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TABLE OF CONTENTS.

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Mr. Woodbury on the Finances and Cur-.
Mr. Woodbury on the Finances
Mr. Woodbury on the Finances
Mr. Woodbury on the Finances
Mr. Woodbury on the Finances
Mr. Ewing on the Finances
Mr. Forward on the Finances
Mr. Forward on the Finances
Mr. Spencer on the Finances
Mr. Bibb on the Finances




Sept., 1837
Dec., 1837
Dec., 1838
Dec., 1839
Dec., 1840
June, 1841
Dec., 1841
Dec., 1842
Dec., 1843
Dec., 1844

1
89
175
231
351
437
461
485
597
649

REPORt ON THE FINANCES.
DECEMBER, 1839.

,

•

. ,

TRIEASURY DEPARTMENT, I>ecem&6r 3, 1839.

The undersigned respectfully submits to Congress the following repoit
on the finances, in obedience to the .''act supplementary to the act to
establish the Treasury Department."
. :It is gratifying to be able to state, notwithstanding the embaiTassments
of the present year, that the revenues of the General Government have
been increasedj the expenditures diminished, and most of the Treasury
notes redeemed.
•
REVENUE AND MEANS FOR 1839, EXCLUSIVE OF TRUSTS, AND THE POST
.
OFFICE. ; /
°

The balance in the Treasury on the .1st of January, 1339, which could
•' be cpnsidered available for general puiposes w a s . . . . . $2,466,961 9.5
The data on which thi^ computation rests are in the table annexed, (A.)
The.%*receipts from customs,'the first three quarters, as
/appearing on the Register's books, are-.
$18,328,393* 50
This includes about two millions and three-fouiths collected'last year in Treasury notes, but not carried oh his
books till 1839. From thisjcause the actual receiptsin .this year willj to that extent^ appear larger than they •.
ought. '
"
•
: "
. Receipts from lands the first three qu arters, including also
. some collected last year in Treasury n o t e s . . . . . . . . . . 5,417,286 31
Miscellaneous r e c e i p t s - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
.... . ' 125,208 78
Estimated receipts, for the fourth, quarter from all those
s o u r c e s . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . : . . . . 5,700,000 00
Receipts dn some of. the debts against banks not available on Ist January, 1839, .but since p a i d . . . . . . . . . . . 1,322,686 00
Frbm the third issue of Tre'asury notes under the act of
' ; March 2, 1 8 3 9 . . . . . . . v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . : . . . 1 . a,857,276 21
Aggregate



riieans...........;.'.....

.$37,217;812;75

232 •

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

EXPENDITURES FOR 1 8 3 9 , EXCLUSIVE OF THE POST OFFICE AND TRUSTS.

Civil, foreign, and miscellaneous, for the first three quarters $3,649,508 23
Military, for the first three quarters
: . . . . . : 10,791,799 21.
Naval, for the first thr^e quarters
4,713,701 57
Estimate for all, during the fourth quarter.
5,600,000 00
Funded debt for the year.
14,658,98
. . •
..
,24,769,667
Redemption of Treasury nptes in the first three quarters,
interest as well as p r i n c i p a l — . . :
9,891,759
This includes two millions-and thre'e fourths paid in
for duties and lands last year, but not carried on the
Register's books till 1839. . From this cause the expenditures on that account will appear larger by that amount •.
than they actually have been within those quarters.
^. ; / .
Estimated aiiiouht of notes redeemed in the fpuith quarter 1,000,000

99
83
.

00

Aggregate p a y n i e n t s . ; / . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . ..35,661,427 82?
Leaving an available balance of money in the Treasury • on the 3lst of. December, 1839^ of.,. -> . . . . . . . . . . . : . 1,556,384 93
$37,217,8i2 75General exhibits of the receipts and expenditures in 1838 are presented in, the table annexed, ( B . ) . / . . . .
^
: .
. The funds cpmpute'd. to be not available nor applicable to pubhc purposes at.the commencement.and at the close of the present year, can be
seen in the table before mentioned,; (A;)
. , . , - - . '
Details of the expenditiires in the first three quarters of 1839 are also
;given in the subjoirie'd statement, (C
PUBLIC DEBT AND TREASURY NOTES.

The condition of the small remains" of the funded debt has not materially altered since the"' last annual repprt. A .statement of it, with the '
several payments made within the year is herewith exhibited, (D.) - ' •
Though ihc.ommpded by repeated pressures in the money market a:nd
SiTspensions of specie, pay ment by the banks within the last three years,'^
the' interest a.nd.all the principal due on that debt, as well as on-Treasury.
notes j have been punctually paid in; specie v^henever desired. A detailed .
statement pf the issue and redemption'of Treasurynotes during; 1839 is
annexed, (E.)
^
;
'
.
• . ;.
. Notmore than one. fourth of a naillion of the first and second emissions,
and .two miUions and ahalfbf the third, will prbbablyreniaih.outstanding
at the close-of the year. The former emissions have been, for some
months redeeniable, but the last one does not; begin to be till March,
18.40, except as previously offered.in payment of p'ublic dues. The
aggregate of two millions arid three, fourths of priricipal is therefore all
that is computed will be unpaid of neaiiy twenty millions, which were
issued since October, l837V.in consequence of indulgences granted tothe .



1839.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

233

merchants on their bonds, and the- banks on their deposite debts. At no
' time has the amount of notes outstanding been allowed to exceed ten
millions, and the- present very reduced 'aggreg^ate unredeemed is less
than the sums still owing from the banks that suspended specie payments
in 1837, and from the Pennsylvania':Bank of-the 'Unitecl States on its
bond due in.:Septehiber next; and might with ease have been paid
during the. present year had the money been received .on those claims.
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS WITHIN THE COMMERCIAL YEAR 1 8 3 9 .

"The exports during the year ending September 30,1839, are computed
to have beeh $118,359,004. This is $9,872,388 more than those in the
year 1838.
• • ..-" . •' •
,.
• • .
Of the .whole exports only $17,408,000 were of foreign brigin; and of
the excess in exports over 1838,. only about fiye millions were domestic
produce.
..;^ — ^
; .
. "
' • '
'
The i^mports 'during the saihe^ year were^ about ^$157,609,560, being \
the very large excess of $43,892,156/over those'during the previous 1
year.' This may be a solution of a portion of the' pressure in the
hioney market.^ The difference betweenthe imports and exports, being .
$39,250,556 in favor of the.former, is larger than in any year, except
three, since 1789, and is much larger than any difference, in the valuation ofthe same articles with the profits in the foreign trade added. I t must, /f
therefore, except so far. as reduced by ail'unusual- quantity of goods/ '
consigned here from abroad,, and yet in store unsold,_ be a very decisive"
evidence of ain iricreased indebtedness by this country to other nations.
And except so far as'this, riew indebtedness^ may consist of stocks sold
tod the proceeds.returned here in merchandise, it must, furnish another
proof of pne immediate cause ofthe present.pecuniaiy pressure.
The history of our commerce, during th,e twenty years from 1818 to
1838, preserits,a..singular change in the last half of that period., which
tends strongly to illustrate the correctness of these suggestions. During
the first half of it the excess of iniports over exports was only about
seventy-five millions, ofdollars, or in the proportion of neaiiy seven millions and a half annually on an .average. .
.
But during the last ten y.e.arS of it "the excess was neaiiy two hundred
and twelve millions, or over twenty millions annually; and- thus mpre
than two hundred and fifty per cent.- greater than it h'a^d been. Supposing
that the seven and a. half millions were'composed principally ofthe fair '
profits and difference in valuation^ the excess over that rate in the last
ten years ihust constitute a debt, either mercantile. State, or corporate.
It equals nearly one hundred and thirty-seven millibris before 1839. The
debt thus computed to have beeri created abroad, by stocks and otherwise, within that period, .will, .with the amount of previous indebtedness,
form. an. aggregate quite as large as has been estimated by many from
other data.
" ' ". - \
; ^
Further particulars, possessing a general interest and relating to this
subject during the last six years, are exhibited in the statement annexed,
(F.) Additionarinformationof some iniportance concerning our exports
and imports frpm the commencement of the Gbvernment to 1838, inclusive,



.234

\

R E P O R T S OF T H E

:

[1839,

has been prepared j and is subjoined* in other tables, (G arid H.) These
tables are intended to be in a form "convenient for reference, and "are
calculated, by easy as well as extensive comparisons, to throw nev^ light
on several subjects of commerce and otherbranches of industry, connected
with the finances. They exhibit npt only the whole exports and imports
in each year,, but the consumption of the latter; and.the changes in the.whple. aggregate value of each principal, article,; whether exported or
imported, and the progress of pur foreign trade to and from each;State
; separately, as far bacli as is practicable, and to-and from each ^country
of much. commercial importance" abrPad. ' A few.of the. hiPst 'strildng
results are condensed in a note, ^(I.)
\
•
' .
'" ,
ESTIMATE. OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR 1 8 4 0 . ; ^

For reasons hereafter to be explained,; the receipts into.the' Treasury
the. ensuing year cannot be estimated ;S0 high as in 1839.
- ,
: From the. best inforriiatipn • possessed by this Department, it is computed that the' a'ggregate of them available,foi: public purposes.* will not
exceed $18,600,000, viz: frbih" : V .'
r
. :.
'• , , . .Customs . ^ . : . . . ' . . .
: , . . . . f i : , . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000,000 0:0
L a n d s . . . ' : . . . . . . . . . , . : . - ! . . . . . . .^V . . . . . . . : . . . . . , . . : ;.3,5t)p,000'. OQ
' Miscellaneous . . . . . . ' . . . ' / . :fi.^ifi._......: J . . . . . . . . . ' . . / . ' 100,000 OQ
Add to these th^ balance aivailable and applicable to other
' ',
- '.
purposes, which it is supposed will be in the Treasury
-f' .. on the 1st of January, 1840. v . . . . . . . . ' . , - . . . ; ! : . , . . . . , 1,556,385 00
The efficient means in. that yeai": will then aniount, i n t h e ;•
- ;
^
aggregate.to . ' . . . . .1 - • . . . ^ . . . : . . . . . . . : . : : J . . . . . • . , . . '20,156,385 Op;
If Congress should 'ihake appropriations, to the extentdesired by the.different Depaitmerits, the expenditures. \ - : '
for 1840, indep'endent qf the redeemption Pf Treasury , •
.' notes,-are estimated a t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i . : . : . ' . . . . . " .20,6:00,000' Op
Including all .the Treasury: nptes to ^be redeemed, the '.
aggregate expenditure would be about.-... . . J . . . ; . . . .22,750,000.GO
"This would leave a deficit in the" Tre.asury. at the close ;
'
of the year, amounting to. . . . . - , . . . - . - • . - . . . . . . . . . - . . . . 2,593,615 00
B.ut there will be due from the tlnited- States Bank, in
• '.
. S e p t e m b e r next, on its-fourth bond,-about .^.;,^--v--.. 2,526,576 00
^The piincipal now. due on the Treasurer's deposites iri - . . . < .:
•" : other banks, which suspended specie payments in "•,"
1837, i s . . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . . . : : .', fifi,...,. i . . . . . , . . .
1,149,904 00
Should all these clainis be collected iri 1840, they would *; ' -'
prevent a deficiency; .and leave an available balance
•.
. '
. inliieTreasuTyof nearly..........:,.,,.....".
. . . . . . 1,082,865 00
It is not,, however, considered prudent to rely exclusively on the cPl-^
lection of these, debts. • .
^
. ••
•
• ' ', : '
;One mode, .then, of obviating anyVdiffiqulty froin) thut/circumstance,
'will be to reduce the .aggregate of new: appropriations, by postponing
some an^ lessening others, so that the riieans probably available willbe;



. 18'39.]

SECRETARY. OF T H E TREASURY.

23^5

sufficient to meet all. calls upon the Treastrry, and leave in it an average
•balance of about two millions.
—
. - .
. It is beheved, for .reasons enumerated hereafter, that such a reduction;
is possible without essential injury to any useful object, ahd -that this •
balance is the smallest.which is. adequate to secure promptitude and
good faith in public payments so heavy in amount as Purs, so unexpected
at tiiries in the demands.for them,, arid so dispersed over .a wide territory.
If the appropriatiohs arc hot thus reduced, it will be* wise to provide ^
seasonably in soine,-other.way for the amounts of the contingent defi- •
ciency, an.d of such a balance.' ' -.
°
, .
According to the opinions of the'differerit Departments a:s to the sums
of money-proper for each, and. which constitute the basis of theestimates
''submitted, to Corigress, the • new appropriatipns required fpr. the next
•jear wili equal the sum^of..
......
fi.....".....,.
$18,280,600 55
••

. ; t i z : ' • ' • ' •••-'. y. [ ' ' f i : \ ' - , ' . ' f i - ' ; •: •-. \

\

.'.

'^

.^

'

•.Civil, foreign intercourse,, and miscellane-- -.
' •'
• .: OUS. . . . . . : . ' . : ' . , ^ . . . : . • . . , . J--...1-.. .•... .$4,981,344 19
Military service^,, perisions, & c . . . . . . . . . 8,213j610 74 .
' Nayal s e r v i c e , > . . . . , . . . . . . . . . " : . . . ; . . . . . . . 5,085,645,.62
,
'' For further particulars as to these, see- the anhual^ estimates herewith
submitted,: (J.) . B e s i d e s these,-'the permanent, appi-opriations which,'
.' by existing, laws and the:. inodification, of therii ' recoriimended, first
'become chargeable * on. the Treasnry in 1840, ariiount to- $1,586,000^
••They are in the "War ,Depa]rtnieht;-$l,236,Obo;; i^ the Navy, $340,000;
and public debt, $10,000. • .The principal on Treasury notes falling.due
. Will be about $2,7,50.,000 more.' The appropria:tions already made and
chargeable, which will' reinain -uncalled for at.-the end of the. present
.'year,'-ai:eestimated by the.'different Departments at the further sum of
!.$ll,827,S7l;thoTLigh that is- considered by the undersigned as. likely to
^be about two miihons top small. Of these "they compute that nearty
'$8,270,793 'will be required, in. order .to' accomplish the. objects' contem'plated:by them; 'Jt is proposedlo apply $3,014-,711 to the service. of.
the ensuing year%ithoutTeappropiiation; and the residue of a.bout.
-$541,866,-hot being required in:.order to accomplish these objects, will
= .go to the surplus, fund;' It -therefore follows, if aU the ne>v appropriations
•called, for ai^ made, that the .whole charge-upon*, the Treasury in 1840,
' exclusiye. of the Treasury not'es outstaiiding, will ampunt" at least to
• $31,152,106, of which, as .previously-observed, it :is coiriputed that
, $'20,000,000 will' 'be.: expended within that yearl for ordinary purposes,
• or two.'rnilhons and three'-fburths. more, including the .redemption of
Treasury notes. ..From these staternents it :inustb^ perceived that our
-.condition in relation-to 'the deposite of another iristalmeht of public
inoney:with "the Statea remains -muchthe same, as "at.the close of the
-year 1838" Gonsequently, the views then expressed by the Department
•hstve con tinned.tp go veiii. its co.iirse.^...' . y. - . •
'" .This stateof-the; .firiances: renders' it alsp unnecessary to.submjt* any
remarks .upon the impolicy .of providingfor-theadditional de'posite, or
distribution:of surpluses not likely to' occur,- or' for .ariy dpnatioii of the 


236

R E P O R T S OF T H E

.

|:1839i

proceeds of the public lands, while they are all needed to defray the.
ordinary expenses of the General Government. .
. ' .
Besides the fuither objection to some Of these measures arisirig from
their apparent conflict with constitutional principles, it must be manifest
that if the proceeds of the» lands should be giyen away when needed
to discharge the appropriations,, the deficiency must be riiade up by the
unpleasant alternative of a resort to loans or increased taxation. ; -v /
EXPLANATIONS CONCERNING THE ESTIMATESOJ' RECEIPTS.

•

The estimates pf receipts from duties and lands during the hext year
• have been made lower than for 183.9,* for the fpliowing reasons:
A-further reduction Pf certain duties, amounting to riekiiy $800',000,'
will take place after the .close of the present year. It hkewise happens
that subsequent to a large importation and a fall of prices in articlesexported, as in 1839, the.amount of imports often; declines for. ohe or
two years. After 1825, it declined uninterruptedly for six years. • /
The contractions and. expansions of our paper, currency'have at tiraies
proved another striking indication of the reduction and increase in
importations. Without dvv-elliiig here on the intimate connection between
them as cause and, effect, by means of the foreigh exchanges, and the
. necessity,^ after ^ overtrading and overissues by the. banks j' of drawing; on
them and adjusting large balances in specie, it may be observed that a
diminutiori in the circulation of paper Has .been: going on -for. several *
months; Hence a diminution in theimports has already coiiimencedv'
and is confidently expected to continue for some t i m e / : ' •
' .'•
The country is also supposed to be supplied with foreigiT merchan-r
dise in greater abundance than it was. a 5^ear ago./ ?^This will lead iiott
only to a reduced demand for the. impprtation of more goods, but to a.
greater export of what is already here to" other and better markets, and'
"thus by-increased drawbacks, as well as diminished imports, materially'
lesseii the net receipts from customs. . " .
. . ' ;.
/ . • .•
'
The'price of some of our principal articles of expbit«beirig lower,^
the same quantity'\vill likewise, furnish ..less ability to make-purchases:"
abroad; and where the .quantity is larger, the commercial embarrassments
both there and here will tend tq jpreyent buying,,on either side of .the
Atlantic, much beyond what.is needed for early conshmptioni The
greatly increased habilities on the part of many coiporations and States,
for the payments pf interest and dividends on their, stocks, pwiied by '
foreigners, will still more sensibly-affect the revenue.^ Those payih'ents.'
must require millions ofexports either in. produce or, specie, .which'will .
lead to no returns in additional impprts. It i s believed that within a '
few 5'^ears past an annual tax or drain on this • country has thus been
created, equal to twelve or thirteen .millions ofdollars.- ' ,
^
This is a new and important'eleihent,'besides overbanking and overtrading, to distuii) the industry, the commerce, and jfinances of the "Union.
Its rapid growth'has been accelerated by the distribution o f the suiplus^^
. in deppsite among the States, tempting therii in seyeral instances to hew
' and unprofitable enterprises, and stimulating - delusive hopes of still'
; further .distributions.. Its influence for .eyilhas been aggravated'by a



1839.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

237

few other causes, some o,f theirL_.temporary in duration and limited in
extent, but others diffused in k degree over considerable portions of the
'^civilized world, and presenting some .singular anomalies, in credit,
currency, and trade. • But without enlarging on the consideration of
.them here, the following conclusioris.may be regarded as inevitable.
Should the States not speedily suspend^more of their undertakings
which are'unproductive, but, by new loans or, otherwise, find means to
employ arniies of laborers in consuming rather than raising crops, and
• should prices'thus continue in many cases to be unnaturally inflated, as
they have been of late years in the face of a^ contracting currency, the
jeffect of it on our finances will b e still more to lessen expoits, and .consequently the prosperity and revenue of our foreign trade. It will also
impede the sale of the:.public lands, by diyeiting labor.from the soil to
works which, for .some time, must • be. •'wholly' without "profit. Circumstarices like those, .w^ith the scarcity of/money and -high rate of interest
• abroad .pfoduceff" by them and other occurrences not necessary to be
.riow^repeated, have already diminished the-incomie in ^the pres.ent year
M l p w w h a t it^ otherwise wouH.. have • beeri,' and will probably manifest
their power much more J n the year to Gome.„ , '
• •
Tiie estimates for re veiiue^ from, lands have been reduced the most in
proportion, because, besides.the tlimiiiution of sales which will probably
' -be caused by ,'the pi*esent and prospective -scarcity of money and fall of.
the prices pf produce,- the aimount received from them duringthe present
year has, as was antic.ipa:ted by the Department, .been muCjh increased
:by the temporary influence, of. the late preemption law. .
^The unusual quantity of land''newly :adve,rtised during theyear 1839, >
-\and the consequent large receipts connected with'that cause and the
.preemptions, are circumstances not likely to recur in 1840. It is believed,
therefore, that the low estimates submitted as to lands will prove suffi•ciently high, unless a graduatipn bill should pass. ^ The effect of such a
.bill, judging frorh' reason and from analogy to-the graduated prices, under'
which Jands are now selling, on account of the Chickasaw'Indians, at
Pontotoc, much.Iriore freely than elsewhere within the same State, would
.be to add eonsiderably tctlie revenue for a few years.
EXPLANA;Ti0NS.. OF THE ESTIMATES AS TO EXPENDITURES AND OF SOME
FURTHER REDUCTIONS IN THEM,

, The estimates of expenditure for ordinary puiposes in 1840 are in the'
aggregateaboutfivemillions less than v^hat it is .'computed will be spent
in 1839. ^This great reduction hds been proposed, although tKe expenses
of 1839 will be quite six millionsiess than those of 1838; and those of
1838 were somewhat less than the expenses of theprevious year.
The various items of n e ^ ^appropriations asked for are, as usual, in
the amounts requested by the different -Departments having charge of.
the different subjects. If any omissions or miscalculations .occur in them,
they must, thereforei happen from, inadvertence by those.officers.best
acquainted with the business within their own peculiar province.
But, "in.the present condition of the country and the finances, it is not
expected that much necessity will, arise, either in the opinion of those



238

: .

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

Departments or of'Congress, to riiake important additions to the sums
now requested. On the contraryj ,it is confidently: hoped that some reductions from them can be effected ^without material injury to any great'
national interests. •
'... '
.
, - . "' • ' .
.I t i s difficult in a young, growing, 'and enterprising comniuhity, to
restrict public.expenditures within reasonable limits. -Certain exigencies
also occasiohally occur requiring extraordinary sacrifices. 'When patriot-*
ism an'd hpnor demand large pecuniary contributions, thelatter are:riGhly
repaid by their tendency to impHirt vigor and secuiity tothe'former.. * But
an. expenditure of 'twenty millions^for ordinary purposes','though muchreduced from t h e aggregate d.uiihg a few .years past;is' belieyed by the
undersigned to be more, instead ofless, than sound policy justifies, while
the present unusual'embarrassment ih hioneyed affairs shall continrie.
Indeed, strPng.doubts exist if itbe.not -more than the real necessities .
:of the Generaf Goyernment usually require... .The reasons for this, con^
elusion are briefly these: I t i s true that such!an expenditure; equal-lirig.
only a dollar and a fpurth per head of our populatipn,. is not a yery; large
one to sustaiii a confederacy with such widely extended duties as this..
If reduced to the amount of imposts j'which are the-whole .real burden,
and if. compared >vith.-the taxes elsewhercj equalling sometimes fifteen
dollarsper head,, under.political institutions of differeiit .forms'and less,
frugality, the pres'sure'fi'om that'source here wPuld seem to^be remark-:;
•'ablyhght.*
- . - "-.
•
:..;;;;.
.:.-•- - . . . - • "
.: '
•But it. should be remembered that the people of the United States, are
obliged to" defray a large amount of other pubhc expenses, imposed upon
them by State^ authorities, .and, at the^ same^ time, that their forms of
'-government, amorig various excellences, havebeen preferred particularly
for their economy. .Hence the true question with them in respect:to .
expenditures is; not how .large burdens can be bor.ne,but how .iiiuch can
be dispensed with. -It is* not what is splendid, but what is .iiseful. and
necessary; not;how much.- can be collected fi'orri them.without sufferirig,
but how riiucLcan be left.with them, both of ^money and power, and..
insure all the benefits of .the social system. - - / ; *
•;.
'
As„the interests, and. wishes of the people formed the Government,
they should control it..
./,.
•; '
Considering these circumstances, andthe severe, siniplicity and- frugality befitting a republic, what amount of public-expenses is necessaiy?
In 183r, it was calculated t h a t t h e ordinary expenses of the
General Government need not exceed fifteen millions of dpllars.' The.
undersigned' expressed;, an opinion four, of five years afterward, that'
sixteen or •seyenteen millions would then be- sufficient ;• arid he stiU
beheves that, notwithstanding the continued increase of our population
and wealth, they might'with prudence be.limited' to eighteen millions in •
1840, andi^perhaps, after the-expiration ofiiiost-of thepresent jpensipns
• and-the. removal of the rest ofthe Indiaivs, be for some time diminished
still Ipv^er. > ; .. ^/ •_. "
..
' •
Indeed," in point of fact, 'so recently as. 1834 and 1835 the whole
yearly expenses were only seventeen anGl.eigh'teen millions, independent
of the publicdebt.'" Though the' aniourit has since been increased by.
wars,.pensions, Indian removals, and other peculiar causes, deemed at



1839.] /

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239

the time, in most cases, sufficient to justify the appropriations by .large
and often .unaniriious votes in Congress, yet a reduction has been going
on during 1838 and, 1839, and all the ordinary .experiditures'would not
iri the present year,- but for thepensiori hst and Indian disbursements,
exceed the smallest sum last mentioned. The-whole iricrease, :ho we ver,
has not been confined to these two items, npr could the-whole'reduction
safely be, which, i h the opinion of the undersigned, sound .economy,
appears to require.
/^"
• .
• . . . •. •
In the inquiry as to the* amount pf expenditure 'which should be •
considered necessary, light may so.nietimes be obtained by adverting to
the increase of "population" and wealth." Lpoking to those, if the expenditure, inde.perident, of the public debt, was reasonable- in magnitude
duiing the fifst; eight years of our present Government, the surii of
seventeen or 'eighteen: millions annually wo'uld'not.npw be greatly disproportionate, nor probably be;.found either miich deficient of very unnecess a r y . ' I t would be .nearly .five tiriires the average amount about.half a
century ago, while'-our population, since that time, has undoubtedly
increased ihore than, four-fold,, and our \yealth arid resources have probably increased in a ratio, still larger.?. The last r.emark,.-however, is'a.
matter of inference from- various data more of less- accurate in theina^"
•selves: such, as the average importations, which* have only dbubledin
the last forty of fifty years; the foi'eign tonnage, which'.has increased
but in a like ratio; the 'exp.ortsof dom.estic produce, which have quadrupled since 1792-; and the whole tonnage, iricluding domestic as well as
fofeign, which has also quadrupled-, ahd become more than proportionally
efficient by introducirig into it .over eight huridred steam vessels. . .
Other data,'less accurate but not l^ss sure indications of a'stiU'larger
increase ih.we'alth; are to be foiihd in. the vast extension of agriculture,
manufactures, the. inechanic . arts, and vaiious. useful' applications o.f
steain, as well as in opening ix)ads and -canals," buildirig up fl;purishing
cities, enlarging our territory, diffusing.practical .education, and multiplying, by w'ays too riurnerous for ..repetition, the coinforts,-advantages,
and powers .of a great and prosperous people; ^
.. • - ^
.
But such general considerations, thpugh beneficial ih comparative
examinatio.ns,-afe usually better tests of the ability tp pay than of the
propriety ofthe expenses themselves. . A scrutiny into the principal iteriis
of the latter, and their amo unts. at this tiriie, eompared w-ith those from
.forty to fifty years ago, will aid, much, in cbnnection with the considerations before mentioned, in "forming a'-more accurate judgment on the
propriety and' necessity "of most of the present expenditures. It .will
show what brainches'have since sprunglritb being, .and what, from their
character, should or should npt be longer continued.-'. ''
Some suggestions were submitted on this subject in the- last annual
report, and its importance rriust be the. excuse for adding more -Pn'this
pccasioUi The expenditures npmin-ally connecte.d with foreign intercourse
have increased.least. Those connected with the "War De.partmeiit;haye.;
increased nipst. The civil and miscellarieous charges continue comparatively moderate. .-'But several • of "our heaviest barderis,'such, as the "
Navy , the pensions, Indian disbursements, a n d a class consisting of light- "
^
houses, fortifications, roads,, and improverriehts in harbors and rivefs,.



240

REPORTS OF THE

[1839.

have augmented-very largely since the first eight years of the Government. Some of them have increased more than fifty-fold. • '
'
On a careful exaniination it will be seen that-vaiious vindications, more
or less plausible,'have been m'ade for these additions at different periods; "
"
but they cannot be now applicable for the continuance of them all.
Thus,' the ^enlargement of our naval expenses from less than half a
million yearly before 1795, to.more than six millions now, was in some
degree justified, from time to time, as an eflicient aid to foreign inters
coarse with semi-barbarou's people, and for theprotection of our commerce
and citizens against iiijustiPe or rapine, whether in remotest Asia or nearer ,
quarters of the.glbbe. The increase of pensions frorii only forty or fifty .
thousand dollars yearly at first, andbnly eighty thousand as late as 1811,
to neaiiy four millions mow, was defended on yarious grounds. Buf in
most cases it was considered less as a liberal charity than -sts" a payment .
of the revolutionary debt to a patriotic soldiefy who adva:ne,ed arduous
services in the field father than money,' and endured' sufferings in theestablishment of our liberties which a gf ateful posterity should endeavor
to remunerate. -The Indian expenditures, enlarged from a few thousands
to three or four millions of dPllars, .have been -regai'ded as the,most
efljcacious means of impro ving permaneiitly the condition ofthe aborigines, as wisely extending the boundaries, of civilization over the new •
States, and, in" a fiscal view, as profitable advances of money soon to ^
be fully repaid by the sales of lands to which the' Indiari title'has thus,
been amicably extinguished. The other group of items,-for forts, lighthouses, roads, hafbors, and. rivers, some entirely new, arid the whole,
augmented from-fifty thbusand dohars to three and'four milhori's, have,
on several occasions, and to a proper extent, been considered-as prudent •
precautions for nationa] defence arid useful aids, to the extension and.
secuiity of commerce. Some expenses of smaller magnitude niay have
swollen quite as fast as these; others.-with .less rapidity; -and Pthers still '
have been wholly created since 1797; Pait of them have apparently
become:a permanent chargeon the Treasury, and pait undoubtedly n^ay
be, as others have been, properly discontiiiued-. But, without time now to
, go into the consideration of details as to any except those four enumerated
classes, it may be 'added that these are, when united,, nearly quadruple
: all the other ordinary expenditures ; and either of those four classes alone
^
: amounts yearly to a sum about equalto all the other ordinaiy expenditures, and .mpre^than the whole, of every Idnd, .except the public debt,.
' each'year, fi'om 1789 to 1797. "•;
. '
" V '
The precise periods when the'greatest iricreases happened, and the,
ratio of them, have not kept a uniforiri pace with the progress ^Pf population and wealth;: In many respects^ the ratio has nbt been nearly so
great duririg the last ten or twenty years as in some previous terms.'
Thus, the whole expenses of the Government in 1793, with the exceptionbefore mentioned, were about three millions yearly; and in 1818, after
the lapse ofa quarter ofa century, had increased, though in a peiiod of
peace, to fifteen millions ofdollars, or five-fold, 'while our population iri
that period had only doubled.' But, -duiing the next sixteen of seventeen
years, S S in 1834 arid 1835, the expenses had enlarged riot twenty-five
L
p e r cent., while our pojDulation had advanceci at least sixty-six per cent,


1839.]

.

SECRETARYOFTHETREASURY.'

241

Duiing the present year, though in intermediate periods, chiefly.from
Indian wars and removals, considerably higher, they will not exceed the
amount in 1818 more than sixty-six per cent., while our population has
, since increased more than eighty-four per cent. ^ Again, take the progress
in the ordinary civib expenses, which include those of the executive,
legislative, and judicial/departments, miscellaneous and foreign j nter-course: all of them uriited were but' a little over half a million of dollars
in .1793j while in 1818 they had increased to neaiiy four niillions, or
eight hundred per cent., though pur population had augmented only one
hundred per cent..
. But.since the-last date, that class of expenditures has npt enlarged
forty per cent., haying been not over,five millions and a half in either
1837, 1838,.or probably 1839, while pur population has advanced eighty-four per cent., or more than double that rate. All can thus perceive
where, when, and in what, the greatest incfeases have occurred; the
principal reasons, whether sufficient or btherwise, assigned for several
of them, and the ample opportunity which still exists for further retrenchments, so far as the publie interests^are supposed by Congress to require
them; in any or all of these large burdens on the public .Treasiiry.
As some encouragement to hope for a continuecl reduction in several of
them, without injury to any ofthe important establishments ofthe countiy,
it may be observed, that-portions of these items of expense, and several
smaller ones, hiust cease forever with the temporary occasion for them, and
others will not, when once completed, require renewal soon, if ever.
Such afe numerous special donations'and grants; durable public buildings of all kinds, dry-docks, improvements at navy yards, forts, arsenals,'
and arms, roads and. harbors constructed, obstructions in rivers removed,
the fnanufacture of weights and measures, the survey ofthe coast, much
. of .the removal of the Indians, the extinguishment of Indian titles, and
most of l h e existing pensions. But unpleasant as is the task of reduction, .it may also become necessaryto go further and diminish on a general
prorata scale or otherwise, the"compensatioii to. all officers, civil.and
mihtary, executiye, judicial,:and legislative. It is surely much better to
do "this, so far as the public exigencies may fequire and justice sanction,
than to expose. theTreasury to bankruptcy by continuing to make appropriations beyond the certain means provided for the payment of them, or
:to resort, in a peiiod of peace, to the spendthrift and suicidal policy of
effecting permanent loans to defray ordinary expenditures. Peace is the
time to pay rather thari incur debts; and it would be wiser for any nation
eyen to hoard during peace than to borrow largely,,arid thus encumber
still more those energies and resources which are naturally crippled by
war, but whose whole vigor is so conducive to its success.The preceding remarks are applicable to ordinary expenditures. But
-for extraordinary ones such as, tvithin-a few years past, the expensive
removal of the Creeks, and. Cherokees, the Black Hawk and Florida
"wars, while equal cautiPii^ may well :be exercised in decicling on their
necessity, yet v^hen once that is admitted, less objection exists tof temporary measures for relief, like Treasury notes or short loans, provided a
permanent increase of taxation is not likely to be required in the end.,
In voting' for extraordinary charges, as well as i a sanctioning,, from
VOL. IV.—16.



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R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

sympathy or justice, unexpected appropriations'towards large piivate
clairiis ,arid interesting local objects, it often happens that heavy payments are imposed on the Treasury for purposes not contemplated in the
ordinary estimates.
And the obvious propriety Pf generally making at the same time some
new provision of, means adequate to the discharge of such additional
burdens is sometimes unfortunately overlooked. But, when acting on
these or other, cases, if Congress canriot, consistently-w-ith it's views ofduty to the countiy, adopt the course suggested, and restrict the amount
of appropiiations, whether ordinary or extraordinary, to the \certain
current revenue, the only remaining courses which seem defensible are
these: either to provide for recalling portions pf the public inoney now _
^
deposited with the States,.or establish, an adequate system o f direct
taxation, or at pnce resort to the cpntingent power contemplated in the
existing laws concerning the tariff when changes become necessary for
purposes of revenue, and restore the duty on several articles of luxury
now free.
.
,
. :
> ;
ON SOME PERMANENT SAFEGUARD UNDER- FLUCTUATIONS IN RECEIPTS^ AND EXPENDITURES.
.

Much has at times been wisely done by Congress to supply means for .
meeting unexpected deficiencies. : But all legal proyisions heretofore
adopted for that, puipose having expired, our financial operations wiH be
constantly exposed to danger unless sonie permanent safeguard under
contingencies is estabhshed. " '
.
.'
These circumstances must constitute an. apology for once mdre explaining some ofthe grounds in favor of such a measure, and earnestly asking
speedy legislatipn concerning it.
^
. Theprincipal sources of our present, revenue are sensibly affected b y
fluctuations not only in commercial prosperity, but in the crops, the
banking policy, and credit systems of even foreign nations. The influence of these, causes seems to beconieyeaiiy. mofe change able and ^more.
uncertain in its extent. \ . . ; " '
Numerous illustrations in support of these views havebeen referred to
in former reports. Some of them show a sudden and great falling off in
the regular receipts, though duiing peace, as the duties in 1816, from
nine millions in one.quarter to only three in the next; and as the sales
of public lands, from twenty-four millions in 1836, or an amount over
half of all received in the previous forty years, to less than thre'e. millions
in 1838. B u t t h e returns from the distiicts in some. States, duiing the
last two years, present additionalfacts equally striking oh this subject.; .
, In Michigan, fof instance, the sales of public\lands in 1836 exceeded
five milhons of dollars. They fell in 1.838 to only $154,284; and in
Mississippi, where in 1835 and 1836 they exceeded three niillions each
year, they fell in 1838 to only $96,636. As before intimated, a portion
of such extraordinary fluctuations results from the vacillating character
of the sources from which ^our revenueis derived. But most of them
are evils inseparable from the periodical contraictions and expansions
incident to.the present defective system of bahking, in a countiy so full



1839.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

;

243

of enterprise as ours, with such freedom in pursuits, such facihties of
intercourse, and such strong temptations to rash speculation. , :
:.
The fluctuations, howeyer, are not confined to the receipts. The
expenditures which may be sanctioned .by Congress annually are very
uncertain in their amount, as well as doubtfal in the proportion of them
. which will- be called for within the year, or in any particular portion
of it^.
'
.
- • ^
/'
".
All these, and similar consideratiohs in favor of some permanent provision on this subject, apply with, still greater force.thah they have heretofore. The available balance in the Treasury to facilitate its operations
is much smaller than has formerly been usual. The. receipts.on the debts
still due frora banks, after two previous, disappointnients as to some of''
them, niust be regarded with increased doubt; arid if they should be paid '
within the coming year, the outstanding Treasurynotes become redeemable in the fif st half of it, and must be discharged soihe months before
the bond of the United States. Bank falls due in September.
• The introduction of steam invoyaiges across the Atlantic, besides .me
great reyplutioh it must produce in .other respects, will :So expedite orders
knd imports as. to produce a sensible departure from the; foriner raore.
unifofm. periods of la5ring in stocks of .certain kinds o f nierchandise in
advance^ and must thus add to the irregularity in ouf-receipts from
impoits, as. well as to the uncertainty in previously estimating their
amount. ;•
' ;
•
'' •
The practice of incurring expenses in certain cases^ sometimes legis-^
lative and sornetiiries military or of a different character,.in- anticipation
of appropiiations, and occasioned by unexpected necessities or rinusual
delays^ seems to.be increasing. It augitients the risk of a tempofary
deficiency because large sums thus become payable in a mass, and
forth with, fi-om the Treasury, when rnost of the members of Congress, at
the time. of niaking the appropriatipns, expect that the burden wiU be
spread spmewhat equally pver the whole of the ensuing year. .
Why then should hot a constant safeguard, or • some permanent-remedy
under such irregularities, be provided? ' T h e omission to do this can
hardly be .considefed the true check on extravagant.expenditure, as that
check/would seem tocbhsist rather in a forbearance to make unnecessary
appropriations, thari in a refusal to provide ample means for paying with
promptitude under all prpbable contingencies what has already been
appropriated, and has; thus received the dehberate sanction of Congress.
The national pride,-no less than its.honpr and .credit, appears to be concerned in adopting sPme measure on;this subject, sta:ble, efficient, creditable to free institutions^ and. possessing a paramount influence to preserve
unspotted the public faith. •.
-'.:.'
f. .
The States now possess, separately, quite as deep an interest in such
an arrangement as the General Government, since a blpw on. the credit
of the latter would, like an electric shock, be felt through the whple of
thern, arid inevitably depreciate still more their immense amounts of
stocks.
.- '
^ It is hoped that an actual failure to furnish means to make prompt
payihent, under all contingencies, and thus producing the very violation
of good faith so much to. be deprecated, will not be necessary to awaken'



244

.. -.

.

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

its guardians to the urgent importance of some such remediail provision-ra measure without Which, in the shape of an investment or large balance
on hand, or authority given to postpone certain classes of appropriation
when the revenue proves insufficient for the whole, or some power,to '
borrow money, or issue, on interest, when necessaiy, drafts or exchequer
bills,, no financial system in' any.enlightened country has been, pr can be,
long administered with safety and honor. .
In our system^ the pfovision on this subject was very uniforni and
permanent,, tilL the extinguishment, of the national debt in 1835. Prbrvious to that time, a large balance beyond.the expenses-for ordinaiy;
purposes was" generally collected, and being kept on hand till near the.
* close of the.year, so as to assist in any contingency, was then, if not
thus wanted, applied towards the payifient of the debt. ..
After that time, the first resort in the- event of fluctuations was teniporary, and consisted of the accidental and unexpected, accumulation .
which immediately followed; :When parts .of that accumulation were
expended, and. the residue w a s . divided among the States, instead^of
being invested and held to meet deficiencies, the recall of it, as fast as
needed for. the latter purpose, was still sanctioned by Congress, and
constituted the next permanent remedy. ' But this power of recall was'
afterward taken from the Treasury Department^ and instead of it the
payment'of one instalment was postponed, and.a very limited authority
given to issue Treasury notes for, aid in any contingency. That author^
ity also expired iir June last, and while in force contained requisitions
immediatelyto receive those .notes in payments when offered, and. at.the
same tiriie preventing the reissue of them, which proved-to be bxceedingly inconvenient and 'hazardous; .which have already rendered two additional acts of Congress, necessary, and which, in a. mprieyed crisis
like the present, not only endarigers all fiscal operations, but ^wouldhave
stopped some ofthe most important: of them, if not obviated in a degree .
by seasonable arrangements made in anticipatipn of difficulty. .
The Department,-therefore, is now without any resort,- temporary or
permanent, in case of material deficiencies; and .considering all the cir^
cumstances before mentioned, with the darigemus liability in law tp have
the whole of the outstandirig Treasury notes paid in at any ihqment for
public dues, without a power reniaining toIssue others in their stead;
considering also the present revulsions iri the cpmriiercial world," which
affect so seriously the receipts from,both duties.and lands; considei:ing
the disasters which are befalling, the banks, and rendering our collected
funds in some cases wholly uhavailable, and the advances necessaiy to
be soon Iriade for the large payments of pensions, and Treasuiy notes
falling due in Mai'ch, the earliest attention to new legislation pn this subject seems highly prudent;' if not indispensable,for the effectual secuiity
of the public crediti • *
,. . "V •
•
THE MANNER OF KEEPING THE PUBLIC MONEY, WITH THE ;PROPER GUARDS AGAINST LOSSES.

During the present* year, the public moriey has been kept in the follow-^,
ingmannef: Where suitable banks could be.bbtained, in conformity to



1839.]

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: 245

the act of June 23, 1836, it has been placed in them, in general deposite.
When such could not be obtained, and the amounts were likely to be
permanently large, of were not collected by any public officer, the money
has been placed in banks, in special deposite, either in the modified
form, as explained last year, or under particular stipulations in writing.
In other cases, where it was small in amo.unt, or hkely tp be wanted
immediately for public use, it. has remained with those cpllecting it tiU'
drawn lor.
.
.
.Only two banks are now employed as general depositories, under the
act of June, 1836. Their names, and the amount of public money in
each subject to draft at-the last returns, afe-annexed, (K.)
A tabular statement is also appended, which, shows the condition of
those banks and the reasons for the discontinuance of three of that class
since the last session of Cpngress, (L.)
In respect to the system at piresent in use, it is not proposed to add
much to the comments which have been submitted on its defects in
former reports. The failures among the banks .within the. last few.
months have again strongly illustrated those defects.
Without further legislation, this, system cannot be made, and it certainly is not now, the most safe and convenient one, whether Congress
intend to continue a system of banks, or adopt one independent of banks,
or eriiploy a; mixed one composed of both. But it is a system forced
on the .Department b y t h e pecuhari ties of the existing laws and the
present condition of our banking-, institutions.- It is believed to,be the
best one possible, consistent with them. Under the present ^ arrangements no eventual'losses are supposed to have been • sustained which
are properly attributable to this mode, of keeping the public money.
Any small ones, which are likely to happen, appear to be the-result of
the usual risks incident- to the mere collection and disbursement of the
' money, without' reference to the manner of keeping it, and these kinds
of risks are inseparable from any system heretofore inforce on this subject, whether consisting of a United States .Bank, or State banks, or
either .of those mixed with individual officers.
An exclusive use of bank corporations for coUecting arid disbursing
as weir as,keeping \all the pubhc money, could alone dispense with the
employment of individual officers for the t\vo former purposes, which
has prevailed from, the fpundation of the Govefnment. Such an innovatiPn has been proposed" by some,'and more especially in' the large
seaports. But it. ^ould';Create a radical change in the whole theory pf:
all our collection laws. It would subject the Government, in most ofits.
fiscal concerns, to an entire and humiliating dependence qn moneyed'
corporations. And should the latter, thpugh increased so much in power,
not aspire more to misuse it, yet a wider door would thus be opened to
sinister influences as well as to great fiscal derangeihents and ultimate
losses.: Recent events have evinced the dangers of these so strikingly
as to justify allin being riiore mistrustful, and to render the further'consideration of such a plari-unnecessary.
The chief difiiculty under the old systems need only be understood "
- clearly to be duly appreciated. It has not been in making large payr
nients or large ti^ansfers,.when using for deposite eitherthe State banks



246

V

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

or the United States Bank. . Receivers and collectors have also in many
places.effected paynients with, promptitude and. to great ^amounts, and
almost every trouble in transfefs by them would be obviated b y t h e
authority heretofore asked forthe Treasurer, to receiye money for larids
. in. advance at points mutually.:, convenient to the purchaser and the
Treasurer. But the greatest defect in any fornier system, connected
with this disturbing subject, has always been of a different'charactei'o
It consists in a want of an absolute; prohibition to employ the public
money for any private puipose whatever, and in the w-antof severe
penalties to ;,,enforce. such a prohibition, and pf other .adequate checks
and guards possessing a preventive: operation on both'the minds and
acts of pfficers sufficiently powerful.to dirainish defalcations.
This defect has exposed the Treasuiy to. constant losses from the
foundation ofthe Government, and under all systeni s hitherto in use. ' I t
can be effectually remedied by no. official regulations, as these have
neither the extent, respect, nor force' of laws, • but only by such new
legislation, both penal .and prohibitory, as has been repeatedly recommended by this Department, and as.experience in "most other countiies
has shown to be indispensable to check peculations in the most effective
manner..
.. • •
' •
-. ' "
^
The correcthess of the statement as to' the existence of these Ipsses
under all systems and all administrations bf them which have prevailed
since the present forni pf Government went into operation,, has been
shown generally ffom pfficial Tecords in reports made .to Congress within
the last two years,'and.it .will appear more in detail in a reply, soon to
be presented, 'to a resolution, of the House of Representatives, calhng
for particulars concerning defaults in: ''each Ad mi ais tration, "from 1789
to 1837.
... ., ;
•:
^ ^
•:/
'.-; ;•' •
It is not proppsed to^ enter here into minute particulars, concerhing the
results as containe'd and exhibited in t h a t reply. But a few general
statements from them-will throw light on the topic under'consideration.
; • \
. / . ••
•Losses appear to have occurred from defaults among officers in eveiy
''Administration," or presidential tenri, from the formation of the present
Government. Thus, among disbursing officers, they are found in every
term since 1789; among collecting officers, in each since: 1793; and
ampng'deposite officers, or, banks, in all since 1817. . . . .
The largest amo.unt of loss from each .class, within the peiiod described,
has been by deposite officers, consisting of banks, and including, as the
resolution requires, the depreciation.pn such, of their notes as were taken
for public dues. The loss by this class, at the lowest estimate, has
exceeded six millions and a half^.of dollars.; and, adbpting a computation made by a committee of the '.House of Representatiyes in 1832,
would equal thirty-five -millions. ;The next largest amp.unt bf loss, as
asceitained and computed by the proper bureaus, has/beeh .by disbursing
officers, and has been a httle under five'millions. And the least loss has
been by collectings officers, not much exceeding two milhPns. The
aggregate of all these losses, taking the lowest e;^stimate for banks, is
about thirteen millions and a half .If, in conriection v^ith this; subject,
were considered the losses in collecting the revenue by the non-^payment



1839.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

247

of bonds for duties on which credit was given to merchants, something
over seven andi a half millions of dollars must be added, increasing the
aggregate to mPre than twenty-one millions. The proportionate losses
by these classes have been thus: Those by the banks and by the dutybonds amount to more than-two-thirds of the whole. The losses, either
by the banks alorie.or the merchants' bonds alone, have been nearly as
great as by both disbursing and collecting officers united; and either is
more than three-fold as great as by coUectors and receivers, and several
millions more than by them not only from 1789 to 1837, but from 1789
down to the present moment.
The particular losses in each presidential term being also desired by
the resolution, they have been ascertained; and as they furnish a striking solution.bf |some of the general causes of thos.e losses, the periods
in which the largest and sPme of the smallest ones happened among
each class of pnblic agents may be usefully designated here. Ainong
the banks the largest losses were from 1813 to 1817, then consisting
entirely of depreciation on notes taken;, and next from 1821 to 1824,
consisting then jchiefiy of deposites; while'from 1829 to 1833, and from
1833 to 1837, they were smaller than in any period since 1813. Among
disbursing officers,: looking tb the amount disbursed, the largest losses
were from 1821 to 1825, next froml817 to 1821,.and next from 1809 to
1 8 1 3 ; and theyl were smaller from 1829 to 1833, and 1833 to 1837, than ^
in any other td.rm whatever, except from 1789 to 1793. The, loss on I
each $.100 from' 1829 to 1833 was ohly nineteen cents, and from 1833 to |
1837 only twenty-six.cents; while in some.previous terms it was as high
as two dollars'^and sixteen cents. In this class the most numerous
losses, cpmpareid with allin office, were from 1817 to 1821, next from
1821 to 1825, arid next from 1813 to 1817.; The smallest proportion in
this respect, except duiing the first two terms undef the Constitution,,
was from 1829 jto 1833 ; and except those and the third term, the next,
smallest was from 1833 to 1837.
Among coUe',cting officers, if looking to the amounts collected, the
largest losses W|ere from 1797 to 1801, next from 1809 l o 1813, next
from 1817 to 1821, and next from 1805 to 1809. The most numerous
defaults, compared with the whole number.of that class in office, were
from 1809 to 1813, next from 1805 to 1809, next froni 1821 to 1825,
next from 181,7 to 1821, and next from^ 1825 to 1828. The ratio of them
from 1829 to 1833, and 1833- to 1837, was not one-fourth as large as in
some of the periods just enumerated. Indeed it was less than in any
previous terms from the foundation of the^Goyernment, except four, and
the nuniber of such defaulters was less than in any presidential term
since 1804. .,
,
„
'
'
The accounts of the Post Office establishment being kept separately,
and its officers acting in the capacities both of collecting and disbursing,
aire not included in the above results, but will be given in the» special
report in distinct tables.
• ' .
On a careful review of these data: it must be obvious, that in the
absence of any penal prohibition to use the public money for piivate
purposes, .and of other adequate secuiities agairist misconduct, the
increased losses duiing spme ofthe terms nientioned must have hap


248

R E P O R T S OF T H E

,

[1839-

pened more frbm the strong temptations to misuse the moriey, combined
with the calamities incident to war, extraordinary expansions and contractions in the currency, and great speculations and convulsions in
. trade,, than fi'om any pecuhar rapacity among those then in-public trust;
or any special neglect on the part of those who were the.n either account-;
ing officers or possessed of the power to appoint and remove unfaithful
agents.
-.' j
' •. ;
'
•_
Thus in 1831, 1832, and 1833; prosperous but not speculating years,
in the inteiior scarcely a single loss is supposed to. have happened ariiong
receivers, though some were then reported for suit pn. previous defaults;
and the same may be said of •collectorsthenand in 1835,prosperous.but
not speculating years, on the seaboard. But in more calamitous periods
pf trade, like 1797 and.^ 1798, 1808 to 1813, .1818 to 1821,. and 1837,
sometimes succeeding others of rash speculation, the defaults multiplied
among collectors as well as disbursing agents., So, in similar periods iri
the interior, like 1818 to 1821, and 1836 and 1837, they increased amongthe receivers and the banks much in a ratio with the inordinate thirst
for hazardous investments and the overwhelming disasters which ensued
from them-and overissues of paper.: money.
. '.. "
^;
'' . > ,
Another very strong iUustration of this is to be found iri. the periods of
the greatest losses on merchants' bonds, compared 'with, t h e whole
amount of duties collected. These losses wefe'the highest from 1825 to
1829 of any terrri.since the commenceraent of the Government, doubtless in a great measure growing out,of the excessive mercantile speculations and failures of that period; and the next largest were from 1821
to 1825, resultingprobably from like Pauses; -vvhile from 1829 to 1833,'
a period of comparative regularity in trade, the loss was smaller than in
any other term since 1809, and less^ than even from, 1793 to 1797, and
1797 to 1801.
On the other tPpic, as to the feasibility and utility of additional checks
and penalties against defalcations, the illustrationsreferred to, as drawn
from examples abroad, are these: Out Pftwenty-severi Governments in
respect to which accurate statements have been obtained, and'which
include, almost every important civilized country in the world, twentysix seem to pfohibit any piivate use of the public money, eithef by
collecting or disbursing agPnts. ; Iri" six cases only do the deposite agents
appear to be allowed the use of public funds, -and .that is only when
those agents are banks, and the money is placed with them in general
deposite. In a great majority of these Governments the employment of
public funds for piivate purposes by any agents Avhatever is not only .prohibited but punished by severe^ penalties, ^such as imprisonment, or the
galleys, the penitentiary, and in some instances death. More ihinute
checks and guards also are introduced in inost of thepi, and less is left
to discretion or regulation, even in monarchies,- than here. .
That course of making full and explicit statutoiy. provisions on all
these important points, and duly'restricting executiye discretion, so liable
to degenerate into tyranny,'has heretofore beeh repeatedly urged by the
undersigned, from a regard as well to correct political principles as to
an increase of the public security and a diminution of the difficulties
and responsibihties he chas of late years been compelled to pass through,



.1839.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

249

in a peiiod of such immense coUections and disbursements, .accompanied by so spvere revulsions in commerce.and such harassing bank
suspensions.
DweUing no longer now on this topic, he is. convinced, not only that
the measures for greater security in the collection and disbursement of
the pubhc money, b u t t h e other provisions heretofore recoriimended, in
the estabhshment of an iridependent Treasuiy for keeping, and transferring it, should be early adopted. Prominently among these last is the
separation betwepn the banks and the principal fiscal pperations of the
Government. That would be. likely to produce many advantages, which
have been explained sp fuUy on form.er occasions that only afew of them
need here: be adverted to, and this very briefly. It wpuld render a bankruptcy of the Treasury impossible by a wide if not general suspension
of specie payments. To the loss, vexation, and discredit of this, the
Government has already been more than once subjected, and a United
States Barik, judging from experience abroad and analogy' at home,
would form no riiore effectual guarantee against it, than Statebanks during
periods of extraordinary convulsions in trade, if administered underthe
present imperfect [systeni of'banking; or, in other words, under similar
defective charters, and occasionally similar false banking principles.
Such a separation would relieve'both the banks and the Government
from any further exposure to mutual importunities, embarrassinents, and
criminations. .Boi:h, and'doubtless beneficially to both, would be left
more to their own; resburces and less to dependence on each other's favor,
whether instigated by cupidity on the. one hand or political ambition on
the other. Instead of increasing, it.would diminish executive po\yer;
for the latter would be stripped pf aU bank influence, and be allowed in
its stead neither jthe use. nor possession- of the public money except
under agents not Selected, b y itself alorie, as in case of the banks; little
increased in number, guarded by additional secuiities, and fprbidden by
the severest penalties to use a dollar of it for any private puipose. It
would tend to check iriiprovident paper issues, that.in some degfee deteriorate the'exchangeable value pf specie itself, as well as of paper, and
it would secure tlie best possible -currency in the present state of the
Constitution and, laws. In fine, it would, remove ail inducements to
hoard what could mot be used for profit, to delay payment of what could
nPt be btherwise employed, to augment taxes or tariffs for deposites that
can yield no emoluments, and to indulge in reproaches or suffer inconveniences, as banks how do, at being deprived, by public drafts, pf funds
which, under thej proposed system, wpuld.,only add to the risk and
responsibility of the depositaiy instead bf his gains, and wPuld therefore
be gladly parted with.
. - . -fi .
/
•
CONDITION OF BANKING INSTITUTIONS GENERALLY, AND THE KIND OF '
i MONEY RECEIVABLE FOR PUBLIC DUES.

The condition df the bahking institutions genera:lly in theUnited States
is always a topic of some financial interest.. But it'now possesses less
with the General Governriient^than it did when,:.the connection between
them, was more .intimate, and extensiye.
^
,
It is regrptted that spiace remains on this occasion for but little more ^



^250

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

concerriing their condition than a reference tb the special report which will
' soon be submitted from theJast authentic returns that can be pbtained.
In the mean time, however, it may be infeiTed from returns not very
numerous, and from-some general data, that since the Ist of Januaiy
last the circulation of those banks now paying specie has pmbably, on
an average, been curtailed quite one-third, or between sixteen and twenty
millions; that the circulation of most Pf the others had not been increased
at the time of their late suspension; thatthe aggregate amount of specie
in air of them is nPt reduced more, than eight or ten millions; and that;
since the fall in foreigri exchange, these institutions, with a few exceptions originating in gross departures from correct banking principles by
embarking in trade, and by making large investments and long loans,
often not to busines.s. men nor for common business purposes, are as able
as ever to sustain specie payments, pro vided they felt disposed, to exercise .
their former forbearance and, indulgences tpwards each other, and the
community towards them. It is a source.of much satisfaction tP add
that the recent susperision has caused far less embarrassment, delay, and
probable loss to the Treasury, whether by deposites in banks or the
possession of their notes, than have, occurred hefetofore on similar occasions.
•. ;
_
'••'./
'•''•,'
• • '• "
Two reasPns exist for this. The banks have of late been employed
and their notes taken to a.less extent than was before customary, and
the suspensions among them have been less general by not reaching, it
is computed, Pver one-third of the whole number in the United States,
though including, perhaps, more than half of the whole bariking capital.
Of those suspending j fortunately only three or four held any considerable
amounts of public money deposited with them-since 1837;* and they, as
well as the rest nowda public employ, have made commendable exer.tions to facet with fidelity theif engagements; to the Treas.ury. .'
The admonitions, however, which the late suspension has given in
respect to the importance of sPme new legal provisiphs connected with'^.
the keeping ofthe public money, have not been slight, and: have already
been sufficiently noticed. .
V
!
,.
They appear to be equally strong in favor of some new legislation or
additional regulations as to the kind of currency which should be
received for public dues.,
'
.. •
In relation to this last point the Constitution and laws are now explicit
enough concerning what constitutes-money. \ ;.. '.
..
/
But the practices under them in receiving other things than gold and
/ silver as money, or rather as a currency or substitute for money, haye
•j continued so long and been at times so loose as to create much .danger
and difficulty. The views of the Department oh all portions of this subject were so fully explained to Congress on previous occasions, and more
particularly in Septeniber, 1837, as to render it; unnecessary to repeat
them here.
,
•
^
But some illustrations ahd confirmations of thPse view's, contained in
the transactions ;of the present year, are new, and are as follows : ' • ' '
In sundry instances banks, as well as individuals, holding the Treasurer's drafts, have insisted pn specie in payment, arid refused to accept
the current notes of specie-paying banks.
•



1839.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.^

.

251^

This they had an undoubted right to do, and thus the idea has been
strongly corroborated that, however much both public ahd. fiscal convenience may be promoted by the use of apaper currency for either large
or distant payments, yet the receipt of anything short of specie, or the
notes riot only of specie-paying, banks, but such as are convertible into
specie Pn the spot, and at paf, can never eflfectually protect the public
credit; The practical importance of this question under our present system
will be the more obvious when it is understood that near twenty millioris
of the twenty-five expended this-year, for ofdinary puiposes, have been
or will be paid by drafts drawn directly on collectors and receivers, and
must therefore be met, not only by them, but in .specie or its equivalent.
It seems impossible alsp,lhat eventual embarrassment and occasional
losses by bank failures arid suspensions shpuld be obviated, if anything
but specie is long kept on hand by public agents of any description.
.Nor can any system operate as a.check Pn'Overissues b y banks, restrain
the tendency tp gambling speculations, and aid gradually in iniproving
the currency of. the countiy, as well as presefve in .purity the true constitutionalstandard .of .valiie, unless the notes received are speedily paid
over for public debts when acceptable to creditors, and,.at brief intervals,
any of them left on hand are returned for specie to the institutions that
issued them.
.
' •.•"
. •
It appears that the effect which such a course would produce on the
currency at large, by permanently withdrawing specie either from banks
or from circulation would, in ordinary times, be much less than many
persons have apprehended. In the collection and payment of the above
twenty millions by collectors,and receivers, the whole amount on hand
with all pf them, at any one tinie, has seldom exceeded one million arid^,
a half'
' '•
'
. .
'
At New York city, where hear two thirds of the customs of the whole
Union are collected, and where the gross receipts this year will exceed
fifteen millions of dollars, the am.ount on hand at any one time has not
averaged half a million'of dollars.
' .
. As an illustration of the system of drawing fpr this money speedily,
it may be added that the amount left at the close of each Week subject
to drafts has seldom equalled one-twentietfr of a million.
. A t the recent suspension of specie payments most of the funds in the
custom-houses were composed of bank nPtes; but neaiiy half of those
in the land offices consisted of specie. Thpugh the notes on hand were
issued by banks paying specie and in good credit at t h e time they were
^ taken, yet even a part of them, suddenly beconiirig irredeemable, has
caused some inconvenience, several! protests, .and a few injurious delays^
with both receivers and collectors.'. Atlheforhier: suspension, as specie ^
w a s the.only currency then allowed to'be taken by receivers, most of
these difficulties were obviated with them,, and were confined chiefly to
the deposite banks and large collectors. The.great amount of specie
. which the receivers.then possessed contributed much also tp the general
relief ofthe Treasury, and especially furnished most opportune means
for making legal ds >vell as satisfactory: payriients of the heavy Indian
annuities soon afterward falling due in the West; ;
Some considerations were intended to be next presented on the perma


252

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

nent deficiency apprehended as likely to happen in the revenue after
1841, under the operation of the present tariff. But the length to which
this communication has already extended, and the doubt whether Congress
may deem it advisable to legislate so'long beforehand in'anticipation of
. an event which possibly, but not probably, may be avoided, haye
induced, ihe Department to postpone for the present any particular
remarks on a tbpic .involving considefation s of * so difficult and agitating
a character.
. . .
.
'
MISCELLANEOUS. . . .

fi-'

.• .

-fi'

y
Some of the leading changes'which this Department during the last
/ five years has thought proper.to urge as mateiial in cbnnectipn with the >
/
finances
may ^ before closing, be summarily and. perhaps-usefully condensed, and presented together to the consideration of Congress.
They are as-follows: •
. - ',
.
.
... ^
. A new organizatipn ofthe Treasuiy Department in such respects.as
to insure a more appropriate divisiori of labor,, a stricter accountability, •
and a closer supervision over .the collection ^of the revenue by pfficers^
exclusively devoted l o it. ,
'
:
. An increase of the checks and securities against defaults in all offi.cers,
whether collecting, keeping, or disbursing public/money, and .ihofe
especially by prohibiting its .use for private jpurposes under severe
penalties.
•
. •
•.. '
Spme prpvidentfund, to be ^formed "jy hen'any occasional and accideiital surplus happens tp be in the Treasury, (but never designedly
raising one by taxation,) which shall be employed to' ineet contin- .
gencies and fluctuations instead ' of our being compelled frequenfly to
^
resort to loans or increased taxes; and, in the absence of such a fuhd, a
permanent authority to'be given for the procurement of means, when
needed, under unexpected deficiencies.
' . '
A reduction in the ordinary, expenditures^ so as for seyeral year^ not
to exceed seventeen, or eighteen millions of dollars annually,' unless when
* • the revenue is,abundant the great national works'which it is intended
to ebmplete in any event should be hastened' more, and" when the
revenue is smaller, be proportionably retarded..
The passage, o f occasional preemptipn and graduatipn law's as to the
public lands, under judicious hmitations concerning the quantity sold in.
any one case, and for the prevention of frauds and partialities.
To reduce the. tariff^ whenever the amount bf revenue justifies the
measure; and always regulate-its provisions with a p af amourit regard
to finance, discouraging articles pf luxury, and ^encouraging. useful and
necessary ones only aslncidental\)bjects inlarifflegislation.'
/:
In connection with this policy of protecting freedom of trade, to resist
,, " monopolies and exclusive piivileges, whether in banldng or commerce.
The exclusion of small bank notes from circulation, so as to enlarge
the quantity of specie within the countiy, increase the use of it, and
especially.of gold for common purpPses, and thus protect a s w e l l the
banks againt runs pr panics as the. laboring classes from Ipsses and
depreciations incident tb every paper currency like ours, not.founded pn '
a specie basis- as broad as the paper itself. .-And finally the,rapid .



1839.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

253

extinguishment of any national debt, and the creatipn of no new one of
a permanent description in peace.
A prominent feature in the policy which has thus.been recomriiended
as to our fiscal affairs, has been to leave to State legislation all matters
of doubtful juiisdiction, as w;ell as all clearly of a domestic and State
character, whether connected with the revenue or the currency, the
exchanges, or commerce, or some other exciting interests of the cpuntry
less intermingled with the immediate business of this Department. The
undersigned^ takes, pleasure in acknowledging that several of those
enumerated measures did npt originate with him; yet they have all
received his earnest official support, and he is gratified that' steps have
already been taken, by Congress insuring in part the success of some of
them. •
,;The rest, as well as those, are again respectfully commended to favorable consideration, hopingthat the scrutiny of longer discussiPn and reflect
tion may have satisfied its members that the full adoption of them all
would promote the durable prosperity^of the finances, and at the same
tinie be in harmony with the Constitution, and favorable to most of the
great interests of the country.
' :
•
In respect to several remaining matters connected with the numerous
duties devolved on this Department, it is proposed to postpone the consideration of most of them.to special:reports to Congress, and separate
communications to suitable committees.
Among the latter is a mass of questions, chiefly connected with the
public lands and the custom-house establishment. Am'ong the former
are the state of the light-houses; the progress in the survey of the coast;
the manufacture Pf weights and' measures; t h e condition of the Mint ^
and its branches; the situation of. our trade with the British provinces
.and West Indies; the disposition made of our deposites with the several
States; and various other subjects of minor importance.
In a note annexed (M) are explaiined briefly a few topics still different,
and some of them more urgent in their character, such as the exclusive
employment of one ofthe present comptrollers as a commissioner ofthe
customs; a revisioii o f t h e number and compensation of officers in the
customs, and especially their pay during thepast year; the requirement'^
of official security from dis.trict attorneys; a change^ in the commencement of the fiscal year, making also the commercial the same as the
calendar, year; appfopfiating in certain cases for five quarters, and
keeping and pubhshing all accounts and returns "by quarters as well as
years; new provisions concerning papers in whale ships and in vessels
on the coast of Africa; a declaratory act as to the duties on silks' and
worsteds,; and the further extension ofthe laws for the relief of irisol vent
debtors. '
•
•Within the present year, the business as to the French indemnity has
been closed by ^distributing the additipnal. iriterest obtained ori the first
four instalments. The sixth payment due froin the 'Kingdom of Naples
has also been received and divided among the claimants.
The annual exhibit ofthe condition and business ofthe General Land
Office usually accompanies this report, but, from its length and importance, it will be presented separately in afew days. The. veiy success


254

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

ful progress. made in bringing up the arrears pf business,.and in the
dispatch of the enormous amount of current duties devolved. on that
office by the unprecedented sales in 1835 and 1836, deserves special
notice. It has enabled the Commissioner to dispense with the eriiploy-.
ment pf nineteen of his former clerks. Disagreeable and enibarrassing
as the discontinuance of official services usually is, a strong sense of its
.propriety in an economical view has led to the measure on this occasion
without any special direction by Congress.. It is also again urged as a
proper topic for legislation, and without yvhich it cannot be effected, that
the number and consequently the expense of the bid land offices be'
reduced, by uniting several with pthers adjoining, where the quantity.of
business has become much lessened. A.similar course as to spme of
the collection districts on the sea-board hais before been recommended,
and is stiU considered worthy the attentipn of Congress; In all these, as
well as in larger savings, econoiriyls undoubtedly true wisdom; .
Respectfully,
^ L E V I WOODBURY,
.
• • . ' .'...'
Secretary ofi the Treasury.-.
To the

SPEAKI^R

ofi the House ofi Representatives.

..

/ .

L I S T OF DOCUMENTS
ANNEXED TO THE REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Available funds in the Treasury 1st January, 1839.
Receipts and expenditures.
foi"lS38.'
.
.
.
.
Expenditures of first three quarters of 1839.
^
*
.
Payments of publicdebt to 20th November, 183i9.,
Issue and payriient of Treasury notes from 1st January tP 20th;
November, 1839. .-. . ^ • ^ ' . . • .
-. ;'
-fi--', ..
.
F . Expoits and imports in 1839., ;_
';
. ..
.,
G. and H. Exports and imports fi'om 1789 to 1839—-consurription of
. foreign goods,, and value of principal articles imported and
exported. . . . . .
• .-. - .'
•
.r
;
I. Note on the above tables. -•
:
. '
..
J . Annualestim.ates. . . - ,' .'
. ;^
K. Names of generaf deposite banks, and amourits to the credit-of
Treasurer therein. .
; ' .. -. . . . .
L. Condition of general deposite banks at last returns-^names and
, reasons of discpntinuance since last session.
M. Note on sorne miscellanepus topics. • .
- :




1829.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

255

A.
Statement ofifiundsavailahlefiorgeneral piirposes on the' 1st ofi January, 1839.
The gross balance in the Treasury, at that date, exclusive of post
office, money, was, according to the books of the Register of the
Treasuiy
.$36,891,196 94
Of this sum there were deposited with the
several States, under the act of ,23d. . ,
June, 1836, and not aivailable fpr. the
.
.
. . .
public service until new directions are
given b y C o n g r e s s . . . . .
,$28,101,644 99
There were held by the Treasury in trust, .
.
for indemnities, &c., about. . . . — . , . , . . 500,000 00
There were, of funds which had been . .
unavailable for a long period, being
principally balances due from banks
employed as depositories,.which had
failed previous to 1837.
. . . . . . . . 1,100,000 00
Debts due, by the Treasurer's; statement,
from banks which failed in 1837, and
which had not paid the balances due,
by the sum of. . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . :2,472,590 00.. .
Portion of balance in: the Mint and, its. . .
.
. . ,. ,
branches, which cannot be drawn.out
without much i n c o n v e n i e n c e . . . . . . . . . . . .500,000 00
32,674,234 99
Leaving a balance apparently avaUable on 1st Jan.,.1839. . 4,216,961 95
But the-aggregate of warrants outstanding on that day,
." the amount ofwhich is to be deducted froni the balance
in the Treasurer's hands, was lai'ger on the 1st January, 1839, than at the commencement ofeach ofthe
four.years preceding 1837, by at l e a s t . . . . . .
...

'
1,750,000 00

As these warrants were deducted from the appropiiations
,
to which they were chargeable, it is proper to deduct
this excess of these warrants from the amount of what
would otherwise-have been available means. Com'
puting this excess at the above sum, the effective
available balarice, on the 1st of January, 1839, was... 2,466,961 95
The aggregate of unavailable funds,in the Treasury on
the first day of January, 1840, will probably remain
about the same amount, excepting that the sums due
from deposite banks which became defaulters in 1837
will be diminished t o a b o u t . . . .
'..
$1,150,000 00.




256

R E P O R T S OF T H E

-

[1839.

B,
Receipts and Expenditures ofi the United States fior the year 1838.' '
Balance in the Treasuiy onthe 1st January, 1838.'. ....$37,327,252 69
• REGEIPTSv

»

. . ./,

Customs
: . . . . . . ' . . $ 1 6 , 1 5 8 , 8 0 0 36
Lands.
3,081,939 47.
Second and third instalments due from
.\
the Bank ofthe United S t a t e s . . - . . . . . - 4,542,102 22
Miscellaneous i t e m s . . .
' . . . . . 369,813 29.
Treasury notes .',
.....x 12,716,820 86
Trustfunds...'........
2,149,906 40
-•——

.

•

'
'
.-

-

:-'

$39,019,382 60

/^ 76,346,635 29
EXPENDITURES.

./.

Civil, miscellaneous, and foreign inter'
;
course .1
. . . . . . . . . ....^......-.^.^ $5,666,702 68
•:
Military............
^........19,936,31157
Naval..............
'.'.'.. 5,941,381^94.
Public d e b t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,217 08
Treasury notes redeemed, including m" terest..
5,603,503 19
Trustfunds....
. . . . . . . . . . . . : . 2,305,321 89
-^
39,455,438 35
.

^

V

,

•

.

.

.

•

_

_

_

_

_

,. Balance .on the 1st January, 1 8 3 9 . . . . . . . ^ . . . -$36,891,196 94
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

•

REGISTER'S OFFICE, iVWem&er 27,




.

;

1839.

T. L. SMITH, Register.

1839.]:

SECRETARY.OE THE TREASURY.
" /-....C.--^ . •

., : : : . [ . . . . ' - . . . f i : .

257
:•/••'•

Statement qf Expenditures ofi the United^ States, exclusive ofi the I'rust^Fuiids,
firdm tst ofi^January to 30th ofi Septeniher, 1839. '
CIVIL, MiSCELLANEOUS, AND FOREIGN I N T E R C O U R S E . '

Legislature . . , . . . . . . . . ^ - . . . -....>-.-...-....
Executive Departments
-;.....-;.:i
OfficersandclerksoftheMintandbranches.
Surveyors and their clerks
-.•,-•.-....--.-.
Secretary to sign patents for public lands-.
Commissioner of Public Buildings, Wash' ington
......;V.^
.....>...>.
Governments in Territories, of the United
States
..•.....:.
^......^..^
• judiciary
. . . . -.. ' . - L . . . ^ . . . . . . . . . . . j . . ' , .

$403,710 02' 639,4,92 01
48,800 00
„.
- 35,853 65
^ •
• 1,125 00
-'
, 1^725 00 ,

104\30& 61
358)212 82
-$1,59%225 11
Payment of sundry annuities-,, per acts of . ' ;Congress.-.-....-.-...-.•.-.-.^-... ...^
: 899 .58Mint' establishment J
.^.^
78^700 00
Support and maintenahce of light-houses. 279,514 88
Building l i g h t - h o u s e s . . , . . . .\..-:.. : , . . . . > ; .
189^094 23
Surveyingthepublic l a n d s . . - ' . - . - . . - - . - . . . . ' ' 80,676 13
Surveying the coast of the United States...
6'4,995' '78
Registers and receivers of land offices....
658 97
Eeepers of the publie arehives in Florida.
750 00
Repayment for lands erroneously sold
14,238 01
Maiine hospital establi shment 1 . . . - . . . - . / . . . 90;114 06
Mafiiie hospital at New Orleans
24,015 00
Repaiiing .marine hospital at-CharJeston.^.^
/-2,000^ 00"
Roads and canals within Stateof Indiana^..' . 18,530 "00
Roads and canals within State of Arkansas..
21j740 00
Encouragement of learning within the Stateof llhnois
.....'.
'.. 1 . . . . . . . . . . 23,400 00
Public BuUdingSy ^c.,; in^ Washington-.-..... 297,032 52
Penitentiary in the-District of Columbia. .^
10j689 40
Completing the Alexandria canal.-...- . . -.- ^ ; 40;006 00
Relief of the several corporate citiesln the ^ r . . .
District of Columbia.^.^ 1 . . . . ^ . . .......... - -55^749 77
Bmlding custom-houses and w:arehouses'.. .193,246 56
Docuriientary History of the Revolution.../ -^5,602- 00^
Rehef of sundiy individuals..;-.............
31,046 28
Payment for horses, &c. . . . . . , . . J . . . . . ' . .•
24,437 46
Rehef of certain inhabitants of East Florida.
83,992 5 8 ' .
Additional compensation.to cpUectprs,. &c. . • 65,839 28
Debentures and-other c h a r g e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 11,0!91 20)
Patent f i n d . . . . . . . . . . : . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ^ : ' ; S7,^79 22
Sixth c e n s u s . . . . ---o:^i;u._;..l-. _......-..: ' . 2j000'00
VoL.iv.—i7.




258

R E P O R T S OF T H E

Expenses incident to the issuing of Treasury
notes........
'........-.....,.:.,...-.
Miscellaneous......................,...
iaefiiridingduties.;.:.:..... - . . . . ' J . . - . . . .
Documents ordered, by the S e r i a t e . . . . . . .

. ^

[1839-

- ,
54'
05
99
^•
00.
-$1,853,094 ,49
Salaries of Ministers of the United States. •. 46,780. 00
Salaries of Secretaries of L e g a t i o n . . : . . . .
8,501 22
Salaries of Charges d'Affaires.,..,.,.....-,...., . .47,561 02
Salary of dragoman tp Turkey, and contin- . . ^
gent expenses o f t h e , l e g a t i o n . . . - . . . i J - . .
2,583 12
Outfits of Ministers...;::.
..;.,...:........... ^ [ • 9,000 00 ^
Outfits.of Charges d'Affaires-...;.-.:.•.;..... ' - 4,500 00
Relief of certain diplomatic agents.. --...-•; 11,755 57
Contingerit expenses of missions^ abroad... ^. 15,299 23
Cpntingent expenses of foreign intercourse::
. 5,770 63-^
Salaries.bf consuls at London and P a r i s . . . ^ 3,000. 00:
Relief and protection of .American seamen-.".... 30,,81.6 69 ,
Allowance fpf clerk-hire, '&.c.,'in the office
of the Anierican cohsul at London.. —
2,270 29
Intercourse with. Barbary P o w e r s . . . , . . . . . . . .. 10,178 O ^
.
O
Interpreters, guards, &c., consulates iri the
. . ..; . ,
Turkish domihions^ . . . . . . -^-.-- - --.-.-.- '
5,000 00
Expenses of commission .-under the epnven-.
.,
tion with the Queen of Spain,...... ...-'.,^.,': .. :52 ''86
Expenses of comiriissiori under thevconyen/ .
tion with the.King, of the T>yQ. Sicilies... '
120 00.
203,188 63
$480
25,023
74,557
15,000

: MILITARY .ESgr.ABLISHMENT.

Pay ofthe Army:^ - :•- - v . . . . . : . . . . - • - . . . : , : . : $774,394 83
Subsistence of o f f i c e r s . . - - , - . . . . . . - . . / . . . . 289:,444_64
Subsistence department... .".\.^... - . . - • . . : 493,537 6.9
Quartermaster's departmerit . . - . . . ' . i . . . . . . , 146,848 59
Incidental expenses of the'Quartermaster's . ,.„ .
.d e p a r t m e n t . . ; . . . . . ' . . : . . . . : . , . . . ^ . . ..^ 115,970' 04
Transportation of officers' bagga:ge.......
49,758= 5.i .
Transportation of theArmy.-.-................. . 124,366 58
F o r a g e . . ' . ; . . . . : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . ; . . . . . 66,991 80i
Purchasing department.....^,........,.-......
517,577. 96
.Payments in. lieii of dothirig for discharged '\ . , .soldiers . . . . . . . . : : . r . i . . . . . . . . . J . ^ . . . . : .
29,302 .93
Clothing for officers' servants.'.... 1..,....... ' 17,-340 74
Two months' e^tra pay to reenlisted sol- . . .
,V
diers, and expenses pf recruiting-. - - . ; . . ' , 37,088- 90
Medical and hpspital.department-... / . . .
. 24,364 04
Contingencies of the Ar.riiy . . . „ . : . . . : . . , . . . . .
; 1,933 33
Arrearages prior to July, 1 8 1 5 . - , . , . . . . . . - .
;; .1,992. 30.
Invalid'and half-pay p e n s i o n s . > . . . . . : . . . . ,
160,53.5. 29.



1839.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

259

Pensions to widows and orphans, (payable- ^ v
•/ '-••- •/• .
'thmugh the Third Auditor's Pffice). . . . - . / '$5,235 78 - . . • • -^
Pensions to widows and orphans, per act- - -^ '
of4th July, 1 8 3 6 . , - . . . . . .
....
381,532 95 ^ ^ ' V; :
Revolutionary pensions, per act 18th Mareh, •
.1818..:....
:
.•..-.....•.;•.../ 355,472 91--; • •^•;\ -•••
Revolutionary clairris, per act-15th May,
.
;• 1828 . . - • - - . . . . . . • . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62,591-40 •:• •:^---.V •.-•;.
Revolutionarypensions, per act 7th June,
- ;^
-• * '.' ;
1832.-.,
•
. - J . - . . . . - . . - . . - . / 789,012 7 8 . /-. :
Twoyears'pensions to widows and orphans,
. : :;
per act July,. 1 8 3 8 . ,
. . . - - . . , . . . . 1,036,051 78
Virginia claims, per act 5th July, 1 8 3 2 . - . .
4,875.50
/
'
Unclaimed pensions, 6th April, 1 8 3 8 . . . . . - 59,393 94.
- . .
•.
' West Point Academy.' " '
'
• ';
'
?
'-fi''''
P a y of officers., cadetSj^and m u s i c i a n s : . . . ' 54^418 00
Subsistence of officers and c a d e t s . . . . . . . .
30,700 00
. v
Forage for officers' h o r s e s . . . . ' - ' . . - ' - - , . . . ' ' 1,'227 00
Clothing for officers' servants. - , , . . . . . . . . ; . ". 255 00
Expenses of the board of visiters..; 2,000 00
MisceUaneous and incidental expenses. . ."-;^
731 50
Repairs and improvements, and expenses "
.
:.
of buildings,, grounds, & c . . - . . . . . . .
'."'••.'' 7,221 60
Pay of adjutants and quartermasters' clerks
475 00
Increase and expenses of the h b r a r y . . . . .
•1,000 00" ' "/.
: Department of p h U o s o p h y : . . - . . . . . 1 . . . .
600 00
Departmentof mathematics-. - J . . . . . . . . . . . , •
97 54
;
Department of chemistry
.. -.--.-.....
, 827 50
Department of drawing.
285 00
Department of tactics. . . . . . . ' . . . . '
....
" . 360 00
^
' .
Department of a r t i l l e r y . . . . . . - - - - . . . : . . .
275 00
•Two fire engines with hose c o r n p l e t e . . . . .
1,90000
Arsenals-,.-........: ...--..-..-.......
165,238 11
Purchase of land at the AUegany and W a . .
''
tertown arsenals...;.
—....
3,500^00
: - •
•
Arming and equipping. m U i t i a . . . . . . . . . .
227,423 50 Accoutrements and. arms for infantry,- cay. . . J , ,..
•
airy, militia, &c. . . . . . . - - - . . — / 44,538 56
Ordnance service.
.................
68,011 93
Ordnance, ordnance stores, and supplies..
- 39,110 70 • - • Purchase of light field a r t i l l e r y . . . . . . . i . .
11,389 82
i
Expenses of preparing drawings for a . . „ - . . . ...._...._
uniform system of a r t U l e i y . . . . . .
.. ;
1,000 00 •
"'
NaUonal armories. .-•-. , . L . - . . - - . . . . 288,722 67
• "\
Blacksmith's shop,. &c., at Watertown,
Massachusetts-.....................
6,500 00
New machinery at Springfield armory^....
5,000;-00
-:
Barracks, quarters, &b. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73,632 11'
BaiTacks and quarters on: western frontiers;
70,975 22



mo

REPORTS OF THE

Barracks at Baton R o u g e . . . , . . . . . . . , . . , .
$242 64
Barracks and other buildings _ at Sackett's- Harbor:
.'...
9,000 00
Barracks and other bnildings^ at Plattsburg.. . . .6.,200. OO.
Purchase of gunpowder.
. . . . . ^ . . . . ^.._
. 1,.521 16
Elevating machines for. barbette aiidcasgr>
. . -=
ment carriages
.3,500 00
Armament of fortifications... - .„...........,,
128^-6.69 .84
Repairs and contingencies of fpitijEications..
,4,764 56
Incidental expenses, of fortifiQations.. .and
. purchas.e of lands, & c . . . . . . . . . , , . . . . , .• ^...^..... 28,128 ° 30;
Fort Adams ....;. ^: ..,^ ............... / , ^ - ^, _..., . 48,059 39:
Fort N i a g a r a . . . . . ^ , , , > . . - . ^ ^ , , , - . . . . . . . : . . , . Ift360 00
Fort Delaware.:. ^...
- .„- . 4,2.00 OOi
Fort CasweU.
..7,000 00 .
Fort Schuyler,.New York
......;.;,
58,000 QO,
Fort WaiTen, Massachusetts I
, . . , 87,500 00/
Fort Pulaski, Georgia.
.
62,060 00
Fort on Foster/s.. bank, Florida:. : . . . . . : . .
21,500 OO
Fort McHeniy, Redoubt Wood, arid Cpy- •
ington Battery,iVIaryland.'.-.... . , ^ . . . - 15^485 00
Fort Mom-oe, V i r g i n i a . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63,18.5 74;
Repairing and rebuilding the old fort at
Oswego, and construction " of barracki.
^
, 1 8 3 9 . . . . . . . ; , . . J . ^ . , - - . . : . - . - ' . . , - . . . ' . . . ; - 6^,;739 gSj"
Preservation of Castle Island, and repairs
of Fort I n d e p e p d e n c e . . . . . . . . : . . : : : . . " 49,930 00'
Repairs of Castle; WiUiams and Fbrt'Columbus, and officers' quarters at 'New "
York
.;.,.;.
. . . . ' . . . -.'..
' 2,000 QO
Fortifications at Charleston and preservation ofthe site of Fort M o u l t r i e . ' . . . . . . .
92,232 41
Repairs of Fort Marion, andsea-w:all atSt»
Augustine. - : . : . . . . . . . , . .
...-,.. ..^... -... ..v „ . 18,515. 68.
Repairs of the old fort a t the Bai-rancaa,
Pensacola..:......,....
.........,.,.„..-..,^., . 34,88Q QO.
Fortification a t New London. hai:bor.,.Con'r,
.
necticut
.,... ^ . . . . - .
7,,000 0.0-.
Protection of themorthefn frontier,.&c... ..i.... ... 62,326.14.:
Preventing and; suppressing Indig,n_hps_tili- , „ . . „. .
t i e s .

. . . . . . ••...,> •, •-' . . • • • . • < > • > - • „ • , - •. >•'•.'f».•,". • > . • > •

^.'*,'^0\)i

yj^t:

Foragefordragoons, and volunteer officers,
:
&c..
.
. . . . . . - . . - • --.- ---•-; ^^0/643 87.
Freight on transportation intp .Florida ...ox'
: '
Cherokee country.....:. ....^-.-^....,.„...,..._-/ .127',.5.3.0..51:;,
Wagons, carts, &c
, - - - - - -_.-..;. - ^. ,7.1.,792 14
Hire of corps of'mechanics....-,...,.....,.:..-...., . ,143^399 3,6
Subsistence of militia, .volunte,pra,. and
- .-''
friendly Indians>......... -..>^.-.^.....,".....-... .20,443- 60Transportation of supplies, & c . » . . . : o . . .>. 195,0.03 46



1839i]i

SECRETARYOFTHETREASURY.

,

261

Miscellaneous and contingent- charges. - . ^ 1423,806 04
Pay of four thousand yolunteers for 1838,-. . . .
. . . . ' . / . • -v
including arrearages for 1837. ^.
.•.. 123j282'^ 53
Purchase, &c.,: of three small, vessels to
. .
cruise alongthe coast of Florida, 1839.. •• 22^700 00
Paying three companies of Indian- militia... .•. - 788 64
Selection of sites for marine hospitals on
• '
the Mississippi^ Ohio, and Lake Erie.-..-. ^ . 387. 25
Surveys of a mihtary character jand-for the
defence of the: Atlantic, &c
. . . . . . . . . . . - : :4,827 04. Breakwateratthe mouth of Delaware B a y
-71,504 75 ^
Breakwater at Stamford's ledge,.Pprtland^
• •
"
^
•-."':
Maine-.1..
. . ^ . . - ; 11,680;^00' > /
':
Breakwater at Church's Cove harbor, in. -. the town of Little Compton. 1.1. . . . V I
7^041 QQ"
Breakwater at Sahdy Bay
^ 10,000. 00Breakwater and pier at the harbor of Burlington, V e r r i i b n t . . . . . . . . . . - . . " . .
..
27,Q20:00
Breakwater on pier at the mouth of St.
*
Joseph
i........
. . . . . . , . . - 21,586 O
Q
Breakwater in the harbPr at Plattsburg.. ^ • i3j750 00 = .
Breakwater at Hyannis harbor, Massachur^
".
setts
.......................::^,
^ , 9 3 3 00 ; :
Constructing two piers and improving the
navigation at the mouth of Vefhiihon?
river, Ohfo,
..,..-..-.-.... 10,777^ 00^
:
Fier at the entrance of Kennebunk river..
•1,867 50 '
Pier and mole at Oswego
J . . . 1.-... ..;.
18,962'. 45^
Pier at the northern extremity of Lake Win-T
•'
nebago, Wisconsin.. 1 . - . . . . . . . . . -.-....
500 00
Improving the harbor at Saybrook, Con'
::
necticut.
. . . . . . . - J:
..
. - . 6,460^ 00Improving the- harbpf of Presque Isle^
Pennsylvania
.............
13,954 00
Improving the harbof of Chicago, Illinois.
15,000 00
Improving the harbor at l h e mouth of Bass
river, Massachusetts, 1 8 3 9 . - . l - . . ^ - . i - . :/6,935 00
Improving the harbof of Westport.L.....-.-..
2,^300 00
=
Improving the harbor at the mouth bf Sal-'
mon river, on Lake O h t a r i o . . . . . . . . . . . . . ^
17,237 67 .
Improving the harbor of Black liveiV New
'
York
...........1.....-.-...
1-1,200 50 i.
Improving the harbof of Cattaraugus creek,- .,
,..„...
Lake E r i e . . . . .
. . : . . . . < . - > . . . ^12,208 00
Improving the entraii<3e of White Hall har: '
bor. Lake C h a m p l a i n . . . . . . . . . . . : . . . - .
6,830 00
Improving the harbof of Portland, on Lake
- -'^ Erie.l^..i
1^,052 00
. •.
Improving the hai^bbf of New C a s t l e . . . . i'
2,000 QO



262

,

,

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

Improvingthe harborof Wilmingtouj Dela^
./ .
ware..
J . . . . . . . . . . . . . J. .-:-...
- $2^000 00: •
; ^
Improving the harbor-pf Mobile....... - - - .
30,037 00;.
Improving the harbor of Cleveland . . . . . . .
15',062 OO. .
Improvingthe harbor a t t h e mouth-of the
.
^ ^
.
'-river. Raisin
7,500 O v
O
Preservatipnbf Rainsford. Island, in the har- "
:.
bor of B o s t o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. 5,230 00^ fi . /.
A sea-wall to preserve Fairweather Island,. ^
* ..
"
\
near Black Rock harbor
.,..-2,995 90.
Works at BufMo b a r b o r . . . . - . . . . . ^ , . . . . . . ' 1,733 00 .:
:
P re serv ation of the harbor of Proyiricetb wn - • . 4,358 48
„
Protection and improvement of Xittle.Egg. . . . _ , „. _ .^ .. .
harbor
. . . . . . . . . . , . . . : . . . - . • ^ 5j207:oa. • :
. ,
Removing sand, bair i n i h e . harbox of New. - •
' -.
. ,'Bedford.....:'........:.-..
.='5,881.37
•.; ::;';
Deepening the harbor at Baltimore........." . :10,000 O ?
O
•. .; -^
Cbnstruction of a harbor at Michigaii .City
27,424 00? . '
Deepening the straight channel of East . .
; :; - ^ ,:•
Passy at Appalachicola— . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. 9,900, 00^..,. . 'v
Rebuilding lights on Brandywine ..shoals --. ,, 6,547 00 !
.•. , /
Deepening channel between the islands of • .: •
.;;.-';
North and South Hero, near St.. Albans,
• . . , . . . . . . ...
Lake Champlain...
. . . . . •- > 1 ; . . . . -:
.; 1,250. 00> • ' >
Mound or sea-wall between Lake Erie and . • . .
.- : . ? •
Buffalo creek. L,;....:.
. . . : . _ . . . . . : . . . .. .12,57i;00: ; , ; ,"
Works at the mouth of Genesee
river....
10,210 00; ^ .
- :'
Opening a passage between Beaufort and .. •
' •
Pamlico Sound, and improying New -•
;:
river, & c : . . - . . . . ' . : .
..........-..,.,.,..,;. 12,5^00.00^
A light-house on Flynn's kiiollv near Sandy - : '
, . ' • • v •.. ,;'.
Hook........-..;....:..-.-..,.--.........,..>
. 25,000.00. . . . : • •
Removing light-house on Goat Island. ...'-. ' . 8,706 75- .
;
Improving the navigation of. Cape Fear. . ... , .. . . . •
river, North Carolina.
:....:........ fi • . 14^000 00 .
• , ;:
Improving the navigation of Hudson river.--.
.46^353 17
Improving the naviga;tion pf Cumberland . . .
':
river, Tennessee . ^.....-.'-..
8,000 00.
/ /
Improvingthe navigation of the Ohio be- ;
tweenPittsburgand the falls......... 1... .;,...
24,000 Oa . . •• .
Improving the navigation of the Ohio and . ^
Mississippi rivers from Louis.ville. to .New' ,. . .., ,„ . . . . „ . * •
'
Orleans.......
. . . . . . . . . - . . : -.-.-. - .
34^60^ 6^ /.
; .
Improving the. Mi ssissippi river above the
mouth ofthe Ohio, and the Missouii riyer - - ' 22,000 00
fi,
Improvingthe navigation of l h e Arkansas. „ , . .
. ' . ,.
. r i v e r . . _ . . . . . ' . . l'. .••".. . ' . . . : . f i . - . . . . . . : . . .• ^ 17,451 ;76 • - •.. \fi,
Improying the inland channel between .the . . . ., .S . - . .. , , . ^ .,
St. Mary's .and St.. Jbhh's, F l p r i d a . ^
7 , 3 4 1 QO :..-y^.fi / . • • 


4839.]

SECRETARYOFTHETREASURY,
!

•

"

263
'

-

Improving the navigatioh pf the natural
channels of the. nbrthefn.and-southern
$9,700 00
entrances of the Dismal Swamp c a n a l . .
Increasing the depth of water in the mouth
.
4,950 00 :
of the Mississippi river . . . . . * . - - - - - . . .
Improving the nalvigation of ^Neenah . and
Wisconsin rivefs, and connecting them
with a navigable c a n a l . . . .
- - - -.-. - - - • . .2,000 00
Removing, obstructions from the ^Sayannahl.
river
.
J- .-^../. - .
. . . . . . . . . . - - . > . . .8,535 00 :
Removing obstructions from. Huron river,^
00
.
Ohio..
. . . . . . . . . . . . . - . - - . . - - . . - . . .. , .750
Removing obstructions from^ Grand river, Ohio.1 . - : . ! . -•
- . . . V . . . . . . . 2,;852'60 ;
Removing obstfuctions from - Ashtabula
1,600. 00
creek....
. . . . . . ..^:...: :
Removing obstructions from- -Conneaut ^
"
creek
. - - • . . . . . . . : . . . . 2,100 00
Removing obstructions at the mouth of Su4,500 00
wanee river..
- -... i . . . .
4,500. 00
.
-00
Survey of .Rock river, ' & c . . . . . . . > . - . . . . . . . ; , .1,000
Survey of Yellow river, Flprida, with the
.00..,
view of removing r a f t . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . .. .500'
Survey of Red Cedar river, in Iowa Terri- •
' 1,500 00;.
.,..484:;98Vr
Survey of roads arid canals . . - - . - - - . .
Cumberland road in Ohio and w^est of'
45,100 00.
Zanesville..-..............^.. - . . . : . 13,000 00 ,
Cumbeiiand road in Indiana. . . • . . - . . - -.'.
Cumberland road in Illinois.. -^...... - . . . . . - .85,000 00..
Repairing road from Jacksonville to ~Talia-V
500 0 0 . :
hassee . . - . . : - i:-l. i; . - - . . . , — - - . . . . . "Mail route and post road through, the Creek,
400 00
country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . : . . . <
Road from Foit Howard to northern bound
dary of Illinois . - . . - . - . . . - .^--.. .V.. -.;. .5,000- p
Construction of a bridge, .&c.,>. between
op ^
Prairie du Chien and D u b u q u p . . . . . ' . . - ,
Road from MilwKukie, by way of Madison, .
to Mississippi river opposite ^Pubuque.. .-.•• 10,000 00.
Road from Fort Howard to Fort Craw:. 5,000 o o ford...........-V-..-..-:.-..-.......-...
Repairing road, &c.; from St.. Augustine to .
Picolata..'...'.../•.^..'... - --:^.:».^...-:.: .5 • 7,323 oo
Mihtary road from the Mississippi to .the
39,700 00
• Red river:..:.. .;.^ - . . - -.,. - ^ - . - . - -- .
Road from Sauk harbor, on Lake MichigaLii, .
to Dehonee, on Wisconsin river ..->--... - .5,006. .oo':.:
Road from F6nd,du Lab,,pn Lake Winne- ;
•
' bago, to the Wisconsin river....--;.----:..'- , 5,000.00.'



:io,ooo

•

'

-

-

gM

:

RiEPORTS OF T H E

:

Road from Dubuque to the northernbohhh. ..
dary of M i s s o u r i . . - . : . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . i $20,000 00
Road from Burhngton towards the Indian : . /
agency on the Des Moines. . : . . . ; . - . > . . . .
&,000 .00
Road from Burhngton to De Haques . . , , - . •
2^500 00'
^Civilization of Indians. - . . . , . .
- . .1
"5,930 00
Payof superintendents of Indian affau'S and > ' ^
Indian agents . . - - .......
7,404 26
Pay of sub-agents
,
...... i
4,700 OQ
Pay of interpreters'^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5., 455 .00.
Presents to Indians
,..............^
' 2,034 8:9
Provisions tb I n d i a n s . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. , . . 5.,275. 00
Buildings and repairs
-.....
^
2,650 :00
Contingencies of Indian d e p a r t m e n t . . . . . . . .... 2.4,646 „85
FiilfUhng treaties with Pottawatbmies . . . . .
18,164- 92
Fulfilling treaties with Pottawatomies, o f . . . . .
Indiana.. . . . . . . . . . " . . > . / - 15,000 OO
FulfiUing treaties' with Pottawatomies. of,_
,
,
Huron
. . : . - . . . \:.
400 Oft
Fulfilhng treaties with Pottawatomies of..
. . . /,
the P r a i r i e . . . . . . . . ; . . 1 . . . . , . . . , , . „ . . . . _ 16^000 00
Fulfilling treaties with Pottaw-atohiies of ' . "'
Wabash.......-...-...,..,,....,,_.
20,000-00
FulfiUing treaties with C r e e k s . . . . . . . - . . . " /
9,432 6:g:
Fulfilhng treaties''with Six Nationa, ..New , . . „
.
York
.---...
...........
4,500 00^
Fulfilling treaties with Senecas, NewYbiic.. ; :6,000 00
Fulfilhng treaties with Sacs and Foxes ,..,. . 1Q,45Q QO
FulfiUing treaties with Ottoes .and. Misspur •
r i a s . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . . . . -:......,......,....
3,850 00
FulfiUing treaties with O m a h a s . . . . > . . . . . . • • 3jOOO 00
Fulfilhng treaties with lowas......
.
.. . 16,470 QQ
•Fulfilling treaties with Choctaws . . . . . . . .
' 46,935 75
Fulfilhng treaties'with Sacs.and. Foxes,-^
..
lowas, Sioux, Ottoes, and Missourias;-.;.'* * 1,617 50•
Fulfilling treaties with Wyandots................ . . „. 6,480 00
FulfiUing treaties with O t t o w a s . . . . . , . . ; . . . . , 5,431 8:8
FulfiUing treaties with Wyandots, Munsees,.
.and D e l a w a r e s . . . . .
.;.............
1,000 00Fulfilling treaties with 'Miamies. -.. - -- - > - . . 89,221 12
Fulfilling treaties with Chippewas, Ottowas,;.' .
. andPottaviratomies.......,-.....:.,.......,-....;
.38,602 „3Q
FulfiUing treaties with Mehomonies-:. v . . - . ' 31^110 OQ
Fulfilling treaties with Winnebagaea-....-..:.. . 54,78.Q „ Q '
Q
Fulfilling tfeaties.with Chippewas.
'fi.....
. ' 250 00
TulfiUing treaties with Christiari.Indians...... .,.. 400 „0Q ,
Tulfilhng treaties with Chippewas of Misr.^
. sissippi . . . . . ; . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . . . . . . . : . . . ' 10,206.27
FulfiUing treaties with Chippewas of S.aga:.'
n a w , , ^ , . , , V. ^ . . , . - . - .^...^^..-.........3 ^ 5j^4Q 00



183a]

S E C R E T A R Y O F T H E TREASURY,

265

Fulfilhng treaties with Chippewas, Menomor
nies, Winnebagoes, and NewYork Indians'. ^ $750 00
.
. '
Fulfilling treaties witli.Kanzas..................... . .4,080 .00 , ....
Fulfilling treaties with Osages.. ^ . . i . ^ \ . > . .
.: 800 00 '
Fulfilling treaties with ^Delawares, - , - . . . . . : . . .8,180. 00 .
/
"Fulfilling treaties with C h i c k a s a w s . , . . . . . . .
3,235 50
Fulfilling treaties withjQuapaw.s,............t."
3,202 50 ..
.Fulfilhng treaties with Cherokees i> . . . . . .
4^360. 00
Fulfilhng treaties with:Ottowas .and Chippewas
. . . i . ; * . . . . . ; " ; 53,885 00 •'
Fulfilling treaties with Sipux of Mississippi.' ^ 21,412 32
FulfiUing treaties with Yancton and .Santee
. Sioux
..:...,.
^ 3,760 00 "
Fulfilling treaties with Sacs and Fbxes of
Missouri. . . > . . . - . . : . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . ; .3,291 24
Fulfilling treaties with Sacs and Foxes of
'
••
•-..•-'/
Mississippi . . . . i
......................... 47,348 OP
5,500 00
Fulfilling treaties with Kickapoos.^— -.:...
Fulfilling treaties with :Kaskaskias. a n d P e - .
3iP00 00
onas. . . . . • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . < . i . . . - . ' . : . . .
,.800 OP
Fulfilling treaties with .Piankeshaws....
„
Fulfilling treaties with Weas: •.,:"..:... i.;.."
3,000 00
Fulfilhng treaties with Suwanees................
: 6,340
.00
FulfUhng treaties with Senecas and Shaw-;
.1,640 00,
1,940 00
Fulfilling treaties w;ith S e n e c a s . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fulfilling treaties with Pawnees..... ^...-.., . . 4,600OQ
FulfiUing treaties with C a d d o e s . . . . . . . . . . .
10,000 00
Fulfilling treaties with Eel R i y e r s . . . . . . . : . -.
1,100 00;
.
Subscription to Indian .Biography..- -.-.-:-- - . . . .90000
Mission of A. P . Chpute:au among.the wUd
9;237 58.
Indians, &Cw, wiest... —,...,...................
Expenses of delegations of Ipwas, Yancton
Sioux, Sacs and' F'oxes, of.1837.... . . . . . . , . ....85 00
850: 67'
Holding treaties with the Osages;^.........
2PP 89
Holding treaties with' the C r e e k s . . . . . . - ^ •
.700 00
Holding treaties with Wyandots of O h i o . .
394 62
Expenses of a delegation of Seneca Indians-,
Expenses of a; party of Sacs .and Foxes, in
XlOvZ/O . . .

. . . . . . . . .

.. i.-.

.

.

.'.

.

. , . . „ . J ... ^.. . . . . . . . . . . . m

221 50!
Expenses attending the negotiation of the ;
r
treaty with S;enecas and other hands, of. .
. ^ ..:
New York I n d i a n s . . . . . . . . . , . . . , . ; . . . : .
702 00
Salaiy of a' clerk in the office .of ^superin-: ;; ;
ten dent of Indian, affairs south of , the
Mississippi . . . / , . J . ..;...........,.„-.......... ^ • 500 OQ
Temporary subsistence of Iridians : west,. .
and expenses, attending distribution of the' .
same under the directioh of Secretaiy of.
•'•.-.-•,
W a r . . . . . . i.,. i ; . : . . i . . - . . . . . . ; . . . . . : . . . : . . ;
.25^00000



266

,

R E P O R T S QF T H E

{1839,

Commissioners to adjust claims under
; v ,
Choctaw treaty of 1830, per actof March
3,1837
'..:...-..:."
......:.v...-...-.-.•^•' $750.00
•/
Expensesof removing and subsisting Creek •
Indians........-..:.
........
2,610 24: ' : '
Expenses of the delegation ofStockbridge,
^ * •
. r; .
:'
Munsecj and S e r i e c a . I n d i a n s : - . . . . . . . . . .
. 2,0Q0 00 " •
^^^ \
Holding treaty with the Seminole In•'
dians
.1--.
3,35300,
-^
Cariying into effect-treaty with the Chippe- . - ~ ^ .. - - . . -» •
was of Saganaw, 1837, 1 8 3 8 . . . . . . ' . . . . . . .23,029 9 9 .
• :. "
Carrying into effect treaty with the Chippewas of Mississippi^ 1837;.....-..;.....-....=..-^^..7,352. 04 - - - . . .
Cariying into effect treaty with the Sioux ". , ' . .
:. • .
of Mississippi, 1 8 3 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ^ > ^. 49,978- 67- - ^'',
/-fi'
Cariying into effect treaty.with the Sacs;
.. ' .
'' '
and Foxes, 1 8 3 7 : . . . .
• . . . . • . . . . . . . . . - ; -• 966 38
: ^'. '
Carrying into effect treaty \^ith the Sacs and
Foxes o f M i s s o u r i . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . . - • ^4,130 7 6 '
Carrying into effect tre'aty with the-Winne- ».,.,.„
bagoes
,
.
......
1::..
35,30626
-.:
Carrying into effect treaty with the Oneidas • •
- . - . . " ' ;
at Green B a y . . . . . : .
. ^ . . . . ; . » . . . . - 30,250 00 "
fi,
Carryirig into effect treaty with the Ottowas •. • .
.. > •
and C h i p p e w a s . . . . i i . . . . . . . . . ; . . . « . . . . . . . . , . ^. . ^372 -63 ;
- -;;. •
Salesof the reserves of Creek Indians under
'. - treaty of 1832...-..-.
. . . . . • . . _ . . . . / : : • 707 00
' ;'
Objects specified in third article of treaty
. . with the Cherokees, of 1838,. per -act of
' ^ . •
June 12, 1838.
. 9 6 3 , 3 9 7 06
'-'
Removal and subsistence of Indians^-.'--.J
31,613 35 , . .
-.
Education pf Indian youths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .664 00
•
'
Transportation and incidentalexpensesof
' '^
' '
Indian department. . . . — . . . . . . . . . . J. • . 2,148 85 ;' <
Payments to Mianiies on ratification of third '
s *
:
^
article of treaty of November 6, 1838 . . ^ 60,000 00 * '
. -.
Payment of clainis provided for in fourth
, ;
/=::
and fifth articles of Miami treaty of No- ' *
•;
vember 6,1838. . . . . . . . . : : . . : : . . : . . :
: 9,412 00 ^
.
•
Payment of the first ten- anhual instalments ......-.»-..>.«.../<.•^ to Miamies, per third article of treaty of
.
:• ^
"
November 6,1838 . . . . . . . ' : . : . . , . . . , . : . . ^-12^568 00 ' • • - / f i
:"
Expenses of examining Miami claims, ac- • - •. - . ^ '" •
crued since October 23, 1 8 3 4 . . . . . ' . . . ' . ^
1,200 00
V'^ . : ^
Expenses of removal and. subsistence p f •. ^ '
• . ^
Pottawatomies of I n d i a n a . . - . ' . . . - . - ' . . . . 11,000-00 V^ • '
Payment of expenses of investigating frauds v ' ^ •
'^
on the Creek reservation, 1839'... - . : . . .
'
560 00 ' • • "\^ > ' '
Payment of 5 per cent, interest for one year
; '
' •
•
on $350,000,per a c t - i . . . .,....•..:.,-.^.,..^.. [. 17,500^0 ^ .^^ . ; -•



1839;]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

267

Payment of claims of the Mcintosh party,
' i
• per fifth article of Creek treaty, 183.8.. $21,103 33 .
Payments for improvements ph . missionary
reservations,.perfourth article of treaty of
/
•
December, 1835,. with the Cherokees.,-..."
.9,306 8 7 .
Payment ofthe purchase • money for
forty
•
acres of landjper first article-of treaty of ^
'
1839 with the Chippewas of S i g a n a w . . •
320 00 • " ' —
Expenses of negotiating treaty of 1839-with
-^ .
the Chippewas of S a g a n a w . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : '
125 Q ^
O
Payment of annuity to Osages, per^secdnd ••
'•
article of treaty of January 1 1 , 1 8 3 9 . . : : 19499 64 .'
Support of two blacksmiths'estabhshments,
'.^
- ^
&c., for Osages
. . . . .^... . i . . . . v . . ' •' 1,000:00 .: .
•
Cpws, calves, hogs,ploughs,&c., for Osages- . .. 7,300^ 00
..
Expenses of a commissioner tp.examirie and
• ' "
; V
^
/
. settle claims for Osage depredations-..-.-.. - .2,000- 0.0 . .,. .
Payment of purchase money for Osage re-;; •
: .
'
• .
Sei-vatipns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..-.:
43,52.0-00 . ..
Reimbursement of aunuity deducted from "
. Osage Indians in 1835. . .....„.....,.-......: , . .3,000. Q \ /
O
Reimbufsement of annuity deducted from
^ ^
Clermpnf band of Osages in .1829. ......'.
3,000 -00 . .
Paymentof one year's intereston $157^000,
^ ':.
at 5 per cent.j tb Iowa I n d i a n s . — - . . . . - ^ - .7,850 00
Building ten houses for Iowa chiefs... J.'."
2,O0Q-00 . ; ' '
Completing survey under treaty with. the •
" ..
Delawares, and expenses of• locating
'
Miamies and Winnebagoes . . - . . ; . . . - . . . . 1 • 50Q 00 "
:
Purchase of five sections of land from Wapan-se-tra,Potta;watomies':chief,, b y the . . . .
Executive
............
.4,000 00 .
^
'
Expensesof holding a treaty with the Stock- :
'. <
bridge Indians . . .•.
.,
•• • • .800 00 . .. .• •
Employment of physicians to'vaccinate I n - .
- dians...,...•:^..?.:.vi;..:..:............
1,500 00
Twelve maps, showing the positipri.of the
lands of each Indian tribe, for use of War
:
Departmerit and United States Senate..»
. . 151 00Expensesof surveying and marking bound- . v.- . .
". .
. •
aries between the Indian tiibes west of •
the Mississippi..
.. .3,928 00
::
Relief of James Baker, per act
. . . . . ':'• ; 200-00
Rehef of Ellen Schmuch, per act-June 28, ^./ : v
1836...
'
360 00
Relief of Benjamin H. Macall, per a c t . . .
^ .210 00
Relief of Thomas J. T r i p l e t t . . . - . . i . . . . . ^ - l ^ j m , 00
•
Relief of N. S. Colquhoun, per act March v ' • ; , . ; . . .
•3^ 1839 . . : . . . '
.::.:.-. fi:: ..
> ^ •"'-687- 5 0 •.
^



26®

R E P O R T S OF T H E

Ifimdl

Relief of the legal representatives of Mi-^ .
chael Fenwick, per apt March 3, 1 8 3 9 . .
$7,000 oo: Relief of Joseph Jackson, per a c t . . . . . . .
115 60;
Rehef of the levy court of Calvert county^ . Maryland
a,000 00 .
Relief of Joseph M. Hernandez, per act:
- ' '' ^
V March 3 , 1 8 3 9 . . .
5,009 .80 . : .
Relief of James Thomas, per. act July 2,
1836
:..-..........
17,546 70 : ^
^
Relief of sundry citizens for Indian depre^
: ^ '
dations, per act June 30, 1 8 3 4 i . . . . . . . ; . / 1,370 OOJ ' •
Rehef of A. J. Pickett and . Geprge ^ W..
Gayle, per actMarch 3, 1839.....-...:....
' : 19B 00 . .
_;
Relief of Henry Grady, per act March. 3^
- .-v^^
1839
. . . . . . . . . . . , . . - . . . . . : . . . . . : . . * 506 QO
\ ,
Rehef of WiUiam Clark, per act March 3,
'..
1839
......;.^.;.. 24 00
n
Relief of Thomas Sinnard, per act March
' ^ : •,
3, 1839
....;=.
-...-...;..;..,
. 5i70..24- . .
'
Relief of William Traverse, per act March'
• .; ' •;
^
3, 1839
..,:........
228 00 Relief of Francis Gardiner, per'act March • /
• • .
-; •
1,1839
,.......:.,...vl
- Ml^ 00
.
)
Relief of Irad and Datus Kelly, per act - .•
^
March 3 , 1 8 3 9 . . . . . ^
.:.................
125:75; ^^
Relief of the administrator of Henry Gf a!: ^
tiot, per act March 3 , 1 8 3 9 . . : . . ' . . . . . . ; . . . .
1^413 70:
:''^ "
Relief of E . H. Wilhams, administrator of': . • . • > .
- •
• •' '-5 ^
Dr. Hazel W . Crouch
240 00 = ^ ; •
Rehef of Ann S. Heilman, per act June 22j
.
. -• '•
1838
,360 00 , - ^
New dies to renew the medal made ..in honor
...,_-:.'..'.
of Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, per.' .
•: :
• ' • .:. r :
actMarch 3,1837.
.........._... . '. . . 7:02. 50 r
. ., . . . ... .. Il.,885,3a5. .55.
From which deduct the following repays
: .•.•-':
ments:
. *
• • ; :;
P a y and subsistence
.$8,406 47
•
•
Bounties and p r e m i u m s . . . . '
:3.6: 00
Repairs, &c., o f t h e arsenal
, ..
at Chaiieston.. - . -'.\ . . . 8.4 26.
'. .
Purchase of lands, ,&c., at . . . . . . . :
•
.Mount Venion a r s e n a l . . . .
1,834 56 . .
Tennessee volunteers, mus- . . . . . . . . . . .
..,.„....
tered into service by Gen- ...
''-."•
eral Gaines, April,. 1836,.
. .. /
and proclamation of Gov.
Cannon, April 28, 1 8 3 6 . . . . , . . 59, 2.0. . . .



1839.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY-

One month's pay, &c., to
volunteers, &c., of Ken-,
tucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, &c. —
New machinery at Harper's
Feriy aririory
Fortifications, (old acc't)
Fort Calhoun..
Fort at Grand Terre.
..
More perfect defence of the.
frontier..
Transportation of 4,000 vol-,
unteers
. ^-.. w- -'. -. --. ^
l)fa£tsiyihgover, &G.-, foi-serxvices in Florida, &c. . . . .
Purchase ofpowder and other
materials for cartiidges, &c.
Repressing hostilities.pfSerri-^
inole Indians:..-.::.;.".. — .
Volunteers, and' an rad;ditional.
regiment of d r a g o P r i s . . . . . .
Suppressing hostilities; of >
Creek I n d i a n s . . . . . . . :
..
Removing the:light-house at.
Old Point :Comfort into.
Fortress Monroe. .......
<
.
Light-house onpifer atOswego.
Improvement of PTascagoula
river
.
.
....
Survey of St. Francis, Black.
and White rivers. - . . . . - ,
Opening and constructing,
road from Tallahassee to'
lola
.-;-.;. .—
Road from Memphis t o .
Strong's, on the St; Francis „
river
.^.}..........
Fulfilling treaties with Florida I n d i a n s . . . . -;..... — .
To aid certain Cfeek^Ihdians .
to remove west of the Mis-.sissippi, perialct 20th: May y
1836
.-;.;-.'.:...!:..._.
Expenses of delegation, &c., ,
per act 31st'May, 1832^.
Carrying into effect treatywith the Cherokees, per
• act 2d J u l y , : l S 3 6 . : . . . . . . .
Arrearages of annuities for
Cherokees . .:*., 1,......;..«.,..



:$1,198 6611,672 77
20 00.
1,414 06.
1,805 08.
390 35
.52,320 78
48,047 61
2,029 41
49,664.50^
:V 20 t^Q;
4,548^ 30"
243 .13
_4Q6;50
• 18S.45r
678ji98:
22Q -QQ
; 1,654 I T
35,189 98

;:;;40P 00
• 25. P
, O
84P,888 .01
29,000 OP

269

270

R E P O R T S OF T H E

Indian annuities..-'.
$.445
Rehef of Robert Key worth.
45
P a y and subsistence o f t h e
mounted rangers. - - - . . . .
216
Road from Detroit to Saganaw and Fort Gratiot
4
Transportation of annuities,
peract28thFebruary,1834^ .
95
Annuities, per act 20th May,
1826, and 2d March, 1827
88
Annuities, per act 4th June, . •
1832
250

89
.
50
'
.
46. . -;
^
.V;
52.
. .
'
. /
42 . . ' . . . .
./ •
. .„.
:: • «
32. .
; . . ;^
.
- ^. • • " "
•
00
^ r
•
-$1,093,586.34.>: 10,791,799 21

NAVY ESTABLISHMENT.

Pay and subsistence ofthe Navy
.$1,680;591 52
Pay of superintendents...
..."...... 45,948 53
Prbvisions
356,637 97
Medicines, surgical instruments; fee.- .
.
45,158 :27
Navy-yard at Portsmouth
: . . = 23;230 00
Navy-yard at B o s t o n . . . - - . . . . . . . . . . . - - -. 19,700 00
Navy-yard at New Y o r k . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 22,486 63
Navy-yard at Philadelphia.
495. 36
Navy-yard at W a s h i n g t o n - . . - - - . .
- 26,957-88
Navy-yard at N p r f o l k . . - . - . - . - . . . :
• 58,4lQ. 93
Navy-yard at Pensacola
-,.
. 51,758 80
Survey of the May river from Tybee bar to ..
:. .. .
Hunting Island
7382
Examination of the Mississippit^ahd Salinerivers
:....--•--.......
• 863 43 •
Magazine on Ellis's Island, in the harbor of'
^ .
New York
. . . . . . . . . . . . : - . . : . 2,200,0Q
Hospital at Boston
"
426 63
Hospital at Brooklyn
r 23,125 04
Hospital at Norfolk
1,5,00 00
Hospital at P e n s a c o l a . - . - . . - - • • 22,030 14
Ordnance and ordnance stores..
. . . . . . - 11,873 4 4
Gradual improvement of the Nayy. - . . . . 384,239 11
Repair of vessels in ordinary, and wear and
. •/.
tear of vessels in commission- . . • • . . . . . . . 1,109,267 32
Contingent expenses ofthe N a v y . . . . . . . . . . . . 324,998 .6.7 .Contingent expenses not enumerated . . . . . . .
• 421 60 '
Rebuilding frigate Congress... - . - . . .
. :. ' 8,224 64
Building and equipping six vessels of war : .289,791 59
Agency on the cPast of Africa for suppres- '.,
sion of slave trade.
--;.-..,..
- 553 '87
^ Prize money for officers and crew of the
private armed brig General Armstmng. ,
: 492 41..



[1839,

- 1839.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

Expenses in relation to steam-engines and /
"
steamboats
.-......,....:...
, . $3,006 44; , ' Pay and subsistence of marine c o r p s . . . . .
126,781 01 Subsistence of non-commissioned; officers „ - •;
/ .
serving on shore, marine c o r p s . . . . . . . . . , 24,253 52 ; .
Medicines and hospital stores for marine . / ;
'
corps...
..
. ^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,950 94
:
Fuel for marine coips. - . . . - - - - . . . . . \ 11,316; 52 . ."
Contingent expenses for maiine c p i p s . . . . ^ 14,493^25.
Transportation and recruiting for. marine
: cprps........-::.-....
4,83175
Repairs of barracks for marine c p r p s . - - . . . .
3,775 30
Arrearages to captains andsubalterns, marine corps . . 2
- f.. . ^ . . - - . . ; 7,241 ;8S
Clothing for marine corps
...........
^IVOO'? 41
Reliefof Chaiies Blake, per act 28th June,
180 OP;'
' 1 8 . 3 6 . . . . . . • . . : . . . . . . . . .^..-.".'.;.:. •.-..:
Rehef of Chaiies RockweU, per act 3d
> 719 27
March, 1 8 3 9 . . . - - . . .
. . . . . . . -. - -..
Rehef of Francis MaUaby, per act 3d March
,
00
1839-..-..•:.-.l....-.--...f-"-v-.•..... . - 3 9 2
Rehef of Spencer C Gist, per act 3d March,
1 8 3 9 . . . - . - - . - . . , . . . . - - :..-. ..'.•:.... .-.•- • • -•804- 72
Rehef of Ezekiel Jones, per act 3d March,
" 1839. -•-....-.;. : : : . • . _ :-...;--^.-.'.v.•--..- - S 491 40
•
e Rehef of Dudley Walker, per act 2d March, •
•52
.
•
' 1839'
..:,.--v.....-,----.---v...-•-•-•.'-= . • 158
Relief of Jaiius Loomes, and heirs of Jarnes
50
. . -642Bassett, per act 3d Mafch, 1839. ..-.->- .
Conveying Schuylkill water to naval asylum,
4,889 72
.' Philadelphia
,
4,749,353 75
From which deduct the foUowing repayments, viz.:
Gradual increase Pfthe "NaVy $16,070 28
Rebuilding and equipping
two sloops o f w a r .
-.
4,599 66
Military stores for maiine
•
corps
. 776 51
Rebuilding the fiigate Macedonian
. 3 56
Timber to rebuild Java and
.
Cyane.'-----...'.....-..'
" 4 , 5 8 1 86 • .
Iron tanks.
--....
92 50
Contingencies for 1830....... '
. 18 00 ' ^
. Completing and furnishing.
hospitals. - . ' . . -..
390 85
Completing steam ve.ssel at
.
'the.navy-yard, Bropklyn. . . 349 49



271
'
- •

. '

272

REi>ORTS OF T H E

Naval magazines at Charles, ton and Brooklyn..
Sui-veying and explprihg ex- pedition to Pacific ocean.
Arrears of contihgenbies.....
Sui*vey of the coast of the
United S t a t e s . . . . . . . . . . . •Contingent, for .1831....
Rehef of Samuel Sanderson.

[1839.

'
$776 -80 .
- ' >^
5,193 57
- • 40 16
'

: .

- .,486 00 ^
263 94 2,009 00

.

•

•

-

-

^

- ' .

;

• .

.

-

•

.

•

^ .

• '

•

•

-

•

' s

.

.

:

•

.

.

-

.

•

.

•

•

V

•

•

•

^

.

•

:

•

^

.

\

.

•

•

.

'

•

$35,652^18- • ^ .

•

'

AA 71 * 7 0 1
^

"

'iT

PUBLIC DEBT.

Interest of the funded d e b t . . . . . . . . ^ . . . . . . . . . . .
"34 ^
Interest and reimbufsement of the domestic „ ..
.
' . ;.
debt
^ - -..'..:. . 1 . •^..•' J l , Q O 0 0 0
Paying certain parts of domestic d e b t . . . . . . „ , ^ 641 16 .
Redemption of 3 per cent, stock..../..:.:.,..
;
12,48
Redemption of exchanged 4J per cent, stock
' 3,000 00;
Redemption of 5. per cent, stock..... i..=...- . 10,000 0.0^
Reimbursement of Treasuiy notes, (pld)..
. . ., .5 00
Reimbursement of Treasury nptes issued
p e r act 12th October, 1837 . . . ^ . . . . . . . .^. 4,0^6,133 52
Reimbursement of Treasuiy notes is.sued
per act 21st May, 1.838 . . . . . . . . . . - , . . _ . 5,461,212 18
Interest of Treasury notes issued, p;er act
12th October, 1 8 3 7 . . . . . . - .^^._,.... . ^ .
92,786 44 ,.
Interest of Treasuiy notes'issued per act • .
.
21stMay, 1838..K..
. . . . . . 1,....:. . 261,627 69
9,906,418 Sl>
$29,061,427 82
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
REGISTER'S O F F I C E ,

•

iV(9i;emJer 28, 1839.
T . h . S M Y I i a : , Register.

-

D .

:•

.

-•

•

•'

••

:

Ofi the Piihlic DeU.
^ The payments on account of the (old) funded and'.unfuniled debt?
since the 1st December, 1838, have been as foUows:
1. On accourit of the principal and interest of the"fun"ded .debt ;
Principal
.-i v . . . . . . : . . " ' " $13,012 4 8
Interest . . . . .
,....
.•....:......»
; 1,000 3 4
14,012 82
Leaving^unclaimed and undischarged



. . . : . ; . . . ...Vo ' :311,508 Ql.

1859.]

S E C R E T A R Y OF T H E TREASURY.

273

VIZ:

Principal
Interest

...$62,94199
248,566 02

2. On account of the unfunded debt

$646 16

Leaving the amount of certificates and notes payable on
presentation

$36,267 24

VIZ:
...
, ^ ^
-^
/
Certificates issued for claims duiing the revolutionary war, '
and registered prior to 1798.
$26,652 15
Treasuiy notes issued duiing the late war . . . 5,295 00
Certificates of Mississippi stock.
4,320 0-9

Debts of the corporate cities of the District of Columbia, assumed by
the United States, viz:
Of the city of Washington
$1,000,000 00
Alexandria-.
-......-250,000 00
Georgetown
250,000 00,
1,500,000 00
The payments during the year 1839, on account of the
interest and charges of this debt, amounted to

$76,374 77

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

. REGISTER'S O F F I C E , Novemher 20,

1839.

T. L. SMITH, Register.

E.
Statement of the issue and redemption ofi Treasury Notes firom. the 1st ofi
- '
January to the 20th ofi Novemher, 183^.
The Treasnry nptes issued during the period above mentioned, under
the acts ofthe 21st of May, 1838, and 2d March, 1839, amounted
.'to......
.-.$3..,;S5.7,276- 21
Amount redeemed during the same period:
lb Of notes issued under the act o f t h e
12th October, 1837, there have been entered i n t h e books of this o f f i c e - . . . . . .$4,14,8,848 9.8.
And there are at present under examination by.the accounting officers of the
Treasury, notes which had been received
in payment for duties and lands, amounting to
..'......
126,41365" ^
—
4,275,262 6a
2. Of notes issued under the acts of 21st
May, 1838, and 2d March, 1839, there ^
have been entered in the. books of this '
'
office
5,845,979 18
VOL. IV.—18.



2.74'

REPORTS O F ' T H E

And there are at pi-esent under examination
by the accounting; officers of tlie Depart-.
ment
..:...,,-.-......,.

[iS3^

.508,017.26
".

6,353,996.44,

Totalamount redeemed since the? 1st January, 1839, ,,..$1.0,629,259 07
•

TREASUKY

Biii'iABTittfEiST,

R-EGHS'S-Em's OwS'-iCE, Nffvember-^0, 1 8 3 9 . .

T.; I>.

SONHIH;

Begister.^

A statemmt. exhihiting the-valm of Imports: and Exports i u r i ^ ^
1835, 1836, 1837, 1838, and 1839;
Year ending 30th
of September.

VALUE OP IMFCmTS;

Free of duty.

Paying duty ad valorem.

1834.. $68,393,180 $35,608,2.08 ;
1 8 3 5 . . 77,940,493
45,817,740
1 8 3 6 . . 92,056,481
59,343,388
1 8 3 7 . . 69,250,031
37,716,3741 8 3 8 . . 60,360,005
27,090,480 .
1 8 3 9 . . 72,040,719 , 42,563,739

«22,519,944 . $126,521,332
149,895,742
26,137,509
189,980,035
38,580,166
140,989,217
34,022,812.
113,717,404
25,766,919
157,609,560
43,005,102

VALUE O F E X P O R T S .
Yearending:30th •
of September. Domestic produce. Foreign merchanTotal Exports.
dise.

1834..
1835..
1836..
1837..
1838..
1839..

$81,024il62
101,189,082
106,916,680
95,564,414
96,033,821
10b,95i;004

TREASURY

tofal.

Paying specific
duties.

-

Total Imports.

$104,336,973 ' $1'26.;521,SS2.
f23;3i2,811
, 20,504,495 . 121,693,577 1 149,895,742
' 128,663,040 ;
189,980,035
'21,746,360
1-17,419,376
140,989,217.
21,854,962
108,486,616
113,717,404
12,452,793';
118,-359,004- • r5:7-,609,560\
17,408;000

DEPARTMENT,

REG-ISTER'SOFFICE, iVozjmSer 28^ 1839/



.

^

T.h.SMYTB.,Regism^

1839r|
.

•

S E C R E T M ¥ OF T H E ^ R E A S C E Y -

••

' '

.

•

"

•

^

-

•

275

'

Imports into the United States firom the. 1st-.of October, 17 89.,. to tJie ^ t k qf
....
: Sept'6mb^,-i8S8. '
ARTICLES,.

Value retained
Total value of in the country Cotton mah- -Woolkns.
imp"orts.' ' fdf' Gonsump- ufactufes'.

Wines,

Spirits,

. Teas,

tioni

1790
•17'91
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
•1797
1798
' 1799.
18Q0
1801.
1802
1803
1804
1805:
1806:
•1807
1808
1809

-

•

(

«

)

(

$23,000,000
.29,200,000
31,500,00.0
.31,100,000
'34,600,000
69,756,26;8
'81:,43€,16l
75,379,40'6
••68,551,700
79,069,148
91,252^768
lll,363;5a
76,333,333
64,666,665
85,000,000
120,600,000
129,410,00;0
138,500,000
• 56,990,000
59,400,000
i8io: 85,400,000
1811 53,400,000
1812 77,030,000
1813, 22,005,00.0
1814 . 12,965,000
18X5 113,041,274.
1816 147,103,000
1817 99,250,000
1818 121,750,000.
1819 87,125,000
1820 . 74,4^0,000
1821 : 62,585,724^
1822 . 83,241,511
1823 • 77,579,267:
1824 ,.80,5.49,007:
1825 , 96,340,075
1826 84^974,477:
18'27, 79,-4t4,068:
1828 : 88,509,824.
1829 . 74,492,527
.183b 70,876,920
1831 103^91,124:
1832 101,029,266
1833 108,118,311
1834 126,521,332
1835 .149,895,742
1836 189,9^0,035
18137 • 140,989,217
1838 113,717,404

W i
(^)
i
$22,460,844
•28,687,959
.29,746,90'2
:.28,990,4^8
28,073,767
€1,266,796
'55,136,164
48,379,406
.35,551,700
,33,546,148
52,121,891
64,.720,79O.
40,558,362
51,072,594
48,768,403
67,420,981
69,126,764
78,856,4:42
43,992,586
" 38,602,469
• 61,008,705
37,377,210
68,534,873
19,157,155
12,819,831
106,457,924
129,964,4.^4
79,891,931
102,323,304.
67,959,317
56,441,971
41,283,236 :$7,788,514:
. 60,955,309 10,680,21^6
. ,50,035,645':•• 8,869,482;
55,211,850/ ; 9,157,667;.
. :63",749,432 12,509,516'
,60,434,8165. • •8,348,03456',084,932 9,3]i6,15i3
66,914,807 10,99'6,230
: 5.7,834,049: : ,8,,36l2,0i7
• 56;,489.,'44l 7,862,3^:
83,157,598 16,O9i0,22i4
.•76,989,7'93 -10,399,65:3.
88,295,5.7'6; a3,26S,50J9:
103,208,521 10,145,281:
129,391,247' 15,367^58^:
168,233,675 17,876,187
119,134,255 11,150,841
101,264,804 .6,599,330.

:$836,121 P.,859,975

$352,509

2,828,391 5,02.5,-558 2.,206,348^
2,204,702 , 5V508,026 2,963,977
3^843,022 7:;342,487 1,911,195
*6,170,333
*7,197,560
*5,808,Sri5'
*4,:i30,8l2
*3,364,294
*4,604,361
*5,:455,245
6,022,334

•.f7,238;954
11,752,595
7,953,451
••8,086,853
10,876,873
7,886,826
8,231,515
8,097,559:
6,558,235
5,598,634
12,668,028,
9,762,262
7,660,449.
: 7,379,328
10,023,520;
1'2;758,430;
. 4,243,548;
6,967,530

1,873,464
1,864,627
1,291,542
1,050,898
1,826,263
1,781,188
r,621,035
1,507;533
:i,564,'562
1,535,102
1,673,058
2,39'7,479
2,601 ,'455
•2,944;388
3,750,608
4,332,034
4,105,741
2,318,282

1,804,798. 1,322,636
2,450,261 1,860,777.
l,.79i;419 2,361,245
2,642,'620; 2;786,252
3,135,210 3,728,935
l;587,712:; 3,752,281
1,6.51,436 1,714,882
2,331,656 2,451,197
1,447,914 2,060,457
658,990 2,425,01.8
;i,;037,737 1,418,037
1,365,018- .2,788,353
1,537,226; -5,484,603
1,319,2.45 6,-217,949
1,-632,681- 4,522,806
1,917,381 "5,342,811
1,470,802 5,902,054.
1,476,918 3,497,156

(a) For the early years, .the aggregate of the yalue of imports do.es not appear-on.the official statement, and has.
been estimated at difFerent amoiintS: by different persons, and thus that column and the column as.to the value.of,
foreignmerchandise consumed willnot* always correspoiid with-former reports. But the difference will not be
fouhdsogreat^as to affect materially any geneial result.
.• • '
,
"
:
.
. (b). A greater, portion of imports were "exported before 1819, or during tlie long wars in Europe, .as may be seen
in the other table.
(c.) The practice of making regular reports of thevalue and quantity ofeach article imported did not commence
till 1821.. .Previous to that,' therefore, only detached returns can be obtained for a few article.'? and a. few years.
*The valiie ha.s been estimated agreeably to the prices current returned by collectors of the customs in their
quarterly abstracts of exports for each year.
'




REPORTS OF THE

276

[1839.
STATEMENT G

' ARTiCLEs-^Gontinued.

t
a

Salt.

Crockery
ware.

Ironandsteel.

Molasses.

^.

Silks.

"

Coffee.

'

.

.

:

•

.

1790
1791
•
1792
1793
1794
1795.
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
. 1802
1803
1804
1805.
1806
1807 •
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
.1827
1828
1829
1830
1831 1
1832
1833
1834
1835 •
1836
1837
X838 • •
'•

-

-

$185,047

$1,438,921

-.
-

.

_

-

•

•

•

_
- ^
-'-, ' :
>
-.'
'

•

.

-.
-

•

'

-

•

'

r

•

. -

.-

. '•
;

•

-

.

,

- '

•

-

-

•

-

:

"'
' ^.
-(

• '

.-•
- '
._
.
-

•

-

-

-

. 1

.

-

•

"

- '

r
•

-

.

•

-

•

• •

-'- .;
-

,

.

'

•

"

- ,
. 6)

- .
-

.

' ..

•

• ;-

.

-

•

'

•

-

-

•

*

-

•

: ._-•''

-

-

.
'

•

•

.

;

.•

•

•

- .

•

.

•

:

.. •
;

--

-.

;

•

^ 8,927,208
' '3,851,718
12,339,209

-

;\ -

-.
-.
-

.

•

r . - -

;

•

_

'

,i

•

)

_- • \

-^
-

«

-

••,

:

(

-

-

•

.

•

•
'

•

•

.

.
.

"

, $580,712

•

-

- •

•

- '

•

•

,

-

!

-,
-.

-

•

'

.

'

- '•
-•
-

;
!

2,094,384
2,109,357
1,803,813
.

,' -

.

•

-

740,376
815,895
739,716

•

;.

- •

-

: •

-

•

--

•

-.
-'
-

•

-

•

'

•

-

'

-

'

•

•

• . .

-

-

'

' -. • . - . - .- ' :
:

•

•

'

-

•

•

-

; . .*, -' . : / _ ' -: •'
-

-

.

1 •

609,021
1,719,227 $3,212,861
$629,032 i $4,486,924
625,932
2,398,355
5,210,056
1,107,264
6,840,928.
740,866
2,634,222 ; 5,083,351
1,095,126
6,718,444
613,486
2,413,643
4,584,134
856,326
7,204,588
589,125
2,547,715
5,820,517
1,011,826 10,299,743
677,058 • •. 2,838,728 : 5,451,333
1,239,050
8,327,909
535,201 • 2,818,982
6,002,206
1,091,757.
6,712,015
443,469 . 2,788,471 1 7,286,033 • 1,485,652 . 7,686,640
-714,618
. 1,484,104 i 5,752,925
1,229,817 1 7,192,698
671,979
. -995,776
5,930,070
1,168,477
5,932,243
' 535,138 • ' ' 2,432,488
7,192,979. ' 1,516,435 .11,117,946
634,910
2,524,281 . 8,804,832
1,857,542 • 9,248,907
996,418
' 2,867,986
7,742,763
1,669,336
9,498,366
839,315
2,989,020 • 8,534,458
1,372,800 10,998,964
-665,097
3,074,172
8,965,889
1,697,682 16,677,547
" 724,527
4,077,312 12,892,648
2,709,187^ 22,980,212
862,617
3,444,701 11,119,548 - 1,823,401 : 14,352,823
• 1,028,418 ' .3,865,285 • 7,418,504
1,233,536
9,812,338

-

•

•

.-.-

4,489,970
5,522,649^:
- 7,098,119
' 5,437,029;
5,250,828
4,159,558
4,464,391
5,192,338
4,588,585
4,227,021
6,317,666
• 9,099,464
.10,567,299
8,762,657
10,715,466
9,653,053'
8,657,760-,
7,640,217.

(a) Tlie.exports of coffee in 1802 equalled $6,015,939 ; in 1803, $2,338,462; and in .1804,
12,185,948.—^See, .as to' exports of other articles, 1 Commerce and Navigation, page 658,
G. & S. Digest, .The exports of sugar and teas were near half the mports, though below that
proportion.




1839.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

—=Con tinned.

277

,
ARTICLES—Continued.

.1.
1790
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
. 1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
18091810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
•1827
•1828
1829
1830
.1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
' 1838

Sugar.'

_'

^
..-

$1,676,085
•

-

. -

-

.
..

,

. -

JL€a<L

Spices. ,

.

••

_
.-

'1

-

-

•

.

,

•-'•

• " • .

.-' - ^•

7,704,282
5,684,362
9,993,918

•

•

:

-

1

•

_

-

.

-

-

.

•

3,553,582
5,034,429:
3,258,689
5,165,800
4,282,530
5,311,631
4,577,361
3,546,736"
3,622,406
• 4,636,342
4,910,877
2,933,688
4,755,856
5,538,097
6,806,425
12,514,718
7,203,206
"7,586,825

';

..
.-

•

,..-

•

'

145,376
216,533
319,094

• ,

-

'

-'
^^-

•

..-

_
^

•

) - .

.•

-

. • ,

-

•'. . -

.

.

•

..'.'
' -'
- ;:

$310,281
284,701
. 505,340
266,441
580,956
155,175
369,140
107,494
•626,039
301,408
594,568
265,409
322,730 . .303,615
432,.504
298,544
461,539
52,146
457,723
20,395
279,09.5
52,410
,
306,013 • 124,631
919,493
89,019
•
496,562
183,762
712,638
54,112
vl,028,039
37,521
• 847,607
17,874
438,258
10,494




>

•

-•
-

• _

'• . '.
'•.' .

••

.

'

•

.
.
^
.-•
-

$2,564,159
6,840,928
3,803,807
3,046,920
3,645,125
2,720,565
2,360,880
2,471,352
• 2,480,181
2,485,053
3,145,797
3,391,503
2,352,085
301,502
5,932,568
8,271,213
• 4,851,857
3,583,340

Specie and
Bullion.

Hemp.

_
,
- -^
•-•
, - .'
- '.
.
.
, .
-

^

.

-

-.
.

;
•-

-

•'

•

_ ^
--

. $7],441

'.».

•

- Linen. .

•

_
-;

•

-

•

•

-

.

•

-, \
• -'•

.

:

-

1
•

'

•'

c\
•

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•'

•

.

•

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-'

•

•

-

' ~
' -.

" •; H

•

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-

'

•

-

.

...
•

.
'

•

-

•

.-

• $510,589 $8,064,890
1,054,764
3,369,846 1
674,454,
5,097,896
241,107
6,473,095
' 431,787
6,150,765
551,757 . 6,880,966
. . 635,854
8,151,130 1
1,075,243
7,489,741
655,935
7,403,602
200,338
8,155,964
295,706 " 7,305,945 1
866,865
5,907,504
470,973
7,070,368
514,743 17,911,633
528,981 13,131,447
815,558 13,400,881
483,792 10,506,414
512,506 17,747,116

REPORTS QF THE

27S

.
STATEMJ:NT.-_G-

- - • - - _^..

-,..: -.-..

Great Britain
depen-.'.
' dencies.'

02

- .s • • ;ahd

^

• ^ "

"

' • • ;

" " ^ ' • '

•

\

_

•

-

•

••••

'_
. . '•
-• .

•

•




Spain and
' dep end eh. cies.
,' -r"/ —

'

•

'

« "

: . ; • ' •

—

:

•

"

" - '

,

-

-

•

- .

• .

•

•

-

.

'

• •

~

-

-

•

-

'

-

•-•

.

•

:

-"
-' ,

-

•

•

-

,

.

•.••

$671,49"6
751,323
680;878
• 319,243
.. 562,499
• 474,65"'6
545,03;5.

•

•

.

• '

•

_

•

•

•''.•

•

-

-

'

..

'-•

-

.

•

/ •

- '"'..

-

•

-

.

-

r

- ,

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-

•
• - . •

'

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. - •

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•

_•'-'.,'

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.'

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•

-.

•

-

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'

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'

; - '.. : -. •

••

-

-

•

: $2^614,449
3,283,78T
2,759,;516'
1,343,206
2,941,939
1,37.6,509
3,436,369

'.\

'

• -

•

•

-

• ' z :
;.

••

:. •

•*

.

,
-.
-

•

• '

-

••

y

' - .

• -

9,653,728
2,934,^72
5,900,581
2,708,162
7,059,342 . 12;376,841
14,233;590
:2,125,587
6,605,343
2,355,525
16,577;i56
8,120,763
. 11,835,581
9,566,237
2,265,378
-2,;i74,i8i
• 9,588,896
9,623,420
• 9,448,562.
9,100,369 • ;i,722;T)70
,l6,287,5.65
8,;i67,,546 . 1 ^ 9 9 0 , 4 3 1 .
' 9,616,970
1,617,334
6,801,374
8,240,885
8,373,681
i,35;6,765
14,737,585
11,701,201
1,653,031
12,754,615
2,358,474
10,863,290.
13,962,913
13,431,207
2,347,343
17,557,245
13,527,464
.2,127,886
23,3.62-584
li5;617,140 • ^2,903,718
37,036,235
i9;345,690
-3,861,514^
22,497,817 . ^ 18,927,871
3,370,828.
18,087,149
15,971,394
2,194,238
.

.

• • ' . " • -

. -

-

-./

•

.
_
•

•

,

•

•'

.
'

-'S.:.
-

- •

-

'

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-

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.

•

...

'- '
-• .
• _' •

—

-

--:.

w.

.•

•

'/'

'

•

•

-•

:

Netherlands Sweden and Denmark and
• and depen- : d[epehdeh-^= dependendencies.
.cies.
cies.. '• '•

-•

.
•

- •

35,591,484
.1"828- .
1829- .• ^7;582,082
. 26,804,984
1830;
4'7,956,717
1831.
42,40.6,924
1832
^,085^865
1833 .
52,679,298
1834
65,949,507
1835
. 86,622,915
1836
1837
52;289,55749,651,181
1838

.•

FROM

$3,699,615
120,228,017
$3,942,445
? 19,043,114
.4,857,'9343,86^,366
18,07^2,927
6,O62,01i; .
5,613v249
17,868,102
9,4.47,490
6,538;209
3,186,168 .14,476,929 ,
6,038;626
7,132,627
9,644,323
16,071,918
18,240,314
8,949^473
. 14,606,945

' -

.

•

' • • • ' '

•cies.

~ *

-•

•

.

'•

F r a n c e and
.dependent

' 1790"^'
1791
1792
.
1793
. • .1794
$30,972,215
1795
41,127,345
1796
32,620,643
1797
23,753,241
1798
37,211,919
1799
42,577,590
1800
52,213,522
1801
1802
1803
• 1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
3810
.
1811
1812
-.
1813
1814
-.
18]5
1816
18171818
1819
1820
• 29,277,938
1821
1822 . 39,527,829.
34,072,5781823.
32,732,340
• 1824
42,394,812
1825.
32,212,356
..i826"
33,056,374
' 1827
"

. -.. —. -.
^
—

'-•-

-

•

"^

^

'.'•

1,369,8.69.1,544,9.07;
1,503 ;050
1,101,750
• i,4.l7,.59;8.
i,292,1821,22^042
i;946,783
1,303,959^, '•
i;398,.64().
1,12.0,730
1,150,8.04
^ 1,200;899.:
1,126,541. I,3ifev568
1,299,663
1,468,87S'
''900,790.:

-

•

•r'-''-

•

•

- •

1,999,730
2,535,406
1,324,532
2,110,666
1,539,592.
2,117,164
2,340,171
2,374,0,69
2,086,177
1,671,218
1,652,216
1,182,708
1,166,872
1,684,3.68
1,403,902
1,874,340..
1,266,906
1,644,865

.

1839 ]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

;279

. 1
1

^r-Continued.

• 1

.PROM—^.Continued.

j

•

i
j2-

1
Portugal and .
dependencies."

1790'
17911
17921
17931
17941
17951
1796'
17971
17981799
1800^
1801;
1802"
1803^
1804'
1805'
1806
1807'
1808'
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817 1
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
•1824'
.1825'
1826
1627 .
1828
.1829 .
1830:

•

.

China.

Hanse
Towns.

' -'

_
-'
$1,663,433

.

•

^

"

-

'..

$2,223,777 ^
2,128,326
2,138,305
1,421,346
1,314,984
1,295,736
1,418,434

•

'

*

West Indies,
generally.

Texas.

- .'^
-

•- '

.
-.
- "
1$1,168,715
• 1,382,978
1,418,418
1,067,152
2,274,913
1,524,995
1,672,059

-•
*
.- '
1 ,.
1 ...
1
1
,
-.
..
.
'
•
3,111,951
990,165
1,852,199
-

•

•

•

•

•

-

-

•

•

i

'

.

•

•

•

'

-748,423

.

;

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'

-

.

-

•

• ~

-

--'
.
.
'
I.
-•
.3,727
.

•

_
"
"
-

' -

"
:.-

'

-

^

1
1
1

"

881,290
5,242,5.56 •• 1,578,757
3,307,328 1
1,590
533,635
6,511,425
1,981,026 . 2,258,777
7,123
601,722
.5,618,502
2,527,830
2,209,663
188
733,443:
7.,533,115
:2,739,526
2,067,110
9,579
765,203
7,422,186
2,816,545 '• 2,617,169
120
659,001
•3,617,183
1-638,558 '•2,086,07.7
.
167
433,555
:5,339:,108
2,644,392
.-2,788,362
1,860:
687,869.
4,680,847
2,274,275
.2,218,995
.3,314^
471,643 '
:3.,878,141
1,873,278
1,621,899
•7,386;
397,550'
3,083,205
3,493,301 . 1,608,328
.10,691
:a83i:
;i832.
485,264
5,344;907
. 2,865,096 • .3,251,852 ,
1.2,740"
X833
555,137
7,541,570
2,227,726
2,772,550
1834
699,122
• 7,892,32.7
•3,355,856 • 2,595,840
—
1835:
1,125,713
5,987,187
3,841^943
2,395,245
1836:
672,670 ..
7;,324,816 - .4,994,820
.2,778,554
. 4,4-60:
1837 •- .'
928,291'
.8,965,337
5,642,221
2,816;116 .•• .' •'^:2,183'
1838
725,0.58
• 4,764,356 * ::2,847.,358; . . 1,898,396 V . - - V 2 1 7 . ;




1

-

$85,186
13,050
• 52,898
16,873
101,397
26,937
4,711

'

•

•

•

$1,144,103
2,459,410
.2,176,486
2,319,964
2,755,677
2,309,304 1 3,738,763
3,219,262 1 6,928,511
4,613,463 |. 4,998,975
4,558,356
4,686,757
-

,^
-•
.
-

- '

1

-

Russia.

.

-

' •

'-. ' -J

:.

"
"
."

•

• -

1

;.

•

-

•

'

"

'

•

•

'

; •

'- .
"

'

.

-

•

"

• • -

•

•

'

•'•

•

.

/

' • " ' • '

$163,384
165,718

!

280

[1839.

REPORTS OF THE

STATEMENT G
FROM—Continued.

ci

Mexico.

' Colombia.

•.
1790
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
"
1797
1798
1799
.
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
•
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811 . .
1812
.
1813
1814
.'
1815
1816
1817
•
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
-.
1823
1824
1825
$4,044,647
1826
3,916,198
1827
5,231,867
1828
4,814,258
1829 .. 5,026,761
1830
5,235,241
1831
5,166,745
1832
4,293,594
1833
5,452,818
1834
8,066,068
1835
9,490,446
1836"
5,615,819
1837,
5,654,002
1838 ^
3,500,709 :
•

-




_
.
.
.-.
_
•

-

•

.

-

-

•

_
.
_
.
.
.
.
-

Argentine.
RepubHc.

.
-

_

•

"

•

.
.
- ,
' '-

•

.•
..
.
.
.
.

•

•

-

. $605,126
1,486,567
1,214,810
2,074,119
$1,837,050
$56,789 . 2,156,707
2,079,724
204,270
2,156,678
1,550,248
251,342
2,060,971
1,484,856
204,770
3,097,752
1,255,310
311,931
2,535,467
1,120,095 '
302,883
2,491,460.
1,207,154
198,504
2,375,829
1,439,182
288,316
3,890,845
1,524,622
267,746
5,089,693
1,727,188
-170,968
4,729,969
1,662,764
' 215,450
5,574,466
1,696,650
195,304
7,210,190- ^
1,567,345
163,402
4,991,893
' 1,615,249
155,614
3,191,238

•. .
-

_

•

-

.-

-

. • • • • '

.
• -.-

'

-

-

-

.

•

•

•

-

•

•

•

'

.

•

•

•

' .
..
,

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•

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• -, ;
^
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.-1 '.
-

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-

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- - •.'
' ."

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.
,• -

•

-

•

•

•

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•

•

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-

-

.

.
•/,.
,.
.
. -

«

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.
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..
'

, Chili.

-

,

.
-

•

.

•

^
^

•

• ^ -'
•
'., .
^.
-

.
.
.
-

Brazil.

-;
i

.

.

Central
America.

•

$749,771
522,^769
80,065
. 317,466
912,114
1,431,883
928,103
1,560,171
1,377,117
1,430,118
878,618
1,053,5,03
989,442
1,010,908

,-

•

'

•

$229,509
629,949
184,693
781,863
416,118
• 182,585
413,758
504,623
334,130
787,409
917,095
811,497
1,180,156
942,095;

1839.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

281

—Contmued.
INTO

Maine.

1
>*
1790
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
17961797
. 17981799 ^
1800
1801
18021803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
" 1817
.1818
1819
18201821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
. 1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
. /r.\

'

(a) 1
• .
- ,
'
-

"New
Hampshire.

Vermont.

_

.
'-

Massachu- Rhodelsland. Connecticut.
setts.

•
'

•

$163,500

_

. .
'.
- • .
• .
. - .
.
- •
.
- .
. .
. - -.
.
- •
'- •
• .. • '
_
- •
.
,
- ' -• •
•
.
'. ' ' - •
.- .
- .
; _ •
- - .
-.
.
_
•

-

-

• '

"

-

•

-

•

'

-

i

-

]

^
. -

$980,294
943,775
891,644
768,443
1,169,940
1,245,235
1,333,390
1,246,809
742,781
572,666
941,407
1,123,326
1,380,308
1,060,121
883,389
930,086
801,404
899,142

nPl,« ,rol,,o A ^ „

_

$5,951,500

.

-

.

-

.

• •

•

_

350,021
330,052
371,770
245,513
' 331,244
348,609
302,2111
299,849 1
179,889 i
130,828
146,205
115,171
167,754
118,6951
71,5141
64,3541
^ 81,8341
•
169,985

i.*i/^1nci

•

>-vo.»i.-iv^r«. n r

• $15,987
60,897
62,242
161,854
109,021
228,650
144,078
177,539
. 205,392
140,059
166,206
214,672
523,260
322,806
. 217,853
. 456,846
342,449
• 258,417

•

14,826,732
18,337,320
17,607,160
15,378,758
15,845,141
17,063,482
13,370,564
15,070,444
12,520,744
10,453,544
14,269,056
18,118,900
19,940,911
17,672,129
19,800,373
25,681,462
19,975,667
13,300,925

1 .irn1^«.A.^ . . . r s t n r '^r ; « „ • , , :v, 1 '^7(\^
,

$225,750

_
$160,000

_
.
.
.
«
.
.
.
.
-

•

.
_
>

- .
"
-:
.
•

"
-• •
-. •
" "
*
"
- "
_
,
- '
"

-

•

:

-•
-

1,032,968
312,090
1,884,144
507,094
1,412,953
456,643
1,388,336
581,510
907,906
704,478
1,185,934 1
736,194
1,241,828
630,004
1,128,226 j
485,174
423,811
309,538
488,756
269,583
562,161
405,066
657,969
437,715
1,042,286 1
352,014
427,024
385,720
597,713
439,502
555,199 - 468,163 1
523,610
318,849
656,613
343,331
«w^«.,v^ta/^ i n

ohnnf

i-\tTr\^

thirds of the imports, and consisted of cottons, woollens, linens, silks, hemp, iron, crockeryware, (fcc. The value of the specific jarticles .has been estimated by adding one-third to the
ad valorem. They consisted of spirits, molasses, coffee, sugar, twinej salt, teas, (fcc. The
ad valorem articles imported into each State are taken from actual returns; the others are
apportioned among the States, hy estimatei in a like ratio.




RIEPORTS GF THE

;282

S.TATEMENT -G
. INTo-T^Continued.
NewYork. i

•I'
_
1790'
1791 , $10,739,250:
1792
1793>
'1794.
1795.
1796.
1797• 179817991800.
.
•1801.
1802.
1803.
•1804.
1805'
1806.
18071808 =
1809.
,1810
1811.
1812.
1813
1814
.1815.
1816.
1817
.
1818.
1819_- .
1820
1821 - 23,629,246
1822
35,445,628
1823
29,421,349
1824 •
36,113,723
1825.
49,639,174
1826;
38,115,630
1827
38,719,644
1828:
41,927,792
1829.
34,7.43-,3.07
' 1830- . 35,624,070
1831
57,077,417
1832
53,214,402
1833
55,918,449,
1834
73,188,594
1835
' 88,191,365'
•1836:
118,253,416
1837
79,301,722
1838
68,,453,206

New Jersey.' Pennsylvania.

jDela>\rare.

_

- .<.

- .
.

•

.
-.
- .
- .
,
_ ,.
- .
.

.

-.
- ,
.
•

-

.

.
.
•.
•

..
•

...
. . .
,




.
.
. .
_

.

-

,
.
_

.

.

17,606
103,190
\ 5,933
637,518
. 27,688
48,0;04
338,497
-706,872
"786,247
13,444

'

.^
- .
_
.
_
..'
.
_

•

8,158,922
11,874,170
13,696,770
11,865,531
15,0"4i,797
13,551,779
11,212,935
12,884,.408
10,100,152
8,702^122
12,124,083
. 70,.4.60. . 10,678,358
170 10,451,250
4,4.92 10,479,268.
.18,932 12,389,937
24,263
15,068,233
69,152
11,680,111
1,700 . 9,360,371
'

^

•

.•

,

-

.^64,500

.;$2,500 $11,950,000

_ 1

-Maryland; :District-.of
Columbia.
.. 1
$6,018,500

_
- ..
.
_
.
.
- , ".
...
.
- .
.
. .
.
_
.
- ,
.. ,
. .
- .
. .
^
_ .,

80,997
216,969
. .60,124
12,080 ;
18,,693
10,009
6.,i993
. 15,260
.24,179
26,574
• ; 21,656 .
23,653
9,043.
. 185,943
10,611
107,063
. • 66,841
1,348 /

.
.
'

.

-

.'-: .-.''^

;

-

'

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;

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•

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•

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•

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.
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, _ • "

,

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.

•

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•

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•

• ' • "

.

.

.

-

-

.s

. -

-

4,070,,-842.
4,792;,486
4,946,179
4,551,442
4^751^815
4,928,5.69
4,405,708
5,629,694
4,804,;i3;5
4,523,866
•4,826,577
4,629,363
5,437,057
4,647,483;
5,647,153
7,131,867
7,857^033;
5,701,869

•

'

"

• ;

-

...
$398,984
470,613
275,083
379^958.
277,297
269,630
327,623
181,665
205,921
168,550
193,555
188,047
-150,046
196,254
111,195
111,419
102,225
122,748

:1§39.]

, SECRETARY QF TgE TREASURY.

283

—Continued.
-

. iN.TjOr:TC.ont jniied.

1:
2

Virginia.

-Nprth.Qarolina:. South. Garo. Iina, •
1

>

' S ' '•"'' ,.-...,
'1790" ' " " ' ' '
$355,500!
1791 . $6,461,750
1792
1793
- • ' ".
1794
;
1795;
,
!
1796
1797
"
^
- •
;
1798
;.
1799
1800
•-"
1861
'•
1802
'^
1803
"1804
"-.
1805
* .
1806
'' 1-. • _
• i8d7
.
180'8
•
1809
- \
.
•1
1810
.
1811
'.^
1812
•"• ' . •
1813
".
^
• t.
1814
.'
. r
181^
r'
I8i6
1.
" 1817
-,
181B
18r9
I'1820
;--•
1,0.78,490
1821.
200,673'
• 864U62
1822
258,76i:
68i;810
183,958;
MP3
•
639;787
1824
465,836^
553,562
1B25
;31i;308.
635,438
1826
367,545:
: 431,765
1827276,791:
^ 375,238
1828'
268,615^
395^352
.1829
283,347:
405,739
.1830:
221,992:
488;522
1831:l96,i356;
553,639
1832
215,184:
1833 •
: .690,391
198,758:
18,34.
837,325
222,472
1835;
691,255
241,981
1,106,814
l97,ll6
1837
813,823
: 271,623'
1838577,1.42
. '. 290,405;
.

•

•

'

.

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•

•

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.
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-

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.
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3,007,113: ' . 1,002,684
$3,379,717
2,283,586'3,817,238:
;.989,591.
.670,705
2,419,101.:
4,283,125
2,166,185.: -'• . 551,888"
4,539,769
1,892,297
343,356
4,290,034:
1,534,483
4,167,-521.
330,993
1,434,106
. 312,669
4,531,645.
1,242,'048.308,669
.6,217,881.
1,139,618
6,857,209
380,293
1,054,619'
• 282,346
7,599,683^
399,940. - 9,766,693 •
1,238,163
1,213,725
8,871,653
253,417
1,517,705
318,990 •
9,590,565
1,787,267
: •546,802 • 13,781,809
: 393,049
1,891,805
17,519,814
2,8.61,361- .
.573,222
15,117,649'
•2,510,860' ; • .774,349
•14,020,012
:2,318,791.
776,068 ' 9 , 4 9 6 , 8 0 8

•

r''-

•

_
.
.

•

-

-:

- .
-•
-

•

-.
;.
-

.

- '•
-

•

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/

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.
-

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^

-.Mississippi.

.
_

$858,000

.•

•

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-

!•

-

Louisiana.

$4,516,250

• ; ,

•

.Georgia.

.

-•
- • . .:
-^•.
.;

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.

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$5,650

.*

:ri839..

REPORTS OF THE

284

STATEMENT G .
^ '
02

1790
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
179.8
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
'1834
1835
1836
1837
1838

Alabama.

INTO—Continued.

Ohio.,

Michigan. Tennessee. .Kentucky.

_
.

_
. '
.

• -

•

.

.
.
.
.

.

• .
.

•

_

$36,421
125,770
91,604
113,411
179,554
201,909
171,909
233,720
144,823
224,435
107,787
265,918
395,361
525,955
" 651,618
609,385
524,548

•

.

- _

.

.
.

•

. -.
-

-

.
.
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.. .
.
.
•

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.
.
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._
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.
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
.

.

•

190
161
-

:-

„.

,293
162
617
12,392
8,353
19,767
9,808
10,960
• 17,747
12,895




$2'9,07(5
18,377
2,159
1,886,
5,695
10,628
3,774
3,440
2,957
21,315
27,299
22,648
' 63,876
. 106,202
130,629
^ 502,287
490,784
256,662

•

_

•

" •

/ .
.'--.'.

/

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.

.

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$13,796
36,015
27,401
527

'

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.
.
.
.
.
.
.

•

Flprida.

Missouri.

-

-

-

•

-

•$17,782
8,932

^

.

-

•

.

.

•

-

,

.,
. • .-'
-

$5,881

.-

3,227

-" '

15,921

$13,270
6,877
4,808
' 6,986
. 3,218
16,590
257,994
.168,292
153,642
32,689
115,710
306,845
85,386
135,798
98,173
121,745
305,514
168^690

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

1839.]

28&

H.—:Exports ofi the United States, commencing on the 1st ofi October, 1789,
. and ending on the 30th ofi Septemher, 1838.
VALUE OF EXPORTS F R O M T H E UNITED STATES.

2
Qi

Total.

Domestic.

><

Foreign.

VALUE OF T H E PRINCIPAL ARTICLES".

Cotton.

Tobacco,.

fia)

(&)

$19,666,000
$539,156
$42,285' $4,349,567
1790
$20,205,156
' 18,500,000
512,04119,012,041
52,000
1791
3,481,616
1,753,098
1792
20,753,0981
-19,000,000
51,470
2,109,572
26,109,572 1 • 24,000,000
160,000
1793
26,500,000
6,526,233
500,000
1794
33,026,2331
8,489,472
47,989,472 1
39,500,000
2,250,000
1795
40,764,097
20,300,000
67,064,097
2,200,000
1796
1,250,000.
1797
56,850,206 • 29,850,026 27,000,000
28,527,097
61,527,097
33,000,000
3,500,000
179833,142,522
45,523,000 . 4,100,000
1799 • .78,665,522
39,130,877
5,000,000
• 70,971,780
31,840,903
1800
'.
-.
47,473,204
94,115,925
46,642,721
9,100,000
1801
1
36,708,189
35,774,971
5,250,000
6,220,000
72,483,160
1802
'55,800,033
42,205,9.61. 13,594,072
7,"920,000 - 6;2O9,0OO
1803
41,467,477
36,231,597
7,650,000
6,000,000
77,699,074
1804'
95,566,021 . 42,387,002 : 53,179,019"
9,445,500
6,341,000
1805
41,253,727
6,572,000
60,283,236 . - 8,332,000
101,536,963
1806
108,343,150 ^ 48,699,592 59,643,558
14,232,000
5,476,006
1807
12,997,414
2,221,000
22,430,960
833,090
' 9,433,546
1808
31,405,700
3,774,000
20,797,531
52,203,231
8,815,000
1809
15,108,000
42,366,679 .24,391,295
5,048,000
66,757,974
1810
45,294,041 ^6,022,790
9,652,000
2,150,000
61,316,831
1811
8,495,127
3,080,000 . 1,514,000
30,032,109
• 38,527,236
1812
27j855,997 ' '25,008,152^ •2,847,845
319,000
2,324,000
1813
6,782,272
145,169
,232,000
6,927,441
2,683,000
1814
17,529,000
6,583,350
8,235,000
.52,557,753
45,974,403
1815
12,309,000
.81,920,452
24,106,000
64,781,896
17,138,556
1816
19,358,069
22,628,000
. 9,320,000
87,671,569
68,313,500
• 1817
9,867,429
73,854,437
19,426,696 ; 31,334,258
93,281,133
1818
7,636,970
19,165,683
21,081,679
70,142,521
50,976,838
1819
69,691,669
51,683,640 . 18,008,029 22,308,667
7,968,600
1820
20,157,484
5,648,962
21,302,488
64,974,382
43,671,894
1821
'22,286,202 24,035,058
6,222,838
72,160,387
49,874,185
1822
20,445,.520
6,282,672
47,155,408 27,543,622
74,699,030 '
1823
25,337,157 ' 21,947,401
75,986,657
50,649,500
4,855,566
1824 .
66,944,745
99,535,388
32,590,643
36,846,649
6,115,623
1825 '
24,539,612 ' 25,025,214
5,347,208
53,055,710
77,595,322
1826
29,359,545
58,921,691
23,403,136
6,816,146
• 1827 • 82,324,827
50,669,669 ' 21,595,017 ' 22,487,229
5,480,707 '
72,264,686
1828
16,658,478
5,185,370
'55,700,193
26,575,311
72,.358,671
1829
5,833,112
29,674,883
73,849,5.08 . 59,462,029 14,387,479
1830
25,289,492
61,277,057
4,892,388
20,033,526
81,310,583
1831
31,724,682
5,999,769
63,137,470
24,039,473
87,176,943
1832
36,191,105
5,755,968
- 70,317,698 19,822,735
^
90,140,433^
1833
49,448,402
6,595,305
81,034,162
23,312,811
104,336,973
1834
8,250,577
26,504,495 i 64,661,302
101,189,082
121,693,577
1835
10,058,640
128,663,040
106,916,680
21,746,360 i 71,284,925
1836
5,795,647
63,240,102
95,564,414 •21,854,962
1837 1 117,419,376 i
7,392,029
12,452,795
61,556,811
96,033,821
108,486,616
.1838
'•

-

•

Manufactures.

_
-

- •

•

-

.
-

[

$1,355,000
2,100,000
2,445,000
2,963,000
2,309,000
.411,000
1,711,000
2,174,000
2,818,000
1,655,000
435,000
274.600
2,051,0001
2,331,000 1
2,.551,O0O
2,777,000 1
2,245,000
• 2,443,000
2,752,631;
3,121,0.30
3,139,598
4,841,383
.5,729,797
5,495,130
5,536,651
5,548,354
5,412,320
5,320,980
5,086,890
5,050,633
6,557,080
' 6,247,893
- 7,694,073
6,107,5287,136,997
8,397,078

(a) Not till 1803 were exports regularly distinguished in the returns as to the quantity and value of the different articles. ^ '
.
'
(6) Tobacco exports, before the Revolution, reached nearly 100,000,000 pounds, and the average since is about
the same. The hogshead has increased in weight from 500 pounds to 1,000 and 1,200 pounds. The price per
pound has averaged from 5 to 7 cents, though sometimes as high as 15 cents. About one-fourth of exports to
Holland, one-fifth to England, one-sixth to Hanse Towns. More tobacco has since been grown elsewhere, and
especially in Europe, when supplies from here were interrupted by tlie Revolution, and cotton here took extra
labor and capital.




[183§;

REPORTSOF THE

286

STATEMENT JEl
'
t

, VAtlJE; OF'THE PRINcipALART^
•

• Specieand'
Bullion.

F^l'our." ,

> • .. •

..••.11
Pork, HbgsJ • :Fishl
•
^ c . •

• 'Rice".'

Lumber'i

•

1790
•-:• \$4,5'91,293' $1,263,534 . $1,753,796= . ;$242;3b8;;$94iy69)s
1791
. . . , ; 3,408,245. .. . .9.66,066 . 1,136,599;- • 38ij9l6^ : ; i , W , 3 6 4
1792
4,163,543
1793
6,8^5,164
y •.•.,..•-.-.'
1794
. 5,845,929
V ''.
'''^''.
\'-..-' •• ";"•.:-';'
1795:
, 7,746,974: .-' ,'
1796
. :9ai5,689 ; •." ' ' - v ' ^ " '
•' :>;• .
1797'
•4,800,543
1798
4,614,247
'
•.;.
' '; • -•',•.'
'
1799
4,997,926
1800
6,517,459
'. ' - , .-' •
"
• • • . : ^ - " V - -•'•
1801
. 11,300,0.51 '
.1802
. 8,012,799
. : ^-'
..."
1803
9,310,000
2,866,0fe6- . .2,4^5,066: ' ; i;896;o66; ••' 2,12d,066:^
• 1804.^
i'
. 7,100,000
=2,540,666. ." 2,35.0;060 - • 1,'990.;OOO- . -3,040,060
1805
, 8,325,000. . : 2,607,006
1,-705,000' •'.•i;i9a,6o6 .2,406,000
.
1806
, 6,867,000 . 2;495,066' •• .2,617,066 :;:.lj096,'O602,516,000
[ " . . • '
1807
^ 10,753,000. .2,"637,0O6 : ^ 2,307,000 • .1/157^000- ; • .2,198,060':
. 1808
1,936,000^ ;. .7.23,000 • 221,000.^
398,600' •. •.721,000:
1809
_ -•' . . ' 5,944,000 ; 1,843,000 : 2,104,000 . i,o6i,o;oo ,l,4Q5j00O
1810
6,846,000
2,537,000- . '2,626,000. . •. .•907,000"
1,917,060
1811
1.4,662,000
3,195,066
2,387,000 . .1,002,000. . 1,405,006
T
.
1812
• 13,687,060
.1,'638,O0O . 1,544^006
•• 604,X)6O: ^' 738,^0'661813
' 13,591,000 . : 636,006 " • 3^021,000 :' , 457,000 . • -291,060.
- 1814 •
1;734,O0O. . ' ;258,O0O . ..236,600: -.^ 176,00b - • 178,060'
:
1815
. 6,901,912 • •. 1,835,000^ '; 2.3785;0OO
. •498,600;
702,6OO;
1816
7,290ii530
..4,004,060 • .3j555,000 • • . 719,006: M,i56,O06
1817
17,751,376
3,196,000 :.-2,"3'78,880- ' 537,000 • • M,328,066:
-••
1818
11,576,976: • 2,598,600
3,262,697 ' . 75"4-,006.: 1,398,000 •
1819
. 6,005,280
2,466,600 ^2,142,644 •; 1,069,000^ . 1,461,006
1820
. .5,296,664
3,203,000. ; 1,714,923' •1,179,666.
1,502,000
- ...
1821 • $10,478,059
4,298,043
; 1,512,808 • 1,494,367 ; 1,354,116
973,591
1822 • 10,810,180
5,103,280
1,307,670.
1,563,482-; .. 1,357,899.;
915,838
1823
6,372,987
4,962,373 . 1,335,660
1,820,985
1,291,322": :,i,0O4,8OO;
1824
7,014,522
5^759,176
1,734,586 • .•1,882;'982^ •: i,:489;05l; . 1,136,704
1825
• 8,797,655 • . 4,212,127
1,717,571
1,925,245
..1,832,6.79 • 1,078,773.
1826
4,663,795 . 4,121,466
2,011,694
i:i9J 7,445
•1,892,429.
.-924,9^2;
1827
.8,O14,880
. 4,434,881 . 1,697,170 • 2,343,908
•
1V555,698 • / : / 987,447'
1828.
8,2-43,476"
4,283,669 • 1,821,906;
2,626 j696'
1,495,830. . 1,666,663
1829 .
4,924,020
5,000,023- . 1,680;403^ ' 2,514,370
.1,493,629
.•968,068.
1830
. •2,178,773
6,132,129
1,836,014
1,986,824 • 1,315,2145 • •756:,677
1831
9,014,931
10,461,728 • lj964,195"
2,616,267 .1,501,644'
- 929',83'4
1832
5,656,340
4,974,121 • "2,096,767
2,152,361
•
i,mi96: :.-1^056,721 •
1833
' . 2,611,701
5,642,602
2,569,493 •: 2;774;418
2,151,558
996,296
1834
2,076,758'
• 4',560,379
2,435;3i4
2,122,292
.•1,796;001,
' 863,674^
1835
6,477,775
4^394,777
3,323,057
2^210,3.31 .1,776,732
. 1,008,534'
1836
4,324,336
3,572,599 ; •2;8.60,69l
2,548,756 . 1,383^344:
'967,890
1837
5,976,249
2,987,269
.3,155,992 '2,309,279 , :i,299,796' . . 7.69;;840
1838
3,513,565
3,603,299
3,116,196
1,721,819 Vl,312,346 ;
819>003'
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1839.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

287

-^Continued.
VALUE OP PRINCIPAL A R T I C t E S ^ ^ C o n .

09
Qi

Beef, Cattle, Butter and
&c.
Cheese.

EXPORTED FROM

Skins and
Furs.

Massachusetts

NewHanip- 1 Vermont.
shire.,.

Mainei

./ '

W ,:

1790 $400,233 ; . $57,417 ' $93,524 ' '
L791
492,105^ 1 100,148 h i , 2 8 5
$142,859 •
.$2,519 651
,1792 ^:
181,413
2;888 104l
• • - * . 198,204
v'
1793
3,755 347
;•.•».;•
• '*
*
1794 •'
/ <; 153,860
5,292 441
s.
; ' . -. 1 • 7,117,907
:
" »o
1795
• . 229;,427^ : .
V- , .-••.
1796
378,161
9,949,345
:•
1797
.275,840
\-. 7,502,047,
:..
:. • .*
1798
3617453
j 8,639 252
"
•
1799
361^789 :• ^$20,486 11,421 591
. -'/ hr ' : • -'• : • .
1800
431-,836
. • 57,041 11,326 876
1801
555,055
• 57,267 • -14,870 556
... 1802
565,394. \- •: 31,479 . 13,492,632
1803 . 1,145,0.60 - 585,000 : : 500,000 '
• • 494-,620
117,450 8,768,566'
1804 1,520,000 1 . 490,000
956,000
• 716,091
191,725 1 16,894,378 i
1805 .1,545,000
415,000
967,000
: 608,408 .'169,402 .19,435,657
1806 • 1,360,000 :. 481,000
•
841,000
795,263 : 193,775 21,199,243
*
*
1807 1,108,000
.490,000 1: ; 852,000 \
680,022 1 204,285 20,112,125
''
1808
265,000
.196,006 • 161,000 \:
- 125,059
'108,7'72 5,128,322
1809
425,000
264,000
332,000 • • -~
'286^,505
175,782 12,142,293
1810
747,000
318,000^ : 177,060
'. 234,650
432,631 |a3,O13,048
1811 , 1,195,000
395,000
314,000
571,104
. - " . 368,863 1 138,647 11,235,465
1812
524,000^ . 329,00.0 : 123,000 r - *'
203,401
6,583,338
1813
539,060 . 9 5 , 0 0 0
58,000
29,996
. 1,807,923
1814
241;0O0'
.59,000:
22,000
'37,387
1,133,799
3815
407,000 - 242,000 • 409,000
: .109,782.
161,002
5,280,083
"
1816
.738,000
223,000 - 553,000 • , • 140,293
892,594 10,136,439
1817
845,000
-213,000 :
688,000 |;
: 197,424
913,201 11,927,997
1818
648,000 • 195,000
.
808,000:
> 130,648
240,069 11,998,156
1819
598,000 -. 297,000 .. .481,060 ; ' 157,919
585,596 11,399,913
1820
858,000 - : 302,000 ,575,000 ' $1,108,031
. 240,800
395,869 • 11,008,922
1821
698,323
190,287
766,205
l,O-40,848 . 260,765
263,330 .12,484,691
1822
844,53.4 .: 221,041
501,302 1,036,642
199,699
257,694 12,598,525
1823
739,461
192,778 • 672,917
895,501
.237,705
236,140 13,683,239
1824
,707,299 . 204,205
661,455 .. 900,195
185,383
208,258 10,434,328
1825
.930,465 • ,247,787 •.'5241692
1,031,127 • 198,680
396,166 11,432,987
1826
733,430
207,765 - =582,473 1,052,575 • 167,075
884,202 10,098,862
1827
772,636 •:' 184,049
441,690 > 1,070,134 ^ 177,398 1,259,441 10,424,383
1828
719,961176,354
626,235
1,019,517
124,433
239,610
9,025,785
1829
674,955
176,205 . , 526,567
737,832 ' . 105,740
•808,079. 8,254,937
1830
'717,683
142,370 .. 641,760
'670,522
96,184
658,256
7,213,194
1831
829,982 ; 264,796 • • 750,938
'
805,573
111,222
925,127
7,733,763
1832
^ 774,087-. 290,820
691,909
981,443
115,582
349,820 11,993,768
1833
'958,076
258,452 •: 841,933 1,019,831
155,258
•377,399
9,683,122
1834
755 219 1 190,099
797,844
834,l67-- . 86,870
334,372 10,148,820
1835
638,761 • 164,809 1 759,953 1,059,367
81,681
328,151 10,043,790
1836
699,166.1
114,033
653,662
850,986
15,520 « . 188,165 10,384,346
1837 \ 585,146 1
96,176 . 651,908
955,952
34,641
138,693
9,728,190
1838 . 528,231 ' 1 4 8 , 1 9 1
636,945 ' 935,532
" 74,670
132,650
9,104,862 1
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(a) The largest exports from most of the Northern States formerly consisted of foreign goods,
lumber, fish, &c. The exports from each State for each year, from 1790 to 1810, distinguishing
those of for.eign origin, may be seen in Statementl, Commerce and Navigation, page 926-928.




REPORTS OF THE

288

[1839;
STATEMENT H

EXPORTED FROM--Continued.

2

1790
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1«38

Rhodelsl- Connecticut N e w Y o r k . N"i&\v Jersey. Pennsylvan
and.
Ilia.

...

Delaware.

Maryland.

$470,131
#710,353 . $2,505,465 . $26,988 $3,436,093
$119,879 $2,239,691
'698,109
879,753. 2,535,790
133,972
23,406., 3,820,662
2,623,808
, 616,432
770,255
2,932,370
: 93,559 3,665,056
. 54,179 6,958,836
954,599
812,765
5,442,183
207,985
5;686,191
58,154 -6,643,092
1,222,917
819,465 10,304,581.
158,041
5,811,380
130,814 11,518,260
1,589,872
1,452,793 12,208,027
201,142 ..>9;201,315
59,22'7 17,513,866
975,530
814,506 13,308,064
98,929 9,811,799
18,161 11,446,291 .
. 947,827
763,128 14,300,892
61,877
8,915,463 / 183,727 12,746,190
1,143,818 18,719,527
~ 1,055,273
297,065 16,299,609
9,722 12,431,967
1,322,945
418,695 12,264,331
1,114,743 14,045,079
2,289 11,949,679
1,832,773
1,446,216 19,851,136
662,042 12,767,530
' 25,406 17,438,193
2,433,363
1,606,809 13,792,276
12,677,475
440,504
• 26,227
7,914,225
1,248,571 •10,818,387
1,275,596
7,525,710
428,153 ' 5,078,062
21,311
1,735,671
1,516,110 16,081,281 ' 24,829 11,030,157
' 697,396 9,151,939
2,572,049
1;443,727 23,482,943
358,383 10,859,480
20,743 13,762,252
2,091,835 • 1,715,828 21,762,845
500,106 14,580,905:
33,867 17,574,702
1,657,564
1,624,727 26,357,963
41,186 16,864,744 ' 229,275 14,298,984
242,034
413,691
5,606,058
108,735
20,799
4,013,330
2,721,106
1,284,532
666,513 .12,581,562
9,049,241
138,036
319,175
6,627,326
1,331,578
768,643 17,242,3.30
120,342
6,489,018
430,267. 10,993,398
1,571,424
1,032,.354 12,266,215
1,871
88,632
9,560,117
6,833,987
755,137
720,805
8,961,922 •
-5,973,750 • 29,744 5,885,979
4,186
236,802
' 974,3.03 8,185^494
3,787,865
3,577,117 - 133,432
10,260
472,434
1,043,136
209,670
14,914 . 248,434
- .
561,183
383,135 10,675,373
105,102
5,036,601
: 5,279
.
4,593;919
612,794
593,806 19,690,031" . . 9,746 /7,196,246
56,217
7,338,767
950,467
604,139 18,-707,433
8,735,592, • • 44,854 8.933,930
5,849
1,027,291
577,564 17,872,261
8,759,402
25,957
31,525
7,570,734
1,281,434
438,534 13,587,378
1,474
6,293,788
29,828
5,92^6,216
i;072,762
421,931 13,163,244
5,743,549
20,531
: 89,493 6,609,364
• 996,828
376,187 13,162,917
33,711 . 7,391,767
.85,445
3,850,,394
• 485,.312 17,100,482
862,363
, 168,592 4,536,796
. 83,551 9,047,802
933,114 • 482,061 19,038,990
9,617,192
26,064
53,837
5,030,228
872,899
575,852 22,897,134 ; • 28,989
• 18,964 • 4,863,233
9,364,893
678,467
689,270 35,259,261
3i;656
4,501,304
47,213 11,269,981
781,540
.708,893 21,947,791
8,331,722
35,195
37,965
4,010,748,
804,187
590,275 23,834,137
25,627
7,575,833 '• . - 9,406
4,516,406
521,545 22,777,649
722,126
• 1,892 6,051,480
' 29,395 .4,334,422
390,381
457,970 20,119,011
8,022
4,089,935
7,195
4,804,465
278,950.
389,511 19,697,983
,. 8,324
4,291,793
52,258
3,791,482
367,465
482,883 25,535,144
• 11,430 5,513,713
34,514 .4,308,647
430,466 26,000,945
534,459
61,794
3,516,066
16,242
4,499,918
. 485,481'
.
427,603 25,395,117' . 32,753 4,078,951
45,911
4,062,467
422,416 25,512,014
501,626•
8,13l - 3,989,746
. -51,945 4,168,245
519,270 •30,345,264 • . 74,041 3r739,275
296,003
88,826
3,925,234
228,420
438,199 '28,920,438
62,809
3,971,555
74,981
3,675,475
532,590 27,,338,419 ' 44,217 3,841,599
• 488,258-40,333 s 3,789,917
- 291,257
543,610 23,008,471 '
28,010: 3,477,151
• . 36,844 4,524,575




SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

1839.]

289

-^Continued.
EXPORTED FROM—Continued.
District of
Columbia.

Virginia.

North
Carolina.

South
Carolina."

Georgia.

Ohio.

Kentucky.

.
_
.
_
_
.
1790
$491,250
$3,130,865 • $524,^548 $2,693,2681791
-~
1792
3,552,825
527,900 : 2,428,250
459,106
1793
2,987,098
'365,414 3,191,867
520,955
1794
3,321,636
321,587 ' 3,867,908
263,832
1795
3,490,041
492,161 5,998,492
695,986
1796
5,268,665
671,487 7,620,049
950,158
-:
1797
4,908,713
540,901 , 6,505,118
644,307
- .,
1798 '
6,113,451
537,810 6,994,179 •" 961,848
- • '
1799
6,292,986
485,291 8,729,015 1,396,759. .
L
1800
4,430,689
769,799 10,663,510 •2,174,268
1801 • $894,467 5,655,574
874,884 14,304,045 1,755,939
1802
774,063 3,978,363
659,390 10,639,365' 1,854,951
$626,673
- '
1803 • 1,444,994 6,100,708
952,614 7,811,108 '2,370,875
1804 1,452,198 5,790,001
928,687 7,451,616 2,077,572
- •
1805 1,320,215 5,606,620
779,903 9,066,625 2,394,846 1806 1,246,146 5,055,396
789,605 9,743,782
82,764
$62,318
1807 •1,446,378 4,761,234
745,162 10,912,564 •3,744,845
28,889
1808 • 285,317
,526,573 ' 117,129 •1,664,445
24,626
13,115
1809
703,415 2,894,125
322,994 3,247,341 • 1,082,108
3,850 1810 1,038,103 4,822,611 . 403,949* ,5,290,614 . 2,238,686
10,583
.. 1811 2,063,251 4,822,307
797,976 4,861,279
2,568,866
1812 •1,606,409 •3,001,112
489,219 •2,036,195 -1,066,703
1813 1,387,493 1,819,722
797,358 2,968,484 1,094,595
1814 . 2,500
17,581 ' . 362,446
737,899 •2,183,121
1815 •1,965,626 6,676,976 1,013,942 6,675,129 4,172,319
1816 • 1,680,811 8,212,860 1,328,735 10,849,409
7,511,929
1,305
1817 • 1,768,658 5,621,422
956,580 10,372,613 -8,790,714
' 7,749
1818 1,403,451 7,016,246
948,253 11,440,962 11,132,096
1819 ' 991,351 4,392,391
647,736 .8,250,790
6,310,434
410
1820 •1,204,915 4,557,957 . 808,'319 .8,882,940 6,594,623
2,218 -' .
1821 • 898,103 3,079,209
400,944 7,200,511 .•6,014,310
1822 1,043,430 3,217,389
585,951 7,260,320 5,484,870'
105
1823
801,295 4,006,788
482,417 . 6,898,814 -4,293,666
1824
722,405 . 3,277,564
588,733 8,034,082 4,623,982
' »/
1825
758,367 4,129,520 • 553,390 11,056,742 -4,222,833
.
1826
624,231 4,596,732 '" 581,740 7,554,036- 4,,368,504'
1827 1,182,142 4,657,938
449,237 8,322,561 4,261,555
^-'
1828
707,443 3,340,185 - 523,747 • 6;550,712 3,104,425
1829
928,097 3,787,431
564,506 ,8,175,586 4,981,376
2,004 /
1830 . 753,973 4,791,644
399,333 7,627,031 5,336,626
•- .
-:•
1831 1,220,975 4,150,475 - 341,140 6,575,201 3,959,813 '' 14,728. 1832 1,154,474 4,510,650
342,041 7,752,731 5,515,883
58,394
1833 1,002,816 4,467,587
433,035 8,434,325 6,270,040
225,544
1834 • 820,394 5,483,098
'471,406 11,207,778 7,567,327
241,451
1835
517,639 6,064,063 : 319,327 11,338,016 '8,'890,674
97,201
.1836
326,874 6,192,040
429,851 13,684,376 •10,722,200
3,718 -' • 1837
469,209 3,702,714
551,795 11,220,161 8,935,041 . s 132,844
1838
373,113 3,986,228
545,223 11,042,070 -8,803,839
139,827
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[1839.

REPORTS OF THE

290

STATEMENT H

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EXPORTED FROM—Continued.
Tennessee. Alabama.
179^
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1-898
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812'
1813
1814|
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838

Indiana.

[

Michigan. Mississippi. Louisiaiia

-'•
-

_, _
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•

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.
-.'-"

•

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,

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' - ^ $1,095,412 '
'

$29,430

$443,955

-

•

,

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•

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•

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-

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526,016
*
. ";
"
33,214
$^10,392 1,099,702
"
17,320
276,964'
64,777 $1,600,362
1
313,223
3,371,545
.7
- I
221,260
3,887,323
' *..
311,947
701 4,320,555
50,848
1,261,101
"
136,114
305
541,924
3,615
. 2,958 • 1,890,592
j
21,629
1,441 2,650,050 - • '1
7,111
3,107
i;06O,47l
- .: - - . ^
1
1,045,153
-'
. 76,929
387,191
-,
37,119
2,573 5il02,610
. "
57,290
8,232 5,602,948
,.108,115
9,024,812
$96,857
85,352
12,924,309
. "'
. 50,906
27,745
9,768,753 1 ' -.
96,636
73,4087,596,157 r ' • " • I
-,
108,960
" - V
• 53,290 '
7,272,172
209,748
694
7,978,645
- $1,777200,387
1,010
7,779,072
1,510
^460,727
7,928,826
216
^.- •
• 692,635
2,865
* , '
- ' ' 12,582,924
1,527,112 1 '
i 10,284,380
•
209
|:
'"
1,376,364
1,320
- ' 11,728,997 1 .57,486
1,182,559
11,947,400
60,321
- '
1,693,958
12,386,060.
56,086
, .^! 2,294,594
1,588
15,488,692
. 7,570
2,413,89,4
.12,392
16,761,989
30,495
2,736,387 I
9,234
16,530,930
65,716
.i 4,527,961
9,054
18,941,373
- 64,805
5,670,797 '
36,021
26,557,524 ^ 228,825
7,574,692
61,710
,- • • 64,830
"' •' 1 36,270,823
11,184,166
61,231
37,179,828
71,662
9,671,401
304,831 35,338^697
•' 90,084
. '. ' r '69,790
9,688,244
125,660
31,502,248:
122,532 1
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Florida.




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1839.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

291

.^^Continued.
EXPORTED TO

France and .
depehdehcies. * •

Spain and Netherlands, Sweden and Denmark and
dependen- and depen- dependendependencies.
dencies.
. cies.
^cies.

$9,246,562
1790
$4,668,902
1791
7,953,418
• 4;298,762
1792
8,192,328 ;.
5,674,630
. 1793
.8;431,239
7,050,498
1794
8,175,211
5,353,681
1795
• 9,^18,540
12,653,635
1796
23,164,545
11,623,314
1797
9,212,335
: 12,449,076
1798
17-i086J89 ;
6,941,486
1799
26,546,987 ,. '2,780,564
1800
.27,310,289 ,
5,163,833
•1801
.42,132,032
11,261,751
1802*
23,925,091 . 14,475,537
1803'
25,369,073
8,-245,013
1804
21,829,802
12,776,111
1805
23,047,386
21,072,747
. 1806
23,229,936
18,575,812
• 1807
31,015,623,
19,196,589
1808
5,183,297
4,541,435
1809
. . 8,105,839
. : 15,043
1810
16,555,488
.137,630
.1811
21,881,555
2,317,876
1812
10,270,969
' 3,158;884
1813
. 2,422
4,277,650
18U
10,710
• 494,626
1815
21,589,868
8,727,637
1816
39,184,558.
12,138,135
1817
43,468,242
.12,434,818
1818
46,717,832, . • 14,490,589
1819
29,741,739
11,042,201
1820
28,893,9li5
9ail,215
i82l'i
26,522,572
6,474,718
1822
30,041,337 <
7,075,332
182^^
27,571,060
. 9,568,924
182-4
28,027,845 .,.10,552,304
1825
44,217,525 . . 11,891,326
.1826
28,980,020
12,106,429
1827
32,870,465
13,565,356
1828
27,020,209
•12,098,341
1829
28,071,084
12,832,304
1830
31,647,881 \ 11,806,238
1831
39,901,379
^^^9,882,679
1832
37,268,556 > - 13,244,698
, 1833
39,782,240 . 14,424,533
1834
.50,797,650
16,111,442
1835
60,167,699
20,335,066
1836
64,487,550
21,441,200
1837 , 61,217,485:
20,255,346
1738
58,843,392
16,252,413

$1,989,421 $1,925,981
$47,240 ^ $224,415
1,301,286
1,634,825
•'21,866
.277,273
1,769,618
2,402-,180
166,146
573,890
2,237,950
3,169,536
310,427
870,508'
• 4,055,705
•5,898;515
381,784
1,298,839. 4,714,864 12,884,817.
894,852
1,962,261
3,650,678
7,875,364. '1,096,407
2,675,589'
6,632,352
9,384^896
. 898,315 . 2,637,309
8,740:,553.
7,420,650
733,462
2,901,511
17,421,402
•5,851,503
733,597
4,348,839
15,660,606
5,669,016
562,685.
2,114,442
13,610,816
6,922,372
, 232,208
1,581,186
11,227,859
5,966,858
275,256
1,721,4854,533,539,
5,523,423
265,470"
1,892,895
6,728,125 • • 16,447,417
691,975
3,346,623
i2;672,768 17,835,216
406,043
4,037,454
' 14,809,072 26,499,519
357,030
4,250,855
18,224,720 17^590,043*
1,422,388'
4,529,317
5,949,903
•2,758,587
234,455
415,586
10,318,034
1,313,270
9,085,517 \ 4,317,394
14,941,942 •
174,078 '- 7,902,001 10,546,535
•. 12,572,888
V ' '
1,6;64,,178
• 444,898
.2,136,995
9,287,850
30,747
137,250
10,113,436
29,160 ^2,:608,322 ^
' . -'
• 4,374,572
. 27,581
1,357,139' : \
. '
6,230,960 : ., 4,580,858
1,021,695'
682,742
. '8,589,718
5,609,524
• 760,352
1,340,652
18,423,936 ' 5,785,318
•542,723
2,090,224
'7,556,913
7,215,477
465,316
1,729,348
8,108,259 • 4,830,114
:554,135
2,040,732
., 6,840,024
7,688,336
646,866 ' 2,469,638
7,218,265
6,092,061
;777i4072,327,882
.8,438,212 '5,801,839
92lj434
2,434,046
10,963,398
7,767,075
• 558,291; 1,955,071
15,367,278
3,617,389.
569',428
2,183,252
.5,840,720
'5,895,499
569,550 • 2,701,088
6,687,351
4,79.4,070. • 358,380
2,412,875
7.,321,991
3,826,674
850,877- .2,404,822
7,204;627
3,083,359
1,106,954
3,348,167'
• 6,888,094 . 4,622,120 •. .957,948
2,311,174
6,049,051
4,562,437
961,729.
2,014,085
5,661,420 . 3,096.669.
540,078
2,000,793
6,399,193'
6,035,466
515,140
2,007,551
6,506,041
3;566,361
• 420,069
1,839,834
6,296,'556;
4,'578;,739
. 494,741
1-857,114
." 7,069,279;
4,411,053
602,593 , 1,780,496
8,081,668
•4,799; 157.
.760,3862,122,469
, 7,604,002 • 4,285,767
507,523
1,640,173
• 7,684,006
3,772,206
355,852
1,299;927

'

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2

•^

Great Britain
ahd depen-^
den cies.-




REPORTS OF THE

292

[IS39.
STATEMENT H

t
EXPORTED TO--Continued.

2
>;

'Portugal and
dependencies.

China
(a:).

Hanse •
Towns.;

West Indies . Texas. •
generally./

Russia.

$1,283 462
1790
• $478,050:
' 1791
. 1,039 696
426,269:
$3,570
$59,434
1792
1,018,643
116,071
4,669
'229,496
.- :
- \
1793
• 997,590 . - . , 1 ^
'1,805,884
399,559 :\ • • - :
1794
1,024,241
994,118
... - " ".> ' 3,992,982
- '
..1795 . . 764,285
$1,023,242 • 9,655,524
-.66,221 ^ 1,543,348
.-. '
1796
559,448
1,352,860
9,50.7,447
47,381
3,367,942
".
1797
474,014
387,310 • 9,589,858 ; ' ' 3,450 •1,508,044:
1798.
729 089
261,795 14,563,343
- .60,732;
248,121
1799
857,751
595,249 17,144,400
46,030.
'92,020: :' - —
1800,
1,265,844
1,0.47,385
8,012,846
• r 115,631
1801
1,718,759
l',-374,506 10,516,197. .
9,136
372,932 •'
'
- 1802
2,160,701
877,267
6,229,492
73,721
1,261,122
*
1803
2,305,548
172,495
3,279,732
1,704,404 ' "'
1804
2,496,858
198,601
4,475,007,
3,224,294
1805.
2,105,409
. 322,075
3,232,508
^ 71,372
3,496,947
1806
2,521,995
387,116 • 6,424,224 .
12,407 . 1,754,952
" 'l
1807
1,687,516
197,280
3,160,282
445,217.
1,566,501
• .-.1808
539,647
" .229,815
'
469,005
1809 .'
8,312,897- , ;'
918,022
2,392,643
. 842,261
. 124,450 . - '
1810 |.
7,679,210
319,479
1,126,382
3,975,698
360,931
*
1811 [
11,466,150 1 ^ '631,060 ^ -' ' ..-,- " ; '6,137,657
1,289,274
•
1812
• 9,399,520
• 184,527
". 1,745,597 . 1,042,565
1813
10,687,928
13,086 ;. 51,150
45,259
, 61,228
1814
591,669
460
.9,456
« '
"1
1815
2,281,101 1
488,695
2,236,673
574,549
1,933,465, 1 ' '
1816
. 2,270,389
1,034,764
3,534,500
' 706,844
2,291,097
1817
1,834,823 1
548,660
3,345,631
640,393
3,513,766
-' .
1818
2,898,177: 1
1,758,698'
3,333,518
• 441,019
2,587,018
-.' ':
-.• 1
1819 1
2,263,580
1,586,972
3,529,172
• 629,621 . 2,308,709
.-•• ' ' J
1820
1,325,751 I
1,479,701
2,591,275.
1,382,321
2,508,956
1821
. 435,700
. 4,290,560
2,132,544 . 628,894:
560,513
• • • 1
1822
427,49r
5,935,368 ; 2,505,015
529,081
540,060
«
»
- 1823
' 246,648
4,636,061
3,169,439 fi
648,734
613,690
*
1824 '
518,836
5,301,171 , 1,863,273
231,981
599,884
-1
1825 i- '
408,160- . • 5,570,515
3,121,033
287,401 669,66.8
. - ..
1826
313,553
2,566,644 ' 2,116,697
.174,648
617,869 : '
" \
1827
357,370.
3,864;405
3,013,185
382,244
466,860.
1828
291,614
1,482,802
2,995i251
450,495 ^
460;197
1829
322,911
1,354,862. • 3,277,160
386,226
369,619
1830 ' ^279,799
742,193
2,274,880.
' 416,575 jo 247,121
'
294,383
1,290,835
2,592,172
462,766
635,627
1831
1832
. 296,218,
1,260,522
4,088,212
582,682
562,954 " '^ • ' r '• 1
1833 •
442,561
1,433,759 ' 2,903,296 . . 703,805.
367,773
1834
: 322 496
1,010,483 • 4,659,674
330,694
408,643
-1835
.521,413
1,868,580 ' 3,528,276
585,447. • 450,516
- 1
1836
191,007
1,194,264 . 4,363,882
911,013
513,996
1837
423,705 1
630,591 ^ 3,754,949.
1,306,732.
. 467,557^ $1,007,928
1838
232,131
1,516,602
3,291,645
1,048,289
339,052 ; 1,247,880
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(a) "^Before the Reyolutibn we'had no trade with China; but it.gradually became important,
ana, in 1821 and 1822, had s-ivelled in exports to Canton to five millions of dollars. According
to a report of the British Parliament, made in 1833, (and some American captains were examined as to the facts,) it Was ascertained that our trade was equal to three-fourths of that of the
East India Company; fi ' . • . , .




1839.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

298

—Continued.
EXPORTED T O - ^ Continued.

i

Mexico.

.' Central ,
America.

Colombia.

.Argentine
Republic.

Brazil.

'

Chili.

Qi

1790
1791
• -•
' . '• 1
1792
. -'
.
•1
- 1793
- ' >.
•• 1
1794
,• '1795
• .'''
•1
1796
.'
1
1797 1 - "
«. ,.,--.. ^
''.
1798
•
- '.
.
"
1799
• • •' .- . .
1800' ' , 1-1: . ' .' • r
.-',
1801.
'• 1802
' .
'
-1803
_' . •
1804
•. 1805
,- ,
.
• .1806
-.
' . -^
•
1807' ,. -.
'
•1808
, - .'
-, - '
-.
1809
"- , _
1810
' ,.._. . .. ; .. - '' * '
1811
1 1
- ' ;
-.
. 1812
.
'1813
i
-.• ^ .- ' .'
. 1814:
..
.
1815
-_'
- . ;
' - .
1816
- •
\ -_
,
• / , ' . . . ] •
1817
'^ '
—
, - ..
1818
.
.'".'.
"
- ,.
1819
..
•1820
' . -.
:. -,
'
1821
$1,381,760
.- ''
1822
' 1,463,929
'-' '. "••.•-.
, '
1823
1,341,390
, -. •
1824
^ 2,301,904
, -.
-.. ' -'
1825 j
$99,522
$6,470,144
$2,239,255
2,393,754
$573,520 '.$921,438
• 1826
119,774 '2,200,349
6,281,050
1,952,662
379,340
1,447,498
.1827
.224,772
1,863,806 ; 151,204
4,173,257 ' :. 944,534
1,702,601
1828
159,272
1,988,705
2,886,484:
. 884,524
154,228
2,629,402
1829
239,854 > 1,929,927
2,331,151
. 767,348
626,052
1,421,134
1830
-250,118.
1,843,238
4,837,458
496,990
629,887 / 1,536,114
. 1831 . 6,178,218
306,497 . 2,076,095.
658,149
659;779
1,368,155
1832
335,307 : 2,054,794
3,467,541
1,117,024
923,040 . 1,221,119 1
1833 '
575,616
3,272,101
5,408,091
- 957,543
: 699,728 •1,463,940]
1834 i
2,659,351.
5,265,053
X 795,567 ,. 184,149
971,837
1,476,355
1835
183,793
2,608,656
9,029,221
1,064,016
708,918
941,884
1836
3,094,936
6,041,635
. 829,255 ^ 189,518
384,933
937,917
1837
157,663 . 1,743,209
3,880,323
1,080,119
^266,008 . 1,487,799
, 1838
243,040
2,267,194
' 2,164,097
724,739
236,665
1,370,264
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294

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839,

NOTE L
The object of- this note is to present some general results concerning
our past imports ^and exports, as appearing in the tables^ without aiming
at fractional accuracy or a minuteness, which was not attainable but by
delay and labor not necessaiy to. this purpose.
It appears 'that the whole imports have not more than doubled since
thefirst four years of the Goyernmerit, while the expoits of domestic
produce have quite quadrupled.
" ,
.
Again: Though we formerly expoited more of the foreign merchandise imported than we now do, yet th^ consumption of it 'since those
earhest years has not increased^ much over a.hundred per cent., while
our population has, within the same period, increased quite four hundred
per cent.
•.
'•.
"
.- s
This disparity has arisen chiefly from the facts that larger proportidris.:
of our people are now engaged in^manufactures and.agriculture,: arid
supply much more than they orice did the products of both for home
consumption. For one series of three years, about a third of a centuiy
ago, and another about twenty years ago, the imports were nearly as
large as during the last three years.
•The changes in the amount of some of the leading articles both of
export and import have been veiy extraordinary. As to the first,.the
exports of raw cotton, without reference to the inci:eased consumptipn
of it at home, have altered most. . They have augmented froiii a few
thousarid dollars' worth to sixty or seventy millions. This vast increase .
has happened without any real aid fi'bm a duty, which should be regarded
as protective,. but chiefly by means o f a congenial soil and climate,
assisted by a remarkable improvement in preparing cotton for market, '
which has proved to be one of the niost fortunate inventions on any
subject in any a,ge. B y t h e larger capital-and population devoted to •
the.cultivation of this great staple, and by the increased domestic demand
for other articles of ouf own production to feed arid clothe the greater
nunibers employed in its cultivation, and in many flourishing manufactures, as weU as in an enlarged riavy and army, all our other priricipal
exports from agriculture, aswell as
fr^
forest and the. sea, have
remained stationary or declined duririg the last foity years.
!; ^
For example: Those of tobacco, ranging; near-six and.seven millions ;v
flour at about four millions; lumber at' two and three millions; rice from
, one to three millions; pork at a niilhon and a -half; and furs at neariy
thre.e quarters of a million; have remained almost stationaiy. While
the expoits of-fish have actually falten frorii one arid two niillions to.tess
than one; of beef from one millionto half a million; and of butter and .
cheese from one-half to one-nirith.of a milhon. Indeed the only material
increase in any of the important articles of expoit, besides raw cotton,
has been in doinestic nianufactures. These, from one miUion in 1793.
have augmented to more than eight millions iri 1838. ?
. .
So great have been the changes in some orthem, affecting to a certain
degree the aggregate exported, that in the single State of Massachusetts,
s.till distinguished for its fisheries^ and mariufactures of- cotton and; wopl- '
len, the fabrics fropi leather,, humble a!s they may .seem in character,



1839.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

295

now yearly exceed in value either of .those or any other of its great
articles of production, and equal nearly one-fourth of the immense exports
of raw cotton from the whole Union.
These results show the strong, direction which industry often takes
froripi natural causes, such as soil and climate, as well as from habits
and other peculiarities, whether accorripa,nied or not by special legislative
protection.
^^
This circumstance is further illustrated by someof the changes in the
principal articles of import. Duririg many years the demand for those
made froin cotton has been veiy great. By means of the increased
public taste for their use, and t h e reduced, price of them through
iiriprovements in machineiy, the imports of cotton manufactures have
generally been larger than those .of any, other article;
On an average they were eleven' millions annually for thelast three
years; and in 1836 they reached seventeen millions, notwithstanding all
the flourishing establishments for those'manufactures .here, and their
success to .such an extent that considerable amounts of the domestic
fabric have long been expoited. ' '
' The impoits of silk were formerly smaller in amount than those of
cottori, and in 1821 and 1822 only four to six millions yearly. But of
late; some of them having beeri exempted from duty by Gongress, and
others more recently having become free by;>means of judicial constructions, and the demand for all of them having been also quickened perhaps by the progress of. luxury, those" impprts increased in 1836 to
twenty-two millions, and during the last thrfee years, have been, on ari
average, quite twelve millions and a half.
Specie stands next in the list,.the' impoits of it having in the same
period been enlarged frorii three and five millions to about twelve
yearly; and'those of coffee from f6ur and five millions to eight, though
considerable portions of these are, as formeily, reexported. .
The imports of woollens have also, in the face of a high duty and an
increasing manufacture-of them at home, continued to be nearly seven
milhons annually for the^ last twenty years; arid i n 1836, they rose to
twelve millions.
>
But it is worthy of special notice,^ that with a population^ to clothe
augmented since 1821 quite seventy-five per cent., the great imports of
cotton.and woollen have augmented but little. Arid if those of silk have
increased three or four-fold in amount, yet such is the erilarged demand
for them, and the extended :facihties for producing them here on a small
capital, that without the aid of any legislative protection in most cases,
indications exist that the growth and manufacture of silk may be established in this country wider and deeper than any former article under
the highest tariffl
• .
\
It is a striking fact, that a«.direct bounty on. the growth of silk before
the Revolution, leading to a cultivation ofit in Georgia and the Carolinas
so as to denominate them '.'Silk colonies,"-failed to accomplish as much
as has recently been effected in almost every quarter of the' country by
increased skill, experience, arid enterprise, in defiance of the- reduction
of some duties, the total repeal of others, and the absence of any bounty
from the* General Goverririient." For farther details on the preceding



296

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

topics, reference can be had to the tables themselves. Some of the
alterations in the trade of particular. States and cities in the Uriion, as
well as in our commerce with several countiies abroad, are remarkable.
First stand the expoits from New Orleans. This city was not within
the boundaries ofthe Union till several years after the Constitution was
adopted, and the exports amounted to only two rriilhons in 1811. But
in 1838, by having become the principal outlet of so many ne.w- arid
flourishing communities, the expoits from it exceeded thirty-threis milhons, or six millioris more than any of our .-oldest and .largest cities or
even States. In only the first quaiter of 1839, they have in fact gone
beyond eighteen millions of dollars.; The immense growth and fine
central position of New Yori^ have aflfected its imports much more than
its expoits. The latter were in 179i:two. and a half-millions, or more
than New Orleans twerity years after; and in 1811 were twelve millions,
or six times those of New Orleans in the same year. . But they have
since increased only so as to average :twenty^six milhons during the last
three years, instead of the thirty-three millions of New Orleans. Again:
Mobile, a-city not originally within'the limits o f t h e Union, and the
seaport of a State not lar^e enough to. be organized as such till thirty'
years after the Government went into operation, is now the fouith in the
Union in exports, shipping nearly one-half as much domestic produce as
New York, and morethan all^ whether domestic or foreign, ofthe ancient,.
prosperous, and commercial:State of Massachusetts.' But from South
Carolina, her, rich: and ample exports still exceed both the two last, and
indeed all others in the Confederacy^ except the two first-mentioned
States.
• ] : •
fi"
'
Passing to the impbrts, though New Orleans has increased neaiiy fourfold in the last twenty years, andpiresents an aggregateof fourteen or fifteen millions yearly^yet she is only the third instead ofthe first in the Union.
Soirie other cities possess capital and facilities to exceed her in respect
to those, and to supply the srnaller wants In the lighter kinds of foi^ign
merchandise of these great agricultural States, most of whose, bulky
exports' more readily seek the ocean at the mouth of the. mighty stream
on whose banks and tributaries they flourish. The impoits into New
York now constitute over one-half and indeed neaiiy three-fifths of those
within^the whole United States. In 1802, they were only a little inore
than one-fourth ofthe whole. In 1821, they had enlarged to but twentythree millions, while in 1836 they reached the astonishing aggregate of
one hundred and eighteen millions. In the reduced business of 1838,
-they were neaiiy eighty-nine millions. Besides these.changes.in the
impoits, those of Boston alone among the old cities and States have
indicated a continuance of therii propoitionateto what they were in 1802.
Those of Philadelphia, while remaining, similar iri amount, have declined
in their proportion to the whole; neaiiy orie-half. '
v
Those of Baltimore, lessened still more in ;both views; and thos.e of
Charleston, Norfolk, and Savannah, in a ratio beyond even hers.;
/
But several of these cities have at the saine time,exhibited'an> iricrease
in their domestic trade and manufactures, which has aniply atoned for a
diminution in their foreign conimerce, thpugh the details are omitted on
the present occasion, as not being so appropriate'for explanation here.



,1839.]

SECRETARYOFTHETREASURY.

297

The countries abroad with which our foreign commerce has been,
conducted, and the changes and proportions ofit, are matters of no httle
interest, and of more immediate connection-with the finances. It appears
that our expoits, from, being.confined during a colonial state almost
exclusively to England and her dependencies, suddenly changed; and, in
cbrisequence of the Revolution arid subsequent difficulties, increased to
France, for the'first ten years of the Government, to about twenty milhons annually, or nearly double their amount to.England.' Since that
period they have increased with, the latter td near sixty millions yearly,
and remained' about stationary with the.former, pr at only one-third of
thatamount.
. '^
\ •
;
'
To Spain the exports are next in value, havirig increased from four to
eight millions without including anypait of Spanish America,-now inde-,
pendent^ and classed separately.But i t i s a rema;rkable.fact, that the impoits from all those countries
have remained stationary pr declined,' Oiir foreign supplies, as before
remarked, have increased but half as much as our expoits, and those
supplies, are drawn by our enterprise and new marts and tastes fi^om a
wider sphere, extending irideed, more.or less, to almost every .portiori of
the habitable globe.
:*. .,
; ,'•
\
Thus from Englarid, those impoits formerly fluctuated from twentythree to eighty-six millions anriually, and during the last three years
averaged only sixty millions; whild from France they have usually been
about half that amount; soriie five ;6r six**millions less fi'om .Spain than
France, and with China and.India about half ^as much as with Spairi.
Connected with this subject, and fuither illustrative of results unfavorable to the interests embarked in pur fpreign trade, is the fact, that the
tonnage ^engaged in it, having been in 1838 orily 810,447, was actually
less than what appears in the returns thiity years; ago. In 1809, those
returns exhibited 910,059 tons,_ and in 1810, no less than 984,269. ;The
tonnage owned abroad, which is; erigaged i n this, same business, being
Jately unmolested by . Eurdpean w^ars, has .also become, six times in
quantity what; it was twenty years ago. On the' coritrary, the rapid
"improvements in the domestic trade from 189,153 tons in 1794, to
1,086,238 in-1838, or an addition more than .five-fold, is an evidence of
the greatly increased cornmerce at. home, arid the diffusion of it over
regions much more widely extended.
/

I




298

,

R E P O R T S OF T H E

[1839.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, DecemJer 2, 1839. .

S I R : I have the honorto transmit, for the infprmation of the House of
Representatives, an estimate of the appropriatibns projpbsed to be made
for the service of the year 1840, amounting to >,.. ^.-.. •.$18,280.,6p0 55
••.

. V I Z : ,/• . -'

-

'

;" "

^

"•

'

;

[ '•.'''

.^-/^ -^ '

-

Civil list, foreign intercourse, and miscellaneous. - .>---.- .$.4,981,344
Military service, including fortifications, armpries, arsenals, • '•.
ordnarice, Tridiari affairs, revolutionary and other :,pen^
\
• sions.'.../....:.....-..:..^/;...v....:..:...v...x.^
-8,213^61.0
Naval service, including the marine corps.^...^ - - - . . . . . " 5,0§5,645

19
^
74
62 ,

To the estimates are added statements,, showing-^ " ;
. . '
1. The appropriations; for the seryice of the year 1840,. .
made by former acts of Congress, including, arming arid '
. . .
, equipping the miiitia, civilization of indiaris, revolutiori;•
ary clainis, revolutionary pensions under the, act of 7th
June, 18,32, claims of the State of Virginia, gradual improvement of the Navy, and public debt. - -:- - : - - - - - .$1,586,000 00
2. Theexistingappropriations which.will not be required
. >
for the year 1839, and whichit is proposed to apply in .
.. aid of the service.of the year IMD, ambunting to . . . . 3,014,711 80
3. The existing appropriations avhich wiU:be.required.^^to ^
complete the service of the year 1839, arid former.years',
but which will be expended in 1840, amounting t o . . . , 8,270,793 ,84
There is also added tp^ the. estiinates a statement, of the
several appropriations which wiU probably be carried .
to the surplus fund at the close of the present year,
. .
either because these sums will not be req.uired for, or v
'
will no longer be apphcable to them, amounting t o . -..
541,866 32
I have the honpr to be, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,
.
L E V I WOODBURY,
.
' ^ Secretary-ofi the Treasury ^
The SFBAKBR ofi the House ofi Representatives.




E S T I M A T E O F A P P R O P R I A T I O N S FOR T H E YEAR 1840.
Appropriations
made in 1839.

CIVIL L I S T .
LEGISLATURE.

QO
CO
CD

.

For compensation and mileage of the Senatprsand members
of the House of Repres^e"ritatives, their, officers "arid clerks,
arid for the contingerit experises of bPth Houses of Coii^
':. gresSj viz:.
^ " :; '
' _ "• -'-.
"-- •
Fifty-two Senators, at $8 per day, estimating.216 d a y s . . 21 $89,;856 00
3,456 00
Speaker of the jHouse of Representatiyes, at $16 per .day.;
Two hundred arid forty-one iriembers, at $8.per d a y . . . J . . .416,44:8 00
Delegates from the Territories of "Wisconsin, lowaj arid Flor^
5,184 00
ida, at $8 per day e a c h . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . >
154,000 00
•Travelling experises to arid from-the seat of Government..
$668,944.00
Secretarypf the Senate.
. . . . . . . . . . . ; . . . . . . : . . . . . .1
Principal clerk . .
^Two engrossing clerks, at $1,500 each, arid three clerks at
' $1,500 each, under resolutions.-of 13th October, 1837, and
7th J u l y , 1 8 3 8 . . . . . J . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Messenger.......... ^ .^....;..... . ^ . . : . . . . . . . . . . ^ 1 . :
Chaplain. to the Senate..
..... I.................. .
Sergeant-at-Arms tO'the S e r i a t e . . . : : . . ^ . . 1 . . . . . . . . . .
Assistant Doorkeeper t o t h e Senate :
......,
Clerk of the House of Representatives.•.
Principal C l e r k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' .
:.....
Ten clerks, at .$1,500. each
........
Messenger.
. . , . , . . - ^.. 1




3,000 00
1,800 00
7,-500 00

700 00
500 00
1,500 00
1,450 00
3,000 00
1,800 00
15,000 00
700 00

$370,944 00

CO

ESTIMATE—Continued.
Chaplain to the House of Representatives.
Sergeant-at-Arms to the House.
Doorkeeper to the H o u s e . . . . . . . . . . . —
Assistant Doorkeeper to the House . — . .
Postmaster to the House.
.......:.

$500
1,500
1,500
1,450
1,500

o
o
Appropriations
madem 1839.

00
00
00
00
00

$43,400 00

$43,400 00

I N C I D E N T A L AND CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF BOTH JHOUSES OF
. CONGRESS,.INCLUDINGSTATIONEIlY, FUEL, PRINTING,'&C.

For the Seriate, as estimated by the S e c r e t a r y . . . . . . . . . . .
For preparirig,'^printing, and binding documents, ordered by
• the resolutions of the Senate of 2d February'1836, and
* 2d"March, 1837, relating to: the establishirierit of the:seat
of Government;'repoits, plans, and surveys for improvement of .harbors and rivers, roads arid eaiials; to be disV bursed under the direction of the coinmittee to audit and
; coritrol the contingent expenses^ of the Seriate...
..-..
For the' House of Representatives^ iricluding $50,000 due
on account of the .3d session of the 25th Congress,, estimated by the G l e i ' k . . . . . . .
••../.................-....'

75,000 00

75,000 00

20,000 00

15,000 00

300,000 00

200,000 00
395,000. 00

LIBRARY OF, GONGRESS.

Salary of the principal and assistant hbrarians.
For an assistant duririg the* session of Cbngress, at $1 50.
per day, say .193 d a y s . . . . . . .
...
.....
.. .
. Salary of messenger
^\: . J . ; - " . . . . : ; . . . . . 1 : . . . > . . . . . . . ^




2,650 00

2,650 00

289 50
5 700 00

700 00

.

Contingeritexpenses, including arrearages last yearsof $148 ,
Purchase of books for the library of Congress . . . . — . . -..,

.748 00
5,000 00.

600 00
5,000 00

9,387 50 1
1,116,731 50
EXECUTIVE.
)

.

•

. 25,000 00
5,000 00

Compensatiori to the President of the Uriited States . . ' . . . .
Compensation to the Vice President of the United S t a t e s . .
Secretary to sign patents for public lands . . . . . . . . . . . . ^ .'.

2^,000 00
5,000 .00
^

30,000 00
1,500 00

1,500 00

. DEPARTMENT OF S T A T E ;

i 6,000 00
Secretary of State
..... : . : , . . . , "
Clerks and,-messengers
.— ...
-20,^00 do
Incidental and contingent expenses of the Depaitment of
State, including .pubhshing arid distributing the l a w s . . . . . r . 25,000 op

6,000 00
20,300 00
25,000 00
; 51,300 00
,

S'OR THE GE.NERAL PURPOSES OF THE NORTHEAST EXECUTIVE
.
^
BUILDING.

1. ::1,506''00'
Salaries of superintendent and watchraen . . . . . .=
Contingent.expenses of said building, including-fuel, labor,
3,'350 00
oil, and repairs .^..
.- - 1
,

1,500 00
3,350 00
• 4,850 00'
56,150 00

TREASUR.Y DEPARTMENT.

Secretaiy of the Treasuiy.
Clerks and messengers




j
1

6,000 00
16,450 00

-

6,000 00
16;450 00

ESTIMATE—Continued.

CO

o

.65

Appropriations
made in 1839.

Clerks, per act of 23d June, 1836

•^$3,600 00

$3,600 00
-$26,050 00

First Comptroller-....-.- ^ - - - . - . - . - .
Clerks and messenQ:ers^. 1

3,500 00
19,300 00

Second Comptroller-.
Clerks a^d niessenger

3,000 00
12,25.0 00

3,500 00
19,300 00
22,800 00
3,000 00
.12,250.00
1^,250 00

First Auditor . . . . . . . ^ . . . . . . . .
Clerks and m e s s e n g e r . . . . . . . . \ . . •

.

'

-

•

'

'

.

••

•

^ .

• .

Second A,uditor . . . . . . . . Clerks arid messenger . . . . . . . . .

— -— *.>...

.--.....
•.

_ .

•.

•

•

.

•

3,000 00
15,900 00

3,000 00
15,900 00
18,900 00

•

- . . . : . — . . . . . . . . ^.
....

Third Auditor..'/ . . ^ . . . ^ ^ . . . . . . . . .
...
Clerks and messengers . . . . . . . . . . . .
T w o clerks eniployed on claims, underthe act of 18th Janu; ary,. 1837 .........^..^.

s,mo 00

3,000 00
17,900 00
3,000. 00
29,650 00

1.7,900 00
20,900 00
3,000 00
29,650 00

2,400 00

2,400 00
35,050 oo'

Fouith A u d i t o r - . . , . . .
. Clerks and Messenger .

3,000 00
16,950 00

3,000 00
16,950 00
19,950 00

Fifth Auditor ..-.
.-...".........
Clerks and messenger
....
. . . . . ^..
;TwQ additional clerks, per act of 7th^July, 1838



3,000 00
9,800 00.
2,0.00 00.

3,000 00
9,800 00
2,000 00
14,800 00

Treasurer of the.United States.
Clerks and messenger
- -.

3,000 00
10,750 00

Register of the Treasury
Clerks and messengers . .

3,000 00
24,200 00

3,000 00
10,750 00
13,750 00
3,000 00
24,20.0 00
27,200 00

Commissioner of the General L a n d Office .
. ^.. ^ . . . .
Recorder, solicitor, draughtsman, "and assistant draughtsman,
> clerks, messengers,,and p a c k e r s . . . . . . . . ^ . . . .
...

3,000 00

3,000 00

107,850 00

95,500 00

98,5.00 00
Solicitor of the Treasury.
Clerks and m e s s e n g e r . - . - . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —

3,500 00
3,950 00.

.3,500 00
; 3,950 00

7,450 00
INCIDENTAL AND CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF THE TREA.SURY
BEPARTMENT.

• Office of the Secretary of the Treasury. Nothing required.
- The unexpended balance being deemed sufficient for the
y e a r 1840
-...:..:
.For translating foreign\languages, and for receiving and
transmitting passports arid sea letters, in the office of the
Secretary of the T r e a s u r y . . . .
. . . . . . ^.....^. .-J^
Eor stating and printing the pubhc accounts. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Office of the First Comptroller
- . . . . .>
Second C o m p t r o l l e r - . , . . . . -.
...
First A u d i t o r . . . - - , , - - . J . . . . . . . . . . .
:...
Second Auditor
^
.
Third A u d i t o r . . . . . - . . - ' . . . .
Fouith Auditor. ....
...--....
FifthAuditor
:
.......



12,500 00
300
1,400
2,000
1,500
1,200
1,000
2,000
500
1,000

00
00
00.
00
00
00

00
00
00

300
1,400
2,000
1,500
1,000
1,000
1,000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
1,000, 00
1,000 00

ESTIMATE—Continued.

CO

o
Appropriations
made in 1839.

Office ofthe Treasurer of the United S t a t e s . . . . . . — > - - Register of the T r e a s u i y , . . . . . .
Solicitor of the Treasuiy, including $500 for
law books.
...
.............
....
Commissionerof the Gerieral Land Office, in• ' eluding 83,000 piepes of parchment and
printing..-.^.
r-.-......

$2,000 00
3,000 00

$1,500 00
3,000 00

1,500 00

1,000 00

18,417 00

19,753 00
$35,817 00

F O R T H E G E N E R A L P U R P O S E S OF T H E S O U T H E A S T E X E C U T I V E
-'•'

'

'

BUILDING. '

,

Salaries of superintendent and watchrrien
^
^...
Gontingent expenses of the building, iricluding fuel, labor, oil,
"cariying the Depaitment mails, and sealing ship's regis-

2,100 00

2,100 00

12,000 00

12,000 00
14,100 00

The' superintendent ofthe building heretofore received $250
• for. superintending the building occupied by the General
'^ Land Office, and. as the persons..employed in that building have been reinoved into the new ^Treasury building,
. .ofwhich he has the care, it is deeined proper to subinit
the same sum as an "addition to his salaiy. Submitted, $250.

$370,517 00

WAR DEPARTMENT.

Secretaiy of W a r .




6,000 00

6,000 00

Clerks arid messengers.: — - . . . - i': * ^ ; . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . ' . . :• 13,350 .00
,
Coiitingent- expenses^,. . . . . : • - - i ^ ^ - i : ^ : J-i - - i i . i .^^i; ^ ^ ^
3,000 00
1,000 00
Books, maps^ and plans,/or the. W a r D e p a i t m e n t . . . ; . , . . . ,
^ Compensation of ^xtra clerks, when eiriplpyed in said
3,000 QO
J-

* -

V.^JLXJ,C./V/

*

^ ' M •• *•! •

•

W •. •

•

• ' • ' - • •

• , • - « • • « » • ' • •

M
• • <

»> M / «• ' w^ «k •

r • •

•

.

-

•

•

•

•

.

-

•..-

- . . .

. • ; '•»

M ' a» '«i^ • . « '

•.^
•

- . .

.

""
-

..

•

«»

•» ' •

V *

•

•

•

•'

13,300 00
3,000 00
1,000 00
3,000 00

"i^

26,350 00

.

.

y Commissioner of Indian A f f a i r s . . . . . . . . ' . ^ . . . . . J . - .- - . . . . ^ . ^.3,000 00
.16,40,0. 00
A) tJiefks arid n i e s s i e n g e r . . . . . , . . . . ^ . , . . . . . . .^ ,^: t . v. J^vvv
2,000 Op
^Ppritingentexpienses.. - J w.. j . . . i ^ ^ i . i. .^^ w.^ ^ . . ^ i . - i ^ .^
.00,
Commissioner of Pensions.... .1 — . . . . . . . . - . / . . . . . . . .
. .3,000.
.
13,450: 00
. Glerks and messengers," per a c t o f 9th.May, 1 8 3 6 r - . : . . . . .4;800 00.
. - Clerks transferred from the office of the Secretaiy of W a r : . .
Gontingent e x p e ; n s e s . - - . . . . . . . . . .
fi.......
. . . . . . . . . . . ;i!jO00.
-0.0
.

21,400 00

^ fivfi^.m
"
24,250 00

Clerks: and messenger in, the bffice of the Paymaster
General. / . . . - . . . . . . j . . . . . . ' . . . i . .
. . . . . . . ..J..:,}.
Cbiitingent, experises - . - .^. -^... .Viv.^jj.^.:. . J . . . * . . ..^•.•^••.

;.. 7*,iao: 00.
• .800 OQ,
7,900 00

Clerk and messenger in the/ office of the' Commanding
• „ijrenerai--... . - - ' . * . . -.~.'.-.'J"J ."^.j--"--'-'i-i-.",.•.--'.".;.".'.'•.-.i.:.".•^.
Contirigent expenses . ; . . . - i.r. .r::;;. i^^^<; c ^ . . ^^: ^ . v . ^ ^ . . .

liSOO ,0Q

fi'2/^^)j oi^l

300 0Q
.
1,800 00

Clerks ;and niessenger in the office of the Adjutant General. .,„,.7,650. 00.
Cpntingent expenses . r . - ^ . . : ^ ; ; i . ^ j . i :.r;r^ i ^ J . .:. ^..w ^.
1,600 00
9,250 00
Clerks and messenger, in, the office; of .-the Quartermaster
General.. . . .
\ .....
..
'.'........ ^......
Contingerit expense's
.........:.....--'..,.,........



7,300 00
1,000 00
8,300 '00

ESTIMATE-^Continued.. ,

CO

o
(Ci

Appropriations
made in 1839.

Glerks and .messenger in the offiee of the Cpmrnissary
$4,200 00
General of Purchases..
. - . -•
..... — .
. —
800 00
Contingent expenses L : ; : . : . i : ; : ^ ; : - i°r i -. s ^ & - - ^ i -^ ^ - - ^
$5,000 00
Clerks arid messenger in the office .of the Commissary
Gerieral of Subsistence:: -. s . -. -.;:;. .---•- i .^i -. -. - -. - -. - -i •?.': -• - ^
Contingent expenses-."---..••.".';.".".•---.-.-..^..-.-i.-.•'.-.v-.--^ .-.^i-.

4,300 .00
3y20^ 00

Clerks and messenger in the office of the Chief JEngineer..
Contingent e;xpenses -.-. ^. -. ^."o:.%%.. v- r^ ^ - - ^ -'- ---^ -'--r - ^ - " " '^
^^

,5,650.00:
ly500 00

Clerk and^ messengei^: in thp pffice of thc: Surgeon.Greiieral'i
Contingent expenses . . . 1. °. .^
. . v.
i . . . . . . . . — .'- -

1,656 00
500 00

Clerks and messenger in the Qrdnance Officei v.iivs. ii-s-.v-.
Contingent, expenses -^^i *;£?.. i j ^ i.'i i> i: ^ . \ \ -i 2 i» i-i; - ^> - ^ ^

8,650 1)0
:, 800 00

7,500 00
7,150 00

2,15b 00 I
9,450' 00

L2,500 00
Clerks' and messeriger in the Tbppgraphical B u r e a u . . . . . . . .
Contirigerit; e:xpenses :. -. z ^ z -i z •:; i ^. £ tn z i. ^ -. -. -. £ ii u -. -- s: •. -, = -.% i 1^735 00
^
'
:Foi^irHis GENiiRii pyRpOsEsoF ra

NORTHWEST EXECUTIVE
'•<: / ' . ' ""- ' . • • ; : . ' ' BiirlLDiNG.
' ' ', -.-

Salaries :of the superintendent and watchirieiii % ",'•; s i i-. s i s -.
Cpntingent . expenses^ of said building, ^ includirig repairs,^
; laboi:j fu^elj oil, engine, and also rent of: the bounty land
' - O T T I P P • I-

r •>£•,..} .•'••'-,• ,. .. - ^ * 1 ; . - „ . , 1--.H. „ -. _ w . »•„ .c -- c *,« ;.,.-,_ „ . » . , ., ^ .,.-




4,235 00

2j250 po

4j^i66 &
6,950 00

141,685 OQ

NAVY D E P A R T M E . N T .

^ Secretaiy pf the Navy- -> . . . . . . . . . . . . — ^ - - . . . . . . .^.
Glerks and m e s s e n g e r s . . . . . . . .
.......... - . . . . . . ..,
Contingent'expenses. .^ : i ; . . . . . . " . . ' . . . . . . ; . . . .

6,000 00

•
*

.'

6,000 0 0 :
iS.SSO ,00 I
B,OOQ Qo

.,. '3,Q0Q:.'QJ>.'

21^8^6 Wi
The Secretaiy of the Navy submits: For two . additional
. clerks,"at.$1,400 each, an^ one at $1,000. Submitted,'
$3,800.
..; .:.,•••-, ..• • . . - : .
.
Commissioners of the Navy JBoard.. r -.S e c r e t a r y . . . . 1. -"..— . .
.....
............... :
Clerks and m e s s e n g e r . - - . . - -,
^ ^....... ^.. ^ <........:..;. ..
Contingent e x p e n s e s : . . . . . - . - . > . . . - . . . . . . . . . . .•. ^ . * . . ..

. ' = . -'"
•

•

•..' 1

•

-

1

10,500 00;
2,000 .OOj
8,450 00;

. . . . .

,.

- , . - .

.<».

- . . - , ,

10,500
2,000
8,450
2,W0

. • - . :

l,goo Qoi

00
00
00
00 I

22,750 OOi
T h e Gomriiissioners oif the .Navy 3
ditional bleiks, at | i , 4 0 0 each, and one at^$ 1,000.
niitted, $^,800.
'

[
Sub-J
. . .

'

-•

]

• -

•.

..

.'. • • ]

FOR T H E G E N E R A L PURPOSES OF THE SOUTHWEST!EXECUTIVE
-•'•'
BUILDIiNG.. :
•
•
;

Salaries of superintendent and watchmen. \ -....<:.........•..
epntirigferit. (expenses, including, fuel, laboi> oil,- repairs bf
building, engine, and improvemerit of the ^grounds..> t. ^

1^50 00

I

%^M'm

3,350 00:
4,600 00
49,200 00

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.

-Postmaster G e n e r a l . . . . . . . . . . / . . . . . . . . . . ,
Three Assistant Postmasters. General. ^ . . /



6,000 00
7,500 00

• "

•

-6;00O 00
7,600 00

ESTIMATE—Cohtinued.

CO

o
oo

Appropriations
made in 1839.

Clerks arid messengers. . . , . . . . > / . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — ,
T w o watchmen, at $300 e a c h . .
.... — -.- - Foi-topographer and additidnal clerks, per act of March 3,

$48,600 00

For clerk to keep appropriation accounts, per act of March
3, 1839 . -...,
For contingent experises, including fuel for the Auditor's
.. office, arid $4,000 for rent pfthe building pceupiedby the
Depa,rtment
J:....-...../- — " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10,200 00

$48,600 00
^ 600 00

600 OQ
11,60.0 00

1,400 00
8,000 00

12,500 00
$82,300 00

Auditor for the Post Office D e p a r t m e n t . . . . . . . . .
.. Clerks and' rnesserigers.. 1 . . . . . . ' . . . . . . ; - . . . V.. -.-. - - -.; - . y.
•Eleven additional clerks, per act of July 7, 1 8 3 8 . . . .
.
Contingent expenses,, including the expense, of;quarterly
books, stationeiy, printing, laborers, &c.-..... . . . . . . . . . . .

3,000 ,00
55,500 00
13^200 00

3,000 00
55,500 GO
13,200 00

4,700 00

4,700 00
$76,400 00
$158,700 DO

SURVEYORS AND THEIR GLERKS;.

Surveyor General northwest df the O h i o . . . . . . . . . .;...>
Clerksj per act of May 9, 1 8 3 6 . . . ' . : . . . . . . . , . . . , . . . , . ,

2,000 00
6,300.00

Surveyor General of llhnois .and. M i s s o u r i . , . . . . . . , .• -.
Clerks^, per act of May . 9 , . - 1 8 3 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,

2,000 00.
3,820 00

2,000 00
6,300.00
.85300 00

Digitized for Surveyor General
FRASER


2,000! 0 6
3,820 09^
5,820 00

of Arkansas

—..;,

2,00.0 00

2,000 00

Clerks, per act of May 9, 1836. * . . > . . . . ; i . : L . i . . . . ^ ^ . . -.

2,800 OQ

2,800 00

.4,800 00
Surveyor General of :Lpuisiana . . : : : . : . : . . : : . ; i - . . ; . . . i :
d e r k s , per actof May 9, 1 8 3 6 ; ^ . . . . . : - . : . . ; ; . . . ; : : . . :
Purveyor General of Mississippi..
...............>.
Clerksf per act of May 9, .1836... , . > . . . . . . . ...-.\ ..-.-.-....

2,000 00
5,000 00

Surveyor General of Alabama^.: ^ . . . . . . . . .

. . . : . i..

2,000 00
2,26Q 00

Surveyor" General of F l o r i d a . . . . . I . . . . . . : ' . . - . . . . . . . . . .
Clerks, per act of May 9, 1 8 3 6 . . . . . . . . . .
—....

2,000 00
2,500 00

2*000 00
2,500 00

.2,000 00
3,500 00

4,500 00
2,000 00
6,00.0 00
7,000 00
2,000 0.0
2,200 00

4,200 00
2,:000 00
3,500 00
, 5j50p ftO
Sui-veypr General of Wiscorisiri, per act of June. 12, 1838,
with a proposed increase of $500. . . . . . . . . . . . -,.. - . . . .
Clerks, per act of June 12,. 1838, with a proposed increase
of $.400 - - . . - . . . - . - -'. . - . -..'.-. - . . - - . . . - . . .i - . - . . . . - .

1,500 QO

2,0Qd OQ.
2,Q0Q

00

1,600 00
4,000 00

Salary of the late Surveyor General of Illinois and Missouri,
for his salaiy to • the 26th September, 1836, the same
' having been carried.to the surplus fund on the 31st
December j 1 8 3 6 . . . . . . , . ! . . . . . . - . . 1 . . . . . . ^ . . - . . . . . —
•Salary of the Surveyor General of Wisconsin, for payment
of his salary for the fractional part bf the 4th quarter of
;;'. 1 . 8 3 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
...:......^................
For extra clerks and draughtsmen in the offices ofthe Surveyors
Gerieral, in addition to the unexpended balances of former
appropriations, to be apportioned to them according to
the exigencies of the pubhc service
.........
..



478 26

-

198 97

10,000 00

8,000 00

" ESTIMATE^Continned.
Q'

Appropriations,
made in 1839.'

For extra cleiics-in' the offices- of the- Surveyors General, to
transcribe.: field nptes] of surveys far' thpi purpose: pf prer serving;theini at. the seat of Government-,. in. the event.th.at
ther plan: for building-offices :with-ftre' proofs,- submitted at
the, first sessbri of the lastr(Jongr.ess;:shall;.not.be adopted^
im additiori to: the unexpended; balances o£ fprmer appr.o.T
opriations,.viz;:
,
;•^
•
Office of the Surveyor General northwest of the Ohio.,
• . Qffipe-pf-theSurveyor Generalof llhnois arid Missouri.
' . • . Offieesof the Surveyor General..pfiArkansas>...., ...;>. -.......^.
pffijcecof the;Surveyor Gerieral of M i s s i s s i p p i . . . : . . , . :
,'
Qffice ofthe^Surveyor:General;of Wisconsin .,.;. . > . , . .

44,500^00'
2i2QQ QQ
1,000 00
5.5Q OQ
1,000 00

$4,500 00
-%8;§:Q;G.Q
3,000 00

4:,^m Q ^
O
3,000 Q
O

$%g!5A p
$64,047 23
2,300 00

fiopLriiissioneE of the .Pubhc Buildings-, in- Washington.-... .;
Three assistants to the Commissioner, as superintendent of
'the: Potoniac bridge^ at $1 50 p e r dayj in eluding •; oH for
.; lianipsii fuel^ and^repaira).....^:^;.;.-; . . . . . . . v . . . . . - . . . : .

%,3M0.Q

2,950 00.
5,250 00

_V:

mmw. m : T H E UNIT^©^ST!ATESf AND ITS* BRANCHES^

Compensation to the director bf the Mint at Philadelphia , ,
-;.,,
•;-.' ,,,..1a:easUreis->;;;::...-....::.,--;. J . J..:
^ ;
^ - -,.
chief c o i n e r t i : : : : . ^ . i ; : . . ; ^ . ; : ^ : : ; ,
assayer.......-.-.••
... ....„




3,500^00^
g^OOQ QQ
%0QQ QQ
.v;2,000..6a
2i,Om0M

LiimaQ

^. .>.-.'•;-">-•• 1"'••'"' ^ .erigraver"---. I - . - . . ; . I l . M » 1.1V.:.-.. !•
p. :• . :^ ; -v ' : - second: engraver! I
'.'..llllll:'.':.:..
^ 1 V ' ;^.' ^'•" ^"' ^ assistant a s a a y e r . : : . : : ^ . . : : : ' . . : . . : •
two clerks at $1,200 each, and one at
: $a^jQ00,^rid:Orie'at $700
...:..
For' Goinperisatidri to laborers'^V ^ i . ^ - . . ^ ^ . . 1 1 . . t . ^ JX- X
Fbr incidental and contingerit expenses, including-the wastage of gold and silver', fuel, materials, stationeiy, water. irerit,;arid ta:^es.: ^ . . . . . . . . ^ ^>, X'^'l. '^^ - ^ - -|. - -•-.. 1 - . . . II
Ft)r new^ machirieryv...:.:: 1 . . i.. U^.'.v-;-i'-: - -.- - - -:- - ^-'- - For speeiinensbf ore's and cbiris,'to be reserved at the Mint;

2^000 OQ
1,500 00
.J,3QS 09
4,100 00

16,000 00
3,000 00
. 1,000 00

;,/ -v .01.- v '
l-v: •-•.' •

• - c p i r i e r : : ! I : . . . . . . 1 : : . . : : : : . : : 1..-:

''•..''-'•;••• one'clerk-^^v .-i.v'^.:;^'.:.;^V--'-'-':^--?i?;.---••^'-



^

-

18V3QQ QO
3,000 00
:;iiQOQ 00

.

. 20,000 00
.2;QQOQQ

i;50Q QQ
1,500 QO
1,000 00

.1

:-.-6,000.-00-

Foi* epmperisatibri to laborers iri; the varibus departrnerits..:
For inciderital and coritingent expenses, includirig fuel, maV terials, taxesi and wastage of goldi. .^>^...-|.:j . . i . . . . . . : : :
Compensation to the superinteriderit bf the Brarich' Mirit at
1
Dahlonega-.... ' assayer
coiner, i . w . . . ^ . . ^
o . . , - - - . -,-.^


•

63,400 00

JVbfe.—^The Director of the Mint asks for the sum of $25,000 for the purchase
of a lot of ground adjacent to ,the:Mint.,.fQr^ th^: neee^sajry uses. Jof thelnstitution:

Compensation to the superinteriderit of the '^Bfanch Mirit at
/ Chariotte,^North Carolina: : ^ : ; : : . ^ . . : : . . I ^..:: 1 . . . . : :
CJompensatipri to- the assayer^.-.::. 1 1 . . . : 1 1 1 : . . : : . . . . : . .

20,400 00
23,00a 00

20,400 00
23,000 00

• mm Q
Q
2,000 00
1,500 00
1,500 00

6,000 00
^,600. QQ
5.10Q 00
12,000 00

CO

ESTIMATE—Continued;
For conipensation to orie blerk-i>-'^>-,--^^^

-,5;-i7 - - -

Appropriations
made in 1839.

$1,00Q 00
^$6^000-00^
3^500 QQ

For cpnipprisation;to labbrers:^^
departments...
For iriciderital and coritirigerit eipenses, iricludirig ffi^ riia/terials, taxes, and wastage pf g o l d ^ i . ^:V... w^^:......". :

$6,000 00
3:,8QQ 00

8,0QQ QO

4;QOQ OO

$ii,50;o 00

Compensation to the superinteriderit bf the' Branch^ Mirit at
New Orleans
..."
:.::..: —:..::
Compensation to the treasurer :
'.
:
::....::.:
' coiner.:.::..*:. 1.:
.."—.:...:.
I c'
assayer
melter and refiner
'.
, two clerks at $1,200 each
:

2,500 00
2,000 00
2,000' 00
2,000 00
2,000^ 00
2,400 00
' 12,900 00

For compensation to laborers employed in the various de' partments
'
'
;
.'..
Fbr incidental^and contingerit experises, iricluding "fuel, materials, taxes, arid wastage of gold anid~ silver. . . . . ; : . : .

m

.12j900 00
22;000 00

22,000 00

17i>tQ0 00

17,100 00
52j000 00

GOVERNMENTS IN THE TERRITORIES OF THE UNITED STATES.
^ J^'/A .-i

Wisconsin Territory. ^

.

- -

' Governor
:...;.:.".
....'.: I
Three Judges, at $1,800 each
^ . . . : : I : : : : . 1'...:.::.'
Secretary
',..*..: I
T.::.:..:.:.:: I




2,500 00
5,400 00
1,200 00

9,100 00

Contingent e x p e n ^ s i . v^^ Iv. :.:.: : :.v.*.v.^'l'L111:11.:': *;:: I
Compensation and mileage bf the" rrieiribers^bf the;Legislariv.e Assembly,'.pay of officers''bf thb"A'sge~mbly,^printing,:
^ Stationery, fuel, postage, newspapers^,'^ furniture, and. all
other incidental arid; rriisceUanebusobjectsl...^ J
.

^350 00

34,075- 00

25,000 00

43,525 00

Goverrior . . ^ . . . . i : . ^ / .::.;-'....•. .^... ii^:.ui -•..-..-..., ..,;„.^ ^.......
Three Judges, at | l , 8 p 0 each, p e r act! pfSdM^rchr 183^
Secretary....
.-. i . J.. .....,.„..,..:....;...^,.^.. '^:^,.^-^..:......,.'^'...^^.[.
Contirigent expense^.;. ^^ ^.:... ^ ^ . ^ . . ^ ; . . . . . . . . ^ > . . . . . . . . . .
Compensation and inileage ofthe- irieinbers of t:he.L.egislatiye
. Assembly, pay pf pfficers, printirig, stationery,,fujel, postage, newspapers, furniture, and. all other, in-ciderital arid
miscellaneous objects.. i . . . . . . . . -^ -^.;-V^ ^ - - -^ --^ '^ - -

2,500
5,400
1,200
350

00
00
00
00

~

•
8,200 00

37,104 o a |

27,050 00
36,500 00

. ' '•

• : . Florida Territory.' — — - - -

;-

—

Governor ^:;.....:-~-:.. . J ^ . . . ^ - . . . . l . l . V ^ l . l ^ l . . 1 . . ' . . ' .
Four Judges at $lj800 each, and orie at $ 2 , 3 0 0 . . ' . . : . . : . . .

2,500
9,500
1,500
350

.Secretary•.^-.-:^'-.;-.-'.'. .^'..".I'.'i'i'X .1.1.i-:-:: .."I . ' - i : : i : . ; n
Cpritingerit expenses.::.. ^ . . . . . . . . . : : : ; . . . : . : : .;^:.. J.

00
00
00
00

14,370 00

.

350 00

Compensation and iriileage of the nieiribefs" of'the Legislative Gduricil, pay of officers, stationeiy, fuel, printing, rent,
furniture, and all .other iriciderital and miscellaneous




28,215 00'.

29,325 OQ
43,175 00
-

:

•

:

-

•

-

.

-

, . . - •

.

'

'

123,200 00

ESTIMATE—Continued.

••/•••:

.



Appropriationsmade in 1839.

^JUDIGIARY.-

Clhief Justice of the Suprem.e Court..
Eight Associate Jud.ges,;at $4,500 each,
pistiict Judge bf M a i r i e . . . . . . " . . . : . .
' New Hainpshire...
^ ^ . •. -: " / . Massachusetts ^ . . ' . .
r
./
,.
, Vermont
Rhodelsland',,.:--.'
Connecticut
New York, northern district, ^ . , , , , ^ ^,
New York, southern, district. ^..,,, „.,,.
New Jersey..
,..,
.,. S.^. ._.^.,..
Pennsylvania,,eastern district..,.
.
Pennsylyania,. westem diatrict ^ - , . , , , . ,
;" ^
. '
Delaware..!......,......... ^ .,.,„ ^ ^,. ^.. ^.,,
Maryland
^
,
.,..
Virginia, e.astern district -....,.. ^ ^.! ^....,.,
Virginia, western district
Kentucky..,.,'.
Tennessee.
Ohio
' North C a r o l i n a - : . . . . . . '
:.:
South -Carohna.. ^..-..,-.'
:
=" G e o r g i a . . . . . . . . L : .u . . . . .^
: Louisiana..
v
"...'.:
 i'
;
. Mississippi
1 . . , .'^
'
:

CO

$5,000 00
36,000 00
1,800 OQ
1,Q0Q 00
i,50Q:QQ
1,200 00
1,500 00
1,500 00
2,000 00
; 3,500 00
^ 1,500 00
2,500 00
1,800 00
1,500 00
2,000 00
1,800 00
1,600 00
1,500 00
1,500 00
1,000 00
.2,000 QQ
2,500 00
2,500 00
3,000 00
2,Q0Q QQ

Indiana..^-,.;^,.. ^ . . : . .
Illinpis'. — . ' . . - - -/—
Alabiau:?;^--'--^'--- -"•
Missouri. -: ^ ..... .. . ^...: ...
Michigan.......^....,.....;.,,
Arkarisas,

1

UOOO 001

1,Q.G0 00
2,500 00
1,^.00 00

•

1,.5Q6

00

2,000 OQ
93,900 OQ

93,900 00

12,700 00

12,700 00

•2,700 0 0 :
Chief Justice of the IJistrict; of Colurribiai.- - - . . - - . - . . . . 5,0.00 . 0
Two Associate JudgesVat. $:2',500 each-.'.;.'-'...- . . , . - . - . . .
0
2,000 001
Judge of the Crimiiial C;pU:yt. . . : - • - . , . . . .
............
J u d g e o f the Orphans' C.onrt^ •Wa-shington - c o u n t y . . . - . . . . ,
i,.6oo
Additional Judge ofthe Orphari:s.'Gpurt;,,Washi^^^
.• 1,000 00
Judge pfthe Orphans' CQXixt,i Alo'^^ndvxhQO^nij: . • . ; , . . . . .
.1,000 00

m\

•Reporter of the deGisions" of the Supreme C o u r t . . -i . . . . . . :
•District Attorney, Maine... . . . • - . . ' . . . . .-*.'...;.:^.: . . - - - . - ' - - New liampshire^..... .:>..:...^.. \.:: ^ ^ . . . .
Vermont,.:.. .v 1.: ^ .^-. - -;.... i . ^ . . ' . . . ' . . .
Rbpde: Island >....-. ^.,...., . ^ . . i ; . . . . . .
Cprinecjticut-.........,. ......^ - i i . . . \ : . . - . . :
r.
;V
New York, uortherri d i s t r i c t - . . . . 1 . : . . ' .
• . . •
NewJersey
-----^.-•
.
Pennsylvania, western d i s t r i c t . . . . . . V . .
0. '
.Delaware..
,. ^..?.^.....,.,.,. [




4,00Q 00
800' 00

4,:0OQ 00
1,000 QQ
• 500
00

Attorriey General of the.; United States-, .-.fi..;..
. . . , . . -.
Clerk
•
. . . . • , , . . . : . . . ". .
.
Messenger
' . . ' . . ^ w....^.-.•-:..;- ......v-.-^- --•:-—.?-- - . . - . . . - ' . Contingent expenses-.^.., .!.,v,.-..-..,-...-: .>^.;4...;.,...... -;;^^ . :
. For purchasing law b o o k s : . . . . . . . . . . . . i . . . ; . . . . . . - . , . . .

500 00 I
500 00

500 00
1,0QQ QO
7,000 00
1,000 00

•

20.6
00
200 QO
im 00
200 QQ
20Q 00
2Q0 QQ
200 00
200 00
200 ool

1,000 00

ESTIMATE—Continued.
District Attorney, Virginia,: eastern district.. ^ . . . . . . .
. ' Virginia,, western d i s t r i c t . . . . . . . . . .
. •' Te.nnes see,, eastern d i s t r i c t . . . . . . . .
Tenriessee^ western district. -'.^^.--.. • "
' / Tennessee, Jackspn. d i s t r i c t . . ; . . . . .
• . * V ^ , .-. - / Kentucky ;:i . ' . . . • . . . • . - . v . - v . . . . . . .
'•/.•' r.ir - ..'''•'/'•••I.'/' Ohio. ...w :.,..-.-^'...i . . . . . . . . . ^-;.
\
North Carohna . . . . . . .
. . . . i. ..
V: : V V ' Y. •
Georgia......'....: .*..........:c
".;:.., ". -: ; Louisiana, eastern district-.-J.'. ...•:, i •:; :..*
"' ^ ^ . Lpuisianaj western district;^. - : . :v^
\;:^;:'.V • •- "• ' — ;''.^'Mississippi i:-'."^v.-.i ..*."."-w^jv.^^
^ •: •'. ;
" .•JLiiciiana.•...»... -?* r'..'.."'..;.''.'.- .-.^
llhnois. . i . . . . . . . . = . ^ .
....^..^/.--. ^v ^ y ; .,. ;: ^ Alabama, f nbrthern d i s t r i c t . . ; : . . r^r
: ^ - ^ -^ : Alabama, southern distriet. . . . ^ , i . , .
• *:---,::•.;• *: ' • --.-.Missouri, v.;..-^ .•...•... ..^. 1.-^ ..._j^ .-j- ,:. ^ •" • • . . v:. Michigan^;-...'. -•. -^. - . .-.".'.v. ..'.v.i
•^
ixxriiansas-•*i,... .-•i;."-.".^.'.'-*•« ."»*.'. ^'
\^ r :^ ' ^ :: {; . •:.;:; Flprida, eastern d i s t r i c t . : . . : .^. .r.-..,
Do. middle d i s t r i c t - . . .
...
\. '
. . Do.:'western district!. . . . v . V - ^
Do. s o u t h e r r i d i s t r i c t . - . . . - . . .^
Do. Appalachicola d i s t r i c t . : : ;
* Wiscprisin.^..V. . - . : . . ...J.-:-\:^^j^^
:Iow^a..'^^.--.-v.-'^'.-. ....y.^----^"^.-..;
Marshal for the district of Maine i . -. ~.. i . -.. * •."*..:*..



$200 00
200 00
200 OQ
20.0 00
200 QO
20Q. QQ
200 00
• 2 0 0 00
20Q 00
600 00
200 OQ
200 .00
2QQ 00
- 2 0 0 00
;20Q OQ

2oa Qo
20a 00
20Q 00
-200 00
-20Q.00v
..200 OQ
^200 QO
.200 OQ
;20Q OQ
- - 5 OQ
r20
i2QQ 00
. 200 00

CO

Appropriations
made in 1839.




New Hampshire:
.
Vermont. ^ . .
............
^Rhode Islarid. - - .- - - . . . . . . . .
Connecticut.......... ^ . . . . .
New York, northern d i s t r i c t . . .
New Jersey....'. . . . - . . - . . . . . Penn sylyania, we sterri district.
Delaware . - - - - . .:. .^
—'...
Virginia, eastei'ri district. ^ L
Do. .western distrct.\ . . .
North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Iventucky...:.-.... .-.^^.,^^.. i . .
Ohio..;,
........... ^
Tennessee, eastern district-. - ^
. Do.- western distiict;.. ^:
Do. ; Jackson district...:.
Louisiana, eastern district.> . .
Do. ' .western district J.-..
Mississippi... S . . . . > . . . . . . - I r i d i a n a ^ . . . . . . . . . . * ^^.. - . ; . - .
Illinpis . . . . . . - . - . 1 . . . . ^ . . . .
Alabaina, northern d i s t r i c t . . . .
Do. southern d i s t r i c t . . . . .
Missouri....................
-MiGhigan.. •. -.-.".-.... . , • , . . . - . .
Arkansas.'-V.-.-V.-.--....--.---..
Florida, eastern district.^ . . : « ,
Do. middle district
Do. western district..
Do. southern district
,

200 00

.200 oa
-200 00
.200 00
-200 00
200 00
200 00
200 00
200 00
200 00
40Q 00
200 00
200 00
200 OQ
200 OQ
200.00
200.00
200 00
200 00
200 00
200 00
200 00
200 00
200 00

GO
CO'
CD

o

w
w

>

o

>

200 oa
'200
200
200
200

OQ
OQ
00
00

20Q oa

CO

ESTIMATE—Continued.

CO

>-*
QO

Marshal for Flprida, Appalachicola district. .^ !;.•>.-.-.".'•,-.'-.-.
Wisconsin-

«^-w;?w. ^ ^i';.-^••;-••--.".•"-'-';."-•^.-.---. ••.".'-.•^•^^'•.•'. V

I o w a . . . . . . .--''w -•^^;i-i-^^- --•.*=.'-.''- v.-.'.^.;.".-'---'^^.'';.^-.:

Appropriations •
made in 1839.

$200 00
200 00
:20Q130I

$14,550 00
For defraying the expenses of the'Supreme^ Circuity and Dis-:
trict Courts of the United States, ineiuding -the District-of
Colurnbia; also for jurors and witnesses,-in aid of the
funds arising from fines, penalties,- and-forfeitures incurred
in the year 1840, and preceding years> and likewise for.
defraying the expenses of suits in. which the United
States are concemed, and of rproseeutions for offences
committed against the United /States, and. for the safe^
keeping of p r i s o n e r s . . . ' . - . . . ^ w-^^... ^^ v^^-u i^^^^^^vi ^ «s ^ i

$14,842 00

300,000 00

128,000 00
$429,15a 00

Total civil ligt.>-..

2,685,030 73

MISCELLANEOUS.
ANNUITIES ••A:Nb ^'GRAiSf-TS.

Josiah H . Webb, per act bf December 1 2 , : i 8 1 1 . .
Rachel Dohrman,per act 3d March, 1817^^^
Elizabeth-"C. Periy, per act 2d "March, 1821...........
Elizabeth M. Periy, per afct M ' March, 1 8 2 1 . . . -....,



$50 00
300 00^
40a 00
15Q..00

I

900 00

1,050 00

For survey of, the. coast of the United States^ iricluding;the eornperisation
pfthe superintendent and. assistants i.^.'.;; ^ vs^^lc;.^^ .u^^:i^.^v;iVv;;2:-r4- ^
F o r the.salaries of two keepers ofthe pubhc archives in Florida Territory
F o r salaries o f registers ap^d . receiyers of land offices y^rhere there -are no
.For buildings and naabhiner^^^^ for- the Brapch Mint a t Gharlottei -North
Carolinaj being a balance due to. the ebinmiissioner appointed to superin• tend the"'erectiori of t h e buildings-. ••..-^*- •- •^."i;z •--.-.-. - • -.-. -:; -.'-.i--.-^^-. H.V.-.-. ^•-.-.
^ For/expenses iri relation t o t h e rehef of .certain insplvent dpbtors pf the
United States, rioihing required^ balance of appropriation deemed suffi-

100,000 .()Q
1^5^000

3,500

:0Q

90,000 00
1,000 00

00

12 20

^Qpo ao
Fbr aliowarice to'the law agent, assistarit counsel, and district attorney,
' under the acts providing for the settlement o t private; land claims in

.5,oao oa
MGHT-HOUSE ESTABLISHMENT.

For supplying the hght-houses, contairig 2,629 lamps, with oil,, tube glasses,
wicks, buff' skins, whiting,'and cottou cloth, transporting oilj&Ciy and
108,856 26
keepirig the apparatus in repair.
............
96,138 00
g^alaries of 235 keepers of li^t-te)uses'.>i. .^.v^^^i^ i;.; v . i i i i i i i .^ . . i : .
15,850 00 il
Salaries of 30 keepers of floating lights.
•
_
....--....-..-.
..
VNTeighing, mooring, cleaning, repairing, and supplying the loss.of beacons, jl
24,454 00
buoys,.chains, and sinkers . ^ .^ . . . . . . . . . - . . ; . . . . . ^ . . . . ^ . ^ . u . . . . . . . , . . . .^^
Incidental expenses, repairs and improvements of. light-houses, and the
f9^50a OOJl
/buUdings connected t h e r e w i t h . . . . . . . . ^ . - . . ^ ^-\: .^ ^ - i.>^>.v'- L^ . . \ ^ v .
Incidental expenses, seamen's wages, repairs and supplies to 30 floating
75,689 00
lights
. . - - - . . - - . i ' . ' . - . i i " . . . . v i . :..:.•.. i . . . . . . . ^ . . .
7,500 00
Superintendents' commissions
:......
.'.....
•4,ooa 00
Experises of exariiiriirig "arid reporting the cbriditibiibf hght-hbusBs'a^^^
1 431,987 26 • 394,331 00



E S T I M A T E B—Continued.

^

CO

iO

o
r...

•• '

PUBLIC BUIDDINGS IN WASHINGTON;

-

;

Appropriations
made in 1839.-

—

$51,000

m

$100,000 00

: 45,000

m

50,000 00

125,000 00

150,0Q0 00

For alterations-ari'd-repaks of the Capit^^^^ -and incidental expenses, f i .^^ .^
1,551 QQ
"Forlightinglanips, purchasing trees,^
' order the. pubho grourids around the Capitbl, .the iron water-pipes, ;and
.' •' wopden'.,fences.-^-'.,.'i.I....,^-:;;.r..z^. ^-..;,..>..;.. l--.- J^..-1.. - ^'.^^.-^^'S-.-^>.'-.-w. V^--^' • 6,86000
For attendance &t-the wp^^
.;
547 50
For salary pf thp:;priricipal.gardener^v.'....:-..fi : . . ..^z...v^^ w:.:-.,^'.^^.'..^r
. 1,200 00
For altei^atipns^ and :repairs of the President's? hbuse -and .furniture, for^ purchasing trees, shrubs, arid compqs^^^^^^^
3,665 00

1>198 00

For continuing the'construction-of Mhe new Treasuiy building..-, .v^.....-..
' .JVbife.-^The further'sum of |54..p00 has been asked for by the Commissioner^ to complete the
. colonnade and portico, a large portion of materials-being on hand, ahd cpnsiderable work on them
• executed.
'. : '
/ ". •/ ., •
•/ .'^
'
, • ,

For continuing the construction of the-new Patent Office building..: : :•. :
•

M)te,—^Th'e further sum of $55,000 has been asked for by the Coniniissioner, to complete-the porticb of said building. . :
"'</• ./' .
;. . :
:., ; . / ' •.. ^
r

For continuing the cpnstj.'uctiori of the new Genei-al. Post Office building..
JVb^fi.—;The further sum of •$125,000 has been asked/for by.the Commissioner, to complete"the
' said building according to contrkct. , , . : - J .
> . ;: :j • • V ^ . ;•': ' •; '-i(: :
";:•

^

$234,823 50^
For paymerits to t h e ^artists engaged in-executing Tour historical paint^^^
;.for the yaparit panelsbf ,the rpturido ofthe CapitpliU ...:.,.;^> y .>j^.<^ i.i.>. . •
'




•

•

•

.

6,300 00
547 50
1,200 00
3,465 00

-

8,000 00

8,000 00

For payments to LuigrPersico and Horatio Greenough for statues to adorn
the two blockings, east front of thPCapitol.
For the support and maintenance of the penitentiaiy of the District of
C o l u m b i a . . . : : . . . - . . . . " — \ . . . . . . . . . . . — — . — . - . . . . . . . . . . — . . -.
<

8,000 00

8,000 00

14,503 50

21,226 76

725,000 00

•20,000^00

.oEXPENSES OF THE SIXTH CENSUS.*

M

the enumeration arid returris, including
necessary
I Ofservices, &c., except postages. — . . . . \ . .the. 1, . \ " .blanks,. .clerical
.
. . . : . . . ...11
•

'

.

.

•

.

.

-

."

'

•

'

.

.

«

*

•

.

"

^

•

. •

••.

.

^

•

'

•

'

'

•

,

.

"

•

-

.

.

"

7 JVbfe^^Unless the law is altered, which is requested to be done, exernpting the blanks, &c.., from
postage, there will be required -in addition as follows, for postages also. ; If those on the.transmission of blEQiks are charged at the rate of letter postage^ as was iordered by the Eost Office
. Department.............
.;.../...;..;... .V...........,.........'.
. . . . .$370,000 00
If charged at the rate of pamphlets, (not periodical,) as was done in the case of the .
fifth census.,
.t
:
...'
:
: . . . . . : . 51,000 00
If charged at the rate of periodical pamphlets.
20,000 00
SURVEYING THE PUBLIC LAND.S.

In addition, to the uriexpended balances of former appropriations , for surveying the public lands, to be apportioned to-the several ;surveying districts, according'to the exigencies of the public service.: . . . . - " . .•.;.-.....
For closing the' surveys bf the public lands in the State of Mississippi,
chiefly relinquished contracts. With authority to expend the same at a
rate not exceeding $8 per mile
•.'
— .
For retracing certain old surveys in the State of Mississippi, with-authority
to expend the same at a rate not exceeding $6 per mile for section lines,
and $8 per mile for township
fines.....^......
For cpnqipleting—the surveys of unfinished portions of townships, islands,
lakes, &c., in Florida, at a'price not exceeding $5 per mile, in addition
' to an unexpended balance of the $6,000 appropriated per act of March
3,1837.......
,._.
:



215,000 00
. .18,640 .00
17,200 00

10,000 00

ESTIMATEr^Continued.
to.

For surveying in the; State pf Louisiana, with, authority to; expend the sarne
at a rate not exceeding $8 a-mile, and t o b e applied, if hereafter: found
expedient, for. retracing and correcting certain old. surveys: in. said State,
chiefly inthe St. Helena district- — . - -.
.....:.,...-.......

Appropriations
made in 1839.-

$10,000 00
$270,840 00

For completing the custom-hous.e buildirig at New York,. $138,743 is. asked
for b y t h e commissioners, but it is recommended by the Departinent to
postpone $20,OQO to another year, leaving to be appropriated the sum t)f...
To meet expenditures for the-building of the n e w custbrQ-hpuse'at Boston..

$47,000 00

118,743 00
121,000-00

i5a,ooo 00
75,000 00

JVbie.—^The further sum of |79,000 has been asked for by the commissioners for twenty granite
colurnns, but as these may not be-essentialin the^presentstat-eof the building, or affect the progress
of the work, it is deemed unnecessary that' any appropriation for -that object should be made for
th'e ensuing year.
. ^

For experises incurred-by the. Collector of New York urider the act of
- March 19^ 1836, fbr the reliefof the sufferers'by fire iri the city of New.
3,354 00
For the discharge of such iniscellaneous claims against the Ilnited States,
not otherwise provide.d fbr, as shaU.be admitted iri due cou;rse of settlement at the'Treasury,-(nothing' required,.' balance of .appropriation,
deemed sufficient).. . ^ w - . - - . . . . ' : . - ^ . . ; . - ! • . . . . . . . i . . . . . . . . . . . ^ ."..^. ^..,
' Total miscellaneous

>

^

I N T E R C O U R S E W I T H FOREIGN NATIONS.
The Secretaiy of State estiniates, v i ^



•>

,

...
-

..^ .
•

12,000 00
[$2,046,663.46|

For salaries ofthe.. Miriisters ofthe United Stateato Great Britain, France,.
Spain, Russia, Prussia,: Austria,, and.Mexico. .:-.^
......
..,
For salaries bf Secretaries, of Legation to the .same places................. 1.......
For salary of the Minister Resident of the United States to. Turkey.
,
For salaries ofthe Charges d'Affaires, tp Portugal, Demnark, Sweden, Holland, Belgium, Brazil,. Chih,..Peru, New Granada, Venezuela, Texas,
Naples, and Sardinia-—
....--.-....•..--,>.-....Contingent expenses., of all t h e missions abroad - - -.-.;...-.-.-. -..-. -. -. -. *. -. - -. *...,..
Outfits of-a Minister tb Russia, and of Charges d'Affaires to HbUand and
oaroinia - . . . . -..«...,«...,........... « • * - . * - . . . * . . . . . . . . « « . . . . « . . . . . . . .

63;,Q00. OQ
14,000 00
M O O 00

54,000 00
12,00Q 00
6,000 00

58,50Q 00
30,00a 00

59,784 00
30,000 00

18,000 00

4,500 00
1§9,50Q QO

For salaries of the., consuls at Xondon and P a r i s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .„,...,,................
For the relief and prote.ctipn of American..seamen iri. foreign cpuritries,..-.;
.For clerk hire, offic.e. rerit, stationery, and other expenses, iri^ the office bf the
American consul at London, per act of Januaiy 19, 1836
......'....,
For interpreters, guards, and other expenses,, inqident to the consulates in
the Turkish doniinions— — . . . . . . . . . . . - - . . . . ^
-

4,000 00
40,000 00

4,000 00
.40,000 00

2,800 00

2,800 00

5,500 00

5400 QQ.
52,300 00

Total foreign intercourse-

$241,800 00

MILITARY E S T A B L I S H M E N T .
Estimate of the Secretary of Wiar of the sums requii=ed to be- approprif^
ated for thp^service of;the W a r Department for the year 1840:
PAY DEPARTMENT.

P a y ofthe Aimy
Subsistence of officers.



1,172,028 oa
514,489 00

1,534,832 00
470,754 00

CO

ESTIMATE-^Continued.
Appropriations
made in 1839.

Forage of officers' horses
Payments in lieu of clothing... - .
P a y of cadets and of officers and musicians at the Military Academy, and
for forage of the officers' horses, and clothing for their servants

$114,571 00
80,030 00

$111,115 00
59,400 00

103,558 00
1,984,67.6 00

103,558 00

47,163 27

30,927 00

ADJUTANT GENERALES DEPARTMENT.

For extra pay to reenhsted soldiers
For expenses of recruiting.._

9,420 00
37,743 27

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT.

•For Army clothing and e.quipa7ge.
.. .i
....
-. - -.
• • - - .425,635 67
For taxes on the Passyunk arsenal, in clothing bureau near Philadelphia,
1,450 5a
fbr i839 and 1 8 4 0 . J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L . . .
..............

473,435 00
427,086 17

SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT.

For subsistence in kind . . . . . . . . . i

•

.

....

515,492 00 1,122,831 00

Q U A R T E R M A S T E R ' S DEPARTMENT.

fiRegular and Ordinary Ohjects.
For regular supplies
.'
...........
,
For barracks, quaiters, storehouses, &c. . . ^ . . . . . ^ . .
For transpoitatiori of officers' b a g g a g e . . . . . . » . . , , . , . .




271,ooa 00
173,000 66
65,006 00

245,500 00
100,Q00 00
- 60;006 00

For transpoitation of troops arid supplies.
Iricidental expenses'..;.... - . . . .•;.'..-.. 1.
Contingencies of the A r m y . . . : . . . : : . . . :

205,000 00
102,000 00
7,000 00

[ 287,000 00 1
121,000 00
7,000 00
924,000 00

•
Special and Extraordinary Ohjects.
30,000 00
For continuing the^barracks, quarters,- &c.,',at Fort;Leavenworth. . . . . ' . " . .
20,000 00
For continuingthe.barracks, quaiters," &c., at Fort. W a y n e . . . . 1. . - i . . . . .
For. continuing the'barracks,.quarters,' Sec.,- at Foit.Siriith . . . J . . . . . - . . . .
.50,000 00
Fbr continuing the barracks, quarters, &c.; at P l a t t s b u r g . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . " . . ' • 20,000
00
. 50,000 00
For commencing the proposed .work; at Fort. G i b s o n . . . , . . ' . . . . . . . . . . I^..
For purchase of a site and comniericemerit.of barracks, quarters, &c., near
20,000 00
For purchase of a site and coirirriericement of,barracks, quaiters, &c., at
50,-000 00
. Detroit. : . , . . . . - . . v . . . . . : . - . : . . . . : . : . : : . . . 1 . . . . . .^. i . . . . ' . . . . . . . . ! . '
1 10,000 •00
For commencement of barracks, "quarters, &c., at O s w e g o . . . . . . . . . .
. 10,000 00
For continuing the barracks, quaiters, &c., "at Fbit Jesup. - - . . . . - . - . - . .
18;588: 82
For barracks, quaiters,"&p.,' at S a v a n r i a h . . . . : , . . • . . . . " . . . . . . . ^ . . . . . . ' . '
, .9,029 53
For barracks,.quarters,'&c., at Fort Severn.'.. .^ . 1 ^ . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 . 1 . . 1 .

20,000 00

287,618 35
,

:

;

MEDICAL AND HOSPITAL D E P A R T M E N T .

For medical and hospital department

^.

1

.

38,000 00

.. .

24,400 00

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT.

_ .
Military Academy.
• ' '
For defraying the expenses of the board bf visiters, and the other various,
current, and ordinary expenses of the academy, other than pay, subsistence, &c
.;
For increase and expense of the library
..--.....



27,193 95
1,300 00

48,497 09 I
28,493 95

1,000 00

CO

ESTIMATE—Continued.
• ,
V
'Fortificcitions.
For repairs of Fort N i a g a r a . . . . . , . . . . . . . . /
-For rebuilding old fort at O s w e g o . . . . . . . . . .
-..
For a fort at the outlet of Lake. Champlain.
-r
-—-For repairs of Foit Preble..For repairs of Fort S c a m m e l . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..-......
For repairs of Fort McClaiy.
^
....---For repairs of Fort Constitution -.
For repairs of Fort Independence and sea-wall of Castle Island..'...
For Fort Warreri . . . . . . . . . . . ^.......,..,'...:. . i . . . . . . .
.......1...
For Fort. Adams..:. ^ . . . . . . , . - . :
......:.....'.'.... . \ . . . . . . .
FortifibationsatNe^ Loridon h a r i D o r . . . . . . . . . . ' 1 . . . . . : : . . , ' / . . . 'fi...
F o r t Schuyler.. / . . . . . . . . . . . . ^ . . ^ . . . .
.................,...,
Repairs of Fort H a r i G L i i t o r i ' : . . . : : . . : : . : . . . . , . : ; : . . : . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Repairs of-Fort L a f e y e t t e . . - . . . . 1 . - . . . . . . . : . . . . . . v . . . . ^ . . . ^ . . . . . .
Repairs of^FprtCbluriibus :.-...-...'. ; . . . ; ! / . . . . : . . . .L : . L . . : . . . ^ . . .
Repairs, of Fprt; Castie W i U i a r i i . . . . ; . . . . . . . . : . . . : . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . .
.Repairs of :south battery,' Goyerrior's-Island....,.. . . . . • . : . . . . . . . . 1."
.Fort at Soller^'?Poiritflats, Patapsco r i v e r . . . . . . . . .-..-.•
. . ^. ^
Fort;Monrbe.. 1 . . . . . . .-..^•...... . . . ' . • . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . ..->,- r - ^ - - - Rebuilding bridge over Mill Greek,:riear Fbrt M o n r o e . . . - . . . . . : . . . . .
Repairs ofroad fiom Fort; Monroe.to'tht3 bridge'over M i l l ' C M e k . . . . .
Purchase of land in the^ieiriity ixf-Fort Monroe . . . . . .
. . - ^ - -.
Fort Calhoun . . . . : . . *
'.
........................
..Fort C a s w e U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . : . : : . . . . : . . . . . : : . . . . : . . . : . . , . . : . :
Fort'Suriiter.':.. . . ^ . , : . : . : : . : . . I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - , . : . . . .::'.•
3aira>pf ;F0n/Moultrie.\ . J.... V . . . . ^ . . . ; . . . . . ^ . . . . . . . I . . . . . .^^.




Appro}3r,ialions
made in 1839.

$27,500 00
20,000 00
50,000 .00
. 3,200 00
3,400 00
750 00
. 3,671 00
100,000 00i50j000 00
80,000 00
25,000 00
8o;ooo 00
'20,000 00
5,000 00
•1,662 oa
5,735 0.0
-3,500 00
25',aO;Q O
Q
50,000 00
5;,poa 00
i,aoa Q
O
i,aoo do
50,000 O
Q
6^000 oa
125,000 M
;:io,aoa.aa

$30,000 00
20,000 00

25,000
40,000
10,000
5,000
10,000

00
00
00
00
00

2,000 00^
10,000 00

15,Q00 00
:5,aoa 00
iQ,ooa 00

Fort P u l a s k i ; . . . . .^
.1
. - . . . . . . I:...
Fort on Foster's bank, Florida — . . . . . . . . % . . ^ . . . . . .
'.
— ...
. Fort Pickens, Florida
- Repairs of Port Barancas.
- . . . . . . . . -.
*.......:
....:..
Repairsof Fbrt Morgan. : . . . . ; • . : : 1^"^
1.:;..;.,.;. ...^..;....'.... 1
' Repairsof Fort Pike, Louisiaria. i . . . . . . . . . . . . ' ^ ^ . ^ i . . . . . : . . : . . . . . . ; : . . .
Repairs of Fbrt Wood, Louisiana. . . . . - . . . 5>;^.
. ^ . . i . . . ; . . . . . . . L.. 1
Repairs of Battery Bierivenue,. L o u i s i a n a . . . . . . . . . . . •
..........
Repairs of Tower Dupre, t o u i s i a r i a . . - . . . . . . . . '
.*.... — .'..
Repairs of Fort Jacksori, Louisiana. L i ^ . , . - . . . . . . . . . . ^ . . . — . 1 . . . . . . L
Repairs, pf Fort St. Philip's, Louisiana
,..
........
Fort Livingston, Grand Terre,;Louisiana . . . . : . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . ° . .
Contingericies bf fortifications . . . . . . . . . . i . . . . . i . .;....r... I . . . . . 1 . . V . . - • incidental expenses teeriding the repairs of fortificatioris . . ' . „ . . . . . . . . . . .
ORDNANCE DEPAkTMENT.

'

/-

15,000 00
5,000 00

44,000 00
14,000 00
; 8,000.
00
15;O0O 00
10,000 .00'
.5,000- 00
• '3,580 00
2,500 00'
.. 400 00'
20,000 00
• 3,300 00
15,000 00
l6,.000 00
'56,000 00

15,000 00
10,600 00
50,000 00
$953,198 00

:

100,000
100,000
120,060
360,000
150,000
20,000

For the current expenses oifthe^ordnance s e r v i c e . . . . 1..^. i . . . . . . . . ' . . : . . . 100,000 00
• For armamerit of
fortificatioris.........
i...
. _ . . . . . . ^ : . . . . . : 1 . . 1 . 150,000 00
For ordnance, ordnance; stores^ and s u p p l i e s , , . - . . ..^ ..
. . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . 100,000 00
360,000 00
For national aririories
..............
For arsenals
-..\.....
.
. . . • . . . • . . . . . . . : ^ 1-5O,-0OO,00
10,500 do
Fbr repairs arid.improverii'erits at Spririgfield a r m o r y . . . . . . .
. . . . . 11
50,000 00
For repairs arid improveirients at Harper's Ferry aiiriiory.^ . . . : . . . . . . . .
For purchase of saltpetre and brimstorie. . . . . . . . . . .
. . - - . . . . « . . . . ."i.
»40,000 00
For expenses of preparing drawings o f a uniform system of aitfilery, and
other supplies in the Ordnarice department.
3,000 00
For mihtary and geographical surveys of the country west ofthe Mississippi.
To complete the survey ofthe Des Moines and Ibw^ m m . . . . . . . . . . , .




3,800 00

963,500 00

2. Surveys.
16,000 00
2,000 00

00
00
00
00
00
00

ESTIMATE—Continued.

•CO

00

For surveys and exaniinations of a mrhtary and civil character

-

3. Light-houses.
For the removal of the light-house on Goat Island . " . : : . . : . . . . . . . \". l l l l 1
For rebuilding the hght-house on Brandywine shoal, iri the Bay bf Dela• -ware .,
1 . - . . . ' . . . . . .-.^.-. :'!'.-. 1-i.-..-...
•. :•'.'.'. l'....-. . i . - . . . . .^.-1 ;'
• J ^' . "

4:. Pensions'.

. -. ,

....

Appropriations
made in 1839.

$30,000 00
$48,000 00
•11,842 00

,706 75

90^000.00
101,842 00

.;.

For revolutionaiy pensioris under the act of 18th March, 1818, in additiori
'. to the probable balance at the end of; 1839.. 1 . 1 . . . ; . . . . . - 1 1 . 1 1 1 : i . . . . 1
For-perisions to v^idpws^ and brphans under the act of 4tK July, 183.6, in
-addition to the. probable balance at the end" of 1 8 3 9 . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . .
For five years'pensions to widbws, under the act of 7th July,* 1838, in
addition to the probable l^alaric.e at4he end of 1839 . . . . . . . 1 . . . ...'*...For half-pay perisions,'payable through the Third Auditor's office.'!;^.."...

112,132 00

326,250 00

23,676 00

490,084 52

863,540 oa
1Q,606^*00

1,372,000.00
, 10,000 00

. '.. ^ , . . , ' .

1,009,348 00

For .arrearages payable through the Third Auditor's office - 1 . .11,.. 1 1 . . .1

1,500 00

• -

v. , .' ' .
....

" ,

5.'Arrearages: ,.

'..'.-..'

&. Indiaii Department.. .

' ' . ... ..

* -.- -

For the fulfilment pf the treaties with the various Indian t r i b e s . . . . . . . . . . 1 .788,593 00
Fbr the current expenses of .the Iridian depaitment,'iricludirig ti'arisporta95,1.00 00
tion and injcidental expenses. .•: 1 . . . ^ . / . : . . . ! : . . . : . . 1,.:. 1




747,460 00
102,100 00
883,693 00

' Total militaiy..

3,000 00

3,213>610 74

NAVAL E S T A B L I S H M E N T .
There wiU be required for the general service of the Navy, duringthe year
' 1840, iri addition to'the balances whichv.may reniain bri hand on the .Ist
of'Jariuaiyi "viz:.
•
/
-. .
. . . . ^. , .
...
Fbr the pay pf commission, warrant, and petty officers and spairien' 1. .^. * 2,250,000 00
For the pay of superintendents, riaval constructors, .arid all the civil estab74,620 00
, lishnxeiits of theseveral y a r d s . . . . X . . . . 1 . . " - ^v
-;-. - -". - - - - -.- For provisioris.
. . . . . .,-\. . ' J . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . i . . 2 . . .V-- - - . . ^ - . - . . . . 620,000-00
For the repairs of vessels in ordiriaiy,"and the-repairs and wear ^arid-tear
' -of vessels i n . c o m n i i s s i o n . . . . . . . . . . . , ' . .
......
..
..-•-..-. i : . . i,o6o,O0Q 00
For .riiedicinfes arid surgical instruirients, hospital stores, and other expenses
75,000 00
on accourit ofthe sick.. .^1.
...1....--,-.-.
"For the improvement and necessaiy repairs of navy-yards, viz: 7 ' .; •
Portsmouth, New Hampshire J . . . ,
. . . ' . . . . , . . . . . . . . . .V... -. . 1 .
20,000 00
Charlestown, Massachusetts . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . - ' - . . - - - - r - „ 17,000 00
18,000 oa
. Brooklyn, New York . . 1 . . . . " . . . . . . l.\.. . 1 . . . - ' . . V . . ^ . . . 1".... l - ' , . . . ;
•\ Philadelphia, Pennsylvania .'."... 1 . . . . . . . . . . . .".•.'........."...'....' . 5,000 00
Washington, District of Cblumbia . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,000 QO
17,250 00
Gbspoit,: Virginia . . . . J
...................
. . . . — . . . . . . . . . 1.
. Pensacola, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . ' - . : . - . . .13,000 00
65,000 00
For ordnance arid ordnance, s t b r e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . .
. -.........
For contingerit expenses..
. . . . - . . . - . . - . . - . • . . . . . . . . . .•...• 45a,000 00
For contingent expenses not enumerated... _ . . . . . ' • . . . . . . . .
. . . , - . . . . . . 3,000 00

' • "-V

2,352,625 64
44,000 00
.600,000 00

.

^

•

i,ooo,aoo 00

'•.;..:••_:

.
.
.
'
.
.
.
.
.
.

75,000 06
' 30,000
26,000
7,500
8,000
26,a00
64,000
25;000
65,ooa
450,00a
3,000

4,647,870 00 ^
SPECIAL ESTIMATES.

• '

It is proposed that Congress be. requested to authorize the transfer of
$340,0Q0 from the appropriation for the gradual improvemerit of the
Navy, in addition to the sum of $330,000 already conditionally author


00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

CO
CO

ESTIMATE^Coritiriued.

o
Appropriations
made in 1839.

ized by the act making appropriatibns for the support of the Navy, ap, proved 3d March, 1839, for completing two steamers of war, which have
; / b e e n commenced under that act: said.trarisfer to be authorized under the
sanieconditions and •restrictions'^as, iri. that already authorized: ^
T o reappropriate the balance of the aniount appropriated 3d March,.-18'35,
for a site and constructiori-of a dry-dock In the harbor of New York,
W'hich was subsequently carried to the^ surplus fund. - - - .
•-....,- -.
To meet expenses• on account of hospitals, viz:'
'
, For the. hospital at New Y o r k : . . . . . . . : . , . . . . . . . . . . . 1 : . - . . . . . . . ."$9,500
. . ; \ * ; P h i l a d e l p h i a . . . ^.."
" . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . ' 4,250„
'
.' NorfolkK---:......-^---.-..^.;...--,--.."---'3,500
•
*
^
P e n s a c o l a . . . . ; . . . . . . . . . . . . \ . . i ' . , ^ . . . . . . . . . 7,00.6
$35,260 00
$119,313 61
\ ^

- M A R I N E C O R P S . '

For the pay of officers, nori-cbmriii^sibried officers^, riiusicians, priVates, arid
-, seryaiits servirig on shore, and subsistence of bfficers.
'.'......
For provisibns for the'nori-coirimissioned officers, iriusiciaris, privates, 'se'r;; vants, arid' washerwomen, servirig on shore
..-•.... .!?......•....
Fbr clothirig.. ^ _. . ^ . . . . . . . ..^........... .•-.'•.. . f i . . . . : . . ^ . , fi.... fi. .^. 1
^Fbrfiiel-;..../..::..... ^
. \ \ ; . . . ' . . : . . . . ; . ^ , . . . . . . } , . . ! . . . 1 . . . . . .^..
..
For keeping barracksliri repair, and: for rent of temporaiy barracks at New
For transportation of officers, nori-cornmissioried officers, musiciaris, and

privates, and expenses bfrbcruiting^......... 1 ^ . . w ^ ^ . . . . . . . . . . . . I
:..


175,050-40
45,054 99
V43,662 50
16,274 12
6,000 00
8,000 o a

For mediciries, hospital :supphes, ^surgical instfumerits, a M pay of matron
and hospital s t e w a r d s . . . . . . 1 . 1 . . . . . . .*. ^ . . . . . . ; " . ' . - . . ^. i ; . . . ' . . " . . . . . .
For military'stores, pay bf-.ariribrers,'keepirig afrns in repair, Sec. . . . . . 1 .
For contingerit experises.. .:-w.. .,=;. . ^ . . . . . . V . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . - . 1 . . . . . . . . .

^4,140 00
;^2;300 00
17,980:00
318,462 01

Total n a v a l . . . . . . .
Aggregate'..........
;

•
V '

.

$5,085,645^62
18^272,750 55\

'REqAPlTtJLATION.
.

,

CIVILLIST.

Legislature .....,.,...
..,..,... ... /.;.....,..
^.,.-.,-.
Presideut and Vice Presiderit of the United-States........
Secretaiy to sign patents for .public. lands
- :.. -.. - . . . .
. Bepartment bf. S t a t e . . . . . . . .
• Treasury D e p a r t n i e n t . . . . .
; . . . . . . . . .„
.
... —
War Departnient.
,... 1
..
Navy : D e p a i t m e r i t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1..,. ....... . . . . . .
Post Office Departriient.....:.. . t . . . . . . . . . . . .
Surveyors arid their clerks. . . , . .
.....................
. Comriiissioner of the. Public. Buildings and his. assistants,
Mint ofthe United States and its branches.
Governments in the. Territories of the Uriited States'...;..
Judiciary.... .,!'..
......... .... ......*...

1,116,731 ,50
:30,oo.a 00
i,50Q oa
56,150 QQ
370,517 QO
141,685 QO
'-49,200 00
158,700. OQ
64,047 23
5,250 QO
138,900 00
123,200 00
429,150 oa
2,685,030 73

MISCELLANEOUS.

Annuities and grants



900 00

STATEMENT—Continued.

CO
CO

to

Survey of the coast of the United States-.. —
.
_
$100,000 00
Salaries ofthe' two keepers of the public archives in Florida
1,000. 00
Salaries of the registers and receivers of land offices where there, are.no
- 3 , 5 0 0 00
.Buildings and machineiy for the Branch Mirit at Charlotte, North Carolina.•
. ; 12 20
.Expenses in relation, to rehef of insolvent debtors. . ,
Allowance to law agent,. &c., in. relation to private land''claims in Florida- ; ' 5,000"'oa
.Light-house establishment..
.
.. 1.,.'..-...
I . . . . . . . . . . ~ . . . . . . 431,987 26
Public'buildings in W a s h i n g t o n . . - . ; . . . . . . .
.
..
-.
:.
. . . 234,823 '50
Historical paintings for the.Capitol.''..
.-......'-...
*.. _. ^. ;^-.
8,000 ao
Statues for the CapitoL . . . .
" .-•..... 1.... l . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
..'
8,00Q 00
Suppoit arid maintenance of the periitentiaiy .of the .District of Cplumbia. . 14,503 '50°
Expenses of the sixth c e n s u s — . . . - . . . . . , :
:'..;,,... .^...
725,000'00
Surveying the-public lands. . ' • . . . . . . . .
• . - .> - . . ' . . . ' - - - . . . . . . . 27a,840' 00
Completing- the custom-house at New Y o r k . . . .
•.. . 118,743 00
Continuingxthe custom-house at . B o s t o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
121,000 00
^Expenses incurred under the act for the re.lief of the sufferers by'fire in
New Y o r k . . . - . . . . . : . . .
.-.
.'
...:..
3,354 00
2,046,663 -46
:

INTERCOURSE WITH FOREiaN NATIONS.

Salaries of. Ministers
^ .^... l
:
Salaries of Secretaries of Legation,
.
..
Salary of a Minister Resident to Turkey 1 . . . . . . . . ; . . . . " , . : . " . . . • . . ' : . . . .
Salaries of Charges.d'Affaires .^... - . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . ; . ^
.... 1 _. . • . . , , . . "
Contirigent experises of all themissionsabroad:.;'.-.. . . ' . . ' ; . • . . . . . . . . . " . .
Digitized forOutfits, of a Miriister and two Charges d'Affaires. I . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FRASER


63,000 00
14,000 00:
6,00.0 00
58,500 00
30,000 00
i8,00Q 00

1
4,000 00
Salaries of the consuls at London and P a r i s . . . . . . . / . . . • .
Relief and protection of Anierican s e a m e n . . .
40,000 00
- , 2,800-00
Clerk hire, office rent, &c., to American consul at L o n d o n . . :
Interpreters, guards, &c., to the consulates in the Turkish dominions:;;.
5,500 00
241,800 00
IN^ilLITARY ESTABLISHMENT.

P a y departmerit.. i .
.......................
Adjutant General's departrnent.
—
Purchasing depaitment.
. . . . . -,.,.\
•Subsistence departmerit..
... .i............
Quartermaster's depaitment..
.:
.
Special and extraordinary o b j e c t s . . . . . . . . . . . ' - . . , . .
Medical arid Hospital departmerit. - . 1 . . . - - --'.......
Military Academy
-.-.;...- :-Fortifications . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . 1 .^........'..
Ordnance department
......... J....
....
Surveys.
Light-houses...
Perisions - - . c
..
Arrearages . . : . . . . . ,
Indian d e p a r t m e n t . .
NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT.

General"service of the Navy.
Special objects .
,.
Marine corps
.
......




4,973,494.19|
1,984,676 00
.
47,163 27
427,086 17
.515,492 00
924,000 00
287,618 35
^ ^ 38,000 00 .
28,493 95
^ 953,198 00
963;500 00
48,000^00
.. 101,842 00
1,009,348 oa
1,500 00
883,693 00
8,213,610 74
4,647,870 00
1.419,313 61
318,462 01
5,085,645 621

1

18,272,750 5 5
• $

STATEMENT—Continued.

CO
CO

RECAPITULATION OF SUBMISSIONS, TO BE ADDED TO THE CIVIL LIST HEAD.

Superintendent of the building occupied by the Treasuiy Depaitment. .^
Clerks in the office ofthe Secretary of the N a v y . - . . . . . '
-...•...•...
Clerks in the office of the Commissioners of the. Nayy B o a r d . .
..
.-

$250 00
3,800 00
3,800 00,
$7,850 oa

Tbtal estimates.

.........

.

18,280,600 5 5

Statement cfi Appropriations made fior tJie service ofi the year 184:0 hyfiormer acts
^ofi Congress.
'
Arming and equipping militia, per. act of •23d* April, 1808.
$2oa,oQa O
Q
Civilization of Indians^ per act 3d March, 1 8 1 9 . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . - . . . . . . .
iQ,aoa 00
Revolutibnaiy claims, (indefiriite,) per.act 15th May, 1 8 2 8 . . , . . ^.......
66,006. oa
Revolutionaiy pensions, (indefinitej)"per a c t 7 t h June, 1 8 3 2 . . . . 1 . . ' . . . . . . .950,000 GQ;
Glaims ofthe State of Virginia, (iridefinite,) per act 5th .July, 1 8 3 2 ; . . . . . . . .
ia,aoQ 00.
For pubhc debt, payable at the Treasury; per act 3d March,-1817. . . . . . . .'.
10,000 OQ
If the sum of $34.0,00.0 should be authorizedto be taken from the appropriation for the gradual improvement of the.Navy, as-proposed,.the-sum
of $410,0.aO out of the .'$750,000 which-will be, due in 18.40, under the
appropriatibn. for the ^gradual improvement o f t h e Navy, .per ^ act-of 31st
bf May, 1838, may be postponed until .1841 without any prpbable injury
to the public interest, if it sho.uM.be:deemed desirable, provided the
total amounts which have been or.may be transferred from the^ gradual
340,0Qa^ 00 ;
improvement, shall be everitually restored by future, appropriatioris $1,586,Q00 00
JVo.^^.—Treasury notes amounting^,; to. a^Qut #2,7^^
most of wKich may be redeemed'in 1840, are riq^



andv p60,d00. interest, and

Statement accompanying the Annual Estimates and Appropriatiom, fiormed. iii pursuance ofi the 8th section ofi the act ofi the
• •
1st May,.1820.
.
\
-*
. ^ '
- ." "

H E A D S QB APPROPRIATIONS.

Officers and clerks of both Hbuses of C o n g r e s s . , . . . .
:...:.....
Purchase of books for the library bf Cbngre.ss. - -.. - -,
-. - - •Purchase of law. books for the library of Cprigress....:....'.....*.,..
Compensation to the President and Vice President of the United
States, Secretaries of State, & c . . . . . . . . . ' - . . . . • . . . . . .
.,...
Clerks and. ines sengers iri the office of the Secretary of State'..,
Contingent expenses.-of the bffice of the • Secretary of State......
Biennial Register . . . : . . . • .
.,-.. •.
---- --- --^ -- Clerks and messengers" in the several offices. of the. Treasury
• Depaitment..-.
'.'.
...
•Contingent expenses of the several offices o f t h e Treasury Departinent. . . . .
-..
_
.
.......-.,
Clerks and messengers in* the several, offices of the W a r Departr
. ment
.."
.
.
.,
Clerks and messengers in the office of the Secretaiy of the
.-Navy.......'.".
...:.-.."
....'
..'....
Contingent expenses of the office of the Secretary of the Navy.



lAmounts required to [Amounts which will
.complete.^ the ser- not be required for
vice of the' present the service, of the
and former years, present yea:r,- and
though they may may therefore be
not ,be! called .for applied' in . aid of
until after the close the service of the
year 1840.
of the year 1839.

Amounts which may.be carried to the surplus fiind at
the close of , the present
year, either because the objects for which it was appropriated are -completed,
or . because these^ moneys
willnot be required for, or
will no longer be applicable
to them..

$4,439 50
$2,500 00
^ 1,36Q 80
10,00Q OQ
$30 77
9,895 40
3,99 23
8,77.6 72
24,126 58
1,050 00

556 13
105 92

• 1,400 00

00
CO
CD

STATEMENT—Continued.

CO
CO

a

Coritingent.expenses of the office of the Commissioners, of the
. Navy Board . . . . .
1
.
Contingent- expenses, of the southwest'executive building . . . . . .
Clerks'and messengers in the office of the P.ostmaster GeneraL
Clerks- and messengers in -the office of the Auditor for the Post
Office Depaitment*
l.-., —
. .\
.. — :
'.Guarding the site of the. old post office, &c.
.....
Surveyors General and their clerks • . . . . .
-.......
Secretaiy to sign patents for-public^lands.. —
....-....Commissioner of :the •Piiblic^Buildingsl . . . . : . . . . . . . ^ . . : . ' . . . . - .
Expenses of the Legislative' Council of Florida T e r r i t o i y . . . . . . .
Governor,, Judges, and Secretaiy of-.Florida Territory. 'fi-. . ^
^
. Governor, Judges, and Secretary of Wisconsin Territory!. ..•....
Arreafages of .expenses of Legislative "Assembly, of Wisconsin

00
2,000, 00

$42 30

35,328 SO
' 375 00
575. 00,
. 5,000 00
2,875 00
2,275 00

393 13
837 28.
11,384- 49

3,378 55
. 239 67
2,89Q 69

Expenses of Legislative" Assembly bf Wisconsin Territoiy.,....
Governor, Judges; and Secretaiy of Ipwa T e r r i t o r y . . . . . . . . . .
Governor, Judges, Secretaiy, District Attorney,'Marshal, and con. tingent expenses;of Iowa Territoiy
: . . . . ..-^- ^ . . . . . . . . . 1 . . .
Expenses of Legislative Assembly of Iowa Territoiy
"...
Chief Justice and Associate Judges of the District ofColumbia,
Chief Justice and Associate Judges ofthe United States,-fee. , .
Compensation t o District Attorneys and Marshals
,..:....
.
Expenses-of courts of-the United. States, & c . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . , . . : . .
Salaries of officers -and clerks of Branch Mint, New Orleans, i . ^
 of officers and clerks of Branch. Mint,' C h a r l o t t e . . . . . . .;
Salaries


' 5,Q27 10'
2,200 00
5,552 45
20,750 00
3,175
23,475
5,195
75,000
12,519
3,500

ob
00:
97
00
78
00

509 79
4,706 76

S alaries o f officers^ and "cterks^bfBrarich' Mint,' Dahlonega.'....., ^
3•2S0•a0
Purchase of copper for the Mirit . f i ' - : . . : : . -~.':. •..'.'.":'. ;.'.."." i": .^.
P a y .of laborers iri t h e various departrnerits orthe"*Mirit.*i'--'.;...
]i8,aoa i o
<l incidental and;ebritingeritexperises, arid repairs of the" Mirit."..'. .•
iirL,^aa^0Q
f Wastage' of ;gbld-aiid bQritingerit'^exp'erises of'Brarich "Mmt, T>]ahg
Ibnega .i.v.'-i i^^-^ww-- v^.^^ J-.-^J'^'.-J^'. '^-.^^ -;----.^-L''V.'C-W ..y^-.'^--J..-'.!^^i-u'.^-:.^.2,daQ 00-^
Y Buildings, r&cv, :at (Braric>h:Mirit^ NevTOrlearis.'. :-y...;.:
fi....;.
io;ooo oa.
ib Wastage ^bf gbM^and (goritiHg^rit^exj^
21,175 00:
^ P a y of; labGrei^,^Nevi^O^^
.." .V . . . ; . " . : . J : . . " . : : ' . - ' ; ;-.|
22;244 78;
462'50;
. ,4Payinerit-of/stiriSiy'^^^
L-UV'.>.kKfi<}:--J-X^.XLi^'C.:L':'-^'-y^.-'./.l
Support'arid"riiaihteriari'c'^e.of light-hbu^PsV'&c.".;..'.'..:..'..:.. .1
iiQ^oofOa
- Buildihg;light4ipus;es,''&^
.i^.U.---.^... w'- .LiJ^^^.-^ .^^ij^^-. w.i <.=-i.*. 400^000 "00:
, Surveying the publico l a n d s : . : si^:.:^ .•...".:;. - . . J : . . . ; . : . . . . .
53;Q0Q 00:
"Survey of'the'Gbast-bfAe'Urife
i^v-^^. j^L->^K'.-'!.y-lh. 'iL:..^^::fi
20,000 00
Keepers 'of the 'public archives iri " F l o i i d a . . ' . . . . . . . . " . ' . . . . . " . . . .
. ^250-do.
Procuring'books'arid {)aj)ers;^^ating-tb'=S|>&ish-grants
20,oaa 00^
Marine hospital • at ;Ngw 'OriSaris ^ . „ . ; : . ^ . . . . . . . . . . . . .'..;;."...
28;985.oa
21,000 00.
•'Miarine'hpspital•afMbb'ile^w'.V'^ •:•.•.^^v;-"- .j-•'^•-•>^-•-^-•^"^•w^ .•^•^u-'.-WV'w--;
75;000 00
. Fire-prbbf buildirig for the 'G6riefal'Pbst*0ffide.'....':..',."- --.'^..^.r'
' Fnrriishing riew .Treasury^biaildiri^•.^.-L^.'-V/.'.-^.-.-^^.V-^ J-U i. J.si-:^j'.h:
10,000 00
Support .arid mairitenance" of the •periit^ritiafy..'. 1...".'. ; II'." .\;.
5vOoa^;aa.
Paymerit of"dertairi'certifitoates-v/;;... - - ; : . . " . • - . : : : : j . . . . ' : . .
Custom-^hbuse,iBb^stbn.....::::.:-.:..::_.::.:::..-.... ^ ^ . . . : .
. 25;00Q«00;
Building lazaretto a M wharf ne^rthbi pity : ^
"Sixth cfensus ..^L^..-.. c> .-^vi^v i'^..i:^'^^'^.^. vfi^'iv-.^^'.:.-.... . . J . : : J
. 8;ooQ oa
Public buildirigs iri Iowa Te~rritbfy. . \ . . . . . V . . ' . . . . .":."..V> . ; .
^•E4yi23 oa
. Public buildirigs in Flbrida Territoiy^ v=.^ ..?.v^'i^^ Vv--•--^iv--].;
Expenses in relation to steam-engines.I
.......:
i4,oaa oa
Distribution of the compilation of State P a p e r s . . . . . . T . . . . . . . .
%aod aa
Purchase of nineteen copies of American State Pajiiemo... J.-. .-.


30,766 .45

37 92
150,000 00

S7fi£^5m
1,067 19

201 29
95 00

STATEMENT—Continued.
Expenses in relation to certain insolvent debtors bf the Uriited
States
V. .^
-....'.
-. - .' - . . - - .
Expenses incident to the issue of Treasury ribtesl — . . . . . . . . . "
Payment of horses turned over to the Government.
^. .
Miscellaneous claims . . . . . . . ^
..,."...
,
Florida claims.
..... ^....
'.'.. . - . i . . . - - ,----.
Patentfund. - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —
1... — . . . . . . . .
Expenses of;running the southwest bbundary line of the United
States .... -.... ^
....'......-..--..---'.-.
Salary of the commissioner for running the-southwest boundaiy
hne of the Uriited S t a t e s , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . ' . - . . . . -^.'
-•. ^;:
Salary of the sui'veyor for running the southwest boundary line
of the United States . . . . . . . . .
. 1................;..'...,.
Exploring and surveying the noith and east boundaiy of the
United States .
. . . . . . . . . . . < , . . : . . . ' . - 1 . . . -«,,-..
Survey- of the boundary hne between the United States and
Salary of the commissipne'r for running, the boUridaiy hne between
the,United States and J e x a s . ^ . ; . . . .*.?.. .1 . . : • . . . ' . . . . . . . . . '
Salary of the surveyor for runnirig the bpundaiy hne between'the
United States and T e x a s , , . „ . . . . . . . . > . . . 1 . : ^ . . ' . . " . ' . . / . . .
- Salaiy of the plerk for runriirig the boundary line betweeri "th"e
- United States and;Texas> . ; , . . . . . . 1 . . : ....''.^,. fi.^0.... - . -.
^
Salaries of Ministers of the United States- • - . :
-. -' - -'.
Salaries of Secretaries of L e g a t i o n . - . . . . . . . . , 1 . . . . . . .^- J . . . .
. . . . . . . . ; . . -.'.'.":"..
Digitized for Salaries of Charges d ' A f f a i r e s . . . . . . . ^.
FRASER
Salary of a
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ Minister Resident to T u r k e y . , . . . . , . . . • : : . . . . . . .1.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

CO
CO
CX)

^,500 00
$7,000 00.
$29,000 00
18,000 00
1,519 41
500 oa

'159,300 76
10,000 00
2,500 00
2,000 00
'20,000 00

5,000 00
1,250 00
• ; - •

_•"

,

^ • •

1,500. oa
1,000 00

18,092 85;
4,000 00'
23,'282 .32

720 oo:

7,998 78

Contingent .expenses of missions abroad1.
.... ..*•-.".........
Salary of a dragomari to Turkey, and coritirigericies . ' . . ' . . ..'.M.
Contingent experises of foreign intercourse . . . . . ; . . . . . . . . ^;.. - - •/
Allowance for clerk hire,^ &c., tb American cbrisul at Lbndbn. .V
Intercourse with Barbaiy Powers . . . , . . : . . . , ' . ' . . ' . . ' ' . . . / . . . . : . .
Interpreters, guards, &c., iriciderit" to the consulates in the Turkish dominions . — . . . . . . . . - ^ f i . . . : . . . . . . . . : . ^ . - . . /.'../-,...
Carrying into effpct the 4th article of the treaty with Spairi . . . . '
. Claims:on France ( o l d ) . — . . . . : . . . . . . . . . ^ . . . . . . . . . \ . ' . ' . . : .
Claims on Spain (old) . . . . . . . - . - - , . " . . - . - ' . - . . . . . " . . . „ . . ; - . . . . '

.9,711 24
"6,173 34
29,333 64

• 10,000 GO
. 3,000 00
5,000 00
.694 42
. -.5,000. 00

17,584 19

6,000 00
' • •

•

. , • " ' "

.

'

•

•

'

«

.

-

•

•

.

'•'

•

'

•

•

• ' • •

1,675 60

=<•

• • .

•

•

.

'>''•••

11,731 02
2,427 31

i"

•

•

"

'

'

;

MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT. ^

P a y of the Army . . . . . . . . . - . - . . . . . . . . . . - i . . . . . . . . . — . . . Subsistence pf.officers.. J . ^ l . . . .
. . . . . v-.... - -:- - -.- - . .
Subsistence department. - - . . . .
. ......^........."...'.."..
Quartermaster's department - . . - - --••--.--.-.-;-'-.."....'.-'.'-"-':'.
F o r a g e . . - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — . ; . . . . . . . . . -\.:...-......'.'. . 7 . .
Payments"in heu of clothirig for discharged s o l d i e r s , - . " . . . , ; . . . . .
Two months' extra p a y tp reerilisted soldiers, arid experises of
recruiting 1\ . ' . ' ' . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .;.^;-. ^ : , . . \ ' . . .'^.•^•-.V.
Bounties; and p r e m i u m s . . . . 1 ; . . . . . . . - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " . . " - . ' . . . /
Medical and Hospital departmentl. - . . . . . . . . . . . . : ; . . . . . . . - . ' . " .
Contingencies ofthe Army . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . / J .
Arrearages prior to "July, 1815 I . . j . . : .
.............,'...
Arrearages prior to July, 1817 —
•.......'........'....
Invahd and half-pay pensioris.
. . . - . — --..'-"--.---".....
Pensions to widows and orphans, (payable through the Third
Auditor's o f f i c e ) . . . . .
...:
.
Pensions to widows and orphans, per act of 4th.July,.1836. > . .



'

•

361,545 35 ' '500,000 00
94,542 13
"
390,000 00
68,40a 05
96,877 51
10,;23ld4
•

•

->

.

,

'

' .

i

. ; • • • •

•

29,59a 73:
" . • •

•

•

"

,

' •

.

•.

•

•

v..
.

- .

.

-

•

'

.

36 0 0
.

.8,000- 00

V.

1,000 00
500 00

0
•

/

.

•

•

2,000,00
•. .'

••

? '

.• •

.282,418 8 9
'
450,504.36

lj200 00

•STATEMENT—Gontinued.
Revolutioriary pbrisibns - i>.L.'.."-.^-^^
. . . . J..."—\ - -.
Five years' peristbn% to wldbw"s'arid'brphah's;.. . 1 . . . - ' - - - - ' - " . - . ' - Experises of the bbafd of visiters at "West P o i r i t ' . ' . ' . ' . . . . ' — . . .
/Miscellanebus and ineiderital expenses at'West'Poirit.'.".-.....'.
Goiriperisatibli to 'actirig prbf#s^br bf cheniistiy'at"* West' P b i n t . . .
Recoristruction "'of building "for library"at' W e s t Pbint.'.".".'-'.'..'..'
Fuel, foliage; stati'^onery,' and 'printing' at West Poinf,.'. V.".'.. 1 .;.>
.IDepaitriierit pf jMLosbphy at• W^tt Poirit^. Xfi...-^..t. i:.::.^y. ^ ^ .Ars<erialfe:. j..^..!. t w. t... i ^ -•=. yi,i i/.--'. ^.^^.-i -;. -.-^-/i.... u ^ ^ ^-^ • - . . . . . . . . . \".".
.Repairs* arid inip'rpvenierit of the arsenal a t ' C h a r l e s t o r i . : ; . . . . . . .
, Clainis'of tbe S t p e ;pf •Gbririecticut-^.^V- - - -^ fiifi'.".".'^.. .-:.".•.'..
P a y 4 u e 'bxe;eiatiVe;;Staff bf the G^veinbr bf;Ten;riessee"-'.'.." f. 11".'..
Terinessee vbluritfe^ers^liabihties iftcuire'd by^GbverripfCaririonV'.
:Tenfie^See fbluriteefsV mUsteredliritb.^sefvic^^by iGeri.'Gaines, iSbc.
P a y of rifle rangers, & c . . . . . . . . - - . - ' . . : . . . .
. . 1^..;.'
...
One month's pay to voluWeefs-and^^^m^^
Tennessee, Alabama, and M i s s i s s i p p i - . ; . . . : . / . . J . . . ^... .\ . - . . . . . ;Arpirig and ^^quipping the riiihtia.'. 1.'.". . 1 . ' . . 1.^ ."-,....'..".".'.'.
GrdriJanc©, ig^drifflibe:«^toi:es,^arid 'supplies. •."l''.y.-.. .*. ^'.'. l^.^'.-l^.I^epaiMig^drawfegsipf a iMfofflr s y s t i ^
.V
' New riiaphirieiy "at Springfield "arml5ry..'....:.'.;.V.^^^^^
.fi.
:Arriiari|erit'offbrtifics^^
.-^^i.^i .L<^4.d^y^-^
fR^paii^s and e'pritirigerieies of fb^rtiflc'atibris".'.:-.'.'-.'.-.'.;. •.\' 1 . ' . . . .
FbrtificaiionS, ^(bld)^..i^ > -v 1' a^-:'.^:v .•:!'^ i •I'. -l\ I> :X- ^i.^... JCi V^-L' .'.'.
iriciderital experilMs bffi^rti|6&atiMs/^
:

.iFort;'Galhburi^.i-^:-i-i:!d--i


^i^;^i-w-•^i'.i^-d'^vi'i^'.i:':.^.'.. v'."^=.".'...W-.., .'•:

..CO

$330^65 ^ 1
. 280;948 22
; :. 80
; «8:a9"
c^ . • •'
21,'649 50
J6.^5@l m
•

$300 oa

600 Od

'25,1^8 >42
84 26
34,930 71
:..;:'^!3g4V43-:
7,150 10.
;{5S{5^3^63
11,65Q do
49,062: 64
25,'OOd 00 ;
25,1000. QQ
2,0.00 00 .

10 i oao foa;
7,000 o a ;
•^i9ia54^^37._;:
20 00

11V871 ^ ^ 1
ldi94Q(61 j
t'6i4i4 m 4

Fort Pelaware..,.,.,..,.... ^...•-,.,:^ ..,-„,,..-,.,..,.,.^..*.-^....:-..,.,.;^..;.„.,..,...,,.;...
Fbrt Pulasld."..,.,. ..i ..n^^/r--r-'-r -.^-^'-r.T -i-^-.T^-.-.w-i.r;T,>-|.-;-..r-«--.Kepairs of Fort Ma.i;ipri and; the sea-\y.ail .at.St.,Au:g.usto
Repairs of thp old fort at the .Barancas:, Florida-.-v-l...-. ...;.„-., .l->-—..
Fbitific.atibn? at Ne^: Loridon. harbbr,.;Cp"n
..:..-.:^ -.,1;..
Fort/sLt;Grand.Tei;le ..^;:, i^
Payment; tp, Missouri* volunte.ers, for • horses.-, lost^ -&c.-./.,........ .„...-.Protection of the riprthera frontier,, '&co.....i.^fi^:..:..fi...l..^...-.,.-...l.......r..j>>
Freight .or transportation, irito;^
Subsistence.of mili^^^^^^^^ ybluhteefe, arid fripri.dly Indians.....................
Trarisportatibn qf supplips^, &c...,.;...,.,^.;...^,...... ._.„..... ^.,^,.;.,...,..:.,-..,,.:
Miscellaneous and/cpntihge^^ chargea...*-....,....-.,.,.-.,........,....,:1^.....
I^ay of fouK'thou$:an4>ohi^
.,.;^:,.^>..,^.,.,...:...;:.,.,:,...;.......
Piirchase, of powder and: other materials for cartridges, &,c... 1.,.....
Selection of sites fbr marine h^
Repressing hostilities of Seininp|e; Ip/iiatis;z./.-,.;.^.•..•..'.-.,. -....:.........
Yplunteers, and addtional regiment pf dragporis;..-:--U.-^
Suppressiri-ghpstiliUps. of Greek
ImprPving haj^or'bfMpbife - r,-^-^- .•r.^-.-w^ :..:...,.^....:,fifi'./.^.:.....^^.,^....
Beacpn-light at pier, .entrance of Erie harbbi'r -^-^ - '•.'<•"--^--,- -—^.•
Sea-waU: to preserve Fairweather Islaud- ......... ^..,j..^l.:-l.. ..^,-;.—:....
Itemo.ying sand -barr./harbor of Ne\y ^Bedford .....;........'., ...i. . : . . , .IVTound or sea-wall between Lake. Erie; arid Buffalo, creek
.... ...
Remp.ving the hght-hpuse at Old Point Comfort into. Fortress
.Monroe,.,.,'...;. fi.j.^^^..^....;.'......./..;. ^. ...,.'..,. 1... . .. j . _ ,
• Light-house.pn Flynn's KnoU, near Saridy Hook../.,...
........
Light-house on. pier at Qswego..., 1 . , . . , . : . , .
... ^.,.......
.
Improvement of Pascagoula river
..
....
improving the inland channel between St. Mary's and St.- John's.
Removing obstructions, Ocracoke inlet
.:...,............



3A,Qaa QQ
» 4:,65Q: dW

2,2lk 32
: 13,1^0: Op;
i2,6;aa:;Qa;

i2,^bk6k

25;0QQ djo;
503^3?. 22:.
9g^Qi,.i8;
••77;452^22:
2qQ-oaQ ' 0 ,
.m,7M-4^S/

63,183 04
100,000 Od

.3,001 0$
12,408 d3

49,664 50
.20 OQ
4,548 30
34,46a OQ

5,ooQ^ oa
1 6a

'674: QQ;

'7,897. 00
4^43, 13n

142,40a 26
406 50
182 45
10,260 0730 00

. STATEMENT—Gontinued.
Removing obstructions at the mouth, of Suwanee. r i v e r . . . . .
Survey of Des, Moines and lowa rivers..,..... .....
.
•.
Survey of St/E'rancis,.Black, and White.riyers. ...•..-......:...-.
Cumberland road in I n d i a n a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ^ . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . .
Cumberland road in llhnois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ; . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . :.-> .
'Repairing rbad frbin 'JacksonviUe to TaUahassee...-,..............
Arrearages due cbhtractors ori Curiiberland mad. . 1 . . . , .
'..,.'...
Mail route arid post road through ^ the -^Creek country... . . . 1 . . : . , . . .
Road frorri the iforthern boundaiy of Flbrida tb Appalachicola >.-.
Road from .lola tp Tallahassee. - . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . ^ . . . . . . . . .
Road fronri MemphiV to-Strorig's'on the St. Francis-river..,: ...^•..
Repairirig road from Jacksonville to N^^
Road'frbm'JacksbnviUeto St. Mary's,.Florida......v^ ....
....;. r
Civilization of Indiarisy..;.;-. . • - . . > . " 1 1 . " . . . . . . . - . . . : ; . . . , . : . . . .^:.'.
P a y of Iridian agentsy superintendehts,. & e . . . . - . . . . . , . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . .
P a y pf sub-agents ^'-/^... /fi-..... .^1 fi. ^..,,.:.,;!...—...... I......^.......:.l.
P a y bf' interpretoirs w y . . ' . / . . . . : . . . . . . . . . c
..J......!.,.. ^. i;, ....,-..
' Presents-to Indiarisvyv^-^ --v -;;.z;^^
Provisions to "^Indians. - . . . / / . ? : , . ! . . . i . . . : l . v J . . , . : . . ;......-..:.
Buildings arid repairs. . . . : . 1. .1 ..,'.._... fi'. - - . ' . . - . : . . . - . . . . . -,;-...
Contingencies of Indian. department......:.. . > . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FulfiUing certain Indian treaties.^ -.-:........ .^...:..-:. ?,.:-.::..:.^......
Subscription to Indian Biography.;. . . ^ i . . . : . . . . . . . . .....>
Expenses of Indian niedals: : . . . .^^ - . ; . . . . J y . . . . . ; . .
1......
^Mission of A.. Chouteau arriong the .wild*Indians,^ S o u t h w e s t . . . .
.Running boundaryiihe betweieri; Choctaws and: Chiekasaws.....:
Digitized for Tempprary'subsis;tence .of Indians west, &c.v...i',.;....:....;.,.;:..'...
FRASER


10

$10,500 00
1,000. 00
$678 98'

$8,000 00
28,000 ao
9,5dd ao
631 ;65
, 1 00

l{46i U
.9,500 00
1,654 17
5,00d 00
7,500'^ 00
16,357 07
. 4,269 34
16,897 61
; ••9,528^-37
1-6,991X35-

.33,820 52
9,671 "03^
33,048 13
3,66,244 38v
; . 600 00
. ^ 475 69
. l0^7;62 42.
. 1,085. ;QQ'
.45,000 ao

16,850 00

03

22,389 76
Expenses of removing and subsisting IndianSi... . * . . . . . . . . . . . . . ^.
_i •,' •
400 00
T o aid certain Creek Indians, to r e m o v e , w e s t — .
...:....
25 00
Expenses of delegations
.......
.
:
Location and temporaiy support of. the. Seminole Indians
10,000 do
I
Cariying into effect treaty with the .Cherokees,.as per act. 20th
July, .18.36 . . . . . . - . . . - . ; . . . - .
-,-........ :. - .
:
: — . : 1,622,836 67
C b i y i n g irito effecttreaty with the .Cherokees, .act.June 4, 1832
. 545 79
.: 11 00
Carrying into effect treaty wdth the .Cherokees, act 2d March, 1831
Current.expenses of the, Indian.department.-.--;.......
.........i
12,306 39
: 205 13
Locating r e s e r v a t i o n s . . . . . . . . :•.
.........'.. -;...............
'112 38 • . " •
Purchase of rifles for Pottowatomies... .L.. . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . - .
8,928 oa
Sales of reserves of Creek, I n d i a n s . . . . . . ^ ..-.•..-... — . . > . . . .
2,630 00
Expenses of Indian deputations..
..:.....•
.
Holding treaties with certain t r i b e s . . . .
. . . . . . ; . . . . ^... 1....;
447 5a
24,000 00
Blacksrniths'establishriients.
: . . . . . . . . ^ . . .•
'.-... l".,.
..
'
10,000 00
Treaty s t i p u l a t i o n s . . . . . . — ^ . . . . . . . . . . . 1..'......^
------.—
83,669 94
Objects specified in .3.d aiticle-.of tre aty .with Cherokees of 1838.'
Arrearages of annuities, &c., for C h e r o k e e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . .
67,000 00
30,000. 00
Reinoval and subsistence, of Indians . . . . 1
...
15,0dQ OQ
Education of Indian y o u t h s . . ^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.. — ..
19,910 00
Removal of the Choctaws from Mississippi. 1 . : . . . . . . . . . . ^ . . .
'.
2,526 82
Transportatioii and iriciderital expenses of Indian department..
30,000 00
Removal and subsistence of Pottawatomies, .of I n d i a n a . . . . . , —
Expenses of rations for one year fpr Sacs and Foxes, of Missis14,657 37
sippi.
.•
. . . ; ^ . . . .>..,._
..
Compensation to a commissioner and clerk to examine the Indian
5,500 00
country.
..:.
....... . . . . . . . , . / . . . .
2,000 00
Investigating frauds on Creek reservations, in 1 8 3 9 . . . . . . . . . . . .•
50,000 00
P a y m e n t in stock ariimals, 2d article Creek treaty.
.
10,000 00
Purchase of stock animals for hostile C r e e k s . .
......»



.

• .

•

STATEMENt-^Continued.
Expenses- of the. purchase, arid.distributiomof stock animals,. 2d.
, a n d 6th.articlps Creek treaty -: r. -,-:^. - ^ - - -;,- -,- -. - - -. -; ->- - f-.-. -,-,-;-.—
*
•Obrnpensation-toa commissioner und.fer Cherokea treaty of 1835..
Support,of blacksmiths' establishmerits,, &c.., for Osages.;,..,.,...,.,.
HoUses.for, chiefs,, wagons, parts,, &c,.,. fpr Osages. .,-........•....;..'
.Completing suryeys, under treaty with, Delawares, &Ci,-,..;^....,.,..
Emplpyment of physicians, tp. vacciriate Indians . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . .
•Expense.s. of suryeying aiid, .marking, boundaiies, between, t h e .
Indians tiibe.s.;w:est/pf^ the M^
./....
..................
Transportatipn of! annuities .:.:.^.\-,...... 1,.,.,.,..-.;......:...;.-..-.
.
Indian, annuities...-;...;:. J.,,..,-.,..,.,.^..,. .;..,.,^.-...-.;.;......'l^,..... ..............
Rehef of. Robert, K^^^
...•....;.....;...-•,. !..>.%.. .:.\....-.l J . 1.../
Road-from Detroit, to Saginaw and Fort Gratiot.. ..•..; . . . . - . . . •Pay and/ subsisterice of mpunte^d-m
. .--..v.....,...;;*- -r.-..;.,...,.
• 1 ,1

. ]^y-AJLjE,Sl^ABLISHM^

..:,. .

$3,000 00
$8,000 0.0
3,000 00'
' 6,98Q. 00..
1,Q0Q 00.

5X)aoa
6,072 Qa
- 95. 42.
64,464;. 84^

... . \

_ P a y and; syb^igtenbe, p.f die. ,Nav:yL_„...,: .....,--..-•--.-.........-...--'...........-....i..-.;.-..,.....-^ . _ 639,2.9,o;-4:ei
P a y of'superintendents,; &c,.,.-., -•-^-•-.-, .,-.,.;;-,..,.;,-.. --fi:.^..,..,.,...« y........1
23,621; 7$
Bourities:tp^Sjeaineii- .^.,..,.'...,.,..^^./.,....:, - f - : r ; . ? r > " ^ : > > v - r < " ' - r y ? - ; ; - . : - - r t - ^ - 5 - ; ; n --•^+
34,000 00,
_Provisibus ;;.„..,.,-^^,. ...^^^,^^.^^^..!,.,. -.....^., - . r . - ^ - f r ^ r c ^ - . ^ ^:rr-}? •^-1-Tl-<:• • "Hi-^ -1-••^•••^c;'
370;338 35;
Medibirie,'surgical in&truinents,,&^
i.,>.;.-rfl.,..,....-u-—.........I^,;-.....«.p.^.-wir ;• .. 2g;881;. 0^^
'Na^^ar(i;,,Bbpton.^
..,.,.... r--.'-<n.^"!'^^?7.y^-!-f- .•tj'"!j::-f'- "^.r••*•".-^^A•"<;•• V '
336*010
^ I)pi.^ Philadelphiaj..^,...,.^...,i„....^.
!.. 18,09,2;.'06
Do.
Washington-..-.;.-..-„......;-. . ..1.. .^,...;.-;!., p...;....-..-...,. ..^..,.,.,-, i
i 3,429; ^20
• fiS^/o,, ;Norfolk.;..,,.:,-,,,.....,,,..r^,., -^ . . ..,' -.1.. .;.. .. - .. .. ... ,..,-.. ,. .. .. ,:- .. ..;
4,1:82 -20

• .'..Jjo^.-. Pi^nsaqolia-j-;.,.,.^.:.:,.,•-;;-p-.f - 1 - !".n' :•••-•"- •'- —"- '.- • - - . . . - . - . ' - i - . - . . • . ' . ' 3-8,,;§m.m


CO,

$45 50
4 52
^216 4 6 .

' 636. 575!
3,000 l a
2,205 36
^ 468-4&
^
750 00
. 14& 51,
^

Exaupniiig; th^^Mississippiaridr;Sabine riyeirsj.,->.......;...^.jr.:-^.^.-v-..:
Powder m a g a z i n e s . . . . , ' - - — - -•- w . . . ........^.. . . . . . . ; . . . . . . . . .
Magazine riear Boston.. — . . . . . . . . : • . . . . . . . . . . — .
.MagazinpcOri Ellis/si Island-,/NewrYor^ ./...^v....
......'.......,
Magazine near Norfolk.. .•
...........
.
.•. . 1 . . . . . , . .
H o s p i t a l a t B o s t o n ) . , - -^..•-^^^;. ^ . s . . ^ i^. i.^lr^ ^ i i . . 1 : i ^ ^ i ; .r ^ i ; ^ . .

.Fixtiires,^ &Ci, for asylum near Philadelphia.. • . . . ~ . . . . . . . .*.'....,
Ordrianpe a4i4?.0^dnanG^stores:.-.
i ^. ^.z-. ^ i i ^ i ^ ^ i s i i> => ^.,
Gradual increase of the N a v y . .
.....
...... 1 ^
.. .
Gradual„improveirierit,of.the:N,avy.
.^.....---...........:.—..........—...Repairs-of vessels. — ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
'-...
...
Contingent expenses ofthe; Navy.
-.••.
.Contingent expenses riot enumerated.. 1 . . . . . . . . . . ; . . . ' . . . . . . . . .
Rebuilding- frigate G o n g r e s s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .*
. —........
Building and^ equipping two sloops^of war...*.. V; i,./-i-......; .;^-.
BuUding six small vessels of war.
. .,:.^-..
Agency on the^ coast of Africa.. i . . .
. . . . . , . . . . . . — . . . /.
Prize-inoriey for officers .and: crew of priv:ateer- Gen. Arnistrorig-.
Expenses in relatipntpfSteamrerigines;and steamboats
. . . ..
Rebuilding the frigate-Mabedpriian.... . . ^ . . . . - . . ! . . . : . ^
. . ; . ,Timber to rebuild the Java and Cyane
Iron tanks 1 . . , . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
,
....
Completing and- furnishing- hospitals-.-. -.^. .".•..-..-.. .•.-'.. ...•..'. -.-.-^
• Goinp.letirig st^ani-yessels-af the navy-yard; Brpp.klyn.-. .-.-.-^..-.
Naval magazines at Charlestown and BiHDoklyn . •.. .-•. . . ^ . - . - . Survej^ng- and exploring-expedition- .> .-....-. ..-.-.-.-.•.-"--.-...-.-.
Ai^rear&.of contingencies.,-,^:......_. ..^
.^..-.•.>...."..-.. .^-..-.
Survey of the coast pf the United States
•...-..
Gontingericies for 1831
.
•..
P a y and subsistence ofthe marine corps .... .^..,-;--,


18

• '?4,25:6, 34
•• 15,7d8' 22
7..6!7,.6m. 6.1.
. .82,225 22
•^84,S5B 96.
.4,389 66'
• 5a^950- .58-4,952:. 0.7'
1,260 06
10^,209 87
2,467 61
993 56
^3 56
4^58.1 8j6,
.li.....92L,.5ja
390, 85.
349. 49
7.76. 80' i

:

-,

.";

•

••

:
•

•

•

'

.

' . .

•

•

-

'

.
35,000 00

.

-.

5,193 57
40 16
486 00
'263^94

STATEMENT—Continued.

CO

Ci

$24,167 54
.; 3,000 00
190 29

Subsistence, of non-commissioned offieers, &c.:.....-.
Fuel. - -.-.. --— . . . . .
........ -.. - -...
• Military stores.. .=.
- - - - — - - - . - . . . - . . -.
^
Barracks at .Qharlestbwn, Gosport, and Pensacola.
Clothing^'.. p.-.-....: — , - . V- i. - ^^.-. - - .^- - - - ' . . . . -

$150,000 00
7,592 95
$8,270,793 84 $3,014,711 80

TREASURY DEPARTMENT., . . -

—

KBGISTBR^S OFFICE, Decemher 2,

-

$541,866 32

T . L . SMITH, Register.

1839/

K.
:Staiemenfiofi Moneys to tM credit ofi Treasurer ofi'United States in the two genercil deposite Banks, as appears hy their last returns,
Date o.f return.

Arnount.to credit
of Treasurer.

. Planters' Bank of .Georgia, S a v a n n a h . . . ^;.. ^ i- ^.-.. l.

Nov. 16,1839

'Bank of Missburi,-St. Louis ^^.. ^'^^^ifi.^^^^ i . ^ i i i .

Nbv. 9,1839 "586,506 31

.

TREASURER'S O F F I C E ,

iVbz;em5er 28, 1839. ; - -

-

$6,256 .91

Outstanding
drafts thereon.

$6,239 25

Balance subject
to draft.

$17 66

111,188 65 *475,317 66

. W I L L I A M S E L D E N , Treasurer United States.

* The Bank of Missouri has been" required to transfer to the Bank b r America ^350,000 of this balance, and the Bank of America has acknowledged the
receipt of $25p,OQO, which has not yet appeared on: the returns .of the Bank of Missouri: so that.the actualbalance subject ^to draft is only $225,317 ^66. .



Q

CD

oo
p

00
CO

Statement, ofi the conditipn ofi the]Deposite Banks according to. returns received a t the Treasury Department, to the 20th. of i
.• , ; . . ; . - - ' • "
• . • - • . ' ' • -l- _
.
November, 1839. . v . . , , ;. J-.^- •... ' fi _.:.'.. •,.. ^ •.

Names and location of Banks. " .-. ' Date pf return.

^ Loans and dis- Domestic bills' of Suspended debt.' .
exchange.
counts! ' . :
.

... . . . . •

Real estate.'

Stocks.

^•^.•*'A

Barik of the State of Missouri,; at
St. Louis. . 1 . . . . ...*:- -.-.-.I..,-.. November \ 2 $1,497,094 89; $518,201 37:
•Planters' Bank, of the State of
612,790 92
52,700 30
Georgia, at Savannah. . 2 . . ' f i .- November 12

$35,317 17

$51,868 05

140,563.51

11,000 00 $130,560 oa

$2,109,88;5 8 1 . 1570,901 :67 $175,880: 68

$62,868 05 $130,560 00

STATEMENT L—Continued.

- Names and location of Banks.

Date of return.

Other investments. Expense accounti' Balances due from Other Bank notes
on harid.
other Banks,

Bank of the State of Missouri, at
November 2 $216,606 65
• St. Louis
. . . : . ^..;. .•
Planters' Bank of the- State bf
November 12
33,845 88
Georgia, at Savannah.




$250,452 63

"Specie:

$12,140 90 $434,292 -84 $335,820 OO $316,827 39 '
7,173 56 ' 32,066 82

57,9^35 00

85,598 81

$19,314 46 $466,359 66 $393,755 00 $402,426 20

STATEMENT

L—Continued.
op;
;

Names and Ipcationj.of Banks.

•. • '

Date of;.
. ireturri.

Circulation.

.

Treasurer of the
- UniteH States.

Bank of the; State of Missouri;' at
St.' L o u i s . . . . . . . . . .
- . ^ . . . Nbveriiber 2 $45a,9lQ-0Q • $88-5v95-2-^5Planters' Bank .of the State' of
qv469 91
Georgia, at" S a v a n n a h ' . . . . . . . — November 12 101,173; 00 •
.

.

-

-

'

'

'

•

*

"

DEPOS-IT-ES...

'

Public
.officers.'

'

All other depositors.

Due to other.
Banks.

: $-^19,742- 5-2 $356,986' 58
.53,925.9:9

209,158 15

101,838 20

$552,083 00 $891,422; :56 - $-54,6-43-57 $728,90;a 67 • $458,824 78

:

a

STATEMENT L—Continued.

m
Names and location of Banks.

'

'

Date of return. - •] • Other iiabilitiesv;;.' • ' Capit^-stocki. .

Cbntingent-fundi;

Profitfand^ Ipssj dis.n.
_ ;C.Qu».t..and., interest.,.

Ba;rik pf; the, ;State:."0f Miss.purij, at
1 /
'•
•
•St: L p u i s . ' . . . . . .•.\:...;..^;-^;...'...%.; November . 2 .^.. .;$32,;93 09 : ' |iy.ll2,43,3; 79. , : . /; .$5^,Qoq; pa .. ,•• $54,233^05
planters'. ;pank. .of. the, ^tate,. of
l M , 4 a l . 4 6;
. Georgia,^ at Say annah;. .„ .^.^.^... .^ ,;Noyenib.e.r 12 .,
9,^0^ 81.'> . ;5;35.,.40.a .0.0 .
2.7 ,.6.0.5: 2.8
'

..."

9..,.

. ,

•

' . . , , „

\ - 141^395 90 ! •;|i,e47,833,79 •

1125,461 ;4^

m.
m.

$81.^83^ 33

••
Since the lastVession of Congress the Insurance Barik of Columbus has been discontinued' from the performance of the djuties of apublic depository, in conse-quence- ofthe removal of- the bank to Macon, a. point remote from the land-offices- in-Alabania, (to accommodate which i t was principally needed,) and; wher(e it
could not discharge the financial duties required!
. . '
_
.. /
"
•
•
The Brooklyn Bank has also been discontiniied as a depository. .The.amount ofmoney placed therein whenfurther depositories M^ere required to be selected^
in 183%having been drawn, out,, and. the, pjabliic.seryice.; not making its, ;,emplp;ynfient'necessary,.th^
r,e,qiiired by; l.a^t wei^.(^. pmitted.;tp be tr^ansrpjtted to.; th«,
Department, and iti\vasacc6i:di'ngly'disco"nU^^
*V . " •
;
. ' ' '/•,'. '
.•
.-'' .
,': •'
.• '
/
1- ..•''
ooThe. Citizehs Bank of Louisiana having Suspended specie payments in October last, it was discontinued as a general depository under the provisions of the co
ZD'
act of June 23i 1836.
'
.l.
•
";



1M9J

:SiE.GlETAlf < ^ T i p TRE^^

\, ':.r: y.^.'-' .:,

['-fi

.^NOTE-M.'--

349
,' ' T'' /

.. .'

. .A: plan fpl^'the ireprganization^.rf
submittpd ;to
iSprip^ss^by thfemuderd^ried^aS:^^
\.
.The iSubjeMi\^;;then dJeeined pf^ sjifficient impgi^anee^^fe
to a select committee.- They reported .a JbiJl for e.ariying most of the
il^eppniniendatibns.intp=effeGti
'.- • • ^ ':
. ' ' , :
. ; ^ p e that, ithpugh jIhe rnatte^^ha^ :^^
prot
greSiS'rha^^biPi^-ni^^-^iri -rplatiori^^^^ ; ,^t::thersame itime, cw;ith thp;great
inprpasg pf buliiriess; siripe, fthe npce^ssityvhas ;iucjEeaspd^^.fe
iprincipal
.cha4igeir^b^;j;eii^ries^
&e ^uporinlOridpnGe of-the
^pligc^Priipf ;duties5lrbrnj1^
-Gpinpti-ollei-, ^ h e r e it%a^.'been
long" deyolved/\!^h]Si[^;na^
.as r^^ith-pthpr. aircumstarige^
•|oie^4'^^^-^^^i^^'^^^
':'".•••'' :'•
, The additioinal ie2Q)eii§ei^puM[be^^J^^
^thmg^iri.hs#ing prierbf thjs,
ppe^^nl jSpmptrohefe^ -^ade- explufi^eilyva/conpaisiipr^
the customs.•Theiimp3;(fw;e,dlinearis.^and,-skill pf ,piie.pf-theni;iri/SUQh a-situatiori,;to do
p£)|hirig|hut^iUpieiT^i^
^tiie :Pthpr;to ^supervise pijly
l^fe ^settl^nient.^pf/aaQoupts^ m
.Eaph ;by :Su/iii a '
.iiatu?l# division yof plater .Mwould; act :Mth more .prpmptitudej system^
• iinj^r]oiity,>andvthproughiriv^^
deteptiori of defaults
would become much more.probablp. jA'i^ish;has been ofte.ri repeated
f ^ : ;ia rredision: of jthei.number ,and: Gomppusatioii :pf eustpm^
cw
and is stiJl :St3X)ngly pherished^ ,The jlMerent l ^ ^ rreppiled'pflatp years
tp ;capyvthis.ic^
make other useful,
•chariges in some of the colleptipriia^iS,Lhave failpd hithe.itp,itis.hoped,.
more from the pressure of other business than from serious objectioii to
their final passage. The v^hole subject is important to proniote efiSciency
•and uniformity in that branch: of the public service, and .part of the
legislation proposed is essential as an act of .justice to many meritorious
collectors. . The; failure at the last session to pass the,usual clausefor
•additional allowarices, rendered proper since the reduction of the tariff
in 1832, produced great embarrassment and'bid fair to suspend the whole
business at some of the-cUstom-houses,.uritil i t w a s partially remedied
by granting in seyeral cases the per dierii compensation authorized by a
fprmer actof Congress to all persons assisting in the collection of the
customs. Besides^ these eriibarrassments,'additional onerous duties have
been iriniposed on most of them in keeping a journal of their doings under
a resolution of the Senate.
• New legal provisions for the* security ofthe pubhc mon^y collected by,
district attorneys were recommended to Congress by this Department
as long ago as December, 1836. Experience seems since strongly to
• verify their expediency. •
"
:
•
A change in the commencement of the fiscal year is again recommended
for reasons too obvious to need repetition.." The keeping and understandr
ing of our public-accounts of receipts and.expenditures, and of foreign,
trade and tonnage, would likewise be rhuch simplified if the.year for all
.of them were made to begin at the same date and to correspond with,
the commenceinent of the calendar; year. Ih that event, if the, appro


350

R E P O R T S OF T H E SECRETARY, &c.

[1839.

priations for permanent and ordinary purposes were made.for one year,
with authority to expend a fifth quaiter at the same rate-when no new
legal provision should intervene, iriost of the existing difficulties and
confusion in the present system would be obviated. Whether these
changes be adopted; or not, another iiriprovenient would be to require aH
receipts and.expenditures, as well as impoits iarid exports, to be stated
by quaiters of the year separately.
; • •
'
, '
An additipnal provisiori-concerning the papers of yessels eniployed iri
the whale fisheries is respectfully recommerided, to remove the inconvenience, expense, and danger-resulting from^a recent'judicial decision^ iri
respect to the papers in that class of v.essels whose enterprise, skill,.and
success are so usefulto thecountry, a n d s o richly erititled to liberal legislation. The decision and voluminous corre spondence on this subject
will be. seasonably submitted to the appropriate comniittee. ' ' ^
Further provisions concerning the registry of vessels j in; Gonsequence.
of abuses of their papers in the -West Indies arid'On thie coast pf-Africa,
seem urgently demanded. A. declaratory act, as to.tbe^ duties to be
assessed on certain articles of silk, hiien, and worsted,'seeins also proper,
from a like cause, since the construction of the existing laws,; w^hiGh hks
prevailed forseveral years with the Depaitment, has been :unexpectedly
altered b y t h e couits, to the loss probably of a quaiter of a milhon of
revenue yearly. A large riurriber of docuniehts' in respect to this' question are ready to be communicated. '. ' ;;•
; ^ ;
The existing.acts pf Congress, for the relief of Jnsolverit debtors expire
on the 2d of March next, and it is^ cpnsidered proper that the |)royisions
-of them .should be extended'further, arid the cases. oGcurring since January 1, 1837, be inGluded within their purview. ^
.'
... -




INDEX,

A.
Alexandria city, the debt of, assumed by the Federal Government
'
273, 352, 357, 358* 371, 385, 483, 504, 630, 651
Allowances—seeFishing Vessels.
Appeal/the right of, to the Supreme Court should be allowed in cases involving an amount
of duty
....
617
Appropriations, detailed estimates of, for 1838.
. . . .123, 124
for 1840. ...
298, 299
for 1841..
.•.
,..390,391
Appropriations, in aggregate arid detail, made for 183?
.. <124 to 158
......
299 to 334
made in 1839
made in 1840'
.... . .391 to 424
Appropriations, in aggregate and detail, made by former acts of Congress—
' for the service of 1838.,
...123,158
for the service of 1839
..... '
181
for the service of 1840..
"...
298,334
for the service of 1841..
390, 424
existing, required for 1837 and former years, to be expended in 1 8 3 8 . . . , , 123,
-159 to 170
existing, required for 1839 and former years^ to be expended in 1840... . 298,
335 to 346
existing, required for 1840 and former years, to be expended in 1841
390,
425 to 436
suggestions in 1838 that prudence requires a reduction in the annual
186
which will probably be carried to the surplus fund in 1837. ,.123, 159 to 170
"
in 1839
298, 335 to 346
in 1840
390, 425 to 436
existing, not required for 1837, proposed to be applied to 1838.'. 123, 159 to 170
1839, proposed to be applied to 1840. .298, 335 to 346
1840, proposed to be applied to 1841. .390, 425 to 436
views" in 1837 in regard to the difficulty in paying the, and on the issue of
Treasury notes
,,,
..«*
7
a reduction in the* for the year 18.40 recommended, to prevent a deficit.
234
estimated amount of new, in 1 8 4 1 . . . . . . . . .
...o
358
the outstanding and unexpended in 1837, charged on the Treasury
3
the outstanding, unsatisfied at the end of the year 1837, estimated
. 91
the'outstanding, unsatisfied at the end of the year 1838, explanations as to
the
... .
<
180
the'amount'of, estimated to be uncalled for at the end of the year 1839... 235
the estimated, to be uncalled for at the end of 1840
a*
358
the amount of the, for 1837, to be applied to the service of 1838, without
reappropriation
„
91
the amount'of the, for 1838, applicable to "the service of 1839.
180
the atriount of the, for 1839, which will be applied to the service of 1840,
without reappropriation..
235
the amount of the, for 1840, which will be applied to the service of 1841,
without r e a p p r o p r i a t i o n e
*
<.
. 358




686

njTDEX.

Appropriations, the balance of, outstanding on the 1st of January and 4th of March, 1841.
a lessening of the, f<?r the service of 1841, recommended as a means to preserve a balance in the Treasury
.
beyond the estimates, views in 1837 in regard to the indefinite and the
outstanding.
,....„...„.,.. i i . 1
to pay the debt of the District of Columbia to Holland
.,..
,
Army.—Estimates, appropriations, and expenditures on account of the—see Military
Service.
Attorneys, United States, circular to, in 1837..
.....

448
361
0 1
91
36

B.
Balance in the Treasury 1st January, 1836, including trust funds. . . . . . .
88
1st January, 1837
.1, 89, 175, 605, 627
30th June, 1837...
3,441
1st January, 1838..
90, 91, 176, 178, 256, 627
1st January, 1839
175, 178, 231, 255, 256, 371, 629
1st January, 1840
.351, 371, 372, 437, 627
1st January, 1841..,
.438, 461, 462,. 605
4th of March, 1841
...
"
438, 439, 441, 486
1st of January, 1842.
, ..
.485, 598
IstofJanuary, 1843..,.,
"....'.'
487,599
1st of July, 1843
,
598, 600, 678
1st of October, 1843
,
„
601
1st of July, 1844 . .
..
667, 673, 680
nominal and actual, at the end of each year from 1837 to 1843. .626, 627
on the 31st December, 1836, exclusive of trust funds and outstanding warrants...... ...... . . . ..
.. , . , . . . . . "
627
Balances in the Treasury, views in 1837 in regard to the
• •• •
.91
views in 1838 on the policy of avoiding large.
184
unavailable
,
.178,'372, 599
Balances estimated to be in the Treasury on 31st December, 1838, and views in regard to". .93, 98
on the 1st January, 1839
177, 178
on the 31st December, 1839
.180, 232, 234
on the'31st December, 1840
234, 255, 352
on the"31st December,-1841
. .i
.:357, 358
on the 30th June, 1843
.
488
on the 30th June, 18.44
488
on the 1st July, 1845. ..
. . . . . .'.'. 669
on the 1st July, 1846
..........
^670
Balances of public money due by the late deposit banks, December 12, .1834
229
due the^United States—see Banks—see Bank United States—see
Bonds.
of public money subject to draft, 4th'March, 1841.
•
. . .449, 452
Balances, of appropriation outstanding on the 1st of January and 4th of March, 1841.
448
Bank capital, discount and issues, a cause of the financial embarrassment in 1836-57.
-30
Bank notes, not. receivable in payment of duties, &c.
,„.... u
.
.43, 47
circular from the Treasury Department in 1789, with regard to the receipt for
duties and transmission by mail of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....
.
53
Treasury circular in 1790, in regard to the bearing of the collection law upon
;the receivability of, for public.dues..'
..„..,.
.. . . .
54
the circulation of, in 1837.
.....
103
.the conveniences of, when equivalent to s p e c i e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
the effect of the. curtailment of the issues .of, in bringing about a resumption
of .specie payments.
..... „
. . . 190
act of. Congress of July 5, 1838, in relation to.
217
the exclusion of small, from circulation advocated in 1839..
• - . 252
Bank of the. United States, the amount of "the" bonds due by. the,
3, 234
concerning the restriction on the sale of the .bonds of the
182
the creation of a, recommended'in 1 8 4 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
447
bonds of the, outstanding and falling due to the Treasury in 1837,
1838,: 1839, 1840, and 1841. . . . . . . . . . . . . . v r „ " . " . . ' . . . .
455
receipt into the Treasury from the bonds due by the—
in 1837. , ...
;
„
90
1838
.
92, 176, 178, 256
1839.
v............
180
1840
.'..'
,.....:
351, 437
1841;.
..:
; ; . . . . . . . . . .438, 461, 462
the condition of the, in-1837.and 1 8 3 8 . . . . . . . . . . . .218, 219, 220, 221
warrants drawn on the
*.»........,...,...
61
in 1816 did not prevent revulsions-in trade, and finanpial embarrassments
368




INDEX.

687

Bank of the United States, views in 1841, in favor of-a, as a "fiscal agent-of the Government .-.
........
..........
. . . .445, 446
Banking, its conveniences, advantages to trade, &c..
.......
. . . . . . . . . . . 102
free, the preferable system of. .•„ . . . . . . .
369
Banking institutions, a reform in, suggested to the States in 1838
191
views in 1839 in regard to the condition of, generally, and the kind
of money receivable for public dues.
,. ..,
..
249
Banks, the deposit, views in 1837 in regard to the condition of, and to a settlement with
the former deposit. „ „
..
........ ... .17, 102
letter to the Executives of the States, with the postscript as to the ret/urn of the
transfers in case of <the nonpayment of the deposits by the.
..
51
Treasury circular to the deposit, discontinuing those which had .ceased to pay
specie for-their n o t e s . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . „ , .
..
...
55
list of the deposit, discontinued under the act of June, 1836. . . . . . .
... .. ..
57
of deposit, list of, retained under the act of June, 1836,
...
58
(collectors of the customs and receivers of the public moneys made depositaries in
case of a suspension of specie, payments' by the. ,u,
...,..'...
. . . . . . . . 59
views in 1837 on the,circulation and ability of the, to resume specie payments... 103, 105
the deposits of Government funds unavailable for the service of 1838... „ . ..
.177, 178
the deposit, including the United States Bank and branches, the number and amount
of warrants drawn on the, in the year 1834.. .. .-..61
comparative condition of the, in certain particulars, in November, 1836, and in
March, May, July, and August,1837
...
. . , . , . 64
state of the accounts of the former and present, with the Treasurer of the United
State's.
.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
statement of the condition of the former, on the 15th of August; 1837. . . . . . . . . . 70
Treasury circular of J^uly 3, 1837, to the former, urging the resumption of specie
p a y m e n t s . . . . . . . ....
,,-..
86
views in 1837 in regard to the availability of the balance of Government funds in
the coffers of the
........
91
recommendation, in 1837, that the notes of-local, specierpaying, only, be received for
lands
....
.. ..
.. .,. .. 25
views in, 1837 in regard to the, and the safekeeping of the public moneys
102
comparative statement of the condition of all the, in the United States, on and. near
the 1st of January, 1836, 1st January, 1837, and since the suspension of. specie
payments........
. . . ..
172
comparative condition of the, in fifteen States, before and since the suspension of
specie payments.
............. — . , , . . . . „ „
...........
173
the further credit.extended to the, and the ultimate and ready settlement by the, & c . . .97
views in 1838, in relation to the resumption of specie payments by the
188, 191
comparative statements of the condition of the, in the different divisions of the Union,
according to returns dated nearest January .1, 1837, and January 1, 1838. ..218, 222
views in 1839 in regard to the, in connection w;ith the safekeeping of the public
moneys.
,.. .. - , ;
245
the use of the public money by the, for discounts, unprofitable.
„...
192
concerning the system of special deposits with t h e . . . . . .
193
deposit, statement of the condition of the, on or near the 1st of November, 1838, &c. .225
losses by the .deposit, in 1834, small compared with those of 1837...
„
194
list of.general deposit, and. the amount in cash subject to draft, , in accordance to
returns received to ,1st December, 1 8 3 8 . . . . . . . . . . .
—
224
list of the late deposit, in which special deposits have been made,..&c., .and the
•amount ofspecial deposits subject to draft, 1st December, 1838
228
statement of balances due the United States, 10th November, 1834, from banks
formerly depositories of the. public money, with the credits to 'which they are
entitled for payments since that date, &c.
...
.....
. . .229
list of former deposit, which suspended specie payments, and gave bonds to. the
United States, under the act of 16th October-, 1837, and the amount of balances
due by them on said bonds on 3d December, 1838, &c... . ..
230
statement in 1839 of public moneys to the credit of Treasurer of the United States
in the two general d e p o s i t . . . . . . .
346
statement of the condition of the deposit, to the 20th November, 1-839..,
347
estimated payments into the Treasury in 1840, out of the moneys due by the former
deposit.. , . . . . . . .
.....
, , 351
available funds in the depositj in'1841. ,
....
357
"balances of the deposits with the, .prior to-the-suspension in .1837
, .451, 454
amount of .special deposits with the
., .
.....
.451, 454
debts due by the, in 1837 to ,1841, inclusive
....
455
lists of general-and special-deposit, in .1843
.•
„...
.^628
list of deposit, in 1844.
"
683
in the-District of Columbia, concerning the resumption of specie.payments by the.. 21
insolvent, Government funds in th.e,,unavailable. „ . . , . . . „ ;
91, 177, 178




688

njTDEX.

Beaver cloth, the prices of, in 1842. „ „ . „ . . « i . . .
, ..
. . . . . 508
Beef, cattle, • hides, &c., exported annually from the United States, from 1790 to 1838
inclusive, the value o f . . .
..
... . . . . .
287
statement of the |value of, exported' annually from the United'
States, from 1821 to 1842, inclusive; and of the countries to
which exported.
.
.645, 646, 647
Bibb, Secretary—see Finances.
Bonds due by the Bank of the United State's—see Bank of the United States.
Bonds for duties, concerning the payment c>f.......... , , . . „•.......
3
for duties, considerations in 1837 in regard to the postponement of the payment of..
4
circulars of the Secretary and Solicitor of the Treasury in regard to the postponement of the payment of..
. . . . I.
...........
. . . . . . . ... .33, 36
memorial of the New York merchants, in 1837, to the President, for the .stay of
the collection o f . . . . . .
. . . . . . J.
......
..
°
......
38
memorials of the Chambers of Commerce of Boston and New Orleans on the same
subject... .'
...I
. .
40,41
Treasury circulars to the Boston Chamber of Commerce and the Collector at .New
York, in regard to the kind of money receivable for, &c..... , u
,.43, 47
.memorial of the Chamber of Commerce of New York, August 28, 1837, asking
for a postponement of the payment of duty bonds
..
49
views in 1837 and 1838 in regard to1 the extension of the credit o n . , .
..
97, 190
..
..
....
360
Bounties and drawbacks, a modification of the, recommended in 1840.
on pickled fish exported, payments for, from 1821 to 1842.
, .,...
635
Bullion and specie—see Imports—see Exports.
Butter* cheese, &c., exported annually from the United States, from 1790 to 1838, inclusive, the value o f . . I
...
28 7
statement of the value of, exported annually from the United States,
from 1821 to 1842, and of the countries to which exported. .645, 646, 647
C.
Calico, imported and American, the prices of, in 1842
„„...,.-„.
508
Certificates, without interest, recommendation, in 1837, that, be issued and made receivable
v.....
for public dues., . . . . . . . .
...
..
25
Clerks, submissions for the appointment of new. „ . . . . '
. • 157
•
Clerks—see Customhouse.
Circulars—see Treasury Circulars.
Civil, diplomatic, and miscellaneous service—
estimates for 1838
- .123, 124, 138, 156, 159
estimates for 1839.
..
i ...
"
181,232
estimates for 1840
235,, 299, 331
estimates for 1841
;
.358, 390, 421, 440, 462
estimates for 1842
..
..
486
estimates for 1843
487, 601
estimates for 1844-'5.
..
..
.488,603
estimates for 1845-'6.
..
—
669
appropriations made in 1837.
..
..
124, 159
appropriations made in 1839.
.. ...
< .299, 331, 335
appropriations made in 1840
• .391, 421, 425
appropriations made in 1841
438
expenditures in 1837
'
109, 175
expenditures in 1838...!
» .. .177, 178,- 201, 256
expenditures in 1839
..
232,257, 371
expenditures in 1840 .
352, 373, 437
expenditures in 1841
.....
438, 462, 471
•expenditures in 1842
.486, 492, 620
expenditures in 1843-'4
600, 623, 678
expenditures in 1844-'5.
^ ..
668, 680
Coast Survey, the progress of the, &c
:
;.
.108, 199, 253, 675
Coffee and tea, duty on, recommended. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . -609, 616
the value <of, imported into the United States annually, from 1821 to
1842.
637
Coffee, the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838, inclusive. ..
276
Collection.of duties, statement of the expense of, annually, from -1821 to 1 8 4 2 . . . . . . . .
635
Collection law, extract from the report of the Secretary of the Treasury in 1790, touching
the bearing of the, upon the receivability of bank notes in payment of
duties..v.*.... .,.
..
•• • «•••
54
a revision of the, recommended
199
'Collector at New York, Treasury circulars-to, in 1837, in regard to the specie circular and
duty-bonds.,..'.
,
• • -33, 47
circular from the, in regard to the excessive supply of foreign
merchandise in 1842
507




INDEX.

5

Collector at Baltimore; in 1789, Treasury circular to the, in regard to the receipt and transmission by mail of bank notes
.,
53
•Collectors of the Customs, made depositaries of the public moneys received by them in
case of suspension of specie payments by the b a n k s . . .
59
to. receive Treasury drafts in payment of duties
6*8
continue to make deposits of public moneys in certain banks. 192
concerning the report of the ultimate losses qf public moneys by, 194
recommendation of collateral security from, as keepers of the
public moneys, and making any embezzlement of public
money by them a penal offence.
. . . . . . .195, 196
Treasury circulars to the, in .1838, in relation to the kind of
currency receivable in payment of public dues
215, 217
list of, and of receivers of the public moneys; having public
,moneys in their hands, on whom drafts have from time to
time been placed, and are intended to. be continued, for the
sums to the credit of the Treasury; showing, also, the balances in their hands subject to draft, conformable to returns
to December 3, 1838..
. . 227v
Treasury circular of July 14,1838, to the, 'exhorting them not
to use the public moneys for private gain, &c.
.
..
230
a reduction of, recommended in 1840.
..
..
364
Commissioner of Customs proposed in 1837 and 1838.
108, 109, 349
Compensation, the, to custom-house clerks. . .
..
617
•Commerce of the United States, views in 1839 in relation to the.
....
....
.. ..
233
the extent of the—see Imports—see Exports.
statistical view of the, from the year 1821 to 1842.
.. 634
Commerce, foreign, concerning the fluctuations in the.
, . ..
..
. ..
604
s
what constitutes .legitimate
367
•Constitutional currency—see Currency.
Cotton, over product of, and reduction of its price, cause of financial embarrassment in
1837
.28,95
the net profits of, in 1835 and 1836.
............
105
statement of the value of manufactured, imported annually into the United States
from 1790 to 1838, inclusive. ..
275
statement of the value of, exported annually from the United States from 1790 to
1838, inclusive
,,
285
statements of the value of, exported annually from the United States from 1821 to
1842, and of the countries to which exported. t .
645, 646, 647
Cottons, statements of the kinds and value of, imported into the United States annually
" from 1821 to 1842 .
636
the value of manufactures of, imported for the same periods., .
638
Credit, the Government, views in 1839 as to some stable means to preserve the
243
public, views on the necessity of permanent legislation to preserve the, against the
contingencies of a fluctuating trade.
.. .. . . . . 184
how preserved, &c., in 1840.
..
.354,355
the importance of its maintenance
..
490
views in 1844 on the importance of sustaining the public.
650
Credit, an excess of, always ends in revulsion..
367
Crockery ware, the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive. 276
Currency, views in 1837 in regard to the constitutional, and the proper kind of, to be
received in payment of public dues, &c.
... — . . .
.21,98
Treasury circulars to -the Boston merchants and collector at New York in regard
to the kind of, to be received in payment of duties
.v.
.43, 47
circular in 1789 in regard to the kind of, receivable for duties...
......
53
kind of, in view of the collection law, in 1790 receivable in payment of public dues. 54
the, as afforded by the banks. ,.
..,„,
103
views in 1838 on the kind of, received for the public dues, &c..
.. ..
188
Treasury circulars of June 1 and July 6, 1838, to the collectors and receivers,
in relation to the kind of, to be received in payment of public dues.. . . . . .215, 217
views in 1839 on the condition of the banking institutions, and the kind of, ,
receivable for public dues
..
...
.......
249
advantages to'the, by the disuse of paper in paying public dues
—
363
Custom-house establishment, concerning t h e . . . . . . . , .. .. . . . . .
253^
bonds—-see Bonds.
clerks, practice of allowing compensation out of the revenue where the fees
are inadequate, &c., abolished.. ,
..
.. ..
617'
officers, concerning the restriction on the increase o f . . . . . . . . . . . . .
673
revision of the pay of, recommended in 1837...
.. - .
.109, 199
reduction of, recommended in 1840
364
responses of the various, of the United States, to Treasury circular
of November 24,1842, in regard to the warehouse system. .530 to 595'
VOL. I V . — 4 4 .




690

njTDEX.

Customs, Commissioner of, proposed in 1838 and 1837..".
....
. . . . . . . . . . .108,199, 34$
Customs, receipts from, estimated for, and ascertained—
In 1836.,
..
183 7
2, 90, 175
183 8
'
92, 176, 178, 256
1839.
...
.180,231,371
184 0
234, 351, 437
184 1
357, 438, 439, 440, 456, 461, 462
184 2
442, 456, 463, 485, 620, 6,03
1843-' 4
456, 487, 488, 600, 623, 667, 678, 680
1844-' 5
602, 667, 678
1845-'6..
669
Customs, receipts from, from 1st January, 1816, to 31st December, 1836, inclusive. .,
459
from 1st January, 1837, to 31st December, 1840.
..
460
from 1st January, 1837, to 30th September, 1843
627
a change of duties recommended in 1841, and an increased revenue therefrom... 442
estimate of the amount which will be. received from, in the last Quarter of 1841,
and each of the two succeeding years, under a modification of the tariff,. — .. 466
views in regard to the receipts from, in 1842.
..
..
..
.463, 603
estimated receipts from—see Estimates.
D.
Defalcations,, report in 1838 of the probable losses of the'public funds by receivers and collectors.
..
., . . . . . .
194
concerning the list of officers reported as standing on the books of the Treasury, 12th October, 1837, as defaulters.
.. ,
..
.. 195
collateral security from collectors and receivers -and other depositaries, and
attachment of penalty to prevent.. . . . . . .
..
195, 196
concerning checks and securities and penal enactments against.
, , .252, 363
the losses by individual
. ..
. . ..
.r..366, 444
.—
......
445
the, by banks, as keepers of thp public moneys
congratulations in 1843 that there are no, by officers of the Government.. .
618
Deficiency in the Treasury, apprehended.
..
..
... .
3
apprehended at the close of the year 1840, the amount o f . . .. 234
views in 1839 on some permanent safeguards to prevent, & c . . 243
concerning a provident fund to meet a
. 252
a modification of the tariff recommended in 1840 to prevent a. 362.
to be provided for in 1842, and views in regard t h e r e t o . . . . . . . . 439,
440, 462, 463 , 464, 469
amount of, 31st December, 1842, and views in regard thereto, 487,488
amount of, on the 1st January, 1842
...
.. . . .
598
probable, at the end of the fiscal year 1843-'4.
.'. 602
probable, at the end of the fiscal year 1844-'5.
..,
603
the, how supplied.
./
,
. 605
views in 1843 as to provisions for meeting, in the revenue-.
608
217
Deposit act of 23d June, 1836, an act to modify the.
Deposits, of the public moneys with the banks, views in 1837 and 1838 in regard t o . , . 10, 17, 192
letter to the Executives of the States, with the' postscript as to the return of the
transfers in case of non-payment of t h e . . . . . , . . '
.....
..
.
51
Treasury circular discontinuing the, to such banks as had suspended specie payments
..
55
unavoidable
91,177, .178, 357, 372, 627
with the banks, considerations in relation to a system of special. .
193
with the States, in 1837
,
..."
..
„ . 1.1, 3, 30
considerations touching obstacles in the way of transferring the last instalment
of, to the. States. ..
..
5
views in 1837in regard to the extent and availability of the, &c
...
90, 97
unavailable for the service of 1838
.. . .
.177, 178
the Secretary does not anticipate that there will be any surplus inNthe Treasury
1st January, 1839, to deposit under the act of June, 1836.. ... —
181
the obligation to deposit with the States any surplus, not a debt due the States, 181
further views in 1839, on the impracticability of making available the, and the
legislation of Congress on the subject
:
184
concerning the.
..
....
253
the aggregate amount of
..
. .. u . 627
. (For further information and views in regard to, see Banks—see Public Moneys.)
.'Deposits, public,.interest on, from 1837 to 1841
..
455,
Deposits in the Mint—see Mint.
Depositories, views in 1837 on the propriety of appointing general. .. . .. . . . . . . . 107
general, under the act of 4th July, 1840
^ ..
.449, 452
selection of certain, in 1844.
674




INDEX.

691

Diplomatic service—see Foreign Intercourse.
Disbursing officers, views in 1840 in regard to, &c
363
Discounts, the use.of the public moneys for, unprofitable and injurious to the banks and
borrowers.. ..
,, ......
...,„, 192
District of Columbia, amount of debts of the cities of the, assumed by the Federal Government. 179
payments on the, and remarks in regard to the debt of
273,
352, 353, 357, 358, 371, 385, 483, 504, 630, 651
Documents, list of, appended to the Secretary's report in 1837
•
32
Domestic produce and manufacture, value of annual exports of, from 1821 to 1843 inclusive. 632
views in 1840 on the exports of, for a series of years. 355
statement of the value of the annual exports of, from
1821.to 1842.. .
....
634
> statements of the value of certain articles of, exported
annually from 1821 to 1842, and exhibiting the countries to which they were exported..
., .645, 646, 637
value of exports of, in 1844
683
exports of, from 1834 to 1840, the value of, 15 per cent.
added
...
457
statement of +he value of, reexported annually from
1821 to 1842
.631, 632, 645, 646, 647
exports of, from 1790 to 1838.
.285, 287
See Exports.
Donations for local objects should be forborne, recommendation in 1838 that.. .,.
187
Drafts in hands of disbursing officers saleable for specie alone.
363
Drawback paid on foreign merchandise, domestic refined sugar, and domestic distilled
spirits, annually, from 1821 to 1842. ,.
635
Drawback, the inequalities of the, on sugar and molasses, and necessity of legal provisions
to correct..
., ...
. 442
a retention of a larger percentage of, recommended .
. ..
611
Drawbacks, views in 1840, concerning..
.354, 360
Dues, the money receivable for—see/Public Dues.
Duties, the amount of, collected annually—see Revenue—see Receipts—see Imports—see
Public Dues.
the bonds for—see Bonds.
views in 1837, concerning the extension of credit on
..
97
the receipts from, in 1838, and the estimated, for 1839.
183
how estimated
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
under protest, concerning the mode of keeping and repaying..
200
a modified duty of 20 per cent; ad valorem, recommended in 1841.
442
increase of, recommended in 1841
...,
..
, 469
the decline in the importations in 1842, not attributable to the system of duties.
490
the largest importation under the highest rate of
.. 604
any change in the .rate of, not likely to improve the revenue. ...... , . , . . . , . . 6 0 9
•on tea and coffee urged
609, 616
on tonnage and light money recommended to be applied to hospital purposes.. .610, 616
transit, on imported merchandise, &c., suggested.
,
.611,616
the amount of, on merchandise from 1837 to 1843.
626
the amount of, collected on foreign .merchandise from 1821 to 1842.
631
amount of, which accrued annually upon imported merchandise, from 1821 to 1842. 633
statement of the amount of, on merchandise, tonnage,'' light money, passports, &c.,
annually from 1821 to 1842 inclusive . .
635
expense, of collection annually from 1821 to 1842 inclusive
635
statement of, ad valorem and specific, upon manufactures of iron and steel imported
into the United States annually from 1821 to 1842 inclusive
641
their effect upon importations and the prices' of merchandise, &c
662
the average yield of, &c., under the act of 1842.
671
of articles imported during the nine months ending 30th June, 1843, the duty on
which exceeded 35 per cent, on the average wholesale market value of such
articles.... ..
681
gross, which accrued in the fiscal year 1844.
683
Duty, the value of merchandise imported from 1834 to 1839, both inclusive, free of, paying
aa volorem, and paying specific
274
E.
Embarrassments—see Financial.
Estimates of receipts into the Treasury from all sources and of all expenditure for all
objects—
for 1837
2,3,90
for 1838 .
92, 93, 123, 124, 176, 177, 178
for 1839
180, 181, 231, 232
for 1840
234, 235,298,299,351, 352




692

njTDEX.

Estimates of receipts into the Treasury from all sources and of all -expe'ndittlre for alf
o bj ects<— Continued.
for 1841. ..
.....
357, 358, .390, 391, 439, 440, 456 * 462
for 1842.
.. .. ..
,,.,......;.,.:...
442,463,485,486,598
for 1843
..
„.......
487, 599
for 1843-'4. / .
..' .. '
..487, 488, 600, 601
for 1844-'5. . . , , ,
,..
..602,667,668for 1845-'6. . , .
.,.,..
66$
explanatory remarks in 1837 on the, for 1838,
99, 101, 123, 124
f . . . . . . ,.„
explanations in 1838 of the, for 1839, and suggestions on the mode of meeting fluctuations
in them, .
......
-182
of 1839, .on an economical basis.
*«.. / . . . . . . 185views in 1839 in regard to the estimates of receipts for 1840
.....
.235, 236explanations in 1839 of the estimates as to th.e expenditures and of some further reductions in them..
237
viejvs in 1840, in regard to the, for 1841. ,.
.....
356, 357
explanations in 1841, of the, for 1842. .,„ ..
463,487,358,359.390, 442
.views in 1842 of the estimate of 1843...,..........
.. .
488
views in 1843 of the estimates .of 1844-'5.
..
......
.„..,..,..
603
views in 1844 of the estimates of 1845-'6
. . . . . . ... . . „ . . . „
670
of appropriations, in aggregate and detail, for 1838.
123,. 124
of appropriations for 1840. . . .
..
...
.235, 298,- 299
of appropriations for 1 8 4 1 . . . . .
.:
......
.358, 390, 391
statements .under the act of May 1, 1820, accompanying the a n n u a l . . . . . . . . .159, 335, 425
of the duties on the average value of imports, from the 30th of September, 1834 to 1840
inclusive
. . . ... . ...
....................................
. . . . . 4§8
Ewing, Thomas, Secretary of the Treasury-^see Finances.
Exchanges, domestic and.foreign, views in 1838.on the good.condition of the... .„,
. .190, 191
Expenditures of the Government for all objects, estimated for and ascertained, in aggregate
and in detail, in—
,89
1836.
lOOU . ..
..
..
u
..Go'
183 7
90, 109, 175
183 8
..
...
93,177,178,201,256
183 9
180,181,232,257,371
18.40
:
235, 352,373, 437
1841. . . . .
...
.358,.438, 439,440, 448, 462, 471, 599
184 2
....
, , .,
463, .486, 492, 599, 620
1843
..
.487, 599, 623
1843-'4.
„
..
.. ..
.48, 600., 601, 667, 678
1844-'5 i
...
.'..
.... '
.603,668,680
1845--6 .
. ...
669
Expenditures, views in 1837 in regard to the estimates of, for 183.8.
. . . . . . 9 4 , 101
and revenue for 1837, further explanation as to the effect upon them by laws
passed at the special session in 1837.
. . . . . . . . . . 96
prediction in 1837 that on certain contingencies the, can be re.d.uce.d to
$17,000,00.0., .and views why former predictions of reduction were not realized
....
"
./
101
views in 1838 in regard to the fluctuations-in the.
.182, 184, 185
yiews in 1838 on a reduction of the annual to meet the diminished revenue
apprehended in consequence of the gradual reductions in the tariff,.... .185, 187
views, in 1839 why the expenditures in 1,840; will be les.s.than those of the
previous year, and why they should not be more than $18,000,000
237,
238,252
general yiews in 1839 in regard to the causes of increase in the. ..... . . . . 239
considerations in 1839 as to some permanent safeguard under fluctuations in
receipts and.
,..
.,-......
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242, 252
proposition for a reduction of.
„. 252
general views in 1840 in regard to, and for a reduction of t h e . . . . . . . . . . . , 366
exceeded .the r.ev.enu.e, and how, and the necessity of early regulation to prevent a further augmentation..,, ,.. , , . . . . . . . . . . „ „ . . . . . . , „ „.. . . „. . . .441, 442
excess of, oyer revenues,in 1842. ....
599
views in 1843 in regard to a diminution .of the. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 605
views in 1844 against extravagance in
.. .. 662
average rate of, for certain years, exclusive of the public debt.
605
exclusive of trust funds, loans, and Treasury notes, from 1816 to 1836, and
from 1st January, 1837, .to 30th D.ecember, 1840
.459,460
average annual expenditures from 1816 to' 1836, and from 1836 to 1840. .459, 460
excess of average annual expenditure for current expenses orver receipts
460
.statement of the'annual expenditures pn all accounts, from January 1, 1837,
s to. September. 30, 1843*.
627




INDEX.

693

.Expenditures, an account of the principal and interest of the public debt existing before
1837, between January 1, 1837, and September 30", 1843, and for interest
on loans and Treasury notes from 1831 to 1843.
....
626, 627
see Miscellaneous Expenditures—see Treasury Notes—see Estimates—see Public
Debt—see Naval Service—see Foreign Intercourse.
for the Jlrmy, see Military Service.
Expenses' of Governm-ent, views in 1843 in regard to a reduction in the.. . " . . . . . . „ , . . , 607
of collecting the revenue—see Collection.
see' Expenditures.
Explosions—see Steam-boilers.
Exports, in 1837, ascertained and estimated, and views in regard to'.
94
statement'of the value of, during the years ending 30th September, 1836—'37.,.... 171
value of, during the commercial year ending September 30,1838.
181, 214
value' of, during the commercial year ending 30th September, 1839, and views in
relation to the amount, &,c.} of.
,
233
•statement of the value- of imports and, during the years 1834, 1835, 1836, 1837,
1838, and 1839.
'
...
274
•statement of the value of annual, domestic arid foreign, from the United States,
from 1790 to 1838 inclusive. A
•
'
285
statement exhibiting the States from which the annual, from 1790 to 1838 were
made', send the value' of, from each State, &c..
287
countries to which the annual,'from the United States were made from 1790 to
1838 inclusive, and the annual value of, to each c o u n t r y . . . « ,
291
views in 1839 in regard to past imports and, of the United States
. . . . . . 294
iiri 1840, the amount and peculiarities of, showing an excess over the imports. . 354
views in 1840 on the, of domestic products for a series of years
.355
statement exhibiting the value of imports and, annually, from 1791 to 1840 inclusive,
and the excess in either case for the same period
. 387
value of, and imports during each presidency, from Mr. Monroe's second term to
Mr. Van Buren's, inclusive.
..
..
..
388
of bullion and specie during the year ending 30th September', 1838
224
of bvllion and specie annually from 1790 to" 1838. . , . . :
286
average value of, for six years, &c., &c
.,, , . .
. . . . . 456
o f domestic' and foreign produce from-1834 to 1840, the value of 15 per cent, added. 457
value of,- during the" year ending 30th September, 184&
505
value of foreign merchandise exported annually from 1821 to 1841.
506
statement of the value of, of domestic produce and manufacture, and" of foreign
merchandise reexported- annually, from 1821 to 1842.......
631, 632
•statistical view of the commerce-of the United States, exhibiting the value of im'
634
ports and, annually,, from 1821 to 1842
•statements-of the-value-of certain articles of domestic produce and manufacture,
and of bullion and f^pecie exported annually, from 1821 to 1842 inclusive, and
the countries to* which exported..
645, 646, 647
statement exhibiting the value of, during the year ending 30th June, 1844...,
683
F.
Fees, the surplus, of clerks of district and circuit courts, concerning.,
..
607
Finances, in 1837; reports' of Mr. Woodbury on the state of the Government
.1, 89
1838; report of Mr.' Woodbury on the state of the
175
1839, report of Mr. Woodbury on the state of the.. .
.. ...
231
1840, report of Mr. Woodbury on the state of the
' . . , . , 351
1841, report of Mr. Ewing on the state- of the.
.. . . .. ..
437
1841, report of Mr. Forward on the state of the.
.., ..
;. .. .. .. 461
1842, report of Mr. Forward on the state of the". .
*
485
1843-^4, report of'Mr. Spencer on the state of the. .
597
1844-'5, report of Mr. Bibb on the state of the.
..
649
of the Government, 'recommendation in 1837 of certain legal provisions for the
1 pro'p'er'administration of the...
..
"
.
. . . .. . . , . . 107
touching the recommendation of permanent measures to meet any fluctuation in
the;,;
'
183
Financial embarrassment, views in 1837 and 1&38 in regard to some general causes of,
and remedies for. , , . . . . . . . . .
,..-...
. . . .28,184
the excess of importation of foreign merchandise' over the exports one great cause o f . . . . . .
, . ..
233
legislation recommended in 1840 to prevent
355
Financial operations of the Government, general views in 1840 in regard to the. ..
365
Fiscal year, alteration in the, proposed.
.,
. . . .
.199, 349
the change in the
....
. . . . 597
Fish; exported annually from-the United States from 1790 to 1825, inclusive,.the value of. 286
exported annually from the United- States, from 1821- to 1842, inclusive, the value of.. 645
Fishing vessels, allowances to, annually, from 1821 to 1842. . . . . . . . .
635




694

njTDEX.

Flannel, American, the price of, in 1 8 4 2 . . . . . .
...... — , , .
^ SOS1
Flax and hemp, statement of the value of manufactures of, imported into the United States
annually, from^l821 to 1842, inclusive
640
Flax—see Linens.
Flour, exported annually from the. United States from 1790 to 1838,. inclusive, the value of. 286
statement of the value of, exported annually from the United States, from 1821 to
1842, and of the countries to which exported.
..
,
,....645, 646, 647.
Fluctuation in receipts and expenditures—see Finances.
Foreign intercourse, estimates for 1838 for.
..
.123, 144, 156, 159, 177
estimates for 1839 for.
181, 232
estimates for 1840 for
298, 235, 322, 332
estimates for 1841 for
358, 390, 413, 422, 440, 462
estimates for 1842 for.
„
..
486
estimates for 1843 for
i.487, 601
estimates for 1844-'5 for
488, 603.
estimates forJ^S-'G for
669'
appropriations made in 1837 for.,
..
• -144, 159'
appropriations made in 1839 for. ...' ... :
299, 322, 335;
appropriations made in 1840 for. „. ..... ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ,
.413, 42£
appropriations made in 1841 f o r . . . . . . . .
438;
expenditures in 1837-on account'of.
..
. . . . . . . . 109, 175178, 201, 256-'
expenditures in 1838 on account of
expenditures in 1839 on account of. . ..
,
.232, 257, 371
expenditures in 184.0 on. account of.
..............
352, 373, 437
expenditures in 1841 on account of.
..
.
462, 471
expenditures in 1842 on account of. .........
... u . . . . . . . . . .486, 492, 620
expenditures in 1843-'4 on account of.
. ...600, 623, 678
expenditures in 184.4-'5 on account o f . . . . . ;
....
.668, 680
Fortifications,, a reduction of appropriations for, recommended in 1838.,
—
.. • 187
estimates for 1838 for
148
estimates for 1839 for
A
181, 232
sestimates for 1840 for
..
..
235, 298, 326
estimates for 1841 for.
.358, 390., 416, 440, 462
estimates for 1842 for
486
estimates for 1843 f o r . . . . . . . .
..
..
'
487,601
estimates for 1844-'5 for.
..
.488, 60$
estimates for 1845-'6 for
...
'..
.........
. . . . . . . . 670'
appropriations made in 1837 for..
~
....148, 164
appropriations made in 1839 for
,..;...
..
326, 339'
appropriations made in 1840 for.
. . . . . „ . - . . .......
.. .417, 429"
appropriations made in 1841 for
; .. ..
. . . .
.. . .438, 439s
expenditures in 1837 forV
.. ,.
..
.....
175
expenditures in 1838 for
.177, 202, 25G
expenditures in 1839' for.
..'.232, 258, 371
expenditures in 1840 for.
.352, 374, 437
expenditures in 1841 f o r . . .
-.. .438, 462, 472
expenditures.in 1842for.. . .
..
..486, 492, 621
expenditures in 1843-'4 for
'
„ r.
624, 679
expenditures in 1844-'5 for.
..
..
.. .....
..
.668,^680
Forward, Walter, Secretary of the Treasury—see Finances.
France, the sixth instalment due from, to the United States, paid...
... ..
199'
the interest on the first four instalments of the indemnity d u e b y . . . ......
..
253*
Funds—see Trust Funds.
public, unavailable..
»
.91, 177, 178, 372, 62T
G.
General Land Office, concerning t h e . . . . . ..
253
the operations of the, in 1840, concerning
. ..
364
the operations- of the—see Public Lands.
Georgetown, the debt of, assumed b y the Federal Government...
-179, 273, 385payments on said debt—see District of Columbia.
Grain and flour, views in 1837 touching the price of, their value, and the- quantity
imported and exported, and their bearing upon the national finances and the stability of
trade
.,
...
95
Great Britain, the warehouse system of—see Warehouse system.
H.
Harbors and rivers, the improvement of—
estimates for 1838
estimates for 1839.
estimates for 1840.




A

148
181,232, 371
235,, 298

INDEX.

695

Harbors and rivers, the improvement of—Continued:
appropriations for 1837
..
.—
.148, 164
appropriations for 1839
..
..
..
..
339
appropriations for 1840
..
,..
. . .. 432
appropriations for 1841. . , . „ „
.,
439
expenditures in 1837.. .. .,
.
175
•expenditures in 1838
.187, 202, 256
expenditures in 1839
232, 258
expenditures in 1840.
;
..
.352, 374
expenditures in 1842 . . .
..
621
expenditui-es in 1843-'4
, ..
.624, 679
Hemp, the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1800, inclusive.
277
clean Russia, the price of, in 1842.,,
507
imported into the United States annually, from 1821 to 1842, the value of manufactures of
o.....'.
,
..
..
636
and cordage imported into the United' States annually from 1821 to 1842, statements
of the value of.
637,642
and flax, statement of the value of manufactures of, imported into the United States
annually from 1821 to 1842
640
Holland, remarks in 1837 in regard to the outstanding appropriation under the act of May
20, 1836, to pay the debt due by the District of Columbia.
91
the debt due—see District of Columbia.
Home market, the creation of a, recommended in 1841.
..
,. . . . . . .
468
Home valuation under the tariff of 1833
..
465
I.
Importations of foreign goods, the excessive, a cause of financial embarrassments in J 837.
29
how affected by the expansions and contractions of the currency
...
., . ..
236
Imports^ the value of, in 1837, and views in regard to the diminution of.
94
views, in 1837, in "regard to the fluctuations in, caused by restrictive legislation, &c. 100
statement of the value of, during the years ending 30th September, 1836 and
1837:
171
the value of, during the commercial year ending 30th September, 1838. . . . ..182, 214
the value of the, during the commercial year ending 30th September, 1839, and
views in relation to the amount, &c.,, of
— .......
, , .. „ „ . .
233
the effects of the excess of, over the exports, treated of.
.,
233
.statement exhibiting the value of, and exports during the years 1834, 1835, 1836,
1837, 1838, and 1839.
274
statement of the quantity-, kind, and value of imports into the United States, from
the 1st October, 1789., to the, 30th September, 1838, and the value of those
retained in the country.;.. ..«,
....
.
„275
•statement showing from what countries the imports into the United States, from
1790 to 1838, inclusive, were derived, and into what States they were entered,
and the value in each case.
..
. . . . <.
278, 281
views in 1839 in regard to the past, and exports.
........
..
.,
294
in 1840, the amount and peculiarities of, &c.,
...
.354, 367
statement of the annual value of, and exports, from 1791 to 1840, inclusive, and
the excess of imports and of exports annually, for the same period.
...
387
value of exports and, during each presidency, from Mr. Monroe's second term
to Mr. Van Buren's, inclusive.
..
..
..
..
..
..,;
..
388
average value of, for six years..
...
„
.,
, .. 456
from 1834 to 1840, and value thereof.
....
457
estimate of duties on the average value of, from 1834 to 1840, inclusive.
458
of bullion and specie from 182i to 1842
..
, .636, 645
•of bullion and specie during the year ending 30th September, 1838.
224
of bullion'and specie from 1790 to 1838. ..
277
of bullion and specie from 1834 to 1840
., 458
the decline in the, in 1842, not attributable to our system of duties
490
the value of, during the years ending 30th September, 1840, 1841, and 1842.
505
statements of the value of foreign merchandise imported , &c., annually, from 1821
to 1843, and the amount of duties accruing thereon
....
..
.631,633
statistical view of the commerce of the United States,- exhibiting the value of exports
and., annually, from 1821.to 1842. . . . ' . .
, ..
.,
......
634'
statements of the value of the principal articles of merchandise imported into the
United States annually, from 1821 to 1842.
636, 637
statements exhibiting the value of manufactures of cotton and wool, flax and
hemp, iron and steel, hemp and cordage^imported from 1821 to 1842, inclusive, 638,
639, 640, 641, 642
statement of the'value of articles imported into the United States, designating the
countries from which received, annually, from 1821 to 1842, inclusive
643, 644




696

njTDEX.

Imports, statement of articles imported during nine months ending June, 1843, the duty on
which exceeded thirty-fiye per cent, on the average wholesale market value of
such articles.
...
... . .
.,.
681
statement of the value of, and exports during the year ending 30th June, 1844... 683
Indemnities—see France—see Naples.
Independent Treasury, views in 1837 and 1838 in favor of an. , . . . .
10, 106, 198
views in 1838 in regard to the operations of the. .,
,-...
192
views in 1840 in regard to the operations of the
362
views in 1841 against the, and against individual custodians of the
public moneys, and in favor of the repeal of the
..
444
Indian affairs,, remarks in 1840 in regard to.
....
366
Inscriptions, Spanish, concerning the payment of. , . .
......
108
Insolvent banks, Government funds unavailable in the—see Banks.
Insolvent debtors, extension of the acts of Congress for the relief of, proposed
. . . 350
: Internal improvements by the Federal Government, reductions in appropriations for,
recommended
..
..
..
.......
187
Intercourse—see Foreign Intercourse.
Iron and steel, the value of, imported, into the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive... 276
imported into the United States annually from 1821 to 1842, the value of
manufactures of.
..
,
......
..
. . . . o 636
manufactured and unmanufactured, statement of the value of, imported into
the "United States annually from 1821 to 1842. „•„.,...;.,.•
641
Russia, bar, the price of, in 1842.
'
..,,....,.
507
Judicial condemnation of goods, the expanse of
..
..
... 607
L.
Land laws, as to any modification of the.
.. „
608"
Lands, public, receipts from the sale of, &c.—see Public Lands—-see General Land Office.
Lead,.imported into the United States annually from. 1821 to 1842, the value of
637
the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive.
277
Linens, the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive..
277
and the manufactures of flax, imported into the United States annually from 1821
to 1842, the'value of. . ...
636
Light money—see Tonnage and.
Light-house establishment, recommendation in 1838 of a reduction of appropriations for. ..186, 187
concerning the.
..
. .. •'.
...
253
Light-houses, on a part of the1 Atlantic coast, concerning proper sites for
......
108
concerning.
...
..•„„..
199
Loans, to supply the Treasury—see Treasury Notes.
per acts of 21st July, 1841," of 15th April, 1842, and of 3d of March, 1843, receipts
from, estimated and actual, in 1841. ..
461, 470
in 1842
.485, 486, 491, 599, 620
in 1843
. .487, 600, 623
in 1843-'4...
.... .
667, 678
statement of receipts from, from January 1, 1837, to September 30, 1843. .
626
expenditures on account of the, of 1841, 1842, and 1843—
in 1841
462, 482, 627
in 1842
. .486, 502, 599, 622, 627
in 1843...
487, 600, 625, 627
in 1843—'4
. . „ . . \ . .488, 602, 627, 680
in 1844-'5
.. .603, 627, 668, 680
in 1845-'6
..
670
statement in 1842 of the amo.unt due on the-, of 1841-'2, the, former redeemable 1st
January, 1844, and the latter the 1st of January, 1863. . . .
504
statement of the payments from January 3, 1837, to September 30-, 1843^ and of
interest on account of the. ,.
., — . . .626, 627
statement of persons, to whom was awarded the loan of 1843, the terms of acceptance, &c., and of the offers not.accepted, &c.
.. ..
629
statement, December 1, 1843, of amount of outstanding., ..
..
630
statements in 1844 of the indebtedness of the United States on account of. .652, 676, 677
recommended in 1841. . . . .
.....
,,
., . > ..•
*..
,. , .443, 444
views as to the anticipated receipts from, in- 1842'
463
to make the late loan available, an extension of time-recommended. . .-. . . .
464
concerning the.
..
,,..,.,
..
489
606
a new loan recommended in 1843 to meet a deficit. „ „
considerations in. 1843 in regard, to the loan authorized by the act of March, 1843.. 613
views in 1844.in regard to the interest on the-, and the payment of the.
.660, 661
Losses, of the public money, views in 1839 in regard'to.
. . . . . ...246, 247
Lumber^ exported annually from,the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive, the value
of286
exported annually, from the United States from 1821 to 1842 inclusive; the value of. 645




INDEX.

697

M.
Manufacture, domestic, statement of the value of the annual exports of, from 1821 to 18'42. 632
Manufactures, the value of certain, imported into the United States annually from 1821 to
1842. . . . . . . . .
..... . . , , . . . .
...
,, ,.
636
statements exhibiting the value of, of cotton and wool, flax and hemp, iron
and steel, hemp and-cordage,^ imported from 1821 to 1842 inclusive....... 638,
239, 640, 641, 642
statement of the value of* imported into the United States as-above, annually,
from 1821 to 1842, and the countries fronrwhence received., . . .
.643, 644
statements exhibiting the value of certain articles of domestic produce and,
exported annually from the United States from 1821 to 1842, and the
countries to which exported.,..
o.-... ;o . . .
645, 646, 647
the value of, exported-annually from the United States from 1821 to 1842. 645
statement of the value ofj exported annually from the United States from
1789 to 1838 i n c l u s i v e , , , . - , . , . - . - . . •
285
Marine hospitals, concerning places most suitable for...- „ • . . . . . . . . .
. ,..
108
Marine Corps, appropriations and expenditures for the-^see Naval Service—see Estimates
—see Expenditures.
Merchandise, for the annual imports and exports of-^see Imports-^Exports.
statement of the kind and value of imports of, from'the 1st October, 1789, to
the 30th of September,- 1828, and the countries5 from whence derived., .275, 279
statement of the exports of, for the same period.
..-.-.-.„ ..- „ .. 287
foreign, the value-ofj exported annually from 1821 to 1841.
.,
* 506
a redundant supply of foreign, in the United State's before the enactment of
the tariff of'1842, and the prices of certain....
.•
......
507
foreign,-imported and reexported, the amountof duties on, from 1837 to 1843. 626
foreign, statements of the' value- of, imported, reexported, and consumed or
on hand, annually, from 1821 to 1842
631, 632
statement of the value of, imported from 1821 to 1842, and-the gross duties
1
from 1821'to 1842
633
foreign, statement of the value of the annual exports of, from 1821 to-1842. 634
foreign, drawbacks paid on, annually, from 1821 to 1842. ,. .,
...
. . . 635
statements exhibiting the value of the principal articles of, imported annually
into the United States from 1821 to 1842 inclusive, and showing the countries from whence received .
.636, 638, 639,^640, 641, 642, 643, 644
statements exhibiting the value of certain articles of domestic produce and
manufacture, and bullion and specie, exported annually from the United
States from. 1821 to 1842 inclusive, and the countries to which exported..*. 645,
646, 647
statement of articles imported in nine months of 1843, at a rate of duty averaging 35 per cent
,, .. .......
i.*.. I. ..
;
681
the value and kind of, imported and exported. . . .
........ *
Military service, including, fortifications, armories, arsenals,, ordnance, Indian affairs, revolutionary and military pensions, and internal improvements—
estimates for 1838
*.
.123, 146, 156, ,164 178
estimates for 1839
' ... ......
181,232
estimates for 1840.
,
.235,-298, 323, 333
estimates for. 1841.
358, 390, 397, 414, 423, 440, 462
estimates for 1842
•
486
estimates for 1843
=
.;
..
.487, 601
estimates for 1844-'5
.. ,
..
.488,603
estimates for 1845-'6
670
appropriations made in 1837. ..
^
146, 164
appropriations made in 1839
..
...
.323,339
appropriations made in 1840
........ .,
.. .414, 429
appropriations made in 1841. .
...
..
.438, 439
expenditures in 1837
.111,175
expenditures in 1838.
177, 178, 202'
expenditures in 1839
.!
..
..
.. . . . .232, 258, 371
expenditures in 1840.
.352,374,437
expenditures in 1841. .....
.-".4:39, 462, 472'
expenditures in 1842...
...
486, 493, 621
expenditures in 1843-'4. ,
„ .600, 601, 624, 679
expenditures in 1 8 4 4 - ' 5 . . . . . . . . . .
-...
....
.668, 680
Militia service, &c.—see Expenditures—see Estimates.
Mint, the amount of deposits in the, and considerations in regard to.
.-.
,
2, 177
concerning the. . . . . . . ..-.. . . .
.-.I.
199, 253
deposits in the. under the act of June 23', 1836, and January 18^, 1837 ..
.91, 451, 454
views' in 1837 on the--propriety of imposing the duty of a general depository on the., 107'
recommendation" of legal penalties' in case of embezzlement of any of the public
funds in the.
. . . . . . . 1 9 5 , 196




69S

INDEX.

Mint, amount of special deposits in the, and subject to draft 1st December, 1838....... • 228
Mint certificates, recommendation in 1837 that the, be receivable in payment of public dues.
26
Miscellaneous serviceestimates for 1838
123, 144, 156, 159, 178
estimates for 1839
181, 232
estimates for 1840.
•
•
235, 298, 318, 331
estimates for 1841. , .
.. ..
.358, 390, 410, 422, 440, 462
estimates for 1842
:
..
486
estimates for 1843-'4
487, 601
estimates for 1844-'5
.488, 602, 603
estimates for 1845-'6.
669
expenditures in 1837
109, 175
expenditures in 1838
, ,'
177, 178, 201, 256
expenditures in 1839.
232, 257, 371
expenditures in 1840.*.
352, 373, 437
expenditures in 1841
.438, 462, 471
expenditures in 1842
..
.486, 492, 620
expenditures in 1843-'4
.600, 624, 678
expenditures in 1844-'5
668, 680
appropriations made in 1837.
....
•
144,159
appropriations made in 1839. , ..
/.,„,,..
...
.299, 318, 335
appropriations made in 1840
..
..
. . . .410, 425
appropriations made in 1841.
. ..
.. . . . . .
438
Miscellaneous sources, receipts from—see Receipts.
Molasses, the value of, imported'into the United States annually from 1790 to 1838 inclusive. 276
the value of, imported into the United States annually from 1821 to 1842.. . . . . . 637
Moneys of the Government, the safe-keeping of—see Public Money.
N.
Naples, the fifth instalment of indemnity due by, paid.
the sixth instalment due by, paid. . .... . . . .
another indemnity paid.. ,
Naval service, including the Marine Corps—
estimates for 1838. \ .
estimates for 1839
.
estimates for 1840
estimates for 1841.
estimates for 1842. ... , , „ . .
,..
..
estimates for 1843
;
estimates for 1844-'5
estimates for 1845-'6
expenditures in 1837
expenditures in 1838

...........

..
•

123, 153, 157, 168, 178
181,232
235, 298, 329, 333
358, 390, 418, 423, 440, 462
..'.-.486
..
.487,602
488, 603
670
120, 176
.177, 178, 202, 256

V

expenditures in 1839
expenditures in 1840
expenditures in 1841. ..
'
expenditures in 1842.
expenditures in 1843-'4. ; , . . ,
expenditures in 1844-'5
appropriations for 1837. .
appropriations for 1839
appropriations for 1840
..
appropriations made in 1841.
Navigating interests in 1840 prosperous.

..

199
253
364

...

""
:
..,.,...,...
i
..
......

1...
..
...

...;..
„...,

..

..

.232, 270, 371
.352, 383, 437
438, 462, 480
486, 501, 621
600, 625, 680
668
152, 169
328, 344
..
.418,435
.
. ...438
. .355

P.
Passports, duties on, annually, from 1821 to 1842
, „...
.63^
Patent Office, concerning the money to the credit of.
..
....
3
Pension grants, the expense of, views in 1838 on the propriety of avoiding an increase of,
during the gradual reduction of the tariff
)
..
188
Pork, hogs, &6., exported annually from the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive,
the value of.
.. 286
statement of <the-value of, exported.annually from the United States from
1821 to 1842, and of the countries to which exported. ,. , .645, 646, 647
Port of entrv, at Independence, the establishment of a, recommended.
..
.617
Post-Office Department, concerning the money to the credit of
.. ..
....
3
Preemption and graduation laws, the passage of, recommended in 1839.
252
Premiums offered and accepted for the stock of the United States loan in 1843. ..
..
629
President of the United States, memorials in 1837 of merchants, Chamber of Commerce,&c.,
for a recision of the specie circular, and for a stay on the payment of duty bonds.. .38, 40, 41
Produce—see Domestic Produce.




INDEX.

699

Public debt of the United States, expenditures, estimated for and actual, for payments on
account of the funded and unfunded, in—
1837
.2, 90, 92, 111, 176, 178
1838.
...
.177,178,202,256,272
1839
..
,,
.
...181,232,272,371
1840/
352,384,385,437
1841.
357,358,438,441,462,482
1842.' ..
486, 502, 599, 622
1843...
..
'
487,625
1843-'4
/.
*
.488, 600, 602, 680
1844-' 5
603, 652, 668, 680
1845-1'6. '
670
Public debt, principal and interest on the old, undischarged—
in 1836
'
..
..
92
in 1837.
...
179
in 1238
272
in 1839,'
.385
in 1840
<
.
483
in 1842. .
..
..
504
in 1843. ...;
630
in 1844.,..
676, 677
concerning the extinguishment of the. .
187
views in 1837,in regard to the foreign, of the United States.
95
views in 1840 in regard to t h e . . . ,
..
..
353
on account of the cities of Washington, Alexandria, and Georgetown, and payments of interest thereon,., .179, 273, 352, 357, 358, 371, 385, 483, 504, 630, 651
statement of the old and new, December 1, 1843., . . .
630
statement, of the old>and new, July 1 and December 1, 1844
, ..651, 676, 677
expenditures for debt and.interest, exclusive of payments arising from loans and
Treasury notes, from 1st January, 1816, to 31st December, '1836
- .459, 460
views in 1841 on the means of providing for the, and in favor of funding the.. 440,
441,443
amount paid from 1816 to 1837
..
441
when paid, and how much paid.,
..
.. ..
'* 606
statement and views in 1844-'5 in regard to the
.652, 653
statements of payments on account of the old, funded and unfunded since—
1st December, 1836
92
1st December, 1837. ,
..
178
1st December, 1838. ,,
.. 272
1st December, 1839. . . .
385
1st December, 1840.
..483
payments of principal and interest of the old, between January 1, 1837, and
December 31, 1840, and between January 1, 184J, and September 30,
1843
'
...
.626,627
statement of payments on account of the old, Treasury notes and interest, from
January 1, 1837, to September 30, 1843.
627
in 1790, foreign and domestic.
.. . . ; .
654
on account of the Revolution. ,
654
in 1800
654
iri 1810
154
in 1816.
;.,.
. 654
in. 1820.
654
in 1830
654
in 1835.
..
655
interest paid on the, from 1789 to 1835
655
new, incurred in 1841-'2, and '3, and for payments of principal and interest
thereon—see^Loans—see Treasury Notes.
see Revolutionary Debt.
considerations in 1844 as to the existing .security for payment of interest and
ultimate redemption of the principal of the
.
.,
657
Public dues, views in 1837 on the kind of money receivable for, &c.
. ,
..
.21, 43, 47
bank notes made receivable in 1789, for.
...
....
53
Treasury circular in 1790, in regard to the bearing of the collection law on
the receivability of bank notes in payment of.
..
. .
54
Treasury drafts tp be received in payment o f . . . . „ . .
,.,',.
68
views in 1838 on the kind of currency received for the
...
188
Treasury circulars of June 1 and July 6, 183&, to the collectors and receivers in relation to the kind of currency to be received in payment of... .215, 217
views in 1839 on the condition of the banking institutions generally and.
the kind of money receivable for. ..
..
.. . 249
Public credit—see Credit.




700

njTDEX.

Public lands, receipts from the sales of, estimated for and ascertained—
in 1836.
"
89
in 1837 ,
2,90, 175
in 1838
..
..
92, 176, 178, 256
in 1839.
.180, 231, 371
in 1840.
234,351, 437
in 1841.
.. ..
..
357,438,439,440,461,462
in 1842.
485, 620
in 1843...
..
487, 488, 600, 623, 667, 678, 680
in 1844-'5
..
.602, 668, 678
in 1845-'6
.
669
receipts from the sales of, from 1st January, 1816, to 31st December, 1836. 459
:st December, 1840.
receipts from the sales of, from 1st January, 1837,- to 31
460'
receipts from the' sales of, from 1st January, 1837, to September 30, 1843. 627
views in' 1837 iir regard to the'fluctuations* in the receipts from, and on the
.„ .......
, 9 9
estimates for' the' future". ,,
recommendations to receive payments in' advance for.,..;
. . 107
views in 1839 in regard to the"fluctuation's"inthe sales of, &c., and how the
Government finances are affected thereby
. . . . 242
views in regard to the estimate of sales of, in 1839..
182, 183
views' as to the receipts from, in 1842
..
..
.. . 463
views in 1843, in regard to'the sales of the;
.
'
604
considerations in 1844 in regard to and the revenues to be derived from the, 656
concerning the
.
253
Public moneys, unavailable in 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841
.. .91, 177, 178, 357, 372, 627
views in 1837 on the safekeeping, of the...
„ . . . . . . .10, 102, 107
circular, May 12, 1837, directing the collectors of customs and receivers
of, to collect and safely keep the, in case of a suspension by the banks.
59
extract from the Treasury report in 1790 as to a new class of officers to
keep and transfer the.. . —
60
statements showing the condition of the, in the former and present banks
of deposit and Mint in August, 1837
....
.64, 65
under'the opinion of the Attorney General, and by order of the President,
the, to be deposited with specie-paying banks, and with other bainks, on
condition of approved security for a prompt return in kind, &c.
...,,
68
views in 1837 in regard to- the banks and safekeeping of t h e . . . . . . .
102
practicability of keeping the, independent of the bank's as fiscal agents..106,107
the use of the, for discounts' by the banks' unprofitable, & c —
,. 192
views in 1838 on the manner of keeping the, and changes proposed. . . . t 192
collateral security for the safekeeping of the, recommended. . . . . . ..194, 195
recommendation that the embezzlement of the, be made a penal offence.., 196
see Banks.
amount subject to draft in' certain general deposit banks the 1st December,
. 1838...
.. ..
....
224
list of •collectors of customs and receivers of, having moneys'in their hands
subject to draft, conformable to returns to December 3, 1838.
227
list of late deposit banks in which special deposits have been made, and
the amount of special deposits'subject to draft 1st December, 1838... . 228
statement of balances of, due th'e United- States on the 10th November,
1834, from banks formerly depositaries of the "public money, with the
credits to which they are entitled for payments since that date.
229
list of certain banks which suspended specie payments, and balances due
by them on* 3d December, 1838, on bonds given under the act of 16th
October,-18-37
....
230
Treasury circular of July 14', 1838, in regard to the'safekeeping of the, and
exhorting the depositaries not to- employ it for private advantage, &c
230
views in 1839 on the manner of keeping, the, and the proper guards
1
against losses.
....
.,
.. . . . . . . . .
.,.,
..
244
statement of the, available for general purposes 1st"January, 1839..,
255
statement in 1839 of, in the two general deposit banks.. ..
.. .. .. 346
available in 1841 in the deposit banks. .
,.....357
opinions in 1840 that the mode established by Congress for the*safekeeping
of the, has answered' well, &c.
..
'. . . . I . . . . 362
views in 1841 in regard to keeping and disbursing the, adverse to the independent Treasury
. . . ... . .
444
subject to draft;,, in 184T, in the hands of the Treasury agents, enumerated.
., . .,
..
..,, , . . . ,,. . . . . . . . . ..
.449,452
R.
Receipts into the.Treasury, from all sources-, as estimated for, and ascertained—
in 1836.
-




89

INDEX.

701

Receipts into the Treasury, from all sources, as estimated for, and ascertainedr--Co?i*wi'wed.
in 1837.
2,90,175
in 1838
92, 176, 178, 256
in 1839
.180,231,371
in 1840.
.. ...
.234, 351,.437
in 1841.
.357, 438, 439, 440, 456, .461, 470, 599
in 1842.
..
.463, 485, 491, 5.99, 620, 603
in 1843.....
'..487, 599, 623
in 1843-'4.
.488, 600, 601, 667, 678
in 1844-'5.,
.602, 667, 680
in 1845-'6.
... v . . . . ,...,.
'
669
views in 1837 in regard to the estimated, for 1838
93, 99
-views in 183.9 in regard to the estimates of, for 1840, and on
some permanent safeguard under fluctuation in expenditure^
and
„ ...
.236,242
explanatory views in regard to the estimates of, for 1839. .182, 183
views on the necessity of guards to preserve.the public faith
against the fluctuations in the..
,
184, 185
explanatory views in regard to the estimates of, for 1840...
236
as to the probable deficit in the, for 1837..
...
5
as to the effect of legislation of the special session in 1837 upon
the, of the current y e a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
the entries on the books of the Register do not always show
the true dates of the.
. . . .
.,. . ., 441
explanation of the, of 1842.. 1. ..
.......
..... . . . .
• •.. 603
the average rate of, for several years, deficiency in, &c... - .
605
exclusive'of the trust funds, Treasury notes, and loans, from
1st January, 1816, to 31st December, 1836.
459
average annual receipts from 1816 to 1836, and from 1837 to
1840
.....
.459, 460
excess of average annual, over expenditures for current expenses from 1816 to 1836. . . . .
..
.,
459
exclusive of trust funds, loans, and Treasury notes, &c. from
1st January, 1837, to 31st December, 1840
..
460
statement of the, from customs,, lands, and miscellaneous sources,
from debts and other funds existing prior to 1837, and from
loans and Treasury nbtes annually, from January 1,1837, to
September 30, 1.843
626
from the bonds due by the United States Bank—see Bank of
the United States.
from public lands—see Public Lands.
from customs—see Customs.
from loans—see Treasury Notes—see Loans—'See Estimates.
Receivers of the Public Moneys, made depositaries of the public Moneys in case of a suspension of specie payments by the banks.
59
to receive Treasury drafts in payment for public lands. ... 68
views in 1837 on the propriety of .making, general depositaries .,
• . .
107
continue to make deposits of public moneys in certain banks 192
losses of public moneys by, concerning.
..
.,
. . 194
recommendation of collateral security from? as keepers of the
public moneys, and making any embezzlement by them a
penal offence
195, 196
Treasury circulars in 1838 to the, in relation to the kind of
currency receivable for lands, &c
.215, 217
list of, having public moneys in their hands, on whom drafts
have been placed, &c., and the balance in their hands subject to draft conformable to returns to Dec. 3,. 1838
227
Treasury circular of July 14, 1838, in regard to the safekeeping of the public money, and exhorting them, in the
absence of legislation, to vigilance, and against the use of
the public, moneys to private advantage, &c
230
Receivers General and Treasurers, view;? in. 1840 in regard to
362
ReeXportationis, value of foreign merchandise reexported annually from 1821 to 1842
631,
'
.
632, 635
Reserved funds in the Treasury in 1837.
—
.,
.
1
Retrenchment in the expenditures, views in 1838 on the necessity of, and the proper
objects of,,
•
186
Retrenchment recommended—see Expenses-^-see Expenditures.
Revenue, the Surplus—see Suiyl'us—see Deposits with the States.
considerations in 1837 in regard to the the causes of fluctuations in the.. •••«».• 0 95




702

njTDEX.

Revenue, and expenditures in 1837, further explanations as to the, and the effect upon them
by laws passed at the special session in 1837..
....
96
views in 1837 on the propriety of vesting-authority to issue Treasury notes to
supply any deficiency in the
...
107
views in 1838 on the fluctuations in the, and the reductions in the, under a reduced tariff.
.... ,
.. .183, 184, 185
causes which would operate to diminish the, in 1840, from customs
, . . , 236
fluctuations in commercial prosperity, the crops, the banking policy, and credit
systems of foreign nations, affect the . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . 242
. . ....
• • 359
considerations in 1840 in regard to the, for 1841. ..
the best modeof avoiding inequality between the anticipated receipts and expenditures in 1841 and 1842.
.',360
general views in 1840 in regard to the, and the causes of fluctuation in the, &c.. 365
the amount which the, exceeded the expenditures from 1816 to 1837
441
estimate of the amount of, which will be received from customs in part of 1841,
1842, and 1843, under a modification of the revenue laws
—
. . . . 456
received from the 1st of January, .1816, to 31st December, 1836, inclusive, exclusive of loans, Treasury notes, and trust funds.
..
459
received from 1st of January, 1837, to 31st December, 1840, exclusive of trust
funds, loans, and Treasury notes, from other than ordinary sources of income.. 460
from customs and'other sources, from January 1, 1837, to September 30, 1843.. 626
gross and net, from imports of foreign merchandise, from tonnage and light
money, passports, and clearances, from 1821 to 1842 inclusive..
635
outstanding and falling due to the Treasury, arising from other sources than that
of the ordinary revenue, which were paid between the 1st January, 1837, and
4th March 1841
•..
.'..,.. 455
on the importance of adequate provisions of.
,
..
.. .. 490
considerations in 1844 in regard to the resources of the United States as to.
. 656
an augmentation of the, deemed in 1841 to be necessary...
..
469
the probable augmentation of the, in 1844 and 1845 under the tariff of 1842...
603
the average rate of revenue for certain years and the' actual, independent of extrinsic additions, and how the deficiencies have been supplied.. ... . . ..
.. 605
views in 1843 as to provisions to meet deficiencies in the, and the best means of
improving the, &c
...
, .608,610,616
concerning the svstem of collecting the..,
,.
..
618
the yield under the act of 1842.
.664, 671
Revenue laws—see Tariff.
Revenues, amount of, estimated and ascertained—
for 1836.
..
89
for 1837
:
2,90, 109, 175for 1838.
..
..
92,176,178,256
for 1839
180,231,255,371
• for 1840
'
234, 351, 352, 372, 437
for 1841
357, 438, 439, 456, 461, 462, 470
for 1842
440, 456, 463, 485, 491, 598, 599, 620
for 1843 and 1843-'4
487, 488, 599, 600, 601, 623, 678
for 1844-'5
'
.602, 667, 668, 678, 680
for 1845-'6
669
Revolutionary debt, the amount of the . . '
.....
. . . . . . . . . 654
Rice, exported annually from the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive, the value of. 286
statement of the value of, exported annually from the United States from 1821 to
1842, inclusive, and of the countries to which exported
.. „
.. 645
S.
Salt, the value of, imported into the United States annually from 1790 to 1835 inclusive.. 276
the value of, imported into the United States annually from 1821 to 1842
637
Saltpetre, refined, the price of, in 1 8 4 2 . . . . .
,.
„
.. . 507
.. ..
508
•Satinets-, American, the prices of, in 1842. ,
...
........
..
Seamen, sick and disabled, considerations in 1843 in regard to relief t o . . . .
617
Security, collateral, for the safekeeping of the public funds recommended in 1838. . .194, 195
Sheetings, Russia, the price of, in 1842.
—
. . ..
507
Silks, the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838, inclusive. .. ., . . . 276
imported into the United States annually from 1821 to 1842, the value of. . . , , . .
636
Sinking fund, the excess of revenue above expenditures is the only real,
. 653
the, by which the revolutionary and other public debts were paid, the operations o f —
....
. . . . ,,
...
656
recommended in 1844 to anticipate the payments of the stock under the acts
of 1842 and 1843, the mode of providing,. &c
. . . . .659, 664
Skins and furs, exported annually from the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive, the
value of
287
the value of, exported annually from 1821 to 1842. .. . . . ..
.
645




INDEX.

703

Smithsonian legacy, invested, &c.
199
Smuggling, marine preventive service a g a i n s t . . . . . . . . . . . . .
618
Solicitor of the Treasury, circular of the, in M a y , 1837, to the United States attorneys in
regard to the collection of duty bonds."
. . . . ... - . . . . . X ... ,
36
Special deposits of public moneys have been made, list of the late deposit banks in which. 222
list of banks in which are made.
.. ., ..
628
Specie and bullion, imported and exported in 1837 and 1838.
..
224
value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive.
277
value of, imported from 1834 to 1840.
458
imported into the United States, annually, from 1821 to 1842, value of. 636,
exported annually from 1821 to 1842, and the countries to which exported, value of.
...,.„
.645, 646, 647
"exported annually from 1790 to 1838.
.280, 287
Specie basis for circulation, an enlargement of the, recommended in 1839..
253
Specie in the United States in 1814 and 1837, the periods of suspension by the banks, the
amount of.
...
,..
... ....
,... ..
188
Specie, views in 1837 in regard to imports and exports of,..the bearing upon trade, &C.20,104,105
statement exhibiting the value of bullion and, imported and exported during the
year ending 30th September, 1838.
224
statement of the, and bullion exported annually from the United States from 1790 to
1838 inclusive.
.'
286
annual imports and exports of—see Imports—see Exports.
Specie circulation, the advantages o f . . .
. . . . . . . . . 363
Specie payments by the former deposit banks, views in 1837 in regard to the resumption of. .18,20
banks which had suspended, discontinued as depositories.. .. .
55
Treasury circular of July 3, 1837, to the banks in regard to, and urging
the resumption of
86
views in 1837 on the ability, &c., of the deposit banks at different points
to sustain
...
.'. . . .
103,105
views in 1838 in relation to the resumption of, by the banks. . .. . .188, 191
see Banks for further views in regard to.
Specie circular, memorials of the New York and other merchants in 1837, and the Chambers of Commerce for the recision of the. . . . . . . . . . .
38, 40, 41
from the Secretary of the Treasury, asserting the constitutional duties of that
department in regard to the collection of duties in specie, and against the
recision of t h e . . .
,
43
Spices, imported into the United States annually from 1821 to 1842, the value of
637
the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive
277
Spirits, the value of,.imported into the United Stktes from 1790 to 1838 inclusive.
. . . . . 275
domestic distilled, drawback paid on, annually, from 1821 to 1842.
..
.. " 635
allowance for natural waste, under the British warehouse system
,,..
521
imported into the United States annually from 1821 to 1842, the value of.
..,. ,
637
Spencer, John C., Secretary of the Treasury—see Finances.
Steamboilers, and the best methods of preventing explosions, concerning experiments to
test the strength of.
....
..
,,
108
a promised collection of facts in regard to explosions of
..
199
Steamboats, promised statistics, &c., o f . .
,1
..
, 199
States, the deposits with the—see Deposits.
Stocks, lists of persons to whom the loan of the United States was awarded in 1843, and
the amounts awarded.
.;
. ..
..
629
the marketable value of
.
, . 653
sinking fund recommended to anticipate the payments of the, under the acts of
1843 and 1844.
....
659
statement of the gain on the purchase o f the stock of 1841, in anticipation of its
redemption on the 1st of January, 1845
633
Steel—see Iron.
Submissions, recapitulation of, for 1838.. u
.....
157
Sugar, the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive.
,.
277
domestic refined, drawback paid annually, from 1821 to 1842, o n . . .
...
,..
635
imported into the United States ^annually from 1821 to 1842, the value of. . . .
637
Surplus in the Treasury, not anticipated during the year 1839, for deposit with the States. 181
the existing, temporary and fallacious in its character, &c...
184
views in 1838 on the good policy of avoiding large. . . . . . .
1851
Surplus fund, amounts of appropriations which maybe carried to the, at the end of—
183 7
..
..
•
91, 123, 159, 170
183 8
„-..
180
183 9
..
.235, 298, 335
1840.
..."
.,
.,
358,390, 425
Surveying districts, concerning a consolidation of
607
Survey—see Coast Survey.
Swartwout, Samuel, collector at New York, Treasury circulars to, in 1837
33, 49




704

njTDEX.

T,
Tariff, prediction in 1838 of a diminished revenue consequent upon a reduced, & c . . . . « . « 186
a reduction of the, recommended in 1839.
.
. >.
••<
252
a modification of the act of 1833 recommended in 1840, to prevent or supply any .
deficit, instead of a resort to loans or issue of Treasury notes
.361, 362
the high, of 1824 did not prevent low prices and bankruptcies
368
a modification to .20 per cent, ad valorem recommended in 1841...
442
estimate of the amount which will be received from customs for certain periods,
under a modification of the.
.. . . . . . . .
456
views in 1841 on a readjustment of the, and an increase of the, recommended. .464, 469
views in 1842 in regard to the operations of t h e . . . . ,
. . . . 489
views of the collector of the customs at New York on the
.•« . . .
. . . . . 507
views in 1843 in regard to the operations of the new.
608
a review and reformation of the act of 1842 recommended in 1844
665
views in regard to the operations of the act of 1842. , i.
. .. .. .. . .671, 672, 673
Taxes, the value of, &c.
„„...,
,.
..
..
661
Tea and coffee, duty on, recommended in 1843. . . . .
..«,...
..609, 616
Teas, the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive.,.... . . . . 275
imported into the United States annually from 1821 to 1842, the value of.
...
637
...........................
108
Telegraphs, concerning a system of.
Tobacco, statement of the value of, exported annually from the United States from 1790 to
1838 inclusive.
.. '
...
285
statements of the .value of, exported annually from the United States from 1821
to 1842 inclusive, and the countries to which'exported.,
.645, 646, 647
Tonnage, and light moneys, concerning the duties on....
,...
.....
610
statement of the amount of the, employed in the foreign trade annually from
'1821 to 1842
634
recommendation in 1844 of a change in the mode of ascertaining.
. 672
Trade, -views in 1837 in regard to the fluctuation and revulsions in
95
Treasurer's statement in regard to the condition of the public moneys on deposit with the
banks and Mint, in August, 1837...
.....
64, 65
Treasurers—see Receivers General.
Treasury, the condition of the—see Finances^see Deficiency—see Balances.
in regard to the mode of exhibiting the state of the.
598
Treasury circulars, in 1837
.33, 36, 43, 47, 51, 55, 59, 68, 86
in 1789 and 1790
53, 54
in 1838...
215,217, 230
in 1842
.....
530
Treasury Department, concerning the laws relating to the....
674
proposition for a reorganization of t h e . . . . . . . . . ..,, .108, 199, 252, 349
Treasury drafts, views of Hamilton in 1790 in regard to.
. 54
circular of the Secretary of the Treasury, May 17, 1837, to collectors of
customs and receivers of public money-to receive, in payment of public
dues..
. ..
68
Treasury notes, the issue and receipts into the Treasury, estimated and ascertained, of—
in 1837.
90,17.5,179
in 1838
..,
.92, 176, 178, 179, 256
in 1839
273,371
in 1840
351, 386, 437
in 1841.
357, 438, 439, 440, 461, 470
in 1842...
439,463,485,491,599, 620
in 1843-'4.
..
.
487, 600, 623, 678
in 1844-'5.
...
,..
....
667
the reimbursement and redemption of, estimated and actual—
in 1837
I l l , 179
in 1838
93, 177, 178, 179., 202, 232, 256
in 1839
180, 181, 231, 232, 272, 273, 371
in 1840
234, 352, 384, 386, 437
in 1841
„
35.7, 358, 438, 462, 482
in 1842
:.
.439, 463, 486, 487, 502, 599, 622
in 1843-'4
487, 488, 600, 601, 625, 668, 680
in 1844-'5. ..
680
payments on account of, issued during the late war, amounts payable, &c. 92,
179, 272, 273, 385, 483, 630, 651
outstanding in 1841 ..
. •..... •
484
outstanding in 1842
.... • 504
outstanding in 1843
630
outstanding in 1844.
.652, 676, 677
amount paid' for interest on, from 1837 to 1843
. . . • .626, 627
statement in relation to the issue and redemption of, in 1837 and 1838..,« 179




INDEX.

705

Treasury notes, statement of the issue and redemption of, from the 1st of January to the
20th of November, 1839..
.
273
statement in relation to the issue and redemption of, from 1st of January
to the 30th November, 1840..
386
statement in 1841 of the, issued and redeemable, and balances of outstanding
. .. \
,,.. .. . .. . ,
484
views in 1837 on the issue of, to meet the wants of Government.. . . 7, 9
views in 1837 on the necessity of the further issue of, and on the means
to redeem those payable, & c . . ..
—
97, 98, 101
views in 1838 on the outstanding, and the advantages in the power to
issue, to preserve the public faith, & c . , . . . . .
182, 185
views in 1839 concerning the emission and redemption of.
232.
views in 1840 in regard to the outstanding..
353
views in 1841 against the issue of, to supply the Treasury
. ' . . . . . , 443
views on the propriety of vesting the power to issue, in case of deficits in
the receipts. .. . . . .
.107
an issue of, recommended in 1841, to supply the Treasury
. . . 462
a reissue of, recommended. . ......
. .
.464, 489
the payment of interest on, proposed in 1842, to keep them out
489
considerations in 1843 in regard to the unredeemed, and reissue of .. .606, 613
Trade, recommendations in 1838 of permanent legislation to preserve the finances of Government against the fluctuations in
184
freedom of, recommended in 1839.
........
252
with the British Provinces and West Indies, concerning.
..
253
the natural laws of, cannot be violated without financial evils
367
Trust funds, included in the balances in the Treasury in 1836 and 1837
,.
91
1838
256
expenditures on account of, in 1838.
256
receipts and expenditures on account of, in 1839.
.. 371
receipts and expenditures in 1840
372
balance of, in 1842
599
U.
Unavailable funds—see Balances in the Treasury.
V,
Value of imports and exports—see Imports—see Exports—see Merchandise.
Vessels engaged in the whale fisheries, &c., concerning the papers and registry of

350

W
Warehousing ports in Great Britain, list of, and of goods that may be warehoused in each..524,527
Warehouse system, extension of the, recommended in 1837.
..
.. ..
.. .5, 107
views in 1841 concerning a
490
act 3 and 4 William IV, of 28th August, 1233, regulating the, of Great
Britain. . .
508*
list of the principal articles of foreign merchandise remaining in warehouse, under the locks of the Crown, in the London, Liverpool,
Bristol, and Hull, in January, 1832 and 1833.
,.
524
circular from the Treasury Department, and responses thereto by the
custom-house officers and Chambers of Commerce, in regard to the... 530,
531 to 595
considerations in 1843 in regard to the.,,
. . 613
Warrants, statement of the number and amount of, drawn on the United States Bank and
branches, and the other banks which were depositories of the public money
in the year 1834.
...
. 61
drawn on the banks and Mint in August, 1837, and not paid
"
65
Wares, earthen, stone, and China, imported into the United States annually from 1821 to
1842, the value of.
..
..
636
Washington city, the debt of, assumed by the Government
179,
273, 352, 357, 358, 371, 385, 483, 504, 630, 651
Weights and measures, concerning the standard of..
.. .108, 253
concerning the progress in the manufacture of...
.. .. 199^
Wine, loss for natural waste under the British warehouse system
.,
521
Wines, the value of, imported into the United States from 1790 to 1838 inclusive. . .
275
imported into the United States annually from 1821 to 1842, the value of.
. . . . 636
recommendation in 1844 that the duty on, be changed to an ad valorem. „.......
66
VOL. I Y . — 4 5 .




706

njTDEX.

Woodbury, Secretary—slee'Fmarichs;
'Woolens-, the" value of ? imported into the United1 Staifes'from; 1790 to 1838 inclusive
imported'into:" the United States annually frbm: l$21 : to 1842, the value of.
"Worsted linings,' the prices'of; in 1 8 4 2 ; . . . . . ... . V . . . .
. ..;
i.




275
636
508


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