
15, 419
8, 005
21,034
12, .532

38
.33
02
80
98

711
469
236
637
378

20
36
19
90
42

23, 835
14, 950
7, 768
20, 396
12, 154

18
02
83
90
.56

19, 007 71

698 93

18,308 78

14, 119 12

1, 045 82

300 26

536 66

1,450 25

81, 538 56

2, 433 07

79, 105 49

2, 500 00

75 00

2, 425 00

1,.500 ( O
S

30 04

115 75

42 00

430 00

6, 792 04

205 04

783
1, 200
999
1, 000

26
65
25
75

6, 587 00

3,
3,
2,
2,

202
6
254
163

626 91

34, 839
20, 486
14, 543
28, 454
17, 228

85
64
69
29
82

11.5, 553 29

COLORADO.

Colorado

11, 179 79

CONNECTICUT.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t . .
Third district
F o u r t h district
Total "...

4, 014
3,318
2, 589
3, 098

18
.36
46
36

13, 020 36




146
115
79
104

57
92
42
90

446 81

867
202
.510
993

61
44
04
46

12, 573 55

31
00
96
00

3, 983 27

47
• 40
33
54

34
89
47
90

176 60

6
12
28
3

50
30
05
25

50 10

158
311
173
107

15
.53
48
59

750 75

280
1 0
2.54
75

00
00
03
00

709 03

13, 812
9, 490
•7,501
10, 894

88
79
19
94

41, 699 80

239
180
141
205

18
64
88
16

766 86

13, 573
9,310
7, 359
10, 689

70
15
31 78

40, 932 94

69 35

18,
14,
11,
14,

69 35

.59, 245 59

785
177
3.58
923

96
31
34
98

Cn

H.—Statement showing the expenses of assessing the intei'nal revenue taxes in the several collection districts, fc.—Continued.
GO
District.

G r o s s compensation.

N e t comxiensation.

Tax.

Clerk hire. Stationery.

Printing
a n d advertising.

Postage
a n d express.

K e n t of
assessor.

Oompen.sation of ass i s t a n t assessors.

$118 00

$1, 992 08

$70 93

$1, 921 15

17, 267 12

306 70

16, 960 42

Net
compensation
of- assist,
assessors.

Tax.

Survey
of distil
leries.

Total.

•DAKOTA. .

$26 30

$11 00

,

$13 45

$1, 792 92

86 36

21 86

..

93 27

2, 307 25

1, 828 00

50 70

14 38

1 00

420 00

11,310 .54

214 19

11,096 35

2, 425 00

1, 375 00

103 58

96 21

248 80

480 00

10, 702 26

276 21

10, 426 05

58 33

15,212 97

3,
3,
2,
3,

2, 440
3, 750
2, 992
1,920

69
52
126
86

7
16
45
55

27
42
153
211

.500
470
416
441

16,192
31,888
21, 916
20, 299

423
817
563
504

1.5, 768
-31 070
21,3.52
19, 795

48 50
42 85

22 020
39, 233
28,115
2.5, 668

$1, 373 60

$22 94

$1, 350 66

2, 716 27

85 78

2, 630 49

2, 376 04

. 68 79-

2, 500 01

Dakota

75 01

$3, 445 56

DELAWARE.

Delaware

$38 90

$21, 624 22

o

DIST'CT OF COLUMDIA.

D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a

15 717 68

FLORIDA.

Elorida

H
O

GEORGIA.

F i r s t district
Second d i s t r i c t .
Third distiict
F o u r t h district

' 3,
3,
3,
3,

316
967
087
227

56
11
04
01

108
135
108
111

36
84
41
31

208
831
978
115

20
27
63
70

00
00
98
00

13
02
69
44

50
00
00
00

68
05
65
55

00
69
67
76

27
92
05
85

8499
12
23

43
93
93
62

...

13, 597- 72

463 92

13,133 80

11,102 98

334 88

123 50

434 93

1, 829 12

90, 297 09

2, 3.9 18

87, 987 91

2, 961 96

Total

92 56

2,869 40

1, 990 38

41 33

57 00

36 50

600 00

10,106.54

303 48

9, 803 06

47, 093
11, 397
11, 057
15, 448
23, 920
12,907
14,646
22, 046
6,386
12,781
10, 083

975
203
202
247
387
218
2.52
356
110
232
183

.

91 35

94
56
05
92

115, 038 47

IDAHO.

Idaho

ai

15, 397 67

ILLDfOIS.

F i r s t district . . . .
Second d i s t r i c t
Third distiict
E o u r t h district
Fifth distiict
Sixth district
Seventh distiict
E i g h t h district
'
N i n t h district
Tenth district..
El venth dist
fore FRASERr i c t

o
W

8,140
3,375
4, .597
4,763
6,792
3, 700
4;600
4, 594
l,5fe9
2, 247
1, 520

Digitized


77
51
73
14
07
02
57
10
74
77
12

357
118
179
188
289
134
180
179
28
62
26

03
75
86
15
59
98
97
68
48
38
00

7, 783. 74
3, 256 76
4, 417 87
4, 574 99
6, 5 2 48
3, 565 04
4, 419 60
4,414 42
1, 541 26
2,185 39
1,494 12

• 3, 909
900
1,116
1,000
1, 062
534
827
1, 550
. - 900
707
800

92
00
65
00
50
00
76
00
00
00
00

316 51
43 97
62 93
160 00
166 39
45 42
55 67
137 49
6 20
• 92 00
52 12

20
40
39
54
16
11
37

00
55
00
00
00
70
50

20 40
26 75

271
105
110
286
173
31
87
230
73
134
21

68
34
51
34
72
25
36
37
B6
,55
19

966
120
180
3 0
300
200
124
349
83
167
100

67
00
00
00
OJ
00
66
06
33
21
00

.

74
59
47
05
44
62
31
29
06
44
97

48
87
46
61
91
.52
55
79
74
10
10

46,118
11,193
10, 8.55
15,201
23, 532
12, 689
14, 393
21, 689
0, 275
12, 549
9, 900

26
72
01
0453
10
76
.50
32
34
87

57
183
25
35
124
38

30
90
40
.30
70
15

59,366
15,639
16, 783
21, 618
32, 575
17,106
19, 955
28, 533
8, 918
15,855
12, 395

78
79
52
67
52
21
81
04
12
89
05

Twelfth district
Thirteenth district..
Total

3, 362 34
2, 073 40
51, 337 28

121 98
58 66
1, 926 51

3, 240 36
2, 014 74
49,410 77

633 33
397 32
14, 938 48

75 76
62 47
1, 276 93

28 50
40 50
334 90-

138 31
7 00

168 00
65 00

11,134 15
8, 849 79

190 67
157 89

1,071 48

3,123 93

207, 753 52

3, 719 69

5
69
36
66
73
57

120
310
200
lv,8
145

10, 999 77
7, 672 02

176 67
133 34

8, 344 :37
13,014 51
• 6, 932 12
09
69
64
38
63
52

i n 67
187 37
127 87
207 14
• 157 15
86 31
182 91
84 72
166 07

7, 533 68
8, 202 70
12, 827 14
6, 804 25
11,466 95
8, 872 54
4, 664 33
9 , 761 47
"
4,339 91
8, 532 45

95, 484 74

1, 656 22

93, 828 52

10, 943 48
8,691 90
204,033 83

3 50

468 25

12,231 24
11 278 93
275, 258 57

INDIANA.
Eirst distiict
Secoud district
Third district
Eourth distiict
Eifth district
Sixth district... ..
Seventh district.
Eighth district
Ninth district
Tenth district
Eleventh district
Total....-:....

139 45
3, 789 30
323 87
5 61
3, 446 53
122 30
5, 792 35
238 59
1,731 12
36 54
3, 629 87 . - 131 45.
2, 846 68
92 33
1, 838 93
50 30
• 4, 770 41
38 51
1,351 47
25 95
1, 614 66
23 51
28,135 19

909 54

3, 649 85
318 26
3, 324 23
5, 553 76
1, 694 .58
3,498 42
2, 754 35
1, 788 63
1, 731 90
1, .325 52
1,586 15

788 11
994 39
800 00
889 39
800 01
1, 000 00
900 00
• 735 00
204 00
290 00
501 LO

59
74
63
42
63
116
42
80
32
57

27, 225 65

7, 901 90

710 05

55
24
73
83
43
95
45
64
48
91

32
42
29
10

00
72
95
00

14 75
51 00
3 75
29 50
24 00

75 84
237 67

37
76
56
40
20
38

4 45

5
76
45
98

00
42
94
10

543 58

00
00
00
00
28

"""-75'66"
154
40
100
150

12
42
00
00

1, 402 82

-

11, 674
9, 029
4, 750
9, 944
4, 424
8, 698

10, 823 10

25
15
42
16

30
IJ
20
6J

....:-:

99 20

15, 503 23
9,358 15
12, 699 37
19,514 12
9 585 75
,
16,154 45
- 12, 699 79
7, 431 47
11 876 19
6,183 28
10 943 54
131 949 39

H

IOWA.
3, 603 72
, 2, 160 20
3, 047 95
1, 705 49
1, 499 82
1,252 64

First distiict
Second district
Third district
Fourth district
Eifth district
Sixth district

130
58
100
36
25
20

16
03
50
94
00
91

3, 473 56

2, 102
2, 941
1, 668
i, 472
1, 231

17
45
55
82
73

700
598
696
699
333
334

00
33
96
96
80
82

93
108
3
74
28
56

43
60
15
95
14
62

11
25
14
42
5
77

00
10
75
25
50
50

114''63
105 78
12 48
114 71
4 00.
24 72

110 00
79 69
120 00
40 80
144 00

12. 906
8, 852
13, 112
8, 965
4,241
5, 525

97
66
70
90
12
76

223
164
225
1(35
81
103

65
.54
50
83
69
01

12, 682 62
8,688 12
12, 887 20
8, 800 02
4, 159 43
,5, 422 75

48 75
94 60

179 70

36 35

17, 234 04
11 802 29
16 .555 96
11, 556 79
6, 046 49
7, 292 14

13, 269 82

377 54

12, 892 23

3, 363 87

364 94

176 00

376 29

494 49

53, 604 41

964 27

52, 640 14

2,509,28

Total

67 07

2, 442 21

1, 7.50 00

119 73

40 00

269 12

360 00

19, 244 02

361 -16

18, 882 86

23 863 97

1,
1,
1,
2,
4,
5,
4.
1,
2,

997 23
1, 1.50 00
1, .500 00
1, 733 34
2, 499 90
1,7r0 00
800 0/
800'03
637 50

2"-) 5 0

15 25

179 97
187 91
125 6'6
360. 00

9,992 91
10, 412 33
10, 101 59
33,361 67
27, 308 60
43, 309 56
46, 561 n

183
169
176
.553
5 1
595
712
198
219

9, 809 26
52 30
10, 242 72
177 60
9, 924 70
208 20
32, 808 00
263 05
26, 807 32
42, 714 37 " l 3 0 ' 5 0
45, . - 8 54
"4
12, 659 20 ""'i.35'6.5
12, 952 79
51 10

12, 964 02
13 213 05
13 409 .59
38, 322 73
33,907 13

8 00

38 97
6 00
24 45
• 89 78
60 00
36 00
34 93
20 00
78 60

99 35

388 53

1,018 60

245 473 73

70 487 71

KANSAS.
Kansas
KENTUCKY..
First district
Second district
Third district
Eourth district
Fifth district.
Sixth di.sf,rict
Siiventh district
Eio-h.th district.
Niuth district
Total

..

1,895 29
1, 430 34
1, 643 04
3,021 34

2, 718 77

44 75
23 83
32 15
101 05
175 48
229 73
165 35
27 23
86 00

26, 662 96

885 57

4, . ^ 9 78
=0
.5, .592 38
4,307 31
1, 544 71




8.50
406
610
92)
334
362
141
517
632

.54
51
89
29 •
30
65
96
48
77

25, 777 39

11, 90S 06

42
16
134
168
93
95
78
27

31
.35
-27
95
56
01
95
11

677 01

14 00
36 60
• 19 50
. 6 00

250
245
•145
350

00
00
11
00

1, 842 99

12, 857 62
13, 172 47
206, 977' 82

65
61
89
67
28
19
53
42
68

3, 210 92

203, 766 90

50, 396 58

51, 171 44
15 356 42
16, 737 87

s
t-H

H
O

H.—Statement showing the expenses of assessing the internal revenue taxes in the several coUection. districts, f c . — C o n t S . n n e d .
O
•

G r o s s comliensation.

' District.

N e t comXJensation.

Tax.

Printing
P o s t a g e . K e n t of
C l e r k h i r e . S t a t i o n e r y . a n d ad- a n d
e x - , assessor.
vertising.
press.

Compensation of ass i s t a n t a.ssessors.

Tax.

Net
compensation
of assist,
assessors.

| 1 , 390 37
2y2 39
383 43

$53, 689 95
11,131 25
14, 525 69

$64, 624 21
17, 097 30
23,149 33

2, 072 19

79, 346 89

"104, 870 90

Survey
of distill
leries.

Total.

LOUISIANA.

Eir.st district
Secbnd district
Third district

$4, 395 45
2, 495 99
4, 939 58

$4, 225 72
2, 420 99
4,788 11

$5, 999 37
3.000 00
3,361 22

• $496 42
84 96
132 77

11,831 02

Total

$169 73
75 C
O
151 47
396 2J

11, 434 ri2

12, 360 59

$154 50

714 15

70 00
-224 50 .

$58 25
40 16 ""$420'66'
25 39
246 15
123 80

666 15

33
102
88
81

300
75
48
83
79

$55, 086 32
11,423 64
14,909 12
81, 419 08

.

MAINE.

First district.."
Second district

2, 512
1, 642
1, 403
2, 089
1, 748

Total

75
06
39
87
04

75
32
25
54
32

61
10
86
48
46

2, 437
1, 609
1, 377
2, 035
1,716

14
96
53
39
18

1, 500
498
050
866
500

03
21
00
67
00

9, 396 71

220 51

9,176 20 "" .4,014 88

2,371
3,664
4, 284
2,153
2, 952

68
1.37
164
57
97

2, 303
3, 527
4,119
2,095
2, 855

53
29
75
83
23

53
02
32
60
55

265 02

'

16 00
01 63
12 63
24 00
114 26 1

72
63
64
59

9 7 :3.^

00
00
03
33
17

8, 269
7,485
6, 084
6,33.)
7, 638

30
19
00
55
06

1.56
138
114
117
143

15
46
58
.57
31

8,113
7, 346
5,969
6,212
7, 494

15
73
48
98
75

12,
9,
8,
9,
9,

4.53
661
270
376
865

.54
55
03
19
00

333 93

595 53

35, 807 16

670 07

35, 137 t 9

49, 626 91

64.94
5 45
54 06

171 00
500 01

41 o r

90 00
49 17

.11,126
13,694
45, 466
15, 879
17, 792

200
2.55
862
263
302

10, 920
13, 439
44,603
15,615
17, 489

O
H
O

MARYLAND.

Second district . . ; . . .
Fourth district
Filth district....Total.:

77
94
00
52
61

15, 426 84

58
35
19
66
61

525 39

19
59
81
86
00

14, LOI 45

- 469
. 1, 287
3, 399
641
356

.58
00
84
63
95

6, 1.55 00

43
25
"180
52
26

127 6256
43
93 " ' " ' 3 l ' 5 4 '
19 50
55 '
82
76 81

329 29

255 47 1

8 90
175 32

810 18

66
89
06
81
27

103, 959 69

51
26
75
86
84

1, 891 22

15
63
31
95
43

$26 65
43 29

14,1(0
18,785
52 389
18,584
20, 906

102, 068 47

69 94

• 124, 765 12

04
11
49
05
43

>
Ul

MASSACHUSETTS

Eirst district
Second district
Third dintrict
Fourth district
Filth district

:

Seventh district. . . . .
Eighth distiict
Is'inth di.strict
Tenth district
Total

2, 747 -50
3,128 71
4,26b 58
4, 737 40
3, 566 15
3, 971 80
3, 392 22
3,218 77
2, 468 29
2,244 25
33, 743 73




• 87
106
163
186
128
148
119
UO
73
74

76
42
41
84
28
56
.59
92
41
69

1,199.88

2,659
• 3, 022
4,105
4, 550
3, 437
3, 823
3, 272
3, 107
2, 394
, 2,169

74
29
17
62
87
24
63
85
88
50

32, 543 85 |

-9.38
1,814
- 2, 700
2,183
1, 996
2. 105
2, 056
1,922
1, 455
1, 500

14
17
00
75
85
50
50
33
00
02

61 80
65 85
205 44
117 69
42 67
111 09
143 29
71 32
111.82
131 84

18, 672 26

1,062 81

00
25
50
75
50
CO
00
00
99
67

225 68
73 67
427 39
123 00
9 67
255 07
103 37
117-49
leo 56
149 40

303.95
200 00
929 58
550 00'
175 00
400 0,J
157 31
400- 00
200 00
., 249 30

293 26

1,680 30

3, 505^ 14

69.
14
39
18
25
18
18
19
42
27

11,707
11,972
33, 825
1(3, 260
17,-790
14, 865
14,722
12,194
14, 918
17, 778

73
22
20 55
58
53
49
20
62
62

166, 055 80

219 95
226 50
669 31
321 .52
320'23
270 20
270 27
229 62
276 39
317 29
3,127 28
•

11, 487
11, 745
33,155
15,9.59
17, 470
14, .595
14; 446
11, 964
14, 642
17,401

78
72
95 " ' " " 2 6 ' 6 6 '
03
35
33
22
58 '"*"i6'20
23
94 75
33

162, 928 52

131 61

—

15, 746
16, 935
41,589
23, 502
23,157
• 21,308
20, 202
17, 612
19,-132
21, 689

09
95
69
84
91
83
32
77
23
12

220, 877 75

',

MICHIGAN.
First district
Second district
Third district
*" Fourth district
"^
'"^ Eifth district
^ Sixth district
Total

1, 694 00
834 64
999 96
800 00
819 83
1, 080 00

68
33
145
38
17
108

6, 228 43

411 84

208 60

769 06

447 50
515 00

33 72
19 50

9 25
20 12

20 41
76 31

3, 934 47

962 50

53 22

29 37

59 47
87 36
113 70

1, 923 27
2, 824 74
3, 404 62

1, 373 51
2, 299 99
2, 333 34

76 55
7 40
86 59

8, 413 15

260 53

8,152 62

6, 006 84

170 54

3, 999 99
1,597 23
2,592 90
2, 345 00
2, 880 74
5,123 33

150
29
75
71
82
181

00
86
54
35
16
13

3, 849 99
1, 567 37
2, 517 36
2, 273 65
-2, 798 58
4,942 20

3, 960 00
900 00
1, 950 00
641 63
1, 400 00
1, 650 00

171
147
54
47
132
123

18, 539 19

590 04

17, 949 15

10, 501 63

676 27

322 43

3, 416 71

127 75

3, 289 46

1, 287 00

153 85

52 50

1, 636 02.

31 81

1,604 21

900 00

202 71

16 00

2,.795 79

93 99

2,701 80

1, 070 00

89 46

116 00

83
27
93
20
26
67

3, 904 35
1, 739 90
2,081 91
1, 858 91

14, 382 36

423 16

13, 959 20

1, 656 85
2, 376 79

30 36
68 81

1, 626 49
2, 307 98

4, 033 64

99 17

1, 982 74
2, 912 09
3, 518 32

4, 057 18
1, 783 17
2,138 84
1,904 11
2, 325 58
2,173 48

152
43
56
45
66
58

2, 259 32
2,114 81

45
77
36
13
82
31

44
63
18
30
22
29

15
40
95
10
35
65

25
181
303
25
92
141

00
98
06
10
63
29

500
200
150
150
150
175

00
00
00
00
00
00

14,046.09
12,753 26
9, 683 50
7, 472 15
7, 527 93
14, 489 80

259
239
183
142
141
270

14
91
63
22
04
69

13, 786 95
12, 518 35
9, 499 87
7, 329 93
7, 386 89
14,219 11

20, 022 90
15, 571 04
13,199 11
10, 232 17
10, 748 84
17, 868 17

64,741 10

87, 643 23

65, 977 73

1, 236 63

100 00
300 00

9, 066 08
li; 186 60

172 83
194 81

8, 893 25
.10,991 79

11,130 62
14,230 70

96 72

400 00

20, 252 68

367 64

19, 885 04

25, 361 32

39 75
2 50

6 75
6 25
20 05

284 71
300 00
317 50

13, 691 84
14, 575 89
29, 809 23

349 74
373 64
755 05

13, 342 10
14, 202 25
29, 054 23

39 70

17, 046 64
19, 643 17
35, 256 03

42 25

33 05

902 21

.58, 077 01

1,478 43

56, 598 58

39 70

71, 945 79

999
150
200
100
294
420

35, 088 17
11, 349 60
8, 437 47
7, 607 93
14, 948 50
19, 831 88

636
207
154
137
273
343

34, 451 90
11,142 44
8,283 28
7, 470 43
14, 674 97
19, 488 35

56
11
53
116
160

25
25
50
00
95

43, 448 52
14, 238 75
13,188 69
10, 732 17
19, 652 14
27,182 12

1, 752 18

95, 511 37

397 95

128, 442 39

1, 325 00

MINNESOTA.
First district
Second district
Total
MISSISSIPPI.
First district
Second district
Third district
Total

Total

64
46
67
07
23
20

39
43
74
58
107

00
00
00
75
68

15
236
129
71
177
289

00
23
13
89
61
74

919 60

99
00
00
00
00
00

27
16
19
50
53
53

2,163 99

97, 263 55

540 00

8, 912 86

306 38

8, 606 48

50 62

198 02

7, 393 35

142 16

7, 251 19

12 00

400 00

11, 544 83

349 53

31 75

73 25

7, 774 62

144 54

MONTANA.
Montana

13, 929 29

NEBRASKA.
Nebraska

133 25

10, 356 00

NEVADA.
Nevada

11,195 30

15, 584 56

•

N E W HAMPSHIRE.
First district

H

w
>

MISSOURL
First district
Second district
Third district
Fouith district
Fifth district....
Sixth district

^

2, 193 37




59 63

2,133 74

764 25

20 94

7. 630 08

10, 6 5 01
.4

H
O

Q_.—statement showing the expenses of assessing the internal revenue taxes i/n the several collection districts, cfc—Continned.

District.

Gross compensation.

Printing Postage
Net comand adpensation. Clerk hire. Stationery. vertising. and express.

Tax.

Rent of
assessor.

Compensation of assistant assessors.

$200 00
75 00

$7,231 40
7, 321 21

$136 57
136 34

$7, 094 83
7,134 87

$10, 752 69
9 576 99

Net compensation Survey
of assist, of distilleries.
assessors.

Tax.

Total.

N. HAMPSHIRE—Con.

Second district
Total

$2, 559 34
1,549 51

$77 96
27-48

$2, 481 38
1, .522 03

$756 65
.574 99

$49 19
76 89

$29 07
19 50

$141 57
123 71

6, 302 22

165 07

6,137 15

2, 095 89

126 08

69 51

297 03

348 25"

22, 327 23

417 45

21,909 78

30, 983 69

2, 323 44
3,115 67
3, 484 52
3, 274 08
3,725 76

66
105
125
113
136

15
87
17
69
27

2, 257 29
3, 009 80
3, 359 35
3,160 39
3, 589 49

1,200 00
1,300 01
2, 000 01
1, 599 96
3, 272 29

10 30
71 34
105 61
- 152 53
166 29

8
11
36
34
39

1
76
89
103
9

00
73
33
25
98

1 5 00
.0
137 35
200 00
200 00
650 00

11, 907 60
10, 767 30
1.5, 939 66
19, 833 57
23, 629 47

219
202
299
365
450

97
14
64
3440

11, 687 63
10, 565 16
15, 640 02
19, 407 73
23,179 07

15 314 47
15,171 39
21, 431 22
24, 825 40
30, 906 12

547 15

15, 376 32

9, 372 27

506 07

280 34

1, 337 35

82, 077 60

1, 537 99

80, 539 61

N E W .lERSEY.
Second district
Fourth district

Total

1 5 923 47
.,

25
00
85
45
00

129 55

$107 09
107 09

107,648 60

H
O
H
W

NEAV MEXICO.
N e w Mexico

o

2, 501 14

75 06

2, 426 08

999 96

339 67
4,033 44
4, .592 78
4, 000 00
3, 265 73
4, 065 50
4,127 .53
5, 221 06
4, 828 07
3, 077 75
2, 606 85
3, 400 90
.537 44
4,100 00
3, 729 03
1, 828 68
465 98
2, 687 58
1, 793 49

8 88
151 67
175 36
150 00
125 78
153 25
156 35
213 60
191 39
103 86
80 32
119 97
11 45
154 98
136 44
41 43
12 45
84 37
39 66

330 79
3, 881 77
4, 417 42
3, 850 00
3,139 95
3,912 25
3, 971 18
5, 007 46
4, 636 68
2, 973 89
2, 526 53
3,280 93
525 99
3, 945 02
3, 592 .59
1, 787 25
453 53
2, 603 21
1, 753 83

3, 000 00
4, 925 51
4,8.39 15
5, 000 00
3, 000 03
4, 985 10
4, 000 00
4,199 88
3, 983 26
1, 948 67
999 97
1, 800 00
1, 299 99
3,199 25
2,106 00
281 45
333 00
1, .500 00
OOO 00

301 70

148 00

37 89

299 53

17, 816 33

676 66
850 00
1, 083 33
1, 041 66
700 00
458 32
3, 583 33
1, 516 67
1,110 00
385 05
51 67120 00
112 50
500 00
500 00

22, 047 77
24, 200 81
34,751 68
37,300 41
16, 223 63
27, 595 22
22,182 44
45, 059 58
40, 776 58
21, 630 13
10, 619 88
15, 744 17
9, 212 94
20, 033 23
14, 838 07
5, 949 41
8, 042 11
11, 391 95
8, 946 24

. 532 32

17, 284 01

249 50

21, 746 67

N E W YORK.

Eifth district

T PT1 th d i «itri r t,
ElevPTith district
T W ' P I fth d i stri of,

Thirteenth district..
Fifteenth district


Nineteenth district..


61 53
246 05
481 94
521 24
113 83
1, 300 66
73 79
1, 000 51
273 76
1, 294 24
96 82
8 30
20 76
225 55
486 97
8 26
93 02
93 22
127 37

12 65
45 92
52 50
56 10
90 20
119 00
91 50
81 90
103 00
23 95
16 25
. 11 65
13 10
30 00
5
49
15
25

50
50
90
80

71
58
5
11
3
50

05
00
00
50
00
00

16
27
27
92
23
36
230
203
114
51
21
76

25
60
14
81
85
56
36
79
61
15
20
78

61 67
200 00
160 00

402 06
450 13
653 22
704 45
303 23
533 77
411 50
844 04.
746 63
400 87
197 15
291 24
170 86
385 93
278 85
110 45
148 03
210 06
166 60

21, 645 71
23, 750 68
34, 098 46
36, .595 96
15, 920 40
27, 061 45
21, 770 94
44, 215 54
40, 029 90
21, 229 26
10, 422 73
15, 4.52 93
9, 042 03
19, 647 30
14, 559 22
5, 838 96
7, 894 08
11,181 89
8, 779 64

48 34

25, 798 39
33, 757 93
44 977 80
47, 076 46
22, 967 41
37 886 78
33,490 74
56, 038 21
50,164 20
27,883 20
14,206 78
20, 697 66
11, 099 32
27,777 48
21,448 57
8, 036 03
8, 935 95
15, 616 42
11,523 42

O
Ul

Twentieth district...
Twenty-first district.
Twenty-second dist'ct
Twenty-third district
Twenty-fourth d ist'ct
Twenty-fifth district.
Twenty-sixth district
Twentv-seventh dis't
Twenty-eighth dist'ct
Twenty-ninth dist'ct.
Thirtieth district
Thirty-first district..
Thirty-second dist'ct.
Total

2, 037 80
3, 435 33
1, 880 00
4, 215 31
3, 667 88
3, 522 69
2,129 21
2, 311 65
4, 337 30
2,417 97
4, 765 59
1, 743 62
3, 998 30
99, 664 13

51
125
43
156
123
112
60
63
175
70
188
37
149

88
87
99
62
50
57
57
10
18
83
27
1796

3, 475 77

1, 985 92
3, 309 46
1,836 01
4, 053 69
3, 539 38
3, 410 12
2, 068 64
2,248 55
4, 662 12
2, 347 09
4, 577 32
1, 706 45
3, 848 34
96,188 36

677 86
1,875 00
1, 200 00
2, 383 39
965 96
699 29
916 63
1,055 51
1, 750 00
966 64
3, 575 00
784 32
4, 990 74
73, 744 10

35
72
01
91
02
53
81
98
13
96
59
10
51

25 10
5 70

15 15
16 35
19 72
16-05
.33 00
14 00
22 50
14 00
50 00

8, 349 49 1, 075 99

20
253
25
123
87
127
88
148
48
16
131
145
15

77
37
25
51
.30
31
08
59
23
95
00
39
00

120 00
300 00
495 13
91 67
63
187
260
400
150
400
85
416

19
50
40
00
00
00
75
66

2, 351 40 16, 081 16

9, 045 84
16, 712 86
11, 9.52 93
13, 091 34
15, 811 .50
7, 324 44
11, 097 82
9,107 31
17, 323 16
16, 631 36
. 25, 605 77
5, 795 86
67, 242 89

8, 876 34
169 50
297 70
16,415 16
221 31
11, 731 62
237 83 . 12, 853 46
• 283 99
15, .527 51
129 84
7,194 60
206 57
10,891 25
172 33
8, 934 98
312 04
17, Oil 12
288 29
16, 343 07
470 38
25,135 39
108 77
5, 687 09
1, 261 52
65, 981 37

623, 289 33 11, 569 24

20 83

611, 720 09

69 17

11 710 24
22, 550 81
14, 838 59
19, 996 74
20, 268 19
11, 596 81
14, 235 91
12, 716 06
23,971 43
19, 880 71
34, 024 80
8 470 10
75, 936 62
809 579 76

•

N O R T H CAROLINA.
First district
Second district
Third district
Fourth district
Eifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district
Total

29
372
40
66
40
82
83
51
46
42
183
47
634

1, 664 84
2, 307 64
2, 010 48
2,280 63
3,288 41
2, 242 44
2,150 02
15, 944 46

41
61
54
64
110
66
54

62
25
62
02
30
37
12

1,623 22
2, 246 39
1,955 86
2, 216 61
3,178 11
2, 176 07
2, 095 90

1, 000 00
1, 037 83
45 .00
1, 725 00
1,500 00
1,375 00
1, 741 66

81
33
111
43
56
16

452 30

15, 492 16

8, 423 49

342 17

74 25

163 20

285
160
185
96
68
49
190
54
113
37
28
113
78
60
44
37
35

34
32
19
34
54
14
72
39

00
00
15
00
00
00
95
25

13
27
29
14
11
16
6
12
11
22
15

25
85
50
00
75
50
00
50
00
CO
00

11
12
193
32
34
124
232
15
103
65
40
64
152
37
67
96
107
47
30

48
27
03
18
67
54

11
14
4
13
.31

25
50
50
00
00

25
34
6
38
26
24
7

75
15
50
60
34
00
86

120
272
137
225
200
211
101

00
50
50
00
00
25
25

10, 630
8, 449
5, 264
13, 087
12, 587
4, 410
11, 357

49
69
77
25
96
49
43

50

65, 738 08

81 1, 200 00
00
750 00
68
393 00
32 • 150 00
71
70 00
84 ^
~
100 00
150 00
45
24
71 39
100 00
69
97
147 00
00
122 50
56
120 79
63
132 07
43
100 00
89
42 50
77
150 00
67
499 91
99
100 00
78

29, .555 01
25, 707 17
28, 828 59
11, 729 95
7, 810 71
11, 439 42
18, 276 12
6, 779 85
11,692 54
8,128 61
7, 254 86
14, 252 53
8, 863 53
8, 741 43
4, 934 90
8, 346 44
7,121 89
20, 691 74
8, 592 96

4, 399 16

248, 748 25

1, 267

223
179
111
274
262
89
240

89
13
82
03
26
76
34

10, 406 60
8, 270 56
5,152 95
12, 813 22
12,325.70
4, 320 73
11,117 09

1, 381 23

64, 406 85

48 60
30 90
21 00
100

50

13, 175 .57
12, 002 76
7, 376 48
17,132 96
17 286 33
8, 215 72
15 080 30
90,270 12

OHIO.
First district
Second district
Third district
Eifth district
Sixth district
Eighth district
Ninth district
Tenth district
Twelfth distiict ...
Thirteenth district..
Fourteenth district
Eifteenth district
Sixteenth district ...
Seventeenth district
Eighteenth district..
Nineteenth district..
Total

w
l-H

150 00
4, 000 00
329 46
7, 570 75
262 67
6,171 75
157 44
4, 111 33
57 11
2,142 36
' 4, 384 16 • 165 06
161 33
4,216 18
28 33
1, 339 57
144 56
3, 891 86
147 99
3, 960 59
155 49
4,110 30
183 30
-4, 666 18
80 00
2, 600 81
29 23
1, 571 22
36 29
1, 558 42
27 32
1, 453 93
56 46
1, 962 13
3,931 03
142 18
1, 864 20
39 03
65, 511 77




2, 353 30

3, 499 97
3, 850 00
7, 241 29 • 2, 040 97
5, 909 08
1, 6.50 00
3, 953 89
1, 440 00
474 96
2, 085 25
999 96
4, 219 10
4, 054 85
1, .585 00
1, 311 24
588 33
3, 747 30
825 00
3, 812 60
27 50
3, 954 81
4, 482 88'
999 99
2, 520 81
799 89
1,541 99
454 00
1, 522 13
500 00
1,431 61
383 29
1, 905 67
1, 000 00
3, 783 85
2, 000 00
1, 825 12
468 50
63,158 47

19, 737 36

10
00
09
43
68 •
49
26
69
40
43
78
85
83
86
95
62
74

114 32
49 10
1, 804

62

473 70

1, 472 43

495
408
419
181
131
176
299
125
196
139
128
236
160
162
92
138
132
383
158

01
43
58
27
31
51
08
84
35
96
87
68
49
98
86
49
25
24
58

4,167 78

29, 060 00
25, 298 74
28, 409 01
11, 548 68
7, 679 40
11, 262 91
17, 977 04
6, 654 01
11, 496 19
7, 988 65
-7,125 99
14, 015 85
8, 703
8, 578
4, 842
8, 207
6 989
,
20, 308
8, 434
244, 580

149.74'
160

70

9 65
35 55
30 60

04
45
04
95
64
50
38

11 00
41 15
14 25

47

4.=;9

=

fi4

37, 940 88
35 535 00
36, 908 75
17 255 32
10, 467 00
16, 931 00
24 262 55
8, 743 80
16, 434 33
11 990 60
11 326 08
19 813 63
12, 398 74
10, 321 30
7 083 01
10, 2.53 39
10 199 72
26, 781 57
10, 937 13
336, 033 85

H
O

a:)
oo

H.—statement slwwing the expenses of assessing the internal revenue taxes in the several collection districts, cfc.—ConJinuecL

District.

G r o s s compensation.

N e t compensation.

Tax.

Clerk hire. Stationery.

Printing
a n d advertising.

Postage
a n d express.

R e n t of-^
assessor.

Compensat i o n of ass i s t a n t assessors.

a^
^

Net
compensation
of assist,
assessors.

Tax.

Survey
of distilleries.

$14, 911 88

$50 00

Total. .

OREGON.
Oregon

<^...

$2, 978 93

$98 94

*3,153
3, 563
3, 592
3, 741
3, 312
2, 681
2, 025
2, 317
3, 244
1, 769
2, 802
2, 522
2, 007
3, 041
3, 728
1,618
1, 515
1, 656
2,142
1, 656
1,151
4,071
3, 504
3, 688

113
137
133
128
115
84
51
70
112
42
79
76
50
89
123
30
29
37
61
32
46
153
125
121

$2, 879 99

$732 50

$144 75

$102 25

$420 00

$47 07

$15, 362 78 •

$450 90

$19, 288 44

PENNSYLVANIA.

Third district
Eourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district. ..
Seventh district
Eighth district
N i n t h district
Eleventh district
Twelfth district
Fourteenth district
Eifteenth district
Sixteenth district . ..
Seventeenth district
Eighteenth district..
Nineteenth district
Twentieth district ..
Twenty-first district.
Twenty-second dist..
Twenty-third district
Twenty-fourth dist..
Total

52
28
84
09
57
36
84
09
46
63
38
22
64
24
92
68
24
82
98
57
52
42
84
48

63
25
74
58 •
61
05
29
68
21
67
38
13
56
31
87
92
87
21
26
96
17
54
23
90

3, 039
3, 426
3, 459
3, 612
3,196
2, 597
1, 974
2,246
3,132
1,726
2, 723
2, 446
1,957
2,951
3, 605
1, 587
1, 485
1, 619
2, 081
1, 623
1,105
3, 917
3, 379
3, 566

89
03
10
51
96
31
55
41
25
96
00
09
08
93
05
76
37
61
72
61
35
88
61
58

4, 716
3, 689
4,050
3 999
3,389
800
1, 600
1,088
1,200
949
999
916
732
1, 200
1, 912
800
124
681
939
1,400
999
2, 784
1,500
1, 069

65
31
00
96
66
05
00
03
00
43
97
70
20
00
60
00
50
72
00
00
96"
30
00
99

122 66
261 42
150.98
210 01
45 30
34 17
93 99
34 14
70 00
. 48 77
35 15
56 04
51 43
161 30
89 19
29 83
30 31
64 61
5 90
74 12
128 62
126 29
77 10
134 93

54 70
26 40
17 80

00
30
85
20
00

24
17
14
21
17
22
19
44
11
22
37

20
50
00
50
90
00
35
50
78
50
00

15
6
15
18

75
50
25
05

53 00
14 75
107 74
39 06
71,82
249 91
14 94
129 48
58 50
27 54
24 52
87 07
33 52
196 37
34 12
40 50
38 80
125 28

43 10

•

30
17
62
3
70

•

600
754
700
500
500
174
300
146
437
237
140
141
74
278
199
• 43
100
99
40
162
98
500
300
100

00
44
00
00
00
88
00
11
50
48
00
67
92
98
99
39
00
67
00
50
16
00
00
00

44, 055 94
29, 967 80
34,149 55
42, 994 01
17, 535 13
20, 736 97
16,188 66
13, 332 52
16, 456 76
8, 327 05
7, 631 70
13, 331 90
13, 790 59
18, 226 91
31,271 17
14, 800 64
• 5, 972 22
16,140 29
10, 344 03
15, 269 91
31, 387 96
20, 813 08
17, 009 70
24, 379 02

808
560
632
819
324
419
298
229
280
149
142
239
245
318
600
256
108
291
190
266
440
355
281
332

80
82
66
51
16
62
51
50
46
50
72
57
97
75
14
12
72
99
83
26
49
85
07
82

43, 247
29, 406
33, 516
42,174
17, 210
20, 317
15, 890
13,103
16,176
8,177
7, 488
13, 092
13, 544
17, 908
30, 671
14, 544
5, 863
15, 848
10,153
15, 003
30, 947
20, 457
16, 728
24, 046

14
J8
89
50
97
35
15
02
30
55
98
33
62
16
03
52
50
30
20
65
47
23
63
20

ih 50
11 66

158 37
26 30
62
44
18
51
206

80
60
00
15
60

597 98

51, 756
37, 610
41 966
50, 500
24 430
23, 923
19,959
16, 650
21,147
11 196
11, 484
16,924
16 393
22,651
36,555
17, 235
7, 639
18, 449
13,290
18,-523
33, 374
27, 850
22, 090
29,267

34
18
22
18
69
76
79
96
99
75
58
24
09
85
71
91
98
78
34
05
03
70
54
63

590, 874 30

64,510 63

2, 048 02

62, 462 61

41, 544 03

2,136 27

449 78

1, 535 27

6, 629 69

484,113 51

8, 594 84

475,518 67

3, 490 39
1, 813 50

123 99
40 67

3, 366 40
1, 772 83

2, 380 75
800 00

110 09
13 52

48 00
16 37

37 99
31 95

200 00

18,140 32
6, 560 08

341 61
• 121 27

17, 798 71
6, 438 81

23,741 94
9,273 48

5^ 303 89

164 66

5,139 23

3,180 75

123 61

64 37

69 94

200 00

24, 700 40

462 88

24, 237 52

33, 015 42

R H O D E ISLAND.

F i r s t district
Second district
Total




o
H
O
i2j

I—(

O

w
Ul

SOUTH

CAROLINA.

First district
Second district
Third district
Total

2,909 71
2, 851 82
3, 400 42

88 87
92 59
12Q 01

2, 820 84
2, 759 23
3, 280 41

677 48
1, 200 00
1, 499 98

13 64
17 67
31 14

30 00
13 20
10 25

66 80
67 12
15 25

75 08
200 00
166 65

13, 330 90
9, 519 95
20, 464 89

340 63
•246 32
"527 72

12, 990 27
9, 273 63
19, 937 17

i9 66

16. 674 11
13 530 85
24, 959 85

9,161 95

301 47

8, 860 48

3, 377 46

62 45

53 45

149 17

441 73

43, 315 74

1,114 67

42, 201 07

19 00

55,164 81

2, 000 00
2, 000 98
2, 094 47
2,115 95
3, 785 52
2,132 57
2, 075 40
2, 632 04

50
50
54
55
139
56
53
88

00
05
72
78
25
62
76
31

1,950 00
1, 950 93
2, 039 75
2, 060 17
3, 646 27
2, 075 95
2, 021 64
2, 543 73

1, 000 00
1, 599 97
1, 500 00
600 00
1,650 00
1,170 00
1, 400 00
1, 557 69

98 96

18 00
45 50

1
10
121
10
13
8
19
16

70
300
287
72
300
100
99
775

8, 913 19
8, 967 30
10,-411 04
1.5, 953 06
21,562 47
15, 024 92
9, 642 55
17,197 12

189
187
211
275
373
283
202
357

8, 723 52
8, 780 11
10,199 42
15, 677 29
21,189 11
14,741 74
9, 440 43
16, 839 85

548 49

18, 288 44

405 83

96 80

200 75

275
34
76
334

12
35
24
11

219
83
62
35

TENNESSEE.

First district
Second d i s t r i c t . . . . .
Third district
Fourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district
Eighth district
Total

18, 836 93

10, 477 66

99
17
19
4
41
123

96
65
40
85
27
74

20 30
4 00

9 66

00
33
25
60
50
50
00
57

00
00
50
00
00
00
33
64

2, 004 47

107,671 65

67
19
62
77
36
18
12
27

2, 080 18

105,591 47

24 76

24 70

11, 843 48
12, 661 64
14, 276 58
18, 437 71
26, 818 28
18,110 04
13, 039 67
21 902 72
137, 090 12

TEXAS.

First district
Second district
Third district
Fourth district
Total

2,
3,
2,
4,

912
368
623
587

08
29
63
00 '

87 36
101 66
78 71
162 64

2, 824
3, 266
2, 544
4, 424

72
63
92
36

2, 333 36
5, 079 71
1, 705 92
3,041 62
12,160 61

64
38
25
42

00
00
94
00

92
21
13
43

365
465
347
520

82 94

400 69

1, 205 66

221 10

• 45 00

1,551 51
1, 599 89
1, 573 47

211 75
94 00
410 63

53 20
44 67
50 50

22 50
13 75
21 83

89 33^
148 50
66 86

103 92'

4, 724 87

722 38

148 37

53 03

304 59

24
115
211
27
55
42
64
25

59
44
62
62
68
84
23
00

1, 450 68
3,108 65
5,125 43
1, 358 34
2, 043 17
2, 064 34
2, 221 22
1, 475 00

82 00
1, 832 58
2, 337 13
913 89
1, 098 92
1, 500 00
780 03
708 37

49 87
79 28
105 85
43 19
. 88 03
38-19
43 85

20 50
67 50
15 50
57 08
11 75

4
85
113
14
174
33
66

567 02

18, 846 83

9, 252 97

515 09

172 33

13, 060 63

3, 375 51

106 13

3, 269 38

1, 584 86
1, 631 46
1, 612 47

33 35
31 57
39 00

4, 828 79
1, 475 27
3, 224 09
5, 337 05
1, 385 96
2, 098 85
2,107 18
2, 285 45
1,500 00

672
668
322
457

95
66
22
52

25, 433 73
• 24, 664 20
90 00
12, 240 45
17, 361 84 ""'66"66'

31,
33,
17,
25,

464
718
001
788

50
13
86
67

2,121 35

79, 700 22

10, 303 19

312 53

9, 990 66

15, 783 00

5, 870 58
5, 756 20
7,129 95

110 43
108 94
131 21

5, 760 15
5, 647 26
6, 998 74

7, 753 34
7, 623 07
9, 328 03

340 00

18, 756 73

350 58

18,406 15

74
78
00
75
00

8, 449 36
17, 998 10
15,391 97
14, 642 26
6,187 16
24, 350 27
15, 808 14
4, 498 71

153
320
263
262
113
331
258
83

92
61
67
81
45
43
24
84

8, 295 44
17, 677 49.
15,123 30
14, 379 45
6, 073 71
23, 968 84
15, 549 90
4, 414 87

1,127 52

107, 325 97

1T;:837 97

105, 488 00

1, 697 38

150 00

H
O

UTAH.

Utah

d

107,973 1 5
(

81, 821 57

101 20

430 37

26,106 68
25, 332 86
• 12, 562 67
17, 819 36

26 25

720 69

13, 491 00

13
00
25
00

950 00

VERMONT.

First district
Second district
Third district
Total

•

65 00
75 00
200 00

,

24, 704 44

VIRGINIA.

Eirst district,
Second district
Third district
• Eourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district
Eighth district
Total

19, 413 85




6 6 83

50
86
63
40
52
09
80

497 80

137
264
200
193
250

.. ,. . _ , , .
. .
,

15 50

82 i6
24 00
153 20
34 00
308 80

9, 904 24
22, 738 50
•22,811 05
17,156 50
9 562 17
28,143 93
18, 917 31
6, 970 64
136,209 34

a:)

H.—Statement showing the expenses of assessing the internal revenue taxes in the seveixil collection districts, fc.—Continned.

District.

Gross compensation.

Tax.

Net comSurvey
pensation
of assist, of distilleries.
assessors.

Rent of
assessor.

• Compensation of assistant assessors.

$38 00

$240 08

$8, 306 85

$230 48

$8, 076 37

$94.67-

35

252 83
. 41 00
8 40

10,911 39
13,159 29
10, 623 84

197 28
234 13
195 84

10, 714 11
12, 925 16
10, 428 CO

75

14, 973 69
15,106 14
12, 454 38

302 23 •

34, 694 52

627 25

34, 067 27

75

42, 534 21

400
150
120
113
75
106

18, 385 48
9, 468 75
'9, 766 94
7, 309 32
14, 911 85
9,271 18

305
172
178
136
276
166

18, 080 34
9, 296 43
9, 587 96
7,172 89
14, 634 97
9,104 37'

Printing Postage
Net comStationery. and adand expensation. Clerk hire.
vertising. press.

Tax.

Total.

WASHIN(5T0N.
Washington ..

$2, 998 87

s$100 00

$2, 898 87

$599 99

3, 008 39
1, 389 54
1,833 80

100 39
30 36
30 56

2, 908 00
1, 459 18
1, 803' 24

999 96
576 66
132 00

. 9 44
6
29 89
43 24

$29 00
73 50
33 25

6"25'

6 331 73
,

161 31

6,170 42

1, 703 62

142 57

135 75

6 60

189
46
25
25
36
27

4, 606 77
1, 880 22
1,477 17
1, 475 00
1, 962 81
1, 521 56

2,.65> 15
1,200 00
537 50
799 92
937 50
300 00

$151 86

$12,099 84

VnSST VIRGINDV.
First district
Second district
Third district
Total
WISCONSIN.
First district .
Second district
Third district
Eourth district
Eifth district
Sixth district
Total

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
Calitbrnia
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota:
Delaware
District of Columbia.
Elorijia
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Digitized Indiana
for FRASER

. 4, 796 57
1, 926 . 4
5
1, 502 27
1, 500 00
1, 999 76
1, 549 00
13, 274 14

80
32
10
00
95
44

350 61

12, 923 53

6, 432 07

89
97
69
36
81
62

29
74
55
98
03
85

8 80
20 00
. 11 00
17 50
16 50
26 25

100 96
165 70
113 89
113 73
. 57 20
192 16

437 44

100 05

743 64

00
00
00
33
00
75

965 08

69,113 52

14
32
98
43
88
81

1, 236 56

-

67, 876 96

25, 943 31
12, 810 09
11, 917 07
• 9, 729 35
17, 765 01
11 313 94

TJ
O
Pi
H
O
525

89, 478 77

RECAPITULATION.
Ul

•
$9, 696 27
3,125 00
7, 044 31
19, 007 71
2, 500 00
13, 020 36
1,373 60
2, 716 27
2, 376 04
2, 500 01
13, 597 72
2, 961 96
51, 337 28
28,135 19



$340- 98
93 75
213 46
698 93
75 00
446 81
22 94
85 78
68 79
75 01
463 92
92 56
1, 926 51
909 54

$9, 355 29 $8, 381 24
$217 94
$282 25
3, 031 25
72 25
110 00
6, 830 85
5, 056 32
77 25
188 65
18, 308 78 14,119 12
1,045 82
360 26
1, . 0 00
50
2, 425 00
30 04
115 75
3, 983 27
12, 573 55
176 60
50 10
1, 350 66
26 30
11 00
2, 630 49
1, 792 92
86 36
21 86
2, 307 25
1, 828 00
50 70
14 38
2, 425 00
1, 375 00
103 58 . 96 21
13,133 80
11,102 98
123 50
334 88
2, 869 40
1, 990 38
57 00
41 33
49, 410 77 14, 938 48 1, 276 93
334 90
27, 225 65
7, 901 90
237 67
710 05

$249 14
9 99
193 60
536 66
42 00
750 75
, 18 45
93 27
1 00
248 80
434 93
36 50
1,671 48
543 58

$346 09
300 00
1,137 50
1, 450 25
480 00
709 03
118 00
420 00
480 00
1, 829 12
600 00
3,123 93
1, 402 82

$60, 310 84
3, 091 93
24, 031 87
81, 538 56
6, 792 04
41, 699 80
1, 992 08
17, 267 12
11, 310 . 4
5
10, 702 26
90, 297 09
10,106 54
207, 753 52
95, 484 74

$1, 544 29
93 01
614 93
2, 433 07
205 04
766 86
70 93
306 70
214 19
276 21
2, 309 18
303 48
3, 719 69
1, 656 22

$58, 766 55 . $20 83
2, 998 92
23, 416 94
79,105 49
626 91
6, 587 00
40, 932 94
69 35
1, 921 15
38 90
16; 960 42.
11,096 35
10, 426 05 ""'5833'
91 35
87, 987 91
9 803' 06
,
468 25
204, 033 83
99 20
93, 828 52

$77,619 33
6, 522 41
36,901 11
115, 553 29
11,179 79
59, 245 59
3, 445 56
21, 624 22
15, 717 68
15, 212 97
115, 038 47
1.5,397 67
275, 253 57
131, 949 39

Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts ...
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouii
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire.
New Jersey
New Mexico
New Tork
North Carolina..
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania —
Rhode Island
South Carolina ..
Tennessee
Texas
Dtah
Vermont
Yirginia
•Washington
West Yirginia...
Wisconsin

269 82
509 28
662 96
831 02
396 71
426 84
743 73
382 36
033 64
413 15
539 19
416 71
636 02
795 79
302 22
923 47
501 14
664 13
944 46
511 77
978 93
510 63
303 89
161 95
836 93
491 00
375 51
828 79
413 85
993 87
331 73
274 14

377 .54
67 07
885 57
396 20
220 51
525 .39.
1,199 88
423 16
99 17
260 53
590 04
127 25
31 81
93 99
165 07
547 15
75 06
3, 475 77
452 30
2, 353 30
98 94
2, 048 02
164 66
301 47
548 49
430 37
106 13
103 92
567 02
100 00
161 31
350 61

12, 892 28
2, 442 21
25, 777 39
11,434 82
9,176 20
14,901 45
32, 543 85
13, 959 20
3, 934 47
8,152 62
17, 949 15
3, 239 46
1, 604 21
2, 701 80
6,137 15
15, 376 32
2, 426 08
96,133 36
15, 492 16
63,153 47
2, 879 99
62, 462 61
5, 139 23
8, 860 48
18, 288 44
13, 060 63
3,269 38
4, 724 87
18, 846 83
2, 898 87
6,170 42
12, 923 53

Grand total
695, 802 35 22, 861 68 672,940 67
Add amount of taxes.




3, 363 87
1, 750 00
11, 908 06
12, 360 59
4, 014 88
6,155 00
13,672 26
6, 228 43
962 50
6, 006 84
10, 501 63
1, 287 00
900 00
1, 070 00
2, 095 89
9, 372 27
999,96
73, 744 10
8, 423 49
19, 737 36
732 50
41,544 03
3,180 75
3, 377 46
10, 477 66
12,160 61
1,205 66
722 38
9, 252 97
599 99
1, 708 62
6 432 07
,
364, 918 44

176 00
364 94
40 00
119 78
677 01
99 35
714 15
224 50
265 02
114 26
.329 29
255 47
293 26
1, 062 81
411 84
208 60
53 22
29 37
170 54
42 25
676 27
322 43
153 85
52 50
202 71
16 00
89 46
116 00
126 08
69 51
506 07
129 55
301 70
148 00
8, 349 49 1, 075 99
74 25
342 17
1, 804 62 • 478 70
144 75
102 25
2,136 27
449 78
123 61
64 37
62 45
53 45
405 83
96 80
720 69
82 94
221 10
45 00
148 37
58 08
515 09
172 33
151 86
142.57
135 75
437 44
100 05

376 29
269 12
388 53
123 80
333 93
175 32
1, 680 30
769 06
96 72
33 05
919 60

494 49
360 00
1, 842 99
666 15
595 53
810 18
3, 565 14
1, 325 00
400 00
902 21
2,163 99
540 00
198 02
50 62
400 00
12 00
348 25
297 03
280 34
1, 337 35
37 89
299 53
2, 351 40 16, 081 16
163 20
1,267 50
1, 472 43 4,399 16
47 07
420 00
1, 535 27 6 629 69
,
69 94
200 00
149 17
441 73
200 75
2, 004 47
400 69
1, 697 38
101 20
950 00
304 59
340 00
1,127 52
497 80
240 08
38 00
302 23
6 60
965 08
743 64

26. 292 33 7, 218 92 13, 755 50

53, 604 41
964 27
19, 244 02
361 16
206, 977 82 3,210 92
81,419 08
2, 072 19
35, 807 16
670 07
103, 959 69
1,891 22
166, 055 80
3,127 28
65, 977 73
1,236 63
20, 252 68
367 64
58, 077 01
1,478 43
97, 263 55
1, 752 18
8, 912 86
306 38
7, 393 35
142 16
11,544 83
349 53
22, 327 23
417 45
82, 077 60
1,537 99
17, 816 33
532 32
623, 289 33 11, 569 24
65, 788 08 1, 381 23
248, 748 25
4,167 78
15, 362 78
450 90
484,113 51
3, 594 84
24, 700 40
462 88
43, 315 74 1,114 67
107, 671 65 2,080 18
81, 821 57 2,121 35
10, 303 19
312 53
18, 756 73
350 58
107, 325 97
1, 337 97
8, 300 85
230 48
34, 694 52
627 25
69,113 52
1,236 56

179 70
52, 640 14
18, 882 86
203, 766 90 1, 018 60
79, 346 89
35,137- 09
69 94
102, 068 47
162, 928 52
131 61
64,741 10
19, 885 04
56, 598 58
39 70
95, 511 37
397 95
8, 606 48
•7,251 19
i33 25
11,195 30
21, 909 78
80, 539 61
107 09
17, 284 01
249 50
611, 720 09
69 17
64, 406 85
100 50
2''4, .580 47
452 64
14,911 38
50 00
475, 518 67
597 98
24, 237 52
42, 201 07
"i9 66
105, 591 47
24 70
79, 700 22
150 00
9, 990 66
18, 406 15
105, 488 00
8,076 37
34,007 27
67, 876 96

70, 487 71
23, 863 97
24.5, 478 73
104, 870 90
49, 626 91
124, 765 12
220, 877 75
87, 643 23
25, 361 32
71,945 79
128, 442 39
13, 929 29
10,356 00
15, 584 56
30, 983 69
107, 648 60
21,746 67
809, 579 76
90, 270 12
336, 083 85
,19,288 44
590, 874 30
• 33, 015 42
55,1.64 81
137, 090 12
107, 973 16
. 15, 783 00
24, 704 44
136, 209 34
12, 099 84
42, .534 21
89, 478 77

65, 711 57 3, 664, 402 17 71, 470 06 3, 592, 932 11 .5, .668 67 4, 754, 438 26
94,331 74
4, 848, 770 00

W
Ci

o

168

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

I.—Statementof accounts of internal revenue stamxj agents from July 1,1869, to March 31,1870DE.

To amonnt transferred to personal acconnts of agents from Commissioner's acconnt, July 1, 1869
$2, 891,294
To amonnt of stamps received from Commissioner
6,707,186
To erroneous credits to A. Lawrence and William C. Webb, agents, prior
to July 1869..
210
To commissions to close accounts.. .1

64
84
06
43

9, 598,691 97
CK.
^
'
By amount of cash dei^osited with the United States Treasurer.
$6,147,903 51
By amount'alio wed as commissions
301, 623 03
By eiToneous\charge to B. F. Coates, June 1869
1, 074 00
By act of Congress, private No. 181, for relief of Palemon John, approved
July 27, 1868
:
769 37
By credits from old accounts
12 93
By amount of stamps returned to Commissioner
I l l , 451 20
By amount outstanding in liands of agents to be accounted for
3, 035, 857 93

9,598,691 97
K.—Statement of amounts paid for pfrinting stamp^s for the office of internal revenue for the
year ending June 30, 1870.
To Continental Bank Note Company
To American Phototype Company
To Bureau of Engraving and Printing (Treasury Dpartment)
To Joseph R. Carpenter
To Henry Skidmore
,
Total

!|204,181
-6, 023
171,299
85,597
6,924

52
07
98
55
15

474,026 27

L.—Statement of accounts of Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internal revenue beei'
stamps from August 20, 1866, to June 30,1870.
DR.

To amount of stamps received from Bureau of Engraving and Printing $25,259,148 08
To amount of stamps mutilated in x^rinting
:
48,619 16
To amount of stamps returned by collectors
105,937 16
25,413,704 40
CR.
^
~
By amount of stamps sent to collectors
|24, 817, 908 50
By amount of stamps destroyed
58,177 19
By amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissioner to be accounted for
;
- -.
5.37, 618 71

25,413,704 40
M.—Statement of accounts of Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internal revenue stamps
for distilled spirits from July 20, 1868, to June 30, 1870.
DR.

To amount of stamps received from Bureau of Engraving and Printing $97,894,500 00 ,
To amount of stamps mutilated in ]3rinting
t
1, 026,500 00
To amount of stamps returned by collectors
'...
2, 524^ 400 00




101, 445, 400 00

F I F T H AUDITOR.

169

CR.

By amount of stamps sent to collectors
$84, 052,500 00
By amount of stamj)s destroyed
1,082, 400 00
By amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissioner to be accounted for
16, 310,500 00
101,445, 400 00
N.—Statement of accounts of Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internal revenue tobacco and
cigar stamps from October 21, 1868, to June 30, 1870.
DR.
.
To amount of stamps received from Continental Bank Note Company.. $35,586,239 84
To amount of stamps received from Bureau of Engraving and Printing 24,945,293 00
To amount of stamps returned by collectors
2,114, 045 09

62, 645, 577 93
CR.

By amonnt of stamps sent to collectors
$51,742,733 54
By amount of stamps destroyed
^
6,100,255 50
By amount of stamps attached to contract of Commissioner of Internal
Revenue and the Continental Bank Note Company, and canceled
211 85
By amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissioner to be accounted for
4, 802, 377 04
62,645,577 93

0.^—Statement of accounts of Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internal revenue stamps
{adhesive) from May 1, 1869, to June 30, 1870.
DR.

To
To
To
To
To

amount of stamps on hand and in hands of agents, April 30, 1869:.
amount of stamps ordered from printers
•.
discount withheld in exchange of stamps
amount overjiaid by agents in settlement of their accounts
amount of stamps returned by agents

$3, 216, 952
20,154, 958
1,125
995
120,736

40
54
18
19
02

23,494,767 33
CR.

By amount of cash deposited Avilh the United States Treasurer
$9,302, 808 90
By amount allowed as commissions
64,191 75
By amount of stamps destroyed
145, 074 93
By amount of stamps sent to agents.,
10, 061, 604 47
By amount allowed on affidavits of loss
..".
5,116 16
By amount transferred to personal accounts of agents
3,233, 906 89
By excess of stamps returned by agents prior to April 30, 1869
994 21
B}^ amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissioner to be accounted for
101, 070 02
23,494,767 33
P.—Statement of accounts of Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for intetmal revenue stamped
• foil wrappers for tobacco from October 31, 1868, to, June 30, 1870.
DR.

To amount of stamped foil wrappers received from printer (H. Skidmore)
$1,394,181 68
CR.

By amount of stamped foil wrappers sent to collectors



$1, 394,181 68

170

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Q^—Statement showing the amounts paid to certain internal revenue officers for salary and expenses; also the contingent expenses of the office of internal revenue, including salary and
expenses of the Special Commissioner of the Eevenue, salaries of Commissioner, deputy commissioners, clerics, cfc, xjrinting, #c., stationery and expressage; counsel fees, moieties, and
rewards, drawbaclcs on rum and alcohol, and taxes erroneously assessed and coUected, refunded from July 1, 1869, to June 30, 1870.
SUPERVISORS.

Salary
Tax

$70,090 80
2,284 77

Netsalary
Expenses
Clerk hire
Furniture
Rent

':

67, 806
40,851
38,579
1, 455
' 7,807

:

03
52
86
11
19
$156,499 7 i

DETECTIVES.

Salary
Tax

:
,

•

39,007 42
800 79

Net salary
Expenses

38, 206 63
28,306 16
66,512 79
SURVEYORS OF DISTILLERIES.

Salary
Tax

25,811 50
465 13

-

Net salary
Expenses

25,346 37
16,720 99
r-

42,067 36

CONTINGENT E X P E N S E S , SALARY, E T C . , OE SPECIAL COMMISSIONER AND COMMISSIONER'S
OFFICES.

Salary
Tax

.•

322,282 96
4,571 94

Net s a l a r y . . . !
Traveling expenses
Tax

317,711 02
$6,066 03
58 13

Net traveling expenses
Printing, &c
Office furniture, &c
Expressage

6, 007
5, 952
6,986
3, 111

'
:

90
87
28
21
339,769 28

MISCELLANEOUS E X P E N S E S .

Salary
Tax

6,919 49
62 81

_;..

Net s a l a r y . !
Expenses
Office furniture, rent, &c
Printing, &c
Stationery
Expressage

'
:

6,856
9,453
36, 335
8, 918
54,453
57, 805

68
81 ^
62
05
64
96
173,823 76

COUNSEL F E E S AND E X P E N S E S , M O I E T I E S AND .REWARDS.

Fees and expenses
Moieties
Rewards
Drawbacks on rum and alcohol
Taxes erroneously assessed and collected refunded
Total.,.



38,699 89
3, 086 36
12, 050 00
53,836 25
492, 072 03.
204,540 74
1,529,121 92

F I F T H AUDITOR.

171

(^^.^Statement of fines, penalties, and forfeitures.
Balance on deposit to credit of the Secretary of the Treasury July 1, 1869 $259,165 28
Amount deposited
$218,288 45
Amount disbursed
156, 010 10
62,278 35
Balance on deposit to the credit of the Secretary of'the Treasury, Jnly 1,
1870
:

321,443 63

R.—Statement of disbursements for salaries of United States direct tax commissioners in insurrectionary districts during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.

State.

Salary.

ci

Tax.

1
Principal. Interest. Amouut.

•

South Carolina
Texas.
Tennessee
Total

$5, 013 59
400 00
5, 413 59

$167 12 $4, 846 47390 00
10 00
177 12

Moneys refunded, lands sold
for"taxes and redeemed.

5, 236 47

$300 00

$165 84

$465 84

300 00

165 84

465 84

S.—Statement of certificates issued and allowed for- drawbaclcs on merchandise exported as provided for under section 111 of the act of June 30, 1864, for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1870.
Number of certificates received and allowed
Amount allowed




75
$5, 827 49




REPORT OF THE SIXTH




AUDITOR.




REPORT

THE SIXTH AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
O F F I C E OF THE A U D I T O R OF THE TREASURY
F O R THE P O S T O F F I C E DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 22, 1870.
S I R : In accordance with, the uniform custom of this office, I respectfully submit the subjoined statement of the clerical labors performed in
this Bureau during the past fiscal year.
The forthcoming annual report of this office to the Postmaster General will exhibit in detail all that pertains to the financial transactions
of the Post Office Department.
SUMMARY OF PRINCIPAL LABORS.

The postal accounts between the United States and the foreign governments have been promptly and satisfactorily adjusted to the latest
period. 31,852 corrected quarterly accounts of postmasters have been
examined, copied, re-settled, and mailed; 105,734 accounts of postmasters have been examined, adjusted, and registered; 205,761 letters
were received, endorsed and properly disposed of, 284 of which contained the amount of $4,989 19, which has been deposited with the
Treasurer of the United States to the credit of those remitting the
same; 122,270 letters were answered, recorded, and mailed; 15,378
drafts were issued to mail contractors and others; 5,150 warrants were
issued to mail contractors and others; 4,690 certificates of deposits
made by postmasters with other postmasters Avere examined and registered, amounting in aggregate to $648,181 20.
The number of folio-post pages of correspondence recorded, viz:
2,582 i)ages in collection book; 226 pages in report book; 1,474 pages
in miscellaneous book.
MONEY ORDER

DIVISION.

Eighty-seven thousand six hundred and twenty money order accounts
have been settled, involving the amount of $62,928,206 52; 1,374 letters relating to money-order aifairs were written, copied, and mailed.
PAY DIVISION.

Twenty-four thousand nine hundred and eighty-one mail coiitra.ctors'
accounts were adjusted and reported for payment; 87,773 collection orders
were transmitted to mail contractors; 349 miscellaneous accounts were
audited and reported for payment; 447 special agents' accounts were
audited and reported for payment; 5,365 letter carriers' accounts were
settled; 6,000 special mail carriers' accounts were settled; 9,000 mail



o

176

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

messengers' accounts were settled; 4,732 accounts of railway postal
clerks, route agents, local mail agents, and baggage-masters were settled ; 76 accounts of attorneys, marshals, and clerks of the United States
courts were reported for payment; $385,193 95 was collected from special and mail messenger offices; $2,383,894 10 aggregate amount of
drafts issued to mail contractors and others; $8,857,203 92 aggregate
amount of warrants issued tb mail contractors and others; $2,681,560 S6
was received of postmasters, by mail contractors, on collection orders ;
$1,231,340 68 was paid to letter carriers; $66,571 80 was paid for advertising.
COLLECTION DIVISION.

The collection division has had charge of the following numbers of
accounts, viz: 28,492 accounts of present postmasters; 8,061 accounts
of postmasters who had become late; $25,684 44 was collected from
mail contractors, by collection drafts, for over-collections made by them
from postmasters; $74,978 12, amount of internal revenue tax received
by postmasters, and amounts withheld from other persons, paid to the
Treasurer of the United States; 126 suits were instituted for the recovery of balances due the United States, amounting to the sum of
$146,586 43; 170 judgments Avere obtained in favor of the United
States.
In addition, many duties of ah important character have been discharged, requiring much time and labor, which it would not be practi'^able to particularize in this report.
I have the honor to be, sir,' very respectfully,
J, J. MAETIN,
Auditor,
Eon,

G E O . S. BOUTWELL,

Secretary of the Treasury,




REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES.

12 P







REPORT
OF

THE TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES.
TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES,
Washington, November 1,1870.
S I R : In compliance with the requirements of statutory law and
departmental regulations, the following statements of receipts and
expenditures, into and out of the treasury of the-United States, for the
year ending with the 30th day of June, in the year 1870, are most
respectfully submitted:
The statements and tables exhibit, under appropriate heads, not only
the business transactions of the principal office located at the seat of the
Government, but of all other offices connected with the treasury of the
United States; comprising tbe offices of all the assistant treasurer.s,.all
the officers designated as depositaries, and all national banks that have
been designated as depositaries by or through which any moneys belonging to the treasury of the United States have been received or
disbursed, and the balance of any such moneys remaining with each, on
the day aforesaid.
Other tables and statements exhibit the movement of the treasury of
the United States in former fiscal years, as compared with the one that
ended with June 30,1870. Some of these statements are brought down
to the date hereof, and are so stated to be.
Attention is most respectfully invited, among other suggestions, to
the one in regard to the present inadequate pay. of the personnel of the
office, and what will be required in this regard for its safe and efficient
conduct in the future.
The books of the office were closed as of June 30,1870, after the entry
therein of all moneys received and disbursed on authorized warrants
within the fiscal year closing with that date, as follows :
Cash, I h \
Balance in treasury from last year
Received from loans,
Recei ved from internal revenue
Received from customs
Received from-lands
Receivedfrom W a r . . .
Received from Navy
,
Received from Interior
Miscellaneous

$155, 680, 340 85
$285,474,826 00
184,899,756 49
194,538, 374 44 . .
3,350,481 76
69,476,490 63
5,712,733 12
685, 488 01
:30,326,279 56 '

Total receipts for fiscal year

774,464,430 01

Total ..,




-

930,144,770 86

180

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Cash, Cr.
Paid on account of public debt
Paid on account of the Array
Paid on account of tbe Navy
Paid on account of I n t e r i o r . . .
Paid on account of Treasu.ry proper
Paid on account of customs
Paid on account of Treasury Interior
Paid on account of internal revenue
Paid on ^account of diplomatic
•
Paid on account of quarterly salaries
Paid on account of War (civil branch)
Balance in treasury
Total

'.:.....

:......'

:......

$539,017,629
127,132,166
27,492,962
32,433,628
22,478,035
'14,593,394
5, 450, 313
9,092,814
1, 511, 541
499, 525
940,288
149,502,471

80
03
99
.33
89
30
82
79
76
01
54
60

930,144,770 86

The receipts, as stated in the foregoing table, were carried into the
treasury by 11,800 covering warrants, which is an increase of 808 over
the preceding year, and of 1,708 over the year before that.
The payments were made on 25,304 authorized warrants, for the payment of Avhich there Avere issued 25,954 drafts drawn on the treasury,
and the various branches thereof. In both of these two last-named
items there Avas a falling off from the numbers issued in the year preceding.
The two foregoing tables show: thefirst, the cash on hand at the commencement ofthe fiscal year, and the various amounts that were received
and covered into the treasury by warrants issued and entered upon the
books of the office for the fiscal year, including payments, repayments,
and coun ter-warrants; and the second, such aoiounts as were paid out
on w^arrants, including corresponding amounts transferred by counterAvarrants, aiid such paymeuts that were repaid as are included in the'"
first table; and also the balance of cash, on hand at the close of the
fiscalyear.
.
These payments and repayments', and transfers by counter-warrants
equal to each other, and in most cases representing the same moneys^
help to swell the aggregate amount of both sides of the ledger beyond
the actual receipts and disbursementSo So, too, they may contain warrants issued within the then current fiscal year; but the moneys that
they represent may have been received in the preceding or the succeeding fiscal year.
The tables, therefore, do not show the precise amounts received or
disbursed within the fiscal year, commencing with July 1,1869, and
ending with June 30, 1870.
Transfers are sometimes made from one appropriation to, another by
warrants and counter-Avarrants of sums of money, equal in the amounts,
in the detail, and in the aggregate. All such sums of moneys were technically carried out of and replaced in the treasury, and thus enter into botli
sides of the warrant ledger account, and appear therein both as receipts
and as expenditures.
Moneys received from sales of stores, shipsj materials of war, and
other property no longer needed for the public service^ have in like manner been covered into the treasury.
The foregoing amounts include coun ter-warrants and , repayment of
moneys unexpended:
.
The coun ter-warrants amount to
The amount retarned from sales and unused money to
Total



$69,656, 384 84
8,078, 071 54
77,734,456 38-

TREASURER.

'

181

The counter-warrants were issued on account of the—
Army
Navy
Interior..
Internal revenue
Customs
Lands
Miscellaneous

...'

$65,079,261
3,400,019
60,831
- 15,859
11,430
1,055
1,087,926

:
i

Total

:

73
93
12
93
96
13
04

69,656,384 84

With the corrections of deducting all the items of payments and repayments, and of counter-w^arrants from both sides ofthe book account,
the true receipts and payments would then stand as follows:
ACTUAL RECEIPTS.

(As per Avarrants, less counter-warrants.)
On
On
On
On
Ou
On
On
On

accountof loans
account of internal revenue
account of miscellaneons sources.
account of lands
account of Army
accountof Navy.
account of customs
account of Interior

Total of aU actual receipts
Add counter-warrants
Balance held from last year

.•

....
:

$285,474,826
184, 883, 896
29,238, 353
3, 349,426
4,397,228
2,312,713
194, 526, 943
624,656

00
56
52
63
90
19
48
89

704, 808, 045 17
69,656, 384 84
. 155, 680, 340 8$

^
'.

Total

. 930,144,770 86
ACTUAL EXPENDITUEES.

(As per warrants, less coun ter-warrants.)
On account of public debt
On accouut of internal revenue
Ou account of War (Army branch)
On account of War (civil branch)
Onaccount of Navy
'
On account of Treasury
On account of Treasnry Interior
On acconnt of Interior proper
On account of diplomatic..-.
On acconnt of quarterly salaries
On acconnt of customs
Total of all actual payments
Add counter-warrants
Cash balance in treasnry

$539,017^629
8, 891, 586
61, 977, 594
9.25, 567
1".
24,114,552
22,155, 331
5, 439, 073
32, 365, 383
1,138, 529
494, 855
14, .465, 810

'

_.
^
I
'.
'..

'

Total

80
91
10
88
27
32
18
28
69
50
49

710,985,914 42
69, 6^6, 384 84
149, 502, 471 60
930,144,770 86

The actual receipts during the year ending June 30, 1870, as per
ledger, were—
•
'
Cash, Dr.
Cash ledger balance, June 30, 1869
,,.
Legal tender notes, new issue and series of 1869..
Fractionalcuruency
Coin certificates
Temporary loan
'.
Certificates of indebtedness
Six per cent, twenty-year bonds



$159, 351, 999 99
$135,173,580 00
31,315,266 00
76,731,080 00
335, 000 00
1,000 00
700 00

182

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Six per cent. 5-20 bonds
Customs
'.
Internal revenue
Semi-annual bank duty
Salesofland
Premium, chiefly on sales of coin
Profits on coinage
Patentfees
Real estate tax
Captured and abandoned property
Conscience money..
Fines and penalties
Internal and coastwise intercourse
Interest
Indian trusts
Prize captures
Miscellaneous receipts
War, (repayments) . . . . 1
Navy, (repayments)
Repayments.

$24,500 00
194 488,367 73
184,265,743 33
'
5,842, 473 41
3,361,925 33
15,288,075 17
296,528 06
682,697 98
.....r...
228,82613
1,609 46
3, 406 03
551,905 71
26,042 12
15,232 13
551, 306 88
42,836 14
. 2,707,955 08
. 3, 746 470 03
2,067 230 42 43,885 524 49

Total actual receipts
Canceled drafts
Total

;

.

,..'.

$701,635,261 63
95, 688 82
861,082,950 44

The actual amount of disbursements, as per cash ledger, were made on
account of the—
Public d e b t . .
Internal r e v e n u e . . . .
War, (Army branch)
War,(civU branch)
Navy...
Treasury....
Treasury I n t e r i o r - . . . :
Interior proper
Diplomatic.
Quarterly salaries
Customs

:

-

:
:

,

$539,017,629
8,891,586
61,977,594
925,567
24,114,552
22,155,331
5,439,073
32,365,383
1,138,529
494, 855
14,465,810

80
91
10
88
27
32
18
28
69
50
49

710,-985,914 42
Suspended custom warrant 2,518,2d qr., 1866, on collector, paid by the
treasury
Balance cash in treasury
-..'.
Total

:

,.

-

125 00
150,096,911 02
861,082,950 44

This balance consists of gold and silver
Other lawful money

$113,433,406 59
36,663,504 43

Total cash
Deduct cash not covered by warrants

150,096,911 02
594, 439 42

Balance as per w,arrauts ledger—see [' Cash, Cr."

„

149,502, 471 60

The cash balance as per ledger, after all the cash accouuts had been
received from the various offices constituting the treasury, and entered
upon the books, Avas:
Cash, Dr.
Ledger balance from old account
Receipts during the year
Canceled drafts
Total



.'

•

$159,351,999 99
701,635,261 63
'
95,688 82
861,082,950 44

183

TREASURER.
Cash, Cr.
Payments during the y e a r . .
Suspended cnstoms warrant
Balance, cash in the treasuiy to new account
Total

.„

$710,985,914 42
125 00
150,096,911 02

.'

361,082,950 44

Comparative statement of the balances on hand at the beginnAng of, and of the actual receipts
during, each of the fiscal years ending with the thirtieth days of June in 1869 and 1870.
RECEIPTS.
1870.

On acconnt of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On accouut of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of

1130, 834, 4.37 96
247, 519, 755 76
25, 204, 982 12
765, 685 61
4,012, 313 .54
279,651 70
3,
3,434,546 98
1,601,379 70
818, 260 29
180, 024, 649 44
158, 086, 604 45

..^

Total

$155,680,340 85
285, 474, «zti UO
29, 238, 'iO'i 52
63
"3:349;fi 90
4;397;2;°i9
2, 312, 71'^
624, 656 89
194, 526, 943 48
184, 883, 896 56

755, 582, 267 55

balance from old account
loans
miscellaneous sources
direct t a x . . .
•.
sales of publfb lands
the Army
the Navy
the Treasury
the Interior".
customs (in gold)
internal revenue

860, 488, 386 02

Comparative statement of the actual expenditures during, an§ the balance on hand at the ch
of, each of the fiscal years ending with tlie thirtieth days of June in 1869 and 1870.
EXPENDITURES.
1870.

On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
On account of
• Total

public debt
internal revenue
War (array branch)
War (civil branch)
Navy
Treasury
Treasur.y Interior
Interior" proper
foreign intercourse.....
quarterly salaries
customs!
balance to new account
:

$403, 119, 624
9, 01.8,400
80, 474, 545
1, 488, 759
23, 561, 082
26, 171,140
4, 961,408
36, 316, 364
741,276
.500,189
13, .551, 205
155, 680, 340

61
96
36
08
77
34
10
94
65
30
32
85

$539, 017,
629 80
586
8, 891, 91
61, 977,.594 10
925, 567 88
' 24,114,552 27
22,155, 331 32
U73 18
5, 439,
32, 365,383 28
.1,138, 529 69
494, 855 50
14, 465,810 49
149, 502,471 60

755, 584, 338 28 860, 488, 386 02

Comparative statement of receipts in the fiscal years ending with June 30, 1869, and June 30,
1870.
Fl'om
From
From
From
From
From
From
Prom
From
From

There was received in 1870 in excess of the receipts of 1869—
loans, as per statement
$37,9.55, 070
internal revenue
26,797,292
miscellaneous sources
4, 033, 371
the Army
1,117, 577
customs
14,502,294
•
There was received less in 1870 than in 1869—
direct t a x e s . .
. . . , . $765,685
sale of public lands
662,886
the Navy
1,121,833
the Treasury
1,601, 379
the Interior i
:...
193,603

24
11
40
20
04
^ $84, 405,604 99
61
91
79
70
40

"

,, 4, 345, 389 41
Total excess of receipts in 1870 over 1869



80,060,215 58

184

.

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Receipts in 1870
Receipts in. 1869

V... $704,808,046 17 ^
624,747,829 59
$80,060,215 5S

Comparative statement of expenditures in the fiscal years ending with June 30, 1869, and Jvme
30^ 1870.
There was paid in 1870 in excess of the payments made in 1869—
On the public debt
$135,898,005 19
For the Navy
553,469 50
For Treasury Interior
477,665 08
»
For foreign intercourse
397,253 04
On account of customs
.\
914,605 17
$138,240,997 98
There was expended less in 1870 than in. 1869—
On account of internal revenue
»
$126,814 05
For the Army
.'
19,060,142 46
For the Treasury Department
:.
. . . 4, 015, 809 02
^
For the Interior Department
3,950,c981 66
For quarterly salaries
5,333 80
27,159, 080 99
Total excefts of paymeiit in 1870 over 1869
Expenditures in 1870
Expenditures in 1869

I l l , 081,916 99
$710,985,914 42
599,903,997 43
111, 081,916 99

, Statement of increase and of decrease of receipts, and of expenditures, by items, with the inGi^eased receipts of customs in gold reduced to currency, excluding only loans, which compnse
simply an exchange of United States notes from the one side, and payments on the public
debt which are represented by a corresponding increase of the sinking fund from the other
side, for the fiscal years ending, respectively, with the thirtieth days of June, 1869, and
1870, which are contrasted with each other.
Increased receipts—
From internal revenue
From miscellaneous sources
From the War Department
From customs (in gold)
.\...:
From, premium on last, say 12^ per cent

11
40,
20
04
75

$126, 814
19,060,142
4, 015, 809
3,950, 981
5,333

Decreased expenditures—
On internal revenue
O n t h e Army
On the Treasury Department
On the Interior Department
On quarterly salaries

$26,797,292
4, 033, 371
1,117,577
14,502,294
1,812,786
•
'

05
46
02
66
80

$48,263, 321 50

27,159,080 99
Total of increased receixits and decreased expenditures
Decreased recei pts-rdii^ect taxes
sales of public lands
the Navy Department
the Treasnry Department
the Interior Department
'
Increased expenditures—
the N a v y . . . . !
:.
Treasury Interior
foreign intercourse
customs

From
From
From
From
From
For
For
For
For

•

$765,685
662,886
1,121,833
1,601, 379
193, 603

75,422, 402 49
61
91
79
70
40
$4, 345,389 41

..,.

$553,469
477,665
397,253
914,605

50
08
04
17

/
2,342,992 79

Total of decreased receipts and increased expenditures



6,688,382 20

TREASURER.

185

The comparison, or rather the contrast, between the two last fiscal
years, then, stands as follows :
Increased receipts
Decreased expenditures

'.

Decreased receipts
Increased expenditures

/

$48,263, 321
27,159,080
•
4,345,389
2, 342, 992

50
99
$75, 422,402 49
41
79
6," 688, 382 20

Being a clear gain, by larger collections and reduced expenditures, of..

6S, 734, 020 29

In order to explain more clearly to such persons as are not in the habit
of thinking of money by millions of dollars, the great saving that has been
made to the treasury of the United States in the last fiscalyear over
the one preceding it, the statement is here made, that after deducting
52 Sundays and 4 legal holidays from the 365 days, 309 executive days
remain in the year, in which time the saving of $'68,734,020 29 was made;
and that the average saving on the working days of the fiscal year, that
closed with June 30, 1870, over those of the year preceding was over
$222,440 per day; being over $9,268 per hour and over $154 per minute;
and more, than equal to the extra dropping of $2 50 into the coffers of
the treasury in every second of the time. These facts suificiently explain how the administration, by thorough action and,an economical
course, was enabled to purchase so large an amount of the stocks of the
United States .for the sinking fund.
The following tables of receipts and expenditures, by warrants, excluding such as were issued for payments and repayments, for the last ten
fiscal years, are made that the movement of the office from year to year,
and for each year, may readily be compared with that of any other
year:
RECEIPTS.

In
In
In
In
In
In
In
In
In
In

the
the
the
the
the
the
the
the
the
the

year
year
year
year
year
year
year
year
year
year

1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870

$83,206,693
581,628,181
888,082,128
1,389,466,963
1,^.01,792,627
1,270,884,173
1,131,060,920
1,030,749,516
609,621,828
704,808,045

'

Total receipts in tron years

56
26
05
41
51
11
56
52
27
17

9,491,301,077 42

EXPENDITm^ES.

In
In
In
In
In
In
In
In
In
In

the year
the year
the year
the year
theyear
theyear
the year
theyear
theyear
the year

1861 •.
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867...:
1868....
1869
1870

,

Total expenditures in ten years

:....

$84,578,834
570,841,700
895,796,630
1,298,056,101
1,897,674,224
1,141,072,666
1,093,079,655
1,069,889,970
584,777,996
710,935,914

47
25
65
89
09
09
27
74
11
42

9,346,753,693 98

The increase of both "receipts'^ and '^expenditures'^ during the last
fiscal year over the preceding one, was swelled by an amount of



186

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

legal-tender notes destroyed in a former year, which had been erroneously entered as statistical matter, and which has since been entered as
received and destroyed as money, (See page 44 of the report of 1869.)
The remainder of the increase of receipts is due to the larger collection
of internal revenue and of customs duties. The increase of the expenditures represents the increased purchases of United States stocks for the
sinking fund.
\
Statement showing the amounts of balances and overdrafts standing to the credit and deMt of
the Treasurer of the United States, at this office and ihe various offices of assistant treasurers, desifgnated depositaries, and national banlcs, designated as deposiiames on June 30,
1870. . ' .
•
,
Treasurer, Washington
Assistant trea.surer. New York
Assistant treasurer, Philadelphia
Assistant treasurer, Boston
,
Assistant treasurer, St. Louis
Assistant treasurer, San Francisco;
Assistant treasurer, Charleston
Assistaut treasurer, New Orleans
Depositary, Baltimore
Depositary, Cincinnati
Depositary, Chicago
Depositary, Lonisville'.
Depositary, Buffalo
Depositary, Pittsburg
Depositary, Olympia .1
Depositaxy, Oregon City
Depositary, Mobile
Depositary, Sa.ntaF<S.-.
Depositarv, Tucson
Nationalbanks..
United States mints
Suspense account
Balance as per ledger
Total

-^

,

,.
'.

$22,434,668 29
80,379,830 51 .
5,687,540 57
6, 507, 545 89
1,844,435 26
6,292,099 73
145, 477 76
2,209,181 46
3,304,188 55
1,622,999 80,
1, 440,146 12'
59,672 20
287,542 53
690,892 65
,
37,559 35
848 53'
163, 422 58
'....' •
$12,824 18
51,028 17
8,483,549 79
7,467,992 19
999,113,27
150,096,911 02
150,109,735 20

OI the abovev balance there is in coin
And in currency

150,109,735 .20
$113, 433,406 59
36,663,504 43

Total balance

150,096,911 02

Receipts by warrant, on account of the public debt, segregated for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1870.
On acconnt of 3 per cent, certificates.
On account of 5-20 bonds, act March 3, 1865
On account of bonds of the loan of July 17, 1861, (1881s)
Coin certiiicates
Legal-tender notes
Treasury notes, act of July 17, 1861 :
Old demand notes
Fractional currency
Total receipts on account public debt by warrant

.'

..

$340,000
20,000
200
76,731,060
177,173, 520
270
60
31,209,716
285, 474,826

Payments on aooount of the public debt, segregated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.
On account
On account
rency
On account
On account
On account

of sinking fund interest account
$48,4,098
of purchase of United States bonds, interest account, cur'
:
495,580
of purchase of United Sta,tes bonds, interest account, coin
553,480
of purchase of United States bonds, principal
82,050 000
of purchase of United States'bonds, premium
12, 401,608




06
99
92
00
30

TREASURER.
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On

account
account
account
account
account
account
accouut
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account

187

of redemption of United States loan of 1847, &,., in coin..
$83,435 75
of redemption of 3 per cent, certificates
6, 915, 000 00
of redemption of legal-tender notes
177,176,997 50
of redemption of fractional currency
, 23,238, 088 88
of redemption of compound-interest notes
701,150 00
of redemption of one and two year notes of 1863
83, 070 00
of redemption of 7-j% United States loan
673,607 00
of redemption of coin certificates
75,270,120 00
of sinking fund, principal
27, 000, 000 00
of the sinking fund premium
3, 594,740 30
of redemption of Texan indemnity bonds, in c o i n . . . . . . . . .
20,782 87
of the payment of interest, in currency
3, 533,252 27
of the payment of interest, in coin
119,213,732 63
of the reimbursement of temporary loan
:
9,170 00
of the redemption of certificates of indebtedness
2, 000 00'
of the Navy pension fund
210,000 00'
of the payment of interest on 3 per cent, certificates
194,550 00'
of the payment of interest on Pacific Railroad bonds
1, 890, 625 44
of the payment of interest on temporary loan
^.
48 89*
of the payment of interest on 10-40 bonds, coin
3,222, 490 00

Total payments on account of the public debt

539, 0t7, 629 80

Balances standing to the credit of disbursing office's of the United States June 30,1870.
Treasurer of the United States
$1,514,791
Assistant treasurer, Boston
".. $432,146 76
Assistant treasurer. New York
.1
4,937, 870 41
Assistant treasurer, Philadelphia
388,231 66
Assistant treasurer, Charleston
116,232 85
Assistant treasurer, St. Louis
,
831,293 25
Assistant treasurer. New Orleans
'.
, [ 523, 074 02
Assistant treasurer, San Francisco
'3,971, 494 71
11,200,343
Depositary, Baltimore.
$148,122 99
Depositary, Buffalo....:
33, 529 00
Depositarv, Chicago
733,296 29
Depositary, Cincinnati
262, 019 17
Depositary, Louisville
.'...
502, 090 81
Depositary, Pittsburg
68,745 48
Depositary, Mobile
91, 624 59
Deposi tary, Santa F6:
:
285, 453 51
Depositary, Oregon City
..'
299 66
Depositary, Olympia
335, 58
Depositary, Tucson
11, 837 05
2,137,354
In 64 national bank depositaries
2,563,717
Totalamouhtin all offices to, credit of disbursing ofS-cers..:

50^

66

13;
90

17,406,207 19

Transfer of funds.
To facilitate payments at points where the moneys were needed for disbursements,
transfer letters, transfer orders,.and bills of exchange were issued during the fiscal
year, in number, in kiud, and for the amounts as follows :
2,553 letters on national bank depositaries
$42,608 891 06 ^
718 transfer orders on national bank depositaries
10, 810,104 41
22 bills of exchange on national bank depositaries
150, 000 00
44 bills of exchange on collectors of customs
180 000 00
2,333 transfer orders on assistant treasurers and designated depositaries 189, 585,273 18
5,670 transfers—total amount of transfers
Of which amount there was in coin
And in currency
Total




..'. 243,334,268 65
}

$21,361,273 18'
221,972,995.47
243,334,268 65

188

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES. -

F a y warrants, for which drafts have been issued, classified, and segregated for the fiscal yea/r
ending June 30, 1870.
Quarterly salaries—
,- '
Account of United States courts, &c
$.305," 040 64
Inspectors of steam vessels
77,641 69
Oovernors, judges, &c
112,173 17
Total of quarterly salaries

,

^

Diplomatic—
Ministers, consuls, &c
,.......:
Relief and protection of seamen
Foreign intercourse
\..'. —

•

494,855 50

$813,946 48
56,424 66
268,158 55

:

Total of diplomatic
CustomsCollecting revenue from customs
Erection, &c., of public buildings
Light-house establishment
Revenue-cutter service
Refunding duty, &c
Captured and abandoned property
Relief, & c . . .

1,138,529'69

.'...

, $5, 077,269
926, 409
3,110, 988
2, 562, 911
2,730,375
45, 657
12,198

Total cnstoms
Treasury proper—
Legislative department
Jnspectors of steam vessels
Assistant treasurers, depositaries, &c
Refunding, act 1865 &c
Public buildings and grounds
Ntfvy Department
Executive department
Treasury Department
United States courts, &c
Smithsonian Institute
Relief of colored women and children, act March 31, 1870
Outstanding liabilities'
Commissioner of Mining Statistics
Telegraphing
Governors, judges, &c
National loan
Agricultural Department
Post Office Department
;.
Unprovided' claims
Return of proceeds from captured and abandoned lands

14, 465, 810 49

$6,183,605
43, 303
1,188,154
69,598
1, 907, 893
642, 749
267,663
2,563,807
- 269,324
39, 000
7, 972
2, 797
9,800
40,000
91,864
2,773,700
149,500
5,569,775
1, 841
332,977

*
...:

'.

Total Treasury proper
Treasury Interior—
Public buildings and grounds
UnitedStates courts, &c.
Interior Department and post office
Metropolitan Police
Registers and receivers of lands, &c
'Surveyors general, &c
5 per cent. State fund of Michigan, &c
Repayment for lands, &c
€ensus
Total Treasury Interior




33
54
61
69
76
21
35

73
70
75
34
33
56
90
94
99
00
00
60
00
02
47
61
00
67
03
68

22,155, 331 32

i..........
•.
..
-

$457,208
2,169,228
1, 380, 753
211,000
339,131
804 752
35,537
16,461
25, 000

23
65
24
00
62
17
29
98
00

5,439,073 18

TREASURER.
Internal revenue—
Aseesment and collection
Detecting, &c., a c t o f 1867
Refunding duty, &,c..:
Total internal revenue

$8, 048,421 60
112,448 83
, 730,716 48
.,

Interior—
Indian Department
Army pensions
Navy pensions
Total Interior
Public debt—
'
Sinking fund, interest account, (coin)
Purchase of United States bonds, (currency)
Purchase of United States bonds, interest account, (coin)
Purchase of United States bonds, principal
:
Purchase of United States bonds, premium
'.
Redemption of United States loan of 4847, &., in coin
Redemption- of 3 per cent, certificates.
,
Redemption of legal-tender notes, &c
Redemption of fractional currency
Redemption of compound-interest n o t e s . . .
Redemption of one and two year notes of 1863
Redemption of 7j^United States loan
Redemption of coin certificates.. i
Sinking fund, principal....:'
\
Sinking fund, premium
Texan indemnity bonds, (coin)
Payment of interest in currency
Payment of interest in coin
Reimbursement of temporary loan
Certificates of indebtedness
I
Navy pension fund
1
Interest on 3 per cent, certificates
Interest' on Pacific Railroad bonds
Interest on temporary loan
•..
Interest on 10-40 bonds, ( c o i n ) . . . . . . :
Total public debt
WarQuartermaster's Department.
Subsistence of Army
Pay of the Army
:
Bounty of July, 1866, &c
National cemeteries
Refugees, freedmen, &c
Army and officer's transportation
:
Harbor fortifications, &c
......:..
Horses, &c., lost in service
Medical and Hospital Department
:
Ordnance Department
Collecting, drilling, organizing volunteers, &c
Military Academy.;:
JPayment under reconstruction acts
Contingencies of the Army
Reimbursing to States
'
Washington and Oregon volunteers
Relief, &.C
Capture of Jefferson Davis
Total of War




189^

8,891,586 91

$3,783, 321 01
28,105,733 43'
476,328 84
32,365,383 28

$484, 098 06
495,580 99
—
553,480 9282,050, 000 00
12, 401,608 30
83, 435 75
, 6,915, 000 00
177,176,997 50
23, 238, 088 88
701,150 00
„...
83, 070 00
673,607 00
75,270,120 00
27,000,000 00
3,594,740 30
20,782 87
3,533,2.52 27
119,213,732 63
9,170 00'
2, 000 00
210,000 00
194,550 00
1, 890,625 44
48 89
3,222,490 00
539,017,629 80

$l4, 038, 495 82
7,820,122 51
12, .354, 544 30
5,802;705 45
'.
^ 34, 355 50^
" 1, 330,978 15
8, 435,270 19
4, 711,174 86200, 985 50
520,081 45
2, 040, 436 73
2, 311, 324 85
289,941 72:
385, 957 34
154,602 03
1, 347, 067 22.
44,198 83'
74,568 53'
80,783 12
61,977,594 10

190

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

War, (civil branch)—
Public buildings and grounds

^. .
$233, 356 05

Compensation, &c., to Secretary of War

692,211 83

Total of War,(civilbranch)

925,567 88

• Navy—
Pay of the N a v y . . . . . .
Hospital f u n d . . . .
,..
Naval Observatory
Construction and Repair
Provisions and Clothing
Medicine, Surgery, &c
.'
Naval Academy
Yards, Docks, and Stations
„
Ordnance Department.
Naval Asylum
Engineering and Steam Machinery
Navigation, &c
Equipment and Recruiting
Pay of Marine Corps
Bounty, &c., to seamen
Prize money
Relief, act February, 1853..'
TotalNavy....!.'.........

•
'.
,

•
:

^.

:
:..

.
'
$7,643,615
239,093
25, 345
5,987,869
966,874
:
242, 221
'..
212,673
2,355,946
650,732
48,752
1,799,266
228,648
2,167,180
1,065,574
47,610
423, 923
9,224
24,114,552

07
00
49
43
95
96
23
51
02
00
98
17
45
12
48
82
54
27

OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE.
Stateinent of letters received and transmitted during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.
Received by mail, containing money
Received by mail, containing no money
Received by express, money packages

-

...
.....

35,238
47,951
26,970

Total r e c e i v e d . . . .
Transmitted
Transmitted
Transmitted
Transmitted

* 110,159

by' mail, manuscrij)t letters
by mail, printed forms filled i n . . ,
by mail, drafts payable to order
by express, money packages

6,688
86,386
25, 954
25,034

'...
^

Total transmitted

,

144, 062

NATIONAL BANK DEPOSITARIES.

The business transactions between, the treasury and national banks,
as depositaries, have been for the fiscal year as follows :
Balance brought from last year's account
Receix)ts duxing the year
Total

$8,875,141 73
122,550,562 85

,

Payments during fiscal year
Balance due the United States

.^....

.,

•

Total.




..

$122,942,154 79
,8,483,549 79
131,425,704 58

Payments through expresses, at Government expense
PaymentSj without expense to the Government
Total....

131,425,704 58

.,

$10,810,104 41
112,132, 050 38
122,942,154 79

TREASURER.

191

CONSCIENCE FUND.
Amonnt received from various'*persons, from December, 1863, up to and
including June 30, 1869
And during the fiscal year ending June 30,1870

$113,991 81
3,406 03

Total amount received since November 30, 1863

117,397 84

OPEN ACCOUNTS.
With
With
With
With
With
With

^

assistant treasurers
designated depositaries
Uuited States mints
national bank depositaries
disbursing officers
impersonals

.,
- y

Total open accounts

'

18
11
4
152
141
, 90
, 416

OUTSTANDING LIABILITIES.
Amount covered into thetreasury up to and including June 30,1869..
In fiscal year ending June 30, 1870

$188, 695 81
18,948\15

Total amount so covered in

,

..

207,643 96

There has been paid to various parties entitled to receive the same, up
' t o a n d i n c l u d i n g June30,1870
Unclaimed balance remaining in the treasury
Total amount, as above

. $28,113 92
179,530 04
207,643 96

UNAVAILABLE FUNDS, JUNE 30, 1 8 7 0 .
Currency—
'
First National Bank of Selma, Alabama
Venango National Bank of Franklin, Pennsylvania

• $59,978 07
217, 391 ,38

Total amount with national banks
Assistant treasurer, San Francisco (lost at sea)
Deficitassistanttreasurer,Nc)w Orleans, (Whitaker's).
Deficit designated depositary, Louisville, (stolen):.-.
Deficit designated depositary, Louisville,(BIoomgart's)
Deficit designated depositary, Santa Fe, (Collins &
^Greiner)
Deficit designated depositary, 01ympia,(Jos. Cushman)

277, 369 45
$1, 000, 000
663,913
9,000
l l , 083

00
69
00
52

^

33,518 21
6,143 04

Total with assistant treasurers and depositaries

1,723,658 46

Total currency

2,001,027 91

Coin—
Branch mint, Charlotte, North Carolina
Branch mint, Dahlonega, Georgia
,. .•
Assistant treasurer, Charleston, South Carolina
United States depositary, Galveston
Total in coin
Total amount of unavailable funds

^
:

$32,000
27, 950
2,053
778

00
03
41
66
62,782 10
2, 063, 810 01

The amount above stated as unavailable with Joseph Cushman, depositary at Olympia, Washington Territory, $6,143 04, has, since the
1st of July, 1870, been reduced $2,031 97, making the amount of the
deficit $4,111 07. There are also certain moneys due the depositary,
which have not yet been audited, which will still further reduce the
amount of the deficit.



192

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
MILITARY EXPENDITURES.

The payments for, and on account of the jftmy, less repayments, in
each year for the eleven yea-rs from 1860 to 1870, both inclusive, with
the ciVil branch included in the last two years, were in the years, and
ior the amounts, as follows :
$16,409,737 10
In I860.
22,981,150 44
7'In 1861.
394,368,407 36
' In 1862.
599,298,600 83
In^l863.
690,791,842 97
In 1864.
,031,323,360 79
In 1865.
War expenses for eleven years

,449,701
95,224, 415
128,906,351
81,963j304
62,903 161

In 1866.
In 1867.
In 1868.
In 1869.
In 1870.
,

82
63
43
44
98

3, 408,620,034 79

NAVAL EXPENDITURES.

The payments for, and on account of the Navy, for the eleven years
from 1860 to 1870, both inclusive, less the repayments, were in the years,
and for the amounts, as follows:
In 1860
$11,514,964 96
In 1861
12,420,887 89
In 1862...J
42,668,277 09
In 1863
63,221,963 64
In 1864
85,725,994 67
In 1865
122,612,945 29
Naval expenditures diuing the eleven

In. 1866
In 1867
In 1868-....
In 1869
In 1870

$43, 324,118 52
31,034,011 04
30,230,262 50
23,561,082 77
24,114, 552 27

years

490,429, 060 64

ARMY AND NAVY PENSIONS.

Statements of pensions paid to soldiei'S and sailors for the eight years
from 1863 to 1870, both inclusive:
Navy pensions.

Army pensions.
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870.....

:

$932,886 29
4,902,651 01
9,191,187 02
13,483,665 19
19,448,088 69
23,987,469 14
28,623,650 47
28,105,733 43

1863
1864
1865
1866
1867.'.
1868.,..
1869
1870

\

$185,188 36
184,755 04
. . . - 7,222,424 59
3,371,058,33
.. 3,328,795 46
890,828 69
535,991 34
• 476,328 84

Fourteen million dollars from the above amounts previous to the year
just closed was placed to the ''naval pension fund." Two hundred
and ten thousaiid dollars was placed to the same fund, in the last year,
that is not included in the last item of the above table.
PAYMENTS BY CHECKS ON OTHER OFFICES.

There were drawn during the year, transfer checks on the offices of
the assistant treasurers of the kinds and numbers, and for the amounts,
as follows:
'
Currency checks—
46,099 on New York for
4,548 on Boston for
4,726 on Philadelphia for
645 on New Orleans for
84 on San Francisco for

'.

56,102 total number currency checks, aniounting to



'

$38, 338,662
2,113,797
2,128,786
892,963
234,157

04
62
64
19
22

43,708,366 71

TREASURER.
Coin checks—
1,639 on New York for..
151 on Boston for
432 on Philadelphia for
3 on New Orleans for
10 on San Francisco for

193
$7,841,563
25,263
41,281
11,908
1,876

*
,

2,235 total number coin checks, amounting to
58,337 checks, total of currency and coin

79
14
11
15
50

7,921,892 69
51, 630,259 40

SPECIMEN FRACTIONAL CURRENCY.

There has been received from the sale of the various kinds of fractional
currency, with the faces and backs printed on separate pieces of paper^
and mostly pasted on cards, as follows :
Up to and including June 30,1869
During the fiscal year closing with June 30, 1870
Total amount sold.,.

$14,042 30
.640-96
.

:

14, 683 26

An error occurred in the report for the year ending June 30, 1868.
The sales to that date were $11,571 05, instead of $20,317 05, as reported. The mistake was in classifying unsigned whole notes as specimen currency. As some of these notes have been redeemed, this class
was charged to the mixed currency account. In making up the report
of sales for the year ending June 30, 1868, the amount on hand was
taken from the amount received without noticing this transfer, and the
difi'erence reported as sales.
EXCHANGE.
There has been received since a separate account has been kejot, prior t o
July 1,1869
In fiscal year closing with June 30,1870
Total amount

$109,745 84
31,745 92
141,491 76

TRUST FUNDS.

There remains in the custody of the Treasurer, held by the Secretary
of the Trieasury in trust for the Smithsonian fund, 6 per cent, stocks of
the State of Arkansas that matured in 1868, amounting at their par
face value, interest excluded, to $538,000.
The coupon bonds of the Union Pacific Eailroad Company, and of the
Central Pacific Eailroad Company, reported as held on June 30, 1869,
have, under the direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, been surrendered to the respective companies.
There were held on the 30th of June, 1870, by the Treasurer as custodian of the special fund and the sinking fund, coupon and.registered
bond§ purchased for those funds amounting to $123,429,100.
There are also held special deposits in sealed packages, the contents
of which are, and their value is, unknown.
13 F




194

REJPORT

ON

THE. FINANCES.

Statement of five-twenty bonds xmrchased for the sinking fund previous to July 1, 1869.
Loan.

Coupon.

5-20s of 1862
5-20s of M a r c h 1864
5-20S of J u n o 1864 . . .
5-20a of 1865
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867 . . . . . .
Consols of 1868

Premium
paid.

Accrued mterest
j)aad i u coin.

, $1, 621,000 00
70, 000 00
115,000 00
46.5, 000 00
446, boo 00
15, 000 00
380, 000 00
4, 338, 000 00
305, 000 00

$1, 621, 000 00
70, 000 00
1, 051, 000 00
465, 000 00
461, 000 00
4, 718, 000 00
305, 000 00

$254,574 15
11, 725 00
163, 544 .50
74, 969 00
73, 430 00
748, 803 10
49, 442 50

$7, 384 60
218 63
1, 470 42
2 683 54
429 04
116, 032 35
8,173 98

3, 097, 000 00

8, 691, 000 00

1, 376, 488 25

136, 392 56

$936, G O 00
O

5, 594, 000 00

Total

Total.

Registered.

EECAPITULATION.

Coupon
Eegistered
Premium paid
Accrued interest paid in coin
[

-

$5, 594, 000 00
3, 097, 000 00
1, 376, 488 25
136, 392 56

*.

Total

:

10, 203, 880 81

StoJement of five-twenty bonds purchased for special and sinlcvng funds from Jmie 30, 1869, to
July 1,1870.
Loan.

Coupon.

Eegistered.

Total.

P r e m ' m paid.

A c c r u e d interest paid.

Total

625, 350
257, 000
803, 650
920, 200
009, 000

$13, 038, 600
682, 400
5, 088, 750
5,153, 600
8, 846, 700
6, 389,150
445, 000

$13, 517, 300 $1, 932,131 99
682, 400
132, 706 35
1.5, 714,100 2, 276,106 49
10, 410, 600 1, 464, 756 27
47, 650, 350 6, 722,156 46
24, 309, 350 3, 785, 358 85
2, 454, 000
418, 334 99

$156 963 48
10, 702 12
195,977 16
131,119 00
629 152 01
272, 859 72
28, 380 00

75, 093, 900

5-20's of 1862
5-20'8 of M a r c h 1864
5-20's of J u n e 1864
5-20's of 1865
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867
Consols^ of 1868

39, 644, 200

114, 738,100 16, 731, 551 40

1, 425,153 49

$478, 700
10,
5,
38,
17,
2,

RECAPITULATION.

Coupon
Eegistered
Premium paid
Accrued interest

$75, 093, 900 00
^ . . . . ^ 39, 644,200 00
16, 731, 551 40
1, 425,153 49

Total

• 132, 894, 804 89

Statement of five-twenty bonds purchased for special and sinlcvng funds^from May 11,1869, to
July 1,1870.
Loan.
5 2 0 ' s b f 1862
5-20's of March. 1864
5-20's of J u n e 1864
5-20's of 1865
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867
Consols of 1868
Total

Coupon.

Eegistered.

Total.

P r e m ' m paid.

11, 561, 3.50
5, 257, 000
38, 818, 650
22, 258, 200
2, 314, 000

$14, 659, 600
752, 400
5, 203, 7.50
5, 618, 600
9, 292, 700
6, 769,1.50
445, 000

$15,138, 300 $2,186, 706 14
144, 431 35
752, 400
16, 765,100 2, 439, 650 99
10, 875, 600 1, 539, 725 27
48, 111, 350 6, 795, 586 46
29, 027, 350 4,534,161 95
467, 777 49
2, 759, 000

80, 687, 900

42, 741, 200

123, 429,100 18,108, 039 65

$478, 700

A c c r u e d int e r e s t i)aid.
$164,
10,
197
133,
629
388,
36,

348 08
920 75
447 58
802 54
581 05
892 07
553 98

1, 561, 546 05

The above includes. a $1,000 bond of June, 1864, gift of William P .
Peters, and $3,688,100 bonds bought with proceeds of $3,492,004 64 coin
dividends.
KECAPnULATION.

Coupon
•.
Eegistered
Premium paid
Accrued interest paid
Total




•
:

$80, 687, 900 00
42, 741,200 00
18,108, 039 65
1, 561, 546 05
143,098, 685 70

195

TEEASUEEE.

Statement of five-twenty bonds imrchased for special and sinldng funds from May 11, 1869, to
November 1870.
Coupon.

.5-20S of
5-20S of
.5-20S of
5-20s of
Consols
'Consols
Consols

1862
M a r c h 1864
J u n e 1864
1865
of 1865
of 1867
of 1868

Total

505, 600
771, 200
339, 250
736, 550
401,100

$16, 842, 400
754, 400
6,109, 8.50
6,951,850
11., 087, 350
7, 510, 050
470, 500

107, 076, 250

49, 726, 400

13,
8,
49,
31,
2,

. ..

.

cc
Premium paid. i n tA r e srtu e d i d .
e
pa

Total.

Eegistered.

$1, 322, 550

Loans.

$18,164,
754,
19, 615,
15, 723,
60, 426,
39, 246,
2, 871,

950
400
4.50
050
600
600
600

$2, 465, 822
144, 609
2, 700, 494
1, 989, 858
7, 877, 774
5, 448, 980
478,106

80
05
56
44
23
41
45

$209, 992
10, 961
248, 039
• 203, 786
770, 064
517, 366
37 664

21,105, 645 94

156, 802, 650

07
52
72
22
84
26
54

1, 997, 875 17

The above includes a $1,000 bond of June, 1864, gift of William P.
Peters.
Stateinent of purchase of five-twenty bonds for tlie special and sinldng funds, showing their net
cost in gold and currency, the average gold cost of each xmrchase, and the average gold cost of
all tlie xmrchases made x^rior to the end of each month, from May 1869, to July 1, 1870.

H a t e of p u r c h a s e .

1869.
M a y 12.
M a y 19.
M a y 19.
M a y 27.
June 3
J u n e 10
° J u n e 17
J u n e 23
J u n e 26
July 1
July 3
July 9
J u l y 14
J u l y 15
J u l y 21
J u l y 28
J u l y 29
August 4..-A u g u s t 11
A u g u s t 12
A u g u s t 18
A u g u s t 25
August 26....
S e p t e m b e r 1.
S e p t e m b e r 8.
S e p t e m b e r 9.
S e p t e m b e r 15.
S e p t e m b e r 22.
September 23.
S e p t e m b e r 25.
S e p t e m b e r 29.
October 6
•October 7 . . .
October 7 —
October 1 3 . . .
October 2 0 . . .
October 2 1 . . .
October 2 7 . . .
]N^ovember 3.
N o v e m b e r 4.
N o v e m b e r 4.
N o v e m b e r 5.
N o v e m b e r 5.
N o v e m b e r 10
N o v e m b e r 17
N o v e m b e r 17
N o v e m b e r 24
D e c e m b e r 1.
D e c e m b e r 2.
D e c e m b e r 8.

Principal.

IS^et cost.

N e t cost estima.ted i n
gold.

| 1 , 000, 000 $1,152, 565 64
81,718 00
70,000
1,168, 512 10
1, 000, 000
1,153, 581 50
1, 000, 000
1,164, 770 68
1, 000, 000
1,161, 967 00
1, 000, 000
1,1.52, 950 00
1, 000, 000
1, 870, 402 50
1, 620, 000
1,1.58,228 25
1,« 000, 000
1, 158, 098 75
1, 000, 000
3, 496, 474 00
3, 000, 000
3, 518. 044 00
3, 000, 000
3, 607, 622 90
3, 000, 000
1, 201, 850 00
1, 000, 000
3, 600, 028 80
3, 000, 000
3, 604, 859 00
3, 000, 000
1, 000, 000 1, 201, .570 55
2, 000, 000 2, 431,136 80
2, 000, 000 2, 422, 038 27
1, 000, 000 1,198, 931 70
2, 000, 000 2, 378, 781 81
2, 000, 000 2, 389, 539 01
1, 196, 247 80
1,000, 000
2, 000, 000 2, 401, 991 00
2, 000, 000 2, 356, 000 00
1, 000, 000 1,183, 972 53
2, 000, 000 2, 369, 639 55
2, 000, 000 2, 337, 657 62
1, 000, 000 1,165, 548 50
3, 000, 000 3, 537,158 16
3, 000, 000 3, 473, 533 12
2, 000, 000 2, 319,139 18
1, 000, 000 1,1.59, 945 10
178,187 69
153, .500
2, 000, 000 2, 318, 883 53
2, 000, 000 2, 314, 079 00
1, 000, 000 1,152, 000 00
2, 000, 000 2, 292, 600 00
2, 000, 000 2, 257, 255 21
1, 000, 000 1,126, 843 74
1, 000, 000 1,129, 090 29
227, 413 00
201, 300
489, 241 07
433, 000
2, 259, 000 00
2, 000, 000
2, 000, 000 2, 256, 513 69
1, 000, 000 1,129,039 02
3, 000, 000 3, 382, 483' 67
2, 000, 000 2, 206, 992 21
1, 000, 000 1,102,659 61
2, 000, 000 2,248,236 56




A v e r a g e gold
cost of a $100
bond.

|832,177 36
57, .548 45
822, 895 85
826, 940 14
842, 510 43
838, 208 84
833, 960 21
1, 364, 012 76
842, 347 82
842, 253 63
2, 552,170 80
2, 586, 797 06
2, 626,113 12
877, 262 77
2, 664, 221 12
2, 640, 922 34
885,134 84
1, 787, 600 59
1, 787, 482 12
887, 276 00
1, 788, 557 75
1, 793, 275 07
893, 555 78
1, 800, 930 46
1, 732, 352 94
871, 368 92
1, 740, 782 04
1, 697, 029 12
822, 982 17
2, 647, 078 14
2, 599, 463 51
1, 783, 953 22
884, 610 18
135, 891 47
1, 782, 043 06
1, 780, 060 77
885, 302 59
1,761,844 38
1, 768, 662 26
889, 906 21
891, 680 39
179, 773 12
386,751 83
1, 780, 492 61
1, 775, 035 35
888,132 95
2, 671, 260 54
1, 807,158 41
901,971 06
1,818,593 78

A v e r a g e gold
cost of t o t a l
purchases to

$83 22
82 21
82 29
82 69
84 25
83 82
83 40
84 20
84 23
84 22
85 07
86 23
87 54
87 73
88 81
88 03
88 51
89 38
89 37
88 73
89 43
89 66
.89 36
90 05
86 62
87 14
87 04
84 85
82 30
88 24
86 65
89 20
88 46
88 53
89 10
89 00
88 53
. 88 09
88 43
88 99
, 89 17
'
89 31
89 32
89 02
88 75
88 81
89 04
90 36
90 20
.90 93

date.

$82 1%

83 55.

85 m

S6 87

S6 90

87 20

87 48:

196

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Statement of purchase of five-twenty bonds, ifc.—Continued.

Principal.

D a t e of p u r c h a s e .

1869.
December 15..
December 16...
December 22..
December 29...
December 30..

Net cost.

Net cost estimated in
gold.

$2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000

$2, 239, 710 90 $1, 839, 598 27
919, 557 94
1,118, 412 34
2, 215, 985 83 1, 844, 733 26
2, 220, 427 12 1, 852, 285 40
1,110, 507 80
926, 388 15

2, 000, 000
• 451,700
1, 342, 550
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
50, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, OUO, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
345, 400
758, 800
2,000,000
1,850
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1,000,000
2, 000, 000

1870.
January 5
J a n u a r y 11
J a n u a r y 11
J a n u a r y 13
J a n u a r y 19
J a n u a r y 27
Pebruary 10...
P e b r u a r y 11 —
February 24...
February 24...,
March 2
..
M a r c h 10
M a r c h 17
M a r c h 24
M a r c h 30
April 7
A p r i l 13
A p r i l 21
A p r i l 27
A p r i l 30
A p r i l 30
May 5
M a y 12:
M a y 12
M a y 19
M a y 26
June 2
June 9
J u n e 16
J u n e 23
J u n e 30

2, 246, 595 03
517, 400 49
1, 539, 794 35
1,141,010 09
2, 281, 555 49
1,142, 872 27
1,126, 500 00
56, 325 00
1,115, 764 80
1.117, 488 85
1,107,377 50
1, 067, 347 35
1, 067, 480 27
1, 060, 440 34
1, 069, 985 26
1, 070, 574 91
1, 073, 953 37
1, 078, 778 18
1,100, 490 79
383, 020 40
840,929 55
2, 215, 447 70
2, 070 46
1.118, 370 86
2,230,611 87
1,108, 910 71
2, 223, 786 41
1,109,976 64
2, 217, 755 94
1,104, 612 10
2, 218, 005 71

Average gold A v e r a g e gold
cost 01 a $100 cost of t o t a l
purchases to
bond.
date.

1, 876, 071 01
422, 367 75
1, 256, 974 98
938,137 79
1, 877, 823 45
936, 780 55
932, 919 25
46, 888 66
948, 577 94
950, 043 66
951, 559 61
961, 574 19
953,107 39
942, 613 63
9.56,411 41
955, 870 46
954, 625 22
951, 513 28
966, 402 45
333, 423 63
. 732, 038 78
1, 932, 778 80
1,794 55
969, 335 52
1, 943, 888 34
970, 600 18
1, 942,171 53
977, 952 99
1,960,447 24
989, 574 11
1, 987, 015 19

$91
91
92
92
92

98
96
24
61
64

93 80
93 51
93 63
93 81
93 89
93 68
93 30
93 78
94 86
95 04
95 16
96 16
95 31
94 26
95 64
95 59
95 46
95 15
96 64
96 53
96 47
96 64
97 00
96 63
97 19
97 06
97 11
97 79
98 02
98 96
99 35

$88 26

88 73

89 04

89 76

90 31

Principal.

Loan.

5-208 of
5-208 of
5-208 of
5-208 of
Consols
Consols
Consols

1862
Maxch 1864
J u n e 1864
1865
of 1865
of 1867
of 1868 .
...

Total

N e t cost.

Net cost estimated
in gold.

Statement by loans shounng net cost in currency and gold of bonds purchased for special and
sinldng funds, and average gold cost of all the purchases to July f, 1870.

.

$17, 324, 068 00
896, 818 87
19,199, 734 73
12, 415, 271 79
54, 881, 952 78
33, 560, 767 03
3,226, 685 59

$13, 639, 430 89
665, 289 57
15,200 516 67
10, 045,221 09
43, 844 734 88
25, 632 647 03
2,434 342 76

123, 428,100

.

$15,138,300
752, 400
16, 764,100
10, 875, 600
48, 111, 350
29, 027, 350
2, 759, 000

141, .505, 298 79

111, 462 182 89

<1
$90
88
90
92
91
88
88

15
42
67
37
13
31
23

90 31

TJNITED STATES P A P E R CURRENCY.

The following tables exhibit, under their appropriate heads, the whole
amount of paper money that has ever been issued by the Government
of the United States from the commencement of siicli issues under the
act of July 17,1861, and the several other acts since passed by Congress
in egard to such money up to and including June 30,1870^ the amount




197

TREASURER.

during that time redeemed, and the amount outstanding at th^ date last
named, by kinds and by denominations, ranging from notes of three
cents up to those of ten thousand dollars.
Old deinand notes.
Issued.

Denominations.

Eedeemed.

Outstanding.

$21, 800, 000
20, 030, 000
18, 200, 000

$21, 760,168 25
19, 992,144 25
18,171, 431 50

$39, 831 75
37, 855 75
28, 568 50

60, 030, 000

F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars

59, 923, 744 00

106, 256 00

Total
D e d u c t d i s c o u n t for m u t i l a t i o n s

2,108 50

Total amount actually outstanding

104,147 50

Legal-tender notes, new issue.
Issued.

Denominations.
O n e dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
O n e thousand dollars

Outstanding.

Kedeemed.

..

.

Total

$28, 351, 348
34, 071,128
101, 000, 000
118, 010, 000
102, 920, 000
30, 055, 200
40, 000, 000
58, 986, 000
155, 928, 000

$18,48.3,013
20, 568, 802
49, 960, 841
51, 658, 772
38, 818, 854
18, 445, 942
20, 038, 285
35, 338, 650
115, 821, 700

669, 321, 676

'.

369,134, 861 00

25
75
25
25
00
50
00
00
00

$9, 868, 334
13, 502, 325
51, 039,158
66, 351, 227
64,101,146
11, 609, 257
19, 961, 715
23 647 350
40 106,300

75
25
75
75
00
50
00
00
00

300,186, 815 00
11, 041, 783 00

D e d u c t for n e w n o t e s n o t p u t i n c i r c u l a t i o n

289,145, 032 O
O

Total

Legal-tende)^ notes, seizes of 1869.
Denominations.
One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y doUars
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars

Issued.

Outstanding.

..

Total

$8,220,000
14, 032, 000
19, 580, 000
37, 920, 000
23, 760, 000
20, 600, 000
28, 600, 000

$24, 507
38, 208
1,000
29, 040
2, 000
2,300

$8,195, 493
13 993 792
19, 579, 000
37,890, 960
23, 758, 000
20, 597, 700
28,600,000

152, 712, 000 •

..

.

Kedeemed.

97, 055

152, 614, 945
85, 759, 977

D e d u c t for n e w n o t e s n o t p u t in c i r c u l a t i o n

66, 854, 968

RECAPITULATION.

Legal-tender notes—
Issned
Redeemed

$782,215,251 00
329,413,491 00
452,801,760 00
96,801,760 00

Dednct for new notes not yet put in circnlation
Amonnt below wliich there can be no reduction
Deduct discouQts for mutilations
Total amount actually outstanding



^

356,000,000 00
73,960 50
355,926,039 50

198

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

New notes on hand but not yet put in circulation.
One-dollar notes
Two-doUar notes
Five-dollar notes
Ten-dollar notes
Twenty-dollar notes
Fifty-dollai" notes
One-bundred-dollar notes
FiYe-hundred-dollar notes
One-tbousand-dollar notes

$1, 060^
893,000
14,000, 000
21,366,000
16, 360,000
10,055,000
23, 085,700
2,041,000
9,000,000

,.

Total

96,801, 760
Legal-tender notes, new issue and series of 1869.
Issued.

Denominations.
O n e dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n doUars

$36, 571, 348
48,103,128
120, 580, 000
155, 930, 000
126, 680, 000
50, 655; 200
68, 600, 000
58, 986, 000
155, 928, 000

-

F i f t y dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
FiA^^e h u n d r e d dollars
O n e t h o u s a n d dollars

Kedeemed.
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

822 033, 676 00

Total

$18,
20,
49,
51,
38,
18,
20,
35,
115,

507,
607,
961,
687,
820,
448,
038,
338,
821,

520
010
841
812
854
242
285
650
700

Outstanding.
25
75
25
25
00
50
00
00
00

369, 231, 916 00

D e d u c t for n o t e s n o t p u t i n c i r c u l a t i o n

$18, 063, 827
27, 496,117
70, 618,158
104, 242,187
87, 859,146
32, 206, 957
48, 561, 715
23, 647, 350
40,106, 300

75
25
75
75
00
-50
00
00
00

452, 801, 760 00
.96 801, 760 00

Total amount actually outstanding

356, 000, 000 00

Circulating notes issued during the year.
N u m b e r of n o t e s .

Denomination.

8, 219, 023.
6,569,500.
1,116, 000.
1,655,400
370,000
210,900
55,150

Amount.

Total.

$8, 219, 023
13,139, 000
5, 580, 000
16, 554, 000
7, 400, 000
10, 545, 000
5, .515, 000

One doUar
T V o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars

$66, 952, 023
F r a c t i o n a l currency.
66,080,000.,
17,041,44036,774,000.
25,704,000.,

6, 608, 000
2, 556, 216
9,193, 500
12, 852, 000

Ten cents
Fifteen cents
Twenty-five c e n t s .
Fifty cents

T o t ^ i s s u e d i n fiscal yea.r
T o t a l n u m b e r of note's, 163,295,412.

^'actional curroicy, first issue.
Issued.

Denominations.
F i v e cents
T e n cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents
Total
D e d u c t d i s c o u n t for m u t i l a t i o n s
Total actual amount outstanding




. . .

$2, 242, 889
4,115, 378
5, 225, 692
8, 631, 672

Kedeemed.
00
00
00
00

20,215, 631 00

$1,195, 696
2, 820, 251
4,139, 256
7, 583, 430

96
07
59
51

15, 738, 635 13

Outstanding.
$1, 047,192
1, 295,126
1, 086, 435
1,048,241

04
93
41
49

4, 476, 995 87
13, 586 52
4,463,409 35

199

TREASURER.
^Fractional currency, second issue.
Issued.

Denominations.

$2, 794, 826
6,176,084
7, 648, 341
6, 545, 232

Five cents
Ten cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents
Total

Kedeemed.
10
30
25
00

23,164, 483 65

:

$2, 073, 699
5, 21.3,198
6, 862,113
5, 742, 281

Outstanding.
$721,126
962, 885
786 228
802, 950

18
52
00
92

19,891,292 62

92
78
25
08

3 273 191 03
9, 072 58

D e d u c t d i s c o u n t for m u t i l a t i o n s
T o t a l a c t u a l a m o u n t outstandino"

3, 264,118 45

Fractional currency, third issue.
Issued.

Denominations.

$601, 923
657, 002
16, 976,134
• *1, 352
31,143,188
36, 735, 426

Kedeemed.

Outstanding.

T o t a l . . --

90
75
50
40
75
50

$.501, 317 85
510, 484 88
14, 416,107 57

86,115, 028 80

Three cents
F i v e cents
T e n cents
Fifteen cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents

75, 448, 472 28

27, 741, 643 73
32, 278, 918 25

$100 606
146, 517
2, 560, 026
1 352
3, 401, 545
4, 456, 506

10, 666, 556 52
60, 276 96

D e d u c t d i s c o u n t for m u t i l a t i o n s
^

05
87
93
40
02
25

Total actual amount outstandin <
^

10, 606, 279 56

* specimens.

'

Fractional currency, fourth issue.'
Issued.

Denominations.

$6, 608, 000
2, 556, 216
9,193, ,500
9, 576, 000
3, 276, 000

T e n cents
Fifteen cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents *
Fifty cents t
•^

Total

Kedeemed.
00
00
00
00
00

. 31, 209, 716 00

. . .

$2, 273, 826
853, 289
2, 568, 227
4, 052, 431

Outstanding.

74
34
06
80

9, 747, 774 94

$4, 334,173
1, 702, 926
6, 625, 272
. 5 523 568
3, 276, 000

26
66
94
2D
00

21,461,941 06
228 46

D e d u c t d i s c o u n t for m u t i l a t i o n s

21 461 712 60

Total actual amount outstanding

* With vignette of Lincoln. ^

t "With vignette of Stanton,

PRACTIONAL CURRENCY-—RESUME.

Three cents
Five cents
Ten cents
Fifteen cents
Twenty-five c e n t s
Fifty cents

Kedeemed.

Issued.

Denominations.

.

$601, 923
5, 694, 717
33, 875, 596
2, 557, 568
53, 210, 722
64, 764, 330

.
..

.

90
85
80
40
00
50

$501, 317
3,779,881
24, 723, 383
8,53, 289
41,311,240
49, 657, 062

85
02
90
34
38
48

Outstanding.
$100 606
1, 914, 836
9,152, 212
1, 704; 279
11, 899, 481
1.5,107, 268

05
83
90
06
62
02

120, 826,174 97

39, 878, 684' 48

T o t a l a c t u a l a m o u n t outstandino*
Of t h e above s t a t e d a m o u n t t h e r e w a s h e l d in t h e ofiice a t t h e close of b u s i n e s s on J u n e
30 1870

39,795,519 96

Leavino- t h e a c t u a l o u t s t a n d i n g c i r c u l a t i o n a t

36, 424, 619 96

Total

-

D e d u c t d i s c o u n t for m u t i l a t i o n s




160, 704, 859 45

.
'.

-

83,164 52

3, 370, 900 00

200

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
One-year notes of 1863.
Kedeemed.

Issued.

Denominations.
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars

...

$6, 200, 000
16, 440, 000
8, 240, 000
13, 640, 000
44, 520, 000

Total
D e d u c t for d i s c o u n t for m u t i l a t i o n s

-

,

Outstanding.

$6,169,729
16, 361, 914
8, 213, 545
13, 614, 375

$30,271
78, 086
26, 455
25, 625

44, 359, 563

160, 437

90
237
327

Total actual amount outstanding

160,110

^ .

Two-year notes of 1863.
Issued.

Denominations.

Kedeemed.

Outstanding.

.'
.

.

. . . .

Total

$6, 800, 000
9, 680, 000

$6, 768, 687 50
9, 654, 910 00

$31,312 50
25, 090 00

16, 480, 000

F i f t y dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars

16,423,597 50

56, 402 ,50

D e d u c t d i s c o u n t for m u t i l a t i o n s

. 152 50

Total actual amount outstanding.

56, 250 00

Two-year coupon notes of 1863.
Issued.

Denominations.
F i f t y dollars
One l i u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
O n e t h o u s a n d dollars

$5, 905, 600 00
14, 484, 400 00
40, 302, 000 00
89, 308, 000 00

Total

150,000,000 00

Kedeemed.
$5, 898, 597
14, 472, 700
40, 298, 000
89, 283, 000

50
00
00
00

149, 9.52, 297 50

Outstanding.
$7, 002
11,700
4,000
25, 000

50
00
00
00

47, 702 50

10, 500 00
2 50

D e d u c t for u n k n o w n d e n o m i n a t i o n s
D e d u c t for d i s c o u n t for m u t i l a t i o n s

10, 502 50
37,200 00

Total actual amount outstanding

Compound-interest notes.
Denominations.
Ton dollars
'...
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One liundred dollars . .
Five hundred dollars .
One thousand dollars .
Total

Issued.

Kedeemed.

Outstanding

$23, 285, 200
30,125, 840
60, 824, 000
45, 094, 400
67, 846, 000
39, 420, 000

$23,109, 003
29, 856, 827
60, 404, 070
44, 885, 370
67, 757, 500
38, 391, 000

$176,197
269, 013
419, 930
209, 030
88,500
1, 029, 000

266, 595, 440

264, 403, 770

2,191, 670

Deduct discount for mutilations
Total actual amount outstanding .

2,191,190

Outstanding J u n e 30, 1869
Kedeemed within the fiscal year.

3, 062, 930
871, 740

Outstanding as above.

2,191,190




TREASURER.

201

Three per cent, certificates.
Received from printing bureau
Redeemed and destroyed
Destroyed statistically

$160,000,000
.1

$39,400,000
1,980,000
:

41,380,000

Total
On hand at Wasbington and New York

118,620,000
73,075,000

Outstanding per public debt statement

45,545,000

Movement of three pei' cent, certificates.
Sent to assistant treasurer, New York
Redeemed
On band at New York

$93, 000, 000
$39,400,000
8,055,000
47,455,000

Outstanding as above

45,545, 000
Treasury notes of'1861.

Issued—
46,076 of fifty dollars
44,958 of one hundred dollars
13,665 of five hundred dollars
8, 836 of one thousand dollars

$2,303,800
. 4,495,800
6,832,500
8,836,000

113,535 of all denominations

22,468,100

Redeemed—
46,041 of fifty dollars
44,944 of one hundred dollars
13,665 of five hundred dollars
8,836 of one thousand dollars

$2,302,050
4,494,400
6,832,500
8,836,000

113,486 of all denominations

22,464,950

Outstanding—
35 of fifty dollars

, $1,750

14 of one hundred dollars... J
49 of aU denominations

1, 400
.-

Total redeemed and outstanding

3,150
'.

This account agrees with the-booksof the Register.
more outstanding.

:

22,468,100

The Secretary's books show $50

Statement shoiving the various Icinds and amounts of United States curroicy outstanding at the
close of each fiscal year for the last nine years.
June 30, 1862—
Old demand n o t e s . . . . .
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Total

..'

June 30, 1863—
Old demand notes
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Fractional currency, first issue
Total



\

$51,105,235 00
96,620,000 00
147,725,235 00

$3,384,000 00
387,646,589 00
20,192,456 00
411,223,045 00

202

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

June 30, 1864—
Old demand notes
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Compound-interest notes
One-year notes of 1863
Two-year notes of 1863
Two-year coupon notes of 1863
Fractional currency, first issue
Fractional currency, second issue

$789,037
447, 300,203
6,060, 000
44,520,000
16,480,000
I l l , 620,550
14,819,156
7, 505,127

Total
June 30, 1365—
Old demand notes
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Compound-interest notes
One-yearnotesof 1863
Two-year notes of 1863
Two-year coupon notes of 1863
Fractional currency, first issue
Fractional cnrrency, second issue
Fractional currency, third issue

649,094,073 70

$472,603
431, 066,427
191,721,470
8,467,570
7,715,950
34,441,650
9,915, 408
12,798,130
2, 319,589

„
:

'.

Total

$272,162
400,780, 305
172,369,941
2,151,465
5,209,522
1,078,552
7,030,700
7,937,024
12, 041,150

Total

.•

,
!

Total




75
85
00
50
50
50
78
57
01

608, 870, 825 46

June 30, 1867—
Old demand notes
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Compound-interest notes
One-year notes of 1863
Two-year notes of 1863
Two-year coupon notes of 1865
' Fractional currency, first issue
Fractional currency, second i'ssue
Fractional currency, third issue

Total

50
99
00
00
00
00
66
60
50

698,918, 800 25

June 30,1866—
Old demand notes
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Compound-interest notes
One-year notes of 1863
Two-year notes of 1863
Two-year coupon notes of 1863
Fractional currency, first issue
Fractional currency, second issue
Fractional currency, third issue

June 30, 1868—
Old demand notes..."
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Compound-interest notes
One-year notes of 1863
Two-year notes of 1863
Two-year coupon notes of 1863
Fractional currency, first issue
Fractional currency, second issue.
Fractional currency, third issue

50
10
00
00
00
00
00
10

' $208, 432
371,783, 597
134,774,981
794,687
396,950
134,252
5, 497,534
4,975, 827
18,001,261

50
00
00
00
00
50
93
08
01

536,567,523 02

:

$143,912
356, 000,000
54, 608,230
458,557
188,402
69,252
„ 4,881, 091
.........
3, 924, 075
'..
23,922,741

^
;.-...
•.

00
00
00
00
50
50
27
22
98

! . . . 444,196,262 47

TREASURER.

203

June 30, 1869—
Old demand notes
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Compound-interest notes
One-year notes of 1863
Two-year notes of 1863
, Two-year coupon notes of 1863
Fractional currency, first issue
Fractional currency, second issue
Fractional currency, third issue

$123,739 25
356,000,000 00
3; 063,410 00
220,517 00
^84,752 50
42, 502 50
4,605,708 52
3,528,163 65
23, 980,765 19

Total

391,649,558 61

June 30, 1870—
Old demand notes
Legal-tender notes, new issue
United States notes, series of 1869
Compound-interest notes
One-yearnotesof 1863
Two-year notes of 1863
Two-year coupon notes of 1863
Fractional currency, first issue
Fractional currency, second issue
Fractional currency, third issue
Fractional currency, fourth issue

'

- $106,256
289,145, 032
66, 854,968
2,191, 670
160,347
56,402
. 37,202
4, 476,995
3,273,191
10, 666,556
21,461,941

.,

Total

00
00
00
00
00
50
50
87
03
52
06

398,430,562 48

Comparative statement of the total amount of United States currency outstanding at the close
of each fiscal year for the last nine years.
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

30, 1862
30, 1863
30, 1864
30, 1865
30, 1866
30, 1867
30, 1868
30, 1869
30, 1870

$147,725,235
411,223,045
649,094,073
698,918,800
608,870,825
536,567,523
444,196,262
391,649,558
398,430,562

...!

00
00
70
25
46
02
47
61
48

TEMPORARY LOAN CERTIFICATES.
Outstanding 4 per cents—
Payable at the Baltimore ofiice

$100,000

Payable at the Cincinnati office

75,000

Total of 4 per cents
Outstanding 5 per cents—
Payable at the Washington office
Payable at the New York office
Payable at the Philadelphia office
Payable at the Cincinnati office
Total of 5 per cents
Outstanding 6 i^er cents—
Payable at the Washington offi,ce
Payable at the Philadelphia office
Payable at the Cincinnati office

:

$175,'000
$905
500
900
400
2,705
$255
• 2,200
. 1, 400

Total of 6 per cents
Total of all kinds outstanding



3,855
-....

181,560

:204

R E P O R T ON THE

FINANCES.

RECAPITULATION B Y O F F I C E S .

Payable
Payable
Payable
Payable
..Payable

at
at
at
at
at

the Washington office
the New York office
the Philadelphia office
the Baltimore office
the Cincinnati office

$1,160
500
3,100
100,000
76, 800

Total amount outstanding

181,560

COIN CERTIFICATES.
'Coin certificates of all issues received from the Pnnting Bureau, exclusive of amount destroyed
statistically.
Twenty-dollar notes
^
$960,160
One-hundred-dollar notes
11, 645,700
Five-hundred-dollar notes
19,109,000
•One-thousand-dollar notes
72,633,000
Five-thousand-dollar notes
423,725,000
Ten-thousand-dollar notes
126,390,000
Total

,.

654,462,860

Cash destruction of all issues—
Twenty-doUar notes
One-hundred-dollar notes
Five-hundred-dollar notes
One-thousand-dollar notes
Five-thousand-dollar notes
'Ten-thousand-dollar notes
Total destroyed
Redeemed, but not destroyed
Amount on hand
Amount outstanding

$850,300
10,650,600
7,874, 000
57,640,000
309,250,000
19,400,000

,

,
".

405,664,900
2,757, 880
$408,422,780
211,492,960
34,547,120

1

Total.....

.•

654,462,860

Coin certificates, old series.
K e c e i v e d from
p r i n t i n g bu-

500s.
1,0008.
5,000s.
^ 0,000s.
Total

A m o u n t on
hand.

$960,160
11, 645, 700
9, 004, 000
60, 008, 000
323, 040, 000
25, 000, 000

Denominations.

$160
800
4,000
8,000
40, 000

429, 657, 860

Issued.

$960, 000
11, 644, 900
9, 000, 000
60, 000, 000
323,000,000
25, 000, 000
429, 604, 900

Deduct amount redeemed

404, 942, 780

T o t a l old i s s u e o i i t s t a n d i n g .

Denominations.

Issued.

$850)\300
10, 650, 600
7, 690, 000
56,995, 000
308,790,000
17, 960, 000

$109, 700
994, 300
1, 310, 000
3,005,000
14, 210, O O
G
7, 040, 000

429, 604, 900

Total

402, 935, 900

26, 669, 000
2, 006, 880

Deduct amount redeemed b u t not destroyed.




Outstanding.

$960,000
11, 644, 900
9, 000, 000
60, 000, 000
323, 000, 000
25, 000, 000

$203.
100s.
500s.
1,000s.
5,000s.
10,0003.

T o t a l old i s s u e o u t s t a n d i n g

Kedeemed.

,

24, 662,120

205^.

TEEASUEEE.
Coin certificates, series of 1870.
K e c e i v e d from
XDrinting bureau.

Denominations.

$5008
1000s
5, 000s
10 OOO's

..

A m o u n t on
hand.

$10,105, 000
12, 625, 000
100, 685, 000
101, 390, 000

Total

$9, 505, 000
10, 080, 000
95, 995, 000
95,860,000

224, 805, 000

y-

211, 440, 000

Deduct amount redeemed

$600, 000
2, 545, 000:
4, 690, 000
5, 530, 000
13, 365, 000
* 3, 480, 000

T o t a l a m o u n t of o u t s t a n d i n g

.

.

....

.

Issued.

Denominations.
$nOOs
1 oOOs
5 OOOs
10, OOOs

Issued.

.
.

-

Total

.

9, 885, 000^

Kedeemed.

Outstanding.

• $600,000
2, 545, 000
4, 690, 000
5, 530, 000

$184, 000
645, 000
460, 000
1, 440, 000

$416, 000
1, 900, 000
4 230 000
^•'^OOO^ 000

13, 365, 000

2, 729, 000

10, 636, 000

D e d u c t amount redeemed b u t not destroyed

751, 000

Total amount outstanding

9, 885, 000

* This amount includes $751,000 redeemed at New York, Jnne 30, 1870, but not destroyed.

Total redemption of coin certificates since date of issue.
At Washington
At Boston
AtNewYork
At Philadelphia ..
At Charleston....
At New Orleans ::
At Saint Louis . . .
At San Francisco.
At Baltimore
At Buffalo
At Chicago . .
At Cincinnati
At Saint Paul
At Louisville
At Mobile
Total redemption since issue
Movements of coin certificates. .
Washington office notes—
Received from printing bureau
Redeemed and destroyed
On hand

$625,280
15,139,020
380,006,500
712,720
248,920
771,420
440,620,
1,040
9,520,520
82,980
346,080
316,300
9,000 115,620
8&, 760''
408,422,780

$3,200, 000 '
$3,193,200
800
3,194, 000 •

Outstanding
New York office notes—
Sent to New York previous to June 30, 1869
Sent to New York during fiscal year

6,000'$386,680,000
64,130,000

Total amount sent to New York
Remaining on hand at New York, June 30, 1870

450,810,000
7,885,000

Total issned at New York office
Total redeemed of New York issues

442,925,000
408,383,880

Outstanding of New York issue
Total outstanding as per public debt statement, July 1, 1870v.



34,541,120
34,547,120

206

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Coin certificates.

From
From
From
From
From

Issued—
November 13, 1865, to June 30,1866
June 30, 1866, to June 30, 1867
June 30, 1867, to June 30, 1868
June 30, 1868, to June 30, 1869
June 30, 1869, to June 30, 1870

$98,493, 660
109,121,620
77,960, 400
., 80,663,160
76,731, 060

• Total issued
From
From
From
From
From

Redeemed—
November 13, 1865, to
June 30, 1866, to June
June 30, 1867, to June
June 30, 1868, to June
June 30,1869, to June

442,969,900
June 30, 1866
30,1867
30,1868
30,1869
30,1870

^

$87,545, 800
101,295,900
79,055,340
65, 255,620
75,270,120

Total redeemed

408,422,780

Total outstanding as per books of this office

34, 547,120

Bedemx^tion of coin certificates for the.fiscal year was for the amounts and at tlie xilaces as
ollows :
New York
$74,707,500
Boston
454,740
Charleston
900
Baltimore
59,540
Chicago
:
39,100
Washington
5,140
Total redemption of New York issue
:
Redeemed at Washington of Washington issue

75,266,920
3,200

Total redemption . . . . >
Outstanding June 30, 1870, as per public debt statement

75,270,120
*34,547,120

Total as above . . . :

109,817,240

Coin certificates, all issues outstanding, by denominations.
Twenty-dollar notes
One-hundred-dollar notes
Five-hundred-dollar notes
One-thousand-dollar notes
Five-thousand-dollar notes
Ten-thousand-dollar notes

,
•.

Total amount outstanding

- $105,920
964,700
1, 637,500
4,679,000
17,390, 000
9,770, 000
34,547,120

Coin certificates.
Balance of outstanding notes as per statement, June 30,1859
Issued at New York during fiscal year
Issued at Washington during fiscal year^

,
$33, 086,180
76,727, 960
3,100
109,817,240

Up to
oflGlces of
quent to
assistant

the date of August 1, 1869^ redemptions were made at tlie
the various assistant treasurers and depositaries, but subsethat date redemptions were only made at the ofiSce of the
treasurer at 'New York.

*\This includes $151,120 redeemed at New York June 30,, not returned to Washiligton.




TREASURER.

207

On hand at New York J u l y 1, 1869, which were never issued
Sent to New York during fiscal year

$20, 482,960
64,130, 000

Total
Less amount issued during fiscal year

84,612,960
76,727,960

On hand July 1, 1870, (never issued)
, On hand, redeemed, on June 30, not returned to Washington

7, 885, 000
151,120

Total on hand at New York, as joer statement of Assistant Treasurer at New York

8, 036,120

COIN CERTIFICATES, B(^SUm<^.

Amount received from printing bureau exclusive of amount destroyed
statistically
Amount remaining in the offices at Washington and New York
Amount issued at Washington and New York
Ainount redeemed and destroyed
Amonnt redeemed, but not yet destroyed

$654,462,860
211, 492,960
442, 969, 900

$405, 664, 900
2,757,880

Total amount redeemed at close of fiscal year

408, 4.22,780

Total amount outstanding at close of fiscal year

34,547,120

SEYEN-THIRTIES OF 1 8 6 1 , AND OF 1 8 6 4 AND 1 8 6 5 .
Statement of conversions and redemxitions of seven-thirties of 1861, and of 1864 and 1865, during the fiscal year, by series and denominations, and in gross amounts during fo^Dier years,
and gross amounts outstanding.
Seven-thirties of 1861—
16
7 one-hundreds
2

fifties

$800
700
1,000

five-hundreds

Redeemed during the fiscal year
Redeemed previous to July i, 1869

2, 500
140,062,550

Total amount redeemed
Outstanding July 1, 1870

140, 065, 050
29,700

Total original issue

140,094,750

First series August 15, 1864—
567
421 one-hundi-eds
40
five-hundreds
19 one-thousands

.
fifties

.
$28,350
42,100
20, 000
19,000

»

Redeemed during the fiscal year
Redeemed previous to July 1, 1869
Total amount redeemed
Outstanding July 1, 1870
Total original issue
Second series June 15, 1865—
421
fifties
503 one-hundreds
133
five-hundreds
38 one-thousands
1
five-thousand



.
109, 450
299,718,000
299, 827, 450
165,050

.^.
....'....

299,992,500

$21,050
50,300
66,500
38,000
5, 000

208

•

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Redeemed during the fiscal year
Redeemed previous to July 1^ 1869

$180, 850
330,636,400

Total amount redeemed
Outstanding July 1, 1870

^

330, 817,250
182,750

'

Total original issue

331,000,000

Third series July 15,1865—
1,330
fifties
1,280 ohe-hundxeds
82
five-hundreds
11 one-thousands

:

•

Redeemed during the fiscal year
Redeemed previous to July 1, 1869

$66,500
128,000'
41,000
11, 000
246,500
• 198,470, O O
>
O

Total amonnt recleemed
Outstanding July 1, 1870

198,716,500
283,500

Total original issue

,

199, 000,000

KECAPITULATION O F ALL T H E ISSUES..

2,334
2,211 one-hundreds
257
68 one-thousands
1

fifties

$116,700
221,100
128,500
68,000
5,000

five-hundreds.....
five-thousand

Redeemed during the fiscal year
Redeemed previous to July 1, 1869

;
:

539,300
968,886,950

Total amount redeemed.
Outstanding July 1, 1870

969, 426,250
661,000

Total

970,087,250

Statement, by series and denominations, of seven-thirties of 1861, and cf 1864 and 1865, outstanding on the ZOth of June, 1870.
Seven-thii'ties of 1861—
96
84 one-hundreds
11
11 one-thousands
Total

fifties
-

-

five-hundreds
,

29,700

First series August 15,1864—
999
fifties
691 one-hundreds
66
five-hundreds
13 one-thousands
Tota]

Total



$49,950
69,100
33,000
13,000
:

Second series July 15, 1865—
424
565i one-hundreds
120
five-hundreds
45 one-thousands
-.

$4,800
8,40O
5,500
11,000

fifties
;....
1..,

165,050

$21,200'
56,550
60,000
45,000
182,750

TREASURER.
Third series July 15,1865—
1,571
1,264^ one-hundreds
99
29 one-thousands

209

fifties
five-hundreds

$78,550
126,450
49,500
29,000

•

283,500

Total

RECAPITULATION OF T H E FOUR SERIES COMBINED.

3,090
2,605 one-hundreds
296
98 one-thousands

fifties
five-hundreds

'

$154,500
260,500
148,000
98, 000
661,000

CERTIFTCATES OF INDEBTEDNESS.
Statement of amounts issued redeeined and outstanding.
Old issue—
N u m b e r s l tol53,662of $1,000
$153,662,000 00
Numbers 1 to 14, 500 of $5, 000
72,500,000 OQ
Numbers 15, 001 to 31, 010 of $5, 000
80,050,00.0 00
N u m b e r s 3 1 , l l l to 69,268 of $ 5 , 0 0 0 - . . . .
•
190,790,000 00
Numbers 1 to 13 of various amounts
1, 591,241 65
Total of first series issued

498,593,241 65

New issue—
N u m b e r s l to 15,145 of $1,000

$15,145,000 00

Numbers 1 to 9, 603 of $5, 000

48,015,000 00

Total of second series issued

63,160,000 00

Total amount issued

561,753,241 65

Redeemed to July 1,1869
Redeemed during fiscal year
Outstanding

$561,746,241 65
2, 000 00
5,000 00
•
561,753,241 65,
Five certificates of $1,000 are outstanding, two of which are caveated.
Interest paid to July 1, 1869
$31,157,002 09
Interest paid this fiscal year
106 52
Total amount of interest paid to July 1, 1870
Princijjal paid as above stated
Total principal and interest paid to. July 1, 1870

:

31,157,108 61
561,748, 241 65
592,905, 350 26

The 100 numbers intermitted of $5,000 certificates, above spoken of,
were never printed nor received. The skipping over these numbers was
an accident in the printing bureau; and as the next series of 100 notes
had been issued, it was not thought advisable to issue lower numbers of
a later date. So 100 numbers were never issued.
The history of the other amount that never was issued is as follows:
On the 3d day of December, 1862, t ^ e hundred impressions of these
one-year 6 per cent, certificates of indebtedness of the denomination of
five thousand dollars, amounting in the aggregate to $2,500,000, being
printed numbers from 14,501 to 15,000, both inclusive, were abstracted =
from the Department.
They were all returned to the Department by detectives on the 6th day
of February^ 1863, and were destroyed by burning on the 18th day of
14 F



210

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

the same month and year. These numbers were dropped from the numerical register, and no certificates of indebtedness of the denomination
of five thousand, bearing the numbers of those abstracted and destroyed
as above mentioned, were ever issued.
REDEMPTION AND DESTRUCTION OF MONEYS AND SECURITIES WITHIN
THE YEAR.
Old demand notes
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Amount transferred froin statistical account.
.. • •
Legal-tender notes, series of 1869.
One-yearnotesof 1863
Two-year notes of 1863
Two-year coujDon notes of 1863
Compound-interest notes
Fractional currency, first issue
Fractional currency, second issue
Fractional currency, third issue
Fractional currency, fourth issue
Coin certificates
Coin certificates, (series of 1870)
Discounts on above
Total amount destroyed as money
National bank notes, (in liquidation)

$17,483 25
$95,258,040' 00
39,818,425 00
• —^

135,076,465 00
97,055 00
60,170 00
28,350 00
5, 300 00
871,740 00
128,712 65
254,972 62
13, 314,208 67
9,747,774 94
73,632,200 00
2,729,000 00
39,717 ^04

1.

,.

236,003,149 17
178,738 00

-.

Total
Certificates of indebtedness
Statistical matter destroyed
B a l a n c e o n h a n d July 1,1870

^

236,181,887 17
, $2,106 52
453, Oil, 360 62
1,035,064 51
.

454,048,53165

' Total amount

690,230,418 82

Cash account. Dr.
Balance from last year
$434,135 49
Amount received during the y e a r —
196,745,936 15
Amount transferred from statistical account
39,818,425 00
^"5,998,496 64
Contra, Cr.
Amount destroyed during the year
Transferred from statistical account
Balance on hand July 1,1870

Ajnonnt brought down
Discount on same
Certificates of indebtedness and interest
National bank notes, (in liquidation)

196,145,007 13
39, 818,425 00
1,035, 064 51
;——
236,998,496
39, 717
2,106
178,738

64
04
52
00
$237,219,058 20
453, Oil, 360 62

Destroyed on statistical account
Total amount for fiscal year

During fiscal year
As per last report

690,230,418 82
Destroyed as money.
$236,003,149 17
1,194,953,509 32

Total amount destroyed as money



$236,998,496 64

$1,430,956,658 49

TREASURER^

211

Destroyed statistically.
$453,011,360 62
1,970,092,173 90

During the year
As per last report

Total
Less amount transferred to cash account.

2,423,103,534 52
39, 818, 425 00

Total amount destroj^ed statistically

,

$2, 383,285,109 52

Certificates of Indebtedness.
Redeemed during year
. As per last report.
Not previously reported

2,106 52
582,476,004 74
10,427,239 00

•

Total amount certificates of indebtedness destroyed
Destroyed during year
As per last r e p o r t . .

National bank notes.
•..

592,905,350 26

178,738 00
1,123,442 00

Total amount national bank notes destroyed.

1,302,180 00

Total......

4,408,449,298 27

Total of all destroyed during the year
Total amount reported before
$3,748, 645,129 96
Less amount transferred from statistical account
to cash account
39,81.8,425- 00
Certificates of indebtedness not previously reported

•.

Total

$689,195, 354 31

3,708,826,704 96
10,427; 239 00
4,408,449,298 27

DISCOUNT ON MUTILATED CURRENCY.

Discounts have been made for missing parts of mutilated currency
destroyed up to and including June 30,1870.
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
Ou

old demand notes
legal-tender notes, new issue
one-year notes of 1863
two-year notes of 1863
two-year coupon notes of 1863.
compound-interest notes.
fractional currency, first issue
fractional currencj^, second issue
fractional currency, third issue
fractional currency, fourth issue

Total
On money redeemed but not destroyed

$2,108
73,960
237
152
2
480
13,586
9, 072
60,276
228

^.^
.:

50
50
00
50
50
00
52
58
96
46

160,105 52
22, 430 3^5

Total discounts from beginning

182,535 "^87

These discounts were made for the amounts and in the years as follows, viz :
In
In
In
In
In
In
In
In

the
the
the
the
the
the
the
the

year
year
year
year
year
year
year
year

1863....
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870

Total discounts from the beginning



.•
:
..1.
:......

$615
11,393
13,108
17,813
24,767
31,671
38,543
44,622

27
93
09
36
m
54
56
43

182,535 87

212

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
DESTRUCTION OF P A P E R MONEY.

There have been "destroyed, since the commencement ofthe rebellion,
papers representing money of the kinds, denominations, and numbers
of each kind, as follows:
Old demand notes.

'-

Five dollars
Ten dollars

4 352,129i
1,999,258^

Twenty dollars

908,631

Total number of notes destroyed

7,260,019

Legal-tender notes.
One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
t
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand doUars
Total number of notes destroyed

18,505,362^
10,292,068
9, 995, 020^
5,166,854
1,941,354
368,952
200,400
70, 678
115,822
46,656,511

Legal-tender notes, series of 1869.
One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
, Fifty dollars

24,507
19,104
200
2,904
100
46

Total number of notes destroyed

46,861

One-year notes of 1863.
Ten dollars
Twenty d o l l a r s . . . . .
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars

.-

616,976
818,102
164,272
136,144

Total number of notes destroyed

1,735. 494

Tivo-year notes of 1863.
Fifty dollars

"

135,375

One hundred dollars

96,550

Total number of notes destroyed.
Two-year coupon notes of 1863.
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand doUars.,
Total number of notes destroyed

231,925
117,970
144,728
80,596
89,283
432,577

,

Fractional currency, first issue.
Five cents
Ten cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents

-

Total number of notes destroyed



...

23,943,929
28,224,007
16,580,198
15,175,150
83,923,284

TREASURER.

213

Fractional currency, second issue.
Five cents
Ten cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents

41,512,194
52,168.960
27, 455, 372
11,488,033

•

Total number of notes destroyed

132, 624,559 .

. Fractional currency, third issue.
Three cents
Five cents
Ten cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents

•

16,715,528
10,217,768
144,311,060
111,043,703
64,608,726

•

Total number of notes destroyed

Ten cents
Fifteen cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents

346,896,785

F)'aetional currency, fourth issue.
.*..".

:

22,738,826
5,688,732
10,273,128
8,105,058

-

Total number of notes destroyed

46, 805,744

Coin certificates.
Twenty dollars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand dollars.'
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars

:
r.
-•

Total number of notes destroyed

:—

284,950

Coin certificates, series of 1870.
1
1

Five hundred dollars
One thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand doUars

42, 515
106,506
15, 380
56,995
61,758
1,796

^.
'

Total number of notes destroyed

368
645
92
144
1,249

National banlc notes, (in liquidation.)
One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars

14,814
5,308
147,534
31,387
8,538
663
'
213

,

Total number of notes destroyed

208,457

Compound-interest notes.
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand doUars

'.

Total number of notes destroyed




..1
•

2,310,914
1,492,848
1,208,085
448, 854
135,515
38,391
5,634,607

214

REPORT ON THE FINA.NCES.
RECAPITULATION—NOTES

DESTROYED.

Showing the number of notes of each Icind destroyed during the year.
Old demand notes
Legal-tender notes, new issue
Legal-tender notes, series of 1869
One-year notes of 1863
Two-year notes of 1863
Two-year coupon notes,of 1863
Compound interest notes
Fractional currency, first issue
. Fractional currency, second issue
Fractional currency, third issue
Fractional currency, fourth issue
Coin certificates
Coin certificates, series of 1870

.'. 1

2,085
12,346,000-|46,861
2,776
425
64
27,981
770, 889
1,860,715
56,229, 575
46,805,744
51, 096
1,249

Total
National bank notes

118,145,460^
31,172

Total number of notes destroyed daring the year
Number as per lastreport

118,176,632^
554, 566,389|

Total to July 1, 1870

672,743,022
DESTRUCTION ACCOUNT.

Showing the amount efface value of the various Icinds of paper money destroyed since 1861 as
money.
Old demand notes
$59,925,852 50
Legal-tender notes, new issue
369,208,821 50
Legal-tender notes, series of 1869
97, 055 00
One-year notes of 1863
44,359,890 00
Two-year notes of 1863
16,423,750 00
Two-year coupon notes of 1863
149,962,800 00
Compound interest notes
264, 404,250 00
Fractional currency, first issue
•...
15,752,221 65
Fractional currency, second issue
'
*
.
19,900,365 20
Fractional currency, 'third issue
75,508,749 24
Fractional currency, fourth issue
t
9,748, 003 40
Coin certificates
402,935,900 00
Coin certificates, series of 1870
2,729,000 00^
Total amonnt destroyed as money
Total amount destroyed statistically
National bank notes in liquidation
Certificates of indebtedness, redeemed and canceled

1,430,956, 658
2,383,285,109
. 1,302,180
592,905, 350

Total amount destroyed up to July 1, 1870

49
52
00
26

4,408,449,298 27

REDEMPTION ACCOUNT.
Showing redemptions of moneys since the beginning.
Moneys destroyed before July 1, 1869
$1,194,953,509 32
Moneys destroyed within the fiscal year
235,963,432 13
Discount on the same
'
..'.
39,717 04
Total
Broken national bank notes before July 1, 1869..
Broken national bank notes during the fiscal year.
Discount on same
Certificates of indebtedness before July 1,1869..
Certificates of indebtedness during the fiscal
year



•.. 1,430,956,658 49
$1,123,442 00
178,695 60
42 40
1,302,180 00
592,903,243 74
2,106 52
r

592,905,350 26

215

TREASURER.
statistical matter before July 1, 1869
Statistical matter during the fiscal year

$1,970, 092,173 90
453, Oil, 360 62

Less amount transferred to cash account

2,423,103,534 52
39,818,425 00
$2, 383,285,109 52

Total amount destroyed to July 1, 1870
Balance on hand redeemed but not destroyed

4,408,449,298 27
1, 035,064 51

Total redeemed up to July 1, 1870

4,409,484,-362 78

Statements showing the amounts paid, amounts discounted for mutilations, and the total
amounts retired from the beginning up to July 1, 1870.
'

Old demand notes. A m o n n t iDaid.

Total

.

$479 25
440 75
1,188 50

$21, 760, 647 50
19, 992, 585 00
18,172, 620 00

59, 923, 744 00

P i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T"\venty dollars

A m o u n t s discounted. .

$21, 760,168 25
19, 992,144 25
18,171,431.50

Denommations.

2,108 50

59, 925, 852 50

Total amounts
retired.

Legal-tendo' notes, new issue.
Denominations.

A m o u n t s discounted.

Amouiit paid.

O n e dollar . .
T w o dollars
'
ITive dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
[Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
!Five h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars . .

. .

Total

...

$18, 483, 013
20, 568, 802
• 49, 960, 841
51, 658, 772
38, 818, 854
18, 445, 942
20, 038, 285
•35,338,650
115, 821, 700

$22, 349
15, 333
14, 261
9, 767
8, 226
1,657
1, 715
350
300

25
75
25
25
00
50
00
00
00

369,134, 861 00 •

75
25
25
75
00
50
00
00
00

73, 960 50

Total amounts
retired.
$18 505 363
20, 584,136
49, 975,102
51 668 540
38, 827j 080
18, 447, 600
20, 040, 000
35 339 000
115 822,000

00
0.0
50
00
00
00
00
00
00

369, 208, 821 50

Legal-tender notes, series of 1869.
A m o u n t s paid.

Denominations.
c
One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars.
T e n dollars
TAventy dollars
E i f t y dollars

$24, 507
38, 208
1, 000
29, 040
2, 000
2, 300

.
..
'-

Total

00
00
00
00
00
00

97, 055 00

Total amounts
retired.
$24, 507
38, 208
1, 000
29, 040
2, 000
2, 300

00
00
00
00
00
00

97, 055 00

One-year notes of 1863.
Denominations.

T o n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
Unknown
Total

. . .

.




A m o u n t s paid.

A m o u n t s discounted.

$6,169, 729 .00
16, 361, 914 00
8, 213, 545 00
13, 614, 375 00
90 00

$31
126
55
25

00
00
00
00

44, 359, 653 00

237 00

Total amounta
retired.
$6,169, 760
16 362 040
8, 213, 600
13, 614, 400
90

00
00
00
00
00

44, 359, 890 00

216

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

Two-year notes of 1863.

A n i o u n t s paid.

Total

$62 50
90 00

$6, 768, 750 00
9, 655, 000 00 S

16, 423, 597 50

F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars

A m o u n t s discounted.

$6, 768, 687 50
9, 654, 910 00

Denominations.

152 50

16, 423, 750 00

A m o u n t s discounted.

Total amonnts
retired.

Total amounta
retired.

Tkvo-year coupon notes of 1863.
Denominations.

F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
Unknown

.

.

A m o u n t s paid.

.

.

.

Total

50
00
00
00
00

$2 50

149, 962, 797 50

»

2 50

$5,
14,
40,
89,

898,
472,
298,
283,
10,

597
700
000
000
500

$5,
14,
40,
89,

898, 600
472, 700
298, 000
283, 000
10,500

00
09
00
00
00

149, 962, 800 00

Compound-intm-est notes.
Denominations.
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
Onehundred dollars.
Five hundred dollars
dne thousand dollars

Amounts paid. Amounts dis- Total amounts
retired.
counted.
$23,109, 003 00
29, 856, 827 00
60, 404, 070 00
44, 885, 370 00
67,7.57,500 00
38, 391, 000 00

Total

264, 403, 770 00

$137
133
180
30

00
00
00
00

$23,109,140 00
29, 856, 960 00
60, 404, 2.50 00
44, 88.5, 400 00
67,757,500 00
38, 391, 000 00

480 00

264, 404, 250 00

Fractional currency, first issue.
Denominations.

Amounts paid. Amounts dis- Total amounts
retired.
counted.

Five cents
Ten cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents

$1,195, 696 96
2, 820, 251 07
4,139, 256 59
7, 583, 430 51

$1, 499 .49
2,149 63
5, 792 91
4,144 49

$1,197,196 45
2, 822, 400 70
4,145, 049 50
7, 587, 575 00

Total

15, 738, 635 13

13, 586 52

15, 752, 221 65

Fractional currency, second issue.
Denominations.
Five cents
Ten cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents
Total




Amounts paid.
$2, 073, 699
,5, 213,198
6, 862,113
5, 742, 281

Amounts discounted.

18
52
00
92

$1, 910 52
3, 697 48
1, 730 00
1,734 58

19, 891, 292 62

9, 072 58

Total amounts
retired.
$2, 075, 609
5, 216, 896
6, 863, 843
5, 744, 016

70
00
00
50

19, 900, 305 20

217

TREASURER.
Fractional currency, third issue.
.Amounts paid.

Denominations.

Amounts discounted.

Total amounts
retired.

Three cents
Five cents
Ten cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents

$501, 317 85
510, 484 88
14, 416,107 57
27, 741, 643 73
32, 278, 918 25

$147 99
403 .52
14, 998 43
19, 282 02
25, 445 00

$501, 465 84
510, 888 40
14, 431,106 00
27, 760, 925 75
32, 304, 363 25

Total

75, 448, 472 28

60, 276 96

75, 508, 749 24

Fractional currency, fourth issue.
Amounts paid. Amounts discounted.

Denominations.
Ten cents
Fifteen cents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents

'

Total

$2, 273, 826 74
853, 289 34
2, .568, 227 06
• 4, 052, 431 bO

Total amounts
retired.

$55 86
20 46
54 94
97 20
228 46

9, 747, 774 94

$2, 273, 882 60
853, 309 80
2, 568, 232 00
4, 052, 529 00
9 748, 003 40

DISCOUNT ON MUTILATED MONEY.

There has been retained on the redemption of mntilated currency for
parts of notes that were missing therefrom, as follows:
On moneys destroyed to J u l y l , 1870
On moneys destroyed to J u l y l , 1869

$160,105 52
120,388 48

Discount in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870
Discount on moneys redeemed but not destroyed up to July
1,1870
$22,430 35
Discount on moneys on hand July 1, 1869
17,524 96
Discount on moneys not destroyed, year ending June 30,1870
Total amount of discounts during the fiscal year
Amount of discounts before July 1, 1869
Amount of discounts in fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.
T o t a l o f a U d i s c o u n t s u p t o July 1, 1870
DESTRUCTION

$39,717 04

4,905 39
,
,.-..

44, 622 43
$137,913 44
44,622 43
18.2,535 87

OF STATISTICAL MATTER DURING THE FISCAL YEAR
ENDING- J U N E 3 0 , 1 8 7 0 .
Coin certificates—
Twenty dollars
$1,039,840 00
One hundred dollars...
3,154,300 00
Five hundred dollars..
29,996, 000 00
One thousand dollars..
56,992, 000 00
Five thousand dollars.
146,960, 000 00
142,140 00
Coin certificates, series of 1870145,000 00
Five hundred dollars
275,000 00
One thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
2,815,000 00
Ten thousand dollars
1,610,000 00
4,845,000 00



218

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Legal-tender notes, series of 1869—
One dollar
Two dollars
Fivedollars
'..
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty d o l l a r s . . . . :
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
.....:.:."....
One thousand dollars

$890,000
989,600
1,256,020
3,744,000
897,040
766,000
1,204,000
270,000
396,000

,
00 .
00
00
00
00
00
00~
00
00
$10,412,660 00

Fractional currency, 4th issue, 1st s e r i e s Ten cents
Fifteencents
Twenty-five cents
Fifty cents

140,674
184,230
719,340
4,585,452

00
00
00
00
5, 629, 696 00

Fractional currency, 4th issue, 2d series—
Fifty cents
Treasury notes of 1857—
Fifty dollars
One'hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand d o l l a r s . . . . .
Five thousand doHars

55,048 00
•

2,300,750
4,845,000
10,191,500
20,654,000
7,330,000

00
00
00
00
00
45,321,250 00

Coupon bonds, loan of 1848—
One thousand dollars
Three thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
Xfen thousand dollars

193,000 Ot)
426,000 00
240,000 00
• 2,710,000 00
:—-

..i.

Coupon bonds, loan of 1858—
One thousand dollars
Coupon bonds, loan of I860—.
One thousand dollars
Coupon bonds, loan of 1861, (exchanges)—
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars...
:
Five hundied dollars
One thousand dollars

3,569, 000 00

>
506,000.00
2,000 00
16,950
145,900
163,000
817,000

00
00
00
00
1,142,850 00

Coupon bonds, 5-20s of 1862,1st series, (exchanges)—
Fifty dollai^s
26,000
One hundred dollars
.'
73,900
Fivehundred dollars
61,500
One thousand dollars
224,000

00
00
00
00
385,400 00

Coupon bonds, 5-20s of 1862,2d series, (exchanges)—
Fiftydollars
20,600 00
One hundred dollars
126,800 00
Five hundred dollars
'.
^
47,000 00
One thousand dollars
226,000 00^
— - ^
Coupon bonds, 5-20s of 1862,3d series, (exchanges)—
\
Fiftydollars
16,550 00
One hundred'dollars
111,800 00
Five hundred^doHars
V...
22, 000 00
One thousand dollars.!
213,000 00

420, 400 00

363,350 00
Coupon bonds, 5-20s of 1862,4th series, (exchanges)—
Fifty dollars
:
19,950 00
One hundred dollars
172,000 00
Fivehundred dollars:
64,500 00
One thousand d o l l a r s . . . . . . . .
300,000 00



'

556,450 00

219

TREASURER.
Coupon bonds, 10-40s of 1864—
Fiftydollars
One hundred dollars
Fivehundred dollars
Onethousand dollars

$1,100
8,900
100,000
22,850,000
•

00
00
00
00
$22, 960 000 00

Coupon bonds, 5-20s of June 1864—
Onethousand dollars

1,515,000 00

Coupon bonds, loan of 1865,3d series—
Fiftydollars
.."......'
One hundi-ed dollars
Five hundred dollars
Onethousand dollars
/
Coupon bonds, consols of 1867—
FiftydoUars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
Onethousand dollars
..............'...

243,250
723,000
1,062,500
7,052,000
.
r^-

00
00
00
00

363,450
39,700
2,591,000
15,343,000

00
00
00
00

9,080,750 00

18,-337,150 00
Coupon bonds, consols of 1868—
Fifty d o l l a r s . . . . V . . . . . V . . . '
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
'..•..".•......•...
Onethousand dollars
Coupon bonds, consols of 18.67, (exchanges)—
Fiftydollars
One hundred dollars
Fivehundred d o l l a r s . . . .
One thousand dollars
i
•
Couponbonds, consols of 1868, (exchanges)—
Fiftydollars
'
One hundred dollars
Five hundred doBars
Onethousand doUars
.......

64,300
100,000
750,000
3,000,000
•
:

00
00
G
O
00

280,150
905,400
1,574,500
10,217,000

00
00
00
00

3,914,300 00

^
12,977,050 00
•

135,300
463,700
691, 000
4,879,000

00
00
00
00
6,169,000 00

Coupon bonds, consols of 1865—.
FiftydoUars
'.
One hundred d o l l a r s . . . .
Fivehundred dollars
Onethousand dollars..'...
'.'

30,000 00
95,700 00
6,923,000 00
36,079,000 00
—
'• -^—

Coupon bonds, 10-40s of .1864—
Onethousand doUars
Coupon bonds, Oregon war d e b t Five hundred dollars . . . . ' . . . . . .
'....,
Coupon bonds, Texas indemnity—
Onethousand dollars..
•....
Coupons, loan of 1865
Coupons, consols of 1 8 6 7 . . . .
Coupons, consols of 1868....

1,851,000 00
15,000 G
O
1,000 00

:

Registered certificates, loan of 1863, (1881s)—
Fiftydollars
One hundred doUars
Fivehundred dollars
Onethousand doUars
Five thonsand dollars
Tenthousand doUars




43,127,700 00

1-.."..•-

-----

700 00
900 00
17,Q0.0 00
70,000 G
O
200,000 00
370,000 00
— — ^

13,500 00
1,362,885 00
86,320 50

658,600 00

220

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Registered certificates, March 3, 1865—
Fiftydollars
One hundred doUars
Fivehundred dollars
One thousand doUars
Five thousand dollars
Tenthousand doUars
'..1

$1,500 00
333,100 00
47,000 00
34,000 G
O
420,000 00
250,000 00
$1,085,600 00

Registered certificates, 10-4Gs of 1864—
Fifty doUars
One hundred doUars
Five hundred dollars
Onethousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
Tenthousand dollars

1,300
1,600
37, 000
358,000
465, 000
5,140,000

00
00
00
00
00
00
^

6, 002,900 00

Registered certificates, loan of July and August 1861, (1881s)—
FiftydoUars
600 00
One hundred dollars
4,400 00
5,000 00
Registered certificates, 5-2Gs of June 1864—
One hundred dollars
Registered certificates. Pacific Railroad—
Onethousand dollars
^
Five thousand doUars
Tenthousand dollars

8,500 00
6,031,000 00
860,000 00
3,530,000 G
O
10,421,000 00
2,067,861 12

Internal revenue stamps
< Total for fiscal year
^
Amount as per last report.^
Less amount transferred to cash account

453,011,360 62
1,970,092,173 90
39,818,425 G
O
1,930,273,748 90

Total to July 1,1870

2,383,285,109 52

Number of notes, ^-c, destroyed during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870, on statistical
account.
Cdin certificates
,^...........
229,911
Coin certificates, series of 1870
."1
1,289
Legal-tender notes, series of 1869
2, 083,552
Fractional currency, 4th issue
14,683,204
Fractional currency, 4th issue, (Stanton)
110, 096
Treasurynotes of 1857
136,968
Coupon bonds, loan of 1848
654
Coupon bonds, loan of 1858
506
Coupon bonds, loan of 1860
2
Coupon bonds, loan of February 1861, (18818)
2, 941
Coupon bonds, 1st series, 5-20s of 1862
1,606
Coupon bonds, 2d series, 5-2Gs of 1862
2,000
Couponbonds, 3d series, 5-20s of 1862
:...'.
1,706
Coupon bonds, 4th series, 5-20s of 1862
2,548
Coupon bonds, lG-40s of 1864
:
23,161
Coupon bonds, 5-20s of June 1864
,
1,515
Coupon bonds, 5-20s of 1865
21,272
Coupon bonds, consols of 1867...
28,191
Coupon bonds, consols of 1868
6,786
Coupon bonds, consols of 1867, (exchanges)
28, 023
Coupon bonds, consols of 1868, (exchanges)
13,604
Coupon bonds, consols of 1865
---51,482
Coupon bonds, 10-4GS of 1864
-.
'..
1,851.
Coupon bonds, Oregon war debt
30
Coupon bonds, Texan indemnity
1
Registered certificates, loan of 1863, (1881s)
204
Registered certificates, 5-20s of 1865
3,598
Registered certificates, 10-40s of 1864
1,081



221

TEEASUEEE.
Registered certificates, July and August 1861, (1881s)
Registered certificates, 5-26s of J u n e 1864
Registered .certificates, Pacific Railroad

56
85
6,556

Total number for fiscal year
Number as per last report

17,444,479
13,208,616

Totalnumber of notes to J u l y 1,1870

30,653,095

DESTRUCTION OF NOTES OF NATIONAL BANKS IN LIQUIDATION.
National banlcs in liquidation, notes desttvyed—by denominations.
Amounts
Amounts paid. discounted

Denomination.
One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars
....
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars
Total

$14, 809 25
10, 614 90
737, 619 75
313,856 00
170, 758 00
33,150 00
21, 300 00

,

$4
1
50
14
2

75
10
25
00
00

1, 302,107 90

Total.
$14, 814
10, 616
737, 670
313, 870
170, 760
33,150
21, 300

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

1, 302,180 00

National banlcs in liquidation, notes destroyed—by banlcs.
Dui'ing fiscal As per last
• year.
report.

Title.
First I:^ational Bank of Attica, New York
First National Bank of Carondelet, Missouri ...'
First National Bank of Columbia, Missouri
First National Bank of Medina, NCAV York
First National Bank of Newton, Massaclmsetts
First National Bank of NCAV Orleans, Louisiana
First National Bank of Selma, Alabama
First National Bank of Keokuk, Iowa
First National Bank of Bethel, Connecticut
^
First National Bank of Rockford, Illinois
First National Bank of Jackson, Missis.sippi
First National Bank of Worcester, New York
First National Bank of Cedarburg, Wisconsin
First National Bank of Nevada, Austin, Nevada
First National Bank of Oskaloosa, Iowa
First National B.ank of Ai^pleton, Wisconsin
First National Bank of Marion, Ohio
Merchants' National Bank of Washington, District of Columbia.
Venango National Bank of Franklin, Pennsylvania
Farmers and Citizens' National Bank of llrooklyn, New
York.
Croton National Bank of New York, NCAV York
Tennessee National Bank of Memphis, Tennessee
Unadilla National Bank of Unadilla, New York
Farmers' National Bank of Waukesha, Wisconsin
The National Bank of Yicksburj^, Mississippi
Commercial National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio
Total destroyed during the year
Total destroyed as iDer^last report
Total destroyed from tho beginning
Discounts during the year
Discounts as per last report

$2,340 00
1, 720 00
825 00
2,144 50

$37, 528
20,174
8, 450
32, 512
2,198
141,926
63,152
59, 767
13, 605
4, 050

00
50
00
75
25
00
50
50
00
00

Total.

148, 359 75

$39, 868
21, 894
9, 275
34, 657
2,193
152, 231
69, 312
70, 721
17, 790
15, 725
1, 086
6, 012
3, 599
3, 918
966
915
1,619
157, 589

^ 3, 595 00
21,.885 30

74, 038 50
187, 553 50

77, 633 50
209, 438 80

13,
5,
5,
23,
4,
22,

139, 252
7.3,119
81,157
24, 758
. 11, 709

152,
78,
86,
48,
15,
22,

10, 305 00
6,160 00
10, 954
4,185
11, 675
1, 086
6,012
3, 599
3, 918
966
915
1,619
9, 230

316
530
834
969
219
789

00
00
00
75
00
75
50
10
00
80
00

40
00
50
00
75
00

55
00
50
00
25

568
649
992
727
929
789

00
50
00
25
25
00
50
50
00
00
75
00
75
50
10
00
80
75

95
00
00
00
00
00

178, 795 35
1,123, 312 55
1, 302,107 90

;

42 40
29 70

beginning...

72 10

T o t a l d e s t r u c t i o n s t o J u l y 1,1870 .

1, 302,180 00

T o t a l d i s c o u n t s from




222

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
NATIONAL BANKS.

The number of national banks that had deposited United States
securities with this ofiice, preliminary to their organization.
June 30, 1869, was
:
.' v 1,692
Number of new banks organized during last fiscal year
\ 6
Whole number of banks, June 30, 1870

1,698

The number of banks having securities in custody of this office
for their circulating notes, and that have paid duties, was, on
the 30th June last
Failed prior to June 30, 1869, and securities sold
Failed prior to June 30, 1869, securities in part still held
'..
Failed in last fiscal year, securities still held
Banks having no circulation, securities withdrawn
In, liquidation, money deposited to redeem circulation prior to
June 30,1869
In liquidation, money to redeem deposited in last fiscal year.
Number of banks organized

:

The number of banks in voluntary liquidation on the 30th June,
1869, was
Number gone into voluntary liquidation in last fiscal year
Number in voluntary liquidation

1,660
12
2
1
12
5
6
1,698

54
12
%^

NEW NATIONAL BANKS.

The six new banks made their first deposits of securities in the following order:
The National Bank of Commerce, of Chicago, Illinois.
The National Bank of Lebanon, at Lebanon, Kentucky. >
The First National Bank of Utah, at Salt Lake Cit}^
The First National Bank of Leon, Iowa.
The First National Bank of Port Henry, New York.
The Howard National Bank of Burlington, Yermont.
' NATIONAL BANKS THAT HAYE FAILED.
First National Bank of Attica, New York, in 1865.
Merchants' National Bank of Washington, District of Columbia, in
1866.
Yenango National Bank, Franklin, Pennsylvania, in 1866.
First National Bank of Medina, New York, in 1867.
Tennessee National Bank, Memphis, Tennessee, in 1867.
First National Bank of Newton, at Newtonville, Massachusetts, in
1867.
First National Bank of New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1867.
First National Bank of Selma, Alabama, in 1867.
National Unadilla Bank of Una.dilla, New York, in 1868.
Farmers and Citizens- National Bank of Brooklyn, New York, in 1868.
Croton National Bank of New York, New York, in 1868.
First National Bank of B^^tbel, Connecticut, in 1868.



223

TREASURER.

First National Bank of Keokuk, Iowa, in 1868.
National Bank of Yicksburg, Mississippi, in 1868.
First National Bank of. Eockford, Illiuois, in 1869.
First National Bank of Nevada, Austin, Nevlda, in 1869.
Whole number of banks that have failed, 15.
The circulating notesi of the First National Bank of Newton, at Newtonville, Massachusetts^ .have been assumed by the National SecurityBank of Boston, Massachusetts.
NATIONAL BANKS IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION THAT HAYE DEPOSITED
MONEY IN THE TREASURY TO REDEEM THEIR CIRCULATION.

Before July 1, 1869—
First National Bank of Columbia, Missouri, in 1865. ^
.
First National Bank of Carondelet, Missouri, in 1866.
Farmers' National Bank of Waukesha, Wisconsin, in 1868.
First National Bank of Jackson, Mississippi, in 1869.
First National Bank of Cedarburg, Wisconsin^ in 1869.
In the last fiscal year—
The National Bank of; Lansingburgh, New York.
The Appleton National Bank of Appleton, Wisconsin.
The First National Bank of Oskaloosa, Iowa.
The Commercial National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio.
The First National Baiik of "South Worcester, New York.
The First National Bapk of Marion, Ohio.
The whole number that have deposited funds and withdrawn their securities is 11.
!
The
The
The
The
The

Eedemption of circulating notes of national banlcs in liquidation.
N a m e s of b a n k s .

F a r m e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of W a u k e s h a Wisconsin
•.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of C a r o n d e l e t M i s s o u r i
F i r s t N a t i o u a l B a n k of C o l u m b i a Itlissouri
'.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of J a c k s o n , M i s s i s s i p p i
F i i ' s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of C e d a r b u r g 'Wisconsin
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a u k of Oskaloosa I o w a
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of S o u t h AVorc'ester, N e w Y o r k
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of M a r i o n , Ohio
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of A t t i c a N e w Y o r k ' '.
F i i s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of M e d i n a N e w Y o r k
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of NCAV Orleans, L o u i s i a n a
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Selma, A l a b a m a
.•
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of B e t h e l C o n n e c t i c u t
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of K e o k u k loAv^a
. .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of K o c k l b r d u i i n o i s
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e v a d a , A u s t i n , N e v a d a
A p p l e t o n N a t i o n a l B a n k of A p p l e t o n , AVisconsin
C o m m e r c i a l N a t i o n a l B a n k of C i n c i n n a t i Ohio
N a t i o n a l B a n k of L a n s i n g b u r g h , N e w Y o r k
F a r m e r s a n d C i t i z e n s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of B r o o k l y n , N e w Y o r k .
V e n a n g o N a t i o n a l B a n k of F r a n k l i n , PennsylA^ania
N a t i o n a l U n a d i l l a B a n k of U n a d i l l a NeAV Y o r k
T e n n e s s e e N a t i o n a l B a n k of M e m p h i s , T e n n e s s e e
.. .
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l Bank.of W a s h i n g t o n , D i s t r i c t of Columbia
C r o t o n N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w York,' N e w Y o r k
N a t i o n a l B a n k of V i c k s b u r g , M i s s i s s i p p i
1
.'...
Total

!

T o t a l n o t e s d e s t r o y e d d u r i n g fiscal j'^ear
D i s c o u n t s on s a m e

K e d e e m e d to
J u l y 1,1869.
$29,948
20, 634
8, 670
7

00
50
00
50

.
38, 228
32, 912
144, 511
64, 377
14, 255
.62,342
6, 730

00
75
00
50
00
25
00

.
191, 923
74, 798
82,157
74, 219
150, 489
142, 407
12, 609
1,151,221

50
50
50
00
75
55
25
55

Eedeemed
i n fiscal
year.
$23, 238
1,590
685
1, 594
4, 709
3, 452
9, 558
3, 783
1,960
2,149
10, 900
6, 290
4,160
10, 279
13, 025
11, 682
1, 828
27, 706
2, 382
21,139
3, 450
6,189
5, 400
8, 890
12, 578
4,134

25
00
00
25
00
95
00
40
00
50
00
00
00
25
00
25
00
00
80
00
00
50
00
00
35
75

202, 755 25

Total
redemption.
$53,186
22, 224
9 355
1, 601
4 709
3' 452
9, 558
3, 783
40,188
35 062
155 411
70, 667
18, 415
72 621
19, 755
11, 682
1, 828
27, 706
2, 382
213,062
78, 248
88 347
79, 619
159, 379
154, 985
.16, 744

25
50
00
75
00
95
00
40
00
25
00
50
00
50
00
25
00
00
80
50
50
00
00
75
90
00

1, 353, 976 80

178, 695 60
42 40
178, 738 00

T o t a l d e s t r o y e d as p e r l a s t r e p o r t
D i s c o u n t s oii s a m e . . . .




1,123, 412 30
29 70
1,123,442 00

1,302,180 00

224

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Circulating notes outstanding of national banlcs in liquidation.

Faraiers' National Bank of Waukesha, Wisconsin
J
First National Bank of Carondelet, Missouri...,
First National Bank of Colurabia, Missouri
First National Bank of Jackson, Mississippi
First National Bank of Cedarburg, Wisconsin
First National Bank of Oskaloosa, Iowa
First National Bank of South Worcester, New York
First National Bank of Marion, Ohio
First National Bank of Attica, New York..
First National Bank of Medina, New York
First National Bank of New Orleans, Louisiana
^
First National Bank of Selma, Alabama
First National Bank of Bethel, Connecticut
First National Bank of Keokuk, Iowa
First National Bank of Rockford, lUinois
First National Bank of Nevada, Austin, Nevada
Appleton National Bank of Appleton, Wisconsin
Commercial National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio
National Bank of Lansingburgh, New York
-.
Farmers and Citizens' National Bank of Brooklyn, New York
Venango National Bank of Franklin, Pennsylvania
National UnadiUa Bank of UnadiUa, New York
Tennessee National Bank of Memphis, Tennessee
Merchants' National Bank of Washington, Distript of Columbia

$36,813 75
s3,275 50
. 80,645 00
.
38,898 25
85,291 00
'
64,047 05
147, 842 00
106,066 60
3,812 00
-.
4,937 75
24, 589 00
14,332 50
7, 885 00
17, 378 50
25, 245 00
118, 017 75 ^
43,172 00
318,244 00
132, 617 20
40, 837 50
•
6,751 50
11, 653 00
10, 381 00
20, 620 25

:.

Croton National Bauk of NCAV York, NOAV York

25, 014 10

National Bank of Yicksburg, Mississippi

8,756 00

-Total outstanding

1,397,123 20

Total circulation, $2,751,100 5 redeemed, $1,353,976 80; outstanding,
$1,397,123 20.
Dexoosits made and balances remaining to o'edit of national banlcs in liquidation.
Names of banks.
F'armers' National Bank of Waukesha Wisconsin
First National Bank of Carondelet, Missouri'
First National Bank of Columbia, Missouri
First National Bank of Jackson Mississippi
..
. .. .
First National Bank of Cedarbui'g, AV^isconsin
First National Bank of Oskaloosa, JoAva
First National Bank of South AYorcester, New York
First National Bank of Marion Ohio
.
. . . . .
First National Bank of Attica, NCAV York
..
.'.
First National Bank of Medina, NeAV York
First National Bank of NOAA' Orleans, Louisiana
1.
First National Bank of Selma, Alabama
First National Bank of Bethel Connecticut
.
.
First National Bank of ICeokuk loAA^a
.
First National Bank of Rockford, Illinois*
First National Bank of Nevada, Austin, NevadatAppleton National Bank of Appleton AVisconsin
...
Comraercial National Bank of Cincinnati Ohio
National Bank of Lansingburgh, New York
Farmers and Citizens' National Bank of Brooklyn, New York
Venango National Bank of Franklin, Pennsylvania
National Unadilla Bank of Unadilla, NCAV York
Tennessee National Bank of Memphis, Tennessee
Merchants' National Bank of Washington, District of Columbia
Croton National Bank of NCAV York, NCAV York.
.
Niitional Bank of Vicksburg, Mis-sia.«!ippi
'___,....
, .
Total

:

Deposits to re- B a l a n c e r e maining.
deem notes.
$90, 000 00
25,
11,
40,
72,
63,
152,
105,
44,
40,
155,
85,
26,
90,
17,
45,
345,
45,
253,
85,
100,
90,
180,
180,
25,

500
990
500
000
745
900
833
000
000
874
000
300
000
475
75
000^
950
000
900
000
000
000
000
000
500

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
15
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

2,371,542 15

* First National Bank of Rockford, Illinois, is overdraAvn $2,280.
t First National Bank of NoA^ada, Austin, Nevada, is overdraAvn $11,607 25.




$36,813
3, 275
2, 635
38, 898
67,291
60, 292
143, 342
102 049
3, 812
4, 937
463
14, 332
7, 885
17 378

75
50
00
25
00
05
00
60
00
75
15
50
00
50

43
318,
42,
40,
6,
11
10,
20,
25,
8,

00
00
20
50
50
00
00
25
10
00

172
244
617
837
751
653
381
620
014
756

1 031 452 60

225

TREASURER.
Securities held in trust to assure the redemption of circulating notes, June 30, 1870,
Registered United States.bonds; 6 per cent., coin
Registered 10-40s,5 per cent., c o i n . . . . , . ,
Registered currency bonds, 6 per cent., currency
Coupon, 10-40s, 5 per cent., coin
Coupon bonds, 6 per cent., coin
:
Amountheld June 30,1869....L,
Amount withdrawn in fiscal year
Amount received in fiscal year.
.

,

$229,599,350
94,917,200
17,740, 000
6, 000
16,000
1
^

$342,278,550
342,851,600
16, 381,500
15, 808,450

Securities held in trust io assure public deposits, June 30, 1870.
Registered United States bonds, 6 per cent., coin
$10,163,750
Registered bonds, 5 per cent., coin
2,542,700 ' ,
Registered currency bonds, 6 }3er cent
915, 000
Couj)on bonds, 6 per cent., coin
1,231,700
Coupon bonds, 5 per cent., coin
1,219, 350
Personal bonds
330,000
!
16,402,500
Amount held June 30, 1869... J
25,423, 350
WithdraAvn in fiscal year
J
[.'.
11,411,350
Received in fiscal year....,..............
---.--.-,
.-.-..........
2, 060, 500
The number of banks constituted depositaries ofthe United States was, on the 30th
June, 1869
276
Number discontinued in fiscal iyear
131
Number designated in fiscal year
3
Number on the 30th June, 1870
148
Statement of the whole amountof United States stoclcs held in trust fw' both the circulating
notes and the public moneys deposited with national banlcs, designating the amount of each
loan, rate of interest, and when redeemable.
D a t e of a c t .

REGISTERED

R a t e of i n t e r e s t .

W h e n redeemable.

Amount.

BONDS.

J u n e 14,1858
J u n e 22, 1860
F e b r u a r y 8, 1861...'
J n l y 17 a n d A u g u s t 5, 1861 . .
F e b r a a r y 25, 1862
M a r c h 3', 1863
M a r c h 3, 1864
,
J u n e 30, 1864
M a r c h 3,1864
F i r s t series, M a r c h 3, 1 8 6 5 . . .
Second series, M a r c h 3,1865 .
T h i r d series, M a r c h 3, 1865 . .
F o u r t h series, M a r c h 3, 1865.
J u l y 1,1862, a n d J u l y 2,1864.

5
5
6
6
6
6
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
6

per
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
per
per

cent. c o m
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
cent. coin
'..
cent. c u r r e n c y . . .

J a n u a r y 1,1874
J a n u a r y 1,1871
D e c e m b e r 31, 1880
J u n e 30, 1881
A p r i l 30, 1867
J u n e 30, 1881
F e b r u a r y 28, 1874
October 31, 1869
October 31, 1869
October 31, 1870
J u l y l , 1870
J u l y l , 1872
J u l y l , 1873
J a n u a r y 1895 to 1898 .

6
6
6
6
5
6
6
6
6
6

per
per
per
per
per
i)er
per
per
per
per

cent.
cent,
cent.
cent,
cent.
cent,
cent.
cent,
cent,
cent.

D e c e m b e r 31, 1880.
J u n e 30,-1881
A p r i l 30, 1867
J u n e 30, 1881
F e b r u a r y 28, 1874.
October 31, 1 8 6 9 . . . .
J u l y l , 1881
,
October 31, 1 8 7 0 . . .
J u l y l , 1870'..:
Julyl, 1872........

$665,000
35, 000
3, 761, 000
60, 283, 400
57, 789, 700
33, 987, 750
96, 759, 900
34,606,600
2, 938, 500
25, 985, 200
12, 601, 000
7,171, 950
638, 000
18, 655, 000

COUPON BONDS.

F e b r u a r y 8, 1861
:...
J u l y 17 a n d A u g u s t 5, 1861
F e b r u a r y 25, 1861
M a r c h 3,1863
1...
M a r c h 3,1864
..:
J u n e 30, 1864
:...
M a r c h 2,1861
L...
F i r s t series, M a r c h 3,1865
..L...
Second series, M a r c h 3,1865
L..
T h i r d series, M a r c h 3, 1865
P e r s o n a l b o n d s h e l d for p u b l i c d e p o s i t s .
T o t a l s e c u r i t i e s h e l d J u n e 30,1870.

coin.
coin.
coin.
coin.
coin.
coin.
coin.
coin.
coin.
coin.

12,000
187, 900
232, 700
213,100
1, 225, 350
102, 000
41, 000
87,500
289, 500
82, 000
330, 000
358, 681, 050

The number of banks that have complied with the requirements of
the 25th section of the national currency act, by causing an examination of their securities in this office during the last fiscal year, is 1,055,
Payment of coin interest of coupon bonds held in trust was made in
the last year by the issue of 203 coin drafts, amounting to $159,953 50.
The depositary accounts with the one hundred and thirty-one national
15 F
i




226

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

banks that have ceased to be depositaries of Government funds during
the last year have been promptly settled and balances paid over in every
instance. Claims for public moneys with the Yenango National Bank of
Franklin, Pennsylvania, and the First National Bank of Selma, Alabama,
remain unsettled.
Statement of semi-annual duty paid to the Treasurer by national banlcs, under section 41 of the
national currency act, during the year xireceding January 1, 1870.
For the term of six months preceding July 1, 1869—
\
On circulation
..:
$1,478,138^89
Ondeposits
1,281,195 98
/Oncapital
163,151 27
_ $2,922, 486 14
.
For the term of six months preceding January 1, 1870—
On circulation
$1,478,029 13
Ondeposits
1,244,375 89
On capital
185,996 70
2,908,401 72
Total duty for the" year

5,830,887 86

Amount of unpaid duty of banks in. liquidation—
January 1, 1869, was
Unpaid during the year

$3,334 48
744 89
$4,079 37
146 85

Less amount paid during the year
Amount due and unpaid January 1, 1870

„

3,932 52

Duties refunded to banlcs in the last fiscal year under a resolution in relation to national banking associations, axiproved March 2, 1867, viz:
Refunded for six months preceding—
J u l y 1,1865
$176 40
January 1, 1866
607 06
J u l y l , 1866
387 05
January 1,1867
730 34
J u l y l , 1867
578 01
January 1,1868
964 28
July 1, 1868
1,226 21
January 1, 1869
1,438 02
J u l y l , 1869
350 45
January 1, 1870
21 14
$6,478 96
The preceding was refunded on undivided profits
Capital....
' Amount of duty received as per last report
Amount received ih year preceding January 1, 1870
Decrease of duty

$3,664 90
2,814 06
'—

$6, 478 96
$5,911,280 64
5,830, 887 86
80,392 78

A considerable number of banks are dilatory in payment of their duty,
the delay in some instances seeming to be wilful, in others careless omission. The loss of interest caused thereby to the treasury is enough to warrant an ainendment of the law and the exaction of a penalty for nonpayment. The period of one month within which the law now requires
payment of semi-annual duty—January and July—is practically a
months' credit to most of the banks, and it is suggested that a per centage upon such duty be added to it for every ten or fifteen days' delay
to payment after the expiration of the one month's time now allowed.
The collection of one per cent, of the duty for every ten days' delay in




227

TREASURER.

payment, after January and July, would insure more prompt remittances from delinquent banks.
COUPON INTEREST.
I

Statement of coupon interest paid in coin during tlie year ending June 30, 1870.
Denominations.

N u m b e r of coupons.
L o a n of 1858—
28,976
L o a n of 1860—
1,803..:
I...
L o a n of F e b r u a r y 8,1861, (1881s)10,394
Oregon Avar debt—
423
950
i...
3,274
i...
L o a n of J u l y & A u g . , 1861, (1881s)
8,023
".
i...
33,973
60,642
1...
109,296
:...
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862—
169,530
438, 572
. 276, 268
564,458
7
L o a n of 1863, (1881s)—
3,311
:
11,309
12,435
39,192
:
Ten-forties of 1864—
6,931
23, 160

I
:...
i...
1...
I
i
i...
[...
i...
;...

Total.

Twenty-five dollars.

$724,400,00

Twenty-five doUars.

45, 075 00

T h i r t y dollars

311, 820 00

Three dollars..
Six dollars
Fifteen dollars.

$1, 269 00
5, 700 00
49,110 00
56, 079 00

One doUar a n d fifty c e n t s .
T h r e e dollars
F i i t e e n dollars
,
T h i r t y dollars

12, 034
101, 919
909, 630
3, 278, 880

50
00
00
00

One dollar a n d fifty c e n t s .
T h r e e doUars
Fifteen dollars
T h i r t y dollars.'
Fractional

254, 295
1, 315, 716
4,144, 020
16, 933, 740
23

00
00
00
00
11

'4, 302, 468 50

22, 647, 794 11
One doUar a n d fifty c e n t s .
T h r e e doUars
F i f t e e n doUars
T h i r t y doUars
,

4,
33,
186,
1,175,

966
927
525
760

50
00
00
00

T w o dollars a n d fifty c e n t s . .
F i v e doUars
:
TAvelve dollars a n d fifty c t s .
Twenty-five d o l l a r s . .•
,
Fi'actional

.

17, 327
115, 800
707, 987
2, 447, 550
4, 077

50
00
50
00
14

One dollar a n d fifty c e n t s .
T h r e e dollars
:
F i f t e e n dollars
T h i r t y doUars

10, 939
102, 684
525, 660
2, 708, 460

50
00
00
00

L..

One doUar a n d fifty c e n t s .
T h r e e doUars
F i f t e e n dollars
T h i r t y doUars

1, 573
126, 447
1,142, 925
6, 868, 860

50
00
00
00

209, 550
840, 624
2, 846, 265
9, 821, 790

00
00
00
00

1,401,178 50

I
:...
L...

56,639

97,902
1,870

Amount.

1...
|...

3, 292, 742 14
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e , 1864— !
7,293
1...
34,228
'...
35,044
:..,
90,282
L...

3, 347, 743 50

F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865—
1,049
42,149
76,195
228,962

i
;...
•....

Consols of 1865—
139, 700
280,208
189,751
327,393
:

I
!..
'...
!...

One dollar a n d fifty c e n t s .
T h r e e doUars
F i f t e e n dollars
T h i r t y doUars

Consols of 1867—
231,682
449,629
218,095
-•
380,436

;
!...
:..
L..
L..

One dollar a n d fifty c e n t s .
T h r e e doUars
F i f t e e n dollars
T h i r t y dollars

347, 523
1, 348, 887
3, 271, 425
11, 413, 080

00
00
00
00

One dollar"and fifty c e n t s .
T h r e e doUars
F i f t e e n doUars
T h i r t y doUars

40, 266
196, 083
351, 030
1, 304, 010

00
00
00
00

8,139, 805 50

13, 718, 229 00

16,380 915 00
Consols of 1868—
26,844
65,361
23,402
43,467

•...
:..

1, 891, 389 G
O
S e v e n - t h i r t i e s of 1861—
16
11
20




j
1..

One dollar e i g h t y - t w o a n d a
half c e n t s .
T h r e e doUars a n d sixty-five
cents.
E i g h t e e n doUars a n d t w e n t y five c e n t s .

29 19
40 15
365 00
434 34

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
KECAPrrULATION.
Title.

No. of coupons!

L o a n of 1858
L o a n of 1860.
L o a n of F e b r u a r y 1861, (1881s)
Oregon Avar d e b t
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t 1861, (1881s)
Five-tAventies of 1862..
L o a n of 1863, (1881s)
Ten-forties of 1864
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e 1864
Five-tAventies of 1865
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867
Consols of 1868
S e v e n - t h i r t i e s of 1861

28,976
1,803
10, 394
4,647
211, 934
1, 448, 835
66,247
186, 502
166, 847
348, 355
937, 052
1,279,842.
159, 074
47.

$724 400
45 075
311, 820
56, 079
4, 302, 463
22 647,794
1,-401,178
3, 292, 742
3, 347, 743
8 139, 805
13,718,229
16, 380, 915
1,891, 389
434

•4 850, 555

76,260,068 59

i
.

.

.. :
I

Total

POST OFFICE

Amount.
00
00
00
00
50
11
50
14
50
50
00
00
00
34

DEPARTMENT.

The receipts and expenditures for and on account of the Post Office,
Bepartment for the fiscal year have been as follows, viz:
Cash Dr.
Balance brought forward from last year
Received at Washington
Received a t N e w Y o r k
Received at Philadelphia
^.
Received at Boston
Received at St. Louis
Received at San Francisco
Received at Charleston
Received at New Orleans
Received at Bailtimore
'
Received at Cincinnati
Received at Louisville
Received at Pittsburg
.'.
...
^Receivedat Mobile
J
First National Bank of Dubuque, loAva
First National Bank of Leavenworth, Kansas
First National Bank of Memi)his, Tennessee
First National Bank of Mihvaukee, Wisconsin
First National Bank of Nashville, Tennessee
First National Bank of Springfield, Illinois
FirstNationalBankofWashington, District of Columbia
Second National Bank of Detroit, Michigan
Atlanta National Bank of Atlanta, Georgia
Central National Bank, Booneville, Missouri
Merchants' National Bank, Cleveland, Ohio
Merchants' National Bank, Little Rock, Arkansas
Merchants' National Bank, Portland, Maine
San Antonio National Bank, San Antonio, Texas

$1,429,697 92
$233,853 69
4,415,619 18
616,524 89
596,873 29
553,814 27
1,384,153 21
264,297 52
436,570 62
40 15
46 28
579 10
653 35
1,794 22
447 97
288 24
1,754 67
46 80
2,570 26
780 82
8,965 84
32,775 66
5, 465 24
153 50
1,572 20
267 50
1,185 05
345 26

Total receipts during year.

8,561,438 78

Total

9,991,136 70

Warrants were issued on the various offices for the payments of the
aggregate amounts as follows:
Cash Cr.
On
On
On
On
On
On

Washington, District of Columbia
New York, New Yo/rk
PhUadelphia, Pennsylvania
Boston, Massachusetts
St. Louis, Missouri
San Francisco, CaUfornia




$240,607
4, 898, 094
600,704
590,539
718,493
1,227,304

41
53
89
10
93
11

TREASURER.

229.

On Charleston, South CaroUna.
On New Orleans, Louisiana
On Louisville, Kentucky
OnMobUe, Alabama
On Olympia, Washington Tierritory
On Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
.. ^
On Atlanta National Bank, Atlanta, Georgia
On- Merchants' National Bank, Cleveland, Ohio
On Second National Bank, of Detroit, Michigan
On Colorado National Bank, Denver, Colorado
On First National Bank of Dubuque, Iowa
On Merchants' National Bank, Little Rock, Arkansas
On First National Bank of Mihvaukee, Wisconsin
On First National Bauk of Nashville, Tennessee
On First National Bank of Portland, Oregon
On Merchants' National Bank, Portland, Maine
On First National Bank of Springfield, Illinois
On San Antonio National Bank, San Antonio, Texas
On First National Bank of Washington, District of Columbia

$340,775
514,153
\ 523
1,960
21
804
5, 365
1, 572
27, 878
1,147
447
898
46
2,591
178
985
368
345
11,134

Total
Balance of cash on hand to new account

12
55
00
25
25
69
35
20
70
50
97
00
80
94
96
05
62
26
79

9,186,942 97
804,193 73

Total

9,991,136 70

Moneys were drawn from the treasury on account of the post office
that were not receipts from the Post Office Department, but were appropriated for its use by Congress, under the several laws as specified, at
the times and for amounts as follows:
For mail steamship service between San Francisco, Japan
and China, act of March 3, 1869. July 21, 1869,. paid
treasury warrant No. 955
October 14, 1869, paid treasury warrant No. 1346
January 20, 1867, paid treasury warrant No. 136
AprU 11,1870, paid treasury warrant No. 455....,......:....:

$125,000 G
O
125, 000 00
125,000 00
125,000 00.
$500,000 00

For compensation of such mail services as may be performed for the several departments of the Government,
as per act March 3,1847. September 14,1869, paid treasury warrant No. 1228...
For payment and compensation for mail services performed
for the two Houses of Congress and other departments
and offices of the Government in the transi^ortation of
free matter by the Post Office Department, acts of March
3, 1867, and March 3, 1861. May 25, 1870, paid treasury
warrant No. 667

500,000 00
;

500, 0.00 00

700,000 00
700, 000 00

For the overland mail transportation between Atchison
and Folsom, and for marine mail transportationbetween
New York and California, per acts May 18, 1866, and
July 25, 1868. August 16, 1869, paid treasury warrant
No.1123
:
April 21, 1870, paid treasury warrant No. 509

66,188 36
109,640 85
175, 829 21

For mail steamship service between the United States
and Brazil, act March 3, 1869. September 4, 1869, paid
treasury warrant No. 1192
December 1, 1869, paid treasury warrant No. 1582
March 7, 1870, paid treasury warrant No. 317
June 4, 1870, paid treasury warrant No. 719

37,500
37,500
37,500
37, 500

00
00
00
00
150,000 00

For steamship service between San Francisco and the
Sandwich Islands, per act March 3, 1869. August 19,
1869, paid treasury warrant No. 1141
'
October 15, 1869, paid treasury warrant No. 1351
February 4, 1870, paid treasury warrant No. 183. .•



18,750 00
18,750 00
18,750 00
—

56,250 00

230

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

For supplying the deficiency in the revenue of the Post
Office Department, as per act March 3, 1869. September 13, 1869, paid treasury warrant No. 1228
$1,262,500 00
January 7, 1870, paid treasury warrant No. 15
300,000 00
February 11, 1870, paid treasury warrant No. 248
1,000, 000 00
May 25, 1870, paid treasury warrant No. 767
200, 000 00 '
• '
$2,762,500 00
Total amount received from the Government

4,844,579 21

Eeceived by postanasters, on account of postage on letters, neiuspapers, and pamx^hlets, registered
letto'S, emoluments, ^c.
For quarter ending September 30, 1869
$3,592,722 81
For quarter ending December 31, 1869
3,791,556 45
For quarter ending. March 31, 1870
3,96.6, 889 88
For quarter enduig June 30, 1870'.
3,790, 464 57
•
'
$15,141,633 71
Cash, Dr.
Balance from last y e a r . .
.^..
Receipts into the treasury from postmasters and others.
From the United States, under various laws
To Post Office Department receipts

$1,429,697 92
$3,716,859 57
4, 844, 579 21
15,141,633 71

Total receipts from aU sources

23,703,072 49

Total....

25,132,770 41
Cash, Cr.

Paid 5,101 post office warrants
Paid 18 treasury warrants
Post Office Department payments

$4,342,363 76
4,844,579 21
15,141,633 71

Totalamount of aU payments:
Balance to new account
^
Total

$24,328,576 68
804,193 73
25,132,770 41

CHANGES IN THE EMPLOYiES OF THE TREASURER'S OFFICE FOR THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDING J U N E 3 0 , 1870.
Total force ofTreasurer's Office June 30, 1869
Number of persons appointed during the fiscal year ending June 30,1870
Deceased during the same period
Resigned during the same period
Transferred during the same period
Discharged during the same period

Total force of Treasurer's Office June 30, 1870

279
122
3
18
1
7
—

29
—

93
372

The amount disbursed for salaries to the above number of emxyloyes during the year was as
follows, to wit:
On regular roU
:
$136, 476 89
On lapsed-salary roll
25,863 47
On temporary roU
211,633 89
Total payments during the year
Less income t a x retained from salaries

373,974 25
4, 078 32

Net amount paid for salaries-.

369,895 93"




TREASURER.

^

231

ABSTRACTION OF TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS.

In my last annual report, the fact was stated that within the eight years
that the treasury had been in my charge, money transactions were had
that footed on the books of this office at a sum exceeding $44,000,000,000,
and that not one cent had been lost to the people of the United States
on account of the management of the treasury or on account of the conduct of any of the employes in this office^ and I concluded by saying
that such good fortune could not last always, and that the law of chances
would be strongly against me in the future. The forebodings then felt
have during the year, in a single case, been verified.
On Saturday, the l l t h day of June last, an uncounted package of
2,000 new United States ten-dollar notes, numbered consecutively from
H 3,530,001* to H 3,532,000*, both inclusive, was stolen from the division of issues, where it had been delivered from the division of engraving
and printing, to be counted and covered into the treasury.
Two strangers had for several days been seen about the halls of the
treasury building. On the day mentioned, the wife of a prominent resident of this city, with her young son, and two relatives', a gentleman
and his wife, residents of a western city, were passing the upper door
bf the long room, where the money packages were piled on a table to be
counted. The first-named lady and the chief of the division, were well
acquainted, and as she came to the open door they recognized and
saluted each other 5 she, with her friends, naturally advancing into the
room.
Now, the theory of the manner of the robbery is, that the two strangers
were in the hall, watching for just such an opportanity to act the part
that they had long been rehearsing. When the party named entered
the room, one of the thieves forced himself between the lady who led
the way and her friends. This man immediately entered into conversation with Mr. Eoot, the chief of the division, making all manner of
inquiries in regard to the manufacture, receipt, and counting of the
notes, and the after disposition made of them. Mr. Eoot supposed him
to be of his friend's party, aud was thrown entirely off his guard. The
lady in turn, from his. apparently familiar manner, supposed him to be
a particular friend of Mr. Eoot. The lady and her friends walked down
the length of the room, passing all the counters, ajid passed out into
the hall at the farthest door. The principal thief in the mean time, held
Mr. Eoot in conversation, and gradually drew him to the table where
the money packages were piled up. Here he managed so to place Mr.
Eoot as to make him a screen to cut off the view of a female clerk, whose
duty it Avas to keep an eye on the money. Mr. Eoot's body was interposed between her and the packages. At this moment the accomplice
came stealthily into the room, through the same door, from the hall, and
threw himself in front of, and partially over a female messenger, who was
sitting on the opposite side, watching the money packages. He made
inquiry for a female clerk, calling her by name, and although told that
there was no such person belonging to the office, he insisted that
there was, and he persisted in thus preventing the messenger from seeing the money, long enough to give the principal thief the opportunity
to effect his purpose.
The principal thief now diverted Mr. Eoot's attention, by pointing to .
the party leaving the room, and saying, '^My friends are going, and I
must go too," and at this moment took the package with his left hand,
• and thrust it under his right arm. Thief No. 2 now quietly left the
room bythe same door through which he entered. The packages of all



232

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the denominations of United States notes, when they come from the
printing division, contain each two thousand notes. Each package
is just the length and breadth of a single note, and the 2,000 notes make
a package of a little over six inches high.
The principal thief came into the room holding a large Panama hat
by the rim, with the lapel of his large sack-coat over his right breast,
and thus he continued to carry it until he left the room. The package
was effectually hidden under his hat and coat. Packages of $20 notes
were lying side by side with packages containing $10 notes; but the
thief, being obliged to keep his eyes upon Mr. Eoot, inadvertently took
one of the lesser packages, because he could not look at them to tell the
difference. ^
Mr. Eoot followed his friend, accohipanied by the thief, with the money,
the whole length of the room to the lowest door, out of which the thief
passed, with thanks to Mr. Eoot for his kind attention to himself and
his friends.
The money was missed within the hour that it was taken; but there
^ a s at that time no suspicion that it had been stolen.
The theory then was, that it had not been received from the printing
division, and all investigations for that, and a part of the next day, were
inade under that supposition.
In the after part of the following day, which was Sunday, I learned
for the first time, from the female messenger, that another person had
been in the room, and of his strange conduct toward her while there. The
case now seemed plain enough. Mr. Eoot called on his lady visitor, and
learned from her the facts as before related, and that she was inclined
to denounce the stranger at the time for his rudeness to herself and her
party, and that she was only deterred from doing so, because from his
naanner she supposed him to be a particular friend of Mr. Eoot.
The scheme for the robbery had, no doubt, been planned and matured for some time before, and only awaited a favorable opportunity to
accomplish it. The whole thing was most ingeniously planned, and
adroitly carried out. As soon as these facts became known, telegraphic
dispatches were immediately sent to the principal cities, through the
associated press, and otherwise; and Government: and other detectives
employed, to the end that the thieves might be arrested and the money
Recovered.
Advertisements of the robber}^ were sent to every bank, banker, and
broker, and to all newspaper publishers in the United States and the
British colonies in America, stating the fact of the robbery, describing
the notes, and that no new ten-dollar note of a number higher than
H 3,236,000* had been issued. The intervening numbers between the
highest number issued and the lowest-numbered note stolen are held
in this office, and will not be issued unless the stolen notes are recovered.
These intervening notes so held here represent nearly $3,000,000.
This has, it is believed, prevented the thieves from using the stolen notes,
except as hereafter stated. On the 28th of June last, a letter bearing date
of the day before was received at this office, from the Stuyvesant Bank
in the city of New York, stating that one of their '' dealers had deposited
on the morning of that day, $1,500 in United States ten-dollar notes,
coming within the numbers and series which were in the lot of $20,000
stolen from the Treasury Department.'' Colonel Whiteley, the chief of
the secret service of the Department, being in New York at the time, was
immediately informed by telegraph of this fact, and asked to call on the
bank's officers for further information on the subject. He answered that *
he had found the facts as stated, and the further sum of $6,400 of the



TREASURER.

233

stolen notes had that morning been deposited with the same bank by
another party. These two sums, amounting to $7,900, were deposited
by persons who could give no satisfactory account for their possession
of the notes. One of the depositors was arrested and held to bail for
his appearance at court, and the other has fled the country. The money
is in the hands of the officers of the court. The cashier of the bank
named wrote me, under date of June 30, 1870, ^ We have stopped the
^
depositor's balance, thus securing the Department from any loss."
A letter was received from the cashier of a bank in the interior of
the State of New York, bearing date July 27, 1870, stating the fact that
note No. H 3,530,198*, being one ofthe stolen notes, had comednto his
possession. This is the only note, of those stolen, that has been heard
from, except those that were recovered as above stated, in the city of
New York. It is confidently believed that the remainder of the notes
stolen cannot be disposed of for the benefit of the thieves without instant
detection, and that, therefore, the whole amount stolen will eventually
be recovered.
THE EDWINS DEFALCATION.

"Misfortunes never come single;" my long term of over nine years of
immunity from loss has ended. Mortifying as the robbery above detailed
was to me, it was bearable, because it was committed by outsiders,
and in a way that would probably have succeeded with the most careful
and cautious of custodians. Not so with a more recent case. On the
morning of the 29th day of September last, Charles C. Edwins, a fourthclass clerk in the division of redemptions in this office, whose duty it then
was to receive from, and receipt for to Adams' Express Company,
all money packages received through that company, and to enter the
same upon the register kept for that purpose, voluntarily confessed to
me that he had abstracted, and applied to his own use, three money
packages so received by him, and amounting, respectively, to $5,000,
$2,000, and $1,500, being in the aggregate $8,500. He at the same time
surrendered to me various items of value, consisting of bills of exchange
on London, Bank of England notes. United States stocks, gold coin,
chiefly in British sovereigns, passage tickets by Steamer ''Erin" for
Europe, and tickets to Niblo's theater. The papers showed that he had
procured first-class berths forhimself and wife, under the name of H. G-.
Williams, on the steamer afore named, which had sailed for England on the
day before. He surrendered the three letters from which he had abstracted
the money, and stated that he had intended to have been far at sea before that time, but he had changed his mind, and had returned to make
confession and restitution. He further stated that he had for several
months been in the habit of abstracting money from packages and
using it, and that after a week or so, he would take other money from
other packages and replace that taken before; thus from time to time
replacing the money stolen from one package by money stolen from
another, and thus preventing inquiry after the stolen nioney, and consequent detection. He stated that in a then recent case he had taken from a
package received from the Davenport National Bank the money, amounting to and marked at $5,000, and from another package the money,
amounting to $1,000; that he afterwards took the inoney from two packages of $3,000 each, with a view to replace the inoney he had taken the
week before, as above stated, but that in his hurry and agitation he had
inadvertently placed the whole $6,000.4n the wrapper from the Davenport
National Bank, and handed it to a clerk to be counted. The clerk, of
course, reported the package $1,000 over by inventory. Fearing de


234

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

tection if he corrected the error, he advised the bank of the over, and
remitted by check on New York for the whole $6,000. The National
Bank of Davenport has since returned the $1,000. The National Steamship Company has also generously returned | l 5 0 that Edwins had paid
for his passage tickets, and the proprietors of Niblo's Garden $2, for
theater tickets not used.
The account of loss, and of amounts recovered, then stands as follows :
Amounts paid by Treasurer, acknowledged by Edwins to have been taken by him—
First National Bank of Janesville, Wisconsin
$1, 000 00
First Natioual Bank of Milwaukee, Wisconsin
5, 000 00
F. D. Hagar & Co., Marshalltown, Iowa.
2, 500 00
Total
Amounts realized from notes, drafts, coin, and other securities given
up by Edwins, and from moneys returned as overpaid by bank,
as foUows :
Bank of England notes, 6 of £10 e a c h . . .
5 of £ 5 each
Drafts, Bank of British North America, on Glyn, Mills & Co.,
London, 2 of £50 each
lof£25
."
„.

$8,500 00

£60 00
25 00
100 00
25 00
'£210 00

Sold at 109^ for gold
American gold, 3 pieces, $20 each
Sovereigns, 15 at $4 84 each
Premium on $1,151 10 gold at 113^
Two bonds, $100 each, 5-20's of 1867, at 110
Less broker's commission on sale and expressage

$1,018
60
72
155
220

50
00
60
40
00

1,526 50
4 50

1,522 00
Passage money returned by the National Steamship Company, two
tickets to London by steamer ' ' E r i n "
150 00
Returned by Jarrett & Palmer, managers Niblo's Garden, New
York, for two-tickets for September 28, purchasedbut not used
by Edwins
2 00
Balance of Edwins' salary for September, ($70 drawn by him,)
76 72
Returned by Davenport National Bank, overpayment of Sept. 24.. 1, 000 00
Total amount realized

2,750 72

Leaving as the deficit

5,749 28

In the conversation with me Edwins stated that the money he had
taken, and that he did not account for, he had lost in unfortunate speculations. I t is therefore not probable that any part of this deficit of
$5,749 28 will ever be recovered.
I have been informed by Colonel Frank Jones, the assistant cashier of
this office, and by J. F. Burr, esq., the law clerk in the office of the
Solicitor of the Treasury, that Edwins made substantially the same
statement of the case as here detailed severally to each of them, and
that on such statement so made to the latter, that officer entered a complaint against Edwins on which he was committed to prison. He has
since been indicted for the offense, and remains in prison awaiting his
trial.
Edwins came into this office in June, 1864, and was appointed on the
highest recommendations and testimonials in his favor, given by the
leading men of the cities of New York and Brooklyn, and it is but just



TREASURER.

235

and fair that the facts should be stated that he has been three times promoted for his industry, efficiency, and capacity for business, and for his
general good conduct, and that for years he has earned better pay than
was allowed him by law.
REORGANIZATION AND INCREASE OF SALARIES.

From year to year it has become more and more apparent that the
present pay of the employes of this office is entirely inadequate, and
that the public service is demoralized and the interest of the Government is endangered and suffers thereby. I therefore^ deem it a duty
not only to reiterate all that has been said on this subject in former
reports, but again to urge the necessity for an increase of their pay.
It may be asked why employes in the office of the Treasurer should
receive more pay than in the other offices of the Goverument. It is
answered that-they are daily subjected to the risk of errors in count,
and of taking counterfeits for money, for which they are pecuniarily
responsible, and are compelled to make good all losses resulting from
any.mistakes made by them. Instances have occuri?ed where counters
have become so liable, in a single day, for an amount double what their
present pay would amount to for a whole month. To make such a loss
good, they would be required to relinquish their salary for two whole
months.
While as high an order of talent is required as in the other offices, it
is necessary that the integrity of the persons employed in this, who are
in the daily habit of handling large sums of money, should be assured,
vouched for, undoubted, and above suspicion; therefore it is necessary
that the stumbling-blocks of small pay and large temptations should not
be placed in their way.
Necessity, temptation, and opportunity make thieves. The opportunity to steal in this ofiice cannot be guarded against, but the temptation to do so can be removed by taking care that the necessity to steal is
not forced upon the employes by pay Avholly insufficient to the decent
support of themselves and their families.
While the salaries and wages of persons employed in every kind of
labor, mechanics, arts, businesses, and professions have been advanced
to more than double their former rates, and while the pay of all the
branches of the military service has been largely increased, that of the
civil service has been kept down to the rates paid when the cost of living was less than one-half what it now is. The sufferance of this state
of affairs it is believed is very bad economy.
Persons holding places in the civil service, like other people, must
live; they cannot subsist on the honor of the thing. When Government officials feel that they are but half-paid, as compared with the
pay received h j persons engaged in like services for banks, companies,
and business firms, and at the same time see their families suffer for the
ordinary necessaries of life, they may be sorely tempted to do wrong.
The first step may be to get necessary articles of food and clothing on
trust, for which they will be unable to paj^ Now come the importunities of creditors for their pay.. To get rid of this annoyance, the salary
for the next month is pledged to a '^ sharper," who loans money to the
unfortunate at the ruinous rates of usury of from five to ten per cent, a
month. At the end of the month there is nothing left to provide for
the living of himself and family. To keep from starving, he contracts
new debts, if he can find anybody who will give him credit; and the
same round over and over again, until no one will trust him further.
To keep the family from starving, article after article of household



236

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

furniture, and even necessary wearing apparel, goes to the pawnbroker,
never to return. , Dogged by creditors, threatened by his superiors with
dismissal if he does not pay his debts; unable to beg or borrow money
enough to carry him out of town, and away from, his misfortunes; with
the starvation of his family staring him in the face, what is he to do %
He sees abundant opportunities by stealing, taking bribes, or other dishonest practices and wrongs upon the government, by which he can
extricate himself from his difficulties. Is it any wonder that he yields
to the temptation, and falls % How many of the- well-fed, who hold up
.
their hands in holy horror when detection comes, would, under like circumstances, have been able to do otherwise'?
Christian legislators would do well to remember the command, ^^Thoii
Shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn;" and
that other precept, ^'The laborer is worthy of his hire;" and they ought,
when they hear of defalcations, embezzlements, and other wrong-doings
on the part of poor wretches of public officers and clerks, inquire
whether the '^hire" allowed them by existing law was sufficient for the
decent support of their families, and, if not, whether the responsibility
of the crime did not, in part at least, rest upon those who withheld a
reasonable compensation for services rendered the Government. The
whole theory of low and inadequate salaries is demoralizing to the last
degree. I t is said, ^' Let those who are not satisfied with the present
pay, resign. There are plenty of others who would be glad to take their
places." True; and if the new ones should happen to be honest, they,
too, in theiT turn, would be obliged to resign, to make room for still
others to learn a like experience. There are plenty of persons in the
land, some of whom are still outside of a State prison, who would be glad
to fill all the public offices, without any pay, and who would pay the
Government a large bonus for their possession. If this evil is not corrected, the time will soon come, if it is not already upon us, when none
but rich men or thieves will be able to hold any public office. Are the
masses of our people, Avho are honest, and who desire that justice
should be done by as well as to the Government, prepared for such a
state of things'?
I t is time that demagogism on the subject of "high salaries," on the
part of the political party press, and of legislators as well, should cease,
and that the honest truth should be spoken by those whose duty it is to
speak it.
Three-quarters of a century ago, when, we numbered less than four
millions of people, and when the price of a day's farm labor was a
quarter of a dollar, the salary of the President of the United States
was fixed at $25,000 in gold per annum.
Is there a man possessing a reasonable share of common sense in the
whole land, who believes that now, when our population numbers over
forty millions, and when the price of labor has advanced more than hve
fold, that the same nominal amount, in a depreciated paper currency,
paid the incumbent of that high office, is enough ?
With the heads of departments the case is still worse. Every wellinformed man knows that the salaries paid these high officers of the
Government is not sufficient to pay for the cost of the public entertainments that it has always been customary, and that it is reasonably expected that they will give the representatives of foreign nations, and
others, in order to keep up the dignity of the Government.
Most of these officers could earn for themselves, in their professions,
amounts of money to which their official salaries bear little comparison.
And then there is, perhaps, not a day in the year on which any one of



TREASURER.

237

these officers cannot secure to himself, without fear of detection, an
amount greater than he receives for his annual salary.
Would such a course be pursued, or considered safe, by sagacious
business men in the ordinary walks of private life ?
But for the generous interference of Congress, by special enactment,
in favor of the officers in this Bureau, it would not have been possible to
have.retained the services of some of them. The exception was made
in their favor because their offices were anomalous. Some of these offi, cers have responsibilities exceeding those devolving on the heads of
bureaus. None other of their grade being recognized by law in any of
the departments. Many clerks, who were equally deserving, were excluded from receiving extra pay, the committee deeming it inadvisable
because their grades were common to all the offices, and it was not
thought proper at that time to increase the pay of all the employes in all
the departments ofthe Government. Under this view of the case, a list of
officers, for whom it was necessary that something should be done, was
furnished to the committee. The appropriation was made in accordance
with this list, and the distribution by the Secretary was made according
to the intention of the law. I t is to be hoped that Congress, at the coming session, will be prepared, by a general law, to do justice to all the
officers and other employ6s of the Government.
A system of organization of the offices of the Government, however
suitable it may have been to the wants of four millions of people, collecting and disbursing a small revenue, is entirely insufficient and unfitted to the requirements of a population of over forty millions, with
an increase of revenue, proportionably, still greater. Eeorganization
has been too long delayed. The public interest is suffering in consequence of the delay.
It must now be apparent to all that this nation can never go back to
the state of things existing when the present organization of the public
offices was made.
Things suited to the wants of a young child are ill-adapted to the
needs of full-grown man.
When the treasury was placed in my charge, less than 20 employes
transacted the business of the office. 350 persons, working much harder
than the 20 then did, would be unable to transact it now.
Temporary clerks have from time to time been employed under various
special laws, and to some extent will have to be continued for some time
to come. The number may, however, be gradually decreased with the
return to specie payments, and when theredemptionof the paper money
of the Government shall have been accomplished.
The nuinber of persons now employed in this office is 374. There is
neither probability nor hope that the number can be reduced to a number less than 250.
In the table submitted last year it was proposed to fix the number at
253, being a reduction of the force, as now employed, of 121 persons.
The tables of the number required of each grade, and the compensation
to be allowed, as stated in the report of last year, are re-stated here,
with modifications in regard to the female employes made necessary by
the favorable legislation in their behalf by Congress at its last sessioui
With a view to the reorganization of this office, the following table of
the officers, clerks, and other employes, with the pay that should, for
the proper conduct of the office, attach to each, is most respectfully submitted :
Assistant treasurer
Cashier....



$5,000
4,000

.238

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Assistant cashier
Chief of division of correspondence
Chief of division of national banks
Chief of division of redemption
Chief of division of issues
Chief of division of loans
Chief of division of general accounts
Chief of division of Treasurer's accounts
Pajdng teller
Receiving teller
'.
Assistant i)aying teller
Assistant receiving teller
Principal bookkeeper
Assistant princij^al bookkeeper
^
20 fifth-class clerks, each
26 fourth-class clerks, each
30 third-class clerks, each
30 second-class clerks, each
40 first-class clerks, each
1 engineer
9 messengers, each
9 assistant messengers, each
8 porters, each
20 female clerks, each
20 female clerks, each
9 female messengers, each
8 female assistant messengers, each
7 female sweepers and dusters, each

•

i

:

$3, 500
3,000
3, 000
3, 000
3, 000
3, 000
3, 000
3, 000
3, 000
3,000
2, 500
2,500
2,500
2,200
2,000
1,800
1,600
1, 400
1,200
1,200
1, 000
900
800
1, 000
900
800
700
400

According to this plan, females may be competent to hold any class
of clerkships; but males are not to be appointed clerks, except in the
classes from one to five.
If a reorganization should be made, it is suggested that the numbers
of the classes should be reversed, so that the clerks would be rated according to the numbers of their respective classes, and so that the i)resent absurd and contradictory classification and rating of a first class
clerk as a fourth-class clerk, and a fourth-class clerk as a first-class
clerk, may thereby be corrected and made to conform to common sense.
CONCLUSION.

For the escapes from perils that threatened at every step, through
which I have passed in perfect safety, without the loss of a single cent
to the people of the United States, and without any serious pecuniary
mishap to myself, in the collection and disbursement for the government of many thousands of millions. of dollars during the nine years
preceding the last one, I desire earnestly to express my heartfelt feelings of profound thankfulness and gratitude.
Although recently despoiled by thieves from without and from within
the treasury, I hope my gratitude has not been abated by reason of the
two misfortunes that have within the yea.r overtaken me. But I fear
that my thankfulness may be ofthe kind expressed by one who, having
fallen from a great height and broken his leg, thanked God it was not
his neck.
I congratulate the administration, the Congress, and the good people
of the country, on the fact that by your skillful management of the
finances, and the retrenchment of expenses by the executive head, and
the heads of the Departments of the Government, especially in the expenditures for the Army, an amount exceeding sixty-eight million dollars has been gained and saved to the treasury in the last over the
preceding fiscal year; and on your acljievement, within the same year, of
reducing.the public debt nearly^ one .hundred and three million dollars.



TREASURER.

239

and of buying in for the Government, at a cost in currency of nearly
one hundred and thiyty-three million dollars, six per cent, stocks of the
United States, of the face value of over one hundred and fourteen
million dollars.
By these purchases there is and will be saved to the people in
the future the annual payment of interest thereon, amounting to
$6,884,886, in gold.
From the proceeds of this amount of interest, paid semi-annually in
gold, and from its accumulation, and from like savings and their accumulations and gains in the future, other United States stocks may be
purchased by the Government until, by a constant and accelerated decrease of the debt, and increased means to pay it, the whole indebtedness shall, at no distant day, be paid and canceled.
If any other nation or people, ancient or modern, has ever made any
approach to such an exhibit, it is not within the ken of—
Your obedient servant,
F. E. SPINNEE,.
Treasurer of the United States,
Hon.

G E O R G E S. BOUTWELL,

Secretary of the Treasury,




240

R E P O R T ON THE FINANCES.

EECEIPTS AND DISBUESEMENTS OF ASSISTANT TEEASUEEES OF THE UNITED STATES FOE THE YEAE ENDING
JUNE 30,1870.
NEW YORK, N. Y.
Eeceipts.
Onaccount
On account
On account
Onaccount
On account
. .On account
On account
On account

of customs
of internal revenue ..
of misceUaneous
of transfers
of patent fees
of coin certificates
of temporary loans
of post office warrants

$134,492,988
14,212,172
86,144,175
149,130,937
40, 025
76,727,960
340, 000
4,733,687

$472, 021,596
4,736,546
6,548,120
96, 482,796
96,152, 090
86,639, 062
2, 321,658

^
,..

'.

Payments.
On account of Treasury Department
On accouut of post office warrants
On account of temporary loans.
Amount credited to disbursing officers' accounts
Amount paid on disbursing officers' accounts
Amount paid for interest on the public debt in coia
Amount paid for interest on the public debt in currency

46
44
52
79
35
00
00
54

00
67
60
10
21
53
94

BOSTON, MASS.
Keceipts.
Balance June 30, 1869
Treasurer's general account
Customs
Patent fees
Sales of internal revenue stamps.
Transfers
Miscellaneous
,
Interest account, registerecl
Interest account, coupons
Post Office Department
,
Disbursing otticei'S
Balance June 30, 1870
,

Pa;5Tnents.

$8, 767, 217 27
S38, 220, 491 43

20, 885, 351 01
33, 058 05
1, 001, 994
22, 427, 725
2, 516, 006
8,139, 640

94
28
19
67

597, 794 66
10,331,301 18
74, 700, 089 25

Total .
.Fractional currency redeemed.
Five-cent nickels redeemed

8,132, 554 67
10, 010, 603 50
628, 739 96
9 731, 403 11
,
7,976, 296 58
74, 700, 089 25
2, Oil, 395 32
40, 000 00

PHILADELPHIA, PA.
The receipts which were placed to the credit of the Treasurer of the United States
during the fiscal year were as follows :
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From

transfers from banks
customs
internal revenue tax
internal revenue stamps ...'
patent fees
semi-annual duty
Post Office Department
miscellaneous accounts

$16, 455, 839
8,429, 427
1,210,493
1,113,149
14, 542
309,208
642,691
4,152,945

Total.
From similar sources previous year
Deduct
Decrease of receipts this year



00
79
39
70
95
16
84
77

32,328,298 60
•.

$34,912,628 77
^ 32,328,298 60
2, 584, 330 17

TREASURER.

241

The disbursements during the same term were as foUows:
Account general treasury
Account Post Office Department
'
Total....:

$32,116, 550 73
610,999 39

,.

Sirailar j)ayments previous year
Dednct . . . . :

32, 727, .550 12

,

$35, 383.659 31
3.2,727,550 12

Decrease, of payments this year

2,656,109 19

Tbe payu'ieuts made on disbursers' checks, numbering 26,385, including those drawn by the Treasurer ofthe United States on his transfer account, amount to
Similar payments previous year
Dednct
'...

v

Decrease of payments this year

$9,247,347 78
$10,240,735 28
9,247,347 78

., .^

993, 387 50

The amount standing to credit of disbursing "officers on the 1st of
July 1869, was
Credits during the fiscal year ending Jnne 30, 1870, were
Total credits
Deduct total disbursements

• $902, 085 21
9,755,73.5 04
10, 657, 820 25
9, 247, 347 78

Balance to credit of disbursers June 30, 1870

1, 410, 472 47

The amonnt of fractional cnrrency redeemed dnring the fiscal year ending June 30,
1870, was $3,064,503.
The payments on acconnt of interest on the public debt were as follows :
On registered loans, coin
$4, 331, 531 00
On coupon loans, coin
:..
4, '6b8,237 50
On temporary loans, L . M
186,246 10
On Pacific Railroad loans, L. M
252; 460 53
9,128, 475 13
Siniilar pavments previous y e a r . :
Dednct ..1
:

.

Decrease of i^ayments this year

•.

.

$9, 563, 699 85
9,128, 475 13
435,224 72

The amount of five-cent nickel coins redeemed during the same term was $69,100.
ST. LOUIS, MO.
Eeceipts.
Balance June 30, 1869
From transfers
From customs
.From internal revenue
From Post Office Department
From disbursing officers ..'.
From misceUaneous
'
,

$3,135,091
3, 684, 440
1, 966,789
5, 867, 493
656, 895
9,68.5,220
2,410, 664

..,..

Total

:

22
94•
14
29
32
84
41

27,406,595 16"

Disbursements.
On account of Treasury Department
On account of post office warrants
Disbursing officers' checks
Coin sales

16 F




$11, 077, 537 50
685,183 35
10,148, 111 04
1, 928, 418 57.

242

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Paper
Miscellaneous
Balance June 30, 1870

$2,1-50 55
16, 791 01
3,548,403 14

•

Total

--'.

27,406,595 16

CHARLESTON, S. C. '
Eeceipts.
Balance on hand
Customs, (coin)
Internal reveuue
Miscellaneons
Disbursing officers .. .•
Post Office Department
Interest on pnblic debt

$591,739
239,670
1,310,279
955,518
1,628,148
265,597
7, 8.27

,

Total

•.

45
76
05
20
17
15
00

.4,998,779 78

Disbursements.
Treasnry drafts
Transfer orders
Disbursing officers' checks
Post offi ce war ran ts
Interest on public debt
Total

^

•.

11,786,432
770,000
1,744,949
308,075
7,893

.^
1

^

21
00
31
01
00

4, 617, 349 53

Balance on hand

$381,430 25

Fractional currency receivecl
Mntilated currency redeemed

$345, 000 00
102,980 50

....
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
EeceiiDts.

On
On
Ou
On
On
On
On
On
On
On

a c c o u u t of
a c c o u n t of
a c c o u n t of
a c c o u u t of
a c c o u n t of
a c c o u n t of
a c c o u n t of
a c c o u n t of
accomit of
a c c o u n t of

$8,
5,
"3,
17,

transfers
customs
:
internal revenue
d i s b u r s i n g officers
P o s t Office D e p a r t m e n t . . ' .
T r e a s u r e r TJnited S t a t e s , g e n e r a l accouut .
legal-tender n o t e s r e d e e m e d
Iractional c u r r e n c y r e d e e m e d
interest
miscellaneous
'
:

.537,
863,
610,
366,
520,

000
758
527
473
152

Disbursements.
00
17
89
48
80

117,116,072 98
536, 448 84
14, 398, 555 38
2, 733, 000 00
268, O O 00
G
411,8.57 00

395, 022 74
36, 292, 935 08

35, 463, 934 20

SAN FEANOISCO3 CAL.
June 30, 1889, balance to credit of depositors
Receipts during the year

:

.
^

Total

.32,384,641 14

Disbursements
'
June 30, 1870, balance to credit of depositors
Total

$2, 602, 780 43
29,781, 860 71

-

, . . .•

$27, 381,145 34
5, 003, 495 80
32,384,641 14

EECEIPTS AND DISBUESEMENTS'OF DESIGNATED DEPOSITAEIES OF THE UNITED STATES FOE THE YEAE ENDING JUNE 30, 1870.
CHICAGO, ILL.
Deceipts
Disbursements .



$18,557, 640 64
19,420, 095 50

TREASURER.

243

CINCINNATI, OHIO.
Balance June 30,1869
Receipts

:

Total

$3,759,080 61
24,935,717 39
28,694,798 00

Disbursements
Balance June 30, 1870

$26,798,964 65
1,895,833 35

Total

28,694,798 00
LOUISVILLE, KY.

Balance Jnne 30, 1869
Receipts

$110,057 25
6,717,198 98

Total

6,827,256 23

Disbursements
Balance June 30, 1870

$5.793, 977 86
1,033,278 37

Total

6,827,256 23
BUFFALO, N. Y.

Balance June 30, 1869
Receipts

$567,773 43
4,872,330 29

Total

5,440,103 72

Disbursements
Balance June 30, 1870

$5,137,214 13
302,889 59

Total

5,440,103 72
OLYMPIA, WASH. T E R .

Balance June 30, 1869
Receipts
:

$44,873 29
115,036 50

Total

159,909 79

Disbursements
Balance June 30, 1870

$114,146 19
45,763 60

Total

159,909 79
SANTA F E , N. MEX.

Balance June 30, 1869
Receipts

$338,056 83
1, 881,209 74

Total

2,219,266 57

Disbursements
Balance June 30, 1870

-..

Total

$1, 966,147 47
253,119 10
2,219,266 57

OREGrON CITY, OREGON.
Bahance June 30,1869
Receipts
,..
Total

'.




^

$7,339 58
42,922 35
50,261 93

244

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Disbursements
Balance June 30, 1870

'.
:

Total...

$43,270 84
6,991 09
50,261 93

TUCSON, ARIZONA.
Receipts...Disbursements
Balance June 30, 1870.,




$52,221 92
1,093 75
51,128 17

REPORT OF THE REGISTER OF TIIE TREASURY.







REPORT

THE REGISTEE OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register^ Office, October 26, 1870.
S I R : In presenting this, my second annual report of business transacted in this office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870, I have
the honor to state that it has not been found necessary to increase the
clerical force of this Bureau over the 229 persons employed at the date
of my last report.
Tbe expenses of the Bureau have been reduced to the lowest amount
consistent with the public interest.
The clerical force is iu a high state of efficiency, and I take this opportunity of beariug testimony to the high character, ability, and general attention to duty, of the class of i)ublic servants who toil from year
to year in these offices, but whose duties are not such as attract public
attention or due recognition.
The large number of journals and ledgers of public accounts necessary in this office requires clerks of the highest order of clerical ability,
who should have practical experience and a thorough knowledge of the
science of book-keeping, as well as possessed of a natural aptitude for
precision and accuracy. In this respect this office is fortunate in its
present corps of clerks, but it is a sabject of regret that the uncertain
tenure by which subordinates hold their positions in these offices tends
to deprive the Government of the services of the most efficient clerks,
who often are induced to accept of positions in other pursuits which
promise more certain employment. These defects seem to be inherent
in the system of civil service as heretofore practiced, but we may indulge the hope that Cougress will devise a more perfect system.
The report of transactions in this office during the last fiscal year is
submitted under the different divisions iuto which the office is divided
DIVISION OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES.

This division is in charge of D. E. B. Nevin, esq., and employs 24
male a.nd 6 female* clerks. The division has control of the receipts and
expenditures of the Government. Its records consist of eight ledgers for
personal accounts, nine appropriation ledgers, five journals, and various
auxiliary books for the record of accounts, warrants, and drafts. Detailed statements of receipts and expenditures are made from time to
time, Avhen properly authorized, and a list of all ^ receipts and expend^
itures" warrants issued during each quarter is prepared for settlement
with the Treasurer. Copies of records and accouuts required in the
prosecution of suits are prepared in this division, and authenticated by
the Eegister. Th.p custody and arrangement of the files are also in


248

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

trusted to this division. A large amouut of miscellaneous business,
which caunot be classified, is transacted in this division.
The number of warrants issued during the year for civil, diplomatic, miscellaneous, internal revenue, and public debt expenditures,
was
17, 679
In the preceding year
18, 856
Decrease

-

1,177

The number of warrants issued for receipts from customs, lands, direct tax, internal revenue, aud miscellaneous sources, was
9, 561
In the preceding year
9, 300
Increase

261

The number of Avarrants issued for payments and repayments in the
War, Navy, and Interior, Pension, and Indian Departments, was. 9, 927
In the preceding year
10,284
Decrease

357

The number of journal pages required for the entry of accounts relating to the civil, diplomatic, internal reveuue, miscellaneous, and public debt receipts aud expenditures, was
4,017
In the preceding year
4,483
Decrease

466

The number of drafts registered was
In the preceding year
Decrease

29, 735
32, 788
-...,..

3, 053

The number of certificates furnished for the settlement of accounts
was
- 6, 814
In the preceding year
6,250
Increase'

,

564

The laimber of accounts received from the offices of the First and
Fifth Auditors, aud Commissioner of the General Land Office,
was
20, 775 •
In the preceding year
20,585
Increase

190
LOAN DIVISION.

This division is in charge of Hartwell Jeiiisou, esq., and employs
20 male aud 8 female clerks. The busiuess of this division is increasing yearly, aud will require an increase of clerks as soon as the
work of funding the debt is fairly commenced; besides, an increase will



REGISTER.

249

be necessary should the number of registered bonds increase as they
have during the last year.
The total amount of registered bouds issued during the year was
$229,010,970, being an excess of $109,402,810 over the previous year.
The direct issues amount to $5,402,200..
The i^eduction of the public debt, on accouut of the purchases of the
Secretary of the Treasury, does not appear in this report, as the cancellation aud destruction of the bonds were not authorized until the passage of the act of July 14, 1870.
The amount of registered bonds issued in exchange for coupon bonds
was $97,934,450, against $20,551,750 duriug the previous year, showing
a marked preference for this form of investment induced by its greater
securit}^ and immunity from loss.
The interest-bearing'indebtedness is represented by fifteen different
classes of issues, requiring a'separate aud independent set of books for
each; aud as there are about 50,000 holders of registered bonds, each
one of which requires a separate ledger accouut, the labor required to
keep these accouuts and declare the semi-annual dividends on them can
scarcely be estimated. Nearly one-half of the interest is made payable
in New York, but the delays incident to this heavy disbursement have
been materially diminished by the present plan, adopted during the
year, of consolidating the different loans on oue schedule, aud having
the names of the payees priuted. The increased facilities for paymeuts
and the favor attending its adoption amply coaipensate for the heavy
extra labor entailed on this office iu compiling the abstract, and the
plan will be extended to the other principal desposLtories.
It has beeu the desire and aim of this office to render the registered
bonds as couvenient as possible to the business community; and in order to facilitate transfers aud exchanges, as a rule, returns are made by
this office the same day the stock is received. Small denominations of
the same loan of like amounts may be exchanged for larger, and vice
versa ; and so frequently is this done that any restriction or limitation
ou this privilege will be prejudicial to the popularity of the loan.
There are now entered upon the books of this office 384 caveats
against bonds of different loans and denominations, lost or stolen. A
number of these bonds ha.ve been presented for transfer with names
aud numbers altered so skillfully as to impose upon parties purchasing
them, but they have invariably been detected by the clerks in charge of
their respective loans and the issue made to the proper owners. The
present system of printing the bonds ou the prepared paper and tinting and ruling the numbers aud the blank spaces for the names of the
payees, will be au effectual check against fraud by alterations.
As a large proportion of the transfer transactions are based upon
permanent powers of attorney, and other evidence of authority, necessary to be ou file iu this office, this record, heretofore found to be faulty
and unreliable, has been carefully revised and systematized during the
last year.




statement showing the number of cases and numl)er and amount of registered and coupon bonds issued and canceled during the fiscal year ending .Tune 30, 1870.

to
O

ISSUED.
Direct issues.
Loans.

1

i

I
1

i
1847
.
. . . .
1848
1850
] 8.58
I860
1861, F e b r u a r y 8
Ore<^oii w a r
1 8 0 1 ' J u l y 17
1862
1863
1864, 6 p e r c e n t
1864, 5 p e r c e n t .'
1864 J u u e 30
.
1865
Cous '65
Cou.s '67
Cons '68
C e n t r a l Pacific
IJniou Pacific
U n i o n Pacific E a s t e r n D i v i s i o n
W^estern Pacific
TJnion Pacific C e n t r a l B r a n c l i

.

Transfers.

Exchanges.

1

1

1
O

O

s

<1

o

1

•

g

<

G-rand t o t a l




O

d

1

43

o

o

<

1

.

'
1
2
60
:

3

14

$700

. . . .

1
5
137

424
160
178

1, 637
329
574

317
199
128
631
839
, 295

1,235
1,497
712
5,267
4,490
970

15, 000
25, 000
358, 000.
5, 339, 450
857, 600
1, 256, 200
5,
10,
4,
41,
24,
3,

736, 800
851, 200
440, 300
165, 400
224, 000
67.5, 500

37
35
189
11
774
958
331
38
955
380
440
1,100
1,374
216
740
788
163
26
45
61
8

173
206
453
99
2,669
5,624
917
226
3,664
1,616
2, 598
6,377
6,302
612
2,607
2,193
452
198
87
145
66

1777, 000
934, 000
1, 212. 000
47, 500
7, 597, 000
22, 528, 000
2, 421, 300
861, 900 '
10, 340, 350
. 6,887,350
8, 545, 900
15, 754, 950
19, 2.58,150
2, 069, 600
11, 729, 000
10, 486, 000
1,108, 000
1, 677, 000
277, 000
642, 320
520, 000

1782, 000
959 000
1, 570, 000
47 500
12 937 150
23, 385, 600
3, 677, 500
861,900
16, 077,150
17 738 550
12, 986, 200
56, 920, 350
43, 501, 650
5,745 100
14 821 000
11,126, 000
3,108,000
3, 327, 000
277, 000
642, 320
520, 000

32

90

19, 500

3
1

325
73

.3, 092, 000
640,000

3

261

1, 650, 000

31
11

83
680

14, 200
5, 388, 000

3,234

16, 854

97, 934, 450

157
8, 512

3,150
34,134

1. 427, 250
124, 247, 070

1, 441, 4.50
227, 569, 520

42

763

5, 402, 200

3,234

16, 854 •^ 97,934, 450

8,669

37, 284

125, 674, 3§0

229, 010, 970

Atchison and Pike's P e a k
T o t a l coupon
Total registered

1

pi

CO

Total issue.

.

o
H
O

tn

o
Ul

Statement showing the number of cases and number and amount of registered and coupion bonds, tf-c—Continued,
CANCELED.

Kedemptioas.
Loans.

Exchanges.

i

o
ci
o

fl
fl
o

.go

o •

o
1847
1848
1850
.
18.58
1860
1861, F e h r u a r y 8
.
.
Oregon w a r
1861, J u l y 17
1862
•
1863
1864, 6 p e r c e n t
1864, 5 p e r c e n t
1864, J u n e 30
.
1865
Cons., '65
Cons.,'67
Cons.,'68
C e n t r a l Pacific
Union P a c i i i c . . . .
U n i o n Pacific, E a s t e r n D i v i s i o n
W e s t e r n Pacific
U n i o n Pacific, C e n t r a l B r a n c h
Sioux C i t y
Atchison and P i k e ' s P e a k

6
6
1

.
.




18
25
10

ri
fl
o
o

<

z
i

1

fl
fl
o

47, 450
10,000

i
358

^5, 000
25, 000
358, 000

8,488
4,163
2,048

...

5, 339, 450
857, 600
1, 256, 200

12, 207
15, 205
7, 682'
73, 466
75. 400
9,824

'

..

.

4i

o

m4. ooo

.

5, 736, 800
10, 851, 200
4, 440, 300
41,165, 400
24, 224, 000
3, 675, 500

...

173
302
463
123
3,254
11, 137
1,078
134
4, 969
2,374
3, 133
8,240
8,209
672
2, 079
1,928
491
247
85
106
52

^777, 000
934. 000
1, 212; 000
47, 500
7, 597, 000
22, 528, G O
O
2, 421, 300
861, 900
10, 340, 350
6, 887, 350
8, 545, 900
15, 754, 950
19, 2.58,150
2, 069, 600
11, 729, 000
10, 486, 000
1,108, O O
U
1, 677, 000
277, 000
642, 320
520, 000

124, 000
47, 450
10,000
782, 000
959, 000
1, 570, 000
47, 500
12, 936, 450
23, 385, 600
3, 677, 500
861. 900
16, 077,150
17. 738, 550
32,983,200
56, 9ii0, 350
43, 482,150
5, 745, 100
11 729 000
10, 486, 000
1,108, 000
1, 677, 000
277, 000
642, 320
520, 000

3
10

T o t a l coupon
Total registered
Grand Total

43

ni
O

o ,
ni

Total
canceled.

Transfers.

,

22
31

22, 000
59, 450

208, 871

97, 934, 450

4,318
44, 931

1, 427, 250
124, 247, 070

53

81, 450

208, 871

97, 934, 450

49, 249

125, 674, 320

I—(

H

99, 383, 700
124. 306, 520

13

Q

223, 690, 220
t^O
Cn

252.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
NOTE AND COUPON DIVISION.

This division is in charge of Lewis D. Moore, esq., and at the close of
the fiscal year the clerical force consisted of 77 clerks and 2 messengers (20 males, and 57 females.) The whole number employed during the
year was 92; the average per mouth was 78. The whole number employed during the previous fiscal year was 250-,the average per mouth
was 150. .
"The total number of notes and certificates received during the year
was 83,558, amounting to $77,107,060.
The whole number of five and six per cent, interest notes received
from the Comptroller counted, verified, and delivered to the United
States Treasurer was 34,989, amounting to $1,078,980.
The whole number of '^ seven-thirty" coupon treasury notes received,
counted, assorted, arranged, registered, and examined was 4,881, amounting to $563,400.
Of coupons detached from notes aud bonds there were counted, assorted, and arranged 4,372,503^ registered, 8,342,699; and examined and
compared, 10,671,227.
At the close of the previous fiscal year a large amount of work had
accumulated, and remained undisposed of in this division, but at the
date of this report all this Avork has been disposed of, aud all current
work is kept up as close as practicable.
The following consolidated statement exhibits the character and
amount of work performed by this division during the last fiscal year:
Statement of treasury notes, bonds, and coupons.

IN'otes, honds, &c.

A u t h o r i z i n g act.

N u m h e r of
pieces.

Total amount.

Coupons attached.

TREASURY NOTES AND GOLD CERTIFICATES.
( U r t ' E R IIA.LYES.)

Counted, assorted, a r r a n g e d , r e g i s t e r e d ,
and examined:
One-year five p e r c e n t
T w o - y e a r s five p e r c e n t
T w o - y e a r s five p e r cent, coupon
T h r e e - y e a r s six p e r c e n t
Gold certificates
Total

M a r c h 3,
M a r c h 3,
M a r c h 3,
M a r c h 3,
J u n e 30,
M a r c h 3,

1863...
1863...
1863...
1863...
1864...
1863...

2,786
425
65
841
27,140
52, 301

$60, 370
28, 350
5, 400
31, 880
839, 860
76,141, 2(J0

83, 558

77,107, 060

M a r c h 3,1863, a n d
J a n e 30, 1864.

34, 989

$1, 078, 980

M a r c h 3,1863, a n d
J n n e 30, 1864.

34, 989

$1, 078, 980

J u l y 17, 1801
J u n e . 3 0 , 1864
M a r c h 3, 1865 . . . .
M a r c h 3, 1 8 6 5 . . . .

26
1, 013
1,126
2,716

$2, 600
102,450
206, 400
251, 950

213
300
595

4,881

563, 400

1,108

.

34

34

TREASURY NOTES (WHOLE) RECEIVED FROM
COMPTROL LEli.

Counted and verified:
F i v e a n d six p e r c e n t
D e l i v e r e d to U n i t e d S t a t e s T r e a s u r e r :
F i v e a n d six p e r c e n t
" S E V E N - T H I R T Y " COUPON TREASURY
NOTES.

Counted, assorted, a r r a n g e d , r e g i s t e r e d ,
and examined:
.

Fir.st series, A u g u s t 15,1864
Second series, J u n e 15,1865
T h i r d series, J u l y 15,1865

Total




25.H

REGISTER.
Statement of treasury notes, bonds, and coupons—Continued.
Authorizing act.

N o t e s , bonds, &c.

N u m b e r of
pieces.

Total amount.

C o u p o n s attached. .

FIVE-TWENTY AND OTHER BONDS RECEIVED.

E e g i s t e r e d , e x a m i n e d , scheduled, coraIDared, a u d delivered to t h e c o m m i t t e e :
Exchanged and transferred

2,926

$1,127, 850

73, 230

7, 860
10,509
64, 766

1, 850, 6.50
5,148, 650
29, 686,100

197,195
588, 087
2, 279, 771

. 86,061

Do
Do
Do

37, 813, 250

3,138, 263

J u l y 17 a n d A u g .
5," 1861.
F e b r a a r y 25,1862.
M a r c h 3; 1864 . . . .
M a r c h 3, 1865 . . . .

Total

NOTE AND FRACTIONAL CURRENCY DIVISION.

This division is in charge of Charles E"eale, esq., and employs 2
clerks of the first class and 55 female clerks as examiners and counters,
1 assistant messenger and 1 laborer.
Although during the first part of the fiscal year the work of this division was materially diminished by the reissue of old notes "in consequence of the delay caused by the change made in the process of printing the new issue, yet the amount of work accomplished in the whole
year is considerably above the average amount of work done during
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869.
The folloAving statement shows the number of notes and amount of
fractional currency and treasury notes examined, counted, canceled, and
destroyed during the year :
N o . of n o t e s .
•

/ ^

F r a c t i o n a l , second i s s u e
Fractional, third issue
F r a c t i o n a l fo a r t li i s s u e
Eogal-ten d e r n o t e s
L e g a l - t e n d e r , series 1869
Demaud notes
National b a n k notes

.

400, C O
O
1, 600, 000
56, 052, 000
4.5, 200, 000
11, 959. 052 •
35, 580
3,758
26, 748

.

.

--

Total

Amount.

•

".

115,277,138

' $57,200
216, 000
13, 577, 000
9, 326, 400
94, 062, 965
74, 900
16, 525
149,108
117, 480, 098

Discounted money record kept but not counted in this office :
Postal currency
„
$167,823 00
Fractional, secoud issue
171,825 00
Fractional, third issue
112,624 50
Fractional, fourth issue
62,400 00
"
"
122,190 00
Legal-ten der notes
Total.......:
The number of notes counted during the year was — .
During the preceding year
Decrease




636,862 50
115,277,138
128,696,665
13,419,527

254

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The amount of notes counted during the year was
During the preceding year
Increase

$118,116,960 50
73,085,959 00
45,031,001 50

The average number of counters employed during the year was
During the preceding year
Decrease

57
77
20

TONNAOE DIVISION.

This division is in charge of Joseph Nimmo, jr., esq., and employs
8 male aud 5 female clerks, and 2 messengers.
Part one of the Geueral Eegulations relates almost exclusively tothe
duties of this division, which are as follows:
1st. The registration, enrollment, and licensing of vessels, and matters relating to title.
2d. The annual statements of the tonnage of the country, of vessels
built, vessels lost at sea and wrecked, vessels sold to foreigners, vessels
abandoned, &c.
3d. Surrendered marine documents and duplicates of marine documents issued which are returned to the Eegister by collectors.
4th. Documents surrendered to American consuls and notices of the
loss or sale of Americaii vessels abroad.
5th. All cases relating to the admeasurement of vessels. These are
referred to this office by the .Secretary of the Treasury.
6th. The preparation of lists of vessels of the Dnited States from the
records of this office.
Books and blanks.—The books and blanks iu use in the various custom-houses throughout the country are prepared by the Congressional
Printer, and issued under the directions of this division under the orders
of the Secretary of the Treasury. The catalogue embraces thirty-eight
difierent kinds of books, of which we have a complete supply on hand.
The number issued prior to October 1, 1870, was 1,926, value estimated at $20,162 05. There are now on hand 1,655, value estimated
at $1^9,420 47. The law requiring that these books and blanks shall
be suiiplied here has two objects in view: first, that of economy 5
and second, the securing of uniformity in the records of the customhouses and of this office. Both these objects have been fully attained.
The former method of allowing customs officers to order their books and
blanks at private establishments led to gross irregularities and serious
embarrassment iu the administration of the duties of the Department. In
the course of eightj^ years many changes were introduced into the forms,
aud to this extent coUectors of customs Avere a law unto themselves. To
remedy these irregularities, aud to secure strict uniformity of practice.
and compliance with the regulations of the Department, it is necessary
that the Eegister should supervise both the printing and issue of these
supplies.
The present condition of our merchaM marine.—Our shipping engaged
in foreign trade still remains in the low condition iuto which it fell in
the year 1862. During the late war nearly one-half our tonnage employed in foreign trade was either captured by Anglo-rebel privateers or
was sold to foreigners in order to avoid the risk of capture. But the
chief cause of the continued decadence of Americaii shipping is the



255

REGISTER.

supersedure of sailiug vessels by steam vessels, and the substitution of
iron for wood as a ship-building material.
While we have in this country inexhaustible supplies of coal and iron
and unsurpassed facilities for tlie building of iron ships, we have not a
single establishment which can compare wuth the great works of England aud Scotland. Our failure in this broad field of enterprise is a
serious detriment to American industry. With far less expenditure
than England has made in favor of her steam marine we can develop
our latent resources, and ere long again compete Avith her in maritime
commerce.
The admission of foreign-built A^essels to the privileges of American
registry Avould tend to crush out for an indefinite period all attempts at
iron ship building in this country, aud to denationalize our merchant
marine in the interest of our most formidable rival upon the ocean.
It is to be hoped that such measures may be adopted as shall tend to
place at least one-half our shii)ping in foreign trade under the American flag.
Tonnage of the TJnited States.
The tonnage of the United States, and the ship-building for the years
1869 and 1870, are as follows :
R e g i s t e r e d , enrolled, a n d licensed t o n n a g e of t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s .
Tear.

Enrolled.

Eegistered.

Vessels.

Vessels.

Tons.

A^essels.

Tons.

3,281
2,942

1, 566, 421. 51
1, 516, 800. 06

19, 732
21, 525

2, .526, 093. 52
2, 677, 940. 62

1869
1870

Sail.

1869
1870

1
.1

Tons.

4,474
4, 531

Vessels.

52,125. 73
51, 766. 55

27, 487
28, 998

Tons.
4,144, 640. 76
4, 246, 507. 23

'•, steam vessels, barges, and canal-boats of the United States.

Tonnage of saiUng

Year.

Total.

Licensed.

Steam.

Barges.

Total.

Canal-boats.
CO

Tons.

i

Tons.

Tons.

CO

o

>

i

Tons.

>

17, 846 2, 399, 971. 54 3,546 1,103, 568. 38 1, 423
17, 534 2, 363, 086. 45 3,524 1, 075, 095. 03 1,530

220, 957. 84 4, 678
240, 410. 60 6,410

1
>

Tons.

420,143. 00 27, 487 4,144, 640. 76
567, 915.15 28, 998 4, 246, 507. 23

Ship-building of the United States, 1869 and 1870.
Steam.

Sail.
Year.

i
1869
1870

Tons.

874
806

149, 029. 61
145, 784.18

1

Tons.

279
287

65, 06.5. 99
86, 325. 02

Barges.

1

Tons.

191
162

26, 021. 87
29, 742. 26

Total.

Canal-boats.

Tons.

1

.3.5,112. 68
28, 338. 27

1, 726
1,489

>
382
234

Tons.

275, 230.15
290,189.73

Before closing I deem it but an act of justice to the Assistant Eegister and the several gentlemen who haA^e charge of the different diAisions into W'hich this Bureau is divided, to bear testimony to their abil



256

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

ity, diligence, and efficiency; and I acknowledge my indebtedness to
them and to the gentlemen who haA^e acted in the capacity of chief
clerk for the promptitude and accuracy with W'hich the business of the
Bureau has been performed.
I remain, with great respect, your obedient servant,
JOHN ALLISOIST,
Eegister,
Hon.

GEORG-E S. BOUTAA^ELL,




Secretary of the.Treasury.

257

EEGISTEE.

Statement ofthe number of persons etnpfloyed in each district of the United States for tli^ collection of customs during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870, with their occupation and compensation, per act M March, 18A^.
'•'. .
D i s t r i c t , n u m b e r of p e r s o n s , a n d occupation.

A g g . compensation.

D i s t r i c t , n u m b e r of p e r s o n s , a n d occupation.

AROOSTOOK, MAINE.

1
1
3
1
1
2

collector
d e p u t y collector . .
d e p u t y collectors .
special i n s p e c t o r . .
inspector
inspectors

CASTINE, MAINE—Continued.

U , 500 00
1, 460 00
3, 285 00
1,460 U
O
1, 095 00
1, 460 00

PASSAMAQUODDY, MAINE.

1 collector
1 surveyor
1 d e p u t y collector
1 deputy collector—
1 d e p u t y collector —
1 - d e p u t y collector
1 d e p u t y collector
1 inspector
1 inspector
1 iuspector
1 inspector
1 inspector
1 insxiector
:•.
1 aid to the revenue.
1 aid to t h e revenue.
1 aid to tho revenue.
1 aid to the revenue.
1 aid to t h e revenue.
1 watchman
1 boatman

3, 252 00
2, 000 00
2, 000 00
1, 460 00
600 00
730 00
912 . 0
5
1, 095 00
1, 095 00
1, 095 00
1, 095 00
912 . 0
5
912 50
1, 095 00
912 50
912 50
400 00
912 50
730 00
360 00

MACHIAS, MAINE.

1
1
1
2
1
1

collector
d e p u t y collector.
d e p u t y collector.
inspectors
inspector
inspector

1, 705 60
1, 095 00
912 50
1, 460 00
487 00
502 00

1 special d e p u t y collector a n d inspector
d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r . . .
d e i ) u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r . . .
d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r ' . . .
inspector
iuspector

1, 200 00
730 00
600 00
600 00
1,095 00
500 00

15ANG0R, MAINE.

1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

collector
d e p u t y collector
d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r
d e p u t y collector, w e i g h e r , a n d
gauger...
weigher, gauger, and m e a s u r e r . . .
inspectors
:
inspector
iuspector
inspector
occasional inspector
aid to t h e reveuue
night watchman
janitor

1
1
2
1
1
1
1

coUector
d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r . .
d e p u t y collectors a n d i n s p e c t o r s
d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r . .
d e p u t y collector a n d i u s p e c t o r . .
special inspector
superintendent warehouses

3, 000 00
1, 600 00
1, 095 00
500
500
190
912
645
464
849
925
316
188

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

2, 500
1, 460
2,190
912

00
00
00
.50

CASTINE, MAINE.

17 F



1 weigher and measurer
1 i n s p e c t o r (discontinued A p r i l 30,
1870)
.'

237 (10

1, 460 00
180 00

^153 00
900 00

BELFAST, MAINE.

1 collector
1 d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r —
1 d e p u t y coUector, i u s p e c t o r , w e i g h er, & c .
1 d e p u t y coUector, i u s p e c t o r , w e i g h er, &c
1 d e p u t y collector, i n s p e c t o r , w e i g h er, &c
1 d e p u t y collector, insxiector, Aveigher,. &c
•
•1 temporary inspector
1 temi3orary i n s p e c t o r

2, 221 16
1, 460 00
1,162 00
1, 295 17
583 32
. 3 31
13
58 31
20O 00

WALDOBORO, MAINE.

1 special d e p u t y coUector
1 inspector ....'
1 deputycoUector, inspector,
er, <fec
1 d e p u t y collector, i n s p e c t o r ,
er, &c
1 d e p u t y collector, i n s p e c t o r ,
er, &c
1 d e p u t y collector, i n s p e c t o r ,
er, &c
1 d e p u t y collector, i n s p e c t o r ,
er, &.C..1 d e p u t y coUector, i n s p e c t o r ,
er, (fcc

1, 095 00
300 00
weigh730 00
weigh825 00
weigh1, 395 00
weigh1, 305 00
weigh1, 060 00
weigh923 00

WISCASSET, MAINE.

1
2
1
1

FRENCHMAN'S BAY, MAINE.

1
1
1
1
1

A g g . comiDensation'.

collector
d e p u t y collectors a u d i n s p e c t o r s ,
d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r . . .
d e p u t y collector for five m o n t h s . .

797 66
2,190 00
750 00
66 66

BATH, MAINE.

1 collector
1 dei:)uty collector, i n s p e c t o r , w e i g h er, &c
1 d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r . . .
1 inspector
1
1 inspector
1 aid to t h e revenue a n d temporaiy
weigher
1 inspector
1 inspector
1 inspector
1 inspector
1 inspector

2,735 35
1,
1,
1,
1.

500
460
460
276

130
095
6C0
500
350
62

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
GO

PORTLAND AND FALMOUTH, MAINE.

6, 400 00
1 collector
9, 000 00
3 d e p u t y coUectors
1, 433 15
1 8ux)erintendent w a r e h o u s e s
1, 500 00
1 clerk
I .^
:
3, 90O 00
3 clerks
2, 400 00
2 clerks
1,100 00
1 clerk
1,000 00
1 clerk
670 OO
I clerk
2, 497 61
1 s u r v e y o r , s a l a r y a n d fees
S, 500 00
1 deputy surveyor
2 vreighers, measurers, and gaugers . 4, 000 00
3, 430 08
2 occasional weighers, gaugers, &c.
3, 000 00
1 appraiser

258

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Statement of the number ofpei^sons employed for the collection of customs, cfc.—Continued.
D i s t r i c t , n u m b e r of p e r s o n s , a n d occupation.

Agg. compensation.

District, number of persons, and occu- A g g . compation.'
pensation.

P O R T L A N D AND F A L M O U T H , M E . — C o n ' d ,

1
^
1
2
3
2
2
1
13
2
2
7
2
1
10
2
1

N E W B U R Y P O R T , MASS.

$2, 500 00
1, 407'49
2, 920 00
3, 832 50
1,336 00
• 2, 920 GO
464 00
16, 390 50
2, 555 00
2,190 00
7, 665 00
1,460 00
636 00
. 2, 205 00
. 1,460 00
5 5 00
.0

assistant appraiser
examiner
storekeepeis
storekeepers
special inspectors
inspectors
inspector
inspectors
inspectors
night inspectors
3.
temporary inspectors
temporary inspectors.:.,
t e m p o r a r y ins^pector
temporary inspectors
boatmen'.
porter
SACO, MAINE.

1
1
1
1
1

collector
inspector
inspector
d e p u t y collector
aid to revenue

-.

305
500
100
495
62

-"

01
00
00
50
00

KENNTiBUNK, MAINE.

234 20
600 00
468 00

1 coUector
1 inspector..:
3 inspectors
YORK, MAINE.

274 20
100 00
33 00

1 collector
1 inspector —
1 inspector

1
1
1
3
1
1

1,290 05
461 20
1,460 00
250 00
1,500 00
4,380'00
650 00.
400 00

VERMONT, V T .




00
00
00
00
00
00

3, 000
1,134
2, 920
2,190
1, 460
600
360
300
225
],500
1, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
"00

1,980
590
245
1,460
1, 460
1, 500
400
600
5, 475
735
360
183
480
300
36
480

81
54
77
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

478
912
365
1,460
730
100

00
50
00
00
00
00

SALEM AND BEVERLY, MASS.

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

collector
'.
surveyor
surveyor
i n s p e c t o r a n d d e p u t y collector .
inspector and clerk
weigher and gauger
measurer
inspector
i n s p e c t o r s a t $1,095 each,'per a n n u m |
inspector '
inspector
inspector
boatman
boa,tman
watchman
porter and messenger...,

1
1
1
1
1
1

collector
d e p u t y collector a n d insxiector . . .
d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r . . .
inspector
inspector
boatman
:

MARBLEHEAD, MASS.

collector
surveyor.
.'
d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r
d e p n t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r . . , . .
i n s p e c t o r , w e i g h e r , g a u g e r , &c
inspectors
inspector
porter and watchman

1 collector
1 d e p u t y collector a n d i n s p e c t o r
1 d e p u t y collector a h d i n s p e c t o r
1 d e p u t y collect<3r a n d i n s p e c t o r
2 d e p u t y collectors a n d i n s p e c t o r s
4 d e p u t y collectors a n d i n s p e c t o r s
7 d e p u t y collectors a n d i n s p e c t o r s
1 d e p u t y coUector a n d i n s p e c t o r
2 d e p u t y collectors a n d i n s p e c t o r s
6 d e p u t y collectors a n d i n s p e c t o r s
' 3 d e p u t y collectors a n d i n s p e c t o r s
1 inspector
1 inspector
2 5 inspectors
1 inspector
^
1 in.spector
1 inspector
1 inspector
4 inspectors
1 inspector
1 custom clerk
1 custom clerk
. 3 night watchmen
1 revenue boatman.
1 revenue boatman
1 porter

$1, 570
491
250
. 3,285
45
96

GLOUCESTER, MASS.

1 collector
1 surveyor
2.inspectors
2 inspectors
2 inspectors
2 inspect<)rs
1 boatman
1 Janitor
1 k e e p e r of b u i l d i n g
1 d e p u t y collector .
' 1 clerk

PORTSMOUTH, N . H .

1
1
1
1
1
3
1
.1

collector
surveyor- inspector
inspectors
storekeeper
storekeeper

..
...
..
..
..

.

2, 500 00
2, 000 00
1, 800 00
1,600 00
2, 800 00
4,800 00
7, 000 00
763 00
1,200 00
3, 000 00
2, 737 50
692 00
819 00
22, 812 50
33 00
684 00
5C0 00
1, 000 00
1, 460 00
153 00
1,200 00
912 50
2,190 00
640 00
, 400 00
510 00

BOSTON AND "CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

1
3
1
1
2
4
1
3
8
5
17
3
7
2
1
2
1
4
7
1
95
1
1
2
46
11
4
3

collector
6, 400 00
d e p u t y coUectors
9, 000 00
cashier
3, 000 00
assistant cashier
•
• 2, 000 00
clerks
4,200 00
clei:ks
8, 000 00
clerk
1, 900 00
clerks
5, 400 00
clerks
13, 600 00
clerks
7, 500 00
clerks
23, 800 00
clerks
3, 900 00
clerks
8, 400 00
clerks
:
2,200 00
clerk
1, 095 00
clerks
:
2,000 00
messenger
1, 200 00
assistaut messengers
3, 000 00
laborers
'4, 914 00
engineer
1, 095 00
inspectors
'
138, 700 00
inspector
.\.
1, 095 00
i n s p e c t o r , (female)
,
480 00
d e p u t i e s a t H i n g h a m a n d Cohasset]
1,400 00
night inspectors
50, 370 00
weighers
22, 000 00
gaugers
5, 940 00
measurers
4, 455 00

REGISTER.

259

Statement of the number of persons emxfioyed for the collection of customs, cfc.—Continued.
District, number of persons, and occu- Agg. compensation.
pation.

PLYMOUTH, MASS.

collector
deputy collector and inspector
deputy collector and inspector
deputy collector and inspector
deputy collector and inspector
deputy collector and inspector

..
..
..
..
..

1,479
. 1, 095
400
300
200
300

80
00
00
00
00
00

BARNSTABLE, MASS.

1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1

collector .1
deputy collector and inspector ..
deputy collector and inspector ..
deputy collector and iuspector ..
deputy collector and inspector ..
deputy collectors and inspectors
deputy collector and inspector . .
keeper custom-house
aid to the revenue
clerk
boatman

1, 665 00
1, 095 00
900 00
800 00
500 00
1,500 00
400 00
350 00
300 00
300 00
150 00

FALL RIVER, MASS.

1 oollector
1 deputy collector and inspector, and
weigher, gauger, and measurer..
1 inspector, weigher,and measurer..
1 night iuspector
1 weigher, gauger, and measurer...

2, 212 13
1, 591 01
1, 500 00
198 00
1, 269 23

N E W BEDFORD, MASS.

1 collector
1 deputy collector and iuspector .




Agg. compensation.

N E W BEDFORD, MASS.—Contiaued.

BOSTON AND CHARLESTOWN—Cont'd.
15 foremen to weighers and gaugers.. $15, 000 00
6 temporary foremen
4, 500 00
100 weighers and laborers, when em' 27, 500 00
ployed
3,650 00
4 revenue boatmen
730 00
1 revenue boat messenger
. 1, 800 00
1 superintendent public stores.
19 storekeepers, paid by merchants.. 27, 740 00
2 assistant storekeej>ers, paid by
2, 920 00
government
3 assistJint storekeepers, paid by
2, 400 00
merchants
3, 900 00
3 storekeepers' clerks
],200 00
1 storekeepers' clerk
1,100 00
1 storekeepers' clerk
'...
15 laborers, at $2 25 per day
10, 530 00
2 special assistant storekeepers and
2, 004 00
laborers
1 naval officer
3, 000 00
1 deputy naval officer.'
2, 500 00
1 deputy naval officer
,
2, 000 00
9, 000 00
5 clerks
-.
6, 400 00
4 clerks
1 messenger
800 00
1 surveyor
.
2, 500 00
1 deputy surveyor
2, 500 00
1 deputy surveyor
2, 091 32
1 clerk
'.
,
1, 800 00
1 clerk
./
1, 460 00
,1 clerk
1, 249 00
1 clerk
1, 296 54
1 messenger
700 79
1 general appraiser
3, 000 00
2 appi-aisers
6, 000 00
2 assistant appraisers
5, 000 00
2 clerks
-.
4, 000 00
3 clerks
5, 400 00
4 clerks
6, 400 00
5 clerks
:
7, 000 00
1 clerk
1,100 00
7 laborers
5, 976 25
1 laborer
950 00
1 laborer
850 00

I
1
1
1
1
1

D i s t r i c t , n u m b e r of p e r s o n s , a n d occupation.

3,171 28
1, 460 00

1 inspector
1 inspector, weigher, gauger,
measurer
1 inspector and measurer
1 inspector

$1, 460 00 .
and

1 inspector

2 in.spectors
1 inspector
1 aid t o t h e r e v e n u e

1 janitor and boatman
1 admeasurement clerk

...
r - -: - •
'...'...

. —

1, 460 00
875 00
300 00
, 125 00
160 00
120 00
1, 000 00
600 00
40 00

E D G . ^ R T O W N , MASS.

1
1
1
1
2
1
1

collector
.'..
deputy coUector and inspector.
deputy collector and inspector.
temporary inspector
temporary inspectors..
.
night inspector
revenue boatman

1, 255
1, 350
1, 095
600
1, 000
600
420

41
00
00
00
.00
00
00

NANTUCKET, MASS.

1 collector
1 special deputy coUector and inspector
1 inspector

600 00
600 00

PROVIDENCE, R. I.

1 collector
1 deputy collector, inspector, and
measurer.'.
2 inspect;Ors, weighers, gaugers, and
measurers
:..'.'.
2 inspectors, weighers, gaugers, and
measurers
2 in.spectors, coastwise
.:
2 in spectors, foreign
1 inspector for measurement of lumber
1 inspector, permanent
:>
1 messenger and storekeeper
1 storekeeper
^—
1 inspector at Pawtuxet
1 inspector at East Greenwich,,
1 boatman at Pawtuxet

3, 000 00
1, 500 00
2, 930 71
2,910 32
1, 460 00
2, 788 00
620
1, 460
1,200
547
880
483
600

00
00
00
50
00
33
00

B R I S T 0 L > N D WARREN, R. I .

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

collector
inspector
inspector
temporary in.spector.
ganger..".
weigher
boatman
storekeeper

1
1
1
1

collector
superintendent of l i g h t s —
agent mariue hospital
deputy collector

2
1
1
1
4
1
1

inspectors
inspector, North Kingston.
inspector, Dutch I s l a n d . . .
inspector. New Shoreham.
occasional in.spectors
gauger
boatman

1
1
1
1

coUect^ir
inspector
:
inspector at Mystic
surveyor at Pawtucket..

595 11
, 1, 095 00
250 00
368 00
193 92
61 35
211 82
32 00

NEWPORT, R. I .
1, 338 91
160 44
45
1,200 00
2,190 00
203 86
600 00
200 00
1, 228 Od
145 92
500 00

STONINGTON, CONTs.
1, 564 34
400 00
500 00
150 00

260

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Statement of the number of\persons emxiloyed for the collection of customs, cfa-—Continued.
D i s t r i c t , n u m b e r of x)ersons, a n d occu- A g g . compation.
pensation.

NEW LONDON, CONN.

1
1
2
1
1

collector, d i s b u r s i n g a g e n t , & c —
clerk
i n s p e c t o r s . . . -\
iuspector
i u s p e c t o r , \yeigherj g a n g e r , a n d
measurer
MIDDLETOWN, CONN.

1
1
1
1
1
1

collector
d e p u t y collector
watchman
storekeeper
inspector a t Hartford.
temporary inspector..

1
1
3
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
3

collector
d e p u t y coUector
"
inspectors and clerks
weighers, measurers, and gaugers
inspector
inspectors
watchman
boatmen
messenger and porter
laborer
temporary inspectors

NEW

HAVEN, CONN.

F A I R F I E L D , . CONN.

1
1
1
1
1

collector
inspector, w e i g h e r , ganger^ & c .
inspector
inspector
night inspector
SAG HARBOR, N. Y.

1
1
1
3

coUector
d e p u t y collector.
surveyor.
inspectors
N E W YORK CITY, N. Y.

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
3
9
11
32
36
29
36
51
56
28
10
33
2
>'2
1
2
13

collector
a s s i s t a n t collector
auditor
-.
:
assistant auditor
chief c l e r k
cashier
assistant cashier
d e p u t y coUectors, $3, 000 e a c h
c l e r k s , at'$3,000 each, p e r a n n u m .
c l e r k s , a t 12,500 each, p e r a n n u m .
c l e r k s , a t 3)2,200 each, p e r a n n u m .
c l e r k s , a t $2,000 each, p e r a n n u m .
c l e r k s , a t $1,800 each, p e r a u n u m .
c l e r k s , a t $1,600 each, p e r a n n u m .
c l e r k s , a t $1,500 each, p e r a n n u m .
c l e r k s , a t $1,400 each, p e r a n n u m .
c l e r k s , a t $1,200 e a c h , p e r a n n u m .
clerks, a t $1,000 each, p e r a n n u m .
c l e r k s , a t $900 e a c h , p e r a n n u m . . .
c l e r k s , a t $800 e a c h , p e r a n n u m . . .
c l e r k s , a t $750 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
c l e r k s , a t $600 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
s u p e r i n t e n d e n t of c u s t o m - h o u s e . .
u s h e r s , at$1,100 p e r a n n u m , e a c h .
p o r t e r s , a t $720 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .




Agg.compensation.

N E W Y O R K CITY, N . Y.—Continued.

STONINGTON, C O N N . — C o n t i u u e d .

1 boatkeeper—.,
1 weigher, Stouington.

D i s t r i c t , n i u n b e r of p e r s o n s , a n d occupation.

$144 00
601 00

8 w a t c h m e n , a t 1,000 p e r a n n u m ,
each
4 S u n d a y -watchmen, a t $130 p e r
a n n u i n , each
1 engineer
3, 291 47
4 firemen, a t $720 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
1, 800 00
1 j a n i t o r . N o . 23 P i n e s t r e e t
1, G O 00
O
2 c a r p e n t e r s , a t $1,277 50 p e r a n num, each
200 00
1 opener and packer, seizure r o o m . . .
, 974 61 247 i n s p e c t o r s , a t $1,460 p e r a n n u m ,
each
7 iUiSpectors, a t $1,095 p e r a n n u m ,
each
1,113 46
1 inspector a t Troy
994 .57
1 captain, night watch
600 00
2 l i e u t e n a n t s , n i g h t , w a t c h , a t $1,200
100 00
per annum, each
316 00 106 n i g h t w a t c h m e n , a t $1,095 p e r
64 00
aunum, each
19 w e i g h e r s , a t $2,500 p e r a n n u m ,
each
8 g a u g e r s , a t $2,000 i^er a n n u m ,
3, 4C0 00
. each
2, 000 00
1 a s s i s t a n t collector, J e r s e y C i t y
3, 000 00
1 surveyor a t Troy
3, 000 00
I warehouse superintendent
1, 290 50
98 s t o r e k e e p e r s , a t $1,460 p e r an2, 998 25
num, each
1, 095 00
1 assistant storekeeper
1,050 00
9 m e a s u r e r s of v e s s e l s , a t $1,400
500 00
per annum, each
626 00
1 m e a s u r e r of m a r b l e
180 00
1 appraiser a t large
1 clerk to appraiser a t large
1 c l e r k to a p p r a i s e r a t l a r g e
1 ajjpraiser
10 a s s i s t a n t a p p r a i s e r s , a t $3,000 p e r
2,108 28
aniuim, e a c h
1, 500 00
24 e x a m i n e r s , a t $2,500 p e r a n n u m ,
200 00
each
125 00
123 00 j 14 examinei'S, a t $2,000 p e r a n n u m ,
each
12 e x a m i n e r s , a t $1,800 p e r a n n u m ,
each
2 e x a m i n e r s , a t $1,600 p e r a n n u m ,
965 04
each
300 00
9 c l e r k s , a t $l,500^per a n n u m , e a c h . .
244 90
1 clerk
.'
306 00
39 c l e r k s , a t .$1,200 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
2 c l e r k s , a t $1,000per a n n u m , e a c h . .
7 m e s s e n g e r s , a t $900 p e r anniim,
each
6 400 00
,
5, 000 00
5 o p e n e r s a n d p a c k e r s , a t $1,173 75
I)er a n n u m , e a c h
7, 000 00
4, 000 00 84 oi)eners a n d p a c k e r s , a t $939 p e r
annum, each
2, 700 00
1 n a v a l ofiicer
5, GOO 00
3, . 0 00 3 d e p u t y n a v a l officers, at" $2,500
50
per annum, each
21, 000 00
1 auditor
9,000 00
5 c l e r k s , a t $2,200 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
22, 500 00
'4 c l e r k s , a t $2,000 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
24,200 00
• 64, 000 00 10 c l e r k s , a t $1,800 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
7 c l e r k s , a t $1,600 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
64, 800 00
7 c l e r k s , a t $1,500 i^er a n n u m , e a c h . .
46, 400 00
8 c l e r k s , a t $1,400 p e r a n n u i n , e a c h . .
54,OLO 00
4 clerks, a t $1,:}00 p e r a n n u m , . e a c h . .
71, 400 00
9 c l e r k s , a t $1,200 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
67, 200 00
1 clerk
28, 000 00
2 c l e r k s , a t $1,000 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
9, 000 00
3 m e s s e n g e r s , .at $1,000 p e r a u n u m ,
27, 200 00
1, 500 00
each ...'.
1, 200 00
1 surveyor
4 d e p u t ^ s u r v e y o r s , a t $2,500 p e r
2, 400 00.
annum, each
2, 200 00
4 clerks, a t $1,500 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
9, 360 00

$8,000 00
540 00
1, 200 00
2, 880 00
800 00
2, 550 00
1,000 00
363, 540 00
7, 665 00
1, 460 00
1, 600 00
2,400 00
116, 070 00
47, 500 00
. 16, 000 00
2, 000 00
250 00
3, 000 00
143, 080 00
1, 000 00.
13,140 00
2, 000 00
3,000 00
2, 500 00
1, 200 00
4, OOO 00
30, 000 00
62, 500 00
28, 000 00
21, 600 00
3,200 00
13, 500 00
1, 400 00
47, 800 00
2, 000 GO
6, 300 00
. 5, 868 75
78, 876 00
4, 950 00
7, 500 00
2, 500 00
11, 000 00
8, 000 00
18, 000 00
11,200 00
10, 500 00
11, 200 00
. , 200 00
5
10, 800 00
1,100 00
2, 000 00
3, 000 00
4,500 00
10, 000 00
6 000 00
,

REGISTER.

261

Statement of the number of p>Grsons employed for the collection of customs, cfc.—Continued.
District, number of persons, and occu- Agg. com.
pation.
X^^i^sation.

District, number of persons, and occu- Agg. compation.
pensation.
Os^VEGO, N. Y>—Continued.

N E W YORK CITY, N . Y.—Continued.

5 clerks, at $1,400 per annum, each ..
4 clerks, at $1,300 per annum, each ..
3 messengers, at $900 per annum,
each
1 xiorter

;7,000 00
5, 200 00
2, 700 00
720 00

ALBANY, N . Y.

1 surveyor
1 deputy collector and inspector
1 temporary clerk

.3,000 00
1, 460 00
480 00

CHAMPLAIN, N . Y.

1
1
1
2
1
8
4
7
1
1
1
1

collector
fleputy collector aud cashier
deputy collector and clerk
deputy collectors and clerks . .
deputy collector and in.spector . . . .
deputy collectors and inspectors...
inspectors, at $900 per annum each ;
in8pectors,only during navigation..
deputy collector and inspector
boatman
female inspector, three months
occasional inspector

2, 500 00
1, 800 00
1, 600 00
2, 400 00
1,000 00
1
7, 200 00 1
3, 600 00 1
3, 575 00 1
943 00
2
300 00
227 50
1
150 00 10

2, 496 66
1, 998 16
3, 329 65
1^ 998 16
1, 824 CO

301 65
754 11
670 35
402 20

oollector
^
special deputy
cashier and deputy
:
inspector and deputy
clerks, at $1,100 per annum, each .
clerks, at $1,000 per annum, each .
clerk.
clerk

4 inspectors, at $1,095 per annuni,
each
3 inspectors, at$840 x^sr .annum, each.
2 insxiectors, at$93 per a n n u m , each.




2, 500 00
1, 498 12
1,200 00
1, 000 00
1,608 00
948 50
8, 239 00
900,00
• 720 00
408 97

1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1

collector
dexiuty collector and inspector .
deputy collector and inspector
deputy coUector and inspector .^...
deputy collectors and insx>ectors ..
deputy collector and insxiector
deputy collectors aud inspectors ..
dexiuty collectors, at $912 per annum, each
deputy collector
deputy collector aud watchman . . .
deputy collector and watchman . . .
inspectors, at $912 per annuni, each
inspectors, at $730 per annum, each
sxiecial inspector
temporary inspector
temporary in.spector
night watchman
bridge night watchman
female examiner

1
1
1
3
1

collector
deputy collector
deputy collector
deputy collectors, at $3 x^er day..
clearance deputy

2, 500 00
1, 800 00
. 1, .500 00
1, 095 00
4, 560 00
687 00
1,650 00
2, 736 00
550 00
1, 200 00
912 00
3, 648 00
1, 460 00
1, 460 00
'
912 00
730 00
275 00
912 00
547 00

BUFFALO CREEK, N . Y.

447 50
230 94
2, 663 17

1 clerk

1, ,325 00
9, 632 50
4,106 50

1
1
1
1
1

2, 762 00
2, 000 00
1, 400 00

1
1
1
1
1
1

OSWEGO, N . Y.

1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1

4, 380 00
424 00

.366 00

CAPE VINCENT, N . Y.

1 deputy collector and inspector —
12 deputy collectors and .insi)ectors..
8 inspectors

1, 400 00
763 89
547 50
1,125 00
1, 095 00

NIAGARA, N. Y.

1
1
1
1
5
1
3
3

3, 800 00
608 00

$552 00
1, 375 00
825 00
218 00
198 00

GENESEE, N. Y.

collector
depnty coUector
dexiuty coUector
deputy collector
deputy collectors, at $804 each, per
annum
deputy coUector
inspectors
5 temporary inspectors
8 temporary inspectors
1 clerk....".

OSWEGATCHIE, N. Y.

2 deputy collectors, at $1,500 each,
(ten* nionths)
2 deputy collectors and clerks, at
$1,200 each, (ten months)
....
5 deputy collectors, at $800 each,
(ten months)
2 inspectors, at $1,200 each, (ten
months)
2 inspectors, at $3 x^er day, each,
(ten months)
5 inspectors, at $2 50 per day, each,
(ten months)
1 inspector, at $2 per day, (ten
months)
1 deputy collector, at $1,800, (two
months)
2 doxnity coUectors and clerks, at
$1,500 each, (two months)
—
5 deputy collectors, at $800 each,
(two months)
2 inspectors, at $1,200 each, (two
montlis)
2 insxiectors, at $3 j^er day, each,
(two months)
3 inspectors, at $2 50 per day, each,
(two months)
1 inspector and 1 watchman
1 collector

1 inspector
2 inspectors, at $687 50 per annum,
each
1 inspector
1 inspector
'...
1 inspector
2 deputy inspectors, at $700 per annum, each
1 deputy inspector
1 watchman
1 superintendent warehouses . . .
1 storekeeper
,,.r:
6 storekeepers, at $730 per annum,
each ,
1 storekeeper
'.

1, 460 00
2, 200 00
3, 000 00
730 00
300 00
4, 380 00
2, 520 00
186 00

•

•

cashier
clerk and bookkeeper
clerk
inspector
inspector and clerk
Sundry inspectors, at $3 each
janitor
watchman
fireman
night clearance deputy
to 3 detectives, at $2 50 per day.
to 2 detectives, at $3 per day

2, 500 00
1, 983 15
1, 460 00
3, 285 00
1,198 52
857 50
1, 787 87
1, 500 00
3 1, 200 00
1. 460 00
i; 460 00
17, 631 00
600 00
834 00
600 00
642 00
1, 220 00
1, 095 00

DUNKIRK, N. Y.

1 collector
1 depnty collector
2 insxiectors . . . .•

1,186 GO
912 50
1, 825 00

262

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Statement of tlie number of persons emxjloyed for the coUection of sustoms, cl'c.—Continued.
D i s t r i c t , n u m b e r of persons, a n d occu- A g g . comXieiisation.
pation.

D i s t r i c t , n u m b e r of xiersons, a n d occu- A g g . comxiation.
xiensation.

PHILADELPHIA, PA—Contiuued.

N E W A R K , N. J .

1 collector
1 deputy
1 inspector

$1, 089 79
1,460 00
1,460 00

P E R T H AiVDiOY, N. J .

1
1
2
1
1
1.

collector
d e p u t y collector
i n s p e c t o r s , a t $600 each, p e r a n n u m
i n s p e c t o r , a t $3 xier d i e m
inspector
s t o r e k e e p e r , a t $ 2 p e r dieni, (xiaid by
o w n e r s of p r i v a t e b o n d e d yard.)

2, 4 5 65
.3
1, 200 00
1,200 00
1, 095 00
730 00

LITTLE EGG HARBOR, N. .1.

3 i n s p e c t o r s , ( w h e n emx:)loyed)
J boatman

,

,.

'

1,074 00
648 00

1
2
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2

GBEAT EGG HARBOR, N. .J.

722 09
547 50

1 collector
1 inspector
BURLINGTON, N. J.
1 collector
1 dexTuty coUector,
tioned.)

'...
(uo siim m e n -

BRIDGETOWN, N. J.

"

1 collector
1 depiity collector.'...'.
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
1 collector
2 d e p u t y coUectors, a t $3,000 p e r annum, each.
:
\....
1 a s s i s t a n t coUector a t C a m d e n
1 surveyor at Chester
1 cashier
1 a s s i s t a n t c a s h i e r , (in p a r t )
1 assistant cashier
2 c l e r k s , a t $1,800 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
2 c l e r k s , a t $1,600 ])QV a n n u m , e a c h . .
8 c l e r k s , a t .$1,400 -pQv a n n u m , e a c h . .
11 clerks, a t $1,300 p e r a n n u m , e a c h . .
1 messenger a t custom-house
1 porter a t custom-house.
1 .fireman
>
2 n i g h t w a t c h m e n , a t $912 50.
64 d a y insxiectors, a t $1,460 p e r annum, each
1 special i n s p e c t o r
'.
1 m e s s e n g e r to i n s p e c t o r s
1 c a p t a i n of n i g h t insxiectors
1 l i e u t e n a n t of n i g h t i n s p e c t o r s
30 n i g h t i n s p e c t o r s , a t $912 50 p e r annum, each
30 n i g h t i n s p e c t o r s , a t $1,095 p e r a n num, each
7 t e m p o r a r y i n s p e c t o r s , a t $1,095 p e r
annum, each
1 Dnited States weigher
1 clerk
4 assistant weighers
6 regular beamsmen
4 temporary beamsmen
1 foreman to laborers
2 gaugers
2 temxiorary g a u g e r s
1 measurer
1 insxiector a t L a z a r e t t o
1 i n s p e c t o r a t M a r c u s H^ook
1 inspector at Bristol
1 naA'al officer




605 00
75 00

1
3
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2

1
1
1
6, 340 00 1
1
6,000 00
11
1, 500 00
500 00
1
2,500 00
1
668 48
4
1,198 37
3, 555 97
3,200 00
11, 200 00
12, 509 13
1
912 50
1
671 43
1
912 50
2
1, 792 50 3
85, 640 00
1,460 00
912 . 0
5
1, 460 00
1,200 GO

1, 536 00
2, 000 00
750 00
4, 563 36
6, 543 00
4, 380 00
912 50
2, 970 00
1, 361 66
1,485 00
500 00
547 50
547 50
4, 950 00

$2, 500 00
3, 200 00
2, 800 00
5,200 00
912 50
4, 500. 00
2, 500 00
1, 500 00
1,400 CO
1, 460 00
1, 095 00
912 50
912 5 0 '
3, 000 00
5, 0T)0 00
1, 800 00
3, 000 00
2, 800 00
1, 600 00
4,118 34
8, 030 00
250 25
616 50
821 25
821 25
912 .50
1, 500 00
1,'400 00
1, 825 00
912 50
912 50
900 00
^
500 00
1,600 00
13, 716 00
354 00
1, 346 74
3, 650 00

ERIE, PA.

collector
dexmty collector a u d insxiector . . .
insxiector
temxiorai'y i n s p e c t o r s
temxiorary insx:>ectors

1,000 00
1, 400 00
1,095 00
2,157 00
1, 325 00

PITTSBURG, P A .

1 dex'mty s u r v e y o r
1 c l e r k '.
'.
.-..-.
1 janitor and watchman

10,957 50
19, 071 00

dexiuty n a v a l officer
c l e r k s , a t $1,600 x;)er a n n u m , e a c h . .
c l e r k s , a t $1,400 X)er a n n u m , e a c h . .
c l e r k s , a t $1,300 x)er a n n u m , e a c h . .
messenger
•..,...
surveyor
deputy surveyor
clerk.'
clerk
admeasurement clerk
admeasurement clerk
marker
messenger
general appraiser
a s s i s t a n t a.ppraisers, a.t $2,500 p e r
a n n u m , each.
examiner
e x a m i n e r s , a t $1,500 ^ e t a n n u m ,
eacli
*
e x a m i n e r s , a t $1,400 -per a n n u m ,
each
clerk
clerks
x^ackers. a t $1,003 75 x^er a n n u m ,
each
xiacker
-.
assistant sampler
watchman
laboier
messenger
'.
.
s t o r e k e e p e r of t h e iiort
clerk
foremen, a t $912 50 -pev a n n u m ,
each
day watchman
night watchman
inarker
samxiler
superiutendeutof warehouses
a s s i s t a n t s t o r e k e e p e r s , a t $1,460
each, p e r a n n u m
assistant storekeeper
clerk, for coxiying w e i g h e r s ' books
b a r g e m e n , at'$912 50 each, -pev annum

1, 400 00
900 00
638 75

DELAWARE, DEL.

1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1

collector
dexiuty collector
dexiuty collector
d e p u t y coUector
inspector
inspector
oarsmen, a t $300
messenger ..'

^
a n d insxiector . . .
aud iuspector . . .
a n d insxiector
'...
x>er a n n u m , each.

3,000 00
1, 500 00
1,000 00
800 00
800 00
.500 00
1, 200 00
365 00

BALTIMORE, MD.

2 d e p u t y collectors, a t $3,000 each,
Xier a i n m m
1 dexiuty coll ector a t Ha^'^e de G r a c e .
1 i n s p e c tor, a t H a v r e d e Cr r a c e
1 c a s h i e r ..'

0, 000 00
900 00
85 53
2, 500 00

REGISTER.

263

Statement of the number of persons emxiloyed for the coUection of customs, cfc.—Continued.
Agg. compensation.

\

BALTIMORE, MD.—Continued.

1
4
5
4
4
9
39

assistant cashier
clerks, at $1,800 each, per annum.
clerks, at $1,600 each, per annnm.
clerks, at $1,500 each, per annum.
clerks, at $1,400 each, per annum.
clerks, at $1,200 each, per annum.
inspectors, at $1,460 each, per annum
2 female .inspectors, at $600 each,
per annum
12 special day inspectors, at $1,460..
1 aid
'.
1 weigher
1 clei'k to weigher
1 assistant clerk to weigher
13 assistant weighers, at $1,200
40 laborers, (regular and temporary')
1 measurer
2 assistant measurers, at $1,095
1 .special assistant measurer
2 gaugers, at $1,.500 each
4 vault watchmen, at $1,095
41 watchmen and night inspectors . .
8 special night inspectors
1 captain of night in.spectors
1 lieutenant pf night inspectors
3 messengers
2 porters'
2 markers
1 superintendent of building, (public stores)
1 superintendent
1 clerk and storekeexier
2 clerks and storekeepers
5 porters
3 laborers
20 storekeepers, at $1,460
1 engineer
1 fireman
1 messenger
1 general appraiser
2 local appraisers
1 clerk
4 examiners, at $1,500
.•...
5 clerks, at $1,400
1 clerk
1 foreraan, opener and packer
4 ox)eners and x:)ackers
4 porters
1 messenger
2 laborers
1 deputy naval oflicer
5 clerks
1 -messenger
1 deputy surve^'-or
1
1 clerk
1 aid to surveyor
2 clerks
1 messenger
,

GEORGETOWN, D. C.

$1, 708 00
6, 788 71
7, 578 47
5, 512 09
5, 366 66
9, 529 79

1
2
1
1
1

$1, 923 57
2, 400 00
1, 200 00

collector
'
deputy coUectors and inspectors .
insxiector
deputy inspector ..-.
laborer
'

2C0 00
600 00

ALEXANDRIA, VA.

52, 004 00
1, 200 00
5, 278 00
1, 095 00
1, 980 00
1, 400 00
600 00
15,180 44
24, 223 57
1, .500 00
2,190 00
300 00
2, 625 00
3, 624 00
40, 446 00
1, 004 37
1, 392 00
1,150 00
2, 493 00
1, .540 00
1,825 00
1, 000 00
1,800 00
1,110 00
2, 026 67
3, 937 50
2, 218 35
17, 722 00
• 690 85
435 00
522 00
3, 000 00
6, 000 00
1, 800 00
4, 223 56
6, 401 11
1,103 33
654 84
2, 277 00
3, 462 50
455 00
1, 593 00
2, 500 00
3, 800 00
912 50
2, .500 00
1, 250 00
764 00
2, 774 00
912 50

1 coUector, (comxiensation not reported.)
1 dex3uty collector
2 inspectors
1 laborer '.
TAPPAHANNOCK, VA.

250 00
350 00

1 collector
1 deputy coUector
RICHMOND, VA.

1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1

collector
deputy collector
deputy collector
clerk '.
clerk
clerk
inspectors .--inspector . .^.
inspector
janitor
janitor
watchman
watchman

,-.

-..

/

360 00
269,00
75 00
• 100 00

TOWN CREEK, MI>

1 surveyor

165 00

PETERSBURG, VA.

1
1
1
1

collector ..'
deputy collector and clerk
inspector at Cit}^ Point
x>orter, messenger, &c

•..

1 collector 1 inspector
i insx'>ector




1,200 00
1, 460 00
1, 095 00

499 51
1, 800 00
1, 432 00
374 00

NORFOLK AND PORTSMOUTH, A^A.

1
1
2
1
6

collector
deputy collector
:
clerks, at $1,500 each, per annum..
clerk
inspectors, at $1,460 each, per annum
1 messenger
1 watchman

1
1
1
6
3

3,400 00
1,800 00
3, 000 00
900 00
8, 760 00
600 00
912 50

,

collector
insxiector
inspector
temporary inspectors
revenue boatmen, at $360 each, per
annum
2 revenue boatmen, at $45 75 each,
per annum
2 temxiorary watchmen .:

985 42
1, 460 00
540 00
171 00
1, 080 00
91 50
36 00

WHEELING, W- VA.

1 surveyor
1 watchman

E..\STERN, MO.

47
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
00

687 16
720 00
1,460 00

1 collector
1 deputy coUector and insxJector
1 deputy coUector and inspector

ANNAPOLIS, M D ,

collector
surv^'or
surveyor
boatmen, at $80 per annum, each.

3,291
1, 498
150
984
356
120
1, 460
644
476
615
297
670
60

YORKTOWN, VA.

CHERRYSTONE, VA.

1
1
1
2

1, 500 00
2,160 00
600 00

744 41
600 00

PARKERSBURG, W . VA.

1 surveyor

3.50 00

264

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Statementof the number of persons emxiloyed for the collection of customs, fc.—Continued.
District, number of persons, and occu- Agg. com- District, number of persons, and occu.- Agg. compation.
pation.
pensation.
pensation.
SAVANNAH, GA.—Continued.

ALBEMARLE, N. C.

1
1
1
1
1
2

collector, (no salary nientioned.)
deputy collector aiid inspector
deputy collector and inspector . . . .
inspector of the coast .-•.
clerk
boat hands.
PAMLICO, N. C.

1
2
1
1
2

collector
deputy collectors and inspectors ..
inspector, temporary
deputy collector and inspector (...
revenue boatmen at-$300 each, per
annum
•
1 inspector
2 revenue boatmen

7 temporary insxiectors, at $1,095
$1,460 00
each, per annum
1,095 00 19 night watchmen, at $912 50 each.
365 00
7 boatmen at $720 each,per annum..
424 88
1 weigher and gauger
60 00
1 storekeeper
1 assistant storekeeper
1 porter
1 porter
$2, 052 94
2, 920 00
1, 460 00
730 00
600 00
360 00
600 00

7, 665 OO ^
17, 337 50
5, 040 00
1, 500 00
900 00
1, 095 OO

840 oa
360 00

BRUNSWICK, G A .

1 collector
2 dex)iity collectors and inspectors,
at $1,195 each
4 boatmen, at $420 each . . . :

2,390 oa
1, 680 00

ST. MARY'S, GA.
BEAUFORT, N. C.

1 collector.
1 inspector
1 boatman

1 collector
1, 265 05
675 00
300 00

1 deputy collector and insxiector . . .

, 872 55
1, 460 00

FERNANDINA, F L A .
WILMINGTON, N . C.

1
1
1
6
1
2

deputy collector and inspector
clerk-'
inspector, weigher, and g a u g e r —
inspectors at $1,460 each xier annum
messenger and storekeeper.
boatmen, at $360 each, per annum..

1
1
1
1
1
3
1

coUector
deputy collector and inspector . . .
inspector
temporary inspector .'
boatman and porter
boatmen, at $360 each, iier annum.
boatman

•1
694 62
2
1,095 00 ' 1
1, 200 00 4

insxiector and deputy
insxiectors
night inspector
boatmen, at $360 each, per annum.

2, 000 00
1,272 48
1,500 00
8, 760 00
1,111 00
720 00

1, 328 00
1,296 00
730 00
30 00
420 00
1,080 00
223 00

ST. J O H N ' S , F L A .
GEORGETOWN, S. C.

1 collector
1 inspector
2 boatmen, at $600 each, per annum.
CHARLESTON, S. C.

1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2

coUector
deputy coUector
auditor
:..
clerks
:
clerks
clerk
registry clerk
appraisers, at $1,500 each, per annum
'.
1 weigher and measurer
1 gauger
3 storekeepers
1 examiner of drugs
12 day inspectors
10 night inspectors
•.
4 wai^tchmen, at $730 each,per annum
2 x^orters
4 bargemen
1 porter
1 messenger

ST. AUGUSTINE, F L A .

6, 400 00
1,768 29
1, 3.58 59
3, 035 15
2, 719 75
375 00
1, 258 05

1 collector
'.
2 insxiectors, at $1,437 each, per annum

83 34
11, 052 00
5, 002 00
2, 920 00
1,407 90
2, 526 50
150 00
1, 000 00

8 deputy collectors and inspectors,
at $4 pev diem.
1 collector
2 deputy coUectors, at $1,460 each..

877 96
2,920 00

APALACHICOLA, FLA.

SAVANNAH, GA.




1, 739 93
1, 460 00
1, 460 00
939 00
717 00
1, 082 00

ST. MARK'S, F L A .

BEAUFORT, S. C.

deputy collector and clerk
auditor
cashier and bookkeeper
clerk
clerks at $1, 500 each, per annum .
clerk
appraisers, at $1,500 each, per annum
10 inspectors, at $1,460 each, per annum

893 87
2, 874 00

KEY WEST, F L A .

1 collector .,
.^
1 deputy coliecto:r
3, 000 00 1, inspector
1
.'
1, 439 55 1 clerk
7.59 70
1 temporary inspector
2, 399 00
1 inspector", (St. Mark's district)...

1 coUector.

1
1
1
1
5
1
2

1, 336 0 0
1, 095 00
93 CO
1, 440 00

2, 500 CO
2, 000 00
1, 800 00
1,600 00
7, 500 CO
.1, 000 00
3, 000 CO

14,600 CO

1
1
1
1
1

collector
inspector, weigher, and gauger.
clerk
boatman
temporary insxiector

1, 509 58
1,239 45
1, 095 00
1, 200 00
36 00

PENSACOLA, FLA.

1 collector
2 deputy collectors, at $1,095 each,
per annum
3 inspectors, at $1,095 eacli, per annum
r..
4 boatmen, at$360each, per a n n u m .

3, 000 00

2,190 oa
3, 285 00
1, 440 00

REGISTER.

265

Statement of the number of pt^'sons employed for the collection of customs, fc.—Continued.
Distiict, number of persons, and occu- Agg. compation.
pensation.

District, number of persons, and occu- Agg. compation.
xiensation.
N E W ORLEANS—Continued.

MOBILE, ALA.

1
1
1
1
1
7
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

collector
deputy coUector
auditor and impost c l e r k . . . . . . . . . .
cashier of customs and deiwsitory.
marine entrance and clearance
clerk
inspectors, at $1,460 each, per annum
inspectors
inspector, weigher, and measurer.
inspector and storekeeper
night inspector
night watchman
day watchman
night inspector
boatman

$6, 000 00 1 warehouse superintendent
2, 500 00 15 storekeepers, at $1,460 each, per an• 1, 800 00
num
3, 000 00 1 assistant storekeeper
1, 500 00

11, 220 00
5, 600 CO
1, 500 00
1, 460 00
900 00
1, 460 00
1, 080 00
4,50 00
600 00

P E A R L RIVER, MISS.

1 collector
1 deputy coUector

2
4
2
3
59
25
47
12
24
3
1
1
1
1

250 00
300 00

weighers, at $,2000 each, per annum
dexin.ty weighers
deputy weighers
gaugers
inspectors
temporary river inspectors
night inspectors
special inspectors and watchmen..
boatmen
samxilers
assistant boarding otficer
engineer
carpenter
naval officer and employes

2, 000 00

$20, 456 88
549 09
3, 366 67
5, 958 33
1,713 04
4, 500 00
86, 056 00
26, 529 00
50, 493 00
7, 593 72
16, 052 56
2, 400 78
1, 974 00
726 72
177 00
23, 320 00

TECHE, LA.

2 inspectors and boarding officers...

1, 232 00

VICKSBURG, MISS.
GALVESTON, T E X A S .

1 oollect<ir, (comiiens.ation not rexiorted.)
NATCHEZ, MISS.

1 collector
N E W ORLEANS, LA.

collector
deputy coUectors
auditor
cashier
as.sistaut cashier
•
assistant cashier
enti-y clerk
clerks
clerks, at $1,800 each, per annum.
clerks, at $1,700 each, per annum.
clerks, at $1,600 each, x^er aunum.
clerks, at $1,500 each, x^er annum.
clerks, at $1,400 each, per annum.
clerks, at $1,300 each, per annuni,
clerks, at $1,200 each, per annum.
clerk, at $1,100
'.
clerk, at $1,000
clerk, at $700
messengers
appraisers, at $3,000 each, per annum
assistant axix^raiser
examiners, at $1,800 each, per annum
.°
examiners, at $1,500 each, per annum
sx>ecial examiner of drugs
laborers, at $1,095 each
chief laborers, at $1,000 each
laborers, at $950 each, per annum.
.surveyor '.
deputy surveyor
clerks at $1,800 each, per annum.
clerk
clerks, at $1,200 each, per annum.
clerk, at $1,000
clerks
clerk
messengers
messenger
messenger
laborers, at $900 each, per annum .
chief laborer '.
laborers.,




1
1
1
1
• J
1
1
5
6, 000 00 8

collector
dexiuty collector.
dexiuty coUector aud clerk
deputy collector and inspector
deputy collector and inspector
surveyor
Aveigh'er, gauger, and measurer . . .
clerks, at $1,600 each, per annum..
inspectors, at $1,460 per annum,
6,122 28
each
3, 000 00 2 boatmen, at $600 per annum, each..
2, 416 67
4 boatmen, at $900 per annum, each..
1, COO 00
1 night AA'^atclimau
900 00
3 night inspectors, at $1,460 each
2, 200 00 1 messenger
9, 6.55 56 1 porter
27,901 65
1 laborer, at $4 per day
,16,451 19
1 laborer, at $3 per day
11, 085 70 2 temx)orary laborers, "at $3 per day..
24, 288 20
0,200 65
3,351 17
1, 696 67
549 99
836 11
623 64
6, 894 06
9, 000 00
2, 500 00
6, 837 28

3, 032 49
2, 000 00
1, 800 00
1, 800 00
1,500 00
1,000 00
1, 800 CO
8, 000 00

11, 6,30 00
1, 200 00
3, 600 00
1, 095 00
4, 380 CO
730 CO
730 00
1, 252 00
939 00
1, 704 50

SALURIA, TEXAS.

1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1

collector
surveyor
deputy collector
deputy collector
inspectors, at $1,460 each, per annum
insx')ectors, mounted, at 1,460 each,
per annum
clerk
^
storekeeper.'
storekeeper
boatman
xiorter and messenger

2, 250 00 1
1, 000 00 1
2,191 20
1
2, COO 00
7, 068 20
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS.
2, .500 00
1, 793 48
2, 700 00 1 collector
1, 292 12 1 deputy coUector
3, 332 62 1 clerk
500 00
1 inspector
511 01 . 1 inspector
366 00 ' 6 deputy collectors and inspectors,
2, 800 71
at $1,460 each, per annum
200 54
1 mounted iuspector of customs
1,467 00
1 mounted inspectoi- of customs
8,115 00
1 mounted inspector of customs
900 00
1 mounted inspector of customs
25, 216 22
1 mounted inspector of customs

2, 669
• 600
1, 500
1, 500

36
00
00
00

2, 920 00
2, 920 00
1,460 00
480 00
142 00
600 00
240 00

2, 480
1, 487
1, 500
1, 264
632

70
78
00
00
00

8, 760 00
1, 460 00
872 00
972 00
364 00
760 00

266

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Statement ofthe number of persons employed for the collection of customs, fc.—Continued.
District, numberof persons, and occu- Agg. comxiation.
pensation.

District, number of persons, and occuoccupation.

BRAZOS DE SANTIAGO, TEXAS.

1 collector
1 deputy coUector
1 dexiuty collector, cashier, and
bookkeeper
1 entry clerk
'.
"..
1 bond clerk
2 dexiuty collectors and inspectors,
at $2,000 each, per annum
1 deputy collector and inspector
1 storekeeper, weigher, gauger, and
measurer
'.
1 clerk^and insx')ector
11' inspectors, at $1,460 each, i)er annum
1 female insxiector
-•
....
1 messenger
1 detective
1 boatman
1 temporary inspector and detective
PASO DEL NORTE, TEXAS.

1 collector
3 deputy collectors, at $1,500 each...
3 deputy collectors, at $1,000 each,
, pev annuin
1 deputy collector.
1 clerk and insxiector
,
4 mounted insx:)ectors '..\

CUYAHOGA, OHIO—Continued.

$2, 500 C
O
2, 085 C
O

,.'.

4, 000 00
2, 400 00
1, .574 00
1, 600 00

16, 060 00
960 00
600 00
309 00
480 00
156 00-

2, 269 16
1, 200 00
• 600 00

^ '.

350 C
O

LOUISVILLE, KY.

1, 500 00
1, 460 00
1,100 00
912 50
720 00

CINCLNNATI, OHIO.
1
1
1
1
1
1
3

surA'eyor
deputy surA^eyor
assistant bookkeeper
measuiiug clerk
weigher, gauger, &c
additional clerk
storekeepers, at $850 each, per annum
T janitor

1
1
1
2
1
i
1
1
2
1

MIAMI, OHIO.

collector
deputy collector
deputy collector and insx^iector.
inspectors
iuspector
detectiA^e
:...,
messenger

GOO CO
000 CO
200 00
2.52 00
600 CO
1, 000 CO

3,
2,
1,
1,

2,550 CO
480 00

1 coUector
1 special deputy collector and clerk.
1 clerk
1 deputy collector and clerk
1 deputy collector and clerk
2 deputy collectors and inspectors ..
1 dexiuty collector and insxiector
1 deputy collector and inspector
1 deputy collector and inspector
1 dexiuty collector and insxiector . . . .
2 deputy collectors and insxiectors ..
1 dexiuty collector and iuspector
3 dexD.uty collectors and inspectors ..
1 dexiuty collector aud inspector
1 deputy collector and inspector
1 insx)ector
'
1 inspector
1 insxiector
2 insxiectors
-...
4 in.spectors, at $800 each, x)er aunum
1 iuspector
1 insx:)ector
3 insx)ectors, at $600 each, per annum
1 insxiector
• 1 inspector
1 inspector
1 insxiector .,
1 iuspector
1 i.usx)ector.
.
1 dexiuty collector and inspector
1 depiity collector and inspector
1 dexiuty collector
1 dexiuty collector
1 female in.spector
1 porter; messenger, and watchman.
4 inspectors, at $1,000 each, per annum.. 1

2, 546 35
1, 491 27
1, 300 00
3, 285 00
705 00 >
45 00
300 00

2,900 00
2,250 00
1, 500 00
1,500 00
1, 400 00
2, 600 00
1, 200 00
1, 000 00
915 76
912 50
1, 600 00
300 00
600 00
• 120 00
90 00
1,460 00
1, 003 75
949 00
1, 825 00
3, 200 00
803 00
700 CO
1, 800 00
5^K) 00
500 05
500 00
240 00
120 00
5 00
5 00
600 00
240 00
200 00
320 00
900 00
4, 000 00

HURON, MICH.

1 collector
CUYAHOGA, OHIO.
1 special depnty
collector
'.
2, 500 CO 1 cashier and bookkeex^er
special dexiuty
1, 400 00 1 bond and entry clerk
."
deputy coUector and inspector . . .
1, 460 00 1 marine clerk
deputy coUectors and inspectors .
2,180 00
1 general clerk
clerk
1, 200 CO 1 deputy collector, in charge Grand
deputy collector and clerk
812 50
Trunk KailAvay Crossing
dex)uty collector
480 00
4 inspectors at Grand Trunk Crossdeputy coUector.
300 00
night inspectoi's
1,825 CO
2 insxiectors at Grfuid Trunk Crossweigher and gauger.
917 50
ing*
"• Paid by Grand Trunk Eailway Comx)auy through custom-house.




2, 500 00
1, 000 00
912 50
600 00
300 00
600 00
600 00

DETROIT, MICH.

3, 000 00
300 00
1,000 00
5,110 00

PADUCAH, KY.

1 surveyor (compensation not rexiorted.)
chief clerk
'.. .
inspector and dexiuty surveyor
recording clerk
'.
inspector
xiorter and warehouseman

collector .'. .^
depnty collector
dexiuty colleotor and insx)ector .•.
deputy collector
deputy collecror
clerks, at $200 each, per annum .
clerk

4, 500 00

NASHVILLE, TENN.

1
1
1
1
1

$2,180 00
912 50
730 00

SANDUSKY, OHIO.

1
1
1
1
1
3
1

1
1
1
3
1
1
2, 000 CO' 1

1 surveyor

1 surA^^eyor.

2 lumber inspectors, at $1, 095 each.
1 night watchman
1 x^oster and janitor
,

2, 500 00
2, 000 CO
2, 000 GO

MEMPHIS, TENN.

1 surA'-eyor
1 clerk.. 1 messenger

Agg. compensation.

2,500 00
2, 000 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
1, 095 00
1, 095 00
1, 460 00
4, 380 00 ^

,2,190 00

REGISTER.

267

Statement of the number of persons emxiloyed for the collection of customs, fc.—Continued.
D i s t r i c t , n u m b e r of x^ei'sons, a n d occuxiation.

A g g . comxiensation.

D i s t r i c t , n u m b e r of p e r s o n s , a n d occu- A g g . compe'n'satiou.
xiation.

H U R O N , MICH.—Contiu.jied.

CHICAGO, I I I . — C o n t i n u e d .

1 i u s p e c t o r a t G r a n d T r u n k Crossing* - - - - - 1 i n s p e c t o r a t G r a n d T r u n k Cross.

ing

-•

1 deputy at Graud T r u n k Crossing..
1 night deputy at Grand T r u n k
Crossing..'
1 female insxiector a t G r a u d T r u n k
Crossing
4 insx)ectors, (sx:)ecial,) a t $912 50
each
1 w a t c h m a n a n d xiorter
1 d e p u t y collector a t St. Clair
1 dexiuty collector a t M a r i n e C i t y . .
1 d e p u t y coUector a t B a y C i t y
1 d e p u t y collector a t E a s t SagiuaAV
1 dexiuty collector a t A l g o n a c
1 d e p u t y collector a t Alx>ena
1 d e p u t y collector a t L e x i n g t o n
1 temporary inspector
1 i n s p e c t o r a t T o r o n t o , Ontario* . . .
1 inspector at Stratford, Ontario*. .
"

1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
2.
1
1
1

$821 25821 25
912 50
720 00
240 00
3, 650
730
800
800
1, 095
600
420
360
180
440
1,460
1, 460

00
00
00
CO
CO
00
00
00
00
77
00
C
O

2, 900
1,624
1, 20a
900
812
458
400
900
1, 140
100
488
781

00
00
CO
00
00
34
00
00
00
00
00
00

2 i n s p e c t o r s , a t $1,460 e a c h , x^er'ann u m ..'
2 i n s p e c t o r s , a t $1,185 50 each, p e r
aimum
>
7 insxiectors, a t $1,093 50 each, p e r
annum
.1 i u s p e c t o r
2 i n s p e c t o r s , a t $643
1 inspector.
—
1 inspector
1 inspector
1 watchman
1 AVatchman
,1 p o r t e r
1 laborer
1 sxiecial i n s p e c t o r
1 sx)ecial insxiector

2, 371 00
7, 654 .50
1, 003 00
1,286 00
565 50
460 00
183 00
912 50
885 00
530 00
600 00
. 248 00
935 40

GALENA, ILL.

729 05
500 00

1 surveyor
1 clerk."

SUPERIOR, MICH.

collector
aids to t h e revenue
d e p u t y colleotor
dexiuty collector
'.
dexiuty coUector
d e p u t y collector
d e p u t y collector
d e p u t y coUectors, a t $800 e a c h
d e p u t y coUectors, a t $570 e a c h
d e p u t y collector
dexiuty c o l l e c t o r . :
d e p u t y collector.

$2, 920 00

PEORIA, ILL.

'.

'.
.
.

2, 710 99

1 surveyor
QUINCY, ILL.

1 surveyor
ALTON, ILLINOIS.

1 .surveyor, ( c o m p e n s a t i o n n o t reported.)
CAIRO, ILL.

1 surveyor..
1 i n s p e c t o r •.

1,960 22
939 00

MICHIGAN, MICH.
M I L W A U K E E , AVIS.

1
1
1
2
2
4
5
1

2, 752 15
1, O O 00
C
700 00
1,200 GO
876 GO
1, 5G0 00
• 1, 380 00

1
2
3
2
1
1
1
1

collector
d e p u t y collectors, $1,.5C0 e a c h .
i n s p e c t o r s , a t $1,095 e a c h
d e p u t y collectors, a t $300 e a c h .
d e p u t y collector^
d e p u t y collector
d e p u t y collector
:
Avatcliman

936 20

1
1
1
1

820 22
469 43

collector
:
d e p u t y collector
d e p u t y collector
•
dei)uty coUectors, a t $600 e a c h
dexiuty collectors, a t $438 e a c h . . . .
d e p u t y collectors
d^x->nty collectors
.•
d e p u t y collector (no comxiensation.)

1
1
2
1

coUector
d e p u t y collector —
d e p u t y collector
sxiecial collector, clerk, a n d inspector
,inspector
insxiector
m o i m t e d i n s p e c t o r s , a t $10 95
temxiorary insxiectoi'

MINNESOTA, MINN.

NEWwVLl^JANY, IND. .

1 surveyor
EVANSVILLE, IND.
1 SurA'eyor
1 clerk."
CHICAGO, ILL.
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2

collector
d e p n t y collector a n d c l e r k
dex)ut"y collector a n d c l e r k
d e p u t y .collectors a n d c l e r k s , a t
$1,300 e a c h
dex;)uty collector a n d clerk.
d e p u t y collector a n d c l e r k ' .
surA^eyor of c u s t o m s
-..
auditor
cashier
clerk
1
clerk
c l e r k s , a t $1,200 each, p e r a n n u m . .

4, 772 57
2, 500 00
1, 483 15
2, 600
1,000
184
350
1, 500
1, 400
1,300
1, 250
2, -100

00
00
61
C
O
C
O
C
O
00
00
00

2, 500 00
1, 200 00
730 00
1, 215 50
730 00
545 00
2,190 00
27 00

DUBUQUE, IOAV A.

1 surveyor.
1 janitor —

1, 544 72
600 00

BURLINGTON, IOWA.

No report.
KEOKUK, iOWA.

1 surveyor.
1 inspector .

^••Paid b y G r a n d T r u n k R a i l w a y C o m p a n y t h r o u g h c u s t o m - h o u s e .




2, 900 00
3, 000 00
3, 285 00
600 00
. 200 00
150 00
, 600 00
912 50

3.50 00
750 00

268

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Statement of the number of persons employed for tlie coUection of customs, fc.—Continued.
District, number of persons, and occupation.

Agg. com- District, nvimbor of persons, and occu- Agg. com-^
pensation.
pation.
peiisation.
SAN FRANCISCO, C.\L.—Continued.

ST. LOUIS, MO.

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2

surveyor and acting collector .
speciiil deputy and clerk
cashier and clerk::
deputy cashier and clerk
admeasurement clerk
statistical clerk
copy clerk
xiorter
porter
inspectors
storekeexiers

$6,140 97
2
2, 650 00 1
1
'2,050 00
1, 900 CO 3
1, 650 00 1
1, 450 00 1
1
600 00
1
900 CO
7 5 00 2
.0
2, 392 00
789 CO 12

MONTANA AND IDAHO.

No report.
P U G E T SOUND, AVASH. T:

1
1
1
1
2
3
1
4

collect(.ir
deputy collector
deputy collector
record clerk and inspector
inspectors, at $1,368 75
,
inspectors, at $1,460
night AVatchman
boatmen, at $900 each, per annum

1
1
2
1
1
5

collector
.'
special deputy collector and clerk
dexiuty collectors, at $1,500 each ..
inspector
inspector
inspectors, at $1,000 each, X3er an^ num
Sundry special inspectors

3, 000 00
2, 500 00
1, 800 00
1, 600 00
2, 737 . 0
5
4, 380 00
900 CO
.3,600 CO

OREGON, OREG.

3, 000 00
1, 800 CO
3, 000 00
1, 200 CO
771 74
5, 000 00
787 41

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.

1 collector
4 deputy coUectors, at $3,000 each,
per 'annum
1 auditor
'
2 clerks, at $3,000 each, pev annum.
5 clerks, at $2,200 each, xier annum..
5 clerks, at $2,000 each, per aunum..
4 clerks, at $1,875 each, jier annum...
16 clerks, at $1,800 each, per aunum..
4 clerks, at $1,600 each, x:»er aunum..
5 messengers, at $1,080 each, per annum
3 w^atchmen, at $1,080 each, per annum
2 laborers, at $1,080 each, per aunum
2 appraisers, at $3,000 each, per aunum




6 400 00
,

12, 000
3, 625
6, 000
12, 000
10, 000
7, 500
18, 800
6 400
,

00
CO
00
00
00
00
00
CO

assistant appraisers, at $2,500 each,
examiner
examiner
clerks, at $1,800 each, per annum..
clerk
."
packer and sampler
superintendent of laborers
messenger
watchmen, at $1,080 each, per annum
laborers, at $1,080 each, per annum
5 temporary laborers, at $3 50 per
diem.
1 surveyor.
1 deputy surveyor
1 clerk...
1 messenger
3 district officers, at $1,800 e a c h . . , .
25 inspectors, at $1,560 each, per annum
13 inspectors, at $1,000 each, per annum
8 temporary inspectors
1 night inspector
1 night inspector
.'
14 night inspectors, at $1,200 each
2 temporary inspectors
4 Aveighersi at $2,000
1 gauger
6 laborers, at $1,100 each, per annum.
25 temporary laborers, at $4 per day .
2 boarding'officers, at $1,600 each '...
6 bargemen, ai $1,080 per annum,
each
,
1 naval officer
,
1 deputy naval officer
1 clerk'
:
1 clerk
2 clerks, at $1,875 per annum, each..
1 clerk
3 clerks, at $1,600 each, per aunum..
1 messenger
1 special agent, at $8 per day
1 as.'5istan.t"'8pecial agent.. .*

1
1
5, 40a 00 2
•3
3, 240 00 4
2,160 CO
1
2
6, 000 00 1

• $5, 000 00
2, 250 00
2, 000 00
5, 400 00
1, 700 00
1, 200 00
1, 200 00
1, 080 00
2,160 00
12, 960 00 .
5. 425 00
4,000 00
3,000 00
1. 800 00
1, 080 00
5, 400 00

39, 000 00.
13, 000 00
> 10, 738 CO
1, 560 00
1, 400 00.
16, 800 00
2, 400 CO
8,000 00
2, 000 00
6, 600 00
31,000 00
3, 200 CO
6 480 00
,
4, 500 00
3, 000 CO
2, 200 00
2,100 00
3, 750 00
1, 750 00
4, 800 CO
1,080 00
2, 920 00
2,190 00

ALASKA.

coUector
:
deputy at Sitka
deputies at Wrangel
dexiuties at Kodiac
deputies at Unalaska
deputy at Tongas
clerks at Sitka, at $1,200 each .
in specter at Sitka

3, 286 36
1,500 CO
1, 500 00
1, 500 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
2, 400 00
1, 460 00

REGISTEE.

269

Statement showing the amount of moneys expended for collecting the revenue from customs, at
each custom-house in the Uniied States, x>revious to June 30, 1870, not heretofore rexiorted,
per actof March 3, 1849.
D i s t r i c t or x)ort.
Aroostook, M e
Passamaquoddy, Me
Machias, Me
Frenchman's Bay, Me
Bangor, Me
C a s t i n e , M e . ..,
Belfast, M e
"Waldoboro, M e
Wiscasset, Me
Bath, Me
Portland and Eaimouth, Me
Saco, M e
Kennebunk, Me
York, Me
:
Portsmouth, N. H
Vermont, Yt •
Newbur3''port, M a s s
Gloucester, M a s s
S a l e m a n d .Beverly, M a s s
Marblehead, Mass
Boston and Charlestown, Mass .
Plymouth, Mass
Barnstable, Mass
.,
N e w Bedford, Ma.ss
FaU Biver, Mass
Edgartown, Mass
Nantucket, Mass
P r o v i d e n c e , K. I
B r i s t o l a n d W a r r e n , R. I
NewpoTt, E . I
S t o n i n g t o n , Conn . . . : . . . . . .
N e w L o n d o n , Coun
M i d d l e t o w n , Conn
N e w H a v e n , Conu
Fairfield, Conn
Sag Harbor, N. Y
N e w York, N. Y
Albany, N . Y
Champlain, N. Y
Oswegatchie, N . Y
Cape Vincent, N. Y
Oswego, N . Y
G e n e s e e , N . Y ..'
Niagara, N. Y
Bufialo Creek, N . Y
Dunkirk, N . Y
Newark, N. J
P e r t h A m b o y , N . J"
Little E g g Harbor, N. J
Great E g g Harbor, N. J
B u r l i n g t o n , N . J" .'.
Bridgeton, N. J
.Philadelphia, P a
Erie, Pa
Pittsburg, P a
Delaware, Del
Baltimore, M d
Annapolis, Md
T o w n Creek, M d
Eastern District, M d
Georgetown, D. C
Alexandria, Va
Taxipahannock, V a
Bichmond, Va
Yorktown, Va
Petersburg, Va
Norfolk a n d P o r t s m o u t h , V a . .
Cherrystone, Va
Wheeling, West Va
P a r k e r s b u r g , W e s t Va
Albemarle, N. C
Pamlico, N. C
Beaufort, N. C
Wilming-ton, N . C
G e o r g e t o w n , S. C
C h a r l o e t o n , S. C
B e a u f o r t , S. C
Savannah, Ga
Brunswick, Ga




P e r i o d rexiorted.
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
:..
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, to J u n e 30.1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m Jul'y 1,1869, to J u n e 30, 1870.
,
Fi.om J u l y 1,1869, to M a r c h 31, 1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J a n u a r y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J n l y 1,1869, to F e b r u a r y 21,1870
F r o m Axii-U 20, 1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m Axiril 1, 1809, to A u g u s t 1,1869
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u u e 30,1870..;
.Fr-om J u l y 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870 . . . . . . . . .
F r o m M a y 4,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
From. A p r i l 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, to J u n e 30,1870 . . . . „
F r o m J a n u a r v 1,1869, t o M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m A p n l 1,1869, t o J u u e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 3 0 , 1 8 7 0 . . ' . . .
F r o m A p r i l 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30, 1870
-....
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1669, to J u n e 30, 1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, to D e c e m b e r 31, 1869
F r o m Jul'y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to A p r i l 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u u e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870.
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30.1870
F r o m A p i i l 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m A p r i l 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m Jul'y 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1809, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
,
F r o m M a i c h 1,1869, to J u n e 30, 1869
F r o m A p r i l 1, 1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30, 1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, t o M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m M a y 1,1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to M a r c h 3 1 , 1 8 7 0 . . . :
N o rexiort.
F r o m A p i i l 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, to J u n e 30, 1870
F r o m J a u u a r y 1, 1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m A p r i l l", 1869, t o October 31, 1869
F r o m J a u u a r y 1, 1869, to D e c e m b e r 31, 1870.
F r o m J u l y l,'l869, to J u u e 30,1870
F r o m J a n u a r y 1,1869, to M a r c h 31, 1870
Fi'om J a n u a r y 1,1869, to D e c e m b e r 31,1869 .
F r o m J u l y 1, 'l869, t o J u n e 30, 1870
Fi-om J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m A p r i l 28,1869, t o J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J a n u a r y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30, 1870
F r o m J u l y 1, 1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30, 1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J a n u a r y 1,1869, t o M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869, to J u n e 30,1870
F r o m J a n u a r y 1, 1869, to M a r c h 31,1870
F r o m J u l y 1,1869 to D e c e m b e r 31,1869
F r o m J a u u a r y 1,1869, t o J u n e 30,1870

$11,369 47
21, 580 12
5,180 73
5,152 67
13, 849 86
8, 560 04
4, 696 77
9, .520 37
5,221 14
5, 772 74
111, 577 94
1,56 41
1,149 02
441 78
10, 460 96
96, 556 26
4, 757 96
11, 779 82
15, 036- 58
4, 827 24
462, 709 33
3, 026 00
8, 824 94
9, 340 11
5, 874 00
5, 796 .55
1,954 88
21,141 68
2, 740 89
6, 889 36
2, 718 33
5, 620 08
2, 851 62
19, 530 27
1,537 86
1,164 75
, 778, 853 33
3, 983 99
31, 763 49
29, 706^02
19, 685^20
58, 784 56
19, 782 38
33, 844 28
46, 780 19
2,263 94
2, 821 24
7, 094 89
1, 562 45
1,128 80
269 65
551 76
141, 634 71
10, 017 29
4, 006 27
6, 846 98
282, 304 11
677 34
3, 850
5,178
7, 484
504
8,195
2, 675
6,0.58
20, 886
4, 327
1,186
451
6, 895
8,182
2, 407
16, 831
4, 998
43,153
3, 209
28, 964
9, 702

25
26
58
32
50
62
15
82
39
13
68
83
49
81
24
17
77
15
39
70

270

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

Statement showing the amount of moneys expended for collecting the revenue, fc.—Continued.
District or port.
St. Mary's,,Ga
Fernandina, Fla
St. John's, Fla
St. Augustine, Fla
KeyAVe8t,.Fla
St. Mark's, F l a . :
Apx^alachicola, Fla
Pensacola, Fla
Mobile, Ala
Selma, Ala
Pearl BiA'^er, Miss
Vicksburg, Miss
Natchez, Miss
^
New Orleans, La
Tech6, .La
Texas, Tex
Saluiia, Tex
Corpus Christi, Tex
Brazos de Santiago, Tex . . .
Paso del Norte, Tex
Memphis, Tenn
Nashville, Tenn.
Paducah, Ky
Louisville, Ky
Cincinnati, 0\no
Cuyahoga, Ohio
Sandusky, Ohio
"...
Miami, Ohio
Detroit, Mich
Huron, Mich
Superior, Mich
Michigan, Mich
New Albany, Ind . -.
EvansAnlle, 'ind
Chicago, HI
Galena, .III .1
Peoria, IU
Quincy, HI
Alton; HI
Cairo, HI
Milwaukee, Wis
Minnesota, Minn
\....
Dubuque, loAva
BurUngton, Iowa
Keokuk, Iowa
St. Louis, Mo
1......
Montana and Idalio
Alaska, Alaska
,...
Wrangol Island, Alaska....
Puget's Sound, Wash. Ter .
Oregon, Oreg
San Frahciso, Cal
Total .




Period reported.
From Axiril 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From Jul'y 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From Jul'y 1,1869, to June 30,1870
Fi^om July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From AprU 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From April 1, 1869, to March 31,1870
No report.
No report.
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From April 1,1869, to Juue 30,1870
From January 1,1869, to June ,30,1870
From April l', 1869, to September 30, ,1869
From April 1,1869, to October 31,1869
iYom July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From July 1,186't, to March 31,1870
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From July 1,1869, to February 11,1870
From March4,1866, to June 30,1870
From Jiily 1,1869, to June 30,1870
Frora July 1,1865, to October 23,1865
From May 10,1869, to March 31,1870
From July 1, 1868, to June 30,1869
From Apiil 12,1869, to March 31,1870
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From Jul'y 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870..
...
From AiirU 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From January 1,1869, to AprU 1,1870
Fi-om July 1, 'l869, to June 30,1870
From October 1,1868, to September 30,1869 .
From AprU 1,1869, to June 30, 1870
From AprU 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
No report
From July 1, 1869, to March 31, 1870 .:
From May 11,1869, to June 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From July 1,1869, to December 31,1869
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
•
Froiu July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
No report.
From January 1,1809, to Jnne 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From May 8,1867, to March 31, 1870
From October 18,1867, to December 31,1869..
From May 1,1868j to December 31,1868
From January 1,1869, to May 31,1870
From January 1,1869, to June 30,1869
From Januaiy 1,1869, to February 20,1870...

996 86
887 22
,568 53
031 96
569 53
279 87
776 68
427 87
004 27
377 50
524 68
761 05
578 00
755 23
805 12
082 59
639 46
595 56
022 32
782 94
053 06
617 73
551 77
844 52
079 82
627 35
764 96
580 55
698 99
327' 73
470 00
707 49
711 74
066 70
497
815
149
556
345
11,
2, 608

54
73
72
22
57
95

2, 991 34
63, 082 73
5, 815 35
9,674 22
42 58
32, 244 73
• 8,506 91
445, 911 17
4, 895,288 06

EEGISTER.

271

Statement showing the amount of moneys exxiended for the revenue-cutter service at each customhouse in the United States previous to June 30,1810, not heretofore.reported, per actof
March 3, 1849.
Period reported.

District.
Passamaquoddy, Me
Castine, Me
-.
Belfast, Me..
Waldoboro, .Me'
Bath. Me
Portland and Falmouth, Me . . . .
Portsmouth, N. H
Boston and Charlestown, Mass.
Plynioxith, Mass
New Bedford, Mass
Edgartown, Mass
Providence, R. I
Newport, R. I
New Loudon, Conn
New Haven, Conn ...•...
Sag Harbor, N. Y
New York, N. Y
Oswegatchie, N. Y
Oswego, N. Y
....'.
Buffalo Creek, N. Y
Pliiladelxihia, P a . . . ,
Erie, Pa
Delaware, Del
Baltimore, Md . . . 1
Richmond, Va
Norfolk and Portsmouth, V a . . .
Pamlico, N. C
Beaufort, N. C
:
Wilmington, N. C
Georgetown, S. C
Chai-leston, S. C
Savannah, Ga
1.
Femandiua, Fla
Key West, Fla
Appalachicola, Fla
MobUe, Ala
New Orleans, La...'
Texas, Tex
Saluria, Tex
Brasios de Santiago, .Tex
Cuyahoga, Ohio
Detroit, Mich
Chicago, III
Milwaukee, Wis
Alaska, Alaska
Puget's Sound, Wash. T
Oregon, Oreg
San Francisco, Cal
Total




From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to December 31, 1869
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From Jul'y 1,1869, to March 31,' 1870
From July 1,1869, to Juue 30, 1870... i
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
,
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From AprU 1,1869, to February 28,1870
Froin July 1,1869, to June .30, i870
From July 1,1868, to March 31,1870
Fi-om July 1,1869, to June 30, 1870.
Frora July 1,1869, to June 30, 1 8 7 0 . . . . . . . . .
From Jul'y 1,1369, to June 30, 1870
From July 1,1869, to June 30. 1870
From Jul'y 1,1869, to March 31,1870
Fi-om July 1,1869, to June 30, 1870
From AprU 1, 1869, to June 30,1870
Fi-om July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
:....
From March 1,1869, to Deceniber 31, 1869..
From May 24,1869, to Juue 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From May 1,1869, to March 31,1870...:
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
No rexiort.
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870.. .•
No report.
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From March 1,1869, to December 31,1869:.
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From June 1,1869, to Deceniber 31,1869
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From Jul'y 1,1869, to June 30, 1870
From Axiril 1,1869, to June 30,1870
From July 1,1869, to December 31,1869
•
.
From July 1,1869, to December 31,1869
From July 1,1869, to January 11,1870
From July 1,1869, to December 31,1869
From Juiie 4,1869, to September 30,1869.'...
From July 1,1869, to March 31,1870
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870......
From July 1,1869, to September 30,1869 . . .
From July 1,1869, to June 30,1870.
From October 18,1867, to June 30,1870.....
ITrora October 1,1868, to May 31,1870
No report.
From Jauuary 1,1869, to February 20,1870.
:

$25, 021 70
23, 740 82
370 92
146 60
260 73
42, 078 02
4, 005 24
39, 197 06
671 44
22, 671 68
1, 540 35
662 05
24, 393 94
23, 530 99
296 71
1, 220 08
105, 081 54
10, 695 68
577 76
1, 664 22
30, 700 76
12, 835 71
27, 477 22
95, 095 93
1, 530 15
20, 370 03
587 57
745 55
231 25
847 76
830 51
493 23
248 43
806 02 '
630 74
536 70
459 71
823 22
420 30
644 40
637 ,56
583 95
197 35
096 82'
179, 848 70
1,034,507 10

statement of revenue collected from the beginning ofthe government to June 30,1870, from the following sources.
IN:?

Years.

Customs.

F r o m Mar. 4,1789, to Dec. 31,1791.
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
:
1797
1798
1799
1800,
1801
1802
:
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
:
1809.
1810.
1811.
1812.
1813..
1814..
1815..
1816.;
1817..
1818..
1819..
1820..
1821..
1822..
1823..
1824..
1825..
1826..
1827..
1828..
1829..
1830..
1831..




Ilnternal rcA^eDirect taxes. Postage.
nue.

$4, 399, 473 09
3, 443, 070 85 $208, 942 81
4, 255, 306 56
337, 705 70
4, 801, 065 28
274, 089 62
5, 588, 461 26
337, 755 36
6, 567, 987 94
475,289 60
7, 549, 649 65
575, 491 45)
• 7,106,061 93
644, 357 95
6, 610, 449 31 • 779,136 44
9, 080, 932 73
809, 396 55 $734, 223
10, 750, 778 93 1, 048, 033 43 534, 343
12, 438, 235 74
621, 898 89, 206, 565
10, 479, 417 61
215,179 69|
71,879
50, 941 29
11, 098, 565 33|
50,198
12, 936, 487 04
21,747 15
21, 882
14, 667, 698 17
20,101 45
55, 763
15, 845, 521 61
13,051 40,
34, 732
16, 363, 550 58
8, 210 73|
19,159
4,044 39
7, 296, 0-20 58
7, .517
7, 430 63
8, 583, 309 31
12, 448
2, 295 95
7, 666
13, 313, 222 73
4, 903 06
8, 958, 777 53
•859
4, 755 04|
13, 224, 623 25
3,805
5, 998, 772 08 1, 662, 984
2, 219, 497
7, 282, 942 22 •4, 678, 059 07 2,162, 673
36, 306, 874 88 5,124, 708 31 4, 253, 635
26, 283, 348 49 2, 678,100 77 1, 834,187
17,176, 385 O J . 955, 270 20 264, 333
83, 650
229, 593 631
20, 283, 608 76
106, 260 53
15, 005, 612 15
31, 586
69, 027 63
13, 004, 447 15
29, 349
67, 665 71
17, 589, 761 94
20, 961
34, 242 17
19, 088, 433 44
10, 337
34, 663 37
17, 878, 325 71
6, 201
25, 771 35
20,098,713 45
2,330
21,589 93
23, 341, 331 77
6,638
19, 885 68
19,712,283 "'
2,626
17, 451 54
2,218
23, 205, 523 64|
14,502 74
22, 681, 965 91
11, 335
12,160 62
21, 922, 391 39j
16, 980
6. 933 51
10, 506
24, 224, 441 771

020
478
400
909
500
500
000
OOJ
500
000
427
500
342
117
614

51
49
00
84
00
00
00
00
CO
00
26
00
50
6
'
73|

37 70
039 70
000 00
000 00
000 10
787 74
371 91
070 CO
71 32
465 95
516 91
602 04
110 69
469
300
101
20
86
55
561

56|
14
00
15
60
13
02

Public lands.

$4, 836
83, 540
11, 963
443
167, 726
188, 628
1 . , 675
65
487, 526
540, 193
765, 245
466,163
647,939
442, 252
696, 548
1, 040, 237
710, 427
835, 655
1,135, 971
1, 287, 959
1,717,985
1, 991, 226
2, 606, 564
3, 274, 422
1, 635, 871
1,212,966
1, 803, .581
916, 523
984, 418
1, 216, 090
1, 393, 785
1, 495, 845
1, 018, 308
1, 517, 175
2, 329, 356
3, 210, 815

DiAddends
a n d sales
of b a n k
stock a n d
bonus.

Miscellaneous.

N e t revenue.

Loans and treas
Total receipts.
urj'^ notes, &c.

$19, 440 10 $4, 418, 913 19
9, 918 65 3, 669,960 31
$8, 028 00
10, 390 37 4, 652,923 14
38, 500 00
23, 799 48 5, 431,904- 87
303, 472 CO
5, 917 97 6,114, 534 59
160, 000 00
16,506 14 8, 377,529 65
1, 240, 000 CO
30, 379 29 8, 688,780 99,
385, 220 00
18, 692 81 7, 900,495 8Cl
79, 920 CO
4.5,187 56 7,546, 813 31
71,040 CO
74, 712 10 10, 848,749 10
71, 040 00
88, 800 C; . 266, 149 15 12, 935,330 95
177, 905 86 14, 995,793 95
1, 327, 560 col
115, 518 18 11, 064,097 63
112, 575 53 11, 826,307 38
19,039 80 13, 560,693 20
10,004 19 15, 559,931 07
34, 935
16, 398,019 26
21, 802 35 17, 060,661 93
23, 638 51 7, 773,473 12
214 28
84, 476 84 9, 384,
. 60, 068 52 14,423, 529 09
41, 125 47 9, 801,132 76
236, 571 00 14,340, 409 95
119,399 81 11,181, 625 16
150,282 74 15, 696,916 82
123, 994 61 47, 676, 985 66
80, 389 17 33, 099,049 74
202, 426 301
37, ,547 71 21, 585, 171 04
520, 000 CO
57, 027 10 24, 603,374 37
675,000 00
54, 872 49 17, 840, 669 55|
1, 000, 000 00
152, 072 ,52 14, 573,379 72
105, 000 00
452, 355 15 20, 232,427 94
297, 500 00
141,019 15 20, 540,666 26
350, 000 (0
,
350, 000 00
127, 603 60 19, 381,212 79
858 02|
367, 500 00
129, 982 25 21,840,
434 21
402, 500 00
94, 288 52 25, 260,
420, 000 00 1,315,621 83 22,966, 363 96
629'23
455, ( 00 00
65,106 34 24, 763,
490, 000 00 . 112.561 95 24, 827,627 38
116 51
490, 000 00|
73,172 64 24, 844,
820 82
490, 000
583, 563 03 28, 526,

$10, 210,025 75
8, 740,766 77
5, 720,624 23
10, 041,101 65
802 79
9, 419,
8, 740,329 65
8, 758,916 40
8, 209,070 07
12, 6-21,459 84
12, 451,184 14
12, 945,455 95
391 31
1.5, 001,
11, 064,097 63
11, 835,840 02
9 532 64
,
128, 814 94
13, 689,508 14
48, 897 71
15, 608,828 73
16, 398,019 26
17, 062,,544 09
1, 882 16
7, 773,473 12
12,144, 2;J6 53
^^2, 759,992 25
14, 431,838 14
8, 309 05
900 00
22, 639,032 76
12, 837,-'
40, 524,844 95
26,184, 435 00
34, 5.59,536 95
23, 377,911 79
50, 961,237 60
35, 264,320 78
57,171, 421 82
9, 494,436 16
33, 833,592 33
734, 542 59
21, 593,936 66
8, 765 62
24, 605,665 37
2, 291 CO
493 68
2 J, 881,
3, 040,824 13
19, 573,703 72
5, 000,324 00
20, 232,427 94
20, 540,666 26
24 381, 212 79
5, 000, 000 00
5, 000, 000 ^00 26, 840,858 02
25, 260,434 21
22, 966,363 96
24, 76.% 629 23
24, 827,627 38
24, 844, 116 51
28, 526,820 82
$5, 791,112 56
5, 070,806 46
1, 067,701 14
4, 609,196 78
3,305, 268 20
362, 800 00
70, 135 41
308, 574 27
5, 074,646 53
1, 602,435 04
10, 125 00
5, 597 36

O
O

5?5

O
C/2

1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
^1837
^1838

^

-

1839
1840
1841...
1842
1843 (to J u u e 30)
1843-'44
1844-'45
1845-'46
1846-'47
1847-'48
1848-'49
1849-',50
•.. -.
185C-'51
1851-'52
1852-'53
1853-'54
1854-'55
1855-'56
1856-'57
1857-'58
1858-'59
1859-'60
1860-'61
1861-'62
1862-'63
lS63-'64
1804-'65
1865-'66
1866-'67
1867-.'68
1868-'69
1869-'70




465,
032,
214,
391,
409,
169,
158,
137,
499,
487,
187,
046,
183,
528,
712,
747,
757,
346,
668,
017,
339,
931,
224,
025,
022,
875,
789,
550,
187,
582,
056,
059,
316,
928,
046,
417,
464,
048,
538,

630
759
196
4,59
370
493
467
553
682
261
495
103
777
517
897
375
375

65
00
09
48
CO
84
27
32
25
36
00
25
34
12
26
00
00

6, 791
394
19
4, 263
728
1,687

13
12
33
79
70

755 22

1, 795,331
1, 485,103
109, 741,134 10
475, 648
209, 464, 215 25 1, 200,573
309, 226, 813 42 1, 974,754
266, 027, 537 43 4, 200,233
] 91, 087, 589 41 1, 788,145
158, 356, 460 86
765, 685
184, 899, 756 49
229, 102

73
01
96
03
12
70
85
61
88

100 00
893 00

10 91

2, 623 381 03 659, 000 00
99,,276 16
865, 561 16
3, 967 682 55 610,285 00
334,,796 67
948. 426 25
4,857 600 69 586, 649 50 • 128, 412 32
791, 935 .55
14, 7.57 600 75 569, 280 82
696, 279 13
430, 087 10
24, 877 179 86 328, 674 6' 2, 209,
,891 32
826, 796 08
6, 776 236 52 1, 375, 965 44 5, 562, 190 80
,
890, 864 69
3, 081,939 47 4, 512,102 22 2, 517,252 42
302, 561 74
7,076 447 35
023, 966 68
1, 26.5,068 91
3, 292 235 58 1, 774, 513 80
442, 646 08
874, 662 28
1,365 627 42 672, 769 38
860,160 27
331,,285 37
1, 335,797 52 56, 912 53
965, 009 25
383, 895 44
231,001 26
286, 235 99
897 818 11
320, 707 78
2,059 939 80
1, 075, 419 70
941, 8.53 90
2,077 022 30
328, 201 78
699, 967 74
2, 694 452 48
289, 950 13
437, 403 16
4, 340 39
186, 467 91
2, 498,355 20
698, 699 21
34, 834 70
577, 775 99
3,328 642 56
721, 077 50
676, 424 13
8, 955 00
1,688 959 55
592, 888 88
1,859, 894 25
2, 064, 308 21
555, 039 33
924, 922 60
2,352 305 30 260, 243 51
846, 815 60
463, 228 06
2,043 239 58
1, 021 34
483, 730 31
1,667 084 90
853, 313 02
31,466 78
800,341 40
8, 470 798 39
1,105, 352 74
350, 574 68
11,497 049 07
827, 731 40
056, 699 24
8,917 644 93
1,116, 190 81
965, 312 57
3, 829 486 64
1, 259, 920 88
655, 365 96
3,513 715 87
1, 3,52,029 13
761, 699 58
1,756 687 30
1, 454,596 24
1, 088, ,530 25 56, 054, 599 83
1,778 557 71
05
476, 299 39
1, 023, 515 21
870 658 54
907, 944 62
904, Oil 50
1.52, 203 77
167, 617 17
3, 735,794 37 74, 448,157 55
49, 621, 084 98 262, 742, 354 32
588 333 29
26, 503, 183 73 323, 092, 785 92
996 553 31
128, 733, 397 76 619 646, 647 91
665 031 03
1,163 ,575 76
42, 824, 852 50 490 634,010 27
1, 348 715 41
46, 949, 033 09 405, 638, 083 32
4, 020, 344 34
t27, 754, 900 50 370 945,817.94
3, 350,481 76
28, 237, 762 06 411, 255, 477 63

2, 992, 989 15
12, 716, 820 86
3, 857, 276 21
5, 589, 547 51
13, 659, 317 38
14, 808, 735 64
12, 551, 409 19
1, 877, 847 95
28,
21,
29,
4,

900, 765
293, 780
075, 815
056, 500
207, 664
46, 300
16, 372
1, 950
800
200
3, 900
23, 717, 300
28, 996, 857
20, 786, 808
41, 895, 340
529, 760, 860
814, 925, 494
130, 709, 452
482, 840, 464
651, 065, 430
640, 420, 910
62.5, 111,433
238, 678, 081
285, 474, 496

36
CO
00
92
00
50
00
00
00
00
00
72
00
74
50
96
85
90
91
29
20
06
CO

31, 865, 561 16
33, 948, 426 25
21, 791, 935 55
35, 430, 087 10
50, 826, 796 08
27, 883, 853 84
39, 019, 382 60
242 89
•••33, 881,
25, 032, 193 59
30, 519, 477 65
34, 773, 744 89
20, 782, 410 45
31,198, 555 73
29, 941, 853 90
29, 699, 967 74
55, 338, 168 .52
56, 992, 479 21
59, 796, 892 98
47, 649, 388 88
52, 762, 704 25
49, 893, 115 60
61, .500,102 81
73, 802, 291 40
65, 351, 374 68
74, 056, 899 24
68, 969, 21^, 57
70, 372, 665 96
81, 758, 557 30
76, 841, 407 83
83, 371, 640 13
581, 668, 805 12
889, 373, 652 51
393, 451, 807 17
805, 933, 250 82
270,712, 078 82
131, 060, 920 56
030, 749, 516 52
609, 623, 899 00
696, 729, 973 63

•

Q
GO

H

* $1,458,782 93 deducted from the aggregate receipts as x^er account ofthe Treasurer No. 76,922.
t $2,070 73 added, being net amount paid by dexiositories previously deducted as unavaUable.

to

274

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Statement of expenditures from the beginning of the government
[The year 1807, and subsecxuent, are from the account of Avarrants on the Treasurer

Years.
F r o m Mar. 4,1789,
to Dec. 31,1791..
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799..I
1800
1801
1802
1803..
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815.-.•1816
1817
1818
181.9
1820
1821
1822.1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831:
1832
1833
1834
1835
:.
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843 (to June 30)
1843-'44
1844-'45
184.5-'46
1846-'47
1847-'4S
1848-'49
1849-= 50
1850-'51
1851-'52
1852-'53
1853-'54
]854-'55
1855-56
lS56-'.57
1857-'58
1858-'59
•
18.59-'60
1860-'61
1861-'62
1862-'63
1863-'64
,
ia64-'65
1865-'66
1866-'67
,
1867-'68
1868-'69
l869-'70
,

Civil list.

$7,57, 134 45
380, 917 .58
,241 08
358,
440, 946 58
,633 36
361,
,139 05
447,
,233 70
483,
,605 17
504,
592; 905 76
,688 45
748,
,288 31
549,
,981 11
596,
526, 583 12
• 624,795 63
,849 79
585,
,230 53
684,
524
^ 655, 65
691,a 6 7 80
712, 465 13
703, 994 03
,467 27
644,
,271 55
826,
,
780, .545 45
927, 424 23
,247 16
852,
,125 77
1, 208,
994, 556 17
1,109, 559 79
1,142, 180 41
310 05
1, 248,
292 64
1,112, 131 58
1,158, 911 65
1,058,266 24
1, 336,
747 24
1, 330,
745 48
1, 256,
141 04
1, 228,490 .58
1, 455,
C(i9 36
1, 327,
724 64
1, 579,
755 99
1, 373,7.57 74
1, 800,
758 28
1, 562,601 60
2, 080, 551 51
1, 90.5,175 47
2,110, 035 94
2, 357,708 .56
2, 688,982 77
2,116, 769 31
2, 736, 471 79
2, 556,041 65
2, 905,422 48
1, 222,958 15
2, 454,652 79
2, 369, 232 92
2, 532,
2, 570,338 44
2, 647, 802 87
2, 865, 196 91
3, 027,454 39
3, 481,219 51
3, 439,923 22
4, 265, 861 68
4, 621,492 24
6,350, 875 88
6, 452,256 35
547 27
7, 611,
7,116,339 04
5, 913,281 50
6, 077,008 95
6, 074,041 83
5, 886, 615 07
6, 204,605 97
7, 999,683 50
10, 584, 604 17
11, 984, 773 97
15, 585, 489 55
11, 950, 156 .58
12, 443, 712 07
19, 031,283 56




Foreign intercourse.

$14, 733 33
78, 766 67
89, 500 00
140,403 51
912, 685 12
184, 859 64
669, 788 54
457, 428 74
271, 374 11
395, 288 18
295, 676 73
550,925 93
1,110, 834 77
1,186, 655 57
2, 798, 028 77
1, 760, 421 30
577,826 34
• 304, 992 83
166,306 04
81,367 48
264, 904 47
347, 703 29
209, 941 01
177,179 97
290, 892 04
364, 620 40
281,995 97
420, 429 90
284,113 94
253, 370 04
207,110 75
164,879 51
292,118 56
5,140, 099 83
371 666 25
232, 719 08
6.59,211 87
1,001,193 60
207, 765 85
294, 067 27
298, 554 00
325,181 07
955, 395 88
241, 562 35
774, 750 28
533, 382 65
4, 603, 905 40
1, 215, 095 52
987, 667 92
683, 278 15
428, 410 57
563,191 41
400, 566 04
636,079 66
702, 637 22
409, 292 .55
405,079 10
448, 593 01
6, 908, 996 72
5, 990, 858 81
6, 250, 427 16
4,196,321 59
950, 871 30
7, 763, 812 31
997, 007 26
3, 642, 615 39
999,177 65
1, 396, 508 72
981, 946 87
1,146,143 79
1,147,786 91
1, 339, 226 66
1, 241, .325 03
1, 239, 893. 66
1,251,120 10
1, 315, 749 04
1, 548. 589 26
1, 441, 344 05
8, 365, 416 77
1, 490, 776 25

MisceUaneous.

$311, 533 83
194, 572 32
24, 709 46
118, 248 30
92, 718 .50
150, 476 14
103, •880 82
004 15
' 149,
175, 111 81
193, 636 59
269, 803 41
315, 022 36
205, 217 87
379, 558 23
384,,720 19
•445, 485 18
464, 546 52
427, 124 98
337, 032 62
315, 783 47
457, 919 66
509, 113 37
738, 949 15
1,103, 425 50
,731 27
1, 755,
,995 00
1, 416,
2, 242,384 62
305, 849 82
1, 640,917 06
1,090, 341 85
903, 718 15
644, 985 15
671, 063 78
678, 942 74
1, 046,131 40
1,110, 713 23
826, 123 67
1, 219.368 40
1, 566,679 66
1, 363,624 13
1, 392,336 11
2, 4.51,202 64
3,198, 091 77
2, 082, 565 00
396 74
1, 549,
721 60
2, 749,
428 93
2, 932,
860 68
3, 2.56,
340 20
2, 621,
351 50
2, 575,
999 09
3, 505,
391 55
3, 307,
724 48
1, 579,
146 05
2, 554, 470 97
2, 839, 758 42
3, 769,190 81
3, 910,455 37
2, 554, 140 61
3, 111,450 16
7, 025,577 33
8,146, 926 64
9, 867,335 03
12, 240,
13, 461, 450 13
16, 738, 442 29
15, 260, 475 94,
18, 946, 189 91
17, 847, 851 19
16, 873, 771 68
20, 708, 233 43
16, 026, 524 79
14,160, 020 80
1 5 662,451 37
.,
IS. 332. 639 71
27, 798, 654 98
27, 312, 591 16
33, 975, 948 46
39, 618,367 04
35, 664, 932 69
32, 715, 401 75

Military service.

$632, 804
1,100, 702
1,130, 249
2, 639, 097
2, 480, 910
1, 260,263
1, 039, 402
2, 009, 522
2, 466,946
2, 560,878
1, 672,944
1,179, 148
822) 055
875, 423
712. 781
1, 224,355
1,288, 685

03
09
08
59
13
84
66
30
98
77
08
25
85
93
28
38
91

2, 900, 834 40
3, 345,772 17
2, 294,323 94
2, 032,828 19
11, 817, 798 24
19, 652, 013 02
20, 350, 806 86
14, 794, 294 22
16, 012, 096 80
8, 004,236 53
5. 622,715 10
6, 508,300 37
- 2,630, 392 31
4, 461,291 78
3, 111,981 48
3, 096,924 43
3, 340.939 85
3, 6.59;914 18
3, 943,194 37
977 88
3, 938,
544 56
4,14.5,
291 07
4, 724,
128 88
4, 767,
4, 841,835 55
5, 446, 034 88
6, 704,019 10
5, 696,189 38
5, 759, 1,56 89
12,169, 226 64
13, 682, 730 80
12, 897, 224 16
8, 916,995 80
7, 095, 267 23
8, 801,610 24
6, 610,438 02
2, 908, 671 95
5, 218,183 66
5, 746,291 28
10, 413, 370 58
35, 840,030 33
27, 687, 334 21
473 26
14, 558,
024 58
9, 687,
965 11
12.161,
506 19
8, 521,
498 49
9, 910,
282 87
.
11,722,
074 07
14, 648,
160 .51
16, 963,
150 87
19,159,
121 63
25, 679,
720 53
23,1.54,
202 72
16,'472,
530 67
23, 001, 562 29
389,173, 411 82
603,314, 048 66
690, 391, 400 06
1, 030, 690.
676 06
283,154; 415 63
95, 224, 648 62
123, 246, 990 61
78, 501, 675 40
57, 655,

Pensions.

813
$175, 88
109, 243 15
80, 087 81
81, 399 24
68, 673 22
100, 843 71
92, 256 97
104, 845 33
95, 444 03
64, 130 73
73, 533 37
85, 440 39
62, 902 10
80, 092 80
81, 854 59
81, 875. 53
70, 500 00
82, 576 04
87, 833 54
83, 744 16
75, 043 88
91, 402 10
86, 989 91
164 36
90,
656 06
69,
804 15
188,
374 43
297,
719 90
890,
939 85
2, 415,
3, 208,376 31
242, 817 25
1, 948,199 40
1, 780,588 52
1, 499,326 59
1, 303,8ia 57
1, 550,593 83
976, 138 86
850, 573 57
949, 594 47
1, 363,297 31
1,170, 665 M
1,184, 422 40
4, 589,152 40
3,c364, 285 30
1, 954,711 32
2, 882,797 96
2, 672,162 45
2,1.56, 057 29
3.142, 750 51
2, 603,562 17
2, 388,434 51
1, 378,931 33
839, 041 12
2, 032,008 99
2, 400,788 11
1, 811,097 56
1, 744,883 63
1, 228,496 48
1, 328,867 64
886 02
1, 866,
2, 293, 377 22
2, 401, 858 78
1, 756,306 20
1, 232,665 00
1, 477,612 33
1,296,
,229 65
1, 309,115 81
1, 219,768 30
1, 222,222 71
1,100, 802 32
1, 034,599 73
852, 170 47
1, 078,513 36
4, 985,473 90
16, 347, 621 34
15, 605, 549 88
20. 936, 551 71
2;i, 7S2,386 78
28, 476,621 78
28, 340,202 17
•

275

EEGISTEE.
to June 30^ 1870, under the foUowing approx^riate i
issued ; all previous years are frora the account of Avarrants paid.]
Liclians.

N a v a l establishment.

N e t ordinary exXiendi tures.

Public debt, including princixial &, interest.

Total.

Balances in the
treas'y at the
end of each y'r.

$27, 000 00
$570 00
$1, 919, 589 .52
$5, 287^ 949 50
$7, 207, 539 02
$973, 905 75
13, 648 85
53 02
1, 877, 903 68
7, 263, 665 99
9,141, 569 67
783, 444 51
1, 710, 070 26 • 5, 819, 505 29
27, 282 83
7 529 575 55
7.53, 661 69
13,042 46
61,'408 97"
5^ 801 i .578 09
3, .500, .546 65
9, 302,124 74
1,151, 924 17
23, 475 68
410, 562 03
4, 350, 6.58 04
6, 064, 411 61
10, 435, 069 65
516, 442 61
113, 563 98
274, 784 04
2, .531, 930 40
5, 835, 846 44
8, 367, 776 84
888, 995 42
62, 396 38
382, 631 89
2, 833, 590 96
5, 792, 421 82
8, 626, 012 78
1, 021, 899 04
16, 470 09
1, 381, 347 76
4, 623, 223 54
3, 990, 294 14
8, 613, 517 68
617, 451 43
20, 302 19
2, 858, 081 84
6, 480,166 72
4, 596, 876 78
11, 077, 043 50
2,161, 867 77
31 22
3, 448, 716 03
7, 411, 369 97
4, 578, 369 95
11, 989, 739 92
2, 623, 311 99
9, 000 00 ^ 2, 111, 424 00
4, 981, 669 90
7, 291, 707 04
12, 273, 376 94
3, 295, 391 CO
94, 000 00
915, .561 87
3, 737, 079 91
9, 539, 004 76
13, 276, 084 67
.5, 020. 697 64
60, 000 00
1,215,230 53
4, 002, 824 24
7, 256,159 43
11, 258, 983 67 • 4,825,811 60
116, 500 00
1,189, 832 75
4, 452, 858 91
8,171, 787 45
12, 624, 646 36
4, 037, 005 26
196, 500 00
1, 597, .500 00
6, 357, 234 62
7, 369, 889 79
13, 727,124 41
3. 999, 388 99
234,200 00
1, 649, 641 44
6, 080, 209 36
8, 989, 884 61
15, 070, 093 97
4, .538,123 80
205, 425 00
1, 722, 064 47
4, 984, 572 89
6, 307, 720 10
11, 292, 292 99
9, 643, 850 07
213,575 00
1, 884, 067 80
6, 504, 338 85 10, 260, 245 35
16, 764, .584 20
9, 941, 809 96
337, 503 84
2, 427, 758 80
7, 414, 672 14
6, 452, 554 16
13, 867, 226 30
3, 848, 056 78
177, 625 CO
1, 654, 244 20
5, 311, 082 28
8, 008, 904 46
13, 319, 986 74
2, 672, 276 57
151, 875 00
1, 965, 566 39
5, .592, 604 86
8, 009, 204 05
13, 601, 808 91
3, 502, 305 80
277, 845 00
3, 959, 365 15
17, 829, 498 70
4, 449, 622 45
22, 279,121 15
3, 862, 217 41
167, 358 28
6, 446, 600 10
28, 082, 396 92
11,108,123 44
39,190, .520 36
5,196, 542 00
167, 394 86
7,311,290 60
30,127, 686 38
7, 900, 543 94
38, 028, 230 32
1, 727, 848 63
530, 7.50 00
8, 660, OCO 25
26, 953, 571 00
12, 628, 922 35
39, 582, 493 35
13,106, 592 88
274, 512 16
3, 908, 278 30
23, 373, 432 58
24, 871, 062 93
48, 244, 495 51
22. 033, 519 19
319, 463 71
3, 314, 598 49
15, 454, 609 92
25, 423, 036 12
40, 877, 646 04
14, 989, 465 48
505, 704 27
2, 9.53, 695 00
13. 808, 673 78
21,296,201 62
35,104, 875 40
1, 478, 526 74
463,181 39
3, 847, 640 42
16, 300, 273 44
7, 703, 926 29
24,004,199 73
2, 079, 992 38
315, 750 01
4, 387, 990 00
13, 134, 530 57
8, 628, 494 28
21, 763, 024 85
1,198, 461 21
477, 005 44
3, 319, 243 06
10, 723, 479 07
8, 367, 093 62
19, 090, 572 69
1,681,.592 24
575.007 41
2, 224, 458 98
9, 827, 643 51 • 7. 848, 949 12
17, 676, 592 63
4, 237, 427 55
380, 781 82
2, 503, 765 83
9, 784,154 59
5, 5.30, 016 41
15, 314, 171 00
9, 463, 922 81
429, 987 90
2, 904, 581 56
15, 330,144 71
16, 568, 393 76
31, 898, 538 47
1,946, .597 13
724,106 44
3, 049, 083 86
11, 490, 459 94
12, 095, 344 78
23, 585, 804 72
5, 201, 650 43
743,447 83
13, 062, 316 27
11, 041, 082 19
4, 218, 902 45
24,103, 398 46
6, 358, 686 18
760, 624 88
4, 263, 877 45
12, 6.53, 095 65
10, 003, 668 39
22, 6.50, 764 04
6, 668, 286 10
705, 034 24
3, 918, 786 44
13, 296, 041 45
12,163, 438 07
25, 459, 479 .52
5, 972, 435 81
576, 344 74
3, 308, 745 47
12. 660, 490 62
12, 383, 867 "^8
25, 044, 358 40
5, 755, 704 79
622, 262 47
13, 229, 533 33
11, 355, 748 22
3, 239, 428 63
24, 585, 281 55
6, 014, .539 75
9.30, 738 04
3, 856,183 07
13, 864, 067 90
16,174, 378 22
4, .502, 914 45
30,038,446 12
1, 352, 419 75
3, 956, 370 29
16, 516, 388 '7
17, 840, 309 29
34, 356, 698 06
2, Oil, 777 55
1, 802, 980 93
3, 901, 356 75
22, 713, 755 11
1, 543, 543 38
24, 257, 298 49
11, 702, 905 31
1, 003, 953 20
3, 956, 260 42
18, 425, 417 25
6,176, ,505 19
24, 601, 982 44
8, 892, 858 42
1, 706, 444 48
3, 864, 939 06
17, 514, 950 28
58,191 28
17, 573,141 56
26, 749, 803 96
30, 868,164 04
4, 615,141 49
5, 807, 718 23
30 868 164 04
46, 708, 436 00
4, 348| 036 19
2i,822 91
37, 243, 214 24
37^ 265', 037 15
37, 327, 2.52 69
6, 646, 914 53
5, 504,191 34
6,131, 580 53
33, 849, 718 08
5, 605, 720 27
39, 455, 438 35
36, 891, 196 94
26, 496, 948 "3
11,117, 987 42 . ' 37, 614, 936 15 33,157,503 68
2, 528, 917 28
6,182, 294 25
2, 331, 794 86
6,113, 896 89
24,139,920 11
4.086,613 70
28, 226, 533 81
29, 963,163 46
2, 514, 837 12
6, 001, 076 97
26,196, 840 29
5, 600, 089 74
31, 797, 530 03
28,685,111 08
1,199, 099 68
8, 397, 242 95
24, 361, 336 .59
8, ,575, 539 94
32, 936. 876 53
30, .521, 979 44
3, 727, 711 53
11, 2.56, 503 60
861, 596 55
578, 371 00
12,118,105 15
39,186, 284 74
1, 256, 532 39
6, 498,199 11
20, 050,108 01
12, 991, 902 84
33, 642, 010 85
36, 742, 829 62
6, 297,177 89
21, 895, 369 61
8, 595, 039 10
30, 490, 408 71
36,194, 274 81
1, 539, 351 35
1, 027, 693 64
6, 455, 013 92
26,418,4,59 59
1, 213, 823 31
27, 632, 282 90
38. 261, 959 65
53, 801, .569 37
6, 719, 282 37
60, 520. 851 "4
1, 430, 411 30
7, 900, 635 76.
33, 079, 276 43
1, 252, 296 81
9, 408, 476 02
45, 227, 454 77
15, 427, 688 42
60,655,143 19
29,416,612 45
1, 374,161 55
39, 933, 542 61
16,4.52,880 13
9, 786, 705 92
56, 386, 422 74
32, 827, 082 69
1, 663, .591 47
7, 904, 724 66
37,165, 990 09
7,4.38,728 17
44, 604, 718 26
35, 871. 753 31
2, 829. 801 "7
44, 049, 949 48
4, 426,154 83
8, 880, 581 38
48, 476,104 31
40,158, 353 25
40, 389, 954 56
6, 322, 654 27
3, 043, 576 04
46, 712, 608 83
8, 918, 842 10
43, 338, 860 02
3, 880, 494 12
11, 067, 789 53.
44, 078,156 35
10,498,905 39
54, 577, 061 74 50, 261, 901 09
10, 790, 096 32
51,142,138 42
24, 330, 980 66
75, 473, 119 OS
1, 550, 339 55
48, 591, 073 41
56, 312, 097 --2
9, 852, 678 24
2, 772, 990 78
13, 327, 095 11
47. 777. 672 13
66,164, 775 96
60, 333, 836 45
12, 392, 505 12
14, 074, 834 64
72, 726, 341 57 49,108i 229 80
2, 644, 263 97
65, 032, 559 76
6, 242, 027 61
71, 274, 587 37
12, 651, 694 61
46, 802. 855 00
4, 355, 683 64
72,291,119 "0
9, 771, 067 04
82, 062,186 74
14, 053, 264 64
35,113, 334 22
4, 978, 266 18
3, 490, 534 53
14, 690, 927 90
66, 327, 405 -2
17, 351, 237 20
83, 678, 642 92
33.193, 248 60
2, 991,121. 54
11, 514, 649 83
60,010,062 .58
17,045,013 07
77, 055, 075 65
32, 979, 580 78
12, 387,156 52
62, 537, 221 62
22,850,141 46
85, 387, 363 08
30, 963, 857 83
2, 865, 481 17
456, 379, 896 81 109, 287, 461 27
565, 667, 358 08
46, 965, 304 87
2, 327, 948 37
42, 640, 353 09
694, 004, 575 56 205, 811, 335 09
899, 815, 911 25
63, 261, 235 31
36. .523, 046 13
3,152, 032 "0
85, 704, 963 74
811,283,679 ;.4
484, 257, 435 72 1, 295, 541,114 86 134, 433, 738 44
2, 029, 975 97
33, 933, 657 89
5, 059, 360 71 122, 617, 434 07 1, 214, 349,195 43 692, 084,135 94 1,906,433,331 37
385, 954, 731 43 753, 389, 350 .52 1,139, 344, 081 95 165, 301, 654 76
3, 295, 729 32
43, 285, 662 00
202, 947, 537 42 890,132,117 85
1, 093, 079, 655 27
4, 642 531 '"1
31, 034, Oil 04
839, 974, 882 63 1, 069, 889, 970 74
229,915,088 11
4, lOOi 682 32
25, 775, 502 72
190, 496, 354 95 394,231,641 16
584, 777, 996 11
20, 000, 757 97
7, 042, 923 06
164, 421, 507 15 538, 486, 335 73
702, 907, 842 88
3, 407, 938 15 21, 780, 229 87




276

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Statement of the x>ublic debt on the 1st day of January in each of the years from 1791 to
1842, inclusive, and at various dates in subsequent years to July 1, 1870.
Jamiary 1, 1791
1792
1793
1794
.
1795
1796
1797
1798
. 1799...
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807.:
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830




p 6 , 4 6 3 , 476 52
77,227,924 66
80,352,634 04
78,427,404 77
• 80,747,587 39
83,762,172 07
82,064,479 33
79,228,529 12
78,408,669 77
82,976,294 35
83,038,050 80
80,712,632 25
77,054,686 30
86,427,120 88
82,312,150 50
75,723,270 66
69,218,398 64
65,196,317 97
57,023,192 09
53,173,217 52
48,005,587 70
45,209,737 90
55,962,827 57
81,487,846 24
99,833,660 15
127,334,933 74
123,491,965 16
103,466,633 83
95,529,648 28
91,015,566 15
89,987,427 66
93,546,676,98
90,875,877 28
90,269,777 77
83,788,432 71
81,054,059 99
73,987,357 20
67,475,043 87
58,421,413 67
48,565,406 50

Jannary 1.. .1831
$39,123,191 68
1832
24,322,235 18
1833
7,001,032 88
1834
4,760,081 08
1835..,.-.
351,289 05
1836
291,089 05
1837
1,878,223 55
1838
4,857,660 46
1839
11,983,737 53
1840
5,125,077 63
1841
6,737,398 00
1842
15,028,486 37
Jnly 1
1843
27,203,450 69
1844
24,748,188 23
1845
17,093,794 80
1846
16,750,926 33
1847
38,956,623 38
1848
48,526,379 37
Dec. 1
1849......
64,704, 693 71
1850
64,228,238 37
Nov. 20
1851
62,560,395 26
Dec. 30
1852
65,131,692 13
Jnly 1
1853
67,340,628 78
1854
47,242,206 05
Nov. 17
1855
39,969,731 05
Nov. 15...... 1856
30,963,909 64
Jnly 1
1857
29,060,386 90
1858
44,910,777 66
1859
58,754,699 33
1860
64,769,703 08
1861......
90,867,828 68
1862
514,211,371 92
1863
1,098,793,181 37
1864
1,740,690,489 49
1865
2,682,593,026 53
1866
2,783,425,879 21
1867
2,692,199,215 12
1868
2,636,320,964 67
1869
2,489,002,480 58
1870
2,386,358,599 74

REGISTER.

277

Payment of judgments rendered by Court of Claims from July 1, 1869, to June 30, 1870.
N a t u r e of claim.

Date.

T o A\''hom paid.

J u l y 6, 1869
J u l y 10, 1 8 6 9 . . . .
J u l y 20, 1 8 6 9 . - . .
J u l y 26, 1 8 6 9 . . . .
J u l y 30, 1 8 6 9 . . - .
A u g u s t 28,1869 .
A u g u s t 31,1869 .
Sept. 6, 1869
Oct. 23,1869
N o v . 12,1869 . . . .
Dec. 15, 1869 . ' . . .
Dec. 15, 1869 . . . .
Dec. 18, 1869 . . . .
M a r c h 16, 1870..
A p r U 19, 1870 . . .
M a y 2, 1870
M a y 13, 1870 . . . .
M a y 19, 1870 . . . .
J u n e 3, 1870
J u n e 3, 1870
J u n e 9, 1870
J u n e 9, 1870
J u n e 9, 1870
J u n e 17, 1 8 7 0 . . . .

W . T. P a t e
W . A. Barnes
J . C. F r 6 m o n t e t a l s
E m o r y a n d B l a k e et ais
J . Iv.'Holland
G-.lvirby
A . Burcheil
J . K u g l e r , deceased
J. Hawkes
;
J . E. lieeside
P . Floyd
J . S. Sjoeed a n d D . H . D a v i s
F . A . Gibbons, sr
E. Whittlesev etals
A . Gr.ant & CJo
C. C. . W e n t w o r t h
F. J. Hosmer
A. P . Brand
:..'
W . L y o n s et ais
,..
W . H . F o g g and B. Mosher
H . D . MctCinney
C.C.O'NeU
J . C. F r 6 m o n t
H . T . (^loA^er a n d A . S. G-arduer.

Not stated,
.do - - - .
-do .
.do .
-do .
-do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do.
-do .
-do .
-do .
-do.
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
.do .
-do .
.do-,
-do .
-do .
-do .

Amount.
$5, 852 69
311 32
18, 666 CO
540 00
1, 870 36
97 60
1, 823 95
15, 200 00
384 00
4, 691 10
22, 665 11
22, 025 15
1,726 52
4, 364 18
34, 642 38
11, Oil 86
100 00
• 373 CO
6, 315 00
3, 856 89
8.301 CO
9, 251 00
10, 000 00
2, 869 00
186, 938 11

Total-

Statement exhibiting the amount of tonnage of the United States annually, from 1789 to 1869,
inclusive; also the registered, enrolled, and licensed tonnage emxiloyed in steam navigation
in each year.

•

1

1

a
i»
rt

«o

Year endiug—

fcJO

•

TJ

803
...

808
1809
810
11
812

-..

813
1814
815
816
817
1818
1819
1820
1821




. . .

r-=( C S
r-l CO

03
kD

2

o

p^

T071S.

n:Jr-i

^

•o
S
o

804
805
06
07

i§

© a
o

©

Dec. 31 1789
1790
1791
1792
1793
1794 . .
1795
796
797
1798
799
1800
1801
1802

-TJ a

C3

oa

IB
<Ti

!H

O c3

rS-S

g^
R

p^
.

123, 893
346, 2.54
362,110
411, 438
367, 734
438, 863
529, 471
576, 733
597, 777
603, 376
662,197
559, 921
632, 907
560, 380
597, 1.57
672, 530
749, 341
808, 265
848, 307
759, 054
910, 059
984, 269
768, 852
760, 624
674, 853
674, 633
854, 295
800, 760
800, 725
606, 089
612, 930
619, 048
619, 896

H

^

Tons.

Tons.

Tons.

^

77, 669
132,123
139, 036
153, 019
153, 030
189, 755
218, 494
25.5,166
279,136
294, 952
277, 212
302, 57l
314, 670
331, 724
352, 015
369, 874
391, 027
400, 451.
420, 241
473, 542
440, 222
449, 515
463, 650
,509, 373
491, 776
484, 577
513, 833
571, 459
590,187
619, 096
647, 821
661,119
679, 062

.

§
3
CO

a

3
a
O
H
Tons.
201 562
274, 377
502,146
564 457
520, 764
628, 618
747, 965
831 899
876 913
898, 328
939, 409
972, 492
947 577
892 104
9^9 172
1, 042, 404
1,140,368
1, 203, 716
1, 268, 584
1, 242, 596
1, 350, 281
1 424 748
1, 232, 502
1, 269, 997
1, 666, 629
1,159, 210
1, 368,128
1, 372, 219
1, 399, 912
1, 225,185
1, 260, 751
1 280 167
1,298! 9.58

278

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Statement exhibiting the amount of tonnage, fc.—Continned.

o rt

Year ending-

Ci o

•bo

Dec.

31, 1822
1823
1824
1B25
1826
1827
• 1828
^
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
Seiit. 30, 1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842.
_-.
J u n e 30, 1843
1844
1845
/
:
1846
1847
1848
1849
'
1850
1851
1852
1853
:
1854
1855
.1856
18.=^7.......
18.58
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
-.
1864
1865, old a d m e a s u r e m e n t .
1865, noAA'' a d m e a s u r e m e n t
1866, old a d m e a s m - e m e n t .
1866, neAV admeasui-ement
1867, old a d m e a s u r e m e n t .
1867, n e w a d m e a s u r e m e n t
1868, old a d m e a s u r e m e n t . .
. • 1868, ncAV a d m e a s u r e m e n t
1869
1870




Tons.
628,150
639, 921
669, 973
700, 788
737, 978
747,170
812, 619
650,143
.575, 056
619, .575
686, 809
749, 482
857, 098
885, 481
897, 321
809, 343
819, 801
829, 096
895, 610
945, 057
970, 658
1, 003, 932
1, 061, 856
1, 088, 680
1,123, 999
1, 235, 682
1, 344, 819
1, 418, 072
1, 540, 769
1, 663, 917
1, 819, 774
2, 013,154
2, 238, 783
2, 440, 091
2, 401, 687
2, 377, 094
2, 499, 742
2, 414, 654
2, 448, 941
2, 540, 020
2,177, 253
1, 892, 899
1, 47.5, 376
1, 022, 465
482,110
341, 619
953, 018
182, 203
1,187, 714
33, 449
1, 310, 344
1, 3.52, 586
1, 324, 256

Tons.

Tons.

1,419
877
181
.545
340
340
454
1,104
2,791
5,149
4,155
746
4,701
5, 373
6, 909
6,492
6,287
.5,631
16,068
20, 870
44, 429
62, 890
79, 704
90, ,520
95, 036
115, 045
89, 715
86, 873
78, 027
92, 748
97, 296
102,608
113,908
133, 215
106,519
69, 539
28, 469
42, 776
155, 513
32, 593
165, 522

Tons.
696, 549
671, 766.
697, 580
699, 263
762,154
833, 240
889, 355
.556, 618
5.52, 248
613,827
661, 827
754, 819
778, 995
816, 645
839, 226
932, 576
982, 416
1, 062, 445
1, 0S2, 815
1,010,599
892, 072
917, 804
949, 060
1, 002, 303
1, 090,192
1,198, .523
1, 381, 332
1, 4.53, 459
1, 468, 738
1, 524, 915
1, 675, 456
1, 789,238
1, 887, 512
2, 021, 625
1, 796, 888
1, 857, 964
2, 550, C6'7
1, 961, 631
2, 036, 990
2,122, 5892, 224, 449
2, 660, 212
2, 550, 690
1, 794, 372
730,695
443, 635
1, 4.89,194
95, 869
1, 646, 820

24, 879
21, 610
23, 061
34, 059
40,198
39, 418
54, 037
63, 053
33, 568
90, 633
101, 305
122, 474
122, 474
145,102
153, 661
190, 632
199, 789
198,154
174, 342
224, 960
231, 494
265, 270
319, 527
341, 606
399, 210
411, 823
441, 525
481, 005
521, 217
563, 536
514, 098
581, 571
655, 240
533, 362
618, 911
651, 363
676, 005
770, 641
774, 596
.596, 465
439, 755
853, 816
630, 411
338, 720
114, 269
770, 754
36, 307
957, 458

221, 939
213, 252
192, 544

1, 808, 559
1, 651,182
1, 847,156

977, 476
890, 316
882, 551

Tons.
1, 324, 699
1, 336, 566
1, 389,163
1, 423,112
1, 534,191
1, 620, 608
1, 741, 392
1, 260, 798
1,191, 776
1, 267, 847
1 1,439,450
1, 606.1.51
1,758,907
1, 824, 940
1, 822,103
1, 896, 684
1, 995, 640
2, 090, 479
2,180,764
2,130,744
2, 092, 391
2,158. 603
2, 280; 095
2, 417, 002
2, 562, 084
2,839,046
3,154. 042
3, 334, 016
3, 535, 454
3, 772, 439
4,138, 440
4, 407, 010
4, 802, 902
5, 212, 001
4, 871, 652
4, 940, 842
5, 049, 808
5,145. 038
5, 353, 868
5, 539, 813
5,112,165
5,126, 081
4, 986, 401
3, 516, 787
1, 579. 994
942, 299
3, 368, 479
346, 972
3, 9.57, 514
33, 449
4, 318, 309
4,107, 336
4, 246, 507

279

EEGISTER.

Statemeiit exhibiting the number and tonnage of registered, enroUed, and licensed vessels in the
United States on tlie 30i/t June, 1870.
Registered.

Enrolled.

States.

1

o

>
.. -

NCAV H a m p i s h i r e . . .

Yermont
Massachusetts
R h o d e Lsland
Connecticut
NCAV Y o r k
NCAV J e r s e y

Pennsylvauia
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of Columbia
Yirginia
N o r t h Car olina
S o u t h Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
- .
Mississippi
Lonisiana
Texas
Tennessee
Kentucky
Missouri
loAva .
- ..
Minnesota
AYisconsin
Hlinois
- -..
Indiana
Michioan
Ohio.^.
California
Oregon
Washington Ter...
j ^ laska
Total..

410
12

236, 729. 36
9, 455.19

754
361, 827. 27
18
4, 556.17
64
14, 735. 21
890 - 624,240. .56
22
2, 448. 36
122
51, 910. 43
8
1, 994. 49
92
31, 374. 24
30
4, 044. 75
29
7, 614. 24
24
4, 021.14
237
9, 718. 60
32
12, 481. 04
65
8, 266.14
17
4, 055. 52
66
27

34, 246. 42
6, 782.16

6

867. 64

6

956. 64

4
16

738. 22
3, 779. 53

143
3
39
6

69,109.12
1, 420.15
9, 054. 72
372. 75

2, 942 1, 516, 800. 06

ro

0

o

H
1,769
49
28
1, 8.53
137
476
6, 382
686
2, 903
130
1, 422
344
317
70
82
35
59
150
20
368
99
57
41
222
72
34
241
866
40
640
1,125
85
629
53
41

H

151,269.50
477
6, 004. 95
4, 20.5.18
17
161. 44
5, 857. 72
160, 625. 57
326
3, 909. 36
38, 954. 73
44
546.12
61, 511. 94
175
2, 071.17
838, 222. 35
621
7, 089.12
79, 953. 91
254
2, 863. 89
363,157. 86
1, 941. 49
166
11, 704. 20
19
246. 40
105, 794. 05
4B6
- 6, 081. .54
24,164. 79
54
.595. 86
• 16,661.05
511
4, 996. 36
194
2,152. 43
4, 715. 26
1, 018. 34
93
5, 235. ,52
156. 01
4, 233. 46
16
124
5, 463. 79
1, 217. 63
20,145.08
65
633. 29
1, 979. 25
8
76.80
65, 7,54. ,50
270
2, 635. 43
10,521.22
154
1, 638. 29
13, 651. 73
1
19.03
11, 823. 33
1
13. C
O
94, 388. 04
10.87
2
131. 51
9
5, 639.16
102.44
20, 812. 34
6
40, 875. 45
113, 699. 70
25
322. 97
7, 052. 85
112, 820.13 '"133" '""i,"650.'47'
1.54, 925. 35
019. 61
49
14, 401. 09
125. 73
9
• 85, 308. 26 185
2, 370. 77
163.17
•9,128. 21
15
186. 91
13, 283. 55
22

21, 525 2, 667, 940. 62 4, 531

Total.
ro

CO

ro

cn

Maine

Licensed under
20 t o n s .

1
>

ro
0
0

H

2, 656
394, 003. 81
78.
13, 821. 81
28
5, 857. 72
2,933
526, 362. 20
199
44, 0.57.12
715
73, 318. 32
7,893 1, 469, .561. 03
962
85, 271.16
3,191
417, 009. 78
157
13, 945. 09
2,000
143, 249. 83
428
28, 805. 40
857
29, 271. 65
288
10, 888. 88
212
15, 972. 46
83
16, 870. 51
.248 •. 14, 947. 56
232
24 833.89
23
2, 056. 05
704
102, 636. 35
18 941. 67
280
58
13, 670. 76
42
11 836 83
230
95, 266. .55
81
5 770.67
140
20, 914. 78
241
40 875 45
797
114, 979. 31
40
. 7,052.85
777
115, 208. 82
1,190
159, 324. 49
94
14, 526. 82
957
156, 788.15
71
10, 711. 53'
102
22, 525.18
6
372. 75

51, 766. 55

28, 998

4, 246, 507. 23

43,10.5.66

20, 284

2, 973,198. 28

2, 945.19
2, 720. 85
2,994.85

5, 349
1,136
2, 229

684, 704. 90
190, 397. 61
393, 206. 44

SUMMARY.
Tlie A t l a n t i c a n d
Gulf coasts.
T h e n o r t h e r n l a k e s . .5, 087
T h e Pacific c o a s t . . 191
10
T h e Avestern r i v e r s .
Total

29, 203. 47
678, 420. 53
79, 9.56. 74
15, 010. 62

2, 942 1,516,800.06




13, 791 1, 500, 889 15 3,780
5,083
723
1,928

67.5, 630. 48
107, 720. 02
393, 700. 97
2, 677, 940. 62

238
222
291

4, 246, 507. 23

280

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Statement exhibiting number and tonnage of sailing vessels, steam vessels, barges, and canalboats in each customs district of the United Staies on June 30, 1870.
Sailing vessels.

S t e a m vessels.

Barges.

Total.

Canal boats.

St.atp^
No.
Maine
N. Hampshire..
Yermont
M a s s a c h u s e t t s -.
Rhode Island...
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylv.an.ia . .
DelaAvare . .
Maryland
Dist. Columbia.
Yirginia
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Carolina.
Geor'^^'ia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Loid.siaua
Texas
. . .
Tennessee
Kentucky
Missouri
Minnesota
W^isconsin
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Oh io
W e s t Yirginia .
California
Oregon
Washing'n Ter.
Ala.ska.'
•
Total

Tonnage.

2,609
73
22
2,855
168
654
3,328
759
826
127
1,609
95
756
261
186
54
218
84
13
456
230

375, 231. 94
13, 362. 59
1, 316. 51
503, 297. 05
17, 401. 00
52, 105. 37
694, 081. 43
47, 733. 21
127, 316. 87
8, 396. 98
86,190. 74
4, 070. 42
20, 343. 84
3, 460. 83
11, 352. 74
12. 646. 65
10, 697. 23
5,132.14
224.13
33, 771. 06
9, 380. 01

204
334

27, 292. 02
63,189. 21

419
322

46, 437. 68
54, 279. 36

761
25
80
6

106, 881. 42
1, 6L5. 63
20, 505. 59
• 372. 75

No.
47
5
6
78
31
54
863
82
407
19
108
28
64
25
26
29
30
55
13
228
38
58
38
159
32
58
37
142
37
271
181
. 73
136
44
22

Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No.

18, 771. 87
459. 22
4, 541. 21
23, 065.15
26, 656.12
25, 249. 82
5
383, 967. 22 342
21,139. 73
49
92, 677. 50 340
4, 564. 39
8
39, 491.13
21
29
5, 951. 94
11
6, 044.12
2, 309.14
2
4, 619. 72
4, 223. 86
4, 250. 33
15, 540. 62
93
1, 772. 24
2
66, 973. 73
20
8, 287. 08
12
13, 670. 76
4
9, 508. 06
70, 485.15
68
3, 076. 45
49
11, 590. 29
82
13 ,583 43
19,135.19
•98
6, 646. 83
3
47, 784. 48 .. 87
53, 328. 29 122
12, 274. 44
21
60
42. 434. 45
2
9, 001. 48
2, 019. 59

Tonnage.

2
745.13
218. 00
62, 254. 47 3,360 329, 257. 91
9, 256. 39
72 7,14lf83
,51, 481. 80 1,618 145, 533. 61
674. 97
3
308. 75
2, 493. 44 262 15, 074. 52
991. 75 276 17, 791. 29
949.14
26 1, 934. 55
118. 91

4,161.13
59. 68
1, 891. 56
1, 274. 58
2, 328. 77
24, 493. 52
2, 694. 22
^9, 324. 49
12,187. 07
406. 02
20, 936. 66
21, 812. 87
2, 252. 38
7, 472. 28
94. 37

3

282. 88

223 20, 467. 84
565 29, 903. 97

No.

Tonnage.

2, 656 394, 003. 81
78
13, 321. 81
5, 857. 72
28
2,933 526, 362. 20
199
44, 057.12
715
78, 318. 32
7,893 1, 469, 561. 03
962
85, 271.16
3,191 417, 009. 78
157
13, 945. 09
2,000 143, 249. 83
428
28, 805. 40
857
29, 271. 65
288
10, 888. 88
212
15, 972. 46
83
16 870.51
14, 947. 56
248
232
24, 833. 89
• 28
2, 056. 05
704 102, 636. 35
280
18, 941. 67
58
13, 670. 76
42
11 836 83
230
95, 266. 55
81
5, 770. 67
140
20, 914. 78
241
40, 875. 45
797 114, 979. 31
40
7, 052. 85
777 115, 208. 82
1,190 159, 324. 49
94
14, 526. 82
' 957 156, 788.15
71
10, 711. 53
102
22, .525.18
6
372. 75

17, 534 2, 363, 086. 45 3, 524 1, 075, 095. 03 1,530 240, 410. 60 6,410 567, 915.15 28, 993 4, 246, 507. 23

SUMMARY.
Atlantic
and. 14, 708 1, 966, 619. 26 1,716
Gulf coasts.
872 129,375.44 202
Pacific c o a s t . -.
N o r t h e r n l a k e s . 1, 699 264, 608. 73 642
255
2, 482. 97 964
AYestern r i v e r s .
Total

17, 534 2, 363, 086. 45

616, 655. 94

590 84, 541. 71

53,455.52
142, 973. 09
262, 010. 48

1,136
62 7, 566. 65
114 27, 569. 53 2,894 249, .553. 50 5,349
764 120, 732. 71 246 12, 980.
2,229

1, 075, 095. 03 1,530

305, 381. 37

2, 973,198. 28 .
190, 397. 61
684, 704. 90
398, 206. 44

567, 915.15 28, 998 4, 246, 507. 23
J O H N A L L I S O N , Eegister.

TlliSASURY D.P;rARTMENT, REGISTER'S OFFICE,
October 26, 1870.




REPORT OF THE SOLICITOR OF THE TREASURY.







EEPORT
«

THE SOLICITOR

OF

OF THE TREASURY

DEPARTMENT OF J U S T I C E ,
O F F I C E OP THE SOLICITOR OF THE TREASURY,

Washington^ D. 0., November 23, 1870.
SIR : I have the honor to transmit herewith six tabular statements
exhibiting the amonnt, character, and results of the litigation under
direction of this office for the fiscal year endiDg June 30, 1870, so far as
the same are shown by the reports received from the United States
attorneys for the several districts. These tables embrace, respectively—
1. Suits on transcripts of accounts of defaulting public officers, adjusted by the accounting officers of the Treasury Department.
2. Suits fbr the recovery of fines, penalties, and forfeitures under the
customs revenue and navigation laws.
3. Suits dh custom-house bonds.
4. Suits against collectors of customs and other agents of the Government for refund, of duties and acts done in the line of their official duty.
5. Suits in which the United States was interested, not embraced in
the foregoing classification.
6. A general summarj' or abstract hereto appended of all the other
tables.
An examination of this summary will show that the whole number of
suits commenced within the year was 1,868, of whicli—
37 were of class 1, for the recovery of...:
$453,937 98
594 AYcre of class 2, for the recovery of
754,100 00
441 were of class 3, for the recovery of.
1, 538,230 10
458 were of class 4.
338 were of class 5, for the recovery of
2, 620, 739 36
Making a total sued for, as reported, of

5,367,007 44

Of the whole number of suits brought, 692 w^ere disposed of within
the year, as follows, to wit: 388 were decided in favor of the United
States; 11 were adversely decided; 261 were settled and dismissed.
In. 32, penalties were remitted by the Secretary of the Treasury, leaving
1,176 still pending. Of those pending at the commencement of the
year, 123 were decided for the United States, 83 were decided adversely,
. and 422 were settled and dismissed. The entire number of suits decided
or otherwise disposed of during the year was 1,320; the whole amount
for which judgments were obtained, exclusive of decrees in rem., was
$272,393 16, and tbe entire amount collected from all sources Avas
$477,025 37.




284

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

The following tables exhibit a comparative view of the litigation of
the last year and the next preceding one:
In suits commenced during the fiscal years ending June 30, 1869, and June 30, 1870.

%

ll

CO

r
Date.

0

f

11

1

to
<1

J u n e 30,1869
J u n e 30,1870

1-

<1

l i e , 087, 346 98
5, 367, 007 44

o

$72, 070 05
73, 388 24

$328, 358 46
231, 884 71

C «
D

73
Ul

w
342
338

22
11

292
261

1
P^

•g

0?

o

o a^

f^

H

3 1, ,510
3 2 . 1,176

2,169
1,863

i-^i S7.a/5 commenced prior to the fiscal years ending June 30, 1869, and June 30, 1870.

ll
11

Date.

^1
J u n e 30,1869
J u n e 30,1870

1260, 763 SO
199, 004 92

CO (/5

II
1^ II 1
191
123

54
83

o
o
fl

"o

23

ll

H
§i

•.^3 CD

'o
O

427 $391, 436 78
422 245,140 66

1,333
1,320

533 $332, 833 85
511 272, 392 16

$719, 795 24
477, 025 37

I am, A^ery respectfully,
E. 0. BAYFIELD,
Solicitor of the Treasury.
Hon.

G E O . S. B O U T W E L L ,

Secretary of the Treasury,




No. 6.—Statistical summary of business arising from suits, f c , in which the United States is a party or has an interest under charge ofthe Solicitor of the Treasury
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1870.
S u i t s b r o u g h t d u r i u g t h e fiscal y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30,1870.
13

J u d i c i a l districta.^

F i n e s , j)enalties,
and
forfeitures
S u i t s on t r e a s u r y
u i i d e r t h e custranscripts.
toms
reveuue
laAvs, &c.

Suits against
collectors of
S u i t s on custom- c u s t o m s a n d
a g e u t s or offiliouse b o n d s .
cers of t h e
TJnited S t a t e s .

Miscellaneous
suits.

i

o
g.flw

^.

if
iSTo.

Amount.

^"0.
23
3
29
37

!MM s s a c h u s e t t a

N e w York, eastern district

1

!N^e\v J e r s e v

3

3

$15, 000 00
20, 000 00

5, 294 79

Amount.

•No.

Amount.

Ko.

Amount.

ll

fl^

No.

Amount.

m

ci

-1

•

$23, 800 CO

$23, 800 00

$274 23

$314 23

1,120 17

200 CO
2,859 47

1,273 45
7,631 83

9, 585 66

30 00
5,115 CO

4
$183 91

32
28
161
2
3

728,100 00

11

6

23

2

2

1
15

300 00

1
365

1,113,184 03

427

ii

30
3
18
9

CQ

$936 26
9, 585 CO

41,109 22
20, 000 C
O

2
1

Plorida, northern \listrict

5

16, 930 97

12

Alabama middle district

2
13, 610 00

9
24

1
33

125 40
287,961 19

1
15

8

33, 339 03




00
85
00
83
02
00

21, 090 21
10, 500 00

15, 000 00
1, 804, 318 45
20, 000 CO
21,090 21
10, 500 00

ir"
O
H-l
H
O

2, 647 95

900 00
500 00

o

500 00
3,831 00

2
21

3
4

1,000 00
96, 784 00
1

6, 500 00

2

612 00

41,109
27, 500
96, 784
16, 930

22
C
O
CO
97

7, 981 61

2

....

30
5, 216
1, 040
156, 928
364
25

5, 594 79

03, 034 42

10
1

2
1

Arkansas, eastern district

o

1

4

1

IS

3

600 CO

600 00

8
2

15, 227 25
5, C O 00
O

15,352 65
306,571 19

117 30
324 00

33, 339 03

500 00
200 00
5, 000 00

4
1

1, 335 74
983 94
INS
GO

No, 6 . - Statistical summary of business arising from suits, fc.—Contiuaecl.

to
CO

Judicial districts.

\
Arkansas, western district
Missouri, eastern district
IMissouri w e s t e r n ( ' i s t r i c t
Touuessee, eastern district
Tennessee, iniddle district
Tennessee, western district
Kentacky
Ohio, n o r t h e r n d i s t r i c t
Ohio, s o u t h e r n d i s t r i c t . . '
Indiana
Illinois, n o r t h e r n d i s t r i c t
Illinois, s o u t h e r n disti:"iot
Michiaan, eastern district
Michigan, western district
Wisconsin
Iowa
Miiniesota
Califoi'uia
Oregon
ifevada
ISTebraska . . .
Washington Teriitorv
iSTew M e x i c o
Utah
Colorado
Drikota...
...
Arizona
Idaho
Mojitana
Total




Fines,
and
under
toms
laws,

No.

Amount.

penalties,
forfeitures
t h e cus- S n i t s on customr e v e n u e ^ house bonds.
&c.

Suits ngainst
collectors of
cu.stoms a n d
a g e n t s or offic e r s of t h e
UnitedStates.

No.

S u i t s on trea-sury
transcripts.

Amount.

No.

No.

Amount.

Amount.

39
1
1
1

$10,000 00
4, 880 88
20, 000 00

1

8
2
14
6
10
31
1
11
4
1
14
5
2
24
2

3
1

97
-1

214 00

2

2

25,666 66
262,112 12

$2,599 14

1

4

4
1
3

No.

1
3

1

""36" "'''i,'906'66" ' " ' " 5
4

800 CO

2," 639'46'

1.
II

1

11 1
37
2

1
'..

-^
Miscellaneous .
suits.

Amouut.

f

%.

11
«rc3

H

11,700 00
200 00
594 05
500 00
7, 200 00

| 1 , 000 00
458 35
16, 688 00
652,169 25
1, 605, 865 65
20, 036 80
6, ,500 00
178. 035 00
-5,150 00
17, 050 00
2, .599 14
11,700 00
414- 00
594
500
25, 800
269, 312
• 3,939

05
00
00
12
40

5

$8,170 78
200 00
900 00

$148 60

5, 917 50
1, 799 65
200 00
2, 838 35
100 00
647 47
15, 612 90
150 00
450 00
1, 500 00
150 00
2, 740 00
2, 870 00
4, 050 C
O

15, 795 60

294 50

H
O

523 65

642 15

o
34,120 58

•

'

~

2
f

2
37

453, 937 98

594

754,100 00

441

1, 538, 230 10

458

338

2, 620, 739 36

5, 367, 007 44

o

806 04
1,149 65

176 00

$1,000 00
. 458 35
16, 688 CO
642,159 25
1, 600, 984 77
36 80
6,500 CO
178, 035 CO
5,150 00
17,050 00

1

. 2

Total amount reported in judgments in
favor of the , United States. '

S u i t s b r o u g h t d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30,1870.

73, 388 24

231, 884 71

No. 6.-- S (Mistical summary of business arising from suits, cf'-c--Continued.

-§
fl

1^

Judicial districts.

czj

^§
P fl
o ©
r^ B

BS

'o
©

©
©

Massachusetts
C o n n e c t i c ut
3-lhode Lsland
N e w York, n o r t h e r n district
N e w Yorlf, e a s t e r n d i s t r i c t
N e w Yoi'k, s o u t h e r n d i s t r i c t
New Jersey
Penusyivania, eastern district
P e n n s y l v a n i a , Avestern d i s t r i c t
Delaware
Marvland.
.
.
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a
Yirginia
W e s t Virginia
:
North Carolina
South Carolina
"
Georgia
Florida, n o r t h e r n district
F l o i i d a , s o u t h e r n dlslorict
Al.ai)ania, iiortliern d i s t r i c t
Alabama, middle district
Alabaina, southern district
Louisiana
..
Mis.sissippi, n o r t h e r n d i s t r i c t
Mississippi, southern district . . . .
Tcx.as, e a s t e r n d i s t r i c t
T e x a s , ^v•estern dl.'^trict
Arkansas, eastern district




.

fi

fi
Maine
Nevf H a r a p s h i r e

t

is

©

|a

1

©
OQ

2

2

2

3
13

16

1

141
2

1.
• 1
15

3

1
1
3
3

1
2
1

o

3

fl
©

o

Pi

10
41
1
22
16
40

fl

17
7

""I'i

23
7
29
68

22
13
799
3
31
7

1
49
30
983
8
32
9

5
5

1

3
1

1

7
8
21
20

5
11
1
7
1

2

1

1

2

7

1

....^

12
40

23
60

14

2

%\, 435 40

11

17

$15,930 93

f1,749 63

1
2 ""6

2, 431 44
23,182 92

20
53

40
74

650 00
39, 625 16

3, 704 89
30, 714 80

1
33
17
63

1
49
62
482
5
2
2
1
21
1

30 00
8,176 64

3D 00
14, 362 33
1 090 00
218, 856 02
685 89
982 07

©

«

©

if 1

.
^

^1

is
11 •

g.2fl

Si
©

©

fi
9

450 00
36, 765 69

10
12

fl
'^
fl-^ JT
.^ <^ ©

M

1

•s

C

ass

fl

fl^«>

o

.s
.-§
S

=<i
o

1

ill

©•

m

©

o
H

fl©^

"0.5 '^

0
^

w fl>
p fl

C C fc;0
O
3 © 5i

S fl s
c« 0 «^

Ul

3, 061 64

11
1
23

i
2

1
7
44
273
1
1
1

1

1
27
1

9,145
50
61, 927
321
957

48
00
14
87
07

i"
1

O

a
H
O

500 C
O

4, 528 10
3, 920 00

16

13

3, 578 62

3
2

5
19

9/

14

8, 624 33

18, 473 86

1, 535 74
29, 636 41

3, 831 00

7 176 05
3, 920 CO

2

6
7

Ci

*fl

1
©
rfl

P
c, o

©

$15, 656 70

24
1
5

2
4
21
9

Whole amount of judgments rendered in favor'of the United
States dni?ing the fiscal year
ending June 30,1370.

1

si

I n suits brought prior thereto.

Amount of judgments
reported in all old suits
tliis year.

S u i t s b r o u g h t d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r e n d i n g
J u n e 30,1870.

2
3

6

1

1

900 00 .
500 00

642 52

2

1

13, 473 86

200 00
134, 483 00

2
19

1
7

200 00
28, 652 47

7
30

14
46

317 00
134, 807 00

3
84
1
2

500 00
200 CO
5, 000 CO

11,000.00

1
7
1
2

4 190 62

70
2

2
1

CO
11,000 00

No. 6.—Statistical summary of business arising from suits, fc.—Continned.

Minnesota
Ivan sas
California
Oregon
Nevada
Nebraska
AV^ashln^'ton T e r r i t o r y
N e w Mexico
UtahColorado
Dakota
A ri zona
Idaho. .
. . .
Montana
.Wyoming

ii
ll
1

35

'o'©

"s
©

29
- 1
4
1
10
7
3
12
3
2
74
1
1
5
2
19
20
2

©

fi

©

1

1
3

Is

1

bb

5s
%""
o
H

'A

5
23
2

1
1
1
6
1
1
2

i

8
2
1
1

fl ^

fl

©

12

1
1

38
42
14
5
9
3
17
11
20
34
8
11
102
2
14
11
4
27
41
5

3
18
8
5
9
2
5
3
13
16
4
8
25
1
5
4
1
8
7
2

1

6

I n s u i t s b r o u g h t iirior t h e r e t o .

7

©

'fl

©

§P§p 5 ^
'S.ti

lit

© r.

©

ll
ll

'TS "^

|3

o;d
"S'o

3"

[3

1

fi

HI

P-£5 C
O
o ©•;=

CO

fl %•%

fl'S ^

3

.

fl^^

<

30 00
400 C
O
25 00
1,500 C
O

1
4

2
1
7
2
3
1
2

2

7

1

5
18
4
1
3

%\, 277 86
• 9, 789 69
200 00

15, 010
1, .517
11, 717
1, 058
5, 505
1, 241
4, 812

27
53
20
86
49
48
61

1, 500 00

1

1

4, 671 49
11,148 29
2, 950 54

264 17

3
1
1

19
1

1, 315 82

1

2

119 11

32 00
o

Total




1

1

2

29
2
8

35
25
12

$9, 670 00
1,154 20
2, 500 00

$1, 426 46
9,789 69
200 00

1
12
8
10
14
6
3
76
1
2
5
2
22
21
3

1
21
9
19
38
11
6
82
1
11
7
3
22
54
5

5, 947 50
1, 799 65
600 OC
2, 863 35
100 00
2,147 47
15, 612 90
150 00
1, 9.50 00
1, 500 00
150 00
3, 004 17
2i 870 00
4, 050 00

15 816 31
2, 667 23
11 717 20
1^ 582 51
5, 505 49
1,241 48
20, 603 21

1
6

3
7

1

32 00
176 00

5 313 64
11 148 29
2, 950 54
35, 436 40
1^9 11
294 50
3, 000 00

'
1

1
388

11

261

32

2

1176

1 868

1
199, 004 92

123

83

422

245,140 66

GO
OO

1 bo2

1

%1, .500 CO
954 20
1,600 00

3,000 CO
,.

_ "

Whole amount of collet
frora all sources durin
fiscal year ending Ju
1870.

:§

1

fi

Arkansas, western district
Missouri eastern district
Missouri, western district
Tennessee eastern district
Tennessee middle district
Tennessee, western district
Kentucky
Ohio n o r t h e r n d i s t r i c t
Ohio soutliern d i s t r i c t
Indiana
Illiuois, n o r t h e r n d i s t r i c t . . . : .
Illinois, s o u t h e r n d i s t r i c t
Michigan, eastern district
Michigan, western d i s t r i c t .
VViscon.sin

6

Amount of judgments
reported in all old
suits this year.

t
Judicial districts.

©
rfl

Whole amount of jndgments
rendered in favor of the Uni.
ted States dnring the fiscal
year ending Juue 30,1370.

S u i t s b r o u g h t d u r i u g t h e fiscal y e a r e n d i n g
J u n o 30,1870.

to
CO ©

511 1,320

272, 393 16

477, 025 37

o
H
O

Q

REPORT OF THE SUPERVISING ARCHITECT.

19 P







REPORT
THE SUPERVISING ARCHITECT OF THE TREASURY.
TREASUKY D E P A R T M E N T ,
O F F I C E OF T H E SUPERVISING- A R C H I T E C T ,

Octoher 30, 1870.
S I R : I have the.hoRor to submit for your coiisideration the following
Teport ofthe progress of the various works with tbe construction of which
this office has been charged, and of the condition of the public property
nnder its supervision, together with some recommendations in regard
thereto.
During the past year the only new works that have been commenced
arethe court-house and post office buildings at Omaha, Nebraska, Knoxville, Tennessee, and the assay office at Boise Gity, Idaho. Plans were
prepared, and arrangements .made, for the erection of the court-house
and post office bnilding at Columbia, South Carolina, the custom-house
and post office building at Machias, Maine, and the custom-house,
court-house and post office building at ISTashville, Tennessee; but the
constrnction given to the fifth section of the act making appropriations
for the civil service of the Government for the present fiscal year by
the First ConiiDtroller of the Treasury left this office without funds, and
it has consequently been unable to commence operations. Work has
been. prosecuted as rapidly as the means at the disposal of this office
would permit on the Treasury building; the custom-houses at Portland,
Maine; Portland and Astoria, Oregon; Cairo, Illinois, and Charleston,
iSouth Carolina; on the court-houses and post offices at New York, K Y.;
Des Moines, Iowa; Madison, Wisconsin, and Portland, Maine; on the
post office and treasury building at Boston, Massachusetts; on the
branch mint at San Erancisco, California; on the appraisers' stores at
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; on the revenue dock at the Battery, J^ew
York City, and on the paving and grading of the court-house and post
office property at Springfield, Illinois. Work has been entirely suspended on the custom-house at St. Paul, Minnesota, and on the marine
hospital at Chicago, Illinois, it being found impossible to complete the
building within the limit fixed by law, the appropriations being available only on that condition. The work on the proposed branch mint at
Dalles Cit}^, Oregon, has also been suspended, it being deemed desirable
by the Department that it should be completed as an assay office rather
than as a mint, for which special authority is required.
The custom-house at Wiscasset, Maine, has been completed and occupied. The court-house and post office buildiug at Des Moines, Iowa, is
now neai?ly ready for occupancy, and will be finished the present season.
The court-house and post office building at Portland, Maine, and Madison, Wisconsin, and the appraisers' stores at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
could have been completed this year had the amounts asked for at the
last session of Congress been granted. I t has been found impossible to



292

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

•reduce the cost of the buildings below the amounts then estimated, and
their completion is therefore necessarily deferred until the necessary
appropriations are granted.
The following buildings have been thoroughly renovated, repaired^
and remodeled, and are in many respects in even better condition than
when first completed, namely: the custom-house, court-house, and post
office buildings at Bath, Maine; Chicago and Galena, Illinois; Detroit,
Michigan; Louisville, Kentucky; Mobile, Alabama; Petersburg, Virginia; Savannah, Georgia; and Wilmington, Delaware.
Eepairs more or less extensive have been made on the custom-houses
at Alexandria, Yirginia; Boston, Massachusetts; Baltimore,Maryland;
Buffalo, New York; Cleveland, Ohio; Cincinnati, Ohio; Dubuque, Iowa;
Eastport, Maine; Erie, Pennsylvania; Georgetown, District of Columbia; Gloucester, Massachusetts; Key West, Florida; Milwaukee, Wisconsin ; New Orleans, Louisiana; Norfolk, Virginia; New Haven, Connecticut; Newark, New Jersey; Newport, Ehode Jslaiid; Oswego, New
York; Portsmouth, New Hampshire; Pensacola, Florida; Pittsburgh
Pennsylvania; Plattsburg, New York; Providence, Ehode Island; San
Francisco, California; St. Louis, Missouri, and Wfieeling,West Virginia;
the court-houses at Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; Indianapolis, Indiana; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Eutland, Vermo'nt;
the marine hospitals at Chelsea, Massachusetts; Cleveland, Ohio; Portland, Maine, and St. Louis, Missouri; on the appraisers' stores at San
Francisco, California; the branch mint at Charlotte, North Carolina^
and the sub-treasury in New York City.
The business of the post office at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, having
increased to an extent that rendered it impossible to transact it without
increased accommodations, an addition was made to the building that
will probably answer all demands for a few years; but as the business
is steadily increasing and the building is not fire-proof, and is small for
a city of the magnitude of Philadelphia, it will soon become necessary
to erect a suitable fire-proof building for the nse of the Post Office Department.
An approxiriation was also made for the extension and remodeling of
the post office at Baltimore, Maryland. Plans have been prepared therefor, but as it is doubtful if the relief thus afforded would be more than
temporary, operations have been suspended pending further investigation. I would strongly recommend that authority be griinted for the
liurchase of the Merchants' Bank, which is a part of *the custom-house
and post office building, its being in private hands, greatly impairs the
value ofthe government xiroperty, and is required for the proper accommodation of the sub-treasury, created by the act approved June 15,1870..
The custom-house and post office building at Chicago, Illinois, was
considered, when Completed, out of the city, entirely too large for the
• present or prospective wants of the government, and extravagant in
cost and construction; yet, though twelve years have scarcely elapsed, it
isnow inthe heart of the business portion, overcrowded and too small to.
accommodate all branches of the public service in that city, and when
compared with the ornate buildings that surround it, a plain and unassuming structure. During the past year the side-walks surrounding the
building have been excavated, and the heating and plumbing apparatus
and the fuel vaults removed thereto, thereby utilizing the whole basement for the wants of the Post Office Department. A large part of the
lobby on the principal floor has also been inclosed, no further space
for the postal service can be obtained in that structure.
I regret'to state that the progress of the work on the post office-audi



SUPERVISING .ARCHITECTo

293

treasury building at Boston, Massachusetts, has not equalled the expectations of this office. Unforeseen and unexpected embarrassments
have been met, and obstacles encountereei that have seriously delayed
the progress of the work, and could not have been anticipated. The
generous cooperation of the authorities ofthe city of Boston, who have
from the first granted the Department eveiy facility, rendered the opposition of a few citizens the more unexpected, but which, I am happy
to say, has only resulted in a temporary delay. The contract for the
granite-work of the building, which wasniade on the 26th day of October, 1869, has been ratified under the provisions of the act of Congress,
apjiroved July 15,1870, the material being furnished by the Cape Ann
Granite Company. The quality of the granite is unexceptionable, and
the character of the workmanship cannot be surpassed. The site of the
building has, however, been found insufficient, and as the owner of the
adjoining property has persistently refused to dispose of any portion
except at exorbitant rates, proceedings have been commenced under
the statutes of the State of Massachusetts to condemn the portion neces sary to provide a passage for the mail wagons, the balance of the original appropriation for the purchase of the property being deemed amjile
for the purpose.
The remarks in regard to the progress of work on the post office at
Boston apply with equal force to the post office building at New York.
The delay has not, however, arisen from any negligence on the part of
the Department or its agents, the amoimt of the available appropriation
being practically exhausted at present, and will be entirely so before
the meeting of Congress. The- most difficult portion of the work has,
however, been completed in a highly creditable and satisfactory manner.
The contract for the iron-work to the first floor has been awarded to
the ^ t n a Iron Works of that city. The contract for the granite work,
which was made on the 2d day of September, 1869, has been ratified
under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved July 15,1870, t h e
material being furnished from the quarries at Dix Island, Maine. The
quality of the granite and of the workmanship is of the most superior
character. The limit fixed by Congress as the cost of this building will,
if insisted on, necessitate the adoption of a timber, instead of fire-proof,
construction above the main story, including the roof, the estimates
having been again revised, and conqiared with the working drawings,
most of wliich, including those of the entire granite-work, are completed.
I t is sincerely to be hoped that Congress will authorize the amount necessary to complete in a proper and sul3stantial manner this building, which
is situated in the most conspicuous part of the great metropolis of the
nation, and should be in every respect worthy of its location and the
Goverriment Avhich it represents. I believe that the necessity for its
completion at the earliest practicable moment cannot be overestimated,
both on account of the convenience of the public and the interests of the
Government. I will add. that the building when finished will be the
cheapest, considering the thorough character of its construction and the
magnitude of its proi)ortions, owned by the Government.
The improvements in progress on the south front of the Treasury
buildiug have been since the date of my last report comjileted, and have
proved entirely satisfactory, the fine proportions of that front being for
the first time revealed. I again recommend that the incongruous sk}^light behind the portico be removed, and the vestibule completed according to the original design, or finished in the same manner as on the
north front. The latter plan has the advantage of economy, and of
affording considerable additional room, which is much needed. The



•

294

/

•

•

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

extension of the main staircase to the upper story and the construction
of the skylight and interior dome have been completed, and add greatly
to the comfort and appearance of the building. The reconstruction of
the interior of the northwest corner of the building, Avhich has been a
task of more than usual difficulty, is nearly finished, and will complete
the interior of the extension. The system of ridge ventilation introduced
by me' on the north wing, has been extended to the remaining portions
of the building, and the stairways ventilated on the same principle.
The heating apparatus of the south and west wings has been improved
and thoroughly repaired. Arrangements have been made for the removal of the ink-mill, machine and blacksmith shops, &c., belonging
to the Note Printing Bureau, after the removal of which, the ventilation pf the building will be in good condition, and the atmosjihere
free from the pestilential odors that have pervaded it for so many years.
The printing and engraving departments of the Note Printing Bureau
not only occupy the attic, but have encroached on the upper stories of.
the building, of which they now occu]iy a considerable portion. The
space, however, is much needed for other purposes, and as the Department is overcrowded, and its business will not probably decrease, I
earnestly recommend the erection of a suitable building for that important Bureau.
I again desire to call attention to the unsightly and useless drive-way
on the Avest front, and the enormous width of the area, which seriously
injures the symmetry and beauty of the principal front ofthe building;
and as there is a great deficiency in storage-room for coal, I earnestly
recommend that an appropriation may be obtained for the construction
of additional coal-vaults, and a subway for the rehioval of ashes, &c.y
which would enable this blemish to be remedied at a moderate expense.
There is also a pressing necessity for additional closet accommodation, and a thorough renovation and repainting of the interior of the entire building.
I venture once more to call attention to the importance of early action
in regard to the condemnation of a strip of property on the east side of
Fifteenth street, between New York and Pennsylvania avenues, required
by the plan for the improvement of the east front of the Treasury building, submitted with my report for the year 1868, feeling assured that
no cheaper or more satisfactory solution of the problem presented by
the unfortunate location of this magnificent building can be devised.
Every improvement that is made on the property in question increases
the amount necessary to carry this plan into effect, and I respectfully
submit that after expending the sum of $6,700,000 upon the Treasury
building, it is too late to pretend to economize by leaving it mutilated
and unfinished. The extension of the Treasury building was, in my
opinion, an error, the old xiortion being constructed of a worthless sandstone that would have perished long since had it not been protected
by paint. This portion of the building is not.only an unworthy sham,
but is badly arranged, unsuitable for the wants of the Department, and
must sooner or later be reconstructed to corresxiond with the magnificence and solidity of the new granite extension.
The commission appointed by the present Congress to submit a plan
for improving and establishing the grades of the streets adjoining the
Treasury grounds has completed its rexiort for submission to Congress,
when it is hoped that this important question may receive a prompt and
satisfactory solution. In this connection I desire again to call attention
to the imxirovement of the grounds of the Executive Mansion on the
south front, and the filling ofthe north half of reservation No. 1, or the



SUPERVISING ARCHITECT.

295

^ White lot," which has been, thus far, effected without expense to the
^
Government, and which, when completed, will remove all objections to
the health of this locality. I trust that the necessary appropriations will
be made to enable the Commissioner of Public Buildings and Grounds
to complete Executive avenue, including the fencing of the same, and
venture to express the hope that steps may be taken to improve the
various reservations between the Executive Mansion and the Capitol,
which, at a slight expense, may be connected and combined into a continuous x^aik, worthy of the national capital, and accessible to all,
and affording an agreeable and convenient means of communication
between the points named.
^
I desire to renew my recommendations that immediate steps be taken
to secure a sufficient portion of the Battery at New York for the use of
the revenue department at that port. The present custom-house is not
well adapted to the wants of the Government, neither can it be made
so, already overcrowded, the demand for additional space is daily increasing. The accommodations for the appraisers' department, though x'>robably as good as any thiat can be obtained in the city, are unsatisfactory,
and will be found inadequate before the termination of the present lease.
The annual rental has already been increased trom $32,500, in 1864, to
$66,003 25, which is now paid, while a large exxienditure has been made,
in addition, to adapt the building to the wants of the Department. 1
believe that, irrespective of the improved character of the accommodations to be obtained, it will be found desirable, as a mere question of
economy, to erect on the Battery buildings sufficient to accommodate
the various branches of the custom-house, including warehouses for theappraisers' department, for unclaimed goods, and for other purxioses;;
and as the property in question is the only unoccupied space of sufficient size in the city of New Yo?k that could be obtained for the purpose, I cannot too strongly recommend that the necessary authority be
obtained from Congress to enable the Secretary of the Treasury to negotiate for its acquisition by the Governnient. The revenue dock, which
is now being constructed on a portion of the property, is nearly completed, and I would respectfully suggest that before proceeding with the
erection of the barge office it would be desirable to investigate and decide
the various questions involved in the preceding recommendations, which
are more fully explained in my last report, to which I respectfully refer.
I have previousl}^ called attention to the unoccupied portion of the
custom-house lot in San Francisco, California, and in my last report recommended the confirmation of the conditional lease tliat had been entered into with parties in that city. This recommendation was not,
however^ approved. I again respectfully call attention to this property,
which is situated in the heart of the commercial portion of the city, and
is in its x>i'^sent condition a disgrace to the governnient, a nuisance to
the city, and a serious injury to the adjoining property. It appears to
me that the property should be sold, leased, or utilized iDy the erection pf
a building thereon. The government is at x)resent paying rents, amounting to $67,800 per annum, for the accommodation of the various x>ublic
offices located in that city. The xiroperty is worth at the lowest valuation not less than $100,000 in gold coin. If the interest on this sum be
added to the amount paid for the rental of property for government
purposes, it will be seen that the sum of $73,800 per annum is wasted
and paid for accommodations far inferior to those which might be provided on this property. I have previously alluded to the great cost of
pile foundations as a reason for disposing of this property. The success
that has attended the efforts to obtain a foundation for the mint in that



296

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

city by the use^of beds of concrete, leads me to believe that piling may
bedispensed with and that great expense avoided. A substantial and
well constructed building of brick and timber would probably be better
adapted to the location than of cut stone and iron, and could be made
comparativelyfire-proof at a moderate expense, while the building being
isolated from others by wide streets, little danger would exist in case of
the destruction of the surrounding buildings.
The custom-house at Portland, Maine, is now nearly completed, and
will, it is believed, prove second in xioint of convenience and adaptation
to the wants of the Government to none in the country. The wharves
in front of the building are needed as a landing for the revenue boats
and for passengers arriving from foreign ports, and cabu now be obtained
on most advantageous terms. I earnestly recommend an appropriation
for their xiurchase.
I desire to call attention to the unsuitable and insufficient character
of the custom-house, court-house, and post office buildings at Cincinnati,
Ohio, and St. Louis, Missouri, and to urge the importance of making
apxiropriations sufficient for the erection of suitable buildings in those
cities at an early date. It is difficult to decide which is the worse lighted
and ventilated or the most deficient in accomodations, but i t i s believed
that while^ the former is much the smaller and more crowded the latter
can claim precedence in unfitness and general discomfort, and has been
frequently x^resented as a nuisance by the grand jury of the United States
district court, which presentment has been fully apxiroved by the judges.
An appropriation of $300,000 was made at the last session of Congress for
the commencement of a new building at St. Louis and the x^reparatioii
of plans directed. As the approxiriation was made contingent uxion the
donation to the Government of a suitable lot the preparation of the plans
has not been commenced, no action "^s yet having been taken by the
city.
The Government having been informally offered one of the most valuble and eligible lots at Hartford, Connecticut, by the authorities of that
city, as a site for a court-house, post office, &c., I strongly recommend
that an axiproxiriation be made for the erection of such a building, and
that authority be given the Department to accept the proposal, the necessity for a suitable building in that city being urgent and the offer exceedingly liberal.
•
•
The temporary roof on the custom-house at New Orleans, Louisiana,
has been renewed and a survey of the building made in order to determine the best method of completing and utilizing that structure, the
results of which will be submitted for approval at as early a date as practicable. I do not, however, believe that any exxienditure thereon would
result in xu^oviding a suitable, creditable, or convenient building.
Work has been resumed on the custom-house at Charleston, South
Carolina, which Avill be hastened to completion as raxudl}- as the nature
of the work and the means at the disposal of the office will permit, and
will when comxileted be an ornament to the city.
An admirable site for the building now in course of erection at Knoxville, Tennessee, has been x^urchased for the nominal sum of five thousand dollars, the balance of the xiurchase money having been contributed
by the citizens. The custom-house lot at Nashville, Tennessee, which
was badly located and entirely too small, has been exchanged for one of
the most eligible and desirable pieces of prox^erty in that city. A fine
lot has been donated to the Government at Columbia, South Carolina,
by the citizens of that place. The decision of the Coinxitroller has rendered it impossible to commence work on the building without further



S U P E R V I S I M G ARCH.ITECT.

297

legislation. The old custom-house lot at Wiscasset, Maine, has been
sold, and the marine hospital x^i'operty at Vicksburg, Mississippi, and
Wilmington, North Carolina, offered for sale but withdrawn, no satisfactory proposals having been obtained. I would recommend that authority be obtained for the sale of the branch mints at New Orleans,
Louisiana, Dahlonega, Georgia, and Charlotte, North Carolina, or the
conversion of the latter into an assay office; the old custom-house lot
at Astoria, Oregon, the custom-house lot at Perth Amboy, New Jersey,
and the old court-house a t St. Augustine, Florida. I w^ould also in this
connection renew my recommendation for the passage of a law authorizing, under proper restrictions, the disposal at public auction of property
no longer needed by the Government, believing that it would greatly
facilitate business and save money to the treasury.
I desire to renew my recommendations for the sale of the small
marine hospitals, retaining only those at the x^rincipal x^orts. I would
also strongly recommend the transfer of David's Island near New York
City, together with the hospital buildings thereon, and of Sedgwick
hosx)ital near New Orleans, Louisiana, to the marine hospital establishment, they being no longer needed for military x'>nrposes, and most
admirably adapted to the wants of the Treasury Department. I would
also renew my recommendation that authority, be obtained for the
sale of the unfinished iron, structure known as the marine hospital at
New Orleans, Louisiana. I t is situated in an unhealthy and unsuitable
locality, and will require a much larger sum to repair and complete
than the value of a well-arranged and suitably constructed hospital of
Xiroper size. I would also recommend that authority be granted for the
sale of the marine hospital building at San Francisco, which was abandoned in 1867, on account of fears for its stability, and which is now
raxiidly becoming a ruin. It w^as originally constructed of inferior materials, and has been much damaged and neglected, I cannot recomjnend the expenditure of the large sum that would be needed to place it
in repair, and believe that the sale of the old hospital and the erection
of a new one on the x^avilion plan, either on the premises, or on one of
the neighboring reservations, would be the most desirable and advantageous arrangement, the estimated cost of a Avell-built and commodious hospital, on the plan above indicated, being less than that of the
repairs needed on the present building.
The following hospitals are now under lease, viz., at Louisville, Kentucky, Mobile, Alabama, and Wilmington, North Carolina.
In my last report I called attention to the delay and embarrassment
caused by the system of insufficient and partial appropriations for public
works, which causes not only great and unnecessary delay in their construction, but greatly increases their cost, in many cases more than
doubling the incidental and contingent expenses. I would most respectfully renew my recommendations that the estimated cost of the xiroposed
building should be at once xilaced at the disposal Of the Secretary of the
Treasury, to. be expended at his discretion, as rapidly as the necessities
of the work should require. If this is deemed undesirable, I respectfully
recommend the repeal of the x^rovision of law restricting the amount of
<5ontracts to the axipropriation on hand. There can, it appears to me,
be no valid objection to authorizing the Department to enter into contracts not to exceed the estimated cost of the buildings, provided payment is made contingent upon apxiropriations being granted therefor.
This princixile has been sanctioned by Congress in regard to the postoffice buildings at New York and Boston with good results, and I feel



298

REPORT ON THE FINANCES..

confident that an extension of the same principle to all public works'.
would prove most advantageous.
I also desire to call special attention to the uselessness of attempting
to economize by restricting the cost of work below the amount absolutely necessary to accomplish the object indicated. Instances are not
unfrequent in which the Department has been directed to erect certain
works, but has, at the same time, been prohibited from expending the
amount necessary to accomplish the object. The size and character of
buildings are necessarily determined by the use for which they are intended, and the size and character in turn determine the cost. If the
limit fixed by law, as the cost of the building, is below that required
by the necessities of the case, it is evident that the limit must be exceeded or the money wasted in the erection of a building worthless for
the purpose for which it was designed, and, consequently, to the Government. The inability of the Department to erect buildings. for the
amounts to which it has been limited has been, in many cases, the cause
of much criticism, but I would respectfully submit that it is scarcely
just to hold it responsible for estimates it has neither prex)ared nor indorsed, or to charge it with failure because it has been unable to accomplish impossibilities.
The system of returns, to which I called special attention in my last
report, has x^ioved an absolute check upon the expenditures on the
various buildings now in course of erection, and has enabled this office
to compare the cost of the different items of work in the several localities, and the efficiency of the various suxierintendents, and has furnished
an exhibit of the fluctuations in the cost; of each branch of labor, or of
material, during each month. It has also furnished reliable data for the
Xireparation of estimates, which are now carefully computed in detail.
I t gives me great pleasure to report that the estimates that have been
prepared in this office during the past two years have proved rema.rkably
accurate, and that, save in one or two exceptional cases on the Pacific
coast, where the cost of material and labor has exceeded all expectations, the cost of work has been kex^t within their amount.. The result,
of the various proposals received under advertisement during the-past
year has also, in every instance, furnished gratifying evidence of their
correctness.
The system of operations, explained in my former rexiorts, has been
adhered to with even more satisfactory results than heretofore, both as
regards the material and manufactured work furnished under contract,
and that performed by days' labor. The work has been, in.most cases,
of the most superior character, and in all good, while the cost has been,
as a rule, below average market rates in the same locality. At the same
time, if it were xiossible to award public in the same manner as private
contracts are awarded, much labor would be saved the Supervising
Architect, and it is probable that many other advantages would be found
to result therefrom, but public officers are virtually compelled to award
contracts to the lowest bidder, irrespective of his character or. reputation, even though they may know that he is dishonest or incompetent,,
or attemx^ting to obtain the work at an inadequate x^rice as a basis for
a subsequent claim against the. Government. The result is, of course,,
disastrous, while the bonds filed are practically worthless to the Government from^the difficulty of enforcing them.. Bonds are unnecessary
in contracting with honorable and responsible men, and utterly worthless as a x>rotection against rogues and shysters, thus placing the honest,,
hona fide bidder at the mercy of the dishonest and irresponsible one.
I desire to call special attention to the system adopted for the supply



SUPERVISING ARCtllTECT.

299^

of granite-work for the post offices at Boston and New York, by which
the contractor is allowed a stated percentage on the cost of the work,,
which is performed under the immediate supervision of a duly authorized agent of the Department. The advantages of this system maybe^
briefly stated as follow^s, namely, the work being performed under the
direction and x^crsonal supervision of an agent of the Government, therC'
is no opportunity for fraud, and there being a fixed and equitable profit
allowed, there is little or no temptation therefor, and no inducement to
furnish an inferior quality of work, or to delay the fulfillment of the contract. The interests of the Government and the contractor are made asnearly identical as possible, both being interested in having good and
satisfactory work done, and in having it completed as rapidly as possible. The operations of this system, where tested, have been most satisfactory, and, in my opinion, it is the most equitable one that has been
devised.
I again call attention to the necessity for an appropriation for the pay
of janitors for the various public buildings under the supervision of this
Department, there being at present no law under which they can be appointed or paid. Many of the most valuable buildings are occupied by
officers of various Departments, and, in the absence of a duly-axipointed.
guardian, are exxiosed to depredations and injury, and are virtually at.
the mercy of any evil-disposed person. This has been remedied as faras the power of the Department will permit by the designation of one
of the officers as custodian, but as this appointment is purely honorary,
and carries with it neither compensation nor authority to employ any
one to protect or clean the building, much valuable property is destroyed
or defaced. It appears to me that public property should receive at
least as much care as would be bestowed on private, and I am unable
to see any economy in neglect.
The small appropriations granted for repairs and preservation of
public buildings have not enabled the Department to keep them in
proper condition. Most of the buildings erected prior to the war were
defective in construction, and consequently have needed extensive repairs,, and, in maiiy cases, entire remodeling, including the reconstruction of important portions of the work. The buildings in the Southern
States were, without exception, so seriously injured during the warthat large expenditures were indispensable for their preservation. A
large number of buildings, including many of the most important,
are now much in need of repairs, and, with few exceptions, the necessity
for painting and renovation is pressing. I do not think the amount estimated for the next fiscal j^ear can be reduced with due regard to the
protection of the Government property, and is but two-thirds of one percent, on the value of the buildings; but I believe if they are once placed
in thorough and complete repair, they can be maintained in suitable
condition at a cost not to exceed one-half of the above x^ercentage.
I also desire to urge the importance of more liberal apxiropriations forfurniture. Few buildings now owned by the Government are properly
or even decently furnished—in many cases a few rickety chairs and
tables being the sole representatives of the extravagance that is supXiosed by many persons to pervade this branch of the Government exX^enditures. Experience has demonstrated the utter uselessness of supplying cheap and temporary articles; and that the only judicious plan
is the furnishing of all buildings in a proper manner with the necessary
number and kind of plain, substantial, and suitable articles, and then
holding officers for whose use they are designated to a rigid accountability for their projier preservation.



300

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

In this connection I desire most earnestly to recommend that the
practice of converting public buildings into establishments for .the
accommodation of retail venders of peanuts, apples, and other similar
commodities, be prohibited by law. The vestibules and approaches of
many of our buildings are, at present, disfigured, and the public incommoded, by the stalls that benefit no one but the owners. I am at a loss
to see why one citizen has not as good a right to carry on his private
business in a x^ublic building as another, or why certain favored persons
should enjoy a monopoly of these stands.
Most of the buildings under charge of this office w^ere erected at a
time when the subject of heating and ventilation received little attention; a matter now recognized as of vital importance, and an indispensable requisite in a x)ublic edifice. These buildings were, with few exceptions, heated with furnaces of antiquated construction that have been
abandoned as worthless, necessitating the introduction of suitable apparatus, which is being done as rapidly as the means at the disposal of the
Department will permit.
The system of x^roviding fuel, light, and water for each building from
one general appropriation has proved as advantageous as was anticiXiated, and has resulted in considerable saving to the Government, besides systematizing the expenditures under the proper head. The estimates submitted will, Avith proxier economy, prove sufficient for/the
purpose.
In conclusion I desire to say that, in the x^reparation of the estimatea
accomxianying this report, in the x^reparation of designs, and in the execution of the work performed under my suxiervision, I have endeavored
to conform strictly to your instructions to reduce all estimates and exXienditures to the lowest amount consistent with the necessities of the
Government and the requirements of good and permanent construction.
I also wish to express my gratification at the cordial sux3port and assistance I have received, and to return my sincere thanks therefor,
And remain, with great respect, your obedient servant,
A, B..MULLETT,'
Supervising Architeot,
Hon.

GEORGE, S. B O U T W E L L ,

Secretary of the Treasury.




Tabular statement of custom-houses, court-houses, post offices, branch mints, fc.,Mnder the charge of this office, exhibiting the cost of site, date of purchase, contract
price of construction, actual cost of construction, and the total cost of the worh, including site, alterations, and repairs, to June 30, 1870.
[NOTE.—Sums marked with an asterisk (*) denote "Bnilding and site."]
ISTatureand location of property.

Contract
Date of purchase of site. Cost of sit^. price of construction.

Actual cost
of construction.

Total cost
to J u n e 30,
1870.

$8,246 46
57, 913 64

$14, 396 46
77, 986 89
900 00
23, 037 77
105, 724 35
204, 155 47
37, 489 93

Remarks.

CUSTOM-HOUSES.

Alexandria, Va
Alexandria, Va
Astoria, Oreg
Astoria, Oreg., (new)
Bath, Me
Bangor, Me
Barnstable, Mass
Baltimore, Md
Baltimore, Md
Baltimore, Md
Belfast, Me
Boston, Mass
Bristol, K. I :
Buffalo, K . Y
Burlington, V t . . :
Cairo, III
Castine, Me
Charleston, S. C
Charleston, S. C
Cleveland, Ohio
'^
Cincinnati, Ohio
Chicago, ill
Chicago, n i
Chicago, III
Detroit, Mich
Dubuque, Iowa
Eastport, Me
Eastport, Me
Ellsworth, Me
Erie, P a
Galena, III
Galveston, Tex
Georgetown, D. C
Gloucester, Mass
Kennebunk. Me
Key West, Fla
Louisville, Ky

'

,
^.

Machias, M e
Middletown, Conn
Milwaukee, W i s




Nov.
May
Mar.
May
Feb.
June
Apr.
July
Feb.
May
Oct.
Aug.
Mar.
Jan.
Mar.
Apr.
Apr.
Eeb.
July
Apr.
Sept.
Jan.
July
Jan.
Nov.
Feb.
July
Apr.
July
Mar.
Sept.
Oct.
June
Nov.
July
Oct.
May
Feb.
Feb.

- 1820
,
1,1856
' 1856
,
• 1868
,
' 1852
,
>, 1 8 5 1
• 1855
,
1,1817
, 1853
! 1857
,
. 1856
,
1,1837
! 1856
,
: 1855
,
. 1855
,
\ 1866
, 1833
,1818
, 1849
,
1,1856
, 1851
1,1855
, 1857
,
1,1865
1,1855
, 1857
. 1830
,
, 1847
. 1855
,
! 1849
,
, 1857
,1855
, 1856
, 1855
,
\ 1832
i 1833
,
, 1851
, 1870
; 1833
,
1,18.55

*$6, 000 00
16, 000 00
900 00
8, 000 00
15, 000 00
15, 000 00
1,500 00
*70, 000 00
*110, 000 00
*207, 000 00
5, 600 00
180, 000 00
4, 400 00
45, 000 00
7, 750 00
*1,200 00
=^•60, 000 00
130, 000 00
30, 000 00
50, 000 00:
26, 000 00
34, 200 00
8, 400 00
24, 000 00
20, 000 00

$37,149 37
47, 594 36
45, 584 39
17, 250 00

17, 500 00
17, 522 00
117, 769 05
28, 238 40

90,182 65
103, 698 13
34, 433 71

Old building
Old site.
In course of erection.
QQ

Part of present building.
Do

741 60 Including both of above.
451, 672 61
34, 340 25
38, 534 82
886, 658 00 1,109, 422 13
28, 297 00
23, 952 68
284, 092 00
191, 764 34
40, 036 96
71, 209 96 In course of erection ; site donated.
104 35
^ 180,
13, 030 72
70, 000 00 Old building.
2,119,232 40
189, 812 82
138, 236 30
362, 406 41
242,197 23
365 694 18

468, 343 53 Additional site.

103,160 66
87, 334 50

214,020 61
179, 095 96
32, 509 60
21, 629 84

43, 056 20
26, 646 42
32, 145 14
82, 130 02
131, 014 60
67, 270 51
50, 754 82
2, 348 42
8, 796 48
303, 728 61
1,000 00
32, 801 83
190,

o
o
H

m
a

218, 464 81
199, 772 71

30, 500 00
9, 200 00

a

Old building ; acquired for debt.
2, 780 00
3, 000 00
*29, 000 00
16, 500 00
6, 000 00
5, 000 00
9, 000 00
*1, 575 00
*4, 000 00
16,000 00
1, 000 00
3,500 00
12, 200 00

43,
94,
41,
26,

629
470
582
596

00
74
00
78

61,372 44
108, 359 82
55,368 15
40, 765 11

148,1.53 00

246, 640 75

130,064" 03

12,176 64
161, 779 61

O
H4

Statement of custom-houses, court-houses, post offices, branch mints, fc,—Continuecl.
O
IN:)

N a t u r e a n d location of p r o p e r t y .

D a t e of p u r c h a s e of s i t e .

Cost of s i t e .

Contract
p r i c e of construction.

A c t u a l cost
of c o n s t r u c tion.

T o t a l cost
t o J u n e 30,
1870.

Bemarks.

C USTOM-HOUSES—Continued.
Mobile, A l a
Nashville, Tenn
Newark, N. J
N e w Bedford, M a s s .
Newburyport, Mass.
N e w Haven, Conn ..
N e w London, C o n n . .
N e w Orleans, L a . . . .
N e w p o r t , R. I
N e w York, N. Y . . . .
N e w York, N. Y . . . .
Norfolk, V a
Norfolk, V a
Ogdensburg, N. Y . . .
Cswego, N . Y
Plattsburg, N. Y ....
Pensacola, Ela
Petersburg, Va
Pittsburg, P a
Philadelphia, P a . . . .
Plymouth, N. C
Portsmouth, N. H . . .
Portland, Me
Providence, E. I
Providence, R. 1
P o r t l a n d , Oreg
Richmond, V a
S a n F r a n c i s c o , Cal
S a n d u s k y , Ohio
Savannah, Ga
Salem, Mass
St. L o u i s , M o
St. P a u l , M i n n
Suspension Bridge, N. Y .
Toledo, Ohio
W a l d o b o r o ,Me . . .
Wheehng, W . Va .. .
Wilmington, N . C . . . . . .
Wilmington, N. C
Wilmington, Del




Oct.
Feb.
May
Apr.
Aug.
June
May
Jan.
Sept.
Dec.
Apr.
Dec.
Feb.
Eeb.
Dec.
June
Eeb.
May
Aug.
May
June
Oct.
Dec.
Nov.
Oct.
Apr.
June
Sept.
Dec.
Dec.
June
Oct.
Apr.
May
Feb.
Nov.
Sept.
Mar.
May
May

1856
1851
1844
1834
1857
1828
1S66
1817
1854
1868
1853
1654
1854
1845
1818
1851
1867
1867
1855
1852
1855
1819
1845
1853

$415, 606
20, 000
166, 441
109, 873 00
24, 500 00
35, 228
26, 960
23,188 50
203, 951
158, 614 50
88, 000 00
21, 411
14, 600 00
2, 929, 264 50 2, 984, 980
12, 684
9,100 00
70, 000
1, 277, 888
34, 352 33
47, 002
203, 893 75
225, 387
218, 037 87
232," 191
114, 012 03
133, 958
77,255 00
66, 425 17
73, 550
51, 224 94
49,177 43
51, 821
27,115 00
84, 664 88
103, 351
67, 619 88
99, 747 00
152, 035
39, 866 00
320, 234
2, 932
145, 046 91
82, 728 96
173, 706

1851
$12, 500 00
1857
20, 000 00
1855
50, 000 00
1833
4, 900 00
1833
3, 000 00
1855
25, 500 00
1833
3, 400 00
1848
1829
1, 400 00
1816
*70, 000 00
1865 1,000, 000 00
1817
%000 00
1852
13, 500 00
1857
8, 000 00
1854
12, 000 00
1856
000 00
15, 000 00
41, 000 00
*257, 000 00
*2, 506 00
19, 500 00
5, 500 00
35. 000 00
3, OOO 00
40, 000 00
15, 000 00
61, 000 00
150, 000 00
11, 000 00
20, 725 00
5, 000 00
37, 000 00
16, 000 00
*6, 000 00
12, 000 00
2, 000 00
20, 500 00
*14, 000 00
1, 000 00
3, 500 00

$382,159 93

81, 252 90

1

75
00
33
62
80
22
95
83
88
00
32
33
66
77
75
40
48
33
85
79
70
72

Site d o n a t e d .

O

P a r t of site of s u b - t r e a s u r y . •
Merchants' Exchange purcnased.
Old b u i l d i n g .

O

S i t e a c q u i r e d from Spain.

i25

451, 023 40

151, 000 00

10 504 00
209, 841 71

110, 000 00
400, 000 00
47, 560 00

194, 404 47
628, 581 49
64, 019 41
156, 434 35
14,271 77
321, 987 08

45,530 11
15, 800 00
85, 070 82

83, 543 52
22, 824 68
96, 618 64
42,039 75
40,146 34

I n course of erection.

16, 492
261, 444
70,150
287, 429
805, 687
75, 565
194, 817
35, 838
382, 46'3
175, 000
25, 883
96, 312
25,132
125, 307

Old b u U d i n g ; u s e d as w a r e h o u s e .

26
91
81
50
84
05
80
59
61
00
37
41
93
71

59, 971 70
46, 960 29

I n course of erection.

D e s t r o y e d b y fire, J a n u a r y , 1840.
B u i l t on site of above.

o

Wiscasset, Me., (old)
Wiscasset, Me

Nov. 23,1848
June 20,1868

*2, 000 00
1, 800 00

July
Oct:Jan.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
June
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.

50,000 00
12, 000 00
10, 000 00
23, 000 00
500 00
6, 000 00
4, 000 00
6, 000 00
7, 000 00
12, 000 00
*6,185 34
1,100 00
10, 253 00
11, 000 00
600 00

23, 250 00

8 , 178 15 Destroyed b yfire,Oct. 9, 1866, and site sold April,
"
1870
25, 050 00

»LA.RINE HOSPITALS.

r

Chelsea, M a s s . . .
Cleveland, Ohio .
Chicago, 111
Detroit, Mich . . .
Key West, F l a . .
Louisville, Ky ..
Mobile, Ala
Natchez, Miss
New Orleans, L a . . .
Norfolk, Va
Ocracoke, N. C
Pitt.sburg, Pa
Portland, Me
San Erancisco, Cal.
St. Louis. Mo
Vicksburg, Miss . . .
Wilmington, N. C ..

DelMay
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Mar.
June
Eeb.
Mar.

12,1858
11.1837
22,1867
19.1855
30,1844
3,1842
20.1838
25.1856
9,1837
7,1855
16,1800
15,1843
7, 1842
22,1852
13.1852
7,1850
25.1853
28.1856
17.1857

4, 500 00
4, 700 00
6, 500 00

122,185 39
20, 000 00

233, 015 31
79, 972 05

54, 637 12

78, 215 14
25, 600 00
53, 591 28

374,160 80
110, 489 10
160, 856 19 In coiirse of. erection.
106, 243 03
31, 378 13
90, 631 78 •
64, 540 00

-429, 395 79

59, 785 37
496,162 05

66, 200 00

8, 927 07
50, 420 32
84, 758 73
224, 000 00
85, 712 63

57, 021 02
28, 968 25

66, 785 37
528,134 34
15, 845 10 Sold October 12,1869.
10,327 07
66, 976 05
121, 603 22
232, 471 10
98, 458 03 Site ceded by War Department.

67, 525 16

<!

76, 975 16

37, 346 04

43, 897 44

COURT-HOUSES, E T C .

Baltimore, Md
Boston, Mass
Boston, Mass., post office and sub-treasury.
Des Moines, Iowa
Indianapolis, Ind
Key West, Pla
:
Memphis, Tenn
Madison, Wis
Omaha. Nebr., post office
New York, N. Y
Portland, Me

June 6.1859
Mar.
Oct.
Nov.
Apr.
June
Mar.
May
Apr.

— , 1859
25,1868
16.1866
5,1856
28,1858
6.1860
25.1867
19,1870
11,1867

Philadelphia, Pa .
Raleigh, N. C ..-..
Rutland, Vt
St. Augustine, Ela .
Springtield, 111
Windsor, Vt

Oct.
Aug.
July
May
Mar.
Mar.

50, 000 00
*105, 000 00
4,58, 415 00
15, 000 00
17,160 00
3, 000 00
15, 000 00

263, 100 66
119, 198 40
663, 535 00 In course of erection.
Do.
194, 839 64
202, 79^, 69
3, 000 00
15, 000 00
255, 306 23 In course of erection ; site donated.

98, 983 79

500, COO 00

1, 278,483 61
302. 906 63

6.1860
7,1860
4,18.57
17,'1859

*161, 000 00
7, 700 00
1, 400 00
• 500 00
6, 000 00
4, 700 00

287, 271 17
71, 347 32

May 3,1865
Nov. 2,1835
Aug. 3,1835

1, 500 00
1, 050 00

26, 000 00
69, 588 33

>
o
H
O

247, 784 11
7, 700 00

2,1857
4,1857

Site donated.
In course of erection.
In course of erection on site of old custom-house,
destroj^ed by fire in 1854. (Exclusive of site.)

P

55, 701 75
2, 000 00 Acquired from Spain.
302, 762 33
85, 905 33

UNITED STATES MIXTS.

Carson City, Nev.
Charlotte, N. C .. Dahlonega, Ga




* Building and site.

292, 000 00 Including machinery ; site donated.
36, 756 65
69, 588 33

03

O

C;5

statement of custom-houses, court-houses, post offices, branch mints, fc.—Con tinned.

Nature and location of property.

Date of purchase of site.

Cost of site.

Actual cost
Contract
price of con- of construction.
struction.

Total cost
to June 30.
1870.

OS

O

Remarks.

UNITED STATES SIINTS—Continued.

Dalles City, Oreg . .
Denver City, Colo..
New Orleans, La . . .
Philadelphia, P a . . .
San Francisco, Cal.
San Francisco, Cal .

Feb.
Nov.
June
July
Apr.
Mav
Jan?

28,1868
25,1862
19,1835
18,1792
30,1829
2,-1854
1,1867

•^$25, 000 00
*5, 466
*31, 666
*283, 929
100, 000

$327, 548 55
207,101 25

66
67
10
00

$94, 413 56 In course of erection ; site donated.
93, 377 69
614, 825 88
230,508 03

300, 000 00
468,158 54

Old building.
In course of erection.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Baltimore, Md., appraisers' stores
Bois6 City, Idaho, assay office
New York, N. Y., assay office
New York, N. Y., post office
...,..'
New York, N. Y., sub-treasury
New York, N. Y., barge office
New York, N. Y., Pine street building. No. 23.
New Orleans, La., quarantine w a r e h o u s e . . . . . .
Pass k I'Outre, La., boarding station
:
Philadelphia, Pa., appraisers' stores
.San Francisco, Cal., appraisers' stores
Santa F6, N. Mex., capitol New Mexico
.'.
Santa F6, N. Mex., penitentiary, New Mexico .
Southwest Pass, La.,, boarding "station.'.
.•..
• Washington, D. C , treasury building




June
July
Aug.
Oct.
Jan.
Mar.

10,1833
8,1869
21,1854
29.1860
9; 1833
30,1867
— , 1859
Sept. 23,1858
Feb.
1.1856
Mar. 2.1857
Feb.
May

1,1S56
— , 1854
9,1857.

41, 444
885
358
000
212
000
626
865
092
556

.^30, 000 00
*530, 000 00
*200, 000 00
200, 000 00
10, 000 00
*11,137 60

(*)
*250, 000 00
5, 000 00

$31, 984 00
10, 900 00

713,
250,
1, 249,
125,
13,
39, 865 12 ' 39,
12, 000 00
16,
500,
93, 566 75
45, 000 00
20, 000 00

103,
63,
20,
7,
6, 751,

804
720
000
335
528

77
83
75
00
08
00
57
12
40
69
55
39
00
70
94

S
o

In course of erection ; site donated."
Formerly custom-house.
Sea-walL
Building and site donated.
Use of. site granted by city of New Orleans. In course of erection on site of Pennsylvania Bank
building.

o
QC

SUPERVISING

305

ARCHITECT.

Tabular statement of appropriations for the erection or repair of public buildings, <f-c., under
control of this office, showing available balance June 30,1870.

.So

2s

Nature and location of work, &c.

CUSTOM HOUSES, ETC.

Astoria, Oreg
Bangor, Me
Furniture for ditto..
Cairo, 111
Charleston, S. C
Castine, Me
Detroit, Mich
Knoxville, Tenn
Macbias, Me
Mobile, Ala
Nashville, Tenn
New Orleans, La
Ogdensburg, N. Y
Furniture for ditto.
Portland, Me
Portland, Oreg
Philadelphia, Pa
Richmond, Va
Savannah. Ga
St.Paul, M i n n . . . .
,
Toledo, Ohio
Wiscasset, Me
Furniture for ditto.

$14, 432 74
484 76
145 83

19, 740 00
ioi'21.5 69

$5,
12,
40,
25,

000 00
000 00
000 00
000 00
600 00
1, .500 m
100, 568 19
15, 000 00
25, 000 00
.5, 003 00
1.5, 000 GO
90, 000 00
50, 000 00

$14, 432 34
484 76
5,417 73
40,145 83
10, 540 00

1, 150 00
15, OCO 00
202 16

3, 500 00

37,754 10
0, 283 03
34, 393 40
3, 614 33
• 55 38
J
2, 743 33
12, 576 57

42, 7.54 10
15, 000 00
95, 628 00
54, 274 21
3, 446 77
2.5, 000 00
1.5, 000 00
50, 155 38
2, 743 33
12, 626 57
390 95

100, 000 00
10, 000 00

2, 506 36
17, 667 28
10, 000 00

25, 000 00
15, 000 00
'75, 000 00

$5, 000 00
6, 582 27
14, 460 00
600 00
1, . 0 ^0
50
100, 568 19
18, . 9 00
50
104, 013 . 3
5
25, 000 00
655 03
29,849 19
167 56

57 00
3,109 05

MARINE HOSPITALS.

2, 506 36
17, 667 28

' Chelsea, Mass.
Chicago, III...
Portland, Me ..

100, 012 73

COURT-HOUSES, ETC.

Boston post office, &c., Mass .
< lolumbia, S. C
Des Moines, Iowa
Furniture for ditto
Madison, Wis
New York. N. Y
Omaha, Nebr
Portland, Me
Springfield, HI
Furniture for ditto

700, COO 00
75, 000 00
24, 573 00
12, 000 00
8 J 000 00
,
383 .17
273, 422 79 1, 2',0, 000 00
25, 000 00
45, 000 00
72, 484 65
12, 000 00
5, 275 30
15, 000 00

. 466 77
,
226 00
\, 333 23
399 82
886 30

498 175 84
74, 774 00
18, 740 96
12, 000 00
703,199 30
25, 000 00

484 65
275 30
OuO 00

UNITED STATES MINTS, ETC.

Bois6 City assay office, Idaho . .
Dalles City branch mint, Oreg .
San FrancioCO, Cal
San Francisco, Cal., (old)

75, 000 00
58,093 78
131,3.57 49
33, 700 00

885 83
.54.146 75
308, 208 59

74,114 17
5, 580 44
131, 970 10
*45, 000 00

49, 443 08
42, 542 75
20, 000 00
106,111 96
65, 000 00 76, 602 64

1,130 65
22, 457 27

"360,660 66

MISCELLANEOUS.

Furniture and repairs of furniture for public buildings
Fuel, light, &c., for public buildings
Heating' apparatus for public buildings
Barge office, New York^ N. Y
'.
Appraisers' stores, Philadelphia, Pa
Preservation and protection of public buildings not
completed
Repairs and preservation of public buildings
Extension of Treasury building
Alterations of Treasury building
Stone work and west center stairs of Treasury
building
File rooms under porticoes of Treasury building ..
Vaults, safes, and locks for depositories

299 45
106,111 96
11, 602 64
5, r02 56
1, 098 13

3, 627 46

* $11,300 repayment.

20 P



50,000 00
65, 00.) 00
20, 000 00

2.5, 000 00 25, 000 00
140, LiOO 00 135, 416 67
.1,0.50 42
68, 500 00
68, 500 00
' 7, 500 00 7, 500 00
9, 500 00
8, 364 90
25, 000 00 28, 627 46

13, 396 17
47 71
213 80
1,135 10

306

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Tabular statement of expendi tures authorized and made from th.e appropriation for repairs and
preservation of public buildings during the fiscalyear ending June 30, 1870.

N a t u r e a n d location of b u i l d i n g .

CUSTOM-HOUSES.

Alexfindria V a
Bath, Me
Bang(r,Me
Brnliri"t< >n V t
Boston !Mflss
B a l t i more. M d
Bnfliilo N Y
Ch-'vt'land Ohio
Chnrleston, S. C
Castine, M e
Chicago IU
C i n c i n n a t i Ohio. .

. . . .

Detroit, Mich
Eastport. Me
E r i e , -Pa
Gal en a 111
Gloucester, M a s s
Ivev W e s t F l a
Loriisvilb'), K v
Miiw.ivil^ee W^is
Mobile, A l a
Norlolk V a
N e w Orleans L a
Newark, N. J

.. .

Newport, li. I
N e w York. N . Y
Portsnioutii, N. H
P e n sn col a," F l a
Pittsburg, P a

Authorized and
expended.
' N a t u r e aud locatiori of b u i l d i u g .
Plattsburg, N. Y
Providence. K. I
$25 00
Richmond, Va
283 f>4
San F r a n c i s c o . Cal
8, 507 24 S a n d u s k y Ohio
15, 411 65
St. L o n i s Mo
. - .
7, 477 84
Tolwlo, Ohio
524 03
Wilmingtoji. D e l
1, 61 \. 23 W h e e l i n g AV V a
247 71
716 .58
MARINE HOSPITALS.
11, 572 19
870 21 Clcvela,nd. Ohio
Norfolk V.T,
1, 505 42
116 75
Portland M e
992 67
San F r a n c i s c o , Cal
958 15
160 00 CO URT-H 0 U S E S A^T) POST OFFICES.
3, 600 98
2,221. 70
Baltimore, M d
969 71 Bo.ston, M a s s
^ 96 82
Indianapolis, I n d
290 45 Pliiladelphia, P a
Rutland Vt
273 40
92 70
MISCELLANEOUS.
40 00
1,959 27
2, 708 79 B a l t i m o r e , Md.,
appraisers'
13, 085 55 1 stores
Charlotte, N. C , branch m i n t . .
220 65
4, 842 27 N e w York,'N, Y., s u b - t r e a s u r y
N e w Y o r k , N . Y., P i n e - s t r e e t
7,931 07
building, No. 23
140 25
San F r a n c i s c o , Cal., a p p r a i s e r s '
381 55
stores
589 37

Authorized and
expended.
•

$659
241
1 734
432
42
1,239
5,957
1, 560
99

50
98
49
00
00
44
03
00
25

369
149
2,749
1, 528

79
75
62
58

110 95
2, 954 04
3, 280 83
2, 404 59
649 61

'

7, 345 07
407 05
3, 368 90
2 400 00
3, 838 36

Tal)ular statement of expenditures authorized and made from the appropriation for heating apparatus for x^nblic buildings during the fiscal year ending June 30,1870.

N a t u r e a n d location of b u i l d i n g .

Authorized and
e x p e ided.

CUSTOM-HOUSES.

E a s t n o r t MeN e w Y(.rk, N . Y
Portland Me

$308 95
486 67
4, 500 00

N a t u r e aud location of b u i l d i n g .

Madison, AYis
Portland, Me

Authorized and
expended.
$4, 500 00
4, 500 00

A P P R A I S E R S ' STORES.

Baltimore, M d

4,104 38

COURT-HOUSES, ETC.

1. 600 00 '

Tabula.r statement of expenditures authorized and made from the appropriation for furniture
and repairs of fu)niturG for public buildings during ihe year ending June 30, 1870.
N a t u r e and location of b u i l d i n g .

Authorized and
j Na,ture a n d location of b u i l d i n g .
expended.

CUSTOM-HOUSILS.

Ba.n ffor M e
BoRtoviT Ma ss
Baltimore. M d
Bufialo N Y
Cleveland, Ohio
Cha.rleston. S. C
Castine Me
C i n c i n n a t i , Ohio




$6'11 00
1,549 85
I, 424. 74
188 78
227 50
984 11
583 27
823 50
482 50 1

Chicago, 111
Dubuque. Iowa
Detroit Mich
Erie, P a .. . .
Galena,, HI
GcoT'g<^town, D . C
Gloucester, Alass
Louisville, K y
M i h v a u k e e , AiVis
Mobile, A l a
Norfolk, V a

,

Authorized and
exi^ended.
$401
794
652
25
260
25
209
788
681
230
44

05
25
13
00
00
00
00
70
50
00
13

SUPERVISING

307

ARCHITECT.

Tabular statement of expenditures authorized fc.—Continued.

N a t u r e a n d location of b u i l d i n g .

Authorized and
expended.

N a t u r e a n d location of b u i l d i n g .

Authorized and
expended.

CUSTOM-HOUSES.

0""densburg, N . Y
P e t e r s b u r g A'^a . . . .
Pensacola Fla
Philadelphia P a
Pittsburg Pa
P r o v i d e n c e , R. I
Richmond Va
Suspension B r i d g e , N . Y
San Francisco, Cal
St Louis M o . . .
Toledo, Ohio
N e w Orleans, L a
N e w H a v e n , Conn
Nev,''London, Conn . . .
N e w York, N. Y




$1, 532
400
.55
1, 772
3, 634
59
149
387
1,149
290
2, 562
205
835
330
2, 263

74
00
00
38
50
50
00
20
50
00
06
00
51
60
21

Wilmington, Del
Wheeliu"- AV V a

$784 45
75 00

COURT-HOUSES, ETC.

Boston, M a s s
Indianapolis I n d . .
Philadelnhia P a
Rutland, V t
Springfield HI

..

1, 018 35
2 662 13
907 37
166 74
4 144 66

MISCELLANEOUS.

Boston p o s t office, M a s s
Charlotte branch mint, N. C . . .

8 465 95
'224 65




REPORT OF CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF STATISTICS.







REPORT

CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF STATISTICS,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Bur eate of Statistics^ Octoher 31 ^ 1870.
S I R : I have the honor to submit the follovviBg report of the operations
of this Bureau during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1870 :
CLERICAL FORCE,

The clerical force of the Bureau at the close of the year consisted of
31 male and 8 female clerks, Avho were employed as folioNVS:
Number of clerks.
Division.

Name of ch ief.

Fxami nation
Compilation
Tonnage a.iid immigration
Registi'y of mei'cliant marine .
RcAHsion and rniscella,neous ...
Pnblication a,nd miscellaneous
Libiary and til es

J. N. Whitney.
Tbomas Cle.ar..
L. F. AV^ard
J. B. Parker ....
A. W. Angerer*
Ja,ni(is Ryan
E. F. M.'Faehtz

18
3 •

4
3

* Mr. Augerer is also translator to the Bureau.

In addition to the female clerks above designated, one has char'ge of
tbe correspondence, and anotber is a copyist.
At tbe present time the clerical force consists of one chief clerk, (Mr.
E. B. Elliott, AAdio was appointed in September last,) 32 male, a,nd 7
female clerks.
WORK OE THE BUREAU.

Owing to the peculiar and A^aried character of the work iierformed in
tbe Bureau, it is impossible to furnisb a tabular exhibit which shall
indicate its nature and extent.
Examination.—In the division of examination, for example, the following work Avas performed:
Number of pages of letters written
Letters acknowledged, over
Acknowledgments of statements, written
Statements examined
Statements called for
Statements corrected by correspondence

•

4, 639
2, 000
3, 600
24, 000
400
1, 000

The aboA^e figures give, however, a A^ery inadequate conception of the
critical and elaborate examination ofthe various monthly and quarterly



312

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

returns from the several custom-houses, or of the A^ariety of work of a
miscellaneous character accompbshed in that division.
Compilation.—The same remark is applicable to the other divisions,
especially to those in wbicb tbe clerks are engaged in tbe compilation
ofthe statistics of commerce, a labor which, in addition to the preparation of statements for members of Congress and others, cannot be fully
expressed by figures.
Immigration,—The infiux of alien passengers, who intend to make this
country their future home, has been deemed of sucb vital interest to our
material prosperity, that the collection and digest of the statistics of
immigration bave been assigned to and constitute the principal pa.rt of
the duties of one division. Mu(j.li care has been exercised to obtain and
publisb accurate statements of the age, sex, nationalit}^, occupation, &c.,
of immigrants. Systematic inquiries instituted during the j^ear bave
rcA^ealed tlie fact that large numbers come a.cross the Canadian frontier,
either directly from the British Provinces, or througb them from Europe,
of Avhich moA^ement previous reports liaA^e furnished no account; and it
is to be regretted tha;t the condition of mucli of tbe northern frontier, as
to facility of crossing, and also a.s to the a.bsence of means and regulations
for the iiroper registry of persons entering our territory, is such, that
full and trustworthy returns are at present impra.cticable.
Emigration.—The importance of securing statistics of the departure
of emigrants from this country has also been recognized, and special
eflibrts have been made to.render them as complete as possible in the
total a.bsence of compulsory legislation on tbe subject.
Numbering vessels^ tonnage, (&c.—Agreeably to the requirements of tbe
act of Jul3'28, 1866, the second annual statementof ''A^essels registered,
enrolled, and licensed under the laws of the United States, designating
the class, name, tonnage, and place of registry," as well as the official
number arid signal letters aAA^axded to each A^essel, A ^s prepared, and
Aa
• 5,000 copies published. The officers of customs, tbe commanders of
United States war vessels, and the largest merchant vessels engaged in
the fbreign trade, as well as the principal ship-owners, baA^e been supplied witb it. A supplement has also been publislied, completing tbe
record to April 22, 1870. A similar statement, shoAving the merchant
A^essels of the United States up to June 30,1870, bas been compiled, and
Avill shortly be sent to press.
As in other departments of inquiry, accuracy and completeness have
been the first considerations. Difticulties an obtaining iirompt and
accurate returns fromthe various collectors and surA^eyors of customs
liave, by persistence, been surmounted, so that the Bureau is now able
to publish the condition of our mercbant marine Avitb confidence as to
its correctness.
A table exhibiting the number of vessels a.nd amount of tonnage
belonging to the several customs districts of the United States on the
30tli of June, 1870, geographically classified, is appended to this report.
The tonnage of the country was in the aggregate 3,946,150 tons, showing a net increase over that at the close of tbe preceding fiscal year of
only 201,831 tons.
Fublicatw7is.—The monthly reports of this Bureau liaA^e, during tbe
past year, been regularly published, and at the earliest date possible
after the receipt-of the returns. As they have been widely distributed,
it is unnecessary to append to this report tbe statements Avhicli they
contain, relative to the trade of the country.
The publication of tlie annual report of Commerce and IiaAdgation has
usually been many months delayed, owing in part to the time required



CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF STATISTICS.

313

to correct, by correspondence witb the distant custom-bouses, the many
erroneous returns, and the great labor necessary to compile the numerous statements, and in part to the pressure at this period of the year of
otlier official work at the office of the Congressional Printer. Unusual
efforts ha-A^e, howcA^er, been made, am;! are making, to haA^e the A^olunie
for the fiscal year 1870 ''submitted to Congress in a printed form on the
1st of Deceinber," in accordance witli the jirovisions of the act under
which tbe Bureau was established.
In this connection, the undersigned calls attention to the increased fullness and accuracy of all the publications of the Bureau. Whileit has been
his aim to make the published statements absolutely correct, itis gratifying to know that tbe iraproA^'ement exhibited in the closer approach to
acctiracy has been recognized and acknowledged.
Difficulty of ohtaining accurate statistics.—Considerable difficulty has
been experienced in obtaining from collectors of customs full and accurate data relative to our foreign commerce; an experience which is not
surprising, Avhen we consider the vast extent of our seacoast, the number of small custom-houses, and the fact that the utility and aim of statistical inquiries are far from being generally appreciated or understood.
The values of articles which pay ad valorem duties, and the quantities
of those Avhich are charged with specific im\)0^t'^., have been given with
approximate accuracy. But to supply the Bureau with the true valines
of both ad valorem s and specifics, wi thi the quantities, and above all witli
the correct A^alues of the articles exported, was a service which many
custom-house officers not only in small or remote ports, but in some of
our largest cities, regarded as alike unnecessary and impracticable. The
task of insisting upon such returns, and of impressing the officers Avith
a conviction of their importance for legislative and other statistieal purposes, has been no light one. Although the result of the efforts made
in this direction has not been all that could be desired, yet a decided
and most encouraging improvement lias taken place.
USEFULNESS OF THE BUREAU FOR LEG-ISLATIVE AND OTHER PURPOSES.

During the last session of Congress the serAdces ofthe Bureau Avere
called into requisition to an unusual extent, and its usefulness recognized
by members of botli Houses of the illation al Legislature.
While the periodical statements of the trade of the country giA^en in
the published monthly reports of the Bureau afforded reliable data for
legislative purposes, those of a miscellaneous character baA^e also furnisiied a A^ariety of information of great A^alue. The tariffs of foreign
countries, translated and published in comparison with each other and
Avith the rates of duty in the United States, the statements of the population, agriculture, commerce, manufacturing and mining industry, cost of
labor and of subsistence, of the railways, telegraphs, postal facilities, &c.,
of the states of the Old World, as well as of our own trade with Canada,
Mexico, South America, the West India Islands, &c., haA^e from time to
time been published, and in many instances at so early a date as to anticipate the demands of Congress and the public, and to prove of practical utilit^'^ as a basis and guide to legislation.
CONSULAR REPORTS.

The reports of our ministers and consuls abroad are carefully examined, ancl such information as appears to be of value to the commercial
community selected for and published in the monthly reports of the
Bureau.



314

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

These consular reports frequently afford information, of great jn:'actical
Arable, not merely to the mercantile class of tbe community, but to tbe
public at large. Although some of the foreign representatives of our
Government obtain, and systematically furnish, early and A-aluable intelligence, yet, it is to be regretted that tlie custom of making sucb
communications to the Treastiry Department is not general, and that
our consular body in this respect is behind those of the leading commercial nations of Europe.
Wbile it is. gratifying to be alile to select for publication from tlie A^ery
complete reports made to the British Government by its enterprising
representatives in otlier countries, it is a source of chagrin that our
Government has not contributed its full quota of information of the
character desired. Yet, tlie hope is indulged that at no distant day the .
commercial reports of our legations and consuls will regularly supply
full and trustworthy information of the countries to Avhich they are
accredited.
INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS.
In the report of my immediate predecessor allusion Avas made to the
fact that the act establishing the Bureau required the officer in charge
''to collect, digest, and arrange for the use of Congress, statistics of the
manufactures ofthe UnitedStates, their localities, sources of raw materials, markets, exchanges with the producing regions of the country
transportation of products, Avages, and such other conditions as are found
to affect their prospeiity." With the explanation, therein given by Mr.
Walker, of the obstacles AA'hich prevented the accomplishment of tbe
A\^ork above specified, obstacles which still continue, I fully concur.
As tlie publication of the census returns of the products of industry,
giving in detail a,ndA\nth approximate accuracy most of the information
indicated in the clause just quoted, may be expected during tlie*ensuing
year, it is deemed inexpedient to make extraordinary efforts to obtain at
this time returns of like character, but which must necessarily be inconililete. As, however, the subject possesses, great and increasing importance it should not be lost sight of, but in the succeeding years of this
decade the eaxnest and persistent efforts of the Bureau should be directed
to obtaining and publishing trustworthy information in regard tothe extent and condition of our manufacturing industry.
Ill a new and sparsely settled country like ours the practical utility of
the statistics of manufactures and mining is obvious. Taken at regular
annual intervals, they Ax^ould show the growth of these industries, and
would also afford the means of testing and measuring the infiuence of
the dilferent circumstances and conditions in promoting or retarding
such growth. The extent of each branch, the number of persons indirectly as Avell as directly supported by it, its relative condition as to locality, and its deA^elopment in different sections of the country, its influence on
agriculture and on commerce; these, and other facts, if periodically placed
before legislators and the public, Avould not only afford data for an intelligent estimate of the A'alue of eacb industry to the nation, but would
indicate ^^'itll tolerable clearness the measures required to furnish the
conditions of general prosperity.
During the continuance of the excise tax upon manufactures, it was
easy to deduce from the receipts of revenue the A^alues of the A^arious
products—a source of information Avhich has been cut off' b^^ the abolition of the tax. It is, however, worthy of inquiiy Avhether returns
similar to those formerly made b^^ the assessors should not still be re


CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF STATISTICS.

315

quired for statistical purposes simply, and whether the machinery of
the Internal Eevenue Bureau, with its trained and intelligent ofiicers,
might not be advantageously employed in the accomplishment of the
desired object. The labor thus imposed would, it is obvious, be much
lighter than when the facts weie required lor purpo^ses of taxation.
As the true object of the inquiry Avould be known, and as annoying
details niight be dispensed witli, the information desired could, in general, be obtained with great completeness and accuracy.
As compared with the other great interests, agriculture and commerce,
manufacturing industry has not received that attention, from a statistical point of view, Avhicbits importancje demanded. While agriculture
bas been deemed worthy- of the creation of a special department to
mark its progress and make known its condition, and Avhile commerce
bas, from the earliest iieriod, been made the subject of statistical record,
emplojdng UOAV, besides others in the Treasuiy Department, the principal part of the force of this Bureau in obtaining, examining, and compiling statistics in relation to it, manufacturing industry, it is respectfully submitted, has not receiA^'ed that share of careful consideration to
Avhich it is justly entitled.
TRANSPORTATION.
One of the objects contemplated in the legislation previously referred
to possesses great interest, viz., that relative to the transportation of
products, to attain Avliich, extraordinary efforts sliould be made. It is
particularly important that the movement of the crops toward the seaboard, and of merchandise to the interior, whether by rail or by canal,
lake, and river, should be ascertained and made public. All the information as yet obtained on this subject relates to the movements of commerce on the northern lakes, and on the canals of the State of New York,
together with sucb reports of transportation over railroads as their directors choose to publislu In the absence of compulsory legislation in
this direction, earnest efforts will be made to obtain, from the officers of
tbe great lines of railway, annual statements of the movement of iiroduce and merchandise over those lines.
COST OF LABOR AND SUBSISTENCE.

The single word " wages" in the paragraph already quoted opens into
a wide field of inquiry. The subject indicated has engaged the thoughtful consideration of the ablest statesmen and economists of the age, and
is now occui^yingtbe attention o f t h e more progressiA^e governments
of Europe. Impressed with its iinportance, and atthe suggestion of the
tben Special Commissioner of the Eevenue, the undersigned, about a year
ago, prepared and transmitted to the proprietors or superintendents of
mills and factories, and to the assessors of internal revenue, circulars, making inquiries as to tbe rates paid in different parts of the
country, for factory, farm, and mechanical labor. To guide in forming
an intelligent estimate of the purchasing power of wages in different
localities inquiries Avere also instituted as to the cost of proAdsions, groceries, and other leading articles of consumption. Erom the replies
obtained in response to these circulars received from every part of the
countr}^, tables baA^e beeii compiled showing the rates of wages paid in
the respective years 1861 and 1869: I, for factory; II, for mechanical;
and III, for farm labor; also IY, giving the prices of leading articles of
subsistence and domestic use, in each State and Territory, during the



316

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

same years. These tables were printed at the instance of the Speciai
Commissioner, and one thousand additional copies ordered by the Bureau for distribution. The great demand for this pamplilet—a demand,
beyond my ability to supply—indicates the almost universal interest
felt on the subject. JSTo less than five tbousa.nd copies were requested
for distribution in England, by the American Emigration Agency in London, but ovAdng to the limitecl number printed, only fifty were forwarded.
In acknowledging the receipt the agent states that his efforts were directed to sending to the United States the best mechanics, artizans,
small farmers, laborers, &c., among which class tliere is naturally a
strong desire for accurate biformation as a preliminaiy to emigration.
In view of the benefits Avhich ma.y confidently be expected from a diffusion of such statistics some action by our Government would seem to
be necessaiy.
IMMIGRATION.

Intiinately connected, as itis, with tbe foregoing subject, and of CA'-en
wider importance, immigration demands thoughtful consideration. In
a country like ours, possessing ricb and undeveloped resources, rendered available by the progress of internal improAT^ements, the advent of
intelligent labor has, in general, been cordially welcomed. The A'alue
of this addition to our material Avealtli has never been more highly
prized than during the last two decades. To the influx of skilled and
comnion labor is due in no inconsiderable measure the unexampled deA'Clopment of the northwestern and Pacific States.
Since the termination of tlie Avar the .fertile hinds of the South, heretofore under a system of serAdle labor but partially cultivated, present
extraordinary inducements for immigration. At the present time in the
northwestern, southern, and Pacific States, there exists a deraand for common, and, to a more limited extent, for skilled labor, ncA^er before equalled.
Witb a view of affording to the immigrant such trustworthy information in regard to tbe several States as Avould guide him in making an
intelligent choice of a home, the undersigned prepared and forwarded
to the assessors of internal revenue in all the States Avest and south of
Pennsylvania the following circular :
I. Can land be purchased or rented in your district suitable for small
farms on favorable terms "
^
^
II. What is the price per acre of small imp)roved farms'? State AAdiat
liroportion has been under cultivation, hoAv much is fenced, and the
kind of buildings'?
III. A"Vhat is the price per acre of improved land, AA^hat proportion
bas been under cultivation, and how much, if any, is .fenced ?
IY. What is the yearly rent for small improved farms'? If rented on
shares, what share does the OAvner receiA^e " Does the latter provide
?
stock, implements, or seeds *
?
Y. What are the chief articles of iiroduction, and wliat are the present
prices of IAVO or three of them *
?
YI. What is the distance to a market town, a railroad station, or a
steamboat binding"?
YII. What is generally the quality of land, and the kind of timber?
YIII. What are tbe prices of ordinary farm-stock, sound and in good
condition, A^iz: AYorking oxen, per pair; working horses, per pair;
working mules, each; milch cows, each; sheep, eacb; bogs, each'?
IX. Eor Avhat kind of labor is tbere a demand"?
X. What mills or factories, if any, are in operation or in progress, requiring skilled labor *
?
^



CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF STATISTICS.

317

XI. A.re there in your Adcinity any railroads or other public Avorks in
progress, requiring common labor? If so, how.far distant!
XII. If any foreign-born workmen are employed in your district
please give the preponderating nationality *
?
XIII. Please state any advantages which your district can offer to laborers, mechanics, or small farmers'? Is there much land of good
quality and well watered yet unoccupied?
Eeplies to the aboA^e questions from the assistant assessors in nearly
CA'cry part of the western, southern, and Pacific States, and the Territories, have been received, and the data classified and compiled, embodying an amount of information in regard to the advantages offered
to immigrants, by eacb State and Territory, which, in fullness and accuracy, has not before been attained.
These comxiilations are now undergoing revision, and Avill, in connection Avith tables sbowing the cost of labor in the several States corrected
to October, 1870, be submitted in a special report.
In conclusion, tbe undersigned takes pleasure in bearing testimony
to the ability, industry, and efficiency of the officers, clerks, (both male
and female,) and other emiiloyes of this Bureau.
I have the bonor to be, A^eiy respectfully,
E D W A E D YOUNG,
.Chief of Bureau,
Hon.

G E O R G E S. BOUTWELL,

Secretary ofthe Treasury,




318

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

Table exhibiting the number of merchant vessels and amount of tonnage belonging within the
several customs districts and ports of the UnitedStates on the 30th of June, 1870, geographically classified.
Saili ig vessels.

S t e a m vessels.

U n r i g g e d vessels.

Total.

Customs districts.
ISTo.
ATLAJsTlO AND
COASTS.

Tons.

No.

Tons.

No.

Tons.

Vessels.

Tons.

GULF

Ea.nGjor,Me
Batli,Me
Lelfast, M e
Castine, Me
r'reTicli.riiair,s Bay, M e . . .
Keiii.ebuiik, M e .
Macliias, Me
Passamaquoddy, Me
PoitI.'iKlaiidPalu;ioiitb.,Me
Sa(M:), M.0
AA^iscasset, M e
Voile M B

237
245
355
376
281
38
200
172
344
17
537
155
15

0
38, 338. 00
10
131, 223. 49
1
07, 051. 74
23, 702. .52
15, 872. 52
1
4,053.01.
22,178. 78 ' " " 2
0
20,127. 02
70, 040. 29
18
2
3, 048. 17
86, 862. 07
9, 597. 85
008. 34

243
255
356
376
282
38
202
178
362
19
537
. 155
15

688. 79
4, 179. 54
lu3.13
21. 40
133.91'
3, 571. 44
8, 560. 75
276.18

39 026 85
13.5, 403. 03
67,154.87
23, 762. 52
15 893.92
4, 053. 61
22 312 69
23 698.46
84, 601. 04
3 324 35
86, 802. 07
9, 597. 85
008. 34

2, 972

Barnstable, Mass
Bf)Stou a u d C h a r l e s town,
Mass
Edftartowu, M a s s
Gloucester, M a s s
Miirbleliead, Ma.ss
DyaDtnclcet, .Ma.ss
N e w Bedford, M.ass
JS^ewburyport, Mass
Plymoatli. Mass
Salem a n d B e v e i l y , M a s s

Bristol, E . I
Is^ewport, E . I
Providence H

I

498, 704. 46

40

17, 535. 14

3,018

510 299.00

71

19, 624. 84

5

459, 22

76

20 084 00

621

49, 839. 54

1

2u6. 04

^ 622

817
28
108
560
63
25
288
79
119
87

259, 804. 55
3, 751. 67
11, 338. 87
28, 547. 17
2, 857. 80
2, 394. 86
.59, 041. 00
13, 303.11
5, 278. 73
7, 993. 50

03

22, 020. 08

10
1

2, 009. 02
13. 05

0
1

1, 040. 73
15. 91

880
28
118
56 L
63
25
294
80
119
87

2, 795

P o r t s m o u t h , IT. H

444, 75J. 80

82

20, 033. 23

2,877

470, 784. 09

22
80
70

2, 072. 44
5, 247. 87
9, 795. 14

11
21

10,789.91.
10, .502. 55

22
91
' 91

2 072. 44
22, 037. 78
20, 297. 69

:

172 . 17,115.45

•Stoninijton, Conu

32

27, 292. 40

148
119
131
163
109

8,71.2.90
11,276.03
15, 423. 59
11,198. 87
9, 715. 90

8
18
10
15
8

1,
0,
4,
10,
6,

925. 53
.523. 05
2«6. 21
621. 04
618. 49

0
1
4

746. 82
23.02
559. 68

070

Pairfield, Conn
M i d d h j t o w n , Conn
N e w H a v e n , Con n

56, 327. 29

59

29, 974. 32

11

.

50, 100.18
281
3
13
28,
2
2
61
13,
5,
7

825 23
751 07
408. 49
500. 82
857. 80
394 86
287.73
319. 02
278. 73
993 56

204

44, 407. 91

162
138
145
178
117

11,385.25
17, 822.10
20, 269. 48
21,819.91
16, 334. 39

1, 329. 52

740

87, 631.13
908, 928. 39
8, 743. 06

Bridgetown, N. J
Burlin.acon, N . J
G-reat JEuc; Harl)or. N . J . .
L i t t l e E'OO H a r b o r N J
IvTewarlvr^T. J
P e r t h Amboy, N. J

2, 460
171

473, 451.12
8, 535. 70

055
2

311, 890. 61 1, 487
207. 90

183, 586. 66

2, 631

]S^ew T o r k , Is^ Y
Saf Harbor N Y

4,602
173

481, 980. 88

057

31.2,098.51 1, 487

183, 586. 66

4,775

977, 672. 05

260
42
128
01
04
205

14, 225. 92
3, 037. 37
12, 448. 35
•i, 503. 00
3, 070. 40
9, 498.27

. 4
14

1,039.-53
2, 770. 63

. 1
55

123. 8b'
5,727.51

28
37

2, 865. 53
14; 472. 74

20
27

2, 504. 85
6, 357. 56

271
111
128
61
112
209

15, 389. 33
11, .535. .51
12, 448. 35
6 563 06
8, 446. 78
30, 328. 57

21,148.43

103

14, 713. 80

9.52

84,711.60

50, 637. 37 1, 390

137, 995. 22

2, 404

290, 069.14

700

48, 849. 37

83

Philadelphia, P a

829

101,436.55

245

DelaAvare D e l

130

8, 509. 42

10

4, 567. 01

11

983. 72

157

14, 060.15

Annapolis, Md
Baltimore, Md
E a s t e r n "District, M d

03
850
527

1. 694, 95
47, 037.17
14, 277. 80

0

103

81. 17
38, 970. 35

1
274

20.15
16, 487J17

00
1, 227
527

1, 790. 27
103, 094. 69
14,277.80

1, 440

63, 009. 92

105

39, 051. 52

275

10, 507. 32

1, 820

119,168. 76

75

1, 900. 70

23

4, 509.17

300

18. 290. 70

398

24, 700. 57

G e o r g e t o w n , D. C . :




-

CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF STATISTICS.

319

Table exhibiting the number of merchant vessels, tf-c, geographically classified—CoDtiDued.
Sailing A'essels.

S t e a m vessels.

U n r i g g e d vessels.

Total.

Customs districts.
No.

Tons.

No.

Tons.

No.

Tons.

Vessels.

Tons.

2, 213. 56

877

6

209. 60

1
10

120. 02
1,301.^0

58
69
99
35

1, 450. 21
902 21
1 950 02
1 85.5. 31

.3, 940. 44

24

2, 007. 71

6

209. 60

261

6, 157. 75

5
133
6

07.11
2, 41.5. 79
553. 30

18
4

3,038.41
220. 14

5
151
10

67 11
5, 454. 20
773. .50

3, 030. 20

22

3, 258. 55

166

6, 294. 81

470. 79
4,810.55
454. 73

23

3, 979.14

4
18
45

476 79
4 810. 55
4 433. 87

5, 742. 07

aa

3, 979.14

67

9, 721. 21

222. 57
20. 52
1, 684. 90
1, 330. 41
40.30
88.53
107.07

7

1, 580. 77

1, 809. 34
26 .52
1 0H4. 96
2, 278. 91
46. 30
1 604 99
' 307. 07

71

Mobile, A l a

29

520. 29

184

App.alacliicola, P l a
Eernandiua Pla
Key West Fla
Pensacola, F l a
St. Ano'ustine, F l a
St. d o h n ' s F l a
St. M a r k ' s F l a

4, 055. 23

7

13
2
93
52
3
7
14

Brnnswick Ga
St. M a r y ' s , G a

57

714.32
902. 21
1, 830. 00
493.91

44

.

14, 778. 07

4
18
22

...

521. 29
1
21.45
3,140. 70 ' " ' 1 4 '
10.11
14
301. 02

144

B e a u f o r t S. C C h a r l e s t o n S. C
Geoi't^'otown S C

11
1
33
1
11

231

Albemarle, N. C
Beanfort, N. C
P a m l i c o N" C
AVilmington, N . C

1, 864. 05
4. 532. 75
6, 232. 17
60. 21
122. 03
030. 44
2, 330. 42

45
09
98
19

P i c h mon d, V a
Tappahannock, V a
Yorktown Va

SO
250
316
3
3
28
105

791

Alexandria, V a
C h e r r v s t o n e , A^a
Norfoik a n d P o r t s m ' t 4 l , V a

53.69

'""i.'iis.oi
1, 041. 86

;::

98
251
363
4
28
28
105

2, 439. 03
4,. 5.54. .20
9, 190. 94
76 .32
1, .525. 51
630 44
2 330 42
21, 046. ^6

8

948. 50

13

1, 510. 46

20
2
93
60
3
20

3, 506. 36

28

4,051.73

212

7 558. 09

1, 002.12

51

13, 887. 76

94

210

19, 748. 91

34

4, 259. 03

B r a z o s d e Santiago, T e x . .
Corpus Christi, T e x
Sal n ria
Texas, T e x

20

382. 79

2

68. 45

22

451. 24

14, 252. 33
85. 46

170
12

41, 788. 25
860. 99

13

835. 27

583
21

56, 875. 85
952 45

14, 337. 79

182

42, 655. 24

13

835. 27

004

57, 828. 30

6
16
35
143

101.73
2 5 1 v621. 37
2, 624.12

4
1

1,254.73
176. 56

33

4, 689. 79

12

1, 274. 58

10
17
35
188

200

..

N e w Orlean.s, L a
Teche, L a

400
9

409

P e a i l Pivei', M i s s

• 3, 007. 09

38

6, 121.08

12

1, 274. 58

250

1, 356. 46
436. 43
021.37
8 588 49
11,002.75

W E S T E R N RIVERS.

Alton,111
Burlington, Iowa.
Cairo, 111. . .
C i n c i n n a t i , Ohio
Ilubnque, Iowa
Evansville, I n d
Galena, I I I . . .
Keokuk, Iowa
Louisville, K y
Memphis, Tenn
M i n n e s o t a , Alinn
Nashville, Tejin
N a t c h e z . Miss .
Padncall, K y
Pjtisbur"" P a
Quincy. I l l
St. L o u i s M o
A^icksbur(^ M i s s
AVheeling^ W . V a




2
9
17
95
13
30
37
8
35
40
50
17
2
9
137
12
142
11
47
725

688. 98
809. 59
2, 509. 40
39,990.90348
1, 409. 00
51
0, 783. 33
3
8, 441. 80
78
802.17
4
7,771.10
10, 300. 72
11,380.14
73
3, 382. 00
75. 35
2, 825. 09
3.5,140.42 " 1 9 7
1. 248. 39
14
02,891.47
61
1, 096. 89
7, 964. 00
14
206,189 46

843

33, 572. 42
3,194. 02
400. 02
8, 770. 70
2, 535.13
8, 534. 31

'.30,'270.'48
778.19
24, 215. 82 •

2
9
17
443
64
39
115
8
39
40
129
17
2
9
334
20
203
H

"2,'004.'98

or

120, 288. ()7

1, 568

688. 98
809. .59
509 40
569 32
003 08
189 35
212 50
802. 17
10, 300. 29
30,300.72
19, 920. 45
3, 382. 00
75 35
2, 825, 09
71 410 90
2, 020 -58
87 107 29
1, 090. 89
9 968 98

2
73
4
7
17

320 478.13

320

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Table exhibiting the numbe)' of merchant vessels, f c , geographically classified—Continued.
Sailing vessels.

S t e a m vessels.

Total.

U n r i g g e d vessels.

Customs districts.
No.

No.

Tons.

Tons.

No.

Vessels.

Tons.

Tons.

NORTHERN LAKES.

107
28
332
333
156
192
3
•23
12
62
26
80
205
5
11
78
67
7
15

34. 682. 26
3,710.45
8, 472. 91
62, 722. 22
33, 371. 57
29, 053.12
.573. 23
4, .305. 98
1, 752. 97
7, 319. 40
5, .524. 54
5, 033. 50
25,149. 58
1, 207. 36
1, 778. 37
17,140. 52
8, 755. 21
416. 93
823. 49

112
1
12
81
49
113
1
10
2
65
19
64
37
16
20
25
7

474
51,6n.83
17. 63
1, 499. 30 " 6 2 8 '
8,144. 40
230
11,185. 94
200
35, 757. 25
40
5.45
2
700. 47
235
66.49
217
7,17.3.33
11^2
^ 557.15
184
3, 294. 40
8
13, 085.13
1
22
2.54.'.59
8
672. 70
792
2, 44.5. 28
1
1, 4.50. 52
3
4, 552. 61
7

1,548

252, 453. 67

641

142, 474. 47 3,154

Oregon O r c ' o n
P u g e t Sound, AVash. T e r .
Sail F r a n c i s c o , Cal

24
62
710

1, 609. 42
13, 388.10
73, 570. 00

42
19
135

8. 537. 20
2i 01.5. 87
42, 360. 45

Alaska

796
6

88, 573. 52
372. 75

196
1

52, 913. 52
175.16

802

88, 946. 27

197

53. 088. 68

Buffalo N Y
C a p e AAucent, N . Y
Champlain, N . Y
Chicao'O III
Cuy.ahoga, Ohio
Dunkirk, N. Y
Erie Pa
Genesee N Y
H u r o n Mich

...

M i l w a u k e e , AVis
Niagara N Y
Oswegatchie, N . Y
Osweoo, N . Y
S a n d u s k y Oliio
SnperioT' M i c h
V e r m o n t , A^t

693
29
772
644
405
345
6
268
231
229
229
158
243
27
26
886
88
35
29

140,055. 24
3, 728. 08
50, 079. 6S
94, 216. 99
54, 473. 88
74, 660. 74
809. 28
13, 290. 22
28, 637. 26
27, 862.16
15, 946. 72
10,674.29
38, 493. 40
3, 557. 30
2, 545.16
102, 224. 21
11, 337. 20
2, 002. 85
5, 869.12

285, 535. 64

5,343

680, 463. 78

2
8
62

94.37
140. 77
7, 478. 75

68
89
907

10, 240. 99
' 1.5, 544. 74
123, 415. 20

72

7, 713. 89

1,064
7

149, 200. 93
547. 91

1,071

149, 748. 84

53, 761.15
J
'40,107.'47 '
23, 350. 37
9, 916. 37
9, 850. 37
230. 60
8, 283. 77
26, 817. 80
13, 369. 37
9, 865. 03
1, 746. 39
258. 69
2, 289. 94
512. 20
84, 410. 99
136.71
135. 40
493. 02

PACn^IC COAST.

RECAPITULATION.

VcsSelS.

Total

28,138

Total



'.

•

....

3,946,149.73

VcsSels.

, SUMMARY BY STATES.

Atlantic and Gnlf coasts:
Maine
NCAV Hampshire
Massachusetts
Rhodelsland
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
District of Columhia
Yirginia
North Ca,rolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Ah<hav-a
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas-:
Western rivers
Northern lakes
Paciflccoast

Tons.

16, 995 2,135,268.67
3, 341 1,015,075.43
795,805. 63
7,802

Sailing vessels
Steam vessels
Unrigged vessels

TonS.

3,018
76
2, 877
204
740
4,775
952
2, 464
157
1,820
398
877
261
166
67
212
,216
22
604
250
1, 568
5,343
1,071

516,299.60
20,084.06
470, 784. 09
44,407.91
87, 631.13
976,672.05
84,711.60
290, 069.14
14,060.15
119,168.76
24,760.57
21,046.86
6,157. 75
6, 294. 81
9,721.21
7,558.09
19,748.91
451. 24
57,828.30
11,002.75
326, 478.13
680,463.78
149,748.84

28,138

3,946,149.73

REPORT OF-SUPERmTENDENT U. S. COAST SURVEY.

21 F







REPORT
^SUPERINTENDENT OFTHE UNITED STATES COAST SURVEY.

COAST SURVEY O F F I C E ,

Washington^ Septemher 30, 1870.
SIR : I liave the honor to present an abstract of the field and office
operations conducted "during the present year Avitli the means appropriated for the prosecution o f t h e surA^ey of the Atlantic, Gulf, and
Pacific coasts of the United States. The field parties are yet engaged
in their respective sites of Avork, but vrill be transferred to continue the
surA^ey of the southern sections of the coast yhen the season is someAvhat further advanced. Final statements Avill then be due, together
Avith the topographical and hydrographic sheets resulting from the Avork
of the year. The folloAAdng is a brief recapitulation of A\^hat A\all be
given in detail in my report on the progress made during the surveying
yeiar Avhich terminates at the end of October:
The Avork of the year has included the topography of the shores vaud
the hydrography of Moose-a-bec Eeach, on the coast of Maine; triangulation for the survey of SouthAvest Harbor, (Mount Desert Island,-)
extension of the hydrography at the entrance to Penobscot Bay; topography of the Fox Islands, of the vicinity of the Muscle Eidge Channel,
and that of islands in Penobscot Bay, near Camden ,• plane-table Avork
and soundings in the Kennebec Eiver, near Gardiner; coast topography
near Biddeford, Maine; the surA^ey of Lake Champlain is now in progress, and soundings have been commenced in its Avaters; supplementary soundings have been made between Portland Harbor and Cape
Ann, and in-shore soundings on the A\^est side of Cape Cod Bay; the
longitude of Duxbury, Massachusetts, has been determined relative to
Brest, in France, by telegraphic operations through the French Atlantic
cable; anel topography done this year nearly completes the detailed survey of the shores of E^arragansett Bay. The triangulation stations in
the vicinit^^ of l^ew HaA^en Harbor haA^e been examined; special observations haA'e been made of tides and currents in NCAV York Harbor, and
the positions of buoys and sea-marks haA^e been verified for the engraved charts. South of New York the operations include triangulation
near Mount Holly; coast topography near Atlantic City; the main triangulation along the Blue Eidge south of Washington; shore-line survey
and soundings of the estuaries oh the east side of Chesapeake Bay, and
of the outer coast of "Virginia, north of Cape Charles, developing in that
vicinity the Broadwater; triangulation of the James Eiver; off-shore
hydrography northward of Cape Hatteras ; triangulation, toxography^
and hydrography in Pamplico Sound; hydrographic resurvey of the
channels of Cape Fear Eiver, ]!^orth Carolina; examination of the station marks along the coast of South Carolina, north of Charleston;
topography between Broad Eiver and SaA^annah Eiver, defining May
Eiver and Wright's Eiver; extension of the primary triangulation of



324

'

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

this section to Saviannah, Georgia; topography of St. Andrew's Sound;
hydrography abreast of Cumberland Island, Georgia; the sounding of
North Eiver and Matanzas EiA^er, northward and southward of St.
A.ugustine Harbor, Florida; topography of keys in Chatham Bay, and
soundings in their vicinity; hydrography of the Gulf of Mexico off the
Marquesas, and of the quicksands between the Marquesas and the Tortugas ; triangulation and shore-line survey of St. Andrew's Bay and its
branches, including St. Andrew's Sound on the western side of Florida;
soundings completing the hydrography of Lake Borgne, Louisiana; triangulation on the north side of Isle au Breton Sound, and triangulation
and topography, east and west from Fort S t Philip, of the banks of the
Mississippi EiA^er.
The Avork now in progress on the western coast comprises the following operations: Determinations of the latitude, azimuth, and magnetic
elements at three principal stations on the Santa Barbara- Channel, coast
of California, and diff'erence of longitude between San Francisco and the
light-house on Point Arena; coast topography between Santa Barbara
and Point Concepcion, and between San Pedro and Point Duma; special
examination of the tides and currents of San Francisco Bay; azimuth,
triangulation, and topography in the vicinity of Point Arena; reconnaissance and topography of Humboldt Bay. and special examination of
changes in shore-line at the mouth of Eel Eiver; shore-line survey from
Eed Bluff'to Eureka; azimuth near Crescent City, and topography north
from Point St. George; plane-table survey of the north shore of the
Columbia Eiver, Oregon; completion of the topograi^hy of Port DiscoA^ery and Washington Harbor, and their connection Avith New Dungeness Eock; plane-table surA^ey of Blunt's Island and of the shore from
Admiralty Head to Deception Pass.
The parties on the western coast are yet actively engaged in the field,
and their final reports have not come in. My visit to San Francisco
in July last afforded ample eAddence, of the excellent condition of the
work on the western coast, considering the means allotted for its prosecution.
The operations of the Coast Survey Office, embracing the computation
of observations, the drawing, engraAdng, and publication of maps and
charts, have kept pace Avith the field-work; eight new charts haA^e been
published, and twenty-three others haA^e been advanced by adding the
additional results of the prcAdous season's field-work. " Eleven new charts
have been commenced, and fifty-nine in all haA^e been worked upon. Of
the various engraved charts twelve thousand copies have been printed
and ten thousand four hunclred issued. Seventy-two manuscript maps
haA^e been copied or traced for various departments of the ipublic service. Tide tables for the ports of the IJnited States for 1871 have been
computed and published, and a new edition, re\dsed and illustrated, of
The Pilot for the Pacific Coast has been issued.
Yery respectfully yours,
• BENJAMIN PEIECE,
Superintendent United States Coast Survey,
Hon. G E O R G E S. BOUTWELL^

Secretary of the Treasury,




REPORT OF THE LIGHT-HOUSE, BOARD.




O F F I C E E S OF T H E L I G H T - H O U S E BOAED.
[Light-house Board of the United States, organized in conformity to the act of Congrelfes approved August 31, 1852.]

LIGHT-HOUSE

BOARD.

HON. G E O P G - E S. B 0 U T A V E L ] L , Secretary of tlie Treasruy, Ex-ojjicio President.
PEAR-ADMIRAL AV. B. SHUBRICK, United States
Navy.
PKOF. JOSEPH HENRY, LL.D., Secretary Smithsonian Institution.

EEAR-ADMIRAL C. K . STRIBLING, United States
(^N
Navy.
PROF. BENJ". PEIECE, LL.D., Superintendent
Coast Survey.

BREVET MAJOR GENERAL A. A. HUMPHREYS,

EEAR-ADMIRAL

Chief of Engineers, United States Army.
BREVET MAJOR GENERAL 'J. G. BAPNARD, Colo-

nel of Engineers, United States Army,

;

THOENTON

A.

JENKINS

United States Navy.
MAJOR G E O E G E H . ELLIOT, Corps of Engineers, United States Army.

C H A I R M E N OF C O M M I T T E E S .
Lighting.—PROF. PEIECE.
Floating JLicfe.—EEAR-ADMIRAL STEIBLING.

i?Y?ia?ic<3.—GENERAL H U M P H E E T S .
Engineering.—GENERAL B A E N A E D .

Experiments.—PROF. HENEY;
The Chairman and Secretaries are ex-offhcio members of all committees,

M E M B E R S OF T H E BOARD E M P L O Y E D IN T H E O F F I C E .
EEAR-ADMIRAL W . B . SHUBEICK, United States Navy, Chairman. .
EEAR-ADMIRAL THOENTON A. J E N i a N S , United States Na^y, Naval Secretary.
MAJOR GEOEGE H. ELLIOT, Corps of Engineers, United States Army, Engineer Secretary.

CLERKS.
AENOLD B. JOHNSON, cMef clerk.
WILLIAM D. O'CONNOE, corresponding clerk.
FEANK BAKEE, accountant.




BEUCE SMALL, examining clerk.
SAMUEL STONE, recording clerk.
JOSEPH MCMA.KIN, draughtsman

REPORT

THE UNITED STATES LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.
TREASURY DEPARTIMENT,

Office Light-house Boardy Octoher 31,1870.
S I R : By your direction, the following report ofthe operations of this
board during the last year is respectfully submitted:
The detailed statements under the heads of the respective districts,
based mainly upon the annual reports of the engineers and inspectors,
embrace the work which has been done; that which has been laid
out for the current j'ear; and the present condition of all the aids
to navigation, with such remarks and recommendations in regard to
improvement of existing and the establishment of such new aids as
seem to require the attention of Congress at this time.
The light-houses, and light-A^essels, (so far as the exhibition of efficient
lights is concerned,) are, it is belicA'-ed, equal to any in the Avoiid, and
those beacons and buoys actually in position are efficient day-marks to
guide clear of the obstructions for Avhich they were established. For
those light-stations at which extensive repairs and renoA^ations are
needed, special appropriations are recommended. The annual estimates
submitted for the fiscal year ending June 30,1872, show a small aggregate increase over those of the last year, but not in excess of the aggregate increase in the number of new aids established and authorized to
be established during the present year.
A large number of additional aids to navigation haA^e been authorized,
which haA^e been, established during the present or will be completed
during the next fiscal year, which must be provided Avith keepers and
supplies, &c. For the last tAvo years the appropriations for the support
of the light-house service have been considerably less than the detailed
estimates submitted by the board, and for the current year the difference was $99,104, to Avhich add the sum of $99,214, which reverted to
the treasury under the operations of the fifth section of the act of July
12,1870, making appropriations '^ for legislative, executiA^e, &c., expenses
ofthe Government for the year ending June 30,1871," giAdng an aggregate
sum (within a fcAv dollars) of $200,000, Avhich is, so far as calculations
could be relied upon, and independently of the thousand casualties arising out of freshets, storms, running ice, &c., to Avhich this service is
daily liable, a clear deficit of necessary funds, although not such in
the legislatiA^e sense, inasmuch as no indebtedness has been, or will be,
'incurred for Avhich ample funds haA^e not been previously iDrovided.
With the balances of last year's appropriation, it Avas expected, as soon
as the appropriations for the current fiscal year were made^ to be able to
lirovide a number of spare buoys to replace the many large and expensiA^e ones Avliich have been.lost during the last two or three years; to
repair vessels greatly needing attention at this time; and to put such
light-stations as are suffering for want of repairs at this time in good



328

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

order. To liaA^e used these supposed available balances before the passage of the appropriation, (July 15, 1870, for the ensuing year,) would
have left the board Avithout aA^ailable nieans to meet any demand, hoAvever pressing and important, Avhich might have been made in the interim,
on account of accidents or storms. It has alAA^ays been the custom of
this office, in preparing the annual estimates for supporting the existing
and authorized aids to naAdgation, to make as close a calculation of items,
quantities, and prices, as the information at compiand Avould alloAV, and
to endeavor to so manage .the disbursements as at all times to have ample
funds aA^ailable to supply any losses and repair any damage, however
serious, to Avhich this service is so peculiarly liable during the Avinter
months. The estimates for special objects are in many cases simply
reappropriations of funds for authorized aids, which have reverted to
the treasury under the act of July 12, 1870, and in others, for objects
of sufficient importance to justify their being brought to the notice of
Congress.
Over one million of dollars rcA^erted to the treasury under the operation
of the fifth and sixth sections of the act of July 12, 1870, on account of
appropriations/or special ohjects. Many of these sums were for lighthouses on new sites, AA^hich had to be purchased, titles approved by the
Attorney General, and cession of jurisdiction granted by the legislatures
of the States in Avhich they were to be placed, before the work could be
commenced; others whose completion Avas dela^^ed for want of time by
the breaking out of epidemic diseases, or the inability to carry on Avork
during certain months of the year, on those parts of the coast where
they Avere authorized to be established.;
Light-house works of construction cannot be carried on safely and
economically north of Chesapeake Bay during the winter months, nor can
they be economically carried on, on the southern coast, during the months
" when eiiidemics almost ahvays prevail, more or less severely. Besides
these draAvbacks and difficulties, these works, from their greatly exposed
positions on the sea or lake coast, require not only to be built of the
best and most durable materials that can be procured, but those materials ought not J30 be put together too hurriedly, and hence, as a rule,
the large and expensive structures require a much longer tiiiie than one
year to commence and complete thenr x3ropeiiy.
Under the act of March 3, 1795, all special appropriations for lighthouses ran two years until July 25, 1848, when the following joint resolution Avas passed:
A JOINT RESOLUTION extending the time for the erection of certain light-houses.

Besolved by the Senate and House of Eepresentatives ofthe TJnited States of America in Congress assembled. That so much of the sixteenth, section of the act approved March three,
seventeen hundred and ninety-five, entitled ^^An act making further provision for the
supi3ort of puhlic credit and for the redemption of the public debt," as requires that
sums remaining unexpended for two yea.rs after the year of approi)riation shall be
carried to the account of the surplus fund, shall not apply to the act approved March
three, eighteen hundred and forty-seven, entitled ''An act authorizing the erection of
certain light-houses, and for other purposes," until two years after the first meeting/
of the legislature of those States in which said light-houses are to be located.
Approved July 25, 1848.
'

And a similar proAdso has been attached to many subsequent api3ropriation bills, among Avhich may be cited those of March 3, 1849, March
3,1851, August 31,1852, and March 3,1853. It is respectfully submitted
that a similar clause ought to be attached to future appropriations for
light-house works, and made retroactiA^e so far as to embrace those appropriations contained in the bill for light-houses approved July 15,
1870.



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

329

It not unfrequently happens, that appropriations are made in the
absence of estimates from this board, or information as to the real requirements, and in such cases frequently a second appropriation is
asked for before commencing the work. In cases of this sort, it ajiiiears.
that itAvill be necessary hereafter to add the words, in all cases of additional aiipropriation for any object, ^Hn addition to former appropriations
or ktkc?ices," to render the former ones aA^ailable.
^ Last year an estimate Avas submitted for completing the light-house
at Eace Kock, Long Island Sound, of $110,000, (for Avhicb $90,000 had
prcAdously been made,) but concluding, from ncAv developments at the
locality, that so large a sum Avould not be needed for that work'during
the year, (and if at all, not for some time after,) the Committee on Appropriations Avas requested to reduce the estimate to $10,000, AAiiich Avas
done; but as the words '^in addition to former appropriktions". were
omitted, the sum of $90,000 (which amount only could be of any use
economically during the Avorking season, in carrying on the Avorks) Avas
unavailable after June 30, and the appropriation of $10,000, niade July
15,1870, only could be used, and the Avork Avas practically arrested for the
year. Unless balances of appropriations are made available lor continuing authorized works to completion, Avhich cannot be safely and economically carried on during the summer season at the South and the winter
season at the North, and allowed to be expended during the succeeding
fiscal year, the efforts to complete works in tod short a time may result
In the introduction of bad materials, sloA^enly work, and higher iDiices
paid for both than a true economy and the interests of the public service Avould justify.
.
The following changes in the members of the board have been made
since the date of the last annual report: Brevet Major General Richard
Delafield, Brigadier general of engineers, and Brevet Brigadier General Hartmau Bache, colonel of engineers, retired from thetoard, February, 21, 1870, and were succeeded by Brevet Major General A. A. Humphreys, Chief of Engineers, and Brevet Majoi' General J.| G. Barnard,
colonel of engineers. Brevet Brigadier General O. M. Eoe, major of
engiiieers, was relicA^ed April 1^, 1870, by Major George H. Elliot, Corps
•of Engineers.
The board has to deplore the loss by death of two of the engineer officers of the Army in charge of light-house Avorks, Avhile in the midst of
their arduous labors, during the past year. Brevet Major George Burroughs, Corps of Engineers, incharge of light-house Avorks in the sixth
district, died suddenly at Charleston, South Carolina, January 22,1870,
and Brevet Brigadier General C. B. Reese, major of engineers, in charge
of light-house works in the eighth district, died of yellow fe^^er at Mobile,
Alabama, September 22, 1870.
While the board recognizes the great value of the serAdces of both of
these officers, who had a short time previous to their deaths entered
uiioii light-house duties assigned to them b}^ the War Department, it is
especially due to the memory of the late General Reese to bear testimony to the great zeal, energy, and abiliiy Avhich he iiiA^ariably displayed in the performance of his duties, and in his intercourse with this
office.
FIRST DISTRICT.
The first district extends from the northeastern boundary of the
United States, (Maine,) to and including Hampton Harbor, New Hanipshire.
Inspector,—Commodore J. B. Hull, United States Navy, to October



330

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

1, 1870; Commander A. E. K. Benham, United States Navy, present
inspector.
Engineer.—^Brevet Brigadier General J. C. Duane, lieutenant colonel
of engineers. United States Army.
In this district there are:
Light-houses and lighted beacons
Day or unlighted beacons
Buoys actually in position
:
Spare buoys .for relief and to supx)ly losses
Tender, steamer Iris
Tender, (sail) schooner Wave

.,
:

'

48
50
323^
236
1
1

The following numbers, which precede the names of stations, correspond with those of the '^ Light-House List of the Atlantic, Gulf, and
Pacific Coasts of the United States," issued January 1, 1870i
.8. Petit Menan, coast of Maine.—At this light station a steam fog signal has been provided and ]ilaced duriug the last year. A cistern has
been built and a Avell dug to supply the Accessary fresh water for the
use of the keepers and for running the fog-signal engine.
Prospect Harhor, Maine.—The light at this old station was reexhibited during the last year, to serve as a guide to the harbor of refuge
which it marks. The tower, lantern, and keeper's dwelling Avere thoroughly renovated and repaired and the necessary out-buildings erected.
A new lens apparatus Avas proAdded and the light exhibited, for the benefit of mariners, on the night of May 15, 1870.
Burnt-Coat JB^arhor, Sivan^s Island, coast of Maine.—An estimate ot
$10,000 has been, submitted in the annual estimates for the next fiscal
year, for the establishment of two small lights to mark the approach to,
and serve as a range for entering this important harbor of refuge at
night, Avhen threatened with such weather as to make it necessary to
seek a safe anchorage. This harbor is commodious and safe, and is
distant 36 miles from the nearest place of safe anchorage on that coast.
20. Matinicus Eoclcj off Penohscot Bay, Maine.—A steam fog signal
has been proAdded for and placed at this light station during the last
year. A cistern and well for supplying the necessary fresh water have
also been, provided.
21. White Headj entrance to Penohscot Bay, Maine.—A steam fog signal
has been provided ibr .and placed at this station during the last year,
and the necessapy cistern built and well dug to proAdde fresh water for
the use of the station.
30. Manheigan Island, coast of Maine.—A fog signal, with a six-inch
Ericsson engine and a ten-inch Daboll trumpet, has been placed on
Manana Island, half a mile to the Avestward of the lighthouse tower
at this place during the last year, to take the place of the fog bell at
that place.
•
'^
36. Seguin Island, off the mouth of the Kennehec River, Maine,—The
work preparatory to the establishuient of the steam fog signal at .this
important outlying light station A as begun last year, and a Avelldug, for
V
proAdding the necessary Avater for the engine.
Salfway Rode, in the Atlantic, off Casco Bay, Maine.—The approiiriation
bill for the light-house service, approved March 3, 1869, contained an
appropriation of $50,000 for the establishment of a light on this rock
lying in the arc of the outer approaches to Portland Harbor, Maine,
and to A^essels passing along that dangerous coast. The site is isolated,
and consequently the landing of materials and the employment of laborers
were necessarily .more than ordinarily difficult and expensive. The
tOAver will be of granite, the masonry of Avhich was nearly completed,



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

331

when the balance of the ^appropriation, which was ample for all purposes
connected with the station, reverted to the treasury under the operation
of the fifth and sixth sections of the act of July i2, 1870, and thereby
making it necessary to discharge the mechanics and await a reappropriation of funds thus turned into the treasury, before the work can be
completed a.nd the light exhibited. Although the sudden abandonment
of the work, and materials which had been collected for completing it,
Avill be attended with loss, as the quarters for the workmen and other
accessories of construction will be swept off' by the waves which cover
the rock in the storms of winter, yet it is believed the whole may be completed within the original estimate and appropriation.
37. Cape Elizaheth, coast of Maine.—The Avesterly tower of the two,
at this light station, was built in 1828 of rubble stone, and is now in
such a state as to render it necessary to rebuild it in a better manner,
for which an estimate has been submitted in the annual estimates. The
station is one of the most important on the eastern coast, seindng the
double purpose of a sea-coast light station, and as a mark for the entrance
into Casco Bay and to Portland Harbor.
43. Whalers Bade, entrance to Portsmouth Harhor, New Hampshire.—
The granite pier erected in 1829 on which the light-house tower now
stands had become so much injured by the heaA^y seas, to which it is
constantly exposed, that Congress, by act of 15th of July, 1870, granted
an appropriation of $70,000 for a new tower, which will be placed on
the reef near the old pier. The position is one of the most difficult to
work upon on the coast, as the rock is covered by the waves except at
low water and is exposed to the full force of the Atlantic. The new
structure Avill be a masonry tower, solid to a height of 20 feet aboA^e lowAvater mark, and the blocks of granite which Avill form a facing for the
interior mass of concrete will be tied together by doA^etail joints, as is
usual in similar sea structures. The diameter of the tower at the base
will be 27 feet, and height of focal plane above the sea will be 6S feet.
The surface of the rock is UOAV being prepared for the foundation, but
as the work can only be carried on at low Avater, the progress is necessarily slow, so that it is not expected to finish the structure Avithin the
fiscal year, and it is therefore recommended that the balance of the
appropriation remaining on hand on the 30th of June, 1871, may be
made available for finishing the Avork.
44. Portsmotcth Harhor, N'ew Hampshire.—The keeper's dwelling requires to be rebuilt at this light station, at an estimated cost of $2,000,
which has been submitted with the annual estimates.
At each ofthe following named light stations there have been repairs
and renoA^ations more or less extensiA^e during the last year, viz:
1. St. Croix, on Docket's Island, St. Croix River, Maine.
2. West Quoddy Head, entrance to Eastport Bay, Maine.
• 4. Lihhy Island^ entrance to Machias Bay, Maine.
5. Moose Pealc, on Mistake Island, coast of Maine.
6. Nash^s Island^ at the mouth of Pleasant River, Maine.
7. Narragtiagas, or Pond-Island, entrance to Narraguagas Bay, Maine.
^, Petit Menan, co2i^t oi M^iiiQ.
Prospect Harhor, Maine, (extensive.)
9. Winter Harhor, Maine.
10. Mount Desert, on Mount Desert Rock, Maine.
11. Balcefs Island, entrance to Frenchman's Bay, Maine,
12. Bear Island, coast of Maine.
13. Bass Harhor Head, coast of Maine.
14. Edgemoggin^ on Green Island, Blue Hill Bay, Maine.



332

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

17. Beer Island Thoroughfare, coast of Maine.
18. Eagle Island, head of Isle au Haut Bay, Maine.
20. Matinicus Rode, off Penobscot Bay, Maine.
21. White Head, entrance to Penobsc9t Bay, Maine.
23. Broivn^s Head, Fox Rocks, entrance to Penobscot Bay, Maine.
35! Pond Islandj entrance to Kennebec RiA^^er, Maine.
;
36. Seguin Island, off* the mouth of Kennebec River, Maine.
39. Portland Brealavater Light-house, Portland. Harbor, Maine.
42. Boone Islcmd, off' York Harbor, Maine, (extensive.)
The folloAving-named light stations require repairs to be made during
the current and ensuing year. Adz:
2. West Quoddy Head, entrance to Eastport Bay, Maine.
3. Little River, mouth of Little River Harbor, Maine.
11. Balcer^s Island, entrance to Frenchman's Bay, Maine.
15. Saddlehade, entrance to Isle au Haut Bay, coast of Maine.
20. Matinicus Rode, in the Atlantic, off* Penobscot Bay, Maine.
21. White Head, entrance to Penobscot Bay, MainCc
22. OivVs Head, entrance to Penobscot Bay, Maine.
30. Manheigan Island, coast of Maine.
31. Franldin Island, entrance to St. George's River, Maine.
33. Burnt Island, entrance to ToAvnsend Harbor, Maine.
34. HendricWs Head, mouth of Sheepscot River, Maine.
36. Seguin Island, off the mouth of Kennebec River, Maine. .,
40. Wood Island, entrance to Saco Harbor, Maine.
45. Isles of Shoals, off' Portsmouth Harbor, New Hampshire.
The following are the names of light stations in this district not mentioned elsewhere:
'
16. Heron Nfedc, Penobscot Bay, Maine.
19. Pumpldn Island, Isle au Haut Bay, Maine.
24. Negro Island, entrance to Camden Harbor, Maine.
25. GrindeVs Point, entrance to Gilkey's Harbor, Penobscot Bay, Maine.
26. Bice's Head, neax Castine, Maine.
27. Fort Point, mouth of Penobscot RiA'-er, Maine.
28. TenaMs Harhor,. Southern Island, entrance to Tenant's Harbor^
Maine.
•
•
'
29. MarshalVs Point, St. George, coast of Maine.
38. Portland Head, entrance to Portland Harbor, Maine.
41. Goat Island, entrance to Cape Porpoise Harbor, Maine«
DAY OR UNLIGHTED BEACONS.

Names and positions of the day or unlighted beacons in the first dis
trict:
No. 1. Jerry^s Point, Portsmouth Harhor.-—Iron beacon., In good condition.
No. 2. Sottth Beacon, Portsmouth Harhor.—Stone beacon. In good
condition.
No.. 3. North Beacon, Portsmouth Harhor,—Wooden mast. In good
condition.
No. 4. WilUyls Ledge, Portsmouth Harhor,—lion spindle. In good
condition.
No. 5. Yorlc Ledge, off Yorlc River,—Iron spindle. In good condition.
No. 6. lishing Rodcs, Kennehunk Port.—Iron spindle. In good condition.



*

LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

333

No. 7. Stage Island Monument^ entrance Saco River,—Stone tower 40
feet high. In good condition.
No. 8. Sharpens Rodcs, entrance Saco River,—Spindle. Spindle broken
off. ' Spar buoy temporarily placed to mark the danger.
No. 9. Bade Cove Beacon, Portland Harhor.—Pile beacon.. In good
condition. '
No. 10. White Head Ledge, in White Head Passage to Portland Harhor.—Iron spindle. In good condition.
No. 11. Trotfs Rode, same as ahove.-—Broken,
No. 12. Marie Island Momiment, Casco Bay.—Square stone toAver. In
good condition.
No. 13. Blade Jaclc Rode, Kennehec River.---Wooden spindle/ Avith
wooden cage on top. In good condition.
.1^0. 14:. Seal Rode, Kennehec River.—Spindle Avith copper cylinder
painted black. In good condition.
No. 15. Lee^s Rocle, Kennehec River.—Iron and Avood. In good condi- .
tion.
Noc 16. Ram Island Ledge, Kennehec River.r—lion and wood. In good
condition.
No. 17. Winslow Rodes, Kennehec River.—Iron and Avood. In good
condition.
No. 18. Ames Ledge, Kennehec River—Iron and wood. In good condition.
No. 19. Beef Rode^ Kennehec River.—Iron and Avood. In good condition.
No. 20. Li7ne Rock, Bade River.—Iron and wood spindle. In good
condition.
No. 21. Carlton^s Ledge, Bade River.—lion and wood spindle, in good
condition.
No. 22. Clougli's Rode, Sheepscot River.—Iron and Avood spindle.
No. 23. MerrilVs Ledge, Sheepscot Riverc—lvon and wood spindle.
No. 24. Yellow Ledges, Penohscot Bay.—Iron spindle, copper cylinder
on top. In good condition.
No. 25. Garden Island Ledge, Penohscot Bay,—Iron spindle like above^
with red ball on top. In good condition.
No. 26. Otter Island Ledge, Penohscot Bay.—Iron spindle. In good
condition.
No. 27. Ash Island Point, Penohscot^Bay.—Iron and wood. In good
condition.
-=^=3:^/
No. 2'^. Lodgers Point Ledge, Penohscot Bay,—^Wooden mast, 12 feet*
long. In good condition.
No. 29. Potterfleld'S Ledge, Penohscot Bay.—^tone beacon. In good
conditioh.
.
No. 30. LowelVs Rode, Penobscot. Bay.—Iron spindle. In good condition.
No. 31. SeaVs Ledge, Penohscot Bay.—Iron spindle. In good condition.
No. 32. Harbor Ledge, Penohscot Bay.—Stone beacon. In good condition.
No. 33. Shipyard Ledge, Penohseot Bay.—lion spindle. In good condition.
No. 34. Fiddler'^s Ledge^ Fox Island Thoroughfare.—Stone beacon. In
good condition.
No. 35, North Point of Northeast Ledge, Camden Harhor.—Iron spindle.
In good condition.
No. 36. Morsels Point Ledge^ Camden Harhor.—Ixon spindle. In good
condition.
*



334

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 37. Hosmerh Ledge, Castine Harhor,—Stone monument. In good
condition.
No. 38. SteeVs Ledge, Belfast Harhor.—Square stone beacon. In good
condition.
No. 39. Fort Point Ledge, Penohscot River,—Square stone beacon. In
good condition.
" No. 40. Odom^s Ledge, Penohscot River.—Square stone beacon.^ In
good condition.
No. 41. Budc's Ledge, Penohscot River.—lion spindle. In good condition.
No. 42. Ship and Barges, Blue Hill Bay.—Wooden spindle, 30 feet
high, cask on top, (UCAA^) In good condition.
No. 43. Bunlcer'^s Ledge, Mt. Desert.—Square stone beacon. In good
condition.
No. 44.' Halftide Ledge, Narragaugus Harhor.—Iron socket^ wooden
spar, cask oh top, (UCAA^.) In good condition.
No. 45. Norton''s Reef, Pleasant River.—Iron tripod and shaft, ball on
top, Avhole 35 feet high, (ncAV.) In good condition.
No. 46. Snoiv^s Rode, Moose Peale Reach.—Wooden spindle, cask on
top, (neAV.) In good condition. ,,
No. 47. Gilchrist Rode, Moose Pealc Reach.—Iron spindle, cask at top,
(new.) In good condition.
No. 48. Moose Rocle, Moose Peak Reach.—Iron tripod, 35 feet high
cage on top, (new.) In good condition.
No. 49. Western Bar, Luhec Narrows.—^AVooden beacon filled Avith
stones. Nearly all Avashed away in heaA^.y gale last year. Will be rC:
built this year.
No. 50. The Ledge, St. Croix River.—Wooden beacon. In good condition.
There are no light-vessels in this district.
The steam tender Iris is a small tug ; needs extensiA^e repa^irs, and is
too small for eff'ective service in the fall or winter and springy on that
boisterous and dangerous coast.
The small schooner Wave is used for transporting materials and small
working parties for making repairs at light-stations, during the working
season^
The large number of light-houses, day beacons, spindles, and buoys in
this district, embracing the entire sea coast and interior navigable waters
of Maine, and the annually increasing number authorized by Congress^
as dangers on that coast are developed and accurately defined by the
surA^ey IIOAA^ in progress, it has become a matter of considerable
importance in regard to economy and efficiency of the same that a small
steam tender be provided, and for Avhich an esti mate has been submitted
in the annual estimates. The winter storms and spring freshets are
always more or less damaging to all the aids in this district, and as there
are but few that can be reached by public conveyance^ even in the summer months, for ordinary repair or for those caused by casualty, it is
almost indispensable that the engineer should have a vessel with wlii(ih
to dispatch labor and materials to any point needing them at all times
SECOND DISTRICT.
The second district extends from Hampton Harbor, New Hampshire
to include Gooseberry Point, Massachusetts.
'
Inspector.—Commodore George S. Blake, United States Navy, to
October 1^ 1870; Commander John J. Walker^ United States Navy^
present inspector.



LIGHT-HOUSE-BOARD.

335

Engineer.—W. A. GoodAvin, esq., (acting,) to May 31, 1870; Brevet
Brigadier General J. C. Duane, lieutenant colonel of engineers United
States Army, present engineer.
In this district there are—
Light-houses and iighted beacons
Day or unlighted beacons
Light-vessels, (including two for relief;
Buoys actually in position
Spare buoys for relief and to supply losses
Tender (steam) Verbena

-

'

'.

55
49
- 10
491
378
1

The numbers, preceding the names of stations correspond Avith those
ofthe ^^Light-house List of the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific Coasts ofthe
United States^" issued January 1, 1870.
47. Newburyport, mouth of the Merrimac River,, Massachusetts.—This
light station was first established in 1790, and the beacon-light, designed
to serve as a range for entering the harbor, (or for reaching a safe
anchorage at night,) Avas erected in 1816. The tower of the main light
is a IOAV, octagonal, AA^ooden structure, with a fifth-order lens apparatus
in the lantern. The beacon, the position of which was changed during
the last year, rendered necessary by the change in the direction of the
channel, must necessarily be so constructed as to allow it to be moA^-ed
from one side to another, in front of the main, light, as changes take
place on the bar and in the outer channel.
Newburyport is a place of sufficient importance to justify the establishment of a more poAverful light than the present oue, and the erection
of buildings of better materials than wood. The frequent and very
marked changes in the shore-line, bar, and channels by the heaA^y winter storms and gales have prevented the formation of any very definite
plans for improving this light sta,tion; but new buildings must be
erected at no very distant day, when a more poAverful light AviU be substituted for the present harbor lights
52. Cape Ann, on Thatcher''s Island, off Cape Ann, Massachusetts.-^A
fog-signal has been in operation at this important outlying light station
since 1861. One of greater poAver has been iilaced there during the last
year.; and, in consideration of the A^ast number of vessels which pass
that point daily a,nd nightly, and the great necessity for marking it
during fogs and thick weather, a duplicate steam fog signal should be
kept there at all times, so that in case one gets out of order {as all steam
machinery is very liable to do) the other Avill be in readiness for sounding its blasts.
55, BaJeer^s Island, entrance to Salem Harbor, Massachusetts.—EffortshaA^e been made during several years past to render the range-line,
designed to be formed by the main and beacon lights at that station,
more maxked than it is; so that the outlying rocks and reefs, outside of
which tliis line Avas originally designed to pass, might not be a terror to
navigators passing along that part of the coast. The beacon-light was
originally placed (1797) only 40 feet from the main light, a' distance
entirely too short to make a Avell-defined range line to guide clear of the
southeast breakers, the chief object in having two lights. The character
of the ground belonging to the United States, and the OAvnership of the
land adjoining the light-house site being in a person unAvilling to sell,
have prevented the desired change of increasing the distance between
the two lights. It is hoped that at no distant day the serious defect in
this light station may be remedied.
Salem Harhor, Massachusetts.—An appropriation Avas made at the last
.session of Congress (July 15^ 1870) for the establishment of three lights



336

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

to mark the main channel lead.ing into this anchorage, with the view to)
its becoming „a harbor of refuge Avhich may be safely entered at any
time. Negotiations for the purchase of the proper sites have been in
progress since the adjournment of Congress, and the works Avill be commenced as soon as the titles are perfected and approved by the Attorney General in conformity to law.
..
Duxhury Reef entrance to the harhors of Duxbury, Plymouth, and Kingston, Massachusetts.—An appropriation of $17,931 Avas made at the last
session of Congress (July 15, 1870) for the erection of a light-house on
this point. An examination of the reef has been inade by means of
borings, and plans haA^e been adopted for the site.
The structure will be a tower 25 feet in dia meter at the base, with a height
of 50 feet focal plane. It AAdll be founded in two feet of Avater at low tide,
and will be of concrete, faced with iron. The run, of ice is very scA^ere
from Plymouth Harbor, and to resist it, and the heaA^y seas by which it
will be assailed, the toA\'er Avill be built,in one solid mass to a height of
15 feet above the water. It is expected that the entire work will be
completed by the end of the current fiscal year.
62. Plymouth, '' The Gurnet,''^ entrance to Plymouth Harhor, Massachusetts.—The bieacon-light at this station was placed originally (the stations established in 1769) too close to the main light to serve the purpose eff'ectually as designed, viz.,, ^'to serve as a range to clear BroAvn's
Bank." Efforts haAT-e been made to remedy this defect, but owing to the
character ofthe ground, and difficulty of obtaining a site for extending
the distance, this defect cannot easily be remedied until new structures
are built, AA^hich must be done at no distant day, as the present buildings
are merely Avooden ones.
^Q. Billingsgate Island, entrance to Wellfleet. Bay, Massaclmsetts.—
During the month of March last the sea broke through the beach on the
northwesterly point of the island and flooded a part of the light-house
lot, but there has been no recurrence, and no immediate danger to the
structure is apprehended.
80. Nantuclcet Beacon, Nantuclcet Harhor, Massachusetts.—This beacon,
originally established on the southerly side of the harbor, prior to 1861, to
serA^e as a range Avith Brant Point light-house for entering the harbor
at night, was reestablished and relighted December 1,1869, on the north
side of the light-house, and remoA^ed to its original site Aiiril 20, 1870.
A dAvelling for the keeper of this light- is required, and will be built as
soon as a site can be purchased and valid title obtainedo
%Q. Cape Poge, Martha's Vineyard Island, Massachusetts.—Rapid and
continued encroachment by the sea on this site made it necessary to
purchase more land, adjoining that of the present one, so that the buildings may be removed to a safe distance from the brink of the diminish- .
ing bluff bank. The purchase has been completed, and the land can be
paid for and possession taken of it so soon as the legislature of the State
passes the usual act of cession of jurisdiction, and which it is expected
will be done at its next session.
92. Tarpaulin Cove, Naushon Island, Massachusetts.—It having been *
represented that, possibly, the fixed light at this station might be mistaken fbr some other light of the same kind, a fixed light, A^aried by
flashes CA^ery half minute, Avas substituted in April last, thereby giving
increased power, as well as a more marked distinction, to the station.
A severe gale, in September.. 1869, did much damage along the seacoasts in this district. At each of the following named stations there
haA^e been repairs more or less extensive during the last year, viz:
46. Neioburyport Harbor.^ mouth of Merrimack River, Massachusetts,



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

337

. 47. Neivhuryport Beacon, mouth of Merrimack River, Massachusetts.
50. Annisquam, Wigwam Point, Annisquam Harbor, Massachusetts.
51. Straitsmouth, Straitsmouth Island, coast of Massachusetts.
52. Cape Aim, Thatcher's Island, off* Cape Ann, Massachusetts, (extensive.).
53. Eastern Point, entrance to Gloucester Harbor, Massachusetts.
54. Ten Pound Island, Gloucester Harbor, Massachusetts.
55. Baleer^s Island, entrance to Salem Harbor, Massachusetts.
56. Marhlehead, entrance to Marblehead Harbor, Massachusetts.
57. Egg Rocks, off'Nahant, Massachusetts.
•
5^, Minot^s Ledge, entrance to Boston Bay, Massachusetts.
59. Boston, Little Brewster Island, entrance to Boston Harbor, Massachusetts.
60. Narroios, entrance tb Boston Harbor, Massachusetts.
61. Long Island Head, Boston Harbor, Massachusetts.
62. Plymouth, " The Gurnet," entrance to Plymouth Harbor, Massachusetts.
63. Race Point, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, (extensive.)
64. Long Point, entrance to Provincetown Harbor, Massachusetts.
66. Billingsgate Island, entrance to Wellfleet Harbor, Massachusetts.
67. Sandy Neck, entrance to Barnstable Bay, Massachusetts.
65. Cape Cod Highkmds, Massachusetts.
69. Nausett Beach Beacons, Eastham, near Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
70. Chatham, Chatham Haxbor, Massachusetts.
72. MonomQy Point, Cape Cod., Massachusetts.
78. Ga>y Head, Martha's Vineyard Island, Massachusetts, (extensive.)
. 80. Nantuclcet Beacon, Nantucket Harbor, Massachusetts.
83. Bishop and Clerks, Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts.
SS. Edgartoion, Edgartown Haxbor, Massachusetts.
91. No'hsque Point, Wood's Hole, Massachusetts, (extensiAT-e.)
92. Tarpaulin Cove, Naushon Island, Massachusetts.
97. Clarlc's Point, entrance to New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts.
98. Palmerh Island, New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts.
99. NeWs Point, Mattapoisett Harbor, Massachusetts.
100. Bird Island, Sippican Harbor, Massachusetts, (extensive.)
The following named light stations require repairs to be made during
the ensuing year. Adz:
48. Ipswich, entrance to Ipswich Haxbor, Massachusetts.
52, Cape Ann, Massachusetts.
55, Baker-s Island, entrance to Salem Harbor, Massachusetts.
56. Marhlehead, entrance to Marblehead Harbor, Massachusetts.
60. Narroios, entrance to Boston Harbor, Massachusetts.
63. Race Point, Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
65. Mayors Beach, head of Wellfleet Bay, Massachusetts.
69. Nausett Beach Beacons, Eastham, near Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
75. Nantucket Great Point, Nantucket Island, Massachusetts.
78. Gay Head, Maxtha's Vineyard Island, Massachusetts.
79. Brant Point, Nantucket Harbor, Massachusetts.
83. Bishop and Clerks, Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts.
88. Edgartown, EdgaxtOAvn Harbor, Massachusetts.
95. Cuttyhunk, entrance to Buzzard's Bay, Massachusetts.
99. Nedh Point, Mattaiioisett Harbor, Massachusetts.
The following are the names of stations, in this district not mentioned
elsewhere:
49. Ipsioich Beacon, entrance to Ipswich Harbor, Massachusetts.
22 F



338
76.
81.
82.
84.
89.
90.
96.
101.'

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Sanlcaty Head, Nantucket Island, Massachusetts.
Nantuclcet Cliff Beacons, Nantucket Island, Massachusetts.
Bass River,. Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts.
Hyannis, Massachusetts.
Holmes's Hole, West Chop, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.
Holmes''s Hole Beacon, Martha's Vineyard Island, Massachusetts.
Dumpling Rode, Buzzard's Baj^, Massachusetts.
Wing''s Neck, head of Buzzard's Bay, Massachusetts.
SURVEYS.

SurA^eys and plans of light-house sites in this district have been completed during the year, as folloAvs, Adz:.
Hyannis, a.nd Cuttyhunk.—-Surveys have been made, but iilans not
completed at Brant Point, Cliff* Beacons, Great Point, Sankaty Head,
and Nausett.
Plans have been completed from last year's survej^s of Ii^swich, Boston,
and Narrows, Plymouth, Saxidy Neck, Long Islaud Head, Billingsgate
Island, Cape Poge, West Chop, Long Point, Race Point, Cape Cod
Highlands, and Nobsque Point, the latter including Wood's Hole Lightvessel and Buoy Depot.
All the beacons in the folloAAdng list are in good condition, unless
otherwise stated:
1. Old Cock, Buzzard's Bay.—Iron spindle 36 feet high, with open
work cage at toil.
2. Egg Island, BuzzarWs Bay.—A granite cone, Avith iron spindle,
having vane at top.
3. Range heacon on Fair Haven, Fort Point, Buzzards Bay.—A boiler
iron triangular pyramid, 40 feet high.
4. Cormorant .Rocks, to the southward of the entrance of Mattapoisett
Harhor, BuzzarWs Bay.—An iron spindle 26 feet high, with cage at top.
5. Lone Rocks.—Ivon spindle, with cage on top, marks northeast
entrance to Wood's Hole, Massachusetts.
6. Collier^s Ledge, to mark the entrance to Centerville Harhor, Vineyard
Sound.—A granite.base, Avith iron spindle, haAdng at the top a ball and
A^ane.
7. Great Rock.—Iron spindle beaxing a cage at a height of 26 feet.
I t marks the edge of the flats making off' to the west of Point Gammon,
Vineyard Sound. ^
8. East end of hreakwater.—A Avooden spindle, having at top four arms
and a cask. East end of Hyannis breakwater requires rexiair of day
mark.
9. Sunken Pier.—A Avooden spindle, with cask on top, on northeast
part of Bass RiA^er Bar.
10. Spindle Rock.—An iron spindle, Avith cask on top, marks a rock
aAvash at high Avater, at entrance to EdgartOAvn Harbor.
11. Billingsgate Shoal, old site.—A pyramidal open-Avork timber beacon,
12 feet square at base, 15 feet high, A^dth mast haAdng 15 feet additional
height; and day mark formed of slats crossing at right angles, is in process of erection, to be known as old site.
12. Egg Island Rocle.—A Avooden spindle, with cask at top, entrance
to Wellfleet Harbor.
13. Duxhury Beacon.—GiSinite, square, surmounted by a granite post,
4 feet high, painted red. Out of repair; will not be required aftex completion of light-house on Duxbury Reef.
14. Breakwater Beacon.—Square, open-work granite, with wooden
spindle surmounted by a cage; all painted black. Requires new spindle



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

.

339

15. Hogshead Beacon.—An iron spindle with prong cask on one arm;
and basket on the other.
16. North Beacon.—Iron spindle with two rounds, one aboA^e the other,
and at right angles, is placed on the point of the flats at entrance to
Scituate Harbor. ,
.
17. South Beacon.--Iron spindle with two lozenges, one above the other,
and at right angles, stands on iioint of shoal at entrance to Scituate
Harbor.
18. Londoner.—On Londoner Rock, off* Thatcher's Island (Cape Ann)
is an iron spindle 45 feet high, with an octagonal cage on top.
19. Point Alderton.—A square granite pyramid, surmounted by a black
cone of stone; it is placed on the shoal Avhicli makes out from Point
Alderton, about 200 feet from the shore at IOAV tide.
20. False Spit.—Granite base, with iron spindle and square cage.
21. Spit Beacon.—Square granite pyramid.
22. Nix's Mate.—'L'^lY'ge, square, granite base, with octagonal pyramid.
23. Great Fawn Bar.—Square granite base, and granite cone, with
iron spindle and cage on top.
24. Dear Island Point.—Square granite pyramid, painted red, on
extreme point of Deer Island.
25. Bird Island Beacon.—Iron spindle with cage on top: stands on
southeast point of Bird Island, on rocks bare at low water but covered
at two-thirds flood.
26. Sunken Island.—Open-Avork granite base wooden spindle, with
small square cage on top.
27. Pig Rode.—Square granite pyramid; small wooden staff with small
square cage.
28. Halftide Rocle.—A wooden spar 40 feet high, with barrel day mark,
has been set, and secured to the stub of the stone beacon formerly
marking the danger, and braced with four iron braces.
29. Cat Island Beacon.—Wooden spindle. Requires renewal of day
mark.
30. Marhlehead Rock.—Of granite, in the form of a truncated cone
with Avooden spindle. Requires renewal of spar.
31. Little Aquamtce.—A Avooden spar, Avith tAvo prongs at top, stands
on a rock Avhich is dry at half ebb.
32. Great Aquavitm.—Granite surmounted by a wooden staff and cage
To be left on starboard hand in going up South Channel to Salem.
33. Hardy^s Rock.—A wooden spindle with iron braces, has two triangles at top. Rock dry at half tide.
34. Bowditch Beacon.—Large, triangular pyramid of granite, bearing
a Avooden spindle, with black cage on top. The condition of this beacon
has not changed since the date of last annual report. The displaced
stones seem to be firmly held in the Avork. No repair can be eff'ected
short of tearing doAvn and rebuilding the Avhole beacon. Although in
its present condition the structure looks badly, yet it is quite as efficient
an aid to naAdgation as if a large sum had been spent in its repair. It
is not proposed to take any steps in the matter so long as the beacon
remains as it is.
35. Halfway Rock.—All gone except foundation, Avliich shows above
the AA^ater., The beacon was destroyed some 3-ears ago, and it is not
proposed to rebuild it.
36. Little Haste.—A 35-foot wooden spar, Avith cask on top, marks this
rock; dry at loAv-water. I t is off' the. northwest side of Great Haste
Ledge.
37. Ahhotfs Monument—Square, granite, surmounted by a wooden
staff, A\^ith open-work square cage on top, painted red.




340

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

38. Monument Bar.—Square crib-work filled with granite, Avith a
w^ooden shaft, bearing a square cage, painted black.
39. Ramshorn.—Square crib-work filled with granite; wooden staff,
painted black ; top like a sugar-loaf.
<
40. Lohster Rocks, Beverly Harhor.—Stone, with a wooden spindle.
41. Black Rock, Gloucester Harhor.—An iron spindle with oblong
cage.
42. Harhor Rode, Gloucester Harhor.—An iron spindle Avith open-work
ball; all painted black.
43. Five Pound Island, Gloucester Harhor.—Granite base, with iron
spindle and ball, painted red.
4,4:. Lohster Rode, Annisquam,—Square open-work, granite beacon;
top black. '
45. Lane^s Point.—Square Avooden beacon.
46. Point Neck Rock.—Iron spindle, painted red; ball on top.
47. North Pier, Newhuryport Harhor.—Is built of hcAvn. timber laid up
as a lozenge-shape crib and filled with stones; shows about four feet
above high Avater.
48. South Pier, Newhuryport Harhor.—Exactly like the preceding.
LIGHT VESSELS.

94. Hen and Chiekens light-vessel. Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts.—This
vessel has been ordered into port as soon as she can be relicA^ed by
another vessel, to undergo necessary repairs to encounter the coming
AYinter gales.
Relief light-vessel, (No. 38,) was built last year and is kept at the
station. Wood's Hole, in readiness to take the iplace of any damaged or
remoA^ed light-A^essel in the district.
Relief light-vessel, (No. 9,) requires very extensive rcjiairs which are
now being made.
.
BUOY AND R E L I E F LIGHT-VESSEL DEPOTS.

Wood^s Hole Depot.—The fencing and shed for protecting the buoys
at the Wood's Hole Depot haA^e been comiileted. The dredging Avas
only partially done last season.
Gulf Island Depot.—This depot for spare buoys is also the place of
residence of the light-keepers and families belonging to Minot's Ledge
light station.
TENDERS.

Steam tender Verhena,—This tender was built during the last year and
sent to the second district to relieve the Cactus, which had become
unfit for further service.
Sailing schooner Wave.-—This tender was transferred July last to the
engineer of thefirst and second districts for use in transporting materials and labor to light stations requiring them either for construction or
repair. Sailing vessels cannot be employed economically to attend upon
buoys, especially on. such a coast as that of Massachusetts and Maine in
the Avinter season. An estimate Avas submitted last year for a steam
tender for this coast, but the apiiropriation haAdng been deferred, it has
been rencAved this year.



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

341

THIRD DISTRICT.
The third district embraces all aids to navigation from Gooseberry
Point, Massachusetts, to include Squam Inlet, New Jersey, as A^^ell as
the Hudson River, Whitehall Narrows, and Lake Champlain.
Inspector.—Rear Admiral Charles S. Boggs, United States Navy.
Engineer.—Joseph Lederle, esq., (acting) to June 16, 1870; Brevet
Brigadier General I. C. Woodruff', lieutenant colonel of engineers United
States Army, present engineer.
In this district there are—
Light-houses and lighted beacons
Day or unlighted beacons
Light-vessels
Buoys actually in position
Spare buoys for relief and to supply losses
Tenders (steam) Cactus and Putnam

,.

105
42
8
387
345
2

The numbers preceding the names of stations correspond with the
Lighthouse Lists of the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific Coasts, and the
Northern and Northwestern Lakes ofthe United States, issued January
1, 1870.
Castle Hill, Rhode Island, east side of entrance to Newport Harhor,
Narragansett Bay.—In the report of this board last year it'Avas stated:
"Applications liaA^e been made at A^arious times in the past, and renewed
^his year, for a light-house and fog signal on Castle^Hill, to guide A^essels,
especially in thick and foggy Aveather, into Newport Harbor and Narragansett Bay. After a careful examination of the locality, and a full
consideration of the whole subject, it is recommended that an efficient
fog signal be authorized for this point, which it is belicA^ed will, with the
existing lights and other aids to naAdgation in the immediate vicinity,
subserve the desired purpose. The land uiion Avliich this fog signal must
necessarily be placed, if authorized,' being held at a certain A^^alue, an
estimate for an efficient fog signal, including the cost of-the land, is
submitted in the annual estimates." The applicants for this aid to navigation are still urging its establishment. With the price asked by the
OAvners for the land upon which the keeper's dwelling and fog signal
must be placed, if authorizedj the sum of $18,000 will be required—the
amount estimat^ed and submitted last year.
103. Beaver Tail, Rhode Island.—A new fog signal has been provided
and placed at this light station as a substitute to the old one, which A ^s
Aa
worn out.
106. Rose Island heacon-light, Rhode Island, near,Narragansett Bay.—
The light authorized tobe placed on this island has been completed this
season, and the light exhibited on the 20th of^January last.
108. PopUtr Point, Rhode Island, Narragansett Bay.—The work of renovations and improvements authorized for this light station are in progress.
Hog Island Reef, Rhode Island, Narragansett Bay.—In the report from
this board last year it Avas stated that " a reef runs out from Hog Island
to the main channel, rendering naAdgation difficult and dangerous. To
prcA^ent, as far as possible, loss of life and property at this place, the
steamboat company owning and running a regular line of steamers
between New York, Newport, and Fall RiA^er, keep a light-A^essel sta«
tioned there at the cost of the comxiany. Should Congress see fit to relieve this comxiany of this unusual expense, which it incurs for the benefit
of others as Avell as for itself, by authorizing the building of a light-house
with a protecting pier, in about six feet water on the reef, the estimated
\



342

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

cost would be $45,000." As no apxiroxiriation was made last year it is
deemed xiroper to refer to the facts contained in the x^rcAdous rexiort..
112. Conimicut Point, Rhode Island, entrance to Providence River, Narragansett Bay.—When the light on the shoal off' Conimicut Point Avas
lighted as a substitute for the light on the main land, at Nayat Point,
(distant about one mile,) the only available means of attending upon it
were to allow the keepers to retain the dwelling at the old light station,
and for them to visit the new light by boat. The land constituting the
site of the old light station at Nayat Point is A-aluable, and would bring,
at public sale, a good x:>rice. The old tower is not Avortli tlie cost of tearing it doAA^ii, and the dwelling not having been xepaired, in expectation
of an approxiriation for comxileting the buildings at'Conimicut Point, to
include a xiroper dAA'Cllingfor the keexier, it now becomes necessary either
to make considerable exxienditure upon the Nayat Point dAvelling, or ask
ibr a sjiecial apxirox3riation for the necessary xirotection ^ier against
running ice, and for a dwelling at that light-house. The estimated cost
of the Avork is $30,000. The only accommodation for the keeper now
is in the tOAver, xilaced on the foundation of the old day beacon, Avhich
is close to the deepest Avater of the channel, and the only suitable xilace
for the light to guide clear of the shoal.
Saben's Point, Rhode Island, Providence River.—In a sxiecial report,
made in comxiliance to a call of Congress last May, a light-house and
keeper's dwelling wei^e recommended for this xilace. The foundation is
in 8 feet Avater at mean low tide, and will require an axipropriation of
$42,000 to construct the x^ier of xirotection and the other buildings.
Pumham Rocle, Rhode Island, Providence River.-—An axipropriation
Avas made July 15, 1870, for the erection of a light on this rock, Avhich
Avill be commenced as soon as A^alid title and cession of jurisdiction are
obtained in conformity to law.
Fitller^^ Rocle, Rhode Island, Providence River.—Congress made an axixiropriation July 15, 1870, for a beacon-light to mark this rock. Work
Avill be commenced as soon as valid title and cession of jurisdiction are
obtained.
Sassafras Point, Rhode Island, Providence River,^An appropriation
Avas made July 15, 1870, for a beacon-light at this x^hi-ce, AAdiich it is
exxiected may be commenced at an early day.
i l 5 . Watch Hill, Connecticut, near Stonington.—The renoA'ations and
improA^ements authorized by tli6 ax^x^rox^riation act of July 15, 1870, are
in progress and Avill be finished during the present season for work in
that Adcinity.
120. North Dumpling Island, Fisher''s Island Sound,—The renoA^ations
and improA^ements for this station authorized in the axix>rox')riatioii bill
of July 15, 1870, are in progress, and Avill be comxfleted this working
season.
Rfice Rock, main entrance to Long Island Sound from the eastward.—
Congress axix^ropriated July 28, 1866, $90,000 '4br a n e w light-house oil
Race Rock, or on the soutliAvest end of Fisher's Island, entrance to LongIsland Sound, as ma}' be axixiroved by the Light-house Board." After
due consideration of the requirements of navigation, it Avas deemed
necessary to locate the IICAV light on the nest of boulders called "Race
Rock," nearly a mile southeast from Race Point, on. Fisher's Island. A
careful and minute survey of this locality has developed the fact that
the reef on Avhich the light-house is proposed to be built consists of an
accumulation of boulders of various sizes, pa-cked solid, OA^ergroAAm Avith
sea-Aveed, and in about 12 feet of water. The estimated cost for caxrying this project into eff'ect is $200,000, of Avhich $90,000 were then



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

343

available, leaving $110,000 to be xirovided for b^^ Congress. Of this
amount only $10,000 Avere asked for and appropriated sJuly 15, 1870,
"for continuing the construction of a light-house on Race Rock, Long
Island Sound." This amount in addition to the former approxiriation,
Avould have been sufficient to carry on the work for at least a season,
and to bring dt safely aboA^e high water. By an act of Congress of the
12th of July, 1870, the balance of the first approxiriation reverted to the
treasury, leaving only $10,000 with Avliich to commence the construction.
An apxiropriation of $150,000 is recommended for continuing this imxiortant work and included in the annual estimates.
123. Little Gull Island, main entrance to Loiig Island ^Sound -from the
eastward.—The new tower, keex>er's dwelling and building for fog signal
are completed. The new second-order light was exhibited for the first
time on the 15th December, 1869. The cellar of the old keeper's dwelling has been converted into a cistern for the service of the steam fogsignal. The Wilcox x>atent steam generator Av^liich operates the Siren,
has proved unreliable and will be replaced by a horizontal steam boiler.
This being a A^ery imxiortant station on Long Island Sound, the fog signal should be of the most reliable character and in duxilicate, as the
station is not easily reached, in case the signal should give out. The
estimated cost for a duxilicate signal is $5,000, and is included in the estimates for this year.
124. Gardinerh Island, Long Island Sound.—The alterations in the
lantern required at this station and for which an ax:)propriation Avas
made July-15, 1870, are xirogressing, and Aviil be completed during this
season. A fog bell Aviil be xilaced at this station before Avinter.
125. Plum Island, Long Island Sound.—The rebuilding of this station,
which was commenced last yeax, will be completed during the present
season.
•
Long Beach Bar, New York, Long Island.—The erection of a lighted
beacon at this station has been provided for by special appropriation ot
July 15, 1870. Plans and estimates have been prepared and the AVork
will be commenced at as early a day as possible.
132. Horton's Point, New York, Long Islamd, Long Island Sound?.—The
repairs and renoA'ations provided for by the apxiropriation of July 15,
1870, are xirogressing and will be comxileted during this season.
133. Faulkner^s Island, off Guilford Harhor, Long Island Sound.—The
authorized rexiairs and renoA^ations will be commenced during this season, and will be completed if possible before winter sets in. As reported
last year, the island is Avashing aAvay on the east side, and an appropri
ation for its protection b}^ a sea-wall is again recommended. The estimate cost is $12,000.
134. New Haven, Connecticut.—The rexiairs and renovations provided
for by the ax^x^roxiriation of July 15, 1870, haA^e been commenced and
Avill be comxileted during the present season. The caloric engine Avhich
operated the fog bell .became Avorn out and has been rexilaced by a Stevens striking apxiaratus.
136. Stratford Point, Connecticut, Long Island Sound.—The condition
of this light station is the same as at the date of the last report. It is
not in a fit state for rexiair, and true economy requires that it should be
rebuilt whenever an adequate appropriation can be obtained from Congress. An estimate of $50,000 Avas submitted last year, but no axipropriation was made.
138. Bridgeport Beacon, Connecticut.—The reconstruction of this beacon is authoiized by the appropriation made July 15, 1870. The work



344

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

will be commenced at an early day and Avill be prosecuted so as to insure
its completion during the fiscal year.
140. Black Rode, Fairweather Island, Long Island Sound.—The lighthouse at this place is A^ery old and ought to be rebuilt, but on consideration of other pressing wants, no appropriation is asked for that purxiose
this year. A reappropriation of the $8,000 carried into the treasury by
act of July 12, 1870, for a depot for buoys, &c., is asked and included
in the annual estimates.
Penfield Reef, Long Island Sound.—An axixiropriation was made July
15, 1870, of $30,000 "for commencing the construction of light-house
on Penfield Reef, near" Bridgeport, Connecticut, Long Island Sound."
The estimated cost of completing this structure in addition to the former
appropriation is $25,000, and is embraced in the annual estimates.
145. Execution Rocks, Long Island Sound.—The x^i'otection to this
station against the ice and sea, for which funds have been approxiriated
July 15, 1870, is xirogressing, and will be completed during the season.
Hart Island, Long Island Sound.—An axiproxiriation Av^as made Ax:)ril
7, 1866, for the erection of a light at this point. The OAvner of the island
being nuAvilling to sell the requisite quantity of land for this light station for such a sum as the board would have been authorized to give,
proceedings Avere instituted, in conformity to laAV, for condemning the
land. The award of the appraisers for five acres of land-Avas $25,000, a
sum far exceeding the entire apxiroxiriation, and, in the oxiinion of the
board, fax beyond its intrinsic money A^^alue. Having made further
examinations, it is found that the south end of the island, ux)on which
the light would necessarily be placed, if i^laced on the island at all, is
continually Avashing away, and unless it is protected by an exx)ensive
sea wall, a light-house could not remain there very long. The end of
the reef, (in 6 feet Avater,) which runs out from the southern end of the
isla-nd, would aff'ord a good foundation and prox3er site for the erection
of a stone structure vsimilar to those already erected at xioints o n t h e
Hudson River. The estimated cost of the proposed structure and apparatus, complete in all respects, is $50,000, and is included in the annual
estimates this year.
155. Sandy Hook, east beacon, entrance to Neio York Bay.—The effect
of the heavy gales of last Avinter upon the north xioint of Sandy Hook,
on Avhich this beacon is located, was such that the removal became
necessary. The Avhole building Avas moA^ed 500 feet south, retaining^ its
former range with the main light. It was x^l^ced on oak piles, and is
now considered out of danger. The fog signal at this station is in good
condition, and gives general satisfaction. It is to be feared that the
tubes of the boiler may give out at any time; should this haxipeh, this
most important station Avould be without a fog signal until UCAV tubes
could be inserted. A station of such importance to navigation as Sandy
Hook ought to liaA^e two complete fog signals, for the same reason as
two, and in some cases three sets of lamxis are furnished to light-houses,
and an ax3X)ropriation is asked therefor of $5,000 for this purxiose
One or more permanent heacons in the lower hay of New York.—
Last year's report contained the following dn this subject, which has
been very often brought to the notice of Congress by parties in New
York and elsewhere, interested in OA^er-sea com merce: "An ax')X3ropriation
Avas made March 2, 1867, by Congress, of $45,000 ^ to enable the Lighthouse Board to erect in the lower bay of New York one or more permanent beacons.' This sum is wholly inadequate to the accomxilishment
of the purpose for which this appropriation Avas made. An appropriation of $200,000 Avasxmade March 3, 1837, 'for a light-house on Flynn's



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

345

Knoll, near Sandy Hook, to be built under the direction of the Engineer
Department.' On the 3d March, 1851, Congress made another approxiriation of $30,000 ' for a light-house on Flynn's Knoll.' For reasons
heretofore communicated to Congress by those charged Aviththe erection
of the proposed light on Flynn's Knoll, the light has not been built. It
is belicA^ecl that Flsmn's Knoll is the only obstruction to naAdgation in
the lower ba}^ of New York which is not proxierly marked; and as Congress has, by three'separate and distinct approxiriations, manifested its'
desire for the erection of a light-house there, the board has no doubt
but a suitable structure, to serve as a range with the Princess Bay
light, and also to m^rk this dangerous shoal, which lies between the
two princixial channels leading up New York Bay, can be built for the
sum originally axipropriated in 1837, viz., $200,000 in addition to the
$45,000 noAv available. This light, xilaced so as to make a range Avith
Princess Bay light for the deepest water in Gedney's Channel, would
enable vessels ofthe heaviest draught to cross the main bar, and reach
a safe anchorage at night in the lower bay, in addition to its usefulness
in marking a shoal upon which there is only 9 feet of water at low
tides." •
In recurring to this subject it may be repeated that it is likely a proXier light maybe erected on Flynn's Knoll for $200,000, the amount
originally appropriated in 1837, and in that vicAv an estimate of $100,000
for commencing the Avork has been embraced in the estimates.
157. Conover Beacon, New Yorlc Bay.—In the appropriation of $13,400
made March 3, 1869, "for repairs and renovation at Throgg's Neck,
Highlands of Navesink, Sandy Hook, Conover Beacon, and Fort Tompkins light stations," $2,500 Avere intended for rexiairs and renovations at
this station. The necessary repairs to the tower and keeper's dwelling
AA^ere intended to be made during this season, but the appropriation,
under the act of Congress, reverted into the treasury. The repairs
are much needed and are again recommended. . Estimated cost, $900.
161. Elm Tree Beacon, New Yorlc, Staten Island.—The sea has washed
away over 50 feet in front of this station and behind the jetty, AA^hich
had so far protected this side. The j e ^ y requires to be extended 60
feet toward the shore and filled in with stones. The estimated cost is
$1,800.
163. Princess Bay, New York, Staten Island.—An appropriation of
$12,000 Avas made July 15, 1870, for the protection of this site against
the encroachments of the sea. Plans and estimate bf cost haA^^e been
made, and it is intended to commence AVork at an early day.
164. Fort Tompkins, New York, Staten Island.—The repairs and renoA^ations authorized at this station by the appropriation made March 3,
1869, haAT^e not been carried into effect, it being doubtful Avhether the
buildings (to\yer and keeper's dwelling) can remain in their x^^Bsent
positions, on account of the Avant of the ground for fortifications. No
recommendation in regard to this station can be made until this question is settled.
196. Elhow Beacon, New Jersey, Newark Bay.—A beacon has been
erected at this place and fitted Avith a lens of the sixth order, in place
of the former stake-light.
171, West Point, New Yorlc, Hudson River.—It is proposed to erect a
suitable structure for a beacon, to be fitted Avith a §ixth-order lens, at
this point, to take the place of the present stake-light, for which an
estimate of $1,500 is inclosed in this year's estimates.
172. Esopus Meadows, New York, Hudson River.—The appropriation
of July 15, 1870, Avhich A ^s made for rebuilding the toAver and dwelling
Aa



346

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

at this station, became available at too late a day in the working season to safely commence the work this season and get it far enough
advanced to'resist the Avinter storms and ice of the spring. The Avork
Avill be commenced as early next spring as it may be safe to do so, and
have it comxileted by the closing of t h e riA'cr in the fall. The entire
apxiropriation Avill be required to comxilete the Avork, and, therefore, any
balance that may reniain on June 30, 1871, must be maide available for
^the next fiscal year.
174. Saugerties, Neio. York, Hudson River.—The Avorks of reconstruction at this light station have been completed during the past summer.
Hockdaling^s Point, New York, Hudson River.—A beacon-light is required
on this point, which is near "Four-mile Point," to guide vessels at night
from the "outer" into the "narrow" channel. The estimated cost is
$700.
177. Stuyvesant, New York, Hudson River.—As ,the portable beacons'
placed on this river must be removed to prcA^ent their destruction by ice
and freshets, OAving to the close of navigation, this point has been
selected for storing those aboA^e it; and the old dwelling for the keeper
Avill be coiiA^erted into a storehouse for their X3reservation.
.
178. New Baltimore, New York, Hudson River.—Owing to the frequent
losses ofthe beacons on the Hudson RiA^er by heavy freshets during the
navigating season, it is found necessary to place them on crib foundations filled in with stone and of sufficient height aboA^e the highest
stages of the river to save them from destruction, to do Avhich will
require an appropriation of $1,000 each.
Loioer end of Baltimore Dike, New York, Hudson River.—This dike
has recently been comxileted by the Governnient, and a beacon is nece^ssaxy to mark its lower end. It is proposed, if the necessary axipropriation is granted, to place the beacon on a crib 6 feet high, filled AAdth
stone and properly secured to the dike, at an estimated cost of $1,000.
179. Five:Hoolc Island, New York, Hudson River,—A beacon, placed
on a crib filled Avith stone, similar to the one at New Baltimore, is
required for this place, in lieu of the small light noAv there, which is frequently washed away. Estimated cost $1,000.
180. Coeyman^s Bar, New Yorlc, Hudson River,—This station requires
to be put in the same condition as is proposed for New Baltimore, &c.,
at estimated cost of $1,000.
181. Roha Hoolc, New Yorlc, Hudson River.—It is x^ioposed to protect
this small light against the effects of running ice and spring freshets by
the construction of a crib foundation of sufficient height, at an estimated
cost of $600.
182. Schodack Channel, New York, Hudson River.—It is x^ioposed to
apply the same reniedj^ at this light station as at Roha Hook, at an
estimated cost of $600.
183. Nine-mile Tree, New Yorlc, Hudson River.-^The main ship channel runs close along the edge of the dike at this xioint. It is xiroposed
to construct a crib inside of the dike for the foundation of a new portable beacon, at an estimated cost of $1,000.
. 184., Cow Island, New Yorlc, Hudson River.—The stake-light at this
place should be rexilaced by a portable beacon xilaced on a crib-Avork
foundation filled AAdth stone, at an estimated cost of $1,000.
185. Parada Hoolc, New York, Hudson River.—A xiermanent beacon
has been built at this x)lace during the present working season.
Upper end of Stpne Dike, Neio York, Hudson River.—The steamboat
comxianies in the Hudson River have placed, and noAv keep, a stakelight at this xilace; private lights are, in every Avay, objectionable.



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

347

They are liable to mislead strangers, and there is no responsibility on
the x^art of those Avho establish them for the xiroxier care and management. That this light is a necessary aid to the safe naAdgation of the
riA'cr is quite apparent, and therefore an estiuiate has been submitted
for its establishment, amounting to $1,000.
187. ' Cuyler''s Dyke, New Yorlc, Hudson River.—A x>ortable beacon
was xilaced at this point last year, but it haAdng been run into and destroyed by a tow, a stake-light Avas x:)laced as a temporary expedient until
means are pro Added for the erection of a suitable structure for exhibiting
a light of the proper order. .The estimated cost of a suitable structure
of crib work and stone is $1,000.
WHITE HALL NARROW^S.

378. Opposite Chapman^s Dock.—This stake-light is to be rexilaced by a
X^ortable beacon fitted Avith a suitable illuminating ax3paxatus, similar to
others in these Avaters.
379. Soutli of Snoddy^s Dock.—This stake-light is to be improved in the
same Avay that others have been in the Adcinity.
At the following stations in White Hall Narrows x^ortable beacons
haA^e been established in place of former stake-lights. Adz:
380. Steam Mill Point,
381. Head of Two Channels.
'
382. Maple Bend.
383. Lower end of Two Channels,
384. Opposite Belden^s Wharf,
385. Ahove Pulpit Point.
386. Loioer end of Four Channels.
By authority of a sxiecial axix^roxiriation of March 3, 1869, portable
beacons have been established on crib-work foundations at the folloAving
points in White Hall Narrows, Adz:
.Benjamin's Place,
Carey^s Camp,
Long Reach. •
.
•
»
Chisolni's Bend,
Old MaiWs Place,
In continuation, and to complete the entire system in these waters,
approxndations Avere asked for last year for Red Hook and Pulpit Point.
These two beacons should be erected on land, the fsites for Avhich can
be purchased for $100 each, and the whole estimated cost is $1,300 for
both sites and works.
.
v
Barher^s Point, New Yorlc, Lake Champlain.—An apx3roxiriation was
made July 15, 1670, for ,a light-house at this point. The site has been
surveyed, and negotiations for the purchase of the land are entered into.
If successful, the cession of jurisdiction will be applied for as soon as
the legislature of the State of NCAV York is in session. Plans and estimates are in course of x>reparation. It is expected that Avork at this
station can be commenced at the opening of next sxiring and completed
during the ensuing summer; but to do this any balance of the apxiropriation Avhich remains June 30, 1871, must be made aA^ailable for completing the Avork.
389. Juniper Island, Vermont, Lake Cham'plain.—A landing Avharf and
a boat-house for the xirotection of the boat necessar}^ for this station are
greatly needed, and an estimate of $3,500 has been included in the annual estimates.
^
390. Burlington, Vermont, Breakwater heacons, Lalce Champlain,—The



348

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

beacoii on the north end of this breakwatex was destroyed by fire during last summer. A temporary light was immediately exhibited, AAdiich
Avill be superseded by a proper structure and a proper light before cold
Aveather sets in this fall. The breakwater is now being constructed by
the Government further north, and Avhen the work is finished a ncAv
beacon must necessarily be built, under existing laAv, if means are aA^ailable. In the spring and fall these beacons are reached by the keeper
Avith great diificulty, not to say sometimes at the risk of his life. To
fail to light them at any time Avould be a A^ery serious business for those
navigating the lake, but especially so AA'hen the Aveather is such as to
render it hazardous to go to the breakwater by boat. It is therefore
deemed of considerable importance to provide a dwelling for the keeper
on the spot, for which, and the rebuilding of the beacon on the extended
Xiart of the breakAvater, an estimate of $7,500 has been submitted.
Colchester Reef, Vermont, Lalce Champlain.—An Axipropriation v^as
made July 15,1870, " for building a light-house at Colchester Point or
in its vicinity. Lake Champlain." After a careful examinatioii and survey of the locality, it was found that the rock called " Middle Bunch"
was the proper place for the new light-house. This rock is in the middle of the channel, with 7 feet Avater at loAv-Avater over it, and deep
Avater on either side. With a light thereon a vessel can pass on either
side close to the rock. The Avork has been commenced and Avill be carried above Avater (and further if xiossible) this fall, and will be comxDleted
next season.
Bluff'Point, Valcour Island, Lake Champlain.—An appropriation was
made by act of Congress apx^roved July 15, 1870. A proxier site^ has
been selected a.nd surveyed. As soon as the land can be purchased,
and the jurisdiction ceded to the United States, work will be commenced,
Avith the hoxie of comxoleting the construction during the next summer,
Xirovided the balance that may remain June 30, 1871, is not carried to
surplus fund.
392. Cumherland Head, New Yorlc, Lake Champlain.—As reported last
year, this light is obscured by trees in the direction of Plattsburg and
toward Point aux Roches. The OAvners of the adjoining land offer to
remove the trees for a compensation of $100 per acre, or.to sell the land
and remove the trees for $200 X3er acre. The nuinber of acres necessary
to be cleared is 15. It is recommended to xiurchase the land and to sell
it after the obstructions are remoA^ed, and turn the x3urchase-money into
the treasury, Avhich it is probable Avill be equal to the original sum
Xiaid and the cost of removing the trees.
The following are the names of light stations in this district not mentioned elsewhere:
105. Newport Harhor, Rhode Island, on Goat. Island.
110. Bristol Ferry, Rhode Island, entrance to Mount Hox3e Bay.
117. Stonington, Connecticut.
119. Morgan^s Point, Connecticut, near Mystic.
126. Cedar Island, New York, Long Island, entrance to Sag Harbor.
128. Calves'' Island, Connecticut, Connecticut River.
136. Stratford Point, Connecticut, Long island Sound.
141. Eaton''s Neck, NCAV York, Long Island, Long Island Sound.
143. Norwalk Island, Long Island Sound.
144. Great Captain Island, New York, Long Island Sound.
146. Sand's Point, New York, Long Island, Long Island Sound.
14:8. North Brother Island, New York, East River.
l49. Great West Bay, NCAV York, sea-coast of Long Island.
154. Sandy Hook^ entrance to New York Bay..



LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD.

349

156. Sandy Hoolc West Beacon, entrance to NCAV York Bay.
158. Chapel Hill Beacon, entrance to NCAV York Bay.
159. Point Comfort Beacon, entrance to New York Bay.
16Q. Waakaack Beacon,.entrance to NCAV York Bay.
162. New Dorp Beacon, entrance to New York Bay.
166. Bergen Point, New Jersey, NcAvark Bay.
167. Corner Stake, New Jersey, opposite Elizabethport.
173. Rondout, New York, Hudson RIA^CX.
176. Coxsackie, New York, Hudson River.
378. Opposite Chapman^s Dock, New York, Whitehall Narrows.
379. South of Snoddyh Dock, Vermont, Whitehall Narrows.
387. Crown Point, NCAV York, Lake Chamxilain.
• 391. Plattshurg Beacons, New York, Lake Chamxilain.
LIGHT-VESSELS.

*

102. Brenton^s Reef light-vessel, (No. 11.)—Stationed to mark Brenton's
Reef off' the eastern entrance to NcAvport, Rhode Island.^ A complete
gang of iron-wire standing rigging has been ordered for this A^essel, and
to be placed before winter sets in.
151. Sandy Hook light-vessel, (No. 16.)—This light-vessel has been
eight years on her station Avithout rexiairs, mainly owing to the Avant of
a proper relief vessel and the demands for repairs of other vessels. A
relief light-A^essel Avill be aA^ailable soon, and this A^essel will be hauled
up and put iii thorough repair.
152. Wreck of Scotland light-vessel, (No. 20.)—It is understood that the
work of remoAdng the wreck of the Scotland has been completed, and
as the authority for placing this vessel there ceases upon the completion
of the removal of that Avreck, this board has no